University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR)

 - Class of 1917

Page 1 of 400

 

University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 400 of the 1917 volume:

mi, Vf- Y. 0'. .Q M NH ,4 m: 0,010.0.1 .0'; 0 ' 4 4 . . . ', 0 n g? 4 - . x . mv'" " 4 0 :$'?R 4 ' 0 0 004m 454.? nu 0 5:? Q. Fl ' a ' 4. 52'; 71; 0 rm? :1, f 0! x. +Mu - 4 j A WKJ$ 4 . . J." .0 g; 0 '2, A 1 0 1 l u . 4 ' 'D 0 I! 4 J4 0' :0 . 'MW."$' t'hfk C??:b. '3. 5 ' , vthh 9 L3 ' 4 4 4 4 ' f , $i-v 4 K . Nr- - , + . 4 ' . .ihiJ- , r- 0 R 4' 3 434' 4" Y'thfi't' J 4-! 'g, n mrimzph Rh 472m N i V V a + ' . ' $.94 d5 ruvv t adyh 0x .;. , I - 3. 1.5511: F' 1, , ; F111,. x 0 , l v 0 A- . kl . .. 0 44', u 0,-1.1. Ty! V . . 1" " .. 1 v 1 . 4 A '- wv 23.0 01 '2. K. 1m . v Viv. 1' .4 H I ' 0 m v y: r rv- l. b v " 4243 00080849 9 .wn-qa Win r, y m ;r d O n'bru, .. I l- u 4'? 0r tillr unluH , An- I' . - r 4', U r' aqua. : 0.x, :yJ-I . I" "- 2','...,w ; or 'b"; '3'. v II'L4 9t. ' 333'?" ha 'n '1. :54 1. 0 4,91 Ml. M. t'm-g- 1k .33:me 4 L. i '14 hr, um; o $mk VII! DOCUIK . mum: ' 0121:ch AV ' E : 3N ,- lying r rwirgn mg . r ,, k :77! V: a L .n , n ; , . ...- :;;:, .5. I w Mn m 2 1;; . - '3 , 7;; Ir .Uy 1 1,1 YEAR GWK GM THE WWERSHTWZ Q? chE G CDNOVQDL EX ADO MDCDM M sz-Je. U 09 DE 1F nremnrh Efrain a aeeh nur Huineraitg haa grown into an iuztitutinn. Ehruugh herahea zhe hag heen Alma mater tn thnuaanha. Ehrnugh her hallz their treah atill erhnea. Amung her treea their laughter atill ammha. Arrow her lamna rnmez the unite at their beep aingiug-anh memnriea. Enhag her templez ruuer the kunll by the millrare. Armani! their greg walla mnnea the gnuth nf $regnn. Eheze templea, the garhenz where they atanh, anh their atatir, latent putentialitiea are nur heritage. ' Ghnae amnng 115 111th aee moat rlearlg know that me are near the haunt, the breaking at a new hag when the gray walla anh iuy tmuera zhall he multiplieh anh their talk hnuhleh many timea. Gin gnu mhu hane gune hefure me hope hg thia hunk tn bring hark the geaterhaga, the iuga anti arenea nf nnhergrahuate haga. Evin gnu who are to rnme-tn the future rhilhreu nf Alma matereme hnpe tn reveal the ahahnnm anti zuulight unit the berk- nning hanh nf QDregnu. En uur rnmrahea mhn are fortunate mith wa-reating in the arma at am QBregun '-1UP hnpe tn bring a pannrama at the pant gear, an image at nne nf the fuur happieat gram it is given 1w tn line. Ehia, then, ia the tri-uurpnae nf the 19 IE immatta. rk I D Q3 :1 :::::::: ".mmul G WIMN MWQRWM W W THE WNWAML DAY L WWDMCHJ REGENT 0113 THE VNWEIRMTY 0F OQLGON 020201 DESS WMMAN A; X R x1 J ? 33:6 1 'qu ' Dr L --J 4 4K J, awfhsg... .1 r0 k w 2 , h 2 a P E U 9 v u ; .pm . h; .f . a U G 5; g 3 En anarl; 15119111 31525th mhu baa mahp GDrpgntfa fnnthall tram nut nf 1hr hwt in the rmmtrg, anh mhn 11:15 hunt hi5 part in the huilhing nf a grmtpr Gbrpgnn, m2 rwpptlfullg hphiratp 111m 11111111112 nf the GPregana - maemmm 4 ,t ;. armrmv o. wmxytp W gm 0 0D 0 z y" .-- .7 --,-I..-..--';--'j .. '-:;j;; git? :1, 1 ' 1321mm; Varsity, Varsity, our dear old most adored, How oft we sing thy praises who can know? Your old Vine covered buildings, Shady walks where roses grow, ' ' . Place of all our golden dreams and fancies stored. We have labored 111 your class rooms, we have frolieked on your lawns, We have given you the glamor of our youth, But you gave us back our labors and our pleasures with your truth And we bless you as our lifeWs rich morning dawns. Varsity, Varsity, our dear old most adored, You have given us the glory of our age And weWV-e taken up the burden, each of us the futureWs page, And you 11 find that glory doubled and restored. We have had our nights of freedom on the river and the race, We have given you the glory of our youth, But you gave us back our labors and our pleasures with your truth, And we bless you for you,ve taught us life to face. --Leslz'e Burton Blades. UL .J a 17 D t::..-:'::-:-: ; uh :33 .32 kx n... - Q'Jmhrd hall .v-L a Go hi6. '- ' AihleTicx The Univemity Admtnvtraiton Oregon afirif Pubhcationx Dramairicw Ckxaaar Medical fchook Organizationw WomewAdLviTtem Muncal Oganizattonw Debating Mermhex fomritie Oregon emon 70000000000000 C3D QQQQQQQQw 700000000000 CDDQQQQQQQQ 700000 000 C70 Q DD QQDISDQQU 2' Ehe Engageuria TEnat Stung Ho, ho, the rushing stream is foaming, Ho, ho, the boat is wet with spray, Ho, ho, we love the life of roaming, Roaming, roaming through the quiet day. Ho, ho, the portage now approaching, Ho, ho, the sturdy back must bend, Ho, ho, who here will bear reproaching; Reproaching, reproaching his sluggard ways to mend. Ho, ho, the bright camp fire, is glowing, Ho, he, the meat is on the fire, Ho, ho, the cool north wind is blowing, Blowing, blowing the tossing pine to tire. Ho, ho, the morning light is breaking, Ho, ho, we greet the coming day, ' Ho, ho, we boatsmen now are taking, Taking, taking again our joyful w.ay. eCecil 1WcKay 10 V. 11 03h, QDrPgnn! Eherfa a prettg little village 3111 a 11:11le in the 111251. r4 EMORIES CAMPUS 1W n ., ; f .:-:: ::.::3 D I l r WINTER ,. ,. . -ve- triadmaLn-z ' ' :- x:.- ,.- xv ..-N... ..- A trig - wpc-or d-uw-r r A. wag. m..." gwa- ..... .. -A VKVXQa I'x. 1'1 TCI-IE CONDON OAKS x M 4ng f! 1 . wnmwxw. , bum V. mxxxxxxxwa4 xxxxxxw OUR ALMA MATER 332$??sx1ai ,6 DEADY HALL I X ' 1 SUNLIGH'IV AND SHADOXVS .....g.- . M34 Ngw NA .K WM. THROUGH THE TREES SI GI ?ZMXK 0;; w xxx 1 Xv: ; ; .x M W6 Ax 4V KXK? q xx x I , , m JACQMMW x CAx x xx $ A q, , . KXFQZCXXX M? VILLARD HALL 5x t 20 m n m M W . D .. f . M u L h . mu . .. Y m m, , 31mg mm L m , in D M A, , N m n H m m. w .U m w H H m H IE 1 i 3' r. ., X C. ..b -... MM.;..... -....v.h .. umwa -. 2' - 1.; Ln .3 C w"! - mm.-.. -M...". Lv WM. V. rum... , h... ..,,.-..w..- i 2e ,- L 1 IHCC'LVRE HALL 83 113-1.. 4'; ,, 3W, V t i ; m xvi? xx x kw W KR THE LIBRARY $nng5 11f 09m OPrpgnn In the harbor of the mountains, In the gleaming valley, Where Willamettets hill-fed fountains Join our roaring rally, Shifting sunshine, dancing showers, By the hying water, Play across the ivy towers Of our Alma Mater. CHORUS: From the mountains comes the gloaming, To the skies the stars are homing, Looking down on Oregon While soft the ripples run, XVhile canoes me softly gliding, Through the shadows, stealing, hiding, tFloat the songs from the 01d millrace, Songs of our Oregon. Heroes of forgotten ages, Of the worldfs romances, Fair haired maidens, budding sages, Books and boats and dances, Dreams of youth :and 01d ments teaching, Green and autumn. yellow, In the after years onreaching, Mingle, blend and mellow. f 1.1, . $4.14:ng . 11.111 . 1.1 THIL. J ....J.,Hl7.N -...,..;., . , C3I....VJIM. u.ll.:l JTJI 1I1 x5...!q . J11? . J . I , ..... .6, ,. r??? . J No 1:; 57;. ., . 3 .1. - g. , kg... 3. I ..4Nw......t.,.. Ema; 1-111--.. 1 , ' 1'13 . HON. ROBERT S. BEAN, President. HON. ROBERT S. BEAN 0991x2127 nf 1hr Hniuermtg THE BOARD OF REGENTS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE L. H. JOHNSON, Secretary. 9 . 7"""1132... 7 i1 1 ; d HON. ROBERT S. BEAN, EX-Officio Chairman. H k HON. A. C. DIXON, Acting Chairman. 3; HON. CHAS. H. FISHER. HON. W. K. NEWELL. ; MRS. G. T. GERLINGER. HON. WM. H. GORE. 1 EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS Hon. James VVithycombe, Governor ............................................................................ Salem. 2 H011. Ben. W. Olcott, Secretary of State ..................... Salem. i Hon. J. A. Churchill, Supt. of Public Instruction .................................................. Salem. 2; APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR 3 Term Expires ; g Hon. R. S. Bean, Portland ............................................................................ April 15, 1917. 3; Hon. William H. Gore, Medford ................................................................ April 15, 1919. 1; Hon. W. K. Newell, Seghers ........................................................................ April 15, 1921. 1 Hon. A. C. Dixon, Eugene .............................................................................. Oct. 15, 1923. Hon. Charles H. Fisher, Salem .................................................................... April 15, 1923. ; Hon. James W. Hamilton, Roseburg ............................................................ April 15, 1925. f , Hon. C. C. Colt, Portland .............................................................................. April 15, 1927. Mrs. G. T. Gerlinger, Dallas .......................................................................... April 15, 1927. Hon. Henry McKinney, Baker ...................................................................... April 15, 1927. Hon. Lloyd L. Mulit, Portland .................................................................... April 15, 1929. PRESIDENT P. L. CAMPBELL 1:13:22: c117 at Erwihpnt Glamphpll HERE is no shroud of mystery, no fuss a and feathers, about him. He does not guide the UniVersity f1 0111 depths of bevelled glass and mahogany. He is not some potentate of whom we hear but seldom, Whom we fear, but do not know. He is the friend of every person on the campus, the intimate of many. He moves amongst us and We greet him as readily and eheerily as we do our fellows. He is at every game, at every rally, bearing the burdens of the University and individual in every crisisathe best friend an Oregon student hasePrinee L. Campbell, our President. There is no face more pleasant, n0 ear more ready to hear a studentis troubles 0r Wishes, no hand more ready to help than his. His regard is not paternal; it is brotherly. Student himself-0f the Universityis good -he is closer to the student than any' p10- fessor,bette1' Chum for the young man than his roommate. N0 rooter in the bleachers, no alumnus, tried and ready, is a more loyal supporter, a more tireless worker, a truer friend of the University. In dark days and in days Of prosperity, in times of criticism, in houis of praise, he stands quietly and 151me at the Wheel, pilot of the University, comrade 0f the student, friend of the facultyeP. L. Campbell, man. In 0D um? Ejr Ejnhn g?tmuh, 11m. B Nearly a. generation ago, thirty-eight years, in fact, a professor came to the University of Oregon to take up a position on the faculty. Today, in the marble corridor of Johnson is a door Whose inscription says, "Dr. John Straub, Dean of Men? That is Where one hnds the same professor after these thirty-eight years. Coming when Deady was the University, the Dean has watched it through the prosperity and vicissitudes of nearly two score years, until now its students are told in four figures, and its temples stretch from the millrace to the cemetery on the hill. Each freshman has known him as comrade and advisor. Throughout the state he has friends in every hamlet. He has seen generations of students come and go until his ttboys and girlstt are thousands, but he has forgotten none. On his venerable head he has taken the care of students past number. Today he walks the campus, hearty, cheery, happy. Among the faculty one finds no more active figure than the Dean. Go to him With your troubles. In time of happiness or time of pain you will find there a willing ear and helpful advice. To us John Straub is all this: dean, teacher, counsellor, friend.- Elizabeth ilireeman 3an, Evan nf mantra To bring the University women together so that the Oregon spirit may come home to them as above all else, and to do this through, the already existing or- ganizations, particularly through the Woments Lezagueethis is the policy adopted by Oregon,s new Dean, Elizabeth Freeman Fox. Another way in which Dean Fox has come into close contact with the students is through her lectures, for she is also a professor of sociology. During the last year she has taught a class in social agencies. Also she has taken charge of the woments division of the Freshman ethics class. Dean Fox is particularly adapted to sociology work because of her former ex- perience. Before she was graduated from Barnard College in 1908, she did set- tlement work in the slums of New York City, teaching in the vacation schools of the east side. Also she was substitute librarian in two of the New York down town libraries. In 1908 she went to Northwestern University as a local Y. W. C. A. secretary. After three years she left this position to become the national Y. W. C. A. field secretary for the northwest. In 1915 she resigned and went to Bel- lingham, Washington, to have charge of the city Y..W. C. A., and from that work she came to Oregon as Dean if Women and Professor of Sociology. g1r:r:::::f:;:::3 D 0 U! M Wynn .mmq-wh,.v .. NW Ahminiatratiuv GDEwra P. L. CAMPBELL, B. A., LL. D., ................................................ President. M. H. DOUGLASS, M. A., .................................. Librarian KARL W. ONTHANK, M. A., ............................ Secretary to the President. LOUIS H. JOHNSON, .................................................................. Comptroller. A. R. TIFFANY, B. A., Reglstrar THE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS ERIC W. ALLEN, B. A., ............................ Dean of School of Journalism. ELIZABETH FREEMAN FOX, B. A., ................................ Dean of Women. EDWARD W. HOPE, Ph. D., ................................ Dean of School of Law. ELLIS F. LAWRENCE, M. S., .............. Dean of School of Architecture. RALPH H. LYMAN, B. A., .................................. Dean of School of Music. K. A. J. KACKENZIE, M. D., ........................ Dean of School of Medicine. D. WALTER MORTON, M. A., C. P. A., Dean of School of Commerce. JOSEPH SCHAFER, Ph. D., ............................... Dean of Summer School HENRY D. SHELDON, Ph. D., ................ Dean of School of Education JOHN STRAUB, M. A., Lit. D., .............................................................. .................... Dean of College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. FREDERICK GEORGE YOUNG, B. A., ............ Dean of Graduate School. $lfmra nf Elnatrutlinn THE FACULTY P. L. CAMPBELL, B. A., LL. D. President of the University. PERCY PAGET ADAMS, B. S. Professor of Graphics. ERIC W. ALLEN, B. A. Dean of the School of Journalism and Professor of Journalism. Delta Upsilon; Sigma Delta Chi. FREDICARLTON AYER, Ph. D. Professor of Education. JAMES DUFF BARNETT, Ph. D. Professor of Political Science. ERNEST S. BATES, Ph. D. Professor of Rhetoric and American Literature. Phi Beta Kappa. HUGO BEZDEK, B. A. Director of Men's Gymnasium. Phi Kappa Sigma; Alpha Kappa Kappa. . xJOHN FREEMAN BOVARD, M. 8. Professor of Zoology. Psi Upsilon; Sigma Xi. WILLIAM PINGRY BOYNTON, Ph. D. Professor of Physics. Phi Beta Kappa. JULIA BURGESS, M. A. Professor of Rhetoric. ALBERT EDWARD CASWELL, Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Physics. HERMAN ALDRICH CLARK, M. A. Assistant Professor of Latin. u A ROBERT CARLTON CLARK, P11. D. Professor of History. Phi Beta Kappa. TIMOTHY CLORAN, Ph. D. Professor of Romance Languages. Beta Theta Pi; Phi Beta Kappa. EDMUND S. CONKLIN, Ph. D. Professor 01' Psychology. MABEL LOUISE CUMMINGS Director of WomeWs Gymnasium. BURCHARD WOODSON DE BUSIK, Ph. D. Professor of Secondary Education. EDGAR EZEKIEL DE COU, M. S. Professor of Mathematics. FREDERIC STANLEY DUNN, M. A. Professor of Latin Language and Literature. CHARLES H. EDMUNSON, Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Zoology. ALBERT N. FRENCH, M. A. Assistant Professor of Education. ELIZABETH F. FOX, B. A. Dean of Women and Professor of Sociology. Kappa Kappa Gamma. JAMES HENRY GILBERT, Ph. D. Professor of Economics. R. S. HAMILTON, LL. B. Professor 01" Law. Sigma Chi; Phi Delta Phi. HANS F. HARTHAN, B. S. Professor of Romance Languages. WILLIAM L. HAYWARD Associate Director of Men's Gymnasium. EDWARD WILLIAM HOPE, Ph. D. Dean of School of Law and Professor of Law. HERBERT CROMBIE HOWE, B. A. Professor of English Literature. J. HUGH JACKSON, B. A. Assistant Professon of Commerce. EARL KILPATRICK, B. A. Director of Extension Department. JOHN J. LANDSBURY, Mus. Bach., Mus. Dr. Head of Piano Department and Instructor in Composition. Alpha Tau Omega. ELLIS FULLER LAWRENCE, M. S. Dean of School of Archiiiecture and Professor of Architec- ture. RALPH HAINE LYMAN, B. A. Dean of School of Music and Professor of Music. EDWARD HIRAM McALISTER, M. A. Professor. of Mechanics and Astronomy. G. ROBERT MCAUSLAN Professor of Commerce. HARRY B. MILLER Director of Commercial and Industrial Survey. D. WALTER MORTON, M. A., C. P. A. Dean of the School of Commerce and Professor of Commerce. my, van: a": xr' - 2M2 Mme; M -155; r. 4.- 4-: r .. Jwa. ., arm, as! myasaav MWM- .wA .2 .w,;m-: . A mmm..u,,., . . 4 AM rats 99:: Jamar xna'awvrzwvvrm W . "r..m.-sm,a-n... , a. 1 ; ,H u..y. M A . .Aw'v' . a F; rwumarw qr mx'im- m a - JOHN P. UHARA, Ph. B. Assistant Professor of History. EARL L. PACKARD, Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Geology. Sigma Psi; Theta Tau; Beta Kappa Alpha. MABEL HOLMES PARSONS, M. A. Professor of Rhetoric. Alpha. Phi; Phi Beta Kappa. ELLEN M. PENNELL Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. MARY HOLLOWELL PERKINS, M. A. Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. ROBERT W. PRESCOTT, B. A. Professor of Public Speaking. GEORGE REBEC, Ph. D. Professor of Philosophy. ROBERT P. REEDER, LL. M. Professor of Law. GEORGE F. RICHARDSON, Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. ARCHIBALD F. REDDIE, B. A. Professor of Public Speaking. EDWIN CLYDE ROBBINS, Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociology. JOSEPH SCHAFER, Ph. D. Dean of Summer School and Professor of History. Phi Beta Kappa. FRIEDRICH GEORG G. SCHMIDT, Ph. D. Professor of German Language and Literature. A. H. SCHROFF Professor of Fine Arts. HERMAN SCHWARZ, Ph. D. Assistant Professor of German. HENRY DAVIDSON SHELDON, Ph. D. Dean of School of Education and Professor of Education. FREDERICK LAFAYETTE SHINN, Ph. D. Professor of Chemistry. WARREN D. SMITH, Ph. D. Professor of Geology. Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi. ORIN FLETCHER STAFFORD, M. A. Professor of Chemistry. Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi. FRED L. STETSON, M. A. Professor of Education. Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Delta. Kappa; Acacia. JOHN STRAUB, M. A., Lit. D. Dean of the College of Literature, Science and the Arts, and Professor of Greek Language and Literature. Alpha Tau Omega. ALBERT RADDIN SWEETSER, M. A. Professor of Botany. Psi Upsilon. ' A; me...m....,w. ..... ..... ,1. z A i N quluwwW-ki d ..-'...........4.yug...l... qu", ...... M; x u s. - -1"... . .. 4 . W. F. G. THACHER, M. A. Professor of Rhetoric. HARRIET THOMPSON Assistant Director in Department of Hygiene and Physical Education for Women. 3 3 t EDWARD THORSTENBERG ,Ph. D. i a ; 5 A 5 V t. i Professor of Scandinavian Languages and Literatures. GEORGE TURNBULL, B. A. :11 Professor of Journalism.. ROY MARTIN WINGER, Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Kappa. Sigma. 1! FREDERICK GEORGE YOUNG, B. A. Dean of Graduate School and Professor of Economics and Sociology. Beta Theta Pi. m- , .H "Ht; ..5 , Au.-. ! ; : - , - u... ; ilnatruflnra anh Aamatant Anztruflnra . . HOWARD ANNETT h Instructor in Piano. 1 FRANK V. BADOLLET b ' Instructor in Flute. 'W""" CECILIA S'MITH BELL, B. A. Instructor in English Literature. ' wl- LOUIS BOND, B. S. Assistant in Chemistry. RICHARD W. BROECKER, B. A. r g t." Instructor in Education. RUTH DAVIS, Mus. Bach. Assistant Instructor in Piano. . ALLAN J. DELAY Assistant Instructor in Journalism. 1 W ROSWELL DOSCH . g, 1 'w Instructor in Drawing. .10 "' I " " ALLEN H. EATON, B. A. w a 3 Instructor in History and Appreciation of Art. '. ELLA EHMSEN Instructor in Education. 1 JESSIE FARISS, B. A., Music Bach. L w ' Assistant Instructor in Piano. ' Mu Ph1 Epsnon. II ' WINIFRED BORBES pa Director of Orchestra and Instructor in Violin. I . FREIDA GOLDSMITH, B. A. Instructor in Women's Gymnasium. n M MOZELLE HAIR, B. A. . w .4' Secretary of Extension Department. , .4 ALLAN c. HOPKINS, B. s. ' yd. Instructor in Commerce. RUTH M. HOWELL, B. A. Assistant Instructor in Botany. CHESTER KRONENBERG, B. A. Instructor in Mathematics. CAMILLA LEACH Assistant in Drawing. MRS. DAISE BECKETT MIDDLETON Assistant Instructor in Voice. MU. Phi Epsilon. ALBERT PERFECT Instructor in Wind Instruments. MRS. ROSE POWELL. Instructor in Public School Music. Mu Phi Epsilon. HAZEL VERN RADER, B. A. Instructor in Women's Gymnasium. LOUIS C. ROSENBERG Instructor in Architecture. ETHEL I. SANDORN, M. A. Curator of Herbarium. ALFRED C. SHELTON Assistant in Zoology. EDGAR W. SHOCKLEY Assistant Physical Director for- Men. IDA V. TURNEY, M. A. Instructor in Rhetoric. INA WATKINS Assistant Instructor in Piano. Mu Phi. Epsilon. MARY E. WATSON. M. A. Instructor in English Literature. J. ANDRE WELLS, M. A. Instructor in Physics. RAYMOND HOLDEN WHEELER, Ph. D. Instructor in Psychology. DA; Hnium'aitg E51115 ZJuninr Meek-Enh Olnmmmwmtnt Huhtrrlaaa mix $12th Bag ZHrwhman 71-311mm: ignmm'nming thnnaylnania iRaIIg OPrPgmt Erahitinna ZHamItg anh Svmhenta Eluninr MPPk-Enh AY comes with its week-end 0f revel, its entertainment, m its doors open in hOSpitality. May brings with it the guests and the games 'with other universities. May brings some of our brightest days. For a space we forget all things, the closing year, the friends that must part, and lend ourselves to the enjoyment of our life, our college and our compamons. There was the University day when we all worked. There was the meet with O. A. C. and another crown for Bill Hay- wardalong may she wave,-and then there was the senior play iiAI'izonaW The next day the high school track meet filled the program full as the younger stars strove to emulate deeds done by their elders the day before. Then with the J un- ior From in the Armory, a great, brilliant dancing throng, the week-end died as week-ends do. With Sunday came the exodus, while the Uinversity preened herself after the bustle and settled down to face the end of the year, a scant month away. Junior Week-End is growing saner with each successive year and each cycle of the months finds it more firmly and more logically established as one of the features and factors of college life. It is our May Festival, our Spring Carnival, our way of delighting in? the glories of the vernal season. Eluninr mepk-Enh 1ngrzmi Thursday, 8:00 P. Mr-Water Fete. Friday, 8:00 A. M.eC1ean-up Day on Campus. Friday, 12:00 M.-Luncheon. Friday, 1:30 P. M.-Junior Week-End Parade. Friday, 2:00 P. M.a0regon-O. A. C. Track Meet. Friday, 8:30 P. M.eSenior Play, llArizonaW Saturday, 8:00 to 12:00 A. M.-Pre1iminaries, Interscholastic Track Meet, Co- ed Tenniis Match between Oregon and O. A. C. Saturday, 4:00 P. M.-Tennis Match between Eugene Country Club and the University Team. Saturday, 8:30 P. M.eJunior Prom. Sunday, 4:30.--Vespers. Address by Father OlHara. ub- m '6H. ,NH UMhh ad .I a- mad: rm; WV ddt m. mini. .m- u' '3 wd .xarw' 6H: W1" 37 THE CAMPUS LUNCHEON . wag 03 BL .- . w Olnmmmrpmmt NEW departure in the conduct of the college year A marked the 1916 commencement. ' The previous eus- tom of having the exercises attendant 0n commence- ment occupy the first few days of the week following the Uni- versity examinations, was abandoned and senior examina- tions and the graduation days took place before the dismissal of college. Instead of a mere fragment of the active students bidding the departing seniors good-bye as in former years, the whole University was enabled to be present at the eonnnencement. The weather was wonderful and the graduates, filing into Vil- lard for the last time as students, saw Oregon at its best, with the roses and the lawns and the ivy and the millraee yonder past the shadow of. Condonis trees. N0 day in all their life here could have been more perfect than that Monday morning in early J une. The services of graduation, ever solemn, always impres- sive, were lent new dignity by the presence of the undergrad- uates who were waiting for their turn to be brought by the years. Old grads were there, remnants of Classes graduated before the members of that day,s Class were born; their chil- dren, members of Classes to come. There were mothers, sweet and fondly delighted. There were fathers, stern and manful- 1y proud. There were fresh young faces lit with the hopes of future years. There were old faces sad with the memories of other days. After the services the throng filed out as it had come, the undergraduates back to their examinations, the new-made alumni out to their tasks, the old graduates back to their lives. , .- aesmwur-s-rw m A '.w mu -mm..-uwdmi ,. ,h 1 .10 ,. an 09 a 2:113 Gnmmbnrvmmt Erngram N 0 q; FRIDAY, JUNE 2- K N; 4:30 P. M.-Ba.nd Concert. M - 4 w, 7:00 P. M.40The Comedy of Errors." !0 9:30 P. M.-Peace Ceremonial. I a! 0 W MM: SATURDAY, JUNE 3- 9:00 A. M.-Meeting of Alumnae. 'N , .- 10:30 A. M.4Meeting of Alumni. hi my", 12:00wUniversity Dinner. 3:00 to 5:00 P. M.4President1s Reception. 4:00 P. M.--Baseba11. O. A. C. Faculty vs. U. of 0. Faculty. 1 t! a. nkM 6:30-Concert. Womerfs Glee Club. ' 8:30 P. M.-Alumni Ball. "I CI :1 Sm 1m .. :4 SUNDAY, JUNE 4- I W t '5 c... 11:00 A. M.wBaccalaureate Sermon, by Dr. Stephen B. L. Penrose, President ,. of Whitman. College. d 0 mm 3X0 4:00 P. M.-Sacred Concert. "at W 'W t M- MONDAY, JUNE 5- t w wtanim ; 10:00 A. M.-Commbncemgnt A.ddress, by Dr. Ray Lyman Wllbur, Pres1dent . y . of Leland Stanford Junlor Un1ver51ty. t w x0 3" I l. 2:30 P. M.4Ce1ebration of Fortieth Anniversary. , y. 4:00 P. M.4Laying of the Corner Stone of the Education Building. M u uh" 7:30 P. M.4Fern and Flower Procession. 8:00 P. M.4Failing and Beekman Oratorical Contest. 9 30 P. M.4Serenade by Men. ".0 tu0 M tun M THE 0 ON SKINNEEFS BUTTE GENE AND ECHO COPS THE TIE-UP 40 Svixth Annual Huherrlaaa mix HE Underolass MiX is always a delightful eventefor the I onlookers and a few of the contestants who land on top. Many a man, looking back on his college days, has said, HThe Underolass Mix of my freshman year was the best time 1 had in college? It is the time when the Sophomores show the Freshmen that a Frosh is just about what is described on the death-head posters put out the night before and when the Freshmen show the Sophs that, even if they do wear green caps, they lre going to be men some day. This year the l20ers started out well by kidnapping the Sophomore president, whom they promptly refunded under compulsion from a superior force. In the mix itself they gave their older opponents a hard and game fight all the way - through, and it was by the narrow margin of five points that the class of double 19 walked off the field winners. ' It was a tough, rough light, more so than the Willamette game which followed, Inayhap, but, as in all underelass fights, good humored sportsmanship prevailed, almost to the exclu- sion of any untoward assistance being rendered the second- year men by the star-wearing Seniors. Each year the Under- class MiX is being made more and more fair. At the present rate it looks as if the Freshmen might win some day. The slo- gan all the way through was: THIS IS A SQUARE MIX. When the dust had cleared away, and the legs had been pulled back into place, and the fingers had been disentangled from hair, and the Seniors had bowed and posed for pictures and the women, almost everyone Voted that it had been about the best and squarest miX that had ever been staged. If a pushball had been obtainable, it would have been peerless. TY OVE AND BEAU UNT THE FROSH ST S O R E R B M O S D N A S R A T S L F O S N E E U Q $11,th Bag S we have said, traditions are in the making. Oswald West, Governor of Oregon, a few years ago, estab- lished One Which holds its place among those most dear to Oregonis students. He conceived Pledge Day. Each year in October, the Governor of the State of Oregon administers a pledge to the students of the University in Which they bind themselves to their commonwealth in earnest pur- pose and With firm conviction. Last fall Governor James Withyeombe stood in Villard, Where the students crowded the auditorium t0 overiiowing, and read out over the throng of upturned faces this pledge: ttAs a student at the University Which is maintained by the people of Oregon I heartily acknowledge the obligation 3. owe. The opportunities open to me here for securing train- ing, ideals and Visions for life, I deeply appreciate, and re- , gard as a sacred trust, and do hereby pledge my honor that it shall be my most cherished purpose to render as bountiful a return to the Oregon people and their posterity, in faithful and ardent devotion to the common good, as Will be in my power. It shall be the aim of my life to labor for the highest good of an ever greater eommonwealthf, Standing, the Students subscribed their obligation, and then filed forth, once more consecrated t0 the service of their state, bound by the Pledge of Oregon, administered by Ore- gonis executive, vowed by Oregonis youth. 3H r1151; 71-31mm? end of historic K111Ca1d-the annual Freshman bonfire. F011 weeks it dominated that part of the campus, While the green- -t0pped toilers wrought With muscle and ardor t0 Iais e the st1ueture 111ghe1. Even late at night and all through the night the activity did not cease. There were heavy eyes 111 class While the work of stripping La11e county of its waste wood went 011. At last 011 the night of November 3 the mo- ment of ignition came. As the black serpentine chanted d0W11 the street, the hames leaped up the 011- soaked sides of the p11e. The ye1107W serpents licked and lashed about the timbers, beating back the rain and darkness and revealing the horde that swarmed 0n the gridiron, that overran the grandstands and braved the rain 31 T was a great square pyre that over-balanced the west in the mire of that old field. It was a roughneek rally that smacked of the old days and lit grins 0f reminiscence 0n the faces of the 01d grads. Booming into full iiame, the giant torch lit up the Whole neighborhood and drove speakers and rooters farther from the holocaust. It was a eonfiagration that thrust back the darkness and that kindled even hotter flames of Spirit and enthusiasm in the breasts 0f the Shouters. On the arms of a full Wind the blaze swung far out over the gridiron, While myriads 0f sparks hissed and showered into the street. The flickering light lit and reddened the black field, the black stands and the black thousands Who tramped and stamped there. Speakers rose, cheered, and battled With their voices against the howling 0f the Wind and the roar of fiames behind them. The light played and swayed over the breath- less faces uplifted in aeelamation. Gradually the throng dispersed. The lire in the field died down, but the fire that it had kindled in hearts did not die- grew, even, to the climax the next day. OUT MCKENZIE VVAY r. .1... -,eAWi,,Vrn.4--m.a.-..m-1mw 1w iglaal- -. vwhw 13va ""1: :11?" 1:: r1: ME 111::LWW,,.-i:: -. m 1.1-1,--. Qumrrnming Bag TATE universities, especially many of those 111 the west $ who have undergone such phenomenal and mushroom growth 111 the past I'eW years, often find one of their real problems 111 the holding 01: the interest and support of the graduates 01" the institution 111 after years When they are eeihg drawn farther from the scenes and memories or eel- 1ege iiIe. Growth from rounding to enormous size 111 a few years is not conducive to sturdihess and hardiness, either 111 the college or 111 the spirit and loyalty With Which it imbues its alumni. Such spirit, such loyalty must be accompanied with traditions and With an air of consecration Which only time, memories and generations of students can engender. Rapidity of growth and great numbers in attendance cannot but act derogatively upon this very real phase of the life of every college man. The west is largely devoid of that almost fanatical devo- tion to the Alma Mater Which graduates of the venerable 001- leges along the eastern seaboard possess. 01' this section have been too hurried and too recent in their growth for this splendid condition to be obtained. In the University of Oregon, however, is rooted a great portion of the amount of this sort of feeling and spirit centered 011 the Pacific coast. Oregon is old among the colleges of the west; she is small and is situated in the hallowihg influence of a little city; she has had the time and tendencies and atmosphere that lead to the creation of tradition, alumni, loyalty, and the respect of the undergraduates for those Who passed this way 111 time gone. It is these things that make possible the annual Homecom- ing Day held in Eugene each fall at the time Of the largest campus football game. It is this that brings the throng of Old grads t0 clasp hands and laugh again under the Tree Which stands in front of Deady, or by the Condom Oaks, shading Villard. Last fall they came in slanting rain and lowering skies. In the gym they crowded, mingled With the guests from Wash- ington Who were realizing something of the spirit of Oregon and the place a small school 111 a small town bears in the hearts of its children, grown and growing. 'Womeh were there Who, 111.2; The institutions ' -u17n:-::::::Jri ., . as girls, had led long marches down that floor; men, Who had there been primed to defend 01d Oregon, even as, downstairs, Bezdekts fighters were waiting for the Whistle. Then the game, disappointing, Of course, but Showing spirit that was a tribute to students and alumni. .What heart but stirred that day When the Lemon Men stopped Dobiets Un- beaten Ones in their tracks and, despite the mud, thrust them back until the N ortherners, fighting grimly, hercely, staved Off defeat and the men Who slaughtered Penn for a scoreless tie 6! The dance that night was really the end. Old friendships, 01d faces, homecoming to their Alma Mater, found joy and . laughter, memories, and the Yesterdaye 0n the smooth maple 0f the Armory. Then the exodus 011 Sunda 7; good-byes and plans to come next year, to shake hands again With Doctor Straub, t0 re-live once more the old days, and to see California go down again before those Oregonians. 4', OF THE HOUR THE FACULTY PARADE VVHEN IS A BERRY A BLUE BERRY? BILL AND BEZ l,'mv-mmttwmrw ...v ,- VA Smum wmm..... 94' . J 43 iapnnzgluania 3321111; J an. 8, 1917ethe four-rank column that has come to be tradition, two lines of women flanked by rows of men-st01"es Closed and vacantebands and the townspeople thronging in the streets with the studentsethe team on aheadeand then the gathering in the Armory that shut the floor from View even in the farthest cornerethe upturned faees-the team ' 0n the platform trying to swallow something, blink something back and make speechesethat was the Penn Rally. It was a week after the game and still the spirit knew no bounds. Eugene might have been ruins had the meters been gathered when the news came in. 1 Students of every type were there. University, high school and grade-all dismissed that they might add honor to the teameand the Armory, crammed as Sehumann-Heinek and Hegorza never filled it, roared and rumbled with the voices. On the stage, which ttDoell Read said was grander than hea- ven itself, sat the teamethe greatest team that ever foughte thatls what Bezdek said. They all made speeches, ttBezl, and ttBill" and the two Johnnies-the last speech for those two Romanseand all the team and some of the faculty, and the President and business men, Scaiefe, and everyone. They all agreed on several points e-even Dr. Hope, Penn. ,86ethat it was a great team, a great state, a great west, and the Oregon Spirit over all. Then, after the speeches and after the 0ft-repeated testi- mony 0f the players that ttit was some game? and after the echoes of the oskies had died out among the beams far over- head, one Of the three bands furnished the wherewithal and they danced, and many a supper was eaten cold that night. It was not only a football rally. It was a University rally and the University rallied like the Old Guard, and the townspeople with them; and perhaps the main thought of it all was that all must, as President Campbell said, ttfollow the example set by the team. show the world that 0111" University and team are inseparable and that the institution is on the same plane as the teanWeyes, and the score was Oregon 14; Pennsylvania 0. gmwvyh v BERKELEY QDrPgnn Erahitinna HOUGH small, her traditions are legion and Oregon a lives in them, proud of her heritage, strong in the feel- ing that beneath the coming and going of current cam- pus life there still stirs the pulse of a day that dawned almost With the birth of the commonwealth. Now in an institution reaching the larger phases of a great university, there endure the relics, hallowed and revered, of former years When the students were as a family and lived here generating the cus- toms and oeremonials that persist to this day, that Will persist through generations Who Will yet come to learn. No one smokes on the Oregon Campus, no one walks on the Oregon seal before Villard, no one save a senior sits on the ' senior bench. We Speak to all we meet, students and faculty; and the greeting is ithellofi The freshmen wear green caps, keep the mammoth O on Skinneris Butte bright yellow, watch it and their bonfire before the big games. They erect a great pyre on Kincaid field Which is burned on the eve of the yearis big football game. No'freshman is hazed, but they are held PAINTING THE ttO', THE SENIOR BENCH t0 the chores and tasks by the ever-ready Sophomore and the nearby millrace. it ujjl The Junior wears his corduroy trousers, baggy and dirty, but his pride and his badge. The Seniors crown is his som- brero, wide of brim and full of dignity. 011 him rests the re- sponsibility 0f the campus. The Oski-e is Oreg0117s great yell and her favorite anthem sings how iithose days at Oregon, they are the best of allfi The Oregon Agricultural College is our ancient rival, While the University of Washington follows Close behind our neigh- boring enemy. There are two forums Where the tide of student life eddies longest in its moments 019 leisureethe Librarv steps and the Tree, that maple facing Deady. There are the oaks, named for Thomas Condom, there are the buildings in Whose names live the memories of eminent Oregonians. The storied millrace is full of tradition, bright With the laughter of decades. The trees and ivy towers, renowned and venerable, know the treasures Qf the campus by the river. In 0902:2219 Ellamltg anh g?tuhenm 0 anyone familiar With student life at the University a through the period of several years, the complete change in the general relations between the faculty and the stu- dents is a very real and apparent thing. The entire attitude of former years has given away to a greater or less degree and in some cases it has been entirely reversed. Where a short time ago any movement on the part Of the faculty T0- Ward increased efficiency or higher standards, toward disci- pline or revision of policy, met With stubborn resistance and protest from the students, today it is ordinarily greeted With acquiescence and co-operation. If the administration of the University wishes to promulgate some plan, or considers some contemplated activity of the students as ill-advised 0r harmful, an expression of opinion to this effect is received courteously and entertained theughtfully, not alone With the good of the students in mind, but With the best interests of the University and all concerned at heart. Correspondingly, any petition or request from the stun dents receives careful consideration and Willing investigation With an aim toward granting all that is possible or just. Thege seems a more harmonious and Willing'eorrespondence 0f opin- ion amongst the tWO factors in the University tending-toward concerted activity and progressive attainment of the best re- sults from college life. The students have bowed readily to the increased scholar- ship demanded, have submitted quietly toward athletic legis- lation and many other movements Which they have come at last to realize are for the best. On their part; the faculty has reinstated basketball, has. granted studentrbody dances, post season football games, class hours, revisions in the cut system, dismissal of college. for rallies, and numerous other liberties and accessions Which haVe established more amicable rela- tions between the members of the faculty than ever before. This tendency is probably due largely to the undeniable growth of the University from the former status of a small college to an institution of the larger and higher type. It is a trend that is to be expected When one considers the change of attitude and personnel that the widening of the scope and influence of the University is bound to bring. It is a better and more Wholesome position and state of affairs, making possible closer harmony and activity among faculty and stu- dents for the betterment and progress of the University. ALL THE LADIES LOVE THE BAND 54 U! GI Elbe Empralh In the spring of 1900 the Iirst student newspaper was published at the Univer- sity of Oregon by Clifton N. tPaU McArthur. It was called the "Oregon Weekly" and for nine years it continued as a weekly paper. In 1909-1910 the editor, then W. C. tSkipperi Nicholas, decided to change the paper to a semi-weekly. The student body at the same time re-christened it the "Oregon Emerald." One more change took place in 1912 When Karl Onthank, now secretary to President Campbell, changed the paper from a sevmi-weekly to a tri-weekly, the form which the "Emerald" still holds. This year a- magazine supplement has been issued several times with the proceeds of a lecture by Rabindran-ath Tagore. The University students have contributed the stories, poems and articles published in the sheet. It is hoped that some means will be found Where this can be continued next year. Year Name Editor Manager 1900 ........ Oregon Weekly....,,Clifton N. McArthur, '01....L. E. Hooker. . 1900-01....0regon Weekly ...... Clifton N. McArthur, '01....C. C. McCornack, '01. 1901-02....Oregon Weekly ...... Allen H. Eaton, '02 .......... Oscar Gorrel, '02. 1902-03....Oregon Weekly ...... James H. Gilbert, '03 ........ Holt Stockton, '03. 1903-04....Oregon Weekly ...... Jois. H. Templeton, '05 ...... Albert R. Tiffany, '05. 1904-05....Oreg0n Weekly ...... Earl R. Abbett, '06 .......... Frank C. Dillard, '05. 1905-06....Oregon Weekly ...... Harry H. Hobbs, '06 ........ E. L. Stockwe-ll. William Neal. 1906-07....Oreg0n Weekly ...... Henry M. McKinney, '07....Frank Mount, '08. 1907-08....Oregon Weekly ......Thos. R. ToWnsend, '09....W'. M. Eaton. 1908-09....Oreg0n Weekly ...... Earl Kilpatrick, '09 .......... Dean T. Goodman, '10. 1909-10....Oregon Emerald W C. Nicholas ............... Fritz Dean, '11. 1910-11....Oregon Emerald....Ra1ph D. Moores, '12 .........D Leslie Dobie, 1'1. 1911-12....Oregon Emerald .....R Burns Powell, '12 ...... ....A F. Roberts, '13. W. C. Barbour, '12. 1912-13....Oregon Emerald....Kar1 W. Onthank, '13.-......Andrew M. Collier, '13. 1913-14....Oregon Emerald ....Henry Fowler, '14 .............. Marsh H. Goodwin, '15. 1914-15....Oregon Emerald ....Lee A. Hendricks, '15......Anthony Jaureguy, '15. 1915-16....Oregon Emerald ....Max H. So-mmer, '16........Floyd Westerfield, '17. Stoddard amhall Br Gllbert Epping Hamstreeet Harwood Calkins 5112 Emeralh S'taif STUDENT NEWSPAPER EDITORS AND MANAGERS EDITORIAL STAFF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF ........................................................................ HAROLD HAMSTREET Associate Editor ................................................................................. Milton Arthur Stoddard Associate Editor ...................................................................................... John DeWitt Gilbert Managing Editor ...................................................................................................... Ed. Harwood City Editor ...................................................................................................... Adrienne Epping Editor of Magazine Supplement ......................................................... John DeWixtt Gilbert BUSINESS STAFF BUSINESS MANAGER ...... , ............................................................ BURLE D. BRAMHALL Assistant Manager ................................................................................................... Louise Allen Assistants ........................ Joe Denn, Lay Carlisle, Jeannette Calkins, Hlarold Barde Circulation Manager ................................................................................................. Paul Reaney Phone, Editor, 565 Phone, Manager, 841 DEPARTMENTS Sports Editor ................................................................................................... James S. Sheehy Assistants ..... . .................................................................... William Haseltine, Clifford Sevits Administration ...................................................................................................... Earl Murphy " Student Activities ........................................................................................... Dorothy Parsons WomeWs Sports ......................................................................................................... Helen Hair Forensics ............................................................................................................ Rosalind Bates Exchanges ........................................................................................................... Helen Brenton General Assignments .................. John Dundore, Elsie Fitzmaurice, Richard Avison, Gladys Wilkins, Ross Dalgleisch, Russell Fox, Martha Tinker, Pearl Crailnc, Erma Zimmerman, Dorothy Duniway, Lucile Saunders, Bert Woods, Arvo Simola, Florida Hill, Adelaide Lake, Helen Brenton, Beatrice Thurston, Lyle McCroskey, Tracy Byers, Paul Reaney, Douglas Mullarky, Bill Morri- son, Jacob Jacobson, Pearl Ellis, RobertCase, Mellie Parker, Nell Warwick, Anne Dawson. VVootton Sheehy Gilbert Calkins Fleischmann Dundore Harwood Barker Roberts Tinker Epping Reigard Vance Kennon Madden Moores Tregilgas Dunbar Littler Tuttle 58 E112 QDrvgmta g?taff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF ................................. ....... ................................ EMMA B. WOOTTON Assistant Editors ...................................................... Adrienne Epping, Kenneth A. Moores MANAGER .................................... CHAS'. H. DUNDORE Assistant Managers ..................................................... Edward P. Harwood, M-ax Reigard Circulation ...................................................................................................... Harold Tregilgas College Activities ....................................................................................... John DeWitt Gilbert Classes .................................................................................... Sana Barker, Dorothy Dunbar Fraternities ..................................................................................................... Walter S. Kennon Athletics ............................................................................ 5 ...................................... James Sheehy Organizations...................., ............................................................................. Donald C. Roberts Women's Activities ....................................................................................... Lillian M. Littler Musical Organizations ............................................................................... Martha W. Tinker Publications ................................................ , .................................................... Jeannette Calkins Forensics ...................................................................................................... Earl E. Fleischmann Features ........................................................................... Adrienne Epping, A. James Vance Art ......................................................................................................................... Harvey Madden Dramatics ............................ Marian Tuttle ow D 03 E3 111.11-191-11; :9: ,1 , 03h? GDngana Sixteen years ago the class of 1902 presented the first year book to the Uni- versity of Oregon under the title of the ttWebfoot." It was edited by Allen H. Eaton, who is now a. member of the faculty of the University and 3 represent- ative in the Oregon legislature. ' . During the next seven years only 1ive of the junior classes published books. Various names were used by these five classes. TWO more of them, the class of 1903 and the class of 1905, published their books under the title of the "Web- foot." The classes of 1907 and 1908, hoWever, called their small paper-oovered volume the ttBulletinW The class of 1909 again changed the name, this time calling the book the ttBeaverF It was the class of 1910 that finally decided on the name of ttOregana." Since that time the book has appeared regularly each year. In the fall of 1915-1916 it was decided that the financial strain of publishing the "Oregana" was too great for any one class to bear, so the ttOreganaii is now a student body affair, although still managed by the junior class. YEAR-BOOK EDITORS AND MANAGERS 'Class Name Editor Manager 1902 .......... Webfoot .................. Allen H. Eaton ...................... Edward N. Blythe. 1903 .......... Webfoot .................. Harvey B. Densmovre ............ Condon R. Bean. 1904 .......... No Book. 1905 .......... Webfoot .................. Earl R. Abbett ..................... Frederick Steiwer. 1906........'..No Book. 1907 .......... Bulletin ...Le1a. Goddard Harry L. Raffety. 1908 ........... Bulletin V James Cunning .................... William Barker. 1909 .......... Beaver Jessie Hurle .......................... Charles Mac Snow. 1910 .......... Oregazna. Oliver B. Hustonn .............. Carey V. Loosely; 1911 .......... Oregana Charles W. Robison ............ D. Leslie Dobie. 1912 .......... Oregana Chester A. Moores .............. Wendell C. Barbour. 1913 .......... Oreig-ana ' Karl W. Onthank ...... ....... Andrew M. Collier. 1914 .......... Oregana. Donald B. Rice .................... Hawley J . Bean. 1915 .......... Oregana Leland G. Hendricks ...... Ben F. Dorris Jr. 1916 .......... Oregana. ...Maurice B. Hyde ................. William P. Holt. 1917 .......... Oregana ..Milton R. Stoddard ...... . ....... Ernest Watkins. ah'u". bwgzw w; ' W7 3 i N: i,mmy ATHLETICS 61 CAPTAIN JOHN BECKETT ZHnnthall Any review of Oregon,s 1916 football season must needs be one of superlatives. The cold black type is far too inadequate to truthfully picture those brllliant victories but six months ago. Pacific coast newspaper critics heralded Bezdek's varsity as the "greatest team that ever trod a western gridiron'i-"a team that could step into the Yale or Harvard bowls and hold their own With the best elevens in the country." . A team that trounced the California tiGolden Bear" in its own lair by a 39 to 14 score--a team that beat Dietzls famous W. S. C. machine-a team that smothered the Oregon Aggies under four clean-cut touchdowns-a team that defeated Multnomah on two occasions by big margins-eand finally a team that upheld the honor of the west against the east by vanquishing Pennsylvania 14 to 0 in the biggest intersectionlad game of the year at Pasadena-that is Or- egonis team-that is their record, a priceless legacy left to adorn for all time the laureled pages of almai materis athletic history. To Coach Hugo Bezdek, to Trainer Bill Hayward, to Assistant Coach Dean Walker, to Captain Johnny Beckett, to every member of the varsity, to the ever- faithful scrubs and freshmen, rightfully belongs a share in the credit for the season of successes-victories that placed the lem-on-y-ellow on the highest pin- nacle of her athletic achievements. Oregon Went through the season undefeated. Coach Bezdek, who has a faculty of accomplishing What he goes after, planned the entire seasonts camrpaign long before he issued the first call for practice. He had wisely looked a-head--he met his opponents prepared. He knew what they had to offer-he met their attack with a strong frontehe repulsed them. He developed the most powerful running offensive drive that western football ever experienced. tlBez" had a great scoring machine fronted by a. line that out- charged opposing forward flankers on every occasion. He turned out a team with each man a star in his position. The Oregon eleven was polished-it was a finished product, versed from alpha to omega in the technique of football. With 10 letter men from last year's state champions on hand, "Bez" set about his task of moulding them into a machine. Football in all its minutae was gone through nightly on Kincaid field. The wily mentor harped on the fundamentals. Oregon men knew the game from a to z. For thrde solid weeks the tackling dummy was given little time to rest, the bucking machine worked overtime, blackboard talks became a regular diversion. Sprinting, and more sprinting, was the cry. The strenuous sessions on old Kincaid had their effect. Bill Hayward and his regular routine of conditioning made it possible that but five substitutions were necessary throughout the entire four months of play. Eight hard games were played. The season was auspiciously ushered in with the Willamette Methodists lined up against the varsity on October 7 at Eugene. The lemon-yellow, without its full strength, humbled the Salemites in a near three-Iigured victory. The count of 97 to 0 represented 14 touchdowns and 13 goal kicks. Shy Huntington gave an exhibition of what he had in store for rival elevens throughout the season by reeling off no less than four 50-yard runs for scores and numerous 25 and 30 - xxw M Mix gm w A . gay; , x x 9 $25 m mud"d IN THE MIRE, NOVEMBER 4 DOLAN, DOBIE AND VARNELL YOU,RE DOWN, WASHINGTON yard gains. His contribution for the afternoon was 6 touchdowns and 12 goal kicks. A week later on Kincaid field Oregon Walloped the husky Multnomah clubmen of Portland in the first of the two 27 to 0 lickings handed the scarlet and white. Johnny Parsons, after an absence of a year from college football, stepped into the fray and showed his old field cunning. Tegart on the receiving end of the two forward passes, was easily the star of the afternoon. The Portlanders failed to show their expected strength and were unable to pierce Oregonts line for yardage. Fandom the northwest over realized that Bezdek had a great scoring machine and a wonderful all-around team. On October 21 they stepped on California field for the first time in years, with an acknowledged terrific offense, but an un- tried defense. Willamette and Multnomah had failed woefully to even test the lemon-yellow line. The web-footers were plainly nervous and over-anxious when they ran on the well-sodded Berkeley turf before a crowd numbering close to 12,000 people. It was an ideal afternoon. Three minutes after the Californians had kicked off the varsity had worked the ball past midfield. Then there was a fumble. The blue and gold recovered and by a series of aerial heaves and open formations scored on the dazed varsity. Captain ttBrudtt Montgomery kicked goal. Immediately the maddened northerners caught a second kickoff and ran roughshod over Andy Smithis proteges, tieing up the score. Bezdekis machine, once it got under way, was unstoppable. Parsons and Beckett each scored in this half, bringing the score to a 20 to 7 count. California showed a varied attack, but was sadly lacking in the fundamentals of the game. The open iield work and forward pass catching of Sharp, quarter back, was a revelation to Bezdekts men. Oregon opened up in the second half and ripped the southerners' line to shreds. Three more touchdowns came duringthe final two periods. A penalty near the end of the game brought the ball to the levmzon-yellowis 15-yard line, from where the California backs bucked it over. r'.:As the whistle blew the score sheet showed a 39 to 14 victory for Bezdekis men. " A11 Eugene paid homage to the varsity as they stepped off the Shasta Lim- ited fresh from conquering the 'Golden Bear." The entire team was bundled into a frosh-pulled tally-ho and led a monster parade to the steps of Johnson hall. Bezdek told how the Oregon spirit had conquered; Bill Hayward said, "We outfought themV; and President Camlpbell saidHfit .Was a great victory? It stands as a never-to-be--forgotten day when Oregon students paid homage to thei: great team. Bezdek immediately settled down to meet Dobieehis ancient foe. He spent a solid week in stiffening the defense that had proven little of an enigma to the Californians. All eyes were turned on Eugene to whip tWashilngton on Novem- ber 4. Five hundred alumni came back to witness Oregonis chance to humble the mighty Dobie, but the weather interfered. A weekts rain lefthinsaid field as soggy as a lagoon. The iield was in deplorable shapeWitvcost Oregon the game. ' ' . Despite the fact that the varsity had by far the better te.am,iit had'tobe sat- isfied With a tie score. The bulky Washingtonians were repulsed at every attempt yam Mr . MI I;I;111 l! gt ' I! ,f, !,,I, g I gm ,4 ' k " . , . x XWW ,, v, 5 X .x H 723w , th 1 x xxrggf gm r .0 g, f SKINNING THE GOLDEN BEAR VVILLAMETTE NAILING SHY " PARSONS SCORES ON MULTNOMAH 65 to break through Bezdekis defense. Neither team could get under way. Ore- gon pulled an onside kick in the second quarter that rolled to the purple and goldis one-yard line. In his hurry to grab the rolling oval before it crossed the line, Johnny Parsons fumbled, losing a golden opportunity to score. Fandom in general voiced the sentiment afterr the game that had it been a. dry Iield Oregon Would have won by at least two touchdowns. Campus interest lagged somewhat after the scoreless tile with Washington. Not so with the varsity. The following week in Portland was their vindication. They came back-they walloped Washington State to a. nicety in a thrilling 12 to 3 batle. The Staters wrere helpless before the terriiic. drive of the Oregon back- field. Dietz admitted after the game that it was the first time since he had been coaching that his. line had been outcharged. Every Oregon man played the game of his life that day. It was do or die. "We were fighting for that little institution at Eugene," were Coach Bezdek's words after the game. It was a. wonderful victorye-it sent Oregon's praises over the country. A week later the Tournament of Roses committee at Pasadena invited Bez- dek's machine to represent the west against Pennsylvania on New Yearis day in the southern city. Eugene was football crazy, but Bezdek refused to enthuse. uWait until we beat 0. A. G. Then weill talk about playing Pennsylvania." Oregon beat 0. A. C. They smothered the Aggies 27 to 0 on an ankle-deep, m-ud-covered field in Corvallis. On a dry field the score no doubt would have been doubled. The Agies, out-weighed, out-played, and out-generaled, fought gamely but were unable to stop the drive of Bezdekis men. 0. A. C. showed themselves to be game losers-dthey rooted harder as the lemo-n-yellow added to the score. They fought hardethey backed their team and Coach Pipal from beginning to end. They lost with glory to a superior team-a team that later proved itself on a par with any eleven in the country. Great was the enthusiasm when the faculty unanimously voted to allow the coast champions to meet the sons of Penn on New Year's day. They deserved the honor-they merited the chOice of the Pasadena oiiicials With the big game loom'ing on the horizon, Bezdek trotted his athletes to Portland for the annual Thanksgiving battle with Multnomah. Portland sportdomi saw for the last time the team that Was to meet the east but a month later. Oregon played straight football and had little difficulty in handing the clubmen their second 27 to 0 defeat. , Rest was the reward to the team after the long seasonis grind of three months. Bezdek took no chances on his charges going stale-they forgot foot- ball for 10 days or more. Then the grind again-three solid weeks were spent in getting a line on the Pennsylvanians. Penn loomed formidable with its How ard Berry, its Heinie Miller, its record of having trimmed Cornell 23 to 3 on Thanksgiving day. But the varsity and Oregon fans had confidence in their own ability-it was a grand opportunity to dispel the old humbug of the east's superiority over the west in football. Bezdek planned to make the most of it, and he did. Few dopesters gave Oregon 3. chance against the weII-coached Quakers when they lined up on New Year's day before some 27,000 spectators. It was a war. derful setting-the stands displayed a riot of color. Fortunately, Bezdekis men m, , , z x. $52.. yr, . Sley Shy Huntington i R l'arsons Bartlett Monteith Tegart .0 67 entered the fray the under dogse-ready to fight to the 1ast-ready to defend the west's fair name. - The details of that memorable victory are historye-they will never be for- gotten. Oregon 14-Pennsylvania 0 ticked in every telegraph office in the United States. It told of a brilliant close of the most successful season Oregon ever experienced. It vindicated western footba11-it fairly appalled the easterners. They were stunned, they couldnit believe it. ttWhy, Pennsylvania is one of the best teams in the country. There must be some mistake? they said. But there was no mistake. Even the tiBrotherly Lovers" themselves admitted defeat by a team that sprang their own attack on them. "You beat us at our own game," said Coach Bob Folwell in congratulating Coach Bezdek on his wonderful Vic tory. "You have a great team. You deserved to win? During their stay in Pasadena the boys were royaLly feted by the Tournamen: of Roses committee. When they won there was nothing too good for them. East- erners who saw the game rated Brick Mitchell and Shy Huntington as two of the greatest footballers in the country. ttThatis the trimmest looking team I ever saw? was the comment on the fine showing of the Oregonians. Best of all, Oregon has been invited to represent the west at Pasadena on January 1, 1918. Coach Bezdek graciously accepted the offer, providing the faculty permits the playing of the game. u1111 have a stronger eleven next year," said ttBez" in commenting on the choice of his athletes. A summary of the season shows that the varsity scored 244 points, while the opponents were gathering a miserly 17. Captain Johnny Beckett and Shy Hunt- ington made places on W'alter Camps third all-Amlerican team. In company with Jake Risley, Bill Snyder and Johnny Parsons, they were the unanimous selections for the all-coast and all-northwest teams. Oregonts athletic light never shone brighter than during the football season just passed. Captain Johnny Beckett and Johnny Parsons are the only ones who will be missing next year. The fall of 1917 ought to be more brilliant than its predecessor, if. such a thing is possible. THE 1916 SEASON AT A GLANCE Oregon-Will-amette .................. at Eugene .......... October 7 ....................... Score Oregon-M. A. A. C. .................. at Eugene .......... October 14 ................... Score oregon-California at Berkeley ........ October 21 ................. Score Oregon-Wiaxshingto-n at Eugene ............ November 4: ................ Score Oregon-W. S. C. ...................... at Portland ........ November 11 ,. .......... Score Oregon-O. A. C. ........................ at Corvallis ...... November 25 ............. Score Oregon-M. A. A. C. .................. at Portland .......... November 30 ..t....Score Oregon-Pennsylvania .............. an Pasadena ........ January 1, "i ............ Score Oregon 244; Opponents 17. Xszliii i ;;i:gi :E:if2 :::l:;;;!li;! ; w . .: . g .. V! W ' t f ; WUW-S 2!? Iz'ie'aggi!5!!f!:la I'M: , +- 69 OREGONS GREATEST FOOTBALL TEAM Little was heard of HShy" Huntington, 18, until that memorable day at Corvallis three years ago, when he booted the ball squarely between the uprights for a 3 to 3 tie. Since then he has been in the limelight on several occasions. He possesses a stocky frame, a cool head, and is one of the shiftiest open field runners in the conference. He scored over 120 points unaided last year. Critics unanimously gave him the all-coast quar- terback positiOn for the year of 1916. ttJohnnytt Parsons, 17, was the most ma- ligned athlete on the coast. When he wasn't playing football he was bothered with news- paper tales concerning his eligibility, hatched by rival colleges. Despite all these, Parsons proceeded to play the best football ever put forth for old Oregon. He was the best open field runner in the conference as well as being a bear on the defense. His final feat in a lemon-yellow suit was to circle Heine Miller, the all-American Pennsylvania end, for a gain of 45 yards, coming within an ace of scoring a well-de- erved touchdown. OI v3. , 11 .1. Ma... - 'hw. .,1.,,.v.n"... 1.. . .7 H11 .15- A . t:- 3 V! "g-.. u .... 11;... w .. ., 71?", F . 1 ,Amwmmt, , ,m aw. "Jake" Risley, '18, the 175-pound boy 3: from Milwaukie, Oregon, has more scrap V and Iight in him than any other lineman in this part of the country. Risley at center is a. terror on the defense and has put it ? all over rival snapperbacks the past three years. A sure passer, reliable, a fierce tackle-r, he is ever 011 the alert to break up the opponent's plays and passes. He was the all-coast center selection for 1916, and the last three all-northwest teams. e .Kr..v-sgx.um.wwe... 4 ; 3.... mnmragsxmam . as .3 ,. n NP..u-,;-.ovx. . Jhwt we" m cefn another worthy who ttBill" Snyder is "' w ' 4' grabbed an all-coast berth for valiant ser- m -t w vice during the 1916 season. Fandom real- n .w 0" ized at the end of the playing season that , WW "Bill" Snyder made possible many of the w long gains of the Oregon backfield through 5 s W d . the opposing lines. Bill was the match 1; "w; ii. for the best linemen 0n the coast. He was i; in W m the fastest big man on the squad and fre- f; w" quently downed the safety before the ends f b t , ; w. w could reach hlm. j i3 W 1, E 1 o .4:- In t 1M ' M "Ken" Bartlett, ,18, like Spellman, won his job by his ability to grab the finer points of the game and to put them into play. He is seldom flashy or brilliant, but he is one of the steadiest and most conscientious workers on the team. He made possible the first score against W. S. C. last fall by running back the kickoff a cool 55 yards. His pluck vand clean-cut tactics at all times have won him a host of friends. "Dud" Dudley, ,17, Who hails from Athena, came out for the varsity in his senior year and made his letter in the Aggie game. Al- though with little real football experience he showed a world of fight at right guard. Dudley is a great hand to break through the opposing line and smear the backfield liven before they get under way. iiBrick" Mitchell is another product of the class of 18 that placed eight athletes on the varsity team. There is not a harder or iiercer tackler on the coast. Critics Who saw him in the Pennsylvania game lauded him as one of the best ends in the coun- try. Brick rarely misses a tackle, and once he hits a. man there is no crawling or squirming from his clutches. He was easily the all-coast selection at left end. "Teg" Tegart is the fellow Who scored iive touchdowns during the now historic 1916 season. At right end "Teg" earned three squares a day by his uncanny ability to grap iiZeppelins" and to pile up the 0p- position on runs around his side. He has the hapy faculty of being in the right place at the right time. Tegart scored the first touchdown against Pennsylvania by grab- bing a forward pass over the goal line. Fight and hard work alone gave ttBartP Spellman hits we'llydeserved job on Bez- dek's machine. Bart worked on the scrubs for two years, finally breaking in two years ago at right guard. His main difficulty has been to chase old man injury and ill-luck from camping on his trail. Spellman grad- uates this June, but may be back in the fall for a third year on the gridiron. An injured knee marred to some extent what promised to be "Monty" Monteith's most successful year on the gridiron. At left halfback he ran rough-s-hod over rival teams in early season. He injured his knee after the California game, which reduced his speed and dodging ability. Monteith is out of school at present, but expects to be back for the 1917 season. 12' h kt:!!i H. ttHollie" Huntington, 19, came to college last fall after an absence of two years and stepped right into the fullback position. Although not a sensational player, Hollis improved as the season grew older. His specialty is his ability to break up forward passes and to stop line plunges through the center of the line. He has but another year on the varsity, due to the conference ruling barring participation after five years of a mans hrst registration date. Eugene, Oregon, was represented on the 1916 coast champion eleven by "Bast VVil- liams, t19. "Bas" made the squad in his fresh year, doing substitute duty at left end. Last fall he got his chance against 0. A. C. and filied "Johnny" Beckettts shoes, who worked in the backfleld in the place of Parsons, who was declared ineli- gible. "Bas" has plenty of scrap and is learning the liner points of the game rap- idly. Bezdek expects great things of him next year. , m- n. anymrrvou an .m w . . 4-"... .. .. -....- . , 10 tnumr -VW :nA-s ,.,.i e ,a-a W ,4 ans 7 da m -ELECT MARTIN NELSON m A T P A C Mg? 7; ,x L xx 17??? 6?: z? x? ?4. CAPTAIN CHET FEE Elbe 1H 15 Erark Gleam When the spiked shoes had been laid- away for another 10 months, when 0. A. C. and Washington had been defeated, When the conference championship had been tucked away, when the weeds had over-grown the Kincaid oval, when the track season of 1916 was at a close, there stood out like a single star in the heavens the name of one man-a man who has done more for track athletics than any individual in the northwestea man who annually brings old Oregon the northwest conference track championshipeBILL HAYWARD-long may she wave. Fandom has oft repeated its boast of, iino matter how badly we get licked in the other branches of athletics, we can always count on winning the track championship, as long as- Bill Hayward is coach." "They cantt beat us in track -Bill will pull us through somehow or other." Such is the esteem and coniidence that Oregon students hold for Bill Hay- WIard. They stand by him through thick and thin. They back him to the limit. Bill Hayward comes throughehe delivers the goodsehe is a great handller and shaper of the raw recruitehe develops track teams from ambitious fellows, some of whom never saw a pair of running shoes. Active training for the 1916 season started in the second week of February. The sun shone brighteOregon got a good start. Yet Hayward issued his annual bear story-ttNo materialePayne, Loucks, Huggins and Heidenreich are gone- if we ever get licked it will be this year? Fandom listened to Bill, yet they felt assured that when the time rolled around another trophy, bearing the in- scription, ttNorthwest conference track and field championshipSe1916," would adorn the case in the menis gymnasium. A large squad, with a goodly share of old men, partially offset the handicap of a rainy training season, which hindered the progress of the men in gaining their stride Hayward started from the outset to build his team around captain "Chet,' Fee and "Moose" Muirhead, two of the mbst versatile athletes on the coast The Far Western Meet, held April 1, in the indoor armory at Corvallis, marked a new wrinkle in conference track and field games. Oregon entered the meet untrained. O. A. C., with all the advantages of the indoor track, was doped to Win by a big margin. The presence of Fred Kelly, Worldis champion high hurdler, added considerable color to the meet. 0. A. C. Won the meet by annexing 40 points. Oregon surprised her most ardent admirers as well as iiBilli Hayward, by amassing 30 points, just one more than the Los Angeles Athletic Club team. Captain ttChet" Fee performed up to standard by clearing the bar in the pole vault at 12 feet and winning the javelin with a throw of 164 feet 11 inches. iiMooseii Muirhead won the high jump at 6 feet 1142 inches. He bowed to Kelly in the 80-yard high hurdles. Lee Bostwick broke into print by winning the five-mile grind from Lucas, of O. A. C., in the fast time of .27241. Bob Atkinson, Ray Staub and Don Belda ing each took a third place in the 880, 440 and mile runs respectively. Junior week-end saw Oregon in its annual dual meet with O. A. C. on Kincaid field. Mainly through the point grabbing abilities of itChet" Fee and tiMoose" Muirhead, the Aggies were defeated by a 71-60 score. "I :::::.::T::T:3 D l 15. 5 1T;:::i.:;ff.:17i"Nm'w'." "WIT, JD 60 0mm These two jack-of-all-trades annexed 17 points apieoe, or close to half of the lemon-yellowis total markers. Fee took first place in the javelin, shot put, pole vault, and third in the low hurdles and broad jump. Muirhead was good for first honors in both hurdle races, second honors in the high and broad jump, and third in the javelin throw. A perfect day and a perfect track made an ideal setting for the meet. The Aggie started off with a rush when Coleman, the sturdy distance man, ran away from Belding in the mile run. Coleman later made Martin Nelson extend him- self to win the half-mile and ambled behind Lee Bostwick in the two mile for a second place. Not content with this, Coleman ran the first lap of the relay and gave his teammates a lead that the lemon-yellow could not overcome. Cole- man's great endurance was one of the outstanding features of the afternoon. The large crowd cheered Oscar Goreczky and Bert Peacock as they exchanged places in the 100 and 200-yard dashes. Goreczky Won the 100 from Peacock only to have the latter nose him out in the 220 by a great burst of speed. Oregon journey to Seattle the Week-end of May 20 and had little trouble in winning a 76-55 victory over the purple and gold athletes on Denny field. As usual, it was a case of too miuch Fee and Muirhead, with the former working overtime in eight events. It was Captain Feeis last appearance against Wash- ington and he more than outdid himself. His total Was 27V2 points for the afternoon, representing four iirsts, two seconds and ham thirds. Muirhead won the high hurdles, finished second in the 220-yard low hurdles, and grabbed three third places. Kent Wilson and Ray Staub staged the most thrilling race of the day from an Oregon' standpoint. The tWo athletes rubbed elbows rat the start of the 440- yard dash: Both entered the race With the knowledge that first meant the win- ning of his "0" for the seasonis labors. Never did two men strive harder for honors. It was a case of two equally fast men pitted against each other in their final test of speed and endurance. They ran neck and neck the entire race. Coming down the straightaway in the last 40 yards, Wilson called upon all his reserve powers, and with one last lunge, broke the tape a scant yard ahead of his teammate Staub. Two surprises stood out in the track enevts. One was the defeat of Martin Nelson by Paul Clyde in the 880-yard run. The purple and gold athlete gained the pole at the first turn and refused to let Nelson pass him, try as he might. The time was 1:58:3. McDonald, of Washington, beat Bostwick, of Oregon, to the tape in the two-mile run and upset the dope. Fandom had figured Bostwick to Win the race, using his past performances as a criterion. Kenny Bartlett won his letter by throwing the discus 136 feet 10 inches, win- .nivng over Fee and Cochran, of Washington. Don Belding finished third in the mile and two mile. Then the conference meet at Pullman. It was another feather in Bill Hay- wardis hat. Bill spent weeks in doping out his sheet as to what points the other teams Would take and what events he could count on his athletes taking. He won the meet before he entered his team. He out-doped the other conference coaches-his men took the points he had counted upon them to win. Things looked bad at the outset for Oregon. The Idaho sprinters came to the front and won both the 100 and 200-yard dashes. Kadderly, of O. A. 0., ran ,- . .. ... . ...-. .".u-u " hth-n mk. x tuna, Q" . k Ithu' l n -'" '$ noun$' "'r "bu. , n no UI'W"' .0 U'",'y II- In -" '5 .0 -.' . I D v'." .. y Yr , A true to form and won the 440 dash. Wilson, of Oregon, grabbed the first point for the lemon-yellow by finishing third in this raCe. Martin Nelson, who, never gets going until after mid-season, came to life and won the 880 yard run from a big field of starters. ttCotton" ran a great race and flnished in 1:59:1. Soon the redoubtable Fee-Muirhead comzbination got into action. Fee won the jayelin from Damon, of O. A. 0., with .a throw of 184 feet 1 inch. He fm- ished third in the high jump and second in the pole vault. Muirherad saved the day by taking the high jump after winning the high hurdles in the iiast time of 15:2. Oregon won the meet with 37 points, with Idaho finishing second with 29. O. A. 0., W. S. 0. and Whitman finished in the order named. Immediately after the conference meet, the letter men elected Martin Nelson, of Astoria, to lead the 1917 team. His choice was the reward for three years of faithful service under Bill Hayward. Prospects for the coming year are the darkest that ever faced Hayward. Both Fee and Muirhead are missing, which leaves the team without an all-around man; As the Oregana goes to press, the war scare threatens to riddle the team of available point winners. Kent Wilson was the first letter man to leave the squad. Smmmarg nf the $2aann NORTHWEST CONFERENCE MEET 100-yard dasheRichmond, Idaho; Morrison, Idaho; Edwards, Whitman. Time, 10 flat. . 220-y.ard dash-Morrison, Idaho; Miller, W. S. 0.; Richmond, Idaho. Time, 21:3. 440-yard dasthadderly, O. A. 0.; Schlacter, W. S. 0.; Wilson, Oregon. Timer. 48:3. tNew conference recordJ ' ' 880-yard run-Nelson, Oregon; Ge-rlough, Idlaho; Kadderly, O. A. 0. Time, 1:59:1. Mile run-Coleman, O. A. 0.; McKay, Whitman; Schlacter, W. S. 0. Time, 4:37:1. Two mile run-Smith, W. S. 0.; Bostwick, Oregon; Schlacter, W. S. 0. Time, 9:54z3. 120-yard high hurdles-Muirhead, Oregon; Hoover, Whitman; Fee, Oregon; and McCroskey, W. S. 0., disqualified. Time, 15:2. 220-yard hurdleseHoover, Whitman; McCroskey, W. S. 0.; Damon, O. A. 0. DiscuSe-Cole, O. A. 0. ; Bartlett, Oregon; Lommason, Idaho. Distance, 132 ft. 8 in. Pole vault-0assiidy, Idaho; Fee, Oregon; Thompson, W. S. 0. Height, 12 ft. High jumpeMuirhead, Oregon; Grant, 0. A. 0.; Fee, Oregon. Height, 6 ft. 2 in. Jiavelin-Fee, Oregon; Damon, O. A. 0.; Dement, Whitman. Distance, 184 ft. 1 in. .,; Broad jump-MacDonald, Whitman; Fee, Oregen; Muirhead, Oregon. Dis- tance, 21 ft. 11 in. , Relay-Won by W. S. 0.; Idaho second; Oregon third. Time, 3:25:1. RESULT OF MEET Oregon 37; Idaho 29; O. A. 0. 28; W. S. 0. 22; Whitman 18. . U.. KM y. K. , an . Jun; I - , 9 in: t h w t. 4 Mb. '5$W . " ui " W mvti. . 'M ' "' am. a ! V, 1., E '9 .. , tutu. . . c-A .-. - 1a 1.231; '3 Lani! a OREGON LEADING THE CONFERENCE RELAY FEE BREAKS THE NORTHWEST RECORD START OF THE 440 AT SEATTLE 81 FAR WESTERN INDOOR MEET CORVALLIS, APRIL 1, 1916 80-y1ard dash-Kelly, L. A. A. C.; Ford, Willamette; Small, Willamette; Mor- rison, Idaho. Time, 8:1. 6Wor1d1s indoor recordJ 440-yard dash-K1ardder1y, O. A. C.; Sloman, O. C.; Staub, Oregon; Wilson, Oregon. Time, 51 fiat. 880-yard run-Coleman, O. A. C.; Beebe, U. S. C.; Atkinson, Oregon; Mon- tague, Oregon. Time, 220024. 220-yard dash4Kelly, L. A. A. C.; Kadderly, O. A. C.; Morrison, Idaho; Betty, Idaho. Time, 23 flat. Gndoor recordJ Mile run-Devvey, M. A. A. C.; Tille-ry, unattached; Belding, Oregon; Crippen, U. S. C. Time, 4:38:1. 0 80-yard hurdles-Ke11y, L. A. A. C.; Thompson, U. S. C.; Muirhead, Oregon; Straugn, O. A. C.,1atnd Radcliffe, Willamette, tied for fourth. Time, 10 flat. 220-yard hurdles-Hummel, M. A. A. C.; Damon, O. A. C.; Reardon, unattached; and Thompson, U. S'. C., finished in order but were disqualified. Time, 27 :2. Pole vault4Fere, Oregon; Sutherland, O. A. C.; Metzler, O. A. C.; Magone, M. A. A. C. Height, 12 ft. 6.1 in. Shot put-Bagnard, L. A. A. C.; Casey, O. A. C.; Philbrook, M. A. A. C.; John- son, unattached. Distance, 43 ft. 11 in. Five mile run-BostWick, Oregon; Lucas, 0. A. C. Time, 27:41. High jump-Muirhead, Oregon; Murphy, Columbia; Magone, M. A. A. C.; Thompson, U. S. C. Height, 6 ft. 1112 in. DiscuSyCole, O. A. C.; Philbrook, M. A. A. C.; Bagnard, L. A. A. C.; Lom- masen, Idaho. Distance, 140 ft. 915 in. 6World1s indoor recordJ Mile relay-Won by O. A. C. 0Dutton, Anderson, Coleman, Kadderlw. Idaho second. .Time, 3:32. ' Broad jump-Kelly, L. A. A. C.; Thompson, U. S. C.; Bagnard, L. A. A. C.; Hummel, M. A. A. C. Distance, 20 ft. 6 in. Javelin4Fee, Oregon; Damion, O. A. C.; Hummel, M. A. A. C.; Brown, Wil lamette. Distance, 164 ft. 11 in. RESULT OF MEET ' O. A. C., 40; Oregon, 30; L. A. A. C., 29; M. A. A. C., 21; U; S. C., 13; Wil- lamette, 6; Idaho, 5; Unattached, 5; Olympic Club, 3; Columbia, 3. . ANNUAL OREGON-WASHINGTON TRACK MEET Seattle, May 20. Oregon, 76; Washington 55 100-yard dash4Stenstrom, Washington; Goreczky, Oregon; Peacock, Oregon. Time, 10:4. 220-yard dash-Newton, Washington; Stenstrom, Washington; Peacock, Ore- gon. Time, 2321. 440-yard dash-Wi1son, Oregon; Staub, Oregon; Newton, Washington. Time, 52 fiat. 880-yard run401yde, Washington; Nelson, Oregon; Woodbridge, Oregon. Time, 1:58z3. ' Mile run-Clyde, Washington; MacDonald, Washington; Belding, Oregon. Time, 423522. . Two-mile run-MacDonald, Washington; Bostwick, Oregon; Belding, Oregon. Time, 9:51. '4 WILSON WINS HIS 0" . 0 CHET GRABS FIVE MORE POINTS MUIRHEAD AND FEE LEAD THE HIGH HURDLES 83 120-yard high hurdles-Muirhead, Oregon; Fee, Oregon; Gibson, Washington. Time, 16:3. 220-ya-rd low hurdles-Gibson, Washington; Muirhead, Oregon; Fee, Oregon. Time, 26:2. Shot put3Fee, Oregon; Anderson, Washington; Bartlett, Oregon. Distance, 40 ft. 414 in. Pole vault-Stuchell, Washington; Fee, Oregon; Muirhead, Oregon. Height, 11 ft. 6 in. Broad jump-Fee, Oregon; Stuche11,Washington; Muirhead,0regon. Distance, 21 ft. 3V; in. Javelin-Fee, Oregon; Anderson, Washington; Muirhead, Oregon. Distance, 176 ft. High jump3Fee, Oregon, and Muirhead, Or'exgon, tied for first, 5 ft. 6 in.; Young, Washington, third. D'iscus-Bartlett, Oregon; Fee. Oregon; Cochran, VVashjangton. Distance, 136 ft. 10 in. ' Relay-Won by Oregon. 7Goreczky, Peacock, Staub, NellsonJ ANNUAL O. A. 0.-OREGON TRACK MEET Eugene, May 12. Oregon 71; O. A. 0. 60 100-yard dash3Goreczky, Or.; Peacock, Or.; Kadderly, O. A. 0. Time, 10 flat. 220-yard dash-Peacock, Or.; Goreczky, Or.; Kadderly, O. A. 0. Time, 22:4. 440-yard dash-Kadder1y, O. A. 0.; Wilson, Or.; Anderson, 0. A. 0. Time, 51:1. 880-yard run-Nelson, Or.; Coleman, 0. A. 0.; Montague, 01'. Time, 2:003. Mile run-dColeman, O. A. 0.; Belding, Or.; Tillery, O. A. 0. Time, 4:27:2. Two-mile run-Bostwick, Or.; Coleman, 0. A. 0.; Van Buskirk, O. A. 0. 4Time, 9:46. 120-yard high hurdles-Muirhead, Or.; S'traughn, O. A. 0.; Hilton, 0. A. C. Time, 15:3. Pole vault-Fee, Or.; Metzler, O. A. 0.; Watkins, Or. Height, 12 ft. 4 in. New N. W. record. 220.y1a7rd 10W hurdles-Muirhead, Or.; Damon, O. A. 0.; Fee, Or. Time, 25:4. High jum1p-Bryant, O. A. 0.; Muirhevad, Or.; Fendall, O. A. 0. Height, 6 ft. IA; in. Broad jump-Fendall, O. A. 0.; Muirhe-ad, Or.; Fee, Or. Distance, 20 ft. 10V; in. Discus-Cole, O. A. 0.; Bartlett, Or.; Funk, 0. A. 0. Distance, 137 ft. 1 in. Shot put3Fee, Or.; Johnson, 0. A. 0.; Fendall, O. A. 0. Distance, 40 ft. 7172 in. Javelin-Fee, Or.; Damon, O. A. 0.; Muirhead, Or. Distance, 173 ft. 6 in. New college. Relay3Won by O. A. 0. moleman, Damon, Anderson, KadderlyJ Time 3:29:1. .n n... 1:. I 1... ... m .2.. .....- V .-. ..23 w v NORTHWEST CONFERENCE CHAMPIONS ?xxxii. X . ttMoose" Muirhead, 18, made enough points him- self to Win most any track meet. ttMoose" was a sure Winner in the high hurdles and high jump and cold be counted on to place in the broad jump, 10W hurdles, pole vault and javelin. Any time Bill need- ed a few points he would call for Muirhead and ttMoose" would invariably come through. A11 in all ttMoosett totaled some 46 points for the seasons work, Which is as much as could be expected of any young man. Lee Bostwick, t17, stepped into ttMose" Paynets shoes as if they were made for him. While he didn't equal the illustrious record of his predeces- sor, he managed to Win a goodly number of points for the lemon-yellow. In the Far Western meet at Corvallis he defeated Lucas, of the Aggies, in a thrilling five-mile run in Which the lead changed hands ten or tWelve times. Lee duplicated his vic- tory in the two-mile event on the local campus. ' . "n.1'1'! i'ihss.e aUehsi: .uw.n.s hwy"..s " s his regular events. Kent Wilson, 18, bowed to Kadderly, of O. A. 0., alone in the quarter mile. Kadderly beat "Prexy" both here and at the conference meet, but both timed by the slimmest 0f margins. In fact, at Pull- man 'he forced the O. A. C. runner to a mark of 48 3-5 seconds. With as much improvement as he showed last year, Kent should come near reaching that mark himself. iiTony" Goreczky, 18, was Bill Haywardis main- stay in the sprints. In his freshman year he was was unable to show his true form, due to a severe illness, but Last spring he came into his own. iiTonyii is at his best in the century, Which he won in the O. A, C. dual meet. He also grabbed second in the 220 against the orange and black. This year Bill is counting on him for the hurdles in addition to in Q; Elma "I v-n4nxi..-wm-wvm vmx-m A E W, , -... w-h-rm.-.: u-.." .MW,-....N,,,,.i U Kenneth Bartlett, i18, wanted some exercise to keep in trim after football season, so Bill Hayward inveigled him into coming out for track. "Estyi' had never seen a discus before, but When the con- ference meet came around he was t0ssing the Gre- cian saucer some 135 feet. This was good enough to win from the Washington weight men, and Cole, of O .A. 0., alone surpassed him. Look out for the record this year! "Ray" Staub, 18, was the original "hard luck guy." During spring vacation he engaged in an argument with an autompbile and came off second best. Ray wxas Laid up for a few weeks in Port- land and lost a good bit of training. His best race was in the quarter at Seattle, in which he finished a stride behind Wilson. F13? w "f..r.,.-,.-i-.t.i. ,. -, h.-i 0 Q0 0 wan "Bert" Peacock, '18, won his letter by beating Goreczky to the tape in the 220 against 0. A. C. He responded to Billis call for sprinters early in the spring and soon began to fight it out with "Tony" for supremtacy. How evenly they were matched is shown by the fact that each tallied eight markers in the Aggie meet and each scored in the Wash- ington affair. Bert owed some of his success to his fast starts. shim. "M.- mhu WW. v .uzm A .w e Graham McConnell, i16, captain of the '14 team, came out last year to help Bill with his new run- ners. Although he did little running himself, "Mac" Was always on hand. He accompanied the team to Seattle and did his share by assisting in winning the relay. tiMac" used to be a 440 man and was hard to beat when in his prime. :1- w. mm,- Av A wvAuwy-a. i 89 ttDont Belding, ,18, was Billts best shot in the mile, although he didntt make his letter. Don gave the O. A. C. marvel, Coleman, a grand race here junior week-end and lost by only five scant yards. If working and training Will make a track man, Don should certainly succeed, for he keeps in con- dition the Whole year. He led the Oregon cross- country team in their race with the Aggies this fall. INDIVIDUAL POINT WINNERS FOR 1916 Far Westtn O. A. C. U. of W. Conference t 17 27 V2 12 Muirhead 17 13 1A2 11 BostWick 3 u" 3$4 Goreczky 414 Bartlett 6 614 Peacock 2 Belding 2 3$4 Atkinson Montague Watkins Totals 66$? 4815 16 1314 1214 12 1114 $3 . -t .t -wguu- Mk. HM,- .... e-.. WM; .1 524- $7,???qu aoow INA we, x k O Q. h I h. h . m. h 1Q. h . N 9 C. hn- . M 3w m . 3"! u.h! .' a b ! I I U s ,I V a ! t g 6 .1 .z' CAPTAIN ANSON COR 1y R wv Q. , m1 M22m7X 4 CAPTAIN-ELECT DICK NELSON awn OD ur.:,-m..1--1,,.....i-..,.,t.;w. .4 4. ...L; 1;" M r Haraitg 1113:1511!th The 1916 basebali season Was distinctly one of surprises. It is the record of a green, inexperienced vteamr-a team that at the opening call for practice in the ' middle of February showed little prospect of developing into a pennant con- tender, only to turn the tables in mid-season, and to be nosed out by the barest margin in the final two! games for the northwest conference title. Coach Hugo Bezdek faced a real problem from the start, but five letter men responding to the initial call for training in the middle of February. They were captain and shortstop Anse Cornell, pitcher Bill Tuerck, first baseman Dick Nelson, infielder Walter Grebe, and outfielder Jimmy Sheehy.l The three Bigbee boys, Carson, Lyle and Maurice, who had been the standbys of Oregonis diamond team during the three previous years, were among those missing. From the outset Bezdek made an entire reorganization of his material on hand. Men who had never before played the infield were brought in from the gardens to show their worth at second and Iirst base. Husky recruits, green and raw, were shuhted into the box to bolster up the pitching staff. Never before was the squad put through such strenuous conditioning stunts. Bezdek, realizing the lack of real baseball ability, taught and preached fundamentals till he was black in the face. Oregon men learned how to bat, how to run and how to slide into the bases-they learned inside baseball. The long session of arduous hours spent on the simple points had their effect on the team. There were no individual stars; it was the case of nine average ball players Working together as a unit. The varsity opened the season on March 31 by shutting out the Chemawa Indians by a lopsided score. A week later the famous Chicago Colored Giants, fresh from conquering the Portland Beavers at their training camp, dropped off at Eugene and gave the varsity an 11 to 0 lacing. Dick Nelson started the engagement, but it was not long before the Giants were finding his offerings With little effort. Scoop Rathbun pitched four innings and was touched up at frequent intervals. With his team picked, Bezdek departed April 7 on the annual spring vaca- tion barnstorming tour, with Seattle as the goal. Pitchers Tuerck, Nelson and Rathbun, iniielders Grebe, Captain Cornell, Huntington and Maison, along with outfielders Medley, McLean, Risley, Wilhelm: and Sheehy, made up the squad. The team stopped off at Centralia on Tuesday long enough to defeat the Gen- tralia high school by a large score. The following day Oregon met the Tacoma northwest team in a practice game and was badly beaten. Bezdek used his entire squad, as the game was in the nature of a workout for both teams. Oregon showed a woeful weakness in fielding and base-running ability that proved its undoing against the University of Washington. Washington drew first blood in the initial conference game by shutting out Oregon on April 14 by a 6 to 0 score. The Seattleites had 311 the breaks. Rogers, the purple and gold pitcher, managed to tighten up When the varsity threatened and came through unscathed, although he was found for six hits. Tuerck pitched good enough ball to win any ordinary game, but was unfortunate in having several drives that went for two bases dropped into the close right field bleachers. i edwa- m' ":1 a 17 a mr:g;m i: 92 .... w a m-.. ,. uai-Ol. m 2... --C-; ,. h. w gl,.... , .5 b-o 3! bau- 1'" 22 . 3'... .. W. ka2 k. W m 'u 9.. W g??? " H.156 1 , L , MXKK 4, 7M I! uni XE? n M' m" y . 5 ' "' H m mu. v. MI " I am " '.. . ,.. . pd. k a . . N i 0 V ' . A. ,. W i .u " w' .4i ' -. v I .n J. m. M 4 wt: y, . , ' . i .4' . of C ;',. ,,,.. .r I GOBLE GOES UP IN THE AIR ' i SHEEHY SCORES '" ' OUT! I' w 93 Ragged playing, errors galore, and wild baseyrunning cost Bezdekts men the second game. Washington won out in the final frames by an 8 to 7 score. Scoop Rathbun took up the gauntlet thrown down by Dick Nelson in the early innings and deserved to Win had he been accorded any kind of support. The game was replete with long hits, with Maison, Medley and Cornell responsible for three apiece. The following two weeks were days of toil for the varsity. Bezdek labored on upbuilding the defensive 0f the team. Hourswere spent in infield and outfield practice. The entire squad ran bases nightly and took several turns at the sliding pit. Dick Nelson took his old station at first base. The varsity was rejuvenated. Oregon fans will long remember the week-end of April 27-28 and May 1-2. The varsity met and defeated Washington and O. A. C. in four of the most stirring games that the Eugene campus ever witnessed . Pitchers Rathbun and Tuerck, backed up by perfect support and some terrific hitting by the entire team, led by "Dott' Medley, repulsed the Seattleites and gave the Aggie cham- pionship hopes a real jolt. The four victories gave the lemon-yellow the upper hold on the conference ladder. The final Aggie games to decide who should represent the north in the southern invasion were scheduled for Corvallis on May 4-5. A heavy downpour caused the postponement of the struggles. The following Monday, May 17, saw the varsity unnecessarily jeopardize its title by shaking its chances on the out- come of a hurriedly arranged doubleheader in the rain on a field that more nearly resembled a golf course than a baseball field. 0. A. C. got the jump in both games and won the conference bunting. The enforced layoff caused Bez- dekts men to lose their fine edge that was so prevalent the week previous. Sie- berts of O. A. C. twirled the entire 18 innings and pitched masterful ball. Rath- bun really deserved to Win the second game. Ragged work in the outfield was responsible for three runs. Immediately after the final games the letter men elected Dick Nelson, of Lafayette, Or., to lead the 1917 varsity. The credit for the success of the 1916 season belongs chiefiy t-o Coach Bezdek. He developed Shy Huntington from a raw recruit into one of the best catchers in the conference. He brought out Scoop Rathbun. He worked up a nine that for all-arounds effectiveness and knowledge of the game was the superior of any rival conference team in mid-season. As the Oregana goes to press the 1917 varsity is beginning to be shaped. Prospects are brighter than at the opening of the season just reviewed. Seven letter men are in college, together with numerous candidates from last year's freshman squad. Varsity fans are looking forward to a successful year. A SLIDE, AND SAVE WALTER WTFST MEETS IT" AGGIE INFIELD IN ACTION Medley Cornell Sheehy Grebe Maison Tuerck VARSITY BATTING AVERAGES FOR 1916 ABH 31 12 31 11 33 11 22 27 16 3SKINNY" Pct. .387 .354 .933 .318 ,-259 .250 AND Pct. Huntington .200 Nelson ' .187 Rathbun . . .111 .000 McLean .. .000 Team batting average ................ .260 HSCOOP," YELL KINGS gu4x 22. hr... gum. mW-- w... NQN h", r -0. "Scoop" Rathbun, ,17, divided the pitch- ing honors with Bill Tuerck last season. After serving two years apprenticeship on the scrubs, ttScoop" jumped in when the chance came and made good from the start. He won one game each from Washington and O. A. C. and suffered his only defeat on that fateful day at Corvallis. "Scoopis" main stock in trade is his superb control. As for hittingwwell, his lone bingle of the season scored two runs in the second Aggie game. iiBill" Tuerck, t17, pitched his fourth sea- son and won his third letter under the iiBill" got off to a bad start losing his game i6-O, but he evened up the count When Washington came to the local campus. With the Aggies. lemon-yelloW. at Seattle, He also broke even had trouble with his arm in the early part of the season, Which put him under a handicap. Bez used the Dutchman as a utility man in some of the games on account of his hitting ability. .9...- xwmkwnmw 32 .. av-.. WWW ,tm w W x i 99 Jimmie Sheehy, ,18, played center field under Coach Bezdek for the past two years. His home is in Portland. 4:4,. "Shy" Huntington, '18, developed from a mediocre catcher at the beginning of the season into a first-class receiver under Coach Bezdekis tutelage. iiShy" caught all the conference games and handled his pitch- ers in the same capable manner that he did his backfield on the gridiron. Possessed of a bullet-like throw, he mowed down the baserunners like a German machine gun. iiShyii is a good man to Wield the Willow in the pinches. :N.r. - wr- M-w-mwuw-v 7,... ID 03 U 2::::::::.:- a . whui-msi Vhy r .,,l ,Icm t ., e y '3 F 1. -' I i i 1 l i l t r O H I w ' x ,. 1 .- C I t u w h ' 4 . at ' M ttFod" Maison, 18, won the reputatlon 0f 5 - d. the steadiest player on the team by his 0. I . work ,at third base. Although a trifle slow, O' - l he played the difficult corner with the . d ' g ? hneness of: a veteran. ttFod,s" incessant . O p chatter was a big factor in keeping the b . . p 1 team on their toes every minute. He f1eld- ed well above par and lacked but a few points of landing within the charmed circle. II. IIII IIIIII I" I ii : q. i t Walter Grebe, ,18, rounded out his second ' year at the keystone sack in fine style. Wal- ter pliavyed a steady, consistent game, not being charged With a single error all sea- :1 son. He also clouted the ball for the neat average of .318. Due to his diminutive stat- ure, he drew more walks than anybody elso on the team. wruw e -l mma.WA , - e; , Mus. a, v ELJLI-v , a a 1'1 :1 32:32:35 100 um mi": wmmM.-W.me..-n.-...,m-r. ,.m . . t V .. . r n t D U Ltrisfftfr'fffifin "Dot" Medley, 18, led the team in hit- ting with a mark of .387, most of his hits being of the extra. base variety. "Dot" had a habit of unloading the bases When he came to bat, Which was very disconcerting to the opposing pitcher. He played left held the first part of the year and filled in at right the last few games. If "Dot" could nab flies like he does basehits he would be a big-leaguer. wrw .. -..... W" "wmae .mme: When graduate manager A. R. Tiffany took charge of the student body purse strings in 1914 he faced a coal deficit of $2,400. By careful managing, keen business insight, and scrupulous hnancial tact, cou- y pled With .a firm hand on foolish expenditures, he j succeeded in placing the student body on a solid foundation, Where it now rests. Tiffany arranged i a great football schedule last fall and cleared close 3 to $7,000 for the season. .V, ,4,....u- mvumm- . A ZEaathall The 1917 intercollegiate basketball season at Oregon was one of the freakiest ever experienced in the athletic history of the institution. It was the exact converse of the great gridiron success that preceded it. The varsity five failed to win a single game out of the 11 played. A variety of causes were responsible for the miserable showing. Pre-eminent among these was the lack of expe- rienced men. Bezdek had a green squad to work with, Without .a single letter man to steady the numerous com- binations that he tried out. Another difficulty was the fact that the game was being resumed after a year of idleness due to the faculty abolishment of the previous year. Lastly, Bezdek was busy With football until the early part of January, due to the post-season game with Pennsylvania on New Year's day. He was unable to give any time to the indoor sport until the other conference teams were well under way in their training. The Oklahoma state normal quintet easily defeated the varsity in Hayward hall in the first practice game of the year by a. 32 to 12 score. Bezdek used all his men but was unable to cope With the clever visitors. Oregon simply did not know basketball. They were green and lacked teamwork and the ability to advance the ball dOWn the hoor, once they had it in their pos- session. I The only real basketball displayed during the entire season was against the famous Dallas team. Oregon came Within an ace of winning, but lost out in the last minute of play with a 22 to 21 defeat. Hollis Huntington made possible the near win by his six sensational baskets. The Dallas game proved to be but a flash in the pan. The Oregon Aggies, last years coast champions, trimmed the misfit varsity in four straight contests. The two local games ended 41 to 8 and 24 to 9, and at Corvallis the Ag- gies were on the long end of a 25 to 14 and 29 to 10 victory. Two weeks later on the local floor Coach Davidsonis University of Washington five netted two Wins over the Oregon team. Bezdekts men, as usual, started in strong and gathered an early lead, only to have the purple and gold come from behind and smother them under an av- alanche of field baskets. Captain Davidson, the Wash- ington forward, was mainly responsible for the 33 to 12 and 33 to 16 victories. Lynn McCready, Bezdek's center, was easily the star for Oregon. His cool, steady, all- around floor work made him invaluable to the team. The lack of capable running mates marred his efiiciency. Washington added further ignominy by taking the final two conference games on their own iioor. The varsity played poor basketball throughout the games and fouled continually. Multnomah Club, of Portland, put on the finishing touches to the disastrous season by humbling the lemon-yellow by a 33-3 score. Prospects for next year are brighter than at the beginning of the season just summarized. Coach Bezdek, by virtue of his new contract with the student body, Will not coach the sport next year. Who Will handle the indoor game is a matter of speculation, although the logical man is Bill Hayward, who has had consid- erable experience in handling basketball teams. RESULTS OF 1917 SEASON Oregon 12 ........................ Oklahoma State Normal, ........................ 33 Oregon 21 ........................ Dallas Oregon Oregon Oregon 14 ........................ O. A. C. ........................................................ 25 Oregon 10 ........................ O. A. C. ........................................................ 29 Oregon 12 ........................ University of Washington ...................... 33 Oregon 16 ......................... University of Washington ...................... 33 Oregon 16 ........................ University of Washington ............... 29 Oregon 14 ........................ University of Washington ...................... 26 Oregon 3 ........................ Multnomah Club ......................................... 33 Eaakrthall Enhiuihuala ' Lynn McCready, ,19, was one of the live men on Bezdekis varsity who made his letter during the 1916-17 season. McCready was the best basket shooter and iioor-man on the team. McCreadyis long suit was his ability to dribble dOWn the floor and place the ball in the net. Although light for intercollegiate competition, "Ferd" Gate, 19, was always on the job, despite his inability to find the basket more frequently. At times Cate showed real basketball, being adept at eluuding his man and feeding his forward. Cate was most effective on tipping rebounds into the basket. Hollis Huntington, i19, played the required 10 halves to gain an "Oi, in the indoor sport. Although not overly fast, Hollis managed to cage the ball from the forward position at frequent intervals. The long grind on the gridiron told on him in mid-season, which affected his play. Jay Fox, 19. Fox was used at guard and managed to throw several sensa- tional baskets at long range. His small stature and lack of avoirdupois handi- capped him in guarding his larger and huskier opponents. "Dicki, Nelson, 17, played at odd times during the 1917 season. Owing to his size, he was able to hold his own with rival centers in the jumpoff. Nelson was overweight during the playing season, which hindered his floor work. He graduates in June. "Shy" Huntington, 18, had rival forwards in fear of their lives every time they advanced the ball into his territory. Shy insisted on meeting them half way and injecting a little of the football tactics to liven the play. Inexperience alone kept him from making his letter. WAxxwmmmWw Axwmm mxx WV NXX X xxx xx THE VARSI'I Y-l 9 17 From left to right Moores, C. Nelson, H. Huntington, Si ms, D..Ne1son, McCready, S. Huntington, Fox, Coach Bezdek, Hayes Capt. Lewis Bond Paul Bond Earning Emma 1915 By winning three out of five match games played, the University of Wash- ington tennis team defeated the varsity tennis trio in the only conference games of the year. Washington won one game of doubles and captured two of the three single matches. Oregon was handicapped from early spring by the continued inclement weather, which made practice impossible. For weeks at a time the team was unable to touch a racquet. It was not until the middle of April that Captain Lewis Bond could select two men to pair With him in the tournament. Paul Bond, a brother of Lewis, and Willard Hayes composed the lemon- yellow team that met the Washington aggregation on May 26 and 27 on the Eugene courts. Lewis Bond accomplished a feat that no other man in the conference had been able to do When he defeated the crafty Miuria, the Japanese net artist. Bond won the first two sets handily, mainly through his smashing and wicked. serve that completely baffled Miuria. However, the Washington athlete regained himself in the final set and forced Bond to the limit, only to be beaten by a 15-13 score. A large gallery of fans witnessed the match. H. G. Canfield evened the score on the following day by trimming Paul Bond, of Oregon, in a five set match. The left-handed Washington captain won on his ability to keep the ball Within the lines. H. F. Higgins, of Washington, beat Willard Hayes, of Oregon, in the final singles match. Hayes faltered in the last set after coming from behind and evening the sets at two all. Bond and Bond showed fine form in the first doubles match and disposed of Higgins and Miuria in four sets. The scores were 6-1, 6-2, 5-7, 6-4. With but a 15 minute rest the Bond brothers attempted to repeat their former performance in the deciding match of the afternoon. The strain proved too much for them and Caniield and Miuria had little trouble in winning three out of the four sets. Canfield was fresh and his terriiic driving was the undoing of the varsity pair. TENNIS RECORDS OREGON VS. WASHINGTON, EUGENE, OREGON, MAY 26 Lewis Bond, Oregon, beat Miuria, Washington, 7-5, 6-4, 15-13. MAY 27 H. G. Caniield. Washington. beat Paul Bond, Oregon, 6-4, 517, 6-8, 6-2, 6-1. H. F. Higgins, Washington, beat Willard Hayes, Oregon, 7-5, 2-6, 8-6, 5-7, 6-1. Bond and Bond, Oregon, beat Higgins and Miuria, Washington, 6-1, 6-2, 5-7, 6-3, 6-2. Caniield and Miuria, Washington, beat Bond and Bond, Oregon, 6-1, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2. INTERCOLLEGIATE WRE STLING Coach Edward Shockley, who has handled the mat men for the past three years, worked nightly with green material in an effort to develop a winning wrestling team for the 1917 season. The varsity mien, captained by Ellwyn Ruth- erford, the only letter man in the entire squad, were slow to round into form. Lack of real competition, due to the fact that the freshmen aspirants hadntt a single meet to look forWard to, caused a general lethargy in the wrestling ranks, Tryouts were held on February 9, and one week later Oregonis five men went onto the mat at Corvallis against a more experienced and rugged team. Strome of O. A. C. won two decisions over Bruce Flegal of Oregon in the 115 pound division. Claude Hill was pitted against the best wrestler in the northwest, when he met Captain Bolin in the 125 pound class. Hill fought dog- gedly and put up a great fight, yet the strength and experience of Bolin proved too much for him. Bolin secured tw'o falls with a head Chancery. ' Dwight Wilson and Watson fought a draw in the first two bouts at 135 pounds. Each gained a decision. In the final bout, Wilson slipped to his knee and when time was called Referee Duffy held Watsonis hand aloft signifying that he had Won the match. His ruling proved unpopular with the majority of the crowd. Captain Rutherford and Hawkins of O. A. C. put up the liveliest wrestling bout of the evening in the 148 pound division. Neither was able to gain an ad- vantage. After three six-minute draws, by agreement they wrestled nine min- utes over time. Hawkins was the stronger of the two, but Rutherford was the shiftier and more clever. The match ended int a draw. Ed. Allworth made short work of George Taylor in the heavyweight class. AIIWOrth went after his man with a vengeance and gained an easy decision in the first bout, followed by a fall in the second. Prospects are brighter for next year's team providing more meets are sched- Iuled and student interest is increased. Rutherford is the only man who will be lost through graduation. i 107 Swan Soccer came into its own this year. After three stormy seasons, with the fate of the game in the balance, an eleven was turned out that not only defeated O. A. C. in two engagements, but tied the experienced Multnomah clubmen in their first battle, and were nosed out by a one-poimt margin in a thrilling exhi- bition on Multnomah field. Interest in. the association game was at fever heat during the opening game of the 1916 season, when the varsity met captain and coach Neal Ford's O. A. C. aggregation at Eugene on November 18. Some 500 fans saw Coach Colin V. Dymentts eleven wallop the Co'rvallisites by a 4-0 score. The iirst half ended with neither team able to score. Hardly had. the whistle started when Dyment's well trained proteges planted a perfect ace between the Aggie bars. The line swamped goalkeeper Johnson during the 35 minutes of playing time. Nelson, the lemon-yellow inside-left, shot two beautiful goals from difficult angles. Tuerck drove the final marker under the bar with a well-directed boot. A week later Oregon administered a. 2 to 0 whitewashing to the Aggies in their return game at Corvallis. A steady rain, and the fact that the field was covered with water, kept the score down. Captain Campbell, Jay Fox and Walt Kennon were the big stairs of the game. Multnomah and Oregon battled their third successive tile in as many years on Kincaid f1e1d as the Thanksgiving attraction. Both teams had several oppor- tunities to score, but lacked the punch to put the leather between the posts. As a sequel to a most successful season, the husky Multnomah clubmen, rein- forced by several high school luminaries, spoiled the varsity's four-year record of no defeats by slipping over a 1 to O victory on December 23. Multnomah field was a quagmire. The scarlet and white had all the better of the argument and deserved to Win by at least four goals. Oregon was minus the services of center forward Bill Tuertck and center half Herb Heywood and suffered accordingly. Only the stellar work of goalkeeper Walt Kennon and the defensive work of Campbell and MacDonald kept the score down. The clubmen,s goal came in the last few minutes of play after a foul some 15 yards from the Oregon golml. Sammons, of Multnomah, crossed up the lemon- yellow backs and shot a low fast drive that slipped from Kennon's hands and rolled between the posts. Costly as it Was, it Was not Kennon's fault, as the ball was watersoaked and very slippery. It marked the big fellowts Iirst bawble during the entire season. With the departure of Coach Colin V. Dyment for Seattle the future of the association game is far from secure. Coach Dyment has championed the game ever since he introduced in into the university Sport calendar four years ago. He gave soccer his unswerving support-he sacrificed his time without hope of any remunerationehe stood for sportsmanlike conduct at all times. Colin V. Dyment will long be remembered at Oregon. Providing a capable coach:- is secured, chances for a winning team. next year :are the brightest. All of this years regulars will be on hand excepting Captain Campbell, Tuerck and W. Sheehy. In all probability the O. A. C. series will be made an annual affair, with the provisibn for a. third game in case of a tie re- sulting in the first tWo. COACH COLIN V, DYMENT ilirwhman Athlrtira THE FRESHMAN FOOTBALL TEAM Under the coaching of Dean Walker, a freshman football team was developed this year that held its own in many of the nightly scrimmages with the varsity, and incidentally tied the Oregon Aggie ttrookst when all the dope pointed to a real licking for them. The varsityis system was the freshmants system. Nightly they toiled, in rain and mud, to furnish the lemon-yellow with competition and make possible the victories of the 1916 season. Two outside games were played. Early in the season they met and defeated the Eugene high school team by a big score. It was in the nature of a practice game and proved nothing, as the high school failed to furnish the expected op- position. On the afternoon of November 18 the'frosh held the O. A. C. yearlings to a scoreless tie on Kincaid field. Real football was impossiblee-Kincai-d field was a veritable sea of mud. The frosh, urged on by a Large crowd of fans, fought until the end and time and again backed the Corvallisites up under their own goal posts. Tuffy Conn, the much vaunted Aggie recruit, failed to get away for any of the long runs that featured his seasonts work. Ends Anderson and Wil. son kept him covered at all times. For Oregon, Bill Steers, StroWbridge, Rhine- hart, and uSpike" Leslie were the big stars. On the frosh the future varsity must depend for its material. The strength of the yearlings means the future strength of the first team. From last years ranks Bill Steers, Ed StroWbridge, "Spike" Leslie, and Bill Rhinehart ought to make good under Coach Bezdek. FRESHMAN TRACK O. A. C. Freshmen 65. Oregon Freshmen US. The above tells the story of the freshman track season-vthe story of the lone dual meet of the year that was undecided until the Aggies won the broad jump and captured flrst place in the relay. The meet was held at Corvallis. O. A. C., by virtue of her strength in the sprints and distance events, was able to pile up a lead that the lemon-yellow could not overcome. Three wearers of the orange and black broke the tape for 9 points in the 100-yard dash. The 220 was a repetition of the century. Bob Case, the high point winner for Oregon, won the mile for the Iirst Or- egon markers. Case amassed 13 pointers, winning first place in the javelin and second in the half. He threw the spear 157 feet. . Oregon was the best in the field events. Laman Bonney and Peter Jensen tied for second place honors with 10 points each. Bonney won the shotput, finished second in the discus, and gathered two thirds in the pole vault and broad jump. Jensen got a second in the pole vault, javelin and high jump, and third in the broad jump. ttMike" Harris, of Portland, captained the frosn team. Coach Bill Hayward gave what little time he could spare from the varsity to aiding the first year cinder-steppers. The present freshman class of 1920 has a wealth of material in its ranks. Captain Hodson, of North Bend; Foster, 0f.John Day; and Mulkey, of Monmouth, form the nucleus for a strong aggregation. FRESHMAN BASEBALL 1 Without the aid of a coach, the freshmen went through the 1916 season as best they could and managed to develop some promising varsity material for future years. After a. month and a half of training, during which time they furnished nightly competition for the varsity, the frosh met and were defeated by the O. A. C. yearlings on the Eugene diamond in the opening games of their schedule. Wet grounds on May 5 made necessary the playing of a morning and afternoon game the following day. Ralph Hurn worked for Oregon in the morning game and was beaten in a 6 to 3 battle against Pitcher Shake. The Aggies owed their victory to their ex- perience, their ability to bunch their hits and take advantage of the numerous misplays pulled off by the fresh. The afternoon engagement was far more lively than the ropening game. Dwight Wilson opposed southpaw Kraft. The Aggies won out in the final inning by a 5 to 4 score. Both teams played good ball save for a costly bobble in the Oregon infield which gave the visitors a two run lead, which they held through- out the game. On May 20 and 21 -the Corvallisites repeated their former dose and had little difIiculty in trimming the Oregon fresh in the final two games at Corvallis. The scores were 8 t0 3 and 15 to 3, with the orange and black athletes leading all the way. There was no disputing the superiority of the Aggiesethey knew more baseball and out-hit Oregon two to one. FRESHMAN BASKETBALL. Besides winning the championship of the inter-class basketball league, the class of 1920 showed their worth by decisively drubbing the O. A. C. yearlings in two straight games. Teammmrk coupled With an unlimited amount of fight and endurance favored the froslh in their rampage through the class series and their final duty of conquering O. A. C. All the dope favored the sophomores to win an easy victory. They had three men on their team Who later made the varsity. However, the frosh showed some of the stuff that Will Win them places on the varsity teams to come by gaining a 24 to 17 victory over the second year men. ttBilly" Rhinehart and ttSpike2 Leslie were mainly responsible for the victory of the first year men. To Bill Hayward goes a large share of the credit of the double win over Everett Mayis O. A. C. "green-cappers." Hayward sacritiiced his valuable time to aid the frosh against the enemy. In a short period of two weeks he devel- oped a basket-shooting iive that completely puzzled the huskier Aggies by their fast floor work and ability to find the hoop. The first game ended 16 to ll-the second 24 to 12-With Oregon on the long end of both. Entprfratprnitg Gtamw PHI GAMMA DELTA INTERFRATERNITY BASEBALL. The 1916 interfraternity baseball championship was won by Phi Gamma Delta in a thrilling 2 to 1 Victory over the Sigma Chis, who had Won the cup the year previous. Both teams had little difficulty in winning their early season games and it was soon evident that they would later battle for the championship. The faculty nine, which displayed some real biayseball at times, worked its way to the semi- finals. Sigma Chi, Phi Gamma Delta and the faculty played a round-robin in the elimination process. The Fijils had little trouble in defeating the faculty team and earned the right to meet the Sigs for the cup. Never was a more thrilling inter-club game staged. The Fijis entered the game With all the odds in their favor, having five varsity men in their ranks. Sigma Chi presented a well-balanced, scrappy team. Wilson, of the Fijis, and Bullock, of the Sigma Chis, battled each other on the mound with honors even. Sigma Chi led 1 t0 0 up to the sixth inning, When the Fijis tied the score. In the final frame Wilson led off With a long three bagger t0 right-center. Keith Kiggins then rose to the emergency and belted in the Winning run with a timely single through short. Each team has won the cup for a year. Permanent possession goes to the club that first wins the cup twice. ' INTERFRATERNITY TRACK Kappa Sigma tied with Alpha Tau Omega in the hardest fought and most closely contested interfraternityxtrack meet in many years. The lead alternated With each event, and not until the relay had been run and the javelin thrown, was the final score of 28 to 28 determined. "Skinny" Hargreaves and Laman Bonney were high point getters for their respective teams. SIGMA CHI INTERFRATERNITY BASKETBALL Sigma Chi, with four varsity men on their team, had little difficulty in winning the 1917 interfraternity championship basketball title. With the title goes the possession of the silver football to be held for a period of one year. The tro- phy is not a permanent one, but is given to the winner of each yearis series. Sigma Chi, with their array of varsity talent, coupled with their excellent teamwork, were doped winners of their division before they played. Last years cup holders, Phi Delta Theta, staged a rough and tumble game with the Sigs and were beaten 8-2. The Phi Delts failed to show the smoothness and team- work they displayed the previous year. Sigma Chi won their other games by big scores. Section two went to the Fijis only after the hardest kind of a struggle with the Delta Taus. More interest was evidenced in this game than any other in the league. The, iinal score was 11-6. Few fans gave the Fijis a look-in with the fast Sigma Chi quintet in the finals. By agreement, the winner of two out of three games would garner the cham- pionship. A crowded gymnasium saw the Sigs barely nose out the Fijis in the last few minutes of play. Sigma Chi got an early lead, but the tiIslanders" came strong in the last seconds and all but netted a victory. The score was 12-10. A week later the Si-gm Chis displayed their true form and showed the rela- tive strength of the two teams by trimming the Fijis by a 39-7 score. Mainly through the eiiorts of Billy Rhinehart, the Sigma Chi guard, was the score so large. Rhinehart time and again dribbled down the iioor, eluded Rathbun and Wilson, and drOpped the ball in the net from various angles. Sigma Chi won a. well-deserved victory and was by far the best team in the league. 114 3 u- 3 8' 3 IQ ' "Inn m 7 '3. Ian. ? huh 3 M1 ? .. 3 "Mn. 0 h 1 " I hu- ODthr nf the WE" OFFICERS:-Martin Nelson, President; Kenneth Bartlett, Vice-President; Charles Huntington, Treasurer; and James S'heehy, Secretary. HONORARY MEMBERS Hug0 Bezdek, William Hlayward and Edward Shock- ley. FOOTBALL John Beckett ........................................ '17 Clifford Mitchell .................................. ,18 I William Snyder .................................... 18 Charles Huntington ............................ 18 ' " m" - . 31378 Sterling Spellman .............................. 17 John Parsons ........................................ ,17 F . W :13 It: L Lloyd Tegart ........................................ ,18 Glen Dudley ........................................ 17 u and N U W .1 Orville Monteith ................... 18 Basil Williams ...................................... ,19 w"- .. i. run t 'V ' Jacob Risley .......................................... '18 Hollis Huntington .............................. ,19 . Kenneth Bartlett ................................ 18 William Tuerck .................................... ,17 -w .al m H. g; a.- ma w' V BASEBALL '. . "g. ,, nut? Emmett Rathbun ................................ 17 Walter Grebe ...................................... 18 n W. 4. null!" Richard Nelson .................................... ,17 Dorris Medley ...................................... 18 M w u r 7 William Tuexrck .................................. 17 James Sheehy ...................................... 18 V "' Charles Huntington ............................ 18 w ns TRACK . 'M a i. ,3! A' Martin Nelson ...................................... 17 Oscar Goreczky .................................... '18 , ,- 4-0 " 'E Kenneth Bartlett ................................ ,18 Kent Wilson ........................................ ,18 . . Graham McConnell ............................ ,17 Harold Hamstreet .............................. 17 , ' wvw BASKETBALL . ,, v w .4 . Lynn McCready .................................. ,19 Hollis Huntington .............................. ,19 y, $ z , Ferd Cate .............................................. '19 .0 , $ $ ,.7 - " , . WRESTLING . a, 0 ' f W l. - ' Elwyn Rutherford .............................. 17 W... J" v TENNIS wru ' ,, " Lewis Bond ........................................... 16 M .W ' IL ,. vym. $ .- a. '"O '4; 1 ii .0 a .w' w a'd 115 ! OREGON AND MEGAPHON ! 0 I HNIUIWH O ROOTERS, NOVEMBER 4 SMILE, 11 Eh? anmvhy nf Errata The ttComedy of Errors" was presented by the Dramatic Interpretation class under the direction of Mrs. Eric W. Allen. The play was staged on the campus with natural scenery and setting. The dances, designed to interpret the spirit of the out-of-doors and comedy, were presented by the Physical Department and directed by Miss Freida Gold- smith. The music was furnished by the University Orchestra under the direc- tion of Miss Winifred Forbes. The whole out-of-doors contributed to make the effect of the play lovely, With the balminess 0f the spring evening and the soft, gradual change of light- ...h. 'va-g r: u .w m .a-, , MW ., .nrm. .p-zew- s.. n... "nae... was... .m- wwAmlhyu .. .V . e, .- . - e.. ,an t. ing effects from sunset, twilight and dusk to the electric lighting. The fir trees and background of natural scenery added much charm. The play was staged as a regular part of the Commencement program. CAST Solinus, Duke of Ephesus .............................................................................. Grant Shaffner Aegeon, Merchant of Syracuse .................................................................... Walter Kennon Gaoler ................................................................................................................ Ernest Watkins Antipholis of Syracuse, Son of Aegeon and twin of Antipholus of Ephesus ...................................................................................... Este Brosius First Merchant .......................................................................................... Kenneth Shetterly Dromio of Syracuse .......................................................................................... Merlin Batley Dromio of Ephesus ................................. . ....................................................... Myandell Weiss Adriana, wife of Antipholus ..................................................................... Virginia Peterson Lucia, her sister ........................................................................................................ Edith Ochs Antipholus of Ephesus ................................................................................ Ernest Watkins Angelo, a goldsmith .............................................................................................. Robert Earl Balthazar, a merchant ................................................................................ Creston Maddock Luce, servant to Adriana .................................................................... Harriette Polhemus Second Merchant ............................................................................................... Bert Thompson Oiiicer ............................................................................................................... Dale Melrose Dowsabel, cook to Adriana ...... i ...................................................................... Agnes Dunlap Mariana ...................................................................................................... , ........... Eyla Walker Pinch, school master- .......................................................................................... Victor Sether Aemilia, wife of Aegeon ................................................................................... Charlie Fenton Acting as Lady AbbeSS-i Nun ............................................................................................................. Frances Shoemaker A E11113! 33mm? The faculty of the University of Oregon proved its efficiency in the field of dramatics when it produced Henrik Ibsenis "A Dolls House? under the direction of Dr. E. S. Bates", in Guild Hall. 'The first college play of the year held the attention of a full house from the first moment, when Ellen, the servant, played by Mrs. J. F. Bovard, moved about quietly putting the room to rights, to the last highly dramatic scene, when Rosa- lind Bates, as Nora, fled into the darkness, leaving her husband, Torvald Helmer, interpreted by W. F. G. Thacher, to pace wildly about the room in genuine agony. Every member of the cast deserves praise for the thoroughly natural way the play was presented. There was no stretching of the imagination necessary to follow the Helmer househOld through an unusual course of events. The leading role of Nora has been played twice before by Mrs. Bates, who handled the part like a professional. She changed easily from the happy, friv- olous young wife and mother who romps with her children, to the determined lady who in the face of all obstacles carries through to a finish the course which she believes is right. ' Professor Thacher interpreted the character of a fond but selffish and short sighted husband so skillfully as to win the sympathy of the audience for Torvald Helmet- 119 John, Bobby and Betty Allen, as the Helmer Children, were so perfectly un- conscious and so evidently enjoying tthide .and seek, and ttbear," that the dis- turbing arrival of Nils Krogstad-R. W. Broecker-Was doubly untimely. This gentleman proved a disturbing character hard to deal with till he was taken in hand by Mrs. Linden, widowed friend of Nora, who proposed to him and refused to take ttnoh for an answer. Mrs. H. D. Stheldons interpretation of the difficult part of! the widow was well received. Dr. Rank, the family friend and physician, who declared his love for Nora and finally succumbed to spinal consumption, was sympathetically portrayed by Professor J. F. Bovard. Etc metatprarhalf The German Club presented ttDie Meisterschafff a three act comedy by Mark Twain, at Guild Hall on the night of February 3rd. It Was prodcucd again the afternoon of the following Friday and the whole student body Wls invited to be present. . The play, which contained enough English to make it comprehensible to all, was under the direction of Herman Schwarz, professor of German. The cast was as follows: Margaret Stephenson .......................................... Martha Beer Anne Stephenson .............................................. Vivian Kellems Mrs. Blumenthal .................................................... Helen Wells Mr. Stephanson ...................................................... Tracy Byers William Jackson ............................................ Ernest Watkins George Franklin ............................................ Herman Gilfilen Gretchen ................................................................ Agnes Basler Eh? 7131112 0111mm ttThe Live Corpse? a French comedy by Alfred Hernanty presented at the Eu- gene Theater on the 12th of January, was the first play given by Mask and Buskin after the granting of their chapter by the national fraternity. T- comedy netted eighty dollars for Oregonts championship football team. It was staged by Dr. E. S. Bates and the cast was entirely COUIDOSUd of members and pledges of the society. " The Live Corpse, scored a big success before a large and appreciative au- dience. The play proved to be one of the funniest farces seen here in years. The cast, composed of the best amateur material in the University, took good advantage of its unusual opportunities.,,-Morning Register, Jan. 13th. ttIt was literally a scream from beginning to end. Mr. Watkins, the ablest comedian the University has developed in recent years; Mrs. Batest Vivian, full of color and romance; Rosamond Shaw, a comedienne of ability; Martha Beer, charming. Earl Fleischmann and Cleveland Simpkins did good work; Charles Prim incited many laughs; an essentially well balanced castPeEugene Daily Guard, Jan. 13th. "The players showed to splendid advantage."-Oregon Emerald. thnho .. 3h b,"bk b. V' in. , F-w e. "tbs,NW kk't at! he 120 Elbe iBiETatnr ttThe Dictator," a farce comedy by Richard Harding Davis, was presented by the University Players in a highly satisfactory manner. The play was staged under the direction of James Mott. Leading roles were taken by Alex Bowen, Echo Zahl, James Mott, Lylo McCrosky and Ruth Montgomery, all of whom are well known in dramatic circles in Eugene. CAST Brooke Travers, alias "Steveh Hill .................................................................... James Mott Simpson, his valet, alias ttJim" Dodd ...................................................... Lyle McCrosky Charlie Hyne, wireless operator for the Red C Line .................................. Alex Bowen Samuel Codman, captain of the ttBolivarf Red C Line .................. Bernard Breeding Duffy, a. secret service detective ........................................................... A1 Holman Rev. Arthur Bostick, a missionary .......................................................... Perry Lawrence General Santos Campos, President of San Manana ............................ Ernest Watkins Dr. Vasquez, health ofiicer of Porto Banos, San Manama ............................ Floyd Hart Col. John T. Bowie, U. S. Consul to Porto Banos .................................. Cleve Simpkins Jose Dravo, proprietor of the hotel del Prado .............................................. Russell Fox Corporal Manuel .'. ................................................................................................ Orval Simola Lieutenant Perry, of the U. S. S. Oregon .................................................. Howard Abbey Smoking room steward .................................................................................... Orval Simola Lucy Sheridan, a missionary girl, engaged to Rev. Bostic ................ Echo June Zahl Mrs. John T. Bowie, the Consults Wife ................................ V ...................... A dienne Epping Senora Juanita Arguilla, a Widow from Panama ........................ Ruth Montgomery Soldiers, Sailors, Ship Stewards, etc. ACT I Deck of the steamer ttBolivar," harbor of Porto Banos, Central America. 6:00 A. M. ACT 11 The United States Consulate at Porto Banos, three hours later. ACT III Same as Act II. 10:30 the same morning. . h 3.... M, .. .. u. s W 5 w: r . Mifzz 41g 5496?; wank anh Euakin Hauhpuille Under the direction of Dr. E. S. Bates, Mask and Buskin Chapter of the As- sociated University Players staged an installation vaudeville at Guild Hall on Feb. 3rd. The program followys: 1. Overture .......................................................................................................... Orchestra Miss Forbes, Directom A Modern Courtship .................................................................................... E. S. Bateq CAST Him ........................... Ernest Watkins His Relaxation ...................................................... Eyla Walker His Inspiration ...................................................... Helen Bracht Interpretative Dances ................................................................................ Martha Beer Prudence Butterfly Gaiety Rosalind Barrie Mrs. Page ............................................................ Rosalind Bates Dame Quickly .................................................. Rosamond Shaw Charles ............................................................ Earl Fleischmann One Round of Melody ......................................................................... Helen Bracht Cleve as Simpkins ........................................................................ Cleveland Simpkius Secret Sorrows .................................................................. Rosamond Shaw, Earl Fle-ischmann Words-Leslie Blades Music Haze1 Radabaugh 2??? 2222, x42 , 2 S ROSALIND BATE CHARLES PRIM N FLEISCHMAN AND EYLA. WALKER 5 g a l m. l a t n P m I r a n. D. Em T 2 ???V? , HELEN BRACH EARL r1 ?IIK, . V 2? 2w? e. .. luqlll , 1! HHIJENGWHHNN .411 II l s11 A. : . i. guminr 0113155 GEARY BROWN RISLEY FLEISCHMANN 011mm QDIftrera ROLAND W. GEARY ............................................................................................... President MILDRED A. BROWN ..................................................................................... Vice-President OLIVE RISLEY ................................................................................... Secretary BEN FLEISCHMANN .............................................................................................. Treasurer COMMITTEES Senior Lottery Jack Elliott, Eulalie Crosby, Helen CurreyA Memorial Committee Emmett Rathbun, Fred Kiddle, Milton Stoddard, Jennie Huggins, Bernice Lucas. Commencement CommitteeFJoe Bell, Margaret Hawkins, Helen Johns, Charles Newcastle, Louise Allen, John Huston, Bernice Perkins, Leo Potter, Henry Thor- sett, Helen Wiegand. Senior Play-Alex Bowen, Rosalind Bates, Echo Zahl. Seniors Whose Photographs Were Missing-Arthur Pengra, Percy Streud, Gustav Winter, Allen Rothwell, Mrs. Alice E. Cornell, E. Allen Bennett. 125 $2ninr ?Eiamrg The Class of 1917 has witnessed the evolution of Oregon from a small college to a large university. We entered a university of about six hundred and fifty students, and are graduating from one of over a thousand students. Our class has helped in this growth and we hope for a far larger expansion in years to come. During our Freshman and Sophomore years we held two of the best dances ever staged in Oregon. Our bonfire was a successeand won the praise of even Dean Straub. As for our class hours, they are still famous. The Underclasts Mix went the usual way both years. Upon entering the upper classes, we came in contact with the bigger prob- lems and endeavored to meet them with our usual success. Events like the Underclass Mix, Junior Week-End, and Homecoming Dance were all well managed by us. In fact, our class has always been financially sound, thanks to the good work of our treasurers. With the leadership of the college in our hands, we strove to uphold the traditions of old Oregon and to aid her in her progress. A new athletic field has been one of our aims and will soon be a certainty. The Cooperative Store has been $tarted at last. A Pacific Coast Championship in Football has been won. We leave the University with the hope that the next four years will bring greater advancement and expansion to old Oregon than even these four through which we have just passed. --ROLAND GEARY. I! u. gs LOUISE H. ALLEN .............................................. Eugene Kappa Kappa Gamma Assistant Manager of Emerald 00; Emerald Staff 01, 3, 2h Manager of Womews Edition of the Em- erald M, 3M Y. W. C. A. Cabinet M, 3, 2k Y. W. C. A. President 01, 3h Theta. Sigma Phi; Eutaxian. MARY LOUISE ALLEN ..................................... Eugene J. BOTHWELL AVISON ............................ Oregon City Sigma Chi Glee Club 0,, 2, D; Manager of Glee Club 0D; Delta Theta Phi; Degree LL. B., first regular grad- uate of the University of Oregon Law School. IDA E. BARR .................................................... Springfield ROSALIND BATES ................................................ Eugene Entered as a Junior from Arizona; President of Eutaxians 00; Emerald Staff 0U; Varsity Debating Team BM Delegate to Oratoric'al Contest BM Honor Student; Scroll and Script; Mask and Buskin. - 4 a FRANK L. BEACH .............................................. Portland Sigma Nu Order of the H"; Crossroads. .r r" KARL G. BECKE .................................................... Aurora . t w. Sigma Chi ' Vice-President Interfraternity Council MM Sec- retary Interfraternity Council Ch; Student Council 05, 40; Friars; Torch and Shield. JOHN W. BECKETT ...................................... Eight Mile Sigma Nu Naru- ab" Varsity Football M, 2, 3, AD; Football Captain 0U; To-Ko-Lo; Alpha Kappa Psi; Friars; Order of the s...- u. jg . l:Cj U .x v'rA w n:nuarwzsvb wn :. uriv A JUNE BEEBE .......................................................... Eugene MARTHA BEER ................................ Arcata, California Women,s Athletic Association Advisory Commit- tee a, 2, 3N Eutaxian 6, 1D; Vice-President Wo- . mews Athletic Association GM Dramatic Club 0, 2n Emerald Staff ca, 49; Oregana Staff 030; Uni- 2R versity Players 8, in; Honor Student 8, 4D; Stu- !.- M. dent Council 00; Scroll and Script; Senior Play; k... Mask and Buskin. w ..... a w ,65 .-62-1-;,1$,ux.; MA g. .hz-umw Marv.--.uw e r; .v. rm-z a V, .,. -u. ,, , g JEAN BELL ............................................................ Pioneer Hockey Q, 3, 1D; Emerald BM Class Basketball 0;. 3h Theta Sigma Phi. JOSEPH CLARK BELL .................. Rickreall Delta Tau Delta Entered as a Junior from Monmouth; Vice-Pres ident Y. M. C. A. 0D. JOHN BLACK ...................................................... Portland Phi Gamma Delta Glee Club a, 2, 3, AU; President Glee Club 00. ALEXANDER BOWEN ...................................... Portland Kappa Sigma Assistant Editor Oregana 90; Emerald OM Uni- versity Players 8, 4D; President University Play- wk 13 I I ' wt? ;d1 ' R G 5 uv'g ' W" . n; .1! ' '; ' I $ l I. la "M , v1 " . no". . aw , . 0 .W ..7. ,0. 9 I :' "Mr. 4w ers HM Sigma Upsilon. BERNARD B. BREEDING ................................ Portland Varsity Wrestling Team GD; Honors; Alpha Kap- pa Psi. 'rv EARL CLAPP BRONAUGH .......................... Milwaukie Kappa Sigma MILDRED AILEEN BROWN .............. Spokane, Wash. Chi Omega Vice-President Senior Class; Senior Play. MILDRED G. BROWN ........................................ Medford Dexter Club Oregon Club; Eutaxian. WILLIAM BURGARD ....................................... Portland Beta Theta. Pi LOREN G. BUTLER ............................................ Eugene University Band. 130 .v'" 1 51"" 4'3 t aw" . "I hot- l gm ' "' 36.:. B W ,. M M, M. .. ,V - qu. 7w". vmmwm... ,- N... -v . -. MHV..0M.......V. x .. - , "am 7 N 5 : FRANK CAMPBELL .............................................. Dallas ' Friendly Hall ' Soccer Captain 8, 4D; Y. M. C. A.; Volunteer Band. in Skim! Rug: x ,.. MARY CHAMBERS .............................................. Eugene Kappa Alpha Theta. 'M w - , L ' . Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 6, Ln; Womerrs Athletic Association 0, 2, 3, 1D; Eutaxian QL .9 t ,.,,.. . CHARLES COLLIER ............................................ Eugene hm! U Class Treasurer 6h Y. M. C. A. Cabinet Q, 3N Delta Theta Phi. I- U W GEORGE THERON COLTON .......................... Portland Sligmw Nu ,. Business Manager Emerald OD; Mask and Buskin. .. p .mI-t' CLINTON V. CONLEY .................................. Springfield Band O, 3, AD. .4 , .r"; a w ' W NELLIE COX .......................................................... Eugene y W! Vice-President Eutaxians 8M President Eutax- ians BM Executive Committee Women,s League OD; Scroll and Script. W $ . . . au- i : W ' w EULALIE PALMER CROSBY ................... The Dallas 213' w Chi Omega HELE.N CLAIRE CURREY ............................ LaGrande a! ' Gamma Phi Beta .5 Emerald Q, 3; Socrety EdltOI'. Women's Edition 1 i q" . H Emerald 6Q; German Club; EutaXIans; Theta Sigma Phi. MABEL A. DAVENPORT .................................... Eugene Entered as a second semester Senior from the I." University of Washington. FRANCES M. DePUE .................................... Springfield . mm: wax" u. W I- Emu I70- 133 ELIZABETH DEVANEY ............................ Boise, Idaho Baseball; Captain Baseball mu Newman Club. WALTER R. DIMM ........................................ Springfield Sigma Delta Chi; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet OD; As- sistant Manager Dramatic Club QM Treasurer Y.' M. C. A. G30; University Players. GLENN G. DUDLEY .............................................. Athena Sigma. Nu Varsity Football 00; Torch and Shield. STANLEY D. EATON .............................................. Union Friendly Hall University Band 90; University Orchestra CD; Emerald CM; Sigma Upsilon; Crossroads. JOHN J. ELLIOTT .................................................. Salem Kappa Sigma Manager of Baseball 8, M; Class Football on; Class Basketball 0, 2, 3, 4M Class Track my Torch and Shield; Alpha Kappa Psi; Executive Committee; Manager of Senior Plzay; Order of the "H." Q- .. .......,p ".mmmnm 4-4 . AL va mtqsxm: sc-Mb. q, 1H n . ,. ... ,pnp..- HAROLD FITZGIBBON .................................... Portland Beta. Theta Pi To-Ko-Lo. BEN G. FLEISCHMANN ...................................... Eugene Class Treasurer 09; Emerald u, 3; Baseball Squad 0, 2M Law Class Treasurer UM Senior Play. EARL E. FLEISCHMANN .................................. Eugene Varsity Debating Team s3, 0; Oratory Mk Fo- rensic Council s3, 40; Glee Club BM Highest Schol- arship among men 00; Oregana Staff Ch; Dramatic Club UN Mask and Buskin; Vicre-President Mask and Buskin OD; Tau Kappa Alpha; Senior Play. ROLAND WOODBRIDGE GEARY ................ Portland Sigma Nu Class President 0D; Manager of Football OD; Executive Committee; Manager of Basketball an Alpha Kappa Psi; Friars. HERMAN GILFILEN ........................ Bellinghaam, Wn. Delta Tau Delta Treasurer Y. M. C. A. CD; Treasurer German Club wk Business Staff of Emerald 0, 2y WNW MMW , . g g ,, U sawmw ,, ,, .. .M.,,-..... ..... , NV..- "H...NMs e A L4 A -m ,mwihagswun .v M" y " f v .u'ur 4'1?" "M1 a v w ;1 5s" 3 w WM kl N i . i K 3 h'h M i mm s Q s 12 ., "h E IN !s. a .3 ' i 7;! 7 : f?i .'i;.wm ' MC. , 10 Q3 02:11-22:7223 E . N 0 3 u... GARNET L. GREEN .......................................... Portland Sigma Nu , I Entered as a Senior from the University Law School in Portland; Delta Theta Pi; Torch and Shield. I: . it, t: i f '2 r t g , mm ; W ' N..- c u... MARGUERITE GROSS ...................................... Portland g 2, .g. tn Gamma. Phi Beta 0 'JTW'3 a a q... 1. a ' EVAH F. HADLEY ............................................ Newberg . 1 . b y - Dexter Club 3.8 Oregon Club. .3 a w "V .- I '3" mm . W M ELISABETH M. HALES ...................................... Eugene ; y? u i ADA ROBERTA HALL ...................................... Portland Dexter Club Class Basketball 0, 3, M; Executive Board of , Agra anwarmw i Womews Athletic Association Q, 3, 4h Eutaxians , 7" 6, 0; Scroll and Script. ' u , ; '3 3.1 135 2. HAROLD HAMSTREET ............. . .................... Sheridan Sigma Chi Editor Emerald 0D; Student Council 0U; Man- aging Editor Emerald GU; Band u, 2, 3h Glee Club Q, 3N Varsity Track UN Oregana Staff GD; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet a, 3M Order of the HO"; Friars; T0- Ko-Lo; Sigma. Delta Chi. MAE HARBERT .............................................. Springfield Entered as a Senior from Monmouth; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. , MARION HARRINGTON .................................. Portland Dexter Club Entered as a Senior from University of California. MARGARET HAWKINS .................................... Portland Kappa Alpha. Theta Kwama. MARY ALICE HILL ........................................ LaGrande Gamma Phi Beta Eutaxians u, 2, 3, 4M Secretary Eutaxians GD; Secretary Athletic Association CD; Athletic Asso- ciation u, 2L u! w iv v ;! v m "iv! W, ,3 M t" 4 UI""' 5' "IIIOI' Wu igw W1 +Wm":1 m h quM 2H!" 1" "H un- Wv'm JENNIE HUGGINS ............................................ Portland Delta. Gamma Secretary of Student Body OD; Student Council 0D; WomeWs Athletic Association 0, 2, 3, 4M Treas- urer WomeWs League UM Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 0, 2, 3N Treasurer Y. W. C. A. m. MAURICE H. HYDE ............................................ Eugene Delta Tau Delta Editor-in-Chief Oregana GU; Band u, 2, 3, 1D; Manager and Assistant Director of Band 00; Pres- ident and Director of Band Q, 3N Orchestra 0, 2, 3, 40; Emerald B, 40; Sigma Delta Chi. NICHOLAS JAUREGUY ............................ Tacoma, VVn. Friendly Heall President Associated Students 0D; Varsity De- bate Q, 3, l0; Varsity Oratory U, 3M Winner Alum- ni Medal 00; Winner Forensic Shield BM Y. M. C. A. Cabinet Q, 3, AD; Oregana Staff 80; Forensic Council C30; Awarded Koyl Cup BM Class Debate UM Tau Kappa Alpha; Friars. LUCY JAY ................................................................ Eugene Pi Beta Phi Entered as a Senior from Hillsdale College, Michigan. HELEN JOHNS ................................................ Pendleton Gamma Phi Beta Glee Club O, 3, 4D; President Glee Club 00; Or- egana Staff Bk Eutaxians Q, 3M Treasurer Eutax- ians QM Kwama; Theta Sigma Phi. qu x: ai..m - Ada ,1 R .a-w-:.Ffll'r -. . Q'a n... . - :Mfr: n 4 6 N! FRED E. KIDDLE .......................................... Island City Sigma Nu Student Council 8, 4d; To-Ko-Lo; Alpha Kappa Psi; Friars. WALTER KIRK .......................................................... Salem Alpha Tau Omega HAZEL KNIGHT .................................................... Dallas Delta Delta Delta RUTH LAWRENCE .......................................... Medford Pi Beta Phi Eutaxians u, 2, 3, 4U; Vice-President Eutaxi-ans CD; Secretary Eutaxians on; German Club O, 2, 3M Mu Phi Epsilon. BERNICE LUCAS .............................................. Portland Kappa Alpha Theta Theta Sigma Phi; Mask and Buskin; Kwama; Senior Play. rmms-srnurw.,.. -. 4 , - , . 138 Y 1151 q h H: by m c m a 1 c3 03 t1 5:.m ;--::::'ff: f2u :; ' F :3, '55 i HARRY LYNCH .................... Salem 3 ; Entered as a Junior from Monmouth; Math. Club. ? MAE LYNCH ............................................................ Salem Entered as a Sophomore from North Dakota Nor- mal; Oregon Club Q, 3, Q; Secretary Oregon Club on; German Club; Math. Club. JAMES H. McCALLUM ........................................ Eugene E $3 HELEN MCCORNACK .............................. Spokane, Wn. Gamma Phi Beta l MARIAN MCDONALD ............................................ Nyssa Delta Gamma g Entered as a Senior from College of Idaho. ; i i a; r; E ; 139 r1522: n l. u: m r 0 1 3 w MYRA E. McFARLAND ...................................... Eugene Vice-Presidevnt Eutaxians OD; Eutaxians 8, 4h Y. W. C. A. :HLN . u x: IM " JOHN C. MCGUIRE .............................................. Eugene M W" Architectural Club; President Architectural Club UH; Treasurer Architectural Club QL rm U' GLADYS McKNIGHT ............................................ Albany 1 yum uln- 3 W n . a . Y.W.C.A. 'vM-U gL l 3 U1 ; uh 9. a... MARJORIE MACHEN .................................. Springfield v' UM!- ' bu: " U 3- Inl- ; Du .U ' l . w FRANCES MANN .......................................... Springfield l: J. "u Delta Delta Delta 1 h "H N a 1 '5 uh? Vi Mm d W .2 I: 17 a 12:22:: 140 :;n Ell, In Q," um? hi4... 1 5-5 . a k 1 g 11 DELPHIE MEEK .................................................. Coburg Iran 1 x I FREDERICK E. MELZER .................. . ................. Baker 1 '3 N. m; Iota Chi ' M i i' Highest Scholarship Honors 1916-1917; Order of r; the H 5! i WALTER L. MYERS .................................... The Dalles ji tun Winner State Oratorical Contest 131; Varsity De- '55? '1 hate 13, 41; Order of the "H." 'f 14 I 5' I 3? CHARLES R. NELSON .................................. Lafayette :4; Alplha Tau Omega hi? 1, Athletic Council 141; Interfraternity Athletic 1 Council 12, 3, 41; Baseball 11, 2, 3, 41; Captain Base- 1 ball 141; Basketball 141; Torch and Shield; Order 3,: MN 0f the "0"; Order of the Blanket. MARTIN V. NELSON ............................................ Astoria Delta Tau Delta 13 Track 11, 2, 3, 41; Captain of Track 141; Class 1 Soccer 141; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 11, 2, 3, 41; Vice- 3 President Y. M. C. A. 131; Class Football 12, 41; Cap- 1,? tain Class Football 121; German Club; Vice-Presi- 1:? dent German Club 121; Treasurer German Club 111:; 13 Class President 111; Class Debate 111; Dramatic Club 111; Order of the 20"; President of Order of 1!, H 4d! 3O" 141; Order of the 3H"; To-Ko-Lo; Alpha Kappa " v. :w ; Psi; Friars;Polity Club; Northwest Record in Half- Mile. 1:34:31 U E? C? "mm 1.... '"h' ".4le 11.11.111.11: ' 141 '1":T"': : Wu. ,,.,, m"--- N1 1. .9 CHARLES NEWCASTLE ................................ Portland ; Sigma Chi ' k MARY E. OTARRELL ........................................ Eugene i i I LYNN PARR ...................................................... Woodburn : Delta Tau Delta ; i g. i JOHN F. PARSONS .......................................... Portland '5 ' Sigma Nu Football u, 2, 3, 0; Track a, 2, 3h Order of the 0, ; Athletic Council CM; Friars; Torch and Shield. CHALMER N. PATTERSON ............................ Eugene Oregon Club Debate 0D; Entered as Sophomore from Philo- math College. f .. u 4 a 11 :1 Wt: 142 7W9 hNh-u :54 1020 U ,, E3: .... 22 2 4th 5-. BERNICE PERKINS .............................................. Baker Delta Delta Delta President Panhellenic 242; Eutaxians 21, 22. LEAH PERKINS ................................................... Eugene .. , Pi Beta Phi 2 Glee Club 21, 2, 3, 42; President of Glee Club 23, 42; Mu Phi Epsilon. k. VERA E. PERKINS ........................................ Springlield 3th '9. :u- .. 7' HARRIETTE POLHEMUS .............................. Portland 2 2 Gamma Phi Beta III- ' . , W! :1 h 5 Orly 2-4 . LEO A. POTTER .................................................. Eugene Alpha Tau Omega Band 21, 2, 3, 42; Alpha Kappa Psi. , .4 r'aa', '32. 2 ff" . rd " W .14 143 . 12:11'" 4.. x": :22 o". w;- a , .., m 3mm- JD 2. 1 ,1 f3: 3 4; RUSSELL CLYDE RALSTON ...................... LaGrande 3; Delta Tau Delta Glee Club 343; Class Football 31, 2, 43; Soccer 9 31, 2, 33; Treasurer German Club 333; Freshman 3 Track Team; Gobblers. EMMETT RATHBUN ........................................ Portland Phi Gamma Delta Baseball 33, 43; Assistant Yell Leader 343; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 343; Soccer 323; Assistant Manager Oregana 333; To-Ko-Lo; Alpha Kappa Psi; Order of the 33033; Friars. OLIVE A. RISLEY .......................................... Milwaukie Delta Delta Delta Class Secretary 343; Eutaxians; German Club; Kwama. LOREN C. ROBERTS .................................... The Dalles Phi Delta Theta President Y. M. C. A. 343; Class Basketball 32, 3, 43; Captain of Class Basketball 343; Greater Or- egon Committee 33, 43. i E RUTH ROCHE ........................................................ Eugene Kappa Alpha Theta Class Vice-President 313. 3:3; ; 4 3 a I 7 :1 1:22:20 144 .; Wim- ml M m tumm- 'h n- " 1 U l: 0 2:22:10 F r1 ' k1... " N - 2. i . N ?- LS F ELLWYN RUTHERFORD ............................ Eugene Oder of the "0,2 Wrestling Captain. t $ m "I'- h. J FRANK SCAIEFE .................................................. Eugene I : '1 ..., Delta Tau Delta I hn- : Hts Yell Leader OD; Senior Play 0D; Class Basket- .gdw KI: b 3;" ball a, 2, 3, 40; Class President BM Treasurer Class g QM Class Football 0, 2M Tennis Squad QM T0- Ko-Lo; Sigma Upsilon; Friars. ; :a , .1 3? a I R g . E r i H ' g OENONE M SHAW .................................. Pullman, Wn. 5; Mu M Ni ; g; . Entered as a Senior from Washington State 001- r p" ' Mum J2 lege; Eutaxianv. r9 ,5 FRANCES E. SHOEMAKER ............................. Eugene Pi Beta Phi D3. P. 'n .5 n Student Council 00; Emerald Staff w, M; Y. W. "5 Idl. 'l3 9 5w l F. C. A. Cabinet GU; Eutaxians; President Triple A Oh . l I ' ,3 I; KWama; Scroll and Script; Order' of the "H." ul ' " n M W 1 1! ' 9 3 1i :2 7 i E : HENRY W. SIMS .................................................. Eugene t; 2 .4: Sigma Chi .j . m, g; Varsity Basketball m. ! : XI ' k ;, t as!" ' i I 5: w- L s? 'c P; h a $ ii M , mm D II E"- wrf +-- W -.:;:.;;; 145 D' . 4 await , WiM-m 4.. awn" aw ..."........ -, wk . s . U, ,. . . . . ...w,...g......m ;- 7N. mhm ...... V .. ,..-,, FLOYD SOUTH .......................................... Tehama, Cal. Phi Delta Theta Band U, 2, 3, ID; President of Band 08; Class Football M, 3, 2N Vice-President Commerce Club BM Greater Oregon Committee; Torch and Shield; Polity Club; Alpha Kappa. Psi. MARGARET SPANGLER .................................... Eugene Delta Delta. Delta. Glee Club 0, 2, 3, 4h Oregana Staff GD. WAYNE J. STATER .................................... McMinnville Beta Theta Pi RUBY STEIWER ............................................... Jefferson Gamma Phi Beta MILTON ARTHUR STODDARD .................. LaGrande Delta Tau Delta Associate Editor of Emerald 4 ; Editor-in-Chief of Oregana BM Emerald Staff 0, 2N Oregana Ar- tist u, 2, 3; Class Debate u, 2N Dramatic Club GM Sigma Upsilon; Sigma Delta Chi; The Cross- roads; Polity Club. 1 a: I '1 a ::.:.: :.;::.:- 146 9.. ' .V' Li mm lg Nun. ? ; i '- , GENE GOOD ........................................................ LaGrande m ?m i3 Alpha Tau Omega. . N .h Torch and Shield. 1 k H i n i' n... h b i HENRY L. THORSETT ...................................... Eugene i 1 Oregon Club ' unu- N : i j a '2 5 4; g MIRIAM TINKER ............................................... Eugene H: ., Pi Beta Phi I M 3' Glee Club. ' MYRTLE G. TOBEY ....................... ' ....... . ............ P ortland . Alpha Phi Glee Club O, 2, 3, M; Secretary of Class SN 3'3; German Club QM Kwama. w n1 m WILLIAM P. TUERCK .................................... Portland Phi Gamma Delta u: I Baseball u, 2, 3, 0; Soccer u, 2, 3, 4n Football 0" L w, QM Athletic Council CD; Order of the 0"; Torch . v . .m "' 35:2 and Shleld. o '0' ,J . '3, - . y: A", v.71! :15 u i W1..;;:::.,".1i';:::;:;3 C; l '1' , ':":.: : 1:1; 147 ,1 I U .mm- A - af .n v".f' . w i'wa- A- f; -43 U EVA L. VON BERG .......................... Albert Lea, Minn. Kappa Kappa Gamma Entered as a Senior. Girls Glee Club Mk Y. W; C. A. Cabinet 00. EYLA L. WALKER ............................................ Corvallis Alpha Phi President Womexfs Athletic Association OD; Treasurer Women,s Athletic Association BM Hockey Team m; Eutaxians; Mask and Buskin; Senior Play; Scroll and Script; Order of the H." MARY WARRACK ................................................ Portland Kappa Alpha Theta Entered as a Senior from Reed College. ERNEST WATKINS ........................................... Bandon Alpha Tau Omega Vice-President Student Body 010; Varsity Track 6, 4D; Class Football U, 2, AD; Order of the "H"; President of Order of H MM Oregana Manager 8h Emerald Staff 02h Class Debate u, 2M Asso- ciated University Players; Gobblers; Band. HAROLD J. WELLS ............................................ Eugene 1n 1'70 mm n'. .rst . ,V'Kl u ;, "A . law 2413' ' J o 'pMW . ".7 , h." '9'...- ' i ?Lv' "I h! F' o " .-" wt. , ua gn-F. I :5" 'k' v a V' . La; ,1 ,. f; ;.5! A ,ww'" 'E 5: 9S, 9 v.- W'" ' gt. a aw 1 w L N aw! 'm r ' C s u..- 'm u unnum- W1 v? a.t . . 1". 148 f. HIP; 1 M ; m g MN. t!!! v "V lmxm : M 81c! ha; 95 W? :t 'm 's" L 3a,; "m -.a I .ll ELLW " kld" C , I PM 5 I "m p t... 1H ' 3 '.. JHMV'" J1 149 FLOYD C. WESTERFIELD ..................... Grass Valley Friendly Hall Student Council on; Oregon Club; President of Oregon Club OD; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet B, M; Man- ager Emerald BL Emerald Staff u, 2, 30; Track m, 3H Freshman Track Team 0h Sigma Delta Chi. JEANNETTE WHEATLEY ............................ LaGrande Alpha Phi President Womams League 0D; Student Council 00; Treasurer Woman's Athletic Association QM Vice-President German Club m. DOROTHY WHEELER ........................................ Eugene Kappa Kappa Gamma. Executive Council Wom.an,s League 0D; Secfe- tary Panhellenic Association 0H; Treasurer Wo- maws League BM Advisory Council WomaWs Ath- letic Association m; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 9, Zn; Vice-President Tennis Club QM Eutaxians; Scroll and. Script. MAUDE E. WHIPPLE ....................................... Eugene WALTER WHITE Alpha Tau. Omega HELEN E. WIEGAND ........................................ Portland Delta Gamma Treasurer Panhellenic Association UH; Secretary Womarfs League Ch; Class Vice-President BM Treasurer Triple A an Kwama; Eutaxians. LEONE WILLIAMS ................................................ Dallas Delta Delta Delta MARJORY M. WILLIAMS .................................... Eugene Kappa Alpha Theta Girlsf Glee Club O, 2, 3, 4y D. HILBERT WILSON .................................... Roseburg Phi Delta Theta Vice-President Math. Club OD; Torch and Shield. JAMES CELLARS .............................................. Portland Sigma Upsilon wwww-s. mn-,tx-g....hhm mgW m mu 1! HP'" .1! :0 V V "'9' ad f M . "- ' " who!" u 01th '8 I "I a ham; , m g M 5 km 1 a?" 1-H : o . '. ' 'Ww "h- h Uh- 9,2,; .h, x m yaw-.m1 3.7133"; -T7'..TTZ"TZ:::IL- .Tff5W;mT::;Tl::;:ZZTZILLD L 30:3 U 1M3nmwwi." m ' L :3 3 s "- . h M, h FRED B. DUNBAR .................................. Klamath Falls Alpha, Tau Omega Emerald 32, 3, 43; Oregana Staff 333; Sigma Delta Chi. m. 3Q in. h. IVA BELLE WOOD .................. Eugene Girls, Glee Club 33, 43; Glee Club Quartette 33, 43; German Club. 3 TLNAIO b w- 5: LEO A. FURNEY .................................................. Astoria I V 1 k ' Delta Tau Delta Varsity Track Team 343; Baseball 31, 2, 33; Class Basketball 31, 2, 33; Class Football 31,23; German Culb. .3; 1 ECHO JUNE ZAHL ............................................ Portland 'in "3' id- Emerald Staff 33, 43; Class Basketball 31, 3, 43; .. . 3 Oregana Staff 333; Student Council 333; Y. W. C. A. "' uK Cabinet 343; Dramatic Club 31, 23; University Play- ers; Senior Play; Theta Sigma Phi; German Club 31, 23. u" '35 151 I , 1' 44. 3' Fr -.- 4pm.... A 17 raw, : v :uraam am y 4.x'4 mmMr w, A: 2v -33.. SJthIr Ollaym MOORES LITTLER TINKER TREGILGAS 0115155 QDlTIrPra KENNETH MOORES ................................................................................................ President LILLIAN LITTLER .......................................................................................... Vice-President MARTHA TINKER .................................................................................................... Secretary HAROLD TREGILGAS .................................................................................. . ......... Treasurer COMMITTEES Underclass Mix-John Montague, Walter Kennon, James Sheehy, Don Beld- ing and Ray Couch. Junior Homecoming Dance-Joe Hedges, Helen Purington, Harold Tregilgas, Erma Keithley, Emma Wootton, Charles Crandall, Aline Johnson, John Dolph, Winifred Starbuck, Marshall Woodworth, Melba Williams, Charles Dundore, Pearl Craine, Miriam Page, DeWitt Gilbert, Cord Sengstake, Elizabeth Carson, Oscar Goreczky, Joe Denn, and Wily Knighten. Junior Week-End - Junior Prom Genera1 Chairman: Lloyd Tegart. Decorations -Haro1d Tregilgas, Don Roberts, Walter Kennon, Helen Purington, Florence Sherman, and Joanne Driscoll. Music -Marian Neal, Russell Quisenberry, Melba Williams, Emma Wootton. Programs Dorothy Dunbar, Beatrice Gaylord, Lucy Powers, Joy Gross. F100r -Wi1y Knighten, Ernest Bills, Larue Blackaby, Bill Garretson. Punch Joe Hedges, Charles Croner, Cora Hosford. Patrons and Patronesses-Leura Jerard, Veola Peterson, Vera Clmstead. Opening Parade Kent Wilson, Ray Couch, Max Reigard, Leonard Floan, Adrienne Epping, Miriam Page, Lillian Littler. Junior Week-End Programs-Ed. Harwood, Cord Sengstake, DeWitt Gilbert, Raymond Hausler. Canoe Carnival-James Sheehy, Charles Crandall, Harold Cake, Edwin Cox, Roberta Killam, Erma Keithley, RalphService. Painting the uO,,-Kenneth Bartlett, Clifford Mitchell, Joe Denn, Shy Hunt- ington, Charles Tisdale. Finance- Har01d Tregilgas, Joe Hedges, Charles Dundore, Don Belding. 152 wv-z1rwg A .. m anwmw v A, "unuw... "a. w: 9m m" Ww .1 .A nan L "317 a 3:22:10 U n I it-C3 ' r , 5w?" v - Qlim"v 1' jlhddh m' 54'hwn cl minnow... u 4'3. m I... .--w ha u h$Mth a h 3-. homl ilgnm$ .l :55 . haw- - 3111mm igmmrg Junior history dates from September 14, 1914. On that memorable day we paid our entrance fees to Registrar Tiffany in Villard Hall and commenced an active University life, which from the very beginning has been full of success. Without the least semblance of boasting, it can truthfully be said that the Class of 1918 has placed more men on the different athletic teams than any other class for the last ten years, in addition to its liberal representation in other forms .of University activities. Within two months the Varsity football squad included nine of our freshmen, five of whom won their letter at the end of the season. Similarly in baseball three from our class were given regular berths In the annual underclass debate we humbled the Sophomores by an unanimous decision. When our hrst year was ended we iirrnly believed Dean Straub when he told us that we were the best Freshman class that had ever entered the Universxtyi of Oregon. As Sophomores we won the underclass mix easily ,and with absolute firmness. The class formal that year in the new armory was an auspicious occasion. Again in football and baseball nineteen-eighteeners figured prominently, a majority of the positions being Iilled by them.- Flunkers, too, were few ,and far between, despite the reputation of poor students which clings to the members of any second-year class. At the beginning of our Junior year the class-roll had suffered very little decrease. Although a few had left for other schools and several were compelled to leave for lack of money, these have been replaced by recruits from the Senior class or by transfers from other colleges, ,and on the whole the class list this year is the same as last. Throughout the year our men and women have ac- complished more than ever before. S-uch names as Tegart, Snyaer, Mitchell. Bartlett, Risley, Monteith and Huntington are known almost nattonally and no comment is needed. Beside these football mentors which the Junior class claims, we have to our credit Goreczky, Wilson and Belding in track, and in baseball, Grebe, Knighten, Huntington, Maison and Risley. Cur women, too, have been prominent. For the iirst time a Junior woman was elected to edit the Oregana; the! positions of city-editor of the Emerald and a member of the Varsity debate team are also taken by Junior women. Next year will see almost the entire Junior class back, working hard for a diploma and striving for a bigger andibetter Oregon. .. azuw wmw Welve picked out Raymond Allen to head this mighty list of Juniors for two reasons, both of which are important. One is the alphabetical reason, and the other is that we think he is a fit subject for such an honor. Here we have Mary instead of Frances E. The girls tennis team lost a factor of vital strength when Frances E. Baker was taken sick, about Christmas time, and went home to Hood River. Anyway we appreci- ate what Frances might have done for us and Wish her health and happiness. This Chap with the innocent face is not a Freshman, but is a Junior and a Beta, and his name is Walter Ams- poker. Walter is one of the boys who has not settled down, he just goes out with ever so many girls. We think it is rather unconventional to write your name without the preiix, but well write it here on the sly-Mrs. Baneye-we Juniors like such culmina- tions of college romances. Helen Anderson has dimples and would qualify as an Amazon. She keeps the neighbors awake giggling on the Kappa porch. We have a few things on Sara Bar- ker, which all the Juniors already know about, so we wont say anything here, but we will wonder among our- selves, ttWho will it be in her Senior year?" Hello, Rucien! Youlre pretty near the head of this list too. Rucien is a clever man. How do' we know it? Why, just look at his gradese-ttClever is, as clever does? ttFather calls me Kenneth; all the sisters in college call me Ken; but the fellows call me Estacada. But whatever you call me, Illl say this, Tm a big, handsome blonde "and a football hero, and the girls are all crazy about me? ,l N. B. eKenneth wrote this write-up, so of course we had to publish it. Elizabeth Aumiller lives in North Yakima, Washington, and even went a year at Pullman. But Bettyis long suit is gray matter, so she decided, of course, to iinish at Oregon. The world at large had never heard of Bethel, Oregon, but now that El- mer Boyer has come to college he has put the town on the map. 154 5 fit vet l ti . ' I .I $ ., i , 0!i i. a It I am. C v ' 1h . . . . ' ' l . aw. i , v ,4 w M, aft to 9 'V' ' C r . ,50' , ' ' h u i t. t la'h I 3 : . .. go at Vii ' l' 8 4w' . 1 z, 4, w wr- ' h i5 " mun 3t ' t- M ." malt .. n t' . u-wa . " '9' W N gm . hm .e; i . .4! I - vii! g i gt; '. 1th: as .5 h-mm y... u Ir '1u at- t: 2. NH! arr s... mm ""' runs lug, ..t .. ' . . t' ' Kihu U .. Nun. h thw -e U$I ' w m". 5. CH h W .p ha :. .. H I i n ' m ,R . :. 'lig 5.," ha I w h A. V p t ws t m h 5i- .- .Ix'. tn, . .how i. st' g Q. h hi "1. V i I . i u. a W ' "M! .h . K . I I'.' 1: '1 l "I;0 '9 I i ! i '.i-m u! Izil I l I if I :- ll ; Curtis Beach left school at the end of the Iirst semester, but that did not prevent him from returning and help- ing to make the Menls Glee Club con- cert the first historic success. Here is a girl doing major work in two subjects, Romance Languages and Commerce. But thatls all right, Mil- dred, we know you couldntt take Com- merce without the Romance Lan- guages, because they have to go to- gether. He is from Grants Pass, but when he gets his spikes into the Cinders it takes a mighty good runner to pass him. A stand-by of Bill Haywardis, and a mighty all-around scout is Don Belding. We all know that when she plans her house, Loveline Brown will cer- tainly insist upon a Denn. "No, Ernest Bills is not at home. Try the Delta Gamma house." Who would have though this pic- ture was of Clarence Brunkow? There seems to be an uncertainty whether the picture flatters you or does you an injustice. Lillian Bohnson has been neglected by Timmy Clorian. He has never fa- vored her with even one of his famous "Oregon Ols." Yes, Lillian is some French student. Hello, Cookie! The Fijis have done a lot for Harold Cakeethey took him as a freshman in, and changed him all except his name. Arlo Bristow has set his heart on donning the mantel of Demosthenes. But at present he is merely laboring with voice culture and how to talk the language of gesture. Good luck to Arlo, and may his tongue grow more silvery every day! Jeannette has boosted the Oregana so extensively in her world-wide sell- ing campaign, that we shall just have to say, ttYoulre worth more than pen can write? Cleone Carroll is quiet, but thinks there,s a dangerous gleam in her eye. She is capable and a hard worker. But keep a weather eye peeled, boys. This young woman With a name like a fountain pen comes from Grants Pass, and has a pallet on the Kappa sleeping porch. She majors in jim terror in spellingi. This girl with the broad smile un der the broad hat is Elizabeth Carson. Who ever saw Elizabeth When she was not cheerful? Drusilla Costeel is quiet and sweet, but she thinks a lot, and says little. Another protege of. Professor Mor- tontseVictor Chamberselikes the la- dies and is quite eligible. Have a heart, girls, take it, its yours. Coucheray, ray, rayeCouch! Here,s a lad that never liesenot on himself at any rate, and especially When Bez is hounding him on Kincaid. Her name is Ailey Church. Ailey has a sugary disposition, red hair and a six foot stature. Add spire to her last name and you have described her. This bird belongs to the army- not Coxeyis. He doesnit own it, but he knocks them dead, both when Lheyire having a dance and having a drill. Dorothy Collier, alias Sunbeam. How susceptible this name might be to puns; but weill cast no pearls before swine, for some seniors might come craining their necks at our ef- forts. Her heart is in Berkeley, her heart is not here; her heart is in Berkeley, a-chasing his beer. b: all or! i; Dm;,.k 157 Harry has more real nerve and stick-to-it-iveness than any five sen- iors in college, Colton included. He doesnlt scoot about very fast, but youlve got to hand it to him. Ever hear of the story friend Aesop told of the tortoise and the bunny? Edith DahlbergeWe are proud. to say, like the wolf in Little Red Rid- in Hood-what beautiful hair you have. Charles K. Crandall.eWe pause aghast here. What a wealth of op- portunity! Youlve got to do some tall talking to bring this bird down. We sure envied him in that week-end when. the state was going dry. Think how mruch more taste he got for his money. Helene DeLanoeHerets where the passer-by gets a hearty lthello." The greeting she tips off to you sure glad- dens one of those pasages c-t Hello Lane a fellow sometimes strikes that reminds him of Washington skating through the Delaware. Charles H. Croner.-Fiddlint Charlie, the A. T. O. orchestra, or part of it- pleased to meet you, Mr. Croner. Say, the rags he gets out of that violin would make him a fortune in the oll clotse business. As Irish as you can make tem- black hair, Irish eyes of blueethatls Lucy Devaney. When it comes to athletics, honor grades, dramatic ability, Margaret Crosbyls all there. Joe Denn.-How did you like that clever pun on your name, Joe? By your smile, we think you didnt mind much. T. D. Cutsforth.-Herels another good junior youlve got to remove your manhole cover to. Despite his handi- cap, youlll find no more loyal rooter in all Scaiefels horde. Joanne Driscoll.-This lady is better known as just plain Jo. She shakes up the tradesmen to provide the prov- ender for the Tri Delts and leaves the ice cream on the back porch when they have a formal. For all of which, and more too, we vote her a good jo. Sscvnrd Dorothy Dunbarr-Comes from As- toria, the tinny town. There the fish have fins and the Finns are on the fish. Look at Dorothy. She would indicate Ashlandis great product, not necessarily the cling variety either. Evelyn FostereHeres a girl we ade mire. She minds her own business and doesntt curl her hlh'. Charler: Dundore. Celeste FoulkesrdDo you take care of your brother, or does your brother take care of you? But sh! Celeste, your a junior of experience, so you wont mind this blow. Your brother steps out with an Alpha Phi. Adrienne C. Epping.-This young lady has enough dope against her to send her to jail. She is editor of the back yard of this book and city editor of the Emerald. Take any kicks to her. Shets responsible. This promising looking individual is Byron Foster. We like your dispo- sition and your manners, and we dontt -hare any political dislike for your first name either. Bruce F1ega1.eWhen this small edi- tion of Gotch shakes ,em up on the mat over at the corral his hair sure looks like a comb, a roosterts comb, not a hair comb. Esther Furuset.-Hats off to Esther! Hereis a girl who has real ability. She can even beat some. of the men when it comes to strength tests. Leonard Floanr-Heres another jun- ior that showed discrimination. He came from Spokane, for he cou1d11,t see Dobieis joint very far so he done fiozn down here to spill soup on the Beta table. Len is one of the best menehe was at the D.-P. nuptials, anyway. Beatrice G.aylord.-A young lady who belongs to the itOrder of the H." and still shes a good looking girl. 158 Wm n. It. nu Glut i .- u it Jim u! t." ;i Oscar Goreczky.eA look, a smile, a dimple! Farewell, Tony. No more bacheloric freedom! Youire caught, youtre captured! But, pep up, life isnit so long after all. Harold H. Hargreaves-Husky, hum- ble, happy, hearty, hurried, hiand handsome?! No alliteration 0f ithisi, was intended. Walter Grebe-This Fiji toots in the band, plays basebaii, .and basket- ball, and is, oh, so slick and slipperyu twait, dontt be hastyiein stealing bases. This Hartley is not a brother to the Hartley belowewe mean below the picture, you know. Irwin is far too good a chap to have any member of the family below, really below. Carl Gregg is from Salem, and he majors in Psychology. No wonder! Hereis to Albert Hartley! Long may she wave! We begin this write-up about you in such a manner to let you know that we want you to remain with us a long time. Joy Gross-Say, those eyes! How many have fallen Victims to her charms? There are juniors Who have fair sniap-shots, but What can you expect with such faces. We like this pic- ture of Raymond Hausler thoiehow about it, girls? Clytie HaueShe talks little, but writes much, and has lots of sense. Go thou and get likewise! Some day Clytie is going to be an editreSSe maybe. One of the biggest surprises is Ed. Harwood. Ed., tell us, do you practice what you preach? Herbert Heywood dabbles in build- ings on large scales over at the Ar- chitectural building. You should be able to plan a fine little home for your- sel"; and -w? Another BillieWilliam Haseltine is one of the main stays at the Fiji house. That is, he stays there some- times, when he is not at his classes, or e. We don't think Bill reu ally pigs enough to justify one add- ing anything else. Joe Hedges.-0h, what a pretty face! This boy breaks the poor girlst hearts. Are there any more at home like you, Joseph? ttJerome, Jerome, why for art thou, Jeromth My, Jerome, but you cer- tainly would make a good Romeoe Romeo liked the stage effects he made, alsoee Cornelia HeessreHow many people pronounce your name correctly? Any- way, if people donit get your name right, they certainly get you right, because you are right there! Levicy Hamilton.-We tried to find a nickname for you, Levicy, but we were unsuccessful. Anyway, she knows about the latest news in Got- tage Grove, and she hangs out in the Education factory. There are lots of students from Springfleld, but Dell Hinson is 'the stu- dent from Springfield. Rieta HougheWe dont believe Rie- ta ever said a cross word in her life --just to look at, you would know she was a girl who never gets ruf- fled, like lots of other hens, young and old, we know about. All we can say about Mary Hislop is that she is an awfully good scout- she helps out whenever she is needed, and thatts a mighty big job, we're thinking. This young lady in this picture is Lillian Hausler. We,re awfully glad to know you, Lillian; but dontt worry, your,e so nice that we wont crack any clever Hi puns about you. .t h hm. m p hmpauw- .nnginn'il" 161 It is a sure go with Cora Hosford as to what gentleman will take her out next, and it was ever the same, even back in her high-school days. Jerard is a French nameenow do you see why Leura shines in French so? Well, tdeep holei it is because she must be French. Leura has had many personal experiences. How do we know? Why, because she is al- w.ays talking about them. Why does Giles have a perpetual blush on his face? So many people have wondered about this matter, and we would be thankful for a good, rea- sonable answer. Mary Johnsr-Same as above, only leave out the French part, and add more of the gift of gab. They're both from Pendleton. Hester Hurd.eThis young lady is one of the songbirds from the Phi Phi House. Thereis lots of them over there. We must pause here and won- der how such a little person can make so much noise. What we see of Aline Johnson, we like very much; which is her tip-tilted nose and her pearly chinethe rest is overshadowed by her hats-scoopy hatsemushroom hats-and her furs. Shy is the boldest, bravest warrior on the football team. Weire proud of The Dalles for sending such a product to us-so are the Phi Delts. This feminist movement!eAnother girl who majors in mathematics. Kathryn Johnston lives with the bevy of girls down at the Alpha Phi House. There .are many things of a favora- ble nature to be said about Wilford Jenkins; but well let you all guess and ponder about them. Thatis it, Vivien! Kill ,emftalk ,em to death! These are the qualities which make Vivien such a debator. Vavucu Hereis a Belt tDelt is the more exe elusive way of saying Delta Taul named Ray Kenney. He belongs to the National Guardv-and he is a real warrior! Jeannette means iilittle Jean"-and thats what this Kletzing miss is-a sweet, diminutive young lady. Walter KennonreThis man is a good, honest worker, and we strongly advise giving him all the difficult jobs when hels on your committee. In real life Wily Knighten is lots more sturdy looking. Why havenit you ever gone out for football, Wily? Lots of you dont know it, but Erma Keithley is .an awful little kidder. She has cute little feet and is one of the principal members of the Theta House. Lillian Littler doesnlt walk-she just breezes along. Being Vice-Pres- ident of our class, and head of the Kappa House, she has many respon- sibilities. Roberta Killam. - She came - she had her eye peeled for him-and she made him fall for her. When he with- drew his forces to Alaska, she retreat- ed also. Here is a bright light, which shines over in the Math department. We wouldnt be a bit surprised if Clarence Lombard were a teacher of mathe- matics-some day. Tula Kinsley decided to stop school for two years, in order that she might become a member of the only real class that will ever graduate from the University. We certainly wouldnt have afforded to miss you from our roll. Creston Maddockr-This keen looker has departed from our midst. We must pause now and wipe the tears away-both of them. Cres was such a. dear boy. I ' ltall 162 ' N. a u. '- 4 N H 5C . U x ii m N. low . h D ui- c .. . . ml .1 ""W "" ha. m In. h IL! g. i . tn I m; w 4. 1! aw ht? V . .. I N ha; a Imnv ha I 1 Incl w; is 163 Harold Maison lives over at the Kappa Sigma House and the Oregana -he walks across the street, thereby working up an appetite and making it necessary to stave off the gnawing pains at the Oregana. Too much exer- cise, Harold. Another Junior that the Seniors kid- naped last year. You just leave our Delilah alone; shets got nice, beauti- ful hair, so you just stop making such bold statements about Sampson and the rest of tem. Now, will you quit! Heres a girl who lives in Portland and who hangs out at the Theta House. Louise Manning kids some of her pro- fessors along; it takes temerity to do that. Miles McKay is another would-be lawyer with a weary air; but he seems. to enjoy the art. This Cottage Groveite pounds the ivories in line style. Ada Matthews proves the theory that the little people can make the most noise. Dot Medley is the only man who is always invited to the coed lottery dances; but he is too bashful to go. He spends most of his time on the baseball. diamond. Late of the Astoria High School- now of the University of Oregon fame. Walter Matson plays all kinds of games-like throwing balls in baskets, and other outdoor sports. Dale MelroseeThis man, with a name like a rose, takes lots of courses in the Lit department. were glad there is at least one man there for Prof. Howe to appeal to for the gentle- menls ideas on the reform stuff. What a coincidence! Two people from Astoria together. Oh, excuse. We were thinking of Martin when we looked at Jeanette McLaren,s picture. Lily Millerr-We know you spell your name L-i-l-l-i-e; but we mentioned roses in the former paragraph and now we want to scatter in a lily or so. This is a very subtle compliment, if you really want to know, folkses! The Junior class is proud of its athletes, particularly those that are long winded. Hereis Ralph Milne, who also blows his own hornein the band. were going to Nail this man in Earnest. He never pigs, never smokes, never does nuthini, and still heis an A. T. 0. boy. What can we say to do justice to this customer? Brick Mitchell is an- other of Bezdeckis champions, who hangs his hat at the Sigma Nu House. Marian Nealis on this page also. She plays the piano, too. Montie is the greatest kidder on the campus. We miss Orvilleis cheerful grin this semester. Clarence Nelson is the guy that put the ttclar" in clarinet. He toots one in the band. It would be hard to iind a man with a lustier pair of lungs. were sorry to put these two Betas together, but we wanted to bring out the contrast between a handsome man and an unhande, we fooled youeun- handy man. But which is which? Ethel Newland wears high, mlannish boots. She also wants to look man- nish. Whether she does or not is for you to decide. Kenneth Moores.-Who would think that this guileless-looking youth held the responsibiliey of the Junior Presi- dency on his shoulders? He has to answer "guilty." Itis Nye time for Ruth now. But, dont worry, Rutlr-weire just going to tell the public how much we like you. 164 n 'r MI II In l-OI N a . .q .I had I II 1".: Hrs n. .t ' 1 . WM "g .1.qule BA! .11" T '. u: l'U' I- 165 Vera Olmstead.-A good sport and a good studentea rare Combination. Earle Powell is from Springfield, Oregon. Just think how much he ex- erts himself to amount to something. Abraham Lincoln. came from the coun- try, and we think Napoleon did, also. Fred Packwood is a perennial grin- ner. You know, hets one of these smiley, Wily chaps. Charles Prim is the Villain of the piece. Thatts enough for you, Charl S. This maid from Albany studies the ancient classics in the original. Miriam Page has literary propensities, also-get me, Steve? This Junior is head of the Phi Delt House. Henry Proctor must be quite a man to keep all his charges keyed down; because, some of them are older and bigger than himself. The only incriminating dope we have on Blair Paul is that he is in Miss Watsonsi Novel classebut thatts enough! Everybody loves a Kappa, that's why E'm in love With you, Helen Purington. Helen Purington-we all know this tune, and this girl, too. Veola Peterson is one of the mem- bers of the Alpha Phi-Sigma Nu quar- tet. Youtve certainly kept us guessing for two years or more, Veola. Russell Quisenberry.eDid you all get that last name? Your names enough, Russell; Were not going to say any more about you. Jeanne Reekie had heard all about our wonders way off in that one-horse college in Seattle; so she came all the way down here to find out for herself. We know a lot about Donald Rob- erts. He has red hlair-yes, and he goes with a red-haired Gamma Phi in Portland, and feels Ruthless Without a certain Theta. Max Reigard is something of a bachelor of late. Perk up, Max! Show ,em you're one of the live wires from Marshfield. He wields a mighty pen over at the Architectural building, does Arthur Runquist. Some are borne great, you know. Harry With the deep blue eyes! If Harry Richardson wasnit such a quiet chap, he,d have all the girls crazy about him, just because of those eyes. Paul Scott.-Now, here is another Junior with exceptional ability. He belongs to a most exclusive literary society-Crossroads. We want to tell you that Paul is some pumpkins. Robert Riggsebetter known as Bobby Riggs. Bobbie is from Klamath Falls Where all the rest of the A. T. Ois come from. If these brilliant people donit stop turning up, were going to fly to the tall timbers. Now, here is Randall Scott of Psychology fame; he is the short Scott, the other is Great. Scott! Why is it that all the girls tall for the football heroes? But you girls donlt need to set your caps out for Jacob Risley next year, just because Frances wont be here; because, Jacob is a true and faithful man. Cord runs around the campus with long, manly strides. Cord isnit all his name-his real name is Cord Seng- stake Junior. . n rill 93' a1? ,7, 'WV' r N. W1: a un u w m ff. '5? I O1 fns- IN min I taunt! . phmV V! I tW't't' HWW 'I mi 2' r" mum at .ew 'i '1 g, $'. W." ,. vi 167 Ralph Service lives up Alder street and has a most happy countenance. We are sorry, this snapshot does not show your crinkly blond hair. Kenneth Shetterly. e The. regular Beau Brummel! M-m-m, girls, take notice! Ladies and gentlemen! We want to introduce you to the great dramatic impersonatoreVictor S-ether. He can take off anything from a lion to a cub reporter. Katie SchaefereDo you know, your name just suits you; because youtre a Winsome girl with dimples, honest, you are! Rosamund Shaw-Here is another young lady Who makes us swell with pride and gratihcation. She left Pull- man to join us, and she has now be- come a great actress down here. Life goes easy with Glenn Shock- ley. We wouldntt call you lazy, but- er-hm-maybe indolent! Lets talk about Jimmie Sheehy now, girls. Hasnf he got the strongest handshake-the most beamy smile, tho? Jimmie plays soccer and base- ball and makes an awfully good ap- pearance on the field. Seth Smith admitted to the bar! That sure is some accomplishment. How did you ever do it, Seth? Well, look whots coming next! Herets a beguiling young ladyeFlor- ence Sherman. Has just all the real stuff for a girlesweet smile, dimples and a soft voice. Will you take a friendly warning, old man Snyder? Beware! Youtre being caught in the meshes! n. f g 34"" ' .g-MN t Here,s brains and brawn in this . ""3 young lady. Olga Soderstromts a E 'w, .w : whizz at hockey and baseball. ; ,' kw, ' : Caroline TayloreThere are lots of g ' , . w . 1 Charming girls in the Junior class. 3 W V, a ' - Take Caroline Taylor, for instance. i , , . ' Donit you think that White feather hat t . is just the cutest thing, girls? . . Melvin Solve looks like an artist; 1 h: ,. :0 he,s tall and has a far-away look in his ' t 1 , . r ht eye. Hets got more sense than most "' artists, even if he is .a literary one at b that. x W "l3 1. w Your picture is with a good class of Juniors now, Clinton. We like your smile. You donit let the weather af- fect your spirits, wetve noticed. Io nviw' I... . She did a good thing in 1915, did ... .. . Now Annabel Sparkman. She came to Ore- gon in 1915 in order that she might register With our class. :gyx l" .w KW "um . b tor om c: A man With the patience of Job, Burt Thompson fusses around behind the library desk and does menial labor over at the Dramatic Interpretation de- partment. n' W. a nu.-. 't at u. 9 .... a 8 DJ "x- H Ye gods! Still another celebrity in our midst. Just look thru this book and you,11 see soul-stirring proofs of Glenn Stantonts handiwork. ' NIit. 'n-m Clark T110mpson.-This man has W 1 0w. . . . V lead a motley existence. He goes off '"1' w , and on to college. At present he is 3": ma holding down two jobsetraveling .i It:- v u ,N salesman and student scholar. w: "' w . Winifred Starbuck sprang a dark horse on the campus With a strange 1.. p... man. It looks pretty serious, Wini- NNe .. g fred. "'1- . ... h 3..Q '"w She is secretary of our class. We h . Wt like Martha Tinker, and Martha likes us. We know she likes us, because, 7 Nu she always smiles so sweetly. Martha H m: M... . ?Agh ":2 'w k N t ' .I-n... iyw .- 168 ix! VI ...11m: zl V". ?1' t am i H N4 p'zmhi ' :' run... MW v prim Mn N s :1" i hue 5b V ' ?I DMZ PM v i ,1 1 I i 4., 2- l J: b , 1 I i 1,?in Harold Tregilgas is a handsome workingman at the office. He is also our treasurer; in fact, he keeps an eagle eye On every nickle that is spent. This man walks to and from the Law department with the Whole library under his arm. Charles We:- Lenhaven used to go to Stanfordeyou know, that school down in Cal tnot an abbreviation; down there they call it that; its so careless-like, yuh knowli Weid like to say a lot of nice things about Mabel Van Zante; only, were afraid Tony will get jealous. were running Ruth Westfall in here, because she has to run some- where. Owning .a car she doesnt have to use Walkeris horses like the rest of us. Still another man Who is learning to count on his lingers over at the Commerce department. Ivan Warner is trying to pig, also. So many worthy characters come from Dallasefor instance, Frank Wil- son. Cheer up, Frank, you cant help it if youire not from New York. She laughs all the time and gets a lot of pleasure out of life. Helen Wells even enjoys gym, and thatls going some! Itis straight goods that Melba VVill- iams is going to dance something real aesthetic and high fuluting in the pageantecalled the Dance of Gold. The pageant is an affair Which may be and may not be tLatest report- not bel. were going to tell you some inter- esting gossip concerning Wayne Wells now. Wayne is going to be a teacher. And, listenlehe lives right here in Eugene. Herels .a lady Who sticks to the ship. Translated this means, she is not fickle, Which means a Whole lot in these days of modern thot. Long may she be Gladys, but not Wilkins! d 50. thVS Kent Wilson was the last man in the waiting list to be read off. Maybe its because his name comes at the end of the alphabet. Kent can get most anything he sets out for, thoe including medals in the quarter mile, and renown as a brave soldier in the awful war with Mexico last summer. If the Mary Spiller Hall hasnit got more brilliant students than can beat the Dutch, weill eat our hats Land it's hard times, tooi. Now, hereis Helen W'ithycombeeyou cant find a bright- er, nicer girl anywhere. Another Nelson who slipped out of his place and got among the Wis. He,s another one that goes on toots, with the rest of the band. Jesse Witty started out with a zip and go; but now, we're sorry to say, he left us in February, on account of illness. Honor grades and the presidency of the Y. W. C. A. can be hung up at the side of Ruth Wilsonis name. Mildred Woodruff w So much romancing goes on between the Belts and the Pi Phis. Maybe its because its not far to walk getting there. How about it, Mildred? George Winter is from Corvallis; this means that he passed up 0. A. C. thoorayU and is getting a worth-while education here. Marshall Woodworth is with us once again. We're glad, tho, that he doesnit go to the college in his home town- Marshall lives in Albany, you know. Sophus Winther is a ruddy blonde who makes the ladies hearts beat faster. From his first name you would think he had slipped up a class. Emma Wootton. NTW ' .sfuam th-IWW '"I' .ym-uulmu - N M Q d I! M in in II 3 t ht; Q nwant M in l. ?-Cim II V'Hou mu-t :- 8W Ii" tfmpvkhav Robert Wright-ed things by coming way dOWn from Idaho to join this care- free bunch. His father is a very learned educator, and Robert is, too. Bill Garretson eats and sleeps over at the Delta Tau House-the rest of the time he studies a bit, recreates a bit, and steps out a bit with a certain Kappa. Espar Young comes from a town called Eugene and goes way up to the University of Oregon to learn things. Of course, she goes home for the holi- days, and once in a while on a week. end. She has red hair and wears a green coat-happy combination. John DeWitt Gilbert.-This is Gil- bert, the Kernel of the Nuts. He comes from the Venice of America. There is little he does not know. His motto: The World knows only twow that,s Rome and I." Once a month he gets out a magazine section that turns the Emerald green With envy and gives Ye Editor another gray hair. Yes, indeed, his literary inclination will make him famous-or tinyfamous. Erma ZimmermaneThey put you at the very end of those pictures last year, these naughty Juniors! to treat a girl Who is so little and sweet that way. Freda LairdeWell, heres a girl With several things to her credit. She majors in Mathe, disciplines her sophomore sister, and demonstrates to the thousands at Creswell what Ore- gon can do for a person. LaRue Blackaby.eYou thought you were left out, didrYt you, Rube? No, we wouldntt leave out that foolish grin of yours for anything. were kinda peeved at Don New- burry. Wotcha mean by going off an a leavint us? If you haan 3. came back, youtd have gotten yours. Frank E. Folts.eThis A. T. O. hol- lers in the Glee Club, knows all the fruit in Hood River, and hangs out with Dean Morton in the CommerCe factory. Franklin E. also trudges about With the orchestra. Graham McConnell has a niche over at the Sigma Chi House. We want to tell you, he leads the life ahead of others round the running track, you know. Q "r a h l M Still another Junior that we have leason to be proud 01'. When Hazel Radabaughs name appears among the worlds greatest musicians and com- posers, weill say With a fond air: iiShe used to be in OUR CLASS at college? Charles Tisdale is pinlessebut he u.t says it's worth it. What do you say, s fellows? m ;I We think Marian Tuttle is Scotch, 'iiu'w but were not sure. But, donit you an 0... hr Mu think she looks like a. sweet Highland as '0' g... e4...- las31e in that plaid coat and ta 0 :h M shanter? Marian also leans towards the footlights. Nlli'YliK It was impossible to get pictures of the followingeour photographer was DH .h Q H afraid in some cases of breaking his cameraeeothers were so elusive that, though 1... he chased them for days without his gun, he was unsuccessful. The black list is: m "- Ellen M. Anderson Elmer Howard g 3W .. I John s. Daly Doris Hubbell . Ir 5 N w "" Helen. Dresser Esther Jacobson XWN : k Elva Estes Irene Rugh .. h M Mabel Goyne Lloyd Tegart uh u 5.. Donna Belle Henry Isa Wasson WK .5 h N is. '- h' i '0. i '- 5 7 . .Q s EN Vu e h x in" IV t u an; J'l '0 e t e It; it ' 172 ganphnmnrp Glam? ATKINSON BRACHT BOYLEN I ROSS 011855 0931er ROBERT ATKINSON .............................................................................................. President HELEN BRACHT ............................................................................................ Vice President LILLIAN BOYLEN .................................................................................................... Secretary IVOR ROSS .................................................................................................................. Treasurer COMMITTEES Underclass Mix-Keith Kiggins, Jay Fox, Charles McDonald, James Vance, George Cook, Kenneth Farley, Ross MCKenna, Marian Grebel, Marian Coffey, Dorothy Robinson, Edythe Bracht. Sophomore HopeLynn McCready, George Gates, Harvey Madden, Harold Grey, Frank Hunt, Raymond Burns, Charles McDonald, James Vance, Marian Grebel, Helen Bracht, Marian Coffey, Roberta Schubel, Mary Murdock. gmphnmnrp Quinn; The 1919 class can justly be proud of itself in having two men on the great varsity football team-Basil Williams and Hollis Huntingtond On the Glee Club, the class is even better represented with nine men, almost half of the University songsters. Five members of the varsity basketball team this year are Sophomores: Ferd Cate, Lynn McCready, Jay Fox, Karl Nelson, and Hollis Huntington. Last year our class team won the interclass championship. , Last year we went down gamely to defeat; in the Underclass Mix, while last fall we easily won the affair. The two formal dances that we have given, we be lieve, will compare with the best that have been staged. Our Sophomore Hop was the first class dance to use the alphabetical scheme of seating the girls. This year one of our class, Walter Bailey, was on the varsity debating team, and Virgil Alexander will probably be strong as an outfielder 0n the baseball team. So, all in all, we think that we have done our part for our University, and hope that the two years to come will find us worthy. eROBERT H. ATKINSON. KVi i SOPHOMORE CLASS CI. bu wan 3Hr25hman 011355 PIXLEY BEACH PARSONS SEVITS 011355 GDliirem , EVERETT PIXLEY .................................................................................................... President MARIE BEACH .................................................................................................. Vice President DOROTHY PARSONS .............................................................................................. Secretary CLIFFORD SEVITS .................................................................................................. Treasurer COMMITTEES Underclass Mix-Ruth Connell, Elizabeth Bruere, Marian Chapitn, Marie Beach, Anna Lee Miller, Jessie Garner, Gertrude Colwgill, Dorothy Parsons, Ernest Boy- len, Muriel Peringer, Floyd Hart, Douglas Mullarky, Curtiss Peterson, Arvo Si- mola, Bob Montague, Lee Waldron, Harold Simpson. Bonfire-Ned Fowler, Hugh Thompson, Lyle Bartholomew, Lee Waldron. Frosh Glee-Rodney Smith, Ada Otten, Hugh Thompson, Claire Holdridge, Naomi Marcellus, Marian Chapin, Reba Macklin, Marie Beach, Anna Lee Miller, Louise McCandliss, Gretchen Colton, Jack Dundore, Nick Carter, Ned Fowler Lyle McCroskey, Harold Simpson, Helen Rhodes, Byron Garrett, Roy Stickles. JHrv5hmatt 13i5tnr Class histories have a habilt of being an opportunitygfor the class to sing its own praises in a manner more to be marveled at than praised. The present fresh- man class has learned its lesson of silence and will merely state the facts and let the readers judge for themselves. As usual, our number exceeded those of any other entering class. In a:h- letics we held the famous freshman team. of O. A. C. to a scoreless tie in fombafl. 1n basketball we finished first in the interclass league and defeated the first year team of the Aggie school. In student activities, members of the class are on the debating team and are reporting for the Emerald. On the roll of the various dramatic societies members of our class hold prominent places. Our part of the Underclass Mix bonfire and the Freshman Glee are examples of our quality to speak for themselves. Besides all these material accomplishments, we believe that as a class we have absorbed the OREGON SPIRIT and will go on through our college course in an endeavor to forward the interests of our University. , . .- VX x . $ xeSxQx: x V ?M- ;,.,-A . .-45 p.12. , wk Memes; ?,1 E? 11' .. .- .wm-r .u-u-n m-n -...w W , F. -l Kl mvhiral iHamltg ALVIN WALTER BAIRD, A. B., M. D. JAMES FRANCIS BELL, M. D., L. R. C. P., London. ROBERT LOUIS BENSON, A. M,, M. D. OTTO SALLY BINSWANGER, P11. D., M. D. HOMER T. COFFIN, A. B., M. D. A. N. CREADICK, A. B., M. D. RICHARD B. DILLEHUNT, M. D. ROBERT H. ELLIS, M. D. HORACE BURNETT FENTON, A. B., M. D. ANDREW JACKSON GIESY, M. D. J. ALLEN ALBERT, Ph. D.,. M. D. WILLIAM HOUSE, M. D. HOWARD D. HASKINS, A. 13., M. D. DONALD H. JESSOP, th. G., M. D. HENRY E. JONES, M. D. SIMEON EDWARD JOSEPHI, M. D. J. C. ELLIOTT KING, A. B., M. D. WILLIAM s. KNOX, B. s., M. D. EDMUNDE JOHN LABBE, M. D. CLARENCE J. MCCUSKER, B. 8., M. D. ALBERT EDWARD MACKAY, M D. KENNETH A. J. MACKENZIE, M. D., C. M., L. R. C. P., and L. R. C. S., Edin. JOHN DICE MACLAREN, M. S., M. D. E. H. MCLEAN, A. M., M. D. RALPH CHARLES MATSON, M. D. H. B. MYERS, A. B., M. D. WILLEY HIGBY NORTON, A. B., M. D. RICHARD NUNN, B. A., B. Ch., M. D. LAWRENCE SELLING, A. B., M. D. GEORGE BURNSIDE STORY, M. D. ERNEST FANNING TUCKER, B. A., M. D. GEORGE MILTON WELLS, M. D. CALVIN S. WHITE, M. D. GEORGE SHATTUCK WHITESIDE, M. D. OTIS BUCKMINSTER WIGHT, A. B., M. D. GEORGE FLANDERS WILSON, M. D. ROBERT CLARKE YENNEY, M. D. JAMES CULLEN ZAN, M. D. mehiml girlinnl The medical school has made marked progress during the last year in spite of the great difficulties arising from increase in the cost of operation and main- tenance, and in spite of the rather' general financial depression. The legislature of 1915 appropriated $50,000.00 for a new building, contingent upon a popular subscription of $25,000.00. The citizens of Portland responded liberally to this requirement, and before the meeting of the last legislature, the needed sum was deposited with the Secretary of State, thus providing for a beginning of the com- prehensive plan for a medical center upon the magnificent campus donated to the state by the Oregon and Washington Railroad 85 Navigation Go. While this sum would be adequate for the construction of a building unit, exclusive of clearing the land and providing foundation, the last legislature was asked for funds with which to put the property in shape for buildings. An appropriation of $40,000.00 for this purpose was allowed, which assures a start this spring, and with the appropriation of $60,000.00 for maintenance, the next two years bid fair to see greater progress than ever. i The attendance in the medical school is larger than was expected under the new ruling requiring two years of University Work for admission, and judging from applications for admission next year already on hand, there is prospect of a large, well trained first year class. The clinical facilities for teaching have been augmented by the addition of free beds for clinic patients in St. Vincents hospital, and by securing new and well equipped quarters for the Portland Free Dispensary at'Fourth and Jefferson streets. During the next year there will be additions to the full time staff in Physiology and Anatomy. The library facilities are soon to be enhanced by the employment of a full time librarian to care for the consolidated library of the medical school: and the Portland City and County Medical Society. 011mm nf 1917 DELBERT HARRY NICKSON ............ Seattle, Wash. HERBERT V. H. THATCHER ........................ Portland a m mm M - -:1;1:;M,-;.;.M.W., M , w a 178 N 'Mi. eh gig Cl C. '"A 1-". WM ,.M...,M J. F. BELL, JR. .................................................... Portland 1 5 iv 1 ; 5 3 ERNEST A. DAUS .................................... Weiser, Idaho i ,2 1.? g: L, ISAAC DELLAR .................................................... Portland ;; i z: '1 i 5 ALAN LUCILE HART .......................................... Albany 1 s 3 . E ,1 1 I ROY W. HENDERSHOTT ................................ Portland i 1: v 1 :1 2.1 1: I V, U 1 1,114,; 179 B M A L D. T S E N R E ..-Port1and MURREY. M. LEVY RALPH L. LIES'ER ...Port1and JAMES A. LOUNDAIGN ..New York City RUSSELL F. MADDREN 181 $Iuhpnt GDrganizatinna Azznriatph $tuh2nts Athlrtit lemril S'Iuhmt Glmmril 13. 11111. 01. A. 13. m. 01. A. futaxiana $Prman Olluh Newman Olluh Grime A Eriplv Th? iganhpllmir Elmirrfratpmitg Olmmril QDrrgnn Q'tluh Arrhitrfhtrp Olluh Hniupmitg iHIagPra Mummy 31322121112 Ernfwainnal anh Ennnr Eratprnitiw Evita Ghrta 1am gimma Alpha g?tgma Evita thi $119121 $igma ighi Alpha Kappa 335i $igma lapailnu 111311 1am Epailnn mask anh ZEuakin Enral anh 0115155 gamivtiw iHriara Strnll anh Suript Kmama En-iKn-En Gurrh anh $hivlh $nhhlpra Aaznriateh $Iuh2nta JaureguyG l-l'aggins cury NICHOLAS J AUREGUY Elliott Mwag; Watkins .............................. President ERNEST WATKINS ........................................................................................ Vice President JENNIE HUGGINS ............................................................... . .................................... Secretary ROLAND W. GEARY . ................................................................... Executive Committee JOHN ELLIOTT N. Jau-reguy . J. Beckett Nelson ...Executive Committee 0. Monteith 11:: 0103:2123 g?tuhmt Olmmril ' Jaureguy Hamstreet Watkins Huggins Wheatley Becke Beer Kiddle Westerfleld Shoemaker Tregilgas Jerard l Couch 1 C001: ? L L I , 1. 1 .. .W'. i. 111.04.11.17 .1. ' '11"". WMXIJ 183 , ,I:,iliiiwlr9sluxai , 1:41. 4 8 1 f .q. T d I my 2 rg. . e 1 u tee m. srt L Www VJF U wl$ I. Evy a rt mm WES lsnr q 11130 eeDwu BNSl T 4. S n n a Z ent.e . bntLn , 08mm T RDSP 5 m tsm e and kmmw .lh GTM W . . . A m A 1 .- l ?:?.IE. rw I l . hnl w ,y lttt'Naxi nu? 4I UD 2A; h: '4'. f! 4. J a. x l. -. !, : iiiiii nL 13. .4311. 01. A. LOREN ROBERTS ................................................................... ' ................................. President JOSEPH BELL .................................................................................................. Vice President DEWITT GILBERT .................................................................................................. Secretary JOSEPH DENN ........................................................................................................... Treasurer COMMITTEES MARTIN NELSON ................................................................................................ Membership FLOYD WESTERFIELD .......................................................................................... Finances CLINTON THIENES .............................................................................. Student Volunteers JOE BELL ....................................................... Bible Study RAY HAUSLER .................................................................................................. Mission Study RANDALL SCOTT ...................................................................................................... Meetings PAUL SPANGLER ................................................................................ Se-lbeck Conference NICHOLAS JAUREGUY ............................... Employment JAMES MCCALLUM ............................................................................................ Deputations RAY HAUSLER ...................................................................................... James Lyman Fund LYMAN PICKETT ................................................................................................ Boys Work HENRY THORSETT ........................................................................................ Social Service aJWIg OutnIII..llla nm Troa eesd Hkns lrhn 030.1 : CBJD iv :1 Mm; t . .men w Wamm f 1D.mn S. 88 .lrmtl .q HWSB f ,. 3 2, .m M 0a . r L e . 1 QHBw N mmme w 11 7 v1 , AWVF W "A .u M N. n nrmo OQtS StST Hrea 7 0V8 VPVP 74 3,7 2 all: Qt u, 1w 13. 133. am. A. FIRST SEMESTER OFFICERS TIRZA R. DINSDALE .............................................................................. General Secretary LOUISE ALLEN ........................................................................................................ President MARY HISLOP .................................................................................................. Vice President DOROTHY COLLIER ................................................................................................ Secretary RUTH WILSON ....................................................................................................... Treasurer SECOND SEMESTER OFFICERS RUTH WILSON .......................................................................................................... President MARY HISLOP ...... Vice President LILLIAN PORTER .................................................................................................... Secretary HELEN WELLS ........................................................................................................ Treasurer CABINET DELILAH MCDANIELS ............................................................................ Association News MARY HISLOP ...................................................................................................... Membership SARA BARKER .......................................................................................................... Missions RUTH WESTFALL .......................................................................................... Social Service ESSIE MCGUIRE .......................................................................................... Practical Service EVA VON BERG .................................................................................................... Bible Study DOROTHY COLLIER .................................................................................... , ....... Conference MILDRED STEINMETZ ............................................................................................. Finance KATHRYN JOHNSON .................................................................................................... House RUTH PEARSON .............................................................................................................. Social DOROTHY FLEGAL .................................................................................................. Meetings HELEN BRENTON .................................................................................................... Publicity 1' Shaw IIall Pbrte Wiegand Tobey C. Crosby Ik VValker H n m 1.n rknlt Tea wmr .mm Zmu Currey 1?11111i1 s lli Gay 1 lsle -enton Shaw chuebe y Beer Iiellenls B1 0 S R Tuttle Dunba: Jacobsen , McFallani! Lawrence . Stemmetz Eutaxian illiterarg gmmktg OFFICERS FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER ROSALIND BATES ............................... President ................................. MARIAN TUTTLE MYRA MCFARLAND ....................... Vice President .............................. MIRIAM PAGE RUTH LAWRENCE .............................. Secretary ........................ DOROTHY DUNBAR MARIAN TUTTLE ............................... Treasurer ........................ ESTHER JACOBSEN MIRIAM PAGE, ......................................... Critic ............................................ MARY JOHNS ADA HALL ....................................... Sergeant-at-Arms ................ MILDRED STEINMETZ m Mmavu, m4, . , 23$me .11: , madam ymwn m9 3,-4.9; "1 A KM :25. 3k 4. v- M . 4..-.vm-. N44...-,- :2.fr:-.1xv 2. u. ,4 ,4-M 4 4 4w. Basle; Wells Hislop Reigard FIRST SEMESTER OFFICERS HERTHA HANSEN .................................................................................................. Fresident CURTIS BEACH ................................................................................................ Vice President MARY HISLOP ...................................................................................... Secretary-Treasurer BEATRICE THURSTON ............................................................................................ Reporter DR. SCHWARZ .................................................................................................................. Critic SECOND SEMESTER OFFICERS AGNES BASLER ........................................................................................................ President HELEN WELLS ............................................................................................... Vice President MARY HISLOP .......................................................................................................... Secretary MAX REIGARD ........................................................................................................ Treasurer GLADYS CONKLIN ..................... . ............................................................................... Reporter HERMAN GILFILEN .................................................................................. Sergeant-at-Arms DR. SCHWARZ .................................................................................................................. Critic MEMBERS Tracy Byers, Agnes Basler, Elmer Boyer, Curtis Beach, Martha Beer, Joe Bell, Margaret Crosby, Gladys Conklin, Helen Flint, Esther Furuset, Herman Crilfilen, Mildred Garland, Mary Hislop, William Haseltine, Lottie Hollopeter, Hertha Hanssen, Lillian Hausler, Esther Jacobsen, Jeannette Kletzing, Tula Kinsley, Vivien Kellems, Mae Lynch, Gladys McLeod, Helen McDonald, Mrs. Maxhzam, Marjorie Machen, Norman Phillips, Vera Perkins, Max Reigard, Paul Reaney, Lucile Stanton, Dr. Schmidt, Dr. Schwarz, Beatrice Thurston, Helen Wells, Har- riet Garrett, Nanma Axtell, Charles Johns, Bruce Flegal, Olive Risley, Frances Frater, Claire Gazley, Lloyd Tegart, John Joub. 190 '34 m5" 21.45! : i'w w mm yum!!! J. Sheehy FOX Basler W. Sheehy Npmman Olluh Founded September, 1914. An organization of Catholic students in the University. OFFICERS JAMES SHEEHY .................................................. , ........................................................ President AGNES BASLER .............................................................................................. Vice President JAY FOX ...................................................................................................................... Secretary WYVILLE SHEEHY ................................................................................................ Treasurer MEMBERS Charles Dundore, Bartholomew Spellman, Oscar Goreczky, Leo Furney, Joseph Denn, Ross McKenna, John Masterson, Jack Dundore, Ed. Tracy, Harry Lynch, Edward Gordeau, John Kellaher, John McGuire, Thomas Hardy, Adrienne Epping, Margaret Casey, Nellie Reidt, Lorraine Mahoney, Louise Manning, Marian Coffey, Genevieve Rowley, Florence Powers, Lucy Powers, Lucille Redmond, Naomi Bernard, Mae Lynch, Mary O,Farrell, Ana OIFarrell, Joanne Driscoll. ,- 1::::'i:'7:":f3 u I 4, a V ;; Aura 7.. u 2.4 .an 1w var m;wa: :- - a mung: M: a, -uE.P 9:31., 4 v . fwwr" .. -d.s.- pneus m- mm 7' v9- wry". 2w. z. dtdnsrmw: :9: r. . w: - 'H'n ' t A 9 y . '7' ' "i 7' "77" T" g '7': 1:17., 7.1.1.1 - ..,-..-..-.............-V.A...-.1 El 5n Ii M t T 1 t F low 1.71. m. ' ha." H w 3 'hmM EW.' a $$w T'Tl " u... amt ' l H ' W w '7, wt ' u Wt- I T Frasier Garner Hall Gates r 3'- "" h" .- BROWNELL FRASIER ......................... President u JESSIE GARNER ............................... Vice President tl'" HELEN HALL ............................................................. 4 ...................................... Secretary MARIE GATES ............................................................................................ Treasurer DOROTHY PARSONS .................................................................................................... Editor In the fall of 1912, Triple A, an organization for all Freshman girls, was established through the initiative of Helen Frances Driver, Mary Anne Smith, and Myrtle Gramm. The founders foresaw in Triple A an opportunity to develop friendships which would not be limited to narrow circles and which would en- dure throughout the four years of college life. The Freshmen of that year wel- comed the idea; and each year since, Freshmen women have reorganized Triple A with the expressed purpose of promoting class and college acquaintance, irre- Tm u spective of fraternity affiliations. This year Triple A has accomplished its mm "L pose through several delightful social gatherings. The present officers are: President, BrOWnell Frazier; Vice President, Jessie Garner; Secretary, Helen Hall; Treasurer, Marie Gates; Editor, Dorothy Parsons. -- e , e. r' h 1:" r - u 11 c1 22::30 192 .WMQ uh M 5 M m 'Vhii 5'4 R '5; s. "In- ' '53 wt w. 5'5"w' M". twain ' ' f r Eh! 4 . u, 'an .,a u 1 V 13;: Hr; I h. w W ;Vm d "rpm ' U . a s '31 r"; I p nt'w5 'qau ,mol H. .vwg X'lr 5" 1 D 03 U m:k;,: Grime 313' RUBY BOGUE ............................................................................................................ President MARY DUNN .................................................................................................... Vice President ANNE DAWSON ...................................................................................... Secretary-Treasurer BEATRICE THURSTON .......................................................................................... Reporter iganhvllpnir DELEGATES 1. GAMMA PHI BETA5Mrs. Homer, Helen McCornack, Mary Johns. 2. CH1 OMEGA-Rose Basler, Eulalie Crosby, Gladys Wilkins. 3. KAPPA ALPHA THETA5Norma Hendricks, Bernice Lucas, Grace Bing- 11am. DELTA DELTA DELTA5Mozelle Hair, Bernice Perkins, J0 Driscoll. KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA-Mrs. Allen, Dorothy Wheeler, Celeste Foulkes. DELTA GAMMA-Amy Dunn, Helen Wiegand, Lurline Brown. ALPHA PHI5Ruth Howells, Ruth 'Westfall, Elizabeth Carson. PI BETA PHI5Mrs. Datson, Ruth Lawrence, Jeannette McLaren. 0051.05.01? Arrhitprtural Glluh JOHN MCGUIRE .......................................................................................................... President CORD SENGSTAKE ........................................................................................ Vice President LAWRENCE UNDERWOOD .................................................................................. Secretary PETER JENSEN ................................................................................. Treasurer ' Enterfraternitg Gnunril HUGO BEZDEK .......................................................................................................... President KARL BECKE .................................................................................................. Vice President EMMETT RATHBUN ............................................................................ Secretary-Treasurer 091'?an Qlluh i FLOYD WESTERFIELD .......................................................................................... President JOHN HOUSTON ............................................................................................ Vice President MAE LYNCH .............................................................................................................. Secretary RUTH WILSON .......................................................................................................... Treasurer liniuerzity magma ALEX BOWEN .......................................................................................................... President ECHO ZAHL .................... Secretary MARIAN TUTTLE .................................................................................................... Treasurer JAMES MOTT .................................................................................................................... Coach 332:: D II p ' "5;.,M.mfm":;g;:1.. 5 . 193 5 5 w Jr- 5"1'5wvz-5 v. J! 2"t?u1"igr :3 a4 JQ4W . mg-c- $mm311 mm ' whey; 5;,yw .....J., w... htt-t'h-5. .m.x I an: Mn... a. .;; .- my ,5; v 1.3.42 mmmvw -;.r A A n ,. 5..-... 4; r; 1 A 5; wwa-euwrhndnpwy- .. . m ,---.. kmqw-w. -y la. 0 ab 8k ..e4y' 31d w l :a 'M ' 34ea in '1" ' H '1 p w .... 194 . , . hmann 0, ISO Fle Barnhar W Spellman .. ier ells C011 W McConnell th k, m m m1 Maddoc x4 Avison arrell Green P mLm-Wmm a 1'1 w 195 4391151 Elma 1am Founded at Cleveland Law School, September, 1900. Emily $2natp Installed May 2, 1913. FRATRES IN FACULTATE Edward W. Hope. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE H. Elmer Garrett, Garnet Green, Seth Smith, Charles Collier, Bart Slpellman, Graham McConnell, C. C. Clark, Ben Fleischmann, Harold Wells, Creston Mad- dock, Frank Farrell, Bothwell Avison, J. Elmer Barnard. ALUMNI MEMBERS Dal M. King. v23. 1 anew: ugrm 1- wzz'ngra? U. u .3. ., .. w p. nun . . , c. . u w w x m 1' g t H w H w V w M r. NU... . .h . me MW m . a v., n w m b w u n w a m u .u m . - ? ., 'nm- u .n g 196 m N, Y H mm am yxaem.l . 1 7 , nmmz 1 1 whao. T BIVHD .; fn.., f; w s , . x wwmwo m rnwrF W 000a . GJBHI . : 1 ; 7 L L n e ; $?.Q, mosm 1 gmmNX , Heaeo . gNhkF e um r. . TMWCR H s o n d .mamrn kmiae pszw , Mm.ea SCKLP 5igma Alpha Pre-Medioal Fraternity, Founded 1913. Alpha Ghaptpr FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Cleveland Simpkins, Harold Tregilgas, Edward Gordeau, Clarence Brunkow, Leo Cossman, M. T. Nelson, Raymond Jones, W. Holman, Kent Wilson, Basil "Williams, Albert Bowles, James Vance, D. Leonard, Conrad Cockerline, Thomas Hardy, J. L. Holzman, Edward H. Padden, Ray Fox, Irwin Fox, Dwight Wilson! INACTIVE MEMBERS Wilmot C. Foster, Walter Kresse, Bert Peacock, Douglas Corpron, Percy Guy, Archie Bird, Vernon Melson. HONORARY MEMBERS President P. L. Campbell, Dean John Straub, Dr. C. H. Edmondson, Dr. J. E. Gutberlet, Prof. O. F. Stafford, Prof. J. F. Bovard. 197 Hamstreet Hyde J. Sheehy Stoddard MOOres Newton VVestel-Iield Gilbert NICNary 198 V1 1;- .n I; own 1 "fa.- .r mmmm', g?tgma 4321121 Olhi Founded in DePauW University, April 17, 1909. , v www.irmia-s'wzlh. a,xrswm Iv GDmirrmt Olhapter Installed April 10, 1913. i A National Journalistic Fraternity. I i ACTIVE MEMBERS Harold Hamstreet, Kenneth Moores, Milton Stoddard, Floyd Westerfield, Wal- 5 ter Dimm, Harold Newton, James Sheehy, Maurice Hyde, DeWitt Gilbert, Fred Dunbar, Robert McNary. ALUMNI MEMBERS ; Lee Hendricks, Jesup Strang, Thomas Boylen, Earl Blackaby, Sam Michael, 3 Karl Onthank, Franklin Allen, Carlton Spencer, Fen Waite, Andrew Collier, I Henry Fowler, Harold Young, Don Rice, Clarence Ash, Wallace Eakin, Lamar Tooze, Harry Kuck, Merlin Batley, Leslie Tooze, Max Sommer, Mandell Weiss. l HONORARY MEMBERS P. L. Campbell, George Palmer Putnam, Dean Collins, Frank Jenkins, W. A. 1 Dill, Herbert Campbell, E. N. Blythe, Colin V. Dyment, Eric W. Allen, Harold . Hunt, Robert A. Cronin. 7571:3233 H g I n L. , . 1u 199 1 l 3'3 I . y a. .;QHLI I ,3 0:03: I .JOL O 33-. ; . - L. ubbr m. RX .h 200 n 0 t 1m1 .. hom , aV iLMAIiI ZXH S n n mmm Jtm .ran HWK aw. K emu MTUQ TCB 201 Ehvta Svigma 1911i Founded in Washington University, April 8, 1909. Eheta Ghaphzr Installed June 10, 1915. A National Journalistic Woman's Fraternity. ACTIVE MEMBERS Bernice Lucas, Helen Johns, Echo Zahl, Helen Currey, Lucille Watson, Emma Wootton, Jean Bell, Roberta Killam, Clytie Hall. ALUMNAE MEMBERS Grace Edgington, Claire Raley, Beatrice Locke, Rita Fraley, Mary Baker. HONORARY MEMBERS Mrs. Eric W. Allen, Miss Caroline Cole, Mrs. Mabel H. Parsons, Mrs. J. Frederick Thorne. w . w ., to $ $,, V. .1. ht .1? pa; i.h hwp ;w v ml u a r h e I . n w? t I h W a u. h? . ., Wm. . .Zw. b?mmm a . . . ? ' -'.HD m.' ".m f . f Si v 2M n 0 w rnmm 3U S 0 mnmm euea GHTJ ..,-... w n J o g m y m n 1 h eHMhm u NoecA w Heuc i.1r0 NEBCM , w. t 8 mg mmwmu Mmeam RSBBN 7 r m r T. ; m .. L 1 He M urw hw rbor "w e de .n th ttnb an 0au0 .. PRDR ; . . m . Dr . V 1:: 090mg Alpha Kappa Wt Founded in NeW York University, May, 1905. Kappa Glhaptmf Installed May 3, 1915. ACTIVE MEMBERS Fred Kiddle, Martin Nelson, Leo Potter, Floyd South, Jack Elliott, Roland Geary, Emmett Rathbun, John Beckett, Bernard Breeding, Charles Huntington, Charles Dundore, Kenneth Bartlett, Ray Couch, Lloyd Tegart, Don Roberts. ALUMNI MEMBERS Lamar Tooze, Harry Kuck, Edwin Dorr, Leslie Tooze, Robert McMurray, Max Sommer, John Clark Burgard. HONORARY MEMBERS H. B. Miller, D. W. Morton, D. C. Sowers, Robert McAuslan, J. Hugh Jackson, Allan G. Hopkins, C. C. Colt, Fletcher Linn, A. R. Clarke, John A. Keating, A. C. 1 : Dixon. 3'; . V- X a ' 2 i .1 . K i 5 ' L; r a ,. w: ,,,,w....... , L .4 W rw---......w::::: :1 I 1 a u: , a0 N .04 NI! ,'- "N am- u. '1: hma- Wh- b. w, W K .- .. H nII-u W 'W'" . .' h". .2 MW : $231 204 cm Bow Case Boatman Gilber; Solve R. Fox 'wool Blades Murphy Hal ard todd Eaton S Newton awn$i ya... g?tgma Hpailnn Founded in the University of the South and Vanderbilt University, 1906. 132 Enharh Elna Installed October, 1915. A National Writers1 Fraternity. ACTIVE MEMBERS Milton A. Stoddard, John D. Gilbert, Chandos Castle, Frank Scaiefe, Russell Fox, Alex Bowen, Ed. Harwood, Harold Newton, Leslie Blades, Percy Boatman, Lobert Case, Melvin Solve, Stanley Eaton. ALUMNI MEMBERS James Cellars, Henry Howe, Chester Fee, Max S-ommer, Howard McCulloch. ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Professor W. F. G. Thacher, J. Frederic Thorne. Davis Datson Radabaugh Frasier Talmadge Middleton Goldsmith Hurd Calvert Banlield Gillette Huston Vander Sluis V an Nuys Pim Hampton annett Crosby Mathews Neil Cochran Crawford Macklin Rowley Strowbrilge Farris Forbes 1 u I K :1 27324-7: 1 w ".1 II V mil!" '4" H w t O l I I Z ". vnv-r . 2 ' n- m J- 'h M and h 'u.u.m . 'h Mn . N 207 1151: 1311i Epailnn Founded at Metropolitan College of Music, November 13, 1903. N11 thapter Installed March 3, 1911. ACTIVE MEMBERS Dorothy Bennett, Margaret Crosby, Mrs. Edna Datson, Ruth Davis, Winifred Forbes, Anita Goldsmith, Hester Hurd, Ada Matthews, Mrs. Daisy Middleton, Mrs. Maud Hampton, Marian Neil, Ursula Pim, Mrs, Rose Powell, Hazel Rada- baugh, Ann Calvert, Rena Watkins, Charlotte Banfleld, Mabel Cochran, Viola Crawford, Byownell Frazier, Mamie Gillette, Elizabeth Houston, Reba Macklin, Genevieve Rowley, Irene StroWbridge, Frances Tallmadge, Alice Vander Sluis. Giadys Van Nuis, Jessie Farris. hmann isc Shaw 1e E R. McNary ttler arnett Bracht L B H i olton Carroll Edwards C 2'09 Awnriateh Hninpraitg Imagem illHaEk anh Euakiu Glimmer Installed February 3, 1917. ACTIVE MEMBERS Martha Beer, Bernice Lucas, Ernest Watkins, George Colton, Earl Fleischmann, Charles Prim, Rosalind Bates, Helen Bracht, Robert McNary, Rosamund Shaw, Victor Sether, Cleome Carroll, Warren Edwards, Golden Barnett, Lillian Littler. HONORARY MEMBERS Granville Barker, Dr. Ernest S. Bates. t 1': MW "m unn- W "" silk" "Am 3"" h. r: mama 2 I... W! 9' It. :- p M" In-" .hk $1.3 gr 8 Ila! km. ; 2 sh h I l.gim 3mm h. w I wut- m L wInt. '5. ."kii L. $1 I , h 4.. h... M Hamstreet Beckett Jaureguy McMurray Becke Geary M. Nelson Rathbun Kiddlo Scaiefe J. Sheehy Tregilgas 210 K Q; 0c ' 10 Q; amt: nus; - EHriarE An UpperclassmenVs Society, organized November 1, 1910. u ACTIVE MEMBERS Nicholas Jaureguy, Harold Hamstreet, Emmett Rathbun, Karl Becke, Robert McMurray, John Beckett, Martin Nelson, Roland Geary, Frank Scaiefe,- Fred Riddle, James Sheehy, Harold Tregilgas. V22: '2' V 1? .5:- i ALUMNI MEMBERS Thomas A. Burke, Percy M. Collier, D. Leslie Dobie, Charles M. Taylor, Ralph FF". Newlands, Earl C. Latourette, James S. Johns, Ralph D. Moores, R. Burns Powell, Martin W. Hawkins; Robert Kellogg, Homer Jamison, Leon Ray, David L. McDaniels, Dean H. Walker, Carlton Spencer, Andrew Collier, Karl Onthank. f Fendel-S. Waite, James C. Cecil, Howard Zimmerman, Karl Martzloff, Vernon i '2 Motschenbacher, Don Rice, Edward F. Bailey, Vernon H. Vawter, Carl B. Fenton, f Alvia R. Grout, Delbert C. Stanard, Robert C. Bradshaw, Dalzel King, Willard Shaver, Hawley Bean, Henry Fowler, Earl Blackaby, Tom Boylen, Bertrand S. Jerard, Herbert W. Lombard, Raymond H. Bryant, Leland Hendricks, John Par- sons, Fred A. Hardesty, Ben F. Dorris, Ernest Vosper, Leslie Tooze, Anson Cor- nell, Lamar Tooze, Sam Cook, Merlin Batley, Cloyd Dawson, Chester Fee, Fred B. Dunbar, Max Sommer, G. Chester Huggins. vam: , pa: A a:axzv m HONORARY MEMBERS . i Gustave W. Buchen, LeRoy Johnson, Arthur M. Geary, Hugo Bezdek. 2 -m-V.w-r guts, Wm ;; ::::::::::J D II 1:2 , w V MV-VV WV; ".1; - Bates Beer Cox Hales Hall Shoemaker Walker Wheeler ..W11 .3113. w wk 3O w Ihm a " "" g... M h .3 "Nil I-n.d"'. I $w nun: 19m M h'rw bum human... .hk Hicks thin!" m I .h .g- g... .h.-hb. b" .vr:w-.n.n-- - 1.; ,73h .,,. m: MW ,. 5:11:11 amh $rript Senior Honor Society, Organized June 3, 1900. ACTIVE MEMBERS Rosalind Bates, Martha Beer, Nellie Cox, Anna Hales, Frances Shoemaker, Eyla Walker, Dorothy Wheeler. INACTIVE -MEMBERS Ruth Duniway, Bertha Dorris, Mrs. Raymond Kerr warolyn Dunstam, Mrs. E. Moller Wrances Oberteuffem, Mrs. Harold Dalzell Mae SageL Jennie Lilly, Mrs. Thomas Word aluth Hansom, Lila Prosser, Mrs. Ben Chandler mecile Wil- com, Mrs. F. J. Whittlesy Edith Woodcocm, Mrs. Thomas Burke Uuliet CrossL Marian Stowe, Mrs. Graham Mitchell He1en Beacm, Willetta Wright, Mrs. George M. Vinton 01iVe DonneID, Mary DeBar, Mrs. George Benchandler leice Stod- dardL Naomi Williamson, Mrs. Charles Robinson Birdie WiseL Mildred Bagley, Ruth Merrick, Alma Payton, Fay Claark, Jean Allison, Mrs. Glen Briedwell Er1ne1 Millen, Jessie Bibee, Pansy Shaver, Nellie Hemenway, Carin Degermark, Lucile Dams, Flora Dunham, Maude Mastick, Ruth Beach, Meta Goldsmith, Norma Do- bie, Edith Clements, Katherine Carson, Beulah Stebno; Vaughn McCormick, Lyle Steiwer, Callie Beck, Louise Bailey, Bertha Kincaid, Mina Ferguson, Grace Edgington. HONORARY MEMBERS Luella Clay Carson, Ruth M. Guppy. . . . . n h m n ualv ! v. N 1 a . e v. rw m. Mm .. .. r M. Wu. k N h .r P pf. .auw I . H, . .. ,5. KIWJHWWHWWQ 3:12:93? 7.27 - J J: 1 s6 L Murdock Steinmetz ande' Dunn Alex len Brenton ickev Pearsm Boy Bracht ilson Porte Robertson XV H. Bracht womey sley Sghuebel K1 n T .-.wwx-, u . , , . A ,I , $1. st iui xmulk,ihhs. We? .L . y u4gbl;U Ivanlnvliy ; alvii . a: !!;1 e .rx ill l'ailriillnk. ZKmama Sophomore Honor Society, Founded March, 1912. 1913-1914 Louise Bailey, Eva Brock, Palm Cowden, Mona Dougherty, Rita Fraley, Gladys Grayhill, Elsie Gurney, Marie Hager, Evelyn Harding, Georgia Kinsey, Tula Kinsley, Mildred Lawrence, Fairy Miller, Katherine Northrop, Rose Price, Claire Raley, Mary Smith, Kate Stanfield, Katherine Watson. 1914-1915 Mi1dred Broughton, Lurline Brown, Grace Campbell, Ina Cochran, Mar'garet Hawkins, Marian Ingram, Florence Johnson, Helen Johns, Bernice Lu- cas, Merle McCloskey, Bernice Staggs, Marian Reed, Olive Risley, Frances Shoe- maker, Miriam Tinker, Myrtle Tobey, Helen Wiegand, Louis Williamson, Emma Wootton. 1915-1916 -Sara Barker, Grace Bingham, Dorothy Collier, Elizabeth Carson, Mary Johns, Ruth Holmes, Sylva Lloyd, Leura Jerard, Erma Keithley, Jeanette McClaren, Vera Olmstead, Lucy Powers, Grace Reed, Winifred Starbuck, Martha Tinker, Alva Wilson, DorotBy Wilkinson, Juanita Wilkins, Mildred Woodruff. 1916-1917-Caroline Alexander, Lillian Boylen, Edith Bracht, Helen Bracht, Helen Brenton, Myrtle Cowan, Genevieve Dickey, Mary Dunn, Genevieve Gilles' pie, Lucille Msesner, Iva McMillan, Mary Murdock, Ruth Pearson, Lillian Porter, Dorothy Robertson, Roberta Srchuebel, Mildred Steinmetz, Katherine Twomey; Louise Wilson. ma, h MW - ;.:.. iwi' r W V nr'J I I "k "r . . -.-: 'Pwk' IN Fw- f-u- w: - - Wu- nu. H'- w 2",..." " U'Q amm- V gm. .mg uh Atkinson Cool; Grey Hoisington Butts XV. Sheehy Madden L'. XVilson Maurice Kiggins Farley Tourtellotte Jensen McDonald 216 217 En-iKn-In Sophomore Society, Organized January 12, 1912. ACTIVE MEMBERS Wyville Sheehy, Keith Kiggins, Peter Jensen, Dwight Wilson, Robert Atkin- son, Harvey Madden, Charles McDonald, Estley Farley, Ralph Tourtellotte, McLeod Maurice, George Cook, Harold Gray, Dale Butts, Ernest Hoisington. INACTIVE MEMBERS James Sheehy, Charles Dundore, Don Newbury, Oscar Goreczky, Ray Staub, Donald Roberts, DeWitt Gilbert, Thomas Campbell, Kenneth Bartlett, Don Beld- iug, Laird Woods, Harold Tregilgas, Robert Earl, Walter Grebe, Bert Ford, How- ard Bull, Howard Hall, Emmett Rathbun, Llyod Bayley, John Beckett, Oscar VViest, Fred Kiddle, Martin Nelson, Frank Scaiefe, Joe Sheahan, Harold Fitzgib- bon, Walter Amspoker, Allan Bynon, Lawrence Mann, Merlin Batley, Robert Bean, Sam Cook, Dean Crowell, Fred Dunbar, Chester Fee, Claud Hampton, Frank Lewis, Chester Miller, Lamar Tooze, Leslie Tooze, Henry Trowbridge, Glen Wheeler, Hermes Wrightson, Herbert Normandin, Earl Blackaby, John Plock, Tom Boylen, Ed Geary, Aaron Gould, William Heusner, Bertrand Jerard, Fred Hardesty, Clark Hawley, Henry Heidenreich, Jessup Srtrang, James Pack, Ken- neth Reed, Ernest Vosper, Clay Watson, Vernon Motschenbacher, Wallace Ben- son, Robert McCornack, Harold Young, Joe Jones, Delbert Stanard, Wallace Cau- field, Robert Bradshaw, Carl Fenton, Alva Grout, Hawley Bean, Charles Rey- nolds, Donald Rice. FOX Reinhardt Brown Gates Farley McCready Vawter Leonard Clubh I.?cKinneY Brown Gore Harris Heitschmidt ROSS I-Iowarzl Morfitt Phipps Hunt Boatmatl Alexander Vance Brock Hamlin 'p t' i m' y 5 l b.4f ,v 34.7. t .:.:E" .1 v I . 3"- .m HQ h. H 5km a... . hbh . a x. L- 219 Earth anh Smivlh Sophomore Society, Organized in 1912. ACTIVE MEMBERS George Gates, Kenneth Farley, Ivor Ross, Neii Morfitt, William Vawter, Nellis Hamlin, Ward McKinney, Jay Gore, Percy Boavtman, James Vance, Lynn Mc- Cready, Dorman Leonard, Maynard Harris, William Reinhart, Roy Brown, Royce Brown, Vergil Alexander, Bert Clubb, Dolph Phipps, Dorsey Howard, Howard Bowles, Harold Brock, Earl Heitschmidt, Frank Hunt, John McMurray, Jay Fox. INACTIVE MEMBERS Robert Malarkey, Frank Farrell, Leonard Floan, Fred Fenton, I. B. Bowen, Lloyd Tegart, Joseph McLean, Clifford Mitchell, Marshall Woodworth, Charles Huntington, Clark Thompson, Hilbert Wilson, Henry Proctor, Max Reigard, Jake Risley, Joseph Hedges, Ray Couch, Charles Croner, Harold Sexton, Harry Har- greaves, Kent Wilson, Bert Peacock, Fred Heitshausen, Orville Monteith, William Snyder, Glenn Shockley, Folsom Tallman, Charles Tisdale, Kenneth Moores, Karl Becke, Hugh Lieuallen, Robert Fitzmaurice, Wallace Martin, Leo Malarkey, Robert Hayes, Bartholomew Spellman, Charles Parcell, Ernest MacCowan, Edwin Dorr, Glenn Dudley, Carson Bigbee, Donald Cawley, Robert McMurray, Claire Hender- son, Rex Kay, Frank Wray, Paul Hendricks, Ray Gorman, John Elliott, William Tuerck, Raymond Sweeney, William Holden, Raeman Fleming, Joe Gilpin, Earl Bronaugh, William Burgard, Gordon Billings, Walter Kirk, Arthur Olsen. Vernon Garrett, Bruce Holbrook, Floyd South, Lyle Bigbee, William Montgomery, Both- well Avison, Leland Hendricks, Clark Burgard, Boyce Fenton, John Parsons. Bryant DeBar, Eugene Good, Dale Chessman, Ben Dorris, Maurice Hill, Melville Morton, Morris Bigbee, Robert Buchanan, Don Rader, Richard Fulton, John Welch, Lloyd Stevens, Walter Gaunt. min"! n21..- , I v y w. ,7 f "v 'w. wm' hm- kins Ralston Underwood Sevits Cockerline Simp n ISOH O Solv V raln C Av an H01 Holzman :1Win ngs Vawter Pease Gates Goo cConneH Kennon atkins Grey Cutsforth V" 1 I $191111er An Interclass Society of Ancient Origin. 091?an Olaliphatp Founded in 1893. OFFICERS HARRY N. CRAIN ............................................................................................ Grand Master ERNEST WATKINS ...................................................................................... Imperial Scribe CLEVE SIMPKINS ........................................................................................ Royal Physician GRAHAM McCONNELL .................................................................................. High Marsha FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Graduate Students Cleve Simpkins, Chester T. Kronenberg, Marsh Goodwinn. 1917 J. Bothwell Avison, Ernest Watkins, Russell C. Ralston. 1918 Graham McConnell, Melvin T. Solve, Jerome L. Holzman, Harry N. Crain, WaL ter S. Kennon, Robert Riggs, Thomas D. Cutsforth. 1919 George E. Gates, Lawrence Underwood, Harold D. Grey, William Vawter, Con- rad Cockerline, Robert Case. 1920 Levant Pease, Ray Van Horn, Clifford Sevits. FRATRES IN URBE J. Elwood Luckey, 112, A. Burleigh Cash, 113, Ben Dorris J12, 115. VVheatley I V'v'v'alket Olmstead Wilson Brenton mummy 152mm JEANNETTE WHEATLEY .................................................................................... President MARTHA TINKER .......................................................................................... Vice President EYLA WALKER ................................................................................ Second Vice President VERA OLMSTEAD .................................................................................................... Secretary RUTH WILSON ; ........................................................................................................ Treasurer LILLIAN PORTER ..................................................................................... Sergeant-at-Arms HELEN BRENTON .......................................................................................................... Editor The Woments League is composed of the associated women of the student body and is consequently the largest w'oments club in the state. It was orig- inally organized in 1911 to try out student government among the women. This organization is responsible for the sponsor system, whereby every fresh- man woman is provided with an upper Class sponsor or adviser When she enters. Louise Allen is head of the system. This year the league pledged one hundred dollars toward the new Woments Building. It directs the annual April Frolic; has charge of the campus dinner on Uni- versity day during Junior Week-End; and brings to the campus speakers of es- pecial interest to college women. The Woments Athletic Association is a branch of the Woments League, as are also the Consumers League Committee, and the War Relief Committee. .VV. . '51 ;s H. . . waws'f' II Eepartmmt nf Ighgairal Emitting anh ?Qggipnp In pursuance of the policy of the University to develop its women students equally with its men along the lines of good citizenship, President Campbell secured the services of Dr. Bertha S. Stuart, Director of Physical Education for W'omen at the University of Michigan, to undertake the building of a similar de partment in the University of Oregon. X The work Was begun in the fall of 1909 a d continued under Dr. Stulrt's di- rection up to the fall of 1915, when Dr. Stuart resigned and Miss Mabel Louise Cummings became the director. The purpose of this department is twofold in that it endeavors to inculcate health habits in its students that Will enable them as future citizens to be doubly efficient, and it trains instructors in plaground supervision, in hygiene and physical education, and it greatly benefits those going into social service. work. Its methods of work in developing health habits and better physique: are determined by the results of the physical examinations given each fall and spring. The students are divided into three general groups: general all-around work, restricted work, and corrective work. The first two groups are given regularly progressed physical exercise in connection with lectures in Personal Hygiene, and those in the corrective group have individual attention according to their needs. The students majoring in the department have a thorough and more or less inelastic course, the fundamental work during their hrst two years both in theory and practice. Elective work, practice teaching and general rounding out comes in the Junior and Senior years. Walker Crosby Bogus Conklin Hansen Brenton mummy Athletir Aaanriatinn EYLA WALKER ........................................................................................................ President MARGARET CROSBY .................................................................................... Vice President RUBY BOGUE ............................................................................................................ Secretary GLADYS CONKLIN .................................................................................................. Treasurer EVA HANSEN ............................................................................................................ Custodian HELEN BRENTON .................................................................................................... Reporter The Womerfs Athletic Association was organized at Oregon October 9th, 1913. Membership requirements include good scholastic standing, and eligibility for office requires the possession of from one hundred to two hundred points won in . sports. Three silver cups presented by William Hayward are awarded each year, one each for basketball, baseball and track. Names of winners are engraved upon these annually. Each year a Womxan,s Field Day is held, the different events- including: a. canoe race, tennis match, golf tournament, archery round, a baseball game, and a track meet. Trophies are offered the winners of each event. .;l,$l;k 2.72., , Furuset xandel' Ale W'arner Garrett; S nn XYill Tregilgas Bell Chambers Hall 1.. ng.L A m1? -n; AmL-mr-ms-JM r. T, The girlst hockey team played 0. A. C. at Corvallis on October 28, and despite a defeat of 5-0, Coach Frieda Goldsmith declared that Oregon put up a good game and that the girls fought hard and showed their Oregon spirit. The superior defensive work of the backheld, Claire Warner and Maud Lombard, kept the op- posing score down. The lineup W15: Ethel Murray, center forward; Margaret Crosby, left inside; Helene Reed, right inside; Ella Dews, left Wing; Margaret Bailey, right wing; Harriet Garrett, center half; Jean Bell, right half; Eva Han- sen, left half; Claire Warner tcaptaim, left fullback; Maud Lombard, right full- back; Esther Furuset, goalkeeper; Frances Baker, Essie Maguire, and Jeannette Moss, substitutes. Eaakpthall The Sophomores walked off With the Hayward cup as a result of the inter-class basketball series staged to determine the college championship. They won two conaecutive games from the Freshmen, 17-9 and 23-9, and overcame the Juniors, who won the upper class series. The score for the final Sophomore-Junior game was 12-2. The lineups were: Senior: Echo Zahl and Ruth Roche, forwards; Jeannette Wheatley and Jennie Huggins, guards; Ruby Steiwer, Ada Hall and Mae Harbert, centers. Junior: Cora Hosford and Ethel Newland, forwards; Jeannette Kletzing and Frieda Laird, guards; Evelyn Foster, Melba Williams, and Margaret Crosby, centers. Sophomore: Hazel Rankin and Maud Lombard, forwards; Louise Clausen, Caroline Alexander, and Harriet Garrett, guards; Claire Warner and Ruby Bogue, centers. Freshman: Nell Warwick, Margaret Bailey, and Jeannette Moss, forwards; Doris Slocum, Mary McCornack, Martha Humphrey and Era Godfrey, guards; Eva Hansen, Marie Beach aIid Genevieve Keller, centers. 0. unaml! h 'V" Ina: hhv A: 2-9!! to: gm '3 ,. n n 1 9-3.1. . . m... h" hi; W I i a ' s 3 mar; th h. "d 3- 1"! f? and alumni .3901? .M th-Al u a u-owt 'I" i u I 'ihw 1w u 5'" N. , w. 1: d '1." 0 1M HY .M - Mt hf. '" 1 egg 1 w u w m " W r at?" 4' 33' 'r'. ' u' a 4 w :Iih . . nu D," If x q; r. 0W bl" w i ' 9'1" 1 5-" HM" ,wt ! Emma Six standard tennis courts are provided for women's tennis on the campus. Varsity material is developed through the doughnut series and the tennis club tournaments held annually. In varsity tennis, Adrienne Epping won the singles from O. A. C. last year, and Roberta Killam and Frances Baker took the doubles. The games were staged here on May 13, and Referee Hazel Rader declared that the matches were hard- fought and marked by good, steady playing. Besides winning the tennis title and the Hendershott racquet, Miss Epping holds the Laraway cup for one year. As the Winners of the doughnut series, Roberta Killam and Caroline Alex- ander won the silk hose offered by a local store, while Frances Baker won the gym racquet on Field Day. Membership in the Tennis Club is purely honorary and is open to women in- terested in the game. Ohicers 1916-1917 are: Caroline Alexander, President; Ro- berta Killam, Secretary-Treasurer; Adrienne Epping, Manager; Jessie Garner, M ember-at-Large. Members: Roberta Killam, Dorothy Wheeler, Adrienne Epping, Echo Zahl, Helen McCornack, Mary Chambers, Caroline Alexander, Helen Hair, Gladys Smith, Helen Bracht, Marjory Kay, Louise McCandliss, Maud Lombard, Jessie Garner, Grace Williams, Mary Murdock, Helen Brenton, and Edna Gray. Eamhall Nowadays when women invade everything, a co-ed baseball series is quite in order. Last year a hhdoughnuth league was formed and teams entered from the sororities, Oregon Club, Mary Spiller Hall, and the faculty. On Field Day the final game of the series was played between the faculty team and Mary Spiller Hall, resulting in a faculty Victory. The Hayward baseball cup was consequently presented to them to be held for one year. M. L L"! V u' " .- Q49 .xn . .. . " W' U wax .5 .N 't a . h I 0.. O! h ,. s a .w . me. w a x ... .. ,,..:. H. c .. . xh..N Kw e 5 I6 v I m . ,. .. h? Evan ZRaIph 1Q. Elyman Four years ago Ralph H. Lyman came to the University of Oregon to take charge of the Music Department. At that time the Music Department consisted of a few small rooms situated on the lower 110017 of the Ments Dormitory-and a few members comprised the faculty of the School of Music. Professor Lyman leaves the University of Oregon this year after having organized and established a School of Music that ranks among the very best in the Northwest. At present we have a building known as the Conservatory of Music, in which room is pro- vided for the twelve members of the faculty, besides practice rooms for the stu- dents wishing to study in the music department, and a small recital hall. During his four years of connection with the University of Oregon, Professor Lyman has organized and taken charge of both a Menls and Womenls Glee Club, the Vesper Choir, a Philharmonic Society, composed not only of the University students, but townspeople as well, and has done much towards making the band and orchestra a success by his willingness to help in any way possible. It has been through his efforts also that Eugene has been visited by the great mu- sical artists, such as Schumann-Heink, Gadski and Gogorza. In fact, Professor Lymanis time and effort have been directed at all times to the further apprecia- tion of good music among the students and people of Eugene. Professor Lyman leaves behind him, however, not only the School of Music and many organizations Which stand for a great deal of work On his part, but, better still, hosts of friends among the students of the University. He has al- ways been most enthusiastic in all of the events in which the University has taken parteespecially athletic events, at which one could always find him among the rooters; but also he has been a friend to all who have in any way come in contact with him. The best wishes for greater success go with Professor Ly- man wherever the future may find him. MEN,S GLEE CLUB ' Top Row-Madden, Scearce, Bond, Mills, Kennon, Peterson, Moore, Black. Middle Row-Phipps, Vawter, Vance, Lyman, Ralston, Rowe. Beach. Bottom R0w White, Burns, Folts, Holzman, Smith, Edwards, Morrison, Weinheimcr. men? 05122 Qlluh JOHN BLACK ............................................................................................................ President XVILLIAM VAVVTER ...................................................................................... Vice President LEWIS BOND .............................................................................................................. Secretary RALPH H. LYMAN ...................................................................................................... Director HOWARD ANNETT ................................................................................ Assistant Director BOTHWELL AVISON ................................................................................................ Manager DONALD ROBERTS ................................................................................ Assistant Manager MEMBERS First Tenors A1gie VVeinheimer, Warren-Edwards, Harvey Madden, William Morrison, Dolph Phipps, Jerome Holzman. Second Tenors-Russell Ralston, Merle Moore, Robert Scearce, James Vance, Graham Smith. Baritones -Lewis Bond, Harry Mills, Franklin Folts, Curtiss Peterson, William Vawter, Raymond Burns. Basses Wa1ter Kennon, Curtis Beach, Irving Rowe, John Black, Harold White. GRAND OPERA. A. LA OREGON vb " i:;.;::::::;:1 U 03 m: . I ' ,IL'; "" ' i '14 "j, M 'f. l '5 i x w ' l " a - : ; ' , ' d V v""' . 111E211 a $192 Olluh Elma -.L , w M ,. E L ' "V w' 35; "Bobbie, whatlll we do, what'll we do? Jim isn't here yet," exclaimed an ex- it t: W a M' 2t cited voice as its owner scurried down the embankment into camp along the rail- j '1 M ,r a . W 4 road track ttsomewhere" in America. , , 1" kw. a..." g iiWhatlll we do? Just sit down," answered he one addressed. ttYou have the ' . , bf rd" 1 i " wad." z ., aw w a "Yea, but Jim has some more. The old safe had only about four-six-bitsin it ' , n W an! altogether? E $ '0" " u rWhat! Only $4.75? You bunch of flatheads." t .1 w W" M". "Here's a card I got by mistake. Must be of the proprietor. What does ' , .4 9' "M W it say?" f w w n- w "' "Noblesville Milling 00., Graham B. Smith, Pres., Noblesville, Ind. That : u div reminds me of a yarn. Slip me a pipeful of tobacco and I'll spin it to you while ' '1 '4 w. .. m waiting for Jim to show up. U ' "' '1." . m d1 "One time a bunch of college fellows, twenty-two in all, went on a concert I I" n: nightingaling tour. The college was located in a pretty little village in a valley 'r, M u "' 'm in the west; and this tour took them to the Coos Bay country along the Oregon- 3 m r: W 4" coast. I remember that the director, Dean Lyman, of the School of Music, was 'r 3. w t m ' not able to go along with the bunch, so a jolly young fellow by the name of ; m ,7- .n' Howard Annett, also of the School of Music, took his place. Their manager was t 1 d sort of a queer duck by the name of Bots Avison. 3 w "" M "Well, they sure were a jolly crew and they never let a dull moment hang l 'l "W' h" m around during those five days that they were on the trip. First one fellow and an t h 5H" M then another would be the cause of merrirnent. I think it was one of the tenors, M ' km .3 .- Edwards or Weinheimer, who caused the first excitement. That was at Marsh- iield. One of them came to the depot to catch the early morning train in such wan " '1' w a rush that he forgot his shoes and the other his suitcase. 'Edwards thought at 'w '.P W first that he would send a wireless up to the hotel and then he decided to hoof n i" W Ga it and have the bunch hold the train. It was about a mile up to the hotel and in back again. "Well, they sang at about five different towns and were well received every- .5 N where. The last place at which they appeared was'North Bend. In order to reach I h T that place they had to go there from Marshfield in jitneys. Some of the boys didn't pay their fares and so the manager'had to talk for his life in order to V'VNIN-i u u keep out of jail. " T B h h M , ttBut everybody forgot about that little affair when they got back to Marsh- . '.l .Iu h- k field and began to dance at the Hotel Chandler, and later on at the Millicoma . . h club. Nobody knows exactly when all got to bed. but Bond, Scearce and H017.- M N a man had to be jerked out of bed next morning in order to catch the train for home. "One night at one of the concerts, at Powers, I believe, a typical western logging camp, Smith's wig came off. You see Smith was supposed to be a shy little princess in one of the stunts on the program. The princess had red hair. VVell,.next day at a beach party at Bandon given by a Mr. H. W. Quigley, this Smith fellow backs up to the prettiest girl in the bunch, takes a package from 0' ' , m 17 u 222:2:35 232 :31; M 'tal 'Iw M n'N iih'yrzi bun lb 0 pain zawu g .- t" 3..h 5:: ,1 ha Mun are null w- Win. mu m :- 3.7: M 7W manna d mu M fli'fm .3 III. R wt? 109'; d 1.: mint :2: mfiu W: V r: u m .. rm Wm: 42' .n ,m.uum$ H; l gm". slw w m t '.1, glrf. k3 . t! M a- Him Ema 33 W" I. V: " NNW vui $3 7:"! w..- u't' ' ii 1.7 EM l :Mi' w w x'rl l 1 'g u r U' ' 1t MJ'M a :11 ,t ,. . . or-irn. o -.-.7 JrAlm - beneath his arm, whispers s0mething to her, and off they go. The manager comes a snooping around later and finds the girl combing a mop of red hair. Smith was giving her some orders about not pulling so hard and about making some kind of a knot up on the back. Anyway the manager sneaked off again. ttFunny, some of the boys had never seen a real ocean before, and so they began to play duck on the rock. That play wound up by Kennon and Annett getting ducked before they found out that waves climb rocks. uA11 the boys had a good time at Bandon. The biggest house of the whole trip greeted them that night. Then afterwards, later in the evening or earlier in the morning, Vance began to wonder why his key wouldnit iit; Beach, why Rowe wouldnit let him sleep; and the landlord, why a noise like a continual thunderstorm came from upstairs. About the biggest shock that the boys re- ceived on the whole trip was when John Black, the honorable President, smoked half a cigar in the dark. Black tried to tell the bunch that Moores had been carrying it up his sleeve for him all the evening and that he was smoking it on a wager. He wasntt sick, either." "Well, say, here old man, how do you happen to know so much about that particular trip?" queried a voice in the outskirts of the camp. ttHuh? You? When did you come, Jim? "I heard the whole yarn," answered Jim as he wiped shamelessly a tear from off his dirt-caked cheek. itSay, it makes me homesick. But how did you come to know so much about that bunch? 4 "Oh, I was the manager? and his head fell forward onto his chest. ttWhat, you? Then you are Bots Avison? Shake. I'm John Black. But who are you," he asked of the third unknown. All the hoboes call me No Account.' " A deep silence rested over the amazed trio for a long interval. Each were busy with their own memories. "Say, boys, that sure was pretty country over there, wasn,t it? And the people, couldn,t wish for any better? soliloquized the now dreamy Botts. "My real name is Curt Beach. "Them sure were good old days at Oregon, but look where we are now. And to think that Smith is President of the big mill of the burg? added Black as an after thought. "Lets take the four dollars and six bits back to him and ask him for a chance to work and earn enough to buy his Ford and then go back, back to old Oregon and start all over again? suggested the No Account. Tears of remorse and a new formed purpose fell unheeded from the eyes of each would-be safe-cracker. -CURTIS BEACH. 113 0D 0mg UL KVOMEN'S GLEE CLUB Top ROW- Durf1inger, Von Berg, Tobey, Gates, Williams, Wootton, Johns, Bruere. Middle ROW-Van Nuys, Gillette, Craine, Tinker, Rhodes, Hurd, Williams, Bottom R0W Carr011, Bantield, McMu'rphey, Hosford, Keithley, Tinker, Strowbridge. Mummy $122 Qlluh LEAH PERKINS ........................................................................................................ President HELEN JOHNS ................................................................................................ Vice President IVA WOODS ............................................................................................ Secretary-Treasurer MARIAN NEIL .................................................................................................... Accompanist MEMBERS First Soprano-Pearl Craine, Kate Schaefer, Gladys Van Nuys, Mary Alice Gillette, Melba Williams, Elizabeth Bruere, Marjory Williams. Second SopranodCIeome Carroll, Helen Bracht, Cora Hosford, Martha Tinker, Irene Strowbridge, Jessie Garner, Margaret Mansfield. First AltoeHelen Johns, Emma Wootton, Miriam Tinker, Iva Woods, Hester Hurd, Charlotte Banfield, Helen Rhodes. Second AltOwLeah Perkins, Marie Gates, Vera Duriiinger, Erma Keithley, Irene Rugh, Myrtle Tobey, Eva. Von Berg. One might think, if only the Oregana were read, that the Girls Glee Club never went out on a trip. Such is not thet case, however, for just as funny and ridiculous things could be told of their trip as of the men,s if the Oregana only were published later in the year. In other words, the trips for the Womens Glee Club occur late in the spring. Last year the cities visited included Albany, Newberg, Dallas, McMinnVille and Independence, and each has its special remembrance to the girls taking the trip. A luncheon given for all of the girls by Mrs. Gerlinger, at her home in Dallas, will never be forgotten. And-oh, yesethat was where we gave two tconcerts be- tween moving picture showseand also where Cora Hosford and Miriam Tinker insisted on buying their candy and drinks at a gambling den. Charlie Fenton, as usual, practiced for track when it came to getting to the trains on time. In fact, she even had competition this year! We found the men more gallant in every city, too, and were invited to dances practically every night. However, it wasnt necessary to buy rice this year, as we had to last year, for Katie Schaefer and Erma Keithley. GIRLS' QUARTET 2:2 iii: , 1-9.3. . '1 ' ' i'. n. '...3 m -'. '3. Cafe A m m I... S S n, 8' w my a! m m :1 Y n, m MW, S r R m E w N U Butler, Forbes, Bown, Moore, SeatedHOrawford, Pim, Scearce, Vander Sluis, Rowley, MaC', Thompson, Boylen, MCMurphey, Tinker, Gar"ett, Powers. Standing Grebe, mum Huineraitg GDrrhwtra ALICE VANDER SLUIS .......................................................................................... President BYRON GARRETT .................................................................................................... Librarian MARTHA W. TINKER .............................................................................................. Manager VVINIFRED FORBES ........................................... l ....................................................... D irector MEMBERS First Violins-Alice Vander Sluis, Genevieve Rowley, Mrs. Ursula Pim, Viola Crawford. Second ViolinSeAda McMurphey, Lillian Boylen, Burton Thompson, Byron Garrett, Lucy Powers. Viola-Robert Scearce. CelloeGlenn Macy. FluteeFrench Moore. Clarinet-Loren Butler. French. Horn-Bruco Yergin. Cornets-Harold Simpgon, Morris Morgan. Trombone-Walter Grebe. DrumseMaurico Hyde. Tympani:Lee Bown, PianoeMartha W. Tinker. In former years a great deal of the material composing the University Orches- tra has been found among the citizens of Eugene. This year, however, With the greater growth of the University, the Orchestra has been reorganized on a purely student membership basis. This has meant not only greater strength, but also greater success as a University organization, and it is the hope of members of the Orchestra that next year they will be recognized as a student body organv ization, and be rewarded With block Ols similar to those of other organizations. This has been a very busy year for the Orchestra, for after a successful ven- ture before the student body assembly they have been in great demand. Among their public appearances were: three or four plays put on by the different dra- matic societies of the University, two Vesper services, Pledge Day ceremonies, the visit of the legislators, besides their regular annual concert, Which occurred the 23rd of March. The Orchestra, of course, Will play for all of the Commence- ment Week. festivities. The Orchestra also plans to take a short trip, visiting several of the cities in the northern part of the State. This is the first year for the Orchestra to attempt a trip of more than one nightts duration, but it is hoped that in a year or so one of several nights entertainment will be possible. The program for the annual concert consisted of the following numbers: Mar- tha Overture; Surprise Symphony; Katinka Selections; Ballet Music from Faust; Violin Duet, Miss Forbes and Robert Scearce; Flute Solo, French Moore; Toy Symphony. 888 n ; UNIVERSITY BAND Back Row McElr0y, Milne, Center, South, Watkins, J. Dundore, Keown. Third Row-Quisenberry, Boyd, Castle, Director Perfect. Yergen. Gore. M. Moore, Thompson. Second R0W CImner, Nelson, Butler, Byrne, F. Moore, Baldwin, Goreczky, Fox, C. Dundore, Morgan. Front ROW R0ach, Nelson, Potter, Hyde, White, Simpson, Bown. 5" !""1:3 7 i' ft" :1" unipngl s ;; 23ft: s. flab ,5? :1? 5 - - ,.,;; 5;5; :V f ., .i . ;: ' m?. 1 . . lEniUPrzitg Earth FLOYD SOUTH ................................................................................................... '. ...... President RUSSELL QUISENBERRY ...................................................................................... Librarian ALBERT PERFECT ..................................................................................................... Director MAURICE HYDE .......................................................................................................... Manager MEMBERS CornetseMaurice Hyde, Harold Simpson, Morris Morgan, Reginald Fox, Oscar Goreczky, Charles Dundore, Walter White. ClarinetseLoren Butler, Clarence Nelson, Leo Potter, Clinton C-onley, Milo Roach, Richard Nelson, Norman Byrne. PiccoloeFrench Moore, Clayton Baldwin. HornseBurt Thompson, Merle Moore, Jay Gore, Bruce Yergin. SaxophoneeChandos Castle, Ralph Boyd. BaritoneeRussell Quisenberry. BasseNewton Center, Ralph Milne, Frank McElroy. Trombone-Floyd South, Ernest Watkins, Jack Dundore, Owen Keown, Walter Grebe. DrumsHLee Bown, Charles Croner, Jim Richardson. Three years ago a University Band, as such, did not exist. This year we have a band that is known all over the state for its ability to play. The students of the University usually think of the band as something to help make a noise at a football game and play "Cn Oregon." However, they have been forced to change their opinion somewhat when they heard that the band has been offered a two or three weeks engagement at the Oaks Amusement Park, in Portland, this summer. That certainly sounds like something! This came about, however, through their successful appearance at the Oregon-VV. S. C. foot- ball game, at which they made a big hit with their music. Last year the student body presented the band with sweaters in recognition for their hard work in the organization . This year they were presented With uni- forms, Which make them more than ever the proverbial "band boys." Just look at the picture and see! Anyway the University has great reason to be proud of its present musical organizations and certainly among the first of these should appear the band. Nu mania Earth I walked With Satan in his domain, In Desert Land, in No Mans Land. Above us the shells shrieked a weird refrain, Around us Vile heaps on heaps of slain, In No Mans Land A wilderness of gloom and dread Is Desert Land, is No Mans Land Vesuvius, fires are not so red, Sahara,s sands are not so dead As No Mans Land "Look around," said Satan, IRave have here a sign, In Desert Land, in No ManIs Land, Of manIs advance from base to fine, Of the force of manIs claim to things divine, In No ManIs Land!" Around us vile heaps on heaps of slain, In Desert Land, in. No MaIYs Land. Above us the shells shrieked a weird. refrain, As I walked with Satan in his domain, In No Man,s Land. -Robert Case. '5 L'm;h .3 ,m .2. . .' :1 . u c: -: i ' 1 mu m nu 1S .1: 5 Liz :15 II 3W ; m "m .14 v : y! '4 J 1-"!3 , I m: r I.- K1" ; IT, , . . t . k :5?- n H t, 3 1.14 ' ' INTLR worm 5. uARW L. w V ,m," 4 h bsTunoN ,AW mm m mud- . a..- -mv MP- . ,...n. 7. me .. .wh -e .th .. 0. W .q. um, 7......w. r, 3. n.5cm iHnrpnaira, Ephatp anh ODrainrg The Varsity Debating Team entered upon the ,17 season, weakened by the ioss of Rosalind Bates and Cloyd Dawson, leaving but three experienced men, Walter Myers, Nicholas Jaureguy, and Earl Fleischmann. These, with three new members, Lewis Beebe, Vivien Kellems and Don Davis, and C. N. Patterson as alternate, survived the tryouts and made the team. Because all the trained debaters were Seniors, the extensive system was adopted under which the old men were used, as far as possible, for one debate only. The result was a disastrous season with but a single debate won by Ore- gon. However, Coach Prescott, with the other members of the Forensic Council, believe that this sacrifice was necessary in order to train more men from year to year. The coach is confident that with an Inter-Fraternity Leigue and Intra- Mural Debating Societies, the extensive system will prove the better over a number of years. VARSITY DEBATING TEAM FORENSIC COUNCIL Elbe Emu Eehatv The dual debate with O. A. 0., Thursday, March 1, 1917, on the question, Re- solved, that labor and capital should be compelled to settle their industrial dis- putes in legally established courts of arbitration, went to both the affirmative and negative teams of the Aggies by a 2 to 1 decision. AT CORVALLIS Negative, 0. A. C.-Robert Reichart, B. Basler. Affirmative, Oregon-Walter L. Myers, Vivien Kellems. AT EUGENE Negative, Oregon-Lewis Beebe, Don D. Davis. Afiirmative, O. A. QeW. B. Mainwaring, E. W. MCMindes. The judges at Corvallis were Marshall Dana, of the Portland Journal, Prof. Miriam, of Reed College, and F. D. Young, principal of Albany High School. At Eugene they were Ex-Governor West, Cornelia Marvin, State Librarian, and Eugene Brookings, a Portland attorney. 242 DH" 'su- It"! 31': w. h WM 1' "' "via I! N" at M h anoiu 'u kww ' .0 'M r". H; ruck... u-" Amwa-v 1m .. -wmmm wavt-m mm .- w r .1 A-o-ax :Aw 01119 Eri-gviaie 132113.112 The Tri-State Debate with Washington and Stanford, March 23, 1917, was won again by Washington by a 2 to 1 loss to Stanford and a unanimous victory over Oregon. The Oregon negative team saved the day by defeating Stanford at Palo Alto by a unanimous decision. Nicholas Jaureguy and Earl Fleischmann repre- sented Oregon against Stanford. It was a long trip through a wet state and a big city, and had it not been for the excellent reputation of the debaters on the campus, their delayed return might have started a scandal. It is rumored that the bright lights of the Bay City proved too much for the victorious youths. No one knows, they refuse to tell. They say that they won the debate and had a good time in "Sunny Calf but the rest is a secret. The question was: Resolved, that the method of settling industrial disputes by compulsory investigation and a compulsory acceptance of the award should be applied to all industries involving one hundred or more persons. AT EUGENE Afiirmative, OregoneWalter Myers, Lewis Beebe. Negative, WashingtoneMatthew Hill, Wendell Black. Judges: A. E. Clark, Portland; Plowden Stott, Portland; Dean Alden, Wil- lamette University. AT tSTANFORDi PALO ALTO Negative, Oregon-Nicholas Jaureguy, Earl E. Fleischmann. Affirmative, Stanford-A. G. Westwick, J. R. Brokenshire. JudgeseS'uperior Judges Shortall, Sturtevant and Parker, of San Francisco. E112 Gn-iEh Erhaie The Co-Ed Debate with Washington has been revived this year. It will be held in Seattle, May 4, 1917. The question is: Resolved, that the Constitution should be so amended as to assure equal suffrage to both men and women in all states of the Union. The Oregon team, Vivien Kellems, Roberta Schuebel and Amy Carson, will uphold the afiirmative of the proposition. ODratnrg The annual forensic clash with Washington, May 20, 1916, resulted in the sec- ond victory for that University since Peter Crockattis oratorical triumph. Walter Myers represented Oregon with the oration, ttIndependent Sovereignty and Vital Interests." The Oregon Intercollegiate Oratorical Association held their "old line" con- test in Corvallis, Friday, March 9, 1917. Lester Jones, of Pacific University, took first place with his oration, "The Predatory Instinct and Peace." Earl Fleisch- mann, the Oregon orator, Came second, winning three "firstsh in delivery. 0. A. C. was third. The other schools represented were Willamette University, Pa- cific College, McMinnville College, and Monmouth Normal. The title of the U. of O. oration was uPreparing for Peace." Quanta The medal given by the Alumni Association of Oregon for excellence in de- bate was won by Nicholas Jaureguy for the season of ,17. Jaureguy, who is Student Body President, is also the hrst Ciregon man to be awarded the Foren- sic Shield for proficiency and service in oratory and debate. Humbert Simpkinj Eh? iHailing-Eppkman Hrizvz The three winners of the Failing-Beekman Prize Contest for ,16 were Harold Humbert, with the oration, ttBehold, the Man"; Lamar Tooze, with ttAmerica, thc Hope of the World"; and Cleveland S'impkins, with ttMants Place In the Scheme of Things? Because of an error in the decision of the judges, the scholarships of $250.00 were awerded equally among the three highest men. Usually, the Fail- ing prize of $150.00 goes to the one winning first place and the Beekman prize of $100.00 is awarded to the orator taking second place. This prize money is the surplus accruing from an endowment made by these loyal patrons of the Uni- versity. I :u' v w. Ir 13:: Km .VI Natinnal Eratprnitiw Local N ational Name Installed Founded Members Mem'ship Sigma Nu ............................................ Dec. 1, 1900 ........ Jan. 1, 1869 .......... 31 ........ 11,719 Kappa Sigma ...................................... April 16, 1904 ........ Dec. 10, 1869 .......... 34 ........ 13,654 Beta Theta Pi .................................... Dec. 4, 1909 ........ Aug. 8, 1839 .......... 28 ........ 20,992 Alpha Tuau Omega ............................ Feb. 25, 1910 ........ Sept. 11, 1865 .......... 33 ........ 11,854 Sigma Chi ............................................ Nov. 27, 1910 ........ June 28, 1855 .......... 36 ........ 14,678 Phi Gamma Delta ............................ Oct. 1, 1911 ........ April 22, 1848 .......... 29 ........ 15,362 Phi Delta Theta ................................ May 30, 1912 ....... Dec. 28, 1848 .......... 30 ........ 20,016 Delta Tau Delta .............................. Nov. 15, 1913 ........ Feb.. ...., 1859 .......... 33 ........ 13,061 - illnral 01111115 Mem-hip Friendly Hall ........................................ 52 Mary Spiller .................................... 21 Geary Goreczky Malarkey Comfort Dudley Tegart Gates Morfltt Pierce Kiddle Beckett Spellman Beach Mitchell Newbezrry Ross Fox Farley Hart Thompson Dyment Parsons Colton Vawter Farrel! Tracy Schafer Green Holman Brown Johns : m a War 5 biw m 9 . 5a.. 9ta 3. ?EWEWEE $igma N 11 Founded at Virginia. Military Institute, January 1, 1869. 695111111151 22181 thaptvr Installed December 1, 1900. FRATRES IN FACULTATE Richard W. DeBusk. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1917 Fred E. Kiddle, Glenn G. Dudley, Roland W. Geary, John W. Beckett, George T. Colton, Sterling B. Spellman, Frank L. Beach, Garnet L. Green, John Parsons. 1918 Cscar Goreczky, Lloyd Tegart, Clifford L. Mitchell, Donald.R. Newberry. 1919 William I. Vawter, Albert W. Holman, Huntington Malarkey, George E. Gates, S. Iver Ross, Russell A. Fox, Frank P. Farrell, Walter D. Brown, Charles Comfort, ' Neil Mortitt, Kenneth Farley. 1920 H. Floyd Hart, Edmond Tracy, Flint Johns, Ralph Pierce, Hugh M. Thompson, Donald Dyment, Max Schafer. EIYiott Bowen C. Dundore Shockley Harwood Maison gox eaney Lawrence Anderson Benefiel Still Landreth Robinsc-m Avison Boylen paughhn Bronaugh Tisdale Moores Brock I3. Hunt Hershner Bowles Hill J. Dundore Woods Masterson .1. Hunt Wilson Moore Strowbridge Randall Kappa 591311131 Founded at University of Virginia, December 10, 1869. $amma Alpha Glhaptvr Installed April 16, 1904. FRATRES IN FACULTATE R. M. Winger. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1917 Earl C. Bronaugh, John J. Elliott, Alexander Bowen. 1918 Chas. H. Dundore, Chas. H. Tisdale, Kenneth Moores, Glenn Shockley, Ed. Harwood, Harold Maison. 1919 Jay Fox, Harold R. Brock, Frank Hunt, Lawrence Hershner, Albert Bowles, Claude Hill, Paul Reaney, Perry Lawrence, Charles Johns. 1920 Stanford Anderson, John Benefiel, Lloyd Still, Wallace Landreth, Do ald M. Robinson, Jack Dundore, Bertrand Woods, John P. Masterson, Richard Avison, Ernest Boylen, Barkley, Laughlin, John Hunt, Earl Wilson, Merle Moore, Edwin Sirowbridge, Don Randall. Stater Fitzgibbons Bartlett Snyder Amspoker Floan Montague Tourtellottu McKinney Gore Vance Edwards C. Nelson H. Edwards Morrison Boatman Nelson White Fowler H. Foster Miller Mulkey Macy Schwering P. Foster Robinson XVatson Peterson Evin whvta iai Founded at Miami University, August 8, 1839. 71-3213 iKhn Glhaptpr Installed December 4, 1909. FRATRES IN FACULTATE Frederick G. Young, Timothy Cloran. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1917 Wayne J. Stater, John Harold Fitzgibbons. 1918 William Kenneth Bartlett, William C. Snyder, Walter B. Amspoker, Leonard M. Floan, John R. Montague. 1919 Ralph N. Tourtellotte, Ward F. McKinney, Jay I. Gore, A. James Vance, Jr., Warren A. Edwards, William Morrison, Percy Boatman. 1920 Burnice Nelson, Herald W. White, Frank E. Fowler, Henry M. Foster, Franklin J. Miller, W. Jay Mulkey, Glen S. Macy, Leslie Schwering, Paul Foster, Donald T. Robinson, Forest C. Watson, Curtiss Peterson. A' 1 , M 9 ngmm 1 E 251 Couch Watkins Simpkdns Kirk Bgtter Nelson White W' lson Folts Nail nggs L. Blackaby Hargleaves Bills Croner Wllcox Haines Williams Hurn Burns W. Blackaby Skelton Hamlin Garner Barnett Howell Adams Pease Simpson Pennington Morgan Zumwalt Atkinson 2'5 2 !' g" 1 Lb in 1 m'" w w w lawt amt: .bm 3s mum vi ." . U, ;hhu v u I t! Founded at Virginia Military Institute, September 11, 1865. 691?an Cgmnma iHhi Ghapter Installed February 25, 1910. FRATRES IN FACULTATE Dr. John Straub, Dr. John J. Landsbury. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1917 Ernest Watkins, C. S. Simpkins, Walter J. Kirk, Leo A. Potter, C. H. Nelson, Walter E. White. 1918 Ray M. Couch, Kent Wilson, F. P. Folts, J. E. Nail, Robert Riggs, Larue Blackaby, H. H. Hargreaves, Ernest W. Bills, Charles H. Croner, George Wilcox, Leland H. Haines. 1919 Basil Williams, Ralph E. Hurn, Robert Burns, William B. Blackaby, Joe Skel- ton, Nellis Hamlin, Tyrrell Garner, G. J. Barnett, James F. Howell. 1920 1 Chester Adams, Paul E. Pease, H. E. Simpson, C. E. Pennington, Morris Morgan, Chester Zumwalt, Stanley Atkinson. ? ' 253 Sims Maddock Cate Farley Coleman Potter Becke Hamstreet Newcastle Avison Crandall Bullock Harris Alexander Leonard R, Dalgleisch Mullarky Stam Bradeson K. Leslie Bree Ping Goodwin Gregg Clubh Brown Keown Richardson McConnell Tregilgas McCready Giger C. Dalgleisch E. Leslie D. Brown Kennon McDonald Melson Reinhart Mueller Carter 255 g?tgma 0111i Founded at Miami University, June 28, 1855. 31-32161 31mm Olhaptpr Installed November 27, 1910. FRATRES IN FACULTATE Edward W. Hope, Ralph Hamilton. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Post Graduate9Marsh H. Goodwin. 1917 Karl G. Becke, Bernard B. Breeding, Harold H. Hamstreet, Charles Newcastle, Henry M. Sims, Bothwell Avison, Graham McConnell. 1918 Harold Tregilgas, Creston H. Maddock, Charles Crandall, Walter S. Kennon, Sam C. Bullock, Bryan Turner, Carl Gregg. 1919 Lynn S. McCready, Roy F. Brown, Ross Dalgleish, Roy E. Farley, Charles McDonald, Maynard H. Harris, Ferd Cate, M. Vernon Melson, Virgil Alexander, Bert Clubb, Ross E. Giger, J. Dorman Leonard. 1920 Ben Stlm, William H. Reinhart, William Coleman, Douglas Mullarky, Dennis Brown, Owen Keown, Earl Leslie, F. Carston Mueller, Clarence Potter, Victor Bradeson, Keith Leslie. gg; w $w e m YHHWIQH measoy ssrlme 2w .1 .14. 07.1k N ?X IHXXSW r c m N t d m n Syl tram Mm.asd ebNHu r C n R0 M He K I1lson V" n lleehx S wk Jensen 'ilbert liodso B1 G J. i L Sheehy CK 1001 ges TueI Hal Hpnter NW N' Bain am. 0 b 'h thbun Q gglns i ak 1137 Ra Re C 11X Vi 1911i Cgmtmta Evita Founded at Jefferson College, April 22, 1848. Epailnn 09mirrnn Olhaptpr Installed October 1, 1911. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE . 1917 William P. Tuerck, John A. Black, Emmett Rathbun. 1918 Walter G. Grebe, Jacob S. Risley, Max Reigard, John DeWitt Gilbert, Donald Clarke Roberts, William A. Haseltine, Harold H. Cake, Giles Hunter, Jr., James Sheehy, Joseph C. Hedges. 1919 Robert G. MCNary, G. Francis Yoran, William Pope Allyn, John Wyville Sheehy, Peter L. Jensen, Earl T. Heitschmidt, Dwight Wilson, Keith Kiggins. 1920 Roland W. Nicol, B. Fremont Hodson, Carl H. Knudson, Arvol A. Simola, Lyle M. Bain, Herman L. Lind, Dow Wilson, Lyle W. McCrosky. h m own? M. WousF dTOk Obnonr 0a1 3 eaaa WSBBR n n u D U. h Mmmnm C v mmmws iohr WHPBL y m n . o n t g Rn OH H SHQO p S 1 uce Umiwi umIem Ovl...Ca SIHSJn 0 m n 1 m a a N n n..x Uh o mnnmw Humrab bHsar 0 ea ..C RCPSM X o F R 1?d8 1 FC mMamm ue memm CPHBS ,q 5 zm--;0.-..,...w w mm-.ww,-. 3A mm... :m 1311i E91131 61112121 Founded at Miami University, December 26, 1848. GDregnn Alpha 01113111121: Installed May 30, 1912. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Post Graduate9Wa1ter E. Church. 1917 Loren Roberts, Floyd South, D. Hilbert Wilson. 1918 Marshall Woodworth, Henry Proctor, Charles Huntington, Clark Thompson. 1919 Roger Holcomb, Dean Selbrook, Dorsey Howard, Paul S. Smith, Hollis Hunt- ington, Dolph Phipps, Wayne Barbour, Macleod Maurice, Robert Scearce, Richard Scearce, Royce Brown. 1920 Walter H. Banks, William Steers, Merl Margason, Harry Jamieson, Irving Smith, Ray Fox, Reginald Fox, Lee Waldron, Everett Pixley, Rodney Smith, Ray Dunn. Stoddard Packwood H. Madden Downard Bell Gilf11e11 Denn Atkinson Holdridga J. Scaiefe Bond Ralston Gal retson Newton Montague Foulkes Nelson 11'. Scaiefe Chambers MacKenna Carlisle Yel'gen Par - Furney Kinney Mills Backstrand Brown Hyie Murphy Laraway E. Madden Nx WWI! . 71177.. 91 1H,; 1W, ,,,v. N w 1 9 $er92$1 "-3. E21121 Glam Belts: Founded at Bethany College, February, 1859. $amma 331111 Glhaptpr Installed November 15, 1913. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Post Graduate9LeWis A. Bond. , 1917 Joseph C. Bell, Martin V. Nelson, Lynn A. Parr, Milton A. Stoddard, Herman Gilfilen, Russell C. Ralston, Frank Scaiefe, Leo A. Furney, Maurice H. Hyde. 1918 Fred W. Packwood, Joseph A. Denn, Will H. Garretson, Jr., Victor Chambers, Ray Kinney, Doris W. Medley. 1919 Earl W. Murphy, J. Harvey Madden, Robert H. Atkinson, Harold J. Newton, R. Ross McKenna, Harry Q. Mills, Thurston Laraway, W. Paul Downard. 1920 Claire P Holdridge, Robert M. Montague, Lay A. Carlisle, Jerald S. Back- strand, Elmo W, Madden, Joe W. Scaiefe, Horace Foulkes, W. Bruce Yergen, Dwight S. Parr, C. Mortimer Brown. me. wan ou- Cutsforth Cockerline McKay Cossman Brunkow NVinters VVeSterfield Knighten Holzman Wilcox Jones Grey H e b m n a C Barnhart Iaureguy Milne Solve Eckerson Taylor ether Underwood Huston Eaton Arant Pfouts S Garrett Gordeau VVhitten Schenck Baruh Gray Gilbert Davidson Berg VVatters Frahm McArthur Cain EHriPnhly 75ml Post Graduates-H. E. Barnhnart, Roscoe Hurd, Cecil McKay. 1917 John W. Huston, Frank H. Campbell, Floyd Westerfield, Clarence Brunkow, Stanley Eaton, Nicholas Jaureguy, Harry Lynch. 1918 Wily Knighten, Thomas Cutsforth, Miles McKey, Edwin Cox, Lucien Arant, Ralph Milne, Jesse Witty, Jerome Holzman, Arthur Runquist, George C. Winters, Victor Sether, Melvin Sollve, Harry Grain, Harry Richardson, Don Belding. 1919 Harold Grey, Lyle Harpole, Conrad C. Cockerline, James Pfouts, Rufus Eck- erson, James M. Burgess, Millard T. Nelson, Everett Burch, Richard Wilcox, Norris McKay, Lawrence Underwood, George Taylor, Forrest Peil, Raymond Jones, Leo Cossman, George Cook, Edward Gordeau, Thomas Hardy, Burle D. Bramhall, Archie E. Bird. 1920 Edmund Padden, Ray Van Horn, Richard Thompson, Levant Pease, Merritt Whitten, Warren Gilbert, Julius Frahm, Harold Barde, Clifford Sevits, Hubert Schenck, Roy L. Davidson, Lindsay McArthur, Don D. Davis, Clifford Chase, Morris Bocock, Leo Baruh, Arthur Berg, Max Cain, Byron Garrett, Ed. Ward, Richard Gray, Ralph Watters, Vergil Hatten. 21112.4. .5: :91: .V:. H .3! V'wn, 265 Natinnal g?nrnritiw Name Installed Gamma Phi Beta .............................. Dec. 18, 1908 ........ Chi Omega .......................................... April 30, 1909 ........ Kappa Alpha Theta ........................ July 11, 1939 ....... Delta Delta Delta .............................. Cct. 30, 1910 ........ Kappa Kappa Gamma .................... Jan. 11, 1913 ........ Delta Gamma .................................... Oct. 17, 1913 ....... Alpha Phi ............................................ Jan. 8, 1915 ........ Pi Beta Phi ........................................ Oct. 29, 191' ........ Local National Founded Members Mem,ship Nov. 11, 1874..,.......27 ........ 2,518 April 5,1895 .......... 25 ........ 3,154 Jan. 27, -1870 .......... 33 ........ 6,066 Nov. ...., 1888 .......... 27 ........ 4,560 Oct. 13,1870 .......... 29 ........ 6,816 Jan. 2, 1874 .......... 35 ........ 4,026 Oct. 20,1872 .......... 22 ........ 2,954 'pril 28, 1867 .......... 24 ........ 8,162 :yt-A. ,4 , n: , .pammam ma. -..1 H. Johns Polhemus Barker Boylen Cellars MCCOI Hack Currey J. Gross Robbins Grebe! Steiwer Collier Sherman Guttery Hammarstrom Strowbridge Ka y A, Hill XVootton Dunbar Hunter Marcellus M. Gross M. Johns Dickey E. Hill Crawford GEamma 1911i 71am Founded at University of Syracuse, November 11, 1874. Nu thaptvr Installed December 18, 1908. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1917 Helen McCornack, Helen Johns, Ruby Steiwer, Mary Alice Hill, Marguerite Gross, Harriette Polhemus, Helen Currey. 1918 Dorothy Collier, Emma Wootton, Mary Johns, Sara Barker, Joy Gross, Florenne Sherman, Dorothy Dunbar. 1919 Genevieve Dickey, Lillian Boylen, Vernice Robbins, Helen Guttery, Nita Hunter, Esther Hill, Mary Cellars, Marion Grebel. 1920 Grace Hammerstrom, Naomi Marcellus, Viola Crawford, Irene Strowbridge, Marjorie Kay. -v mw mmwf Banfield XYilkins E. Bracht Bennett Bernard ma -- x. vv.",mg--.wa; Crosby Koren Emmett Basler Miller Brown Reekie Reidt Messick Harbke Olmstead Johnson Casey Cochran Pegg m "Olfa ' . .hth 1m '1 .m H h1u'v Jerard H. Bracht Dunn Hemenway Mahoney 0111i Gbmega Founded at University of Arkansas, April 5, 1895.7 1911i Alpha Glhapter Installed April 30, 1909. SORORES IN FACULTATE Rose Basler. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1917 Eulalie Crosby, Mildred Brown. 1918 Vera Olmstead, Leura Jerard, Gladys Wilkins, Charlotte Baniield, Helen Koren, Jean Reekie, Aline Johnson, Helen Bracht, Edythe Bracht. 1919 Mildred Emmett, Nellie Reidt, Margaret Casey, Mary Dunn, Dorothy Bennett, Agnes Basler. 1 1920 Belle MesSick, Jean Cochran, Florence Hemenway, Naomi Bernard, Anna Lee Miller, Gladys Harbke, Mildred Pegg, Lorraine Mahoney. Chambers: DeLano Dawson Rodgers Lucas XV arrack M. XYilliams Yaite Otten Garland King Hawkins Rotln'ock Carroll Gillette Spencer Roche Schaefel' Coffey Hamilton Demming Montague BI. XVilliams Manning Trowbridge . . Montgombery G. XVllllams Gates Fltzmaurice Keithley Porter Garner Tregilgas hW nu 1th MVW . hiihll kn . x911 119 :11:$W 113qu S k3 X11939 Kappa Alpha 117112121 Founded at DePaW University, January 27, 1870. Alpha Olhi Olhaptpr SORORES IN FACULTATE Hazel Rader. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1917 Bernice Lucas, Margaret Hawkins, Ruth Roche, Marjory Williams, Mary Cham- bers, Mary Warrack. 1918 Ruth Rothrock, Kate Schaefer, Louise Manning, Erma Keithley, Helene DeLano, Melba Williams, Cleome Carroll. 1919 Marian Coffey, Ruth Trowbridge, Lillian Porter, Anne Dawson, Ethel Waite, Mamie Gillette, Merle Hamilton, Ruth Montgomery. 1920 Grace Williams, Margaret Rodgers, Ada Otten, Donna Spencer, Eugenia Dem- ming, Marie Gates, Jessie Garner, Mildred Garland, Philena King, Carrol Montague, Elsie Fitzmaurice, Evelyn Tregilgas. 1 Mann Starbuck Rhodes DeYoe - www... ..... M.m $wnm v Risley Perkins Hunter Hair F. Tallmadge Ross rwmwm XVilliams Kinsley Twomey Golden Chapin Ball Spangller McDanielS Murdock E. Tallmadge Calvert Blewett 3 E." ! fl CI Driscoll Frater McKim Mansfield i2, hm"! ..- , -, M n MMW .r y I U3 3 g- "Hill! W h h h I' Jami": .. m .9". it Nil main. 'mwl. f.: w Ir.-. Etna Bplm B2113 Founded at Boston University, Thanksgiving Eve, 1888. Ehvta E21121 thaptpr Installed October 30, 1910. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1917 Olive Risley, Leone Williams, Hazel Knight, Margaret Spangler, Frances Mann, Bernice Perkins. 1918 Tula Kinsley, Delilah McDaniels, Joanne Driscoll, Winifred Starbuck. 1919 Sophie Hunter, Katherine Twomey, Mary Murdock, Frances Frater, Letx Rhodes, Helen Hair, Frances Golden, Estelle Tallmadge. 1920 Margaret McKim,iKatherine DeVoe, Frances Tallmadge, Marian Chapin, Anne Calvert, Margaret Mansfield, Myrtle Ross, Frieda Ball, Iris Blewett. W33 2 . w a s 1 st D l ? slim .m ' x ; g .Dhrw ; mu ! Zmr:w m, . L .h Uefu'ma $ thin W'f ; :1 bbvm :2! u '3'- " . H ' 3; 9 I f it i 5 l 2: Little: Vx'hgeler Allen Von B9111; Broughton H Foulkes Purmgton Hosford Conklin Fiegal n, Robertson Hartley V. Van Schoonhoven Stanton Anderson 1 May Howd Brosius Slocum Dunniway .; , Beach Service Geisler A. Van Schoonhovcn Engberg w a Smith Irving Moss Keller Bailey E i :; h.ggz'm m m M, ------- mm---wm. . u Mu " W a If U . 1t '3" Kappa Kappa $amma Founded at Monmouth College, October 13, 1870. 7159151 Gbmvga Ghaptvr Installed January 11, 1914. SORC RES IN UNIVERSITATE 1917 Dorothy Wheeler, Louise Allen, Eva. Von Berg. 1918 Lillian Littler Mildred Broughton, Celeste Foulkes, Helen Purington, Cora Hos- ,ford, Gladys Conklin. 1919 Dorothy Flegel, Dorothy Robertson, Kathryn Hartley, Vera Van Schoonhoven, Lucile Stanton, Helen Anderson. 1920 Gertrude May, Ednx Howd, Florence Brosius, Doris Slocum, Dorothy Dunniway, Marie Beach, Grace Service, Gene Geisler, Alice Van Schoonhoven, Helen Eng- berg, Gladys Smith, Mary Irving, Jeanette Moss, Genevieve Moss, Mary Bailey. XViegand Neil Calliins Aumiller Powers Sage XVilliamS Rowley Brucx'e Stephenson Yoran .... My -m- .mmm-w o.r . Huggins Killam Francis Johnson Macklin Morrow McDonald Church Alexander 'lhurston Godfrey McCabe "in I ., W Brown hamburg Page Grey Powel s Dunn Houston Adam Hall Engel 1 0 C31; : E21121 Cgmmna Founded at the University of Mississippi, January 2, 1874. Alpha E91161 thaptpr Installed October 17, 1913. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1917 Helen Wiegand, Jennie Huggins, Marion McDonald. 1918 Lurline Brown, Marian Neil, Jeanette Calkins, Roberta Killam, Ailey Church, Edith Dahlburg, Miriam Page, Margaret Cornwall, Elizabeth Aumiller, Lucy Powers. 1919 Dora Francis, Caroline Alexander, Edna Grey, Florence Powers, Grayce Sage, Claribel Williams, Alleyn Johnson, Beatrice Thurston, Dorothy Dunn, Mary Town- send, Elizabeth Houston. 1920 Genevieve Rowley, Elizabeth Bruere, Reba Macklin, Eva Godfrey, Rena Adam, Helen Hall, Erma Stephenson, Beatrice Yoran, Luceil Morrow, Gertrude McCabe, Helen Engel. 277 WW .6 .4. .v- thsis'amu... .5 , ,- . uh Watson XVestfalI Brenton G rey Yheat1ey Ba 11 mm D 11 Phillips Colton Parsons , , - vwrmwwwv1 Tobey Peterson Colman Case XVavlker Van Zante Schuebel Hunzicker L'gllter Ca...". "9 Jul k r Johnston Pearson McMurphey 2 78 .v.- n"..- -3 ..-.00 ?-, . . -Ag- M-- M...- y--rf-.l...-. .x--. .- A- - v- '- J 7 c1 c2230 u ' O '3' ' v" ' in l 'WJ W4 I. a i: I 5' m .5 .Au'ln' n .m ' i a hh'.k l a 'I hm Winn fun W. .vvls: : Nnha 1311i Founded at the University of Syracuse, October 20, 1872. Glam Olhaptpr Installed January 8, 1915. SORORES IN FACULTATE Mrs. Mabel Holmes Parsons, Ruth Howell. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1917 Myrtle Tobey, Eyla Walker, Lucile Watson, Jeanette Wheatley. 1918 Selma Baumann, Veola Petersoh, Mabel Van Zante, Kathryn Johnston, Ruth Westfall. 1919 Alene Phillips, Bess Colman, Robert1 Schuebel, Ruth Pearson, Helen Brenton. 1920 Gretchen Colton, Helen Case, Dorothy Hunziker, Adah McMurphey, Margarft Grey, Dorothy Parsons, Alice Lighter, Gladys Shute. 279 Cl'aine H'oodruft Parker Lawrence Gaylord Tinker Dewes W'ar Wic 1x: Shoemaker Hurd Clausen XViIson Birchard Jay xuaLtheXVS Steinmetz McCandliss Martin McLaren Spencer Cowgill IHiEEngm 1311i Founded at Monmouth College, April 28, 1867. 091mgnn Alpha Olhaptpr Installed October 29. 1915. 9 SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1917 Ruth C. Lawrence, Frances Shoemaker, Miriam Tinker, Leah Perkins, Lucy Jay. 9 1918 Pearl Craine, Beatrice Gaylord, Hester Hurd, Ada Matthews, Jeanette McLaren, Mildred Woodruff, Martha. Tinker. 1919 Louise Clausen, Mildred Steinmetz, Bernice Spencer, Mellie Parker, Ella Dewes, Louise Wilson. 1920 Louyse McCandliss, Gertrude Cowgill, Nell Warwich, Dora Birchard, Adda Martin, Mary McDonald. 1 281 J l u I 1 'fm w :. 0 i . l "'4! ', J p ' I l 3 ,1 F i a . 1 t :3 we- 'V! $ 'm . I D i 3 : i I i E l i ' 1 L A c k 7. l www-uz :lt ; : lVigulley Brown Hall H 1: rington I g Heess XVilson Nye Campbell 7 j XVitaker Bagley Hollopeter Davis: 9! Vander Sluis Neal Laughllin Stearns aim 1:: 11 :1 3.7751 282 x '.15 l: Ewan 0111111 Organized at Mary Spiller Hall, September, 1913. MEMBERS 1917 Eva Hadley, Mildred G. Brown, Ada Hall, Marion Harrington. 1918 Cornelia Heess, Lillie Miller, Ruth Nye, Ruth Wilson, Helen Withycombe. 1919 Marie Badura, Myrtle Campbell, Sylvia Rowland, Marjorie Stearns, Lois Laughlin. 1920 Elvia Bagley, Marion Bowen, Louise Davis, Roxie Hall, Lotta. Hollopeter, Hazel Neal, Helen Whitaker. GDthr 11f 111va ?linnnr $mhmm nf the Hniuprzitg Ernest Watkins Rosalind Bates Eyla. Walker Marian Neil Miriam Page Beatrice Gaylord Frances Shog-maker Dorothy Dunbar John Elliott DeWitt Gilbert Dale Melrose Frank Beach Martin Nelson Martha Beer Bernard Breeding C. N. Nelson Frederick Melzer Doris Hubbell Wayne Wells 'isountzr: Tm: LEMON LET THE JUICE. 50mm WHERE. IT MAY" . I'" , 73f miu$ n'.1 . ' whit" .uwuuot THE OREGON LEMON VOLUME I Adrienne Epping, Editor in Chief James Vance Jr., Manager In memoriam Enrolled upon this parchment list You'll fine the names, at least the gist, 0f those who 've set themselves apart; Chev're gone, thev died by zupid's dart. Babe Cochran Louyse McCandliss Emma Whootton Helen Guttery Marion Grebel Aline Johnson Helen Bracht Bernice Lucas ' Ruth Roche Sylvia Rowland Martha. Beer Melba Williams Mamie Gillette Bernice Perkins Frances Mann Myrtle Ross Leta, Rhodes Mary Murdock Cora Hosford Dorothy Robertson Kathryn Hartley Helen Wiegand Roberta Killam Betty Bruere Mabel VanZante Veola. Peterson Pearl Craine Jeanette McLaren Echo June Zahl Charles Comfort r113 AVvQyQ X STOP! This is the Oregon Lemun for its furst year. The furst thing iz the speling reform ov owr lrangwrig by owr Fakultla; Thair hav bin uthur books, but non lik this. tThingz wil hapn. ' 313 dayz hav kum and 313 dayz hav gon, and thtatir hav bin 52 Sundayz evn in the Fiji hous. Thair haz bin at leest wun 23 for the Gama Phiz in eech munth. Pan Hel without them wud be unseazond. This is a tru acont ov ow'r kolege Year. Do not blame the editor: if the lraf' is on yu. If you ar not feling hapy thiz morning STQP. Butiiif yu kan laf at the jok on the uthur fellow and ov'unluk the wlun on yu or yur'frend, be Car'FULr HESITAT. Then go out and bury yur aks and yur gun and pare yur fingernailz if yu ar a woman and then spit on yur thum and turn the next page. -...- , il' 1 .. I ' . L' 5W 1 . I ' l. L bieocllers om 1 4QCCIICL Bird: 97? v iew ,f " 'lerqrtl 3telas . . . I L1; . . ucoflonal Ln - ','7 . mmw 'Buildt'ng- . - Summer. .Il i' i . , . . ' 5 mu- m m - Worm's eye view bf Camlqu, - Campus Vt'Jt'for; " 1m 2M V . .Q .1: 5L" :2: 1.05 :1! 2:! '1? 1.0 I. n: In I z 'n 11' .4 u, ,v ,. r2". 5 u o .v. . A , 1 . ; .V ; v .a x V .. Comfa-ax OAscenc. 7h SEEN SECTION . ""' WHY W3E CAME TO THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON The Oregon Lemon has gone to a great deal of trouble in securing letters from the following representative people of the University, telling why they came to the University: Martin Nelson- In seeking an institution of higher education my first care was the selection of one whose standards of thought and living were conducive to a higher, purer life In the University Y. M. C. A. I found this atmosphere and unhesitatingly and eagerly packed my few belongings and came here. I joyfully acknowledge that my first surmise has proved to be correct and I have found that every inau- ence in the University has been toward a tendency for furthering the spiritual life of a. Christian, young man. I may also add that here, in this beautiful spot, I have likewise found a true and congenial helpmate. I can not tell you how happy I am that I came to the University of Oregon. Clifford Mitchell- At first my parents thought of sending me to Mills College fOr Women, so I could be near them in California, but I teased awrful hard for a long time and finally told them how nice the girls were up here in Oregon, so then they let me come. I play with the fellows a little and the rest of the time I study. Lloyd Still- Once there was a boy from Milton who went away to school and when he came home he was so lionized by the girls that I decided to run an opposition to his monopoly, so I came here. I am getting all the experience I possibly can in my dealings with the fair sex. The fellows are green With envy, for they all tell me that the girls like me just awfully well. I can hardly wait until June comes to get home and see what my arrival in town will cause. tOut of the kindness of his heart the editor has sent a note to the young ladies in Mr. Still's town.-EdJ Mildred Garland- You know Isabelle, my sister, came here before I did, and from what she said I thought Oregon must be a terribly nice place, so I came too and I havenit been disappointed, either. It is the best place for stabbing and pulling I ever struck. Molasses candy isntt in it with the profs. And then any girl who halfway tries can be awfully popular with the men here. Anyway I have a good time and my only regret is that college is only four years long. Eulalie Crosby-- I wouldn,t have come if I hadnit expected to increase my circle of gentlemen friends. tYou are to be congratulated upon having met with such marked success.-Ed.l Roberta Killam- In Salmon, Idaho, where my family lives, there aren,t any nice boys at all. NOW I believe that it is the duty of every woman to get married, and I think that the best time to get married is when you are about twenty-one or two. I am nearly that old now, so I looked over the colleges around in Idaho and Washing- ton and I decided that the nicest fellows went to Oregon, so I came here in the hopes of finding one that I could marry. I have not been disappointed in my ambition and I am glad that I came. Ray Couch- I was such an active little boy at home that my mother could never keep track of me. She used to worry a lot because she never knew where I was. Finally she decided to send me to some nice school where I would be well taken care of and not liable to get into any harm. She sent me to Orgeon and the A. T. 0's look after me so well that she doesnit worry any more. We are both glad I came. Shy Huntington: I came here for development, good, all round development. For this reason I try and develop all the year round. To do this I play football in the fall. This develops your nerve. On my southern trips I make it a point to develop my CA- PACITY. After football there is about twelve hours before I begin developing myself at basketball, When I develop my mind. During the spring time I play baseball. This helps my foul development. ' Jean Reekie- To be a good, studious little girl, to give all my thoughts to books and never to think of dress or the boys. This was my end and aim in coming from Wash- ington to Oregon. tHow you have succeeded CD-EdJ ' Charlie Croner- I entered the University here because I live here and stay at home with papa and mamma while I am going to school, and when I get into scraps they can help me out. tThatls right, Chuck, just stay by papa and m-amma until you reach years of discretionJ Bronaugh-Did you come up on the boat after the Cal game? Gene GoodeMe? No, but everything else did. John Beckett-ttAt a football dinner a man got up and left the table because someone told a story he didnit approve of." Laura Miller-"Oh, how noble of him! What was the story?" A CLASS IN GEOLOGY Prof. Smith-Mr. Mitchell, what is the largest diamond known? Brick-Would you count the joker, Professor? Hunt-Hello, Jack, how're you feeling? Dundore-Like a dull razor blade. Hunt-Spring it. JackeNo more cuts. Dorothy R.-Bring me a. cup of bouillon. Barnett--Yes, I'll take a dish of soup, too. eBates-Pm sorry, Mr. Laraway, but I found it necessary to hunk you. Do ymi know why? Thurstonel havenht an idea. Bates-Thaths exactly right. To show he was a kid of class Young William Smith blew! out the gas; The undertaker caxIQed at seven; Poor Wilolie's soul is now im heaven. Pennington-Be candid and tell me when you want me to go. Helen-Iths a couple of hours too late for that. Sara-Herehs the man the house mother sent to clean up the leaves. NaomiJ-How do you know that ? Sara-Heos got such a rakish look HAVE YOU A LITTLE IVORY IN YOUR DOME? "How Dry I Am? Demonstrating Three Lids Things Seem Picking Up Hang-over Bull With Brothers Four Tanks Count Em. Bez Coachng a Steal Boss Olive on the Job Firends or Enemas Coffey a. la pump. Showing Hermie Up WW . H5 u- kW' 1" '. rm' ' 3;. " pww iauka at; .bWw "hm ' Z. I in -. " tW ! ' hm V; $- . h H mm; 'm Q . .40 a g A 3, MR. AND MRS. A. S. SHOCKLEY ANNOUNCE THE FIRST SEMESTER EXAMINATIONS OF THEIR SON GLENN FROM FEBRUARY THIRD TO NINTH INCLUSIVE AT HOME AFTER FEBRUARY ELEVENTH BAKER. OREGON WE SHOULD LIKE TO KNOW??? Just Who did have a hand in the Junior lottery? If Apollo is as popular With the co-eds as they say he is? What the matter was with the basketball team? If the boys really did drink milk at Pasadena, as Bez says they did? If Miss Fox believes that, or if she is kidding us? How much a love adornment plays in these college engagements? What A1 and Glen and Bob and Jay and Bill and Don and the Delta Taus would do without the graveyard and the bleachers and the sewer? Why the Eutaxians under Mrs. Bates put on a stunt at the Rex the night Professor Reddie put on Crichton? If Gladys Wilkins is glad they count election returns in a grocery? What Skinny Edwards and Ward McKinney do when they week-end at the Grove? If a. fellow does have to belong to the Y. M. C. A. to enter college politics. If Sara really was engaged to thee fellows at the same time? And if she was, did mother know about it? Who the advocates of the free Emerald were iiWho didnlt like to campaign for it for political reasons"? What the fellows did after the Glee Club concert in Marshfield? If Pewee Edwardsi heart is still in Coos county? Where Timmy Cloran gets his jokes? If Hawkshaw has all the "dopeh people credit him with having? If the Juniors ever had to pay that bill for their Emerald ad? Who started the talk about the couple on the Chi Omega porch Saturday night after the April Frolic? Why Dean Fox has asked the girls not to go walking up the Alder Board Walk? How long it will be before the graveyard will be similarly publicly banned? How the report that Echo is engaged to a Kappa Sig can be true when she has just acquired a new Sigma Nu pin. N. BeThis doesnlt count Keiserls. That is a relic three years old. "v: HAVE A GREAT STATE" .'IV'; $$l 2",; u4":h.":' ' $mfg$ M" I V: v FAMOUS FLAMBUOYANT FRIENDSHIPS Mrs. Rosalind Biates ................................................................ Archibald Ferguson Reddie Marjorie Kay .......................................................................................................... Pearl Craine The Fijis .................................................................................................. Dean Elizabeth Fox Kathleen Fraley ............................................................................................ Muriel Perringer Russell Fox .................................................................. , .................................. Merle Hamilton Gamma Phi Beta .................................................................. . .............................. Pan Hellenic University Players ...................................................................................... Campus Players Mabel Van Zante ........................................................................................... Miss Cummings Marian Coffey .................................................................................................. Timothy Cloran Maurice Hyde ...................................................................................................... Henderschott Brick Mitchell ....................................................................................................... Tracy Byers Professor Allen ....................................................................................................... Hamstreet an J.- -h: as COACH CUPID PICKS SPRING TEAM LINE-UP After a long season of practice games, Coach D. Cupid has announced the members of the annual spring team which has Challenged any sim- ilar collegiate aggregation. The contest for places this year was par": ticularly close, as many more than usual were out for this sport. With three hits and no errors chronicled in the diary, Echo Zahl 0n the third cushion and Belle Messick in the box with the fast stuff were bought by Danny Cupid yesterday to bring up the batting average of his 1917 White Sox. The whole Hight has been batting fairly high, and with the unusual speed and class of the new: players the team is expected to give the Oregon boys a bad time in the king of indoor sports this spring. The complete lineup, with the tabulated work of the individual players, follows: AB. R. B.H. P.O. Helen Bracht, ss. 2 1 Betty Bruere, rf ............................................................................ 1 Echo Zahl, 3b .................................................................................. 5 Elsie Fitzmaurice, c .................................................................... 1 Muriel Perringer, 2b .................................................................... 3 Belle Messick, p. .................. 4 Laura Miller, 1f ............................................................................ 5 Pearl Craine, cf ............................................................................ 2 Peggy Gross, 1b ............................................................................ 3 Totals 26 Utility-Babe Cochran, Mabel VanZante. Two-base hitseZahl, Gross. Home runsePerringer, Bruere, Miller. Struck out-By Messick, seven. Double playse-Bracht to Gross; Crainve t0 Zahl. Bi WOOWOCDN. HOOHHHOOH H -X- iwcwor-Aocaoc? inOOOOHOHH as NIH - w wooinMI-Ipoo iota w I H .5; H .q iDisputed. m, OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG MEN So Intellectual Dear You Cute Thing. How Charming, Smiling for Him? How Modest Laura! Posing Nellie? Quite at Ease. Hellin Ruffles Watch the Birdie. XVinning? THE REASON XVHY A Freshman girlo That lightly draws her breath, And has her fill of being oopigged," Can her charm next year have death? I know a little Sophomore lass, She,s a pessimist, she says. I wonder What has come to pass That makes so dreary her days. The fellows crave a girl thatos new, They rush her off her feet, But Hed her novelty, and woo! She can,t seem near so sweet. PUZZLE Carft you guess whose foot this is? Why! It ought to be easy. Elv sie Fitzmaurice? Eulalie Crosby? Nope! Youore wrong. Guess again. What, do you mean Mary Johnsoand it isnot Miriam Pageos either, or Jeanette W'heatleyos. Don't you know those girls well enough toooh, well, we didn,t really mean that. So you think it might be 01- ive Risley's? Well, it mlght; you never can tell-and I don,t see how you expect us to know any more than you d0.. J37 SuCCeeluS 21x KGQPIUS CO'nsiahTLy be?ore ihQ 'PubLlc Eye; CohgTamLahbns J 0 MPH WMkwar : won. 533?! ..,;l??? :,, 2,1927 NV UNNDWG CO. '0, A iiffuz , DRUGS. 50229222223 PERFUMES , , KODAK SUPPLIES " ???,memm'p ' ', , I 2 7 W OFING , HNG ENLARGING 4 BAKER a ATKINSON. PROPRJETOaS succumns ro COPYING , REYNOLDS LANTERN SLlDES OPPOSITE max THEATRE 932 WILLAMETTE S7". EUGENE. OREGON w ., A , 22 vacuum 1 unamuxnonmx '3 . ms- Hts .0..." L A man M. rs Arum w RIDDLE Professor Sweetser is the owner of a series of ancient mud tablets impressed with Egyptian hieroglyphics. They have recently been translated by an Honor Stude and the translation has been exposed in the faculty colloquium. The fol- lowing are comments which have been made upon the bit of prose. A reward is offered to the man who turns in the most interesting guess at the contents of the paragraph. NOTE-The answers will not be printed. Let's go! Bernard Shaw has written nothing like it."-Prof Howe. "I have never read anything which affected me in quite the way this does."- Mrs. Parsons. "With the publication of such a thing as this I am entirely willing to lay aside the reins of the Spring Scarlet Sheet-even anxious."-DeWitt Gilbert. "If it's too shady to be printed in English-even in the faculty bulletin-come around and tell it to me in private."--Dean Straub. "I couldnit have done it better myself. At last I have found a kindred spirit." -Leslie Blades. "This was evidently the second greatest man in history."-Prof. Harthan. "This is right in my line. It came out of the mud."-Georgie Colton. "I think that I will use this as .a syllabus in my next course on the European Novel."-Prof. Bates. Miss Watson-Are you fond of Stringberg? Charlie Johns-Yes, but I prefer Roquefort. Tegart-Did you call me a. liar? Colton-Not at all. I merely remarked that the sinuosity of your ultimate conclusion was due to a superficial succedaneum for the veracious reality. Have a. Camel? m U ' , '- El 17 c1 SXKTTTZTWV '16 vs $2.1m- -A A I'M' ' t! .5".ng v 3. I ran": L. Dc::.::;:7:;....j 0 I7 :1 r 1 ,- l VARSITY POOL, 16-17 The Schedule- Eugene Bible University, Dec. 15. Canning Factory Champs, Jan. 10. Faculty of Women,s Gym, Jan. 24. Miss Fox,s Ethics Class, Feb. 6. Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, Feb. 17. Personnel- Corner Pocket .......................................................................................... Bill Burgard Miscue ............................................................................................ Gene Good Side Pocket .......................................................................................................... Bill Hayward Break ......................................................................................................................... Jack Elliott Cue ........................................................................................................................... Charles Prim 15 Ball .................................................................................................................... Hick Harwood Reverse English ...................................................................................................... Len Floan Bridge ............................................................................................................................ Walt Kirk Rack-Em-Up .......................................................................................................... Nellis Hamlin Scratch .......................................................................................................... Shy Huntington AT THE Y. M. C. A. MIX J. D. Fosteh-"Come on, boys, gather 'round the organ and we'ltsing some of the old college songs." Keith-"Nix, nix! Don't you know that college sentiment is against this or- ganized stuff?" THE SEVEN AGES Jollification Procrastination Preparation Examination Expectation Communication Continuous vacation. SORORITY HOUSE CHATTER Merna-"Why, Helen dear, what are you doing with all these young men's' pictures up here in your room?" H. B.a"0h, those? Why, that's my collection of souvenir spoons." A students' union that :every co-ed wiants.aMatrimony. "THE TRUTH, THE WHOLE TRUTH AND NOTHING BUT-N" o 'Mam .Fi..nJrg r, faleGJQ rffurn, 740. Nd'o'lrn 16" Where B;icK . N dfvenf New Year'sNiglzf ' Pi PIN .Subljort- '- N. B.-P1ease note the diamond owned by the Pi Phi. We were afraid you might overlook it. Thank you. m; ADVERTISEM ENTS Can You Draw This? If so, you can draw anything Michael Angelow and C. D. Gibson make large sums of money drawing pictures Why N 01: You? Wo teach drawing by mail and will make you a Great Artist in siX easy lessons Address University of Oregon Correspondence Institute of Fine Arts Professor A. H. Shrof P. O. Box 23-23-23 Eugenics, Or. 19 Uxtra! Uxtra! Just before going to press the OREGON LEMON received an ex- clusive dispatch telling of the formation of three new clubs. It is ex- pected that When the boundaries of the University and O. A. C. unite these clubs Will assume a national significance and establish chapters abroad. We are also informed that back of the formation of these clubs are three people of considerable prominence, Theodore Roosevelt, Rosa- lind Bates and Edward Harwood. The success of the organizations is aixsured. Their names and personnel follow: aarmmxtm; .,.. .2 aewe .';A ; p HARD ON THE EYES CLUB Chuck Crandall in B. V. Ds. Marian Coffey,s bathing suit. Milton Stoddarde mustache. The library lights. The soccer uniforms. The Oregon Lemon. Pewee Edwards strutting across the campus. A1 Holman on the campus alone. Mrs. Parsons chewing tobacco. Prof. Harthan,s spring suits in January. J. D. Foster drunk. Walter Church playing football. Ethel Waite out for track. Independent Order of the Chawers of the Honest Scrap The Presiding Member: Brick Mitchell. Graduate Member: Chet Fee. Head Coach: Fred Kiddle. Worst Specimen: Jay Fox. World Beater: Tracy Byers. Fratres in Facultate: Prof. Thorne, Bill Hayward. Total Abstainer: P ? ? P ? ? Finest Spit: Gene Good. Members of the Spit: George Gates, Herman Edwards, Dick Nelson, Walter Kirk, Charlie Croner, Sandy Leonard, Harold Humbert, Mike Harris, Howard Bowles, Kenneth Shetterly, Hilbert Wilson, Bill Tuerck. Emblem: The Plug Variety. Motto: Sph-z-z-z-z-zsst. Flower: The Cabbage-head. University of Education: S. P. track in rear of Architectural Hall. TEED N EES Chief Mate of the Schooner: Martin Nelson. Twin Spiggots: Ross Dalgleisch and Claire Dalgleisch. Prize Guzzler: Nick Jaureguy: High and Mighty Supporter of the Lamp Post: Roscoe Hurd. Record Beer Pump: Joe Bell. Ex-omcio Souse: Lamar Tooze. Brother Rounders: Wyville Sheehy, Bill Haseltine, Paul Smith, Victor Chambers, Burle Bramhrall, Leo Cossman, Otto Pfahl, Garnett Green, Carl Nelson, Ellis VVilliam- son. Amuated Sisters of the roam: Jeannette Wheatley, Mrs. Pennell, Elizabeth Fox, Rosalind Bates, Ada Hall, Louise Allen, Frances Shoemaker, Ailey Church. 23 PROBLEMS OF YOUNG MEN A11 1nqulr1es must give full name and address of the writer. Corres- pondents enclosing stamps o-r stamped envelopes will be answered by mail. Or--lle M--t-ith: No, the young woman made no mistake when she said to you, dAnd all the world wondered that you passed? although she did make a mis- quotation. M--tin N-l--n: We would diagnose your trouble as a complication of chronic Pi Phism and acute Y. M. C., A. egoism. The opinions of the Sigma Nus applied externally and well rubbed in, might be beneficial for the latter, but we fear there is no remedy for the former. N-ll-s Ha-lin: We fear that the lltirerl feelingil that you speak of results frOm car- diac weakness. This frequently manifests itself in a desire to take long daily walks. Such cases are hopeless unless taken in time. Ru---11 F-x: I would suggest a looking-glass fastened in the inside of your hat. Then when you take it off on meeting your lady friends, you can adjust your hair and tie to your own satisfaction. ' J. G'o-lden Ba-n-tt: 7 Stripes and plaids will continue to be worn this season. However, trousers of plaid will be cut bias, and stripes will run bayadere instead of up and down. We would suggest that a pair in one of these styles, together with a poker-dot tie of some nice cheerful shade, and your checkered career tthose like yours are sure not to go out for several seasonsl, worn. with a black and white bull dog, would be quite the latest shriek. Gle- D-d-ey: Color in ties is largely at the option of the wearer, but at the same time should be chosen with due regard to the feelings of others. Al-e-t H-lm-n: You are quite right. A young man should be careful about what he does in supposedly uninhabited graveyards. We think your idea about looking around a bit next time before embracing a certain young Greek a most excellent one. There are so many misunderstanding people in this world prone to put the wrong emphasis on things. xA-iv- mi'WW Emu 03 UK F Ke-t Wilun: In the best circles it is considered very poor form to propose to a young lady before consulting papa. For answers to your questions con- cerning the duties of a young married man, see Gates on Domestic Re- lations, volume 37. j-hn Be-k-tt: i Yes indeed, you have commenced well. Just keep up your practice and you cannot fail to be one of the most sought after young men on the campus. It is always well when contemplating stepping someone to a dance to talk it up hrst among several of your co-ed friends, review the different women that strike your fancy, look up the names of sev- eral in the phone book, then discuss it with the different members of the football team, and finally talk the matter over with the coach be fore committing yourself. In these days a young man cannot be too careful. Ch-rl-s T-sd-le: In answer to yourl question asking if it is permissible to dance with another besides your hancee, I hesitate in advising you on what course to pursue. Your mention of the fact that you both attend a college where the atmosphere is very democratic might have some bearing on the subject, however. I might say that it would be permissible to dance with AN other besides your betrothed, but be careful not to multiply the number. Some people think so much of these small matters of social etiquette. Er--st W-tk-ns: You are right. Everybody else is mistaken. DeW--t G--b-rt: The estimate which a critical world places upon a young man,s abil-v ities is apt to fall below the true one. In such cases, oneis own views are vastly more satisfactory, and should be cultivated to the exclusion of others. Pr-f. Ha-than: Your mode of procedure was as you hoped itevery exemplary. In fact, we could hardly recommend a better course. It is always well when accepting a chair at a co-educational institution, to wear a dif- ferent suit of clothes, tie, socks and shoes every day for the first few weeks. Be careful not to repeat the same costume inside of seventeen days. The feminine mind has Very retentive faculties for points com- prising the masculine toilet. NEGLIGEE SECTION Floored Grayce a la Billie Burke Dave Wiggilefglri giggrary Steps Linger Logggisiriggggfglggd. ava They Are the Limit A. T. Us in Underclo es 25 THE BLAME Once there was an evil court, And they put the ban on sport, So they coo-cooed basketball, Cut it out a year, thatts all; NOW graduate are all the bOys Who made the game their forte. Oregon was overtaken by defeat, Four times the Aggies made them easy meat, U. of W. took them in, Oh the season was a sin. And the Rangers had them going In discouraging retreat. ' In percentages the lemon score is nought, With every cruel defeat the more they fought, On that court there lies the blame, Due the faculty the shame, For the sadsome year of besting That a year of resting brought. eJ. D. G. EVOLUTION Berber: h V I b Shave, Sir?" Stude: "N0. Shave? Stude: ttNO. Hair-cut? 3' '?:.T:'.,:T,',.."swsm. D : s M if; :3 hjh D L.. JD v'v'h Hi 5 '1 3V h g THE NEGLIGEE LURE or wigs How a D. G. Does It ,5" . saga M 69'?" W Time: 4 ham and. W" W . $.51 ".mw Setting: North side of Delter Gammer boarding house. Third story " 4... :W window open; curtain embellished on south side by feminine eyes. Al- ?K M4, 91 t der and Thirteenth streets, sun shining hotly down, twenty-three rain- W W Mr drops decorate the concrete. M21365 H" CURTAIN d w. W' tDiscoveretD Mr. Sandy Leonard strolling frOm Stigma Si house. 1 do, W W He glances up Alder street-eye does not pierce the curtainehe turns ow M!" and engages in sprightly conversation with a brother wop. vg ' . miim tbusiness in the t. 8. WJ The curtain is drawn aside, sixty pounds t3" v m WW of avoirdupois, complexion about forty ehromo, value fifty, ten yards of Vim 9"" 1 yellow eorkscrews and one arm extended. :p In mm W Betty: OhOOeO-O-OHHH! tbusiness of gurgles, squeels and high cresendo in generalesufficient to reach Alder and Thirteenthehls it Ema my arm h rainING?" t tAudience begin to assemble on Gamma Phi porchQ 1'3' Mr. Leonard unconsciously inclines d.g.ward. Brother w0p is for- gotten. ED 5-11an is" Business of much waving of extended arm and hasty clutching of embroidered, treal val insertedy unmentionables. yaw w, u in Betty: hWhoo hoo! Hello Sandy, howtre you? kth t M Q Our hero turns, irresistibly drawn. He takes a few faltering steps $7 I . . h toward the habitation of Nellis, widow. ,'"W3MI . . "I W! m g h tAudlence now assembled on Gamma P111 porchJ hi " e h? o q Our Hero: ttPretty good, howtre you ?tt Piwi w. -. , t I Betty: ttPretty good toosbut I cant hear you so far away? :Lwh a 4 O. H. approaches to entrenchment behind telephone midway be-- CH; '5!- tween the Four Doric Columns and Thirteenth. yes . Ni... tSeveral guests have added themselves to the Gamma Phi group. he N ' Fight begins for front row stallsJ W 28 Betty: ttWhatcha doing? 0. H.: ttNothint. What ,re you doirf?H tOur heroinets hold on real val inserted loosens-busitness of startled ylpS, hysterical garglese-usual high cresendo fmaleJ During this time our hero has advanced to a point of vantage on the edge of the Dog Gone clipped emerald. Betty: tChromo now forty-five, value fifty-eigth ttOhooooOOH! I have something to tell you!!!!!tt Sandy now stations himself under the t. s. w. tLast seats in nigger heaven now sold out. Three heads out of Gamma Phi upper Windowsj tBusiness o-f muttered colloquy under d. g. windowJ Our Hero navigates to a strategic position between the middle of the four Dorics. Front door opens. Betty joins him. They disappear up the Alder Street Walk. Closing Chorus: ttWhat Crust!!!!tt tGiamma Phi and Guests en-- sembleJ CURTAIN ED HARWOODtS PROPOSAL Itve seen such sights as the Northern Lights, But the light in your star-like eyes Is ahead of Borealis as a huts below a palace, Its a light that artists prize. Itve seen wolves cry in hunger and die, But the hunger than in my heart Cantt be satished till you are my bride. Here,s your furs. Ah, dear, lets start To the land of snow Where a hundred below Carft chill my love for you; Oter the malamute trail we,11 gaily sail As northern sweethearts do. ttWhat you plant ye shall also reapf, When you plant a fraternity pin, what then? L , "M 0W: cup- : , a um. ,ww -, t'-'a-mwot'm. v.4 A - .... -4: p--um;-I' w mn-wm W," mxm'w-wm - w! vm..-- "gun A rota: ,1 mn-wsermamtw uanw-a rxmm vmw, w. e . 5 - a water otwdm- Watchful Waiting Campus Hosiery Bez Trying Out for the Womews Page Nick Returning from Barbary Coast Soul Mates Score One for Johnny Preparedness ANSWERJS TO CORRESPONDENTS ECONOMY-We know of no place where toothbrushes are Ilaun- dered. HISTORIAN-You are right. Noah was the largest individual hold- er of watered stock during his age. SCIENCEeYes, ice is slippery on both sides. SPORT-You lose. Adam was born an orphan. DIFFIDENTe'Dhe proper way to handle a lobster is to have him arrested. WELL VVISHEReWe return the $5 note. We cannot accept coun terfeit money from admirers. CORRESPONDENTS ANSWERED Editor Oregana Feature Secti0n:w What ails my hens? Every morning I find two or three lying on their backs, toes curled up, never to rise again. CONSTANT READER. Springfield, Ore. AnswerzeYour hens are deadeEd. Dear Editor:- Am a farmeris wife, and am greatly troubled with birds in the or- chard. Which do you think the worst, sparrows 0r worms? tEditofs Answerr-Dontt know. I have never had the sparrowsj Kent Wilson-Aintt nature wonderful? Messner-Why? Kente-She gave us all faces, but we can pick our own teeth. Hurn-What a funny looking girl! B1ackaby-Yes, she was the missing link in the Paul Jones last night. Marian Grebe1-Do you think that a girl should learn to love before twenty? Stan Anderson-Nope; too large an audience. Son tjust back from collegei-Congratulate me, Father, I have just made Phi Beta Kappa. Father-Whlarc's that? Another of them, driinkin' soicetieis, I suppose. DAILY REPORT OF ABSENCES' UNIVERSITY OF OREGON TKI VOLLOWINO N mounp W Il AllDNT tho I menu IILDWI " CLA I TODAY A, NAME 7 It 1': my desire lo assist and Support the work of general Christian welfare carried on by the Universdy of Oregon Young Menk Christian Association. I hereby pelilion for membership in that organization, and if elected I agree to pay within one month from dale the sum of one dollar h$ I .003 or the year's dues. Dale; ' Class In Universily W-M .4, .- ,W-, - ?Am- - UnivenilyyAddnss .,-,7,.4:,: . '. -4 w: - REGISTRAR'S OFFICE . M ZAQWA has withdrawn from colleg X A. R. Tiffany; Rggistrar. UNI ERSITY 0,.- O EUGENE Prm'zlmz'; X 16171!er 17mm MK! axf 111701 1111 ' ' hy, 1147040., ll; l. . Ald'flAl-j', 771 f?fa M0d . 7 In Why, I'Hzlay 'rBw Com: Night m the i 5mm": 1.; 3.; L. EK .v.. N The Busiest Corner, the Best Store and Right in the Heart of Eugene This store is proof of an old contention of ourshthat prompt, courteous and intelligent service, backed b honest merchandisin olicies ultimatel wins Y g P 9 Y Dry Goods, Menhs, Womerfs and Children,s Ready to Wear Phones in all Departments Rest Rooms , Special Delivery Service ?EEWmmgXainmeg I ' FOR $TYLE,OUAI.ITY C ECONOMY , A gas s... eta. GREAT EXPOSE! TRUTH PUBLISHED F OR FIRST TIME Believing that the gullible prepper ist always fooled by the bunches that feed him during Junior week-end and rush week, the OREGON LEMON has magnani- mously dragged the skeletons from the respective fraternities, clotets and for the first time in history exposes them to the public eye. NOTEe-We know a lot more about them, but we don't dare print it. Send a self-addressed envelope to the ttLemon" and we will give you all the dope. You might as well join the human race as join the Kappa Sigs 34 I E . -. - ' . . .- . : ,, $ 1.4; q; $7!C:;;:;:::::::113;.1; $1116 Mark of Highest anlitybr-m i Eugenek Premier Ice Cream and Lunch Parlors ; i R. J. Hawley 86 Son, Proprietors j. 778 Willamette Street P hone 1030 E; ?? SOLE OREGON DISTRIBUTORS ; 5 i i It , WrightSCDitson w . Athletic Goods : ? ; Baseball Track and Field Supplies Tennis Hunting and Fishing Equipment Golf All Sporting Goods N Sporting Goods MW Sporting Goods L X low Basement Balcony THE QUALle 510 E or PORTLAND rim, 5mm "mm as Basement Balcony 35 The Sigma Chis are awful bums :l W mmwv --- I A - . mm." -NQW- , ., . , -w at; Hz v A - '7:me , -Wmvv-v. .. mm Hwy:1'1" mm x m; , Wine weed, women and song! Naughty Betas! ., a vum. n . K. 8 a ' W,.,.H.-...-. -vw,.....w... ; H .wmj- ;" Yr 1 W. ii; :gf t' ' ; :':7,":' "?;:: 75 .:: :1:' U 5 g D E::T::iff"' ' " ' DJ 36 D C-.... 37 LINNDRUG CO. BERT PENNINGTON 764 Willamette Street Drugs . Sundries Perfumes Kodak Supplies Phone 217 STANLY STEVENSON Eugene Oregon "See Moody and See Bette? We sell twenty-eight years of sight-testing experience and pains-taking eHiciency with every pair of glasses Your money back any time inside of one year, if you are not perfedtly satisfied with our correftion Sherman W. Moody Eye Sight Specialist and Optician 881 Willamette Street Superibr Candies K , 'Uictoria Zbocolates Manufadturer of all kinds of Candies and Ice Creams Lunch Room in conne6tion Seventh and Willamette Eugene, Oregon 4 , .-A....., .va w$wu N . ,, . -m m......... ,,... W. n a p U r, ,,m,-x,-..- , m 1 way u. Mam Wm The Fijis are a crusty bunch -that 's the only way they get by There s not: much difference between an A. T. O. and a clothes dummy E E z 3 Th b . . . . E '8 E E e very est 1n anhty and Serv1ce. We have only skllled E m 2 and experlenced workmen. See us for everything in photo work E . i ; 'r a E 5 E E S l E p g : Opposite Rex Phone 535 E 982 Willamette Street Eugene Oregon I 2: uThe Po ular Sweet Sho ,E Frank E. Dunn P P "Reliable merchandise for lessE, '- E E Dry Goods ,3 f N otions E : E LadiesE Ready to Wear E E E GentEs Furnishings Portland Oregon : Men,s and Boys, Clothing E Shoes; Extends to the 'E 1917 Oregana Agents for Henderson Corsets E Agents for McCall Patterns Greetings and E Dutton-Hoffer LadiesE Shoes . E E Q Best Wlshes , a v. E a L Ralston Men,s Shoes : E Phone 230 E E Eugene Oregon E To be a Delt is to be a nut THE WOMEN,S HOPE BOX Jay Gore-High prime favorite. Hugh Thompson-Pretty Baby, Pretty Baby! John Beckett-Record Winner of H. 1. Us. Hollis Huntington-Gamma Phi and Pi Phi meat. Orville Monteith-Secret Sorrow Specialist. Jack Dolph-Campus Regret. Merlin Batley-dAbsent Member. Couch--You should have seen the truck he ate at dinner. Hargreaves N0 wonder he has wheels. Couch-dWheels? Skinny-Yes, off the truck. ---.u-- - -a"-:-----'.- E A x 9'35, x. NJVNV P FOR THE Prinfi .7"?! 5-111. . M , , 3.41; . . my M4M4hwafh' ,,.,M,.a..m;,.vu. mvmma' ' W x . . gw'wx v v... .... w w.-j..m-.. ,......,,,,... am... .Ft 4 . h k. AA AM kw 4 Repel. p. 'rwi .W.- H mm, m. WWW," BELLS By John DeWitt Gilbert. The Belles The belles, oh Hell, they stingeling-a-Iing, Sting you and they sting me, A belle I gave a ring a-ling-aling, She sent it back to me. Their false emJbraces cling-aling-a-ling Till you can scarce tear free, The belles, oh Hell, they stinge-ling-aling, Sting you and they sting me. Church Bells The bells: tgainst Hell they fling-aling-aling Their peels, the soul to free. The churchly bells they ring-aling-aling A chord of hope for me. My pennies I Will bring-a-ling-a-ling To cut Hellts devil-tree. The bells 'gainst He-ll they fiinga-ling-a-ling Their peals, the soul to free. , w, a; .a-muu. kw w , . .A. ..,A -4"..- "g; wlw 4......" avgw .. .9 ,.,. -- . ,, ..... wnm ' M- -. -., -.V.v,..,.-,:g. v w --- .. '-... - u.- u--.;":mm.,a.m u": :3 m 03 1;; 57:01::3'7'1 .. RED RIBBON BRAND PURE FOOD PRODUCTS THE BEST OBTAINABLE Jellies Pickles Olives Condiment Oil Peanut Butter Catsup Dried Fruits Fish Spices Vegetables Teas, Etc. Dessert Fruits Sperryk Drifted Snow Flour Distributed by Mason, Ehrman 86 Company Portland Eugene Medford Lewiston, Idaho P H O T O S of v5? 3 gfeiirllgipiiiiiegiiinfi the GLEE CLUB and its managers We save you money 'Don,t forget to call on me when and glve you the best in Portland Glavingly yours . Charles F. Berg S b St dlo Vice Pres. and Manager un eam u LENNON s ,: Seventh and Willamette Morrison St.-Postoffxce opposite Laraways ultimately: why not first? That Diamond From that all important diamond to a simple graduation gift come Larawafs first. Unless you are yourself an expert judge of diamond values the twenty year? of diamond buying experience behind every Laraway gem is worth a great deal to you: It costs you nothmg. For Jewelry, Cut Glass, China and Sterling Novelties, come to Laraway,s 31. SETH LARAWAY Vi6trolas Pianos Records 43 ' ':'f:'i:::'.;t:n E3 433 D g--w."-..::w ...-,i-..-.-.-w,- 0 WHO mes AnYTHms ABOUT TH: 43 DELTS . The Phi Delts? Oh, what ,s the use! INSEPARABLES George Colton and reinstatements. Leta Rhodes and Elmer Howard. Joe Bell and Biblomanianism. Spring and the Fever. The Men's Glee Club and deficits. Bill Tuerck and Plug Cut. John Beckett and his Senior Hat. Emerald and Typographical Errors. The Junior Prom and Penury. Jay Gore and Himself. Fred Packwood and the Gamma Phi Swing. Anne Dawson and Outs. Helen Bracht and a Good Time. Jay Fox and The Oregana. Dorsey and his impeccablenesm 5 .v. 3 am Largest Department Store In State Outside of Portland . t? 1 . v55: 1ft stifvjrm'm A Store of Reliable Methods, Reli- ableMerchandise and ReliableService Special Attention Given Mail Orders .....--AW- ., .mh..- t a.- gape mg... i For the past 50 years Gilrs have been associated with education in Oregon. In the Grammar School, in the High School, in the Univer- sity, Gill's have been synonymous with books and supplies that were needed When you step from your school life our long experience in serving business and professional men will be of service to you Command Us! The J. K. Gill Co. Booksellers, Shtionen. Office Outfitters Third and Alder Sis. Portland, Oregon hdusicians We have the Largest Stock of Music and Musical Merchandise in the Northwest All the Late Songs Holton and Buescher Band Instruments All Things Musical at All Times Send for Catalogues Seiberling-Lucas Music Company 125 4th St. Portland, Oregon The scene is laid in a local confeetionery shop. A heated argument is progressing between the mathematical shark and the profes- sor of Economics. iiGentlemen, I reiterate,' duced from the proverbial thirteen to eleven." 3 went on the shark, Hthe baker's dozen has been ree Whereat the professor came back at him something as follows: iiSir, your contention is undoubtedly founded on faet. My experience, however, has been rather the converse, for the other day I chanced to purchase a loaf of Royal Bread and found to my delight that it was so full of quantity and goodness as to set at naught the oft repeated sallies on stances it will hold true. the high cost of nutrition." There was nothing for the student to do but stop in at the Royal Bakery on his next trip to Portland and find out for himself. In a large number of in- Ralston Statuetted Ching in Dolphys Place Reading Their Future Hoot, Man! Hedges' Mecca Nick :in Sunny Ca1.! Sandy Oh, Erma! Spider Its Hard to Believe It Shy Tackled Buck's Ambition 46 Gllnthim anh Eurniahpra tn anllrgp 1113211 atth IEHmmm fur nuvr Entry 13mm may. e uh-M . IV rermm z " :rsar e .wmvsmexamra ruueg-xmt 3a EDITORWS NOTE On account of several unforeseen obstacles, such as the increased cost of. censorship, due to the prevailing war prices, and the rapidly rising price of I Pebecco, it was deemed necessary to increase the receipts of the Oregana a sufficient amount to cover the manager's car-fare and laundry bills and to provide a surplus for the Woments Activities of the University. WA N T E D By Fijis One more student body office for which we can put up a man. WANTED By Kappa Stigma Shasta Water, Ice, Towels, Telephone, Box of Cloves, Private Tutor for Charley Johns, and a few more Boarders. lllwemGhis Wanted to be forgotten Do You Want to Become An Athlete? ANY VARIETY If you do, see us. Always let a well established flrm handle your career We now have complete control of the athletic situation in this University Make any team you wish for the asking. We made Beckett, Parsons, Mitchell, etc. , etc. We are the most daring athletic managers in the country Ask Your F atherethe frat that makes athletes famous SIGMA NU ATHLETIC MANAGERS NOTICE We can still accommodate a few more barbarians in our glorlous meltingpot Alpha Tau Omega For Exchange Will exchange modern, roomy, three compartment vanitycase, com- pletely furnished, for attractive an- kle watch. BELLE MESSICK WANTED By Kappa Alpha Theta Window Blinds for the West side of the FIJI HOUSE Announcement We are still offering good odds on anyone challenging our dog Don to single combat. Robertts Rules of Order abolished. Any- thing goes. Call the Phi Delts, phone number 127, anytime day or night. :' :3: b Eh XV m: :4 ' Wg' $ a '0 I '. XS x33- U 5 O :kx u. Ki 388-90 Washington St. THE HAZELWOOD Ideal for Fraternity and Sorority Lunches and Dinners The Finest Candies in Portland Meet your friends here Portland Oregon 387,: Alder St. The Quality Store of Eugene Dry Goods-Furnishings-Ready to Wear corner Sixth avenue and Willamette street HAMPTON,S MERCHANTS AND PROFESSIONAL MEN WHO ADVERTISE IN THE OREGANA DO CATER TO AND DO APPRECIATE STUDENT PATRONAGE 5r " ' f::j 2 M i2 1 WE; WwV huh mu: m 'IttM'hr UV pm! at 1 ! Jaclq Playing Cupid XVoodwork Brothers Dorothy and Her Beaux Three Hits and Out Oh, Darn! Out for Bracht Kappa Sigmutts 50 Steinway There is nothing in the human vocabulary that conveys a more definite impression of piano pre- eminence than the single word Steinway Royal appointments by Foreign Rulers; its Choice by all the Greatest Artists, past and present; its purchase by all those who demand the unquestioned Best; all point to the fa6t that the STEINWAY represents the supreme achievement of Piano Construelion Sherman, Q3 ay 8c, 00. STEINWAY and other Pianos PIANOLA Player Pianas VICTROLAS and all the Vietor Records SIXTH AND MORRISON STREETS PORTLAND, OREGON 51 NEW FRATERNITY THEDA BATA AND HER TWO PLEDGES NEW F ICTION .- DANCING- AS A PROFESSION By William C. Snyder. The famous right guard tells in his own inimitable style about his own inimitable style as a dancer. Anyone who has seen Bill dance will appreciate the book. Pro- 1mm fusely illustrated with half-tone reproductions of photographs taken of the author in characteristic poses. - Annotated and. revised by Rader and Holzman. Sim THOUGHTS FOR HIGHER LIVING t From the spoken and written words of Charles K. Crandall. A volume 01' short selections in prose and verse, spiritually helpful, cheerfully de- votional, and making for braver, happier and higher manner of living. Collected by the untiring efforts of Mr. Crandall himself. With a frontispiece portrait. Price, 460 tpostage 100i. SOME WOMEN I HAVE LOVED By Milton Stoddard, author of ttAsleep At the Switch" and other poems. With frontispiece, 12m0., $1.50. Mr. Stoddard is recognized by all readers of fiction as one of the most artistic, self-esteemed and finished novelists of the day, and. he has done nothing that shows wk." certain fine characteristics of his work more than this charming gallery of executed miniatures. "Some Women" is a book that will enhance the fine reputation of the s author, which he justly deserves. m t A PAGE OF SOPHOMORAL EXPECTATIONS Types of Fair MeneAn artistic compilation by Helen Bracht. The material for , this most attractive article has been gathered by the author f1-om among the men N'Jm 0f the University, whom she had ample chance to study. She has written upon every type and has characteristic pictures taken with her own camera, of the men she describes. MY LIBRARY C'OURTSHIP A. society romance. This clever story from the stub pen of Bob Atkinson will be the literary masterpiece of the 1918 Oregana. Besides the exquisite charm of the narrative, the familiarity of the setting adds much to the charm of the story. The scene is laid in the library and. the leading characters may be Ieadily recognized as real people. The hero, Richard De Vere de Vere, is easily seen to be the 'coquettish Bob himself. In tlhflS story, as in all tales of society life, the author will be seen 1. at his best. T wt v.13 cl Lo 1m 1H m 2:430 1 H 1112 thank 1112 511111211121 nf 1191mm fur 111211' 11111111 patrnnaga 71211311111 nur 1121111111115 111 1112 futur2 mag 112 1121 111211511111 11111! 115 zatizfaflnrg 1121 111 1112 1111211, 5511111221 55711111111 ELIE 3111112211111 1111211112 21151 Honeyman Ham and Eggs1 Hardware Company A Delicious Breakfast2 Especially if it is Columbia Brand HAM 1Government Inspe6ted1 Portland Ore gon GOLDSMITH GUARANTEED ' The popularity of this SPORTING GOODS celebrated brand is due to its superior Havor and high quality Prepared by UNION MEAT COMPANY FIRST-because they-LAST NORTH PORTLAND, OREGON 1-. Q i:'::fi:':t:::;'5w?1 171 H V! r: 1227:: 53 hela tha'bsai pichme we haci' 1?, wouga make Wang manna? 153$:str Tim gang graver ?efused to reprbaucg it for fear m'a 6e 913mm. Hewefrer 721$ Mil: havaihe giczwe 12: ms manila. affine and. it $31.11 be m; athitiqn ' aver? Sazuyday evani g "fcrl any Uzzivw'gity men who care to $1er in ." Three of a Kind Enough Said Reserved Seats Twelve at Noon! Cunning Things A Legacy Something 0n the Track 54 l ' o. ,s w :2 w M ti , W V I . F u! T! . 'I Preferred Stock Groceries In Cans, Glass and Cartons The Name Explains the anlity The Quality Justifies the Price Eugene Branch Allen 86 Lewis, Inc, Eugene, Ore. Distributors University Pharmacy Sidney R. Allen, Prop. Drugs, School Books and Supplies 1. P. Books and Fillers The Portlan d Hotel Extends to all U. of O. patrons and friends a cordial invitation to make this hotel your headquarters When in Portland R. W. Childs, Manager E. S. Robe, Assistant Manager gm 0 03 a '53::"tr': .::::.:: :.: 5 INDOOR SPORTS IN A FRAT HOUSE , Cleve S'impkinsl Latest Invention Designed Especially for A. T. O. Frat A A a m W m Patent applied for Demonstrations daily at Fiji house. Call 660 for appointment. 0L ' an I'7u.........:-::..: DORRIS PHOTO SHOP EUGENE, OREGON CHERRY BLDG. PHONE 741 The synonym for the best in portraiture t G '1'? g. M mg; I hdiw'm'. I a K :21 ann '00 V .i Wr T1 .w ww, mu m Hu 0 CL I n U H W." Barb" Sh! I M. mm: :9 9! Hum akin: 5 FAMILY SKELETONS HOTEL OSBURN Pride of Eugene Banquets to Students and Business Men a Specialty Our Sunday evening table d, hote dinners are unexcelled. Hendershottk orchestra. New palm room for private dancing parties W. F. Osburn, Lessee and Proprietor There is a Chance for every man to succeed if he has enough sense of humor to keep him from taking himself too seriously Fisher Laundry C0. C l u b W. A. Kuykendall The Prescription Druggist Ba rb e r S h o p Where all college me" go 870 Willamette Street George W. Blair Eugene,0reg0n 4'? ' e . 1m n m u e SEWAV tau h ubS Mu. . Nny ena 1!? tan M . me E. o m C r 2 m r C . v m, v r W o o M C F m. m d a e u. w s w P o P m e W S Y m U m D. .1; u. re a . m V S . R W Sweet basses XVorking 0n the R. 11m, Tum, Tiddle R Eventually :Why N 0t N CW? The Tollman Studio For First Class Photos J. B. Anderson, Proprietor Phone 770 734 Willamette street All students of the U. of O. are made comfortable at the Imperial Hotel Manager Phil Metschan Jr. Wishes it particularly understood that he is fond of the upep and gingertt stuff, and likes to see the boys get it out their own way ROOMS ONE DOLLAR UPWARDS Stumped Looking for Phi Delts Ten Pts. Off Course Beta Guard Duty Has He Went? Fool'ing the Public Smiles Still On the Job A Pipe Course Red and Don v. YORAN PRINTING HOUSE EUGENE,OREGON PRINTING RU LING BINDING LOOSELEAF SYSTEMS FERTILE FOUNTS OF CAMPUS FOLLY Echo Zahl Milton Stoddrd Marian Coffey Forrest Watson A1 Bowles Helen Bracht Betty Bruere Bert W004. George Colton Charles Crandall Eulalie Crosby Cleveland Simpkins Frank Scaiefe Warren Edwards Russel Fox Lennie Floan Jay Fox' DeWitt Gilbert Gene Good Orville Monteith Doronhy Hunzicker Emmett Rathbun LITTLE DORA Sigma Chi Doughnut Championship Trophy NADIE GUSTA UN HOMBRE GORDO! diLuTed ONncle Juice LASTINA! W HARTHAN REDUCES The store that is owned by the Student Body FOUNTAIN PENS ALL STUDENT SUPPLI ES FROSH CAPS Tie up to the Co-Op; it Will save you money The CO-OP We are prepared to supply Instruments of Precision Apparatus Glassware Chemicals For the Industrjal Technilcal CHEMIST Analytical Metallurgical A half-century of experience at your service Woodard, Clark 85 Co. ALDER AT WEST PARK PORTLAND. OREGON CATALOGS LISTS P RICES on application Students, N ecessaries in H ardware S-W Paint Furniture and Rugs C 1-1 AM B E R S HARDWARE CO. M my?! ?Km:v::mqwaizrm"wa- - A . -:.. A7" .r .wu- 9.va wvw ,- . ,e A 4mmw, Le s t'f-rk -w: . A NA: t..m, t . This XYas Long Ago Going Up! Kappa. Kaptives If the Girlles Could Be Soldiers Echo and the Gang q 1563:3013 land ?ftlgr. . uvee unc 1es 0 alsles l SIDNEY R. ALLEN 86 Ninth Avenue East, Eugene, Oregon Cameras and Photo Supplies Anything in Drugs THE PRESCRIPTION DRUG STORE Phone 232 We Deliver tKuppenheimerClothes-- for young men are nationally famous because of individuality in style faultless Et and the workmanship of master tailors Prices as low as $20 . Morrison at Fourth I The Portland Home of Kuppenheimer Clothes "Another of Americak Exceptional Hotels" Multnomah Hotel PORTLAND, OREGON Admirably adapted for College Gatherings, Banquets, Dances, Dinners, etc. GRANT SMITH 8: CO., OWNERS Eric V. Hauser, Prsident H. H. Cloutier, Manager Going M1: H 0 Home for and. Mrs. Sneaked In Vacation Dolph Twice XVoods-Cut- Ups As Theykl Like to Be Penn Pains Our Prexy Second ChildhOO'J. The One Bright Spot for Students The Rainbow Dancing a The Club M Billiard Parlors Student Headquarters 814 Willamette Street DR. TI-IOS. VAUGHAN DR. E. A. VAUGHAN DENTISTS Marshall 1945 Portland, Oregon 905 Ele6tric Building Roberts Bros. Clothing and Furnishings 804 Willamette Street 1917 Oregana $3.00 postpaid CHAS. I-I. DUNDORE EUGENE OREGON THE LUMBFR YARD A freshman I saw ycoterday, With downcast eyes and shuffling feet, His green cap tilted oIer one ear, I met him crossing Thirteenth Street. And I looked up and thought I saw What seemed to trouble him the most; A board in front of Johnson Ha11-- Hod just been up to pluck. his post. IICheer up, old man," I said to him; HJDOIlyt take it quite so hard; he first a notice from your Prof. To put you on your guard." T nOne dinky post don't bother me," He said, and lhxis face was all a smile, IIFor one or two I woulant care, But I plucked a Whole lumber pile." Frosh Un whisperI-Who are those seniors talking so loudly over there? Soph IdittoIaSeniors? They're the librarians. MortonaThe quiz standings on the whole Mere not satisfactory. One person got as low as 28. Hamlin On a whisperIaGneat Scott! Is it possible I got as low as that? Bezdek-What the deuce do you mean by refusing 'to kick the field goal? Hollis-Sorry, Coach, but I promised my mother I'd nev'er touch another drop. I s. ; 17A C odd agar??? 06f$dtlkd WU!!! 41! Ami 7GJX '- oqf The home Che Equitable Life Hssurancc Society of the United States Edgar 10. Smith Rgencv manager 306-9 Oregonian Bldg. Portland, Oregon 25, '1 i II; I ' . ' I K .W Girl Here Ring Around a. Rossy Boy Here XVe Cut Sara Off Travelling In Style Showing Edith Up Teaching Gym V'hen They Got Military Training In Two Reels 2n 3 x Paul H. Hauser Lloyd J. Hauser Hauser Bros. EUGENE- ALBANY- SALEM ATHLETIC GOODS . FIRE ARMS FISHING TACKLE CUTLERY Specialties in FOOtwear and Clothing for Athletes and Sportsmcn Prompt Service Good Goods New Perkins Hotel Fifth and Washington Street Portland Oregon Most centrally located Reduced rates Special student rates, 75c and up 1 CA T533253 I EgPMAW 83 V ---,.. This is another adage falsew A1l sayings are deceiving I see the Emerald every day, But seeings not believing! There was a young man from Dundee, Tried to humble a bumble bee; The bee stung with a rumble, Without any grumble, And now the more humble he. THIRTEEN DESPERADOS CORNERED .. ..,.. .4 w 4' r3 mwvza. ,4 -: A 'x. 3 4 wnuwmw ugpx .1, x u . ,. . Mb .4 .4. a L .1... arms"............., w? y -..Mw..,- 4. .., ,m-v..m--mmgw hsw... ,---m mm,$:n 4-... Eugene Steam Laundry The Student Laundry Phone one-two-three Eighth Avenue West Eugene Oregon, Table Supply Co. Fancy Groceries, Meats and Home Cooked Foods Picnic party lunches a specialty 77Phones 246, 247, 248 Ninth and Oak Frateynity ' TheLaneCOunty Fountaln Pens Creamery A lever action, self filler, with solid, gold pen, and the price is only $1 50. Biggest value ever had in fountain pens M. L. Kreamer, Jeweler 657 Willamette St , Eugene, Ore. Phone 117 48 Park St., Eugene Mfgrs. Pasteurized Sanitary Butter Once used always used mt::f::::':::.::z :1 03 n L. 5's 3 THE EXCEPTION Mlableoo'ls she a college girl?" VeolauooNo, I think she's oNormal'." Dr. Morton-uYour answar is as clear as mud. Hawk Geary-Well, that covers the ground, doesn't it? ACCORDING TO FOOTBALL A delayed DassuA removed condition, Worried StudentuCan you let me have a minute of your time? Hurried Prof.-Not unless it is a matter of moment. Farlequhat's your roommate like? Crandall-Darn near everything IW'e got. John. McMumray-uVVhIat do you think of these exams? A1 BowlesuQuestionable practice. old man. Prof. SweetseruWhat was the significance of the miracle that befell the ushermen? Scaiefeo-I,m not prepared on any catch questions. St. ,Peter Go applicanU-VVhat was your business on earth? Applicant--Dean of Women of O. A. C. St. PeteruPick out your harp. .. Vyw k ewewt .'vm t A A .o.r..t;.:a.. he The Hotel Seward wishes to thank thehOreganah and its friends for their loyal patronage in the past and solicits a continuance of the same in the future All Oregon Elettric trains stop at the Seward Rates $1.00 and up Alder at Tenth Street PORTLAND, OREGON W. M. Seward, Manager A. N. Pierce, Asst Manager AM Game or Business you will need a. The pen with LooseLeafBooks andForms Visiting Cards Commercial and Fine Stationery Engineers Supplies hElerthing for the OHicd, KILHAM Stat,y 85 PBg Co. Portland, Oregon Go to For Ice Cream Confecftions Tobaccos In your buying, discriminate between a mere foot covering and a real Shoe We suggest Burden acGraham Shoes The college folkts boot shop g;:....'tm.u..:::::::1 D I f ' sf. .,.,..,..x. -gxzp. w, .r-a-Wn A m- t- WM? A:.:.. .. r V . , He's Gone Vho Says Our Faculty XVorft XVork The Uk.s Ting-a-Ling Plenty Girls Our Bishop The Girls Mix Dogge'l Persistence Isrft W'arren Popular The Library Mob iglg' I fl It i 1 '11: If I 3;; 3 " I - V iEntry-Pight 132nm nf gwmirp What Ghia $71an iliaz E11112 EHnr Enrig-right 13mm Eur $tuhpnta Qlatprph in that 211mg want ?RPpairPh Ihnuzanha nf matrhw ZEixrh Pnnrmnna ammmia nf irmrlrg $11111 mang line engagement ringa imam in plain tigurw Enrkvgk 31211112114; $.71an OUR ADVERTISERS Allen 8: Lewis. Ax Bil'ly Department Store. Burden K: Graham. Chambers Hardware Co. Club Barber Shop. Club, The. Dorris Art Gallery. Dunn, Frank E. 8: Co., The. Equitable Life Assurance Society. Eugene Steam Laundry. Friendly, S. H. Fisher Laundry Co. Gill, J. K. Co. HamptOIfs. Hauser Bros. Hazelwood. Hicks-Chatten Engraving Co.' Honeyman Hardware Co. Imperial Hotel. Kilham Stationery 8: Printing Co. Kodak Shop. Kreamer Jewelry Store. Kuykendall Drug Co. Lane County Ceamery. Laraway, Seth E. Lennons. Linn Drug Co. Lion Clothing Co. Luckey J ewelry Store. Mason, Ehrman 8c Co. McMorran 8: W-ashburne Store. Meier 8: Frank Store, The. Moody, Sherman W. Multnomah Hotel. Oregana. The. Osburn Hotel. Otto Confectionery. Perkins Hotel. Portland Hotel. Rainbow, The. Roberts Bros., Toggery. Royal Bakery. Seiberling-Lucas Music Co. Seward Hotel. Students Co-operative Store. Sunbeam Studio. Swetlantfs. Table Supply Co. Tollman Studio. Tuttle Studio. Union Meat Co. University Pharmacy. Varsity, The. Vaughn. Drs. Thos. and E. A. Wade Clothing Co. Woodard, Clark 8; Co. Yerington-Allen Drug Co. Yoran Printing House. WELL! The Public Demanded It X:


Suggestions in the University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) collection:

University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1914 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1915 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1916 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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