University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR)

 - Class of 1922

Page 1 of 472

 

University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 472 of the 1922 volume:

$1 M l 3080 4 243 0 1H!!! ll 5! ii? 34 llii Ii III! v.4...t-lnfvxflm , fril. .4. 1 e ,,,u,, W, Ami. .; -. .. q..Ws....m.....uvu.1M3W,m.u.mu. . . 1 .H5.11.,"351.1W.u.........,a1w.....,w.1 .3 wrufwld. 31 . 51.... . . . z. aK. 1.4.1.119. 3.1.1.1..wE4. 511.... 4.4.1.1.. .. .m-u. "hm..- 5...;qu m...:-'. w J w u . n a 3 . w K m w .w gillIIIIlll1HIllmlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIlllIIIIllIIIDIIII'IllIll"IIllI"In"llIIIIllllllIllInllllllllmlllllllllIIYIHIIIIIIIllllllllllllllll! Edi1201r INE Z KING Mamag er GERRGE MOINTYRE IlllllllnlllllllllltllmlllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllIIllllllIlllllllllllIllIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIFE PLATES BY HICKS-CHATTEN ENGRAVING C0. PORTLAND, OREGON PRINTED BY KOKE-TIFFANY C0. EUGENE, OREGON YWKBCDK 013 fl? E Uniwermlg7 Op 162;? fhg 115175. 19 2 1x1 9 2 2 wume Fourteen Foreword FEW words-descripti0ns of student A activities, stories of Junior week- end, of rallies, of Homecoming, and ac- counts of cqntests 0n the athletic field-- and a few pictures-the pillars of Johnson hall, vine-covered Villard, a glimpse of Deady, 0f the Library steps and of Memor- ial hall, the purposeful hgure of the pio- neer, familiar faces of fellow students and the different phases of their life at the Ulziversitye- In the years that are to come, when col- lege days are past, may these words and these pictures bring memories of this year of progress and achievement, and create a new feeling of love and of loyalty to Oregon, our 141nm Mater. THE EDITORS. II of student hmior umi- u'ng, and ac- hlm'r field- rs of Johnson a glimpsc of ad of Mmor- r! of the M 3 stud"!!! and it lift a! "ll mu, wlmz to!- m words and '5 of tin: W, "I and mm of MW Io HE EDIWKS' MLMZM m. , $114.. To a friend of all students, a teacher and a scholar, a worker whose toil is dirett- ed toward accuracy in knowledge and whose inHuence is an inspiration in the attainment of the ideals of the University e to GEORGE STANLEY TURNBULL this fourteenth volume of the Oregana is dedicated UNIVERSITY CLASSES ACTIVITIESm ORQWATJLQNS FEATURE . VAW W' M , II a harbor of the mountains In the gleaming YWZIFJ', Wherf WGNMIIHNVS hill fwz' fmmmins Join our roaring rally, hifting sunshine, dancing showers, By the flying water Play arross the ivied towers Of our 141nm Mater. mm the mountains falls the yloaming, To the skys the stars are homing, Looking down on Oregon; lVlzile soft the ripples run, 2.1.52 2.. E 52. 2 i2 2 i i 5, Izilev mnoes are softly gliding Through the shadows stealing, hiding, Float the songs from the old will race, Songs of our Oregon. eroes from forgotten ages Of the worldls romances, Fair-lzaired maidens, budding; sages, Books and boats and dances, Drmms of youth and 01d men's teaching, Green and datum" yellow, In the after years on reaching 1Mingle blend and mellow. ram the mountains falls the gloaming, T0 the sky the stars are homing Looking down 071 Oregon, '9; While soft the ripples run. 7 While canoes are softly gliding Through the shadows stealing, hiding, Float the songs from file old mill rate, Songs of our Oregon. H. C. HOWE. m .....r ,.... --.. ... . , wumwmuWWWF-vmwrmmyrrmnmwmmn "?5'F'WW-H.'7'1 .vrn-naw-wmrM-v ump-uu... ,. . ... www.uu .mw... mm.-. -- - ' ' ' 7, :" ; I - '1. . ' ' " ' l-v-4.1..1 - 2-. .--...m q.........a w..- - , V-w. ..r ,S'Mrmlrm THE PIONEER JESSIE M. THOMPSON With faces toward an ever farther goal, Beyond the distant valley, the last hill. The pioneers pressed 'always on, until They found for us heritage, the whole Beauty of fertile land they saw unroll. Oh, if we still look forward! If the will That urged them on, may urge us, if we still May keep that seeking spirit. of the soul! And in this place of quest, it is most right That he, the Pioneer, should always stand As pioneer of old, staunch and unfearing; And hold before these young wayfarersh sight A vision of reply to far Command, T0 guide us, if we, too, g0 pioneering. Eighteen mind" W11 gmm Irish fatt'www mngF' Wxiuddmi' Mmhmibull Mmimi Thum- Fanny- 4. lmim'qrdihi Ihhthimdm th-m.m.1mmd midi. Mandunfnring: H HI? d!!! m nytamskighz IdrqumhrCmnd. inimmgopimdng. PAST OUR GATES EMILY VEAZIE Steel rails- Long-spun threads of silver, Catching the sun-beams arid racing them down through the distance- Laying a pathway far into the distancee It is strange to see you here: For we, Within our gates, Have made us a universe- A little universe that revolves within itself, Contentedly. Then you come hurrying your burdens past With a rush and a grind. And some there are Who look from in the gates And see a silver path That leads away- Far awaye Into the sweeping rush of the life beyond. Nineteen Mia arm E, .mawhhuaisiri. :...;i!.i.lanf V. 9:2..raEgaF $$$3 A MOMENTS PAUSE EMILY VEAZIE 0 Us, who from day to day pursue our busy life at the University so in- tently that we scarce can see beyond the day itself, comes, sometimes, the need of a moments pause. We become day-blinded, forgetting whence we came and whither we are going. And yet, it is only as we keep clear this vision of our goal that we can hope to follow the path to its at- tainment. Let us, then, for a moment pause to learn from whence we started and how far along the way we have come. It seems, indeed, a distant day when the legislature of Oregon voted to establish a State University at Eugene. That was fifty years ago. lVIoney was appropriated for the building of Deady hall, hut difhculty in raising it almost led to the abandonment of the project. Let us give thanks to those far-seeing citizens who saved us our Uni- versity by their personal subscription to the fund. We will better enjoy our many buildings now, when we fully realize and hear in mind the strides of progress which have been made. From today and our present faculty with its thirsty schools and depart- ments, it is a long look to the time when the University boasted two profes- sors. and a principal and assistant to the preparatory department. But it is only some fortyfive years ago. Truly we have advanced. And yet, if we could see to the heart of these early days, we should find there the same spirit that today makes us continue to grow and prosper. Though commencement exercises were held in the top of Deadyi and assem- blies beneath the trees in front, students gathered to express those same ideals that we now cherish. SO let us keep carefully our heritage from the past. that we may pass it on to the future-the spirit of Oregon which calls for hner students, finer Citizens, a finer state and a more glorious nation. Trwmlty-mu? . ythm-sw W-xmmw wmwwwwmwxmmwew .w , 2a.? :3:35 ,:15!:3.5? :Uaaiasgza.? s, a NianizeLan IN THE FUTURE COLIN DYMENT HERE is too much of measurement of American universities by acres and numbers; and so. as the writer tries to look into the future of the Uni- versity of Oregon, he does not Visualize it as having so many thousand students. Rather he sees it as an academic establishment achieving a certain type of intellectual purpose, and achieving it las is the responsibility of a state supported institutionl at as reasonable a cost as hard work and thoughtful organization without selfishness make possible. It is true that the University is attracting from both this state and neighboring states numbers of students to a far greater extent than has ever been true; and that, accordingly, unless somehow these numbers are checked, the University will become far larger than most persons expect, and that by the same token it will have to expand over much land. Never- theless, my answer to the Oregana,s question is restricted to a statement re- garding the Universityls intellectual idealism, as I now see it taking form and make conjecture as to the form it will have in days to come. The University,s success will be gauged by the quality of graduates. If these men and women think primarily of themselves, then the University will have been a failure. If they think primarily in terms of society, but are incapable of influencing their communities through their ideas, then too, in whatever degree they are so incapable, the University will have failed. But if primarily their thinking is socialized, and if they are able to help toward realization those principles of good that make for general happiness, then the University will have succeeded, and thereby will have justified its establishment and maintenance. Those who do so succeed must be exceedingly well-trained and well- disciplined. They must have the fervor, even the evangelization, to utilize their training and their discipline to ethical ends. It is a long hard road for both the University and the individuals to achieve that goal. The writer would accordingly say that the University of the future, as he conceives it, is a University the purpose of which is to have trained its graduating classes in social idealism, and so to have developed their intel- lectual capacity, that they can make science, literature, the arts, commerce, the traditional professions, and any phase of activity in which they may be engaged, produce their respective contributions toward the sum of human knowledge, which is truth; and through them hasten'that day of world- wide well-being, concerning which the philosophers have written so much and Which, mythical though it may seem at times, must, because of its place in the worlds thinking from the beginning, be an achievable thing. Trwcnty-llzrec Hgmieiczx A NEW GLORY FREDERIC STANLEY DUNN Class of 1892 LMA MATER, Mother Oregon, with brow yet young, the long years of adversity have thronged about thee, whose dear eyes, even under the stress of woes, have ever beamed the benediction of hope and faith upon thy children, whose lips have ever seemed parted in happy prophecy, when we of weaker Hber were but blindly gropinge l Mater Beatrix, in whose bosom we first lisped the catechism of man- hood and womanhood, at whose feet we have learned whatsoever things are good and right and beautiful,e Now rest thy distaff briefly, Cara Mater-this shall be gala day for thee and for us. We have come to make jubilee before thee, to acclaim thee in a new ode of yet untried rythm. Like a goddess thou hast ever seemed to us, our Mater Formosa, no coronal too priceless to rest upon that queenly head, no fane half worthy the sacrifice and devotion thou hast given us. It has become a sweet pleas- ure to evidence in some measure our allegiance, our filial love for thee. Thus it is that we have builded for thee a new shrine into whose courts we would now lead thee. Mater Benigna that thou art, thou wilt rejoice to know that this, our new Womanis building, we have named it, is the free- will gift of thy children wheresoever scattered throughout thy domain of field and forest. Every stone, every brick, every particle in this splendid hall is, as it were, impressed with the seal of personal fealty to thee. Oregonia Felix, now seated on thy new throne, with tears of glad- ness glistening 0n thine eye-lashes, how 0ft in past years, when under the Condon oaks or by the old mill race, we have noted those dear eyes lifted in wistful yearning across the horizon. For what wert thou dreaming then? 0 Mater Fidelis, the days of thy travail were weary and long, yet that great heart within thee had but one voice blending prayer and answer in one, llYea, it shall be,-that day when I shall come into mine own." L0! this is now thy day, which shall be to all thy people a new Natal Day, the first day Of a new week. Thy uStabat Mater" is past. No more the dreary Vigil, the tedium of delayed fruition, the pioneers fatigue. A new glory is upon thee. How ravishing the crown of Oregon pine about thy dark locks! Hail, hail to thee, Alma Mater, Oregonia Eterna. Twenly-fi-vc JOSH COATS, IMPERIAL COATS AND LARGE CLOISONE VASE CHINESE muss STOVE FOR BURNING JAPANESE ARMOR AND KNIFE WHICH DE- CHARCOAL CAPITATED LEADERS 0F BOXER REBELLION VALUABLE BLUE AND WHITE MING VASE BRONZE TEMPLE BELL 1,000 YEARS 01.0 BEAUTIFUL OLD CLOISONE VASE TEMPLE MIRROR 400 YEARS OLD BRASS AND BRONZE DOG CHINESE SCEPTER 0F CARVED JADE INCENSE BURNERS Trwmzty-Jix :0 1 WM 1,. Mmgakxm : i? kWhnih Ma FULFILLMENT LILLIAN AULD 0 YOU believe that dreams come true? . Dean Hale of the Law School, and Dean Lawrence and Profes- sor Schroff, heads of the School of Architecture and Fine Arts, have Hrm faith in this theory. Ceratinly the gift of a private law library larger than any other west of the Mississippi, and an art museum containing one of the finest collections of Oriental art were only dreams a year and a half ago. Yet due to the generosity of Judge W. D. Fenton of Portland, and Mrs. Murray Warner of Eugene, they have become a reality upon the Cree gon campus today. Judge Fentonls gift was formally presented to the University of Ore- gon on April 10, 1921, in memory of his son, Kenneth Lucas Fenton. It is known as the Kenneth Lucas Fenton Law Library, and consists of about 10,000 volumes valued at $50,000. Many of them are made up of the ori- ginal state reports and are consequently very rare. They include an almost complete set of Oregon session laws, some volumes of which have become very scarce. The value this library is proving to the Law School is almost'incalcu- able. Besides making it possible for a student at the University of Oregon to-get as thorough an education in law as he would receive anywhere on the Pacific coast, it has given the school prestige in the state and puts it on a par with the best schools of law in the West. The best educated and well trained men will not refuse a professorship at the Oregon School of Law because of inadequate library facilities. Under the wise guidance of Dean Hale, and his eEicient corps of instructors anything can now be hoped for the future of the school. The Mrs. lVIurray Warner collection of Oriental art treasures bears a relationship to the School of Fine Arts exactly analogous to that the Fenton Library has to the Law School. Students of composition, color, and design are now able to see first hand some of the most rare and beautiful examples of the unsurpassed Oriental arts in existence. Mrs. Warnerls collection forms the neucleus of the long dreamed of art museum. It can be classified under eight general heads. First, there are the textiles, tapestries, embroideries, coats and costumes. Then there are two hundred and fifty of the finest Japanese prints and many exqui- site Chinese paintings. Next come the porcelains, bronzes and brass, pipes, coins and nitsukis. Last are the armor, guns, and knives. In a Class by themselves, and in addition to the large Oriental collection, is a small but choice group of European art objects. Trwwzty-se-ven IWost interesting,r among the costumes are two imperial coats once worn by members of the Chinese imperial family. A single tapestry of great beauty, sixteen feet long and six wide, is valued at $10,000. The bronzes and brass are extraordinary. A bronze temple bell among them is over one thousand years old. A bronze mirror is five hundred years old. In the European Class is an ancient piece of Sicilian drawn work in archaic pat- terns which has no counterpart in any other American museum; The VVarner collection is at present housed in the VVomank building awaiting the fire-proof museum building which will eventually be erected. There it is proving the inspiration of students and Visitors alike. The Old Man Who Rakes the Leaves MAPLE DELL MOORE Old man, You who are silently raking up The yellow leaves of autumn, I wonder what you think of As you work there alone in the wind? Youth. With bright hopes and courageous laugh Passes by, absorbed in life; But, heedlessy you plod on Amassing a great heap of lifeless leaves. Your body, StiHened with age, almost fails you As you stoop to shovel The withered leaves into the cart. Your face, Thought blurred, is drawn with pain. Do you see yourself A leaf of the great earth plant Now broken and frail and scarred? In your heart Is there a fear that some day A relentless gust from the Unknown Shall scurry by, and finding you helpless, Shall carry you away? Ttweniy-eigltt iustum Cs , . x dre , .enzll familV M Impt'rial ' ' V'Iaz le 2 . A 51 . 1.x valued at 1giftaptlstrm 'Onz . .9 temple bdl 1m ' TM;- ong e in mlrnjr ' ls , ?ufSicili the undredw3r V 0th an drawnwmk: sold-L Sex er American muse m arm 38m hm - um: bed In h din v - t eWomanK . x. I k "H:, nu: HM W111 eventually ISM . ents and visitors alike. m 10 Rakes the Leaves ELL KIOORE ntly raking up ; of autumn, u think of 6 alone in the wind? and courageous laugh rd in life; plnd nn heap of lifeless leaves. '. nlmmt fails vou hovel res into the cart. is drawn Wlth pal rlf 'nt earth plant , frail and scarr .1! sun day . t um I L'nknmxnl 16" n .,, d fin mg on hep an a my TAUWNI-V'linp Hy HM! THE ADMINISTRATION OFFICERS HON. JAMES W. HAMILTON, President HON. A. C. DIXON, Vice-President L. H. JOHNSON, Secretary EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE HON. JAMES W. HAMILTON, Ex-officio Chairman HON. A. C. DIXON, zfcting Chairman HON. CHAS. H. FISHER MRS. G. T. GERLINGER HON. HERBERT GORDON HON. VERNON VAWTER EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS HON. BEN W. OLCOTT, Governor, Salem HON. SAM A. KOZER, Secretary of State, Salem HON. J. A. CHURCHILL, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Salem HON. HON. HON. MRS. HON. HON. HON. HON. HON. HON. APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR A. C. DIXON ................................................................................ Eugene CHAS. H. FISHER ........................................................................ Eugene JAMES W. HAMILTON ............................................................ Roseburg G. T. GERLINGER .................................................................... Portland C. C. COLT.........; ........................................................................ Portland HENRY MCKINNEY ........................................................................ Baker HERBERT GORDON ................................................................... Portland VERNON C. VAWTER ............................................................... Medford C. E. WOODSON ........................................................................ Heppner WILLIAM S. GILBERT ................................................................ Astoria Tllirly A Km :13. PHD. : :. 5 i Yin KG. LL". . -:2 . ;, Bi .7 13: U; D . " :V BA. Um I! .1. $ gummy: Hi 0m s ., L.- $.85ng PHD. Dru 5' SIM .9 , hm P10. Den 5 LA 31. pm 152: BL LLK x I gazsm, 85. HD. Dan ,L'Vsem, HtsD Um .9 SIM 0m ' . . ISTRATION CERS How. A. C h : Cfrdary COMMITTEE mm 5140mm Chairman 1 Acting Chairman -. H. F ISHBR Hon. Hmm Gomx N VAwm 0 MEMBERS '- . Governor, Salem Sammy of State, Salem Will! of Publitlmtrutlion,31ltm ......... . DIXON, ViumMr: OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION P. L CAMPBELL, B.A. LL.D ............................................................. President KARL W. ONTHANK, M.A ............................................. Executive Secretary LOUIS H. JOHNSON? ...................................................................... Comptroller CARLTON E. SPENCER, A.B.,.LL.B ................................................. Registrar JOHN STRAUB, M.A., LIT.D ..................................................... Dean of Men ELIZABETH FREEMAN Fox, B.A ......................................... Dean of Women VVILBUR K. NEWELL ........................................ Superintendent of Properties M. H. DOUGLASS, M.A ..................................................................... Librarian THE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS GEORGE REBEC, PH.D ............................................. Dean of Graduate School COLIN V. DYMENT, B.A ................. Dean of Literature, Science and the drts ELLIS F. LAWRENCE, M.S ............................. Dean of School of Architecture EDWIN CLYDE ROBBINS, PH.D...Demz of School of Business Administration HENRY D. SHELDON, PH.D ............................. Dean of School of Education ERIC W. ALLEN, B.A ......................................... Dean of School of Journalism VVILLIAM G. HALE, B.S., LL.B ................................. Dean of School of Law RICHARD B. DILLEHUNT, BS. M.D ................ Dean of School of Medicine JOHN J. LANDSBURY, MUS.D ................................ Dean Of School of iMusir JOHN FREEMAN BOVARD, PH.D ........ Dean of School of Physical Education FREDERIC GEORGE YOUNG, LL.D ..................... Dean of School of Sociology EARL KILPATRICK, B.A ................................. Director of Extension Division Tllirty-ons leirty-Iqun OUR PRESIDENT N PRINCE LUCIEN CAMPBELL, President of the Uni- I iversity of Oregon, every student gratefully recog- nizes a leader under whose splendid administration the University has achieved its greatest development, a counsellor to whose wisdom and sympathy one turns as td a father, a friend whose genuine interest in every student and his affairs is like a benediction. 9'6 x X x It is neither necessary nor possible to enumerate the quali- ties in our President that we admire. Valiant in any just cause, patient under circumstances that try menis souls, invariably cheerful when cheer seems most digi- cult to come by; gracious, chivalrous, always the gentle- man, and of a goodness of heart that none has ever found wanting: this is our President. g6 'X X To respect and honor him: that is his right. But to express the devotion which we feel for him, and to pledge to him once more our most loyal allegiance: that is for us a privilege. Tllirty-Hzree s3 8.;W;B.44 JOHN STRAUB Dean of him mt: excellence. Instwi. wand deep; and so must be ' merimes throughout long peri- Hr. 'mtrimtc and laborious pm :2xhb:fortrutl1. Whtthcr in lit- :53 ipureand applich and d! E ?? '"E',41P0l1thtll16,orln' Iv m '. ELIZABETH FREEMAN FOX Dean of VVomen Tllir'ty-fam- JOHN Sum Dean of Men The College of Literature, Science and the Arts IIE College of Literature, Science and the Arts exists for numerous purposes, but if its chiefest end-in-View must be singled out, then it is this: To have inspired in its graduates a 56,101- arly attitude in the quest for truth. For, truth seldom lies on the surface where all may discern it. If it always lay on the surface, Civilization would be ages nearer the point of ultimate excellence. Instead, truth often lies hidden and deep; and so must be mined for, sometimes throughout long peri- ods and even by intricate and laborious pro- cesses. In such searches for truth, whether in lit- erature, science tpure and appliedl, and the arts, or in religion, politics, ethics, or in whatsoever phase of thinking or act- ing or human relationship, there is essential the scholarly attitude. And the scholarly attitude has as some of its attributes discipline, studiousness, pati- ence, simplicity, self-abnegation, the xrvillingness to examine all evidence, and the capacity to appraise it. Usually, also, the man of scholarly attitude has a fine sense of social duty: if he be a true scholar, perhaps the Sermon on the Mount will be part of his way of life. He is Platols Htruly educated many but With 2500 ad- ditional years of human discovery at his command. So, if it can have inspired in a quota of sttidents eachyear this schol- arly attitude, the College of Literature, Science and the Arts will have per- formed the highest type of service to the state that supports it. --COLIN DYMENT, Dean. Thirly-aivr The School of Journalism 5'59 m: TUDENTS preparing for various branches imtdofbummidp ' Id S of the writing and publishing profes- will'dtoww sions constitute the undergraduate per- .fpplf ' sonnel of the School of Journalism. On the W lywinthltitsnot one extreme are found some who expect to j.f;jqi;.ilieilmml W . devote themselves exclusively to the author- finmmmgfmmm ship of magazine articles or books; at the untigitfanWh-V'nm :th other some who are preparing for the man- ,Jgndwiofth. Rathtmm'lm . agement of the business phase of publica- :Wstotwmf . . tion, or who wish to become specialists in efwmmisofnypmhdm- advertising or circulation. The typical jour- fgztatopfmmwd ! nalism student, however, is seeking 21-well ijdmhcmisebfmmc- rounded preparation that W111 enable him to tfefmmgiVinglfow follow his opportunities for success wherever they may lead in one of the most varied and Ltzi preparation in: WWI m M. widely ramifying of all professions. 'i'imdf'mchdmm Journalism is an easy profession to enter; it is a difficult one in which "53.6131"meth to rise to an assured position. For this reason the Oregon School of Jour- ?'iiiifiuntofourycarundam e: nalism insists upon an educational foundation of great breadth and thor- :uidiminiilradonmythh w. oughness. Few schools in the country offer such a variety of professional mmmimfm and academic courses devised to help the student at 2111 the stages of his iTuihifnrimmob'mm, . career, especially after the first promotions are attained. 'ilitrali'gh' J WIN The School of Journalism is divided into four departments: Journal- iii llsmdmtsmm ism, advertising, publication and University Press. The last named depart- :W'W' Oneoftbcmms ment serves as the laboratory for all journalism students. It is one of the orifimmmmmhc most complete in the country, equalled by not more than three or four and ??mgusmntthg surpassed by none.-ERIC W. ALLEN, Dean. Ill" hammer . Wismbm WWW; s" ngm and Phi 111:3 MW :prmttsthesc itimsmdentsof .1121 training in min? leirty-six 0f Journalism lUDENTs preparingl Of the writing and sums constitute the undergraduate .l of the School of Journalism. ill rxtreme are found some wh e themselves exclusively to the ll of magazine articles or loch; .l some who are preparing for then ent of the business phase of pill or who wish to become specialist 'tising or circulation. The typical? n student, however, is seelinga'i led preparation that will enable ll; v his opportunities for Sutftixillltlft mav lead in one of the most l'lllfl lv iamifying of all professions. - i to enter; it is a dillicult one mi this reason the Oregon Schoolm tion of great breadth all? founda . , +u trv olier such a variety 01W, i ' fill lp the student at all the stag otions are attame . mm W ided into four departm "melt; v 'ti Pres Thalastna 6;, versn ; 1 on U l Journalism h cf of mm led by not mo c, Dean fir"; he or various lilli- puhlishing pli 0 tlpmi The School of Business Administration HE School of Business Administration is organized upon the assumption that the laws underlying sound business procedure are capable of scientific demonstra- tion and classroom analysis. Just as in en- gineering, law, medicine, architecture, and so on, there are codified rules of practice, so too in the field of business known principles are being applied to successful industrial ad- ministration. The school is distinctive in that it is not interested in training for elementary business pursuits, i. e. stenography, typewriting, book- keeping, and so forth. Rather, its aim is to prepare persons to assume managerial posi- tions. The instruction is of a type which en- ables graduates to progress toward responsible positions much more rapidly than would otherwise be possible. Aside from giving a foundation for general business, the school offers specialized preparation in: professional accounting Give year courseh, fin- ance, foreign trade, merchandising, salesmanship, insurance, trafhc manage- ment, and chamber of commerce work. In addition to four year undergraduate work, the degree of Master of Business Administration may be earned by persons holding undergraduate degrees from institutions of recognized standing. Since the primary object of the school is to train business executives, it follows naturally that students ought to be kept in actual touch with current business conditions. One of the means of doing this is through the various commerce organizations in the school. The Chamber of Commerce, 21 stu- dent organization, cements the scholastic, business, and social relations of the school. It arranges for special lectures, and also maintains an employ- ment bureau for its members. Other organizations, such as Alpha Kappa Psi, Beta Alpha Psi, Beta Gamma Sigma, and Phi Theta Kappa are indicative of the professional at- mosphere that permeates the school, and are but a few examples of the many means by Which the students of the school of business administration are re- teiving liberal training in many phases of sound business administration. -EDWIN C. ROBBINS, Dean. Thirty-Mwen The School of Law HE Law School of the University of Oregon conceives that it has a three- fold function: First: To give the men and women who are preparing to enter the legal profession sound training. The foundation for this training consists of at least two years of col- lege work in English, economics, sociology. logic, argumentation, history, and various courses that are given in the School of Busi- ness Administration. This work, combined with that which is given in the Law School, is designed to make thorough lawyers and broad-minded, constructive citizens, able in a larger measure to cope with the complex local, national, and international conditions of the present day. Second: To bring to non-legal groups in the university a knowledge of the origin and development of the law, of fundamental concepts as to legal rights and duties, of the operation of our machinery of justice, and 0f the problems and methods of law reform, to the end that such knowledge may become'a part of the equipment of every college man and woman for citizenship in our great democracy. Third: To foster and carry forward progressive movements in legal reform and to be of immediate service to all of the lawyers of the state through comments upon and elucidation of present complications in Oregon law. For this purpose the Oregon Law Review has been established and is distributed to all members of the Oregon bar. Briefly, the work of the Law School thus consists, first, of turning out well-trained, large-minded, constructive lawyers; second, of bringing a knowledge of our law and legal institutions to non-professional groups in the University, and third, of serving immediately and constructively the in- terests 0f the members of the bar and the people of the entire state. --WILLIAM G. HALE, Dean. leirty-yiglll 11111d111g 10111111011: Mala ,, 1111:1111 111"-1nt:fMS '1 hr Lniwrsin 11: 11h lCll lilllalb C319 Of that ;1111'1'11111111111gg111up of regu- 131:1 111111115111 students Who ':;1111lradegrmn four yws :1.f?111111111111'115111hera major or Then there is the prolw l11h1'1school emphasis is laid u 1171111 music. The work of the 1 1:.r11l1111111111h1'olmcntion. lts 1 111111, Th 11111111111 school pron'dcs ' l11'l110lf llWId'KS Ol mm, b" 115111111 department mm to Th H hmlWlltsm'th pmk 11 WHE Law School . regon Conceiv I fOId fUnctiOn: trst: Prepari "d trainin """g cons 33 that it h V rscs that are given in the Sch Administration. This work csigned to make thorough hues gal groups in the university ahtth 0f the Unh'eatl 353-. 0 give the men and WW -- ng to enter the legal pi g. The foundation ti - tsts of at least two t'tatti? e work In English, economieti 1c, argumentation. histon: ant Mi h that which is given in the Lati: d-mindcd. constructive citizens, :i arger measure to cope with the , national, and internationiictiit i the law. of fundamental eoneepiv ration of our machine reform, to the end that such hie1 if cm of every colitgf man anditi i. . ' tonvard progrmtcl vet 0t 17,. w 3 t of tilt 3' '. .. h: movemtnt5 ii Law RC" Jregon bar. t. 0mm? 115 com ' brihf- Sehool th d. I ' waive iatW 0N nth: ry of justice The School of Music HE School of NIusic at the University T of Oregon aspires to a somewhat un- ique position among university schools of music. Its organization, while seemingly simple, 'is in reality rather complex. It main- tains four more or less separate departmentse 2111 of them under the supervision of the same faculty, but each serving a distinct group of students and student interests. First of 2111 there is the University School of Music proper, which takes care of that large and rapidly increasing group of regu- larly matriculated university students who are expecting to take adegree in four years and who will offer music as either a major or minor subject. Then there is the profes- sional school. In this school emphasis is laid upon the professional and V0- cational aspects of music. The work of the department of public school music is particularly worthy of mention. Its graduates are to be found in all sections of the state. The special school provides for the student who wishes to enroll for one or more branches of music, but does not intend to take a degree. The public service department aims to sponsor and give support to every movement tending to improve musical conditions in the state and tcountry at large. The school points with pride to its past record in state and national affairs. VVith the new building, which is one of the finest of its kind in the VVest, a splendid faculty, and a large and enthusiastic group of students, the School of Music looks to the future with confidence. -JOHN J. LANDSBURY, Dean. Thirly-niuc The School of Education HE courses in Education earlier founded were in 1907 reorganized as a co-ordi- nate division of the University of the same grade with the School of Law, Medicine, Commerce and Architecture. Its aim is to train men and women for up-to-date leader- ship in the different fields of Education. The faculty of the School of Education proper, de- voted to professional work, number eleven. Eight members of other departments in the University offer professional courses for teach- ers, which treat 0f the methodology of dif- ferent high school and special subjects. The University of Oregon is recognized by the state board of higher curricula as the au- thorized state institution for the training of teachers in such high school subjects as Eng- lish, French, Spanish, Latin, history, civics, economics, mathematics, general science, biology, physics and chemistry. Students expecting to become high school teachers should register for a major in the subject which they are most interested in teaching, and also preferably for two minor subjects. Courses should be elected in the major subject throughout the course, and in the minor subject for at least two years consecutively. It is important that teachers avoid undue specialization at the beginning of their course, as ordi- narily positions are first secured in small high schools where a number of subjects are necessary. Inasmuch as a thorough knowledge of subject matter is the most essen- tial qualification in a high school teacher, students who enter the University late in their course find it difficult to carry sufficient constructive work to qualify them for this type of position. Therefore, students should enter the University as soon as possible after leaving high school. The University now graduates from sixty to ninety high school teachers each year. -H. D. SHELDON, Dean. Mi M m Pon- malwurso m MI, W jg, Chmlw m my trim on II? M med or Icoachl'ng that who blimhegamc. that KIN my k ?:?:in again a SWIG 0T M 7; mm m dim rm TN r institutions and M M N' " h rcgaiar theoretical and u m ' :' .- :12: student is introduced to Eh g: pmpoxstopartidpatcinitinm I 'cdsi and every play will mn'ch ms t wk with whom he or she 55 N, ' 1 i'rzmntieth cmmn hm m 6551 Humanityas 1 WM: 15 now on ft! Narwlerating Speed Its d3! mim imd' MUS voted to professional wethnur chemistr1.Studcnts expecting 11f: h'.L LE Tim 3 major in the xubjett111'111 s0 preitrahh for two 111101111 11: ior subject thr 111 1w 110 years consu' 1111': be nningoIt on at the g'h 51-hsooi 11hf' utivch. uti Ier m smaiig hig faculty of 11131110111111; Eight members of other 1111111: Universin otter profcs 1111111 111 S :15. which treat of the 111111 .- fcrcnt high school and 5111111! The University of 01110111; the state board of higher 111111111.- thorizcd State institution for the T teachers in such high school 5111? histon' CiViCS. economie' 1111111131. oughout the 10111 4. .rr' " The School of Sociology HE real game is the game of 1ife,of hu- man life. The really human life is wholly a social creation. So sociology as the science of society must be the study of the game of human life. It gives the points in the game and outlines the origin, the de- velopment and the service of the formations or institutions through which the game of life is played. 1n the School for Social VVork in Port- land and the special courses in social path- ology and philanthropy given on the campus, preparation is secured for coaching those Who are losing out in the game, that these may be aided to become again a source of strength rather than weakness in their respective for- mations or institutions and among their associates. In the regular theoretical and constructive courses of the school on the campus the student is introduced to the game from the point of view of one who proposes to participate in it in such a way that every opportunity will be seized and every play will enrich his or her personality and help those to score with whom he or she is associated. We twentieth century humans are essaying to play the game as a democracy. Humanity as a whole is now on the field, and the game is played at ever accelerating speed. It is thus becoming more and more intricate, hazardous, and interesting. To be wholly at home in this all-inelusive game, to be sure of bringing all the potentialities that nature has endowed us with to bear toward being the best inHuence and force in our family community, state, nation and for mankind as a whole, is the goal. The School of Sociology is yours for winning success and happiness in the game of life. -F. G. YOUNG, Dean. Forty-mw The School of Physical Education 1113 School of Physical Education is organ- T ized to carry out several purposes: to pro: Vide for the physical welfare of the students, faculty, and administration, to encourage sound and sane health education of those who come to the University, to maintain a normal course for the training of teachers in the fields of high school, college, and university physical education and ath- J; :1 :52: $.32 g6 ; 4, , letics, as well as to train city, county, and com- munity workers. The faculty of the School of PhysicahEduca- tion is made up Of all instructors in the depart- ments. Their work includes the training of the students in physical education and also of physical education teachers, ad- ministrators, and investigators. The course leads to either an AB or a 3.8. degree. The several departments are separate insofar as they serve separate and distinct purposes, but all departments are one in carrying out the aims of the school. The department of physical education for women and that for men serve the whole University in providing physical education for the freshman and sophomore Classes. The department of athletics provides for those who care to engage in competitive sports. Through the regular Classes all freshmen and sophomore men have the opportunity, if they so desire, to work under the varsity coaches, a training which is well worth while. The University health service is concerned with the sick: but more particularly with the health education of the students. Physical and medi- cal examinations, consultations, medical advice, eye, ear, nose and throat clinics, are free, with the idea of acquainting the student with his diHieul- ties and how they may be avoided in the future. The watehword of the school is physical well-being, the proper ad- justment of man to his environment. VVe are encouraging everyone to provide some recreational program as a part of his equipment for his life. job. -JOHN F. BOVARD, Dean. Forty-trwo , l1 udlh lmtkdcgrmof Mm d. ' 2': there ' dWlCOlined ?Wd , ill: llprmatim : mntdcmrps. and am " mime mutt work with dies - 4:4:ums of one of thc Jury Days. :M:stai. in hisor her own w; '3 rietcaching in the schoolis m Irmm: Thereisnoothcr .. Ml 4:336:ng the Wing 0f the ms and the architect. "3W departments 311d 55M l' Ewellwgnn i: the thirtecnth of d! "-r-aviiation ol Collegim SCllools d fillgramsmmm 'lllgreatly pm lfmonofo smith. ka mmih l of Physical Education HE Schml in the h cdlsII cg: and universiti phIsIclee as well as to train ciII III in workers. he facultI 0f the School 0i PI is made up of all InstrucIIIsiI Its. Their work includesh Ih I lllh'f'. n and also of physical cduczIIiIIII rs. The course leads to IiIhII I: Is are separate insofar II III ITW' dCWl'thnts are one in carrying Izgt' cm of phisiml education for III; niI'crsitI in prmiding phi hIsiIal II'I classes. The departmcnIIIIIlII-Ih : in competitiIc sports. Th1 IIIIi homorc men haIc the opporIIf-II IrsitI' coaches a training IhIh cem dIIItht 3M hstlldemS Cf Cite iii smite l5 CO" 4., cation 0i he III .. medical Idli I 0010f PhIsi SIcal MW . The School of Architeeture and Allied Arts 0 KNOW what the School of Architec- T ture and Allied Arts is really accom- plishing, one must browse around its studios, workshops and testing laboratory, and see at first hand how over 200 earnest students are expressing themselves in creat- ing beautiful things. One sees designs for cottages and capitals, layouts for ideal Cities; murals and statues; examples of interior decoration; paintings in oil and water colors; photographs an ad posters; book binding and hook illustrtatiens , II caving and pottery, batik 21nd dyeing, and many other beautiful exam- ples-for the school is in every sense creative. Here art and engineering merge and ar- chitecture becomes veritably what tradition namely, the mother of the arts. has established for her The school boasts an esprit de corps and cameraderie unequalled on the campus. To sense it, one must work with the students at their tasks, and participate in the stunts of one of the Jury Days. Each member of the staff, in his or her own way, is likewise producing ein other words, the teaching in the school is done by practising archi- tects, artists and craftsmen. There is no other school in the country which combines to such a degree the teaching of the arts of the craftsman, the painter, the sculptor and the architect. Out of forty-four departments and schools teaching architecture in the United St' the thirteenth of the fourteen to he honored by election to the association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, with its graduates accepted in the great eastern schools on a par with their own graduates, as candidates for the degree of Master of Arts. Last year three Oregon men at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology won six out of seven prizes offered there. The school will greatly proht hy the gift to the University of the splendid VVzIrner collection of Oriental art, which will serve as a basis for. courses that will bring to the student the subtleties of this great art. The courses are not confined to majors in the schooleemany of the technical courses are open, and the courses in European Civilization and Art Epochs, and Art Appreciation are especially recommended to those students who have a desire to cultivate an appreciation of the fine arts. -ELLIS F. LAWRENCE, Dean. Forly-MII'I'I' The Extension Division Q9 HE state is the campus." This much-used phrase expresses the viewpoint of the Extension Di- vision of the University of Oregon. Stated in the language of an administrative order, HThe Extension Division is the oHicial ag- ency through which the University of Ore- gon renders service to organizations and indi- viduals outside the campus. All such ser- vice is administered through the Extension Divisionf, More specihcally, the services of the Ex- tension Division include the Portland Ex- tension Center, correspondence-study, teach- ersy reading circle, visual instruction, exten- sion lectures, public welfare activities, the Oregon High School Debating League, and numerous miscellaneous activi- ties. The annual report for the year 1921 reveals growth, with considerable improvement in quality, in nearly every aspect of extension service. The Portland Extension Center is maintained for the purpose of plac- ing University classroom instruction within reach of a large number of people who, temporarily at least, are not able to go away to college. Under the direction of Dr. George Rebec, this service is meeting with increased public favor, as is indicated by the fact that there were 2583 registrations in Portland Extension Center classes in 1921 as compared with 15-16 in 1920. University instruction throughout corresponrdence-study has been one of the leading activities of the Extension Division since 1909. Here, again there was a notable increase in enrollment during the past year, the num- ber of course registrations increasing from 724 in 1920 to 1136 in 1921. A splendid collection of educational slides and films is being built up by the visual instruction department. Sets of slides were sent out during 1921 for 1169 showings in 152 communities, while 76 communities were supplied with films for 737 showings. The total attendance at the show- ings was nearly 275,000. These statements are merely indicative of the volume of extension service in its leading aspects. They show, however, that through the Ex- tension Division, the resources of the University of Oregon are being made available to communities, organizations and individuals through- out the state. --EARL KILPATRICK, Director. Forty-four 11' 11111110121 0 11111111 01 M" --1.11111k 1111116 mm: W 12111111011111113113131161!1 Of W 11111 11 1111 111mm humbly Put '1 "1.1511111111" 11110101111: 01' dm 0i SCI " 1111111111 "0111111311113" HW1 "101 11111111111111.1111. Amman it is "1111131111": amt, 1111110111 1 '1 3111. 1111 it is the chief 1mm of a 1 '51'1.11113.11 11611 as to WM '1I 1111111111 1111 1101111111116 01 11m 1 "11101111111 young men and n.1, "-11.111111 10:5 1101 1151111 bring forth - 11118 111111th racords 11 such 11 131111111; 1111 docs 1101 M 1h 1 m 111 111 all . . 155111110101fqmmt5d '11!!! 1h p A U1 More Specifically. the seniusoif: DiVision include the Port: lectures. public wdfm am'rlii wly-evcry aspect of extension m 'cntcr is maintained for the purpwi action within reach of alargcnu t are not able to go away to college. : ension Center, correspondmusmdy. 1r 5' mding circle, Visual instrumn; Lam. and numerous miscellmes var 192! reveals gmmm The Graduate School NDOUBTEDLY, the function of a graduate scheol includes helping its l J students toward an iiadvancedh knowledge of their special subjects. As the rapidly developing standards for teachers, and other profes- sional folk as well, bring ever increasing demands for umore knowledge," an ever larger number of such persons seek the graduate schools of the country with the express purpose of getting this umoreH of knowledge. In the case of the M.A. degree, Which has not inaptly been called the Titeachefs degreef, this desire for an enhanced knowledge may be set down as the average conscious motive of the candidacy. And in its measure, and under a right understanding, it is quite legitimate. The University of Oregon graduate school is so far in sympathy with this motive that it tries to safeguard the adequacy of the students iiadvancedn knowledge, by insisting that the latter embrace the requisite qualities of orderly breadth and liberality. In other words, it requires 0f the student that he not merely accomplish a certain total of hours and courses, but cover reputably his whole major and minor yields of study. But graduate work implies something beyond a mere receptive accu- mulation, or even improved arrangement, of knowledge. This something more is suggested by the demand invariably put upon the applicants for the degree of doctor of philosophy, or doctor of science, that they give evi- dence of intellectual "originality." However, horiginalityii is in itself a term needing interpretation. Academically, it is likely to be defined as the ability to do Tiresearchh: and, Without further cavil, the proposition may be laid down, that it is the chief business of a graduate school to send out scientific workers, as well as to accomplish Within its own walls work that shall push forward the boundaries of human knowledge. A graduate school that does not train young men and women in the technique and habit of research, and does not itself bring forth scientific discoveries and the books and papers which are records of such production, may have a variety of other virtues, but does not meet the modern graduate-school ideas. Nevertheless, we are all acquainted with the phenomenon of TTPh.D.- iismf, It is possible to do Tiresearchi, with a very barren mind. It is, unfortunately, possible to produce a doctor,s thesis, and indeed many "researchesii and TTArbeits," with a minimum of mental fertility. Routine and fidelity have accomplished the result in thousands of cases. Often, routine and obedience to the allotted task have been accounted the prime Virtues for the apprentice student, if not for the scholar afterwards. The resultant output, whatever be our judgment of its value to science, surely Forfy-fi-vr has not deserved the name iioriginalf, and the educational results of the training have been conducive of anything rather than originality. Originality is a movement from within, a creative impulse, a devele oped capacity and habit of individual thought and the daring thereto. It is an attitude which the man carries out into life, which the teacher car- ries into the classroom, transforming all its procedures. The classic ex- ample 0f the teacher is, of course, Socrates; and he, and a greater than he, and a whole host of the supreme educators of mankind who never put hand to paper, remind us that, after all, the final, and the most fruitful product, is the mind itself. To stimulate and help develop intelligences open, active living; to encourage them to the attainment of authentic per- sonality, able and ready to take the responsibilities of personality whether in the study and laboratory or in the world outside; not failing meanwhile, of course, to instill in them the more technical capacity and practice of dis- crimination, patience and justness--this is the culminating endeavor and service of the graduate school. Herewith, too, is indicated the proper relation of the Graduate School to the University as a whole. It is not :1 thing apart, :1 segregated elite of formidably Uhigh-browH persons, either students or professors, but a dynamically participant factor in eveig satage and phase of the Universityg its undergraduate course, its professional schools, the free HactivitiesH both of its students and professors. Everywhere and 2111 the while, it is peculi- arly the representative and reminder of the seeking, adventuring, pro- ducing disposition of mind. Viewing it in this way, one might go on to argue for the part the right sort of graduate school has to play in our whole school system even down to the high schools and the earliest elementary grades. But enough has been said, I believe to indicate the ideals which the Graduate School of the University of Oregon has set itself towards its own members, towards the University, and towards the Universitfs supporting the public. -GEORGE REBEC, Dean. Farly-xix A .. , .133??? W La. :wgzg . 22.3 "as gin, 1.. 2.2. Ba 5:? : Eggs; Ear E m, K ,5. 53?: 2a "fag: a .352 a :3 mg m... 5.. 23 am? me a 3 as? x... Eu. 3 2a 5 cs EnE: 5; E E? gang mousu mamas .2 Ear 13 E KnQVxEIhEeXVN FarIy-Piyht 1111111., IXMJ" x Ir: 'Hr'mm'mar J .x: '1'" 71!; tamrrgrrz : -.- 1 1 1H; .A 111 . 1.11,..1'1 1n w m. , .w. 1N3: W'irc x ' f" mmmmcrmnml J HUM 111111111? 1.2. , :wg I17 ?X17 v. ; 4 X M, WWW V,.g- .9 WMWMWJ MCI 21115331 5 h $Xr11uu Um; EEI? Warn ' f3: ;l.fly;lifg1t". inn IHIH 1 :2 '1 5? 3151111111 31? 3?; . .3', 1'51??? puma mfg L2111. Z4;. ?44? ,1 3.114.411 111:1 .1111?" -L' 1 I ' y ' 1 ,'.3f. II 1 W... p. x 5 .o i x L':::' x ' ?1 '7 19,1 NHM'J'J ,W74 f. k. hr ? ' N 1, .... ,- - 111': . 1 ..... 1M. 1 v .1- 1 .11.;wl1 ' - Hut?" u... rm .r .uu-u up . , vqu-tv . m .lu- . W -.-.,W . . wwmpgmumm-rmrrkmn-W--smn . -nuw-, 7,...,, ...,., ,. , . ... .. w..." mm. ,. gab- 7 Iv'm'Iy-nim' ABBOTT PERRY COLLINS CLASS OFFICERS LEITH ABBOTT .................................................................... President CHARLOTTE CLARK .................................................... Vice President EMILY PERRY .................................................................... Secretary WILLIAM COLLINS ............................................................ Treasurer HERBERT GEARY ............................................................ Class Barber The Class of 1922 RADUATION 0f the class of 1922 marks the passing of the final Hwar G year,, class of the University of Oregon, the class which in its fresh- man year, passed through the trying period of the S. A. T. C. and the distressing influenza epidemic. These setbacks, suffered at the outset, were quickly ameloriated. Now we pause at the end of the road and look back over the past four years with pride. The class of 1922 has not only restored student life to normalcy but leaves emblazoned on pages of university history a record of achievement second to none. During the past year we have been a concrete example of a unified class, teeming with a Class spirit which has served to bind all Classes into a unified body working for the progress of the university we love so well. Besides fathering a student body through one of its most successful years, we have imbued the remaining classes with Oregon spirit, that traditional element of our University which alone of all things shall never die. LEITH ABBOTT ASHLAND Journalism-Phi Gamma Delta; Friars; Sigma Delta Chi; Sigma Upsilon; Or- der 0f the H0 ; To-Ko-Lo; editor of Oregon Emerald BM staff 0, 2, 4H; varsity track captain 6 ; varsity track team Q, 3, 4H; senior president VD; sponsor Oregon Knights VD; Oregana staff Q, 3M student council BM senior man elect OH; Greater Oregon com- mittee U, 2, 3, H; chairman UM Historian staff CZ, 3M Y. M. C. A. cabinet LZL RUTH M. AUSTIN WOODBURN Journali5m KapDa Kappa Gamma; Theta Sigma Phi; Emerald staff BM daily news editor OH; Oregana staff OH; treasurer Woman,s Athletic as- sociation OH; Greater Oregon commit- meiirn! tee Q, 4U. Wm WM WAYNE M. AKERS WAsco WK.-..SlmmrI Business Administration-Beta Theta ' Pi; track U, 2, D ; band U, m ; orches- quWW tra U, 2, 3H Y. M. C. A. cabinet U, CMSBW 2, 9 ; glee club Q, N ; Greater Oregon W committee Q, M; student council BM delegate Des Moines convention HO; Oregana staff 8 ; chairman canoe fete 6W; member of board of directors of Co-Op H, 4H; Phi Mu Alpha; Friars. MILDRED APPERSON MCMINNVILLE Botany and Bacteriology Kappa Kap- pa Gamma; Kwama; Samara; secret- ary VVomaNs Athletic association BL LILLIAN AULD EUGENE Rlzetoric-Kappa Alpha Theta; Pot and Quill; Eutaxian; advertising staflE Lem- on Punch OH. VVILFORD ALLEN GRANTS PASS J01trnali5m Phi Sigma Pi; transferred from Stanford junior year; Emerald staff night editor Uh news editor UH; Sigma Delta Chi; Ad Club. MYRTLE N. ANDERSON PORTLAND Clwmistry Tre Nu; ChemisEs Club. LEROY ANDERSON ESTACADA Larw-Delta Theta Phi. Fifty-onz' LOIS MARION BARNETT VVASCO Pllysiral Eduration Kappa Kappa Gamma; VVomaWs Athletic Association treasurer HM head of track ML LAWRENCE J. BOYLE CANYONVILLE Edumfion. LYLE BRYSON EUGENE Journalism Kappa Alpha Theta; Ore- gana staff Q, N; news editor Emer- ald BM associate Emerald OH; Theta Sigma Phi; TrcNu; vice-presi- dent class BM secretary associated students Md; student council OH; ex- ecutive council OH. VVOLCOTT BUREN . Pre Medics-Beta Theta Pi, CLAIRE BEALE PORTLAND .10112 711111'1771 KELLY BRANSTETTER EUGENE Commerw-Delta Tau Delta; Hammer and Coffin. ALDA M. BERRY NEWPORT Edmation-Pi Lambda Theta. GEORGE VERNE BLUE ASHLAND History De1ta Tau Delta; Sigma Up- silon, Le Foyer Francais. Fifty-Irwo H; lam! Emerald H1: 3 TI! Nu; vice-pmi- "E Wary associaud n W; student council HE; e1- rmndl Hi. DU BREE Sun lcliu-Bm 111m Pi LE BEAU: mm ulinl' Eran? ANNAMAY BRONAUGH PORTLAND Educati0n Kappa Alpha Theta; Theta Sigma Phi; Emerald staff Q, 3M Ore- gana staff BM Historian staff ML ERINEST L. BOYLEN PENDLETON Pre-Medim-Kappa Sigma; To-Ko-Lo; freshman basketball; freshman track; sophomore basketball; Craftsman. ECHO BALDERREE DALLAS Physical Education-Susan Campbell hall; Hermian club; class basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ' ALEXANDER BROWN PORTLAND Journalism-Kappa Theta Chi; Sigma Delta Chi; Sigma Upsilon; Emerald staff U, 2, 3M Oregana staff U, 2h senior play. J. HORTON BEEMAN PORTLAND Laqy-Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Delta Theta Phi. AGNES BROOKS PORTLAND Normal Art Kappa Alpha Theta. RAYMOND BURNS COQUILI.E Commerce-Alpha Tau Omega; class president UM glee club U, 2M or- chestra WW ; president French club OH ; University Chamber of Commerce; Phi Mu Alpha; Spanish club. MAE BALLACK ALBANY Rlzetoric Kappa Alpha Theta; Y. W. C. A. cabinet UM Eutaxian; Emerald staff OH. FifIy-tlzrrc RALPH BURGESS PENDLETON Business AdministrationeKappa Sigma. FLOYD BOWLES PORTLAND Business Administration-Kappa Sig- ma; Emerald Q, 3N circulation man- ager HM Alpha Kappa Psi; frosh track UM Varsity track L2, 3, 4H Order of B0." VVILLIAM FRANCIS BECK DALLAS Pre-Medirs-Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Laurean society; Craftsman; Phi Delta Kappa. LYLE P. BARTHOLOMEVV SALEM ArelziterlureeBachelordon; Architect- ure club; Mask and Buskin; student council UM student body play UH senior play OH; Friars; president A. S. U. 0.; student council UH; executive council OH; sculpture club; Texon. GRACE BOLICK ASOTIN, WASH. Music- VICTOR BRADESON wa-Sigma Chi. EDGAR BLOOD PORTLAND Business Administration- FRANCIS BELLER FREEWATER EeonomitseKappa Sigma; To-Ko-Lo; frosh basketball UN Varsity basket- ball a; 3, M; Varsity baseball 0, 49; Order of the BOB. . 9553 Wu' P111 "11111.1 :ldlluuhaio WI??? 11111311,;11 hugnmsg 11-11 KIWI P51; 11011 1" 1 1111314114' P111111 ARWOIDMEW 8.11111 t-Blchelordon; Archim- ;Mni and Ruskin; 111111111 131; 111111111111le1; 1.!" 141; Frim; 1111511111 1.0; student 11111111114: .ml 111 111111111111- BOLICK Asunx,11'1i1 511111 111035.01 Sign: 11 Pmlm ummmnw 11111;: 150' ISBEufEEI $13111: 15m 0.2155; Lu u 1"; wbi 1' 111113111111 3,111.5: 1110 1' ARNOLD BLACKBURN PORTLAND EmnomirJ-Kappa Theta Chi; fresh- man and Varsity track squad; Order of 4'10." VIOLET B. CRANDALL EUGENE Fremh4Vice-leader student volunteers 141. XVILLIAM J. COLLINS PORTLAND 1llatlzematir54Delta Tau Delta; base- ball squad; treasurer class 141. CHARLOTTE MARJORIE CLARK EUGENE Plzysiml Edzu;ation-Alpha Chi Omega; vice-president class 141; Y. W. C. A. cabinet 141; Oregana staff 131; Her- mian club; class baseball 131. W. THOMAS COATES TILLAMOOK zqaounting4Kappa Delta Phi; entered as sophomore from Willamette Univer- sity. ELAINE COOPER PORTLAND Hi5tory-Alpha Delta Pi; winner intra- mural debate 111; Varsity debate 12, 3, 41; forensic council 13, 41; Zeta Kappa Psi; Pi Lambda Theta. REMEY M. COX PORTLAND Rlzetoriwariendly hall; Varsity de- bate 12, 31; forensic manager 131; forensic council 13, 41 ; Koyl cup; Tau Kappa Alpha; Phi Mu Alpha; Cross- roads. CLARA CORRIGAN MCIVTINNVIIJJE Eduration4Kappa Kappa Gamma. Fifty-fiw IAN CAMPBELL EUGENE GeologywOregon club; Crossroads; University Honor society; Craftsman; Chemistsy Club; Condon club. FLORA CAMPBELL EUGENE Pre-IVIpdirs-Kappa Kappa Gamma. WILLIAM COLEMAN PORTLAND WW Larw-Sigma Chi; Phi Delta Phi. m? L M! ';; $1;de" ya: P9: W GP I '.u m 331k". 1 am a $' M. MARCILE CARLOCK PORTLAND Edzuation-Kappa Alpha Theta; French club QM W'omank Education "WWW my; club 3 , Hawthorne Club OH. J'Eibikidmtu' Emmi? ",.55 115; ;01:!- ,L ;.:msmlL ARTHUR W. CAMPBELL HEPPNER Clzemislry Friendly hall; Phi Mu A1- pha; Crossroads; Chemistsy club; asso- ciate member Condon club; band U, 2M orchestra Q, 3, 4H; student coun- cil OH. HELEN CARSON HOOD RIVER Romaine LanguageJ-Alpha Phi; intra- mural debate; Zeta Kappa Psi; Eutax- ian; Dial; secretary Triple A UM sec- retary associated students 0H ; ex- ecutive council 0H ; student council OH; finance committee OH. VIRGIL CAMERON HOOD RIVER Pre-Aledim-Alpha Tau Omega. ELEANOR COLEMAN EUGENE E n g 1 i 5 11 Literature - Pi Beta Phi; Kwama; Pi Lambda Theta. Fifty-six 10mm . ' Pox ll 0"; Phi Delta PhiTLNJ ECARIJOCK Ponmn -szpz Alpha Theta; lb 03; Wolan's Education Hawthorne club W. MCAMPBELL Hmm Jdmdly hall; Phi Mu Al- smds; Chtmisu' club; :3 nber Condon dub; hand 11. an L7,, 3. H; studwtmm- ALLEN CARNCROSS MONROVIA, CAL. Journalism-Alp'ha Tau Omega; Ham- mer and Coffin; Lemon Punch staff 0, AH; Sigma Upsilon. CAROLYN CANNON PORTLAND Physical Edutation Kappa Alpha Theta; executive council VVomaWs Athletic association OW ; Hermian club; Varsity swimming team QM class swimming U, 2, 3, 1H; class basketball 1, 2, 3M class hockey QM head of hockey BL VIRGIL DE LAP KLAMATH FALLS Busineu Administration - Friendly Hall; Beta Alpha Psi; Beta Gamma Sigma; Y. M. C. A. cabinet 0, 4H. DOROTHY DICKEY CHICAGO, ILL. Music-Mu Phi Eosilon; executive com- mittee University historian OH; intra- mural debates 0, 3M Oregon music festival QM womaws band UL VICTOR VERNE DUDLEY LONG BEACH, CAL. Bzuine-s: Administration-Sigma Nu. RITA E. DANFORD EUGENE Botany-Entered as junior from North Dakota Normal School; Samara; Pi Lambda Theta. JOHN DIERDORFF HILLSBORO Jour'nalism Kappa Theta Chi; Sigma Delta Chi; Emerald staff Q, 3, 4M Oregana staff Q, 3, 4M University Ad club; Greater Oregon committee U, M; Y. M. C. A. cabinet UH. WANDA LOLETA DAGGETT PORTLAND JVIatlzematics-Alpha Sigma; Zeta Kap- pa Psi; Chemisw club; forensic council UM Varsity debate Q, 3, 4H. Fifty-chmz RAY DUNN . . EUGENE Business Administrattorb-Phl Delta Theta. MARIANNE DUNHAM PORTLAND Eronomics-Delta Delta Delta; Kwa- ma; head of tennis GM Varsity ten- nis; executive council of VVomaNs league OH. LOUIS DUNSMORE . PORTLAIND Business AdministrationsKappa 51g- ma. EDWIN DURNO EUGENE Physical Educatian-Phi Delta Theta; Varsity basketball; Friars; Order of the "O." MARY CATHERINE EVANS PORTLAND EdurationsKappa Kappa Gamma; Y. XV. C. A. cabinet 8, 4M University historian ML MAURICE EBEN JOSEPH Law-Delta Theta Phi; Phi Mu Alpha; glee club s2, 3, M ; president OH ; student council OH ; Oregon music council. STANLEY EISMAN PORTLAND Journalism-Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Emerald staff s2, 3M Oregana staff HM editor Lemon Punch Q, 3N Ham- mer and Coffin; Sigma Delta Chi; Sigma Upsilon. ALICE :EVANS PORTLAND Botany and BacteriologysKappa Kap- pa Gamma; student council OH; Scroll and Script; executive council Womanss league OH; Pi Lambda Theta; vice- president Woman,s Athletic associa- tion OH; class secretary UM Varsity baseball s2, 3; Samara. Fifty-cigllt SYDNEY HAROLD EVANS MONROE Business Administration. MH.;uinl. LUCILE ELROD PORTLAND er' 1mm. Alusic Alpha Phi; Mu Phi Epsilon. 0' Womm' ERNEST EVANS EUGENE Business Administration. MORE Pmnm I i: GLADYS M. EVERETT PORTLAND Larw-Delta Zeta; Kappa Beta Pi. V0. ' Evcm aul-Phl Deltanm; qu;0rderol HARRIS ELLSWORTH LAGRANDE CommercesKappa Sigma; Sigma Delta Chi; Ye Tabard Inn of Sigma Upsilon; To-Ko-Lo; Emerald staff 0, 2H man- ager QM Oregana staff s2, 3H man- ager UM manager Lemon Punch VD; ERINEEVANSPMMW glee club U, 4H; Hammer and Coan; "K PWGMI'Y Lemon Punch society; Phi Mu Alpha; W U 4' UIIIVCNU Ad club. H. JIM MAURINE ELROD PORTLAND MEN . , AW PsyclzologysAlpha Phi; Varsity ten- mmmPh'M" M nis title UM Varsity basketball UM uggnmld'm NJ class basketball s2, 3N Y. W. C. A. 'l m; Oregon W BoosterNs club s2, 3s ; Hawthorne club; W French club s2, 3s ; head of tennis WW m! ISMAN $105; FRANK N. FASSETT EUGENE Lsism Alpha 1an Aammtzng-Beta Alpha Psi; band HHOHE'," m 0, 2s. raff hwu,zl;H'. m 5in Delta 0" Y M FLORENCE FURUSET EUGENE Physical Education-Zeta Rho Epsilon; 1W": Tre Nu; Eutaxian; Hermian club; Y. Pl , W. C. A. cabinet UM treasurer UH; sdgrxlppgoll class basketball BM class baseball W": M will! HM house basketball BM intramural lef, 166' s debate OH. Fifty-nine EUGENE CRECENE FARISS Business zqdministration-Delta Tau Delta; Phi Mu Alpha; glee club U, 2, 3, M; frosh track. NEWBERG NIILDRBD FERGUSON History-Susan Campbell hall; entered as junior from Pacific College; student council OH. EUGENE ESTHER FELL Commerw-Pi Beta Phi; Phi Theta Kappa; Emerald staff QL EUGENE GLENN O. FRANK, Chemistry-Oregon club; Y. W. C. A. cabinet 0H; Zeta Kappa Psi; Pi Lambda Theta; Chemistry club. REUBEN CHARLYLE GOFFREIERE PORTLAND illusic and Edutation-Friendly hall; entered from Reed College. SALEM MARGERY GILBERT Education--Phi Lambda Theta; Haw- thorne club; Dial. HERBERT L. GEARY CLATSKANXE Commerce. ROBERTA ADELE GIBSON LONG BEACH, CAL. Education. Em MMWW :31! We 3. 3,- .EuMV Pmul ?:ath-Alyh Ii; . ,xfsxi i111; mil; h- - 1;$: 1.134;;$ ' 11m Mil; 5min; 9;: EMMA JANE GARBADE PORTLAND Physical Education-Kappa Kappa Gamma; Hermian club. MARGARET GOODIN SALEM Architecture-Delta Delta Delta; en- tered from Willamette University as sophomore; s e c r e t a r y Architectural club; Architecture and Allied Arts club; class basketball OH. PHEBE E. GAGE PORTLAND Art-Kappa Kappa Gamma; Kwama; Texon; vice-president Y. W. C. A. 0D; head of canoeing LN; vice-presi- dent class UM secretary WomanBs league BL LOIS HALL EUGENE EducationeDelta Gamma; Zeta, Kappa Psi; intramural debate Q, 3L VVINIFRED HOPSON PORTLAND Business AdministrationeAlpha Phi; varsity basketball UH varsity base- ball QM swimming 0, 2, 3, 4H; Wo- manBs Athletic council; Eutaxian; Spanish club QL NEWTON HARRELL Business Administration. WILBUR K. HOYT HOOD RXVER Business Bdministratione-Phi Delta Theta; Oregana staff WM FRANCES HABERSHAM PORTLAND Physical Education-Hendricks hall; Samara; Y. W. C. A. cabinet. XVALTER HEMPY EUGENE Business deministratimz A1pha Tau Omega. RENA HALES PENDLETON Edm atian Gz1mma Phi Beta. ROSCOE D. HEMENVVAY PORTLAND Anlziierture Phi Gamma Delta; Or- der of HO"; varsitv track; Architecture club; Hammer and Coffin. GENEVIEVE HAVEN PORTLAND Spanisll-Pi Beta Phi; Emerald staff U, 2L SYDNEY B. HAYSLIP VANCOUVER, VVASH. Artlziterturzu-Sigma Nu; varsity track U, 2, 3M Order of the HO"; Archi- tecture club; Texon; Washington club; assistant football manager GM foot- ball manager OH. BEATRICE HENSLEY NORTH BEND English Literature-Alpha Chi Omega; Eutaxian. MALCOLM H. HAVVKE FOREST GROVE z4N011nti71g Beta Alpha Psi, Beta Gamma Sigma. ROXIE HALL MARSHFIELD Eduration. k 611W m 4?: M H; ml! h 1 . mmm HEW HAVEX Pom: M Beta Phi; Emmld 2:9 ,ZL ' I, HAYSUP . Rm Mom W1" l. MAW .Vu: $312522; 112.3!" Mfr of the 10:3:- cg; Tm; Washmgg .: I a W" mmgu 1: . J W m. . 72 352'. VSLEY M AWCEEEWAIPMW CLIVE HUMPHREY EUGENE Matllematirs-Sigma Alpha Epsilon. LOUISE HASSAN EUGENE Latin2Pi Lambda Theta. ARTHUR HICKS CANYON CITY Romanre LanguagH-Sigma Alpha Epsilon. LILLIE HASENMAYER PORTLAND History--entered as senior from Reed college. MARTIN HOWARD PORTLAND Zoology2Beta Theta Pi; varsity foot- ball; captain 0H; Order of the 220." LEO G. HERTLEIN WICHITA, KAN. Geology Friendly hall; frosh track; Geological and Mining Society of American Universities. BERTHA HAYS EUGENE Edutation-vHendricks hall; Pi Lambda Theta; entered as junior from Normal school. FREDERICK HOWARD PORTLAND wa-Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Delta Phi. Sixty-tllree C. N. INGLE LAGRANDE Pre-Engineering-Delta Tau Delta; freshman track Uh varsity track Q, U ; varsity soccer Q, Q ; student coun- cil VH; To-Ko-Lo; Engineering so- ciety. OGDEN JOHNSON PORTLAND Larw-Phi Gamma Delta; Emerald staff U, D; Mask and Buskin; gen- eral chairman junior week-pnd 1921; Phi Delta-Phi. ARTHUR HAROLD JOHNSON PORTLAND Drama and Speech flrts-Friendlv hall; glee club U, 2, 3, H; Oregon music council; Phi Mu Alpha. CLEO JENKINS ALBANY Arrlliterture Sigma Chi; president Studenw Allied Art league. PETER JENSEN JUNCTION CITY Arrlzitwture Phi Gamma Delta. LUTHER JENSEN JUNCTION CITY Arrlziterture Phi Gamma Delta. ISABELLE J. KIDD PORTLAND Latin-Alpha Phi; University Honor society; Scroll and Script; Pi Lambda Theta; Eutaxian. ARTHUR KUHNHAUSEN PORTLAND Business Administration Kappa Sig- ma; freshman track Uh varsity track Q, 3, 4M Alpha Kappa Psi; Sigma Beta Chi; publicity manager junior week-end; Order of the 0". ' "ht: anvmnmmwww-m cm 1 Sixiy-four .i ? W Pm , m ll. 1!; m :5ka ' W m M: "Mg: "?WMMM m dsmum-rmzrm H di UJJJWWM ' ; H! MI Alph M; s W ARV! g w .Ah Chigpmnsit , AMMkIgue. .71 ELIZABETH KESSI HARLAN Rlzetoric-Alpha Sigma; Emerald staff UM Oregana staff UH glee Club B, H; the Company. CARL KNUDSEN PORTLAND Business Administration-- Phi Gamma Delta; varsity baseball; Order of the KtO,,. EUGENE KELTY PORTLAND JournalismsBeta Theta Pi; Sigma Delta Chi; Emerald staff; Oregana staff. . CLAIRE KEENEY EUGENE DramasPhi Delta Theta; yell leader; Mask and Buskin; Friars. KAY LEEP MYRTLE POINT Business AdministrationsChi Psi. MARY D. LARGENT SILVERTON ZoologysZeta Rho Epsilon; Tre Nu; intramural baseball. EARL LESLIE COQUILLE Business HdministrationsSigma Chi; varsity football; baseball; Order of the HON Friars; Alpha Kappa Psi; Beta Alpha Psi. GLADYS M. LUPHER EUGENE Chemistry - Oregon C l u b; Chemistss club. sm$u.mum. sm"wsw raauwgr ,, , ugvmww RAYMOND LAWRENCE WOODBURN Journalisvaelta Tau Delta; Sigma Delta Chi; Emerald stafiE U, 2H Ore- gana staH s2, 3s ; Greater Oregon com- mittee, chairman 0H. RUTH LANE EUGENE Business AdministrationnDclta Zeta; Eutaxian; secretary social service club; director Chamber of Commerce; class tennis team UM Y. W. C. A. cabinet 9, 3, H; Phi Theta Kappa. FRED LORENZ COQUILLE Business Hdministrationn-Beta Theta Pi. WAYNE LAIRD CRESWELL Business Administration-Kappa Sig- ma; basketball UM baseball Uh To- Ko-Lo; interfraternity council; Y. M. C. A. friendship council U, 2, 3s ; track manager QL ELSIE LAWRENCE MEDFORD BatteriologynPi Beta Phi; woman's league, vice-president OH ; Y. W. C. A. cabinet UH; Samara; associate member Condon club. MARCUS LORENZO LATHAM SILVERTON Business Administrations? h i D e 1 t a Theta; Friars; To-Ko-Lo; Order of the HO"; frosh basketball us ; varsity bas- ketball s2, 3, 40; executive council H, M; captain R. O. T. C. BARKLEY LOUGHLIN PORTLAND Business Administration-Kappa Sig- ma; Alpha Kappa Psi; frosh football Uh varsity football 8, AH; Order of the HO". FORREST: LITTLEFIELD PORTLAND Lanc-Slgma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Delta P111; Oregana manager UL Sixty-six :YY W Emmi! mu AlliniMu-Bm m, WYAYRD Cum; Mainm- WY; :Wdl Y1Y;mebaYYlYY.YY'Yr C mmixy counul; Y Y Y LMMMJYIH YYY' Ym . YZY OLE LIEN PORTLAND Education. HAR'OLD LEE ' NEWBERG HistoryWChi Psi. AVOCA S. MCMINIS MCMINNVILLE LatinWSusan Campbell Hall; entered from McMinnville college senior year. HOWARD MCCULLOCK PORTLAND Larw-Beta Theta Pi. MRS. R. V. MCDOUGLE EUGENE Sociology-Kappa Alpha Theta; Phi Theta Kappa. GLENN MCGONEGAL WOODBURN Fine Arts-Chi Psi. M. LUCILLE MURTON PORTLAND English Literature-Delta Delta Delta; entered as a senior from Reed college; Mu Phi Epsilon. DONALD MCDONALD, SEATTLE, VVA-SH. LanWBeta Theta Pi; Phi Delta Phi; Sigma Upsilon. Sixty-se-ven RUTH MELLINGER NEWBERG Hixtory Susan Campbell Hall. DOROTHY MILLER ' MEDFORD P11 y s i t al Edutation-Kappa Kappa Gamma; Hermian club; class baseball QL MYRTLE MAG'ERLE ROGUE RIVER Pllysz'ral Edwation-Oregon club; Her- mian club; class baseball U, 2, D; class basketball U, 2M student volun- teer. ELIZABETH MELIS MIST Dramati65 Entered as sophomore from University of Washington; intramural debate BM intramural debate council Uh Zeta Kappa Psi; the Company; Spanish club. DOROTHY DALE MANVILLE PORTLAND Romance Language5 K a p p a Alpha Theta; French club Q, 3, 4H; vice- president QM Eutaxian Q, U ; Histor- ian staff 8, M. RONALD MCINTOSH PORTLAND Zoology-Bachelordon. M. ELSIE MARSH MARKAPUR, SOUTH INDIA Botany and Bacteriology-Orchestra 0, 2M Y. W. C. A. cabinet CH; Samara; Y. W. C. A. Boostefs club QL HOPE MACKENZIE PORTLAND Psytlzology- Kappa Alpha Theta; Var- sity swimming team U, 30 ; Hawthorne club. Sixty-eiglzt MAGERLE Rm lid ElltlliM-Ortgun Em: ' . tllsslmelnllu":1 "M U; 2? StudtmmL ETH MELIS Va nditt-Emued as sophomore iron ' 'V of Wishingmn; intramurzi UV, intramural dcbatcmm Zm Kipp: Psi; the fomp Ly dub VVILIE xoTHY DALEM ML pm; W . w WCFKIEPP P3 'er mm M4: Cy, HEN rmf' m: Wm V "3' II ,1. 61w deTOSH W lordon WW Ta h timm lul $me my $10 LcabinfC; :zr Y. . .. W .Vl' . 1 1E W , M3052; AlPh: TM wwggnzmwu' ' 5' d7 BERNICE JEAN MACKENZIE SALEM LatinCOregon club; Y. W. C. A. cab- inet V3, 4V. C. CARL MYERS EUGENE Business AdministrationCBeta Gamma Sigma; Beta Alpha Psi; Alpha Kappa Psi; Chamber of Commerce. OLA M. MCDERMOTT EUGENE EducationCOregon club. JOHN MATHESON POWELL RIVER Business Administration-Sigma Nu. FRANK MILLER ALBANY CommerCeCBeta Theta Pi. MURIEL MCKINLAY SALEM English LiteratureCHendricks Hall. FRENCH MOORE EUGENE ZoologyCSigma Nu. MAPLE DELL MOORE WILBUR RlzetoricCEntered as junior from O. A. C. Sixty-nine KATHERINE H. MORSE OLYMPIA, WASH. Matlzematics-Susan Campbell Hall; Pi Lambda Theta; Spanish club. DOROTHY MCGUIRE PORTLAND E 71 g 1 i 5 11 Literature - Kappa Alpha Theta. HELEN COFFEY MANNING, PORTLAND Journalism-Kappa Alpha Theta; glee club 51, 2, 35; manager 535; Emerald staff 51, 2, 35; editor 1920 Oregana; Theta Sigma Phi. CARL NEWBURY MEDFORD Business Administration-Sigma Nu; Alpha Kappa Psi; Phi Mu Alpha; glee club 53, 45 ; student council 525; presi- dent University Co-Op.; director Uni- versity Chamber of Commerce; presi- dent class 535; assistant manager foot- ball 525. ILA NICHOLS HOOD RIVER Commerce-Alpha Phi; Kwama; Phi Theta Kappa; Eutaxian; trustee Uni- 1:355 Mill versity Chamber of Commerce 535 ; sec- E'WHMIHIHIH; retary 545. 11.. HWM; HELEN NELSON PENDLETON 5555mm Busineu Administration2Gamma Phi "pgww 5 Beta; Kwama; Phi Theta Kappa; wo- 5' 54! 5; 55; man,s Order of the HO35; secretary of . mlyh class 525; varsity basketball 535; var- sity swimming 525 ; class basketball 53, 45; class swimming 51, 2, 35; captain Varsity swimming 525 ; woman,s league executive council 54-5 ; woman5s athletic association executive c o u n cil 525 ; Greater Oregon committee 51, 2, 35; Historian committee 525; Y. W. C. A. Booster club 525. MARGARET NELSON PORTLAND Dram a. GEORGINA PERKINS GARDINER History-Hendricks Hall. Sewnty DONALD H. PORTVVOOD, MONMOUTH Business Administratiorz Delta Tau Delta; To-Ko-Lo; Order of the HO"; Varsity track. . lkcm; ll'lld ha" PMS: 1h; REM DORIS E. PITTENGER PORTLAND N Drama and Speech Arts-Kappa Kappa Gamma; Zeta Kappa Psi; Mask and Buskin; assistant Historian UM the 6311 . Company B, 4L WW EWKEEG'W $ . . EMS umiggwtw IVAN PHIPPS ASHLAND '.d.ml9300rqz:g Larw De1ta Theta Phi. , MARGARET PHELPS PENDLETON INEWBCIY MEET MusiC-Kappa Alpha Theta; glee club him: JWdiOI-Sigmzx: U, 2', 3s ; orIChest-ra U, 2., 3, AH ; Oregon Ahmmnmnl mp: Musxc counc1l; lee-pr?51dent class WU ; Hummmmipg Kwama; Mu Phl EpSIIOn. h Flimsy Mp; dim E- Iaiy GM of Comment: :25? duda- Uhlnimmsufw DELMER L. POWERS PALOUSE, WASH. um Geology To-Ko-L0; freshman .fqot- ball; member geological and mlmng society. mums W MPMWW? , ,. . Camr- HWI; EMILE A. PERRX PORFLAND mm; mm W English Literature Hendricks H a l 1; WMMWMN Scroll and Script; Pi Lambda Theta; mm Pot and Quill; secretary of class OH; Oregana staff OH; head of track QM head of basketball OH ; class basketball V mm H, 2, i, 4;;11c1sass baieball s2, bM; g , V; varsity ase a 1, 2,4 ; varsity as- WWWWFWTV ketball Q, 4N intramural debate UM giant ' IEEEW Spanish club; Sigma Delta Pi. 1' f 'i'm .35 0rd" 0. M51111: 'vi mum ttblllf wsbslhdmfagmw WILLIAM PORTER W ALKER ?;"memmw Business rfdminislratio71 Kappa Theta t ; . W .3 ,n'siw Chi. VW!"W1 w: "33.1w am 510""?an 0m MAW E. OLETTA PEDERSEN , Mmt" PETALUMA, CAL. W" m. Latw-Susan Campbell Hall; entered as dd, junior from Stanford University; Cal- TN ifornia club; class basketball B, 4M , W" class baseball Uh varsity basketball 1'wa UM captain HM varsity baseball 8, WGARE ' 4L Dfl'l' 6W Sewcniy-one 3W 1 D'la :3, 9;; SH . . mil" w. W ,W WILLIAM B. PURDY EUGENE Edumti071 Class treasurer UM fresh- man track squad; varsity track squad HM secretary Y. M. C. A. UH. DWIGHT PARR VVOODBURN Business dmi7zi5trati0n Delta Tau Delta. STERLING PATTERSON PENDLETON Pre-Engineering-Beta Theta Pi. AUDREY ROBERTS MEDFORD Englixlz Literature-Pi Beta Phi. FRANCIS QUISENBERRY EUGENE CMM Journalism Emerald U, 2, D. ..,al-thdriil Han; daS:Y.W.CA. stza'mmumil H, 0; 42:2 auxin mm? B, ARNE G. RAE OREGON CITY Journalism-Friendly Hall; Craftsman club; University Ad club; Emerald staff UH. HELEN ROSE SALEM R o m a 716 e Lmzyuages-Kappa Kappa Gamma; entered as junior from Will- amette University; Mask and Buskin. DONALD RANDALL SALEM Larw-Kappa Sigma; Delta Theta Phi. Seventy-tcwo MY ROBERTS Minn: W Limam-Pi Beta Phi. MVCISOUISENBERRY Errasw Wham 1,2,3 VELMA RUPERT EUGENE Journalism-Alpha Delta Pi; Theta Sigma Phi; Emerald staff U, 2M as- sistant news editor UM Oregana staff 0, 2M associate editor Oregana By WILLIAM REINHART SALEM Buxiness fldministration-Sigma Chi; Friars; Order of the H0,2 varsity foot- ball; varsity basketball; varsity base- ball. FLORENCE RIDDLE GRANTS PASS Delta Delta Delta; Kwama; secretary VVomaNs athletic association QM Y. W. C. A. cabinet CD; varsity tennis squad 8 ; varsity debating squad UM Hawthorne club. WILLIAM RIALSTON PORTLAND wa-Phi Gamma Delta; Phi Delta Phi. ELLA B. RAVVLINGS CORVALLIS Physical Edutation Hendricks Hall; Tre Nu; Hermian club; Y. W. C. A. cabinet QM student council 8, 4M Woman,s League executive council 0, 4H; president OH. CECIL F. ROBE WESTON Latin. IVIARGARET RUSSELL, TACOMA, VVASH. Physical Eduration-Hendricks Hall; Woman's athletic association, vice-pres- ident BM president OH; Hermian club; class basketball Uh class swim- ming team U, 2, 3, M ; executive coun- cil Womaws League OH ; Oregana staff L70. ROSCOE ROBERTS THE DALLES Mathemati65 Phi Delta Theta. Sewenty-tlzree FLORENCE SKINNER, EMMETT, IDAHO Journalism-Susan Campbell Hall; Emerald staff; Oregana staff. jAMES C. SAY SHERWOOD Business Administration-Kappa Theta Chi; Alpha Kappa Psi; student council OH ; freshman baseball; trustee Univer- sity Chamber of Commerce Us, 4L HELEN STRAUSER PORTLAND Education-Chi Omega. ELEANOR SPALL PORTLAND Sociology--Kappa Kappa Gamma; Kwama; Theta Sigma Phi; Tre Nu; Y. W. C. A. cabinet s2, 3N president 0H; Emerald staff UM Oregana staff s2, 3H delegate to DesMoines conven- tlon. FLOYD SHIELDS CAPE HORN, WASH. Business Administrations-Kappa Sig- ma; varsity baseball squad s2, 3s ; var- sity football squad BM varsity foot- ball 0H. GRACE SNOOK OREGON CITY Physical EdurationsHendricks Hall; entered as senior; Hermian club. KENNETH SMITH PORTLAND Pre-Medirs-Frosh tennis; varsity ten- nis s2, 3, H; captain tennis H, H; Order of the "ON chairman minor athletics committee OH. RICHARD SUNDELEAF PORTLAND Arclziterture-Kappa Sigma; Texon; architecture club; sculpture club; stud- ent art league; To-Ko-Lo; interfratern- ity council; varsity football squad us ; varsity soccer 8, 4H frosh track cap- tain UM varsity track s2, 3, AH; Order of the ssOs'. Seventy-fom' MARGARET LUCKE SIMONTON , VVENDELL, IDAHO h Political SciencesDelta Delta Delta; QM transfer Stanford fall term 1921. EMERALD F. SLOAN, CENTRALIA, WASH. Chemistry Oreg0n club; major R. O. T. C. battalion; Chemistss club; fresh- man track team; varsity track team PETA? sZL 4mm SPAU, PEIN . smhxupwmm GENEVA MARIE STEBNO EUGENE Km;nm5igmlPhi;TreX.: English Literature-Gamma Phi Beta. Y. W. c A nbinet t; n; pmlfr: tmhnldmuuom 1 nibbkgmtollmioinmuv :i i: HUBERT G. SCHENCK EUGENE Geology Condon c l u b; Craftsman g. club; Spanish club. r'DSHlPlDS CmHaWi mm Alliuwin '2. ., 1W! hid?!" squid W111i, 4. . 'W! squid m; rszib' ;7 m. HAZEL SEELEY INDEPENDENCE : Rlzetoric Alpha Chi Omega. HARRY SKYRMAN CENTRAL POINT Larw Phi Delta Phi. 1 w; wwkgmh tcnlll5' Eng : s . m , . 5?. hralweffmw THOMAS STRACHAN . DUFUR 1 I' Hf d". in. Business fldministration-P h i D e 1 t a i W. Wm" Theta; varsity football; Order of the E ml: MOH- ; mam? Hair RICHARD S;K1PP'I3gncub-:, . I l, JW'Mdub.i"thttfgu, BARTON SHERK KEwaxcx warm WWW? - Business z4dministration--Sigma Nu. d'" wifms i W wwwwger 0.4 u?! $3ka Srvwnly-fim' MAX SHAFER MADISON, WISCONSIN Business Administration-Sigma Nu. GRACE TIGARD TIGARD Plzysiral Eduratirm- Hendricks Hall; Y. W. C. A. president OH ; cabinet UH; Hermian club; executive council Wom- an s League UH; class basketball UH. J. CLIFTON TUCKER PHILOMATH Education Oreg0n Club; Phi Delta Kappa. JESSIE O. TODD EUGENE Plzysiral Eduration-Oregon club; Zeta Kappa Psi; Tre Nu; Hermian club; Y. W. C. A. cabinet 6, 4H; varsitv debate QL ,SEIES GumPn MARIAN TAYLOR EUGENE ..;:m;yaln;w Dramati65 De1ta Gamma; University , ' Company Q, 3M Mask and Buskin; Phi Theta Kappa; Scroll and Script; senior play 1921; the Country Cousin 1922. rumxm Sum ,:3!!:15.4er34 RALPH TAYLOR ALBANY Pre-Medics-Chi Psi. EULALIA TITUS MCMINNVILLE .Grqek Alpha Delta Pi; entered as a jumor from McMinnville college. ROY VEATCH EUGENE Economics President Y. M. C. A. My Sewenty-six 2No.mnn m: 2. H mm club; Zr: ..... FLORENCE VAN METER EUGENE Pre-Medzcs2Delta Zeta; entered from Umversity of Iowa senior year. BIRCHARD A. VAN LOAN, MONMOUTH Pre-IVIrdivs-Friendly Hall; Craftsman club. v EMILY VEAZIE PORTLAND English Literature - Hendricks Hall; Scroll and Script; Eutaxian; Y.VV.C.A. secretary; Zeta Kappa Psi; Pot and Quill. CHARLES A. VAN ZILE MARSHFIELD Accounting -- Beta A I p h a Psi; Beta Gamma Sigma. EARILE VOORHIES GRANTS PASS Journalism-Friendly Hall; Emerald staff ML VVALTER R. VVEGNER SUTHERLIN Business A!dmi71istrati0n2Friendly Hall. GLENN VVALKLEY EUGENE Geology-Oregon club; Order of the HO"; track 0, 2, 3, H; captain B, 4H; cross country 22, 32; athletic council 82; track committee OH; Chemisfs club; Condon club. FORD VVILSON SALEM Clzemislry2Chemist2s club. Seventy-smven ARTHUR F. XVICKS NORTH POWDER Bmineu Hdministration. JANET WEST PORTLAND Romanre Languages G a m m a P h i Beta; secretary Washington club; His- torian committee UL NORTON WINNARD EUGENE Zoology-Vice-president A. S. U. 0.; varsity wrestling; executive council; student council. MARIAN E. WHITE EUGENE History-Oregon club; entered from North Dakota normal school as junior. BURDEN WOOD WOODLAND, CAL. Larw Phi Delta Theta; Torch and Shield; Oregon Law club; Phi Delta Phi; interfraternity council UM pres- ident law school student body OH. ADELAIDE H. WHITE EUGENE English Literature Zeta Kappa Psi. GRANT WILLIAMS FAYETTE, IDAHO Larw Delta Theta Phi. OLGA WIKBERG SALEM Edzu ati0n-Susan Campbell Hill. Smmnly-riglz! 1x Pm! 12M": Hi 22m ill Ci- hiw; H d 3'in hp fjfi; Y W. C L ' W13! Akin -m hd um m nau- u uw' HORACE XVESTERFIELD MCLVIINNVILLE Business x1dminislralion-sFriendly Hall. KATHARINE WILSON PORTLAND Rlzrtorit'wGamma Phi Beta. FRANCIS T. WADE, XVAITSBURG, WHSH. Larw-Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Delta Phi; Craftsman; entered as senior from Pacific University. LAXVRENCE XVOODXVORTH PENDLETON Business Administration-Beta Theta Pi. LELAINE WEST PORTLAND Romance Languages-G a m m a P h i Beta; entered as sophomore from Uni- versity of Washington; Scroll and Script; Pi Lambda Theta; Zeta Kappa Psi; Sigma Delta Pi; Y. W. C. A. cabinet; Spanish club; vice-president W'ashington club. JOHN YETTER EUGENE Businrss .4dministrali0n. CHESTER G. ZUMVVALT NEWBERG Business HdministrationsAlpha Tau Omega; Beta Gamma Sigma; Beta Alpha Psi; University Ad club. EI'NICE ZIMMERMAN EUGENE Fine xlrts-Delta Zeta; Sculpture club; Allied Arts league; French club; Em- erald staff. Se-vmzty-nine SYLVESTER BURLEIGH ENTERPRISE Larw-Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Delta Phi. . RUTH M. FLEGAL EUGENE Zoology-VVomeWs league executive board 2 ; class basketball U, m ; head of womenk basketball QM student delegate to DesMoines convention QM student council 8 ; Y .W. C. A. cab- inet Q, 3M Kwama; Tre Nu. WILLIAM J. YUNKER PORTLAND Business zqdministration-Oregon club. GERALDINE PILKINGTON PORTLAND Education-Kappa Alpha Theta. HUGO A. REED ASTORIA Clzemistry Kappa Delta Phi; Chemisfs club. IRENE COMPTON BOISE, IDAHO Eduration-Alpha Delta Pi. LOIS W. MORTHLAND EUGENE Romance Languages-French club; Eu- taxian. HELEN WILLIAMS EUGENE Fine Hrts. m: " Mb fhii; D . wt? 0' M; w Efif x'I w GEORGE BREXVSTER SISTERS Larw. GENEVIEVE TILLOTSON TYGH V ALLEY Jlatlwmatim Hendricks Hall; entered as a junior from State Normal school. ELSTUN IRELAND HOOD RIVER Emnamirs-Kappa Sigma. HELEN HOOPER EUGENE Rommzre Lalzgztage5 Delta Gamma; Zeta Kappa Psi; California club. PAUL COOK EUGENE Grology. DOROTHEA BOYNTON EUGENE Psyrlmlagy Alpha Chi Omega; Kwama IZLSIE HILDEBRAND EUGENE PllysiKal Edufation-Zeta Rho Epsilon; 'I're Nu; Hermian club; Zeta Kappa Psi; intramural debate Q, 3M intra- mural basketball BL MARVEL SKEELS CO0UILLE 311151'1 131 Beta Phi; Mu Phi Epsilon; Kwama; Pi Lambda Theta; glee club; class secretary UM Gerlinger cup. EigllIy-one . .9... MMMM 7 1W f k M NRA VERA HENDERSON PORTLAND English Literature-Hendricks Hall. MARY ALTA KELLY PORTLAND A4rt-Delta Gamma; Texon. WANNA MCKINNEY, SAN PEDRO, CAL. J01trnali5m Alpha Chi Omega; senior woman, executive council of student body; editor Oregana UM Emerald staff U, 2, 3, M; daily news editor, Emerald OH; editor Womads league QM Theta Sigma Phi; California club; class swimming U, 3, M; French club. HELEN DOUGHERTY, SAN JOSE, CAL. Engli511 De1ta Gamma; Theta Sigma Phi; Hammer and CofEn honorary member; California club. Eigltty-trwo . .Su Pmms . 4X . aChIOme m omsn, gxecunve council of m. mg, cdxiora Oregana U1; E1113; til. .. 3, H5 daily news edi': U Drad HI; ngmr Woman's in .l, Theta .51ng Phi; faliforil; c ub; class smmming H. 3, 41- hrs: club. I a HELEN DOl'GHERTY, 5351mm Englisb-Dclta Gamma; Them Sig. Phi; Hammer and Coffin hmmzq member; California club. HARRY A. SMITH EUGENE JournalismsSigma Delta Chi; Ye Tabard Inn of Sigma Upsilon; Ham- mer and Coffin; Friars; Emerald staff U, 2s ; managing editor Emerald CH; editor PH; Oregana staff s2, 3, H; associate editor Lemon Punch UH; editor student handbook BM student council 0H. JAY C. ALLEN JR. SEATTLE, VVASH. Journalism-Lambda Chi Alpha; Sig- ma Delta Chi; transfer from VVash- ington State senior year. DELL HINSON SPRINGFIELD Arclziterture. LYN DON MYERS Larw. ERNEST ROSEN PORTLAND English Literature. JEAN STRACHAN DUFUR Journalism-Theta Sigma Phi; Emer- ald staff M, H; Spanish club. VVINONA STONE EUGENE English. CORWIN SEITZ English. DARLE SEYMOUR EUGENE ' Business Hdmim'stration. JOSEPH TORBET SPRINGFIELD Education. LEAH WAGNER VVILSONVILLE EdwationsAlpha Chi Omega. F. T. WEBB EUGENE Business Administration. IIUNAH XVALLACE, SAN SIMON, ARIz. Chemistry. ARNOLD ANDERSON, SAN JOSE, CAL. Journalism. GUY ARMANTROUT, MONETTE, ARK. Geology. PAUL BOWEN FORD, WASH. History. ' - ARTH UR BRAMLY Plzysiss. MARGARET EVANS EUGENE History. MRS. ARTHUR ELY German. EUNICE EGGLESON JOSEPH MusirsAlpha Chi Omega. THOMAS ESTACIO LA UNION, P. I. Aledicine. KARL GLOS PORTLAND LawsDelta Theta Phi. ROBERTA GIBSON, LONG BEACH, CAL. Edm'alion. JOHN JOHNSON EUGENE Eduration. MADALENE LOGAN MCMINNVILLE Journalism. PER'C Y LASSELLE PORTLAND Chemistry. IRA LEVVIS EUGENE Edufation. MARION MITCHELL PORTLAND Ameriran LiteraturesPi Beta Phi. TROY PHIPPS ASHLAND PllysiKs-Friendly H2111. EileIy-lllrm Jiiglzty-four war. .V...wi... V .w, ,.,.., .. . . - 7,, Eiglzty-zfrve The Gerlinger Cup THE fourth woman to receive the Gerlinger Cup, offered by Mrs. George T. Gerlinger, member of the Board of Regents, to the best all-around junior woman, is Nlarvel E. Skeels. Scholarship and student activities are considered in the awarding of the trophy, which is presented annually at the junior prom. Miss Skeels majors in music, has been active in the Girls, Glee Club and in the Oregon Music Council. In her junior year, she was secre- tary 0f the class. She is a member of Pi Beta Phi, Kwama, Mu Phi Epsi- lon and Pi Lambda Theta. Eiglzty-six The Koyl Cup THE Koyl Cup, which is offered by Charles W. Koyl t0 the best all- around junior man, was awarded to Remey Cox in 1921. The cup re- mains 0n the campus from year to year, and Cox is the eighth man to receive the award. He entered the University in 1918 and was elected frosh presi- dent. He Was a varsity debater during his sophomore and junior years; forensic manager, and president of Forum in his junior year. He is a mem- ber of Friendly Hall, Cross Roads, Phi Mu Alpha, and Tau Kappa Alpha, Eighty-Mwu WYATT SMITH MC VEIGH SIMPSON JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS THOMAS WYATT ............................................................ President HALLIE SMITH ........................................................ Vice President ELLEN MCVEIGH ............................................................ Secretary HAL SIMPSON ................................................................ Treasurer The Class of 1923 ROM the Squarest Mix in 1919, to the best junior week-end in 1922, the class of ,23 has been on top 0, the world. As freshmen, we surprised our staid 01d Alma Mater with our numbers and enthusiasm, besides being the first frosh Class after the close of the war. Even Daddy Straub pro- nounced us the best freshman class in history. The frosh glee was an event to be proud of-and our bonfire lighted the way to an Oregon victory at Homecoming. As sophomores, we did not fall far short from our original numbers and our enthusiasm was not in the least lessened. We sent strong men out for varsity football and did our share in other athletics. We maintained the standards set in our freshman year at the annual sophomore dance. Many of our numbers have survived the standards of achievement, and are with us as juniors. Forgetting the dignity that comes with the third college year, we threw aside our stateliness for one hilarious Junior Jazz Jinks. We still uphold our performance of the duties of uperclassmen-- with the Vision ever before us of greater service to the University and to the state. Eigllty-eiglzt , '8 1 z 11 1 11 1 1 ucmcn 5W :LASS OFFlCERS .................... President ................................... Vite Pmllm Suntan .......................................... Trmum of 1923 l ur numbers and en ., th 0 'ar Even DaddyStraupr fresh glee was an event ori inal 011mm men 0": l . 'i Sent Strong to the best junior weekend in 193.7, N the world. As freshmen. WC sulfa husiasm. belt MARIE ANDRESEN comes from Oregon City and itls all very well, for she needs lots of paper to send those lengthy volumes to 0. A. C. every day. GAYLE ACTON is out for an education and honors, and whatls more, she seems to be getting them. Gayle fairly revels in all the hard courses that the English department offers. JOHN W. ANDERSONeJohnny is an ex- 0. A. C. student who saw the light and came to Oregon to learn to be a cub reporter. When he is not chasing news for the Emerald, he slings a mean right in the lcello section of the orchestra. CAROL AKERSellAke" should go into the woolen mills business for his lifels work for his yarns cannot be excelled. We are reminded of the ancient but ap- propriate axiom, HWith all his faults we love him still-the stiller the better". GEORGE ADLER is one of the able assistants in the biology lab and once took French from uTimmie". Donlt forget, girls-u hels married. HELEN ADDISON majors in romance lan- guages but still finds time to make her- self useful around the WW bungalow. ASK CATHERINE ANDERSON about art and watch her blush. BERN ALTSTOCK oHiciates in the glee club and holds the VVomenls league money bag. Besides this she chums with every girl on the campus. Eiglzty-ninc RM; s3 h 35 it AULIS ANDERSON has the good cotnbination of blue eyes and yellow hair and a happy disposition. . ,a JUGGLING wheat and other; light wor.k 45" take up ROL ANDRES time when he is gt! home in Athena. At present he handles a basketball in handy style and is a good man on the varsity. .gk tt H X BY her walk you shall know her ill! There's a lot of fun and mischief hid- den behind ZOE AI,I,EN,S formal exterior, which all goes to prove that appear- ances surely are deceiving. MARGARET BEATIE-"Peggy" is what you "ii might call a capable sort of girl- g.g' always representative-and she comes from Oregon City, bringing llLotll with 54 her. CLARENCE BALDWIN heaved the sphere for 71! the freshmen last year with his bread 1' lib and butter hand and hence gained the atyp- distinction of uLeftyll. Having lived 15'"; in Hawaii at one time he knows all of WEIR the island dances and lately has been .p$. ' trying to co-operate with Shyls foot- L. l t ball team on the subject. t 1 JUNE BURGANeJune rhymes with moon- .. draw your own conclusions. VHF" V3331 tun. With VIRL BENNEHOFF is a law student who 31m majors in math and believes that any man who sits around a sorority fireplace should be awarded a congressional , medalethis i.s Benny. :iu l M MILDRED BROWN took a degree in music down in California and then she came up here to play for the Mu Phils and Pi Phils and to get another degree, sh this time in physical ed. n l f: Ninety When :Eeqp :01: 0th.: light wm "1 the When a buhetball h p tun: be hand'. man on th t in 1; Miemm BEAm-"Peggw is what n; might call a capable sort of gil- always representative-and she mm; from Oregon City, bringing "hit" ti": her. CLARENCE BAHJWIN heaved the sphere is: the freshmen last year Wlth hisbni: and butter hand and hence gamedliit distinction of hLefltf'. Having Ii: in Hawaii at one time be harsh; the island dances and W3. ii trying to co-operate. With y. , ball team on the subiect JIMMIE BAKER tries to live up to his name of thDocii by majoring in the medical department. It is easy to see that life treats him well by the smiles he wears above his collar. VVILHELMINA BECKSTED is another one of those enthusiastic art students. LUCILLE BRANSTETTER is another proof that gym majors are just like the rest of us. We wonder if Lucille learned to be such a good dancer in the gym department? BETWEEN education, letters, her work, and Lou, MARIAN BOETTCHER never has time to get acquainted With anyone. CECIL BELL has two common nicknames, HDing Dong" and "Liberty". The first is obvious, the second may require per- sonal explanation. ihDing" is an all- around man, as anyone who has ever followed his trail from Pendleton to Eugene would quickly learn. HALLIE BEAVER took a course in ground work in Hying last summer but the Ford bug didnit have wings so she is yet alive. Another summer may see her heart in the clouds again, however. THIS is the first of what KAY BALD ex- pects to be her three junior years. MERLE BOYEIUS chief recreation consists in perusing such light literature as Kester,s iiAccounting". He has even tried to express himself in HEspanol". Ninety-onc DID you ever see LAVELLE BARGER handle a bunch of kiddies in playground? Just stop in at the gym some Saturday morning then. MEREDITH BEAVERaHBevoyl, a gent wot comes from Ashland. He intends to major in medicine, get a degree, return to his village and buy out the local drug store tif anyl and eat up the candy stock. RUD BROWN acquired considerable repu- tation as a football player only to have it over-shadowed by his recent reputa- tion as a hero and hula dancer. JAMES BENEDICT intends to study medicine but as a side issue dabbles in contract- ing and building. His activities are centered it seems in one direction. WE would all bob our hair if we had MARY LOU BUR'rON's curls. thicially this eHicient young wonan answers to the name of Miss Burton; and she is mighty competent too, making the june iors proud to Claim her as one of their number. IRENE BARRETT comes from Albany. Al- bany is closer to Corvallis than to Eu- gene, which goes to show that Irene used the best of judgment in selecting an institution to grace with her presence. MAXINE BUREN comes to Oregon from Willamette. Shels little in size but she has a big voice that makes a lot of noise in the girls, glee club. GRETCHEN BROWN, more commonly known by the undignified name of llHooch," is another Willamette convert. She may be seen about any day taking the cross country run over to the music building where she accompanies some of Madame McGrewls aspiring young Galli-Curcis and McCormacks. Ninety-rrwo E . CEEDJH BEAVERthBe u ".198 from . a gem ,, a10H mtdicine ' elmmw . get a dim, M r "Y. store oif Uy 0"! th h; candy stOCk, a i and Cltupti RligttBROM acquired considerable rrv ' .on as a foatball piayeronlvmhj- It ovcr-shadowed by his remit nil: non as a hero and hula dancer. pun JAME; BENEDICT intends to study midid: but as a side issue dabbles incomm- ing and building. His activitiesa'a centered it seems in one direction. WE would all hob our hair if thiil Mm Lou BUkrox's curls. Uhaaa. this cihcicnt young wonan answersj the name of Miss Burtoni and He mighty competent too, mzhnguthieL iors proud to claim her as on.u ii number. , 1.- es from Albany ; . m , IRENE BARRETT co Corvallis than ml L. is closer to I w high: which goes. to Emil; :W e best 0 Ju . W usc'ilsiitution grace With her p an: FREEWATER sent us iiFRANdi BELLER, who for two years has played as guard on the varsity basketball team, and with his speed and temper has made even a losing game interesting. BILL BOLTON is the sorrel-thatched lad who caused so much commotion 0n the campus during his first year, on ac- count of the glaring difference between his hat and headgear. Bill has man- aged to slide through three years of medicine. GEORGE BLISS emigrated from California this year. "When I was in Cal.H is a favorite expresion of his opponents in word battles, but Georgeis good nature is hard to ruffle. XVE know nothing against MORRIS BO- COCK outside of the fact that he was once in the marines. Despite this han- dicap he retained his good looks HORACE BYLER is the manager of Alex- anderis Rag Time Band. The part of his time not taken with his managerial duties is spent on the track and foot- ball field. DON BENNETT looks meek and quiet but he is generally responsible for that mu- sical noise at the Sigma Chi house . EUGENE BOWEN-HHankii is a home pro- duct, both literally and figuratively speaking, still thinks that Eugene high school is the best in the state; other- wise a darn good man. DOROTHY BYLER rame up from California to look after her little brother, Horace. Nilzety-tlzret RUBY BAUGH is the Zeta Rho's proudest bet. The way she manhandles the fresh is an envy of even the best of us. JOHN BRADDOCK, HDoc." But if he ever gets to be a doctor itill be because M. D. degrees are handed out with each and every package of Arm and Ham- mer brand of baking soda. No one in the university knows what his major is, but that,s a small matter anyway. THIS reserved looking gent is RAYMOND BOYER. We cannot say much about Ray, but we feel a lot. Riay can determine your expenditures before you even re- ceive your allowance. We believe in Ray, we know he will get there. MARGARET CARTER is one of those people who star in Mr. Thachefs short story classes. We think she aspires to be a writer some day and weill say her fu- ture looks promising. CLIFFORD CARLSON, better known as hKernalji likes to get at the heart of things, especially that of the women. Some day the Kernal is going to be a Heart specialist. Not Law-Medicine. nRED" CRAM is a journalist of experience and therefore capable of critical com- parison of the Lemon Punch and the Orange Owl. Lenore is a K. A. T. PRINCE iiPRINK" CALLISON, six-foot plus of rock and iron linesman. An asset to most any team, as Harvard once found. DOROTHY CONDON is interesting because she always does the unexpected. Her French is the pride of Timmy,s heart. NinMy-four Tilitii"t'v'il mm W is l" . annot say much aim? but we feel a lot. Ray catdtir yottr expenditures befor: tot til ceivc your allowance. Wehtlit: Ray, we know he will get than M ARGARET CARTER is one of those ;; who star in Mr. Thatcher's stony classes. We think slit aspirati- writer some day and well sat ts:- lure looks promising. Curmm CAtusos, better ltte'tt "Kcrnal," likes to get at the t; things, especially that of H .. Some day the, -. x1. Heart specmst. NotLtw t Kernal is gomgltim DOLORES CATLOW deserted us last term and from her always happy countenance and friendly ilhello" she is glad she is back again. MARGARET CASAD is one of those girls who fits the adage, uStill water runs deep? Margaret doesnlt make very much noise but she certainly knows how to make good grades. The uscandal sheet" proves it. JACK CAPELL was such a bashful boy when he came into our midst. Time brings changes, and Jack has had his share. TAKE a good look at TOM, it is a real op- portunity to see a Merry Christmas. lVVe realize the accepted status of puns, but we couldn,t resistJ BEULAH CLARK and her flute have be- come well known on the Oregon cam- pus. But Beulah will be one of the deserters 0f the class next year for she is going to New York to continue her musical studies for concert work. HE'S pretty quiet, that CHARLIE CHICK, but they say some of his parties would be worth a column in the Portland News if some ambitious reporter could get an interview. EARL COBURN has no fear for anything, but he says: UOnly a cowardly pair of legs would stand and see a manls body beat up? So "Earley" he will be on the Track. DORCAS CONKLIN, after spending two years at the Normal, decided to come to a regular school. When she isnlt around the Physical Ed. Building, youlll find her on the tennis court. NinNy-M'p WE know what happened to the scandal sheet-the profhs ran out of Its after they had given MARION .CRARY her grades. And she has as blg a corner on good times as she has on grades, from what we have observed. DOROTHY CUSHMAN makes a cinder path out of Hello Lane, hurrying back and forth between Villard and the library. DOROTHY CASH majors in English Lit, but spends a lot of time at the Art building. Dorothy isn,t Irish, but you hear a lot about Mickey from her. OWEN CALLAWAY is Y prexy and mem- ber of the Lemon Punch staff-a queer combination, we,11 admit. UDocH CLARK hails from Idaho where there is a demand for watermelons and he sure can sell hem. He likes the lo- cation of Susan Campbell hall. SPEED CULBERTSON swings a uwicked mitth in the boxing ring. His activity might be likened to the army tanksh he,s not a speed demon, but hes absolutely sure. LIKE young Lochinvar who came out of the west, on all the wide campus her steed is the best. But MARGARET CLARK really can ride. DOROTHY CHAUSSE is an ambitious junior who teaches once in a while at Eugene high. She doesn't always go to as- sembly because she has to wait for the mail man. Ninety-six jors in English ll, but spends a lot of time at l: ls :uIldmg. Dorothy isn't Irish, but i car a lot about Mickey from lei" OWEN CALLAWAY is Y prexy and me: her of the Lemon Punch staff-a quit: combination, we'll admit. "DOC" CLARK hails from Idaho wlers there is a demand for waterpelans 1;: he sure can sell lem. llel1lestlt:: cation of Susan Campbell hall. 3 Speed e , who came 0H; Loc . c FUN: LXKE yoi'sig on allt lllllm am e w , ti . tsliced is the hast. B really can n e. " giulls' ' mbmau w an ' KEUE' US$515. 11H Damm- Cut once in whs g0 l I, Who 1mm 0 ll.t alwaiwtillom sto hlg'lilvlswtsausese a scm , mail man. WHEN iiRUSTY" COUCH isnlt playing bas- ketball he is keeping the street cars busy between the A. T. O. house and Springfield. He carries a 1 average in both subjects. HELEN COOPER Hdidnlt tell a souP, until one night someone let the cat out of the bag. She lfessed up then, but still blushes whenever anyone mentions Hen- gaged girls." To be an actress has been the day dream of every flapper, and LORNA COOLIDGE hopes to enjoy the thrill of the realiza- tion of such a dream. LIFE with GLENN CAMPBELL is just one darned lab after another. He has helped tear up the football field rather consistently, too, and the knowledge of human anatomy gained by trying to tear the opposition to pieces should come in handy at medical school next year. KNOWING about things artistic comes in very handy, we are told, when one wants to Ex up a cozy little home. Now we arenit attempting to create any gos- sip, but we bet that the time which JOSEPHINE CROXALL puts in at the art building will not have been used in vain. VIRGIL CAMERON threatens to become a M. D. some day, the main reason being that he has no intention of becoming a D. D. ALICE CURTIS is taking a short course in agriculture at present, but we hope for her return in the fall. IF you ever want to find HELEN CLARK it will be an easy task. Just drop in at the swimming tank and youlll Find her in the stellar role of life guard. Ninety-M-ven MARGARET CUNDY is another reason why the Delta Gammas get their moneyls worth out of their telephone. In call- ing 125 the chances are just about 1 to 5 that the line isnlt busy, and Margaret does her share of warming the receiver at the D. G. end of the line. VERNON DUNCAN is studying to be a preacher, and welll say hels surely "got the gift of gab? RITA DURKHEIMER divides her time be- tween the Education, Music and So- ciology buildings. She is one of the people who travel in the student class. ESTHER DENNIS may present a rather quiet exterior, but ttyou canlt judge a book-ll FROM present indication, we doubt that CECILE DEVORE will help young hope- fuls along the flowery path of knowl- edge for very long. YOU always know when HELEN DAY is around, for she loves to tease. Be- cause she lives here in Eugene we were able to get all the dope on her. In spite of her active nature, she has been seen quiet and pensive on several oc- casions. JOURNALISM, chemistry and other related subjects have interested LOYE DEVORE from time to time, but like many an- other girl, household arts will probably win out in the end. ANABEL DENN plays around the music building and never seems to have to worry about the HRising standards of the University." Ninrty-piglll ft to h It! ' '3 teph Sunni CcWest t""" i ' . e E31. douh etillmilsn'tb junabwtli Rm DURKHEIMER divides her time -' . e ucation Music I i mlogy buildings. Si and e is on: ' WPIC who rm 0! cl m the studem ch ESTHER DENt'Is may present a mi: qmet exterior, but "you can't judga; book-" Flou present indication1 we daUhI sir CECIL! DEVORE will help youngbatr fuls along the Howcry path of m edge for very long. i n t. YOU always know Whtll HiLHWDtEiV around, for she lovesEto SW ' in "g9 ' SC Silt lives here 11 t MARGARET DUNIWAY spends most of her spare moments over in the journalism shack, playing important communica- tions on the typewriter. Cub reporter? Oh, no. Sheis Dean Allen,s secretary. HERBERT J. DARBY-ttjunkh hails to us from the Cherry City, where he still sends his laundry each week. He claims that many a man has made a fortune of? his middle name, why not me? MASON DILLARHiiMase.,, has a canoe, which, on balmy nights is not to be found in the shed; is also missing on nights not so balmy. HAROLD DEDMANeiiHal." One of the Delt gold dust twins. Where thereis Bevo therefs Hal. They sleep ensemble and every morn at seven there ensues a heated argument as to priority of rising. RALPH P. DODDRIDGE. Ralph has just re- turned from a year,s sojourn in Texas. He proved an apt pupil to Southern conditions, and came back with a work- ing vocabulary of Southern dialect. His mind is supposed to be occupied with business administration, but the dreamy expression in his eyes leads us to believe that some "Senoritah causes him more worry than accounting. RICHARD DIXONeDiCk made the trip to Honolulu with the team as tiwater" boy, but was not kept very busy. He's a Gamma Phi brother, but that isn,t the only reason he hangs around there. FRED DUNN-Fred is a local product, but donit hold that against Eugene. He is one of the proprietors of Dunn Bros. Potato Restaurant, otherwise known as the Phi Delt house. JESS DIGMAN is generally known as iiTony," because of his olive drab com- plexion. He is most interested in his books and pursuits of higher education. Ai- most any night you can find him pouring over some diHicult looking vol- ume, but he finds a little time to step out now and then amongst the fair co-eds. Niner-ninr llGLADY" EMISON left us and went to California for a visit. She also left Bennie a HBachelor"--but shels cominl back. tAsk no questionsJ UP where HACE" EGGLESON lives the cows still fall out of the pastures. This condition will be remedied, he says, by moving the rest of the world nearer to Enterprise. THIS dreamy-looking damsel is LUCILE ELROD, known as ttCully" around the Alpha Phi house. BY rights HARRY ELLIS doesnlt belong in here because he has been just marking time since last year, having been ab- sent in the interim. He hears more gossip around the library than a coun- try postmaster does around the cracker barrel. Harry is one of the biggest assets the library has when it comes to getting books into circulation. IN the capacity of Dean Foxls private secretary, RUTH ENGSTROM should be well qualified after graduation to teach the youthful mind to shoot the right way. Just now shels practicing on the Kappas. NELSON ENGLISHeA great believer that white vaseline, when taken internally, is good for the voice. His Scottish in- stincts will make him a good lawyer some day. MAURICE EBEN is the big, brawny presi- dent of the menls glee club. He has a deep, bass voice and is going to be a lawyer some time in the near future. ONE can End ttPith EPPING behind the soda fountain at the Campa Shoppe most any time. He maintains a doubt- ful reputation in society circles in the prlmltive metropolis of Hood River, and, from all appearances, he is main- taining the same status here. His major is geology, however, so he may get down to bed-rock sooner or later. 021p lnmdrml m d'm'Hoohin t , known asgucda" '1 li llig Alpha Phi house V aroma BY "Elm HM" ELLIS docm'tbdm . R hymns: hc has been justhih: time twee last year, havingbmg: lem- tn the interim. Ht hearse: golp around the library ham:- try postmaster docs around hum: barrel. Harry is one of the the; am: the library has when it 60th getting books into circulation. IN the capacity of Dean Fox's pnit: mum, Rm Emoishout: well qualified afttr graduaaonmtt: the youthful mind to shotthtn; way. just now she's practicing 01 .: Kappa. hrlittttt: , K ENGLISH-A great . 333th vascline, when talingllihnt. ' for the VOlCt. is hit :25: will make him a good I. soul: day. .- bi brawn?p Mtuucl Em lsyth'mghb. Hell? h' femts .'Ioll' den! 0 . dlsgomg volt! futility dc: bass . - meant I P." 50""th aw! , . bfhlhllh ." PPM 'ff nPH'G E 35th n lle 'n 2! the. amps 3 Mil loanialc He malntllr: F in 5? n tlm '. 'ctya . '"u' ful rclpuylation lbgof Rt, , o priminve m'" a d from same 051 C3 ,oda most grim 1x" fX-wxh ?- t h en'viremmmw.mwam M Em we on; WNWW UM... .wqimk; u m. - ' 31; 32'- . 4 ?;WV awning A 3w :IM RUTH FOWLER gives pianologues for the anusement of the Pi Phis and is very fond of Junior lotteries. uFITZ" FITZGIBBON may be seen almost any rainy afternoon frolicking about the library. She believes with all the fore- most educators that the instinct of play is one of the fundamental principles upon which education is based. THIS, my Children, is one of the nationls great men. Bilious Hart? N0! VERN 0. FUDGE, manager of the Guild theatre and star of the legitimate stage. MARJORIE FLEGEL packed up all her pep and her propensity to work along with her tooth brush and other necessities when she came to Oregon. In spite of her two years at Willamette University, she can now sing "Oregon, our Alma Materll almost as naturally as "Fight yem Bearcatsll. AUBREY PERCIVAL FURRY, better known as HDocll, hails from Phoenix, wherever that is. He sings a wicked voice in the glee club. MAE FENNO has the gift of argument as her debating opponents can testify. FENTON FORD, although no relation to Henry, helps him take all the Ford jokes. HJit" played good interfraternity basketball last year and as a pitcher he has considerable on the ball. You can always find him just across fron the library. IF you want to know how to carry 21 hours and draw 1,5 and 2,5 in account- ing, business hnance and other such subjects and still have time to be good natured apply to ESTHER FELL. She is the model. One hundred 0m? SOME time ago LAURENCE FRALEY grew tired of his sheepherder friends at our sister college and decided to join his Sigma Nu brothers at Oregon. This is his last year with us since the study of medicine is calling him to Portland next year. As a swimmer CHARLES FISH is a shark, as an actor he is a star lfishl, as a wrestler he is an octopus, and as an orator he is a crab. MABEL GILHAM-lQuotedl An ideal state in Hendricks hall would be: no one engaged -- fireplaces a n d davenports might then be open to use by the in- habitants. MAUD GORRIE is a typical Scotch lassie and is very fond of Fords and Billse- not the kind you get on the first of the month. EVERYBODY knows that ELIZABETH GEXSER was a 1.2 student fall term. Besides all that she is president of the Theta house. iiSLATS" GANT is the boy with the brown curly hair. Aside from being a slicker 0n the basketball Hoor, he sometimes takes in a pink tea. LEAH. GREENBAUM has been extremely quiet and modest this year. lWhy say this year so specificallyh STAN GOODELL decided that he liked pig- ging better than fussing, so he came over to Oregon from O. A. C. He be- lieves in higher education, but aspires to higher stature. His hibernating ground is Junction City. One hundred two ! I "Nler he is 0mm he is a cu 0ft MPH Gum- hlbitann MAUI! .Gouui is a typical Scuttle 1nd I: very fond of Fords and Bi . not the kind you get on tltlri the month. Emnwv knows that Eumntfsy : was a LZ student fall term Britta that she is president of the 11m: ta; "Sum" Gil . curly hm. on the basketball floor, he w V takes in a pink tea. . lQuoted. '1- m Hendncks hall woldlll I ettglgedelireplaces and dart: en open to use by E; i SINGING is not the least accomplishment of FLORENCE GARRETT. Even if it were it would still be mighty good. Shels worth knowing. Ask those who know her. SHORTY GILLIS has gone in for various and sundry things, in her University career. She has put the ball into the basket for the doughnut hoopers, she wields a paddle on the race, and she has a beautiful time kidding Timmy along. He seems to like it, too. "SLIMMY" GANT is a dwarfed Goliath in stature, but that doesnlt hinder his war- like attributes in the least. He is known on the campus for his wicked eye, being a member of the rifle squad. BOB GREGORY may be seen flying about the campus most anytime. She majors in music and incidentally makes the Delta Zeta freshman step around. JOHN GAVINeJudge had a pair of white gloves so he bought a dress suit antl lljoined" the glee club; now whenever they sing HThe Lost Chordll he blushes. He hails from The Dalles, takes a little law and majors in dancing. DWIGHT GREGG Claims to have registered in the school of medicine. Besides, he has succeeded in getting on the list 0t Lemon Punch contributors. Probably a graft. HERB GRAHAM is the man of mystery who is destined to become a lawyer of note. He allows nothing to interfere with the placidity of life. ELVA GUTTRIDGE dabbled around in art while she was here. She also helped the D. Z35 put on their original inter- pretation of the stage success, HWay Down East 13thll. One hundred Hirer mmew .: -ykaatpn-3-v-W$a m 4 At tMguhtlmwnn . . mme Mt whhmrw . . ham to t wnmthwtgthgt ROLLO GRAY-eHROH", the Delt commuter, Spends alternate terms at the Univer- sity. Has also been known to play baseball. WE recommend MAUD GRAHAM to any one who has the blues. HLaugh and the world laughs with you', 18 her motto. GERTRUDE is the blond member of the Golding-TenBrook firm founded during freshman days. She has a well de- veloped sense of humor and can smile even on rainy mornings on her way to eight oiclocks. GEORGE HOWARD GODFREY has confessed that hes going to school and weyve heard him say that hes a soph. How, he rates this section, nobody knows. Maybe its because he brings his dog to classes with him to help absorb know- ledge. LUCILE GARBER is majoring in art, but may change to domestic science. Its so much more practlcal, ian it, Lucile? MARY GILL is the girl with the bookish line. She decided to be a co-ed after two years at Mills. AUSTIN H. HAZARD, well but unfavorabiy known around the University of Oregon and Coquilie as Hap Hazard. IT is not unusual to see HULDA HAFNER promenading with a certain Beta soph- omore on sunny afternoons. That is because all she wants is a Ray of intel- lectual light. One hundred four c has a well veloped seqse of humor and can vi even on rainy mornings on her Mr eight o'clocks. I Giana! HOWARD Gomn' has mnth- that htis going to school and m; hcard him say that he's a soph. Hi: he rates this section1 nobody hm Maybe it's because he brings his diii classes with him to help absorb hr ledge. LUCILE GARBER is majoring in an. may change to domestlt stench so much more practical, isntu, mt Ito SC 1 ftcrnogn- Rat of W e HULDi Hi crtain W 21 V . a C Thy HARRIET HERRING HUDSON habitually hikes hazardous heights hereabouts. WE donit know very much about LEONARD HADSALL except that he comes from Bandon and is a major in the school of business administration. We looked him up in the scandal sheet and it tells us that hes a sophomore. We wonder if they made a mistake. LAW is one of the elements which tends to make the life of ELMER HARDENBERGH interesting. What the other elements are is as yet problematical. HILDA HENSLEY deserted this term, but we hear that she still contends that HDopey Danii wears a Breath-of-Spring overcoat. HERBIE HACKER is never found beneath the nicotine tree with the rest of the junior class, being in Hmusical train- ing". He saves his wind for the trom- bone, which he is able to make laugh, cry or groan. Herbie came to college with a trombone in his mouth. THE sunny south claims HILDRED HALL now, and such an atmosphere is well in keeping with her disposition. Her major subjects are singing, playing and riding. JACK HILARY is going to show the old home town what a real lawyer can do. HELEN HOEFER is an all-round girl. She manages to have a good time and in- cidentally to collect lis and 25 on the side. One hundred firm? GEORGE HOUCK doesnit appear serious here, but just wait until you catch him in the zoo lab. He goes right into the heart of things. Yes, he'll make a good surgeon. CHARLOTTE HOWELLS is known as "Hefty, and when it comes to running up bas- ketball scoreSeshe is the despair of op- posing teams. HARRISON HUGGINS is one of the world's coming physicians. Was in love his Erst year, but since then he has gotten some pretty good grades. DORA HERMAN is a loyal Oregon student but in spite of this she still has a warm spot in her heart for Mills college where she spent her freshman year. Dora is a part of the University,s con- tribution from Grants Pass. EP HOYT is the original athlete with a typewriter. His predictions and post- mortems of athletic events for the Em- erald are excelled only by such well known writers as Ring Lardner. Ep also squeezes out numerous jokes for the Lemon Punch. LAWRENCE HULL came down to master the grimy details of business. He plays around the A. T. O. house as well as the Kappa. IF FLORENCE HARTMAN canit be found Hsomewhere in the art department" youill have to watch the machines that pass by. Sheis an artist-temperament If everything. ANNA HILL longs to sufTer because to her that means the attainment of fine feel- ings. We expect her to cut off her arm any mlnute. One lzumlrcd six MM Ythllrgm- ttDUTCH" HENRY, a school teacher in the pre-war days, took his Ph.D. in Powder River philosophy in the A. E. F. Hun", ts. "Mm; ERNEST HAYcox-E. J. H., the campus M: l: MWWQ; cynic. um m 3 11mm Hmm' FOLLOWING the trend of his convictions, Ming .. "Whitt- DIX HOLADAY is enthused with the am- am ml iillmigy, bition to be a salesman. He believes Wvbmmhmhmn. that practice makes perfect, so he is WPWMgndn ' conducting a little business of his own along that line. Du Hum in a loyal Orrgon Millpittofthisshcstillhnm RAMAH ILER doesnit need to worry about Q! in herhunforililka: having her name mixed up with that lmmwthfmmt of anyone .else for heris is entirely in Doninpmoititflimh a class by Itsel'f. Ramah IS. a girl who ill mempm i wears the distinctlon of being an hon- est-to-goodness pal. ' mto":l:1hletf'- . E? Md; Hisnfmndjaimsm: IIAVE you ever heard BOYD ISEMINGER de- ithletittvmuion'itf bate? Well, he can do it. Boyd has W91 onlvaT-t' joined the class of those students who mild .. U . . 1". M11? carr thelr knowledge around 1n a honwmmu WW portfolio as well as in their heads. Ibmmswn'm', Boyd also is a Eugene native. WE;- JoHANNAH JOHNSONeFate made Jo,s in- . Ull CM, Hg: itials J. J. and made Jo joyous, jovial WWH 'lotbl'm'..; and jolly. Vdem huqlii' thremillirtimiheA-T'O' o- I In mKIPP , MINNIE JOHNSON has been here only one H41 year so we don't know her very well Hmmmdmf yet. No telling what may turn up IF W5C! ill thumb about'her when we do get acquainted. 6 th' V. Mgmtwh" walth :3: Wm 'ixitmf 79","; he'san'm :35: . :qvtiytm LEONARD B. JORDAN is a student and a Digger. Aside from these defects he is W! a gentle and agreeable young man of pmsuilrlffi' the type that gets by in polite society. 11 '21! I MN Hmnlotht 1:11:13 cut ii I t ,ht Wca'd inP- a. nun" In! 0110 ll mzdrml smrcn THE remote village of Baker has from time to time produced some real live wires for the University and MARGARET JACKSON has done her share to keep up the name of the eastern Oregon metrop- olis. In her odd moments, when she isnlt passing out books at the lib-rary she is generally engaged in multitud- inous activities. HONORABLE mentions mean nothing to MABEI, JOHNSON. She Stlll speaks to every one. FLORENCE JAGGER wields a trusty bat an the diamond and a trusty pen in W. A. A. "JIMMIEl, KING lived on raw meat most of his sophomore year but underclass- men at the Fiji house say the law school toned him down considerable-yes, quite considerable. "SLICKEW KAYS has managed to llslickerH his picture inta the junior column for the second consecutive time. He says 3' , mygnsl'U. that he would rather pay $1 class dues l i ilreszxiful than $15 for a senior hat and that a 17,2. i$ person is "young but once". Hence . L VIM his ardent devotion for the junior class. '3 t SEW?- , a ..:Mllhh unanih IN spite of the honors thrust upon her INEZ KING is just an ordinary girl with the usual number of Secret Sorrows. ,W'vg 349'" , "Wind; ALFRED KROHN and his ability to get 1 "WM Emerald ads are with us as part of ' . the junior class. We wish that we knew some inside dope that we could spill about you, Al, but youlre sort of an illusive chap and we havenlt the time to go snooping. OREGOle famous lthello" tradition would never be in danger of extinction if all the co-eds on the campus had as cheery a greeting as LOLA KEIZUR. You can find her almost any time around the physical education department. One lzundred right Ito: Mg 0m hm l . 'Hlly Chg: l C3. l'lnullfl KING lived on nu ma l his sophomore yur 501 mi:- Iltl It the Fiji house unlit in, Mal him down wnsldmble-yea milenblt W" KAYS has mantged In it H5 Wt inn tllt junior t': M mad mnswudv: mm. t:- that he would rather pay ll r2", thtn $15 for I senior lit 15! '1 rm 5, mbutoww lick Irdent devotion for l! lllil ' of tht lslgmmwjuga let! tlu mull numb" "f' ll ordllllll F. , hi5 lhlllll II; mun W ll N lld ads m R ml 1' l ' ' Us; ml 1 the MW: insid! doP' dlle' ? tncw mm ALW ll. '2'; Y qllllbwtfgandmhmm l - cl! Inns!" . l0 5n M113! u mars W i. V, :1 51:5 "0" trillhr LIKE the Pioneer, GEORGE KING is always found in front of the library. When not here he divides his time between football and pigging. MAURICE ANTHONY KENNEY aspires to tack an M.D. after his name and from all appearances uthem" aspirations will be realized. llBILLll KAYS is the other half of the Kays combination. He has a berth in the glee club and says that he enjoys trav- eling through the cities of Oregon. He plays basketball and when he was in short pants played on the piano but he scratched it up so that he had to get off. KATHLEEN KEM, the llHot Dog Girl", warbles away in the glee club. She wins her fame and popularity by hand- ing out state aid checks in the Ad build- mg. llCASEY" KNODELL gave up all hopes of being a policeman several years ago and is now majoring in commerce so that he can work up in the merchant marine. llCasey" is active in Dream- land hall activities and is at his best when he has gum on his shoes. BILL HAYWARD found it diHicult to get the boys away from Hawaii. How could you pull yourself away, KURASHIGE? GUY KOEPP is a cinder artist of no meager ability. He took honors in the mile when a freshman and last year made competition hard for the varsity. He is with us again this spring. HKAP" KUHN has ideals which are highly sublimated, but his instinctive inquisit- iveness has decreed that he major in journalism. uKap" is a good listener whose receptive faculties are unlimited. One hundred nine PEARL LEWIS divides her time between English lit and basketball in which she plays for Oregon club, junior class and the varsity. VANCOUVER used to be noted only for its marriage license dispensary but that was before LLOYD LALONDE began to spread the name abroad. Londy is delving into legal lore, but whether to become a lawyer or just to Find out what is Hwithin the law" has not yet been decided. MAYBELLE LEAVITT, otherwise known as Bab, came back to school this year just to be a junior with us. Bab majors in journalism and someone told us that last year she put into practice some of the things she learned around the shack. hCHUCK" LAMB, the proverbial black sheep of the Sigma Chi house. Between var- sity debate and junior week-end chair- man he hasnit a thing to do, so he carries 22 hours of academic leisure. His partners in crime at the Sig abode say he "works while they sleep and sleeps while they workll. ALTA LANDON is an English major and, like the immortal William, she is ab- normally fond of puns. FRANCIS LINKLATER came down from Reed this year. Hels tried Pacific University, too, making us wonder how long helll like us. Link spends his leisure winning love sets. MARIAN LINN-nPeterl, believes there are many advantages in being a town girl. She is one of the Theta songbirds. IMOGENE LETCHER-HImO", the Kappa Al- Pha Theta Padevewski, always grac- iously responds with a tuneful bit of Jazz on every occasion. 0w lnmdrm' 1M WE wish to suggest that MILDRED LAUDER- DALE change her major from economics to home economics. WAVE LESLEY'S hobby is talking and when she exhausts the English language, she starts in miles an hour in French. SALLY LAMBERSON went to Washington for two years and then decided to come to Oregon and help the upperclassmen at the Alpha Phi house run things. She,s turning into a regular Oregon student, MAYBEUI LEWMlhuwiqk-r tOOeit never even occurred to her to BahumcbadthN root for Washington at the basketball f0 IIjuniorwilhus. Baht games' ' Mmahsm and mean: mid .. I" Year she put into pracicts N , , mmiBESShclcamcdamuniip - ARTHUR LARSONf- Ole". Ohve 011 Oley. The gent w1th the grand manner-- after you Alphonse. Also a feet run- ner. Has been donated an O. THINK" LAMB, 1h: proverbiai him of the Sigma Chi house. chs ' sitydcbltundiuniomfhiia AUDgEY PERKINS asplres to be somebody,s V W m, prlvate secretary some day, she says. manhchasntamg, S h d h . b b' . 27hourtofmdm' 0.5 e Spen 5 er tlme a ser mg every- cattle: " mm thmg thatts offered over In the school HISPIWHWP' of business administration. But we :1! he "works WMFHEV' have our doubts when we consider those sleepswhik WWW attractive dimples and brown curly hair. HERB LARSON is the little fellow from Washington, a journalist and a quick thinker 0f the type that always has a good comeback but never hurts any- onets feelings. Turns out an occasional feature story for the Emeraldeyes, ex- tremely occasional. HUGH LATHAM is uthe tall gangling youtht' from Silverton, whose long form is fa- miliar to all followers of Oregonts ath- letics. Hart Schaffner 8: Marx put out a Hspecial editiont, of corduroys when Hunk registered last fall. FRED MAIN is the author of that popular novel, HAcross the Continent in Thirty Days, or East to School and Broke? All he brought back from Columbia was a cosmopolitan air. One 1111 mired eleven A DOMESTICALLY inclined girl is GERTRUDE 'LIVERMORE, who majors in domestic science and has been at school way after six otclock cooking doughnuts. They say that is the way to a man,s heart. NATRUDE LARSEN registers in a great num- ber of hours, but she takes time out to play around a bit, too. CHAWNCE LAWTON is a curly headed jug- gernaut. His bulk is offset by a good humored grin. He can play water polo abut he canit sing. JESSIE LEWIS, commonly known as nJess", is the queen of Hood River and an asthetic soul as well, especially when she dons her artistic smock. ELLEN MCVEIGH-No girl at Susan Camp- bell hall is better loved than Ellen. And the girls arenit the only ones who like her. MARION LAWRENCEeHLarry" is another Mu Phi protege known to have a marked preference for football songs. RALPH MCLAFFLIN is a law major with high ideals. When not studying Black- stonian literature, tiMac" extracts har- mony out of a violin for the edification of the University music lovers. MAC MCLEAN has more cars than any other undergraduate in school. He has a soldering outfit at home and let him get hold of the most essential parts of a Hivver and hell have a new car in- side of three days. One lmndred trwrlivr Jim LIWB, commonly known as in I! the queen of Hood Rim tit wed: soul as well, tsptdaiitzv the dons her artistic smock. Bull MCVHGH-No girl at Sumizt: hell hall is better loved than And the girls aren't the omitt- lie hcr. LULA RASOR is the queen of the movies run by Powers and Co. in the extension division. ARVIN BURNETTe-Ever hear "Burniei, laugh when he is pleased about some- thing? Basketball is his game, and many a rooter has been glad to see him at the right place at the right time. WE thought that FRANK MICHELS wasnit ambitious until we heard that he plans to go to Boston Tech next year. BEATRICE MORROWeiiBee" is a vivacious little art major, can draw anything from a glowing sunset to a good con- ciusion. ttFRITzii MICHELSON is also a habituator of the journalism shack. It is sus- pected that he has kindred interests in that building. His latest adventure is consolidation with HThe Amalgamated Order of Night Editors". HARRY C. MAYER is the campus piano-key teaser and has a habit of breaking into harmony every Friday and Saturday nights. He is the musical half of uMay- er and Collinsii, featuring HDreamland moonlight waltzes". Harry can be found playing around in the school of com- merce almost any morning. VERNE MCCLELLAN divides his time be- tween answering the questions popped at him by law profs and popping corn just to hear the errnels" snap out of it. WHEN HELEN MURDOCK,S Y. W. C. A. work becomes too strenuous, a gallant Chi Psi comes ULeaphing to her assist- ance. tSuthe, eh whatN 02117 hundrrd Illirlrrn COLLIS P. MOORE broke out of his cradle with a baseball bat and last year batted his way to fame on the frosh nine. He always carries a benevolent smile for his friends and during his leisure hours is fond of counting up graduation hours. MAYBELLE MILLER is a petite little D. G. blond who let her heart wonder down a shady HDell". iNicely!U HMIKE,, MICHELSON spends most of his time solving questions of justice and jurisprudence. Some day he hopes to be admitted to some bar. USNooxsiy MOORE has worked for the Uni- versity library for a number of years and it is understood is going to ask for a pension upon graduation. Besides dispensing Ucanned chatter" he has a mania for basketball and motoring. Ask any Alpha Chi about Snookis bug. YOU,D never think that this demure lass answers to the name of NCannibal", would you? ANABEIXMACKENZIE hasnit the least bit of cannibalistic nature even though the Thetais call her that. ALBIN MARTINSON has so many friends among the fair sex that he is consider' ably troubled therewith. Marty looks like he was in deep water, but thatis because he is an accounting shark. FLORENCE MOORHEAD goes home every week-end so we haven,t had time to see much of her in spite of her three years on the the campus. MILT MASON intends to follow the pro- fession of medicine. Seems to take his education on the installnent plan. Lots of terms ahead, Milt. 0m? lnzmlrrd frmrtMII 3W Mimi ha! world for . "W limy ill! I mimic! Liv. Ill It is undemood isgo'mgmzL I pension upon graduiiot 33v dinning $calmed chamr'l l: i: llhil in! basketball and WE; any Alpha Chi about Swell: 5;; Ym 3"" think that till; dim m m the mm "L W ? Al'llillililtlilllifri tit last bit of anillllllliilflllli'li WE havenlt been able to get much dope on RONALD MCINTOSH because he spends most of his time in the zoo lab. IF anyone thinks that IVAN MCKINNEY isnlt making good in society as well as in commerce, just ask the Tri Delts. Ivan thinks that the price of hair cuts is going down this spring so let us hope. HHOOT MON" MACGREGOR would be a splendid pigger, but he doeSn't pig. Some day he may bust out the old kilts and capture a braw bonnie lassie. JEAN MITCHELL wishes more girls would major in commerce. Those classes full of men are so appalling. She is a member of Phi Theta Kappa. ROMANCE language is Loxs MORTHLAND,S major but she claims she will never thrust her knowledge upon the young mind. Perhaps social service work in South America is her goal. THE school of music stole a march on the other departments when GLEN MORROW registered with them. After hearing him sing one cannot help predicting that he will sing his way through life. HELEN MCCORMICK is part of this yearls delegation from W. S. C. The iiBishopil Hings a wicked shoulder when it comes to basketball. FLOYD MAXWELLeThey say newspaper editors are the greatest factor in mold- ing campus opinion. No wonder so many students are becoming engaged. 07m lnmdml nfipen GUESS what it is! Doctor, musician or mathematician? Wrong again; its uJIGGs" MCARTHUR. He has a studious look behind those horn-rimmed eyes when in a class but its lucky none of his profs live in the same block with him or know about his dark past in Baker. WHEN it comes to ttbillsl, FRANCES MAC- MILLAN can tell you all about them. She is young for her Class but not for her age and is known lwe have heardl for her giggling. Its no longer a secret that she aspires to be a typical peda- gogue. PAUL MCCULIMOCHeHOur Mady is major- ing in law and has ambitions of buying out the Ontario gas works When he graduates. He expects to get married one of these days and is constantly on the lookout for good real estate buys. ASIDE from being from California GEORGE NEALE,S particular distinction is his ability as a swimmer. Hels a life guard and upholds Oregon in all such meets. GIRLS, this is ALBERT NIEMI. It is hard to determine just What Al is thinking about, but if you should mention some- thing about the theory of accounting tor any other theoryi, Alls response would prove that he had been thinking. WHO wants the dope on a co-ed? Ask JACK NEVVHALL. Though Jack is thor- oughly posted on this subject, it is not the primary reason for his attendance at college. He is a math major and hopes to adapt these principles to bank- ing in the near future. ONE year at O. A. C. didnlt bother DOROTHY OSTRANDER a bit. She can out-hello every helloer on the campus now. ANYBODY can talk, especially around the copy desk, but FLORINE PACKARD pos- sesses the admirable quality of being a good listener. She and Margaret Scott are generally within hailing distance of each other. 0213 lumdred sixteen M midi lm' n mules: 11 1 LLAN can 1H1" billsi F111511 3 he is young f h 1 her age and 1 her that shgiggling1th "0 longerm C as H 80:11:. p 33011639111111:- iAUL MCCULImH-' '0111 Mac" 1511113152 in; in law and has ambitions 111111 out the Ontario gas 111111111511:- graduates. He expects to get 1111: one of these days and 11 1011111111 the lookout for good real estateb 11 ASIDE from being from California 0113.: Nuns particular distinction is ability as a swimmer. H6113- guard and upholds Oregon 1111!. meets i111 this is Awm N11111. Gmetermine iust what A111. 1511 but if you Minn; about the theo eory oil'itiiu or a 11y othereo 1 . wouldp rove etha 1th 00155 W dmi THIS is OBIE, his long arms and large voice help a lot when it comes to lead- ing yells. He is a pigger of no mean ability. LOUISE OlDELL, better known as Dewey, must be from the Isle of Erin for she has all of the requisites: a keen sense of humor and a charming Irish smile. SAM OLIVER came from the wild and wooly city, Pendleton, and will undoubt- edly be a success at the bar. "VIRGll OLIVER is an all around man, though his energies run toward the in- tellectual. He is a major in rhetoric and minors in such pipe courses as philosophy. ALBERTA POTTER is a quiet girl but she sure can make noise on her violin. JOHNNY PALMERis greatest worry besides his curly hair is to keep his grades up to meet the constantly increasing scho- lastic standards so popular at Oregon. VIO POWELL has a future, but it is a ques- tion which she will become famous for, on the covers of a magazine or in the role of a concert singer. JIMMY PEARSONys future seems assured as a dealer in junk judging from his pres- ent accumulation, namely: Exhibit A, one 1900 model Packard; Exhibit B, one 1901 Cadillac bug; Exhibit C, one Buescher saxaphoneenot too good 1we mean his playingi. 01m lmmirrd smimlan INTRODUCING JOHN PARRISH, who began his college career at the University of Colorado, visited for a while at Stan- ford, then decided that the campus of the Pioneer was the place to drop an- chor permanently. PAUL PATTERSON has been a varsity de- bater since his advent 0n the campus and certainly a good one. His activi- ties are not confined to debating, how- ever. ANY one wishing information on how to obtain diamonds inquire of PERK PER- KINS at Thacher cottage. HEREVS a ladies' man for you. Some folks think that SHRIMP PHILLIPS is a care- free individual but he really worries a lot because there are so few nights each week in which to pig. He is a pole vaulter and as a tenor he has often got clear up to high Z. ALTHOUGH RALPH E. POSTON is majoring in medicine, he seems bent on getting a business course also, as he buys the pie and beefsteak for the Phi Sigs. Ralph takes great delight in his French, as he is looking forward to the time when he can read HLa Vie Parisienne". His participation in activities is limited to the menVs glee club and committees of various origins. ESTHER PIKE helps Oregon club uphold its honors in athletics. R. PORTER and Volstead are contempor- aneous notable, but R. PORTER of cam- pus fame, contrary to the popular con- ception about the kickless beverage, possesses considerable Hkick". Ray is a geology major who plans on doing some more digging when he goes out into the world. VVILBUR PH1LL1PSWConfidential advisor to all, with unusually good success sometimes. Not too good and not too bad-just a good man. When are you going to Salem again? One hundred eighteen ?iimih'h. mnth VWIh' Mun... it since his a v athirsmdf ac:rt mly a go Histim'pp e not conhned t debating iii I i I ope veishing information on how un Iamonds inquire of Phi Phi s at Thacher cottage. I s a ladies' man for you. Someiolh ik that SHRIMP PHILLIPS is we 5 individual but he really worries; because there are so few nigh h week in which to pig. Heist e vaulter and as a tenor he h: en got clear up to hith. lOUGH RALPH E. P051033 is mahm; medicine, he seems bent on getting: siness course also, as he bqysh: : and beefsteak for the ?h hg tiph takes great delight in hart: he is looking forwatti to iii". Ien he can read HLa 'Vl'e'Pa'mi'm'ii is participation in acnwtaes 1:311:66: the mens glee club an to various origins. elps Oregon club uphi: IKE h . m P thlettcS- ; honors in a merit"? ad are C0 ;. PORTER ai'd VOISRR. PORTER "f a e th Nous "om , h op waif HBILL" POTEET is an example of Hcome again, gone again Hooligan". First he is here then he is there, so we may expect him to turn up most any time without warning. LILY POLEY is a regular card shark and she is known to sit in a poker game every week-end night. THE fact that WEB RUBLE was named after the Russian monetary unit may have something to do with his ability to handle the finances of the Emerald. His from name was well chosen, too, for anyone who can talk forty minutes over the phone to a girl must have a vocabulary approaching that of the im- mortal Daniel W. himself. RITA RIDINGS plays basketball, sings in the glee club and gets good grades in Spanish. Thatis quite a combination to be carried out successfully but Rita seems to manage it all without much trouble. WOODLAND, California, sends us this spec- imen of southern masculine beauty. Bi- ology keeps JAMES ROYLES with us. CLARA ROBINSON is showing them in the commerce department that women are to be recognized in the business end of things. Sheis a good advertisement for the fair sex. "BUBBLES" ROYCROFT was out last year getting a little practical banking ex- perience. Comes in handy he says at Obaks. Lynn has changed his major so often that we shouldn,t be surprised if he ended up at a sewing machine. RUTH ROBERTseAs this is her first year on the campus she has all the frosh advantages thrust upon her. 0110 muzdrml ninrtrrn BLANCHE Ross knows all the contents of all the history books. Speaking of dates-she has yem. BEE RISE already has become an eHicient and enthusiastic librarian. GEORGE ROYERehStill water runs deepfl Get to know George and youlll find him as good as he looks. Something slipped out during his freshman track career that showed us he was a good man. AS a track man, ART ROSEBRAUGH shakes a wicked pair of spikes, as a lawyer he wags a wicked tongue, but his main Hope is in another direction. THERE are three court houses at Klamath Falls, but since HBRUTE FORCE" RIGGs left the community only one of them is doing business. However, George and the law are generally on pretty good terms, even though the dean of women does sign his study card. RONALD REID, the tall skinny fellow with the Russian wolf hound stride and the musical fingers. Ronald had to have an extra foot added to his bunk 0n the Fiji porch. The piano has to wear stilts when he parks his lower frame under the keyboard. EVERYBODY likes HADDON ROCKHEY. He is a good sportsman, a streak of lightning on the basketball floor and an all-round athlete. Nothing keeps Haddon from grabbing of? good grades at all times. HALLIE SMITH helps Tommy run the jun- ior class, looks after the Chi Omega freshman and still has time to write long letters to Portland. Hallie says all one needs is scientific management. One lumdrml trwmlty Eimm NH .9 "t$li351k-$ v-limi'whq w-awm inc: ROYEHStill yet to know eot . ge and ' ' m as good as he looks. ihiiitii lipped out during his freshman 14 met that showed us H nan. he was i gt. a track man, ART ROSEBRAUGH shah l Wicked pair of spikes, asalamt 1e wags a wicked tongue, bullish: Hope is in another direction. lERE are three court houses at Klimt Falls, but since "Brim FORCElllIJ'i left the community only one of them' doing business. However, George: the law are generally on pretty g terms, even though the dean of mi. docs sign his study card. tall skim.v lam ll mde an L lf hound 5 ad l0 1;? mm Rem, the the Russmn W0 . o ,, musical fingers 15 bunlOlL': added to h annextricfm iano hI m ll Fit! P0 ' Stilts W en boar . under the key A MODERN Toledo Blade is JIMMY Ross. He,d never have left the tide Hats 0f the coast city unless burning ambition had driven him to the study of law. He aspires to the title of Prosecuting Attorney of Lincoln County James Hale Ross, LLB. He sings first bass on the village choir and plays second on their baseball nine. NED STRAHORN is a Pendleton product. He is making good in the B. A. department, is a natural athlete and has a mean line with the girls. FRANCES SCOTT is another proof of the correctness of Prof. Howels beliefe that marriage and education go hand in hand. BERNIE SLACK is a staunch and loyal patriot of the Lone Star state. A long ways away but all the more glory for our University. ELIZABETH STEPHENSOle natural ability in the use of the English language-es- pecially in argumentationeis fully demonstrated in her achievements in the debate line. TINY SHIELDS needs no introduction. Who doesnlt know our big football star? Although Tiny is a big man athletic- ally and otherwise, he never has any trouble pulling good grades. DORRIS SIKES is one of the Tre Nus, Uwoikinl goilsll and she has done every- thing there is to do with a typewriter from cutting stencils to writing Salem society. She occasionally deserts the Zeta Rho house to spend the week-end in Springfield. JOHN SASS is divided in his ambitions: he wants to be a school teacher and he desires to be a farmer. Time will tell. Um lmmlrm' tu'rzzly-ouc MARGARET Scoths ambition is to be un- dignified. So she says, at least-but we,re quite sure she can attain that. We know her. H. B. SEILER finds the royal road to learn- ing a rocky one, but hetll probably don a judge's robe some day. SUE STEWART bats high on the diamond at Cemetery ridge. It goes without saying that she is a physical education major. uHALH SIMPSON, financial genius. Also can do a passable imitation of Pavlowa or Rruth St. Denis when happy. MILDRED SMITH swears she wontt change her name. Oh, well, Mid-Smith isntt so bad at that. WILLIAM SILVERTHORNnuBaron,,, the boy with the suave way. Hetll either be a barber or a diplomat. When William looks really bland and happyeah! there,s a perfect gent for you. EDITHE SLIFFE is majoring in music so that she can brighten the lives of the John Day inhabitants with harmonious melodies. THIS introduces HARRY SHERMAN. Al- though he wears a smile he is serious In some things, for example, economics and domestic science, two lines along vyhich his ambitions run. These two hnes are going to converge sometime 1n the near future, so Harry announces. One luuzdrml twcnty-two cMish'sMMQ m m? nth u I am fwmhm$ 3751173ch - ' "F?'TWHFL mhkuhh , Hmmm- mm c gnliied '33: ambltlon' m0 ere SC 33 M quite 3M1 'e SUre She cash knowh". m natIaiW GLYDE SCHUEBEL works for the Y. W. C. A. and Eutaxian, and is always ready to do her share of work-and there aren't many such people. She studies 3. those things known as "romance lan- SEILERfi "dse oyah oad guages,,, and pulls down the grades, too. "3 a r iud Mk0 b'hinpob'i'm ges 1.0:: 5mm day raiidv RUTH STEWART is another of those for- tunate students who does the cross country to the music building every morning. STEW m bats hi gh on I Cemetery ridgeg lying that she is a p Iajor. the diary; It goes with VA IN EVENS sabout ettin resulti hYSicaledm'u L D E ST goe g g s in her quiet way, but she is full of fun, too. She hopes to be among the ranks of the C. P. A. some day. GENxAL HHUB" SMITH hails from the round-up city. He is a B. A. major and has put in many a long hour get- ting things lined up for freshman foot- ball games in the capacity of manager. u." SIMPSON, financial gtniusi' m do a pass'ablc imitation of Pm r Ruth St. Denis when happy. MOE STATON spends his time working on the Emerald and playing soccethhe blooming Scotchman. Coon shuinng is his delight on the dance floor, rope climbing is his forte as a gymnastic exercise, and warbling as an indoor sport. .DRED SMITH swears she won'tchng' or name. Oh, well, Mid-Smithi 0 bad at that. HORN- "'Baron. tit LLIAM SILVERT He'l'" iithtra e W vith the 5"" ya tWhM ll CARPENTER STAPLES-another who entered i bar or a dipom :tiks really bla nd a'aifidrhagpw hercs a perfect gem 0 yo the nmarried group". and going to college They say he's majoring in pre- medics but it's a long, slow'route to an M. D. degree for a married man. maio 115?: "BONES" SKELTON was not one of the HE SLIFFE 15. it IMO" founders of the University, as was be- T tighten am 1' d f h'l ' . hat she ca ' thharm ieve or aw 16. He still remembeis Day in mm the time, though, when Timmy Cloran 'Ohlndies flunked him in a Spanish course. neo n'VVAD" SHIRLEY is a journalist of the third tude. The products of his em- bryo pen are heralded far and wide through the columns of the Emerald. magni He writes the sporting line. One Izmzdrml tcwmzty-tlzrm RUTH SANBORN is interested in society field and spends a lot of her time in the lit. department. sometimes whether Bobby got her name because of her hair, or whether she bobbed her hair in order to live up to her name. Bobby does things with the Household Arts club, canoes, plays bas- ketball and a few other things like that. GLADYS TAYLOR-This girl sings as she works and she works a lot. WHEN the sun makes the slightest pre- tense at shining GERTRUDE TOLLE speeds over to the tennis courts. Sheis there when it comes to a racket. AMONG NELL TENBROOICS assets are her snappy brown eyes and freckles. She is noted for her parlor tricks. items. her visiting his brothers l,iquinktr'ix at the Phi Delt house" has a certain it attraction. U ".15! ivtwmmiiw'sfg': DORIS SENGSTACKEN is back again from aniiiic'ihm O. A. C. Doris Comes from Marsh- WW writ I'M mm W jaw I CHLOE THOMPSON-People have wondered W5 W" m W'V'qu mnw-W 3 WMMM. CONCENTRATION did a lot for Gladstone, MM but the only thing it did for AMY ; TURNER was make her enter the busi- ness office in the Ad. building with her umbrella u . , p Bnmimnudi Mninbk i t Moiurimnhh' Wlwn Wmmihn immisbq One Izmzdrcd trwcnty-four EDw. THOMPSON, popularly k n 0w n as i , HBanker", has his home in Portland but 1 i still finds Pendleton, his former address, i very attractive during vacation periods. lS Asizhgmlgxliy is back agamf . . ors com V Idrand spends 1 es from Mama 9 1t. epartrnent mm 05 THOMPson-People have Wanda metlmes whether Bobbv got hern-Q muse of her hair, . L . . or whether :- bbed her hair in order to liveh r name. Bobby does thingswith ousehold Arts club, canoes, playsii- tball and a few other things lileh CENTRATION did a lot for Gladstratc t the only thing it did for Au, URNER was make her enter lhebw ss olhce in the Ad. buildingwithlv nbrella up. DYS TAYLOR-Thls girl sings as orks and she worksa on , su W 55. the . , G x RUBETOLLEPHEIE l k" pOP .Poyti oWE and" dill" WHEN it comes to music LORA TESHNER is there. We are sorry that the Chau- tauqua circuit claims so much of her time. Otherwise she would be with us. VIC. RICE comes from the University of Washington, but shels cheering for the lemon yellow with a will now. HTHE curly headed Cherub who does chores for the University postoihce? Thatls WALTER JEROME TAYLOR, the marcelled minion. Why, he and Prexy Campbell run the institution-ey ALICE THOMAS e ltTommy" e Blue-eyed and golden-haired Alice is a whiz in her major and in everything else that she does. BEATRICE TOWERS is a studious rhetoric major who increases the libraryls cir- culation records. BOB TAPP is a disciple of the French school of writers and when the mqued rumble of a typewriter is heard in the wee smal hours his pals know something mysterious is being pounded 03. IF there is anything in heredity and nat- ural ability we may expect a second Dr. Torrey in ELIZABETH, who answers to the name of llTorreyll among the Theta sisters. JESSIE THOMPSON, if anyone should happen to ask you, is that smiling demure little journalist who gets anything she goes after, and for this reason is the joy of her editorls heart. 07117 lnzmirpd IrwmIIy-iltvz' uBic; KARUy VONDER AHE got a wallop out of giving the hula-hula the double-O, but he has decided that the A. T. O. ranch is a more suitable place for a football man. HORACE VINCENTeFlutter, fiutter! Them lamps, them lamps! Came from Col- orado. Donit see how he left there un- married. Really donit. VVHEN FRANK VONDER AHE isn,t pigging; he can be seen chasing golf balls acro-ss the links. He is greatly hampered in this work by the lack of golf sox. ETHEL WHEELER has remarkably good ideas even though she came from O. A. C. For proof, drop in some eight oiclock and hear her literary dialogues with Professor Howe. DAN WOODS is a man of unceasing activ- ity and a friend of all. Danny aspires to become a surgeon. Hereis to him. bannMaHil . teamwmui ii CARP WXLLETT passed his first two years gfmimiltrshii With the medical department, but, fiat- Waitrilamd' - tered by the clever iiline" he was able n' ' to master during this period, he has changed to journalism. If you succeed in cutting news copy as well as frogs and sharks, youill get by, Carl. SAVILLA WELK is so quiet that even the girls in her house canit seem to get any dope on her. All right, Savvyebut itis the quiet people that get things done, and we believe that still waters run deep. ADAM WILHELM lives up to both names. He is generally the first man in a rifie match and is militaristic to the extent of holding a commission in the local unit of the backbone of the national army. One lmndrrd Iwmzly-six KARL" V n I UNDER gle AH i he 15 the h" ":1 'Ch is a: gnawed ,that thidoubllll than man Ore SUltable Placeiu ' ill; 53 VINceu-Hs Ipsy them lam M 0. 011,! 38 mt W110; - e h . mCd- Really diiiihhe left thwa- I Fm: . K VONDER HE 1m l .1: rain be seen chasing golf balls atiii in s. e is greatl . yham a work by the lack of golfiiidl' WHEELER has remarkably gmi 2 even though she came from v. For proof, drop in somtciglz le and hear her literary dialogm 1 Professor Howe. V0003 is a man of unceasingacii nd a friend of all. Dannylsplll: :come a surgeon. Here's to llllll NILLETI passed his first two yin: the medical department, huh :3 by the clever ll'lme" lie was aha: taster during this perimsulwd' ged to journalism. If illuaslmgl ltting news copy as we sharks, You," get by l E 0 121-11 1g lavvanoh JOHNNY WATSON is an ex-football player with an eye on the E. B. U. He made the town of Turner famous by killing a hawk with the assistance of a bat and ball. Johnny doesnlt make a great deal of noise but he likes public speak- ing and he Figures that his turn is com- ing. CHARLEY WALKER has one thing to be thankful for and that is that he doesnlt snore. If he did the watch-dog of the library would have thrown him out more than once before this. House managers never do get their full quota of sleep around the house, though, and the comparative peace of a class or the library seems like heaven sometimes. VERA WOOD is preparing herself to help the poor unfortunate waifs in the slums. A noble cause, Vera, youlll be a second Jane Addams. DON WILKINSON is so hard boiled he is petrified. Perhaps this is the reason he studies rocks and mountain ranges and other things which are solid and hard. Don is a member of the Wilkinson clan which hibernates on the lower slopes of Mt. Hood adjacent to a stream known as the Columbia. CHAUNCEY WIGHTMAN is 0115 of our ris- ing young barristers but his talents run along other lines as well; pigging for example. MARGARET WVINDY" VVINBIGLER has a well trained look of demureness that may fool some but therels them around the Pi Phi house as could tell what lies behind it. HAIL to our president! TOMMY WYATT is going to be a doctor and we think he will be a good one. As a secret keeper he is llthere" as evidenced by his eight months silence about his marriage last spring. "BETTER late than never," is GENE WHXT- TEN'S philosophy. He never is more than a few minutes late, though, and is always out of breath so it looks as if he hurried, anyway. lth, Ilve been out in my canoe." 0M lmmlrm! Irwmry-smmn JIM VVHITAKER tried a season in Alaska, but he has decided that the University is more to his liking. In his repertoire are a few stories about Juneau. DAN WELCH is closely associated with the school of business administration and intends to use his knowledge in furn- ishing the boys with Hthe last whisper from London". THE news editor of the Emerald should be a harried looking individual with a walk that approximates a run but KEN YOUEL manages to retain a little of his youthful carefreeness in spite of journ- alistic duties. Cub reporters donit seem to shy at him as they are traditionally supposed to but he seems to be able to fill up the chinks between the ads with news items. ALICE YOUNG is a little prima danseuse with a bright smiieeand hair. DON ZIMMERMAN has wavy black hair, plays baseball and basketball, gets grades between one and two and no- body has ever seen him hurry yet. It must be this complacent deliberation of his that makes it so easy for him to get by on all three counts. Oh yes, he,s an artist, too. He paints houses. "FAT" CARTER has for motto, hLaugh, love and live longer? He is always around when there are any pianos to be moved and up to noon any Saturday or Sunday may be found at home in bed. Frank is a Huent talker and may graduate some day if the standards donit go up any higher. IF GEORGE GOCHNOURiS ready smile wins as many friends in the business world, for which he is preparing, as among his campus associates, his future suc- cess is assured. THIS pleasant appearing fellow is JOE OLSEN. Joe does not hesitate to assist the professors of accounting, but he sure makes the students work. Joe has already convinced a certain group of his C. P. A. ability. 071p lmmlrmi lrwrnty-riglll MW . youthful carefreene alistic duties. Cub to shy at him as th supposed to but he h l up.the chinks be ICWS items. ICE YOUNG is a little primadaiso retain a lime sly ss in spite of jot: "Porters don't 5e CY are tradition seems to be abh tween the ads z: Ivith a bright smile-andhah. N ZIMMERMAN has wavyblacllzk lays baseball and basketball, :rades between one and two and; ody has ever seen him lllll'l'yll'llvz must be this complacent delibchaf f his that makes it so eastyslorozlm at b on all three counl 3f els ah artist, too. He paints bow T" CARTER has f0 ' nger v and live lo ' e here are any to noondwl limit? 11 at 0 ' ' Sunday may illeeftlutallerillnldl5 If tllC m h: round when t 3 moved and "P :d. Frank is a l' mom! W; 9! He islllllg' pianoij 15h .0..an Mt w "m." M km"; a. V, t MARVIN EBY thinks in terms of therapeut- ics, both mental and physical. Marve does not feel that a course in education will detract from his ability to become an M. D. Look out, Retards, Marve may be regarding your HCorpus Col- losumly through a microscope some day. CLOYD llBLACKY,, BLACKBURN is one of the multifarious students who hails from Portland. He is a demon when it comes to work and oftimes indulges in some less strenuous pastime. FIVE days a week PEARL PYRITZ devotes her time to the physical ed. department. The other two she entertains masculine company from home. IF you want to know all about principles of accounting, ask MARY PARKINSON. Besides getting 1,3 in it herself she spends part of her time helping would- be accountants Over the rough road to the mysteries of the subject. RUTH TUCK is a proof that all gym ma- jors aren,t husky six-footers. We won- der if she is training to be a doctors assistant? MELTRUDE COE is one of the fortunate Uh students of world literature who has struggled in an attempt to wind her tongue around those never to be forgot- ten Chinese names. Meltrude lives in Eugene. THE attractions of Oregon's lit. depart- ment were enough to bring HELENA SCOTT over from a neighboring institu- tion. WE donlt know just what brought JANICE WHITE down from Washington. She has shown that the feminine mind can master business details, however. 0M lmmirml twrnIy-niw One hundred thirty DRES SOPHDM 0 up l1 mzdrml Illirfy-onc JOHNSON PRIDE HAUSLER CLASS OFFICERS WILLIAM JOHNSON ............................................................ President ELIZABETH PRIDE ........................................................ Vice President LUELLA HAUSLER ................................................................ Secretary ALICE GARRETSON .............................................................. Treasurer The Class of 1924 HE class of 1924 began its sophomore year with the same keen inter- est in the activities and general welfare of the University as had char- acterized its members last year. A majority of the members of the class were on hand for registration last fall and, contrary to the usual case, there was also some money left over from the freshman year. Both the men and women of the Class took an important part in Uni- versity athletics. 'Four men represented the class of ,2-1- on the varsity foot- ball team last fall and two were on the varsity basketball squad. Baseball and track will also find the sophomores taking a very active part in them. The women of the class were in the majority on the swimming team and were active in the other sports. True to tradition the underclass mix was won by the sophomores who were the aggressor's in the hsquaresth mix in history. The annual sopho- more dance was also well worthy of the class of ,24. As they have always tried to do all they could for the University in the past so shall the men and women of the class of 192-1- continue throughout their college life, always seeking to go just a little farther along the road of service to the University and to the state. ' One lnmdred tllirty-Icu'o HAUSLER ....................... President .............. V ice President ....................... Secretary ...................... Treasurer 924 with the same keen inter- the University as had char- ity of the membersofthe o the usual we. contrary I STAR LOUISE BEHIND THE SCREEN FOOLING THE PUBLIC MARCELLA BIZNESS! BIZNESS' DRESSING FOR THE FORMAL AT YOURVSERVICE TOO LATE JOE GAMMA PHIS EXCUSE ME! AGNES One lmmircd tlzi'rty-three EVERYBODY HAPPY! VERA, LUELIA, MID LETS Go! WHATS THE RACKET! ROSE AND LXZZIE WAITING FOR THE MAIL GEORGE LLOYD 2:30 A. M. MID PAULINE OUR PREXY 01m lumdrrd Illirry-four X . One hundred tlzirty-ff-vt' METCALF HAYNES SARGENT CLASS OFFICERS HESDEN METCALF ............................................................ President BERT HAYNES ........................................................ Vice President GERALDINE ROOT ............................................................ Serretary ALEXANDER SARGENT ....................................... . ........... Treasurer The Class of 1925 HE members of the hbiggest and best,, freshman class yet-the Class of ,25-met and organized, under the supervision of Dean Strauh, early in the Fall term, preparatory to taking their part in Oregon life. Work was begun immediately upon the Homecoming bonfire. Then the many worthy iiwearers 0f the greeni, were introduced to the mill race, to the varsity "Oi, paddles, were taught proper respect for the Oregon seal, and took part in the annual frosh pee-rade. There followed the get-acquain- ted party in the men,s gym, and Homecoming, when the bonfire was a big success. The freshman-sophomore mix was a true test of courage, and amid mud puddles and in pouring rain the class of ,25 put up a hard fight, which resulted in the inevitable soph victory. In February the frosh Glee club was one of the outstanding social eV- ents. Its oriental decorations, carried out with lanterns, pagodas, and in- cense, entirely transformed the new armory. Frosh interests in athletics was shown by their activities in football, basketball and minor sports. The members of the teams worked hard, made several out-of-town trips, and in basketball won every game played. One lumdred-tlzirty-six ERS President ................. Vice President .......................... Surnary ......................... Treasurer I925 reshman class yet-thc dassm: DCI'ViSiOIl of DeanStraub,eaI1! their part in Oregon life. m r Homecoming bonfire. x UP IN THE WORLD LUCY, EUGENIA, HELEN TRI DELTS NICE NEW BROOM HANDLING HEINY HAZEL SAY AH !" LONESOME LU ALPHA CHI DRESS PARADE MARY FOOLISI-I FIJIS DON,T CROWD, BOYS One hundred tlzirty-stwcn ? THE HIGH DIVE FIJI FROSH HERES THE FIRE Vk ORLD 7 M BRIGADE O ATOP TH E VX 021p lumdrcd Illirty-ciglzt O R B G I S A P P A K -BOO SOME BIRD PEEK-A SISTERLY LOVE ON THE FENCE Ar Wilsl 7:41:99 . V :5! r. 1 T V U wtt I ,! i; s t 6 w , . . x , z It , . b : V . Z . 5, . g, K ; In v, n x . . 2.x 1! 1 '4 AK i Ll I l w u 0H,! m A.?w .y: 01w lmmirmi Illirty-ninc As I Sit and Dream at Evening 1. As I sit and dream at evening Of those days now past and gone, And I think of all the old friends Whose memories to me return; I can see them all in fancy As they were in days of yore, And the sweetest days in all this world Are dreams of Oregon. CHORUS: Oh those days at Oregon They are the best of all Those dear old days at Oregon dre past but off recalled, 14nd yet in fancy I return To those good times for which I yearn I like a shady place By the old mill race 14f dear old Oregon. Once again I turn in fancy To those days of long ago, I can see the teams before me Winning fame and glory for the IIOJ, I can see those college rallies Where we sang 0f Victlries won, And the sweetest dreams in all this world Are the dreams of Oregon. One hundred forty evening it and gone. 01d friendi return ; ncy i yore, in all this world Oregon 1! all 5 at Oregon ecalled, r return 5 for which I W" e 168 m. ancy lgoy H'C me ,, V for the HO' J rallies fries Wm; d s in all M WM :0". Homecoming OMECOMING 1921 I Home to meet iem-back to beat ,em! H It was a colorful day on Hayward field despite the wind-driven rain which made the gridiron resemble a wave-swept island. Across in the bleachers were hundreds and hundreds of many colored umbrellas, and lemon and yellow hued cardboards held by the rooters which danced and scin- tillated into an ever changing animated iiOiC And then on the field was a team which did not beat ,em, if we are to believe the 0-0 score, but which up- set the dope and made sport writers crawfish. The Oregon clan heeded the signal fire and gathered for the annual Homecoming from all parts of the Northwest. Remember the Homecoming rally? Vesuvius in pyrotechnic eruption could hardly display the wim, wigger, and Witality of that noise carnival. And the bonfire! Flames which licked low-hanging clouds, speeches which aroused the 01d fighte that was the spirit of Homecoming. The greatest number of persons that ever attended an Oregon Home- coming were present for the big time staged on November 19, 1921. By the use of systematic methods, the campus luncheon and the big Home- coming dance went off better than ever before. Two dances were held, one in the Womenis Building and'the other in the new armory. Praise must be given the persons who arranged and managed Oregon,s greatest Homecoming. 0713 lmmirrd forIy-mm .0 m . y f. r 0 f 11. l f .I Ju n U I" e n 0 S ALSO SENIOR MORE FROSH e e r I" 4.1 y I r 0 f ll 1 0L r Jl t n H II P. N 0 Underclass Mix AUT and straight are drawn the lines which govern the annual un- derclass mix. Above all, campus tradition decrees that the mix 45in: shall be square. Square it was 5in the fall of 1921, but instead of a mix it was a swim. - 16' 131 Concisely and tersely, headlines in the Emerald told the story: uMuddy 5:311 mix is on the square. Sophomores win by 12 Splashes. Frosh are in swim." : 5, ;- Appropriately costumed for the torrential weather, the president of T1 the freshman class was led onto the field of aquatic battle just before the 57155553 siege of the sand bags began. uSome sophomore class? announced Dean i1535m Straub when he arose to leave after seeing the exalted sheik 0f the 1925 cram!" class strolling nonchalantly through the mud, gowned in a bathing suit. 31:17:55 Several times during the afternoon, the frosh showed symptoms of pugacity, but Leith Abbott, leading the sombreroed hosts, quelled the in- cipient insurrections with wicked sticks. Especially were the babes indig- nant when the rope broke in the tug of war contest and upon investigation it was found that in some unknown manner the soph,s end of the rope had become tangled with one of the football goal posts on Kincaid field. Still, it was the squarest mix staged at the University. Onr lmmlrmi fnrty-fozzr lix vhich govern the annual 1. dition decrees that the e itead of a mix it was asst: lld told the story: lhhii; iPlaShes. Frosh are in 511111 :11 weather, the president 1? aquatic battle just before ii: nore class," announced De: he hexalted sheikoithel 1h gowned 1n a bathing 511i . :frosh showed 5111p oml hreroed hosts, quellCW tecially were ontest and U hes MN Posts on Kincaide . University- the babes hi 9 pon inhijtlM a ,3 ophs endofthellllpii'l A ....s-w ; movmwywm .. t . mmzm.-e1.t "team-.. mane T hm . 1, wwf what evm r-wvwwsWWF .mf ' April Frolic QQ LUE DEVILS" and Gold Dust twins; whiskered sailors and barefoot B boys; Chinese dames and Colonial maidens; hundreds of girls and not a man student-these are merely a few characters assumed by that great colorful group of girls which gathered 1n the Women 5 Building last April for the annual April frolic. The door was mercilessly barred against men, but mens clothing was in evidence in all its stages from snowy -wigged colonial gentlemen to the modern college football hero proudly diSplaying his llO." The stunt put on by Kappa Alpha Theta won the silver cup for its originality and cleverness. Dorothy Fichard, dressed to represent a gor- geous peacock, won the first prize for the best costume. A quaint, dainty pineushion tEthel Wheelerh won second prize and Lillian Goon, represent- ing a jovial Chinese cook, was given honorable mention. Brides, bathing girls, Highlanders, soldiers, swaggering gobs all intermingled and rubbed shoulders in the festive vernal frolic. The powers that be last year saw that it would be good strategy to keep the men busy on the evening of the April frolic. Never before had such an affair been held in the Women,s building and some were dubious concerning its secrecy. Perhaps it was with this end in view that the men of the Uni- versity were entertained on that same night with a Usmokeless smokern in Villard. In previous years the frolic had been held in the menls gym and it had often been rumored that strange ape-like creatures had been seen moving about the roof of Friendly hall gazing in the general direction of the Three Sisters. Unmolested and in a new environment, the April frolic of 1921 was truly the greatest ever. Nancy Fields was general chairman of the April frolic committee. Our Mlmlrml forly-hvr xxHo SAID HBOHSH JUNIOR WEEK-ENDV 071p lnlmirml forIy-Jix Junior Week-End OW briefly theycan be enumerated now-those thrilling times and events of the 1921 Junior week-end. The canoe fete, state high school debates, campus day, Pacific coast tennis tournament, the two games of baseball between the Aggies and Oregon, the Pacific Coast Confer- ence track meet, and the junior prom. During the week-end festivities the University students showed to hun- dreds of prep school Visitors and to thousands of others the playful side of college life. Most colorful of all the events was the canoe fete. Kappa Kap- pa Gamma sorority won first prize for the girls, organizations with UForest Fantasy," a float depicting a piping Pan atop a huge mushroom. "A Spirit of the Sea," a large sea shell surrounded by sailors, and centered by an Aphrodite, won first prize among the men,s organization for Alpha Tau Omega. The canoe fete was directed by Wayne Akers and the lighting was supervised by George Pasto. The Varsity and O. A. C. split the double header baseball game, Ore- gon winning the first contest 32 and losing the second 5-4. In the Pacific Coast Conference track meet, Oregon perched on the third rail of the per- centage fence, but succeeded in setting two new marks when Walkley trav- eled the mile in recordtime and Tuck tossed the javelin in his usual super- ior form. Senior cops, captained by hSlim" Crandall, supervised and directed the numerous cleanup squads which policed the grounds on campus day. Ogden Johnson was general chairman of Oregonhs junior week-end. ' One ltmm'rml forly-xrrvmz 3:: ?tili ?leigws The Womatfs Building 1TH the completion of the Woman,s building in 1921 the spirit of the gXI social life in the University was entirely Changed. Previous to this time social functions where large groups were in attendance had to be. held in some hall away from the campus. tMany of the less formal af- fairs were held in the men,s gym. In either the down town halls or in the gymnasium the true spirit of the college function was lost. But now it is different. The VVomanis building has knitted more closely that harmonizing spirit of the campus. No longer do the students have to intrude upon the floors of others to stage their college gatherings. The Woman,s building has added a new tone to the spirit of the campus. More than ever before the social life of the campus is unified. The Woman,s building not only changed the social environment, but it also adds to the appearance of the campus. Placed as it is on the higher ground, its presence towers over the entire campus. Its great walls, its bold architecture, its spreading lawns'have intensified the beauty of the Univer- sity. Although the magnifiicent structure is named the Woman's building, every department in the University feels the challenge of the standards set by Ttw The building does not belong to the women alone. Already it is an es- sential part of the spirit of the University. To follow a thought expressed by the governor at the dedication of the building, it is also a great monu- ment-an enduring piece of beautiful masonry in memory of the people of the state who were interested in its construction. Our hundred forty-Izing One hundred zgfty Dedication of the WomanTs Building ORMAL dedication of the Womalfs building was held on Sunday, May F 7, 1921, with hundreds of people from all sections of the state in at- tendance. President Campbell presided at the dedicatory ceremonies, while Dr. Aurelia H. Reinhardt, president of Mills College, delivered the main address. President Campbell briefly summarized the campaign for funds for the building and praised the work of Mrs. Irene Gerlinger and others who saw the need of the women of the University. Governor Olcott in his address said that the building was a monument to the women of the state who had been interested in its construction. The dedication of the WomanTs building was an epochal mark in the progress of the University, said the governor. During the ceremonies the keys to the building were entrusted to Judge Hamilton, president of the board of re- gents. Dean John Straub, connected with the University since its beginning in 1878, praised the work of the early pioneers who had made possible the founding of the University. No other institution has had a smaller or more insignificant beginning and has developed more nobly than Oregon, said Dean Straub. Mothers Day was held at the University last year jointly with the dedication of the WomanTs building. The mothers of University students Visited the new building Saturday morning and later made a tour of inspec- tion of the campus. Mothers, students and friends took part in a campus luncheon. The following Sunday, however, was the real Mother,s day, and it was then that the Visiting mothers were the most honored. Every church in the city was the scene of a special service in the morning. A ves- per service was held in Villard in the afternoon. After the opening musi- cal program, the mothers were welcomed by Carlton Savage, president of the Associated Students. Savage said that he hoped the mothers of the university students would make the affair an annual event. 0716 htuzdrml fifty-onc Senior Leap-Week OMETHING original in the line of social entertainment for sedate stu- S dents who have long passed the frivolous stage of underclassmen was held. last February when the seniors 0f the University reversed the rul- ings of age-old custom. Senior women called up the menis organizations for dates, called to escort their men to dances and socials, and went fifty- fifty in the payment of all debts incurred during the evening. When the plans to hold Leap Week were first made known it was re- ported that a host of upperclassmen took careful precautions to establish their senior standing. One Eugene attorney brought suit against a senior girl because she refused to date him on the grounds that he was not a stu- dent. An article in the Emerald at the end of the wild week insinuated that the local attorney won his suit. One of the delightful events of the week, to use the phraseology 0f the society editor, was the Kappa Koffee Bust. A wild time was had by all. Guests came in autos, 0n skates, and in horse-drawn vehicles. Jealous jun- iors who saw their best ladies dating up seniors, declared that Leap Week should be made an annual affair. What was said to be one Of the wildest affairs of the week was the nbar room bust" held in Hendricks hall on February 16. Bar tenders, accoutered in the habiliments 0f the gun toter 0f the western ranges, ad- eptly slid schooners of root beer across the bar. So hilarious was this bust that the managers of a show being held in the Guild theatre, had to call up Hendricks hall by telephone and request the participants to make less noise or close the windows. The wild week terminated on Sunday when the Thetas staged a paper chase. Jay Dee, writing in Walt Mason style, commented on the senior Leap Week in this manner: iiNot since exams or scandal sheet have senior girls had such a treaty One lnmdred fifty-trwo :ek ntertamment for sedate sh stage of underehhmen u; n1versrty reversed the rh. up the menh organizahh and socials, and went hh. the evening. I first made known it we: re eful precautions to etahh nrought suit against a :enh: uunds that he was not a it;- of the wild week insinuatsi to use the phraseohgi' 011?: h wild time was had h h trawn vehicles. Jealoushn- TS, declared that Leap he? .i, ahairs of the week hath February 16. Bar tenet; .' of So hilarious wag Guild theatre, had toe ess nu artieipants to make the western range; t 15.5 Junior Prom N EIGHT piece jazz orchestra furnished the music for the junior prom, held in the armory on May 21, 1921. Elston Ireland was in charge of the big formal dance. Ireland, with a score of assistants, arranged and carried out many new features for the prom. The orchestra was hidden with a maze of decoration; system was used in getting the great crowd into the hall without congestion, and a special feature dance was staged. Frosh Glee IC T U R E a soft, colorful Japanese garden illuminated with subdued P lights; in your imagination transfer that gardenecentered by a pagoda for the musicians, canopied with many-hued streamers, lanterns and glass pendants-to the armory and you have the general effect of the an- nual frosh glee held on February 10. According to a previous announce- ment, the best musicians in the city were obtained for the one big time of the year when the freshman class rises into social distinction. Flowers and taxis were strictly taboo. The patrons and patronesses for the glee were ' Governor and Mrs. Ben W. Oleott, President and Mrs. P. L. Campbell, hir. and Mrs. George H. Gerlinger, and the deans of the schools. Homecoming Dance ECAUSE of the increased popularity of homecoming, as well as the lar- B ger enrollment in the University, it was necessary this year to divide the Homecoming dance. So while the underclassmen frolicked in the new armory, the alumni and upperelassmen danced in the Womanhs building. As the feature of the evening Mildred Le Compte entertained with inter- pretative dancing, after which she presented each guest with a fancy paper cap. One hundred hfty-tlzree A. 4,: Journalism Jamboree s A grand finale to the annual conference of the newspaper editors of the state, which was held on the campus January 13 and 14, the journal- ism students gathered in the men,s gym for their annual jamboree. Partners were chosen by lottery, so the affair was a real mix for everyone in the school, and an opportunity to mingle very informally With the fac- ulty and those editors who remained for the event. Some of the most enter- prising 0f the embryo journalists published several editions of the "Hammer" during the course of the evening. Class Lotteries T LEAST once every year each of the four classes stages a dance which is primarily for its own members. Early in the fall the freshmen celebrated with their Hacquaintance partyfi a dateless affair where everyone met everyone else. In the spring term the sophomores indulged in their lottery hard-times dance, the success of which is as annual as the dance itself. Possibly the iiwildest of them all"-if one considers the garb of the revelerseis the junior jazz jinx, an event of February of this year, which, was the result of a drawing. The seniors substituted, the same even- ing, a dateless dance for their usual lottery, but their really big time was the party for which the Sigma Nus were hosts at their chapter house in the spring. One lzzlmired fifty-four tree the newspaper ed1t01s nit ary l3 and 14, the Jim. for their annual jamhm vas a real mix for 1111mm ry informally with the hi- 1t. Some of the most enti- 11 editions of the "Hammer" lasscs stages a dance whit: y in the fall the heshm a dateicss aihh 1111111 111 the sophomores in high i which 15 as annual M -ii one considersg thch-i? tof February oithi::: ssubstitutede thesam their really higW their chapter 0Wn One Izumirml fifly-MM 1 777,; 4f A: 74A ;.4 1: BRICK One hundred 17fty-Jix The Coaches BILL BART MARTI N HOWARD Q: ART? was the captain of the varsity for this season. This marks M the end of his fourth year on the Oregon varsity, and for every year he has a good record to show. Before coming to Oregon "Mart,, played some four years with the Jefferson high school team of Portland. He came to college in 1918 in time to play on the S. A. T. C. team although at that time he was a freshman. The next year he. showed the coaches that he was real varsity material, and fought on the team that p1ayed Harvard 0n january 1, 1920. This was his last football season. and he plans to attend the Oregon medical school in Portland next year. 0211' lmmlrrd XifIy-sn-vrn .0 32a 2 . .. gas a :5 5:. m g". E :2 $22: ,5; :3 is a "a max :5 oamem ,f 8a.... :3 wigs. 838". K? A 2E3 a a: 2592 838" m: .32: an o. P n. "88 r: . i. m. a. mag E 2553 A game. Qua: munzams. 6: Hg: .3; :18? 133m a was 5:2; aim. jg gnaw 2: 5;? SM :5 mm: a 9n mwa a ii 5 ms; 3 :19; gang: 5? 95 Va N51: . .2 ans" TH E VARSITY SQUAD ; 03 ?:iEi 3573.3: ,. Wee. .meM u y," "as ' 1w 'a4vayu9g-r , , Mnu...-a-W Lafief Var .rw Varsity Football OREGON VS. 0. A. C. OR the second time in two years the varsity met the Aggie football team F with the same resultaa scoreless tie. But the statistics say that Ore- gon should have won the game. The held was wet and slippery and the boys tore up the turf so badly that it became a big mud puddle. The two heavy teams battled back and forth across the field, but neither was able to gather suHicient punch to put the ball across the opposing teams goal. Regardless of the wet day the Oregon sections of the stands were packed and many Aggie rooters even braved the climate to come and look on at one of the llflightingest" battles of the year. Both teams fought. Both teams deserve credit. But how different was the outcome from that predicted by the sport writers of the state after Oregon went down to a fighting defeat by a large score in the Berkeley contest. After that game Oregon was hardly conceded a chance to win another contest during the year, and the odds were heavily in favor of the O. A. C. team for the annual clash. Not until the time of the W. S. C. game did outsiders realize that under the tutelage of "Shy,, Huntington, "Bart,' Spellman, llBrickl, Mitchell, and llBilll, Hay- ward, Oregon was no longer placing a green team into the field that would be easy meat for all rivals. The Aggies came and sawethe rest is history. No one player was the star of the game. All of the team fought, and all of them scintillated as stars at various phases of the contest. To the mighty toe of "Spike" Leslie can be attributed much of Oregonhs success. Ortelmmlrml aIIy-nine 11Spike" was right, and time after time he would boot the ball high and far, pulling Oregon out of danger of a possible fluke get-away by the Aggies. He managed to outkick the Gill-Miller combination about a foot on every punt during the day. Captain 11Mart" Howard and 11Rud" Brown were on the job all the time, and every punt could End them waiting beside the re- ceiving Aggie, ready to spill him in his tracks as soon as he touched the ball. Both teams played a more or less defensive game, and the way that the Ore- gon backs stopped the farmers when occasionally they broke through the line prevented any Chance scores on that account. Oregon made three first downs from scrimmage to one for the Aggie team. There were many thrills in the games despite the fact that the field was too wet for any attempt at open field running. Four times Crowell tried kicks from placement for the Aggies, and four times the Oregon sec- tion sighed with relief as the ball went wild. 11Spike" tried two for the Lemon-Yellow team, and it was his second that nearly settled the outcome of the days contest. The ball rose true for the posts, but the aim was off just about an inch and the ball hit the cross bar and fell back. So much for the game. It was cleanly played on both sides and a hard fought battle. The teams were both in the best of condition, and the cone test was a good one. The Aggies have for two years maintained a clean record as far as Oregon is concerned. Each year the dope pointed to other outcomes in each case. 0m" lmndrrd sixty rlregon-King, 42 ; Johnson, 38. "llll of points -------------------------------- f111gth of punts ...................... x1 aained bv return of punts am rt- 3 . :15 recovered ................................. 1111011 fumbles igoals attempted ........................... 1adii'idual players with highest ya lmhge to one for the Ag? ESPltC the fact that thehh nlng. Four times Crowh four times the Oregon Sh "Spike" tried two fat the : nearly settled the outcome 3 posts, but the aim wash r and fell back. ed on both sides andahh t of condition, and them- :d a clean record as hm :d to other outcomes in each: Statistics of the game were as follows: Oregon First down from scrimmage .............................................. 3 Total number of scrimmage plays ...................................... 38 Total yardage gained from scrimmage ............................ 132 Ball lost on downs ............................................................ 1 Penalties ............................................................................ 5 Yards lost from penalties .................................................... 25 Forward passes attempted .................................................. 2 Forward passes completed ................................................ 1 Forward passes intercepted ................................................ 1 Yardage gained from passes ................................................ 20 First downs 0n passes ........................................................ 1 Number of points .............................................................. 13 Average length of punts .................................................... 33.9 Yardage gained by return of punts and kickoff ................ 42 Fumbles .............................................................................. 7 Fumbles recovered .............................................................. 4 Balls lost on fumbles ............................................................ 3 Field goals attempted ........................................................ 2 Individual players With highest yardage from scrimmage: OregoneKing, 42; Johnson, 38. O. A. C.-Miller, 10; Powell, 4. O. A. C. y-A HNO-F-OUIHHOOUIH p-L O 33 DJ 0 mNN-F- 07M lmmirml Jiny-mm 3 CAPTAIN NMART, How- ARD returned again this fall to hold down his old berth at left end on the varsity. This was llMartlsl, fourth and last season of playing for Oregon, and in him the var- sity loses one of the best and m o s t consistent ends 0 f s ome years. UMartH is a W Q2. .i r- speedy man at getting down under punts, and shows a great aptitude for receiving through the aerial route. It is on defense that lfMartll shows his greatest ability and seldom during the season did the opposing offense get around his end. He received his first injury in four years when he hurt his knee this season, but even with that handicap he showed the opposing elevens some real foot- hall. HMartH will be at the Oregon medical school next year. FLOYD SHIELDS, left guard, held down the other side of the line from his brother. This was Floydls first year on the varsity, and he work- ed like a veteran. He has the bulk and hght that seems to run in the family, and he will make his brother step to keep ahead of him next season. After Floyd made his place on the first team at the opening of the season there was no danger that he would be moved off. He is consistent, and Clever at taking the other man out of the play. He will be an asset to the team next year, and will be one of the returning veterans. One lmmlrml sixty-trwo ilmsh football experience to bac sity loses one of the by 1., most consistent end i S 5 0m? years. l'lian'lli Speedy man at gcttin E for receiving th school next year. gin roughi- shows his greatest iii: lg offense get around hiizi 1 he hurt his knee this saw iposmg elcvens some real RUTHERFORDuRUD" BROWN played his second year for the varsity at right end this year. llRud" is an id e a1 end as he is built heavily, and is able to combine suflicient speed with this bulk to keep up with any of them. At the opening of the season this year it looked as though HRudH would have a fi g h t "i604 .6fcww Liivnril ll, fwaj " -"' on his hands for this position with four good ends out, and he showed the coaches that he had the stuff to make a real varsity player which earned him the position. llRud,, will be back next year with two years of varsity and one of frosh football experience to back him. GEORGE KING, half back, was another man to show his mettle this year. George was a little late in getting back, but when he started he refused to take a back seat to anyone. He seems to have a peculiar inability to tell when he is down, and keeps right on going when by all rights he should stop. That is the reason that he is a consistent ground gainer, and when he starts with the ball the head linesman may as well start walking down the field. George is short and heavy and when he hits, something must give. He will be back again next season. One 11101de sixty-tlzree EARL HSPIKE" LESLIE, left tackle, also helped make the left side of Oregonls line t brawmw l L5 lmkw VQHCpOW l2! 2 WILLIAM nBILLY" REINHART, had a lot of hard luck this year which kept him out of the game for most of the season. In the Willamette game llBilly,, injured his shoulder so severely that the doctors said he would be unable to play during the remainder of the year. llBilly" did get in condition so that he could play at half in the Hawaiian games, and there acquitted himself with all his old-time ability. HBillyH seems to be the hard luck king for injuries, his last season trouble being a bad ankle which prevented him from playing in all the games. This will be his last year with the varsity, and in him uShyH is losing another player with plenty of the when the call comes. year heavier than ever, but his ability to boot the ball, and to open up the holes in the opponents line was not cut down in the least by this fact. round man-equally good at defense, of- fense, and in punting ability. This fact brought hini recognition from all the sport star berth by several. a stone wall defense this year. llSpike" is another man who has played his full 1 time with the varsity and whose shoes are going to be hard to fill next year Leslie returned this liSpike" is an all- writers of the coast and mention for an all- . X Lgomuf W OSJQNV Zr speed and fight which have made Oregon elevens victorious before. tan hululrrd.wa1y-four WLA i a mm 1,153th raved ii' 'th .Hettff Ihls' es. MOI ti m man he 51 BAP made 1 "Bark manag oflense is a h; 5ghter but dc throug ball. RM .""wff i N w. .1" ' - w "I h i n 5 new H : N-EIL IV'IORFITT alternated with Brown 1. i WM "N at right end this season. Neil made his u .5 g'vxzrvi second letter this yeari and proved valu- , N553, able to the varsity many times. iWorfitt is Nziitbri'" 1, e 3!. H" X'kth fast and when he tackles a man he seldom Emmy "I i L' .13. hp..." misses. Klorfitt looked better this year '3 t- v. v than last with his added experience, and . a... . N showed good head work both on the 0f- "Wmi' :g r .,,n tense and defense. He was on the receiv- . WK me mg end of the famous 45-yard pass that tied the score in the Idaho game. BARKLEY HBARK." LOUGHLIN, center, made his letter with the varsity this season. iiBark" is a steady, consistent player and - manages to smear up the opposing players Offense with considerable consistency. He is a hard worker, and in a game a hard fighter. iiBark" is never a Hashy player but does consistent work 2111 the way through. This was his last season of foot- : .. anrlLleu?khh ball. h Cenfor'ope? i i h i Y I . i i! v 4' 4 Our lmmirml Jiny-fi-t'c i 't I '7 KARL UVONDEH VONDER AHE, right tackle, hit his stride this season, and sur- prised everyone. Last year he was accounted a hard worker but he was unable to End himself. This sea- son was a different story. llVonde" seems to have a great ability to get through the line and break up the play of the other team before it can get started. He is tall and heavy, and combines these two assets with speed. He plays a game like that Of llKen,, Bartlett, and bids fair to fill that veteranls shoes next year. Bart Spellman will have good use for him on the line next year. H A R 0 L D iiCHAPPIE" CHAPMAN played a game at puarter this year that should put him in the Steers-Hunt- ington category with a couple of more years of ex- perience. "Chappiell came up as a raw recruit from last year,s frosh team, and at the first of the season failed to hit his stride. During the Chm pt? Lhapwm latter part of the season he surprised all of the fans by his whirlwind way of running the team. His headwork pulled Oregon out of many holes during the year, and on top of that he is a ground gainer of no little ability him- self. He is an accurate passer, and backs up the line on the defense with great ability. He has two more years ahead of him on the varsity. One hundred Jixty-six r 75 t lllled 0 o and '0 tears 3g 3 N I "last vear hrvarsm '. rv :l u I irrtceived an m M nhoulder which P Qt. This year he I - lav . t A 13ndplayfd 1n ' L A .5 11 again ad 3103100 m l' the ward was out 3 mm m '"ihUUldCI and was forced to q he back next year. 5550A. C. fans began to W0 husoh was returning to O t3'tarw1th the Olympic club though to that team that th tgtturned the day of the P hi :5 35 work out. F rom :ltlal Mano "the be :3 - nC dllUOlha l and Showet lllhtsuhbed for 03:9. at, Oregor HUGH CLERIN returned this year and played during the first part of the season. Hugh played on the frosh team of two years ago, and was out for varsity last year until he received an injury to his shoulder which put him out. This year he re- turned and played in the left end position against California when Howard was out with a bad leg. In this game he again hurt his shoulder and was forced to quit the team due to this injury. Hugh may come back next year. THE 0. A. C. fans began to worry when they heard that PRINCE l'PRINKl, CALLISON was returning to Oregon for another season. played last year with the Olympic club team of San Francisco and he was valuable enough to that team that they tried hard to get him to stay. llPrink" returned the day of the Pacific game. and was on the bench to watch the boys work out. the field than 0 nthe bench, and showed the stuff in all games. came into football prominence at Oregon on the S. A. T. C. team of 1918, and in 1920 he subbed for HBrickH Leslie. Since then he has improved greatly and will help make next year's outfit a real team also. Um' hunfrml ,riny-Jri'wn From that time on he spent more time on HUGH uHUNK" LATHAM t 0 0 k h is initial whirl at football this season. He started the season at end, but later was shifted to cult pass. CHARLES iiCHUCK" PARSONS began the season as a backfield man and was later shifted up to a guard position. NChuCk" also played in the California game in great shape. He is a brother of Johnny Parsons who played for the varsity here in 1916. NChucki, played with the frosh team of the year before, and bids fair to take the place of his brother in Oregon athletics with some more experience. In the Hawaiian games he was moved to the backfield again and showed that he had the real football stuff in him. He should go well next sea- son. One hundred sixty- impossible. iiHunlU played the fullback berth and was a good ground gainer. He will re- the backfield. Latham,s great stunt is to reach some ten or fifteen feet into the air and safely haul down a diHi- Last years experience on the varsity basketball team makes his judg- ment of distance good and he managed to complete some passes that looked almost He is speedy and hits hard. turn next season also. CHUCK 'quaow? Oregv n 2' TM? Kicking eight .gaawagonthroug . . . santhe varsity stood him m A ind bi next year he should mil; kirehi He is one of the men 5 YthOHs'sox was another me i to the varsity this year and 'th'. Ward played a halfback pl hints other teams. He posse hashifty open field runner. This 2: and he will make his mark in th ARCHIE HTINY" SHIELDS, right guard. ' . i played his second year on the varsity at a I i guard berth. During the first part of the season HTinyH was shifted to the fullback position but Bart Spellman needed him back in the line to fill his old place so he was changed again. l"Tiny", also has con- siderable punting ability and is a good man at heaving passes. His mainstay is stopping the other fellow, however. He is heavy, but moves quickly and his oppon- ents usually find him just where they most wish him not to be. When he opens up a hole on offense there is a place big enough to drive a wagon through. His last years playing on the varsity stood him in good ' anlel'lr Fun l mun 3n 3 : stead, and by next year he should make all the guards on the coast look to their laurels. He is one of the men llShy" will have to build on next year. VVARD JOHNSON was another member of last seasons frosh team who came up to the varsity this year and made good in the backfield during his first year. Ward played a halfback place, and his speed made him a dan- gerous man to other teams. He possesses a cool head and a stocky build, and is a shifty open field runner. This year's experience will be invaluable to him and he will make his mark in the conference next season. HARLAX HDUTCHH GRAM, halfback, played his first varsity year also. uDuteh" is lighter than most of the other backs but he made up for this by being a fast. shifty runner. He showed his greatest ability in open field running. and when tackled his man seemed to slide off. HDutchH has two more years ahead of him to play. He showed up especially well in the Pacific and Idaho games, and was a consistent ground gainer in each of these con- tests. 01mlmmlrr'ifJixly-nilzr Charles ttShW Huntington HEN the season opened unsuccessfully, some seemed to forget the previous record of Coach iiSh3r',, Huntington, and there was some unfavorable comment. Many felt that he was not putting out the team that he should. ihShyU said nothing but went on with his work. That these early season comments were unjustified is proved by the work of his reorganized team. ihShyy, is a good coach, and he has the Oregon spirit at heart. He has shown himself worthy of the confidence, and sup- port of the student body. He is to coach the varsity again next fall. Re- gardless of early season showing there will be no unfavorable comments. The Season,s Summary At the opening of the year, few men were back for ihShyh to use as a nucleus for his varsity team. Several good men had come up from the fresh- man team of the year before, but these were green. It was with this prob- lem confronting him that Huntington set to work. BEHIND THE LINES One hundred seventy . 'hflfd an "'6thth up against, and began to wrohaprospect ahead of them h :tc-worhimproving all the men a .vmmlyseason battle the game 5 H- ., .an :Ihfgndlmnc' hSthi Hunting' him. 011 , men in thisg i , . h. t rm ,iuh h15 hfbt 5': g The "105 then nexthW wee s. rsts string quar nableo to play during hands of the t mutheteam was fumbling i enough to score Late in th dmarchcd straight dov hchdmsn Reinhart kicked t .2: in th e hlast quarter. They m hehand t ere hquarterback Tuiiy throphich. game was slow, and both tea. whinvaluahle to Oregon, A5 5 ter, h Reinh hart fi hth'twu mbllwasi" the hlnew it the game, and had n kur'ii'm luinqmmv up- humus 'im Oregon vs. Willamette Oregonls first battle of the year came when the team met the lVillam- ette University Bearcats at Salem. October 1. The varsity won the contest by the close score of 7-3, and for a time it even seemed as though there was danger that Oregon might lose. It was after this game that everyone began to realize that all was not well on the gridiron, and that Oregonls previous overconfident attitude was uncalled for. Coach liShy,, Huntington was handicapped by the loss of several of his first string men in this game, which made his job a difficult one for the next few weeks. The most serious of the injuries was that of llBillll Reinhart, first string quarter, whose shoulder was hurt to such an ex- tent that he was unable to play during the remainder of the season. The ball was in the hands of the Oregon varsity the great majority of the time, but the team was fumbling regularly and could not keep posses- sion long enough to score. Late in the third quarter Oregon did manage to get started and marched straight down the field on a series of line bucks for a touchdown. Reinhart kicked the goal. The score of the Bear- cats came in the last quarter. They worked the ball down to the eighteen yard line and there quarterback HTuffy" Irvine lifted it over the bar with a pretty drop kick. This game was slow, and both teams showed a great lack of practice, but it was invaluable to Oregon. As soon as it was over the coaches knew what they were up against, and began to work the kinks out. The men were nearly all new at the game, and had never played together before. With this sort of a prospect ahead of them iiBill," ilShyf, "Bart" and "Brick" began to work improving all the men and building what they lacked. As an early season battle the game served its purpose. UIH' lmmlrml .rri'rVIIy-rmr Oregon vs. Pacific The first part of the game with Pacific University started much in the same fashion as that which had been played against the Willamette Bear- eats the week previous. The first half was filled with fumbles and costly penalties, but in the last quarter the varsity showed to good advantage win- ning the game by a 21 t0 7 score. Oregon could not seem to get started until after the Pacific men scored in the third quarter. The ball had been worked down the field to the Pa- cific ten yard line, and the Lemon-Yellow players looked good for a score, when a fumble gave the ball to Blackman, the Visitors right end who raced the length of the field for a touchdown. When placed in danger by this score the varsity suddenly wakened, and a different team seemed to play the remainder of the game. The Oregon backs smashed through the Pacihc line after the kickoff straight down the field to the four yard line, where ihTinyT, Shields carried the ball over. Gram, Chapman, Shields and Jordan plowed through the opposing line with little trouble, and time was called for the third quarter with the ball in Oregon,s possession 0n Pacificys ten yard line. With two plays after the opening of the next period Oregon again scored. On the kickoff Oregon again began the same march down the field with a series of short line bucks and end runs, and scored her last touchdown. hhSpike" Leslie kicked all three goals, giving Oregon 21 21-7 lead over her opponents. Pacific played a strictly defensive game, waiting for a break that might give her the Victory. Only four attempts were made to make gains on line One hundred Jervszy-lrwa ; 2i he old 'hhht 1, ; weed to return home With any a . htgtnphyed good ball but see a shitsmostneeded. One perfect Oregon v ' i ' ic hisloohed like the year In wh superstition that no aggi he gridiron warriors from heheah came in the second qua at'stenyard line. The varsityfi :tuhand then the ball was snappet a .irt'hSphe's" toe spuarely, but it 1 Khldaho's right tackle, had slipp zhmof Leslie. The ball hit h 'gtttttttd by Idaho. Score, Idah plays, and usually Adams. the fullback, punted as soon as Pacific received the ball. The team was much lighter than that of Oregon and during the latter part of the game sustained numerous injuries. Oregon showed up to much better advantage during this game and showed the training received during the week previous to the battle. TTShy" tried several backfield combinations, all of which played good ball. The three touchdowns were made by the Shields-Chapman-Jordan combination. TTSpikeh Leslie was punting up to form and made some very pretty kicks. Two Of his boots passed the 60 yard mark and he did not fizzle any of the time. Oregon vs. Idaho This looked like the year in which Idaho had the best chance ever to break the old superstition that no aggregation from Idaho is ever destined to humble the gridiron warriors from Oregon. But still the Gem staters were forced to return home with only a 7-7 tie to their credit. The break came in the second quarter of the battle. Idaho punted t0 OregonTs ten yard line. The varsity first tried a trick play which was not successful, and then the ball was snapped t0 TTSpikeH Leslie for a punt. The ball met TTSpikes, toe spuarely, but it was a fraction of a minute too late, as Vohs, Idahds right tackle, had slipped through the line and placed him- self in front of Leslie. The ball hit his Chest and rebounded over the line being recovered by Idaho. Score, Idaho 7, Oregon 0. Oregon played good ball but seemed to lack the punch at the times when it was most needed. One perfect play saved the day for Oregon, and One lmmlrni Iti-I'rnly-lln'm' showed Coach Kelley of Idaho thatregardless of his lack of faith in the Idaho jinx, there was such a thing as a good play which could beat his team. Oregon found herself on Idahds 38 yard line with one more down to go. Line bucking had not been able to make the necessary yardage, but when HSpikeH Leslie dropped back in the usual punt formation Idaho was not sus- picious. The ball was snapped to him, and he calmly drew back his arm and waited until he saw an Oregon man in the clear. The Idaho men were on him as he threw, but still he made the most beautiful pass seen for many a day upon the Multnomah turf. Neil Morhtt was waiting under it on Idaho,s three yard line, and he dashed across making the tying touchdown. The pass measured 45 yards, and Oregon may thank Leslie and MoHit that the Gem staters went home with a tie instead of a Victory to their credit. hiSpike" kicked goal a few minutes after. Score, Idaho 7, Oregon 7. All the luck seemed to be going to Idaho in the first part of the game, and it seemed as though the goddess of chance had deserted Oregon for once. VVhen the blocked punt gave Idaho a score the Idaho rooting sections went Wild. The jubilation was short lived, however, as Oregon tied the score five minutes later. For the most part Oregon played a defensive game. After the Lemon- Yellow score, Idaho 'opened up with an offensive passing game, but this campaign was unsuccessful. Oregon had only one other chance to score. hiSpike" tried one kick from placement, but it was smeared by Idaho. One hundred seventy-four a Store, California 39, Oregon . core The World 5 h 1i'ragaintooh the ball and 5m Uhth hhhrun, scoring another touchdt ghhhhr ended with a score of 1:1 Thenext period saw a reversw hhctiw which had marked th marched down the field and crt :honetouchdown, and Nisbit th jshhn the other. This was his firs hhtht second half Oregon's lim 'hwns. After an exchange of w .':h his second touchdown. The ichDuunc got away for a scnsatio h the fourth quarter Oregon hthahihomians were unable to s Mugs: a'r . m4 N.?- hl um .35? 1.! Hull??? ., Oregon vs. California Oregon,s team was unable to stop the rushes of the California Bruins, and went down to a fighting defeat to a score of 39 t0 0 on a rain soaked field at Berkeley, October 25. The Lemon-Yellow team fought from start to finish, but was outclassed from the outset by the Californians. California began the scoring seven minutes after the opening kickoff. Parsons received the ball for Oregon, and after Oregon had twice bucked the line for short gains TTSpike" Leslie punted. California began a march down the field with a succession of short line 'bucks. Nichols finally carried the ball over. Erb kicked goal. Score, California 7, Oregon 0. The second score came shortly later. After an exchange of punts Nichols again took the ball and smashed through the Oregon team for a 35-yard run, scoring another touchdown. Erb again converted the goal and the quarter ended with a score of 1+ to 0 in favor of the Bears. The next period saw a reversion of the California backs to the steam roller tactics which had marked their seasons work. Twice the native sons marched down the field and crossed the line of the Oregonians. Bell scored one touchdown, and Nisbit the other. Erb converted one goal and failed on the other. This was his first failure of the year. In the second half Oregon,s line bucked up, and held the Californians for downs. After an exchange of punts and a series of line bucks Bell scored his second touchdown. The final tally came a few minutes later when Dunne got away for a sensational gain of 4-5 yards through Oregoxfs team. Score, California 39, Oregon 0. In the fourth quarter Oregon put up a stone wall brand of defense that the Californians were unable to pierce. Twice during this period the Oregon men smashed the California line for first downs, and once it seemed that the varsity might score. Both teams fumbled badly in the last period and the ball changed hands several times on that account. Um, lmmirml Jsrezw'nly-hz't' The California game proved one thing: Oregon can never be out- fought. All the Sport writers who witnessed the game admit that. The team played against a great scoring machine, and was outclassed in every department of the game, but when the final whistle blew it was still fighting as hard as at the opening of the contest. Oregon vs. W. S. C. The week after Oregonls tangle with California, the W. S. C. Cou- gars met that team. Of all the coast teams, the only one conceded a chance with California was W. S. C. The Cougars put up the fight of their lives and held California to a two touchdown lead. On the strength of scores then W. S. C. led Oregon by 25 points. But the Oregon-W. S. C. game ended with a 7 to 7 tie. After the California game Coach liShy7 Huntington began to remake Oregon,s lineup. Backs were shifted to the line, and ends went into the backfield. Long, hard workouts, and careful drilling were the orders each day. Several of the men witnessed the California-VV. S. C. game and a system was prepared to meet the Cougar onslaught. Oregon went to Pullman with a do-or-die determination back of the team. No one was confident of the score, but everyone knew that the Cou- gars were in for a battle. The dope experts did not concede Oregon a chance, but the score ended 7 to 7. Fight was the thing that did it. llShy" had drilled the training into his men, but it was their personal light that made a defeat into a tie. The score stood in the fourth quarter, W. S. C. 7, Oregon 0. . Oregon took the ball in midfield, and marched straight down the field to the striking distance, Where Hal Chapman, playing a great game at quarv ter, shoved it over. Leslie kicked the goal. Score, W. S. C. 7, Oregon 7. Oregon should have won the game but for a piece of bad luck. King recovered a fumble of Zaepfel, Cougar left half, and raced across the line. 07m lmndrml swmty-six '2- 5h opening whistle. .iilillll' H Howard Pla-l i gaptain "llart hjmpl y him uh " ' 'nJury. uh rrcencd lIlS l h'hhington State had the C081 . ?mput up real football. Oreg. hrs, but what it lacked m ex; Oregon vs. The last game of the season he fhmah Club team. This was 1 fad many rcdoutablc football u gfzduding Bill Steers, cx-Oregol 5-2th to 7. Philbrool's team was considered ,Timm this year, even though c :h California game. The clu :. during the seasori including th and the sporting writers of PI w 9mm: '7;;' h 9' r. as 11.2w- u'u tag 1'", b 1:5me3 .' a r W bah" m1? : H h! 'Rmmw: wrw m i! M , W V. 7W2 V N f " v? rt: . T I 0' ?mfl 3' The score was disallowed. however. as one of the Oregon men was called for tripping HlVlike" NIalone who was trying to pick King from behind. The game was cleanly played and brilliant. Few penalties were called. and both teams were playing up to form. Had California met the Oregon team that day there would have been no 29 to 0 score. The XV. S. C. points came in the second quarter. Skadan passed 25 yards to Jenne who raced to the Lemon-Yellow three yard line before he could be stopped. It took llMikel, lVIoran just two tries to put the ball over from there. Skadan Licked goal. Captain iiMarW Howard played all the game. although it was not decided to play him until just before the whistle. This was his first game since he received his injury. VVashington State had the coached team that was sufficiently experi- enced to put up real football. Oregon had a well coached team that lacked experience, but what it lacked in experience it more than made up in fight. Oregon vs. Multnomah The last game of the season before the Hawaiian trip was with the Multnomah Club team. This was looked forward to with interest as the club had many redoutable football warriors of former college teams play- ing, including Bill Steers, ex-Oregon quarter. The club was downed in the battle 21 t0 7. Philbrookls team was considered to have the big edge on the Lemon- Yellow team this year, even though considerable improvement was admitted Since the California game. The club had trampled over some very good teams during the season including that of the Olympic Club of San Fran- eisco, and the sporting writers of Portland were handing them the prize before the opening whistle. 0111' lmmlrml xr-z'rnIy-Jr-IWI l l l i The game was no walkaway for the varsity, and Bill Steers and his friends made things interesting all the way. With the score standing H to 7 in favor of Oregon, Multnomah began an offensive which looked for a time as though it might even things up, but Oregon braced up and held the clubmen by a brilliant defense. Oregonls third touchdown came in the last quarter with but a few min- utes to play. A partly blocked punt 0f Lathamls was recovered and after a few ineffectual attempts to buck the club line Oregon opened up with a tassing game that gave the final score. The first was from Chapman to La- tham, and the second from Latham to Howard. The Multnomah Club game of course does not Change Oregonls posi- tion in the conference standing, but it shows the improvement that has been made in the team since the opening of the season. The team of the Club was the strongest produced by that organization in many years. So ended the season as far as the United States was concerned. The Hawaiian Trip For the first time in the history of the University of Oregon an athletic team was sent across the briny deep to meet the team of another country. The 1921-22 football team holds that distinction, and will go down in the history of the institution in that category. The best part of it is that the team played two games and won both of them. The first game was played with the University of Hawaii at Honolulu on December 26, and Oregon took this team into camp by a score of +7 to 0. The second game was a slightly harder battle. with the Pearl Harbor Navy aggregation, played on January 2. This game was also won by the varsity by a score of 35 t0 5. Details of the games are lacking, and information cannot be obtained from the team members. When asked in regard to how they were played the usual reply is, lth, they were good games; but can you imagine a coun- 07117 lmndrml .rrvmzty-riglll Z A lillll time 0Ut raggngation. 1: men were all strong in their hrs of entertainment. Everyt telathone. and the only thing that :zhtlhll Hayward laid down st thtllml 1' Ill 11' authf"tlL Info rre th . C CO lllt at least seeml ll awa .ll. th UanCrSl 0 .. ht nllllll llC H walla" izilllll it Up .el' allt 1had1 an Pl tr .3 113W ' 0 a c l game W215 med mt tllhult :1nt .11 Th hiel dl L odgame nith the Pearl l 111tr to llart Honard. Th. ll Uiab battle than the Han anan1 l1 seamt hat hthe first one had beer 1110 the man Most of theh Z'ttllltgf teams. and the others l viltheprinciples and the proper 1 :11 still one and the score does -.:jtgohg all the time to prevent try where they have the sides of the houses replaced by wire nettings, and no stoves for heating purposes ?" Or some one will say, lll shaved in cold water all the time I was there as they do not have any hot water for washing purposes." About the only authentic information one can get is in regard to the scores. They at least seem to be correct. As these scores would indicate. the varsity had the University of Hawaii team very much outclassed. The Oregonians say that the Hawaiian boys, although outweighed and out- coached, gave all they had, and put up a good lighting battle. The latter part of the game was turned into a track meet by the Oregon backs, and they scored at will. The chief difliculty; according to Quarterback Chap- man, was that the day was so warm that one could only run some twenty yards at a time, and then had to lie down to rest. hrlost of the game was spent in taking time out. The second game with the Pearl Harbor team was a different propo- sition, according to Mart Howard. The Navy aggregation put up a stron- ger kind of a battle than the Hawaiians. This was not the inexperienced sort of a team that the first one had been, and Oregon was also outweighed ten pounds to the man. Niost of the Navy players had previously played on some college teams, and the others had played the game sufficiently to understand the principles and the proper method of carrying them out. The fight was a stiff one and the score does not indicate the fact that Oregon was kept going all the time to prevent her lead from being cut down by the other aggregation. The men were all strong in their praise of the methods of Honolulu along the lines of entertainment. Everything possible was done to make the men feel at home. and the only thing that marred this feature of the trip was the fact that Bill Hayward laid down strict training rules which prevented UIII' anilnui .fl'AI'I'IIIy-III-llf l i l l x l i E , . the boys from accepting many of the proffered engagements. As it was they met many of the Island people and agree that an Oregon team has nowhere received superior hOSpitality. A great part of the success of the Oregon team may be laid to those same training rules which Trainer Hayward so rigidly enforced. The Oregon men left a cold climate and went into a hot one which is enough to spoil any football team unless it has the best of care. Had the men not been in the best of condition before they left, and handled in the right way by Hayward while in Hawaii they would not have been able to pile up the scores that they made. The members of the team all laud the good sportsmanship shown by the Honolulu aggregations. They were frank to admit that they were out- classed, and complimented the Oregon men on the showing made in the two games. Fourteen football players made the trip. These were Captain Mart Howard, left end; llRudll Brown, right end; Karl Vonder Ahe, right tackle; Floyd Shields, left guard; Prince Callison, center; llBark" Laughlin, center; Archie Shields, right guard; NSpikell Leslie, left tackle; Hal Chap- man, quarter; Bill Reinhart, halfback; George King, halfback; llDutchn Gram, halfback; Charles Parsons, halfback; and llHunk" Latham, full- back. All of these men played in each of the games. All of them are now varsity llOll men. Coach HShyH Huntington, Trainer Bill Hayward, and Graduate Man- ager Jack Benefiel also made the trip. This was a honeymoon trip for Coach Huntington and Manager Beneflel. These were the last games of the football season for Oregon. Ac- cording to Captain Mart Howard, the team picked up 100 per cent during the year. When the season opened nearly all the men were green. They were all hghters, but they didn,t know how to act effectively. uShyl, Hunt- ington made them football players. With his training and their own ability to fight they made a real team. Nearly all of them will return next year, and will have a year of experience behind them. It is too early to begin to prophecyy but Oregon looks good for next year. One lmmlrml pigllly l'tgun 0 ....................................... 'rgonll Conference 5 l'r'gllll l ...................................... legnn 31 Oregon team . m . "K1 V enhhm 1d the good SPOmIMnship 'e hank to admit that thaw; men on the showing made in he trip. These were Cam 7; hght end; Karl h'ondtr .h 3 x Callison. center; "Bath" L; Spike" Leslie. leht tathh; hi i; George King. hahhhh: hlfback; and "Hunk" m: h of the games. All oh them: r Bill Haward. and Grahtzzh . This was a honfhmhii." chch. . football sewn ho: 0hr: team picked up 100 phi arlv all the 77m h: hoh' to act thcttlh'f L With his tramlhh an L , ley all Oh them ,2, m. , , 123' rience beh1nd hem ,t XE 1 t EVENTEEN Letter Men men received football letters this year. The large number of games played, and the two intersectional games caused a larger number to be given out than usual. The men receiving the decorations were: Captain Mart George King-Halfback Neil Morfitt-Right end. HowardeLeft end EEBark7 LaughlineCenter. HTiny7 ShieldSeRight guard. EERud7 BrownT-Right end. Floyd Shields-Left guard. "Hunk" Latham-Fullback. Hugh Clerin-TLeft end. TEHal" Chapman ETPrink" Calli TESpikehT LeslieeLeft end. EEVonde" Vonder Ahe-Tackle. Quarter. HChuckH ParsonseHalfback. VVard J0hnson-Ha1fback. "Dutch7 GrameHalfback som-Center. The Season,s Record Oregon 7 ................................................................ Willamette 3 Oregon 21 ............. , ..................................................... Pacific U. 7 Oregon 7 ........................................................................... Idaho 7 Oregon 0 ................................................................ California 39 Oregon 7 .................................................................... W. S. C. 7 Oregon 0 ....................................................................... Aggies 0 Oregon 21 ................................................................ Muhtnomah 7 Conference Standing PACIFIC COAST Team VV L T California 4 O 0 W. S. C. ................................................................................. 1 1 1 'Stanford 1 1 1 Oregon 0 1 1 U. of W. .................................................................................... O 2 0 0m? lmmlrmi cighty-mzrf 34 E 1;. h A t l h h ' f 5 ,3 J h : ' : E: h , h ; w ' h h , . t z: x h f i E h x E r u v z E h h E i h ' 1 a . 5 g , a E l l , I .' . h h 4 i 'h Eh a E h- E h h ; g1. E; h.' h it h 1, E17 h E, h it Hliherf T 11m wt - large" -dto - .i rama . , ttrIC VarSIty Basketball Mgdopnhlghltngf while 0 ' l ' ,iiitffemc the future On tip and little attempt was rnad 'trheChemawa Indians, wmmng viz Club of Astoria and the Mt: from the North Pacific Dental t Thcntttgame was with the M lost by a small margin. The COACH BOHLER RECON was handicapped for the basketball season this year by the fact that some of her best basketball men were also members of the foot- ball squad Which made the Hawaiian trip. The football men did not return from this trip until after the season was fairly well under way, and then, due to press of work, they were unable to try for team places. This fact, combined with the fact that the other teams of the northwest and the Pacific coast were the best in several years, accounts for the place Oregon had to take in conference standings. In spite of these handicaps Coach Bohler has worked hard with the men and prospects for next year at least appear to be considerably better. The Doughnut series was considerably enlarged this year and this brought a great deal of material into the limelight, both for the ifrosh and the varsity hves. There was a large turnout for the team.but nearly all of the men One llzmdred eigllty-trwo were inexperienced. Bohler saw the problem he had to face and began a process whereby he might determine just which men were best suited to play and also train a large number for next year. He did not keep one team and try to develop it highly, but tried to develop a large number of men by play- ing different combinations. VVhile this is not a game-winning system, it is one which will make the future Oregon teams of the caliber of those which are playing for the other coast colleges this year. When the season opened it was easy to see that the team was going to miss the stellar work of llEddie" Durno, captain of last years aggregation. "Eddie" acted in the capacity of freshman coach this year. "Nish" Chap- man who had served as varsity guard for three years was also missing from the line-up. "Hunk" Latham, the rangy center of last years team, was with the football team in Hawaii, and so was unable to compete. This left a nucleus of two letter men, Beller and lVIarc Latham, and a number of last years subs to build on. Hal Chapman who had been figured to fill his brother,s shoes on the varsity this year, was also with the football team. Bohler took his men on a pre-season barnstorming trip to give them some experience during Christmas vacation. This was strictly an experi- ence trip and little attempt was made to win the games. The varsity men met the Chemawa Indians, winning both games, were defeated by the Co- lumbia Club of Astoria and the McMinnVille American Legion team, and won from the North Pacific Dental College team in Portland. The next game was with the Multnomah Club five in Portland and the varsity lost by a small margin. The team returned home then and the next EDLUND ZIMMERMAN 07m lmndred eigllty-tllrct four games were played in Eugene, the opponents being Whitman and Idaho. In these games the men showed the greenness of a new team, but they fought hard throughout and the games were not easy Victories for the other teams. On the northern trip two games were dropped to the Uni- versity of Washington. Six games were then played at home, with Stanford, Washington and the Aggies. The week-end following, two more games were p1ayed with the Aggies in Corvallis. By the time of the southern trip the team was beginning to show the effect of Bohler,s hard work. The California Bears were planning on two easy Victories after their 49 to 15 Victory over W. S. C. the week previous. In these two games the varsity showed the native sons that Oregon is never beaten until the final whistle and held the Bears to 25-12 and 30-32 victories. A brand of defensive ball was played Which kept the Californians puzzled. Bohler picked this style of game previously and had trained the men to play it. The following games were played with Stanford, and here again the varsity played real ball. The scores here were 17-12 and 20-9. In the sec- ond game the men were tired and did not go so well. Eight men made the trip With Bohler, and these eight 2111 played in every game except the final one with the Cardinals in which Bohler used a straight Iine-up. The remaining six games were played with Nevada and Willamette. The varsity stepped into the win column on the first Nevada game, and showed the crowds that the team was a different organization than that which had played the openers at home with Whitman. LATHAM BELLER BURNETT 0712lzundred eiglzty-four 11regon'smainhopcf . d .. This season Bohler receive it. but these were circles in WI '13:: is a sportsman. His teams 1:: alibi; He is a real coach. More power to him. the Bears :0 25-12 and 30.3213 1 which kept the Californians; 'cviously and had trained the red with Stanford, and here 3;? here were 17-12 and 2M. ln 1 not go so well. Eightmcnm- played in every game mph? lcr used a straight linc-up. played with chada and llili' ilumn on the first lei lit a dilimnt orgmiunon h" With the material now in sight for next year Oregon should have 21 team fit to meet any of the coast colleges. This year Oregon pitted a first year team against the third year teams of all the other colleges. Next year the tables will be turned. Only two men will be lost this year, Beller and Latham, and there is a good crew of frosh to come up. The freshman team did not lose a game this season, and some of the men should be good for the varsity next year. In addition to these men there are a number of men ineli- gible this year for various reasons who will all be out next season. This list includes Shafer, Spear, Bliss, Brown and several others. Hugh Latham, Oregonls rangy center, will be able to participate for two more years. Hal Chapman will be able to play also. These last two were on the Hawaiian trip this year Which cut them out of basketball. The varsity men of this year who will return are Rockhey, Andre, Edlund, Burnett, Zimmerman, Alt- stock, Goar and Couch. Oregonls main hope for next year lies in Coach George M. Bohler, how- ever. This season Bohler received some unfavorable comment from some sources, but these were circles in which basketball technique was unknown. Bohler is a sportsman. His teams never crab decisions, and he personally never alibis. He is a real coach. More power to him. VARSITY SQUAD One Izmzdred eiglzty-ii-ve Order of The "0,, FOOTBALL F. SHIELDS REINHART CLERIN H. LATHAM A. SHIELDS BROWN VONDER AHF. H. CHAPMAN KING LESLIE GRAM PARSONS HOWARD MORFITT LOUGHLIN CALLISON W. JOHNSON ?,if'f'l'cfr' 5-7nx3- r v.4 4,; z, BASKETBALL M. LATHAM GOAR ANDRE BELLER ROCKHEY ZIMMERMAN EDLUND BURNETT COUCH BASEBALL LESLIE SVAVERUD JACOBSON BERG ZIMMERMAN KNUDSEN BELLER GAMBLE H. JACOBBERGER REINHART BASE TRACK TUCK SUNDELEAF VVALKLEY HAYSLIP STRACHAN PORTWOOD I BLACKABY KUHNHAUSEN BOWLES WYATT LARSON BLACKBURN HEMENWAY PHILLIPS PELTIER TENNIS WILLIAMS WESTERMAN WRESTLING WEGNER One hundred eiglzly-six OmEzO: .3525. . ,, , s 95. SEE 5; Aw53 53:5 V. ?:zSz mm $35 9; 85:2 Guzman 2wa a :8; E2 5E, . m. E .. . Cum $22?wa SENQLER: Varsity Track WITH 21 new $10,011 oval cinder track Oregon was in good shape to entertain the other conference colleges at the annual Pacific Coast Conference track and field meet held in Eugene May 21. Four colleges, Oregon, Washington, 0. A. C., and W. S. C., were represented. The teams from California and Stanford were unable to participate as they were scheduled to appear at the Intercollegiate Amateur Athletic Asso- ciation of America meet at Boston at the same time. U. S. C. also planned to send a team until a short time before the meet when Charlie Paddock became ill. Washington won the meet with 60 points. The other teams, 0. A C., Ore- gon, and W. S. C., followed in order with 48, 36V2, and 18V2 points respectively. The meet was successful from all stand- points, even including weather and crowd. Six conference records were broken and one was tied. Glen Walkley, running for Oregon, clipped 1-5 second off the mile record, doing it in 4:28; Tuck, of Oregon, raised the javelin record to 192 feet 8 in- ches; Hobart, of O. A. C., cut the two l t e" : 1 mile record two seconds, doing it in 9.514-5, and Pope, of Washington, broke two weight records, the discus and shot put. He threw the dis- cus 14-8 feet six inches, and put the shot 45 feet eight inches. Sims, of the Aggie team, won the half mile in 1:57 1-5, which set a new confer- ence mark. In the century, Hurley, of Washington, stepped to the tune of 9:4, tying the record set by Kirksey of Stanford last year. Hurley was also high point man of the meet, making fifteen points with firsts One lumdred eiglzty-eiglzt T Wyatt an 5'Prhier Wayne Akers and B rst later Oregon 333m hof hvashington in a dual ' mhofahndslide for the Sun 43m 88 to 43. Tim coast ret Jvtz'Oregon, who threw the jave ,thpeofWashington, who hurlet 5:531th Oregon runners mist hit rate and all broke their thniant This cost the va we able to recover sulliciently 11h ll'allley showed that he t '22th bl taking a first i W time later. On the Or; in . :hhunors. Mm 1 thHMWW mandshotput. Hc-lr mmHMWW ei11157l5llWleta in the hundred 220, and 220 low hurdles. Tuck, of Oregon fame came next with 10A points, and Sims of O. A C. and Pope of Washington, tied with 10 counters. Washington took the lead in the early part of the meet and was never in danger. The first meet 0f the season in which the varsity participated was the relay carnival at Seattle April 23. Nine teams entered, representing Wash- ington, W. S. C., O. A. C., Idaho, U. S. C., Whitman, Riontana, Montana Wesleyan and Oregon. Oregon entered teams in the half-mile relay, the mile relay, and the two-mile relay. Arthur Tuck was also entered in the pentathlon. Oregon was only able to pull a fourth in the meet, Tuck win- ning the pentathlon and the mile relay team taking a third in that event. The men who made the trip were Art Kuhnhausen, Del Oberteuffer, Arthur Larsen and Roscoe Hemenway in the half mile relay; Dick Sundeleaf, Scan Collins, Tom Wyatt and Ray Lucas in the mile relay; and Glen Walkley, "Spud,, Peltier, Wayne Akers and Bill Coleman in the two-mile relay. Two weeks later Oregon again made the northern trip to meet the University of Washington in a dual meet on their home Cinders. The meet was much of a landslide for the Sun Dodgers who carried off the honors to the tune of 88 to 4-3. Two coast records were broken in this meet, one by Tuck of Oregon, who threw the javelin 192 feet 4 inches; and the other by Gus Pope of Washington, who hurled the discus 14-5 feet 4 inches. In the 220 event the Oregon runners mistook the finish posts of the century for those of that race and all broke their strides although they were leading the Washingtonians. This cost the varsity first and third places, although Larsen was able to recover suHiciently to take the second place. Glen VValkley showed that he had not lost any of his endurance of the previous season by taking a first in the mile run and a third in the two- mile a short time later. On the Oregon team Tuck and Blackaby tied for high point honors, each making nine points. 0M lmmirrd eiglzIy-nine The third meet for Oregon came the week after when the Aggies came over for the annual encounter. The farmers managed to return to Corval- lis on the long end of a 71 to 60 score. The meet was a close one and depended upon the javelin throw and the relay. Oregon had to have a first and second place in the javelin, and a first in the relay to win. Dalton of O. A. C., took a second in the javelin which spoiled Oregon,s chances so Bill did not use his regular relay team and the Aggies won that event also. Another coast record was broken in this meet when Hobart of the Aggies, pounded out the two-mile in 9 minutes, 53 2-5 seconds. Tuck of Oregon, added a few more inches to his javelin record by hurling the spear 193 feet 1 inch. Seven teams representing Washington, 0. A. C., W. S. C., Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and Whitman, entered the Northwest conference meet held at Pullman on June 4. True to all the dope the Sun Dodgers won the meet handily, the Aggies taking second. The Washingtonians grabbed 48 points, the Aggies took 38, while Oregon, Idaho, and W. S. C. followed in that order with 23, 23 and 19 respectively. Montana scored only 12 points, while Whitman received none. Two Northwest conference records were broken when Art Tuck of Oregon, threw the javelin 190 feet 4 inches, and Pratt of Washington, clip- ped one-Hfth of a second off the quarter mile record with 49 3-5. Pope was expected to break the discus record also but was off and only got 139 feet 10 inches. Jenne tried for a new record in the pole vault but was unable to make the grade. At present he holds the Northwest and Pacific Coast records in that event. The failure of Bill Haywardls protegees to make a better showing on the cinder this season was undoubtedly due to a large extent to the 'fact that the rainy spring prevented the proper amount of training. The track hardly was in shape all season for real workouts, and the men were unable to put themselves into the best of condition. 1921 Track Schedule Wash. Ore. May 7-Oregon-Washington, Seattle ................ 88 43 O. A. C. Ore. May lheOregon-O. A. C., Eugene .................... 71 60 Wash. 0. A. C. VV S. C. Ore May ZleP. C. meet, Eugene... 60 48 18M 36V3 June FN. W. meet, Pullman- Wash. W. S. C. O. A. C. Ore. Ida. lVIont. Whit. +8 19 38 23 23 12 0 0711' lmmlrmi nirmfy - Shhhch. hignh rally ever held at Ill! vfsh the departure of the lootba ha, Eighteen hundred students .::nhed this year, specially the hih'hhrd. The annual noise and Ellington. 0. A. C.. W. S. l entered the North to all the dope the Sun Dodge thmmmm mmhmmmh respectively. Montana m ne. W whee words were broken when .lrtf 4 inches. and Pratt of Welly trter mile record with 493.51 I also but was all and only g: record in the pole vault hate- , holds the Northwest and PL? 5 WWW5 '0 Wklhi. dly due toalzrztfml nmmMMMWP m: :rkouts. and the men welt Yell Staff ELL KING OBERTEUFFER originated a new sys- tem this year in having a four man yell staff to handle the organized student rallies. With Oregonls increased student body this move was al- most necessary. Every athletic contest this year has been taken care of by the yell leaders, and Oregon has supported all of her teams at home with organ- ized rooting. Oberteuffer called for tryouts for the staff dur- ing the third week of college, and the student council then selected Arthur Larsen, Arthur Rose- braugh and Fred Woods to fill these berths. A uniform dress was provided by Graduate Man- ager Benefiel. The largest rally ever held at the University preceded the departure of the football team for California. Eighteen hundred students were in line. Nearly all rallies were well attended this year, especially the W. S. C. and Bezdek rallies Which packed Villard. The annual noise and fireworks rally previous to the O. A. ORERTEUFFER ROSEBRAUGH LARSEN WOODS 071? lnmdrml ninNy-onr em...me 'M' WW.M r,' C. game was a great success. Bachelordon received the prize for having the best ear-splitting iiHoatf, Several new features have been introduced by this years yell staff, in- cluding the new varsity yell, which was originated by Oberteuffer. The stunt of forming a block iiOh in the bleachers during the O. A. C. game was also new. Baseball HE baseball season of 1921 was not a brilliant success for Oregon. Out of a total of 19 games played, mainly with conference nines, the Lemon-Yellow succeeded in annexing but six wins. A number of causes contributed to the unsuccessful season, perhaps the main one being the lateness of starting practices. For the election of a baseball mentor was delayed through long days of perfect baseball weather in March, by the athletic council, that body finally choosing George M. Bohler, then basket- ball coach. A herculean task faced the new director of Oregon,s baseball destinies, that of building a team around six letter men, none of them in- fielders, from decidedly raw material. Not a man of the preceding year,s crack inner defense returned which was made up Of Lind on first, V. Jacobberger, second, iiSkeeti, Maneurd, short, and Jay Fox, third. So Bohler, experimenting with and trying out members of the 1920 freshman aggregation and former varsity substitutes, picked Art Base to perform on the initial sack, put Francis Beller 0n sec- REINHART KNUDSEN BOHI.ER One lmndrpd nirmty-quo zigagvregation was the inabilit ittingc 'Wh d ven' chance isihenacctptt C . fen l'iebcit batters in the con rfii . . ' .mhamewith m Id . Hh- , 1 higher, last years out 6 r ' the varsity his first year. fields M in his stick work, ShOI Gamble. who decorated the n 'ikiiiii the club which made up it 0 men 0"- 'TiinliKllUdSCn are lost to this hdevehpmcnt of a new pair hither dihcuhy encountered by xii well along into the season. otabrilliantsuccessfo 11110 , I! mainly with conferenccrg maxing but SIX m in 1 season, perhaps the mama l the election of a baseball 11:1 t baseball weathermllm Jsing George M.Eolller,1l11 hit new director of Oregon! : iund six letter men. none 11" "5 crack inner defense 1111135 cobbcrgcr second "She'll, r experimentingwlth W '- c-nd, brought Bill Reinhart, stellar outfielder, in to short patch and placed Svarverud on third while Bill Collins and Hube Jacobberger were called upon to fill the infield utility roles. With Reinhart transferred to short, John Gamble, varsity baseball let- terman in ,18, was elected to hold down the middle held job, while Don Zimmerman played left field practically all season. llHomerunl, Knudsen was on the job to hold down his old position in the right garden and played big league ball all season, fielding his position perfectly and hitting the ball like a demon. Carl Knudsen, through his three years of play with the Lemon-Yellow nine, showed himself to be a real ball player and the season of 21 was a fitting culmination to his varsity baseball career, for in the field Knudsen accepted every Chance that came his way and proved himself one of the best batters in the conference, his specialty being a circuit clout in the first frame with two men on. Altogether, last years outfield looked pretty good, Zimmerman play- ing on the varsity his first year, Eelded his position well and though he was rather weak in his stick work, should develop into a good ball player. Johnny Gamble, who decorated the middle garden last year, did some good work with the Club which made up for his erratic work in the field. Both Gamble and Knudsen are lost to this years nine through graduation which entails the development of a new pair of gardeners. Another diHiculty encountered by Bohler in his attempt to build up a winning aggregation was the inability of the pitching staff to get under way until well along into the season. Art Berg, the varsity mainstay and ZIMMERMAN LESLIE BERG 0M lmmlrml ninrly-fln'm' one of the best pitcher in either conference, did the major portion of the work and pitched wonderful ball after he got going and all but one of the var- sity wins came behind his stellar brand of left handed pitching. iiJakeh Jacobson, right hander, did not live up to the promise he had shown during the preceding year, ill health handicapped him throughout the entire season and the big fellow was not in condition to lay them over as he had form- erly. R0110 Gray, Marc Latham and Carl Knudsen made up the rest of the pitching staff and occupied the mound at various times during the sea- son with varying degrees of success Knudsen being called in from the held several times to start games for the Lemon-Yellow but Car1,s lack of con- trol put him in the hole practically every time he appeared in the role of heaver. R0110 Gray and Marc Latham each made several starts for the varsity and were used repeatedly in the capacity of relief men, both of these hurl- ers are right handed and are back for another go at it this year. Earlier in the season Eddie Durno, iiFlivverh Ford and Hewitt were used in games played on the ridge. HSpikeH Leslie handled all the receiving work during the season and handled it well. Although the big fellow did not hit as hard during the season as he had in 1920 he caught good ball and handled his pitchers well. Floyd Shields completed the regular catchers corps, acting in the capacity of relief catcher but due to the fact that HSpikeH enjoyed excellent health throughout the season he did not enjoy much of a chance to display his wares. BELLER GAMBLE JACOBSON 07M111171drminirzety-fozzr tiit'iiversity of W ashington. WE :13 Club and North Pacific C 12:: trip: battery, Berg, Gray, t gig. jaoobberger and Svarvc: inudscn and Zimmerman. txriuntoi illness and his loss St i kirstgamcsof the trip were playi .5gj122and23 and Oregon, w :jizrlcdiiithy in dropping both li-i the Huskies pounding md at various times durinwi rudsen being called in fronfzk- mon-lYellow but Carlfs lack r 3H mm he appeared in thy. I made several starts for the y of relief men. both of the mother go at it this year, 3 0rd and Hewitt were uscdirt eiving work during the tab: tow did not hit as hard dark; l ball and handled his pitches tchers corps. acting in the .t HSpike" enjoyed emilrnie" ' much of a chance to dirk The season opened on Cemetery Ridge, April 6, against the nine from the North Pacific Dental College of Portland and the dentists took over the contest 5-4. Bohler used a large number of men during the game in order to get a line on their reSpeCtive merits. Berg and Gray pitched nice ball for Oregon but the inability of the Lemon-Yellow batsmen to consistently solve the riddle of ffDoc,f Quizzenburyfs delivery enabled the dental sur- geons to come out on top. The following week the Willamette Bearcats came down from Salem and divided :1 two game series with the varsity taking the first 6-3 and dropping the second 12-7. In the first game Gray, Berg and Durno did the hurling for the varsity while Hewitt, Jacobson and Ford worked in the second contest. Both games were marked by ragged fielding by Oregon, especially in the infield. On April 21 the squad, thirteen strong, started north for games with the University of Washington, VVashington State College, Whitman, Multnomah Club and North Pacific College. The following men were taken on the trip: battery, Berg, Gray, Latham and Leslie; infield, Srflith, Base, Beller, Jaootbberger and Svarverud; outfield, Captain Reinhart, Gamble, Knudsen and Zimmerman. flake, Jacobson remained in Eu- gene on account of illlness and his loss seriously crippled the pitching staff. The first games of the trip were played with the Washington Sun Dod- gers on April 22 and 23 and Oregon, with a weakened heaving staff, ex- perienced little difficulty in dropping both of these contests, the first 8-1 and the second 17-5, the Huskies pounding the varsity,s twirlers offering at will. ROSS GRAY SVARVERUD 0713111011in ninety-hqm : A V4 2441242 Monday and Tuesday of the following week the Lemon-Yellow broke even with the Cougars, winning the first 4-3, and dropping the second 12-7, while on Wednesday Whitman was taken into camp 9-3. Then the squad made the jump back to Portland where on Friday they lost their second game to the North Pacific dentists 7-6. The northern trip was closed with a game against the Multnomah Amateur Athletic Club nine which the var- sity dropped 5-2. Then came a series of games on the home lot with the Lemon-Yellow tossers entertaining. On May 6 and 7 the Washington Sun Dodgers put on a two game series with the varsity, which the team divided. Behind Art Berg,s masterful pitching the University team took the first set-to 6-3, and dropped the second, which Carl Knudsen started and Berg finished 6-2. Then came a brace of games with the Washington State Cougars 0n the VVednesday and Thursday of the following week which resulted in a double win by the Visitors, 4-3 and 7-1. On Saturday, May 1-1, the Winged-M came to Eugene for a return game and though Berg pitched stellar ball for the locals errors behind him and inability to hit Lewis, the clubmen,s twirler, gave the Multnomah aggregation the long end of a 5-4 count. Saturday morning of Junior week-end, the varsity went up against their traditional and ancient rivals, the Aggies, in a double header, the University nine taking the first 3-2, and dropping the second 5-4. Berg was going at top form in these games and in the 15 innings he worked, in the two games, the big left hander allowed but eight hits and retired 17 of the Aggie batsmen on strikes. SHIELDS COLLINS JACOBBERGER 01111 lmmlrrd IIiIIrIy-six I m T: .3. . .. Non i W 1 W udsm started and Beiv the hVBShington SlateCi-g ,. illom'ng week which 1111! On Saturday hla1 HM 1111' .1; and though Bergpituhedg" bilit1 to hlt I111: 1th1 - 1: long end of a 54 1011111. wcchnd. the 11111111111: . is. the Aggies, in a huh: 3': 2. and dropping the 511115; " ' -h:' i" and in tilt 13111111113111. I allowed but eight hit: 115 r' ..-.1y.::.,-..1 L: ,- ,,.,... .9 Oregoxfs baseball season, a season full of the vicissitudes of luck, ended with a series at Corvallis against the Aggies 0r1 MaV 27 and 28. Honors were even in this series,1vith Oregon Agricultural College tak- ing the first contest 1-h- 5 and the varsit1 coming back on Saturday 21nd 111nn1ng the final game of the season 8- 6 behind some great heaving b1 Art Berg. Gra1 and Jacobson divided the pitching burden of the first game their offerings were hit freely and the Aggies pursuit of vict0r1 was aided by 11 holesale boots on the part of the Oregon infielders. ness and his loss greatly crippled the University nine. Summary of Games Played , Ohwu-N. .aam-and 8m Place of Game Teams Eugene ........................................ North Pacific- 5; Oregone Eugene ............................................ Willamette- 6; Oregone Eugene ............................................ Willamette- 7; Oregon-e Seattle ...................... . ...................... Washingtone 8; Oregon-- Seattle .......................................... hh ashington-17; Oregon-e Pullman ............................................. W. S. Ce 3; Oregon- Pullman ............................................ W. S. 0-12; OregonC Walla Walla .................................... Whitman 3; Oregon- Portland ...................................... North Pacific- 7; Oregon- Portland ........................................ Multnomahe 5; Oregon- Eugene .......................................... Washingtone 3; Oregon- Eugene .......................................... VVashington- 6; Oregon- Eugene ................................................ W. S. C.- 4; Oregone Eugene ................................................ W. S. Ce 7; Oregone Eugene .......................................... Multnomah 5; Oregone Eugene .............................................. O. A. Ce 2; Oregone Eugene .............................. , ................. O. A. C.8 5; Oregone Corvallis ........................................... O. A. C.-1-h; Oregon-- Corvallis ............ . ............................... O. A. C.-- 6; Oregon: 0 1m lnum'rnl Ilizwty-smwz baseball The closing games of the series marked the passing of some great ball players from the varsity nine, Art Berg, Iohnn1 Gamble Jake Jacobson and Captain Bill Rein- hart. Carl Knudsen, 11ho also finished playing ball under the Oregon uO" was unable to participate in the final games of the season on account of ill- H OOUl-F-W-l-HWNCFNOON-FUIHNw-F Varsity Tennis 0f the colleges of the Pacific Coast Conference at Eugene. In the first day of play Ken Smith, of Oregon, defeated Heald, 0f VV. S. C., win- ning two singles in two sets 6-2 and 6-3, and hh'esterman defeated Heald's teammate, Webber, 6-4 and 6-3. When the doubles tournament came around Oregon,s representatives went down to defeat before the whirlwind team of California made up of Bates and Levy in the first set 6-4. In the second set the southerners did not allow the Oregon men a game. This EST year for the first time Oregon entertained the visiting tennis teams eliminated Oregon from the tournament. The other teams met during the year were Multnomah Club, Willam- ette University and O. A. C. In the first meet With Muhtnomah, Oregon sent a five-man team composed of Westerman, Culbertson, Jue, Garrett and Williams. The club won the meet, Oregon,s only wins being Williams, in singles, and Williams and Garrett in doubles. In the second meet with the club Smith and Westerman won in doubles over Goss and VVolford, both former state Champions, but lost their singles. - The meet with Willamette was won by Oregon, Westerman taking his singles set, and Smith and Westerman Winning the doubles. 1h the war. and its pOPulmU Onh confrrencc meet W25 5 .th mo more have been an Tifehnhry. A return match was ht hd while the of the six demons hr h min most instances to hem "hams were McKcom Winnan ihgnrr. chner. featherwcight. m :35 under the rcccnt ruling will rec: One hundred ninety-eiglzt year were Multnomal Gull : first meet with Mullnomzll sterman, Culbertson Jufe G? Oregons only wins being ll'lfzg doubles. In the second meet doubles over G035 and ll'ilir-i r singles. won by Oregon, Westerman LL 1 winning the doubles. The Oregon men met the O. A. C. racquet wielders in a dual contest at Corvallis May 27. The matches were evenly split. VVesterman, Smith, and Williams all won their singles matches, while Jue and Garrett lost to their opponents. Oregon also lost the doubles tournament. As Oregon topped the Aggies in the Pacific Coast Conference the Lemon-Yellow has good grounds for claiming the state championship. Wrestling NTEREST in wrestling was revived at Oregon last year after the general I set back given it by the war, and its popularity has never waned through- out the year. One conference meet was staged with the Oregon Agricul- tural College and two more have been arranged with Washington to take place the last of February. A return match was held with O. A. C. outside the conference, and while Eve of the six decisions were lost in the firstitilt and six in the last it was in most instances to heavier men. The men who participated in the meets were McKeown, Winnard, Nygren, Kirtley, Kirk, Bradway and Wegner. Wegner, featherweight, was the only Oregon man to win his bout and under the recent ruling will receive his letter. One lmmirml ninefy-nine Coach Gerald Barnes, in addition to putting out the varsity aggrega- tion, had charge of regular classes in wrestling. These classes culminated in the doughnut wrestling matches at the end of the term which are inter- nrganization contests worked on an elimination basis, and which have proven very satisfactory in keeping interest aroused. Competition has proven keen in every instance. ' The popularity of wrestling here during the last two years insures its permanence among Oregon sports, and the prospects are bright for a winning team next year. Some very promising material has been unearthed among members of the class of 1925 which should be developed into finished form next year. It is expected that in the ensuing year a still more extensive schedule will be arranged. Soccer soccer team lost both games to'the O. A. C. booters last Fall. The men were not anxious to splash through the lacustrine scenery of H ANDICAPPED by the lack of a suitable field for practice, the University the old Kincaid gridiron and they had very little team work when they faced the skilled Aggie team in the first game of the season, played at Cor- vallis during the Aggie Homecoming. This match ended 4 to 0 in favor of the O. A. C. men. In the return game played in Eugene on November 19, the Oregon hooters made the Visitors fight to the end, even though the match was staged zltmid the miniature lakes and sawdust hilhocks of the Hayward Hats. 0. A. C. won this game 1 to 0. Colin VF Dyment, who introduced soccer at Oregon, was unable to coach the squad last Fall, and his place was taken by Gerald Barnes, of the Physical Education department, who laid the foundation for a good team next year. ThMonte,, Byers captained the 1921 team. Some of the men who found it sport to dig into the mud of Kincaid field in search of the soccer ball were Vester, Staton, Jacobs, Ingels, Brogan, Potter, Gowansx McPher- son, Lao, King, Sundeleaf, and Parr. Two ll 11 mired uhmmmmmhmh 2;: 112cm November 5. was an e351 1-hour oh the last half and took th 1M Eitmt with the University of W '1 and the fresh lost to the tune I which rm consistently beating the CCI' table field for pmctia: M the 0. A C. booms let P: i 15h through the 1mm Id very little team work :r? a game of the scum. pizyei This match ended 4M :5? ' rte V gene on November 19 .I d. even though the mate: it u illocks of the Hayward uw Freshman Football W ITH a squad of over 60 out for the team, Coaches Baz VVilliams and Everett Brandenburg, had to begin an elimination process before the season was hardly open. There were so many men out that the problem was not that of filling teams, but of picking the best teams. All through the year two backfields were kept, each about equally good there were suHicient substitutes so that the line could be replac time. , and ed at any Four games were on the frosh schedule this year. The first was with Mount Angel College, October 22, in Eugene. The field was slippery, and a heavy rain fell during the greatest part of the game but the frosh walked through the Mount Angel defense to a score of 53-6. The Collegi- ans were completely outclassed, and in the last quarter when they began to tire the frosh went through them at will. The game with the Chemawa Indians at Eugene, November 5, was an easy Victory. Again the frosh made a track meet out of the last half and took the game by a 35-0 score. The game with the University of Washington first year men was a different story and the frosh lost to the tune of 42 t0 7. They were up against a team which was consistently beating the Washington varsity and were outclassed. Trwn lmmlrmi IIIIP The rook game was the seasonys big battle. and it was fought to a i, i scoreless tie on the Aggie gridiron. The frosh showed the true Oregon fight ,ilginthind I in a battle with a heavier team, and at one time held the Aggies for downs 'Uglb'lzan hman team inside the five yard line. exlinfup er John. . The season was successful, two games being won, one tied and one lost. Wlatcher'ldvin: left fie ; L The men playing on the frosh team were Bliss, Spear, Zachery, Reinhart, i'nighI-Short;Ba i 9 Quinn, Gregg. Davidson, Haak, Barton, Sutton, Frenchi Smith, Lovelace, i" Tergeson, Lundbergi Hill, Braeher, High, Godecke, Jacobberger, and Bag- i e Icy. i Freshman B: Freshman Baseball Wningonheseason a g: . . :7? W figuring on us HI: frosh baseball team under the tutorship of B111 Steers. a three year We Dumo . T varsity letter man for Oregon. put in a very successful season, drop- a jgjbleonacwuntOf gtatieb- .i i I ping only two games. These were two of the four game series with i ComrafHO predlctlon, the . ii the rocks and the frosh made them up by winning twice on the home lot. 'thbemtumw outforSCVCl'a ' i' The season was a poor one for baseball due to the rainy weather which Mm vaictories and no d4 i: H, prevented practice, but the frosh made a good showing nevertheless. .10 Hi. rooks. The victory on E 1 Several games were scheduled with the Portland interscholastic teams. ' Jefferson was defeated by a score of 7 to 6 in a thirteen inning battle and 1. Columbia put up a good brand of ball against the frosh but lost by a 2 to WWW 5:: that Ashland has ever been Trwo II It mired trwo 155 Magmdshmingmzrw Md with ti! Portland initilf t II" M 7to6inathinmr; zgfball Whittiif -. ?gi-zn.m1V-;v$iau. Emu , we HA": ,FWM... .Aa. . 0 score. In the game with Washington high the frosh amassed 9 round trip circuit while the preppers were able only to garner 3. In the first two games with the rooks at Corvallis the frosh were de- feated, but in the two return games at Eugene the rooks were humbled to the tune of 16-12 and 6-5. The lineup for the freshman team was Wright and Ringle, pitchers; Ward Johnson, catcher; Terry Johnson, first; Sorsby, second; Moores, third; Knight. short; Baldwin, left field; Douglas, center field, and De Armond, right field. Freshman Basketball T THE beginning of the season a great many of the men that Coach TTEddie" Durno was figuring on using on the freshman team, were in- eligible on account of grades. This severely handicapped "Eddie" in his work. Contrary to prediction the freshmen developed into a better team than has been turned out for several years. Their record for the sea- son is as follows: Ten Victories and n0 defeats, including four straight wins over the O. A. C. rocks. The Victory over Ashland High School was the second time that Ashland has ever been beaten on their home Floor in the history of their school. Two I; u 71 tired tlz rye King and Crandall held down the forward positions in the best Of 1 1 1' style, King being responsible for the greater share of the freshmen1s points. 1111111100 tanive" 311 1116 W 3 1 1 Poulsen played at center the first part of the season. Jost did not come out 11111111111111, 10m Spear: 1 1 until the middle of the season and then he and Pou1sen alternated at the 112,051,30551551 center position. The guards were Alm and Haynes, with Jones as utility 11111115- . MM 19 E E gnard or forward as was needed. 111 1705111 captain Freshmen .............................. 25 Eugene High ........................ 21 Freshmen ............................ 419 Chemawa ............................ 25 1:, ; Freshmen ............................ 5+ . Chemawa ............................ 16 Doughnut 111" 11 Freshmen ............................ 19 O. A. C. rooks .................... 1-1 1 1 ;, Freshmen ............................ 16 0. A. C. rooks .................... 13 EIWCS 10, th1S year 1111 E: Freshan ............................ 19 0. A. C. rooks .................... 13 1115.101111gand the winnm 1:;3 - E a Freshmen ............................ 25 O. A. C. rooks .................... 18 E51111: . rcnan . '1 1 1111 3 '- Freshmen ............................ 413 Medford High .................... 23 371111f1malmmsa . Freshmen ............................ 31 Ashland High ................ 28 11111111511161 11611391351163 Freshmen ............................ 31 Medford High ................... 26 1311111115111. Thehandbau 10" 1 11.211111111'111 the scores are 1 M i i I 11831311611'81'611111'85 added 1 FreShman TraCk y111111111mund men in each 11 11111111 to the organization 11 11E freshman track team had 0n1y three meets last year, but of those T three they managed to win two, and 10st to the O. A. C. rooks by only ten points. R211ph Spearrow was the mainstay of the team and ac- counted for his share of the points in every meet he participated in. Albert Grilley was also a valuable man, and could be counted on for two firsts in 111 1 the sprints in any crowd. ' The first meet was with the Franklin high school team of Portland and the frosh walked away with it to the tune of 82 to 38. From a spectatofs viewpoint the meet was poor, but it showed the ability of the Oregon men. Spearrow was high point man with a t0ta1 of 16 counters. The next meet Two hundred four "Kl ' M H n3$mmhwii and Hum with J11; Eugene High H Chmwa Chcmm . thmL 01 A- C "1013.. 0- A C mob, 0- A- C. r0015 . ., Mcdlord High. Ashland Highe Mallard High A. mTrack ml only three meets last year, l I two. and lost to the 0. MM row was the millet; Its in every m be Whl 1'- :. and could be wuntdiillfll' was a combination of three teams, Washington high school of Portland, Eugene high school and the fresh. The score here was, frosh 101V3, W H. S. 43V2, and Eugene H. S. 3. The frosh-rook tangle was held at Corvallis, and was a battle from the start. The meet was even all the way through, but the rooks came out on top of a 65V; to 55V; score. Spearrow was high point man here also, taking 15 points. mHank" Foster, captain of the 1920 and 1921 varsity teams coached the fi'osh. Doughnut Sports HE doughnut series for this year has been worked out on the basis of the years showing and the winning organization will not be picked until the final events are run off. The year opened with a round rob- binlbasketball series. The Kappa Sig team won the basketball series with the Fijis as runners up. The handball tournament was next on the program and throughout the year the scores are kept of the places made by each group. This year a new event was added, that of the physical ability test to pick the best all around men in each house. At the end of the year a cup will be awarded to the organization which has the best standing. Trwn lmmlrml 1131117 The doughnut track meet of last spring was one of the closest meets of some time. The Kappa Sigma team won the meet by a score of 25 points, the Delta Tau, Beta and Sigma Nu teams being tied with 24V; points each. The relay was the deciding event of the meet. Ralph Spearrow of the Delta Tau team was high point man with ISVZ counters and Arthur Tuck of Sigma Nu, was next with 12 points. Tuck heaved the discus 190 feet 5y; inches in this meet. One hundred and thirty-five men participated. The doughnut athletics seems to be doing a great deal of good for the Varsity teams. Previous to the adoption of this system there were far smaller turnouts for the varsity and frosh teams but this plan brings many men into action. The material for all college sports, with the exception of football, are taken from these doughnut teams. Coach George M. Bohler has tried to encourage the men to come out for organization teams and a large amount of the success of the plan is due to his handling of the work. He has ar- ranged things so that every man in college is eligible to compete for some organization and no one is left out. Whether a man makes a team is a mat- ter of his own ability, but all have an equal Chance. Boxing OXING has proven very popular among Oregon students for several years, B and the growing interest in the sport will probably warrant the form- ing of a varsity team in the near future. Regular classes are conducted by Coach Dawson and every man out for gym is given a Chance to don the gloves. Interfraternity boxing has received lots of support from the students and various organizations on the campus. As in the case of wrestling, an elimination series is conducted every year, anyone being eligible to take part, and the outcome of these bouts counts in favor of the organization produc- ing the winners. A prize is awarded the house having winners in the great- est number of events staged during the year. It is desired by the physical education department to make boxing as well as wrestling a sport of science rather than one of brutality. The men are well clothed and the bouts are conducted in such a manner that any one may go and see them without being offended. The support of every Oregon student is urged and upon the amount of interest shown by the students in general depends in a large measure whether or not boxing will become a varsity sport at Oregon. Trwn lmndred six gr Sports iiith theemiivi S.Coach George KW or organization teams and 0 his handling of Iheinri n college is eligible to MT . Whether amanmakmi: an equal chance. xmg r among Oregon midnm i: v the sport will probably ii'erf."' leariuture. Regulardmzi 1 out for gun is given uhxr menedlotioisuppon , immwv. Taco lunlilrm' 5mm Baseball ENDRICKS Hall was the first organization to have its name engraved '73 .- 00 Pm. 0n the Staples cup for winning the doughnut league baseball series itlllwcwere ""1! e .' last spring. The Hendricks Hall girls were winners in league II, 'lmls'g base'Vcrnctta Quit '5 and the Oregon Club girls were winners in league I. The result of the .ta-Vlllmt llsand HClCn 3 fmal doughnut league game ended with a score of 33 t0 6, in favor of Hen- gEglelteHOWC 1ft fielder, 3 f dricks. ,lulceclrmwnlc en E Fourteen girlsl houses entered in the series and a great deal of enthusi- :ddOlethCders , asm and interest was shown by all of them, especially so, since it was the Tilt first time that the doughnut league baseball series had been held. The lineup ' B for the final contest was as follows: VMSIW Hendricks Hall Oregon Club talhltHlthcoregon varSlty tl Emily Perry ............................ c .................. Lucy Vander Sterre ifmhemanfxdtlng game W Ruth lVolff ............................ p ............................ Pearl Lewis l '1g0reg0nt93mIChosen a few : 1; Vernetta Quinlan ................ 1b .................... Charlotte Howells gwmdokaedersen, f0! W Lynetta Quinlan ................ 2b ------ t ---------------------- Sue Stewart :quDorothyMcKcem ; Olhe stoltenberg ................ 3b ................................ Esther Ikae MUM Helm Gk r H Frances Habersham ............ ss ................................ Lola Kelzur J: P dW'l Chi El l5 Laverna Spitzenberger ........ ss ........................ Lola McCullock JIM roctorzrn Hm. ' l ll l Grace Murfin ........................ rf ............................ Fern Travis mfllmo'A'C'mdUdCd Vlra , Maud Graham .................... 1f .................... Harriett Howells lilllllOYWdSSHClCn M00113, l Helen King ........................ cf .................... Theresa Robinette iftiiiandldithGillette,Ruth Ih H1 The name of the sophomore class of 23 will have its name engraved on UN the Hayward cup for winning from the juniors in the final interclass game l; k1 on Field Day. The seniors and freshmen entered teams also, but they both l r l l were defeated by the junior and sophomore teams respectively. The lineup l for the final interclass game was as follows: Sophomores Juniors Jessie Lewis ............................ c ............................ Ruth Griffin Pearl Lewis ............................ p ............................ Emily Perry c, Florence Jagger .................. 1b ............................ Lois Barnett l; Edith Herrin .................... 2b ........................ Dorothy Miller r Esther Pike ........................ 3b ........................ Florence Furuset h l Leona Gregory ...................... ss ................ Frances Habersham ll Charlotte Howells ................ ss ....... , ............... Myrtle Magerle Ql' Lucy Vander Sterre .............. 1f .................... VVinifred Hopson Maud Graham ................ cf ............................ Leah Wagner Beatrice Morrow ................ rf .......................... Ella Rawlings Trwn lmmlrml right lnncts m 1 cl ll'HH . e i. with a sum of 33106 . rt ' m 13in p m the series and am deal- I 01 them ' 1' 9 mlally SO. 5. 1' 1p baseball series hid bftn 11:113.: 7 . . - c OregonClub cLun Vandcr Sr .. p Pail Lg. .lb...... CharlotteHiwzls 2b Sue 5h: 35 Esthe: 1:9 . sshlaliix .sshila Militia. r1 Fem ha 11 Harriett 1101!: .d ....................Thcrm Robins? lass 01 '23 will have iisnamf r5; . - 'ti'u- lm th jumomnthtlimlm H: rcshmcn entered W 1190; l Whomore teams! " as follows: I . cw W511, p ,15 1- Wu, Ml lbw... MMWW 3b ................... i M: 9 .................... "Mild? H: 9 ' W i; ll ...... WM Cl ....... E111 Rph mum ., llllll Gm: The only intercollegiate game that the varsity team took part in was that held on our field against 0. A. C. on June 4, 1921. The score remained fairly close all through the game, with the Oregon team leading most of the time. In the last inning, however, the O. A. C. team rallied and the final score was 20 to 19 in favor of the Visitors. The Oregon girls who played in this game were Emily Perry, catcher; Ruth Wolff, pitcher; Flor- ence Jagger, first base; Vernetta Quinlan, second base; Ruth Griffin, third base; Charlotte Howells and Helen Glanz, shortstops; Alice Evans, right fielder; Alice Garretson, left fielder; and Helen King, center fielder. Sub- stitutes included Oletta Pedersen, Pearl Lewis, Laverna Spitzenberger, and Betty Pride. Varsity Basketball N MARCH 4 the Oregon varsity team met the O. A. C. team and won from them an exciting game which ended with a score of 27 to 19. The Oregon team, chosen a few days before, was composed of Char- lotte Howells and Oletta Pedersen, forwards; Marjorie Flegel and Helen King, centers; and Dorothy McKee and Pearl Lewis, guards. Substitutes were Grace Sullivan, and Helen Glanz, forwards; Alberta MCMonies, guard; and Ina Proctor and Wilma Chatten, centers. The girls who made the trip from O. A. C. included Vira Van Hollenbeke, Ruth Mills, and Anna Mofer, forwards; Helen Moore, Edith Wilkenson, and Marie Pon- fcth, centers; and Edith Gillette, Ruth Wilson and Ella Anderson, guards. Trwo lmndrml Ilillf i ii it i uttndlaguc. . '15thth tht wmner o nth this year when its teat! W Chuhin a score of 21 to izgh' it was awarded the Lara it had heat the property of GM :huh and the Hendricks Hath t 3W throughout the doughm 9h. hharhottc Howells, Orego mm: M scored the tota jhmathah the Hmdri$ girls W 'h Pm MW Hathaway, -r t W Trwo Izumirrd IN! Basketball LEVEN 0f the womenTs houses responded W .1 E to doughnut basketball this year, which was evidence of an even greater in- terest than that of last year. The organi- zations that entered teams were divided in- to two leagues: Oregon Club, Kappa Kap- pa Gamma, Pi Beta Pi, Gamma Phi Beta, Chi Omega and Alpha Delta Pi comprising the first league, and Hendricks Hall, Su- san Campbell Hall, Delta Delta Delta, Kap- pa Alpha Theta, and Delta Zeta compris- ing the second league. Hendricks Hall became the winner of the basketball title this year when its team de- feated Oregon Club in a score of 21 to 12. Accordingly it was awarded the Laraway cup which had been the property of Gamma Phi Beta last year. Both the Oregon Club and the Hendricks Hall teams had maintained an unbroken record of Victory throughout the doughnut series, so the final battle was an exciting one. Charlotte Howells, Oregon Club forward, was the outstand- ing star of the game, and scored the total of 12 for her team. But the su- perior teamwork 0f the Hendricks girls was the deciding factor. The work of Emily Perry and Mary Hathaway, Hendricks guards, was particularly noteworthy in that they played throughout the game without a single per- sonal foul against them. The lineup of the teams follows: Oregon Club Hendricks Hall Charlotte Howells ................ F ........................ Grace Sullivan Kitty Sartain ........................ F .................... Bernice Corpron Wilma Chatten .................... C ............................ Helen Kings Camilla Anderson ................ C: ....................... Mildred Crain Pearl Lewis ........................ G .................... Mary Hathaway Alberta McMonies ............ G ............................ Emily Perry Substitutes: Grace Snook for Grace Sullivan. Enthusiasm for interclass basketball was unusually great this yean and for the first time in history the senior class had its name engraved on the Two lmmlrml rlr-vrn 2435., ,uiitfxvrgt. Hayward cup. In a thrilling game on February 13 this team defeated the juniors by a score of 30 to 28. At the end of the regular game the score was a 28 to 28 tie, so it was necessary to play an extra five minutes to determine the winners. Following is the lineup: Seniors Juniors Oletta Pedersen .................... F .................... Charlotte Howells Alice Evans ........................ F .................... Helen McCormick Grace Tigard .................... C ..................... Marjorie Flegel Echo Balderree .................... C ....................... VVilma Chatten Emily Perry ........................ G ............................. Pearl Lewis Margaret Goodin ................ G ....................... Dorcas Conklin Previous to the fmal junior-senior game the sophomores won from the freshmen, 26 to 24; the seniors defeated the sophomores, 21 to 12; the juniors and freshmen tied, 18 to 18; the seniors were victorious in a game with the freshmen, 31 to 21; the juniors scored with the sophomores, 20 to 19; and the juniors were defeated by the seniors, 36 t0 8. Hockey LTHOUGH there was much interest shown in hockey this year, nothing was accomplished in it as a sport. During the good weather physical examina- , tions occupied most of the time of the stu- dents in physical education, and later the weather was unfavorable to outdoor practice. GEORGIA Trwo lmmirrd lrwr-ltvc mm vawb w'w n g 0L t r .1 l1 t 1 1 c r ll 1 H 1 1 l1 W an age , haw? n...-.-.. m m. ... m... . -... "kw : .......-.-... -.......-.......a.' Fm . C MC Swimming ORE interest in girls, swimming has M been taken this year than ever be- fore in the history of the University. Perhaps the new VVoman,s building with its tile swimming tank has proved a big induce- ment. VVhatever it was, the girls got to- gether and produced six teams for the dough- nut swimming league. Taking into consid- eration that there had never been dough- nut swimming 0n the campus before this was a good showing. The houses entering teams were Hen- dricks Hall, Susan Campbell Hall, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Kappa Alpha Theta, Alpha Phi, and Delta Zeta. The schedule was so arranged that each team competed with every other team in the league. The program included free style races, 60 and 120 feet in length; breast stroke and back stroke races of 60 feet each; strokes for form; plunge for distance; relay races and diving. A swimming meet was arranged with O. A. C. in the Spring. An active interest has been taken in life-saving work, a number of girls being members of the VVoman,s Life-Saving Corps, a branch of the Ameri- can Red Cross Life-Saving Corps. Many of the girls qualified for member- ship this year. Helen Clark, Margaret Russell, and Muriel Meyers were appointed as official examiners for Red Cross life-saving work. Two lumdred fourteen I 'ng has "u be. "inrsity. g With its ig induce, ls got to- the dough to consid. n d0ugh. c this was ere Hen. :11, Kappa eta, Alpha ule was so With Wary I gram included free style mt back stroke ram?! 60 feet a lay races and dim, Am. Two hundred httpmz Tennis E N N I s was a real success last year, 3 igjchbprmg'ofthSCdCSIrm . . . . H r w1th several exc1t1ng varslty games, Tiimnnumevmmodatcd' class games, and a HRound Robbin" Imranb'eafi th' in use tournament. I rocISCone . EWTKan In the varsity series Nladeline Slotbottom I won from Genevieve Betts of O. A. C., by Wresmged 3 us T a score of 7-5, and 6-3. This was one Of No" ..mtering a tea the most spectacular games of the season as dlhvdzm ddlcS. Th 1 there was some very excellent playing shown. mnmgthfpa homOfCS bliss Slotbottom also won from Marion "Twenthesop d Glad . Nauude Larsen an Bohan in the Willamette tournament. 1n f chonors for the t a very fast game in the O .A C. tournament rjffdethh Ada Harkness was defeated in a score of 'Encidentillhwm awarded 11 6-3,, 1-6, 86. The varsity doubles, repre- ' sented by Marion Dunham and Sarah Mar- MAY tin, won from O. A. C. in this series. On field day the class tournaments were held. The racquet was won by Ruth Hayman, freshman, from Naomi Robbins, senior. if , S Tennis has not been pushed as a class sport largely because of the lack T of facilities The courts were used by the men more than usual last year on account of the Pacific coast conference held on the campus. Archery QRCHERY enjoyed a heavy enrollment of enthusiasts last Spring and promised to be a keenly contested sport. However, the spring rains lasted so late I ,T into the season that not sufficient time was left to develop the proper amount of skill. As a result the archers were not partici- pants in the Field Day contests and n0 yew wood bow was awarded. Trwo lmmircd sixteen cry fast gum in the 0 A C h: a Harhncss was defeated in at v ,, 1-6, 8-6. The varsih'dohh ltd by Marion Dunham and 51.2" Won from 0. A C. in thht'h ' ts were held. The ramuem lomi Robbins. senior. a class sport largely hcaumtt' by the men more than Mhhi; mcc held on the mmpu; rchery tllmcnt of ' promised d sport. 1 50 late time W I of skill. ht Partid' l and n0 NCREASING interest in canoeing is mani- I fested each Spring, but unfortunately only a small number of those desiring to take the sport can be accommodated. Ev- ery available canoe is constantly in use on the mill race. Interclass contests were staged as usual last year, each class entering a team in the hope of winning the paddles. The Enal contest was between the sophomores and and Gladys Johnson carried off the honors for the for- mer and incidentally were awarded the juniors. Natrude trophies. HARRIET Canoeing Walking IHIS year it was planned to put walk- ing on a level with other sports by holding an interhouse competition. Plans were formed for carrying out the contest on a point basis, points being awar- ded for the different hikes according to their distance and difhculty. In order that small organizations and large might be on an equal basis the total number of points earned by each house was divided by the numbers. The organization having the highest average won. Two lmmlred Jewentwn Track AST Spring, because of the time taken L up by the gymnasium classes in get- ting settled in the new VVomank building, they were unable to hold the track meet as had previously been planned. But this year, in March, a team of ten girls from each class competed in heavy apparatus work. which was made possible by the excellent equipment which the new gymnasium affords. The winning class was awarded the Hayward cup, and letters were given to all high point winners. EX- hibitions of military marching and folk dancing were included in the events of the meet. Two hundred eighteen RUSSELL AUSTIN KING PRIDE Womenk Athletic Association OFFICERS MARGARET RUSSELL .............................................................................. President ALICE EVANS ................................................................................ Vife President FLORENCE IAGGER .................................................................................. Sanitary RUTH AUSTIN ...................................................................................... Treasurer HELEN KING .......................................................................................... Reporter BETTY PRIDE .......................................................................................... Custodian H EADS OF SPORTS ELIZABETH STEPHENSON ........................................................................ Ardmry CHARLOTTE HOWELLS ............................................................................ Baseball EMILY PERRY ...................................................................................... Basketball EMMA GARBADE .................................................................................... Canoeing GEORGIA BENSON ...................................................................................... Hodeey MURIEL MEYERS ........................................ . ................................... Swimming MAY LINDLEY .......................................................... V ................................. Tennis L013 BARNETT .............................................................................................. Trade HARRIET VEAZIE ...................................................... , ............................. Walking Trwo llundrml ninrttmn 4 v3.1: ;.A. x; A Field Day HE hnals 0f the interclass baseball series and interclass tennis matches T were last year the principal events of the seventh annual Field Day on May 28. The canoe race between the sophomores and the juniors, scheduled for that day, was postponed until June 1, and archery, usually a feature of this occasion, was dispensed with entirely on account of the weather, which did not permit outdoor practice. The Hayward cup, which is awarded every year to the winner in the interclass baseball series, was presented to the sophomores after a lively con- test with the juniors. This game, which ended in a score of 23 t0 7, was played as the result of two class games in which the juniors defeated the sen- iors, 25 to 19, and the sophomores won from the freshmen, 27 to 17. Ruth Hayman, freshman, was the winner of the racquet for the inter- class tennis tournament after playing two sets with Naomi Robbins, senior. Both games finished with a score of 6 t0 3. In the semi-hnals Miss Hayman won from Winifred Hopson, junior, and Miss Robbins won two sets from Edith Sliffe, sophomore. In spite of the fact that the canoe race did not take place on Field Day, but several days later, there was unusual interest displayed in it. In this event the sophomores were again Victorious, Gladys Johnson and Natrude Larsen winning from Carolyn Cannon and Emma Jane Garbade, juniors. They were awarded paddles by the IN'omens Athletic Association. Trwo lmndred trwenty tunes in which the juniorsdehh . won from the hahm, 319:1; . the winner of the racqurt h- 1ng two sets with Naomi Roth hf 6 to 3. In tht scmi-hnahhft: ior, and Miss Robbins won h v anoc rat: did not tahephttonh unusual intercst displaycd in 5:, n'ctorious, Gladys Johnson 1th annon and Emma Jan: Garhh tc hh'omcn's Athletic Assodahh Trwo lmmirmi lrwrnIy-rmr N425 ?tili 32237366 i. a? 55. 35 :0 g" Egg .V , 3 953 Ea. a $2.... The Girls Glee Club HE large number of unusually talented women on the campus has made T it possible for the Girls Glee Club to achieve the musical success that it has this year. The annual spring concert which was held March 4, in the Woman,s Memorial Hall brought the seasorfs work to a culmination and gave to the campus a very high class entertainment which was pleasing in the variety of serious and comic numbers. During the Christmas vacation a tour was made to Coos County. Six towns were visited, Marshfield, North Bend, Myrtle Point, Bandon, C0- quille and Reedsport. Old grads and friends of the University entertained for the girls with dinners, dances and drives. Everywhere the concerts were well received and best of all, the trip was successful Hnancially. OFFICERS BERNICE ALTSTOCK ................................................................................ President FLORENCE GARRETT .......................................................... Secretary-Treasurer Soprano: First Alto: Gwladys Keeney Margaret Phillips Ramona Roe i Alice Baker Maude Lageson Hildred Hall Florence Garrett Vera Price Allegra Ragsdale Eloise McPherson joanna James Belle Chatburn Marvel Skeels Swami Soprano." Bernice Alt510Ck Viola Powell Beatrice Gorman Serond 141103 Leona Gregory Bess Huff Ruth Akers Muriel Meyers Dorothy Poille Margaret Powers Marian Linn Betti Kessi Constance Miller Maxine Buren Rita Ridings Hrmmlmm'xl, Mildred Brown Two lumdrpd trwmlly-tllree ,2 .5: Eu lsX..i..,..,... Sm E kl11x ........... x E E. a :25 .11!1t.x1-.x, . , V N426 325;.ka Ecazgkit. T xxx X3 The Men,s Glee Club HE Men,s Glee Club has had a very successful year under the able lead- ership of John Stark Evans as director, Morris Eben, president, and Arthur Rudd as manager. The concerts have been very well bal- anced due to the quantity and variety of desirable voices from which to Choose. The annual home concert was given in the WomanTs Memorial Hall in January to the largest crowd ever assembled for a glee club concert within the city. The annual Portland concert was given in February in the Heilig theatre to a large and appreciative audience. The Spring trip, taking in sev- eral southern Oregon and northern California towns was very successful, as was also the trip to Seattle in May. JOHN STARK EVANS ................................................................................ Dirertor MORRIS EBEN ....................................................................................... President ARTHUR RUDD ..................................................................................... Manager GLENN MORROW .............................................................. Secretary-Treasurer PERSONNEL I First Tenors: Baritones: Ralph Poston Wallace Cannon Curtis Phillips Allen Smith Sevond Tenors: Nelson English Arthur Johnson Crecene Fariss Roy Bryson Willis Kays French Moore Ronald Reid Glenn Morrow John Gavin Harris Ellsworth Bangs: Morris Eben Carl Newbury Herbert Pate Aubrey Furry Cyril Valentyne Soloixtsr Glenn Morrow Arthur Johnson R'onald Reid Trwo lmndred Irwmtyfwe The University Orchestra RGANIZED with over thirty members at the beginning of the Fall term, the University orchestra began work with better prospects for a good year than ever before. Most of the former members returned and the new members proved very good material. The orchestra this year has been better balanced in its instrumentation and has worked together with Mr. Underwood very effectively. The first public performance of the year was the concert-dance given on Armistice eve at the Woman,s building which again proved a success, this being the second attempt of this kind. The annual spring trip was the most extensive yet undertaken, extending through eastern Oregon and including Portland. This trip established the reputation of the orchestra throughout that portion of the state and was highly successful. UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA REX UNDERWOOD .................................................................................... Dirertor JOHN ANDERSON .................................................................................... President LORA TESHNER .................................................................. Setretary-Treasurer FRED LORENZ .......................................................................................... Manager ARTHUR CAMPBELL .............................................................................. Librarian First Violins: Flute: Alberta Potter Margaret Phelps Gwendolyn Lampshire Ransom McArthur John Reisacher Helen Harper Second Violins: Charlotte Nash Anne O,Reilly Norma Wilson Clare Turley F. M. Chapman Alberta Lou McMonies Ralph McClaflin Violintello: Ralph Hoeber Lora Teshner Agnes Kennedy Piano: Helen Caples Viola: Claire Collette Trwo lmmlrpd Irwrnty-Iix Beulah Clark Ernest Rosen Arnold Anderson Contra Bass: John Anderson Clarinet: Frank Dorman Bass Clarinet: Arthur Campbell Cornet: Meryl Deming Harry Series Trombone: Herbert Hacker Saxaplzone: Velma Farnham Drums: Kenneth Moore .hhh hits th The Univ iiihmi which was organized Tish is the largest and most su liliigonmmpus. Originallv in ichrship is forty, due to the fa hi hi. and others finished their .ihihrs of the hand are exempt Csame amoun .-;9hheibaH ga t of 7 3mm of m, :5 lair: Comm The University Band THE band which was organized by the military department early last Fall is the largest and most successful that has ever appeared on the Oregon campus. Originally intended to include fifty pieces, the pres- ent membership is forty, due to the fact that many of the men were forced to drop out, and others finished their military work and withdrew. Members of the band are exempted from military drill, as work in the organization takes the same amount of time. The band played at all foot- hall and basketball games in Eugene this year, and also at all rallies, and im- portant functions of Homecoming week. OHicers 0f the band are Robert H. Stewart, leader; James Pearson, as- sistant band leader; Lee Williams, senior sergeant, in charge of bass section; Cecil Fargher, clarinet sergeant; Floyd VVright, comet sergeant, and Harry Searles, bugler. Roy Graham was made drum major during the fall term, but later withdrew, so the position was then given to Donald Knapp. Although handicapped to some extent by lack of time for practice, the organization came through in splendid style. All equipment, including in- struments, music and uniforms, was furnished by the government. Trwo lmmlrml Irwmzly-srvmz I :H I. .1 f y f. n m. m I L .F I 1a n u l1 v0 T m T A Two lnmdrmi tuenty-zzinc R1?be The Acted Drama '1' THE beginning of the present school year. the Department of the ADrama and the Speech Arts was re-organized so as to exclude all work such as oratory and debate, not directly associated with the acted drama. At the same time, 2111 dramatic endeavor in the University was definitely placed under the supervision of the department. With these changes, the work in acted drama 0n the campus has gone forward with great success. Since the advent of Fergus Reddie, in 1912, hdramaticsh have shown a constant improvement. Charlotte Banfield has been assistant professor since 1918, and during the present year, Norvell Thompson and Claire Keeney have been added to the staff. The department of Drama and the Speech Arts offers a wide range of subjects such as elementary interpretation, teehinque 0f the voice, stage- craft, dramatization, play-production, and advanced interpretation. The company consists of students in advanced interpretation who are judged to be competent to handle parts in public performances. Since this is the group that actually produces the monthly plays given by the department, the com- petition for admission to the company is keen. The Company Irene Stewart, Norvell Thompson, Claire Keeney, Darrell Larson, Elizabeth Melis, Vern Fudge, Arthur Johnson, Kenneth Armstrong, Doris Pittenger, Lorna Coolidge, Hildegrade Repinen, Mabel Gilham, Delbert Faust, Joe Clark, Virgil Mulkey, Sadye Eeeles, Betti Kessi, Margaret Nelson, Thelma Gannaway, Wade Kerr, Charles Fish, John Ellestad. Two hundred tlzirty . WOMAN OF NO IMPORTANT ' .HMDO . m um mMEEE'sEK DeParIment of DH PLAT Scam u'm' HARRY? ............................. ; mum ; gx'AXWHITE m WEDDING GLEST ........... - WSMELI t IHEUJFXTRY COUSIN tMasl ' THE MERCHANT 0F VENICE t LEAR AND CLEOPATRA ....... Spr ALE OF TWO CITIES ............... FLRIZOXA A 'u Drama fStnt $11001 3m. . t e D ' W35 fC-orgam'u mm;- 1 50 35 t0 CHEN. WE at d' ' ' nrcctly. muted With the x9- Iln'trsin 11m us has gone forward m'th gm- cddic, in 1912. Hdmmmvmd Barfcld has been assistant pm , Nowell Thompson and C12 1,: .. d the Speech Arts offers a wide rprctation. tcchinque of me hi: , tion. and advanced interprem ' vanccd interpretation who arrfudg" lit performances. Since this :9 :l- ; .' plays given by the departmcmf any is keen. Company OOOVOKUIa-wmm H O 11. 12. 13. 14-. 15. Department of Drama and the Speech Arts PLAYS PRODUCED Season 1921-1922 WHY MARRY? ........................................................................ JESSE LYNCH VVILLIAMS PYGMALION ...................................................................................... G. BERNARD SHAW SWANWHITE .................................................................................. AUGUST STRINDBERG THE WEDDING GUEST ........................................................................ JAMES BARRIE DISRAELI ...................................................................................................... LOUIS PARKER THE COUNTRY COUSIN 1Mask and Buskim ...................... BOOTH TARKINGTON THE MERCHANT OF VENICE .......................................... WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE CABSAR AND CLEOPATRA .......................................................... G. BERNARD SHAW BELINDA ........................................................................................................ A. A. MILNE HAMLET ...................................................................................... VVILLIAM SHAKESPEARE Spring 1921 TALE OF TWO CITIES .................................................................. CHARLES DICKENS A WOMAN OF NO IMPORTANCE .................................................... OSCAR WILDE MIKADO .......................................................................................... GILBERT Sz SULLIVAN THE LADY FROM THE SEA .............................................................. HENRIK IBSEN ARIZONA ............................................................................................ AUGUSTUS THOMAS Trwo lnmdrcd tlzirty-anc J ESSE LYNCH WILLIAMS HOULD a scientist, with a small income, Who is valuable to the world as S a researcher, give up his research in order to marry? Can marriage be successful if the man and woman each have a career? For whose sake should one marryefor one,s own, for ones family,s or purely as a mat- ter of love? These and any number of other vexatious problems concerning the Hmarriage eviY, were discussed and settled after a fashion in Mr. Wil- liams, play of modern marriage. The cast, consisting of the senior members of The Company, did more than justice to Mr. Williams, weak lines but clever situations. The play served as an opener to a season of great activity and was an unusually suc- cessful effort. CAST OF CHARACTERS JEAN, younger sister of Helen and John .................................................... Doms PITTENGER REX BAKER, scion of the hhwealthy Bakershy .............. 7 ................................ DELBERT FAUST LUCY, wife of John ...................................................................................... ELIZABETH MELxs THEODORE, cousin to John, a rector .................................................. KENNETH ARMSTRONG HELEN, assistant to Dr. Ernest Hamilton .................................................... IRENE STEWART UNCLE EVERETT, Uudge Greyh .................................................................... CLAIRE KEENEY JOHN, older brother of Helen and Jean ............................................................ VERN FUDGE DR. ERNEST HAMILTON ............................................................................ NORVELL THOMPSON BUTLER ................................................................................................................ JOHN ELLESTAD Two hundred tlzirty-trwo Swz Eifuh fairy fantasy was broug Shudherghs "Swanwhite." pmypmducc a fantasy about 'T5I things of the hind ever pl Uh the junior company can hgh hhhhey and the soft light ' for the success of th thLLMMS "DC, Who is valuable to the world in order to marry? CWWJQ? an each have a career? Forth? for one's family's or purely m. other vcxatious problems mnrem't; settled after a fashion in Mr. H ' m: W t Swanwhite BIT of fairy fantasy was brought to the campus in the dream play of A Strindbergfs hhSwanwhite." It has become a tradition that the Com- pany produce a fantasy about Christmas time and this play was one of the best things of the kind ever produced here. The clever work of the members of the junior company combined with the magic work introduced by Virgil Mulkey and the soft lighting effects produced by Henry Wastell were responsible for the success of the production. CAST OF CHARACTERS THE BEAUTIFUL SWANWHITE ........................................................................ LORNA Coomoce THE WICKED STEPMOTHER ...................................................................... HELEN ENOCH THE NOBLE PRINCE, father of Swanwhite ...................................................... EDWIN KEECH THE HANDSOME YOUNG PRINCE ........................ A .............................................. CHARLES FISH THE GREEN GARDENER .................................................................................. JOHN ELLESTAD SIGNA .......................................................................................................... HILDEGARDE REPINEN ELSA .................................................................................................................. MABEL GILHAM Tom ............ , .......................................................................................................... SADYE ECCLES THE COOK ........................ , .................................................................. . ....... DELBERT FAUST MOTHER OF THE PRINCE ............................................................................ MARGARET NELSON MOTHER TO SWANWHITE ........................................................................ THELMA GANNAWAY Two hundred tllirty-tlzree Mikado HE production of the delightful comic opera hMikado," by Gilbert T Sullivan, was made possible through the combined work of the de- partment of Drama and the Speech Arts, and the School of Music. As this was the first production of the kind produced on the campus and as it was full of good music and wholesome comedy, it was the most talked of production of the Spring of 1921. The leading roles, played by Fergus Reddie and Madam Rose McGrew, both professionals, were equal to the work of these stars and the colorful Japanese costumes added much to the gay effect of the opera. CAST OF CHARACTERS KATISHA .................................................................................................... MME. ROSE MCGREW YUM-YUM ...................................................................................................... MAURINE VVELCH PEEP-BO ........................................................................................................ ELOISE MCPHERSON PITTI-SING ................................................................................................ CHARLOTTE BANFIELD MIKADO .......................................................................................................... MANFORD MICHAEL Ko-Ko .................................................................................................................. FERGUS REDDIE PooH-BAH .................................................................................................. NORVELL THOMPSON szH-TUSH ........................................................................................................ GEORGE STEARNS NANKI-Poo .......................................................................................................... DELBERT FAUST THE CHORUS Mary Alexander, May Vooley, Katherine Kem, Leota Green, Delores Catlow, Marian Linn, Connie Miller, Maurice VVelch, Gladys Emison, May Fenno, Florence Cartwright, Leona Gregory, Mable Smith, Margery VVelIs, Wallace Cannon, Crecene Fariss, Victor Husband, Raymond Osburne, Ralph Poston, Harold Orr, Allen Smith, Ted Baker, Charles Huggins, Glenn Morrow, Paul Mortimore, Don McPherson, Orrin Thomas Trwo lmndred Illirty-four AWoman 0 K Wow or No IMPORTAN Aaf English society life wit n'td to Guild Hall. Lo i'etzymathorough bit of Englis fzfnns. Irene Stewart in the war? work in a thoroughly satis fiftof Guild theatre successes. Ewe leading characters worke 1:52 thrchd every member of th indie mind of everyone who sa t mmm ...... CAST 0F mm .............................. .R kmim ....................................... do 393nm costumes added ARACTERS WW lie ....................... V? 1 thin, 10MLS ta Green, Delores Ca ihi' em c0 . A VFCDUB: x" "laidys Emlson' hhifilsv hhaiim J t Smith. Margcrihond 05W?- 3! s H"siwnd' 331mm"ark 3" Smith! . 0"! Doll comic opera "Mikado." by Gh- ough the combined work of had 't h Arts. and the Sthooi of Rh, kind produced on the mmpushi. nc comedy, it was the most hihi' ic leading roles, played h hi;- nth professionals. were cquai h much ' Mm. Rm hiii A Woman of No Importance of English society life with its gaiety and tragedies which was car- ried to Guild Hall. Lord Illingworth was presented by Claire Keeney in a thorough bit of English character work Without any American variations. Irene Stewart in the role of Mrs. Arbuthnot did a difhcult piece of work in a thoroughly satisfactory manner which added another to her list of Guild theatre successes. The other members of the cast combined with the leading characters worked well together and produced the play which thrilled every member of the audience and left a favorable impres- QQ a WOMAN OF No IMPORTANCEH by Oscar Wilde, was a delightful bit sion on the mind of everyone who saw it. CAST OF CHARACTERS LORD ILLINGWORTH ............................................................................................ CLAIRE KEENEY MRS. ARBUTHNOT ................................................................................................ IRENE STEWART HESTER VVORSELEY ................................................................................................ LOETA ROGERS GERALD ARBUTHNOT ................................................................................................ TED BAKER MR. KELIVIL .......................................................................................... CHARLYLE GOFFREIERE LORD ALFRED ...................................................................................................... HAROLD BROWN SIR JOHN .................................................................................................................. RUEL MOORE THE REVEREND MR. DAUBENY ............................................................................ CARL MILLER FRANCIS .............................................................................................................. DARRELL LARSEN ALICE ...................................................................................................................... HELEN CASEY SOCIETY VVOMFN....MAR1AN TAYLOR, MARIAN GILSTRAP, DORIS PITTENGER, MARTHA RICE Two hundred llzirty-fitve it-u" i The Lady From the Sea CQT IIE LADY FROM THE SEA," the one play of Henrik Ibsen which ends entirely satisfactorily, was another production of The Company. The strange story of the girl, Elida, who is peculiarly attracted to the sea, fills the drama with a decided atmosphere which carried one com- pletely into the spirit of the Norwegian life. Elida was married to a doctor in a small Norwegian town and although her life there was uninteresting and not thoroughly congenial the family life ran along quite smoothly until the return of a sailor with a powerful will which had a power over Elida which was almost equal to hypnotism. Elida loved the sailor, and Wrangle, her husband, wished her to decide for herself the future course of her life. Although Elida wished With all her heart to leave the dull town and travel on the fascinating sea with the sailor she is so nearly overcome by her new spirit of freedom that she decides to stay with her husband. CAST OF CHARACTERS ELIDA .................................................................................................................... IRENE STEWART DR. WRANGLE ............................................................................................ DARRELL LARSEN HILDA ............................................................................................................. DORIS PITTENGER BOLETTA ................................................................................................... DOROTHY VVOOTTON ARNHOLM ..................................................................................................... JOHN CANOLES THE SAILOR ............................................................................. .. DEFORD WALLACE LYNGSTRAND ................................................................................................. HAROLD BROWN BOLLESTED .............................................................................................................. RUEL MOORE Two hundred tlzirty-xix Dis: "Dismal" the powerful histori duttd as a commencement 1 Izmir was repeated the fol ,.,' a the cast. CAST 0F CH A Dmru mm the Sea 6 one play 0i Henrik ihsen which another production of The hm; '1. Eiida. who is peculiaihattzhh? rd atmosphere which carried iii: in life. Elida was marriedhah: tough her life there was unintth'i. tiiv life ran along quite smooth J il'will which had a power mi, Elida loved the sailor, anti! , 'VT' . .56, r herself the future COUNh L , dull NW" heart to lean: the byiw wrcomt H she is 50 "who stat with her husband. HARACTERS Juhi'r Disraeli QQ ISRAELIN the powerful historicai play by Louis N. Parker, was pro- D duced as at commencement play in June and because of its popu- larity was repeated the following February with only a slight change in the cast. CAST OF CHARACTERS BENJAMIN DISRAELI ........................................................................................... FERGUS REDDIE MRS. TRAVERs ...................................................................................... CHARLOTTE BANFIELD LADY PEVENSEY .................................................................................................. IRENE STEWART VISCOUNT DEEFORD ......................................................................................... CLAIRE KEENEY DUCHESS OF GLASTONBURY ........................................................................ MARGARET NELSON LADY CUDVVORTH ................................................................................................. SADYE ECCLES MR5. DISRAEu ................................................................................................ ELIZABETH MELIS LORD BROOKE ........................................................................................................ VERN FUDGE DUKE OF GLASTONBURY ................................................................................ HAROLD BROWN SIR MICHAEL PROBERT ....................................................................................... EDWIN KEECH BASCOT ..................................................................................................................... VVADE KERR MR. FALJAMBE .................. , ............................................................................ ARTHUR JOHNSON MR. HUGH MEYERS .............................. 7 ........................................................ DARRELL LARSEN POTTER ..................................................................................................................... TED STRONG BUTLER .............................................................................................................. VIRGII, MULKEY FOOTMAN .................................................................................................................. JOE CLARK Trwo lmmlrml Illirty-serven The Wedding Guest JANIES BARRIE CAST OF C HARACTERS MARGARET FAIRBAIRN, the bride .................................................................. LORNA COOLIDGE BLANCHE RIPLEY, her bridesmaid ................................................................ MABEL GILHAM PAUL DIGBY, artist, the groom .................................................................. ARTHUR JOHNSON MEIKLE, butler t0 the Fairbairns .......................................................... ' ...... JOHN ELLESTAD CAPTAIN ARMITAGE, the best man ................................................................ DELBERT FAUST LADY JANET DINWIDDXE, Margaretts aunt ............................................ MARGARET NELSON KATE OMANEY ........................................................................................ HILDEGARDE REPINEN MR. ALEC FAIRBAIRN, MargareVs father .................................................... CLAIRE KEENEY REV. MR. GIBSON ............................................................................................. VIRGIL MULKEY JENNY GEDDES ................................................................................................ DORIS PITTENGER WEDDING GUESTS, BRIDESMAIDS, FLOWER GIRLS AND SERVANTS Elizabeth Melis, Ruth Hayman, Thelra Gannaway, Charles Fish, Irene Stewart, Edwin Keech, Sadye Eccles, Wade Kerr, Darrell Larsen, Norvell Thompson, Betti Kessi, John Watson, Beth Fariss, Harold Brown, joe Clark, Viola Powell, Dorothy Hall, Emily Houston, Portia Kidwell, Katherine Pineo, XVinifred Graham, Helen King, Helen Kenny. Arizona ACH year the student body produces one play and during the Spring of 1921 "Arizona" by August Thomas, was Chosen. The play tells in farcical humor the love story of a young army officer and a pretty girl, Bonita. Soldiers, more pretty girls, a Iove-sick Mexican with a guitar, all play together to make an interesting plot. The play was produced under the direction of John Houston who also played one Of the star parts. CAST OF CHARACTERS THE YOUNG HERO .................................................................................... LYLE BARTHOLOMEW BONITA .................................................................................................................... STAR NORTON ESTRELLA .................. , .......................................................................................... JOHN GRIFFIN MR. CANBY ....................................................................................................... JOHN HOUSTON HTONW, ........................................................................................................................ SI SIMOLA THE COLONEL ...................................................................................................... HANK FOSTER MRS. CANBY ........................................... . ...................................................... DOROTHY VVOOTON LENA .......................................................................................................................... JANET VVEsT SERGEANT KELLER ..................................................................................... ' ....... N ELSON ENGLISH SAM WONG . .............................................................................................................. RAY DUNN MIss MCCOLLOUGH .......................................................................................... NAOMI WILSON THE SURGEON .................................................................................................. BARK LAUGHLIN LIEUTENANT HALLOCK .................................................................................. BARNEY GARREF MAJOR COCHRAN .............................................................................................. ELMER PENDELL AN ORDERIX ................................................................................................ CLAIRE HOLDRIDGE SOLDIERS .................... ED HANI.EY, PAUL SAYRE, EARL DICKENSHEETS, HOWARD XVINNARD Trwo lmmlrmi tlIirIy-rigllt ta Gannaway, Charles Kerr, Darrell Larsen, Nam" Hm ariss, Harold Brown, IwChrk W Houston, Portia Kidwcll, Kathedrr m, Helen King, Htlen Kenny. . 113 mm 0'10 Play and duringthesgg; Thomas, was chosen. The p12; 2. Of a young army 05mmdzlpsc'i; s. a lovc-sick Mexican with a g ng plot. The play was prr w; I also played one of the surpass m! M PW Taco lmmlrml Illirty-ninw The Coach GREAT deal of the credit of Oregon,s success in debate this year is due to the coach, Professor Clarence D. Thorpe. This is his first year on the Oregon campus, but he came to us with a long record of success behind him. Not only has he come out Victorious in many championship deg bates, but he has coached several championship teams. Professor Thorpe is a graduate of the University of Michigan, and came to Oregon from the University of Arizona. He is to be especially complimented on the excellent showing he has made so far in this coaching of debaters and orators. Calendar December 9-eState Triangular Debate, Oregon, 0. A. C. and Reed. February 23eWomenis Dual Debate, Washington and Oregon. March 3-Coast Debate, Stanford, Washington and Oregon. March 10-State Oratorical Contest, I. O. A. 0. April - --Women,s Dual Debate, 0. A. C. and Oregon. The Forensic Committee PAUL L. PATTERSON ...................................... Chairman, Forensic Manager ELAINE COOPER ...................................................................... Student Member REMEY Cox .............................................................................. Student Member CARLTON SPENCER .................................................................. Alumni JVIemller DR. JAMES H. GILBERT ....................................................... Faculty Member The constitution of the Associated Students provides for certain activity committees, of Which the Forensic Committee is one. The committee con- sists of a student majority, with at least one faculty member and one alumni member. The Forensic manager is one of the student members. This committee is the outgrowth of the 01d uForensic Council," which passed out of existence with the acceptance of the new constitution in the Spring of I921. The duties of this committee are to promote and safeguard the interests of forensics in the University, and to arrange the schedules in debate and ora- tory. Through their efforts debate and oratory have come to a prominent position on the campus, and it is their constant duty to encourage these activi- ties by every possible means, so that Oregon will be as superior in forensics as in other lines. Trwo lnmdrrd forty AEWN again was awarded ti wlar state debate contests i iiihington, Oregon and 1 iii Oregon has won this hon v'friihtaiirmam of the ques .:il'ihington negative at Eug I:Robinson and Charles Lamb mtoone decision there, 2': Thanh: federal governmei M" 0Ttg0n01C1111 W" Mngtonandom 0rd 11 aslungton and01eg11. ontest. I. 0.1-1.0. me. 0. A. C. and Ortgm sic Committee Hairs", famrit 1111,21 51m 111:1 , SIM! 111:1 11m? 111': 1 F 111111 111'? Itcd Studmu pm 11o n cm Committee is one. Them WT 1h: Stud: Hm: '1'th n $C0umT v 1d Fomr . 0n111::- u! tht new 030511 11121qu If! to p! wwulci 1nd?" 0 Inmg'thc th t 111ma; 1 , .1 v PATTERSON LAMB ISEMINGER ROBINSON Triangular State Debate gular state debate contests Which were held March 2, 1922, between Washington, Oregon and California. This makes three consecutive years that Oregon has won this honor. Paul Patterson and Ralph Bailey rep- resented the afhrmative 0f the question and won a tWO-to-one decision over 0 RECON again was awarded the Pacific coast championship in the trian- the Washington negative at Eugene. The negative team composed of Claude Robinson and Charles Lamb, journeyed to Stanford and were Victori- ous by a two-to-one decision there. The question debated upon was, "Re- solved: That the federal government impose a tax on manufacturefs sales." Oregon State Triangular Debate leges entered are the University of Oregon, Oregon Agricultural C01- rlege, and Reed College. On December 9, 1921, the Oregon aHirma- tive team, composed of Paul Patterson and Charles Lamb, defeated the O. A. C. negative team with a score of two to one. Oregon,s negative team, com- E ACH year a triangular debate is held in the state of Oregon. The col- posed of Claude Robinson and Boyd Iseminger, journeyed to Portland and won over Reed by the same score. 0. A. C. won over Reed at Corvallis. The question was: NResolved: That the present policy of naval expansion be discontinued for a period of seven years? Two lmmirml forty-onr COOPER DAXGGETT COULTER LARGENT 1g Woman's Debate shield is hicks Hall, who. by xirtue t :trdebate series for three sut Oregon -Washington Debate f tttshxeld. This m gnen to ; .231 to be presented to the chi , HE womanES dual debate which takes place each year between the Uni- IEEtHendriCVS Hall teamy ; E 9 versity of Washington and the University of Oregon, was held FCer' Lsmdl920-21. E2 E1, ary 23E 1922' OregonEs anatiVC team composed of Lurline Coulter E EEEE and Elaine Cooper, defeated the Washington team at Seattle by twoetO-one 1 W1 decision. At Eugene the Washington negative won a three to nothing Vic- ., E tory over the Oregon afhrmative represented by Wanda Daggett and Edna FalhngBeekr E Largent. Thus VVashington was the winner of the series with a score of EJEEEEEKBffkman orationsm four to two. The question debated upon was: mResolved: That congress mdeaH' ThisiSan t annu E; N :3 should pass the Veterang compensation billy "1, t E E I : mrsawardedtoth I . CtWOSf : i 1 .t L 3; Gizcofgzoo WM . , g :E E . On bV A E E'E" Canola, ' be Trwn lmmirmi forfy-lrwo ington Debate takes place each year between 11:1. University of Oregon. was held1 ivc team composed of Lurlmrta ihington team at Seattle by M 1 ncgative won a three to W: 'Nntcd b! Wanda Dam Mn b - f the series 111th lved: That m; g m'nner 0 1W" W15: "R60 m bin? The Shield HE Womarfs Debate shield is now the permanent possession of Hen- dricks Hall, Who, by virtue of Winning in the W0men1s Dough- nut debate series for three successive years have earned the right of title to the shield. This was given to the student body by the Men,s Foren- sic Council to be presented to the champion women,s inter-fraternity debate team. The Hendricks Hall teams were Champions in the years 1918-19, 1919-20, and 1920-21. Failing-Beekman Orations THE Failing-Beekman orations took place Thursday, June 18, 1921, in Villard Hall. This is an annual event on the Oregon campus When prizes are awarded to the two seniors who give the best orations. The Failing prize of $200 was won by Abe Rosenburg, and the Beekman prize of $150 by John Canoles. Wearers of the "0,1 RALPH HOEBER REMEY COX ABE ROSENBERG JESSIE TODD PAUL PATTERSON LURLINE COULTER ELAINE COOPER TED RICE WANDA DAGGETT BOYD ISEMINGER Two hundred forty-flzree Intra-Mural Debate Series HE Doughnut Debate series was revived this year, and an active inter- est shown in the contests. A number of organizations were not en- tered, but those who were showed a great deal of good material and hard work. These debates are watched closely by Coach Thorpe and the varsity debaters with the idea of lining up men and women as possible mem- bers of future varsity teams, and it has been found that some of the best de- haters make their start in college forensics in this field. The winner of the girls Doughnut Series was the Oregon Club, and the Chi Psi debating team was Victorious in the men,s series. Tru'o lumdrmi forIy-fuur ,mw mm .wnusuww mi" - . ' ' 'xsw;;Km '"",x,:u,:1 . wau-mwmvm -m ,1in A..-..an h ,x- me m wiymrv r m4"; qu . ho.4.;r.5bq.cv;4jww .ebate Series rcvived this year, and an active number of organizations were mt v. wed a great deal of good mm? :. ' cd closely by Coach Thorpe m; 1g "P men and women mihk 1:: as been found that some of theori- rnsis in this field. The mm 1' ;on Club. and thc Chi Psi debaang :21 Two hundred farty-fivc , Oregon Lumber Pacific Int: f- Floyd-MAXWCH Editor 523; MW of the 5mm 8! $3: ml "mm W "311339 .ml La: Editorggmkenneth Youel mm mm mm Ruth A m hm ism mm Wilma HcKi KM Edwml Eigtm YOUEL ALLEN STATON SCOTT AUSTIN ANDERSON RUDD MC KINNEY 1,; g VOORHIES GODFREY BLAHA MICHELSON LYONS ' A HOYT manna MC KUNE KUHN BROGAN 9 , , SIKES ZIMMERMAN LAUDERDALE FRASER WILSON GILHAM CALLAWAY PIPER JANZ WRIGHT Two lmndred forty-Jix MAXWELL RUBLE Oregon Daily Emerald Member Pacific Intercollegiate Press Association 111-1111176737de Mggwehifw 77 '1'17777777Web'ster Ruble Editor Manager Omeiul publication of the Associated Students of the University of Oregon, issued daily except Sunday and Monday, during the College year. News Editor ............ Kenneth Youel Associate News Editor ........ Wilford Allen Daily News Editors Night Editors Margaret Scott Ruth Austin Earl Voorhies George H. Godfrey John Anderson Marvin 131211121 Arthur Rudd Phil Brogan Wanna McKinney Fred Michelson Arne Rzlv Dan Lyons Sport Editor .................... Edwin Hoyt Newx Service Editor .......... Alfred Erickson Sport Writers Kemwth Cooper, Harold Radio Servirv Editor .......... Don Woodward Shirley, Edwin Fraser. k1ixolmngos ................ Eunice Zimnwrnmn Spevizll Writers-John Hiortlorff. llmest .1. Huymx. Society Writers-Cathorinv Spull, Mildred Burke. News Staff Xunm' Wilson, Mabel Gilham, Owen Cullaway. Florino Packard, Mudnlene Logan, Florence Cartwright, Helen King, John Piper, Herbert Larson, Margaret Powers, Genevieve Jewell, Rosalia Kebor, Freda Goodrich, Georgiana Gerlinger, Clinton Howard, Elmer Clavk, Mae BalIzu-k, Martha Shull, Ernest Richter, Herbert Powell. Henryettn Lawrem'o, Geraldine Root, Norma XVilson. BUSI NESS STAFF Associate Manager .................................................... Morgan Stzlton Advertising Managers ............................................ Lot Boutie, Lyle Junz Circulation Manager ..................................................... 'Inson McCuno Assistant Circulation Manager ............................................ Gihstm Wright Proofreaders ............................................... Izu-k High, Don Womlworth Collw-tions.......................................................Xlildnwl lmutlonlulo Advertising Assistants ...... Karl llunlcnburgh, Kelly Brunstottvr, George Whvclcr, Loo Munly Trwo lmmirm' farty-sznvtn SCOTT HAUSLER THOMPSON DUNIWAY VEAZIE DI ERDORFF BROGAN HAYCOX KELTY WOODS AUSTIN YOUEL SKIN NER PERRY MAC GREGOR Two hundred forly-m'gllt jACKSON CRAM BETHERS KEBER SHANN , Km; Mchsz ...... . ........ EDIT mSoomJOHN DIERDO 'THOMPSON, ..... ' 1 mm Arm, MARGARET JACI u Cm, KENNETH You: Bums m Dummy, ROSALIA Ix PERRY VENE KELTY wmuw W wmm N' uv. , , ,, wgwu . 5am. rm MC INTYRE Oregana Staff INEZ KING ........................................................ , ..................................... Editor GEORGE MCINTYRE .......................................................................... Manager EDITORIAL STAFF MARGARET SCOTT,, JOHN DIERDORFF .................................. Associate Editors JESSIE THOMPSON, ................................................................ Administration EMILY VEAZIE .................................................................................... Literary RUTH AUSTIN, MARGARET JACKSON, LUELLA HAUSLER ................ Classes LENdRE CRAM, KENNETH YOUEL ........................................ Organizations RAY BETHERS ............................................................................................ Art MARGARET DUNIWAY, ROSALIA KEBER .................... Honor Organizations EMILY PERRY .................................................................... lVomen's Athletics EUGENE KELTY .................................................................... Men's Athletics FLORENCE SKINNER .......................................................................... activities PHIL BROGAN ........................................................................................ Events ERNEST HAYCOX .............................................................................. Feature BUSINESS STAFF JOHN MACGREGOR ........................................................ Circulation Manager DAN WOODS ................................................................ Advertising Manager MYRON SHANNON ............................................. Assistant Two hundred forty-nine Lemon Punch EMON PUNCH, Orcgonk comic magazine, was founded in February, L 1921, by a few members of the present staff. Its first appearance on the campus met with the approval of the student body and since then the subscription list has reached the two thousand mark. Beginning with three issues a year. the magazine has increased its output to two issues a quar- ter and also has enlarged the size of the publication. The quality of the work in the Lemon Punch met recognition when a Chapter of Hammer and Coffin, National Publishing Society, was granted in Why, 1921. Since the first few issues, membership in the society has increased to seventeen mem- bers, as follows: Stanley Eisman, Harris Ellsworth, Harry Smith, Wilbur Hulin, Allan Carncross, John Braddock, Ernest Haycox, Roscoe Hemenway, Edwin Hoyt, Owen Callaway, Raymond Bethers, Warren Kay's, Si Sonnich- . gen, Hal Simpson, Mason Dillard, Herbert Larson and Kelly Branstetter. Helen Dougherty and Beatrice Morrow have been elected to honorary mem- bership. TH E STAFF STANLEY EISMAN .................................................................................. tEditor HARRIS ELLSWORTH ............................................................ Business Manager ALLAN CARNCROSS .................................................................. Literary Editor HELEN DOUGHERTY .................................................... Advertising Manager ERNEST HAYCOX, EDWIN HOYT, JOHN BRADDOCK ............ Associate Editors OWEN CALLAWAY, RAYMOND BETHERS, BEATRICE M0RR0W....Art Editors Trwo lmmired hfty The Order Of Wanna McKinney Eleanor Spa! Ravmond Lawrence Ham's Ellsworth Leith Abbott Annamay Bronaug Stanley Eisman Lyle Bryson Elston Ireland HEM Rupert Wilford Allen Edwin Hoyt Alexander BmWn 0m Canmv HWY Smith Fm Quisenbem. Ruth Austin John Diefdorff ch it was founded in FHlmb'i t sta11.1ts first appearante 1 :he student 1013 and 5111: r iousand mark. Beginningiiii d its output to two issumi b1 1 if. in ication.T1ic qualit3 0111: when a chapter 01 Hammm anted 1n 11a3 19211111 1-3 has increased to scienteen mii- E11sworth, Harry Smith,11'i1i.i rncst Ha3'cox, Roscoe Hememi; Lcthers. Warren 1121338151113 rt Larson and Ke113 1111111111: we been e1ected to 1101101111116?- The Order of the Emerald 110,, VVanna McKinney Eleanor Spall Raymond Lawrence Harris Ellsworth Leith Abbott Annamay Bronaugh Stanley Eisman Lyle Bryson Elston Ireland Velma Rupert Wilford Allen Edwin Hoyt Alexander Brown Owen Callaway Harry Smith Francis Quisenberry Ruth Austin John Dierdorff Two hundred 15fty one Jean Strachan Kenneth Youel Floyd Maxwell E. J. Haycox Fred Guyon Margaret Scott Inez King John Anderson Maybelle Leavitt Warren Kays W ebster Ruble Mary Lou Burton Harry Ellis George McIntyre Rlildred Weeks James NIeek Jason MCCune A1 Krohn Oregon Publications LD OREGON, the ofiicial publication of the Alumni of the University of Oregon, is issued quarterly. Old Oregon has had no regular edi- tor this year, Mrs. Erma Zimmerman Smythe, the active members of Theta Sigma Phi, and Miss Jeanette Calkins taking Charge of the pub- lication at different times. Oregon Exchanges is published by the School of Journalism for Ore- gon newspaper men. Journalists from all over the state write articles for the sheet, which is edited by Professor Turnbull. The News Bulletin contains news of campus happenings Which are of interest to all parts of the state. It is sent to Oregon neWSpapers as a mail news service. The Winnagen is a humorous sheet published by the class in editing, and is sent to the alumni just before the annual Homecoming in the Fall. It is printed in green ink on yellow paper and has become quite popular among the alumni. Gibes and Scribes makes its appearance at the annual banquet of the Newspaper Conference held at the University every January. It contains a list of those in attendance and short items of interest about the visiting editors. The Extension Monitor is published by the University Extension Divi- sion, and is mailed to those enrolled in correspondence study. The Women,s Emerald, an 8-page special edition of the HOregon Dailyf, is the officialijunior week-end issue and is edited by Theta Sigma Phi, with the assistance of the women members of the regular staff. Trwo lumdred 15fty-tcwo he Alumnl t L" hhfrih rew h A gm has h d n0 reguhu t School of Journalism forth. mer the Stats writ e artichs f , urnbuh. campus happenings which his , to Ortigon mwspapers a; g m' nu mhhshed hy the chss in thtir; nnual Homecoming in the F! r and has become quitephpg? cc at the annual hanqucthi' 'sitv extcry January. human ms of interest about the WT. V the University Extensm D; 'respondence study. h . special edition of the hr: d is edited hr Theta. big?! e an f1- hcrs of the regular :ta , , :0 W I HEN mu cum v i I l . xiv IIIIIII 1411,! Ly dlK KKK; : ,3 l I K 1 . r I W, .HV K , l; , '9 KK' 'Kl"HLll ,, 4;.ww14 V7 1 "WW 3," V, w Axtuaamrvx 0 Two llznldrml I fIy-iln'n LYLE BARTHOLOMEW President of tile Hssoriated Students of the University of Oregon Trwo lumdred fifIy-four Student 1:; Bmuowmw .................. :ox WINNARD 1:2x Cmox .................... " :WBExEHEL .................. EXECU'. Bartholomew Wilmard Carson Lutham Couch McKinney Student Body Officers LYLE BARTHOLOMEW ........................................................................ President NORTON WINNARD ................................................................ Vice President HELEN CARSON ................................................................................ Secretary JACK W. BENEFIEL ........................................................ Graduate iManager EXECUTIVE COUNCIL Lyle Bartholomew, chairman; President P. L. Campbell, Professor H. C. Howe, Karl VV. Onthank, Norton Winnard, Helen Carson, Jack Benefiel, Dean Walker, Marc Latham Ralf Couch, Wanna McKinney. Trwn lmndrrd Mfty-zgw' Burtholom ow Winna rd Ca rson Ma xwell Rnwlings Campbell Eben Say Evans Ferguson Ingle Letoher McKune Student Council Lyle Bartholomew, Norton Winnard, Helen Carson, Floyd Maxwell, Ella Rawlings, Arthur Campbell, Maurice Eben, James Say, Alice Evans Mildred Ferguson, Clayton Ingle, Guy Koepp, Imogene Letcher, Jason McCune. Delbert Obertueffer, yell leader Trwo lmndred 15fty-5ix Glcnwal D V61 ,1 diam: Roy Hu,,llLa ProfeSgOl szxmmcrmna Rollo James King, Walter ' Karl Onthank, a v Winifred Hopson, Carolyn Frances Haber Miss C2 Paul Patterson, Elaine C04 Dr. Hoyd Maxwell, Inez I ean M" Anderson, E Dean JOhn n1 Canaan k I m WWW u; dent COunql P rd. Helen Carson. FlmdSI: ll Maurice Eben, Jamefiagfpn .Clmon lnglc. Guy 9 m'dlf' J nMcCunc. w sclllcader .33; , AW." .v,....-W rwymr, I hm. - wMWW.w Activity Committees FOOTBALL IVIartin Howard, Earl Leslie, George King, Luke Goodrich, Alumnus; Dean Colin V. Dyment, faculty. TRACK Glen Walkley, Peter Jensen, Tom Wyatt, A. R. Tiffany, alumnus; Dr. W D. Smith, faculty. BASKETBALL Hugh Latham, Roy Veatch, Francis Beller; Dean Walker, alumnus; Professor V. R. McDougle, faculty. BASEBALL Don Zimmerman, R0110 Gray, Art Base; David Graham, Alumnus; E. R. Bryson, faculty. MINOR SPORTS James King, Walter Wegner, Kenneth Smith, George Neale; Karl Onthank, alumnus; Dr. J. F. Bovard, faculty. WOMEN,S ATHLETICS Winifred Hopson, Carolyn Cannon, Margaret Russell, Florence Jagger, Frances Habersham; Charlie Fenton, alumnus; Miss Catherine Winslow, faculty. FORENSICS Paul Patterson, Elaine Cooper, Remey Cox; Carlton Spencer, alumnus; Dr. J. H. Gilbert, faculty. PUBLICATIONS Floyd Maxwell, Inez King, Stanley Eisman, Ruth Austin; Dean Eric VV. Allen, faculty. MUSIC John Anderson, Bernice Altstock, Margaret Phelps; Dean John Landsbury, alumnus; John Stark Evans, faculty. Trwn lmmlrml fIy-smrm, , WV Evans Dickey Historian Staff MARY EVANS .................................................... University Historian DOROTHY DICKEY, PHIL STROWBRIDGE, PHIL IRELAND ........ .................................................................... Executive Committee HARRIET VEAZIE, VIRGINIA PEARSON, MARGARET SAGABERD WINIFRED GRAHAM .................................... Clipper Committee REPRESENTATIVES OF DEPARTMENTS AND ORGANIZATIONS Journalism, Florine Packard; law, Sylvester Burleigh; business administration, Carl Myers; psychology, Wilbur Hulin; education, Margery Gilbert; arts and arch- itecture, Roscoe Hemenway; pre-medics, George Houck; graduate school, Helen DuBuy; political science and economics, Marianne Dunham; summer school, Emily Perry; English and rhetoric, Gayle Acton; physical education, men, Del Oberteuffer; physical education, women, Margaret Russell; science, Elsie Marsh; history, Verne Blue; foreign languages, Isabelle Kidd; dra- matics, Doris Pittenger; household arts, .Chloe Thompson; library, Lenore Cram; military science, Emerald Sloan; sociology, Germaine Dew; public speaking and debate, Claud Robinson; Hendricks hall, Emily Veazie; Alpha Chi Omega, Charlotte Clark; Alpha Delta Pi, Elaine Cooper; Gamma Phi Beta, Janet West; Pi Beta Phi, Helen Ball; Chi Omega, Mildred Lauderdale; Delta Delta Delta, Gertrude Golding; Delta Zeta, Ruth Lane; Zeta Rho Epsilon, Ruth Tuck; Kappa Kappa Gamma, Nancy Wilson; Delta Gamma, Helen Murdock; Alpha Sigma, Louise Odell; Sigma Nu, Carl Newbury; Kappa Sigma, Al Krohn; Beta Theta Two lumdred ijIy-eigllt ' h 3,: y. 0, -;,4..1surk.u n.5,. J, .a VLMu-e- -"' Wu... - 'wa ngmmduw. ,, , , , , ,7 w MM'u'mu-J. 1w H Pi, Milton Steiner; Alpha Tau Omega, Lawrence Hrll; Sigma Chi, Randall Jones; Phi Gamma Delta, Nelson English; Phi Delta Theta, George King; Delta Tau Delta, Arthur Larson; Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Frank Carter; Kappa Theta Chi, John DierdorfT; Chi Psi, Harold Lee; Bachelordon, Paul Patterson; Friendly hall, Remey Cox; Kappa Delta Phi, Howard Bailey; Phi Sigma Pi, John Anderson; Delta Theta Phi, LeRoy Anderson; Scroll and Script, Emily Perry; To-Ko-Lo, Allen Mooers; Friars, Leith Abbott; Theta Sigma Phi, Helen Man- , ' H ning; Sigma Delta Chi, John DierdorPf; Kwama, ?;l Luella Hausler; Alpha Kappa Psi, Floyd Bowles; Tre Nu, Margaret Duniway; art Club, Agnes Brooks; Sigma Upsilon, Arthur Larson; Mu Phi Epsilon, Margaret Phelps; Phi Theta Kappa, Esther Fell; Phi Delta Phi, Ogden Johnson; Zeta Kappa Psi, Jessie Todd; Eutaxian, Florence Furuset; Mask and Buskin, Doris Pittenger; Spanish club, LeLaine West; Pi Lambda Theta, Margery Gilbert; French club, Dorothy Manville; Pan-hellenic, Katharine Wilson; interfraternity council, Raymond Lawrence; Triple A, Margaret Rankin; Condon club, Emily Veazie l ' f SnE - mW szni 3mm, mm. ........ M 'Ceusie m Funny, Mmmm . w. ., ?L . ' W W x ' ' ' 'h'lw- MMPT '. ad Mm' Wm . M M I A my; W MM 5: cg. Dd WMEHE Ni WW ., ' E193 ' , 121 0019 use arris .u 9011 nine 'iciens "' ' KM"; Why": Kidd,d" Morrison Ith iiiohen B H lfilge HY :S'kilmex' 1' '1 Mterrifioltl ' l'Tidd 1A" lww CW ' 1 10k Manna; 1450115 Muham Bulrd ,3 '9 . N am 'dxw' . :5! M Wlfam - ,W'Hfiggi- StUant BOdy Secretarles if'f ' ID; mdcbmv Claudkobwmmrli Grace Pick, Beatrice Tidd, Marjorie Baird, Mary Skinner, Helene '.' f "End hlrmeclid;A"'HemBz La Fontaine, Winifred Graham, Cleo Base, Eugenia Page, 'ji' " W CWd; pi B$1P3Mtio'51" Geraldine Morrison, Edwina Richen, Frances Lyons, '2 31 Jim III DCchMtth;Klf7 Nila McGinty, Vivian MerriHeld, Mary Harris, i' hk'DeRho Epgloilal'l'1 J4"? Martha Pickens, Dorothy La Roche. j'i ,; letI . , ch: . of ' and 'v'mn'ode'hs'gwr'om E . .' Lou" .Bd' FE ' Two I; Imdrrd fifly-ninr 3 TI , ; A, h Hugs 523$.me Evade w 1.....323 ya 7:: CE: 958:: Ea E5 . ..... E: E: ............... ; .1693 ES: ?3 2.52. E .312. m. o $5152: 9; ma gag :5; 52; E; mag. 35 mg 28239. E m E? ESE w 293. E; Q. g: 2?: :23; 9 ma. mime. anemn 22: 2E. . w 55 912 Eggs. 9:. Es: The Oregon Knights HE Oregon Knights were organized by underclass students of the Uni- T versity of Oregon, to provide an organization for the promotion of Oregon spirit, the promotion of activities on the campus and to keep inviolate all Oregon traditions. Its membership is composed of one man trom the freshman and sophomore members of each living organization xecognized by the Student Council, two from each underclass group from Friendly hall and the Oregon Club, the president of the freshman class, and three members at large elected by the freshman class. OFFICERS JAMES MEEK .................................................................................... Stunt Duke DELBERT OBERTEUFFER .................................................... Honorary President MARCUS YOUNGS ............................................................................ Royal Scribe GEORGE NEALE .................................................. Chancellor 0f the Exchequer ACTIVE MEM BERS Jason McCune, Harold Potter, Gordon Wilson, Hal Kelly, Tom Hill, Kenneth Guldager, Ed Tapfer, H. D. Edlunds, Allen Smith, Lot Beatie, Jefferson Nelson, Milton Steiner, Carl Houston, Tom Crosthwait, Alexander H. Sargent, Douglas Farrell, Kenneth Williamson, Russell Gowans, Henry Heerdt, Justin Smith, Paul Sayre, John Southworth, Howard Winnard, Lloyd McCormick, Ed Haney, Everett Jones, R. A.. Hunt, Martin Biddle, Harold Holdman, Marcus Youngs, Richard Car- ruthers, John Simpson, Troy McCraw, John High, Gor- don McDonald, Eddie Evans, Robert F. Taylor, Howard Bailey, Herbert Brooks, Ivan Norris, Douglas XVright, George Neale, Lars Bergsvick, Roy Bryson, James A. Meek, Ted Baker, Cyril Valentyne, Paul Staley, Frank Chapman, Price Sullivan, Wallace W. Strane, Henry Karpenstein, William Buchanan, Dahl McKenzie, Charles Buchanan, Darrell Larsen, Archie Pitman, Charles King, Lyle Palmer, A1 Langrell, Pete Reinhart, Bill Johnson, Lloyd McRae, Ray Harlan, Harold Goedecke, Francis Quinn, Philip Irelan, Fred Young, Gibson Wright, Donald Woodward, Hesden Metcalf, Jack Sullivan. Two hundred sixty-one Perry Taylor Evans Kidd West Denn chlzie Scroll and Script Senior Honor Society Organized June 3, 1910 ACTIVE MEIWBERS Emily Perry, Alice Evans, Isabelle Kidd, Marian Taylor, Emily Veazie Annabel Denn, LeLaine West. HONORARY IVIEMBERS Luella Clay Carson, M. Ruth Guppy, Dean Elizabeth F. Fox, Ida V. Turney. INACTIVE MEMBERS NINETEEN HUNDRED EIGHTEEN Miriam Page, Ruth Wilson, Olga Soderstrom, Mrs. Ross Giger Marian NeiD Helen Wells, Ruth Westfall, Beatrice Gaylord, Emma Wooton Hall, Margaret Crosby, Mrs. William G. Williams Marian Tuttld, Margaret Crim. NINETEEN HUNDRED NINETEEN Ethel Waite, Marie Badura, Frances Frater, Mrs. Anna Landsbury Beck, Lois Laughlin, Mrs. Kathryn Johnson NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY Dorothy Duniway, Luceil Morrow, Grace Knopp, Irva Smith NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE Marian Gilstrap, Mildred Hawes, Alice Thurston, Mary Turner I Two hundred sixty-lwo Winnanl Bartholomew Icith Abbott, Wayne Aker Leslie, Floyd Maxwel Gustav W. Buch. 1 and Script ' Honor Society "4 1m 3, 1910 WE MEMBERS ' V155 Kile Kidd, Marian Taylor,Em11y c 3m, LeLainc West. WY MEMBERS F Isz.Ta:i Ppy Dean ElizabethF. ox. "Vi MEMBERS . v EchTEES . MN Hmpm Mrs. Ross 61ch Luiw SOdcrgrzmgd Emm WootonHagtd: ' vo , a "5' GZ'Marian Tun Marg lliams . Bl ' mrm W x HUNDRED; MM mm nCcs Flt:t , Johnson Reinhurt Maxwell Winnard Lutham Akers Bartholomew Leslie Kecncy Abbott Friars flu Upperclassmen's Society Organized November, 1910 ACTIVE MEM BERS Leith Abbott, Wayne Akers, Lyle Bartholomew, Claire Keeney, Marc Latham, Earl Leslie, Floyd Maxwell, William Reinhart, Harry Smith, Norton Winnard HONORARY IWEIVIBERS Gustav W. Buchen, Arthur Geary, Leroy Johnson, Hugo Bezdek Ttwo l1 undred Jixty-tlzrec Lawrence Alexander Fal'nhzmi Pearson Weeks Ilurkness Johnson Murphy Alexander Repinen Smith Peterson Hausler Berry Green McPherson Sophomore Honor Society, Founded fVIarch, 1912 ACTIVE MEMBERS Mary Alexander, Margaret Alexander, Marcella Berry, Mabel Rae Green, Luella Hausler, Alice Garetson, Velma Farnham, Adah Harkness, Agnes Kennedy, Henryetta Lawrence, Florence Johnson, Eloise McPherson, Margaret Murphy, Margaret Peterson, Virginia Pearson, Gertrude Smith,Hi1de- garde Repinen, Mildred Weeks, Gwladys Keeney Two hundred sixty-four Mane McCraW 5m Neale 111w Younss Sophomor: Orga 310M Chapman, Lawrence i rimllWilliamJohnson Edi V 11w,Jz180n McCune .1111, W. Lyle Palmer, Paul A, Sm McKnne McCruw Wilsey Johnson Potter - Knight 5 5' 5 Sayre Neale Farrell Rudd Chapman Weber 1 n Palmer Youngs Risley Lucas DuPuul Kix'tley i MINOR Weeks 515;" 5 5 I 5 met ilepinen Smith 5"? 5 7 Green 10W 5' 5 To-Ko-Lo 5 Sophomore Men's Honor Organization 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 Organized January .12, 1912 ACTIVE MEMBERS 71':ij FOIMM Man'h, Harold Chapman, Lawrence Cook, Raymond Douglas, Jean F. DuPaul, Douglas Farrell, William Johnson, Edwin Kirtley, Leonard Knight, Marvin Lucas, Troy L. McCraw, Jason McCune, Raymond McKeown, Allen Mooers, George D. Neale, W. Lyle Palmer, Harold Potter, Victor Risley, Arthur Rudd, Paul A. Sayre, Lee W. Weber, Marcus Youngs Two hundred sixty 557M Sculpture Club OFFICERS EUNICE ZIMMERMAN ............................................................................ President LUCII.E GARBER .......................................................................... Fire President BEATRICE MORROVV ................................................................................ Snretary CLEO JENKINS .......................................... .. .......................................... Treamrer ACTIVE MEM BERS Eunice Zimmerman, Emmy Lou Douglas, Knut Digerness, Mrs. L. H. Hodges, Lucile Garber, Florence Hartman, Beatrice Morrow, Mabel Johnson, Ellen Gardner, Helen Stoppenbach, Inez Fairchild, Alicia Agnew, Walter Wegner, Ward Prescott, Ethel Johnson, E. K. Harkness, Edgar Bohlman, Ivan Houser, Cleo Jenkins Normal Art Club OFFICERS FLORENCE M. MooxHEAD .................................................................... Prwidcnt HELENE KUYKENDALL ...................................................... Saretary-Treasurer MIss M. KERNS ........................................................................ Farulty Hdwiwr ACTIVE M EM BERS Victoria Avakian, Hazel Hayden, Lena Eastwood, Margaret Masters, Jennie McClew Hazel Broders, Florence McCly, Kathryn Nicholson, Eleanor Kilham, Helen Ball, Agnes Schultz, Eleanor Keep, Helene Kuykendall, Florence M. Moor- head, Helene LaFontaine, Edwina Goudey, Nellie Nygren, Margaret Rankin, Frances VVarrens, Gladys Russell, Wynne White, Georgina VVaIkys, Wilhelmina Becksted, Catherine Anderson, Josephine Croxall, Gertrude Livermore, Jessie Lewis, Maxine Buren, Ruth Claassen, Phebe Gage, M. Alta Kelly, Agnes Brooks, Eve Beekman, Mrs. Christianson y Two hundred sixty-six Jenkins Stuck?n mo Jnsxixs ............... RICHARD SUNDELEAF Jessa Gmx BEATRICE Momw ,,,,,,, fred Abbott, Lyle Bartholome Bradford, James Bradway, Goodin, Jesse Green, Syc Irle, Clarence Irwin, Koepp, T. T. Lare, Harlan Pearl, Tr Harry Series, Le Ahe, Kenneth son, Harold '1?th Butterhld, Doris Ellen Dngas, Ruth Brauti, Clar PWR Quintilla Reed, Fairchild, Grace Md EM Johnson, H32 Lillian Goon, Cla Mabel Johnson, Mildred HeEr -; Hayden, Le sift; Tim Braden, . . . gnes SChultz 1'18va 1a; , Earet ' 'grem lana Walkup, Wilhel Croxall, Gertrude Li Joorhead, Ruth Kuykendall m" T'fiflh Jenkins Sumleleaf Green Morrow TWE mmms ugh; kanigcrnCSSMuL.H.Hgf;. Students, Allied Arts League mce Morrow, Mabcl Johnson, Ella a1; fluid, Alicia Agncw, Walm Wail OFFICERS . Harkness, Edgar Bohlman,lmH . CLEO JENKINS ........................................................................................ President ; Cleo jmkim M RICHARD SUNDELEAF .................................................................... Vim President 3 : ; JESSE GREEN ........................................................................................ Treasurer 5 i ,1 Snretary ; BEATRICE MORROW ................................................................................ ACTIVE MEMBERS f5 mal Aft Club Fred Abbott, Lyle Bartholomew, Raymond Bethers, Stuart Biles, Edgar Bohlman, Don :: ; Bradford, James Bradway, D. A. Buell, Lester Chaffee, Salome Cusick, Margaret fag 1 Goodin, Jesse Green, Sydney Hayslip, Roscoe Hemenway, G. Hinson, C. A. 3 5 Irle, Clarence Irwin, Cleo Jenkins, Luther Jensen, Peter Jensen, Guy ! I OFFICERS WM Koepp, T. T. Lare, Cedric McComb, Jefferson Nelson, Roland Orne, ; .,. ,...:.:..Summ'rm Harlan Pearl, Truman Phillips, Merill Richmond, Roy Sawyer, $2M? mmk Harry Serles, Lester Smith, Richard Sundeleaf, Karl Vonder LEM j Ahe, Kenneth Wadleigh, Herbert Warren, Charlie Wil- ' son, Harold Wagner, George Wolff, George York, I ZTIVE MBWERS ,W Olive Butterfield, Doris Ellen Bothwell, Ivan Houser, Eunice Zimmerman, Emmy Lou 1:3! . Lem anwd'MargaraMamgg Douglas, Ruth. B.rauti, Clare Turlay, Ellen Gardner, .Dorothy'Campbell, Ina Mae 1! , . Vicholm EICW Mb, Proctor, Qulntllla Reed, Ward Prescott, Lulu Davls, Beatnce Morrow, Inez i?! .Vv kathn" I . ,kcndanflorchv Fairchild, Grace McInnis, Florence Hartman, Mary Pauline Chase, Hi KRPy HCICM My'll'e ggrenuiYi-T Ethel Johnson, Hazel Hatch, Knut Digerness, Constance Cole, :l Edwina GoudCvavclcimijt Lillian Goon, Clara Meador, Francis DuBois, Anne Bidwell, ; GladvsRusscthn "Josepha: Mabel Johnson, Anna Louise Vonder Ahe, Elma Bohn, :an ' ed Catherine .nderSOII Burt?! Mildred HefTron, Penelope Gehr, Dorothy Lare, Hazel 5kg ' it I Mum Hayden, Lena Eastwood, Margaret Masters, Jen- ' anmm'lcs: Alta KtHYumn nie McClew, Hazel Broders, Florence McCoy, Kathryn Nicholson, Eleanor Kilham, ; ICI'Je Gage. . - chri5ti3n90l1 Helen Ball, Agnes Schultz, Eleanor Keep, Helene LaFontaine, Edwina Goudey, If Beckman'x I Nellie Nygren, Margaret Rankin, Frances VVarrens, Gladys Russell, Georg- ! iana VValkup, Wilhelmina Becksted, Catherine Anderson, Josephine g; Croxall, Gertrude Livermore, Jessie Lewis, Maxine Lewis, Florence . Moorhead, Ruth Claassen, Phebe Gage, Alta Kelly, Helene Kuykendall, Agnes Brooks, Eve Mary Beekman 1 Two lzundred sixty-seruen Bartholomew Sundelcaf Hayslip Jenkins Gage Brooks Kelly Honorary Prater Founded 4 Techna Honorary Art Society, Organized 1919 EmEHanboszabeHe Nau l - Elsie Marsh, Rita ACTIVE MEMBERS Rut! Lyle P. Bartholomew, Sydney Hayslip, Richard W. Sundeleaf, Cleo H. Jenkins, Fl Mary Alta Kelly, Agnes Brooks, Phebe Gage Ofence Jagge Two hundred sixty-eiglzt Hayslip Fechna Society, Organized1919 Samara Honorary Fraternity for Botany and Bacteriology Students Founded at the University of Oregon 1920 ACTTVE NiERIBERS Ethel Sanborn, Isabelle Nauerth, Mildred Apperson, Elsie Lawrence, Alice Evans, Elsie Marsh, Rita Danford, Mrs. Delia Keeney, Alice Thomas, Ruth Sanborn, Frances Habersham PLEDGES Florence Jagger, Mrs. Rebecca P. Lansfield, Ruth Russell Two hundred sixty-nine Nichols Lane McManus Rasor Taylor Fell Perkins Nelson Beatie Curtis Mitchell Honkanen Phi Theta Kappa Women's Honorary Commerce Fraternity Founded at the University of Colorado BETX CHAPTER Installed April 13, 1920 OFFICERS ILA NICHOLS ........................................................................................... President MARIAN TAYLOR ........................................................................ Vim President MARY VIRGINIA MCDOUGLE ................................................................ Serretary HELEN NELSON .................................................................................... Treasurer HONORARY MENIBERS Dean Elizabeth Fox ACTIVE MENIBERS Ila Nichols, Marian Taylor, Mary Virginia McDougle, Helen Nelson, Madeline McManus, Esther Fell, Lulu Rasor, Hilma Honkanen, Ruth Lane, Margaret Beatie, Alice Curtis, Jean Mitchell, Audrey Perkins, Eloise White Two hundred seventy - McDougle 30km Leslie Say Wes BlacGregor A Natia Founded in 3 Annex A. KUHNHAUSE! 8mm R COLLINS . Ammo L bow Jens M. MACGREGOR . Thomas I. Bolitho, Alfred Harlan draRthfMd Bro ml Arthu Job . r A- l McManus Rasor Nelson Bali: . itchell Honkanen heta Kappa ry Commem Fraternity Uniwrsity of Colorado CHAPTER April 13. 1920 - xiE-ME 1 lcnxf'wu'. W .- McDouge, hLletuv H'gfi'llaa Honkanfn, Eloisewhnf HI m Perms, dCY Bolitho McDougle Lomax Whitaker Myers Collins Leslie Say Newbury 0011011 Brown Bowles MaoGregor Loughlin Carter Kuhnhuusen Gm 111 Alpha Kappa Psi National Commerce Fraternity Founded in New York University zMay, 1905 KAPPAI CHzIPTER Installed May 3, 1915 OFFICERS ARTHUR A. KUHNHAUSEN .................................................................. Prmidmzf SPENCER R. COLLINS .................................................................. Vim Prmidmt ALFRED L, LOMAX ................................................................................ Sprmim'y jOHN M. MACGREGOR ....................................................................... Trcaxzzrm' FACULTY MEIWBERS Thomas J. Bolitho, Alfred L. Lomax, Verne R. McDougle, John R. Whitaker STUDENT MEM BERS Floyd Bowles, Rutherford Brown, Frank Carter, Spencer R. Collins, Ralf Couch Harlan Gram, Arthur A. Kuhnhausen, Earl E. Leslie, Barkley G. Iloughlin, John M. MacGregor, C. Carl Myers, Carl Newbury, James C. Say Trwo lumdrmi sp-vszy-onr Myers VunZilo Collins Hawke Doan Whitcomb Smtt Mclmuglo Bolitho Janney Benetiel Leslie Evans Fassett Geary Zumwalt Olsen Ness Simpson R. Boyer Niemi Buck M. Boyer Beta Alpha Psi Professional Hccountihg Fraternity Founded at the University of Illinois in 1917 BETA CHHPTER Installed May 25, 1921 HONORARY NIEMBERS A. Lester Andrus, Arthur Berridge, Walter D. Whitcomb, Paul Scott FRATRES IN FACULTATE Thomas J. Bolitho, Philip W. Janney, Vern R. McDougIe GRADUATE MEMBERS Jack W. Benefiel, Spencer R. Collins NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Virgil G. DeLap, Ernest J. Evans, Frank N. Fassett, Herbert L. Geary, Malcon H. Hawke, Earl E. Leslie, C. Carl Myers, Charles'VanZile, Chester G. Zumwalt NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Merrill A. Boyer, Raymond A. Boyer, Clyde J. Buck, Lewis J. Ness, Joseph C. Olsen, Harold V. Simpson, Albert Niemi Two hundred sewenty-trwo National Ii GREG I n: C. CARL Mms 0m, VANZILE .............. Cam G. ZUMWALT A rm E C. Robbins, T. J. BOW H C. Carl Myers, Chas. Va Malcol X Hawke lithe Janney m1 Alpha Psi ftounting Fratcrnity vmity of Illinois in MI CHJPTER May 25, 1921 W MEMBERS . SM Ive Walter D. Whltcomb, Paul D , 1x FACULTATE l W Janncy, Vern R. McDOIlgt rE MEMBERS . I Spencer R- comm NTY'TWO L Gem 3k; ' 2W, DRED TWE crbe f G, lcs Va ilc, CW .5, Char Dvhp M: Geary Zumwalt "la Xiemi Buck ll 3:" Robbins Bolitho Janney Folts Benefiel Myers VanZile Zumwalt DeLap Miller Hawke Beta Gamma Slgma National Honorary Commerce Fraternity OREGON ALPHA CHAPTER Installed January 8, 1921 OFFICERS C. CARL MYERS .................................................................................... President CHAS. VANZILE .................................................................................... Serrelary CHESTER G. ZUMWALT ........................................................................ Treasurer ASSOCIATE MEM BERS Dean E. C. Robbins, T. J. Bolitho, Franklyn E. Folts, Philip W. Janney, Jack Benefiel HONORARY MEMBERS Luke L. Goodrich STUDENT MEMBERS C. Carl Myers, Chas. VanZiIe, Chester G. Zumwalt, Virgil G. DeLap, Malcolm H. Hawke, Frank Miller Trwo lnmdred se-vmty-tllree i ?i 1 II t 1' i Taylor . Rose Fudge Pittenger Cartwright Bartholomew Wilson Iweney Young Dunn English Norton Johnson Associated University Players MASK 14ND BUSKIN CHJPTER ' Installed February 3, 1917 OFFICERS DORIS PITTENGER .................................................................................. President NELSON ENGLISH ..................................................... Vire President MARIAN TAYLOR ....................................... - ........................................... S ecretary ACTIVE MEMBERS Lyle Bartholomew, Florence Cartwright, Berrian Dunn, Ray Dunn, Nelson English, Vern Fudge, Ogden Johnson, Claire Keeney, Star Norton, Doris Pittenger, Helen Rose, Marian Taylor, Esther Wilson, Alice Young Trwo llundred se-venty-four Mucm Guam ..... hm COLEMAN ............. Emu" PERRY m EVANS Gun MK ........................ Mm mm; ..................... Gilbert Perry Evans Frank Parkinson Morse Hussam Ewer Kidd lettee Cooper Ihlwos Coponhaver Berry Danford Perkins Hayes Fudge MW ? 1 Wilson . Wm ; ish Sorton L P1 Lambda Iheta var . Womanls Honorary Educational Fraternity . ' z ta 1 2 Z nvctSlty Players 175' lled .7117 e 1 , 19 I U 'SKIN CHAPTER OFFICERS . 11:3 3 1917 MARGERY GILBERT ................................................................................ Preszdent Ti War! I ELEANOR COLEMAN .............................................................. Vite President 1;! EMILY PERRY ........................................................................................ Treasurer x ALICE FVANs ........................................................... v'forresponding Serretary il CERS WPrNW GLENN FRANK ......................................................................... Rewrder f "Wi-l-Npruim MARY PARKINSON .................................................................................. Reporter 3 ............................ SWIM 9! --------- MEMBERS : Mrs. Ruth Wheeler, Mrs. Lillian Crosland, Katherine Morse, Louise Hassan, Adah EWIBERS WHEN Ethel Ewer, Isabelle Kidd, Mrs. Helen Maxham, Mrs. Pattee, Elaine Cooper, H . n Ray n.1-WEE Ethel Wakefield, Mildred Hawes, Lucile Copenhaver, Anna Grace Pallett, ' , Bcrrian Dull ,Vonon,90"5 l ' Alda Berry, Rv'uth Kneeland, Reta Danford, LeLaine West, Felicia f Keeneersxtr?lrso;1, AliceYOung Perkins, Bertha Hays 1 Esther Trwo Izumired seventy-fivf Hawes Carson Daggett l,ittenger Veazie Hall Frank White Melis Stephenson Cooper West Hildebrand Hooper Mzu-Millzm Zeta Kappa Psi Honorary Forensic Fraternity for Upperrlass Women Established at Kansas State Agricultural College in 1913 BETA, CHAPTER Installed June 1,1917 OFFICERS ELSIE HILDEBRAND ................................................................................ President ADELAIDE WHITE .. ...................................................................... Vite President GLENN FRANK .................................................................. Serrctary-Treasurer VVANDA DAGGETT .................................................................................... Reporter ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Miss Julia Burgess ACTIVE M EM BERS Mildred Hawes, Ethel WakeSeld, Lois Hall, Helen Carson, Jessie' Todd, Doris Pittenger, Elaine Cooper, Wanda Daggett, Helen Hooper, Elsie Hildebrand, Glenn Frank, LeLaine West, Adelaide White, Elizabeth Stephenson, Emily Veazie, Elizabeth Melis, Francis MacMillan Trwo 11101de .wwmzty-six t Install 1 Cm 50mm ........... ?ngmcn ................ meEstn mm Hm ASS Hbmikcad Bain, T. J. :clzs C. A Gregory, R, M. M , Am F. 15ch J. Carl BOWmar fund, Arthur C. Hicks, Elbert 0mg: R. McIntyre, Peter L. 6 him F. SLOAN ................. Hm A. REED ........................ Em E. WILsox ..................... Gm C. WALKLEY .............. HON 0:. F. L Shinn, Dr. R. J- W 5 A"demo 3395rll 1 Phi Delta Kappa AIME Honorary Educational Fraternity CHI CHAPTER Installed February 19, 1921 OFFICERS J. CARI. BOWMAN ................................................................................ President READ BAIN .................................................................................... Vice President PETER L. SPENCER .................................................... Corresponding Secretary LLOYD ENLUND .................................................................. Retording Secretary ARTHUR HICKS .................................................................................... Treasurer ASSOCIATE MEM BERS J. C. Almack, Read Bain, T. J. Bolitho, B. W. DeBusk, R. S. Dickerson, H. R. Douglas, C. A. Gregory, R. M. Miller, H. D. Sheldon, F. C. Stetson, Kimball Young ACTIVE 1AWEIVIBERS - E VViIIiam F. Beck, J. Carl Bowman, Verne G. Blue, Harry B. Brookhardt, Lloyd A. E E Enlund, Arthur C. Hicks, Elbert L. Hoskin, Herman A. Leader, Ralph U. Moore, E E George R. McIntyre, Peter L. Spencer, Clifton J. Tucker, Sophus K. VVinther Pittwgex Dawn . . White M9115 uh? Hildebrand Hooper .. E. Chemist,s Club Kappa PSE OFFICERS Eternity for L'pperIEHSSEEEE'EEEE EMERALD F. SLOAN .............................................................................. President 11 mm: HUGO A. REED ............................................................................ Vice President J rirultuml 60 '9 , . - . 1f! 1 9 FORD E. WILSON .............................................................. Serrelary Treasurer GLENN C. VVALKLEY ............................................................ Sergeant-at-Arm: EEE CHJPTER !; 1917 HONORARY RiEIVIBERS EEEEE dlum' E, . . . . 4 Dr. F. L. Slunn, Dr. R. J. VVIlllams, Prof. H. G. Tanner, J. L. VVhltman FrlcERS Pn GRADUATE MEMBERS E E 3 l'it'IPEEEEEEE VVilIiam R. Skidmore, Roger W. Truesdail .JlilE-E'E' U ............ SWIM .43?" ASSOCIATE MEMBERS M EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE Claire Holdredge Ex TI MEMBERS E2 EEIEMBERS AC VE S$ Myrtle Anderson, Wanda L. Daggett, Glenn Frank, Gladys M. Lupher, Arthur XV. Iulia Burgh Campbell, Ian Campbell, Meryl W. Deming, Percy A. Lasselle, Hugo A. Reed, .13. Emerald F. Sloan, Glenn C. VValkley, Ford E. Wilson : WIBERS NEE 7 , EIEE rwn ,E EEEEEE 5! H n Helen ca'er ElsirEE'i, E ' a y 0P 1 n'LL l5 H0 ya 1 I Helen eth StfPhE" E E Mg?!" . Elizab Trwn Immlrtd JewezzIy-scrvm Bryson Manning Beck McKinney Rupeft Scott Burton Cram Bronaugh Austm Silics Dougherty ' King Thompson Theta Sigma Phi Women's National Journalistic Fraternity Founded at the University of Washington April 8, 1909 THETA CH14PTER Installed June 10, 1915 HONORARY MEMBERS Mable Holmes Parsons, Mrs. Eric Allen, Mrs. W. F. Osburn, Caroline Cole, Mrs. Frederic Thorne ACTIVE MEMBERS Ruth Austin, Mrs. Anna Landsbury Beck, Annamay Bronaugh, Lyle Bryson, Mary Lou Burton, Lenore Cram, Helen Dougherty, Inez King, Helen Manning, Wanna McKinney, Velma Rupert, Margaret Scott, Dorris Sikes, Jean Strachan, Jessie Thompson Two hundred sewenty-eiglzt National Founded at DePa OMI C ml; McKinney W ram Bromugh 3m :11 Journalistic Fraternity u !y of W askingion Jpn! 3, J CHAPTER, 11111151011913 Lawrvnvo Ellsworth Dierdorff liisman Brown Maxwell Abbott Ix'elty lillis lloyt Kuys Youol Allen Brogan Sigma Delta Chi National Journalism Fraternity Founded at DePauw University, April 17, 1909 OMICRON CHXPTER Installed Hpril 10, 1913 HONORARY MEMBERS Prince L. Campbell, Eric W. Allen, Colin V. Dyment, George P. Putnam, Dean Collins, Merle R. Chessman, Charles H. Fisher, Elbert Bede, E. E. Brodie, Robert W. Sawyer, Paul R. Kelty ASSOCIATE NIEMBERS Karl W. Onthank, Carlton B. Spencer, George S. Turnbull ACTIVE NIEMBERS Leith Abbott, Jay C. Allen, Wilford Allen, Philip Brogan, Alexander G. Brown, John Dierdorff, Stanley Eisman, Harry Ellis, Harris Ellsworth, Fred Guyon, Edwin P. Hoyt, Warren Kays, Eugene Kelty, Raymond Lawrence, Floyd Maxwell, Harry Smith, Kenneth Youel Trim lmndrpd scwenly-ninc AuItl Thompson Youzic Watson Carter Perry J umer Skuvlzm Orary Burton Pot and Qgill SCRIBBLERK? CLUB Established May, 1919 OFFICERS JESSIE THOMPSON .................................................................................. President EMILY VEAZIE ............................................................................ Viva President EMILY PERRY ...................................................................................... Treasurer AMY TURNER ........................................................................................ Swretary ACTIVE MEM BERS Lillian Auld, Laura Moates, Irene Stewart, Emily Perry, Emily Veazie, Amy Turner, Jessie Thompson, Mary Lou Burton, Katherine Watson, Marion Crary, Mar- garet Skavlan, Margaret Carter, Mrs. Eric Allen, Mrs. Harry Beal Torrey, Mrs. Grace Campbell Mann, Anna Landsbury Beck, Julia Burgess, Mary H. Perkins, Ida V. Turney, Grace Edgington Trwo lzumired ezglzty 1: it!!! Hulin M: nga" mm J. Hum ........ Amy Csnxcnoss MI . X n Abbott Hulin Blue McDonald Ellsworth Larson Curncross Brown Brogan Whitten Huycox Eisman Sigma Upsilon Founded at the University of the South and Vanderbilt University, 1906 YE TdBdRD INN Installed October, 1915 OFFICERS ERNEST J. HAYCOX ................................................................................ President ALLEN CARNCROSS ............................................................ Sem-etary-Treasurer FACULTY IVIEIVIBERS XV. F. G. Thacher, Melvin Solve STUDENT M EM BERS Leith Abbott, Verne Blue, Philip Brogan, Alexander G. Brown, Allen Carncross, Stanley Eisman, Harris Ellsworth, Ernest J. Haycox, Wilbur Hulin, Arthur Larson, Donald McDonald, Harry Smith, Gene VVhitten Two hundred ciglzty-one Eismzm Ellsworth lIulin Braddock Ilaytox Czlrllcross Short Uallzm'uy Larson llomcnway Sllnpson Bctllcrs Somnichson Brunstcttcr Dlllaml lloyt hays Hammer and Coffin National Publishing Society Established at M67210, California, zfpril I7, 1906 LEMON PUNCH SOCIETY Granted Chapter in May, 1921 HONORARY MEMBERS Beatrice Morrow, Helen Dougherty ACTIVE MEMBERS John T. Braddock, Kelly Branstetter, Owen Callaway, Allen Carncross, Mason Dillard, Stanley Eisman, Harris Ellsworth, Ernest J. Haycox, Roscoe Hemen- way, Edwin P. Hoyt, Wilbur Hulin, Warren Kays, Arthur Larson, Frank Short, Harold Simpson, Harry Smith, Edwin A. Sonnichsen, Ray Bethers. Two hundred eiglzty-two Conrad mug Littletield Helm!!! Rosebraugh Armstrong Conrad Burleigh Coleman McFadden ' Wood Wade Howard Littlefield Skyrman Abbott McClellan Johnson Ralston f McDonald Rosebraugh , Gavin Iseminger McCulloch Michelson Slmlason ' Bmddtlyick Him!" tr anuu -- - 3 1.1: - - LE DillardmEM Hon W S: Phl Delta P 1'11 Founded University of Michigan, 1869 CHszE INN r and COHm Installed 1903 , - -n Sofie", FACULTY IWEIWBERS :Vfi " "bin?" 9. A 117 It William G. Hale, Sam B. Warner, E. H. Decker, James A. Miller, , , California, P" ' Edwin R. Bryson, Carlton B. Spencer. fEl POST GRADUATE 7NCH SOCIETY Kenneth Armstrong 4"" in May, 1921 ACTIVE MEMBERS NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Earl P. Conrad, Sylvester H. Burleigh, VViIliam E. Coleman, Sylvanus Kingsley, ,RARY MEMBERS H. Borden Wood, Francis T. Wade, Frederick L. Howard, Forrest Littlefield i M' Helen Doughert-V NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE ' Harry C. Skyrman, Leo L. Abbott, Verne B. McClellan, Ogden C, Johnson, W EMEMBERS Carnaog'y' William G. Ralston, Lindon L. Myers, Donald McDonald 3 H151: NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Encst . Yah mnyfw Arthur Rosebraugh, John Gavin, Boyd Iseminger, Howard McCulloch, Chauncey HNorth, r Arthuru Lawton, Harold Michelson, Melville Jones, Rolfe Skulason. Two hundred eighty-llzrte Cond 0n Le Foyer Francais French Club Organized 1919 OFFICERS VERNE BLUE .......................................................................................... President DOROTHY CONDON ........................................................... , ........... Vice President ANNABEL DENN .................................................................................... Secretary JEAN DUPAUL .................................................................................... Treasurer HONORARY MEMBERS Dean Elizabeth Fox, Timothy Cloran, Mrs. Leland Coon, Henriette Guoy, Lois Gray, Mme. Fayard, Helen DuBuy, Prof. W. C. Barnes, Gerald Barnes ACTIVE MEMBERS Verne Blue, Dorothy Condon, Annabel Denn, Jean DuPaul, Florence Garrett, Ralph Poston, Wilbur Bolten, Randolph Kuhn, Germaine Dew, Don Zimmerman, Ransom McArthur, Doris Sengstacken, Dorothy Manville, Cornelia Pipes, Mrs. Watts, Beatrice Towers, William Russis ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Maple Moore, Glyde Schuebel, Helen Chambreau, Melville Jones, Bertha Fountain, Claudia Broders, George Pellin, Hallie Beaver, Wave Lesley, Gladys Taylor, Mary Gill, Helen Hooper, Claude Robinson Trwo lmndred eiglzty-four LELAISE WEST ............ Rm RIDIXGS ................ Hm: Hosm ............. EMILY PERRY ................ MARGARET Scm'r .......... Mus ROSALINA Cums Ridings El Circulo Castellano Organized 1920 Dyer Francals OFFICERS r L , LELAINE WEST .................................................................................... President L31; Fund, CM, . RETA RLIDINGS .................................................................... . ......... 1'in President 3 i L . 1 HELEN HOEFER ...................................................................................... va-etary L: rgdmztdIQIQ EMILY PERRY ...................................................................................... Treasurer L115 L MARGARET SCOTT .................................................................................... Reporter L; W OFFICERS sts ROSALINA CUEVAS .......................................................... Faculty Adwiser 2 2 WWWPLLLLL' W. nflpmb" S: 1 I WWJLL'LLLL': - W TrLer'L' fl, DNORARY MEMBERS :3; , Ham? 9 Cloran Mrs Leland Coon, GmMEL" EL .LLLLLLL. m. w CW L; L E TlVE MEMBERS ! Iomlf' l, L be I Donn, 1C3" DUPaDlL: Don imp West Hoefel' Gillis Perry Addison L: ; h K" hn Germ alfhy Ham'lkm ,; ? - : roV - - - .L cngsmcken 'WeLs williamW Slgma Delta P1 . L , L ' c To . . . mtnc Natzonal Honorary Spamsh Fraternity , R5 2 L IATEMEMBE em": MB GAMMA CHAPTER L Chambrcau'Ma'clethGhdv Installed February, 1922 Hallie B'ava'audco R bmson 2 er ACTIVE MEMBERS L n HOOP ' LeLaine West, Helen Hoefer, Marion Gillis, Emily Perry, L L Frances Morgan, Helen Addison 2' Two lnmdrml Pigllfy-fI-vp Phelps Letcher Linn 115111 Caplcs Teshner Potter Garrett Skeels Denn Elrod Altstook V Brown Harper Trwo lumdrmi rigllfy-six Clark hegory Dickey McPherson Wilson I" Founded at the Met VAnzjancThacher, Mme. R Dixon, Mrs. W. Doug! Margaret Phelps, Dorothy Beulah Clark, Lora '1 Gregory, Margaret Linn, Imogene Hildred AWyKArNMW a .. ., Mu Phi Epsilon Honorary Musical Fraternity Founded at the Metropolitan College of Music November 13, 1903 NU CHszTER Installed March 3, 1911 HONORARY MEMBERS Mrs. Jane Thacher, Mme. Rose McGrew, Mrs. Anna Beck, Miss Banfield, Mrs. A. C. Dixon, Mrs. W. M. Case, Mrs. C. A. E. Whitton, Mrs. M. H. Douglas, Mildred Smith, Dorothy Dixon ACTIVE M E M BERS Margaret Phelps, Dorothy Dickey, Marvel Skeels, Annabel Denn, Lucille Elrod, Beulah Clark, Lora Teshner, Alberta Potter, Florence Garrett, Leona Gregory, Margaret Kern, Bernice Altstock, Mildred Brown, Marian Linn, Imogene Letcher, Esther Wilson, Eloise McPherson, Hildred Hall, Helen Harper, Helen Caples Trwo lmmirz'd pigllIy-xpwpn Landsbury Evans Coon Akers Furry ' Hoeber Woods Gavin M cArthur Newbury Staples qu'iss Campbell Phillips Johnson Burns Ellsworth English Gailey Morrow McCIaflin Anderson Cox Poston Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity 0f dlllerica Founded October 6, 1898 At the New England Conservatory of Music PSI CHAPTER Installed October 16, 1921 OFFICERS AUBREY FURRY ...................................................................................... President RALPH HOEBER .................................................................. Firxt Vite President RALPH POSTON ................................................................ Second Vim President GLENN MORROW .................................................................................... Secretary JOHN ANDERSON .................................................................................. Treasurer ARTHUR JOHNSON ................................................................................ Historian FACULTY MEMBERS Dr. John J. Landsbury, Prof. John Stark Evans, Prof. Leland A. Coon, Rex Uunderwood, George Hopkins STUDENT MEMBERS Maurice Eben, Curtis Phillips, Raymond Burns, Carl Newbury, Harris Ellsworth, Crecene Fariss, Ransom McArthur, Wilson Gaily, Meryl Deming, Arthur Campbell, Remey Cox, Herbert Hacker, John Gavin, Dan VVoodS, Carpenter Staples, Wayne Akers, Nelson English, Ralph McClaHin, Frank Jue Trwo llumlred eiglzty-cigllt Kidd Veazie Carso: Juhon Elm MM! Burger Eu Fumsxcs FURUSET RUIH Lays .......... GERTRUDE Gowmc Gm: SCHUEBEL Iss2 ch ..... Winifred Hopson, Elizabet R; Tuck, Isabelle Kidd eeler, Leona Grego; orence Johnson M Esther Dennis, ! La el'" COOP", Fl Son, Audrey J'thlll' Newbury Ison Bums 'latlin Anderson Mu Alpha rattrnity of Ameriaz ' 0610120111898 . and Conservatory of Mum CHAPTER Ottober 16, 1921 OFFICERS Pm." Pmih rm! 1111 l W 11 '11 Kidd Veazie Carson Ilopson Schuebel Hensley Perkins Morthland Jackson Elrod Jagger McCurdy Stephenson Gilham King Gregory Scott Golding Lumberson Packard Wheeler Johnson Thompson Barger Andrae Veazie Pride Dennis Cooper Eutaxian Literary Society OFFICERS FLORENCE FURUSET .............................................................................. President RUTH LANE .................................................................................... Vice President GERTRUDE GOLDING .............................................................................. Secretary GLYDE SCHUEBEL Treasurer INEZ KING .............................................................................................. Reporter ACTIVE MEMBERS Winifred Hopson, Elizabeth Stephenson, Inez King, Emily Veazie, Helen Carson, Ruth Tuck, Isabelle Kidd, A1ice McCurdy, Beatrice Hensley, Ruby Baugh, Ethel Wheeler, Leona Gregory, Pauline Tompkins, Betty Pride, Florence Jagger, Florence Johnson, Margaret Jackson, Alice Bates, Gertrude Andrae, Esther Dennis, LaVelle Barger, Margaret Scott, Mabel Gilham, Helen Cooper, Florine Packard, Harriet Veazie, Chloe Thomp- son, Audrey Perkins, Lucile Elrod, Sarah Lamberson, Lois Morthland Trwo Izzmdrei righty-nine 'Pigzlrd Burnett Burger Pike Hildebrand Rawlings Russell Miller Cannon Furuset Gax'lmde Mugerle Todd qurk Howells Graham T11: k Stewart Bulderroe Brunstetter Ixelzur Hermian Club Uppervlass Physiml Edumtion Club Organized October 21, 1920 W ome OFFICERS RUTH FLEGAL ........ FLORENCE FURUSE ELSIE HILDEBRAND GRACE TIGARD ...................................................................................... President L015 BARNETT .............................................................................. Fire President LAVELLE BARGER ........................................................ .. ....... .. ................ Scrretary ESTHER PIKE ........................................................................................ Treasurer ELSIE HILDEBRAND .................................................. Corresponding Secretary HARRIET THOMSON .................................................................. Fautlty Adwiser ACTIVE M EM BERS Grace Tigard, Lois Barnett, Margaret Russell, Florence Furuset, Echo Balderee, Emma Jane Garbade, Caroline Cannon, Dorothy Miller, Elsie Hildebrand, Jessie Todd, Myrtle Magerle, LaVelle Barger, Lucille' Branstetter, Charlotte Clark, Charlotte Howells, Esther Pike, Sue Stewart, Ruth Tuck, Maud Graham, Ella Rawlings, Lola Keizur, Grace Snook, Dorcas Conklin Ttwo lmmlrrd nilmly Hildebrand Rawlings aw, lingerie Todd M Bakleme Emmett" Em Club Eduration Club 7 21, 1020 .............................. Sfl'NW - WM n s, I by mi?! MW NH Flegal Curtis Largent Hildebrand Rawlings Bryson lmniwzly Towers Todd Cram Furuset Anderson lingstrom Bald Iler Farnham Gillmm Stewart Tre Nu H7ommfs Honorary Vocational Organization Established December 9, 1917 OFFICERS RUTH FLEGAL ........................................................................................ President FLORENCE FURUSET Vim President ELSIE HILDEBRAND .............................................................................. Saretary IVIARGARET DUNIVVAY ........................................................................ Treasurer MABEI, EILHAM ...................................................................................... Reporter HONORARY MEMBERS Mrs. A. R. Sweetser, Miss Dorothy Collier ACTIVE NI EM BERS Lyle Bryson, Ella Rawlings, Florence Furuset, Ruth Flegal, Mary Largent, Elsie Hildebrand, Jessie Todd, Margaret Duniway, Alice Curtis, Velma Farham Myrtle Anderson, Ramah Iler, Beatrice Towers, Ruth Engstrom Sue Stewart, Mabel Gilham, Lenore Cram Kay Bald, Violet Wood. Trwa lmmirml ninrty-onc Thompson Benson Anderson Home Economics Club The Home Economics Club, an organization to promote interest in household arts and home making, has had a very active and successful year. Monthly meetings were held at the Anchorage where the girls informally discussed topics of interest. The program committee arranged for addresses by women prominent in the held of Home Economics. The sale of doughnuts at the student body games provided funds for membership in the national association and for sending a delegate to the National Home Economics Convention which is to be held during the sum- mer. OFFICERS CHLOE THOMPSON ................................................................................ President GEORGIA BENSON ........................................................................ Vim President GLADYS ANDERSON ................................................................................ Serretary HONORARY M EM BERS Lillian Tingle, Hazel Houck, Freneta Pattison. ACTIVE NI EMBERS Chloe Thompson, Gladys Anderson, Ruth Engstrom, Georgia Benson, Olive Gates, Florence Morrison, Madonna Wright, Victoria Rice, Edna Bushman, Rena Hales, Francis Manary, Cora TenEych, Lottie Benshadler, Marie Meyers Trwo luum'red71inpty-trwo fnii'mity of Oregoh Established Dec Named in Honor of the Drum L. Powms In CAMPBELL .......... Hvsm G. SCHENCK . ah Ellen Condon McCorna r.Graham John Mitche r. HWY Ho ' m Ofmizadon f0 pl'OEOKiHTT' Powers Campbell Husband W alkley mm . d , Iloltlredge Cook Hertlein Schenck . 1 avcryactlvcan SUM: v; thc Anchoragcwhercthegirlsim: Condom Club N: j . P lmcommitltflfmgfdfm University of Oregon Section of Geological and Illining Society of i dinerican Uniwersities 0f Hm mom: mn'drdf'f'f' Established December 11, 1910, by the Upperclassmen of i It Studmtbodygm'bp MW Department of Geology f ' jation and forindmga ff; Named in Honor of the Pioneer Geologist of Oregon, Dr. Thomas Condor; 5mm WhichktobehelddUIWL- "Down to Bedrock; OFFICERS . r, y DELMER L. POWERS ............................................................................ President ' IAN CAMPBELL ............................................................................ Vife Prexident , : HUBERT G. ScHENCK ...................................................... Sccretary-Treamrer " HONORARY IWEMBERS Mrs. Ellen Condon McCornack, Dr. Warren DePre Smith, Dr. Earl LeRoy Packard, Dr. Graham John Mitchell, Dr. Edwin T. Hodge, Mr. Chester W. Washburne Mr. Henry Howe, Mr. Richard Nelson, Carrol Waggoner ACTIVE IWEIWBERS Claire P. Holdredge, Rachel A. Husband, Leo G. Hertlein, Paul W. Cook, Ian Campbell, Hubert G. Schenck, Glen C. VValkIey g ASSOCIATE IVIEIVIBERS VViHiam Skidmore, Raymond Porter, Dorothy Dixon, Elsie Lawrence, Don Zimmerman, Arthur Campbell, Troy A. Phipps, George Riggs Kenneth Moore, Mrs. P. XV. Cook, Homer A. Wise Tun bun erd Izilzrly-lerp ml. M553" WM W mH-W fjfdvn m snow 05 TH nod 12:: F mumns 0 51:11! W " bung: ' . mm m the W 19mm of I oxpmllhlre, 1 mdprepmtic KIM Moment 1: tilt m Myers Buck Nichols Couch Al I. R ' F It. M D g1 Xewbury obbms Say 0 S McIntyre C on C Boaltie IO! lork fOII U Chamber of Commerce Member of Chamber of Commerce of the United States of America W9 1933 I OFFICERS CARL MYERS .......................................................................................... President CLYDE BUCK ................................................................................ Vire President ILA NICHOLS .......................................................................................... Serretary RALPH COUCH ...................................................................................... Treasurer I'm Wu TRUSTEES ,3." . '0 James C. Say, Carl Newbury, George W. McIntyre, Margaret Beatie, ' . mum": Dean E. C. Robbins, Prof. V. R. McDougle, Prof. F. E. Folts AS... . d Trwo lumdred ninety-faur Thule... JAMES SAY Premier".- CARL MYERS DUNLmeMD UNWERSTYiMTOREGON vmhwhw CARL NEWBURY GEORGE Mamas CHA MBER Of COMMERCE smite BUCK ,' I, MARGARET EEATIE ILA NICHOLS i If Dan E. c. ROBBINS EUGENE. OREGON numb. PROF, V. R. McDoucua RALPH COUCH PROF F E. FOLTS SNOW ON THE MOUNTAIN IS POWER IN THE VALLEY Knowledge is Power. The Forefathors of the American Peeple knew the meaning of thrift but their example was forgotten. Slcwly but surely those lessons of thrift are now being taught us. Thrift does not mean a pinchy miserliness nor the hardships of eelf-denial. It means the lessening of extravagance, the cutting of useless expenditure, the cultivation of the saving habit and preparation for the hour or need. KNOWLEDGE is power. If we be thrifty in e our student days knowledge will come to us and with . w it that POWER which in life spells SUCCESS. i As we once fought for our country let us .m mam Hmwn; now work for it. Mwmn University of Oregon Chamber of Commerce Q2, CECLHJZ QVVX?fJUhJ l President ,f Commerce May 9 , 1922 ; . . mm. H I a 0; M, mefs 3 W I UMBER OF COMMERCE MEMBER v of tho OREGON STATE UNHED SFATB OF AMERICA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE A Student Organization of the University of Oregon School of Business Administration 5 iwl STEEw WWW w; airfoil! "gt: hicDouglcv M W Thcohundrcdldntmhewc :0 1r; X :34 5. Abbott, William Alk: VHawld R Barton, Willlal Bolton, J. Carl Bowma Callahan, Glenn 8. Ca Coatcs, William Col' W. Dedman, Mal Herbert Hacker, D. Jackson, El Edie, Forrest E. Littlefield, '1 BenMaxweH, Harry C. M Rae, Merrill D. Richmon Herbert G. Schenck, E t A. VanLoan, Earle j; . Horace Westerfiel :33 Craftsmen Club Woods, Fk 3; Student and Faculty Members, 14. F. E A. M. L FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION Sergeant Agule, T. J. Bolitho, John F. Bovard, Prince L. Campbell, Dan E. Clark F. S. Dunn, Robert C. Hall, E. T. Hodge, C. M. Hogan, Charles A. Huntington, L. J. Johnson, Earl Kilpatrick, A. L. Lomax, Verne R. McDougle, Karl Onthank, Carlton Spencer, John Straub, E. S. Tuttle, Rex Underwood, Sam Bass Warner, Raymond H. Wheeler 3 Two Izundred ninety-six x Ta: 1 1 mm: ' y KL M, nen Club Htmlim, J. F. 31.11. ADMINISTRATION D1 . ' Campbell. invard. Prince C rlcs H 3:, C. 51' Hogan' McDoUEh' 5" Y EV M7 x bHU ' STUDENT MEMBERS Fred E. Abbott, William Akers, Guy E. Armantrout, James H. Baker, W. C. Barton, Harold R. Barton, William F. Beck, J. H. Beeman, Leslie G. Bennett, W. M. Bolton, J. Carl Bowman, Ernest L. Boylen, Clyde J. Buck, Robert F. Callahan, Glenn S. Campbell, Ian Campbell, F. W. Clark, William T. Coates, William Coleman, Harley Covalt, Clyde D. Davis, William W. Dedman, Maurice Eben, Shirley Edwards, E. E. Evans, Herbert Hacker, A. H. Hazard, Martin A. Howard, Virgil D. Jackson, Eugene S. Kelty, CliHord Knodell, Earl E. Leslie, Forrest E. Littlefleld, Troy L. McCraw, Paul MCElwain, John M. MacGregor, Ben Maxwell, Harry C. Mayer, Dwight L. Parr, Fred S. Radspinner, Arne G. Rae, Merrill D. Richmond, Roscoe Roberts, Claude Robinson, Ramey Rugh, Herbert G. Schenck, Edwin A. Sonnichsen, William M. Tow, Birchard A. VanLoan, Earle E. Voorhies, Frances Wade, John Watson, Horace Westerfield, Arthur Wicks, L. Lee Williams, Dan L. Woods, Floyd D. Wright, Thomas D. Wyatt Two hundred nindy-xetven Tigurd Gage t Veuzie Furuset hchuehel Y. W. C. A. OFFICERS . GRACE TIGARD ........................................................................................ President PHEBE GAGE ................................................................................ Via? President EMILY VEAZIE ........................................................................................ Secretary FLORENCE FURUSET ............................................................................ Treasurer GLYDE SCHUEBEL ............................................ Undergraduate Representative The Young VVomerfs Christian Association includes within its mem- bership all women who are in sympathy with its purpose. Meetings, Bible classes, and social service groups develop religious and social consciousness. The members of the cabinet direct the different activities of the Association and through committee work, members may participate according to their individual interests. An employment bureau is conducted to assist girls who are wholly or partially self-supporting to hnd employment. A series of social affairs spon- sored. by the Y. M. C. A. 1nd the Y. VV. C. A. further friendship and democe racy. Every effort is made by the association to co-operate with the churches in building up and maintaining religious standards among the students. Two hundred ninetv-eigllt Fnruset M m: Perkins Parkinson l u s ' mtungs, Jean Mackenzne; "5mg; Mrs. wm Mm? Church R C Ha"; Bun tsmfiation N Publ - M. Case CO-Ope m Balow, A 9W3, M rs. idly, Mrs. A. R Se S W1 WM 1. C, A. low. '11., P111111 Ha P111111": 511111111 Tum L'ndtryms 1mm RIP'UIWM Furusct I121 wrom-e C lurk West 1511111 Perkins Evans Cram Tmltl Parkinson Frank 1.21110 MucKonzw THE CABINET Meetings, Jean Mackenzie; Finance, Elsie Lawrence; Bible Study, Mary Evans; Church Co-Opel'ation, Mary Parkinson; World Fellowship, Ruth Lane; Bunga- low, Glenn Frank; Practical Service, Jessie Todd; Association News, Char- lotte Clark; Social, LeLaine West, Helen Murdock; Publicity, Kay Bald; Boosters, Lenore Cram; Social Service, Felicia Perkins ADVISORY BOARD Meetings, Mrs. Wm. 1W. Case; Finance, Mrs. G. E. Lehman; Bible Study, Miss Mary Perkins; Church Co-Operation, Mrs. D. R. Gullion; World Fellowship, Mrs. R. C. Hall; Bungalow, Mrs. W. P. Fell; Practical Service, Mrs. L. P. Hubbs; Association News, Mrs. A. R. Tiffany; Social, Mrs. S. A. E. VVhitton; Publicity, Mrs. A. R. Tiffany; Boosters, Mrs. A. C. Dixon; Social Service, Miss Barbara Booth Trwa bmzdrml ninaty-ninp i 1 l , I Callaway Rudd Duncan Woods Bureu DeLap Truesrlail Veatch Rockhey Morrow McConnell Y. M. C. A. OFFICERS Dienlorff Winnartl Eby OWEN CALLAWAY .................................................................................. President VERNON DUNCAN ........................................................................ Vice President WILLIAM PURDY .................................................................................. Secretary DAN WOODS .......................................................................................... Treasurer LEMUEL P. PUTNAM ............................................................ General Secretary CABINET MEMBERS VVolcott Buren, Virgil DeLap, John Dierdorff, Marvin Eby, Bruce McConnell, Glen Morrow, Haddon Rockhey, Arthur Rudd, Dell M. Tedrow, Roger Truesdail, Roy Veatch, Norton Winnard. Three hundred T Oregonk Graduate l m all parts of the we arch. The Graduate Cl . aanremmt of methods of : monthly for dinners wher wk encouraged. Kenneth Armstrong, Stanley J. Carl Bowman, Arthur Ian Campbell, Lillian Collins, Zetta Cook, Helen DuBuy, Fe Enlund, Amelia Foster, Bruce Guoy, Daisy .lmes, Philip 3 Harold N. , 3m lnaxkc' o. McConnell Eh! ICERS PIIHP'V"t . v.1": l'iu W T' .................................. .. Sam ................................... 61W! $er -n .wkT-wkxx "up" -""9 ' ' W": Hawes Byrne The Graduate Club Oregon's Graduate School is composed of about seventy-flve members from all parts of the world and representing many fields of study and re- search. The Graduate Club is the organization for the maintenance and ad- vancement of methods of study, of research and of culture. The club meets monthly for dinners where reforms are instigated, reports given and original work encouraged. ACTIVE IVIEMBERS Kenneth Armstrong, Stanley Asp, Mildred Aumiller, Walter K. Bett, Ethel R. Bohler, J. Carl Bowman, Arthur Bramley, Fay Alice Breneman, Norman T. Byrne, Ian Campbell, Lillian A. Carleton, NIarguerite R. Clarke, Spencer R. Collins, Zetta Cook, Lucile Copenhaver, Thomas D. Cutsforth, Helen DuBuy, Ferris Eldridge, Richard M. Elliott, Lloyd A. Enlund, Amelia P. Esparza, Adah E. Ewer, Evelyn M. Foster, Bruce J. Giffen, Margery Gilbert, Henriette O. Guoy, Daisy Halleck, Laura Hammer, Mildred L. Hawes, Arthur C. Hicks, Mary Hockett, Ralph C. Hoeber, Claire P. Holdredge, Benjamin Homing, Elbert L. Hoskins Azile Howard, Wilbur S. Hulin, Rachel A. Husband, Charles A. Irle, Oscar W. james, Philip Janney, Rebecca C. Lancefield, Horace Lane, Herman Leader, Harold N. Lee, Howard Lehman, Dorothy Lowry, Mathilda Mathisen, 'George R. McIntyre, Helen K. Maxham, Laura Moates, Dean Moore, VVasily Muller, Benetta Nash, Isabel Nauerth, Karl W. Onthank, Frank Palmer, James Pruett, Minnibel Reid, William R'ussis, VViIliam Skidmore, Melvin Solve, Norma Dobie Solve, Victor Storli, George E. Theiss, Joaquin Thomson, Alice B. Thurston, Frances J. Thorpe, William M. Tow, Roger W. Truesdail, Veronica Tracy, Emil G. Tschanz, Ethel Wakefield, W. Howard Wise, Sophus K. XVinther, Catherine W. B. Yocum, Lovisa A. Youngs. Titre: 1m mired 0 716 . Hilary Altstock K 01111me Condom N ewman Club OFFICERS JOHN F. HILARY .................................................................................. President BERNICE ALTSTOCK .................................................................... Vite President AGNES KENNEDY .................................................................................... Secretary DOROTHY CONDON .............................................................................. Treasurer The Newman Club is an association comprising the Catholic students of the University and other students who, though not members of the Church, express a preference for the Catholic religion. A large and adequate library is at the disposal of 2111 University students at any time. The Apologia is a publication, edited by the members of the club. This review is issued quarterly. The members also plan and carry out all social activity. , ' Three lnmdred trwo Hmlings Lawn Yi'iixm Xe womx's ELLARawuxcs ......... Emsumxca ..... MARGARETJACKSON. -- BERNICEALTmcK ----- that Amen ....... vamox ....... HMNMN ............. AtlcrEvm ................. Mm .................. 3mm ........................ a .. Gk ETRUstIzLL ...... Wham '''''' 1!th M01501 ............... Au. ,, ................ MEDUN ' ....................... W-.. 75:: Pm .- .................................... "Sm: ................................................. THEE Ruwlings Lawrence Jackson A ltstock Alexander v 3 Wilson Nelson Evans Hall Russell Addison Dunham Tigard 1 sciation compr'ming the Cathaiiu v 5 who, though not membersmi; licreligim H Womenk League 3 at the disposal of all Lmvm. , WOMEle LEAGUE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE - ! l - dcam'W ELLA RAWLINGS .................................................................................... President rmbch 3150 Planan ' ELSIE LAWRENCE ........................................................................ Vite President y MARGARET JACKSON .............................................................................. Serrctary BERNICE ALTSTOCK .............................................................................. Treasurer MARY ALEXANDER .............................................................. Sergeant -at-Arms . NANCY WILSON ...................................................................................... Reporter HELEN NELSON .................................... Cllairman Foreign Sdzolarxlzip Fund ALICE EVANS ...................................................... Chairman IxVomenCt Building LOIS HALL .............................................................. Chairman Musiml Cozzrert 'MARGARET RUSSELL ...................................................... President of W. A. A. , GRACE TIGARD .......................................................... Prexident of Y. W. C. :1. 1 HELEN ADDISON .................................................. Oregon C1111; Representative MARIANNE DUNHAM .................................... Chairman :Idiruiiim Committcr TlH'PF lumdrmi Iln'w Addison Pike Aman Cushman Hassan Oregon Club of Womenk League . men The Oregon Club of Women,s League is a body of non-fraternity wo- men organized for the purpose of promoting social activities, debating, ath- 0 letics and other campus activities. r9 OFFICERS . John RBovard, A. E HELEN M. ADDISON ............................................................................ Preszdent ESTHER M. PIKE ........................................................................ Vice President Henry EVA E. AMAN ........................................................................................ Serretary ; DOROTHY CUSHMAN ........................................................................... Treasurer IJfPh'H'Ald'Cd. Zelma Arra LOUISE HASSAN ...................................................................................... Reporter ??trhngw. Heed, Doris Bo Burk" Ralph Crandall ACTIVE MEMBERS DUPMAnh 3A Helen Addison, Eva Aman, Helen Andrews, Camile Anderson, Mildred Braaten, 'ld, "rETlesen Dorothy Cushman, Francis Marion Douglas, Louise Davis, Lena Eastwood, Med Hall,Ka,1 D Wanda Eastwood, Helen Enoch, May Fenno, Glenn Frank, Ida Flanders, Mary HathaWay H Ethlyn Forrest, Bertha Hayes, Edith Howe, Charlotte Howells, Louise IrelandJUan'it Hassan, Genevieve Jewell, Ethel Johnson, Pearl Lewis, Marion 3Wton N'I Lowry, Vera Loelmer, Josie Milliorn, Mildred Orr, Vera EV , l Oglesby, Esther Pike, Theresa Robinett, Edna Stewart, CrettM Jessie Todd, Estelle Vadnias, Cosema Vitus, Enid Jack Myu- Veatch, Adelaide White, Marion White, Merle OI Marie Wood El Ole eanore Reavi UEol-d 3, I Kenn Three hundred four If womenk W Bothwell I Mytirs DoquhGI'U' is We is a MY 0' MW Cahfornla Club dew; Organized January 16, 1922 HONORARY MEMBERS John F. Bovard, A. E. Caswell, Jeanne Fayard Coon, Justin Miller, Henry D. Sheldon, John B. Siefert. ACTIVE MEIWBERS Ralph H. Aldred, Zelma Arrasmith, Helen Atkinson, Norma Barrett, Carl Beed, Sterling W. Beed, Doris Bothwell, Mildred Brown, Walter Bunker, Mildred Burke, Ralph Crandall, Armonde G. DeMerritt, Helen E. Dougherty, J. F. Du Paul, Arthur Ericksen, Ruth Fowler, Emil Ghio, .Raymond Graham, Hildred Hall, Karl D. Hardenberg, Mary Hardy, Hazel Hatch, Mary Hathaway, Helen Hoefer, Helen V. Hooper, Rebecca Ireland, Juanita Jackson, L. Dorothy Kent, Chauncey Lawton, Nila E. McGinty, Wanna McKinney, Everett Miner, Mina Miner, Carl Myers, Jack Myers, George Neale, Jack Newhall, Merle Oliver, Don Park, John Parish, Oletta Pedersen, Viola Powell, Eleanore Reavis, J. T. Royles, John Schumacher, Grace Ufford, Kenneth VVadIeigh. George Wheeler. :romoting social activities. Three lzmzdred hm Knight L. Wmt J. XVest i Washington Club Organized in 1921 ACTIVE M EMBERS E j John Braddock, Charles Fish, Mabel Gilham, Sidney Hayslip, Claire Keeney, Helen English 3 1 King, Leonard Knight, George McIntyre, Ella Morrison, Florence Morrison, 1; 2 Lloyd Reed, Ruth Roberts, Margaret Russell, Ted Strong, Barton Sherk, '31 1 Floyd Shields, Geraldine Troy, Janet West, LeLaine West, 1 Virginia West, Nancy Wilson Th1 NW Excusn ........... PAUL Sm .................... Hmw SIMPSON ............ Mmon F. MCCLAIN BOARD NINETEEN Prof. T. J. Bolitho, De Wilson ' Kerr Shull Rankin Triple A Soriety for Freshmen Women OFFICERS . NORMA WILSON .................................................................................... President ELIZABETH KERR ........................................................................ Vive President ' 1 H MARTHA SHULL .................................................................................. Secretary ' 1 , MARGARET RANKIN ............................................................................ Treasurer lerw lmmlred six GM Sid!!! Hqi'q, 01in EH 1 dame, E"! Motrin Firm 3i": 1: m Rune", Ted Sim; But; 59?. Troy, Jana W5. Mint wt! '51, Nancy Wilma PW!f 1 111P"' " , 5:114" " WW ICERS .7 English Simpson Sayre The University Co-op. NELSON ENGLISH .................................................................................. President PAUL SAYRE ................................................................................ Viva President HAROLD SIMPSON .............................................................. Serretary-Treamrer MARION F. MCCLAIN .......................................................................... Manager BOARD NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY AND TWENTY-ONE Prof. T. J. Bolitho, Dean J. F. Bovard, Carl Newbury, Wayne Akers, Nelson English, Arthur Base BOARD NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE AND TWENTY-TVVO Prof. T. J. Bolitho, Dean J. F. Bovard, Carl Newbury, Wayne Akers, Paul Sayre, Tom Hughes Three lumdred seven Manville i1 Hellenic Counc Pan- OFFICERS idem etary Pres 130 N ATHARINE Wu K .. Secr H n M S m L L A H easurer NVILLE A DOROTHY M gle -D0u 3h Council 1ty OFFICERS Interfratem President President E MCDOUGI 1AM C01 . R. ILI V ICE IX EMAN W NELSON ENGLISH Three 1m mired eight Saw: Trmv' Three lzundrcd Izinc Wilson Allen West Idleman Phillips Hales H artman MacMillzm Wilcox Versteeg Morrison Nelson Stebno Livermore Day Littlejohn Manary Garetson Setters Scroggin Lee Simmons Morrison Three hundred ten J. West Condom M urphy Benson Rankin M asters L. West Hull Sohmeer Davies Wurrens NINE .xsmanne Wilson, Rena Hale Gamma Phi Beta Founded at University of Syracuse November 11, NU CH14PTER Installed December 18, 1906 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TWO Katharine Wilson, Rena Hales, Helen Nelson, Geneva Stebno, Helene Kuykendall, Janet West, LeLaine West. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-THREE Beatrice Barker, Zoe Allen, Florence Hartman, Margaret Kern, Gertrude Livermore, Frances MacMillan, Helen Day, Dorothy Condon, Hildred Hall. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Virginia West, Georgia Benson, Areta Littlejohn, Frances Manary, Margaret NIurphy, Dorothy Schmeer, Helen Idleman, Catherine Wilcox, Alice Garetson, Elizabeth Setters. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Margaret Masters, Bernice Davies, Margaret Phillips, Helen Versteeg, Alladeen Scroggin, Euth'elma Lee, Margaret Rankin, Frances Warrens, Geraldine Morrison, Helen Simmons, Mina Miner. Thrte hundred eleven m..; ."fw .4 .K 3',23.$'$.".1. 4-mu$h ,. .5 . ,1; . Strauser Smith Andresen H . 3 Lay Kennedy Swartz ? Pinneo Eccles Wheelhouse ' Carpenter Meyers Fly Ii' Greene Gates Marsh M Wobber Muthisen Burke Three hundred ttwelqze Lauderdule Lorenz Sheasgl'een Johnson Ridwn Seufert found!!! at I ,1 f S Julia Burgess Chi Omega Founded at the University of drkansas April 5, 1895 PSI ALPHd CHAPTER Installed April 30, I909 SORORES IN FACULTATE Julia Burgess, Charlott: Banfield, Isobel Naeurth. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TWO Helen Strauser. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Hallie Smith, Marie Andresen, Mildred Lauderdale, Hulda I'Iafner, NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENT L'-FOUR Carmel Sheasgreen, Marion Lay, Agnes Kennedy, Miriam Swartz, Camilla Lorenz, Margaret Mathisen, Katherine Pinneo, Sadye Eccles, Clara Wheelhouse NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Mildred Seufert, Maud Neighbor, Dorothy Carpenter, Marie Meyers, Violet Webber, Irella Fly, Veola Johnson, Eulalia Butler, Elcena Greene, Olive Gates, Mildred Marsh, Edwina Richen, Zelma Arrasmith, Mildred Burke, Marion Mathisen. Three hundred thirteen Brmmug'h Cannon Auld Lewis Ilonkmwn Bain Eakin McGuire MacKenzie Ballack Munvillo Phelps McDongle Torrey Letoher 0mm Sengstacken ,Hll Lawrence Norton Berry Campbell Gerlinger Buck Harris Honkanen Gay Shull Three hundred fourteen Carlock Bryson MacKenzie Coolidge Lawrence Fortmiller Hardy Sensenich Cusick Brooks Manning Linn Beatie Hazard Ireland Phelps Foundfd in D81 ALI 1m 50F Grace Robertson, M SON mm i'efdinc Pilkingron, Annamav Hamil: Carlock, Agnes 'Broo'k Phelps. Virginia Mc Lilli .zzith Gm Eli NINETEE Hr . , zabeth T1 Mum, Marion Linn, Je: MW Gill, Marion Law :3 NINETEE , Hakim, Helen St 911 OPPCnbal f?ftta LaWrence , Kappa Alpha Theta Founded in DePauw University January 27, 1870 dLPHXI XI CHAPTER Installed July 11, 1909 SORORES IN FACULTATE Grace Robertson, Ruth Montgomery, Mrs. George Fitch SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Geraldine Pilkington, Annamay Bronaugh, Dorothy McGuire, Hope MacKenzie, Marcile Carlock, Agnes'Brooks, Carolyn Cannon, Dorothy Manville, Margaret Phelps, Virginia McDougle, Lyle Bryson, Helen Manning, Lillian Auld, Mae Ballack. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Elizabeth Geiser, Elizabeth Torrey, Imogene Letcher, Lenore Cram, Anabel MacKenzie, IVTarion Linn, Jessie Lewis, Doris Sengstacken, Cornelia Pipes, Mary Gill, Marion Lawrence, Lorna Coolidge, Margaret Beatie. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Hilma Hokanen, Helen Stoppenbach, Asteria Norton, Marcella Berry, Jane Campbell, Henryetta Lawrence, Elizabeth Garrett, Marjory Hazard, Gloria Collinson, Catherine Bain. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Georgiana Gerlinger, Florence Buck, Mary Harris, Florence Fortmiller, Mary Hardy, Rebecca Ireland, Eleanor Eakin, Betty Honkanen, Jeanne Gay, Martha Shully Ruth Sensenich, Salome Cusick, Genevieve Phelps Three hundred jffmen Dunhzlm Golding Glzmz Fraloy Espinosa TenBrook Clarke MoCurtly Fontaine Ridll 10 Wheeler Rezlvis Repinon Tuthill G001 lin Young: Pride Simonton Barrett Nicholson Fitz Sim mons Sherwood McMonies Three hundred sixteen Comett Murton Haynes Pmptor Ulrioh 6 Founded a! 305m" THET: I nsta SOR hrmm Espinosa, Mattie P SOROR mm! Mznanne Dunham, Florence mums Glltrude Golding, Nell Fri: mam. Haw Helen - IChOISQn Delta Delta Delta Founded at Boston University Thanksgiving Eve, 1888 THETA DELTKI CHAPTER Installed October 30, 1910 SORORES IN FACULTATE Carmen Espinosa, Mattie Pattison, Madeline McManus, Martha Spofford. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Marianne Dunham, Florence Riddle, Margaret Goodin, Margaret Simonton, Lucile Murton. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Gertrude Golding, Nell Tenbrook, Ethel Wheeler, Alice Young. Irene Barrett. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Teka Haynes, Helen Glanz, Beryl Clarke, Eleanor Reavis, Betty Pride, Kathryn Nicholson, Ina Mae Procter, Beatrice Fraley, Alice MCCurdy, Hildegard Repinen. NI NETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Margaret Fitz Simmons, Helen Sherwood, Josephine Ulrich, Helene LaFontaine, Alice Tuthill, Alberta MCMonies, Tona Cornett. Tllree Izzuzdred seventeen Corrigan Garbade Acton Engstrom Strowbridge Montgomery M. Evans Barnett Duniwny Griffith McKee Spall Gage . A. Evans Austin Rose Pittenger Campbell Fitzgibbon Buren Brown Caples Wilson Alexander Teshner Gehx' J. Johnson Orput Clemens M. Johnson Lester Skinner TIII'FE lmndred eighteen Apperson Miller Flegel Steuding Service Titus Dean Elizabeth F JR, NI N mEmmy ET wn l t'Ho'ence Me n, Margaret Alexa Kappa Kappa Gamma Founded at Monmouth College October 13, 1870 BETA OMEGA CHAPTER Installed January 11, 1914 SORORES IN FACULTATE Dean Elizabeth Fox, Norma Dobie Solve, Helen DuBuy. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Clara Corrigan, Mary Evans, Phebe Gage, Alice Evans, Ruth Austin, Mildred Apperson, Emma jane Garbade, Lois Barnett, Helen Rose, Doris Pittenger, Flora Campbell, Dorothy Miller. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Gayle Acton, Margaret Duniway, Evelyn Fitzgibbon, Maxine Buren, Gretchen Brown 7 Marjorie Flegel, Ruth Engstrom. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Margaret Griffith, Florence McGillivray, Dorothea Von Berg. Helen Caples, Nancy Wilson, Margaret Alexander, Vivian Steuding, Elizabeth Strowbridge, Dorothy McKee, Lora Teshner. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Penelope Gehr, Josephine Orput, Neva Service, Nan Montgomery, Catherine Spall, Gretchen Clemens, joy Johnson, Madelyne Lester, Mary Skinner, Mildred Johnson, Alice Titus. Tllree lzzmdred nineteen Taylor Emison Potter Folts Powers Dougherty McHaley Morgan Fairchild Sherwood Hall Miller 'Pillinghust Holman St. Clair Hooper Morrow Alexander Hawkins Scotton leree Izundred trwenly Kelly Murdock Green Kerr Clerin Cundy Thomas Dickey Lyons Bondu 'ant Found!!! 11! U" Delta Gamma Founded at Uniwrsity of Mississippi January 2, 1874 ALPHKI DELTJ CHAPTER Installed Ortober 17, 1913 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TWO Lois Hall, Helen Laughary, Nlarian Taylor, Helen Hooper, Mary Alta Kelly, Helen Dougherty, Irene Stewart, Ina McCoy. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-THREE Helen Murdock, Margaret Cundy, Alice Thomas, Beatrice Morrow, Maybelle Miller, Francis Morgan, Alberta Potter, Gladys Emison. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Mable Rae Green, Mary Alexander, Anna Katherine Chapman, Hilda Tillinghast. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Frances Lyons, Vida Povey Sherwood, Thyra St. Clair, Margaret Dickey, Margaret Powers, Mary Clerin, Betty Kerr, Laura Folts, Doris Holman, Pauline Bondurant, Charlotte Hawkins, Dorothy Scotton, Marion Phy, Margaret Phy, Katie Potter, Inez Fairchild. Tllrm' lumdrml IrwmIIy-rnm A Faunded at Unirmi Nichols Elrod Elrod Kidd Carson H0p4on G21 rrett Thompson Thompson Schuebel Grillis Welk LGnberson Loughlin Anderson Peterson Wright Miles Gormzm Deich Vilsml Bailey Johnson Hutton Anderson Bushman Smith Walker Schuebel Page Chambreau WReilly O'Reilly Adams Akers McMurphey Atkinson Hoover TIH'N lnuzdrpd lQL'NIty-IQUO Wilt" Aha Alpha Phi Founded at University of Syracuse Ortober 20, I872 TAU CHJPTER Installed January IL 1912 SORORES IN FACULTATE Mrs. Jane Thacher. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE NiNETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Isabe'lle Kidd, Maurine- Elrod, Lucile Elrod, Winifred Hopson, Ila Nichols, Helen. Carson. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-THREE Florence Garrett, Jessie Thompson, Chloe Thompson, Glyde Schuebel, Maribn Gillis, Savilla Welk, Sarah Lamberson, Aulis Anderson. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Gladys Anderson, Esther Wilson, Alice Jean Bailey, Beatrice Gorman, Marguerite Miles, Gladyse Wright, Florence Johnson, Lucille Hutton, Margaret Smith, Della Deich, Genevieve Loughlin, Edna Bushman, Margaret Peterson NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Helen Adams, Ruth Akers, Helen Atkinson, Lucy Hoover, Lylah McMurphy, Anne 0,Reilly, Helen Chambreau, Jane OReilly, Eugenia Page, Ruth Schuebel. TIII'PP lmmlred lrwmlly-MrN Found!!! a! J Thurston Lawrence Mitchell Haven Fell Coleman Smith Ostmmler Winbig'ler A ltstook Clarke Rem Carter Loavitt Brown Byler Cullx'ins Douglas Weeks Prudhonmw Hausler Bull Uieslvr Davis Fostor Pearson Dnllu 4 Douglas XVeuH-r Rogers LaRoc-he DcGolyer Barrett Three lmndrcd Irwenty-four Pi Beta Phi Founded at Monmouth College Apri128, 1867 OREG 0N ALPHA CHAPTER SORORES IN FACULTATE Mrs. Anna Beck, Miss Mary Watson, Alice Thurston, Evelyn Foster. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TWO Elsie Lawrence, Marion Mitchell, Genevieve Haven, Audrey Roberts, 3 NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-THREE Mildred Smith, Dorothy Ostrander, Margaret VVinbigler, Bernice Altstock, Helen Clarke, Kathleen Kem, Lucile Garber, Margaret Carter, Maybelle Leavitt, Ruth Fowler, Mildred Brown, Dorothy Byler. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Myler Calkins, Emmy Lou Douglas, Mildred Weeks, Vera Prudhomme, Luella Hausler, Helen Ball, Ruth Giesler, Lula Davis, Evangeline Foster, Virginia Pearson, Madeline Dallas, Delight Verdenius. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE fellu Lucille Douglas, Norrine Weaver, Atha Rogers, Dorothy LaRoche, Louise Vonder 811?": A116, Mary De Golyer, Norma Barrett. wait" 1' w"? 1W Three lzmzdrcd lrwcnty-lf-vc Installed October 29, 1915 , . I 1 Esther Fell, Eleanor Coleman. W I Copenhaver Matthis Parkinson Herman Tillson Cooper Clark Stone Keber Brodie Lampshire Three hundred lrwenly-Jix Kidwell Chase Pick Titus Iler Ridings Geoghegan McPherson Titus Rupert Perkins Dedman McIntyre Harper Alpha Delta Pi Founded at PVesleymz Female College May 15, 1851 XILPHA LAMBDA CHAIPTER Immzied May 20, 1920 SORORES IN FAC U LTATE Lucille Copenhaver. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TWO Elaine Cooper, Irene Compton, Velma Rupert, Eulalia Titus, Gladys Matthis. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-THREE Beulah Clark, Genevieve Chase, Meltrude Coe, Ramah Iler, Audrey Perkins Mary Parkinson, Lelah Stone, Marguerite Straughn, Josephine Croxall, Helen Warner, Rita Ridings. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Mildred Dedman, Claudia Gratton, Dora Herman, Rosalia Keber, Portia Kidwell, Eloise McPherson, Gertrude McIntyre, Elizabeth Tillson. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Dorothy Brodie, Pauline Chase, Julia Geoghegan, Helen Harper, Gwendolen Lampshire, Grace Pick, Orpha Titus. 'lerM hmzdrrd lrwanfy-M-zwz Lune Conklin Gluvey Loinomvolwr Search Everett Graham Christie Kilkonny Faust VzmMeter Guttridg'e Amlmo Bartlett Guttritlg'o Morrifit-ld Three hundred tcwentywiglzt Zimmerman Barger Smith Chathurn Evans Perry Stevens Cntlow Wright Ha lvorsen T111vi4 W Vi Gregory Skoog Freeland Honk McCoy Found!!! at M M 0 Y elle arger, D W J MNETEEX ::er? Glavey, Agnes C l Feeland uh' , l ardett, Belle ,3Ed'Houk KINETEEN tudt' J : ary Se "ch Travis Farm Fr 1 TCDC Delta Zeta Founded at XVIiami University October 24, 1902. OJMEGA CHKIPTER Installed Octobpr I5, 1920 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TWO Ruth Lane, Gladys Everett, Florence Van Meter, Eunice Zimmerman. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Nadine Stevens, Leona Gregory, Dorcas Conklin, Maude Graham, Elva Guttridge, LaVeIle Barger, Dolores Catlow, Beulah Wright. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Elsie Skoog, Irene Glavey, Agnes Christie, Gertrude Andrae, Gertrude Smith, Beulah Wright, Velma Freeland, Louise Leinenweber, Rose Kilkenny, Gertrude Bartlett, Belle Chatburn, Billie Halvorsen. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Gertrude Houk, Mary Search, Frances Faust, Clara Guttridge, Grace Evans, Fredericka Travis, Florence McCoy, Viv ian Merrifield, Jean Perry. Three 1111 mired twmlty-ninc Wagner Boynton Curtis Ilnnson Root B. Hensley 0121 rk H. Hensley K oenoy Baird Soeley Egglesun Sunburn Hoodrit h Dunsnmre 3k Kinney Jackson Price Stephens Brodors Three bzmdrpd Illirly ' WWW w W? Marsh KIoComlick LeCompte Frvenmn Courtney "W7MWM ; MW , 7 MW; 'Ww Denn Jagger Howzml Derhum XVilson Foundrd a! DIP ' , NINETEE. .:"rchuslcy, Leah Wagner Annabel Dena, Dorothea NINETEEN fgam Ja Hilda I 31me G Compte, Vera wadys KGCnev' F A .... bbwwysqk mmwm-, m EMME .,,.w V E wwpv f w-n .. M E HHMW Alpha Chi Omega I'Vozhzded at DePauw University October 15, 1885 .3 E1; zILPHAl KAPPAI CHAPTER "1: Installed June 23, 19.21 ' . ' SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TWO Beatrice Hensley, Leah Wagner, Hazel Seeley, Wanna McKinney, Elsie Marsh, ' E Annabel Denn, Dorothea Boynton, Charlotte Clark, Eunice Eggleson. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-THREE E Ruth Sanborn, Margaret Jackson, Helen McCormick, Florence Jagger, Hilda H'ensley, Alice Curtis. E E NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FOUR Mildred LeCompte, Vera Price, Nita Howard, Henrietta Hansen, E E Gwladys Keeney, Freda Goodrich, Marie Courtney. E f NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FIVE Lilian Stephens, Katherine Freeman, Mary Derharn, Geraldine Root, Marjorie Baird, Marian Dunsmorel Claudia Broders, Norma Wilson. W .. manner MW P .. w w whoa Mil" ' 'ce W . F553" $5M .cW' Fin Yb deeh ' K Three hundred Illirty-onc' Largent Smith Kemloy Lurgont 'Fitld Furusvt Brunstotter Rzlusohert Sk zlvlam Russell Three lmmlrcd tlzirty-trwo Hildebrand Tuck Baker Rood Taylor Corrie Bzulgll S1kes James Tompkins Rasor Benson Youel Haydon H , Nmmm H 121?; Zeta Loml 0m SOROR Jeanne Fayard sonons mmax M"! Largent, F lore .. 1P auline Tompkins RUby Baugh, L x RM." b MNHEEN H at ert, Alice Baker , 5k xmmax avian, Quintclla Reed H H Ruasen Mark Zeta Rho Epsilon Lam! Organized December 7, I919 SORORES IN FACULTATE Jeanne Fayard Coon, Ethel H. Wakefield. SORORES IN U NIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TWO Mary Largent, Florence Furuset, Elsie Hildebrand. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-THREE Maud Gorrie, Pauline Tompkins, Helen Smith, Lucille Branstetter, Ruth Tuck, Ruby Baugh, Lulu Rasor, Delia Keeney. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Theresa Rauschert, Alice Baker, Dorris Sikes, Gladys Benson, Edna Largent. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Margaret Skavlan, Quintella Reed, Joanna james, Mildred Youel, Beatrice Tidd, Eva Russell, Marion Taylor, Hazel Hayden, Tllfff lnmdrpd IlzirIy-Illrre Local Organim Chausse Seymour Pickens Odell Jackson Anderson .7 I. I 0 r.I y I r .1. IN 4! 11 I a! ..I ll 1 N I. I IN 0! F. .II A ... M 4;, M L rgbwhoumzw Alpha Sigma Local Organized December 12, 1921 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TWO Betti Kessi, Wanda Daggett, Jane Huson. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-THREE Louise Odell, Dorothy Chausse, Dorothy Cash, Helen Hoefer. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR uanita ackson Mar aret Se .nour.' , g Y NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Martha Pickens, Wave Anderson, Gladys Royse. TIH'M lnmdred Ilzirly-fiwe Hendricks Hall POST GRADUATE Mildred Hawes. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Myrtle Anderson, Mary Carter, Lillie Hasenmayer, Vera Henderson, Muriel McKinIay, Elizabeth Melis, Maple Moore, Georgina Perkins, Emily Perry, Ella Rawlings, Margaret Russell, Grace Snook, Grace Tigard, Genevieve Tillotson, Emily Veazie. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Catherine Anderson, Kay Bald, Wilhelmina Becksted, Eve Mary Beekman, Ruby Broderson, Helen Bromberg, June Burgan, Helen Cooper, Esther Dennis, Mabel Gilham, Leah Greenbaum, Anna Hill, Mabei Johnson, Minnie C. Johnson, Inez King, Zola Kirry, Natrude Larsen, Florence H. Moorhead, Florine Packard, Felicia Perkins, Lillie May Poley, Viola Mae Powell, Bernice Rise, Ruth Roberts, Margaret Scott, Elizabeth Stephenson, Emily Stoneberg, Gladys Taylor, Amy Turner. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Hazel Coffin, Bernice Corpron, Mary Dustin, Velma Farnham, Lillian Flint, Lillian Goon, Elizabeth Griggs, Dorothy Hill, Evelyn Hogue, Eleanor Kilham, Helen King, Louise Leonard, May Lindley, IVIuriel Meyers, Constance Miller, Grace Murfin, Helen Norcross, Nellie Nygren, Ruth Powell, Leila Ptack, Helen Purdum, Harriet Veazie. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Leona Anawalt, Catherine Barnard, Mary Bartholomew, Cleo Base, Myrtle Baker, Ruth Benson, Edith Bewley, Florence Blake, Golda Boon, Ruth Brauti, Kee Buchanan, Gertrude Butler, Ethel Campbell, Helen Cantine, Alta Chenoweth, Ava Clark, Mildred Crain, Mary Frances Cox, Ethelmae Daniel, Gertrude Davies, Augusta DeWitt, Frances Donegan, Margaret Duerner, Josephine Evans, Hazel Fahy, Gladys Gallier, Louise Gidley, Stella Haglund, Hazel Hatch, Mary Hathaway, Gwendolyn Hedges, Florence Hunt- ress, Gladys Hurley, Ethel Johnson, Eleanor Keep, Helen Kenney, Echo Knight, Katherine Kressman, Maude Lageson, Charlotte Latourette, Florence McDonald, Nila McGinty, Bertha McKeen, LaVerne Maulding, Clara Meador, Hazel Mills, Laverne Moore, Carlotta Pace, Allegra Ragsdale, Myrtle Rice, Thelma Riley, Gladys Russell, Margaret Sagaberd, Dagmar Skulason, Yvonne Smith, Ruby Speer, Esther Stricker, Marie Strube, Isobel Stuart, Grace Sullivan, Anna Tow, Josephine Townsend, Clare Turlay, Geraldine Troy, Russell Varney, Bernice Yeo. Three hundred thirty-six ?NDID Mmmm illic Humming Van 3mm aPle Moore, Georgina Milk E9133; gam Russell, Gm: SMLGnu Tillman, Emiiy Venic. snub TWENTY-THm Iclmina Bechud, Eve May Bukmsz urgan, Helgn Cooper, WWW Hill, Mabel Johnson, M C. JwL'f-L Larsen, Florence H. Moorland, Hm? May Paley, Viola Mu MW 1 Scott, Elizabeth Stephem Em; rs Taylor, Amy Tumtf' NMED TWESTY-FOUI Hawes M clis Snook Bu 1d Cooper Huberslmm Hasonmuyer Henderson Moore Perkins Perry Tigzml Tillotson Veuzic Becksted Boettcher Bromberg Dennis Gilhznn Grve-nlmum Hill King Johnson Tllrpe llzuldred tllirty-Jeven McKinluy Russell Anderson Burgun Johnson Larson Moorhead F. Perkins Packard Poloy Powell Roberts Scott Stephenson Taylor Turner Comm Corpron .Dubiver Farnhum Flint ankson Griggs Goon Ilog'ue King Leonard Lintlley Meyers Miller .Murh'n Powell Ptn ck Purdum Tllrpr lmmlrrd Illirty-righ! Vcnzie Bmuti Cuntinc DeWitt Ilntoh WM Anuwzllt Brown Clark Duerner Hathaway Krcssman "mums. musm Blu kc Buchzl nun Cox Fully Hurley K onncy Base Butler Grain Gidlcy Johnson Knight Tllfl'l' lmmlrm' Illirty-ninp Bu rtholonmw Cu mpbell Davies lluglund K001; Susan 51me5' ' ' Hm Grace Bolick, Gcnllfa hocz'MtMinis, Ruth Mel m .1 Etta Shelton, Hon XISETEEX H' Hark Marion C my: Edit : landon, Ellen McVeigh, J . Ruth Russell, H NINETEEN HI Sim Doris Bothwell, Helen J :Conlter, Dorothy Dickson, vztsawadeah Harkness, Bcs .srawzy, Bernice Meyer, Eliz: Read, Gladys Smith, Glac Lila Madd mmax Hl ; Aiken, Lenore Baldwin, Evcl. 19m Helen Campbell, Rach , Lageson Latourette MacDonald McKeen Meador ' J Mills Moore Pace Ragsdale Reavis 3 - Rice Riley Roe Russell Sagabenl Skulason Speer Stricker Strube ' Stuart Sullivan Tow Townsend Troy Turlny Gamer Yeo Varney Three Izumired forty Susan Campbell Hall NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Echo Balderree, Grace Bolick, Germaine Dew, Mildred Ferguson, Elinor Goodnough Avoca McMinis, Ruth Mellinger, Katherine Morse, Oletta Pedersen, Etta Shelton, Florence Skinner, Olga VVikberg. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-THREE Margaret Clark, Marion Crary, Edith Driver, Johannah johnson, Katherine Kaye, Alta Landon, Ellen McVeigh, Jean Mitchell, Pearl Pyritz, Victoria Rice, Ruth Russell, Helena Scott, Vera Wood. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Lucille Biggs, Doris Bothwell, Helen Burfield, Grace Caviness, Florence Cartwright Lurline Coulter, Dorothy Dickson, Anette Dobbins, Eleanor Everett, Thelma Gannaway, Adah Harkness, Bess Huff, Belle Karo, Irene Kendall, Adah - Laraway, Bernice Meyer, Elizabeth Phelps, Margaret Phy, Marjorie Read, Gladys Smith, Gladys Thomasen, Katherine Watson, Lila Maddox, Irene Rydman. V NI NETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Dorothy Aiken, Lenore Baldwin, Evelyn Bennett, Hazel Borders, Dorothy Bushnell, Elma Bohn, Helen Carripbell, Rachel Chezem, Frances Cochran, Leola Craig, Gwendolyn Darbee, Olive DeGuire, Gladys DuBois, Frances DuBois, Ardis Eberle, Alice Ehrenreich, Beatrice Fish, Ruth Forhan, Edwina Goudey, Winifred Graham, Dorothy Hall, Mildred Hall, Augusta Hamilton, Christina Heckman, Ruth Higgins, Bessie Holts, Hortense Hough, Margaret lnabnit, Dorothy Jarman, Jessie Keyt, Jean Kitts, Jennie McClew, Ruth McCord, Marie Malmgren, Gertrude Miller, Doris Neptune, Merle Oliver, Myrtle Pelker, Marion Phy, Viona Pyritz, Julia Raymond, Ethel Reeves, Nellie Rowland, Gladys Sather, Maude Schroeder, Helen Schuppel, Marietta Shumway, Frances Simpson, Bell Taggart, Eleanor Torrey, Grace Ufford, Stella Van Vleet, Lela Wade, Helen VValdvogel, Dorothy Wagner, Laura VVenneg Helen .Winter. Tltrcc luuzdred farty-onc Mellinger Wikberg McVeigh Cartwright Gannawav Wood ICMinis kinner andon cott oulter verett 3 S L S C E $011 Fel'gu Shelton Johnson Ric 9 field Bur .0 m . u! t r 0 f m la. .b e r .m .d D H U 1H e c V IH 1x0n 5r1t Bothwell P D leerree Iorse zn'v B IN C 1 B1 r . Ijtche1l 1 ggs Cavmess gm ' tn; HfquV J...ry,.M.A.....W ,. Hnrknes ; Iluif K a 1'0 Myer Phelps Reed Thmnuson Watson Maddox Bushnell Buhn Campbell Cochran Craig I hxrheo lClx-rlo th'enrvich Fish TlIrM l1 undrml forty-IIIrec Kendall Phy Bu ldwin Clark I KMuiro Forha n La 1'21 wu y Smith Bennett Chezom DUBOiS irkwood K K H eckm a n I a rm an 3 Hamilton all Holts H Graham Higgins MCClew Pelker eyt Inabnit Malm Neptune Sather Ufford YanVlL-et ogel Iiller meos orrey aldv T W gren vmond art 1 gg ade r R a T W d r. 0 C v. uh 1 Mc- Slmpson Wagner 3y Shumw W enner leree lzundred forty-four ERMERNITIES 171w:lzzmdredforly-fiwc Foundld a! "Win CAM 1mm FRA mm Mathew, Barton Sheri, Carl Newbu , , Mathoson Sherk Dudley Hux'slip Newbury Moore ,; I Schnfvr valmll Fraloy McKinney Goohnour BI'IViOIl .: IS Reed Harlan llvRue 7 Johnson lmPuul Knight I' Campbell Johnson MCDmmM lmhl Quinn Keller A 7 Hamilton lioff Hoetlm-ko Horton Pearce Hopkins 'W Anderson Brostorhousc Luumm-e Goodrich McLean Bullivzmt '; lercc lnuzdrcd forIy-Jix GdzMjWA ZETJ CHAPTER Installed Drrember I, 1900 FRATRES IN FACULTATE B. W. DeBusk, Philip A. Parsons FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NI NETEEN HU NDRED TVVENTY-TVVO john Matheson, Barton Sherk, Neil Morfitt, Verne Dudley, Sydney B. Hayslip, Carl Newbury, French Moore, Max Schafer. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-THREE Jack Newhall, Lawrence K. Fraley, Ivan B. McKinney, George R. Gochnour. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FOUR John Bryson, Richard Reed, Ray Harlan, Lloyd McRae, Charles Parsons, Ward Johnson, Jean DuPaul, Leonard Knight, Cogswell Campbell, Terry Johnson, Dennis Campbell, Keller King, Wesley Mims, Sam Goza, Donald McDonald. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE joyle Dahl, Francis Quinn, Beldon Keller, Ralph Hamilton, Asel EOE, Harold Goedecke, Kenneth Horton, Max Pearce, Rex Hopkins, Emmett Anderson, Edward Brosterhouse, VVendeH Laurance, Donald Goodrich, Mac McLean, Rupert Bullivant. Tllree hundred forty-Mrumz Found"! at I'niwr Gum Burgess 0. Randall Kuhnhausen Bowles Loughlin Boylen Laird Ellsworth Sumleleaf Beller Dunsmore F. Shieltlh A. Shields Braddock Culbertson Smith Andre Struhorn Wyatt Thompson Burnett Krohn Bliss Larson Rockhey Kirtley Youngs Jannon Biddle Holman Yirden Fraser Tergeson Snwtell Swanson K. Randall Baird Carruthers Munly Ashby Simpson lerce lmmlred forfy-c'iglzl Kappa Sigma Founded at University of Virginia December 10, 1867 GAMMA ALPHA CH14PTER Installed dpril 4, 1904 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TVVO Ralph N. Burgess, Donald T. Randall, Arthur A. Kuhnhausen, Floyd F. Bowles, Barkley G. Loughlin, Ernest L. Boylen, Wayne T. Laird, M. Harris Ellsworth, Richard W. Sundeleaf, Francis M. Beller, Louis S. Dunsmore, Elston L. Ireland, Floyd Shields, Archie Shields, John T. Braddock. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-THREE 1 Leon A. Culbertson, Hubert L. Smitlw, Roland A. Andre, Edward S. Stralmrn, I Thomas D. Wyatt, Edward W. Thompson, Arvin A. Burnett, Alfred Krohn, Georg;- Bliss, Herbert Larson, Hadden Rockhey. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FOUR Edwin Kirtley, Marcus L. Youngs, VVaIIace Cannon, Martin B. Biddle, Harold Holdman, Ben Virden, Edwin Fraser. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Jens Tergeson, Stewart Sawtell, David Swanson, Rolland Randall, Fred Baird, John H. Simpson, Richard T. Carruthers, Leo Munly, William Ashley, John Haak, Laird Theiring. Threw hundred forly-nine Kelty Akers Digmun McKeown Haynes Buren Howu r11 Oberteuffor Smith Loveln 00 M CDoml 1d Patterson Phillips Chapman Johnson D. Womhvm'th McCulloch Miller Akers Kelly Smith Steiner Tlli'l'f lmndrml fifty Lorenz Calluwny idluml Piper McClzlnly Smith L. Womlv ortll Stuton Beutie Grilloy Nelson Faundrd a! 3 Wm" Edlund ME" I eatie m if? u 0 n W Hams NIHET Met! , aY'Ilond W, Jefferson V fowl : 9 Son. 43' ,. , ' , $31.33!: r12 M 7' My Wit "d my; r x 1M mum Beta Theta Pi Founded at Miami University 14119113! 8, 1839 BETA RHO CHAPTER Installed Detember 4, I909 FRATRES IN FACULTATE F Timothy Cloran, F. G. Young, H. M. Foster. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Eugene S. Kelty, VVolcott F Buren, Donald McDonald, Howard T. McCuHoch Fred Lorenz, Lawrence VVoodworth, Wayne Akers, Martin Howard, Sterling Patterson, Frank Miller. ! NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Owen Callaway, Morgan Staton, Jesse Dignan, Delbert Oberteuffer, Curtiss Phillips, Carol Akers. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FOUR Halmar Edlund, Lot Beatie, Raymond McKoewn, Allen Smith, Harold Chapman, Eugene Kelly, John Piper, Clifton Bagley, Albert Grilley. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Bert FHaynes, Raymond Lovelace, Morris Johnson, Lawrence Smith, Richard McClardy, Jefferson Nelson, Donald VVoodworth, Milton Steiner, Glen Smith Thrm' llmlzlrml Xifly-om' Zumwalt R iggs M uCGregm' Fudge Blzlkely I I i 1d ebraml Bums XVhituker Hull Potter Dawson Gray Camcross Skelton Jordan Bocock Cameron K. Vonder Ahe Pate Gross Edwards Lundburg Smmichsen Hulvey Tllree llmzdred fty-t9w0 Hempy Eggleson F. Vonder Ahe Short Wilson Eusterdny Burleigh Couch West MCCune Bracher Gillenwaters A11 Foundtd at l'irgini OREGON Ins! John Straub, John J. Land. Onthank, Frankli Alpha Tau Omega 1501171de 0! Virginia Military Institute September 11, I865 OREGOJV szMMd PHI CHAPTER Installed February 25, 1910 FRATRES IN FACULTATE John Straub, John J. Landsbury, John Stark Evans, Peter C. Crockatt, Karl Onthank, Franklin E. Folts, Rex Underwood, George P. Hopkins, Philip W. Janney. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Chester G. Zumwalt, Raymond H. Burns, Walter J. Hempy, Sylvester H. Burleigh, Allen Carncross, Joe L. Skelton. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Morris Bocock, Asa W. Eggleson, Virgil L. Cameron, James Whitaker, Frank H. Vonder Ahe, Karl Vonder Ahe, George D. Riggs, Ralf Couch, Vern Fudge Lawrence Hull, Leonard B. Jordan, Jesse H. West, John M. MacGregor, NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY -FOUR Jason C. McCune, Charles K. Dawson, John Wistar Rosenberg, VVilIis H. Blakeley, Harold Potter, Thomas William Short, Clause R. Groth, Herbert V. Pate, B. Shirley Edwards. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Gordon B. VViIson, Harold Lundburg, Ross Hildebrand, Edwin A. Sonnichsen, Paul Gray, John Hulvey, Victor C. Bracher, Horace Easterday, Theodore R. Gillenwaters. Threelnmdred25fty-tl1rw Sig Foundzd a! Miami 6 BETA 10 3 Installzd N FRATRES IN mmax Hm; Winn Reinhart, William Earl E. Lcsli mmszx Bush 343 :? ,JraRmherford A. Brown, . Carpenter Staples JWT r Art W. Roinlun't Coleman Brmleson Leslie Jenkim Lamb Brown Royles Poteet Maxwell Byler .I. Palmer Htupkes Fish D. Bennett Rosebraugh McElwain Hazard Ringle W. Johnson Jones Danneman L. Palmer C. Bennett Hayden Sm'sby Gunlinivr Grieves Vester anuugh White Burton Spear French D. Peck R. Reinhurt Wiltnoe D. Johnson Lnngrell W. Peek Young Thrrr'11117111; 2 1 fty-f0ur Sigma Chi Founded at Miami University June 28, 1885 BET14 IOTA CHszTER Installed Arovember 27, 1910 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HU NDRED TVVENTY-TVVO William Reinhart, William Coleman, Victor D. Bradeson, Earl E. Leslie, Cleo Jenkins. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE B. C. Lamb Jr., Rutherford A. Brown, Floyd W. Maxwell, Horace T. Byler, john R. Palmer, H. Carpenter Staples, Arthur D. Bennett, William A. Rosebraugh, James T. Royles, Paul V. McElwain, Charles Fish, Austin Hazard, William Poteet. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR John W. Johnson, Randall S. Jones, Charles A. Bennett, George E. Bronaugh, XV. Lyle Palmer, Philip H. Ringle, George B. Hayden, George L. Gardinier, William A. Sorsby, Clifford Vester, Leceister XVhite, William Grieve, J. H. Danneman. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Russell Burton, Albert 1. Langrell, Donald N. Johnson, Dwight French, Roland Reinhart, Lloyd VVatnee, William Spear, William Peek Donald Peek, Howard Young. Three hundred fifty-fi-vt' Abbott Knudsen Furry Gram Valentyne Staley Hemenwny Huggins Phillips Baker Shafer Sulli 'an P. Jensen English Reid Houston Hawkins R. Hill Jones L. J ensen Bowen Chick Altstock Rudd Jacobberger Poulsen Three lumdrml ;9fly-5ix Johnson Royer King Risley Goar Chamnun Rulstun Darby Brown Meek D. Hill Hollistvl' EPSILON OMICRC Installtd Ottoh FRATRES IN Um mum: HUN 1 Humnm'ax huh" 1m 1, William RIIQ Phi Gamma Delta Founded at Jefferson Colltzg? April 22, 1848 EPSILON OMICRON CHdPTER Installed October 1, 1911 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TVVO Leith Abbott, Roscoe Hemenway, Luther Jensen, Peter Jensen, Ogden Johnson, Jack Schumacher, William Ralston, Carl Knudsen. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-THREE Harry Huggins, Nelson English, Eugene Bowen, George Royer, Herbert Darby, Aubrey Furry, Wilbur Phillips, Ronald Reid, Charles Chick, James King. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FOUR Russell Brown, Harlan Gram, Theodore Baker, Ivan Houston, Francis Altstock, Victor Risley, James Meek, Cyril Valentyne, Earl Shafer, Robert Hawkins Arthur Rudd, Leo Goar. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Dudley Hill', Paul Staley, Price Sullivan, Robert Hill, Bertrand Jacobberger, Frank Chapman, Claude Hollister, Evan Jones, William Poulsen. Thyme lmmlerml fifty-sm'm OREGON A L : M. Imthum Dunn Dumo Stmchzm Woods Hoyt 1 1:3!!an MNETEIN EU : Rooney Roberts Dixon F. Dunn Gavin King 2H P! "133D 3 II. Lzlthum Pearson Main Belknzlp Fell Digerness W805, Mrmmd ; .Iunz Sutton Murphy Day Strowbridgc VD. Wright t ; Miner Myers Neale Robert; E. Wright Bunker 1 Shute Bryson Bcrgsvik Erikson Alm 1 1 1 , lercc l11uzdrcd;5fty-eiglzt Phi Delta Theta Founded at XWiami University December 26, I848 OREGON ALPHA CHAPTER Installed May 30, 1912 FRATRES IN FAC U LTATE Charles A. Huntington, Harry B. Torrey, Gerald Barnes. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-Two Marc Lafham, F. Ray Dunn, Eddie Durno, Thomas Strachan, Borden Wood, Wilbur Hoyt, Claire Keeney, Roscoe Roberts, Cecil Smith, George Stearns. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Richard Dixon, Fred Dunn, John Gavin, George King, Hugh Latham, James Pearson, Fred Main. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Roderic Belknap, Thomas DeArmand, George Fell, Knut Digerness, Lyle Janz, Jack Myers, George Neale, Ivan Roberts, Philip Strowbridge, Floyd Wright, Everett Miner, Arthur Sutton, Erroll Murphy. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Jack Day, Arthur Erikson, Walter Bunker, Arthur Shute, Eugene XVright, Roy Bryson, Lars Bergsvik, Frank Alm. leree lzmzdrcd 15fty-m'nv . ..a:.u,mn, .. w i Janun '1 z... , mun ; Founded at l G J M 11 I "stall H '3 n ' a 3 Lawrence Holdredge Smith Portwood Parr Fariss , Hamid E :r' ? ' x Branstetter Collins Ingle Callison Dillard Gray : i , Dedman Beaver Simpson Larson Vincent Silverthorn ,3 MVET Ni 1 McPherson Gowans Farrell Lucas Williamson Gastrock ; um!!!" EEN : i Wright Jones Pellon Evans Smith Jost do n BO d a . ;! Blue McClellan Byrkit Smith Lawton Boyd Heerdt y 88: leric hundred sixty Delta Tau Delta Founded at Bethany College February, 1859 GAMVUWA RHO CHAPTER Installed Novemlmr 15., 1913 POST GRADUATE Claire H. Holdredge. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TVVO Raymond Lawrence, Kelly Branstetter, Verne Blue, William Collins, Crecene Fariss, Clayton Ingle, Dwight Parr, Donald Portwood, Kenneth Smith. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-THREE Meredith Beaver, Prince Callison, Harold Dedman, Mason Dillard, Rolla M. Gray, Ernest J. Haycox, Melville Jones, Arthur Larson, Chauncey Lawton, William Silverthorn, Harold Evans, Harold Simpson, Horace Vincent. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FOUR Douglas Farrell, John Boyd, Russell Gowans, Marvin K. Lucas, Donald McPherson, Kenneth Williamson, Ralph Spearow, John Gastrock. . I , d W; NINETEEN HUNDRED TWEN'I'Y-FIVE yon? 00' 1W I 314315 . . 03111;" $$$$me 5'; Edward Smith, Palmer Byrkit, Frank anht, Justln Smith, George Pellon 1 DES mm Cylbert McClellan, Charles Jost, Henry C. Heerdt. L1108 5 Bow! 9'323 1on I nilh Three lnmdrnl Jixfy-onr Founded at the I, GREG 1mm! AnhurCHicks, Wilbur S. Ht FRAT 5731; F mm W 'Beck, Stanley 0. Eis Francis T NINETEE. LaWrencC W. mo; IMOON' John A e, George C. KnOdel Wade Hicks llulin Collins Bmk Beeman C. Humphrey Eismun Littlefield Rays Purdy Baldwin Knodell Howard McCulloc-h C. Moore Carter Ford Moore Watson Rays Mayer Hacker Giml Rowl Roycmft Hickok Buolumzm C mulull Norman Chalmers Movers Wade Brown Ellis Larsen D. Faust Ilumplm-y Gregg: Curry Park Zachary Kronenberg Kings; Butts Breukoy Anderson Pitmun Three lnuzdrmi sixty-trwo Sigma Alpha Epsilon Founded at the Uniwersity of Alabama JWarclz 9, I856 OREGON BETXI CHAVPTER Installed November 8, 1919 POST GRADUATE Arthur C. Hicks, VViIbur S. Hulin, Clive Humphrey, Spencer Collins, Paul Scott. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO William F. Beck, Stanley C. Eisman, Forrest E. Littlefield, Frederick L. Howard Jr., Francis T. Wade, Josiah H. Beeman. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE William B. Purdy, Lawrence W. Kays, Joseph W. Kays J12, Harry C. Mayer, Fenton Ford, Collis P. Moore, John M. Watson J11, Paul R. McCulloch, Kenneth W. Moore, George C. Knodell, Clarence R. Baldwin, Herbert T. Hacker. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Clarence G. Hickok, Lynn Roycroft, Frank G. Carter, Frank B. Dorman, Charles B. Buchanan J12, Allen H. Mooers, Harold H. Brown, Benjamin M. Reed, Darrell D. Larsen, Clarence R. Ellis, John Chalmers, Ralph Crandall. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Edward A. Britts, Donald Breakey, Bruce Y. Curry, Donald Park, Richard Ginn, George Kronenberg, Archie Pittman, Charles King, Howard Zachary, Earl Gregg, Esten Humphrey, Delbert Faust. Three f1 11 mired sixty-tllrte Lee Hoyt Oliver Houston Bidwell Byrne Leep H. Gant Thomas Hodges Hart Yetter F. Michelson 0. Gant DeMerritt Skinner Shepherd Taylor H. Michelson C. Blackburn Crosthwait Burke Chapman Three hundred sixly-four McGonegal Koepp H. Shirley DeVaul Sargent Gaily Founded MCGODF, 509p Sarge Gail? M5111 H sgirlfF gt gal . Maw Chi Psi Founded at Union College, 1841 ALPHA ET14 DELTA Installed January 3, 1921 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Harold Lee, Norman Byrne, J. Forrest Yetter, Ralph Taylor, Glen McGonegal, Edwin Hoyt, Kay Leep. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Fred Michelson, Harold Michelson, Guy Koepp, Wilson Gaily, Virgil Oliver, Homer Gant, Orvin Gant, Cloyd Blackburn, Harold Shirley. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FOUR Carl Houston, Byron Thomas. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Armonde DeMerritt, Thomas Crosthwait, Berkeley DeVaul, Truman Bidwell, Law- rence Hodges, Harry Skinner, Basil Burke, Alexander Sargent, VVaIdo Hart, Robert Shepherd, Miller Chapman, Thomas Hughes. Three Izmzdred sixtyivi Anderson Brewster N. MiolK-ls Uovalt Bothwoll Williams H i larv NVhitcomh H 21 11101111011111 Monro Three lnmdrmi Jiny-Jix Berg F. Michels Millard Zinnnermnn XVilk vnson Eben Baker Hmted Dodtl XVvstfaH Phipps Chutbum XVilson MC Phillips Conley Founded a FRA NINET I:Roy P. Anderson. Grant Ivan F, NINETE John F. Hilary, Fran'c B. Delta Theta Phi Founded at Cleveland Law Srlmol, 1900 DEADY SENA TE Installed Illay 2, 1913 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TVVO LeRoy P. Anderson, Grant Williams, Richard F. Berg, Maurice N. Eben, Ivan F. Phipps, George H. Brewster. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE John F. Hilary, Fran'c B. Michels, James H. Baker, Thomas W. Chatburn, Nicholas L. Michels. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FOUR VVaIter VVhitzomb, Orval Millard, David S. Husted, Charles XVilson, Harley Covalt, Elmer Hardenbergh, Henry Zimmerman. NINETEEN HU NDRED TWENTY-FIVE VViIIinm P. Dodd, Eordon C. VViIkenson, Bernard McPhiIlips, Jesse B. XVilliams, Stuart S. Bothwell, Martin S. Moore, Robert V. Chrisman, Clarence VVestfall, Marvin Conley. Three I1 11 mirer sixty-smwn - 1- -- A wwmrvrww-ea-r w m XValker Bell Rice High Mm- I wnald Say Ellis Campbell McCraw Shannon Harding Brown Dionlorff Porter Zinnnermnn McArthur McIntyre Bethers McKinney Youel Ruble Rice Powell Irwin Three Izzmdrezl :ixty-cighl B111 ckburn 142114011th Taylor Hockett Harding 000k XYhitten Ross Evans Isenburger Peterson a Founded a! the I'm FRATR NINETEE J1me: C. Say, Alexander G. Kappa Theta Chi Founded at 1le University of Oregon January 5, 1919 HONORARY MEMBERS Eric W. Allen. FRATRES IN U NIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TVVO James C. Say, Alexander G. Brown, John Dierdorfjf, Arnold M. Blackburn, William W. Porter. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Charles Walker, Ransom J. McArthur, Lloyd LaLonde, Glenn S. Campbell, XValter J. Taylor, R. Gene VVhitten, Cecil D. Bell, James H. Ross, Harry C. Ellis, Webster Ruble, Don Zimmerman, J. Kenneth Youel. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FOUR Frederick L. Rice, Frank C. Rice, Eddie E. Evans, Verden Hockett, Troy McCraw, George W. McIntyre. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FXVE Herbert B. Powell, John H. High, Lawrence Isenbarger, Raymond Bethers. Gordon MacDonald, Edward J. Irwin, Eugene B. McKinney, James Harding, Donald R. Cook, Myron E. Shannon, Elmer Peterson, Richard Harding. Tlxrnl lumdrmi siny-ninr Bartholomew McIntosh Graham W'elch Gross Weber Bohlman Guldager Hollingsworth Gamer Patterson McCouI't Black Tapfer Miller Wood Kelly Capell Gilbert Ulrich TllrM lnmdred seventy Clark Benedict Hill Mason Hopkins K. Graham Gross Reisuchor McGill EEG NINETEEN HU Edhldlg"! Pres eitonG N H dwardMM. Mill er EdFOSgC Ed Wm mnmzx R Lyle Bartholom mmm m Mann, John MCCoun. W Hacksou Cape", Herber Wan mud Graham Th W0 ,Kcnneth M Bachelordon Founded October 5, 1919 FRATRES IN FACULTATE Frederick S. Dunn, FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Lyle Bartholomew, Ronald B. McIntosh. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Milton C. Mason, John McCourt, William L. Clark, Paul L. Patterson, Daniel L. Woods, Jackson Capell, Herbert Graham, James Benedict, Dan VVelch, NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR . Prentiss Gross, Raymond Graham, Thomas P. Hill, Edwin H. Kelly, Lee W. Weber, Ted Hollingsworth, Kenneth M. Graham, Carl Black, William S. Hopkins. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Kenneth Guldager, Preston Gross, Edgar Bohlman, John W. Garner, Warren Ulrich, Edward M. Miller, Edwin C. Tapfer, John Reisacher, Harry McGill. Tllrn' lnmdrpd srwmly-mlr Foundtd at the l'nit'ersii FRATRES I NINETEEN H Dean Moo M! NINETEEN Hu m mu. Wilbur Bolton, a x Allen n ' George H IIoladay Willett Hadsall Anderson lipping 09 dedridge Gregg Poston Bolton Cooper Merrifieltl Trowbritlge Shontz Strane Blahu Kurpenstein A. Karpenstein Anthony Hoelling Kaegi Imphnm Bm'hzmun Hoerr Carleton Larabee TIII'I'f lmmlred .w-vmzty-lrwo Phi Sigma Pi Founded at the University of Oregon ZVTO'UPIIlber II, 1920 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Dean Moore, Wilford Allen. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE John Anderson, Wilbur Bolton, Carl Epping, Dwight Gregg, Leonard Hadsall, Dix Holaday, Ralph Poston, Carl Willett. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FOUR Joe Anthony, Kenneth Cooper, Leo Hoelling, Melvin Kaegi, Andrew Karpenstein, Henry Karpenstein, Evan Lapham, Acie Merrifield, Frank Shontz, Wallace Strane, Spencer Trowbridge, Marvin Blaha. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FIVE Edgar Buchanan, George Hoerr, Edward Carleton, VVilber Larabee. hum Three hundred JE'UL'Ilty-HIITC' Reed Coates McConnell Wilhelm D. Hill Bullock Taylor A. Adler Roberts Norris Elsensohn Troutman Threehundredsewenmhfour Adler Bailey Brooks Lebeck Kapp Foundtd at the l'niwm FRATRES NINETEEN Hugo Reed, mmEN H GWEC Adler, Vernon Adam Wilh NINETEEN H Arthur A. Adler, Robe Kappa Delta Phi Founded at the University of Oreyon December 15, 1921 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Hugo Reed, Wm. Thomas Coates. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE George Adler, Vernon E. Bullock, Robert B. McConnell, Adam Wilhelm, Delbert V. Hill. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Arthur A. Adler, Robert F. Taylor, Howard E. Bailey. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Ellis J. Briedwell, Berger Lebeck, Frank Troutman. Three lmndred servanty-fI-vc V. Herbert Brooks, Ivan Norris, Harold Elsensohn, Lawrence D. Robertson, Friendly Hall POST GRADUATE J. Carl Bowman, Thomas Truesdail, Ralph Hoeber, Thomas Cutsforth, William Russis, Rex Yamashita. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-TVVO Arthur Campbell, Reme-y Cox, Virgil DeLap, Reuben GofTreiere, Leo Hertlein, Arthur johnson, Troy Phipps, Arne Rae, Birchard Van Loan, Charles Van Zile, Earl Voorhies, Arthur Wicks, Horace Westerfield, Walter Wegner NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Virl Bennehoff, Raymond Boyer, Philip Brogan, Clifford Carlson, Earle Coburn, Marvin Eby, Stanley Goodell, Verne Henry, George Houck, Randolph Kuhn, Albin Martinson, Ralph McClaHin, Harold McConnell, Albert Niemi, Joseph Olsen, John Parish, Raymond Porter, John Sass, Harry Sherman, Robert Tapp, Donald Wilkinson, Clyde Davis. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR James Bagan, Hally Berry, Lester ChaHee, Eyolf Corneliussen, Earl Dickensheets, Edwyn GarEnkle, George Horsfall, Edwin Kolar, Benjamin Pollack, Claude Robinson, Paul Sayre, Theran Sausser, Alex Shipe, Howard VVinnard, Edd Haney, William Nettleship, Francis Haworth, Hubert Prescott. NI NETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE Alva Adkisson, Theodore Amstutz, Harold Baird, Spencer Carlson, Elmer Calef, Harmon Crites, Raymond Garrett, Earl Hughes, Thomas Hughes, Jack Hunt, Everett Jones, Harold Judge, Harold Karo, Hesden Metcalf, Wayne Mack, Lloyd McCormick, Theodore Paulus, John Rogers, Glenn Savage, John Southworth, Lee VVithrow, Truman Yates, Leonard Niemi. leree lmndreml sewcnly-six William Rusk 1;an 3 mam sum w my Cox. ma Delay, haw:- w Phipps, Ame Ru, Wkwv 5. Ann." mm. Hem mam xxxmu: Hum MW 3d Boyer, Philip 3W WW; Good!" Verne Rearmm WMRI Ralph Mmm. Barnum? MW WWW! mn' mm" "mm, ,,, John PamlL RIM kw?" TIP? WIMW NIX muster Chain. Emu njm'7 '. rr: mfg; Horsfall EM 51W! Mai" man. Paul Sayrc. W W: dHaney,I HW' nmrd. "m Mal humm Bowman 'Pruesduil Hoeber Campbell Cox DeLap Goffreiere Hertlein Johnson Phipps Rae VanLoan VanZilo Voorhies Wicks Westerfieltl Wegner Boyer Bennehoif Brogan Carlson Coburn Ehy Goovloll Henry Kuhn Houck Martinson McClzlfh'n Nic-mi Olsen 'I'upp Porter Parish Sass Sherman Wilkinson Three fmmlrml JEWEIIfy-JWUEH Davis Garfinkle Sausser Baird Hughtk McCormack Bagan Berry Ilorsfall Kolar Shipe Winnzml Carlson Calef Hunt Jones Puulus Rogers Chaffe Corneliussen Pollack Robinson Haney Atlkisson Crites Garrett Karo Met -:11f Savage Southworth Wilson 'Three lmndred seventy-eiglzt Dickensheets Sayre Amstutz Hughes Mack Yates '"Kvwn- , mm umwnq Unit KW 1mm 1'le Mr huh! 1 H-U"? WE; warn CW WM 1 ' '. 1 ', m4 thnuthW'm' .WP Hulls :H'S MUHMM f4 1m! 1 1' Mn Three lmndrmi JMWIIy-ninc HE Medical 55ml: The Portland C31 Academy 0 Me If t ave and their mergbeiiigivcn t1 ' hasish35 e . Medical School :p,apidly'out.0f dam: 1112 University of Oregon Medical School is rapidly advancing to the imecklypcrlodlczlb f T position of one of the leading medical institutions of the country. OC- .fnmlperiodifala ate lnC cupying as it does the unique position as the only medical school west of an as from the first n Denver and north of San Francisco it is destined to play a great part in the mii'vdfrom elCVCHP medical history of the northwest. The campus is assuming the appearance of 1 "mm? d m the mm an important medical center. The First wing of the new Multnomah County Uwontalnf . l ted durll hospital is nearing completion and the new wing of the school is well under Mkjtreredftua an. The exterior of the hospital is completed and offers an imposing ap- pearance, visible from almost all points of the City. It will probably be in use by the fall of this year and will greatly increase the standing of the school by adding considerably to the clinical facilities. The new wing of the school is a four story building and will more than double the present floor space. The first floor will be occupied by the ad- ministration offices, the girls rest room and an expansion of the bio-ehemis- try departmentf The pathology department, overflowing from their present quarters, will occupy a good part of the second floor. The library, more than twice the size of the present one, will also be on this floor. A new lec- ture room completes the quota. The third Hoor will afford quarters for the whole bacteriology department, an expansion of the physiology department, and medical and surgical laboratories. On the fourth floor will be the ani- mal quarters and a gymnasium. The gymnasium will include handball and volleyball courts and lockers and showers. The new wing is being built at a cost of $275,000, one-half of which was donated by the Rockefeller Foundation. It will be of similar architec- ture t0 the present wing, forming the base of the U which the completed . plans call for. The old wing will be partially remodeled during the summer to provide for the expansion of the departments remaining in it. About $20,000 will be expended on the work. Three hundred eighty I. an tRWSlO" 0 ml showers. ml: at a W 0 ., Foundation- ning the bag of . dwlmtnfl:i led during W f l-rcmod' , . 5... 321"; remaining m It AW "K . ital l5 Mplctcd and ollersan Ill points of Ill: City. ll Wlll Mr W." greatly inmase the stall: to thc clinical facilities. ml is a four story building and ml: t The first floor will be lXTllplftlL .t room and an expansion of thel- gj' department. overflowing from ll? ' part of the second floor. Tltllj' .-nt one. will also bcon thislmr. The third floor will afford W. I f tllt physiolog 0?- 't ratonCS. 0n the twwill includl hr? I. le gmaslum Medical School Library HE Medical School Library has shown a steady growth in the past year. The Portland City and County Medical Society and the Portland Academy of NIediCine both contribute to the support of the library and their members have full library privileges. In building up the library emphasis has been given to the current periodicals since scientihc text books are rapidly out of date. During the past year one hundred and fifty monthly and weekly periodicals have been currently received. Both English and Con- tinental periodicals are included in this list. Also during the past year com- plete sets from the first number published up to the current number have been received from eleven periodicals. The approximate total number of books now contained in the library is five thousand. About twenty-five hundred books were circulated during the term from October to January. Knxfw'juv m : :13 z z I I I I I "H M'- i H I l l I I I I d I HUI!!! llHHllg Mngn 1 771nm lmmlrnl riyllly-nnr ND H. PADDE 7,131? 1: JOHN W. HUSTON, A. B. University of VYIHENityo Oregon Oregon, 1917, Alpha Kappa Kappa. .n CHARLES JOSEPH SIMON, Phi Sigma Kappa, Nu Sigma Nu, A. B. University of California 1919, University of Cali- Y fornia 1921. kW HERMAN MILLEIIIZ 9an1 Kappa, A- B' Reed C0 1 VVILFORD H. BELKNAP, Phi Delta Theta, Alpha Kappa Kappa, B. S. Uni- versity of Oregon 1921, University of Washington 1916-1918. WE YONG, Alpha Epsilon r. l'niversity of Oregon 1919. CHARLES C. NEWCASTLE, Sigma Chi, Nu Sigma Nu, B. S. University of Ore- gon 1917, A. B. University of Oregon 1920. BERT 1.110RRISON, Alpha Laps. 1mversity of Oregon 19! MILDRED TVICBRIDE, Alpha Epsilon Iota, A. B. Willamette University 1915. CHARLES FERGUSON, Alpha Kappa 1 Kappa, A. B. College of Idaho 1919, ?HH'GALLOW ' :1 Junior Class president 1920-21. 3'B1S.L'niver.M,Alpha r. 5" of r ' Egon Tllrep lmndr-rd eigllty-lrwo i r 191. 114113.131. I 1, Alpha K1331 EDMUND H. PADDEN, Nu Sigma Nu, University of Oregon 1916-18. CHARLES JOSEPH 51111; p muSngmHME of California 1919,1' 1111111 orni: 1921 WALTER HERMAN MILLER, Alpha Kappa Kappa, A. B. Reed College 1918. WILFORD H. 311111.111 Then, Alpha KappaK ' versity of Oregon 1931 1 Washington 1916-1911 GRACE YOUNG, Alpha Epsilon Iota, B. S. University of Oregon 1919. CH ARL-ESC SEWSTU-i Nu smaxu,B.S.1p11E gon 1917, 111111116155 1920. ALBERT T. MORRISON, Alpha Kappa Kappa, University of Oregon 1916-17. WBRIDE quwg. Wen: ZILPHA V. GALLOVVAY, Alpha Epsilon Iota, B. S. University of Oregon 1918. Threw hundred eiglzly-tltrek MU III' M"! r Alpha Epsilon Iota Founded at the University of Michigan February 3, 1890 XI CHAPTER Installed at the University of Oregon January 1922 SORORES IN FACULTATE Bertha Sabin Stuart Dyment, M. D. SORORES IN U NIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE Jessie B. Farrior, M. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO Grace Young, Mildred McBride, Zilpha Galloway. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Rita Hough. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Ruth Watkins, Lewa Wilkes, Wilmoth Osborne. Three lnmdred eiglzty-four Founded at Dam UPL Installed at the U I FRA f F.Bell, M. D., E. F. Tucker, G. P. Wilson, M. D., R. w. J.Ziegler, M. D., A. F . Holt, M. D., Darwin J. B. Bilderbach, Alpha Kappa Kappa Ia EPSllon 10m Founded at Dartmouth College September 29, 1888 7 . . UPSILON CIszPTER rrsity ofMirhigan Mruarymm Installed at the University of Oregon March 21, 1903 FRATRES IN FACULTATE Y1 CHAPTER J. F. Bell, M: D., E. F. Tucker, M. D., A. E. Mackay, M: D..,.J. Earl Else, M. D., . . JMMU'M G. F. VVllson, M. D., R. W. Matson, M. D., Marr Blsallllon, M. D., Fred mmm' 0f0"90" J. Ziegler, M. D., A. F. Noyes, M. D., H. N. Howard, M. D., R. F. Holt, M. D., Darwin Palmer, M. D., Ralph C. Walker, M. D. I. B. Bilderbach, M. D., B. L. Norden, M. D., I. M. RES '5' "Chum D Lupton, M. D., G. L. Hinson, M. D., M" Swan Dme'M' ' F. Macauley, M. D., F. E. Taylor, M. D. . TATE FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE ES IN UXMRSI NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO WTYME Charles Ferguson, Ira Manville, Wilford Belknap, John Houston, 5' HUNDRED TM' Albert Morrison, Walter Miller. 'c B Farrior,M-D' NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE l Waldo Ball, Kenneth Cook, Edwin Osgood, Henry Freeborg, David Robbins, Axel .. '0 HUNDRED mNGaHDW Osterholm, Carleton Pynn, Paul Torland, Carl Emmons. Mchi g, ZIPa NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR Id ed ii Vern Douglas, Thurston Laraway, john Lecoque, Wayne Hunt, Marion Lecoque, . ' RED 'ESTY'THI Mathew Riddle, R. H. Mast, Bernard Barkwill, Carl H. Phetteplace, HUD h Evon Anderson, George Benshadler, Hugh Dowd, Quincy Davis. Rita Houg . , NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE TMS'TY'FOU at C. W. Eunice, Squire Bozorth, Verner Ruedy, Earl Clark, Paul Spickard, Nelson :HUSD'ED Vilmolhosbor Mercer, Hobart Belknap, Cecil Adams, J. Walter Gilbert, Adolph VVeinzirl, W1 WilktSJ H. Dobbin, Barton Peden, Bernard Hanley. ' 771nm luum'rmi ringly-fitw . 0" Ierd Mm! Nu Sigma Nu Founded at the University of Michigan March 2, 1882 BETA NU CH1! PTER 1 .1MEM'IIIIUII10IIOfT100 Installed in the University of Oregon May 16, 1919 11889101111011? in th FRATRES IN FAC U LTATE C. R. McClure, M. D., G. N. Pease, M. D., T. H. CoEen, M. D., VV., Knox, M. D., BE? W. C. Foster, M. D., J. F Strohm, M D., F. A. Kierle, M. D., R. E. Watkins, M D, I 111d . . H. Bean. M. D., T. M. Joyce, M. D., R. M. Dpdson, M. D. "H1 e at the Lmz FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO FRATRE Charles Newcastle, Edmund Paddeo, F. Simons. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE J. D. Leonard, K. R. Wilson, Dale Butts, Dean Seabrook, W. C. Hunter, L. Lucas, Marshal VVoodworth, G. Morgan, J. Coffey, Al Bowles, Merle Margason. FRATR . . NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR V . VNETEEV Morrls Brxdgeman, O. B. Schreuder, Merle Moore, Floyd South, Al Young, John 1 H Pieroth, W. Hollenbeck, M. E. Wilson, Kirk Prindle, C. XV. Moffat, An R. Kaupp, E. W. Barendrick. ' NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE K. Lancefield, David Baird, R. L. McArthur, Earl Dubois, P. F. Holbrook, Arthur Jorfes, Howard Staub, Charles Robertson, James Sears, JOSeph R. Mi Paul Bailey, J. B. Eakin, XValter Brodie. Three hundred eighty-xix Nu Sigma Nu vuim'q of Imam M 2m BEN NU CHJPTER w L'Ilimily of Oregon May 16,191? ; Phi Chi Founded by the Union of Two Chapters, One in the University of Vermont U889tand One in the University of Louisville K1894t BETd CHHPTER Installed at the University of Oregon October, 1921 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE F. R. Menne, M. 13., F. E. Burget, Ph.D. FRATRES IN FACULTATE NI NETEEN HU NDRED TWENTY-THREE Arthur Chapman. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FOUR Charles C. Coghlan, Charles G. Pugh, Merritt B. VVhitten, VViIford M. Briggs, Joseph R. Mizner, J. Dwight Wilson. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE William W. Sutherland, Ellsworth F. Lucas, William P. Sharkey, Sherman E. Reese, L. Dow Inskeep Jr., George B. Dewis. Three hundred righty-sewen hh Military Acaderlnzv. I Medical fraternities. .ahn? host the only social actwntu? :m'sorganizations are now lr :umhsaf the Greeks this ye i-hanztional women's medih The four classes are organ h'hhnt council which sometimh :hrxecutivc faculty in voicinh Kappa Psi Founded at Russell Military Alcademy 1879 GAMMd NU CHAPTER Installed at the University of Oregon March, 1921 FRATRES IN FACULTATE H. J. Sears, Ph.D., C. J. McCusker, M. D., W. B. Holden, M. D., Karl P. Moran, M. D. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE C. H. Thienes, Clyde Homer. NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR N. R. Jones, R. Thompson. NINETEEN HUNDRED TVVENTY-FIVE Harley Shields, Frank Douglas, Glenn Cushman, Dave Lawson, Robbin Fisher Three lmmired Piglny-rigln School Activities lFE in Medical School is vastly different from that of undergraduate days. The student body dances, hikes t0 Spencers, and the old mill race by moonlight, are only fond memories to the medical student. HHard work and plenty of itf, is the keyword. Classes and labs fill up the time from 8:30 to 5 p. m. on almost every day of the week. An afternoon off is a luxury to be spenteusually-in catching up on back work. Naturally, under these conditions we send out no championship football or basketball teams. But in the Spring time baseball sends a call not to be resisted. Last spring a team was organized and several games were played with different teams around the city, including Vancouver Barracks and the Hill Military Academy. Medical fraternities, combining the social and professional activities, are almost the only social activities connected with the school lfe. Two of the men,s organizations are now living in houses. The girls of the school joined the ranks of the Greeks this year by obtaining a charter from Alpha Epsilon Iota, a national womenhe medical fraternity. The four classes are organized and their elected representatives form the arudent council which sometimes functions as intermediary between students and executive faculty in voicing student opinion. Kappa Psi M at Rm" Military MM! 13;; 611!le NU CHAPTER i :t M! l'uimsity of 0an ,g FRATRES IN FACULTAW e D CJ. McGuhrJHLW-ll L " KarlP.an, MD. ' ,. ATE , mms IN NEW Three hundred eigltiy-ning TINT Tercc lmmlrmi ninety 7k, lercc Izmzdrcd nincly-mzc THE TROUBLE WITH THE WORLD IS WOMEN Tllrce lnmdred niner-trwo factories; ant? . h11:31:23medieval motlf m growth. Bum. Aperson, a moocher, a gm", one whose brothers ta raEe not to draw forth c: in his presence; one whgs status is such that he pig metree music recitals dove immensely unpopular, almo m to the democratic ins of the school mirlys viewpoi adl'ective. A state of mind people on returning from t Yard or millrace, Bids Apolite and formal i mspendmoney. See dress Bust Asocial gymnasium c lowed by refreshments in l"eglllar shower a1 IheBOCketbook , so a EEEpZShop. $$c$$c$$C$$CW nabsence from class T117 Webstefs Dictionary of Local Terms tUnabridlged and Unauthorizedl Administration. to occasionally by Colin Dyment in his various heart to heart talks about the sort of a University were! going to have ten years from now.J Art Appreciation. A course in collegeE remarkably easy to sleep in, very; academic appreciation ofl Seei popular; antique art and modern form. anatomy. Anatomy. See art appreciation. A Architecture. A course studied in 001- l lege over draught boards and in 1 front of the library steps. For ex? amples of architecture see the westi side of the Oregon building, illustrat- i ive of the most approved type fori burlap factories; an d Journalism? shack, a medieval motif in adnoidali growth. 1 Burn. A person, a moocher, a ttgimme 1 guy", one whose brothers take great care not to draw forth cigarettes? in his presence; one whose social status is such that he pigs to all the free music recitals down town,i immensely unpopular, almost a men-j ace t0 the democratic institutions: of the school girls viewpoint, bum, adjective. A state of mind of many people on returning from the grave- yard or millrace. Bids. A polite and formal invitationi to spend money. See dress suit. l Bust. A social gymnasium class fol-i lowed by refreshments instead of: the regular shower; also a state oft the pocket book. i Campa Shop. $$c$$c$$c$$c$$o. 1 Cut. An absence from class with the? purpose of securing personal atten-i tion and co-operation from the pro-; fessor. The most approved method1 of cutting is by remaining in bed during the morning hours. Thought; waves can thus travel undisturbedl by bodily movement straight to the professor whom one tries to influ- ence; cut, verb, the phenomena of: bodily invisibility when some mem- ber of the opposing sex passes by; 1 this phenomena is usually induced: because of some social faux pas off the cuttee or the finding of a more eligible male by the cutter. I That entity referred Co-op. Abbreviation for co-operation; uYou give, we takeft Deans. Theoretical heads of depart- ments from whom all wisdom is supposed to flow. See fixtures. Deady Bugs. Mild adjective. A small crawling creature of infinite legs and doubtful color seen by anatomy majors after working all afternoon on dead cats; hence, a state of mind, sometimes shortened to just bugs. Dyment. Verb. To dyment is to apply soothing speech; to mildly softsoap; to appear to agree, to gently sug- gest, infer, interpret, modify, and, eventually, to have onets own way. Dumb-bell. A wooden stick; a bell that won't ring; hence, a person, preferably masculine, wooden in taste and temperament, or one short- circuited between hand and pocket book. A dumb-bell is the social bete noir, the pariah, the leper, the aw- ful example than which there is none more horrible, often causing convul- sions to the person having to step with one. Dress Suit. An article of wear. The most common forms of dress suits are carefully wrinkled in the back and around the lapel, having special cantalouped knees, and are built large enough for the wearer to park anything from a handkerchief to a grand piano inside; concentrated hell bounding a person on the south, west, east and north sides over a period of time. Ear Stoppers. Thick and heavy ob- jects designed to keep out all sound; things which every family living next to a fraternity ought to wear around seven in the morning. Eight o'clock a. m. The beginning of the normal comatose condition which is attended by a series of one hour slumber periods in semi- reclining positions, interrupted only by lunch and dinner, functions which fortify the process, and enable the person to resist the intrusion of agitating thought waves; eight o'clock, p.m., the beginning of the normal blood iiow and heart action and brain movement. Three lmndred ninety-tlzree -. , aw ,N 5.70 Fixtures. Immovable appurtenances of the school such as desks, chalk trays, ash cans. See deans. Fuss. Verb, passive and active; act- ive form most used on campus; an endeavor to, or actual performance of, the action of buzzing around some one member of the opposing but not permanently opposed sex. Fussed, past tense; a state of con- dition of mind which no college woman experiences. Grade. A series of figures registering oneis computed intelligence. The figures begin at three and run to six. To complete the theoretical scale one and two are added as ornament- al digits. Health Service. See b o v a r d and cough medicine. Hootch. A liquid, not found in the pure form; a substance acting queer- ly on various people, fostering the impulse in some to lean over in pub- lic places and bite the ear of. the neighbor; creating a desire in others to cry, blubber, laugh, sleep, fight, or recite. See poison, paradise, per- dition. Hot Dog! Expression having nothing to do with either dogs or heat; a cryptic phrase expressing a strong reaction of the blood pressure to the universal agitants, women, song, the dance, and the seven thousand com- plications thereof. Ninth letter of the alphabet; used considerably by frosh and profes- sors. Kiss. An accident, the component parts of which are noise, friction, and clutching; a common article, not reserved for rare occasions or special events; a medium of ex- change, given in return for various things; a kiss may be taken, seized, offered, or just lying about, appar- ently to be had, but not too posit- ively s0. Lawn. An expanse of green grass dotted at irregular intervals with foreign plants guaranteed not to bloom, blossom, or even suggest the quality of appropriateness. Lottery. A shuffiling of names for the alleged purpose of pairing people impartially for some social function or other. Synonymous with crooked. Love. A generic noun often used in poetry. See millrace, milkshake, moon, cemetery, fraternity pin, quar- rel, and gate. Pigging. Historical term, deriving its signiiicance from the fact that once upon a time a young gent spent a pleasant sociable evening through mistake in a pen of porkers out Springfield way. tNow ian that complimentary, girls'D Porch. A projection in front of Ira- ternity and sorority houses, sporad- ically covered with burlap, empty in day time and winter, but being used considerably in the evenings and the summer, during which time .there is a continual ghostly ttcreeke e?eek" emanating from it. Prune. A fruit; hence, a person green or over-ripe, one who lacks the social graces, or has his scruples too great 1y developed; sometimes applied by the men to women who canit dance and won't kiss, and by the women to the men who prefer the fireplace to the millrace. Roll. An experience entered into dur- ing quizzes; also a state of being such as cigarettes and sox. T. L. An effectual means of bribery; an alleged compliment some person is supposed to have said of another, reported by a third; motive always ulterior. University. Generic term; a place theoretically dedicated to the un- foldment of the tender buds coming here each year. Practically a mat- ter of rules, textbooks, women, rules, poverty, women, rules, iiunks, wom- en, and rules. For a further defini- tion of a university ask dyment, he knows. The Song of a Sophomore tWhich is the Song of a Nuty Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, Study I hate, but pig I must. tContinued on page 397i Three hundred ninaty-four 5.? 3.5 $555 .. :3 55$$ tm 1? 19W; someK' 'Wi 1? thumntowmeuihoar' um? nim'tkiswdbiiie j mbthef tothewwoprelersba: .mm; Mew. dmgm Anupemnce: 2,- JOURNALEESERS TINY," Izumlrml Izilzyty-fiwp The Shack tBetter Known as Adenoid HalU By pieces and patches the structure grows, Acquires impediments and breathes through its nose, Is divided, dissected, partitioned, and spaced, Till the original lines are completely defaced. Its numerous cells and corridored alleys Teem with journalists on frantic sallies; The place is filled with steam heated vapor, Broken typewriters and copy paper. McClure Hall and Sweet Essences all many an essence of rotten egg, In the dark mzfathomed corridors of this hall, Is born to gay the student there, 14nd upon the neighborhood to 12011. The Ad. Building Still sits the building by the road, A monstrous ogre sunning; To which the students trembling go, From Which they come a running. Within the ofhcial sheets are seen, Deep marked by red inked Hunking; Which once were White and clean, And now are fit for junking. The men and women behind the bars, Are deep immersed in duty; While now and then the building jars, From strong-chewed Tooty Fruity. But, alas, a voice there comes to me, And forceful is its meaning. Wm sorry to halt your melodye The scholastic ax is on you leaning." A Three hundred ninety-six ASheg t0 80mma If y Bid If y Sort If y Do dam Do gaze u A million As up and A million As Harol Me It dwells That noisy To which From whi And many DOCS turn And hurtli 18 lost am The ashe W's tCo "J, Ill Sm Esme: i mm: of mm m, nfdiml corridor: of Iii: MI I; ll: ml": tim. , WWW to pull. The Commerce Department AIIIS not harmonious here, If you gather what I mean; There,s battle in the atmosphere, If you gather what I mean; Bickering words their heads do rear, If you gather what I mean; Someonek going to lose their job I ICEIIX If you gather what I mean. Deady Hall and Spirits. he ghosts of muntless murdered cats, Do dwell in mewing legion here; Do drmre at nigh! with the belfried bats; Do gaze upon their pirHed running gear. The Library A million squeaks do infest this place, As up and down the stairs we wander. A million whiSpers oier the tables race, As Harold to his love does maunder. Mewsick, Mewsick! It dwells among untrodden ways, That noisy music shack, To which in morn the student turns, From which at night he stumbles back. And many a wierdsome ghastly note, Does turn the buildings angle, And hurtling down the winding walk, Is lost among the grassy tangle. The Song of a Sophomore H. Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, . A summaryIs useful, but its figures mistrust. IContimted 071 page 398i TlerF lmmlrml ninNy-mwmz Senior Leap Week The Amazons come, the Amazons come, In motley rank to the beat of a drum; They Iharry the male, they camp on the phones, While ghosts of tradition rattle their bones. Four years gone, their one last Chance To choose their man, to caper and dance; They storm the town, they riot and brawl And clamor for actioneAmazons all! Oh man, oh man, can it possibly be You,Ve poorly used your liberty? Fed them milk when they craved wine? Called them angels when none were divine? The Amazons come, the Amazons come, In motley rank to the beat of a drum; . They raise the roof, they howl with the mob, While ghosts of tradition totter and sob. Ears - Female Sweet ear, that shunhst the noise of classes, That parks away from the rude-eyed masses, Behind a bulging cupola of hair. Sweet ear, behind henna 0r peroxide tresses, Lashed by pins against the strains and stresses, Of naughty words or knowledge. Sweet ear, so carefully from sound refraining, Is, Itll bet by heck, every fibre straining, T0 catch stray morsels 0f scandal. The Library ENCORE The librarian,s gleaming eye, Some lovelorn ninny spears; Charges on him and draws nigh, Then out he goes on both ears. The Song of a Sophomore Ill. Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, 0h where is the coed that ever gets fussed? rantinued on page 40W Three hundred ninety-eiglzt THE FEMALE RAMPA NT Three hundred ninety-nine The Fraternity Bath Towel Its a ragged, jagged towel, A hanging on the door, A serving in its dryish way, Near thirty men or more. It hangs most any place, It has no bathing day, It rests content to wipe the suds, Of many men away. No brother wants to claim it HIts a Hauntin, rank disgrace," Yet they slyly use its folds, T0 wipe their bloomin, face. Bit by bit its color deepens, Till its used for mopping Hoors, And another towel is left, To do its catholic chores. Song of the Golf Sock Pipe stems, shinny shanks, piano legs, all, Bow legs, crooked legs, pins both short and tall; Incurved, outcurved, 0r bulging like a hell, I clutch Jem all in dreary round. It's hell! The Midnight Blues Breathes there a man with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, About one in the morning: uT0 hell with Taussig, Ilm going to bed.H The Prayer of the Inveterate Lounge Pup Drink to me only with thine eyes, And I will answer too, But I no longer hold my lihher, S0 drink a milder brew. Four hundred MMMM n.hkb,hw, '5. M M, hum m I, M, thEuhiil i '5 J i m yd. !1'3 LIES. MEN ONLY Four lmmired one The Perils of Football Oh, Hawaiian lakes are sightly, And Hawaiian cliffs are fair; Hawaiian trees sing lightly In the soft Hawaiian air. Their forests croon of hist,ry, Their shady places are for rest; In the night strums the mysthry Of the Hawaiian lover on his quest. Now all these things rhyme correctly, And are quite within the poeths reach; Trouble is, how to tell, circumspectly, Of the attractions on the Hawaiian beach! Knighty Knight Now little Knighty, don,t stub your toe, With your head in the air, And your big yellow egg shell On a field of green Which put the student body more in debt. Now, little knighty, donht you cry, You,11 be usefu1--by and by! The Co-Op Half a cent, half a cent, half a cent higher, Up goes the prices, God heljJ the buyer. The Song of a Sophomore IV. Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, Exams are near, in God we trust. tContinued 071 page 406? Four hundred two ,m' WW... Wm ., HOW TO PLAY PO0TBAI.L--I.ESSON 1. Four I'mmlred litre! A Confidential Letter Dear Timothy: Listen. I got to thinking last night. About you. Strange, isnlt it? It is. But I did. It was this way: There drifted into my mind all unawares a picture of Creation. I saw the old world amalgamate from a bunch of hot air into a sizzling torrid ball; so hot that ,most any old snake would have scorched his garters had he been present. Then I saw the world cool, and pretty soon a bunch of people with the funniest one piece aprons came clump- ing through the landscape and built a little hutch of stones on a mountain called Olympia, or something like that. WellaThey were a cool crew, al- ways squabbling to beat the devil. One fellow with an enormous bushy mus- . tache almost as large as Herb Howels mustachel seemed to be the Leader of the discussion, and his name seemed to be IlJupe," or llMarsW old sox; or something like that. And he had a hot sketch who purported to be his wifee though I didnlt see any marriage license framed around the walls. Well they fought all the time. Beenus, or Venus Uupels alleged wifel was always Grabbing about the sleeping quarters. IILissen," she kept saying, llLissen, you old fossil. That mattress is positively beyond words. I've slept in for the last night. Either you send that little brat Mercury out after some fresh ferns today or I go home to Ma." Jupe was eating at the time and in his irritation he swallowed a small gallon of ambrosial nectar tsorne cheapbrand of two per cent, I imaginel down the wrong vent. He got as soreyas a boil. HShut up,,, he roared, plucking out enough of his beard to make a dozen mattresses. HCan that line of ear torture, or 111 put you to washing dishes in the community kitchen. If you donlt like that bed you can sleep on the floor. Besides? he continued in a meaning tone, "Ilm getting kind of tired of your line. It wears like a cheap aprone-very thinf, Venus took off that record immediately and went into a corner to do a little first class sulking. Well, the rest of the gods were perturbed. If Jupe really got the idea of Changing wives, somebody would lose a perfectly good mate. And as there were no family squabbles current at the time, no one wanted to shift fraus. So they got together. llListenf, they argued, "Welve got to get the old boy in humor. Who wants Venus for an exchange. Net If, So they all assembled around Jupe and began to kid him. llListen, JUPCX one? And he leaned over and whispered in the old man,s ear. Jupe nearly broke a rib laughing. HHot dog? he gasped, after ten minutes. HMore of the same kind. More.n ! said Vulcan wiping the soot from his bicepts, UHave you heard this Four lmndred four L 0! Yea Ulu's M 1111111 m t, "1M; m dd W. Th? 1:, L. t Sb! i htkhStm Eitherw Mummmlg h and h B mhmnuwri; 3' Mimi of mwctnILIizr pt $ 501? 151W. W191 rdtomhlmm Uni: HOW TO PLAY FOOTBALL-LESSON II. Four lmmirmi fi-Z'K? Well, they went around the circle, and finally exhausted their stock of jokes. But Jupe wanted more. In desperation, Triton made up a joke. It was rotten, and Jupe stopped it before it got to first base. IITerribleX, he groaned- You know, Timothy, how I came to think of you? Well, I heard you tell that same joke the other day. And I wish I had been Jup'e. Yours truly. The Bible Told in Modern Prose I. Genesis. 1. The faculty created warm air that they might thrive and do busi- ness; they established the myth that teaching is an honorable profession and ought to receive a salary superior to the trades. Whereupon they had a bowl of soup; and the day and night was the first day. No dissension in their ranks as yet. 2. They created the University, the buildings, the campus, the grass thereon and the weeds therein, Iron lMike, the pioneer, the ivy,influenza, and student morality. And some misguided being said, "Lefs make it a six day week? And the day and the night were the second day. 3. They created a job for each and every one of them, and drew lots, the blacksmith becoming Dean of Semitic languages and the haberdashefs clerk taking the chair of Drop Forgings. And another gent said, UFive days is enough for any man? And they established Crossroads to fight the thing out. And the day and night were the third day. 4. They created the College, of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and added freshman composition, which is neither liberal, scientihc, nor artistic. And the day and night would have been the fourth day if they hadnlt got into 'a jawing match over the six day week which lasted well into the hfht day. 5. And on the hfth day they rested, trying to hatch up more poison. ,6. They created all the departments great and small, established fines and cuts, grades and Hunks. Then some one said, IIThis is too easy," so they established the group system and Saturday laboratories. And some one said, HLet there be humor." So they established the Military department. And there was humor. And the day and night was the sixth day which echoed with their struggle on the six day week. 7. And they were forced to rest on the day and night following which was the seventh day. They said, NLet us postpone the six day plan until the next faculty meeting." And it was so. As a matter of general rounding out of the new world created, and to give substance to their livelihood, they cre- ated students. And we have been damned ever since. Four hundred six "Dun "aw . , . V "MM , 5 ' W nntb 1x: I w 1:: that they mig5t H21! r M ' ,eJ I RH. hmllng b an h'iHWH' . 4 : ?: '2 ' .V ' ' , u the hidb. Mr; 5 Mu night M thg rim GI. l numb. me nundmgs. m . : , 2.", Iran Hike. :he pinncer 13c migmed being uid "L55 3,, 5: n;;2 : urrr zhc mnd day. Tu? rich and new one n1 ?Wff. k u: Semitic ianmm am 5 39 hump. And anuthcr :rrf Kati 2hr; NaNiyhed Gm Ht? 351' third day. L17: w Literature, mar. 1'5 V?! 'l" neither 113ml, 0? the murth day :1 : .1 Tgfxfwfn d n . ;gthN a MMJ M M mMWM rm and 5m ' . kurfmm -' - . gswrawm "LI" : ,tic WW? 'Y BONE COMPLEX ODDITIESI OR THE URCE TO EXPRESS THE FUN Four hmldrmi ym'rn ' The Cemetery In Spring Time Are there spirits, I hope to state! . VVander ,round yon taII tomb near half past eight. More loving ghosts youyll never find. IIHoneyV Smack! And the echo rends the air, For nothing more than spirits they are a husky pair. If this be death, then death is kind. UOuch, not so tight V, The lady spirit squeaks, Then comes a soulful sigh, the air it fairly creaks. T00 healthy spooks for me. Another place I find. The Compleat Dress Suit The trousers come from Jerry, The coat I borrowed from Jack; The suspenders sing of Harry, As they slide along my back. The studs are owned by Phil, I got the tie from Teck; The collar I snitched of Bill, Now it gets me in the neck. The shoes of course are AIIs, Glistening, small sized ferries; The silken shirt is HalIs, The spotless vest is TerryIs. The sox I pulled from Nick, The scarf I bummed from Don; The hat was Ient by Dick, The snappy overcoat by John. Gloves, powder, and nicotine, A11 Ient by fraternal martyrs; One thing I own, I ween, My nobby Boston garters! The Song of a Sophomore V. Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, Here,s the fountain of knowledge, drink till you bust. Mlontimwd 071 page 41W Four lumdrcd ciglzl THE HE AND SHE STAGE: A STEP IN COLLEGE EVOLUTION F1; 10' hundred nine A Modest Little Shrub There was a little shrub, As pretty as could be, And it grew around the lot, For all the world to see. Itls leaves were richly green, Itls buds were flaming white, And it had a graceful tendril, That cheered the flagging sight. There came a prosy man, And tacked in front a sign, That said, in some strange tongue, HWhiH'lenitz Verbosa Campanine." Well, the shrub soon wilted, The name too great to carry, And soon with rake and hoe, The man the plant did bury. There,s a moral to this tale, It runs like this I think: The place for such a man, Is in the briny drink. The Assembly Many a student has tortured his back, And many a student has damned his soul, While suffTring the bunk of some speechy hack, Stuttering HThe Need of a Christian Goal." Oh, the goalls all right, we donlt complain, Perhaps we are a restless bunch; But gesture and rant, and flowing refrain, Is never enough for lunch! The Song of a Sophomore VI. Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, Gtmorninl sweet teacher, youlre well, I trust? tContinued on page 413T Four hundred ten I '3 ,4 HOW WOMEN ACT WITHOUT MEN AROUND. Four hundred eleven MORAL: GET MEN The 1 . la The Chant 0f the N1cot1ne Bush ofmugg? Of rocky 5m 3! Puff, puff, puff, lmu: Chew, Fllf'iU, thew, Camels, Herbies, . . . ' v fha Climax thin, and Honeydew. 121k: mm, 1 I And potted P a not 3 0f oatmea The little boys gossip, These jimsun h The little boys smoke, ,JuSt leave tht And stand on one leg, Till their arches r0 broke. - . V . h r t .5 bat x; lhey peer at the sky, Beauty They gaze at the street, They shiver at the cold, J nsu'ering And they cuss at the heat. HUN!!! rfhcy moan abbut classes, A51. mg no nmrt't H And groan, hSo much to dof, Th? deskmayris: Then they huddle in masses, t TheEnfj'dOPMia And take 21 fresh chew. - The man brhmd I They rock on the curb, 3nd! rould "at They lean on the tree, .M me no mart. Till a beckoning bell, Sets them free. The Son Puff, fJug, puff, Chew, chew, thew, A9168 to ashes, d Camels, Herbies, Climax thin, and Honeydew. Didn't want to k: Four X111 mired frwtlrw The Shrubbery This is not a land of heather, Of muggy sky and villainous weather, Of rocky soil and stagnant glen, Of oatmeal mush and grumpy men. Take away these doggoned shrubs, And potted plants in dumpy tubs, These jimson weeds of a foreign kind eJust leave the grass behind. Grass is grass and green is green. Beautfs best when plainest seen. Answering 4 Profit. Question Lelrmrdi'ng tn Tmznysmd sk me no more: What answer should I giw? The desk may rise and smile me 021 Ill? cheek, The Encyclopedia rare by on a pair of stilts, The man behind me prod with a pair of custom-builts, 11nd I could not retail the dope I knew last week. Ask me 210 more. I don't know a doggoned thing! The Song of a Sophomore VII. Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, Didn7t want to kiss the girl, but if I must, I must. VIII. Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, ltes fine to be modest, but it,s well to have crust. Hl'ontinued on page 47W Four humlrml Mirlr'ml Ode to Fergus ReddiEs Dandelion Hound Hi doodle de doodle, Fergreddie and poodle, And its collar and strap and marcelle; Fergeddie first led, Then the dog went ahead, With the strap and Fergreddie as well. Ah ! Perfessuh ! iws of professors all remind us, We can make our lives quite dreary, And in lecturing, leave behind us, fllany pupils supremely weary. Membrandum to the Law Department Oh, Truth is Truth, and Law is Law, And never the twni.1 shall meet, Though the peerless form of Justice herself, Shimmy 0n Thirteenth street. Ode to 1471 Econ Prof. wee! Jimmy, who thinks all passing grades 0 folly, Most musical; not quite so melancholy, Sweet Jimmy, of the sounding grand hnale, Calm thy voice, or I'll go deaf, b'golly. Ode to a Perfect Gent Dear professor, mentor of tongues defunct, Moving through a world that has mostly junked The outward poise and sign of culture; You swing along in leisured ease. Though they may talk of intensive training. And scoff the classic's hne-tooled graining Of character, mind and life, You swing along in leisured ease. Four hundred fourteen AINT NATURE WONDERFUL? Four lmndrred ;5fteen SERIOUS SENIORS Open House IN LIBERATED VERSE Round the corner the open housers Straggle wearily, Bound for the next sisterhood mansion. Somewhere in the rear a brother stumbles, swallows a cigarette, And maunders: HGlad t, meecha, Miss Umntum. My name,s Umntum-" He is choked to silence By the weary, shambling figures at his side. They approach the sisterhood porch, stop, And assume attitudes of dejection, Waiting for the crowd inside to jar loose. Time passes. URazzberries, and other sundry fruitsfi Comes the ominous mutter from the waiting gang. More time passes. With smoldering passions and blistered feet they rush the house, Knock at the door and clamor for entrance. Inside the pianist stops struggling, and so do the open housers. Comes the shoving of feet, the circular football formation, And down the endless line go the gents, with elastic-hand smiles. Words of fond farewell do the girls utteredarned fibbers. Words of hearty joy do the men give hack-damned liars. They shove out and the new crowd pushes in. Four lmmlred sixlpmz 1A2: And in passing friendly W0! For nicotine and the match! Coming from the trenches. Again the round is started. Totters over the door sill, "Glad t, meecha. Miss Um And down the line he g The music grinds out a dol Time pyramids, draws out. Outside the angry mobs foi' tcrowd inside pushes out, And starts down the street of Cl' . Ix 111mm I'm; m i th mahume d5: . hm Hunk Miss lam M J! $43 1:59:22??? x1 '3 . mlut 4 .m ,9 9. 9 Id Ww ,, FINA JAZZY JUNIORS And in passing friendly words of condolence are exchanged For nicotine and the matchesMsustenance for the warriors Coming from the trenches. Again the round is started. The maundering brother Totters over the door sill, extends his paw, and recites: HGlad t, meecha, Miss Umntum. My names Umntume-H And down the line he goesedazedly. The music grinds out a doleful tune; the struggle begins. Time pyramids, draws out, and stretches into infinity. Outside the angry mobs form again and rush on the door. The crowd inside pushes out, gulps once again God,s free hootch, And starts down the street. A brother takes a chew 0f Climax medium And yodels a roundelay about the sweetness of death. Another brother does a Swedish dozen of deep breathing exercises, Preparing for the next house. Down the middle of the street they troop, In the dank and clammy night, Wishing for some strong opiate to soothe jangling nerves, And the throbbing threnody of tired toes. In the rear our friend totters and SObS pitifully: hGlad ty meecha, Miss Umntum. My name,s Umntum? Four lmmlrml srwmIth The Final F I sign my mum Appearing i" I Mayhap, W And mi "11' I But anyway: L And not a fat A You're none 5! Tim! amno! 5!, A NOBLE GROUP Four hundred eighteen The Song of a Sophomore IX Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, The prof's favor women, which never is just. X. Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, The Venus de Meelo has a handsome bust. m XI. Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, If books are levers of power XII. Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, She said I was a hgood boy"-a deadly thrust. Thus endeth the Song of a Sophomore, Which is the Song of a Nut. The Final Fling of the Author sign my name to all the junk prearing in this section; Mayhap, perforce, 171 pack my trunk, 14nd seek my health's correction. those levers will rust. But anyway, this truth I hold, And not a jot I vary: You're none s0 wise, and none so old, That cannot stand the good raspberry. E. J. H. THE END Four hundred nirzptpm List of Advertisers Allen Drug Co. Allen 8; Lewis Anchorage Babb, R. A. Hardware Co. Booth Kelly Lumber Co. Co-Op Elkins Gift Shop Ellison-VVhite Chautauqua C0. Equitable Life Ins. Co. Eugene Clearing House Association Eugene Farmers Creamery Eugene Hardware Co. Eugene Steam Laundry General Electric Co. Gill, J. K. Co. Grahamk Green-Merrell C0. Griffin-Babb Hardware Co. Hauser Bros. Hazelwood Hotel Oregon Hicks-Chatten Engraving C0. Imperial Hotel Imperial Lunch Kerr-Gifford Co. Kilham Stationery Sz Printing Co. Koke-Tiffany C0. Kratz, C. R. Kuykendall, W. A., Inc. Laraway, Seth Lipman Wolfe Luckefs Jewelry Store Ludford, Fred Manerude Bros. Martin Studio Mason, Ehrman 8: Co. Matlock Grocery McMorran 8t Washburne Meier 81 Frank Mountain States Power Co. Multnomah Hotel Nebergall, D. E. Meat Co. North Pacific Dental College Obak Oregana Osburn Hotel Penney, J. C. Co. Plummer, O. M. Rainbow Roberts Bros. Schaefers Bros. Sherman, Clay 8: C0. Seiberling-Lucas Music Co. Staples, Jeweler Table Supply Co. Tollman Studio University Florist Varsity Wade Bros. VVetherbee-Walker Furniture Co. Vhite, H. C. Electric Co. WT PAYS TO ADVERTISE" l n11rl1z17IdrmI' Irwmzly 1;5! HE, rzr I "w ' m: I' 3" 'r W If 1?": 5.553.! an all EM ?v'mr'rn m ".5 rrr r EUTWUI M M W: WW. m m m r In! .- .555 ,5? .24 -jfifff .- rr .-. F F A!" E5!!! 9:! ng L: Fjeggsrrggi 7 QMW . ...'I 3F Z l" , Ix 1 ?FZFFXFFL; ?iilvFa kl, .. l-mf , , 33X INN 3. f .U ', VII? Mil '31,. 3'13".in 3 , +l3' I'M'M'thiyl '33:: m1! 3 x 3'7 V3 2'31 Ivynriff VVSV'giZ: 3 33;, n I I'J'ICWMW ff W "a ? F F ' m ?3'3.31;3"r".'i1w!3:343 r;- M ,- - - . 333 :3 3m 4;, :1 NW - BED Ull 3' 3."; LIL . F 77,1. J! y 9Q! E" "' f" MT "W Eli: I'M WEI llljiiugg' 1:43.14. H 'N'm FF??? WMWHT m: r" TFO FIB UT IE .4- - A 33.1,. 7133.59,,h. zaZFFw 3 W21 E59 U- " F" - F ' am: illh'w'i".IHI'Fl'WL'Ih'H" FiX A m p rrr r r rrr N'I rrr EM 333;; 33.31 113.33.34.33 WFJQ a F-F r 'l'h- 1'3'3'M 'llit'h'hl' XFF a! m TT' III 593 EH. EELEEII ELF! I'll; WWW lflhlth'Fiwjdw :42? 7' TF7! n-r r757 r" rlrr rrr, rrr EFF FFF WWrshhlllsi'albf g x62: Li: W? rrr rr ' 13st "W'H'ai 3 7;; UV rrr r" F: :M" FFI' Ell DE! 5.! 'JWWW'W . Pi? 9:: nu. me E PIE? 3;! m rmr 33333333333.3.3333; I Ir! r3 , F' :':.. F-J HM '33::3 hill. .,H..1,, F ELF 2;: n? "Y PEI - -a "5.! ll! a l, MW!!! , , - ' '13? 1 '3; 7.- 2! F x 13' um LARGEST DISTRIBUTORS OF MERCHANDISE AT RETAIL IN THE NORTHWEST .-u...3-;.-". ---.3".-.-..- . .; v .FIJ fa ,EsmusuaoNi film Q Fa g . , E THE QUALITY STORE OF PORTLAND. OREGON FIFTH SIXTH. MOREISON. ALDEP STS Four hundred twenty-onc ' 1 The 1 Shop of 529101in can also suggest very pretty ate mountings of which we assortment A pleaxure to DIAMONDS , Our stock of diamonds includes some genu- ine bargains in raie and beautiful stones. 'Ihese are especially appealing now when diamond prices are rapidly increasing. We show our goods SETH LARAWAY Diamond Merchant and Jeweler and appropri- have a large THE ELKINS ART and GIFT SHOP Picture Framing Pictures Pottery Jewel Glass Stationery Roycroft ware 832 Willamette Street EUGENE, OREGON T1 We' All Agreei FOR SERVICE FOR QUALITY FOR TASTY PASTRIES FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT FOR DELICIOUS CANDIES We must go to HE RAINBOW HERMAN BURGOYNE, Prop. 820 Willamette Thane 52 Four hundred lwcnty-two Invitation; iIoWg'zm Fwntunm Pen: Pewlsm r Ill! 0511?" MN MM '0 E553 832 W118 EUGENi C-E all. En graving and Printing 9 w For all of your school 0C- casions Dance Programs Invitations i Monogram Stationery 1 Fountain Pens Pencils, etc. "Everything for the Officel; JMbwrf$erlmig Q. Fifth and Oak Sts. PORTLAND, OREGON 4E- Hotel Osburn Largest and most com- pletely equipped Hotel outside Portland Caters to Student Dances and Banquets WHOM, BUY? 190 11 r l1 :1 ndrmi trwmzty-llzrce II'FWFEWHM: a.g- :3 ' ::;,' . .3134 mi. ; - Eii 31$??le l ' I at; .-- ,1; J ' rrg, , : The Easiest Corner 'The Best Store and-Rigbt in the Heart of Eugene This store is proof Of an old contention of ours. HPrompt action, courteous and intelligent ser- vice, backed by honest merchandising policies, ultimately WinSfU - DRY GOODS, MENS, WOMEN,S AND CHILDREN,S READY-TO-WEAR REST ROOMS Phones in all departments Special Delivery Service ?Engiavlifmw , ' FOR STYLEQUALITY C' ECONOMY Four 11qude ttwenty-faur IHE STEINWA The sutttss of the Steinway Piano ' ideak of m with m intmstlv pn making, Nae Duo Art is the imminent imions played bv the no d1 , played them. . Where College Folk buy Foot e W at Come to the ANCHORAGE for 828eVVillamette Street-828 AFTERNOON TEA AND OTHER REFRESHMENTS phone .. DAILY LUNCH Qual- 600 Serv- OR DINNER lty 14R9 ice SUNDAY SUPPER M A T L O C K, S tczmd on Saturdayn Groceries Dry Goods THE STEINWAY PIANO The success of the Steinway Piano is the uniting of the highest ideals of art with an intensely practical experience in piano- makin . g THE DUO ART PIANO -The Duo Art is the instrument that produces hundreds of se- t ' lections played by the worldis greatest pianists, exactly as they played them. THE VICTROLA The one instrument for which the greatest artists make records. The one instrument especially made to play their Victor records. The one instrument that reproduces their art in exact accord with their own ideas of interpretation. Sixth and Morrison Streets PORTLAND, OREGON buw-v-Im... Four hundred trwcnty-jiwc BUESCI-IER SAXA-PEONES Are used by more leading professionals than all other makes com- bined. Let us tell you why. BACON BANJOS CUNDY-BETTONEY FLUTES DEAGAN MARIMBAS GIBSON MANDOLINS LEEDY DRUMS LUDWIG DRUMS MARTIN GUITARS PEDLER CLARINETS PENZEL 8: MULLER CLARINETS VICTROLAS PLAYER ROLLS PIANOS LARGEST SHEET MUSIC DEPARTMENT IN NORTHWEST Seiberling-Lucas Music Company EVERYTHING MUSICAL PORTLAND ; I wll SJ" 3: Lil ., 4hr N Thal'i Wm And rememlwrv-ynu dun. 1 Mid YOU can send your or MA . Mw ?:de Four hundred twbltty-Jix -!0 The BesteFirst! That's what you get at Lipman, XVOlfelsealways. For whatever seasonefor whatever occasion Lip- man, VVOlfe 81 C0. can be depended upon to ptovide the best, the smartest, the most exceptional at the most reasonable prices-the liner fashions for wo- men-the smarter apparel for menethe standard furnishings for the home. eAnd remembereyou don"t have to come to Port- land. You can send your order by mail. 11 Well c$ Go. "Merchandise of Merit Only" Portland Oregon Table Supply Company L. D. PIERCE, PROP. Fancy Groceries, Meats and Home Cooked Foods The store that aims to give its customers the best the market affords at all timeseto be all that the name implieS-a real service store. We want the students of the University of Oregon to make this store their headquarters when it comes to eats. Our delicatessen and baking departments are always ready for an emergency call. Come in, we want to know you better. Make this store your store Phone 246-247-248 Cor. 9th and Oak Streets. Four Izumlrml lrwculyaM-vm .1. Say It W ith Flowers The University Florist Phone 654 993 Hilyard St. Most students buy at Luckey,s Jew- elry Store. Most students buy at Luckeyts Jew- elry Store. Most students buy at Luckey,s Jew- elry Store. Most students buy at Luckeyts Jew- elry Store. Most students buy at Luckeyts Jew- elry Store. Most students buy at Luckeyts Jew- elry Store. '1? Oli I-IIu-IIII-IIu-IIIl-IIn-IIIIelmezm-nt; Iron Mike You lead :1 dogs life Standing out there In the rain and cold h h t t h h t t With the wind howling Around your feet And the snow drifting down. You lead 21 dogs life Letting the water run Down your neck Day and night. Clothes WADE BROS. The Home of Hart, Sbafner C9" mam Stylish Clothes Four lmndrml trwenty-cight Oldies of women. nittti! hu lead a dog's life. Hftii?! Iwish I wcrc a dog. A Delightful Viigmzmgand. nutritious meals SC Iareexcepnonally low, considc rand attracm'ely decorated dini Every day the women, 9! 9K 5K- 9K 9E 9k- 9K- 9K- Oodles of them, FOR aleeseateakeleaxeeleek- ASAFEANDSOUND Come up to you INVESTMENT And lean over and give you M O U N TAI N STATES One husky smack POWER CO. And then another. 8 W0 Oodles of them. Gold Notes Oodles Of smacks Put your spare money to work for 95 916 9K 9k as are 916 916 you in a company supplying electricity Oodles of women. gas and water to many cities and ah ah axe 9g 9g ak- 9K 9E towns in Oregon. You lead 21 dogs life. Inquire 11! our nearest olfire I wish I were a dog. A Delightful Pace to Dine Appetizing and nutritious meals served in a pleasing way at prices that are exceptionally low, c01151der1ng' quallty Of food, attentwe ser- vice and attractively decorated dimng rooms. We Specialize in Good Things to Eat and Delicious Soda Fountain Beverages AFTER THEATRE SPECIALS Hot Chicken Tamales, Hazelwood WelOSh Rarebit, Crab Louis, Clubhouse Sandwiches, Frled Oysters OUR AFTER THEATRE'MENU Offer a great variety of temptlng dlshes fThe Hazelwood 388 XMashington St. 127 Broadway Four lmmlrrd IrwrnIy-mnr "nonn-unlu-ull-onu-ulq. for YOUT OlUn PHOTOGRAPHS OREGON SCENIC PICTURES The Martin Studio 7th and Willamette Itos 3 Fact! That wherever your summer path may lead you, from Louisiana to Alaska 01' E San Diego to Winnipeg, you will al- u ways be close to the big brown tents of the Ellison-VVhite Chautauquas. Ellison-White MzzsitoLyreum-Cllautauq1ms Under Four Flag: 071 Two Hemisphere: Portland, Calgary, Auckland, Melbourne Iibu-ml-ml- TOLLMAN STUDIO 734 WILLAMETTE ST. PHOWE 7 7 0 PHO TOGRAPHERS As a little remembrance for the new or old acquaintance of Col- lege days-your photograph. u Your Friends can $uy Anything You can Give Them-u6xcept Your Photograph " Four lnmdrpd tlziriy y ALUMINUM WARE u pmx WARE 10mm AND TINWARE f FLOOR WAX mm OIL AND MOPS If you want good supplies for MW your houses just drOp in at the W; :M Eugene Hardware Co. . hi0", ' ihEhx-rl' 9th and Oak Phone 670 Dealers in BUILDERS' HARDWARE PAINT AND GLASS ALUMINUM WARE PYREX WARE GRANITE AND TINWARE M00; FLOOR WAX 0 O-CEDAR OIL AND MOPS "The Store that Undersells Because LLMAN it Sells for Cash" Students of Economy Have Learned UDl0 to Pr0j9t by making this F.0MM0 Helpful Store WWV- F0" THEIR STORE pHOTOCR 1001036500' Here at 311 times you will find dgpcmlable quality mer- Wmmm chandise for the home, or person, prlced less than the same pb'vgnph Wk; qualities sold elsewhere. FMWLBWXI MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED l '16,. W 00000:. T YW' Fwd Yd" , Four hundred tllirty-one The J. K. GILL CO. WHOLESALE JqND RETAIL Stationers fIND Booksellers PORTLAND OREGON When in Portland Make the HOTEL OREGON YOUR HEADQUARTERS Most Centrally Located at the Pivotal Point in the Cityis Business, Shopping and Amusement Districts. Broadway at Stark St. Also the Home of the Famous YE OREGON GRILLE MUSIC AND DANCING EVENINGS Arthur H. Meyers, Manager. Four lmndrrd tllirty-irwo va- zes'atew-e pi 1 North Pacific College SCHOOLS OF Dentistry and Pharmacy PORTLAND, OREGON The Annual Sessmn Begins Sapt; 28th Students are required to enter at the beginning of the session COURSES OF INSTRUCTION The course in Dentistry is four years. The course in Pharmacy is three years. The length of the annual session is eight months. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Graduation from an accredited four year high school 01' academy or an equivalent education, fifteen units, thirty credits. N0 conditions on the foregoing entrance requirements are allowed. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS Prospective students preparing to enter North Pacific College, should include in their academic studies physics, chemistry and biology. The pre-medical course given by many of the colleges and universities is recommended, In the near future requirements for admission Will be advanced to include one year of college pre-dental preparation. For illustrated catalog address East Sixth and Oregon Sts. THE REGISTRAR Portland, Oregon EUGENE BRANCH Mason, Ehrman 8: C0. Incorporated Wholesale Grocers-nCigar Importers Home OfficeePortland, Oregon BRANCHES Eugene, Oregon; Medford, Oregon; Klamath Falls, Oregon; Astoria, Oregon; Bandon, Oregon; Lewiston, Idaho? OFFICES Seattle, Washington; San Francisco, Cal.; Spokane, Washington Fa Mr I; undrml tlzirlyntlzree af- mi. 'ir Pllil Metxclzan Manager regarded as the favorite Portland home forstudents of Oregon ccause nothing is left undone to make student Vis- itors feel at home. Four lmmlrrd tllirly-fozzr Ht W. A. W'e have a plan for delivering furniture to your 1101116 110 KUYKENDALL, InC- . matter where you live-th a very low price. Vritc us. The REXALL ' v Maweerlbaum Pmm:824 91.11. OAK Imported Toilet - I ?reparations Stationery and Dean H. Walker F. R. Wetherbee DRUGS Eugene, Oregon The UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE STORE Owned and Operated by the Students of the University of Oregon for Ike $ene15t of all Students and Faculty Members JOIN THE CO-OP. PATRONIZE THE coop. ITS YOUR STORE Four lmmirmi Illirlle'wc viva Kratz Sign Phone 00' 1 1 1 465 Willamette Street "On the Shady Side of Post O$ceH We Deliver 86 NINTH AVE EA's'1- pru-I:I:--IIII- a "Electric Lighting Fixtures" H. W. WHITE ELECTRIC CO. Electric Washing Machines, Percolat- ors, Sewing Machines, Vacuum Clean- ers, Toasters, Irons, Automatic Water Systems, Soldering Irons, Chums, Drills, Power Stands, Motors, Fans EDISON MAZDA LAMPS OHice and Sales Room 694 Willamette PHONE 254- Phone 232 $5X g ixxx $ 651551 01:25 Cameras and Photo Supplies Everything in Drugs The Prescription DR UGGIST For Genuine Satisfaction and Quality SHAE.FERS BROS. ARE IN THE LEAD HE store Which consis- tently gives to its student trade the very best. It appreciates the patronage of the students and faculty of the University chamro X BILLY DEPARTMENT STORE Four hundred tlzirty-six Phone 232 We Deliver .3. THE VARSITY The most popular Sweet Shop in Eugene. You will always find some of your friends here. They are usually all here. The brightest Spot 'in town. THE VARSITY lX'. A. EDXVARDS, l'lregon '18 J. W. SHEAHAX, Oregon '17 Four hundred tXIir'ly-Jrvrn Grian- Babb Hardware Co. Suppliers of fishing tackle and Sporting Goods. OREGANA THE STUDENT SHOP Fountain Delicmies . 716 Willamette St. nglzt Lzmclz G'E' 4b MILK-uCBEAM We are prepared to give student organizations special service and prices on milk and cream. See us before you contract for next year's supply. Eugene Farmers Creamery MAKE IT YOUR R U OF 0 Headquarters DINNER DANCING BALL ROOMS MULTNOMAH HOTEL Portland, Oregon. tin Four lumdred tlzirty-eiglzt '11. Fashion Park Clothiers que your cloths a compliment to your brains? :13: 3.. t .1qu II " ' GREEN MERRELL CO. MENsS WEAR uOne of 6ugene,s Best Stores" STAPLES THE J EWELER OP'FICIAN 266 MORRISON STREET PORTLAND. OREGON We Must Have Your Business If Not, Why Not? One of tile largest stories in the North- We have our own factory and shops west. connected with this store. We will meet all competitiOn on class pins Four hundred tlzirty-nizm ii- Picture F taming POTTERY JAPANESE GOODS FRAMED PICTURES ARTIST SUPPLIES, ETC. FRED LUDFORD Paint, W'all Paper and Art Store 922 Willamette St. Phone 749 $1? PREFERRED STOCK BRAND The steadily increasing demand is indicative of the high standard con- stantly maintained. Have you tried Preferred Stock Coffee? Eugene Branch-Allen 8t Lewis, Inc. Distributors 2 '8' Pi9 Imperial Lunch THE HOME OF Lets Eat Here WE NEVER CLOSE 727 Willamette St. We are with you students at all times . Phone 579 I THE BOOTH KELLY LUMBER CO. Lumber, Lath, Shingles, Slabwood Phohe 452 5th and Willamette Sts. Four hundred forty w A Modern Education 111C11u1cs 16580118 in how to save money as well 215 how to earn it. Yhe great fortunes of today are due as much to thrift as to large earning capacity. Busmess successes of the future demand more than ever the wise conservation of 0116's capital resources. Eugene Clearing House Association Composed of First National Bank United States National Bank Bank of Commerce Four htuzdrml farty-ong .1. '3 THE EQUITABLE LIFE INSURANCE SOCIETY OF U. S. 120 Bro adway, N. Y. Life I nnnnn Insurance Re tir nt Ann uiyt Business CInsurance Inhe riant nTax Insurance Partnershcip Insurance ROBERT w. EARL 31 7th St. East near Willamette PHONE 164 1 E0. .L T ,h MEAT CO. IIPINK" AND "SKEET" MANERUD BROS. FUEL CO. All kinds of Wood All kinds of Tran and Coal sferring at any hour Phones: Office 651-J i 696 Willamette, ' Res. Eugene, 139-L Oregon I '3' D. E. NEBERGALL GOVERN MEN T INSPECTED MEATS 66 EAST 9th AVENUE PHONE 37 2' .L I EUGENE STEAM LAUNDRY Student Business A pp recialed ?hone, one, two, three WEST 8th STREET 4n L T R.A.BABB HARDWARE 00. A WI he Winchester Storeii , SPALDING ATHLETIC GOODS GUNS, AMMUNITION AND FISHING TACKLE Mill and Logging Supplies 771 Willamette St. Phone 47 Four hundred forly-trwa 7 MAlN PLANT Va a GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY A Gateway to Progress There it standSea simple forty-foot gateway but unlike any other in the en- tire world. Through it have come many of the engineering ideas that have made this an electrical America. The story of electrical development begins in the Research Laboratories. 2 Here the ruling spirit is one of know- ledgHtruth-rather than immediate ' practical results. In this manner are established new theories-tools for fu- ture useewhich sooner or later find ready application. The great industries that cluster around Niagara Falls, the electrically driven battle ships, the trolley cars and electrified railways that carry millons, the household conveniences that have relieved women of drudgery, the labor- saving electricol tools of factories, all owe their existence, partly at least, to the co-ordinated efforts of the thousands who daily stream through this gateway. .EEeetric LGeneralomce Campany Schelgecytady, 95-486F Four lnuldrml frn'ty-llu'cc ,3."- 12-5 lbs. of Beefsteak 3 3 -4 lbs. of Chicken 4-5 lbs. of Ham 33- 5 lbs. of Codfish 14 Average Eggs 14-5 lbs. of Beans 41-3 lbs. of Peas 10 3-4 lbs. of Tomatoes In addition to this food value BLUE BELL ice cream contains VITAMINES, those vital factors of food that are so indispensable to the health. 11 One Quart Of Blue Bell Ice Cream l is equal in food value to any of the following portions of food: HAUSER BROS. Outfitters to thhletes and Sportsmen Wilson Football Goods Wilson Baseball Goods Wilson Tennis Goods Sporting High Top Boots Leather Coats and Vests Gym Suits and Shoes Guns and Ammunition Fishing Tackle Flashlights and Batteries Saxony Knit Sweaters and Jerseys THE OBAK .iiobak4, Wallace CIGARS AND TOBACCO IMPORTED PIPES AND POUCHES SODA, COXNFECTIONS AND LUNCHES FISHING TACKLE AND RODS BILLIARDS 8c SNOOKER RA'ZOR BLADES RESHARPENED 804 Willamette St. EUGENE, OREGON Four hundred forty-four ACID BLAST ETCH ED PLATES -We 52w? fAe onKyACIDBLAST maci z'nes m f5e 5fafegp0rgaan ' - , . HICKS-CHATTEN ,- "'Urhnu '; 7 ENGRAVING g ?Hhih . ' . v . - pggq-i?$3: 3121-: mun. , 5 $$$th . 3 hanhutmm; ; .leh-n. i ' Four lmrzdred farIy-jirue X L"-.- '1? ""110 Did You Know Your Dollar . will go further in purchasing Ready- to-Wear Clothing, Shoes and Dry Goods at our store? If. you didwt you had better Investigate m . . We Manufacture and Distribute KERBS FLOUR, CEREALS, DAIRY FEEDS, POULTRY . FEEDS Ask For Them at Your Dealers Eugene Mill and Elevator Company Hierr Gifford Co. Inc. 'OwnerI Four Izumircd forty-six JOSEPH H. KOKE, Pres. and Mgr. A. R. TIFFANY, Sec. aad Treas. KOKE-TIFFANY CO. YORAN PRINTING HOUSE, Inc. EUGENE, OREGON .- - l-'"l-ml --:':I-IIn- IIII-mu uu-u0? Printers and Bookbinders Blank Book Manufacturers, Stationers, Loose Leaf and Record Systems, Bank and Office Supplies THE HIGH STANDARD OF OUR PRODUCT AND THE INTEGRITY OF OUR HOUSE ARE SO WELL KNOWN THAT YOU NEED NOT HESITATE TO PLACE WITH US YOUR NEXT MAIL ORDER, WITH ABSOLUTE CONFIDENCE THAT CARE AND PRECISION WILL BE EXEMPLIFIED WE WILL BE PLEASED T0 ESTIMATE ON YOUR NEXT ORDER Four lmndrrd forty-srwn THE OREGANA STAFF Four hundred forty-eight he trail of bright days and loved memories a n 0 10 Z l 6 w LK s a t r u 0 .u n 6 h a .m e r e h 10 6 v r 6 s e r .p 10 n u 0 f e b y e h .l y a 4. A To those who by their loyalty and their unselhsh service 11am made the hath less difficult The way more bright; To those who placed this trust into our keeping. dnd looking backward feel a sense of gratitude And here acknowledge our own indebtedness r e W 0 C 0 .f. s r u 0 U m h .w ,m "l. m r t e h .I. la 6 r e v 0 C e v a h V5 I T 71d now we have come to the end of the journey. a n 0 04 .M h .w h w r a e y e h t f 0 Here, let us pause A . ...,.-.u "unwuhu ... . . . M


Suggestions in the University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) collection:

University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

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