University of Omaha - Tomahawk / Gateway Yearbook (Omaha, NE)

 - Class of 1956

Page 1 of 250

 

University of Omaha - Tomahawk / Gateway Yearbook (Omaha, NE) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1956 Edition, University of Omaha - Tomahawk / Gateway Yearbook (Omaha, NE) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1956 Edition, University of Omaha - Tomahawk / Gateway Yearbook (Omaha, NE) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

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Text from Pages 1 - 250 of the 1956 volume:

T0 WK David Langevin..Editor-in-Chief Judy Samue1son..Associate Editor Joseph Byrneg ......... Photo Editor u N V E R S I T Y o F O M A H A A 2 Q is if E 'nm- ,HM W- MM. ..,.f.,w,. .W W., .M-.W f ,Mmm- M- gnu-M ,hs Q-:LA lm ' if in nffd WM 12' P .S Q M4- 5 As "" hm - . -gay ' T A ft- A A, V jig: .--xx 5, sg I I q hf A ii W A i ,K ,gy Y ' , If A, -gy , ' B' wb grvlfx sf? ADMINISTRATION. . .Page II STUDENT LIFE ..... Page 35 FINE ARTS ....... Page 81 GREEKS .... . . . Page 99 ORGANIZATIONS. .Page I35 ATHLETICS . . . . . . Page T61 SENIORS . . . . . .Page204 ADVERTISING .... Page 233 O tw, 524' 1, f '!' I 5 "I if 1 2' ew.. J 5' im., . fs KN , X , cy :f'E'ff,,qI""' v Q? I I ff I UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT KING AK-SAR BEN LxI DEDICATION Dr. Nlilo Bail was presented as King Ak-Sar-Ben LX1 on October 21, 1955. By capturing Omahas highest civic honor, he holds the distinction of being the first educator to rule the myth- ical realm. Since coming to Omaha in 1948, Dr. Bail has endeared himself to students, faculty and friends, and has promoted much growth and progress at the University. As an educator he has been associated with fields from chemistry and physics to football, basketball and track. A quotation of Dr. Baills following his presentation as King of Quivera typifies his unself- ish, humble personality .... 'The record that you-faculty, staff and students-have made at the University during my seven years made it possible for me to get this high honor. You are the ones being honored. 1 am very humble but happy to bring this high distinction to your Universityf, And so to the man who has accumulated honors Gone at a timev and has so successfullv reached the top, to the man who symbolizes education at its best-to you, Dr. Bail-we are proud to dedicate this 1956 Tomalzawk. 'fill H.. E fi I I Mr. Gene Eppley Formal dedication ceremonies for the Gene Eppley Li- brary were held on Sunday, February 5, 1956, in the The Gene Eppley Library and Adult Education Center has been "dedicated to the educational and cul- tural lives of the citizens of Omaha." Through this dedication we have endeavored to perpetuate the hu- manitarianism of Mr. Eugene C. Eppley and to acknowl- edge his great desire to share with his fellow Omahans in the University's achievements and influence for good in this area. As the donor of the Gene Eppley Library, Mr. Eppley becomes one of the first men in the United States to share the fruits of his labor with his fellow-townspeople through their Municipal University, an institution which is dedicated to higher education for all. The University and the community will be forever grateful to Mr. Eppley, President of the Eugene C. Ep- pley Foundation, for this significant expression of con- fidence in the University. Thank you, Gene Eppley. MILO BAIL President Adult Education Center Auditorium. Mr. Eppley pre- sented the keys to President Milo Bail who turned them over to Librarian Ellen Lord. Formal acceptance of the new building was made by Milton Peterson, Jr. for the Board of Regents, Dr. Robert Harper for the faculty, Warren Whitted for the Alumni Association, and Lewis Radcliffe for the student body. Following the acceptance speeches, a portrait of Mr. Eppley was unveiled in the main hall of the Library. Clarence Kirkland, president of the Board of Regents, delivered the main address. Keys to the new building. A gift of S850,000. Bail, portrait, and artist J. Anthony Wills. Gene Xpplcy library 4 Audio-Visual Office The Gene Eppley Library is one of the finest and most modern libraries in the country. It offers every type of study aid, advantage and convenience to all users. There are 104,000 books in the library now, all placed on open shelves. Accommodations have been made for at least 150,000 more in future years. The first floor of the library houses the Adult Education Center, the Audio-Visual Department, and reference and reading rooms. The Adult Education Center has an auditorium, conference rooms, lecture halls, and a lounge. The Audio-Visual Department has preview rooms, proiection rooms, a photographic darkroom, a laboratory for teaching methods, and a graphic arts division. The second floor provides a large study area and research and seminar rooms. Fluorescent lights and acoustical ceilings are used throughout the building for the best study conditions. The Gene Eppley Library ,Music flu!! Q mm: W5 . i it K if Q f be Y' V 'ii 'T ww 7291: -rw' v-sq.,--.,, 5 i ,gg 53 f,,, ,gf ,gklkflr-gg:-3 1 :g , 2 ps W ' ffgf-wmzg-xq.'j ,L ,,,. AM-M M -A ? 5 K fi W Wi ,PM , my, ,1 fi f.-3, .V ,N if A A K K QW 'iii' L1L" s-A '2 pl- 1 'T L.......-..- - W.. Peterson and Custer at rehearsal Must have been a sour note. L,,,,.,.,.,..,l........- L....-.l--- New Music Hall The new music building, which adioins the south side of the Fieldhouse, was opened to classes in December. The Music department which had been scattered in different parts of the main building is now a unified department. The new unit, which houses all OU music activities, offers the de- partment the possibility to function as a whole by uniting faculty, class and practice space. The main features of the new addition are the department offices, a large central rehearsal hall and large amounts of storage space. Storage closets and lockers border the rehearsal hall on three sides. Teaching and individual practice rooms are available to- the music students and a special music library is provided for their use. Q , ! i,., I I L g , ..,,,,,,,ii , - in ' l l 5 Putting on the finishing touches. if .35-' A , ' ,. .wgwk ' M,.g,1. W V ' - .w g sv . .W H av ww Swag- ff Sw. . ,fi M5 " ' 5: 55 F351 'Z 1+ 1' JB: M N A W 395 +514 Q Jw -2. .J W Q 8 4 wwf? l ' .1 VQUIY' "V 122 tim : 1? i .- -:: 1,51 y '7 .V li 7' ,. ,Q ' 1 E?T,.,-.L-:,:a.ff.al. -5 , i -A f'7 ' l?'f5', , , - A .M 5. YL P . ,aw 'ifif Clarence Kirkland Mrs. A. C. R. Swenson Charles Hoff Dr. Milo Bail E' Advisory group to one of Omaha's fastest and most pro- gressive institutions . . . the University ot Omaha Board of Regents. This group, responsible for new faculty appointments, f" the addition of new courses and colleges, budget recommenda- tions, and other administrative duties, proves year after year how great an asset they are to the University. Clarence Kirkland headed this year's Board as President, H and Louis Somberg served as Vice-president. Mrs. A. C. R. Swen- son was Secretary. Other members of this year's policy making body were Dr. Milo Bail, Edward Borchers, Charles Hoff, Senator Roman Hruska, Henry Karpf, Ralph Kiplinger, Milton Peterson, L Q A 5, aft 'kd' gf 'a by 3' ,W , fi W Edward Borchers Thomas Quinlan, and Miss Alice Smith. iie s fi its Senator Roman Hruska Henry Karpf Ralph Kiplinger I 2 Thomas Quinlan- Milton Peterson Th? Pwsidvlll 'Ns Frank H. Gorman, Ph.D. Carl W. Helmstudter, Ph.D. Dean of the College of Education Dean Of the College Of Applied Professor of Education Arts ond Sciences, Professor of Business Administration 'I'llE John W. lucas, M.B.A. Dean of the College of Business Administration Professor of Business Administration William H. Thompson, Ph.D. D0l10ld Emery, Ph.D. Dean of the College of Arts ond Sciences Dean of the College of Adult Education, Director Professor of Psychology, Summer Sessions, Associate Professor of Head, Department of Philosophy and Psychology Education F! Jay B. MacGregor Ph.D, Donald Pflasterer, M.E. I Dean of Student Personnel Assistant Dean of Student Personnel Professor of Education Assistant Professor of Education DEA Mary Padou Young, M.A. i Associate Dean of Student Personnel Associate Professor of English N ,A Roderick B. Peck, Ph.D. Charles Hoff, B.Sc. Assistant Dean ofthe College of Adult Education Vice-President For Business Management, Assistant Professor of Sociology V Financial Secretary Frederick W. Aclricln Ph.D., Associote Professor of History 4 ,sw sf' 1? .A Lt. Col. John E. Asp Robert R. Berueffy B.S., Associate Ph.D., Associate- Professor of Air Professor of Chemistry Science: Director, Instruction Hollie Bethel M.S., Assistant Professor of Education Joe went overboard on the diet. 1 if p a si A rtiit ' , g tti i kkV,i I ,.. ,.,:., V . K ,.t, A it ,IL lilies Thomas N. Bonner Stewart J. Briggs Ph-D-1 Associate Ph.D., Instructor of Professor of History Psychology James E. Brock M.A., Associate Professor and Head, Department of Physical Education for Men James H. Brown M.A., Assistant Professor of Engineering Marion Marsh Brown MfSgt. Alfred W. Buckner M.A., Instructor of Sergeant Major English T3 Ph D Instructor of Foreign Languages Charles M. Bull M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business Administration in ,gr-4 Jack Cotton M.A., Instructor of Physical Education for Men, Basketball Coach Lloyd Cardwell B.Sc., Instructor Physical Education for Men, Football Coach Roderic B. Crane M.B.A., Professor and Head, Department of Economics, Chairman, Social Sciences fX in wi pr. Arthur R. Custer M.Mus., Assistant Professor of Music E' Edwin L. Clark Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatics Paul T. Crossman M.Sc., Professor of Business Administration and Head Department of Accounting Hurford H. Davison M.B.A., Professor and Head, Department CO1 an Cl S mebody please! Turn off the iuice!" of Retailing Russel C. Derbyshire Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology and Anatomy I 7 l Ji W, Hodge W. Doss M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Physics 1"'N .N rl. 4.-140' Joseph G. Dunn William H. Durand Ed.D., Assistant B.S.M.E., Assistant Professor of Professor of Education Engineering Feeling on top of the world ff ""'- ,avg James M- Evrl Clifford L. Ellis Ph.D., Professor M.A., Aggigtqnt und H9051 Depaflmeftl Professor and Head, of Mathematics Department of Journalism Leslie N. Garlough Sallie A. Garretson Ph.D., Professor of Biology B.S., Instructor of and Head, Department of Home Economics General Sciences, Chairman, Natural Sciences vi Christopher S. Espinosa Ph.D., Professor and Head, Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures X, Ernest Gorr M.Sc., Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Men, Track Coach wi GN Robert D. Harper George Harris Rowland Haynes Mfsgf- LUYYY C- HidUl90 Ph.D., Associate Pl1.D., Associate M.A., President Emeritus ASSiSTC1I1f to Professor of Professor of C0mmGndGf1t0fCGdefS English Finance Duane W. Hill Jack A. Hill Ph.D., Instructor of M.B.A., Assistant History and Political Professor of Science Business Administration William C. Hockett M.B.A., Associate Professor of Business Administration ff! Leta F. Holley Frances Holliday M.Sc., Associate Professor of Business Administration There's u freeloader in every crowd. Ed.D., Professor of Education v 'x if il , A Francis M. Hurst Ed,D., Assistant Professor of Psychology I9 't!'f:5..pLif Kilbourn L. Janecek M.A., Associate Professor of Library Science oil? Wit K? Harry Johnson Capt. Bruce G. Keltz Ph.D., Assistant Assistant Professor of Professor of Air Science: Educationp Head, Assistant Director, Reading Improvement Laboratory lngtruction pf A My amoeba died. Paul C. Kennedy Margaret P. Killian Robert S. Knicely Ed.D., Assistant M.A., Professor and B.A., Assistant Professor of Head, Department of Instructor of Education Home Economics Psychology Berthe C. Koch John W. Kurtz Ph.D., Professor and M-Sc-M.E., Heqd, Depqrfmenf of Assistant Professor of Art Engineering John D. Leonard C, Glenn Lewis L.L.B., Assistant J.D., Assistant Professor of Professor of Business Administrvtivn Business Administration Walter W. Linclstromberg Ellen Lord Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry B.A.L.S., Associate Professor and Head, Library Science Department, Head Librarian Mary McCoy B.A., Assistant Instructor of English D. N. Marquardt Ph.D., Associate Professor and Head, Department of Chemistry Raymond J. Maxwell M.A,, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures Robert S. McGranahan M.A., Assistant Professor of Journalism: Director, General Printing and Information Marjorie Mclaren B.S., Instructor of Physical Education for Women John G. McMillan Arthur G. Mehl M.A., Associate ' Professor of Physics M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting John D. Miller M.M., Assistant Professor of Music- The fix is on- Choir Director I Joyce Minteer M.S.B., Assistant Professor of Business Administration Ruth Moline B. A., Director of Audio-Visual Department and Instructor in College of Education V Home brew. Marilyn Nass M.S., instructor of Physical Education for Women Hedvig C. M. Nyholm M.A., Assistant Professor of English Frank M. Paulsen M.A., Instructor of English 22 B. Gale Oleson Grant M. Osborne Ph.D., Director Ph.D., Associate Testing, Counseling and Professor of Research Insurance Wilfred Payne Roderick B. Peck James B. Peterson Ph.D., Professor of Ph.D., Assistant Ph.D., Associate Philosophy, Chairman, Professor of Professor and Head, Humanities Sociology Department of Music Paul V. Peterson Capt. John W. Plantikow James C. Porterfield Cheryl H. Prewett M.A., Instructor of B.A., Assistant M.A., Assistant M.Sc., Associate Journalism Professor of Air Professor of Professor of Science, Assistant Education Engineering Commando nt of Cadets TfSgt. Ernest N. Quist Personnel Sergeant Major Verdq Rqugh Anita Reznichek M.B.Ed,, Instructor of B-A-, Assistant Business Administration lnSTl'UCT0I' Of English Harry L. Rice Roy M. Robbins M.Sc., Associate Ph.D., Professor of Professor of History and Director Mathematics Graduate Division gsm "I used this thrust while with Barnum and Bailey." Paul C. Rodgers Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English Kathryn M. Schaake M.A., Assistant Professor and Head, Department of Physical Education for Women 'e,,,,S'm4lgfI N -N, , Guenter G. Schmalz Rev. Beniamin F. Schwartz Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures S.T.B., Assistant lnstructor of Religion Col. Walter K. Shayler B.A., Professor of Air Science Paul J. Stageman M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry Alfred Sugarman M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech R, T. Earl Sullenger MGYY C- T'-'Ylof Mary Lou Templeton Ph.D., Professor and M.F.A., Assistant M.A., Instructor of Head, Department of Professor of Art Physical Education for Sociology Women "Who said Applied Arts wasn't aesthe ic " . ed' ' Q Q., if'5S"s""i 6' , Alf 3 Richard S. Thoman Ph.D., Associate Professor and Head Department of Geography A fn-fi 1fLt. Norman C. Th0mGS Sarah Tirrell Robert J. Trankle Rqymond W, Trenholm B.A., Assistant Professor of P Air Science, Adjutant and P Personnel Officer h.D., Assistant M.A., Instructor of M,M,Ed,, Assigfqm rofessor of History Botany and Bacteriology Professor of Music ,W ui rig., ,, . r sffa. --, , I 1 James D. Tyson William T. Utley Ralph M. Wardle PHD., ASSOCi01te M.A., Professor and Head, Ph.D., Professor and Professor of SPeeCl'l Department of History and Head, Department of Government English MD: Major Leroy A. Wenstrom George L. Wilber B.A., Associate Professor of Ph.D., Associate Air Science, Professor of Sociology ff "You say you don't like your grade Commanda nt of Cadets Sylvester V. Williams M.E., Professor and Head, Department of Engineering Director of Technical ?II Institute Garland S. Wollard Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education John E. Woods B.A., Placement Director, AF-ROTC Xlligfj' of "There I was flat on my buck at 10,000 feet . . ." Business Administration ax, tt. wounsmo if, ,-, fx L ,. Jack E. Wright Virgil Yelkin MfSgt. John O. Young M.F,A., Instructor of B.Sc., Assistant Assistant to the Art Professor of Physical Director of Instruction Education for Men, 26 Athletic Director "No, we don't serve tap TOMAII WK David Langevin..Editor-in-Chief Judy Samue1son..Associate Editor Joseph Byrncg ......... Photo Editor U N I V E R S I T Y M H A Omaha, Nebraska I 2 49- ,,,,, ,M ...., A ...- ,HH M. ...M f iii an hh 'F' has all vi My ADMINISTRATION. . .Page II I STUDENT LIFE ..... Page 35 I 1, ,-,. I FINE ARTS ....... Page 81 I GREEKS .... . . . Page 99 GRGANIZATIONS. .Page 135 ATHLETICS . . . . . . Page 161 SENloRs . . . . . .Page204 ADVERTISING .... Page 233 O - 1 ..'f4'ZiftQfQ1""'Wf1f, if ff. fri , ia' Q. . . x , :V W . .5131 .JJ LP' UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT KING AK-SAR BEN LX' DEDICATION Dr. Milo Bail was presented as King Ak-Sar-Ben LXI on October 21, 1955. By capturing Omahais highest civic honor, he holds the distinction of being the first educator to rule the myth- ical realm. Since coming to Omaha in 1948, Dr. Bail has endeared himself to students, faculty and friends, and has promoted much growth and progress at the University. As an educator he has been associated with fields from chemistry and physics to football, basketball and track. A quotation of Dr. Bail,s following his presentation as King of Quivera typifies his unself- ish, humble personality .... 'The record that you-faculty, staff and students-have made at the University during my seven years made it possible for me to get this high honor. You are the ones being honored. I am very humble but happy to bring this high distinction to your Universityf, And so to the man who has accumulated honors Hone at a time-H and has so successfully reached the top, to the man Who symbolizes education at its best-to you, Dr. Bail-We are proud to dedicate this 1956 Tomahawk. 'lili A Mr. Gene Eppley Formal dedication ceremonies for the Gene Eppley Li- brary were held on Sunday, February 5, 1956, in the The Gene Eppley Library and Adult Education Center has been "dedicated to the educational and cul- tural lives of the citizens of Omaha." Through this dedication we have endeavored to perpetuate the hu- manitarianism of Mr. Eugene C. Eppley and to acknowl- edge his great desire to share with his fellow Omahans in the University's achievements and influence for good in this area. As the donor of the Gene Eppley Library, Mr. Eppley becomes one of the first men in the United States to share the fruits of his labor with his fellow-townspeople through their Municipal University, an institution which is dedicated to higher education for all. The University and the community will be forever grateful to Mr. Eppley, President of the Eugene C. Ep- pley Foundation, for this significant expression of con- fidence in the University. Thank you, Gene Eppley. MILO BAIL President Adult Education Center Auditorium. Mr. Eppley pre- sented the keys to President Milo Bail who turned them over to Librarian Ellen Lord. Formal acceptance of the new building was made by Milton Peterson, Jr. for the Board of Regents, Dr. Robert Harper for the faculty, Warren Whitted for the Alumni Association, and Lewis Radcliffe for the student body. Following the acceptance speeches, a portrait of Mr. Eppley was unveiled in the main hall of the Library. Clarence Kirkland, president of the Board of Regents, delivered the main address. Keys to the new building. A gift of S850,000. Bail, portrait, and artist J. Anthony Wills. Gem' fppley L76 ary , ir K . ,' f Audio-Visual Office The Gene Eppley Library is one of the finest and most modern libraries in the country. It offers every type of study aid, advantage and convenience to all users. There are 104,000 books in the library now, all placed on open shelves. Accommodations have been made for at least 150,000 more in future years. The first floor of the library houses the Adult Education Center, the Audio-Visual Department, and reference and reading rooms. The Adult Education Center has an auditorium, conference rooms, lecture halls, and a lounge. The Audio-Visual Department has preview rooms, projection rooms, a photographic darkroom, a laboratory for teaching methods, and a graphic arts division. The second floor provides a large study area and research and seminar rooms. Fluorescent lights and acoustical ceilings are used throughout the building for the best study conditions. The Gene Eppley Library Mu ic J-la!! E Peterson and Custer at rehearsal Must have been a sour note. New Music Hall The new music building, which adjoins the south side of the Fieldhouse, was opened to classes in December. The Music department which had been scattered in different parts of the main building is now a unified department. The new unit, which houses all OU music activities, offers the de- partment the possibility to function as a whole by uniting faculty, class and practice space. The main features of the new addition are the department offices, a large central rehearsal hall and large amounts of storage space. Storage closets and lockers border the rehearsal hall on three sides. Teaching and individual practice rooms are available to the music students and a special music library is provided for their use. Putting on the finishing touches. Wwqm -Jsnxfw -if N-asap-nv kwin'-M u.: md mm M. 1 W, qnw an 6 Midi sun gun-rf as piqpln an dw-Q L,..,., ...,.... .Edna ,. A I A, fsisnnpm . nfs- A 4vwv'bf ,,. Af... w and-me .N- La: W Kmwwim QW use rw 1-.W .tn- SMH? 4- 5 Q af ,S f QNQW fun: 5 4' fl f, , J' A " N., Q1 ',, + My ,A ,mv . -ww ., .nv-f :YA v l"'x if 'f!'.-5' Clarence Kirkland Mrs. A. C. R. Swenson Charles Hoff 'sf Q? Dr. Milo Bail E' R EG E T Louis Somberg Miss Alice Smith J Advisory group to one of Omaha's fastest and most pro- gressive institutions . . . the University of Omaha Board of Regents. This group, responsible for new faculty appointments, For the addition of new courses and colleges, budget recommenda- tions, and other administrative duties, proves year after year how great an asset they are to the University. Clarence Kirkland headed this year's Board as President, and Louis Somberg served as Vice-president. Mrs. A. C. R. Swen- son was Secretary. Other members of this year's policy making body were Dr. Milo Bail, Edward Borchers, Charles Hoff, Senator Roman Hruska, Henry Karpf, Ralph Kiplinger, Milton Peterson, Edward Borchers Thomas Quinlan, and Miss Alice Smith. .341 F all . M A t Senator Roman Hruska Henry Kqrpf Ralph Kiplinger I2 Thomas Quinlan' Milton Peterson i Q .A Al Thv Pwsidvlll Frank H. Gorman, Ph.D. Corl W. Helmstadter, Ph.D. Deon ofthe College of Education Dean of the College of Applied Professor of Education Arts and Sciences, Professor of Business Administration 'lllll John W. Lucas, M.B.A. Dean ofthe College of Business Administration Professor of Business Administration William H. Thompson, Ph.D. Donald Emery, Ph.D. Dean ofthe College of Arts and Sciences Dean ofthe College of Adult Education, Director Professor of Psychology, Summer Sessions, Associate Professor of Head, Department of Philosophy and Psychology Education squnvihb Jay B. MacGregor, Ph.D. Donald Pflasterer, M.E. Dean of Student Personnel Assistant Dean of Student Personnel Professor of Education Assistant Professor of Education DEA MNNN Mary Padou Young, M.A. ' Associate Dean of Student Personnel Associate Professor of English Roderick B. Peck, Ph.D. Charles Hoff, B.Sc. Assistant Dean ofthe College of Adult Education ViCe.Pre5idem For Business Management, Assistant Professor of Sociology . Financial Secretary Frederick W. Adrian Ph.D., Associate Professor of History Lt. Col. John E. Asp Robert R. Berueffy B.S., Associate Ph.D,, Associate Professor of Air Professor of Chemistry Scienceg Director, Instruction Joe went overboard on the diet. " rt trs ft ., .s s . , . A ,A K I V ' W '-.. 1 t J AV',A'V l " "" 1 7'kk A s r Hollie Bethel Thomas N. Bonner Stewart J. Briggs M.S., Assistant Ph,D., Associate Ph.D., lnstructor of Professor of Education Professor of History Psychology James E. Brock M.A., Associate Professor and Head, Department of Physical Education for Men James H. Brown M.A., Assistant Professor of Engineering Marion Marsh Brown MfSgt. Alfred W. Buckner M.A., Instructor of Sergeant Maier English Oscar Budel Charles M. Bull Ph.D., Instructor of M.B.A., Assistant Foreign Languages Professor of Business and Life,-qmres Administration ,sift gr-A Jack Cotton M.A., Instructor of Physical Education for Men, Basketball Coach u--- "'.:.2 -1- i "Somebody please! Turn off the juice!" fr Lloyd Cardwell B.Sc., Instructor Physical Education for Men, Football Coach Edwin l.. Clark Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Speech and Dramatics Roderic B. Crane M.B.A., Professor and Head, Department of Economics, Chairman, Social Sciences Paul T. Crossman M.Sc., Professor of Business Administration and Head Department of Accounting I I :tk if 1. gs., Arthur R. Custer M.Mus., Assistant Professor of Music Hurford H. Davison M.B.A., Professor and Head, Department of Retailing Russel C. Derbyshire Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology and Anatomy I 7 L41 ..,-+1 Hodge W. Doss M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Physics as L.-. 'QT 41 Tr 4,16 Joseph G. Dunn William H. Durand Ed.D., Assistant B.S.M.E., Assistant Professor of Professor of Education Engineering Feeling on top of the world 4? t -ldmes M. Earl Clifford L. Ellis Christopher S. Espinosa Ph.D., Pr0feSSOr M.A., Assistant Ph.D., Professor and and Head, DSPGYTFNBH1 Professor and Head, Head, Department of Of Mf1fl1emGllCS Department of Foreign Languages Journalism and Literatures Leslie N. Garlough Sallie A. Garretson Ph.D., Professor of Biology B.S., Instructor of and Head, Department of Home Economics General Sciencesg Chairman, Natural Sciences Ernest Gorr M,Sc., Assistant Professor of Physical Education Men, Track Coach .gf for Robert D. Harper George Harris ROWlC1l1d HCIYHSS Mf59'- l-PVYY C- Hidvlso Pl1.D., Associate Ph.D., Associate M.A., President Emeritus Assistant to Professor of Professor of C0mmUndC""i of C5595 English Finance Duane W. Hill Plt.D., Instructor of History and Political Science Jack A. Hill M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business Administration Q .wi Leta F. Holley M.Sc., Associate Professor of Business Administration William C. Hockett M.B.A., Associate Professor of Business Administration Frances Holliday Ed.D., Professor of Education .X '4'f' rx., Francis M. Hurst Ed.D., Assistant Professor of There's a freeloader in every crowd. Psychology I9 fe- .QWM ...I .VN ' , 66517 Kilbourn L. Janecek M.A., Associate Professor of Library Science My amoeba died. Harry Johnson Capt. Bruce G. Keltz Ph.D., Assistant Assistant Professor of Professor of Air Sciencep Education: Head, Assistant Director, Reading Improvement Laboratory Instruction Paul C. Kennedy Margaret P. Killian Robert S. Knicely Ed.D., Assistant M.A., Professor and B.A., Assistant Professor of Head, Department of Instructor of Education Home Economics Psychology Berthe C. Koch John W. Kurtz John D. Leonard C. Glenn Lewis Ph,D,, Prgfessor and L.l..B., Assistant J.D., Assistant Head, Deparimeni of Assistant Professor of Professor of Professor of Arl' Ef'lQll'l66I'lhg Business Admll"IlSii'CIilOl'1 Business Adminisirqfion Walter W. Lindstromberg Ellen Lord Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry B.A.L.S., Associate Professor and Head, Library Science Department, Head Librarian Mary McCoy B.A., Assistant Instructor of English D. N. Marquurdt Ph.D., Associate Professor and Head, Raymond J. Maxwell M.A., Assistant Professor of Foreign Department of Chemistry Languages and Literatures Robert S. McGranahan M.A., Assistant Professor of Journalism: Director, General Printing and Information Marjorie McLaren B.S., Instructor of Physical Education for Women John G. McMillan Arthur G. Mehl M.A., Associate ' Professor of Physics M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting John D. Miller M.M., Assistant Professor of Music- The fix is on- Choir Director I i i Joyce Minteer M.S.B., Assistant Professor of Business Administration Home brew. 61' Ruth Moline Marilyn Nass B. A., Director of M.S., Instructor of Audio-Visual Department and Physical Education for Instructor in College of Women Education Hedvig C. M. Nyholm B. Gale Oleson Grant M. Osborne M.A., Assistant Ph.D., Director Ph.D., Associate Professor of Testing, Counseling and Professor of English Research insurance W it K it . - , 'fr W. t , f X Frank M. Paulsen Wilfred Payne Roderick B. Peck James B. Peterson M.A., instructor of Ph.D., Professor of Ph.D., Assistant Ph.D., Associate English Philosophy, Chairman, Professor of Professor and Head, Humanities Sociology Department of Music 22 Paul V. Peterson Capt. John W. Plantikow James C. Porterfield Cheryl H Prewett M.A., Instructor of B.A., Assistant M.A., Assistant M Sc Associate Journalism Professor of Air Professor of Professor of Science, Assistant Education Engineering Comma ndcnt of Cadets TfSgt. Ernest N. Quist Verda Rauch Anita Rezmchek Personnel Sergeant M.B.Ed., Instructor of BA A5SIStar1t Major Business Administration IFISYVUCTOV of Harry L. Rice M.Sc., Associate Professor of Mathematics "l used this thrust while with Barnum Bailey." tv 'E-f Kathryn M. Schaake M.A., Assistant Professor ond Head, Department of Physical Education for Women Guenter G. Schmalz Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures f...-gift twig., -s..-M , .af f Rev. Benjamin F. Schwartz S.T.B., Assistant instructor of Religion "Who said Applied Arts wasn't aesthetic?" Col. Walter K. Shayler B.A., Professor of Air Science Y' Paul J. Stageman M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry Z Alfred Sugarman M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech -. is T. Earl Sullenger Mary C. Taylor Mary Lou Templeton Ph.D., Professor and M-F-A-, ASSiS'fGl1f M.A., Instructor of Head, Department of Professor of Art Physical Education for Sociology Women i if ,A f - swf sm, . :.t . i A,y, k y yy if Richard S. Thoman Ph.D,, Associate Professor and Head, Department of Geography A 1fLt. Norman C. Thomas Sarah Tirrell Robert J. Trankle Raymond W, Trenholm B.A., Assistant Professor of P Air Sciencep Adiutant and P Personnel Officer h.D., Assistant M.A., Instructor of M,M,Ed,, Asgigtqnf rofessor of History Botany and Bacteriology Professor gf Music -N H ,,,. ,. W . 5 L' is Wk- ,.. Me, rl f . James D. Tyson William T. Utley Ralph M. Wardle Ph-D-, ASSOCiClle M.A., Professor and Head, Ph.D., Professor and Professor of Speech Department of History and Head, Department of Government English 1? 'K Moior Leroy A. Wenstrom George L. Wilber B.A., Associate Professor of Ph.D., Associate Air Science, Professor of Sociology X "You say you don't like your grade Commandant of Cadets Sylvester V. Williams M.E., Professor and Head, Department of Engineering Director of Technical ?ll Institute Garland S. Wollard Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education John E, Woods B.A., Placement Director, AF-ROTC IIAV-Igffl of "There I was flat on my back at 10,000 feet . . " Business Administration 116001111090 ,-I rf Jack E. Wright Virgil Yelkin MfSgt. John 0. Young M.F.A., Instructor of B.Sc., Assistant Assistant to the Art Professor of Physical Director of Instruction Education for Men, 26 Athletic Director "No, we don't serve tap Alumni Secretary, Jim Erixon and office secre- tary, June Gautier The Alumni Association unites all former University of Omaha students in an organization dedicated to preserving col- lege friendships and working for a finer university. ln 1955 the Alumni Fund campaign set an all-time record by collecting S8,610. Among the contributors was Glenn L. Martin, Ph.D. '45, whose 55,000 gift established a scholarship in his name. First winner Ralph Ewert is shown at left. Senior Senator Roman L. Hruska, 25, accepted the Citation for Alumnus Achievement at the Achievement Day Banquet June 4, 1955. Other award winners were '55 Fund Chairman Glenn C. Cunningham, '35, who received the Alumni Fund Recognition Award, Marcia Morris, '55, the Daniel E. Jenkins Scholarship, and Jerry Tannahill, '55, Athlete of the Year Award. Association members celebrated the '55 Homecoming victory with a dance at the Fontenelle Hotel. Through the Alumni Fund they helped sponsor the Institute on World Affairs. Officers for 1955-56 are Warren Whitted, '41, president, Donald B. Johnson, '48, vice-president, Eileen Wolfe Damhoff, '50, secretary, and Alan Pascale, '50, treasurer. ALUMNI BOARD: iSeated left to righti Sally Step, Alan Pascale, Warren Whitted, Eileen Wolfe Damhoff, Mariory Mahoney Murphy. iStanding left to rightl Erwin Schultz, Jim Erixon, Charles Ammons, Dan Koukol, Harold Poff, Homer Schleh, Don J. Pflasterer, Mary Uhl Collins, Jim Borland, Gunnar Horn. Not pictured: Don B. Johnson, Dick Holland, Jean Bressler, Thresa Clark, Bob Schropp. 27 5 President Lew Radcliffe Student Omaha University's student governing group, Student Council, supervised student campus ac- tivities during the year. Among the duties of the Council are sponsorship of Homecoming and Ma-ie Day festivities, the Freshman Mixer, and co-sponsorship of the Sophomore Cotillion and the Junior Prom. The Council also took charge of fall and spring all-school elections and partici- pated in the University's freshman orientation program. Presiding over the 1955-56 Student Council was Lew Radcliffe. Other officers included Park Ames, vice president, Pat Vogel, secretary, and Dean Thompson, treasurer. Secretary Pat Vogel lx- - i ......... Vice President Park Ames Treasurer Dean Thompson 5' s.....-1 Council Serving on the 1955-56 Student Council from the senior class were Gayle Anderson, Jean Bed- nar, Thomas Harper and Lew Radcliffe. Miss Bednar replaced Corinne Houser Rotella, who did not return to school. Representing the iunior class on the Council were Richard Daley, Jean Harrington McKee, Dean Thompson and Pat Vogel. Elected from the sophomore class were Park Ames, Betti Coleman, Jim Plaster and Jeanne Vogt. Freshman repre- sentatives were Ronald Bendorf, Sandra Gorey, Diane Langevin and Robert Sherwood. Student Council sponsors were Dean Jay B-. MacGregor and Assistant Deans Mary Padou Young and Don Pflasterer. tv' ls JUNIORS, Left to right: Dick Daley, Jean Harrington McKee, Pat Vogel, Dean Thompson FRESHMEN, Left to right: Ron Bendorf, Sandra Garey, Diane Langevin, Bob Sherwood SENl0RSy Left to right: Tom Harper, Jean Bednar, Anderson, Lew Radcliffe 'Z Gayle SOPHOMORES, Standing: Jim Plaster, Park Ames, Seated: Betti Coleman, Jean Vogt President Chuck French Secretary-Treasurer Gloria Zadina Senior Class Officers Vice President Bill Steck Charles French was chosen by senior mem- bers to preside over the graduating class of 1956. The fall class elections named Bill Steck senior class vice president and Gloria Zadina as- sumed duties of the senior class secretary- treasurer. The senior executives headed arrangements for Senior Day, the Senior Banquet, Baccalau- reate and Commencement. Junior Class Officers President Simon A. Simon Vice President AI Thomsen Members of the junior class elected Simon A. Simon president of their class. Al Thomsen assumed the office of vice president and Irene Rorick was elected secretary-treasurer of the junior class. The junior class and the Student Council co- sponsored the annual Junior Prom February 14. Eddy Haddad and his orchestra provided the music for the all-school semi-formal dance at the Blackstone Hotel. A Junior Prom queen, chosen from the junior class, was presented at the dance. Secretary-Treasu rer Irene Rorick Sophomore Class Officers Vice President Doug Postlewait Presiding over the Class of '58 was Bob Wheeler. Other sophomore class officers re- vealed in the fall election were Doug Postlewait, vice president and Sharon Gidley, class secre- tary-treasurer. Twenty sophomore couples waltzed during intermission ceremonies at the annual Sopho- more Cotillion December 19. The all-school dance was co-sponsored by sophomore class of- ficers and the Student Council. Eddy Haddad and his orchestra played for the formal dance at Peony Park. - 1, i . f"U'i'-.1 President Bob Wheeler P'N Secreta ry-Treasu rer Sha ron Gidley Vw ,fve- President Roger Lee Secretary-Treasurer Marcia Wetzler Freshman Class Cfficers Vice President Al Longacre Roger Lee was chosen by freshman students to direct the activities of the Class of '59, The fall election named Al Longacre to the post of vice president and Marcia Wetzler took over the duties of freshman class secretary-treasurer. 9 if s f X i'-ff -JY I M 'Q ,. V , V K gy. , A bl A y A , up 'N r . CAFETERIA - Left to right, first row: Kloke, Donley, Lewis, Kerr, Leslie, Ford, Babcock. Second row: Schow, Moore, Harris, Keim, I. Johnson, McCullough, M. Johnson, Doescher, Kephart, Krogh. Third row: Hewett, Ivey, Bastian, Reaver, Hall, Cooper. OFFICE STAFF-Left to right, first row: Keefover, Fick, Titzell, Bunney, Hoff, Roberts, Pratt, Crowder, Williams. Second row: Price, White, Harsh, Markey, Huntington, C Miller, E. Swanson, Robinson, Anders, Clark, Goos, Sinnett, Gibbs, Danielson, E. Swan- son. Third row: Ryle, Paulsen, Morton, Wilch, Pierce, Boisen, Camoriano, Ebert, Kersey Jackson, Baker, B. Miller, Bosking, Efferding, Monrad, Wiley, Neddermeyer, Dillon Lang, Kragh, Koenig, Barrow, Wolf, Debus, Wolfe, Peterson, Buesing. 34 I. ii + . . University Staff Most Omaha University students are aware of the importance of the faculty members in their daily life. However, very few people realize that the Uni- versity needs more than teachers. Many students know the workers in the Business and Registrar's offices, the professors' secretaries and the library and bookstore employees, but they don't realize that there are many other people hired to make OU a better place to get an education. Those that they are least conscious of are probably the most important. Cafeteria and student Club facilities are provided so that one may eat at almost any hour of the day. Buildings and grounds employees work hard to keep the buildings and lawns in excellent condition. These are the people behind the scenes who make OU your University. MAINTENANCE - Left to right, first row: Lockwood, Livingston, Gordon, Miller, Bakora. Second row: Blair, Kunneman, "Butch", Harder, Hanna, Anfinson, Dro- tor, Clawson. Third row: Aust, Potts, Krenzer, Ackerman, Hiatt, Spangler, Johnson. 6 feast- , QQ X I of Am x X QV 'Q x Qs o STUDENT LIFE Q K ff P za. 14? fr 1 , .115 is 1. v. v" g , ,V 4 , I , , ' 4 . f, f 2 " f ' 'ffwf' fi ' I 8-'j-hfif' 'Sf M 15 A M? 'Q x y 1 W5 5 uf Guest speaker Senator Hruska. Scholastic leadership was recognized at the annual Honors Convocation April 19. Commendation was given to students who were named to Dean's Honor Roll. Also honored were members of Omicron Delta Kappa, Wao- kiya, Corinthian Society and the freshmen honoraries, Phi Eta Sigma and Alpha Lambda Delta. Senator Roman L. Hruska, Board of Regents mem- ber, was program speaker. ln his speech, "Scholarship, Leadership, and the Public Service," he emphasized the responsibility and duty accompanying achievement. Senior Roger Dunbier was awarded a two-year scholarship to Oxford University and a Pi Gamma Mu medal for highest scholarship in the Social Science De- partment. Sharon Erdkamp received the Chi Omega award for outstanding work in social science. Corinne Houser Rotella was announced winner of the Philip Sher Essay Contest. Honor Convo Honor students file in. "O.K., she's warm." The 1955 annual Blood Drive, according to Ralph Fournier, chairman of Red Cross recruitment, was "one of the best organized visits the bloodmobile has made." The unit's staff included six Red Cross volunteers who served coffee and donuts to all donors. At Ma-ie Day festivities trophies were awarded to the men's and women's groups represented by the most donors. The winning organizations were Zeta Tau Alpha sorority and Phi Beta Chi fraternity. The groups had twenty-one and eighteen volunteers respectively. Ninety-two pints of blood were collected. Organizing the project were co-chairmen Rodney Conser of Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity and Betty Ellsworth, president of the Red Cross College Unit. Other chairmen were Mary Erion, Jacqueline Snyder, and Bev- erly Thoma. It wonft hurt, I know it won't" Blood Drive 9 u9 to r The 55 X, wee nv Be rt tw Ellsvlo Q we Am..,7- I e a sorority reigned as Betty Ellsworth of Chi Om g 1955 Junior Prom Queen. She was presented during in- termission ceremonies at the semi-formal Junior Prom at Peony Park, April 6. Miss Ellsworth was chosen in an all-school election March 30. The new Prom Queen received a dozen red roses from Donna Reynolds, 1954 Junior Prom Queen, and an engraved compact from Charles French, junior class president. Other Junior Prom candidates were Joan Palladino, Alpha Xi Delta, Pat Vogel, Zeta Tau Alpha, and Dorothy Traynor, Sigma Kappa. The dance was planned by iunior class officers and 'l members. junior Student Counci U llrhe W. inner by two lengfhs. i u ,, fm . 77mm Zum 3,6589 filament! 3 v 1 C ll 'Y Mm 5 pb "lsn't this fun?" "I'Il say it is." 09 NL il' ity . A . an-" 'vxw ,- . ii Q . 4 .. ff n a 60 60, f , .7 A nm-TZ .Ui'lWlV'5 . . , . ,. l 1 " .J J gf tim . 'Jzk . Come on Janice, smile. Spring Election Twelve students were named to Student Council posts in the spring elections May 4. More than 700 Uni- versity students voted in the all-school election. Senior Student Council members named were Gayle Anderson, Thomas Harper, Lewis Radcliffe and Corinne Houser Rotella. Assuming Junior Council positions were Richard Daley, Jean Harrington, Dean Thompson and Pat Vogel. Electe-d to Student Council from the sophomore class were Park Ames, Betti Coleman, Jim Plaster and Jeanne Vogt. Joe Byrne and Charles French were elected to rep- resent the student body on the Board of Student Publications. Deans Mary Padou Young and Donald Pflasterer are Student Council sponsors. ui ...is W No Simon, on the face. Joe College . ""'N-N. Sam Marasco, .loe College 1955. The front steps of the University Administration Building were the setting of the annual Joe College Dance May 7. Sam Marasco, Theta Chi, was elected Joe College XII, Other candidates 'For the Joe College title were Bill Beindorft, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Bill Fedderson, Lambda Chi Alpha, Joe Slavik, Phi Beta Chi, and John White, Pi Kappa Alpha. The informal dance was sponsored by Feathers, OU chapter of Phi Sigma Chi, national women's pep organization. Co-chairmen of the event were Avice Hill and Buckingham Winslow served Also helping with the dance were Betti Coleman, Marilyn l. Jones, Mardee Martin and Jody White. Admission was open tivity cards. Nancy Hodgens. Darlene QS mistress of Cel'9I'YlOl'1leS. to all holders of student ac- ll Where's sam, unaer the table?" We came, we saw, we sat , rm i Me., 'W MA-IE DAY . .:'-"-ig.-N' MA-IE Princess Donna Reynolds. 1955 Ma-ie Day festivities were launched May 'I3 with the presentation of Donna Reynolds as Ma-ie Day Princess Attira XXI. Miss Reynolds, 21-year-old mem- ber of Chi Omega sorority, was chosen in an all- school vote. Miss Reynolds was attended by Jane Anderson, Zeta Tau Alpha, Virginia Cline, Sigma Kappa, Joanne Rentschler, Alpha Xi Delta, and Faith Stitt, Independent Student Association. Other Ma-ie Day activities included a parade through downtown Omaha, a play-day at Elmwood Park and the Ma-ie Day dance at Peony Park. Zeta Tau Alpha walked away with first prize in the float competition. Their winning entry was "Holy Mackerel! OU's Caught 'Em All." The Pi Kappa Alpha float, "Something to Crow About," netted them second place, and Alpha Xi Delto's theme, "We Come, We Saw, We Conquered," was ranked third. - slfi-iikifillllwitliiffikir 7754- 2 I Q Kiev" :?f51UiS5fSwS5i5?5''wr' .mx f..,A..,.. .. . , Aff, .iw f w igisfwiihz A :FK '.i"Av3'2' 2Ei": frfvfffk . L fm.. - A 'ww' r fi fl TEC .F VT A LS? ffxfffffik' L ' ' "''P2S121Sf?1s?k:1sgi5fffg:fw,:-,1 - ' i' ff'f:T iff.sw - Duma feq '05 J nl, ,lf- 4, ,at Dear Mr. Harry Belly - - - Zeta Tau Alpha's winning float. !""' r'Qv,, 6 'tug pw fe- 1 , ' , W The Pi Kap's placed second. Alpha Xi Delta took third. KX to 'x ...idk il' t iw?-:Fx Car sale-To pay for parking meters? "Why Jerry Norene! Sigma Kappa "We Licked Them" Sigma Phi Epsilon "We Bowlecl Them Over' Mms""""""'Mv-A--e .W 52. Theta Chi "Ouampi's Victories" lSA mlhe Vlclory Yearu -vw-M.: 'c a Mm Chi Omega "Wings gf Triumph" lambda Chi Alpha "Victories Unlimited Must be u newly-w ed vfvpun-1 f wh.,,e,s th e PICNIC 'lu' fi O.U. Friendship C lub. Eating their curds and whey 4-""" TIME n. them u adv Won And E The Lone Ran ger on location L Salvation Army Fa mished group, ar en't they Theta Chi, men's division sing winners. Spring Sing and Tapping And they re real straight arrows 'M' Twenty-one iunior and senior students were tapped for Waolciya and Omicron Delta Kappa, honorary leadership societies at the All-School Sing May 4. New members of Waokiya included Gayle Anderson, Betty Ellsworth, Mary Jane Acker- man, Shirley M. Johnson, Marcia Morris, Pat- ricia Nolan, Beverly Pace, Arlyss Welch, Dona Wells, Nancy Weymiller and Virginia Nieder- luecke White. Tapped for Omicron Delta Kappa were James Erixon, Charles French, William Graddy, Donald Hansen, Dave Langevin and Frank Pazlar. Six groups participated in sing competi- tion. Chi Omega placed first in the women's division and Theta Chi won top honors in the men's division. Well, who's got the cards? Two degrees for Jane Andersen. Seniors of the class of 1955 received a day of recognition May 20. Senior Day activities included a program on the front steps of the Administration building, a luncheon given by Dr. Milo Bail, and the traditional tree-planting ceremony. Class president John Cottrell presented a victory bell to the school as a gift from the Seniors. Other class officers, Ted Romberg, vice president and historian, Joanne Rentschler, class secretary, and Susan Bivin, class treasurer, as- sisted with the program. Honored as the two graduating students with the highest accumulative averages were Roger Dunbier and Susan Bivin. Senior Day Meanwhile, back at the tree. 1l" i 'Y x Fixiii ,f1,.w2L':1J1 mHaA4na mr' ec ,, 'IM 1 .si.Exiw1 " xn.ir . John Cottrell and buddies. GRADUATICN KL . Praying for parking meters. ii' "Ed, may I have my cigarette?" "l2.. ,ff 1955 Four years of hard work were climaxed with the forty-sixth annual Commencement exercises June' 6 in the University Fieldhouse. Sir Leslie Knox Munro, Am- bassador to the United States from New Zealand, was commencement speaker. Two-hundred twenty-tive seniors received degrees from the University's five colleges. Eleven graduates were granted degrees with distinction. They were Paul Cherling, Gloria Dunaway, Roger Dunbier, Sharon Erd- kamp, Myra French and Joan Olsen. Others were Bev- erly Petersen, Joanne Rentschler, Robert Skudlarek and Sol Weinberg. Baccalaureate took place June 5 in the Fieldhouse. Rabbi Sidney H. Brooks of Temple Israel was Bac- calaureate speaker. Sponsors for the 1955 graduating class were Capt. John Plantikow, AF-ROTC staff, and Dr. Ralph M. Wardle, Head of the English Department. SHAZAM! Cong ratuIations" "By the way, did we notify the guest speaker?" I'lI have two eggs, toast . . " Sm' Cfibbing Junior Jets? The iury is in. "6 The prisoner is token away. salma The iuclge passes sentence Court dismissed. ' T Coffee Time - 8:00 Sack Time - 9:00 -.ix Charity Time - lAI:00 Some Time - I0:00 Lunch Time - I2:00 Lab Time 2 00 Ball Time - I:00 Time -'3'00 The only thing free on campus. Over 2,300 students signed up for classes as fall registration was boosted to the largest enrollment in the history of the University of Omaha. This figure was an increase of almost sixteen percent over last year's enrollment. This record-breaking enrollment included over 800 freshmen, the largest class ever to attend the school. Over 2,200 students enrolled in university night classes, bringing the total enrollment to about 4,500. Class cards, counselors, class schedules, and the book store were all moved to the University Field House in order to handle the record-breaking registration. CAE helps set record I Hm'iEs"ZQiZUfsCfXd?iEZ2iLSt i't"55f?'av3t2i1w'3FaX5 ,Gt-?w.Q5i5iki??Zi' Founder's Day l Faculty and students celebrated forty-seven years of progress of the University of Omaha on Founder's Day, Oct. 7. An informal coffee hour honored alums, trustees and former university Regents. AI Gordon, former presi- dent of the Omaha University board of directors prior to the University's becoming a municipality, spoke at the coffee hour. The celebration marked nearly a half-century of academic growth. The University of Omaha was in- corporated as a co-educational, non-sectarian college in 1908 at 24th and Pratt Streets. In 1930 Omaha citizens voted to establish the Municipal University of Omaha. A chance to chat. Coffee hour "When shall we five meet again? M56 1? Typical Freshman Joan Engstrom Elected Typical Freshman Boy and Girl at the an- nual Freshman Mixer Oct. 4 were Bob Sherwood and Joan Engstrom. The Typical Frosh were announced during the intermission ceremonies at the dance. Gale Martin and .lim Plaster, last year's winners, presented the new typi- cal trosh with a gift from the student body. Master of Ceremonies was Park Ames. Miss Engstrom and Sherwood were pledges of Zeta Tau Alpha sorority and Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity, respectively. Other candidates were Wendy Bamesberger, Kay Custer and Nancy Wolfe. Men running for Typical Freshman Boy included Walt Ehrhorn, Don Kaliser, Tom Roberts and Jerry Veatch. Typical Freshman Girl and Boy Typical Freshman Bob Sherwood The latest Playboy, I presume. tk +-...OWN Q-W A s ,K t li-as "Oh Joan, I don't believe that." Cutest Pan Ugly Man Ugly Man Don Waddell Voting for themselves Cutest Pan Adrienne Miller Adrianne Miller and Don Waddell were announced winners of the Cutest Pan and Ugliest Man titles at the Campus Chest Dance held Oct. 19 in the newly re- decorated Student Club. The dance climaxed a three-day campaign spon- sored by Alpha Pi Omega service fraternity. Miss Miller, a member of Zeta Tau Alpha sorority, received S238.19, and Wadell, a member of Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, received S'l55.08. All donations totaled 593648. Other contestants seeking the Cutest Pan title were Nancy Hodgen, Jenelle Rentschler, Nancy Reed and Joan Erickson. Ugliest man candidates were Dave Drittler, Gary Schultz, Ken Korinek, Bob Henkel and Tom Casey. ke A kiss for the Miss The mutual window. Fall Election Voters went to the polls Nov. 7 and elected Blanche Bell Homecoming Princess of 1955. She served as the royalty for Homecoming festivities Nov. 'IO and il. Class officers were also named at the fall election. Senior officers include Charles French, president, Bill T on hi I' f B ni Vncn PRF l K ., 4 H 'I ' Qing' AY , NT CUWIUL: " fi' ' TOM 'il 'i Holsgljan ROBERTS Yes, everyone ran to vote. Steck, vice president, and Gloria Zadina, secretary- treasurer. Juniors taking class offices were president, Simon A. Simon, vice president, Al Thomsen, and secre- tary-treasurer, Irene Rorick. Members of the sophomore class elected Bob Wheeler, Doug Postlewait and Sharon Giclley as presi- dent, vice president and secretary-treasurer, respectively. Taking offices in the Freshman class were Roger Lee, president, Al Longacre, vice president, and Marcia Wetzler, secretary-treasurer. : .. 'f.isef,w f-rw rn I1 -vv-. --cv U ll Remember, mark this one Looking or booking? Just dying to vote BLANCHE BY AN AVALANCHE! "And mine is better than yours" -' ' swsgfff 3255252 Bell and Boosters The casual pay-off Heap big blanket party HCME A bonfire-pep rally and the presenta- tion of the 1955 Homecoming Princess, Blanche Bell, launched Homecoming activities, Nov. 10. Miss Bell, a member of National ln- dependent Student Association, was elected Nov. 7 in an all-school election. She was attended by Shirley Barnum, Sigma Kappa, Judy Rogers, Alpha Xi Delta, Lois Tate, Chi Omega, and Gloria Zadina, Zeta Tau Alpha. Nearly 'IOO cars and two floats, one carrying the Princess and her attendants and the other carrying the University band, took part in the pre-game pa- rade through downtown Omaha. We want Manhattan Island back. CCMIN Homecoming activities continued as the Omaha University 'Football team won their ninth straight Homecoming victory, beating an undefeated Idaho State team, 18-7. Miss Bell was presented a bouquet from the Student Council and a letter sweater from the "O" Club at half-time ceremonies. Ouampi, University mascot, presented the traditional victory dance and four mounted horsemen led the school in the victory chant. Highlighting the two days of ac- tivities was the Homecoming Dance at Peony Park. Eddie Gracldy and his Com- manders provided the music for the dance. Half-time ceremony Parade passes C.U How true A foggy clay for Idaho State The Asp congratulates Bell They just won't come down. 'Q ., 1 The victory dance W 'XJ .gwgzsfafw 1 51,5 iw-wg, , f.m??5i2Q fzzfgm -N 91 : ",w,3iezii:i5? 1 if, .fswfi , A M :sg Qiiiiifif W, W es Mi. Us Zcceea Zlcwcie Zac!! The five finalists, left to right: Jo Snyder, Gloria Hattam, Gayle Chapman, Gwen Stoler, and Susan Forrey. Gayle Chapman was chosen 1956 Tomahawk Beau- ty Queen. She was chosen from among twenty-eight other contestants. Miss Chapman, a sophomore, is a member of Chi Omega sorority. Second place winner was Joelissa Snyder, and Susan Forrey was announced third place winner. Both are affiliated with Chi Omega sorority. Runners-up were Gloria Hattam, Alpha Xi Delta, and Gwen Stoler, Unaffiliated representative. Judges for the contest were Miss Ann Pettis, Wil- Iiam Hutcheson and M. Cooper Smith. The Kidd combo at intermission The judges take a careful check 3 N... . ...- Nqncy Mm-fin Mary Strater Sue Forrey Those d - - n boys x 0' , .fcxxkwi 31 4 Marilyn Jones Carol Wallen Marcia Wetzler NUUCY Fm Gl0l'iG Hdhum Wendy Bamesberger Chi O's gaze in awe. Pat Conley Put Kuspur Joyce Workman 74a Zueaa 94440 Kiwfm Second pldfdd ' Q 5 ar XX faglcbfm Swim 740:45 ?lace Sauna ?meg -is ,sswMsaiisi,i, sf. , , .esf1f?f2,if?,g1s 2?wg9FfS?PsSr?e:s,2a?tei5igg, Eiiligiiifisiifi ?SsE5?5if?i5SiSf5gFEffi51?isg i Ms?5igi425?f?2f's1 esasisgmgg sF5KE43Ysa55Y4g 9533132 x University Choir tells the Christmas story CHRI TMAS CCJNVO Three "Christmas Sketches" were presented at the annual Christmas convocation. The program was given by the Music department, under the direction of Choir Director John D. Miller. The three scenes consisted of "The Spirit of Christ- mas," "The Shepherds Heard an Angel" and "The Won- ders of Winter." Don McKeen narrated the program. Soloists were Marylinn Johnson and William Jurgens. Pianists were Miss Johnson, James Felton and Richard Herre. Orchesis members, Ann Alstrand, Judy Bondurant, Marilyn Brandes and Skip Goss, also performed. 2 -LY 5.3 L' i -W H 1 ' Hides 535' Aaswzmzuvtsv -wfwvhf A-91533 WSI l yiiftji rift, P ffi--JN.. . , W.: rratww-. ister. - -e fffewff an A 3 '- mm missile, W 5 ' lv:Q::.e,: '- 1'1- ,Sv gm , iii A g ,,,,. Fx. . . rf.sf,ff.,s. .ts fs, 2, Q X -V575 , - M5 51 uw- gqgffff ,'LW,,L. ,X 'K ' ' Mfsgxit-2, 1 szmwm-1.-1 i Hmugsm: B S, U,,b,,,. , asf ww 1,1 ft, fgiiifziiii Q q.A., H, X K1 5, 'ki Fifiviiifiz ww sf-iifggif 2557 L' S, sf ti' t12e,fm:t9:ei:es sy, 'iiiggsfkteifaftfssiigaigsifigie', l Hgm, ,Wm ?Zss?ffei?i:SiT:ii' ' Editors look over copy Left to right: Wendell Walker, Jerry Emery, Kay Talty, Marcia Morris and Sue Moss Sponsorship of a high school literary contest was one of the projects of "The Grain of Sand," student liter- ary magazine. The Grain of Sand editorial board this year was headed by Wendell Walker. Other editors included Jer- ry Emery, Marcia Mlorris, Sue Moss and Kay Talty. Students contributing short stories to the fall issue of the magazine included Emery, Larry Means, Miss Moss, Elaine Sternhill and Walker. Poems published were sub- mitted by Stanley Charnofsky, Miss Morris and Annette Nicas. The magazine, which is published bi-annually, was sponsored by Dr. Ralph M. Wardle, chairman of the English department, and Dr. Robert D. Harper. 4.-f Beats going to class Editorial chairman Wendell Walker checks with advisors we believ e in education for dll- TUDENT NURSES Omaha U and Jen are two of the first institutions in the country to participate in a cooperative student nursing program. nie Edmundson Hospital The nursing program was begun in Septem- ber of 1952 under the direction of C W H I . . em- stadter, Dean of the College of Applied Arts and Sciences. Omaha University's student nursing program offers girls from local hos it l d p as a egree as a Registered Nurse at the end of three years work. Cooperating hospitals include Immanuel and Methodist Hospitals in Omaha and Jennie Ed- mundson Hospital in Council Bluffs. 1 I - . ' f , , 'fi f'l"l',l"' f"'f il f llsllln qlllgllll fl',fll?,tilyll ,ll l r - r mil gt' all ,Hint it X 2 A ' H I 5 ' 5, , t Q 3 r -WW K l ! Q. if' V HI lump Q-, if ftfl K l l lg' I ' 2 . 9 MW 'll' Culture time It must be a drinkin song There is a big-head in every crowd. M Af.: .. ..,... I k,-: My 5, How to apply a band-aid. ls this the YMCA? -. .NA ww ' Reading the Kinsey report . 'f,g 1 f W ff 41 -ffm' W, W 15145511 'fm is f i f 5, ,, qw, W , lxlfww ff M,:Wr-ZWJ f 5 'ff wwf -JW W W ,W4W'?WrW'3QsWg, .swfgfwglevi-Wg'QF,Q'w ,: ' T V f fl M' T W W W f XSQUI is sow' gmc' 3 dl PK- H xo ndsflgell. Stmon Q0 pat . AUKB5 ueen 1956 wllxl PNN Q and el'-'N Vs Y N X 0 Q NX nl ones T .fwwwff M ,www Www 4 W r WEJXWWWQ Q 7i7,41QM f ww rf,,wW,W,, wfmwwwf MW, cf,,,4w,ff.Q7--srwfifsmywwwth Wvwgswsr 'ln 'A-fr',,f-rnfwwr W if - M Q .1-.mel-QNQQJ ww s H '5"Q75lfX4xEf,' ,, .f 'V ' fs fw-.J-t.7s. T' '-Li 5i'4S4r-we t f , . --4: fr, ZW fm? 7 yigwggcl ,, l .7 ,, ,, " ww L' fi "-C 14 Us ' QNQ Q f , n sw-s,sfw,e,sJws'w-2.s,.s5,,. r wg ,- ' Q ' 1 'Se i s ., X- :ggi f xfwf vw- X- Q xeg QQ . 5 2 s' C I - r X? ,Q e N. . ie Nxoflol and Mm AY C s QNX' Students went to the polls in February to elect the 1956 Junior Prom Queen. Pat Vogel was revealed win- ner at the annual Junior Prom, Febr. 17. Miss Vogel, a member of Chi Omega sorority, was attended by Marilyn l. Jones, Zeta Tau Alpha, Margery Radek, Sigma Kappa, and Judy Samuelson, Alpha Xi Delta. Eddy Haddad's orchestra p-layed for the annual dance at the Carter Lake Club. The dance committee was headed by Junior Class President Simon A. Simon. Simon was assisted by other iunior class officers, Irene Rorick, Dean Thompson and Al Thomsen. 56 Try 9 , eftmy G lime closer iss L q 1. .Jes si f fm. Www Zaeeog Fkmdccu Wage! if "The spirit of the Greeks" was the th eme of the 1956 Greek Week-Help Week activities. versity Greek letter organizations that cooperation and working together while experience. 4 Under the direction of Interfraternilty Panhellenic Council, sorority and renovated and r d South 22nd, "Mission accomplished!" declared speaker? John Plantikow, AF-ROTC instructor, at the Greek b anquet. The banquet and dance climaxecl the of work. ' ' e ecorated the Christ Chi'IldlCen'ter, 1 General committees were headed by'LoWwell and Judy Rogers, IFC and Panhellenic presidents A mes and Bob Rasgorshek were co-chairmehy' project. ' ' fi" ' Time out for dice and pool Yes, they painted everything 0 1 "X ,duct a tie all sg! Laughing won't help Pai' Kaspar and Sandy Ruish clean up after clean-up. if ...- px Q, 5 Back to your books, Glory-hog. -X4 9 who ' 'YW' K 9' X Xp iff ' ' X was X X X m X MX iw X XXM , N WXXYMMMM X Xnsimfg X, f3wyg.w QtQ:gAXfy35:X XX XX X X N X vw' AXXZWQQMXMXX .A W XM WN X, XXXXXXXXXX XXX W m WXXXX X MJXM-W X XX W X X M m " X" MX XXXXWXXM Awww Xe X ,mmm XXXXx X M QWM' W-X M Qgxgw XXXXXQQ1Q1QRQx XywX X il L FU!-... vw it A ' "Many a New Day" . . t 'Tr-' i 'A 1 c W' 'FH A J 1. 5 P A l ,E ? ,1', r ' is rtrss 1 A ' N- ' ' Y E 31, 3 My . Y' H V J A 'J if l V I ' . . R ,, Q Q 1 ll' , i f li it , it it - 5 ty y ,J - ' ",,w - M ,, . g ., 'X N fr 5: ,wwf 9,239 2, ,,i 1 J ,,,A ii. , H A ffl, it we .,.. , , , l J pm, y .4 4 . Jean DuBois "0KLAHOMA!" Singing, dancing and acting were combined for the spring musical, "Oklahoma!", March 24, 25, and 26. A cast of twenty-five University Players filled the roles in the Rodgers and Hammerstein production. The husband and wife team of James and Jean DuBois played the male and female leads as Curley and Laurey. Playing supporting roles were Paul Blaufuss, Jud, David Drittler, Ali Hakim, Marlene Hoffman, Aunt Ellen, William Jur- gens, Ida Skidmore, Don Rokusek, Will Parker, and Barbara Watts, Ado Annie. Dr. Edwin L. Clark was over-all director of the production. Mrs. Mary Lou Templeton directed the dancing. Vocal music was under the direction of Richard Brewer and Dr. James Peter- son directed the orchestra. James Erixon was stage director. James DuBois 'ag " fn V HQ sq,-. E376 'ww Sta rs Are Born K Philly "Lizzie" and the boy 1 ll-als 9 Sheriff File makes a ca 'f""Y as Marlene Hoffman msfiili-3IH5fi" 42 .0545 Rainmaker If Hugh Allen University Players opened the T955-56 theatre sea- son at Omaha U with their production of N. Richard Nash's "The Rainmaker" Nov. 4 and 5. The cast of seven persons portrayed the story of a midwestern family with two problems: how to get the daughter, Lizzie, "married off," and what to do about the drought. Hugh Allen, playing the role of the bragging, fast talking rainmaker, offers solutions to both their problems. He brings rain, collects his one- hundred dollars as payment, and convinces Lizzie that she is not a plain girl. The role of Lizzie, only female part in the play, was played by Marlene Hoffman. Others in the cast were Gifford Anderson, Jerry Emery, Thomas Finley, Jon Lundberg and Don McKeen. Director of the fall dramatics production was Dr. Edwin L. Clark. Ancl in the far corner .... About that blond . . . "BERNARDIN,E" "Bernardine," a comedy by Mary Coyle Chase, was the first University Player production of 1956. Two full houses attended performances Feb. 10 and 'l'l. The comedy is the story of a crowd of high school boys who dream aloud of a mystical Venus they call "Bernardine," a slick chick with a 1956 Cadillac. Dick Herre played the male lead, and Marcia Morris portrayed the female lead. The 17-member cast included Hugh Allen, Gifford An- derson, Becky Chartier, John Clark, Dave Drittler and Sandy Dungan. Others in the cast were Thomas Finley, Al Longacre, Don McKeen, Jack Moskovitz, Carl Rhea, John Schmidt, Arnie Smith and Marcia Wetzler. Dr. Edwin L. Clark was director of the play. Damn rt, I said a quart! D Suzie Dick Herre And to continue .... You're u friend of my mofher's? So you put the slugs in the coin-changer . . . A beer? Why, I must study! THE "CREW" Note the argyles He'II never feel it That added attraction That smoo-oo-th line in action Same band we had for the Ball Watch the ashes, Drittler Tickets and teeth I 5' -Q' if The boys . . . Blast off! Gunner and manual ORCHESIS 4 'SJ lt's u touchdown! A "Dream Fantasy" was presented by modern dancers at the third annual Orchesis Concert, April 20. The recital consisted of a succession of contempor- ary dances, ranging in material from "The Spirit of Memphis" to "Happy Africa." Orchesis members por- trayed their interpretations of dream experiences. The program included scenes from the surrealistic, subcon- scious and realistic dream world. At the completion of the concert Judy Bondurant and Marilyn Brandes were awarded a plaque for out- standing work in modern dance at Omaha University. Members of the cast included Gayle Anderson, Shirley Barnum, Miss Bondurant, Miss Brandes, Pat Burke, Pat Carlson, Betti Coleman, Annine Dinkle and Janet Hanson. Other dancers were Pat Kavan, Phyllis Kuta, Joyce Miller, Joyce Patrick, Judy Samuelson, Pat Vorel and Nancy Weymiller. Orchesis sponsor, Marillyn Nass, directed the concert. It'sa bird.....it'sa pIane..... Cross that line a ,QW v KJ 2 W 5.5 I I xx 'Q K , 55 Q , ' ' ex 5 N . ,LL-L . 'tx gd ' , me ' Xa' W LJ fl-at A, ' Q 'ff fx H L X a 0uampi's victory dance That Christmas feelin Go man, go! MUSIC ACTIVITIES A series of concerts cmd performances were all a part of the Omaha University Music De- partment this year. Under the direction of Ar- thur Custer, the band formed a council to act as a general governing body. Band officials this year included Drum Major Rodney Murray, Jack Fullerton, Bud Pratt and George Johnston. The band played at most of the home foot- ball games, and at school convocations. A seven-man combo, called the f'Fieldhouse Nine Minus Tvvo," provided pep music at rallies and basketball games. John Miller directed the school choir in a fine program for Christmas. A year ago in the spring, the music department put on a show featuring individual performers in the instru- mental and vocal field. ws Honorary officers lead grand march 94 i r l i l i Aerotones perform Honorary Colonel Jean DuBois . A 3, . V -1 Military Ball Jean Madden DuBois and Cadet Colonel Frank Pazlar led the grand march at Omaha University's fourth annual Military Ball April 22. Jean was named honor- ary Colonel during the intermission ceremonies. She was chosen from among six final Angel candidates by mem- bers of the Arnold Air Society. Other honorary officers were also announced. Joanne Rentschler and Donna Rasgorshek were named Honorary Lieutenant Colonels. Gayle Anderson, Betty Ellsworth and Lois Tate were chosen Honorary Majors. The Sauter-Finnegan Orchestra provided music for the Ball at the City Auditorium. Also on the program were the Angelettes, dancing Angels, the Sabres, crack drill team, and an instrumental solo by Johnny Vana. The Military Ball Committee was headed by Cadet Colonel Frank Pazlar. Assisting him were Robert Al- mein, Bill Beindorff, Larry Brehm, Darrell Githens, Wesley Guthals, Warren Hopson and Jerry Korisko. Others helping were Jerry Norene, John Skarda, Joe Smith, Johnny Vana and Park Williams. gui-g 'E iw at 'P,:'.s.fg ew f. Bax? K sr 'Y ,qi MQ , M , .M f A5553 'ff , gg - gk., . M 2' 5' .Jim A ' . .2 , qw 2 Yak,- wfu f b ,Q ..,... I A or ff- -1-4 ' s M sw , so L f P F , :ff ' ' .,., . 1'5" 'Alu ' .ii gmt ' ...-Q... EZ: M3 , In-was-sv- can-41 .W , ...- ,.,, .Fa , x ,.!.!9Q,9o 4 4' ,.. ,D ,, ,.....tsa,.. .,.,-,.,.s. Mm Aw w? it lb A 4 M s.M..-ss.,,s,.s,,,, W .,.,,s1,s.w-.,m A , L V P , ' "' by 1 1 1 A Q N ' A A , O y AL V , 5 ,,q,., 1., L V g 4 -W en W- ff N 'V U 'f-'S 't .., 5.4 ,' h--D if V,-Y if LJ A L A A - 1 ,n 1 W , y Federal Inspection Hero medal for Highpockets The band leads the way A year of training was climaxed April 29 as Air Force ROTC cadets were reviewed by a federal inspect- ing team. Col. Charles S. Densford and Lieut. Col. Robert Moon of Montgomery, Ala. were the inspecting officers. Classes were dismissed to enable students to wit- ness the cadet wing parade and performances by the AF-ROTC band, the Sabres and the Marching Angels. The review was highlighted by the presentation of twenty-four awards. Among them were the President's Medal, Park Williams, Air Force Association Medal, Richard Matthews, Distinguished Cadet Medal, Frank Pazlarp and American Legion Medal, Larry Brehm. Others receiving recognition were Melvin Rousek, Professor of Air Science Medalp Jerry Korisko, Veterans of Foreign Wars Medal, and Larry Peters, World-Herald Wing Commander Plaque and Reserve Officers Associa- tion Medal. Other cadets who received awards included John Cottrell, Air Force ROTC Staff Medal, Ted Caiacob, Air Force ROTC Marksmanship Medal, and John Skarda, Forty and Eight Award. as s,, '35 5 For Simon it was another year as an also-ran. "Snorkle-snout" barks orders ofthe day. "You're at attention, Miss Reynolds." American Legion Medqlfor Brehm, Eyes straight ahead when you're marching please. Three Scotch-on-the-rocks, please ROTC ACTIVITIES Angels and Arnold Air Society members participated in the dedication of Abbott Drive leading to the airport in the late fall. Pat Vogel was chosen to reign as "Miss Avia- tion" over the ceremonies. In February, the Angels and Arnold Air Society members were given a SAC Briefing at Offutt Air Force Base. Fol- lowing a tour of the base, a buffet dinner was held at the Officers' Club. Miss Aviation Future Tallulah Bankheads Attention please, sir! Qi I ' 'iw M r s lt's a bird .... it's a plane? Q, ef, ? 9 fs A gg, ma, Q X i1?siz,,. 525: K 57 K ik' .. -, , - 'Z , Z . " " . mg. 5 Masai: 'Sw.g,jjiQ : :mg vm 'wif'-1 .fQi?j H11ii,.2:f.?? f' iwflllfiiifwl 5' -fziffi A ' - M fw- W 7 X Mm ., . ,...,. , Q. , . .. . ,. ns. N . .. .,,ys,.. MMS, L. ,. ,. . l K - W J, - . . , , .x W5v,,e 3, ,mit 5,5 257 1 f 2 A .,,. , GREEKS KW H . V . - ,'5?vHP2z91v5. +1 4439, i 'i ., . me wsaefgw . ..,. ,fm s K 94,2 .Q Kr sw , 1 1 1 2 1 my kg? ",, . -i.: MEL .V . ,. . . . ,gm wf-eagw wfeggfg ,nw f f . mizzif is - S, bv I Qmigsv '- M y , ea . Qlsx Q 'W , K Q' 5 as Y fx A 5 Dubler Moss Tietgen PANHELLENICJ COUNCIL The Panhellenic Council, composed of two women from each sorority, is the governing body for the four national social sororities on the Omaha University campus. As a new proiect this year, Panhellenic Council sponsored Christmas and Valentine parties with enter- tainment for three Omaha homes for the aged. Other duties of the organization included guiding women's rushing activities, checking sorority membership limita- tions, and co-sponsoring the annual Greek Help Week. Officers for the year were Judy Rogers of Alpha Xi Delta, president, Patricia Kavan of Zeta Tau Alpha, vice- president, Marie Strenger of Sigma Kappa, secretary, and Betty Ellsworth of Chi Omega, treasurer. Members of the Council included Judy Samuelson, Carol Tietgen, Annette Dubler, and Sue Moss. Mrs. Paul Sutton, Miss Margaret Killian, Miss Alice Smith, and Mrs. Frances Smith were alumnae advisors. Mrs. Mary Padou Young was administration advisor. Junior Panhellenic Council Alpha Xi Delta, program chairman. Pat Kaspar, and Laurel Shewan. Samuelson Strenger Kavan Ellsworth This year Junior Panhellenic Council members spon sored a coffee hour for sorority pledges and took part in a Valentine party at St. Vincent's Home. Junior Panhellenic Council is a pledge organization composed of representatives from each sorority. Of ficers were Glee Sides of Zeta Tau Alpha, president Nancy Morris of Sigma Kappa, vice-president, Virginia Frank of Chi Omega, secretary, and Gloria Hattam of Other members included Carol Wallen, Pat Roberts Mrs. Mary Padou Young was administration ad Left to right, back row: Laurel Shewan, Pat Kaspar, Carol Wallen, Front row: Gloria Hattam, Nancy Morris, Glee Sides, Virginia Frank, Pat Kavan. visor. my 5 1, .gy Poast, Dean Pflasterer, Huber display winning IFC plaque. 5 'K Lowell Huber IFC President INTERFRATERNITY .nies NPV" Judy Rogers Panhellenic President Ames Daley Gathmann ffl' ,B couNclL 1 jg- lnterfraternity Council representatives returned from the National IFC convention in January with the coveted plaque awarded to the outstanding small college IFC prog ram. Delegates to the national IFC convention were Ron Jenkins, Gene Poast and Don Pflasterer, assistant Dean of Students. Interfraternity Council is composed of two repre- sentatives from each of the men's fraternities. In ad- dition to deciding all policies concerning the OU fra- ternities, the organization also manages men's rushing, regulates inter-fraternity athletics and meets with the Panhellenic Council to formulate Greek Week activities. IFC officers this year were Lowell Huber, president, Gene Poast, vice president, Park Ames, secretary, and Sam Georges, treasurer. Georges Graddy QA l Jenkins J so gg-v , Poast 3 C , 7' Radcliffe LL Q Rasgorshek Alderman Don't you have a bigger one? Judy Rogers ALPHA Xl DELTA Gamma Delta Chapter of Alpha Xi Delta was well-represented in all phases of campus activities. ln Anderson Bowley Erion Goodwin Herbes Hoffmann R-Ima-a the spring, Gayle Anderson and Nancy Weymiller were tapped for Waokiya, and the Alpha Xi float took third place in the Ma-ie Day competition. Alpha Xi swept the Sig Ep All-Greek Sing for the third consecutive year, gaining permanent possession of the trophy. At the Alpha Xi-sponsored Devil Dance Bill Steck was crowned King Satan VII. Journalism kept Alpha Xi's busy-Jo Olsen was edi- tor ofthe Gateway, and Patsy Halverson, Harriet Meyers, Marcia Miller and Judy Samuelson were on the Gate- way and Tomahawk staffs. Marilyn Johnson S. Johnson Little J. Palladino Simonson Weymiller Wolf Beck Dall Halverson Nellor Thompson Burns Carter Cheyne J. Elliott Haney Marylinn Johnson J. Kruse Meyers S. Pallaclino Winslow Weiser Stolley Proffit Fitl Barton Brinlee Burney Ceika Custer R. Elliott Fleck French Hansen Hattam Judy Samuelson Judy Rogers, Pan-Hellenic Council president, was voted Lambda Chi Alpha "Crescent Girl." Alpha Xi's were presidents of Phi Theta Chi, Kappa Delta Pi, Re- tailing Club, Press Club, Pinfeathers, and Angels. Judy Samuelson was College World Series Queen and Miss Autorama. Four of seven Angel's flight officers, including the Flight Leader, were Alpha Xi's. Senior sorority girl with the highest accumulative average was Jo Olsen, and Best Supporting Actress was Marlene Hoffman. Officers were Judy Rogers, president, Judy Samuel- son, vice-president, Susie Beck, secretary, and Martha Goodwin, treasurer. Advisors are Miss Evelyn Schellak and Mrs. Louise Sutton. RQ ,V S. Kruse McPherron Rentschler Sanders Strater Wallen Oh yes, Roy, Trigger dances divinely. 'Yr'-A Rigg Miller Bednar Chartier Wolfe Lasell L. Tate Bondura nt Brandes Comine Engle Three little maids from school are we-and friend. Betty Ellsworth CHI OMEGA Chi Omega received the highest average for the fifth consecutive year and retired the Panhellenic schol- arship tray. Sue Moss was outstanding Greek pledge, Sue Rowe and JoAnne Manger had top pledge averages. Betty Ellsworth and Donna Reynolds were Junior Prom Queen and Ma-ie Day Princess, respectively. Betty Ellsworth and Lois Tate were Honorary Majors at the Military Ball. Chi O's won the All-School Sing. The 24 pledges saw Sharon Heldt, Jody White, and Nancy Wolfe as cheerleaders. Class secretaries were Marcia Wetzler, Sharon Giclley and lrene Rorick. Stu- dent Council members were Diane Langevin, Sandra Gorey, Jeanne Vogt, Pat Vogel, Jean Bednar and Betty Ellsworth. Hodgen Manger Martin Oberdorfer Rorick K. Talty Thoma Vogel J. White Chapman Forrey Gidley Johnson Kratky D. Lane Lucht McMahon Moredick Moss Rowe Sampson Vogt Wright 0'Donnell Wickman Allard Clark Edstrand Frank Geiger Gorey Gosch Henderson Heldt Kuntzelman B. Lane Janet Hanson The three Tomahawk Beauty Queens were Gayle Chapman, Jo Snyder, and Sue Forrey. Queens were Gayle Chapman, Joyce Wright, Irene Rorick and Pat Vogel. Tapped for Waokiya were Jean Bednar Cpresidentl, Betty Ellsworth, Carolyn Chapman, Bev Pace and Vir- ginia White. Club Presidents were Jean Bednar 131, Judy Bondurant, Jeanne Lucht and Jody White. Social highlights were the Deans Tea and the Din- ner Dance. Officers were Betty Ellsworth, president, Janet Han- son, vice-president, Mardee Martin, secretary, Jean Bednar, treasurer and Pat Vogel, pledge trainer. Advisors were Mrs. John Adams, Mrs. John Gustaf- son, Miss Mildred Hollingsworth and Miss Margaret Killian. Langevin Loring Roberts Snyder Starr Stevens J. Talty Gallagher Townsend .95 ed sf!! if ' s. 'tr' Wetzler "We're rushing you Chi Omega . . ." vs WrW' su., y Wh' 'HZ' ffl! Barnum Lenihan F' as "' Sigma Kappas entertain at coketail party. Mathiasen Smith Cameron Disney Dubler DuVall Marie Strenger Jackie Snyder SIGMA KAPPA The Sigma Kappas were especially ac- tive in this year 1955-56. In the spring they were hostesses for the annual Sigma Kappa State Day. Shortly after they entertained at a tea honoring their retiring sponsor, Mrs. Mildred Gearhart. Climaxing the spring ac- tivities was the annual formal Dinner Dance held at the Blackstone Hotel, and the bi- annual Mother-Daughter banquet. With the fall term came rushing and then a round of annual social events. The Born Dance was the first of these followed in December by the Violet Formal and the Jones Radek B. Sommers Buell su Decker Derham Fokken Kline Rogers Stevens Bamesbergelf Bosco Brady Carroll Chappell Coffey . , 43 ee Martin McGinty Morris election of Typical Fraternity Man. Dusty R d Decker of Pi Kappa Alpha reigned for the Rig' evening. Then came Christmas and the Schroer Alumnae tea, Mother and Daughter party and the all pledge party, Kappa's Kapers. Sigma Kappas took an active part in Feathers, Pin Feathers, O.U.W.l., Future Teachers of America, Home Economics Club, Kappa Delta Pi, and The Spanish Club. Officers for the year were Marie Streng- er, president, Jackie Snyder and Annette Dubler, vice-presidents, Mary Lenihan, sec- Shewan retary, and Jean Mathiasen, treasurer. TUYIW Thomsen C E' 1 if if 3 F Ti gd 3 'li y g s l , C f I- A Q, K g gi. Qian , ,, j ig if , F r -fe .,. . if Qi? , . . ,T H W 1 tl T41 A T if T, ii .. ,Ti G V WE A 1 Kg' L at ilvfftl 23' 'xv ,XZ--V A ,L H M vk ,LAI ii 5 a V' A 1 f iz 2 W K ' ,. . 6 is I 3' 7 i T' 3 gf Q' ii 'L l N , ,Q N ii ,fi g , 2 V, 1 K ,V ,Ha W 5 The Student Council strikes a pose! ' - 555: id: Nolan A2 ? 2 WRT' 'J -11 5 Lilly A Wx .mm .Q . .V .,-- .9 ,silly 5 3 an .Y if 5 . 'iv ., N5 Q Whittington Woolley Tietgen Harper Zadina Hill Pat Kavan Jean McKee ZETA TAU ALPHA Zeta Tau Alpha proudly presents its members and a summary of the past year at Omaha University. Last spring their Ma-ie Day float won first place and Jean DuBois was named Honorary Colonel at the Military Ball. This fall Zeta pledged 28 women. Joan Engstrom was elected Typical Freshman girl and Adrienne Miller was chosen Cutest Pan during the Campus Community Chest drive. ' Zetas were busy with scholarship, activities and fun this year. Gloria Zadina was secretary-treasurer of the senior class, Jean McKee, head cheerleader, was on Student Council. Gayle Martin was also on the cheer- ing squad. Glee Sides was president of Junior Jones Marley M Miller Olson Post Larson Beach M. Zentner Martin Danielson Perry C. Zentner Heim Schroeder Peters Shala Andrews Shirley Andrews Pazlar Nicas 0- Beckner Dungan Edwards Ellis Engstrom Fleming Goeser Howard Kaspar Jenson Lodwig McClelland A. Miller Raish Rhea Rohling Panhellenic. Mary Jane Ackerman and Pat Nolan were tapped for Waokiya. Zetas held office in many other organizations. This year's officers were Pct Kavan, presidentf Bar- bara Scott, vice-president, Avice Hill, secretaryp Betty Post, treasurer. The pledges entertained at an All-Greek coke-tail party and later at a party before the ZTA dance, Fanta- sy in Frost. The Sweetest and Meanest active and pledge were named at the Christmas party. Parties were held with both the fraternities and Zeta's mothers. This spring the dinner dance was given. Sponsors were Mrs. Frances Smith and Mrs. Irene Dilley. Schepp Scott Sides Smith Sutton Wells 7 Haalv-,, if-,lfailvi :- Mill Poast Klima Kaus Johnson Vickery s..' if 1 inn 'Af , ' 1'f,i,5j' ' wg , ' wp 1 ' ,ig 2' il ,, .4- Dick Horn LAMBDA CHI ALPHA The anniversary of lota Delta chapter's installation as a fully affiliated chapter of Lambda Chi Alpha was celebrated by the second annual closed White Rose For- mal. At this time, Miss Judy Rogers of Alpha Xi Delta was crowned Lambda Chi Alpha Crescent Girl. At the Greek Week banquet in the spring, Robert Henkens won the Outstanding Pledge Scholarship award, for the second straight year. Ron Jenkins headed the Greek Week activities committee. The Mardi Gras Dance in March was followed in April by the all-school pancake supper. The fall semester brought 24 new pledges to lota Delta. Henkel Michalik Storms Fricke Lett Parks Henkens Drexel Warrior Fiellin Cavanaugh Marvin Haber Braddock Skarda Dahlbeck Wandell Anderson Clark Gamble ,E ...Z J ls, ' ft' 311 '?5I3jP:f., W ff ?..fs.5w'fgst:iffvW. ' . - - . A-vf 1 ft .. . M,4s,ws.e,w aww. '-V. . f Pfgs,v2:3wef. ww.f1?qw .4 ,w , .- -gpg' .- .2 M. , wtflds, ' 'M 'A l'Cy lf ,5-.- . -,tn s , . ,,.. . . , , dgf . Kallsek Luedtke Mac Donald Jerry Emery Lambda Chi's were officers in the Brush and Easel club, Alpha Psi Omega, Phi Eta Sigma, and German club. Gene Poast was National Executive officer of Sabres. Rich Siekman played varsity basketball. Lamb- da Chi also had members in Phi Mu Alpha, Gamma Pi Sigma, AAS, the language clubs, KWOU board of di- rectors, the Gateway, and Tomahawk. Almost half of the cast of the fall production, The Rainmaker, were Lambda Chi's. Officers for 1955 were Richard Horn, president, Jerry Emery, vice-president, Don Haffner, secretary, Joseph Michalik, treasurer, and Gene Poast, pledge trainer. Sponsors were Dr. Robert D. Harper, C. Glenn Lewis, Lt. John W. Plantikow, Dr. J. D. Tyson, and Dr. Duane W. Hill. Marsh Pendrock Petersen D. Poast Pollet Schuett Siekman Woodward I say, Judy, don't you think three pictures are quite enough? Bailey Brehmer Dvorak Georges Hadden Philpot I :gf- yrs. MX? Phi Beta Chi's attend tea. ,. .W f A semen 'v" Ip, -wut . ' Q ' ,, ' '- .,., vp, 425,17-f? .., as , .ZH K ,J ,ff . James Gathmann PHI BETA CHI In the fall of 'I953 Phi Beta Chi was established as a local fraternity. Last fall it affiliated with Tau Kappa Epsilon, one of the top ten national fraternities. Members of Phi Beta Chi have taken part in a well-rounded activities program, including participation in Arnold Air Society, KWOU, Gateway, Tomahawk, Band, A.P.O., and intramural sports. For the second consecutive year Phi Beta Chi's Don Waddell won the Campus Chest "Ugly Man" contest sponsored by A.P.O. Highlighting the social season was the All-Greek "Coral Dance" at Carter Lake Club last spring at which Gayle Chapman was named the first "Queen of the Coral Island." Wilkie Ehrlich Sobczyk Byrne Conrad Jenkins Townsend Waddell Andrews Cochrane Farquhar Ehrhorn Olsen Poole Roberts Thomsen Durbin Elsasser Griess Gruhn 'M Kostlner McCIaren Miller Severm George Bluvas Sobeski In addition to the social functions for members of Stephenson the fraternity, Phi Beta Chi co-operated with other Truax Greek organizations and campus groups in a number of ioint activities, including all-pledge teas, sorority parties, and intramural sports. The executive council 'For the year was composed of James Gathmann, president, George Bluvas, vice- president, Richard Bailey, secretary, James Troboughf treasurer, and Sam Georges, Inter-fraternity Council Whinnery representative. Wiley Sponsors for the year are Lt. Col. John Asp, Clif- W90dUfd ford Ellis, Guenter Schmalz and William Utley. nl 5 Winner -'M' ls doing neep dnee bends? H3 Is drinking cokes tonight, Brad? i . ' I -Wm ' w i. ' , ' ' ' - ,amy - ww.. , ,i ' .A , 'egwzsfsi-f.csYfisz2,.iv -'5 ,swag f f 1, f, 1-r fwgzsiggsmggfi: ' a -, I - - I ' ' ' - ....i--g.v',,,:- :.- lm Chuck French Pl KAPPA. ,,,,,,,e, A L P H A Ford Hopson R. Matthews Stillwell Whittington Conser Byrne Founded on the basis of leadership, scholarship, and fellowship, Pi Kappa Alpha started its fifth year as Delta Chi Chapter and its thirty-ninth year on the University of Omaha campus. Delta Chi captured three class presidencies and all four vice presidential positions in the fall elections. Chuck French, Simon A. Simon, and Roger Lee were presidents of the senior, junior, and freshman classes. Bill Steck, AI Thomsen, Doug Postlewait, and Allan Longacre were the respective vice presidents. Lewis Radcliffe presided over the Student Council, while Dick Daly, Ron Bendorf, and Jim Plaster served as elected members. Daly and Radcliffe also repre- sented Pi Kappa Alpha on the Inter-fraternity council. ,th-AC' Daley Kanago Larimore Seefus Simon Thomsen H. Zwieble Smith Eckstrom W. Christy Finley Harrington McKenzie Plaster D. Postlewait Reed Strang Kennedy Q . Georgios Stoney Sedlacek R. Postlewait "' N Burke Dain McCoy Anderson Bendorf Longacre Lemen Veatch Jones Zulfer Havlu 4? Lee Carlson Nordquest , s "f- - c g , H n C' 'Q-. ' A C Brad Pence Thirteen members held offices in campus organiza- tions, and three seniors were tapped for Omicron Delta Kappa. Dave Langevin and Joe Byrne served on the Tomahawk staff as Editor-in-Chief and Photo Editor. ln athletics, Simon A. Simon and Bill Steck were starters on the football team. Howard Larimore played varsity tennis, and Steck and Langevin played varsity baseball. Delta Chi won the campus fraternity scholarship trophy, and ranked second nationally among Pi Kappa Alpha chapters. The annual Garnet and Gold Ball, the only All- Greek formal dance, was the highlight of the Pi Kap social season. Irene Rorick of Chi Omega was chosen Dream Girl of the fraternity. -Si' isis it Z Chamberlain Wickman Welna Wright Menze Heckenlively W, 'QQ mam, Raschke B. Matthews Marvin Decker Melvin Decker "For Witherington needs must I wayle as one in doleful dumpes For when his leggs were smitten off, he fought upon his stumpes X13 Q1 Bob Barnes Beem Bill Barnes Browning Sage Shainholtz Stone Jensen Anderson Cagni Caiacob Doeschot VY! Jones McFarland Nordell Vicker aw 0 be ofw' iw Sig Eps serenade Sweetheart. Dave Raymond SIGMA PHI EPSILON Sigma Phi Epsilon showed leadership in nearly all fields during the past year. Under the direction of President Dave Raymond, the 'Fraternity had its biggest social year in history, with the annual Sig Ep Sing starting the year's events. Tro- phies were awarded to Alpha Xi Delta sorority and Theta Chi fraternity for the best singing. The Christmas date party, Sweetheart Dance and the costume party, all with live music, highlighted the year. Sig Ep pledged 25 men at the first of the year. Bob Sherwood was elected "Typical Freshman Boy" in the fall all-school election. Shooter Morse Claussen Henkens Long McMillan Rasgorshek Rice Schmoller Grossoeh me Crozier Heagle Rasey Pulley Houghton Sherwood Maddux Neuiahr Pelzer Hawk Shimonek Ekberg Shields Johnston Colchin 9050- Lowell Huber He was also chosen to be a freshman representative to the Student Council. The sophomore class elected Bob Wheeler its president. Dave Raymond was elected Cool- est Man at the Zeta Tau Alpha "Fantasy in Frost" dance. Sig Ep walked oft with the Sweepstakes trophy for intramural sports forthe second straight year. Omi- cron Delta Kappa tapped Frank Pazlar for membership last spring. Officers of Sig Ep are Dave Raymond, president, Lowell Huber, vice-president, Demeral Andrew, secre- tary and Clarence Sage, comptroller. Sponsors are Tom Brock, Bill Gerbracht, Francis Hurst, and John W. Kurtz. 9 if V Kuehl Hahn Saltzman Courtright Field McCartney Grant Morotto Dehart Coughlin Miller Vogl t 4 4:53 'QF' gi ,s 'Unw- wr Toga, or not to ga? 'D- 'GT II7 Dior's Dollies! Avvx 'CSI THETA CHI . Delta Zeta chapter of Theta Chi fraternity, which will celebrate its 100th anniversary this September in Norwich, Vermont, recalls a past year of leadership, fellowship, and service at the University of Omaha. Theta Chi sponsored the first All-Greek dance of the year at which Miss Joyce Wright was chosen 1955 Sweater Girl. At the fraternity's annual dinner dance last spring, Miss Margie Barker was chosen "Theta Chi Dream Girl," and new officers were announced. A pledge banquet, parent's tea, and many sorority parties round out the social calendar. Colman P. Geihs Howell Langhummer R. Schulz G. Schulze Thompson Walters Henderson Ames Brackenbury Brewster y s Campbell Dudycha J. Graddy Jakobsen Larson Lozier R. Nemer Salman 'A Terrano F. Geihs Myers Palmer , ,gi Richard Vernon The Theta Chi Choraliers, for the second consecutive year, took first place in the All-School Sing and All- Greek Sing. ln intramurals, Theta Chi tookifirst place in both volleyball and softball, while taking runner-up spot in football. Dean Thompson and Sheldon Carlson won places on the varsity basketball squad. In leadership, Theta Chi's were presidents of the Retailing Club, Warriors, and Radio and TV Club. -Dar- rell Githens served as National Commander of Sabres, while Bill Graddy was tapped for ODK. Sponsors were Dr. Gale Oleson and Capt. Bruce Keltz. Officers were Robert Holsten, president, Richard Vernon, vice-president, .Frederick Walters, secretary, Richard Brehm, treasurer, and Richard Bennett, pledge- master. ff.. if 'SIS' new it-ve Qi. fa K9 H X TH, by-N -vs, it Lund Jansen - 'Ls B. Bennett Q, l IQ- J. Nemer Welch vp, Roberts 'T T Moberg Zeltins f sqm- ,gc Herre 4' if-5 We lose more pledges this way. ms' if 'GEN ur Anderson fs. II9 Lehr Dahlgren Mickna 0. K. Peterson eu' Eucker 'ir--Q .Wav DELTA SIGMA Pl The international fraternity of Delta Sigma Pi was founded at New York University in 'l907. The Gamma Eta chapter at the University of Omaha was installed in April, 1949. The pur- pose of the fraternity is to promote scholarship, social activity, and the association of students in the College of Business Administration for their mutual benefit. . Delta Sigma Pi is a professional fraternity and sponsors a professional program with out- standing speakers from the business world. Larsen Acamo Wilkins Summers Simmons 9 'Fi Q ," ' - V- '- "--: .ky ' Ed Rohan Drive' Mvshief PfUChen5kY M. Pedersen Henderson Blumel 120 Miller Foreman Blake Nordell D. Olson Qrfszwiiy 1 1-Q. .- .f .-E H.. . ' -f vrzl C'-f'1suffgj4rzg Robert Ethington lt conducts business tours of leading firms in accounting, finance, manufacturing, marketing and other fields for the benefit of its members and students in commerce. The fraternity maintains 30 alumni organiza- tions in major cities of the country, it has an alumni placing service and publishes a senior's directory with qualifications of its graduating members which is distributed annually to more than 2,000 leading business firms throughout the country. Buesing Hohneke Donnelly O'Brien T. Olson B. Green Prochnau French R, Green Hogarth wgqd Schumann 'rf mag Rod Conser Roch 4'9" lemen Ames Campbell Bennett G Johnston A L P H A Jones French PHI OMEGA Founded in 1925, Alpha Phi Omega is a national service fraternity composed of men with Boy Scout ex- perience. Its purpose is to provide service to the stu- dent body and faculty, service to youth and to the com- munity, service to the nation, and service to members of the fraternity. During the school year APO sponsors various proj- ects in the fulfillment of its objectives. Highlight of the service program is the annual blood drive for the Red Cross. Last spring 92 pints were donated. Another feature of the yearly agenda was the fourth annual Community Chest Drive at which time a total of 5936.48 was collected. Adrienne Miller and Don Waddel were selected "cutest pan" and ugliest man" respectively. Officers for the 1955-56 semesters were Rodney Conser, president, Garland Griffith, secretary, and Robert Jones, treasurer. Browning B. Johnston Carlson ff' Andrews Griffith Q GREEK RCYALTY 775644 fayce Weigh 646 Omega 'Meta 646 Sweatm Wim freely fayua A A144644 Za Delta aww ea ,ima emma We 71644 'Yfzeoae Zonal t E46 Omega Pa Kappa 14444 D-mm gat O mdd Dawg, Mwgdmw Sffm' P44 5911404 s,.,,,,4,,, , mwnwfi SMW' ga 0-ffm film 646 Dum' QM l -,M wi .xf" 775644 Sue Qfendozeon ea 00,694 7246 'am ea eww 2am Wfiddf Willie 646 Omega Pau of Delta, Sigma Fd Dam, Dada Pe Kappa 14x44 Scynoa Kagan 'Miami ?'!f456'!4lf5fQ WK-in Dave 24Q0904Wf S4944 Ma Spain Zeta 7m M4644 6045445 WM Vf1'd!kv..,A-A ' X 4, Q. in 925545 r . I HW' in . 2. ,'x.i4f?ff-G-' 11 12' Q ' 2.zmfi!: : L , 1' Q-a-,.gj,mff:uf - f ni A A - f 'Ai :ery ' wi mf? 244424 Styne: 7746 Sputum 'Za Zap? mm Greeks celebrate successful week with dance. GREEK WEEK Annual Greek Help Week activities, held last year from March 28 to April 1, began when Greeks redec- orated the YMCA gymnasium and additional recreation rooms. Ron Jenkins directed work activity. The annual banquet and presentation of achieve- ment awards closed Greek Week. Chi Omega and Pi Kappa Alpha won group schol- arship awards. .lo Olsen and Roger Dunbier took in- dividual trophies. Marilyn Kline, JoAnn Manger and Susan Rowe tied W three ways for pledge scholarship awards, while Robert YMCA moms get new Iggk during 1955 Help Week Henkens received the fraternity cup. Outstanding pledges were Sue Moss and Bob Rasgorshek. n The Pledge Dance followed the banquet. Annual banquet climaxes Greek Week. ALL-GREEK SING For the third consecutive year Alpha Xi Delta so- rority took first place in the Sigma Phi Epsilon All-Greek Sing, thus securing permanent possession of the trophy. In the men's division Theta Chi fraternity placed first for the second year in a row. Competition was judged by John Miller, new head of the University vocal music department. Each group was required to sing both a competition song, and a fraternity song of its choice. Competition song for the women's organizations was "l'll See You in My Dreams." Fraternity groups sang "The Desert Song." The annual Sing, sponsored by Sig Ep fraternity, was held last fall at Teitz Barn instead of Hill Haven as in past years. The change of locations was made necessary by the growing yearly attendance. Traditional group singing was held previous to the competition, and dancing followed. After the sing, cider and doughnuts were served. Cider and doughnuts for Greeks after sing ui-Us gf' ur 'fs num'- AQA Theta chi's sing for trophy Alpha Xi's-three year winners Pledge Dance Martians invade earthlings on Peony stage. Again this year, pledges from the nine Greek or- ganizations on campus assumed their proper role and entertained their actives at an All-Greek Pledge Dance. "Space Chase," a take-off on creatures from Mars, was the theme of the skit given during intermission ceremonies. The dance was held October 28 at Peony Park. Skeets Mahoney and his orchestra played. Overall chairman for the dance was Jim Nemer. Jack Lemen was secretary and Judi Hansen was treasurer. The skit was written by Sandy Dungan and AI Longacrej Walt Gray and Kay McGinty were in charge of decorations, and John Maddux was courtesy chair- man. The dance was planned by members of all the pledge classes with the assistance of Judy Rogers and Lowell Huber, Pan-Hellenic and lnterfraternity Council presidents, respectively. , 'Q 1' 54 N I if :A ' Q ff 5 Q 9 f-G! X , x 2 3 E wweyahndlii fi? 1 .2 B' ix 4' x Ye Q. x .. x is ff 2' 5 Q X FSS, , . A X 4? . 55. 'ik me, Q 3 4 20, f, 3 ff Q 5? R1 . Q f f -V Q. W iff K 13 5,1 , ,fi 's 5 fi 7 f 1 - Lb. I ff: 3 :fi - I '25 9. . I .3 .wg v 1 J Q , P 32' 3, my , 3? , JW . g 5 if sig, , ip . Q? if . V ,,, Q S if Q 2 -S' i . in ' Q1 . ? 1 wiv L5 , qw nw W- ., Ai K 71. 3 H Q1 5 452 S 5 ,5 A5 V 3 , in 1 , ' 1 P is iw , A A, . ' Q ,J .. f , is Z' " 2 2 f 4 f 4 ig K ,, , L , Q E - 5 V . , f ff i .V It 53 ? - I ,X 1 Q, ,mg 7 6 lmw-an-M Q, - . r 55' +P, 4. , Q I ff' kk P5 3 ,H 5' Q 5 5 Sv ,5 fx Q, - AQ, I W . . f ,QL ' 5 if .9 - gg, Ai 5 12 7 I 35 ' E fig, if H, B 2 4 QQ ,iw S A f Q. f 1. ff - ' ' 'R K P MSW 'M Wiixg Q: 71. Q6 EQ, f FK' - ,gi My e. y vi, ek ? Y gi Q if if 2 L 3 ,V V liz. 'Q 15 ,nm 'Sw A ,W , 355' ,s 'si Qs f 2 5-if 2 3 Q Y Exim 4551 an 735. 3, ,xi ' sw: Y 2 Q ,...ff 55, E 3 .U 2 Ea W as -:...-fb is 5, 6X if mi ,sf 59 ww-A M ww, ' ' fm W , Q M 'M -M M MLW M .L1,m,x Wg- za: , , , H-fwm,,Ym,Wm-fzm,, .f WM 1 i I E i 5, 3 5 gi, xy 3 S 'H - .MM ,,,,E-wk., K if ini .....! 3 :ii Y mmm E ' A f if ff Left to right, first row: Dr. Clark, Langevin, Dean Pflasterer, Dean MacGregor. Second row: May, Huber, G r a d d y, Matthews, Erixon, French. Waokiya Waokiya is the University of Omaha's senior women's leadership society. Women who have attended the Uni- versity five semesters and are in the upper 35 per cent of the women of the class scholastically are eligible for membership. In addition, each member must show out- standing leadership in scholarship, publications: speech, music and dramatic arts, social, religious leadership or athletics. New members are tapped each spring at the All- School Sing, sponsored by Waokiya and ODK. A spring banquet in honor of the new members and the fall tapping and special service projects are other activities of the group. Officers are Jean Bednar, president, Marcia Morris, vice-president, Betty Ellsworth, secretary and Miss Mar- garet Killian, treasurer. Left to right, first row: Ellsworth, Mrs Young, Miss Killian, Miss Holliday Second row: Rogers, Chartier, Zadina Bednar, Ackerman, Welch, Weymiller O.D.K. Winter and spring tapping ceremonies highlighted Omicron Delta Kappa's fifth year on the University cam- pus. Latest members were tapped just two weeks ago during the All-School Sing. ODK members are selected for their scholarship and leadership qualities. In January, Dick May, Dick Matthews, and Lowell Huber were tapped in mid-year ceremonies. ln May, 1955, Donald Hansen, Frank Pazlar, Chuck French, Bill Graddy, Dave Langevin, and Jim Erixon were tapped. Dave Langevin presided over ODK this year, and Dean Donald Pflasterer was secretary-treasurer. Dean Jay B. MacGregor and Dr. Edwin Clark were faculty members. I Left to right, first row: Engle, Miss Tirrell, Walters, Gimple, McDowell. Second row: Mr. Lewis, Mr. Utley, Talty, Mr. Gerbracht, Haffner, Dal- strom, Dr. Bonner, Dr. Thoman. Alpha Lambda Delta Alpha Lambda Delta is the national scholastic hon- orary organization for freshman women. To qualify for membership a freshman must earn an average of 3.5 for the first semester or first year. Alpha Lambda Delta encourages girls, early in their college careers, to maintain their good scholastic and leadership qualities. Officers for the year were Marilyn Crandall, presi- dent, Shirley Lang, vice-president, Norma McAuliffe, secretary, Marilyn Kline, treasurer, and Joan Gerry, historian. Pi Gamma Mu Pi Gamma Mu is a national social science honor society composed of members having 20 hours of social science with grade average of B and no academic failures. Thelpurpose of Pi Gamma Mu is to improve schol- arship in the social studies and to inspire social service to humanity. Officers for the year are: Shirley Gimple, president, Fred Walters, vice-president, and Arlyss Welch, secre- tary. Sponsor and treasurer is Dr. Sarah Tirrell, Left to right, first row: Kline, Cran- dall, Lang, McAu- liffe. Second row: R o w e, B e a c h, W e l I s, Anderson, M o s s, Sorenson, Talty, Winslow, Giles. 1lf'4' L. I37 ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY Left to right, first row: Goffin, McGowan, Conser, Korisko, Skarda, Guthals, Hatch. Second row: Kaus, Williams, Pratt, Hopson, Matthews, Col. Shayler. Third row: Klima, Poast, Radcliffe. Left to right, first row: Walters, Schultz, Colman, Edmonds, Caiacob. Second row: Wray, Fullerton, Pence, Capps, Storms, Daley. Third row: Marvin, Holsten, Myers, Gell, Rager, Byrne. The Earl S. Hoag Squadron of the Arnold Air So- ciety, a national fraternal organization of advanced Air Force ROTC students, climaxed the year's activities with the fourth annual Military Ball on April 22, 1955. High- lights of the ball were the presentation of the Honorary Colonel, Jean Madden DuBois and Cadet Colonel Frank Pazlar. The Sauter-Finnegan Orchestra played for the ball, which was the largest dance in the history of the Squadron. The Executive Staff . . . Left to right, first row: Conser, Korisko, Skarda, Guthals. Second row: Hatch, Means, Edmonds. ,L Fi-If WOHLIMAM it 4 Arnold Air Advisors: Lt. Col. Asp, Col. Shayler, Mai. Wenstrom and Capt. Pla ntikow. All right, boys - at ease! The Squadron held its formal initi- ation at a banquet in October. For the first time in the history of the Squadron a Chaplain was elected as a member of the Executive Council. A tour of the Strategic Air Com- mand Headquarters and a briefing on SAC's mission in the defense of our country was held on the 17th of February, 1956. It was attended by Squadron members, their fathers, and Angels. A buffet supper at the Officer's Club followed the tour. Left to right, first row: Rager, Salmon, Grant, Poast, Bertich, Jacobsen, Rokusek. Second row: Julian, Cavanaugh, Sherwood, R Nemer, Terrano, Schiltz. Third row: Swain, J. Nemer, Welch, Neuiahr, Anderson, Chamberlain, Jakobsen, Schuman. Fourth row Daley, Ames, Rasgorshek, Gamble, Hunnigan, Bennett, Campbell. Sabres The University of Omaha was named national headquarters for the Sabres at the 1955 AAS convention, placing this unit in control of all Sabre flights throughout the nation. The organization, which was originated at OU in 1953 and one year later opened on a national scale, has grown to include 40 colleges and universities. National officers are: Darrell Githens, commander, Duane Post, executive officer, John Skarda, comptroller, Warren Hopson, operations officer, and Richard Matthews, adiutant. They represented all Sabre units in the AAS conclave at Denver in March. The Sabres preformed at the OU-Eastern Kentucky replay and ushered at the Library ded- ication. The color guard is chosen from the group. Local commander is Joe Rager. Left to right, first row: Thompson, Bowley, Anderson, Bednar, Rorick, Talty. Second row: Beach, J. Palladino, Manger, Vogt, S. Palladino, Third row: Post, Olson, Zadina, M. Martin, Halverson, Vogel, Hanson, Kratky, Burns, Proffit, Bondurant, Fitl, Larsen, Johnson, Meyers. Fourth row: Haney, White, Samuelson, Jones, Gidley, Comine, G. Martin, Coleman, McMahon. A n g e F I i 9 Check those tonsils! The Angels Flight is the coed auxiliary of the Arnold Air Society. Women leaders on campus form the member- ship ofthe group. The Auxiliary holds weekly element meetings, and meets with the AAS on Sunday afternoons. The Angelettes and Angelaires performed at the Mili- tary Ball intermission. The Marching Angels, commanded by Joan Palladino, performed at the OU-Eastern Kentucky replay and the OU- Emporia basketball game. The Angels attended the SAC briefing on Feb. 17, and were guests at the buffet dinner which followed at the Of- ficers' Club. Officers are Gayle Anderson, Flight Leader, Judy Rogers, Adiutant Recorder, Marianne Bowley, historian, Jean Bednar, comptroller, Gerri Thompson, Information Services Officer, Lois Tate, Operations Officer, and Betty Ellsworth, acting Honorary Colonel. Captain John Plantikow and Major Le- Roy Wenstrom are advisors to the 45 Angels. The platoon Ellsworth's at it again! .IN 'Q Q ?f35i5QS43,gsZfs , .g.gg5gs?-sgirgz l i' V- '-ifi5ii,Mf'.: W A , V Left to right, first row: Washington, Placek, Zelenka, Kudym, Dr. Espinosa, Poppe. Second row: Walters, Longacre, Emmanuel, Flatt, Simonson, Krumins, Piller. Third row: Totilas, Lang, Wright, Osborne, Stanley, Harris, Fiellin. Spanish Club The purpose of the Spanish Club is that members may add to their knowledge and understanding of the Spanish-speaking countries and people. This is done by speaking the language, by singing Spanish songs and learning to appreciate Spanish music, dancing and literature. The group holds monthly meetings featuring movies depicting Spanish customs. Officers this year were Judy Zelenka, president, Betty Kudym, vice-president, Ralph Osborn, secretary, and Joanne Placek, treasurer. Sponsors are Dr. C. E. Espinosa, Mrs. Peggy Payne, and Mr. Seb Spagnuolo. German Club Der Deutche Verein, social German club, was formed in i952 with the aim of acquainting interested students in the ways and customs of Germany and its people. The club meets once a month for an informal dis- cussion on a particular phase of German life featuring a guest speaker who is well-versed in the area. The members elected Charles Ditch, president, Dick Daley, vice-president, Dick Horn, secretary, and Howard Larimore, treasurer. Left to right, first row: Mr. Maxwell, Daley, Ditch, Stone, Dr. Schmalz. Second row: Marling, Paige, Fullner, Storms, Claussen, Gulstead, Krummins. Left to right, first row: Blake, Foreman, Teitgen, Giles, Miller, H i b b a r d, Lewis. Second row: Holst, Olafson, Paul Geihs, Fred Geihs, Closson, Pence, Eck- strom. Third row: Herink, Fischer, O l s o n, Thomsen, Driver, Seka, S w a n s o n, Brown. The Club Rho Epsilon Rho Epsilon is an honorary organization to promote the professionalization of the field of real estate. Newly organized on the OU campus, Rho Epsilon encourages students to teach real estate as a profession, and aids research in the field. Meetings are held twice monthly, usually during the school day, and speakers active in some phase of the real estate business give informal talks. Officers for the year were Owen Giles, President, The Club is an honorary organization open to all students who have taken nine hours of upper division English and received grades of "B" or above. Members of The Club meet together once a month to discuss literature and literary criticism. Writings of members are also read and criticized by the group. Each year a picnic at Dr. Robert Harper's residence closes the year's activities. Officers this year were Jean Bednar, president, and Mary Jo Lasell, secretary-treasurer. Dr. Ralph M. Wardle, head of the English department, and Dr. Harper served as the club's sponsors. Bruce Miller, Vice-President, Floyd Foreman, Secretary, Merl Hibbard, Treasurer, and James Blake, Correspond- ing Secretary. Left to right, first row nar, Lasell, Morris, Dr Wardle. S e c o n d row ger, Wells. Third row gen, Talty, Sternhill. 'lil' Dr. Harper, Emery, Bed- Marling, Marley, Man- Walker, Gimple, Hod- Left to right, fi r s t row: Green, H e r b e s, Schultz, Nordell. Acamo, Dr. Davi- son. Second row: Marcus, Donnelly, M c G i n t y, Van Horn. Third row: Johnston, Blank, H a n e y, Kalinsky. Fourth row: Voerster, No- votny. Retailing Club Phi Theta chi The Retailing Club helps to provide a close as- sociation between the commercial world, and the student who is interested in the retailing program. Although being a retailing maior is not necessary for membership in the club, it is comprised largely of students who maintain an active interest in that field of work. At the monthly meetings top execu- tives from local business firms speak to help give the student a more practical view of the retailing field. At the final meeting each year, alumni of the club are invited to return to relate their own ex- periences in business to the members. Ray Schultz served as president of the group for 1955-56. Other officers included Marilyn Herbes, vice-president, Ben Nordell, secretary, and Richard Phi Theta Chi, professional business sorority for women enrolled in the College of Business Adminis- tration, was organized to promote the cause of higher business education and training for women in the field of business. The group meets monthly, and once a year has a ioint meeting with Delta Sigma Pi, business men's fraternity. There was a membership tea in March and a pot luck supper at the beginning of the fall semester. Officers for the year were elected at a group picnic last June. They are Marilyn Herbes, president, Carole Zentner, vice-president, Ernestine Starks, sec- retary, and Marlene Moe, treasurer. Sponsors were Leta Holley, Joyce Minteer and Verda Rauch. Acamo, treasurer. Left to right, first row: R a u c h, Zentner, Herbes, S t a r k s, Moe, Miss Holley. Sec- ond row: Stren- ger, H a n e y, Wooley, Babb, Rorick, Hill, Lar- son. Third row: Wright, Keisling, H o f f m a n n , Peters, Nelson, Scott. I44 Q 1 French Club "Le Cercle Francais" started last fall by staging a 'masquerade party at the Student Club, with decorations in a French motif and costumes of a French and mis- cellaneous nature. Another noteworthy party was the one at Christ- mas time in the Faculty Clubroom. Youngsters from Mrs. Peggy Payne's Saturday French class were guests of the Club. Janet Wolfe served as president, James Thomas was vice-president, Bob Hayes, secretary, and Doug Wright, treasurer. Mr. Michel Beilis and Dr. Oscar Budel Left to right, first row: Dr. Derbyshire, Kaplan, Bondurant, Hodgen, Bell, Dr. Marquardt. Second row: Linda, Williams, Marsh, Stastny, Fullner, Pulley, Rigatuso. Third row: Daley, Schwid, Alberts, Wright, Skavaril, Field, Rosholm. Pre-Med Club All students interested in the "healing arts" are eligible for membership in the Pre-Med Club. Members represent the fields of Medical Technology, X-Ray Technology, and Pre-Dentistry, as well as Pre- Medicine. At the monthly meetings guest speakers discuss opportunities and problems in the various fields of medicine. Officers for the year were Steve Schwid, president, Lee Pulley, vice-president, and Judy Bondurant, sec- retary-treasurer. Sponsors are Dr. Derbyshire and Dr. Marquardt. sponsored the group. Left to right, first row: Schroeder, Wright, Wolfe, Thomas, Hayes. Second row: Frost, Dun- gan, Placek, Peddicord, Kudym, Dr. Budel. Third row: Dalstrom, Mc- Auliffe, Bondurant, Moss. l45 The Women's Physical Education Club meets once a I46' Left to right, first row Gloden, S m it h, Jackson Muxen,TannahilI,Mr Gorr. Second row: Drake Miller, Butler, Baker hill, Morse, Moyer, Gallup ell, A n d r e w, Meehan rinek. in 4 P.E. Maiors To better acquaint undergraduate students in the field of physical education is the aim of the P.E. Maiors Club. The club is responsible for all football and basket- ball program sales. During the spring, a picnic is held for active and alumni members of the club. Every active member belongs to the American and State Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. A trophy is awarded to the student member of the club making the most contributions to Physical Educa- tion, Health, and Recreation. The trophy was awarded to Arnie Smith this year. Officers for the year were Dick Tannahill, presi- dent, Marv Nevins, vice-president, and Spence Roberts, treasurer. Left to right, first row: Wetenkamp, Morris, G l a n d t, L a r s e n, Barnum. Second row: Paska, B a m e s b u r g- er, B r i a n, Imig, Leo. T h i rd row: Peters, Buell, Fok- ken,Bridgewa- ter, T a I t y, Miss Schaake. "z:3 Ax- ref-1u.'x.x'il' 1 Women P.E. Maiors Hearn. Third row: McMa- Rokusek. Fourth row: Both- Trumbauer, Johnson, Ko- month to promote interest in various forms of physical education and to discuss professional advancements. An Alumni dinner, a Christmas party for a ward at Children's Memorial Hospital, and the sponsoring of a social workshop at the Benson Community Recreation Center highlight the year's activities. The Club also has annual volleyball, basketball and softball tournaments against the faculty and alumni team and is host to guest speakers and professional conventions to fill the calendar for the year. Officers are: Joyce Morris, president, Charlene Cam- eron, vice-president, Mary Ann Larsson, secretary-treasur- er, and Ruth Glant, social chairman. The club's sponsor is Miss Kathyrn Schaake. f mn1 4 rcxxss. 1 Left to right, first row: Bondurant, Leo, Barnum, Talty, Scott, Moss. Second row Mrs. Templeton, Morris, Giles, Wetenkamp, Brandes, Coleman. Third row: Houlihan, Brinlee, Chapman, Peters, Buell. W. R.A. WRA is the national women's athletic organization. The WRA board is composed of the officers and representatives from each sorority, ISA, and Un- affilated. During the year, intramurals occupy a prominent place in campus activities. Tennis, volleyball, badminton, basketball, archery, table tennis, softball, and track and field events are the maior sports in intramural play. Under WRA supervision are Orchesis, modern dance group, the Bowling League, and the Rifle Club. WRA officers are Shirley Barnum, president, Mary Ann Leo, vice-president, Kay Talty, secretary, Sue Moss, publicity chairman, and Barb Scott, intra- mural coordinator. Advisors are Mrs. MacLaren, Mrs. Templeton, and Miss Breese. l2 ' aE5 MIQHVGFW' REE! The Bowling League meets e v e r y Monday night at the 40-Bowl. Teams from the sorori- ties and ISA compete for league standings. Pictured at left is Pat- sy Halverson, treasurer of the league. Orchesis is the national modern d a n c e honorary Members participate in vari- ous dance exhibitions at lo- cal high schools and perform at an annual spring dance concert. The Rifle Club is open to all girls interested in target-shooting. The girls fire on the range every day, and those qualifying by their s c o r e s participate in varsity m e e t s against other schools. I47 Left to right, first row: Scott, Martin, Hill, Hod- gen, Vogler. S e c o n d row: Jones, Marley, Din- kel, Placek, Gidley, Ni- cas, Post, Leo. T h i r d row: Olso n, Stanley, Snyder, Bondu ra nt, Johnson, Rorick, Burns, Schaake, Talty. Left to right, first row: Ames, Vernon, Walters, Rasgorshek. Second row: Ben- nett, Holsten, Welch, Zeltin, Neuiahr. Warriors Keeping school spirit and interest in athletics is the aim of the Warriors. This past year the Warriors sponsored the Homecoming Bonfire Rally on Nov. 'IO where the Homecoming Prin- cess was revealed. On Dec. 'lO, the Warriors promoted the annual migration to Peru State Teachers College. Basketball center Stanley Schaetzle won the annual "Basketball Player of the Year" Award. K Methods to boost school spirit and attendance at athletic events were discussed at monthly meetings of the group. Officers of the Warriors were Fred Walters, president, Dick Vernon, vice- president, Bob Rasgorshek, secretary, Park Ames, treasurer, and Bob Holsten, Inter-Pep repre- sentative. Feathers Feathers, girls pep and service organization, consists of ten upperclassmen from each sorority, ISA, and unaffiliated. The purpose of the organization is to provide moral support and boost team spirit at the foot- ball and basketball games. Their uniforms are red skirts, long-sleeved white blouses and beanies with the club insignia. They support Pinfeathers, freshman pep club, and sponsor the annual Joe College dance in the spring. Sam Marasco was elected Joe College for 1955. The group is a member of Phi Sigma Chi, national pep organization. Officers for the year are: Avice Hill, presi- dent, Barbara Scott, vice-president, Shala An- drews, secretary, and Mardee Martin, treasurer. ll l ' l l Left to right, first row: Kaspar, Schroeder, Miss Bethel, Jones, Hanna, Talty, Wetenkamp, Wolfe, Disney, Smith. Second row: Bratt, Dr. Gorman, Peters, Wells, Post, Moredick, Gallagher, Stollard, Lang. F.T.A. Future Teachers of America is an organization open to all students planning to enter the teaching pro- fession after graduation. Activities this year included participation in the newly formed state FTA organization, and visits to col- leges in the surrounding area to encourage the establishment of new chapters. The group also participated in a recruitment tea early in the fall followed by an initiation tea. A Christmas party for the children at St. James Orphanage and the spring FTA state convention held on the OU campus completed the year's activities. FTA officers were: Joe Hanna, president, Janet Hanson, vice-president, Kay Talty, secretary, Marilyn I. Jones, treasurer, Betty Post and Carol Moluf, publicity, and Charlotte Stanley, recruitment chairman. Sponsors are Miss Hollie Bethel and Dr. Paul Kennedy. OU's chapter also had two state officers: Kay Talty, secretary-treasurer, and Joe Hanna, historian. Left to right, first row: McMahill, Houlihan, Stanley, Shanahan, Kline, Lindemood, Hoffman, Woita, Engle. Second row: Bevelheimer, Webb, Lewis, Meyers, Noodell, Lee, Helling, Comine, Schack. PA leed, Welch, 'e, Reinhardt, rson, Bickett, naffiliat- en. The :in elder- Joanne ...fe at ,Q .K ' -QE ,'.- ' itss f F 4 n 5 , 55-R l '--, . ,. Q I Q l l . . ""' I n ' W ' f I T .5 :rt ' l l 149 151 Left to right, first row Miller, Halverson, Disney. Second row: Hennig, Ells- worth, Barton, Anderson Larson. Third row: Krat- ville, Henkel, Byrne. '11 American Chemical Society The student affiliate of the American Chemical So- ciety affords students in chemistry and chemical engi- neering an opportunity to associate with the national professional organization of their intended vocation. A number of meetings are scheduled each year to which are invited guest speakers from both industrial and academic phases of chemistry in the Omaha area. Members of the group are also eligible to partici- pate in the activities of the Omaha and Nebraska sec- tions ofthe American Chemical Society. Officers for the year are Ross Yates, president, Lee Pulley, vice-president, Patrick Hyland, secretary-treasurer. Left to right, first row: Harrington, Hy- land, Paige. Second row: Yates, Furnas, Geisler. Press Club The Press Club is an organization for journalism majors and persons interested in all phases of journal- ism. Projects for this year have centered around applica- tions for membership in Theta Sigma Phi, professional journalism fraternity for women, and Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalism fraternity for men. Members of the club have corresponded with the fraternities and have sent information on the school journalism curriculum and practical activities on student publications. The group sponsored a convention for college journalists in Nebraska and Iowa in the spring. This was the first time such a meeting has been held on the college level in this area. Officers are Patsy Halverson, president, Sue Moss, vice-president, Judy Samuelson, secretary, Marcia Mill- er, treasurer, and Elaine Hennig, historian. Sponsors are Clifford Ellis and Robert McGranahan. f-19" , first row: Sutton . Second row: Mc :h, Schwid, Marvin 'I B ub on campus, the 955. ' the spiritual, in- 1an Catholic stu- a common union, Jdents, whenever are Frank Rada- 'esident, Ann Mc- ', treasurer. They s in St. Margaret -n Lord, and Miss , assistant pastor zhaplain. , University Players Successful dramatic productions are the aim of the University Players. The groups constitution states that it will attempt to be "first and foremost," and to assist in all dramatic productions of the school. The group also aims to cre- ate a strong interest in drama and stagecraft. A tea honoring prospective members is held in the fall to acquaint them with the club's activities, and stu- dents may earn membership points by working on the various committees as well as appearing on stage in the plays. Formal initiation of members is held yearly. Players entertain for local civic and social organiza- .. Left to right, first row: Miss Gar- retson, Olson, White, Oberdorf- er, Martin. Second row: Snyder, McCone, Martin, Bodnar, Miller, Radek, Dinkel, Jones, Garey. Third row: 0'Donnell, Jensen, El- seffer, Dall, S t e v e n, Smart, l Henderson, Kirk. Home-Ec Club The aim of the Home Economics Club is to'further professional knowledge and promote interest in the field. Membership is open to all home economics ma- iors and minors. The main project of the year was the designing and construction of Indian costumes used for the Homecom- ing princess candidates in the bonfire and ceremonies. Besides the regular business meetings the Home Ec Club sponsored a Christmas cookie sale. A smorgas- bord of foreign foods cooked by the individual members was held in February. They also entertained members of the American Dietetic Association in the Fall. Officers for the year were Jody White, president, Jean Harrington McKee and Nancy Oberdorfer, vice- presidents, Mardee Martin, secretary, Claudia Olson, treasurer, and Eleanor Engle, historian. Sponsors were Miss Margaret Killian and Miss Sallie Garretson. tions by presenting readings and one act plays. Officers were Hugh Allen, president, Marlene Hoff- man, vice-president, Jean Bednar, secretary, Paul Blau- fuss, treasurer. QI- ir? ikli' if 913' - Left to right, first row: Wetzler, Chartier, Hoff- man, Allen, Emew, Rhea, Clark. S e c o n d row: Christensen, Fleck, Hou- lihan, Burns, Claussen, Schmidt, Osborne, Kaus. Third row: Land, Meyers, Flem i n g, Dungan, Clarke, Herre, Lodwig, Ahlstrand, Nicas. f .- , Y , Watersports Club Active interest in water activities is the requirement for membership in the Watersports Club. Meetings are held twice monthly at the Jewish Community Center on Sunday evenings. An aqualung demonstration, under- water swimming with the aqualung, and life-saving practices are a few ofthe meeting activities. Canoe-swim parties at Fremont and Manawa, and an ice-skating party also kept members interested. Officers for the year were Jim Shainholtz, presi- dent, Rod Smith, vice-president, Barbara Peddicord, secretary, and George Johnston, treasurer. Sponsors are Mrs. Templeton and Lt. Thomas. Left to right, first row: Sage, Undeland. Second row: Smith, Peddicord, Weymiller, Howells, Burquist, Bourke, Davis, Micek. Kappa Delta Pi Kappa Delta Pi is an international education so- ciety for men and women which encourages high ideals and scholarship among students in the education field. Eta Omega Chapter at the University of Omaha was formed in 1953. Prospective members must be in the upper fifth of the junior class. During the past year, Kappa Delta Pi sponsored a tea for practice teachers and their critic teachers in the Omaha Public School System. Officers for the year were Nancy Weymiller, presi- dent, Jean Miller, vice-president, and Shirley Barnum, historian. Miss Hollie Bethel was the faculty advisor. Left to right, first row: Proffit, Workmen, Han- son, Larson, Engle, Blum. Second row: Wells, Bar- num, Weymiller, Dr. Gorman, Miss Bethel, Miller. Third row: Howell, P o s k a, Vogel, Talty, Mecaskey, Sweeney, Post, Dubler, Bullard. 'Z' David Langevin Editor-in-Chief Judy Samuelson Associate Editor Parker Shipley Student Life Editor omzzlzaufk Staff The staff completed work on the '56 TOMAHAWK on March 15. The yearbook covers school activities between March 15, 'I955 and this last deadline. Dave Langevin, editor-in-chief, formulated yearbook plans and guided them to completion. Judy Samuelson was associate editor. Sports editors Bob Henkel and Lew Radcliffe, and senior editor Lowell Huber mailed their sections in March. Other editors who sent their sections to meet earlier deadlines were Patsy Halverson, Greeks, Harriet Meyers, organizations, Pat Nolan, faculty, and Parker Shipley, student life. Joe Byrne, photo editor, was responsible for the shoo-ting and printing of all TOMAHAWK photos. Sue Moss wrote the copy. JoAnn White and Joanne Manger compiled the directory and Tom Dudycha supplied the art work. '.. V .,-k ,:::Mff .. i '.'. 21 .JY ,eiii Robert Wolfe f Business Manager rii' Joe Byrne Photo Editor Patsy Halverson Greek Editor , Lowell Huber Senior Editor 6 Harriet Meyers Organizations Editor Pat Nolan and Elaine Hennig Faculty Editors ,E 1 'gm' V Par X mf Hr Sue Moss Copy Editor Bob Henkel and Lew Radcliffe Sports Editors Tom Duclycha Art Editor Jody White and JoAnn Manager Directory Editors A if g.-14. ..-ff .f 'CJ -n 54 ,., w..,, F rj ,,1a+w,. 4. miie QU! , Q... - Own Wx 'gf 7 f N in V ,QL . I xx A NHNVW-Vu V .fx-f ix K 5 """1g,Kg i . F' 'M an V0.5 ,, ,fi K ,X 'AW m'k"fi:lv-sw, VK K . - , , V' V M.. ... A-A 3 , V Aw- - . v Y 1- 'fd ' 2 f R V A K is , V A Vw. ilwftf ' I 43" A 5 Ab . 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""-vMpau..,,- ' 'U , 'hp . K' vu I R f A .. . . x-,s..A,uM V s,f , , J.,,Qk-nu ,,,i an -A...,w..q, A, ,, H., N M -13:4 VV fu A W A "' ' xx., E 5 W - J by 'Ns 'Z hw. M., .gg Q. N mg'--V . - ,,, N is , .,,, ' 'L' .M VV .- N- " wwf' Vu, 'Www m'x A ,thy K N -Nawaz. A iii Q ,Wh I M., M M me , , H . M as M V...,w Q -M, Wm., N gb,sQ,, mba .-,N V . ,V u u" gg. A O Left to right: Wolfe, McGranahan, Byrne, Ellsworth, Hoff, Peterson, Miller, Langevin, Pflasterer, Debus, Rodgers, Wollard Board of Student Publications Publication advisor Paul Peterson was chairman ofthe Board of Student Publications. The board consisted of eight faculty members and five members from the student body. Faculty members were: Charles Hoff, Robert Mc- Granahan, Paul Peterson, Don Ptlasterer, Paul Rogers, Raymond Trenholm, Garland Wollarcl and Robert Wolfe. Joseph Byrne, Betty Ellsworth, Charles French, David Langevin and Marcia Miller were the student members. Some functions of the board are to elect Gateway and Tomahawk editors, to oversee publication activity and to regulate this activity. Yearbook assistants Sam Georges and Gordon Wright. 4 "We left out the Idaho game." Anthony Van Dyke visits yearbook office. al' ATHLETICS 3. 'Lv nav'- f W' , X . S -' 43. 52 Q ' gf' i kVkk.k :kk-in M... - .V f m '- 'W-qu Track Takes limelight ,Wife we-H Wgdfge i fwfr? 2 we W- mu. W '42,-"'i 5.9, if , VN , ., Q, .,., 5 Q 'if K - , ,-., V- lg. 1 nigga V 1. ,Ai ,V U. 55' 2 'its 'if W' MW,H'2g1GfQ.N4ak,vff'ifwwff -f'Ef5:L, 'DW-K' , fi 1, 'LACK'',''WT-'',Vffzilf-J-JF:-,UZ'ff-Si-':Hf1'Q"f.'1,V,, .- L f. ff'f ' " ' , .f ffyfiwjgfi :L-,-:X 3 -' I J- 1' 4 gf gg, jf ' ,, Q-,Z-,,1 s 2.7421 f. ' " ' 1 T,, , . .5 , V V if -, I fri f f" f V -y - 5-wg ?a,,f?f '1:-ti - V55 - ' , - 3 :ii -gsgzrfw -- 1 - , v W,,, ,.kV , ,,,,, ,K K , I L' t Ji fc fy! Coach Ernie Gorr Q A highly successful track season saw INDIAN track and field men win national notice, and add a bevy of trophies to a fast growing repu- tation of track accomplishments. Highlights of the season include Bob Gerdeman's Drake Re- lay 400 meter hurdle victory, Bill Barnes' 19 first place finishes in high and low hurdle events, and two new mile relay records set at the Doane and Sioux City Relays. Top row: Postlewait, Georgios, Olson, May, Jensen, Trumbauer, Hunter, Gorr. Bottom: Means, Seals, Lainson, Jackson, Anderson, R. Barnes, Piller, W. Barnes. Champion Mile Relay Team THE MILE RELAY TEAMS at Omaha U have won first place in the event three years running at the Sioux City Relays. Last spring Gerdeman, Lainson, Means and Barnes did it again. With that effort they retired the coveted Saunderson Memorial trophy. The winning time was 3:22.8. The same quartet set a new Doane Relay record for the mile relay with the better time of 3:2'l.7. Champion Bill Barnes Champion BOB GERDEMAN is the national NAIA 400 meter hurdles champion. His time was :53.2. The soft spoken track star startled a nation-wide television audience with his great exhibition in winning at the 1955 Drake Relays. Gerdeman was also a key man on the mile relay quartet that set two relay records last spring. Champion Bob Gerdeman BILL BARNES is the national NAlA 220 yard low hurdles champion. At the NAIA national meet at Abi- lene, Tex., Barnes ran the 220 in :23.6 to better the existing national record. But the time was not official because of the wind. Barnes scored more first place finishes than any other OU trackman in 1955. He also earned the most points for the team. Indian Nine Win 10 of 14 Omaha University's baseball INDIANS high- lighted a fine 10-4 season with double wins over city rivals Creighton, and Iowa foes, the Bulldogs of Drake University. Stan Schaetzle and Chris Solberg pitched seven of the team's ten wins, leading hitters were Dean Johnson, Jim Swan- son, John Welch, and John Cimino, all with aver- ages of .400 or better. Coach Virgil Yelkin Top row: Yelkin, Mayne, Hansen, McClure, Langevin, Johnson, Yambor, Morse, Vogler. Bottom: Welch, Korinek, Malnack, Steck, Schaetzle, Solberg, Helme, Cimino, Ladd. BASEBALL RECORD 5, so A '14 N- , ,, 252:'Aiia'S+ii'fy , L, X A 95 fi ,gain if "A, ,.a.M.' " ., w af OU OPPONENT 7 Rockhurst 8 6 Rockhurst 1 24 Morningside 6 17 Morningside 5 5 Nebraska Wesleyan 6 5 Drake 0 2 Iowa Teachers 15 4 Iowa Teachers 7 19 Drake 2 'I2 Creighton 9 2 South Dakota 'I 15 South Dakota 7 1 1 Hastings 0 4 Creighton 2 ei? ff ,V --.f- :'f L: ':.' -,.',, X , 1. . -- i e s r . N K A Sw x 1-+',s4"'5" ,. f. Y' " , .Y I ,eh s....f .fs M, . V Q, , ,MJ ew fvegrtff 53.92 Dean Johnson . .. . Jim Swanson . . John Welch . . . John Cimino .. Don Hansen ..... . . . Buddy Yambor . .. ... Bill Steck ..... Bob Wheeler . . Batting Averages PCT 600 500 .461 .400 362 353 339 315 PCT 288 285 255 .229 218 2 .200 186 100 Bob Ladd ..... . . Stan Schaetzle . Chris Salberg . . . . . John Cimino ... .. Warren McClure Pitching W 2 4 3 1 0 5 19 21 21 3 Varsity Win Cver Grads, 39-14 The strong Indian football team that materialized in the fall of '55 was put to it's first test when the Alumni team challenged, and fell to the Varsity 39-'I4 on May 7, 1955. Team balance, traditional single wing strength, and new found "T" formation capabilities were in evi- dence as six of Cardwell's men figured in the scoring. 17s -"X X Knight's Golfers Win 8 of l 3 Golf Team Record ,wk ' Tim X536 2 . W W, sf, sw 7 vs-M, f ww, 'Eh i' ' 7 5,'?,s,,,:'f, ' 3 cs,-A . A- E. ,i 73 SE r H wma T Coach Dick Knight KM T New OU OPPONENT 3 Washburn 4 15 Morningside 3 4Vz Nebraska IOM 4 Kansas 14 7M Creighton 4M 12 Doane 0 9M Hastings 2'A 7 Drake 9 12M Grinnell 2M 18 Midland 0 7Vz Nebraska 7'A 15 Creighton 3 'Il Neb. Wesleyan 'I i Dick Knight guided the golf team to a .667 record with 8 wins, 4 losses and one tie, in his first year as golf coach at Omaha U. Dean Wilson's 66 featured the second OU win over Creighton. Jerry Norene sank a hole-in-one in the season's opener against Washburn. N 350 T GD OU Netmen shut out 'huskers Tennis Team Record Washburn Midland Nebraska NW Missouri Creighton Drake Grinnell Nebraska Kansas State Creighton OPPONENT 'l'l 0 0 0 2 'I 5 3 6 4 .4 4, U1 t, r ae li iirrs er sf Jr , T i xiii W t F H, ff' V 3 xxi'-K1 X ffl P :-. 1 T , Y roylfl RX, TQ fmy m Ik y .1 s Coach Gerald Perry A new coach and new vitality sparked the OU tennis team before the mid-season sus- pension of two key players. The team won five and lost five under coach Gerald Perry. Mm " .askin a 1 I at . Br, T MUN, , Grid Success Continues Omaha University's powerful Indians swept past all but one foe on their nine game sched- ule to compile the second best record in the school's history in 1955. Coach Lloyd Cardwell used the dependable single wing formation with a split "T" variation to befuddle opposition. More important than the formation used though was the hard, steady play of OU's veteran line sparked by some great backfield performances by Engelhardt, Smith, Steck, and Rigatuso ln- corporated. A fired up Washburn eleven was the only team to slow the Red and Black attack. High spots in a thrill packed season were the wins over Eastern Kentucky State and Idaho State on the home grounds, and a hard fought win over previously unbeaten St. Ambrose on the road. Co-captains Frank Hahn and Simon A. Si- mon will be back at the guard posts to lead the 1956 Indians along with Little All American Billy Engelhardt. Top row Petersen Keast Gallagher Muxen Pelzer Grimmoncl Lofshult Wolenski Marv Decker. Fifth row: Rotella, Gloden, Tannahlll McClaren Benning Elliot Hunter Paulsen Mob rg Welniak Lara Wagner Fourth row: J. Cotton, Andrew, Shebuski, Moyer, Dasovic Goethe Trumbauer Chatman Anderson Nelson Hunnigan McCarclle Third row Brock, Miller, Roberts, Sage, Gibson, Leeper, DiBiase Akromis Blair Norgaard Burmester McGee Second row Cardwell Ruvolo Nevins, Welch, Hearn, Green, Huston, Harper, Coyan Cimino Engelhardt First row Smith Conrad Mancuso H Baker Malnack E Baker, Steck, Rigatuso, D. Cotton, Simon, Hahn. eve-6-40fee1,..s4J 1955 Record OMAHA OPPONENT '35 Emporia State 13 34 Morningside 0 13 Washburn 19 20 Bradley 13 20 Eastern Kentucky 13 21 St. Ambrose 7 27 Northern Illinois 12 35 Wayne lDetroitD 13 18 Idaho State 7 Team Captain Ed Baker O.U. football coaching staff: Rotella, Brock, Cardwell and Cotton. NAME Engelhard? Tcmnuhill . DiBiase . . . Trumbuuer Rigufuso . . I74 PASSING ATT COM YDS TD ...106 50 824 8 29 12 185 3 .. 10 3 23 1 .. 3 2 19 0 .. 3 I 19 0 'sa fx 1 n W, ! 52 ,if ,nun 1' , 1 5 25235 K .f " 1 , ,, . W a ii" -1' .lf--.1lw"' A '-M ,,,,.. . , .....---' s'l"m , -353 . Q Qfgkgs-f I i Q- - wr H+ ..,h ,V " we W we if 'f fi ,Naam Y QF,-N Q: ' " ..-,gpw f,M,Q. . -, .Mtn as 'G . X I 'Wiz ,Q W s, I C . -r - .Q vga. 1531 . f , ,F - .,,, ,yn 6 wr ,., . x M, ,V . aw 5 . ff x 'fiif A mf: Wy .4 is M' dw, ' M .. , A " ,L V, K ,359 ,N ' , li- ' . Q. k A V fa - K bi 4 J. f . dl Q .. M 2 ,Q ,, ,, ,K -- .,5f N, Q, ,, Q. F 4 if aywiqi. -,, 4, . ag 'aw 5, lx - . E Q "" fi .W W i Y , aff My qw-in ,. .. qw -' ,. A ,A J K 5 tm ' 4? A 6 1 '45 'L . 'QQ , , MA 95 'bn .K W . '35 7 Q ' 1 1. in iv- M! me .W .W . ... . Q. . "A WW 'OM fails, . , 'gms' 'Vf" sf. M6 'F -P489 .,E. -' . pK, WW g mg? H nr 2- A W - ar ak' xi' fgwii' A . ' It tiger. ,nf 'K ' 31 'S' Y ii , g W my 55:19, X ., .ja k . Q 'iff' 'iff Q . k f .Y J V . A ., Aff, Xivr ,Fw K .2 M Y 'Egg Q, igvf... wir, qi, ,t My D A 1 M. , J , K ' , ,, f. . H ff N ,525 Q 1' QA wk. thliff s--ag., f ,.,i,H MS. K5.w 1 if is E, AL . W Q Aw x5Z,iLw 1: H H V-Q, Qs w .guys ,f V 2 - . ' ' k gwiakmgiguf iff is I - 'vii Rf A M- . 355359. ., ' fi ' . - fr A' gf' i gg - , 3., in , as 3 'P' ', 'fwfr W ry . k ,VL' - A W- Akyk ,k4 W,4,., W g K ,. W, 'qw mvk X ?'-32 ., z - ' if N52 ,"'M ' fig H E , W Y, ,A , 0 A A . H K Af , Wg, , - W , V. . s ' , J 'L M iw. ff' Q. 1. ,. we mf- . ff if 1 f f ' sf -. ., ff' f, f , if f Q "5 ,if was K K K 5 ,Q ' M, ff gg, , 5 g 'la I 1 Q 3 K 4 'Q ,K 8. if .W ? if an ., We ' as ,X ,Q fn I . as i S W E K If QF i ' 1 - . H w V I f 4 , ' kk .Zi "k'- . ' V N F LV S K l wi: :VJ xx , .fy-. , K .W ' - ef 'fi Almost! NAME Engelhcrdt Rigufuso Smith . Steck . . Cimino . Cotton . Conrad . Miller . Leeper SCORING TD EP ....8 2 ....8 I ....419 ....6 0 ....3 0 ....2 0 ....1 1 ....1 0 ....0 0 S PTS 50 49 43 36 18 I2 7 6 2 2 in ff if' W Q I I 4, ,--. fl f""'-' .ff x A ,,X,64-5 8,751 bd J, x ,fm iv 2652 Q fx vb. 24 if Lp!! Q 1' , Homecoming 1955 Undefeated and untied Idaho State was Omaha University's Homecoming opponent. The Bengals came to Omaha with eight straight lopsided victories and the championship of the Rocky Mountain Conference. For the first time in two seasons the Indians were underdogs. At stake for Omaha was not only a football game, but a Homecoming victory string that extended back to World War II. The Indians came through with a great team effort to lower the boom on the Bengals, I8-7. OU's little All- American Bill Engelhardt led the Omaha U attack, ac- counting for 261 yards in the air and on the ground. Nineteen OU gridders saw action in the contest. Starting Iinemen Ed Baker, Frank Hahn and Tom Harper didn't miss a play during the long afternoon. The Homecoming win completed the fourth con- secutive season without defeat at home' for the Indians. mtg, . ,Wg rt 1.,. , ls. gi in ?. - . .i, 9 . 1: T' M 1 all W. Qmwy Y its at L 'tiff ii Cornell 20 Emporia 10 South Dakota 16 Drake 1 1 South Dakota 11 Cross Country-Fir t Year Omaha Omaha Omaha Omaha Omaha Triangulars Emporia 12 Drake 27 Omaha 45 Emporia 11 S. Dakota 34 Omaha 40 "A beginning." Those are coach Ernie Gorr's words describing the 1955 Cross Country season. This was the first year OU has fielded a Cross Country team, and it competed against some of the strongest squads in the area. Mel Decker was the standout Indian perform- er. The hard working senior was consistently among the top four at the finish line. For those with questions about the sport, scor- ing is like golf, the lowest number of points wins. OU was winless this season, but groundwork was laid for more participation in the sport next fall. Building year for cagers A hustling but undermanned Omaha U basketball team completed its first season under coach Jack Cotton. The new Indian mentor, for- mer Wyoming University and Denver Nugget basketball star, instilled a spirit of go-till-the- final-whistle. Sparked by the steady play of Stan Schaetzle and Dean Thompson, the cagers played good ball all year. Outstanding games by Howard Baker, Bob Sklenar, Don Meade and John Morse pulled the team through for wins in several games that the dopesters picked OU to lose. One of the brighest spots in the season was OU's suprise 62-53 win over South Dakota U on the OU court. The Red 81 Black started off with a bang in their NAIA Tip Off Tourney game against Western Illinois. The reserve strength and experience of the Illinois team, eventually tournament champs, proved too much and they won 89-65. Stan Schaetzle had the top single game performance with a 33 point night against Kansas City University. Dean Thompson hit for 29 that night, the second high single game total. Best thing about the season was the chance for a new coach to establish his style of play here. With a good nucleus for the 1956-57 team returning next season, and a promising crop of reserves coming up from Rudy Rotella's Papoose team, next yeafs team is potentially a top drawer quintet. A post-season player vote chose seniors Bob Sklenar and Howard Baker as Co-Captains. Coach Jack Cotton Mgr Glllotte Morse, Sklenar, Carlson, Raikes, Sklenar, Shields, Korinek, Schaetzle, Meade, Baker, lukasiewicz, Jorgenson, Thomp son Slekman Paulsen, Mgr. Badami. CENTER: Coaches Rotella and Cotton. A 2 wud? is av I 0 3 ,fi in X, W 'A " i3?'5f-4 , ' 1 'A 5 iQ H E i ,Eff Q g, Q I 'mam ,J?5E ? 113559 if f I Y - J' Q 1 , I f ,i sf' '5 J bl-'Q 1 5' , 3 uk ga . li I,-4 gg, 'W' gk N 1 we ff. 'Y -nt 21-al as fst L Es: ?l 4930 gm-N W , All! ew Coach A new coach took his place on the OU coach- ing staff this fall. Jack Cotton is the newest Indian mentor. He was athletic director at South- western College before coming here. OU athletes call the new varsity basketball coach a real firebrand. Red and Black rooters saw more hustle and fire in this year's cage quin- tet than has been seen in many years. The tall, friendly Montanan graduated from Denver University, prior to that he played at Wyoming. Cotton has also had pro experience with the famed Denver Nuggets. His basic coaching belief: HUSTLE! Q 5 ..,,,MN ...,4 -.iii W "9 1 QR! QSM IEE! l"'lQ-W ill! um Q 1113.4 I UIIVAR n.. 1 and FLAG FOOTBALL Pawnees Pi Kappa Alpha Theta Chi Independents Sigma Phi Epsilon P.E. Phi Beta Chi AF-ROTC Lambda Chi Alpha ,, . 4- ,v,,a M.. -wwe-,,m, 'Pkwy ...H Mi, wk- P' we time p 32. A-.. A th., an-we A mix w . . . , Lt N , V K, A if I W if A y .Q K V My f Y .,.f .,. xv- 5 . Q: .F hae ' fr BASKETBALL W L PCT Pawnee . . . . . 8 0 1000 Theta Chi .... . . . 7 1 .875 Sig Ep ........ . . . 6 2 .750 Newman Club ... ... 4 4 .500 P E Majors .... . . . 4 4 .500 Independents .... . . . 4 4 .500 Pi Kappa Alpha . . . . . . 3 5 .375 Phi Beta Chi .. ... 1 7 .142 Lambda Chi .............. 0 8 .000 This year's Intramural b a s k e t b a I l race showed marked improvement in the over all caliber of play. With former lnter-City league stars sparking many teams, games moved faster and scores were higher than they have been for several years. Pawnees took an early league lead and never relinquished it. .lack Lee, Bill Engelhardt, Dick Cotton and the Stella brothers led the way Unsanctionecl, but unsuppressible, hockey is a sport that seems to crop up each year on the O.U. Campus. This year, being no exception, hockey was start- ed as an informal activity, with irregularly scheduled games between four groups, the Theta Chi's, Pi Kap's, Veteran's All Star's and Sig Ep's largely filling the bill. The Sig Ep's, at the risk of marring a 3-year, no-loss record, have purchased a trophy and are sponsoring the first of what they will hope will be an annual tournament. March' 15th saw four of the original six teams surviving the hazards of single elimination play. to the Pawnee 8-0 record. g Theta Chi took top honors in the lnterfra- ternity division. Sigma Phi Epsilon, Pi K A, Phi Beta Chi and Lambda Chi Alpha finished in that order. ' fl- 1. I H! H - i'i' 1V 5 .j' 'fatal as Q wisp Qgiiw-an 5 2' 5 as fl 1--. WZ W f, . jx - 2?-llfw .E-Jf.f44t,5f 'f 1 JA iz' V1 T A Q v Mag 1 vw L ,.,. ..., . WM 3 P K X 411 r Q-far M- Wmbn, U , 3' ' g.,',,7v4e.,k ' 5 .f " We if, o Nm., Q mf aww K N 4 I 'H-, '12 hx my N J' H Q w if Su- AF 5?- 1'- . n Q. my v:- ,, ,-N , ,ii ,,, -wi ,cw 1"'-f' ,Fc .K 4. , ALF-'rw In V 'fans lx A 'amtsisdl i Freshmen participating in college intramurals and athletic programs concentrate primarily on learning team sports and group activities. The factor of working together is stressed. As the student progresses in years, so does training on an individual sports basis. Bowling, golf and badminton are a few of the sports which are offered to those interested in the pro- gram. Team records are kept to help increase sportsmanship and further the will to compete. Physical education director, Tom Brock, is assisted in the program by coaches Lloyd Cardwell and Ernie Gorr. ln case of inclimatic conditions, all facilities of the field house are availableffor use. ln addition to teaching the will and desire to win, is the one main objective-sportsmanship. Men Physical .um mul. Education Women A well rounded program of physical educa- tion activities keeps Omaha U coeds busy the year round. Closely allied with Women's Rec- reation Association, girls P E courses usually furnish the cream of the crop of women's intra- mural athletes. From soccer and archery in September and October, the sports program moves on to basket- ball, table tennis, and volleyball in the winter months. Spring brings activity outdoors again, and the women's athletic field bustles with golf, tennis, and softball activity. The Physical Education program for women has been expanded in scope and participation under Kathryn Schaake. This year more girls took part in more P E activities than ever before. Busy Athletic Year WOMEN'S INTRAMURAL WINNERS Golf Beverly Thoma Tennis lsinglesl Sue Moss Tennis ldoublesl Sue Moss Kay Talty Badminton Nancy Land Volleyball Unaffiliated Basketball Chi Omega Table Tennis lsinglesl Sue Moss Table Tennis ldoublesi Sue Moss JoAnn Bevelheimer Rifle Judy Bondurant Bowling Independent Students Assn. The Women's Recreation Association at the University enjoyed a year-long athletic program. More than 200 women participated in the program, which consists of tennis, golf, softball, archery, load- minton, volleyball, basketball, bowling, modern dancing, and rifle competition. The Unaffiliateol team took top honors in 1955. They won the Overall Outstanding Plaque which was presented at the Awards Banquet at the Fontenelle Hotel last spring. WRA activities during the past year include the annual Christ- mas Party at the Creche Children's Home, and the state women's physical education convention. WRA officers this year were Shirley Barnum, president, Mary Ann Leo, vice-president, Kay Talty, secretary-treasurer. Shirley Bar- num and Sue Moss represented OU at the National Athletic Federa- tion of College Women at Smith College, in Northhampton, Massa- chusetts in March, 1955. "Pass it to me, Twinkletoes W.R.A. Banquet 'Z"'w64""1""1" Margaret Killian was main speaker at the OUWI Awards Banquet at the Fontenelle Hotel last spring. The Overall Outstanding Plaque went to the Unaffiliated team. Individual awards went to Sue Moss for tennis, Kay Talty for tennis doubles with Miss Moss, Bev Thoma for golf, and Nancy Land tor badminton. Other team awards went to Chi Omega for basketball, and Unaffiliated for volleyball. hs Welcoming new officers X 1 vi Lots of pep at Homecoming. Cheerleaders School spirit remained high throughout the year mainly because of efforts of the seven cheerleaders. The squad, captained by Jean Harrington McKee for the second straight year, led student support for Indian bas- ketball and football teams. Members of the cheerleaders, who attended every home football and basketball game, were Betti Cole- man, Sharyn Heldt, Bob Holsten, Jean McKee, Gayle Martin, Judy Samuelson and Dick Vernon. "Oh, my aching back." Holsfenf Hel'-lf Und Vernon- Martin, McKee, Samuelson and Coleman. .li frm " t '- 'ff-IJ i fs . 5- 5 w Q , ' IX B s i I be jf, gl f J x , i X , J x ' I . ..-W' ' wi .f ' . , ,,,,,......-----'1 , Yi W7 This year's tenth annual lnstitute on World Affairs featured seven guest lecturers from the fields of govern- ment, international relations, history and philosophy. Professor William T. Utley of the University of Omaha conducted the Institute. The theme, "Since the Summit" concerned the Ge- neva Conference of last summer. Opening the six week lecture series was Hanson Baldwin, military editor of the New York Times. Bald- win, leading civilian authority on military affairs, spoke WORLD AFFAIRS on "The Summit and Western Security." Dr. Hans.Morgenthau, professor of political science at the University of Chicago, discussed "Germany and Western Security." "Southeast Asia Since Geneva" was the main topic of Dr. Diosdado Yap, editor and publisher of the Ba- taan Magazine. Hanson Baldwin Dr. Diosdado Yap T X Hans Morgenthau IN TITUTE Of special interest to Nebraskans were reports on the American visit to Russian farms observed and told by Dr. William V. Lambert and Dr. Gale Johnson, both mem- bers of the American group visiting Russia this past summer. Lambert is Dean of the University of Nebraska College of Agriculture, and Johnson is agricultural econ- omist at the University of Chicago. His Excellency M. Maurice Couve det Murville, French Ambassador to the United States, spoke on "France and Western Security Programs," and Dr. Hans Dr. William T. Utley Kohn, outstanding authority on today's Europe, closed the session with "The World and the West." William T. Utley, head of the history department, arranged and coordinated the Institute. Maurice Couve de Murvillel Dr. Hans Kohn EW., Dr. Gale Johnson ADULT EDUCATION The College of Adult Education, under the guid- ance of Dean Donald Emery, enioyed a highly success- ful year. More than 2,500 students were enrolled in CAE courses which afford working people, service men, and teachers a chance to further their education. More important than the record enrollment was the establishment of the Adult Education Conference Center, which is located in the new Gene Eppley Li- brary. The Center has the Deans' Offices, a lounge, a large auditorium, and a variety of seminar and "We do all this - and more." conference rooms. These rooms are available to civic groups throughout the Omaha area. The CAE also offers credit courses through a TV Classroom series. Courses offered this year were "Problems in Teaching Reading," with Dr. Harry John- son, Head of the Reading Improvement Lab, and "World Regions," with Dr. Richard Thoman, Head of the Geography Department. Coffee break. ""IY Dean Emery, a busy man during registration Assistant Dean Roderick Peck explains CAE program to prospective student , in 2 ' " i E. a O F Dr. Thoman and artist Harlan Peterson. OU Deans and faculty members were seen on the second semester WOW-TV Doors of Knowledge series. Dean Donald Emery opened the series with a dis- cussion of the CAE and the new library. Dean Frank Gorman made the first of his two appearances with Miss Frances Holliday with whom he discussed Elementary Education. Paul Kennedy joined Gorman on the next program 'For a presentation of Secondary Education. Dean Carl W. Helmstadter also appeared on two programs. He and Dr. D. N. Marquardt discussed chemistry, and he then teamed with Sylvester Williams for a program on engineering. Dr. James Peterson and music department members wound up the series with a panel discussion of their field. Dean Helmstadter and Williams plan engineering portion ofTVshow. KMTV producers help Dr. Johnson with last-minute script check. Tv Show. Dean Gorman and Frances Holliday present Elementary Education M1 ' .W Q' up vt' U7 nk 77 1:2 I . ,4 xi Z A 1 . 4 j 3 ' ah ,fb 'hi Vwf, ,J I Ai.. a-cw ik", 'W K -1 Hyswsx 1 is q- ,-nf 44 F .WV Vf . V W, , y, . , - ff Q I 'um Ik! ,M . .U .7 xi W--lag 'Mtg in., A ,sh- N W r 4: ' I. 3 Ni 31 fa W vga .- . w,,,'LfA ,R M A Nimba 9 'X v..' if 114, . .M A 4+ " iv. Y! mflvf M ' -f-fm., MW- h '4 A lv .ff GPX, Vp ' :w+ M r' , u -f A f"f.' nv' X' Q 'ev .,t,.s.q1 N, Q J' K 13, wg- , -lux X 5. 1' m . Q 4 , v Q' A 0 5' - 4 1 yi, iiiqz 35233 - K K E xl it WC'-Q 5 3,3 "' 'HQ is 0 L4 Y 1111 :ag ,.4-...S A ,114 W, R ,.. 5. 'Q J' 'H 2 ,MV W-.H 'F Mary J. Ackerman Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 1 Robert C. Adams Bachelor of General Education Ronald B. Adwers 'HDWW V Bachelor of Science in Engineering-Business Administration I'Il give you just four hours to put me down. Felicia A. 'Alberts Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Patricia A. Alderman Gayford E. Baker Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education, Maior in Physical Education Donald O. Babcock Bachelor of General Education Gayle E. Anderson Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education ,,,,,.-asm., W -if Qg . X wiv William J. Barnes Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in General Business Robert M. Barnes Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in General Business .lean Marie Bednar Bachelor of Arts, Major in English Raymond M. Beem Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Insurance 206 Shirley A. Barnum Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education And furthermore, if you vote for me, I promise .... E Nancybelle S. Beery Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Blanche A. Bell Bachelor of Science Home Economics in gf Robert G. Bell Bachelor of General Education lichard R. Bennett lachelor of Arts, vllaior in Psychology James E. Blake Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Real Estate J' ,F In X Rebecca L. Chartier Bachelor of Arts, Major in Sociology gpm, WVW Paul P Blaufuss Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Molor in General Business E 3 2 E 5 5 2 ButProfessor,I...I...I.. 15 f .. 2 -egg 1 . N' if R, f. We ' " , '52 g i S - , ,A ' ., W -, as , ' 9 'n g e ggfy F f ' f- lt. mea . ..1i 'fg.5g7:2g 5 , 'z ' Ni, 5 2,51 Y fi: 5 f QQQQQ, , , I-1, f. ,g55,g,,f5L3f .5 -Aglfy -:'va',,:p:ws ' N ' " e-wirsp i, s ,b A C 3 f Q. f--Q., iii - mil A 4, A Eg '-. f b K f iTfi'fi Francis J. Buglewicz Bachelor of Science in Engineering-Business Administration a Vilma A. Bodnar ' Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Harold A. Buesing Bachelor of Science in Business Administratio Major in Accounting nf Marianne Bowley Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 1 l 207 is IK- Dick T. Cotton Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education, Major in Physical Education y . 'W--..W.,- T. Eugene Dahlgren Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Maior in General Business 208 Francis J. Cooney Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Rodney A. Conser Bachelor of Science in Engineering-Business Administration Charles A. Christy Bachelor of Arts, Mai History 81 Govt., and Economics or in fi QQ., Barbara E. Day Bachelor of Scien Home Economics ce in Melvin S. Decker Bachelor of Science in Business Administration William Chin Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Barbara L. Deloria Bachelor of Arts, Maior in History and Spanish 'X' George R. Dillon Bachelor of General Education Robert J. Dvorak Bachelor of Arts, Maior in Speech Joann l. Elseffer Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Charles M. Ditch Bachelor of Arts, Maior in Psycholo y Betty J. Ellsworth Bachelor of Science in Home Economics and Journalism Jack F. Dodds Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 'HC' Leroy N. Edwards Bachelor of Arts, Major in Economics Davin W. Drittler Bachelor of Arts, Major in Art E. Steve Dvorak Bachelor of Science in Education Kenneth R. Ford Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Maior in Accounting Floyd D. Foreman Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Real Estate and Insurance 2lO Aleane M. Fitz Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education James B. Felton Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education I'm tellin' you Dave, we don't have to worry about the Theta Chi's. E f Lyndy L. Foulk Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Ralph A. Ewert Bachelor of Arts, Major in Natural Science Charles C. French Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Marketing Eugene M. Frese Bachelor of Arts, Major in Government Leigh R. Fried Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Accounting E. Gibson of Science in ndary Education Hazel I. Frost Bachelor of Arts, Major in Spanish L -:' ,Mists it ' - 1: , ', . .+ fm.fs,,: - 1,,,,,,jvw,wjg1 V . at .. 1 V 1 l ' H fiif?-f -X, vizsaisfft -, ef. fy - ex ,.,, if -1-1 Qs. , 'K , ., s,,h ,,,,..,g,,l,,,,, ,Lg - Ht, 4 . ,gyjigsf -fg::gSgge.!e- ,T K gf F K 4- - Ronald A. Garre Robert R. Gercleman Bachelor of Science in Business Administratio Major in Accounting nf Bachelor of Arts, Major in Biology Sixty minute time limit. Samuel J. Geor es Bachelor of Fine Arts, Major in Art James C. Gathmann Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Charles H. Geisler Bachelor of Arts, Major in Chemistry, Physics Keith R. Goffin Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Marketing Martha A. Goodwin Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Retailing 2l2 Darrell R. Githens Bachelor of Arts, Major in Speech A tap room in the new Student Unionl William L Graddy Bachelor of Arts, Major of Government Shirley T. Gimple Bachelor of Arts, Major in Economics 1 E, , .em-W fi , ., if 'Z 1 3-.fx W . ' 'til -f l - , , . . g V ,, LJ? ,af -,. 4 4 me t at 41 4 f we . 4 4 mf, fr Viicrl-Yfflwfeffiifi, ,, if -ws,a7Vcc51's -haf .. " ' 2 f.EEJifl?5.':1 V 'YV 'E - fm.. J. -mt :f .,,u..,. f 5 ' fl' . . t ' ,few Q. 4 1 4 W ,, , M A, ,..,,, 1 ., t g . Ng, ,E V ".'.'1 Q- Richard L. Graham Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Finance , 'et H 5- ff ft .. G, ,a'f?e,a. , ,G Owen A. Giles Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major in Real Estate ,Y D' , if it Russell E. Green Bachelor of Science in Business Administratio Major in Personnel Management I1 William J. Green Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Maior in Marketing' A MF' ff' Janet S. Hanson Bachelor of Science in Ele mentary Education Garland G. Griffith Bachelor of Science int Business Administratio Major in Accounting HQ? , nf Wesley J. Guthals Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Maior in Accounting W- Careful, you may lose that whole arm. Beatrice E. Hansen Bachelor of Arts, Maior in History i t Don W. Haffner Bachelor of Science in it A Secondary Education, Maior in History Helen J. Gulstad Bachelor of Arts, Major in Sociology Douglas B. Hadden Bachelor of Science in Engineering-Business Administration Kay J. Harrington Bachelor of Arts, Phyllis A. Harber Bachelor of Arts, Major in Natural Science Major in Chemistry we Roy I.. Heath Bachelor of Arts, 'S Major in Mathematics sv Q' "' 9 xfl ,.., ...,. ., , i, . , t1.fw's5'. 551. ::et"S1:Q--if ? Sl'-'saw - ,vzJ..'f Yf.s,Wf. :. - ww, -- ' . . -.vie,.::f:-,muff - ,iz-ff: -mx wma ,1- ,,. f ix: ,543 ii, 1, 5 we , . . 1- K A 1 4 l me f X T. .,,' Robert W. Henkel, Jr. Bachelor of Science i Journalism 2l4 T1 Jess W. Harris Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Accounting Sacre bleu - a two-thirds zombie. Marilyn Ann Herbes Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Secretarial Training Frank W. Hoch Bachelor of Arts, Major in Physics dl"e Marlene B. Hoffman Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major in Secretarial Training Q Ma Bachelor of Science in Ele ry Lou V. Hofmann menta ry Education Kenneth F. Johnson Bachelor of Arts, Maior in Government Bruce M. Hogarth Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Marketing Charles E. Honke Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education Better use two hands, Ken. Warren I.. Hopson Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major in General Business ' 975 ,. MN .1 .K , Leslie G. Jensen Bachelor of Science in Engineering-Business Administration Edwin H. Jenks Bachelor of Fine Arts, Maior in Psychology Lowell H. Huber Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Accounting Es 'Qs E. John Karnes Bachelor of Arts, Major in Government Dennis D. Kasparek Bachelor of Arts, Major in Mathematics, Spanish 2 l 6 Thomas C. Johnson Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Leroy A. Katz Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major in General Business Shirley R. Johnson Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Chee-ese. Philip J. Kaus Bachelor of Arts, Maior in Speech' Marilyn A. Johnson Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Patricia J. Kavan Bachelor of Fine Arts, Maior in Music Barbara C. Keisling Bachelor of Arts, Major in. Psychology l 3 fl James E. Kinstler Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Maior in Accounting '75, 'S Winn... 'Nye Richard G. Kotfer Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Jerome J. Korisko Bachelor of Arts, Major in Natural Science Kay M. Kirk Bachelor of Science in Home Economics What are you doing, Max? Paul M. Kohlmeier Bachelor of Arts, Major in Biology Walter F. Kleinsasser Bachelor of Arts, Maior in Sociology Judith J. Kloster Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education George H. Lang Bachelor of Arts, Maior in Psychology i ,fl I S W Ar A K' -'Eng t r f Al M at rrro fi 1 J ,1r. . , , TWV? ',-' ' is 1 5523, , w A f .ia-:5 v ii, Quang... ' .f::. . f 1 X "" mt., W , - A , ' Q , E David G. langevin Bachelor of Science in Journalism , 2I8 Betty J. Kudym Bachelor of Arts, Maior in Spanish William W. Kratville Bachelor of General Education The Pawnees are puttin' me up for president. l Richard J. Lambert Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Maior in Marketing Mary J. Lasell Bachelor of Arts, Maior in English '54 l. John Kratky Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in General Business Martin J. l.ehr Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Accounting Mary M. Lenihan Bachelor of Fine Arts, Major in Art Elaine I. L'Esperance Bachelor of Fine Arts, Major in Art Galen K. lillethorup Bachelor of Science in Journalism I eIidn't hear the question, Mr. Crane :Mammar- Wayne Malnack Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Insurance Robert E. Mackie Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education Esther J. little Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education Mary C. Little Bachelor of Arts, Major in Speech Rosean Marie Machal Bachelor of Science in Nursing Beniamin O. Martin Bachelor of Arts, Major in Natural Science Richard L. May Bachelor of Arts, Major in Speech 220 Laura D. Marling Bachelor of Arts Malor in English According to Judy, cigarettes will shorten your life by twenty-three years. Robert I.. Mayne Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Maior in General Business 'N Richard D. Matthews Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Maior in Gelneral Business Gerald N. McAuliffe Bachelor of Science in Engineering-Business Administration .lean C. Mathiasen Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Earl E. McCormick Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major in Accounting 'Ili Lawrence Lee McGowan Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Maior in General Business Lawrence C. Means Bachelor of Science in Journalism ,ma I, A ""'t-. -r Raymond B. Means ,rf 5 'ZR' Marilee A. Miller Bachelor of Science in Nursing 'WL BVU' Jean E. Miller Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education But I can't vote for you, Ed, I'm only a iunior. Jack E. Miller Bachelor of Arts, Maior in Government Geneva M. Mecaskey Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Bruce J. Miller Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Maior in Real Estate six! Donald A. Myers Bachelor of Arts, Major in Government and History fe- WVQ ik Donald B. Munson Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Personnel Management Shut up Jess, all I want to do is pay my Senior fees. if if Evelyn R. Moles Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Marcia Morris Bachelor of Arts, Major in English Sue lane Neff Bachelor of Arts, Major in Psychology 222 Ralph A. Nielsen Bachelor of Science in Engineering-Business Administration nlil ll Patricia H. Nolan Bachelor of Science in W tj Journalism 'N H it X Donald E. Olson Bachelor of Science in Engineering-Business Administration Robert G. Osborn Bachelor of Arts, Major in Speech Kyle A. Petit Bachelor of Science in Engineering-Business Administration David S. Raymond Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Personnel Management Melvin H. Raiala Bachelor of General Education Francis E. Poast Bachelor of Science in Engineering-Business Administration Couldn't you make me a duke or a prince? Lewis E. Radcliffe Bachelor of Science in Journalism Bette Ann Poska Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Leonard R. Pritchard Bachelor of General Education Peter P. Rigatuso Bachelor of Science in Education Judith M. Rogers Bachelor of Arts, Maior in Speech 224 Kenneth I.. Richards Bachelor of Arts, Maior in Psychology 'Ki Rudy J. Rotella Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education James R. Reynolds Bachelor of Arts, Major in Psychology I really like these field trips, Prof. .wx George W. Sader Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education Mary E. Renna Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education l 33" Clarence E. Sage Bachelor of Science in Engineering-Business Administration U' If lanet A. Schack Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education .ess vliliils "525s3?f1'f.S1 William C. Schade Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in General Business Dennis A. Schmidt Bachelor of Arts, Major in Natural Science Steven A. Schwid Bachelor of Arts, Major in Natural Science ,. Once a pledge, always a pledge. Dean T. Short Bachelor of Arts, Major in Speech -Q Robert E. Sherbondy Bachelor of Arts, Major in Sociology James D. Shainholtz Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in General Business Francis C. Scott Bachelor of Arts, Major in Speech 5 Y? ,. 'U' lx PV' Dorothy Smith Bachelor of Arts, Major in Speech Arnold G. Smith Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education The Devil and the the fire hot. Jacqueline Anne Snyder Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 226 Raymond E. Stanley Bachelor of Arts, Major in Business Administration Janet Lou Simonson Bachelor of Fine Arts, Major in Art Robert R. Sklenar Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Marketing Bear keeping Ernestine E. Starks Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Secretarial Training ,, a R ' V, . ' , ,,... V er x I, 3 William L. Steck Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in General Business Mar ie L. Strenger Bachelor of Science in Busi ness Administration, Major in Secretarial Training Rag Bac Lt. Donald E. Summers Bachelor of General Education James A. Swanson er G. Thacker helor of Science in Business Adniinistration, Maj or in General Business Q, Lois Jane Tate Bachelor of Arts, Major in Sociology Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education Am I ever glad we're getting rid of Graddy and Kratky and Munson. Richard E. Tannahill Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education Patricia M. Sweney Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Robert K. Syvertsen Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major in Accounting Winston A. Toft Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Accounting dawg 411-. Von R. Trimble Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Accounting 228 August Tieman Bachelor of Science in Military Science Donald K. Tickler Bachelor of Science in Engineering-Business Administration Would you please point out the Arctic Circle, Bill? 'Inn .gan-nit John Thorsley Bachelor of Arts, Major in Sociology 1 If x Gertrude I.. Trumble Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education John J. Vacanti Bachelor of Arts, Major in Biology Bernadine A. Vogler Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Hannah L. Wells Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education i s S E S , 2 3 2 1 3 Nancy E. Weymiller Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 229 W Curtiss O. Wood Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Accounting Dorothy J. Wright Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Major in Secretarial Training 230 H. ,ff Mn. Janet A. Wolfe Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Wesley R. Yates Bachelor of Arts, Major in Mathematics and Chemistry ' Park A. Williams Bachelor of Arts, Major in Biology Gloria A. Zadina Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education Gary E. Whiteman Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Robert C. Zimmerman Bachelor of Arts, Major in Sociology Judith J. Zelenka Bachelor of Arts, Major in Spanish l Kenny and his kicks for '56 JANUARY GRADUATES Lawrence Albert David G. Alexander Ralph W. Anderson Marc E. Anthony Joice L. Arnold David A. Baxter Norman F. Buddecke Raymond A. Carnes Clyde Conrad Darrell D. Cox William R. Cron Capt. Milton C. Davis William F. Davis Capt. Ray A. Dearth Angelo L. Dentamaro Donald J. Dunn Janice M. Ebert Stewart L. Engdahl Sam J. Firmature R. Helen Fisher James E. Forrest Audry Bennett French Ralph E. Hammer Kenneth C. Heyer Muril Leroy Hibbard Capt. William M. Higgins Joseph C. Hudak Gene E. Jordan Sylvester M. Koenigs Veston H. Mallory Kathryn B. Mangels Elizabeth Mclntosh Charles McManaman Lyle K. Meier Arthur J. Menzies Edgar F. Menzies Robert L. Morton Capt. George W. Muhlbach MfSgt. Thomas Oliver Mrs. Janet Parrett Emil Radik Sgt. Donald E. Root Lt. Col. Bestow R. Rudolph Charles R. Rullman Mabel M. B. Schroeder Joe L. Slavik Lt. Col. John Smith Dorothy Ehlers Spence Capt. R. L. Sprankle Elizabeth M. Stratbucker Patricia M. Sullivan Elizabeth Tyndale James K. Vickory Gerald Vogt Richard Westcott Mai. Carol E. Wildman George R. Wood Mai. John H. Workman Donald L. Worley Kenneth K. F. Young N me ' we sv. .H D Sometimes a man's got to go his own way John Adams Robert Alexander Mary Arentson Angelo A. Bataglia Edward Baumer Everett E. Bauer Richard Beck Kenneth L. Blizek Margaret Broggini Rudolph Brown Connie Bryan James W. Clark Janet M. Coffey Joseph C. Corey Herbert J. Cossano Harold L. Davis Don V. Digilio Mary F. Erian Joe Firmature, Jr. Mary Lou M. Gallup Ovila H. Garceau Richard W. Gerdeman Lawrence Glynn John O. Gregorsoit Diane Y. Hamsa Joe E. Hanna Thomas E. Harper Lauren Hetland Mary M. Hill Ludmilla Jelinek Paul E. Johnson AUGUST GRADUATES Richard Bullet' Patrick C. Lemmers J UNE GRADUATES Alice Jorgenson Lionel Jourdan Mary 0'Keefe Karsten Robert W. Kidd Robert S. Knicely Fred W. Lamson, Jr. Adriane Leader Maurice Lipton Janis Nielson Lustgroof Edward J. Madden Georgena L. Mardison Ronald G. Mayne Donald E. Meade Carol Lee Moluf Michael Paskevitch Elmer S. Patterson Richard E. Pulley Patrick J. Ryan Elizabeth Smith Savidge Edith B. Sautter Donald R. Shipley Robert E. Slattery William H. Smith Dale Stouder Emil L. Sulentic Patricia Sweney Beldora Tacke William J. Voerster Phyllis Mae Wasserman Joyce V. B. Weaver John M. Welch Ackerman, Mary Jane Ahlstrand, Marjorie 1 Andersen, Jane 1 Andersen, John 1 Anderson, Gayle 1 Arbogast, Charles 1 Arentson, Mary 2 Bachman, James 1 Bamesberger, Wendy Barber, Katherine 1,S Barnum, Shirley 2 Bauer, Everette E. 2 Beach, Beverly 2 Beery, Nancybelle 1 Bell, Miles 2 Bellar, Ralph 2 Bethlenfalray, Nicholas Bivin, Susan 2 Blease, Ernest 2 Blotzer, Darline 1 Blum, Carolyn 1 Bondurant, Julia 2 Braun, Ronald 1 Brereton, Maryanne 1 Brown, Joseph 2 Buckingham, Darlene Buesing, Harold 1,2 Burdick, Nancy 2 Burry, Marceil S Busse, Russell 1 Carter, Carolyn 2,5 Carter, Jean 2 2-spring semester 1-fall semester' S-summer school 1,2 Fleck, Barbara 1 Kloster, Judith 1 Pulley, Lee 1 1 2 Chambers, Elizabeth 1 Chapman, Carolyn 2 Chapman, Gayle 1 Charnofsky, Norene S Childs, Karen 2 Christensen, Lydell 1 Clark, James W. 1,2 Cochran, Janet A. 1,2 Coffey, Carol Ann 1 Coffey, Catherine 1,2 Coryell, Marlene 2 Cosford, Patricia 2 Cramer, Willis 2 Crandall, Marilyn 1,2 Crowder, Christopher Dalby, Eileen 2 Dall, Shirley 1 Dalstrom, Harl 1,2 Day, Eleanor S Dearth, Ray 1 Degmetick, Margaret Deloria, Barbara 1,2 Derry, Paul 2 Dinovo, John 1 Ditch, Charles 1 Dolan, Paul 1 2 2 Donnelly, William H. 2 Doyle, JoAnn 2 Dresher, Charles 2 Dreyer, Mary 2 DuBois, Jean 1,2 Dunaway, Gloria 2 Dunbier, Roger 2 Dworak, Phyllis 2 Dyche, Mariorie 1,S Eagleson, Beryl 1,2 Eckdahl, Elvera 2 Ekberg, Norman 1 Ellerbeck, Lloyd 1 Elliott, Janice 1 Elliott, Leon 1 Ellsworth, Betty 1 Engle, Eleanor 1,2 Erdkamtp, Sharon 2 Erickson, Eldean 2 Estrada, Suzanne 2 Evenson, Marion S Ewert, Ralph 1,2 Finley, Thomas 1 Flatt, Dorothy 1 1 Ford, Kenneth 2 Forsythe, Russell 1 Foulk, Lyndene 1 Frank, Virginia 1 French, Charles 1,2 French, Myra 2 Frese, Eugene 1,2 Galemba, Donald H. 2 Gaskill, Jacqueline 2 Gautier, Mark 2 Gearhart, Wanda 1 Geisler, Charles 2,S Gerry, Joan S Gibson, Nola 2 Giles, Myrna 1,2 Gimple, Shirley 1,2 Godkin, C. James 1,2 Gorup, James 2 Gosch, Sandra 1 Grandgenett, Amanda 1 Grau, Judith 1 Green, Russell S Gulstad, Helen 2 Haffner, Don 1 Haines, Lyle 2,S Hale, Mary 2 Hallgren, Mary 2 Halverson, Patsy 1,2 Handelman, Edward 1 Hansen, Barbara 1 Hansen, Donald F. 2 Hanson, Janet S. 1,2 Harber, Phyllis 1 Harling, Robert 2 Hart, Norma S Haury, John 2 Hayes, Robert E. 1,2 Henderson, Harry 1 Henderson, Sylvia Sue 1 Henkens, Robert W. 1,2 Higdon, Marilyn 2 Hill, Avice 1 Hines, Carol 2 Hoch, Frank W. 2 Hoff, Paul 2 Hoffman, Mary Lou 1 Holt, Marvin 2 Horacek, Godfrey 2 Hornsby, Joseph 2 Howell, Helen 2 Hoyt, Merrill 2 Hufford, Gertrude 1 Hunt, Betty S lllian, C. Elizabeth S lngraham, Robert 1,2 lnman, Ivan 2 Jenks, Edwin 1,2,S Jensen, Julia 1,2 Jensen, William C. 2 Johnson, Kenneth P. 2 Johnson, Marilyn A. 1,2 Johnson, Shirley R. 2 Johnston, William A, 1 Jones, Lewis 2 Jones, Marilyn l. 1,2 Jurgens, William 1,2 Kallander, Mary 2 Kaplan, Helen 2 Kasparek, Dennis 1,2 Keisling, Barbara 1 Kerrigan, John W. 2 Kezlan, Thomas 1 Kimmel, Betty S Kinstler, Dorinne 'S Kinstler, James 2,S Kiplin, Jerree S Kirk, Kay 1,2 Kleckner, Eleanore S Kleinsasser, Walter 2 Kline, Marilyn 2 Koenigs, Sylvester 1 Kosowsky, Annette 1 Kriegler,,Arnold 2 Krumins, Rota 1,S Kruse, Judith 2 Kudym, Betty 2 Kulish, Elizabeth S Kvedaras, Gytis 1 Lake, Richard 1 Lang, Shirley 1,2 . Larson, Janet 2 Larson, Mary Ann 1 LaRue, Wayne 2,S Lillethorup, Galen 2 Lindemood, Sara 1 Lipari, Sandra 2 Lipton, Maurice 1,2 Little, Esther 1,S Loomis, Jeanne S Loukota, Frank 1 Lozier, Mary 1 bactfffJeanne 2 Ludvik, George 2 Mader, Janet S Manger, JoAnn 1,2 Marley, Betty 1,2 Marling, Laura 1 Martin, Mardee 1,2 Mathiasen, Jean 2 Matthews, Richard 1 Mattson, Richard 2 McAuliffe, Norma 2 McCone, Diana 1 McCoy, Mary 2 McElderry, Nancy 2 McFarland, Warren S McMillan, Richard 1 Means, Raymond 2 Mecaskey, Geneva 1,2 Menard, Orville 2 Menzies, Arthur 1 Miller, Carol 1 Miller, Jean E. 2 Miller, Marilee 1 Miller, Richard 1 Moles, Evelyn 1 Moorhead, Jane S Moron, Jeanne 1 Morris, Marcia 1,2 Morrissey, Larry 1 Moss, Suzanne 1,2 Moyer, Shirley 2 Muhlbach, George 1 Nell, Larry 2 Neuiahr, Bruce 1 Nevins, Carolyn 2 Niederluecke, Virginia Oberdorfer, Nancy 1 O'Brien, Neal 2 O'Connor, Richard 1 O'Donnell, Eugene 1 Oliver, Thomas 1 Olsen, Joan 2 O'Rourke, James S Pace, Beverly 2 Page, William 2 Palladino, Shirley 2 Parkert, Gerald 1 Patterson, Elmer S Paynter, Richard 1 Pazlar, Frank 2 Pedersen, Jackie 2 Petersen, Beverly 2 Peterson, John 1 . Peterson, Ronald 2 Placek, Jeanne 1 Prescher, Vernon 1 Prochnau, David 1 Preston, Mina S Pugh, Eugene 1 2 Radda, Charles 2,S Radek, Margery 1 Rains, Russell 1 Rasgorshek, Donna 2 Raven, Jacqueline 1 Reed, Charles 2 Rentschler, Joanne 2 Reynolds, James 1 Rice, Carol Ann 1 Roberts, Carol 2 Roddy, Kimball 2 Rogers, Judith 1,2 Romberg, Thomas 2 Root, Virginia 1 Rowe, Susan 2 Rubin, Sharon 2 Russell, Amy 2,S Ryan, Patrick 2 Safar, Geraldine 2 Saltzman, Don 1 Samuelson, Judy 1,2 Schack, Janet 1 Schluter, Eric 2 , Schmidt, Dennis 1 Schroeder, Joan 2 Sedlacek, Charles 1 Shinrock, Frederick 2 Sidner, Ann 2 Simmons, James 2 Simmons, Raymond 2 Skaggs, Lee S Skavaril, Russell 1 Skudlarek, Robert 2 Smart, JoAnn 1 Smisek, Sister Mary S Smith, Harold 1 Smith, Marcia 1 Snavely, Ruth 1 Snyder, Jacqueline 1 Sorenson, Bonnie 1,2 Sotilas,Algimentis S Stallworth, Nancy S Stanley, Raymond 1,2 Stastny, Milton 1 Stern, Louise S Steven, Janet 1 Stitt, Faith 2 Stokes, Vernon 2 Stratbucker, Betty 2 Sulentic, Emil 1,2 Sweney, Patricia 2 Sweetman, James 2 Talty, Kay 1,2 Ticler, Donald 1 Toft, Winston 1 Towne, Arthur 2 Vance, Donna 1 VanHorn, Patty 2 Wagner, Joyce S Walters, Frederick 1,2 Warthen, James 1 Wasserman, Phyllis 1 Watanabe,Emiko 2 Wehrman, Nancy 1,2 Welch,Arlyss 1,2 Wells, Camille 1,2,S Wells, Dona S Wells, Hannah 2 Welna, Richard 1 Wennihan, Robert 2 White, JoAnn 1,2 Wickman, Carole 1,S Wilcox, Leonard 2 Wildman, Carol 1 Willey, Joan 2 Williams, Robert 2 Willoughby,Janece 2 Winslow, Janet 1,2 Yelinek, Robert 1 Zocholl,Ora 1 M BMJ P-N -N


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University of Omaha - Tomahawk / Gateway Yearbook (Omaha, NE) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

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University of Omaha - Tomahawk / Gateway Yearbook (Omaha, NE) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

University of Omaha - Tomahawk / Gateway Yearbook (Omaha, NE) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

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University of Omaha - Tomahawk / Gateway Yearbook (Omaha, NE) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

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University of Omaha - Tomahawk / Gateway Yearbook (Omaha, NE) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

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University of Omaha - Tomahawk / Gateway Yearbook (Omaha, NE) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

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