University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR)

 - Class of 1921

Page 1 of 468

 

University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 468 of the 1921 volume:

w. 7-4:...u-ukum x;r..umvn R, :5 :7 W S ' 45 .3 ' '9 .5.5E.5E2:E: . i i..::::E-:sg. xg- .:..7 g: $$$$$ 'I Egg .5: w A? . . V 17 K '.I' r ' . 5V 2" M ,ijggy Eg ang A ,,.,,,,zg,,,ggrw I f. attawm $ .. 1 j MKS; .. Klimt F: M E gEEEE . Kg: M 9 XX MY mm X; F 1 K5 TI-IE OREGANA VOL. XIII Wanna McKinney, Editor Forest Littlefield, Manager 3"" .: 11'.. .. Enremnrh Me mhu are here at Gbregnn hating the year 1321, feel that great rhangea are taking plate in nut helnueh liniueraitg, feel OREGANA that big thinga are happening in mtr mihat, mithnut reallg being able to fully aenae the greatueaa mat the higneaa uf theae rhaugea. . th haa been the aim at the Qbregana 1921, to pnttray theae uital MW! Edi" rhangea inanfar a5 itia puaaihle in the Iimiteh tielh nf theae pagez. We have that, in the yearn tn rume, we ran lnnk nner theae pagea again, anh nee that me hail taught a glimpae nf the meaning of nut hay; anh hah been able, by pitture anh aturg, tn qmrtrag that prireleza "Qbregnn gpirit" mith mhirh me zerue, tired nut linineraitg, anh later the Nninetaitg at life. te w J. , pa 1 V 4;. Q .- v MauK ,. . .2, M, Eu Glnlin Hittnr Eymmt A hrnah think2r, a hrnah mnrk2r, a hrnah 09r2gnnian; 11111052 521111225 m 1112 Huiunaitg, 251122111111; During 1112 millam hill, 1151112 112111211 mak2 nf it a "$r2at2r 1191'2gnn." 31a mvmnriam Zennhia Eaffutg h lEniUPraitg Ahminintratinn Ollamwa Artinitim OBrganigatinna 16a Hi2 QDregnnipnne 9. THE PIONEER STANDS AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE CAMPUS; HIS STRENGTH AND RUGGED- NESS AN INSPIRATION TO ALL WHO PASS SSVd OHM ldSNl NV SSHN HlBNElHlS SIH .I. HONVHLNE 1NOI1VH 619ml uuv 5mm am. 0 EvHVSONVlS 833NOId 3H1 510 1 y I 417 571;; x K k3! F N Av $TTx - QR' 9' x '7' FV-w uixs ' N 9 .TiwiKQ-g wmx 4x ,9 'Is xix H1 ,V J Ne am: 6 Qt 4- .x - n 1-- m. ' t e . V. 9 . qs' . y- . Q xFWr1 men A? II Fairy t4 AIN r it ' , vx y ,. 4 ,, tr N , 4 n... 79' KW 9' T 3'7 g1? T MN 1143'- Epmnrrarg anh IFriPnhlinpaa at GDrPgnn The keynote of democracy at Oregon is Hello Lane. Here everyone speaks, no matter Whether your names have ever been indistinctly and un-understandably murmured by a polite hostess at some college function, or Whether the passer-by sits in front of you in class and has been dis- tinctly and very understandably called upon by the instructor. No one is a stranger in Hello Lane, everyone is a friend and fellow student. To further the democratic spirit ttOpen House" is held the first of the college year, When the women students are at home to the men of the University. The girls gather at the woments fraternity houses, Hendricks Hall and the Y.W.C.A. bungalow. The men come in big groups and pass down the receiving line, then they dance a little while and go on. Few names are understood and fewer remembered, but nearly everyone re- members faces, and from this time on the student body is one big friendly group. During the year at least one or two exclusively girls, dances are held and in the spring the April Frolic is put on, to give the girls an opportunity to meet each other and become friends. On the night of the April Frolic the men have a big smoker, held with laughter and much song but no Wine or women. These are only a few of the outward manifestations of the inner spirit that pervades campus and class room a1ike-the spirit of democracy, co- operation and friendliness. g; . "W :51; V g "mmia ! ; K 55 811 091?an Hello Lane. Here everyone, - ever been indistinctlyauu'l ees at some college function. In class and has been dis by the instructor. Noone? t d and fellow student. 3 x K "x ouse" is held the first of the at home to the men of the raternity houses, Hendn'ch ome in big groups and pass ttle while and go on. Few ,d, but nearly everyonereu Tent body is one bigfriendfy w sively girlst dances are held We the girls an Oppertumt te night of the Apnl FIOIIC: ter and much song but 110 3stations of the inner 5th ct: 3e spirit of democracy, JOHNSON HALL PILLARS sh $7.2m V; g; Wk . 4 $ 1 ,Axx . V3 y- 5! .I a x t WK? .- 2 :5?! .!R x as x x Ff? a- l - a .' K 5 m h J WW X ?ft- wag .5 '. tW ' ' V t - , .62 , INA w M ' a a J? , Ao- fiW h 5i Q. h Olampua Erahitinna When some Oregon graduate far away from the friendly shade of the fir trees, finds himself humming iiOh, those days at Orego-on, they are the best of awle", he isnt thinking about the grades he got in differential calculus or WiTennyson, a poet of the seat. He is thinking about the underclass mix and wondering whether the sophomores are still winning. He is wondering whether the freshmen are keeping the WOW on Skinnerts Butte properly painted. He wants to know whether the yell leaders have as much pep as they did when he went to school. y ' He is dreaming about the ivy on old Villard and Deady, of the dancing shades on the mill race, of a sunshiny day with Spencer in the distance but growing closer with every step. Traditions a another word for memories grown so dear that they are kept alive by each generation of students. Always will there be J unior Week-end with its games and sports and the J unior Prom. Always will there be Homecoming when a friendly smile and hearty handshake greet former students. And always will there be imparted to each new group of students that undefinable thing, made up of all these associations and memories a Oregon Spirit, the most treasured tradition of all. A . ,7; m. e K. A xhhba' M .2. b, :0 I M F 0 WV... W Pa h I ....VI,H M h 5wa ,6? x o r. e w. n,y M h E R E V O c Y N E H T 101' 7 hade of the hey are the differential pep as they the dancing he distance lat they are be J un of students qemories ,. D V J Qsi Q1 bk 4 :3 i q t C??? WIS . 4:3 ' 3;? 0.91m Euilhingz Each has a soul of its own. Our buildings are not mere strUctures of stone, iron and cement. To each there has been imparted the hopes, courage, Vision and spirit of sacrifice of the builders. There has been left by the succeeding generations of students the traces of their aspirations, efforts and the spirit of youth. And out of all these has grown a soul that makes of each building a living thing, and a friendly presence. i When we look at old Deady, we see not a mass of stone overrun by ivy, but we see in its tall, straight lines and dignified entrance, the simplicity and earnestness of those who built it. It was not an easy matter in those early days to erect a building as large as this was then considered. It was paid for entirely by subscrip- tion. The people of Eugeneathen a tiny Villagee-and Lane county 'could give little money, so they donated labor, building material, board for workers, anything they had to give, in order to make possible this building which was to be the beginning of a State University. Its com- pletion in 1876 meant more than sawing the last plank and driving the last nail. It was a personal Victory for each person Who had sacrificed for it, and it was the beginning of a new epoch for education in Oregon. Villard was the next building. N amed after the builder of the N orth- ern Pacific railroad, the greatest individual donor to the Universityis en- dowment, it stands as the second milestone in the march of progress. It is the embodiment of dreams and Visions toward a tiGreater Oregonii. McClure Hall was another step forward. It was named in memory of Dr. Edgar McClure, who lost his life on one of our mountain tops. Into it went the best of equipment, plans for greater service and usefulness to the state. I And so on down through the years the buildings have appeared. Each has been built to answer a certain need. Into each has gone the vigor, ideals, the life of those who conceived it. . Our latest building, Susan Campbell Hall, represents years of work, discouragements overcome and the vision and unselfishness of the ones who have made it possible. Withithis background its raw newness will soon disappear, and give place with use to the spirit of her for whom it is namedethe spirit of courage, simplicity and friendliness. k K Kxf X rv, h t; Ff: l . R A V Sm w:m H: ma: 0 mm N5 93 CDOy-g 52$Fhm :3':,+O ocbw-H3 13am Hugo? 5 5:. :1 m CD H: E :3 CD :12 m g IE: 1; 01111 'sdoq u phomaw 11; pan 33103910 .1; s; 11 'ssaJBOJd JC I K 1103910 U; L' 10; paogmes peq 311131111419 P119 41109 S11 'KCHSJQ . sun angssod 9:19. 5 CICD :2 H- 1$ SEC.- 025 :F-a: wvz m8 $3" 37 .S pmq 1911mm Alunoo auerI pun duos k A. m I I 3'? Buwnnq a 19m qns Kq KIGJ I 1 am. A ' I H l m? x , .4911 g5? , JKF' Ra ear xx x x i - x.. l f. X , x35- ,4 l g k xa Ehnae ana at GDrPgnn As I sit and dream at evening Of those days now past and gone, And I think of all the old friends Whose memories to me return; I can see them all in fancy As they were in days of yore. And the sweetest dreams in all this world Are dreams of Oregon. Once again I turn in fancy To those days of long ago, I can see the teams before me Winning fame and glory for the thll; I can see the college rallies, Where they sang of victories won, And the sweetest dreams in all this world Are dreams of Oregon. Oh, those days at Oregon! They are the best of all, Those dear old days at Oregon Are past but oft recalled; And yet in fancy I return To those good times for which I yearn, I want a shady place By the old mill race At dear old Oregon. wane. ' HON plxom SII. :lii- 9x m .1 ?:??:MK L xx Qm : a NA Ki; h I. V $u. 1' IA .; ' ! gr s? Q t X x; K 4 t 7 y. 'AA r'g-I E .r- JFA 4x ' V ' 5112 6ngan lalrhge W 0 " As a student at the University Which is maintained by the people of X Oregon, I heartily acknowledge the obligation I owe. The opportunities open to me here for securing training, ideals and Vision for life I deeply appreciate, and regard as a sacred trust, and do hereby pledge my honor that it shall be my most cherished purpose to render as bountiful a return to the Oregon people and their posterity, in faithful and ardent devotion to the common good, as will be in my power. It shall be the aim of my life to labor for the highest good and glory of an ever greater commonwealth. The above pledge is administered every year by the Governor of the state of Oregon to the students of the University. hzo... 9Q m: f I i l ! .H O omsggag o 38.334H-CLW qumHo oorFH EMU 13$ng 0 sagHVHf-i $ ogg g :EE-cs-gae ??sgaqa gm w Joaldoed aq; Kq OUR PRESIDENT'S HOME 9: - $3 x$ libS 243' Jr fads M. ::.3- WC 4 k S: ?;?I 9 yy 5112 $1311? ia the Qlampua The inviting piece of land, smaller than the donation claim of a pioneer, Which is commonly regarded as the campus of the University of Oregon, is only technically so. In a very' real sense, the Whole state of Oregon is the campus. Through correspondence study courses, extension classes, reading circle work, Visual instruction, public discussion and lectures, the Univer- sity of Oregon has extended its advantages to the communities and into the very homes of the state. Nearly a thousand people are enrolled in correspondence courses, studying in spare time by their own firesides in every county in Oregon, doing their work steadily and well and securing University credit. These distant but earnest students represent workers in every trade and pro- fession and include old people as well as young. The largest number of extension classes are offered in Portland, Which holds, like every urban community, an extensive number of people Who are anxious to train themselves for higher responsibilities, but th must seek opportunities for study While they work for a living. These classes are carried on in the same manner as those at the University, but usually in the evenings. Nearly four thousand teachers of Oregon annually do their profes- sional reading through the Extension Division of the University. In this way they keep up With the progress and latest methods of their profession. The work of the University in public discussion reaches a large number of communities each year; For six years the Extension Division of the University has main- tained a Visual instruction service through Which six thousand stereopticoh lantern slides and nearly a quarter of a million feet of educational moving picture films, as well as microscope slides and mineral sets, are now avail- able Without cost to schools, churches and other organizations of Oregon. Audiences aggregating 250,000 people used this service last year. Although the University is unable to meet all requests for speakers, the faculty gives a large number of addresses. These addresses, Which are often illustrated, are made before teacherst institutes, community clubs, general audiences and groups of people everywhere in the state. m sr 10; 313 3112M qsu KSJQX'GadS 11033.10 J0 SUO H 3qu 39.1mm IRA? MOU am pm ?BSSBIQ u ',. m WFDQN th-nuH. ' gang H? H' Hmmmb 329-02: B mum 833- 19-1 EE'EHW ??Oo dev-I- HCDCDO r'F. PU 6,- :: S H. CF 0Qr-n."$ w 600 .1 am 5 Omk: Hmct- -v-a r-hh: OH- H. Bev- CD '31:: 3.: 6 mem d 936D: :33ch- U-mc-i-hdg 6915.8ng 5. H33 CO'H Egsgs 9356: m Eia 3$EE gogg: 3-98 g E.H-m 53.24.- 0 :97 ea: 9.: +3133? agE'EZ-f 333;; Egg; 55-; x -:. x 4' ?W '5 ' v nguus. . - ; $4;$9 W M: s. 3,, ' : k$$$qu$$vmvwmw x Nqa $bkz.. $fxg;.t:xgw 3m $ 3 M Q k A. 3? ;13- hwy OREGON HALL -; p .x., t a M ? - w a $kQW$m , r l a IIIIIIIII I m I ----- I . ";""-II 'IHWUMII '1 "m", "mum IIIIIIllwg'I, ,' J I Winlillw IIIII: ml . 411:;HLJWLIHI ,' I I IV F I II II MI I I l I .- lHI 1 III III 'IIIII I I III I III II ."i $.45 p, ' $33 ww- z? o Elbe Ahminiatratinn OFFICERS JAMES W. HAMILTON, President L. H. JOHNSON, Secretary EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE HON. JAMES W. HAMILTON, Ex Officio Chairman HON. A. C. DIXON, Acting Chairman H. FISHER HON. GERLINGER HON. CHAS. MRS. G .T. HON. VERNON VAWTER EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS HON. BEN W. OLCOTT, Governor HON. SAM A. KOZER, Secretary of State APPPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR Name and Address 3E WV$XXVQQNECANAV 9 3 HON. J. A. CHURCHILL, Superintendent of Public Instruction ............................ HON. A. C. Dixon, Vice-President W. K. NEWELL HON. LLOYD L. MULIT .. Salem .. Salem .. Salem Term Expires HON A. C. DIXON, Eugene .............................................................................. Azpril 15,1923 HON. CHAS. H FISHER, Eugene ........................................................................ Arpil 15, 1923 HON. JAMES W. HAMILTON, Roseburg ...................................................... Aprill5, 1925 MRS. G. T. GERLINGER, Portland ................................................................. Apri115, 1927 HON., C. C. COLT, Portland ................................................................................ April 15, 1927 HON. HENRY MCKINNEY, Baker ....................................................................... April 15, 1927 HON. LLOYD L. MULIT, Portland ...................................................................... April 15, 1929 HON. VERNON C. VAWTER, Medford ............................................................ April 15, 1931 HON. C. E. WOODSON, Heppner ........................................................................ April 15, 1933 HON. WILLIAM S. GILBERT, Astoria .............................................................. April 15, 1933 OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION P. L. CAMPBELL, B.A., LL.D. .................................................................................. President KARL W. ONTHANK, M.A. .................................................................... Executive Secretary LOUIS H. JOHNSON .................................................................................................. Comptroller CARLTON E. SPENCER, A.B., LL.B. ........................................................................ Registrar JOHN STRAUB, M.A., Lit.D. .............................................................................. Dean of Men ELIZABETH FREEMAN FOX, B. A. ................................................................ Dean of Women WILBUR K. NEWELL .................................................................. Superintendent of Properties Eh? 010119925 anh 5711101115 GEORGE REBEC, Ph.D. COLIN V. DYMENT, B. A. ELLIS F. LAWRENCE, M. S. EDWIN CLYDE ROBBINS, Ph.D. HENRY D. SHELDON, Ph.D. ERIC W. ALLEN, B.A. WILLIAM G. HALE, B.S., LL.B. RICHARD B. DILLEHUNT, B. 8., M. D. JOHN J. LANDSBURY, Mus.D. M. H. DOUGLASS, M.A. Dean of School Librarian Dean of Graduate School ...................................... Dean of Literature, Science and the Arts ................................................ Dean of School of Architecture Dean of School of Commerce ................................................ Dean of School of Education ................................................................ Dean of School of Journalism of Law ...................................... Dean of School of Medicine ................................................... Dean of School of Music JOHN FREEMAN BOVARD, Ph. D .......................... Dean of School of Physical Education FREDERIC GEORGE YOUNG, LL.D. EARL KILPATRICK, B. A. ................................ Dean of School of Sociology ........................................................ Director of Extension Division w x. kotxxzingxQxx is! .7! l-gl x. t . V v . . Mi. k !x, . .' Xi! DI , .x UV is $ A it'll. x , r m 1.3!. T m.. N n 2!..- . m Ia t... . p s. m i i. i. U -9 mail. 5... lb. 7"! 3 , Mg? .i! HI I 3 E ..f .. 'Iu. , E . .l u .: k .W .j! of i N 5,3 ? Viv SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ARTS ELLIS F. LAWRENCE, EA. 1. A. ...................... Dean of School of Architecture and Arts B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1901, M.S., 1902 PERCY P. ADAMS, B.A., B.S. .................................................... Professor of Architecture . B.A. University of Oregon, 1901; BS, 1902 H. M. KING, S. B ...................................................................................... Professor of Architecture S. B. University of Minnesota, 1918 CAMILLA LEACH ............................................................ Librarian School of Architecture EDWARD McALISTER, M.A. .................................................... Professor of Architecture B.A. University of Oregon, 1890; M.A. 1893 F. M. MILES .......................................................................................... Lecturer in Architecture GEORGE E. REED ........................................................................ Lecturer in Architecture ALFRED H. SCHROFF ........................................................................ Professor of Fine Arts Studied art in Boston, Paris, and London; First Medal for stained glass, Wor1d1s Columbian Exposition, Kingston Exposition, Jamaica Exposition; represented in Eastern art collections1 AVARD FAIRBANKS ............................................................................ Professor in Fine Arts Art Students League, New York; Ecole Nationale des Beaux Art, Paris; Ecole Col'orassi, Paris; Ecole Moderne, Paris; Exhibitor in Paris, New York, Chicago and Pittsburgh Academies, and expositions in San Francisco, and Buffalo ARTHUR RUNQUIST ............................................................................ Instructor in Fine Arts VICTORIA AVAKIAN Instructor in Normal Arts HELEN RHODES ................................................................................ Professor of Normal Art Cowles Art School, Boston; National Academy of Design, New York; Teachers College, Columbia University; Student at Bryn Mawr SCHOOL OF COMMERCE E. C. ROBBINS, Ph.D. ................................................................ Dean of School of Commerce 1B. A. University of Iowa, 1910; M. A., 1912; Garthe Fellow in Economics, Colum- bia University, 1912-13; Ph.D., Columbia University ,1915 T. J. BOLITHO, B.A. ............................................ Professor of Accounting B.A. Washington State College, 1917 GEORGE DENFELD, B.A. ........ Professor of Commerce B.A. University of Wisconsin; Alpha Kappa Psi FRANKLIN E. FOLTS, B.A. ............................................................ Instructor in Commerce B.A. University of Oregon, 1918 A. L. LOMAX ........................................................................................ Professor of Commerce Alpha Kappa Psi VERNE R. MCDOUGLE, B.A. .......................................... Assistant Professor of Accounting B.A. University of Wisconsin; Phi Beta Kappa ROBERT PERKINS BASS, M.A. .................................................... Professor of Commerce B.A. Harvard, 1896; M.A. Dartmouth, 1898; Governor of New Hampshire, 1911- 13 MADELINE McMANUS ........................................................ Assistant Professor of Commerce Ph.B. University of Chicago, 1918 JOHN R. WHITAKER, B. S. .............................................. Assistant Professor of Commerce B. S. University of Pennsylvania, 1920 CARLTON M. HOGAN, M.A. B.A., M.A., University of Illinois: Graduate Student at Harvard, 1918-19. SCHOOL OF EDUCATION HENRY D. SHELDON, Ph.D. ................................................ Dean of School of Education B.A. Stanford University, 1896; M.A. 1897; Ph.D. Clark University, 1900; Student at the University of Leipsic, 1911-12; Phi Delta Kappa C. A. GREGORY, Ph.D. ........................................................................ Professor of Education B.A. University of Indiana, 1898; M.A. 1915; Ph.D. University of Iowa, 1920; Phi Delta Kappa ' BURCHARD WOODSON DE BUSK, Ph.D. ........ Professor of Educatlonal Psychology B.S. Central Normal College, 1898; B.A. University of Indiana, 1904; Ph.D. Clark University, 1915; Phi Delta Kappa; Fellow, Clark University, 1909-10, 1914-15 -271. W 1 I :1; g DEAN FOX DEAN STRAUB H. R. DOUGLASS, B.S. ................................................ Professor of SecondaKfy Education BS. University of Missouri, 1915; Phi Delta Kappa ROLLIEN DICKERSON ............................................ Principal of University High School FRED L. STETSON, M.A. .................................................. Professor of Secondary Education BA. University of Washington, 1911; M.A. 1913; Research Scholar, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1920 SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM ERIC W. ALLEN, B.A. ............................................................ Dean of School of Journalism BA. University of Wisconsin, 1901; Sigma Delta Chi GEORGE S. TURNBULL, B.A. .................................................... Professor of Journalism BA. University of Washington, 1915; Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Delta Chi W. F. G. THACHER, M. A ............................................................................ Professor of Rhetoric B.A. Princeton University, 1900; M.A. 1906; Graduate Student University of Chicago, 1906 ROBERT C. HALL ........ Assistant Professor of Journalism, and Superintendent of. the University Press DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND BOTANY ALBERT R. SWEETSER, M, A .................................................................... Professor of Botany B,A. Wesleyan University, 1884; M.A. 1887: Graduate Student Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1884-85; Graduate Student, Harvard College, 1893-97 MILDRED L. JOHNSON, B. S. ....................................... . ........... Assistant Instructor in Botany 38. Oregon Agricultural College, 1920 9289 nww clam 18 815i 5 o Jag; ; 51$ g8 : t ETHEL I. SANBORN, M. A. ...... Assistant Instructor in Bacteriology and Plant Anatomy B. S. State College, South Dakota, 1903; B. A. 1904; M.A. 1907 w DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY OREN F. STAFFORD, M.A. ................................................................ Professor of Chemistry BA. University of Kansas; M.A. 1900 F. L. SHINN, Ph.D. ................................................................................ Professor of Chemistry BA. University of Indiana, 1901; M.A. 1902; Student Yale University, 1902; Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, 1906 ROGER J. WILLIAMS, Ph.D. ............................................................ Professor of Chemistry B.S. University of Redlands, 1914; Graduate Student at the University of California, 1914-15; Fleischmann Industrial Fellowship, Chicago University, 1918-19; Ph.D. 1919 J. L-. WHITMAN, M. S. BA. University of Oregon, 1914; M. S. 1915 DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS i JAMES H. GILBERT, Ph.D. ............................................................ Professor of Economics BA. University of Oregon, 1903; Ph.D. Columbia University, 1907 l PETER C. CROCKATT, M.A. ............................................................ Professor in Economics BA. University of- Oregon, 1915; M. A. 1918 MERTON K. CAMERON, M. A. .................... Professor of Economics B.A. Princeton, 1908; M.A. Harvard, 1914 DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LITERATURE HERBERT C. HOWE, B.A. ................................................ Professor of English Literature B.A. Cornell University, 1893; Graduate Scholar, Cornell University, 1893-95 MARY WATSON, M.A. ........................................................ Professor of English Literature BA. University of Oregon, 1909; M.A. 1911; Graduate Student at Columbia University, 1918-19 NORMA DOBIE, B.A. ........................................................ Instructor in English Literature BA. University of Oregon, 1914 DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN FRIEDRICH G. G. SCHMIDT, Ph. D. ........ Professor of German Language and Literature Student at University of Erlangen, 1888-90; Scholar at Johns Hopkins Uni- versity, 1894-96; Ph.D., 1896 EDWARD THORSTENBERG, Ph.D....Professor Scandinavian Languages and Literature B.A. Bethany College, 1899; Scholar at Yale University, 1900-03; M.A., 1902; Ph.D.1904 .y . condary Educam" rsity High 50W condary EduC?jltlon Scholar, TeaCherS DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY WARREN D. SMITH, P11. D. .................................................................. Professor of Geology B.S. University of Wisconsin, 1902; M.A. Stanford University, 1904; Fellow in Geology :at the University of Chicago, 1904-05; Ph.D. University of Wis- consin, 1908; Phi Beta Kappa 1001 of Journalism sor of JourI.lallsm EARL L. PACKARD, Ph.D. .................................................................... Professor of Geology 1a Delta 0111 , BA. University of Washington, 1911; M.A. 1912; Fellow in .Pale-ntology at fessor Of Rnewrlg the University of California, 1912.14; Ph.D. University of Cahfornla, 1915 wt Universny 0 EDWIN T. HODGE, Ph.D. . BA. University of Minnesota, 1913; M.A. 1914; William Bayard Travehng Fellowship, Columbia University, 1914-16; Ph.D. 1916; Honorary Life mem- e . nt Of th . . . anntende ber of Canadian Institute of Mining Englneers; Slgma X1. Y DEPARTMENT OF GREEK feSSOI' of 30mg: JOHN STRAUB, Lit.D. .............................. Professor of Greek Language and Literature 31,. MassaChuSeg7 B.A. Mercersburg College, 1878; M.A. 1879; Lit.D. Franklin and Marshall ' College, 1913 v Collegev tructor in Botany l ;rms m, 11:3? ' K" 5 k x E $4; - 3x 9 Nix 2:1, 1'51 I 3x . $ 1 5K . 9Q DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY ROBERT C. CLARK, Ph.D. .................................................................. Professor of History BA. University of Texas, 1901; M.A. 1901; Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, 1905; Fellow in American History at the University of Wisconsin, 1904-05; Phi Beta Kappa WALTER CARL BARNES, B.A. 001mm ............................................ Professor of History B.A. Colorado College, 1912; Graduate Student University of California, 1912-13; Rhodes Scholar, School of Modern History, Oxford University, Eng- land; B.A. Oxford, 1916; Phi Beta Kappa ELDON GRIFFIN, B.A. Instructor in History B.A. Harvard 1916; Seabury Fellow at Stanford University, 1919-20; Phi Beta Kappa , DEPARTMENT OF HOUSEHOLD ARTS LILIAN TINGLE .............................................................................. Instructor in Household Arts Graduate of Educational Trust School of Domestic Economy, Aberdeen, Scot- land; Student Robert Gordon's College, Aberdeen, Scotland; Aberdeen Uni- versity, 1898-99; Teaching Certiflcate for Chemistry and Physiology from British Government . GRACE McCOLLISTER, B.S. ................................................ Instructor in Household Arts B.S. University of California, 1913 HAZEL HOUCK Assistant Instructor in Household Arts DEPARTMENT OF RHETORIC AND AMERICAN LITERATURE Professor of Rhetoric and American ERNEST SUTHERLAND BATES, Ph.D. Literature BA. University of Michigan, 1902; M. A. 1903; Ph.D. Columbia University, 1908. Phi Beta Kappa JULIA BURGESS, M. A. ................................................................................ Professor of Rhetoric B.A. Wellesley College, 1894; M.A. Radcliffe College, 1901 ; GRACE EDGINGTON, B.A. Instructor in Rhetoric BA. University of Oregon, 1917; Theta Sigma Phi ANDREW FISH Assistant Professor of Rhetoric B.D. Pacific Unitarian School for the Ministry; BA, University of Oregon, 1920 MARY HALLOWELL PERKINS, M.A. ............................................ Professor of Rhetoric B.A. Bates College, 1898; M.A. Radcliffe College, 1908; Graduate Student in English Columbia University, 1916-17; Phi Beta Kappa W. F. G. THACHER, M. A. .............................. Professor of Rhetoric and University Editor B.A. Princeton Univefnsity, 1900; MLA. 1906; Graduate Student University of Chicago, 1906; Sigma Upsilon IDA V. TURNEY, M.A. ........................................................................ Instructor in Rhetoric BA. University of Oregon, 1912; M.A. 1913 DEPARTMENT OF LATIN FREDERICK. S. DUNN, M.A. ...................... Professor of Latin Language and Literature BA. University of Oregon, 1882; M.A. 1889; M.A. Harvard University, 1903 HERMAN A CLARK, M.A. .................................................... Assistant Professor of Latin ILA. University of Michigan, 1909; M.A. 1910; Phi Beta Kappa DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE MAJOR ARTHUR C. BAIRD, Commandant Professor of Military Science and Tactics MAJOR ARTHUR E. ROWLAND .............................................. Professor of Military Science DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS EDGAR E. DeCOU, M. S. ................................................................ Professor of Mathematics B. S. University of Wisconsin, 1894; M.A. University of Chicago, 1897; Graduate Student University of Chicago, 1899-1900; University Scholar Yale, 1900-01. WILLIAM E. MILNE, Ph.D. Professor of Mathematics ' B A. Whitman College, 1912; M.A. Harvard University, 1913; Ph.D. 1915; Phi Beta Kappa LTTCILE CCPENHAVER, B.A. ................................ Assistant Professor in Mathematics BA. University of Oregon, 1920 , nstructor in L , 1919-20'; p or in Household Arts my, Aberdeen, Scot- and; Aberdeen Uni. I'd Physiology from ' in Household Arts in Household Arts E RATU RE etoric and American lolumbia University, ?rofessor of Rhetoric 01 ' :tructor in Rhetonc Mfessorr of Rhetoric ; Liversity of Oregon, 'ofessor of Rhetorjc 'rraduate Student m 1d University Edigor 'S-tudent UniverSIty tructor in Rhetoric lage and Literature rd University, atill Professor 0 appa TacticS w ' and . 3C18nce Sclence of Military ematics sor 0f Mgtgraduate History 3 hi Beta 3 THE DEANS OF THE SCHOOLS SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION JOHN F. BOVARD. Ph.B. ............................ Dean of the School of Physical Education B.S. University of California, 1903; M.S. 1906; Ph.D. 1917; Sigma Xi DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN MABEL LOUISE CUMMINGS .................... Director of Physical Education for Women Boston Normal School of Gymnastics; University of Chicago; Tufts College Medical School; Rush Medical School DR. BERTHA STUART-DYMENT Medical Advisor to the Women LAURA G. McALLESTER ................................................ Instructor in Physical Education Boston Normal School of Gymnastics; Wellesley College HARRIET W. THOMSON, B.A ................................ Assistant Physical Director for Women BA. University of Michigan, 1904 CATHERINE WINSLOW, Ph.B. ................................ Instructor in Women1s Gymnasium Graduate Chicago Normal School of Physical Education, 1914; Ph.B. Univer- sity of Chicago, 1910 EMMA WATERMAN, B.A. .............................................. Instructor in Physical Education BA. University of Minnesota, 1917; Certificate of Hygiene, Wellesley, 1919 GRACE K. ROBERTSON, R.N. .................................................... University Health Nurse Served for the U. '8. Government 1917-18; Red Cros Service in Siberia, 1919-20 uauuk-r v -.- -1.:-.. 'h- :3: ,.i 7R -md: :- 959 t, 'k' r Efi; 5.x- M r x; 59 QR-I TUE. :gt'fx1, ' A 1' ,- 1;. r. A F K xxx Twig! 571.". Wxgx ,44v 5: ax. :9 .6. ff ?Q x11 11$ 1 ,A w, -' l1 ; J? r" 1 x4:- 5; x 7 P 5 ,Zpo 8 W... J .1 g 9 6ll;f Ins. 9, k 88 17 1' DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN WILLIAM L. HAYWARD ............................................................ Physical Trainer for Men CHARLES A. HUNTINGTON ........................................ Instructor of Physical Education GEORGE M. BOHLER Instructor of Physical Education B.E. thuykill Seminary, Reading, Pennsylvania; P.D. Chautauqua School of Physical Education, Chautauqua, New York DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY EDMUND S. CONKLIN, Ph.D. ...................................................... Professor of Phychology B.A. Springfield, Massachusetts, 1908; Scholar and Fellow in Psychology, Clark University, 1908-11; M.A. 1909; Ph.D. 1911 HAROLD E. CROSLAND, P11. D. BA. University of South Carolina, 1913; M.A. Clark University, 1914; Ph.D. 1916; Phi Delta Kappa CELIA v. HAGER, M.A. ........................................................... Instructor in Psychology BA. University of Oregon, 1912; M.A. 1918 RAYMOND H. WHEELER, Ph.D. ................................................ Professor of Psychology B.A. Clark University, 1915; M.A. Chicago University, 1917; Research Fellow Stanford University, 1919-1920; Phi Delta Kappa KIMBALL YOUNG, M.A. B.A. Bingham Young University, 1915; M.A. Chicago University, 1917; Re- search Fellow Stanford University, 1919-1920; Phi Delta Kappa DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES TIMOTHY CLORAN, Ph. D. ................................................ Professor of Romance Languages B.A. Western Reserve University, 1891; Student Universities of Berlin and Strassburg, 1879-99; Ph.D. University of Strassburg, 1901; Student University of Paris, 1904-05; Student University of Madrid, 1905-06; Phi Beta Kappa JENNIE FAYARD-COON, B. A. ........................ Assistant Professor of Romance Languages BA. University of California, 1917; Phi Beta Kappa HENRIETTE GOUY, B. A. ................................ Assistant Professor of Romance Languages B.S. 1Bredet Superieum University of Marseille, 1919; BA. Colorado College, 1920 ROSALIE CUEVAS, M.A. .................................................................... Instructor of Spanish Colegio de la Ensenanza, Bogota, 1895; Normal College, Milan, Italy, 1896-98; B.A. Adelphi College, 1909; M.A. Columbia University, 1913; Graduate Student University of Madrid, Spain. FLORENCE M. WHYTE, B.A. ............................................................ Instructor in Spanish BA. University of California, 1915; Collegio de la. Purisima, Saltillo, Mexico; Phi Beta Kappa ANNA M. THOMPSON, B.A. ................................................................ Instructor in Spanish B.A. Western Maryland College; M.A. 1907; Graduate Student Columbia Uni- ;ersity, University de Toulouse, 1916-19; Centre de Estudios Haistoricos, Ma- drid, 1919 DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS WILLIAM PINGRY BOYNTON, Ph. D. ...................................................... Professor of Physics B.A. Dartmouth College, 1890; M.A. 1893; Scholar and Fellow in Physics, Clark University, 1894-97; Ph.D. 1897; Phi Beta Kappa ALBERT EDWARD CASWELL, Ph.D ................................................ Professor of Physics B.A. Leland Stanford Junior University; 1908; Ph.D. 1911 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SPEAKING ARCHIBALD F. RED-DIE, B.A. ................................ Professor of Public Speaking Graduate Emerson College of Oratory; B.A. Valparaiso University 6Honorary1 CHARLOTTE BANFIELD, B.A. ........................................ Instructor in Public Speaking BA. University of Oregon, 1919 WILLIAM MICHAEL, B.A. ................................ Assistant. Professor of Public Speaking BA. University of Illinois, 1920; Delta Sigma Phi DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY DR. HARRY BEAL TORREY, P11. D. ................................................ Professor of Zoology B.S. University of California, 1895; M.S. 1898; Fellow in Zoology, Columbia University, 1900-01; Ph.D. 1903; Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi 9? , q rx- 5 a ".3qu4.3. x 9 r; ,9 1- 51m. A; .1 IV 1: - 9. ' 545- 4:1 1 xwmaget o 1V5 I '1 a" a3595$51 Q! g??? Q t HARRY B. YOCUM, PhDAssrstant Professor of Zoology B.A. Oberlin, 1912; M.A. University of California, 1916; Ph.D. 1918; Sigma Xi CATHERINE W. BEEKLEY, B.S'. .................................... Assistant Professor in Zoology B.S. University of Pennsylvania, 1910 , , SCHOOL OF LAW WILLIAM G. HALE, LL.B. Dean of the School of Law B.S. Pacific University; LL.B. Harvard University; Order of the Coif; Phi Delta Phi SAM BASS WARNER, LL.B. Professor of Law B.A. Harvard University, 1912; LL.B. 1915; THOMAS A. LARREMORE, LL. B. B.A. Yale University, 1911; LL.B. Phi Delta Phi JAMES D. BARNETT, Ph.D. Professor of Public Law B.A. College of Emporia, 1890; University of Wisconsin, 1904-05; Ph.D. 1905 W. C. DAZELL; J.D. B.A. Stanford University; J.D. Stanford University; SCHOOL OF MUSIC JOHN J. LANDSBURY, Mus.D. ..-.Dean School of Music; Professor of Pianoforte and Composition Mus.B. Simpson College, 1900; Mus. D. 1909; Pupil of Max Bruch, Berlin; Edgar Stillman-Kelly, Berlin; Leotschrottenholz and Otto Fleischer, Berlin; Graduate Student, University of Berlin MADAME ROSE MCGREW Instructor in Voice Studied With Professor Natalie Haenisch and Fraulein von Katzerne, Dresden, Germany; three years at Royal Court Theatre in Meckenburg-Schwerinr three years at Royal Court Theatre, Hanover; six years at Municipal Theatre, Bres- lau, East Prusia; received decoration of House Order from the Kaiser, at Hanover JOHN STARK EVANS, A.B. Pupil 0f Rudolph Ganz, Kappa JANE THACHER ...................................................................................... Professor of Pianoforte Pupil 0f Leschetizky, Vienna; Karl Pfleger, Vienna GEORGE PAYNTER HOPKINS Assistant Professor of Pianoforte Pupil of Harold Randolph, Baltimore; Moritz Moszkowski, Paris LELAND A. COON, A.B. ........ Assistant Professor of Pianoforte and Organ; Director Girlst Glee Club A.B. Alfred University, 1914; Graduate Student, 1914; Graduate New England Conservatory of Music, 1914; Pupil of Henry B. Vincent; Conradi; Alfred DeVoto; Louis Elson; Samuel Cole ' ' REX UNDERWOOD ............................ Professor of Violin, Director of University Orchestra Pupil of Joseph Olheizer, Chicago Musical College; Hans Becker, Leipzic; Michael Press, Berlin; Ostrovsky, London; Student at Bavarian Conservatory of Music, Wurzburg ANNA LANDSBURY BECK, A. B. .................................... Professor of Public School Music A.B. University of Oregon, 1919; Student University of California, Simpson College, Colorado Normal College INA M. WATKINS, Columbia School of Music; . Frothingham, Carl Lachmund AURORA POTTER ................................................................................ Instructor in Pianoforte . , - SCHOOL OF SOCIOLOGY FREDERICK G. YOUNG, B.A;, LL.D. .................... Dean of the School of Sociology B.A. Johns Hopkins University, 18661; University Scholar Johns Hopkins Uni- versity, 1896-87; LL.D. University of Oregon, 1920 PHILIP ARCHIBALD PARSONS, Ph.D. Professor of Sociology B.A. Christian University, 1904; M.A. 1905; Student Union Theological Stem- inary, 1904-06; Research Fellow School of Philantropy, Columbia University, 1908-09; Ph.D. 1909 5MK I; . z 99 1116 L k t6; .. 14$sz $N k?! :1, '5: l,- x X11, 1E5555E::E$:4 4'4 .. v .- l . 6yt$ 58132 the School of Law r 0f the '- . ,. A Coif, Phi iw' the organization of hve hospital units to take care of the S. A. T. C. and other students . PTOfBSSor of Law? x t Sick at the Un1vers1ty. It was deemed advisable to continue an infirmary for students i E t ,m after the epidemic subsided but how to support it was the question. ..... Professor of Law : 4; .6; Phi Beta Kappmi w; H essor of Public Law 2 e at the University V ".v 1 i . A Professor of Law 7! C 44 hi Sick Service. ll 1' of the Coif i ywk h Jr of Pianoforte and V Max Bruch, Berlin; 3 Fleischer, Berlin; 3. y '. down and out. .K W, themselves by becoming physically fit. In addition, the Health Service Instructor in Voice hQ to develop better hygenie conditions on the campus and college community. Katzerne, Dresden, I inspections are made and methods of improvement studied out. iurg-Schwerin; three The Health Service maintains a staff of two physicians, four nurses, and takes Lcipal Theatre,BreS' p care of approximately forty five bed patients, two hundred and fifty out patients, mm the Kaiser, at ,3; and twelve hundred dispensary calls each month. ' If I anoforte and Organ , . ew York; Phi Beta ; MihQ oforte pfessor of Pian $ . 4 ifessor of Pianoforte i Paris , ind Organ ; Director land duate NeW. Eng 1t; Conradl; Alfred. a long time before it was organized. 5hr Hniupraitg ihpalth 57mm? The need for some form of service which would care for the sick was felt for The epidemic of influenza in 1918 necessitated Beginning with the winter term the institution was financed entirely on money from bills collected, later during the spring term by a voluntary fee of $2.50 per student. After June, 1919, the board of regents was persuaded to take it over and from then on it has been entirely financed by a budget voted by the board of regents. W This last year the Health Service has been made a definite department of the s School of Physical Education. There has been a distinction made between Health and The infirmary and dispensary are concerned with the latter. Iirmary staff is supplemented by a staff of consulting physicians. The Health THE UNIVERSITY INFIRMARY Service is concerned with better health for those who are not Consultations, advice and treatments are given to those who are underweight or subnormal for some reason and who desire to make the most of is trying -qu HM... ta WA . -.2 . ..-.i H tqmlwm't wad... 7.. Lu.- .. .i. ..AA A , 4 ' ., A. rat; A .i A A - rma THE INFIRMARY INTERIOR oamo vallyl xg c ; IOXONONOMONOMW OCAW.z ll ? I9I I I ll Ail;l'y - - . . MIX .t P . 9 Q , -467 I '- - t 's 1 : .t ht 5:1;w'1? wxxhxh QQW I g c r624 . - 1 m t w w r e '1 V7 s 1X 9 v X Que" 4? 111:1 . r,l"f. 1V IV ; " I Hopkins . Thurston Loughary Earl George Hopkins ........................................................................................................................ President Alice Thurston ................................................................................................................ Vice-President Helen Loughary ...................................................................................................................... Secretary Robert Earl .............................................................................................................................. Treasurer Svenmr 1515mm The class of 1921 has taken a most Vital part in bringing the student life of the University of Oregon back to normal conditions. Being the first class to enter after the declaration of war in 1917, our ranks were sadly thinned during the following two years and those who were left carried on the struggle against overwhelming difficulties. In spite of these irregularities the upper classmen were never allowed to forget the existence of the ever-present freshmen class on the campus. As sophomores, we trained the incoming frosh in his appreciation of Oregon traditions. The beginning of the third stage found us With a realization not only of greater responsibilities in student activities but also greater obligations toward the attainment of a mightier Oregon. With pride we received those who were returning from service in the cause of democracy. With unbounded enthusiasm we strove to do our share in the reorganization of student affairs and the reviviflcation of the grand old Oregon Spirit. That growing, gripping loyalty to our Alma Mater brings up a strange mingling of emotions as we consider this, our last year at Oregon. We cannot overestimate the value of our college experiences. As we step out into the future we are ever-mindful of the ideals set before us at Oregon. It is our most sincere desire to exemplify these ideals as citizens of the Greater Democracy. 1 GEORGE HOPKINS. GP? ' : r '1; WWII Q . ............................. President .................... Vice-President ............................. Secretary 1 ............................. Treasurer - MARIAN ADY ............................................................................................................................ Eugene Delta Gamma Texy,n UH; Womeny Educational Club 6,43 President Studenty Art Club GD bringing the student nditions. Being the w ,917, our ranks were yl t those Who were 19f , WILLIAM POPE ALLYN .................................................................................................... Portland ' '; Phi Gamma Delta t1es. 110w ed $6 x . . n were nevera Phi Delta P111; Pre51dent Craftsmen OD; Captam R. O. T. C. 8,40 class on the campus. his appNCim0 lge found us. W 1tguat tudent activmeS 7i . ' Oregon- a mlghtler 'n the from SerVicel our we strove to d.0n0 the revivif'lcatlo KENNETH ARMSTRONG .................................................................................................. Portland Phi Delta Phi MILDRED AUMILLER .................................................................................. Yakima, Washington Delta Gamma Phi Theta Kappa FERRIS BAGLEY ...................................................................................................................... Salem str Phi Delta Theta 3r brings Up 21011, We Entered as Senior from Berkeley year at reg tepout . Wes CECILE BARNES ...................................................................................... Goldendale, Washmgton . on' nceS t OTEgthe Hendricks Hall 'tizenso Hermian Club; Class Basket Ball 1 41 . MAUD BARNES .......................................................................................................................... Dallas Chi Omega LYLE BARTHOLOMEW ............................................................................................................. Salem Bachelordon . MARY ELLEN BAILEY .......................................................................................................... Eugene I - Kappa Kappa Gamma Emerald Staff Uy2,3M Oreguana Staff 0,3;9; Historian; Theta Sigma Phi FELIX BELUSO .......................................................................................... Pontevadra, Capiz, P. I. JACK BENEFIEL .................................................................................................................. Portland Kappa Sigma Freshman Football 1916; Torch and Shield; Friars; Beta Gamma Sigma; Alpha Kappa Psi J. ARTHUR BERG .................................................................................................................. Portland - . Delta Theta Phi Order of the "O"; To-Lo-Ko; Gobblers; Newman Club; Freshman Baseball; Freshmen Football; Varsity Baseball 2,3,40; Varsity Football QBM Athletic Council CD 5 Hun 5u mg l w h... N N .................................... Dams DORA BIRCHARD Grants Pass Pi Beta Phi .........-----'Salem WILLIAM BLACKABY .......................................................................................................... Ontario , k351i- H Alpha Tau Omega 1 X '. Eugene ' ' MERLE BLAKE 1 ................................ I . one ... h Sigma Chi - Phi heta Slgma i A Camp; d ROBERT BOETTICHER ........................................................................................................ Albany ,.PonteVadra, Phi Delta Theta d ....Portlan -------------------- . DOROTHEA BOYNTON Eugene 113199;" Sigma Delta Phi . ma' Alp ma Sig ' Kwama d ,,,,,,, Fortlall VICTOR BRADESON Salem -------------------- en Sigma Chi shln 1' Te sebab . m nan Ba , 11611 Athletic u ANNAMAY BRONAUGH ...................................................................................................... Portland :53 Kappa Alpha Theta d Theta Sigma Phi; Emerald Staff CH 4k; WANDA BROWN ...................................................................................................................... Stayton . Hendricks Hall :5 Tre Nu; Womens Band 0,3M Student Council 0D "" U gm 0-0 LYLE BRYSON .......................................................................................................................... Eugene L i Kappa Alpha Theta -. M M ' ,.' News Editor Emerald, 6N Associate Editor Emerald, 00; Oregana Staff, QBM - .$. I Theta Sigma Phi; Tre Nu; Vice President Class 8M Secretary Student BodyUD; ?,h Nb. M ". 3 Student Council, 09; Executive! Council, 0D w Nut W ' ' a Q FRIDOLIN BUHOLZER .......................................................................................................... Eugene Cosmopolitan Club French Club; University Masonic Club; Honor Student History in bu RAYMOND BURNS ................................................................................................................ Coquille E Alpha Tau Omega President Class, UM Glee Club, Uik Orchestra, CH; President French Club, ID; V 'nx University Chamber of Commerce; Mu Z Ka W... !-H ' ' t . NORMAN BYRNE .................................................................................................................... Eugene X? ' Chi Psi Band, u, 2, BM Orchestra, Q, 3, 40; Crossroads, B, 4N Oregon Music Council, 0D; . N M g Honor Student Philosophy J ..................... Stayton ...,EuEW U Oregana Statidtli: cretary Student Bo: "HELIW story '1: "COM 0111M esident Fren WEugEfR 1 W M11510 n b ESTELLA CAMPBELL ................................................................................ Spokane, Washington Pi Beta Phi Entered as Senior from O. A. C. JOHN CANOLES .................................................................................................................... Lebanon Tau Kappa Alpha; Winner State Oratorical Contest, 2 VVILBUR CARL ........................................................................................................................ Portland Phi Delta Theta To-Lo-Ko; Tau Kappa Alpha; President University Forum; Varsity Debate, BM Winner Oratorical Medal, 8M Manager Track, 6M Executive Council, Q, 10; For- ensic Council, GD; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, Q, 3, 4D; Crossroads HELEN CASEY ...................................................................................................................... Roseburg Delta Gamma VIVIAN CHANDLER ...................................................................................... Dayton, Washington Class Basketball, 0, 2, 3M Vice-President W. A. A., QM Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, w, 30; Hermian Club; President Wome1fs League 00 THOMAS I. CHAPMAN .......................................................................................................... Eugene Beta Theta Pi Student Council, Q, ID; To-Ko-Lo; Class President, m; Phi Delta Phi; Secretary -Treasurer Order of 0", BM Secretary Treasurer Inter-fr aternity Council, on; Friars; Varsity Football, 01, 3, AD; Varsity Basketball, m, 3, 4d; All-Pacific Coast Guard CD; All-Northwest Guard, m, 3M Order of Blanket; Koyl Cup GENEVIEVE M. CLANCY ................................................................................................. Portland Gamma Phi Beta Entered as Junior from St. Marys College; Glee Club, 8, 4g; President Glee Club VD; Mu Phi Epsilon; French Club WILLIAM COLEMAN .......................................................................................................... Portland Sigma Chi Ph1 Delta Phi; Track Squad, 9, 3, 40; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet U3, 10 SPENCER COLLINS ............................................ Eugene Sigma Alpha Epsilon KENNETH COMSTOCK .................................................................................................... Sutherlin Phi Gamma Delta CLARA CORRIGAN ........................................................................................................ McMinriviue Kappa Kappa'Gamma 3 N h. N N: . . BEATRICE CREWDSON .................................................................................................... Portland Alpha Delta, Pi Entered as Sophomore. from Reed College; Eutaxian, OD; Athletic Association, 3 'L . ' I a 7'" N. ........................... Portland President Glee Club 2 ............ Portland ...... Eugene ...sutherlin DON D. DAVIS ............................................................................................................................ Nyssa Kappa Theta Chi Beta Gamma Sigma; Alpha Kappa Psi; Tau Kappa Alpha; Varsity Debate, 0, 3M Varsity Track Squad, Q, 0; Student Council, 00; Y. M .C. A. Cabinet, 00 W. WALDEN DILLARD .................................................................................................... St. Helens Delta Theta Phi Entered from Pacific University 1916 DOROTHY G. DIXON .............................................................................................................. Eugene Gamma Phi Beta Mu Phi Epsilon; Emerald "0,3 2 MILDRED DODDS ...................................................................................................................... Dufur LAURA DUERNER .............................................................................................................. Hillsboro Hendricks Hall Entered as Junior from Oregon State Normal School JACK DUNDORE .................................................................................................................. Portland Kappa Sigma Emerald, u, m; Band, u, 2, 3, M; Manager Oregana, QM Circulation Manager Oregana, BM Football Squad, m, 3, M; Class Treasurer, QM Executive Committee L90; Student Council, BM To-Ko-Lo; Friars RAY DUNN ................................................................................................................................ Eugene Phi Delta Theta EDWIN DURNO ........................................................................................................................ Eugene Phi Delta Theta Varsity Basketball, 12, 3, 41; Varsity Baseball Squad, 12, 3, 41; Order of "02; Student Council, 131; Friars; Torch and Shield; all-Coast forward ROBERT EARL ...................................................................................................................... Portland Kappa Sigma. Baseball Squad, 1915; Football Squad, 1915; Coach Senior Play, 1920; To-Ko-Lo; University Players; Mask and Buskin; Class Treasurer, 141 .WARREN EDWARDS ................................................................................................ Cottage Grove Beta Theta Pi HARRIS ELLSWORTH .............................. ' .............................................................. C ottage Grove Kappa Sigma Sigma Delta Chi; Ye Tabard Inn of Sigma Upsilon; To-Ko-Lo; Emerald Staff, 11, 21; Manager, 121; Oregana Staff, 12, 31; Manager Lemon Punch, 141; Glee Club, 13, 41; Lemon Punch Society, 141 ILLOYD ENLUND ................................................................ ; ................................................... Eugene Phi Delta Kappa, Entered as Junior from Oregon Normal UMV tM k. 11 .. 1hi . 5-,. H.Cottage GM --------- f 01 1d Stan , : . Emera its, Jammy Glee Club LC : , EDWARD S. EVANS ............................................................................. , ........................... Monmouth Kappa Theta Chi AMELIA ESPARZA ...................................................................................................... Ogden, Utah DONALD J. FEENAUGHTY .............................................................................................. Portland Beta Theta Pi Class Treasurer, UM Freshman Track Squad; Varsity Track Squad NANCY FIELDS ...................................................................................................................... Eugene Custodian Women,s Athletic Association, CD; Head of Archery, m; Treasurer Women,s League, GM Gerlinger Cup, 8M Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 0D; Tre Nu, 010; Head of Walking, 0D; Chemists, Club, On LEN BRYAN FISHBACK ................................................................... Monmouth Doughnut League Debate, Q, 33 Oregon Club BROWNELL FRASIER .......................................................................................................... Eugene Kappa Kappa Gamma JANET. FRASIER ...................................................................................................................... Eugene Kappa Kappa Gamma Kwama, m; Secretary Class, ON Mu Phi Epsilon; Eutaxian, 0D; Women,s Educa- tional Club JOHN GAMBLE, Jr. .............................................................................................................. Portland Phi Delta Theta To-Ko-Lo; Order of 0"; Historian Staff, 8, ID; Military Tributary, G3, AU; President Y. M. C. A., CD; Vice President Y. M. C. A., an Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, u, 2, 3, 4D; Treasurer of Class, GD; Junior Class Delegate to Des Moines Convention; Freshman Baseball; Varsity Baseball MILDRED GARLAND ............................................................................................................ Lebanon Kappa Alpha Theta B. O. GARRETT .................................................................................................................... Hillsboro kn. Beta Gamma Sigma; President Merrs Oregon Club, On; Orchestra, 0, 2J ml' EFFIE GIBSON ............................................................................................ Long Beach, California Rehm Hall "uh ISLA GILBERT ............................................................................................................................ Salem Hendricks Hall 1 a 'a M KN $. J . 2.52 MARION GILSTRAP .............................................................................................................. Eugene 1' Delta Gamma mews Educa- f . W0 11 AVE Mu Phi Epsilon; Scroll and Script; Mask and Buskin , I .4 4 '1 ..Portland 11; 1 LESTER GLADDEN ................................................................................................................ Eugene -------------- 1 -'u 1 . resident 13, 41, P2 3 41: LEOLA GREEN ............................................................................................................................ Baker line'F, 11, 395111121 Sigma Delta Phi entlon F1 Eutaxian; Y. W. C. A. Lebanon GEORGE GULDAGER .......................................................................................... Mobile, Alabama ................... Bachelordon Hillsboro ELIZABETH HADLEY .................................................................................................... The Dalles ----------------- Alpha Phi u, 21 1 California HELEN HALL .......................................................................................................................... Eugene I BeaC , Delta Gamma Secretary Triple A, 1916-17; Vice President Y. W. C. A., 1918; W0me1fs Educational Club ..88119111 1511 LOIS HALL .................................................................................................................................. Eugene Delta Gamma - President Zeta Pappa Psi, VD; Women's Doughnut Debate, 6, 4D; entered as Sopho- more from Stanford University a. 1W Maw". D ALICE HAMM ............................................................................................................................ Eugene Sigma Delta Phi Womerrs Intramural Debate, 13M Vice President Eutaxian, 0D; Oregana Staff, 0D MAYNARD UMIKEU H. HARRIS .................................................................................. Portland . Sigma Chi "a u. Phi Delta Phi; Track Squad, 0, 2, 30; Glee Club, 2 - ' m Ono. NORMAN HAYES ............................................................................................ White Salmon, Wash. MILDRED HAW-ES ................................................................................................................ Portland , Hendricks Hall , h". M. Scroll and Script; Zeta Kappa Psi; Eutaxian; Womerfs Educational Club; Intramural ' ""' aw . k Debates, m ' w... h: "'. a 3am RALPH c. HOEBER .......................................................................................................... Portland "V 5-. V Friendly Hall ' m- State Oratorical Contest QM Varsity Debate 8, AD; Tau Kappa Alpha; University Orchestra QM President 9., ID; Candidate for Honors Department Economics; en- tered as sophomore from Reed College "Nu 9:? xv ; 17 a 5$1 ?:7 ,,. N j g 5 f. Eur. I 1 - N i552 11 9m k "7 k r Ni" E I118 3' ;X W e .I .3; MARJORIE HOLADAY ........................................................................................................ Scappoose Y. W. C. A. Cabinet Bk President OD; Spanish Club; Treasurer 0D; Forum Re- porter my French Club; Women,s Athletic Association; Secretary Women s League GO; WomeWs Educational Club , CLAIRE HOLDREDGE .............................................................................................................. Trent .......... Eugene g4, L Delta Tau Delta """""""" ' 3 Varsity Soccer m; To-Ko-Lo; Condon Club; Crossroads; Honor Student OD Oregana Staff, W GEORGE HOPKINS ...................................................................................... Claremont, California Alpha Tau! Omega ............... Portland Glee Club O, 3, ID; President CH; President Oregon Music Council VD; Friars; Class """""" President Oh JOHN H. HOUSTON .............................................................................................. Klammath Falls onwaSh' Phi Gamma Delta Vice President Student Body on; Student Council GU; Vice President Y. M. C. A. QM Student Delegate to Des Moines Convention 83 Orchestra UM Band 0, 2, 30; White 331m d ...,......Portlall Emerald Staff m; Baseball Squad u, 2, 3, An; Basketball Squad a, 23 Assistant 1 ' Yell Leader Wk Assistant University Historian Ch; Order of uON Friars; Mask 1 club' Intramllra and Buskin; Torch and Shield na ' JOSEPHINE HOWE ......................................................................... Mansiield, Illinois Portland Kappa Beta Pi; A. B. from University of Illinois ------------------ ,1 WILBUR HULIN Eugene Universm Sigma Alpha Epsilon Alph , '05 en 93 owl E00 ment W xxx ; - r w i v - w! Q; 14m CAN -- N N rd 1. N 1 , . v . ?' 1 Q??- g. N N ' . 17' N l' 2' CLIVE HUMPHREY ........................ . ....................................................................................... Eugene Sigma Alpha Epsilon MILDRED HUNTLEY ..................................................................................................... Oregon Clty Q N Delta Gamma ,N u. .m w N i332, N hum M . K N i M NW A mm RACHEL ALICE HUSBAND .................................................................................................. Eugene V N Students Art Club CD; Secretary Treasurer Condon Club wgn 139$ 1L I N1, L 9y; VICTOR PIERPONT HUSBAND ........................................................................................ Eugene H1 h '- Condon Club; Y. M. C. A. '0 EVE HUTCHINSON .............................................................................................................. Portland L. Nb Kappa Alpha Theta . M JOE D. INGRAM ..................................................................... , ............................................... P ortland Phi Delta Theta N M c... . Phi Delta Phi; Glee Club N3, 40; President OD; Associate Editor Oregana CD; Y. M M. C. A. Cabinet 03, 4M Vice President Y. M. C. A. 0D; French Club on; Oregon Music Council N3, 1D x x 31' FRANCIS JACOBBERGER .................................................................................................. Portland Phi Delta Gamma JACOB JACOBSON .................................................................................................................. Eugene Kappa Theta Chi Sigma. Epsilon; Order of 0"; Emerald Staff 0, 3, LU; Emerald 0" w, 40; Freshman Baseball UM Varsity Baseball US, 4D; Interfraternity Council CLEO JENKINS ........................................................................................................................ Albany Sigma Chi EVA KELLY ........ 7 ................................................................................................................... Portland Kappa Alpha Theta HOWARD E. KELLEY .......................................................................................................... Portland Beta Theta Pi Oergana Staff OH University Orchestra UM Historian Committee 3 LETA D. KIDDLE ............................................................................................................. Island City Gamma Phi Beta Kwama; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 0U; Treasurer Y. 4W. C. A. GO n 'fvl" L 4i i ,MQA . '. .I: ,;. ,4 x R x 6-?- f elm - KEYTH KIGGINS .................................................................................................................... Portland -' , - Phi Gamma Delta . , Mo 4 HAROLD W. KING .......................................................................................................... Grants Pass . Friendly Hall ; University Orchestra GERMANY KLEMM ................................................................................................................ Eugene " Sigma Delta Phi t 'l '1'. W. C. A.; Students Art Club; Women's Educational Club H . ARNOLD H. KOEPKE ............................................................................................................ Athena Kappa Sigma Torch and Shield; Assistant Baseball Manager 3 CARL KNUDSEN .................................................................................................................. Portland Phi Gamma Delta MARGARET KUBLI .............................................................................................................. Portland Delta Gamma ...................... Portland . ............ Grants Pass ....... Enge119 ,...Ath9m ENID LAMB ...................................................................................................................... Scotts Mills. Rehm Hall Oregon Club; Oregon Club Baseball Team KENNETH LANCEFIELD ........................................................................................................ Amity Phi Delta Theta RUTH LANE ............................................................................................................................ Eugene Delta Zeta Class Tennis U, 2M Eutaxian; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet OD; Phi Theta Kappa MAUD LARGENT ................ Silverton Zeta Rho Epsilon Tre Nu; Hermian Club; Class Basketball U, 3M Class Swimming GB, 43 Orchestra U, 2, 3, 10; Oregon Music Council; WomeWs Athletic Association, Historian Staff 00; Varsity Basket Ball 0D BARKLEY LOUGHLIN .................................................................. . ................................... Porthand Kappa Sigma EARL USPIKEW LESLIE .................................................................................................. Coquille Sigma Chi Alpha Kappa Psi; Foot Ball 0, 2, Bk Baseball an Order of "0,3 Athletic Council I y , , AL CE 1.11GHTER .................................................................................................................. Portland Alpha Phi HARRY LINDLEY .............................................................................................................. Enterprise Sigma Alpha Epsilon KATHERINE LIVINGOOD .................................................................................................... Albany CARLTON K. LOGAN ............................................................................................................ Tualatin Phi Sigma Pi Sigma Delta. Chi; Emerald Staff 00 ELIZABETH LONDON ........................................................................................................ Portland Hendricks Hall Secretary Class 0D HELEN LOUGHARY ................................................................................................................ Dallas Delta Gamma ............... Portland ........... Enterprise ................. Albany ......... Tualatin ------ Portland .,,.Dallas .-xl - MIX? Q w ' 2 :2? g r n I g E ?; r lt- x141 l K m. G. STANLEY LOWDEN ...................................................................................................... Portland Kappa Theta Chi DOROTHY LOWRY ................................................................................................................ Eugene Delta Gamma LOIS MACY .............................................................................................................................. Portland Alpha Phi Kwamu CID; Y. W. C. A. u, 2, 3M President Pan-Hellenic BM Eutaxian Q, 3, 0; French Club 6, 4d; Spanish Club B, 1D ELMO MADDEN ............................................................................................ Kitano, Osaka, Japan Delta Tau Delta Student Council 8, 40; Vice President Student Body BM Varsity Soccer 02, in; JENNIE MAGUIRE ................................................................................................................ Portland Hendricks Hall University Historian OD; Tre Nu; Zeta Kappa Psi; Y. W. C. A, Cabinet 0U; Varsity Debate !3;; Intramural Debate 69; University Orchestra Q, 30; HAROLD MANNEL ................................................................................................................ Eugene k F l ,;:.N. --- Q 7' MIX x 1 " 14v? r '1: 7 "E.Sk ' w $41 I d A ' LEONA MARSTERS ........................................................................................................ Oregon City RICHARD MARTIN ............................................................................................................... Portland Mi: Beta Theta Pi Assistant Manager Oregana C30; Oregana Staff QM Historian Committee 3 , JOHN MATHESON ................................................................................................ Buell River B. C. . Sigma Nu 1 ; GLADYS MATTHIS .............................................................................................................. Corvallis i i Alpha Delta Pi v a 4, ' bg HELEN KERR MAXHAM .................................................................................................... Eugene LUCILE MCCORKLE ........................................................................................................... Portland ' Alpha Phi MCCROSKY LYLE 3?; '1 9! rm A d' SaLem Phi Gamma Delta Sigma Upsilon; Phi Delta PM E ...Oregon City 7 Friars ' xecutive Council BM Delta Tau Delta Cross Roads; Beta Alpha ROBERT R. MacKENNA Beta Gamma, Sigma; ,,,.Portland nittee W Washington 7 .Olympia I CKINNEY W ARD Beta Theta Pi .Prairie City MAN MEADOR MAS LY THO Kappa Theta Chi "Comllis .Portland SSNER VIEI ORNA F L P' Beta Phi 1 Eugene KELSON IC I J. ODINE "Eugene Alpha Tau Omega 61 "Portland k Kn F 4' . W77 5: 11:3? ROW" w x3; A.Ss k h ,5 w ; i gagzl ' $ LAURA MOATES .................................................................................... Ridgefield, Washipgton a , A35 Hendricks Hall d" Pot and Quill t2, 3, 40; President GU; Eutaxian Q, 3, 4M Treasurer VD; Spanish y Q Club Q, 3, ZH; Editor 00; Edison Marshall Rewards; Oregon Club; Honor Student ' 'ka Rhetoric MAR Y SPEER MOBLEY ................................................................................ Williams, California " J Hendricks Hall Entered as Junior from University of Montana CAROL CONTENT MONTAGUE .................................................................................... Portland .. I, Kappa Alpha Theta i I Q! MARY E. MOORE .................................................................................................................... Eugene Sigma Delta Phi Class Basket Ball UM Y. W. C. A. Cabinet UN Y. W. C. A. Treasurer m; Tre Nu; Vice President UN Womenk Athletic Association C M REUEL MOORE ...................................................................................................................... Eugene Phi Sigma Pi NEIL L. MORFITT .................................................................................................................. Malheur - Sigma Nu gk 5 3.. Torch and Shield; Order of "0"; Spanish Club; Emerald Staff u, m; Baseball; " N . Clue Vars1ty Football u s. 5. u... .n V!!- n- x I 1d, Washington ' er 00; 59331511 Honor Student iams, California .......... Portland ....... Eugene r m; Tre Nu; ....Eugene "Malhem eball'y m; Bag ? ? ! QW- r ; ' 14v! r 1:7 . .R 2, V; w: G. RUSSELL MORGAN ...................................................................................................... Hillsboro Entered as Senior from Northwestern College of Law; Delta Theta Phi AUSTRID MORK .................................. '. ......................... : ...................................................... Portland Alpha Phi ETHEL MURRAY .................................................................................................................. Portland Alpha Delta Pi WANDA NELSON ............................................................................................................ McMinnville Chi Omega DONALD R. NEWBURY ........................................................................................................ Medford Sigma Nu Delta Theta Phi; Friars; To-Ko-Lo; Student Council On; Glee Club O, 2, 2D MINNIE L. NOLAN ................................................................................................................. Beaver Entered as Junior from Oregon State Normal. School; Oregon Club - 63 1! ? ! mg . qr ' ; XE - WE.$ V w V2, . Y'I' ; g: $?- IA g ' Q W d' , CARL NYGREN .......................................................................................................................... Albany ANNA GRACE PALLETT .................................................................................................. Portland - r 1 Kappa Alpha Theta LILLIAN PIERSON .................................................................................................................. Eugene Pi Beta Phi ELMER PENDELL .................................................................................................................. Eugene Friendly Hall EDITH PIRIE .......................................................................................................................... Portland Pi Beta Phi EVERETT PIXLEY .................................................................................................................. Eugene Phi Delta Theta h- AURORA POTTER CLARES POWELL H. RAMBO MAEBELLE RAMONT Class Football UM Phi Delta Phi .................................................................................................................. Eugene Delta Gamma Mu Phi Epsilon; Glee Club; Orchestra 0, 2, 3,19 ............................................................................................................ Monomuth Kappa Theta Chi EARL POWERS ........................................................................................... , ............................... Eugene Sigma Alpha Epsilon XVILLIAM C. RALSTON ...................................................................................................... Portland g Phi Gamma Delta ............................................................................................................................ Eugene . Sigma Nu .................................................................................. Modesto, California Delta Delta Delta 65 V5 3.. $ 1.3. T 1' ,f :1 ' - '43.? Q t .- l , A 9. y - ,g'; xb$s pkg; - 1'2 A I10 ....................................................................................................................... Portland Pi Beta Phi LAURA RAND G1ee Club O, 2, 3, 43 President on WILLIAM BILL REINHART .................................................................................... Salem Sigma Chi Friars; Alpha Kappa Psi; Torch and Shield; Athletic Council; Baseball m, 3, 40; . am .5. ,m Captain 00; Football QM Basket Ball an Order of 0" t M, A FRANKIE MARIE RIDINGS .................................................................... Eugene d ' Alpha Delta Pi , . I- , Zeta Kappa Psi; Treasurer Womerfs Educational Club BM Treasurer Womenhs .h- g... .. i a Athletic Association GU; Class Basketball M, 2N Eutaxian; Intersorority Debate Q, a 2 I .5. NAOMI ROBBINS .................................................................................................................... Molalla Alpha Delta Pi V VERNICE ROBBINS .................................................................................................... Oregon City ' 'w- . Gamma Phi Beta LOETA ROGERS .......................................................................................................... Independence .' Alpha Delta Pi Vice President Oregon Club UN Varsity Swimming Team m; Womenk Band QM "h . Nam 3 Captain Sophomore Swimming Team QM The Company of University Players 6, t0; ' "x 1... Head of Swimming for University Women QM Vice President of French Club 00 ...................... Portland 92 d' I x 4W ..............Salem , V' 3, n; a , , Baseball Q, ,,,,,, Eu:eue n'i Treasurer wow; 31 n'ority Debate t , ....Molam h-- ZONEWEISS ROGERS .................................................................................................. McMinnville Kappa Kappa Gamma ABE E. ROSENBERG .......................................................................................................... Portland Tau Kappa Alpha; Winner Inter-collegiate Oratorical Contest; Winner Northwest Inter-State Oratorical Contest UM Forensic Manager a, :0; Secretary Inter-Collegiate Oratorical Association CD IRENE RUGH ............................................................................................................................ Eugene '1 Pot and Quill; Mash and Buskin; Glee Club WILLIAM J. RUSSIS ............................................................................................................ Portland Friendly Hall Crossroads B, 10; Philological Society UM French Club 8, 4D; President GD; Cosmo- politan Club 00; President 00; Forum 0U; Historian Committee OD; Political Science Club 00 CARLTON SAVAGE .............................................................................................................. Waconda Friendly Hall President Student Body OD; Varsity Debate QM Forensic Council BM Tau Kappa Alpha; Friars JAMES H. SCHMEER .......................................................................................................... Portland Phi Gamma Delta 67 ..-x V 77' WWII Q . 1 4 14v? r 't; 7 w V; ' "x :x :. . lily; MAURICE N. SELIG ........................................................................................................... Falls Clty " Friendly Hall " Croosroads ". '4 " W h- VICTOR C. SETHER ............................................................................................................ Glendale Friendly Hall Alpha Beta; Mask and Buskin; The Company a .. 5. I BESSE SHELL ........................................................................................................................ Wallowa " H Sigma Delta Phi . . u. a "". I GEORGE F. SHIRLEY ................................................................................................ McMinnville Chi Psi . k in ARVOL SIMOLA ................................................................................................................... Portland .i. Phi Gamma Delta M i... . IMADELINE SLOTBOOM .................................................................................................... Portland Delta Gamma H Class Secretary GD; Kwama QM Tre Nu; Varsity Tennis M, 2, 3N University '. Title 31 H S Q S. E. Sigma Nu , Alpha. Kappa Psi; Order of 0"; Athletic Council; Torch and Shield; Football Squad U, 2, 3, 10; Basket Ball UN Track u, 2, 3M Band ................. Falls City I WILLIAM H. STEERS ...................................................................................................... The Dalles Phi Delta Theta IRENE STEWART .................................................................................................................... Eugene Delta Gamma Mask and Buskin OLLIE M. STOLTENBERG ................................................................................................ Hillsboro Hendricks Hall Trle Nu, Secretary Bx Y. W. C. A. Cabinet CD; Womens Athletic Association, President OD; Student Council 0D; Hermian Club tland MARJORIE STOUT .................................................................................................................. Eugene ............ por Phi Theta Kappa T. A. STRACHAN ................................................................................... , ................................... Dufur Portland Phi Delta Theta .................... Varsity Football 6M Order of "0 - rs Unlve .Eugene Spanish Club Q, 3, 40; President Oh; Students Art Club ULALA M. STRATTON . . n17 .. I a 1. Hm kagxl! 1: I, H'Jxm Q! 1' VVomeWs Educational Club VD ; k x II xi :'I 4!! !. 1 L 1 IIIIIV I :I 1Q WM .95. ay i x tau Portland LEE SUMMERVILLE Kappa Theta Chi ..Eugene RHETTA TEMPLETON Zeta Rho Epsilon Entered as Junior from Missduri Valley College ; Spanish Club ...Moro CLARA THOMPSON Chi Omega ............Portland ELVIRA THURLOW i Pi Beta Ph Hellenic President Pan .Roseburg ALICE THURSTON Pi Beta Phi $70.5 ............... Eugene tudent's Art Club ......... Portland ''''' Eugene VIRGINIA TOMLINSON .................................................................................. Haley Cottage Entered as Senior from McMinnVille College ..................... Albany MARY TRUAX ........................................................................................................................ Medford Susan Campbell Hall Emerald Staff 141 EMIL TSCHANZ ........................................................................................................................ Eugene MARY TURNER ........................................................................................................................ Eugene Sigma Delta Phi Scroll and Script; University Honor Society; Treasurer Eutaxian; tional Club; French Club RAYMOND E. VESTER .................................................................................... Sigma Chi EDWARD L. WARD ............................................................................................. Phi Delta Theta Women,s Educa- .................. Portland ............. The Dalles Torch and Shield; Architecture Club; Freshman Baseball, 1916-17; Freshman Football, 1916-17; Varsity Football 0D; Inter-fraternity Council 00 "71.1, A. - Ac: . GORDON WELLS .................................................................................................................... Eugene Phi Delta Phi HAROLD J. WELLS ................................................................................................................ Eugene Delta Theta Phi; B. A., U. of O. 1917; University of Besoncon 1917; Admitted to State Bar 1920 BLANCHE WICKLAND .................................................................................................... Hammond Gamma Phi Beta Entered as Junior from Reed College HOWARD WINES .................................................................................................................... Eugene . n t BALOISE H. WHITE ................................................................................................................ Portland 'h ' Gamma Phi Beta Entered as Junior from Reed College. r . A IRENE WHITFIELD ............................................................................................................ Portland Q V Ex h- Hendricks Hall Eutaxian, Women1s Educational Club ............................ Eugene ..................... Eugene 'r-l 1917; Admitted 10 ...... Hammoud ........ Eugen? "Portland GERTRUDE WHITTON .......................................................................................................... Eugene Delta Zeta ' Eutaxian; Spanish Club, Treasurer 6L secretary 0D RUTH WOLFF .......................................................................................................................... Portland Hendricks Hall ROLLIN WOODRUFF .......................................................................................................... Portland Delta Tau Delta JOHN WOODWORTH ........................................................................................................ Pendleton Beta Theta Pi MARVIN B. WOOLFOLK ...................................................................................................... Oswego Friendly Hall Entered as Sophomore from Pacific University DOROTHY WOOTTON ............................................................................................................ Astoria Gamma Phi Beta REX Y. YAMASHITA .................................................................................................... Kobe, Japan Friendly Hall EUNICE ZIMMERMAN ........... ......... Emerald Staff 8, Q ISOBEL FAITH ZIMMERMAN ...................... ....................................................................... Eugene .................................................................... Portland Delta Gamma Womems Educational Club BEATRICE WETHERBEE ............................. ....................................................................... Eugene Kappa Alpha Theta JENNIE PERKINS Emerald Staff .................................................................... Portland LIST OF SENIORS WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT APPEAR IN THE OREGANA: Lucile Elaine Johnston .................... Dufur Bessie Mittleman .......................... Corvallis Winona Stone .................................... Eugene Paul David Stone ............................ Eugene Veronica Tracy Tracv Robert Bradshaw .............................. Eugene Peter Lincoln Spencer .................. Ashland LeRoy E. Detling .................. Gridley, Cal. Boyd West Haynes ...... Hutshinson, Kans. Harlan B. Holmes ....... : ................ Ashland Dean F, Moore ........ Homer Morninweg ............................ Halsey Frank J. Palmer .......................... Philomath Cecil F. Robe ............ Junction City Albert Runquist ............ Aberdeen, Wash. Peter Christensen Dorothy Foster .............................. Portland Reuben Goffreiere ........................ Portland Hazel Marie Hauck ............ Seattle, Wash Reuben Ratner ........ San Francisco, Cal. Merritt Whitton ............................ Portland .......................... Eugene f. 'z ., K9; :gaw ! K Xx iObe, Japan --------- Eugene ...... Portland ......... Eugene ....... Portland R EGAN A: ........... Halsey ....Philomath .-- ; Lt AN gN .1; Q :TWwi'AQigl x K . 5 I ' ' Y M. : ' P s, :1.ka I; an. n fwvi'w' -56??- v7 I A . 79 i 7' u' filw'l? , r .i Z? QM? "5,! gs i 3:: M. x a" ,w f sf r 1:4 r '1'; .. ixakpum: V; i ,x $prling2r 011111 In the fourth year of its existence as a permanent trophy on the campus of the University of Oregon, the Gerlinger cup offered by Mrs. George T. Gerlinger, member of the Board of Regents, to the best all around J unior woman was awarded to Nancy Fields at the J unior Promsof 1920. Miss Fields is a pre-Medic major. In her sophomore year she served as custodian of the Womanis Athletic Association. As a J unior, she was head of archery, and treasurer of the Woman,s League. She is also a member of Tre Nu, the Chemists, club, and the Y. W. C. A. cabinet. Scholarship as well as college activities is considered in making the award of the Gerlinger Cup. ' Kngl Clan The seventh man to receive the Koyl Cup, offered by Charles W. Koyl, to the best all around Junior man, was Thomas I. Chapman, the award being made at the J unior Prom of 1920, along With that of the Gerlinger Cup. "Nishii Chapman is a major in law. As a sophomore and senior, Chapman served on the student council. He was president of the J unior class. He served on the Varsity 'football team' When a sopho- more, junior and senior; also on the basketball team these three years. In his second year he was named all Pacific Coast guard; all Northwest guard for this year, and his third year as well. He is a member of Beta Theta Pi, To-Ko-Lo, Phi Delta Phi, and Friars. Newbury Skeels Howard Euniur LEizimrg Carl N ewbury ........................................................................................ President Margaret Phelps .......................................................................... Vice-President Marvel Skeels ........................................................................................ Secretary Martin Howard ............. . ....................................................................... Treasurer The world war and influenza epidemic were not enough to keep the class of 1922 from distinguishing itself during three years at the Uni- versity. The first year of Our college life was more or less of a struggling one With University activities and student life taking second place to military training. Ante-bellum brought recruits from previous classes Which increased our number so that we now boast more students than any other class. In college activities of every kind, especially sports, the J unior class has been unusually well represented. Both men and women have entered the field of every kind of activity, thus making the J unior class known by the ability of its members. The final test of What the J uniors can do Will come at the J unior week- end of 1921, Which promises to be the biggest one ever staged because of the fact that it Will be the first time that a Pacific Coast track meet has ever been held in Eugene during a J unior Week-end celebration. 1 Kb Eh ! t 'RM A'. 1 ! .m'hhthkTh'.. Howard .......... President .Vice-President .......... Secretary ......... Treasurer gh to keep the rs at the Um. struggling oni hich increaSed ther class. he J unior class xi 1 :uf-fgggi "a F l Vi Ace Eggleson used to take public speaking with a view of trying it out on the sorority houses, but it didnit work, so he adopted a line of his own. Ace never borrowed anything in his life except the stiff collar he had his picture taken in. Mart Howard is the captain- elect of our football team for next year. He can always be depended upon at end on the football field as well as at the end of 11 oiclock Thursdays, as he may always be found among the frosh diseipliners at that time. Mart swings a nasty pad- dle. This is a good picture of Maurine Elrod as she herself or the photographer will tell you. She is serious minded and is given to holding up the Alpha Phiis house grades. Maurine may be found in any number of collegiate activities. Zelda Hamilton is an educa- tion major and it is her firm de- sire to end up teaching school under a higher wage than the janitor receives. Stay with it, Zelda, wages are coming down, but not salaries. Hank Evans is a clever R.O. T.C. officer and his chief delight is in running the demerit book. ttCarnytt Carncross packed up his pen and ink not so very long ago, kissed University of Cali- fornia goodbye and here he is. He has a bad habit of blossom- ing into verse at unexpected moments but when it comes to custodian of the kick depart- ment of "Lemmytl he is there. Dorris Sikes earned the name of ttScoopt, around the journal- ism shack and could gather a news story before others had lo- cated an ink bottle. She is with the Salem Capital Journal just now but will be with us again 'one of these days. The whole world smiles when Pat Pittenger smiles-it cant help it. She is one of the happy moments in Guild hall plays. Ask her about Pinney in "Huck Finnit and she will tell you that one foot is just as good as two from a tiniggertsil standpoint. Here's Alex Brown; we knew held get here, as he gets a look in on all big occasions. Alex may be seen on the campus al- most any morning after 10 A. M. with his sombrero, putting one foot in front of the other. He is chuck full of journalism but why talk-look through the book. We looked Helen Rosels name up in the directory and asked :1 few Kappas about it but they all seem to be satisfied with the name of Helen, so we guess she hasn't any nickname. We could think of all kinds of puns on Esther Fell's name, but we wonlt. She is somewhat serious minded and. is all mixed up in Commerce. It is her ama bition to be a second Hetty Green, but we will bet that she doesn't become one. Ralph Burgess has become a consistent pigger since his ireshman year and he plans later on in life, they say, to donate fabulous sums to co-edu- cational purposes that others may profit. Ray Kinney is the tall, lanky Junior with the corduroy pants who is seen but seldom heard. He gets more pleasure out of his Spanish class than any other known means of torture and like the rest of us, he grins and bears it. Dorothy Dickey is about the only person we have seen yet Who registers a thinking mood when her picture was taken. Dorothy is a regular little dickey-bird when it comes to singing. We haventt much to say about Adelaide White, as she hasnlt many funny spells, except flo she majors in English Lit. She also was tempted to change to Commerce during the great rush but she is glad that she didnt do it now. Haz Smith is the first Emer- ald editor to turn out a success- ful daily at the University of Oregon, and he deserves a good deal of credit. Haz also helps run the Lemon Punch and a dozen other activities during his spare time. The lad with the handsome white collar is no other than Roscoe R o b e r t s, sometimes known as iiCaesar". Because of his name he is often confused with others but when you once know him you will never con- fuse him. He has a copyright all of his own. Babe Leavitt spends almost all of her time around the journals ism building and she would as soon write as eat, which is a happy circumstance as good journalists seldom have time to eat, anyway. Violet Crandall is no relation to Slim Crandall although Slim usually claims everything in sight. Violet is a French major and gets a great deal of enjoy- ment out of it. Compliments to Prof. Cloran. Jim Say sometimes has a hard time distinguishing himself from ordinary conversation but he doesnlt mind it much. Jim is a good dependable ball player and we wouldn't be surprised to see him make his letter one of these days. Mark him well; its the same one only he has graduated from a basketball suit. Marc Latham, as the elite call him, entertained the University with a deluxe brand of basketball this season and he is one of the Varsityls mainstays. Ruth Mellinger comes from Newburg and will tell you that the buildings there are much prettier than in Eugene. History is her pet diversion and she can tell you all the important dates that ever happened in the his- tory of the University. iiLet ler buck Nelson" has no end of. pep and radiates it around the campus in the form of activities of all kinds, mostly committee meetings. Her major is commerce, her minor picnics. Willie Coates majors strong in Commerce and his chief pleas- ure is in watching the receiv- ing teller in the banks take in paper. He aspires to be more than a bank watchman, how- ever, and some day he may be found running a mint all of his own. - Bill Sharkey is often mistaken for the janitor because he car- ries tobacco, but this is nothing against Bill as he is serious minded through Without and even hopes to go his last term in college carrying an hour. If Marvel Skeels only had a pair of wings attached to lzer shoulders now she would look just like a valentine, wouldnit you Marvel? Marvel, aside from her delightful personality, is an exceptional singer. Here we have Eunice Eggle- son. After speaking of Ace the way we did we ought to apolo- gize to Eunice, but we know she enjoyed it, too, and is willing to let it drop. Max Himelfarbe took the R. 0 T. C. so seriously that he has never gotten over it. However, he is going to be a doctor, so some day he may be able to cure himself. Jim Whitaker may be found registered in almost any Com- merce course. He cant take much more Cdmmerce without moving his tooth brush in too. Jim doesnit intend to teach school. Nell Southworth is vitally in- terested in English Literature, and being so, is an exceptional girl. Not being exceptional writers we except ourselves from further comment. Elalia Titus, strange as it may seem, is absorbing Greek as a major requirement. This is something we cannot under- stand, so we will have to let it pass undisputed. Don McDonald looks as if he had been taken by surprise. Don has a sense of humor and aspires to be an attorney. As good attorneys must have a funnybone we will give Don a V and pass him on.. I! 'H 'l b ltxizl 3H5. J a Q l '33.! i t M A ,1 .hxl 77' French Moore expects to be a doc. some day and heal bones, but all he has done so far is to break them, as it costs quite a bit to go to school nowdays. Some day he Will tell his grand- children how hard he worked in college and the Sigma Nuts will back him up. I Q"?! 7 I rig? w x4, Ii?b A V r K.Ss Ruth Austin believes that wo- men Will eventually control the press and so majors in Journal- ism. If all women write stories the way she does the men had better shake hands with the pro- fessions now. Somebody ought to give Ruth Flegal a card index for Christ- mas, for she has participated in so many activities that it is hard to remember them on the. finger tips. Ish is the Chinese for Edward Bentley and it was originated by the late Toy, Sigma Nu cook. Ish understands Chinamen better than he does engineering, but What can you expect in two years. Carl minors in baseball and When it comes to saving the op- posing team the trouble of run- ning around the bases, Carl is a great little time saver. Mabel Smith is distinguished from the rest of the Smiths be- cause she majors in music. She first manifested musical tenden- cies about fifteen years ago by putting the loud pedal on the piano out of whack, but she has since gotten over that. Lelaine West is one of the army of West sisters, and when it comes to week-end activities, Janet and Virginia haveift any- thing on their big sister. Horace Westeriield looks as if he were daring the photog- rapher to do it, but when he gets back his ttcords,l he will smile again. Horace is another Com- merce disciple and is out after the greenbacks. Clyde Davis finds a lot to worry about in Economics, but at that he manages to pack around a grin outside of Econ Classes. Clyde is a hard worker and a dependable man. Gladys Lupher can tell you just why you ought to live in Eugene, and she would like to apply her chemistry here after she graduates. We expect to find her as proprietor of a drug store before long. Here we have Beatrice Hens- ley, of North Bend, Ore. Bea- trice is very much involved in English Literature, but at that one seldom finds her spending her week-ends in the library. Arthur Hicks and J. Miller, the poet, both hail from Can- yon City, Ore, and when it comes to filling st shoes Art does it to perfection, for he leads the University in scholar- ship every year. The dignified looking gent is Gene Kelty. Gene gets a fiend- ish pleasure out of contributing to the Lemon Punch, but aside from this he is a good journal" ist and one of these days he will start a battle of his own, in journalism. Madge Calkins is the original ttjoy girl" and she wears the same smile every day of the week. Music has made some people sour, but it doesnit seem to have affected Madge. Elsie Lawrence is rather quiet as is becoming of a Botanist. Sometimes, however, she forgets Botany and majors in public speaking for a time. She has just the right combination, though, and every one likes her. Elston Ireland is the first half of the Ireland combination. Elston is a hard worker in track and is a man of exceptional ability. He and his grin have become a part of Oregon tradi- tion. MWCV P 4 r :13; :3 2K!" 7 9 K m: Frank Hill will be remembered for the high class brand of foot- ball he played last year. Frank is a hard worker and is going to be one of Oregonis strong points next year on the gridiron. Wanna McKinney is editor of this volume, so we have to be more particular about the truth. Wanna is an enthusiastic jour- nalism major and if hard work gave her her pleaSing personal- ityewe are in favor of hard work. One instinctively connects Ruth Grifiin with ttArizona." She first demonstrated her dra- matic ability in Prof. Reddieis class in itHuCk Finn? and ever since that time has ranked high in University dramatic produc- tions. The lad with the funny face is Stan Eisman. He is of variable temperaments, however, as he never knows whether the next issue of ttLemmy" will find favor or Iind him out looking for a job. Stan doesnit know whether to go into journalism or janitor work. Floyd Bowles is trying hard to look unconcerned, but it is rather embarrassing, we will ad- mit. Floyd is a dependable track man and has made a name for himself at Oregon. Eleanor Spall and the ttSpall smile" are well known on the campus. Eleanor used to take a lot of interest in journalism and we were going to spring a good joke about her majoring in journalism, but we found she majors in Botany now. 7 Madelene Logan looks rather unconcerned and for the fact that she majors in Arts we can think of nothing else against her. Madalene has a pleasing person- ality and she is well liked. Carl Newbury is a well-known young man, being junior class president at the present time. Carl is a good talker and a good student and with the two ought to be at least president of a to- bacco company. Harold Lee dared us to write something funny about him. About the funniest thing he does is taking English Literature and swear, but every man has his short-comings and Harold is really a good student-so to to speak. Myrtle Anderson is one of those students who help make classes worth holding. Chemis- try is her chief delight and if she doesnit blow something up before she graduates she ought to make a great success of it. Unlike most Bills, Helen Hooperis Bills come once per day, and sometimes oftener, but Helen is a wonder at Romance Languages and has many other accomplishments but lack of space prevents and Helen is modest anyway. The toothpaste ad is no other than Frank Short. The photog-- rapher is telling Frank a funny story and he is just getting ready to laugh. Frank is art editor on the Lemon Punch and is a hard worker. Sid Haysiip buries himself in a cloud of dust on the track. He majors in Architecture, but is thinking of changing it to Mili- tary Tactics as he has always missed the R. O. T. C. more or less ever since he graduated from it. Lulu Rasor gets keen enjoy- ment out of open house. Lulu lives in Eugene and when the ignoramus ask her at the be- ginning of: the term, "When did you get back?" she has a choice answer ready to hurl. Elsie Marsh is probably think- ing of the number of bacteria in front of the camera lens. She is a major in Botany and Bac- teriology, but from her sunny disposition one would never think she thought about germs. Wayne Akers is another fast track man and the Betas have a hard time trying to keep him from walking in his sleep. He hangs around the school of com- merce between classes and makes dates during his thought- less moments, thereby being an all-around man. Arnold Chaimov doesnit make hlmself very conspicuous but he is a hard worker in pre-medics and ought to accomplish the un- usual feat of graduating with his class. The boy with the genial smile is Forest Littlefield. Florrie, in spite of hard grind, is going to be a lawyer, and he may be found around the law library on almost any rainy afternoon. Margaret Phelps doesn,t make very much noise but she can say a whole lot in a few words. She is a music major and has to as they are taught to measure their words there. Alta Kelly isn,t paying much attention to the photographer, but is looking at the little bird, as directed. Johnny Dierdorff was respon- sible for the melange of wit in the rear of the book. He has a sense of humor that is apt to break out almost any time, so on the Oregana and other publica- tions he is perfectly at home. Remey Cox needs no introduc- tion, though he usually takes one in a debate. He is one of Oregonts most dependable Var- sity debaters and nothing de- lights him more than picking to pieces opposition speeches. Curly Lawrence, like the crook, works nights and sleeps during the day. He can be found down at the Emerald of- fice almost any evening hashing over stories. Curly is a good 11ttle hasher. Nora Maclay is right there when it comes to a sweet. dis- position and lots of Oregon friendliness. . 1.. ,. mxfff I x - .3 I QR" .a..x IA. . 95$ 5 J. 1 $ le' 6? ;$ .zaiagga- .3; 'E 'ix 1?! QB. 7.4? i 4 K V With the assistance of the graphite method and a borrowed stiff collar, Ermine Gentle is able to be with us today. Lest this sound libelious we take it all back as Ermine is quite a student after all. Vera Henderson is said to have lofty ideas and foreign mis- sionary work occupy most of her thoughts. She can usually be found talking to an education professor. Geraldine Pilkington aspires to be a school marm and per- haps later marry a janitor. However, the Thetas are gradu- ally taking the thought out of her head and she Will probably end up by writing books on Latin and Mathematics. instead. We knew Bill Smith would get here somehow. Bill is well sarv- islied With just about everything in life with the exception of Spanish, which he claims is a ball and chain to him When he is in a hurry. Roscoe Hemenway is a fast track man as well as a good Camel Walker. He may be found in action afternoons and Saturday nights at the armory. He looks rather disappointed in this picture, but that is the way he always looks. Emma Garbade is one of the most pleasant girls around the Kappa house, as any of the sisters Will tell you. Emma in- tends to be a school teacher, al- though she may change her mind. Rae Peterson usually speaks for herself, so there is no use trying to introduce her. She is an English major, is fond of walking andebut ask Roscoe, he is just above and keeps a card index. Emerald Sloan is a hghting Irishman and he didnit get his first name from the college newspaper. Emerald is a good track man as well as a com- mander in the R. O. T. C. 90 it t W F??? S .11 i Y - u". yr Q 2 q "' .Z'Te?$. .1 $ . t: x, K xV Veryle Jones looks as though he were a happy-go-lucky lad, but he is really very serious minded. Veryle is generally at peace With the world except when someone hits him in the ear in boxing and that makes him mad. , Louis Dunsmore is the tall, handsome Swede of the Junior class. In spite of this handi- cap, he has been consistently turning out for track and foot- ball. Florence Furuset intends to be a physical education instructor, and Well say she is going to make a good one. Florence has a habit of making good at everything she tries. Leo Cohen has been with us for the last three years and is getting to be a permanent fix- ture on the campus. His chief joy is handball, his chief disap- pointment, Commerce. Here we have a student who risked a soft collar to get heree- Art Larson. Art is a sprinter of rare ability as well as an all- around good fellow. Max Schafer finds the walk from the Sigma Nu house to the campus an invigorating one, es- pecially after ten A. M. Max is apt to make a name for himself in something one of these days. One can tell by looking at Gene Tillotson that she is a math shark. She is good in just about everything else as well as a hard worker. Jim is giving the camera that soulful expression he treats his professors With at eight o'clock. Jane Huson reminds one of determination and when it comes to mastering everything on the term schedule that is takeable, Jane does it and still manages to have a good time. Our next object of attack is Mr. Lucas, familiarly known as ttD. Bi, ttD. B." is going to be- come a physician and he has already learned to roll the bones with the best of them. Next on the list we have Dr. Thomas, himself, sometimes known as Irvin, if one desires to wax familiar. Irvin has ab- sorbed so much pre-medics that he feels like going in every time he sees a scarlet fever sign, which is a bad sign. George LaRoche, as you can tell from the diplomatic expres- sion of the face, is one of our coming lawyers. Nothing de- lights Georvg'e more than a con- tvoversy at law, and divorce cases are mince pie for him. Gene Ferris is learning to be a broker, as he iigures that is the best way to get the hot cakes every morning. Now and then Gene loosens up his joints on the track and causes :a ripple of ex- citement. Birehard VanLoan claims no relationship to the writer of coon stories, but he is there when it comes to talking about pills and whoopingcough. Bir- chard is a promising young phy- smian. This little ray of sunshine is Ronald McIntosh, Who hopes some day to buy a saw and carv- ing knife to use on humanity in general. Introducing Dr. McIn- tosh. Youtre welcome, Mac. Tiny Shields has many and varied athletic accomplishments and came here all the way from Cape Horn, Wash, as a person- al representative. 77' "WIS Q t V5 , " 14v- r'ui .- -xQ V . Rukhw pa, "X x 5 i4 Atory than poems. sh a w " A r. . k'yr .. -. 0-. 11". 15-1 u xA - I xx klleiQh wbxx g't'$ k "W 3 $7.21 1.x a w y , 4 , ,V. y gjd 1N i "7A 1.9 l 5 i; g ' N 4 5! i '- V a r ' J a l - . iv o ' i :9. a T; Ill; r 7x i 3? hi I 7 I 'i ll r i Hank Beller played his second successful season of Varsity basketball and is a steady, con- L-istent player. We all have our worries, though, and Hankis is the school of commerce which he claims "wont give him a rest". Ruth Tuck lives in Eugene now and she has a good time telling strangers what a good time she had when she went to O.A. C. Ruth has a pleasant disposition and believes in hum- orinvg one. We might easily take Mildred Ferguson for a poetess from the thoughtful expression on her face, but reluctantly we must ad- mit that she is a historian. Still as the school of commerce would say, there is more money in his- It is Dorian Pattersonis ambi- tion to become secretary of every club he joins. When he canit find anything else to do he takes down the minutes of the clock, which may account for his mathematical ability. Sandy Kays wanted to wear his dress suit for this event but the odds were against him. He is much in evidence in Univer- sity pigvging circles and when he is not so engaged spends his spare time on all three of the University publications. uSay it with flowers" is his motto. Echo R. Balderee comes from Dallas, a suburb of Salem, and although practically a cherrian she says that she prefers dates much better since coming to Oregon. Velma Ross always reminds us of someone but we canlt think who it is so we will have to talk about something else. Velma came from Marshfield high school but that was quite a while ago. Since that time she has been conducting Eng. Lit classes at the Pi Phi house. Jack Newhall claims that he knows less than when he came here but you never can tell about these modest boys. Arouse his enthusiasm and he will tell you of the days when he drove Pres. Campbellls car around, and his experiences. h.glh. E;- ib' . l WWII Q t as i v '7 JAA r13, n.35 a . vky p - A Eleanor Coleman is a typical Oregon "Helloil girl and her chief delight is in serving time on committees of all descrip- tions. She is popular on week- ends also, as the worn out Pi Phi telephone would groan. Hilma Fox goes by the name of tiFoxy" around the Kappa house and some of the freshmen call her "Foxy Grandma" be- cause she has never been fooled on April foolls day. "Foxy" always has a pleasant word for everyone and is well liked by all. They used to call Don Port- wood itFoodii over at the Belt house because he went so high on the pole vault last season. If anyone would like to get some interesting information on the trials of house managing ask Don for hes the man that starved the D. T. D. , The intelligent face is none other than Bib Hoyt, the silent humorist of the Phi Delt house. Big Bib makes all the noise but little Bib gets all of his humor out of the Ad building, where he is in a position to receive "probs." and posts first hand. Mary Carter never says very much but when she does others say that she makes a person feel foolish. We might say that she was an unusual woman but that might bring up the problem of ttthe last wordti again. We guessed that Olga Wik- ber-g was going to be a school teacher and when we'looked it up and found that she was maj- oring in Education we congratu- lated ourselves. Olga comes from Salem .and likes cherries as well as anyone. John Finneran always wears a patient look on his face when he has his picture taken. They call his Santa Claus around the Fiji house because he is always giv- ing his things away. Dick Shim is small but, oh my, what a drive he carries in his arm! Dick is in a class all by himself when it comes to clever DitChing and with a little more weight could make them all take a back seat. . Dorothy McGuire always spends the ten minutes between classes expanding the McGuire smile. And it isn't the mail order variety, either, as anyone can testify. Arnold Anderson is from San Jose, California. Journalism claims his attention at Oregon, and some day he may surprise the old home town. Here we have Hugo Reed of Astoria. Hugo is taking chem- istry at this institution and has a plan whereby fish can be can- ned by chemical process but that is another story and we will leave it to him to work out. This is Mildred Apperson. She is not the automobile manufac- turer, but she is a botanist of some note. She also helps to keep the Kappa sisters in order. One cannot look at Wanda Daggett without thinking of de- bating for the whole University knows of the famous Daggett rebuttals. Lately, however, Wanda has been taking an inter- est in commerce. Hope to hear you debate again, Wanda. Horton Beeman is an all- around good fellow and, although he claims no relationship to the chewing gum magnate, he will tell you that his uncleis grand- father came over on the Titanic. Here's a funny Guy. Guy Sacre is usually found in the journal- ism building except when he gets nervous, then he comes out for air and paces the campus for awhile. Guy can write anything from a morgue assignment to a bank fire. Let us have more women from Tacoma, Washington. Lydia Beardemphl is from there, .and Lydia is a girl with a mighty sweet disposition. i it Am? Q .. F ,ax h 3M7! - ws.$ r. g XxKVk Fa, Henry Judd is one of the fas- cinating lifes of the University. Henry has some fair ideas at times and nothing delights him more than expounding his ideas to docile people. Dick Sundeleaf tells his teach- er that he wants to be an arch- itect. Then he turns right around and plays in the movies on the Kappa Sig porch. Some day Mack Srennett will grab him -if some woman doesnt Betti Kessi is great on stu- dent activities-a few of which are the girls glee club and rhetoric. She is one of Oregonts interesting girls and fully enjoys her college life. A juggler of Indian clubs and various gym contraptions and impedimenta. is Carolyn Cannon. Some day she may be teaching the class. Horace Hair immigrated here from Grants Pass for the pri- mary purpose of taking English. Horace is a good student and is possessed of a pleasing person- ality. ,This young man, with the high intellectual brow, has joined "the legion 0f the lost ones". Bein-g interpreted, this means that tiChuck" Huggins has plant- ed a pin+or intends to plant one. Louise Hassan lives in Eugene and takes Latin. She is present at all of the student activities and is a strong supporter of Oregon. She is the wife of a prof, but she holds that this is no handi- cap in the study of sociology. Mrs. V. R. McDougle is her name. P 39 w 4.x k: x . l V IN f an . , mmng' '7X 1, l Nell Warwick looks as if she were always thinking of some- thing funny but that is better than looking dewy eyed most of the time as some of our co-eds are prone to register. Nell is the official joy girl of the Pi Phis as well as of the campus. Aulis Anderson is the girl with the sunshiny hair, and the sun- shiny smile to match. If you don": believe it take a look at the picture. And she lives right here in Eugene, too. This distinguished personage is not Rev. Herbert Geary at all but H. Geary, of the school of commerce. Herbert thinks the music of the cash register is sweeter than the organ but he may be reformed yet as he is young and Willing. When the thunder of an asth- matic chariot is heard rumbling down 13th St. the children run for shelter. Fear not, little ones, it is but Carl Meyers in his model 1900 Busterbend. Mae Ballock has the knack of creating a pleasing first impres- sion and holds it as long as you know her. The Thetas are quite proud of her and would like to arrange her program week-ends but Mae has a mind of her own. Eugene has never produced anything but college students but there is about to be produced here a great journalist. Frances Quisenberry is one of the shackis best workers and Dean Allen would recommend her to the ghost of Horace Greeley. We had a snappy write-up for Dave but couldnt tind it at the last minute. Dave Baird usually turns up missing when wanted. He keeps his suitcase at the Kappa Sig house and during his spare moments studies zoology, his future. Wesley Frater looks as if he might make a great actor but he is too fond of movies and he and Fergus Reddie do not even know each other. Wes is a great little commerce shark, however, and hopes to graduate with his class. .....95.a V- a -- .mw" . 4 . w A-t...g...im-s.-A- V Quest. sh x. 5 see: a r. 5.7a g i "MIX Q ' I 12;? a3 .'. w, VQK $4, - A ste I 9 Qt g 92;; '0 Lois Barnett comes from Was- co, Ore. We might creat a nfaux pas" now and say that we never heard of that place before but that would be indiscreet so that instead we will say that Lois is making a name for herself in physical education and let it go at that. Walter Wagner is a serious lad when he is asleep but when awake he can make as much trouble as the rest of the com- merce students. His chief de- light is to face a class in sales- manship and unburden his mind. Here we have the walking del- egate of the Delt house, Ned Twining. Ned always wears an innocent 100k on his face which is rather rare for a commerce major. We could tell lots of: things about Ned, his having been appointed professor of pig- ology at the Delt house, etc., but Hlack of space, etc." Mary Evans is one of the wise juniors of the Kappa house. It is Maryis duty to instruct the new pledges each term in the art of making themselves useful which is a difficult task for most girls. Clare Ryan is a girl that one cannot help but look at a second time. She lives right here in Eugene which accounts for the fact that so many return to school before vacation is over. Here we have the orator "a la librarisii, Art Kuhnhausen. Art is a strong advocate of closing the graveyard as he prefers the grandstand. He still has a few friends left and has been out for Varsity track of Late. Adrian Rouslow is helping run Astoria at the present time but he would appreciate a little scandal beside his name. tiPee- Weei, put on the glasses for the intellectual effect it would give. Catherine Morse is one of our mathematical geniuses. The in- finitesimal theory of functions is pie for her and she works other peoples problems for them in her sleep. Velma Rupert is associate editor of this Oregana, associate news editor of the Emerald, and a mighty good ordinary asso- ciate. The above, I think, in- dieates that she is very popular around the shack. Pat O'Rourke, of old Hugenot stock Hi. He returned to col- lege this fall after a long ab- sence from the K. S. House. Pat is from Anaconda, Montana, and has a good record as the high school coach there. Kenny Smith is always to be sought when you hear a racquet He is a. tennis player of ability and a sure Varsity man. You often hear of babbling brooks, but Agnes Brooks isnit that sort of a girl. She is quite demure and spends much of her time in the art building, but, oh, no, not all of the time. Miss Dunham isnit a simple 01d Marion, she spells her name Marianne. She won the campus tennis championship last spring but during the winter she prac- tices new strokes in wielding the racquet among the tri Delta freshmen. Wayne Laird has been out of school for a year, but the girls havenit forgotten him and he claims to have spent most of his week-ends in a dress suit. Frank Jue is quitea dazzling young man. His diamBnds daz- zle around Hendricks Hall and his saxophone playing has its effects, too. Anyone seen Lil- lian? Frances Haversham is the best little hiker you could ever imagine. Habby is always hit- ting the trail for the tall timbers but that doesnit indicate that sheis Wild. Melvin Murchie is a wicked dancer and just loves to ttrash" the little girls. He also dotes on rushing for Sigma Chi and well athe boys hate to discourage him. Muriel McKinley as herself is all right, but as Wallace Reid she is a knock-out. All the ladies get movie thrills when Muriel starts imitating the adored star. Leah Wagner works around smelly labs that every one else tries to keep away from. She likes to help struggling Frosh with their physics and chemistry, and tries to convince them that they really are interesting. Kenneth Jones has decided up- on a commercial career. He is going to get his degree and then go out and help the world solve its industrial problems. Maybe he came out here be- cause there are more mountains to dig in, since he is majoring in geology. Leo Hartlinls home is Pratt, Kansas, and if our faint impression of geography is cor- rect, that state is on the level. Janet West has a demure man- ner and tan ingenue method of approach that distinguishes her. Alice Evans finds planning botany labs not so. bad When picnics provide such a handy way of gathering specimens. Alice likes a large assortment of specimens and thinks Oregon provides some pretty good ones. Malcolm Hawke probably means to be one of the leading business men of Cottoge Grove. He is majoring in commerce to get a flying start. -. Yul o W h ..s i 3 g? r l t a I 3.3 m .: si' E. .m. nus... W-........- -MA Charles Lamb, or tiLamby," is certainly a meek-looking boy, but he registers no shyness in riding his profs for 1 and 11s. Chuck is very interested in Sig- ma Chi bonds. Marian Tuttle is a great itman- ageressfi S'he manages lots of things, but is such a tactful per- son that the managee thinks he is doing the managing himself. Marian Lawrence has such a sweet manner that it makes it possible for her to always get her own way. Moreover her wishes are Nishis. Ogden Johnson is one of the Fiji law majors and an efficient Junior class officer. "Oggy" is awfully fond of dancing and makes the girls toddle right along. We donit know very much about Oscar Hoffman. We do know that he likes to ask ques- tions in psychology class and we have an idea that he believes in going deeper than ordinary folks do. Marian White is one of those fortunate people who live in Eugene and who can' ride to an eight oiclock in the morning in her own cute little car which sister Adelaide skillfully directs. Among the people who grew up in the shadow of Oregon and finally decided to come here for more knowledge, is Margaret Evans. Margaret plays around in botany lab and maybe sheill teach it some day, who knows? Its not an uncommon sight to see Francis Shrode promenad- ing with a certain mademoiselle from Hendricks Hall. We didn't think it of you, but still water runs deep, we are told. Right here is a good place to apologize to Dorothy Wootton. After we got her all pasted up as a Junior, we discovered that she was .a Senior instead. And then it was too late. Staubie Staub needs no: intro- duction to the women readers, or to the rest of them, for that matter. He and his curly hair may be seen together on the campus at all times of day. J. Carl Bowman parts his name in the middle, as you see. Nevertheless he chose a2 college wisely because he came clear to Oregon from Ohio. Speaks well for us, doesnlt it? Helen Dougherty is a splen- did advertiser for the Lemon Punch, indicating her fondness for humor and her ability .as a coming bookagent. The joys of an Emerald re- porter are not unknown to Claire Beale. The shack is her favor- ite haunt, and she participates in the joys and sorrows of be- ing a major in journalism. Even at that, it's a great life, isnlt it? Art Campbell is one of the half dozen Campbells who have chosen to cast their lot at the U. of 0. He says his father is a judge and he himself revels in chem. labs. That sounds like solid stuff, Art. Claire Keeney takes the part of an Englishman beautifully in Professor Reddiels plays, but you'd never think it when you see him perform before a crowd of howling students at a football game. Elaine Cooper has been a var- sity debater for two years now, and shes been on the winning side, too. No one knows about all of the things she does on the side, either. She certainly knows how to work. :i I J '0 I, "I" 55 3: .i H H"? 3:": i..- l I v ihi Ila Nichols is the youthful business woman of the Alpha Phi house who Is helping the sisters buy their house. She also manages the commerce de- partment for she is a member of the new campus Chamber of Commerce. Bob Shepherd, unbeknown to his many friends, is quite mu- sical. He composed a song quite recently itOh Krazy Kat, Where Are You At? Bob says he is extremely fond of cats, having made their acquaintance when active in T. and S. Charles Van Zile a another North Bend sky-scraper. But as to his ability in star-gazing- well, well quit horsing you, Charlie. Bertha Hays affected a Green- wich Village bob when she had this picture taken, but she doesn,t wear it that way any more. In fact, she looks very, very demure now. Why need .Geneva Stebno ever worry about her man tak- ing other girls out? He always tells her the truth; did you ever catch Cockerline tlyingy Arthur Wicks comes from North Powder. This explains his peppy disposition. That ought to be a good town to start something in when he finishes majoring in commerce. ' Jimmy Sears is interested in animals, human and otherwise. So he is majoring in zoology, and when his smile isntt bright- ening Deady, he is studying in the library, or strolling on the campus, or he might be at home. Sometimes he is. Rena ttHales" from Pendleton, but that is really nothing against her. Rena is all for Oregon, but she must visit her "Stock" at O. A. C. e101"- v..w,, ."w. a..- . ?.?sm- Lillian Auld is one of the leading literary lights on our campus. As president of uPot and Quill" she is a big success. Some day we are going to see her name on the front of our best magazines. He aims to be a business man, judging by the fact that he is a commerce major. Walter Hempy lives in Eugene, but that isnlt saying he spends his week-ends at home. His tuneful voice is raised early and often around the Phi Delta house. When he isnlt fa- voring them with a solo he is over practicing in the glee club. George Stearns hopes to rival Caruso. tOr does George sing tenor? Weive forgotten just nowJ Ola McDermott is majoring in education. Does that mean she expects to be a school ma'am? You cant always tell. Another frequenter of the ttShack" is Florence Skinner, but from little things we hear and see we are ready to bet that she doesnlt live the life of a cub re- porter very long. Virgil De Lap hails from a lively little town in Eastern Ore- gon and helps to swell the num- ber of commerce majors. Bill Collins cells every one how much dance programs, snaps and so forth, will help to recall pleasant days at Oregon. Likes to visit all the womens houses each term and always carries the familiar green book. Helen Carson is always ter- ribly busy studying psych and managing all sorts of things. Debating is her pet hobby, but she also likes to play basketball and go up the race and things like that. Dorothy Manvile is due of the first of the Theta social index. Dot has a very nice way with all young men, but seems especially nice to her neighbors. Orange Lemon e L e m o n squeezers wanted. Girls, dontt crowd, because hets really bash- ful. Chuck Robinson registered, we think, just to get his picture in the Oregana, because he with- drew SO soon. He always comes up for homecoming and the Fiji breakfast, but Portland, the big city, has too many attractions. Marcile Carlock just bubbles over with psychology-it is the most interesting thing about col- lege. Her whello" is even some- what psychological. Some day Miriam Holcomb is going to instill knowledge into the heads of youtheat least she is majoring in education. Howe ever, you cant always some- times tell just what women will do, no matter what their major subject may be. Julius Frohn is exceptionally studious. tNote the intellectual frown he is wearing at presentJ It all comes from being a fa- vorite with the faculty. Virgil Cameron hopes some time in the future to put an M. D. after his name. Of course, now that they are raising the standards of grades, etc., eteae but that doesnlt worry him any. Heis an A. T. 0., and theylre all good students. She is learning to swing In- dian clubs, swim, climb ropes and other athletic feats. Myrtle Magerle is a physical education major. See how sassy she looks? V ll 9?; QM. ;hh ' 14v! r t:7 y . .KR Veg X44; gx Adele Gibson came all the way from Sunny California to Rainy Oregon so she could go to school and enjoy herself. Shes a ma- jor in education and has a sister who is a Senior and a Greek major. Norton Winnard is a well- known character around the ttY,t hut. He helps with the drives that are started on the compus and on the side majors in zoology. Hets a Varsity box- er, too. Herets a man who doesn,t need to worry about people getting his name mixed up with that of some one else. Sanfred Gehr isntt fortunate enough to have a twin name for confusion. Nice, isnt it? Margaret Russell gets by swimmingly. Everybody knows Maggie tcause she naturally is in everything all of the time. Three cheers for Maggie, well back her to the limit. Isabelle Kidd insists on being asked to all the faculty teas and things, but shes really too tender-hearted to give out posts. Among her other campus ac- tivities she finds time to pull the grades. Harold Orr has come a long way to get some Oregon spirit. His home is Manistique, Michi- gan. We cant pronounce the name; we arentt even sure its spelled right, but some of you French majors ought to know. Edwin Hoyt is an embryo journalist. He is on the sport staff of the Emerald, and is just an all tround man, doncha know. Win Hopson isnt a gym ma- jor, but you might think it from the way she goes out for basket- ball, swimming and baseball. It is Win Who gives the freshmen the once-over and says, "Why aren,t you out for the house teamfw Glen Walkley certainly has done his share to uphold Ore- gonts colors. He knows how to travel over the Cinders and he isnit daunted by cross-country runs, either. Wetre glad hes a Junior. T0 Grace Tigard belongs the honor of having a whole town named after her. And besides this, Grace carries off more hon- ors by making mighty good grades in the gym department. Ina McCoy wishes the war hadnit ended before she got a chance to be a nurse and utilize her French among the poilu in a ttcoy" way. Harold Simpson divides his time between the school of com- merce, the A. T. O. house and the yellow house on the corner of Eleventh and Hilyard. We know that much about him. Floyd Johnsonis home is San Jose, California, which leads one to speculate whether he wont take a try at the movies when he goes back. Ainit that profile View just like Wallie Reed? Now, aint it? Pauline Coad dashes indi- cate the "Coadti between the D. G. and Phi Deltthouses. Pauline is an earnest campus worker and has a good word for every one. She expresses extreme fondness in the slang ttGood Joe? Oletta Pederson hails from Petaluma, California. and who hasntt heard of Petaluma chick- ens? She is a law aspirant and we havent decided whether she intends being a regular ttbar- maid" or just maintain the law at home. Floyd Shields has been a first string sub 0n the Varsity. He is a plugger and with his ability ought to be a valuable men to the varsity next year. --105- mm; H . "WW -m-e... WA "1.; r4 Luv mu..- ' w - w..-me You cant always tell by the name, although we believe that if Hjalmer Gentle lives up to his he will at least be a nice, kindly doctor when he finishes his college career. Glenn Frank is not a gym ma- jor. She majors in chemistry, but seeing her perform on the apparatus in the Women,s build- ing made some of us come to the conclusion that maybe she has missed her calling. How much is "Woodwor'th" today? Ask Kate Wilson, she knows. With home economics as a major, indications seem promising. Bill Purdy highbrows the boys by riding to and from clases each day in at Henry, thereby being considered one Of Eugenets elite, as well as a good little basketball bounder. Frank Miller comes from a little town just down the river, and just because his name is terribly common is no sign that Frank is not a distinguished personage. The name ttFroshtt adopted Gladys Everett when she first came to school three years ago, and we fear it will stick by her all through her college dayse even when she is .in her fifth year in the Law School. ttCome on Phebe, speak to de dice!" Please dont Gage this demure young lady from the above outburst. She really is just a sweet, innocent young girl who delights in activities and is qiute fond of canoeing. Wolcott Buren lives down at the Beta house. He is taking pre-medics and some day will be able to cure all earthly ills after he gets his degree and the right to wear M. D. on his business cards. -x' g i v- ,ag 122i - , xjggmx :4 awn ax x34; .- .x x John Tuerck spends most of his time in the mysterious labs in Deady, playmg around With his major subject. Fern Murphy is taking Do- mestic Science and while prac- ticing about the kitchen she just loves to sing that sweet old song, "Oh, Johhny, Oh, Johnnyf, Maple Dell Moore majors in rhetoric and hopes to be a real author some day. Charles Robertson drives a big car around the campus and his blond hair and pink cheeks make him quite a popular 1a- diest man. Clarence Cannon majors in physics, but that does not pre- vent him from teaching young ladies how to shoot after his lab work is done. Helen Kuykendall has her pe- culiar droll way of saying things that amuse her friends. Her talent is art but she does find some time to read ttEat and Grow Thin." Martha Rice used to keep the piano shimmying at the Pi Phi house before she left school last term. Delmer Powers goes in for the hard subjects. He likes to study rocks, boulders and peb- bles-nothing' soft for him. -107-.- Dorothy Miller finds dancing 3. most interesting sport in col- lege. She even attends classes to discover new methods. We donit know just what system she prefers but we think it is the iiVirginia Reel" style. Martha Westwood has gym as a major, but Tommy claims his share of her time, and walking is a brand of athletics anyway. Dashing and impressive, thatis Roy Veatch. We didnit think that he would make his hours because he has so much Y. M. C. A. work, but we got fooled. Roy will begin to call the boys up about Seabeck pretty soon. We donlt know whether he was named after the most pop- ular make or not, but Ford Wil- son is equally as well known and much faster. Jean MacKenzie majors in Latin. That lets Jean out be- cause we canit understand the stuff ourselves and hence wouldnit want to wax coniiden- tial about Jeanls activities. Marian Tlayloris middle name is Priscilla. She doesnlt look a bit like a Puritan maid and we donit think she has lost her sweetheart. We donlt think so. Harry Ellis isnit with us this term, having decided to be a business man. Harry is now helping his father in Baker, Ore. His iirst venture was a case of scarlet fever, but he came out of that all right and is ready to tackle something easier now. If all these commerce majors turn theory into practice, just think how efficiently everything is going to be run very shortly! Frank Fassett expects to do his bit. 4133'! H Charlotte Clark is a mighty small person With a mighty big lot of activities to her credit. She divides her time between the Y. W. bungalow, the Ore- gana, and the freshmen at Sig- ma Delta Phi house. Clarkie is right there whenever there is anything to do. Mary Lou Burton is one of our coming journalists and writers. Whenever any of the college publications wants a feature story they call on Mary Lou. She also writes real stories for Professor Thacher and some day no doubt well be reading them in the Saturday Evening Post. Katherine Baker has lots of red hair, but we know she hasnit the usual red-haired temper. In fact she is quite sweet and de- mure, as the D. G.'s Will testify. II X: $ lk - '- ' '.:: 1 ; "s ' $ ., j Arm;d.r ml. $ " m. - M N.- '13:; w 121:1!!va - - '. Murphy W7eiss Altstock Simpson Svnphnmnrv Qiatnry Tom Murphy ............................................................................................................................ President Marion Weiss ................................................................................................................ Vice-President Bernice Altstock .................................................................................................................... Secretary Harold Simpson ...................................................................................................................... Treasurer The majority of the "biggest freshman class in the history of the Universityh was able to return to continue the good work started last year. Then we managed to let everyone know that our men were not only big in stature, but were able athletes and students as well. Three sophomores won letters in Varsity football this year--and who doesntt know what we did for Varsity basketball? In swimming the girls fulfilled every promise made by the success of last year. Though we recognize the triteness of the proverbial ttsquare mix,,, nevertheless we still contend that for once the University witnessed a mix which fully came up to Dean Straubts expectations of a fair fight. The tthoptt needs no comment; ask anyone who was there whether or not it was a success! . Perhaps, as sophomores, we may realize our own worth too well, but we hope to do more for Oregon each succeeding year. Watch the class of nineteen hundred and twenty-three! - BERNICE ALTSTOCK. MW W. xX W G g4 Len LaW-ic hce. , Vern, J! ! :5? Fxsim 3 a r 5$si NA. 8 h 9' Q 1 "WIS Q s v ! T: J a r 1.3; rN El 38x XTK Tx X n-y- fa .xv Wallace Bushman Smith ilirwhmam fainting Claire Wallace ........................................................................................................................ President Edna Bushman ................................................................................................................ Vice-President Ianthe Smith .......................................................................................................................... Secretary George Bronaugh .................................................................................................................... Treasurer The largest class of frosh in Oregon history entered the University this fall, with a definite purpose in mind of being great in campus activities, scholastic achievement and social life. The annual ttfrosh" parade, When all the men kneeled and kissed the Seal, started the year right for the class of 1924 in the eyes of the upper classmen. They fought valiantly at the UnderclaSs Mix, but were unable to break the tradition of the sophomorels Victory. As displayed in their football career, the frosh showed that they would be the future gridiron heroes. Then came a successful basketball series. The social side of the life of this class began With the annual Freshmen Acquaintance party in the men s gymnasium, followed by the Frosh Glee in the armory. The work of the fresh class on the athletic fields and on the bonfire for the Homecoming rally 1s characteristic of the class of 1924, and of the Oregon campus. - IANTHE SMITH. M im ?4 W , , :fw WV' ' WW W ; w . gay W2; 71wa 2 M W 5.? mm OPrpgnn Gnarhing Svmif BABT" SPELLMAN "BILL" HAYWARD SHY" HUNTINGTON W M $ f: ?sz , w MM xgmw 7X x STEERS HOWARD BACKFIELD, LEFT TO RIGHT STEERS, REINHART, KING, HILL LINEy LEFT T0 RlGHT-BROWN, A. SHIELDS, MAUTZ, K. LESLIE, WARD, E. LESLIE. HOWARD eat 519 . 4' Q i "VII Q . Ah: I A r '2; xx VVt -. X it E- $ xlg; $372? vv, 09r29nn-1E5aahingtnn 6am? Oregonts mighty football team scored the third succes- sive victory over the University of Washington gridsters in the Annual Homecoming Game played on Hayward Field, No- vember 13. Two touchdowns and a perfectly calculated field goal, all scored by Captain "Bill" Steers, ran the total number of points for the Varsity eleven up to 17 while Washington amassed none. Oregon outgeneraled, outplayed and outfought the Sun- dodrg'ers in every department of the game, breaking up their attempted passes, smearing their forward offense and defense and tearing through the line for repeated gains with the ball being carried by Steers, Chapman, King and Mead. A costly fumble in the last few moments of the initial quarter is all that prevented the lemon-ryellow warriors from scoring at the very outset of the contest for they carried the ball to the Washington 3 yard line and pierced the Sundodger defense almost at will. Oregonts first touchdown came in the second quarter uSHyn when Captain Steers, received a Washington punt and raced 75 yards through the entire Washington team for the goal line, Twisting, dodging and sidestepping, the mighty Oregon quarterback eluded his opponents and in as pretty an exhibition as has been witnessed in many a day on the Oregon football gridiron, he completed the run by placing the ball squarely between the Washington goal posts. Captain Steers crossed the Washington goal line for the second touchdown at the opening of the fourth quarter, when with the ball on the 4 yard line, a fake line buck formation let the mighty quarterback get away and skirt the Sundodgerts right end for the score. The ball had been placed 011 the- 4 yard line by a sensational 35 yard run by Chapman when he intercepted a Washington pass in the last few minutes of the third period. The third quarter saw the addition of three points to the- total when Captain Steers' educated toe placed a well calculated drop kick squarely between the posts from a very difficult angle .Washinvgton never threatened the Oregon goal line "BRICK" LESLIE itGOING OVER THE TOP" IN THE WASHINGTON GAME - mxgt Q ii 1 t4 7 Y "AA r1; .Stw Fwy $ 3x 2: z: XQ a1 Is 3'. it 3'? r'a a g5 .4: - ;- ea. .. u ' i f .a- "a m g I a . 7a,; 1 ?e' a ' 7h 7 y 7 .' g h 7 a5: 3;? 9V ' g? throughout the entire game, the Sundodgers resorting to the open style of play after they had repeatedly attempted to pierce the Oregon defense without success, but their passes were smeared time after time by the Oregon defense, Mead and Chapman being mainly responsible for this. Oregonts line held the washington backfield plunges like the proverbial stone wall and the Varsity forward defense played a sterling game throughout. ttSipike" Leslie, ttBrick" Leslie and "Mart" Howard were the big factors in the work of the Varsity line. ttBill" Reinhart played a sensational game at quarterback in the final period when he was substituted for Captain Steers, the husky understudy smashing through the Sundodgers line for repeated gains and making yardage almost at will. Mautz and Strachan, Oregon guards, worked like Trojans both on the offense and defense playing and ttTiny" Shields holding down the tackle position next to "Fat" Mautz on the line made a good running mate for the husky veteran. Morfitt worked well at right end, Brown going in for him at that position during the second half. 'tBart" Laughlin was also substituted for ttBrick" Leslie, Oregonts pivot man, in the latter period of the contest when ttBrick" was unable to continue the game on account of injuries. Nine thousand fans packed the grandstand and bleachers to witness the .annual battle for supremacy between the two ancient rival elevens and a mighty rally the night before the contest which included the huge freshman bonfire had keyed the excitement of the crowd up to the highest pitch. Pandemonium broke loose when big ttBilltt Steers uncorked his 75 yard run through a broken field for the initial touch- down of the game and from then on the game was Oregon,s throughout. Huntingtonts style of defense played havoc With the Washington passes with the lemon-yellow forwards breaking through time after time and causing Wilson to hurry his passes which oftentimes went wild. The Oregon attack also showed much brilliancy and using the unbalanced line offensive the Varsity swept the Sundodgeris defense before it leaving vgreat holes for the backfield men to tear through for substantial gains. Although outweighed by the Washington line the Lemon-Yellow forward defense performed beautifully and charged the visiting forwards off their feet. A close perusal of the statistics of the Oregon-Washington game reveals in detail how the Varsity balked Washington at every angle of the :game. Of course Washington intercepted one more pass than Oregon and totaled 367 yards from punts t0 Oregon,s 365, but these few yards or flashes of play were mere details of a great struggle in 'which Oregonts supremacy over the Sundodgers was undisputed. P mx$1 Statistics of game between Oregon and Washington: Oregon Wash. First down from scrimmage, first quarter First down from scrimmage, second quarter First down from scrimmage, third quarter ............................................................ First down from scrimmage, fourth quarter Total first downs from scrimmage Total yardage made from scrimmage Forward passes attempted ........................................................................................ Forward passes completed Forward passes incompleted Forward passes intercepted Total yardage from passes Total number of punts ................................................................................................ Total yardage of punts Average length of punts, Number of times out Penalties Yardage lost from penalties Attempted Iield goals .................................................................................................... Successful field goals Fumbles H .q .CIQDWNHDO QDOOHMNG The two teams lined up for their annual battle as follows: Oregon- Washington- Name Wt. Position Wt. Name Howard ...................... 166 ............................ Left End ............................ 162 ............ Faulk maptj E. Leslie .................... 186 .......................... Left Tackle .......................... 185 .......................... Clark Strachan ...................... 82 .......................... Left Guard .......................... 170 ............................ Hobi K. Leslie .................... 166 ................................ Center ................................ 175 .......................... Smith Mautz ........................ 189 .......................... Right Guard .......................... 200 .......................... Glenn A. Shields .................. 190 .......................... Right Tackle .......................... 186 ........................ Ingram Morfitt ........................ 170 ............................ Right End ............................ 62 .............................. Abel Steers waptj ........ 180 Quarterback .......................... 165 ........................ Wilson Chapman .................... 159 ...................... Right Halfback ...................... 145 ...................... Eckman Mead .......................... 160 ........................ Left Halfback ........................ 165 ........................ Dailey King ............................ 160 .............................. Fullback .............................. 163 ........................ Harper Score by quarters: 1 2 Oregon ...................................................................................... 0 7 3 Washington ....................................................... 0 0 0 Substitutes: Oregon-Laughlin for K. Leslie; Brown for Morfitt; Reinhart for Steers. Washington5Pope for Glenn; Butler for Dailey; Dailey for Butler; Rogge for Abel; Bryan for Harper; Miller for Ingram. Officials: George Varnell, Chicago, referee; Plowden Scott, Stanford, umpire; 6Heck" Dorman, Washington, head lineman. . RALLY SERPENTINE BETWEEN HALVES IN THE HOMECOMING GAME k era k i - MK 2 41 V y. '14 "'i-?7 V; ' shn i. .ev in i1 V H. A .c- ' 1. 3A HM Fax. 1. a WILLIAM iiBILL" STEERS, captain of the team and Winner of three letters with the Varsity eleven, completed his final season With the Oregon team this past fall. Rated on the Pacific Coast all-star team as quarter- back and considered as one of the greatest players in the collegiate football world, his place Will be hard to fill on the Varsity eleven next fall. Bill made more yardage than any other one man on the Coast this season, and his punting and passing ability ranks with the best in the conference. His specialty is making yardage through a broken field. e A .4 .. . v Q a w g sen: W 10 O z'r? KEITH tiBRICK" LESLIE, Oregonts red- headed center, a fighter Whose place Will be hard to fill next fall. iiBrick" won his third letter the past season and has completed his college career. He had a knack for breaking through the opposing defense and smearing plays and he was usually With the ends When it came to getting down the field under one of ttBill" Steersi punts. He passed the ball With unerring aim and his steadiness and cool head made him a valuable man. An opposing eleven seldom made yardage through center With ttBrickt playing defense. CARL ttFAT" MAUTZ, left guard and bulwark of strength on either defense or of- fense playing. He won his third letter with the Varsity and the past season was selected L i by several critics for the guard position on the Pacific Coast mythical all-star team. Steadiness and consistency marked the play- ing of Mautz, and sensational plays were not his line. His size and his fight made him a for- midable linesman for any of the opposing teams to encounter and his position will be one that will be hard to fill. Mautz will con- tinue his education in the Medical School in Portland. EDWARD itED" WARD, right guard, who fought gamely, but was injured early in the season with a broken collar bone and could not get into the latter games. Ward has been a consistent plodder on the squad. for the past three years and succeeded in making his letter for the first time the past season, his last in school. He played throughout the Stanford game with a broken collar bone, which the coaches nor' trainer knew nothing about. Ed played an equally strong game on offense and defense and deserves credit for his work in the time which he played. He graduates this spring. e-127v- higr,.,:;eugvgn: U;;A: W4 4A+-- ewe- V vxwiww- u hw:h ".1st 1:1 . 4 e . . 20 A .s- . - r A am As, : E97, e i WK Q I Fwy p f? -.$s j ' "i3 VQK k?! hf wfx vexXJ Ate $2 g ' 3 Q. Lg ' W" I gtg' EARL tiSPIKE" LESLIE, left tackle, one of the greatest players on both defense and offense. on the Coast. The unanimous se- lection of critics for the tackle position on the Pacific Coast mythical all-star eleven. itSpike" is a tower of strength on defense and smeared many plays for the opponents before they were fairly started. His Spe- cialty was opening holes in the opponents defense for the backfield to convert into yardage. tiSpikei, completed his second sea- son with the Varsity the past fall, and will be eligible for his old position at the start of next season. 4'. bk. Q A , few 145' tvgu- , W . N , THOMAS ttNISH" CHAPMAN, half- back, a consistent ground gainer with the Varsity eleven the past season, and will be eligible for another season. His speed and ability to charge made him a valuable man in Huntingtonis backfield, and he made most of his yardage on long end runs. "Nish" made substantial gains in the O. A. C. game time after time, but was handicapped by the . heavy field, his speed and shiftiness make it necessary for him to work on a dry gridiron, where these qualities count. iita '13 RHEH moo mhmr: WILLIAM iiBILLYii REINHART, halfback and quarterback, and equally as val- uable at either position. Playing his first season with the Varsity eleven, Reinhart made an enviable record in spite of severe injuries to his ankle which kept him out of the games a great deal of the time. His work in the Washington and O. A. C. games de- serves special praise, and he charged the op- ponentis defense for consistent yardage in both of these games. iiBill" has plenty of fight and dash, which characterize his play- ing and these two factors will make him as strong a player another season. NEIL MORFITT played at right end dur- ing the season and won his first letter with the Varsity eleven. Morfitt played with lots of dash and fight and he was a consistent plod- der during the entire season, proving a fast and sure tackler and possessing rare ability to catch difiicult passes. He played an equally good game on both offense and de- fense and will be back another season with a years experience to work from. Brown and Morfitt alternated at the right end position during the past season. -.129e 1 ,9" g :1? 1;: .1 x 1. ' .1 ' "771i f1 ...- k '4 i' .1 :1. 555: $A f? :5 ,1: N 1437,1149 wgsi W? v If 7;? 3w V k .i i i . ; t1 :5 . Q , A7,, E: N i 3Q? JANE ; t A f ; ' d, 1 f i ' 1 I31 a 4' ih L vy h Xx W4". i 1 13X: 3; y , ? y- 9x t xffg1 i m; 1p 4: J 2,10 . - x 1 ' 5 A -. t Q i E MARTIN iiMARTi, HOWARD, Captain- elect, and left end of the Varsity eleven for Martis work earned i the past two seasons. f . Ki for him mention for the all Coast mythical mu! 1 k , in eleven, and he iS generally conceded as one of W" M; the greatest offensive ends on the Coast. He ,; is especially strong on catchlng difficult v"- ' passes, and his speed stands him to good ad- W w vantage in converting them into yardage. He ",1 i ' s is a hard, suretackler and an opposing eleven 1.9! i X4 N never circles his end. Mert gets down swift- nm- N V 1y on the punts and he W111 probably make an ' ' enviable record for himself the coming sea- son. THOMAS ii SCOTTY i, STRACHAN, ! '3'? m right guard, won his first letter and particu- xm- W - lar mention for his work in the O. A. C. game. i u. 11"? .. ' Straehan took Wardis place at guard When i the latter was injured and handled the po- Ch I sition like a veteran. He is full of fight and . " H broke through the Aggie line several times, hp. smearing their offense before they got 51 ' started. He was a bulwark of strength on i'h . defense and offense playing, and made a . 1 name for himself in the short time in Which .1 9 he played. Scotty Will be back another sea- H son and With the experience gained during aw. the past fall should be a valuable man. h ' 1 ' - 130 1 h. . 12".; 1 . Wm Am, i i' -h Yum, $.22: Inf. yd"! ?h g; fa n k! cw..i "ii. a 1km s :1 twh m "wk bum. M u mind Hut B'and I I whim: gnaw? '4! n '4 oh K at Tali ih- a ,5; Q! wane l? Ll't s. h thxk'; mix??? 14; J a .4 r ' n? ARCHIE iiTINYii SHIELDS, right RUTHERFORD itRUDD" BROWN, right end, whose speed coupled With his size stands him to good advantage in handling his posi- tion. itRudd" broke into thelimelight in the Idaho game when he scored two touchdowns for the Varsity, racing 40 yards with a re- covered fumble for the first and catching a forward pass to carry over the line for the second. Playing his first season at end, Brown made a good record in spite of his in- experience and should be a strong man on the Varsity next season. He played a tackle po- sition for the Frosh the previous season. tackle, an inexperienced man Who made good his first year With the Varsity. "Tinyii is another steady, reliable man who plays the game all the time. Heavy and well able to take care of his weight, Shields proved a big factor in stopping the line smashes of the op- posing teams, and seldom did they make any yardage through his position on the line. He charges hard and fast and opened great holes in the opposing line, time after time during the past season. "Tinyh will prove an even more valuable man another season With his added experience. h: :11 x 4 a to i .e i , . .1 .,I f"- I ,1 5 . a . A! 1 n 1' d iiJSP. '3 KM U . F W GEORGE KING, fullback, had a real I ?i v, .. w... h task as an inexperienced man but handled the , ,5 it... f'h . u - 1 ed his mt V i' V task 11ke a veteran. George'p ay . 1 4h . . . 354 season With the Varsity thlS year, havmg him f 1"".1. 3i ,1 handled the fullback position on the Frosh 71. r 7...! 1' :f .. WWI eleven the previous season: He was a steady Kiwi syn. . W l r 1'7 and consistent ground gamer and could be m w," I,- .1 - v i depended upon to smash through the oppon- ;' ' i ,1": . a ad 5 ents, line for the few remaining yards in the :4 pra- w u- ,. 1W - ' d d f1 ht 111 make :w' 11 . tlght places. H1s spee an g W. ,1 "Imgnun 7 h him a valuable man in itShy,, Huntmgtonis 5; .N' In 41$ , backfield another Season and a year of ex- 1' .1.qu - i perience Will aid him greatly. u I ,y I s h e i m 3. l3 M u C " KX' "cannib' tQi "ah DI u i - v; . 'hdlil , H izbdlu s H PIERRE iiPETE" MEAD, halfback, an- other raW recruit from the Frosh eleven of "j ii the previous season, Who made good his first i V year With the Varsity. Mead was fast and 0 full of fight and his charging ability charac- terized his playing. He broke into promi- nence in the Idaho game When he smashed through their entire line for consistent gains. After the Idaho game he was used in nearly all the games at times and played a steady game. Mead Will not be back another sea- son, as he like iiBrick" Leslie, has entered the game of matrimony. ' .- '7'." re; hr $.11. al I neEE . S! x ?V N M9 1m"! 5'2? 4!? Nudlmm g 5 12.912.33.21 til .o-hic. mmirv 29;! 2. human: s ,l? E.M'Jathm. t; umtm; , 'tbiit!:r.,v. 5w '55. HQ. ': i a m: 1 m: :55 mt? QDrpgnnUa Illnnthall gamma With a nucleus of Coach ltShytl Huntington had a real task last season and one in whi sary not only to break in the many green players but also to build u from this same green material. able assistant coach and Trainer llBilll' which delivered a severe drubbing to the the strong University of Idaho eleven, a Agricultural gridsters. conference game and this to Stanford on The Iirst practice call was issued University of Washington, October 30 at Palo Alto. ward worked diligently with the opening of school when the squad Varsity berth. . On October 16, a bare week before the 0 season, tlBill" Steers, captain and quarterback of rated as one of the greatlstars of the college foo turned to school and football stock immediately r0 October 9, EugenieeOregon 7, Multnomah 0. October 23, EugeneaOregon 13, Idaho 7. October 30, Palo Alto-Oregon 0, Stanford 10. November 13, Eugene-Oregon 17, Washington 0. November 20, Corvallis-Oregon O, O.A.C. 0. November 25, Pasadena-Oregon 0, Southern California 21. se above par. SEPTEMBER 15, 1920-A FEW STARS RETURN EARLY six letter men about which to build his Var sity football eleven, ch it became neces- p a football machine The Oregon coach took hold of things and with the Hayward, a team was whipped into shape decisively defeated nd battled to a scoreless tie with the Oregon Two games were lost to the southern teams, but only one Coaches Hunt- the squad before was added to by some 50 more aspirants for a pening game of the intercollegiate the team the previous season and tball world in the 1919 season, re- inf K P. . s h .Ql ,frl'g 5.! I! e? : t AMX- Q . 2 1'3 r '3? K As w k5? hi i k h X A xx xx 'AAil-n . GDregnn-QD. A. 01. 03am: the soggy mire of the Corvallis led to a finish and a scoreless tie in the ahnual the two rival institutions. Captain ttBillt, werless on such a field, as were le of play which the Lemon- Hayward field the Slipping, sliding, plunging and floundering in gridiron, two football elevens batt contest for the state championship between Steers, Oregon's mighty quarterback, was practically p0 the rest of the speedy Oregon backs, and the fast open sty Yellow eleven used so successfully against the Washington team on week previous was useless. Time after time the Oregon they were on an open field withou weather was ideal on the day of the game and a warm 5 the field all day had aided materially in drying out the gr of rain which had preceded was very much in evidence in s would have been a beautiful exhibition of football. On such a gridiron it was hard to rate the strength of either team, both Oregon and O. A. C. making their first downs from scrimmage an equal number of times during the afternoon. Both succeeded in plunging, twisting and fighting the ball from scrim- mage for first downs, five times during the contest. Both teams completed two forward passes each, although the aerial attack was practically taboo on account of the wet, slippery ball. Oregon gained 32 yards from passes and the Aggies two throws scored the same amount of yardage. But Oregonis penalties robbed the Lemon Yellow eleven of a total of 40 yards during the contest while the Aggies lost but 15 yards from this V g, same cause, and the Oregon penalties came at the crucial moments during the game. After working the ball to the Aggiest120 yard line in the initial period, smashing '"v the Beaver defense time after time for gains through the line, Oregon received a 15 4w711 ? backs slipped and fell while carrying the ball when t an opposing player near them. Although the un which had been shining on idiron, the result of the week lowing up what otherwise yard penalty, and 15 yards on such a field as the one on which this game was played I meant a pretty severe penalty. gt; i 9W .0 'w. mg" STEERS DODGING THE AGGIES IN RETURNING A PUNT The old Oregon iight for which the famed, broke into the limelight again in Aggies had recovered an Oregon fumble Oregon offside penalty and two luckil elevens from the University have long been the annual battle this year when, after the on the 45 yard line and with the aid of an y completed forward passes had placed the ball . .. 4' ?.n on Oregon,s three yard line. Four successive times the Aggie backs smashed into the "NH!!! $3. Oregon line in an attempt to put the ball across for a touchdown and four successive i N! maid f ,3 times did the OregOn line hold like the proverbial stone wall and the Aggies lost their in H 51mm 0AM only chance to score. The ball advanced 40 inches in four downs. x H- 1m '1. t: y" 1'! O. A. C. football fandom went wild with excitement when the Aggies put the ball ' in danger to the Oregon eleven by their aerial attack, but this excitement soon died m M U3: out when iiBilli, Steers punted 40 yards out of danger from behind the goal line after nu U ham N W the Oregon front line defense had performed so remarkably. The safety was downed m '5' WHEN! f in his tracks when he received the punt and although the Aggies by a superhuman unit it With 4N effort and the use of an entire new backfield did manage to push the ball up to the 44 35 yard line where Crowell attempted a place kick, the ball failed to soar off the u! run? m m as ground and the Aggies only chance to score was lost, and lost because Oregon out- "... sum 11' an, . fought them. WIN 1'" 51 f": ' m 3' A crowd of 10,000 people, by far the largest which has ever witnessed a football w MW V 4 7N, game between the state institutions, cheered their favorites on. nun n. ITW 191,; x :- ut- 1135'": ' I stunts of a unique variety were carried on between halves by the r u :1.- man! "39' . .. w ,, 925;. "man mm 3'3 '1' QJI- W dry- , I9 "Q ,M NS! i" i. ' bull! a t , i Cioti 31 93' h I W. b V lt- I 'i .x t "IA in And serpentines and ival rooting sections. A TENSE MOMENT IN THE OREGON-O. A. C. CONTEST e135e 3mm a.gtx t V 1' 4" $.14: 74"; M '1 37V t WVIX Q . 14 r' .7 .3 k9 X4; X ,2" .99 $ ,. e t ur' .rrf; 'a 15' ; ngw ' Vb... . 'x b 2' . - kar' - .. -" r .A in WKE "m b . 5...,f4f'rkz. wkk .IWM ff Egg ha 2; Ex: mEA V A X 2 X 2,. x Q! k .. X 2 K X t. n E ynlt - y , QDrmnn-Zlhahn 03am? Contrary to what might have been expected the University of Idaho eleven gave Coach Huntington,s gridsters one of the hardest battles of the season on Hayward field, October 23. Idaho, greatly strengthened over former years and With a new coach in the person of Tom Kelley, battled Oregon almost to a standstill in a sensational curtain raiser of the 1920 football season. A fumble by ttBeany" Breshears, quarterback 0f the Gem State eleven, which was picked up and carried 40 yards for a touchdown by ttRudd" Brown, right end for the Varsity team, barely four minutes after the start of the game, and a second touch- down in the second quarter by Brown after he had made a pretty catch of Reinhartts forward pass enabled Coach Huntingtoxfs warriors t0 chalk up a total of 13 points to the visitorts 7. Idahots touchdown came in the ea yardage gains made from the itIdaho spreadt halfback for the visitors, did most of the work. the visitors, smashed through the Oregon line for t ball over the goal line. Idaho won the toss and kicked off to Oregon, Reinhart returning the ball 20 yards after receiving it on the 10 yard line. Steers made an eight yard buck through tackle and on the next play a forward pass was attempted which Idaho intercepted. On the next play the Idaho quarterback fumbled the ball and Brown scooped it into his arms making the 40 yard run for the touchdown. Following the Oregon touchdown the Idaho eleven fought stubbornly and smashed through the, Oregon line for a total of 48 yards, the quarter ending With the ball on Oregows four yard line in Idahots possession. At the start of the second period ttBricktt Leslie broke through the Idaho defense and tackled Whitcomb for a five yard loss on the second play and the ball went to Oregon With the result that Steers kicked 50 yards out of danger. Oregon held and rly part of the last quarter after a series of formation in which Irving, speedy right ttHech, Breshears, big fullblck for he one yard needed to place the 1 STEERS ADDS ONE POINT BY THE AERIAL ROUTE f; nitrlrr'I-IIU Xt 1!!!qu l XV math an $h!bE . IAIIICIU ?gg kahuig. H Kuhn u.!1.h.!' WA: a . m ?ABK U h: M Manx 93 ii Qz m m l wai 1!! hit: "81'! h W W I Wz- 143;; I 5 N murr 601ml 7 11d Eng wt 461 "Mar: m 122m? - 3.4 MM '4 I' t" qt gun '5? l. , "n, u-t In :1? .3.3 mm W' pm rmrrw M V:- twain? . VJ ' W m. "d " T is hurt WY. 3'. ; $h g5 g t max ik . I. ' I yhk I .3 "1011 3" M; 257' t'il Idaho lost the ball again on downs; this availed little, however, for the Lemon-Yellow was unable to pierce the Idaho line and Steers punted. An exchange of punts followed with Oregon annexing yardage in returning the punts, Frankie Hill at safety being responsible. With the ball on the 45 yard line in Oregonts possession, George King and "Bill" Steers each smashed through the Idaho line for 15 yards apiece when a pass from Reinhart to Brown for 15 yards carried the ball over for the second touchdown. The half ended with the ball in the middle of the field. V Steers kicked off to Idaho at the start of the second half and the Idaho eleven returned the ball 10 yards, Breshears and Irving then tore through the Oregon hrst line defense for a total of 13 yards when the Oregon line rallied and held the visitors with the result that Oregon took the ball on the 33 yard line. Repeated attempts to pierce the Idaho line failed and Oregon resorted to the aerial attack completing three passes, ttJakett Jacobberger on the receiving end of two of them and Frankie Hill catching the third, tiBill" Steers dOing the passing. These placed the ball on the 30 yard line from which Steers atempted a drop kick, the ball falling short. Idaho failed to make yardage and punted 45 yards to Hill who returned 28 yards. Oregon fumbled the ball on the next play and Idaho recovered, the Gem Staters completing their first pass for a gain of'10 yards shortly after. The quarter ended with the ball in .Idahots possession on Oregonis 45 yard line. The Idaho touchdown was scored soon. after the start of the final period when an end run by Irving and a short pass coupled with the "Idaho spreadh play from which Irving made 20 yards placed the ball on Oregonts four yard line when Breshears bucked it across the line. The remainder of the game was all in Oregonts favor with the Lemon Yellow smashing through the Idaho line for yardage almost at will. Mead, who was sent in for Steers, was the most consistent line plunger for gains during the iinal minutes of the contest. The game ended with the ball in Oregonis possession on the Idaho 10 yard line. WASHINGTON AND OREGON MEET ON THE TURF Svtanfnrh-OPrvgnn diam? Smashing the ball through the Stanford defense to the two yard line and then unable to pierce the Cardinals line for the touchdown is the introduction to the story of the fatal third period of the Stanford-Oregon battle played on the Palo Alto gridiron on October 30. Stanford rallied and held the Oregon backs from making further yardage on this two yard line and then ttDink" Templetonis, mighty toe booted the ball 60 yards from behind the Stanford goal line. Oregon fumbled the ball and R. Schauderman of Stanford recovered, scooping the ball into his arms and running 40 yards before he was downed. From there a forward pass and a line smash by the Cardinal backs put the ball over for the touchdown and Templeton kicked the goal. The winning play on the part of the southerners was put over before the players hardly realized what was happening and Stanford had put the game safely away. Oregon attempted to come back and by a supreme effort wrest the laurels from the Cardinals but the rally was useless and the Stanford goal line was never in danger again after the third period. The final score for the Stanford eleven came in the last few minutes of play when a pretty drop kick from the 30 yard line by Templeton added an additional three points for the Cardinals. The game was hard fought from beginning to end and a feature was the punt exchanges between Templeton and Steers, with Templeton having a little the edge of the contest. ttBillh Steers was the most consistent ground gainer for the Varsity during the game and tore up the Cardinal defense for repeated long gains. Bill Reinhart was injured in the second period of the game and was replaced by Jacobberger, while Hill was also taken out on account of injuries and was replaced by itNishi, Chapman. Repeated fumbling on the part of Oregon was the cause of spoiling several chances for yardage and the Stanford gridsters came through with a minimum amount of fumbling in spite of the early season game. ttSpikett Leslie recovered a Cardinal blocked drop kick which ttBrick" had succeeded in preventing Templeton from getting off and made a 35 yard run during the game, while both uBrick" and ttSpikeh Leslie were towers of strength of the offensive and defensive playing of the Lemon Yellow eleven. THE CARDINALS FAIL TO PIERCE THE OREGON LINE 1 M' 3753311 W" 3' n 3.331.311 3 Va 6 .32va '- ml raft"? m W3! "- L! 5-7:: m m m l gmmw a LQI'I a F's: Md '3!- Nu imm '3' Mr M WE'TM '1'?" run. p K! i" Tin 11m i: ' rm. t H? him ",3 33" in W 33.1! 11 DH 1"?231 w 'N 3.3111' m :u ubtmt L! u: :m maturing mm v.1 '41 2K 'J' 14 LL511cr: 'J '1! ix. Mm L Jr NWT" '1 L i" Tint W I'd. w'r m Ana 3': 1 t l'. . $4 ., ,v I ,P i 91?; it Hat :1' $2.31 3 61$ .1"? .j ' ,1 r! s MW V t '4 I "lvi'tT'NL M I x um . Wt? V-x 1ft. tux $u..: , a u! 5 HM J0 5' The Stanford game was the only was the contest which eliminated Ore conference. game lost in the Pacific Coast conference and gon from the running for the honors 0f the Stanford afterwards lost to California by a decisive score. GDrvgnn-H. S7. 01. $211112 It was a badly crippled team, one lacking materially and morally because of the absence of Captain Bill Steers, that went down to defeat at the hands of the University of Southern California football team in Pasadena on Thanksgiving Day. The game was played at Tournament Park, the scene of the great Harvard-Oregon battle of less than a year since. The weather, too, according to the veterans of that nationally famous classic, was very much like that of the previous New Years Day- the day that the Lemon-Yellow warriors showed all the United States the meaning of "Oregon fighttt. One great difference in the setting of the two games, however, was the state of mind of the individual members of the two respective Oregon teams. The team that played Harvard had that confidence born of prime physical condition. They had had two weeks of twice-a-day practice after their thousand mile journey to the south, plenty of time to remove the inevitable train kinks. They had worked toward this game almost a month. It was a grand climax. On the other hand the team that played the U. S. C. Trojans had but two days of practice after the long train journey in which to limber up. Steers was not in the game. The team had been put in the prime of condition for the O. A. C. game and from prime condition there is always a reaction. The U. S. C. game was an anti-climax. From the kick-off the Trojans advantage was evident. Oregon failed to make yardage a single time. Nor did the Lemon-Yellow fighters complete a single pass. The southern university scored its first touchdown in the iirst period after receiving a punt near the middle of the field and advancing the ball by a series of line plays and end runs to the Oregon eight yard line. The quarter ended with the score U. S. C. 7, Oregon 0. From the second quarter throughout the game Oregon played a defensive game, punting on the first and second downs continually. The Trojans scored again in the final period. After completing a pass for 10 yards, Leadingham to Dean, the red and gold took the ball to within striking distance of the Lemon-Yellow goal where Dean put over the second touchdown with a line plunge. Captain Swede Evans converting the second goal. The final scoring was done with a pass over the line, Leadingham to Smith, after the ball had been worked to the Oregon 10 yard line. Final score, U. S. C. 21, Oregon 0. WAITING FOR STANFORD TO START SOMETHING $59 g 'X x 43m 'rmsTkld v x . w " mitt? Q t l I 4 7 w T 14 r137 w x52, y k -5x Sm: . . wit Ii- 9K h 411- Y I x' Gbregun-multnnmah Giant? A perfectly calculated forward pass from Jacobberger to Mart Howard Which the speedy end caught beautifully and raced across the Multnomah club goal line was responsible for the 7 to 0 defeat which the Lemon-Yellow eleven handed out to the winged ttMt, gridsters in the opening game of the 1920 season. The game was played on old Kincaid field on Saturday, October 9, and was arranged by Coach Huntington for the purpose of giving him a chance to watch the way his squad would perform against real competition from the outside. The clubmen came up to Eugene with a well balanced organization of former stars, among them Stan Anderson and Ed Strowbridge, who wore the Oregon colors in several games in previous seasons. Coach Huntington had not yet perfected his machine and the rough edges were very much in evidence although the contest was a brilliant one for an early season game. The game was easily anybodyis until the last five minutes of play when Oregon blocked a punt which Hiatt, the husky fullback for the clubmen was a little slow in getting away with, and the Lemon-Yellow players recovered the ball. From this position on the clubmenls 30 yard line the winning pass was put over. Both Oregon and Multnomah used two teams during the game and only two men of the Oregon lineup stayed through the entire contest, these were George King at fullback and Spike Leslie at left. tackle. Multnomah weakened perceptibly after the first half and it was then that Coach Dorman sent in his utility men in an effort to stem the Oregon onslaught. Oregon made hrst downs from scrimmage four times during the first half while the clubmen made hrst downs five times. In the second half Oregon succeeded in making yardage from scrimmage seven times while the clubmen made yardage once. For Oregon it would be hard to pick a star, numerous substitutions being resorted to throughout the game, which gave little chance for effective team work. Hill, Rein- hart, Jacobberger, Mead, King, Blake and Hoisington were all used in the backfield at various periods in the contest and made their share of the yardage against the clubmen. Working in the line positions during the game were: Howard, E. Leslie, Ward, K. Leslie, Starr, Strachan, Clerin, Shields, Mautz, Brown, Latham, Morfitt, VonderAhe. Captain Bill Steers, quarterback, Ed Ward and Carl Mautz, guards, and Keith Leslie, center, will not be members of the Varsity squad next season and the loss of these veterans will be one which will be hard to fill. Captain Steers has completed his three years with the Varsity eleven, as has Leslie and Mautz, while Ward graduates with the 1921 class and will not return to school. THE WINGED .iM" AND OREGON MIX IT UP A LITTLE e140e 15, 3.... 3 are t 5 m: f 3 Q h h t. I E . g R ,4, r fig; : l 1 Vs. w x3 ; E w t: 6 J44 I.u!lii t! kw 33.: Ivagm M I"- rd'rtd 23 110 0124'. WI 25$ .13: 11 pm Ih: 1.53! x 65$ 5. z ,'.'.' 91:1: . hay. Friaii '4 q o .11: Liv: .1373 v .. "er w-zf'h U y Fourteen member of the s as follows: ttBrick5 Leslie .................................... Center "Rudd" Brown .............................. Right End Ed Ward .................................... Right Guard Neil Moriitt .................................. Right End ttScotty" Strachan .................. Right Guard 0Bill" Steers ............................ Quarterback ttFaV Mautz ................................ Left Guard George King .................................... Fullback ttSpiket, Leslie ............................ Left Tackle ttBilF, Reinhart .............................. Halfback "Tinytt Shields ...................... Right Tackle ttNish" Chapman ............................ Halfback ttMart" Howard .............................. Left End ttPete" Mead .................................. Halfback The election of Mart Howard, two year letter eleven, as Captain for the 1921 season and retenti another year, with Brick Mitchell and Bart Spellman staff, closed the 1920 season. With the excellent mat the past season a good year is looked forward to. The standings of the teams in the the past season: man and left end of the Varsity on of Coach Shy Huntington for as his assistants for the coaching erial produced on the frosh squad conferences were as follows at the end of PACIFIC COAST CONFERENCE Won Lost Tied Pct. California ............................................................................ 3 0 0 1000 Stanford ................................................... 2 1 0 .667 Oregon ...................................................... ' .......................... 1 1 1 .500 Washington State ............................................................ 1 1 0 .500 Oregon Aggies .................................................................. 1 2 1 .333 Washington ........................................................................ 0 3 0 .000 NORTHWEST CONFERENCE Washington State ............................................................ 3 0 0 1.000 Oregon ................................................................................ 1 0 1 1.000 Whitman ............................................................................ 3 1 0 .667 Idaho .................................................................................... 2 2 0 .500 Montana ...... , ........................................................................ 0 3 0 .000 Oregon Aggies .................................................................. 0 1 1 .000 Spike Leslie and Bill Steers were both selected on the mythical Pacific Coast eleven during the season by George Varnell, official conference referee. selected for the position of left tackle and Bill for quarterback. THE CONFERENCE STANDINGS Northwest Conference Pacific Coast Conference Won Lost Pct. Won Lost Pct. Spike was Oregon .............................. 13 0 1.000 California ........................ 8 2 .800 Idaho ................................ 13 4 .765 Washington .................... 10 4 .714 Whitman .......................... 5 6 .455 Stanford .......................... 7 3 .700 Willamette ...................... 4 7 .364 1 Oregon ............................ 8 4 .667 Montana ............................ 2 6 .250 W. s. c. ............................ 3 11 .214 W. S. C. ............................ 3 10 .231 O. A. 0.5 ............................ 2 14 .125 O. A. C .............................. 2 8 .200 $3 .I' a' . Q3? efr' Q t A A. g Northwest conference champions! Never Was such a title W. M w: ; w 'tj won with a more clean-cut record than that of the 1921 Oregon Pt: M"... l 1 basketball team, a record of 13 victories in 13 conference games . H i if! bearing mute testimony to the type of ball which characterized fig? 1': 9" u .. N7V the past season. Seventeen conference games were on the mgf'N 1:43:11 . y ya schedule. Oregon suffered but four defeats. A total of 20 games .' .2 tr ' a M , i 40 were played and of these 15 were victories for the Lemon-Yellow. 3.6 V" " w i H With the 1921 season Coach George M. Bohler makes his ?zW'E'i" p" 7. debut as an Oregon mentor. Aided by the return of four of last '51; aw" 1"" .M ' 5 W yearis first string men and considerable other promising material, 1.: 15$; MT?" "t ; N , Coach Bohler developed a squad which showed its calibre in the ', 1:5;in I 3"i 7 R consistently excellent ball which was displayed during the entire I f1. m u. v u H" 4b season. Oregon was handicapped in that her trip north was tgg gun erm V taken a bare two weeks after the opening of the season which ?E'Itli't x :n l? v 3 gave her but three non-conference games in which to hit her ,i in "w w, t W N, ha stride. The first encounter of the season was with Multnomah 31'? 19:1 4,! sin" w , ,' BOHLER Club at Portland. Eight men, including Captain Eddie Durno, 4 Q y I XV: W ht Haraitg Eaakrthall Marc Latham and Francis Beilar, made the trip down the river and were humbled by the clubmen, 19 to 21. Two games with Chemawa, which completed the pre-conference schedule, were played in Eugene the following week, January 14 and 15. Both contests were disastrous for the Indians, the first ending 27 to 18, and the second 30 to 16. Then came the trip north. Six men, Durno, Marc Latham, Hunk Latham, Nish Chapman, Bellar and Bill Reinhart, composed the squad which made its first stop in Salem. Here, expecting a real battle, the Lemon-Yellow annexed two games of the double header with Willamette, January 21 and 22. In the first game, with Hunk Latham benched for personal fouls and a 11 to 11 tie score at the end of the first half, the squad demonstrated its first inklings of real fight and brought home a 27 to 22 victory. A score of 21 to 17 tells the story of the second game. Two victories over Washington State followed. Coach Bohlerts men met an 3 gym: .5" kit! It fymnn 1,: am flidi'!lf$1.' 'Ii'KUK'M k M 13' 75-39;ka ipw- " twin:- :- rum; 1 rifflii'IW mm J n iill'rrifimdn arm H 3;; Ln qt"! I 3mg" 24.1." '3 fWPV '1 7'03"? um um. L 4 34mm be... aggregation trained by his brother "Doc" Bohler and the fact that each knew the 'Liitm'nu w h- . .. otheris style of play made the games ragged. Loose work characterized the first game iiii'au-n 4. J. with the Cougars J anuary 25 which ended 27 to 23. The next night both teams tightened 43' 13:4. N W. F" -I.M up, but the poor teamwork of the northerners was unable to withstand the onslaught S'iyh; Ham. a if of the Oregon forwards and they dropped the final whistle, 33 to 18. Two days later it .1-1 V;- '1! t 0 Oregon met the University of Washington at Seattle. The last five minutes of the first 1 4m W MN m '1. . I ma: , 3. . f m J. 213' Mi ,. ' .; Ra N J w w ., L? x, DURNO H. LATHAM M. LATHAM kn up r t: n-mxici??? k A Ex" XM; EA 3': 'yXl m n OMEN "m I" 011313. m WW? phtIGNI-ug, 't' v .- V at a! a The game ended 50 to 26. ping off at Corvallis, the team administered two in hard fought games. The Aggiets attempt to retaliate 0n the Eugene floor the following week proved ineffectual. The scores of the Corvallis games were close, the first being won by one point, but the lead established in the games on home court were taken by a wide margin. In the initial encounter Durnots ability to convert free throws gave the Lemon The week following the Pacific Coast conference title hung in the balance when the California Bears journeyed to Eugene. California had won five out of six games; Oregon six out of eight. With two victories, and the larger number of games to be played, Oregon could have taken the championship of the coast. Primed for battle, the Bears, using the short pass and short shot method of play, contrasted oddly with the long pass and long shot system used by the Oregon five. The games were the hottest of the season. In the initial encounter Oregon main- tained a lead With difficulty. The score see-sawed back and forth, Californiats tighter floor work giving them the advantage in the last few minutes of play. The tally was 23-26. The fate of the Varsity was the same the following night. Fighting from start to iinish they were unable to break into the speedy passing of the visitors and annexed but 18 to the Bear's 24 points. On February 21 Idaho journeyed to Eugene for a single game which proved a listless exhibition. The Gem Staters were handed a 31-19 defeat, Which gave Oregon a considerable lead in the northwest conference standing. The a two-game series and were defeated 33-27 nsiderably more speed than those played in , ower Oregon,s lead in the conference, played on March 4 and 5 two of the fastest games of the year. The Iirst went to the Lemon- Yellow by a margin of four points, 25 to 21, but the iinal encounter closed down to a 26 to 25 battle. The winning point was the most spectacular tally scored on the Armory floor this year. L 2. 4 REINHART CHAPMAN A MIX 7 fd' -' 14y? Ar 'yg7 h ' Whjhas E:- V, eason, Captain Eddie Durno plays his third and last e Varsity squad. Named in two mythical conference teams as first forward, the coaches and is unquestionably the fastest man in the Northwest or Pacific Coast squads. Eddie is sure of the basket from any place on the floor. His long shots as well as short ones are made with the same ease which characterizes his conversion of free throws. It will be a long time before Oregon sees as speedy or brainy a player as Eddie or as agile a man upon the floor. Eddie's bril- liancy is not of the grandstand variety, but real basketball. Hunk Latham, who played his first year with the Varsity, was named by J. Fred Bohler on the mythical all-Northwest five. He has all the qualities that go to make a good center; tall, rangy, fast on the iioor and an excellent shot from the immediate vicinity of the basket. Hunk proved most effective in tipping rebounds into the hoop. Marc Latham in his second year with the Varsity justified the hopes which he aroused last season. His aggresive offense is coupled with an ability to iind the basket and a knack of dodging which is illusive to the opponent guards. To Francis Bellar, a veteran of last season, must be given considerable credit for the low scores of the teams which Oregon met. Bellar received special mention when the all-Northwest mythical team was picked. As an offensive guard there were few in the conference which outshone him. He is sure death to a long pass and a good shot With the ending of this s year on th Durno is the unanimous choice of all at the basket. Nish Chapman, guard for the past two seasons, played a consistently brilliant game. His work on the northern trip and in the California games displayed his good judgment in breaking up his opponents plays. Nish is always on the job and augments his dribbling with a snappy and accurate pass. Bill Reinhart completed the guarding combination. His success comes from his sureness rather than his speed, but he is a hard man for forwards to get around and plays with an aggresiveness which more than offsets his slight deficiency in speed. BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS OF THE NORTHWEST CONFERENCE --144- ' 'llllli'n'HHHiHH 7 J? I'UCFbHWHUIIViH'IWiSI'I $5 Q; 3 r - k1 V: :1; 1 4.? 3. . -38.! 9:7 5 1 AM. 3G 7 y: , 514 r'g; E.Sl vw X9; 5 ,- a' 1': Date $ .3 3 a 1 E Q a J anuary 8 14 15 21 22 25 26 28 29 February 4 Total scores 5 11 12 18 Eh? $paamfa gmtnmarg Score 19 Multnomah 27 Chemawa 30 Chemawa 27 Willamette 21 Willamette 27 Washington State 33 Washington State 31 Washington 26 Washington 30 O. A. C. 25 O.A. C. 42 O.A. C. 37 O.A. C. 23 California 18 California 31 Idaho 33 Washington State 35 Washington State 25 Willamette 26 Willamette Opponents , Place Portland Engene Eugene Salem Salem Pullman Pullman Seattle Seattle Corvallis Corvallis Eugene Eugene Eugene Eugene Eugene Eugene Eugene Eugene Eugene 1: g l. rfl;. -- 1 '11??? V; ' V - 1-1 x11 k5? 1 x ,1 Elnhiuihual 332mm in Olnnfervnw $111125 Games Field Fouls Fouls Fouls Committed Player Played Goals Tried Scored Personal Technical Durno 17 67 180 136 13 4 H. Latham 143A 28 14 3 I M. Latham 17 45 35 7 Bellar 16 16 21 6 .; Chapman llvz 10 7 3 i , Reinhart 71x2 4 17 1 1' Couch 1 1 ' Veatch 14 1 1 f r . 3 3:: 1': D m- md 111. 31 g :1 NUNN IRELAND KEENEY 146 - 7 '11'q h" ' If; 0 37.: '1 1.1512 ' 1,1 7 mu: . 3 am: ?;x $51 $6: : v, ' if 4- vb- C; K: .- I Cw a Vhik u $54! I F- tt I V 3 6 ' x92 . :7 , I! Art Berg 3', . Nish Chapman 3 Eddie Durno Li W Merle Blake George King N ish Chapman Bill Reinhart Carl Knudson Dick Sundeleaf Carl Knudson J ohn Houston Q? x , Q2 nu. ., . . '1'? 59"-451 xx .fx: EN V." - . .t'g- 1.5.1? 52:. Wm 723V ' ,4. -I' ,3 5 I ' .l V . E b A 4 . . . 7-. 1' i Gbrher nf 1112 TV FOOTBALL Carl Mautz Bill Steers , Pierre Mead Franz J acobberger Mart Howard Spike Leslie Bill Reinhart Brick Leslie Ed Ward Rudd Brown Scotty Strachan N eil Morfltt BASKETBALL Mark Latham Franz J acobberger Franz Beller Eddie Durno Hunk Latham TRACK Glen Walkley Hank Foster Sid Hayslip Si Starr A1 Runquist Don Portwood BASEBALL Spike Leslie Bill Steers - Art Berg Bill Reinhart Franz J acobberger J ohn Gamble WRESTLIN G Bob Shephard . u - in wavi 772;; ,, , , M 7, ?ZWWZK? , 402 '96 '72, A MW 1 xm 4W ., $gg W: , 7x 2M k z?Q ?Q?W J , . ; 1 g, XngX? l 0W ,4 X: y W! MM ,4, 2 x 54 ',w33 FOSTER ABBOTT m, WW MWg , W$W 3g? gmxym :2 x??? g Wyxx f x ,9 WWny 2 MM ? XX v ; 2 w , TRACK STARS Wm 1 Jizg fwi; ' qt 7-4 MWWAAW. . J, 6?? I V 1 gt a I am k ,m' ' 2 1:5: ,1; k xr'a k X '1 9 I .$' 3, m. ,s -' V w .737 ' " ' thi f 13"" 2 a 23 zxy; $ -th 19.221533. $ka AQ$Xi A7, FNXAXM - F. W: w t' i I 9 fl ax. s i231 hit?" 3 y GAS Ki. f xw a I '- , 2 n 1" Q3. 1.1 i s .7 V27 a Wei 0 r: all n , f 4 k v I? i " ,4 way, Do Woodings, Don Davis, Wayne Akers, Bill Hayward, trainer, and Bob Case, not in picture. Members of the 1920 squad, reading from left to right, follows: Marion McClain, nald Portwood, Carl Knudsen, Ken Bartlett, Leo Cossman, Glenn Walkley, Earnitg Erark Spilling the proverbial dope right and left and furnishing a triumphant close for the 1920 season, Oregon athletes captured the northwest conference track and field meet at Pullman with a total of 36 points, O.A.C. taking second with 33 points and Idaho third with 30. Going to Pullman as a second rate team slated for defeat by O.A.C., the logical winners according to the dope sheet, the combination of Foster, Abbott, Bartlett, Knudsen, Walkley and the Lemon-Yellow relay team sprung the sufprise of the 1920 season. All three teams were in line for tirst place with the conference title at hand for either one and the broad jump and relay the only events remaining on the program, when Hank Foster won his third first place for the day, with a mark of 23 feet 10 inches in the broad jump and the Oregon relay team took that event in the remarkably fast time of 3:22v-cinching northwest honors for Bill Haywardis squad. Incidentally, Fosteris mark in the broad jump, although not a record breaker, was the best to be registered by any college athlete in the United States last year. Out of the four meets engaged in last year the Oregon cinder artists took two iirsts-at the northwest conference and in the Washington dual meet. It was in this meet that Foster, Oregonis premier trackman, tied the Pacific Coast record for the 220 when the stop watch ticked him off in 22 1-5 seconds. At the Pacific Coast conference meet at Palo Alto Ken Bartlett set a new Coast record for the discus with a' throw of 139 feet 111A; inches. Oregon lost the dual meet with O.A. C., staged in Corvallis, 80122 to 501A. The affair was clearly an Aggie victory from start to finish, the Corvallis representatives having a better rounded team, with the entrance number unlimited, than Oregon could A WI? '2 I 4: 3' "A.a r1; s Q A h.sk k k9 graduate manager, Harry Hargreaves, Emerald Sloan, Dick Sundeleaf, Roscoe Hemens Scotty Strachan, Sidney Hayslip, Art Kuhnhausen, Henry Foster, Leith Abbott, Floyd present. Foster, with 15 points representing first places in the 100, 220 and broad "jump, was Oregonis high point man as usual. In the Pacific Coast meet the northern athletes failed to stand a show against the well trained California men. Weather conditions afford the southern institutions a great advantage in spring track training which presents a handicap almost insurmount- able in competition with the northern colleges. This condition is well illustrated by the summary for the coast meet, in which California and Stanford led with 511A and 46 points, respectively, while O.A. 0., taking third place, could chalk up only 22 points, the remaining northern colleges ranging from there on downeW. S. C. 20, Oregon 11 and Washington 11V2. , The Washington-Oregon dual meet at Seattle was clearly ittoo much Bill Hay- wardtt for the Sun Dodgers. With the outcome a matter of a few points either way, the veteran Oregon coach completely outwitted itHech Edmundson, the Washington mentor, in manipulating his entries so as to bring the second and third placesewhich were largely responsible for the Lemon-Yellow victory. An example of Bills craftiness is illustrated in the 120 yard hurdles, in which Hargreaves, Oregonts diminutive track star, took second place. tiSkinny" never did the hurdles but Edmundson couldntt be expected to know that, so Bill gave Hargreaves specific instructions to finish the race without disqualifying himself by knocking down too many sticks. So "Skinnyii loped along and virtually jumped the obstacles. Resultethe Washington entry, in his haste to take second place, was disqualiiied and Oregon received three instead of one point in the event. ARIA n j E w 99 Q . E W ,. e :2 F" rpm Q E " m f? eh i x? tQE 11a; 'KE 1' Q ' 1 '1' "w 1-? 5: AV E E c ,1 w a....w: wx w W Aw. g 6 45-; t A: E waeffx OHIUEC gw , , M . 1 E Ev E EE . h 1," 4 I x x! r 1 VJ J :4 ; E 1.3; V V . Q" 3 v ix 4 M J E ;L t '05 17!; 1V.- IIIE V VEX J1 .11. a 9-1-1 ,- 3 gr rm E x Q t f . h$ SUMMARY OF NORTHWEST CONFERENCE MEET Carl Knudsen, Sidney 1;. k3 I'd! 2A4; : k A. xhh X I -$W duh S; v I , ,e E The season marked the winning of letters by six new men- a. E E ' Hayslip, Dick Sundeleaf, Don Portwood, Glenn Walkley and Bob Case, while Hank ,I'": E E E :5 . Foster won his third track 110" and Ken Bartlett, Leith Abbott and EESkinny" Har- E 5! E E E E M $3 greaves their second Oregon emblems. The 1920 schedule furnished considerable oster, who was taxed to the limit in E '1' E strain on HaywardEs list of veterans, especially F every meet. The veteran Oregon captain was called upon for four hard events, the A E 100, 220, broad jump and relay, which constitute a full days work to say the least. Although no Varsity meets were staged on the campus during the year, Oregon students will long remember the brand of Ethght" demonstrated by Hank in that memorable E E Aggie meet of 1919. m EEEE E EE . INDIVIDUAL POINT RECORDS HE E Man Wash. 13.0.0011. O.A.C. N.W.Con. Total E 11; 1E dag Foster .................................................. 18 3 15 1614 5214 j E . .. Bartlett ................................................ 6 5 6 3 21 E E i Abbott .................................................. 5 1 5 614 1714 E HE: Walkley .............................................. 8 1 6 5 20 E; E Knudsen .............................................. 9 3 '12 E EE E E I Portwood ............................................ 7 9 E E E E Hayslip ................................................ 114 114 KYLE Sundeleaf ............................................ 3 114 414 . E E E Hargreaves .......................................... 11 1 12 , .- . E' Akers .................................................... 1 1 E1 EE 1. ' ' Case ...................................................... 5 1 A6 E E , E . 9. Strachan .............................................. 3 3 E :EE E E E E. E," Hunt' ...................................................... 2 IV; 3119. E EE EE EE Cossman .............................................. 3 3' E Kennon ................................................ 1 1 w E E E E 31 i E j? E1 E if E E E 1:; E E E. E EE E II E 3 :E e E;, E E 0 ' E i L E v-152 - e E "E E 1 Eq V E 0-6' .. '6 1h : V ll. X t I , a Wigs! i 1 , I 1919 TRACK SCHEDULE Wash. Ore. May 8-Washington-Oregon, Seattle .................................................................. 64 66 Calif. Stanford O.A.C. W.S.C. Wash. Ore, May 15-P. C. Conf., Palo Alto ................ 5115 46 22 20 llvz 11 O.A.C. Ore. 6801K; 501l2 Ore. O.A.C. Idaho Wash. W.S.C. Mont. Whit. May 29-N. W. C0nf., Pullman 36 33 30 25 22 13 5 May 21-0. A. 0,-0r6gon, Corvallis ........................................................................ hu- N D E U S R D E U N N A K M D, - N T .I R L A m, w L a S F. R L - . m m E E B E T S GAMBLE, JACOBBERGER, V. F. JACOBBERGER, MANAGER SCHMEER JACOBSON, LEFT T0 RIGHT COACH HUNTINGTON, FRONT ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT FOX. REAR ROW, E. . ..w w .55. . . I.u .M . :9, A 3 . . , .... $an , m . 4.4x 19E i! n. uhaua lat: Ti: "1 Ta a... Hut1 i .hw .90 m .3 - gzwaa ..$.J .x. .. iii. 2.. . A uwaml ma .4: I: ran K. .3 ... KiluhimlJ Run '- 6 ..3: psi :5 4L: c ,x 5K? i 1 . fwd; .. .u 1.. . 3.. a: w .3: t ml??? I Q xi A1 7 r thy kV- Eat A, '4! x as 2.3; nnuc-;nu .4 -m. u. t; I .Dulo $ 4 A ... .uo-a-nu . m'nrarr-33 3.2-:ch f-t . Haraity Eamhall The Varsity baseball team finished a very successful season this year, winning the N orthwest Conference championship and tieing for third place in the Pacific Coast Conference, playing only six gamesand winning all of them. Oregon opened with two practice games with the Moosejaw team of the Canadian League. The Lemon-Yellow broke even on these games. The Conference schedule was opened in Seattle against the Sun- dodgers, where the first game was lost, 6-2, and the second, 11-5. The next games were with Washington State College at Pullman. In a land- slide of hits the Oregon team won both games, 9 to 4 and 8 to 4. In the two games Oregon made .21 hits. Moscow was the next stopping place and the Gem Staters were taken into camp by a 10 t0 9 score in one of the most sensational games of the season. Oregon made three runs in the ninth on hits by Steers, Lind, Knudsen and Fox. In the second game'with Idaho, Oregon won 14 to 0. In this game 21 hits were scored off Hunter, the Idaho hurler. Of this number Manerud and Knudsen each got four. The next day the Oregonians met the Missionaries at Walla Walla town. Old man Hard Luck was on their trail this time and after a hard fought contest they lost by a three to two score. In the second game, hard hitting combined with excellent team work gave Oregon the big end of the score, 14 to 6. In this contest Billy Reinhart managed to bingle five ttTHE GOOF IN HIS MANY POSES'i-IN ONE SCENE BY THE VARSITY BASEBALL NINE 3mm ff"!!! I8 I it mu 9.;- REINHART a; i 542 2:2 ggtleg r z k.- $ , o. 14' if! ' i. i. rang? times out of five times up to bat, and Karl Knudsen succeeded in knocking out a homer, a triple and a two-bagger. An incident of this game was the fact that Ralph Knudsen, Karlis brother, was the Missionary pitcher. Following a ten day tour, wherein the Oregon team played eight games, they returned home and dropped two contests to Stanford. Bill Steers was the stellar light in both these contests. The defeats were due largely to the fact that the men were tired after their trip. Washingon State College nine were the next Visitors on the local lot. After only a two day rest the home team beat the visitors, first by 10 t0 5, and in the Second game 7 t0 3. In the annual row with the Oregon. Aggies the Lemon-Yellow beat their ancient enemies in the first go, 6 to 3, with Art Berg pitching a five hit game. Herman Lindis two home runs were responsible for all the runs made. 0. A. C. heavy hitting brought bad luck to Oregon inthe second contest and the Visitors took it with a 14 to 8 score. In this, Keene, the star Aggie hurler, was on the mound. The Sundodgers from up Seattle way came down and took a beating from the locals in one of the best games of the season. It was a pitcherKs battle throughout, Berg as the Oregon twirler and Rode as Washingtonis, Six to two in favor of the Washingtonians, was the way the score read in the second game. Oregon seemed unable to bunch hits, Chamber- lain, the Sundodger pitcher, striking out 15 men." It was the only time STEERS . JACOBBERGER sh hu'f iwa ssh n '.;. f .-:-N..A S $ m 1 ft - m: -J 0; z"d I n, 7 r 9.; s xa w V2, a I 5 i K , '5. .AK b- g Oregon nine at eason that any pitcher was able to keep the his mercy throughout an entire game. he season Oregon shut out 0 A. C., 4 to 0, by the during the s In the last set-to of t use of Berg,s famous pitching arm. Oregon made eleven hits but was on runs. 0. A. C. made five hits but cro nine innings, beating Oregon. It was B in each of them the opponents were only able to score five hits. Oregon had a scrappy, hard-hitting team, Lind leading the Sluggers with a seasonis average of .403. He was one of the leading hitters of the Conference, and several of Oregonis Victories were due to his ability to handle the stick. He led the circuit swatters by making five home runs. tiSkeet" Manerud, Oregonis lead-off man, was able to bat an average of .372, being second in theilist of bat artists. Being a hard man to pitch to and an excellent hitter, he was a dangerous man from the opposing teams Viewpoint. He was high point man when it came to stealing bases and scoring runs. Knudsen hit .362, making two home runs and six triples. He started the season as a pitcher, but due to an injury to his arm, finished the year in the right garden. "Billyii Reinhart had a batting average of .333 to his credit when the last game of the season was finished. He also had an enviable reputation as a fielder. In the second game, at Corvallis, 1y able to convert two of them into ssed the plate three times during the ergis third game in four days, and i a 2,4. REINHART LESLIE KNUDSEN -158- gtggthZEI Em mg: 12?; erg; mink W11; d' WW ' 4' sq $4. y game of the season and had a batting average of .290. der'ed one of the most consistent players on the team. Steers played the center field position and made a number of sensa- tional catches during the season. His average as a swatter was .276, six three-baggers and two home runs being chalked up to his credit. Berg hit for an average of .272 and was by far Oregonts best heaver. He won five out of seven starts and fanned a total of 71 men. In the last five contests 0f the season he allowed less than five hits a game. As a slab artist he is of professional calibre. Francis J acobberger, pitcher, also had a good year, winning four out of five starts. His batting average was .230. The batting averages of the other players were as follows: J acobberger, 209; Fox, 147; Jacobson, 111. He was consi $y h JACOBSON v. JACOBBERGER MANERUD 1 1 1-"? r 'L- 7 vm' v i y 1 cf ' aw A WI! Q ! is; ,v i ngV $ w, SUMMARY OF GAMES Place of Game Eugene .............................. Eugene .............................. Seattle .............................. Seattle .............................. Pullman ............................ Pullman ............................ Moscow ............................ Moscow ............................ Walla Walla .................... Walla Walla .................... Eugene .............................. Eugene .............................. Eugene .............................. Eugene .............................. Eugene .............................. Eugene .............................. Eugene .............................. Eugene .............................. Corvallis .......................... Corvallis .......................... Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon Oregon NANAoomqom-q Teams Moosejaw Moosejaw U. of W. U. of W. W. S. C. W. S. C. Idaho Idaho Whitman Whitman Stanford Stanford W. S. C. 99?:53993 ??$3??m 9.023.090 H H mwccoup-uswmom WOGNVPWOOUIGH f n :5, pl. 'v . 6 1:09 r! w bl Jr: ' gle' 1'," m ' . h 3W IN '. 1 5' fwiylHW'w "4 4 .. K1 , m Mm. ' V , - 5' W " . W 5? M ' W'r ' ';r rniuu .4. m' 'm "m; nary!!! W M t; r M 3' w'b "1 12???? n, w "a w :n-an v?! 3" W E-mqw rm 5.: l T5 1:! u h 'It' an mp H. hwy: ?- Q5313!" Num- run, . 4' ' - 12; r .q'.;? ANAl w J, " '. r. 'a a uJ n7"? h gutter Three games of soccer were played by the University team this season, two with O.A.C. and one With the Eugene Allstars, captained by Neal Ford, former Stanford player. The two games against the Aggies resulted in ties, the score being 0-0 in the iirst and 2-2 in the second. The contest With the Allstars, which was promoted to enliven student body interest in this activity, terminated in a 0-0 score. This is the eighth year of soccer playing by the University of Oregon aIfd during this time four games were won, eight tied and three lost. The old Scotch game was introduced at Oregon in 1913 by Colin V. Dyment, present dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, who coached this years aggregation into a formidable scoring machine. More enthusiasm was evinced for the sport this year than formerly. However soccer has had a severe handicap here owing to the lack of a good field and sufficient t funds to back it properly. Lively interest was shown by the students and faculty this h year which brightens the outlook for soccer in the future. Dr. John Bovard, head of T. I. 3:: a I '6 the physical education department, promised his support in making the game a letter ' , sport if the men take sufficient interest next fall. Oregon has an excellent coach in . Dean Dyment. While he was able to give the team only a small portion of his time 'l . m he worked wonders with the men. Credit must also be given the players for their i ' '. persistent practice through all kinds of weather, playing often on a muddy field. , aw The Oregon team this year was composed of Pat Patterson, Elmo Madden, Monte ' x Byers, Al Capps, Phil Brogan, Dan McPherson, Tubby Ingles, Harold Deadman, Henry nu : I Koerber, Hay Schmeer, Patterson, Hube Jacobberger and Morgan Staton. w 6 mg 11 ml 6 C. 5 f 2 V x it u ' 2 L I l , . O l . I SOCCER TEAM a 161a Wrestling Wrestling took a new lease on life at the University of Oregon this year after a partial dormancy lasting since the war. On February 11 an Oregon wrestling team met O.A. C. at Corvallis, consisting of Wagner, 125 pounds, who lost on two decisionS; Sheppard, 125 pounds, who won his fall and decision; Woodruff, 148 pounds, who lost on the fall; Norton Winnard, 158 pounds, who won one and lost two, and Bradway, 175 pounds, who got one draw and lost two decisions. At the beginning of the first two teams about 45 men signed up to take wrestling under the instruction of Arvo tSii Simola. As in the case of the boxing team there was no definite schedule arranged and for a time the men did not know whether they were going to have any bouts or not. When the meet was finally arranged with O. A. C. it was such a short time off that the team was forced to get in condition to meet their opponents in a very limited time. Dean Bovard, head of the physical education department, assures a more definite schedule for next year and it is expected that several matches witll be arranged. The contest with O.A. C. will be held here next season. Coach Simola has some promising material lined up for next year and expects . am!!! up on u even more interest to be taken in the sport then than this year. That Oregon is really " in thinking more seriously about wrestling is evidenced by the fact that it is a letter sport run! "314'" ' ,;;.m '2: '11 "mm at the present time. VARSITY WRESTLING TEAM 1 1'9 m milk m h u 3mm. 13 '1 3' m m t5 0! UN is: in mum 1? his a n 1.3: a! Mime ea 13:4 93; A 3!! H113 ', bu. unmt Int! ad 9W3 T'WCL'HQF' 131:!135W l 1 Eu LU $79 MM !, 'siw N I t m ' l v 4' l I Boxing at Oregon is becoming more popular among the students. meet was staged with Multnomah Club at For another in the spring. The men who faced th who fights at 130 pounds; L. A. Culbertson, pounds. While none of the University men won their bouts they showed good form and give promise of good work in the future which reflects credit upon Charles Dawson, the student boxing instructor who was added to the staff at the beginning of the year. Dawson instructed classes of 140 men during the fall and winter terms, but in the spring only about 30 men were allowed to register in the course. This will allow the instructor sufficient time to give each man the attention that is needed. With the large classes it was impossible to reach each man during the class hour and under the new method every student in the course may receive personal instruction from Dawson at least once during the period. There is some verypromising material in the University, freshman class, and it expected that a formidable aggr year. The schedule this year With other teams was rather indefinite, making it awkward for both the team and coach, but it is expected that the schedule will be fully arranged in the future owing to the awakened interest and good turnout this year. This year a tland and it is probable that there will be e Multnomah boxers were: Acie Merrifield, at 133 pounds, and Charles Lucas, at 150 especially among the egation will be turned out next Wow 3 e a t g 5 i f VARSITY BOXING TEAM ,7, i h T ' '91. .Te V? 5'31. t gm :5: f 1:; Q7.-. 52' x -A t t '1 T T w r l; Mikxxxi ..;;;ctzgia$gn wka IQQV x 6 1 .Mtj if I e ijgt Faub..3jR1!LmE C; b 7 $5, g t t .0 J , T T ,1: T it Q52 5; . t , ' "1 V; e th'; t p2,. T X I . Ill; . T' T t, 4 f 5 W; 17ft , II ' l a" Q! 1 C57 $?mimmmg The only meet in which the University of Oregon swimming team participated last year was staged here against Multnomah Club during Junior Week-end. Eight places were captured by Oregon. The men Who placed for the University were: Fred Howard, third in the 100 yard dash; Kurashige, third in the breast stroke; Hazard and Kurashige, second and third respectively in the back stroke; Hazard, third in the 50 yard dash; Murchie and Hedges, second and third respectively in the distance swim, and Capps, third in the diving contests. An Oregon swimming team compose Q t "WK Q t I if? r 1; 2K xx-N V, d of Austin tHapT Hazard and George Neale won three places in the Oregon state championship meet held in Portland this year and sponsored by the Multnomah Club. Neale placed third in the free style for seniors and fourth in the 100 yard dash, while Hazard placed fourth in the 50 yard free style. Water P010 is in its infancy at Oregon, but according to the interest exhibited by the students here and the excellent quality of available material, everything looks favorable to' its jumping to the foreground in minor sports. Under the coaching and captaincy of Fred L. Howard, former member of the interallied team in Europe, the team has developed into an efflcient machine. Captain Howard has received letters from some of the colleges of the northwest who are anxious to compete against Oregon ' polo and. in all probability some of these matches Will be arranged in the .Sk e ,' in water near future. This years team consists of: Howard, F; Wilsey, F; Douglas, F; Du Paul, G; Ringler, G; Palmer, G, and Murchie, G. Substitutes, Hazard and Buchannan. Wu - mrer-aiwwv 4 . u r- . I I e n 4 1'; VARSITY SWIMMING TEAM , ' i v164e- VARSITY TENNIS PLAYERS GETTING INTO ACTION mania Oregon held one dual tennis meet with Willamette University of Salem last spring inthe Northwest Conference. The first contest was held in Salem on May 7, and resulted in a victory for Oregon, while in the return match, held here on Junior Week-end, Oregon won both the men,s singles and ments doubles, but the womens singles and mixed doubles went to 'Willamette. Arrangements were open for dual meets With Washington and O. A. 0., but due largely to depleted funds the final arrangements were not made. A formidable group of raquet wielders was turned out here last season under the captaincy of Mortimer Brown, northwest singles Champion. In the final match with Willamette Brown defeated Moody of Salem in an evenly matched contest lasting a little more than an hour; By his superior head work and smashing drives Brown won by the scores of 6-3 and 7-5. Harry Westerman and Kenneth Smith, who successfully represented Oregon last year, are both back in school this spring. These men together With some promising aspirants of last year, and material from the Freshman class in- sures a bright future for the game at Oregon. Enough interest has been evinced for tennis here to make it a letter sport. This year the Pacific Coast Conference tennis meet will be held in Eugene on May 20 and 21. The schedule of the University this year includes 0. A. C., Willamette University, Reed College and M. A. A. C. for both men and women. The dates have not been definitely decided upon as yet. x KZQ 47W 'Z k; ..w '4 h 1 .c K h i I" V RX S . ash ' X , 3:3.- f: f s!. .'9 ,a f 1x I .- 4h Zlirpahman Ennthall ball next season, viewed from the performance of the Prospects for Varsity foot n the sport horizon. The babe gridsters freshman eleven this year, 100m bright upo , created history, not only in the annexing of the games with the O.A.C. rocks and Paciiic, but in the development of line and backfield material that will count when the call for practice is sounded in 1921. The frosh were fortunate in having two coaches trained in Oregon tactics. Ken Bartlett and Baz Williams handled the first. year men, Bartlett coaching the backheld while Williams worked with the line. The first real game of the season came a bare three weeks after actual practice rted when Pacific University was played on Kincaid field October 25 and humbled th at record of a 6 t0 6 tie with the O.A.C. rocks the week previous. There followed a game with Chemawa, Which was played October 30 on the Indians, gridiron. The freshmen battled hard but luck broke against them and in the last few minutes of play victory was snatched from beneath their grasp. Chemawa won 10 t0 9. The yearlings classic was p College rooks. Hayward field was slipper sta by a 27 to 7 score. Pacific came here wi layed on Armistice Day against the Oregon Agricultural y under the light drizzle which accounted for the many fumbles by both sides. The frosh started merrily down the field in the first quarter and planted the ball beneath the posts, annexing the additional point by kicking goal. The second period developed into a punting battle, but iri the beginning of the third quarter the freshman backs smashed through the rooksi line for a series of yard- age gains which brough the ball over the line. They failed, however, to kick goal and the score stood 13 t0 0 when the final whistle blew. The last period developed no scoring but was replete with brilliant aerial attempts by both elevens, the completion of which was hampered by the wet field and slippery pigskin. The freshman backfield combination was compose Harold Chapman, Charles Parsons and Lee Weber. In the line Digman, Allan Mooers and Whipple handled the ends, Kel King and Dick Reed the tackles, Slim Johnson and Horace Byler the guards and Bill Johnson The team was captained by "Kenny, Burton. d of Ken Burton, Lynn Whipple, center. FROSH FOOTBALL TEAM -166- WI "nu cog r ". hi rmhvzu f 5C 11'! If; 5 I Yum" mu; 1 W M Ln w Mt'u 7k .- m w :2: rt: 661x k mm: 1: w: r a raw m: .1 ' m , ,v-.'u.wrlvt'-ii ' I n uuwmif" ax t . n M7332nil I 2 I mm. yin" de-m'2tli ; N at F'm my! 12.?5 ImeUhtw'antz Kg N rm 2 x14 .11 .21ly'.ntr 1W ahmwuiya.?3 $?ai ,....mM2 111 iHrwhman Eazkethall Freshman basketball for the frosh have faced for some time. of 30 men in Which he found con of the tangles with the Varsity s The squad was composed Douglas, Chapman and Black, g The team was captained by Rockhey. J anuary ; 21 22 28 February 4 5. 11 12 18 19 March 1 THE FRESHMAN SCHEDULE Freshmen Freshmen Freshmen Freshmen Freshmen Freshmen Freshmen Freshmen Freshmen Freshmen 27 24 28 9 9 21 30 19 18 32 Roseburg High Roseburg High Franklin High 0. A. C. Rooks O. A. C. Rooks O. A. C. Rooks O. A. C. Rooks Franklin High Multnomah Inter. Washington High 1921 season was one of the heaviest years that the Coach Shy Huntington began the season with a squad siderable promising material. econd team, were played during the season. of Alstock and Rockhey, forwards; uards; Ten games, uninclusive McMillan, center; Wilsey, Oliver, Gore and Blackman, alternates. 17 21 21 31 26 25 24 13 FROSH BASKETBALL TEAM ZHerhman CIIrark Four track meets, three of which were won by the first year men, is the record of Bill Hayw'ard,s freshman team for the year of 1920. The annual meet with the O.A. C. rooks was held on Kincaid field May 15 and taken by the'rooks with a score of 66 to 56. The fresh were handicapped by the in- ability of Arthur Tuck to enter in but three events, due to an injured knee. He placed first, however, in the javelin throw with a distance of 178 feet, first in the shot -put, 40 feet 10 inches, and first with the discus, 128 feet 10 inches. These three first made him high man for the meet. In the mile Koepp placed first in 4:35 2-5. Collins took the 440 in 50 2-5, while Walters cleared the bar at 11 feet for first place in the pole vault. 'Greer won the broad jump with a distance of 20 feet 9 inches. First place in the 100, 220, 880, high jump and low and high hurdles went to O.A. C. Oregon took all three places in the pole vault while 0. A. C. annexed all three places in the low hurdles. For the frosh Oberteuffer scored third in both the 220 and the 100 yard dashes. Phillips took second in the pole vault. Third places were won by Wyatt in the 440 yard dash, Engle in the pole vault, Greer in the high hurdles, Malone in the broad jump and Nunn in the high jump. The hrst meet of the year was staged with Chemawa in Eugene on May 4. The freshmen won by a score of 64-56, the tally running evenly until the last event which was the relay race, taken by the Oregon team. Larson won the 100 in 10 3-5 and Peltier ran the half mile in 2:0014. Koepp made the mile in 4:48 and Walters took the pole vault. Oberteuffer ran the 220 in 23 2-5. Chemawa showed up strongest in the weights and jumps. McKinney, with ten points, was high point man. The other two meets, with Washington High School and Jefferson High School, of Portland, proved easy Victories for the freshmen. The Washington meet was held FROSH TRACK TEAM '0L' UV '1 1031,!!! :3 m: V tlwuwn Vin 1-! 1-! .W 1L". 'Ji :1: 3" 1H" :3. hm" 1 'h r327: tmau 1! Ir- 5 1 A '3, Aymttti n 3.. m :97: .1 1 u w: hm I mad :3 $530: 1 ,..1' ml , M le'W-c EC 0 .l IIOAM'K 990051 in Eugene May 8 and the prepers were able to score but one hrst. Oberteuffer, with Iirsts in the 100 yard and 220 yard dashes, was high point man, making a total of 121A; points; Greer followed, scoring 11, while Nunn and Collins tied for third with 914 points. The Jefferson squad, which annexed the state interscholastic championship, met the freshmen on Kincaid May 22. Oregon won the meet with a 92 to 30 score, Arthur Tuck being high man with a total of 1614 points. The members of the freshman team and their r Phillips, pole vault; Wyatt, 440, 220; Peltier, 8 javelin; Ireland, hurdles; Brown, shot, discus; Tuck, 100, 220, shot, discus, jaVelin; Oberteuffer, 100, 220; Waters, pole vault; Greer, mrdles, broad jump; McKinney, 220, 440, high jump; Larson, 100,220; Royer, 440; Boyer, 220; Couch, 100; Malone, hurdles; Koepp, mile; Blackburn, two mile. espective events follow: 80; Collins, 440; Ingle, pole vault, Shields, shot, discus; Nunn, high jump; FROSH TRACK TEAM - an ,1 1 x4. ' 26.11:; 5" $1 4.5, V "o IQ" Six m- :;w H? ???We 930 5 he" .. 'T k ; t 11' t. ' 1 i'. q! k V a' 4 ?- Li Efrmhman Eazvhall m. Coach Dick Nelson was faced with the problem of weeding out a freshman baseball squad from over 40 aspirants to fame 0n the diamond Who reported at the initial practice of the 1920 season. The hrst game scheduled with the O.A.C. rooks was postponed due to the fact that practice had been in progress but two weekS. The following Saturday, April 30, the rooks were played here, defeating the freshmen by a score of 12 to 1. Gray and Furrey were the batteries for the freshmen. The return game with O.A. C. was played in Corvallis May 20. The yearlings turned the tide in the seventh, changing a 1 to 1 tie to a 4 to 1 victory for Oregon. On Junior Week-end Columbia was played in Eugene and defeated by a 13 to 2 score. Several games were played during the year with the Eugene High School, the freshmen proving too strong for the prepers, defeating them each time by heavy scores. The lineup of the freshman team follows: Rolla Grap, p; Pink Manerud, 0; Ralph Smith, 1b; Art Base, 2b; Carl Svarverud, 3b; Hube Jacobberger, 55; John McEntee, 1f; Eugene McEntee, If; John Alexander, cf; Don Zimmerman, rf; Ducky Holmes, Fent Ford and Doc Furrey, substitutes. '10 FROSH BASEBALL NINE Enughnut Swarm The Kappa Sigma teams captured the three championships in intramural athletics, basketball, baseball and track. The doughnut championship in basketball for the year 1920-21 was annexed by their speedy quintet. The Kappa Sigs defeated every team in the league with the exception of the Delta Tau Delta five, who took the champions into camp early in the season. The Delts, however, 10st games subsequently to teams defeated by pennant Winners. The race for the top in the doughnut league early de- veloped into a three-cornered hght between the Kappa Sigs, the Fijis and the Owls; the Phi Gamma Delta aggregation topped the percentage column with a thousand per cent but struck a snag in the Kappa Sigs who defeated them in two hard fought games 16-9 and 11-6. The champion quintet was composed of Andre, Rockhey and Strayhorn, forwards; Shields and Blackman, centers; Burnett and Culbertson, guards. A great deal of credit for the planning and carrying on of the season should be given to Coach George M. Bohler. The doughnut championship in baseball for 1920 was won by the hard hitting Kappa Sig nine. They defeated the Weonas, an independent non-fraternity team, in the finals by a score of 12-1. The battery of Shields and Earl worked well for the winners who kept a consistent lead throughout the game. Tiny kept the Weona hits well scattered while his team mates hit Amburn at will. Several strong teams put in an appearance, making a strong bid for the championship. Sigma Chi played excellent ball, having a well balanced team and were only put out of the running by the brilliant pitching 0f Amburn 0f the Weonas who held them to one scratch hit in the semi-Iinals. The Fijis looked good until they were outhit by the Kappa Sigs. KAPPA SIG, WINNERS OF BASKETBALLuCHAMPIONSHIP mrww; V ,Ww u w DINTY gimimming The climax of interest in swimming was reached when the Uni- versity women's team defeated the O.-A. C. mermaids on May 8, 1920. The contest for intercollegiate honors was held in the mens tank at the University and resulted in the victory for Oregon by a score of 53 to 13. The competition was keen and evoked widespread interest. The program arranged was composed of free style events at different distances, breast stroke, back stroke, plunge for distance, strokes for form, relay race and fancy diving. Frances Moore of the University was high point winner, win- ning 18 of the 53 points. Oregon was represented by the following girls: Frances Moore, Wenona Dyer, Helen Nelson, Winifred Hopson, Helen Nicolai, Carolyn Cannon, Hope Mackenzie, Valiere Coffey, Marion Nicolai and Frances McGill. Four women on the Varsity were awarded sweaters for their work on the team. These were Helen Nelson, Valiere Coffey, Wini- fred Hopson and Frances Moore. With the completion of the new tank in the woments building a great deal of VARSITY HIGH POINT WlNNERS : - .a fawn In t Hen him; '1': '. t ' ,. a Man. mime 449 mi uaia L? . Ly?! '32!" I. m V , Te 1: . m; a :l. ax, I interest has been aroused in the aquatic sport. Many women turned out to try for places on the class teams. The interclass meets were held Saturday afternoon, March 21. Keen rivalry made the meet of great interest both to spectators and swimmers. The freshmen girls won with a total of 32 points. The sophomores came second with 29 points and the juniors third with 21 points. Frances Moore, swimming for the sophomores, was high point winner of the meet, winning 22 of the 29 points. Muriel Myers, a Freshman, was second high point winner and was awarded the Woments Athletic Association trophy, a swimming suit, since Miss Moore was given the trophy last year. Emily Houston, a Freshman, won the plunge for distance; Leila Ptack and Agnes Schultz, Freshmen, won first and second places respectiveely, in diving. Helen Nesson was high point winner for the Juniors. The members of the teams were: Seniors, Maud Largent and Eva Kelly; Juniors, Margaret Russell, Helen Nelson, Carolyn Cannon, Winifred Hopson and Wanna Mc- Kinney; Sophomores, Frances Moore, Frances McGill, Wenona Dyer, Valiere Coffey, Emily Veazie and Marion Nicolai; Freshmen, Grace Conivers, Emily Houston, Muriel Myers, Leila Ptack, Star N0rt0n,-Agnes Schultz and Harriett Veazie. The women,s life saving corps, a branch of the American Red Cross life saving corps, was organized on the campus in the spring of 1920. The following seven girls qualified for membership: Jeannette Moss, Dorothy Reed, Helen Nelson, Valiere Cof- fey, Marion Nicolai, Emily Veazie and Frances Moore. zzzzmxxxh WW! WW Wx THE NEW TANK it x t i n t i i , i i in u : .1 i i i 1 H i , t i 11 i M i 1 1 i t t H z .1 1' t M 9 hi i 1' t i t , v i; w H , H t i it i i ii i :1 . .t t i 1 i i r t I it t , 1 1 , 1 I i t i mwi t: :i:,,, 1 I m 1 ,Mt J M t i i t A ti V t. 11 i it i J h i H V ivW . i 1 t g m WV t 1 1 ti 3 1 v u 1: i y i . t i tl Y 1 Vi t i w 1 l 1 M i i J t q i .1 c t t . p t . . , H wk 1 i , i ' i 1 1'1 V i 3 5 L . .5 t n ' . I x . i i i y i x $1 V xx '- Kt F l ;t . 23-!Eg; 5:72 ri m; , 41 ,?:i 2K0 x; h; v. - Wile Q: N44; ;' 6Q Q. rec A ins: W A h; ' Eaakethall A great deal of interest and enthusiasm was shown this year towards girls basketball in which over 100 came out to work for house teams. This year was the first attempt at doughnut league basketball and the results were altogether successful. There were eight houses which entered teams in the league besides several others who made a good attempt. The teams which entered the contest were: Gamma Phi Beta, Hendricks Hall, Kappa Alpha Theta, Zeta Rho Epsilon, Oregon Club, Delta Delta Delta, Alpha Phi and Thacher Cottage. The Gamma Phi Beta girls won the series by a close margin over the Hendricks Hall girls. Seth Laraway of Larawayts Jewelry Shop of Eugene donated a lovely silver cup for the winner of the series. These two teams played a series of three games before it could be determined which was the better team. The scores of these games I were as follows: 24 to 23 in favor of Gamma Phi Beta. In the second 4'. game the Hendricks Hall team rallied and brought the score up to 27 to 19 in their favor. In the last game, however, the Gamma Phi Betats returned with the winning spirit and ended the game in their favor 'with a score of 24 to 23. The Gamma Phi Beta girls displayed unusually good team work throughout the series. The players in the final game were Helen Nelson and Margaret Murphy, forwards; Hildred Hall and Wenona Dyer, centers; Edith Herrin and Alice Garretson, guards. Hendricks Hall players were Lynetta Quinlan and Vernetta Quinlan, forwards; Helen King and Agnes Christie, centers; Emily Perry and Ruth Wolfe, guards. The girls Varsity team met the Oregon Agricultural College girls on March 12 at Corvallis in a hard fought battle in which 0. A. C. came out with the highest score. The game was fast throughout. The O.A.C. girls were much the heavier in most cases which helped them a great deal to top the score to 19 points, while the visitors were only able to reach 11 points. The girls who made the trip were: Captain Charlotte Howells, Helen Nelson, Dorothy MeKee, Emily Perry, Maud Largent and Lucy VandeSterre. The substitutes were Sarah Martin, Eloise Harris and Oletta Pedersen. The girls who did the best work for Oregon were Dorothy McKee, Emily Perry, guards, and Helen Nelson, forward. The guards displayed unusually good pass work as well as breaking up the forward passes. CHARLOTTE ,.1 'rr'; ,- t 3x . Z . :I- f"? V 75;, .ijryl; m f9 , ewes " A ' ! y ; Wt T X e i' t '- . I; S . ff ? Little time was spent on class basketball this year, owing to the fact that so much time was used for the Doughnut league games, nevertheless the games were clean and fast. The class of 223, who took the Hayward Cup last year, came back strong this year with the determination to retain it, but were unable to hold the Freshmen, who took the initial game by a score of 14 to 16. The Junior-Senior game resulted in a one-sided score in favor of the Junior class. The final game was played between the Freshmen and Juniors in the mens gym, on March 18. The score was 27 to 26 for the Freshmen. The line-ups were: Freshmen Junior L. Quinlan ..................... t ....................................... F .......................................................... Helen Nelson V. Quinlan .......................................................... F .................................................... Oletta Pederson Edna Largent .................................................. J. C .................................................... Maurine Elrod Helen King ........................................................ R. C .............................................. Caroline Cannon Eloise Harris ...................................................... G ........................................................ Sarah Martin Alice Garetson .................................................. G ........................................................ Echo Balderee Substitute: Juniothlorence Furuset. VARSITY TEAM -177e Clamping New canoes, bought last year by the physical education de- partment, have more than proved their value by the increase in demand for canoeing as a sport. Interhouse and interclass contests are a regular event each year. The paddles given by the Womenis Athletic Association were won by Vivian Chandler and Nancy Fields, of the junior class. Walking One very popular outdoor sport at Oregon is walking. The surrounding country is most favorable for either short walks or long hikes. Who has gone through college without climbing Spencerts Butte? And those who have made a week-end hike up the McKenzie are to be envied and emulated. The ideal of the Womenis Athletic Asociation is to have all the women students participating in some sport, and walking is especially adaptable and beneficial. In the spring and fall easy hikes for conditioning and regular long ones are arranged. A great deal of enthusiasm is manifest and compe- tition for the trophy sweater is keen. r M inn "h I 9' Luvu tr '2 v t. 2 Wu: lam Ma 5." 1mm; u; h f m,"- t" J M mu iWSRmr-u . Mar 111M: . rpm 4:: WN m .Q MARION Emma The tennis season last year was most successful. The tennis classes were fllled to overflowing and combined with the elimina- tion tournament and interclass matches, the courts seldom were not in use. The elimination tournament for Varsity metwith great enthusiasm and some class matches were played. The Varsity team, composed of Madeline Slotboom tcaptaim, Marjorie Kay, Florence Riddle and Marion Weiss, met the Corvallis team at Corvallis and were successful in two out of three matches. Marjorie Kay lost her match only after three hard fought sets in which there was an exhibition of some beautiful tennis. Madeline Slotboom won in her singles match and Florence Riddle and Marion Weiss successfully captured the doubles event. In cooperation with Field Day of the Woments Athletic As-' sociation, interclass matches were staged. Marianne Dunham,' sophomore, won the racket offered by defeating Ruth Wolfe, junior. M180- xP $- 4??? ; t AWX i 13;! Archery, that fine old English sport, has had a revival in this country in the last few years. The archers of the Oregon campus are enthusiastic and competent shooters. The ranges are on the lawns west of Villard hall, and give almost unlimited opportunity for train- ing along this line. x The thirty-six-pound bows with a ra nge of thirty, forty and sixty-five feet, ar e used, which gives exercise that is not as mild as most people seem to think it. Jeanette Moss, the trophy awar ,20, won the yew-wood bow last year, which is ded the Winner of the Field Day match. --181e - 11, -- f. 1 ,r , k .E' st 3" - . g $ -131 '93!va WKR IZQEX ;; 'lwai '3x ".2 . . r I ' ' " V 7:; XX xx 55:17.; 3!": i a I b l! ' ; ! 3il k 43 v x 'x..4;" -E; x 7$43V ; fl'l K 1'7 n J . : 1;; ? 0; '4' V IV '1, Eamhall A game was scheduled with O. A. C., and was played at Corvallis on May 1. In practically an errorless game our girls defeated the Agri- cultural college by a score of 25 to 6. Much credit is due to Dorothy McKee, Oregon captain and pitcher. The Oregon line-up was: Dorothy McKee, pitcher; Emily Perry, catcher; Florence Jagger, first base; Marian Bowen, second baseman; Ruth Wolfe, third baseman, Lola Keizur, left short-stop; Lois Barnett, right short-stop; Charlotte Howells, left fielder; Frances Habersham, center Iielder; Alice Evans, right fielder. Substitutes were, Hilda Chase and Dorothy Reed. VARSITY TEAM - -182 - . pinrd a! COM. 1- -!'-1rwdlheig '. .s 41qu .nnzp us: Ding Jaw. Iirsz iii; q-rZAR. ML? 1W .midy Horeht Eun- ngm m SENIOR-SOPHOMORE TEAM The hockey schedule could not be carried out as it was planned, owing to the rainy weather this fall. Two teams were formed; one was made up of the freshmen and juniors, and the other, the sopho- mores and seniors. The tournament was not played off, but a num- ber of games were played in class. Next year, with the new athletic field, a full schedule will be carried out. JUNIOR-FRESHMAN TEAM ?hv Q t . ! iHielh Bay A WI! Q , ,4 J fay? r 'ui WK The sixth annual Field Day was held under the auspices of the W. A. A. on Saturday, May 29. Elimin- ation contests had taken place in the following sports: Canoeing, archery, swimming, tennis and baseball. The finals for these sports were played off and trophies and letters were awarded for these and for basketball and track. In the canoe race paddles were awarded to Vivian Chandler and Nancy Fields of the junior class. The yew-wood bow for the winner of the archery contest went to Jeanette Moss. Marianne Dunham won the wE.$s g V , ZN. racquet in the tennis Iinals. In the doughnut league baseball game Kappa Kappa Gamma won the Hayward cup from Hendricks Hall, by a score of 8 t0 7. After the final contests, letters and trophies were awarded. The swimming cup went to the freshmen, and Frances Moore received the suit for the highest point winner in the inter-class .meet. The sophomores won the track cup, and the freshmen the basketball- cup. Teams in both these sports received their letters. Varsity and doughnut baseball letters were given 'to participants in final games. AA VIVIAN AND NANCY hold gun Kb! VI! :9 mm fnliulmg 590115: Am: 5134111 m m:- mmmm wt bmidhllu uM-d m m -:a:: ch51 Th r m1??? m2: Inch: m 2-: .EPPY PERRY In the indoor track meet held on March 18 the gym demonstration, the sophomores won the cup for the second time. The total scores were: Sophomores, 396.5; frosh, 297; junlors, 261; seniors, 242. The teams were: Seniors, Moss, Susman, H. Reed, Godfrey, Case; Juniors, Robbins, Chandler, Stoltenberg, Miller, Barnes, Largent; Sophomores, Cannon, Stone, Frank, Van Nuys, Kelly, Habersham; Frosh, Muir, McKee, VanderSterre, Bartle, Pay- son, Coffey. , in conjunction with ' Individual high point and letter winners were: Stone, 97; Can-' non, 78.5; Susman, 74;" Habersham, 71; Vander Sterre, 69; McKee, 67; H. Reed, 65, and Frank, 63. McKee won the swinging high jump at a h eight inches. The record in the running jum Lelah Stone. In the standing broad jump, feet, three inches. eight of six feet, p is four feet, made by Dorothy Miller made six HIGH POINT WINNERS Eaming itThe Pied Piper? taken from Browning's poem and Josephine Prescott Peabody,s play of the same name, was given in pantomime and dancing on the campus west of Villard hall, June 11, 1920, by Miss Catharine Winslowts dancing classes, as a part of their annual outdoor program. Eva Hansen took the part of the Piper, Vivian Chand- ler was the Mayor of the Village, and members of the dancing classes. were the villagerS, the Crystal, the rats and the children, with Ruth Tuck as their leader. The second part of the program included solo, trio and group dancing in which the children in Eva Hansenis and Dorothy Miller's dancing classes took part. Temporary bleachers were provided for the spectators. The out-of-door stage, decked With California poppies to represent footlights, and with Villard hall for a background, furnished an appro- priate setting for the dancers. fr r W I l a ' gr! I I I v STOLTENBURG RUSSELL TUCK JAGGER BARNETT , HABERSHAM Mnmantz Athletit Azznriatinn Ollie Stoltenberg V .. .................... President Margaret Russell ........ Vice-President Ruth Tuck ............................................................................................................................... Secretary Lois Barnett ............................................................................. 4 ................................................ Treasurer Frances Habersham ....................................................................... Reporter Florence Jagger ...................................................................................................................... Custodian The Womants Athletic Association has tripled its membership this year. The constitution was completely revised the first of the year, providing for general as well as active membership. - Last year, the Athletic Association was represented at the Western Conference at Seattle by four delegates, financed by the Student Body. This year, we were repre- sented by two members at the National Convention at Bloomington, Indiana. Women have been very limited in their athletic pursuits, in the past, due to in adequate equipment and crowded quarters. Now, however, withtour own athletic council room, the new building and grounds with modern equipment, and also, with our broadened ideas, we expect almost unlimited development. get 52! IV hmhg Q; q th t far! r '147 p .SK . w v, ht:- $5. . S V K ; h WAX. THE WOMEN,S BUILDING EH12 mnmania Enilhing The hopes of many people connected with the University have been realized with the completion of the Women,s Building. The interest was started about 1914, by Miss Ruth Guppy, then Dean of Women at the University. She organized the VVomants League, which had for its first big task the boosting and collection of money for the new building. Miss Guppy then solicited the interest of Mrs. George T. Garlingei', a regent of the University, and who afterwards carried on the work with unflagging interest and enthusiasm. The State Federation of Women,s Clubs ap- pointed a WomaWs Building Committee, with Mrs. Roy Bishop as its chairman. This committee, with Mrs. Gerlinger, organized drives throughout the state and raised money in 25,000-dollar amounts, to which the state added an equal amount. Many prominent people made large donations and the Alumni and students gave their hearty support. The state made an extra appropriation of 50,000 dollars for equipment, the total cost of the building thus reaching approximately 300,000 dollars. Besides being one of the most imposing structures on the campus; it will possess one of the most complete and convenient equipments for college health work in the country, not only from the educational standpoint, but from the social as well. The main building and the west wing are used for educational purposes and con- tain the Physical Education Department with its well-equipped gymnasiums, swimming pool and classrooms. In the east wing are found the large Alumni hall and the smaller committee rooms which may be used by any organization, faculty or students on the campus. ' 4' . yr, Ikg k'j' . .. . a x- 666 WI: kg; 1.31 ?7 $ "Ha .6 .$ A .l,1 , 6;; - X VKQMX "mentoring nf QDrPgnn" I love the memories of Oregon Through the years that come and go Treasured in the songs we sang By the firelight glow. Softly in the melltwing shadows Stealing gently over all, Humming the old tunes over, Melodies I so oft recall. ttOregon, our Alma Mater," t I seem to hear them sing x: pg; Treasures of my memory I! I Live forever on In the dear old songs of Oregon. Wheneter the cares of life otertake me When I sad or lonely grow, On the wings of memory Swiftly then I go To the 01d familiar Iireside .. Where my heart is young once more ' With my old companions Singing as in days of yore. ttAs I sit and dream at evening," I seem to hear them sing Treasures of my memory 4 Live forever on In those dear old songs of Oregon. . -Homer Maris, .l I13. i; 31' $4 ,,. N155 - "'7 TR fay. Wxxxx 1,: 'ihix i I 5W,ww I A r - 4- A CAIW x A , V1 r l. i A , J Alli"? . 711 . T g? 6th millagviEill The new buildings springing up on the campus remind us all of the successful Millage bill campaign conducted by friends of higher education in Oregon last spring and responded to by the voters of the state. The University students will not forget for years to come the thanksgiving and joy felt when the results of the election were received. In the early part of February last year the students were organized under DoniNewbury, chairman of the campus Millage bill committee, and student committees from every part of the state cooperated with Professor Colin V. Dyment, chairman of the Millage bill campaign, conducted by the institutions of higher education in the state. The students advertised the Millage bill in their home towns during the spring vacation and sent literature to friends and relatives explaining the need of the larger appropriation. In May, Salem Cherrians and members of the State Legislature spent a day on the compus, giving the University an opportunity to bring home to them most forcibly the serious needs of the Oregon campus. The Monday following the passing of the bill was declared a holiday by the col- lege authorities. A student body rally and program was given in front of McClure hall under the great fir trees. The quiet dignity of this rally, together with the sinzere words of the student and faculty speakers, spoke eloquently of the Universityis regard for the great good fortune which the people of Oregon had provided for their institu- tions of higher education. -191- ms; ram WMW u. .233 I' 3 MF- 9 atria mu - :3 3!" 9m- m- inim Ir fh M y .5 hal' N .':u 919.3. All v1 - l w 9'. 9.9 It 3"" 350'", THE CANOE FETE --192a .,. 3 1f . 35$ .. r: $1 I 9... are W 3? :KW'" a k E k3 Q1$ X x f 1': i1 13$; $uninr3mPPk-mh The weather man was on the side of the Juniors and the 1920 Junior Week-end will always be remembered by the University as a successful and joyous occasion. The canoe fete, University day, the campus luncheon, the burning of the frosh caps, the Woments Emerald, the tug-of-war, the track meet, the baseball game and the Senior play made the time pass all too quickly for the students and their guests. Chi Omega won the canoe fete, with their ttMay basket" filled with lovely flowers. Kappa Kappa Gammats ttChinese junktt won second place and the Alpha Tau Omega entry, itThe Vikings? third place. White collars were taboo on University Day, when all University men worked on the campus, or the athletic iields or re-painting the ttOP A corps of efficient Senior policemen, led by itSIim" Crandall, kept order on the campus and punished all offenders of their edicts. Dripping from their impromptu swim in the race after the tug-of-war, the Frosh filed slowly by the fire and left forever the sign of obedience to the upper- classmen. The Senior play, ttThe Man on the Boxfl was an enjoyable feature of the week-end. Winning from the Oregon Agricultural College in baseball and from Willamette in tennis made the merry-makers all the more happy, and by the close of the formal prom, at the Armory, every one agreed that the class of 1921 deserved all kinds of credit for the success of the week-end. 4'193 -- Liv 3' by. ,1 JUNIOR WEEK-END CAMPUS DAY 2232-! kl tan a "AN I" I l m: .-mmn i'nmktwl .3"...- April Zlirnlir N0 men are allowed to view this yearly event when darkies, clowns, little children, daring soldiers and sailors, fairies, goblins, and what-not frolic together on the big gym floor. Each house tries to outdo the other in putting on the cleverest, prettiest and most original stunt, after which the music begins and every one dances. Last year, the Frolic was held April 9, 1920. Delta Gamma won the cup for the cleverest and most original stunt, portraying the stages of courtship from the days When the caveman used the big stick to get his bride until the near future when the modern woman will carry off a protesting husband by main force. The happy love affair of two scarecrows, disregarding their duties and making love in the midst of a beautiful flower garden, while a large moon created the proper atmosphere, won for Hendricks Hall the second place. Marion Bowen, 0f the class of 1920, won the first prize for the most original cos- tume, attired as ttSpearmint." Lois Barnett won honorable mention, attired in a Chinese costume. Mrs. E. L. Knapp, Mrs. F. L. Shinn and Miss Mary Watson were judges. Patronesses were Mrs. P. L. Campbell, Dean Elizabeth Fox, Mrs. J. F. Bovard, Mrs. F. L. Chambers, Mrs. W. F. Osburn, Mrs. L. E. Bean, and Mrs. E. E. De Cou. Irva Smith and her committee, Nancy Fields, Alice Hamm, Eva Hansen, Ruth Flegal, Mabyl Weller, Vivian Chandler and Eleanor Spall, managed the Frolic and served ice cream cones to the dancers. M55 W'" 5mm 3'. "74 i 1519065! U 'n- m '35 M" 1.3 l 2 1-131 JUNIOR WEEK-END- THE WATER CURE" 196-- r1 5 n A an 3.x. - mmahi-T: ?msp . rt": T? W133 v! " J Erma: T: f": '"2- m om 7f :5 , .,, TE 5;:Ak. '. ' Tzkt':nfn14.k k'ud! if1.'.; . .3 Hvatr: 3; ,. hm: 51:1 - . 310mm.- 1 WW RPPET; a i . z. 1$NML1Q..4.. 1.: I " n. Aammhltea Every Thursday morning at 11 otclock Villard hall is tilled to overflowing at the Oregon assemblies. Assemblies form almost as important a part of the educational instruction at Oregon as do the courses listed in the curriculum. This past year seems to have outdone itself in providing speakers and entertainment for the assembly hour. A new feature of the assemblies has been the singing of the combined glee clubs under the leadership of John Stark Evans of the school of music. The glee clubs lead the group singing of the students and have revived many of the 01d Oregon songs. The school of music provided a musical number for each assembly, either vocal or instrumental. The first important assembly of the year was the annual Pledge Day when Gov- ernor Olcott read the Oregon pledge taken every year by the students. Major W. S. Gilbert of Astoria was the speaker of the day and Madame Rose McGrew sang several solos. The speakers for the year were worth while and interesting and spoke on indus- trial problems, the Japanese question, social service work and other topics near to the hearts of everyone today. They include Dr. H. D. Sheldon, dean of the University school of education; Bishop William O. Shepard, Methodist Episcopal bishop of Oregon; Sherwood Eddy, noted Y. M. C. A. worker; Mahlon H. Day, secretary of the Canton, China, Christian College; Dr. Edward T. Devine, associate editor of the Survey; Pro- fessor E. C. Robbins, instructor in history; Norman F. Coleman, president of the Loyal Legion of Loggers and Lumbermen, and Bishop Walter T. Sumner. THE SQUAREST MIX" -198-- Dot? 7:. I I aKai 'f .- W i: m? r; :3? W: - wax, i i s 'Qb zm 45.1.. T g i st w J! ;..x 3: -xx x $ :T'TllfT flag! $ka Kaabw If Twa ; . t iii?! t qK: t ' - ,, . -, . 47F - t it Q14 MECNA a K t : V.. 4' . T , i! x "" a. 1.. .4: fi t 34", . . 1. .- . T w V ; g .4714, 4,716 t V XT II: J V T 37 thrrrlaza mix "The Squarest Mix" announced the posters, and, as usual, the frosh were snowed under at the annual Underclass Mix October 9, 1920, on Kincaid iield, before the football game with the Multnomah Athletic Club. Senior policemen with sombreros, paddles and stars were very much in evidence and restored law and order whenever an un- fortunate frosh attempted to rise above his natural position and also clipped several highly prized, but slightly out of season, mustaches. "If it had nit been for the flag rush, we id have wonV Many a frosh was after- wards heard to exclaim, for so just were the judges, Bill Hayward, Shy Huntington, Bart Spellman and George Bohler, that the frosh would have won if it had n't been for the Hag rush. CtWhy must there be a Hag rushi" they innocently wonderJ The order of events and the victorious class in each was as follows: Ambulance call, attendance and singing contests, won by the frosh women. The sophs won the yell contest, since the frosh were too timid to make any noise. The square judges made a tie decision on the stunt, but the tug of war was won by the sophs, unaided, unassisted by any outside force excepting the cheers of the women from the grandstand. The tie- up contest also tied and the frosh won the cane rush and the sand bag scrap. "Frosh, this is your chance to be the highest man on the campus. Show Bill who is the ilogical leader, announced the program-but the sophomores won the mix by valiantly defending their colors atop a swaying pole and established their superiority to the youngest class. tiThis is the Squarest Mixli, --199- a 44?, "V! V f f t :6 : ,. ,: 1???? v 127 z. 3T. HYOU CAN'T BEAT OREGON FIGHT" "5'? I .l a "a r HNV' f. w . I h t :Vt . ,0. . 69:? $ t X gm hex. g. x a '5. IA 9w v4 v u a . L d9; 1Q s Enmnnming Everyone remembers Homecoming! Who could forget that wonderful run Bill Steers made against Washington and the glorious Victory of that day? And the noise parade, and the frosh boniire, of which Dean Straub made his annual remark about "being the best ever"! Alumni and students joined with equal zest in the rally, with tractors and trailers full of enthusiastic rooters with every available kind of noise-producer. Alumni and students alike were thrilled when the wearers of the ttoh marched around Hayward field at the big game. Then, of course, the Homecoming dance added the appropriate close to the day. The campus was alive with old grads and old friends of the University and the entire week-end was given over to them. The campus luncheon Saturday noon was provided by Womenis League in their honor and large numbers were entertained in the different houses. Homecoming is an annual institution at Oregon and it is the one time of the year when all the alumni come back to hnd that- the University is constantly growing but that she still has the same old tiOregon spiritti. ' Johnny Houston was general chairman of the Homecoming week-end, working With the following committee: Rally, Lyle Bartholomew; decorations, Chas. Huggins; Homecoming dance, Wilbur Carl; welcome, Don Davis; campus luncheon, Vivian Chandler; publicity, Jack Benfield; rooms, Norton Winnard; registration, Warren Kiys; slogan, Harry Smith. ix 55 91 VA 2;, .i: Ma mmmmmx ROOTERS AT 0. A. c. l 3 t 1 ?kfftfwywk' ,xx N9. , gust; x'N z iRallivz Oski wow wow! What is more exciting and more inspiring than an Oregon rally or an Oregon parade, before a big game, when Oregon spirit it at its height, or in the celebration of an Oregon victory, anywhere, any time, an Oregon rally is all life and enthusiasm. This year has offered added opportunities for displaying what Oregon Spirit does to the University students. First came the regular frosh parade when the "wearers of the greenh were soundly paddled by their upperclassmen as they bent to kiss the Oregon seal. Then came the great rally at the depot the night the Varsity left for the Palo Alto game. Oregon Spirit just tore things loose and the cheers swelling from hundreds of throats made more noise than the biggest freight train on record ever thought of making at that depot. Following the yelling, under the leadership of Claire Keeney, rooter king, various member of the team and ttBill" and ttShyii told the crowd what they were going to do to Stanford. ' Before the Homecoming game one of the biggest rallies in the history of the University was put over by the students and alumniea noise parade, followed by the big frosh bonfire. Special trains carried the Oregon rooters t0 Corvallis the day of the big game when Oregon fight held the score to a tie. An impromptu rally-dance took place in the armory 0n the Monday following the Homecoming Victoryeand nothing need ever be said about the intensity of Oregon Spirit following the annual game with the Oregon Agricultural College. .f, 't w a .. -' 0' , ' H - . E? Q ,I N as C, ,74Qp xQx ,: V b ,a mu. -Q Jen I y: . . . K . s . . riTQi 1 qu v q . ' ty 4 ,1 , V A m f, mmE VA J7 a J t X '1 r :31? K 2 AM t. e X! a '- ' X ,..J : F . If t Q E i m2" - 4' o 52' J La, 10$ 1ft" r W mnthrrzi Eng A new custom was established on the University of Oregon campus last spring when National Mothers, Day was celebrated the week-end of May 8 and 9. Invitations were sent to all mothers of University students to come to the University where special entertainment was provided for them. Jack Dundore was general chairman of the h week-end, with Ruth Flegal in charge of the luncheon and Lois Macy the reception The luncheon, served in the mens gymnasium, was in honor of the visiting mothers. They were special guests at a performance of ttSuzanne," a play put on by the Dramatic Department in Guild hall. A reception followed the play, with . dancing and refreshments for the faculty and the mothers. Sunday morning special 'v services in honor of Mothers, Day were held in the Eugene churches. committee. Ema f'r":4'.d m1 1 0' Hm v in: .9 1 Ltd?! W'uhs . t r N ward mm the MMWH I " ' E112 130m at the $712112 illegizlature a luncheon at Hendricks Hall, and a visit to the new buildings ' 'm "'Vw'vm ' "t ' ' ' i islators busy seeing what the passage of the on their biennial visit, Saturday, January 29. rsity and other institutions of the state the assembly when Villard hall was tilled I V'MW Iht 31! i 010 ; l ' HI 91g i A special assembly, kigzmhit f M ' u; w '5 .' on the Oregon campus kept the state leg Millage bill had done for the University, A desire to see the usefulness of the Unive . extended as far as possible was manifested at i to overflowing with the visiting law-makers and the University students. Six of the visitors spoke and showed a lively interest in the future of the school. They were it welcomed to the campus by President P. L. Campbell, who presided at the meeting; , H. 0. Bowen, president of the Eugene Chamber of Commerce, and Carlton Savage, 1' president of the Associated Students. ' A three-course luncheon was served by the girls of Hendricks Hall. Dean Colin V. Dyment acted as toastmaster, and speeches were made by the legislators and by faculty members. Music was furnished by the Hendricks Hall girls. The legislative party numbered about seventy-five, and spent the entire day on the campus. At each session, the custom of. the legislature has been to spend one day visiting the institu- tions of higher education in Oregon, and their work in behalf of these schools aids w my! am." Q01 rat 3 ht ' :r i m '14? '1: mm" 11- l' m w. .a, i V 4 aUH, n a 4:02: 1' p-. u 11!.- imm H31! .pw Nsuq' Inn 3m. wk 2: .4 mt! ;tm1 ham 0 1 .11: '1' 1 H6 1m mm, a - C n L. "Qt. hi hi mew ,1. -$.. ll :V' very materially in their welfare and influence. at n: H hf. P- 1 V O p ' A "Jim , mp. ; ' W ,. . t l A - "M- M iQ l ' l' 'R u ' Au. 5QX xx 1 A mag K bhf'. G 3., w h I h K-; h ,. ;x we , ijtrnaliam Slag; Slime The Journalism Jazz Jinx, the lottery for all journalism majors, given every fall by Theta Sigma Phi and Sigma Delta Chi, honorary journalism fraternities, was held in the ments gymnasium the day when tw 1 two presidential nominees, were foremost ' t V Reports-very official-looking yellow telegramsewere brought in regularly, evoking cheers from dif- ferent party sympathizers. The evening was spent mest informallyaladies, choice and Paul Joneses being the most popular dances. No white collars were allowed. Hot dog sandwiches, doughnuts and cider refreshed the hungry editors of the future, and the annual jinx was over for another year. 010.11ng Garninal Every one came in costume or old clothes to the College Carnival, given by the Y. M. and Y. W., October 22, after the rally for the Idaho game. was prepared under the leadership of Beatrice Wetherbee. stunts which represented almost every kind from black-faced girls to acrobats and magicians. Various sideshows and booths were provided, with the usual nigger baby of the country fairs, and Monte Carlo, with a roulette wheel, where vast sums of money were lost and won by the reckless gamblers. ttSomething dif- ferent" was what the committee promisede-and the evening was ttsomething different," keeping several official-looking policemen busy keeping order when the refreshments of hot dogs and buns were served. A rollicking evening Several houses put on comedians and chorus Eluninr '1?er The lemon-yellow and green block hots" in our Memory Books are reminders of the Junior Prom, May 15, 1920, the one formal student body dance of the entire year. From the grand march to the last strains of 2Home, Sweet, Home," the annual prom, sponsored by the class of 1921, was an evening of pleasure for the University students and their guests. Patronesses and patrons were: Governor and Mrs. Ben W. Olcott, President and Mrs. P. L. Campbell, Dean and Mrs. John Straub, Dean Elizabeth Fox, Dean and Mrs. D. W. Morton, Mrs. George T. Gerlinger, Mrs. Wilson F. Jewett, and Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Dixon. er .. e -m ;, e; . 4" xo xbw -.. XKQLQI "5ka II x "35$ X2 k; F ,v 1.: . H h Ak' i .- 7 liltxx :Tm v -. l x 5? ' .- i a 1 b . ,3, sx l! E 7?, 74.3 Q . a 2 12 7 r 1;; V ?- xlg I Etap-ymr Estate 3x38 X It can happen only once in four years, so of course all University women have memories of the leap-year dance given by Women,s League May 19. The women ildid it all," from inviting their partners to thanking them for dances, and all the men had to do was to be entertained. Button-hole bouquets were very much in evidence. A committee from Womenls League decorated the Armory in evergreens and spring flowers. Patrons and patronesses were: President and Mrs. P. L. Campbell, Bill Hay- ward, Dean and Mrs. Straub, Dean Fox, Miss Catherine Beekley, Dr. and Mrs. J. F. Bovard, Dean and Mrs. D. W. Morton, Miss Gertrude K. Talbot and Mr. Rex Underwood. illrnah $122 Airy balloons and tiny kewpies floated through the air as Verena Shute danced for the unique feature for the dance of the Freshmen Glee in the Armory February 4, when the student body were guests of the Frosh. The Glee is one of the big annual social events of the year. Patrons and patronesses were: Governor and Mrs. Ben W. Olcott, Mr. and Mrs. George T. Gerlinger, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Dixon, Pres. and Mrs. P. L. Campbell, Dean and Mrs. William G. Hale, Dean and Mrs. John Straub, Dean Eliza- beth Fox, Major and Mrs. Raymond C. Baird, Dean and Mrs. Colin V. Dyment, Prof. and Mrs. W. F. G. Thacher, Prof. and Mrs. H. B. Torrey, Miss Gertrude Talbot, Miss Ida V. Turney and Prof. A. F. Reddie. w: iQnmprnming Bum With every one feeling jubilant about the victory over Washington, the Home- coming dance at the Armory, November 13, was crowded with students and alumni. Greens and the Oregon lemon-yellow made effective and simple decorationse-and the programs we carried home to put in our Memory Books were in the shape of a yellow Chrysanthemum, with a picture of Bill Steers, the hero of the day, on the inner page. Patrons and patronesses were: Governor and Mrs. Olcott, President and Mrs. Campbell, Dean Fox, Dean and Mrs. Straub, and Mr. and Mrs. Dean Walker. 5an ! "mp: ' , ruW V I ' A ;, . rkx g "max K -an x A1,? r. 3.. z. :8. , 3: twat... ? 4237, Elie $rhnnl nf mum The University School of Music occupies a somewhat unique position not only with respect to the other schools in the University, but with schools of music in general. In common with other schools included in the organization of the University, it offers courses suited to the needs of those students desiring a broad general education which will include a specialized major line of interest. It also provides faculties for those wishing a distinctly professional course in music which may be directed toward public performance, teaching, or a career of research. It offers thorough courses for the student interested in an amateur way or who wishes to utilize them in satisfying a group requirement. It maintains graduate divisions and even a department for children. It will be seen then that it is a very complex organization. Its distinctiveness, however, lies in the fact that it is primarily a school built upon the idea of public service. It is not a self-supporting institution, hence we find an absence of commercialism Which is at once refreshing and conducive to the highest type of artistic accomplishment. Being the last of the fine arts to develop, the place of music is not yet definitely assigned. The public must be taught to appreciate the cultural value of music; to discountenance the cheap substitutes, some so persistent; to demand the discountenance 0f the commercial abuses now existing and our students and constituency must be pro- vided with both means and guidance and the opportunity for enjoying genuinely musical productions. Such a task is worthy of the highest mettle and it is to this task that the University School of Music has committed itself. The faculty of the school is composed of men and women thoroug with the educational ideals and each is an artist in his line. The new structure soon to be occupied Will provide quarters excelled in few schools in the country. No institute can boast of finer equipment. In connection with the School of Music and largely in- strumental in carrying out its service designs are such organizations as the University glee clubs, vesper choir, orchestra, the Oregon Music Council, Mu Phi Epsilon, etc. The members of the glee clubs and orchestra are chosen by competitive try-outs. They perform a very large service to the student body and at the same time carry the mes- sage t0 the people of the state. The vesper choir provides music for the Sunday hly conversant vesper services. The Or nposed of glee club and orchestra members who have served one or more years in these organizations. The council, though but a year old, is providing an artist course for the beneht of the student body and Eugene townspeople. Mu Phi Epsilon, a national womanst honorary musical sorority, brought great credit to our campus by entertaining the n of the order. In addition to the local ministrie heartedly t0 the state ser superintendent of public secondary schools, etc. egon Music Council is 001 ational convention s of the School of Music, it has lent itself whole- Vice through general extension work, collaboration with the instruction for the putting of music into the curriculum of Its influence has extended far beyond the borders of the state. -J0hn J. Landsbury. w 315 - GIRLS GLEE CLUB Alice Gohlke, Gwladys Keeney, Esther Wilson, Fredrica Schilke, Florence Garrett. Marion Linn, Doris Hoefiier, Leah Zink, Naomi Wilson, Nell Gaylord. Laura Rand, Margaret Phelps. Skeels, Eloise McPherson, Bell Chatburn, Haskins, Muriel Meyers, Marjorie Wells. First Soprano-Genevieve Clancy, Second Soprano'Constance Miller, First A1t0;Bernice Altstock, Marvel Second Alto-Betti Kessi, Irene Ruch, Alberta Carson, Vashti nun. DlCC rtn- .nQI-IO :1 Ins. n: In. ' . K: I Illtlv 5--s-la-I :1 1'0: CI . ,0 I 'tO'... a I1mua- lI-n-I .Oau-au- I .'-.'".. Airgun... Io: ::1ull- I t a i'cl.:l:u I Wagstau .3.III.' ... , u..l.15- I.-1--I-. It--.,.., I Iona: Ih-ol- O...ria- c I owl. . II I'Iuno---ov IIvI. '...... 1 n-lill OCnCLIUn- Qluul-U Nhtn-l- Inc. lul-l I 'gl:c D :In-. a . ... .u n. a nu..-"- .- uuu. :Qnauno- RIM!- Alioo-ICa I'c-o-un 'A.I r.:-..I..L .'. . ..n.-l hour.-."- I tau! A:t-- .:u0.-lc .1 AIIQI-uh :I-OQEI n..nu-I Al". Qlull! ku-ul Ico-uu- IIu- II . X -Aa:fy :. iv 1.: m. CW :1 -129mikxx ka W , f ,. 3: i1 J: V IE' ta w MEN'S GLEE CLUB First Tenors-Eugene Short, Long Beach, 0211.; Ralph Poston, Le Grande; Wallace Cannon, Prineville; Carrol Akers, Wasco; Curtis Phillips, Portland. Second Tenors-Wayne Akers, Wasco; Joe Ingram, Portland; Arthur Johnson, Portland; Crecene Farris, Eugene; George Hopkins, Claremont, Cal. Baritone-George Stearns, Eugene; French Moore, Eugene; Glen Morrow, Eugene; John Gavin, Eugene; Charles Huggins, Hood River. 1 Basquaurice Eben, Joseph; Harris Ellsworth, Cottage Grove; Herbert Pate, Eugene; Ed Kamna. Hillsboro; Carl Newbury, Klamath Falls. :3... lwwwl Huinrmitg QDrrhwtra Officers Rex Underwood .......................................................................................................................... Director Ralph Hoeber ............................................................................................................................ President Alberta Potter ...................................................................................................... Secretary-Treasurer John Anderson .......... . ................................................................................................................. Manager Herbert Hacker ...................................................................................................... Assistant Manager Maude Largent, Arthur Campbell .................................................................................... Librarians Members ' Violins A1berta Potter, Eugene; Margaret Phelps, Pendleton; Gwendolyn Lamp- shire, Burns; Ransom McArthur, Baker; Leland Perry, Eugene; Truth Terry, Portland; Grace Barnett. Second Violins Ra1ph McClaflin, Boise, Idaho; Reginald Gustafson, Portland; Claire Collette, Eugene; Guenter Bickel, Rock Island, 111.; Maude Largent, Silverton; Dan Woods, Weiner, Idaho; Charlotte Nash, Milwaukie. Viola Wi1son Gailey, Enterprise. Violoncello Carpentar Staples, Portland; Agnes Kennedy, Portland; Ralph Hoeber, Portland; John Anderson, Ashland. Contra Bass-Harold King, Grants Pass. Flute Beulah Clark, Portland; Ernst Rosen, Portland; Arnold Anderson, San Jose, Cal. Clarinet-Norman Byrne, Springfield; Arthur Campbell, Heppner. Cornet Haro1d E. Simpson, North Bend; Meryl Deming, Eugene. Trombone Herbert Hacker, Portland; Wistar Rosenburg, Prineville. Saxophone Frank Jue, Portland; Velma Farnum, M'cMinnville. Horn Th0mas Larremore, Eugene; Herbert Darby, Salem. Drums and Tympani-Fred Buck, Eugene. Pian0 Aur0ra Potter, Eugene. --215- - 9IZ-d r ng Evelynd Sliffe, Charlotte Nash, e Forrest, Velma Farnum, Prisci 11a Eakin, Fred Buck, Audrey Pe Cecile de Vore, Art Campbell, Georgia Benson. .fmxxwm 2 2 . x . ououhu 2 - 5-... - -vlnoI-v Au...-:.,-u- - . nu... O. ou-.I-o..'. J .2: Incluutou I u. a u a count:- I o-Xoaano .I o Oil, anon... .I. ,0 'un-v; I n I cal. 30. cut SIS... .IB . .7 .uv-u.o-Iwup d 6'... u- u t Engledinger Garrett Potter Hopkins Murphy Clark lngrahm Staples Simpson Huggins Dixon Rand Morrow Akers Marsters Gaily Campbell Hacker Stems Byrne Gohlke Largent Altstock Potter Anderson Posten Jue Clancy Gilstrap Hoeber Deming illms Ph Skeels 2217- mewmnm MU PHI EPSILON NATlONAL CONVENTION, JUNE. 1920 x V: Q's :7' E Q"?! I At Y r I 14 r'tgl wt V14; '- T. wE.x PROFESSOR A. FERGUS REDDIE MISS CHARLOTTE BANFIELD Eh? Arteh Emma The work in Acted Drama became a part of the University curriculum in the autumn of 1912. Professor A. Fergus Reddie arrived on the campus in the fall of 1911. Under his guidance the department became the pioneer of the Acted Drama in universities. A great many departments, patterned after this one, have been organized in different institutions over the United States. Miss Charlotte Banfield accepted the assistant directorship in the autumn of 1918. Her work has gone far toward making the department a strong organization. Year by year the work in the Acted Drama has received more attention and a corresponding increase of students. The work is divided into three classes: the elementary class, the advanced class, and The Company. It is the hope of. every student to become a member of this class, for they are the ones who are actively en- gaged in the presentation of plays. The Company is under the direct supervision of Professor Reddie and during the past nine years has presented sixty-nine plays With a total of one hundred forty-six performances in Guild Theatre. -220-- than" mun 1 m; 1H TI! 71:; 'm VIM U!!! :qw; : 'I'LU 12!! 5'? lmxx'wz' L- mFW'131 I h l J 1 94-h 1i P. K. 5+ W"? fin x ngu JA F W K P 9" Mr :1; x 7 v- r, . 2 2 T ,..;,, I re x e 1 xx 7,592 AW 1" L Erngram for 13mm 9The Cassilis Engagement" ............................................................................ St. John Rankin A comedy in four acts, given at Guild Theatre November 3 and 4, 1920, by The Company. TTPrunella" .................................................................................................. Barker and Housman A fantasy in three acts, given at Guild Theatre December 2, 3 and 4, 1920, by The Company. "The Two Gentlemen of Verona" .......................................................... William Shakespeare A comedy in five acts, given at Guild Theatre January 27 and 29, 1921., by The Company. . "Pygmalion" .............................................................................................................. Bernard Shaw A comedy in four acts, given at Guild Theatre January 20 and 22, 1921, by a faculty cast. 9Tale of Two Cities" .......................................................................................... Charles Dickens A drama in four acts, dramatized by Professor Reddie and given at Guild Thea- tre February 25 and 24, 1921, by The Company. nThe Mikado" .............................................................................................. Gilbert and Sullivan A comic opera in two acts, given at Guild Theatre March 8 to 2, 1921. 2The Lady from the Sea" ...................................................................................... Heneric Ibsen A drama in five acts, given at Guild Theatre April 15 and 16, 1921, by The Company. 2A Woman. of No Importance', ................................................................................ Oscar Wilde A comedy in three acts, given at Guild Theatre May 13 and 14, by The Company. 2The Winters Tale,' ................................................................................ William Shakespeare A comedy in five acts, given at Guild Theatre June 18, 1921, by The Company. AH- W- .an-w. a --.4 Va . rvy l 7 i 1 ! I Jim at - WK Q l , .73 r g k $ . , Tva 34, r' l Elbe Gazailia Engagement, By St. John Rankin How many mistakes would you rectify if you could but live your life over? What speeches would you recall that were prompted by a pretty face? Geoffrey simply couldnlt help falling in love with pretty Miss Barridge when he rescued her from an omnibus wreck because all men fall for the beautiful things God has created. But these beautiful things are only beautiful in the spot where God has created them. So when Miss Barridge and her mother, with a past, are removed from the shops and restaurants of London to the simple country life on the Cassilis estate, by Geoffreyls mother, they become ugly. No one knew this better than Mrs. Cassilis, who reveled in the fact that Miss Barridgels attraction for Geoffrey was becoming less every hour. Then came the breaking off of the engagement and the wailing of Mrs. Barridge, who wanted her daughter to be a ttreal MARION GILSTRAP loidyf, AS ETHEL BARRIDGE The Cast built up a true English atmosphere and it lured the thoughts away to those beautiful isles across the Atlantic, giving the audience a touch of true English life. The soft, tinted lighting effects went far toward producing the result desired. The play was presented on November 4 and 5, 1920. It was received with great enthusiasm and Guild Theatre was filled to overflowing both nights. The play was given at a later date at the Eugene Theatre as a benefit and the third performance did not dull the success of the first two. GEORGE STtARNS AS GEOFFREY .1' M Q '1 .L' oh'gwx I" Muir syn. 4A Ht-Q'QNB'JW t!!! ' .7 hy h l ILyL, if A g A . K K. A : :kQW z? W; A thr' lp- 5w '1 5 iv A" 4 UL: V9.,;. to: "3" Kg: 2M$B371i'.. 1m gnarl A f, A m r, . x 6. m; .. - - Ax m AK A a .. ' .. K - - ,WM .: x ,gx . , ,1, 1369er x XX A y 4mh WA , m . AW 6-. ' 5... 3'" W ?CuMNE A w ' A A A N er g; 2-: 407 x. . H A i, V . x 1 A A A r . A . . - . - A '9 3; F a A ,$A " . E A . A A f: x, xx; Mrs. Herries ....................................................................... Loeta Rogers Mr. Herries, the Rector, her husband .......................................................................... Vern Fudge Watson, the Cassilis butler .......................................................................................... Carroll Akers Lady Julia, Countess of Remenham .................................................................. Dorothy Wootton Lady Mabel Venning, her daughter .......................................................................... Marian Taylor Mrs. Adelaide Cassilis .................................................................................................. Irene Stewart Margaret, Lady Marchmont, her sister ............................................................ Charlotte Banfield Geoffrey, Mrs. Cassilis, son ...................................................................................... George Stearns Dorset, Mrs. Cassilis, maldHelen Madden Mrs. Barridge ...................................................................................................................... Martha Rice Ethel, her daughter, engaged to Geoffrey ............................................................ Marion Gilstrap Major Warrington, Lady JuliaAs brother ............................................................ ?...Claire Keeney gf?wV f f faswt- ' A223- at " f s Q, tr. Is; 7 ,4? u .I , M. i- ' R , and". H 5.57 s ,9 :' WIN u T i Frunplla W Iii By Barker and Housman 5w; v4 '1. Many of we mortals are living in a world of fancies, failing to . l ,W connect the realisms of life with our dreams. While others lose the ' ;; vyzy romance and deal only with realities. But the dream world and the A-1 , 1W real world are linked together in the play ttPrunellatl in such a man- 4; I ner as to keep the interest at a high pitch, yet carrying its lesson w-"l'z deep into the hearts of all. N- :1 H" 5N W Prunella is just an ordinary girleit may be you. But she is , W. n! 7, v restricted within the walls of the home of her three old aunts. But 'A ,w, . r l ' ll "' Mg love, in the form of Pierrot, enters the high walls of Prunellals heart 'w $w and she becomes the dream character, Pierrotte. Pierrot returns dur- w, ing the night with his jovial band, the mummers, and steals Pierrotte " away from her tiny enclosure into the great dream world of life. She 3 m . can not be blamed for going. Who has not dreamed of the world be- ; ii" , y " HELEN CASEY yond? When Pierrot and his followers become realities, as all dream . ' 1h" 4 ww AS PRUNELLA characters must, and Pierrotte returns to her tiny world to find that it t' x it has tumbled down and become a realism. It is then that she makes the great dis- t :13 ,l ' covery, as we all do, that true love surrounds us on all sides, and a life of continual . - wt: pleasure is only a dream. 3',":H .7 14 M n L. a 5 mad 9!? iiPrunella" was given at Guild Theatre on December 2, 3 and 4, 1920. The matinee , m J of December 2 was given for children, and their appreciation of the work done by The d t h Company was shown by individual compliments. The two following performances were away. received with fully as much enthusiasm by the grown-ups. The fact that every seat was 4 sold for both evening performances proved the success of the play and the work of the . actors. ' VICTOR SETHERS AS THE BOY -224... 'v: m 1.9;?! u H: ,321 'zHW 1' V5 ? r .4 - .1 Cast of Characters The gardenefs boy ........................................................................................................ Victor Sether Jeremy, as gardener .................................................................................................... Claire Keeney Samuel Patcher, another gardener ........................................................................ Ervin Ludeman The head gardener .................................................................................................... Reuel Moore Queer, a servant .................................................................. Helen Madden Prunella ...................................................................................... L ....................................... Helen Casey Her aunts- Prim ....................................................................................................................... Martha Rice Privacy ............................................................................................................... Loeta Rogers Prude ........................................................................................................... Dorothy Wootton Quaint, a servant ..................................................................................................... Wenona Dyer Pierrot, a strolling player ........................................................................... Norvell Thompson Scaramel, his heavy lead ....................................................................................... de Ford Wallace Mummers 0f Pierrot 85 00., Unlimited Kennel ............................................................................................................... George Stearns Callow ................................................................................................................. John' Canoles Mouth .................................................................................................................. ....E1gin Altimus Hawk .......................................................................................................................... Harold Brown Tawdry .................................................................................................................. Marion Gilstrap D011 .......................................................................................................................... Doris Pittenger Romp ............................................................................................................................ Marion Taylor Coquette .................................................................................................................... Irene Stewart Tenor, Pierrofs singing voice at times .......................................................................... Frank Jue Love, a statue .............................................................................................................. Alphonse Korn l. I H l '4 x l $ l 2h Am: Q a h v 2 I43" 'AV? yK xvi, V s 3-$ X x J. - 242' 'K- v- ,- 9 b. X g xiaggmalinn,9 By Bernard Shaw HIf you dare to set up your little dogs tricks of fetching and carrying against my creation of a Duchess, P11 slam the door in your silly face? This speech of Henry Higgins only gives a slight idea of the keen sarcasm that Bernard Shaw has placed in the mouth of this character. Liza Doolittle comes in for her part of the retorts and if Shaw had not so carefully prepared the lines, Henry Higgins would have found it necessary to think a few days before making his replies. Colonel Pickering objected to Henry making a Duchess of the little flower girl just as a matter of experiment, but Henry is just one of those persons who insists. His mother, Mrs. Higgins, could not deter him from his purpose. Neither did Mrs. Pearce have any influence on the matter. However, all were called in to assist in the rejuvenation of Liza Doolittle, who insisted, tTm a good goil, I CHARLOTTE BANF.ELDam," and didnit want to become a Duchess. She did become a AS L'ZA DOOL'TTLE Duchess, though somewhat against her will, and when she realized that she could not revert back to the life of. a poor iiower girl, she becomes afraid of the future: Then something happened that Professor Higgins had not anticipated. The mew creature that he had created becomes his mistress. He then promptly throws up his hands and walks out. Nobody wants the girl, not even her father, Alfred Doolittle, who is continually afraid that she will come back to him for support. The play was presented at Guild Theatre January 20 and 22, 1921. The work of the actors cannot be spoken of too highly, and a true professional touch carried each speech across to the audiences. Scenery was manufactured especially for this pro- duction and much could be said about the stage managing and lighting effects. NORVELL THOMPSON AS ALFRED DOOLITTLE :2262 Ow! nylon! r" ,5? 7 1' 1M H" . 2, xrttil MP , yam inwu r ; 1W!" '3 M ya ,. ,0 3"511 blzlrg; '4 5" QN A "X ' ea Q t x WIS 'hlfhw ht la is. . 5.1m LL-lw nmm 'Iuh. uin- Quay. m3. , .:11;..u:,.:;i Kfori ; . 1. W Milli: ' k1 rm .. hr MW" e 7': .' d 350-1341;!W mmmmm- J'n ' W wu-Il WV ': ' ' ' r". LII $13.4. x x S ,,a gal , s I. mun b. .: 44$ ,0, hr by U! . gig Cast of Characters Henry Higgins, professor of phonetics .................................................................... Fergus Reddie Colonel Pickering, his friend and co-worker ................................................. Manford Michael Mrs. Pearce, Higgins' housekeeper .............................................................................. Irene Rugh Liza Doolittle, a street flower seller .............................................................. Charlotte Banfield Alfred Doolittle, her father, a dustman .......................................................... Norvell Thompson Mrs. Higgins, Henry's mother .................................................................................. Rose McGreW Mrs. Eynsford-Hill ..................................................................................................... Charlie Fenton Miss Eynsford-Hill ................................................................................................ Dorothy Wootton Freddy Eynsford-Hill ......................... . ......................................................................... C laire Keeney Parlour maid .......................... ' ....................................................................................... Irene Stewart Staff Acting director ............................................................................................................. Fergus Reddie Assistant director ........................................... V .................................................... Charlotte Banfield Stage manager .................................................................................................... Norvell Thompson Electrician ...... . ........................................................... v ................................................... George Pasto Properties ................................................................................ , .............................................. Ted Baker Mf' M Wwwwwmw Kw i r:?,eX'g-ih V ' I i: i x i xIWN C vx a . i'Ehe Emu $2ntlvmm nf 132mm" By William Shakespeare This comedy is one of Shakespeareis minor writings and came at the beginning of his career as a dramatist. It has none of the tragic element that is to be found in most of Shakespeareis plays. There is a strong vein of comedy running throughout, ending with a swift climax and happiness is dealt to all. The two gentlemen from Verona, Valentine and Proteus, contest for the hand of Silvia. Launce and Speed, the servants of the two gentlemen, are the comedy char- acters. The manner in which these two individuals were interpreted cannot be spoken of too highly. Julia follows Proteus from Verona to Milan, disguised as a boy, and succeeds in winning back his love. ttThe Two Gentlemen of Veronaii was given at Guild Theatre January 27 and 29, 1921. This was the iirst Shakespearian play at- tempted by The Company this year, and its success cannot be doubted, i t when the fact that only a week was spent in rehearsing, is taken into MARAENJJGXLOR consideration. A complete set of scenery was manufactured to ffects necessary in this play. The audience termed the better produce the staging e lighting effects and costumes as being exquisitely beautiful. ' 311'." Oh!" in u 1'. h... Ii , k 9er x: CLAIRE KEENEY AS SPEED IU' $. 5 MLqu hgn 1m. l , Q nu n 1323.3; 5. t r Cu P'"! L .c 1 M If! Mm0 IHrumuxy nanuu 'u Mia. m v, :1 wimnx s Cast of Characters Julia, in love with Proteus .......................................................................................... Marian Taylor Lusetta, her gentlewoman .......................................................................................... Doris Pittinger Valentine . m n George Stearns Proteus phlends, the TWO Gentlemen Norve11 Thompson Speed, servant of Valentine ....................................................................................... Claire Keeney Antonio, father to Proteus ...................................................................................... Verne Fudge Panthino, his secretary .......................................................................................... Clifford Knodell Silvia, in love with Valentine .............................................................. Marion Gilstrap Ursula, her gentlewoman ............................................................................................ Helen Madden Launce, servant of Proteus .................................... . ............................................... Fergus Reddie Thurio, a wealthy fantastic in love With Silvia ........................................................ Reuel Moore The Duke of Milan ................................................................................................ Manford -Michael 1 deF0rd Wallace 2 Outlaws ...................................................................................................... 1 John Canoles 3 x Reuben Goffreiere Host at an inn in Milan, where Julia stops.........- ......................................................... Ted Baker Sir Eglamour, a friend of Silvia,s .............................................................................. Victor Sether TAYLOR STEARNS MADDEN CASEY GILSTRAP I WALLACE KEENEY STEWART BROWN CANOLES ROGERS FUDGE AKERS RICE KNODELL PITTINGER WOOTTON MOORE SETHER THOMPSON Ehe Olnmpang George Stearns, Helen Madden, Claire Wallace, Claire Keeney, Irene Stewart, Harold Brown, Helen Casey, Marion Gilstrap,, John Canoles, Loeta Rogers, Vern Fudge, Carol Akers, Martha Rice, Clifford Knodell, Doris Pittinger, Dorothy ;Wootton, Reuel Moore, Victor Sether, Norvell Thompson. Marion Taylor, fillillllIIJlIt' w 'xxs m x xa xx x mexxm m x .4.."n; "' ,K'Ij ' . ,n'izKi-n $th AWA , N?LSS xEC NAW W 41" s: w l' va, 2w N ey l, x I mi? QC! I ."ng ., .. -" :wl'F'f." ?'m I. an '. COOPER CARL Wii:i-'a Tn: .nu . ROSENBERG DAGGETT COX ht! .' 31W . n m ' 1 rq " 0 t lift A ;5" "I Wu 4 , Eh? JHnrmmr Olmmnl . " William M. Michael ............................................................................................................ Chairman Walter Myers ......................................... Alumni Marion McClain ....Graduate Manager Abe Rosenberg, Remey Cox, Wanda Daggett, Elaine Cooper, Wilbur Carl, Student Members. The existing Forensic Council grew out of the old Menls Forensic Council, com- posed of five men appointed by the president of the student body, of the graduate man- ager, one alumni and the debate manager Who acted as chairman. The only change that was made when reorganizing the old council was that three men and two women com- I posed the student personnel in place of the five men. One student is the student man- ager for all debates and orations. The duties of the council are to arrange all schedules in debate and oratory. They sign all the contracts and plan for a brilliant future for Oregon in forensics They strive to get contracts that Will mean the most to Oregon. Gratlually they are getting contracts with big schools, such as Washington, California and Princeton. Next year they hope to get contracts With some of the larger Middle Western colleges. In oratory they are forging ahead and Since Oregon has won the medal for the last two years the council feels that can now reach out into a larger field. One of the unwritten duties of the council is to encourage and perpetuate debate and oratory at Oregon, and to make our University stand for perfection in all intercollegiate activities. "-1232 --- g?thehule December 10-State Triangular Debate, 0. A. C., 3; Reed, 2; Oregon 1. January 1-Oregon-Princeton, Princeton, 2; Oregon, 1. March 1-Gir1s Dual Debate, 0. A. C., 4; Oregon, 2. March 4 Interstate Debate, Oregon, 5; Stanford, 3; Washington, 1. March 18-State Oratorical Contest. xx. V l d'. . W X 1V4 ' W i'- WEARERS OF THE "0" my;- $27: wm 144 b hunt a 1mm lum- a1 mun .m. WIIQI'NWM . s iuw E'KMOT! " v w -; !' . iw 22! W lU' HI 4 ".01 hing," . "I .. n M'g.m ha" Wm'uu "Hy ' mm 1: .g" l m m- , Harv: ,, :n. .9" Hum i1... 3:: 3 n i I nu- Nu w. "01: 6? Q t m; r t' TT 133 k LEE; wk. V "x .J Mummy Haraitg Erhateeabrvgnn 115. CD. A. 01. The primacy of other events during the war allowed forensics to slump and so it was with particular interest that the custom was revived by holding a dual debate with O. A. C. during Junior Week-end. The affirmative team composed of Elaine Copper and Edna Spatrlinvg remained at home and won a decision of two to one. Wanda. Dag- gett and Ethel Wakefield brought home a three to nothing decision from Corvallis. The question was ttResolved, That American Labor Should Organize and Support a Political Party of Its Own." The success of the Woments Varsity debate season of 1920 undoubt- edly justiiied its re-establishment. 691?an 3.712112 Eriangular Ethan On December 10, 1920, the University of Oregon affirmative team, composed of Remey Cox and Ralph Hoeber, met the Reed College negative team at Eugene, while the Oregon negative team, Kenneth Armstrong, went to O. A. C. Reed College, won the contest with a two to one decision .at Eugene, and the Agriculural College won a unani- mous decision over our negative team. 7:, 4'2; , y. ?t I ll, 1, 3 3x 1'33. z'l'VT Tg. I m5 av . x W 1, ,a' rmE C? Q t "WI! Q t ge1 .. 't 74 y r 1;; QK E341 ylxa F bx :f 'H'm fork I v ; 'y'LW' envy ?vfr "cur 'wM'h-W f tu gAfW' :1 Mel twwmo l Yb WAKEFIELD 313w? ?qu V mn'm! , ' .y n mam?! war " Wt" "'" m t . n 1H: m:- Smiling anh Ewkman GDratinna test was held on the occasion of the forty-fourth Com- riday, June 18, 1920. and the Beekman prize by The Failing-Beekman con mencement 0f the University of Oregon, in Villard Hall, F The Failing prize was won by Kenneth Hendricks, Ethel Wakefield. The judges of the contest were Homer of Portland; Judlge E. O. Potter, of Eugene. D. Angell, of Portland; Whitney L. Boise, '1! M3 pued in but Mina r13," rim 1! ham 5. :w 1113 9mm! 'W 'w- Mvm "' .1 3m yun- w u e 1.7-1 I b Q XIW' THE CONTESTANTS AND THEIR ORATIONS am: e x . V Im'ne 1'" W" N . Fred Coley nr- 11?"! w, ;. :n u. ttCall No Man Common" "Guarding the Citadelh bThe American Marathonh "Americats Heritage Imperiledtt ...................................................................................... Kenneth Hendricks ...................................................................................... Ben W. Hosmer ............................................................................ Ethel Wakefield GDrPgnn-igrinrptnn Ethan est with an Eastern school, held at Portland, January nceton. Abolish Strikes in Essential Indus- John Canoles, Carl Meyers Oregonts first forensic cont 1, resulted in a two to one decision in favor of Pri The question was, "Resolved, That Congress tries." Oregon upheld the negative, and was represented by and Remey Cox. L'W'W hu- man"... Lilnjiu mg... w 'huv N i;T u !a ' 3.u 'ul t h h 'wla "batty; w'.u.1th.m hm 555 .51 I'M 1 sstpg gr 5 w 7 Q : 5 W35 575 : i W? z'G 1 ' 113' V; x E N27 14 $ v IA- E! . . v a '31 W Mummy Jntvr-Olnllvgiate Ephatp The debates were scheduled for women,s intercollegiate debate for 1921. One with 0. A. C. and one with Washington University. The debate with O. A. C. was held on March 1. The negative team, composed of Wanda. Daggett and Jessie Todd, 10st to O. A. C. at Corvallis, while affirmative team, consisting of Elaine Cooper and Lur- line Coulter, won from the O. A. C. negative team at Eugene. The quesion used for the debate was: "Resolved, That Congress Should Pass Laws Prohibiting Strikes in Essential Industries." - anazt Eriatigular Brhate The University of Oregon debate activities for 1920-1921 Closed with both teams victorious in the Pacific coast triangular debates. On March 4 Oregon affirmative team decision over Stanford University. At the same strong debating the negative side of the question Washington two to one. The question debated by both teams was: ttResolved, That Congress Should Pass Laws Prohibiting Strikes in Essential Industriesfi This is the second year that Oregon has held the Pacific Coast championship. in Seattle defeated the University of 09121 311m? The forensic activities at the University of Oregon for the year 1920-1921 ended With Ralph Hoeber receiving first place in the Old Line Oratorical contest held at the First Christian church, March 18, 1921. Mr. Hoeberts subject was "The New Despotism". Second place went to Oregon Agricultural College, third to Eugene Bible University, and fourth to Albany College. The nine Oregon colleges and their representatives were: Pacific College C. S. Pil; Eugene Bible University, John Carter; University of Oregon, Ralph Hoeber; Mc- Minnville College, Jesse Manley; Pacific University, Francis Taylor; Oregon Agricul- ural College, W. B. Black; Oregon Normal School, Jennie Carroll; and Willamette University, Pete Wapapto. THE DEBATE SHIELD Ethane 011111 The debate cup presented to the student body by Tau Kappa. Alpha, the ments national debating fraternity, is awarded to the champion team of the campus. Hendricks Hall and Beta Theta Pi tied in the year 1918-1919, and Hendricks Hall won from Phi Delta Theta in 1919-1920. The team was composed of Jennie Maguire, Ma- bel Black, Wanda Daggett, Ethel Wakeiield. Hammett? Behate $hielh The Womerfs Debate Shield was given to the student body by the Ments Forensic Council, to be present- ed to the champion woments inter-fra- ternity debate team. Hendricks Hall won the shield, first in 1918-1919 and again in 1919-1920. Any house hold- ing it for three successive years may keep the shield. THE FINAL AWARD .4! ,..m h. M - um, W ' "uh dbh " 1h ax .im'ui ' us: m. :11 '3: :1 IJMI II Hi Ir 1 ! .., :u 'VMMI -'. u! 33:0,qu '54 1 $ "WI: ,41, A 14 r ' 5y .3 . w V11; MISS TIRZA DINSDALE Mummy Artiuitipz came to the University of Oregon he Association, to ke up her Miss Tirza Ann Dinsdale, Y. W. C. A. secretary, in 1917, then left in March, 1919, with the overseas department of t help With the work in France and Italy. Last fall she returned again to ta work with the girls at Oregon. While in France Miss Dinsda American soldiers, at Brest, in Brittany, 1e was in a military camp working among Wives of the port of embarkation. From there she went to Italy, in November, 1919, as American executive in the Student Foyer for the Uni- versity of Naples, in the industrial centers and in immigration work. Later she was field secretary with headquarters in Genoa, supervising the work in eight large cities. Miss Dinsdale there supervised student work and regular city association work Which is quite similar to the work of American organizations. HOLADAY CHANDLER HABERSHAM FLEGEL MAGUIRE FIELDS GILBERT KIDDLE THURSTON MARSH SCHEUBEL SMITH MACKENZIE SPALL LANE FURUSET E. m. m. A. Marjorie Holaday .............................................................................................................. President Vivian Chandler ....................................................................................................... Vice-President Frances Habersham ......................................................................................................... Secretary Ruth Flegal ............................................................................................................................. Treasurer THE CABINET Annual Member, Jennie Maguire; Social, Beatrice Wetherbee; Elsie Marsh; Practical Service, Florence Furuset; Bungalow, Ruth Lane; Publicity, Margaret Smith; Finance, Leta Kiddle; Seabeck, Alice Thurston; Meetings, Isla Gilu bert; Boosters, Nancy Fields; Bible Study, Eleanor Spall; Church Co-operation, Jean MacKenzie; Missionary, Glyde Scheubel. The Young Womants Christian Association is the organization of women to fur- ther fellowship and Christian feeling on the campus. It is the friend of eVery new- comer as well as the counsellor 0f the older girls. It fosters the religious life of the women. The Bungalow is the social center for the women of the campus. it is used has a clubhouse by many organizations and clubs other than the Y. W. C. A The Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. combine to to raise money to send representatives to the annua summer. Social Service, give the Seabeck ride each spring 1 conference at Seebeck during the ---242.m Y. W. WORKERS ?Fe NW CHANDLER WARWICK CALKINS GILLIS Mnmanta 41.12am? Vivian Chandler ...................................................................................................................... President Nell Warwick ................................................................................................................ Vice-President Phoebe Gage ....................................................... Secretary Madge Calkins ........................................................................................................................ Treasurer Marion Gillis ............................................................................................................ Sergeant-at-Arms Inez King .................................................. Reporter The Womanis League is an organization of all the women on the campus. It works to further the democratic relationship of the women. Womants League held the Sponser-Sponsee dance October 16, in the Men,s Gym- nasium. It is a dance at which the upperclassmen entertain the freshmen girls. The annual affair of the League is the April Frolic, which is composed of skits put on by each organization of women on the campus and was held April 20. Womants League was hostess at the opening of the Womants Building, March 7. , "QN I . i ix: gt. b g ,4' - s aims 7' J $ t WKIK Q t f F KEV .9 is ,2 y .VL '- vmvk g . Xxijfggsj f '1 O' - :3 A4 :' at ' ;j3.:n t n: .3 v e- ,. . l ' ' .. A ND"! 1.. t Secretary-Treasurer Ruth Geisler Henrietta Hansen ................................................................................................ nized in nineteen-fifteen by Mrs. Mabel Holmes Parsons and Freshman class advisors at that time. The three 1s which all members strive to live up to. elt advisable to create an organization in a socially intellectual way, and that e minds of the younger women. anized by Triple A was orga Dean John Straub, who were the tats" are significant of certain idea Triple A was organized because it was f which would bring the Freshman girls together college ideals and traditions might be instilled into th Triple A works in cooperation with the Practical Ethics class, since org Dean Elizabeth Fox, the two having the same aims. mummy Emeralh Emerald is published each year by the women of the University who are interested in journalism. Theta Sigma Phi, women,s national honorary journalistic fraternity, directs the work and composes the upper staff. The Women's Emerald appears on Saturday of Junior Week-end, and in 1920 was an eight- page publication. It contains sports, features, campus news, literary contributions, and a complete review of the Junior Week-end events. One edition of the Oregon Daily Editorial Staff Adelaide Lake ................................................................................ v ................................................ Editor Dorothy Duniway ...................................................................................................... Associate Editor Helen Manning .................................................................................................................. News Editor Lyle Bryson ................................................................................................................ Managing Editor Victoria Case .............................................................................................................................. Features Louise Davis ................................................................................ . .................................................... Sports Frances Blurock ............................................................................ Society Editor and Proofreader Contributors Anna Landsbury Beck? Emma Wootton Hall i """""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""" Assistants desk; Frances Habersham, artist; Mrs. Amy Larre- more, Velma Rupert, Eleanor Spall, Annamay Bronaugh, Wanna McKinney, Elva Bagley, Mary Lou Burton, Dorris Sikes, Mauna Loa Fallis, Frances Quisenberry, Pauline Coad, Eunice Zimmerman, Ariel Dunn, Inez King, Mildred Weeks, Mary Truax, Maybelle Leavitt, Esther Fell, Margaret Carter. Business Staff .................................................................................................................. Manager Nell Warwick, head of copy- ilary Ellen Bailey Assistants Clem Cameron, Doris Parker, Friederika Schilke. 99 :x 3e .-' 37 H Lx, ' x . TKN san'fNQgN wmk ICQTN, V W 1 . Nix ,, N N 7. xxx0-1qu c; N ' 1:711. L Q: g x 3, Naif, e h I mi N h ll? 1: O x Ennkiug Emma nu Ghana BY GRACE EDGINGTON The young moon trails a golden train Down college ways we used to know; The hills come out beyond the plain To watch the infant evening grow. And down the moonlight street We slip Past windows full of supper glow, Where song runs round from lip t0 lip, Good golden song made long ago. NFrom the mountains comes the gleaming, T0 the skys the stars come homing, Looking down on Oregon ................ , Oh Oregon ................ Oh Oregon ................ Oh Oregon? The sad rain trails a tattered shroud Behind him down the midnight street; The Wind runs, crying half aloud, The trees their aching bosoms beat. But through the dark panes the flrelight plays And in the firelight glances meet; There rise soft songs of golden dayS,- Oh sing 10w, Oh sing them sweet: ' NFrom the mountains comes the gloaming, To the skys the stars come homing, Looking down on Oregon ................ Oh Oregon ................ Oh Oregon ................ Oh Oregon? h 5' 11w Tm. cw"! IV ll; 3-8:" wt '53 .f um m: i .Lu-I Sham 'nf 501 n :Y '3' W HQII H 3W 10d fur" N Tb Mn. nag" '9 Wit i swg 3 Val um... m m.' an! Q hf Nlhtti '1 h .Svhahnma 7 TR BY LAURA MOATES Those years of mine were noisy years, - , ,. Busy and full of care ............ gum 9A Again 01d Villard is all astir, Shadow feet are on the stair. 4? In the dead echo of a rally cry, ' Ti 1-9 I hear old glories live; 3 xx The shadow voices call to me, d EU 4?? My answer I cannot give. , ' A hT $ 15" e The luring sadness of the voices! ?T- i! , They linger and Will not be gone. ' I6- But slowly my heart is Whispering . . M y v The lilt 0f the shadow songs. , x I, T al- "v .4 i. I '- , -1"... w a 6$ J, E F V K", kg . e7 V t 3 gm. , 1'3 r 'vy k - .xQ $0 V , 5 hr tx. GDrPgmt ignppwa LILLIAN AULD Out on the campus poppies grow A11 purples, greens and reds, And down each class-hall path they go With nodding, heavy heads. Out on the campus mists come down To dress the world in gray and brown- Until the noon-time class bell rings And to the scene rich color brings. For over there on ttHello Lane" Umbrella poppies, merrily, are bobbing thru the rain $ $ 31: 9!: Fl: Out on the campus of the world Therets a rest in the great tired day. There are factory tops With flags unfurled Of drifting choking gray. Out on the campus of the world Within ttgradt hearts are memories curled, That ravel out in a golden dream Each little break in lifets swift stream. Out there in the pageantts train Theytre living college days again. With me itts not a victory yell Or the Wild band,s gay refrain- But a little thing that is hard to tell, Mirrored on thoughtts window pane ............ Down the years they joyfully come In laughing groups or one by one, ............ My poppies that went bobbing thru the rain. lad 3-"t qgm nu! Am IIQNMWM HM "' an "W IsSumaut :4 3m u 8:! JHnr 091?th . h i x w IRENE STEWART x "Oregon, our Alma Mater ........ " - . Much we owe you ; m m And yet, we are you, Oregon; ' - v: . Much we owe each other, X In sincerity and fellowship. Come and let us be worthy of ourselves, $ 9;? Worthy to be 'called Oregon; ' E A. ll J That when we leave this second home, I b M - g Q We Will have made ourselves finer; HZ Will have made our college greater. III - w m mt Mia.- e For Oregon will ever live in us i r And We in it ............ n . That is inevitable. . '3 w ' Oh, let us make our record proud for 1d 1 wwMighty Oregon? 'I d r f' ' i ,0 f w 1' w " ,1! A 5mg fur 09m OBrpgnn EMILY A. VEAZIE What shall we sing for our Oregon-- Of growing things in Spring? ' For she is young,and yet to come Is her time of summering. Oh what shall we sing for Oregon- Of peaks flushed rose with dawn? For see, her light grows eter more bright In a world where night is gone. What shall we sing for Oregon- Of a stream that singing flows? How strong and deep her waters sweep From the past in which she rose! Yes, all of this we will sing for her- Sing Youth, and Hope, and Spring; The dawning sun and the race to rune- Oh, Oregon, glad we sing! w in mi! u' unit 7 ' '1'" mum Ii 1 7'" ii ' 'N H: hm '.H' m2 Etta 15' phi! m o be v 3 Val um MI! W at .- ml 50M 8-- run... -$-wt! IAN Whn I-o H1". M 1- mm"; .3 7' ml U. 13M! Wu ?unm'u-q lulu- ii' FD- Isv h linww-c :11? kli WM h :h n" Eta. V Y "M I- bun m a a 6 -m Kst 0 w 7 4' a V," s xtfi Q! a .I .. gt 7' 9 i w ' 1;? wk?" X s-a k5- av 34 1 was aX '5 i 4: p It'll!- 3W unu- 4 . u." a A 7. i R Q: X go h A Berg Natural igniting tWith a Moran Some time ago, Satan was touring the United States with an idea of introducing some of the latest improvements from the Old Country. In the East he found things in better condition than he had expected. Vices were flourishing, especially in the great cities, and he found very little work to do there. ' The Middle West was still backward, but in a short time Satan had set things wrong, and then, being tired, he sat down on the Rocky Mountains to rest, and to take a look at the Frontier. As he glanced up and down the Pacific Coast, he shook his head sorrowfully, and said: "This is bad, very bad. Why, conditions here are not much worse than they were in the Garden of Eden. If it werenit for the presence of Indians, Hard Work and Whiskey, I should say it were a second Eden? Satan sighed ............ ttHow shall I go about improving these poor people? As he studied, he idly poked up a few Indian tribes with his walking-stick, and was amused by the little wars and massacres that followed. But soon this grew monotonous. iiOh, shucksf said Satan, ttthose Indians are no help? He sighed again, and reaching out, picked up a cloud that was floating near, and put it on his head, for the sunlight was so bright it hurt his eyes; then he rested his chin on his hand and thought deeply. Suddenly he began to laugh. itWhat a fool live been? said he. tiltis the Old Situation over again, same as in Eden. These people must be educated. What they need is colleges." Without delay, Satan chose the three likeliest spots on the coast for universitiesa Seattle, because it would be handy for the Japanese;; Eugene, because it had Spenceris Butte and a Millrace; and Berkeley, because Barbary Coast across the Bay, was sadly in need of competition. Having decided on these desirable points, Satan reached forward, and with his apple-engraved walking-stick, stirred up three Universities. - In a few years-years were but minutes to Satanethese Universities were thriv- ing and doing a fine business. Also Temperance Societies sprang up, and Y. Mfs and Y. Wfs, Amateur Theatricals, Life Classes, Philosophical Societies, and other such things conducive to Evil. And Satan was greatly pleased to find that his Home was frequently mentioned by students, and that he himself was often spoken of-though in truth he was generally called rather familiarly by his nickname. One day Satan felt his right ear burn, and listening to that side, he heard a Club on Washington Campus talking, and it said, tiWe must defeat Satan; we must arraign ourselves against sinful pastimesewe must not Dance, or Flirt, or play Crok- inole? Egg :22, .. 1'" l7 . m .1': vie kg. 3 . ON , x7 g, 1 ft I' But Satan only giggled, and filled a chunk of passing sunlight so full of Wicked Inclinations that when it touched the Club-members they immediately adjourned to the nearest Ice Cream Saloon and ordered Cupidls Delights. A minute later Satan felt his left ear burn, and listening to that side, heard a Society on the California Campus talking about him, and it said, ttSatan is much maligned. Without him there would be no education. It is a shame." And Satan wiped a self-commiserating tear from his eye, and ordered the Mem- bers new Stutzes all around. Just then he felt his nose tingle, and looking straight ahead to the Oregon Campus, he saw a group of neighbors talking at an Intersection, and they were saying: ttInter- esting old Myth, the Devil. Only one other great Myth so indicative of the racial psychology. Interesting Myth; charming Lie? Satan scratched his nose thoughtfully. His Was a fair-sized nose, and could accommodate a good amount of scratching. , . Then he got up and went Below, where he appointed a Reception Committee, and stirred up the Goals. 7 wax? -Irene Stewart. v m WWMMMAA, 4 $71" :6 G. Dunwarr WWI": as Q s " WIS r177 xsa $4 , x x s SMITH VESTER 091?an Bailg Emeralh Editorial Staff Harry A. Smith .............................................................................................................................. Editor Lyle Bryson ................................................................................................................ Associate Editor Charles E. Gratke News Editor Velma Rupert, Elisabeth Whitehouse, Joh Wilford Allen, Carlton Logan, Reuel Moore, Kenneth Youel .............................. Night Edtors Floyd Maxwell Sports Editor Eugene Kelty, Edwin Hoyt ......................................................................................... Sports Writers Jacob Jacobson News Service Editor Alexander Brown, Eunice Zimmerman Mary Lou Burton, E. J. H., Frances Quisenberry ............................................ Feature Writers Don Huntress Statistician News Staff Fred Guyoh, Margaret Scott, Kay Bald, Owen Callaway, Jean Strachan, Inez King, Lenore Cram, Doris Parker, Wanna McKinney, Ray D. Lawrence, Margaret Carter, Flor- ence Skinner, Emily Houston, Mary Truax, Pauline Coad, Howard Bailey, Arthur Rudd, Ruth Austin, Madalene Logan, Mabel Gilham, Jessie Thompson, Hugh Starkweather, Jennie Perkins, Claire Beale, Dan Lyons, John Anderson, Florence Walsh, Maybelle Leavitt. Business Staff Raymond E. Vester .............................................................................................. Business Manager Webster Ruble ....................................................................... 4 .................................................. Associate George McIntyre ................................................................................................ Advertising Manager A1 Krohn ............................................................................................ ' .................. C irculation Manager Advertising Assistants James Meek, Randal Jones, Jason McCune, Ben Reed, Mary Alexander, Elwyn Craven, Donald Bennett. 4m 7f. E3 e S u 0 h e R h V X e r O 0 I 3 n a 1 mu 1 n1 Ym Hn eh HZ McIntvre Rupert Youel J ncobsnn Burton Dierdorff Quisenhorry Allen Hoyt MCKINNEY LITTLEFIELD Gbrtgana, 1921 Editorial Staff Wanna McKinney ................................................................................................................. Editor Velma Rupert .......................................................................................................... Associate Editor Department Editors I. Mary Lou Burton ............................................................................... ....................... University Betti Kessi, Wayne Akers ......................................................................... L; ............. Administration Pauline Coad, Stanley Eisman, Doris Parker, Margaret Carter, Ray Vester, Harry Ellis ............................................................................................. '. .......................... Classes Floyd Maxwell, Charles Gratke, Haseltine Schmeer, Guy Sacre .................. Men's Athletics Margaret Russell, Florence Jagger .......................................................... ,....Womenss Athletics Inez King, Elisabeth Whitehouse .............................................................. The Memory Book Fern Murphy .............................................................................................. 4 .......................... Music Verne Fudge, Irene Stewart ............................................................................... Oregon Quill Alice Hamm, Remey Cox ............................................................................................ Forensics Charlotte Clark ........................................................................................................ Busy Hours Harry Smith ................................................... . .......................................................... Publications Stanley Eisman Military Eleanor Spall, Raymond Lawrence.............................................................................Organizati0ns Mary Ellen Bailey, Barton Sherk, Doris Pittenger ................................................ Fraternities Richard Thompson ...................................................................................................... Medical School John Dierdorff, Madge Calkins, Scanland Collins, Wesley Frater .................................... Bunk Wilbur Hulin, Frances Habersham, Fern Travis, Bernice Butler, David Baird, Marion Ady, Germany Klemm .............................................................................................................. Art Business Staff Forest Littlefield ...................................... Wilbur Hoyt Ben Reed, Harold Brown ..... Manager x ..................................................................... -256- Clark Carter Hulin Travis Reed Lawrence mith lbersham S H Brown x Maxwell Eisman Spall SSI n O t r u B Ke Coad Shark Sucre Littlefield Schmoer Dierdorff M urphy Fudge King Calkins EISMAN ELLSWORTH 162mm igumh Editorial Staff Harry A. Smith John T. Braddock .................................................................................................... Managing Editor Allen Carncross ....................................................................................................... Literary Editor Frank Short ............................................................................................................................ Art Editor Business Staff Dean Ireland - Helen Dougherty .............................................................................................. Advertising Manager WEARERS OF THE "0" 259 . 5gb :th x , J I All; . X. I x. e W357 '4: w 41 '11:; r' .7 V$ k3 e As SQ x Obregcm iguhliratinnz e magazine published by the School of Journalism OREGON EXCHANGES, a trad rnalism by newspaper men for Oregon newspaper men. It contains articles on jou from all over the state. editing'and This is the that it is sheet published once a year by the class in s a homecoming advertisement. hed and so successful has it been WINNAGEN, a humorous sent to the alumni of the University a second year Winnagen has been publis planned to make it a permanent thing. als throughout the year by the Uni- issued at regular interv vice. It con- i and Oregon newspapers as a mail news ser f statewide interest. NEWS BULLETIN, versity and sent to alumn tains news of campus happenings o 8 University as the official organ of the OLD OREGON, published quarterly by th duates and former students of the Uni- It is devoted to the activities of gra alumni. has edited Old Oregon this year. versity. Miss Grace Edgington r the beneiit of students registered in the EXTENSION MONITOR, published to hed free to all those Who enter. University Extension Department and furnis ax $ 1 $ 1 f 9w I Cir? w $ N .xa a 'Q n ' :5: :X l$ M I, .. ., f K A 9 g 1 . ":1; a 1 . s 171,. ' y 11 1 99. a 1 4' h A 'K n" --.: 'h MAJOR BAIRD madam Baird has completed his second year as commander of the R. O. T. C. unit at the University of Oregon. He has held a commission in the regular army since 1908 and prior to the war was the organizer and commander of the cadet corps of Kansas City, Mo., high school, which won the National War Game Competition in 1917. He held the grade of Lieutenant-Colonel during the war, commanding an in- fantry replacement battalion at Camp Lee, Virginia, and the 64th Pioneer Infantry at Camp Taylor, Ky., and was detailed for duty at the University of Oregon March 14, 1919, under the rank of Captain. Since that time he has been raised to the rank of Major. Assisting Major Baird is Major Arthur E. Rowland, who was detailed for duty as assistant professor of military tactics at the University Feb. 1, 1921. Major Rowland was formerly commander at Fort Stevens, Ore. In addition, Sergeants Agnew, Sulli- van, Vaughn, and Conyers, have been detailed as assistants to Majors Baird and Rowland. Major Raymond C. x e H WIS: ' 1599' V .R .' 299 x X I l v- I xxik A ,, k DC XI THE STAFF OFFICERS Igumnap nf the ER. 09. E. 01. The R. O. T. C. was established at the University of Oregon and other celleges throughout the country in accordance With our country,s general scheme of national preparedness. The object is to provide for the nation a group of young men who, in times of emergency, will be qualified to execute the duties of commissioned officers and assume leadership over the nation,s war forces. R. O. T. C. OFFICERS Mark nf the 11119.5.01. 11ed in the R. O. T. C. at the present time. Each cadet, before enrollment is completed, is required to take a physical examination ose of determining along What lines he may be deficient. The cadets are e issued complete equipment, including uniforms, rifles, bayonets and cartridge belt. , Student commanders are placed in charge of the companies and cadets are advanced to higher positions according to the ability dis- played. Each cadet is required to take fours per week of military training. One of the features of the department is the rifle range. A range is maintained near the city limits of Eugene where cadets receive thorough training in marksmanship. In addition the department possesses a 37 milometer one-pounder gun, stokes mortar, machine guns, automatic rifles and hand grenades. There are approximately 325 men enro for the purp divided into four companies and ar lnh on." gun- a a .- O Mum .m- ' h." H W downy. COMPANY A, E112 33.09. Ell. 01. a5 a mainr 0111mm Military tactics has been recentl curriculum as a major course. A ' ' t ' ' ' awing and field work is Mili- reshman and sophomore years, and those yond their sophomore year receive a monthly allowance of $15.00 from the government. They are required to take five hours of military work per week and in addition spend one summer in the R. O. T. C. summer training camps. Upon the completion of these requirements they are given reserve commissions in the United States army. COMPANY B m 05. . COMPANY C Eh? '43. 09. GI. 01. Armnfg The R. O. T. C. armory is a two-story frame building 100 feet long and 40 feet wide. It contains offices for the military staff, cadet class rooms containing sand tables, maps, miniature trench systems, etc., rifle rooms, equipment rooms and an indoor shooting gallery. One of the new features in the building is a system of maps, showing the progress made by each cadet during his successive terms in the R. O. T. C. A complete equipment of haversacks, kits, tents, uniforms and ammunition is maintained for the use of the cadets, and each is provided with one hundred rounds of ammunition for target practice. COM PANY D CARLTON SAVAGE, STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT -:267- Houston 1 .1! r. u u n G D. n 911. ,u r. P X E . President Carlton Savage President .Secretary .,..Member ....Member ...Vice John Houston Lyle Bryson Wilbur Carl Large Large at at- Marc Latham Savage Houston Bryson Stoltenberg Chapman Bartholomew Warwick Smith Flegel Akers Chandler Davis Winnard Maxwell 557111212111 lemril SENIOR REPRESENTATIVE S Carlton Savage, John Houston, Lyle Bryson, Nish Chapman, Harry Smith, Vivian Chandler, Don Davis, Lyle Bartholomew, Nell Warwick, Wanda Brown. JUNIOR REPRESENTATIVES Wayne Akers, Norton Winnard, Ruth Flegal SOPHOMORE REPRESENTATIVE Floyd Maxwell. $ 7 ,4, " 14 rig; 'x;.', k V; $5 Xx A Maguire Frater Winnard Pittenger lininvraity Quantum Jennie F. Maguire Historian Doris Pittenger, Norton Winnard, Wesley Frater ................................ Executive Committee Katheryn Bald, Laura Spall, Wolcott Buren, Dean Ireland .................... Clipper Committee Poster Committee Kenneth Youel Publications . Departments: Journalism, Florine Packard; Law, Commerce, Wilbur Hoyt; Psychology, Wilbur Hulin; Education, Marie Ridings; Pre-Medics, Birch- ard Van Loan; Architecture and Arts, Lyle Bartholomew and Marion Ady; Graduate school, Vivian Kellems; Summer School, 1920, Helen DuBuy; English and Rhetoric, Mildred Hawes; Physical Training, Men, Floyd Maxwell; Women, Maud Largent; Science, Elvira Thurlow; History, Margaret Jackson; Extension Division, Mozelle Hair; Foreign Languages, Isabelle Kidd; Political Science and Economics, Elmer Pendell; Sociology, Eleanor Spall; Public Speaking and Debate, Remey Cox; Dramatics, Dorothy Wootton; Household Arts, Frances Moore; Military Science, John Gamble; University Library, Louise Davis. Organizations: Hendricks Hall, Frances Habersham; Sigma Delta Phi, Leola Green; Alpha Delta Pi, Beatrice Crewdson; Alpha Phi, Helen Carson; Gamma Phi Beta, Janet West; Pi Beta Phi, Marjorie Kruze; Chi Omega, Margaret Smith; Kappa Alpha Theta, Marion Lawrence; Tri Delta, Gertrude Golding; Zeta Rho Epsilon, Ruth Tuck; Delta Zeta, Gladys Everett; Kappa Kappa Gamma, Marion Weiss; Delta Gamma, Paul- ine Coad; Sigma Nu, Charles Robertson; Kappa Sigma, Haddon Rockhey; Beta Theta Pi, Owen Callaway; Alpha Tau Omega, Ralph Couch; Sigma Chi, Charles Lamb; Phi Gamma Delta, Francis Kern; Phi Delta Theta, Hugh Latham; Delta Tau Delta, Ned Twining; Chi Psi, Ralph Taylor; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Forest Littlefleld; Kappa Theta Chi, James Say; Bachelordon, Dan Woods; Friendly Hall, Remey Cox; Phi Sigma Pi, John Anderson; Y. W. C. A., Is-la Gilbert; Y. M. C. A., Roy Veatch; Mews Glee Club, Nelson English; Girls, Glee Club, Bernice Altstock; Orchestra, Ralph Hoeber. Professional Honor Societies: Sigma Alpha, Elmo Madden; Alpha Kappa Psi, Bill Reinhart; Mask and Buskin, Marion Taylor; Mu Phi Epsilon, Leona Marsters; Theta Sigma Phi, Velma Rupert; Sigma Delta Chi, Eugene Kelty; Zeta Kappa Psi, Ruth Griffin; Tre Nu, Florence Furuset; Sigma Upsilon, Phil Brogan; Phi Theta Kappa, Marjorie Stout. Local and Class Societies: Triple A, Fannie Ruth Alderman; Oregon Club W0mem, Glen Frank; To-Ko-Lo, Martin Howard; Kwama, Hallie Smith; Friars, Don Newbury; Scroll and Script, Alice Thurston; Student Art Club, Dymon Povey; Eutaxian, Dorothy Manville; Se Habla Epanol, Gertrude Whitton; WomeIfs Educational Club, Mary Turner; French Club, William Russis. -270 - . 1 Y pmx$ 24 2 .q 7 r ft; Thurston Gilstrap gmnll anh guipt Senior Honor Society, Organized June 3, 1900 ACTIVE MEMBERS Alice Thurston, Mildred Hawes, Mary Turner, Marian Gilstrap. HONORARY MEMBERS Luella Clay Carson, M. Ruth Guppy, Dean Elizabeth F. Fox, Ida. Turney. INACTIVE MEMBERS Mrs. Paul Hamilton Miriam PageL Ruth Ann Wilson, Dorothy Duniway, Lucell Morrow, Irva Smith, Grace Knopp, Olga Soderstrom, Mrs. Ross Giger Oviarian NeiD, Helen Wells, Ruth Westfall, Beatrice Gaylord, Mrs. Elmer Hall Emma. Wootem, Mar- garet Crosby, Mrs. William G. Williams Marion TuttleL Ruth Duniway, Bertha Dorris, Mrs. Raymond Kerr warolyn Dunstom, Mrs. E. Miller Wrances Oberteuffem, Mrs. Harold Delzell, Mae SageL Mrs. Carl B. Neal Uennie LillyL Mrs. Thomas Word Ruth Hansom, Mrs. George Felteroff mia Prossem, Mrs. Ben Chandler wecile Wilcom, Mrs. F. G. Whitelesy Edith Woodcocm, Mrs. Thomas Burke Uulie CrossL Mrs. Chester Downs Marian StoneL Mrs. Graham Mitchell He1en Beacm, Willeta Wright, Mrs. George M. Vinton 01ive DonnelD, Mrs. Charles Taylor Mary DeBaU, Mrs. George Benchander A1ice StoddardL Mrs. Charles Robinson Birdie WiseL Mrs. Carl Gregg Wrances Shoemaken. I Q 6-? ' W Q 1;? k x S: . V..1V .x? I A V .5 ;Zv b- J g '2 9Q Q W M cCrosk ey Dund ore Newbury Benefiel Reinhart Hopkins Smith Houston Keeney Chapman Savage Durno : lu' , . W 1Hrtara An Upperclassmerfs Society, organized November, 1910. ACTIVE MEMBERS Carlton Savage, Jack Dundore, Don Newbury, Henry Foster, , Lyle McCroskey, Thomas I. Chapman, John Houston, John Benefiel, William Reinhart, Edwin Durno, . Harry Smith, Claire Keeney, George Hopkins. 5"! Ni.- W . k! t... "" In- HONORARY MEMBERS l'- H r m. . N's Gustav W. Butchen, Leroy Johnson, Arthur Geary, Hugo Bezdek. ' Ni. K N 'Qu . k b h .5" y '14j Bailey Warwick Coad Sikes Burton Bronaugh Bryson Spall McKinney Rupert Ghent $igma 1am Fraternity. Founded at the University April 8, 1909. Ghent Glimmer Installed June 10, 1915 National Women1s Journalistic of Washington J Mary Ellen Bailey, Lyle Bryson, Mr Mary Lou Burton, Pauline Coad, Wanna Warwick. s. Anna Landsbury Beck, Annamay Bronaugh. McKinney, Velma Rupert, Eleanor Spall, Nell 1: HONORARY MEMBERS 4"" 1" Mable Holmes Parsons, Mrs. Eric Allen, Mrs. W. F. Osburn M Mrs. Frederic Thorne. ' ACTIVE MEMBERS W V , Caroline Cole, v,- .10 w'w 3', ! d f, I w I .35- re jg 9;: i121 Xx r ix 1 :1, ' a W:?- .. b X? x :33 x 139., .. j ,V x" Ellsworth. Lawrence Brown Vester Dierdorff Smith Logan Kelty Eisman Kays $igma Eelta Olhi Founded at DePauW University, April 17, 1909. National Journalism Fraternity. QDmirrnn Glimmer Installed April 10, 1913. ACTIVE MEMBERS ence, Alexander Brown, Raymond Vester, John Dier- Harris Ellsworth, Raymond Lawr Stanley Eisman, Warren Kays. dorff, Harry Smith, Carlton Logan, Eugene Kelty, HONORARY MEMBERS Dean E. W. Allen, Robert W. Sawyer, Merle Chessman, Elbert Bede, Charles Fisher, E. E. Brodie, Prince L. Campbell. ASSOCIATE MEMBERS George Turnbull, Karl Onthank, Carlton Spencer. gr- M' - MXEV Q .- y J'Iisman Hulin Smith Ellsworth Q3! Carncross Brogan Haycox Jacobson Brown ' a I , $igma lapzilnn , ; Founded at the University of the South and Vanderbilt University, 1906 w ; q. 132 Eaharh 311m ' x Installed October, 1915. nu ACTIVE MEMBERS v ' w .F'V Wilbur Hulin, Harry Smith, Harris Ellsworth, Stanley Eisman, Allen Carncross, E. J. "p l, Haycox, Jacob Jacobson, Alexander Brown, Phillip Brogan, Chandos Castle. I, ' ASSOCIATE MEMBER cl? V W. F. G. Thacher I .- I M f McGrew Case Thacher Beck Murphy Marsters Frasier J. Frasier Aurora Potter Rand Gilstrap Clancy Alberta Potter Dixon Skeels Gregory helps Garrett Clark Kern Letcher -276- 7 MW . , ., , .A h ltbht I" .Hu "1.. . hr" Jar. ham xx: .: ' g 5 kg, .91 91i!5$i Q! .I 4 $7? MIX? 9 111111 ighi Epzilnn Founded at Metropolitan Colle 13, 1903 Nu Glimmer Installed March 3, 1911 Honorary Music Fraternity. ge of Music, November FACULTY 7 Mrs. Anna Beck, Mrs. Jane Thacher, Mme. Rose McGrew , Alberta Potter, Aurora Potter, Laura Rand, Inez W'atkins, Charlott e Banfield. TOWN MEMBERS Mrs. W. M. Case, Mrs.VC. A. E. Whitton, Mrs. M. H. Douglas, Mrs. T. A. Larremore 9 1921 Aurora Potter, Dorothy Dixon, Marion Gilstrap, Leona Marsters, Brownell Frasier, Janet Frasier, Fern Murphy. 1922 Beulah Clark, Margaret Phelps, Alice Gohlke, Genevieve Clancy, Laura Rand, Alberta Potter. Imogene Letcher, Marvel Skeels, Margaret Kern, Mrs. M. H. Leona Gregory, Florence Garrett TOWN ALUMNAE Mrs. Edna P. Datson, Mrs. Rose Powell, Mrs. Alton Hampton, Miss Goldsmith. Savage Hoeber Armstrong Rosenberg Carl Canoles Patterson Davis Gan Kappa Alpha National Forensic Fraternity Founded 1908 Kenneth Armstrong, Carlton Savage, Don Davis, Abe Wilbur Carl, Ralph Hoeber, anoles, Paul Patterson, Remey Cox Rosenberg, John C mwivcy Q R I99, I n f 3.; ER . m V;- 35. d a 7 ,- m ,. 6 i 1!- Hall Thurston Hawes Wakefield Ridings Grifh'n Pittenger Carson Daggett Cooper Hooper Todd Zrta Kappa 195i Honorary Forensic Fraternity for Upperclass Women. Established at Kansas State Agricultural College in 1913. 7152151 thaptpr Installed June 1, 1917. Lois Hall ............................................................ President Jennie Maguire ........................................................................................................................ Secretary Doris Pittenger ...................................................................................................................... Treasurer Ruth Griffin .............................................................................................................................. Reporter ASSOCIATE MEMBER Miss Julia Burgess. ' 1917 Rosalind Bates Blades 1918 Vivien Kellems, Amy Carson, Rosamund Shaw. 1919 Roberta Scheubel, Helen McDonald, Harriet Garrett, Marie Badura, Ruth Graham Case, Pearl Crane Waite. 1920 Eva Hansen, Laurel Canning, Edna Hyde, Grace Knopp, Helen Flint, Ethel Wakefield. 1921 Alice Thurston, Jessie Todd, Norma Medler, Marie Ridings, Lois Hall, Mildred Hawes. 1922 Helen Carson, Doris Pittenger, Ruth Griffin, Elaine Cooper, Wanda Daggett Helen Hooper. 92799 'vmw. -Q L 4,: :1 ! ;'A p- ' 77" 3 gm AK 7 vv , A 31 r jgl WX a - REIS' V14, vr-v ?'A rh I K 1W . 4 k334i x -- Bartholomew E X Fudge Dunn .- Marian Gilstrap, J 0 son, Ray Dunn, Doris Pitteng rion Taylor, George Stearns, Keit Esther Wilson, Florence Cart Alice Young, Dunn. Granville Barker, Dr. E. S. Bates, A. F. Reddi Earl Taylor R. Dunn Simola Houston Keeney Stearns J ohnson Rose Stewart Pittenger Rice Norton E. Wilson Cartwright Dodson Azanriatph Eniueraitg iglagprz 2113:1111: anh ?BuEkin Olhapter Installed February 3, 1917. ACTIVE MEMBERS hn Houston, Arvol Simola, Bo er, Lyle Bartholomew, h Kiggins, Helen Rose, Star N HONORARY MEMBERS -280-- wright, Verne Fudge, Marth English Wilson Young b Earl, Claire Keeney, Ogden John- Fred Dodson, Nelson English, Ma- orton, Naomi Wilson, a Rice, Berrian 8, Miss Charlotte Banfleld. K H,?Q . 'ru 26,1 k w-s a3 ,.. 9 ml VAN: :4.. a! I MQKQE: 'L Q .I-J. w Q4 x f a - Q - 3Q . JRQMX .-.- a ka 54 V p; x :Q , , x Q . - V 4 Q v c WLQi? mwv. Jim Q. ; n; 12' y z 7;, J ; QT, F; . Q Q' v; Q ; Iw Q'CJ - k Xi ?; - Q; 4 g? I Lowry Aumiller Rasor W arwick Fell Stout 1am Elma Kappa Founded at University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado. National Womean Commerce Fraternity, Installed University of Oregon, April 13, 1920. Margaret Fell .............................................................. President Dorothy Lowry .............................................................................................................. Vice-President Mildred Aumiller .................................................................................................................. Secretary Lulu Rasor ...................... Treasurer Marion Weiss ............................................................................................ National Council Member ACTIVE MEMBERS Margaret Fell, Mildred Aumiller, Lulu Rasor, Nell Warwick, Dorothy Lowry, Marion Weiss, Esther Fell, Marjorie Stout. HONORARY MEMBERS Dean Elizabeth Fox. iu' I u-.. . .. McCroskey W ells Armstrong Chapman Burleigh Harris Coleman Hedges Conrad . Weide Wood Ingram Howard La Roche Skyrman Littleiield Ralston J ohnson Abbott Allen McClellan 13m 3321161 lam 0111mm Glimmer Installed 1903. MEMBERS Lyle McCroskey, Gordon S. Wells, Kenneth Armstrong, Nish Chapman, Sylvester- Burleigh, Maynard Harris, William Coleman, Joe Hedges, Earl Conrad, Francis Weide, Bordon Wooda Joseph Ingram, Frederic Howard, Silvanua Kingsley, George La Roche, Harry Skyrman, Forest Littleiield, William Ralston, Olgdon Johnson, Leo Abbott, Wil- liam Allen, Verne McClellan, Donald McDonad. M' 7' $ 1 K . gm- 1110 Av! - 3.37 , A , 1V x Myers Bolitho K. Leslie Reinhart E. Leslie Alpha Kappa igai Founded in New York University, May, 1905 Kappa Olhaptpr Installed May 3, 1915 National Commerce Fraternity ACTIVE MEMBERS William Reinhart, Jack Benefiel, Donald Davis, Earl Leslie, Silas Starr, Franklin Miller, Barton Laughlin, Arthur Kuhnhausen, Carl Knudson, Carl Meyers, A. L. Lomax, T. J. Bolitho, Verne R. McDougle, George Denfield. ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Charles Huntington, Henry Foster, William Steers. Pierson, Wakefield Ridings Pattee Copenhaver J . Frasier Lighter Turner Holaday M ontgomery Hall Hawes Pallet Klemm W hitfield Hensley Skeels Ady Stratton iHi Eamhha Ghent Installed University of Oregon, 1921. Lillian J. Pearson Grace Knopp ..... Ethel Wakefield ................................................................................................... Marie Ridings ...................................................................................................... Pirie Zimmerman Carlock Secretary Treasurer Margaret B. Goodall, Ruth D. Wheeler, Edith Pattee, Ruth Montgomery, Ethel Wakefield, Lucile Copenhaver, Anna Grace Pallet, Mary Turner, Lillian J. Pearson, Marion Ady, Marie Ridings, Helen Han, Beatrice Hensley, Janet Frasier, Alice Thurston, Mildred Hawes, Isobel Zimmerman, Marjorie Holaday, Germany Klemm, Alice Lighter, Ulala Stratton, Edith Pirie, Irene Whitfield, Marcile Carlock, Marvel Skeels ? 1 !. w ' 155; R -, TV x30 - w: 37. Holdredge R. Husband Hertloin Powers Collins , Cook V. Husband Glnnhntt 011111! University of Oregon Section of Geological and Mining Society of American Universities. "Down to Bed-Rock" Established December 11, 1919, by the Upperclassmen of the Department of Geology. Named in honor of the pioneer geologist of Oregon, Dr; Thomas Condon. Claire P. Holdredg'e ................................................................................................................ President Merril D. Ely ............................................................................................................... Vice-President Rachel A. Husband ............................................................................................ Secretary-Treasurer HONORARY MEMBERS Mrs. Ellen Condon McCornack, Dr. Warren D. Smith, Dr. Earl L. Packard, Dr. Edwin T. Hodge, Dr. Graham J. Mitchell, Chester W. Washburne, Henry Howe, Richard Nelson, Carrol Waggoner. ' ACTIVE MEMBERS Claire P. Holdredge, Merril D. Ely, Rachel A. Husband, Victor P. Husband, Delmar Powers, Leo Hertlein, Paul W. Cook, Ian Campbell, William Collins. ASSOCIATE MEMBERS y Clarence Cannon. 7 s x - . . 7k! ,, x r, l Alf, s V Ingram Youel Winnard Gamble Bartholomew Buren Carl Houston Purdy -- 2 w. k v .. .7 ,1 1'..$ L le am ,Xv $V " '4 25;... C? ,41 ' 112i - xgiJKWWV? V12, N 2.: ix $$X J1 a! E. 29111. 01. A. OFFICERS Roy Veatch .............................................................................................................................. President Joe Ingram Vice-President Norton Winnard .................................................................. Secretary Elston Ireland .......................................................................................................................... Treasurer Hal Donnelly .......................................................................................................... General Secretary CABINET MEMBER'S John Houston, Wilbur Carl, Don Davis, Kenneth YQuel, Wayne Akers, Wesley Frater, Claire Wallace, Bruce McConnell, Wolcott Buren, Raymond Osborne, Kenneth Lancefield, Lyle Bartholomew, Virgil DeLap, John Gamble, William Purdy. Myers M cKenna Collins Hawke Van Zile Fassett Evans E. Leslie K. Leslie Benefiel Geary J anney Sether Bolitho McDougle Denfeld meta Alpha igai Professional Accounting Fraternity. MEMBERS C. Carl Myers, Robert MacKenna, Spencer Collins, Malcolm Hawke, Virgil DeLap, Charles Van Zile, Frank Fassett, Ernest Evans, Earl Leslie, Keith Leslie, John Benefiel, Herbert Geary, Lewis Ness, Phil J anney, Victor Sether, Thomas J . Bolitho, Vern R. Mc- Dougle, George A. Denfwld, W. D. Whitcomb, Arthur Berridge. -288-- th ' . 'nVLI Miller Blackaby Benefiel Davis MacKenna Bolitho Zumwalt Van Zile Garrett 1821a Qamma $igma National Honorary Commerce Fraternity. MEMBERS C. Carl Myers, Frank J. Miller, William Blackaby, John Benefield, Franklin Folts, Phil Jenney, Don Davis, Robert MacKenna, Thomas Bolitho, Chester Zumwalt, Charles Van Zile, Byron Garrett. . I 4 X S . C V t QR". 141, J A4 f Ply RV x14, V ' x:a V n- 6 x 44 I'- L,..,;L -4 m ..$'? XI Beck Stewart Auld Rugh Moates Cartmell Veazie J. Thompson 1am anh 0911111 Established May, 1919. Lillian Auld ........................ President Margaret Fell ................................................................................................................ Vice-President Secretary Gladys Johnson ...................................................................................................................... MEMBERS Mrs. Eric W. Allen, Mrs. Harry Beal Torrey, Mrs. Anna Landsbury Beck, Grace Campbell Mann, Julia Burgess, Mary H. Perkins, Ida V. Turney, Grace Edgington, Lillian Auld, Margaret Fell, Laura. Moates, Geraldine Cartmell, Irene Stuart, Margaret Nelson, Irene Rugh, Emily Perry, Jessie Thompson, Emily Veazie, Gladys Johnson. 0 -290-- V- . ." um whch hr". .- DeBusk Sheldon Gregory Douglass Bain Bolitho Finnerty Christenson Enlund Thornton Gladden Cossman Spencer IHM E2113 Kappa National Men1s Educational Fraternity Installed February 19, 1921 MEMBERS B. W. DeBusk, H. D. Sheldon, C. A. Gregory, Earl R. Douglass, Read Bain, T. J. Bolitho, G. E Finnerty, Peter Christensen, Lloyd Enlund, William Thornton, Lester Gladden, Leo Crossman, Peter Spencer, Ramie Burkhead. 1 3 gm 7 .' vv r137 x 1d! 2A4 ' s. w v, WE. 3-1-1 1i T. Watters English Andre Larson Oberteuffer Hazard Couch Tuck Edwards Shields Latham Maxwell Woods S chuermann Youel Gavin En-iKn-ilin Sophomore Mews Honor Organization. Organized January 12, 1912 ACTIVE MEMBERS Clayton Ingle, Nelson English, Roland Andre, Arthur Larsen, Delbert Oberteuffer, Austin Hazard, Ralf Couch, Arthur Tuck, Curtis Phillips, Archie Shields, Hugh Latham, Floyd Maxwell, Dan Woods, Fred Schuerman, Kenneth Youel, John Gavin. FRE SHMAN PLEDGES Douglas Farrell, Raymond McKeown, Victor Risley, Harold Chapman, Marcus Young, Edwin Kirtley, Richard Gray, Marvin Lucas, Harold Potter, William Johnson, Arthur Rudd, Raymond Douglas, Glen DuPaul, Jason McCune, Allan Moores. McVeigh Gillis Weiss McGill Mumby Emison Smith Jackson Kruse Altstock Letcher Howells Clark Kmama Sophomore Honor Society. Founded March, 1912 ACTIVE MEMBERS Bernice Altstock, Frances McGill, Marion Weiss, Mildred Mumby, Ellen McVeigh, Charlotte Howells, Marjorie Kruze, Gladys Emison, Imogene Letcher, Marion Gillis, Margaret Jackson, Hallie Smith, Beulah Cuark. 1919-1920 Mildred Apperson, Margaret Biddle, Pauline Goad, Marianne Dunham, Eleanor Spall, Phebe Gage, Helen Clark, Ruth Flegel, Eleanor Coleman, Margaret Smith, Margaret Studor, Dorothty Reed, Vivian Hopson, Eileen Tompkins, Margaret Phelps, Vivian Strong, Maryel Skeels, Helen Nicolai, Helen Nelson, Katherine Baker, Ila Nichols. 1918-1919 Madeline Slotboom, Janet Frasier, Dorothea Boynton, Margaret Hamlin, Helen Nicolai, Beatrice Porteous, Leta Kiddle, Eileen Tompkins, Pauline Beals, Ruth Elton, Esther Banks, Grace Rugg, Pearl Davis, Lois Macy, Theodora Stoppenbach, Eva Diger- ness, Florence Riddle, Helen Watts, Ruth Cowan. an . '5 4g! ! I All; JJ 43 .9 M 32: c J v 1x h;,ty1--Fz xxxk Avg fz JW 5 W 'iAfrFm ,3 J 1W; W 'bt' v J - J7?J J , ??Wf J Jag. Pa: Q14 GA s m! , -- , K 1;. x J. g; N J" E 4. w , WK X N J g; ,LyL-Ml. K J; fl? .. J! m J ' , 4 quJ x C? V ! "WIK- Q , r I 125;! J r I 9x LVEJ -J V x J '1 Stratton Wilson Holaday Whitton IE1 Qlirrulnr Olaatpllann' Ulala Stratton ...................................... President Edythe Wilson ................................................................................................................ Vice-President Gertrude Whitton ........................................................................ ,. ......................................... Secretary Marjorie Holaday .................................................................................................................. Treasurer ; Leroy Detling ............................................ Editor j MEMBERS J W ' Helen Addison, Ruby Baugh, Leroy Detling, Beatrice Hensley, Marjorie Holaday, 0 Malcolm Hawke, Lloyd Homewood, Marjorie Larson, Muriel Myers, Doris Parker, Emily Perry, Frederick Plurad, Miss Cueuavis, Ulala Stratton, Reta Ridings, Rhetta Templeton, Miss Thompson, Edythe Wilson, Maurine Weaver, Gertrude Whitton, Amelia Esparza. Irv. H' J:- how ffon IN ', . tJAN kn. M ' "Wu . VJ J294J gm: .- 'lm R V f I A579 E zv- v Hadley Wetherbee Meissner Bartholomew x? 6236011 Art QIIuh I Organized 1920 . J- . Elizabeth Hadley .................................................................................................................... President 3 t Beatrice Weatherbee ......................................................................... Vice-President 5. Lorna Meissner ...................................................................................................................... Secretary , i-f Sam Lehman .......................................................................................................................... Treasurer I Lyle Bartholomew .................................................................................................................. Manager ' ' H Mrs. Alfred Schroff .................................................................................................................. Advisor t a p: j CHARTER MEMBERS W '0'. Elizabeth Hadley, Lyle Bartholomew, Irving Smith, Cleo Jenkins, Germany U" W Klemm, Marion Ady, Lorna Meissner, Sam Lehman. Eyler Brown, Myrtle Joyner, Mil- . " VI". dred Oliver, Wanda Keyt, Beatrice Weatherbee, Agnes Brooks. v. :H w m"" r pvt" NNX ., AV kXi M oore Thompson Lushmzm Anderson Qnme iErnnnmirz Olluh Organized 1920 Frances Moore ........................................................................................................................ President Edna Bushman ......................................................................... Vice-President Chloe Thompson .................................................................................................................... Secretary Gladys Anderson ............................................................. '. ...................................................... Treasurer HONORARY MEMBERS Miss Lillian Tingle, Miss Hazel Hauck ACTIVE MEMBERS Aulis Anderson, Gladys Anderson, Edna Bushman, Marie Courtney, Mildred Ca1- Ruby Fenwick, Marie Fisher, Rena Hales, Gwladys Keeney, Louise kins, Ruth Engstrom, Frances Moore, Claire Ryan, Nadine Stevens, Chloe Thomp- Meserve, Frances Manary, son, Saville Welk. H. Carson Hamm NiLhols Moates 'l'umct Mork McCorkle Grimn Whitfield Hopson Kidd Ballack H. Hensley Manville Golding Schuebel Veazie B. Hensley Crewdson Ridings Lane Largent iEntaxiatt Eiterarg, gummy Helen Carson .......................................................... President Alice Hamm .................................................................................................................. Vice-President Ila. Nichols ...................................................................................................................... Secretary Laura Moates ................................................................................................................ , .......... Treasurer MEMBERS Helen Carson, Alice Hamm, Ila Nichols, Laura Moates, Lois Macy, Austrid Mork, Irene Whitfield, Mary Turner, Marie Ridin'g's, Ruth Griffin, Lucile McCorkle, Isabelle Kidd, Dorothy Manville, Ruth Lane, Florence Furuset, Beatrice Hensley, Glyde Schuebel, Mildred Hawes, Winifred Hopson, Jessie Thompson, Gertrude Whitton, Emily Veazie, Nell Southworth, Leola Green, Lois Mortland, Leah Zink, Gertrude Golding, Beatrice Crewdson, Mae Ballack, Muriel Bater, Elizabeth Stevenson. "$ '1' K I q ! I 1 . ' Lr lg e3; m $$ 5 1W l; ' k a g WHIK Q 1 : 2 M, r .y We; w k2? x 7: s W N Am: 43 ' MW mg", p.133. 1 . :3: l . . J1 i'mi anv- M'mv g. Wolff London Kelly Barnes Tigard ;v i i ,K Robbins Barnett Murray Furuset Chandler Miller x1 . 15' NJ: L'HV1 h ' McKee Cannon Perry Largent Garbade Stoltenberg 3'. in "UM Balderee Russell nu, 0! Lultmn .' . 1' ' o I igmmw Olluh ,' - Upperclass Physical Education Club. Organized October 27, 1920. t V ' I Ruth Wolff .............................................................................................. . .............................. President Elizabeth London .................................................................................................. Vice-President Eva Kelly ..... ' ....................................................................................................................... Secretary Cecile Barnes ..................................................................................................................... Treasurer Grace Tivgard ......................................................................................... Corresponding Secretary Harriet W. Thomson ....................................................................................... Faculty Advisor ACTIVE MEMBERS Ruth Wolff, Ollie Stoltenberg, Elizabeth London, Cecile Barnes, Maude Largent, Naomi Robbins, Ethel Murray, Vivian Chandler, Eva Kelly, Margaret Russell, Grace Tigard, Echo Baldaree, Florence Furuset, Lois Barnett, Emma Jane Garbade, Dorothy Miller, Jessie Todd, Lydia Beardemphl, Carolyn Cannon. -298-- 41 J A27 C? Q .KWW'X 3' r' Arrhitvrmral Glluh Founded 1914 Q Lyle P. Bartholomew ............................................................................................................ President Sidney B. Hayslip ........................................................................................................... Vice-President Margaret Goodin .................................................................................................................... Secretary Richard Sundeleaf ..................................................................................................... , ............ Treasurer ACTIVE MEMBERS Fred Abbott, Katherine Ashmead, Walter Barton, Lyle Bartholomew, Harshel Ben- shadler, Donald Bradford, James Bradway, Arnel Butler, Verne Corbin, Eunice Cowgill, Jessie Green, Ralph Gibbs, Margaret Goodin, Sidney Hayslip, Roscoe Hemenway, Ruth Holmes, Francis Jacobberger, Cleo Jenkins, Luther Jensen, Peter Jensen, Fred Junken, Guy Koepp, Kenneth Legge, Marian Nicolai, Hubert Rambo, Merrill Richmond, George Sensenick, Hollis Smith, Richard Sundeleaf, Karl Vonder Ahe, Lucy Vander Sterre, Charlie Wilson, George Wolff, Kenneth Wadleigh, George York. Huntley Marsh Habersham Sunburn K eeney J ohnson Brown Pirie Holaday Evans Lawrence Apperson Thomas Sanborn $amara the object of Which is to promote higher scholarship and research in the flelds of botany and bacteriology. CHARTER MEMBERS Delia Keeney, Ethel Sanborn, Elsie Marsh, Lawrence, Frances Habersham, Alice Evans. PLEDGES Alice Thomas, Wanda Brown, Marjorie Holaday, Ruth Sanborn, Edith Perie, Mildred Apperson. manhiugtnn Gluh President Science fratefnity, Mildred Huntley, Mildred Johnson, Elsie John T. Braddock ........................................................................................................... Ted Strong ............................................................................................................... Vice-President Frances Moore .................................................................................................................. Secretary Crescent Lorenz ...................................................................................................................... Treasurer Publicity Hall Smith ................................................................................................................................ ACTIVE MEMBERS Cecile Barnes, John Braddock, Mabel Gilham, Sidney Hayslip, Adah Harkness, R. Hillyard, Dorothy Hill, Dorothy Jameson, Helen King, Leonard Knight, Miriam Luten, Crescent Lorenz, Helen Morris, Constance Miller, Nancy Wilson, Frances Moore, Lloyd Reed, Margaret Russell, Theresa Rauschert, Hall Smith, Sidney Smith, Ted Strong, Marian Tuttle, Floyd Shields, Anne Lou Forney, Carl Willett, Wayne Meer, Elmer Lewis, George McIntyre, Floyd La Londe, Dale J. Benjamin, Norman Hayes, George Hoxsey, Lee Weber, Lawrence Weller, Kenneth Jones, Lydia Beardemphl, Gertrude Williams, Mildred Mumby, Barton Sherk, Hubert Rambo, Charles Fish, Dan Welch, LeLaine West, J anet West, Virginia West, Allan Smith. .. .. '1 :.:$ Iy-nh "III v.0" Ir .uq W... 31'. M V . ..,n,nvm.zl .,, . . H :15 , wv. 'Jtriq r . A , nag; J"a Liv am L..." 0M0 X 1. x . :5 '39 31 Rx XXXWJ x33 E2 Eager Eranmia French Club. Organized 1919 Raymond Burns ...................................................................................................................... President Loeta Rogers ................................................................................................................. Vice-President Dorothy Condon ...................................................................................................................... Secretary Verne Blue ................................................................. , ............................................................ Treasurer ACTIVE MEMBERS Dorothy Manville, Verne Blue, Dorothy Condon, Wm. Russis, Genevieve Clancy, Loeta Rogers, Mary Lou Burton, Raymond Burns, Lois Macy, Imogene Letcher, Marion Gilstrap, Don Zimmerman, Carolyn Cannon, Lois Morthland, H. K. Cooke, Ransom Mac- Arthur, Mrs. Watts, Mildred LeCompte, J. F. DuPaul, W'm. Bolton, Meta Goldsmith, Cecil Todd, Dallas Rice, Lola Keizur, Ruth Holmes, May Lindley. ASSOCIATE" MEMBERS Gwladys Keeney, Evelyn Fitzgibbon, Helen Rhodes, Florence Garrett, Margaret Peterson, Esther Karlie, Vera Huey, Madonna Wright, Beatrice Holbrook, Blanche Wickland, Ruth Hayman, Germaine Dew, Margaret Russell, Wanna McKinney, Paul Harris, Charles Spere, Harold Orr, Geraldine Pilkington, Frances Douglas, Charlotte Clarke, LeRoy Dettling, Raymond Osborne, Cornelia Pipes, Mae Ballack, Beatrice Tow- ers, Vera Hughes, Ralph Poston, Wm. Hair, Frances Burnett, Dolores Catlow, Alice Hamm, Gertrude Tormoen, Ruth Miller, Dorothy Evans, Maple Moore, Mildred Hall, Martin Biddle, Lucille Branstetter, Glyde Schuebel. ' HONORARY MEMBERS Dean Elizabeth FOX, Timothy Cloran, Mrs. Leland Coon, Mlle Henriette Gouy, Miss Lois Gray, Mme. Fayard, Mrs. Johnson. Agm W7." Maguire Spall Anderson Fums et Slotboom M oore Stoltenb erg Fields Todd Thurston Bryson Largent Maud Largent Brown Flegel Hildebrand Engstrom Southworth , Err Nu I' Women,s Vocational Organization. Established December 9, 1917 ACTIVE MEMBERS Jennie Maguire, Eleanor Spall, Myrtle Anderson, Florence Furuset, Lyle Bryson, Wanda Brown, Ollie Stoltenberg, Maude Largent, Mary Moore, Madeline Slotboom, Alice Thurston, Nancy Fields, Ruth Flegal, Mary Largent, Ruth Danford, Elsie Hilde- brand, Nell Southworth, Jessie Todd, Ruth Engstrom, Ramah Iler, Margaret Duniway, Sue Stuart, Lenore Cram, Alice Curtis, Mabel Gilham, Beatrice Towers, Violet Wood, Velma Farnum. HONORARY MEMBERS Mrs. A. R. Sweetser, Miss Tirza Dinsdale w o m I l 4 Lam. . .,. Wu ;: , - LL P Eisman Ellsworth Braddock Short Carncross Vester Smith Ireland 162mm Handy Smtiptg Organized 1920 Stan Eisman, Harry Smith, Harris Ellsworth, Ray Vester, John Braddock, Allen Carncross, Frank Short, Chan Castle, Wilbur Hulin, Ernest Haycox, Roscoe Hemenway. ?;X l; f caret t "W! 'f x?! 9 Y '1 r 7 v9 Va; ' HE.SA ? Lima UP" J- t I Frank Keizur 31;" 11.12119 1,. Huh: I! Loomis Mackenzie Dixon . "i H; r; 5..., J , . H I '1: n'TH'T 'Itftrv 3'1 , 1:31,: Wm H, N 1 GEirla GDrpgnn Glluh 91-: am m... Glenn 0. Frank ................................................................................................................. President 7,131.9" ' i '3 Lola M. Keizur .................................................................................................... Vice-President 1"?" "H "N r . Willa c. Loomis ............................................................................................................. Secretary 1 'u t. . Jean Mackenzie ............................................................................................................. Treasurer 7': '11:..1 t.- 4,5 "1 Dorothy E. Dixon .................................................................................................................... Reporter '9 "'31? v.1 ., . Wu. . A ' ' .; The Woments Oregon Club is a body of non-fraternity girls organized for the 9v- : 3 MW, ?! ' t :6 purpose of promoting social activities, debating, :and athletics. The original Oregon Club was a social organization of non-fraternity men and women at the University of Oregon, March 7, 1911, with Eva Frazier president. At the beginning of the second term of 1919-1920 the girls organized separately, calling their organization the Womerfs Oregon Club. The last of the year, the men organized separately, and took upon themselves the name Mews Oregon Club. Since that time the two clubs have existed -as separate bodies. 1. 304 -- F K V r ' 214 7 f I E;- X r-. 1": 1 9'5? w A. I u u- a QDrvgnn QIluh Reorganized June, 1920 school spirit. Byron Garrett .......................................................................................................................... President Glenn Walkley .............................................................................................................. Vice-President Delbert Hill .............................................................................................................................. Secretary Phil Brogan ............................................................................................................................ Treasurer Virgil DeLap ............................................................................................................................ Manager ACTIVE MEMBERS L. Gordon Avery, Leo Abbott, Vernon Bulock, C. J. Buck, David Bidwell, James Bradway, Arnold Blackburn, Merril Boyer, Harold Bonebrake, Jack Brady, leson, Fremont Byers, Lawrence Boyle, Howard Bailey, Ian Campbell, Stanley Crowe, Henry Carpenstein, Andrew Carpenstein, John Clark, E. P. Conrad, K .F. Campbell, Wil- liam Durham, Merl Denning, L. E. Detling, Lloyd Edlund; E. R. Evans, Lester Elbloom, Alfred Erickson, Frank Fassett, John Farrell, W. R. Godlove, Ted Gebauer, Lester Gale, Charles Gratke, H. W. Hyatt, V. E. Hackett, James Hill, Leonard Huadsell, Allarick Hagtg'lund, Donald Huntress, R. Kuhn, J. R. Kinney, Ole B. Lien, Archie Loomis, Harold McConnell, C. M. Myers, Ovril Millard, C. C, Meyers, Bruce McConnell, Troy McCraw, Mark McCullock, George Owen, George Pasto, Jack Prescott, Gaylord Peltier, John Richau, Vernon Syler, Charles Spere, Walter Schmieding, William Sorsby, Herbert Scheidt, Sephus Starr, Lyle Stewart, Robert Taylor, Lew Tyrell, Dallas Rice, Emil Tchanz, Norton Winnard, Claire Wallace. James Bur- ,. :5 I . 1 $x ' ff' -t'? t h C Q 1 gm: i7 1 t h t 21h h I f; 3'" ' 5.? .V w 9 h l! , I I 5 .w V , a yilg . Thurlow Calkins Thompson T 1 Av . . N iEnn-mllemr lemrtl . ' Elvira Thurlow .................................................................................................................... President ' l Madge Calkins ............ t .......................................................................................................... Secretary h h 3, Clara Thompson ....................................................... mereasurer . z' . ,1 NTATIVES ax Alpha Delta Pi-Velma Rupert, Beatrice Crewdson; Alpha Phi?Helen Carson, l Maurine Elrod; Chi Omegaw-Clara Thompson, Margaret Smith; Delta Delta Deltae y . Muriel Bater, Marianne Dunham; Delta GammaePauline Goad, Margaret Kubli; Gamma Phi Beta-Leta Kiddle, Madge Calkins; Kappa Alpha ThetawDorothy Manville, Imogene Letcher; Pi Beta Phi-Elsie Lawrence, Elvira Thurlow; Sigma Delta Phi-Mary Moore, Charlotte Clark; Kappa Kappa. Gamma-Mildred Apperson, Mary Evans; Delta Zetae- Gladys Everett, Alys Sutton; Zeta Rho Epsilone-Maude Largent, Lulu Rasor. Bovard Chapman V Benefiel Anterfraternitg Glmmril Dr. John Bovard ................................................................................................................... President Jghn Benefiel .......................................................................................................... Vice-President lleh Chapman ..................................................................................................... Secretary-Treasurer The Inter-fraternity Council was organized March 15, 1914, to promote and regulate the activities of the different fraternities in the best interest of the University of Oregon. 1t regulates pledging, and in fact all relations between fraternities and the new student es he comes on to the campus for the first time. It is entirely a voluntary organization m which all fraternities and local clubs are entitled to have representatives provided that they will agree to the regulations that are set down by the organization itself. S1gma Nu, Kappa Sigma, Beta Theta Pi, Alpha Tau Omega, Sigma Chi, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Delta Theta, Delta Tau Delta, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Chi Psi, Bache- lordon tLocaD, Kappa Theta Chi tLocaD. --306-- ; :0 ??f', 5$ 7 ' a : 7 W Fx MIX g ! I41; $1??? W i - Ia TE?! Bu'll . o 2.: , - H MM $ 5 : ; . .' 1 5 r?.- $amma 13m $2161 Founded at University of Syracuse, November 11, 1874 N11 Olhapivr Installed December 18, 1908 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Leta Kiddle, Dorothy Wootton, Vernice Robbins, Dorothy Dixon, Genevieve. C1ancy,8Eloise White, Blanche Wickland 1922 Madge Calkins, Helene Kuykendall, Geneva. Sitebno, Helen Nelson, Rena Hales. Katharine Wilson, Janet West, LeLaine West 1923 Zoe Allen, Margaret Kern, Frances McGill, Florence Hartman, Gertrude Liver- more, Violet Robinson, Edith Herrin, Frances McMillan, Helen Day, Wenona Dyer, Dorothy Condon, Hildred Hall, Edith Dowd 1924 Georgia Benson, Margaret Murphy, Frances Manary, Helen Idleman, Virginia West, Georgia Shipley, Areta Littlejohn, Eleanor Earle, Dorris Hoefler, Thelma Hopkins, Catherine Wilcox, Dorothy Schmeer, Alice Garetson a1 MARE! $5 . ll. 14 AW ,kr Nelson Kern McMillan Benson Littlejohn Uuretson a OHWC mmmmmm e. whammm SAHJSS Dixon Kuykendall L. West V. West Wilcox Hull m9 - Robinson - Robbim Jalkins .1. West Livermore Condom Itllemml Hopkins Hartman XVicklzmd Wilson Dyer Hoefier Mummy White Hales McGill Hay Murphy 'lrle 17 41 Q 4V 2 - . 9ryg-J;' 99x 9 1 Q t 1 1,19 VIzI1I9 Z 2, Lhwm 999 z 19 4! x 1 2 ' 2 9 l l ?x' 1! v 1 "WIN Q . 1 . x; , $ :32 29-29 Glhi Gbmvga Founded at University of Arkansas, April 5, 1895 X 1.1, a 5 1911i Alpha Glimmer Installed April 30, 1909 x A SORORES IN FACULTATE 13ng ,. Julia Burgess, Charlotte Baniield SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE Q 2,; l 1 1 1921 Maud Barnes, Wanda Nelson, Clara Thompson 1922 Margaret Smith, Helen Strausser, Clare Ryan 1923 Hallie Smith, Marie Anderson, Mildred Lauderdale, Frances Hinkle, Lois Pixley, Hulda Hafner, Beatrice Snell, Claire Thornbury 1924 - Carmel Sheasgreen, Agnes Kennedy, Andre Tatro, Marion Lay, Miriam Schwartz, Lillian Manerud, Margaret Mathison, Camilla Lorenz, LeVerne Levis, Melba Byron -310-- Lauderdale Thornbury Swartz Bvron Smith M. Hafner Anderson Lav Levis l 11 t .1 S H. Tatro Lorenz Kennedy Muthiscn Barnes Strausser Slmosgreen Mancrud Hinklc 9r ':;. , - 1. A a ?i, - w? .. . :3 av 94523 A A J- -- Q. .2 ea: '24": 1ka 1.1V 7 9? FAN s? . 1 a w v 17, 1 .3:le i tmxx fo 2f rw 9 J A91 Q?" :1- 1 ,. V'Vx '9 I"! 2A -T" X11; 1, 3? xx 7 , Kappa Alpha Elma Founded at DePau University, January 27, 1870 Alpha Xi thapter Installed July 11, 1909 SORORES IN FACULTATE Charlie Fenton, Mrs. George Fitch, Merle Hamilton, Tirza Dinsdale SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Annamay Bronaugh, Mildred Garland, Carol Montague, Eve Hutchinson, Lyle Bryson, Beatrice Wetherbee, Eva Kelley, Lillian Auld, Anna Grace Pallett 1922 Margaret Phelps; Dorothy McGuire, Marion Lawrence, Carolyn Cannon, Geraldine Pilkington, Dorothy Manville, Miriam Holcomb, Valiere Coffey, Marcile Carlock, Mae Ballack, Ruth Tuck, Agnes Brooks A 1923 Elizabeth Fusselman, Elizabeth Geiser, Imogene Letcher, Lorna Coolidge, Gene- vieve Matson, Doris Sengstacken, Margaret Beatie, Lenore Cram, Elizabeth Torrey, JessieALewis, Hilma Honkanen, Cornelia Pipes, Marion Linn, Anabel McKenzie, Lucil Snyder 1924 Marcella Berry, Martha Johnson, Jane Campbell, Marjorie Hazard, Asteria Norton, Henryetta Lawrence, Catherine Bain .1312- $ 1,. i I V .13 Wxx w .. ? NA "MIST k r4e7 x3 x9, 1 3:: xx. A XV H 9L I g? V 69 $ 4 ,3 II ! ll 15 14 m Bronaugh K elly Cannon Ballack Coolidge Honlizmon Cum pbell Garland Auld Pilkington Tuck Mutson Pipes Johnson Montague Hutchison Elllette Phelps Manville Holcomb Brooks Fusselman Beatie Cram Linn Mackenzie Hazard N orton 313 Bryson Muguire Coffey G eiser Torrey Snyder H. Lawrence Wetherbee M. Lawrence Carlock Letcher Lewis Berry Bain 4 6? $ W M m a. .m .- :7 w - 7r- .. c f? '- X H "3? wk 64:3 74 I;' f 6 2-747 445m ; r1725? 7 77 3,2ng 84f :52 9 Q 4; 9 2 m5 v342 7,1248 7 ' K88 17 ; Evita $21121 Eplta Founded at Boston University, Thanksgiving Eve, 1888 76:? 7'1; 2K Q x p .L$x m ;255 6112151 E21131 Glhaptvr Installed October 30, 1910 a. '4 SORORES IN FACULTATE b. Louise Fitch, Mozelle Hair SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Q g 44! 4 v: 2 . I 1 . Maybelle Ramont 1922 Marianne Dunham, Muriel Bater, Ruth Griffin 1923 Gertrude Golding, Lacy Leonard, Margaret Goodin 1924 Eva Randall, Ethel May Daniels, Helen Glanz 4-3144- Nell TenBrook, Irene Barrett, Leah Zink, Alice Young, Alta Knox, Madge Nelson, Margaret Dickover, Maude Adams, Ianthe Smith, Teka Haynes, Katherine Nichol son, Bettie Pride, Beryl Clark, Hildegarde Repinen, Eloise Harris, Alice McCurdy, Knox Sicholson Haynes Glanz TenBrook r s w numo mik 1 dn.w ASD Ramont G Olding McCurdv Repinen Zink Leonard Nelson Pride Randall 5 W: :7 K;A9 $1 9 4" 9.! I " misgiy Q 41, 7 vv , 9 '14 r'gl v9 x4, 7 1:!FL2 Kappa Kappa $amma Founded at Monmouth College, October 13, 1870 32121 091mm Olhapter Installed January 11, 1914 SORORES IN FACULTATE Norma Dobie, Catherine Beekley, Elizabeth Fox SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Mary Ellen Bailey, Brownell Frasier, Janet Frasier 1922 Phebe Gage, Clara Corrigan, Alice Evans, Eleanor Spall, Emma Jane Garbade, Mildred Apperson, Lois Barnett, Mary Evans, Doris Pittenger, Evelyn Fitzgibbon, Hilma Fox, Fern Murphy, Flora Campbell, Dorothy Miller, Ruth Austin, Helen Rose, Arline Hoerr Tryor, Margaret Swartwood 1923 Margaret Duniway, Mary Jane Albert, Dorothy McKee, Dorothy Jameson, Gayle Acton, Louise Irving, Ruth Engstrom, Marion Weiss, Marion Nicolai 1924 Margaret Grifflth, Nancy Wilson, Laura Spall, Gladys Tate, Elizabeth Strow- bridge, Margaret Alexander, Vivian Studing, Florence McGillavry Fitzgihlmn Duniwny Acton M, Evans Griffith .17 ngymm 99.1,, x VIMWV 944? M urphy Fox A ert Rose XVeiss Gage Pittenger Swartwood Campbell Irving L. Span MOGiHiw-uy V e l .1 a B 4arbude Barnett Austin Jameson Strowbridge Stt-uding' FI'dxleI' A. Evans E. Spall Tryor McKee mdor Alex Corrigu 11 Apperson Miller Nicolai Engstmm $1 3Q? 5W 9: I 1 1 ref N2 2r 1 '4 A r A 2'2""23 X V Z x fi- 5 l ,4; - .1 FA Cs? mm: ; 1 fr 22x .. i 14$" .3 ' 9' XE;VK k3 Eelta $81111sz Founded at University of Mississippi, January 2, 1 Alpha Evita Glimmer Installed October 17, 1913 874 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Helen Casey, Madeline Slotboom, Mar'gareit Kubli, Htelen L-ougkxary, Vivian Chandler, Mildred Huntley, Marian Ady, Marian Gilstrap, Marian Taylor, Helen Hall, Lois Hall, Irene Stewart, Dorothy Lowry, Aurora Potter, Mildred Aumiller, Isobel Zimmerman 1922 Pauline Coad, Helen Hooper, Alice Thomas, Ina McCoy, Helen Mary Alta Kelly, Dougharty, Katherine Baker 1923 k, Maybelle Miller, Jennie Noren, Margaret Cundy, Gladys Emison, Helen Murdoc Dymon Povey, Alberta Potter, Alfaretta Sage Beatrice Morrow, Mildred Mumby, hu' .' 1924 t a! Thelma Lyons, Mabel Green, Anna Katherine Chapman, Mary Alexander, Hilda Tillinghast, Genieve Castle, Marie Fisher --318- Chandler L. Hull Kelly Baker Morrow Green Casey Huntley Stewart Cowl Murdock Mumby Chapman Slotlmom Ady Lowry Hooper Miller Pm'ey Alexander Kubli Gilstmp A. Potter Thomas Nm'on A. Potter Tillinghast -319 Loughzn'y Taylor Aumillor M cCoy Cundy Sage Castle H. 1 1:111 Zinmwrman Dougherty Emison Lyons F1" sher I am ymEEd gr 2 mtg? t: 9 WE.$; . 9V x3 , s. '5. 15k . p 42g? 4 feQ Q Z6 1; 3.11 A "E. 1 Q ' Founded at University of Syracuse, October 20, 1872 61:11: thaptpr Installed January 11, 1915 SORORES IN FACULTATE Mrs. W. F. G. Thacher, Mrs. Mable Holmes Parsons SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Lois Macy, Austrid Mork, Lucile McCorkle, Elizabeth Hadley, Alice Lighter 1922 Winifred Hopson, Isabeile Kidd, Maurine Elrod, Ila Nichols, Helen Carson, Aulis .Anderson, Rae Peterson 1923 Florence Garrett, Marjorie Wells, Kittie May Stockton, Jessie Thompson, Chloe Thompson, Glyde Schuebel, Marion Gillis, Frances Peterson 1924 Gladys Anderson, Savilla Welk, Margaret Peterson, Edna Bushman, Esther Wil- son, Alice Jean Bailey, Beatrice German, Winifred Douthit, Phyllis Walker, Alberta Carson, Marguerite Miles, Verna Peterson Anderson Doich A Amlmson C. Thompson G. Pvterson Ii. Carson J. Thompson Butler Y. Hudlev Nichols Stockton Wilson k F 0 I N. Bushnum Kidd lurl'ett Yx'nlkor R. Peterson Hopson Sohuchel Doutlnt g 2 g3 35- f 2.1 $37 '2 e 1 ' "' 'f ' 2 2 . .-;1:: ca: 1,f 'W , t 12112 , 2g' 1i.h-a$ 1'1; 2 2 .3- 2 43 Q7! 2 v74 1mm 0: . v l'd' A 2R ' 2 2k2k xltgo Founded at Monmouth College, April 28, 1867 1x 0131?an Alpha Ghapter Installed October 29, 1915 5. i I . b- 423' SORORES IN FACULTATE Mrs. Anna Landsbury Beck SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE E! 1' 1921 Dora Birchard, Lorna Meissner, Edith Pirie, Elvira Thurlow, Alice Thurston, Nell Warwick, Lillian Pearson, Laura Rand, Estelle Campbell 1922 Marvel Skeels, Audrey Roberts, Nell Gaylord, Esther Fell, Elsie Lawrence, Ruth Danford, Maybelle Leavitt, Eleanor Colman, Martha Rice, Velma Ross 1923 Helen Madden, Marjorie Kruse, Mildred Smith, Margaret Winbigler, Margaret Carter, Kathleen Kern, Dorothy Eakin, Priscilla Eakin, Bernice Altstock, Ruth Diehl, Dorothy Ostrander, Lucile Garber 1924: Helen Ball, Lula Davis, Luella Hausler, Evangeline Foster, Eunice Cowgill, Emmy Lou Douglas, Virginia Pearson, Ruth Giesler, Estelle Modlin, Vera Prudhomme 23222 Skeels Leavitt Winbigler Diehl Foster Prudhomme 1m vd k Mbw CHH lprh01.1 r. VttSl umx.nsud ,h.aanuuao HCLSAHM kin a edswqug .nnsqui. .IHOLT .ndeQ; PRPKDD;Z 3 m m rS S er nn r. na ed. a $;6 d1 w ll .LIHd mli mxemrm. BIFBPI IS Rice Ostrandor Birchard hougl Warwick ;avlord Kom n n 081 I1... ttwurri srneeg "166th ublrr h00.u.a0 TRCCGC . hngb: 9 Rm 1 A IA . L, 9 x x9' 3 2,. 9, 9 :. V Ix . 1 ' ,',A;'gmfjm :3 Q X2 1 Alpha E21151 lat Founded at Wesleyan Female College, May 15, 1851 VI Alpha Eamhha Glimmer Installed May 20, 1920 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Beatrice Crewdsen, Naomi Robbins, Gladys Matthis, Loeta Rogers, Marie Ridings, Ethel Murray -1922 Velma Rupert, Elaine Cooper, Lydia Beardemphl, Eulalia Titus 1923 Beulah Clark, Josephine Croxall, Genevieve Chase, Mary Parkinson, Audrey Perkins, Reta Ridings, Dora Herman, Vera Houston, M'eltrude Coe . 1924 I . ' Dordthy Fitchard, Claudia Gratton, Gertrude McIntyre, Vashti Hoskins, Eloise McPherson, Rosalia Keber, Helen Warner, Edith Bass :3 -324- C: 3.. Crewd 4011 Rupert Croxall Herman lloskins Robbins Cooper Chase Houston McPherson letthis B iartlemphl Parkinson Fitchzml K Cher -32.3 - R ogers Titus Perkins Gratton Warner R. Ridings Clark R. Aidings McIntyre Bass K1 9? a $1 :3? I? -K . !$ 3?? " Txx2 : K v - - c . .m ,K . 2 x 2 B 1i, 4? xxx2x x41 .VV w 3.14172 ! 4N1: 3.; ON 1 1C ' i :1 ' ; a . . 2 k '1 ' x - 2 Id 2 I '- 1. J g?! 22'? 2ZZ Xsti 2; '0. ,7,EQSV' ,Ix'z K Mfg 1 mt , 4 72m" m ,z, 4 N1 1 1 W E91181 Zeta g Founded at Miami University, October 24, 1902 091119931 Glhaptpr 9.. 1 Installed October 15, 1902 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE p, POST GRADUATE Xd '24 Mildred Parks, Alys Sutton 1921 Leona Marsters, Mildred Dodds, Ruth Lane, Gertrude Whitton 1922 Gladys Everett 1923 1 IN Veda Patten, Elaine Todd, Jean McEachern, Bernice Shipp, Nadine Stephens, 10 Marie Flynn, Naomi Coffield, Jeanette Hogan, Helen Smith, Elva Guttridge 1924 Billie Holverson, Geraldine King, Irene Glavey, Gertrude Smith, Elsie Lyall, Jessie Gamble, Belle Chatburn, Leona Gregory, Velma Freeland, Elsie Skoog -326- $ul I 1M wgtlwaml Nrrnv x .. , rt. 1. Mhh hwuwh M m m M. ESSO R . .k BHV S J'Iogan G lavey Freeland T odd Dodds -- 327 Patten Gregory Flynn King S 1 e t S r U. I 3 mn r tss tDHN .ee,H Ivhu Tawal x .1 I- ESTC Sutton Guthridgc umble 1 W hitten Shipp Emma E21151 13m Local organized February 12, 1918 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Mary Moore, Leola Green, Alice Hamm, Mary Turner, Germany Klemm, Bess Shell, Dorothea. Boynton ' 1922 Charlotte Clark,.Leah Wagner, Elsie Marsh, Beatrice Hensley, Eunice Egvgleson, Annabel Denn, Wanna McKinney 1923 Ruth Sanborn, Edythe Wilson, Eva Rice, Frances Moore, Florence Jagger, Mar- garet Jackson, Hilda Hensley, Alice Curtis 1924 Henrietta Hansen, Gwladys Keeney, Truth Terry, Marie Courtney, Mildred LeCompe, Nita Howard Ni '5 .- 5' fx' 1w A. '52: .7, '2 6-7 $ t 3 WI Wt. Kr E.SL x . 7W N k . 3. 2: Mm M. Moore Green Hamm Tumor Klemm Shell Boynton Clark Wagner Marsh B. Hensley Eggleson ,Denn Sunbom Wilson Rice F. Moore Jagger Jackson H. Hensley Curtis Hansen Keeney Torry Courtney Le Compte Howard g329- Zeta iRhn Epailun Local organized December 7, 1919 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Maude Largent, Retta Templeton 1922 Mable Eaton, Florence Furuset, Mary Largent, Elsie Hildebrand, Dorris Sikes, Lulu Rasor 1923 Daisy Gochnour, Ruth Tuck, Pauline Thompkins, Lucile Branstetter, Beatrice Holbrook, Helen Smith, Lettie Biddle, Marie Hastings, Frances Gross, Maude Gorrie, Ruby Baugh 1924 Opal Gilmore, Gertrude Williams, Josephine Wood, Gertrude Tormoen, Edna Lar'gent, Paloma Randleman Mary Largent Templeton eqqn Maud Largent Hildebrand Wllllams Baugh Biddle Holbrook THOR Tompkins Tormoen Branstetter Gorrie Randleman -331-- Furuset Sikes Smith Gross Wood Hastings Rasor Gochnour E. Largent Gilmore $11 h! 4'. rRs 24 ,l 1 V E19 77' "WIS Q 9 .w1 9? a ,.. 9f . -11 - x1 1, '9 - s 11 r; . iii; .1 1.25;; v; r? 3x xx? 0415 11$ 2449 ff WEV E1 2s 7'7 a? 31 WE mEj , N .- .x , z, . x '" , . M1 s '- 1'. 5V 1 Q: -:? 1 II; k 1 fflu4 9 1 g?! A? w? f 9quh N'- 1x Qenhrirka ?Eall Cecile Barnes, Laura Duerner, ,Isla Gilbert, Mildred Hawes, Marjorie Holaday, Elizabeth London, Jennie Maguire, Mary Mobley, Ollie Stoltenberg, Irene Whitiield, Ruth Wolff, Wanda Brown 1922 Myrtle Anderson, Mary Carter, Wanda Daggett, Frances Habersham, Vera Henderson, Jane Huston, Miriam Luten, Murie1,MJcKinley, Georgina Perkins,.Margaret Russell, Mabel Smith, Grace Tigard, Genevieve Tillotsen, Martha Westwood, Catherine Anderson, Katherine Bald, Olive Snyder 1923 Wilhemina Beckstead, Ruby Broderson, Helen Bromberg, June Burgan, Dorothy Cash, Dorothy Chausse, Leona Christensen, Helen Cooper, Esther Dennis, Amy Turner, Anna Lou Forney, Mabel Gillham, Maud Grahem, Leah Greenbaum, Leona Gregory, Anna Hill, Ramah Iler, Gladys Johnson, Inez King, Alta Landon, Natrude Larson, Mona Logan, Crescent Lorenz, Jean Mitchell, Florence Moorehead, Marjorie Myers, Isabel McArthur, Ruby McWhirter, Louise Odell, Elda Offield, Florine Packard, Doris Parker, Emily Perry, Lillie May Poley, Bernice Rice, Friedrike Schilkie, Margaret Scott, Edith Sliffe, Elizabeth Stephenson, Gladys Taylor, Gertrude Tolle, Emily Veazie, Elizabeth Whitehouse, Naomi Wilson, Beulah Wright 1924 Fanny Ruth Alderman, Rhoda Anderson, Alice Baker, Dorothy Blyberg, Marie Briggs, Agnes Christie, Hazel Coffin, Helen King, Margaret Dickover, Miriam Dubiver, Velma Farnum, Lillian Flint, Alice Frankson, Elizabeth Griggs, Rea Hall, Dena Henslee, Dorothy 9Hi11, Ruth Hill, Evelyn Hogue, Anna Karogozian, Eleanor Elizabeth Melis, Louise Meserve, Luella Moorehead, Muriel Meyers, Constance Miller, Lillian Goon, Estella Muir, Grace Murfm, Helen Norcross, Georgia Petit, Ruth Powell, Helen Purdum, Lynetta Quinlan, Vernetta Quinlan, Theresa Rauschert, Laverne Rum- baugh, Agnes Schultz, Gladys Schumacher, Verona Shute, Laverna Spitzenberg, Harriet Veazie, Florence Walsh, Maurine W'eaver, Violet Wood, Martha Young, Lois Zimmerman, Eleanor Kilham ' ' 9-332- Tignrtl Maguil'e Duggett Luten 'Puttlo Bock Stwl Stoltenbergz; IIoladuy London McKinney Mobely M. Anderson M clx'inlcy Westwood erlorson Gilbert Duemer Vhitfie1d Wolff Ca rt er H ubershu m Pzn'k eI' Perkins Scott C. Anderson Brmnhorg Burgan - 333- Barnes Brown H end erson Smith Bald Cooper Hawes Russell Huson Tillotson Snyder I n'nnis Chausse Christianson Forney Gilham Greenbaum A. Hill King London N. Larson Cossman Lorenz Mitchell Moorehead Myers McAI-thur Odell Offield Packard Perry Polley Rice Schilke Sliife Stephenson Taylor Folley E. Veazie Whitehouse Wilson Farmlm Alderman R. Anderson Baker Blyberg Cristie Coffin DuBiver Walsh - 334 -- D. Hill Lee Myers Graham Rauschert Wood Griggs R. Hill Leonard M iller Flint Rumhaugh Young Hall Henslee Karagozian Kilham M. Larson Meserve Murfin Norcross Purdum V. Quinlan L. Quinlan Spitzenberger H. Veazie Frankson Zimmerman HA King Weaver Hogue Lindley Madsen Mellis Moorehead Muir Powell Shunmker --335-- Margaret Milgne Josephine Smith Florence Cartwright Georgia DeWitb Grace Caveness Mildred Black Cecile Todd Adah Harkness Ruby Fennick Frances Anderson Faye Perkins Kathryn Day Margaret Phy Irene Kendall Lourline Coultor Helen Morris Mildred Nehmx Lucile Biggs V0121 Hughes $ t x KPH" v x x I Vx I v 4; 1 mung", x1 3-3 r; I WUfZ-i IE"? x399, ,, - z i vw Ow 141E 1K: g?tgma Nu Founded at Virginia Military Institute, January 1, 1869 $amma Zpta Olhaptpr Installed December 1, 1900 FRATRES IN FACULTATE B. W. DeBusk FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Donald Newbury, John Matheson, William Ramb0,Nei1 M0riitt,Si1as Starr, Barton Sherk 1922 Max Schafer, Verne Dudley, Charles Robertson, Sidney Hayslip, Wesley Shattuck, Edward Bentley, Carl Newbury, Jack Newhall 1923 ivan McKinney, Arthur Tuck, Robert Sheppard, Lawrence Fraley, Fred Dodson, S'Canland Collins 1924 Jean DuPaul, Keller King, Ward Johnson, Raymond Harlan, Wesley Mims, Lloyd McRae, Charles Parsons, Hollis Smith, Leonard Knight, John Bryson, Richard Reed, Terry Johnson, Bert Dennis Campbell .AAN .x a a. Robertson McKnmoV Bryson Mims g'ht 111 Newhall Dudley Collins Hn 1'13 11 I .V Rambo Newbur son th Tohnson mi T e f a h C S 0. Dad 8 n 0 S e h t a I 3 Sherk P21 rsons Newburv D. Shuttuck Shoppa rd D11 Paul Huyslip 'quck ll" $1 3? N 9 - :5: 2 9X Am 9 9 1; Q 1 a 2 5 $1 K 1 r l. ,4 rms .19 2 ii i r WI: Kappa g?tgma Founded at University of Virginia, December 10, 1867 Chantnm Alpha Olhaptpr Installed April 4, 1904 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 John W. Benefiel, Robert W. Earl, Donald M. Robinson, John G. Dundore, Barkley G. Loughlin, Donald T. Randall, Carl V. Mautz, Arnold H. Koepke, Harris Ellsworth, Leo. 01R0urke 1922 Wayne T. Laird, Elston L. Ireland, Francis M. Beller, David W. E. Baird, Jr., Richard W. Sundeleaf, Louis S. Dunsmore, Ralph N. Burgess, Howard P. Staub, Arthur A, Kuhnhausen, Floyd F. Bowles, Floyd Shields, Archie Shields, Thomas Wyatt 1923 Henry Judd, Edward W. Thompson, Roland Andre, Ned Strahorn, John T. Brad- dock, Arvin Burnett, Hubert L. Smith, Leon A. Culbertson, Thomas Murphy, Alfred Krohn, Dean Ireland, Hall Smith, Haddon Rockhey 1924 Wallace Cannon, Martin B. Biddle, Donald Hood, Edwin Kirtley, Kenneth Burton, Marcus Youngs, Elmer Lewis, Lynn Whipple, Harold Holdman, Wayne Meek, Dwight Blackman Ireland 1i uhnhausen Andre E. Loughlin Laird Staub 0 R0111'ke Burgess Dundore Judd Ilsworth Dunsmore XVyatt Robinson 5 1 Carl I.kae Sumleleaf J I Iautz B c-nefiel Baird Randall Beller Thompson Murphy . Shields Burnett Shields MMOCI Smith Youngs F. B1 Bowles Krohn Culbertson Biddle Smith Cannon H. i Kirtley Hood Meek Struyhorn D. Ireland ' Iackman '11 11 Holdm Whipple khey Wis Roe Lt: H. Burton 3-11 d 7921a Ehpta 13f Founded at Miami University, August 8, 1839 1821a 181m Ghaptpr Installed December 4, 1909 FRATRES IN FACULTATE Frederick G. Young, Timothy Cloran. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Richard Martin, Thomas 'J. Chapman, Franklin Miller, Donald Feenaughty, Ward Mc- Kinney, Howard Kelley, Warren Edwards, Paul Foster, Lawrence Woodworth. 1922 Wayne Akers, Wolcott Buren, Martin Howard, Eugene Kelty, Donald McDonald, Fred Lorenz, Walter Cofoid 1923 Owen Callaway, Hugh Clorin, John Langley, Pierre Mead, Delbert Oberteuffer, Ralph Smith, Jesse Digman, Morgan Staten, Caroll Akers, Ramey Rugh, Curtis Phillips 1924 Halmer Edlund, Allan Smith, Lot Beatie, Harold Chapman, Raymond McKeown, Albert Grilley Feenuughty W. Akers Cofoid R. R. Smith E111und Martin McKinney Burch Galloway Digman A. R. Smith Kelley Howard Clerin Stuton B ultie Chapman Edwards- Kclty Langley C. Akers II. Chapman , 343 -- McDonald Mead Rugh McKoewn W oodworth Lorenz Ubertuuffcr l hi11ips Grillcy r? K I .. ..'"r - ; - 1 1x . -.. 2 2.9, .2, La Q 1117' . ' N 2 1:921. W ' Alpha Eau GDmPga Founded at Virginia Military Institute, September 11, 1865 $ W Gbrpgnn $amma ighi Ghaptpr 1 Installed February 25, 1910 X 4'11 V1 FRATRES IN FACULTATE m John Straub, John J. Landsbury, John Stark Evans, Peter Crockatt, Karl Onthank ' aw . FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE xI 1921 1 Eugene Short, Raymond Burns, William Blackaby, Chester Zumalt, George Hopkins, 91 ' Odine Mickelson 1 12 .d' 1 1922 ' 1 x1 4V1 Harold Simpson, Sanfred Gehr, James Whitaker, Walter Hempy, Asa Eggleson, 1. Charles Huggins, Virgil Cameron, Sylvester Burlei-gh, Ralph Couch, Stanley Shell, Allen Carncross 1923 Frank Vonder Ahe, Karl Vonder Ahe, Albert Currey, Lee Bown, George Riggs, ' ' R. G. Patterson, Reginald Gustafson, Lawrence Hall, Floyd Dodds, Andreas Bracher, . I 1 Leonard Jordan, Verne Fudge 1'1 1924 i a j Jason McCune, Charles Dawson, Winston Rosenberg, Willis Blakeley, Harold Potter, Herbert Pate, Thomas Short, Clause Groth, George Bickel 2 34-1 2- Zumwalt Hempy Shell Riggs Brocher Blzlkely Ad :1 ms Hopkins Eggleson Cumcross Patterson Jordan Potter Ja ney F. Short Burns Mickleson H uggins F. VonderAhe Folts Fudge Pate - 3 45 - Simpson Cameron K VomlerAhe Gustafson McCune T. Short Gehr Burleigh Curry Hull 1 klwson Groth B121 Ckuby Whittaker Couch Bowens Dodtls Rosenburg Bickel gigma 0111i Founded at Miami University, June 28, 1885 7321a 31mm thapter Installed November 27, 1910 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Charles Crandall, Maynard Harris, William Reinhart, William Coleman, Victor Bradeson, Keith Leslie, Earl Leslie, Mearl Blake, Cleo Jenkins, Raymond Vester. 1922 Melvin Murchie, Philip P. Johnson, Frank Hill, Charles Lamb, Jr. 1923 Rutherford Brown, Floyd Maxwell, Austin Hazard, William Poteet, Horace Byler, John Palmer, Carpenter Staples, Paul McElwain 1924 James Royles, Charles Fish, Arthur Rosebraulgh, William Johnson, Randall Jones, Charles Bennett, Myron Wilsey, George Bronaugh, Raymond Douglas, Lyle Palmer, Phillip Ringle, Donald Bennett, George Gardiner, William McKibbon, Eugene Young Coleman Vuster M21 xwell Mclilwnin U. Bennett Bradeson Morchie Hazard Royles Wilsoy D. Bennett Harris E. Leslie Johnson Potoet Fish ermugh $21M iniel' Rofnhurt K. Leslie Hill Byler Rosenbraugh Douglas Mcliibbin -347 Blake Lamb J. Palmer John 40H L. 7:1 lmer Young Jenkins Brown Staples Jones Ringle "$1 37;, if S v k s w 32 .11 ,I 5:72 Q 1 WGII Q . r'kgl xixa . . fS:::uy $4 , 9 - 13m $ammu E21121 Founded at Jefferson College, April 22, 1848 .Epailnu 09mirrnn Glimmer Installed October 1, 1911 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Pete Jensen, Joe Hedges, Keith Kiggins, Bill Allyn, Lyle McCroskey, Arvo Simola, Carl Knudsen, Kenneth Comstock, John Houston, Haseltine Schmeer, Francis Jacob- berger, Bill Ralston 1922 Roscoe Hemenway, William Smith, John Tuerck, Ogden Johnson, George La Roche, Luther Jensen, Wesley Frater, Charles Robinson, John Finneran 1923 Francis Kern, Herbert Darby, James King, Nelson English, Wilbur Phillips, Aubrey Furry, Hubert Jacobberger, Harry Huggins, George Royer, George Sensenich, Harry Hollister, Willard Ables 1924 Eugene Bowen, Albert Capps, Arthur Rudd, Harlan Gramm, Francis Altstock, Vic Risley, Ted Baker, B111 McMillan, Leo Goar, Arthur Mack, James Meek, Orange Lemon, Ivan Houston " 3N1! W $1 Allyn McCroskey Simola F. Jacobberger Ralston Hemenway Robinson English Phillips Furry Hollister Ables Bowen Capps Rudd Gram Risley Baker McMillan Meek Lemon 1. Houston Hedges Kiggins Comstock Houston Schmeer Smith 'Puerck Johnson LaRoche Jensen Frater Filmomn Kern Darby King H. Jacobberger Huggins Royer Sensonich Altstock Knudsen Goar Muck - 349 - $1 J1 '2M5s9hr' 1' V Lg , 1 XQA 1?? Q 1 rm: '3 1911i E91151 $112131 Founded at Miami University, December 26, 1848 091'?an Alpha Olhapter Installed May 30, 1912 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Post Graduate Floyd South 1921 Robert Boetticher, Ferris Bagley, William Carl, Ray Dunn, Edwin Durno, John Gamble, Joseph Ingram, Kenneth Lanceiield, Everett Pixley, Cecil Smith, William Steers, Thomas Strachan, Borden Wood, Edward Ward 1922 Wilbur Hoyt, Claire Keeney, Marc Latham, Roscoe Roberts, George Stearns, Robert Scearce . 1923 Hobart Belknap, Kenneth Cockerline, Richard Dixon, Fred Dunn, John Gavin, Frank Holmes, George King, Hugh Latham, James Pearson, Alan Smith, Lionel Trom- litz, Richard Scearce 1924 Roderic Belknap, Norris Bixley, Thomas DeArmand, George Fell, Kent Digerness, Lyle Johnson, Jack Myers, Darrel Mills, Eugene Miller, George Neale, Ivan Roberts, Phillip Strobridge, Edwin Warren, Floyd Wright, Richard Gray rAvahlg n la i1 va. S. m wm e em mw nb Munmbmm t 11.1 SRKDL m d ha, 1. mm m e mannem SLllrln n- vAao 1XLMVMLC mCl TBS D R Vm ye. y F e u.3e HmDmHW Be ..1.rUF PKFBBG :1 x m 0 D an; M a M e ,x r1 com USM3 ctnenWsoa HYOBeo 30X yr- y .hLIuL BLHIIBS l g H B e .mh m Hm n HHMWMSQ 1 11 1. waamunw thCAMV t C 0 B p m 1n 1m Wmom mGMSmr 0 rlr mo.mmw GWHPJV 1 n n .J 3mm, 0h 1 ncwa Fanuvlu thJLO DSSIF .. ,w h WAX, ! XX vs; 1,; :3: .1 -, x -51 1 1 :- 1 a - 9 ... , : ,u. l '4 a ,,- . M- ',.' 0 . NK 9 9 1;.ny v?! me '34 $ ,2 We g .5- 5W .11??.1;; 4W: ;.'.1 Jam 1 ; ,1? JA 91y 5 LJ J; wa a 1$uz ay. 172 9 1M; 9 21y. 1 1 m; . 9, 3? 4f., 1 .I 7 '1 1W x -mx:?7 '3 Evita 6km Eplta Founded at Bethany College, February, 1859 - 1 ' 7 w -' An r'gl 1$5:;s-. x4, 7 $amma mhn Glimmer Installed November 15, 1913 .g - ,5 FRATRES IN FACULTATE 1; Carlton E. Spencer, Chester L. Carlisle 35$ 5-. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE I.- $ POST GRADUATE Ranie P. Burkhead '1' 1921 Q1 a Robert Ross McKenna, Elmo W. Madden, Rollin W. Woodruff, Claire P. Holdredge 1922 31; A 'J Donald H. Portwood, Guy E. Sacre, Edward B. Twining, Crecene A. Fariss, Ken- l neth G. Smith, Kelly C. Branstetter, Raymond D. Lawrence, William J. Collins yvxx'l ' ' 1923 10 $9,: 1 J. Mason Dillard, Arthur J. Larson, Clayton N. Ingle, Meredith G. Beaver, Harold 1 J V. Simpson, Harold E. Dedman, Fred M. Schuerman, Kenneth K. Condon, Rolla M. Gray, H. Lee Wilson, A. Horace Vincent, Arthur H. Base : 1924 J 3 Kenneth Williamson, Warren E. Oliver, Donald C. Kearns, Douglas T. Farrell, 1 1f Donald McPherson, James H. Graham, John W. Gastrock, Marvin K. Lucas, Robert C. t McKennet, A. Ralph S'pearow in E 1 E 9352-. EN? 9.2g. x Ar. V. Branstetter Smith Ingle Gray 1mg Mernnett K0 Holdredge ariss F Madden 11 a D ilnlSOII ' Gnstmr 'mein Dillard Schuermnn W ill : McKenna Dad m :m Collins Base Sucre Burkhead ant Simpson McPherson Portwood Lawrence X m .1 5QN 13 5 '31 kg. 13 . '4 a" 2F ' . 9 .4 P 4 1 $2 rm: g?tgma Alpha iEpailnn Founded at the University of Alabama, Mrachl9, 1856 QDrvgnn "1321a Ghaptpr Installed November 8, 1919 FRATRES IN FACULTATE D. Warren Morton, Warren DuPre Smith FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE POST GRADUATE Francis T. Wade 1921 Spencer R. Collins, Wilbur S. Hulin, W. Clive Humphrey, Harry G. Lindley, Earl T. Powers 1922 J. Horton Beeman, Stanley C. Eisman, Arthur C. Hicks, Frederick L. Howard Jr., J. Warren Kays Jr., Carl E. Liebe, Forrest E. Littletield, Lawton E. McDaniel, C. Henry Mooers, William B. Purdy, William P. Sharkey, Adrian Rouslow ' 1923 Arnel P. Butler,x1Frank G. Carter, C. Fenton Ford, Vernon G. Henderson, Willis L. Kays, Clifford Knodell, Paul R. McCulloch, Kenneth W. Moore, Kenneth G. McHaley, Harry G. Mayer, Collis P. Moore, John M. Watson, Jr., John Chalmers, Albert Woerten- dyke, Erwin Ludeman 1924 Harold H. Brown, Charles B. Buchanan Jr., Desmond M. Cundiff, Frank B. Dorman, Edgar H. 'Kamna, Darrell Larsen, Allen H. Mooers, Benjamin M. Reed 34- ! ,. Q m: '2 I 5.1:: r 1;: K -.$x v.37 xg Powers Lindley Collins Kays Beeman Eisman Hicks Rouslow Purdy Wade Humphrey Lube Littlefield Sharkey H, Mooers McDaniel Howard Ford Meyers Woertendyke Hays Henderson McHaley K. Moore McCulloch Carter Ludemnn C. Moore Butler Knodell W'ntson Reed Kalmnn A. Manors Cundiff Dormnn Brown Buchanan Chalmers AITSOTI - 355 - 2 -21 I' $11 21:, . ., I .k a NAN. xx; 4" Q! J: as? 2 1 rm 122;? 2K" 2e9; 22x Founded at Union College, 1841 Alpha 16m Eplta Ghapter Installed January 3, 1921 1921 George Frederick Shirley, Norman Terrell Byrne 1922 Harold Newton Lee, Lawrence Laidlaw Weller, Ralph Louis Taylor, Glenn Ster- . , Vling McGonegal, Edwin Palmer Hoyt, Kay Armston Leep Q 1923 Fred Benjamin Michelson, Harold George Michelson, Guy Oran Koepp, James Wilson Gaily, Virgil Flynn Oliver, Homer Calvin Gant, Orvin Thomas Gant, Cloyd Renfro Blackburn. 1924 Carl Eugene Houston H. Michelson McGonegal H. Gant Houston iver F. Michelson 01 Byrne Taylor Blackburn - 357 - Yr. 66 mm h SW Leep Gailey .w $1.. .. wg mgumwszvlh . J I!QX i . , mw Arte x. L ! If It 7 git V LtA K v1 4 f? 5;; 16:9 AAXEQJ' AAK ff ;fAA EEAa 1 A .zyri EEK .3 x , " 7x .. xi 1 hr W wavy e w 51 J? W1fo 4mzlg 3M 1IX'A , J7 p 1 l' J A1 151,1 1? Q4; 15; '1 k 1 V23271 ;:Wz' J A111" .99, 11. .- m; g p 1 is? ' x 1N1 I 7 I I 117. Q! e;:A '7' 1 9 w 1??? k" k 1 1m x X E21131 Ghent 13m Founded at Cleveland Law School, 1900 Emily gmmte Installed: May 2, 1913 FRATRES IN FACULTATE Wm. L. Dalzell FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Leroy P. Anderson, J. Arthur Berg, Victor Bradeson, Charles Crandall, Walden Dillard, Karl F. Glos, G. Russell Morgan, Donald Newbury, Harold G. Wells, Nicholas Michels 1922 . l James H. Baker, Richard F. Berg, Earl Clark, Maurice Eben, John F. Hilary, Veryle I Jones, Ralph Jackson, Ivan Phipps, Don Randall, A1 Teller, Roy Williams i "At , 1923 ' J. Horton Beeman, Mason Dillard, Carl Jaquet, Clinton Mercer, George Samuel, Mearl Snyder, Harold Simpson, Frank Michels 1924 Herbert Booth, Bertell Ford, David Husted, Rodney Langlois, Scott Stalker, For- rest Wilson, Charles Wilson, Henry Zimmerman, Orval Millard, Stanley Crowe 'h 5. K Teller W ells Clark Samuel Bradeson Morgan R. Berg Phipps Mercer Berg 10k son Jones Dillard Randall A. J Anderson Simpson Beeman Hilary hen Williams A Newbury ? Baker 1 Langlois Husted Jaquet Snyder Q Q! 9 9 mx?1 Q w 1! . 9 2:47 F't; Ear Axaw A 19.8: Kappa Elma Olhi Founded at the University of Oregon, Jaunary 5, 1919 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Alexander G. Brown, Don D. Davis, Jacob Jacobson, Edward S. Evans, Lee Sum- merville, William Porter, Clares Powell, Lyman Meador, Stanley Lowden 1922 James Say, Harry Ellis, John Dierdorff 1923 Charles Walker, Walter Taylor, James Ross, Cecil Bell, Edwyn Cravin, Ransom McArthur, Glen Campbell, Webster Ruble, Don Zimmerman, Lloyd LaLonde, Kenneth Youel, Gene Whitten 1924 Edward E. Evans, George McIntyre, Bennie Reed, Verdun Hockett, Charl'es Hendrie v, WV? Lowden Taylor Campbell Whitten Hendri Edwards McArthur Youel Hockett Meador Walker n 0 S b O C a J Dierdorff Craven La Londe Reed Powell Davis Porter Ellis Bell Zimmerman McIntyre Brown Summerville Say Ross Ruble E. E. Evans mathplnrhnn Founded October 5, 1919 FRATRES IN FACULTATE Frederick S. Dunn FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Lyle Bartholomew, Ronald McIntosh, Leo Cossman, George Guldozer 1922 Stanley E. Allen, Ellsworth Lucas, Sherman Rees, Dan Welch, Herbert Graham 1923 James Benedict, Squire Bosworth, Floy Clark, Berrian Dunn, Joe Erickson, Wayne Moore, Walter Gilbert, Cole Kirke, John McCourt, Dan Woods, Carl Black, George McFaul, Leslie Nunn, Rolfe Skulason, Lester Wellington, George Willett, Milton Mason, Paul Patterson 1924 Thomas Hill, Bernard Knipe, Earl Williams, Hal Kelly, Victor Campbell, Prentice Gross Graham McFuul Patterson Moore Ericson Black Mason Welch Campbell Cossman Rees Dunn Woods W illett McIntosh M 0 t g n . 1 1 1 e V X Lucas Clarke McCourt Bartholomew Kelly Bozorth k Slxulason Kir Allen Hill Benedict Gilbert Guldager Nunn 1311i gmma 1m Organized at University of Oregon, November 11, 1920 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1921 Reuel Moore, Carlton Logan, Dean Moore 1922 Wilford Allen, Verne Bleu 1923 John Anderson, Wilbur Bolton, Ralph Doddridge, Carl Epping, Dwight Gregg, Ralph Poston, Leonard Hadsall, Carl Willett, Dix Holaday, Leland Lapham 1924 Kenneth Cooper, Evan Lapham, Wallace Strane, Spencer Trawbridge Doddl'itlge Hadsall Cooper L. Lapham Logan Bolton Poston e n a r t s Moore Anderson Gregg Holaday E. Lapham Allen Epping Willett $15991 $1 I W xiw gs- .I 675 9 1 91 w W430: Q 2 I 124' r y K .3 i2::w' k-fz 2x Erienhlg 7mm 1921 pang 3 29$ $22 J. Carl Bowman, Reuben C. Goffreiere, Ralph C. Hoppes, Raymond Janes, Harold King, Homer Morinhweg, Elmer Pendell, William J. Russis, Carlton Savage, Maurice Selig, Victor Sether, Marvin Woolfolk, Rex Yamashita A, 22225 1922 g Cecil Adams, Arthur Campbell, Paul E. Cook, Remey Cox, Clyde D. Davis, Julius ' Frahm, Ermine Gentle, Hjalmar Gentle, Horace Hair, Leo G. Hertlein, Arthur Johnson, Kenneth Jones, Frank Jue, Oscar Koffman, Verne McClellan, Nicholas Michols, Troy A. Phipps, Arne Rae, Hugo A Reed, Dick Shim, Francis Shrode, Irvin Thomas, Walter VVegner, Horace Westerfleld, Arthur Wicks, B. A. VanLoan, Charles VanZile 87 .. :- Q 2i 1923 Virl Bennehoff, Raymond Boyer, Clifford Carlson, Earle Coburn, Horace Cooke, Marvin Eby, Herbert T. Hacker, Verne Henry, George H. Houck, Newton Langerman, Albin Martinson, James R. May, Ralph McClaflin, Nelson W. Mercer, Frank B. Nichols, Albert Neimi, Joseph C. Olson, Raymond Porter, John Sass, Harry Sherman, Robert Tapp, Donald Wilkinson 1924 Donald Allen, Clarence Anderson, James Bagan, Hally L. Berry, Arlington H. Broadwell, R. Leslie Butner, E. F. L. Corneliussen, Harry Culbertson, Earl Dicken- sheets, Ed Haney, Francis Haworth, Clinton Howard, George Pfeuffer, Benj. H. M. Plack, Claude E. Robinson, Theran B. Sausser, Paul Sayre, Charles Thompson, Cyril Vallentyne, William M. VanW'inkle, Howard E. Winnard Hoeber Hoppes' Russis Savage Adams Campbell E. Gentle H. Gentle Koffman McClellan Shim Shrode Vzm Loan Vzm Zile 367 Ehy May Sass Bugzm Haney Sayer McCluHin Boyer Cobum H. Cook Hacker Henry Houck Langermun Murtinson McLufiin F. Michols Neime Olson Porter Sherman Tapp Wilkinson Allen Anderson Berry andwell Cornelimson Culbertson Diokensheets Hxlyworth melffor Pollack Robinson Suusser Thompson anlentyne Van Winkle Winnard -368-- $ Kx r 1 $ I: 3? l 1? QM. I'G I 4': K Q k3 A $ i 'N x X X. 7 D luau..." u- bum", EE mdunrv : . Eli buds: 0:!" f e H 5216: M n 15-! vrmfrm-J .:g manna 1113:. m .g 1 MWMSW not 1-H; Mumdm Hmm- lthulngpu; .54 a u MIN d P. 93,4; 3'": Mamie. ugh 1", 1m..." w 3" Eu! !. kluum M1354 "W ww m. cl T9 Wanda: wit . khumh'i' M Iw.'.... imbuuu. 0:; h It'llllzh: :0 5!.M d l: Ibi-r hum .u Mm Mk :Vm ha" 24: ?Mdmmu. .1 0 ran M to..."- w" pi x K: Ibbb .1; '4 F V t h qut' j n 1 mvhiml $rhnnl Although not benefited directly by the Millage bill, the Medical School is entering on a period of increasing development and expanding usefulness simultaneously with the major division of the University of Oregon. The school was founded in 1887 and made rapid progress from the first. It was deiinitely rated as a Class A school at the time of the first national inspection in 1910. The position which the school attained in so short a time was to a great extent due to the work of Dr. Simon E. Josephi, dean of the school from its beginning until 1912. Dr. Josephi was succeeded by Dr. A. J. McKenzie, to whose labors are due: Iirst, the amalgamation of the Willamette Medical School with the University of Oregon Medical School; second, the gift to the state by the Oregon-Washington Railway and Navigation company of a campus of twenty acres, situated on Marquam Hill, constituting one of the most beautiful sites for an educational institution and hospitals in the United States; third, in the construction of the first wing of the Medical School building at a cost of $140,000.00. In this building, which constitutes the present Medical School, are situated the laboratories and lecture rooms for the first two years of the medical course. Several acres of the campus were presented to Multnomah county for the erection of the county hospital, which is now nearing completion and will soon be occupied. As a result of its rapid progress and high standards the University of Oregon Medical School is one of the forty per cent American medical schools to survive the thinning-out process of the last few years, resulting from the raising of the standards. It now holds a unique position among the medical schools of the country. It is the only complete medical north of San Francisco and west of Denver, thus serving the largest geographical area of any medical school and serving exclusively the largest population- the three million people of Oregon, Washington, Idaho and parts of Montana. In order to advance still further and attain a better position as medical center of the West, similar to that of Johns Hopkins in the East, extensive plans have been made for more buildings and more hospitals for clinical facilities. From the people of the state, through the legislature, will be requested the construction of the second wing of the Medical School building, together with completion of the present wing and im- provement of the grounds at a cost estimated at $300,000.00, and an increase of main- tainance money to enable more instructors and assistants to be employed and thus increase the research facilities of the school. A large educational foundation, after Study of the program of the Medical School, has indicated a willingness to meet on an equal basis the appropriations of the legislature toward the budget. In addition to the second wing of the Medical School there is also desired in the near future a children,s hospital to enable the school to carry on its work in treating the needy cripple children of the state, which was appointed to it by the legislature in 1917, by the Crippled Childrents law. " v: K LR VuRiV k-fz Helen J. Allrens, Seattle, Wash. University of Washington, ,15317, Delta Delta Delta. Jessie B. Farrior ...... Portland University of Tennessee, 1888, O. A. 0., 1916-17. Archie Edward Bird, Vancouver, Wash. University of Oregon, 115- 117, Nu Sigma Nu. Irvin R. Fox ................ Portland University of Oregon, ,15- 116. Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Alpha, class president 12021, Nu Sigma Nu. Frank H. Campbell, A. B. Dallas University of Oregon, ,17, Alpha Kappa Kappa. Albert W. H01man....Port1and University of Oregon, 115- 116, Sigma Nu, Sigma Alpha, class secretary ,17318, vice- president class ,19320, Nu Sigma Nu. George V. Vandevert, A. B. Bend Willamette' University, 114, Alpha Kappa Kappa. G. S. Holman, A. B. Stanford, 113, Phi Chi. AQKWQJM . Alfred H. Johnston....P0rt1and University of Oregon, ,15, Stanford University, 119, Sig- ma Alpha, Nu Sigma Nu. Harold M. Peery, Ph. G. O. A. 0., 1909-13, assistant physiological chemistry, Nu Sigma Nu. Lester Tollman Jones, A. B. Forest Grove Pacific University, ,18, Phi Alpha Tau, assistant in anat- omy 12,, 3, 41, class president ,19-120, Nu Sigma Nu. Homer P. Rush ............ Portland University of Nebraska, ,14- '17, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, student assistant physiology, 118321, member student coun- cil, 119320, Nu Sigma Nu. Anna Mumby..01ympia, Wash. Whitman College, 115317, Delta Gamma. Delbert C. Stannard, A. B. Portland University of Oregon, 114, Kappa Sigma, To-Ko-Lo, Friars, Alpha Kappa Kappa. Alfred Bertram Peacock University of Oregon, 118, Sigma Chi, Sigma Alpha, Torch and Shield, member student council 120321, Nu Sigma Nu. Laban A. Steeves, A. B. W i 1 1 a m e t t 6 University, member student council, 119- '21, chairman student council, ,20-121, student assistant path- ology, 119320, Nu Sigma Nu. wmxz-wav- . nxm. a .' k... 11.313331? "23V? M'7'17 Alpha Kappa Kappa Founded at Dartmouth College, September 29, 1888 lapailnn thaptpr Installed at the University of Oregon Medical School March 21, 1903 FRATRES IN FACULTATE Dr. James F. Bell, Dr. Robert C. Yenney, Dr. Ernest F. Tucker, Dr. A. E. MacKay, Dr. J. Earl Else, Dr. George F. Wilson, Dr. R. W. Matson, Dr. R. C. Matson, Dr. Marr Bisaillon, Dr. Fred J. Zeigler, Dr. Allen F. Noyes, Dr. H. N. Howard, Dr. Robert F. Holt D1: Darwin Palmer, Dr. Ralph C. Walker, Dr. J. B. Bilderbach. FRATRES IN UNIVERSATATE 1921 Frank H. Campbell, George V. Vandevert, Delbert C. Stannard, John W. Houston. 1922 Ira A. Manville, Wilford H. Belknap, Walter Miller, Albert T. Morrison, 01in L. Wills, Charles Ferguson. , 1923 Carl Emmons, Arthur H. Johnson, Carlton Pynn, Edwin E. Osgood, Waldo W. Ball, Joseph Springer, Thurston W. Laraway, E. Gordon Fletcher, Quincy Davis, Kenneth Cook, David Robbins, Henry Freeborg, Axel C. Osterholm. 1924 Evon L. Anderson, George H. Benshadler, Kenneth M. Campbell, Vernon A. Doug- las, Hugh A. Dowd, Ralph Dresser, Wayne Hunt, Reuben H. Mast, Carl H. Phetteplace, Cecil J. Ross, Vernie E. Ruedy, Paul Torland, Arthur C. Vandevert. -374-- Nu gigma N11 Founded at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., March 2, 1882 at 'I' w : , v 4132131 Nu Glimmer ' 1 3:13 Installed at University of Oregon Medical School May 16, 1919 . u. w W 1 y FRATRES IN FACULTATE ' ' u 9'1 V 11 Dr. Charles R. McClure, D1". G. N. Pease, Dr. T. H. Coffen, Dr. W. Knox, Dr. W. ' , p C. Foster, Dr. J. F. Strohm, Dr. F. A. Kiehle, Dr. R. E. Watkins, Dr. H. Bean, Dr. T. M. n 1 1 W 1 Joyce, Dr. R. M. Dodson. pi ' 'i 1 ' FRATRES IN UNIVERSATATE ,' II" 1 y, 1921 w i . L. A. Steves, A. E. Bird, A. W. Holman, I. R. Fox, A. H. Johnston, H. M. Peery, -.W A. B. Peacock, H. P. Rush, L. T. Jones. 1 i' 1 ' 'l 1922 1 .1 at" C. Newcastle, Jr., R. J. Coffey, Jr., Edwin Padden. 1 1 J" 1923 '1 ,a C. Logle, Warren Hunter, Albert Bowles, Roger Holcomb, Jerald Backstrand, F. V E. Fowler, Bert Woods, M. E. Wilson, J. C. Bell, Merle Margason, Dean Seabrook, Kent , Wilson, Leo Lucas, Glen Morgan, Harold Tregilgas, J. D. Leonard, Harold Foskett, 1 . Dale Butts. 1f 1924 1 I 1 Floyd South, Albert Young, Morris Bridgeman, Erwin Barendrick, William H01- 1 j z x ' J; lenbeck, Clarence Moffatt, Paul Workman, Kirk Prindle, Otis Schroeder, Merle Moore, 4 1 I John Pieroth, Stanley Knapp, Robert Kronenberg. f 1 r C 1,; ,3751- 1 4; 11' I 14.319934? avt-TT Z ,bs', mmmmm .tnf ai$$$$$fi5 k v W Founded by union of two chapters, one of the University of Vermont 118891, and one of the University of Louisville, Kentucky 118941 132181 Glimmer Installed at the University of Oregon Medical School October, 1921 FRATRES IN FACULTATE F. R. Menne, M. D., F. E. Burget, Ph.D., Paul Penniston, M. D. FRATRES IN UNIVERSATATE 1920 C. Elmer Carlson, M. D. 1921 L. P. Holeman. 1924 J. Dwight Wilson, Merritt Whitten, Charles Coghlin, Joseph Mizner, Wilford Briggs. 9' . 1 x11 9 9 2 afiw 'f .. U9 4' '1!" 1 x 2 2ww C 5 ,, 4: 9 9Q .. 7 i; 13 6...: W9 9 Illqlf'avf 9:1??? g 2 0"V . 19 : A Ink E. ; x I 9.1;" 1"; ' ' , v;r 9 T 171,. 1 INK: 1,1;7 F Kappa Wt Founded at Russell Military Academy, 1879 QSamma 1111111 Glimmer Installed at the University of Oregon, 1921 FRATRES IN FACULTATE Dr. H. J. Sears. FRATRES IN UNIVERSATATE 1923 Clinton H. Thienes. 1923 Joseph Wunderlich. 1924 Clyde D. Horner, J. K. Glenn, Fred T. Burke, Norris Jones, I. M. Bowersox, J. W. Whisenant, Richard F. Thompson. g?tnhent Artinitiva The student activities of the Medical School are necessarily very limited. Con- trary t0 the advice of the ancient satirist, studies do interfere very materially with the education of a medical student. The walls of the mews locker-room are decorated with photographs of long- haired, blood-thirsty football heroes of bygone days. The student of today' sees and wonders and takes his ten minutes at noon on the improvised volley ball court on the campus. In spite of these handicaps the Medical School is sometimes active in an athletic way. Last spring a baseball team was formed and managed to play several games with North Paciiic Dental College and other local teams. Some wonderful material was on hand for a championship basketball team this fall, but time for practice could not be found. Hopes are expressed that this spring will see another baseball nine representing the school. The medical fraternities offer a field of student activity outside of routine class work. They are the main factors in such social activities as are squeezed into the school year and are chiefly valuable as a means of introducing the students to the men of their profession Who are now actively engaged in it and with whom they will work when school days are over. There are now four fraternities in the school; two having been installed this year. Plans are now being made for a medical unit of the R. O. T. C. to be started in the school. This will provide for those who wish the training necessary to the medical officer. No drill will be required of the men signing up. A certain number of lectures and attendance at the summer camps will be the requirements. Men fulfilling these- will receive pay during their last two years and a commission as Medical Reserve Officer on graduation. May 1921 Spaof Number Priceless LA VIE OREGONIENNE SEE THE BATTLEFIELDS OF EUROPE Visit the aromatic mud flats of Brest and St. Nazaire. Draw inspirations from the beautiful stained glasses of Vin Rouge. Sprain your ankles on the sunny slopes of the picturesque Pyrenees. ADDED ATTRACTION A special tour of Scotland, including ,Arf an, Arf and other points of like inter- est. Also a side trip to devastated Ireland, the land of the spree and the home of the grave. , FIRST CLASS ACCOMODATIONS Tourists will be furnished with everything necessary for their comfort and con- venience, including guide books, bottle openers, chaperons, and chewing gum. Leave New York on S. S. iiSt. Vitusii about July 1. FOX-BURGESS TRAVEL AGENCY 0 North Hello Lane Why Pound Out Your Life Are Your - ? i . Street Car? Grades Low . Do you have trouble with your courses? Do professors fill you with dread and fear? Can you keep calm when called upon to recite? Does your pencil tremble as you write eX- aminatlons ? If so, it is a sign that you ought to keep POSTEM WW and try Bohning,s Midnight Oil of Beat the crowd on a safe, sane, and simple Enterprlse Boynton Bicycle. They never wear out. Both A It All Fee d Stores genders carried in stock. W. P. BOYNTON, AGENT 24 Deady Way Twenty-nine cents the package of one quart LA VIE OREGONIENNE The WORK wine You Sleep tFORGiNG A HEAD" By Jack Benefiel The gripping story of a man Who fought his way to success and fame only to find that eBut read the story in the authofs own words. The big seller of the season; ,X' 1'? tt1 would cut a class to read this invaluable m WWW " volume," says Professor Timothy Haye Clor- an. 11181679 Your Valuables Against L038 $1.50 net tprOfiU With the BUNK AND RAGNAILS, Publishers BOLITHONIAN BANKER AND TRUST Co. I THE SUN NEVER SETS ON SIGMA ttS.A.ER' ALPHA MEMBERS EPSILON Whether you are in bigamistic Burma or inclement Iceland you.will always find an S. A. E. While one-half of the world wo rks the othir thrii-quarters 1s trymg to sleep throu h a 8' A1 h serenade. By their too ts ye shall now .em. . . gSuch 1fervige is made possible only by the fact that Slg'ma Alpha Eps110n maln- tains 90 branch offices throughout the United States. Look up the agency 1n your town. Our representative will be glad to give you a trlal. Eugene Offices ALDER AT FOURTEENTH LA VIE OREGONIENNE 01071111101, 111,110.74 ugguylzm IIIIII .. .mm mun ....mv-.. ,, . .. n :- Wm. WM i u v lu'll'lmu' K Isluuln'ulm mywnllerzw 'IMX'IK 4:13.. .I- .... l uminiimm ?w .1 : urgzmn 'm.ganun-I.mr-uunuu.:u'mm. yak M anga avA mow erq ' 3m MK QGAAKBNN wA ; 1 1 H Thin; LJ M I '1 8:8 7 xgaamm WWW Om K Examiixc NEW: z AS DEAN AND DR. BERTHA DEAN WOULD LIKE TO SEE IT ctr? .,,3nt 3' F"..' ta" 1n an E". . 1... La m ywdt ! vaubsm ywunki '4'. -r3nmunW" cn- r- away..." n.$! 'a."' M M I. in. hm.- u ,1" u h - . luqih OH - vim. m . Nth .".. h It Kthrhl hL'N "It- LA VIE OREGONIENNE FOREWORD, BACKWORD, HALT! What is your opinion of your fellow student, the average college man and woman of today? Do you consider him an object of idealistic pride to his pro- fessors? Is there a halo of Virtue about his head in your mental image of him? Do you believe that he has a serious purpose in life and realizes it? If you do, then go no further. Gaze long and ear- nestly at the illustration on the left. Turn not an- other page, lest your cherished ideal be shattered like an egg in a rock crusher and vanish like a bank account before a formal. Study it carefully and profit thereby, but remember the fate of the profiteer. But if you are of an adventurous turn and have no fear for the elasticity of your sense of humor, you may proceed with near impuniousness. Laugh, if you must, for it will make you rank ace high with the joker, but keep your mirth in a state of dignity in keeping with the tone of this ponderous tome Whose prognosticators have labored long and thought- lessly over its variegated pages. La Vie plays to no favorites but its own, tramples none but other peoples toes, desires that the ras- berry shall be its own exclusive, patented and bot- tled in bond family fruit. It aims to be as un- biased as the prejudices of the editors will allow. If it has failed to reflect all of the Oregon life that you think it should, remember that the mirror was small and the field large. In the words of the great Trotski, qThe spirit was willing but the mind was weak." Requiescat in pieces! ah i: i MAYBE THE DUCKS WERE RIGHT Pete-I hear that Dr. Sawyer had a fight with his neighbor over some ducks? BilleWere they spoiling his garden? PeteeNo, Doc claimed the remarks they made to him were too personal. i: it i ONE WAY TO FIGURE IT GrindeWhat was your average last term? Stoneelvy. GrindeWhat do you mean? StoneeI got a I and a VI. Doesnit that make my average IVI? WE CAN ALWAYS C6NSOLE OUR- SELVES WITH THE FACT THATe Engagements are not affected by proba- tion rules. No matter how hard it is to graduate it is always easy to flunk out. There are no arc lights on Hayward field. The race is not entirely confined to the swift. ; The drinking fountain is in front of the library. It is expecting too much to think that things can ever again be as they were itwhen we were fresh." THEM'S HARSH W0 RDS, MABEL! 6 LA VIE OREGONIENNE JOLLY JUNIOR JAZZ JINXERS Barbarus to His Brothers By E. J. H. ttBarbarianseat ease! Everybody else fall out. It is that small, straggling, but glorious band of men who neither pig or are pigged timmediately the ranks burst asunder and grow much sparserl that I wish to harangue. tiWe are a noble crew! We are an iron-willed, sturdy-resolved crew! There is no other group in this great University quite like us, nor quite as pur- poseful. We are the undiluted 100 per cent males who do not need the complement of the other rib to go happily through life. To us the restless and dis' turbing sex are only so many iobjective manifestas tionsJ so to speak. HI mean to say that when they sail past us they do not make our heart go tflutter-flutterf We march sternly and flat-footedly by. We are not worried by that intangiblef and ielusivei quality that our less strong brethren go into ecstacies over and maunder incoherently about our presence until we leave in great disgust, with a wonder filling our hearts that such irresponsible imbeciles should be allowed at large. No wonder so many of them go around with an alternately blissful and dejected half-married ex- pressionethe weak-kneed critters! itWe sit in the library in the evenings with the bona fide intention of studying, but are distracted to the point of madness by the endless succession of ipsssst pssssti and tsppps sppppsl and other goofy sounds that emanate from our right, left, front and rear. The poor weak vessel on our right turns a page of Taussig, stares at his conception of heavenly loveliness, seated in some far corner, sighs tit sounds like a water main breakingl, and turns over another page of Taussigemental aberration if there ever was a case! Whats a man of our sturdy race to do in such an effeminate atmosphere? tiThe dotty dumb-bell on our left, seeing his ver- sion of the Loveliest Lamp that eter lit the dark and drearsome void of this existence going out of the door, nearly breaks his neck, the Chair, and our back and imperils the life of all standing near in a mad dash after her. We see those silly and spineless brethren of ours do the tFido fetch-and-carryl act up and down the streets for six days a week, and on the seventh they forsake the pavement and go out into the open fields where they wont be bumping into each other. They amble over acres of roads just to whisper sweet nothings to their Fair Flowers and hear in return-sweet nothings. They push a canoe over yards and yards of water just to see their Dazzling Dream in the bow. ttBrother Barbarians, thank the gods we are above that! We are of a sturdier strain than to need the most giddy of all- Excuse me a second-ah-yes eit is Her! Ilm very sorry, gentlemen, but I must hurry after that young ladyemust see her on a mat- ter of business-solely a matter of business, you understand. I must be going. But Fm so glad we understand each other now. We know each other much more closely than before. Yes, we do!" LA VIE OREGONIENNE 5 71749? ; i I Ir! 1. 9.... Iv! 44 , i, , 1 w," 9me J .2 . .x. 7.x. , ,, 555,. "2.2:? .94? WALTER SCAMPS ALL-OREGON HAREM 8 LA VIE OREGONIENNE LA VIEiS OWN VOCATIONAL GUID- ANCE ADVISORY BOARD After long and slender consultation among the board and himself the advisory commit- tee has drastically recommended that in View of the fact that certain faculty members are round pegs in square holes they should change their vocations as follows: N ame Ideal Vocation James Gilbert ........................ Train announcer F. G. Young ...................... Insomnia specialist Sam Bass Warner .......................... Golf caddy Dean Straub-.-.Manager Roth Memory course Dean E. C. Robbins .................... Freight clerk R. C. Clark ...................................... Undertaker ltStif'fy" Barnett .................................. Hermit Henry C. Howe ............ Small town postmaster Timmy Cloran ........ Whispering gallery guide Emma Waterman ........................ Movie actress E. Sutherland Bates ........ Mohammedan priest Owing to a lack of space and nerve the board has deemed it unwise to print the entire list, but extra copies of the full list will be mailed free for fifty cents to any one ' desiring them. This offer closes May 7, 1921. i fr it HE KNEW Math Prof.-How much is a Gross? . RounderaEighty-five cents the couple. HEARD EN ROUTE Jack-These S. P. trains are just like a pipe organ. PeggyaWhyis that? JackeMostly stops. PEOPLE WE,D LIKE TO MEET The misguided maniac who labeled Span- ish and French the ltRomance Languages." Any one who would like to take a chance on loaning us money. A fellow who can keep his youth like Bob Earl. A Sigma Chi minister. Any man who ever succeeded in beating the business office out of enough to pay the war tax on a free admission. A costumer who could disguise a man so he would get by at the April Frolic. The Bachelordon man who wants to rent out a front row seat for the Midnight Frolic of. Alpha Phi. 1k it i: DID YOU EVER THINK OF THIS? MinisterettScanland, my boy, why do you not tread the straight and narrow path ?ii Scan CollinsetiBecause I figure that if I raise hell here Iill be that much nearer heaven in the hereafter? Wm; LEAVE IT TO THE BAND FOR BRASS AND CHEEK LA VIE OREGONIENNE TH ivownox 0? WE mm. 2nd probably vex" Shall be. ,,-.. H.1y.-rw WHO SAID DARWIN WAS WRONG? LA VIE OREGONIENNE Ouerulous and Quizzical Questionnaires The following list of questions was taken vertebratem from an actual questlonnalre used in a certain course in the .School of Commerce. They are answered 1n an en- tirely logical and almost reasonablefashlon by one of La Viets most intelligent edltors. SALESMANSHIP I. Answer the following questions frank- 1y: A. Your agezelncreasing. B. State the following regarding your family environment: 1. Parents livingzeUh-hiih. 2. Religious denominationzeBoth 3. Were your parents socially inclined? -0ften. Were you ?eWheiiever invited. C. Which parent do you resemble most? -Fathei". D. What would you say were the most positive characteristics of your father and mother ?-Very fond of children. Only rea- son they raised me. E. Which parent encouraged you most? --Hai"d to tell. F. Which parent restrained you most ?1 Yes. G. What is your descent? tFathefs and mothers sidey-Father descended from Adam, mother daughter of my grandfathein. II. Answer the following questions in re- gard to yourself : A. Were you a leader among your early companions ?eAlways first at the dinner table. B. Did you avoid the crowd or tend to mix with it?-Mix with any one, any time, any place. C. Did you read much as a boy?-Very much like a boy. What was your favorite reading?-Pihh Ladies Home Journal. D. What was your attitude as a boy to- ward: 1. Musicz-Courageous endurance. 2. Sportsz-Depended 0n the way they dressed. - 3. Study z-Normal, no reaction. E. State the extent of your education up to the present timez-Fourteen years five thousand and nine dollars. . F. What has been your working exper- 1ence ?eHave worked undeii compulsion, with reluctance and overtime. G. What has been your condition of health? 1. Early childhood up to 10 yearsze VeTy young. 2. From 10 to 20 :eFair, occasional showeys. . 3. From 20 to 30 :eFuturistic. III. What is your present ambition in a business way ?eTo roll four naturals in suc- cession. IV. Check the characteristics or in- fluences you feel that you possess or have had up to the present time: 1. General:-Generatly speaking. 2. Detai1:-Usually K. P. 3. Initiativeze-Yes, also referendum and recall. ' 4. Careless:-Biit not carefree. 5. Carefulz-Wheneyer Fm not good. 6. Musical :ePlay the pipe wrench. 8. Dramatic :eHave attended movies. 9. Social :v-Occasimially church socials. 10. Travel-eCollege Crest and way points. 11. To be tilled in by friends:etSti11 blankJ 12. Mechanicalze-Cah drive a nail with a sponge. 1 V. Check three of the following general disposition traits which you seem to possess: CriticalzeThatts my condition. HappyzeWheii asleep or eating. MorosezeNo, Caucasian. . a PessimisticzeAbout getting dates. Lacking initiativez-Also cash, sense, Courageous :-When out of dangeii. Reserved :-When I can aytord tem. VI. What do you consider your state of health with respect to the following? 1. Heart :--Faint. 2. Lungs :eOne 074 two. 3. Liver:-G00d with onions. 4. Kidneys 1-B0iled. 5. Stomachz-Badly hashedA up. VII. What is your active interest in the following? 2. Golfz-Do I look it? 3. Footba11:-Bet heavily. 4. Baseba11:-Fi1ist, second and third. 5. TenniszeGood Jtshei'man. LA VIE OREGONIENNE 11 ., 8?"? F L g; , 237nm L Warrm KAPPA SIG FROSH INFORMAL I n H m The Ten Prize Winners in La Vie,s Limerick Contest M h The man with three eyebrows is Thacher, A wizard at math is De Cou, W '- m. To him a good book is green pasture, His troubles With numbers are few, , Mug His greatest delight Though often ltis said ' . Is to act, read or write, That figures are dead, w , , N If his head wonlt obey him, he,ll scratch ier. E. E. claims theyire all bright and new. ' i az 1k 1k 3k ak The women are watched by Dean Fox, The gent With the Whiskers is Howe, I a i Who strongly opposes rolled sox, His greatest delight is a row, ' a W ; iiYou can powder your chins But the falr mov1e. queens But don,t show your shins, Took him back to hls teens, m So always wear ankle length smoxfi Although you,d not think 1t now. U. i: at i ir r f ' a ' The shrewd, canny Scotchman is Colin, Do you know Harry B. Torrey Who hates to see scholarship fallini, Whose Wife has won fame at short story? With the help of his aides He lectures on bugs, , u ' He published the grades, Prophylaigls ahd'slugs, Now heis out to abolish all stallini And thereby 18 gegnlilg imUCh glory. i 7': i J. B, There is a professor named Timmy, Now here we havelLelahd A. GOOD, Who tells ancient jokes j ust like J immy. Whosegreatest dellghf: Is to spoon, a l Hes never yet sprung His helpmate 1n life, ' T Any yarn that was young, Is Mr. Qoon s Wife, And Iill bet he looks down on the shimmy. Who helps hlm eathEFYJIOOH. I I ;. T Tk T I o a a V A A publicity man is Al Powers, A dignified blrd 1s De Busku ' His diction is sprinkled With flowers, With a. manner that nearly 1s brusque, At spreading a line He teaches to teachers, r;- 3 - i He is superfine, And pupils and preachers, f And he pounds out the bushwa by hours. From early 1n morn unt1l dusk. 7 ., i If 12 LA VIE OREGONIENNE 5 g x, . 3 'Look af 'em grin w at LA Cw, N Fm! 7595sz, VARIEGATED PHOTOGRAPHIC PHYSIOGNOMIES h LA VIE OREGONIENNE Opinions Upon Pins There are pins that come in papers, And the pins in laundered shirts, But the pins that cut the capers, Hang upon the Tri Delt flirts. Then we have the Pi Phi arrows, Stolen darts from Cupidls bow, They transfix the men like sparrows, Seldom ,tis they miss the foe. Here is Kappa Alpha Theta, With a badge shaped like a kite, iTis a lucky man who rates a Stroll with one by Luna,s light. See the key so plain and simple? Kappas wear it, stately thing, But each maiden has a dimple, And their doorbell has the ring. Hereis the dope on X and horseshoe,, Never mind what others say, Never let a Chi O vamp you, If you do, for it you,ll pay. N ow well take the G. Phi Betas, With their jeweled and sparkling pin, Oh hot dog and sweet potatoes! May their shadows never thin. All the D. Gfs wear an anchor, J ust as does a ship at sea, If one smiles at you, why thank ier, And repay with two or three. Back to days of granite sledges, Go the ways of Alpha Phi, Yellow oak leaves mark their pledges, But the fig was Adam,s tree. Sigma Deltas? You can tell ,em, For each wears a little lyre, I said iitell," and dont dare itcall" them, Or youill find you,ve played with fire. Gaze upon this diamond token, Pride of Alpha Delta Pi, Day by day we hear it spoken, That they cause full many a sigh. Come behold the lamp of D. Z. Neatly lettered with the name, Yes, itis told in accents breezy, That each one can boast a flame. Last we have the pearled letters, 0f young Z. Rho Epsilon, And we bow to all our betters, Thank the reader, and hike on. A. S. OlRority. MUCH NEEDED IMPROVEMENTS 13 Straps in the aisles of the library for those who lose out on seats. Adequate housing facilities for the campus squirrels. Six main phone lines into Hendricks Hall. Red plush upholstery on the library steps. Arms on the ends of the benches in Villard hall or else cushioned aisles. Early morning fire drills. A new double track sidewalk on south Alder street. Shades on the Friendly hall windows. it i i: BAD iCESS TO iIM St. Patrick Did a great Work When he drove The Serpents Out of Ireland but He made An awful mistake When He left the Snakes In Moonshine. - Whiski de Stilleri. HOW HARRIS STAYED IN SCHOOL 14 LA VIE OREGONIENNE g; n 000000 ; MAY OR MAYNOT, 1921 l 3 4 '. l'l-Iu ""v'ulln WVVherds La lWe therds dopefi Published by :33in H1111 . I w , - -. - . t . W? , 1 L y ya w . raer u mEiWe ,y. l 53 i IIT'vwlllzixfi, 1111. wgahm rr 1 - VOL. 7734 No. Sense LA VIE OREGONIENNE PUBLISHING COMPANY John Dierdorff This is the editorial page. Do you recognize it? On it you will find many a plea for reform, regres- sion and resignation. There are also grouped here a great many words whose meaning is not clear to even the most educated of us. They are intended for your conver- sational betterment. Put them in your vocabulary after first consult- ing your minister about their re- ligious standing. In the first place we want to say. something about posts. We had a very nice little editorial all thought up about them when the faculty stole the greater part of our thunder by doing away with the system and left us nothing much to say. But as the past is the only concrete thing we have to go by texcept the - sidewalks, of course, which are a way unto themselves and a num- ber of other placesl, we would fain hark back to this pre-medieval cus- tom. As there is no constructive criticism in stock at the present moment, bear with us while we de- structingly crab. Cuuwg '13 Time was when the professor passed the post in order that the posted person might know that all hope was past that he was passing. Then the posted party would have to wait two days, go up to Dean Straub's office, and be told that the Dean was delivering an address to the graduating class of Hangkow High School and wouldn,t be back until the first of the week. tThe accompanying architects drawing illustrating the student finding the Prof. at his desk is merely a flight of fancy and a stretch of imagin- ative hoped Upon the reurn of the Dean our hero would again seek the great guider of University mas- l Office Just Vacated culinity. Immediately he would be in hot water for the reason that he had not reported within the three day limit and was therefore liable for almost anything from suspen- sion up. From this point the sub- ject of our text is well stated in Vol. 11, Sec. 3, Case 1968, Student Advisory Committee Reports of the University of Oregon, so we shall next turn our atention to other subjects. We have here aniactual photo- graph illustrating a sad phase of student life in this great institu- tion. In fact it is doubly sad. We grieve for the poor frosh who got into trouble because the sophomore class didn,t tell him where to head at in the first place and we are saddened by the fact that it should fall upon such men as the members of the order of the t0" that they should have to carry upon their own shoulders the entire weight of en- forcing the observance of time hon- ored tand time is about all that honors them in these renegade daysl traditions. There is also a tinge of regret in the heart of the old-timer when he thinks of how the time seems to be here when another adjective will be added to ttthe biggest and bestfi In a few years ttbrassiestb should be tacked on to the end of this phrase. The time has come when the pow- ers that be should stop, look'and think. Did anyone ever introduce a law into congress making it an act of treason for a father to spank his offspring for doing that which he should not? Was it ever tRus- sia exceptedy a felony to take a cold bath? Does a prizeiighter train on lettuce salad and weak tea? Will that old, proud Oregon spirit ever be brought to its full strength when it is administered with a tea- Madge Calkins spoon, badly diluted with well skimmed milk of human kindness? It will not! Unless there is a sudden change in student attitude toward such things as the Oregon Spirit, the thing which made the University in the past, the thing that every old graduate is proud of, will quickly fade away and instead of OREGON SPIRIT there will be nothing but COLLEGE SPIRIT. And there is a vast difference be- tween the two. Visit some other campus and see for yourself. It may be said that times have changed, that such things are of a day hat is gone, that it is the in- evitable result of a rapid growth in numbers. These are but excuses. It requires only the united support of each of your to make THE GREATER OREGON the home of THE GREATER ORGEON SPIRIT. May the spirit be with you! We were really serious that time and now that it is off the editorial chest we can once again turn our fancy to something fancier. Let us discuss serenades for a change. There are about three varieties of real serenades and each has one or two or three little brothers. First of all there is such an affair as the Sigma Nuls stage once in a while, with a wagon, a piano, Carl Newbury, Bart Sherk and a lot of faith. Up the street they will come, about two ante meridian, playing soft music to the accom- paniment of harsh voices. The sleepers subconsciously hear the aeolian srains straining at their ears and toss uneasily. iTis but a dream, surely. Nearer come the dulcet strains. Nearer yet. Still nearer. And then each occupant of the sleeping porch iinds himself or herself sitting up VJ it's a r .M t.,, 0 1 a ,5 engW x'nt "J; titaisilxl uQev 1; :4 -3 in bed, badly bewildered, and won- dering whether it is the end of the world or only a lire. Then realiza- tion brushes away sleepy inco- herence and all hands gather at the window, provided the night isn,t frosty, and enjoy the concert. The general public is strong for this va- riety. Another variety is the Kappa Sig engagement serenade. These are even harder to recognize at first than the Sigma Nu kind. The Iirst impression is that there is an un- authorized student body rally being held as the boys trip merrily into line. But the strains of a gentle song quickly dispel any such idea and all fear of having to get up and join them is cast aside. The third type cannot be well classiiied by a house but samples may generally be had from the Betas, Fijis or A. T. 035. This is the harmonic series. If you are curious about the rest of the varieties, just ask any mem- ber of a house not mentioned here and you will get all the dope. When more than one girl is in a room that room at once becomes crowded. A single tMeaning only one, not unmarriedi girl is fairly quiet unless she reads out loud to herself or something wild like that, but two start talking simultaneously and together the moment they break away from the first clinching embrace. This being true, then LA VIE OREGONIENNE just. try to imagine the state of affairs around a sorority fireplace after a big dance. Of course we cannot speak from first hand experience as to this matter for the only time we came near getting in on any such affair we had just climbed half way up the wood lift when some dutiful frosh lifted the lid to get some fuel and discovered us. As a result we left muy allegro, as the musicians have a way of saying. Thus it happened that our initial venture into the missionary field resulted in dark and more or less dismal failure. . For an undertaking of that sort is a missionary act. Think of the untold good that would come about if the men could only hear what are their numerous faults and their few virtues. Think of how much money would be saved by men who do not get by but donit know it. Well might they be spending their Shek- els in a productive field where a 15 genuine smile would be their re- ward. And on the other side, just take thought of what striking reforms might be worked in our present shaky and decidedly illogical social system if the girls might listen in on one of the masculine firelight sessions at which there was a rigid censorship on verbal adjectives. Needless misunderstandings and perhaps a good deal of grief could be avoided if there was in vogue some such exchange of coniidential ideas. But then what would be the joy of pigging if you knew all about your girl and your girl knew all about you? It has been a recog- nized fact for many ages that in mystery lies enchantment. A per- son rarely falls in love with the person next door or sees as green grass in his own yard as there seems to be in the next county. And if the truth were all known about a lot of us we would have a terrible time living down our dread- ful pasts. UPI W16. .le .. S FIVE YEARS AGO DAY BEFORE YESTERDAY 16 LA VIE OREGONIENNE Mananmo PdeO Q WI" ' ya ,, , ME am; bdird. M d the "firm- HITHERTO UNPUBLISHED PICTURES OF BAIRD,S BRAVES H -, 1w"?- f ' F; .1. "3;, 15!. O - .4 -- o- u o . I 2' 1 1. n5 V. . LA VIE OREGONIENNE 17 The Chocolate Soldiers Being a Conservation Rather Than An Exaggeration Damermtic Personages Major Maneuver ...................................... Guess Cadet Major Snapoutavit .......................... Yes Army Sergeants, R. O. T. C. Captains and Lootenants, and the Motley Array of Cadets. ACT IaScene 1 tFunston Hall, 10:57 A. M. any drill day. Enter sundry cadets, wearing listless expres- sions which seem to indicate they care not at all whether Q Company gets highest in de- portment for the month or not. Scene con- centrates itself in a company room where the accoutrements of war are being donned and finally simmers down to Private Property, who is struggling with his blouseJ Private Propertya-ttWhy the Hezekiah do we have to drill outside today? Its cold enough to freeze ice. I dont see-Jl Corporal Calamity tinterruptingy a tiYeah, welll be lucky if we get off without having to paste a line of blackguards today." Chorus talso interruptingy-JtSome son of a somnambulist got away with my cap- blouse--blunderbuss." Answering Chorus inng heroicallyy- wWell I ain,t got it. Go tell your troubles to the band if you want to raise a racket? tEnters the 1st LootenantJ 1st LootattCOme on now, you fellows, lets get out on the line. Youlre late now and the major feels hurt when you slight his drill. I know its cold but we gotta do it and you might as well get something out of it ............ etc? . ' HThe laggard cadets straggle out grumb- lingly, bumping their rifles on the stair steps as they descendJ Scene 2 tNear the lines. Groups of dejected fight- ing men stand about shivering, hands in pockets. Commissioned officers chat among themselves as pleasantly as a supposed West Point posture will allow. Major Maneuver stands aloof, watching for salutesJ Major M.attCaptains, reform your com- panies." Captains tin chorusyattYes, sir, welll try, sirll, tAccompanied by much glitter of cheese knives and attendant risk to officers noses and all spectatorsj First SergeantsattA, B. C, or D, as the case may be, Company, on the line. Come on 110W, hurry it upaFall in !-Right ............ dressingl-Out on the extreme center ........ Thatls good, hold it ............ Fro-n-n-t!" . Platoon Sergeants-flInspecian-"armiesI Order ............ guns IaCorporals ........ report 1, 1st CorporalattBangll, . 2nd CorporalattSquab number two, nine men absent? 3rd CorporaL-ttSquaw number three, two present besides myself." 4th Corporal-tNo responseJ 1st Platoon SergeantattFirst Platoon, all present or discounted for." 2nd Platoon Sergeant-ttSecond Balloon, mostly accounted for." 1st Sergeanta ltTake your postures." tTurns to Captain and salutesJ tlSir, the company awaits!" CaptainattSo I perceive, take your post, too? tAddresses companyy ttMen, welve got the best company. You all know it. Look what we did last term. N ow, lets see if we cant do better yet this term. Therels no reason why we shouldnlt be honor company next month. All you have to do is to keep up the old fight and we have it? tCheer from 2nd Looiey. ttNow, welre going to have a batallion spelling match next week and I want to see 20, no, 50 men from this com- pany try out for that team. Thereis a hand- some aluminum drinking cup with a pocket case offered as a prize and believe me, men, it sure would be worth the effort to win it. Now, before we take our place in line I want to get the names of all those men who want to compete in the try-outs." tPasses down the line looking for volunteers. Two goofs and a 1st lootenant sign upJ Captain-JtNow, letls put some snap in the drill today and act like you had an interest in itaCompany ........ tenshun I-Squaws rite ........ harshl-aHun, to, 3, hun, 2, three, and one more, hut, hut.-Get that cadence, mena Dress up those piecesaLetis gold ACT II-Scene 1 tCompanies are drawn up in batallion front. Captains have just finished reporting to adjutant, who turns to the officer of the dayJ Adjutanta-ttSir, the Italian is deformed!" O. O. D.-ttWhat a pity, but take your seat." tMuch palaver intervenes and finally the band is brought to a misspent life and the review starts. The band is playing as many tunes as it has instruments and each com- pany has a step all of its ownJ Captain of 1st CoatClymleft ........ hurch! aStraight up to the corner men. Dont give way. Make a square turn, cant you ?aCatch that step in the second platoon-Hun, tu, dree, 4.aFirst platoon ............ squadrsi ............ harchaStep right off with the full 30-inch pace, menaUp on the outsideaEasy nowa Glance out of the corner of your eye to the right but donit lookaGuide is rightaltts a good line men, hold it laEyes ............ right." tSilence for a short time, them HRibysquaz ............ no.--...-.....as you was..--..--Front.--.-...-... you to watch these little things and see if you cant do better next time. Now I wish to announce that X Company has been adjudged to have had the most submissive and do-as- youire-told-and-ask-no-questions group of cadets in the batallion and will therefore be honor company for the coming month. tLoud cheers of iiWhen do we eat ?i, from the other three companiesJ Now I believe Ma- jor Snapoutavit has a few words to say before the captains take charge of their companies? Major SetNow, men, that review was rotten, absolutely rotten. It was worse than that. It was perfectly paralyzing. Youlre rotten. Snapoutavit and letis see you go. Now, itis only five minutes to twelve, so we got ten minutes to drill yet. tHearty groans from-all sidesj Captains, take charge of your companies and give then ten minutes of snappy manual of arms drill? 18 LA VIE OREGONIENNE I Ribysquaz ............ harchl ............ Remember the ACT IIIe-SCWW 1 , ,1! four short StepS-One, tWO and three, f0ur- tCompanies are scattered over landscape. "-1? Collymleft ............ harsh!-One, two, three, From all sides emanate commands of, fRi- waltz, one 2, 3, Step -------- hut, hutV, shoulder... ...... rnarch l-Port Wine; ...... drlnk! tCompanies draw up in a hollow square --At trall', rlght dress, ........ 31.31116 rePresent gm J...- :1 with Majors Maneuver and Snapoutavit in -------- arms.-Absent.. ------- arrns. . V'.:Il"" ?.o the centerJ tSubclued mutterlngs thlpplb tEhIrough tllgli 3+1 "3.1'0' Maj or M.-itYou did pretty good that time, ranksgc t Ingtsi-Qt?sggalfre 13: p111 tti Egg? my :1: v" n . .,. but there are a few things I want to call your 353537182158 i333 morning."eiiWe were going :- ".1, 0 $231: lggtgggiiggifgibai?els giexhg 21;: to have beans and, tomatoes for lunch today I! y... La tentioneNow, as I was saying;f you did 13583137 Iglylziiiibla 15:29:: gleinmgofngqfegng much, but " , W"... t " well but ever one was out o ste , an e , ' . . i 9" .. . lines were pretty ragged when theypwent past At 12106 M3301" Maneuver deS lmagln- ' Pi": n! n0 me, and one of the platoon commanders for- ative ClI'CleS 1n the Ellr Wlth h1S left llttle ,. 'gK '". got to give eyes right when he went past the finger. The companies are rushed on the t M. v: .v w 4" reviewing stand, and your rifles were all double to h.IS VICII'llty. When they have been V held crooked, and I noticed a good deal of properly allgned he prepares t0 speak. ' . N." t " 0' talking going on in the ranks, and hardly Major M.eii1 forgot to tell you that an in- 11.391 .unwv a "b any of you had your eyes off the ground and spector from the Slow Ham Company will ' u "a some of you were not in uniform. I want be here next Saturday and I want to see every e , ml ' cadet looking his best for the occasion. The ' inspection at that time will take the place of ' a l!" Sundayis drill and the batallion will be graded by the Department of Labor on its results. Now I want everyone to be sure to be there. Now it is not quite time for dis- missal, but I,ll let you go early today ............ Captains, dismiss your companies? tCompanies march to their point of for- mationj CaptainseiiFirst sergeants, dismiss the companies Iii i 1st Sergeants-iiYessirinspectionarmsport armsdismissed Pi And with a roar the mighty forces of democracy surge and billow into the barracks and dash off to belated and hungry one oiclocks. Another of lifels battles has been fought! Curtain. . SAMPLE VIEWS OF ARMY LIFE a II c J l' .4" r I; 5! r L. f!!!" .. i;- ,5: LA VIE OREGONIENNE KAYDET RULES iTho h-- be doeei 1. Each unfortunate kaydet is required to inyend military destruction for four i4l hours per week accord- ing to the weather. 2. Kaydets will be given demerits for the following: No. of Damerits no. of Damerite shined shoes 20 Breathing shampoo 5 out of step 5 6 7 Dr0pping eyelids 27 Red necktie 10 saluting officer Slang 8 9 5 Flat feet 11 Borrowing smokes Looking intelligent 5 stepping On terrain 3. A kaydet will be passed for three izl attendances at demilitary construction. 4. A kaydet will be promoted for every ten demerits. 5. A kaydet who has been promoted three times will be reported to the Secretary of the navy and commissioned a Reverse Ensign. BY ORDER OF THE COMMONGINK. PRESENT THIS SLIP TO THE TWO-BIT BOSS WHEN YOU DRAW YOUR OVERCOAT. UBXSOL MILITARY DEPARTMENT 'UNIVERSITY OF OREGON Eugene Special Order NO. 15 l. cadet Esprit de corps is hereby transferred from the University Battalion to Fort Leavenworth. 2. Corporal shiny Chevron is hereby promoted to the grade of private, effective this date. 3. NO drill today, Sunday. BAIRD,S MANUAL, REVISED BUT NOT REVERENCED 20 LA VIE OREGONIENNE tiWAITER, WHERE ARE THE EGGS FOR THIS HAM?" The Old-Fashioned Sunday By E. J. H. Sundays in these parts are passing strenuous. What with taking the lady out for exercise, groom- ing for the event and securing a few morsels of food in the scant intermissions the modern young college sprig puts in a full day. As I see the hustle and going on about me I sigh for the old-time Sunday. Do you remember it? If ibourzshwahi, you do. Do you remember coming stumbling down the stairs at some late hour in the forenoon tyou, being the young scionethe tender branchethe fragile limbethe unfolding bud, are allowed to sleep lateY? As you step into the living-room the negligee atmos- phere of this day of rest assails you, plus the aro- matic spirits of coffee and the rest of the breakfast menu tpork and sausage if you are a stevedores son eShredded Hay if you are of intellectual ancestryy Ma tells you to hurry and eat sois she can turn her attention to getting dinner. Pa, in the easy chair reading the paper, makes sarcastic remarks. Pa is dressed in the usual day-of-rest costume, sans shirte with suspenders draped over his' hips, cris-crossed in French fourragere fashione-and plus a pair of heelless mandarin slippers tmotheris Christmas pres- enti that he removes and carries in his hands when moving about. He needs a shave and is very much aware of the fact and gets distinctly irritated whenever reminded of it. He is firmly planted in his chair and wont stir. tMother is the only worker in this hive of Seventh Day dronesy Over near the iireplace the cat regards you with a look of supreme ennui, having long since passed the purring stage. His back tthe catsy is turned to the fire and his tail is perilously near the flames-but he is too lazy to get up and drag it out of danger. You eat and retire once more to this cell of indo- lence, flop down on the floor and reach out for the Sunday paper, scattered about, grunting with each effort. Later, mother comes in and drives Pa off to the bath-room to get cleaned up. He goes, grumbling at each step. You hear the splash of water, the clink of the shaving-mug, the islap-slap, slap-slapi of the razor on the strop. Then a brief silenceethen a Jscratchi - more stropping - another iscratchI-still more stropping-a potent silence, followed by an ominous undertone. Out he comes. iiDot dash and carry four! Johnny! have you been using my razor again? uNo, Paeununhf, you deny with wide-eyed inno- cence. In fact, this is one of the few times when you werenit guilty. Now, don,t lie to me, young man? "No, sir, I didn,t use it-,, A serene voice wafts through the door. "Now, Dick, don't be foolish. You always carry on over that old razor of yours. I used it to cut a bit of string with, and Iim sure it didnit hurt it any. Be- sides you can always sharpen it again, can,t you?'i Years have not taught mother the sacredness of the razor. Women seem particularly obtuse in that one respect. iiG-rrrrV says Pa, stalking back to the bath-room. For the next half hour the sounds of stropping and scraping alternate, then the Head of the House emerges, red faced but devoid of whiskers. He dresses and you do likewise, and an atmosphere of benign calmness descends over the- room, the pre- dinner calm. In the evening the family sits on the porch. Mother gossips with Mrs. Harvey next door. Pa pulls away on a cigar tthe decadence of the nickel cigar has not yet set im watching the lawn-sprinkler abstractedly. Then mother pulls a diplomatic boner. til declare, I forgot to order eggs from the grocery Saturday and we havenit a thing for breakfast." Pa arises with alacrity. iTll go and have Tom Nutter open his store and give me a dozen or soft he says eagerly, stumbling over the cat on his way for his hat and coat. Late that evening he comes creeping home after a happy session in the rear room of the corner barber shop. He is well ballasted with beer bubbles and carries a package in his hand. But it is not eggs. Heid forgotten what the desired article was and, as the one best bet, had brought home fifteen cents worth of dog-meat. Happy days! These fast and furious and sanitary Sundays may be all right. But Pm tbourzshwahf I sigh for the oldtime Sunday. LA VIE OREGONIENNE rilk xmril J a a THEY DON T ALWAYS ACT LIKE THIS 22 THE REVUE OF REVUERS Dramatics at the University of Oregon are divided into two parts, the actors and the audience. Of all these the greatest is the first part, for they have to come Whether they want to or not. The second is, algebraically speaking, a variable quantity which approaches less than one as a limit. 4. g7. ' i .lgl .35. 75' ll .41: : '5 . mmm- Perhaps one of the greatest treats given the regu- lar theatregoers during the last year was when Norvelle Thompson appeared in ttHaste." He was not hasty enough, however, and missed his car and as a result had to walk down town in the rain. A patter of applause and raindrops swept the street as he made his debutante upon the scene. . Another of the notable productions of the decadent theatrical season was Burnhard Pshawts HPigamil- lion." While the plot was so badly stretched that it resembled a three-year-old Boston sock supporter more than anything else, it was still of an ulterior character. Much of its success was due to the finessey and charm of A. Fergusibald Ready and W. Manflivver Michael, who were in turn put across by the emotional acting 0f Mm. Rose McGrew, Who by the way, claims that she is not related to Dan. It might be possible for the ideal politician to pig a million but critics are unanimous in their opinion that the average man has trouble in taking care of one one-millionth that many. guny-u AM The iiickering screen may have its Anita Stewart but Guild hall has Irene. A play without her would be like California without sunshine or wine grapes. Then too, or maybe three, there is Loon Keeney. Few men on the legitimate stage can equal the cosmopol- itan air with which he lights a cigar or cigarette. His face is his fortune and he still has carfare. LA VIE OREGONIENNE Special emphasis must be laid to the quiet artistic lighting effects Which appeared at the beginning of each act and the end of the same. Such harmonic conglomerations of innocent ray is seldom seen this side of Antofagasta. tFrom a current review of a late playJ But there is always something to find fault with in the best regulated stages and here is our kick on this. Very few men go to these plays unless they are accompanied by a girl. Then Why out down the pronts on each performance by running up the light bill? Just leave the curtain down and the lights out. Give the public What it wants when it wants it. Little need is there for us to name over the achieve- ments of such grand old men of the stage as John Houston, Robert Earl, G. Stearns, Oh. Fudge, and the rest. They speak for themselves. And now we pass on, out of harmts reach. it it it Miss Turney announces that a recent census of the English language reveals the fact that the word ttstill" was used 4,258,416y5 more times than ttyet" in the past two years. "THE PURPLE BANDA NNA" GUS REDDIE IN it""'! I? JH; h o :i t u ,. 3 u a s a it. h If! v.1 r . WI , a .i . . Ir u .w 0w 6 h . h 5 .v p C! t it I I ! 51d t . i. u t'iu ' , .94 Kandy" MG , .u a 'Eri; g vtlJ-Q h i lino" , mu 4" ' Jt ,., q 1 3"" i. u: t -' stmm' "'1 . . . lHu-r '" ' ru- H In 9,1: 5' , g.;.gl "- L. V311 W' .i .. l u ,wyoum .m t "h ' lka-i n OH 0' LI f nary gilu ' t.- mn "eh " '3- l'svw '" .- N tar! luau." I.' ml 11$: "Hutu. a sum gov i'd. 10. 1M": dn-QI m In "I M4 U hhvm I Jh- mu noun 1 nine. haw. 'aO wdu hh "U M u h ' 3 IV? Cub . '93- tm lug....h N." In... h. w, j" u m .n ".. .q$ Mun WHO! hi. .4 .. MFR"- l I MORE OR LESS SERIOUS Gamma Phi BetaeltThree Faces West? When a house full of girls gets set down between a street numbered 13 and by any chapter of Sigma Chi you can bank on something happening all the time. The play is adapted from Horace Greeleyis th0 West, my son!" In addition to the triangular lead, there is an excellent chorus, led by Gen Clancy and supervised by Blondie Nelson. Bob Earl is seen at his best in the role of the dash- ing young gallant and Jack Dun- dore plays the villain with the rest of the Kappa Sigs for stage hands. The Sigma Chi and Fiji members of the cast are taken for granted. The moral is, ttHe who calls up last gets left." A A A Phi Gamma DeltaetlTammany Today." In this tragedy of modern politics as they are attempted, Johnny Houston, in the cellar role, tries to carry off a difficult piece of murder with his old time zipper. The moving motive which works silently behind the scenes appears to be Lyle McCroskey, political past master. Several Chi Omegas are involved in the plot, which has some deep designs. It is a prob- lem play of the first order. The problem in point is, ttHow do they get away with it or do they?" Some rather original costumes are worn with blase effects by the under- studies. Gallery seats in the west side of the house give the best view of the borrowed chorus. A A A Alpha Tau Omega-"Chink Cooks Chow." The racial question from an economic standpoint. George Hopkins for once forgets his love for musical comedy and faces the bills with a serious mien. A blg riot scene in the third act furnishes the thrills. Verne Fudge, Sid Bur- leigh and the rest of the Kappa habitues precipitate the fight by challenging the other three-fourths 0f the house, the Alpha Phiers, to immortal combat. Bunk Short thereupon leaves presto-like, say- ing he has no raisins in the brew. The battle goes eleven revolutions to a scoreless victory for both sides. The brothers then rush off to their respective fair ones to re- cite their deeds of valor into a re- ceptive auditory organ, leaving Vlrg LA VIE OREGONIENNE wbtsiwwbt Cameron to sweep out the teeth and scrub the blood from the fur- niture. All of which is a digres- sion from the main theme that no matter how rank the rest of the food may be, the rice will always have a kernel. A A A Kappa Kappa Gammaatt27 Keys To Call Dates? A play in which every character has a character and also a key to the situation. The trouble starts when Carl Knudson sees one of the girls in a pink dress and tells her she looks like Helen Rose. Some quick Act ton follows and in the end Carl is almost Duniway with but Louise glaums on to him in a last effort to Fox his enemies, but the Gage has been cast. As he is about to meet his fate, in dashes George King, crying, "Wheres the Nicolai lostT, To his Fudge answers, "Find Mc- Kee and Ill look in the safe for it." This Evans the conversation and the hero dashes away in his Apper- son eight minutes late. There are some clever lighting and unlighting effects shown on the stage. Choice seats may be found on the porch, in the living room, den, kitchen or dining room. Make reservations early. A A A Alpha Phi-eltMaking the Grade? Here is a play with a purpose. Isa- belle Kidd demonstrates that the honor student can always find time for at least one engagement, and Ishy Hadley shows that other stu- dents can do the same in cupidical proportion. A pathetic scene is that in which Eddie Bentley pleads with the city council for the removal of four superfluous blocks between the Sigma Nu house and Hillyard street and upon being refused de- cides to go forth and seek his for- tune, determined to come back rich and build a home where he wants it. Shorty Gillis causes a near tragedy when she arouses the sis- tersi ire and is thrown in the race, but she manages to keep her nose above water and wades out. All told, it is a powerful drama. A A A Phi Delta ThetaeltAida." tpro- nounced ltEddieU-It is hard to say whether the plot is ascending or descending. It all depends on whether you start with Eddie or Hunk. At any rate there is an av- erage Marc between them. In splte of the fact that Eddie does a great deal of foul shooting, it is a clean drama and there are few casualties except among the opponents. Joe Ingram and George Stearns have the operatic parts and numbered among the athletes are such 11ttle fellows as William Henry Steers, Scotty Strachan, Ed Ward and 23 George King. Fat Pixley is the blase, debonaire, dancing man- about-town and is continually fliv- vering around. Conveniently lo- cated. Only three minutes from commerce eight dclocks. A A A Hendricks Hall-hOperator, 688." Where the average play is divided into acts this production is made up of three units and a reception room. There are also three lines in it, the girls', the telephones, and the clothes line in the basement. A most delightful place to spend a Sunday evening if you can beat Tommy Wyatt, Rolfe Skulason and Skeet Manerud to the davenport. Ollie Stoltenberg wields a leading part with gymnastic grace and is ably seconded by Wanda Brown and Ella Rawlings. Frances Hab- ersham is the mischievous tom-boy who is always cutting up. Bill Wilson is also prominent among those present and is a popular member of the chorus. Mary Spil- ler is very popular among fresh- man men. Remey Cox gets his travel experience by going to see London. A A A Susan Campbell HalletTo be re- viewed next year; we havent enough dope on them yetJ A A A Delta Tau DeltaallClan Mc- Kenna." An Irish drama, or maybe its Scotch tfor the Irish are always full of Scotch and the devil any- wayl, which possesses an appeal all of its own. What the appeal is it is left for the reader to decide. Ranie Burkhead seems to be able to take care of them all anyway, even if he has to contend with some such radicals and bolsheviskian , philosophers as Ross McKenna and Curly Lawrence. An interesting bit of logic is brought in when Rollie Woodruff decides that rather than buy another barrel of bando- line to help him get by with the women he will import a car and carry them away with a whiff of gasoline. Don Portwood has a dual fight with the high cost of feeding the brothers and the high height of jumping. Tubby Ingle, although an Amecian citizen, gives a foreign air to the play by constant intro- duction of a Copenhagen product. Noted for the number of musicians and alleged singers. Bevo, Base and Branstetter form an interesting trio. Admiral Twining gives the whole a nautical flavor. A A A COMEDY AND THINGS LIKE THAT Beta Theta Pi-tlThe Beta Row." Entertainment for all. Akers of fun, Carrols of joy, it never Waynes. With never a worry in the world, even over studies, for why study when a simple reversal of the house standings will place you at the top, this play goes mer- rily on to a happy ending. Nish Chapman and Don Feenaughty are :J 1' i! .1 - i I ' t . L. I M i 0"" w. N h V '.w . .9 J .. I I 24 LA VIE OREGONIENNE N. ; - s L." 40 " . - . u; l 1,. . ' I . the most serious ones in the bunch ing to college," says Bob Earl in his Chlnese cook die .conven1ent1y tfor 3' W 3 J. ,, J ' M.- .- and it is rumored that Nish has act. itDamn the women, play fOOt' them, DOPfOF hlmi, as It saved J 2! d w: the only really serious case. Lob balllli retorts Carl Mautz. hA prur- them paying him all hlS back .lmu H, "4,4", Kelly jazzes up the production im- pose for everything and everythlng wages. Other houses rnay have .: wkn p. , m mensely with his pianomic ability. with its purpose," answers JEFCk their llttle nip, but the Slgma Nus 'H p' . 4 u I . The big surprise comes when Pete Benefiel. JWell, nleilvs JlIlStlahljie have the onlyuk T201: 1'. . ,, n .n 'p:' ' l a e rid of the nrst thisel, egins s on re . . rt , J, r ' . , " ' alchetgd 353:8 K21371 i: the greatest "Plant your pin? states Ralph Bur- Ch!!! Omega-i You Never Can , .4 3-" m r. H r" s athletic asset the house possesses. gess. ttHave somethlng to look Tell. . This might be termed a y 3. J H.,.... 0 He writes sports. Mart Howard Iorward to," Tom Wyatt recom- historical drama s1nce it has much rt; Jul" u .. .. , . runs him a close second, but his mends. itJust act like I do," solutes to do With dates lee the dates of M. A w I . W musical voice is his greatest handi- Tommy Murphy. itCultivate a face history also they are not very cer- . ' . mt". J, . , w cap. Q. E. D. like mine and you canit help but tain until they are history. Each ,. qu. . .IM' .u I at i a have a good time," say Hubert and girls mind ought to be fresh and "Wm i t N ,. h. m .. ' Sigma ChieiiThe New Morality? Hall Smith in unison. tiRead the pure for they are changed often fixed! w W"! . ,, n.1- Mike Harris, D-D., at his worst, at Lemon Punch. I get the inoney- and enough. But there is a ray of w h ,4. w . H. .. least we hope he will never be any you get the good time," inveigles hope in the fact that the house can a .u r"' 1' ' ' , .,. . worse. He is aided and abetted in Harris Ellsworth. Many more an- boast of several chronic dates. such W i l" i' m .7. his efforts to reform the world by swers are given in the course of the as those of Maud Barnes, Mildred 76" im , Maui mm the w. k. social worker Victory production, but some of them are Lauderdale and Wanda Nelson. Per- e.;.;,zt'i' w 1.0 n l H Bradeson. Vic, with his charming censored and the rest are deemed haps the rest of the sorores 1n uni- .0; IN . l "4 1.... voice and gentle ways, draws the too widely known to need further versitate w111eventua11y1earn from ' 54' "m wit! 'i " crowds and then Mike tells them spread. it t t them how to keep one, but Why not 1.1m! "' w mw' u l4 .. the error of their ways. Regular Pi Beta PhietiGood Times." You now? A few Phi Belts and all the iuu'i" :n m a IN," . q... playgoers say, however, that they have the good time with.the girl Fijis seem to have learned the wow u! ' "rnu ,. , miss the presence of such ardent and the girl has the good tlme talk- secret of the unbreakable date but ', .m 1.. '9' l, . m .. workers as Dinty Moore, Jiggs ing you over with the rest of the the general public is still groping M .w . :4 Ju' '1 . . Leslie, and Busher Blake. Spike sisters. Applies equally to all the for it, A test will tell. iw- . .m. . m . Leslie, as an Egyptian ballet rest of the sororcities, or womenls it it 1r ' . '!I$' HUM 7...; u dancer, runs close competition fraternities as they claim to be. Sigma Delta PhieeAs You Like . 74'5 . n W, h. h... with the reform movement, how- There is only the one original Pi It." And you probably will, for u i" m. emm. W . 1. ever, and one would scarce take Phi cast, however. For instance, there is an entertaining central plot a; :n hr. MM " "t. nu him for a quiet family man. Bill there's Nell Warwick, Alice Thurs- with a corresponding set of act- , .1. an . ,. . "LJW ton and Marvel Skeels, each in a am . Ha "I personality role that sure rolls ,em. resses. One of the nicest things gem Reinhart leads the he athletes. Slim ' about it is that there is always any not H Crandall is the past master of the .4, .m .1... Spanish group, and Ray Vester Then there is Audrey Roberts, Mar- Moore and Moore. Then too, there .a f mm ' ' takes interest in and from them all. jorie Kruse and Stel Modlin and is a bright and cosy Denn in one of 1 w W an. Inn V Just what iS the peculiar signiii- that crew. Again we have the the scenes, A hint of war is f, :a- ' 3W Om .. 5.. cance of the title is very hard to steady group including Laura Rand, brought in when Bess grabs a live 1'. Ha: ha ha, Mm Bidge Thurlow, Ruth Diehl, Spud Cowgill and Lillian Pearson. A well balanced, all around cast which makes the name a reality. wire and is Shell shocked. Mar- garet Jackson adds a bit of pathos with a touching uGates Ajar" epi- sode which involves someemotion- tell from the play, but the assump- tion is that it is to wrap the thing in an air of mystery. ir it i: u: L1H!!! um; um ha . .- fn r u'd mu u' n" 5.. .2 fin many .11- twp p. t u. Kappa Alpha ThetaeiiThe Pass- ing Show of 1921f To call this passing is in a way a misnomer, for in all the years we have been here it has never shown any re. liable signs of its being left be- hind. The true meaning of the term is ttgetting byli and this the show does with a vengeance. The heroine is hard to choose but might be Lyle Bryson, Marion Lawrence, Mae Ballack, Imogene Letcher, Peggy Beatie, Dorothy Manville, Bei Wetherbee, Jessie Lewis or whoever you might happen to be in love with at the time. It is easier to pick the ttregular little rascal." Either Boom Cannon or Red Cram are eligible for this position; with Boom leading at latest reports. Only the conference rules keep their freshmen from participating in the contest. Dotty McGuire comes near getting the house disgraced when she is arrested for driving without a license, but she manages to buy the court off with ten dollars. All the girls deserve a lot of credit for keeping cheerful after they have lost the only Hope they had. - a: i: it Kappa Sigma-ttWhen we Are Young." What should we do then? 1k ik 'k Delta GammaetiJust Suppose." Suppose what? That you had a group of dramatic personages like Marion Gilstrap, Marian Taylor, Irene Stewart, Margaret Cundy, Maybelle Miller, et a1, and found an author With a play that was just written for them. Well, here it is with all the trimmings. Vivian Chandler probably has the leading part in this for she ought to be able to lead any or all of the others whether they wanted to come or not. The time for the play is lim- ited this year as last year they had two Morrows and now there is only one. Between Alberta Potter play- ing with the Iiddle and the rest of them fiddling with the play much can be said for the musical effects of this production. it t ik Sigma NuetiThe Bad Man? Just why this play should be forced off on the Sigma Nu is hard to say, at any rate it seems that at least one of their members ought to be able to fill the bill. It is too much to ex- pect that Don Newbury, Neil Mor- fitt, or Bob Sheppard should take such an unfitting part, but it is pos- sible that Herbert Rambo or some a1 acting of the highest order. They constantly refer to their domicile as their heavenly home for the rea- son that they already have their golden harps and ithalos" are con- stantly on their lips. They havenlt their wings yet, but that is prob- ably a good thing as it keeps them from being flighty. 3k i at EYE AND EAR MENT Delta Delta DeltaettThe House of the Several Gables." Featuring such well known characters as the noted Maude Adams. One of those light and frolicsome productions which delight the eye and please the ear. Ruth Griffin also takes quite a prominent share in the affair. When it comes to flashing a deadly pair of optics one Lacey Leonard steps out with a coquet- tish smile and gives the audience a vampish once-over. Plot? Man, there isn't any except a deep and dark plan to live down the likeness of the name to a w. k. cut and dried volume of Nathaniel Hawthorne. Smitzi gives a good deal of help to the production with her inimitable way and besides there's Margaret and Hildegarde ant Gertrude and ENTERTAIN- lr VD" WV l :1!!! mil 5-51 ha" i- 'mum- u 3.. lwvmw hm... .m, "l? Uh i... . t" h" Md Owe. Omar." .J h A 1'; 3!. .u- e 3 M'JJK Mr M, Why, have a good tirne, of course, other ministers son ought to be Betty and Alice and Marianne and 93 i- ..." '--. , answer the Kappa Sigs in chorus. able to carry off the part. Charley 311 the rest. Always refreshing. '9. " 'rq i H . How can you have a good time? Parsons and Ward Johnson come at at: 19c - KN h. m. '- 5..., This is the next question, and in nearest to filling the shoes of the Sigma Alpha EpsilonettScandals .1. H. m" the play eachiof the characters an- villyen. Incidentally the yellow of 1921f No the scandals are not thh' N swers it in 1118 own way. ttBy go- peril is solved by having the so much their, own as those of their 3...: 1:: M H: ' N: N L.Mz fa. " l w tn. Th I N NM 0 . xtthc1111tbt! ;T 4 t k AMMX xVx 1i x I"! t l,ily V i r; I III'I'l! 51' I fl. 3!:l ct 'c 4 1! to! g neighbors. Between the D. Gfs, the Pi Phits and the Tri Deltis and With the Zeta Rhos just up the street it is to be expected that they Should see, hear, or at least hear about a little of what is going on about them.? As Stan Eisman says in one of his lines, ttThe shades at night are pulled well down, Excel- sior carramba, but then it is a quiet town, just like the boys Phi Lambda? Corporation lawyers form a considerable group in this playlet and they generally manage to keep within the law, but once' in a while a fellow like Cack Lindley will add a little excitement by getting pinched for endangering the public with a baseball. Watson, the needle! Horton Beeman gives a demonstration of how to get honey without being stung and is always playing around with the queens. Some clever acrobatic stunts are brought in when the boys start for bed in the garage on a rainy night. The drops are dan- gerous. Thanks to Art Hicks the production is kept within class V. A A A Alpha Delta PiettThe First Year?' Meaning that it is the iirst year since Pi has been carved on their doorplate and made the official des- sert of the organization. You would never imagine from the staid exterior of the place that it housed some village cutups but just spend a Sunday night there some time in- stead of going to church. When Bee Crewdson and Naomi Robbins and the rest of them get started you had better stand from under. Kewpie Rupert manages to pre- serve her dignity most of the time, but then she lives in town and has parental influence to quiet her. Some good music, including Beuh- lah Clark with her flute notes and Vashti Hoskins with her flute-like voice. Away up among the high- grade section even if they must have their fun once in a while. A A A Friendly HallettIt Pays to Adver- tise." tReviewed from the gallery, i. e., the library stepsl. itCarlt-o-o-n Sava-a-g-g-e-e, telep-h-o-o-o-n-e! " tre- peated three timesl. This is the curtain call. The musical sound booms out over the nine otclock calm of a study night. Carl is not in his room, but as is in the base- ment stack of the library, he dashes home to answer the call. For a few seconds the stage is quiet, but for the hum of the li- brary fans and fanettes. Then an- other forensic outbreak comes ring- ing out from the building. UReme-e-y CO-O-O-X,,, demands the gentle voiced frosh on phone duty this time. "Be right do-w-w-w-n-n-nf, assures Remey, and he beats the echo to the nrst floor.' Then another phase of the siuation makes itself apparent. A bright light is seen immediately to the front and second floor center. Two arms are thrust yawningly into the air. A body rises to its feet. A book is tossed in a far corner. A necktie is LA VIE OREGONIENNE jerked off and hung up. Then a collangoes into the discard. Next a sh1rt disappears. And then, after a few minutes,- but why sp011 the show by telling all about it? The t0p step is best. Bring Your own opera glasses. A A A Baehelordon - ttLinger Longer Lookmg," A Bartholomew produc- t1on which bids well to give the race. a run for its money. The plot is Simple. The heroes slide down the neighbor girlis cellar door and the girls in turn slide down their own cellar door. Leslie Nunn wins undying glory as a coach for the Alphis baseball team. George Gul- dager also makes himself a name of the Premier variety. Early in the first scene Rolfe Skulason sneaks out the back way, saying that if he preserves credit he must always have Cash in the future, even though by so doing he belies the name of his organization, which would seem to have for its purpose the downfall of petticoat serfdom, the putting out of business of the University florist, abolishment of campus Greek matrimonial agen- cies and the Iinancial ruin of the county clerk. But whats in a name, as says Apponnoen. Consid- erably brightened up by the antics of Dan and Danny. A A A Delta ZetaeltWay Down East 13th? One of the latest revues of the year. Lamp your lamps on a lamp and the girl you lamp will be one of tem. Red Sutton used to light their path but now that each girl carries her own lighting sys- tem she feels free to live nearer the campus. In her absense Leona Marsters helps look after the Berg but she has a task to keep Jerry King and Belle Chatburn from knocking all the plaster-from the ceiling. Rose Kilkenney is also notable for her acting. Besides these there are the two Smiths and Elva, Irene and Toddy who figure in the front row. Bill Blackaby may occasionally be seen drifting on and off the stage accompanied by Elsie. If you like to be vamped this is your station. A -A A Zeta Rho Epsilon-itThe Z. Rho Hour." An infant among the old line houses but possessed of a healthy voice and a growing char- acter. Introducing the Largents and the two or three who arentt. Of course, you have to count in Ruth Tuck and her side-kick Lucile, and then there is Bee Holbrook and Daisy Gochnour to fill in between Edna and Mary and Maude. Donlt think that the zero part of the name has anything to do with the recep- tion you get here. A play to DOW der over. A A A Phi Delta Phia-"Within the Law." Little is known of this except that it literally lives up to its name. Jory Kenneth Armstrong is the strong arm man of the crowd and no pun intended. The less that is 25 QUITE LOGICAL 26 said about them, the smaller the chance of having one of them sue this publication for libel. i 3k ik Chi PsietiSeventeen." Present- ing George Shirley, Who first starred in itSweet Sixteen." At latest press reports the title is to be changed to one more shortly. Sparkling with pearls of oysters, thought and wisdom. Cast includes such notables as EX-president Tay- lor. Michelson is so rich that he shows money to Byrne, but quickly regrets it. A noble sentiment is uttered by Hoyt; Kay is standing with him and as a pretty girl passes by Brother Hoyt says, "Look before you, Leep." As he pulls this the curtain drops and the guilty party leaps for shelter without a look. LA VIE OREGONIENNE Phi Sigma PiritWestward Whoa." Red Logan and Ig Moore put on an act all of their own out where there is nobody to disturb but the neigh- bors. Johnny Anderson manages to supervise the orchestra With the aid of Bolton at the piano. Pete Allen adds to the journalistic tone of the show with his facile type- writer. If it wasnt for Logan the show would never be in danger of being pinched. He ought to wear a ttPhez" instead of a sombrero. it i Vk Delta Theta Phi. -e tiLawrelli." Supposed to be strictly within the law, but it hinted that a declara- tion of intentions is all that is nec- essary. Art Berg pulls 01f. most of the big league stuff and he is closely tracked by Russell Morgan, who at least has the voice to cheer him on. Boasts of two bugs and a pair of roller skates among the properties of the production. Very litle inside dope has as yet been given out by their press agents. ik ik it Kappa Theta Chi-itA Fowl There Was." Said fowl used to go under the name of Owl but the American Tobacco Company sued for breach of copyright, and a change was forced. Don Davis manages to hold his voice down in his part but most of the others have been commented on by the neighbors. Disturbances are quite usual about seven a. In. each morning, but since the Betas and Chi Omegas got used to it they donlt complain. Jacobson and Say are involved in a continual controversy over which is the bet- ter Ole. hf. X r M cam: ?XM 7W , . A K "WW: h W..i 'I W 4X4 1,0?ny x4, 4- EX "e Vb ANOTHER POST SYSTEM THAT NEEDS ABOLISHING FAMOUS SAYINGS OF FAMOUS PEOPLE AN AWFUL NOTE Hopkins-Xes, her voice has a remarkable range. I belleve she could even reach the top note on a J ewish piano. Stearns-What is the difference between that and an ordinary piano? Hopelt has two more notes. StearnseWhy is that? HopeBecause it wouldnt be complete without an I key. sityey iiFor the ultimate good of the Univer- iiThe biggest and best in the history of the Un1vers1tyeii tiYou did, did youeti iiNow if Mister So-and-so would only vake up ve might go ahead-,i itYou might say-" GOOD TRAINING FOP. FORMALS 28 LA VIE OREGONIENNE SPRING. The Winter days are cold and dreary, And heat in summer makes me weary, The autumn days may have a zip, But listen, and PH spill a tip. If you would Win some fair young thing Just fill her date book for the spring. Then seat her in the old canoe, Of course not With her back to you, And then start paddling up the stream With manly stroke and lots of steam, Until you find a shady nook And thereupon forsake the brook. You spread a blanket all out nice, If folded once it Will suffice, You then sit down With cris-crossed feet And start in talking love mtoot-sweet." Moralehlf you cant win them in the spring, Therels something wrong, youlve lost your Zing? e J oe King. it it sk There are just three classes of college stu- dents; those Who are always worrying for fear they wont make a I average, those Who are in constant dread of flunking out and those Who have a good time. OH, LAWS Harris-Did you know Lyle Bryson has a father-in-law ? Has--Awgwan, she isn,t married. Harris-I know that, but her father is an attorney. s s s DID YOU EVER SEE- Carlton Savage? J immy Meek? J ohnny Gamble? Elmo Madden? Francis Beller? a it it YES, AINlDT IT? Dick-When I was in New York I heard the name of one Oregon product on every- bodyls lips. Dickye-What was it? Dick-Loju! fr it WHYe Is there a ttyl, on Deady? Does a porch swing? Make professors feel cheap by being able to answer any question they may ask you? Is anything? Are eight dclocks? Why, why, Why, Why, Why? TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR ANSWER OREGONIENNE' 1TWAS EVER THUS They had been To a dance And although He Had really wanted To keep on dancing Until there was Only time enough Left To hurry home before 11:15 She said that SHE Was tired So they stopped, And on the way 'Up Willamette street He asked her if She didn"c feel Hungry And she said she wasntt Very but that she WouldnT mind A cup of hot chocolate, So they turned in At the Rainbow And after a half hour or so Their order was Taken And then she decided LA VIE OREGONIENNE MORE HASH, BUT TAKE IT THIS TIME That a Clubhouse Sandwich Would make the chocolate Taste better And it was 10:57V2 then, So he did Some quick figuring And after mentally Deducting four-bits For a taxi he Ordered an ice cream cone A la mode For himself and bought A box of matches With the odd change From the war tax And the next day he Found out That she had been late Anyway and Had lost the date He had with her for The next week-end And not until then did He realize that LOVE Was just like WAR. -Ive Ben Thereto. 4,5 M . ' V 65; mu! :1 kid The I G004: 3' Anlilmr BOW? 5 5 L Ou7nna'3-Gc'xf . FLOCKS OF THEM LA VIE OREGONIENNE WW ONE OF THESE WAS HARD TO GET , LITERARY CRITICISM Ernye-What did you think of my latest story? AinyeToo much like my bank account. Erny-Howts that? AinyeOverdrawn. i 1' 'A' HLives of bookworms all remind us That we too could get good marks, And departing leave behind us Statues in the public parks." i 1k 3k MORE TRUTH THAN POETRY Nelson English was looking in the Window of a trunk shop down town one day. thome 1n and buy a trunk? said a salesman at the door. ttBuy a trunk; What for ?tt asked Nels. ttTo put your clothes in." ttWhat do you think this is, the Garden of Eden ?" n i' i: AND THEY CALLED IT SUICIDE PohticianeWhy dont you get off the fence and take one side or the other of the question? ' VotereBecause I knew a fellow once Who 1s dead now because he took the wrong side. Politician-Which side did he take. VotereHerpicide. HEARD AT THE MENtS GLEE "Thatts right, make tern do it over again until they get the blamed thing right? said an old gentleman, as the singers came out in response to an encore. i wIr i' ttRub a dub dub, three frosh in the tub, What a j olly sight to seeett i it it THE THREE BIG CAMPUS NOISES J immy Gilbert Vic Bradeson Mutt Naterlin. ak it i The latest one they tell on Dean Straub is that one day he came back from lunch early and seeing a sign on the door, ttWill be back at two otclock," he sat down to wait for him- self. i' i Vk Just because Floyd Bowles it is no sign that he is related to George Bohler. i' i' it ONE NEVER KNOWS Art-I helps onets grades does I not? ArthureII too. LA VIE OREGONIENNE One are flu: dams .. Alike 191.3 con" J '1ch $0M! pair'. 'L. 1101 I l" 77 .4, f 777 . Ofcrae, EVERY PICTURE TELLS A STORY LA VIE OREGONIENNE QUAINT PHASES 0F CAMPUS LIFE Since the city council passed the ordinance The new Armory is the Saturday Evemng prohibiting baseball playing on the street the Post of a good many students. Fijis have never let the Patterson school children have the playground to themselves. 3 fr it it It is understood that Volstead has intro- duced a bill into Congress to change the name of Tennysonts ttCrossing the Bar" to ttCross- ing the Soda Fountain? Prety soft for him! . a N u'mQtf One of the college students greatest prob- lems IS Whether to love, honor, or to play. i h ak "At leaet I can say that I made one big splash Whlle I was in college? said the drip- ping frosh, as he climbed out on the bank on the millrace. it i' it Most of the lapdogs you see trotting down the etreet at the end of a dainty chain are leadlng a misspent life. JAG NOT THAT YE BE NOT JUGGED LA VIE OREGONIENNE mm: m. 13 mm m mt? a m'x, ', x . ' ' ,' Aha an open am swxmming pool and board waif: A .m. 1coimebafnchf ioij ,fbeaLucky Sfmkers'." KNOW YOUR UNIVE RSITY 536 LA VIE OREGONIENNE 1311th anh JHiPlh National Honorary Society for Co-education Majors Founded at the University of Eden, January 1, Year 1 guning Smitty, 0111111111111 Installed October 2, 1876 PORCHERS IN FACULTATEM Jean Don Straub, Hennery D. Sheldon, R. Carlton Clark, E. Sutherland Bates, F. Georg G. Schmidt, Louie H. Johnson. FIELDERS IN UNIVERSITATOO 1921 E. Robert Durno, Banty Mautz, Bartemus Loughlin, Johnny Dundore, Joseph Ingram, Senor Don Davis, Scotchy Scratchin, H. Lobbe Kelley, Sing Sing Hopkins, Fatima Pixley, Bibulius Carl, Ishy Had- ley, Silky Bryson, Anamaigh Bronough, Jenny Clancy. 1922 Waign Ake11s,Art1ess Can1pbell,H0wa11d Staub,A1falfa Hayslip, Neddie Twining, Dicky Sunde- 1eaf,K. A. T.Bu11gess, Boscoe Hemenway, Jane T West, Dotty Manville, Awdray Roberts, Mild Red Apper- son, Mary Anne Dunham, V. V. V Coad 1923 J.Ka11efree King, Floyds Maxwell, 0 B.Obe11teuffer, Fat Carter, Art Sekund Base, G. Killem King, Goode English, Hapwell Hazard Toms Murphy and Wyatt, Maggie McGill, Vivy Matson, Mary N. Linn, Mu11e1 de Bater,C.Ga1e Acton, LeeLaign West. 1924 Dugless Far11e11,Pa1my Palmer, Ed de Edlund, Jazz McCune, Otto Buss D0ug1as,Stehl Modlin, Iam The Smith, Margaret Kappa Alexander. "U m R .w. 4 M W"'N mt W' f. war 34! LA VIE OREGONIENNE 37 ' l Alpha Phil Parc ktVS ......,, . MN... , mekww A ..' MX Vw' ' Ruc' 0 : P aw ay. ; N n... .. , Skakc ii WM; wau+sfo $4; dignhffed f A FEW MEMBERS OF PORCH AND FIELD 38 GREAT GUESSING CONTEST What state educational institution in Ore- gon does this picture represent? It is really very simple and any person familiar With the state should be able to solve it. For each cor- rect solution the contest editor Will give a steel plated darning needle as a prize. Con- test closes February 29, 1924. Any answers naming Oregon, Monmouth, or the State School for FeebIe-minded Will not be con- sidered. it i' 'k SAFETY FIRST, LAST AND ALWAYS Fire Marshal tinspecting Delt houseye And What other precautions have you taken in case of fire? Portwood-eWe have the house insured for twice as much as it is worth. it iz 1k THIS IS TERRIBLE Kenels that a bicycle Ceney has? Curly-No, that ,s a Fariss Wheel. LA VIE OREGONIENNE BACK TO NATURE tTm homeless and want a place to stay," said the lost little beaver. ttThatts all right, I dont give a dam," said the hard-hearted brute he was talking to. i i i' FAMOUS WITS To Half . E. J. H. 1k if 'k The campus is so croWded With flowers and shrubs now that if they put in any more they Will have to be in folding beds. i' it it ttThe flowers that bloom in the spring Tra-la, Have something to do With the race, Tra-la." 1k ii i It would seem that the new schools of mu- sic and education should be under the direc- tion of the Extension Division. They are far enough out of town. ' it i it Help Wanted-Small boy wanted to rock porch swing. Preferably deaf, dumb and blind. Call 835 between noon and midnight. HEAD WHAT A UNIVEHSHY PHUFESSEIH HA5 TEI SAY" IJF FLUHIIJA FL'EAU ttBefore taking your marvelous prepa- ration the accompanying photo speaks for my condition of health. Now, after having taken several kegs of your de- lightful liquid, I be What I am today. Florida Flt Eau is, in my opinion; next to Cuban Coneyyack in medicinal and exhilirating powers." Signed, A. Believer. FLORIDA FUEAU BREWING COMPANY Jacksonville, Florida i! b'w l . 'g '1'." .u'f ' .1wa0 t. "M M9 'U: water Weir's HA2! ' 9" ,. hm ???th hm! hi Jun ftkph'II Fm... f. Jamar. wt Mama: .10. HOSTELRY a L 551 'Mme n .m 053-, me 5 INullIIIlIIllllHlIIIIHIIHIIHIHIIIIIIIIIIllllIllllI!!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIllllllllllllllIlllIIIHIIIIillllllllIIIIlIIIIIIIIillllIII!!lllHIHlllIllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIlIIny; QIHHHHHIHHHHIHHHIHHHIHHIHHJIHIHIHIHIHIHIHIHIHHHH!I'HHHHHIHIHIHIHHIIHHIHIHIHHIHIHIIHHHHIII!IHIllIHIHIllHHIHIHHIHIHIHll!IllllHIIIIHIIIIHHIHHIHIHHIHIHIIIIIIIIIIIHIllllIIIHHIIIIIIIJHIHIH LA V'IE OREGONIENNE CANOLES SCHOOL OF ORATORY ttWe teach you to talk" Under the personal supervision of JOHN t CANOLES Pupil of Professor William Manford Michael Take our course and learn how to talk a nickel out of a pay telephone. Results, ' affirmative or negative, are assured. 4'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1HIIHHIWIIHIIIHIIIIIIIHIHIlillIIIHIHHHIIIIIIIIIIEIIIHIwHIlllllllIllllIllllllllllllllllllllHlllIlllllllillllHlllllHllIHIIIHIIlllllIlHllIlllllll A. T. O. HOSTELRY The place for you to stay Central location in respectable com- munity. J ust across street from church. Far away from noises and distractions of campus. Congenial companions and good, Wholesome food. Only four blocks from Obakts and the armory. 316 $ :1: s Under exclusive management of ALPHA TAU OMEGA, Ltd. ttAt the sigh of the Maltese cross" N hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm WIIHHllllllllIIllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllIIIIlllllIlllllllilllIIIIIIIIIIlIlIII!IIIIllllIllI'IlIIIIIHHIIIIIIllllllll'IllilllllllllHllllIIIllIIIIllllHHIIllIIlIlllIlllIlle a WIKIIIIIHIIIIHllHIlllllIIIIIIHiIIIlIIIIIIHIIIllIlillllilllllllHlllIIlIlIIlIIIHIHIHIIllHlllllIllllllilllllllliil'liilllHHllHUI!IllIHIIIHIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIHHHIIHIIIHIIIIIIIIIIHIIIHIHIIIIIHIIIHHIiiilllHllHHIHHIHIIIIIIIIIIHIIHIIHI t. 40IHIHIHHHIHIHHHIHIIHIHIHllHIHIHIllllHlIHi!1I!IIIHIHIHIIlIIHIHllllllllHiillllllllllllllllIlHIHIIHIHIllllllIlHllllIlllilHIlIllIIllIllIllIlllIlllIIIIllIIIIIIIHIIIllHIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIllIIIIIIIHIIIHIHIHH AGENTS! MAKE BIG MONEY! . A few select agencies still open for 11ve salesmen in a good college town. You can make your way through school selling this remarkable new invention. Every man will need one and every W0- man Will want one. SLOT AND ARROW WILL INDICATE PELATJVE POSITION T0 PLATE The Automatic Table Implement In- dicator is the greatest invention since the stone toothpick. Invaluable to the . social man and absolutely a necessity to any one Who would like to be a tea - fighter. A simple twist of the wrist tells you What to do, When to do it, and Why it is being done. No more hesitancy over What to do before the waiter comes. Can be concealed in the palm of the hand and used in secrecy. Price, $19.98, F. O. B. Mesapotamia. IHE IABLE SURPRISE 80. Carl Newbury, Mgr. Sigma N u Apartments, Eugene, Oregon 40 LA VIE OREGONIENNE Can You N ame These Men ? One is president of the student body. You can tell him by the careworn expression. Another is a well-known track man Who has to wear glasses in order to see his competi- tors far behind him. There is also a business manager of the Emerald in the group. He is the man With the philanthropic face and 0ne-way pocketbook. Still another is a famous athlete. He is a Starr in all that Which he attempts. DO YOU REMEMBER THEIR NAMES ? If not it is a sign that your memory is failing. It is then time to write for our great book on iiFading Memories and How to Brighten Them? $5.00, C. O. D. STRAUB SCHOOL OF SCIENTIFIC SYSTEM Eugene lottorBohnI "h h- v- - PE 34TH, SN! Dil'h W932: fan: Fm; 5cm law :hn'" um i9: .121 fruit!!! :0 fan A V'. nu g. 503115 um: IQ huiun: 2'...h-y ".wltNl LA VIE OREGONIElVNE University Infirmary 21-22 ' $?5332 222 2 :2 27: ' , 2.32.: 42 :22 M 5425022222,". 2, . a 2 Doctor Bohn Sawyer, Proprietor When sick, sicker, or in need of medi- cal attention, stay away from here. Our motto, ttKill or cure; its all the same to us? A well-equipped, sanitary and scientifi- cally mis-managed medical plant. Pa- tients provided With all the latest religi- ous periodicals and clerical service is thrown in free. A doctor for every pa- , tient and every patient With the same doctor. CELEBRATED SHORTS Weight. Circuit. Frank. Skirts. 2k 5K :k 2: ltHowe, can I leave thee ?" sang the Eng- lish student Who wanted to leave a lit class to meet a train. V it it i SUCH IS LIFE A Freshman never Realizes How cocky he acts Until he is A Sophomore And then He starts thinking That he is Pretty well along In the world for Year or so, . And by the time He gets it all Out of his system He is An Alumnus. Hey, You! llYoullre just the man Pm looking for. Come on over and PH talk to you. What is it? Thatls a secret, just look me up. Illl tell you then? LOON KEENEY llThe Man of Mystery" ,. MW 42 LA VIE OREGONIENNE :55, 1111px .34' w 2"? H?! W . a "X. . , ":73 0 "I t 1 I 0.5 '7' ,5 0 'i . 't 1. ' "a1" , t gx?t3' I I I I . 'H i . - 1- w; Umversuty of Oregon Matrimonial Agency 1 . W 1 PLANTER OF PINS 1.11111, 111.1,..11:-.:: . 1. If you don,t win a Wife While attending this institution, you are to be considered an eX- .,- ernJ '1 1: .. .- v. cebtion. Three engagements every 24 hours is an average record for our establishment. snip"... rs . 1 ' Results guaranteed very indefinitely. They sometimes last. 1 : IJ. 11 u ' 1 Clothes Don't Make the . 1 Man 3 , Vu it 3 But just the same they go a long way toward making f a '1' . him look well dressed or not. A neat and trim appear- V 0 w 8 3w ance means much in business life. X1: 1 1 ttBe neat, not gaudy? advised somebody some time , 1.5 .x 3 ago. And that is what we strive for in our ham tail- ., 3 3 9' orded suits. 3 The suit shown here is one of the latest and yet most two I or I - . . conservative models in years. The coat is cut full and " t' rdnA roomy. Will not bind at the knees. Four buttons, two on each side. Guaranteed 5000 miles. Your clothier $3.3 1 Will show it to you. .7;ng 307' J l 3531?:Prl .4"! I; FEENAUGHTYS FASHION FAIR firem' i??33--i ;': Sole Manufacturers. ii him "wining: Ii. Dlnuit. hut LA VIE OREGONIENNE v DARK MOMENTS McCroskeyis Moonlight Waltzes. The night of the eclipse. The last week of each term. it i: it THIS NEEDS PATCHING CarnyeDo you know that J 0e Turpin is Violating the federal constitution every day? Barney-How? Carny-He wont let the students have freedom of the press. ir 'k 'k The length of a mile is inversely propor- tional to whom you are walking with. ik i: it Never say dye if you dont want your glory to fade. it at i EXTRA! At the last minute the following men found their names were not in this section, and in response to their urgent demands we hereby vindicate ourselves. The men are Doc Braddock, Chet Zumwalt, Crescene Fariss, Alex Brown, J ess Digman and Clyde Davis. It,s better late than never, but we filglfured that not at all would be the best of a . Falling For Frank And they will fall for you the same way if you will only let Professor Miller talk to you. Six big lectures on itGetting By, the Wherefore and Why? FRANK MILLER CONDUCT CO. 43 Through With College, What Then ? That is the question we aim to solve for you. Years of experience behind us. The World Co. ttWe Give You Knowledgeit Learn to Dance All the oldest steps, stumbles and Fox trots taught by mildewed methods. Give us a chance, we need it. Winslow School of Dancing 44 LA VIE OREGONIENNE XVIIHIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllIHIIIIIIIlIlIHIIIIHIIIIlllIlllIllIlllIIIllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllHlllllll!IllIlllIIlIllllllIlllllIIllilllllllllllll Vi, Crandale Conversation Saith Thomas Sorority Timepieces School A special short course in my school will qualify you to carry on an intelligent conversation with anyone who knows less than yourself. Invaluable for any one Who wishes to get by in society cir- cles. You never feel ill at ease and so- cially superfluous When you have mas- tered my method. I; t l The only clock on the market Which au- tomatically marks time every Friday, Saturday and Sunday evening from 10:30 until 12:00. N o attention necessary. May be ad- justed for special occasions, according to circumstances. Has a loud, clear tick that may be heard plainly by the next door neighbors. Torade M ark a Every hall should have one. CHARLES K. CRANDALL, Dean DAN WOODS, Agent. IIIIIIlIlllllIllllIIllllllIllIlIlIIllllllllIlIIIlllllllllllllllIlIlIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIlIlIIlIlillllllllIiIIIIlIIIIlIIIlllIl!llliIIIlllIilIlIlIIIIiIlIIIII!IlllIIIllllIIIlllllllllllllIIlllIII1IIlllIiIIIllIllIllIIlIllllllllllIIIllllllllIIllllllllIlIHlllllllllIlIllM lllhvillllllllllllhIIIIIIIIIlIllilillIIlIllIllllIllllIlIIlllllIlIllllHlllllllllllllllllllllllIIIHIlIlIIIIllIIIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIHIIlllillIllllllIllllIIlllIIIIIIIIlllIll1l1lllIIIIIIIlIlIIllIIIlllIIIIIIllllllIIHHIHllllllllI1IIlIIlI1IIllllllllllllllllllllllll HllllllllllIlllllllilllIllIIIIllIllIllllllllllllllllIllIlllIllllHllllllllllllIllllllllllIllIlIlIllIllIlllllIllIlillllllllllllllllllllilIlllIllIllllllllllllllIllllHIIIIHIIHIIIIllllIllllllllllllllI1I1lIlIIllIIllIlIllllIlIIIllllIlllllllllllIIlIllIlIllIllllHlllllllIlll t llIlllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIHIHIlllllIHillllllllllllllllllllllllIllHIIIIIIlllllillIIIIHIIHHIHIHIIIIHHHIHIIHHIJHIHHHIIHHIHIHIHHIHIHlIIHHllHHIlHIIIHHHIIHIHHHHHHHIHIHIHHIIIHHHHHHIHIHHIHIHHIHHH 7.4IIllllIHlllIllIIlIIIIIIIIIIIllIIIIIIlIIi!IllllHIllIJIlllllHIIlllIUlllHIIlllIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIllIIlIlIIlIlllIlllHlllllIllIlIlIllIlllIlllllllllllllllIIllllllllllllllllllllllw$ $xNHIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlIIlIlllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIilllHlllzlf'lllllllliIllll'llllllllllllIllIIlllIIlIIiIllEIHIHIHIHIIIHIIHIHIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIllllIllI1IIIHIIIIllllIIIlllIllIHlllllllllIllHlIIIIIlHHllliil!lHilllllilllillllllwiHHHZIllHHHIIllIHHIIHIlllllllllllHHHlllllllllHlIlHllllHlIlIIIillIlIlllllIllIlllllIIlIIlllIllllllllllIlllllllllllllllll'wx N 4AlllllllllllllllllIlllllIIlllllllllllllllIllllllIlllllIllllilllIIIlIIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIlIIlIllIIllIlIHIIIHIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIHIIIIIHHWQ. V u'33 l lEarl 4" Sonard ilwfrf "marl... H-Jr; H Ian. m 0 V-Ul4:zr A Xt;.y burartjtiy-i H 5ki$fitt I. z: u w-ldf "ha T5, xnan. 75$ ilazri- ..3 x'tfthlr.vrg, t '75:.qu '!w..t; 1115173; 5-3.; Were Your Feelings Hurt ? 0304 Did anything said herein seem hard and cruel? If it did, then seea ,1 3.4 .. T'GIFJ: ma .g . nn ., vtg;:fu,rvl;x .' 'r I... - w . v no.?m 139-21" ' .b Fu'rr:;h ' 13' t I ' K 'LIY 0. TN I: GORDON ac VEATCH i rt. . 1LT: 5 v... "Mr; ".4 r, o xny'l Pitt! P A, Y ' And they Will bury your troubles. We h aventt time. IIIIIIHHHIIlll!HIllIllllIllIllHllHllllllllIIHIllIllIIlllIlllllIIllllllllllllIIlIllIlIIIIIItlIIllIIIIIIIlIlillllllIHIilllIlllllIllllllIIllllIIlllllIllIIllllIlIIlllllIllIIIIIlllIllIllIHllllIllllIlIIlIllIlllllIIlllIllllIIllllllllIllIIIHIIIIIIIIIHIIHII 4i!lllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIHIIIIIHllIlllIlllllllllIllIllIllIllIlIllllIlllll1IIllIllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllIlIllIlllllillIllIllIllIllHIIlllllllllIlllIlllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllIlllIIIlIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllll ?nmmmmmmwmmn 1 m 11nmnm1mmnmmumnmumnmnmmnmnmnmumumumnmnmumnmnmnmnmnmHmumumnmnmnmnmnmnmnmnmnmnmnmnmnmnmnmnmnmnmnmumnmnmnmnmumumumnmnmumnmumnmnmnmnmnmumnmnm"mm 'h An 9 a - ' T e ,. Jlittm ' -- 11:3.ng 1 :31, 1:12? 3 'r e e NI! 5 e .9'31 WT v I. bi .11-?9 '5. x; .229ch um I: a a L T i. 4 M. .1 mmzm . vymxm. Humid: 1;: 3M 1'. BNW-Tll 5mm wanna 1:42". 91. bhdhta Z'AN INA; ' Its all over now, you can . ' Come Out in the open 'fJ Again ! 711M nf Ahnrrtimra Meier 85 Frank Co. Seward Hotel. Cornelius Hotel. H. Liebes 8; Co. McMorran 8c Washburne. Eugene Clearing House Association. Sieberling-Lucas Music Co. Wade Bros. The Varsity. The Hazelwood. Northwestern National Bank. Imperial Hotel. Kilham Stationery Co. Tollman Studio. Multnomah Hotel. General Electric Co. Sherman, Clay 8: Co. I. K. Gill Co. The Rainbow. Table Supply Co. Hotel Oregon. North Pacific College. Ottds. , The Co-Op. Allen 8: Lewis. R. A. Babb Hardware Co. R. M. Gray. Shaw Supply Co. Coffman,s. Martin Studio. Hauser Bros. 0. M. Plummer. Seth Laraway. Oregana. Butterfield Brothers. Eugene Clarifying Co. M. Seller 8; Co. MCCune 8: Manley Eugene Farmers Creamery. Kodak Shop. Mountain States Power CO. University Florist. Mason, Ehrman 8: Co. Hotel Osburn. Green-Merrell Co. J. C. Penney Co. City Cleaners. The Anchorage. Myers Electric Co. Ben Selling. Portland Hotel. AllenTs Drug Store. M. L. Kline Co. Ye Campa Shoppe. Koke-Tiffany Co. Hicks-Charten Co. z ., gaggggggglaiuutkig 3.33.3. MMV . letv . . qu i JMK Wx 14in l II J. ., 9!? Y The Meier C3" Frank Store . Established in 1857 it is for merchandise and service F W 64th Anniversary w .u M m S E D N A n R O P F O m 0 . T S Y n M U Q E H. T. Year m s F m A N w .m ,o. N. m .m 5 m II E Xe 1 l$ . w?! l a -Xaj, Vh gl$ ' .I WON? k . 3x!" A . - :ka X 5 .F :3 69 w- mxh :' .- x amt mhl x 't -! ,3, llll WGCULBERTSON PROPRIETOR Two of the most homelike hotels in Portland, located in the heart of the shopping and theatre district. All Oregon Electric trains stop at the TI TE SEWARD HOTEL the uHouse of Cheer" THE HOTEL CORNELIUS the RHouse of Welcome, is only two short blocks from the Seward. Our brown busses meet all trains. Rates $1.50 and Up We invite you to eat at the SEWARD HOTEL, the ttHouse 0f Cheewl and we believe our Club Bmakfasts and our Luncheons, 40c and 50c, and our . Dinnem, 600, 75c and $1.00, and our Sunday Table deote Dinner, $1.00, are unequalled We have been turning so many people away from our Dining Room for such a long time that we have now almost doubled the capacity of' the Seward Grille in order to accommodate our- many friends. We are now equipped to take care of small banquets in our private Dining Rooms in a most acceptable manner. W. C. CULBERTSON, Prop. 3hr" u my t a: 1h4' Store 1 WOM utmgairrzrl Hr 3.th ft x"; fr', 353 txy r g. '5', F . I; :T am ' '71-.- sk t Vt t xxg 2;,4'3'23. WQKR V o Q R o $ T 1 ; -.. -- ., - AgymkE.C NI" 7i, t Q? X S. ,3 - . ANA a V L? t o3 . r; ,, , - 4782 y IQ Xi Ili'l f? yl' ow there is a charming little frock, smart wrap or cleverly styled suit awaiting you at the Store of Individual Shops for WOMEN AND MISSES Considering quality, our prices are as low or lower than you Will find anywhere, yet you get that distinctive Liebes Appearance tt Look for the N-E-W here first t, ES'EdBLISHED 1864 BROADWAYAT M ORRIS 0N A 2. mrww The Busiest Corner; The Best Store and Right in the Heart of Eugene This store is proof of an old contention of ours. Act prompt, courteous and intel- ligent service, backed by honest merchan- dising policies, ultimately wins? Dry Goods, Men's, .Womenk and ' Children,s Ready-to-Wear Rest Rooms Phones in All Departments Special Delivery Service mnganWashbunne Eftme . 5'5 . Fan'fs 1:71. 5251. 0 UAL 1' rxLi,;2:s 7 I? 'c oNoM yrm H' . n:n'h'. '.I" 5: S4 ngurirtt Q 0 $ n:nrr that IIIZI'IQ I'A3u' A Modern Education includes lessons in how to saveemoney as well as how to earn it 9 1 LE7. L The great fortunes tof today are due 'as much to'thrift as to large earning capacity. it. JLMJAQJ Business success of the future Will demand more than ever the Wise conservation of ones capital resources. :9 g e: h .4 J 9 i IWJLKVZ Eugene Clearing House Association Composed of FIRST NATIONAL BANK UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK BANK OF COMMERCE h. 3w Q N w I k An V K ' fnfgx Ix . I . st 't' I" fV' 33x 1". .1 -'-. wk I2, IA EC A N .. ' mi t i 1 ,v 7 W' a -- 4,.th ,z- k - H'Z I NNirI-z 119$ l A .. i3 .- .33: R3 f 9,; ' I7, Q2 I VEGA TUBA-PHONES : -JLKWJI 7 ll ! W KIMBALL PIANOS g AMERICA'S FAVORITE PIANO 55M, ;LJ ' VICTROLAS VICTOR RECORDS 37' $100.00; Terms : tKEJlMllMJLML - - - , TRY US FOR THAT RECORD BUESCH'ER SAXAPHONES Full Line of BAND AND ORCHESTRA INSTRUMENTS LUDWlG-LEEDY DRUMMERS SU'PPLIES DEAGAN MARIMBAPHONES, XYLOPHONES ORPHEUM BANJOS WHYTE LAYDIE BANJOS I MARTIN GUITARS, MANDOLINS WASHBURN GUITARS. MANDOLINS We Repair Pianos, Phonogr'aphs and Instruments IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC STRINGS , CASES FOR ANY INSTRUMENT : LARGEST SHEET MUSIC DEPARTMENT IN THE NORTHWEST FINE VIOLINS Catalogues Upon Request EVERYTHING MUSICAL SEIBERLING-LUCAS MUSIC COMPANY 125-127 FOURTH STREET PORTLAND, OREGON : 9F 14g f f, ' $3,: f'A , ,K x x. r 2, K xv v D. a V . Q1 11" xQR - a a ' L 2'31, YQ-e. I ll 9v 1 !? ; V 6 ??Gi $ng r; ' m GINA! " VJL " ?- 1er . . f lax 9 ; . 1f I ,wa A WADE B The Home of Hart, Schafner c9 Marx Stylish Clothes ' CANDY, ICE CREAM, LUNCHES 778 Willamette Street C. R. HAWLEY, Proprietor "y 5 J .7. A mg 14 J 47;? f, '4 Av k5? K A Xx ann- v- 7a: I- SE 3 5 kg. 7 kEA E re .3: ,- , :1...x, v if" ' g .7 . A. N. ., .xv ft; $71? It: W70; ?E' T. V A '7' 7 7RD "Eu 3, A r E'z' A '5'? , 7 4 E g? ace to Dine P ADe ightfu Appetizing and nutritious meals served in a pleasing way at priges that are exceptionally low, considering quality of food, attentlve service and attractively decorated dining rooms. We Specialize in Good Things to Eat and Delicious Soda F ountain Beverages AFTER THEATRE SPECIALS Hot Chicken Tamales, Hazelwood Welsh. Rarebit, Crab Louis, Clubhouse Sandwich, Fried Oysters OUR AFTER-THEATRE MENUS Offer a Great Variety of Tempting Dishes The Hazelwood 338 Washington Street 127 Broadway '15! Congratulations to the outgoing class and best wishes to those who have graduation to attain. THE N ORTHWESTERN N ATION AL BAN K PORTLAND OREGON AloA - . -- 1" H? -1 I m 01mm Cums. TE"! r N'A '07 tho "flirt" HM; 7W". .M 0.. l x X2 '- g5 67 ! 9 WIS Q, THE MEETING PLACE OF OREGON STUDENTS a IMPERIAL HOTEL When in Portland you are assured of a comfortable room and three square meals a day by $5. 32 A MANAGER PI-IIL METSCI-IAN, Jr. g"mnmnmnmumumumnmnmnmummumHmnmnmnmnmnmnmumnmumnmnmnmnmnmumnmnmnmnmumnmumumnmnmumnmnmnmumnmumnmnmnmumnmnmnmnw SOCIETY AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING -- COPPERPLATE ENGRAVING, STEEL DIE EMBOSSING Wedding Invitations and Announcements Diplomas, CommenCement Invitations, Cards, Monograms, and Address Stationery "Everything Seals and f0? the RubbeT Officw . Stamps Fifth and Oak Streets Portland, Oregon mHMHmHmHWHWHWHWHWHWHMHMHWHWHWHMHMHMHWHMUMHMHMHMHMHWHMHWHWHWHMHWHMH mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm .1 iMHHHHHHHHUHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH Eugeneis Leading PHO TOGRAPHERS THE TOLLMAN 'in um! ' . . I u-lolx.Et ' uh: nu! at v; I ll $3E'l 1W 3 . 1:3?! 2: EW$ mitts: k Visit our studio When you want an mgr; by , excellent likeness, artistically executed. ,w gu- m The most modern and best equipped photo d!" x 1.; .1 . studio in Oregon lht "W; ' N . 2." ml J. R. ANDERSON, PropEr "2 if: ' ' 734 Willamette Street 770 Phone nw'r-W l5: tu'i ,2 H119; . rr hu- PORTLAND, Multnomah Hote , OREGON Pacific Northwest College and University Headquarters Where True West-ern Hospitality Rules V..l E III - i Q! 600 ii: I v f a Garage Outside ' EIE ; l I in Rooms . 3E I - I Connection II ' L ' ,Kmqnm E I I '2 'E E Hi3- I THE PALACE BEAUTIFUL Dancing at the Multnomah is an Enjoyable Event ERIC V. HAUSER, Pres. A. B. CAMPBELL, Mgr. R at Y J. hEd .5 ' k-sv 5A h IF : I i l - ' KPH": V k: V14, k 3 What Is Research? UPPOSE that a stove burns too much coal for the amount of heat that it radiates. The manufacturer hires a man familiar with the principles of combus- tion and heat radiation to make experiments which will indicate desirable changes in design. The stove selected as the most efficient is the result of research. Suppose that you want to make a ruby in a factory-not a mere imitation, but a real ruby, indistinguishable by any chemical or physical test from the natural stone. You begin by analyzing rubies chemically and physically. Then you try to make rubies just as nature did, with the same chemicals and under similar conditions. Your rubies are the result of research-research of a different type from that required to improve the stove. Suppose, as you melted up your chemicals to produce rubies and experimented with high temperatures, you began to wonder how hot the earth must have been millions of years ago when rubies were first crystallized, and what were the forces at play that made this planet what it is. You begin an investigation that leads you far from rubies and causes you to formulate theories to explain how the earth, and, for that matter, how the whole solar system was created. That would be research of a still different type-pioneering into the unknown to satisfy an insatiable curiosity. , Research of all three types is conducted in the Laboratories of the General Electric Company. But it is the third type of research- pioneering into the unknown-that means most, in the long run, even though it is undertaken with no practical beneiit in view. At the present time, for example, the Research Laboratories of the General Electric Company are exploring matter with X-rays in order to discover not only how the atoms in different substances are arranged but how the atoms themselves are built up. The more you know about , a substance, the more you can do with it. Some day this X-ray work will enable scientists to answer more definitely than they can now the question: Why is iron magnetic? And then the electrical industry will take a great step forward, and more real progress will be made in five years than can be made in a century of experimenting with existing electrical apparatus. You can add wings and stories to an old house. But to build a new house, you must begin with the foundation. Schenectady, N. Y. 95-379-B gN P. 1 :N N ,d-jkg - i. E$e 9:7 T i w ltd; J A rig? V hm Am Xrld ; - 5.1; 5. $ . $ , THE STEINWAY PIANO The success of the Steinway Piano is the uniting of the highest ideals of art With an intensely practical experience in piano-making. THE DUO ART PIANO The Duo Art is the instrument that produces hundreds of selections played by the worlds greatest pianists, ex- actly as they played them. THE VICTROLA The one instrument for which the greatest artists make records. The one instrument specially made to play their Victor Records. The one insrument that reproduces their art in exact accord with their own ideas of interpretation. ' N k; g i: Sherman, ay Sc Go. ..... Sixth and Morrison Streets Portland, Oregon An lnstitution---- Rendering a great service to a great state. For Iifty-five years the name "Gill" has been synonymous with leadership in a fieldethe iield of books, stationery and office equipment. LET UT SERVE YOU THE J. K. GILL COMPANY Third and Adler Streets Portland, Oregon The RAINBOW EUGENE, OREGON FOR FINE CONFEC-TIONS REGULAR MEALS 820 Willamette Street Phone 52 The stun that 323m ' affords at :11 imam Slant We tun: 11-, 0.. this store their brazim teseen and taking Jinn call. t'omv m. Ir 1- 3r. SION. Phom1 2-8652 87-13 I9 $h :23, Q N P. :2 I e Al .rp FR 4 A 9:7 37 J :53 r t: m $Qx Q Table Supply Company L. D. PIERCE, Prop. M E Fancy Groceries, Meats and Home Cooked Foods The store that aims to give its customers the best the market affords at all times-to be all that the name implies-a real service store. We want the students of the University of Oregon to make this store their headquarters When it comes to eats. Our delica- tessen and baking department are always ready for an emergency call. Come in, we want to know you better. Make this store your store. Corner 9th and Oak Streets Phone 246-247-248 THE HOTEL OREGON :95 I'd." POthomdts Popular Place .- w I . Located at the Plvotal Pomt 1n Port- landis Shopping, Business and Amuse- ment Districts. . BROADWAY AT STARK STREET Garage Facilities Nearby The Home of the Famous IN , "132 Gbrvgnn $rill" g . tSuggest you phone, wire or $3 write for reservationsJ Arthur H. Meyers, Mgr. . 6y .a E 1 ha I g 'g A" Q! ?V WIT H ! 1122.? x k $ .xzz .. Rf . 2 1,3 g v Q 06 $23 xR V. 3- f if! :V" '. A , 'IV 1 . NORTH PACIFIC COLLEGE DENTISTRY and PHARMACY PORTLAND, OREGON THE ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS OCTOBER IST REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Graduates from an accredited high school, or an equivalent edu- cation-fifteen units. Only credits, n0 conditions on the foregoing entrance requirements are allowed. COURSES FOR INSTRUCTION The Course in Dentistry is Four Years The Course in Phowmacy 2's Three Years RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS Prospective students preparing to enter North Pacific College should include in their academic studies Physics, Chemistry and Biology. The pre-medical course given by many colleges and uni- versities is recommended. For Illustrated Catalog, Address THE REGISTRAR EAST SIXTH AND OREGON STREETS PORTLAND, ORE. Seventh and W album T v u u . The COOperative 'hIIUn-mvhtuttmh - m kmamM-M 0CD 'UO 0 I7".S' !' 1!15' 5'77 13'12' The Best 13 None Too Good for Candies and fountain specials Seventh and Willamette Streets Phone 56 I I 's 0 ed d o e ted b -the students of th U '- The CO'Operatlve Store :IeISIAgI1 ofarrlegore. rElit is thye officialdistributingepomt ITjOIOCD ITiS YOUR STORE forall University text books, note books, athletic goods, fountain pens, and other students' supplies. Become a member of the CO- 0P ASSOCIATION and share In the benefits. 38013 211101 SJI C O O P an S? E $ ! RESULT : ---for 70 years we have maintain- ed a standard Ever-Growing Popularity of Preferred Stock and A. 8L L. Brands of Groceries Have you tried PrefeWed Stock 0013366, the new addition to the Preferred Stock Line? Eugene branch ALLEN 8z LEWIS, Incorporated DISTRIBUTORS . haw R; A. BABB HARDWARE co. THE WINCHESTER STORE Guns, Ammunition and Fishing Tackle SPALDING ATHLETIC GOODS MILL AND LOGGING SUPPLIES 771 Willamette Street Phone 47 GRAY'S Store of Correct FASHION CLOTHES FOR YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN Portland Oregon 366 Washington St. at West Park St. -18 THIS nun: I h r-wmmw! ?; Ir WM! .9 AL - ' r. " nhlliu' m 'J- . LAHHIHT-un .y. Sl'ktilt' U. Pun: X RH H'l'u; x; HHSI'ITU. Fur 2, Shaw Supp Seattle Tacoma a A Real Photograp Sludio HAL OUTFI Wilson Footbal' Gee gluon Batch." 00 THIS TRADE-MARK is recognized throughout the Great West as an emblem of Depend- abilitw in the business of LABORATORY SUPPLIES SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS X-RAY APPARATUS and HOSPITAL EQUIPMENT Shaw Supply Co. Seattle Tacoma Portland Cofman 3 31.. 01. w thnmlatw MADEIN PORTLAND OREGON -...- M4. A Real Photograph Studio Seventh and W illametla Che martin Stubio HAUS; OUTFITTERS TO ATHLETES AND SPORTSMEN Wilson Football Goods Wilson Baseball Goods Wilson Tennis Goods Sporting High Top Boots Leather Coats and Vests .,2 BQOS Gym Suits and Shoes Guns and Ammunition Fishing Tackle Flashlights and Batteries Saxony Knit Sweaters and Jerseys Hm . R 497 4., 44532:. $me 2,.vw a E91. J ; " iv Q :3 12:; v; fxfui r ,.,, .x r -' Inx 'k ,z . KG! 253;. g. 1:4 3:4 A k , w W1 CV y 5 ,1, h. -l, m ,. D .1 fly? g 4 TWO STORES gm FACING EACH OTHER OREGANA - ' j JEWELRY STORE - ,I ' DIAMONDS, WATCHES " A H ' JEWELRY I For years we have been collecting ... tine Diamonds for Engagement THE a VA. Rings. Diamonds sold on easy STUDENT .- terms to honest students. , SHOP MUSIC STORE 'PIANOS, VICTROLAS BRUNSWICKS Make our store your headquarters for Musical Goods. We Will handle your special orders. JEWELER 584 Willamette Street Fountain Delicacies Telephone 1 Light Lunch 04E. $ 2ND FLfmrd .94 I Comc' dw'ppp' +'."---" -'-.-.- RegldtM' Phcnc H -' ' Eugene 0 me" MILK '0' JERSEY "'0 cu! Crockery. Hlas-m House Furnuhmg Spccialiu- m Rm! Hotel Equipmrnt. f- N am? ANAV l-I' ?c ,1,H KXk 121! ' M MAKERS OF BUTTERFIELD BROTHERS Class and Society Pins 2ND FLOOR MOHAW Corner Third and Mo Established 1880 K BLDG. rrison Streets PORTLAND OREGON I T m - Residence Phone 566-J ORDERS PROMPTLY DELIVERED Office Phone 390 Eugene Clarifying and Pasteurizing Co. RICH MILK FOR FAMILY USE AND FREE FROM EVERY IMPURITY JERSEY AND GUERNSEY MILK 943 Oak Street, Eugene, Oregon ONLY CLARIFYING IN THE CITY M.SELLERXzCO. WHOLESALE ONLY Crockery, Glassware and All House Furnishings. specialize in Restaurant and Hotel Equipment. Edith McKune Esther Manley PHOTOGRAPHERS We also Bromide, Grey, Ivory and Sepia Tone Print. Fifth and Pine Streets Portland, Ore. 623 Willamette Street Near Post OfIice Phone 741 OF THE MOTHERS YOU HAVE KNOWN do you remember any who suckled their young on cocoanut oil? Even a monkey starts its young on milk. The cow, not the cocoanut tree, is the foster mother of the human race. The base of most butter sub- stitutes is cocoanut oil. Nature provided no substitutes for dairy products. Use BLUE BELL Butter STEVENSONIS The K odak Shop The place Where you get those bright, snappy Kodak prints. When you need an Album, we have it. We also have hundreds of ' campus pictures that will be inter- esting for your memory book. See our big stunt books. They are great. AlbumseFilms-Finishing I 10th 62 Willamette Sts. Phone 535 Safe and Sound Our 870 Gold Bonds Send for Our Literature Mountain States Power Company EUGENE, OREGON ' 8 a y I t with Flo wars The University Florist Phone 654 993 Hilyard St. m0, Ural! I I I I I I I I x I a I I I I I I x I I Eugene. Or I I z I x I T'V URGEST AND H05! C! I I I I I I I l l I I LIT I L. R. w.,n. cm. F I l I I I Do I I Naturally 1M: .Wd GIN x I I I I I I $ ii! WGIX Q ..Ss x x wfu .i. I 9?; dx p-r" y $ A Q! r14; xxxk k3 1': I- Eugene Branch of Mason, Ehrman Co. Incorporated Wholesale Grocers-uCigar Importers Home Office-Portland, Oregon Branches Eugene, Oregon; Medford, Oregon; Klamath Falls, Oregon; Astoria, Oregon; Lewiston, Idaho Offices San Francisco, Cal. HOTEL OSBURN LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETELY EQUIPPED HOTEL OUTSIDE PORTLAND CATERS TO STUDENT DANCES AND BANQUETS R. Wayne Green Eric W. Merrell Smtiptg 31-31mm 011chsz Have a nation-wide reputation for style supremacy What a young man appreciates Naturally you would expect such Clothes in a store for young men GREEN MERRELL CO. MEN'S WEAR 713 Willamette Street hu- 9? eW 2 l x I v: fix KW ; -: ea'b. . . I a Ix , ,Jf-au ! 4921 If' I I23. N eat.- 3. QR livifl Wk ; Hi M 1:0 4' - J o. . h - - - a. . e meg ,4 ,- n . :X . w; WVV g e3? I 3 4' l G r , I I p. -lllI-llll-IllI-Illl --:Iu-Iul -lt'l--ll r0 STUDENTS You can always save money on The your a h READY-TO-WEAR CLOTHING Ilc orage SHOES DRY GOODS MARY S. KIEFFER J. 0' Penney 00' 997 Franklin Boulevard 312 Stores : Telephone 30 - $0 - 1'" Tea House on the Millrace CITY CLEANERS Eugene, Oregon Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing Luncheon and Dinner Served Daily. SUPERIOR CLEANING SERVICE WHICH Afternoon Tea and Light Refresh- MAKES SATISFIED CUSTOMERS mentsm Hall for Dancing, Banquets W6 Call and Deliver and Club Meetings. Canoeing and Swimming Facilities. 44 8th Ave. Phone 220 Eugene, Oregon 1? ago 1" , .-I l. f4 em-nn- i. . I Smart SUIts and Overcoats Moderately Priced for Young Men Leading Clothier Morrison Street at Fourth Portland I I ' Do You Enjoy I Dancing 5 Hmeric;n Be t. AND GOOD THINGS TO EAT? 311 y : W - Electriclron-the bestironmade I 6 Have BOth I Dinners, $1.50 Dancing, 6-8 We Are Proud to Announce We Sell It . The Portland Hotel MYERS ELECTRIC co. gIIggengIIggIggtgg R. w. Childs, Manager . .i Ill -lll -'llI-II$ -lll' 3? PH" 3'" y-WW'H'ht. JR, xii"? 3 ,o I- o-t.'.'"" "Faultless" PH 8 I-SB-N 7 .5" Ft- IM..--..--N, b.- .u-n mn'-ua- D4 5- Ci NOW Thu 7.x! "'1' w: "h: r i- o .C?1.f ;. NOW Tl. 9am ; Veh' ! u! 50 V" n 34', h t 1 v V , 2 q 1 WHIKF 4: Phone 232 Phone 232 , 124' rl'vy N V 56 Ninth Avenue East, Eugene, Oregon CAMERAS AND PHOTO SUPPLIES EVERYTHING IN DRUGS THE PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST Phone 232 We Deliver t-xk g X4; h tzya: j: e it The MEL KLINE CO. WHOLESALERS "Faultless" Plumbing, Heating, Mill and Steam Supphes 84-86-87-89 Front St. Portland, Oregon Thanks I NOW That the tents are being folded and Oregon stickers are being appended on the suit cases, we Wish to thank Oregon Students for their generous patronage since we opened our doors. This has proved to us that OREGON deserves a first- NOW class fountain and catering service- SO NEXT TERM, When you return, you Will find a store that Will be a credit to a college three times the size of Oregon. Ye Campa Shoppe Twelfth and Alder. H. R. Taylor A. R. TIFFANY, Sec. and Treas. I KOKE-TIFFANY CO. YORAN PRINTING HOUSE, Inc. EUGENE, OREGON Printers and Book Binders Blank Book Manufacturers, Stationers, Loose Leaf and Record Systems, Bank and Office Supplies L THE HIGH STANDARD OF OUR PRODUCT AND THE INTEGRITY OF OUR HOUSE ARE SO WELL KNOWN THAT YOU NEED NOT HESITATE T0 PLACE WITH US YOUR NEXT MAIL ORDER, WITH ABSOLUTE CONFIDENCE THAT CARE AND PRECISION WILL BE EXEMPLIFIED 4 WE WILL BE PLEASED T0 ESTIMATE ON YOUR NEXT ORDER ' 1F3'1FEWFE'HBWFEYFTNE1FENF'KAYFHWBWZOWKHEAYFEWEWKH WEN? 'wmrm' I i 3 3f g . i: ! $wwiewag ACID BLAST ETCHED PLAIES x MQLfin?bQ?aq;Z 'AUDBLAST .mma$heSJVZ k JZWQ39fan aw2 Blasf ezf'im'pfawfes - fan? .9 prlhfz'ng 011211;? Wizbiias neverbeforeieen obfazkahfe ino . process " . . . . 3 , .' ix x, x .y ' L a smagipo, 5? t In Kim x gin h X . A t 5gb be "k N h .55 t X: J3 es F Rx ls t. sl 3- : At I NWW' x. k xhb J far! r '1?! .. L-g k9 xx E.SK E; An Elnarriptinn En mm. 31mm 15. $2rling2r anh mm $115M Olamphpll I pray Thee, Oh Lord, Spare this structure. May generations yet unborn Receive its message. Here have the women of our time Builded into brick and mortar truly laid, Proportions just, and of materials sincere A monument to noble womanhood. This building has a soul. Hearts joined With hands In its erection And love and aspiration Informed a reverent craftsmanship. The very workmen labored Under a benign rule That was more guidance than authority. N ot by tribute torn From the unwilling vassals of a prince Nor from the impudent largesse Of penitent or boastful wealth Were these stones land. Gifts in devout and cherished memory Of noble mothers passed away, Of children unforgotten in a mothers heart Of fathers, sons, And gifts of hope from many a home Made joyful by a little girl Are all here bodied forth. Then the massed power of all the people Moved Within the legislative halls And said The daughters of a democratic state Are its most priceless treasure Let this decree be written In brick and stone. , m5, w h A' 3 $ . Ca! 15' , m! b "2...; huu-um bbahi-h-Oth Mme. It stands today A structure built on honor. Clay from the native valleys of the West, Stone quarried from its everlasting hills, Great firs from the mountains round about our homes And textiles from our fields and flockse Our own land serves our daughters. What skill we have is all shown here. We can no better. ' Our mothers and our wives, we know, Have dreamed beyond our powers. Yet as we could we followed their enlightenment And pictured forth what we could grasp. A little sheltered from the traffic of the street, Yet not too far retired The building stands Strong as the firs and rocks of Oregon Yet built in grace, not ruggedness. Of ostentation not a trace, Yet all thatls here is good, The best that we could obtain. Into this college home we sought to build Beauty with strength And into the lives of our daughters Strength with loveliness. 'A' 5.: 1k Let the coming generations know All this was nobly done And if perchance it seems notgreat T0 children of an ampler day X Let them reflect the women of our timee An age of trouble and discouragemente For not one moment faltered or held back But labored through all obstacles To make that future great. -ERIC W. ALLEN. xfrsth W hf? ,AV ?As v.5; PA ' a '5 N K j 44' a ggxl k . x x 33:: 3:: $6 g .. 5 W k 5 k , F l J J 7;, gWIX Q ' , 155' r 197 k?! - Z'F-zis 43 $ 31a prune anh pirturp me have gathrrhh together 1112 life at nur helnueh $rrgnn fur nut gran am: of the ataff hank put intn it, glahly, many hnurz anh math harh thinking. In baa hnnmp a part nf mu- Hninrraitg, anh m2 ainrprplg hum that you tun mill tall it part nf "09m wagon". 6th Ehitnr Ln thwil..1.rry.hf!.r:rzrl...,....L:F.urF. ?.rr. y ,er $.?:,!?. ,9 Iltir. LLB tn, Hm Ln 3.. i . fj : uh 9m ' c.gluqugm4su. :1qu 1. 7.31.. 1.1.4-


Suggestions in the University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) collection:

University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

1918

University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

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