University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR)

 - Class of 1913

Page 1 of 428

 

University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1913 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 428 of the 1913 volume:

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'IWK'QMER'g Q. wwmxw Q N hm' bl Lg; 4541p f?fmingm giainMghnw MALE -J 5'- 'M In u'U' 1 7 XL". .5: L, . , ,. m .. at: H ' "g '. erfia' m9 V". ,- Q ' $1.344. 7mm Q Q 11 bun... -H km A. Q . g . . 53' h l N1 L3 uli U1, Q Q ' s41 '. 5W 4 , Q. L" I - Qijgg ; Ha. E 2 J ,, a W; K? "I I - Q - Q u d H'W..'ssa.. r" Viv. ...., w-"Qr'm'gWH Q "N v! Q EM '. Q - -g .. Misha. ERR! . ..- . . '. ,. Y Q ' ..V M'Wi watmmwwmm z , Mums '"Q ' : L 4 wmatis; R ' has: mmWAhNQ 11 THE OREGANA VOLUME lV PUBLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1913 KARL W. ONTHANK, EDITOR ANDREW M. COLLIER. MANAGER PRESS OF YORAN'S' PRINTING HOUSE PRINTERS AND BOOKBINDERS EUGENE. OREGON OREGON STATE LIBRAW 7 Documents Section MAR 6 w m 11 , 1113Mmsoms 0P T119 coLLLcL YEAR wa 0771 Y -.- K 152x :7" V 9g . :1 I ' mo Am, 1 ..- 1; 1,g'k m 1k... '11., '. 41 $51774 kn; ?p 1 T ' 1 5 ii: . T .x 1 14; t , t ;0';; R Z L 71,. . I 1" , 159 a " W 1' era: 1 ' 9- Q; a 1 9' T , a n 14g- , ,2 I r . u 1 7 $2 k I, t ?C, o de 1 : git; f a Q n'alf ';. 1 :2 ' Z. q w 1 lm1' g 21:11 I 'v A" - . 2.7 1;; T +1 :3; L , 1741;11 1 9 EN J '1 w 3 ' . Xfl' W K Xx ' 1 . 5 J 7 V? M 1L r- A Il-v . 1 .7 $1,, r" K .n ; 34:14 91. . 13$ , ' 7 2' 7', 1' - T 411 V'rL -. . t ' . y' I x iHnrpmnrh In publishing this Oregana it has constantly been our aim to truly represent the life, standards and ideals of the University of Oregon. We have enlarged the scope of the book and introduced several innova- tions all of which but represent the growth and prosperity of that I institution. We haw endeavored to present a full and impartial record of the University year. If in after years these pages shall recall to memory the happy days spent at Oregonememories of victories won and friendships formed, of moments of idle recreation and profitable hours of study--our purpose shall have been fuqulled. It is with the hope that we have in some measure attained this ideal, that we submit this volume to the University and to the state whose name it bears and whose culture and prosperity it should refleft. lseilht AX 3 fl 770 . IOHN STRA UB Qean of the College of Literature, Science and The quts, who has been with tbe University since the be- ginning, whose counsel has always been timely and good, who has given a lifetime in the ser- vice of his ttboys and girls,,, this volume is respeetfully inscribed. ' lln'! :m 9' a 'HIMTV4' WM. . ' I'i :1, .'M"f',l. VI HWhml .m-u M'w-g ' . ,. ""'Wr "H " , " " " ' I , .. VMMH'I "4' $14 anhKN"h 4vu .v 'H n, .,v u .,,,, -w,u........-.; . ,.-- - --. 'mmww' . w 7-4 . . .' ,, . ..A. .4 r 4 , , N. WM v: ... . m 17-? MW ,g..:r:-:gr; M'VE'j'Pin' "35$ 4151.1?wp37'u. 53:1,! H6 H11 2 d Evy um-a WW '55:? :5 l- U" ;- f, . :-,' '4, -, M u --. A "L . an? .I m ' " .. . humid: ', 114 P- M HAW'" N. "3- "MW :' .- w W M 1 ' "' '1' v" -,. m I" I . ' ...'. 4.. H ;. ..',E Armwf'nmr'rm'u'uh :35th 3.; 'PFMM k M WEN"? . ,:. '1.! l.q.. , um r ' '" . - ,3 - - ,' -h-3h-uiL-:.'u.l 4 g N 'V " U I - U 'n ., wva-us-u. - M ' " ' , a L;l'hu:;w 'r'mzn- ;,. v ' - , . h D .5 7.6. L. g' .' .. .. " tr". . n M K H; ' H. , -.u.. J ' ,..L-Il...,.,l.,..l..g,-c :4. V WW - H mimkiw . 7 A, ;.:.2,;.:..1,.3445+....3. .2 . W4. the hearts and minds of those fearless pioneers who crossled the plains with ox-teams, braving the dan- gers of the journey in order to found an empire 0n the Jwestern slope of the American Continent. Undaunted by their isolation and limitations, desirous of securing for their children suitable educational facilities, they founded in the Willamette Valley those splendid missionary colleges that made possible later Oiregon,s highest educational institu- tion-the University of Oregon. The writer desires to acknowledge the debt which the State owes to llOld Wil- lamette, and to nPacific University, and to IiAlbany Col- legeh and the other denominational colleges of the State and t0 the noble men and women who at so much self-sacrifice taught in them. But they were denominational colleges, and sectarian interests or division prevented them each from getting that mutual support that was necessary to build up a great insti- tution that could take rank with similar institutions in the east. Gradually there arose a demand for an institution that could call to its support all the citizens of the State, regardless of religious or political affiliations. Accordingly, about forty years ago, the Legislature of Oregon, following the example set by older states, determined to establish a State University, and agreed to locate the insti- tution at Eugene, provided the city donated a plant to cost not less than fifty thousand dollars. Eugene, though at that time containing only a thousand inhabitants, accepted the offer undaunted, and its citizens enthusiastically began the work of collecting the necessary sum. Men of small means repeatedly gave more than they could afford, laborers offered their labor, farmers brought in their stock, and it was sold to pay for the material in Deady Hall. The story of the hardships and the self-deprivation of the people of those days for their University is a pathetic one, full of inspiration. We who are now reaping the benefits should not be per- mitted or desire to forget them and they are mentioned here iilest we forget? But few of the actors are left. Judges Walton and Thompson, W. J. J. Scott, A. W. Patterson and others have passed on, having done their work well. Tw0+ quEGONiS educational institutions were conceived in Hon. T. J. Hendricks and Hon. B. F. Dorris, are still with us, and to them should be accorded all honor for their tireless efforts in what often looked like a hopeless struggle. For four years the people worked, solicited, prayed, and finally, in the fall of 75, the University opened in the few completed rooms of Deady Hall. lTwas a motley crowd that first presented itself at the portals of Oregonis University, ranging in age anywhere from ten to twenty-three years. The Faculty consisted of President Johnson, Professors Condon and Bailey, Mrs. Spiller, and her sister, Miss Boise. None of them are now living. In the Fall 0f 78, the writer became a member of the teaching staff. The hrst class of live was graduated in 78. What has always been the attitude of the University to- ward its students? That the most valuable assets Of the state are not its mines, its farms, its forests, but its sons and daugh- ters, the future citizens of the State, and that these are entitled to the best that the state can afford in every line of endeavor, and to the best preparation for life,s struggle. The best efforts of the instructors have been for them. No student is permitted to lose his personality in the crowd. Personal over- sight and care of each student are exercised, but not to the extent of interfering with the development of self-reliance or the feeling of personal responsibility for his actions. N0 student body could be more loyal and ready to co- operate with the Faculty for the good of the University than ours always has been. Its alumni, wherever found, are a credit to their Alma Mater, their State, and themselves. The Uni- versity has nothing to be ashamed of. With its limited re- sources, it has gone forward, sometimes slowly, but steadily, building permanently, having faith in the people of Oregon and feeling assured that when once the good citizens of this grand Commonwealth understood the loyalty of both Faculty and students to their State and to the high ideals of what a University should be, they would rally to her support. The writer has no apologies to make for the University. Neither has he any fears as to the final results. In his thirty- four years here as an instructor, tand they have been happy years in association with his llBoys and Girlsy, he has seen many storms arise and dangers threaten, but after the storm, llOld Varsityl, stood there as she always has stood and aIWays Will stand, unmoved, With a silent dignity, an honor to her founders, a reproach to her would-be detractors. -John Straub. nnnuunn .. n . . -ll ODregana Enarh KARL W. ONTHANK ANDREW M. COLLIER, Ayanriatra ELIZABETH LEWIS - - Organizations . FEN WAITE - - Athletics LLOYD BARZEE - - Features LUCILE ABRAMS - Art NELL HEMENWAY - ' Fraternities JAMES F. ALEXANDER - - Law School EDWARD A. NOYES - School ofMea'z'cine EDWARD BAILEY - Administration CARLTON SPENCER - - Forensics C. F. HOGAN - - Senior Law JOHN SCHROEDER - Faculty Law KARL MARTZLOFF - Assistant Manager REYMUND EARLY - Assistant Manager Art g?taff HARRY VEIRICK HOMER WHEELON OSCAR HAUGEN ARCH VAN CLEVE THORNTON HOWARD Elm Ennka Book I Book II Book III Book IV Book V Book VI Faculty and Administration The Classes Student Activities Organizations Athletics Features m 1 Ennk 1 . . family anh Ahminiatmtintt Eh? Enarh nf Evgenm HON. ROBERT S. BEAN, President. L. H. JOHNSON, Secretary. iEx-nffirin HON. OSWALD WEST, Governor.. . ...... Salem HON. L. R. ALDERMAN, Supt. of Public Instruction ................ Salem HON. BEN W. OLCOTT, Secretary of State ................................. 9.Sa1em Amminteh 11g 1112 $nnernnr Names and Addresses. ' Term Expires. HON. JAMES W. HAMILTON, Roseburg ........................ April 1, 1913 HON. CYRUS A. DOLPH, Portland.........-..........; ............ April 15, 1915 HON. WILLIAM SMITH, Baker ........................................ April 15, 1915 HON. FREDERICK V. HOLMAN, Portland .................... April 15, 1915 HON. R. S. BEAN, Portland ................................................ April 15, 1917 HON. MILTON A. MILLER, Lebanon .............................. April 15, 1917 HON. SAMSON H. FRIENDLY, Eugene ........................ April 15, 1919 HON. J. C. AINSWORTH, Portland ................................ April 15, 1921 HON. A. C. DIXON, Eugene ................................................ April 15, 1921 HON. CHARLES H.r FISHER, Eugene ............................ April 15, 1921 'Ahminiatratine 0913:2111 P. L. CAMPBELL, B. A. ................................................................ President A. R. TIFFANY, B. A. .................................................................. Registrar LOUIS H. JOHNSON ....... ...Financial Agent M. H. DOUGLAS, M. A. .............................................................. Librarian 3112 532mm FREDERICK GEORGE YOUNG, B. A ......... Dean of Graduate School JOHN STRAUB, M. A., Dean of College of Literature, Science, and the Arts EDWARD HIRAM McALISTER, M. A., Dean of College of Engineering CHARLES J . C. BENNETT, Ph. D ......... Dean of School of Education SIMEON EDWARD JOSEPHI, M. D ......... Dean of School of Medicine C. U. GANTENBEIN, LL. B. ............................ Dean of School of Law MARY GOODBAR MORGAN ............ Acting Dean of School of Music MRS. ELLEN M. PENNELL .............................. Acting Dean of Women .2213 p K? , L L E B P M A C L PRESIDENT P. ALBERT RADDIN SWEETSER, A. M. S. Professor of Botany. A.VB. Wesleyan University, 1-884. A. M; Wesleyan University, 1887. Instructor in Cryptogamic Botany, Rad? cliff College, 1895-1897. ORIN FLETCHER STAFFORD, M. ' Professor of Chemistry. B. A. University of Kansas. M. A. University of Kansas. FREDERICK LAFAYETTE SHINN, Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry. A. B. Indiana University, 1901. A. M. Indiana University, 1902. Ph. D. University of Wisconsin, 1906. Scholar, Yale University, 1902. h FREDERICK GEORGE YOUNG, B. A. Dean of Graduate School and Professor of Economics and Sociology. B. A. Johns Hopkins University, 1886; University Scholar Johns Hopkins Uni- versity, 1886-1887. JAMES H. GILBERT, Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Economics. B. A. University of Oregon, 1903. Ph. D. Columbia University, 1907. C. J. C. BENNETT, M. A., Ph. D. Dean of College of Education. A. B. University of Nashville, 1899. Instructor in University of West Vir- ginia, 1892-1895. A. M. Leland Stanford University, 1896. Student, Chicago University and Univer- sity of California, 1900-1901. Teacher of Philosophy, State Normal School, San Jose, 09.1., 1898-1905. Professor of Philosophy and Education, Louisiana State University, 1905. EDWARD HIRAM McALISTER, A. M. Dean of the College of Engineering and Professor of Applied Mathematics and Civil Engineering. A. B. University of Oregon, 1890. A. M. University of Oregon, 1893. PERCY PAGET ADAMS, B. S. Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. B. A. University of Oregon, 1901. B. S. University of Oregon, 1902. RICHARD HAROLD DEARBORN, M. E. Professor of Electrical and Mechanical En- gineering. - A. B. Portland University, 1895. M. E. Cornell University, 1900. v V 0! CHARLES W. CONVERSE, M. A. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineer- ing. A. B. University of Oregon, 1902. M. A. University of Oregon, 1905. FRED GOODRICH-FRINK, M. S. Professor of Railway Engineering. B. S. in Civil Engineering, University of Michigan. M. S. University of Chicago. Special Student Sanitary Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. HERBERT CROMBIE HOWE, B. A. Professor of Modern English Literature. B. A. Cornell University, 1893. Graduate Scholar, Cornell University, 1893-1895. I f'r '0; r... r'. m w. FRANKLIN L. BARKER, E. M. Professor of Geography. 1 I 5 B. A. Colgate University, 1898. J. E. M. Colorado School of Mines, 1906. ARTHUR COLLIER, A. M. Professor of Geology. B. A. University of Oregon, 1888. M. A. University of Oregon, 1894. B. S. Harvard UniverSity, 1894. Professor, Portland University, 1895- 1898. Professor, Willamette University, 1898- 1899. FREDERICH GEORG G. SCHMIDT, Ph. D. Professor of German Language and Lit- erature. Student at the University- of Erlangen, 1888-1890. Student at J ohns Hopkins University, 1893-1896. University Scholar, 1894- 1895. Fellow, 1895-1896. Ph. D. Johns Hopkins University, 1896. Acting Professor of German, Cornell College, Iowa, 1896-1897. 18 uridunmaaiinhimhw 1 "T 1 '3' V; ma. . JOHN STRAUB, M. A? Dean of the College of Literature, Science and the Arts. Professor of Greek Language and Literature. V A. B. Mercerburg College, 1876-. A. M. Mercerburg College, 1879. JOSEPH SCHAFER, Ph. D. Professor of History. B. L. University of Wisconsin, 1894. Instructor State Normal School, Valley City, North Dakota, 1894-1898. Graduate Student Chicago University, 1895. M. L., University of Wisconsin, 1899. Fellow, University of Wisconsin, 1900. Ph. D. University of Wisconsin, 1906. ROBERT C. CLARK, Ph. D. Professor of History. B. A., M. A. University of Texas, 1901. Ph. D. University of Wisconsin, 1905. 0FREDERIC STANLEY DUNN, M. A. Professor of Latin Language and Litera- ture. 0 B. A. University of Oregon, 1892. B. A. Harvard University, 1894. M. A. University of Oregon, 1899. M. A. Harvard University, 1903. EDGAR EZEKIEL DeCOU, M. S. Professor of Mathematics. B. S. University of Wisconsin, 1894. M. S. University of Chicago, 1897. Graduate Student University of Chi- cago, 18994900. University Scholar, Yale University, 1900-1901. HEMAN BURR LEONARD, Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Mathematics. B. S. 0E. EJ University of Michigan, 1895. Ph. D. University of Colorado, 1906. :a:.mmh.-;-;:.L MARY GOODBAR MORGAN. Instructor in Piano and Theory. Acting Dean of School of Music. EVA I. STINSON, Mus. B. Instructor in Song. WILLIAM HAYWARD. Director of Men,s Gymnasium. Athletic Trainer. Coach of University Track and Basket- ball Teams. BERTHA S. STUART, M. D. Director of Women1s Gymnasium. B. A. University of Michigan. M. D. University of Michigan. WILLIAM PINGRY BOYNTON, Ph. D. Professor of Physics. A. B. Dartmouth College, 1890. A. M. Dartmouth College, 1893. - Ph. D. Clark University, 1897. Professor of Physics and Latin, Univer- sity of Southern California, 1890-1893. Graduate Scholar and Physics Assist- ant, Dartmouth College, 1892-1894. Scholar and Fellow, Clark University, 1894-1897. ' Instructor University of Southern Cal- ifornia, 1897-1901. Professor and Dean of Faculty, Califor- nia College, 1901-1903. E. S. CONKLIN, Ph. D. Professor of Psychology. B. H. Springfield, Mass., 1908. M. A. Clark University, 1909. Fellow in Psychology, Clark University, 1909-1911. Ph. D. Clark University, 1911. 4 vai mun"... Anartsti I a w.u .zq-iiVnd A i l A l l' l A. F. REDDIE. Professor of Public Speaking. Teacher of Poetic Intonation and Vocal Expression at the Emerson College of Oratory, Boston, Mass., 1904-1907. Teacher of Vocal Expression at Brad- ford Academy, Bradford, Mass., 1904- 1907. Teacher of Vocal Expression at Pe0p1e1s Institute, Boston, Mass., 1905-1907. Head of Department of Oratory, Valpa- raiso University, Valparaiso, Indiana, 1907-1911. EDWARD ALLEN THURBER, M. A. Professor. of Rhetoric and American Lit- erature. A. B. Yale University. M. A. Harvard University. . Professor of Rhetoric and American Lit- Lf erature at the University of Nebraska, x 1896-1898. 67 University of Wisconsin, 1898-1901. Yale University, 1901-1903. University of Missouri, 1907-1908. . TIMOTHY CLORAN, Ph. D. Professor of Romance Languages. A. B. Western Reserve University, 1891. Professor of Language, Shurtleif Col- lege, 1898-1897. Student at Universities of Berlin and Strassburg, 1901. Professor of Modern Languages, Uni- versity of Idaho, 1899-1900. Adjunct Professor of Romance Lan- guages, Vanderbilt University, 1900- 1904. Student, University of Paris, 1904-1905. Student, University of Madrid, 1905- 1906. I Van JOHN FREEMAN BOVARD, M. S. Professor of Zoology. B. S. University of California, 1903. M. S. University of California, 1906. Ahhitinnal $111155an GEORGE REBEC, Ph. D. Professor of Education. Phi Beta Kappa. B. A. University of Michigan, 91891. Grad- uate Student, University of Michigan, 1891-1893. Graduate Student, Strassburg University, Germany, 1893-1894. Ph. D., University of Michigan, 1897. Student, Florence, Italy, 1898. Professor of English, University of Michigan, 1901-1903. Pro- fessor in Department of Philosophy and Pedagogy, University of Michigan, 1903-1908. JAMES D. BARNETT, Ph. D. Professor of Political Science. B. A. Emporia. Ph. D. University of Wfi'sconsin. MONTANA HASTINGS, B. S. Assistant Professor of Education. B. S., Columbia University, 1909. Graduate'Student at Colum- bia University and University of Jena. Teacher of Education gthpouisiana State University and Miami University, Oxford, 10. J. LEROY-JOHNSON, B. A. Assistant Professor of Public Speaking and Coach of Oratory and Debate. B. A., University of Wisconsin, 1911. x 1nth X1. 31 1.1. 1' l 1:! I Iv" u: 9113-216 ! :1 I l' 115 $3.8 ZJnEtrurtnra RUTH HOWELL. Assistant in Botany. CARL A. McCLAIN, B. S. Instructor in Civil Engineering. B. S. University of Oregon, 1906. CHARLES ROY REED, B. S. Instructor in Electrical Engineering and Physics. 1 B. S. University of. Oregon, 1906. MARY WATSON, B. A. Assistant in English Literature. B. A. University of Oregon, 1908. GRETA ELIZABETH BRISTOW, B. A. Assistant in English Literature. B. A. University of Oregon, 1910. IRA D. STAGGS. Instructor in Machine Shop. 1. ALBERT BAKER. Instructor in Wood Shop. HUGO WILLIAM KOEHLER, B. A. Instructor in German, B. A. Syracuse University, 1903. Student at Leipzig University, 1903-1904. GERTRUDE DENHART, B. A. Assistant in German. B. A. University of Oregon, 1911. WILLIAM B. KEMPTHORNE, Ph. B. Instructor in Mathematics. Ph. B. University of Wisconsin, 1907. HARRIET THOMPSON, A. B. ' Assistant, Women1s Gymnasium. A. B. University of Michigan. PAUL BOND, B. A. Assistant in Physics. B. A. University of Oregon, 1910. GEORGE W. SHANTIN. Assistant in Physics. JULIA BURGESS, M. A. Instructor in English. B. A. Wellesley College. M. A. Radcliffe College. ELLEN M. PENNELL. Instructor in, English and Dean of Women. MARY HALLOWELL PERKINS, M. A. Instructor in English. ' B. A. Bates College. M. A. Rad- cliffe College. MAUD I. STINSON, B. A. Instructor in English. B. A. Stanford University. RUTH LATHROP. Assistant in Romance Languages. ANNIE BERGMAN, B. A. Assistant in Romance Languages. B. A. University of Oregon, 1910. HOMER WHEELON, B. A. Assistant in Zoology. ' B. A. University of Washington, 1911. ALBERTA CAMPBELL. Assistant in Piano. INA WATKINS. Assistant in Piano. ETHEL EVANS, Mus. B. Assistant in Piano. NELL G. MURPHY, Mus. B. Assistant in Piano. I DAVID CAMPBELL. Assistant in Piano. GRADUATING CLASS. 1911 MW1 Wym aw: WK 72' 441" A 7 ,3 1! AMIV ' . ,:Ennk 3 ' H x Eh? Magma ; V gvrtinn 1 , gwnmra T mm: M .79." -qaa 4.1." , ,; m- r, ,h H ,,. . ,. r'ra h L , u .4 : ' , v ' , 4 . - . ,v . F . , . . j- --.$ " W n .. . d y .j . , ,, A , . r. .,. .-- ... m . ., r ,H Jessie Bibee Pansy Shaver Robert Kellogg Ed ward Himes $2mnr Qfotrera ROBERT M. KELLOGG ................. ......... . .......... . ...... . ............... President JESSIE BIBEE .. ......... . ........ .Vice President PANSY SHAVER ............... .. ............ .......... ......... . ............ Secretary EDWARD HIMES .' ..... ......... ... ........ ...... ..... ..... . ......... Treasurer SENIOR COMMITTEES CLASS HOUR-Raphael Geisler, Ruth Merrick, Birdie Wise, . James Johns, Emma Waterman. SENIOR ME.MORIAL--Chester Moores, Ralph Newland, Irma Clifford. SENIOR PLAY-Ralph Moores, Jean Allison, Burns Powell. COMMENCEMENT-Leon Ray, Tom Word, Alberta Campbell. . BANQUET COMMITTEE Ben Chandler, Lyle Brown, Jack Luckey. , ' - 3 - In 28 . x s---.... u stli n. . Nona; WHFELOM .uolo. IWI- 12. . . . .. . -- . munumgnq , 1,,,4 ,. , 4 ., h, V 7 A m .. . - ' v ' 1. .L"" .r.-m' ' ,'; .. , ,. ,' .f .-,.' ., ., , -" - '. h1; . . " " 'A;' ""v ' u. - - .,, - . , 4., ... 1. . ' ' na .r ' ,-, ,. ., . '.. .- , ' ' . - . ., . '"."? . .. -.. . ,,, , w "1 qua ,Wa ,. .un... ,. A u 1 u 4 Ni V . i r v 71 W ' ' '- w . .j: 7 -' '- u. m.t'hx,. '-'- -l .w, . HM . ,M " "m-Mx- -- ; ' xa - .. "5" " " v.-1......- - '- -j ' ' ' an . ' - . - - hp 1 - . . K. . . u a. A. ,-.: 0.4... -.,Ad-V . "" ' ', ' ; L . . 1 1-. , . - '-.'u.n.... .,. -- .. Lu geninr ?giatnrg believes and therefore styles itself the best class ever graduated by the University of Oregon. In numbers it is fact that proves us greatest. In wisdom, de- spite the harrassing of llhigher standards? new grading sys- tems and similar nmental hobble-skirtsfl we have just claim to superiority. - Perhaps, however, our greatness may be due to the diffi- culties under which we were obliged to labor. Was it not the class of 12 that was the first and last to suffer directly from the indulgence in hazing? Has it not had to suffer longest the impertinances, the cockiness and the unbearable bravado of the freshmen classes? Have we not bowed our heads under the time worn and most serious yoke of the referendum, dampering our spirits to soothe the over zealous consciences of some grouchy state taxpayers? Under these distressing circumstances what have we done to keep alive the University? List, kind reader, while we elaborate upon our many promulgations for the ,Varsityls needs. l Inlthe midst of the cries from the powers above to let not our exuberant spirits lead us to bring disastrous pub- licity' upon our Alma Mater, and thereby prolong our wait for our appropriation, our men of literary ability'originated the famed thidnight Doughnut? How did this help? Why, dear reader, that Midnight Doughnut was the essence of ltpep" and with all its funny jokes, its sarcasms and compliments, it fostered that great necessity, llOregon Spirit? One of the greatest, and most beneficial 0f leagues followed this publica- tion, namely the llDoughnut Baseball Leaguefl It was orig- inated by 1912 and through its efforts the league has later ACCORDING to all previous customs the class of 1912 included- basketball, track, and tennis, vThese league cen- tests have developed Varsity material which otherwise might neverahave been heard of. , In all college activities, 1912 has kept her light constantly burning, nor has it been dimmed by comparison. Naturally we llwallopedli the class of the unlucky number in the annual struggle for supremacy in the football realm.. And have not the stars of 1912 shone brilliantly and num- erously 0n the Varsity football teams? And in track, what have we done? We ask no better proof than our record of defeating all the classes combined and individually In fact. we have carried athletics on our shoulders during our entire college career. As to Society, each and every senior is a lion in the col- lege social life. As a class we have proven ourselves capable of giving llthe danceh 0f the year ever since we decorated the old armory for our Freshman hop. Have we lost money? .No indeed. The Senior class boasts tof an overflowing treasury. We made the Oregana pay, 'we made the canoe carnival pay, in fact, everything has paidthat we have laid our hands to, even going to college. But all joking aside, we are sorry to leave old Oregon, the happiest place on earth,-the spot which has, dealt us 'so much of good and has made us what we are, a class Worthy of at least a little consideration; And as we pack our trunks preparatory to facing the cruel world, we hope that the classes we leave have become so saturated with our spirit that they will follow in 'our worthy footsteps. And if, in later years, the University "should need aid, we will be more than glad to leave our scats in congress and our private offices to set you again on the ' right way to success. LL; Robert N- Kellogg. $ nuibixmi. w. :1 v 4k GRACE M. ADAMS . Oregon Club Eugene .................................................... Economics German Club; Junior Orations JEAN K. ALLISON A. A. A r' Portland .................... Modern English Literature 2 Secretary Eutaxian; 3 Treasurer Eutaxian; 3 Vice President Eutax- ian; 3 Secretary-Treasurer Girls Glee Club; 3 At Yale; Ho Manager Gir1s Tennis Club; 6-40 Vice Presi- dent Young Womews Christian Asso- ciation; 0D She Stoops to Conquer; Canoe Club; Scroll and Script; Eu- taxian. NORMAN B. ASHCRAFT . Oregon Club Ashland ........... '. ............................................ History Young Mews Christian Association. RACHEL E. APPLEGATE A. P. Klamath Falls; ............................................. German Q, :5 German Club; 0, 2, 3, M Young Womew-s Christian Association; 4 Womefs Council. MILDRED E. BAGLEY K.A.$ Salem ........................ Modern English Literature Ch Vice President Young Womenis Christian Association; 00 Scroll and Script; Manager Tennis Club; Cham- pion Women,s Tennis; 00 President Tennis Club; President Young Wo- men,s Christian Association; Canoe Club; Dramatic Club; Eutaxian; She Stoops to Conquer. HARRY E. DEVEREAUX Avava Eugene ........................................ Civil Engineering Q, 3 Mandolin Club. RITA BANFIELD 1". A. F. Portland ....... ' .................................... .......... H istory WENDELL C. BARBOUR A. 2. Eugene ................................................... Economics ' 0 President Freshman Class; 2 Em- erald Staff; 3 Manager Track; Man- ager Oregana; Chairman Junior Prom Committee; 4 Press Club; 00 Pres- ident Laurean; Young Mews Chris- tian Association; Manager Emerald. 'I 1"." - '.,w 'V V HERBERT s. BARBUR 2. N. Portland .................................. Mining Engineering Q, 3, 40 Varsity Baseball. NETA BARTLETT F. A. F. Portland ...................................................... German German Club. MAUD BEALS A. P. Eugene ........................................................... French a, 2, 3, AD Y. W. C. A.; Eutaxian; w, 4 Girly Glee Club; Secretary Tennis Club; 3 Princess Chrysanthemum; OD Candida; President Girly Glee Club. HAROLD C. BEAN z. N. Portland .................................................. Chemistry Q, a Mandolin Club; 3 Track Team; President Inter-Fraternity Basketball League; 00 Student Affairs Commit- tee. History terature German ; Portland lneermg i Varsity President Club 1ce Eng Club Oregana Staff eball V mlng 4 Student Manager Bas o o 7 o , BIBEE t t meermg Cabine Tennis . BRADLEY . BROWN 2- X Portland M ; Eng 0 . ! A PANSY BEEBE OD Scroll and Scrip JESSIE M HAZEL H LYLE F 3 Y. W. C. Senior Class Yell Leader Portland e n e g u E 9!- E LUCIA CAMPBELL K. A. 09. Eugene .................................................... Education 1 Vice President Freshman Class; GD Oregana Staff. LOUISE CECIL F. A. F. Portland ........................ Anglo-Saxon Literature 3 Womews Council. CORA CHACE Fort Morgan, Col. ............ .German Y. W. C. A.; OD Womefs Council. EARL CHILDERS Milton .......................................................... History . ' '- :Au-un'n; -!-4.'LA. um"; FAY CLARK A. P. Eugene .................... Modern English Literature 2 Co-Ed. Debating Team; Emerald Staff; Vice President Eutaxian; Vice President Y. W. C. A.; USO Vice Pres- ident Dramatic Club. HAROLD B. COCKERLINE A. 2. Eugene ............................ Electrical Engineering 2 Basketball; 90 Manager Basketball; Manager Inter-Scholastic Track Meet; A. I. E. E. HUGH CURRIN Dorm Club Cottage Grove .................. Electrical Engineering Q, ED Mandolin Club; 00 Dramatic Club; She Stoops to Conquer; A. I. E. E.; Engineering Club; Y. M. C. A. CLEMENTINE CUTLER F. A. F. Portland .......................................................... Latin 0D Womews Council; Y. W. C. A. 36 11.1? W "E MRS. EDNA PRESCOTT DATSON M. Q. E. Baker City .................................................... History Entered as Senior from University of Michigan. WILLIAM G. DUNLAP Acacia Portland ................................................ Economics She Stoops to Conquer. FORREST E. DUNTON Acacia Molalla ........................................................ Physics 3 Vice President Dramatic Club; Jun- ior Orations; w, M President Laure- an; Oratory and Debate Committee; 00 President Dramatic Club; Y. M. C. A. ETHEL L. EVANS M. Q. E. Eugene ........................................................ German 030 President German Club; German Qlub Play; Assistant Instructor in Mu- 51c. WALTER S. FISHER an. r. A. i g. Roseburg ................................................ Economics ' OD Glee Club. ROY O. FITCH Dorm Club y Sherwodd ................................................ Chemistry 1 Oregon Clpb; Y. M. C. A. EVA FRAZIER Oregon Club l Eugene .................................................... Chemistry 3w OD President Oregon Club. HARRY W. FREDERICKSON Oregon Club I Eugene ...................... Modern EngliSh Literature Y. M. C. A. 1 i', ELLEN FRINK A. P. Eugene ........................................................ History 4 German Club; Y. W. C. A. Eutaxian. JENNIE H. FRY A. A. A. Salem .............. English Literature Tennis Club; Y. W'. C. A. MARGARET V. FULTON Astoria .......................................................... Botany GEORGE A. GABRIEL ' A. 2. Dayton .................................................... Economics U, m Track Team; Laurean; Y. M. C. A. ' -.:.c-..r...-....,r. LEWIS RAPHAEL GEISLER A. 2. Portland ............................................ Mathematics U, 2, 3, ID Glee Club; Q, 10 Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; 3 Dramatic Club; German Club; Student Body Executive Com- mittee; 00 Vice President Student Body; Canoe Club. RUTH GIBSON A. A. A. Portland .................................. English Literature KED Queen of Canoe Carnival. FREDA GOLDSMITH Eugene ........................................................ German CHARLES A. GUERNE Dorm Club Salem .................................................. Mathematics Y. M. C. A. "v-r' CELIA V. HAGER Eugene ........................................................ German 3 Vice President German Club; 6, 0 Womerfs Council; Y. W. C. A. RUBIE HAMMERSTRUM Astoria ........................................................ History 3 Young Women's Christian Associa- tion Cabinet; 00 Secretary-Treasurer Girls Glee Club; She Stoops to Con- quer. RUTH HARDIE F. A. F. Portland .................................... Physical Training LLOYD O. HARDING B. $. H. Oregon City .............................................. Geology Laurean; Y. M. C. A.; 4 She Stoops to Conquer. MARTIN W. HAWKINS 2. X. Portland ................................................ Economics 0, 2, 3, AD; Varsity Track Teiam; 3 Captain Track Team; Athletlc Coun- cil; Oregana Staff; Pacific Coast Rec- ord in High Hurdles; Northwest Rec- ord in Low Hurdles; Friar. RAYMOND HEIDER Dorm Club Sheridan .................................... Civil Engineering Oregon Club; Engineering Club; Lau- rean; Y. M. C. A. SIDNEY HENDERSON 2- N. Hood River ................................ Civil Engineering Engineering Club. EDWARD J. HIMES Dorm Club Portland .................................... Civil Engineering 3 Oratory and Debate Committee; 8, M Class Treasurer; Y. M. C. A. Cab- inet; Emerald Staff; OD Student Af- fairs Committee; She Stoops to Con- quer; Editor Y. M. C. A. Edition of the Emerald; Laurean; Engineering Club; Dramatic Club. . 3 I u s A. EVANS HOUSTON Tawah Club Albany ........................................................ History Q, 3, AD; Emerald Staif; G30 Oregana Staff; 6, ID Press Club. J. HUNTER HOWARD Oregon Club Portland ............................................ Mathematics RUTH M. HOWELL Beth Reah Portland ....................... Biology 630 Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; 00 Womefs Council. LEIGH M. HUGGINS Acacia Portland .................................... Civil Engineering 1 Freshman Football; Class Track; U, 2, 90 Class Basketball; 00 Man- ager Oregon Monthly; Engineering Club. WALTER M. HUNTINGTON A. 2. The Dalles .............................................. Economics 333 Vice-President Y. M. C. A.; Presi- dent Intercollegiate Oratorical Asso- ciation; Manager Oratory and Debate; Oregana Staff; Laurean. J. EARL JONES Dorm Club Newberg .................................. Civil Engineering Oregon Club; 333 President, Laurean; 343 Oratory and Debate Committee; Debating Team; Associate Editor Oregon Monthly; President Y. M. C. A.; She Stoops to Conquer; Engineer- ing Club. JESSE BUFORD JONES Dorm Club Portland .................................................. Chemistry Oregon Club; Laurean. HOMER B. JAMISON 2. X. Portland .................................................... Z0 ology 31, 2, 3, 43 Baseball; 32, 33 All- North- west Baseball; 32, 3, 43 Basketball; 33,43 All- Northwest Basketball; 333 Football; 33, 43 Captain, Basketball; 343 Captain, Baseba11;Athlet'ic Coun- cil; Friar. a "Hts JAMES s. JOHNS B. 09. H. Pendleton ................................................ Economics U, 2, 3, Q Varsity Track; 00 Manager Football; Friar; Laurean; Y. M. C. A. J. LEWIS JOHNSON Eugene ....................................... Civil Engineering 9, m Track Team; 4 She Stoops to Conquer; President Engineering Club. FLORENCE JUNKEN Oregon Club Portland .................... Modern English Literature JOHN G. KELLY 2. X. Portland ........................ Mechanical Engineering 0, 2, 3, 0 Class Track Team; 3 As- sistant Manager Oregana; f0 Adver- tising Manager Emerald. ROBERT N. KELLOGG 2. N. Baker City ................................ Civil Engineering 0 Glee Club; O, 2. 3, 4y Varsity Football; 4 All-Northwest Football; Ml Captain Track Team; Class Presi- dent; Engineering Club; Friar; Y. M. C. A. - ROLAND G. KENNEDY CID. F. A. Portland ............................ Electrical Engineering 3 Assistant Manager Emerald; 4 lg 4 She Stoops to Conquer; Dramatic - V Club; A. I. E. E. J ANE KNOX K. A. 69. Portland .................... Modern English Literature 09 Class Secretary; 00 Assistant Edi- tor Oregon Monthly; Eutaxian. a ' x MABEL J. LANE Beth Reah : y Q - Harrisburg ................................................ German H?- l".." 3 "!A ALICE LARSEN P. A. F. Oregon City ............................................ Eutaxian EARL C. LATOURETTE K. 2. Oregon City .......................................... Economics f1, 2, 3, M Varsity Football; Q, 3 All- Northwest Football; U, 2, 90 Track; 3 President Order of the 0"; 4 President Interfraternity Basketball League; Athletic Council; Dramatic Club; Laurean; Friar. WILLIAM E. LOWELL 2. N. Pendleton ............................................... Economics Press Club; Q, 3, M Emerald Staif. MAUDE A. MACDONALD Seattle ........................................................ Z0010 gy 4 Womews Council. DAVID L. McDANIEL A. T. 0. Portland ................................ Mining Engineering U, 9-0 Track; 3 Class President; 4 Student Body Executive Committee; w, 10 Class Basketball; Friar. EDNA C. McKNIGHT Oregon Club Albany ........................................................ History MERLE McKELVEY K. A. $. Portland ...................................................... Botany IMOGENE McKNOWN Oregon Club Eugene ........................................................ German 00 Womews Council; German Club; Y. WMC. A. 12.wa -3 Y WILLIAM s. MAIN 2. N. Santa Barbara .............. Electrical Engineering U, 2, 3, 40 Football; Y3, Q All-North- west Football; 00 Captain Football; Student Affairs Committee; Press Club; Engineering Club. GRAHAM J. MICHAEL 2. N. San Francisco .......................................... Geology u, 2, 3 Football; QY A11- Northwest Football. CHARLES LOUIS MARSHALL Dorm Club Portland .............................. Mining Engineering En gineerin g Club. MELISSA MARTIN Oregon Club Albany ......................................................... Botany Entered as J unlor from Albany College; Y. W. C. A. Egg: hung- -. V RUTH M. MERRICK X- 0- f Medford ....... English Literature H 09 Vice-President Y. W. C. A.; 00 1 Student Affairs Committee; Vice- ;4 President Women's Council; Eutax- ian; Canoe Club; Scroll and Script. ERMEL MILLER X. 9. H Portland ...................................................... German V w, 4H GirPs Glee Club; m President Y. a.- W. C. A.; Md General Secretary Y. - ' H W. C. A.; German Club; Scroll and Script. J OHN M. MOORE I 2- X- Klamath Falls .................................... Economics :i m, 3, 10 Basketball Squad; H2, 3H Class x Basketball. ": CHESTER A. MOORES K. 2. Portland .: .............................................. Economics Hm Edltor Oregana: 010 President Press Club; Laurean; Dramatic Club. . E antuasuuranua4- RALPH D. MOORES K- 2- Salem .................................................... Economics Ga Editor Emerald; Junior Orations; 00 Debate; President Mandolin Club; President Canoe Club; Press Club; Friar. ELLA MOULTON Baker City ........................................ Mathematics 00 Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; German Club. NELL MURPHY X. 9.; M. qa. E. Eugene ........................................................ German Y. W. C. A. FRED T. MYERS Avava Club Caldwell .................................... Civil Engineering 3 Assistant Manager Track; 4 Stud- ent Manager Basketball. FRANK F. NORTHRUP Oregon Club Eugene ............................ Electrical Engineering 3 Secretary A. I. E. E.; Y. M. C. A. CHARLES R. OLESON A. 2. Portland .................................. Civil Engineering Q, 3, AD Track; Engineering Club. ALMA PAYTON Beth Reah Baker City .................................................... French C30 Junior Orations; 6,40 Associate Editor Oregon Monthly; Girls Glee Club; 00 Scroll and Script. R. BURNS POWELL Dorm Club Monmouth .............................................. Economics 2 Debate; President University Cho- ral Club; 0, 2, 40 Leader Varsity Band, 0, 2, 3, Q Glee Club; OD Pres- ident Glee Club; Laurean; Press Club; Friar. 4 i h ta '5 h '31 JESSIE A. E. PROSSER Eugene ........................ Early English Literature 00 Assistant Editor Oregon Monthly; m Women,s Council. .FALLEY G. RASMUSSEN Dorm Club Newberg' .............................................. Psychology W. M. C. A.; Oregon Club; Entered as Senior from Pacific College. JOHN RAST Dorm Club Roseberg .................................. Civil Engineering Engineering Club; Y. M. C. A. L. LEON RAY Oregon Club 12,31 Emerald Staff; GO Junior Ora- tions; 0, 2, 3, 4i Debate; 00 Winner of Alumni Medal for Debate; Presi- dent of Student Body; Laurean; Friar; Y. M. C. A. FREDA RHODES , i '2; - Oregon Club ' ,1 Eugene ..... ' ............................................ German 4 Women,s Council. SARA S. RIDDLE La Grande ...................................... Mathematics j-w Y. W. C. A. I A , , Q . GEORGE W. SHANTIN I Dorm Club ' ' a Cleone ................................................ Mathematics i m, 3, AD Emerald Staff; German Club. g DOROTHY SCHOOLCRAFT . A. A. A. . Bend ......................................... English Literature - f3 g 3N M 54 JOHN W. SHATTUCK tID. P. A. Portland ................................................ Economics She Stoops to Conquer. ' PANSY SHAVER A. A. A. Portland ...................................................... German 2 Vice President Class; M, 3 Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; 4 Class Secretary; Dramatic Club; Tennis Club; Scroll and Script. ERNEST J. SMITH Acacia Medford ...................................................... Zoology 4 President Tennis Club. J AVINA STANFIELD F. C13. B. Pendlefon ................................ English Literature Cb Class Secretary. MATTHEW M. STASNEY Dorm Club J efferson ....................................................... History Oregon Club; Laurean; She Stoops to Con- quer. HARRY M. STINE B. G9. II. Monmouth .................................................. History 2 Captain Basketball; Q, 30 Captaln Ten- nis; 3 Manager Glee Club. WILLIAM E. ST. JOHN Oregon Club Eugene ...................................................... Rhetoric u, 2, 30 Laurean; GB Vice President Laurean; Junior Orations. .1:- unit. 4 h 1 RAYMOND B. THOMAS A. 2. Ashland .................................... Civil Engineering 3 Vice President Engineering Club. ; A . 2 ,mfmmw. n:nu-umihnuau. J; REX A. TURNER A. T. 9. Salem ....................................................... Economics 0 Class Treasurer; Q90 Treasurer Lau- rean; Assistant Manager Oregana; 00 Y. M. C. A.; She Stoops to Con- quer. IDA TURNEY Hawley, Mo., ............................................ Rhetoric Entered as Senior from Beldit College. EMMA J. WATERMAN A. A. A. Baker City .......................................... Psychology 3 Manager Womefs Edition Emerald; 8, ID Captain Class Basketball Team; 09 Vice President Canoe Club; Treas- urer and Vice President Eutaxian; Vice President Womews Suffrage As- sociation; She Stoops to Conquer; Y. W. C. A. CLARENCE W. WALLS A. 2. Portland .................................... Civil Engineering 2 Class Treasurer; U, 2, 3, Q Class Track; 00 Treasurer Engineering Club; Y. M. C. A. HAZEL WIGHTMAN .F. A- P- Orchards, Washington, ............................ Biology 3 Vice President Junior Class; Eutax- ian; Dramatic Club. BIRDIE WISE Astoria .............................................. Mathematics Q, 3, AD Co-Ed. Debate; 3 President Eutaxian; Editor Womefs Edition Em- erald; 00 President WomeWs Coun- cil; Secretary Student Body; President Womews Suffrage Association; Sec- retary Scroll and Script; German Club; Dramatic Club. TOM WORD, JR. Q P A. Portland .................................. English Literature 0, 2, m Baseball. HOWARD W. DREW ' A. T. Q. Tillamook ................................ Education ALBERTA CAMPBELL M. 4:. E. Eugene .................... Modern English Literature BENJAMIN CHANDLER 2- N. Marshfield .............................................. Economics Q, 3, In Baseball; M, 2, 3, ADFootball; OD Student Body Executive Commit- tee. RALPH P. NEWLAND 2. X. Palo Alto, California ............ Civil Engineering U, 2, w Baseball; 0, 2, 3, M Tennis; Q, :9 Manager Tennis; GD North- west Tennis Champion; Engineering Club; Friar. JOHN PERRY MCGUIRE Dorm Club Grand Junction, Col. ...... Electrical Engineering Q, 3, 10 Track Team; 2 Cross Coum try Team; 4 Vice President Engin- eering Club; A. I. E. E.; Oregon Club; Y. M. C. A. LA VERNE VAN MARTER Avava Club Portland ...................................................... Zoology U, m Class Football; 0, m Class Bas- ketball; a, 2, 90 Baseball. VJi w 715mm 2 gmtimt 2 3111mm 61 1- Vlilznii-z:uuuintiu-IA-Q..'L.SIL-I 25'.- McMicken Lewis Sluniur ODmera DEAN WALKER ............................................................................. President ELIZABETH LEWIS ............................................................ Vice President ANN McMICKEN .......................................................................... Secretary ERNEST LAMB .............................................................................. Treasurer JUNIOR COMMITTEES CLASS HOURwAlma Noon, Harold Warner, Ralph Cake, Eliz- abeth Lewis. UNDERCLASS MIX Dean Walker, Paul Briedwell, Carlton Spencer. Erwin Rolfe. PAINTING THE 0 -Bur1eigh Cash, Paul Briedwell, William Neill, Karl Martzloff, Carl Grayson, Edward Bailey, Fen Waite, J erry Martin, Henry Bauer. JUNIOR PROM COMMITTEES DECORATION-Lloyd Barzee, Philip Hammond, Elizabeth Busch, Mildred Waite, Reymund Early. REFRESHMENTS--Robert Kuykendall, Ann McMicken, Erwin Rolfe, Elizabeth Wagner. MUSIC Glen Storie, Florence Cleveland, Jerry Martin. FINANCE Ernest Lamb, Abe Blackman. PATRONESSES Pat Cecil, Carlton Spencer, Harold Broughton. PROGRAMS Vernon Vawter, Nell Hemenway, Cecil Miller. o. . m ,. m ,H; iii. . m 4 n 1 1 .l '1 ' . . . ., rr, Kl. .. . . Tn ... . . a r . . .. 4. .4 . . . ,, . .. u" . . ..w .H .. .s. . J .... . . . .m . . . ".4 . , . .1 . . , . u" . . ... .. .... . , .5. . T. ua .. . n . . . , , A . a . a ,u r . .. A LiJunim' igniting SIT. seems to have become a custom here at Oregon for anyone who happened to be writing a history of his class, to become unbearably boastful and to attempt to conceal the fact with a lot of very questionable wit. Such is not the intention of this brief sketch of the more important events in the history of the class of 1913. President Gillis, ill, writing of his class, said: "Our short stay has marked an epoch in the life of the University. We have lived through the days of reformation and seen the glory of the rare old golden days pass by. We have seen the last of hazing and the entrance of brotherly love. We were the last to enjoy the unrestricted privilege of hurling the nzeophytes into the icy waters of the mill race, and we were the first Seniors who tried to make the Freshmen tusy respect our dignity through the salve of soft words and honeyed smiles, instead of Violence and fear? Such was the entrance of the class of 1913. We were the first to suffer under the new regulations, which forbid the dress-suit and demanded the wearing of the freshman badge ethe green cap, besides undergoing the last hazing at Oregon. , Although the floor was sticky and the ink on the pro- grams a trifle fresh, our freshman dance-the flrst, by the way, in the new llem,L-was "some partyfl In our Sophomore year we won the Inter-Class Basket- ball championship of the college in a close and exciting series, besides giving the class of 1914 such -a driibbing in football, as to fill them with a life long appreciation of our prowess. As Juniors we originated the Underclass Mix. It will undoubtedly be made an annual affair, because it proved such a valuable means of arousing class spirit, introducing the freshman to college life and unifying their interests, as well as affording unlimited amusement to all concerned. We feel justified in being proud of having given such a happy and beneficial institution to our college. . While our list of achievements compares favorably with that of any other class, we are not yet satisfied. We are only Juniors and have a whole year-and a big year ahead of us. Next year, when we graduate, we hope to be satisfied. Dean H. Walker. Lucile Abrams Edward Bailey Lloyd Barzee Leona Bish Verena, Black Abe Blackman Florence Bonnell Henry Bauer Hilda Brant Paul Briedwell Harold Broughton Elizabeth Busch Ralph Cake Russel Calkins Dorothy Campbell Raymond Caro i N: R. S, Garrick Gladys Cartwright Burleigh Cash Raymond Caufield Pat Cecil Florence Cleveland Andrew Collier Marjory Cowan Lucile Davis Carin Degermark Walter Dobie Nettie Drew Reymund Early Ruby Edwards Alice Farnsworth Grace Cole . .. t": -. '"tw mm 4 TTF 1 ,. 1 " WW ur-w .. .. .- " 2-" "z 1 1 . f'. .2": 3 .. 1 ..,:. - , f-f- 1' " " ' ' , l' 1 1 I ' i l l I 1 ; i 4 . I l i if i ! I 1 i a 3 ! a 1 a 1 R 1 2 V i I w 1 V l , k. 11 ,1 Edsall Ford Kenneth Frazier Bob Fariss Lida. Garret ;' : Helen George Lillian Gilkey Carl Grayson Lillian Gardner Phil Hammond Lenora Hansen Grace Hartley Nell I-Ilemenway L '3 Walter Hodge Helen Holbrook Vesta. Holt Pearl Horner 66. ' ' 1 ' x . - . . v -- -. . - Q . V x 1 . . . WA , : l - ' - - . "H - - - 1 M - . 1 . 4 a9um4-M.u-- p... - . -. An .. :-. 'r-, .- .44.... .. 5 . kn . m-.. . - .. . m- -1...-. 11 V Ercel Kay Ada Kendall Walter Kimmell Beulah Kinsey Bob Kuykendall C. Kronenberg Ernest Lamb Ruth Lathrop Bess Lewis Ira. Manville Homer Maris Jerry Martin Edgar Martin Karl Martzloff Hazel McKown Walter McClure Edna Messenger Will Neill Clyde Pattee Blanche Powell Kain 'Onthank Esther Maegly C H Myers Pauline Potter Anna McMickin Alma Noon David Pickett Wallace Mount iller Lena Newton Ruth Peter Mary McFarland Cecil M Margaret Powell Lora. Pummill Harold Quigley C. N. Reynolds Eva Roche Mason Roberts Allyn Roberts Erwin Rolfe Agnes Ryder James Ryder Herman Siglin Clifford Simms B. H. Smith Zena. M. Soults Carlton Spencer Ruth Stone Glen Storie Mary Tappenden Herbert VanDyne Vernon Vawter Elizabeth Wagner Mildred Waite Fen Waite Dean Walker Harold Warner Ida. .Warnock Claude Washburne Muriel Watkins Gwyn Watson Thad Wentworth Margaret Whalley Mildred Whittlesey wuw..,., : Wm . ummrx. mm mlh-A-I 1' Clara Wines Mabel Zimmerman Olive Zimmerman Howard Zimmerman Ahhitinnal Eluninrz Maud Nail Helen Ramage Merles Pate Herman Tschanz Grace M. Adamson Anna Sinclair Ruth E. Davis Edith Watt Maud Guthrie Otto Stoerh Bessie Morrison Earl T. Walker Merle Pate : . IJE... n n. .5 i .. . . v - x .. , , . . x . .. Z w , . . .y r .1 .v w?! . .. x . t . l... t x . . 9 . . 3d ah x. T x . .. y .I.,..vu . ..x Ci; vv..afx Xu h I. II V; i: i - 1 I l . .1 . ..n, .. , x In? .f'. l I . .t. I.. . . . .. . . .3 ..:.Lvl..r . 1 .t. . I. l .c .. . .Iput. .n.l .. . I r. . .1. . '11 .l Islsl: tr .5 r .1 I15 : rhr v 11",. .: r-i...r..r. L 1 1.1m. .. H. .. L. GROUP OF SOPHOMORES ON MCCLURE STEPS Ennk 2 $ertinn 3 thvrrlaaamm . "h.'-w;3un-.arw'-.-.q.x.-. .1..i'i ' u: '2' Motschenbacher Grout 5711111111111an Qfoirvra VERNON T. MOTSCHENBACHER ....... . .................................. President JANET YOUN G .................................................................... Vice President RUTH BEACH .............................................................................. Secretary ALVA GROUT ................................................................................ Treasurer SOPHOMORE COMMITTEES SOPHOMORE HOP-Harry, Vierick, Rose Bassler, Essie Car- son, Delbert Stannard, Wallace Benson. CLASS DAY Dona1d Rice, Edna Miller, Lila Sengstake, Olga Poulsen, Peter Crockett. UNDERCLASS MIX Ch ester Huggins, Wallace Benson, Harold Young, Leon Bratag-er, William Cass. 47m, ,$ A mm,,,,.,.,,muumWW Hhummmummmuummm -..... e9 - 11!;9nyiAuI-Iutn. .x II III lII $nphnmnr2 Emma; ning, or more meekly bore the abuse and insults heaped upon them than the Class of 1914. We per. mitted the Sophs to line us up on Kincaid Field, give us a football as a disguiSe and trample us into nothingness. We served as the goats, at smokers and rallies, and When we reSisted, we were properly Iikeyed downii and told that it was a part of our college education? But a common enemy united us, we awoke, bbegan to work and did the deeds which are here briefiy recorded; As Freshmen we invited the O.A.C.IISqua11ersi, to our city and trailed them 1n the dust on the small end of a 26 to 0 score. In the interclass basketball series we defeated every team but the Sophomores. This year we advanced a step and NO class probably ever made a more inauspicious begin- 'WQn the cup Last fall we vanquished the Frosh in football, .29 t0 0, and in the Underclass Mix we again trimmed them by a score of 113 to 48. Our girls have both years won the basketball cup. Our contributions to the Varsity teams and organizations deserve particular mention. In football we have furnished such men as Fenton, Fiswer Bradshaw Jones, Grout, Cobb, Cauheld, Viereck, and Annunson. Two of Oregons cham- pionship basketbayll tossers, Fenton and Bradshaw, come from our ranks. Roberts, Fenton, Houck, Cobb, Anriunson, and Feet, have won their letter in baseball. In track Huggins, McConne11,Br00ks, Grout, Fiser and Miller have done yoe- man service for Oregon. But not alone in athletics have we been prominent. T0 the Glee Club we have furnished such men as Lai,Stannard,F0rtmiller, Lamb,Bratager,Gi1es, Skei Codeen, and Motschenbacher,whi1e in debate both Crockatt and Motschenbacher have won the gold mO. ii Norma Dobie and Lucile Davis, this years coded debaters, are both sophomores. We are proud of our achievements, but not satisfied. We have discovered our abilities: and we know that we shall always be found foremost in every undertaking which means honor for our University and a step towards the realization of a Greater Oregon. e-Vernon T. Motschenbacher. n:nusu-rah-ual. Harvey Taylor J erard EHrwhman 091:5th LELAND S. FINCH ............................................ ...President EDNA HIARVEY ................................... V1ce President GERTRUDE TAYLOR .......................... Secretary BERT JERARD ....................................... . ...... Treasurer FRESHMAN COMMITTEES CLASS HOUR Edward Geary, George Frazier, Hazel Tooze, Samuel Michael, Edna Harvey. FRESHMAN GLEE-Frank Dudley, Morris Hill,.Ruth Dorris, Bryant IgeBar, Mildred Healy, Bert Jerard, Frank Steig'er, Gretchen Sherwoo . CLASS CONSTITUTION-Jaines Donald, Samuel Michael, Gen- evieve Cooper, Leta Mast. William MacNeill. BON-FIRE-Clay Watson, Chairman. , . rmsa WIIEEIQWYV'T 3 "3;? wE'EA": Vi ' pnyJWI-Iz. . :g .. . r. . . n.. .t T u . . . . ; a . ., . . J. 2 aIr-ur-nuan... ,. .. ilirpzhman iEiatnrg J. AST September, of 1911, three hundred and twenty-six 4 would-be college students wended their way to the A stately portals of Villard Hall, entered therein and recorded their names beneath the numerals 1915. With this act, the present Freshman class was brought into exist- enceea class, which prides among its number students from every county in the state and almost every state in the Union, a class whose members, by choice and not by accident, look to Oregon as their Alma Mater. ' As a class, we believe that we have established a record which following freshman classes will be forced to strive to their utmost to surpass. We placed our numerals on Skin- ner,s Butte and we most humbly displaced them; we sent forth a fearless football team to do battle with the Sopho- mores; our quintette of clever basketball players won second place in the interclass series; we were trampled upon in the push ball contest; ten wearers of the green cap were unmerci- fully dragged through the duck pond; our bonfire was the largest ever; the 1915 relay team won by a big margin, and the Freshman Glee was a grand success. As individuals we believe that we have made good. We have representatives on the iVarsity in football and basket- ball. Early in the season Coach Warner picked Virgil Noland and Bill Heusner to till important positions on the first eleven, and Don Rader has proved himself the cleverest first year man who ever wore the stripes for Oregon. We have the material with which Bill Hayward expects to build his future track teams. We have been represented in debate and ora- tory. The bright smiling faces of the Freshman girls have brought joy to many a lonesome heart and awakened several of the upper-classman to the fact that they are alive. Now, as the first year of our college work is about to come to a close, a feeling of joy and one of sadness comes over us :9joy that the entire year has been such a happy and successful one, filled with incidents which shall always be re- membered with pleasure; sadness that the best days of our college career have passed so rapidly. As Freshman we have solemnly pledged ourselves to love, honor, and respect the name Oregon. The spirit of our Alma Mater has grasped us, heart and soul and whatever we may accomplish in this life, we hope that it shall be for the good of Oregon-a Greater Oregon. Leland S. Finch. WWW K W WW- x xx W xwaWWyW$W .n " , , a a Rm WWWWm , . W xX W W, FROSH AND THEIR GUARDIANS Hirgil ananh Earn Eervmhvr 22. 13911. at Aatnria, 091?an Etch Nnnvmher, 1911. at Eugene, thwart Virgil Noland was the only son of Judge George -Noland., of Klamath Falls, Oregon, who is a graduate of the University of Oregon of the class of 1880. He did preparatory work in . Shattuck Military Academy of Mis- souri, Boone Preparatory School of California, and Portland Academy, graduating from the later institution in June, 1910. He enrolled in the present Freshman Class here last September. Noland was a young man of excep- tional qualities, and in the brief time he was with us, won an enviable place in the esteem of his fellow- M students and the University faculty. He was a member of the Sigma Nui t Fraternity. He was not only a good student, but by hard and consistant work he won a place at left guard on the Varsity football team and played that position in the games against the Vancouver Barracks, Washington State College, Whitman, and the Uni- versity of Washington. Virgil Noland has departed from this life forever, and we can do naught but honor his memory. In doing this, we remember him a man among men, and as a man he made good. eLeland S. Finch. 1., w: Mumfih ?.r. .1 Bf 1... ,. 1.3.1.1: .112. u-w '5 m m "WM"- WW" inwm hf. H. .r 33.7 ,..r x . 11.7??1fvrfn3 CAMPUS LOOKING NORTH FROM DEADY HALL .. 1.1 .-' Ennk a gutinn 4 71.121111 Svdjml - :a- A A hum V... - 4. n. 13 3n n :3 .JL. n n n u M I ' ii. 81 1::uuumn.u.-.-..;h :u-.:-.r:;;.-;.'...;i.-.:n 3 CALVIN U. GANTENBEIN, LL; Dean of Law School. Judge Circuit Court Mplt- nomah County. Crimlnal Law and Evidence. WILLIAM B. GILBERT, LL. Judge United Starttes Dis- trict Court. Lecturer 0n Constitu- tional Law. CHARLES E. WOLVERTON, A. B., LL. D. Judge United States District Court. Lecturer on Federal Procedure. 32 -..I.LL;L...:Y.L.. -.. -- r- .T. wl-aum . . ,. . u ,,,..,,. .1!qu JOHN B. CLELAND, LL. B. Formerly Judge of Circuit Court, Mult- nomah County. Lecturer on Sales and Torts. HENRY H. NORTHRUP, LL. B. Formerly Judge of Multnomah County. Lecturer on Pleading, Practice and Probate Law. ROBERT G. MORROW, Ph. B. Judge Circuit Court Multtnomah County. Lecturer on Brief Making and Su- preme Court Practice. THOMAS O1DAY, LL. B. 1' 1 Formerly Judge Circuit Court Multno- J mah County. i '. Bailments and Carriers. 1. 5 z 1 ' 1 1 1'; g 1 1 1 EARL C. BRONAUGI-I, A. M., LL. B. 1 1 Formerly Judge Circuit Court Multno- 1 2 mah County. E , 1 Domestic Relations. 1' w 5. 1 1; . 1 . l 1 r 1;: . f: 1 1 11m 1 111 ARTHUR L. VEAZIE, A. M., LL. B. 1 T31 1 .1 of lthe Oregon Bar. . .15; 1 J :M Real Property. 'Q 1 1 . 1 1 J i:' 1,; 111 :- 1 g. 11s .. a e1 33' 1 . 1 l s .' .1 I 1 ., 1 1 ' . 1 1 ' 84 5 LI 1 x 1 F 'J'J- . u; :qusnnuau-uu... u mS-u RICHARD W. MONTAGUE, Ph. B., LL. B., of the Oregon Bar. Equiity. BENJAMIN B. BEEKMAN, A. B., LL. B., of the Oregon Bar. Agency. OTTO J. KREAMER, LL. B. Formerly Justice of the Peace for Port- land District. Justicds Court Practice. 3.; .. 1:: 4: WALTER H. EVANS, B. s., LL. B. Assistant United States Attorney. Contracts and Bills and Notes. CLYDE B. AITCHISON, B. S., of the Oregon Bar. WaJter Rights. T. WALTER GILLARD Secretary. 31! 71.151111 $7th111 9372mm BEATRICE M. BUTLER, A. B. iiPlase aux dames." The first learned brother is a sister. Oh! Beatrice, this is Leap Year, and we iitremble at your power? Success to you, Beatrice, may all of your objections be sustained and none of your exceptions over-ruledJ JAMES R. BAIN Of iibuzz saWu fame, Who has always remained faithful to those ideas con- tracted in his early youth. Class Pres- ident. Debate 12. Founder of our moot court. iiHark to this triton of the min- nowsfi J. H. BARBOUR Immigration oiiicer. The howing bowl- er. uIf you wish to appear agreeable in society, you must consent to be taught many things Which you know al- ready? JOHN L. BOZARTH Whose admittance t0 the Oregon bar in his junior year places his case "Res Adjudicafi From Seattle, but without malice aforethought. - 5.!q'uvr'tuiuuaa. ' x5; .x: mam FAY L. BROWN KID. A. A. From the wind-swept prairie of Illi- nois. Brown could bluff St. Peter into admitting him, so why fear he the bar exams? , l DANIEL D. BUMP, A. B. It will take the expert testimony of a phrenologist to read this bump. A. M. BURTON "I wonder What the fellow would have said if he had ever had the luck to see a lion!" EDWARD J . CHAPMAN Q. A. A. Who plays pilot fish to Brownls shark. Ii 1: II A $iv.- HARRY E. COLEMAN, B. S. D. hWell, Judge, the way I understood the text was this." We do not know what the D. stands for. HERBERT A. COOKE Class fusser 10, ,11, 12. Though not yet admitted, has been prominent in many cases. tharewell, quoth she, and come again tomorrow? EUGENE A. DUEBER The Silent Sister. ROSS FARNUM Whose ambition was to sit as a juror on the moot coUrt when Hogan had a case. hCommon error sometimes passes current as law? PAUL C. FISCHER The Abraham Lincoln of our class. ttThe greatest truths are the simplest, and so are the greatest men." VALENTINE A. FRYER Oh! If we all had the school spirit like Val. T. WALTER GILLARD All the way from Liverpool Without Liz. The milk-chocolate soldier of the Boy Scouts. ttI think the boy hath grace in him; he blushes." JOSEPH L. GOULD Not the author of our text on plead- ing, who came all the way from Austria to aid in the keeping of the peace in our village. How Joseph got by the aforesaid Barbour, no one Will ever know. CHRISTOPHER J. HAYES His ambition is to be sporting editor on the Deutsche Zeilttung. KARL HERBRING ttOh! Hets little, but hes wise. Hlets a terror for his size? With Hayes for a partner, and with Deutcher Advocat on his door, will corral all the business from the Kingdom of the Kaiser. C. F. HOGAN dD. A. tIJ. Student Body Treasurer, ,11, ,12. De- beaten team, ,11. Debate, 12. The class goat. ttI once heard an Irishman say, Every man loves his native land, whether he was born there or noti" WM. M. HUDSON He invariably got the Prof. to answer his own question. FRANK C. HUNT Q. A. A. Spit-ball pitcher of the class nine. JAMES B. KILLOUGH CID. A. A. The best thing about him is that no one knows anything about him. This is strong character evidence. FRANK LAYMAN, A. B., A. M., Harv; ttKnowledge is proud he has learned so much, Wisdom is humble that he knows no more." J . MICHAEL McNULTY Government nautical expert. His spe- cialty is criminal law, being a naughty,cl expert. r A PAUL MAHONEY Paulls strength, like Samsonls, seems to lie in his hair. Class musician. "If music be the food of love, play on." DAVID N. MACKAY, L. A., Edin. ltThe real Mackay, sporran and kilt, and ,al an, lat." MARIO G. MONTREZZA A Turkish delight. I live Hfor all the duties that I owe to Rome." WM. A. MORREY Lord Chesterfield had nothing over this man. AENEAS MACKENZIE Member of Detbeaten team. tll. A loyal subject of the king, God bless CU him. "Ant we learned about wimen from timy ROBT. N. MUNLY ttOh! Robert, how long will you con- tinue to abuse our patience?" G. M. PARKER ttWho to himself is law no law doth need, Offends no law and is a king indeed? EVERETT PECHIN Another guardian of the public weal. q .do not think I exaggerate the impor- tance of the charms of pedestrianism? mailed- CLEMER W. PLATT CID. A. A. "A man who lives right and is right has more power by his silence than an- other has by his words." F. M. PHELPS ttTo chase monotony, he exercises of hls brain; that IS, assumlng he,s got any? WM. WALLACE ROBBINS ttAnd grant that they be handsomer in face, Whatts that per se?" GEO. M. SCHAEFER Holds with Cook the title of Class Fusser. ttThou, Julia, thou hast metamorphostd me:a Made me neglect my studies, lose my time? JESSE K. SCOTT mThe princes differ and divide; Some follow law and some With beauty side." WM. J. STAPLES "God bless the man who invented sleep." CHAS. D. TAEKEOKA We shall all remember Charles by his favorite expression, hWhafs the question, please ? " ERIJO U0 The cool, calcu-lating, quiet, but bril- liant, son of the Mikado. d :4 ul ! ,I A uh BEN F. WAGNER: A. B. '11. A. CD. Student Body President, ,11, ,12. Member of Ddbeaten team, ,11. uFor you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you." KANAME WAKASUGA yHe was a scholar, and a ripe and a good one." WM. H. WITT ' cL. A. qs. I. Good health. II. Two to three hundred a year. III. 0 du lieber Gott! FriendsoAmen. BERT YATES Q. A. A.' The world turns aside to let anyman pass who knows where he is going." - ' - I l I .,,...,,.,,. : mm , Arum. ' o . H II gg W 97 .-.-..n..a. I-ah Soren Alexander OtBrien 3111mm OPmtma FRED M. SUREN ........... Vice President JAMES F. ALEXANDER ............... . ............................................... Secretary LOUIS T. OtBIEN ............................................................................. Treasurer CLASS REPRESENTATIVEeWilliam H. Sibbald. BANQUET COMMITTEEJohn G. Schroeder, Jr., William H; Sibbald, and George A. Cobb. Junior activities lose a considerable part of their zest, ear- nlestnesstand strenuosity when you transfer them from the campus to a night school in a large city, where you meet thrice a week, and then only for an hour at a time. No chance to get acquainted like in the "good old college days," no HJunior Proms? no ttJunior 'Week-Endsft no "Skips? no hilarious good times, no moonlight perambulations amid the hallowed associations of the good old Alma Mater; only the cold and cheerless atmosphere of a class-room in a metro- politan building to greet you. Oh Fudge! Whatts the use of comparison? Might just as well compare a buttermilk shake to a gin fizz, or the cold grey dawn of an early mornt with the glorious rising of the morning sun. Most of us ttLawsh are actively engaged in the worldts busy affairs and our association with a night school law de- partment comes at the close of a strenuous day When our energies are pretty well dissipated. So it can be seen that but little opportunity affords itself for extraneous activities. We content ourselves in the memory of "by-gone daystt and try h-.' . ..,- qeg....-.,'n.. - -----, .-... .,......,. u . t-.. In n'am...op.a.a... 7.. . 't II 1.1 Ill II III III .3 :5! EH , 1 II! ' U be- to find what joy is left in some frigid and pulseless treatise on Real Property, Torts, Negotiable Instruments, Equity and Corporations. We do have a smoker now and then and this year the Junior joys will be supplemented by a banquet t0 the seniors, 21 new step, but a good one in the right direction. May none of us ever forget the glorious daysb of yore, for remember, it is a far cry from a university campus to a law ; night school. eJames A. Alexander. i '2 I f I 1 2 am, i: Robinson . Condon Smith ilirwhman 0115155 Qfoirerz CHARLES F. ROBINSON ...... President : CLIFTON F. CONDON .......................................................... V1ce Pre51dent 3 SETH L. SMITH .............................................................................. Treasurer CLASS REPRESENTATIVE-John W. Peters. . p ....-...........;.,AJ..A, i "s: -;-,M?- Wagner Whitney McClure Hogan S71uhpnt 181mg twffirvrz BENJAMIN F. WAGNER .............................................................. President EDWIN F. WHITNEY ........................................................... Vice President FRANK E. McCLURE .................................................................. Secretary C. FRANCIS HOGAN ...................................................................... Treasurer In the early part of October, 1910, in keeping with an an- cient, if not honorable custom, the 01d students of the Law Department assembled the Freshmen, in a hall rented for the purpose, to instruct them in the practice of parlor house hazing. When the rough work was over, and the Freshmen, in order to forget their stings and ailments, were lighting their pipes or partaking of other refreshments arranged for the occasion, soeeches were in order. It was during these speeches that the student leaders came to the conclusion that it was folly to get together but once a year. They expressed their senti- ments to the assembly. Every person seemed to be of the same mind. As a result, the Associated Students was formed. Two years have not elapsed since then, but great good has resulted to both the students and the school. On the second Friday of each month a regular meeting is held Within one of the recitation rooms or in a hall rented for the occa- sion. In the early part of the year these meetings are chiefiy smokers, where the new and old men mingle, get acquainted, u..-.........,.k.....,,..h;. ' .1... 7 .. . .. , t .5 .. . - . . t, i ? when." th ?IN wrw and have a good time in general. Then the students get down to work. Debates are held, prominent men are called to ad- dress them, and a touch of the deeper college spirit is shown. It was these meetings that worked up enough interest to get the Faculty to give us a HMoot Courtf, to be held each week. Here the student gets the practical work with his theory. On the night before the Oregon-Washington game, the law students started what promises to be a custom. A smoker was given to the other departments of the University. All. departments were well represented by both alumni and stu- dents. Many speeches were made by men now prominent in their professions. What an enjoyemnent to hear these speeches and know the llOregon Spirit,, never dies; and 'what an effect on the underclassmen to know that the alumni never forget Oregon and are always willing to come out, mingle with and teach them that that spirit they acquired in the days gone by is still with them. From the success of this meeting, the Law Department will always give a big smoker and rally the night before the annual game in Portland. Being a night school, with all its students working in the day time, the Law Department has never turned to athletics, but has used its energy in pulling for the teams from Eugene. Could the students from Oregon proper step in at one of our meetings some night and see the spirit shown by our llnight school? they could probably appreciate the work the law students are doing to build up an important branch of the University of Oregon. We have no ambition to be re- moved to Eugene; we wish to stay in Portland, where condi- tions better fit us. and here we are trying to build a law school that will be a credit to any university. BEN F. WAGNER. 101 Robinson Hogan O,Brien Bain Peters Singletary Williams Ephating EphateEtaff LOUIS T. OtBRIEN .............................................................. Debate Manager CHARLES F. ROBINSON, Leader; C. FRANK HOGAN ............ .................................. ,..............................Debaters against Washington JAMES R. BAIN, Leader; JOHN W. PETERS, WILLIAM R. SINGLETARY ...................................... Debaters against Willamette JOHN D. WILLIAMS ....................................................................... Alternate The University of Oregon, during the year, will meet Willamette at Portland and the University of Washington at Seattle, the latter contest ' being in the International Debating Deague. The winner of the last named debate will meet the winner of the Victoria-Vancouver Debate and con- test for the championship shield of Canada. The subject of the debate at Portland and Seattle will be the ttJudicial Recall? eJames F. Alexander. u-o-u-..-..4.u.-.-...-::. :We-tmLM-su I .. . N1" I-V;.--.:.w.' u i, .,.,; A M .--A -m' Smtinn E 103 l l. '1' . 'il' ill. $3 .' 1' '!' sgl 1 ...1' 1.1!!!! S. E. JOSEPHI. M. D. DEAN OF COLLEGE OF MEDICINE LV le1 t w llr r1I v .lisxvlr' V ..l IIHI g?thnnl nf mphirinp ZHamltg P. L. CAMPBELL, A. B. President of the University. HENRY E. JONES, M. D., Emeritus Professor of Clinical Gyne- cology. WILLIAM JONES, M. D., Emeritus Professor of Cliinical Surgery. GEO. MILTON WELLS, M. D., Emeritus Professor of Pediatrics. ANDREW JACKSON GIESY, M. D., Emeritus Professor of Gyne- cology. SIMEON EDWARD JOSEPHI, M. D., Dean of the Faculty; Professor of Obstetrics and Nervous Diseases. OTTO SALY BINSWANGER, Ph. D., M. D., Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology. , KENNETH ALEXANDER J. MACKENZIE, M. D., C. M., L. R. C. P. and L. R. C. S., Edin., Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery. RICHARD NUNN, A. B., B. Ch., M. D., Professor of Diseases of Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat. JAMES FRANCIS BELL, M. D., L. R. C. P., London, Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine. GEORGE FLANDERS WILSON, M. D., Professor of Principles and Practice of Surgery and Cliniical Surgery. ERNEST FANNING TUCKER, A. B., M. D., Professor of Gynecology. EDMOND JOHN LABBE, M. D., Professor of Ptgdiatrics. GEORGE BURNSIDE STORY, M. D., Adjunct Professor of Ob- stretrics. ALBERT EDWARD MACKAY, M. D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. JAMES CULLEN ZAN, M. D., Professor of Materia Medica and Th-erepeutics. ROBERT CLARK YENNEY, M. D., Professor of Pathology. DAVID NATHANIEL ROBERG, M. D., Professor of Histologyland Pathology. JOHN DICE MACLAREN, M. S., M. D., Professor of Physiology. R. B. DILLEHUNT, M. D., Professor of Anatomy. F. C. McLEAN, M. D., Professor of Materia Medica and Pharmo- cology. 105 Vania um ' ma III II III II II ill II III ill II II: ll: 3 i Svdinnl nf mrhirinp Situated in Portland, so far from the mother school, the Medical Department enjoys little of .the college life so dear to a student of the University. There is no strolling on the campus down tiHello Lane? or quiet paddling on the tiMill Race," to break the mOnotony of a days classes. The upper- classman spend the few minutes between periods in a hurried walk from the college building to one of the hospitals to attend a clinic, and then as hurriedly rush back to college for a lecture or quizz. . The lower classmen, alas, have not even this small respite from their grind, but from eight in the morning till six in the afternoon, they endeavor to solve the mysteries of the human body, either in the lecture hall, or in the laboratory, industriously modeling the bones of the body, or carefully tracing an artery in its many ramifications. Since last year, two professors have been added to the faculty, one in anatomy and allied subjects, the other in mate- ria- medica and pharmacology, thus making four instructors who devote their entire time to their respective branches. The instruction of the freshmen and sophomores is practically in the hands of these four professors, thus insuring them a solid foundation for the junior and senior subjects taught by lectures and clinics from practicing physicians and surgeons of the city. 'The custom of conferring the degree in Portland has been abolished and the present medical seniors will be the first class to receive their degrees at the University at Eugene, at the regular University Commencement exercises. At hrst this new order of things was looked upon with great disfavor, but the feeling is gradually growing in the Student Body that this will bring about closer and better relationship between the various departments, which in the past has been sadly lacking. eEdward A. Noyes. 106 "staxi '3' --- f... K gaminm, mrhiml $rhnnl EARL BRUCE BROOKBANK qa. M. A. E. Ph. G. University of Indiana. President Student Body, 1911-12. Interne Good Samaritan Hospital, Port- land, for 1912-13. 1. E. BARRETT Masonic Medical Studentfs Fraternity. Ph. G., O. A. C. Vice President Student Body, 1910-11. Interne Good Samaritan Hospital for 1912-13. WILLIS D. BUTLER Masonic Medical Studentls Fraternity. Vice President Senior Class. LLOYD W. BROOKE A. K. K. Secretary and Treasurer Student Body, 1910-11. Secretary and Treasurer Class, 1910-11. VT . , 1 . n FREDERICK R. HUNTER B. S., Quleen1s University, Kingston. Interne Good Samaritan Hospital for 1912-13. CHARLES LOEDING St. Vincentfs College, Chicago. Secretary Senior Class. Interne Good Samaritan Hospital for 1912-13. GEORGE E. MURPHY, Ph. G. Masonic Medical Studen'ds Fraternity. President Senior Class. ARTHUR C. McCOWN A. K. K. Class President, 1910-11. Appointed Interne to St. Vincent1s Hos- pital, Portland, for 1912-13. 108 ....h...v..,....... 1.. . K -1. .. 1 - :1 I:5--w-..a......w-..A.Ls..". t'Z-Hi': A. ., ' .. .u 1 .-..-..';.,.....-' T 'vmuw- . .. . 9 'I'AI-u..hl- 1m T tiff u" ' ALLEN P. NOYES A. K. K. Vice President Class, 1910-11. Appointed Interne to St. Vincent1s Hos- pital, Portland, for 1912-13. LAFE O. ROBERTS A. K. K. Appointed Interne to St. Vincenfis Hos- pital, Portland, for 1912-13. CLARENCE W. ROSS, A. B. A. K. K. A. B... Universimy of Oregon, 1907. Class President, 1909-10. L. S. ROACH Masonic Medical Studentfs Fraternity. Valedictorian Senior Class. Interneship Good Samaritan Hospital, Portland, for 1912-13. THOMAS H. B. RUNNALLS Class Historian. Appointed Interne Good Samaritan Hos- pita'l. WILLIAM T. STOUT, B. S. A. K. K. B. S., McMinnville College, 1908. Interneshrivp Good Samaritan Hospital for 1912-13. STANLEY S. WANG A. K- K- President Class, 1908-09. ARTHUR E. YOUNNIE, B. S. A. K. K. Class Treasurer, 1909-10-11. Appointed Interne to St. Vincent1s Hos- pital, Portland, for 1912-13. - -1-......-.-:-----1-........;-..a...;:;.: 1.1:1'-.:....'g.'.111:;;1"0," ,. mmnnm m?:'- --.' IJIIIJ' IIII .; . .4 ., .V gn x - , SOME JUNIOR MEDICS as seen by Cartoonist VanCleve 111 III iii -----'---I.-,- :- um 1:13 Iowa 8g . RCT' s q; a 19.1";er gasV' NWNF A few Juniors in Action, as 112 .. qnmngv-a-unans w 1. d. ON 0;; 3 g a Ennk 3 Svprtinn 1 57tuhmt Artiuitiw , k , - .. 1' u W- n u, . a . avg . , .. , . - '- ' ' "1- ., --y ; - -3 '. c ,A 7W4 r F 'V'?! '." " "r , "W "1'" m"- 'nr 1. , mu .. n " 'wd .-.. vlgh .1 "1 ...... aw n"? .- r 1' .'.. -.. - . - .- : x . ' . . " ,.., . ' - .-.. "a ' .. -m .1. .an ,. n. , A. n , ,m, .- K W. . -,,,. . ,- ..,..,. .. . . ,. ,MM .. a 7 1; w ;, m mm A yM6MWQWKo . " J- -A' ia I mm Hemenway ' Roberts Shantin N Fowler Watson ' 114 , ., V .W . J W$H9H'...g-mn 09wan Emeralh g?tat' iHirat Swnwater Editor-in-Chief .................................................... R. BURNS POWELL, :12 Managing Editor ........................................................ A. E. HOUSTON, ,12 News Editor .............................................................. HENRY FOWLER, '14 City Editor .......................................................................... FEN WAITE, ,13 Assistants;- NELLVE HEMENWAY, :13; HAROLD YOUNG, ,14. Associate Editors- Exchange .................................................. GEORGE SHANTIN, ,12 Sporting ...................................................... MASON ROBERTS, ,13 Society ...................................................... ELIZABETH LEWIS, ,13 Humorous ....................................................... WILLIAM CASSL ,14 Reporters EDWARD HIMES, ,12; HOWARD ZIMMERMAN. ,13; WAL- TER KIMMELL. ,13; ANNA McMICKEN, ,13; ELIZABETH 5USCH, ,13; WILLIAM McALLEN, :14; COLTON MEEK, e14, FLORA DUNHAM, ,14; BESS COWDEN, ,14; LTLA SENG- STAKE, ,14; LELAND HENDRICKS, ,15; JESSUP STRANG, s15;'LAURENCE DINEEN, ,15; CARLYLE GEISLER, ,15; LUTON ACKERSON, ,15. Business Manager ........................................................ A. F. ROBERTS, ,13 Advertising .................................................................. WALTER L. DOBIE Circulation .............................. CLAY WATSON, '15 $mff $Prnnh $rmwtvr Editor-in-Chief .................................................... R. BURNS POWELL, ,12 Managing Editor .......................................................... A. E. HOUSTON, :12 News Edltor ........................ HENRY FOWLER, ,14 City Editor .................................................... s ...................... FEN WAITE, ,13 Assistants- NELLIE HEMENWAY, ,13; HAROLD YOUNG, ,14; COLTON MEEK, ,14. Associate Editorse Exchange ............................................... GEORGE SHANTIN, ,12 Sporting .................................................... MASON ROBERTS, ,13 Society .................................................. ELIZABETH LEWIS, ,13 Humorous ....................... . ............................... WILLIAM CASS, ,14 Reporterse EDWARD HTMES. ,12; HOWARD ZIMMERMAN. ,13; WAL- TER KTMMELL. ,13; ANNA McMICKEN, ,13: ELIZABETH BUSCH. ,13: WTLLTAM McALLEN, ,14; FLORA DUNH-AM, ,14: BESS COWDEN. ,14: LILA SENGSTAKE. ,14: LELAND HENDRICKS. '15: JESSUP STRANG, ,15: CARLYLE GEIS- LER, ,15: LUTON ACKERSON. ,15; OTTO J. HEIDER, ,14; DAL KING, ,14; ROBERT FARTSS. U3. Business Manager ...................................... WENDELL C. BARBOUR, ,12 Advertising Manager ........................................................ JOHN G. KELLY Assistant Advertising Manager ................................ ROBERT M. WRAY Circulation .................................................................... CLAY WATSON, ,15 115 Degermark Dunham - Payton Cass Presser . Huggins Jones Vlereck Bratager .- HIHEI'COM n. ' '. ' ' -' . N i, ' '- ......., n.... . k,.,-.L.i:.........x2;mh:u amt 3hr Gprtgnn mhnthlg Snuff ZHirat Swmwter Editor-in-Chief ........................................ MISS CARIN H. DEGERMARK Assistant Editor .................................................. MISS JESSIE PROSSER Assistant Editor .................................................. MISS FLORA DUNHAM Assistant Editor ............................................................ MISS JANE KNOX Poetry ........................................................................ MISS ALMA PAYTON Special .............................................................................. WALTER BAILEY Whoss Who ...................................................................................... WM. CASS Art .................................................................................... HARRY VIERECK Engineering ............................................................................ EARL JONES Business Manager ............................................................ LEIGH HUGGINS Assistant Manager ........................................................ LEON BRATAGER gruff $ernnh $meter Edirtor-in-Chief ........................................ MISS CARIN H. DEGERMARK Assistant Editor .................................................. MISS JESSIE PROSSER Assistant Editor .................................................. MISS FLORA DUNHAM Assistant Editor ............................................................ MISS JANE KNOX Assistant Editor ...................................................... MISS ALMA PAYTON Poetry ............................................................................ TOM M. WORD, JR. Art ...................................................................................... OSCAR HAUGEN Whoss Who. .................................................................................... WM. CASS Engineering ............................................................................ EARL JONES Business Manager ............................................................ LEIGH HUGGINS Assistant Manager ........................................................ LEON BRATAGER Exchanges .................................................... MISS MARGUERITE RHOSE , a a I ammgjg -,- . u...- 117 .nv. .-......-..; aabd w on . , E a Hx e .u 1 H. A f f m. r x. r. e .y. c .M n. w .m . M D x. m S a k, . H . v 8 1 1 ... u ,f. .N .. r u. .n e n d M e u o w r T. h K n r c m; eWS w v hl . . .o 1.1 n .4 0a , .17 . CB .. w. . M. ,.., n . u .7." y . m. M kamu. . . nwo V ., anm. 3 het .1 t r m? . 1.4" HM 4m , P A... 1 a V M M. . ...u, 1313 ODrPgana Enarh KARL W. ONTHANK .......................................................................... Editor ANDREW M. COLLIER .................................................................. Manager Aannriniw ELIZABETH LEWIS .................. Organizations FEN WAITE .................................................................................... Athletics LLOYD BARZEE ............................................................................ Features LUCILE ABRAMS .................................................................................... Art NELL HEMENWAY ................................................................ Fraternities JAMES F. ALEXANDER .......................................................... Law School EDWARD A. NOYES .................................................... School of Medicine EDWARD BAILEY .............................................................. Administration CARLTON SPENCER .................................................................. Forensics C. F. HOGAN ............................................................................... Seniors Law JOHN SCHROEDER .................................................... . ............ Faculty Law KARL MARTZLOFF .................................................... Assistant Manager REYMUND EARLY .................................................... Assistant Manager Art Staff HARRY VIERECK, HOMER WHEELON, OSCAR HAUGEN, THORNTON HOWARD, ARCH VAN CLEVE 119 . , VI l l .'-x xk : 'rh . nu 1 rJ. X I . . . . . V l; V h' 4 ' '1 . .; - : .l. 7., . . . ; .. n7' 1 . . f . I 'i .1 ? ,1 .. . , . x , . v w I i L. Egg x V I :5. l. -. . 3 . Ls ., : f, .- :: i; f: i: TRIANGULAR MEET , V ' : " t 7- I IfWMW-r-e- , vj-a'rin-t- . .., I..- V, ' K J. Earl Jones F, E. Dunton Edward Bai-ley Gnmmittve IIII GBratnrg anh Ephate wmrvovwv-W m .117, m P. C. Crockett J. Earl Jones GBrPgnn-latah Ethan Eugene, Oregon, February 23, 1912. 11Resolved, That judges should be subject to popular recall. Con- stitutionality waived? Decisi0n Utah 2; Oregon 1. 122 ....., 1.......,.,. 1. : .g;;::1......1-1..V...'-4.--.1..'...;' ??vhnhvfk Jun... 'Iftii'iiitn S ?.?l' WIN'flt'af-Of'nig JMNQ 691?an 0111-1621 Erhatmi LUCILE DAVIS NORMA DOBIE MARJORY COWAN To meet University of Washington co-eds May 3, 1912, at Seattle. Question: 2Resolved: That the various states should adopt Woman,s Suffrage." twratnrg mth Ethan at 0911411121 In order to secure the greatest result in the way of renewed effort, a series of victories should be interspersed at rare intervals with defeat. This is why the next few years are certain to be fruitful in forensic victories for Oregon. During the year 1909-10, Oregon won three unanimous decisions in debate against Utah, Washington and Idaho. In 1910 Washington and Stanford were beaten with unan- imous decisions, and only by a two to one decision did Utah finally score victory. However, it is only natural that such a series of forensic triumphs could not continue, and the season of 1911-12 has brought us three bitter defeats. Adopting a new system of exten- sive rather than intensive development of men, three teams were chosen. A question upon which strong sectional opinions had been formed, together with an unusually strong opposition, left Oregon without a victory in her three contests. Debating interest is now centered upon Oregonls co-ed debaters, who will oppose the woman,s suffrage measure against the University of Washington on May 3rd. In the year 1909-10 the Oregon girls lost in a two to one decision to Washington, but the following year Oregon carried away a unanimous decision. This year's debate vm'll be the determining event, and it is upon this we rely for the retrieving of our lost glory. Recent oratorical history is merely a chronicle of victories. In 1909-10 Oregon won second place in both the inter-collegiate and the inter-state contests, but in 1910-11 both these events were captured with first place. This year the inter-collegiate contest has already been added to Oregon,s laurels, and the inter-state contest is yet to take place at Missoula, Montana. on May 24th. ' Besides the contests mentioned, the University has her annual J un- ior Orations, and during Commencement week the Failing and Beek- man contest open only to Seniors, and carrying prizes of one hundred fifty and one hundred dollars. In no other activity is real Oregon spirit better demonstrated than in forensics and oratory. The number who enter the prelimina- ries, the staunch supporters, the encouragement and backing of the student body, and the untiring work of cOaches and participants, insures Oregonls high status along these lines in the years to come. eCarlton E. Spencer. 123 - mm"; -2....A. Spencer tun Ekhatp N. C. 1912 1912 March 29 , i 1113 o 9 2 h C r a M gtanfnrh Ephate gene, Seattle, Eu GBrpgnn-IHHaah David Pickett 1 ODrPgnn Ralph Moores Enterrnllpgiatp Gpratnriral Olnntpat Held at Paciiic University, Forest Grove, Oregon, March 8, 1912. University of Oregon, David Pickett, 11The Modern Par- adrOX.,, Oregon State Normal School, Miss Loraine Johnson, ttThe Cry of the Children? Pacific College, Miss Lucile Davzis, 11Mission of Amer- ica." Albany College, Leslie A. La- cey, uThe Mormon Menace? McMinnville College, Raymond B. Culver, 11N eW Statesman? Pacific University, Marion Tay- lor, "Our Nation of Is to Be." Oregon Agricultural Oollege, H. C. Huetzel, "Duty of the Industrial College Student." Willamette University, Harry 1 G. McCain, ttIdeals 0f Citi- max, zenship. . . Eirst place won by David Pickdtt, Dawd Plekett University of Oregon. Elntvratate QDratnriml Olnntwt To be held at the University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, May 24, 1912. University of Oregon. University of Washington. University of Montana. University of Oregon to be repre- sented by Carlton E. Spencer. Oration. 11Our Broken-down Le- gal Machinery." Carlton Spencer MC? . . . V . . . . ... , , . u m.hwwr.p..m,.u...,.u.svrw:..z ..u.,2.A........,.. n 0 .m r r o M .m k S 1 d r w e 0 h M c PMM e mG h C S t r 0 mM W a V d m m r a m M J e .1 r 0 t S r Mm .1 m m G n 0 F e f 1 0 R m d w g1 dO.m.c m u n Q n a t S n U m n 0 e M x u m .w n m r e h m r F mm s m m m G B g .m D r mm b m . o r D F . . 4. lltnuuti. ,7..Lu.y1uwi a...vquTLYpLthfnnx mum?! . v , J.thnerflf lim- :MJHIMZII Al Cecil Powell Geisler $1122 Olluh Qthirera R. BURNS POWELL ............................................................................ Leader RAPHAEL GEISLER .......................................................... President JAMES C. CECIL ............................................................................... Manager First Tenor First Bass Burns Powell Homer Maris Vernon Motschenbacher Raphael Geisler Glen Storie Walter Dobie Lee Morrison Brooke Dixon Second Tenor Walter Fisher Erwin Rolfe Harold Quigley Bert J erard Harold Grady Leon Bratager Earl Fortmiller Edward Giles Ira Mannville Kenneth Frazier Second Bass Delbert Stannard Vernon Vawter J erry Martin Alfred Skei Harry Ding Melvin Ogden A Erin with the $192 0111111 "It is a short life, but a gay one." The above expression would, in the simplest manner, describe a trip with the gayly plumed troup of barn-storming nightingales and meadow larks. which represented the Varsity Glee Club on its recent tour of Southern and Western Oregon. Oakland was the first place victimized by the alighting of a detachment of the troup. Here Burns Powell made a speech, in which he quoted Scripture to the natives to back up his sincerity,e the effect of which was to delude a village Priscilla into enquiring, ttIsntt that Mr. Powell awfully religous." In Roseburg, the boys spent a quiet day and a quieter evening. At this place Harry Ding and Chu Chu Rolf were severely repre- manded for attempting to victimize the mayor in a shell game. The covey iiitted out of Roseburg by request and did not tarry in their wild flight until the state line was approached at Ashland. Here Josh B. Billings, W6, by the dint of persistent advertising and vouching for the sterling qualities of each character on the club, succeeded in turning out the Modoc Indian war veterans, the local Spinsters sewing circle, and the W. C. T. U. The result was that at the concert Martints stock jokes didn,t take, and in the funny parts of the entertainment the audience was. moved to tears. a At Medford the whole town turned out to see the boys perform. It was a full house, with a drummer friend and sympathiser filling the whole front section. After the show the boys were entertained at the University Club, where they were treated to an exhibit of ex- colleg'ers from Texas to Sasketchewan. The girlts basketball team from Grants Pass was leaving Medford on an early train, so the boys trouped down to the city, where General Grant is said to have participated in the great national game. From Grants Pass the club jumned back to Eugene, where a concert at Springfield was boosted but failed to materialize. Going on to Albany the entire club took a ride on the street car, .4- III 'i i i I i I a w-alH SI ITS! a. lit at their own expense. The town hotel man refused to rebate, but attended the concert in person, wishing to do well by the boys. At Medford. The Dalles In Portland every one at- tended the con- cert, and even the Oregonian lcorresp o n d! e mt was favorably impressed. Og- den, failing to comb his reper- toire for acome back after the Schuman-Heink solo, furnished the audience with a silly grin. At Hood Riv- er they grow fruit that ex- plains why Ad- am fell for the apple gag, the concert went off very smoothly. Motschenbacher later lost his fraternity pin by default. and a squaw from the reservation tried hard to kidnap Fresh- man B. Dixone tTWantum skoo- kum pale face papoose." Following the destruction of The Dalles, the club commenced their famous re- treat back to Portland. At St. J ohns they gave a benefit to the mill employees. At Salem, on December 24th, was held the grand finale of the trip. Due to weary lungs and strained throats the melody oifered approached more nearly a spirited saw filing contest. In final despair leader Ic Ogden sent the Old Guard out to save the day. The heroes of a thousand stages failed to dislodge the jeering Willamette war- riors from their entrenchment. The veteran trumpeter Burns Powell sounded the last retreat, and the members of the 1911 Oregon Glee Club fied to their several homes about the state. 131 --Fen Waite. g- A Olhnral 611111 0911113111 MAUDE BEALS .................................... , ......................................... President RUBY HAMMERSTROM ............................................................ Treasurer ALMA PAYTON ............................................................................. Librarian Mending Leona Bish Alma Noon Erma Campbell Olga Poulsen Gladys Cartwright Alma Payton Florence Cleveland Ethel Risley Georgia Cross ' Janet Young Ruth Lathrop Wilma Young Edna Miller J osephin-e Morehead. i Ermel Miller Ruby Hammerstrom Agnes McLauchlan Maude Beals : h ' i a i? i l , 7' A 1 .3 t 132 f u w: V. L. 4;. A1 Princess and her Train agrim'wa Ehrgaanthpmum Presented by the Choral Club, April 13, 1911. CAST OF CHARACTERS Princess Chrysanthemum .............................................. Florence Cleveland Emperor What-for-Whi....' .......................................................... Maude Beals Prince So-Tru ............................................................................ Janet Young Prince So-Sli ............................................................................ Juliette Cross Top-Not ............................................................................ Gladys Cartwright Saucer-Eyes .................................................................................. Alma Noon Fairy Moonbeam ................................................................. Maybelle Larsen Maids to Princess1Edna Miller, Esther Carson, Alma Payton, Blanche Powell, Jean Allison, Ethelyn Risley. Fairies1Meta Goldsmith, Maud Mastick, Edwina Presser, Rhodes, Ruby Hammerstrom, Maud Guthrie. Effie .. .. mmm W a dma ... : .mmme mmL" e m m mr MR . m m n a ... m. u " 31mm Rm .. . " " 605 t . n " Biu nf . m m De 1Mw0 r r. m m MkH re w y m m m0... WW u .. h m m awn m .M . u : HBw Wu I m m we w. a m m DA M m m. n .1. u u .., 1 u n M H a n m m 1 .n h M W W m .... . m m M .me wt. m u m m rug n . m u m mmm " .. . uo . SKD DMOY ,. ECL m 0TH s m 1 OHM Ma Ma .m 2 u S r . . MHM H T .. S . m R m u LK a ACE m RAO A . JJ ;. .. Immah w I g; V: 1 Nyghum..- h!.7v-... V 3"".w w-eeN-u gnu. xxxw-Mww V WMWV . SCENE FROM hJUST OUT OF COLLEGE" o' .N' -'..... .Ai'uu,-, . 1131151 09111 nf 011111221211 By George Ade Presented by the Class of 1912 at the Eugene Theatre, May 27, 1911. CAST OF CHARACTERS Edward Worthington Swinger ................................................... D. L. Dobie Septimus Pickering ................................................................. Thomas Burke Silver Mason ............................................................................... Melvin Ogden Prof. H. Dalrymple Bliss ........................................................ Francis Curtis Ernest Bradford ........................................................................ G. M. White Rufus ............................................................................................. Dean Collins Collector of Souvenirs .................................................... J. Lewis Johnson Solicitor of Insurance ................................................................ John Kestfly Book Agent ............................................................................ Myron Getchell Delegate from the Unlon .................. Charles Koyl Train Caller .............................................................................. Vernon Gilles Ticket Seller ................................................................................ John Kestly Jack Lindsay ............................................................................... Dean Gilkey Harvey Hughes ....................................................................... Stanley Young Tom Catlin ................................................................................... Chas Taylor Caroline Pickering ...................................................................... Juliet Cross N. U. Jones ............................................................................. Madge Hamble Genevieve Chizzle ................................................................. Jessie Calkins Luella Pickering ........................................................................ Mary DeBar Bernice McCormick ............................................................ Willetta Wright Aunt Julia Swinger .................................................................. Pearl Wilbur News Stand Girl ................................................................ Maybelle Larson Lonesome Traveler ................................................................ Laura Kennon Miss Larkson ............................................................................ Sophie Catlin Miss Byrd ................................................................................... Cecile Wilcox Miss Blythe ............................................................................ Alice Stoddard Miss Taylor .................................................................................... June Gray Miss Robinson ................ , .................................................. Gertrude Denhart Miss Radcliffe ............................................................................. ,Daryl BelaIt Miss Dickerson ...................................................................... Buella Bridges Miss Handsome .......................................................................... Grace Hobbs Miss Lightfoot ............................................................................ Hattie Hyde Miss Charmon ....................................................................... Lucia Wilkins DirectormDonald Bowles. 137 --mser:..m w-zgur'ww w . - mmww 4. .- V. "junk-.- V. -;:u-..- H f $112 $11an in annqurt Presented, April 1, by the Class of 1912. CAST OF CHARACTERS Sir Charles Marlowe ......................................................... Sidney Henderson Young Marlowe ..................................................................... Earl Latourette Mr. H'ardcastle ........................................................ Rex Turner Hastings ................................................................................. John Shattuck Tony Lumkin ........................................................................ Roland Kennedy Mrs. Hardcastle ................................................................ Emma Waterman Miss Hardcastle .................................................................... Mildred Bagley Miss Neville ................................................................................ J ean Allison Dolly .............................................................................. Ruby Hammerstrom Landlord ................................................................................. William Dunlap Servants Ma thew Stastney, Hugh Currin, E. J. Himes. Tavern Bums Robert Kellogg, Jas. J ohns, Homer Jamison. ScenkHome of the Hardcastle-s. Professor A. F. Reddie, Director. Edwin Himes. Manager. H-H H' .H I H i! i. H s ww Stannard Allison Dunton Warner Beals , Kennedy Waite Eramatir 0111111 $$er F. E. DUNTON ................................................................................ President MILDRED WAITE ................................................................ Vice President JEAN ALLISON ............................................................................ Secretary ROLLAND G. KENNEDY ............................................................ Treasurer DEL STANNARD .......................................................... Sargeant-at-Arms MAUD BEALS .................................... Chairman of Program Committee 139 At Ya1e1Boathouse Scene. 1331 132112" Presented by. the Dramatic Club March 1, 1911. CAST OF CHARACTERS Dick Seeley ........................................................................ Donald S. Lamm Mr. Clayton Randall .............................................................. William Beals Jack Randall .......................................................................... Harold Warner Dave Burly ............................................................................. C. W. Robinson Jim Tucker .................................................................... Ray Murphy Jimsey ................................................................................ Francis D. Curtis Clancy ........................................................................................ J ohn Kestley John Kennedy ............................................................................ F. E. Dunton Frank Young ........................................................................ Raphael Geisler Ed Scomt ......... ...Vernon Vawter Tom Haynes .............................................................................. Walter Dobie Robert Crosby ............................................................................ Glenn Storie Jepson ...................................................................................... EdW. J. Himes Pol ........................................................................................ Delbert Stannard Harry Wilson ............................................................................. Lloyd Barzee Will Taylor .............................................................................. Leon Bratager Mrs. Randall .................................. Jean Allison Dorothy Randall ........................................................................ Helen Beach Polly Burk ......................................................................... Alicia Farnsworth Mame Brady ............................................................................ Mildred Waite Professor I. M. Glen, Director. Ed. Himes, Manager. - 1'.-n.v.n....w'l;;.:;.' -" I.- LL-11--- wr h r" 1 Glanhiha " By Bernard Shaw Presented by the Dramatic Club March 25, 1912. CASTE Proserpine Garnett, stenographer ............................................. Nancy Noon Rev. James Mavor Morell, Christian Scientist ................ Forrest Dunton Rev. Alexander Mill, his curate .................................... . ........ Frank Dudley Mr. Burgess, Candida,s father...; .................................. Alexander Martin Candida, wife of Morell ............................................................. Maude Beals Eugene Marshbanks, a poet .................................................... Walter Dimm Scene-MoreIPs Study, St. Dominids Parsonage, Hackney Road, Victoria Park, London. Time1The present. Professor A. F. Reddie, Director. Harold Warner, Manager. 11 Engagph 1 Presented by the Dramatic Club May 9, 1912. CASTE Belinda Treherne ................................................................ Albenta Campbell Maggie Macfarlane ............................................................ Hazel Wightman Minnie Simperson ............................................................................ Fay Clark Mrs. Macfarlane ................................................................ Rachel Applegate Parker ...................................................................................... Mildred Waite Belvawney ................................................................................ Ralph Moores Symperson .................................................................................... Alfred Skei Cheviot Hill ............................................................................ Chester Moores Angus Macalister ................................................................ Raphael Geisler Major McGillicuddy .............................................................. Roland Kennedy Wedding Guests ........................................ Bob Kellogg and Buford Johns Professor A. F. Reddie, Director. 141 . x W WWW. 4. ,V. A SHADY PLACE ON THE OLD MILL RACE www.yhvam. .q. .3 JR... W mag L? ; ... . M. K, 31511111: 4 $111 anizatinna $Prtinn 1 Eraternitiw Eirvrtnry nf Eratvrnitiw Natinnal Eraternitiea . SIGMA NU ................................. Corner 11th and Pearl Streets KAPPA SIGMA ............................ Corner 11th and Alder Streets ACACIA ............................................ 342 East Ninth Street BETA THETA PI ........................... Comer 12th and Mill Streets ALPHA TAU OMEGA ................ Oak Street, between 11th and 12th SIGMA CHI ................................. Corner 13th and Alder Streets PHI GAMMA DELTA ............................. 376 East 12th Street 711mm 01111th TAWAH CLUB ....................................... 736 Alder Street AVAVA CLUB ...................................... 365 East 13th Street DELTA SIGMA FRATERNITY-----------------..810 Kincaid Avenue DORMITORY CLUB. 2 OREGON CLUB f n $igma Nu a .M.. Z a m m a $ Z 6g7 a17 , Kellogg Chandler Barbur Henderson Walker Bean Benson McCornack Parsons Radar Vawter DeBar Lowell ichael M 146 n.h.-.'..n.n...'. :--...-.4. u -...-x-.s..... $igma Nu 055mm: Zeta Glimmer Chartered December 1, 1900. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 William Lowell, Robert Kellogg, Benj. R. Chandler, Herbert L. Barbur, William M. Main, Graham Michael, Sidney Henderson, Harold C. Bean 1913 Dean H. Walker, Ercel Kay, Vernon I-I. Vawter. 1914 Wallace J. Benson, Robert DeHuff McCornack. 1915 Harold Grady, Bryant DeBar, JOIhn Parsons, Donald Rader, Edward Geary. Evigma N 11 181111 nf Ghaptem Founded at Virginia Military Institute, 1869, Alpha 1869, revived 1909, Virginia, Mili- tary Institute. Beta 1870, University of Virginia. Lambda-w1882, Washington and Lee University. Psi-1888, University of North Carolina. Beta. 'Tau 1895, North Carolina. A. 8; M. College. Delta Kappa 1910, Delaware State College. Sigma-1886, Vanderbilt University. Gamma Iota 1902, State University of Kentucky. Mu 1873, University of Georgia. Theta 1874, University of Alabama. Iota 1879, Howard College. Kappa 1881, North Georgia Agricultural College. Eta- 1884, Mercer University. Beta Theta-1890, Alabama Polytechnic Institute. Gamma A1pha-1896, Georgia School of Technology. Epsilon-1883, Bethany College. Beta Nu 1891, Ohio State University. Beta Iota 1892, Mt. Union-Scio College. Gamma Pi -1904- University of West Virginia. Delta Alpha 1907, Case School of Applied Science. Delta Zeta 1909, Western. Reserve University. Gamma Beta 1898, Northwestern University. Gamma. Gamma 1895, Albion College. Gamma Lambda 1902, University of Wisconsin. Gamma Mu- 1902, University of Illinois. Gamma Nu-1902, University of Michigan. Gamma Rh0 1905, University of Chicago. Delta. Theta 1891, Lombard University. Beta. Mu-1893, Iowa State University. Gamma Sigma 1904, Iowa. State College. Gamma Tau-1904, University of Minnesota. Delta Eta 1909, University of Nebraska, Nu -1884, Kansas State University. Rho--1886, Missouri State University. Beta. Xi 1894, William Jewell College. Gamma Xi 1903, Missouri School of Mines. Gamma. Omicron 1903, Washington University. Delta Epsilon 1909, Oklahoma University. Upsi10n 1886, University of Texas. Phi 1887, Louisiana State University. Beta, Phi-1888, Tulane University. Gamma Upsi10n 1904, U:niVersity of Arkansas. Gamma Eta l901, Mines. Gamma Kappa 1902, University of Colorado. Gamma Chi 1896, University of Washington, Gamma, Zeta 1900, University of Oregon. Gamma Phi 1905, University of Montana. Delta Iota:1910, Washington State College. Beta. Chi-1891, Leland Stanford Junior University. Beta Psi 1892, University of California. Pi- 1884, Lehigh University. Beta Rho 1894, University of Pennsylvania. Gamma Epsilon-41900, Lafayette College. Gamma Theta 1901, Cornell University. Gamma, Psi 1906, Syracuse University. Delta Delta-1909, Pennsylvania. State College. Beta. Beta-1890, DePauW University. Beta. Zeta-1891, Purdue University. Beta Eta-1892, University of Indiana. Beta Upsilon-1895, Rose Polytechnic Institute. Beta Sigma 1898, University of Vermont. Gamma Delta 1900, Stevens Institute of Technology. Delta Beta 1907, Dartmouth College. Delta Gamma 1908, Columbia University. Delta. Lambda 1912, Brown University. Colorado School of Hi- Rickety-Whoopty doo! Whafs the matter with Sigma Nu? Hullabaloo, terragaroo; Ausgezcicht, Sigma Nu. C olors, Black, White and Gold. Flower, White Rose Publication, Thc Delta? 148 --I Igll H I: I $amma Alpha nf Kappa Svigma bu n ' f... ..Mn- ----,' .-.-- .. ,,- 0..., -- I Latourette C. Moores Cecil Waite Ford Still Bean Clark Cobb Stannard Roberts McAllen Kimball Strang .Heusner Frazier Dickson Hendricks Marsden Boylen Staiger Lytle NF 150 l rw- nu... av...vng.g-MkhL .-b; h7.n:7 umma ..,, w; '1' "" "" "- ' .. .,... 3 .1. ! .. . nu-nn...b.un...us.' Kappa $igma $amma Alpha thaptvr Chartered April 16, 1904. FRATRE-S IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 Ralph D. Moorres, Earl C. Latourette, Chester A. Moores. 1913 Fendel S. Waite, J. C. Cecil, Edsall P. Ford, Glen E. Storie. . 1914 Delbert C. Stannard, Earle S. Cobb, Alfred B. Clarke, Hawley J. Bean, Norton R. Cowden, Oudin F. Roberts, Claude Still, F. N. Kendall, William D. McAllen, George B. Marsden, Nat. J. Kimball. 1915 Franklin Staiger, Wm. B. Heusner, George Frazier, Westbrook Dickson, Jessup Strang, Leland Hendricks, William Harry G. Lytle, Tom Boylen. Kappa Sigma House. WP 'In'ul-m-v :H W Kappa Sigma 181111 nf Olhaptem Founded at University of Bologna, 1395. PsF-University of Maine. Alpha. Rho-Bowdoin College. Beta. Kappa-New Hampshire College. Gamma Epsilon-aDartmouth College. Alpha Lambda UniVersity of Vermont. Gamma Delta Massachusetts State College. Gamma Eta-I-Iarvard University. Beta Alpha Brown University. Alpha, Kappa-Cornell University. Gamma. Zeta-New York University. Gamma IotadSyracuse University. PinWarthmore College. Alpha, Deltar-Pennsylvama State College. Alpha. Epsilon University of Pennsylvania. Alpha. Phd Buckne11 College. Beta. Iota-Lehigh University. Belta. Pi-Dickinson College. Alpha Alpha University of Maryland. Alpha Eta-George Washington University. Zeta University of Virginia. Eta Rando1ph-Mac0n College. Mu Washington and Lee University. Nu Wi11iam and Mary College. Upsilon Hampden-Sidney College. Beta. Beta Richmond College. DeltawDavidso-n College. Eta Prime Trinity College. Alpha Mu University of North Carolina. Beta. Upsilon- N0rth Carolina. M. 8; A. College. Alpha Nu-Wofford College. Alpha. Beta- Mercer University. Alpha Tau Georgia School of Technology. Beta. Lambda University of Georgia. Beta University of Alabama. Beta Eta A1abama Polytechnic Institute. Theta Cumber1and University. Kappa Vanderbi1t University. Lambda University of Tennessee. C 01073, Scarlet, White and Emerald. Phi SouthWestem Presbyterian University. Omega University 0f the South. Alpha Tueta S0uthWestern Baptist University. Alpha. Sigma-Ohio State University. Beta Phi Case School of Applied Science. Beta Delta-Washington and Jefferson College. Beta. Nu Kentucky State College. Alpha Zeta UmiVersity of Michigan. Chi-Purdue University. Alpha Pi Wabash College. Beta. Theta-uUniveI-sity of Indiana. Alpha. Gamma University of Illinois. Alpha. Chi Lake Forrest University. Gamma BetaMUniversity of Chicago, Beta E-psilon University of Wisconsin. Beta. Mu University of Michigan. Beta. Rho-University of Iowa. Alpha. Psi-dUniversity of Nebraska. Alpha Omega William Jewell College. Beta. Gamma-Missouri State College. Beta. Sigma Washing'ton University. Beta. Ch-i Miss0uri School of Mines. Beta. Tau-Baker University. Xi-University of Arkansas. Gamma Kappa University of Oklahoma. Alpha. Upsilon:Millsops College. Gamma-Lrouisiana State University. Sigma-Tu1ane University. Iota-South-western University. Tau University of Texas. Beta Omicron University of Denver. Beta. Omega+Colorado College. Gamma Gamma C0lorad0 School of Mines. Beta. Zeta-Le1and Stanford Junior University. Beta Xi University of California. Beta. Psi-University of Washington. Gamma. Alpha University of Oregon. Gamma. Theta UniVersity of Idaho. Gamma. Mu Washington State College.' Gamma. Nu Washburn. Flower, Lily of the Valley Publication, the Caduceus. " X N' K 2 x w 3? ?V $ 2 153 'l W Donald Dunlap Bratager Ingle illiamson W dge Broadbri Dunton Reynolds McMillan h ins illiamson Heidenric Hugg Spencer W Epperly 154 vn.....;.-.. "ray... -wp.-.;...-.,. .-- -. wag iwwt1 Arms: Gian Glimmer Chartered October 28, 1909. FRATRES IN FACULTATE John Straub, F. G. Young, F. S. Dunn, J. F. Bovard, H. B. Leonard. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 L. N. Huggins, Forrest E. Dunton, Ernest J. Smith; William J. Dunlap. 191 Carlton Spencer, C. N. Reynolds, Harold Quigley. 1914 , Albert M. Epperly , Joseph R. Williamson, Lowell Williamson, Alfred H. M, Skei, Leon Bratager. 1915 George Broadbridge, Chas. McMillan, Henry Heidenrich, Joe Ingle, James Donald. 155 Araria 331111 nf thaptera Founded at University of Michigan, 1904. Aleph University of Michigan. Nun-Cornell University. Beth Le1and Stanford Junior Samehthurdue University. University. Ayin University of Chicago. Gimel-University of Kansas. Pe--Ya1e University. Dalet'h' UniVersity of Nebraska. Tsadhe-Columbia, University. Hev-University of California. Koph-Iowa State College. IWaW Ohio State University. Resh-University of Iowa. Teth Harvard University. Shin Pennsy1vania State College. Hethp-University of Illinois. TaV University of Oregon. Yodh University of Pennsylvania. Aleph A1e ph University of Washington. Kaph-University of Minnesota. Aleph Beth-Northwestern University. Lamedth University of Wisconsin. Aleph Gime1 University of Colorado. Mem University of Missouri. Colors, Black and Gold. Flower, The Acacia. Publication, wThe Acacia Journal." 5i. , . 41;..Aiggsll 731943511111111ig f2; ivggig Igi$gg ZEBRI 5112151 1Hi .47 ... .2.. unn-wn n . .x Fenton Chessman J erard Burgard Brooks B. R. Rice 1, Brooks Fortmiller Payne Oberteuffer L. Fenton ller Mi Young Reynolds Mount C. D. Rice Martzloff Warner Broughton Johns Stine ing Barzee Hard Kuykendall u . k V M . E39151 Elma 1Hi Etta 3111111 thapter Chartered, December 4, 1909. FRATRES IN F'ACULiTATE Timothy Cloran. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 James Johns, Harry M. Stine, L. O. Harding. 1913 Lloyd D. Barzee,Har01d J. Broughton, Karl H. Martzloft Robert B Kuykenda11,Wi11iam Wallace Mount,Har01d J. Warner. 1914 Irwin J Brooks,Car1 B. Fenton, George Earl Fortmlller, Waldo S. Miller, Charles A. Reynolds, Donald B. Rice, Lyman G. Rice, Frederick Harold Young, G Herman Oberteuffer. 1915 Russell M Brooks, John Clark Burgard, W. Dale Chessman, Francis Boyce Fenton, Bertrand S Jerard, Buford B Payne. Beta, Theta Pi House. ZEPta Ehpta iai iVmII nf 0111511112111 Alpha- Miami University. Beta Nu Cincinnati University. Beta-Western Reserve University. Beta Kappa- Ohio University. ' Gamma Washingt0n and Jefferson College. Delta-DePauw University. Pi Indiana University. Lambda University of Michigan. Tau Wabash College. E psi1on Centra1 University, Kentucky. Kappa-Brown University, Zeta Hampden-Sidney College. Eta Beta-University of North Carolina. Theta Ohi0 Wesleyan University, Iota-Hanover College. Xi Knox College. Omicron--University of Virginia. Phi Alpha Davids0n College. Psi Bethany College. Chi Be10it Callefze. Alpha. Beta-University of Iowa. Alpha Gamma Wittenberg College. Alpha Delta Westminster College. Epsilon IOWa Wesleyan University. Lambda Rho University of Chicago. Alpha Eta Denison University. Alpha Iota Washington University, Mo. Alpha Lambda University of Wooster. Alpha Sigma Dickinson College. Upsilon B0ston University. Alpha Chi -Johns Hopkins University. Omega- UniVersity of California. Beta Alpha-Kenyon College, Beta. Gamma Rutgers College. Beta Delta-Cornell University. Sigmar-Stevens Institute of Technology. Beta Zeta-St. Lawrence University. Beta Eta- University of Maine. Phi UniVersity of Pennsylvania. Beta Theta-Colgate University. Nu Uni0n University. Alpha Alpha Co1umbia University. Beta Iota-Arnherst College. Beta Lambda Vanderbi1t University. Beta Omicr0n UniVersity of Texas. Theta Delta Ohio State University. Alpha Tau UniVersity of Nebraska. Alpha Upsilon Pennsy1vania State College. Alpha Zeta-University of Denver. Beta Epsi10n UniVersity of Syracuse. Alpha Omega Dartm0uth College. Beta Pi UniVersity of Minnesota. Mu Epsi10n Wes1eyan University. Zeta Phi University of Missouri. Beta Chi Lehigh University. Phi Chi Ya1e University. Lambda Sigma-Stanford University. Beta Psi University of West Virginia. Beta Tau UniVersity of Colorado. Beta. Sigma BOWdoin College. Beta. Omega- Washingt0n State University. Sigma Rh0 University of Illinois. Beta Mu-Purdue University. Lambda Kappa Case School of Applied Science. Tau Sigma IOWa State College. Theta Zeta UniVersity of Toronto. Gamma Phi University of Oklahoma. Beta Phi C0l0rado School of Mines. Beta Xi Tu1ane University. Beta Rho UniVersity of Oregon, Phi, Kai, Phi; Phi, Kai, Phi; Wooglin, Wooglin, Beta Theta Pi. Colors, Blue and Pink. Flower, Rose Publication, Beta Theta PiY dbamma ighi nf Alpha 32111 091mm - M. q--- V -...,..--., , . . .. - '- .1 r 1" - .- wwwm"... , . .. . . , . ,. . ,M . ". - . .- - . Turner Huggins Viereck Good Dudley Cunning Jerry Martin Kraus Blackaby E. E. Martin McDaniel Onthank C. Motschenbacher Pack Finch V. Motschenbacher Welch Moe 162 "'.-r--.--.......N,. .. Tb- - uir-n." u. Alpha Gian 69mm Qpregun $amma QHhi Glimmer Chartered, February 25th, 1910. FRATRES IN FACULITATE John Straub. POST GRADUATE James Cunning. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912. David L. McDaniel, Rex A. Turner. 1913. Karl W. Onthank, Alexander Martin III, Edgar E. Martin. 1914. Vernon T. Motschenbacher, Harry C. Viereck, G. Chester Huggins, John R. Kraus. 1915. Roger Waldo Moe, Frank A. Dudley, Earl Blackaby, Eugene N. Good, Leland S. Finch, John Welch, Clarence E. Motschuenbacher, James A. Pack, Jr. Alpha wan 0.3mm Emil nf thaptera Founded at Vlrginia Military Institute, 1865. Pi Tennesee University. Omega University of Southern Tennessee. Delta University of Virginia. Xi Trinity College, North Carolina. Alpha Beta UniVersity of Georgia. Alpha Delta UniVersity of South Carolina. Alpha Epsilon A1abama Polytechnic Institute. Alpha Zeta Mercer University, Georgia. Tau University of Pennsylvania. Alpha Theta. Emory College, Georgia. Alpha Iota Muhlenburg College, Pennsylvania. Alpha Lambda C01umbia University. Alpha Mu Adrian College, Michigan. Alpha Nu Mount Union College, Ohio. Alpha Omicr0n St. Lawrence University, New York. Alpha Pi Washingt0n Jefferson College, Pennsylvania. Alpha Rho Lehigh University, Pennsylvania. Alpha Tau SouthWestern Presbyterian University. Alpha Upsilon Pennsy1vania College. Alpha Psi-Wittenberg College, Ohio. Alpha Omega-University of Florida. beta Alpha Simpson College, Iowa. Beta Beta-Southern University. Beta Delta UniVersity of Alabama. Beta Epsilon Tu1ane University. Beta. Zeta UniVersity of Vermont. Beta Eta Ohio Weslyan. Beta Theta C0rne11 University. Beta Kappa Hi11sda1e College. Beta Iota Georgia School of Technology Beta Lambda UniVersity of Michigan. Beta Mu Wooster University. Beta Xi Char1eston College. Beta Omicron A1bion College. Beta Pi Vanderbi1t University. Beta Upsilon- University of Maine. Beta Omega-Ohio State University. Gamma Alpha Co1by University. Gamma Beta Tufts College. Gamma Gamma-Rose Polytechnic Institute. Beta Tau-Southwestern Baptist University. Gamma Delta Br0Wn University. Gamma Theta University of Nebraska. Gamma Eta UniVersfty of Texas. Gamma Iota University of California. Gamma Kappa Western Reserve Gamma Lambda University of Colorado. Gamma Mu UniVersity of Kansas. Gamma, Nu-University of Minnesota. Gamma Xi University of Chicago. Gamma Omric0n Purdue University. Gamma. Pi-University of Washington. Gamma Rho University of Missouri. Beta Gamma Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Beta Washingt0n Lee University. Gamma Tau University of Wisconsin. Gamma Upsilon IOWa State College. Gamma Sigma W0rchester Polytechnical Institute. Gamma Zeta-University of Illinois. Gamma Omicron-Ames College. Mu Iota Kentucky State College, Gamma Phinniversity of Oregon. Gamma Chi Washington State College. Beta Psi Le1and Stanford University, California. Who Rah Regga Alpha Tau Omega K Hip, Hurrah! Hip, Hurrah! Three Cheers for Alpha Tau, Hurrah! Hurrah? Hurrah! Colors, Sky Blue and Old Gold Flower, White Tea Rose Publimz'ion, Wklpha Tau Omega Palm." a 41 U 3 a t P m, nu m ? WW ;WZW$WWWWZW S . m . m .U. . W .0. W .. W . W . , W ,.. . 423m; WWWWWWW S .. n n 0 .1 S . k t A m a . m Hw . w; . . W w m D c W .. W . m . W 663? WWW .w W 1 W B . u 6 J 6 . 1 . e s r e m m m M m m Wm .. L r . y , W F e m v ; .i . . C L .1 W W ix? WW; W . w . r w n n w m . M L . , O 0 d . H , . . .m Fm. Hun , Wig 2W?g , a H u- , . . . W J n W WWWWWWWW ,, m. w . . 1w p .w ., - a -- .- -311 3-3: "Ma . $mma6m 7321a 31am Glimmer Chartered, November 27th, 1910. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 Homer B. Jamison, Ralph P. Newland, John G. Kelly, John M. Moore, Lyle F. Brown, Martin W. Hawkins. 1913 Paul R. Briedwell, Clifford Sims, Reymund B. Early. 191 4 Henry Fowler, Charles A. Fowler, Guyn Watson. 1915 David Hawkins, Lynn Holden, Ernest E. Vosper, Lyn H. Livermore, Clay Watson, Edwin Dorr, Walter Gaunt. a 31 11;. 2T 3 g ,g. 33 '3 ZKnll nf thapterz Founded at Miami University, 1855. Alpha Miami Universlty. Beta University of Wooster. Beta Epsilon University of Utah. Beta Zeta University of North Dakota. gamma Ohi0 Weslyan University. Epsiloaneorge Washington University. Zeta Washington and Lee. Eta University of Mississippi. Theta L ennsylvania College. Kappa-Buckne11 University. Lambda Indiana University. Mu Denis0n University. Xi-De Pauw University. Omicr0n Dickinson College. Rho But1er College. Phi Lafayette College. Fhinanover College. Psi University of Virginia. Omega-Northwesterh University. Alpha. Alpha Hobart College. Alpha Beta University of California. Alpha Gamma Ohio State University. Alpha Epsi10n University of Nebraska. Alpha Zeta Be1oit College. Alpha Eta State University of Iowa. Alpha Theta-Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Alpha Iota I11inois Weslyan University. Alpha Lambda University of Wisconsin. Alpha Nu University of Texas. Alpha XP-University of Kansas. Alpa Omicron -Tu1ane University. Alpha Pi A1bion College. Alpha Sigma University of Minnesota. Alpha Rho Lehigh University, Alpha Upsilon University of Southern California. Alpha Phi Corne11 Lnlversity. Alpha Chi Pennsylvania State College. Alpha Psi Vanderbi1t University. Alpha Omega Le1and Stanford Junior University. Beta Gamma Co10rado College. Delta. Delta-Purdue University. Beta Delta University of Montana. Zeta Delta-Central University. Zeta Psi University of Cincinnati. Eta Eta Dartmouth College. Theta Theta University of Michigan. Kappa Kappa University of Illinois. Lambda Lambda Kentucky State College. mu Mu-University of West Virginia. Nu Nu Co1umbia. University. Xi Xi UniVersity of Missouri. Omicron Omicron:University of Chicago. Rho Rho-University of Maine. Tau Tau Washington University. Upsilon Upsilon-University of Washington. Phi Phi-University of Pennsylvania. Psi Psi-Syracuse University. Omega Omega University of Arkansas. Beta Eta Case School of Applied Science. Befa Theta University of Pittsburg. Delta Chi-Wabash College. Beta ZetawUniversity of North Dakota. Beta Epsilon -University of Utah. Beta Iota University of Oregon. Delta Univ-ersity of Georgia. Who Who-Who am I? Pm a loyal Sigma Chi Hoopla-Hoopla-Hoopla Hi! Sig-ma Chi. Colors, Blue and Gold. Flower, White Rose Publication, Sigma Chi Quarterly." 4WF234N-ytmrfmw gaff g9; ; :45: 4; izr-rar- AA : ma. cu "v A ,ng - E'; EFL ' 31 ii. TH ' 'tl . x s v I Epailmt GDmirrnn nf 1mg $amma Evita If: u! r Howard Shattuck W. Cautieli :4- -.r.l-- Meek ,. R. Cauiield 170 Word Frazier ,izwzi; hi $amma Erna iEpaiInn QDmitrnn Glimmer Chartered, October 1, 1912. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912. Walter Fisher, Thomas M. Word, Rolland Kennedy, John W. Shattuck. 1913. Carl Grayson, Kenneth Frazier, Raymond Caufleld, Ralph Cake. Howard Gray. 1914. Alva Grout, Joseph F. Jones, Colton Meek, W1a311ace Cauiield. 1915. John Black, Bvenj. Dorris, Aaron Gould, Maurice Hill, Thornton Howard. W AWW 1W1 iHhi $amma Enlist IRnll nf thaptera Founded at Washington and Jefferson College, 1848. Allegheny College. Amherst College. Bethel College. Brown University. Bucknell University. Colgate University. Colorado College. Columbia. University. Cornell University. Dartmouth College. Denison University. De Pauw University. Hanover College. Illinois Weslyan Uniwrsity. Indiana. University. Iowa A. College. Johns Hopkins University. Knox College. Lafayette College. Lehigh University. Leland Stanford University. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. New York University. Ohio State University. Ohio Weslyan University. rennsylvania College. Pennsylvania. State College. Purdue University. Richmond College. Syracuse University. Trinity College. Union University. University University University University University University University University University University University University University University University University University University of Alabama. of California. of Chicago. of Illinois. of Kansas. of Maine. of Michigan. of Minnesota, of Missouri. of Nebraska. of Oregon. of Pennsylvania. of Tennessee. of Texas. of Virginia. of Washington. of Wisconsin. of Wooster. Wabash College. Washington and Lee University. Washington and Jefferson College. Western Reserve University. William Jewel College. Wittenberg College. Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Yale University. Mg m. Ag-A---. .- a n n m P ow. 11ml 01111115 113 173 Mlii ' . ,,-- ......x.... k Service armc Stuller q u der Peet Partlow Schnei 1d 1n i Sig Rothch 1 Adler n nee k mhm SC usu ohm HNA Organized, January 9th, 1909. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Herman Sigglin. n: 0 t S u 0 H S n a V E R. S. Garrick, A. M. Service, Joe Rothchild. Everett Stuller, Fred S. Annunsen, William Nitschke, Sanford Addler, Harold Peet. T. Moore. Otto Schneider, erne Partlow, V 175 -.:, , ' i:':7.'-"" ' ru- 3 .A. .x-uuugkhu- VI'iJ'J-r'J-i I - Rolfe Hudson Morton uv, rut ; . Blackman 1. Wm add n Mwm n aMD V 1e Bradshaw Pague lSS ,. . Donnelly, ge Far F Walter Do-bie. Geor Harry Devereau J 1909 y Bau er, 1 a 1 1 i Donald Pague, J. yers Harlan Pefley. UNIVERSITATE Robert Bradshaw anize Fred M bee, Avava House. I McCall, h m a r a M m A O T3 FRATRES IN Rolfe, Abe Blackman, Henr Verne VanMarter Vlle Morton, Morris Big i Irwin Tom Hudson, Chas. Melv Up 7 - . . . , , -. .w . -.-w L. . . .0"... n". , , . .. ., . --.. V .- A . .- . yr. u.-. ' . J, . .4: .. . J. .a .. . .11 . A ,4. -- ' n7 7 .,..4.,.".J q. 7 - .1. v .. .7 ' n- ' "' r... . ' V ' -- " ' ' -. ... ,. ,r.--..x.,: -: 1.. " ' 7 7777777 H7 . XVXVXV' v 7x kli $ xx XCKKxKxNQ$$ x 77 7W WWW , , 4, , , ' bmWA 77M, um X' 7, mem xvx$fo A 7 7 g , , 1. - , , 777791-771 WC x I 7 ,7 ; . xwdqzzxAJMwasz MAWW m' $7 . MFWQ'N w w R. Geisler Cockerline Huntington Thomas Barbour Bailey Oleson Maris Hammond Campbell Bedford Curtis C. Geisler Smith Irish --r . rm ."2 Effrrfrz- -,y.;u. -: .K .. vnn-I n.5u-..u-h . .....1. 1 -- - . .. ..m: Etna Svigma Organized April 14, 1910, Will be Installed May 30th as Omega Alpha of Phi Delta Theta. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 Wendell C. Barbour, Harold B. Cockerline, George A. Gabriel, L. Raphael Geisler, Walter M. Huntington, Raymond V. Thomas, Clarence W. Walls, Charles R. Oleson. 1913 Edward F. Bailey, Philip L. Hammond,-VV. Homer Maris. 1914 Arba S. Bedford, Raymond Giles, Robert M. Wray. 1915 Sophus T. Blohm, Carlyle D, Geisler, Merwin R. Irish, S. Hugh Smith, Lloyd C. Stevens, Carroll M. Wagner, Glen Curtis. SPECIAL W. Homer Wheelon, David B. Campbell. .W .. "1-17,.ij Delta Sigma House. 179 Enrmitnry Q'LIuh 1912 Burns Powell, Walter Bailey, Hugh Currin, Raymond Heider, Ben S. Dinsmore, Earl Jones, Edward Himes, C. L; Marshall, i. P. McGuire, J. B. Jones, Falley Rasmussen, Charles Guerne, Mique Stastny, George Shantin, John Rast, Homer Wheelon. . 1913 R. J. Caro, Burleigh Cash, Harry Ding, Walter Kimmel, C. T. Kronenberg, William Neill, Clyde Pattee, Allyn Roberts, Ira Staggs, T. H. Wentworth, Howard Zimmerman. 1914 William Cass, Peter C. Crockett, Alfred Davies, F. T. J. Galloway, Oscar Haugen, Otto Heider, D. M. King, Elliot Roberts, Edwin S. Sternbe'rg, C. T. Thomas, Laurence Whitman, Ray Williams, A. C. Yaden. 1915 William McNeill, M. Gilchrist, Sam Michael, J. H. Ryan, Roy Johnson, A. P. Scholl, Frank S. Stiles, W. H. Thompson, R. G. Young, R. 0. Evans, A. E. Brotherton, Roy B. Curry, Clyde Dawson, Laurence Dineen, C. W. Frazier, Ira Gaston. en SE A Roberts Zimmerman Rasmu i1 1 1 .1 e Yt 1t re uw CO I C e m MN . Jones Yaden B. Jones Galloway McGilchrist E Currin iams ill Wentworth Brotherton Marshall W or Cl Pattee Rast Stenber Cass Himes Shantin Thomas EH! 1. CL K 4 'zvlr,..r I .PnurZi LHHIHHFACajirhEiV ?ILIfiIII Ii 4 N", U . m . VuShn...nmv .m . e..nlueu m VgG . .. i? m mu ,. O wnmu f . da .1 .IYmm .. 1. eRoa .. m H hI m H. Ti; A m. w. H. a n 1 . ammwn . mSS e . .. thhe n. w .1 hen . ha0.1.l .. ; WDJMD .m. , , , , . . . , $34, . ., . b 1 ge .. $5 4 1 M ghdbn J nc nb . .lnwed w KFSma rm . KB u. ,. V :wy2w? . y e monm trrl m saeu mCuS M; s G .l. v n:- S$r HNae eecm mw e mRBH L 3A0 mp x . .21 :1. ..4.. m... V n a X a . Frazier Hartley Calkins 091mm 0111111 A social organization of non-fraternity students, organized at the University of Oregon, March 7, 1911. OFFICERS EVA FRAZIER ................................................................................ President WALTER HODGE ................................................................ Vice President GRACE HARTLEY ........................................................................ Secretary RUSSELL CALKINS ................................................. T reasurer MEMBERS Men. V. E. Burris Albert Baker Marion Custer C. R. Casebeer C. W. Cook Russel Calkins Alfred D. Collier Frank Davidson J. P. McGuire PL W. Frederickson D. G. Glass D. W. Larwood F. Hendricks I-I. Howard W. S. Hodge R. Heider J. E. Jones Otto Heider C. H. Myers W. R. McClure D. C. Pickett M. M. Stastney O. Stnehr Lee Tappon Edwin Stenberg W. S. St. John L. L. Ray Clyde Pattee A. L, Apperson J. L. Whitman Frank Stiles Roy Fitch F. T. Galloway L. R. Hurd A. Davies Gail White Boy Johnson Lawrence Warner F. G. Rasmussen C. W. Fraizer Lawrence Dineen Ralph Young P. C. Crockett Ira Staggs R. 0. Williams Carl Thomas W. G. Rugh Ernest Anderson Herbert Van Duyne N. B. Ashcroft Men. Roy Curry A. P. Scholl Edwin Stearns W. H. Goodwin J. B. Jones Clark Hawley H. C. Tschanz Vernon Maxfleld A. B. Cash Lawrence Sheridan Herbert Ryan Herbert Lombard Raymond Warner Wm. Cass C. Dawson Walter Bailey F. F. Northrop Luton Ackerson Ora Gaston Women, Grace Adams Grace Cole Rena Black Catlie Beck Pansey Beebe Ethel Beebe Effie Cole Ruth Davis Laura Pummill rwrrn. , 4- -.. ,.. 7-, MEMBERSwContinued Ruby Edwards Vera Edwards Leola Eubank Florence Jenkins Eva Frazier Frieda Goldsmith Lida Garrett Maude Guthrie Ethel Green Vesta Holt Grace Hartley Celia Hag'er Beulah Kinsey Melissa Martin Maud Nail Lena Newton Hulda Parr Zella Soults Helen Ramage Agnes Ryder Freda Rhodes Beatrice Walgamuth Muriel Watkins Ida Warnock Veda Warner Birdie Wise Edith Watt Ruth Lathrop Alma Aupperle Helen Metcalf Minnie Holman Ludella Whittlesey Ruth Smith Ada Hall Isole Eubank Georgia Searcy Edna Harvey Marie Reese Leonia Bish Aliz Cowgill Bulah Stebno Winnifred Northrop Hazel McKown Imogene McKown Edna McKnight Minnie Poley Elizabeth Wooton Darl Zimmerman Edna Howard Rosa Johnson Vera Moffat Helen Johnson Helen Meredith Hilda, Brunt Eva Wash Nina Wiseman Martha Struck Carolyn Koyl Leta Mast Ruth Sears Charlotte Sears Bess Young Mary Ramage Clara Wines Jessie Sweet Hattie Sweet v: - LAVM y. .x-v. av..- ............ .2: x :N- . nu. .. wit .5 mKa: m; . ,E .31 Ertr g?nmrity Eirmurg Nationala GAMMA PHI BETA .................................. 806 Alder Street CHI OMEGA ............................... Thirteenth and Mill Streets KAPPA ALPHA THETA ................... Twelfth and Hilyard Streets DELTA DELTA DELTA --- --- --- - -- -- ---- "-- ---- ----870 Alder Street 1611mm GAMMA DELTA GAMMA-"7-Thirtecnth St., between Alder and Hilyard LAMBDA RHO .......... Alder Street, between Thirteenth and F ourteenth BETH REAH ......................................... 777 Alder Street 186 stnill, a . . m w y 3 . J ul m . a1 . medm m aknn " m y n a ny h a u wmnw . u. nwwh w v aaBS w HH . a u. M . mww . kamy 8 . cere oo ,.. .lheu 1 MSmi mmmL m m w .. MW r. ewwe . nHHaW wtea .1 m SW S u. r; . n n deo .N mama a Kdaa m HWCC Cl . . . CEK . $amma IHhi 71521514 Nu Glimmer Chartered December 18, 1908. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 . Irma Clifford, Javina L. Stanfield. 1913 Ann McMicken, Lenora Hansen, Florence Cleveland, Mildred Whittlesey, Ada Kendall. 1914 Flora Dunham, Edith Sheehy, Alsea Hawley, Esther Carson, Ruth Beach, Marie Zimmerman, Grace Bean. 1915 Helen Cake, Katherine Carson, Lyle Steiwer, Beatrice Lilley, Marguerite Sheehy, Florence Kendall. $amma 1am 71512181 331111 nf albumen: Founded at Syracuse? University, 1874. Alpha-Syracuse. Beta Michigan. Gamma-Wisconsin. Delta-Boston. E-psilon-Northwestern. Zeta+Gouchen Eta Ca1if0rnia, ALUMNAE Chicago Syracuse. Boston. New York. Color, Buff and Brown Theta-Denver. Iota Barnard. Kappa-Minnesota. Lambda Washington. M'u-Stanford. Nu-Oreg0n. Xi-Idaho. Milwaukee. San Francisco. Denver. Minnesota. Flower, The Carnation Publication, "The Crescent" 190 Merrick Murphy Hemenway C. Miller E. Miller Plummet Maegly Davis McLauchlan Thrall Young Bonnell Chandler 192 .""' '"' - 4- ...- ... Moorehouse Basler Cross H. Tooze Mathies Brown E. Tooze Woodward Shepherd Grissen ?.-......-.....-.;... H'uu. 0111i 0911129181 135i Alpha Ghapter Chartered April 30, 1909. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 Ruth M. Merrick, Nelle Murphey, Ermel Miller. 1913 Nellie H. Hemenway, Cecil Miller, Lucile Davis, Esther Maegly, Florence Thrall, Florence E. Bonnell, Sybil Brown. 1914 Doris Plummer Barnes, Rose Basler, Ethel Tooze, Agnes McLauchlan, Georgiana Cross, Willma Young, Meta, Matthes, Esther Grissen, Vesta Moorehouse. ' 1915 Lucile Shepherdeuth Dorris, Hazel Tooze, Gertrude V. Chandler, Constance Woodward. 0111i 0911mm 181111 nf thapterz Founded at University of Arkansas, 1895. ACTIVE CHAPTERS Psi University of Arkansas. Chi Transylvania University. Upsilon Union University. Tau University of Mississippi. Sigma Rand01ph-Macon Womaws College. Rh0 Tu1ane University, Newcomb College. Pi University of Tennessee. Omicron University of Illinois. Xi NorthWestern University. Nu University of Wisconsin. Mu University of California. Lambda University of Kansas. Kappa University of Nebraska. Iota University of Texas. Theta West Virginia, University. EtaEUniversity of Michigan. Zeta- University of Colorado. EpsilonhColumbia, University, Barnard College. Delta- Dickinson College. Gammar-Florida Woman's College. Beta Co'1by College. Alpha University of Washington. Psi Alpha University of Oregon. Chi Alpha Tufts College. Phi Alpha-George Washington University. Upsilon Alpha Syracuse University. ALUMNAE CHAPTERS Fayetteville. Washington, D. C. Atlanta. Lexington. Oxford. Knoxville. Chicago. Kansas City. New York. T'exarkana. . . New Orleans, Colors, Cardinal and Straw Lynchburg. Denver. Milwaukee. DesMoines. Portland. Lincoln. Seattle. Los Angeles. Boston. Dallas. Flower, White Carnation Publication, Eleusis. , 194 I 1 1.. I. .--'- nf Kappa Alpha Ghent .J'urJ-t a...v-w-ynu . r51" mg... .4.-. McAdam Sengstake MacLaren 1ck Rader McKelvey me Emer McCla bee arm ind Bmew aDm C - - ...;V-'..r,s..w- -u-.n......n..... HLT- .. u. Kappa Alpha Ehvta Alpha Ki Glimmer Chartered July 11, 1909. POST GRADUATE Mary DeBar. SORORES TN UNIVERSITATE 1912 Lucia Campbell, Jessie Bibee, Merle McKelvey, Marjorie Holcomb, Mildred Bagley, Jane Knox. 1913 Mildred Waite. 1914 Hazel Rader, Althea. Emerick, Eleanor McClaine, Frances Adams, Ruth MacLaren, Lila Sengstake, Bess Cowden, Maud Mastick, Maurine McAdam, 1915 Gertrude Taylor, Mildred Healy, Elsie Bain, Matilda Knapp. Kappa Alpha 3112151 Founded at De Pauw University, 1870. 181111 of Ollyaptvrz Iota 1881, Cornell University. Lambda 1881, University of Vermont. Sigma 1887, Toronto University. Chi 1889, Syracuse University. Alpha, Beta-1891, Swarthmore College. Alpha Delta 1896, Gaucher College. Alpha Epsilon 1898, Brown University. Alpha Zeta 1898, Barnard College. Alpha Kappar-1907, Adelphi College. Alpha-ISTO, DePauw University. Beta-1870, Indiana State University. Gamma 1874, Butler College. Alpha. Eta 1904, Vanderbilt University. EpsilonM1875, Wooster University. Eta 1879, University of Michigan. Mu-d1881, Allegheny College. Alpha Gamma 1892, Ohio State ' University. Phi 1889, Stanford University. Colors, Black and Gold OmegaHISQO, University of California. Alpha Lambda 1908, University of Washington. Alpha Nu 1909, Montana State University. Alpha XP-1909, University of Oregon. Delta 1875, University of Illinois. Tau 1887, Northwestern University. Upsilonw-1889, University of Minnesota. Psi 1890, University of Wisconsin. A1pha-1911, University of North Dakota. Kappa 1881, University of Kansas. Rho 1887, University of Nebraska. Alpha Iota-1906, Washington University, Alpha, Mu-1909, University of Missouri. Alpha Theta-1904, University of Texas. Alpha Omicron 1909, University of Oklahoma. Flower, Black and Gold Pansy Publication, Kappa Alpha Theta Joumal. Eheta Erna nf Bvlta grim Evlta w .r . mundu W aaoe .. rmou p. .mawB m Wtww. .u hnWahb m. c S . S s . e H, v a n r .. rnG 4 rec ., enm m mg 2 ad f, h e W... SWR r e . n r . 0 H . .. 1 .M w m . 0 mg m . nFm 0 SH B e u B .. R r. n emms .. LGRm a ,w P . $.n ... 1d ;. nyww . e . Olmh . .wd e IaOr lrnO ABao .. VM ,5. E91181 Eplta Eplta Ghent E21151 Olhapter Chartered October 30, 1910. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 Jean K. Allison, Emma J. Waterman, Dorothy Schoolcraft, Pansy Shaver, Jennie Fry, Ruth Gibson, Hazel Bradley. 1913 Elizabeth Lewis, Bess Wagner. 1914 Pauline VanOrsdel, Ethelind Risley, Ellice Shearer, Norma Graves. 1915 Vera Redmon, Gretchen Sherwood, Josephine Moorehead, Lois Parks, Edith Buell, Pearl Horner, Ruth Buell. : du'R-vw- urnkLQasp-nu- 3:1" .',-..au'u Mr-ew Erna Erna Eplta Founded at Boston, 1888. E011 nf albumen! Alpha8Boston University. Gamma8Adrian College. Beta8St. Lawrence University. Zeta-University of Cincinnati. Eta8University of Vermont. Theta8University of Minnesota. Lambda8Baker University, Kappar-Unlversity of Nebraska. Sigma8dWesleyan University. UpsilonWNorthwestern University. Nu-University of Ohio. Omicron Syracuse University. Mu8University of Wisconsin. Xi8Goucher College. Pi8University of California. Rho-Barnard College. 'Tau8Buckne11 College. Phi-aUniversity of Iowa. Colors, Silver, Gold and Blue Chi8University of Mississippi. Psi8-University of Pennsylvania. Alpha Xi8Randolph-Macon College. Alpha Upsilon-Colby College. Delta A1pha-DePa.uW University. Beta. ZetaaTransylvania College. Omega-Leland Stanford Junior University, Theta Alpha8University of Washington. T'heta Betak-University of Colorado. Theta. Gammar-University of Oklahoma. Theta Delta-University of Oregon. Alpha Alpha8Adalphi College. Delta Beta8Miami College. Theta Epsilon8Southwestern University. Delta Gamma-Vanderbi1t University. Chapter Granted Texas State University. Flower, Pansy Publication, 8 8Trident. 8 8 8-wxx wwmwunu Smtinn 4 ":4 pin": 711nm Svnmritiw I 203 ' V - - wrw . . . .4 h ' - , , . 4- v :1. n... '1'! . .1. , V - .. ... ' .1 "r ,' '5 x. - - I .- .- . . .f -.4 . 'v: .n .;4v..r,1 . . . , , ' "1 .- A 'r .. ' - A v -u . .-. . W-o . .. . Banfield Cutler Wightman Bartlett Holbrook Cartwright Riddell Roche Noon Degermark Harding Poulsen Cooper Leach -.,. r, 204 - 7-'-'n--...-.....g. ,5' - --:v'..v,.... . Gbaunma Etna Gbmtmm Organized May 7, 1908. SORORES IN UNIVEIRSITATE 1912 Rita Ellen Banfield, Louise Cecil, Alice Larsen, Ruth Hardie, Clementine Cutler, Neta Bartlett, Hazel Wightman. 1913 Helen Holbrook, Gladys Cartwright, Eva Roche, Alma Noon, Carin Degermark. 1914 Madeleine Harding, Olga Poulson, Florence Avery, Bess Riddell, Margaret Rhose. 1915 Genevieve Cooper, Fairy Leach. , - ' K- 11-. u . . . ,4. . -c'-.--.-M., , -. . - ,. .. ,, . bu. .. ... , -' . ru- ,,. . , - . . .. ...,..g,.. 4- , .. - , 'w".-1 "'3", . ' . ... , ; V... .- r , .. . K -.r.z..,,.. .V v - . Frink Applegate O. Zimmerman Beals M. Zimmerman Busch Cowa Drew Elliott Macklin Campbell Yoran Miller Kincaid Oberholtzer Young Cogswell Werlein Sawyer lements 'Iunungu...-JI 1;; .. Eamhha ZRhn Organized December 1, 1909, SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 Maud Beals, Rachel Applegate, Olive Zimmerman, Fay Clark, Ellen Frink. 1913 Mabel Zimmerman, Elizabeth Busch, Marjorie Cowan, Nettie Drew. 1914 Gertrude Elliott, Lucia Macklin, Cecil Sawyer, Agnes Campbell, Minnie Jackson, Lucile Yoran, Edna Miller, Maud Kincaid, Aldous Oberholtzer, Janet Young. 1915 Lucile Cogswell, Helen Werlein, Hazel Barta, Jennie Clements. 1 mewamc M. Powell George Strahan n V. why mam. dha n r Awp 7152111 1322111 Organized January 4. 1910, 1912 Alma Payton, Mabel Lane, Ruth Howell. 1913 Margaret Powell, Blanche Powell, Helen George, Ruth Stone, Bess Anderson. 1914 Mabel Inglis, Claire Pratt, Anita Slater, Georgia Prather. Elizabeth Snell, Lexie Strahan. 1 . L; .-.-J-u- - . .lh1-Ann-shA-w-h--.o- ....... -;- - .;.. ":4. n.... . . - -r - 1.0.4.4.1-In. . . . . M ...-,,,. .r' Qxx x A .,.........mm.. . . . . EAST CAMPUS Ennk 4 gmtinn 5 IHrnfwainnal atth ?Ennnr $nriptiw ALPHA KAPPA KAPPA PHI ALPHA DELTA MU PHI EPSILON FRIAR,S CLUB SCROLL AND SCRIPT PHI DELTA PHI TOKOLO larnfwzinnal anh ?Ennnr gaurwtiw 011mm Olhaptvr nf' 1311i Erna 1am . mug. ' :1. W wy... ....,.. . ,, y ' I ' .f v a m' ' ' 3' - v.1'm"$ ' '7 -: .1 A ..- m -. .s .. - . r,.- , mp .. 1 , .- -. .. m... w. , , -14 f, hug. -.:-..,. a-m..r.'..,.,,. -d ...- ... 'mw me xx " Wwvwwmwm - V 1131:; Trew IIickson Surcn Bernard Witt Wagner McClure Hogan Richmond Reade Robison Smith 214 " ' - --- 'I-an..-n-...-c.n. 'w-w' Ben. F. Wagner Wm. H. Witt C. F. Hogan E. F. Bernard J. M, Hickson am mm W 011mm Glimmer Chartered 1891. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE A. S. Trew W. J. Richmond Frederick Suren Chas. W. Robison Frank E. McClure Wm. B. Mixter Newton C. Smith E. M. Ralston C. H. Reade iHhi Belts: 1311i Eull nf Glhaptem Established 1869, at University of Michigan, KenteLaw Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. Benjaiirlljn-ICollege of Law, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, 1n01s. BootheNorthwestern University Law School, Chicago, Illinois. Story-School of Law , Columbia University, New York City. CooleyeSt. Louis Law School, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. PomeroyeI-Iasti'ngs College of Law, University of California, San Fran- cisco, California. 1 MarshalleLaw School, George Washington University, Washington, D. C. Jaye-Albany Law School, Union University, Albany, New York. VVebstereBoston University School of Law, Boston, Mass. HamiltoneLaw Department, Cincinnati University, Cincinnati, Ohio. GibsoneDepartment of Law, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Choate-Charter Revoked. WaiteeYale University Law School, New Haven, Connecticut. FieldeDepartment of Law, New York University, New York City. Conkling-School of Law, Cornell University, Ithica, New York, TiedemaneLaw Department, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri. MinoreLaw Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia. Dillone-Department of Law, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. DanielseBuffalo University.Law School, Buffalo, New York. Chase-dSchool of Law, University of Oregon, Portland, Oregon. HarlaneCollege of Law, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. SwaneLaw Department, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. McClaineLaw Department, State University of Iowa, Iowa City. LincolntCollege of Law, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska. OsgoodeeLaw School of Upper Canada, Toronto. Ontario. FullereChicago-Ken't College of Law, Chicago, Illinois. Miller-Law Department, Leland Stanford Junior University, California. GreeneSchool of Law, University of Kansas. Lawrence, "Kansas. ComstockeCollege of Law, Syracuse Unviersity, Syracuse, New York. Dwight-New York Law School, New York City. FostereSchool of Law, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana. Rannengester-n Reserve University Law School, Cleveland, Ohio. LangdelleCOHege of Law, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois, BrewereSchool of Law, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado. DouglaSeLaw School, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. BallingereSchool of Law, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. MaloneeLaw Department, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. EvartseBrooklyn Law School St. Lawrence University, Brooklyn. ThomaseLaw Department, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado. BeattyeCollege of Law, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. ReedwCOIIege of Law, University of Maine, Bangor, Maine. TuckereWashington and Lee University, Lexington, Virginia. RobertseCOIIege of Law, University of Texas, Austin, Texas. ShiraseLaW College, University of Pittsburg, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. AmeseUniversity of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota. Bruce-Law Department, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota. .Holmes-Law Department, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma. WhiteeTulane University Law School, New Orleans, Louisiana" williama Olhaptvr uf 1am Alpha Eplta . ' ' Wu up - an - u... 'x a . . 4. . , - H-u - .. - , . . .V - . .4-- ,- .. . ,,. c .1- . . . A. ,.,--.....,,.,. ., n. g . "' n.4,. " .:1 $'P"nQ.g.: ' t... '-" . . :. ' ""5" -- "' - . J ". ' -434-' '0 w. ' FJP'W'R-n. 1.- . v - - .. , Killough Langdon Schroeder Hunt Peters Chapman Graham McDougal Brown Bechtold Werlein Alexander Strahan Robbins Recken 218 ".7. . .r...-..-......mc...:. 7,-v-,.:',,g.,.,. .w-a. , IHhi Alpha $21121 williama Glimmer Chartered November, 1908. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 James B. Killough, Frank C. Hunt, William W. Robbins, Clemer W. Plat, Fay L. Brown, Edward J. Chapman, Bert Yates. 1913 John G. Schroeier, Donald M. Graham, Charles C. Bechtold, Louis A. Recken, James Alexander. 1914 Clair McDougal, Edwin H. Langdon, John E. Werlein, John W. Peters, Frank Strahan. 1am Alpha E21131 33011 nf mhuntem Founded at Northwestern University, 1888. Blackstone-Chicago-Kent College of Law, Chicago, Illinois. Story-Illinois College of Law, Chicago, Illinois. FullerNNorthwestern University School of Law, Chicago, Illinois. WebsterNChicago School of Law, Chicago, Illinois. MarshallNUniversity of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, Ryan-University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. MagruderNUniversity of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois. Campbell-University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. GarlandNUniversity of Arkansas, Little Rock, Arkansas. Ha.y-Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. BentonNKansas City School of Law, Kansas City, Missouri. Capeni-Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, Illinois. HammondNUniversity of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. ChaseNCincinnati Law School, Cincinnati, Ohio. Williams-University of Oregon Law School, Portland, Oregon. RapalloNNeW York University, New York, N . LawsonNUnivgrsity of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri. TaftNGeorgetown University, Washington, D. C. CalhounNYale University, New Haven, Connecticut. GreenNUniversity of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. Jefferson8University of Virginia, University, Virginia, Gunter-University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado. HamlinNUniversity of Maine, Bangor, Maine. CorlissNUniversity of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota. RossNUniversity of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. HolmesNLeland Stanford Junior University, Stanford University, Cal. TempleNUniversity of California, San Francisco, California. StaplesNVVashington and Lee University, Lexington, Virginia. n ,. Hpailnn Q'Lhaptpr nf Alpha Kappa Kappa r. "V. - , uq n .- '- "" . v" y - . v- .; "ls'-.;..ft. ' , . , ' ' - Jur.r4- ..- .... ' MAM -..I , WW ,. M VWAVW aw Younie A. P. Noyes Wang Stout Brooke McCown Jonez E. A. Noyes Van Cleve Cahill Partlow Ford Harding Hastings Emery .u ,. . -,Inhubwckl. 7. --4- Alpha Kappa Kappa Hpailnn Q'Lhaptvr Chartered March 21, 1903. FRATRES IN1UNIVERSITATE 1912 Arthur E. Younie, Allen P. Noyes, Stanley L. Wang, Clarence 1W. Ross, William F. Stout, Lloyd W. Brooke, Arthur C. McCown. Lafe O. Roberts. 1913 Harvard C. Moore, Hinton D. Jonez, Edward A. Noyes, Archie C. VanCleve, John Hughes, Hubert F. Leonard, Roscoe W. Cahill. 1914 Kenneth A. Partlow. 1.915 Leo R. Ford, Harry G. Blair, Irving M. Lupton, Harry- S. Harding, George Hastings, Mark W. Emery, Darwin L. Palmer. Alpha Kappa Kappa Z8011 nf thaptyrz Alpha-Medical Department, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H. BetaeCollege of Physicians and Surgeons, San Francisco, California, GammaeTufts Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. DeltaeMedical Department, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt. EpsiloneJefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ZetaeLong Island College Hospital Medical School, Brooklyn, N. Y. EtadCOIIege of Physicians and Surgeons. Chicago, Illinois. Theta--Maine Medical .School, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine. IotaeMedical Department, University of Syracuse, Syracuse, N. Y. Kappa-Medical Department, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wis. LambdaeMedical Department, Cornell University, New York City. MueMedical Department, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. NueRush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois. Xi-Medical Department, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. OmicroneMedical Department, University of Cincinnati,-Cincinnati, Ohio. PieStarling-Ohio Medical University, Columbus, Ohio. Rho-Meiica1 Department, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado. SigmaeMedical Department, University of California, San Francisco, Cal. TaueMedical Department, University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee. UpsiloneMedical Department, University of Oregon, Portland, Oregon. PhieMedical Department, University of Nashville, Nashville. Tenn. ChieMedical Department, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. PsieMedical Department, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. Omega:University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, Tenn. Alpha BetaeMedical Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, La. Aloha Gamma-Medical Department. University of Georgia, Augusta, Ga. Alpha DeltaeMedical Department, McGill University, Montreal. P. Q. Alpha Epsilon-Medica1 Department, University of Toronto, Toronto, Can. Alpha. Zeta-Medical Department George Washington University, Wash- ington, D. C. Aloha Eta Yale Medical School, New Haven, Connecticut. Alpha ThetaeMedical Department, University of Texas. Galveston. Texas. Alpha Iotanniversity of Michigan, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Alpha Kappanniversity College of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia. Alpha LambdaeMedical College of the State of South Carolina, Charles- ton, South Carolina. Alpha Mu-Meaical Department, St. Louis University. St. Louis. Mo. Alpha Nu-Me4ica1 Department, University of L0uisvi11e,..L0uisville, Ky. Alpha XieMedical Department, Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. Aloha OmicroneTTniversity Medical College. Kansas. City, Missouri. Alpha PieMedical Department, University of Pittsburg, Pittsburg, Pa. IIIILIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIII $3M III III, IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII .X y EWIAOI IIIIIII'IIIII IIIIIIII III III III WIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIII "III""""'"'""" Nu thaptvr 1113 13311 W iEnailnn I! III ..NI.'I'1'.Q'.' gi Campbell Watkins Eastham Stinson Evans McQuinn : ' "..'-u-'v'-'-.,, .7 Norton r e S s 0 r P E ith Prosser Goldsm L Murphey mu 1am Epailmt Founded 1903, at the Metropolitan College of Music, Cincinnati, Ohio. lNu Glimmer Chartered March 4, 1911. SORORES Ethel Rowland, Eve Stinson, Mary Morgan, Nancy Peterson, Lila Prosser, Juliet Cross Burke, Ethel Evans, Nelle Murphey, Alberta Campbell, Lucile McQuinn, Meta Goldsmith, Mae Norton, Valene Eastham, Ina Watkins, Mabel Withers. 181111 nf Ghaptem Alpha Metropo1itan College of Music, Cincinnati, Ohio. Beta New England Conservatory of Music, Boston, Massachusetts. Gamma University School of Music, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Delta-Detroit Conservatory of Music. Efta-Syracuse University. Theta Kroeger School of Music, St. Louis, Missouri. Iota, Alpha Chicago Musical College. Kappa Metrop01itan School of Music, Indianapolis, Indiana. Lambda Ithica Conservatory of Music. Mu- Bremen Conservatory, Grimesville, Georgia. Nu-University School of Music, Eugene, Oregon. Xi-University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. Omicron Comb's Broadstreet Conservatory, Philadelphia, Pennslyvania. w u m , .7525: md gun orm lu mow te KaN L 317'7 50,-.w-IIGH'1- n m . m 3 mmu . mam . mDo .u a P .7 JC .... M w S r. mrmm .7 hkm n. hwa i. ,. HW wk 5. .w a , IHriara, Q'Lluh An UpperclassmeNs Society in Good Fellowship, Organized Nov. 1, 1910. FHriara Robert Kellogg Ralph Moores Earl Latourette Homer Jamison Martin Hawkins Dean Walker Leon Ray Ralph Newland Burns Powell David L. McDaniels James Jonas A. M. Geary J. LeRoy Johnson Shaver Bibee Payton . . w W N . m .. Y r . eme O 1 l 3 . gun 2 .- ac w rm w. .u. w. W. kn 600 NH S.ns n .1 rh T' W811 v MA A. A r V 2 1 .f . m - g?terll emh g?ttipt Senior Honor Society, Organized June 3, 1910. Ariinv memhrm Mildred Bagley Ruth Merrick Birdie Wise Jean Allison Fay Clark Jessie Bibee Ermel Miller Pansy Shaver Alma Payton QStahuate members! in Reaihem Ruth Duniway Mae Sage Marion Stowe Roberts Caufleld Grout Fenton Reynolds k mm a mn on cm MS Benson Jones Bradshaw Bean Young Motschenbacher Rice III A -..- Ill h-ur' En-Kn-In Sophomore Society, Organized January 12, 1912. mrmhem Earl Cobb Alva Grout Delbert Stannard Harold Young Carl Fenton Wallace Benson Wallace Caufleld Robert Bradshaw Oudin Roberts Robert McCornack Don Rice Joe Jones Charles Reynolds V. T. Motschenbacher Hawley Bean mosooH mnnk 4 $2rtinn E ODrgzmizatinna Gelsler . . . .President . . .Vice President . . . .Secretary .David L. McDaniel, Ben Chandler Chandler P h. .I f U 5 .T. n m u .T. ow h P t a .1. Hninrraitg nf 091?an mum l .w n a D c M A5511: Ray EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE . . RAPHAEL GEISLER BIRDIE WISE 5 l"... , 1 g eQxI ! :1! EH II ill III II m Ill Hayward Latourette Jamison V Leonard Schafer Neill Harris Hug Williams Athletir lemril P. L. Campbell, Chairman. STUDENT MEMBERS Homer Jamison, Earl Latourette, William Neill. FACULTY MEMBERS William Hayward, Dr. H. B. Leonard, Dr. Joseph Schafer, ALUMNI MEMBERS Judge L. T. Harris, George Hug, Ben Williams. 237 - I V" U V - l -..' - 'J '51I'JC'IVI' l?! .n . .A...-.-.A-r ,7 .-M..-4.nn.u .mu.m.u.wn.". --... . Kimmell Zimmerman Dunton Jones Haugen Himes Cash Pickett, King Stastney Crockett Eaurpan Eitrrarg Emma; $113t2r5 F. E. DUNTON .................................................. President WALTER W. KIMMELL .............................. Vice President P. CAMPBELL CROCKETT .................................. Secretary J. EARL JONES ............................................... Treasurer WENDELL BARBOUR ....................................... Treasurer ALFRED DAVIES .................................................. Editor Peter Crockett Otto Heider Walter Kimmell Andrew Collier Alfred Collier Forrest Dunton Howard Zimmerman Earl Jones Mique Stastney Vincent Yaden Dalton King mvmherz Donald Rice Norman Ashcraft Oscar Haugen Wendell Barbour Morris Terpening Alfred Davies William Cass Edward Himes Burleigh Cash Clarence Brotherton Falley Rasmussen Fred Hardesty William McNeill Clyde Dawson Laurence Dineen Ford Hendricks Ben Lombard Earnest Anderson James Donald Marsh Goodwin Walter Huntington Ben Williams ui59.K u A . , mam . w n m 0 m n g e M an N mm g $ .m . t .h m . n mH f in a D ,u: ? nr . aw ma 0B r 4 B t e . u u... m. w... a 2 sm B T .md n w w va a 2 . MY m . u a L F . s " rk . m mm a a ma 7. 4. cn , e m w H m m d . 1 . m 0 $ D . n .s e . . e ,. n - . i . m D ... .- h .. r W e u d . a1 . e .. . H n1. ., u, 1-- I1 . VanOrsdel Maegly Brant Dunham Hemenway Drew Macklin Graves Tooze Beach VVhittlesey McQuinn Cowan Newton McMicken McClaine VVlse Davis McClaren Waterman engstake Cowden Merrick S x Kno Young iEntaxiatt illiterarg gmmtg Qbffiwra ELIZABETH BUSCH .................................................................... President EMMA WATERMAN ............................................................ Vice President RUTH BEACH ................................................................................ Secretary ELEANOR McCLAIN ................................................ Assistant Secretary FLORA DUNHAM ........................................................................ Treasurer MARGARET EGAN ............................................................................ Editor NELL HEMENWAY ...................................................... Sergeant-at-Arms Eutaxiana Ruth Beach Esther Maegley Elizabeth Busch Hazel Tooze Hilda Brant . Lena Newton Bess Cowden Lenore Hanson Lucile Davis Marjorie Cowan Nettie Drew Lyle Steiwer Flora Dunham Beatrice Lilly Norma Graves Mae Norton Nellie Hemenway Esther Grissen J ane Knox Alice Farnsworth Lucia Macklin Hazel Barta - Lucile McQuinn Margaret Sh-eehy Anne McMicken Helen Werlein ' Ruth Merrick . Agnes Elliot Lilah Sengstake Norma Dobie Pauline Van Orsdel Gretchen Sherwood Emma Waterman Esther Carson Birdie Wise Pearl Horner Janet Young Margaret Rankin Mildred Whittlesey Elsie Bain Eleanor McClaine Mildred Healy Catherine Kirkpatrick Jones Zimmerman Himes Motschenbacher Cash Young Calkins Pattce Geisler Heider 13mm; mm QIhriatian Azanriatinn Gahinet J. EARL JONES ............................................................................... President VERNON T. MOTSCHENBACHER ............................................ Secretary CLYDE PATTEE ...................................................................... Bible Study L. RAPHAEL GEISLER .................................................................. Meetings EDWARD J. HIMES .......................................................................... Finance A. BURLEIGI-I CASH ............................................................................ Social HOWARD ZIMMERMAN ...................................................... Social Service RAYMOND HEIDER ................................................................ Membership RUSSELL CALKINS ................................................................. I ..... Publicity Ahniaurg 4:80am PROF. E. E. DE COU .................................................................... President DR. C. W. SOUTHWORTH ......................................... ' ...... , ............. S ecretary C. A. McCLAIN ..... Treasurer HON. R. A. BOOTH J. EARL JONES PRES. P. L. CAMPBELL EDWARD J. HIMES C. A. DALZELL E. K. WHEELER Florence Cleveland Edna Messenger Zella Soults Elizabeth Lewis Ruth Beach Lena Newton Lida. Garrett Lila Sengstake Cecil Miller Ermel Miller Iglizabeth Busch Pauline Van Orsdel Mae Norton mgxu rm 1311qu Mummy Ghriatian 'Aaanriatintt Qlahinvt FLORENCE CLEVELAND .......................................................... President LENA NEWTON .................................................................. Vice President ELIZABETH BUSCH .................................................................... Secretary LIDA GARRETT ............................................................................ Treasurer ERMEL MILLER ............................................ '. ............... General Secretary ZELLA SOULTS ........................ Missions LILA SENGSTAKE .................................................................... Bible Study CECIL MILLER ....................................... Music MAE NORTON .......... Devotional RUTH BEACH ...................................................................................... Social ELIZABETH LEWIS .......................................................... Inter-Collegiate PAULINE VAN ORSDEL .............................................................. Publicity EDNA MESSENGER ................................................................ Membership .u- . ; .ut.w.-..n s-..w ............... w-n..7... .. . .. ., ". Lowell Main C. A. Moores Waite Newland R. D. Moores 14-4 A..- $11,215 Qlluh Ofoirvm CHESTER A. MOORES ................................................................... President R. BURNS POWELL ............................................................. Vice President RALPH NEWLAND ................................................... Secretary-Treasurer members ARTHUR GEARY WILLIAM LOWELL WILLIAM MAIN RALPH MOORES EVANS HOUSTON FEN WAITE MARTIN HAWKINS EDWIN DORR Collier McDaniel Devereaux McGuire Olsen Neill Davies Kellogg Marshall Johnson Stevenson Northrup Broughton Hodge Caufield Grout Martin McClain Walls Onthank Pattee Converse Thomas Reynolds Martin Jones Henderson a Ill. 11h HI. Uh Mb PIII- i - ! !'.'.- - 5L - . III? I Enginpefa 0111111 igannrarg mpmhpm E. H. McAlister. A. M. Fred G. Frink, M. S. Percy P. Adams, B. S. Heman Burr Leonard, Ph. D. Franklin L. Barker. E. M. C. W. Converse. M. A. R. H. Dearborn, M. E. Charles Roy Reid, B. S. r .3: 1 Ar": 1fw524-1-1'y'. "77ft"? 'i"! Pattee ' McGuire Enginppfa Olluh ; 0911?er J. LEWIS JOHNSON ...................................................................... President J. P. MCGUIRE ........................................................................ Vice President CLYDE PATTEE .......................................................................... Secretary CLARENCE WALLS .................................................................... Treasurer g?tuhvnt mrmhpra . . . . ... - - ,- - ';-.-".,-..-.,. ;-. .,.....:.u.u-..x.nl.u-.mg--...w.n-..- J Graham J . Michael Herbert Barbour Harold Broughton Lyle F. Brown Hugh P. Currin Raymond Heider Sidney E. Henderson Edward J. Himes Leigh M. Huggins J. Earl Jones Robert N. Kellogg John G. Kelly Rolland C. Kennedy . William S. Main C. L. Marshall David L. McDaniel Fred T. Myers F. F. Northrop Charles R. Oleson J . V. Rast Elmer E. Hall Donald W. Larwood Lyman G. Rice Elliott Roberts George E. Stevenson Carl F. Thomas Alfred Collier D. G. Glass George Carl A. D. Crenshaw Raymond Caro Abe Blackman Walter Hodge Jerry Martin Edgar Martin Cyril Myers R. P. Newland Karl Omthank Harold Quigley Charles M. Reynolds Allyn F. Roberts Mason E. Roberts J ames Ryder Archie Service H. C. Sigglin B. H. Smith Herbert Van Duyn C. B. Washburne Wallace Caufield Marion L. Custer A. H. Davies Carl B. Fenton Alva R. Grout mm . III!" II Claire Pratt Maud Mastick Mae Norton Frances Adams Hazel Rad-er Merle McKelvy Bess Lewis Gretchen Sherwood Norma Graves Olivia Risley Anne McMicken Emma Waterman Lenore Hansen Flora Dunham Eleanor McClain Edith Sheehy Ruth Beach Alsea Hawley Grace Bean Mason Roberts Homer Jamison Ralph Newland Ralph Moores Raphael Geisler Eberle Shelton Charles Reynolds Harold Young Wallace Benson Charles Fowler Ray Caufleld Eroel Kay Joe Jones Carl Grayson Homer Maris Carleton Spencer Evans Houston Lloyd Barzee Dale Chessman Abe Blackman Robert Bradshaw William Main Harold Bean Carl Martzlof! Ben Chandler Boyce Fenton Moores Dunnam Waterman Newland Qbffirerz RALPH MOORES ............................................................................. President EMMA WATERMAN ............................................................. Vice President RALPH NEWLAND .................................................................... Secretary FLORA DUNHAM ......................................................................... Treasurer mtmhem m A-fu1 x Glimpses of the Race and River Ellie Gimme 0111111 The University of Oregon Canoe Club was formed last spring to promote the interests of what is probably the most Widely partici- pwted in of all our spring recreations. The membership includes fifteen men and fifteen women students, selected With the aim of enlisting those most deeply intenrested in canoeing; canoe owners, if possible. The club has laid out for itself an ambitious program of accomplishments, Which will require several college generations for completion. The Club hopes to make the favorite spring pastime more attrac- tive by providing a boat house-which is under wayebry beautifying the race and providing landings. Also, the Club Will co-operate with the J unior Class in holding a spring canoe carnival and regetta. The social side of canoeing hardly needs to be emphasized or stimulated, but .it will be recognized by a number of club picnics, parties and trips. The typical canoe enthusiast is characteristically individualistic. He instinctively shuns all crowds and clubs, but once this tendency is overcome, the Varsity Canoe Club hopes to make its existence aggressively known and to prove to a sceptical world its title as one of the most ilworth while" organizations in the University. eRalph Moores. 251 h. V. . . .. . . t u - -' --m- .. -. t. . .v -; :u .. I..V...;; .mwnw 4e-.lh...:-;..'W............x..-....---..-.......- . LuntU'f' n - nub -- Hager Kronenberg Skei Zimmerman Sengstake Motschenbacher Busch Prather Ggprman Olluh Qthirera EHirnt $emwter MABEL ZIMMERMAN ................................................................. President CELIA HAGER ..................................................................... Vice President ELIZABETH BUSCH .................................................................... Secretary ALFRED SKEI ................................................................................ Treasurer VERNON MOTSCHENBACHER ................................ Sergeant-at-Arms Qbfftrera vawnh Seawater ELIZABETH BUSCH .................................................................... President GEORGIA PRATHER .......................................................... Vice President LILA SENGSTAKE ...................................................................... Secretary ALFRED SKEI .............................................................................. Treasurer CHESTER KRONENBERG .......................................... Sergeant-at-Arms .K-g.- A-A- m-'- - -r 44A A .14- Gbmnan 0111111 iKnII nf mrmhpm Grace Adams Rachel Applegate Neta Bartlett Rose Basler Elizabeth Busch Dorothy Campb'ell Florence Cleveland Raphael Geisler Celia Hager Maude Kincaid Chester Kronenberg Mabel Lane Esther Maegly Homer Maris Alexander Martin Imogene McKown Vernon Motschenbacher Ella Moulton Hulda Parr Georgia Prather Harold Quigley Cecil Sawyer Lila Sengstake Alfred Skei Harry Vierecx J 0e Williamson Mabel Zimmerman Olive Zimmerman 253 Howard Zimmerman Edna, Messenger Ruth Lathrop Mary Tappenden George Schantin Mabel Miller Laura Pummill Lucia Macklin Arthur Scholl Edith Watt Grace Hartley Hazel McKown Martha Struck Amy Rothchild Mabel Lorence Ellen Frink Margaret Rhose H. W. Heidenreichv Annie Sinclair Alice McFarland Leona Bish Grace Cole Edna McKnight Ellice Shearer Norma Graves Eleanore McClaine Oscar Haugen I raga: themiatrg Glluh Organized February 1912. Prof. O. F. Stafford Prof. F. L. Shinn Harold Quigley Roy Fitch Homer Maris Harold Bean A. M. Collier Ernest Lamb Buford Jones Carrol Wagner Clarence Walls Homer Wheelon Laurence Whitman Herman Oberteuffer MEMBERS Lyman Rice Joe Williamson Walter McClure Henry He-idenrich Matthew St-astney Herbert VanDyne J oe Ingle David Glass C. N. Reynolds A. D. Collier Eva Frazier Lyle Brown Graham Micnael Alfred Skei R. D. Calkins Ellen Cowgill F. F. Northrup Harold Cockerline Ira Staggs R. B. Giles Margaret Powell Frank Davidson John Black W. Gaston Walter Benson Robert McCornack Robert N. Kellogg Charles McMillan ; . mummy lemtil $ffir2ra BIRDIE WISE ................................................................................... President RUTH MERRICK ................................................................... Vice President JAVINA STANFIELD .................................................................. Secretary JESSIE PROSSER .................... ....................................... Sergeant-at-Arms memhem Jean Allison , Frieda Goldsmith Javina Stanfield J essie Prosser Maud McKelvey Cora Chace Ruth Merrick Eva Frazier Rachel Applegate Ethel Green Clementine Cutler Celia Hager Lila Prosser Birdie Wlise Maude McDonald Frieda Rhodes Ruth Howell Imogene McKown Alumni Azanriatinn 09ftir2ra JUDGE WOODSON T. SLATER .................................................. President IDA PATTERSON ....................................................... , .First Vice President RAY GOODRICH ...................................................... Second Vice President C. W. CONVERSE ...................................................... Secretary-Treasurer Onthank Currin Reid Washburne Wagner Van Dyne Pefley Broughton Beebe Custer Pattee McGuire Payne Brenton Martin Cockerline Neill Converse Smith Northrup Dearborn Amprimn Enatitutp nf Elertriral Enginppra University of Oregon Branch. $ffir2ra PROF. R. H. DEARBORN ............................................................ Chairman C. R. REED .................. Harold Cockerline F. F. Northrop R. C. Kennedy C. W. Washburne B. H. Smith Alex. Martin Karl W. Onrthank Clyde Pattee ............................................................... Secretary 13112111112111 at Eargv J . P. McGuire H. P. Currin mtmhera C. H. Myers C. H. VanDuyn S. Adler Jas. L. Watson 0. Jaureguy F. A. Beebe 3 ' . w u..- . I IHan Eellmir Azanriatinn nf the Hnimraity nf GDrmgnn Qthirerz MARJORIE HOLCOMB ................................................................ President J EAN ALLISON ............................................................................ Secretary Eplvgatw Javina Stanfield Ermel Miller Bess Lewis Lenora Hanson Eleanor McClain Nell Hemenway Entprfratrrnitg Athlrtir Aaahriatinn Ir b an: ' ' m 11f thp Huturrmty 11f GDrPgnn W Exemtine anmmiitee BEN CHANDLER, Sigma Nu ..................................................... President RALPH MOORES, Kappa Sigma ...................................... Vice President JACK SHATTUCK, Phi Gamma Delta .................. Secretary-Treasurer L Eelegatw g V. T. Motschenbacher, Alpha Tau Omega 'A Paul Briedwell, Sigma Chi Evans Houston, Tawah Erwin Rolfe, Avava 1? ' : Leigh Huggins, Acacia ' I Ira Staggs, Dormitory Club Edward Bailey, Delta Sigma Walter Hodge, Oregon Club BILL HAYWARD Physical Director and Track Coach ARTHUR M. GEARY Graduate Manager of Student Activities Athlptim , Riga -K . ' " "?mlief!7ui .. V I1? . "hi 1352mm nf the "OB" Erark Robert N. Kellogg Martin W. Hawkins James S. Johns Walter McClure William Neill Ercel Kay Charles Taylor Homer Jamison Carl Fenton Tom Word Herbert Barbur Ben Chandler Ralph Newland Harry Stine Carl Fenton Elmer Hall Robert N. Kellogg Edward Baliley Robert Bradshaw Ben Chandler William S. Main Homer Jamison Carl Fenton Dean Walker Chester Huggins Graham McConnell Waldo Miller Will Fiser Archie Serv1ce Earl Latourette igaavhall Emma Wallace Mount Byron Houck Oudin Roberts Fred Annunsen Earl Cobb Paul Bond Howard Gray ZHnnIhall Earl Latourette Dean Walker Virgil Noland Robert Fariss William Heusner Joe Jones Eaakethall Clifford Sims Robert Bradshaw HS H'I. .-. u: L... L's S' S S's. :- -AA. NV... warmauuu 4v- ,1 ., Eh? Zlhmthall Gleam $mmm nf 1911 WILLIAM S. MAIN .......................................................................... Captain JAMES S. JOHNS ............................................................................ Manager ELLIOT ROBERTS ............ Assistant Manager THE TEAM Ends ................................................................ Chandler, Fenton, Bradshaw Tackles .......................................................................................... Hall, Bailey Guards ..................................................................................... Noland, Fariss Center ......................... - ......................................................................... Kellogg Quarterback ............................................. L .................................... Latourvette Backfield .................................................... Main, Walker, Jones, Heusner Subs .......................................................................................... Grout, Viereck THE SCHEDULE Date. Opponents. Where Played. U. of O. Opp. Oct. 21-Vanc0uver Barracks, Eugene, 36 0 Oct. 281Washington State College, Pullman, 0 Nov. 181University of Washington, Portland, Nov. 281Multnomah Club, , Portland, 29 17 6 Nov. 41Whitman, Eugene, 8 5 3 6 ,. . 1 V .. .. . , . ... 7-..1- nu. A..:,..-..u-.n , , . .. - 1 . wI4v...",r,v...;.u...v. tn 1 A .. .mm . ---..,. - 1.4....A..-........1. .nn.w.-nu.tu.w..... . Z98 THE SQUAD u. ..-..... n. V- ..-.-...N. , -M -..-.. wym.....,r..m... . .. . illnnthall 19121112111 nf geaann nf 1911 In looking back over the events of the season just passed, it seems that the year 1911 was a most disastrous one for Old Oregon, at least as far as football is concerned. Many things had much to do with the outcome. The coaches and trainer had to look forward to a long season, with the hard games at the end, and therefore had to go easy on the training for fear the men would go stale. Also ' luck, and bad luck at that, had much to do with keeping back the development of team work; one after another of the first team men were injured in practice, and owing to the shortage of material there were none to take their places. To make it worse, the injured men were mostly from the backfield, and if there is anything necessary to 3. teams team work, it is the working together of the backfield men, night after night until each knows what the' other man will do almost as well as he himself knows. But the biggest obstacle in the way of a good team was the vast shortage of ma- terial. If the first team men had been made to iight for their places by am- bitious scrubs, Oregon would have un- doubtedly made a far better showing. Hard work and plenty of it, in practice, is an essential element in making a good eleven. The first game of the season was with . the soldier team from" Vancouver Bar- racks, . who were coached by Dudley Clark. With several of the first team backfield missing, the ,Varsity won ease ily, running up a 36 to 0 score, This was simply a practice game to get the team in some sort of shape for the hard . game with the W. S. C. eleven, scheduled for the following week. On the 28th day of October, on the Pullman field, the Oregon team got away with a 6 to 0 score over the Washing- ton Staters, upsetting the theory that the Pullman team would win easily. In this game the Varsity men showed the stuff of which they were made, for it was a hard, heart-breaking contest,- both teams fighting for every inch, with no scoring until the third quarter, when Oregon got away on an end run, scoring the only points of the day. On the next day, Saturday, the men saw the Washington eleven defeat Idaho in Spo- kane, and after the game every man in the Oregon team felt that Coach Warner 263 ,5 ..1 .91-... - - - ' '- - ' .l- L-..Ll.l..... --.. 1.; mu.....-.4......1.muunm-.-... .- we could defeat Dobie,s warriors, for in this game they showed weaker than at any other part of the season. Perhaps this was because the wily Dobie knew that the Oregon team was watching. On November 4th, the ever surprising Whitman team met the Varsity on Kincaid Field, and for the most of the game the University supporters were threatened With heart fail- ure. Except for occasional spurts, the Var- sity played listlessly while the Whitman eleven were up and going every second of the game. Oregon scored one touchdown, which was soon duplicated by the Mission- aries and as neither side kicked the goal the score stood 5 to 5, until just before the end of the game the Varsity added three more points through a place kick, making the final score 8 to 5 in favor of Oregon. Manager Johns After this disappointing game, the team was put through some strenuous licks, sev- eral of the 01d stars returning to help in- still team work in the eleven. Great im- provement was noted and when the team went down to meet Washington on the 18th tthe fatal 18thy the team was conceded to have at least a chance. However the Seattzle-ites showed their superiority from the start, and the final score stood 29 to 3 i' ' in their favor. The team fought to the ASSIStant coaCh Hunt last giving a splendid example of what a team can do, even though hopelessly out-classed, for Dobie had per- fected a wonderful machine, a team that was worried but a few times .5- si'". J, K n t I i 1 m 95-wJDUHvU xwv- during the entire game by the Oregon onslaughts. Too much credit canno't be given the Washington men, for they proved the cleanest and best of players and more than one Oregon man was heard to remark after the game, "That team would give Harvard and Yale an awful rub? Then came the cancelling of the Idaho game, through the death of Virgil Noland, left guard on the Varsity. It was finally decided to play the Multnomah game, although the players had no heart for it after the tragic death of their team-mate. This game was another disappointment to the University supporters, the clubmen winning out 17 to 6. Luck played a large part this day, but the club . had a fine eleven, and they won on their merits. Thus ended the season of 1911. Three Oregon men were chosen in the All-Northwest selections. Kellogg was universal choice for center, Bailey for Tackle, and Main for half-back. Washington had five men selected, W. S. C. one, 0. A. C. one, and Whitman one, so that in this, as well as the percentage rating, Oregon stood next to Washington. WW Swot; LYLE BROWN, Yell Leader Lyle has exhibited ability to yell ever since his days of Mellinis Food and Soothing Syrup, at Which time he kicked the slats out of his trundle bed and led the family hoorah. Lyleis mamma liked the Sigma Chi boys pretty well, so when it came time to send the family pride and papais joy to Eugene, it was a simple matter to change the safety pin to the blue shield With the white cross. Bush has pulled off a number of start- ling things during his college career. In his Sophomore year he was naughty to the 1913 Frosh, and in his Senior year he announced the iicowboy ranch" pictures at the Folly. 265 . , , V ,4 113244! mam S n .m J m k m W V. m .m B es US e.n Pa U4 of t a gL g 0 H e K m .ms M au e A E MH T E HH Ta H r g Mn 30 hJ C n 0 t n e F w a h S d a r SB t r e b 0 R d r a ,w 3 a H BILL MAINeBackfi-eldeCaptain 1911 Bill came to Oregon from Alameda four years ago because the California style of football was too much like drop the handkerchief. The Sigma Nu boys induced Bill to come around to the house, and he liked the fellows, and didnit think heid regret the step, so the deed was did. During his football career Main has beaten a maze of paths across the goal lines of Oregonis enemies. When Bill got the ball, it was "My God, there he goes again! Catch iem!"ebut on the defense, When he speared his man, there was no response, and not a sound save a dull thud of falling bodies, as he carried the runner back toward his own goal line. EARL LATOURETTEeQuarterback Sap came to Oregon With the handicap of having been preceded by an illustrious brother. The Kappa Sigs took him in on condition that he serve frosh duties for two years. Latourette got away for the touchdown, Which took the pip out of O. A. C. in the 1910 game at Corvallis, and for the week following, Con Dillon reported rush sales of dainty black court plaster to a Varsity co- -.eds Sap landed All- North- west quarter for two or three seasons. He learned the principles of football Evith the Chicken Alley team in Oregon ity. DEAN WALKER-Backf1eldeCaptain Elect Dean came up from Independence in 1910 and promptly decided to air his blankets on the Sigma Nu back porch. Dean has gone into football and basketball With a spirit Which works out the old principle that a man gets out of a thing just whatrhe puts into it. Walker will lead Oregonis hopefuls on their pilfering expeditions about the Northwest next Fall. ,,... . ... .. , 1' , i,.,.4l.- ' , .V kebQu-u.m.-4.ru-.'e.uluu1m$h--w.n 4A .. . I BOB KELLOGG-Lineman Lots of great men come from Baker City, and When Bob Kellogg headed for Eugene, the mayor of Baker and the sheriff of the county breathed a sigh of relief. The Sigs decided, Bob was not wholly incorrigible, so they kept him chained in the basement for a week. Be- cause his howls disturbed the neighborhood, it was decided to give him a try out with the Glee Club. He performed up and down the scale like a monkey on thirty feet of grape vine. The next year they turned Bob loose on the football field, and when he learned to distinguish a friend from an enemy, it was duck soup for the home team. Kelloggis three years football record comprises one season All-Northwest center, and the reputation of one of the best players who ever donned an Oregon moleskin. ED BAILEY-Lineman Ed Bailey, Oregon's spritely tackle, just grew up, and the time and place all this happened is of no consequence now, because like all great men, appreciation. comes only after the preacher has been paid for the final rites. Ed was corralled by the Delta Sigs two years ago, and by tearing out a section from the side of the house, the boys succeded in backing him in back- wards and blindfolded. Baileyts three years on the team has won for him the reputation of having been tried and never found wanting. BEN CHANDLER-End Ben was captured on the head waters of Coos river some four years ago, and brought to Eugene at great cost. Some Sig high brow asked Chandler, if he wanted to become a Neophite, and liking the liquid sound of the word, he took the bait without a quiver. Ben has gone into baseball and football each of his four years in college, and his achievements have been responsible for wholesale ink splashing on the roster of famous men in his College. 268 nieAQ-u-A J m, xme' 4 4-: t- em a V';- .1... .- -a- .. . 'm ;;;;;5V:.-a. . .Vrgk1t;e-s.nA.h-AenkO'Gwhlialehhhgw-C - . w CARL FENTONeLineman Carl dropped in from Dallas a couple of years ago, the Betas thought he was a pretty nice boy, and a fellow who can play football, baseball, basketball, and split kindlint when heis restini, ain,t to be sneezed at, and is pretty handy to have around, so they took him in and gave him food and raiment. Carl was a mainstay on Coach Bill Warnefs 1911 line, and the big fellow can be depended upon to move whole sections of the opposing formations. ROBERT FARISSe-Lineman Mrs. Fariss, little boy appeared on the Oregon campus about three years ago, with his sunny countenance beam- ing from sheer exuberance and a recent application of the maternal scrubbing brush. All the girls fell for Robbie, but Bill Hayward, who has a reputation for saving boys with the tendency to go hog wild in society, took a kindly interest in the boy, and finally induced him, to turn his attention to the more legit- imate pastime of football. Last year Bob Fariss won the repu- tation of a hard, clean, and depend- able player. , ELMER HALPLineman Hall comes down out of the Baker County wilderness when the snow fiies in the fall, and he goes back when the deer are coming out of the tibig blueit in the spring. On his first prospecting trip to Eugene, Hall decided to accept a grub stake from the Sigma Nus. In football his free gold ability assays innumerable ounces to the long ton, and the big fellow is billed to land All-Northwest tackle next year. JOE JONES-Backiie1d Joe is the quiet and unassuming little fellow who showed up at Oregon two years ago, broke bread with the Fijis, and finally accepted their permanent hospitality. In football he went into the game With speed dash, and an Irish glory for mixing in a fair fight, where the best man always wins. For a light man J ones plugs the line With marvelous force. BOB BRADSHAWeEnd Brad hails from The Dalles, at which sand and sage- brush locality he grew up to manhood, and to a degree which would keep a less favored individual growing until he reached his second childhood. Bob is line up With the Avavas at Eugene. Brad made end on the Varsity 1n his sophomore year, and pitted against Wayne Sutton, the star Washingtonian, in the Washing- ton-U. of 0. game, Bob played a never dying and clean grit style of game, the glory of which could not be clouded in the slightest degree by defeat. BILL HEUSNEReBackfleld Bill is a German by necessity, according to Dr. Schmidt, who has the upper hand on Herr Heusner,s college destiny. Bill cast his chances at the Kappa Sig boarding house, and submits to frosh duties on account of the arctic in- iiuence 0f the convenient mill race. In football Heusner hits the line hard and picks holes better than the average player with much greater exper- lence. A l tft' h' ' - - - J .. V ' VJ... L...'.'..L.E..L.uvr .1p;.;.e.........4.n-.o'..-hu.....e-u.-- .. 61112 1911 $Paann in 7155152115111 The Oregon baseball nine finished the season of 1911 with a percentage of 572, winning eight collegiate games and losing six. The various collegiate series the Varsity lost to Washington with two defeats, tied Washington State Col- lege with two games each, tied the Uni- versity of California with one game each, won from Whitman College. with two games, and won from the University of Idaho three games of the four played. Two games were also played with the Multnomah Club, the first going to the Varsity 9-1, and the second to the Club 0-5. The annual trip was taken through the Conference circuit. Coach Lynch carried the following men on the trip: Catchers, Taylor and Word; pitchers, Peet, Cobb and Houck; first base, Jami- son; second base, Fenton; short stop, Annunsen; third base, Roberts; left field, Chandler; center field, Mount; right field, Barbur; utility, Newland. Washington, Idaho and Washington State were played on the tour, which resulted in two vic- tories and four defeats. Whitman, Washington State, Idaho and California invaded the Oregon campus, with the result of six victories and two defeats. HOMER JAMISON, 1 Jack Luckey, Manager Bill at Work 271 . .. a . .- .- - '4 ., "0...... .. -. 7.... 9,1...qa..l'.'r; 1!... .I.:.. 1! ., inn..- nu 'w ... -:-"' .mauumun r . - 272 THE TEAM IN ACTION ., .. Eazphall, Smmnn nf 1311 CHARLES TAYLOR ....................................................................... captain J. ELWOOD LUCKEY..1 ................................................................. Manager LYLE BROWN .............................................................. Assistant Manager THE TEAM Pitchers ............ Homer Jamison, Byron Houck, Earl Cobb, Harold Peet Catchers"... ............................................................. Chuck Taylor, Tom Word First Base ..................................................... Homer Jamison, Carl Fenton Second Base ..... ' ............................ L ...................... Tom Word, Walter Dobie Short Stop .............................................................................. Fred Annunsen Third Base ....................................... Cady Roberts Left Field .................................................................................... Ben Chandler Center Field ............................................................................. Wallace Mount Right Field ...................................................... Carl Fenton, Herbert Barbur Utility ..................................................................................... Ralph Newland Qamhall $rhehulv OPPONENTS WHERE PLAYED U. of O. Opponents Whitman College ................. Eugene 5 Whitman College ................. Eugene Multnomah Athletic Club ....... Eugene University of Washington ...... Seattle, Washington ..... University of Washington ...... Seattle, Washington ..... Washington State College ...... Pullman, Washington... Was..ington State College ...... Pullman, Washington... University of Idaho .............. Eugene University of Idaho .............. Eugene University of Idaho .............. Moscow, University of Idaho .............. Moscow, Washington State College ...... Eugene Washington State College ...... Eugene Multnomah Athletic Club ....... Eugene University of California ........ Eugene University of California ........ Eugene ..................... 4 ml wwOmmmemwammm ml $ $Ommom$mowwngwyA v .-.r;a.:..-.-r-u- .w. 1:1lum...u1.tn;wu-.... u. .x-A" CHARLES TAYLOR-eCatcher It would take enough ink eradicator to swim the "Great Eastern" to erase Taylorts athletic achievements from the Sigma Nu log book. Chuch landed baseball and football honors with the ease of the proverbial big kid 1n the small back lot. He caught for and captained COACH LYNCH the Oregon nine for the 1911 season. HOMER JAMISONeInfield Captain 1912 . For the ordinary scribe to attempt to tell of Jamiets true baseball worth and achieve- ments, would be like expecting a Doctor of Divinity to shine at golf. Jamie leads the Sigma Chi flock to church on Sunday and presides at the Monday even- ingts Bible study. For real knowledge of in- side baseball, Hoyle doesntt stand ace high to a club iiush alongside the greatest Oregon infielder and 1912 captain. ma , :. ke:-;J.v.....-.u.-.-.-. .uuu.u.--s.-w.- M... M ::H:l i ' v f IK x lll-Ilfll lHIllII TOM WORD-Catcher T. Word, on his favorite charger, threw wide the portals of his Phi Gam redoubt, and cantered over the slip and across the outer moat, with lance poised arest, like Sir Lancelot on his favorite quest. Though handicapped with a reputation for poetry, Tommy can glare through a catcheris mask, and stenograph signals on the big pad which, With the proper compliance, brings home the pork bosom. BEN CHANDLER-Outfield Ben is a veteran of many battles in the his- tory of baseball at Oregon. Off duty he hangs around the Sigma Nu tiOld Soldieris Home? On the diamond Chandler is a dangerous baserunner, a clever fielder, and at the bat he picks his favorite seam, and laces the sphere a mile or more. WALLACE MOUNTeOutfield Beany Mount is one of the illustrious J unior crew and he claims the Beta corner for his iiIlliheeP In baseball Beany claws the high ones off the blue vaulted canopy back of sec- ond and first. He is a good sticker and an all around number one exponent of the great national game. ; ',;'.;;':..;1.n.s,:..'...e.....-.;n';t:::u1:;x:i:a2.:i..-.:....-.mm-wm HERBERT BARBUReInfield Barbur came to Eugene after a protracted seance at West Point. The Sigs needed a man who could swear at their mrantry without offending the ladies who gather on their corner for the pre-initiation ceremonies, so Herb was welcomed. Herb has taken out itsumacums" .in baseball and pigging. In baseball he is a bear at sec- ond, and at the Chi Omega house he plays first. BYRON HOUCKePitcher Byron is said to have shown big league tendencies before cutting his milk teeth. Last year he dropped into Eugene, hung his ttfe- doratt on the Kappa Sig pianola, and rushed out to play ttantie over" with Miss Mummey. Houck, in action, is a big, strong fellow, and has speed and all the other requirements on the ball. CARL FENTONeOutfield Carl keeps his ultra-violet star constantly at the zenith of the athletic world. Baseball follows football and basketball in such a way that the big fellow has the grandstand craning its neck from registration to commencement. In baseball Fenton plays outfield or first basle, and invariably performs in luminous sty e. l'di'glffj , A 33 OUDIN ROBERTS-Infield They have no vocal qualifications to be passed at the Kappa Sig house, so Cadieis ; falsetto has been permitted to blend with the . - bassos and baritones at the regular itevening ' prayer services." when the boys devoutly assemble in their nighties. Cadie. on the ball diamond, is five feet nine inches in his darned socks, and at bat he fiourishes a mighty flail which would put Jack, the Giant Killer, in a class with Little Red Riding Hood. EARL COBB-Catcher Ty. sprinkled herpicide on the Kappa Sig lawn, and served the heavy role of general utility man on the baseball team last season. Cobb is a dependable sticker, a good catcher, and carries no excess thickness of ivory in the plated construction of the shell about his think tank. I : : FRED ANNUNSENeInfield f"; Dutch was short stop on Coach Lynchis 1': galaxy of baseball jugglers last season. In i 1 his pre-season wOrkouts he developed phenom- ! 4 inal speed for running down second. by legging; 9 i; it from the mill race to the Tawah house. witn ,, his pursuing brother club men in full cry thirsting for a second immersion. Annunsen is a 'dependable hitter and a number one infielder. 4- v . , ,., .i..v. 7:, .. .---4 :.-;ra-e.aorn.'n'.. .Ix;.x.h.z..o... ..... geuW ., . . ... - . l- ;...'.'..l;'.7u ', g,'g.,.,.,....u.-u.rt whunu...nmi WALTER DOBIEeInfielder Wallie Dobie is a brother of the famous Crazy Snake Dobie, Who played short stop With Father Tom Kelleyis 1910 aeronauts. Avava Club is the terrestrial beakon which illumines his righteous path. In baseball Wal- lie is a fast, heady little player, and though not filling the shoes of a regular on the 1911 team, he fairly iislopped over" in the No. 10 moccosins of a hard worker and dependable recruit. In the Bleachers .. , iluuulllr. .1: .. II'DCXWNMR 2211:1331 ' .-- vaun-u-mvn-u r 1:. um: .544"... .1 .u.u..u...u...'w...-.'. H13... 4-. 4 w ,, is I'll! Nun. v, A . 1 V .1... I v 1$ i; Erark , Oregon did not fare very well in the California meet last year, due largely to the fact that it was early in the season and the men were in poor condition. The beating probably did us good, because we came back exceptionally strong, winning all our other meets. By the time of the triangular meet, Bill had developed a few freshmen, who rounded out the team and helped materially in ringing up a score of 72 for Oregon to Washingtonis 51, and Idahois 17. In this meet four college records were broken, one of them tying the Northwest record. The records broken were as follows: The 220 low hurdles, won by Hawkins in 25 1-5 see- onds, tying the Northwest record; the discus, won by Kellogg at 123 feet 6 y 1...,.;..'...-4...- . e suntannesyuwm- m Willianr H. Hayward. Trainer inches, and the 440 yard run, won by Johns in 50 3-5 seconds. All of these are records that will stand for some time. In our other meet we got away with a total of 106 points to Whitmanis 37. In this meet Neill set up his own record to 149 feet 4 inches. For this year the prospects are very good. All of last years men are back, with the exception of McConnell and Kay. pleasant weather the new men are coming out, and the old men rounding into shape. The old backbone of the team is back strong, With the addition of another veteran in Willliams, and a stronger 279 :v,.,.,.,u,.,......-.........' 7., Martin Hawkins Captain, 1911. With the advent of backbone than Hawkins, Johns, Kellogg, McClure, Bailey, Huggins, Williams, Neill, Latourette, and McGuire, could not be wished. Among the promising new men Who are out are Briedwell, Stuller, Henderson, and Miller of past experience, and Freshmen 1;." g .. Boylen, Hawley, Heidenreich, Morton, and Pack. ' V With this bunch, good weather, and good luck, Bill promises to bring home the Northwest cham- pionship again, and have a few points to spare. The meets this year are the Columbia meet, April 13, in Portland, 3. meet With Multnomah, April 27, at Eugene, the Coast meet, at Berkeley, May 4, a dual meet with the University of Washington,. May 25, at Seattle, and the big Conference meet in Portland, June 7. There is also some chance of a . meet With O. A. C. The winner of the Conference meet, Which takes place of the old triangular meet, can claim undis- puted championship of the Northwest. And with Old Oregon spirit booming ahead in the good old way, the Varsity Will probably have another cham- pionship to adorn its memory book. t -R. N. Kellogg. 3 t . 93y i. 1:" 110m!!! WIVEfLuv ugh. 1411-11 M g; 4.; xiv 11 .... .. j. ,1 ..... ., ., , .1 - 1...; -niquQ..A.-nhouzonla;an mw 2.535;. ;;:;e;hg...1:i-.arm 1 rxmzxumzuuu:.; Erark Olhampinna, 1911 Eriaugular 111m EUGENE, OREGON, MAY 3, 1911 Won by the University of Oregon. pava- - . v. ...... Event Record First Second Third 0. W. I. 100-yard dash .0:10 2-5 ......... Courtney 1W1 ....Kay 101 ........... Johns 101 4 5 Discus ......... 123.6 feet ....... Kellogg 101 ........ Gish 1W1 ......... Bailey 101 6 3 Mile run ....... 4:40 ............. McClure 101 ...... Huggins 101 ..... Kleopfer 1W1 8 1 Pole vault ....10 ft. 6 in, ..... H. BOWman 1W1.C . Bowman 1W 1. .Strohecker 111 8 1 880-yard run .:200 3-5 ......... McConnell 101- ..Stoll 1W1 ......... Denning 111.. 5 3 1 High jump . .5 ft. 6 in. ...... Evans 1W1 ....... C. Bowman 1W1 Strohecker 111 8 1 ' 120- -yard hurdlesO: 15 3- 5 ......... Hawkins 101 ..... Latourette 101... Brokaw 1W 1 8 1 Shot put ...... 39 35 ft. ........ Kellogg 101 ...... Eakins 1W1' ...... Gish 1W1 ..... 5 4 440-yard dash .0:50 3-5 ......... Johns 101 ......... Condon 1W1 ...... Loux 111 ...... 5 3 1 220- yard hurd1e0:25 1-5 ......... Hawkins 101 ..... Montgomery 1I1..Latourette 101 6 3 Two mile run 11-13 ............... Miller 101 ........ Huggins 101 ..... McClure 101 9 220- -yard dash .22 3- 5 ........... Montgomery 111 .Johns 101 ......... Courtney 1W1 3 1 5 Hammer throwl39. 45 ft. ........ Kellogg 101 ..... Shenick 1W1 ..... Pat 1W1 ...... 5 4 Javelin ........ 148.4 ft. ........ Neill 101 ........ .Gish 1W1 ......... Evans 1W1 5 4 Broad jump .2247 ft. ........ G.sh 1W1 ........ Hawkins 101 ....... Evans 1W1 3 6 Relay .............................. Conceded to Idaho.1 .......................................... 5 Total ............. 72 51 17 ....... "I .-- III i--w--0 ,0 W' Md Huineraitg nf 16r29uu-Mhitmau meet EUGENE, OREGON, MAY 6, 1911. Events Record. First Second Third oPoinE; lOO-yard dash...0:10 3-5 ...... Kay 10.1 ............ Johns 10.1 .......... Bloomquist 1W.1.. 8 1' Pole vault ..... 10 ft. 8 in...Fiser 10.1 .......... Bowers 1W1 ........ Brooks 10.1 ....... . 6 3 Half mile ...... 2:06 .......... McConnell 10.1....Mi11er 10.1 ......... Campbell 1W.1 ..... 8 1 High jump ....5 ft. 6 in ..... Service 10.1 ........ Bowers 1W.1 ....... Neill 1W.1 .......... 5 4 120-yard hurdle0216 2-5 ....... Hawkins 10.1 ...... Latourette 10.1...Kimball 10.1 ....... 9 0 Broad jump ..... 22 ft. 9 in....LeWis 1W1 ......... Hawkins 10.1 ...... Fiser 10.1 ........... 4 5 One mile ........ 4:34 .......... McClure 10.1 ....... Woods 1W.1 ........ Barrett 1W.1 ....... 5 4 440-yard dash...0:54 .......... Johns 10.1 .......... Blomquist 1W.1...Bradshaw 10.1 ..... 6 3 Discus .......... 113 ft. 8 ln...Ke110gg 10.1 ....... Bailey 10.1 ......... McCoy 1W.1 ........ 8 1 Hammer ....... 139 ft. ....... Kellogg 10.1 ....... Bailey 10.1 ......... Neill 1W.1 .......... 8 1 220-yard dash...0:23 2-5 ...... Kay 10.1 ............ Johns 10.1 .......... Bloomquist 1W.1.. 8 1 Two mile ...... 1.10:24 1-5 ..... Huggins 10.1 ...... Woods 1W.1 ........ Barrett 1W.1 ....... 5 4 Shot put ........ 39 ft. 5 in....Kellogg 101 ........ Lewis 1W.1 ........ Grout 10.1 ......... 6 3 220-yard hurdle.0:27 3-5 ...... Latourette 10.1...Hawkins 10.1 ...... Kimball 10.1 ....... 9 0 Javelin ......... 149 ft. ....... Neill 10.1 ........... McCoy 1W1 ......... Hawkins 10.1 ...... 6 3 Relay ......... ..Forfeited to Oregon ........................................................... 5 0 Total .............. 106 4 Harm: Glnaat Erark meet 111: 1.1 1 : 01:1 . 1 1 2 E11 11 1 1 '11 ,1 1, 1111' .111 I I 11 111 . . ; 'j1 11: ; 11 1 1 MW 1 1.1 .1, gi 11Hi '1 4r. " is 1 1 1 1!11 AT BERKELEY, CAL., APRIL 22, 1911. Event Becord first Second Third Poigvts 0 S. C . . 100-yard dash..10 1-5 see ........ Smitherum1S.1Ca.mpbell 1S.1..Woods 1C.1 ......... 8 1 0 220-yard dash...23 sec ............ McKee 1S.1 ..... Woods 1C.1 ..... Smitherum 1S.1... 6 3 0 0 440-yard dash...51 sec. .......... Gish 1W.1 ...... Taylor 1S.1.....Leaman 1S.1... .. 4 0 5 0 Half mile ....... 1:58 4-5 ........... Dowd 1C.1 ...... Cramer 1S.1....Stoll 1W.1.. . 3 5 1 0 One mile ........ 4:30 .............. Wood 1C.1 ...... McClure 10.1...Lang 1W.1... .. 0 5 1 3 Two mile.......10:24 3-5 .......... Wood 1C.1 ...... Crable 1C.1 ..... McClure 10.1. .. 0 8 0 1 220-yard hurd1e15 2-5 sec ......... Beeson 1C.1....Ha.wkins 10.1..Maclise 1C.1... .. 0 6 0 3 1 ; 120-yard hurd1e25 4-5 sec ........ Beeson 1C.1....Ma.clise 1C.1...Campbell 1S.1 ..... 1 8 0 0 . High jump ..... 6 ft. 2 in ......... Horine 1S.1 ..... Beeson 1C.1 ..... Evans 1W.1 ........ 4 4 1 0 1 1 Broad jump ..... 21 ft. 8V2 in ...... Allen 1C.1 ....... Morrison 1S.1..Brokaw 1W.1 ....... 3 4 1 0 1 3 Pole vault ...... 11 ft. ............ Bowman 1W.1.Mi11er 1S.1 ...... Bowman, C. 1W.1. 5 0 4 0 r 1 Hammer throw149 ft ............. Shattuck 1C.1..Wooley 1S.1 .Rice 1C.1 ............ 3 6 0 0 Shot put ......... 42 ft. 10w, in....Rice 1C.1 ........ Hale 1C.1 ....... Wooley 1S.1 ........ 1 8 0 0 3 Javelin throw..145 ft. 6 in ....... Neill 10.1.. ..Eva.ns 1W.1....But1er 1C.1 ......... 0 1 3 5 1 1 Relay ......... . ..3:23 .............. Stanford .. ...Washington ........................... 5 0 0 0 v ,.1:1H:I.:Mgum 1111 L; ' .31'I rLJ11 thflw Total .............. 42 59 17 12 i e 1 i Neill makes New College Record in Javelin. McCoy, 0f Whitman, throwing the Discus. Start of the Mile. Service takes the High Jump. McConnell Winning the Half Mile., Close Finish in 440. Fiser Pole Vaulting. 91995.10? :40: x- ' ;'7- ' 283 ch'rrxr:n;;:'.:n:::.;::x.;;:...;..Wr-. . . m... Olnlumhia 11111221 PORTLAND, OREGON, APRIL 8, 1912. Events Record First Second Third Point- A B C D 16-1b. shot ...... -':1 ft. 9 in....Wolff 50. A. 0.3....Enberg 50. A. CJ.Kellogg 50.0 ....... 1 8 880-yard run....2:17 3-5 ....... Austin 5P. UJ ..... Williams 50.A.CJ.McClure 50.5 ...... 1 3 5 220-yard dash...0:23 4-5 sec..Kay 500 ........... Baker 50. A. CJ...Schmitt5M.A.A.C.9 5 3 1 Broad jump ..... 19 ft. 11 in..WaIters 50.A.CJ.Kay 500 ............ Hawkins 500 ...... 4 5 Pole vault ...... 10 ft. 8in....Dud1ey 5Y.M.C.AJFife 5Y.M.C.AJ....Fiser 50.3 ........... 8 440-yard dash...0:54 sec ....... Johns 50.3 ......... Bryant 5P. UJ ..... Walters 50.A.CJ. 5 1 3 50-yard dash....0:05 3-5 see. Baker 50. A. CJ..Dart 5M.A.A. CJ.Kay 50.1 ............ 1 5 3 Mile run ........ 4:43 1-5 ...... McClure 509 ....... Wilson 5W. H. SJ.Austin 5P. UJ ..... 5 1 50-yard hurdle.0:07 sec. ....La.tourette 5OJ...McGuire5M.A.A.CJNickerson50.A.CJ. 5 1 0 3 Halfmile rolay.1:40 .......... M. A. A. C .......... U. of O .............. 0. A. C .............. 3 5 Total .............. 31 26 9 12 A-University of Oregon. B-0regon Agricultural College. . C-Pacmc University. D-M. A. A. C. l QInhtmhta meet PORTLAND, OREGON. APRIL 13, 1912 Event Record rust Second. Third Point. A. 3 c Broad jump.... ...20 ft 10 3-4 in ........ Bellah 5M.A.A.CJ.Smith 5L. H. SJUBounds 5E. H. SJ. 0 o 5 Pole vault.. .12 ft. 1 1-4 in.. ..Bellah 5M.A.A.C. .Holman 5M.A.C.L.Williams 5W. HJ. 1 0 8 16-1b. shot.. 41 ft. 10 1-4 in ..Wolf 5M.A.A.CJ...Kellogg 50.3 ........ Johnson 5W. HJ... 3 0 5 High jump" 5 f5 9 in. ...Woodworth5L.H.S.0Powe11 50. A. CJ...Muirhea.d 5C. UJ.. 0 3 o 88 yard ram. 2:04 1-5 .......... Windnagle 5W. HJAustin 5P. UJ ..... Williams 50.A.CJ. 0 1 0 Mi e run ............ 4:32 1-5 .............. Huggins 500 ....... Wilson 5W. H. SJ.Lang1ey U. H. SJ. 5 o o ia'yard hurdle ...... 0:06 4-5 .............. Hawkins 50.3 ...... Bibee 5J.H. S.L...Latourette 50.1.... 6 0 o 440-yard run ......... 0:54 2-5 .............. Johns 50.3 .......... Walters 50. A. CJ.Blomquist 5U. CJ. 5 3 0 50-yard dash ........ 0:06 ................... Baker 50. A. CJ...Bea.sley 5J.B.A.CJ.W;-38tl'irtgrd , . J ......... 3 Dart 5M.A.A.CJ... 0 5V, V, 220-yard dash ....... 0:23 4-5 ............... Johns 500 .......... Beasley 5J.B.A.CJ.Ba.ker 50.A. CJ.... 5 1 0 Half mile relay....1:41 1-5 .............. M. A. A5 C ........... 0. A. C. ............. O. .................... , 25 13'; 23', A-University of Oregon. 0 0 B-Oregon Agricultural College. . C-M. A. A. C. - 3 1 i t i l 3 284 McConnell breaks College Record in Half Mile. McClure winning the Half Mile. Dr. Leonard's Score Board. Hawkins and Latourette winning High Hurdles. High Hurdles at Berkeley. 100-yard Finish, Triangular Meet. Tryout for Berkeley Meet. Kellogg breaking College Discus Record. wugwrwwr - . .... ....,...-.. ,7. ,, .,. .., -...-4 w W ' .- n. W '--L' " 3' - " " V ' ' x "" '22-'37; ire.reissue..-xrprrrxin-xnnmezMMHM d ...-4u.-thuW ' 09r29un-multnnmah 111221 EUGENE, OREGON, APRIL 27, 1912 . Events Record First Second Third Point- . 0. 100- yard dash ....... 0: 10 2- 5 .............. Johns 40. 2 .......... Hawley 40. 2 ....... Briedwell 40. 2 ..... 0 9 220-ya1'd dash. ...... 0: 22 4- 5 .............. Johns 40.2 .......... Briedwell 40. 2 ..... Hawley 40. 2 ........ 0 9 440-yard dash ....... 0:53 2- 5 ....... . ........ T ohns 40. 2 .......... Brace 4M.A.A.C..2..Obe1'teuffe1' 40. 2. 3 6 880-yard run ........ 2:04 4- 5 .............. Boylen 40.2 ......... Huggins 40..2. ..Burns 4M. A.A.C.2. 1 8 One Mile run ....... 4: 27 ..... McClure 40.2 ....... Huggins 40.2 ....... Burns 4M A.A. C.2. 1 8 Two mile run. .10. 05. .. ..McGuire 40.2 ....... Zimmerman 40.2. .King 40.2 ........... 0 9 Half mile relay....1: 36 1- 5 ................ Oregon ........ . .M. A. A. C ................................. 120-ya,1'd hurdle ..... 0:15 1- 5 ............... Hawkins 40.2 ...... Latourette 40..2 ...Schmidt 4M. A.A .C.2 1 8 220-ya.rd hurdle ..... 0:26 1-5 .............. Hawkins 40.2 ...... Latourette 40.2.. ..Schmidt 4M. A.A .C2 1 8 Pole vault ........... 12 ft. 2 3-10 in ........ Bellah 4M.A.A.C.2 .Holeman . 4M. A. A. C.2 ..... Watson 40.2 ....... 8 1 Broad Jump ......... 20 ft. 8 in .......... ..Bellah 4M.A.A.C.2.Ha.wkins 40.2 ...... Parsons 40.2 ....... 5 4 High jump .......... 5 ft. 2 1-2 in ......... Bellah 4M.A.A.C.2.Holeman Stuller, 8 1 . 4M. A. A. C.2 ..... Brooks 40.2 ....... 4 5 Shot put ............. 39 ft 7 3- 5 in ........ Kellogg 402 ........ Wolf 4M.A.A.C.2...Be11a.h 4M.A.A.C.2. 3 6 ...: 9 Hammer throw" ..123 ft. ................ Kellogg 40.2 ........ Wolf 4M.AXA. 2. .Neill 40.2 ........... 3 6 1 1 Javelin throw ...... 157 ft. ................ Neill 40.2 ........... Bellah 4M.A A..C2. Hawkins 40.2 ...... 1 8 Discus .............. 104 ft 9 in ............ Kellogg 40.2 ........ Neill 40.2 ........... Wolf 4M. A.A....C2 0 5 Total ............... 38 102 49111111111 $11112 ilatermhnlaattr 1113221 EUGENE, OREGON, MAY 12, 1911 Event Record :E'irst Second Third Fourth 100-yard dash ....... 0:10 3- 5 ....... . ...... Crickmore, W..HS.Sheehan, 01'. City..Ka.ise1', Salem ...... Skipworth Eug. Pole vault ........... 10 ft. 3 in ............ Doane, Ontario.. ..Gause, Newberg...Jensen. Junction..Pe1'kins,Columbia. 880- yard run ........ 2:05 ................. .,Ba.1'be1' W. H. SZ. W.indnag1e, W H. Autt, Enterprise" .Dickson, Pendleton High jump .......... 5 ft. 6ln ............. Woodworth, LHHS. Mayone, St. Johns. Sheehan, 01'. City.. Lawrence, J. H. S. 120-yard hurdle ..... 0' 17 4- 5. ............. Bibee, J. H....S .Fee,Pendlet011 ..... McLare11,W.H. S.Mille1'ing, La. Gr. Broad jump ........ 18. 35 ft. ........... .-. Fendall, Newberg. Skipworth, EugeneSmall, P. A .......... Wilson, 01'. City. One mile run ....... 4:46 4-5 ............... Wilson, W. H. S.. WMcKay L. H. S....Windna.g1e. W. H.. Lafky. Salem. Shnt put ............. 40.12 ft. ............. A. Foster. Dayt011. Divine, Pendleton. Childress, Medford Hendricks, Eugene 440- yard dash" ..:0 54 3- 5 .............. Barber, W. H. S...Ha.1'dman, Ontario. McLaren, W. H. S.Wi1son, 01'. City. 12-1b hammer ...... 146.9 ft. .............. A.Foster,Dayto11.Fo1'bes,Medford...Da.vis, La Grande. Divine Pendleton. 220- -yard dash ....... 0.24 .................. Crickmore, W. H.. Kaiser Salem ...... Sheehan, Or. City. Small, Salem. Discus throw ....... 99. 33 ft. ............. Drake, Dayton ..... C. Perkins Colum.Divine, Pendleton.Vincent,Sa.1em. 220-ya1'd hurdle ..... 0'27 1-5 .............. Bibee. J. H. S ...... Lacey, Columbia... .McLaren, W H.S.Cha.pma11, Pid'ton. Half mile relay....1:38 1-5 .............. Pendleton. Points by Schools Wash. H. S ..... 34 Jeff. H. S ....... 11 Lincoln H. S... 8 Columbia. ...... 7 La. Grande ...... 3 Enterprise 2 Pendleton ...... 16 Salem ........... 10 Newberg ....... 8 Medford ........ 5 St. Johns ...... 3 Junction ....... 2 Dayton ......... 15 Oregon City 90ntario .............. Eugene ......... 5 Port. Academy. 2 286 ... ....v.. . . .- . . , -7 .Q, pun. ...;...r-:a:u:f. 9: .. ' . I .n .4. . ' . - 4 - mu ..-. - 5;." 1'...A'.-$- t. 09.7.1 - - j-Z'WH K? . m . ,.. . .--x .. .. . . V, . . :- , .M- -. - .. -":' !:l...:x-w.--w . ,. ;. .. : H . , .. ....,..... ; 4 JV ! , w M i'k W M M X M w 'w M w1 W , :1 w! :w W '! W M 'H H ml H x; W l .i M X W ? 1 I S '1 1 ', 1 W , . , x x 220 Semi Finals. Bibee Winning Low Hurdles. P The Score Board. 3 Barber Winning the Half Mile. Crickmore Winning the 220-yard Dash. V i A r .1! -53 287 W34:'3$myszaq'hgau'uauirnmsfzmzmcnaum.-. lOO-yard Preliminary. Barber Winning the 440. Pendleton Winning the Relay. lOO-yard Semi Finals. Wilson Breaking the Inter-Scho- lastic Record in the Mile. Crickmore Taking His Trial Heat in the 220. .-n.A .-.-4.- r; .nluunu.- su-wu..... . -11; It I 3?x.1u$.a.h..:. .uummu -mNNmM-g ..,v I ' ' 1 .1 .' 1 -.,. .,;..r-- .. . .Ve. V . . ' . . tnAQO-hdmhmc'c Mhih.$Wc-um.m- .Au IM J amison Walker Ftenton Bradshaw Eaakethall THE TEAM ForwardSeHomer B. Jamison tCaptaint, Dean Walker. CentereCarl Fenton. GuardseCIifford Sims tCaptain-Elecw, Robert Bradshaw. Utilitwaon Rad-er. iReniem nf the $2aann nf 1912 The basketball season of 1911-12 was probably the most success- ful ever experienced by an Oregon team, though the doubtful result of the championship race somewhat marred an otherwise favorable series. Oregon, Washington and O. A. C. stood head and shoulders above all the other teams ih the Northwest. Oregon and O. A. C. bested Washington in the percentage column, though the games played between the Washingtonians and the two Oregon institutions resulted in a tiIe-up of two games each in both cases. As Ofrfegotn and O. A. C. defeated alltheir conference opponents, With, the ex- ception of the tie With Washington, the championship was, and always will be, in doubt. O. A. Cts percentage claim was somewhat marred 289 ;rI:.te;h'e...2a:T-.-nz y::m;m:x:;:.;;u.;-;m.. by the fact :that some of their games were scheduled after the con- ference season opened. Oregonls claim was strengthened, on the other hand, by their defeat of Gonzaga, a team which bested the Aggies, and by the fact that they repeatedly attempted to bring the two contending teams together. With four of the regular live in college at the beginning of the year, Oregon looked like a sure winner. Only rthe position left vacant by "Doc" Elliott at left guard was left to be filled. Rader, a Med- ford Freshman, was picked for the place by Trainer Hayward. As preliminaries to the regular season, Harrisburg, Willamette, the combined Portland High Schools, and Whitworth, were in turn de- feated by large scores. The first conference game was With Wash- ington, in Seattle, and here the Oregon team met ,1, air first defeat, 30-18. The second game also went to the Seattle players by the close score of 10-11. Leaving Seattle, the five started on the tour of the Inland Em- pire, with Captain Jamison out of the game on account of injuries received in the first Washington game. Rader was shifted to for- ward, and Bradshaw filled the vacancy at guard, Where he remained during the rest of the season. a The tour resulted as follows: Oregon 29; Gonzaga College, 22. Oregon, 18; Washington State College, 13. Oregon, 30; University of Idaho, 13. Oregon, 33; University of Idaho, 11. Idaho was the first conference college to invade the Oregon campus. The Gem Staters were followed by Washington State Col- lege and Washington, with the following results: Oregon, 27; University of Idaho. 9. Oregon, 26; Washington State, 11. Oregon, 19; Washington State. 7. Oregon, 17; University of Washington, 14. Oregon; 17 ; University of Washington. 13. In the conference games the team scored 215 points to their op- ponent's 132, winning eight of the ten contests, and finishing with a percentage of 800. Fenton and Jamison were placed in all selections for All-North- west team. and Sims was picked in some of the selections. Jamison, Fenton. Sims, Walker and Bradshaw were granted the ofiicial Var- sity emblem for work during the season. The future of the game is promising. With the exception of Captain Jamison, Captain-Elect Sims will have a veteran team at his service. With Sims, Bradshaw. Fenton, Walker and Rader in the harness. Trainer Hayward should be able to develop a team which will maintain the high standard already set by the lives Iof the past :two seasons. HOMER J AMISON EH12 ZHrwhman Erma ForwardseVosper, Watson, Apperson. Centers-Gould, Bigbee. GuardseBoylen tCaptainl, Parsons. Tihe team played three games, winning two. Following are the resu s: Washington High School, at Eugene, 34 to 23. Albany High School, at Albany, 28 to 23. Washington High School, at Portland, 25 to 28. 290 AA-AhuAnA-s-am-ar-v r. I. n anT-i'l-I'K' Emma mhampinnahip, 1H 11 The tennis season of 1911 vvas the rnost successful ever expe- rienced by the University of Oregon raquet wielders. Interest in the game was more widespread, and the competition for places on the team was kyeener, than ever before. The Freshman champion- ship, which was played off early in the season, was won by E. Y. Yaden, of Klamath Falls; and the handicap tournament for the pos- session of the Laraway Trophy was won by Professor Arthur Michell. Th-e Varsity team, composed of R. P. Newland, of Palo Alto, California, Harry Stine, of Monmouth, Howard Gray, of Portland, and Paul Bond, of Eugene, overwhelmingly defeated the University of Washington team, winning four of the five matches played. The Oregon team, to a man, played heady ball, and won the tournament on the strength of their superior generalship. The tournament opened May 19th, at Eugene, with Stine, of Oregon, facing Febriger, of Washington. Stine played a careful and consistent game. allowing the Washington player to defeat him- self, 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. Newland and Gray then took the court, opposing Moncrief and Goetz. Oregon took the first set with ease, playing a slow, careful game. During the second set they were more closely pressed by the Nontherners. The third set was won by Washington. The opening of the fourth set, however, found Oregon taking the oifensive instead of the defensive, and playing a hardi smashing game, which threw their opponents completely off their guard. The final score was 6-2, 6-4, 4-6, 6-0. This match closed the days play with Oregon leading, with two matched against Washingtonis none. Play opened the following day with Newland, the Oregon leader, Ditted against Harold. Moncrief, leader of the Washington team. Moncrief played a fast, hard game, but was erratic at critical times. The match went to the Oregon player, 6-0, 6-1, 6L3. Newland and Stine followed, opposing Moncrief and Febriger in the hardest fought match of the tournament. Practically every game went to deuce, but the superior steadiness 0f the Oregonians won for them, 6-3, 6-4, 6-3. Washington followed with their only victory, when Goetz defeated Bond in the closest match of the series, the final score being 3-6, 3-6, 6-4, 7-5, 7-5. The final result of the tournament showed Oregon the victor, 4-1. A resume of the two days play shows Oregon to have taken four- nteen sets to Washingtofs four, and one hundred and two games to Washingtonis fifty-eig'ht. The inter-collegiate record now stands as follovvs: Oregon Washington 1908 .................. 1 1 1909 .................. 0 2 1910 .................. 2V2 3 1911 .................. 4 1 71A; 7 R. P. NEWLAND. 1. Stine Serving. 2. Good Cut, Harry. 3. Oregon. 4. Washington. 5. Stine. 6. Newland. Ennk E $2rtinn a 31 ntra-mllpgiatp Athlptim Sophomore Relay Team Junior Four-Mile Relay Team Freshman Cross-Country Team Entprrlaaa wrath Intra-Collegiate track events during the past year have largely taken the form of inter-class relay races and cross-country runs. The only inter-class track meet held so far this year was a dual meet between the Sophomore and Freshman classes, from which the Freshmen emerged the Winners of the handsome cup donated by Trainer Hayward. The cup for the annual inter-class cross-country run, March 30, was won by the Freshman team, composed of Blackaby, Hardesty, Pack tCapbaim, and Wagner. First, second and third place medals were taken by McClure, Huggins and Pack respedtively. The inter- class relay held December 9 was also won by the Freshman team, adding another cup to the'i'r collection. The inter-class four-mile relay held April 6 was won by the Junior team, composed of McClure, Reynolds, Martzloff and Zimmerman. A nifty Kid. rd Viereck Bradshaw Roberts Brooks Entprrlaaa Eaakpthall The inter-class basketball championship was won this year by the Sophomore quintet, composed of Roberts, Brooks, Viereck, Rice, and Bradshaw. A full series of games was not played, as the Christ- mas Holidays interfered, but enough contests were held to settle the Winners satisfactorially. The Sophomore team finished with a perfect score, hav'mg defeated both the Freshmen and the Juniors. The Freshman won over the Seniors in their second game, closing the series, and leaving the Sophomores in posession of all principal honors, but With pros- pects of running them a close race next year. .. . , N3. .v -. n...w....... ... m,.t nu..." .. , ..e .. . . . "14.. . v. - .Q. 3.. ,ag.....-n.-rr:. .u;.xA1:!...L......-..g-.ua.ouJ-u-h g....4.,m...uol- WW t't McAllen Kimball Roberts Boylen Entprfraternity Eaakpthall . The teams in the Inter-Fraternity League were from the follow- ing organizations: Phi Gamma Delta, Kappa Sigma, Delta Sigma, Sigma Nu, Acacia, Dorm Club, Sigma Chi, Avava, Oregon Club, Tawah, Alpha Tau Omega, and Beta Theta Pi. Those surviving the first elimination round were: Sigma Nu, Kappa Sigma, Sigma Chi, Beta Theta Pi, Oregon Club and Avava. The three winners of the semi-finals played a round robin for the Championship. The Kappa Sigmas won the cup in these finals over their opponents, the Sigam Nus and the Beta Theta Pis, closing a very successful basketball season. The Kappa Sigma team was composed of Boylen, Roberts, Still, McAllen, Kimball and Cobb. 'l-l--h-heh-; uni. Father Burke A Long Poke Elntprfrat Eamhall The interfraternity organization popularly known as the Dough- nut League, started out bright and early last spring to repeat its former success as a branch of intercollegiate athletics and a constant source of amusement to the sport loving University public. Owing to the lack of diamonds on which to play, the field had to be turned over to the Varsity team for practice soon after the series had begun. Immediately after Varsity season, however, the Dough- nut League re-opened, and from then on the games were staged in rapid order. Some close and exciting games were played, especially the final game for the cup, between Beta Theta Pi and Sigma Nu. When the dust of this last and closely played game had cleared away, the Sigma Nu had won the Doughnut cup, for the second consecutive time, giving them permanent possession of it. The now permanent Inter-fraternity Athletic Council has arranged a series of games for the present season, and all the pros- pective competitors for the cup put up by the association are prepar- ing for the fray. Chuck at Bat Strike Three .e.,..-.. . . - - , .I-. .3;- Iz'r:1:.':ui;1'..lhl;1..l::x.;'.l.'.C-J' mm mwme. nukuuuu-rcwh AW - Standing Wi11iamson, Stuller, Fortmiller, Still, Stenberg, Wray, Kendall, Roberts, Peet, Terpenning, Burris, Black, Kimball, Bedford, McAllen, Stannard, Motschenbacher, Cowden. Knreeling Reyn01ds, Rice. Smphnmnrv ZHImthalI 62am winners nf 1112 Svnphnmnre-ZHrwhman 05am? Standing Rader, Bigbee, Heidenrich, Michael, Grady, Finch, Williams, Stevens, Goodwin, Evans, Ryan, Thompson, Snyder, Partlow. Kneeling Dud1ey, Hardesty, Motschenbacher, Geisler. EHrwhman Ennthall 62am V . - . ..;:. .'-. 7 :ixhilu ;;.au.:ngm ...., .v.....-.- . . . .- mom J I .3'T "90 5"? WHEEL + O 0 3 HcVIER 'c Young Avery Cath Cowden Rader Riddell CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM Slaterrlaza Eaakpthall Emma Waging fur the QIhampiunzhip Sophomore Freshman Forwards Hazel Moifatt. Florence Avery. Vera Moffatt, Ada Hall. Hazel Rader. Guards Bess Riddell, Bess Cowden. Elsie Bain, Helen Johnson, Vera Moffat't. Centers Bess Young, Georgia Prather. Georgia Searcey, Fairy Leach. 302 A QHFIIDMV H O x1 Adams Taylor McClareh 2 Baln McClain Cowden Rader CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM 2 Enteranrnritg Eaakpthall - THE GAMES 2 Kappa Alpha Theta, 21; Lambda Rho, 4. Gamma Delta Gamma, 14; Beth Reah, 3. ;; Lambda Rho, 14; Beth Reah, 9. Gamma Delta Gamma, 9; Oregon Club, 7. Kappa Alpha Theta, 26; DeIrta Delta Delta, 3. Kappa Alpha Theta, 11; Oregon Club, 8. FINALS Gamma Delta Gamma, 22; Lambda Rho, 5. Kappa Alpha Theta, 9; Gamma Delta Gamma, 6. 303 . A . 2 ' H ' ' ' 5125.24. w-wm t'? .......-.-- 2- .. 4;..-.:-ii.-:.J..LL-.;-.'.-u JLu.Q-..Au;wuuu "'"' r. h 2 Qthirrra MILDRED BAGLEY. .President MAUDE BEALS ....... Secretary JEAN ALLISON ...... Treasurer Mildred Bagley Tennis Champion President of Tennis Club The Girls Tennis Club at the University of Oregon was organ- ized in the early spring of 1909. Immediately'vgreat interest was aroused in the game and definite steps were taken toward the raising of money for building courts. Through the generosity of the Board of Regents, a sum of two hundred dollars was appropriated for this purpose. Three excellent courts were built and- were ready for use when the tennis season came. In 1910 a tournament was arranged for the women of the Faculty and Student Body. Dr. Stuart offered a cup to the Winner, Who proved to be Miss Obevrteuffer. A beginnersi tournament was also held, Which was never played off, but which created considerable excitement between the Freshmen and Sophomores. Last spring the regular tournament was held. Miss Mildred Bagley was the winner, with Miss Stowe a close second. .. . This year the membership of the club will be limited and a tryout will be held, which will serve as initiation. Arrangements are also being made to bring the Washington co-ed-s to Eugene some time next spring to play off a tournament with the Oregon women. This will serve to arouse interest and put the Tennis Club on an estab- lished and lasting basis. MILDRED BAGLEY. m-mx 5 Hz a mm. 5 E a 1 m Smtinn 1 iFraturw Ennk H till," l'it Chain Gang. Eats. 2 and 3. 4 Cafe de Villard 6. a m 0 C Y e h. Ty t eu ra ee HB 1. 5. hw"...ee-...w..... .. .-- .uw- $uninr 1352212 iEnh lEnhIeraitg Bay Glnmmittew far 1512 GENERAL COMMITTEE- James Johns Chester Moores Graham Michael Clarence Walls Martin Hawkins Edward Himes GENERAL COMMITTEE OF WOMENeh J essie Bibee Ruth Merrick Emma Waterman SPECIAL COMMITTEE OF WOMEN3 Cecil Miller Nellie Hemenway Lucia Campbell Mildred Bagley Jean Allison Bess Lewis Fay Clark Elizabeth Busch Hazel Wightman Alma Payton Blanche Powell Eva Roche Ruby Hammerstrom Alice Farnsworth Eva Frazer Hazel McKown Javina Stanfield Florence Cleveland PAINTING 00"- Burleigh Cash, Chairman Paul Briedwell William Neill Karl Martzloff Carl Grayson Edward Bailey Fen Waite Alexander Martin Henry Bauer Howard Zimmerman mrngram fur 311mm mm Enh Wednesday, May 8, 1912. 3:30 P. M.-Baseball. Washington State College vs. Univers1ty of Oregon. Thursday, May 9, 1912. 3:30 P. M.eBaseball. State College vs. Oregon. 8:30 P. M.3Dramatic Club presents ttEngaged" at the Eugene theater. Friday, May 10, 1912. University Day. Morning-University Day Work on the Campus. Painting the 30? Preliminary Tennis Tournament, Washington University of Multnomah Club vs. University of Oregon. Noone-Coeeds serve dinner on the Campus. Afternoon-Interscholastic Aquatic Meet. Canoe Carnival. Finals of Tennis Tournament, Multnomah Club vs. University of Oregon. Evening-Juni'or Orations, Villard Hall. Illustrated Lecture to visit- ing track men by William L. Hay- ward. Saturday, May 11, 1912. MorningePreliminaries for Oregon' State Interscholastic Track Meet. Afternoon-Oregon State Interschol- astic Track Meet. EveningeJunior Prom. 307 Y A D Y n S R E w N U 1gb Buchen Talks. Left Foot H The Burning of the Green, ! J Wow The Pyre Oskey, Wow 309 u wan- 712:4-3 "mm." wneurr 3 v. u. ln-uunh'sx w"... .a...uau..c s. Thud. The Scramble. 3 4. UD me phs L - Frosh Forming the 0." So 1 2 thprrlaaa mix Ever since that fatal day, now past, but oft recalled, when the "Immortal Twenty-two" of the present Senior class were yanked out on the administration carpet for attempting to place the yearlings of the class of 13 in their proper relations with the University, there has been a deep-felt need of some method by which the incoming class might be iikeyed downii and made to "left foot high, you boob," or to "wipe off that smile Frosh." The present Junior class took it upon themselves to supply this need, and all credit for the institutition of the iiUnderclass Mix" is due that class. Dean Walker, president of 1913, and his committee, conferred with the faculty, and a complete programme was agreed upon. . The affair was staged on Kincaid F-ileld, before a throng of ex- cited and enthusiastic onlookers. The "Frosh" entered the field by the Varsity gate, led by a iiGerman Band? The motley crew carried megaphones of variegated colors, through which they punc- tured the atmosphere with hideous noises. The first year men were closely followed by the ttSophsx, who were headed by a costumed funeral corps, bearing a black coiiin labeled iil915." After a few yells by the contesting bodies, they took their respective places with the co-eds of the two classes, who had previously entered the decorated grandstand. Then the program began. The representatives of the Frosh succeeded in winning the eight man half-mile relay race, the hundred yard dash, the potato race and the three-legged race, but they were beaten badly in the two main events of the day, namely: the push-ball contest and the tug of war. The push-ball contest was as spectacular and exciting an event as one would wish to see. The monster leather sphere was placed in the center of lthe football field, and thirty-flve men chosen from the ranks of each class lined up on either side of the ball. At a given signal the scramble began. The entire program of the first Underclass Mix was a grand success in every particular. So enthusiastic was the student body over the result of the eventful day, that the occasion has been booked on the regular college calendar for the second Saturday after registration in the Fall. Certain it is that this novel mix has firmly entrenched itself with the other distinctive traditions of the University of Oregon. eLeland S. Finch. o s s-uuun-u.ses...w.o.- .. -.- ....-. The Rear Guard d n a B h S 0 Fr 1914 Funeral Corps. 1. The Score Board. 2. "Wictory Is Ours." 3. In the Air. 313 .84... E..- q---A 4A- A u . ;: '11,! N f I ll U W! , W145 . Al my: 3 W 1 3' W I 1, u; l ! : ,, lw v' 1 ! 9 I i? k April Elirnlir The April Frolic, the one time when the co-eds prove that they can do without mere man at social functions, is one of Oregonis yearly attractions. The Frolic held last year was so far ahead of previous ones, and was such a pronounced success, that the April Frolic is now accountedone of the best times the college girl enjoys during her college year. A program, as original and varied as one could wish, was the form the 1911 Frollizc took. The costumes were diversified, to say the least, while most of the stunts performed were clever in the extreme. The faculty women, sororities, clubs, and literary societies, each took their turn in entertaining with their particular stunt. After the program, the girls danced and were served with ice cream cones. This yeafs affair is scheduled for April 29, and promises to be even better than that of last year. Extreme secrecy is being ob- served as to this yearis event, but a few facts have leaked out before the Oregana goes to press. It has been learned that Frieda Gold- smith is general manager of the affair, Clementine Cutler is head of the refreshment committee, and that Florence Cleveland has charge of the stunts, so all expectations as to the success of the Frolic are very likely to be fulfilled. . .- uv-w mu" m..- m...- .- Olnmmmrpmpnt .Probably the most enjoyable and profitable week of the entire school year, to the faculty and students in general, and t0 the mem- bers of the graduating class in particular, is Commencement Week at the University of Oregon. Some of the most interesting events of the week are the Pres- ident,s reception, the Failing and Beekman orations. the Senior Ball, the Alum- ni Supper, and the Fern and Flower proces- sion. The mu- sic, both vocal and instrumen- tal, which ac- companies these programs, is always of the highest order. Two of the features of the C ommencement exercises last year were the address to the g r a d u a t i n g class by Presi- dent Thomas F. Kane, .Ph. D., of the Univere sity of Wash- ington, and the piano recital by Miss Lila C. Prossrer, pre- sented by the U n i v e r! s i t y School of Mu- sic. s e Plans and ar- i 't j rangements for i . v . C , SW. 9 ; Commencement ! , this year are being made far , in advance of the event. In addition to the regular schedule for the week as carried out in previous years, the University Dramatic Club, under the direc- tion of Professor Reddie, will present, in the open air, Shakespearets "As You Like It? The play will be staged on the campus on Monday , afternoon before Commencement Day, which comes on Wednesday. I . The graduates from the Medical Department, in Portland, Will attend the Commencement exercises in a body. These students and the Faculty will appear on the campus in cap and gown, as well as ! the Seniors of the University at Eugene. Commencement Procession. 315 Wm, 1W", ., y, 31.6 TEnnk E gmtinn a Qlalmthar I Gbrtnher 45Burns writes eulogy on Professor Glen. 11Absence makes the heart grow fonder." 55Hamactor Dunton holds Dramatic Club tryout. Chet Moores and Hugh Currin try for membership. Moores makes it on his Wit, and Currin on his face. 65Bob Kellogg elected President of 1912. Ralph Moofes also ran. WW 1 ,. 75Canoe Club reorganized. Ralph Moores elected president. .1725 163:: 1157,11 K, NFl 85German Club meeting. Dr. Koehler introduces a few fancy steps learned abroad. 105Tooseday. Hal Grady deserts the Emerald Staff. 115Emerald: "Monthly will be out soon." 14n-Mandolin Club comes to life. Ralph Moores elected presi- dent. 165Bush Brown appoints Chet Moor-es assistant yell leader. 18-Emera1d: 11Monthly a little late, but will appear shortly." ' 195Oregon Club invites everyone with an extra fifty cents to join. 20-Mand01in Club disbands. 215Underclass Mix. Sophs take it out on the Fresh 113 to 48. Juniors appear 1 ?1 in plug hats. 23-Dr. Stuart starts a class in regular breathing. Several prominent co-ed-s enter. 25-Faculty makes a ruling against extra hours. Consolation party held at Sigma. Nu house. Beanie Mount, Bush Brown and Earl Cobb present. 305Miss Watson gives her sixteenth talk on the subject, "Why Is a College Girl?" 318 "a W w v w . w m n, v m ,m .W 57. 313. 71' rimhlg 8c 0111. Elm Ekahing 571m. C9 3': 1', 319 $pptvmhvr 17eY. M. C. A. holds impetus meeting. 18eFuture Washingtons, Lincolns and Napoleons begin to ar- rive. , Gamma Phis and Chi Omegas paint their houses prepar- atory to rushing. 19e2:00 P. M., Livermore arrives in Eugene. Grabbed by Smiley Newland and Hank Fowler. 2:15, Livermore pledged Sigma Chi. 2:45, Livermore meets Tri Delt and asks the name of his fraternity. ZOeKappa Sigs stick out a "Rooms to Let" sign. Can take ten more men by crowding a little. ZleFrosh tells Avavas that he will let them know if he decides to join a fraternity. 22eY. W. C. A. reception to Freshman girls. In the receiving line were Mrs. Pennell, Raphael Geisler, Dante Walls, Zacchaeus Bailey, Homer Maris, Aaron Bedford, and Phuilander Hammond. 23-Sorority bid day. A. M. ttOh, I think that she is just the sweetest thing!" P. M. "Oh, we did not want her anyway, but we just had to bid her because we rushed her so much." 24eFormer rushees assigned duties in sorority houses and commence to pay board. , 25eAnnual Freshman Beauty Contest. Finch chosen the pret- tiest baby by a big majority. Professor Gilbert returns from honeymoon. 2kProfessor Gilbert springs a joke in class. Class breaks up in a panic. 27aTawahs disband. Gilbert smiles in Seager class. Several students faint. 28eJunior class election. Walker persuades Rolfe to run against him. Collier gets job side-s'tepped by Strong. E. Lamb tBeth Reahy gets treasurership after spirited contest. Barz-ee makes empassioned plea for corduroys. Thunderous applause. 29eTawahs reorganize. Houston iinally accepts a bid to a fraternity. Annual Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. Acquaintance Mix. Not mixed enough, however, for Sigma Nus, Who repair to Springfield. 30eBeavers shed their fur for a lighter and more attractive costume. Name of Fiji cook becomes a secret. 320 a I 3! ll What Makes A Strong Bank? Ample Capital. 0 A high grade direcporate of practical business men. A reputatlon fqr mtelllgent, conservatlve manage- ment covermg a perlod of many years. The First National Band has all these - and is seeking your business Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits - - $ 275,000.00 Deposits - - - - - - - - 1,500,000.00 THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 0i Eugene Corner Willamette and Ninth Streets Why not open up an account with this bank While in college, thereby enabling yourself to get a practical course in banking while you are taking your regular college course? We Would be pleased" to have your Checking account. ' 321 Nnnemher leEmerald: ttMonthly came out shortly." tSee Emeralds of October 11 and 18J 3e-Y. W. C. A. holds Annual Baby Show. Prizes awarded as follows: Fattest Baby, Gladys Graham; Nicest Little 'Girl, Neill Kendall; Biggest Baby, Geisler, Dunton and Blackman tied for first place; Most Talkative Baby, Ruth Beach; Sweetest Disposition, J ohn Kelly; Snookums prize for cooing, Wilma Young. 4eGlee Club goes to Springfield. Berrt J erard takes 'a ginger ale. 5eMasculine caller at the Beth Reah house. Acacias hire a sleuth to shadow the intruder. SeDr. Schafer lets out a; class on time. Students watch to see if he is going to catch a train. lOeKappa Sigmas give Freshman Smoker. Black smokes a pill and goes to the hospital. 15-Ha1 Bean and Edith M. quarrel. Express wagon drives up in front of the Sig house and the band plays "Take Back Your Oil Stove." I 'lkHal Bean h-olds auction. , 17eThey make up. 18eWe. get ours ih Portland, and everyone comes back broke. Glen Storie writes a new verse for ttLuluP ft .! 1 i W, 20-Numerous alumni write and tell us how to do it next year. x r 22eEthel Tooze keeps engagements for this evening as fol- lows: 6:30 P. M., Brooks; 7:30 P. M., Grady; 9:00, Brooks; 11:00, Grady. 25eThree Betas and three Gamma Phis make an evening call on a grape patch, and are met by a reception committee. Harry Stine and Florence Cleveland tied for first place in the cross-country Which followed. Jane Stanfield and Irma Clifford finish close behind them. Kuykendall and Johns lose the course and miss the last car. The recep- tion committee, composed of Lloyd Barzee and Lyman Rice, overtake the panic stricken marauders, treat them to grapes, and see them safely home. ww x mm... ..M,.. . . 322 Q N0 Man Gets Rich Whose Pocket is 6 Flag Station Insteaa of a Terminal You will find it much easier to save a part of your allowance or earnings, if 3 Savings Account is opened at this bank in your name. Our Savings Department has always been extremely popular among the University Students, the deposits from this source show- ing a splendid increase during the past year. Savings Accounts are cordially invited in any sum from $1.00 up, on which compound interest at 3 per cent is paid every six months. Your money is also available at any time in case of necessity. The Eugene Loan and Savings Bank Depositary for the United States. Capital and oSurplus, $200,000.00 323 nku,u,,,..,....,u- -,..... .... .hs.....m.... . .. .s.....r vr-LL: : t .43.. Evrvmher GeSigma Nu elects the football captain as usual, but not im the usual manner. 7eRussell Brooks ieports the loss of his fraternity pin. SeKatherine Carson seen to look often in the pocket of her middy blouse. QeSOphomore Dance. The Chi Omegas appear in dusting caps and make quite a hit. Theta senior says that she has all Kappa Sigs on her program but one, who is a Beta, and she doesnt mind him. lleGlee Club concert. Hats off to Powell and Ogden. Vawter and Cowden give Professor Barnett a shock. IZeInter-class basketball starts. Hal Bean asks to be elected captain of the senior team. ' IBeWe hear from more alumni. Burns deplores fraternity feeling. 15eMisses Abrams and Thurber play golf in the rain. Oh, Botha! ' ZOeProfessor Reddie, Dun!t;0n, and Maude Beals assign the parts for ttCandida" as follows: A. F. Reddie, Director; Maude Beals, Heroine; F. E. Dunton, Hero. 22eAnother frat pin lost. Motschenbacher leaves his with a pretty maid in Hood River. 23eChet Huggins calls on a pretty maid in Hood River. 24-Motschenbacher lccieives his pin by mail. ZSeThe Oregana Chlistmas Tree. Presents distributed as fol- lows: To the University, a referendum-proof appropri- ation; to Dr. Schafer, an alarm clock set for 11:50 A. M.; to Dorothy Schoolcraft, a pair of side c0mbs;,to Karl Onthank, a white collar and a new shirt; to Pro- fessor Gilbert, a new record; to Mother P., a hug and three kisses from her deah boys; to Mildred Healy, a new date book; to Art Geary, a nurse; to Ethel Tooze, a bottle of H2 02; to Professor Reddie, a different pose; to Bert Prescott, Marian Stowe, Tiffany, et a1, a case of ttsneak" shoes; to the Bond Brothers, a new ce- ment court; to Bush Brown, a receipt for fifty cents owed the Oregana; to Professor Straub, a bottle of soothing syrup; to the members of the Suffragette Club, a few steadies; to the rest of the student body and faculty, the things they need most. . 324 G GD . Linn Drug Co. Eastman Kodak Agents Kodak Supplies Sells pills for gout 3115 cows The Store That Saves You Money ON ROOM FURNISHINGS FOR STUDENTS With special designs for F raternities and Sororities Does not Want Your Business If we can not please you andisave you money. Take time to investigate THE MMCLW SEVENTH MagnaEEURNISHERS 5kg- - W C? ANDWILLAMETTE C9 C0, STUDENTS! Eat at the Y..M. C. A. CAFETERIA 7776 Place of Quality Y. M. C. A. Building Willamette Street 325 Jlanuary 3eLyle Brown predicts lots of college cases this spring. Here is hoping, Bush. 6:Sigma N us have extra large picture taken for the Oregana and Mrs. Tollmants window. It pays to advertise. 9eFijis play Kappa Sigs. Colton Meek gets hilt on his Fiji pin. lOeNellie Hemenway and Cecil Miller commence regular at- tendance at Varsity basketball practice. 1kSigma Chis get in wrong with the Lambda Rhos by steal- ing ice cream. Briedwell and Early make vehement denials. 15eNellie Hemenway, and Cecil Miller quarrel about who is the most handsome man on the basketball team. 17ePan-Hvellensic rules that Freshmen must have fewer dates. Mildred Healy calls off sixteen of her dates for next month. Dusty did not lose any. 19eGamma Delta Gammas hold a rough house and invite in the Avavas. Abe Blackman drops Olga. ZOeBeta-Sigma Chi melee. John Kelly has the biggest time of his life. 22eDr. Clo'ran opens class with an address on Parkison and the referendum. 24eGame with the Harrisburg Bullets. Jerry Mantin asks ten different girls for the evening. 25-Betas quit the league. Sigma Chis banquet their friends. .27-eLambda Rhos post a list of dateless girls and send a copy to the Acacia house. 29-First carload of suffragette literature arrives addressed to Birdie Wise, who pays the freight. 30eKappa Sigs pledge Dr. Schmidt to avoid catastrophe in German classes. 326 Burgess Optical Co. Wholesale and Retail OPTICIANS 519 Willamette Street - Eugene, Oregon - Phone 362 Registered Optometrists We are Exclusive Opticians We surface grind and polish our own lenses in our own factory on the premiSes Burgess Optical Co. 327 u. 5...... ....,.y.,.-r - .- wC-D Zthrnarg 1-A. T. Ots begin to hunt partners for the Junior Prom. They call up the different sorority houses and ask for lists of unbid girls. SeExams. Everything dark blue. 9eTheta and Tri Delt collide, and somebody gets squeezed. lOeMatinee dance. Gamma Phi Freshman says she just loves to rag. 12eGrades out. Pendleton gets hit rather hard. Sigma Nu and Kappa Sigma pledge new men. 13eSeven Sigma Chis in the History and Geographic Influences class. McClure Hall said :tefurnish excellent view of the women,s gym. 14eBreezy Lowell graduates. 16eLincoln High Minstrels met by all the fraternities. Clar- ence Walls introduces a prepper to Raphael Geisler. Pee-rade! 17eFreshman Glee. The Delta Sigs phone to the Sigma Chis and ask them to pull down their blinds While dressing. ZleLeap Year Dance. Dean Walker gets a bid at 7:30 P. M. Co-eds in wild scramble for a place on Linkenfeldterts pro gram. 23eSigma Chis telegraph George Carter to beware of blond man at the skating rink. I 27-Tawahs visit bulldog King in the city jail. ZSeBetas advertise loss of cook with remarkable success. House bill goes down. 328 h BEN SELLING Morrison 8: Fourth - - '1 Portland. Oregon Eollege GZIotbes Our entire second Hoor is devoted to Wearables for Young M en University of Gregon ZITen Crabe 52ers g 5hr aim? iJIHag 01111112 There will be many times in your life When a bankefs good word in your favor will be a great help to you. When that time comes, if you are transacting business with this bank, you may be assured of our most friendly consideration. We give you an invitation to bank here. The service we give our patrons will make it of advantage to you. To secure independenceepractice simple economy-have a bank account. Economy requires some courage, ordinary energy and the capac- ity of ordinary brains, and results in order, system, methodeand dividends. Economy and a bank account. That sounds like success. It is success, not occasionally, but most always. We want you to have a bank account at this bank, and deposit the results of your economies to your credit, with us. 715mm 11f 0111111111211? 550 Willamette Street. C9 329 g ' 31'an y ward; 1W" flu leBoyce Fenton and Dolly Gray pull off Mutt and Jeff stunt l' at the skating rink wriith Constance Woodward as ' y mm aggEEEWIIII ' audience. 3eMoon1ight night. Tri-Delts post sentinels at every window to see who goes by on the board walk. 6eProf. Barnett forgets to come to the Law of Ofiices class. Class elects memorial committee, With power to purchase flowers. 7e-Karl Martzloff and Anne McMicken leave for the Orator- ical contest at Forest Grove. Report that they have eloped. Panic in the Theta house. SeRuby Hammerstrom toasts ttThe Good Qualities of Black- manf at the senior pink smoker. QeWilcox- Chandler rag seen once more at the Sigma Nu dance. 15e-Oregon wins another championship from Washington. 16eCounty Fair. Admission, spectators 25 cents; performers, $1100. Co-ed stage Johnnies hang around exit of Beta Ballet. 21eInterfraternity league organizes minus Betas. Tawahs ask to be excused because they cannot get a team With- out using fratres in urbe. ZZeGamma Phis and Kappa Sigs introduce turkey trot at Oregon. 23-Second team goes to Harrisburg to play .the Bullets. Early, Moore, Briedwell, and Viereck celebrate. 25eDelta Sig freshmen begin to engrave Phi Delta Theta ini- tials on Universiity furniture. 28-eFinal of Inter-sorority basketball games. Gamma Delts draw three sprained ankles and two dislocated noses. Thetas get five black eyes and two broken ribs. Gamma Delt junior promises to lick a Theta. 30eHarry Viereck goes to Lebanon with the Y. M. C. A. and assumes the role of Gypsy Smith. 330 r; v- if h 47! G? C03 UP:TO:DATE JEWELRY Biggest Line in the Country An entirely up-tO-date line of Jewelry and Novelties in very handsome designs. Buy from us and get artistic de- signs and just as nice as to be found in any large city. Beautiful selections of Sil- verware, Brassware, Diamonds. Cut Glass and Chma WE PLEASE THE STUDENTS-ALWAY-S SETH LARAWAY S? II:D STATES U N OF PORTLAND, OREGON UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY Capital - - $ 1,000,000.00 Surplus - - - 950,000.00 Deposits - - - 11,000,000.00 With an honorable and successful record for over twenty years and exceptional facilities for handling the accounts of Banks, Firms, Individuals and Corporations. CORRESPONDENCE INVITED WE SOLICIT YOUR BUSINESS J. C. AINSWORTH, President. R. W. SCHMEER, Cashier. R. LEA BARNES, Vice-President. A. M. WRIGHT, Asst. Cashier. W. A. HOLT, Asst. Cashier. 331 N ATIONA,.. ANK April 1eNewland and Stine get special permission from the Bond Bros. to play on the cement court. 2-Senior banquet at the Osborn. Delegation later adjourns to Springfield. Sap Latourette and Butch Moore ride part way Wilth Prexy. 3e1914 places Rice and Bean at head of Oregana menu. 4eProf. Howe discourses to some extent on love and comes to the conclusion that some kisses have more pip than others. SeFreshman Stevens takes the Delta Sigs to Springfield for V a blow-out. Walls and Bob Wray try. to sing, ttI Wont be Home Until Morning? but have to give it up for ttGod Be With You Till We Meet Again? 6eChi Omegas celebrate Founders Day. Nellie Hemenway hops under the table by mistake. 7-Dry weather. Wallace Caufleld crosses the street Without his rubbers. SeDarte of April frolic announced. Carl Grayson and John Kelly held a council of war and decide to postpone their vacation until some time in June. QeCharlie Olson makes the statement in Living Writers, that no man likes to be endebted to a girl. This gives the co-eds an insight to their popularity at shows. lOeNancy Noon gets Brook Dixon to take her and Niell for a drive in her new auto. Prof. Barnett pigs to the senior play. "Scandalousw, lleRex Turner wins Telephone Marathon. Time 3 hours and 45 minutes. Pat and Jessie got tired and went for a walk. Harold and Wilma ruled out for repeating the same thing more than three times. IZeBen Harding seen talking seriously with Ruby DuniWay- wonder who the Betas are rushing now. 13-Vacation. The Calendar man goes on a strike and gets his life insured. 332 KJ 5hr 0111111 BILLIARDS AND POOL Swellest Equipped Place on the Coast College Men, Give Us a Call Eighth and Willamette Streets Q A. B. STEINBACH Southwest Corner Morrison and Fourth St's., Portland, Oregon. Young Melfs Clothes We are specialists in clothes for College, Academy and Uni- versity Men. Suits and Overcoats for Smart Snappy Dressers from $15 to $30. g: WATTS JEW ELRY CO. Watches, Clocks and Jewelry repaired by first class workmen. All work guaranteed. We will order anything in Diamonds, Watches, or Jewelry for you, at prices away beyow ordinary retail prices. WATTS JEWELRY co. 564 Willamette Street. Eugene, Oregon. E 333 Eirprtnrg nf Iliratprnitiea i For the names of the editors of this revised directory, see the reservation list of La Bolivia, sailing May 5 for Rio Janeiro and ports southJ $igma Nu This is a bunch of football players. If you are a possible foot- ball player or an athlete of any sort, you can be a Sigma Nu. All that you have to do is to let them know about you. If you were on any athletic team in high school and were not bid Sigma Nu, it was an oversight. It has been rumored that they sometimes play cards and drink ginger ale. This is a mistake; they donit. What they really do is to run a man for every possible student body or class oiiice, Whether or not he has any qualifications. Owing to this policy and to the fact that they have reduced pigging to a political science, they have got more class presidents and captains of teams during the past few years than all the other bunches put together. They . have several active members who do not live at home. Chief among them is Ercel Kay, who is taking a course in pea pool. He will probably make a good alumnus, if his father pays the tuition for five or six more years. Many Co-eds wear Sigma Nu pins. This does not mean that. they are Sigma Nus, but that they went to the Junior prom last year with a Sigma Nu and will probably go With one again this year. Kappa gigma This is the bunch that belongs to Sap Latourette and the two Moores. They took it over three years ago and are the only things about it that have remained the same. They own their neW house- that is they will in ten or fifteen years. This is undoubtedly the oldest college fraternity. It is so old that some of its members have forgotten how old it is. Some say that it was founded at the same time the pyramids were, others say that Noah built it When he did the ark, but the majority agree that it was founded at the University of Bologna some time before the flood. This bunch has more members than any other. It has three active chapters each year, one in their house, one coming, and one going. The most unique and convenient thing about this fraternity is their system of pledging men. Their alumni can get together at any time and pledge a man Without the knowledge or consent of the chapter. The chief qualifications for membership are a tennis racquet, a set of golf sticks, and an allow- ance of a hundred per month. 334 MERCHANTS BANK EUGEN E, OREGON Corner Seventh and Willamette DIRECTO RS FRED FISK L. T. HARRIS M. F. GRIGGS E. U. LEE ALTON HAMPTON F. N. McALISTER L. H. POTTER Capital $100,000.00 Surplus $6,500.00 335 C9 .A ,-4 $ 4A A ; .v A$flm-a3..l-1MM A wryu...mm- 1W; cw. W"--. Araria This is a wonderful orgnization. It is undoubtedly the most secret bunch in college. They live in an out of the way place, they are quiet, gentlemanly little boys, they never do anything Which is wrong and very little of anything else. They are so secret that only one or two of their men have ever been heard from. They are known chiefly for their members and friends on the faculty, the high grades they get and the pipe courses Which they take. If you see a man wearing a funny looking pin and do not know Who he is, it is a safe bet that he is an Acacia. They have several good men, however. Dunton, Huggins, and Punch Dunlap are all good memethat is, they are good for nothing. ' meta Elma Hi This is the finest bunch in college,-that is in its own estimation. There is nothing too good for them if they can get it. If you want to find out how good any of these men are, just ask another Beta and the chances are several thousand to less than one that you Will get a complete answer. This bunch was originally organized several years ago in the dormitory and managed to sneak out the back door in May With all the principle student body officers and half the foot- ball and track teams. It is only during the last year or two that they have even thought of running a man for office. The Betas at Oregon are considered kleptomaniacs by some people, and it is said that they advocate a Pan-Hellenic to make pledge lifting more honor- able. This bunch once thought that they could play basketball, but when they learned different, they quit the league in order to avoid further defeats. Whenuthere is any work to be done on the campus, the Beta freshmen are usually conspicuous by their absence. The most prominent member of this bunch is Prokos. Alpha Elan 69mm: This bunch is composed of Dutchmen, Swedes and Freshmen, mostly the latter, Who are noted for their long hair and their inability to find green caps. Their one senior is absent most of the time and their numerous frosh are left to the tender mercies of a bulldog and two Jap cooks. Bath tubbing in this house has become a lost art. Their principle men are Alexander Martin 111., Who bought an automobile last spring, and H. Cohen Viereck, an enthusiastic Y. M. C. A. worker. In order to distinguish themselves from a literary society, the members of this bunch wear their fraternity pins on their ties. ' 336 i s -TT Cockerline 8: F raley Dry Goods and ?umishings Let us fit you out with one of those Kaufman ttPre-Shrunk" Suits $15.00 to $30.00. We have the Trunk or Suit Case we euXEP'Kn'waau'tLa you will buy for your next vacation 0; C CO 63 0? C03 The Best For Clothing and C d. I C Gents, F urnishing an 163, CC ream Goods go to and Sodas Also the Best Place to 8 East Ninth Street E A T 03 49 c9 co Telephone 392 I IMPERIAL Cleaners and Hatters The most modern and sanitary method: used in Cleaning and Dyeing Ladies' and Gents' Clothing and Hats; also Dye- ing of Leces, Plumes, etc. 7th and Willamette Sts., Eugene, Oreg. 23 East Seventh St. - Eugene, Oregon 3 :9 to: 9 xwmwe ..-, 7 gnaw? Svignm 01m This bunch of roughnecks is surrounded on all sides by sorority houses. To offset this influence, they lifted John Kelly from the Delta Sigs last fall. They are the most cosmopolitan bunch in col- lege, With some lifty-seven varieties, ranging from Henrietta Fowler to Briiedwell. It also is noted for its lack of freshmen and a little habit they have of taking in second, third, and fourth year men that everybody else has passed up. Last fall a Sigma Chi got off a Springfield car and entered the Gamma Phi house by mistake. To avoid a repetition of this the street car has kindly consented to stop directly in fron't of the house, Where a neW walk leads straight to the front door. The Sigma Chis manage to keep themselves prom- inent by judicious use of the Register, Emerald, and Oregon Journal. A large factor in their success this year has been the work of Mason Roberts, their advisory member, Who took charge of the bunch soon after it became too obs'treperous for Bob McKenzie. 331;: thumma Evita This is the most aristocratic bunch in college. They are a very old bunch, and all come from our very best families. They became a national just this year and have rapidly extended themselves in many directions. They now have more golf and tennis players than anyother fraternity. They are also very good dancers. And as for pilgging, well, Tom Yord has it all laid out for them on a chart. The schedule provides a date for each underclassman at each house at least twice a week. He has outlined a pigging campaign for them Which Will last for three years. When they go out With the girls, they are not allowed to talk anything but Fiji. All the girls are crazy about them. Most of the Fijis are down on some profis class roll, but if you want to find them, do not look in a laboratory or lecture room, but up the race or in a sorority house. The Fijis have a great many distinctive features, Which they tell to everyone. One of them is that they wear their'fraternity pins day and night. One thing that they donit tell, however, is Where they keep their dead soldiers since the school board tore up the Patterson school sidewalk. 338 COD 63.. The Young Lady With grace makes a very pretty subject for our Photographic Skill We aspire to do the best work that can be done in photography. Patience Sure it takes lots of it to make Artistic Pictures, but we have plenty of patience Portraits for Particular People The kind we make all the time Special Prices to University Students CLARKtS STUDIO Seventh and Willamette Streets. 339 $0? Eamah This is the bunch of Bakerites that have been worrying Bob Kellogg and the Sigma Nus for the last three years. It was organ- ized several years ago through the e-iforts of Mr. Walls, and has since been reorganized two or three times each year. Its las-t revival is accredited to A. Evangelist Houston, who has now taken the place formerly occupied by Star Boarder Joe Rothehild. This boarding house is kept up largely by its fratres in urbe, who for various rea- sons do not care to go home. a Anana This bunch is known to some as the Sigma Chi Annex. It was organized by Beauty Robi'son and Les Dobie several years ago. Since then they have spent most of their time in giving concerts, playing penny ante, and petitioning Delta Kappa Epsilon. This year they have been extraordinarily busy pledging enough freshmen to pay the cooks back wages. It is renowned as the home of the proba- tion student Abe Blackman, who has lately donned a pair of spec- tacles in a vain attempt to look intelligent. It is the one house that still keeps alive the ancient custom of water bag throwing, the Sigma Chis having discontinued it last year subsequent to an accident to Bill Mott. Evita gamma This bunch was originally a select few who joined themselves together under the caption of The Virgin,s Club. Later, under the encouragement of a certain gentleman from Washington, they rented a house and established a new branch of the Y. M. C. A. They first attracted notice when Benefield began hanging about stage doors and smoking cigarettes. Last fall they caused quite a stir on the campus when it became known that they were drinking Shasta water in their new house. Since that time they have quickly traversed the stages of good, bad, and worse, and now Clarence Walls smokes three cigars, two pipes, and five cigarettes daily. With their comirng nationalization as a topic for conversation, they are rapidly realizing many of their social-climbing aspirations. 340 3? co PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST AGENT JOHNSTON'S CANDIES 40 East 9th St. Opposite White Temple E co fr - 3 Mills at Elmira and Noti, Oregon. Eugene Yard: Yards at Elmira, Noti, Irving and Eugene. Fourth and Pearl Streets. INCORPORATED manufarturerz nf Gbrpgnn EHir anh lehar Eumher Enugh anh Erwmh Clement. i'lime, 71151111. $hinglw. manta- C-D ' Q C?- G FUNERAL DIRECTOR AND EMBALMER Phone: Residence, 448-R. Tenth and Olive Streets, Phone: OHice. 448-Y. Eugene. Oregon. g C0D 6? C07 LIVERY, SALE .AND STAGE STABLES . . . BAGGAGE TRANSFERRED DAY on NIGHT. AUTOMOBILE AND CAB SERVICE Phone'21. Corner Eighth and Pearl Streets, EUGENE, OREGON L03 GD 341 - a.?w $amma ighi Evin ttY-es, Alonzo, this is a lovely bunch of girls. They live on the corner of Thirteenth and Alder streets, and are just near enough to college to make it. possible to get to eight oiclocks and still wear marcel waves. It is also convenient to the fraternity houses and, thanks to their neighbors, they have no trouble keeping in the lime light." tiYes, Alonzo, they are very kindh-earted. Their house has always been known as an asylum for homeless Kappa Sigmas, and on Sun- day nights When the crowd is too great, they find the waiting station convenient for handling the overflow. But they are good girls and always do what Mamma Pennell tells them to and never provoke Dr. Stuart by cutting gym. But they are a very shy bunch, Alonzo. Some of their girls are so shy that you have to have an ear trumpet to hear them speak and then you have to guess at What they sayKi itIf they ever invite you, Alonzo, you must be sure to go. Their . Sunday evening dinners are famous for quantity and quality, and it is one of the few houses that does not stop at a pickle and a tooth- pick. It is a mooted question as to just Who is head of this house, Jay Stanfield or Lee, the cook. Recent experience indlicates that it is the latter." Olhi Gbmvga tiGee Whiz! Ferdinand, Who are those girls over in that corner of the library, shivering and shaking as though they have the ague? Is there going to be a lawn party on the campus today?" ltHush! Alonzo, not so loud. Those are the Chi Omegas, and this is their birthday, Which they always celebrate on the fifth of April by appearing in conspicuous thite raiment. But they are a sensible bunch of girls, even if they do flirt With the grippe and influenza once a year? "But, Ferdinand, why do so many of them wear two pins? Do they all belong to the senior honor society?" liAlonzo', my boy, What ignorance! They are all underclassmen and those are Sigma Nu pins. That is their method of getting acquainted with the Sigma Nus." liAnd say, Ferdinand, Why are those two girls over there always Whispering and talking with each other?t, ilMy goodness, dont you know, Alonzo? That is the Chi Omega sub-fraternity, Nellie Hemenway and Cecil Miller. ltAnd, Ferdinand, who is that determined looking women always hovering near with an alarm clock in one hand and a cudgel in the other ?" ilSoft, Alonzo, soft! Beware of the Eye that Sees and the Terror that Flys by Night? . C0 342 Corner Ninth and Willamette EUGENE, OREGON b K9 GJ' The Eugene Theatre GEORGE H. SMITH, Manager. Plays all the best read shows C9 '3 IF OUR SEEDS DON,T GROW, BRING THEM BACK WE ALSO HAVE TOOLS TO CARE FOR THEM Blais Implement and Seed House 65 East Ninth Street. Phone 714. EUGENE, OREGON 343 Kappa Alpha Elma "No, Alonzo, it is mean to nickname this fraternity K. A. T3s. They are nice girls and keep good hours and never fight except in rushing season, but all girls do that, you know. Of course, they get one or two girls now and then by a scratch. But they pick not many, but wisely. They were long distinguished for not having any Sopho- mores and for awhile it looked as though there would not be any Freshmen? "Oh, yes, they are very ambitli'ous, Alonzo. Their greatest ambi- tion is to get the Secretary of the Student Body just once,-just to get it away from the Gamma Phi Betas, for they have had it three times and a Theta is just as good as a Gamma Phi any day, isnit she, Alonzo? Of course she is, and if you ask Pat Cecil or Vernon Vawter, they will tell you the same thing,-and they ought to know? iiNo, their house hasnit much of a porch, Alonzo. In fact, they purposely neglected to build one? tiBut why donit they want a porch, Ferdinand'Pl itWhy! Alonzo, my boy, they are all nice little girls and never use a porch, and besides, Twelfth is one of the darkest streets in town." Evita Evita Evita iiNo, Alonzo, that green backed book you saw in the library the other day, with three triangles on the cover, was not a treatise on geometry, but the Tri-Deltfs magazine. They are so proud' of their fraternity that they like to impress others With their superiority and so keep a copy of their magazine on the library reading table. This is not at all necessary, Alonzo, because one glance at the young ladies themselves is enough to convince anyone of their surpassing qualities." itBut, Ferdinand, who is that young chap in corduroys who was reading the magazine? Is he a Tri-Delt?" tiNo! No! Alonzo. He is a junior from the Kappa Sigma house, who has only recently afiiliated himself with the organization. He is working hard in order to become a more proficient rusher." uYes, they are a popular bunch, Alonzo. Lots of men go to their house every Sunday. And do you know, they have the dearest, sweetest house mother? 344 C'D' The McMarran 8: Washburne Store Eugene? Pepular Shopping ?lace Smart, Stylish Wearing Apparel for ' Women, Men, Boys and- Girls ' 030metl7ing a Little Better, 6 Little Newer The home of Society Brand, L S y s t e m and A t ter b u r y Clothes For Men and Young Men of Particular Taste $ll Ihafs New and Correct for Women and Girls 345 C9 QN $amma IHhi Epta Nu Ghaptrr SORORES IN FACULTATE Art Geary. ALUMNAE Jim Johnsf' Bob Kellogg, Bill Main, Tom Word, Brick Michael, Art Means.M SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 Breezy Lowell, Harry Stine, Ralph.Moores. 1913 Fen Waite,H3 Glen Storie. 1914 Joe Jones, Waldo Miller, Ty Cobb, Hawley Bean, Allie Grout, Cady Roberts. 1915 Gene Good, Russell Brooks, .Sophous Blohm. RUSHEE Alfred Clark. 'Charter member. MAbsent by leave. MHszent by request. 346 Q; mw-wv ' -7 ' , : . ,. 7 ,,.4..- ...-;...v:...-,....- --...........;A.-- 0,717 SNOHdE'IEJ. Everything in the AutOmobilo Line' IOtH and Oak Streets Eugene, Oregon Ladd 8: Tilton Bank Established 1859 Capital - - - - $1,000,000 Surplus and Undivided Profits $800,000 Interest Paid on Time Deposits and Savings Accounts OFFICERS W. M. Ladd. President. R. S. Howard, Assistant Cashier. W. H. Dunckley, Cashier. Walter M. Cook, Assistant Cashier. Edward Cookingham, Vice-President. J. W. Ladd, Assistant Cashier. L03 C9 347 .m- -. -- .. .-J ..- ---m - V: - -. ......- ,...... .....;.;..... .. . r ,7 . r . thi 0911mm Hat Alpha Ghapte'r SORORE IN URBE Ercel Kay. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 Herb Barbour, Bush Brown, Ralph Newland, Charlie Olson. 1913 Hal Warner, Bennie Mount, Raymond Caufield, Kenneth Frazier. 1914 Bob McCornack, Irwin Brooks.m 1915 Ben Dorris, Hal Grady, Boyce Fenton, Roger Moe, Ed Geary. PLEDGES Dolly Gray, Walt Fisher 1Absent on leave. 348 le-w- 1x The Oregon Electric Railway A DREGUN ElEURll RAILWAY mm Is now being builded Between Salem :95 and Eugene ' 5 When completed the superior electric train service now main- tained between Salem and Portland will be extended between Eugene, Albany, Salem and Portland. The North Bank Road East Limited Trains are in service through between Portland Spokane, Saint Paul, Milwaukee and 5 Chicago ; East of Spokane they are run via Great Northern and Northern Pacific. Every detali of comfort and pleasure en route is provided. I Your home ticket agent will sell tickets via this route. Details will be furnished on reqeust. ' W. E. COMAN General Freight and Passenger Agent, Portland, Oregon. 349 ' : .L. glg..." 5.. -, 5....m C07 Kappa Alpha Ehpta Alpha Xi Olimpia ALUMNA Chuck Taylor. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 Chet Moores, Ben Chandler, Sid Henderson, Dusty Shattuck. 1913 Pat Cecil,M Fen Waitefk Karl Martzloff, Vernon VeLwter.M 1914 Dutch Young, Del .Stanafd, Vernon Motschenbacher, Norton Cowden, Earl Fortmiller. 1915 Bert Jerard, Frank Dudley, Buford Payne, Rolla Ralston. PLEDGE Harry Lytle. 1Afflliated. a: 1Charter members. 350 L9 co,L ugene s SS'eabing photographers E129. Eollman Stubio Visit our Studio when you want an excellent likeness artistically executed. The I Most Modern and Best Equippe d P h o t 0 Studio in Oregon. Ebe Eollmcm Stubio 3..3 Anberson, Drop 518 millamette StJ Eugene, QDregon - ; .':":v5fl 39139340 : 1 pwg3fff513QW;-'MAW . $ , ,V A A-.4....:. V1M.-A.,.v caw 4. A- r--.u-, 43: 3 A u 3- . - . ' h. v w $K1H11ul . EPIRI Etna Etna Elma Evita Glimmer ALUMNA Bill Mott. SORORES IN FACULTATE Albert Tiffany, Jimmie Gilbert. SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1912 Homer Jamison, Raphael Geisler, Martin Hawkins, Wendell Barbour.11 1913 Ralph Cake, Fat Bailey, Edsall Ford, Homer Maris. 1914 Claude Still,1 Colton Meek, Bob Wray. 1915 George Frazier, Leland 11.413eck" Finch, Elsie Stevens, Carrol Wagner. RUSHEE Carl Fenton. 1House Father. 1 1 Lifted. 352 C0? WATTS OPTICAL PARLORS 611:2 Eeahing Gbmiral Eatahliahmmt nf 1hr Qlitg We don,t think there is anything too good for our customers, and we have fitted our lense factory with the best machinery that money can buy. If you have tried other places and failed to get satisfaction, come here and your troubles will be ended. Eighteen years steady practice in Eugene. Era SJ. $. media 63 0T S64- Willamctte Street EUGENE, OREGON c9 Deli : Kay : Cesscn U. of 0. Seal Pins, 33 West Eighth Street, Cuff Buttons and Scarf Pins Home Cooking , Conklin Self-Filling Fountain Pens Dairy Lunch ' High Grade Groceries Foreign Delicacies Watch Repairing our Specialty. . H D. S M A R T Dell - KAY - Tessen ' Eugene, Oregon. to 3-: Ag 3 THE GLAFK ELDIXON CO. Eugene,s Pioneer Wholesale Grocers Wholesale Grocers Fruits and Produce The Flour of Qualit 2:1 x:'ll3t:sfanned Goads DRIFTED SNOW Y 353 C0D C0D- 6? o , 331??? a Gluh Motto: "Ignorance is Bliss? Qualification for Membership: Ten "Smoke-upy per semester. President .......................................................... RALPH NEWLANDS Vice President .................................................................. CASS KENNEDY Secretary .......................................................................... BEANIE MOUNT Marshall ........................................................................ SA'P LATOURETTE Committee on Membership-WALT FISHER, CLAUDE STILL, . AARON BEDFORD. Committee oh Trotters REX TURNER, HOMER JAMISON, BOB BRADSHAW. Judges of Courses-BUSH BROWN, CARL GRAYSON, JOHNNIE WELCH. Committee on Sore Eyes and General Physical Disability DOLLY GRAY, ERCEL KAY, ALFRED CLARK. Committee on Amliations HARRY LYTLE, BILL NITSCHKE, GEORGE MARSDEN. Faculty Advi'sors PROFESSORS BARKER, COLLIER, STRAUB, and BOYNTON. Meetings Time: Nightly. Place: Sid s. 034 .9 354 a; a :Eugene Steam Laundry WILLIAM H. HODES, Proprletor. Corner West Eighth and Chamelton PHONE 521. GOLDEN WEST Steel Cut Coffee N0 Dust No Chaff Sixteen Ounces of Pure Coffee to Every POund CLOSSET 8a DEVERS PORTLAND SEATTLE f iw X W. 6W , ,, L , WW$X W-y , , wx W Pygma1ian and Galateaw Lambda Rho Stunt at April Frolic C03 0 Our new line of Base- ball Supplies for 1912 has just arriVed. ' Everything for the thhlete and Sportsman C 0 l umbla Hardware Co. 104-106 Fourth Street, PORTLAND, OREGON g 356 .---A-nm v- h---h ,7- h .1?- r.:';h'. '7 h .u. g L V .h..-:g:;...;;: ...:::..'. "-1.3;hv1e: x 4.; -. ........ mpg" , D. M. WATSON, Proprietor. JOHN J. SIREY, Manager. Watsonhs Popular-Price Restaurant SECOND TO NONE We anIte Inspection of Our Kitchen and ?rcmises 108 5th Street, between Open 6 A. M. to 9 P. M Perkins Hotel Block f Washington and Stark Established 1892. PORTLAND, 0REGON i : C9 C0 HOT LAKE SANATOR IUM HNPH H0331 ZOdeL'UO Hot Lake Sanatorium, the largest and best equipped inlstituti'on of its kind in the West, has largest BOILIN G mineral spring known, and IS equlpped to treat SUCCESSFULLY all cases of RHEUMATISM, Skin and Blood DISORDERS. Write for FREE illustrated Booklet. HOT LAKE SANATORIUM CO. ,h HOT LAKE, OREGON l. Special Rates on All R. R. Finest Surgery in West. 357 . .. -- -- .-l-" . - . ' . ..m....,...-..-h-...r , ,. .- --- ,.. - - .. , .v. .-.,.-h.h 4......"1, . . . , ,. .. h ,. . y a , J h .. ,... . . - 1..-...an ,,.,,....-Irl . . r,.......4...s...-..---... V Prof. Fizzler Johnsonts Schumaphone Tri-Delt Stunt at April Frolic Vesta Moorehouse-"What,s the matter, Herb?" Herb-JtAW, nothing; only Prof. Boynton is advising the faculty to discontinue tpipe, courses." Vesta-JtMy goodness! How can we ever hope to graduate." THE NEW IMPERIAL HOTEL Extends greetings to the Faculty and Students of the University of Oregon, and extends you an invitation to make the Imperial your headquarters while in Portland. The Imperial is now the largest and most lavishly equipped hotel in the Northwestern states. . Phil Metschan 8C Sons, Proprietors 358 t K m 232;. 'A-t l 4: ll Id. This Space is taken to Tell Every F B ERRY Fraternity Man and Sorority Girl that COOKING The g?terer W I T H , DecOrator G A S House Parties and is the cleanest, coolest and the Dances a Specialty cheapest way. Telephone 28 THE PIONEER SHINING PARLORS t h. n Oregon Power CO. Eugene, Oregon C9 Lax? G? J GD R? t Eugene F. tuel 8: P eed C0. 5' ALL KINDS OF FEED AND FUEL FOR SALE PRICES RIGHT AND QUALITY RIGHT Phone 825 ' 102 West Eighth Street Yorants Shoe Store The Store that Sells Good Shoes 359 '-' - ........ Helping the Cause Along BenoooPle-ase, just one more? Cecile-JoOh, NO! Your breath smells like onions? Hazel-q thought I overheard Hal propose to you last night? Ethel ocoloringooooOh, no ! He was just singing, Baby Mine; While I ocoloring deepero sang, oYou Canot Expect Kisses from Mel " 61 The Florsheim Shoe "For the Man Who Careso $5.00 and $6.00 TheChesterfieldShoe $3.50 and'$4.00 Sorority Shoe For College Girls $3.50 and $4.00 $ Wilcox Bros. Royal Blue Shoe eStore Across from Hampton's 360 C9 can apply Phoenix Paint, Johnsonos Wax or Dye, as well as a professional. Preston 8: Hales Agents 579 Willamette Street Inexperienced women 4 K ' ' d A d d ' t ' The finest tract in the City immedIiate1y adjoining the University of Oregon Campus. I solicit the building propositions of Fraternities and Sororities. Webster Kincaid 81 E. Ninth Street ' EUGENE, OREGON C03 Hazelwood Chocolates Sent by mail or express everywhere Prices, including postage or express charges 75c, $1.00 and $1.25 per pound The Hazelwood 388 Washington Street Portland, Oregon C0D Moorek Restaurant 148 Fifth Street, Opposite Meier 8z Frank Co. QUALITY WITH GOOD SERVICE AT POPULAR PRICES Can take care of all varsity teams-Managers take notice. Depot car passes door. .19 Before the Fun Began First Frosh - Didn,t Mots nearly chew us up this noon? Second Frosh Yaas! He got so worried that he had to spend a dollar to telegraph to his girl for a letter? 0: 3-2 A Kahn Tailored Suit For Perfect F it Have your Measure Taken at Roberts Brothers TOGGERY 362 C03 Hamptoms Daylight Store Where Cash beats Credit. Cor. Sixth and Willamette Streets. The Largest, Brightest and Best Store in Eugene DRY GOODS, CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS OF THE MOST WORTHY Il' SORT FOR MEN. WOMEN AND CHILDREN. THE HOME OF HART, SCHAFFNER 8: MARX CLOTHES Books for Commencement Oregon Seal Stationery Vollandk Seasonk Greetings Kodaks and Phote Supplies I-P Loose Leaf Note Books Keuffel and Esser Draughting Materials Schwarzschildk Book Store Established in 1889. , 363 Beta Ballet Philosophy Alsea Hawley-JWhich do you like best, the Beta pin, or the man behind itiw V , Ruth Dunniway The pin, of course? - Alsea peeVed - Why? Ruth Because it has a diamond in it? 4-5 co Portraits and Groups Post Cards and Copying and Finishing Kodak Finishing GOURLEY STUDIO Phone 448-J 29 West Tenth St. Eugene, Oregon 364 C-J . 2 ., fo , '-,.? - '. I f' .c - . 2z Cz x x r , a . W x 294411;; '7: . ' r 1 $ "1 V. Hf : i xy V , xk .3 Qx I f f $ $5 I Ii . y ' 4 mi - i ? z Ax xQ s Xxxx f ? , 7 ' y , L 1 W xx wgkx E- x QKT'N E ORE AND AF $.st TO MATHIS. GJ' C. J. Mathis Fine Clothing PORTLAND, OREGON 149 Sixth Street, 365 V u..w..-.... .- -C-D 1912 Banquet at the Osburn N u rsery Stock The Dependable Kind. FRUIT. NUT, AND ORNAMENTAL TREES SMALL FRUIT, SHRUBS AND ROSES 90 Acres in Cultivation. No Agents. Direct to Planter. Send for illustrated booklet Free on request. J. B. Pi'lkingtcm Nurseryman Portland, Oregon. C03 Cuttlds ' Stubiov Patterson and Thirteenth Streets Eugene, Oregon QDur portraits are Soft anb Rounb, with 6reat Depth of Detail G; 93'. . . I MISS Dorms, EUOGREEIEFBN w ; Our- Monogram is Our 3 4 Trade Mark, Signifying: Q ; F I The Studio of Dorris is 3-" The Place of SUPERIOR DESIGNS IN PHOTOGRAPHY Thesis Wofk Locating a Power Plant Miss Watson On Shakespearel: llWhat do we get out of this course that is worth While?,, Chet Moores tSotto Voicel: llThree Credits? Prof. Barnett On Elementary Lawl: ler. Johns, tell us What the law is about keeping vicious animals? 5 Johns tsuddxenly waking upl: llWhy, each dog is allowed one bite." Broughton and Barzee, at Eleventh and Mill tgoing down townl: Broughtonellls that a phonograph we hear at the Chi Omega house?,l BarzeeellOff key, Brout, thatls only Kenneth Frazier." Hunter Electric Company Home of the Mazda Lamp Repairing and all other Electrical work done by nothing but the best of help. . . GEO. F. WILLOUGHBY. Prop. 619 Willamette Street. Phone 718 C0D h WE HAVE tIlI-IE GOODS Everything in Lumber, Shingles and Cement and Building Material MOHAWK LUMBER CO. We deliver it when you want it, at the lowest prices. Phone 209. Yard: Sixth and High Streets. 368 c .4 CT . .unu. GEO. FRAZER LEST 3kg O f Portland $906. 3 GEO. DILWORTH WMMJQ 92 E.MORRISON STREET- 369 63 Au. A U A y t1,qv,.,wj.aapl 1k W" Guard Duty Dainty Morsels Bliss A Miss Is a Hit 63 ' 3? HOTEL OSBU N The FineSt Equipped W R in the Willamette Valley 333 BB EBB Ia HE E a a 23- E E g a g g E J 3 3 -,. .. ;-- ,v,...,.. A$-T-r s .M-s'" r3" STEAM HEAT ROOMS EN SUITE TELEPHONE IN PRIVATE BATHS 0R SINGLE EACH ROOM LARGE SAMPLE ROOMS IN HOTEL W. F. OSBURN Banquets to Students. Fraternities Lessee and Proprietor and Business Men 3. Specialty Q .C9 370 We Appreciate Your Order For; LUMBER, LAT H V AND SHINGLES whethgr it be large or small, and will give it our best attention, Delivery, Good Grades and a Fair Price The Booth-Kelly Lumber Co, PHONE 452. Yard North' of Passenger Depot. 1 371 Circ'us Day SEED 188 Front St. J. The Kind That Grow 5 You can 7 keep them in the ground4 J. BUTZERPortland, Ore PIERCE BROS. F ANCY GROCERIES F RUITS AND VEGETABLES Give Us a Trial Satisfaction Guaranteed We Never Sleep EUGENE, - OREGON g9. Before You Buy, Learn What to Buy, Where to Buy, And Right Prices Complete Buyers Guido Postpaid FREE On Requesti No. 540. General Seed Catalog. No. 541. Nursery Stocks, Bulbs and Roses. No. 542. Poultry Supplies for Every Requirement. No. 543. Complete Bee Supply Cat- alog. ....o. 544. Spray Materials and Pumps. No. 545. SertilizersHow to use-An- alys-es. These give reliable information. true market values and they will save you momy and dissapointment. Ask for them by number. PORTLA4 D SEED CO. Portland - C9 05v , Studenw Necessities in Hardware Furniture and Rugs Sherwin and Williams Mixed Paints Chambers Hardware Company C0D A49 373 Spalding Athletic Supplies HONEYMAN HARDHARE CO., Portland, Oregon. S. D. READ , The Studenty Dentist Office over Hall's Grocery EUGENE, OREGON G?- C03 C03 Lemons . Front RoweBreezy, Old Crow, Houston Gobble! Gobble! Saturday Morning w Eugene Business College Recognized as the leading business school between Portland and San F ran- cisco. We have a splendid equipment and a faculty of experienced instructors We organize special classes for the bene- fit of University students. can at the College or telephone six-six-six for further particulars. EUGENE BUSINESS COLLEGE $330$2$53 374 Dodge Department Store Wholesale and Retail. Corner Eighth and Olive Streets, Eugene, Oregon The. only store in Eugene that has an office in New York City, dealing directly w1th the manufacturers, therefore, getting better goods for less money. Dress Goods, Silks, Ladiest and Ments Suits, ranging in price grad $7.50 on up to $30.00. Bought direct from New York City,s best clothes builders. Wetll save you from one-fourth to one-third on your suit. Also a completelivne of pure and wholesome Staple and Fancy Groceries. Once a customer, always a customer. Give us a call. UP TO DATE PLUMBING is ever: a distinguished mark of our work, appliances, materials and im- provements in sanitation. What you read about in papers and periodicals we get or can get on short notice, from wide-awake manufacturers. If you will inquire here, either in per- son or by mail, wetll be pleased to give full particulars and low esti- mates. COPYRIGHT: Williamson 8: Nicol Co. Plumbing, Heating and Tinning Tenth and Oak Streets CO, :9 G- x G Western Illustration Service Practical I llustrations for Commercial Purposes Newspaper Ads--Booklets designeduAir Brush Catalog Work Real-Estate Birdseyeviews a Specialty Phone Marshall 1923 Behnke-Walker Building 4th. Hoor Q Q a $9 375 Designing and Engraving Three and Four Color Process P l ates Duotones Zinc Color Plates 376 Q; I'lnhgv . . ..- GD Engraving and Color Plates In This Issue Made By ARTISTS PHOTO- ENGRAVERS PHOTOGRAPhtRS GOODNOUGH BUILDING ,. PORTLAND OREGON 377 C-D 1. Springfield Way. 2. Counting the Ties. 3. Springfield Bridge. 4. Springfield Depot, 5. Two of a Kind. 6. Above the Falls. BEST LINE UFHARDWARE IN THE! CITY Also Fine Cutlery IF YOU DONT BUY OF US WE BOTH LOSE MONEY Elliott Hardware Co. ESuccessors to Berger-Bean Hdwe. 00.1 378 Ge. A " Society Branb Clothes Q Sometg Emma CLOTHES for Young JMen and lMen VVho Stay Young Copyright I910 Alfred Deckerb Cohl The "Che Coggerf 394 Washington St. 379 N ear the Hazelwood 49 The Last Degree SHELL THEATRE Eugeneis Modern Photoplay Theatre Change of Program M onday Wednesday and Friday Eugeneis Modern Photoplay Theatre ALWAYS AGOOD PROGRAM Edmission 10 Cents. , Children 5 Cents. LEUPOLD 8L VOELPEL Manufacturers of Scientific Instruments. Surveying and Engineering Instruments 2. Specialty. Repairs of all makes of Surveying and Engineering Instruments receive our Prompt Attention. FACTORY AND SALESROOM, 107 E. 70th Street, North, Portland, Oregon. Phone. Tabor 470. To reach us take Moritavilla car at Third and Morrison Streets. C0 C9- The i1HOF BRAUii SOME SHOP THE Headquarters for Oregon Students Marx Barber Shop S tr 0 b e 1 8r. Barenstecher PROPRIETORS Everything in the Barber Line 128 Sixth St., , Portland, Oregon 565 Willamette Street iL . .. - Sincerity Clothes FOR MEN NEVER CAUSE TROUBLE BETWEEN THE MAN WHO BUYS AND THE MAN WHO SELLS. W. L. Douglas Shoes FOR MEN IS SOLID COMFORT TO THE FOOT- NEWEST IN SHAPE, LONGEST IN WEAR . Ax Billy Dept. Store Corner Tenth and Willamette Sts. Phone 36. Ladies READY to WEAR MILLINERY Second Floor COLLEGE ICE CREAM and PUNCHES For Particular People MADE BY Eugene Ice 8: Storage C0. 343 PHONE 343 381 Oscalaventi, Torrienti! Painting the "O" G CO? 93 C9 Co., of Oregon Accounts of responsible Firms and Individuals are solicited, and the fa- cilities of this Bank are uWiWingfg extended to those desiring to 2 ' ' ?MU?" appoint a Corporate Executor, - N h - Adrhmlstrator or Trustee, The New HOtEI Seward quahEed to"act under the Laws p Of the state Of Oregon. Solicits the patronage of the Fa- culty of the Students of the Univer- 4h Interest is paid on sity of Oregon also Citizens of Eu- gene and vicinity--Only first class SAVINGS FUNDS hotel in Portland situated on the Oregon Electric car line, now be- Third and Oak Streets ing constructed and which will . ' reach Eugene next Fall. Portland: Oregon H. M. SEWARD - PROPR. C9 C9 C03 .QJ 4- - FV-g ah . O .C.J C03 :9 Prim ti We would be pleased to figure with you on All Kinds of Commercial Work, Fine Book and Chapter Work, Window Cards, Prograhs, Invita- tions, Favors, Etc., furnished on short notice. Reglster Job Dept. Phone 363 Register Building 6 L9 1-7 G P L U M M E R W660 Electric 60. House Wiring Lamps D R UG C O M P A N Y and Everything ,Electrical Manufacturers and 5upplies o. P. s. PLUMMER, M. D., President Walph E Weed Phone 595 Third and Madism 818., ?ortlana, Ore. 22 W. 8th St. Eugene, Ore. 93 PIPES REPAIRED O B A K C I G A R S T O R E 558 WILLAMET TE ST. g 383 Couchant Rampant F ellman-N ewland 93 the H ouse Funishers , Always a Complete Stock of the NEWEST AND BEST IN FURNITURE FOR THE HOME OR OFFICE Special PriCCS $5 ?JFFgE Matting, Carpets, Rugs, Linoleum, Bedding, Beds, Stoves and Ranges. See Us before spending money for Furniture or Floor Coverings. ...... CC Q Oak Shoe Store. Wear Walk Over Shoes. They Give Comfort Style and Service 587 Willamette St. Phone 227 384 ax. Q F? 9 ABLUEyBELLA Rah! Rah! Rah! Or-e-gon! Remember The Name--ItIMeans , THE BEST ICE CREAM When in Portland have N - . F R A N K I be Best Butter POLISH your KICKS Basement H o t e 1 Imperial Eugene Creamery F R A N K Champion .Bootblack 576 Olive St. Phone 638 GD 93 co 5-3 0 c- Q 575 Will. St. 755 The :Best College EDERHEIMER STEIN U o F o . . I I Washlngton ngh Art Clothing Tbs Best Canned Goods Vendex and Geo. P. Idol Shirts, Silver Collars, Stet- P refe r r e d son and Nokota Hats, rossc and Du en Hof- fir Slices, Dr:E Goods Stock and Notions : : : ; . F. E. DU N N Allen 8:. lBWIS Phone 230 , Distributors ' 575 Will. St. 575 Portland Oregon 3-3 C-J w ..T - - w o; 385 Amateur Theatricals s. E, STEVENS ' L. G. HULIN, 796 We bought our Piano of the Stevens 8: Hulin Piano House Paine Block Eugene, Oregon QDur purpose Is to Make Clothes that Satisfy Our Custo- mers---THAT,S THE .REASON THEY BRING THEIR FRIENDS ALONG EACH - - SEASON M en Buy At Ebe 5aberbasber 505 Willamette Street 505 386 4 . . - - .ma .- JOS. H. KOKE W. C. YORAN Yorank Printing House This Book is a Product of Our Establishment 387 Once on an Autumws Day Oberteuffer Ueturning from a visit to the Theta house I tell you, fellows, the colofs rea1 -it won,t come off? C03 . '0? ? 0 Athletic Supplies COMBINATION The BARBER SHOP Red ' AND BATHS Store 519 Willamette St. 519 GEO SOVERN PROP. Eugene, Oregon 4; 33 co, 59 0; c9 E. C. Hughes G. E. Wood Eugene Bottling Company , Manufacturer of all Kinds of Soft drinks and syrups Sole Bottlers for Lane County for HIRES and COCA COLA 388 Distinctive Home Furnishings offerings of the leading makers and importers. They include furniture of every sort, carpetings, imported and domestic rugs, E; '3: S . g; 0 EUR stocks comprise the latest, most correct and most distinctive the entire decoration and furnishing of houses, clubs and hotels, wall papers, drapery and fabrics, lamps and decorative materials, In price they range from the simplest and least expensive to the gg finest qualities. We are particularly well equipped to undertake L and sollc1t mqulrles from out of town buyers. :5. GS. mach 8c Qiompang Dortlanb ' C9 - J03 ' G3 ' We C any absolu- 1er the FINEST and LARGEST and LOWEST PRICED Stock of DIAMONDS In Eugene :- -: We sell them at the Lowest Prices of any store in Eugene JUST BECAUSE WE CAN DO SO . We can sell them the cheapest because they were bought before the prgces went up to Whether they are new. We invite you to call andxget our prlces on Diamonds, whether you are in the market .for one or not, or whenever you feel like you wou1.d enJoy seemg our beautiful line of Sparkllng Gems. PRICES IN PLAIN FIGURES Ll K: K EYtS THE QUALITY STORE 563 Willamette Street EUGENE, OREGON Gt - o 389 ENGRAVINGS That Please We furnished over $500.00 worth of Cuts for this Annual.- BuckbeeAvMears . Engraving CO. Saint Paul, . . Minnesota QL 390 BUCKBEE MEARS, ENGRAVING CO. Prompt Attention Gi- ven to College Orders ham; Better Cuts, Lower Prices. Saint Paul, - - Minnesota 391 I 1.. - WWW .' Ml Interrupted Bliss A soft answer appeasethvnot the hard prof. y ' :1: 3k 3!: Going to dry classes, Take a little snooze, Prof. may hear you snoring, That is when you lose. ySage of Podunk. Griffin Hardware Company STARRETT 100LS f0R THE WORKSHOP 506 Willamelle St. Eugene, Oregon 392 answ-Jha -A...z-." 4A 44h A f.';.u .- . whim. Irma :- ! x Mfg f; The quality of the binding done on this book tells that it came from the bindery of YORAN c9 K OKE Rulers Binders Book Builders Leather Binding and Gold Stamping Our Specially 393 Ben Harding" Attending an Eight O0clock THE PALACE OF SWEETS A 19rst class dispenser in charge of the fountam at all tunes Good goods served by experienced help has made this the MOST POPULAR RESORT IN TOWN We wish to announce to our many Friends and Patrons OUR NE W 0Y5 T157? PARLORS are now open to the public HGbe 391w? A. G. 8: H. L. DAY, Proprietors 357 Morrison Street, Portland, Oregon 7:00 A. M. UNTIL 1:00 A. M. We Cater Especially to Theater ?arties OYSTEILS, 3TEAKS am? CHOPS a specialty SHELL FISH IN eSEAcSON 394 g L;- Greek Letter Badges . Made by BURR PATTERSON 8: CO. Are correct in Design, Letter- ing and Workmanship Write for Catalogue and Prices Burr Patterson 85 Co. 75 West Fort St. DETROIT MICHIGAN C0? E m. 1 DILLON DRUG 00. HOTEL SMEEDE BLDG. 527 Will. St. A: THE POPULAR PLACE TO TRADE We carry a com- plete L i n e of Drugs, To i1 ct Articles and Sun- dries Our fountai 11' Specialties excell. Agents for Whit- mans 8: McDon- ald's Chocolates ASK YOUR FRIENDS ABOUT US Q: 395 CHE swagger leathers of the Season. We have all the newest shoe shapes made in fashion- able stocks---every one an attractive style and a good fitter How mucb will you make this space worth to Burden c9 Graham 568 Willamette Street Wudeaf nefiyhry wzyh uavc you' . - 73-. burl? - fo' J n'JCfI f vrfz'yfry. J'fuflf'frr litigvify wfll,,gyf gok . Fyanfion 0f fife Boner Jones Gets Numbers Mixed Joe-"H-ellol Is this 729?, Voice at Chi Omega HousethesW Joe-hMay I speak to Margaret Sheehey, pleaseiw Voice: hNo, Joe, I think you have the wrong number." hTake nothing from this and you have nothing left," said Dr. Leonard, patting the desert area on his head. ch .9 C9 4? Phone Main 1667 A. J. MEEVES. Prop. T is b ca th . I are :0 V3331 ta? Meevesi Restaurant ored and such and Lunch Room good materials that we can 1" Heamcm 311 Washington St. Portland, Oregon g u ara ntee Between Fifth and Sixth Streets hhevery VVOOI- Always Open texn garment Excellent Food at Popular Prices for two full I TE 1 W Co, :63 wsazezgzzzz? 6? 9 seasons. In this City Ours is THE CLUB The Store that Sells . . N B A R B E R S H O P WOOL I EX 8c SUIT HOUSE BERT VINCENT Phone 525 E. LARGE 483 Will St. PROPRIETOR $ 6 co A 4-K- G: O O 'D 0 OJ Qanbg Putcben , . W. A. Kuykendall Ice Cream made fresh every day. Hot and Cold Lun- ches at all hours Candy and Ice Cream in Wholesale Lots at Pu re Dru 8 Lowest Prices, Quali- ty Considered The Only Place Y01 Can Buy : : : . EUGENE, . OREGON lLQD Hulk ibocolates C. A. MOUSE, Prop. Phone 578 G3 '0 C0 93 9 F9 TH E REALTY DEALER O F E w'i'LLSKMJI-z; Eugene, Ore. co 3-; 5x 5? $ole Agent H L Christy c9 60., London, England . Derby, Silk and Opera Hats and Caps Jameson 8' 60., Dcrbies MCIYS Furmsher and Hatter The New Monroe $3 $erbies and Soft Hats John B. cSteISOn Hats 4 to 12 Dollars 329 Washington Street Imperial Wotel Builaing Mgent for Dr. Deimel Linen Mesh Under- wear, E. 6 w. Mannhattan, Cluett Phone Main 1810 PORTLAND. ORE. ant? M. Sichel Shirts 1.50 10 $7 C9 w 397 Lots of Sand Splash Me! Developing And Printing Neatly Done. We use Cyko Paper. Our Price is Right. Agents for Ansco Films and Cyko Paper. tFI-IE PAGE STUDIO 644 Willamette Street C03 c4305? GIFT TIME AND WATCH THOUGHTS Men and Women Who have been looking for the watch that combines beauty and lightness With perfect precisioon Will find theirhighest hopes realized in the Gruen Precision Uerithin Watch. Our Watch tDepartment contains the very finest watch- es that factories can produce. iOur Prices are hard to beat, considering the quality. of the goods we handle; Everything that is New and Nobby in the Jewelry Line. VERITHI N Wedding and Engagement Rings. Diamonds 0 Specialty. Fm Your - The Large Jewelry Store Pickgive'ike JAEGER BROS. Dollai' 266 Morrison St., Bet. 3rd. and 4th. Portland Ore. t0 398 $ Portland, Eugene and Eastern Ry. Co. That meets all S. College Crest and other Suburbs of Eugene. We have now under construction thirty miles of new road. Cars pass the University every few minutes. General Oflices, 1311 Yeon Building, Portland, Oregon. A. WELCH, President. "PS ZS Street Line P. trains and will carry you to Springfield, Fairmounh, Eugene Oflices, 20 Eighth Street West. GEO. W. FORD, Manager. 399 April First, 1912 Hung Up On the Wire iiHello! 729? Is this you, Miss Dorris?" "Why this is Mr. Lingenfelter. Wouldnit youilike to play golf this afternoonW iiOh, busy? Well, how about a show tonight?" "Oh, yes, your sister will be down; thatis fme. Now-is tomorrow night all right for the show?" . "Ohesure-I see-Iim awfully sorry youire dated. Well--then Would Saturday be good for the skating rinkV iiWhat? Engaged for that, too? Oh, well! Never mind! P11 0511 up later. Goodbye." IDeinbarbis malt Qthract A Tonic of the Best Quality of Malt and Hops for Invalids, Convalwcents, and the Fatigued and Nervous. Recommended By The Medical Profession Bremeb anb Bottleb by the 52mg IDeinbarb Bremen; main 72 13th. anb Burnsibe A 1122 Y Q 400 C. W. CRUMP Successors to STERNER1S GROCERY DEALER IN Staple and Fancy Groceries Telephone 18 20 E. 9 St. ' Eugene, Ore. fl BRASFIELD 8c PORGES 111 Third Street 111 Railway Exchange Building COME ON! FELLOWS YOUR NEW SPRING CLOTHES ARE HERE AND READY FOR YOU. CORRECT COLLEGE IDEAS FOR THE SMART, SNAPPY DRESSERS IN ALL THE NEWEST WEAVES AND FABRICS ALWAYS PRICED AT $20., $25Qand $30. When in Portland Look Them Over 401 4-3 KN GIL W . R4. GREEN THE GROCER THE QUALITY STORE Headquarters for Students NiC-Nacs Phone 25 Eugene, Oregon GD 03 John H. Burgard8c Co. Twohy General Brothers Insurance Agents Fire Liability Accident ' Steam Boiler Burglary Elevator PHONES MAIN 688 HOME A 1688 273 Oak St. 8Lewis Bldgj Portland, Oregon C9 Company Railroad Contractors Portland, Oregon : 428,828,828 Swetlanbk 7738' 7738' 7738' , IT MEANS 4Quality in Sweets,, WHEN THIS NAME IS ON THE BOX Safety Packages for Mailing 269-271 Morrison St. PORTLAND, OR. 402 a f: Rushing the Unprotected Wing THE OREGANA Wishes 'to express their appreciation for con- tributions from the following MARSHALL-WELLS, Portland, Ore. JULIUS GOLDSMITH, Eugene, Ore. ALOHA T HEATER MGT. Eugene, Ore. ROWLAND BROS. TRANS. Eugene. ALLEN EATON, Eugene. STUDENTS SHOW YOUR OREGON SPIRIT- PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 403 Our First Achievement H Wm amuu 'Twskmwmmi rwwWiA-T'Zvl Qthlu1rm$ imtqrm- .31 F l r ? V i .qunl "mun uuu-n' , 2:111:01 x n .. H4 w, .4.-..-.,.v,. V hwy W I uxll ' u LN H - u V u' $ . W 5 M ii- ! . um . m ., .. a d - j." r1 RIB: n , "bmg'IEUJR hWthq A"W'I;Innnh INN... 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Suggestions in the University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) collection:

University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1910 Edition, Page 1

1910

University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1911 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1912 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1914 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1915 Edition, Page 1

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University of Oregon - Oregana Yearbook (Eugene, OR) online yearbook collection, 1916 Edition, Page 1

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