University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR)

 - Class of 1920

Page 1 of 462

 

University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 462 of the 1920 volume:

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'f':" , Wu. :WW-t Www' $55.21?! , , ,- ' an, a . . 1' 7 7 r rgxgygrh Aw :1:7::r';34-L . . . .A. m AA", '4ml'41 .,, $ng regatta YEAR BCQDK OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON VOL. 12 1920 AH"0U4"y -II' 'I- kamu H ' , aim; x . 'v'h' 1....1 PaQ , :1 . .. mem x , rim . l1 . " Vhlffl "l'f'lt. I ' .Mmbm m ,,l ,l' W . . . g .u. ' . I, ' u. - 1- ' ' . t . . - ' , L 1' I' I . I 4, II ,. -. .,, ' 1 - , n . I I ; . ; H ' h:'."::I.,I -.- ' '; I'l'uk JZMIIQLI Ill'm z'f'kJ'IZl' 07- I THE OREGAN A VOLUME XII Helen Manning, Editor George Beggs, Manager Press of Koke-Tiffany Printing Co. Printers and Bookbinders Eugene, Oregon mun . N . ., , . "UNIVERSITY , s... .., 1 ' ADMINISTRATION nun L OREGON DAYS CLASSES MUSIC AND DRAMA ' l I' ATHLETICS j YE OREGON MUSE MEDICAL SCHOOL FORENSICS ' ORGANIZATIONS PUBLICATIONS x MILITARY Kg FRATERNITIES . OREGON SPIRITS f 1.1 Fah H . M x ::x ' x x X; , .l ,ll RVAKX sAX 0 ; .K h ' . N NAM ' I ' l I I I MEWORD Siwm 34' Km" m 33mm: :f: tilt? III Ram's: m: wml- 5imun , l? h 4 I :. , 11; W; $ z ? y x J74. V T f1 IX;H KN, r :- I I ' . ,7 711 r DR. KENNETH A. J. MACKENZIE RAYMOND KOESSEL , ,. " . - .e e e, . . -0 . ,J u- A - . , 'ai ' e - . . w x. e - M N 1y MW". e f "e ' e 0 e 4 .. y "e. r. e . e A -. . e 'r X T ;; H 4 V13 -: 5 .,y e'. . FOREWORD Just a page from our Junior note book, Just the memoir of a college year, With the hope that fond recollections May be enfolded here. Mfs. Irene H. Gerlinger TO ,MRS. IRENE I-I. GERLINGER WHOSE INSPIRING PERSONALITY HAS BEEN A LEADING FACTOR IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A GREATER OREGON, THIS VOLUME IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED MESH Where the Mill Race Begins EDUCATION FOR CITIZENSHIP NE of the most important of all the aims of education today. is 0 training for citizenship. There are but few now to question the value of a college education. If there were needed any final ar- gument, the recent great war provided that argument. In that war the man With University training proved his worth and proved the worth of the training he had receivedeproved it in that great supreme test of all the qualities that make for manhood. Does it not follow, then, that one of the chief concerns of a demo- cracy is the education of its citizens-espec'ially While they are young and receptive and impressionable? Indeed, a very great man has said re- cently that the one great business of a democracy is education: the con- stant improvement of the people themselves through education, genera- tion after generation. ' Can the state do better than to educate its young men and women for citizenship? The means whereby society can best accomplish this purpose, how- ever, are not so easily found. The citizen casts his vote according to his best judgment. His judgment is the result of his native intelligence plus his education and experience. The state must work With Whatever brains and character it has at its disposal. , But it can affect that raw material, its untrained youth, by providing for them facilities for education. A manis judgment, in so far as his own affairs are concerned, is developed by experience, his own, and that of others With Whom he comes in contact. Education places before the young citizen all the consummated experience of mankind; and'this body of experience constitutes the truth, in so far as men have learned the truth and recorded it in books for the guidance of other men. . Knowledge, then, is necessary for good citizenship. The student learns the truth about men; his horizon becomes broadened, and because he has learned so much of the experiences of mankind-their struggles, their sorrows, their agonies, their achievements, their high aspirations, he becomes tolerant, liberal, open-minded, open-hearted. Is not that, after all, educatiOn for citizenship? Under the Condon Oaks THE CAMPUS BEAUTIFUL N abundance of trees, attractively grouped, pathways and lanes between the various buildings, shrubbery of different kinds, and always flowers in their appropriate seasons, enable the Oregon campus to have a distinction peculiar to itself. The wonderful Condon oaks, huge and gnarled, have about them a majesty and dignity which is reflected in the ivy-covered walls of old Deady and Villard halls. The leaves give to the buildings varied tones of color; the rich green against the gray walls gradually changes to yellow and then to the brilliant tones of orange and red, flamboyantly asserting that these grand old halls, revered by all students, form one of the iirmest ties that bind to ttOld Oregon? Pink and White roses, equal in their beauty and perfection to those Which have made Portland famed as the iiRose City? line the pathways in the spring. They sometimes begin to bloom very early and one of the most interesting sights during the snow Which whitened the campus last Winter was a number of pink rosebuds, encased entirely in ice. Yellow roses clamber up the sides of Deady Hall and the campus paths are brightened With lilacs, syringa and rhododendrons. The bronze statue, The Pioneer, presented to the University last year by Mr. Joseph N. Teal, of Portland, guards the entrance to the campus, looking With his clear, tifar-seeing eyes? past the hurrying bodies of stu- dents, into his dream-land come true. The senior fountain, Whose grace- ful falling water has been known to cool too-boisterous freshmen in the good old days; the sun-dial; the senior bench; all contribute to the charm of the campus. And lastly, but perhaps dearest to the students heart because of its many associations and memories, is the old mill race gliding between the weeping willows. ttWhile canoes are softly gliding, Through the shadows stealing, hiding, Floats a song from the old mill race, Songs of our Oregon? Eleven Cross Campus 623,8 STUDENT GOVERNMENT AT OREGON TUDEN T government at the University, although far from being ab- solute in its degree of development, has made remarkable advances since its initiation in 1913-14 With the creation of the student council. Previous to this time the control of student affairs, outside those of a strictly student body nature, were handled entirely by the faculty. The steadily increasing unpopularity of this management, by students and faculty members alike, precipitated the organization of the present sys- tem of student council control. The present method of close co-operation between'the students and faculty in the management of student affairs has met with Whole-hearted approval by all concerned. This satisfaction has attained such a general scope and the work of the council; has been so thoroughly effective that the next inevitable step Will be in the form of absolute student control. Promoters of this idea realize that such a movement must have am- ple time to materialize and developesuch as the preliminary steps in the earlier movements of student government experienced. This absolute form has been tried and found not wanting in other universities and colleges and it seems a safe venture to predict that time Will ultimately bring about a similar development in the governing of Oregonis student affairs. The success of the present form can be chiefly attributed to the spirit of co-operation Which exists between the faculty and the student council. The ideas of one are always given thorough consideration by the other and perfect harmony in the work of both is the result. Joint meetings of representative committees from both bodies are often held to thresh out the many different and perplexing problems of student control. Rarely, in the history of the work of the student coun- cil, has the faculty failed to consider favorably any legitimate proposi- tion Which the students may have fostered. Thirteen The Campus Guardian Fourteen wgw NE 6n -. y . 7x ' . ,2. , w u; . " F? , i4.'.e-5.f',l,f';-g'g-r!7i arts; .' magi , 1:113" "eiWJJEJDSH V; .2 i W a r i i ., .f 1mg ., , : Li; 1 L , a N3 2'7 ; J' x ,5; y- - -',7 V'l nz ' 3 i , , i u;, - '- 1- s' WM .4 A t i law, i; i mi 2 1 . 4 A x l'wm w: 4 ' 4 gig? 4$wu tasaxfm l OREGON TRADITION S REGON traditions form a natural background for the student life of the University. For the old graduate they serve as stepping stones or tinotes," Which reiiect back to the pleasant days spent on the Oregon campus, and for the undergraduateewell, just What would this life be With no traditional spirit Whatever? The answer to this question verges on the impossible. Can you imagine a loyal Oregon student shooting his tlsnipeii on the sacred path- way of Hello Lane, or a campus With no senior bench 01' Oregon seal? Could you possibly picture an old graduate returning to his alma mater to find its campus no longer graced With the delicate green headgears of the first-year men, or to lind no mill race around Which, oh so many of his college memories were woven? Just What would be the use of completing underclass years if the great incentive of being privileged to don the famed junior corduroys or the senior sombreros did not await the more fortunate? What kind of a J unior is he Who does not take almost holy pride in his dirty and bagging corduroys, or Where is the Senior Who does not receive a glorious iikickii When crowned With the all powerful sombrero-ethat emblem of supreme dignity and responsibility? And one cannot overlook the Oregon Helloethe secret of the far- famed Oregon Spirit. Although the University is now undergoing one of the greatest transitional steps in its historyefrom that of a' small to a large institution-the Oregon Hello bids fair to remain as the indelible mark of campus democracy. Fifteen A x0 Mx W, W x WNW WK xmm , Wamw w, V M$wa$ww Wwwwm , my ' .FVMMMwwm.wwwwwmumwmwr wwww m x , NW NW w IISGlXIS The Administration Building COOPERATION BETWEEN FACULTY AND STUDENTS ' NE of the finest of Oregonis many traditions is the ease and infor- malityethe human and humane spiritethat characterizes the contact between student and faculty member. Everyone has no- ticed how frequently it happens that a professor who has left Oregon for some larger institution is found within a few months trying to come back. There are many reasons; one is that to his students here he is neither god nor devil: merely an erring human being of like clay with them- selves, entitled to be regarded as a perfect equal. The impression the local campus life seemed to make on a distin- guished professor from a big Eastern University who passed an evening at a faculty iireside not long ago is indicative of the spirit here. The conversation drifted into yarns told by the Oregon men about various students of the current and past years. The Visitor was amazed at the intimate knowledge displayed of the students history; his family, early life, difficulties and struggles, disposition and character, and, of gradu- ates, of their career since leaving the academic halls. His own students were to him Virtually strangers. He had never before dreamed of a life where the four years might result in personal, lifelong friendship be- tween instructor and student. Sometimes a Visitor is offended at first when he notices that the freshman addresses the oldest and most dignified scholars in the institu- tion with an inconsequent tlHelloXl He does not see how it is compatible with due respect. The fact is that there is a double respect shown on the Oregon campus. The student almost never oversteps the bounds of good manners and kindly feeling in his relation with the faculty, while on the other hand a genuine and hearty respect by the older man for the well- behaved undergraduate is not only felt but frankly shown. The Oregon spirit on all this matter was exemplified recently by the student who went over to the office of his major professor on Commence- ment day just after he had received his sheepskin. Being graduated, he naturally and without comment began calling the professor by his first name, and has done so ever since. Seventeen ighteen Reflections ' tha- AWN mmHgsmngi aflgm wwvmgmsw 422:: .L' g ; WM, 2 a ,2 :2 2W -Mw: l: H 2 ' 3 i 3,; L f i it ii fl; , 3 . .2 , g" 22 a . 2 ' 2222 ADVANTAGES OF A SMALL COLLEGE S the University strides onward in the march of progress, ever, after a backward glance, she gathers more tightly around her the gar- ments of the past, and clings to those blessings that survive from the beginning, counting the good works of today of far more value than the good works of the far future. Among those precious garments, woven in the past and still worn proudly, are the privileges of a small University. 2 Students from past years love Oregon as a home, where they knew all their classmates, loved every one of their professors, and helped in building the institution from the foundation. They knew each other- that was the prime blessing of the very small college. It was in this at- mosphere that the Oregon Spirit grew to maturity. At the University this year, with the sixteen hundred students, we have enjoyed, perhaps for the last time, the same traditions and the same privileges. We have known every professor on the campus by name and department, by Virtue and failing. We know our students, and when we have to leave it is leaving home to go into strange places where faces are unfamiliar and characters unknown. Our students do not lose themselves in the crowd. They do not re- main insignificant because of overcrowding. Every man has a chance to become known on the campus, and every woman can meet every other woman until she knows her intimately. When our student body presi- dent becomes ill, or a delegation goes to Des Moines, it means more than a name or names. We miss a familiar presence on the campus, and we know without being told that the delegation has returned, for we know the students in person. In our student body elections, we vote by knowledge, and' not by hearsay; we choose for character and not for reputation. We know the candidates as they will never be known in later life. The spirit of democracy that Oregon began life with will not dis- appear from the campus, although her forty years have brought her to the point 0f becoming a large University. It is not that trite thing that politicians harp on, but the Oregon Spirit now, that smiling, genial, good sportsmanlike and loyal spirit that Visitors recognize so quickly, and that we all know and try to keep alive. 2 These then, are the garments of the University on her march along the Victory Way, and with her on the road travels the Oregon'Spirit, born in our weakness, but undaunted by strength and numbers, growing stronger withthe years. Nineteen v. ,. V 2 . y 2 l rang- y :2 f. ' , . '3 uhixixmae Nu: Xv - r $11,181th In the Sunlight EASE OF OBTAINING AN EDUCATION HE day has passed When students Who come to the University to earn all or part of their expenses as they go through their four years, find life difficult. Now there are usually more positions than there are men and women to fill them. The people of Eugene have come to depend on the University students for business aid more and more, and many college men and women find it an easy matter to earn all of their expenses on the campus, especially if supplemented by summer work. Some of them claim that a savings account under such conditions is not at all out of the question. The most gratifying thing about it is that the students Who thus work lose none of their social position, as is unfortunately the case in many colleges. It is here that Oregon democracy comes to the front. In fact, it is more often than not, the student Who works his way through Who is most active on the campus, Who receives most of the campus honors. Sixty per cent of the men in the University earn part of their ex- penses and nearly forty per cent are entirely self-supporting. For the women, the percentages are a bit lower. The men have found a Wide variety of occupations to suit their special talents, their work ranging from repairing automobiles to presiding in pulpits on Sundays. The list i of their occupations is startling in its length. In addition to the more usual tasks, such as stenography and janitor work, may be mentioned the selling of various articles on commission, posing, surveying, playing in orchestras, tuning pianos, and even undertaking. The womenis work offers as many opportunities as the menis, for we find women, reporters, doctorsi assistants, bill collectors, department assistants, managers for plays, etc. It is certain that these men and women receive more from their work than the financial assistance alone, for their positions serve as a means of keeping them in close touch With the big World of hard actual- ities which the average student is only too prone to forget. Twenty-one 3,3 W gxwx P-3 3 CD 5 PF w: A $1 0 The University,s First Home OREGON SPIRIT Oregon Spirit is loyalty-the unselfish, Whole-hearted devotion of every student to the University and all that makes for its success, its welfare and its progress. Oregon Spirit is enthusiasmethe zeal that enkindles, that inspires; that turns men into heroes, and makes miracles possible. Oregon Spirit is determination-the Will to do; the grim-jawed reso- lution that disdains all obstacles, that never admits the possibility of defeat. Oregon Spirit is good-fellowship. It rings true as a new bell in every Oregon ttHelloll-ethe watchword that admits every student into the fine freemasonry of comradeship. Oregon Spirit is democracye the great leveller, that recognizes no distinctions on the Oregon campusewhether of money, family, race or previous advantages. rWhat' is it that enables Oregon With a student body one-half, one- third, one-quarter the numerical strength of her principal competitors among the colleges on the Coast, to Win Victory after Victory and cham- pionship after championship? Oregon Spirit. What is it, almost before the first lonesomeness has gone, that thrills ' its way into the consciousness of a Freshman, making him glad that he came, and proud that he is a student at Oregon? Oregon Spirit. What is it that, out of all the various impressions and experiences of his four years, a Senior treasures as his most valued possession? Oregon Spirit. What is it that rises first to the surface of the memory of an itOld Gradii When he thinks of the happy days at Oregon? Oregon Spirit. You dont see it or hear it all the tim'e-this spirit of Oregon. It ian worn on the sleeve or flaunted forth on every occasion. But its there just the same, needing only the occasion to bring it forth. Its the one unquestionable characteristic of Oregon; the one thing that makes the life at Oregon a little different from life at other colleges, the; one thing that gives to Oregon distinction and quality-OREGON SPIRIT. Twenty-three . s A, . s l V . me-iuadmem3IM:w-la, V3 ' s I ' i u 6 .ug Jn0;.x1ueALL Executive Committee, Board of Regents THE BOARD OF REGENTS OFFICERS HON. ROBERT S. BEAN, President L. H. JOHNSON, Secretary EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE HON. ROBERT Sr. BEAN, Ex-Officio Chairman HON. A. C. DIXON, Acting Chairman HON. A. C. DIXON, Vice President HON. CHAS. H. FISHER HON. W. K. NEWELL MRS. G. T. GERLINGER EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS HON. LLOYD L. MULIT HON. BEN W. OLCOTT, Acting Governor and Secretary of State ............................ Salem HON. J. A. CHURCHILL, Superintendent of Public Instruction .................................. Salem APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR Name and Address Term Expires HON. R. S. BEAN, Portland .................................................................................... Apri115,1929 HON. W. K. NEWELL, Portland ............................................................................ April 15, 1921 HON. A. C. DIXON, Eugene ...................................................................................... April 15, 1923 HON. CHAS. H. FISHER, Eugene ............................................................................ April 15, 1923 HON. JAMES W. HAMILTON, Roseburg ............................................................ Apri115, 1925 MRS. G. T. GERLINGER, Portland ........................................................................ Apri115,1927 HON. C. C. COLT, Portland ...................................................................................... April 15, 1927 HON. HENRY MCKINNEY, Baker ........................................................................ Apri115,1927 HON. ILLOYD L. MULIT, Portland ........................................................................ April 15, 1929 HON. VERNON H. VAWTER, Medford .................................................................. April 1, 1931 Twenty-Iive ' . aw: N Prince L. Campbe11 Our President Twenty-six K 1 4hm2753m315 v'A A A . 2'9 me: ' mULam1mU ,. 9 - 1. Lu..." Mm 11:1, 1 1 . ..V.14., MW, , 1.4g, 1'," ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS CARLTON E. SPENCER Registrar KARL W. ONTHANK Secretary to the President LOUIS H. JOHNSON Comptroller M. H. DOUGLASS Librarian OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ARTS ELLIS F. LAWRENCE, F.A.I.A, Professor of Architecture B. S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1901 M. S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1902 ALFRED H. SCHROFF Professor of Fine Arts PERCY P. ADAMS Professor of Graphics BA. University of Oregon, 1901 B. S. University of Oregon, 1902 EDWARD H. MCALISTER Professor of Structures BA. University of Oregon, 1890 M.A. University of Oregon, 1893 LOUIS C. ROSENBERG Professor of Architectural Design ARTHUR RUNQUIST Instructor in Art HELEN RHODES Professor of Normal Art Cowles Art School, Boston National Academy of Design, New York City Teachers' College, Columbia University CAMILLA LEACH Librarian Twenty-seven 1H. 5,7,." e v vjaV: .117. .. 9.. mvczl Ad"; Ass; . v 0 1 r 'k mmmfxes "o. r' unwwrimr w K2. 4 1 1a. 2 g. ' yes; ; Snapped Off Guard -eight TWenty .n; n. 9an .n Twenty-nine DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY GEORGE REBEC, Ph.D. Professor of Philosophy Ph. B. University of Michigan Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1897 ERNEST S. BATES, Ph. D. Professor of Philosophy BA. University of Michigan, 1902 M.A. University of Michigan, 1903 Ph.D. Columbia University, 1908 ELIZABETH FOX Instructor in Philosophy B. A. Barnard College of Columbia University, 1908 SCHOOL OF COMMERCE D. WALTER MORTON, C. RA. ' Professor of Commerce B. A. Dickinson College, 1902 M. A. Dickinson College, 1906 B. D. Drew Theological Seminary, 1905 C.P.A. Wisconsin State. Board, 1915 C. C. EDMONDS, M.A. Professor of Commerce M.A. University of Wisconsin, 1919 T. J. BOLITHO, B.A. Professor of Commerce B.A. State College of Washington, 1917 A. L. LOMAX Professor of Commerce RAYMOND H. KINNEY Instructor in Commerce F. M. WARRINGTON Lecturer in Commercial French and Spanish FRANK H. HILTON, J.D. Professor of Business Law J. D. Stanford University CHARLES COUCHE Instructor in Advertising President of Couche Advertising Agency, Portland, Oregon :szrut-k'gcnu ?i. M 4. . r1? ,,-, 5.; g t M E's g ? s f E :b .1. 41. 4,469.4 j .,, .13., ,.m. ..r, a b u a r t S n h 0 J n a e D 7571;, , cf Ci .7 , 00151813949 Wu,1i-IAHJLKQQXLW CHESTER KRONENBERG, M. A. k Instructor in Commerce ' BA. University of Oregon, 1913 1. M. A. University of Oregon, 1918 - 2 SCHOOL OF EDUCATION HENRY D. SHELDON, Ph.D. 9 Professor of Education BA. Stanford University, 1896 1 1 M.A. Stanford University, 1897 1 Ph. D. Clark University, 1900 , C. A. GREGORY, M.A. Professor of Education B. A. University of Indiana, 1908 1 M. A. University of Indiana, 1915 B. W. DE BUSK, Ph. D. Professor of Education B. S. Central Normal College, 1898 B. A. University of Indiana, 1906 Ph.D. Clark University, 1915 ' H. R. DOUGLAS, B. S. Professor of Secondary Education B. S. University of Missouri, 1913 GILES M. RUCH, B.A. Principal of University High School BA. University of Oregon, 1914 FRED L. STETSON Professor of Secondary Education A. N. FRENCH ' Professor of Education SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM ERIC W. ALLEN, B.A. Professor of Journalism BA. University of Wisconsin, 1901 , GEORGE S. TURNBULL, B.A. Professor of Journalism . B. A. University of Washington, 1915 COLIN V. DYMENT, B.A. - Professor of Journalism B. A. University of Toronto UJniversity CollegeL 1900 0 Thirty9one 8 W. F. G. THACHER, M.A. Professor of Rhetoric B.A. Princeton University, 1900 M.A. Princeton University, 1906 Graduate Student University of Chicago, 1906 ROBERT C. HALL Instructor in Printing SCHOOL OF LAW EDWARD W. HOPE, Ph. D. Professor of Law BA. University of Pennsylvania, 1898 Graduate Student University of Berlin, and Munich, 190101 M.A. Stanford University, 1903' Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, 1905 SAM BASS WARNER, LL.B. Professor of Law B.A. Harvard University, 1912 LL. B. Harvard University, 1915 THOMAS A. LARREMORE, LL. B. Professor of Law B.A. Yale University, 1911 LL.B. Columbia University, 1916 JAMES D. BARNETT, Ph.D. Professor of Public Law B.A. College of Emporia, 1890 Ph. D. University of Wisconsin, 1905 E. R. BRYSON Lecturer on Oregon Practice and Procedure SCHOOL OF MUSIC JOHN J. LANDSBURY, Mus. Dr. Professor of Music 1 Mus.Bach. Simpson College, 1900 Mus.Dr. Simpson College, 1909 ALBERT LUKKEN, Mus. Bach. Instructor in Voice Mus. Bach. American Conservatory of Music, Chicago Student of David Bispham, New York City Thirty-two MARTHA FINDAHL lnstructovr' in Voice Graduate University of South Dakota, 1917 Student American Conservatory of Music, Chicago 1 JANE THACHER Instructor in Piano . Student of Leschetizky, Vienna, 1905 LELAND A. COON, B. A. Professor of Music B. A. Alfred University, Alfred, N. Y., 1914 Student New England Conservatory of Music, Boston, 1913 ANNA LANDSBURY BECK, B. A. Instructor in Music BA. University of Oregon, 1918 Student University of California, Simpson College, Colorado .Normal College I INA WATKINS Instructor in Music Columbia School of Music, Chicago Student Mary Goodbas Morgan, Mary Frances Frothinghlm, . Carl Lachmund GEORGE HOPKINS Instructor in Music Student Moszkowski, Paris Student Peabody Conservatory of Music AURORA POTTER Assistant Instructor in Music , Vliwa 1.33.1.1 A r A , $1,934: , F REX UNDERWOOD , Instructor in Violin 1 i 55 Student Leipsic Royal Conservatory of Music. Student Royal Bavarian Conservatory of Music, Wurzburg Student of Michael Frees, Berlin ' ROSS HICKERNELL, Mus. Bach. Professor of Music Bach.Mus. Dana Musical Institute, Warren, Ohio, 1906 Student Northwestern University Student of Bellstedt, Cincinnati Thirty-three. V N 1 mmv-wg-wn v w v. -.u M l, .n 14.141. .709". , 1 9,9-mqam, 9 - 7 . ,n ,v ' a 9 1 1 . - 1 EN . ' S 9 u A' rl : A 4 FRANK BADOLLET Instructor in Music Student Otto Oesterle, New York City Flutist in Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra Pittsburg Symphong7 Orchestra Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND BOTANY ALBERT R. SWEETSER, M.A. Professor of Botany B. A. Wesleyan University, 1884 M.A. Wesleyan University, 1887 Graduate Student Harvard College, 1893-97 r CELESTE FOULKES Assistant Instructor in Botany BA. University 'of Oregon, 1918 ETHEL I. SANBORN, M.A. Assistant Instructor in Bacteriology and Plant Anatomy B. S. State College, South Dakota, 1903 B. A. University of South Dakota, 1904 M. A. University of South Dakota, 1907 DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY OREN F. STAFFORD, M. A. Professor of Chemistry F. L. SHINN, Ph. D. Professor of Chemistry B. A. University of Indiana, 1901 M. A. University of Indiana, 1902 Student Yale University, 1902 Ph. D. University of Wisconsin, 1906 H. IRVING COLE, Ph.D. Professor of Chemistry B. Chem. Cornell University, 1914 Ph.D. Cornell University, 1917 CLYDE MASON, B.A. Assistant Professor of Chemistry BA. University of Oregon, 1919 DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY FREDERICK G. YOUNG, B.A. Professor of Economics and Sociology B. A. Johns Hopkins University, 1886 Student Johns Hopkins University, 1886-87 Thirty-four l'A' .l .0; I" Thirty-Iive w ! m; w wwwfvx , v : w A $ aw k 7: Dean Elizabeth Fox A w: m; AW 7;; 5W? ' V 4195 w $7 $"0$ 0 W f4IR; m WWW x i A Ai x x6w $K$7 A VVX V 0,, wx JAMES H. GILBERT, Ph. D. Professor in Economics BA. University of Oregon. 1903 Ph. D. Columbia University, 1907 PETER C. CROCKATT, M.A. Professor in Economics BA. University of Oregon, 1915 M.A. University of Oregon, 1918 EDWIN C. ROBBINS, Ph. D. Professor in Economics B.A. State University of Iowa, 1910 M.A. State University of Iowa, 1912 Ph. D. Columbia University, 1915 DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LITERATURE HERBERT C. HOWE, B.A. ProfeSSOr of English Literature B. A. Cornell University, 1893 .Graduate Scholar Cornell University, 1893-95 MARY WATSON, M.A. Professor of English Literature B. A. University of Oregon, 1909 M. A. University of Oregon, 1911 NORMA DOBIE, B.A. Instructor in English Literature BA. University of Oregon, 1914 CECELIA SMITH BELL, B.A. Instructor in English Literature B. A. University of Oregon, 1911 DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN FREDERICH G. G. SCHMIDT, Ph. D. Professor of German Language and Literature Student at University of Erlanger, 1888-90 University Scholar at Johns Hopkins University, 1894-96 Ph. D. Johns Hopkins University, 1896 EDWARD THORSTENBERG, Ph.D. Professor of Scandinavian Languages and Literature B.A. Bethany College, 1899 Scholar Yale University, 1900-03 M. A. Yale University, 1902 Ph. D. Yale University, 1904 Thirty-six T----r' JOS azA-uz-z - v-r - vMuQ'LJt-KT w. .mwwA Ju -; w wfm GAHA EARL L. PACKARD, Ph. D. JOHN STRAUB, Lit. D. ROBERT C. CLARK, Ph.D. ANDREW FISH LILIAN TINGLE WM E7- DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY Professor of Geology B. S. University of Wisconsin, 1902 M.A. Leland Stanford Jr. University, 1904 Fellow in Geology University of Chicago, 1904-05 Ph. D. University of Wisconsin! 1908 Professor of Geology BA. University of Washington, 1911 M. A. University of Washington, 1912 . Ph.D. University of California, 1915 DEPARTMENT OF GREEK Dean of College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Professor of Greek LGguages. and Literature B.A. Mercersbvurg College, 1878 M.A. Mercersburg College, 1879 Lit. D. Franklin and Marshall College, 1913 DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY EPH S-CHAFER, Ph. D. Professor of History B. S. University of Wisdonsin, 1894 M. S. University of Wisconsin, 1899 Fellow at the University of Wisconsin, 1900 Ph. D. University of Wisconsin, 1906 Professor- of History BA. University of Texas, 1901 M.A. University of Texas, 1901 Ph. D. University of Wisconsin, 1905 Instructor in History DEPARTMENT OF HOUSEHOLD ARTS Instructor in Household Arts Graduate of Educational Trust School of Domestic Ecgonomy, Aberdeen,,Sc0t1and Student of Robert G0rdon1s College, Aberdeen, Scotland Aberdeen University, 1898-99 . , Teaching Certificate for Chemistry and Physiology from British Government ANTOINETTE SHUMWAY, B. S. Instructor in Household Arts B. S. University of Washington, 1918 HELEN N. RHODES Instructor in Household Arts MRS. EDNA P. DATSON Instructor in Household Arts E. M. SIBBALD Instructor in Home Nursing DEPARTMENT OF RHETORIC AND AMERICAN LITERATURE ERNEST S. BATES, Ph.D. Professor of Rhetoric and American Literature BA. University of Michigan, 1902 M.A. University of Michigan, 1903 Ph. D. Columbia University, 1908 . F. G. THACHER, M.A. Professor of Rhetoric B. A. Princeton University, 1900 M. A. Princeton University, 1906 Graduate Student University of Chicago, 1906 JULIA BURGESS, M.A. Professor of Rhetoric B. A. Wellesley College, 1894 M.A. Radcliffe College, 1901 MARY PERKINS, M.A. Professor of RhetOric B. A. Bates' College, 1898 M.A. Radcliffe College, 1908 IDA V. TURNEY, M.A. Instructor in Rhetoric BA. University of Oregon, 1912 M. A. University of Oregon, 1913 MELVIN T. SOLVE, B. A. Instructor in Rhetoric , . BA. University of Oregon, 1918 A 9 Thirty-eight I - L-L--.-l- J .; . , J4ra....k.f 2311: IN bin w w AHMMMW ugh "g cm: After Classes Thirty-nine DEPARTMENT OF LATIN FREDERIC S. DUNN, M. A. Professor of Latin Language and Literature BA. University of Oregon, 1892 M.A. University of Oregon, 1899 M.A. Harvard University, 1903 HERMAN A. CLARK, M. A. Assistant Professor of Latin BA. University of Michigan, 1909 M.A. University of Michigan, 1910 DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE CAPTAIN RAYMOND C, BAIRD, Commandant Professor of Military Science and Tactics F. R. AGULE, Sergeant-Major ROBERT M. MARTIN, First Sergeant JAMES C. REID, First Sergeant HENRY BLANSIT, First Sergeant DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS EDGAR E. DE COU, M. S. Professor of Mathematics B. S. University of Wisconsin, 1894 M.S. University of Chicago, 1897 Graduate Student University of Chicago, 189991900 University Scholar Yale, 1900-01 WILLIAM E. MILNE, Ph. D. Professor of Mathematics B.A. Whitman College, 1912 M.A. Harvard University, 1913 Ph.D. Harvard University, 1915 EDWARD H. McALISTE-R, M.A. Professor of Mechanics and Astronomy BA. University of Oregon, 1890 M. A. University of Oregon, 1893 DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN MABEL LOUISE CUMMINGS Director of WOmen's Gymnasium Boston Normal School of Gymnastics University of Chicago Tufts College Medical School Rush Medical School Mll99 I'M ; ----,-1 Iy-w mm mm E7" HARRIET W. THOMSON, B. A. Assistant Physical Director for Women BA. University of Michigan, 1904 CATHARINE WINSLOW, P11. B. Instructor in Women,s Gymnasium Graduate Chicago Normal School of Physical Education, 1914 Ph.B. University of Chicago, 1910 EMMA WATERMAN, B. A. Instructor in Physical Education BA. University of Minnesota, 1917 Certificate Of'Hygiene, Wellesley, 1919 DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOG Y EDMUND S. CONKLIN, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology B.A. Springfield, Massachusetts, 1908 Scholar and Fellow in Psychology,'Clark University, 1908-11' M. A. Clark University, 1909 Ph.D. Clark University, 1911 RAYMOND H. WHEELER, Ph. D. Professor of Psychology 1B.A. Clark College, 1912 M.A. Ciark University, 1913 Ph. D. Clark University, 1915 CELIA V. HAGER, M.A. Instructor in Psychology B. A. University of Oregon, 1912 M.A. University of Oregon, 1918 DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES TIMOTHY CLORAN, Ph.D. Professor of Romance Languages B.A. Adelbert College 1Western Reserve UniVersityL 1891 Student University of Berlin, 1897-98 Ph.D. University of Strassburg, 1901 Student University of Paris, 1904-05 Student Madrid, 1905-06 ROSALINA ESPINOSvA, B.A. Assistant Professor- of Romance Languages BA. University of Colnrado, 1917 Forty-one ', "I114 J: ft, 4m;.;.v,p,f..j.,. , zi'F-qra' 1.7, tym- vzxayr .mu..." -w'm'xh 1 Mn 7 ,m.-9..1u.w,m, JENNIE L. FAYARD, B.A. Assistant Professor of Romance Languages B. A. University of California, 1917 ELIZABETH TAYLOR, B. A. Assistant Professor of Romance Languages B. A. Occidental College LOIS E. GRAY, B.A. Instructor in Romance Languages B.A. University of Oregon, 1916 DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN WILLIAM L. HAYWARD Instructor in Physical Education CHARLES A. HUNTINGTON Instructor in Physical Education DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS WILLIAM P. BOYNTON, Ph. D. Professor of Physics B.A. Dartmouth College, 1890 M.A. Dartmouth College, 1893 Scholar and Fellow in Physics in Clark University, 1894-97 Ph. D. Clark University, 1897 GEORGE S. MONK, B. S. Assistant Professor of Physics B. S. University of Chicago, 1913 Graduate Student University of Chicago, 1916-17 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SPEAKING ARCHIBALD F. REDDIE, B.A. Professor of Public Speaking B. A. Valparaiso University 1Honorary1 Graduate of the Emerson College of Oratory ROBERT W. PRESCOTT, B.A. Professor of Public Speaking BA. University of Oregon, 1908 CHARLOTTE BANFIELD, B. A. Instructor in Public Speaking B. A. University of Oregon, 1919 Forty-two WGM warn wf9h mun. wanna, 1933131: GAHA E1; DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY JOHN F. BOVARD, Ph. D. Professor of Zoology B. s. Unix'rersity of California, 19033 M. S. University'of California, 1906 Ph. D. University of California, 1917 CATHERINE W. BEEKLEY, B. S. . Assistant Professor of ZOOIOeg B. S. University of Pennsylvania, 1910 ISABELLE SLAVIN, B. S. Assistant Professor of Zoology B. S. University of Nevada, 1919 EXTENSION DIVISION 3' JOHN C. ALMACK, B.A. ,'- Acting Director :3 B.A. University of Oregon, 1918 MOZELLE HAIR Secretary of Correspondence School DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE W . M gt 3 2 JAMES D. BARNETT, Ph.D. 3 3 Professor- of Political Science 3 3 B.A. College of Emporia, 1890 3 ' 3 1'. Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, 1905 if: 3 33 1 31;? g j a 3 3 an, i 3 '1 33 W I '. 33 ,3 3i 3' f 3 3 3 3 3 i Id! 5 3 i XL 2 3 3 3 , i 3 a , 3, .1 3 '1 '3 3 3 Forty-three elbwiwxim'nWA , $'MW Nam , 9W'W:;m9vft:-' "row W 75.2143. ,QWE-rwfq 3 " 3'? The Dispensary UNIVERSITY HEALTH HE University Infirmary came into existence in the fall-of the school year of 1918, due to the epidemic of influenza which then prevailed throughout the country. A comfortable house just off the campus was secured by the administration and turned into a hospital for emer- gency cases. At the present time the infirmary is under the charge of Dr. E. H. Sawyer and two graduate nurses, Miss E. M. Sibbald and Mrs. M. Sin- clair. The building has a normal capacity of twelve beds. On the lower floor is a ward room, while upstairs there are several small private apartments for special patients. The iniirmary is financed partially by the students and partially by the state. A health fee of $2.50 is exacted from each student as a part of the registration fee for each term and this amount goes to provide care for him when he is ill. Any student in the University is offered the privilege of free consultation with the University physician. In addition to the regular infirmary, a small house adjoining the building has been provided and equipped to care for students with con- tagious diseases. In this way such illnesses may be isolated and given special care. During the fall term of 1919 approximately twenty students were given treatment or consultation every day. A total of 1561 faculty and students were treated in the dispensary, and 74 were actually accommod- ated in the infirmary, during this time. Forty-four s - .- . s - K A ?I' "' Whaling; .i. 3 , O 1,..1. ...'-. .aubt t'g I I V ;. :m-u-.I :Vi !' i L .1 ., '!...b.u "5505.1. ' yv.-'E.-mew w-Q Wm m r: :7 $1091? , mauw .3 . 5"! N. ; , ,- .r .K 5, Jeff; "WW; '7 .. .43; ;.5:. :.."3' 5.. 17 5 .M..215..;iza:$i:m2u.i- litg HOMECOMIN G OW good it seems to be back !-this phrase, better than any other, tells the spirit of Homecoming Week-end, Novem- ber 14-16, 1919. It was the true expression of the feeling of every graduate who was privileged to be back on the campus for the great event. During each of the three days that spirit, the Oregon spirit, was in the air, rampant! The first of the 01d "grads" came Friday. Late in the afternoon the campus was crowded with them and the air filled with the joyful greetings of men and women, old and young, each eager to play once again the part that had so often been his in the past. Friday evening the biggest serpentine and freshman bonfire in - the history of the University was staged on Kincaid field. Early Saturday morning the guests appeared on the campus to renew 01d faculty acquaintances and to see the changes made since "their day." They swarmed through the buildings, noting eagerly every new and 01d feature. For some there were few changes to be noted, but here and there were members of the classes of the nineties to whom almost everything appeared new. The Oregon-O. A. C. football game Saturday afternoon proved a fit- ting dedication for the new turf field. The Oregon team lived up to the University traditions, leaving the field Victorious. What the alumni had come tihomeit to see, became a reality. A large ball at the Eugene armory followed the game. With the last regretful farewell on Sunday evening the curtain fell on the best of all week-ends and there are few who will not long cherish the memories of the wonderful homecoming. Forty-Iive -six Oregon Stunt Forty am Imr-mr m'inv: Rooter Section, Hayward Field Annual Homecoming Blaze , m, , Lang; yr, Jk'eaml w R5,. .: a: .3 .,;.; m A ,4 ll, ,, v22 1 F? Vt v vmeagelw 1 wlw JUNIOR WEEK-EN D HE honor of having staged the most suc- T cessful of all Junior Week-ends goes to the class of 1920. Fortune seemed to smile upon the Whole affair from the opening baseball game to the final glide at the prom, and the weather was all the committee in charge could hope for. THE PROGRAM Thursday 3:45 p. m.eBaseball, Varsity vs. Uni- versity of Washington. Thursday 7:00 p'. m.eState Interscholastic De- bate Championship. Thursday 9:00 p. m.eCanoe Fete. Friday 8:00 a. mr-University Day. Friday 12 :00 noon-Campus Luncheon. Friday 2:00 p. m.eTrack Meet, Varsity vs. Oregon Agricultural College. Friday 8:00 p. m.eSenior Play, ttFacing the Music." Saturday a.m.ePreliminaries, High School Track Meet. Saturday 1 :00 p. mr-Freshman-Sophomore Tug-of-War. Saturday 1:00 p.me-Burning of Freshman Caps. Saturday 2:00 p.m.-Finals of Interscholastic Track Meet. Saturday 8:30 p. m.eJunior Prom. 0 Sunday 11:00 a. m.eChurch services in all churches in Eugene. COMMITTEES General Chairman-V. Lyle McCroskey. Assistant Chairman-eLeslie Schwering. Chief of Police, Campus DayeClifford Mitchell. Entertainment-eFlint J ohns. Canoe FeteeMorris Morgan. Forty-seven FOI'ty-eight Green Cappers Lose The Burning of the Freshman Caps Just Before the Battle Painting the "0' a . . A . . w Improving the Campus A Treat for Shirkers Forty-nine m Duxgugnh ,.a?thvIga$.y , TI-IE PIONEER f a W OFFER this memorial in honor of the T p i: i Oregon pioneer, who represents all that Is ' ' best and noblest in us and who should be y , bi an inspiration to the rising generation," said .; a J . N. Teal in his presentation address when he ' l formally gave the bronze statue of the tiPio- I9 i. Tl neerli t0 the University. I I The unveiling of this statue, which occupies ' 3' A. a prominent place on the campus between the .4 Ha Library and Friendly Hall, was an important ' 1 ' MOT event in University history. It brought to the k , g T ' campus a great many prominent men from all t- T .1 M walks of life, especially the old pioneers of the tT$I - '1 . state to whom the occasion was particularly ..y significant. It meant to them that the struggles T . and hardships which they had undergone to develop a primitive country i - U were not to pass by unheeded. It meant a recognition of the great debt beC. which modern development owes to them. . 7. meyrfl. The statue was modeled by A. Phimister Proctor, of New York, who Siblbuw. had for long cherished the idea of creating some such memorial to the . . . in an a 1 sturdy western ploneers. The Honorable J . N. Teal, of Portland, was at 1- . , the same time imbued. with the idea of erecting a memorial of that nature 'u . . and through his generous assistance Mr. Proctor was enabled to make his dream a reality. It is to these men that the University is indebted - Eugw. for this concrete Visualization of the pioneer, whose courage and unfail- s lth . ing purpose is best expressed in these lines from Joaquin Miller: 1:..- T itI onl k i. :T T. y now that when that land . Th! Lay thick with peril, and lay far alh. It seemed as some sea fallen star, . '7'! T The weak men never reached a hand "32 T. Or sought us out that primal day, wk xi. And cowards did not come that wayfi nut 5mm mi" mag? 3! mt WW .- :t'fwm W l'-- ung 1::3'131IKEICL , fruuzc t 3'33? 1 mqgjxa 1f '35 9 ??:mm 1f M f hum: N33 mil K TIL :3?;r.13'-H1 .13 . 9x251; 3a Pvutil Iv 'wf' . iv '3! z'almm t that ?ng U- '- u s 2 li' M ' zap": a .31' ..Al J5: 1L. ' f I ,q VJ 'i will . ".8 hf 3, 9 fl. w APRIL FROLIC PRIL Frolic, the girls spring festival, Which is staged annually by Womenls League, was held at the menls gymnasium April 12, 1919. The eveningls program was made up of stunts, dancing and eats. During the early part of the entertainment the several womenis organizations put on stunts in competition for the cup awarded for the most original offering. Kappa Kappa Gamma skit took first place. The Kappas included in their feature the Palm Olive girl, with her clever oriental dance; the 1Ritz" girl, who appeared in dainty costumes of rainbow shades; and Campbell soup cans, which looked so like the real thing that the audience claimed actually to feel the pangs of hunger. This display won for them the cup which had for two years been held by the Chi Omegas. The Kappa Alpha Thetas as Belgian puppies, with their songs, stunts and ilgeneral appearance," received first honorable mention, while the Delta Gamma iiRomeo and Juliet" skit was awarded second honorable mention. After the stunts were finished the orchestra tuned up and the danc- ing began. Everybody danced With everybody else, to jazzy music, hold- ing an ice cream cone in one hand, a cookie in the other, and With the end of an all day sucker protruding from their mouths. The committee in charge was composed of Harriet Garrett, general chairman; Helen Brenton, advertising; Stella Sullivan, posters; Marion Coffey and Helen McDonald, programs; Mary Irving and Alice Thurston, finance; Mabyl Weller, eats; and Vivian Chandler, floor manager. FWftyaone 1i; . 5-5:... m' : N mmmn :29 gsmmmig. m, ml-y; . .74 ...V:,.t,, .. 4 . V 'y y , i p A i - COMMEN CEMEN T T the close of the college year, When the last examination is over and the school day worries are lifted from the shoulders of the undergraduates, comes the happiest and most inspiring season of all college dayseCom- mencement. Commencementewhen students put away their textbooks to become the trained men and women of tttomorrow? With the change comes a diploma and all the services of graduation, ever solemn and impressive. These students have accepted the opportunities offered them by the state of Oregon and they are ever willing to return their talents and train- ing for the progress and prosperity of ' their state. With the advantage of his higher education and trained mind the University graduate goes out into the field of service to add one more step in the progress of Oregon and to aid in furthering the interests of the United States. At Commencement time this thought of an indebted- ness which the graduate must pay to the state that has so willingly helped him, comes to his mind. He realizes how little he has accomplished and how much has been given him. Commencement week comes at the close of the school year in J une. ' Every day has its special attraction, every evening is marked With an im- pressive closing. Baccalaureate Sunday finds Villard Hall crowded With eager friends and relatives to watch the long file of Seniors march slow- ly down the aisles to their itfront seats." A service similar to the Baccalaureate is the final Commencement exercise in Villard Hall on Monday morning. The new University alum- ni realize that they are surrounded for the last time by the group of men and women With Whom they have journeyed four years and Whom they have learned to respect and love. Thus these young graduates enter upon the life of the state for which they have been so ably trained. Fifty-two "'2. , . hm..."mv -vrAq w m. M. w. Ni Ix i K r r, .. k . i??? I1 ? a a Q 1 yg 0 NW , 'R '4- V. .4121; I F; w, -5' LIME; W '9 53: Any; ' rm 'ryfu 73": 91h: HM 11.955: h Linf 'htj mt t ' 'Jefb Ii :11 n Psi :91???" . c VWW . w m.gwuaygmaghwwmugs. Fifty-three Commencement Procession :5 $.m me kw w Lynx g$ w wrtursu'xtm ' E 3 11.: w Pajama. Parade Enroute t0 the Station Seeing them Off to W. S. C. Freshman Bonfire Between Halves, Multnomah Game Fifty-four ,1: iygzn, .311 1. 1,111,; 1. .L . -. r r ' xt 1y i l. ,ywaman waxy"! RALLIES ANY and varied costumes graced the Ore- gon rooters at the first football rally held on the night of October 10, before the Multnomah game. Ballet dancers were sand- wiched in between Scotch Highlanders and wild 1 men from Borneo, and pink and white lace affairs 3 were accompanied by staid and practical flannels. i Pep was rampant; the football season was given an auspicious welcome. There was a rally October 30 when the team left for Seattle to play the University of Wash- ington. Led by an ambitious band the long column of fours wended its way to the station "THE CAPTAW and sent the players off with a mighty cheer. WENT DELOWT As an aftermath of this rally several hundred , loyal rooters gathered at the station in a pour- ing rain to welcome home the Victorious team on the following Sunday. Several rallies were fostered by the Washington State game in Port- land. One of these came early on the morning before the game, when , everybody turned out before breakfast to see the team on its way. An- i , y is other was held in Portland that night when a small army of Oregon root- t ers gathered at the Imperial Hotel and from there serpentined up and down the busiest streets, ignoring traffic and conventions alike. The third , 1, , came just before the game, in the form of a serpentine from the Imperial f ? Hotel to the f1eld. In all these the band was in the lead. .1 The rally of rallies was the one held the night before the O. A. C. i 5 game. It started with a serpentine, such a parade as had never before L been witnessed 0n the streets of Eugene. For blocks the writhing line .2: 1 stretched, like a resistless tide, pouring down the streets, emitting a W a continuous din of noise, and then back to the campus and the bonfire at I i Cemetery Ridge. While the bonfire burned, the crowd had a maximum of pep instilled into it by speeches, yells and stunts. The Phi Delta Theta tiAgricultural Rallyi, won the silver cup offered for the best stunt. Then the rally over, the crowd filed away past the glowing embers of the dying fire, ready for the victory of the morrow. . Ad...- .l.h.,' h ills everybody ha-a-a-a-p-p-e-e-e-e-e-e-y?il Fifty-Iive .K' PW : W a Senior Cops Fifty-six The Sophs Perform Flag Rush Tie-up Contest T--;"r "M rfj ORE mm UNDERCLASS MIX EAN Straub said for the forty-second time that it would be a square mix. The J uniors in charge guaranteed that everything would be run in an unimpeachable manner. The judges pledged themselves to absolute and un- swerving impartiality. Under these conditions the Sophomores couldnit help but win. October 11th was the date set for the mix this year and that morning found small knots 0f Freshmen gathered around the posters which had appeared during the night, wondering just how many of the dire threats contained therein should be believed. Then, for the rest of the morning, both classes were busy decorating the grandstands for the afternoon. This furnished excitement for all, for there was a series of attempts to steal decorations and tools on the part of members of both classes. Open clashes were avoided through the interruptions 0f the girls who, just at the critical moment, would demand rescue from a swaying ladder or aid in driving a tack. The judges awarded the attendance, singing and yelling con- tests to the Frosh, to raise their hopes and to keep them from losing faith in their Dean, but from then on their luck was absent from historic Kincaid field. The Sophis pull was the only thing that won the tug-of-war for them but the senior cops declared that it was honest so there was no dispute. Another set of points was chalked up for the second year men when their "army" was declared superior to the stunt staged by the Frosh. The iiag rush proved the Sophomoresi ability to guard their colors and when the fight was stopped by the judges the only colors that the Freshmen had succeeded in gathering were crepe-colored eyes. By the time the tie-upand sand bag contests came along the Sophs had gar- nered enough points to make their winning a certainty, so the judges, in . . a V i V s . a i "k w w J. , j 64,-..1 f, t .I , . 1 .I . A i ,. A , i. i. . V i i . i i A A Am i g i : t 1.. talk .,:A:AA4A '9. rims. ' x;- Ar 2 A A 2Y3 'gr' :4 ';, .sn; ; ...A Q? r- u mwxvuL-ryimmm; mtmwku: :3. w: A , w-MLn-s . i 4:5; " A Ari .N J's; : ' A s A A A A" ;' ' fitrk w 756 t ;. A A: ,, 4v - :4 4-27-19: vama. . . A i' l Fifty-seven 4A,WM TTMNW -; u. .4in-n-l .' r L: , - r ,. y w Afrn-EWW? 3'1an ' . r " 1d '15??? hfsiwtb iM-wmmmgtkuigi ;" m: ' .mi .1 1 a fit of generosity, split the points equally between the two classes. The i . cane rush was a great success, from the Viewpoint of the Victorious Sophs, 3' " but the unlucky Frosh again carried off nothing but wounds and torn 3 h clothes. 9 But it was a square mix, the traditions of the University assured , that, and the Sophomores won, which was also quite in accordance with traditions, so when the fina1.score--Sophs 7715, Frosh 32V2ewas an- nounced, it was felt by all that the ttsquarest mixtt had been a success. W way!" 3"? :? a t x t F a t ' - i E ANNUAL UNDERCLASS MIX h 1' OCTOBER 11, 1919, 1:00 P. M. ' t t h: E The Class M W2! is plntfng 0n this mix to show to the xnxpaytrs cf thir great i 3 State the ideas. Iwncfns :uni Ifulmrc that are dcrix'cd at il'xis scharJL This mix is an. ex. 1 pression of tho :ulmnmgvs 41' :1 mflege mlnmtirm I'Or - t V THIS IS THE SQUAREST MIX, x 1 3 DEAN FQX sky'se'flur'kmyb fgfugl'uz fair over there 11,...ch Comqml. Mm: 011ij ,n-" 5 Point: 1 I . and 53'" a cmch we" term? Krm m: the square Tip 10 From. Noise Lg'nnly a minor detail ; f here. in the. judgment or this canteu. V Sym- t k DEAN STRAUB Silfsaaul :xln'l saw a unhfir mlx h: phony and hammny art: mmHtk-z'; 'jquL , e mylshorl stay :11 um Linivpmity." HI ,1, . XV 1 I' . 4 . , .. s , . .---- nmr ,. z a. 31 en m't s" i a s: a r meuRMu Ii runs 5 'I u l m k N 2 mm 1 ' . ,. . . t All are vewmnu of past mixes and are r-nmpetem MESS SMUAT MOLEMH a and mpable of giving diu'lnious In the must mu ,., . , a, 1 a k serving class. Their nmnes and unprejndicw views 1313 XOUR "BAH. 3110?:er 3 g MI mummy. conditions are as rullows: 1, 1' . ................... a w r i g. 81fo HAYWARrr-"l repeat, my stut-z-rrmm of km, 0 n . m5, Fmsln onb M .L yyar. mu: I believe m-abscdutv. justim: ro '11:: Band Rollswhy um 80pm ft ; I-reshnwn. as they are 111:: 10mm leaders at - . W i the Tinkversny Vr-Jurrnp Cm'lte-IL 30 mm: each" 15 Points? J l V HSHY" HTN'I'JNGTONn-vThmk right. um." KaPEu Sigs un- imrrvdifrmlu Hm; M'cm :03 a , tore are :,3 e z- , .. , a .' IlAR'T SPELLMANu-"Tvn been away for um yearn tlwlr ,:,umeo mun ; nd 0th codxmm m a ii 5 3 MM: zavv: me clmtr tu 2mm. I've vows to thee t . i 1 k1 .' vmwlusiou mm Freshmen are too much :xhnsml." YT,w-V;xxic Rush, 30 men such 0.- IL! l'vinw h : 3h 5 ,Fx- 3 . . , ,. .' . ; UR; '1'le 1:31! tvrrlhlv event Fresh. Gn-waw :1an t , L 'h HXX 0t RLX H'M t vatsy m: the slum 3:4 the Varsity and Mun. t 1. A bunch of ham raking spun! at .21": elder unmuh must use we :lvld later rm 1n the A boy's for a mam. afteruwm. i? Q L 2L 1 : 1; 'w: 4 ' . ' a . t . . , . . y 3 Tue muse M 1m "wk in mm M? puma. X H.wl'l;:; RMIIGIUO mem mch s..- 3:. I'UIIHSL .; . Last. yt-glrj F'resxhnmut whose rlopn 2mm: wyu A nreavar cnmpzmy bf the rabble M11 Rh :3 f rant mu. lnmm to tower the rolnrst er the gallant ; W 9 4. T1.-,- Cunseis. Call 'em what you like. Thu 5012'?N TMS Wm be the 13m! chance far i J 3 mkuvr wouldn't pm 110th Mm w: had. 91:9 R 0. '11 11. to put in"! Primim f"? i ?I now Tm: mono WILL m: smxr WWW? thw'i": "cmw Tm mm t .. . a - 5 . . s ; ,. L g , LD- V?PWIIUIW MM humus KANV VTU.HSzmd 11.1.5.5 :xcrap. .43 mm x r 3 Its! -.--s-----.w..--.--wa F l'ninf'r s vast; ".MWM,,.--,-,,M,",1f; Points . , I , This Is for girls only, Don? h'y v.0 gar. mum. , 1 ' vd more than once rnr we know sum an. You lrgxs'e heard the 0111 sum: or the Mnman. s ' ;e t as we met you .19 open honsv. We woum mm 0'9 014, DMVWR "8!er Hum KW? 31 1 t august mat the Fnishmm sing "I'm hum ' WNW Wing," This WEN dispwws WM 1 1 i ; nvcr Blowing Bubbles." mum: , t ' 1 li a 2 V y a THIS IS THE SQUAREST MIX 1 t1 . ' Fifty-eight STATE PLEDGE DAY OYALTY is, I feel, the keynote of the pledge Which you are. about to make to the State of Oregon," said Governor Ben W. Olcott, as a profound hush fell over the students Who - had thronged Villard Hall to observe the annual pledge day custom of the University of Oregon. The institution of pledge day was established a few years ago by Oswald West, then governor of ' Oregon, Who recognized the responsibility of the ' ; student to the state and the importance of the , leadership of educated men. On October 23, 1919, in Villard Hall, the entire assemblage of students rose in token of assent to this pledge as read by Governor Olcott: tiAs a student of the University which is maintained by the people of Ore- gon, I heartily acknowledge the obligation I owe. The opportunities open to me here for securing training, ideals and Vision for life, I deeply appreciate, and regard as a sacred trust, and do hereby pledge my honor ' that it shall be my most cherished purpose to render as bountiful a re- turn to the Oregon people and their posterity, in faithful and ardent de- votion t0 the common good, as Will be in my power. Itshall be the aim of my life to labor for the highest good and glory of an ever greater commonwealth." . - Fifty-nine FIRST WEEK HE second day of the fall term brought us the first parade of the year when the Frosh exhibited their new green caps, their coat linings and their guileless souls to all who might behold. Their hosts showed them the main points of interest on the campus and later led them to the tiO" on Skinners Butte, where a paint party was held. After everybody present, as well as the ttO," had been daubed the tichildren" were hustled down the street and halted at the Rainbow, where they sang, spoke and danced for their respected elders, who showed their appreciation with waterbags. A score board maintained by the Fijis is one of the interesting fea- tures of pledge day-the Saturday of first week. These enterprising young men, desiring to help the public in its quest for news, station themselves on bicycles in conspicuous places and wait for the freshman girls to go to the fraternities they have chosen. When a girl goes to any house the scout hurries to headquarters to report it. A huge tally card is nailed to the car station on Thirteenth and Alder and in bold figures proclaims that the Gamma ths have 5 and the Pi Phiis 6 and so on through the entire list of fraternities. Frosh Initiation 11 ; '1WMmmsufegquwefum . x7 73: 331 m m TM t'. 23' M! r: L: mam :3. WV: u :ftsxr. ,, On! Thu 9:27 J gan'. 5:: M19? W "-1 1:: Luis: i M l :3 mi; pm". ,'. R 3.4421"; hm m: 3. M12? f3. ? ?LO'TL'JV :2: W W' 63 M U A SOCIETY SENIOR BALL The men,s outdoor gymnasium was transformed into a woody bower for the annual Senior Ball, J une 14. The committee in charge was com- posed of Creston Maddock, chairman, Marion Coffey, Lloyd Tegart, and Helen Anderson. Patrons and patronesses for the affair were Governor and Mrs. Ben W. Olcott, Dean and Mrs. John Straub, Dean Louise Ehr- mann, Professor and Mrs. E. E. DeCou, Miss Camille Dosch, Professor and Mrs. A. H. Schroff, Doctor and Mrs. John Bovard, Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Chambers, President and Mrs. P. L. Campbell, and Doctor and Mrs. James H. Gilbert. J UNIOR PROM The Junior Prom, the most elaborate social event of the season, was sponsored by the class of 1920 at the Eugene armory May 10, 1919. The hall was artistically decorated with green hanging baskets filled with flowering plants and ferns. The patrons and patronesses for the affair were Governor and Mrs. Ben W. Olcott, President and Mrs. P. L. Camp- bell, President and Mrs. W. J . Kerr of Oregon Agricultural College, Mr. and Mrs. George T. Gerlinger, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Dixon, Professor and Mrs. W. F. G. Thacher, William Hayward, Dean Louise Ehrmann and Dean and Mrs. John Straub. The general plans were made by Curtiss Peterson and were carried out by Lee Hulbert, Flint J ohns, Mildred Gar- land and Grace Hammerstrom. Sixty-one Q :1 5.8wa n",- glam. .. r ,:";,,.. r awn, IFRESHHAN GLEE Qt A huge life-like spider spun his web over the merry-makers who danced at the annual Freshman Glee in the armory February 13. Delbert Oberteuffer was general chairman of the dance. The patrons and patron- esses for the evening were Governor and Mrs. Ben W. Olcott, President and Mrs. P. L. Campbell, Dean and Mrs. John Straub, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Dixon, Mrs; M. H. J ewett, Miss Gertrude Talbot, Dean Elizabeth Fox, Mrs. O. F. Stafford, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Baird, Dr. and Mrs. E. H. Sawyer, Pro- fessor and Mrs. F. S. Dunn, Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Gerlinger, and Dr. and Mrs. C. J. Smith. Homecoming Week-end was brought to a most successful close by the Homecominngance at the Armory, November 15, 1919. The patrons and patronesses for this charming affair were Dean and Mrs. John Straub, Professor and Mrs. W. F. G. Thacher, Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Ger- linger, Judge and Mrs. R; S. Bean, Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Chambers, Judge and Mrs. L. T. Harris, Governor and Mrs. Ben W. Olcott, and President and Mrs. P. L. Campbell. Jack Dundore was general chairman of the dance. Sixty-two : '4 m 1W , ' L t. WII'LW 1 ml U Iv" Sixty-three .gmvrr Morgan Macklin Sutton Simola SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS Morris Morgan ....................................................................................................................... President Reba Macklin ................................................................................................................ Vice President Alys Sutton ..................................................................................... .. ...................................... Secretary ArVO Simola ...................................................................................................................... Treasurer SENIOR HISTORY HE class of 1920 has witnessed the most trying epoch in the history of the University. Starting with the fall of 1916, we have dis- tinguished ourselves as the largest and best collection of raw materials to enter the University. In the following two years, our ranks were thinned almost to the vanishing point by the war. Most of the members have since returned but we cannot forget those who will never return. As Freshmen, we fathered enough disturbing elements to give us fireside reflections for years to come. In our sophomore year we came back highly impressed With the magnitude of our duty toward the new Frosh. The third stage found us ready to take an active part in the leadership of the campus: and in student affairs. By a prolonged series of honest efforts we have arrived at the final lap of our college course. The last year is the brightest and contains the most constructive pro- gram. We have brought the student life back to its normal state and perpetuated the many ancient and time-honored traditions, which were so badly shattered during the past two years. During our short stay here we feel that we have taken advantage of the best of the opportunities given us and have profited by the Oregon Spirit which was first instilled into us at the beginning of our college ft??? career. We have characterized ourselves by zealous activity. MORRIS MORGAN. Sixty-four m 1:. w1MM-a awn W M, 1 mug... ga unluaggi AK ammw :;;WY..:m .. 1m; 4; 4mm . l. ' 11' lam :33! h d: ?'I 1: ti 1 waginsw.gA;Ww-y A .341. 1," . ADAMS, CHESTER ................................................................................ Myrtle Point Alpha Tau Dmega ' ANDREWS, MARION ...................................................................................... Eugene Sigma Delta Phi Eutaxian ARMANTROUT, GUY E. .................................................................................. Eugene Sigma Alpha Epsilon ARMSTRONG, J. KENNETH .................................................................... Portland Varsity Debate m; Forensic Council CU; Alumni Medal Winner QM Tau Kappa Alpha Sixty-Fjve vi..4;1:;g,mg.sasm.$:-,,.- Y u . H amok mum , w pug. mu .Afmnlda:Ma 4mm CARLISLE, LAY ........................................................................................ The Dalles 2, ; am Delta Tau Delta . CASE, HELEN ................................................................................................ Tillamook Alpha Phi COLTON, GRETCHEN .................................................................................. Portland Alpha Phi Kwama; Women,s Athletic Association; Canoeing; Students' Art Club ANDERSON, STANFORD ............................................................................ Portland Kappa Sigma Alpha Kappa Psi; Torch and Shield; President Associated Students MM Varsity Football; Varsity Track; Order of the 0"; Friars Sixty-six g.- 4mwrszszw'n ' ' BADER, NEWTON ................................................................... '...Aroma.s, California Sigma Alpha Epsilon Y. M. C. A. Cabinet BAGLEY, ELVA ANNE .................................................................................. Portland Hendricks Hall Emerald LZL GD; Women,s Emerald QL QLWomerfs League Exec- utive Board OD; Eutaxian BAIN, LYLE M. ................................................................................ Poplar, Montana . Phi Gamma Delta Sigma Alpha; Torch and Shield; Gobblers; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet CD, UH; Treasurer 0D; University Band UL QL OD; Varsity Track Squad; Class Football Cu, OJ, OD; Class Basketball QL Ch; Varsity Soccer UL QL 0D; Class Soccer m. BARENDRICK, E. H. .................................................................................... Portland Friendly Hall Sixty-seven ' 'r 7.1m: BARTLETT, KENNETH .............................................................................. Estacada Beta Theta Pi Varsity Football QL an, OD; Order of the 0"; Varsity Track m; Friars; Alpha Kappa Psi; To-Ko-Lo; Athletic Council 0D. BENNETT, DOROTHY .................................................................................. Portland Chi Omega BLUROCK, FRANCES ........ L ....................................................................... Vancouver Sigma Delta Phi Theta Sigma Phi; Emerald UL QL an, OD. BULLOCK, SAM ............................................................................................ Portland Sigma. Chi Sixty-eight ",1, 1.... 'm'u .. .m ' "-rorw f,r'?' x m ,, .pv . . 13E i; . -' . ' - Maul iuggmr. wavunmir n. A N..a w -...a..-.... mu- 4-,. ; - BOWEN, MARION .................................................................... Livingston, Montana Hendricks Hall Tre Nu; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet OD. BOWLES, ALBERT J. ..................................... , .............................................. Portland Kappa Sigma Nu Sigma Nu; Order of the m0"; Sigma Alpha; Varsity Track Team m. BROCK, HAROLD .......................................................................................... Pendleton Kappa Sigma BRANDON, PETER ........................................................................ Tyler, Minnesota Sixty-nine ",9 v .ma. a3... :21. $145 iii. a prl-vw ., -.-.--mv-...-..-um , - .w. -. . ' m: eswmwnmlw...w.w , - - 1a Californ J Long Beach HELEN C Entered as a Junior BURKE, Oregon Club; 1 from Los Angeles Normal School ish Club. Span Eugene CADY, CLARENCE Friendly Hall . , , w ,V, . .. , . , : l ,3! :7 .1? 3 . I9 ; ,155: bun-mihkzltvwwb, ...i..; guvgafygie urn .Wmldixu, 1!.gvinzgn! m; ' .1733 .y. Hillsdale , CLEM CAMERON Delta Gamma Hillsdale ERON, RONALDA CAM hvz gtgti.iu .1 Phi Beta 21111 m G g -.. ,., V wuw'! 1 wmum " WW, ', "qt m W" CANNING, LAUREL .. .................................................................................. Monmouth Alpha Phi Zeta Kappa Psi; Women,s Educational Club; Greater Oregon Commit- tee; Inter-Sorority Debates BL OD; Entered as Junior from Monmouth Normal. COLEY, FRED CARTER, SPRAGUE ................................................ Portland CASE, VICTORIA ......... Portland Hendricks Hall Theta Sigma Phi; Vice President Pot and Quill OD; Entered as Junior from Reed College. Seventy-one CASE, ROBERT O. .............................. Portland Delta Tau Delta Sigma Upsilon; Sigma Delta Chi; Crossroads; Emerald Staff UL QM Oregana Staff CD, 09; Track UL 2 ;. French Club; Editor Lemon Punch; Honor Student in Rhetoric. CHAMBERS, VICTOR .................................. .......................... Cottage Grove Delta Tau Delta COPENHAVER, LUCILE .............................................................................. Eugene COX, EDWARD P. ....................................................... Friendly Hall Seventy-two ' , W ' fW r - i" "f : "57v p Y. A ww ' , ' V' 11m .-r.- "6'- m.: v . v AMRB awn mmN-Ptvsbm V 3v; CRANDALL, CHARLES ........................................................................................ Vale Sigma Chi Delta Theta Phi; Class Basketball BL OD; Varsity Yell Leader 0D, 63 Assistant Yell Leader 3N Emerald Staff 9L QM Manager Senior Basketball OD. DAVIDSON, ROY .................................................................................................... Helix 0W1 Club DAVIS, LOUISE .............................................................................................. Portland Theta Sigma Phi; Tre Nu; Eutaxian 8L Uh; Presiient Women,s League HQ; Student Council; Emerald QL BI, OD; Oregana MM Womews Emerald QL Ch, 00; Executive Board Women,s League m. DIMENT, GLADYS ...................................................................................... Marshfield Sigma Delta Phi Mask and Buskin; Eutaxian QL Ch, 0H. Sm enty-three DUNDORE, JACK ............................................................................................ Portland Kappa Sigma Emerald UL QM Band Oh QL OD; Manager of Oregana QM Circu- lation Manager of Oregana CD; Football Squad OJ, CD; Class Treasurer m; Executive Committee GD; Student Council GM To-Ko-Lo; Friars. DU BUY, HELEN .............................................................................................. Eugene Kappa Kappa Gamma DUNIWAY, DOROTHY .................................................................................. Portland Kappa Kappa Gamma Theta Sigma Phi; Emerald Staff QL GD, 00; Tre Nu; Gerlinger Cup; Oregana Uh, OD; Senior Woman on Student Council 0D; Scroll and Script. EDWARDS, WARREN ........................................................................... Cottage Grove Beta Theta Pi Mews Glee Club. Seventy-four ELLIS, LORAN ............. ...... . ................................. E ugene Friendly Hall Architectural Club; Art Club. ERNEST, MAUDE .............................................................................................. Eugene Oregon Club Spanish Club; Entered as Senior from Emporia College. ESTES, NEWTON .............................................................................................. Eugene Varsity Track Ch, OD; Class Basketball CD; Interfraternity Handball Championship Doubles GM; Order of the "O". EWER, A. ETHEL .............................................................. Oregon Club Seventy-flve l K , , .. hwy", Mam; 3H",- , 3 L .f , I34 . .w,....,.;.w.w.:a.-l FLINT, HELEN .......................................................................................... Junction City Oregon Club Zeta Kappa Psi; Tre Nu. FOSTER, BYRON .............................................................................................. Eugene S-Maralda FOULKES, HORACE ......................................................................................... Portland Delta Tau Delta President Architectural Club 0n. .n -,,A FOWLER, FRANK E. .................................................................................. Pendleton Beta Theta Pi Nu Sigma Nu; Order of the 0, ; To-Ko-Lo; Sigma Alpha; Class Presi- dent QM Varsity Basketball QL GM; Captain Ch; Frosh Basketball; Man- ager of Track 8N Student Council 6W; Oregana Staff QM Athletic Council an. Wmm: x-wnuwm .uw- kgw. Seventyvsix W "W" '" ""w-am-aw.,. 7 Na. , N.- ,, . . ; ,, , ;Lu.,gw,mgsa5auz: .1153, sgam x .awumw 1 ma . .t ; FOX, JAY ............................................................................................................ Portland h :i Kappa Sigma GERRETSON, WILLIAM ................................................................................ Portland Delta Tau Delta GEISLER, GEORGINE .................................................................................... Portland Kappa Kappa Gamma GODFREY, ERA ................................................................................................ Lebanon Delta Gamma Secretary Associated Students OD; Executive Council MM Class Secre- tary CD; Kwama; Student Council 00. . ... A ' Seventy-seven GRAY, MARGARET ........................................................................................ Portland Alpha Phi HANSEN, EVA .............................................................................................. Marshfield Hendricks Hall Zeta Kappa Psi; Eutaxian; Tre Nu; Athletic: Association OL QL CD, 0D; Secretary Athletic Association QM Varsity Basketball QM Hockey m; Secretary WomeWs League GD. HARBKE, GLADYS .......................................................................................... Portland Chi Omega HARDY, THOMAS ........................................................................................... John Day Friendly Hall Sigma Alpha. Seventy-eight 1, JVM u k VJMMtj x ,2. m: a . V " - '3 -3 3 533-333" me 3k'wmwh WWWu , . l. . 1 . m 5N... $2,, HOSMER, BEN W. ........................................................................ Billings, Montana Oregon Club Entered from Allegheny College. HULBERT, LEE .................................................................................................. Albany Sigma Chi Alpha Kappa Psi; Business Manager of the Emerald OD. HUNT, JOHN ...................................................................................................... Portland Kappa Sigma HUNTINGTON, HOLLIS .......................................................................... The Dalles Phi Delta Theta Varsity Football 32L 33L OD; Friars; To-Koleo, SevenLy-nine .1- i bk. 5 "1'" 13:3 Erma it'. w 1'; asuomrw , 3:305": .. "yawgtfv -.. A-wxhua . H. A Amnis:nrn. , IRVING, MARY .................................................................................................... Oswego Kappa Kappa Gamma JAMIESON, HARRY .......................................................................................... Portland Phi Delta Theta Class President QM Student Council 00; Alpha Kappa Psi; Oregana Staff CH; Vice President Interfraternity Council ML JOHNSON, ALLEYN .......................................................................................... Gaston Delta Gamma JONES, NORRIS .................................................................................................... Baker Bachelordon Eighty mm SibMa ;, mywmehmr A-v- :dr. gas" 1 .y wt 1 ' 79:99.29 : .Wf vhlssanv nxnysz 1n! 'Qi!'i5$4:4!' Walcrzu'luv - shwuu JUDKINS, JOY .............................................................................. , ..................... Eugene Alpha Delta Tre Nu; Glee Club QL GD, 00; Spanish Club 90; Y.W.C.A. Cabinet 61 KEAGY, BEULAH ............................................................................................ Portland Delta Psi Mu Phi Epsilon; Glee Club UL QL 6L 0D; Eutaxian; Y. W. C. A. KINNEY, RAYMOND .......................... , ............... . ....Oak1and, California Delta Tau Delta Alpha Kappa Psi; Honor Student in Commerce. KAY, MARJORIE .. ............................................................... Salem . Gamma Phi Beta M M... 50am; , V ,1 Km... ame 3:3. aham; A nag... KENDALL, EVANGELINE .......................................................................... Jamieson Hendricks Hall KNIGHTEN, WILY ................................................................................ Grass Valley Friendly Hall 3h. , 1' 1 $kilbb ' ERIN KNOPP, GRACE ................................................................................................... Eugene H k1- L. h. Oregon Club ; ." . Zeta Kappa Psi; Scroll and Script; WomeWs Forensic: Council; Treas- W" . M urer Eutaxian; President Spanish Club; Womerfs Doughnut Debate. LAKE, ADELAIDE .............................................................................................. Eugene ' ' "aw Emerald UL QL 6L UH; Editor Oregana GD; Oregana Staff QL 0D; Student Council 00; Glee Club QM University Historian OD; Historian Staff GU; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet QM W. A. A. Oflicer BM Theta Sigma Phi; " km Tre Nu; Womews Emerald. -m 3:75:71 w ..,. Eigh ty-t W0 s . 1.! ' .$9 3 ,,: .,,, "-1: 4 : wA.rwn:vn-vv.ww umvmmavjirgg ' Tgiy" : 3' LARAWAY, THURSTON ................................................................................ Portland Delta Tau Delta Alpha Kappa Kappa. LIND, HERMAN ................................................................................................ Portland ' Phi Gamma Delta Friars; Alpha Kappa Psi; Order of the q0 ; To-Ko-Lo; Varsity Basket- ball 02L BL OD, Captain 00; Varsity Baseball QL Ch UH, Captain OD; Varsity Soccer 00; Emerald QL 00. 4.: , KNAPP, STANLEY ........................................................................................... Eugene ,u I; LOUIE, POND ............................................................................................. V ....... Portland , I'Tig'htx -t111ee MACKLIN, REBA ............................................................................................ Portland Delta Gamma Mu Phi Epsilon. MADDEN, ELMO ...................................................................... Kitano, Osaka, Japan ' Delta Tau Delta Y. M. C. A. Cabinet QM Treasurer BM President OD; Soccer QM Student Council GD, 0D; Vice President Student Body BM Associate Editor Oregana BM Sigma Alpha. MADDEN, HARVEY .................................................................. Kitano, Osaka, Japan Delta Tau Delta MARGASON, MERLE .................................................................................... Portland Phi Delta Theta Nu Sigma Nu; Torch and Shield; Sigma Alpha; Varsity Track Squad an. y s e i 1 p ..- "' 13:511.: '1 Q 1 Irma..vtszwg n: r, PE w MATHES, MARY .............................................................................................. Ashland Hendricks Hall McARTHUR, LINDS'AY ...................................................................................... Baker Owl Club Vice President Student Body OD; Sigma Alpha; Or:gana Staff BL Y. M. C. A. Cabinet ex 00, 00; Vice President CU; Student Council 00; Foot- ball Squad QL BL MARSTERS, LEONA ...................................................................................... Roseburg Delta Psi MCCREADY, LYNN ........................................................................................ Eugene Sigma Chi Eightyfive MCGILCHRIST, ETHEL ..................................................................................... Salem Delia Delta Delta MCCORNACK, MARY .......................................................................... Klamath Falls MCCROSKEY, LYLE .......................... 4 .................................................................. Salem Phi Gamma Delta Torch and Shield; Mask and Buskin; Sigma Upsilon; Executive Com- mittee Student Body Ch, 00; Phi Delta. Phi. MCKEY, MILES ................................................................................................ Portland Friendly Hall Delta Theta Phi. Eighty-six $$4 0V .1 .3 . x "J , m '1 MCMURPHEY, ADAH ANTOINETTE .......................................................... Eugene Alpha Phi Mask and Buskin; Student Council 90; Glee Club UL CD, C30, 0D; President Glee Club 00; Orchestra GL QL BL Hendricks Hall MELLINGER, BLANCH ............ ; .................................................................. Newberg MILLER, DOROTHY ............................................................................................ Halsey Hendricks Hall MORGAN, MORRIS ........................................................................................ Portland Alpha Tau Omega Alpha Kappa Psi; Torch and Shield; Band and Orchestra ML QM President of Class 00. Eighty-seven - :2.uv,g,vmm3mns'w4fww f?f?ff ' . -,, W ",9... Marne . , aim m: . W 4-9 Jakxg Wk : . r. a: ..- m '9. ,, m4: m.gn. thhlggznfxr' MORROW, LUCEIL .......................................................................................... Portland Delta Gamma Eutaxian; President of Eutaxian; Executive Board of Women,s League; Pot and Quill; Scroll and Script. MOSS, JEANNETTE ................................................................................. Grants Pass Ka, pa depa Gam -3 President of Women,s Athletic Association; Vice President BM Head of Swimming QM Vice President of Y. W. C. A. OD; Varsity Swimming up my Hockey UM Kwama. NAIL, JAMES ERNEST ...................................................................... Klamath Falls Alpha Tau Cmega Class Debate; Class Basketball QL cw; Mask and Buskin; Varsity De- bate Squad 0D; Honor Student in Commerce. NASH, RUTH .................................................................... Aberdeen, South Dakota Delta Gamma Eighty-eight .,M,,...a.wv4 uwwrhwn NEWBURY, DONALD .............. Medford Sigma Nu OLIVER, MILDRED ..................................................... ..LaGrande Hendricks Hall Students, Art Club; Entered as a Junior from Whitman. PARKER, CHARLES .................................................................................... Philomath Friendly Hall PATTERSON, CHARLOTTE E. . .Portland Chi Omega Eighty-nine PAULSIEN, GLADYS ........................................................................................ Newberg Hendricks Hall PETERSON, CURTISS ...................................................................................... Eugene Beta Theta Pi Mask and Buskin; Glee Club UL QL BL VD; Manager Glee Club On; Manager Oregana Kn; Senior Play QM Student Council 010. PETERSON, ELIZABETH ............................................................................ Hillsboro Hendricks Hall PFOUTS, JAMES ................................................................................... Junction City Friendly Hall ' L3 tun ; ' .L A :-Q: . V mp. . .11 V ' ; . 74;. my: wt 2 1 Wm! 3m . . ,3 it; w u w 2' 3f f , , . Qer4 3.! .17 r. : . A: W1 453:1'3': :Wh 31 k - 47 p; 1 PHILIPS, NORMAN .................................................................................... The Dalles MY: Sigma Alpha Epsilon Mask and Buskin. REDMOND, LUCILE ...................................................................................... Redmond m Hendricks Hall Pot and Quill. , .9: '33 ' ,W' ,, , ' REED, HELENE .................................................................................................. Eugene Eutaxian; Athletic Association; Varsity Hockey Team UL m; V01- unteer Band. B. RICHARDSON, EARLE ............................................................................ McMinnville Orevg'ana Staff; Emerald; Entered as a Senior from McMinnVille College. 33" L: ' Ninety-one Elli! artilkurf Un la! V! 1:3 .Cnfbrlsalk. ,r lievtluicrqr Infulln 2!: 503? if! N AA y. Y X .. e .. :21; fizax: mil. ...w.:$ a!f....,:.3 5:!!! hi? , . V . l Klamath Falls Alpha Tau Omega , GEORGE D. RUCH, GERALDINE . RIGGS .tukh.r1zi . k 2 .. yo: Eugene S 1a Astor PENCER I. , ROSS Nu 1gma S 10 GRAYCE Ontar , E G A S Delta Gamma Ninety-two SCHMIDLI, CARMEN ................................................................................ Oregon City haw F Hendricks Hall Entered as a Senior from Monmouth Normal. SCOTT, RANDALL ........ , .............................................................................. S pringfleld Student Council CH; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet CD, OD; President of Y. M. C. A. OD; Student Volunteer Band 9L BL 0D; Treasurer GD; President 00; i; Laureans; French Club; Koyl Cup. SIMOLA, ARVO ................................................................................................ Portland Phi Gamma Delta Class Treasurer; To-Ko-Lo; Mask and Buskin; Varsity Wrestling Team; Oregana Staff 010. SIMONSON, HERBERT ................................................................................ St. Johns Entered as a Senior from McMinnville College. Ninety-three SLAUGHTER, WILLIAM D. .................................................... Fairburg, Nebraska SKIDMORE, WILLIAM R. ................................................................................ Eugene Condon Geology Club; Freshman Football 0M Class Football 0D. SMITH, BULA ................................................................. '. .............................. Pendleton Gamma Phi Beta SMITH, IRVA ...................................................... Walterviue Sigma Delta Phi Scroll and Script; Kwama; Vice President VVomems Leavg'ue; Vice Pres- ident Eutaxian on; French Club. Ninety-four lgm " Q SMITH, EVELYN ............................................................................................ Redmond Pi Beta Phi Mask and Buskin QL BL 0D; President 0D; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet MM Euvtaxian; Womems Band BL m; President BM Dial; Womews League Executive Board m. SMITH, IRVING ................................................................................................ Redmond Phi Delta Theta Architectural Club UL CD, Gd, OD. SORENSON, NENA ........................................................................ Arcadia, Nebraska Alpha Delta Graduate Kearney State Normal School, Kearney, Nebraska. SPELLMAN, BART .......................................................................................... Portland Sigma Nu Varsity Football 0L QL GU, 00; Football Coach 1920. Ninety-five Aw ymummam 5;..22 SPENCER, BERNICE ........................................................................................ Eugene Pi Beta Phi ii i SUTTON, ALYS ................................................................................................. Portland Delta Zeta Delta Gamma Delta; Secretary Senior Class; Secretary Womerrs League GM Intramural Debate Championship; Class Swimming Team BM En-tered as a Junior from Louisiana University. SUSMAN, RUTH ............................................................................................... Portland Hendricks Hall unwrxy,v 4 1 aw rvr 5: TAYLOR, GRETCHEN .................................................................................... Portland Hendricks Hall v Hm? w. w W $ Ninety six 3 yWanWM'sW':-V !.:7... , '- 6-3115: v - 2 ' a w , f -MA: ,, , . mm, , av-mm! fm': U 4,13; 9,; $91.5 3rg w: o. I Luv k "Wm k" ' Dormitory Club Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 232, OD; Student Volunteer Band. TURNER, MARY ....................................................................... . Sigma Delta Phi .1 . , ,. 22' ; 27" VAN SCHOONHOVEN, ALICE .................... .. 2 Kappa Kappa Gamnu President Spanish Club 0D. VAN SCHOONHOVEN, VERA .................................................... Kappa Kappa Gam a Ninety-seVen THOMPSON, RICHARD ................................................................................ Portland .................... Eugene .......... Portland .................. Portland I2 E 2 a "22' : :53 2 2 wm : . ; -'d-$-.$-;;vx xaadua-gr 2;; gxwuu.ew2-m2wm-s.aag g 2 WADE, FRANCIS .................................................................. Waitsburg, Washington Sigma Alpha Epsilon Entered as a Senior from Paciflc University. WAKEFIELD, ETHEL HARVEY .................................... Long Beach, California Hendricks Hall Zeta Kappa Psi; Intersorori'ty Debate; President WomeWs Forensic League; French Club; Undergraduate Representative Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Athletic Tournament; Student Volunteer; Varsity Debate Team; Womerrs Educational Club. WELLER, MABYL .............................................................................................. Eugene Kappa Kappa Gamma President Y. W. C. A. 0D; Eutaxian; President Tre Nu; Class Basket- ball 60; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 6N Secretary Tre Nu CD; Executive Board WomeWs League 6L OD. WHEELER, PAULINE ....................................................................................... Eugene Delta Delta Delta Entered as a Junior from Stanford University, Ninety-eight WHEELER, RUTH ............................................................................................ Eugene M h '1 'w' Pi Beta Phi mu 6,. J. p3 WHITE, HERALD .................................................................................. Cottage Grove . Beta Theta Pi 2 ml, h" President Associated Students m; Chairman Homecoming Committee , - t ' OD; To-Ko-Lo; Y. M. C. A. rm" FM w: .4 WHITAKER, HELEN .............................................................................. Myrtle Point Hendricks Hall n"' ' 4; v aad'd ru " WINTER, INGA ................................................................................................ Portland Hendricks Hall .t W ' Ninety-nine . WILLIAMS, BASIL ............................................................................................ Eugene Alpha Tau Omega Varsity Football UL QL BL OD; YORAN, BEATRICE .......................................................................................... Eugene Delta Gamma MILLER, KERBY ......................................... . ....................................................... E ugene NICHOL, WALTER .......................... . ....................................................... Hood River Sigma Chi Nu Sigma 'Nu; Entered from Reed Csllege. One hundred . 3.4:: Chapman Brys on Slotboom Gamble . JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS Nish Chapman ........................................................................................................................ President Lyle Bryson ..................................................................................................................... Vice President Madeline Slotboom ................................................................................................................ Secretary John Gamble .............................................................................. Treasurer JUNIOR HISTORY v Our history begins With the "wearini o, the greenii in the fall of 1917. i That year was an exceptional one due to the war and marked a crisis at the University. However it was concluded successfully with much credit to Our freshman endeavors. During our first year a heavy burden was placed on our shoulders, that of upholding the customs and traditions of "mighty Oregon" during the war period. This we entered into with grim determination. In ath- letics we took a prominent part, being represented by men who later form- ed the nucleus of the Varsity teams. Three of last yearis champion basket- ball five were 1921 men while six of our number performed against Har- Vard. On baseball and track teams we have been well represented. Mem- bers of our class are on the Oregana and Emerald staffs, in the orchestra and band, and are serving on the glee clubs. Although our class this year is composed of many students who orig- inally belonged to other Universityiclasses, a spirit of unity has not been lacking. Next fall will find the newly attained Seniors back in the Univer- sity striving for the much coveted diplomas and untiring in their efforts toward attaining a mightier and more prosperous Oregon. NISH CHAPMAN. One hundred two --... 1 bear! A - -.,. 'Qm m-umwaeg4m-gaamwxsmaa 'v . ,wr. .ct-amw ,atil'm JUNIOR JAZZ JINKS HE members of the junior class, garbed in both ancient and freakish design, gathered in the ments gymnasium on the night of October 24 i for the annual Junior Jazz Jinks. The crowd enroute to the gym ; offered the campus one of the Wildest and weirdest parades ever staged at i the University. Partners for the affair were selected by lottery. Such conveyances as wheelbarrows, roller skates and bicycles were in vogue. Dancing was the principal diversion of the evening although much circus ttside-play" was indulged in. What could be heard of the orchestra above the laughter M and shouts of the merry-makers was not of the aesthetic variety. Re- 33W freshments consisted of cider and doughnuts. 152! W V; The committee in charge of the J unior Jazz Jinks consisted of Sam Lehman, Theodora Stoppenbach, Alexander Brown and Dick Lyans. One hundred three pwc'"?h n' .w- 1," Lima , 53" KOYL CUP . HE Koyl cup, offered to the best all-round junior man by Charles W. Koyl, was awarded to Herald White last J unior Week-end. Herald White was the sixth man to receive the cup. As well as having an excellent scholarship record, Herald White has been prominent in campus activities: president of the Associated Students, 3; president of the Y. M. C. A., 3; manager of football, 3; treasurer of the junior class; wrestling manager, 2; assistant manager of the Oregana, 2; manager of the Girls Glee Club, 2. He is a member of Beta Theta Pi, To-Ko-Lo, Sigma Alpha, Friars and the Men,s Glee Club. WMWN-, One hundred four . .W ,.m$3,v,m.mn..-at tum a , '4' GERLINGER CUP HE Gerlinger cup, offered to the best all-round junior woman by Mrs. George T. Gerlinger, regent of the University, was awarded to Dorothy Duniway at the 1919 Junior Prom. Miss Duniway is an honor student in Journalism; member of the student council; news editor of the Emerald, 3; associate editor of the Emerald, 4; and for two years has been a member of the Oregana staff. She is a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma, Scroll and Script, Theta Sigma Phi, and Tre Nu. The Gerlinger cup, together With the Koyl cup, is to remain on the campus and Will be awarded each year. One hundred five Nish is an all around athlete, stu- dent, and man of executive ability. He has a personality that accounts for it. He is the busiest man in the junior class. ' As a southpaw twirler heis there. Carl claims he gets by like a crutch with our co-eds but we've heard different. It takes a left handed man to throw the proper line to a woman. Lyle makes a pretty fine city editor, we know; she turns the Em- erald out for us thrice weekly brim full of news and everything. Besides all this she scurries about helping to get out this Oregana; runs down stray tips and lagging reporters; and shell still tell you its a great life. Bei always has some committee meeting or other that she iimust ily to? We missed her last fall when she was East and weire mighty glad to have her with us again. He's one of those trim men who always looks neat, and style plus when he steps out. Don likes track and hes in to make it sooner or later. Ken is a sober fellow, who has no end to the success with which he gets by With ladies. He denies it but take a squint at him. liCom- merce interests me more than wom- en," says Bickel. Nell is a regular student. She joys in journalism work and is a whiz in commerce. When inter- viewed why she didnit like marine insurance she said, 'tOh, whats the use? Pm never going to be a sailor anyway." Helen Frease was afraid she would freeze in the North Dakota blizzards so she came out here. Last winter the ,freeze nearly froze her but in spite of it all she is still able to study rhetoric, One hundred six I t lailxi 2. I mmmmm WW ' awmmmmww. One hundred seven Maud is quiet and unassuming but that is what people like about her. We happen to know of a cer- tain athlete who is also very fond of quiet and unassuming people. Brandy, the big'halfbaok on the grand team, is shy like all big ath- letes, when at home; but now that the Pasadena trip is over, pictures show us that he has winning ways. Brandy is an ardent subscriber of all movie magazines. Irv is back with us after chasing subs on the briny deep. His major in college is co-ed smiles. Dorothy with her petite ways up- holds Eugene's reputation for put- ting out pretty women. When time hangs heavy on her hands, she wanders over to her commerce classes. Speaking of aesthetic dancing here is Mable. She does it well for we have seen her. It is her hobby to study in front of the fireplace. One would think it hard to concentrate, but her high grades disprove all theories. Don Davis claims that Nyssa is one of the worlds beauty spots but we suspect that he is just trying to talk himself up as a sample. Don can run and talk and thereby makes a good bill collector. When a man majors in romance languages one can infer that it is the romance and not the language he is after. Obviously not all pret- ty senoritas are instructors. How about it, Lombard? Germany is an artist in every re- spect. She is one of Prof. Schroffls best art students. To believe it you have only to see her paintings. Jake is a student and an athlete. Jake likes Pasadena very well but since hets an architect by trade he thinks it best to stay in Eugene until his plans are complete. There is one question that we would like to ask Annette: ttWhys is French the language of langu- agesiw We knew Annette would smile at that. Being too athletic for O. A. 0., Ruth came to a regular school, the same being called Oregon. How she could stand the gaff there for two years is more than we can understand. It is said that Si used to jump the neighbors fences. No wonder hels there when it comes to pole vaulting. Besides being a good ath- lete heis up to his neck in com- merce work. He likes it. Bob is one of those sprouting journalists, who spend most of their time over in the little white annex, back of McClure. His favorite oc- cupation is perusing comic sections of all the newspapers from New York to Oregon. Eve kids along her professors and the Theta cook too. How she does it, nobody knows; yet she has those eyes, you know, a la Theda Bara. Leta helps the Gamma Phi ro- mances by studying the romance languages. Up to date she seems to have been a very successful coach in the art and the course is becoming very popular. And this is Leith Abbott, upon whose manly breast gleam many pins. Leith is a whiz of an editor and when we get him out on the track he more than keeps up his Whizzing record. One hundred eight wwmmmw mww MVW One hundred nine 2:er ' The Education building claims Marie for its own. She spends most of her time learning how to teach other people what they don't know. It is a long way to the Philippine Islands, but even at that Felix Be- lusvo never looks homesick. Franklwarank is a good student even though he does cut psychology class once in a while. It doesnit seem necessary for a person Who lives in Eugene to ma- jor in economics, but maybe Lillian is planning to have a home of her own some day. Minnie tried Normal School and then decided to see how this place compared with it. So far she is all for Oregon. :3 Jack is a business man of much repute. When you see him down town poking around "The Table Supply" you may correctly surmise that he is looking for a way to cut down Kappa Sigma expenses. No, James doesn't carry mail, thatis the drum which keeps the University band in tune. Jimmy can even make it shimmie for drum. ming to him is as easy as eating peas WJi'th :your knife4it comes with practice. Norma has more accidents ! Everything from auto wrecks to broken arms. It seems that she broke a looking glass, so that ex- plains it. But even hard luck canit last forever. W W W Mary is one of those ex-service people. She was in the Military In- telligence Service at Washington, D. C., and now in view of the great "Hawkshaw" experience there has decided to become a newspaper re- porter. Frank is fond of wrestling but says its a hard old game. He is a strong advocate of wrestling with commercial problems for a future vocation. Lynn plans to engineer in the wilds of South America or some- where the isnit quite sure on this point, himselfi. Enahow, as long as he can engineer around in some nice jungle or mountain slope with a. Rainbow 01' Varsity nearby, ev- erything will be serene. Helen came down here to help make the Baker delegation one of the strongest on the campus. If you want to make her mad tell her that Baker is pretty good for a small town. Edna helps the orchestra out with her violin and in between times she can be seen trotting around the campus with her precious fiddle. Ward was one of the football men who went to Pasadena. It is said Ward was very fond of California and we know why. He is interest- ed in foreign commerce. Smiling while you dance is the big secret of getting by, says Herm, but we know better. When a man is tall and handsome, other things must be taken into consideration. Rachael Husband has him in name, but not in reality. She is making a specialty of geology, which makes one rock with sympa- thy, to think of so young a person and so hard a subject. One hundred ten .YKx t E. xxx; Eu Glen, better known as "Guiny," is now in that realm of Which no single man can know until it is too late to return. The poor boy al- ways had a worried look, but now he looks as care ,free as a lark in June. Jessie bosses the Oregon Club girls around and tells them just whatls what. She must be a pretty good boss from What we hear, for all the girls think Jessie is about right. Lorna can draw anything from a glowing sunset to a good sized check. And When it comes to de- sign, well, youlve heard of those designing women. This is a man who makes even "Slim" Crandall stand on his' toes to get up to his level. Leo Coss- man can run fifty yards and then fall over and win the hundred yard dash. Paul says that its hard to get back into the traces of school life after roaming around the South Sea Isles for the last two years. He still looks human, though, so there is hope for him. Mildred has as her motto, itchem- istry, calculus and concentration," and shes good at all three. She doesnlt look at all worried by them Which is more than some can say. Helen has come back to graduate With us. She tried being a school- marm but likes being a Junior bet- ter and we are glad she does. George is one of the big men of our class who is able as well as Willing to uphold our superiority. His good nature plus his Irish hum- or, makes him a desirable class mate. One hundred eleven .x ex 9A. Am :A A damn thew 25.: w .m Enid Lamb is here to learn how to teach the young to shoot. We have never been able to figure whether these education courses were to teach the pupil or teacher, but she is finding out. ' There are berries from Hood Riv- er and berries from California, but this Berry comes from Newport and is called Alda Berry. Newport seems to have more than its beach to recommend it to the world. Arnold is one of those smooth- business men who is particularly fond of the Administration building. He says hetd like to get a job in the registration section. For par- ticulars see Ruth. Bart is the other editor of the "Kappa Sigma Gazette." He be- lieves that we ought to have a nicotine area somewhere near the campus where a chewersi associa- tion could meet. Bark doesnit care for the girls, so all's well. As long as Alice coaches math classes, there will be a Whole bunch of boys Who wish they had never had math in high school so they could take it here. Mary Largent is learning how to run a gymnasium during her stay and some day she may go back to Silverton and show them how its done. Down around the Sigma Nu house they always include Bill Hollen- beck in their lists of inmates but the Gamma Phiis can also claim him. Spike majors in commerce and football tmostly footballi. As tackle on "The Varsity-the only one, he did great work. He claims that those Harvard giants fell hard, and he ought to know. He was there! One hundred twelve One hundred thirteen Marjorie has a genius ,for letter writing and, well since none of her professors are around right now, we might as well say, it takes an interesting class hour to give her the needed inspiration. Day is a person whom we hold in awe if only ,for the fact that from his residence on the mill race he has the dope on the pigging affairs of the whole student body. He doesn't object to going canoeing himself, occasionally. 'Hubert is one of the "scientists in the making" that the campus can boast of, dontt you know. When Thede Stoppenbach isnit chasing squirrels around the cam- pus, she is hard on the trail .of some poor unsuspecting Theta. Thede will tell the world that. its no small job to boss a bunch of girls. Any time you want to find Doris Churchill just look around for Marj and Doris will be somewhere near. They generally take the same courses and' study out of the same book. Bill Blackaby, A, T. 0. His motto is iiFurnish me a girl and pay for the eats and I Will do the rest." The expression of fiendish glee belongs to Clive Humphrey, who is another of the products of Eu- gene. He has a machine and by virtue of it all the girls are wild about him. As Kate Douglas Wiggin said: "Cecile is gone but not forgotten," and is at present teaching in south ern Oregon. It is rumored that her fondest friend is in Seattle but Seattle affairs are not always sound. Dwight Phipps keeps the Phi Delts supplied with apples from the Medford orchards. He plans to be a dentist so he can have a pull. Bill Beck doesnt make much noise until he opens his mouth. These education majors will get their chance when they teach. Leatha left Normal School to find out what a real school-looked like before she started her career of teaching. Oh, you schoolmarms! Winona Lambert, heretofore, pro- fessed man-hater, has been seen around the campus lately sporting a diamond-set-in-platinum 0n the third finger of her left hand. Harold answers to the royal name of King. All he needs to have is a queen to give him a winning com- bination. When Lob starts banging on the 01d piano at a dance, he gets so full of pep that his fellow musicians call him jazzbo. Be still, feet, be still! Isntt it nice that The Dalles isn,t far from Redmond and the train Steers right for it. Ask Gladys what the schedule is. Lois acts as a Bond between the D. G. house and the Delta Tauts. Lewis is planning on the need of a Hall for the wedding. One hundred fourteen WU MW xxim 511 ' A ,m 11$ One hundred hfteen Horn rims and a lot of "ologies" have a foreboding sound but Nancy likes tern also-dogs. Don,t crowd, collies are preferred. Being particularly interested in accounting, Ray has no trouble in pulling "H" grades in it. Perhaps he gets the same hold on his studies that he gets on his opponents in wrestling. Dinty left us for a while, but he couldn't stay away. He has come back to be a little Moore of the Sigma Chi upperclassmen. Another member of that famous Maguire 'family, of not as much weight possibly, but still of quite as much importance. Ruth is a staunch member of Eutaxian. We wonder if she has literary aspirations. Loeta is some swimmer. She helped bring home the bacon for the class of last year and we are looking forward to her doing the same thing this year. Watch out, ye fellow swimmers; weire betting on Loeta. Bill left us for almost two years to pay France a visit. Since hets been back he has been Visiting the Alpha Phi house. Elmer Pendell hails from Wav- erly, N. Y., and since the war has changed his major from air hights to fiights of oratory. We might add that Elmer seldom spends his week-ends at home. This is a characteristic pose of Lyman Meador, Prairie Cityis pop- ular young gallant. The only things that keep Lyman 0n the earth are the Greek calculus, and science courses he takes. Lee shakes a wicked foot whe- ther it is on a tennis court, a dance floor, or a baseball diamond. Who disagrees with him when he says this is a great life? Those shell-rimmed glasses. add a tone of distinction to Bidge. She seems very interested in chemistry. As a student Bidge is always among the top-notchers. Most people dislike "Bills" but Dorothy seems to be an exception. Like the Freshmen, one wonders why all the nice girls are engaged. There must be good spirits on our back country roads to make Fat so joyful when he comes in from a Sundayls Fording. Of course there are rumors of being intoxi- cated by oneis presence but we are doubtful. Carl doesnit 100k a bit Savage in this picture but just wait until he gets in a heated debate. He was such a good man the Salem people let him come here and his behavior is still good. Austrid surely has the silvery tongue when it comes to the profs. but that isn't the only accomplish- ment she has. If you want to see her, call at the Bungalow. Marie Ridings doesn't stop with high grades in math but keeps right on and debates with the best of them. Now that they grade on a one, two, three basis she Will probably get one-half. W4, kwm W at One hundred sixteen hundred seventeen Herets ttEdett Pirie, our little mermaid. She studies and swims and youll find her either swimming in the millrace or in Timmy ClOi ran,s French claSSerathevr a dry place to swim. Florencets name may be Riddle but its no puzzle to know why she holds so many offices, after you once meet her. Once in a while she gets time to hang her hat in the Tri-Delt house. Reed College didn,t agree with Vern Ruedy so he packed his trunk and put a Eugene label on it. If there were an Alpha Phi house at Reed he wouldnit be here. Here we have light-fingered Dick Lyans. He wont take your pocket- book, though, for pianos are his specialty. The girls all like that coy look of his. He has quite a voice, too. If Laura Rand werentt here the Glee club would have to get along without her. Between music and her education she is kept pretty busy. It isn't at all hard to find out that Betty is athletic, that she came from Reed before it was too late, and that she isntt exactly a man- hater. Bib Carlls rosy cheeks and dain- ty dimples can be found on almost any committee. We wonder, though, how he can be loyal to both schools. One of them will have to change. We can,t iigure out just why Ben Breed has a tag on him. Surely he doesnlt need it to identify him. Ben is one of the few WhO can look Slim Crandall and the ttPioneer" in the eye. Remember, Peg, duck season is past, but the Phi Delts have a tame duck that is even better than the wild ones. Shad Martin doesnit look natural here since George Beggs is not in the picture. He and George manage to strike an average so they work together most of the time. Although she may appear'very quiet and bashful around the cam- pus, yet it is rumored that Mildred knows how to have a regular time. A yearts sojourn at Salem caus- ed Kate to bring her musical voice back to Eugene. We wonder just which place she Visited While in Salem. Barton Sherk helps put the jazz in the Sigma Nu's portable orches- tra. His trap drum seems to hold out as well as other peoples ear drums and it is only a question of endurance between the two. This important looking young man is G. Judson Beggs. That air of his comes from being manager of this here volume. He likes music eespecially a certain little Carol. Helen Watt is another Reed Col- lege student who has developed a wonderful power of discrimina- tion, especially in regard to insti- tutions. Byron Garret has the build of a colonel but they only made him a captain up here. We wonder if he will settle down in Hillsboro after he has seen ttParee". If f I an One hundred eighteen WW W W i One hundred nineteen Sand Point, Idaho, is going to be proud of Andy Anderson one of these days when he becomes a famous M. D. Andy is one of the pillars of the Dorm. It was not until ttSlow and Easy'i came out that we knew that Bince was a music composer. For a lounge lizard he can't be beat, and he has never been late for a feed. The English department claims Irene Whitfield for its own and she is one of its standbys. The girls say she always has a new joke to tell. Ollie Stoltenberg, when not turn- inug handsprings for Miss Cummings or diving off spring boards for Miss Winslow, helps propagate the idea that this is the liveliest and peppi- est class that Oregon has harbored in many a long year. Carl Mautz guards his heart as well as he does his job on the .foot- ball team. Even the Pasadena vamps couldn,t make an impression on this man. Durno e Oregonls midget e has been a pretty good luck piece for our athletic teams. Maybe he will be more so now that his interests are not torn between Eugene and Portland. , Clara Thompson came here after she had tried Monmouth and she says she likes it even if she does have to walk all the way up from the Chi Omega house every morn- ing. The blocks are nothing to "miles? Down in the little village of Ya- quina, Thelma Hoeflevin heard so much about the English language and the people who spoke it that she came all the way to Oregon to major in it. She finds time to do much more than study, however. Paul Foster didnit have to go far from home to get an education. He thinks! Eugene is a tiswell" town for a college. John is co-editor of that famous sheet, "The Kappa Sigma Gazette." He is the only man alive who can take a water-bagging with a smile and tiBubbles" is his favorite song. Mary Ellen Bailey had lots of fun as society editor of the Emer- ald. Mary Ellen knows more about pink teas than Charles Schnabel, and that is saying something. Did you ever wonder where the books from the empty library shelves g0? Carl eats them. George Cusick looks quiet and unassuming, but his neckties give his real character away. His nick- name is ttPolar" and every time the Tri Delts call their dog, George pricks up his ears. One of our scribes is Jacob Jac- obson. He is one of the scandal mongers 0f the Emerald and pushes a tiuent pen. Dont let him over- hear any of your secrets if you don't want them published. Hope MacKenzie doesnit look the part, but my, how she can climb! Baldy is her specialty, lets see, oh yes, two hundred times, anyhow. Mildred Aumiller is a small girl with an agreeable smile. It is a good thing that she likes her stul dies better than tennis, else she would not get H plus all the time. One hundred twenty One hundred twenty-one Joe Ingram is one of those pink- cheeked, curly-headed banjo players Who keep the gardens under the sleeping porches full of old shoes, etc. Ifl he werenlt associate editor of this book nothing could keep us from saying more. Andy is our human reservoir of law. He doesnit specialize in humor but his occasional Hreplica- tur mens .rea ferae naturaeli knocks the co-eds on their ear. The Sigma Chis have a regular blonde vamp in the person of Raymond Vester. His knock-em- dead smile, is harmless, however, and he uses it only for friendly greetings. . The man with the "devil-may- carell look is Ernest Crockatt. He loves debate and if you want to hear a good argument just get him started on the 18th amendment. Its a dry subject. Frances: associations with the journalism department are never too earnest, for she always catches the snappy jokes and news tips as they hoat across the copy desk. Rhetta Templeton came from Mis- souri, but in spite of that fact she is not at all hard to convince. Her hobby is writing. No wonder he is bothered with mash notes. Look at the dimples. Clarence is one of the cute Kappa Sigs. This song bird, Genevieve Clancy, came to us from St. Marys Academy but we know she had a voice be- fore she started there. The Glee club wouldnit do without her. Harris Ellsworth was one of the standbys of the Emerald and the Oregana while he was with us but now he is running a business of his own. Although Blanche is a native of Astoria, the city of docks, yet she speaks more often of a "Doc" at the Fiji house. When Hallie sets her mind to do a thing we are pretty certain there is going to be something doing and that something is going to be done well. Ernest Evans specializes in mil- itary science and puts the gang through squads east and south. Be- tween times he studies a little com- merce. Leola Green does most of her singing at the Sigma Delta Phi house, but the rest of the campus has heard enough to know that she is some song bird. Johnny is the little old pep box who knows how to make levee on the stage anyway. He sure is a princee-not of liars, herets hoping. Harry is an enterprising boy ,from Enterprise. His major is pre-medics and some day he may be a res- pected M. D. in his own home town. Joe no longer has the interest in college that he has had. It takes lots of time figuring how two can live cheaper than one these days. One hundred twenty-two One hundred twenty-three Butch Weigel is one of the Deltsi matinee hounds. His breezy way is one of his greatest assets. So is that blonde hair. Madeline developed her athletic ability packing around a name that sounds like the University gun ma- chine after a busy day. Ruth Flegal is one of the busiest girls in the junior class. For more particulars see any gym major. Wilbur doesnit have to take his girl to the movies, he just puts his fountain pen on a piece of drawing paper and turns on the ink. Result -comic cartoons and goofy giggles. Bill Russis majors in Latin and spends his spare time upholding the superior civilization of ancient Greece. He loves to discuss sociol- ogy or religion. It is sufficient to note of Helen Manning that the Oregana staff is distinguished by its weary, hunted look. Any person Who has spent thiee years on committees etc. and has faith enough in human nature to shut both eyes when she has her picture taken is some whiz, and thatis just what Ella is. Pet names arenit socially correct but this one cannot be refrained from: "You left-handed shark." Just guess What Wanda did, all by herself, this summer. Organized a group of girls who picked black- berries and earned all that money. Shets the girl, now you know, hovfs that for executive ability? Mary likes Oregon and its rainy weather because it makes her hair curl more. She is one girl who never gets homesick because she can put her feet under her own motherls table three times a day. The man with the grin all over his face is Earl Powers. He doesnlt look like a cold-blooded pre-medv'ic, but you never can tell them by their looks. Scotty Strachan is the Phi Delts, big boy from Dufur. One of these days "Scotty" is going to break loose and surprise the football fans. The far away look in his eyes is unexplainable to us. Sam is an architect and has com- pleted his designs on the Chi Ome- ga house. We donit see much of him these days so he must be work- ing overtime. Marjorie Holaday is kept mighty busy writing up the doings of that far-famed organization known as the Woments League. With the leap year dance and the Womants Building, Marj has material for voluminous notes. After grinding out a year at Reed, Bee begged mother for a chance to go to a real school. Bee is a good teaser, well tell the world, so here she is! Jiggs Leslie is another of that famous Leslie line. He spends the springs at baseball and the rest of the year at Mexican athletics. If you cant find him at the Sigma Chi house, go to the annex. One hundred twenty-four I I I! 'I I i ' uhwrhi Mme; 4 us. One hundred tWenty-five Weill say that if Dayton, Wash, has any more like Vivian, send them along. Girls like her keep the feminist movement going. The man who looks like he wore a toupe is J. Chandler Harper, late of Milton. That really is his own hair, so donit get excited. As long as he has no classes before 11 oiclock he is happy. All that the Kappa Sigs used to do to get their favorite rushee was to start Lee playing Hawaiian tunes on his banjo. Now Lee has left and the Kappa Sigs are having a hard time of it, Vera recently surprised the Sig- ma Delta Phi girls by announcing her engagement to Kenneth Stand- ifer, a freshman pre-medic student. You never can tell what some of these junior women are going to do. A regular giijl is Mae Ballack. She is one of the best presents that Albany has ever sent to Eu- gene ,and if we ever have to part with her we hope that the Thetas will hunt up another like her. Salem can always make room for another good architect so Lyle will be sure of a good. reception there. Hay Schmeer is one of the stand- bys of Oregon's famous soccer team. He is also a railroad man and engages in construction work every summer. He majors in econ- omics so he can save work. Gayle Roberts goes around like a regular business woman. She has a way of getting more than an education out of this college for some say the salary she pulls down in the Administration build- ing keeps the Kappas supplied with all-day suckers and everything. If a laugh is any index to a girl's disposition we all have a pretty good line on Lucille. Ezra startled us all when he broke into the Junior Jazz Jinks on roller skates. Heis been trying to live it down ever since. Bob thrilled us all when he play- ed Blue Beard in our college play, and he has been thrilling us and others ever since, Red hair is the only pre-requisite, according to the best of authority. Lois keeps things running smoothly between all the womenls fraternities as president of Pan I? allenic, which is a big enough job fl r any junior woman. We wonder if it is a disadvantage to have a father on the faculty. Anyway Dorothea always looks cheerful about it. Maybe the new Grant has something to do with that. Here we have the grand old man of the journalism department, Alex- ander, the man who knows. Alex specializes in sports, but he can write farm stories if called on. He has also traveled extensively in. the East. ttWhen I was in Chicai g0 an Therels one kind of gambling that isnt risky, and was taking' a chance on Johnny Gamble. You can tell by the face of him that his nickname is ttBrowny? Navigation is done by the aid of stars. When Bill steered the Ore- gon team through the Pasadena game, there was a twinkling star of the film constellation inspiring his every move. The question is, when did navigation cease? One hundred twenty-six 0.19-09. law W W WW One hundred twenty-seven We have here Cecil P. Robe, hetter known as tiMike." He majors in Latin, swears in Greek, and was even once known to get a tobacco breath. If you want to know more, ask him. This man Bradshaw is important enough to have an office of his own in Deady. Although he is small he is mighty, especially in tracing out plants. Eloise stood it as long as she could, then she shook the dust of Reed College from her feet and headed for Eugene. "Skin-nayl, Banks says, "A col- lege education brings an era into a mans life that he would not other- wise get? He is only handicapped by the fact that there are fifteen hundred fellow students receiving a college education. Did you ever hear of one making a lot of nice noise in a quiet way? Well, Aurora Potter knows how ltis done, she and the piano. If H's were given for keen Wit and love for argument-Peg Kubli would be a regular honor student. While in the navy Ed had ambi- tions of becoming a first class mate. Since coming back to college his ambitions have not changed. ttCould chlandle ler, Ed? That will Du- fur you? Marion, one of Professor Reddies prodigies, deserted us for contract work on the Ellison-White circuit. We will all miss her. Vic may be a poet some day, or even a dramatic critic: he certain- ly has that dreamy look. Anyway hetll make a good husband. Mary gets plenty of walking ex- ercise every day as she lives on the other side of town, but it does not worry her, She is one of. those practical Tre Nus- and is always having a mighty good time what- ever she is doing. Jane divides her heart between Pendleton and the Theta house. It,s too bad they are so far apart, but the train service is not half bad. Who would think from looking at his smile that Ian is incapable of getting anything less than Hts. The physics de-partmeht couldnt get along without him. Isla Gilbert intends to be a med- ical missionary in some faraway country. She goes out for baseball practice every night so that she will be able to protect herself from the cannibals. Speaking of soap box orators, here we have himegestures, water pitcher and all. Clairets favorite subject is ttA Trip to the Pyren- ness." However, uA Trip up the Race" would furnish him with just as much thunder. Irene, being a Eugene girl, had her college and her course picked out before entering high school. As a dramatist she 'is a goer, but is undecided Whether or not to have a career. Marion is perhaps most noted for the art productions with which she frequently startles the campus, but if you want to see her at her best, get an amateur vaudeville show started. Nuff sed. One hundred twenty-eight 1"1 it 3 x V; xxx 1 we ix hundred twenty-nine Bill is one of those polished men. The study of law is bound to have that infiuence on a man. Bill likes track and is out for distance in or- der to get a long wind . Cleo Jenkins never had a great deal to say. But over in the Ar chibecture building he's usuall-y hard at work designing postoffices and bungalows and - Whisper it softly-air castles. They do say that Grace 'makes those Chi Omega freshmen stand around. All of Which goes to sub- stantiate Mr. Shakesp-earets theory: ttWhatts in a name?" No one can run over her. Dorothy Wootton came here with the handicap of a sister, but that didntt stop her. She got right in and proved that ability isn't ne- cessarily limited to one member of the family. Howard is one of the few brands of Wines that are still on the mar- ket, but he can not get intoxicated with anything but joy. Rex is here for work and to make the most of it. One as determined as Rex cannot help but have a trodden path to his doorstep. He is a pre-m-edic major. Wanda seems to have changed her mind about teaching and Will take up architecture and arts in- stead. It is just as well for a woman to know about the outside of a house as the inside, she be- lieves Space forbids us from telling all we know of Marion Gilstrap. Wart bling, acting, and piano-playing are just a few of her accomplishments. my awwww' KC???1 When we hear a voice to leeward saying, "Well in the navy we do it this way," we know Ray is drift- ing into port. To get to his chief interest in life, however, ask him if he likes wet turnips, If Emil was one-half as hard to get acquainted with as his name is hard to pronounce, he would not be the well known classmate that he is. Alice Lighter is one of the few German majors who will still admit the fact. The Alpha Phis must have a German cook that Alice gives orders to. When it comes to debates, or- atory, or even plain spreading a line, Abe is so far in advance of the rest of us that we can only cheer for him in the hope that he will hear the echo. Busher is still hanging around the corner of Thirteenth and Alder and once in a while finds time to cross the street to get a meal at the Sigma Chi house. Godfrey, although one of those brilliant bookworms sometimes called a grind, has been known to touch the lighter sides of: life, re- freshing his mental facilities by strolling about the campus with the fairer sex. Bob is a real entertainer for he can certainly manipulate the ivor- ies. He is a popular man in the crowd as a good piano player is always in demand. Geology-has its advantages, es- pecially in its field trips. Hubert has learned to combine business with pleasure. One hundred thirty nth. One hundred thirty-one The curtain now rises on Victor Darwin tsupermani Bradeson. Vic once belonged to the state cham- pion high school debating team and he's never quite lived it down. Ar- guing is still his favorite indoor sport. The only difference between Demosthenes and Ralph is that Ralph never needed a pebble to help him in his bursts of oratory. Pete spends most of her time writing long letters to the Round- up City. She has been elected to a seat in the house of Burgess. Warren Gilbert likes to play foot- ball and is determined to make a letter in it next year. He is a student athlete. Life on an ocean wave on the good ship something or other was Harry Smithis experience last summer. But he forsook nautical pursuits for those of the journal- istic variety and is now managing editor of the Emerald. One of the Creedes 0f the Chi Omega house is Edith. She sur- prised us all by failing to return to school last semester, but she says it is great to be a school teacher. The long afternoon labs couldnit scare Renolia Lafferty so she takes chemistry with the rest of the am- bitious people. We hope that she never gets puffed up by any of her experiments. The campus misses Carl, who is of the more conservative type and knows what a course in higher curriculum means. Carl had to leave school on account of ill health but there's a great day coming when heill be back with us. If there is anything you donit understand in literature ask Mor- ris. We challenge you to ask him anything. What about Tolstoy? Why Morris was with Tolstoy when he stepped on his beard and tripped. Cecil takes to that well-known southern game of rolling the bones. ttWhat's the difference if I only do it for fun and besides I have a perfect right to since pre-medics is my major." Speaking of sharks, take a slant at Paul and you see a whiz of a chemist. But even chemists have their friends and in that connec- tion one can easily Iind Paulls. Look out, girls, here comes Ken. He is the original wiseman from Amity. He can answer any ques- tion about economy, gasoline, or co-eds. Did somebody say cougar? Wanda Nelson seldom smiles, but when she does, the t'Ra-ys', fall everywhere. Helen Loughary, whose name is so hard to pronounce without laughing it, is more commonly known to her close friends as Pic- kety, but she doesn't object. George paid us a good price for this second picture 0,1? his. If we didnlt need the money so badly we never would have let him put it over. Bobby makes his best appear- ance in the band, where one can see only a tuft of red hair and a pair of number 2 shoes sticking out from an enormous horn. Does he do it for music, or is he train- ing for track? One hundred thirty-two One hundred tliirty-three James has the distinction cf be- ing one of the red-hieaded men in the junior class. At least he is nsually telling unbelievers that it Is a distinction. Estey looks like prosperity gone wild. Have you noticed him run- ning around the campus in a dif- ferent car each day? We haven,t heard of any banks being robbed and we wonder how he gets that way. Whenever a Junior Jazz Jinks of any kind is started we know that Homer is getting the 01d pep go- ing again. He does much more than dance, however. Take a look at his term card. Earl Voorhies is now home rais- inng prunes, but we have a suspicion that there is a certain peach that makes him so interested in the work, Casey is Irish and it makes her all the better. She, n0 doubtkfeels right at home throwing bricks at the Woments Building. Mildred frankl'yi admits that life is serious and that she is taking it seriously. But those marks that she do get! Perhaps it pays to be serious. Bay rum iinds one of its best customers in the person of Rollin Woodruff. Rollin combs his hair at the Delt house. One of the "town boys, of whom the A. T. Ois are proudest is Odine Mickleson, who does a. little teach- ing out at Eugene High School on the side and makes himself useful around the commerce department- a regular business man. The Lees of the junior class can say "we are seven" without stretch- ing the truth a bit. Harold is the seventh as he started his education at Pacific College. Gertrude is the little girl with the big car Who can be seen pilot- ing a load of friends around most any afternoon. She finds it quite a job to handle the finances for the Spanish club. This is iiS'tuffer,, Dresser, Bill Haywardis iiWalrus." itWalrusi, lives up to his name in all respects, especially in food consumption. They feed the animals at 6 otclock at the Beta house. The curly hair and impressive looks belong to Mervin Woolfolk. He always seems to be in a hurry but it may be just camouiiage. Naomi Robbins is another girl who lost her heart When she went over to Corvallis one week-end. She is a gym major so that she will be able to take care of her Jim some day. There is nothing like proving that a good school is the best. Gladys proved it When she de- serted her father, Who is an O. A. C. professor, and came to Oregon. Here is one of the Seitz of the campus. He'delves into the liter- ature of England and delights in itlit" classes. Eulalie doe'snit really stay around the campus long enough for us to find out any scandal about her. Maybe its an exceptional case and there isnit any, One hundred thirty-four 1; WWXXW Wwww M One hundred thirty-five And still they keep coming from The Dalles! Elmer is one of the bright constellations in The Dalles galaxy. To look at him you would- nit think thatihe were deep, but he iseitdeep, and devilish sly? How about it, Betts? Bas is our big asset in football. Determination such as shown on the gridiron will take care of him. Since the Pasadena game, Bas has been noticed sitting in the movies with a far-away look. Yep, she sure is a wonderful actress. We saw Stan going in the side door of the Rex without a ticket one night. Youire excused under the circumstances, thou'gheit was all the girl's fault, wasnit it? George is an organizer and why shouldn't he be, since commercial problems are the source of his study. George was the organizer of the S-Maralda club. Pop Powell dashes madly around town with his two-wheeled phaeton and only his ability as a lawyer keeps him out of jail. If it werenit for gravity he would have a flying machine. This young Chesterfield hails from Woodburn. The town is proud of Johnnie Brock and so are we. We like to see him make those trips to Woodburn, week-ends- this is a dry state. Nuff sed. Merritt Whitten can always be seen around with Stan Louden. To see one without the other tiisnit donejl thatts all. Here is "Big Bill" Porter, the hy- ing lawyer. We predict a brilliant future for him, for what judge would dare decide a case against him? wow gm Lawrence Woodworth is Pendle- tonis fashion plate. When he moves his wardrobe down to the Beta house the town suffers a severe loss. Here is another of those fellows who spend their time in the law library. Stan Evans is a very agreeable lawyer, however, and we Wouldntt mind taking a case to him. Spencer is one of the S. A. Efs highbrows, He joined the artillery because he wouldntt fit in the trenches. hundred thirty-six . x 1 ,, ' - .. v .I. .n 1' '-' - affix? "WW ,'- w???ip 12W?! . .4; m;- vtkamrrcw t .. i: .' V MTWM V" 'v ' --,JJI:.;I'5 ththxpur . I 'Wsmdb MW : . -. . 1,, 44411 ?:nthg. Cw . l :- - ;f - ' I M, x . x x: xxkamXx 4a .41 M" .xC xxxxx xx ' .. x H xx NMxka XE xg I J51, xx xxxxe :3 ffzxL ' 7x x xxK One hundred thirty-seven v... k. .gebn. u: .41, -wwa. r, Manerud Calkins Nelson Huggins Shim .SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS Clifford Manerud .................................................................................................................... President Clara Calkins ................................................................................................................ Vice President Helen Nelson .......................................................................................................................... Secretary ............................................................................................................... Treasurer Charles H. Huggins . Richard Shim ............................................................................................................ Sergeant-at-Arms SOPI-IOMORE HISTORY During its first year at the University, the class of 22 was not able to distinguish itself in any particular branch of college life because of the presence of the S. A. T. C. and "the holdup,, inflicted on college activities by the wave of infiuenza which swept the country. However-the flu ban removed and the Armistice signed-we proceeded to show the scorn- ful Sophomores and rather doubtful upperclassmen that the class of 22 was not one of the best freshmen classes, but the best freshman class that had ever entered the University. In our freshman year, our basketball team went down to defeat only once during the season, one out of four games with O. A. C. The girls were not to be outdone for they won the interclass swimming meet and as a result have their own numerals on the Mabel Cummings cup. This year, as Sophomores, we started the year off right by easily winning what is admitted to be the really first square Freshman-Sopho- more Mix ever staged on. Kincaid field. The Varsity football team gave place to five of our iihuskiesii this year and one of the two assistant yell leaders is a Soph. Each year our activities are becoming wider in scope and we have set ourselves to do our utmost in keeping Old Oregonis reputation for the best college ever. HELEN NELSON. One hundred thirty-eight A Few of Them One hundred thirty-nine One hundred forty 'er..-atWW3gbxyuzmu-mmnwur -. -. Wm vm. 'viP,'f.l;3?' Maw", One hundred forty-one V w 5'8. .w :u-v Taylor Cundy Weeks Krohn 3 Ralph Taylor ........................................................ .............................................................. President Margaret Cundy ............................................................................................................ Vice President Mildred Weeks ....................................................................................................................... Secretary Alfred Krohn .. Treasurer FRESHMAN CLASS HISTORY I 1 l t' OFFICERS OF FRESHMAN CLASS 3 a f a i H The class of ,23 pauses for a moment to cast a glance over its shoul- ti der before turning to the three years that stretch ahead. There are two a 1' . , questions that we ask ourselves at the end of the freshman year: what ;; ' M - have we received from the University, and what has the University received g: ' from us? We have received from the University a deep love for our Alma I Mater, the desire to work for her, and the strength to fight for her. The l I I second question is harder to answer, and being a modest class, we leave it 3 t0 the University to draw its own conclusions. . . Being the first ttpost-bellum" class was a distinction and an advantage a it t for, from training camps at home and abroad, from the battlefronts and Z , hospitals, both men and women returned to resume the studies neglected f . so long in the stress of war service. L With such backing in numbers, the freshman class went into every- thing it undertook with the idea of ttputting it over? We wont say how V" 1 , well we succeeded but, remember our Freshman Glee and consider whether a U or not it was the ttgleefull-est" glee ever held ; remember the Square Mix, V j and consider whether or not the freshman class was the ttsquaresttt on the I field; remember our bonfire, and consider whether or not it was the biggest y bonfire ever built; remember our athletic teams and what they did; give heed to the fact that we had more presidents for our class than any before , b : us. , MILDRED WEEKS. I u 9w WW'u'e-uioe a One hundred forty-two 4 2i? WW'i-b' a 3m: , ' ' , .: Lv ; , z-ngWm-oa I 3 -...., 7M, g- - m - u H $1! 1' amt 1J1! $41413 N ff lu' Uh . ,gv ,iiiilf?" $ 5L ', 5? Just Frosh One hundred forty-three , Jase ?W;QZFV W W hwy V 4?; VA J More Frosh hundred forty-four lull'mru Guild Hall Stars 9? One hundred fortyJive DRAMATIC RESUME CTING must really be great fun," one often reflects as he leaves the theatre after a performance. This is indeed the impres- sion carried away by those Who look in at the work going on continually in Guild Hall, the Little Theatre of the University. Under the direction of A. Fergus Reddie and Miss Charlotte Banfield the classes in dramatic interpretation have grown until now they boast an enrollment of over 135 students. As soon as one play is produced another is well under way. Not only is the technique of acting taught in the department, but also costum- ing, play production, and stage setting. Perhaps the greatest compliment the depart- ment can confer upon a student of dramatic in- terpretation is the invitation to become a member of ttThe Company? a group of twelve students Who have distinguished themselves upon the Guild Hall stage. . Members are Helen Casey, Helen Case, Irene Stewart, Adah McMurphey, Loeta Rogers, Marian Taylor, Vera Van Schoonhoven, Dorothy Wootton, Charles Miller, Dudley Day, George Pasto and Fred Dodson. Mr. Reddie has divided his time this year between the University campus and Portland, where he is head of the dramatic extension work. During his absence two days of each week Miss Banfield is in charge of the department. One hundred forty-six $1 LOVES LABOUR LOST Friday, J une 13, 1919, the date of the Commencement play, proved a very rainy day indeed, thus the scenes of ttLovets Labour Lostt, were hur- riedly transferred from the flat in front of Villard Hall to the Eugene Theatre. Here a few sets of greenery and two pseudo-stone benches gave the setting of the play as demanded by the scene outside the kings palace at N avarre. The beautiful lighting effects Which were obtained by giving the production inside made the play even more effective, perhaps, than it could have been in a natural setting. CAST Princess of France .......................................................................................................... Hester Hurd Ros-aline ...................................................... Charlotte Banheld Ladies attending on princess Maria .............................................................. Helen Purington Katherine ............................................................ Ruth Graham Jaquenevtta ....................................................................................................................... Frances Stiles Ferdinand, king of Navarre .................................................................................... Ogden Johnson Biron .......................................................................... Fergus Reddie Lords attending an king gLongaVille ...................................................... David Lloyd Stearns Dumain ............................................................................ Carl Miller . ' . Boyett ........................................................ Claire Keene'y Lords attendlng on the prlncess Meroade ---------------------------------------------------- Crecene Fariss D011 Adriana De Armando, fantastical Spaniard .......................................... Norvell Thompson Sir Nathaniel, curat ................ Wilbur Hulin Holofernes, school master ........................................................................................... ..Kerby Miller Dull, constable ........................................................................................................ Creston Maddock Costard, a clown ............................................................................................................ John Houston Moth, page to Armando ................................................................................................ Teressla Cox A forester .................................................................................................................. Garheld Madden One hundred forty-seven THE LITTLE DOG LAUGHED iiHey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon! The Little Dog laughed to see such sport And the dish ran away with the spoon." There is a hidden treasure in every Mother Goose rhyme that is waiting to be found. Per- haps it is the far-famed fountain of youth that bubbles up for both the young and the 01d and makes them feel the potential joyfulness of life. Fergus Reddie revealed his interpretation of this hidden treasure in his fantastic play, iiThe Little Dog Laughed." November 21, 1919, found the stage at the Eugene Theatre all set and waiting for Mother Goose and her folk to take possession. The setting, a most carefully wrought New England kitchen, was so real that Mother Goose could not have resisted it if she had tried. She came and with her came all the children of her train and they frolicked for an hour, making the audience laugh or sigh at will. itThe Little Dog Laughed" was received even more heartily this year than at the time of its first production the winter of 1917-18, because the audience knew what a treat awaited them. Mr. Reddie has created in his play a little mas- terpiece that bids fair to keep in step with the rhymes themselves. Under his coaching the members of his department offered a performance both commendable and delightful. One hundred forty-eight g' a i .y a'..; ,."Qh' av- z'.' t. g..... h9'h '"u 1W" CAST A Cow with a Moon .............................................. Byron Garret A Cat with a Fiddle .............................. ..... Adah McMurphey A Dish with 3. Spoon .......................................... Ralph Hoeber A Little Dog .................. Gertrude Phetteplace Mother Goose-Mrs. Ann Goose .......................... .4 ................................. Miss Charlotte Banfield Abigail, the youngest ..................................................................... - ........................ A property baby Captain Eleazar Goose, Annis husband, a smuggler ..................................... Norvell Thompson Bobby Shafto, his cabin boy, in love with Mary ............................................. Marian Taylor Mary, Annis oldest ................................................................................................ Marion Gilstrap Silence ........................................................................................................................ Florence Jagger Marjory, called Marjory Daw ....... Beatrice Morrow Prudence ........... '. ............................................................................................ .. .................... Janet West Faith ................................................................................................................................ Katheryn Ball Hepzibah, called Bo-Peep .......................................................................................... Arbelyn Healy Benjamin, called Boy Blue .............................................................................. Elizabeth Thacher Old Mother Hubbard, a neighbor ........................................................ Alice Van Schoonhoven Peter Piper, a bachelor, very fond of pumpkins .................................................... tRoy Veatch Thomas Tucker, a constable and collector of customs of Salem Port ........ Norman Philips Jacky Horner, son of Goody Horner .................. . .............................................. Alphonse Korn Mother Goose,s Orchestra... Miss Muffet, a spinster in love with Tucker ................................................ Dorothy Wootton. Goody Horner, a thrifty Widow .............................................................. Vera Van Schoonhoven Jack Spratt, son of Ann Goose by a former husband ........................................ Wilbur Hulin Jean Spratt, his Wife ........................................................................................................ Helen Case Jack ............................. ...................................................................... Bobby Allen Their twins. . J111 .............................................................................................................. Betty Allen Georgie Porgie, their second or third ................................................................. Doris Pittenger A little girl 'in the audience ................................ '. ................................................. Luceil Morrow An old lady in the audience ................................... - ............................................. M argaret Nelson The Unseen Man, WhO works the lights .......................... Carl Miller A maidservant at the Bradburyis ............................................................................ Norma Medler Harold Kennerly, an architect ................................................................................. Wilbur Hulin Vivian, his Wife, an actress ................................................................ .. ...................... Irene Stewart Marian Judson, an artist .................................................................................... Gretchen Wheeler Jim Bradbury, iiBumps" ............................................................................................. Claire Keeneyh Betsy, his wife, writer of childrenis books ........................................................ Marian Taylor Dinah, their daughter ............................................................................................ ...... Alma Tracy Little Jim, their son ......................................................... ' ........................................... James Sawyer Jean, daughter of the Kennerlyis .............................................................................. Joan Sawyer The Property Man ....................................................................................................... George Pasto One hundred forty-nine REAL THINGS ttYou see, a thing isntt the. same when you get it." These were the words of Little Jamie, but wise indeed they were and the philosophy in them proved to be the philosophy of Mable Holmes Parsonst play, "Real Things," which dealt with the relative values of real versus dream pos- sessions. The verdict lay with J anet Durand, mother of J amie, who, know- ing that other things had taken the place of love for her in her husband's e heart, could not bring herself at the last moment to cast her lot with another, J 0e Sawyer, who was her "dream thing." The play was presented on December 6 and 7, 1919, in "The Little Theatre," Portland. Miss Charlotte Banfleld in the difficult and morbid role of J anet Durand and A. Fergus Reddie in that of J 06 Sawyer brought out the fine points of the drama. Jamie lived in the person of Alfonse Korn. CAST Jamie, son of Janet and Jim .................................................................................... Alfonse Korn Martha, Janetts housekeeper .................................................................................... Emily Spaeth Janet Durand ......................................................... -. .............................................. Charlotte Banfleld Joe Sawyer .................................................................................................................... Fergus Reddie Jim Durand, Jranetts husband. .................................................................................... Claire Keeney Charmine Castle .................................................................................................... Gretehen Wheeler Ben Castle, her husband .................................................................................................. Carl Miller Barker, butler of Durands .............................................................................. z ................. Dudley Day Mr. Lewis, J-anetts father ........................................................................................... George Pasto Miss Lewis, Janet's aunt ................................................................................. , ......... Irene Stewart M. Vlorski .............................................................................................................. Nervell Thompson One hundred afty ?mnuwnw W291? 323: 3 A. : . 2 3 ....- l ,:2: 33 2 THE PRINCE OF LIARS 2 3 Reading 3tArabian Nights" so stimulated the pent-ilp imagination -of 2 2 3 Arthur Hummingtop, hen-pecked-by-his-mother-in-law husband, that he 3 Lh ; ' fancied himself Calif Haroun a1 Raschid 0f Bagdad, and sallied off to Lon- , g 3 Q " don in quest of adventure. He didrft know he had found it When he met 23 :32 N. 2 - a cold chorus girl in the park and wrapped his handkerchief about her f3 M I t. , neck to keep her warm. But he had. He realized it When the girl followed t 3 . h2'g3 i 2 the address on the handkerchief and came With it to his home. Then to 3 ? uhhhi 1 , mother-in-law, Wife, and painter friend, the intruder was introduced as 3 -m.3h 3f 2 - Hummingtopk niece from America. But at the crucial moment the right- 253 Z M . ful niece arrived. A hilariously enjoyable unravelling followed. 3 3 Whit; 3 3 33The Prince of Liars" was played by Mask and Buskin, Oregon,s 3 I.h-uz 1 2 chapter of Associated University Players, on Friday night, December 6, ' 3 3 'w k at the Eugene Theatre. 3 h'O' g CAST :3 . .uttti '32 3 Arthur Hummingtop, the husband .......................................................................... John Houston 3- 3 I I y'laf' 2 Mrs. Hummmgton, the Wlfe .................................................................................... Marion Gilstrap 3 3 Daisy, the niece .......................................................................................................... Thelma Stanton 53 3 I .h'." Ralph Ormerad, the friend ...................................................................................... Ogden Johnson 3 Mrs. Gillibrand, the mother-in-law ............................................................................... Helen Case Rosie, the Gutta Pucha girl ................................................................................ Adah McMurphey 3 I 2 Joshua Gillibrand, the son-in-law .................................................................................... Ray Dunn 3 Babara, the maid .......................................................................................................... Evelyn Smith ' Dobson, the butler ..................................................................................................... Norman Philips hundred 13fty-one ENGAGED NGAGED," a Company performance, presented at Guild Hall Friday and Saturday evenings, March 19 and 20, will be remembered by its audiences as itthe play that brought so many laughs." The humor of the situations increased in direct ratio to the complications and when Claire Keeney, as Cheviot Hill, found himself in the distressing predicament of having One wife and two fiancees, he received small comfort from those who watched. The first act of the play was laid in a cottage gar- den 0n the border between England and Scotland and it is here that Cheviot Hill madelove t0 Irene Stewart as Belinda Treherne and thus became the Victim of an old Scotch marriage law which made her his wife. His two fiancees, Vera Van Schoonhoven, as Minnie Sym- person of London, and Dorothy Wooton, as Maggie Mc- Farlane, a lowland lassie, had .a lively aversion to be- ing engaged to a married man. After an attempt to treat each of the three candidates for his heart With impartiality, Cheviot Hill saw his affairs gradually become smooth agaln and with the final curtain Minnie Symperson was his only betrothed. Completing the Scotch trio were Carl Miller, as Angus MacAlister, in love with Maggie, and Mrs. MacFarlane, Maggieis mother. The Scotch dialect of the play was exceptionally well mastered and was just one of those touches which are always present to make even the lightest Guild Hall play a performance of good quality. Fred Dodson, as the picturesque Belvauney, was effective in thicken- ing the plot. George Pasto, as Mr. Symperson, father of Minnie, seemed especially well fitted to his part. Wwwwwm One hundred fifty-two - ., amw 39 u 4am ., "w ywmgwm b.?.brwuuan i ., 31 L? ;- mime-mrwmmmn , gr ww 7 CAST Maggie McFarlane a Lowland lassie .............................................................. Dorothy Wootton Angus MacAlister, in love With her .............................................................................. Carl Miller Mrs. MacFarlane, MaggieE; mother .......................................................................... Loeta Rogers Belvawney, in love With Belinda ................................................................................ Fred Dodson Belinda Treherne, a young lady of property ...................................................... Irene Stewart Mr. Symperson, father of Minnie .............................................................................. George Pasto Cheviot Hill, his nephew, engaged to Minnie ...................................................... Claire Keeney Major McGillicuddy, betrothed t0 Belinda ........................................ .. ................ Carroll Akers Park'er, maid at Sympersoms ....................................................................................... Helen Casey Minnie Symperson .................................................................................... Vera Van Schoonhoven One hundred I'ifty-three SCHOOL OF MUSIC Sharing With the entire University an enormous increase in regis- tration, the School of Music is experiencing a banner year. Last year over 1,000 students were enrolled, a record Which is now superseded by at least 3270. The popularity and thoroughness of the courses offered is evidenced by the fact that the individual students are taking a greater number of music courses than in previous years. 0 Several new activities have been instituted in the school and also some Which concern the residents of Eugene as well. A course in en- semble has been added to the curriculum. This has already produced the desired effectin arousing a healthy interest in chamber music and the larger symphonic forms. Open only to a limited number on a com- petitive basis, an opera chorus has been organized. The Orchestra, the Girls Glee Club, and the Ments Glee Club, under the direction of mem- bers of the faculty of the School of Music, are setting a high standard of excellence. The Portland division of the school is proving increasingly popular, owing to the ability of the professorseDaVid B. Campbell, Abie White- side, piano; J ohn Claire Monteith, Pauline Miller Chapman, voice; Frank Eichenlaub, Susie Fennel Pipes, Violin; William R. Boone, organ, piano and composition ; Carl Denton, organ, piano and Violin ; William H. Boyer, public school music. One hundred fifty-four i fgzggigsy;tlf-watg-igagmaev : 43:. T w 51V r "rum WAWJm'Ig'm-B$ a . t k UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA REX UNDERWOOD .................................................................................... DiTector RALPH HOEBER ...................................................................................... President J OHN ANDERSON .................................................................................... Manager MEMBERS Violin-Alberta Potter, Gwendolyn Lampshire, Ransom McArthur, Ralph McClaiiin, Leland Perry, Ralph Johnson, Edna Rice, Maud Largent, Dan Woods. Viola Wi1s0n Gailey. Ce110 L0ra Teschner, Ralph Hoeber, J ohn Anderson. Flute-Beu1ah Clarke. Clarinet-Norman Byrne. Cornets Haro1d Simpson, Meryl Deming, Reta Ridings. Trombone-Herbert Hacker. French Horn Thomas Larremore. Drums- Samue1 Strohecker. Pian0 Aurora Potter. One hundred fifty-flve Menls Glee' Club Trip, Spring 1919. MEN,S GLEE CLUB TRIP, NINETEEN-TWENTY It was spring vacation all right, the Menls Glee Club was sure of that when they started on their concert tour March 28 but When they reached such towns as Bend and Prineville there were grave doubts in the minds of the Oregon songsters. Snow, some inches thick, covered the ground and overcoats were much in evidence. But this only added to the fun and perhaps the success of the tour. Eastern Oregon people were extremely cordial t0 the glee club men. The concerts were well attended and newspaper comment was altogether favorable. The towns Visited by the men were: The Dalles, Bend, Prine- Ville, Pendleton, LaGrande, and Hood River. a The home concert was given in the Eugene armory on the night of April 23. Many Eugene people as well as campus folk attended, and the 1919-1920 glee club season was voted a success. One hundred rifty-six Girls, Glee Club Trip, Spring 1919. GIRLS, GLEE CLUB TRIP, NINETEEN-TWENTY Southern Oregon towns greeted the Girlst Glee Club members on their sixth annual concert tour With enthusiastic hospitality. Boating parties, after-theatre suppers and dances kept the girls busy between concerts and sent them home on the morning of April 8 at 4 :00 dclock, tired, very tired, but also very pleased. A special car carried the glee club on the entire tour. The towns covered by the club were: Cottage Grove, Oakland, Rose- burg, Grants Pass, Medford, Ashland, and Klamath Falls, Where the girls sang two nights. Dean Elizabeth Fox chaperoned the party. The home concert proved a decided success. The program presented in Eugene was the same as the one used on the concert tour. One hundred flfty-seven Mews Glee Club 95 555969 mmHgmwmwn '17 mi mm W W; ': u 2:5; mm 5x nbawa v5: warm;- , VW'MKV A mWa -:,w.m1: ',w1: .. . Emir." , Hopkins ' Peterson MENS GLEE CLUB ALBERT LUKKEN .................................................................................... Dimctw '$.;; - -2: ;: -. " 513N5W mrmm.m. ., GEORGE HOPKINS .................................................................................. President ; am A . mm .., v A :: ,5: ,1 .A ,-rm:. Jr 74 CURTISS PETERSON .................................................................................. Manager MERLE MOORE -- ............................................................................ Vice Pmsident GEORGE STEARNS .................................................................................. Sewetary MEMBERS First Tenor-Warren Edwards, Curtis Phillips, Caroll Akers, Clifford J ope, Ralph Poston. Second Tenor-Merle Moore, George Hopkins, Crecene Fariss, Wayne Akers, J oseph Ingram. Baritone Curtiss Peterson, George M. Stearns, Charles Huggins, Dwight Phipps, Glen Morrow. Bass Hera1d White, Richard Lyans, Russell Morgan, Maurice Eben, Wilbur Hostetler. One hundred fifty-nine Girly Glee Club 05m 555969 wig McMurphey Manning GIRLS, GLEE CLUB LELAND A. COON ................................ ............ DiTectOT ADAH MCMURPHEY ........................ ................................ President LAURA A. RAND ............................ ..................................................... Sec'retary HELEN MANNING ............ .- ..................................................................... Manage?" MEMBERS First Soprano Beu1ah Keagy, Adah McMurphey, Alice Gohlke, Genevieve Clancy, Florence Garrett. Second Soprano Miriam Stockton, Lois Muir, J 0y J udkins, Arbelyn Healy, Marjorie Holman, Mildred Bettingen, Clara Calkins. First Alto Bernice Alstock, Kate Chatburn, Margaret Phelps, Laura Rand, Marvel Skeels. Second Alto-Marjorie Wells, Helen Manning, Hattie Mitchell, Gladys Lane. ' ,One hundred sixty-one L. ijr'vv v-pwlngt-wA-u 2. Arbr'lw WP A -mw v: A mst 1-1.;40 ' .smga A h.gw. A .. A. AA .i A f v, A .. i uwsurmmmy Nmamwmm v 10.2.:5; 4nd ,4 ijmmfgeb, 4,.1 mm s - t , A . i. A- rwA i 4 x k , ., V r r jif Hi i . 2 x in, 32;" if .4 ' Af .. , .95'5" i A km. .31.. -A. .9 mitiwjm: ,4 . w A 'fwfun As CHORAL SOCIETY HERE is a real live Choral Society on the campus under the leader- ship of Albert Lukken, head of voice. Townspeople as well as Uni- versity students are members of this chorus. The present society revives in spirit the 01d Philharmonid Society, successful in the before-the- war days. . Rehearsals are held weekly in the Y. M. C. A. Hut on the well-known cantata, iiThe Rose Maiden," and also on the grand opera, HCavallei'ia Rus- ticanaf, The orchestral accompaniments are provided by the University Orchestra. The presentation of grand opera in dramatic form is a- new departure and marks an epochal milestone in the development and possibilities of University musical organizations in this country. Vincent Engeldinger is the accompanist for the society. UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA TRIP HE University Orchestra members chose spring vacation for their concert tour. The Coos Bay towns received the concerts With much enthusiasm and the members returned "With a surplus of $200 for their treasury. Coos Bay citizens opened their homes to the Univer- sity musicians and provided entertainment for them between concerts. The orchestra played to large houses at every stop. Bookings were made at the following towns: Myrtle Point, Coquille, Bandon, Marshfield, and North Bend. The orchestra left Eugene March 30 and returned April 4. i One hundred sixty-two r3 jy'iyo 1-- AWV A. . ., M' 'v 'iJki-f 1.. 't.",:., '."'1'.U:l5,. lmsnwagm'-V$VT:TW.'SSVQ$ . k , . A ,w'-v-".-hgnvxipupgmu', 43.4.?! 111". W5 W gnaw: :jifr-aygydyvhrg .- . v 't aim x'i W63, v.3 :09: , .3; am PT U T 3.3" A. 1;; RA. i A. 4913 A in A-.A;.- u... i.gs 9 35! Itun- .0 ! I I' .w .b .,' - v. 2 4 r Wt ' ' $ - mg , 4 ?gz $3 Y if 9 Wm $ii wmqu W349? .bsk-z ?SAJQ r: 3; 5 ; 1. OREGONS COACHIN G STAFF Shy Huntington Bill Hayward Bart Spellman One hundred sixty-three S pelpunq 9110 XI .InOJ-KJ, - K MK W J WMWWWE i HARVARD GAME HARVARD, 7; OREGON, 6. Total yards from scrimmage .................. Oregon 298 yards , ' Harvard 216 yards First downs .............................................. Oregon 15 . . Harvard 12 Average of punts ...................................... Oregon 45 yards Harvard 41 yards 1 ., Return of punts and kickoff .................. Oregon 96 yards :3, Harvard 30 yards Touchdow'nseHarvard .................. 1 Field goals-Oregon .................. 2 Such is the simple story of a mighty football battle, when Harvard, crowned With the oldest football traditions of the nation, came 3,000 miles across the continent to Pasadena, to meet Oregon, the chosen glad- iator 0f the West, on New Yeahs day, 1920. The history of that great game Will not live alone in the flaring headlines 0f the papers Which pro; claimed the Crimson victory, but it will also live in the memory of the wonderful fight of Oregonts team. That team, looked upon by all but the most partisan admirers as beaten at the outset, rushed Harvard back and back as Steers and Brandenberg, and Hollis Huntington and Jacobberger ploughed through the mighty Crimson line, or following massed interference brushed past Pasadena Stadium, New Years Day. One hundred sixty-Iive the ends and crashed into her secondary defense. Then too, it was Steers for Oregon who calmly sent a drop kick hurtling between the Harvard goal posts early in the second quarter for the first score of the game. Between him and the pride of all the East was one thin 11ne of dark jerseyed men, but, wonder of all wonders, no Crimson man got through. Then came the test. For Harvard, roused to a frenzy, opened a terrific attack upon Oregon. Gain after gain was made. Two beautiful passes to Casey; then Church pierced the Lemon-Yellow defense for a touchdown. But still Oregon was not beaten. Once more she battered Harvard. Steers, lighting demon of them all, fell beneath a crushing pile of Harvard men, and little Manerud went in. Hollis Huntington, iron veteran of former years, carried all before him in rush after rush. Harvard was on her seven-yard line, but a penalty forced Oregon back. It was Skeet Manerud this time who sent a drop kick over the locked line and brought Oregon within one point of Harvardts lead. That ended the scoring but the battle had only begun. Men who had hoped to see Oregon make a fair showing against the eastern champions saw the lighter team again and again on the offensive. Seven times that afternoon the Oregon men fought their way within scoring distance of the Harvard goal only to have the drop kick which might have won the Victory miss by inches, or go hurtling off the outstretched hands of a charging Crimson player. Twice Harvardts goal line itself was in danger, and once the timerts whistle, ending the quarter, alone spoiled a pass which might have meant a touchdown. Manerud, who looked like a midget even among his own teammates, was a master mind at quarter Lemon Yellow vs. Crimson-Harvard Has the Ball. .th One hundred sixty-six ware :v .31, ,rmw , V 37-17:... bwravyxzngf' ,2. 1.. 5:7? .tymigx.gown.,....n.,---3., , . 7 . Amy 3 7 .1 ,, UV ...-3;..,., rrnw .m 3, , .li .M,...r,gu3;w-xrl 3 1 33,3 . '71. 73.3333 3 His 1- - .3: f A .3 .. x, H i W, 3 Wow, . 3 , . anr'Jime-f assailant: 43 3, v , 3 3 :Elfu::-v.;i' 2 .w - 4w- g: ....-::.m: Ne. .2 he 2?: i i 4, , iumapmml pg? 1' ,. i N lit ; i V 4, y, . 9n , ' g . . r l J p l ta . . l7 ,3 $.34; unpugr .. sf , . 71; J7; hi; 7'? . :g and carried the ball through, around and under the Harvard team. H01w ,1 lis Huntington played the most brilliant game of his whole career and 28 times that afternoon he hurled himself through the Harvard defense a for a total of 125 yards from the line of scrimmage. Back and forth I the two teams surged upon the torn field. Bill Steers returned in a last attempt to save the day. Once more Harvard felt the fear of Oregonls long range marksmen. Late in the fourth quarter she was forced back to her twenty-yard line. it Victory again lay within the grasp of the Lemon-Yellow. Another drop t. was called for. The tired team braced itself against a desperate assault HI. h p.12: '53 by Harvard. The line held but Manerudls kick swerved just outside the 1"-3:r:-?1,L1: a a . l g: a . ht? Slat , 3' goal posts. The ball went in play on Harvardls 20-yard line. Four R 3 ' f th ame remained. In a last s urt Harvard carried all be- t t N tum: mlnutes o e g . . p . .l W! ' 1 fore her. The Oregon llne- Wthh had borne up under the terr1fic pound- u g ing of iron men without a change throughout the game, was beaten a back. Yard by yard they retreated. Each down brought new life to U 13m lava . the Crimson squad. They came on with increasing speed. Was the u 3mg ; Oregon defense crushed? Four yards to the Lemon-Yellow goal line and b m W51" first down for Harvard. Panting, exhausted, battered, the Oregon team at run W25; braced like a line of steel. Arnold Horween plowed into it with all his a .33 u: EN bulk. Two yards. Another smash, but he fell back a yard when the line ' 1. Wm rose up and met him. Casey came through for two yards. Their own Id! It in 3,; 2,- goal line lay beneath the Oregon linemen,s feet. Once more Horween W threw himself upon them. The line swayed and surged but did not break. 5" 3 Wu H The mighty Harvard half fell short by inches. The last whistle sounded I1 W .1: , as Oregon formed over the ball. Harvard had won the Victory, but to w! Wu V Oregon went the fame of that great day. Harvard Tries Oregonls Right End. One hundred sixty-seven l ,' 324$.-ilww. ; .. . i. mix... 9524;; ' 34,, $91,59me K: .2 ,. is.- The team which outplayed Harvard proved once and for all that western football is thesequal of anything the East can produce. poubt- ers scoffed in former years when the University of Pennsylvanla fell before Oregon, or when Washington State College decisively defeated Brown. But Harvard carried with her all the sacred traditions of foot- ball history and her record for the season past upheld her in the hope of winning the VlCtOIJS wreath. Oregon was fighting not merely for her own honor but that of all the West. The team which upheld the West was truly representative, for in a hard-fought season the University of Washington, the University of California and Washington State Col- lege had pressed hard for the coveted h0nor. Oregon has had an honor- able and brilliant record in football, and many truly great teams have been produced. The team which met Harvard won its place among the greatest of them all. We can pay it no greater tribute. The old Oregon spirit, the never-dying fight, the courage that defies all odds, was with it till the last. No record would be complete without a mention of the men who faced the brunt of battle. Their'University, their state, the entire nation, is proud of them. But theirs is the record of a teamis accomplishment, and not to one or two can go the credit for their deeds. Each one of the thir- teen men who faced the Crimson team contributed his all to make the great showing. Back of them and with them, a force that was felt each time the ball was snapped, was the guiding intellect, the keen, swift judgment of three men who were likewise fighting the greatest battle of their liveseCoach Shy Huntington, Trainer Bill Hayward and Assistant The Harvard Team at Pasadena. One hundred sixty-eight tall, 3. 44' 93v 'er9 35F n- 44" in w! w W C a" " U alll .1 - v ,0! W a, mi J! m- - M.mmm avxa ao-ur :3 db limit. smiamr. w methane. Hmrmm' u but hart? mhuntmgt: m.ttnil'" s; 0.1..u , u e. w 7?' - .7 I My ..m.mmmw-w.r em 40 , I a - 4 V ,, 1 Coach Bart Spellman. To these three men, and to J ohnny Beckett, Brick Mitchell, Elmer Hall and the others Who helped them in the final week of preparation, is due a great portion of the credit. The Oregon line-up and the men they faced: OREGON Howard, 170 .................................... Right end Bartlett, 172 .............................. Right tackle Mautz, 198 .................................... Right guard Brick Leslie, 180 .................................. Center Williams, 179 .................... Left guard Spike Leslie, 180 ........................ Left tackle Anderson, 170 .................................. Left end Steers, 180 ............................................ Quarter Bratndenberg tcaptaim, 175 ...... Right half V. Jacobberger, 170 ........................ Left half Huntington, 175 .............................. Fullback Substitutes usedeBackfield: Manerud and Chapman; line: none. 7Shy" Huntington ................................ Coach Bill Hayward ...................................... Trainer Bart Spellman ............................ Asst. Coach HARVARD Steele, 180 .......................................... Left end Sedgwick, 190 ................................ Left tackle Woods, 222 .................................... Left guard Havemeyer, 180 .................................... Center Hubbard, 190 .............................. Right guard Kane, 180 .................................... Right tackle Desmond, 200 ........................ Right end Murray tcaptaim, 158 ............. ; ........ Quarter A. Horween, 197 .............................. Left half Casey, 156 ............................. : ........ Right half R. Horween, 185 .............................. Fullback Substitutes used-Backfield: Felton and Church; line: Phinney, Ryan, Brown and Faxon. Bob Fisher .............................................. Coach Pooch Donovan .................................. Trainer Eddie Mahan ...................... Backfield coach Our Boys Before the Game. . afmm F116 hundred sixty-nine wma, --.w,-vrm..t..,nm mwulvf. .1 m Mvmmu 'WM-s-W-ua. :4: e'mbix '2 . 1; uvwwk've'wg an? ac ,, - vaunw. - . ta -wrtwe 7 199131135 .4 e , xxwwxmxgxwx $ K1U9A9S pelpunq 8110 The Football Squad. i E, 'K E. a .t 31 m "waacgza-z'w A- WILLIAM STEERS, the fellow Who starred in every game last season, Will lead the Lemon- Yellow in its diligent pursuit of victory next year. In Bill are the combined at- tractions of level-headedness, speed, weight, an unexcelled pass, and an ever-ready boot. Give Bill the ball and a broken field and he will show you What yardage is. He can hit a line as well, and altogether he is exceeding- ly well equipped to lead Oregon through an- ather successful season. Bill received all- American mention for his past seasonis work. One hundred seventy-one EVERETT BRANDENBERG.eThe past sea- son was Captain Brandenbergis third rep- resenting Oregon in football. The quality of his first year playing With the Freshmen built for him a reputation to Which he added strength as the seasons went. Even though handicapped by a crippled shoulder, Brandy missed none of the conference games last year, and was ever a menace to the opposing'teams. He is a consist- ent ground gainer, and possessed With the cool- ness of judgment that is required in a true leader. You could see him in any of the games, looking his team over and steadying the ones Who were unstrung. His efficient leadership helped greatly in making Oregonts season the successful one that it was. i f j 1 II ,. ug m-q . Ma '. ,.-.v;s,.z..v HOLLIS HUNTINGTON just finished his third year of ttBig Leaguell football, having played in 1916 with the team that humbled Pennsylvania and last year with the cham- pion Marine team. He is liconsistencyll personified. To let Holly take the ball is like chalking up an average gain. The returns of the Harvard fight looked like a story about Huntington. On defense he was in every play and his ability to diagnose the opposing teams was largely responsible for Oregon,s success in stopping enemy rallies. Holly was on several a11- northwestern teams as fullback, A gag ., , b v at A FRANCIS JACOBBERGER was a vic- tim of lttoo-many-quarterback-itus." He is a good consistent player and did telling work in all the games in which he played. He carries the ball well and can punt the old pill for a good average. Watch him go next year. One hundred seventy-two i" zymmmwmm , , - nan... w ,VI'aVaM-v . :54." xuxaw me; am w swam , v2.7 ::v A a: any 't'xw aw-wxmm a a A .AH nuts 5 ; uv -NISH CHAPMAN first won fame as a basketball player but that did not narrow activities. He did not berth 0n the team this year, but watch him go next season. He is a fast and aggressive player, and can catch a for-. ward pass from any angle. N ish was kept out of the game during most of the season on account of injuries. One hundred seventy-three CLIFFORD MANERUD makes a hit Wher- ever he goes; His 127 pounds plough through the toughest line, as well as around ends. Opposing teams can hit Skeet hard, but they have never put him out of the game. Did you see him When he came home from the University of Washington fight? He had a few scars, but they hadntt wiped off his smile. He can run back punts With the best of them, and as a field general in the quarterback position he has few superiors 0n the Coast. KEITH LESLIE made his letter at center on the 1917 Varsity and returned to the gridiron this season following war service. Heeplayed a wonderful game against Washington State but Was injured in the contest to such an extent that he was forced to watch the big annual contest with O. A. C. from the sidelines. He recuperated later and aided consistently in making Oregon football history in the memorable Harvard con- test. Brick does not graduate this year and Oregon fans hope to see him in lemon-yellow football regalia again next fall. PRINCE CALLISON filled Brickis place at center When the latter was injured. He did his best work against the Aggies. In this game he was in every play. He recovered fumbles, broke up passes, and in general played a real game of football. Next year the Aggie fans Will see him again in action on the 1920 team. One hundred seventy-four CARL MAUTZ, in a football suit, re- minds one of a prize-winner in a eugenics contest. But for all his good-natured ap- pearance, he is a hard-working and ag- gressive player. He was chosen by some writers for the all-coast team. He uses tank tactics with unvarying success. Carl is a conscientious worker and is in the game from start to finish. The past sea- son was his second on the Varsity. BASIL WILLIAMS spent his second New Years at Pasadena this year. He was somewhat handicapped with an in- jured knee all through the season, but few of the fans could notice this from his play. He is one of the most aggressive linemen seen in action during the year. On offense his tactics are like those of an angry gor- illa, except that they are much more ef- fective. One hundred seventy-five ALFRED HARDING is known as one of the fastest guards in the conference. He is a hard worker, has lots of the 01d fight and excels in blocking attempted kicks. It Will be remembered that Al made a touchdown on a recoveredball in the Washington game. With a little more experience he should develop into a star, He played in all the games this year except the Harvard game, being kept out on ac- count of injuries. EARL LESLIE helped his brother Brick hold down the Oregon line during the early part of the season but later ac- cumulated a broken foot and a pair of crutches. Both of the Leslies participat- ed in the hard games of the early season and in the Harvard contest came through With he old Oregon fight. Spike return- ed to the campus this year after war ser- vice. He was captain of the Vancouver Barracks eleven during a season spent in the army. One hundred seventy-six , 1 -, h sng ten ir a Fr 1 avsvaawr? KENNETH BARTLETT is another lad that has been on the Pasadena excursion twice. Ken is a fast, brainy player, who lets the oppos- ition know that he is in the game all the time. On offense he tears holes in the line and runs 'j interference in a very effective manner. He is ? a hard tackler and smashes plays With a regular- ity that is sickening to the players of the other team. Ken' was unanimously selected for last seasons all-coast team. 42:; . rxzanK'JA-t-L ammazwuq.-r.4s i. . uz: . ,1; m; . -1132 L . Astri: w x " ., u yel-Evlt-i w - .., 'J" i aha .1. ,v ix, mekui a . . :g'" sob. m rawmjmv' MTV M..zv- ii ... -at.mn......4-..' am M2: MARTIN HOWARD just finished a most successful season at V end. Although he is not a flashy player he is always tiup-and-a- coming." He is fast and a sure, hard tackler. . Few end runs were made around the post that Mart was guarding. Mart promises to show the fans next year a few tricks that he learned from Brick Mitchell while preparing for the Harvard game. v IleilVngh One hundred seventy-seven VINCENT JACOBBERGER is another play- consistent type. He is fairly. STANFORD ANDERSON played a stellar game at end during the past season. He was down under every punt and spoiled most of the plays that were attempted on his side of the line. He kept opposing tackles from mussing up Oregon plays and was on the receiving end of many forward passes. He used knowledge gained in the Air Service in combating aerial attacks of enemy teams. is tttherett When it comes to stopping aerial attacks. He made a, name for himself in the Harvard game and was one of the principal actors in the famous "dead- man" play. He fights hardest When he smiles, and he went into most of the games laughing. N ext year you Will hear more of him. One hundred seventy-eight FOOTBALL SEASON Oct. 11 Eugene .............................................. Oregon 23 Multnomah 0 Oct. 18 Moscow .............................................. Oregon 27 Idaho 6 Nov. 1 Seattle ................................................ Oregon 24 U. of W. 13 Nov. 8 Portland ............................................ Oregon 0 W. S. C. 7 NOV. 15 Eugene .............................................. Oregon 9 O. A. C. 0 NOV. 28 Portland ............................................ Oregon 15 Multnomah 7 Jan. 1 Pasadena .......................................... Oregon 6 Harvard 7 As the above indicates Oregon had a hard and successful 1919 foot- ball season. The two defeats, one by Washington State College and the other at the hands of Harvard, represent the fickleness of football luck, for in both games Oregon out-bucked, out-fought and otherwise out-played her Victorious opponents. Shy Huntington won for himself eternal honor and a nation-Wide re- putation as a football coach, building up a team Which topped the Pacific Coast Conference and won the right to represent the West against the East at Pasadena on New Yearts day. Huntington was, however, ably assisted. Bart Spellman, former University of Oregon football star, handled the line capably and efficiently. The team was kept in 1tship shape" by Bill Hay- ward, Who is looked upon by many as one of the best trainers in the - country. The Last Game on Kincaid One hundred seventy-nine The conference championship lay between the University of Cahfor- nia, from the southland, and three northern teams-Wash1ngt0n State College, the University of Washington and the University of Oregon. in the conference Oregon lost but one game, that to Washington State, wh11e both the Purple and Gold and the Oregon Aggies walked on Gus Welchis Staters after having been taken into camp by the Varsity. The Golden Bear was humbled by W. S. C. and by the Puget Sound eleven; Oregon was not scheduled to play either southern team. The Pacific Coast Con- ference standing at the end- of the season was as follows: Team Won Lost Pct. Team Won Lost Pct. Oregon .............. 2 1 .667 California x 2 .500 2 1 .667 Stanford 2 .333 . 2 .500 O. A. C. ............ 1 3 .250 Oregon and the University of Washington were tied in the percentage column but Oregon having defeated Washington by a decisive score had the edge on the championship. ' The season opened on Kincaid field October 11. Multnomah Amateur Athletic Club was the first victim for the Varsity steam roller. This game afforded the Lemon-Yellow supporters a chance to see their team in action early in the season. Coach Huntington used 18 men in the game, the final score of which was 23-0. Eddie Strowbridge, Hollis Huntington and Ken Bartlett were towers of strength in their particular positions for the Var- sity. Francis J acobberger made an average of 48 yards on his kicks, booting several over the 50 mark. The game was Oregonis from the start and the clubmen were unable to make consistent yardage, totaling but Steers Scores on the Purple and Gold-w-Seattle Nov. 1 One hundred eighty 3 w -M' Meagan 1W2? - '2 three first downs against eleven for the Varsity. Skeet Manerud, the Lemon-Yellowfs diminutive Quarterback, went in fer the final quarter and showed excellent judgment in calling his plays. Skeet booted over a drop kick 'from the 20-yard line which closed Oregonls scoring. v; k . :- 14:44.44. :4 rwxarva. r ' i t The Varsity had little difficulty in trouncing the University of Idaho at Moscow on the 18th of October. The first half ended in a 6-6 tie, but 3 Shy switched his line-up and the new combination was too much for the j Silveriand Gold. The Oregon team made ten first downs in the second ' $2 half for a net gain of 130 yards. Hollis Huntington scrambled over the I Idaho line for four touchdowns during the game, while Bill Steers con- verted three goals. Bill also got away for a 63-yard dash in the first half and otherwise lived up to the reputation he has gained on the gridiron. In this game Oregon thoroughly demonstrated the superiority of her backfield, playing a better game in all departments than against Mult- nomah on the preceding Saturday. Enz-wle. x .4 .sc s, A -, v; i: cm in: .3 13! r m W : Mmft'f". Imam . wan ' iv; A '1 .- M. 5.52;. Idaho out of the way, Shy settled down to work in preparation for the important contest with the University of Washington on N ovember 1. .- if 1:31:25"- ? Consistent practice on the part of the squad and steady drilling from the ., gm me: 7165-7 coaches and trainer sent a strong, well-balanced team to Seattle to battle .1; m, m g 4:- the Purple and Gold. The team was given a rousing sendoff as it left Eu- .M J ,3, p315. ' ' gene. Oregon spirit was never higher, and 'a thousand student rooters g, . '-'.tt:r..:u: , marched to the station, Slim Crandall and a brass band in the lead. . .-x.'..c35-'."3' t ...L ,of i. 1! L. -.-. The game at Seattle was one of the most desperate battles of the sea- :5 9 W1; .2; son. It was a real fight from the moment Ted Faulkfs toe sent the pig- skin hurtling through the air into the arms of Captain Brandenberg. Oregon rushed Coach Hunt,s men off their feet and the first 16 minutes of V. a ti .. if f A Hole Through the W. S. C. Line One hundred eighty-one ,, ,N" .. .4 -T nu...- m. play saw the Lemon-Yellow with two touchdowns and both goals con- verted. Washington came back strong in the second and third quarters, putting over two touchdowns. A missed goal alone left the Oregon ma- chine in the lead. The Purple and Gold ceased to score with 13 points and Oregon put across ten more, by a touchdown, a kicked goal, and a drop kick. Oregon,s two famous quarterbacks were the main factors in the Victory. When Bill Steers was knocked out in an attempt to keep the op- position from scoring toward the close of the first half, he was replaced by Skeet Manerud, Oregonis 127-p0under, who carried on Billis work in a highly satisfactory manner. Manerud squirmed through the heavy Wash- ington line time after time for consistent gains. The Victory was dearly purchased, however, and it was a crippled team that returned to Eugene to prepare for the battle with the Cougars on November 8. Spike Leslie, iitackle extraordinary," was out of the game with a broken ankle; Captain Brandenbergis shoulder, which had been giving him a good deal of trouble throughout the season was still badly bruised; Bill Steers had been given a rough working over by the Purple and Gold opponents, and Mart Howard sustained a few minor in- juries from the 1astgonflict. A special train accompanied the team to Portland on November 7, with about 600 Oregon rooters and the band. That night Portland was the scene of a rousing rally, serpentine and general exhibition of Oregon pep; Oregon spirit and Oregon fight were at their height, for the Pullman con- test appeared to be the deciding factor in the conference championship and the trip to Pasadena. A crippled team faced Washington State College on Multnomah field, a team with weakened line but with indomitable fight and courage. Oregon Around W. S. US End One hundred eighty-two known mg 1; W; . l '1" 13- K"; I23, ctimrm-7 ' lb limq. name :1 'szrlmt 2! ms 1 u! . sum hm mow um 17"? m f! ?'thi gt. 4 wg WWW; 121312.12! 5 t h FRI"! 4 r , i'i' kW 2;!3: started things with a rush and for a while it looked as though the husky Pullman team would be vanquished. By successive passes and line bucks the ball was carried to the Staters' two-yard line, but right there the gruel- ling contest of the preceding week told and the Lemon-Yellow lacked the punch to put it over. W. S. C. kicked and again the march toward the goal line began. When the whistle starting the second quarter blew, it was Oregon's ball on the Cougars, eight-yard line. Four yards in four downs was the best Shy's men could do and again Pullman kicked to safety. The break came in the third period, when a costly fumble 0n Oregon's 24- yard line gave W. S. C. the ball. Four three yard bucks followed by a ten- yard gain placed the Pullman men on the Varsity,s two-yard line. The next attempt found the Staters over the line, spelling defeat for Oregon. Manerud was substituted for Brandenberg in the fourth quarter, Steers going to half and Skeet calling signals. The little quarterback played a heady game and under his guiding hands the Varsity made a last attempt to score. Securing the ball when W. S. C. fumbled, Oregon march- ed steadily toward the Washington goal; it was a race against time and the whistle ended it with the ball in the Cougars' territory. Bartlett and Williams on the line played a splendid game and Steers, Huntington and V. J acobberger were the most consistent ground gainers. The prospects for winning the O. A. C. game did not seem especially bright. The hard-fought games with Washington and Pullman had exact- ed a heavy toll in injuries from the Varsity. A patched up team of cripples Oregon Goes Down on a Punt--W. S. C. Game One hundred eight y-three was the best Shy could hope to place in the held against the Aggies. Bill Hayward and the coaches' labored unceasingly through the week. Coach Huntington and Assistant Coach Spellman were aided by J ohnny Beckett, famous tackle, and Bill Snyder, guard, both of the 16 team. The day of the game, November 15, was an ideal one for football and a record crowd filled the bleachers and grandstands and stood ten deep around the Universityis new turf field, named in honor of the veteran trainer, Hayward field. The Aggies were out to win. Over 3000 rooters accompanied the team from Corvallis, and a cadet band kept their fighting spirit surging. Bill Steers and Skeet Manerud engineered the powerful attack which brought the Varsity its 9-0 Victory over its rivals. The game was fought through every yard of play and was replete with thrills. The Lemon- Yellow touchdown came just before the close of the first half. Lodell of O. A. C., standing back of his own goal line, punted 30 yards to Jacob- berger, who ran the ball back seven yards. Brandenberg hit the line for three yards. The Aggies were penalized five and Huntington plunged over from the two-yard line for a touchdown. Manerud added three points in the final period when he slipped over a beautiful drop kick from the 27- yard line. Though the Aggies were outclassed they put up a hard fight and twice threatened the Oregon goal line, both times, however, being held for downs. Powell played a strong game for the Visitors, making his yardage consistently. On the defense Callison, the Varsity center, showed up well, bursting through the Aggie line repeatedly and nailing their back- field men from the rear. Great credit should be given to Captain Bran" Through the Aggie Line One hundred eight-four v r-rm-HJ-xgmg Mnmxwd-rQlw gaiwm. M; T 3,. m is: ' o. 1. miniwawwm'nvmwt V, Inn. 2: "hung denberg in this game for his brilliant work in the secondary defense, While the end runs of Steers and Manerud again and again brought the rooters to their feet. The last game of the regular seasonwas played against Multnomah in Portland, Thanksgiving day. The Varsity returned winner, 15-7. Bill Steers booted over three drop kicks from the 15, 21 and 16-yard lines. Hollis Huntington secured the Varsity touchdown, While V. Jacobberger got away for some sensational end runs. Much of the credit for the successful season should go to the ttscrubs? These men did not secure letters or rootersi praise, but were nevertheless possessed of the traditional Oregon spirit Which kept them steadily at work throughout the season, assisting the Varsity in every possible way. Night. after night they reported for practice, and their consistent, steady work is best appreciated by those Who understand the unrewarded grind at- tendant upon the development of a football team. The Oregon squad was composed of the following men: Everett Brandenberg tcaptaini, Bill Steers, Skeet Manerud, Hollis Huntington, V. J acobberger, F. J acobberger, Stan Anderson, Mart Howard, Ward McKinney, Neil Morfitt, Bob Cosgriff, Ken Bartlett, Brick Leslie, Spike Leslie, Si Starr, Scotty Strachan, Basil Williams, Ed Ward, A1 Harding, Carl Mautz, Stuffer Dresser, Prink Ca1- lison,Warren Gilbert and Gordon Fauley. O. A. 'C. in the Shadow of Defeat One hundred eighty-five .41ij m - r 3 g F . l i 9' , 2E i. ' ; 4., 1,, : a- .4,.4:-....w $4. y j; E "1: 5' v s ' . "AIM a vmmw raw 3 aw; . Ha: k :' L- , s - r w. .224 . t M mwvxmw . g w u , :3 , q . WEJAKvM 1,"? '2 WI tW t H a b ti: I .1 l . I;- Is t a V3 2 J t 5 M1 e Kg" A .. . 3i " t f r H H . t t I Jacobberger Manerud Latham Basketball this season proved to be of the airtight variety in both the Pacific Coast and Northwest conferences. So evenly matched were the teams that game after game was played where only a point or two margin decided which team was to be shoved down in the percentage column and which was to be placed at the top. With the opening of the winter term Coach Huntington m2 found that he had Eddie Durno, Nish Chapman, Francis V' 4: Jacobberger, and Captain Herm Lind from last seasons .2 a , Pacifm Coast Conference champions to build his 1920 team X t around. Five days of the hardest drilling was all too short to get a team in shape, and in the opening game with Whit- man, Oregon paid in basketball for the Pasadena trip. The Lemon-Yellow five was no match for the Inland Empire squad either in team work or physical condition. Fight alone kept them in the running, and some Wonderful shots by Durno held the game in the air till the last whistle, Whit- man winning 23 to 22. The next night, however, Oregon tightened her defense and turned the tables 23 to 12. The Oregon five apparently struck its stride in the second game at Seattle on January 22, but ten days later injuries and sickness took a hand. After losing two games in succession, the first to Washington State and 7 One hundred eighty-six dwvwm U 1920 M nu- ".th uUTa. unto T mi$ T4 gldu- mu..- muwi 'Udds M 'i'! ". em QAHA Chapman the second to the University of Washington on the Eugene floor, the Var- sity faced the Purple and Gold on February 7 With its two stars, Durno and Chapman, out of the line-up. The clash proved one of the most gruel- ling contests 0f the season. The crippled Oregon team kept in the lead till late in the second half When Washington began to creep up. Durno and Chapman went in With the score tied and braced the defense Which had momentarily faltered. From then on the two teams fought neck and neck. Five minutes of overtime failed to decide it, but in an additional overtime period a basket by Lind and a converted foul by Durno gave the Lemon-Yellow a well-earned Victory. Injuries Which still stalked in their wake seemed to doom the team Which met the Beavers on February 13, but the Varsity bested the Aggies by two points in the opener and swamped them the next night 37 to 21. On their southern trip, Which required four games in five days, the Oregon team broke even With the University of California but dropped both games to Stanford. This practically eliminated the last of the northern teams and left Stanford with a strong lead in the Pacific Coast Conference. The influenza epidemic, Which made its appearance dur- ing Oregorfs southern trip, caused the Stanford games to Beller be played behind closed doors at Eugene, and Oregon fans missed an op- portunity to see this yearis conference champions in action. The Varsity un-u.n A 3, Mad; v -at. was badly weakened by sickness and was no match for the Cardinal five in either game. Hopes of seeing the Varsity in action .agalnst the Aggles were also doomed, for O. A. C. cancelled the remalnlng games on her schedule. . The team which represented Oregon this year did not have the pollsh- ed team work of some squads in the past, but they were fighters from the first whistle until the final pistol shot. Eddie Durno, diminutive basketball wizard, proved this year that it was not a flash which won him his position as all-Pacific Coast forward in 1919. Despite injuries and sickness Eddie was the individual star of every contest which he entered. He was on the ball all the time and no guard in the conference could hold him. There is little doubt that Durno will win a place on the mythical all-Coast five for each of his three years of Varsity service. He certainly has proved him- self in the class with Homer J ameson, Carl Fenton and some of the other great basketball men who have won fame for Oregon. He was honored at the seasonis close with the captaincy of next yearis team. In almost the same class with Durno and certainly a great mate for the little forward, is Chapman, running guard on the Varsity this season. Nish was a tower of strength in the Oregon line-up and with the passing around of honors he is a hard man to overlook. Captain Lind worked both at center and forward. He played a clean, hard game, and the fact that he fed many of his chances to Durno kept his own score lower. Herrn looked mighty good against Willamette, in the overtime contest with the University of Washington, and in the second game at Corvallis. Latham, the husky Salem High lad, broke into the Varsity in his sophomore year. Mark showed to greatest advantage as a defensive player, and his work against the rangy Dement in the second Whitman game won the Oregon fans over to him. Latham shoots well, and with the confidence gained from one year on the Varsity Will certainly be heard from next season. Francis J acobberger at guard was one of the steadiest men on the team. Never a flashy player, J ake nevertheless was a hard man for any forward to get past, and he carried the ball down the floor for Oregon time and again when his team mates were blocked out from the basket. Francis Beller was an understudy in the guarding game. The slightly built guard played like a veteran whenever he broke into the line-up and no man on the Oregon team equalled his ability to cut off long passes. Skeet Manerud at forward was a speedy man on the floor and a spectacular shot. His con- sistent foul shooting alone sent the Washington game into overtime play. Lynn McCready and Bill Steers both broke into the line-up in the final games with Stanford, One hundred eighty-eight .hAQ vau- uda'wutiisia 33,1 Awarq. ?Ye 4 A .4 law; :1.. A a i if hmw n aver. mmzw Ml EM?" .. unwitf'mgwwr: A; h: v gr ;, THE SEASONS RECORD Date Place Points Points J anuary 12 Eugene ............ U. of O. ........... 22 Whitman ................ 23 2 13 Eugene ............. U. of O. ............ 23 Whitman ................ 12 2 22 Seattle .............. U. of O. ............ 25 U. of W. ................ 38 2 23 Seattle .............. U. of O. ............ 29 U. of W. ................ 26 2 29 Salem ................ U. of O. ............ 38 Willamette ............ 31 2 31 Eugene ............ U. of O. ............ 38 Willamette ............ 22 February 5 Eugene ............ U. of O. ............ 27 Wash. State .......... 29 , . 2 6 Eugene ............ U. of O. ............ 19 U. of W. ................ 22 I' 9! 23m L433 2 7 Eugene ............ U. of O. ............ 23 U. .of W. ................ 20 in 1",,L3f my. 2 13 Corvallis ............ U. of O. ............ 22 O. A. . .................. 20 Wm 5.2:: mm 72.8 2 14 Corvallis ............ U. of O. ............ 37 O. A. C. .................. 21 Win 5:! w ' 2 17 Palo Alto .......... U. of O. ............ 22 Stanford ................ 39 ,w . 1w .. L 1, - 2 18 Palo Alto .......... U. of O. ............ 31 Stanford ................ 36 ' " 1' 2 20 Berkeley ............ U. of O. ............ 29 U. of C. .................. 27 W 2' '3' ' 2 21 Berkeley ............ U. of o. ............ 19 U. of C. .................. 33 5' "'"h M! "2 2 24 Eugene ............ U. of O. ............ 15 Stanford ................ 47 1- M3! W313 7 2 25 Eugene ............ U. of O. ............ 18 Stanford ................ 29 . :3: 5 . Keeney Crandall Knudsen One hundre'l eighty-nine VeRQTYTRAGK HE 1919 track season was a trying one on Oregon and although the Varsity took but one meet during the season great credit is due the men who wore the Lemon-Yellow colors. Bad weather in the early spring handicapped the squad in its training, and later in the year scarcity of material and in- juries to Abbott and Wilson threw too heavy a burden on the remaining men on the team. 'Especially was this true after the meet with the Uni- versity of Washington on May 17. In both the N orth- west and Pacific Coast con- ference meets Oregonts sure point winners showed the strain of overwork. Measured in development of material, however, the sea- son was a valuable one. The ratrttxaaug-liilscl i'l't" One hundred ninety period of transition from war to peace footing was more noticeable perhaps in track than in any other intercolleg- iate sport and was the partic- ular handicap of the 1919 team. Much credit is due Trainer Bill Hayward for his pains- taking work under discourag- ing circumstances. From a squad containing but two let- ter men he developed a strong team. The veteran Hank Fos- ter was the outstanding star for the entire season. He play- ed himself to the sheer limit of his endurance in every meet. Following the Columbia in- door meet and the Multnomah Athletic Club meet in the early spring, Oregon lost a dual contest with O. A. C. 69 to 61. In the relay, which was the deciding factor of the afternoon, Foster, running the last lap for Oregon, fell fainting across the tape but a few One hundred ninety-one inches behind Kirkenschlager of O. A. C. who had had a start of yards on the Oregon Captain. The meet With the University of Washington also hinged on the relay but this time Oregon won easily, making the score 69 to 62 in favor of the Lemon-Yellow. In the N orthwest Conference meet at Pullman on May 24, Oregon took third place but was only seven points behind Idaho, the winner of the day. Leith Abbott easily won the half against the field in 1:58 3T5 and if he had been pressed would probably have broken the Northwest record of 1 :57 3T5. The Pacific Coast Conference meet at Seattle on May 31 was won by Cali- fornia, while Oregon stood sixth With nine points. The Varsity squad for the season was made up of Hank Foster, Al Runquist, Don Belding, Dwight Parr, Leith Abbott, DOW Wilson, Harry Hargreaves, Newton Estes, Stan Anderson, Si Starr, A1 Bowles, Dubs Mulkey, N ish Chapman, Harry J amieson, Lyle Bain, Merle Margason and Don Feenaughty. The first twelve won ttO,s,t during the season. The Start of the 440 One hundred ninety-two gs nu mu..- uu'b" .. Man. Foster Runquist Belding Parr Abbott Wilson Estes Hargreaves Anderson Starr Bowles Mulkey May 3.4Mu1tnomah-Oregon INDIVIDUAL POINT WINNERS Colum. Mult. 9 11- 10 14 1 9 5 1 3 914 3 1 614 8 5 8 214 3 114 1 3 7 TRACK SCHEDULE, 1919 April 124Columbia Indoor Meet O.A.C. Portland Portland May 10.-O. A. C.-Oregon Eugene May 17.-Washingt0n-Oregon Eugene May 24.-Northwest Conf. Pullman 42 41 May 31.4P. C. C-onf. Seattle Idaho 53122 38 Hank Foster Winning the Hundred One hundred ninety-three 52 U3 Multnomah Oregon W. S. C. 30V; 3 2 514 3 6V4 4 113 114 1V4 3 Multnomah 48 113 72 O. A. C. 69 69 Oregon 35 24V; O.A.C. Wash. N.W.C. P.C.Con.Tota1 11 14 69 27 24122 9 1315 31 8 16 113 8V; 10 214 14 Oregon 22 113 Oregon 58 Oregon 61 U. of Wash. 62 Montana 14 U.0fC. Stanford W.S.C. O.A.C. Wash. Ore. 1915 9 , H352 'ZT'TLTM ,. r 4 i .4 0 , n' w;xv -u.,ar , .352... 1M .1 van , . Summary of Northwest Conference Meet. Mile run-Ratchford 1W.S.CJ; Belding 10reg0; Smith WV-S-CJ; time 4:29. 440 yard dash5McCallie Gdahm; Parker 1W.S.CJ; Calder 1W.S.CJ; time, 0:51 325. Shot put5Irving adahw ; Perrine Hdahm ; King 1W.S.CJ ; 42 ft. 9 in. Pole vault-5Jenne 1W.S.CJ ; Howard 1Montj ; Baker 1MontJ ; 12 ft. 3 in. 120 Hurdles-Sterling 1MontJ ; Howell 1W.S.CJ ; Howard Udahm ; time, 0:16 125. 100 yard dash-Richmond adahm ; Foster 101:ng ; Mose Udahm ; 10 flat. Discus51rving adahm ; Runquist :Orng ; King 0W.S.CJ ; 127 ft. 8 in. High jump-Hodson 1MontJ ; Hargreaves 10rng ; Jenne 1W.S.CJ ; tied for first, second and third ; 5 ft. 10 in. TWO mile rum-Smith 1W.S.CJ; Phillips 1W.S.CJ; Campbell Hdahoh time, 10:23. 880 yard run5Abbott 10regon1 ; Ratchford 1W.S.CJ ; Belding 10regom ; time, 1:58 325. . Javelin51rving Udahm ; Perrine Gdahm ; McCroskey 5W.S.CJ ; 156 ft. I in. Broad jump5Foster 10regon1; Mulkey 50regom; Jenne 1W.S.CJ; 21 ft. 8V2 n. 220 hurdles5Howell 1W.S.CJ ; Moe Gdahm ; Mussey 1Mont3 ; 0:25 425. 220 yard dash-Richmond Gdahm ; Foster 10rng ; Hargreaves 50rng ; time, 0:22 325. Relay-Oregon :Abbott, Anderson, Bowles, BeldingO ; Montana; Idaho. Starr Over the Cross Bar A One hundred ninety-four A2 . '- 2 I r: 1920 LIE... WW... h-tgmemwmmmm...l... ,, N .thqm. N.h Gum: r uhhmn; I. I Ix F M T""""-'r Summary of Pacific Coast Conference Meet. Two mile run5Smith :W.S.CJ ; Phillips 1W.S.CJ ; Davis Roach 1CalJ ; time, 9:59 225. Discus-Pape 1WnJ ; Greene 1StanJ ; Runquist 10regon1 ; Marchant 1CalJ ; distance, 132 ft. 8122 in. High jump5JacAkson :Calj ; Greene 1StanJ ; Jenne 1W.S.CJ ; Waite 10.A.CJ ; 6 ft. 132; in. 880 yard rum-Waltz 10am; Spratt :CaIJ; Ratchford 1W.S.CJ; Tuls- Worth 1StanJ ; time, 2 min. Mile run5SWan :O.A.CJ; Belding 10rng; Phillips :W.S.CJ; Sprott CalJ ; time, 4 :34 225. 440 yard dash5Maynard 10am ; Scofield mam ; Gray 1WashJ ; Parker 1W.S.CJ ; time, 0:51. 120 yard hurdles-Howell :W.S.CJ; Radcliffe 10.A.CJ; Eikelman 10. A.CJ ; time, 0:15 425. 100 yard dash5Wells 1Stanf0rd1 ; Gray 1Wash9 ; Carter 10.A.CJ ; time, 10 225. ' 220 yard dash-Dinklespiel 1Stan3; Carter 10.A.CJ; Foster 10rng; Cantelow 10am ; time, 0:22 225. 220 yard hurdles2-Wells :Stanford1 ; Eikleman 10.A.CJ ; Radcliffe 10A. 03 ; Dailey :WnJ ; time, 0:25 225. Pole vauIFJenne :W.S.CJ ; Peterson 10am ; Sterling; Gardner; height, 11 ft. 8 in. Shot put-Majors :CalJ ; Pore 1WnJ ; King :W.S.CJ ; Howell 10.A.CJ ; distance, 41 ft. 7 in. Hammer thrOW-Marchant :CaIJ; Curtis, 1Stan3; Waltz 10am; King 1W.S.CJ ; distance, 140 ft. 8 in. Javelin throw-Marchant 10am ; Jones 10am ; Butler 10.A.CJ ; Majors wan ; distance, 157 ft. 1 in. Broad jump-Marchant 10am; Jackson 10211.1; Sterling :CalJ; Jenne 1W.S.CJ ; distance, 22 ft. 4528 in. . Relay race-Stanford 1Scof1e1d, Maynard, Wells, DinklespieD; Washing- ton 1P0re, Blue, Dailey, Gram ; Washington State 1Ratchford, Phil- lips, Sutton, Parkem ; O. A. C. :MCCIanathan, Kirchenslager, Butler, Cartem ; time, 3 :27 425. 1WashJ ; BilPS Latest "Find" One hundred ninety-five A +1 j' VARSITY BASEBALL ASEBALL last spring did not add much to the Universityts fame upon the diamond. Oregon lacked a consistent battery, and that coupled with poor baseball weather accounts for the seasons record, Whlch marked up but one conference Victory out of seven starts. As an opener the Multnomah Club team was brought to Eugene on April 26 and the Varsity smothered them 17 to 4. The next week-end saw the Oregon team in action on the O. A. C. diamond. In the first contest Coach Huntington,s men were victors by a 9 to 5 score. They lost, how- ever, on the following day, When the Aggies piled up 9 runs against their 3. -A series of smashing defeats followed. The University of Washing- ton opened a two-game series in Eugene on May 7 and took both games, Winning the first 8 to 4 and the second 7 t0 2. A week later Shy,s men forced the University of Washington to the limit When they met them in Seattle. The first game went 15 innings, but the Northerners won out 10 to 9. The second game went to Washington 7 t0 1. Wet grounds brought the season to an early close. 0. A. C. won over the Varsity 12 t0 3 on May 28 and the remaining game was cancelled after both coaches had looked over the f1eld. One hundred ninety-six ZVW "f"? - ' . wrauw ....w..r.a....,wm ax :- V .a ...az:r $41.: A...J:i" ,V t. x r34: ,9 0-. L-xzwlelmV .. um 5tms.- .T V' TVA'VLEM A' 75;.;.:. $235.3" IA : 3 g a . 'j g "wa g Dwight Wilson and Eddie Durno alternated in the box, while the in- 3 N H h; ; field remained practically intact throughout the season. The veteran Her- : 3 Q h . 'hg 3 man Lind, captain-elect, covered flI'St in good style and went through the g Q h 'H uh ; season with a fine batting average. Bill Reinhart at short was a consistent : ". g 1 fielder, a heady player, and a slugger of no mean abilty. J ohn Houston in a . h ' ; 'his iirst year of Varsity baseball covered third with a world of pep. Second I '3 :3 twig .3 was covered by Bill Morrison, who developed ability both as a fielder and , 'i 3 r:: b k hu'ta ; batter. J iggs Leslie caught throughout the season. 3 :a; h Othtu 1:3 ' Dot Medley and Jimmy Sheehy, both veterans on the team, alter- :3: hw."l.x' i nated in center and left field with Lindsey Campbell. Two sensational 1 i3 '3 1 home runs at the start of the season gave J ohnny Gamble the reputation 33' 3d Yb tmih ' . of a coming slugger. He was stationed in right field. 1 ' ' h I dun; Medley and Sheehy won their third baseball letter last season, lwhile : ' 3 h g 1 di? Wilson, Lind, Reinhart and Morrison Iinished their second season on the , if b . U whit? . team. Four new wearers of the baseball 330, were added in Durno, Leslie, ' w u t Mr ; Houston and Gamble. i n.2g1kmr. g t tag 223: i. t f :g a a mu 3 3 3 3 g i The Oregon Corner 24.4mm, , aw; Nu ; S-Atwmk One hundred ninety-seven wix'tty .-4, , v. .. r 3 3' V-V .-.- ,Me '5 ' 3 ,, wwwvg r w . . :mnmh Jr'v. 1n , ,mqeurwy'wuz n :A . Wilson Morrison Sheehy Conference baseball did not come up to pre-war standards and none of the teams in the conference were delivering a very fast brand of ball. The line-up follows: Morrison, 2nd base; Sheehy, Medley, Gamble and Campbell, outiield; Reinhart, shortstop; Houston, 3rd base; Lind, lst base; Leslie, catcher; Wilson and Durno, pitchers. Herm at Bat One hundred ninety-eight ' ' u 1'9 :4;va mama"; m, . 3m in: :m' 1?; n... ma! 199-1317 Kmart. 15153;; Mxiln Houston Eugene ............ Apr. 26 Corvallis .......... May 2 Corvallis .......... May 3 Eugene ............ May 7 Eugene ............ May 8 Seattle .............. May 15 Seattle .............. May 16 Eugene ............ May 28 Reinhart L Lesiie SUMMARY OF GAMES Multnomah .............. 4 Oregon ........................ 17 O. A. C. .................... 5 Oregon ........................ 9 O. A. C. .................... 9 Oregon ....................... 3 Washington .............. 8 Oregon ......................... 4 Washington .............. 7 Oregon ........................ 2 Washington .............. 10 Oregon ........................ 9 Washington .............. 7 Oregon ........................ 1 O. A. C. .................... 12 Oregon ........................ 3 One hundred ninety-nine Reinhart Waits for One . .1... -A. :. mam... 1411745.; 1, um v :0 wwwtahp - , 7 7 -' 7177M; 7 , ,, , , 7 TWO hundred Kenneth Bartlett Clifford Manerud Stan Anderson Prince Callison Spike Leslie Mearl Blake Vince J acobberger Nish Chapman Lynn McCready Bill Steers Hank Foster A1 Runquist Dick Nelson Bill Reinhart J ohn Houston Eddie Durno Two hundred one FOOTBALL Everett Brandenberg Martin Howard A1 Harding Bill Steers Brick Leslie Dow Wilson BASKETBALL J ay Fox Herman Lind Hollis Huntington Dick Nelson TRACK Dow Wilson Newton Estes Kenneth Bartlett BASEBALL J ohn Gamble Herman Lind Bill Steers Art Berg TENNIS Mortimer Brown ORDER OF THE 0 , ' Nish Chapman Basil Williams Carl Mautz Hollis Huntington Creston Maddock Francis J acobberger. Eddie Durno Francis J acobberger DOW Wilson Leith Abbott Silas Starr J ulian Leslie Art Runquist J ay Fox thamtulanu L wry, y: A 4 EM ,- m, :4. 'vumx v,i,i..i.,.,.-..5:.: w m 2-: an we "v wmvuvw :32: - FRESHMAN FOOTBALL :1. v" pf 7. 1 x i H HERE was a wealth of good football material in the first year class at ., ,3; W L Oregon this year and six or seven good men were fighting for prac- :15 . W tically every position on the team. Coach C. B. Kratz, former Mich- :v 62.1 M igan Aggie backfield man, had difficulty in picking a first squad out of the w "h i. 85 men of high school experience who were out for practice at the begin- t l! I? :3!" ning of the season. 5 a a On October 11 he sent them against the Eugene High School team, at" "nth, which both last year and this year had one of the strongest high school raw , teams in the state. The Frosh were too heaVy for the local team and ran L; :4." up a score of 35 to 0. The "high" lads were plucky and fought till the last $5, M M but the experience and weight of the Freshmen told on them throughout +1 M i the game. A week later the Chemawa Indians made the Eugene trip to try out the Frosh. Coach Kratz had shifted his line-up and his players were round- ing into mid-season form. The Indians had little better luck than the high school had before them, and the Freshmen ran up a 34 to 0 score. Shortly before the annual clash with the Aggie Rooks, Bob Murray, former coach of The Dalles High School, which has sent such men as the Huntington boys, Bill Steers and Dow Wilson to Oregon, took over the freshman squad. Odds were against the Oregon men for they had to face the Rooks on a strange gridiron. The great Oregon-O. A. C. game but two weeks away lent added interest to this contest. On November 1 a large number of rooters accompanied the freshman team to Corvallis for the game. From the out set both teams seemed even- ly matched and neither could gain consistently through the others line. A great battle was put up and When the game went into the fourth quarter without a break it looked like a scoreless tie was probable. With but a few minutes to play, a costly fumble gave the Rooks the ball in Oregon territory, and Quarterback McKenna booted a goal from. placement, beating the Frosh by 3 points. TWO hundred two r r we; mm w: - . M 2., , x . 4? 'siwwwwt! Brigg i i V, t 7 a f Qx, :3 Throughout the season the freshman team gamely bucked the Varsity when called upon, and furnished strong opposition to the team which wal- loped O. A. C. and humbled Harvard. Although the schedule was not a heavy one the freshman team gained much valuable experience and many prospects for next years Varsity were developed. ttDuckie" Holmes at quarter was a consistent and cool-headed punter, and a good ground gainer as well. Frank Hill, George King and Pete Mead all made a good show- ing in the backfield. The Shields brothers, Rud Brown, George Borman, Van Beskirk and Matt Duffy were fighters on the line. 'a$?333kM-3:A"T'e M:M-W2'"Kttr A x A .239. mug: rmstm The following were on the freshman squad: George Borman, ttTiny" Shields, Floyd Shields, ttRudt, Brown, ttFlop" Johnson, Hugh Clerin, Mar- tin Folts, William Gassaway, Frankie Hill, ttDuckie" Holmes, George King, ttPete" Mead, A1 Carson, Birchard Van Loan, Ralph Smith, ttChuck" Rob- inson, ttHubett J acobberger, Matt Duffy, Van Boskirk and Gene McEntee. .agr:9;wr: :eiwv. z 2: 1 r w, v-g. mpm Writ -1. a A, T F 5 I E i" ii i- 1: t mung; me an x The Frosh at CorvalliseNov. 1 Two hundred three .wvwwtgw , . "4 :5 zamu: W wv-mmvww m 7- a- re FRESHMAN BASKETBALL AILURE to secure a coach gave the Oregon Freshmen a late start in basketball this season, but when Bill Reinhart took over the squad about the first of February, 30 candidates were out. The Frosh responded to Reinhartis coaching and won their first game from Salem High School 21-19. This was played as a preliminary to the University of Washington-Varsity game in the menis gym and a large crowd witnessed the second half. On February 13 and 14 the Freshmen accompanied the Varsity to Corvallis but were nosed out in both games by their traditional rivals. The O. A. C. Rooks took the first contest 21-17 and the second 20-18. The only other trip on the first year men,s schedule was a week-end journey to Salem on March 27 and 28, when games with Salem High and the Willamette Freshmen were played. Salem High School evened the count by winning a fast game 30-22, but the Willamette first year men were easily defeated 50-10. The freshman basketball season came to an abrupt end when 0. A. C. cancelled the Oregon games. The influenza epidemic, together with the earlier handicap of not having a coach, marred what might have been a very successful year for the Freshmen. An abundance of good material was available for every position on the team, and almost every man on the squad was a former high school star. In the few games played, Latham, Andre and McEntee showed to bestadvantage. Bill Reinhart, who in former years proved himself one of the fastest basketball men in the state, devoted a great deal of time and energy to the team after he accepted the position as coach. The first eight men picked to represent the Freshmen were: Latham, center; Andre, forward ; Clerin, forward ; McEntee, guard ; Barnett, guard; Couch, guard; Frazier, guard; Phillips, forward. Other men who showed up well but did not place on the team were: Martin, guard; Gass- away, center; Base, forward ; Alexander, guard; and Holmes, guard. An injury early in the season cost Martin his chance to place on the team. 'ikixxs: iliii wwwwamx-r . :7 HA. : ;, r- . 4,7;21 :C a 72 , . ??t x. :- z, wpx.; .VO'L - m A a i L . , E: 5 SEASON SCHEDULE Date Place Points Points Feb. 7 Eugene ...... Oregon Freshmen-.--21 Salem High .................... 19 Feb. 13 Eugene ...... Oregon Freshmen.-.-17 O. A. C. Rooks .............. 21 Feb. 14 Corvallis-.-. Oregon Freshmen...-18 O. A. C. Rooks ................ 20 Feb.27 Salem ........ Oregon Freshmen-..-22 Salem High .................... 30 E Feb. 28 Salem ........ Oregon Freshmen....50 Willamette Fr eshmen-...10 H : ..,4.$, . "A 4 , 501mg; ,4 l. The Freshman Basketball Squad five Two hundred FRESHMAN TRACK HE freshman track season last spring was very successful as far as developing individual men was concerned. In the annual meet with the O. A. C. Rooks the Oregon first year men 10st 75 to 47, but they took six out of a possible eleven first places and their defeat was due to the lack of a well rounded team rather than a shortage of good individual men. Hemenway and Kuhnhausen tied for high point winner for Oregon in this meet. Bill Hayward entered two of his Freshmen, Hemenway and Walkley, in the duH meet with Multnomah club and they both placed first in their events. Walkley won the mile, while Hemenway took both the 100 and the 220-yard dash. Earlier in the season the freshman team, consisting of Akers, Sundeleaf, Hemenway, Walkley and Meyer, took part in the Columu bia indoor meet in Portland. Sundeleaf was captain of the freshman team. The Freshman Track Squad Two hundred six "'3. "M? .: 9: Mtg." FRESHMAN BASEBALL HE Oregon Freshmen proved to be stellar lights on the diamond dur- ing the 1919 baseball season. Twice the O. A. C. Rooks were met and humbled in fast games in Which good baseball was displayed. On May 14 Shy Huntingtonts Frosh met the Corvallis youngsters 0n Cemetery Ridge. The game went for ten innings, ending 12 to. 11 in favor of the Frosh. A return game at Corvallis on May 24 resulted in a score of 9 to 6Lfor Oregon. Practice games were played during the early part of the season With Eugene High and Salem High. Several of the Freshmen whom Shy coached last spring are members of -xie Varsity this season. The line-up for both games With the Rooks follows: Manerud, short stop ; Black, first base; Veatch, first base; V. J acobberger, catcher; Liebe, second base; Collins, third base; Watson, left field; Say, center field; La- Londe, right field ; Shim, pitcher. Freshm an Baseball Team Two hundred seven VARSITY TEN N IS The University of Oregon lost the only conference tennis tournament scheduled last Spring to the University of Washington. Washington won both sets of doubles and two of three singles. Captain Mortimer Brown defeated Todd of the University of Washington, While both George Beggs and Graham Smith were losers in their matches. The Varsity did not meet 0. A; C. as it was impossible to arrange a date agreeable to both teams. The doughnut tennis championship was won by the Delta Tau Delta team composed of Jack Askey and Kenneth Smith. These men defeated the Betas in a gruelling final match. Colonel J ohn Leader and Professor Robert W. Prescott kept the faculty in the race but lost in the semi-fmals t0 the Delta Taus. L 'Hyhljggg 7 7 , M W7 7, g, ,2 M 77; Two hundred eight Uh Um in ft 3:1. . .0, h "t n ' 4., y, .h 3!" 'y. ith1 .2131! a3. a. :w , h T! m." m; 3. '39:: DOUGHNUT BASKETBALL Doughnut basketball this year provided one of the most interesting series in intra-mural athletics yet staged at the University. Fifteen men,s organizations put teams into the field and three leagues 0f flve teams each were formed. All the games were hard fought and the scores in many were close and very low. By the end of the first round Friendly Hall, Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Phi Gamma Delta teams headed the three leagues and all were undefeated. In the semi-finals both the Friendly Hall and Fiji teams won from the S. A. E. flve. When the Fijis lined up against the Friendly Hall squad Hayward Hall was filled with divided rooters. Friendly Hall played true to form and led at the end of the first half, four to two. In the second half the Fijis broke through the Halls defense and jumped into the lead. The game was close and hard fought although neither team could score again; When the timers whistle sounded the Fijis were leading 6 to 4, and pos- session of the cup was won. The following men played on the champion Phi Gamma Delta team: Lyle Bain, Carl Knudsen, Vincent Jacobberger, George La Roche and Johnny Houston. mas Y 4' 'lfwd. Ea en'. 0's $ Fijis--D0ughnut Basketball Champions Two hundred nine a sin; a c "; Lb. 2 5:5 Mi rmws $::$AW.SYW 7 r ,: nvir; 4 . Bm"' r A. ff 31 st; me ha -216. DOUGHNUT BASEBALL HE Oregon Club came out in front in the doughnut baseball league last spring with four wins and no defeats. After the Sigma Nu team forfeited to them 9 to 0, they won in succession from the Sigma Chi, Alpha Tau Omega, and Friendly Hall teams. The Sigma Chi game was a slugfest, going into extra innings before the Oregon Club finally came out ahead with an 18 to 14 score. In the final game with Friendly Hall, Goldstein pitched a no hit game for the Oregon Club, but errors let in three runs. The final score was 14 t0 3 in favor of the Oregon Club. Heavy hitting featured the playing of the winners, although Gold- steints work in the box also contributed to the final score. The following men were in the Oregon Club line-up: Adams, Goldstein, Himmelfarb, McDonald, Sloan, Frazier, Geary, Naterlin, McClellan, Cohn, Jones, and Armstrong. , Doughnut baseball brought out a large number of men last spring. The games were but five innings in length. w, Two hundred ten l. gummy :f w. 31:". , N 4. n". awn; "'wu, WM-mu : :A-uwyakayzum; i??ni e . 7' ' jug; gag; rigaww 5 9m; Wt. INTERCLASS BASEALL HE inter-class football series this year resulted in a tie between Seniors and Sophomores for class supremacy. The Sophomores eliminated the Freshmen in their opening contest, and the senior team humbled the J uniors. A short time later the two teams fought to a finish on Kincaid field and neither had the punch to score. Football in- terest had lagged in the meantime and the tie was not played off. The sophomore team included the following: Sidney Hayslip, Ray Mooers, George La Roche, William Sharkey, Russel Meyer, Wesley Shat- tuck, William Purdy, Paul Shafer, Floyd Bowles, Ronald Lewis, William Bolger. , The following senior men were in action: Jay Fox, Hunky Mast, Dwight Parr, Lyle Bain, Bill Skidmore, Ray Kinney, Carl Garetson, Her- man Lind, Charlie J ohns, J ack Dundore, Herbert Simonson, Si Simola. Senior Football Team Two hundred eleven INTERCOMPANY BASKETBALL OMPANY B this year won the silver trophy cup given by Bill Hay- ward in the inter-company basketball contest. Four companies of the R. O. T. Cfbattalion participated. Two series of games were held, one on February 17 and the other February 20. In the first series Company B defeated Company A, 17 to 5; and Com- . pany D defeated Company C, 8 to 4. In the second series Company D de- faulted and Company Bis quintet again played Company A, defeating them 10 to 6. The contests, which were the first of that nature to be held here, were planned by Bill Hayward in order to open a larger Iield for intramural athletics. More than 50 men took part in the initial tryouts which were held during the two weeks previous to the contests. The teams of the different companies who competed for the basketball cup were: ' Company AePalmer, Dodderidge, Keech, Fraser, Hazard. Company B-eVeatch, Shattuck, Youel, Smith, Oliver. Company C-Robinson, Say, Folts, OiKane, Gamble, Gavin. Company D--Hadsa11, Mooers, Callison, Samuel, Kern, Fariss. WRESTLIN G LTHOUGH wrestling this year is not assuming the proportions of a Varsity activity, the foundation is being laid for a strong squad to represent the University in intercollegiate matches next year. Wrestling became a major sport at Oregon in 1917-18, when the Uni- versity succeeded in winning a number of matches. It was dropped, how- ever, last year on account of the war. This year Trainer Hayward decided to conduct wrestling only as a gymnasium class, preparatory to building a Varsity team next season. Si Simola, a member of a former University wrestling team, was secured to instruct the class. The only contests staged were those in connection with inter-company athletics, with entries from each company at 125, 135 and 148 pounds. mwmwwrthru-m ,, . TWO hundred twelve . 1-....5... W.Afv:.,i,.n..,7 7w . Y . 13f: a f 92 , . 3 1 Z E CRCSSCKHENTRY REGONiS cross-country team scored a victory in the only meet last fall when it met the Oregon Agricultural College, November 15. Oregonis runners took first, third, seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth places. The run was held over a three mile course, extending to the Mason- ic Cemetery and ending on Hayward field. The men finished the race just before the start of the O. A. C.-Oregon football game. Glen Walkley took first place for Oregon, Don Davis ran in third, close behind Hauge of O. A. C. Seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth places Were taken respectively by Emerald Sloan, Lester Gale, Albert Combs, and ttPinktt Boylen. Coach Bill Hayward began the training of the cross-country team a little more than three weeks before the meet. Nearly a dozen men did con- sistent work on the track in training for the big event. Oregon did not fare so well in the Portland News cross-country staged in Portland. The five mile run was taken by the Multnomah Amateur Athletic Club. Glen Walkley was the only man who finished in scoring time for Oregon, taking 11th place. Beside Walkley; Coleman, Davis, Sloan and Ireland made the trip. Oregonis poor showing was due to the sickness of several Of the tirst team members. All of Oregon,s men were in poor condition, having had a comparatively short time for training prior to the race. SOCCER HE University of Oregon soccer team played but two games this sea- T son, both with O. A. C. In the first contest; Which was staged as the opening feature of Homecoming Week-end, Oregon won 3 to 1. The team was in poor condition and had had no regular coach, but it put up a hard hght and in a rally near the end of the game scored three goals. On December 6 a return game was played on the Aggie field. One goal was the best either team could do and the final score was 1 to 1. Art Ritter, center, who has had a number of yearsi experience with a Portland team, gave the Oregon men What little coaching they received. The soccer squad included Schmeer, Lind, Koerber, Parr, Downard, V. Jacobberger, H. Jacobberger, Bain, Ables, Philips, Ritter, Bosch, Tuerck, and Fox. Two hundred thirteen HAYWARD FIELD AYWARD field was dedicated to the veteran Oregon trainer on November 15, the day of the memorable clash with the Aggies. It gives to the University a modern athletic field with a well set turf surface, and stands with ample capacity for several years to come. The grandstand has a seating capacity of 4,000 while the bleachers will easily hold 3,000 more. The grounds were carefully built and filled in on a coarse rock foundation to insure perfect drainage. When finally completed the field will include a baseball diamond, quar- ter mile track and 220 yard straightaway. These features will be added as soon as the surface has settled sufficiently to allow permanent improve- ments. The crowd on Homecoming Day filled the stands to capacity and many hundreds of spectators were forced to watch the game from the sidelines. Hayward Field Two' hundred fourteen Aamtmf n w - a unaide- eLu..... -1; 4.45m fiv-ezaiuil w .; f: ?ESJFVLVFIJM' ?VW ti. WOMENS ATHLETIC - ASSOCIATION HE Woments Athletic Association was organized October 9, 1913. The activities fostered by the association are swimming, baseball, basketball, golf, archery, canoeing, tennis, hockey, and hiking. Good scholarship standing is required for membership and any girl Who is in- terested in the sports promoted .by the association and Who'holds an tch average in all studies is welcome to membership. Woments Athletic Association Oflicers Wm o, p , M fww y W m MMW ma . , 7W X z??? y z W y MWX ,z t I t ' MMMWW ,Wwwngwu , ,, , xt ' MWKW Chandler Apperson Ridings Two hundred fifteen a 2.2;; w , L; ' ' ! .,a,,-h v'mua-rnm-w't-vthim'h'twm-w . .t .mwpwue . ' ; , 4 , , t . r . N . , ,4 , A .. ,r . rite. VITMEMEEW gaff TL , m; .- fig u'v47 mu.uMM-uux:sn..bugavi 7?, .33th .91 t-f-t X t 4 , -.. ; , - , , -, , ' : M ?33': wraiy ,"Qxf 4 egg; i3: What mi: 1 tbs a PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT ITH three new tennis courts, several shining new canoes, and various pieces of new apparatus for the , gymnasium, much work has been accomplished along athletic lines by the women of the University this year. One change has been made in the woments physical edu- cation department faculty. Miss Emma Waterman, a student in the department of hygiene at Wellesley College last year, ' is filling the place of Miss Gladys Gorman, Who left the campus 1 to enter the service of the Y. W. C. A. Now that the Woments Building, Which is to be the new home for this department, Will be completed Within the year, plans for an enlarged curriculum are under way for 1920-21. N 0 modern convenience will be lacking in the new plans, . Which include a woments athletic field, swimming tank, and Missoummings both outdoor and indoor gymnasiums. Two years of gymnasium work is required of every Oregon woman and physical examinations at the beginning and end of each yearts work in the department attest the value of the training on the physical develop- ment of the girls. The department faculty takes the responsibility of keep- ing the University women in ttship-shape" and they are assisted in their efforts by the Woments Athletic Association. suth-rw. V w .ag-vvuv- em-ww - gizmpwlfe aw .2 ..;u.a nWWtw-mrwAth-a N r u . e v. , HNW' ' "K A , Miss Waterman Miss Winslow Miss Thomson Two hundred sixteen ":thAfoerr 1" '2 Am'ruyx :r r n, - - m- vrv Luann mu 3 a n' h mmam m1 mm um um!!! W333:- kymgwn wax u V .. . . W 3 a v; hat: 2n: Rwy; smarts mama: :r' Mr" r7311 :3' mm m1 :5 an "1"; 'mum :n 1! M'Vl 4M. 3- Whig?" a MI! "a yr: 553?; v-V-n' .1; w , 1.. m! mng - 'fo "Tr " ':'7: ' ram 6n r-r a z" w " r x u i'm'. .,j. m;- ma. svnwiga 7 iww adv - HEADS OF SPORTB TEHHIT MURW ILROD BASKETBALL l RUTHfoGAL smmmmc, thim ROGERS 5m BALL- m: TODD Two hundred seventeen Ruth Flegal on January 23. BASKETBALL HARLOTTE Howells, Dorothy McKee, and Grace Rugg starred in the final game of the girls doughnut basketball league in which the Freshmen won from the J uniors with a score of 15 to 9. The first games of this tournament were played on January 19, and resulted in the Sophs winning from the Seniors with a score of 21 to 13, and the J uniors win- ning from the Frosh 20 to 16. The next games were played January 20, the Freshmen win- ning from the Sophomores 19 to 5, the J uniors from the Seniors 39 to 20. The semi-finals were played J anuary 21, the J uniors beating the Sophomores 34 to 10, the Frosh winning from the Seniors 25 to 4. This left the junior and freshman class teams to clash in the iinals Much class spirit was evidenced in these games and many people turned out in the menis gym to see the final game played off. At the end of the first half the score stood 5 t0 5 and much enthusiasm was aroused. In the last half, however, the Freshmen broke forth in fast, clean playing and won from their opponents. The line-up for the final game follows: Freshmen Charlotte Howells Reta Ridings Lelah Stone Lucy Vander Sterre Emily Perry Dorothy McKee Positions J uniors Forward Grace Rugg Forward Thelma Stanton J umping Center Maude Largent Side Center Cecile Barnes Guard Naomi Robbins Guard Vivian Chandler The officials for this game were: Referee-eMiss Catherine Winslow. UmpireeMiss Mabel Cummings. ScorerseEva Hansen and Dorothy Reed. LinesmeneFrances Habersham and Carolyn Cannon. Maurine Elrod took tickets at the door. Two hundred eighteen x6 W Class Basketball Teams Two hundred nineteen w? ?.v t9" p 12 :; .zan'1xut2zlw1? 4 h- ' i " . ,4 3 ygigmswaa, a i if I K SWIMMIN G UCH interest was evidenced in swimming this year among the Oregon women. The interelass meet held during the second term marked the climax of the 1919-1920 enthus- iasm for swimming. As a result of the meet, the 1923 numerals have been engraved upon the Cummings cup, offered for the first time last year by Mabel Cummings, head of the department of physical education for women. The count, after the meet, stood: Freshmen 47, Sophomores 34, Seniors 11, Juniors 3. Frances Moore, Freshman, was individual high point winner of the meet, having 22 points to her credit. Helen Nelson, Sophomore, came second with 13 points, and Valiere Coffey, Fresh- man, third with 10 points. Loeta Rogers - The races were close and in most cases the winner had few more strokes to her credit than the second girl. CAN OEIN G Several new canoes, bought from the gym- nasium departmentis own budget, indicate a rise in the popularity of this aquatic activity, Canoeing is undoubtedly the most sought after sport on the campus because of the fascinating charms of the mill race where it is practiced. On the annual Field Day canoe races are held, each class entering a canoe, and the W0- menis Athletic Association offers a pair of paddles as the trophy to the winners of this race. Dorothy Reed and Phoebe Gage cap- tured the paddles last spring. Paddle Winners Two hundred twenty u .1 7:5 marque ..,M...... -. H . . . "mar iv-wnw. wn-wgmm ,ag, 5.9mwas... -g , A .. w .9 9 . - : V 1 wwumm- - 9- um-M. :3 , m: 'gwj' gag; unms-z wgmmaamumw mg: ; : .MI; . " 'iM. sz-ene g 0 5 mi .m us... a... .33 Q t mh3s I u.......a l Gym Majors at Ease 0118 Two hundred twenty Q TEN N IS Although no intercollegiate tennis matches were scheduled for the women last year interest in the sport was kept at a high point by the round robin tour- nament, which included in its list almost every girl in college who could swing a racket. There was no such thing as elimination in the series, those meeting defeat were swung down in the list but not dropped. As a result the courts were in use from early morn to dusk and the University was forced to add to its ten- nis facilities. Two new cement courts were con- structed'north of. the 01d concrete court and a set of rules governing their use was drawn up by a committee composed of Professor E. E. DeCou, Dean Walker, Professor R. W. Prescott, Professor H. C. Howe and Miss Mabel Cummings. ,, V Classes in tennis under the direction of Maurlne Elrod Miss Gorman were 'very popular. Many racket stars made themselves evident before the season ended. Among them were Maurine Elrod, Marjorie Kay, Madeline Slotboom, Marjorie Campbell, Virginia Hales, Florence Riddle, Maud Lombard. On Field Day the final was played off between the high point girls rep- resenting the respective University classes. Maurine Elrod, Freshman, captured the racket offered by the Woments Athletic Association, playing against Virgina Hales, Senior. rvrhae-ervr - ; A V gum niWa wswww ., Two hundred twenty-two , m; i g , k i' .. P': '3; u. H. J; ' Tip s ts Q. P .y.:- h I i .. " $13 ?a' K in ,r , h ' W". flu? w w a , f ' I Hi.L g. h ".' '83 f QJ'. tv-i "t v-i. a th V y. P" .3131, j- 3'9! K! V :3 h? I "t. i Tin ?a'w Di Is! .sy C'C ' :.gx vu i "N' w? M! V ,yullyv is 'a' av Q '.'p $: . "3'5? 4 g1 F v" .I J l u u lbw ': r t D ' V. 1513.1 w. .m mFW V u. "13,: ,, gs unrfily i, u! lu:;;r ,. r iPFwF; ., 2rd"? W wet I T T? ARCHERY RCHERY, one of the oldest known sports, is a popular activity at Oregon. - Every spring girls are seen darting about the campus armed With bows and arrows. A range, located on the northeast end of the University grounds, affords an enchanting spot for archery en- thusiasts. Bows With a thirty-siX pound pull are used by the girls. The BulPs Eye is hit from various distances, averaging from forty to fifty feet. The girls use the National Round, Which consists of shooting 24 arrows at 50 yards and 48 arrows at 60 yards. For beginners the range is set at 30 yards. Great rivalry existed between the members of the three archery classes. Miss Harriet Thomson, instructor, refused to take sides. Ami Lagus and Maud Lombard 0f the 5 oiclock class, however, seemed to be the most successful archers. The final match is shot on Field Day each spi'ing, after an elimination process on the basis of daily scores. A yew wood bow is awarded the Win- ner. Vivian Chandler won the match last spring. Two hundred tWenty-three BASEBALL "Oregon Clubtt was engraved on the Hayward baseball cup last year when their team won the laurels of the doughnut baseball league series. The fmal game was played in the outdoor gym on April 22, 1919, the Oregon Club winning from Hendricks Hall 32 t0 3. - Steady work and regular practice put the club team in condition to capture the coveted champion- ship. Only four of the twelve organizations on the campus were in the running when the games began. The other eight had failed to send out enough rep- resentatives to make up a team. Jessie Todd The line-up for the final game was as follows: Oregon Club I Position Hendricks Hall Virginia Hales .............................................. Catcher .................................................... Ruth Griffin Maud Lombard ............................................ Pitcher ...................................... Frances Habersham Ruth Flegal .................................................... Ist base .................................................. Leah Wagner Enid Lamb .................................................... 2nd base .............................................. Echo Balderee Jennie Hango ................................................ 3rd base ........................................... Margaret Russel Dorothea Boynton ...................................... Right shortstop ................................ Charlotte Clark Lois Mourthland .......................................... Left shortstop .............................. Vivian Le Prairie Marie Ridings .............................................. Right fleld .......................................... Edna Thomson Jessie Todd .................................................... Left field ............................................ Florence Casey With the coming of the warm weatherszggm last spring the woments gymnasium was abandoned by the indoor teams and work was started. out of doors. Three times a week a large class turned out for practice. A sixty-foot diamond was used, a ball somewhat lighter than the regular league ball, and for the first time at Oregon baseball mits were worn by the girls. Two teams were selected from the class and a game was played off between them on Field Day. Dorothy Reed Two hundred twenty-four magaww: e ., is: tarts ;. 1' Ar ,! V rm hip. ...n;? A- ... HOCKEY NDER the direction of Miss Emma Waterman four hockey teams were formed this season. A field was marked off east of the base- ball diamond and practices were held every Monday, Wednesday and Friday afternoons. Much interest was evidenced in the sport, not only by the team members but also by large numbers of campus folk who turned out to root for the teams. Maurine Elrod, Ruth Wolff, Carolyn Cannon and Dorothy Reed were chosen as captains of the respective groups of players. Many of the par- ticipants had never seen the game played before. Nevertheless clever team work was developed before the season ended. In the tournament which was played off by the four groups, Carolyn Cannons team was the Victor. Ram brought the season to an abrupt end. Winning Hockey Team Two hundred twenty-five yaw... ML... w -W...,Mu....,, s . m ,w M f : s k,.. "a s amJWMMbth A Mme gem . 4f . f 1-1; gawk; gig: m. . sega V t . 36:11,. ugh 1e. ea "c: .L. r-xnt ax- 44.4."; ; Snapped on Field Day Two hundred twenty-six FIELD DAY HE fifth annual Field Day Meet for the womeh of Oregon was held May 24, 1919, under the auspices of the Woments Athletic Associa- tion. After the contests the association letters and trophies were awarded by Maud Lombard, president. Following is the program and the Winners of each event: Trophies. Canoeing, Mill Race, 8:00 a. m ............................................... Pair of Paddles WinnersePhebe Gage and Dorothy Reed,- Freshmen. Tennis, Cement Court, 9 :00 a. m. .............................................. Tennis Racket WinnereMaurine Elrod, Freshman. Archery, University Archery Field, 10:00 a. m ................... Yew Wood Bow WinnereViVian Chandler, J unior. Baseball, Girlst Baseball Field, 10 :45 a. m ................. Hayward Baseball Cup WinnerseThe Oregon Club Team. Field Day Champions Two hundred twenty-seven DAN CIN G ROSE hedge background, deep shadows stealing their way over the green turf. 0f the campus, and the tall, leafy trees bending gracefully overhead formed the setting for ttA Summer Fantasy," the pageant put on by Miss Winslowts classes in interpretive dancing last spring. Part one of the program was an Irish legend called ttThe Fairy Bush," Which was written by Miss Mary Perkins of the English department. Those Who took leading parts were Lucile Evans, Echo Balderee, Vivian Chandler, Wanna McKinney and Ruth Susman. Part two, called ttIn a Garden? featured the more advanced members, including Melba Williams, Luceil Morrow, Virginia Hales, Leila Marsh, Maud Lombard, Lorna Meissner, Marion Coffey, J eannette Moss and Helen Clarke. -,.:t - "weaned: aw V5. Vt i L QB! t' . .n..;.;' e aLJ't Luceil Morrow r - . "7W tpyd.yg-: WWW h t A. Wm xv -tw h. v t ywibs 5 ' Two hundred twenty-eight V 3?, -v i J' I f t T . v: 3' :1 .Jr tu'x'rrw'wu$waww..it$m. "AMHMJA-t :mwleammmn acuis .41 w: .5 Essitfv 5x5 .wnamr EFF ask; 5 , 33 ti P'f iy . t E M! C '. i f , k: 1 i at ?auzyi'vem-ihm .4 c ,m.,;,; Mam A 1; .... e, 731 Q q i t-Ejkae ;. hm: um ACHIEVEMENT Melvin Solve t18 Alma'Mater, I thank thee. For me life was a small gallery of little ikons; A gallery of bright little imagese Hard, fixed little images in rows, Each upon a pedestal. Before them, breathing stale incense, My craven spirit bent in adoration. The images are shattered now. In the cold light I stand Knee-deep in the debris of broken idols. And, when the lingering wraith 0f shrivelled dreams has cleared, I shall lift my arms to the blank sky And thank thee, Alma Mater. 'I W0 hundred twenty-nrin e Wivrwmw "q-t-f-r-wwxe-mw - GHOSTS OF OLD KINCAID Bob Case, i20 tWith apologies to "Ghosts of the Alamolil Thereis the tramp of a ghost on the low Winds tonight-- An echo that drifts like a dream on its way; Thereis the blur of the spectres returned for the fight, Grave-risen at last from a 10ng-vanished day. Thereis the shout and the call of grim soul unto soul As they come one by one from the pastis shadowed glen, To join in the rally, the "Oskyls" long roll When ghosts of old Kincaid are gathered again. I hear iiBeauty,s i, voice and his blood-curdling cry As he sweeps all the rooters as one to their feet, As Parsons, Malarkay and Cornell and iiShy" Follow up the long trail of the Aggiesi retreat. Though lost in the darkness that covers their past, In undying memory their deeds shall remain And their spirits shall rise in the old order massed When ghosts of old Kincaid are gathered again. You think theyive forgotten because they have passed- The day that the Aggies came on in their might, When two thousand Farmers on old Kincaid massed To witness defeat before Oregonis fight? You think they ve forgotten-but faint from afar Old Bezdek is calling the roll of his men, And a voice answers iiHereii through the shadows that bar When ghosts of old Kincaid are gathered again. Thereis a gleam on the Iieldeand you thought it a star. There the lighost ballY is passed-and you thought it the moon, You thought the wind echoed that anthem of war, Not knowing the lilt of the Oregon tune. Grey shade after shade stir again into breath, Grey phantom by phantom they tackle their men, Where souls hold a rivalry greater than death, When ghosts of old Kincaid are gathered again. Two hundred thirty TO THE CONDON OAKS M emorial to D7. Thomas Condon James L. Almack i20 A sturdy, living monument you stand! Yielding us memories of one Who knew The secret of past ages; how they drew Vast wonders through dim aeons on the sand, Indelible impressions of the hand That shaped the universe, and made the land Rise out of Wild waters; gave to View The tale of worlds destroyed and made anew. Give us his wisdom, and clear-seeing eye For truth; the power to see In simple things the broad immensity Of Space and Time, that living cannot die; And knowing, lift us to the light Feeding his torch; that we may be Clothed with the holy prophetis power and might, A proud,uplifted,1iving memory. Two hundred thirty-one PIGGERtS" :REFLECTION S Rollin Woodruf, t21 If the lady you,ve been wooing has a flock of men pursuing Her With tales of love and everlasting bliss, Then at first you Will be jealous, your attentions grow more zealous And you'barely live between each tender kiss, And you then of course are fretful, of your duties youtre forgetful And you think youtll end your troubles on this land; ' Or perhaps you take to drinking, in your stupor see them sinking In the suds-ebut When you,re,sober there they stand. Now to him who has this failing and With lovesickness is ailing May I offer that poor devil my advice? Pm experienced with the ladies and P11 swear by Heav,n and Hades That nine-tenths of them arentt worth one-half the price. You had better look her over and find outif shets in clover, Also find out if its in her private name. For, although its not essential, still it may be influential In deciding Where to look for future game. Is her reputation stainless? Are you sure she isntt brainless? The refinement Which she bears may be a fake, ' Is she pure and sweet and simple? In her cheeks is there a dimple? And how many hearts has she been known to break? Lovets sentiment is pretty, but it surely is a pity That investigation doesn,t prove precise. So when you,re thinking of the altar, think,ye also of lifets halter, For nine-tenths of them arentt worth one-half the price. Tho hundred thirty-two Himhgv 'Mlhn LIWMOT I$vac COMMENCEMENT Melvin Solve i157 Life at twenty-two shoves off In a shining bark Upon still water: Pretty water, Protected from the chilling, ruffling Winds By banks of gold And stout old trees. But the traveler is on a quest; And, tortured With the thirst of life, He leaves the sheltered water, Laughing, And singing a glad song, He heads into the stream. Now cold Winds strike him; Mad waters seize his craft And fling it on the rocks, Where the pretty structure breaks. Many of the fragments iiing away Upon the giddy currents. Burning With resentment At the streamis callous rage, The traveler begins to build upon the rock A new craft: Ribbed With ripened knowledge, Planked With hard experience, and N ailed with adversity. Gleeful With success, He glosses over all a goodly color of conceit, And launches On the whirling stream again. Straight he stands at the stern, And, With a tactful helm, Finds his way at last T0 far horizons And the open sea. Two hundred thirty-three GRADUATION NIGHT By Paul F. Weidenheimev" ,20 Come, reflection, . Shade my eyes from the glaring summer. When winter coaxed the clouds among the hills last fall, And daily I walked down Hello Lane, I saw the mists settle upon the trees around 01d Deady; And I lost myself in the fogs and the rain-e In meditation. Return again that Winter! Come back, come back to mee Cool contemplation. Now, June Days, I"m leaving with you. And forget those eveningse The murmuring tune of the gray-green campus, The Pioneer standing on guard, The trysting of frogs in the mill-race below, The Condon Oaks by Villard, And the cold, cold Frosh on Skinnerts Butte, keeping watch of the Lemon ttO," t Leave these scenes! No, Pm not departing: You,'re going With me- Old Oregon. TWO hundred thirty-four Mm ,pw Law." W4 nun , . Q a? , a I z w. . 4:7 ', Z A FABLE And it came to pass that One came to the University for study and to gain much wisdom, and he said to himself: iiI will learnrmuch, and be a wise man in my own generation." I And in the first week, behold, he went to four dances and three dinners and a Parade, and he was wearied. And the second week he essayed to study, but others took him from his books, and talked so that he could not think, and he fell asleep in his chair. t And after that he went into the houses of his friends many times, and t0 dances and Rallies. The social affairs called him from the paths of Righteousness, and he was wearied unto Death, so that he could not study-efor he had not time. And the week before Thanksgiving he attended three hikes, two, dinners, four dances, and was on a student Committee. When he refused a dinner-date, his friends jeered at him, and cried out unto him with harsh words, saying: "Up, sluggard. You must not neglect your social Education? And the examinations were very hard, for he knew not what the words meant. And he cut class to go to a football rally. So he went home at Thanksgiving, and his mother fell upon his neck and kissed him, saying: uStop the clock and say we are not at home. This my son is weary with much Learning and hard studies. We Will divert him? So they went to a dance at the Multnomah, where there were no rules about closing at eleven-thirty. And when he got home he was half dead, and there was a party of young people waiting for him. They had a midnight Feed, for it was long past two oiclock. I Two hundred thirty-five wpwwweng-fnwn - - A 4 w '1' L .z-r' Ermussiagw , ' - . 4 1V5. w. 37km"; VI , iHe stumbled for very weariness when he went to bed, and his mother gazed after him sadly, saying: iiHe has studied too hard, poor boy. Tomorrow we will divert him further." So it came to pass that early in the morning she rose up, and it was not yet light. But she had planned a trip to his aunt in the country. Now there were four buxom girls in the house of his aunt, and they wels corned him. iiThese will divert him? said his mother. And they did, so that when he hit the hay that night it was almost morning. Now it seemed that the had but closed his eyes when four buxom voices called him, saying: iiCome, it is morning, and breakfast awaitethii So he arose wearily. All day they toured the Shops, and at night he rebelled. His mother mourned as he departed for the train, saying: iiThis is not well. He returns to Study." He struggled on until the week before Christmas, and then his coat- ed tongue and Dark Brown Taste forced him to a doctor. "Tenbones!" said the doctor 'tfor this was the oath by which all doctors sworel. iiYou have studied too much. I will give you a Permit? So he gave him a permit saying that his studies were too much for his health, and the student went back and filled his program for the next two dances, and arranged for a Matinee. . He received a letter from his mother saying: iiMake no Dates for Christmas. I have a full program for you? So the end of the term came, and the exams worried him, but his Permit carried him through, and he got his Cuts excused. So his mother met him at the train, and her hands were full of invitations. She took his arm, saying: iiMy boy, rejoice and. make merry, for we take only two dinners alone this vacation, and you get three hours sleep? But he went to bed and rose not, and they called a Hearse. His mother fell a-weeping, and all his friends shook their heads, saying: iiWould that he could have come home to be diverted sooner. He tarried at his Studies too long? ' . V. u:rag:ur7u-.mu 1.3;: i a . Fr. :11:me gcfkwwfv 1." ,: ,rrf-swr 2, A ; , 52 a l: i: 9:: Y MEDICAL mnmmlllll 6 CA "mun"IHIHHNHHHU MEDICAL SCHOOL HISTORY AN D PROSPECTS ' HE University of Oregon Medical School was established at Portland, Oregon, in the year 1887 by a charter from the regents of the Uni- versity at Eugene. The iirst building was small and offered but-little chance for expan- sion even though at that time the medical course was short and included but few of the subjects now offered. However, in 1892 a larger, and for that time well equipped, building was obtained at Twenty-third and Love- joy Streets. This was adequate for a number of years and was convenient- ly located in respect to the two largest hospitals in the city. A merger of the Medical School of Willamette University, the first foundation of its kind in the Northwest, with the Medical School of the University of Oregon was effected by mutual agreement on September the first, 1913. With this consolidation, the University of Oregon Medical School became the sole school of medicine in the Pacific N orthwest, serving the largest territory for a school of its kind in the United States. The building program of the Medical School has been planned with a View to meet the requirements of many coming years. The Medical School proper is to be built on a three unit basis, the first of the three units now being in existence. The remaining units will be added as needed and placed in a manner to represent a letter H. The board of regents donated seven acres of this new campus to the County of Multnomah with the understanding that a hospital will be erected thereon and that there will exist between the management of the hospital and the Medical School the very closest spirit of coeoperation. In fulfillment of this agreement the County of Multnomah is now erecting a $350,000.00 hospital on the site donated. It will be but a short distance east of the first unit of the Medical School. Two other hospitals, to be erected by the city and by the state, are soon to follow. Thus, in a very few years, a plant costing well over a mil- lion dollars will be complete and Portland and the University of Oregon Medical School will indeed be the medical center of the Northwest. At the present time clinical facilities are provided by eight hospitals ranging in size from 80 to 400 beds. A glance at the faculty will reveal the fact that among the clinical professors are numbered men of national repute. The entire personnel of the faculty enjoys high recognition in Portland and the Northwest. Two hundred thirty-seven V N wmthiww. em, ,, a L a m, A:- MEDICAL SCHOOL SENIORS C. ELMER CARLSON Portland, Oregon Reed College JOHN H. GOSNELL Seattle, Washington University of Washing- ton Alpha Kappa Kappa GAVEN C. DYOTT Portland, Oregon Kappa Sigma Nu Sigma Nu IRENE M. HUNT Roseburg, Oregon University of Oregon Gamma Epsilon HERBERT H. FOSKETT Portland, Oregon McMinnVille College Nu Sigma Nu HARRY S. IRVINE Portland, Oregon Willamette University Nu Sigma Nu WILMOT C. FOSTER Astoria, Oregon University of Oregon Nu Sigma Nu A. F. WALTER KRESSE Hood River, Oregon University of Oregon Alpha Kappa. Kappa Two hundred thirty-eight Two hundred thirty-nine JAMES T. PAPAS Portland, Oregon University of Oregon BEN M. TANAKA Hiroshima, Japan University of Iowa SANCHO P. SANTOS Meycawayan Bul P. Is. University of Phil. GLENN M. YOUNT Wilbur, Washington University of Washing- ton Alpha Kappa Kappa EARL J . SCHUSTER Albany, Oregon Oregon Agricultural Col- lege . Kappa Psi Alpha Kappa Kappa RAYMOND R. STAUB Portland, Oregon University of Oregon Kappa Sigma Nu Sigma Nu NU SIGMA NU Founded at the University of Michigan; Ann Arbor, Michigan, March 2, 1882 BETA NU CHAPTER Installed at the University of Oregon Medical School, Portland, Oregon, May 16, 1919 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Raymond R. Staub, Herbert H. Foskett, Harry S. Irvine, Wilmot C. Foster, Gaven C. Dyott 1921 - Homer P. Rush, Harold M. Peery, A. Bert Peacock, Lester T. Jones, Alfred H. Johnston, I. Fox, Albert W. Holman, Archie E. Bird, Laban A. Steves, Raymond W. Hansler 1922 Richard G. Montgomery, Edmund H. Padden, Charles C. Newcastle, J12, John R. Montague 1923 Joseph C. Bell, W. E. Nichol, Harold R. Tregilgas, John M. Askey, Merle L. Margason, Frank E. Fowler, L. S. Lucas, Roger Holcomb, Bert 0. Woods, Kent R. Wilson, J. 0. Leonard, Clairel L. Ogle, Harold S. Foskett, Albert T. Bowles, Gerald S. Backstrand, M. N. Woodworth, M. E. Wilson, Dean B. Seabrook Two hundred forty ALPHA KAPPA KAPPA Founded at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, September 29, 1888 UPSILON CHAPTER Installed at the University of Oregon Medical School, Portland, Oregon, March 21, 1903 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Earl J. Schuster, Glenn M. Yount, A. F. Walter Kresse, John H. Gosnell 1921 . Frank H. Campbell, George V. Vandervert, Delbert C. Stanard 1922 Wilfred H. Belknap, Ira A. Manville, Albert T. Morrison, Charles Ferguson, Olin L. Wills, Edwin E. Osgood, Walter H. Miller 2 1923 - Waldo W. Ball, Kenneth Cook, William G. Rebec, Carl W. Emmons, Vernon A. Douglas, E. Gordon Fletcher, Matthew C. Riddle, Boyd W. Haynes, Joe B. McCarthy, Axel C. Osterholm, Charles Q. Davis, Joseph V. Springer, Thurston L. Laraway, David Robbins, Arthur H. Johnson Two hundred forty-One MEDICAL SCHOOL ACTIVITIES HE Medical School is developing this year a lively athletic program. T Although handicapped by a small student body, lack of an available field nearby, and a full study program, the school is enlarging the scope of activities to include the major sports. ' Early this spring Dr. H. B. Myers, Vice-dean, called a meeting of the students to discuss athletics. Matthew Riddle was elected general athletic manager with Ned Fowler as his assistant, and Roger Holcomb as base- ball manager. The Medical School in years past has had fast teams in football, baseball and other kindred sports, but the removal of the school to the new campus and the subsequent advantage of more space served as an impetus to a more extended athletic program. The noon hour, when the weather permits, is taken up by volley ball. Tennis courts will be con- structed this summer to satisfy the demands of the racket enthusiasts. Games with local colleges and clubs will furnish as much competition as the baseball team can meet this year on any sort of an equal footing. The material so far looks good. The question of a pitcher seems to be solved in the person of Ferguson, who formerly chucked lem across up in Idaho and later in the U. S. Navy. This man is the biggest itfind" of the year and would grace any college pitching staff. Holcomb, behind the bat, will attempt to catch the hot ones that Ferguson throws past the batters. He will be kept busy. Several candidates for infield are showing good form so far. Fowler at first base. is grabbing all that come his way and cutting up all kinds of capers around the bag. Ball, formerly of O. A. 0., plays a fast, sure game at second. Margason at shortstop is passing up nothing in his itsector? Fletcher at third rounds out the infield with a good brand of ball-playing, Sandy Leonard giving him a good run for his money. In the outfield, Nichol, Wills, Ogle and Hausler look to be the best so far and only more work will determine who will be regulars. Two hundred forty-two a 5i. wdx wwxzsaahmum M. 1 A , x U a ."T idamlId-ud ad. FORENSIC REVIEW HE University of Oregon'has always shown very keen interest in all forensic activities undertaken by the student body. Oregon debaters have met teams from practically every Northwest and Coast institution, and they have demonstrated that the famous thregon Spirit" is not lacking in any contest, forensic as well as athletic. During the many years that debate and ora- tory have had a place in the life of the University, men, Who have since taken high positions in pub- lic life, have participated in forensic activities While at Oregon. Debate and oratory have long been recognized as one of the greatest means of 4 developing statesmen, and a roll-call of the parti- cipants in forensic contests shows that this has been true at the University. Much of the success of Oregon,s debators and orators is due to Coach Robert W. Prescott, who, since his advent as a member of the faculty of the University, has never failed to turn out capable orators to defend the honors of the state institution. Due to Professor Prescottis activities, the intramural debates were started some years-ago. By this system interest in debate is brought home to many members of the student body Who would not otherwise be actively interested in forensics. Oregon is a pioneer in intramural forensics. There is probably a more Widespread activity in debate among the rank and file of the student body . on the University campus than in any other institution in the country. Coincident With the championing of forensic activities by fraternities, sororities, dormitories, and other social groups; is the revival this year of the old time formal debating societies. The Laurean Literary Society is again firmly established, and it is its purpose to offer a continuous school for those men interested in speech training. The women as yet have not organized a formal literary society, sinee the activities of their local league cover the greater part of their forens1c work throughout the year. Two hundred forty-three FORENSIC COUNCIL HE enlargement of debating activities this year has greatly extended the work of the Forensic Council. Three triangular debates were scheduled for the year: one With Reed College of Portland and Ore- gon Agricultural College, J anuary 9; one With the University of Washing- ton and Stanford University, March 5; and one with the University of Idaho and the University of British Columbia, March 1. The Forensic Council is composed of seven members, three student representatives, one alumni member, the debate coach, one faculty member, and the graduate manager. Professor Robert W. Prescott is chairman, and Abe Rosenberg, forensic manager, is secretary. The interest shown by the women of the University prompted the council at a recent meeting to re- commend that the student representation be increased from three to five, two of Whom should be women. x A wwor'tmwhw u Prescott ' Meyers Rosenberg Savage Carl Two hundred forty-four IIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllIllIIIIIllIIIIIIIlIIIHIIIIllllIllllll!IlIIIIIIlIIIIIlIIllIl!IIlIIIlllllllIIIIIIIlllIIi!IllllIllIllllIlIIIiIllIlIIIIIIIIIIIHHllIIIIIIIll!llIlIIlIl1lIlIllIllIIlIIIllIlllllIlllllIIllllll!lllllllHIIllIIllIlllllllllllllllHlIllllIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllli' CALENDAR E $ $ fr il. "Eu n 7 4, :EE: , 1', , E State Oratorical Contest ............................................ April 11, 1919 E ' u 4 E Failing-Beekman Orations .......................................... J une 12, 1919 E hE-hh .5 E Final Round Ments Debate ------..--..........-.,-----,---December 11, 1919 E h. h; 1 E Oregon State Triangular Debate .......................... J anuary 9, 1920 E 2::; 3 a E International Triangular Debate .............................. March 1, 1920 E . b "h: E Final Round Woments Debate ............................ March 2, 1920 E E Pacific Coast Triangular Debate .............................. March 5, 1920 E E State Oratorical Contest .......................................... March 12, 1920 E E2mmIumIIuuuIuImnmmnIImIIIummmmmmummummunmmmuumunmmmmmmuummmmmmmmmmmmummmmm"mummmmIummmmImmmmmnmmummmIIIIIIIIIuIIIumIIImnummummng THIS SEASON With two out of three triangular debate series won, the University of Oregon has more than held her place in the field of forensics in the West. After losing the Oregon State Triangular Debate, the Varsity teams came back and scored decisive Victories over the University of Idaho and the University of British Columbia in the International Triangular Debate, 'and over the University of Washington and Stanford University in the Pacific Coast Triangular Debate. The earlier defeat was completely offset by the Victories in the other conferences, and Oregon has completed one of the most successful seasons in its debate history. In the oratorical field, the University of Oregon has also more than held her own. The victory of Fred Coley over representatives of every other institution in the state in the Old Line State Oratorical Contest start- ed off an extremely successful season in oratory. Two hundred forty-five STATE INTERCOLLEGIATE ORATORICAL CONTEST MARCH 12, 1920 Fred Coley Jesse H. Bond ......................... Carleton R. Spencer ................. David Pickett ............................. Howard Zimmerman ................. J ames T. Donald ........................ Victor Morris ........................... Walter A. Meyers ..................... Earl Fleischman ....................... Abe Rosenberg ........................... Ralph Ho'eber .................. -- ......... Fred Coley ................................. HE State Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest, often called the 201d Line,, contest, was won by Fred Coley, representing the University of Oregon, with an oration entitled, uCall N0 Man Common." The contest was held in Forest Grove, March 12, 1920. Fred Coley is a Senior in the Univer- sity and this is the first contest in which he has represented Oregon. Last year was the first year since 1910 that Oregon has failed to place in this contest. The places won by Oregon representatives are: ........... second 1910 ........... first 1911 ........... first 1912 ........... second 1913 ........... second 1914 ........... first 1915 ........... first 1916 ........... second 1917 ........... first 1918 .................................................................. 1919 ........... first 1920 Two hundred forty-six N ORTHWEST INTERSTATE ORATORICAL CONTEST HE Northwest Inter-State Oratorical Association has been won for .9. h the last four years by the University of Oregon. This is a record ; x that has not as yet been approached, and is something of which 3 . ; every student of Oregon should be proud. T a .- h a 3 11 - f 1b.!u The Wlnners for the last four years are: i In . 1 . . I: 1. Peter Crockatt .............................................................................................. 1916 bit... Earl Fleischman ........................................................................................... 1917 I h .T"V.. Abe Rosenberg .................................... -. ...................................................... 1918 i T. I 3; Joseph Boyd ..................... : ............................................................................ 1919 INTERNATIONAL TRIANGULAR DEBATE : l: .w. . 1 MARCH 1, 1920 UESTION : Resolved, that the application of the principles of the closed shop would best serve the cause of industrial peace. Teams representing the University of Oregon: Affirmative: Wilbur M. Carl, George Black. Negative, Remey Cox, Ernest Crockatt. Oregon negative vs. University of Idaho affirmative at Moscow. University of British Columbia negative vs. Oregon affirmative at Eugene. University of Idaho negative vs. University of British Columbia af- firmative at Vancouver, B. C. ' The debate was won by the University of Oregon, the affirmative re- a ceiving a two to one decision at Eugene over the British Columbia nega- tive, and the negative team Winning a unanimous decision over Idahots afiirmative. xxtltswls 1 Two hundred forty-seven M, , ww".,,...,..,gv..d-.... E - Ali 7E E? mjmmuxw 0: Nail Armstrong Crockatt E sawmmagiwuwt x J EVE x. f' ...2 x f; a LA m Ar u , A wit" waywagt mid. mm E" E .4; m ,Mx, c A 69' .. .A .mmvme maammm .41. :v w OREGON STATE TRIANGULAR DEBATE . x mm E E JANUARY 9, 1920 EE UESTION : Resolved, that the principles of the Chinese Exclusion ,. E Act should be applied to all immigration into the United States for E E E a period of not less than five years. E E E I Teams representing the University of Oregon: E E Affirmative: Kenneth Armstrong, Elmer Pendell. Negative: Remey . i :ih E Cox, Ernest Crockatt. L E Oregon negative vs. Reed College affirmative at Portland. ghoumrwx wwwugz' Ex , M Oregon Agricultural College negative vs. Oregon affirmative at E ;; E Eugene. : E Reed College negative vs. Oregon Agricultural College affirmative at EEE E Corvallis. v The contest was wgn by.the teams representing the Oregon Agricul- tural College. Their negative team won a unanimous decision over the Oregon affirmative, and their affirmative was given a two to one decision over the Reed College negative. Reed College won a unanimous decision over OregonEs negative. Two hundred forty-eight pt Yl I rum 1 W P"?! :w t- ykhiw E z .um t 4,; t .e V A R we..." y, m.fw.WV-we,w 5-,,wtfmwmw-tw awite 3. ix 4: A. V3 1 COX Pendell PACIFIC COAST TRIANGULAR DEBATE MARCH 5 ,1920 UESTION: Resolved, that the present movement of organized labor for a closed shop should receive the support of public opinion. Teams representing the University of Oregon: Affirmative: Don Davis, Ralph Hoeber. strong, Paul Patterson. Negative: Kenneth Arm- Oregon negative vs. Stanford University affirmative at Palo Alto. University of Washington negative vs. Oregon afiirmative at Eugene. Stanford University negative vs. University of Washington affirmative at Seattle. The Coast Debate Conference was won by the University of Oregon. Oregonts affirmative was awarded a unanimous decision over the Wash- ington negative, While the Oregon negative won a two to one decision over the Stanford negative. Two hundred forty-nine f. M m; A Hewmtw- W x , n 1m Aumrt A W 4w" M , Ww-x" - e Ar; mam : out: react A thxgur mgrr Joe Boyd FAILING AND BEEKMAN ORATIONS HE Failing-Beekman Contest was held on the occasion of the forty- third Commencement of the University of Oregon, in Villard Hall, Thursday, June 12, 1919. The Failing prize was won by Joseph Boyd, and the Beekman prize by George Baney. The judges of the contest were E. F. Carleton, of Salem; Dean E. D. Ressler, of Corvallis; J udge G. F. Skipworth, of Eugene. THE CONTESTANTS AND THEIR ORATIONS "Freedom of the Presstt ................................................................ George Baney ttAge 0f the Peoplett ........................................................................ Joseph Boyd nJustice for the Aged,1 .................................................................... Tracy Byers "Is Eternal Vigilance the Price of Freedom,, ............................ Ruth Graham OREGONtS RECORD Oregon should be justly proud of her record in oratory. It is a record that can be boasted by very few schools in the country, and one Which sets the University of Oregon upon one of the highest forensic pinnacles. Oregon is undoubtedly the leader in the field of forensics in the Northwest and on the Coast, not only in oratory, but in debate, especially the intra- mural phase, in Which the University is a pioneer. Two hundred fifty I:II 1?! 3 III MENtS INTRAMURAL DEBATE SERIES UESTlON :Resolved, that the principle of the Chinese Exclusion Act should be applied to all immigration into the United States for a period of not less than five years. Phi Delta Theta Affirmative: Negative: Coach: Phi Gamma Delta Affirmative: Negative: Coach: Oregon Club Affirmative: Negative: Coach: Friendly Hall ....... Afiirmative: Negative: Coach: Beta Theta Pi ....... Affirmative: Negative: Coach: Points Won ......................................................................................................................... 19 Joe Ingram; Eddie Durno. George Black, Wilbur Carl. Professor W. F. G. Thacher. Lyle McCroskey, Joe Hedges. Herman Lind, Carl Knudsen. Professor James Gilbert. Lemuel Fishback, Robert Owen. . Herbert Simonson, Paul Patterson. Kenneth Armstrong. ......................................................................................................................... 11 Edwin Cox, Miles McKey. James Sears, H. Mornhinweg. Carlton Savage. ......................................................................................................................... 10 Eugene Kelty, Curtiss Peterson. Forest Watson, Richard Martin. D1". E. 0. Robbins. Sigma Alpha Epsilon .............................................................................................................. Affirmative: Negative : Coach: S-Maralda Club Affirmative 2 Negative: Coach: Kappa Sigma, Affirmative: Negative: Coach: Sigma Nu ............... Affirmative: Negative: Coach: Owl Club Affirmative: Negative: Coach: Bachelordon ........... Affirmative : Negative : Coach: Sigma Chi ............. Affirmative: Negative: Coach: Stanley Eisman, Albert Woertendyke. Arthur Hicks, William Beck. Professor W. D. Smith. George Shirley, Harold Michelson. Harold Lee, 0. Lasselle. Professor S. B. Warner. Jack Dundore, Thomas Murphy. Victor Morris. Stuart Barager, George Gochnour. Barton Sherk, Robert Morrison. Dr. Joseph Shafer. Roy Davidson, Stanley Evans. Dean E. W. Allen. H. Grahm, C. Kirk. J. McCourt, J. B. McFall. None. Victor Bradeson, W. G. Wilmot. Chas. Lamb, Raymond Vester. None. Two hundred flfty-one Phi Delta Theta Debate Team 3 a . INTRAMURAL DEBATE NTRAMURAL debate proved to be a very popular activity on the Oregon campus this season. Few organizations refused to participate in the series and many debaters came forth With Varsity caliber. , The Winner of the menis league and the Winner of the woments league ' are each to be presented with a shield, to be held for one year, While the Winner of the final contest between the men and women is presented With the Tau Alpha Kappa cup. Much careful work was put in on the debates by the participants, and the contests themselves never failed to draw a large and representative audience. A governing council was organized this year to supervise the activities of both the ments and womens leagues. The Men,s Debate League is composed of representatives from each fraternity 0r ments resident group on the campus. The question, dates for the debates, and all rules regard- ing the contests are determined by this governing council. The Womenis Debate League is quite similar to the ments organization. x! s Two hundred fifty-two 'F-'-r' XE; WOMENS INTRAMURAL DEBATE. SERIES UESTION: Resolved, that the principle of compulsory investigation defined in the Canadian Disputes Act of 1907 should be applied to all disputes between railroad employees and employers. Hendricks Hall Affirmative: Negative: Coach: Ethel Wakelield, Wanda Daggett. Mabel Black, Jennie Maguire. Walter Myers. Points Won Sigma Delta Phi .......... Affirmative: Negative: Coach: Alice Hamm, Beatrice Hensley. Alice Curtis, Doris Sawtell. Peter C. Crockatt. Alpha Delta .................................................................................................................................... Afflrmative: Negative: Coach: Delta Delta Delta Affirmative: Negative: Coach: Marguerite Straughan, Marie Ridings. Elaine Cooper, Lelah Stone. Dr. R. C. Clark. Florence Riddle, Ruth Griiiin. Helen Watt, Ethel McGilchrist. Remy Cox. Oregon Club .................................................................................................................................. 7 Affirmative: Negative: Coach: Grace Knopp, Glenn Frank. Jessie Todd, Elsie Hildebrand. Professor George Turnbull. Kappa Kappa Gamma .................................................................................................................. 6 Afiirmative: Negative: Coach: Thacher Annex Affirmative: N egative : Coach: Delta Gamma Affirmative: Negative : Coach: Ellen Gantenbein, Gayle Acton. Doris Pittenger, Aurita Payson. Ralph Hoeber. Emily Peery, Maud Largent. Mildred Haines, Carmen Schmidli. Professor E. W. Allen. Lucia Watson, Helen Hooper. Elizabeth McHaley, Lois Hall. Victor Morris. Chi Omega ............................ 3 Affirmative: Negative : Coach : Alpha, Phi Affirmative: Negative: Coach: Marjorie Holman, Lois Pixley. Louise Sheahan, Mildred Bettingen. Miss Mary H. Perkins. Laura Canning, Helen Carson. Elizabeth Hadley, Dorothy Reed. Professor W. F. G. Thacher. Two hundred flfty-three Wanmmwgw;o W gkt-mzwruww A A dammmanm 73:57.: a .r f OREGON MENS FORENSIC LEAGUE OFFICERS LEE BARTHOLOMEW ............. ' ..... - - .......................................................... President CARL KNUDSEN .................................................. .- ...................... Vice President ERNEST CROCKATT ................................................................................ Secretary RICHARD MARTIN ............................................ -. ...................................... Reporter On November 5, 1919, representatives of the thirteen ments organ- izations 0n the campus met in Professor R. W. Prescotfs room and adopted a constitution and by-laws to govern the debating 0f the men in the dough- nut series. The purpose of the Oregon Ments Forensic League is to create interest along forensic lines among the men, develop speakers, and stimu- late all intercollegiate activities of a forensic nature. The constitution of the League consists of six short articles. The governing body is composed of a member from each of the various houses and halls of residence. The constitution provides that any fraternity, hall of residence, or similar representative ments group on the campus shall be eligible to membership in the league. OREGON WOMENS FORENSIC LEAGUE OFFICERS ETHEL WAKEFIELD .............................. - .................... t ............................. Ptesident LAURA RAND ................................................................................ Vice Pvtesident DORIS PITTENGER .............................................................. Secretary-Treasurer A constitution and by-laws were adopted by the representatives of the twelve woments houses on the campus on October 31, 1919. The purpose of the League is to encourage work of a forensic nature among the women, leading to intercollegiate activity. The constitution provides for the membership of all women's organ- izations on the campus; honorary membership may also be bestowed on approved individuals, who, however, have no power in the government of the organization. ' Two hundred fifty-four impg ' !.. win- . "-mt l w..." hit. ' mu..." 9.- "C0. wwc 5'. CI id .nn m': '" Q 4 . 1 ?.kv v. ..,. .. , s . 15$er EJEHH MWV . . z 1 51...!!! L intimml. ligwwkg . 1 1 null Cram Iq'! ' 6! h. x Stanford Andersony-President Associated Students Two hundred fifty-five Anderson McArthur Godfrey McCroskey EXECUTIVE COUNCIL Stanford Anderson ................................................................................................................ President Lindsay McArthur ...................................................................................................... Vice President Era Godfrey ............................................................................................................................ Secretary Wilbur Carly ......................................................................................................... Merhber-at-Larg'e Lyle McCroskey ........................................................................................................ Member-at-Large The executive council of the Associated Students is the official board of directors of the student body. The president, vice president and secretary of the student body are ex-officio members of the committee and two men are elected at the regular student body election to serve on the committee with the graduate manager. This council has entire control of all financial matters of the student body am. approves appointments of student managers for the various sports. The council meets every week. Two hundred fifty-six Anderson McArthur Godfrey Madden J amieson Peterson Duniway Lake Davis Rawlings Houston Durno . Abbott Newbury STUDEN T COUNCIL SENIOR REPRESENTATIVES Stanford Anderson, Lindsay McArthur, Era Godfrey, Elmo Madden, Harry Jamieson, Curtiss Peterson, Dorothy Duniway, Adelaide Lake, Louise Davis JUNIOR REPRESENTATIVES Ella Rawlings, John Houston, Eddie Durno, Leith Abbott SOPHOMORE REPRESENTATIVE Carl Newbury T v. 0 lmmh'ezl fifty-soven Smith Fields Holaday Flegal Spall WOMENtS LEAGUE OFFICERS Louise Davis ............................................................................................................. President Irva Smith ...................................................................................................................... Vice President Marjorie Holaday .................................................................................................................. Secretary Nancy Fields ...... ' .................................................................................................................... Treasurer Eleanor Spall .......................................................................................................................... Reporter Ruth Flegal ................................................................................................................ Sergeant-at-Arms The University Women's League this year has tried to unite its members into a working group to help Oregon carry out her reconstruction problem. This problem has been a difflcult one but has been made easier because of the splendid ways in which the women have done each task alloted them. Although the League has added a broader and deeper purpose for its existence to the original purpose of raising funds for the Woments Building, this has been kept in mind, and practically $1000 has been added to the funds through the efforts of the League this year. hundred Iifty-eight M; wuhu us am; an Ms wa VA . i' . 3 n: mmwmrm hmrmuamemm r L 15g Adelaide LaketUniversity Historian HISTORIAN STAFF Historian, Adelaide V. Lake; executive committee, Mary Ellen Bailey, Elston Ire-. land, John Houston. General committee-clipping committee, Madge Calkins, Lois Pixley, Gertrude Livermore; pasting committee, Genevieve Haven, Gladys Everett, Mary Parkinson, Beatrice Crewdson; poster and program, George Walker, Gertrude Whitton, Dorothy Lowry; publication tiles, Charles Hayter, Helen Carson; student directory, Elizabeth Hadley, Frances Blurock. ' Journalism, Velma Rupert; Law, Alys Sutton; School of Music, Marion Gilstrap; Commerce, Kenneth Comstock; Psychology, Jennie Maguire; Pre-Medics, Lindsay Mc- Arthur; Architecture and Art, A1 Combs; Graduate School, Henry English; Summer School, Mabyl Weller; English and Rhetoric, Helen Manning; Household Arts, Zon- weiss Rogers; University Library, Emma Stephenson; Military Science, Reuel Moore; History of the Part Played -by the University in the World War, Richard Martin; Tra- ditions, Leith Abbott; Social Fraternities, Eleanor Spall, Kenneth Lanceiield; Student Organizations, Annamay Bronaugh, Phebe Gage, Howard Kelly, John Gamble; Profes- sional and Honor Societies, Harris Ellsworth, Harry Jamieson, Victoria Case, Elmo Madden, Lee Bartholemew, Ogden Johnson, Dorothy Dixon, Alice Thurston, Ruth Flegal, Lyle McCroskey, Nell Warwick, Wilbur Carl, Sam Lehman, Lois Macy, Jack Dundore, Dorothy Duniway; Physical Training for Women, Helen Nelson, Mary Mc- Cornack, Carolyn Cannon; Sciences, Madeline Slotboom, John Dierdorff; History, Lotta Hollopeter; Foreign Languages, Grace Knopp; Political Science, Lyle Bryson; Public Speaking, Debate, and Dramatics, Evelyn Smith and Gladys Diment. Bailey Houston Ireland Two hundred fifty-nine I , 4 3 ii i f ' 1 Gamble Houston Bain BFOWI1 i, j , . J i A , J , s 9! Y. M. C. A. ; $ f. ; OFFICERS 3: ct ; 1 JOHN GAMBLE ...................... . ................................................................................................ President .r - .i - 3 JOHN HOUSTON ........................................................................................................ Vice President V? ALEXANDER G. BROWN ................................................................................................. Secretary . 4V LYLE BAIN ............................................................................................................................ Treasurer A. M. SPANGLER ................... General Secretary : W . ! ; ; CABINET ' , Membership ............................................................................................................ Lindsay McArthur C j : 1 . 3f 2 5 Volunteer ............................................................................................................ Richard Thompson 3 LR . f l g; h Publicity ............................................................................................................................ Warren Kays Meetings .............................................................................................................................. Randall Scott Social .................................................................................................................................... Wilbur Carl Conferences .......................................................................................................................... Roy Veatch Church Relations ............................................................................................................. Elmo Madden Employment .................................................................................................................... Newton Bader Welfare ....................................................................................................................... Guy Armantrout E '1 A Two hundred sixty I . , -EZWWQWWKQ , 3g . . a . . J. 1 4,,- maxw. mmwut mvgym '1..ng .7 2a... .. 7 W! aux . w 7,. 1 . ' ,i V x . x ,7 Weller Moss Kiddle Moore 3 Y. C: o Co A. 4 W mWM : OFFICERS :M Swmm W'H " : $ MABYL WELLER ................................................................................................................... President w V y. JEANNETTE MOSS .................................................................................................... Vice President m LETA KIDDLE ........................................................................................................................ Secretary ' MARY MOORE ...................................................................................................................... Treasurer ' . . URITH DAILEY .................................................................................................... General Secretary f ,d 3;, , ' CABINET , Ethel Wakefield, Alice Thurston, Marjorie Holaday, Eileen Tomkins, Evelyn Smith, : Vivian Chandler, Austrid Mork, Mae Ballack, Ruth Flegal, Florence Riddle, Dorothy $ 1 Reed. ? . n l .m- 9 av?" , g, ,. "V4. ; Two hundred sixty-one E'? .. I- .. -.... :4 . 3 $ Mv2mmer-x , "' '1 r9! , ' , . ,, ,L 4 .12: mew anwq-W ,7... ., , .., ., l 4 Duniway Morrow Smith Knopp 1 1 Senior Honor Society, Organized June 3, 1900 111. E SCROLL AND SCRIPT f T: i 7 1 ACTIVE MEMBERS : ' f Darothy Duniway, Irva Smith, Luceil Morrow, Grace Knopp, Mrs. Anna Landsbury Beck g I 1 Q . HONORARY MEMBERS Luella Clay Carson, M. Ruth Guppy, Dean Elizabeth Fox 2m n. , INACTIVE MEMBERS 3 ' : i Mrs. Paul Hamilton 1Miriam PageL Ruth Ann Wilson, Olga Soderstrom, Mrs. Ross : E : Giger 1Marian NeiU, Helen Wells, Ruth Westfall, Beatrice Gaylord, Mrs. Elmer Hall " 1Emma Woottom, Margaret Crosby, Mrs. William G. Williams 1Marian TuttleL Ruth AMH1W9$C$MN " ' ' : .x- "Kx Two hundred sixtywtwo i 1 :r : Duniway, Bertha Dorris, Mrs. Raymond Kerr warolyn Dunstam, Mrs. E. Moller 1Frances g 3;, 3 Oberteuffen, Mrs. Harold Dalzell 1Mae SageL Mrs. Carl B. Neal Uennie Lillw, Mrs. g g , Thomas Word 1Ruth Hansom, Mrs. George Felteroff 1Lia Prossen, Mrs. Ben Chandler . i m i r? 1Cecile WilcoxL Mrs. F. G. Whittlessy 1Edith Woodcocm, Mrs. Thomas Burke Uulie f ; 4': CrossL Mrs. Chester Downs 1Marian StoneL Mrs. Graham Mitchell 1He1en Beacm, g N :1 5 Willetta Wright, Mrs. George M. Vinton 10live Donnelh, Mrs. Charles Taylor 1Mary ; j : ,: DeBaU, Mrs. George Benchrandler 1Alice StoddardL Mrs. Charles Robinson 1Birdie Wise: 1 z? k f f! x Vb - 9 ' . E i1? 11 3: K L f: 3- A" 1 ,, ,...y:r.W" ,1. mew mm. "wt A ' VFyfaFEUWEM v. a, 5' I : p K ' 1 1w W: 1le - ?HF'AV ' t." a " . r V171 VKHM hm:W-: m m 'ivnw , ., 1' '3' ?fti'ar-w F I $$$$$ng 31 ; 41? MR: : Haw: 1 . Shattuck Kuhnhausen Gehr La Roche Dudley Eggles-on 1 . L ' Cofnid McDonald Liebe Hemenway Robertson Murcipe Hill Roberts Morrison Day Whltaker Hugglns Main Sharkey Ritter H. Koepke Black Robinson ull ; '1 . 0i - 1 gt" 1 . a "Kw .1 TORCH AND SHIELD .. O y" '7' ! Sophomore Society. Organized April 14, 1912 w h X. 1 r u! ' w 1 .- n" x ACTIVE MEMBERS f . . a vi 1 Wesley Shattuck, Arthur Kuhnhausen, Sanford Gehr, George La Roche, Verne U. ' 'f 1. Dudley, Asa Eggleson, Walter Cofoid, Donald McDonald, Carl Liebe, Roscoe Hemen- , y1 d " way, Sidney Robertson, Melvin Murchie, Frank Hill, Roscoe Roberts, Robert Morrison, 0'" p r . Dudley Day, James Whitaker, Chuck Huggins, Fred Main, Bill Sharkey, Arthur Ritter, . M I Henry Hoepke, George Black, Charles Robinson. , 0' ' T we hundred sixty-three V. Jacobberger McCoy Cullison Mooers Lawrence Burgess vabury Bolger Grey Harding Beller 'lKvining Howard Latham Sumlelouf Plunnner Meyer Munorud x 1 M . 1; 1 1 TO-KO-LO Sophomore Society. Organized January 12, 1912 ACTIVE MEMBERS . Vincent Jacobberger,Martin Howard, Prince Callison, Ray Mooers, Raymond Law- rence, Ralph Burgess, Carl Newbury, Bill Bolger, Lawrence Grey, A1 Harding, Francis Beller, Ned Twining, Tom McCoy, Marc Latham, Richard Sundeleaf, Roger Plummer, Russell Meyer, Clifford Manerud. Two hundred Sixty-four Anderson White Dundore McCroskey Lind Huntington Newbury Abbott FRIARS An UpperclassmeWs Society. Organized November, 1910 ACTIVE MEMBERS Stanford Anderson, Herald White, Jack Dundore, Lyle McCroskey, Herman Lind, Hollis Huntington, Donald Newbury, Leith Abbott. HONORARY MEMBERS Gustav W. Butchen, Leroy Johnson, Arthur Geary, Hugo Bezdek Two hundred sixty-five E Lake Duniway Case Davis Manning Bailey 9 Blurock Bryson THETA SIGMA PI-II National Women,s Journalistic Fraternity Founded at the University of Washington, April 8, 1909 THETA CHAPTER Installed June 10, 1915 ACTIVE MEMBERS Adelaide V. Lake, Dorothy Duniway, Victoria Case, Louise Davis, Helen Manning, Frances Blurock, Mary Ellen Bailey, Lyle Bryson, Mrs. Anna Landsbury Beck HONORARY MEMBERS Mable Holmes Parsons, Mrs. Eric Allen, Mrs. W. F. Osburn, Caroline Cole, Mrs. J. Frederic Thorne Two hundred sixty-six 1, WM"? .,. crux um. , 1. , 9 x iv, 7 Brown Ellsworth Case Gilbert Boatman Smith Abbott Farrington SIGMA DELTA CHI Founded at DePauW University, April 17, 1909 National Journalism Fraternity OMICRON CHAPTER Installed April 10, 1913 ACTIVE MEMBERS Alexander G. Brown, Harris Ellsworth, Robert 0. Case, DeWitt Gilbert, Percy Boat- man, Harry Smith, Paul Farrington, Leith Abbott HONORARY MEMBERS Prince L. Campbell, Karl Onthank, Carlton Spencer, George Turnbuu, Eric W. Allen Two hundred sixty-seven Apperson Flegal Nelson Gage Skeels Colman Baker Nichols Nicolai Smith Spall Strong Clarke Dunham Studer ; Tomkins Reed KWAMA Sophomore Honor Society, Founded March, 1912 5 ' ACTIVE MEMBERS f . Mildred Apperson, Pauline Coad, Margaret Phelps, Ruth Flegal, Helen Nelson, : Phebe Gage, Marvel Skeels, Eleanor Coleman, Katherine Baker, Ila Nichols, Margaret Smith,. Eleanor Spall, Vivian Strong, Helen Clark, Marion Dunham, Margaret Studer, 1 Dorothy Reed, Margaret Biddle, Vivian Hopson, Helen Nicolai, Eileen Tomkins. mu m- u-wr . n Two hundred sixty-eight Ross J ones Bain Hardy M cArthur Anderson Wilson Frater Cossman White Vandervert Dresser M adden Williams Smith Ritter SIGMA ALPHA Pre-Medical Fraternity, Founded 1913 ALPHA CHAPTER ACTIVE MEMBERS Lyle Bain, Herald White, Leo Cossman, Lindsay McArthur, Evon Anderson, Dow Wilson, Thomas Hardy, Raymond Jones, Basil Williams, Elmo Madden, Cecil Ross, Ralph Dresser, Arthur Vandervert, Arthur Ritter, William Smith, Wesley Frater. HONORARY MEMBERS President P. L. Campbell, Dean John Straub, Dr. C. H. Edmondson, Dr. J. E. Gut- herlet, Prof. O. F. Stafford, Prof. John Bovard. Two hundred sixty-nine Hulbert Anderson Morgan Lind Kinney Carter J amieson Bartlett Foster Steers South K. Leslie Loughlin Williams Reinhart ALPHA KAPPA PSI Commerce Fraternity. Founded in New York University, May, 1905 KAPPA CHAPTER Installed May 3, 1915 ACTIVE MEMBERS Stanford Anderson, Lee Hulbert, Morris Morgan, Sprague Carter, Harry Jamieson, Roy Kinney, Kenneth Bartlett, Henry Foster, Floyd South, Bill Steers, Keith Leslie, Barclay Laughlin, Basil Williams, Herman Lind, Ivan Warner, William Reinhart. HONORARY MEMBERS H. B. Miller, D. W. Morton, D. C. Sowers, Robert McAuslan, J. H. Jackson, A. C. Hopkins, C. C. Colt, Fletcher Linn, A. R. Clark, J. A. Keating, A. C. Dixon. Two hundred seventy WW vrnzmmmuw: A : 'a w N ha 1tmy b . rnjk ;Ii$ $,J vhlv 31' FuC low I'"' I3 W, .,w .d. ' "' I 3"; m a y Mr" . E:;; m.;,k;m;m;.,' : i,mmm,xax WW f: . Rawlings Thurston Stoltenberg Slotboom Spall TRE NU Womews Vocational Organization, Established December 9, 1917 OFFICERS Ella Rawlings .................................................................. . ..................................................... President Alice Thurston .............................................................................................................. Vice President Ollie Stoltenberg .................................................................................................................. Secretary Madeline Slotboom .............................................................................................................. Treasurer Eleanor Spall ............................................................................................................................ Reporter MEMBERS Mabyl Weller, Louise Davis, Dorothy Duniway, Adelaide Lake, Joy Judkins, Helen Flint, Lotta Hollopeter, Marian Bowen, Eva Hansen, Ollie Stoltenberg, Zetta Mitchell, Jennie Maguire, Madeline Slotboom, Mary Moore, Mary Largent, Maud Largent, Myrtle Anderson, Wanda Brown, Ella Rawlings, Alice Thurston, Jessie Todd, Nell Southworth, Lyle Bryson, Ruth Flegal, Eleanor Spall, Florence Furuset, Elsie Hildebrand, Ruth Danford, Eileen Tomkins, Ruth Engstrom, Josephine Moore QWVO hundred seventy-one ARCHITECTURE CLUB Established September, 1914 HORACE FOULKES ............................................................................................................ President LUTHER JENSEN ...................................................................................................... Vice President LYLE BARTHOLOMEW ...................................................................................................... Secretary LORAN ELLIS ........................................................................................................................ Treasurer MEMBERS James Bradway, Arnel Butler, Albert Combs, Sydney Hayslip, Roscoe Hemenway, Dell Hinsen, Francis Jacobberger, Cleo Jenkins, Hollis Johnston, Guy Koepp, Sam Lehman, Harvey Madden, V. Mountjoy, Marian Nicolai, Gaylord Peltier, Merrill Richv mond, Sidney Robinson, Paul Schafer, Irving Smith, Richard Sundeleaf, Karl Vander Ahe, George Wolff, Glenn S. McGonegal, L. C. Rosenberg. TWO hundred seventy-two Iv h STUDENTS ART CLUB Established 1919 OFFICERS .uh' 'J MARION ADY .......................................................................................................................... President ELIZABETH HADLEY ................................................................................................ Vice President . AGNES BROOKS .................................................................................................................. Secretary W" GERMANY KLEMM ............................................................................................................ Treasurer HARVEY MADDEN .................................................................................................................... Editor MEMBERS President P. L. Campbell, Dean E. F. Lawrence, Dean Elizabeth Fox, Professor A. H. Schroff, Mrs. A. H. Schroff, Hiss Helen Rhodes, Professor and Mrs. Percy Adams, Mr. ' H . MW 3. 39!! v and Mrs. L. C. Rosenberg, Miss Lilian Tingle, Miss H. Shumway, A. C. Runquist, Arthur M Pr" 21,1.54 K, Runquist, Marion Ady, Marjorie Delzell, Mildred Oliver, Germany Klemm, Myrtle H W' ' . r: jam" 2 Gaynor, Beatrice Wetherbee, Ulala Stratton, Lorna Meissner, Grace Houghton, Eyler .U 1rd ' ' m" Brown, Kay Bald, Mabel Sutherland, Harvey Madden, Wanda Keyt, Loran Ellis, Sam " $ t 5w Lehman, Lyle Bartholomew, U. Backsted, Genevieve Spriggs, Martha Rice, Florence FJW . Hartman, Zoe Allen, Helene Kuykendall, Lois Hall, Roscoe Hemenway, Helen Stop- penbach, Agnes Brooks, Audrey Medler, Lydia Laughlin, Dymon Povey, Helen Smith, Mrs. Ada B. Millican, Gretchen Colton, Alta Kelly, Jessie Lewis, Lenore Cram, Mrs. P. E. Christensen, Brownell Frasier. Two hundred seventy-thl'ee Boatman Gilbert M cOroskey . ' Abbott Ellsworth Smith Crockatt Lyans Cumings Farrington . ' h 1 g,. '- h. 1 , '1 SIGMA UPSILON .3" Founded at the University of the South and Vanderbilt University, 1906 1 7? .' YE TABARD INN "1'- Installed October, 1915 519-? 1b '7 ACTIVE MEMBERS 1 1 ; 13- Robert 0. Case, John DeWitt Gilbert, Lyle McCroskey, Harris Ellsworth, Leith Abbott, 7 g i , : Percy Boatman, Harry Smith, Ernest Crockatt, Richard Lyans, Paul Farrington, Pierce ,, 1 . ; : 3 Cumings X 11. . HONORARY MEMBERS ' : r . W. F. G. Thacher, J. Frederic Thorne .7 k 1 1 . TWO hundred seventy-four i4; Marsters Banfield Keagy Bennett Murphy J. Frasier I'ottev R. Fmsier Dixon Rand Chatbum B. Clark French Conklin A. Potter Gilstrap Phelps Macklin Rugg Clancy Watt MU PHI EPSILON Honorary Music Fraternity Founded at Metropolitan College of Music, November 13, 1903 NU CHAPTER Installed March 3, 1911 MEMBERS Leona Marsters, Charlotte Banfleld, Beulah Keagy, Doroth'y Bennett, Fern Murphy, Janet Frasier, Aurora. Potter, Brownell Frasier, Dorothy Dixon, Laura Rand, Beulah Clark, Margaret Clark, Margaret Conklin, Alberta Potter, Marion Gilstrap, Margaret Phelps, Reba Macklin, Grace Rugg, Kate Chatburn, Patty French, Minnie Johnston, Edwina Prosser, Genevieve Clancy, Alice Gohlke, Laura Tischner, Martha Tinker, Mrs. W. F. G. Thacher, Anna Landsbury Beck, Mrs. W. M. Case, Mrs. C, A. E. Whitton, Helen Watt, Mrs. T. A. Larremore Two hundred seventy-five Warwick Cameron Blaesing Stanton Parker Donlon Adams M. Fell Hegardt E, Fell Sheppard Aumlller PHI TI-IETA KAPPA Founded at University of Denver, August 6, 1919 u a National Womews Commerce Society, Installed at University of Oregon, 1920 CHARTER MEMBERS 9 Nell Warwick, Thelma Stanton, Rachel Parker, Dorothy Donlon, Frankie Adams, Mar- garet Fell, Esther Fell, Mildred Aumiller, Mary Hegardt, Anne Shea, Ronalda Came- ron, Barbara Sheppard, Lenore Blaesing, Edna Howd, Lucile Stanton , CI Two hundrea seventy-six McCroskey - Ivey Harris Armstrong Ingram Hedges Coleman Chapman Wood Howard Conrad Burleigh Wade PHI DELTA PHI CHASE CHAPTER Charter granted in 1903 ACTIVE MEMBERS Lyle McCroskey, Gordon Wells, Ben Ivey, Maynard Harris, Kenneth Armstrong, Francis Wade, Nish Chapman, Sylvester Burleigh, Joe Ingram, Borden Wood, Joe Hedges, Bill Coleman, Franklin Howard, Earl Conrad HONORARY MEMBERS T. A. Larremore, S. B. Warner 0 TWO hundred soventy-sevon Thurston 1Vakof1 01d H2111 Canning Medler Knopp Ridmgs V Hansen ZETA KAPPA PSI Honorary Forensic Society for Upperclass Women Established at Kansas State Agricultural College in 1913 BETA CHAPTER Installed June 1, 1917 MEMBERS Alice Thurston, Ethel Wakefield, Helen Flint, Lois Hall, Laurel Canning, Norma Med- ler, Harriet Garrett, Grace Knopp, Jessie Todd, Marie Ridinrgs, Eva Hansen, Eileen Tomkins ASSOCIATE Julia Burgess Two hundred seventy-eight 1'": , ,f : ,mw.,u'v ipv McKey McKay Pfouts Clark Crandall Newbury Wells Haddock Anderson Dillard Glos DELTA THETA PHI Founded at Cleveland Law School, September, 1900 x DEAD Y SENA TE Installed May 2, 1913 ACTIVE MEMBERS Miles McKey, Morris McKay, James Pfouts, C. C. Clark, Charles Crandall, Don Newbury, Harold Wells, Creston Maddock, Fred Packwood, Waldon Dillard, Leroy Anderson, Karl Glos, G. Russell Morgan HONORARY MEMBER Dean Edward W. Hope Two hundred seventy-nine Morrow Ba 11:1 ck Knapp EUTAXIAN LITERARY SOCIETY OFFICERS LUCEIL MORROW ................................................................................................................ Pre'sident lRVA SMITH .................................................................................................................. Vice President MAE BALLACK ......................................................... Secretary GRACE KNOBP ..................................................................... . ................................................ Treasurer MEMBERS Luceil Morrow, Irva Smith, Grace Knopp, Mae Ballack, Harriett Garrett, Marion Andrews, Lois Macy, Laura Moates, Elva Bagley, Louise Davis, Beulah Keagy, Dorothy VVootton, Mabyl Weller, Leona Marsters, Edna Rice, Lucile Redmond, Reta Hough, Helen Carson, Ruth Griffm, Ila Nichols, Helene Reed, Lucile McCorkle, Austrid Mork, Gladys Diment, Evelyn Smith, Eva, Hansen, Irene Whitfield, Mary Mathes, Alice Hamm, Mary Turner, Margaret Fell, Laura Rand, Marie Ridings, Alda Berry, Ruth Lane, Dorothy Manville Two hun d red ei ghty Smith Thompson ;ilstrap Houston M oUros'k 0y Peterson McMurphey Dunn Leslie Simola Kuoncy Philips Johnson Foster Case Nail St :mton Taylor Dyment Edwards Pittenger UNIVERISTY PLAYERS MASK AND BUSKIN CHAPTER Installed February 3, 1917 ACTIVE MEMBERS Evelyn Smith, Norvell Thompson, John Houston, Lyle McCroskey, Adah McMurphey, Ray Dunn, Warren Edwards, Curtiss Peterson, Julian Leslie, Si Simola, Claire Ke-eney, Norman Philips, Ogden Johnson, Henry Foster, Helen Case, Ernest Nail, Thelma Stanton, Gladys Diment, Doris Pittenger, Marion Gilstrap, Marian Taylor HONORARY MEMBERS H. Granville Barker, E. S. Bates, Fergus Reddie, Charlotte Banfield 'l'wu hundred eighty-one Schoonhoven g Downs Whitton Wines SE I-IABLA ESPANOL OFFICERS ALICE VAN SCHOONHOVEN .......................................................................................... President WILBUR HOYT .......................................................................................................... Vice President ANNA DOWNS ........................................................................................................................ Secretary GERTRUDE WHITTON ...................................................................................................... Treasurer HOWARD WINES .................................................................................................... Sergeant-at-arms Grace Knopp, Lois Hall, Rosalina Espinosa, Amelia Esparza, Alice Van Schoonhoven, Edythe Wilson, Wilbur R. Hoyt, Marjorie Stout, Marjorie Holaday, Lorna Coolidge, Ulala Stratton, Gertrude Whitton, Maude Ernest, Howard B. Wines, Clarence Lombard, Harold Jenkins, Anna Downs, Laura Moates, Helen Burke, Dorothy Miller, Marcus ODay, Mary O,Day, Eleanor Gettings, Joe Meagher, Beatrice Hensley, Inez Lacey, Edith Judkins Two hundred eighty-two Pearson Knopp Wakefield Ridings Radabaugh Turner WOMENWS EDUCATIONAL CLUB Organized 1920 Dan Lillian J. Pearson ................................................................................ g ........................... President Grace Knopp .................................................................................................................. Vice President . Mamie Radabaugh .................................................................................... Corresponding Secretary 9W Ethel Wakefield .................................................................................................. Recording Secretary Marie Ridings ........................................................................................................................ Treasurer 1' Mary Turner .......................................................................................................... Keeper of Records CHARTER MEMBERS . Alice Van Schoonhoven, Clem Cameron, Geraldine Ruch, Ethel Wakefield, Mrs. Ruth .4 Wheeler, Mamie Radabaugh, Helen Hall, Laurel Canning, Anna Grace Pallet, Alda . Berry, Marie Goerig, Lexie Strachan, Beatrice McLeid, Ruth Montgomery, Marion Ady, W' Grace Knopp, Mabel Black, Irva Smith, Ethel Einer, Marion Andrews, Luceil Morrow, Miriam Holcomb, Mary Turner, Lillian Pearson, Georgine Geisler, Dorothy Buruelt, w?! Mrs. Benchadler, Mrs. Margaret Goodall, Mrs. Paltee, Mrs. Anna L. Beck, Miss Mabel $ 1" .;4. Cummings, Miss Helen Rhodes, Charlotte Patterson, Dorothy Bennett ,1! tr; M9". ll! t4, :21! I .1. W , WI: I'd yr" M Two hundred eighty-three Manville Dezendorif Johnson Benjamin F REN CH CLUB Organized 1919 WILLIAM RUSSIS ................................................................................................................ President DOROTHY MANVILLE .............................................................................................. Vice President DORIS DEZENDORFF ...................................................................................................... Secretary ALLEYN JOHNSON ............................................................................................................ Treasurer WILLIAM BENJAMIN .......................................................................................... Sergeant-at-arms MEMBERS Carolyn Cannon, Marcile Carlock, Helen du Buy, Genevieve Clancy, Edith Pirie, iandall Scott, Annette Vaughan, Loeta Rogers, Dorothy Donlon, Gladys Diment, Mauna Loa Fallis, Margaret Gray, Luceil Morrow, Irva Smith, Ethel Wakefield, Verne Blue, Randolph Howard, Robert Burns, Louise Daley, Marian Taylor, Annette Leonard. HONORARY MEMBERS Dr. Timothy Cloran, Miss Rosalina Espinosa, Lois Gray, Miss Jennie Fayard, Dean Elizabeth Fox. hundred eighty-four f it C? Q WAN l3 9 ; ELVIRA THURLOW Q MARJORIE KAY "f w mwmwu s; m .. w .Mug :1; . ,-MV AA; Bovard Jamieson Hulbert INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL JOHN F. BOVARD HARRY JAMIESON LEE HULBERT ............................................................................................................... President .................................................................................................. Vice President .................................................................................................. Secretary-Treasurer REPRESENTATIVES Phi Delta Thetaw-Harry Jamieson, Walter Banks. Beta Theta Pi-Kenneth Bartlett, Henry Foster. Alpha Tau OmegaAMorris Morgan. Delta Tau Delta-Lay Carlisle, Mortimer Brown. Kappa SigmaAJay Fox, Stanford Anderson. Phi Gamma Delta-Herman Lind, Si Simola. Sigma Alpha. Epsilon-Guy Armantrout, Spencer Collins. Sigma Chi-Lee Hulbert, Victor Bradeson. S-Maralda-Howard Wines, George Shirley. Sigma NuAIvan Ross, Don Newbury. Owl ClubAAlexander Brown, Roy Davidson. PAN-I-IELLENIC COUNCIL OFFICERS LOIS MACY ............................. g .................. V ........................................................................... President ............................................................................................................ Secretary ........................................... Treasurer - HOUSE REPRESENTATIVES Alpha. Delta-Alma Ditto. Alpha PhiALois Macy, 3 Chi OmegaAGladys Harbke. Delta Delta DeltaAFlorence Riddle. Delta Gamma-Reba Macklin. Gamma Phi-Marjorie Kay. Kappa Alpha Theta-Beatrice Wetherbee. Pi Beta Phi-Elvira Thurlow. Sigma Delta PhiAGladys Diment. Two hundred eightV-five "M... 1 Awwu - . .4-., v??.vp A. A 94$." ,,,.. . ,. ..A.7 Anmw'- 4,4... . . mat, ' x'. e rmflwf . - A :2: a ; 5 AW. .2 f A f, g 1 .3 i i 9, 4 wax 3 m Aumhuwxaauu .0...- . ; kw . P?.w. I , Vw; . I ' gym Izvzwznx g I. my .., , CONDON CLUB D0wn t0 Bed-ROCIC, Established December 11, 1919, by the Upperclassmen 0f the Department of Geology Named in honor of the pioneer geologist of Oregon, Dr. Thomas Condon OFFICERS LEWIS A. BOND ........................................................................ ' ............................................ P resident HUBERT G. SCHENCK .............................................................................................. Vice President RACHEL HUSBAND ........................................................................................ Secretary-Treasurer MEMBERS Lewis A. Bond, Merril D. Ely, Newton J. Estes, Claire P. Holdridge, Victor P. Husband, Rachel Husband, Mary J. Packwood, Hubert G. Schenck, Frank B. Kelsey Branstetter Engstrom Tuck Kruse TRIPLE A LUCILE BRANSTETTER .................................................................................................... President . RUTH ENGSTROM ...................................................................................................... Vice President RUTH TUCK .......................................................................................................................... Secretary MARJORIE KRUSE .................................................................................. . ............................ Treasurer TWO hundred eighty-six 3lil'33 v-n 3mm v" ' M4 v. .ou lw-r n" k . sicx ICATI O lxxx: wk t:, $$ x l L b. 9 '9 , 1 . i k 4 , w. i . ,. .. - u . , 4 O n . , . . , , , v ,w T coma ... , H a , 3 ' $H m O O I '1 I . vt' $ '8! . 1 v,"m' snip . '3 a .3: W V- . N? No ' u. M THE EMERALD The Oregon Emerald is the official organ of the student body of the University of Oregon. It is published every Tuesday, Thursday and Sat- urday 0f the college year and contains news of campus, University and student interest. The first student newspaper at the University of Oregon started in the spring of 1900 as the Oregon Weekly. It was founded largely through the efforts of Clifton CtPatU McArthur, who held the office of editor for two years. It was printed on the old Washington hand press which still remains as an object of curiosity in the School of J ournalism. W. C. CtSkipperU Nicholas, editor of the Weekly for the year 1909- 1910, changed the paper to a semi-weekly and re-christened it the ttOregon Emerald? The name was suggested by the poems of Joaquin Miller, the Lane County poet, who refers to Oregon as the Emerald state. In response to the demand of a growing student body for a larger paper, Karl Onthank, editor, and Andrew Collier, manager, in 1912 chang- ed the Emerald from a semi-weekly to a tri-weekly publication, and in- creased the number of columns from five to six, Which form the paper still retains. THE OREGAN A More varied in career than the Emerald is the Oregana, the official student body year book of the University of Oregon. The first year book published by the University was edited and man- aged by the class of 1902. It appeared in 1901 under the title of Webfoot. The class of 1903 published another edition of the Webfoot the next year, but the class of 1904 did not undertake the venture. In 1905 the book appeared again but the class of 1906 again sidestepped the responsi- bility. The classes of 1907 and 1908 published smaller and less expensive year books called the Bulletin. The class of 1909 gave their book the title of the Beaver. ' The class of 1910 chose the name, Oregana. Since that time the book has appeared regularly each year and its size and scope has grown with the University. In the fall of 1915-1916 it was decided that the financial strain of publishing the Oregana was too great for any one class to bear so the Oregana was changed to a student body publication. It is still edited and managed by a staff composed of Juniors, however. Two hundred eighty-seven Abbott Kays OREGON :7" - EMERALD EDITORIAL STAFF LEITH F. ABBOTT ................ -. .......................................................... Editor DOROTHY DUNIWAY .................................................................. Associate Editov' LYLE BRYSON .- ................................................................................ News Editor NELL WARWICK ..................................... Assistant News Editor HARRY A. SMITH ................................................ .- .................... Managing Editor HELEN MANNING ...................................................................... Dramatic Editor MAYBELLE LEAVITT ........................................................................ Proof Reader SPECIAL WRITERS Adelaide V. Lake, Louise Davis, Victoria Case SPORT WRITERS Floyd Maxwell, Raymond Lawrence REPORTERS Earle Richardson, Ariel Dunn, J acob Jacobson, Charles Gratke, Mary Lou Burton, Eleanor Spall, Stanley Eisman, Annamay Bronaugh,- Eunice Zim- merman, Frances Quisenberry, Wanna McKinney, Mauna Loa Fallis, Esther Fell, Mildred Weeks BUSINESS STAFF Warren Kays ........................................................................ Business Manager Raymond Vester ......................................................... Associate Webster Ruble -- ................................................................ Advertising Manager Elston Ireland .................................................................................... Circulation Floyd Bowles ................................... .............................. Assistant Lee Culbertson, Charles Lamb ................................................ Staff Assistants TWO hundred eighty-eight , $$3.99!. h! ,ulii. ,1, 5 , Explaining 461ij v.33a $ 33:5 : Avsxugblzrn . igs; K:JH. $$$$$Yizrls 11.14:... Rivhunlsu l'hxnmn . Inxux .l Manning Fell Irvlzm'l Bryson C k O .1 0 x X Duniwav .Iu cohson Smith oighty-nine hundred l'wu r Manning Beggs 1920 OREGAN A EDITORIAL STAFF I HELEN MANNING .................................................................. -. .................... Editm" JOE INGRAM ............................................................................ Associate Editov DEPARTMENT EDITORS Dorothy Duniway, Guy Sacre .......................................................... University Velma Rupert, Raymond Lawrence ........................................ Administration Mary Ellen Bailey .......................................................................... Oregon Days Louise Davis, Si Simola, Eleanor Spall, Inga Winter, J ohn Dierdorff .......................................................................................... Classes Adelaide Lake, Adah McMurphey ........................................ Drama and Music Earle Richardson, George J amieson, Charles Gratke ...................... Athletics Annamay Bronaugh ............................................................ Womenis Athletics Robert Case .............................................................................. Ye Oregon Muse Harvey Madden .................................................................................. -- .......... Art Harry Smith .......................................................................................... Forensics Jack Montague ...................................................................... Medical School Lyle Bryson, J acob J acobson ...................................................... Organizations Leith Abbott .................................................................................... Publications Herman Lind ............................... --Military Nell Warwick, Nish Chapman ...................................................... Fraternities Paul Farrington, Wilbur Hulin .............................................. Oregon Spirits BUSINESS STAFF George Beggs ........................................................................................ Manager RiChard Martin -------------------------------------------------------------------- Assistant Manager Elston Ireland ...................................................................................... Circulation W 10 A Two hundred ninty 4f 3 b 135 I T wo Rit lxzmlson Bryson 1.:1 kc M :Il'tin 511:1 11 h undrctl ninety-One Ingram M :ulllen Smith Lind Sucre llulin Ireland Farrington Rupert I Henlortf XVinter Mdlurplwy Davis Simolu Warwick R i Phill'tlSOII humwuy 1,:1 wronce Qkh-g to. am.- . . ifmwm. Case Bailey Gmtko Abbott Chapman Wain: WW1": .. 1 1' mm pool xx 1?; 1 . 33333331 113133 338E 133338311 42 FEB cm ' 3313181111311 311315 VT V6141: 4: ,czs 310,me tartar: 3.! 0m Wis. , . Wm ' ety H3 3 g . .39 ,5 i, m" "w 4 m 7! Mr W W WWW W mm: to mm mm Dram hat 5W3 mm: 42 gm ism mm Hang wwup of Amy n .meumu mum l AMMVK'C3 W WKMkE , p naval. Mm ,1, ma 2mg having," comm pawn m4 fawn; mm. 13: W W Wm? tit'm mmwuu c um thug lmu- yum ago. I: 5 1m. .n: had '33 ' , W1mmagmaian1xu3333030333033, N a Irma: gnaw; V wmmrm. m wm-jw maria. Now what: for e um Atrium i. 51 m ' I ONIAN mmw , em in man ma by 1M om. mi YchWS yaw Min; m-x- by mg Mums wzurfali. h, u: . ,, M m X'nivev mun am v" ,. a 11 A 1 12 mm: mm mm a , m Bum. 5m .23 mai mu 3 EM! 04590034; wig Eu aback! u M: Mm m. min . mm tad was $12; aka duth nt mm. Mch :- 3w,- 69 ix 3 min 31:33: wayib: 7; NcKWngQr M , n w 411 M: a new a! game WW3 '03 rm "34 "ma W W' km! Gus rm: mm rme m A18 wet .ma mul'm 35150 :1 name raw: 4: 1m 2m: me ..m,,, Wank sun as; 1gb u Mano :u ukotd whiny, wfmvd w W; 111 immejmrn ' , 1111135 , Mb: Nut 335.131 In aww! for m M mazamjm Mag autwh lb? Eme g paint; 9W low M bx. hm 4f mm In 31913131; 1w mt. u. w m x mm: ,m: WWW an 411.; mam: amid. 0w 1mm w: dle m7, 21mm mm mm a per swim am 3 ,7: tray uMcM' Y3 hom'moum :1 m l'w'qnity RE 36371311331117 owning at 1531:! 32: jamwmsgfc 3m 1116 $720 3213mm 1 Mt WM mow: , w 1;7 :zmm mm Conan. M mu ,, MP A 'Mmsr m cw' 43111 mm: Mir Rd 3223031413me 19514 whimsdnp: m1 :0 jaw 01' w-mn 91km; gmdwm of 333. 31,291,131: :1 11-1: 3W2: with 'mek 93:13 a: 8m 303m 3; r0: 3 k $3107 ml Rm mm 7 13m M 1wa mu m h ukzmdvdpd 1 , when m; bum tuna; .3 :2 L , donwxz mu !5!!- Welsmwm w an 111118 1391513 vm 11mm yum 23mm Z.1 Tam Pint From mmwsvm $4,913: 1 :h Shaloni .7918 W. A?TEK IIEYENGE new Hwy," m Good hum, w an Mm vxmom-wuemw , o! cnntamm as main goapcoooochuvo 1" theiiu 13mm Cmtamr o , snwm 39:: 3:75: We. 321241 32051 33,11 fax! 5-1-1 , r tr. Ru: 02,: ,n ma huJ m we 5mm. ha rkwmi'z a: w lbw V41 1' 331' 180 341m in . tbu $313101: umq thw m hula, y! tfvr gar In yummy mum wackmd 0? Ha u 1132 5110;517:wa ?Eww v mam 3 v 3.3' S'smhingmb 21 tom the nmdeE-m, Pzninaiar Saturn wmu. Mag; Weaning am m mm comm twin 3,3 dummy except WA or EN mm aos'l in u'w pw- m mi; gnxxij um 1h: Solid u! a... madman Mammy 3-41. r m :er asuv 1mm UM W 341x144": n . - The $230 mun :Guvmrl-L ware mm. :1. Malay ml 3 -xH .xmo dam pm m: um rm. Ml mm as ,xhn m in the nMr centusm mm .1! thx- Mar ' mm ta win: wm'xZTWrr mm: W auwd m mama: mo magr knmx In the m? glwv, alarm 21 .m: N to . Mwm um! War- 4:9 N01 mm mm ma: 5v, mm m m: day whey; army! Mum the cm 9. a, C and ?u'admxubm Stacfori and Wsshinmrm Suzy Plum;- Tau, kw Wndxiwman mm xi :9 hmmnix a In: tum 28.5" vrkh Smhmi Mk3; waauh 33.5 mm "awn wows, f 3:111 123:; "'11!!! far 3 :0 g N 3 ulifmnm 33$ anwx mad: a WV 33130 win an 5'5123'4 pro! ' ' Scribes TWO hundred ninety-two ii 5 ii I i 1 .8 T: ; vmwwa n :-,r OTHER PUBLICATION S THE EDITIN G CLASSeThe senior students in the School of Jour- nalism constitute the editing class. During recent years the class has aided in publishing numerous papers and pamphlets. During the last year in conjunction with Sigma Delta Chi and Theta Sigma Phi, menis and womenis journalistic fraternities, the class published the "Winnagen" and iiGibes and Scribes." The Winnagen was an iiextra? advertising Home- coming, and was circulated among the Alumni. Gibes and Scribes, the of- ficial sidelight on the State Editorial Conference, was published this year for the second time. It has become an annual publication dealing with the yearly editorial convention at Oregon. OREGON EXCHANGES, a trade magazine published for Oregon newspapermen by the School of J ournalism, is issued monthly during the school year. It contains articles on journalism by newspapermen from all over the state. iiAll Over Oregonf a column devoted to the changes in the staffs of the different papers, and the comings and goings of journal- ists, is one of its best regular features. LEMON PUNCH, a weekly literary supplement to the Oregon Emerald, made its first appearanee December 6, 1919. Later it was de- cided to change the Lemon Punch to a monthly. It is edited by Bob Case and contains contributions from the students, mostly humorous articles. Two hundred ninety-three NEWS BULLETIN centains news of campus happenings of statewide interest. It is issued at irregular intervals throughout the year by the editing class. The Bulletin is sent to Oregon newspapers as a mail news service regarding the activities of the University of Oregon. OLD OREGON is published quarterly and is the official organ of the Oregon Alumni. For a number of years Old Oregon was published only by the Alumni, but during the last few terms the editing class has aided in preparing the copy. Old Oregon is devoted to the activities of graduates, and former students of the University. EXTENSION LEAFLETS.eThe extension division of the University is aided by the School of J ournalism in publishing pamphlets and circulars. The University Bulletin Series, Commonwealth Review, high school pamph- lets and illustrated folders are included in this list. ummnm ugm Thveu Shach Two hundred ninety-fpur 'raw'; s Jig- went. W113! a 131 ,- 1.1.4: AMAIU Ian? k 1;.191119 we '9 Captain Raymond C. Baird was detailed for duty at the University of Oregon March 14, 1919. He has been a commissioned officer in the reg- ular army since 1908. Prior to the war he organized and commanded the Cadet Corps of the Kansas City, M0., High School Which won the National War Game Competition in 1917. During the war he held the grade of Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding an infantry replacement bat- talion at Camp Lee, Virginia, and the 64th Pioneer Infantry at Camp Taylor, Ky. Company A TWO hundred ninetyefive , .1. 11...... Nxv. ".11... '11 R. O. T C. AT OREGON N ITS 0f the R. O. T. C. have been established by the United States government at approximately four hundred universities and col- leges throughout the country. These units are established in accordance With Congressional legislation as a part of the general scheme of national preparedness. The object of the establishment of these units at educational institutions is to provide, in times of emer- gency, a certain number of educated men properly qualified to perform the duties of commissioned officers of the army. Experience in past wars has proved that the college man, or rather the educated man, is the one Who is best qualified, after a certain amount of intensive training, to handle our forces in battle. It has also been proved that those men that have had a certain amount of previous basic TWO 11mm red ninety-six 391 h av" 4 H ' 13 xx, . I k ;- $kww - 4,;ng .' 8 3m: ... 35' - W Ll! . I" m m h- h ' u- t i m m , - . i ' r , , ., . , t . 1 ' -, , . t . - . Company B military training have developed more rapidly along the lines of an of- ficer, and have been of material assistance in hastily organizing a new army. There are now at the University of Oregon approximately four hun- dred cadets enrolled in the R. O. T. C. It is the purpose of this organ- ization to train the cadets in the fundamentals of military science. Browning Automatic Rifle Company Two llUlltlI'Etl ninety-seven Company C An effort is made to ground each cadet in the fundamentals of mili- tary science in order that When the time comes for his intensive training he Will have a foundation which Will enable him to grasp quickly the things that will be taught him at that time, and thus be qualified to act W as part of the ofiicial personnel of the military forces of the United States. A11 underclassmen receive military instruction in the Reserve Offi- cerst Training Corps. For those underclassmen who have satisfactorily completed the military course and are recommended by the president of the institution and military authorities for further military training, mun 9b; Company D TWO hundred ninety-eight Machine Gun Company there is offered an advanced course of military instruction, Which con- sists of five hours a week. The practical work in this course relates to the duties consistent with the rank of cadet officers or non-commissioned officers in connection With work and exercises scheduled for this unit. The theoretical part of this advanced work includes tactical problems for small forces and also for all arms combined; map maneuvers and in- struction in courtmartial proceedings; a course in the international re- lations of America from its discovery to the present time. All students recommended for this advanced course are furnished commutation of rations by the government. This commutation, amount- ing to about forty cents a day, is paid to the student as long as he continues to take the advanced course in military instruction. Two hundred ninety-nine Alleluf 1? "fifa'li HP 3: a .193va iii" n Ava; m. -www:wmwv "Fun: 1 $131K; 3w: Company EeVeteLrans of World War THE R. O. T. C. ARMORY HE University of Oregon has established an armory for the R. O. T T. C. This is a two-story frame building 100 feet long and 40 feet Wide. In addition to the offices for the military staff, there is a room for each company, an indoor shooting gallery, and recitation rooms, Which are being well supplied with equipment, such as sand tables, maps, war game sets, miniature trench systems, etc., with Which to carry on instruction. Every effort is being made to equip this armory to the full- est extent in order that the instruction in the R. O. T. C. may be as thorough as possible. The government has already furnished individual equipment for each cadet, consisting of rifle, bayonet, belt, haversack, mess kit, tents, and the necessary uniforms. It is also providing two hundred rounds of ammunition for cadets With all the necessary supplies for target practice. Three hundred NATIONAL WOMENS FRATERNITIES N0. Local National NAME Installed Founded Cilap- Meggber- Meagher- ers s 11p s 1p Gamma Phi Beta ...... Dec. 18, 1908 Nov. 11, 1874 23 39 5,500 Chi Omega ................ Apr.30,1909 Apr. 5,1895 42 20 4,000 Kappa Alpha Theta 1- July 11, 1909 Jan. 27, 1870 46 42 8,500 Delta Delta Delta ...... Oct. 30, 1910 Nov. 26, 1888 61 25 7,800 Kappa Kappa Gamma Jan. 11, 1913 Oct. 13, 1870 46 46 9,865 Delta Gamma ............ Oct. 13, 1913 Jan. 2, 1874 32 44 5,362 Alpha Phi .................. Jan. 8, 1915 Oct. 20,1872 22 36 4,000 Pi Beta Phi ................ Oct. 29, 1915 Apr. 28, 1867 60 45 10,550 Three hundred one 'wjrsw 41 11.1.23'FJ115? x 1 1 2 1' 9612.,4w1v- "a 1 0 9 -" w-wwav .11 JWEZT-ww r r; .m-N... 1 :. ywamw ax h. w wp- mw-mxeu, V ,1 g 55,-, U Jan; GAMMA PHI BETA Founded at University of Syracuse, November 11, 1874 NU CHAPTER Installed December 18, 1908 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Marjorie Kay, Bula Smith, Ronalda Cameron 1921 Dorothy Wootton, Dorothy Dixon, Leta Kiddle, Helen Woodcock, Blanche Wickland, Genevieve Clancy, Pauline Porteous, Eloise White L 1922 Madge Calkins, Helen Nelson, Bernice Craig, Helen Houghton, Alice Wherity, Rena. Hales, Katharine Wilson, Lenore Blaesing, Doris Dezendorff, Helene Kuykendall, Geneva Stebnlo, Janet West, Eileen Tomkins 1923 Ruth Hopkins, Florence Hartman, Frances McGill, Violet Robinson, Gertrude Liver- moze, Zoe Allen, Beatrice Barker, Margaret Kern, Edith He-rrin, Francm MacMillan, Helen Gardinier, Helen Day, Dorothy Condon, LeLane West, Winona Dyer, Marion Briggs , .. w ., W WK , . 2- H- ,.,.,,,W,,,,y.11..... .1 . 1.1.1.1 Three hundred two Wootton White Wherity Stebno Robinson lecMillan Three hundred Dixon Porteous Hales J West Livermore Day three Smith 13' iddle Cailiins XVilson Tomkins A1 len Condon Woodcock N clson Blaesing Hopkins Barker Dyer Vx'ickland Craig I zezomlorff Hartman Kern Gardinier Houghton Kuykendall McGilI Herrin L. West rtr'vwwfrw m9 r rm;'rz"?""f? ufl 2114?": 9 ' 2- n: 1' 11 K 22' 1, L, 4 1'. 1w: .1 AA A .1 E :3 ' . m1mwm.w-n ' runaway wrw-Kk Kn y. .u A ,...:1$. .14.; ,1 A v mar. ' 'v - um M..m.;m M." mu :. .4. .11 t Any ' . V 9n , n. ynM" ; ' V 2W' V P I H 1 . 1 r , 3.2: WV? :1 ,' ,1 . CHI OMEGA Founded at University of Arkansas, April 5, 1895 PHI ALPHA CHAPTER Installed April 30, 1909 SORORES IN FACULTATE Charlotte Barmeld, Julia Burgess SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Gladys Harbke, Charlotte Patterson, Dorothy Bennett 1921 Wanda Nelson, Clara Thompson, Maud Barnes, Grace Rugg, Cecile Creede, Edythe Creede 1922 Louise Sheahan, Virginia Giles, Mildred Bettingen, Marjorie Holman, Clare Ryan, Margaret Smith, Margaret Studer, Vivien Strong 1923 Lois Pixley, Marie Anderson, Hallie Smith, Hulda Hafner, Mildred Lauderdale Three hundred four ; armies .r . Bennett Nelson Barnes Studer Giles E. Creede thtingon H. Smith Miller Three hundred five Patterson Sheahan Phetteplace Holman Strong M. Smith Thmnpson 11:1 fner Lunderdule Ilzn'hkc C. Croode Pixloy Anderson w 2 :x $ s 1.x VXAA $ k9$0 KAPPA ALPHA THETA Founded at DePauW University, January 27, 1870 ALPHA XI CHAPTER Installed July 11, 1909 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Carol Montague 1921 Theodora Stoppenbach, Annamay Bronaugh, Mae Ballack, Lyle Bryson, Jane Murphy, Eve Hutchison, Hope MacKenzie, Merle Hamilton, Eva Digerness, Helen Manning, Beatrice Wetherbee 1922 Miriam Holcomb, Mary Hegardt, Anne Shea, Barbara Sheppard, Dorothy Manville, Geraldine Pilking'ton, Marcile Carlock, Agnes Brooks, Margaret Phelps, Carolyn Cannon, Marian Lawrence, Emma Coolidge, Valiere Coffey, Dorothy McGuire 1923 Imogene Letcher, Genevieve Matson, Lorna Coolidge, Annabel MacKenzie, Doris Seng- stacken, Carolyn Palmer, Anna Grace Pallet, Margaret Beatie, Helen Stoppenbach, Lenore Cram, Jessie Lewis, Hilma Honkanen, Elizabeth Geiser, Marian Linn, Cornelia. Pipes cm; 4:"; H 11. X ? I' Q M Witnwprr pf 11.. 9 ' 531 A. 7; 5'3ng "em snack 41-5; award, 1..- ! gum 1 'f 1 Three hundred six ,4 , 1 5;. .y .1 . V 34 , r: 133'11 'j'h 1 u .,.. far I ,. .2 , . v V GAVEQW$ f'gfhgflgqgmw :2 imrmumxhwmnaswamwgma Bryson Manning Pilkington Lawrence A. MucKenzie Cram Three, hundred T. Stoppenbach Hutchison Holcomb Carlock Coffey Palmer Murphy Wetherbee lem'ille E. Coolidge Sengstacken Lewis seven Bronaugh Lctrher H. MacKenzie Ilegzu'dt Brooks McGuire 211th Bullack Hamilton Shea Phelps Mutson Bentic Ilmlkunml Digemcss Sheppard Cannon L. Coolidge II. Stopponlmrrh 4 z i 2 1'? a i DELTA DELTA DELTA Founded at Boston University, Thanksgiving Eve, 1888 THETA DELTA CHAPTER, Installed October 30, 1910 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Pauline Wheeler, Ethel McGilchrist 1921 Doris Churchill, Florence Riddle, Marjorie Edsall, Patricia Ball, Josephine Osterhout, Maebelle Ramont, Helen W'att 1922 Marianne Dunham, Patty French, Lucille Parsons, Ruth Griflin 1923 . Lois Muir, Mildred Whitney, Muriel Bater, Irene Barrett, Madge Nelson, Gertrude Golding, Laura. Gates, Nell TenBrook, Leota Burt, Cella Kinsley, Gladys Michael, Gladys Nosler Three hundred Tlll 1:0, Wheeler Bull V lesons Rater Ton Brook hundred nine McGilohrist Osterhout Watt Barrett Burt Churchill Rzmlont Griffin Nelson V insloy Riddle Dunhum Muir Golding: Mir'huvl Edsnll French Vl1itnoy Gut UH Naslol' whs$vgm v V , a ma f 12!!!!134hzh: 4 A bust: wwxle-thx Manmmw .1142- .2 1 . A , 1, . P . 1 . , . . 9 V v. sf ,1, .a , 1.x 1; N v.9 Yuan 1:172. .V 3 1 - mi; 6,112.29. 15.125 1. .A 11 1 1 MUM. 1 1.1 V. , ,W$M.mw1bm. .. 14.4 1. KAPPA KAPPA GAMA Founded at Monmouth College, October 13, 1870 BETA OMEGA CHAPTER Installed January 11, 1914 SORORES 1N FACULTATE Dean Elizabeth Fox, Catherine Beekley, Celeste Foulke-s, Norma Dobie SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Jeannette Moss, Dorothy Duniway, Georgina Geisler, Alice Van Schoonhoven, Vera Van Schoonhoven, Mabyl Weller, Mary Irving, Helen duBuy, Brownell Frasier 1921 Mary Ellen Bailey, Clara Corrigan, Margaret Hamblin, Gladys Smith, Janet Frasier, Zonweiss Rogers 1922 Mary Evans, Emma Jane Garbade, Lois Barnett, Mildred Appenson, Alice Evans, Alice Holman, Helen Nicolai, Phoebe Gage, Helen Huntington, Doris Pittenger, Hilma Fox, Evelyn Fitzgibbon, Hazel Young, Florence Tenneslon, Eleanor S-pall, Fern Murphy, Anna Mae Chipping, Flora Campbell, Dorothy Miller, Ruth Austin 1923 Jeannette Crosiield, Gayle Acton, Dorothy McKee, Margaret Duniway, Dorothy Jameson, Marion Weiss, Louise Irving, Aurita Payson, Audrey Medler, Ellen Gantenbein, Mauna Loa Fallis - Three hundred ten IE -ww.m-av5 k aw .g. 5 magic: 2 i i 5 F 5 vFv-L. 5mm 7 .a' A. Van Schoonhoven Weller Hamblin N. Medler Gage A. Evans Nicolai Murphy Crosfield Weiss Jzzmieson McKee Three hundred eleven 75' 16-1, 15. X???- M. Irving D. Duniway V. Van Schoonhoven Smith J. Frasier 8152111 M. Evans Apporson Pittenger Xuntington L. 1117ng A. Muller Fitzgibbon FOX Geisler Bailey Iampbell Rogers Austin Puysnn Acton Frasier du Buy Miller Garbade Gantenbein 31. 'Duniwny Qlllis DELTA GAMMA Founded at the University of Mississippi, January 2, 1874 ALPHA DELTA CHAPTER Installed October 17, 1913 SORORES 'IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 . Clementine Cameron, Luceil Morrow, Era Godfrey, Alleyn Johnson, Reba Macklin, Grayce Sage, Ruth Nash, Beatrice Yoran, Mildred Aumiller 1921 Madeline Slotbo'om, Helen Lougltary, Helen Casey, Margaret Kubli, Vivian Chandler. Mildred Huntley, Marion Ady, Marion Gibstrap; Marian Taylor, Isobel Zimmerman, Helen Hall, Lois Hall, Irene Stewart, Dorothy Lowry, Aurora Potter . 1922 Mary Alta Kelly, Pauline Goad, Elizabeth McHaley, Grace Young, Helen Hooper, Kath- erine Baker, Alice Thomas, Ina McCoy 1923 Betty'Epping, Helen Murdock, Maybelle Miller, Jennie Noren, Margaret Cundy, Gladys Emison, Beatrice Morrow, Mildred Mumby, Lucia W'atson; Dymon Povey, Albert: Potter, Alfaretta Sage W I. a.g' H111 alum Imti Three Mzmklin Casey Zimmerman Cowl Thonms Ca m eron G. Sage Kubli H. Hall McHuley Epping B. Morrow Mumby h u n are 1 thirteen Nash Clm ndlcr L. Hall Young" Murdock Watson L. Morrow Godfrey Aumiller B. Yoran Huntley Stewart Hooper Miller Povey Ady Lowry McCoy Noren Johnson Slotboom Gilstmp Potter Potter Bu k er Cundy A. Sage Loughury Taylor K elly C. Yoran 1'1 mison ALPHA PHI Founded at the University of Syracuse, October.20, 1872 TAU CHAPTER Installed January 8, 1915 SORORES IN FACULTATE Mrs. Mable Holmes Parsons, Mrs. W. F. G. Thacher SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Helen Case, Laurel Canning, Gretchen Colton, Margaret Gray, Adah McMurphey, Mrs. T. A. Larremore 1921 Elizabeth Hadley, Alice Lighter, Lois Macy, Lucile McCorkle, Austrid Mork, Marie Goerig 1922 Aulis Anderson, Helen Carson, Lucile Elrod, Maurine Elrod, Winifred Hopson, Ila Nichols, Dorothy Reed, Isabelle Kidd 1923 Christine Forbes, Florence Garrett, Marian Gillis, Faye Harris, Gladys Lane, Genevieve Loughlin, Caroline McPherson, Frances Peterson, Glyde Schuebel, Kittie May Stockton, Marjorie Wells, Gladys Wright, Lucylle Hutton, Miriam Stockton 13S 335?; jaw "SLBZSHQI'ERW? 1 f ; A S . A; '" ' Ming: '1!!!" iwI H H "2313 Ntnh.' . C1180 Cunning Colton Gx'zlv Mdlurphoy Lurrmnore Hadley Lighter Macy McCorkle Mork Goorig Anderson Carson L. Elmd M. Elrod llopson .V iohols Reed Forbes Kidd Garrett Gillis Harris Lune Loughlin McPherson Peterson Sclluchvl K. Stockton Wells Vright Hutton M. Stockton Three hundred fifteen P1 BETA PHI Founded at Monmouth College, April 28, 1867 OREGON ALPHA CHAPTER Installed October: 29, 1915 SORORES IN FACULTATE Mrs. Anna Landsbury Beck SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE POST GRADUATE Louise F. Wilson, Isabelle Slavin 1920 Bernice L. Spencer, L. Evelyn Smith, Ruth D. Wheeler 1921 Ngll E. Warwick, Elvira J. Thurlow, Alice: Thurston, Laura Rand, Edith L. Pirie, Mar- garet D. Conklin, Lorna Meissner, Marion Mitchell, Mary J. Packwood, Dora E. Birch- ard, Kate Chatburn, Thelma Stanton 1922 Elsie Lawrence, Audrey Roberts, Marvel Skeels, Clara Calkins, Maybelle Leavitt, Mar- jorie Delzevll, Narcivssa Jewett, Helen Clarke, Margaret Fell, Esther Fell, Martha Ann Rice, Velma. Ross, Rachel G. Parker, Genevieve Haven, Eleanor Coleman, Dorothy ' Donlon, Ethel Gaylord 1923 Mildred Smith, Mildred Weeks, Marjorie Kruse, Priscilla Eakin, Dorothy E-akin, Lucile G-arber, Ruth Diehl, Arbelyn Healy, Helen Madden, Myler Calkins, Margaret Carter, Marguerite Hammond .1" w-" .wm.,...,,.1 .1 PM. 119,111.. WV. , - w, , 1 Three hundred sixteen A .xya. .4 Amp V arwick Spencer L'. Smith Wheeler Tllurlow Mitchell Conklin Meissner Iizmd Stanton Chatburn Packwood Danford Lawrence Roberts I In vcn Iielzell Leavitt M Fell E. Fell Skeels Gaylord Jewctt Clarke Coleman Ross C. Calkins Parker Donlon Collins Weeks Kruse Diohl M. Smith Hammond Healy P. Eukin D. Eukin Carber M. Calkins Carter Madden Three hundred seventeen Thurston Pirie ,L .vwvw- m - muuuiimiumnilunmumnum - mu- 1 "Jarnmei'hang .QJAA mM'. 1 u1WA-n i " ' 1uImmIInImmumulnuiiiuium SIGMA DELTA PHI Local Organized January, 1919 SORORES IN FACULTATE Lois Gray SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Gladys Diment, Irva Smith, Frances Blurock, Marion Andrews 1921 Alice Hamm, Dorothea Boynton, Vera Tobey, Mary Moore, Germany Klemm, Mary Turner, Leola Green, Helen Frease 1922 Helen Gronholm, Eunice Eggleson, Helen Dahl, Charlotte Clarke, Virginia Leonard, Beatrice Hensley, Leah Wagner, Elsie Marsh, Mette Olsen, Doris Sawtell, Annabel Denn, Eva Rice 1923 Ruth Sanborn, Josephine Moore, Edythe Wilson, Florence Blurock, Alice Curtis, Bess Shell, Margaret Jackson Jmhl Olsen Ck . Moore, rgleson b Marsh J. Moore Jackson 411 Fr. Bhlm M T Gronholm Wagner Sunbom Shell T 1 1!. t .1 1. n S t Bovnton Frease Henslev im e 11 Rice Curtis D F1. Blurock Iveonard hundred nineteen 1sz mm Green Denn 4 $9 Andrews Turner Clarke Sawtell Th ree 9 ALPHA DELTA Local Organized March, 1919. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Joy Judkins, Nena Sorenson 1921 Beatrice Crewdson, Loeta Rogers, Naomi Robbins, Marie Ridings, Gladys Matthis, Moreita Howard 1922 Elaine Cooper, Velma Rupert, Alma Ditto, Marguerite Straughan, Florence Fasel, Lelah Stone! 1923 Rita Ridings, Josephine Croxall, Elizabeth Tillson, Mary Parkinson, Beulah Clark Three hundred twenty s inson ard in OXV Robb . Iatthis Stone 1.2111 1 n O S d C row 'Fillson 'wenty-One 4 I. ins k M. Ridings d Straugglmn Croxall .Tl hundred Three HENDRICKS I-IALL MEMBERS 1920 Lotta Hollopeter, Ethel Wakefield, Elva Bagley, Marion Bowen, Victoria Case, Eva Hansen, Evangeline Kendall, Mary Mathes, Gladys Melsnelss, Blanche Mellinger, Dor- othy Miller, Mildred Oliver, Gladys Paulsen, Elizabeth Peterson, Lucile Redmond, Carmen Schmidli, Alys Sutton, Gretchen Taylor, Helen Whitaker, Inga Winter, Beulah Kealgy, Leona Marsters, Amy Turner 1921 Wanda Brown, Laura Duerner, Margaret Goodwin, Mildred Hawes, Thelma Hoeflein, Marjorie Holaday, Wanda Keyt, Winona Lambert, Renolia Lafferty, Maud Largent, Annette Leonard, Elizabeth London, Jennie Maguire, Martha Overstreet, Ella Rawlings, Edna Rice, Elsie Scott, Ollie Stoltenberg, Mary Truax, Irene Whitfield, Ruth Wolff, Florence Casey, 1513. Gilbert, Emily Veazie, Martha Westwood - 1922 Frankie Adams, Georgina Perkins, Mildred VanNuys, Marian Tuttle, Grace Tigard, Marjorie Stout, Vera Shaver, Eugenia Mobley, Mary Larvg'ent, Celia Karsun; Vera Hen- derson, Frances Habersham, Mable Black, Ruth Engstrom, Wanda Daggett, Agnes Coates, Margaret Russell, Ulda. Basler, Ruby Carlson, Elinor Goodnough, Irene Hagen- buck, Jane ston, Flbrence Jagger, Dessell Johnson, Edna Magers, Florence Skinner, Nell Southworth, Vera Wood, Mary Carter 1923 Blanche Anderson, Catherine Anderson, Myrtle Anderson, Bernice Alstock, Ruth Baker, Katheryn Ball, Josephine Baumgartner, Katherine Bald, Wilhelmina Beckstedt, Helen Brown, Morene Bog-gan, Helen Bromberg, June Bungan, Bertha Case, Dorothy Cash, Dorothy Chauss'e, Genevieve Chase, Ruth Carroll, Bertha Chapman, Kathryn Collier, Helen .Cooper, Naomi Comeld, Henrietta Dieterin, Helen Dustan, Josephine Estey, Frances Erickson, Gladyce Ellsworth, Marie Flynn, Florence Garrett, Leona Graham, Maud Graham, Itha Garrett, Leha Greenbaum, Leona Gregory, Alice Gohlke, Mary Gurney, Lulu Heist, Hilda Hensley, Maud Hedrick, Mildred E. Hill, Anna A. Hill, Georgia Hickernell, Hazelle Hickethier, Helen Homuth, Fern Holcomb, Jeanette Hogan, Three hundred twenty-two k ' . : :1! M Em u-m '4 WWWEEJ OREGAHA G " "'"1! J x TV 9.9- : Si Romah Iler, Genevieve Johnston, Florence Johnson, Gladys Johnson, Johannah Johnson, I f Lucilld Keyt, Inez King, Bonita Kirk, Annabel Knowles, Natrude Larsen, Alta Landon, ' Mayme LaFollette, Crescent Lorenz, Mona Logan, Margaret Lucins, Helen Mayer, Ruth W I Mason, Isabel McArthur, Marjorie Myerzs, Jean McEachern, Jean Mitchell, Ramona V . k m ; M'illigan, Jessie Miles, Frances Moore, Mary E. Mobley, Ruby McWhirter, Eitel McDole, Helen Noyes, Vida Nurlin, Nellie Nygren, Louise Odell, Elda Offie-ld, Adelaide Parker, H . - . --WV--V- A -.;'.. - Veda Patton, Doris Parker, Frances Perry, Emily Perry, Irene Poston, Lilly May Poley, Laneita Pfost, Pearl Pyritz, Eva Rice, Bernice Rise, Edna Rife, Imogene Richards, Edna Sparling, Nadine Stephens, Elizabeth Stephenson, Helen Smith, Genevieve Spriggs, Edith Svliffe, Mable Smith, Bernice Shipp, Blanche Shipp, Doris Stiles, Frederika Schilke, I - f Margaret Scott, Mabel Sutherland, Gertrude Tolle, Eileen Todd, Jessie Thompson, Amy hh Turner, Clara Wheelhouse-, Elizabeth Whitehouse, Naomi Wilson, Beulah Wright h af Daisy Gochnour 3.4.... -5 J J;nAM-mmmakmn " Three hundred twenty-three A 4; 1 gQw L ?gQMWg; idli Schm Casey Lambert Rice 1ver itfleld 01 Wh Stoltenberg London Perkins inger Redmond K eyt' aguire Mell M H oladav Hawes urn er Leonard en M elsness T Brown Bow llarsters ker hita t Gilber Largent W inters Tigurd W Hollopeter K and all 1101' Illsen D1101 :1 Irzlfferty Wolff 13 Westwood Moblev 37.19 V? S g 1 I .1 .J a 3X 1.. Hoeflein Karsun . Largent Three hundred twenty-four Shaver 'Puttle Three Henderson I-Iabersham Black Coates Carter Iler Basler Detering Ellsworth Garrett Anderson Bergen Chase A. Hill Johnson hundred twenty-five Van Nuys Collier Flynn Bromberg Hyde G. Johnson Adams Russell Christensen Graham Baker M. Hill Johnston Anderson Carroll Gochnour Brown Hensley Jagger lingstrom Gregory Cash l urney Ball Hickemell K i rk Duggett Chausse Cooper Ureonlmum Beckstwlt Iloniuth King ,x 3.0; .3 v.4 1T1; 341.12 jr 339A N? h . 51? 1kwsw? A INS Luc Z Loren yt L. Ke ers tchell U! i B N Stephenson Rife Sutherland Scott Three hundred twenty-six ry ason Per Milligan E. M I cArthur Foley Shipp Pfost M cDole Wri ght B I Aandon Mayer Poston Sliffe W hitehouse Odell gan Lo Moore Nygren Schilke Pvritz 1d HS Off Eachern 03 0s Stephens arsen Tolle L MC N S, jK0m: GAHA Ex NATIONAL MEN1S FRATERNITIES No. Local National NAME Installed Founded 1 Chap- Member- Member- ters sh-ip ship Sigma Nu .................. Dec. 1,1900 Jan. 1, 1869 80 31 11,719 Kappa Sigma ............ Apr. 16, 1904 Dec. 10, 1869 84 37 13,654 Beta Theta Pi ............ Dec. 4, 1909 Aug. 8, 1839 80 40 20,992 Alpha Tau Omega Feb. 25, 1910 Sept. 11, 1865 71 11,854 Sigma Chi ................ Nov. 27, 1910 June 28, 1855 V 73 14,678 Phi Gamma Delta Oct. 1, 1911 Apr. 22, 1848 63 15,362 Phi Delta Theta ........ May 30, 1912 Dec. 28, 1848 84 20,016, Delta Tau Delta ........ Nov.15,1913 Feb. 4, 1859 63 13,061 Sigma Alpha Epsilon Nov. 8, 1919 Mar. 9, 1856 93 16,948 SIGMA N U Founded at Virginia Military Institute, January 1, 1869 GAMMA. ZETA CHAPTER Installed December 1, 1900 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Donald Newbury, Bart Spellman, Ivor Ross, Sprague Carter 1921 Herbert Rambo, Neil Morfitt, Willard Hollenbeck, Warren Gilbert, Silas Starr, John Matheson, Barton Sherk 1922 , Max Schafer, Verne Dudley, Sydney Hayslip, Wesley Shattuck, Charles Robertson, Harold Connelly, Carl Newbury, Paul Schafer, French Moore, Donald Van Boskirk, Guy Morelock, Cogswell Campbell, Jack Newhall 1923 Fred Dodson, Stewart Baranger, Harry Kurtz, Ivan McKinney, Robert Morrison, Robert Sheppard, Arthur Tuck, Dudley Day, George Gochnour, George Weist, Glenn Hyde, A1 Malone Three hundred twenty-eight WK- W TH $ 1 Morh'tt II. Schufor C. Newbury Dodson H W Wee hundred D. Newbury Hollenbeck Dudley P. Sclmfer Buranger Tuck twenty-nine Gilbert: H ayslip Moore Kurtz ha y Carter Starr Shattuck Van Boskirk McKinney Goclmour W w W , W2 R21 mbo Mutheson Robertson Murdock Morrison Hyde Slu-rk Connolly Newlmll Sheppard KAPPA SIGMA- Founded at University of Virginia, December 10, 1867 GAMMA ALPHA CHAPTER Installed April 4, 1904 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Stanford Anderson, Harold Brock, Jay Fox ' 1921 Jack Dundore, Barkley Loughlin, John ,Hunt, Donald Robinson, Robert Earl, John W. Benefiel, Edwin Strowbridge, Merle Moore, Carl Mautz, Clarence Moffatt, Arnold Koepke, Harris Ellsworth 1922 Albert Harding, Richard Sundeleaf, Francis Beller, Elston Ireland, Louis Dunsmore, Arthur Kuhnhausen, David Baird, Henry Koepke, Howard Staub, Floyd Bowles, Ralph Burgess, Eugene Boylen, Floyd Shields, Allan Carson, Wallace Carson 1923 Archie Shields, Henry Judd, Arvin Burnett, Rolin Andre, Edward Thompson, Frank Dick- son, John Booker, Hubert Smith, Dewey Rand, Thomas Murphy, Leon Culbertson, Thomas Wyatt, Ned Strahorn, Alfred Krohn, George Borman, Dean Ireland Three hundred thirty ya ,2 7.1 :wxww; q v, , :71;;5.$.uigrmfdwym:manw'vm.M, 1 9 ; s! ,7: iijgcdgwmw 22.! vii? yr? .2? Dunsmore Boylen Andre Culbertson Nautz Judd E. Ireland Burgess Loughlin J ohns Moore Murphy D. Ireland Strowbridge Beller Bartholemew Dundore Rand Bowles Borman Fox Benefiel M offatt Staub A. Shields Smith Krohn ke NV. Carson g Booker Strahorn Brock Hardin H. Koep Earl orth llsw Baird 2 Anderson Robinson A. Carson Dickson F. Shields 1 i A. Koepl Kuhnhausen Sundeleaf Thompson Wyatt Three hundred thirty-one Hunt BETA THETA PI Founded at Miami University, August 8, 1839 BETA RHO CHAPTER Installed December 4, 1909 FRATRES IN FACULTATE Frederick G. Young, Timothy Cloran FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Kenneth Bartlett, Curtiss Peterson, Herald White, Percy Boaltman, Forest Watson, Henry Fosfter 1921 Thomas I. Chapman, Donald Feenaughty, Richard Martin, Lawrence Woodworth, George Beggs, George Cusick, Everett Brandenberg, .Warren Edwards, Herman Edwards, Ralph Dresser, Howard Kelley, Arthur Vandevert, Franklin Miller, Ward McKinney, Paul Foster 1922 Roger Plummer, Eugene Kelty, Wolcott Buren, Fred Lorenz, Walter Cofoid, Francis Jackson, Martin Howard, Clifford Manerud, Wayne Akers, Sterling Patterson, Donald ' McDonald 1923 Lawrence Manerud, Reed McKinney, Ralph Smith, Delbert Oberteuffer, Hugh Clerin, Pierre Meade, Owen Galloway, John Langley, Morgan Staton, Jesse Digman, Carrol Akers' Three hundred thirty-two Three hmtlmm Boggs Kelley Cufoid M C l wmlld hundred Watson Cusick Vannlcvort Jackson L. lenvrud Cullowuy thirty-three Bartlett Foster Brandenberg Miller Kolty R. McKinney Langley Peterson Chapman P. Foster XV. McKinney Howard Smith C. Akers White Femmughty NV. Edwards Plumm er 0. Manerud Clerin Digman Martin H. Edwards Buren XV. Akcrs Oberteuffer Statou W 00d worth Dresser Lorenz Patterson Mead ALPHA TAU OMEGA Founded at Virginia Military Institute, September 11, 1865 OREGON GAMMA PHI CHAPTER Installed February 25, 1910 FRATRES IN FACULTATE John Straub, John J. Landsbury, John Stark Evans, Peter Crockatt, Karl Onthank FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Chester Adams, Morris Morgan, Franklin Folts, Ernest Nail, Philip Janney, Robert 1 Riggs, Basil Williams 1921 William Bl-ackaby, Ernest Williams, Raymond Burns, Lynde Smith, Rex Stratton, Paul Pease, Richard Lyans, Odine Mickelson, George Hopkins, Joe Williams, Ernest Crockatt, Sylvester Burleigh 1 1922 Harold Simpson, Asa Eggleson, James Whitaker, Sanfred Gehr, Ormand Hildebrand, Walter Hempy, Charles Huggins, Virgil Cameron 1923 Ralf Couch, Frank VanderAhe, Karl VanderAhe, Verne Fudge, Rufus Dinwiddie, Albert Curry, Mertin Folts, Georvg'e Riggs, Wayman Williams, Lee Bown, Arthur Bushman Three hundred 1thirty-four IANJM bmnhL mumm mint. "3m It ha-.. Three Janney Smith Crockatt Hempy K. Vandcr Ahe Adams R. Riggs Stratton Simpson Huggins Fudge W. Williams hundred thirty-five Morgan B. XVilliams Pease Eggleson Cameron Dinwiddie Bown F. Folts Blackaby I Ayans Whitaker Burleigh Curry Bushman Nail E. XViHiams Mickelson Gehr Couch M. Folts J. Williams R. Burns Hopkins Hildebrand F. Vnnder Ahe G. Riggs SIGMA CI-II Founded at Miami University, June 28, 1885 BETA I OTA CHAPTER Installed November 27, 1910 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Creston Maddock, Sam Bullock, Lee Hulbert, Lynn McCread'y, Charles Crandall, May- nard Harris, Waltei' Kennon 1921 Earl Leslie, William Reinhart, William Coleman, Keith Leslie, Victor Bradeson, James Richardson, John Moore, Julian Leslie, Robert Cosgriff, Acie McClain, Leslie Carter Jr., V Me-arl Blake, Ben Breed, John Elder, Raymond Vester, Cleo Jenkins 1 1922 Stephen Smith, Robert Hays, Philip Johnson, Melvin Murchie, William Patterson, David Logan, Frank Hixll, Sidney Robinson, Charles Lamb Jr. 1923 , John Burch-torf, Rutherford Brown, Floyd Maxwell, Austin Hazard, Stacy Hendrix, Thomas Watters, Wilbur Wilmot, Clarence Gray, Frank Bosch, William Poteet, John Palmer, Ogden Elwood, Holt Berni, Horace Byler ' Three hundred thirty-six Ila rris Richardson Breed Patterson M :lxwell Thwo hundred Mudxlock Kennon Moore Elder Logan Hazard Poteet thirty-seven Bullock E. Leslie J. Leslie Vester Hill Hendrix Palmer Hulbert Reinhart Cosgriff Jenkins Robinson Watters Elwood McCreudy Coleman McClain Smith Lamb VVilmot Berni Crandall K. Leslie Carter Iluys Burchtm'f Gray Bylor Brudoson 131a ke M urchic Brown Bosch PI-II GAMMA DELTA Founded at Jefferson College, April 22, 1848 EPSILON OMIORON CHAPTER Installed October 1, 1911 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE . 1920 Joseph Hedges, DeWitt Gilbert, Lyle McCroskey, Herman Lind, Lyle Bain, Arvo Simola, Dow Wilson, Keith Kiggins, William Allyn 1921 John Houston, Leith Abbott, Carl Knudsen, Kenneth Comstock, Haseltine Schmeer, Samuel Lehman, William Ralston, Francis Jacbbberger, Joe Trowbridge 1922 Artlmr Ritter, Vincent Jacobberger, William Bolvger, Roscoe Hemenway, William Smith, Ogden Johnson, John Tuerck, George La Roche, Lawrence Grey, Wesley Frater, Charles RObinson, Luther Jensen , 1923 Lynn Holt, Hubert Jacobberger, Francis Kern, Herbert Darby, James King, Nelson English, Wilbur Phillips, Aubrey Furry, Elmer Cook, Harrison Huggins, Willard Ables, Harry Hollister, George Royer, George Sensenich ,2, Three hundred thirty-eight 2-.....7 9 9 m'TW'-"m-wmn-murwwn $ pa ? .2r312m I R sank. Hedges Gilbert McCroskey Bain Simola. Wilson Kiggins Knudsen Comstock Schmeer Lehman Ritter V. Jacobberger Bolger Hemenway La Roche Grey Frater Robinson Kern Darby King English Huggins Hollister Ables Three hundred thirty-nine Allyn Ralston Smith Jensen Phillips Royer Lind Houston Abbott F. Jacobberger 'J' 1'0wbr1'dgc J ohnson Tuerck Holt II. Jnoohhergor Furry Cook Sonsenich PHI DELTA THETA Founded at Miami University, December 26, 1848 OREGON ALPHA CHAPTER Installed May 30, 1912 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE POST GRADUATE Floyd South 1920 Irving Smith, Harry Jamieson 1921 Walter Banks, William Steers, Hollis Huntington, Lee Waldron, Kenneth Lancefield, Joe Ingram, Edwin Durno, Edward Ward, John Gamble, Everett Pixley, Wilbur Carl, Thomas Strachan, Ray Dunn, Dwight Phipps, Paul Smith, Ben Ivey, Robert Boetticher 1922 Russell Meyer, Borden Wood, George Black, Marc Latham, Fred Mtain, Wilbur Hoyt, Martin Parelius, Rodney Smith, Paul Farrington, Claire Keeney, Alfred Adams, Roscoe Roberts, Pierce Cumings, George Stearns 1923 2 Lionel Trommlitz, Hugh Latham, George King, Matthew Duffy, Frank Holmes, John Gavin, Hobart Belknap, Kenneth Cockerline, Richard Dixon, Fred Dunn, Robert Mann, James Pearson Three hundred forty $35? W411"? RN... k '33.??5329 2' , ., 35$ Huntington Steers Jamieson Banks Boetticher Ivey Lancefield R. Dunn Ingram Carl Ward Gamble Dumo Wood Farrington R. Smith M. Latham Black Stearns Keeney Meyer Adams Cummgs King Trommlitz Holmes Gavin Bclknap Pearson F. Dunn Dixon Three hundred forty-One AH MI", , 7.,72, $1 1NUF'WIJI4CVMVW DELTA TAU DELTA Founded at Bethany College, February, 1859 GAMMA RHO CHAPTER Installed November 15, 1913 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE - POST GRADUATE Louis Bond 1920 Lay Carlisle, Victor Chambers, Paul Downard, Horace Foulkes, Ray Kinney, Mortimer Brown, Robert Case, Dwight Parr, Harvey Madden, Elmo Madden, Robert MacKenna, vWilliam Gerretsen, Bruce Yergen 1921 9 Claire Holdridge, Carlton Weigel, John Brack, Rollin Woodruff 1922 Donald Portwood, Thomas McCoy, Elmer Bettingen, Guy Sacre, Raymond Lawrence, Kenneth Smith, Edward Twining, William Collins, Prince Callison, Houston Medley, Crecene Fariss, Arthur Medler, Wilbur Hostetler, Kelly Branstetter 1923 Meredith Beaver, Frank Clark, George Crosiield, William Silverthorne, Arthur Base, John Alexander, Clayton Ingle, Arthur Larson, Kenneth Condon, Lee Wilson, Ranie Burkhead, Conrad Roth 99 ,. total on. Three-hundred forty-two Carlisle Bond Chambers Downard Foulkes Broxwx Case Parr Kinney Madden E. Madden MacKenna Gerretsen Yergen Holdridge Weigel Brack Woodruff Portwood McCoy Bettingen Sacre Lawrence S mith Twining Collins Callison Medley Fariss Medler IIostetler Roth Branstetter Beaver Clark Crosfleld Silverthorne Base Alexander Ingle Larson Condon Wilson Burkhead Three hundred forty-three SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON Founded at the University of Alabama, March 9, 1856 OREGON BETA CHAPTER Installed November 8, 1919 FRATRES IN FACULTATE D. Walter Morton, Warren Dupre Smith FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Guy Armantrout, George Harris, Newton Bader, Francis Wade, Norman Philips 1921 Harry Lindley, Chandler Harper, William Beck, Spencer Collins, Wilbur Hulin, Clive Humphrey, Earl Powers '1922 Carl Liebe, Jay Butler, Forrest Littlefield, Stanley Eisman, Arthur Hicks, Erwin Lude-- man, Warren Kays, Albert Woertendyke, William Sharkey, Lawton McDaniel, Joseph Meagher, William Purdy, Adrian Rouslow, Frederick Howard, Thomas Tuve, Ray Mooers Herbert Decker 1923 Frank Carter, Lynn Fuller, William Gassaway, Willis Kays, Harry Myers, Eugene Mc- Entee, Donald McDaniel, Kenneth McHaley, Fenton Ford Three hundred forty-four ' "Vii!'54nun.qufmtaammudu;luwxxtun.Ar n- s m. . . Armantrout Harris H arper Beck Liebe Butler W. Kays Woertendyke Howard Tuve Fuller Gassaway Three hundred forty-five Collins Littlefleld Sharkey Mooers Myers Hulin Eisman L. McDaniel English D. McDaniel Lindley Humphrey Hicks Meaghcr Decker McHaley Powers Ludeman Rouslow Carter Ford OWL CLUB Founded at the University of Oregon January 5,91919 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 R. Lindsay McArthur, Roy L. Davidson 1921 Don D. Davis, Alexander G. Brown, Merritt Whitten, Stanley Lowden, E, Stanley Evans, Clares Powell, Lyman Meador, Lee Summerville, William Porter, JacOb Jacobson 1922 James Say, Harry Ellis, Ge'Qrge-W'alker, Clyde Davis, John Dierdorff 1923 Walter Taylor, Ransom McArthur, Charles Hayter, Elwyn Craven, Glenn Campbell, Clarence Walker, Cecil Bell, Raymond G. Whitten, James Ross Three hundred forty-six R. L. McArthur Davidson D. D. Davis Brown Whittcn Lowden Evans Meador Summervillc Porter Say G. Walker C. K. Davis Taylor R. McArthur Hayter Craven Campbell Walker Bell Ross Three hundred forty-seven $322 C 22949 S-MARALDA Founded at the University of Oregon, October '12, 1919 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 George Shirley, Byron Foster 19219 Harold Lee, Harold Mannel, James Bent, Howard Wines 1922 Edgar Harris, Malcolm Hawke, Harold Quayle, 9Fred Michelson, Percy Lasselle 1923 Harold Michelson, Allan Oden, Stanley Stickle, Ralph Taylor, Wilson Gaily, Guy Koepp, Elton Lasselle Three hundred forty-eight 311311.: $ Shirley Harris P. Lasselle Gui 13' Three hundred forty-nine Foster Hawke H. Michelson Taylor Wines F. Michelson Stickle E. Lassellc BACHELORDON FRATRES IN FACULTATE Frederic S. Dunn FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Norris Jones, Leo Cossman 1921 Cecil Ross, Lyle Bartholomew, Joseph Mizner, George Guldager 1922 Oliver Hargrave, Elsworth Lucas, Sherman Rees, Albert Combs, Alfred Pa'yne, Daniel Welch, Vergil Porter, Stanley Allen, Ronald McIntosh, John McCourt, Herbert Graham , 1923 - Lester Wellington, George McFaul, James Benedict, Dan Woods, Cleo Kirk, Paul Patterson, Berrialn Dunn, Joseph Erickson, Dolph Craig, Leslie Nunn I ' Three hundred fifty Ki ; 2 1920 L'lr-J w Jones Bartholomew Mizner Graham Hargrave Lucas Welch Porter Hunt Wellington Three hundred fifty-one Ross Payne McIntosh Woods Kirk Cossmun Allen Combs McFaul Erickson Guldugcr Revs llcCourt Benedict Patterson FRIENDLY HALL POST GRADUATE C. C. Clark, Miles McKey 1920 Edwin Cox, Loran Ellis, Thomas Hardy, Wily Knighten, Ralph Milne, Norris McKay, ' Richard Thompson 1921 Evon Anderson, LeRoy Anderson, Raymond Boyer, Clyde Davis, Ralph Hoeber, Ray- mond Jones, H. W. King, Oscar Kauffman, Homer Mornhinweg, Charles Parker, Elmer Pendell, William Russis, Vern Ruedy, Paul Stone, Carlton Savage, Maurice Selig, Chester Sorenson, Joe Rex 1922 F. C. Adams, Arthur Campbell, Russel Christiansen, Remey COX, E. C. Clark, George Duke, Wayne Hunt, Leo Hertlein, Vincent Hilary, John Hillary, Ralph Johnson, Frank Jue, Dan Lucas, Louis Latimer, Nicholas Michels, I. F. Phipps, Leslie Peery, Delmer Powers, Raymond Porter, Hugh Reed, Harry Skyrman, Francis Shrode, James Sears, Richard Shimm, Robert Tapp, Horace Westerfleld, Walter Wegner, Arthur Johnson, William Nygren, Charles Woolfolk, Elmer Neely, Raymond Goff, Frank Trahn, H. G. Scrivner, Rex Yamashita, J. Frahm 1923 A. E. Averill, Ezra Boyer, Virl Bennehoff, James Baker, Earle Coburn, George Houck, Carl Jacquet, Newton Langerman, G. Leach, Clinton Mercer, Ralph McClaiiin, William Martin, Albert Niemi, John Sass, Alex Shipe, Harry Sherman, Mear'l Snyder, B. A. Var. Loan, Donald Wilkinson, Tom Voorhies Three hundred fifty-two sh :Wmmmmm: l I Clark McKey Milne Hardy E. Cox Knighton ; Ellis Thompson Savage L. Anderson E. Anderson V. Jones W Russis Pendell King Kauffman R. Boyer Stone 1 Selig Ruedy I-Ioeber Davis Parker Scrivnor L Yamashita Westerfield Campbell R. Cox Michels Phipps ' Wegner Sears Porter Skyrman Adams Shim 3 Lucas Reed Momhinweg Duke Johnson Juc 1 Three hundred fifty-three TFIPD Snyuer E. Boyer Shipe Bennehoff Latimer Van Loan Wilkinson Leach Houck N eely av L... ........,.......u.u :11. weal r: .,, . ,4. un. Muu.anBMWI-WM 7 i??? ' Ht Peery Christiansen Langerman Sass Mercer Martin Goff Powers S chrode McClaftiin Sherman Baker A. J ohnson Frahm Hertlein Voorhies yg Woolfolk Three hundred fifty-four if!!! a 5.5? yrs. pm 3 uncut! H vmm M P-S-S-S-S-ST ! You have come to the section of frivolous fiction. You have neared the department of defunct dope, of deadly defamation. Womaxhts deh- ficteucies, mauts idiosyncrasies, are on the next pages pictured ptttlessty. If , you have a deep-Tooted sense of any kind at all, and 7-esent the framing of libelous writers, halt before you place your manicured tips on the next leaflet. But if, perchahce, you are in the same brainless condition as the editors of the department, proceed-but at your own risk. The law cannot punish the weak of mind. For the convenience of some it might be mentioned that htp-pocket howitzers may be purchased at the corueu drug store. Peace be with thee! PAUL FARRINGTON tCustodum of the Spiritsj bx? 1730 W5 W OUR DICTIONARY tCompiled with more or less cam f0? the benefit of anybody who wishes to be benefitedj ABSENCE tSee CUTye-What makes the heart go iipotato-potato." Very noticeable at 8 o clocks. What follows flunking out While on proba- tion. ANCIENT-Type of humor served daily by Dr. Cloran. How the head of a girlsi house feels. tApparentlyJ BUNK-What you tell her in the moonlight. What she answers back. What fraternity men sleep in-eif sufiiciently tired. BEANSeBald roofs of college professors. Curse of a fraternity house dinner. What you find you donit know about examinations. CUTeWhat you do to 8 o clocks. What she did with her date with you. Punk system used by the registration department. DOG+What she ought to take when she tells you how sorry she is that she cant go. Part of a sandwich. When used before GONE is Y. M, cuss word. DATEeSweet fruit. ,Ditto state of affairs. See PRUNE. DUMP-What a prof. thinks your mind is. What it is. Plural-a state of mind. ' DENTISTRYeWork done on the teeth. See KISS. DAVENPORT-Article of furniture on which some, of the boys get their gym training. . EASYeKind of course you think you,re getting. How she lets you down if sheis tender-hearted. AnteType of course you get. EMERALD-Chapter publication of the Fijis. Color your gills feel when youire discovered in the graveyard. FRIENDeWhat you decide you,ll always be to him. AnteWhat you are after he invites somebody else to the house dance. FISH-What you get on Friday instead of beans. What him and her donit do when they go up the race. GOOF-Bird who says tiYes when the barber queries, "Wet or dry. 7" and takes a camp stool when he goes p1cn1c1ng up the race. PUHViini m huh. hauling WMQWV WW WV rkhum 'V'I'r'wu 14.11;. aggg a ,L 4w . .m fv- r :. VFEQ mex, E, V :IBELIEVE A'ng - WORD 0F V? ?RoF. GILBERT SI THUNDER :J "mam S BLO'FKEDE r .5 W. V; VV KK Auwg'i" .. I I'm A BELTS ARRIVE Fan i THEM EIGHT O'CLocK, hfnagfyv.w W .- II " jg Cawf; $ix 43?; Kim PRESIDENT . ,, mg as" .wm Three 'M-v....m.-...-.- -r....I..-y -. -7 .w. V n-uu-uxmg. ml- HOW TO BEHAVE IN A SORORITY HOUSE 03:11 Our Behavior EditorJ N ever knock on the door or ring the bell When you Visit a women,s fraternity house. Somebody might see you and think you arenit ac- quainted. Fox trot breezily up on the front porch and should you think any other bird is watching you, Whistle something catchy. No doubt he Will think you are draw- ing one of the queens for the even- ing,s entertainment. Open the door w"' softly for about 14 inches and, l H u - sticking your pompadour through SBY H00 HOOl the opening, yell ttHoo-hoo!i1e just as though you were paging a ginger snap. This is to give warning in case some jay Who has beat you to the parlor is engaged in stealing a kiss from one of the sisters Who may have left a box of these delicious confec- tions on the davenport. After you have entered, throw your hat somewhere. It doesn,t make any particular difference Where-just so you throw it. This always shows that you donlt care much about a mere hat, that you could buy another if you Wished, or that the one you heaved belongs to one of the. brothers Who didnit draw on the evening in question. - If the housemother is hanging around, yell, ttHello, Mabel!" or iiHello, Isabelle? or Whatever her first name chances to be. By all means call her by her first name. This Will make a decided hit With her. In all probability none of the other guests have named her initial handle, and she Will appreciate your interest. If you haven,t learned her Iirst name, call her Evangeline or anything that comes to your mind. She Will im- mediately notice how much at ease you are and Will undoubtedly remem- ber you; Always show a marked preference for the head of the house. This may help out some time; tref. page 36, par. 2, iiHOW My Girl Lost a Month of Week-End Dates," by Edwin Durnol. If she doesnlt happen to see you when you come in, amble over and slap her on the back, speaking thus: Four i a;W-m WW - Wham WT'aj-d'h: v.21; . Li :.hl:i 'uht; r. yhma . kn. Ii": .yihm .hh: "tr ihui h.w. 5: natn-m: iQu-tuuu lun'ui " .Chw: 'L w: A 4-... A :eixwz we r; V itBuenas noches, cutie." Nothing will fetch her over to your side if this fails. At the same time she Will notice you speak Spanish fluently. This done, step lightly over to the fireplace and expectorate lightly a couple of times in the general direction of the fire. Everybody will notice that you are perfectly at home and Will likely laugh, Which will show that you are getting by, or something. If by this time your girl hasntt heard that youive arrived and subse- quently fallen downstairs, pick out some lady on the opposite side of the room from you and inquire in a loud voice: itWhereis my lady friend- upstairs getting behind the flour?" This will let everybody in the room know you have a date and havent just horned in on the preliminaries, and it is entirely possible that they will think you one of the funniest fellows in college. If you think these rules too conservative, use your own judgment or refer to the exhaustive treatise on the same subject which has been written by the well-known social lion, William Bolger. ROGER PLUMMER-Jilf the dean doesn?t take back a certain thing he said to me, I shall leave school." HANK FOSTER-JtWhat did he say?" ROGER PLUMMER-iiHe said Pd have to leave school? :: 1 F53 -Wwaw o. J; l f5, .tiu$A,Mea.-. ' i o m d. -u awhg h. m 4 zyiowwrcw Ae , A A INTERVIEWING THE HOUSES I-IEADS With a View to expressing the truth, the real truth and a number of near truths about ments and womenis fraternities at Oregon, a feature section hound, well under the influence of something or other, was detail- ed to gather the following guff. On returning to the sweet-scented room of the editor, he reported as follows: ttIs the Sigma Nu fraternity an athletic honor society ?i, was my first query to Don Newbury, head of the house. At my right sat Si Starr, at my left Arthur Tuck, and scattered the length of the table were various other Oregon letter men. ttWell," he replied, with a deep growl, half laugh, ttI wouldnit hardly call it that, but we have been known to pledge an entire victorious interscholastic track team. Due to the fact, how- ever, that we have on the chapter r011 such men as Sprague Carter, Jack Newhall and Don VonBoskirk, we hardly need to be so particular as to picking men who indulge in the outdoor horseplay sports. Nevertheless we find the meat bill running rather high every now and then? After supper they called up Hal Connolly at the Tri Delt house, and begged him to come home and play for me. At first I thought that the old car with a fiat wheel was going past, but I soon found that it was Hal rehearsing a new tune he had composed. I left with a feeling of good nature however, for the boys had let me sample some of the contents of the Sigma Nu cellar vintage. A.Cb. "Sorens" EETmmq To THEIR ANNEX. "Sheis out in the annexf came the answer When I asked at the Alpha Phi house as to the whereabouts of their chief. I went thither and as I approached I overheard part of a heated argument as to who was going to occupy the back seat of the auto- mobile for the night. I asked if they were going somewhere and one girl said they werenttenot even to sleep unless the rest of them kept quiet. "Howis your house?" I smiled at the chief. She frowned. ttHow should I know?" she answered. "I havenit been in it this term. Us annexers " I interrupted her, ttHow are your quarters?" When I saw her expression I prepared to retreat. ttQuarters!" she hissed, as she took in the garage with one sweep of her hand, "quarters-we live in sixteenthsP' And, having prepared to retreat, I retreated. ......Ilf buuhuuum I$nd 1 .w.-: dune"? ooomooie $0.... 'uac.-t IQ'. t. 't -"uIOU't .n'""" vu-'"""' .. am 1'. THE KATPAS CALL A HOUSE IWEETING. "And she says to me," somebody explained as I was ushered into the Kappa housew but that was all I heard for somebody must have given a warning in code. Dorothy came down almost immediately. She always does. "What do you know?" I asked. ttNothingF she answered, but I knew better. "I just came over to spend the eve " I began. ttYou just think you did? she broke in. uerm class is just about to start. The front door opens easily." Being quick to get things, I departed. WHAT WOULD A BETA "THEATRE ?ABTY BE wneou'r now '5 I found Ken Bartlett shining the brass on the Beta popcorn wagon. Assuming my best interviewing expression, I leaned against the counter and coughed loudly. ttHow many?" he queried without looking up, ttIive or ten?" ttNix," I reproved him, ttI just spent a months allowance getting a sandwich and a cup of coffee at the Oregana. How are things with the Betas?" "Wellf, he considered, as he salted some corn popped the day before, "the stand is paying pretty well since I discharged Don McDonald as jan- itor and forbade Gene Kelty to go near the cash register. Stuffer Dresser takes care of all waste each night in case there happens to be anything to eat after Hal and Bula have left." ttHave you given any theatre parties lately? I asked, thinking of the beautiful society editorts welfare. After he had hesitated long enough to ask a D. G. whether she would have the peanuts with or without shells, he answered, ttNot since tUncle Tomts Cabin? It seems that one of the girls observed that the bloodhounds bore a striking resemblance to Don who failed to give her credit for being a keen observer and broke up the party declaring she had no aesthetic sense. The next show had some trained monkeys in it and Mac was afraid to take a chance? I had just opened my mouth to question further when a Theta came up to buy a weeks supply of chewing gum for the house. Immediately I was forgotten, and so I departed. Seven Some HZ. PLUDGES. I arrived at the Kappa Sig house, as if by accident, at meal time. When I was greeted by Stan Anderson at the front door I began to apologize for appearing when they had guests for dinner. ttNo guests? he said, with a sweep of his hand which in- cluded the mobs on all sides of us, ttjust members." We started across the floor but a Freshman, noticing my green cap and apparently needing somebody to assist him with some work, accosted me. "Do you belong to this house?" As gently as possible I broke the news to him that I'did not. ttOh," he replied, nbeg pardon. You see, Itve only been pledged six months and I haventt quite got all the brothers catalogued yet." I turned to Stan. "What kind of a hand has your fraternity been playing this year?" ttOh, itis been good? he elucidated. ttWere drawn pretty heavy, been lucky With the queens, and pretty well taken care of the campus with a full house." At this juncture the bell rang, and I lined up out by the Oregana to draw what I could at the house cafeteria. GAMMA mus AND SIGMA cms! wore: THIS ?RlNT I5 FROM A DOUBLE anoauasb "Pix says the worlds liable to come to an end any time? I heard a sweet voice re- mark as I entered the Gamma Phi house. Shaking hands with Doris, I reminded her that Everett was selling life insurance. "Beg pardon? I said as we passed the daven- port, but apparently we werentt even noticed. Mentally I noted that the makers of that davenport could get an excellent testimonial as to its strength from the Gamma Phis. Marjorie came up and said hello. tTd like you to meet the girls, but theytre all busy? Hastily surveying the room, I agreed with her. ttWhat do most of your girls major in?" I asked. ttGmeI she answered, and I observed that they should be given a rest occasionally while at home, but she said nothing. ttWhat time is it? I interrogated as I prepared to leave. She scanned her illumined radio dial closely and replied that it was eleven-thirty and that the boys would have to go across the street soon, and couldnt return until the next day at noon. ttSo long," I said. ttYes, it is quite a long while? she answered, and then blushed When she saw that I meant good-by. ' V i y. .I': t, !.l i a "I .x m ' L a 'i f 9 J -. Ditching my cigarettes behind a woodpile in front of the house, I approached the Sigma Chi domicile. After wearing doWn the knocker considerably, I opened the door myself and entered. I glanced at my watch and observing that it was 7:30 in the even- ing I knew most of the boys must be up-somewhere. ttHelIolt, I said. ttHello!" said the echo. I was about to tell the echo where to go when I remembered that echos dontt have a bit of tact or consideration when it comes to answering. There was no- body on the lower floor. Ditto the second. Opening one of the windows I found three men on the west porch. Taking the field glasses away from the one nearest me, I in- quired as to the health of Cres. Jerking the glasses away from me before I had a chance to test their merits, he answered that Cres was sober. On my way past the Eyepiece downstairs I found a note: uGone across the street. Be backesome time- gigs. lNTRODuc mq ATA. After putting a crease in my corduroys with my thumb and forefinger I knocked on the Delta Tau front door. I repeated. No answer. Finally somebody yelled for me to fall in. I did. Mort Brown, studying or sleeping or something on the davenport, proved to be the owner of the voice. Suddenly Bob Case appeared with a lengthy man- uscript in his hand. ttJust in time to hear my latest story," he explained graciously. No sooner had my words passed over Morfs head than Bill Hostetler arrived breath- lessly flourishing a telegram. "Listen to this," he elucidated between wheezes, ttwe've just pledged Hart, Schaffner and Marx? Despite the fact that I couldnt, after looking over the models around me, see the necessity, I congratulated them. ttWellJ, I asked, in parting, ttHowts everybody? As I closed the door behind me I heard somebody say, "Oh, wetre fit? r 2'th W L... "mm i , ,4 J.Jauw .m MMMMM 1 Mint. . WW "WW rm : a mer s n x g? . vat ax. .w r WHERE THE: a FIJIS GET THAT I found all the Fijis in the west wing, and when nobody wrenched himself away from the business in hand at my appearace, I managed to crowd myself in between some of the men and one of the windows. ttHellof, I observed cheerfully, and when I noticed the tired, worn look on Leith,s face I informed him heid better see Moody, but he came back at me with the statement that he could see plenty. It was only 9 otclock in the evening and I sat down when somebody got out the cigarettes and somebodyts 80 per cent hair tonic. Explaining that I was a busy man, I managed to drag myself away shortly'before 3 dclock. SUNDAY MOBN 0N THE THETH 'LIAWN. I I got around to the Theta house Sunday afternoon after everybody in the house was back from church. Spying Theodora talking to Dorothy Manville on the lawn, I ap- proached, not without dUe humility and regard for her station. ttHow was the sermoniw I interrogated. ttI seldom give them talks? she blushed, obviously mistaking my mean- ing, Itbut it was necessary this morning. It is so difficult to keep law and order. But I dontt think you should call it a sermon? I explained hastily that I had meant the preacherts. ttOh," she said, enlightened. ttWhy, our delegate hasn,t returned yet? ttWhat social functions do your girls enjoy most?" I queried, as I toyed with a hairpin which I picked up from the lawn. ttOh, Forrey,s!,t she answered without hesitation and with considerable emphasis. Granting that that was conclusive proof of the excellence of Forreyts tolferings and remembering that the Thetas had been holding lots of ofiices, I observed that the sisters were very active. ttOh yes? she agreed, ttbut you should see them in their setting-up exercises? I agreed with her but said nothing. Turning to Dorothy I asked if she believed in the cut system. III dof, she declared, ttand I don,t think they should chalk them against us? The words were scarcely out of her mouth when the lunch gong sounded and I was left by myself. After helping to their feet two of the less agile girls who had fallen down in the charge, I took leave of my- self and departed. .v 1:.mmtm- s ra-"ff; 431233324151... 3,? g 'm. Eh. I. '1 7:1 a raw K Kgiiwiilis , 3'5 I a U ,5 I.?.s : i. ft, Q A .m. oi'qmu - m- ':w m. "Iiw.u' Im...' .. W b g a t . Emr'A"m-h WA . 0: ax-rn '09-; .a , ,3. Way". awn, , t Hm, j S A ?ABLOR scan: 5: in! THE PI PHI HOUSE. ttBeg pardon? I said as a man answered the door, III thought I was exercising the Pi Phi knocker? ttYou did," he answered, ucome in and make yourself as much at home as possible." Assuring him that Itd rather enjoy myself instead, I was lead into the drawing room, where I was soon to find out that I was to draw nobody. ttWhere are the girls?" I asked a sour-looking man on the davenport, who looked like he might be connected with the place. tTm not a medium," he answered, giving me the steely glint, "and I presume the ouija board is upstairsF I felt out of place for having been born, but duty is duty and I had to get an interview. ItAnybody been robbed lately?" I quer- ied, trying to be agreeable. ttYes," said the man with the lime freeze expression, show- ing me the place on his vest Where his pin should have been, ttbut I think 111 recover my property if the service doesn,t improve. Ive been waiting seventy-two minutes? Find- ing I was to learn nothing I picked Up my silk top hat and determined to be witty. "Is this a meeting of the board?" I grinned, as I gave a last look at the individual Who appeared to be associated some way with the fraternity. He scowled. "This is a meeting of the bored? he answered, ttbut I think well adjourn soon? Realizing that it would be useless to explain, I left. Q "1:3,." WI $7 u I "'MAV: m... l, Miif Ye OLDB 5am 5m ALPH" .-. 'Wm. . m I T. I 3U . qETs UNDER WAY . I FIX 'e "'z'itrn -. I E :3; 9g J VIN a. i'an ; egg '53 XX 3; i "' :2 a 9; y 3: 'aeew t' w. ZJ V$ x S w Guy Armantrout was discovered shining the door-plate 0n the S. A. E. portal. I had hoped to find him without his cloth hat on, for once, but luck was against me. In answer to my query as to what was up, he replied. that there was nothing much but the board bill and a tea for the afternoon. While I tarried a parcel post carrier brought up a large box. "Pledge pins? Guy explained when I looked curious. "Any teas re- cently?" I asked, remembering that the S. A. E.'s had entertained frequently in the past. "Wellft he answered, ttI dontt think its come to that yet. Last term there were a lot of PS listed and ten or twelve of the boys drew flunks, but that, as far as I know, is as low as we went." Deciding that he was endeavoring to kid me, I offered him many happy returns of the day and departed. Eleven Htrff'fth " Ar rxmki rHauWw. ...c- ' i tttt'zmmwzgm.'95im s?! i ; awsawn'amo ::: W: ,2: P7 OZONE DE BANDQUNE ' , JWLP-Wg I was just considering the second story when an angel came to the door at the Delta Gamma house. Refusing to believe my eyes, I asked for Clem Cameron instead of St. Peter. ttWonIt you come iniw asked the Vision. Assured that whether or not Itd ever get out was the more pressing question, I entered. A hasty glance over the room convinced me that the student body was holding an impromptu meeting but when I expressed the thought verbally I was haughtily informed that just a few of the D. G,S were downstairs planning a get-together for the whole house. I explained that the ar- mory was not only inadequate but unavailable and got no answer for my pains. ttWho you gonna elect to student body offices this yeariw I queried the political boss when she appeared. No response '. ttHow,s everybody? I tried again. She shook her head. "Cantt tell you today? she sighed. ttCome around at the end of the month when we invoice? I looked around over the room. The Vision, like anysregular, honest-to-good- ness, self-respecting angel; had vanished. And so I elbowed my way out of the door. OUR STUTZ. THf'sT GOT rff c 5N m . x h Before entering the Phi Delt house I tarried long enough to explain to a passerby who wanted a ride that Phi Delta Theta so far as I knew did not mean jitney company and that he,d probably have to go elsewhere unless Everett was trying to earn enough to take a girl to the Rex. Making my way through the door I found Bib Carl sealing a letter. ttWill you take this to Corvallis ?" he asked; ttthe mail service is so rotten that I'm afraid it wont get there till morning." I agreed, and moved over to where Walt Banks was sitting. ttI represent the Oregana," I elucidated. He looked nervous and asked me to tell George hetd be over and settle right away. I hastened to explain that I was interviewer from the college year book and asked him what he thought of the present era. He blushed. "Oh, shets got the past one beat a mile. My influence " I interrupted him. "How's Eddie Durno coming with the women?" I queried. He re- plied that Eddie was declaring daily that if his girl didn't treat him better he'd never go out with her again-much. Asking for John Gamble, Y. M. head, I learned he was be- ing entertained by Mike Gross. And, after waiting two hours to see Hobey Belknap, George King, and Matt Duffy, I learned they were having a date over the telephone and gave up. ttGood night? I said as I prepared to leave with Dutch Cockerline, who agreed to go asfar as the Gamma Phi house. Twelve aOOthg-yr, "'- 'ICWUU :- S h v amok, OUR r o f" N mcenmfx s :0 A5 ?URVEYD'BS oF THE WquLY NolsES. Hesitating long enough to make certain that I was not entering the school of a1- leged music, I hammered on the A. T. 0. door. Assuring the man who answered my knock that I didnit want to hire an orchestra I was ushered in and was greeted by Chet Adams Who, before I had a chance to explain my mission, assured me that one of his men could teach me to play like Roger Plummer in thirteen easy lesson. Being frank, I admitted that I smoked cigarettes, drank whenever my friends had anything to offer, and was generally careless concerning my own welfare, but that I refused to get even with the brothers by any underhanded method like that. He gave up and some of their artists, including the ttnear" variety and the 2.75 per cent class, offered some renditions which convinced me that I loved music and made me resolve to hear some if. the opportunity ever offered itself. ttHowis your house coming?" I yelled at Chet. "Fine," he shouted back. "We,ve got the music market practically cornered." I made a megaphone of my hands and taking a big breath informed him that I hoped he cap- tured it. And then, noticing through the window that a couple of blue uniforms were making their way up the steps, I made my escape before the place was arrested for disturbing the peace. It was a warm spring evening when I got up sufficient courage and momentum to get down to the Chi Omega house. I shall always be thankful it was warm without. Otherwise I should probably have frozen to death and consequently entered regions Where it was too warm. I had no trouble in locating Grace Rugg. She met me at the door. My temperature shot down forty or fifty notches. I hastily explained that I merely wanted to interview her. Finally she let me in, and stated that the Chi Ois were giving a house warming. I observed that it was a good idea, and nodded to two or three sophomore girls who punched the time clock as they left for the library. In en- deavoring to get past without being seen, one of the girls, a Miss Studer, stumbled and fell down, and in consequence was instructed to check in thirty minutes early. "What has your house it I began, when I was interrupted by the appearanceof the Fiji house en masse. Naturally I was immediately forgotten, and I stunk away w1thout being noticed. Thirteen Tm DE LTS SOMETHI NC, THE: WANTED VAMPISH. At the Tri Delt house I experienced a preliminary encounter with Polar, the houses canine mascot, whose heart I found to be every bit as warm as his name implies. Finding he was content to amuse himself with one of my shoes, I paddle-footed up to the door and played the anvil chorus with the knocker. Curt Peterson, in all his blond splendor, answered my knock. "What do you want? he asked with all the coniidence of one who knows the girls well enough to sing their sorority songs at table. I eX- plained that it would take too long to answer that question as it should be answered and added that he might take my hat and summon the head of the house. Just then Doris appeared. ttWell?" she said. ttBefore I came in," I answered, "I thought I was. Howis everything? She smiled. ttOh, she,s all right," she replied, beaming at Miss French, who was evidently engrossed at the time in giving Curt her attention, a hard look and a piece of her mind. ttWhere are all the girls? I asked, observing that al- though it was Saturday night there was nobody much to be seen. J ust then the phone rang. Aladdin had nothing on that phone. Girls appeared from every corner. One of the huskier girls won the light for the talking instrument and in a moment a feminine voice yelled, ttHey, Marianne, Bill Blackaby wants to know if he can have the other two nights next week." Without hesitancy the answer came, itNopeeIWe got those with my steady? With that I stumbled for the door. BPKHELDKDDQI ,. x : $00 1, v THE "'flEDs' S-MAMLDH l. m 0 un FHATERNWY NURSERY . Here they are-all of iem. Good, husky, strong, struggling infants. get much dope on iem, but weive got all our money there strong. Bachelordon-S- Maralda-e-Sigma Delta Phi-Delta Psi-Alpha Deltanwl Club-all are with us to stay. 1 5.13 I; 'g ' ' ' Lw gJVLR Wv We couldnit .lwwuhtv Va. A 44hm .51 j: .9 4 J 'Vyu::,;gr.w Ii. "Jim? ' Irzg'srwwfv- :zaiviz, I I "w: XHNZE"?"W$33 warn: WIM : a P HIM..,, Mitten Nib. .y mG'u-n,. 0?.w'" Whit Ibbw Q'OHI' t w" mu... swap m v0. skvV.'nv;Mw.A:-Ve-ouovw Mwunw... - a o . J1 i..." as; Higher"? :5 agate" Walmaw vi. mama; :34 i it 3 , 3: ma- ws-i Um, wwww AM. mm 1 A: . m w sift ;V . 7W mew 1.. t s. , A :9 a .x Z a . any. 1. my- 325:" 2M V? g: ;. ig' x R 0 UR OWN I N TELLI GEN CE TESTS tNOTE.-A few months ago a leading iiction magazine offered a series of questions, classified, by which one might determine how well versed he was in those subjects with which he should be familiar. Since then Mr. Ring W. Lardner has offered questions of his own of the same nature, and we now feel it fitting that we, under the influence of Oregon spirits, set forth some interrogations which any Oregon student should be able to correctly answer. One of the features of our system, however, is that we care not in the least whether you are able to answer them-if you cant, all you have to do is to go buy yourself a lemon coce or get a date or something and forget all about it. A prize of one pint -bottle of perfume tguaranteed 45 per centl Will be given to the person showing the least in- telligence, which he may use in drowning his sorrow. Send all answers to Professor Wheeler, Doc Lucky-Curve Conklin, or somehodyJ MUSIC 1. What Oregon basketball man whose initials are E. R. D. took the twelve-easy-lessons course and will probably be the most unpopular resi- dent in Silverton this summer? 2. What Skinny blonde baritone gives private recitals every week night tSaturdays and Sundays includedl to a girl who looks like Nazi- mova but answers him tsometimesl to the name of Patty? 3. What Beta With a name like a sewer expert plays the piano like one of his brothersewhose father is a theatre manageresings? DRAMA 1. Who told Johnnie Houston he could act? 2. Give one hundred reasons Why Professor Archibald Ferguson Reddie is not on the legitimate stage. 3. What yell leader Who is called tlLoonXi and plays the part of the perfect lover in Reddieis plays, is a pretty fair yell leader? SPORTS 1. What Senior with a name something like Creswell is entitled to his "R" because of faithful attendance at'Mike Grossis rat chases? 2. What elongated Sigma ,Chi is the great indoor one at the Theta house? 3. What tiny Kappa Sig, who hopes to win one bottle of perfume, won the distance event in the expectoration meet of the Climax clubs? Fifteen ,. m. ., x . r i :l -.,, 1 v . , ;: nguwsWPEWthwmv i 1. 7 5;; "l-lelng:m:"-fp ? TERPSICHOREAN 1. What Gamma Phi and Phi Delt dance together as if they had a wonderful understanding? 2. What instructor in the romance languages gives at all the dances, interpretations of the Mexican arts, both physical and verbal? 3. Why do they do it, anyway? . ART 1. What Theta, Whose initials are B. 8., might, With Chuck Robin- son, easily serve as a model for a painting, iiElephants at Playii? 2. When will 1The Little Dog Laughed," by Dr. Reddie, be shown at the Lyric theatre? 3. Who are the ten greatest four oiclock fireside artists on the cam- pus? 1A1 Carson, Slim Crandall, Vern Dudley, and other professionals need not be mentionedJ ANCIENT HISTORY 1. When did Dean Straub and Fred Packwood first come to the University, and Why? 2. In What year did the Oregon Agricultural Gellege defeat the Uni- versity? 3. What were the Fijis? LITERARY 1. Describe the works of Shakespeare, James Fullerton, the present editors of the Police Gazette, and the feature section. 2. Tell why this section of the Oregana Will live forever. 3. Make a cross by the name of your favorite story teller. a. Mark Twain. b. John Hunt. c. Sprague Carter. d.Luci1e Redmond. 4. Why do the Chi Omegas have the Atlantic on their davenport downstairs, and Snappy Stories in their boudoirs? 5. What bald-pated, eye-shaded, English professor would make a good plumber or something? 6. What fraternity had pictures of most of its members published in the Emerald during the year? PIGGING 1. Who is Roscoe Hemenway, and Why? 2. What is pigging ? 3. Who started it anyway, and What insane asylum is he in? Sixteen l' '.fuI "M , I F5355 V ' " pica Y ' 1 '1 4;. x Cg; . I. -3 A kin .-.r . I l. ' V, 7., .. g In ' . ' $ . ' v I, wHY mom's V, 0 How you H. , , 5,? N4, -. MISS WEN M. , ' .7 1 cwwcs 511.5ch ?now prSON ' 1 ' 0N o'ngnQ I . ,waxss masY ' 130mm gill - - '1 . 55:53 msvmasu. l ' , j . LEITH qwss noonwaman ; '25 ' 5.41m A 9X5 A DmER'S ' ??- um. . . I k e vf wl'tr 03? m kw n A , $ '0 , W3 '4', Jam x -, - . . - ' I CA'CKLE 41.: rv'il UEBE Tm: : " E; 'K - - 'Xh " Them: 4' Louuqc :42 ' P NC, A. ' .41 .lWlJlW'Illqulzglzliun , ""MI - 4! , ., FRENCH mp ban. . wmuwwm ,, 5m cnmnnm's - 5.. . 2 . , , an WHERE W's ! .1, mman PENCIL i J QUIET FOR A GOOD ' Lowe 1mm. l ' ".i $Q$E ?QGQEEQ Mum Hum u. a . $x r tam. ' v THE SEVEN WONDERS OF THE THEATRICAL WORLD Archibald Ferguson Reddie Archibald Reddie Ferguson Reddie Archie Reddie A. F. Reddie Archibald Fergie Seventeen 1:; 1329:: rmx. 1d. e' . swmmnvu 45;..- wrmnar'a: Van mag. A .mw tharm .K ,' qwr, makmk y nmwmz Mfr v: a . , m. m", ,Lsegrmgme . c v wwamgmmWMm vn. gr 1 J... a . ; .7 L daimlnxm: ewes? mfia LIST OF OREGANA ADVERTISERS LuckeyTs Jewelry Store Meier and Frank Co. North Pacific Dental College McMorran and Washburne Winthrop Hammond Co. Walker Furniture Co. H. Liebes and Co. J. K. Gill Burden and Graham Hamptons Moore Milk Cure Wm. Klumpp Co. Eugene Clearing House AllenTs Drug Store Royal Bakery Mason, Ehrman Co. Romane Studio Oregana Confectionery Staples the Jeweler Lion Clothing Co. Maxwell Taxi Moody Optical Co. Swift and Co. Heitkemper Jewelry Store Chambers Hdwe. Store Woodard, Clarke and Co. GreenTs Haberdashery The Hazelwood M. L. Kline and Co. Koke-Tiffany Co. Hauser Bros. Seiberling Lucas Music Store Fred Ludford Kuykendall Drug Store Osburn Cleaners Osburn Hotel George Blair Fahey Brockman The Varsity Ladd and Tilton Bank .Seth Laraway Eugene Farmers Creamery The Club Coe Stationery Co. Glass and Prudhomme Vogan Candy Co. General Electric Co. The Flynn Shop The Portland Hotel Bushnells Studio Butterfield' Bros. Lennons Multnomah Hotel Oregon Brass Works Kilham Stationery Co. Wade Bros. Barclay,s Kodak Shop Imperial Hotel Sherman Clay and Co. 0. M. Plummer The Rainbow Confectionery Oregon Hotel Northwest National Bank Mountain States Power Co. J. C. Penney Co. University Book Store The McKune Studio Myers Electric Co. Rex Floral 00. Domestic Laundry Linn Drug Go. Red Cross Drug Co. Babb Hdwe.- Co. Imperial NCIeaners Hicks Chatten Co. LUCKEYTS JEWELRYSTORE Fraternity and Sorority Crests carried in stock for mounting on gold and silver articles Different sizes of Greek letters in stock for making into pennants and other jewelry Everything in Oregon Seal Jewelry and Glass Jewelry LUCKEYTS JEWELRY STORE Eugene, Oregon 1,920 , A 4!. , 827 Willamette St. e. 1.4M azak. Arm - ' A. mwsmm"1 .e VTV'e hazy. Tammi 1N man??? :T elmm; hi TA' Vzexgg'zg' " "ran. e mvhtk'JE-TJEV an LeTKQSIiXSJJ r. Mgm; . Infill :itlfnbi xnm$m ain't hut n50. 'I I mm: 'ytyillfll'l'lilll i5 Qxl a l 'Xx I 5. 9 , z . 7. . 9 N 1'! " 7' i 9 ur .- l. ., .i y ' ' 59 'f-- ,. " 2 l 1-H? i h THAT FBATERNITY GBP. IF WE MIGHT GRADE OUR PROFS CiProfessors May Be Graded.,,eEmerald H eadlmej Sincerely Pm wishing that grades I were dishing out daily to all of my teachers; they all would be harking to talks, and my marking would lead in sevlral new features. To any professor who proved a transgressor Itd hand out an F in a minute; and any bald pater who came to class later than two after eight would be in it. J im Gilbert and Howe would be out of school now or at least they would be on probation ; Ild watch close the clocks for the Deans Straub and Fox and theyld get naught but book education. If out after six all their dates would be nix; F minus would set them to working; each morn Iid want sounded all questions propounded and answeredetI wouldnt have shirkingl. Three times every week I would let Douglas speakethe rest of his force wouldnlt rate lem. Those study hall hounds I would kick off the grounds with a smile and my best ultimatum. Ild get out my hammer for teachers of grammar-theyld take it without getting surly. If errors were made they would not get a grade, and theyld turn in their stuff two days early. Theyid fear for their lives for Ild write to their wives tsure Ild have all their spouses addressesl ; and woe to the deans who could not use their beans and got below H,s or Sis! Eier I cease earthly toil and depart from this coil and meet up With the good deed assessors, let me give verbal roasts and a few thousand posts to our bald-headed college professors. ' Nineteen To the Graduates; We Extend our best wishes for a successful career. 1: , Ln 4- r: 1...: f Iv: I m 3 53 ' To the Undergraduates: . ,. ,. We ,exhort steady prosecution of study as the best W .3 "Ira I fouddation for success. it :2. To Everyone: We urge faithful endeavor in carrying out their respec- tive duties as holding forth surest promises of success. "The Quality Jtore" of Portland has studied well the lessons of Store Keeping in the School of Experience and Grad- uated with Highest Honors among the leading. Merchandising institutions of the Great Northwest. R 0 Established 1557 THE QUALITY STORE OF PORTLAND F mm. Sixth. Norrlsom Alder St: waif"? ,, 'szi ttmr ?.mem t t :x $23: 12:. m 3!? mm I.NII" gnaw hdw. ,, , s. e am, v V me x , .que amt usa; 5.;Atam ' :g. n It was a girls voice: ttKiss me again." That was all the head of the house heard, and if she had ever got a real wallop out of life, which is darned doubtful about heads of houses these words dealt it to her. She stopped where she stood. She had heard a feminine voicea tender as frat house steak and ev- er- Y bit as Twenty-one "1"??th 7: 7:34 NW musical as a barn door that hasn,t been oiled re- cently. The head of the house shuddered and looked as only heads of houses can look. To think that one of her girls should be doing this- and on a week- night too! Thoughts of the girls un- limited audacity gave spicy chills DID THIS EVER HAPPEN? to the sorority,s chief and the divine right of authority surged hotly within her breast. Cautiously she tip- toed a- cross the floor which was as shiny as a coa edts nose on arising the a. m. after a dance at which she was be- Witching. toYou I7, she hissed at the girl on the daven- port. "Up to your room lest I cop your week- end appoint- mentsft Cringing, the girla- now de- void of sent- j- men- talitya- beat it for her boudoir. And then, with a withering look. the head of the house turned and roughly shut off the VICTROLA. North Paciflc College Dentistry and Pharmacy PORTLAND, OREGON The Annual Session Begins October lst REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION Graduation from an accredited high school or academy, or an equivalent education --flfteen units, thirty credits. No conditions on the foregoing entrance requirements are allowed. COURSES FOR INSTRUCTION The course in Dentistry is four years. The courses in Pharmacy are two and three years. The length of the annual session is eight months. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS Prospective students, preparing to enter North Pacific College, should include in their academic studies physics, chemistry and biology. The pre-medical course given by many of the colleges and universities is recommended. FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOG, ADDRESS THE REGISTRAR East Sixth and Oregon Sts. Portland, Oregon Twenty-two "A9 ' BETA POPCORN , wsdalleb 5TP'ND' .114 u Ik4h' xkoe IBUY BETH W1 ramsf ""- f 'e-;-. $- 2 l - 2 w , e annuity i 4 Hum! BETA PEANUT STAND This imposing edifice was erected in memoriam of some of the former members of Beta Theta Pi, who during their prime, were manifestly the biggest peanut gluttons 0n the campus. This stand is considered one of the best buildings on the Oregon campus and certainly it might well be. Dean Morton has announced that if the millage tax bill does not go through at the next vote, it is probable that the University Will take over the building to hold classes in. T wenty-three 75g WVR3$EURKQ Nan SVnRZ 990A '1.st I?UU Lit: The BUSleSt Corner; the Best Store 1W" m and Right 1n the Heart of Eugene :n 1:: uh ,1 i Sax X . '1 This store is proof of an old contention of , wen: 'u :m ours-that prompt, courteous and intelligent , m w r x u service, backed by honest merchandising ' . . . . I?! m: 2min p011c1es, ultlmately wms. 'Ef aft: 1;.ng I Dry Goods, Men's, WomenEs and N am : Children's Ready to Wear .m. , 3N Phones in all Departments Rest Rooms Special Delivery Service Em" V 3 2g. T1" E5 11.! t, I! QRCCIRWMWMB 3m mm .4 FOR STYLE QUALITY f; ECONOMY Twenty-four THE PI BETA PHI ROBBERY tBeing a Presentation Founded on an Incident Which, According to Un-- reliable Reports, Occurred, and for All We Know Probably Did, in One ActJ Persons of the PlayeSorority Robber N 0. 1; Sorority Robber N o. 2. tThe sceneeweire sure but sorry that there needs to be one, for we hate scenes-is laid in front of the sorority house. It is an unattractive looking dwelling with a sign in one of the windows reading, ttFour-year boarders taken." There are a few powder stains on one of the pillars where some sister leaned her face while saying good-night, and since all the girls have gone to bed there is no paint to be seen on the front porch. As has been implied by the fact that all the boarders are asleep, it is some- where between four in the morning and noon. As the asbestos leaps heavenward, we hear the burglars quarreling as to which shall enter the house. Obviously Burglar No. 1 wins the argument, for he, after giving a loud, raucous laugh, knocks loudly on the door. There is no answer, and he entersJ tLoud whacks and bangs, apparently resulting from an effort to 10- cate any valuables which might be in the house, are heard, and Burglar N0. 2 paces the walk in front of the structureJ Burglar No. 2: "Why the devil doesnt he hurry? The dray will be here soon and if he doesnit speed up we will have to pay for standing time eand then we must yet hide the loot? tMore loud noises issue from the house. A silence follows. Suddenly the front door opens and Burglar N0. 1 comes out, slamming the screen after himJ Burglar N0. 2: 2Ah-at last. Pray, what luck, Archie ?ii Burglar N0. 1 tpassing over sacki ; itLook for yourself? tBurglar N0. 2 opens the bag and pulls forth eighteen hairpins, two half-bottles of hair tonic, two sets of false teeth, and a hank 0f hairj ,, The Burglars tin chorusi : ttWell? Iill be Curtain. Twenty-five -, Wm? 1-0-2an w - .qiuwy-Tjr w: - f H 81m vawt v af't" ' 5 a .Mr y... 1' u , r ' .:L t 70W- .ur. r; , ,z w .4 . - ... - . A A '1. V A. R q A ,4 v t w M .. , ' y W IL. Jr '1 .t.. .v . V g .e 4., A, ,; -.w.A e . e g u -A A v vamytymilqguik .A . .939, g A. w, , - , w; w 'r - :f'm, h . A wit V A A t . JVCJV - , H t1 AA A t 'v 14 K .5; A U A V .4 . 'M ,al azfii Do You Ever look at some well dressed man and wish you could could look equally well when you are ttdolled up"? You Can. The trouble with many men is that they buy clothing instead of clothes. If you want the best garments that money will buy, and at the same time not be asked exorbitant prices, come in and let us open up your eyes. We carry the best of everything in MENtS WEAR and you will Iind our .prices reasonable, our clerks courteous, and our store attractive. Winthrop Hammond Co. Winthrop Hammond, Pres. 127 Sixth St. I Portland, Oregon Correct Apparel for Men I have a plan to deliver furniture to you .NO MATTER WHERE YOU LIVE at a very low price. write for it. Walker Furniture Co. DEAN H. WALKER Ninth Ave. East and Oak Streets Eugene Oregon Twenty-six " awe; 1xw'uamuum ; Mam: EVWWI , . s .3 "1,, mx-aw HOW TO GET A DATE A COLUMN FOR THE UNINITIATED tEditoris N ote.-Due to the efforts of the sleuths connected With this column, some of the most renowned piggersi methods in securing dates have been uncovered. For the first time their methods are to be disclosedj E. Pixleye-stands on the Phi Delt front porch and holds up three fingers to his girl on her way to her 1 dclock. tWanna date for 3 oiclockJ Sprague Carter--waits at the Rainbow till desired girl makes her ap- pearance. Roy Sticklesespades the Delta Gamma front lawn. Kelly Branstetter-two winks in Spanish class. tLetis go out in the cem- etery and pick strawberriesj Clive Humphreyefinger in one corner of his mouth, nervously twisting his coat- tail With other hand.tGir1 takes pity and says, iiNo, I haven,t got a date for Forrey s dance. U Charley Haytereasks all the information regarding a girl and then makes her happy by telling her he has been considering her as a possibility for some time. Don McDonalde-drives up to the Theta house-iights off the undesirables With a small club. J ay Fox-borrows two Gamma Phi Freshmen for the brothers. Bib Carle-calls sorority house at 4 oiclock in the morning and tells girl who answers telephone that it is the Western Union operator speak- ing and that he has a telegram to telephone to her. 4W" 1 . . Wt , Mir"! Vglij: :11; .1134. L-LL--. Qxhw I ; M$7 l 1w 711m '. IW7771 W717! How John Lost Out With Maud and Mabel Twenty-seven hNewest Modesh hAlways" For the F ashionable Miss at this big specialty store of Feminine Finery When possessed With the thought of a charming new suit, coat, gown, or other garments of distinguished youthful smartness, think of the store which is exercis- ing every effort in presenting garments of utter dif- ference and extreme modishness, especially designed for the younger set. WM 360 firsfaytz'fxi? FURS gigAFuW h TWenty-eight u. '3 s M u, Q 5V3. THE GIRL WHO KNOWS Who is it really knows the most about the ginks from coast to coast, and those to whom they cater? The one who really most has heard, I ,low is that sweet lady-bird, the hello operator. She sits at ease massaging gum and listens in while some big bum gets off his nightly gaffingethe only time she stops at all while talkers lean against the wall is When sheis busy laughing. The hello girls, so rumor hints, are wise to new and old lines since these birds have dished out prattle. And ever since friend Mr. Bell improved the tube in Which we yell theyive made the house bells rattle. And then their pretty shell-pink ears hear lines of love that bring forth tearsetheyive heard that bunk so often. They know who J ohn is court- ing now and how, last week, while in a row, he swore he,d need a coffin. And while he whispers things to Nell they know he really lies like hell- he spilled the same to Mabel. And on another private line friend Mabelis going superfine while spinning Hank a fable. The girls they say come through as well, they canlt repeat the things they te11-the bunk they spill is pretty. Nellls sorry that she couldnt go last night to see the picture show-she went with John through pity. These college folk are all the same-the Y. M. head, the shyest dame, the lightweights, and the pious. The hello girls say all these dips could easy get life memberships and club with Ananias. I llow we all could learn a lot about those things we know of not and get our wires straighter, if we could talk to those who wheeze into the tube, ttWhat number please ?"--the hello operator. Homecoming Twenty-nine Isewaxmxrmmeszw :. . v saxzwr A99 ?'tmi! :13?th pf ' yup: e max": m, W A Gill,s OFFICE FURNITURE OFFICE SUPPLIES Stationery of all kinds, Books of all descrip- t tions, Engineering and Artist,s Supplies, Gift and Art Novelties, Engraving, Steel Die Stamp- ing and Embossing. 6 hoors covering a quarter of a block square filled with merchandise to cover your needs in the above lines makes this the biggest house of its kind west of Chicago. Fifty-flve years in Oregon. The J . K. Gill Co. Third and Alder Sts. Portland, Oregon -FOR-- SHOES THAT PLEASE College Folks Graham's 828 Willamette Street F ootwear WW ,4 ttThe Daylight Store of Eugene sells M erchandise only of Trustworthy Qualityh Dry Goods, Men's, Woments and Children,s Ready to wear e, For economy,s sake Visit Eugene,s only bargain basement Milk and Rest Cure The milk cure provides the neces- sary elements for the supply of de- flciencies in the blood and increases the quantity of blood to standard es- sential to good health. The Moore Milk C are Sanitarium Office, 908 Selling Bldg. PORTLAND, OREGON 149 Tenth Street . PORTLAND, OREGON , Engravers and Stationers Wm. Klumpp Co. Thirty I EE'KIVK 7" ??ha up " '5!nt I'm: 1U!!! m u I :1. Q Kath m- ,, QQW . b u H a K. h b - i .; i THE PIONEER Soon after this bronze image was unveiled a Freshman was heard to ask where the Uni- , versity got the fine statue of Professor Howe. Nevertheless, this is one of the best repro- ductions of an Oregon instructor. Note the whip in his hand. There is nothing slow about our institution of learning a all the latest improved methods of instruction. THE THIRTEENTH ST. CAR STATION The old car station has lost most of its former prestige. For years this was one of the gathering places for all the college roughs. It was once called the shrine of Lady Fatima. Now it is used principally for a billboard for the Universityis activities. Cheer up, old-timer, you have done your bit for the Oregon students and some day you no doubt, will pass. away gloriously in k1 cloud of smoke on the big annual bonfire. 3k :14 3!! SUGGESTED BLANK TO BE FILLED OUT BY ALL PROSPECTIVE PIGGERS AND FILED WITH CARLTON SPENCER 1. Name tfull or soberi ...................................................................................... 2. What is your opinion, so far, of sorority women? .................................... .............................................. tNo profanity will be toleratedJ 3. Do you like women? .......................................... If not, Who turned you down? ............................................................................................................ 4. How old are you? .......................................................................................... 5. How old were you two years ago? .............................................. 6. Which of the following perfumes do you prefer a. Lily of the Meadow. b. Gasoline c. New Mown Hay. . 7. Do you eat onions? ........................................ 8 Would you be likely to feel like decorating a girl with a pin? .................. tSafety, straight, and bowling pins barred. i 9. Write anything here .................................................................................... 10. And here ............................................................................... - ........................... Thirty-one tiltwi .v Q A giant '9 i572, mil j . E g; wait; 9,0 4. if "V; . situawahiwww m .etkfaiaa. $1 ffyvdiiyng: isttiaLVuM-m. ' w! M :evYLxrb mien. diam . ' . d'R 0th . "Hablt 1s a cable. We ,.. weave a thread of It g', every day and at last . we cannot break It." 3,12; .. . THE By practising thrift in our daily endeavor, it becomes a habitaa good , 3- t 7" habit, and one that pays dividends all through life. It means care and. foN H .m prudence, not only in the matter of onets resources, but in the matter of everything. To save time and energy, to conserve health, to build the body as well as the mind, the character as well as the bank account, is to practice Thrift. EUliENE ELEARINli mum: ASSHEIATIUN , Composed of F irst National Bank United States National Bank Bank of Commerce Thirty-two 3. u I I; OUR OWN QUERY DEPARTMENT ?; u '3 tIn accordance with the Oreganast plural-this books and George ' 3 Burris3apolicy of service first and 1ast-mostly lastewe have given space 3 i . H w to a limited number of the student body,s more deserving interrogators. 3; i If your query wasntt answered write a. letter to the student councilJ . 3 TO THE EDITORe-Please explain the law of diminishing returns. i I think a prof. teaching that stuff ought to be mill-racedr-Leith Abbott. 3 ANSESO do we. :3 - $ $ 3k ?k 31:; Quwg" A , TO THE EDITORaI proposed to a girl. She giggled, but said no- ' thing. Will you tell me what that means ?aDick Nelson. 3, b! I 33 " ANSaYes, we Will. 3 t e a In ; :1: :1: :k a: d . cm , TO THE EDITORaA While back, a girl informed me that she loved f me and was willing to run double. How can I know that she is really 3 c d g h speaking the truth ?-Ray Dunn. 3'" ,4 h " ANS.aOur opinion is that you cant. However 'you might test her by asking her to quit shimmying for your sake. I g 3 TO THE EDITOR-What are the three hardest things in the world? T: aKnowledge Seeker. . ANS.--tD A prof. at a Monday morning 8 otclock; m an attempt of a Camel to'get through the Sigma Chi house without getting smoked, and CD to spend a minute in the Kappa house after hours. :1: ax: :1: a: TO THE EDITORaWhat do you think of the Oregon Agricultural College ?e-Curious. ANSatDeleted by CensorJ Thirty-thfee :1.JaP;-: ' uu ,. A .. ex 391191.; 2 V3er 3 A A xv. PHONE 232 PHONE 232 MED ' x3 l a SIDNEY R. ABLEN 86 Ninth Avenue East, Eugene, Oregon Cameras and Photo Supplies Everything in Drugs THE PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST Phone 232 We Deliver When in Portland Visit THE ROYAL BAKERY We serve light lunches that are appetizing, yet moderate in price. We also specialize on French Pastry, Mocha Tarts, Small Cakes, Coffee Cakes, etc. ROYAL" in name ROYAL" in quality ROYAL BAKERY 8L CONFECTIONERY PORTLAND, OREGON RED RIBBON BRAND PURE FOOD PRODUCTS THE BEST OBTAINABLE J ellies Pickles Olives Condiment Oil Peanut Butter Catsup Dried Fruits Fish Spices Vegetables Teas, Etc. Dessert Fruits Sperry,s Drifted Snow Flour Distributed by MASON EHRMAN 8; COMPANY Portland Eugene Medford Astoria. Lewiston, Idaho Thirty-four - uh - wanifl ..A Ruiznk.:.'s: mam N1: m4 Logan ff m 23H 7w NJ r1525 13311 Yum? fir: E11. : in! m: tin! X. 1;, WHAT THE OREGON MEMORY BOOK TOLD I am the story of life and of laughter, Wonder of future, of hoping and dread; Days not forgotten in days that come after- Redolent pictures of things that are dead. Telling a story by silent portrayal- Hints of a story of Oregon days; Picnics . . . a paddle . . . in piquant arrayale Gloves . . . and a rose . . . and a bit of a phrase. Gentle reminders of college romances, Views of the bridges that yawned oter the race, Faded 01d programs of Oregon dances . Bringing back memories . . . lavendar . . . lace. Bits of a song that youtll always remembera Days of the year that remind you of Her- Then it was Spring for you . . . now its December- Dreams of What might have been, yet never were. Justotnce a jean ., Thirty-Iive- , m3. 5 -t;:w:'fpv1;i' 5:" i' "m? U ., leif H rR-ewiakwimrr a av. '57 i'w; .- ,5, muvwg rqu-meer, a ,..., ,u- 1a'irn'ur.1mm5:m,41"b-,:AW, 9:"th n-w a Wh0,s , ? l H a ?W'M Your " V'J': 0353 3 am. amou Photographer, . . , d K. 'WIJ 3" -J wry; :f :3! K919: . l. rfN 3' u... :l 7:; um 13:!" f I E 1'24? w: 4 39! :3? --.. ELI I T1315": Qua: 1 "'3! m mf'. 5.: 11', WHY NOT? . .., f 1' mama. :5 3 ' 333W!!! ' ' 5. WWW :a z . hen W UFMK! Romane A EM 7th and Willamette Sts. ; x. a .A- HJVWMEv$i$yTiiFWH "V A ' 1 Thirty-six RULES GOVERNING PIGGING AT SORORITY HOUSES As Suggested by Such Authorities as Donald McDonald, Bill Blackaby, Ores M addock, French M oore, Carly Weigel, H award Staub, and Professor Leland Coon 1. No man shall be seen at a sorority house later than 2 a.m., except on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays, When 4 shall be the limit. If not seen. he shall use his own judgment. 2. Housemothers shall be deaf in one ear and blind in at least two eyes. 3. A11 clocks must be equipped With illumined radio dials for the convenience of the other piggers Who might want to go home before you do. 4. All girls must devote their time each evening from 7 to 8 oiclock in studying unless they happen to have a date for that period, in Which case they may make up their work on the second Tuesday of the same Week. 5. Tobacco should not be chewed in the house and in no case shall the fire be subject to extinction therefrom. 6. No late entrances to the house in a noisy manner Which might disturb the thoughts of piggers Will be tolerated. 7. Smokers Will be frowned on except on week-ends, When nothing will be frowned on. The smoking of inferior brands of cigarettes by Wayne Akers or anybody else Will be discouraged. 8. Dances barred by Mike Gross shall not be indulged in. Remember you are ladies and gents and act accordingly. Dancing on the tables is. considered poor form. It scratches the varnish. 9. Piggers shall not swear loudly at each other unless entirely jus- tified. 10. Rules shall be enforced if it is convenient, but in no case shall any pigger be dealt With too harshly. Thirty-seven .Aank; wry muwam y 4 Anm'o-JL .4. w ara- . LUNCHES ICE CREAM The Oregana ELEVENTH and ALDER STREETS TOBACCOS HOMEMADE CANDIES The Student Shop Conveniently located, we are in the position to render the most excellent service. Your New Spring Suit Choose a distinctive model from the House of Kuppenheimer or one of our excellent values in Lion Quality Suits Priced at $35 to $75 Lion Clothing Co. Exclusive Kuppenheimer House in Portland Morrison at Fourth DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE Maxwell Taxi and Jitney CO. Phone 114 19 E. Ninth A Gobd j Placem; Mail Orders Given Prompt Attention. We solicit your Special Order Work. STAPLES, THE JEWELER--0ptician 266 Morrison St. PORTLAND, OREGON If You Can? See--- See Carefully filled glasses in all handsome new style mountings. work guaranteed. "We U nderstand Eyes" Sherman W. Moody the A11 m:nwx e A 'v r xmmeugmm : LP? w w .. .Azrpnw , m 3mg! hit b I b. . w ft m M stwwwxrma .ma'i. 2 .4- t .- ya": i :4, :2 2': A tnt'l. . X m' M: t A 1-;W Wtwruwem m9!" 'wuxxM i i ' ' ii: f' iiheag 1mm; war:- x- Li. a a r . m. y A g?tvgas-xi .; " s' 1 e 5 As ,A A w NW: Wt w e . W: Mefeagrme '- Thirty-nine ODE TO A STREET CAR tFrom the original copy done by the great master poet chosen by the Sigma Nu, Kappa Sig, Sigma Chi, Phi Delt houses and the Owl Club. This is a true translation from the Hungarianj V That flat-Wheeled street car gets my goat As down the street I hear it mote. It runs from dawn till one at night And pounds the track With all its might. Each cold grey morn at six otclock I hear it tearing down the block. Quite faint at first its tatoo hums But quick a deafining roar becomes. Five blocks away its hymn of hate Sounds like a boiler facttry great. Itll bet a priceless sack of iiour It bumps ten million times an hour. N earer it comes, and nearer yet, While I more irritated get; It rushes by With clanging bell, And With my sleep it raises hell. And still it runs, and as it goes Its awful iiatness grows and grows- Some day its seats some profs Will grace, And then Iill heave it in thelrace! -J. D. r- .5325- -'Aus v v: p.11! 7.; . - Jung; mu . neg, A ham gun. ham gm. m nvn Big Factors in Oregoxfs industrial progress and prosperity are the livestock and packing industries. The magnitude of the livestock industry of this state and the Northwest is partly em- phasized in the present daily capacity of the Oregon plant of Swift 85 Company at North Portland. This capacity is as follows: 4,000 hogs, 1,500 sheep, 300'cutt1e. During 1919 Swift 8y Company distributed in excess of $15,000,000 to the stockmen of the Northwest As an allied industry Swift 86 Company de- 'sire to state that its co-operation is enlisted in, and assured t0, the livestock industry of the state and elsewhere. Swift 6: Company North Portland, Oregon Furnishing to , Oregon,s Public Diamonds and Jewelry of highest character and worth for over thirty years has established the reputation of G. Heitkemper Co. DIAMOND DEALERS AND JEWELERS 130 Fifth St. Portland, Oregon MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED . Paints, Enamels, Varnishes ALL COLORS OF PAINTS, ENAMELS AND VARNISHES FOR TOUCHING UP OR RE- PAINTING FURNITURE OR INTERIOR WOODWORK. Electric Stoves and Percolators Alcohol Stoves With Solid Fuel CHAMBERS HIlW. Ell. LABORATORY SUPPLIES Full Stock Good Service Right Prices Our knowledge and experience at your command Quotations given promptly WHDDAHD BLAHK 8:. 60. ' VVood-Lark Bldg. PORTLAND, OREGON w: M My! "t n . $ . a ,... i W0... g. war ,3," w, H...Nu, -..v.., e... M t e. h :w : 1g I IA ,'.. EV! s eam: 38$; 353 I ll war" FOOT BA Ll. SLB- PARABLE OF JOBAB Jobab Goeth to College Now it came to pass that Jobab, son of Alumnus, set upon an ark and did journey into far lands. And strange were the manners and customs of those who dwelt in those far lands. ' And J obab took upon himself a color green and fasted. Chapter ILeJobab Coveteth Glory 011 the Gridiron And it came to pass that Jobab was of a mind to make the team. And he did array himself in his raiments and glory in the beauty thereof. . And when they saw him they were amazed, and all marveled at his understanding. ' Sore waxed the conflict and mighty the destruction thereof. And J obab bore the marks of cleaved hoofs and spat forth teeth. Then J obab knew that he was not to be a football hero and the grid- iron knew him not. g, a BASKET BALL uh Chapter ZILeJobab Playeth Basketball And 10 in the fullness of time it was winter and Jobab got himself to the basketball Iioor. Forty-on'e Then he who was coach spoke unto J obab saying, iiRun." And Might- ily did J obab run, until verily his knees wobbled and he knew not what he did. Then spake J obab unto the coach saying, tiCoach, I have run; what shall I now do ?" Then spake the coach unto J obab saying, iiRun more? And when it came to pass that J obab was entirely foozled, the coach put J obab into the game. And one who was a roughneck handled J obab Violently, causing J obab to lose much blood through the nose. t - Then arose J obab, saying, iiIt is well, I shall play no more basketball." BASE BALL - h Chapter I V.--J obab Disporteth on the Diamond In due time the Coach said: iiThere shall be baseball? Whereupon J obab kneweth that at last fame should be his. And to each player there was his time to bat. And when it came J obabis time, J obab girded fast his belt and prepared to destroy.. But it came to pass that there was no destruction, for though J obab swung powerfully, yet the baseball knew it not. Then did J obab realize his worth. J obab playeth not on the team.' And on the morrow his friends did chide him mightily, casting evil spirits into his soul. Forty-two 3 g m. mmfim;z:ma . w ,4 mm very: :55 Aw: $7275.33: w; tax H mm. In: v 7 m TRACK Chaptmn V.aJ0bab Winneth Honors in Track Whereupon Jobab, with enduring resolve, trieth for the track squad. And a track suit was handed to J obab, and he shiver'ed much but ran little. And it was made manifest unto J obab that he should run the dashes. And it was J unior Week-end and great masses were assembled to see the races and to give Oskies. ' And the runners for the dashes were placed in a line. And Jobab found himself placed next one of whom he was mortally afraid. And he prayed unto Allah thusly: 70h Allah, I like not the looks of this man, deliver me from him? And, it came to pass that the man heard, and when the pistol sounded he did set foot for J obab. Then verily did J obab lift them up and set them down, but there was one behind him; and Jobab did move them faster until his feet were as a blur. Then did the masses arise giving Oskies and saying, ttThis, our J obab, has won great fame for Oregon." Then did J obab lose his fear and the Oregon Spirit was made manifest unto him. Great was the glory that was his, and J obab did come to and set his foot upon firm ground. And may that ground continue in its firmness for Allah knoweth we wish him well. Amen. Forty-three WHEN YOUR WARDROBE NEEDS REPLENISHING- DONT BE ABSENT-MINDED. Remember FIRST Successor to The Haberdasher Inc; When in Portland Dine at THE HAZELWOOD 388 Washington St. 127 Broadway ' Appetizing dishes prepared by a staff of high-class cooks and served in an attractive manner. When motoring on the Highway you will appreciate a-- nice hot lunch at MULTNOMAH HAZELWOOD .MULTN OMAH FALLS THE M. L. KLINE CO. Wholesalers Fau1t1ess Plumbing,- Heating 7 Mill and Steam Supplies . 84-86-87-89 Front St., Portland, Oregon 4 Fortyifour SHE TOOK HIS PIN tA Social Novelettw Slowly The Girl turned over the beautiful piece of jewelry which she held in her hands. Indecision was expressed in her truly wonderful face ; doubt showed in her dark eyes. It was very quiet in the sorority house. For several minutes neither The Girl nor the tall man who stood near her had spoken. Over in one corner of the room a clock registered the seconds monotonously, and oc- casionally the fire, which sent a dull glow in its immediate vicinity, crack- ed sharply. "Donit-you want it ?i, It was the man who spoke, and his voice carried a certain sureness, had a distinct quality which suggested self-confidence, and The Girl, who could not but notice that his make-up, his entire bearing, made obvious the fact that he was positive as to her ultimate decision, was perturbed. She lowered her head over the pin which glistened even under the sub- dued lights. ttI hardlyeknowfi she said finally. ttPlease ment to think? A flicker of a smile showed on the mants face. iCertainly? he replied. give me a mo- The Girl turned and walked slowly to the end of the room. ttIn a way? she observed in her low, musical voice, "it will mean considerable to meea considerable sacrifice-efor me to take it. Ia-i, 7, ttPossibly you are right," he interpolated, ttbut on the other hand He stopped and allowed her to iinish his sentence. Suddenly coming to a decision The Girl raiSed her head, smiled, and with a final look at the pin which lay in her fingers, fastened it on her waist. ttI knew you would? the man said quietly, with a happy note in his voice. And, having disposed of the most expensive ornament which he carried, the crack salesman of Smith 8L J ones, womenis fraternity jewelers, snapped shut his sample Case and departed. Forty-iive '51 ? JOS. H. KOKE. PRES. AND MGR. A. R. TIFFANY, SEC AND TREAS. . . , i? RC , Koke-Tlffany Co. 1HE YORAN PRINTING HOUSE Inc. ' . w: , EUGENE, OREGON 1'9 5w" mill 35' Printers and . ' Wm": Book Binders . x, Blank Book Manufacturers ' 1' rj Stationers , , , f . Loose Leaf and Record ;; Systems J: 3 Bank and Office Supplies The highistandard of our' product and the integrity of our house are so well known that you can order by mail with absolute con- fidence that your work will be well done. Let us estimate on your next order L Forty-six . I m; An . 11:51?! WW. $35.9 : ... 3.....ka-uxmuz ASPIRING POLITICIANS HALT ! . uTHE ROPES OF THE GAMP 1n Three Hundred and Fifty-two and One-half Chapters With an Appendix By LYLE MCCROSKEY AND WARREN EDWARDS Given Away at Wings Meat Market With Every 15c Steak. FOR RENT Fine modern house suitable for fraternity. Conveniently located'fjust across street from Presbyterian church. Seventeen rooms and a chapel. Modern kitchen With ice box thrown in. Large storeroom in attic. Twenty- Iive siX-foot bunks in basement. Quiet neighborhood. Gordon 8L Veatch, Transfer Corporation. ,5... - 3 Q :x K -hK hm i m Rx Ne $ . . KI i 3 i :5 u; .3" "Lam .. :1 N I 3:. n :l- . .$ :23. ug :0. 33:3 V-w Forty-seven DKWHomB QEEETED BY AN ENTHUSMSTIC ASSEMBLY. : Alwayo Striving to Please E W335 J ltqimt jif'f'wh; l 3.0 H :13 IN? :1 3' n 'I ,y mum" :l m s; .51" :f w wt: .N'M'u CANDY, ICE CREAM, LUNCHES 778 Willamette Street C. R. Hawley, Proprietor kmt-Hl I L! Sure Financial Success- comes to the young chap Who expects to succeed, uses all his energy to that end, and SAVES. You will not regret opening a saving account With an established bank, and adding to it systematically. But you Will regret it all your life if you dont get the Habit. LADD 8C TILTON BAN K PORTLAND OREGON Forty-eight j CI- eWERS OF T: H HONEST SCRAP Founded at the University of Goshen, October 32, 1809 STAR PLUG 1 ? Installed With the University ; An undergraduate society for nicotine majors, having as its purpose the efficient manipulation of the cud OFFICERS Lord High Masticator 0f the Masterpiece ................................................ W. Kenneth Bartlett Handsome Holder of the Heidsick ............................................................................ J. Black Fox Grand Guarder 0f the Granger Twist ............... , .................................................... Bart Loughlin 1 Offlcial Physician ...................................................................................... R. Des Moines McArthur . 1; ; ESCHEWERS IN FACULTATE t j' John Eagleye Straub, E. Frenchy DeCou, George Fussem Turnbull, R. Hornrim Wheeler, T. Jaz Bolitho, Henry Showem Howe CHEWERS IN UNIVERSITATE 1 1 ' ,1 t 1920 n' Walter Chestie Kennon, Lynn McCready, Charles Copenhagen Crandall, Lyle Poplar Bain, Mortimer Brown, Sprague Carter, Si Lence Simola, Newton Y. M. Bader D e D . '5 1921 ' . .J 'F Alexander Grandstand Brown, Silas Starr, Carl Kewpey Mautz, Ralph Tacky Dresser, ' Mearl Blake, Thomas Scott Strachan, R. Climax Hoeber, Francis Jacob Limbe'rger jx d v h t w: . 1922 I ' 2 3 ' $ 1e Sidney Timothy Hayslip, Richard Sundeleaf, Eugene Erbust Kelty, Willimina Hoyt, n i ' 3 Prince O,Lyers Callison, Carl Rabbi Liebe, A1 Cazar Harding, Charles Confucius Schnabel t I , 1923 ' 1 R. Wynkham Sheppard, Thomas Baker Wyatt, Aubrey Aurelius Furry, Rutherford Brown, John Bryson, and others too young to be initiated ,, Forty-nine alum, 2.,3- g. ,.....a. . M 3 TWO STORES FACI NG EACH OTHER jewelry Store Music Store DIAMONDS, WATCHES, SILVER, JEWELRY ..:I't...4...u He..." M- 3 PIANOS, VICTROLAS, BRUNSWICK VICTROLAS, 2 i' . For years we have been collecting fme Dia- SMALL GOODS 3 , " monds for Envawement Rings and have a' , , ' 1 t 4? most wonderfulbczllection. Diamonds sold on Make our .store your headqugriers dfor fmus1Icla- 2 , 2 eqsy terms to Honest Students goods. We W111 handle your specm or ers 01' a y 2 2 ' 3 . thing you want. 885 Willamette Street 884 Willamette Street 3 Telephone 50 Telephone 1 SETH LARAWYY Ii DIAMOND MERCHANT AND 3 3 3 JEWELER 2222 2 1'32? - ' BLUE BELL 3 7 23 QUALITY-First--Last-A1ways 5 3 4 22 :3 BUTTER, ICE CREAM, MILK, AND CREAM 33 Made under the most sanitary conditions and open for your inspection at any 23 .32 time. Our cafeteria-style ice cream parlor assures you of Quality, Quantity, Service. : 2.3.77 Quantity orders or small orders given equal attention. We solicit your orders. 2 F EUGENE FARMERS CREAMERY 856 Olive St. 4 Phone 638 Fon smoKEs, PooL AND ENBOSSED FRATERNITY 3 32 BILLIARDs STATIONERY 223 3 3 THE CLUB 3 2:33 The Largest Parlors in Eugene 2333' College Men's Hang-out 2 T. C. LUCKEY, Prop. 941 Willamette Street ' 814 Willamette Street ' Eugene, Oregon Fifty 33,, ,3 1:3: . 2 r.,; -,., X W m I O 7 -3 62111 43 24- 4 . 3 15415" 2 V. ,: .r3f'.yb K 1-. e .4 1 WIN .,- n :3; : .3 VW mi" '1 1:; 'n: - .-.,-...u .- Au . a ' , ,' ,. -,- w .u , L, , 7-9 KUU - ,Mw u ,h A ,4: , .. 1. , , , . p w , " . , A a y, 3w 4 W. M, . c H V . , Mn 1 , -mg ..r-nzi!2;:t.$..:u,gz.,? ., . , A A, . . . M-NX FWfty-one m xv m1 ctFm L-I-r ' r ; Q VA: Vii; :1 x V UK 31 vxikif'fi : . WOOD AND STEEL . STEEL LOCKERS FILING CABINETS ?agafa-J'fm i FOR " ' SCHOOLS AND AND SUPPLIES M w J g , ' GYMNASIUMS 52.. gm GLASS 8: PRUDHOMME co. PRINTERS, BOOKBINDERS Desks, Filing Cabinets, Office Furniture 65-67 Broadway PORTLAND, OREGON OGANS CHOCOLATES WIN HER C ONFIDEN CE? EASY ! TAKE HER A BOX OF VOGANS. Use a little tact. Don,t brag! Don t boast! Sheql get your correct number by the name on the box. VOGAN CANDY C9 PORTLAND, OREGON Entering the World Electrical Y The graduate of today enters a world electrical. Gathered from the distant waterfalls or generated by the steam turbine, electric power is transmit- .1 em I: ted to the busiest city or smallest country place. :w' 1' 1"" " f f Through the co-ordinaton of inventive genius with engineering and manufacturing resources, the General Electric Company has fostered and developed to a high state of perfection these and numerous other applications. l I" . f f t And so electricity, scarcely older than the grad- J H uate of today, appears in a practical, Well devel- J r oped service on every hand. :jl'b'IC Recognize its power, study its applications to mum 1r .your lifets work, and utilize it to the utmost for "mu .q . the beneiit of all mankind. t M'UK N x General Electric cuss gizseziidfgf? Company 3313;232:221: 2"" "q H 'h-M': ; 1h: L Fifty-two e t a.?ewww... . . - " I V M 3'. I - t EL k : MP8: 35- KW w .K .2 ; 5;: mm. a! h. 2!. x 4WWJEumKAML.-wdb.kEmmm 1+ . .' , l holly; 1 VI: . .aammgggm-Aamv; W mm x . u ' -" v k: .4 , l A awn. n ,4': :. ' "'er-.WW?';W-rv "I - -' "w" ' ' , ,. b inf ., ,Mrv l, . C hoice Oriental Importations Gifts for every occasion Th e F lynn Shop 718 Northwestern Bank Bldg. lOpposite the Portland HoteD . The Porllg . Hotel W IN THE CENTER" of all things worth seeing and doing in Portland. Big lobby, all outside rooms, Wide porches, good lleats." We invite your patronage when you visit the city. THE PORTLAND HOTEL Richard W. Childs, Manager. 0. D. Schreiter, Asst. Manager. Columbia Bldg. PORTLAND, OREGON gblggdtydw Washington and West Park Sts. Photographs of Distinction Butterficld Bros. CLASS PINS Established 1880 PORTLAND, OREGON Fifty-three WHUS YOUR HOSIER? LENNON KNOWS YER. MAKEhHIM YOUR HOSIER. Phoenix Hose for Men and Women Headquarters at ' Lennon 13 Morrison St. Postoffice still opposite C. F. Berg, Vice-Pres. and Mgr. an; H35: gaww l- .l; ,,- l tau $12.5; alga . A .. l; , . ;..; lwm Kwiiw? mmrmmw 2102: game; . E g 'r? a usau, A a..wm,mw A - . - l 4A;:.;4-A .1 chngE ; 1:;1: .9" : .133 .2ge,$.,;-. .A .' 4 w, mvxmmw akwvmmmrw s..." .u .. mg , $Hq . - ,yrtc A Mun:me uva' . .. w as. .-.-.r.; -2 'A.AA w E: A V - 1- xv .L ,, ,, MT: E ;,.E-..E-x J.H:;-.w, , .,,,.: m; Al-u - v 7- w;..w.MMmQWW Wymg J f E E . mm; W ' 2mm XL a. x .1 x PM. L; I f .3 x ; . E v L i E x E , "A L 4 , V v , z , , E : ' . E . X 2? AJ 1.4 9,, i' . , V fr y e X, E J , .1.ng ., 3N .. . v -- ,,, . xm hwy .. ,,, 3V '" 1,. l V E w W a g 32 k E A , Multnomab 710161 PORTLAND, OREGON 2 ,1: Pacific Northwest, College and University Headquarters 3 Where True Western Hospitality Rules 600 E H Garage 3 Outside ' . if in f E 'l Connection E 'a - I F 3 v 5,13 E - "lLu- k Rooms ,- . a mix E f; WEX 2: ruin .533. E H E??? Huwwm awww ' 'm VL-m uyl J" rtmuunmggg! 4 at Y -;I' E C n C k. a 2:4? . a E quhe Palace Beautiful E DANCING IN THE NEW ARCADIAN GRILL 3; E Dining at the Muitnomah is an Enjoyable Event E' Eric V. Hauser, Pres. A. B. Campbell, Mgr. -' ; Brass Founders and Machinists Specialists in all Non Farrous Alloys l Name Plates-Memorial Tablets 7 Ornamental Bronze Work I COMPLETE STOCK OF Rods-Sheets-Tubes-Wire IN BRASS AND COPPER Oregon Brass Works PORTLAND, OREGON V. E - -1... fun"..-y...x. E... .7 .7.- .pl...h.h.,.:-.m -.,. . I- Kilbum El ta WA! H IH , WKDjBRE iffANA gym 5a CExquisit Society printing QOpperpIate CEngraving, Steel Die $mbossing sSatest Designs in Dogue for webbing anb other announcements Diplomas, ciommencement Envitations, QZarbs, monagmms anb Abbress Stationery GExpress gout personality Kilbam Stationerg 8: printing 60. 020mm: giftb anb QDaIR Streets WADE BROTHERS The Home of ' Hart Schaffner 8c Marx Good Clothes Fifty-five W' M amt 37:" kw o, yanv W. mmmmugw- f A . l .- 31' $ ks: $43.24;:va 2.1:.95 xu'." Wu .. 11 5, 1 NJ g E u r' t , ' a ,2 :4 mega; K .: 3f: 2:: is y w ., - a g 3.1, x y . y, ,. u 7 y ' I ' y x? N f u. 4 - a A a y 4, L , ,- m a , v , '1 m7 r, V o- y 1 - f n ,2 x 3 y I ... w 1 E : v. x ' - ,; , y i i w '7 1! 1., z. k '2'- ?x; Va; .9 g , , - . 14 x ,. x . A -7 ' '1. . - ,f - y o I b ' , .it 4" ,,,, o . I 4 n ; . v mun u-gi We thank you for your patronage , during the past year. Best wishes for a pleasant vacation-wwe hope to see you back next year. i ".moponhmmrmwu rrm-e? Ntv. o 61? A - u BARCLAYS ,KODAK I ; SHOP . 3; Kodaks, Films and Supplies Albums and Stationery i r . L Fountain Pens i 1 E ., k p C m ozimAWzrmtnmmW -4 u : P?I'SI; 3A, KODAK FINISHING ' Fifty-six ,, j All Students of the U. of O. are made , comfortable at the l Imperial Hotel I Manager Phil Metschan, Jr., Wishes it K 5 T5 .. i k particularly understood that he is fond ; . v j of the 'ttpep and ginger" stuff, and likes ; I . h ' I to see the boys get it out their own way l .H-. Rooms One Dollar and a Half Upwards l The greatest musical successes of the age . l have been achieved on the STEINWAY. 1 l: W 61,? Way The most successful teachers have secured lf the best results With the STEINWAY. ; e The most artistic homes are graced by the . 4 F l u h STEINWAY. . l i The STEINWAY is the Piano for those Who l l want only the BEST. 5 ;' The STEINWAY is the standard by Which all other Pianos are judged. The STEINWAY is endorsed by the Musical 3! l School of the University of Oregon. w" Sherman, Sixth and Morrison Streets, Portland, Oregon tOpposite Postofficel Dealers in Steinway and other Pianos, Pianola Pianos, Duo Art Pianola, V Victrolas and Records, Player Music, Music Cabinets, Piano Lamps, etc. Fifty-seven 0. M. Plummet. F INE PASTRY REGULAR MEALS Tine Rainbow Eugene, Oregon 820 Willamette St. Phone 52 Fifty-eight y??? mmwwmgm - x . 1 r x5 CAMPUS PHOTOGRAPHER Groups, Campus Views, Flashlights 536 E. 11th St. Phone 769-L Eugene, Oregon 5. Griffin-Babb Hardware Co. Hardware of Every Description A complete assortment of Starrett's Fine Tools for the mechanic. FISHING TACKLE Our Enamel ware has just come in. A G GR OSHONG "SERVICE THA T PLEASES, - Waterman,s Ideal F ountain Pen L Proprietor 0f I-P Loose Leaf Goods , ' w NINTH STREET 1 PM i Q JKCEATJXCARKET SCHWARCHILUS w BOOK STORE EUGENE, 0 RECON w "Lw Eugene, Oregon nKNOWN ALL OVER, The Home of HANAN SHOES f0 1' F 4: MEN and WOMEN 9 - . Eff? Professmnal and Courteous SeI'VICe gm; Your Feet Will Bring You Back Fifty-nine SLAB VVOOD THE MOST EFFICIENT FUEL ON THE MARKET AND SUITABLE FOR EVERY PURPOSE We have four grades Mixeds1abs for general use; Springfield slabs for heater and small furnaces; Extra. Heavy slabs for fireplace and large furnaces; and Inside Wood for range or cook stove. WE HAVE A GOOD SUPPLY ON HAND AND WOULD BE GLAD TO SHOW YOU SAMPLES OF EACH KIND We can also Supply You with Lath, Lumber, Shingles and Silo Material The Booth-Kelly Lumber Co. J. A. GRIFFIN, Mgr. Retail Dept, Res. Phone 766-J Fifth and Willamette Streets, Eugene Phone 452 - Eugene Stezam Laundry The Students Laundry PHONE ONE-TWO-THREE Eighth Avenue West Eugene, Oregon HOTEL SEWARD Alder and Tenth Street PORTEND, OREGTOTI Rates $1.00 and up UNIVERSITY OF OREGON HEADQUARTERS 999W-.. n Preferred Stock Groceries -1N9 CANS, GLASS AND CARTONS QUALITY ALWAYS UNIFORM .4 Distributed by Eugene Branch Allen 85 Lewis, Inc. .5 - DR. THOS. VAUGHAN DR. E. A. VAUGHAN ; v w W DENTISTS I I Marshall 1945 PORTLAND, OREGON 905 Electric Building w Dr. Robert M. Graves Dr. Orville Waller 9' DENTISTRY 416-17-18 0. 62 W. Bldg. Phone 65 774 Willamette St. Office Phone 195; Res. Phone 989 It: Eugene, Oregon Eugene, Oregon I Sixty-one We are glad to see that the University is developinge- DO YOU KNOWethat Jantzen Knit Goods have become famous for their excellence? Best for Sweaters, Bathing Suits, Yarns fantzen- Knitting Store PORTLAND, OREGON 146 BROADWAY ;' :.q.a.g:wavn haul'wpsa A "swan? 1T1 :m; : v; . L. B. Sigwart, Prop; Telephone 718 I 8111le De Luxe 5; SI GWA RT EWg, Oregon w l ElCCtI'lC CO. The Paine Bldg. V "Quality and Servicet ; 6 e435 6lectric W iring Fixtures . and Supplies f."- Willamette St. between 9th and 10th ARTISTIC WORKMANSHIP 1 Anything electrical supplied' BEST EQUIPMENT EUGENE, OREGON UP-TO-DATE MATERIALS WE CARRY THE v t . ' EVERYTHING TO WEAR . PETER PAN from Head to Feel Home of the "Short-Thick" x1 ' 7k Q5 FOUNTAIN DELICACIES OUR SPECIALTY Frank E. Dunn Walter Hummel Our' Specialtye The Best Cofee in Eugene The Grotto Open all the time. We appreciate your patronage. Sixty-two Eugeneb Leading STUDIO V The Tollman Visit our studio When you want a Iirst class PHOTOGRAPH J . B. ANDERSON, Prop. 734 Willamette St. PHONE 770 Sixty-three um-W 1.. ,m w :3: aimmww m vwwwi'? FT :' ' ,0 f n x , L ' if .,.- Er. " ' ' ". n - Youthful Fashions FOR THE "COLLEGE MISS" Selected with a keen regard for College Style Standards a. , I...- Suits, Coats, Dresses , "0.1 n 42: mm!" 'M '4 LARGES V .- DISTINCTIVE APPAREL FOR WOMEN YE OH I 1'"! . Table Supply Company L. D. Pierce, Prop. Fancy Groceries, Meats and Home Cooked Foods THE STORE THAT AIMS TO GIVE ITS CUSTOMERS THE BEST THE MARKET AFFORDS AT ALL TIMES--TO BE ALL THAT THE NAME IMPLIES-A REAL SERVICE STORE.2 WE WANT THE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ORE- GON TO MAKE THIS STORE THEIR HEADQUARTERS WHEN IT COMES TO EATS. OUR DELICATESSEN AND BAKING DEPT. ARE ALWAYS READY FOR AN EMERGENCY CALL. COME IN, WE WANT TO KNOW YOU BETTER. MAKE THIS STORE YOUR STORE. PHONE 246-247-248 CORNER NINTH AND OAK ST. .Sixty-four HOTEL OREGON Broadway at Stark, Portland This friendly, homelike hotel is right in the heart of Portland-convenient to the newspapers, the theaters, and the retail shops. Whenever you intend to'visit Portland, if you will write or wire, we will reserve a room for you. V l Home of the country-famed t f i i YE OREGON GRILL ARTHUR H. MEYERS, Manager Make Your First Step H to a successful career the establishment of a sound, safe i P banking connection. The Northwestern National will t Welcome you as a follower in the footsteps of the many : successful men whose career really began the day they a. '11 started saving money to take advantage of opportunities t M as they arose in their path. . . i .- t'", r5 The Northwestern National Bank g M t PORTLAND, OREGON Sixty-h've e h-: " AW wt: V aw a A :1 1.? 1 a5 , a .a A a. e. . e, r: - W2; .mawmw . Yimiyzemz ...4:w...e .Wiiglslw h Age; r .e :1 w; "3 Wm? - :1 e2: 3' e gay . The Picnics The Thing How .the folks enjoy the tasty lunch eaten under the' overhanging foliage! But the dainties must be carefully prepared. The quickest and easiest way to prepare the picnic lunch is with a CABINET GAS RANGES For Good Gas Service see the Mountain States Power 80. 881 Oak St. Telephone 28 We now own and operate two hun- dred and ninety-seven stores in US. We Sell Ready-to-Wear Dry Goods M Ladiesh, Missesh Childrenhs, Menhs and Boysh Shoes Buying for Cash-Selling for Cash- A Saving to You J. B. Penney Bu. , I I '2 940-946 Willamette St. For a Greater hOREGONh University Book Store Eugene, Oregon 11th and Alder No matter Where you .are,We are glad to serve you. Sixty-six 2Q .0 .9 The Studio that is Different $5,; " McKUNE dif- : The Photographer in your town ml 620 Willamette II n; ; Near Sixth Rex Floral C0. Designers Decorators Novel Cut Flower Baskets 8; Chiffons Corsage and Bride's Bouquets a Specialty Telephone 962 Rex Theater Bldg. We want to tell you the cost is slighL- The Brighten your home with plenty of light. Domestic Laundry Electrictlly at Your Service Myers Electric Co. Electrical Supplies and Services Phone 245 821 Willamette St. W. H. Nichols, Prop. at your service Prompt and Efiicient Service Satisfaction Guaranteed 143 7th Ave. West Phone 252 Sixty-seven murmu . . a.guzw; M f 2 Am .z. 42-w2zmgg4w-uw r1226; AL mmnm a 22:93; :54. 23$ H" '31" Red Cross + Drug Co. 624 Willamette St. The 'Mark of Quality, Service and Courtesy R. A. Babb Hardware Co. Spalding Goods PHONE 47 771 WILLAMETTE ST. Phone 392 47 7th Ave. East Broders Bros. Wholesale and Retail Dealers in IMPERIALBLEANEHSAND F b C d d HATTEHS ?;gkezr'lbieaii 80 West 8th St. Phone 40 EUGENE, OREGON TO THOSE WHO LEAVE- We wish the Best of Success and Happiness. TO THOSE WHO REMAIN- We Wish to say that our success has been due to our popularity among the students and we appreciate it. We Will look forward With pleasure to your patronage next year. 53333.29, H AUSER BROS. . 732T; HEADQUARTERS FOR ATHLETIC SUPPLIES +4 1920 i; W: q Hriw 7 In Q h. u 'Jmu n Inn H 3M t: '- 9 ma 15325773 mzaz: 15 ;Wa 2:rm;e:m'mex; ;w' A : ' A Wm ' "V Y. i'mfmf FEM-jiw" ,, mA rV,r Seiberling-Lucas Music Co. 125-7 F ourth Street PORTLAND, OREGON Oreg'orfs Big Music Store The Kuykendall LU D F0 RD Drug C0 PAINT STORE 922 Willamette St. Telephone 749 Stand Ready to Serve You with the Best at All Times PAINT, WALL PAPER ART GOODS 870 Willamette PAINTER? SUPPLIES QBZhurn Enid 011 . The I920 Oregana CIeaning-Pressing-Repairing $4.50 Postpaid We Call and Deliver George J. Beggs Phone 342 EUGENE, OREGON Sixty-nine Q5 HOTEL OSBURN Prlde of Eugene ; BANQUETS TO STUDENTS AND BUSINESS MEN A SPECIALTY ; : Our Sunday evening table d:h0te dinners are? unexcelled. a :5 , Hendershottsv Orchestra. New palm room for dancing 5 ' parties. - 5 i; E W. F. OSBURN, LESSEE AND PROPRIETOR 45 I H E 'C L. U B r' $3 1 - - 1:5 When You Tth HaIr-cut rJ j? thInh-The CLUB 5 53 THE COLLEGE MANS BARBER SHOP 5 5 : George W. Blair 814 Willamette St. :3 7 E; LINN DPUG CO Eugene:s Service Giving DRUG STORE :3, 5-5wwm5w5mmwvmmczwm 4? r? : We Have It ! g 5 2 5:- ; IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC TOILET GOODS 5 E 5 FINE STATIONERY 5 t 5 WATERMANES FOUNTAIN PENS , 5 :2: 5 55 KODAKS, SUPPLIES , 5 r 3 $7 KODAK FINISHING THAT PLEASES E"- .w' T 5, 7: mi 4 :3: Seventy g5 . .-J y,-.esat L555, 7' 00 " Suns JOVERcaATS 1 $20 To $50 UP STAIRS CLOTHI EPS m1! mm I14: TL. F.h! 3 ' ......-::: w. ' i l; , $ Kg d ;;! Eyaggw 6393mm TAKE THE ELEVATOR nSAVE $ l09.9 .. 3, U a a 9 I .29. '6 . uOt m'b h ' F i H i. s. X3 33' A TOM Seventy-two m3! 1:55 Xx. : $ , 6m :3 x a w TO ALL THOSE WHOSE GENEROUS COOPERATION AND CHEERFUL SUPPORT HAVE MADE THE NINTEEN HUNDRED TWENTY OREGANA A REALITY WE DEDICATE THIS PAGE Seventy-three 3i; , ; m meu r r'- W. K; .7 AND OUR ETERNAL THANKS THE EDITOR h .t-n'hgyiix w 3.012 " 1' K43 - 7 4.72314


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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 1

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