University of Oklahoma - Sooner Yearbook (Norman, OK)

 - Class of 1975

Page 1 of 404

 

University of Oklahoma - Sooner Yearbook (Norman, OK) online yearbook collection, 1975 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1975 Edition, University of Oklahoma - Sooner Yearbook (Norman, OK) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1975 Edition, University of Oklahoma - Sooner Yearbook (Norman, OK) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1975 Edition, University of Oklahoma - Sooner Yearbook (Norman, OK) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1975 Edition, University of Oklahoma - Sooner Yearbook (Norman, OK) online yearbook collection
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Page 14, 1975 Edition, University of Oklahoma - Sooner Yearbook (Norman, OK) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1975 Edition, University of Oklahoma - Sooner Yearbook (Norman, OK) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1975 Edition, University of Oklahoma - Sooner Yearbook (Norman, OK) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1975 Edition, University of Oklahoma - Sooner Yearbook (Norman, OK) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 404 of the 1975 volume:

1 W. N H n 41 5 4 A 1 E 1 Au - v ,-r-Q.:-2-:as-h 4:v ff, xr, wr '----- '-f-1---1 .,n...4,,-,Y,..s.-mr,-'4.k.-at-.-.-K--A - f K fr f X' 'f f K 1 7 1 X jf N P GE volume seventy-one The University of Gklahoma Norman, Oklahoma 73069 Contents 1 4 Features Sports 98 Academics 132 Residences 150 Greeks , g l Sevent -five 234 ' Student Life 260 A - Classes 302 , Organizations 360 Honors I 394 . Closing I 4 Scenes Famihar faces and prim were both. parm of the campus scene at the of Gklahuma. .A walk down the Swmuth O-val, or Van West Oval, in- cludfed such sights as Dale Hall, noted fm its dogs that portions ni the five: fmnt steps and the majority of freshmam who attended dm there. I Classes inside these waws imluded everything from philasuphy ll wonder, I wcm de'r?, to political science to and mythology. Further fm down the Owl, srmderm :passed by Copeland Hall iwhere Journalism ml-dents spent mmm oi their days? and the Education Buiwing, Gitlmger Hall held dlassm in English ranging from Black Lialeramxe to short fiction and d1ranm . Kaufman Hal!! was where foreign tongues were spoken. Languages such as Spanish, French, and Gemxan were taught here. Nei 1s-mn Hall was the place fm Ashwwamsrs--starwsimclk majmsn an-:I physics majors . . The tall, king tiff the buildings overlooked the emire Duval. Email Mamma! Libmmy was the center for numerous term papers and Wmjfents. Students could cram for test here and study halls fm athletes and some fraternities went on here. High, or rather Hall was a main at'traction, fm' business students and iumm Howard Hughesi - Un the mppusiite mis of the South Oval, one could se-2 tWhe B1o+many-Micrubialagy building and Geoiogy building for those with majors pertaining in earthinesa F'h'y1sic aI 5c2ienoe Center on Elm Street was .am example of architecture an campus. Only thing though, one a may m find the way along its co-mdorsh North' 0WB1,,NDY Farrington Quai, held the Fred Jones Memorial Art Holmberg Hail, and various ad- mmisnmim bluildings. Campus scenes with the foundations of the univefsttyk-b1uiTdings.Q l 1 I J J nfl'-Sf:---7' - 5 -W4 V -Q , M. , N rg:-.pf-'- - ,Z -, J.:-ff . ,9 --- 3 N Ji' 3.-:lf 'fT.4'f.- ' - , R1 ':"7'- l. "" ",' x A-.'f1-.-- g - ' - .l 1 1 -4- Q- 4 U . ' Q .au- .--dv' A-1, .- ,, -,R Q, f. A '1E"- -if-H . -,,,,...A . -,-lf' " ' A ??:'.f"ff'Q'f Q , ,.,f-t P-.. -if vkn , Eliza an 'Q-saw' MTH , ..,..:v- ,....V , x . .....n ...- A uJuwW,:..g1 -1 V :u hi 1 . .. arg, a I I :ml , YSQH I ' ,- ' xx AM ' . LEM - ufgi' ui 'Y V 1 -2. "xx 1 ' .-A-nuff gf - ,,Qg'w-'1'ff:- , -, 3 fy Ke,-3.11-'. ""L . 'MN " Mir aff ' ' Q5 ' 1 f-Y' 1 . -11.-..,f, -. j-'- ' K+ ' 1 ff' .yy if .. , V4 gf -.fa V f if ff. - ,, -4,-. VA Uk -Q w gr- , y ,ld- , CL,,,u,vv: r' 5j,,,gi 5:51 5 1 553' J 1jI4,.!'f '.. - ,- " .' ,qw .Q ' "4 5-g N: , 'A 'x., ' 3.. 'i O4 5- I. 351 5 A - LNQ. .,, - -axi321"n,l- 'K ., ,W V ly, , Z' A, ml, T, Q W- Q f i 'Q 4' 2.1 ',j,5 A 3 13 4. ,'.' ." -Q, "Y-1, 'v if ', :. .:',-L' ,' V Pr, gif r .gig 1 1 YN l 6,21 .N . . -3 A V . R rf .51 'LY' 4 " " ' L31 n.i?95C.T 1 " "5 i iiuu. .nit-.'f.,'. i fl 1 1 is. -. I fs ? I . ll xi? . 142 I' ffl' ff 'iii l'1r . 1 1 gl I 'fx 9 r ', if " ' 'av "'1:,,'- The NIGHT passes fast for me now. An' after dancin' out its dance undresses leavin' nothin' but its naked dawn proudly standin' ' smilin', smilin'4 turnin', turnin' gently, gently. l have seen it sneak up countless times . . . leavin' me conscious with a thousand sleepy thoughts untamed Q " ' and tryin' t' run. l think at these times of many things and many people. Bob Dylan ...X l l L if A , in f. , ill '-'lfrfa ' Ulm. W by Jackie Austin and Tim Marlow College: for some the opportunity to gain a worthwhile education, for' others a place to keep warm between high school and marriage, and for the majority of us an ex- pensive project in which blood, sweat and tears were shed for that precious little piece of paper certifying us as full- fledged graduates. The reasons we came here were as numerous and varied as the people who comprised our student body. Ask any student on any campus in America, though, and he would tell you that college was a lot more than lectures and note-taking. One thing common to all students no matter what their major or where they were from was that everyone needed to break away from the grind once in a while. Night life in Collegetown, USA served as the best example of this fact. More so, the night life was a reflection of the student body itself. Take for example that other state college. For years students there have been labeled as cowpokes and red- necks. The aggies couldn't understand why or how they latched onto this reputation. By simply looking at their town's night life one could see that the reputation was well deserved. When a hot game of horseshoes or an all-night vigil at Lewis Stadium waiting for the artificial grass to grow ranked as the entertainment for the weekend it was ap- parent where the stereotype image came from. Here at OU we have our own reputation through our nocturnal misadventures. We, too, have an image to maintain, an image that can be best summed up in one word: partying. Oklahoma's reputation for good times was as enriched in tradition as the Sooner football team with the party image rivaling the gridiron glory. Of course drinking was as much a part of college as lectures and final exams. It was a wonder that there weren't any universities bearing the names of Adolf Coors or Anheuser-Busch. Those men contributed more to the ORM v. 1 l . , 's iii' ' -.. 5 "'4' " I - W .""V- YT I ifffzitcmj 'Ri 5 "gg " I Yr n -vf 5 X N ' I im 5 I V, W 4, ini ' -A 4 ' I . . ' ' . - a 4 W fe A - I 'gk Y ZAf7lH college experience than some textbooks ever will. Oklahoma held the dubious distinction among its college counterparts as the number one frustrator of Alcoholics Anonymous. Granted, Norman night life wasn't any Las Vegas strip or New Orleans' Bourbon Street. We made the best of what we had, though. 0 Every OU student had his or her favorite watering hole. Some had two, or three or four, or the dedicated Sooners could care less where they were drinking just as long as the tap kept running. Thursday was paint-the-town night. It really didn't matter where the celebration of the upcoming weekend was held. Across The Street offered Trivia night where free beers were foamed out for correct answers to bizarre questions. The Gray Fox manned two bars for madhouse Thursday night and weekend bashes while the Jockey Strap was a favorite hangout for pool and foosball enthusiasts. One could have seen the OU jocks at their best at O'Connells' Irish Pub. On crowded nights a Sooner front line was kept busy opening holes to the bar for some fellow athletes. . Winchesterfs, the newest addition to the bar-hopping circuit, attracted a quieter crowd to its small, cozy at- mosphere. ' The Blue Onion continued to be Norman's official "night club" with live music for dancing. A visit to the Onion usually included borrowing a fake I.D. to get in and then drowning to tolerate the overcrowded conditions on the tiny dance floor. Thursday night officially kicked off the weekend, but a number of bars offered the traditional happy hours or drown nights early in the week that coaxed students away from studying. Donovan's, for example, had a special night of the week that forced students to decide between doing homework or getting shipwrecked at the Reef. By mid-semester the OU faculty was ready to erect a lighthouse on Classen to cut ldown on the number of nightly "wrecks" at the popular ar. Of course drinking wasn't the only evening activity students engaged in, although it might have appeared that N GI-ITLIFE at way. The University itself offered a variety of night time ac- tivities in an effort to surround the pasttimes with an air of scholasticism. Bizzell Memorial Library was open until midnight for any last minute research papers, finals' cramming, browsing, or sleeping that needed to be caught up on. Then there were the numerous speakers the school sponsored ranging from debates between state politicians to lengthy lectures on the sex life of the whooping crane. Functions announced in the Oklahoma DaiIy's campus notes provided entertainment such as foreign language films, Rupel Jones Theatre drama productions, University Symphony Orchestra concerts, and those fabulous Dale Hall movies where one could catch up on the current cinema scene for a mere dollar. After the flicks, barhopping, or whatever, midnight's everlastin' munchies hit with the predictability of a hangover the morning after the night before. As beer ranked as the traditional thirst-quencher for college students, pizza topped the food charts as the number one supplement to the suds. There was a ration of five pizza parlors for every single bar in Norman, or so it seemed. The city was virtually saturated with Italian diners. A drive down Lindsey Street left the impression of New York City's Little Italy. Heck, the pizza parlors even outnumbered the gas stations. The Sonic Drive-In deserved mention, too, for its pacifying effects on home-sick freshmen. The first year of college life involved quite an adjustment, especially for those from a small town. For years now Norman's Sonic has served as a comfort to lonely and depressed freshmen. The new student could put on his letter jacket or her old cheerleader's outfit and cruise through the drive-in to bring back soothing orman Nightlife .,,..a- ,f A1 4' r-.Xf 1. gf .. ff'g,f!""'?fy" l in r - ' TL' I ' 4 -i+x.xrK1 E 'f ,, wc? -47" " 7 53'l'L37 gm? ' L'--3xk4x' R .rr-Q ,gfr-'v'4jv'!y,L - rqnk .. I.. -fm ,Ye ,K ABOVE: THE MEAN MACHINE is operated by George Davis and Jay Flaherty while passing the time at the Reef. LEFT: ENJOYING ICE CREAM are Sally Barry and Terry Maulding. memories of last year's high school days. Naturally there were the typical eating places located in any city ranging from MacDonalds' to Taco Bell. What made Norman's restaurant business unique, though, and set it apart from other towns was a couple of its late night spots. When the word pizza was mentioned, the first place people thought of was Orin's. His popularity and fame resulted from the phantom photos or mug shots he took of people who visited his parlor. The pictures were run in the Oklahoma Daily with captions testifying to L'Why I like Orin's Fine Pizza." Located on Campus Corner, two doors down from the Jockey Strap Saloon, Orin's pizza parlor was just a short crawl or a few staggering steps away for wasted Sooner students. The classiest joint in town, though, that had the most talked about food around was Denco's Cafe, famous for the Denco Darlin'. lt was situated on Main Street in one of Norman's more it picturesque areas. The abandoned city bus station across the street and the passing trains riding the nearby rails added to the tiny little diner's reknowned atmosphere. A night at some town taverns, combined with certain food must have given the Alka Seltzer people the idea for that precious little stomach tablet. What could you expect after drinking and eating food with enough grease to do a lube job on a Sherman tank? Those still slightly tipsy, tried to eat their food before it crawled off the plate. Everyone then, had his or her personal stomping grounds and patronized their favorite hangouts with thoughts of good times in mind. These may turn out to be the best years of our lives. At times exams, research papers, and the daily grind of classes plagued our thoughts and often blinded us to this simple fact--at least until the weekend. "You only live once, but if you make it right, once is enough." H.G. Wells. "you only live once, but if you make it right, once is enough." H.G. Wells 1 1 ' v ABOVE: DIGGING THE BEAT are Norman night owls. LEFT: A STROKE OF LUCK is needed to beat the house. Fashion changes-taste remains by Karen Webb Fashion trends at OU vary distinctly from year to year. ln the past few years, there has been a definite revival of the 30's look. Flowered skirts fell to below the knees and tailored jackets were highlighted by wide collars and puffy sleeves. However, no matter how fashions changed, the mainstay of the coed's wardrobe was blue jeans. Yet last year trends moved away from the 'Lsloppy" jeans look. They were seen with a smartly tailored shirt, sweater vest, furry coat, or hooded jacket. As for accessories--knee socks of the boldest and brightest colors were a must! To spice up an outfit, coeds added a scarf, beads or a new stickpin to the collar. Footwear of all kinds--from silver Sequined shoes with three inch heels to brown back-to-earth hiking boots--was in style. As for men, they were seen in everything from the casual jeans look for class to the more dressy tailored suits for parties. Jeans became straight legged again and flannel shirts gained popularity. Bow ties were back in style to highlight single breasted suits of various styles and colors. Various colors were also seen in another fashion faction of OU. Foreign students many times wore their native dress to classes. One of the most frequently seen foreign dress was the Indian sari. ' Well-groomed hair was a definite asset for the windy days. Girls and guys both favored the new easy-to-care-for layered look. Rust, green and wine were popular colors. Yet during football season red and white still prevailed. While fashion trends continued to change, at OU good taste remained. Q Z 'Q W I.. F11 El' l ' .. W0 lb 1 1 . t In I a f if l l Q -Sb . "'u4 ' 'I-A 66 by Stan Tacker "Well, I didn't try to get rich, I just wanted to make a living," said G.E. Mobley, a long time Norman merchant. i'l've been in business in Norman since 1955 in the same location on campus corner." Most OU students probably wouldn't recognize the name G.E. Mobley, because they have known him for years as Gradyg the same Grady who owned and operated Grady's Grocery at 323 White Street on Campus Corner. Grady retired and sold his store this year, after almost 20 years in Norman. Grady explained that business was getting slow at that location because all of the fraternity and sorority houses moved to the more southern parts of campus. "Back when all the houses were in my location, we used to have three people working behind the counter all the time and used two cash registers." "My wife passed away, you know, about three months ago, and I couldn't do without her. I'm 70 years old, soon to be 71. She did all the bookkeeping. After we were married I sent her to college and she took bookkeeping and accounting and she was an expert on it. Boy, the way it is now, l couldn't keep up with it. You know, a little man in the grocery business practically has to have a full-time bookkeeper, and they're high, very high. The books are complicated, very complicated. They fgovernmenti add more to it every year? Grady leaned back in his easy chair and said with a laugh, 'Tm older than the state of Oklahoma. I was born about 20 miles east of Ardmore in Indian Territory in 1904. "I was captain of the high school football team in Ard- moreg as a matter of fact when I was there, we only lost one game in two years." Grady came to school at OU in 1924 where he was a member of the freshman football team. I-Ie probably remains as one of the biggest OU football fans, to this day. What was the best year for Sooner football? 'Ll think this year's team is the best ever. This team and the 1956 team are a lot alike. They were both great." I remember..." Talking about football reminded Grady of the time when he was a freshman at OU and of an observance called Freshman Night. "I remember one night at school especially well. All the freshmen football players would put on their red caps with a UV" on them and they carried paddles. We called our- selves the "Vengeance squad." After school had been going on three or four weeks, a yell would go up: 'All fresh- men outl' All the freshmen would come outside in whatever they happened to be wearing at the time, and form a big snake line that would lead them all over campus. "They stopped doing this quite a while back, because when the snake line would go through a drug store or someplace like that, after about a thousand would go through, there wouldn't be anything left on the shelves!" Has he noticed any differences in students through the years? '4Sure, Ithink the students nowadays are the best. They participate in more activities on campus. They are a lot more serious now. They study more than students used to. Back then if you studied a lot they called you a bookworm. "I guess students have a lot more to worry about now, there's the population explosion, high prices, and maybe a food shortage. Mostly they seem to worry about getting a job when they get out of school." Grady said with a sly smile, "Students now are not any 2 ,rg if ,ws ww bigger troublemakers like some people say. All students get a little bit reckless in the spring time!" Grady plans to stay in Norman in his retirement--a good place for a man with memories of students, the campus corner and Sooner football.Q .-gz' -'fy v ,f-'Z L SAMPLING SOME BUBBLEGUM is G,E. Mobley, better known as the owner of Grady's Grocery--now a legend. I-ll Z.: rf- , . QL- ml -V ,-,.vwg : d, -,,, h . . 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LEE: ?3.TfT2S,5l,?,' T?-?'i3Q'5lf-HAY" f'1:-,mil f,w'Fg-Ji gmpygg 1:1-wig-gkmldf yi,iUv:f'm,5-ufzfvgf, g.pLJf, Q :mari 2.:iPmw:,y im224zm,hqa' mf? iilmgw felhzkmcmtmgi 1:253355,jq1':1jpjfrfggQ Li .map Q famfx ,aiu 'flliwxfvf A If ' 1 I 1 W I I N w K -ni ' 1 , u..?!, i I I i N 1 a oylx i M K J Another reason the opener is generally a small show is because of the time element. "We have two and a half weeks for rehearsal," Suggs said, "'which isn't that long a time. Normally, prior to the casting, the production meeting is held in which costuming, lighting, sets, and such are discussed. At the beginning of the school year, there isn't time for that. You have to cast immediately and then start rehearsals." Behind the scenes, make-up, costumes, and food for the show took tedious effort by crew members. "The problems of families haven't changed a good deal," Suggs said, "except there is less formalism in today's society. People are trying to be less stereotyped than they were when this play was set. But instead of being free we're - ' Y ' UQ! . are n U N IVERSITY THEATR 'Fifi K. wwf J 'W' asf 41 rl J' IV -249' A7033 fc up w, it T M. M I X35 bvgmt lr 9 ,N task.: wflggii-795' F' f R -1' -Rx "Ni L1 4. 5 f H'-fs lotgrfwg, r v fe . - ,I 4 --- :1 1 '. ' ' r 5 ' QI, W.: N r , . , V I . 1 . , if 533 3 ' , ,vi i il -. . 1-vw? -P ' :sl-H. .'5H"?S':i- -J . 'l .hr 1, , --s, :ff af'-L ' . -"5 f?-1, ' Q' T I is-L, .I I-1 '1 A PIJ4' 'Q . w m .- '7' -wwf ..-.. 1 , , I r 4 . .4 - -,.2 , It .. -.kigayc-I , ...E sr-e - V ' ' 3.5-. ' 5 1,---, . . ' 1- .' ' 4- - Fw. ' J ' 1 , - 7 S4 2. My ' ,Ci -f'f'.f?2sff4-TW J' j, ' --wsN.'f--g'?':-is ff 'E-.-. ' Yrs , J V?-1:35, f 1 A, ' fc.-4g?gg75'Q,Q. r .. , s' gg:-' : ,Q -sw , -21-. cv .1 ,, , u'! 4 ' 4 . 1 f-"H .m-ff .-i'ff?' .15 , 59' it my ,ea I '-I i j I 1 . t .,. mv." 1 r -Pr: , , 5.7.35 M , J-, :if '-, .. .- A ,,,.,.'.-., 1'--. A Aw, I r 9' " ... if-A ga- . ., v .,.....,-. -gw ,fm ' - .4. W. -f V- vs.. - l X .f, 1- - ff-231'-5. .M . . ...., 541- N' W 'affff-. ' 1. IM., 1 A uf .J ., f, .Q A -1f?..- V-f".'... ,FY .4 - - '. Y. .fi-a".9'1g, necessary to establish "Life With Fathern as a period piece. ln spite of this country's belief that nostalgia is merely wide lapels, slicked back hair and '57 Chevys, a popular work of art is not nostalgic unless it brings out the sentiments of the time, preferably tying it in to the times of today. And if "Life With Father's" flirtation with the politics of the day, in a reactionary manner brought to mind the fascination the television viewers seem to have with Archie Bunker, then I suppose the production succeeded." The audiences were entertained by the season's opener though, just as they're supposed to be. "Life With Father" was a typical opener: good, entertaining theatre that can be provocative but can also be entertaining for its own worth. Perhaps that is a compromising way to conduct an entire season of theatre, but it is the only way to begin one. sf E ix ,MO ,,,,, , EASON X, S 8543 much more tethered than we used to be.' Though not wanting to sound reactionaryf, Suggs still saw sense in formalizmg Everybody in that play knew who they were," he said. Today nobody knows who they are." At least one review of "Life With Father" questioned the relevancy of the play. Suggs was quick to point out the tie- in the play had with the feminist movement of today. "The relevance IS evident with all of today's woman's liberation. Life With Father is the beginning of the decay of the family patriarch f1gure.' The patriarch figure himself, as well as some of the other artifacts of that era's formalism may have seemed unfamiliar at the least, obnoxious at the most. But it is 'f I , , Ax 1 E ' L S . , v - 1 . w f f 5 l 1 4 ' " F11 ,i E. ly -f it L i -N , l 1 l l, F f i: ' ' :Fl ' l l A 'P 2 .' 2- ' : L,- Ln E gl Ht it l ' . 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'Z 4' 1 '5 g 3' -.f t'C'As"s ' ' "5 1- ' -Qs : ' 31'z:uf-,43.,- - - .f-sf., -V -, -1 A N if tif'-sz-451-"-U' f - ' ,afijt 1 ' J fr 1' . V- ,far-.am - 42 -f 3Q,s..gaE.g-V,:il,,..- 5, - Y f- .gf 1, ' T- Vt-.Z ,3 5' ..' ., 1-s k s L are f-. tr ff s f?" - , if er? ,fi -557- 3'f 337- .,-1 3 "-ff? , 9 "" 17T1ffi?T1f':fb-1"-'f5'fff'Ef -rugs YW " .F I 1 Q IC L5 ' Ll L ' ' ! . . . , KG 1 MONEY, MONEY, MONEY seems to excite Mary Wrobleski and Debi Woolley as they sell their first ticket to Greta Schmidt. l From the House toa honeymoon: Gerald Ford by Don Huntington Political fortunes were made and destroyed in this past year of turmoil in this country. President Richard M. Nixon took a "mandate" from the people and went into his second tumultuous term as president with the clouds of Watergate over his head. Then the rains carne. In disclosure after disclosure, in- formation compiled against him until the stonewall could no longer hold back the tide. That was at 11:03 Central Daylight Time, Friday, August 9, 1974: Richard M. Nixon resigned from the office of President of the United States, only the first man to do so. With the departure of this President under seige, Gerald R. Ford became the 38th President of the United States. The Ford term is one marked by firsts. Ford was the first Vice-President sworn into office using the newly installed 25th amendment to the constitution. He then became the only President serving that had not been elected to either of the highest offices of the land. He was not elected to either of the highest offices of the land. He was not elected to the Vice-Presidency but voted in by the House of Representatives. So began the honeymoon of the Congress of the United States with "one of their own." The ex-representative from Michigan, the House Republican Leader and Capitol Hill veteran, named from the ranks of the legislative branch, had risen to the highest post possible in the American government. Leaders from both sides of the isle and both houses of government flocked to the White House to show support for their friend who was now President. Pledges of support "V FOR VICTORY", Ford salutes to the assembled Republicans of Oklahoma City, as he receives their enthusiastic applause. and promises of cooperation flowed like the waters of the Mississippi rather than the flood of Watergate. Then slowly but surely the honeymoon wore thin. In- flation was eating at the economy of the nation. Unem- ployment was on the rise. The balance of payments be- tween the U.S. and foreign nations ran further and further into the red. Then the final split to the honeymoon was announced when President Gerald R. Ford pardoned Richard M. Nixon for all possible crimes that he might have committed during the years that he was president. Public reaction was tremendous. Many felt that the President had acted prematurely. Many felt that he had done the right thing, that for a President to resign from office was punishment enough. The country was divided. Public outcry grew toward a subversion of justice. Questions arose as to how a man could be pardoned for something he hadn't been convicted of doing? How could the President do this without due process of law? But Ford stood firm. He said that it was for the welfare of the nation that he had pardoned Nixon. He said that the whole affair of Watergate needed to be buried so that the country could get focused on the needs that were more pressing and more urgent. He urged Americans to turn from the petty rhetoric of Watergate to the real problem facing the country. But debate raged on. Senate hearings and House judiciary hearings were held in order to officially discuss the moves made by President Ford. Finally Ford made his move to quiet the storm. He made an appearance before the House Judiciary sub-committee which had originally probed the Nixon- Watergate scandal and had made impeachment recommendations to the House Judiciary Committee. This committee eventually voted articles of impeachment against Nixon. This seemed to cool the debate of the pardon. Congress settled back to a routine legislative process and the President returned to trying to solve some of the problems his administration had inherited from the Nixon ad- ministration. Both seemed to be waiting for the month-long legislative recess just prior to the off-year election. The democrats seemed to be waiting for the right moment in the elections when they could spring all the ills of the country and the stench of Watergate upon the republican hopefuls and end up with a democratically dominant legislative branch, President Ford seemed to be biding his time. He wanted to wait and throw his support behind troubled republican candidates in order to swing the tone of the election into the GOP's favor. When it was all over and the weight for both sides had been thrown, the President and the republicans had lost ground. Voters had gone to the polls and elected a "veto proof" House of Representatives and had come within eight seats in the senate of electing a Hveto proof" U.S. Senate. Even in the home district of the House of Represen- tatives where Gerald Ford had been elected, voters put a democrat into that seat, a seat that had been a republican stronghold for the last 12 elections. All across the nation democrats had taken hold from the gf- 1-it HIS SENATORlAl. ASPIRATIONS riding high, Republican Henry Bellmon addresses OU law students during his campaign for re-election to the U.S. Senate. republicans. Democrats enjoyed successes they had not had since 1958 and increased their hold on the governors' houses across the land. Whether it was the stench of Watergate or the sagging economy is hard to say. It is even harder to say what the months to come will bring for the President, the Congress and the nation. Whether a republican President can work and solve real problems in the face of a democratically controlled Congress is the big question. Whether that democratically controlled Congress can promote programs that will ease the problems of the nation and still be acceptable to a republican President is another question up for debate. Only time will tell. Q QQ. 4 41, .4-9 ' 1...- i' .'. . a-aff ' f .F-iff--.-,. 5777ff-.ff -5-Tw -fr - W - if ff-ff'.fQ.f,:2525551252515 , -4 nf f 1gi.Jfl?fL :T E?cQ"5f5i"12 Tiff ' 6 Wi?-57,629.41-1 J. -3 iifiif- .12 QE: 75 , - IEQV-fggffxg riff? P5152 'ff?3"k:f'5'5'3'z 113 ini-,:.-:df-sad, 1-:Qui :fL1i..,7: FI' ' ' 1 if " ' :w'-4:wfP:f-'Sigma.-1,51-.-auf. :W 'ff'-.s ' X ,gg Y.IgM.--cQ.-ng1,'.u..,qg..114, , , ' W " 5? 533 V. . 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T3 "f'w411-gs fff-3:-if -fp 'Q14:wff.A,iw .5-1, 7 -7.1: 1. -. - H2lE:'?'iN1g'.- iff' ' ' 'f.,.- Q.: xy ' j . .Qi EL- -xa . 4 .U SW ,M x . :ff X, 73 r 1' i' -3:91.11 J., 1 Q f A.: ww-Q .pawn -mf M 1, '4 , ,f - ,Q .4421 .1 W ., .ws-' .Vg I ':j4L.3' 'Hifi ,gg . ' 9 'sam by Don Huntington Political winds of change blew across America creating a new and fresh climate for the political scenery of the nation. As the winds died down the morning following the balloting, many changes had taken place. From coast to coast voters had changed the traditional face of politics into something that remains yet to be tested. As evidence of the change, voters elected two black officials, in two state wide offices, in two different states. Voters also elected the first woman governor of a con- servative eastern state. She became the first woman elected governor not to succeed her husband. In Oklahoma change also swept into politics. Voters returned to a normalcy of voting that they had not ex- perienced since the 1958 "Prairie Fire" campaign and election of the late J. Howard Edmondson, Oklahoma's youngest governor. When the winds of political change had subsided over the waving wheat of Oklahoma a virtually unknown state representative had swept into the Governor's office of the State of Oklahoma. David Boren brandishing his "Broom Brigade" open politics cleaned out the "old guard" in one of the most lopsided elections in the state's history. Boren garnered 63 per cent of the vote over his Republican opponent. He rode into the governor's office on a platform of cleaning out the "old guard" politicians, OPPOSITE: THE RETURNS OUT, Governor-elect David Boren of Seminole gleefully addresses his campaign workers upon his November 5 victory. BELOW: WITH FISTS ROLLED, President Gerald Ford describes his future national economic program to Oklahoma City gif' Q f .nj s. cleaning up waste in government spending, and revamping of the state medical services and state corrections department. He had begun his long trek to the state house with the defeat of incumbent governor David Hall, and U.S. Representative Clem McSpadden. Hall made his showing a poor third in the race as Boren eroded his strength in the youth vote and the educational strong holds and lVlcSpadden sapped Hall's strength in the rural communities. But Boren's win in the primary had just begun his race to the state house. Boren still had to face a Republican. Jim lnhofe, a Tulsa insurance man, State Senator, and also a reform candidate, easily disposed of his primary opponent Densil Garrison. Inhofe had campaigned on a platform which included governmental reform as its main plank. He also sought to take steps into prison reform and elimination of wastes in Oklahoma governmental spend- ing. But once the votes were counted in the November 5 election Boren had become the state's second youngest Governor. He had taken the state tally by almost a 2 to 1 margin. He made even greater inrodes in the student vote of the University of Oklahoma student body by taking a 3 to 1 edge in the predominantly student precincts around the campus. Boren had proved that with hard work and an open attitude that one man could rise against the political might of the powerful "old guard" politicians and maybe set the tone for the next four years of growth for the State of Oklahoma. Q Republicans. BELOW: A GOVERNORS DESK for Democrat David Boren as he does paper work in preparation for his January move into the highest office in the state. far 22 Backpacking by Jackie Austin "I just want to be a cosmic cowboy," the words of country rock singer Michael Murphy, reflected the trends of American life-style. Whether or not every citizen was spit-shining Justin boots and slipping feathers into felt hat bands. the nation displayed a taste for a simpler, backato-nature means of existence. The transition toward this new emphasis on purity and basics was witnessed in diverse aspects of American living standards. The Age of Euell Gibbons had people stalking the wild turkey and munching on hickory nuts, as diets took on a more nutrition-oriented character. With the aid of "The Whole Earth Catalog" and the 'iFoxfire" books. gourmets chucked filet mignon for dried dandelion weed coffee and sassafrass tea. Vegetarians increased in number, and there was the birth of the health food restaurant. Granola replaced Cracker Jacks as the all-American snack. Fashion mirrored the natural trend, and clothes adopted very basic, almost drab, lines. The emphasis was on loose garments--"let your body move . . . stretch . . . breathe"-M and halter tops, caftans, blue jeans, jean shirts and flannel shirts were donned. I Women were obsessed with the "natural" look in make up, and cosmetics became transparent, translucent, earth hued, and herb-based to produce that "country fresh glow." Popular perfumes switched from femininely elusive fragrances to the nature-based scents of musk, civet, ambergris, grass, hay, roses, lemon, hyacinth, chamomile. clover, amberwood, tuberose and thyme. Hair styles were simplified: teasing, straightening, or drowning strands in hair spray became taboo. The dogma became "Don't fight what's on your head!" "Afro your hair, braid it wet, cornrow it, blow dry it, let those curls kink when you've got the 'frizzy day bluesl' 'ilust don't stifle those locks!" As its values took to the trails, so did the nation Back packing became not just a specialty sport for the ad- venturous outdoorsman, but an invigorating new means of exercise and emotional relaxation that the entire family could practice over the weekend. Backpacks. canteens, high energy candy bars and space food sticks abounded under the Christmas tree, and the mountain paths swarmed with nature-loving hikers. Weekend highway traffic was overtaken by campers, vans and buses toting escapists to the leisure of park camp- grounding and even spontaneous roadside pup-tenting. Further. millions of cyclists hit the roads and bike trails. The bicycle industry ballooned overnight as the United States. in response to high gas prices and pollution problems, readopted the bike, not only as a pleasure vehicle, but as an economical and physically beneficial transportation means. When considering music as an emotional outlet, music styles can be said to parallel a nation's or a people's emotional frame of mind And so, in America's return to the essentials of natural living. country music became popular The influence of the Grand 'Ole Opry country and western artists like Porter Wagoner and Johnny Cash became evident in the country rock and the country blues songs of artists like the Allman Brothers Band, Jerry Jeff Walker, Willis Alan Ramsey, and the Nitty Gritty Dirt band. Some musicians recycled the classics of past country and western. country blues, and country spiritual greats and came out with results such as Leon Russell's album, "Hank Wilson's Back," and Greg Allman's single, i'Will the Circle be Unbroken7" John Denver took us home to country roads, Linda Ronstadt would have rather been in Colorado, and all the easy rhythms and down home lyrics made music lover's toes tap and hearts feel lighter. The ecological crisis forced some of the increased reliance on natural modes of living. ln the post-Vietnam, Watergate-pressured, inflated, hard rock. glamour rock, switched on, hyped up Seventies, the back to nature trend in America may be interpreted as the voice of the rat-raced citizen singing, i'All I want to do is, act naturally." Q 41 -f JJFBWVU . in. Ag rf I Ll " 1, IQ I- A w3H7?L,, Q if 9 , .,., 7. H 'r '59 M ay, ,. 4. 4 Nw 9- 'fs ,swf -,FN Nw Q15 xt "N .un- 1 W1 . I .-,Q ,BP .+- .34- I ' v vvifyj , ,, ..y1 '-X. rg-v. 1 3 A, F, , .. fe .4 A 'P+ Riff ,' ' .Z 1 . -ww - , :A - X I . 1 ,AF ,w-bv. .uf-.fl A Tri-f. .134 Q- .X 9-1. -u 3 1 yf . 1' :A I X ff? -.1 . - IK sits ' :il it .sr :Mgmt favs Et The Stadium goes BIG by Lynne Persing Ordinarily, expanding a university football stadium might appear a relatively uncomplicated matter. Many other schools across the country have undertaken similar projects as football audiences continue to break attendance records and the expansion of Oklahoma Memorial Stadium is not the most expensive project OU has seen. So the project would seem an uncomplicated and uncontroversial matter. Except for the fact that it involves OU football, and more specifically, OU football seats. The passion and sometimes hysteria of OU football fans has become as normal an aspect of OU football as the Big Eight Championship. Most Oklahomans have their own anecdotes about those all-night football ticket lines or their progression from 20 yard-line seats to 24 yard-line seats in only 28 years. And there are those divorce proceedings which battled for months, not over the kids or the house, but the 50-yard-line tickets. With this type of football enthusiasm, the idea of adding 9,000 seats and some added conveniences to the Sooners' stadium at first seemed an expected result of the un- stoppable force which drives both the team and the fans. However, when the plan was announced in October of 1973, the initial cheers were followed by some disturbed grumblings. Out of this grumbling emerged the fact that many OU fans would lose their long prized-football seats. Naturally some fans were not too happy with this idea. University receptionists in various offices were kept busy ENDLESS SOONER CROWDS which pack Oklahoma Memorial Stadium for every Big Red gridiron battle were the impetus for plans for a trying to explain the situation to confused and sometimes irate callers. According to OU officials, the expansion plan involved two phases. Phase One of the Stadium Expansion Program QSTEPD included construction of an upper deck which would hold 9,000 seats, and the refurbishing of the seating area under the deck. The 1,300 seats in this "prestige" area under the deck would be equipped with chair like seats. Contributors were offered seating priorities for ten years and would be rotated within the section each year in order to share the most favorable seating. According to STEP, those people who must be relocated out of the area under the deck would be given the best possible seats in the non-priority section of the upper deck. Phase One also included the construction of a new press box, and improved and expanded student and faculty seating areas. Possible additions to the project included a "V.l.P." lounge, fiberglass seat covers and a special camera level in the press box. Phase Two of STEP would be the development of an annual donors program. Those who donate 3250, 35150 or 55100 to the Athletic Department would have ranking priority for a season ticket. This priority is in a choice area of the stadium, not a particular seat. Money derived from the donation program is to be earmarked for athletic scholarships as part of an effort to keep the Athletic Department self sufficient. stadium expansion. The excitement of Stave Davis f5J, Grant Burget 1253, and Joe Washington C245 keeps the fans coming. . D V aj' ? I, 51 C9 fr, 'PY K Y - 'Q Lf J ., . 'fuk' ' 5 "YT" 1 -f if J w 3 -4- A .J Jakub, '3 ar: N Z,-f - .4 l l .-hifi. X ABOVE: FOOTBALL TICKET LINES begin the night before sales open, with many camping out in hopes of "The 50-yarderf' But not without In addition to the protest made by some longtime ticket holders about the plan, both students and Oklahoma legislators voiced their disapproval. Some students derided the plan as proof that football is a "rich man's sport." In April of this year, the state legislature went on record as being opposed to the plan, although the legislators later agreed to support it. University administrators and Athletic Department officials defended the plan as the best way to improve the stadium and bring additional revenue into the Athletic Department. Although loudly voiced protest of the plan became quiet over the summer, proponents of the plan had not seen the last of their troubles. Delays in gaining approval for a revenue bond proposal which would help start the project caused the construction bid opening to be moved from July to September. When the bids finally were opened, the low bid was over S900,000 over the base cost of 554.2 million which had been estimated by the University. This forced administrators to rehuddle to figure a way to continue with the project. By this time, almost S6 million had been collected through the donors program. By re-examining the plan, cost deductions were made by eliminating some parts of the project and reducing the quality of some aesthetic considerations in the plan. With this obstacle behind them supporters of STEP could only hope that no more problems would arise before the project's expected completion in early September 1975.0 ,ff-ig ,I 1-armani' sie. will IM, I I.. j. Q as-UI llllp,-KW 1 , 'Qw-hi.l'.-T,-2 -,,. . .: 5--T J?" ' -:.-I .1 .-:H ,. -' 'W A '.-i f - . -D , , -ft- ,gg-ru. ' N571-c-'J--.. Q - - - " ' --4 - 2--A EEE EEE :ES sas asa was 1 4 ' 11 1 A X . .ff-., - Q. . 1 I' Ill . . ' .I."'1c.f' .., l i W. ' -Q., . w-.,,,- s f -' ' . , '-.-- . V :S I 'D ' u Fla l -. 5 .. X 4 . . '4ewg1,::Lf- " -. -I '-11' . " Txffix 'fu --r -.:1'4h4fWff' -"T r . . . . - It 4 Xkdix iii?--:Qc. "Q1q4'S'1f4.T"vi.f'r?iv1ii-2. 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" .- 'Q' Ji - 1 'l Q 1 i.r1- 5fj if g."f'..lg 'T-fig'-Ljgsef' kph j,, ' 55-T'-lf' 'Q ABOVE: A QUARTER CENTURY landmark comes crashing down as the press box of Oklahoma Memorial Stadium, long a familiar sight, is pulled to the ground for an expansion of the stadium. Norman. . . a nice place place to hide from the real world, but are there enough jobs upon graduation? t used to be a kid went to high school, got a part-time job, bought a class ring, went to college, shed the ring and emerged in a blue serge suit ready to tackle any ex- ecutive position. lt used to be that way. Really. And then it seemed that every female wanted to be a second grade school teacher and every male was a business major which caused a tiny but noticeable decrease in the jobs available. And then something even a bit stranger happened--someone discovered that women could be doctors and lawyers and petroleum engineers and that they could be pretty good at it and that caused a very, very noticeable decrease in the jobs available. Go to college-get a job At one time it was almost the Great American Cliche-- "You have to have a college education to get a good job." However, while high school counselors and television commercials were drilling this message in the public's brains, two-year technical schools were becoming in- creasingly efficient in turning out highly-skilled job can- didates. These graduates were gobbling up available jobs faster than the positions were opening while the college students still had two years of education left. Still the United States was prosperous and the problem wasn't yet that serious. And then the Vietnam war ended which introduced two more considerations that could not be ignored: the returning veterans and the beginning of an economic recession. More people needed jobs and fewer employers were willing to risk the financial capital for on- the-job training. Enrollment up-jobs down Now, with college enrollment increasing and the economic situation worsening, jobs for college grads joined the ever-increasing list of disappearing commodities in the "Shortage Seventies." The unemployment rate peaked during October of this year at a record 5.4 per cent and statisticians predict it will rise before returning to normal. How would this affect those in college now? The greatest threat was to education majors. The unemployment rate coupled with the decreasing population explained why there were now four times as many people enrolled in education in major universities than there were prospective students to teach. Grade schools were merging together because of decreasing enrollment further alleviating the need for more teachers. Strict tenure laws in Oklahoma hurt the new teachers because of limited access to new openings. Another overly-saturated field was journalism. After gaining glamor through high school yearbooks and newspapers, the mass media received public exposure in the form of almost hero-worship following its recent un- veiling of government secrets. The OU School of Jour- nalism enrollment increased 32.5 per cent in the past three years while jobs with the media decreased almost con- currently. With more newspapers subscribing to wire services and others selling out to giant newspaper chains, the journalism major might have limited success in securing rewarding employment. New jobs for teachers Perhaps the answer lies not in waiting for things to get better, but in a new concept of job organization. Com- panies such as Westinghouse and General Electric are exploring the idea of hiring teachers to instruct employees on the job thus helping the teacher overflow. Specialty employment will help the journalism major. Positions such as editing agriculture material are virtually untouched by many who are qualified. Existing job areas must be explored to find new and useful types of employment to account for the increase of productive people flooding the market. If these measures are not acted upon quickly, the situation for those in college appears very grim indeed. Q .i41, 5 lu1QaM!HLp2,,lQ',,,m m.mfM, 4m:z:.fM. W Z fm., ,. . ,ew M, M f..d,Le4J, aural K A gow 4-he de-:,Ks. 'Go +o Ku Far rw+bn 711.41005 ' ' :Ac my ,uf-I'-Lfvnfv-0'UilA.. .a,a.u.ab ffv5ff21f,5j5u'lLioL'2L7fM.9Am. "Nebr'asKas41Nks . M14 AQCLMM-Hep Mid' awww .- ,, P ON ici dc-35115. dI':x5UX'- NWC oN me de-sire. OSU Wg n,aJ1 ' wb Q, 'MW W ,irf,,,..,MMWWM n +f4.e.b4,?Je,i+Le. 'Q' -Hu -' u6'AJ,wwvu.aL,Lb,2o.., AMZOUA 'z !e' ' 'Hu' A ,Lb4,,QA,.LwAm'Ld" w-om.. .Qa4A,,au Penns-I-:Je-31 00-27 ,wwe wqphwaa Abl"L3EZ.HS11-- mawpmaaaww Wfwwzmizffwwy if MWWMML Q 194,-144-0-4,c,ou,4, ' ?hWf w7Mw:o-5 Qhbfbymi 'T-04,0-4-f7afrn.,e, ,MAI im GKLRHOMA Kee 6'TEKA5 !a'm,6k"mL W From sliding in-Yo We Gulf" by AFW Dwdwu- Mwmwamu afwfkf' MMM o.,-,,4,u,Md -. 'GRE3 'PgUiH was heke Cwho c.6YeS???J W fm A2 T1 we L, ff Q' ,QQ 55? 955,91 andazo '4,,,,,f' 77u,MM.cJuf ' kJf'Fxa,u2h.2M-f . aJ'4nl4cA. ' 0-niizdlabv, ggllbfmhwolagr of44.u47,, b,ul'f4-L IXHLLOQ-A-2641 4f0"N'- 'H-Ufu Off'-"-GU' ' ' 54-.f,w1.ctj.afvwa.LL .pubwt anus! MOKLAHQMA Wr'es+Iinj-- Maw BML vffwwfvugmwf IUI7'-l Mamma-X champs" MM J P I. E have, - H Ugreekkid reelt. '6"'0n""h'!"Vt5 'Lt' WKQML Amin' "5ororH'H65 bra ,jusl rwrseries "f':-l-OP -f-or ole! cheer leaders. " 61414, Luafu. i6 0-ubpb 771.vw,Y'fm4.g, au-e4.f,Nl4v.va.n. cwmfr WzaR'?5 X' MATZJMWMMZWHW' amy ,alfa 41. Ain ,MMLLYLMK A, 0-11.4 zany 0-L . , 2417! ,0,zLR.nf-" " Kennedy? 7b, " an hui: dvvglgerezxyou 50 We m'W+. re' . . 014-asia-L 3 UE! YYIOVQU AAJAZLYM! df-GJQ-4: O-.L " sub lov . "E e ad o+e of Je mules ycu FQPEBSST gcgje. uU Kan " vkfd' yvv 4-m-55+ in Etta E R Za' 2-:cg hy.: bb'lU2'f'e. H cagaqvf awww Lu 4, 0-Q My -- 141 had boi' one hour 706-l.l,047Lb4-4.fR,?S- u 'U-esvsgl OU Z A-0 NN: , :LB spend R-Fm Q . a,,,,,Q 0-V. 0-ng A442 a"?4,wZ,," MXCYO. 592-5, -For H' WBKQS fmt fir. 770121. -- one hour eeem MKG "God Spelled bacliwards an e'J'e"9H'Nl' H I5 SHN man"s 'Desi' Friend." ap.. AAD,-f4fc,'K't244bL,,,..'L.M'f4,Q, Cdamfn-0441--4144 444 Zap-fs-112 '- Read 6 de.sK.0 ' ' li. W3 5.1: wg 3,,WY:.1 QM: WOMEN IN SPORTS- J. .s S, 'sa'-'-wv:vresez"1r':' " I. , -5- ic, in , . - 'Q . Q, I . ', 1 v ,iw 5 . A '-131 . , Lf .JE , 1,14 1 .. ' , y 1 fr'r' A ll at U if ' 'itri 1, 'si ..:'t- v ' via ' 1' a CHALKING UP PLAYS for members of the OU women's basketball team is Coach Amy Dahl. by Lynne Persing While American women boasted victories in the national women's sports revolution, OU women conducted a quieter, more subtle sports revolution. With the birth of magazines devoted entirely to women in sports, such as WomenSports and Sportswoman, came a renewed, revitalized and widespread interest in women's sports. And while Billie Jean King was the victor over Bobby Riggs, in the most publicized tennis match in history ibilled as the battle of the sexes--male chauvinist pig versus feministl, women at OU initiated new sports programs and received funds for women's sports programs never topped in the history of the university. Health, Education and Welfare tl-lEWl also played its part in the women's sports revolution. l'lEW's Title lX guidelines, released in the summer of 1974, specifically outlined procedures to equalize women's and men's sports in every school receiving any federal renumeration. Although the not yet adopted guidelines dictated equalizing sports programs for the sexes, it did not state that women's and men's teams had to receive equal funding dollar for dollar. lt merely stated that women's teams were to have the same facilities, opportunities and proportionally the same funding as their brother teams. "l'itle IX will awaken people to the fact that women are human beings and deserve equal opportunity," Amy Dahl, OU's Head Coach for Women's Athletics, said last fall. "Title IX will help in the enforcement of reasonable funding for women's sports and this will certainly aid program development," Dahl said. OU had eight women's sports last year. Four of the sports were team sports: volleyball, field hockey, basketball and softball. The four other sports offered to women at OU included track and field, tennis, golf and swimming. HThere has been increased interest in women's sports," Dahl said, "and about 100 women actually competed on women's teams last year.'1 The women's sports program was put under the athletic department and received 341,000 for the program in 1974-75 compared to about 31,200 in 1973-74. "We do not have good facilities on which to practice," in the tradition said Dahl. "ln fact, the basketball court the women practice on was only one-third the size of a regular court. Because of the small court and inadequate facilities, Dahl was forced to limit the number of women on the basketball team as well as limit the number of women who participated in the other sports because of other inadequate facilities. "We truly don't have equal opportunity for facilities," Dahl said. "When we only draw a small crowd for our sports compared to large crowds for men's sports, it is sometimes hard to convince those who control the facilities to let us have equal time," she added. "Women can overcome all of the problems, though, by building a quality program," Dahl said. Scholarships for women were also a big item in the national sports-woman scene last year. "l can see scholarships for women in the future," Dahl said, "but if men drop scholarships, l'm sure the program won't be developed for women." Dahl was speaking of the new move to drop scholarships for college sports so that participants would play for pleasure rather than for tuition and-or pay. The OU womenis sports program had one truly mature section in its otherwise young program last year--tennis. "We attracted good tennis players at OU," Dahl said. HAS far as a win-loss record, the most successful women's team in 1974" Dahl didn't foresee a women's football team at OU in the future, but, she said,"If women want to submit themselves to that kind of torture, then I guess it's their right." So the women's sports program was getting on its feet at the University of Oklahoma. Multitudes of well-wishers and exhuberant fans didn't turn out for the women's games and meets. State, local and school newspapers didn't write many big headline stories on OU women's "teams" vic- tories. And a sizable portion of the university community continued to believe that a woman's place was in the home having babies, not on the playing field. But with the interest in women's sports making gains nationally, the trend would surely affect Oklahoma. With the evergrowing interest in women's sports at OU though, the trend apparently made its mark long ago. OU's women's sports revolution didn't peak last year, but the time was surely near. Q Wg wmit' of Billie Jean King rw A L -, , muv, ' CROSS CENTER CHAMPS pose with trophy after winning first in women's intramurals. 44 -3 in -I .. . ' ' . ,, Alix: ,Fif i 1,1 V if :L .. ,fi -i . :fp ' ' ' V' - ,- .1 -' '- Voz- N . 1 ' .. - lj ' C '23 ' V l aE':Qh1f.Pi7i1'.":':i-1.2 , ,L . ' -' -1' . li" lt 'f 'l- '4:'f?9+i353?G':'-':'- - V N f Y ' ' l if . ' b .et Gtgflie-:.-14-'2,j'.a-I-'Eu',fwz',..'i -sL'J.'1fL A- . f .:frir,, -v-.ffcf-Lv.1f-11:95.-ta-fi . .. H-fy,--q 'P' -'. .ff .C V:-wk: ,- Q-Elf:-'W l L . '- Q - gff wis . -5 i ff - X'..-'kj'??tT:.gf5.s-H5'lv3f'YfGgfn1?' , L at-1 gi .msg fig. ' l"1.z"Ll'Si,tw ,-mf. 1,:.1'.i 'iiriazrgq' f is ig . ' ' V.. ' . . . .5 ts. 'Wi 'Y , .,:fss1v:,w:.g3sr,,,,4 ,Mi V. Q.. -dw.- I' ' f ' Q , ' E . E v . , . ' l ' .Q 1 iqixiw J .J A. W . H430 BACKHAND IN MOTlON gives Becky McDonald the winning edge. i . rf' 1,' Ceriter ' ' brings Mx. 5 f'i1it1-'IBA-gwliw XJ 4fY.l'fl TN? " fbfisgll TOP: CONSTRUCTION ROLLS ON through September to complete the BOTTOM: FIELD HOUSE FLOODS are eliminated as workers seal the versatile, new tielcl house located south of campus. floor of the Lloyd Noble Center, which was built below the area water level. "' r , gi -- 1,,'fj .1 ,!,V -.M-fry A A. -H - - X - ., ' in-. - .- , - rf ggr- "Q,-"' A -1: -1-'ss-'Tr' affix? A ' ..',.1..P -35-4545 -2, A .-:.' N Y . . . , fr T A the "concert" by Walter Glover When the new Lloyd Noble Center opens sometime this year, some top entertainers will be brought in. Under consideration are Mac Davis, Olivia Newton John, Charlie Rich, Elvis Presley, George Harrison, and Lawrence Welk. Lawrence Welk? For students? Not entirely. Basically, the Lloyd Noble Center is not really intended to be a student facility. But there will be a lot of student entertainment. Donald J. Hotz, manager of the Center, is now negotiating with the William Morris Agency for a series of perhaps 10 concerts to begin during Howdy Week, 1975, Better? Besides, Hotz says that Welk is really popular on college campuses. He has packed students ini at other universities where he has played. Tentative opening date for the facility is May 1975. With luck, commencement exercises will be held there. Upon its completion the Lloyd Noble Center will become the home of the OU basketball and wrestling teams. With a seating capacity of 11,000 for athletic events and 14,000 for other events, the Center will provide a place for any campus-wide activity. It will be available to students for concerts, speakers and other activities. The Center is designed to be acoustically accurate and has its own public address system. The Lloyd Noble Center is actually an entertainment facility. It will be in direct competition with the Myriad Convention Center in Oklahoma City and similar facilities in Tulsa. Besides student activities, the Center will host outside shows such as circuses and ice shows. In con- junction with the Oklahoma Center for Continuing Education, the Lloyd Noble Center will be able to handle conventions. fs? Everything is not rosy for the Center though. It has had its problems during construction and will possibly have problems when it is finished. For example, the floor is below the area water level. It had to be sealed, and pumps installed. Also, the ceiling was designed about two years ago to use an asbestos-based material. This material has since been taken off the market. New ceiling material had to be chosen and the design changed. When the Center is completed it will have about 950 permanent parking places. This is almost 3,000 places short of the estimated number required for a full crowd. Hotz said he doesn't have a real solution yet. When the facility is occupied student fees will increase by 52.50. Ken Farris, business director of the athletic department, said the tickets for athletic events held there would probably go up. ALONE AT LAST, the old field house sits just north of Owen Field, awaiting its uncertain future. The University will have to subsidize the operation of the Center for the first three to five years. After that any profits will go into the general revenue fund of the University. t'We realize this Center could not have been built without the students," Hotz said, "and it will be directed toward the studentsf' He added that student groups will be able to use the facility for a much lower cost than outside promoters. The 35.5 million structure was made possible through the sale of S4 million in bonds and private donations. The sale of the bonds was approved by 489 students in an election in 1968. Payments on the bonds are to be made partly with student fees. The largest single private gift was one of 351 million from the Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation in Ardmore. An additional amount of ilS150,000 was given by Phillips Petroleum. These gifts were combined with substantial contributions from local business and industry and seat option sales. Q -4-'JT' The Pride of k ahoma by Cinda Cochran Brilliant red uniforms, mmf flags, and n new twirler were part of the Pride of Olclahomak new look this year. Three hundred uniforms, each costing nearly 5135, were delivered lust in time for the first lololball game against Baylor. Each uniform, n sitamzlard MOU Red," has .al while "O" on top of a black HO" to provide a three-dirnensional affeci. A scroll spelling "Oklahoma" splits the MO" horizontally on the white front of the jacket. A reversible reel-and-while cle buttons onto the shoulders. The pants are enhanced with a whiie stripe clown the outside oil the leg. The old., traditional furry shakes were replncecl hy red, modified plllbmi hats and while nlumes. 'The uniforms were designed tu look good and to last," hand director Gene Thrailkill said. There is only one watch pocket and jusi four buttons on the wma! uniform. In previous years, the pockets at the sides tended in gape open and spoil the line of the uniform, and buttons con- stantly fell off and had to he ln len years the unilorrns should look like new except for the expected wear and tear. Seven to ten years is the lile expectancy of an average uniform, and the old uniform-s had been worn nine. Private donors paid about lm the new unilomns, as no state funds were used. Most clonofrs gave 3160, the elxpelctecl cost el the unlfiimns. Yet the band rllri nm buy rain gear, lowering the co-sl. A new flag rank of 16 women was added this year. They cam: red-on-white flags, wearing. regular band jacllcets, red shorts, and white knee-high Thraillcill plans to expand the flag rank to 24 women as soon as poisilzrle. feature twirler Pam Martin ioine the Pride as well. She twirls with up to four batoms and has w-on more than 500 awards and over 50 majcxr titles She was victorious at the 1973 Olympics of twirling in Malga, Spain and was also named the 1973 lnterna1lonalTwirlerafthfe Year in Rome, Italy. The Pricle itself changed this year, the size of 'the band increasing from 224 last year for 254 for 1974. The black, or people who regulalrly march in the halftime show, in- creased from 192 to 214. Thrilled by the many mhnnges, the Pride of Oklahoma has a new sense of spirit and looks. forward to, as one member pint it, "more of the same, but better." ABOVE WITH CHEST OUT a headless band member displays, lhe lzrimanz, new unilmms which have given the Pride a- new look. RlGHTi BATONS UF MM3lC spin in the hands of rfhampinniship tfwnler Pam Marlin, as she leads the Pride in drills ourisidle fha stadium. Q1 L - Yvh F ,Nf- W4 V rx!! .' -2 .1 -. 1 'll sae SQ? by Tim Marlow It's a combination of New 'Y'ear's Eve, Mardi Gras, and your twenty-first birthday all rolled into one. lt's an 18-year-old's paradise--liquor by the drink. lt's a time when Big D no longer stands for Big Dallas, but rather Big Drunk. lt's the grand-daddy of good times, THE party of parties. lt's Dallas weekend. What started years ago as an innocent pep rally in downtown Dallas prior to the annual OU-Texas clash has since evolved into one of the most renowned and historic celebrations in this part of the country. All the wild merrymaking revolved around the traditional grudge match between the Sooners and the Longhorns--or so it seemed. As the partying dragged on into the wee hours of the weekend, though, it made little difference whether you were an Okie, a Texan, or a Notre Dame fan. All that was important was that everyone had a good time. Preparations for this annual extravaganza began early in September when football tickets went on sale. A Texas ticket was always a precious item, but with OU on probation and thus banned from television, the Dallas ducats were more sought after than ever before. According to the number of "senior" students who bought football tickets the first day of sales fwith senior fee receipts that were necessaryl, OU must have had the largest graduating class in the country. Usually the fresh- man class got left out of buying the tickets. This past fall the juniors were considered lucky if they squandered an endzone seat. As the date drew near for the big shootout in the Cotton Bowl, an air of complacency seemed to engulf the campus. The fact that the Sooners had beaten Texas the past three years plus the way OU had polished off its first three opponents must have had something to do with it. Whatever the reasons were, the Red River rivalry didn't generate as much pre-game enthusiasm and excitement throughout the student body as in the past. Sure, there were the traditional pre-Dally rallies, the Thursday night pep rally prior to the mass exodus on Friday, and the annual Run to Dallas for the March of Dimes. . . . parties and hangovers and traffic and OOM-PAHED OUT, tired members of The'Pride of Oklahoma Band, rest outside The Cotton Bowl after the game. crowds and screaming The majority of fans had already decided the outcome of the Saturday afternoon bout and were relishing a victory before the opening kickoff. The big question was just how bad OU would demolish the Texas team. Dallas weekend officially kicked off Friday afternoon as a good part of the student body blew off classes and began the annual migration southward. Every size, shape, and style of transportation flooded Interstate-35 for the journey across the Red River. If students timed it just right, they hit Big D during five o'clock rush hour traffic and experienced the trials and tribulations of life in the big city. Battling the bumper-to- bumper traffic served as a good lesson in maneuvering techniques that could be used that night. Take away the Oklahoma license plates, the OU ban- ners, and bumper stickets and one could still pick out the Okie autos roaming the streets of Dallas. They were the cars that stopped at every other gas station and asked for directions. The passengers' heads in the cars were constantly swivelling in 90 degree arches in searching for street signs, noted landmarks, ,or anything else that might give them a clue as to where they were. Getting lost in Dallas was as much a part of Texas weekend as the all-night parties. However, if our ancestors would have had our sense of directions during the land run of 1889, Norman would be located some place in Wyoming. w A W, QM .i. tr , 1 'HGV-els l x Q Xl-' .i. il . ij T it,t T i. xt TICKETS WERE PRICELESS and hard to find, dramatized by the many signs bobbing outside the stadium in Dallas. and tired feet . . . There wasn't any problem finding the center of action Friday night, though. All one had to do was listen for the blaring horns echoing off the downtown skyscrapers and follow the steady stream of cars pouring into the Com- merce and Akard street intersection. That was the stage for the yearly celebration, the party as big as the Lone Star State itself, the pot of gold at the end of every rainbow. The Commerce Street celebration lived up to its reputation of past parties as thousands of spirited fans took to the streets of Dallas on foot or by car to cheer for their respective teams. The pomp and pandimonium that surrounded the carnival-like atmosphere was loved by all. Well, just about all. For police officers and law enforcement officials, Dallas weekend was nothing short of a perfect nightmare. Fans attending the street celebration for the first time were amazed at the number of police decked out in riot gear patrolling downtown Dallas. There's usually a direct ratio between the amount of beer and booze consumed the night before and the sale of Alka- seltzers on Saturday morning. This time was no different. It never failed. There was always a wife, girlfriend, or date for the weekend that was just dying to go to the Texas State Fair prior to the Cotton Bowl clash. Or if there was no one nagging you to take them, you simply went anyway just because everyone else did. The fair was indeed as much a part of Dallas weekend as the Friday night street party. T:-T' 'UT 2 J ia -ae' 14 TOP: THE FUMBLE RECOVERY that led to Tony DiRienzo's winning field goal in the OU-Texas clash is caused by Rod Shoate C43l. ' ' Ul ...and the Texas Fair and oh yes, Football! The Texas fair was unique, though. It had all the ingredients of a typical state fair, ranging from the midway attractions to the freak shows. Its distinguishing feature, however, was its enormous size. After walking around the fair grounds, most of the early Sooner fans would testify that they covered as much land as was in Norman. When the 1:00 p.m. kickoff time rolled around, OU fans were more than ready to take their seats and watch their number two nationally ranked team punish the Steers. Oklahoma fans would have laughed if someone had told them that OU's victory on the gridiron would be as close as the school's margin of victory in the annual Run to Dallas. The OU chapters of Delta Upsilon fraternity and Alpha Chi Omega sorority edged their Texas counterparts by a mere S300 in their ZOO-mile run to raise money for the March of Dimes. On the gridiron things were to be different. The Sooners were picked as 21 point favorites. Point spreads, though are for bookies and gamblers, not football teams. Jimmy the Greek and friends as well as OU fans failed to take note that anything can happen when OU plays Texas. Head Coach Barry Switzer spent all week telling everyone how tough the game would be. His troops knew it would be a bloody battle. In the end it was the Sooner fans who were the most surprised by the game's result. Oklahomans had just started their partying in the stands when the Big Red fumbled away a sure touchdown early in the game. That was only the beginning of a long afternoon for OU's potent offense. "BE TRUE BLUE to your school," persuades a peddler of the old school pennants, buttons, ribbons. Wonder who he's for? till i X hm rw 7 MIDWAY MANIA STRIKES as Sooner fans get sidetracked enroute to the Cotton Bowl shootout between OU and Texas. Inspired and encouraged by the Sooner's mistakes, the Longhorns led for three quarters. The OU defense was as overworked as the Dallas police on Friday night. The chant "Dee-fense, Dee-fense" roared from the OU student body throughout most of the game. The Sooner fortress withstood all tests, though, and proved to be the decisive factor. Linebacker Rod Shoate was the workhorse of the Big Red defenders despite playing the entire second half with a sprained shoulder which denied him full use of his arm. Mr. Defense branded that No. 43 on the hides of Longhorn running backs all afternoon. Shoate was the epitome of the OU desire and en- thusiasm that overcame the inspirational play of the proud Texans. He made 25 tackles, broke up two passes, caused a fumble, and recovered another loose ball. That was with one arm. Texas was afraid to think what he might have done if he had both arms the whole game. It was only fitting that Shoate recovered the Texas fumble that led to the Sooner's winning TD. Moments later, tiny Tony DiRienzo booted a 37-yard field goal to give OU its 16-13 margin with just over five minutes left on the scoreboard. The game will go down in the record books as one of the classic cliffhangers of all time. It was a traumatic, nerve-wracking experience for all. When the final gun sounded, Sooner fans breathed a deep sigh of relief, said a few prayers of thanks, and made their way to more victory parties. Anything can happen when OU plays Texas. Poor Texas! Q 4" g' ' ll l l " '- diff' I ' .N N 9 .Q 1 ll G l 1 1f2 , fl? YH- Y 40 f 1 '51, . ,.e 1 if ,9 Al ,.-. QAXL WF ul nf" Q -si 3 How can loseoooo oooo ICQ 3 LEFT: 1-us HELMET KNOCKED off at' me 20 yardnne, Joe washmgmn W 1243 struts out df the end Zone after scoring against-Wake Foresf,,ai'nid the N wild cheering of L Soqner fans. ' ' L N BELOW: FOOTBALL 'FUCKED AWAY, Joe Washington 1241 'charges 1 into a pack of Baylor ddfenders, hoping, to end thef closeness ofthe! halftime score, 7-5. I D-0 NX . F3 L-4 1.- ,W fs ll df wands mm my mmf ei Aa nm al M in me ,sammy m.. , ' f , N 4,1 I ,-f , f f' X , 1 as as aheam maallkgd as E Q seldlam fan allii Jim ' Mew fur , s V mo me Jw Him ap vmmfkdmmmwd him . ,-mthwfwgh his , , ,em has M only W0 . .. A. G minsmaddmathewasnoi medledfweshamd 'WEEE It was an me P qpuuitlkmnessk, mad Mm Lfihidie Wray Q gum Emblem, mm if dedwamcl as Ibn fwlmesl: potential. As a he mime Di me of TQWJWQSQET rin. PM Arthur, Texan, he skimmed has md by Qui on busy ilfilmm Vowkswagens, and Q dwesfell hmm' WEEE pwbafimn, the Mm. 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H, by Tim Marlow U A number one national ranking by the Associated Press,l, I Playboy, and a host of various magazines launched thel 1974 probation-plagued Oklahoma Sooners in quest oft that elusive and all-mythical national championship title.l r Conference coaches unanimously picked OU as the gg runaway favorite in the Big Eight. General feelings amongl - Bigi8 bosses ran that the Sooners belonged on a pedestal li and the real race would be for second place. l V Rumor had it that the National Football League offered OU a franchise. That's how good the Big Red was billed in: 1974. f i The Sooners were blessed with the personnel and talent' ' to live up to these expectations. Heisman Trophy can- l didate Joe Washington highlighted the explosive Wish-l I bone attack which returned nine starters from the 1973 10- ll O-1 squad. A seasoned quarterback tSteve Davisl, a pair of sure- ' handed split-ends lTinker Owens and Billy Brooksl, an p awesome front line, and a tiny Brazilian kicking specialist fTony Diliienzol, promised to be a constant headache for opposing head coaches. fi Defense was an area of concern prior to the openingl fl kickoff but one didn't hear many OU fans crying about it., li With the likes of Rod Shoate, everybody's All-American ll everything, and two-thirds of the Selmon family still suiting. V up for the Big Red, Barry Switzer and crew didn't receive pl any letters of condolence. Tom Osborne of Nebraska and . Jim Stanley of OSU wished they had such problems. 1' As always Coach Switzer was modest and humble when r quizzed about his teamls chances for the upcoming year. ll By the season's end, the Sooners had won their third it Aconsecutive Big Eight title and a national championship' ldespite probation. ll W Pete Rozelle and the NFL would have to find themselvesl it another! Super Bowlgcandidateg g ri IN TEXAS ECSTACY are the Sooner Davis', Kyle f5OJ and Steve l5l, jumping for joy after the final OU touchdown during the OU-UT game in Dallas. .IS 15 JY! -W Q e ff M v .- "MVT : r W4 x IQ: S V glx :lt ' '5 - 3' "T by if ,x ' ' -,M ,Qi . , ' K f' 3 -' .JJ P M ,M . 'r' '-if ' 3" A . ' 'iff f- t 31-'H 'iw T' B 4 f 1- W1- cWf.:wsrQA5, -f .- . 4 .' M 51.1355 . if-. '-Q A :W ' I ' XX 'X'.g-111377 ' . L' rj. ' W- -. .f y. .- , - -g x..-4z1 .Qv L' ag!! i W MV J' Q - A ' X -1-HT' x wizmfk -A W I xx XL I M, fl ' '- . . L ' 'J' ' 'H .. :inf-4 .-' 'V 5 ' f'l x .' :ns 1 - 'd A ' K " ft! I A fr i xv -2, 'Q ' ' ' V - " W Nw I Q. , 4... N S. E . I J' ,,,....,+-- 1 , A M in Q nm' ' 'WU MQ. - nw. H - M M .f ffrw MV X f L.. I W W-"? '3?? 'Y H' " H' Win . A 151 'Eg vip? E V Q W ,Q , ' xg' .2 Q es , 1-. WW, "A , '-fwww-Ir' sl fi , 1 . ,K ., we W M, ww M W ,A gy H W we V ET 46 Sooner Coaches OU athletic directors speak out Enos Semore, Sooner Baseball "We're proud to be a part of one of the greatest universities and athletic departments in the nation. We want to do our part to make it even better. We're trying very hard to give the people of the University of Oklahoma a baseball program in which they have a lot of pride. We hope we can have the kind of team that will create a lot of interest within the student body here at the University. lt means a lot to us to have their support. "We're proud of the success we have had the past few years. There are a lot of things that go into developing a winning program but the most important ingredient is the young men in the program. We feel very fortunate to have had, and still have, so many fine young men. Our young men have as much pride -and areas dedicated as any team in the nation. - L'We're optimistic about our chances for success for the 1974-75 season, Our players believe we. will win. I am confident they will be ready to play. We lost three players from last year's squad. We lost Stan Meek, an All-Big Eight pitcher, to the St. Louis Cardinals lStan had another year of eligibility leftl. We lost two outfielders to graduation, Kenny King and Pat Sullivan. "We have three first-team and three second-team All-Big Eight players returning. The first team Big Eight returnees are second team All-American Keith Drumright, second baseman, Mike Umfleet, third .basemang and Stan Lawrence, designated hitter. 'tOur second team All-Big Eight returnees are catcher, Jacky Parishg first baseman, Kelly Snider, and center fielder, Billy Severns. "We return two of our top three pitchers, Mickey Lashley who won the Big Eight earn-run average title with an 0.86 and had a 5-1 Big Eight and 8-1 overall won-loss record, and Bob Shirley was 52 in the Big Eight and 11-3 overall. "Terry Jolly and Wayne Pechek did not start much last year but will be battling for starting position in the outfield. "Mike Cunico would have been our shortstop last year but suffered a shoulder injury and had surgery last spring as well as knee surgery this fall, but we are counting on him this spring. "We think we have some new people that should give us added depth this spring. We have an outstanding schedule and are looking forward to the 1975 season."--Enos 'Semore PONDERlNG A QUESTlON during one of many conferences he en- counters throughout the season is Sooner wrestling coach Stan Abel. Stan Abel, Sooner Wrestling "This should be a very exciting wrestling year at the University of Oklahoma. We have more talent and more determination this year than we have had in the three years I have been here, and it would probably be a safe bet to include the last seven or eight years. "As a team, we return 49 of the 69 points which we scored in winning the 1974 NCAA championship and have three returning All-Americans: Rod Kilgore, defending 158 lb. NCAA Champion, Jeff Callard, NCAA runnerup, 167 lbs., and Brian' Beatson, sixth place finisher in the 142 lb. class. In addition to these three, we have high hopes to gain additional NCAA points from such potential squad members as: Shawn Garel, Norman Hatchet, Mike Chinn, Keith Green, Randy Stalcup, Jimbo Elrod, and many others, all which are returning lettermen. 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L V V6 V, Xzw.-A A 5 x Y-X .M ,, , , , Hg . gnu. 4.40. ,,.V, , aww , ,.....,z. .. 2 Q, V - 'X . ' V, V f a ff, A VX f , V f . ig? VI 'V- X X iJ'iXr1W" a. Q,wf'r 'Qw'l":'e' XMQQQY gi ' f Q , yr, Q--3 . AK yu, Wx wg V , ' wgmx ff ' V, QU N. , 1 2 ,- Ve' -'51 .,,, 4. Q Q' mf 'W X' - X gif' Q . . V' f.,1f-'.,f Q 2:4153 . ,,,' , ,' ffx Xkl 542552 V- .Vg M. yy- V .. - V Q X XV JZ, S ' 'A g5g,g::--H1X1gjf'5rf-' B , ff? X X Q 3' ff 4 ,M A wi ,fr , V jjg A E I F Ndllsuxw' l ba- READY AND WAITING for the pitch is Jacky Parish 1121 as the Sooner baseballers sharpen their abilities in practice. ' ' 2 F I 7 dit M . '- I' Ks ' 3 :.:i .f5g,N Y 1 'ze Y in 'PL 'Y 4 P., , 2 ,WWI Ji 1 2-- 32446 1' ' fit!! ,.:' . N,f -' A SILENT ROW of OU batting helmets await use in the Sooner drive for the conference championship. 1 Big Red baseball... "Cautious but optimistic. . . " THE WIND UP by pitcher Stan Meek will send a ball careening towards home plate during Sooner practices. 425: A ll . 'M 1 x Xs,r..,5RAxx V it 1Sf'i'141'H s 1' . r, Y.. Could the 1974 Sooner baseball squad do even better than last year's record? That was the question that dominated Coach Enos Semore's mind as the regular season approached. Yet, that would entail bettering a record of 48 wins and 12 losses, a second straight Big Eight Championship and a second- straight fifth place finish in the College World Series. If that was the goal, the Norman nine were certainly going to try. The general outlook towards the 1974 Big Red baseball season was optimistic, but full of doubts. The Sooners had lost four All'Big Eight players and were not sure if their positions could be adequately replaced. They lacked a power-hitting lineup. Semore stated tersely, "lt'll be tough for us to be as good as last year because we lost some good talent . .. it's hard to overcome that with freshmen." As Bill Severns, Chuck Redmon and Kenny King moved to patch up the holes, the Sooners moved cautiously in the '74 college baseball arena. FUN 1, J! .- 1 Su lf! N rlyd lil 1 '- las. COLORADO SAYS GOODBYE to another ball as Sooner Kenny King l9l belts a hit out of Haskell Park nn Norman, 53 Record of 40-7 66 0 99 plus the tnple crown finishes regular season 1974 Baseball Scoreboard SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONER5 SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS SOONER5 SOONERS SOONERS SOONERS 25 Kansas 1 ' 9 Kansas 0 3 Kansas 1 3 Nebraska 1 4 Nebraska 3 8 Nebraska 3 " 4 Missouri 5 7 Missouri 0 17 Missouri 14 2 Iowa Slate 0 2 Iowa State 0 6 Iowa State 0 4 Oklahoma State 3 4 Oklahoma State 3 10 Oklahoma State 3 7 Oklahoma State 3 4 Kansas State 5 3 'Kansas State 0 7 Kansas State I 2 Colorado 0 8 Colorado 1 2 Colorado 8 District Five Playoffs l 6 Tulsa 2 5 Tulsa 4 College World Series 10 Northem Colorado 1 1 Miami lFloridal 5 4 Texas ' 10 Season Flecord--40 wins--7 losses 1 . t As the Big Red baseballers virtually rolled through their regular season schedule, second baseman Keith Drumright came to the spotlight to lead the Sooners to the Big Eight Cham- pionship. Taking two out of three games from the K-State Wildcats in a May 4 series. the final game saw Drumright score 'the first Sooner run on Jack Parish's single, and then pound five runs in with a spectacular triple and double. The Sooners left Manhattan with the "triple crown." their third consecutive conference trophy. After the final series with Colorado, OU had amassed a most impressive record of 40 wins pnd 7 losses. , f DEEP IN THOUGHT is Jacky Parish U21 as he contemplates his approach to the batters box. ,ff "S, A AS 'i-5522 -4' 1 mi XA fq a A ' 'wk 0 ,fa ml 1 I 1 1 C 5 mm Aa 1 Y tn " V J fi. .- I 5' xx wake - A .wx Y 50 QWYKGBT naixondw tamed 'Yeuhas k5'Lf6N chdxce, xp end the gaxve WW mi oi the jx B spas 'tor K dxg 'Vow Wi S 6 B500 exas again? 55 ABOVE: TAKING THE PLUNGE too late isa Colorado player allowing Bill Sevems C71 to put him out of commission. IN THE AIR over a high fly is shortstop Chuck Redmon f5l as Keith Drumright K2l looks intently on. , The Sooner nine rode a crest of enthusiasm into Omaha and .the College World Series. Playing brilliantly out of a series they were expected to lose, OU had left Tulsa in the dust and now focused on Northern Colorado University. The Sooners first series opponent had come from nowhere to iznock formidable Arizona State out of the district playoffs. Yet the Oklahoma team played to their peak and blasted the Colorado team, 10-1. One step closer to the national crown, the Sooners geared up for their first real series test, Miami of Florida. Sporting a strong record and a high ranking, Miami proved to be overpowering, handing the Sooners a 5-1 defeat. The Big Red baseballers were now one step closer to going home, the College World Series began a double-elimination contest. Texas was the one to beat. Ranked number one in the nation, they were to be the Sooners third opponent in the tournament. The OU squad could not forget that the Longhorns had eliminated the Big Red from the Series forthe 'last two yearsg by a score of 10-2 in 1973 and 7-3 in 1972. Determined to ignore such a statistic, the ' Sooners moved to make their bid for victory. It truly was "Texas again" though. OU opened up a strong lead as Stan Lawrence, the Sooners best offensive player of the series, opened a two-run triple and raced home on Keith Drumright's bunt-single in' the second inning. The Big Red had a 3-0 ad- vantage. The Longhorns soon began to show their power. They cut into OU's lead in the second on Bobby Clark's 360 foot homerun. Texas made it 3-3 in the third on a series of base hits and proceeded Scbbftter the Sooners to a final score of The OU squad left Omaha a bit dejected but satisfied in their season's performance. And just as in the previous year, Coach Semore thought to himself, "We'll be back." Three objectives guide golfers ABOVE: A FAREWAY FANTASY surrounds Lee a clear smash to the green. So, BELOW: OFF IT Singletary as he lines his ball and club up, hoping for GOES and I-ee finds his Patience rewarded as the ball sails to the cup off in the distance. Coach Jim Awtrey came into the '74 season with three basic objectives, first, to be one of the top ten squads in the nation, second to capture the Big Eight Championship, and third to be a strong competitor in the NCAA Tournament. Awtrey explained, "this is the finest team we've had here in some time. It's the best team ever as far as potential. We only have three juniors on the team. All the rest are freshmen and sophomores." The Big Red golfers placed high in the Pinehurst Intercollegiate Tournament, the Cowboy Invitational, as well as the All- College Intercollegiate competition at Shawnee. Yet the Sooners squad fell short of the conference title, finishing second in the Big Eight competition at Lincoln, Nebraska. Mark Witt, one of the golf team's best from Irving, Texas, added a post season attraction by capturing the Oklahoma State Amateur Golf Championship at Oak Woods Country Club in Enid. 1974 GOLF SCOREBOARD SOONERS 12th Pan American International Intercollegiate SOONERS 3rd Pinehurst Intercollegiate SOONERS 2nd Cowboy Invitational SOONERS 4th Sooner Invitational SOONERS 5th Morris-Williams Intercollegiate SOONERS 3rd All College Intercollegiate SOONERS 6th Great Plains Tournament SOONERS 12th All College Invitational SOONERS 2nd Big Eight Championship I . ,N -.x nbuhuiw wr- -ns. . -. - sf' rw VE BLURRED BY SPEED, Lynn Blevins' club moves towards its objective, as he practices for the first golf tournament in the spring. 4 fi guilt! Hoping to achieve an unprecedented, ninth-consecutive Big Eight Cham- pionship, the Sooner tennis team entered the 1974 season. Those dreams were placed on the line as Big Red netters Mark Crozier and Dale Quigley began their doubles matchwith Kansas stellars Bill Clarke and Bill Tomkins at the Big Eight Tourney in Prairie Village, Kansas. The outcome was decided in the final match, as the Sooners emerged vic- torious, 7-6, 1-6, 6-4. It was the culmination of a spectacular season for Coach Jerry Keen and his squad. "Our success will depend on how our new players do ..." pointed out Keen as the tennis team embarked on their schedule. High hopes were placed on new comers Paul Lockwood and Mike ,cllkfs ' ,- l ' , Q Qs' Q Q ' iQ. Q, , . l'-,.,- , . 4 QWA ,. ' . ,,,,J.x4-.-'wtf'-lf-jf,-yr: 'T QQ . QQ v :.: . . ,.vt. , Q , . Q ,UQ A . 4Q.Q.Q QQ.Q. -Q QQQQ . - ' . I x 1 Y ,J 1 ,K '.,,,...-Stay'-' ' ,,L,,,, , ,.- .A-T... -V-,-.......l.T-e, ,ff ', 5.2.3-.415 . 3-"Lf Q ,Q Q 'fr IRQ., rw- as iQ, . V - Q Q- . g,,,......-iff' A Q QQ , 4 Y, -- 7 Q :QQ fF'1f't.:- ' 1, lg ...ME-,4 Q X ,F , j . , , Q ,. . Q -... Y. ' -t -..--" , 'TQ- QQ6L+.,u-1--- -1, ,ig 1 QA. - - 4 " ' ,-QQ vli Q- Q7 YQ '. tn.-,ffQ Q Q L, A ,-,,---f' ,. -...,Y...-11 ABOVE: RETURNING A SERVE during a BELOW: THROUGH THE NET is seen Paul practice on the varsity courts is sophomore Mike Lockwood as he blasts a serve back across the Newport, one of the top-ranked Sooner netters. court during practice. Knox, as well as the proven ability of Barr 4' - " 'f Ji Baynton and Rick Lashley. Q Q ' MN The Big Eight Tournament also saw , ,, ,,,,, 9, .... ---.-.-f--- """"""""' ' Baynton join the ranks of those achieving Q Q QQQ Q 'Q QQQQQQQQ Q Q X in Q r the status of four time Big Eight, number ' 'P " I " 'T T L 1 " one singles champions. Baynton, ignoring ,. Sw ' " 3 Q . , Q hot, humid weather which followed night ,, i Q I g 5 ' 1 """". ' M-"' X -QSM' xxx ' long rains, won his fourth trophy by Q: . fi Q ,aa " ...1 beating carlos Goffiof ku, 6-2, 6-3. Goffi . ,Q , Tm , ,M 4 C. , e had beaten Baynton in regular com- ff' 'ffl .':,fj' Q2 ' Q , Pb petition whicQh gave the match an added Q: ,Q, . sg .- Hi' if ,Q Q .Qi Q wx gb-QQ, ,Q i Q Q piece of excitement. 9. .' Q.-L41-' TM " ' Q ' .- l 4. ii J JI' ap- ' ' A T' ' .E pl ...,Js""i""" 'T' in O ' ,V QQ! r 4.4 ' ' A N , , Q Q .QQ Q, g 1 -Q 'Kylix ,ij 1' , i 7 I' ' l 54 1 ' I I GM . . . f if . V .fd--1-"""-""x.r"'ny-IT 1 'V I 5 5 1 . 1 L U il K 'I l u ' 5 K . . ,..i 'J . I , ' ' . ,ffl Q - I 'L ' I l .Q Q Q I 5 Di 3 Q . i i I 2 ' 8 . n ' ' s Q I' - Q U 1 . a 'Q i ,. 4 ' ' 4. -if ' -M9 ' 1 g 5 . Q . l - -A 3 ,... Wsf""9" ' - ,.. 'T Q i, law- - Q. . - M' 15,-firv -- - "-" 'N 1- Q 1 at f 'it :v4i. 55.1.i'i. Sz I , Ll K' JJ 'ii Urn I lf A at W1 R . , A J , I 5 ' he 4, QSFQZI i ff' w i" ,IL E L 1,535 n 'gf ' ' " 7 't r . ... .A , 72715 ' -Q if IT'S DOUBLE TROUBLE for Sooner opponents as John Staub and Mark Crozier sharpen their tennis abilities on the OU courts. N:-N: 'fi -W- 1974 TENNIS SCOREBOARD X l 'ff i iii-img-Ev Zh SOONERS 7 Texas Tech 2 l -- SOONERS 5 New Mexico 2 , M A-Mu SOONERS 7 Pan American 2 ,Q M SOONERS 6 Arkansas 3 sooNERs 7 Lsu 2 " W' -'-v---A+ W- ,H Mk sooNERs 8 Easrrexassfafe 1 "nu" "!' ' SOONERS 5 Texas AM 4 ' sooNERs 7 Lamar 2 '- --' ' ' E. SOONERS 5 North Texas State 1 ' f ,,f'f"f SOONERS 9 Nebraska 0 YJ, J, ,,Q,M,,,,WQN:vL5z SOONERS 9 Colorado 0 "L -'Q rvwt-'Mx-vw-2'-I-g '-.- SOONERS 6 OCU 3 ' SOONERS 7 Missouri 2 SOONERS 9 Iowa State 0 SOONERS 5 OSU 4 SOONERS 9 KSU 0 SOONERS 5 Kansas 4 SOONERS lst Big Eight Championship W Season record--17 wins--no losses 0 0 Blg Red netters capture conference tltle 3 4 V 1 'i 'I ' ' ' A I i2 22,II222.2221ll 2. A , ' ' 'L " X I O A ' I ' lM,5,,..,,slfe-f1v".'!""l?" my H J A J f 2 J 'V N 5 - '14 3 -' 2:'5f" W' - ' . v . fx! 5 'N 2 V- ' 2, -. : V 31" 21 f--7 it 7 , A 2 I . . I A! ,ifw ' ,- 5.Tf.L:J. 5237, :L , 2 7 5 ' 2 if . "97"i'Wi:-g.ff,1f ' -l Q me 4 1, A. if xmgg , Q,w,,I , ' i3Q,.5F' i if A 7 it A , 7 L' 4 fit tirr A A 2 4- A f ii V ,A .f 7 1 i t I ' -'-l A Z Q M V A V if f 2- ' Hifi 1 V Y .. 2'-' 2'2,li1. 21371: Iii,-' l'.flf. ?55L1f'1 t:l' '7 lffw v O ' ' C 'O C C 4 ' E ' ' A 7 'L 2 if flf' Aj- e-1 r55V .'- l- .I-i ff- JL: 7. 2, - 2 , ' 7 E 2 -2 2 2 2- 2 it 2 22e2fLu'Qg2 A 7 2 2. f A A ' l 2 ' 'L gl lil!7ll'l21'l'Wl-A2iliiilllll l'l' W e SOONER TENNIS SQUAD, 1974-75: FRONT ROW: Mark Crozier, Mike Knox, Mike Newport, ROW: Coach Jerry Keen, Jay Amos, Bill Paul Lockwood, Rick Lashley, John Staub, Jim Thompson, Jim Glazer, Les Topp. SECOND Bowles. , QA, , :rf dw ,, ,l,, X. xg!- -T P' .V A- M X ', 1 if 3: -kv ,,'-v!,",- K' K ' .f',,:'- Q.,-1-, L' 4,7 W 'fri ,flgt ff y 1 xx' W V W .jjbllfrl , 1 l fw w W1 W w v if nw w W , J ' ,, ' x41 2, ' .4 ?, 14, g,K-,,L.J L J Qu- -RJR-, -rn," Q., .4 -,YJ Q, Xp' , 1 X., 'V' xg! : V N,,,1,, fa, V1 if ,. U w R ,H W , .Y 1 - '- , -T ' l , .5 ' L ,Jr VQ3. -, V' 5, 1- 3 VY5, L V-, Nw WW V . , V , , , . f - L , X , , 1 - -.. ,, . f :,...Q ,. . -..,.Q .Tw Q, ' ,,, '1,,,4,f,f.Q paw-' 1-, ,jp J xg, gf 1 , 1 - Q 1 1 E- '1 f N-KHILQ, . ' Q Via'-'If ' fi. 1 ' h ,gu,.'-,L ,J H: 5' 1 '1' -N ,' "'l"'1" I B' .1 ' Q" fa' I W l ,- if I 1 I H V5 . Lvl 'V X :ki .w'1A,, ' 2 1 , x.. 2 'Vik' -.7 1 1 L. . 'qs -K Mx ' ,i i ,- as ' ' ' .,-QW. 2 4.114 ""f?'3 :jt:7E:..-.-.,.. TV A - W 1 N .. w Y 1 gm ', ' 3 Ii ' OVER THE HURDLES goes Marla Miller as he goes N W through daily praclice cm the OU track. W , , , , , 7 ,J 'ICVJINYIHY 'l'E3l:'ki'K SljlHXiU, l"'f1l 753 Front row: Conch .319 IX-lurk Mzlivr. Bran Nicholfi, lion l:ml1E-:QL Sinn VG1'm,'1'u, Slam l7UQri!cr. Jams?I'1Qlly,Iivi1h Scho-niy, Paul Gn1ns,'I'irn Riley. Miarl-1 Mfzzwx, Pat lM'.1.'i1s, Ixlzfla Kf'c':11ur.w. Bmc! Su.'ar!h41ul, Rmvfix Bmccg' M.u'1.I'-1scc1,5i4:wzk3r.'-frwbcrgihxrx'Vorpnhl.Si-JuPurnzr, iflicxw-.-2. Ram Facia. Rick Carpcniur. Clms Ilomzghs, LDS Smfh. X'f'm4+1lV'IWRd1Ml."2Jiis1'xr1, Im Gorlwx, H.J1rySn1ilh. Culv1l1Cuf1gJuI, I.W.v.'h1 Mmgginru. Gang' Dnvla S-:cond row: -inn Johnsosu. 351.341 Almuvr, Ycmu, John Gklrrxsurl, Krrlkznc! Ilvmxgins, Mark f3mlric'nimim::1, Razginald Blgf, .1 f ------'---' ' - 5, 1- '-xg. f 1 1- ' V ,-,-3. X .. Q .-xx., N.. I - x .4 - ai , 'aff' ,., ,.. ,p.,, ,4 A 'T'-',f " . - :P"i-.gf r' lg .01 fma w, -1 - ' H-:N p.a.M-N-:.. ,., l,,,V..,, ,V , 'Z-'-2'-49 f 1 ' .sb ,Tw -A5 i-:ff -A '-wa' m f '- I ff-' 1 -' 5- mg:--5' wil PH' f he x X ' EW- Q 1 ., N- ,J L g . Iva- V ., . H V um 2 b ggi J .V ,Eid I 171,576 2 My ' N-, X ., . we L - .. ,QP -if 3, Q - I !, . A 5 A Ev E' v , f v ,X 'dll' V yu 'Ll ,XI -! F-JT-: ' - 'L , I Q , , A ' 1 W -k I I I X , . ' a .. .I ' '- , 3 - ' ' . " 3 1 I, f, s - ' , -, ' - - " f X , . . ' W -4 I I A y -' V5 ' W 1 :li A xx "' E Xl " J 'i v . W4 X. .v f Li W Y y , ,, . , h . A x 0 .I l . , 1 A, W ,S V , I 5 V7 - ' . ,. f iw 1. . 1 . f ' , .. , I L ,, 1 , ,- ff' I 1 "' x 1 41' , . N x . ,x L- - 4, ,...-1 X- ' riff" ' 17, I L" I ,,, , THOSE SUNSHINE HURDLES motivate Kansas Relays, an unidentified trackster preparing for the A r +-A fix , t 'xi ll' .. '5 X. k av 1' if If f 1 615 9 ' "' f A r. wt . tk 1 ,Sf i 5 5 M g .Q-EF ti. wx M i, .,.. D 2 D 13, i..- ai I ' I g , . -- at it V as l E! Y , ., I 1 ,- ,. 4, -.lik ' 1 '-ez'-,gras ' by L. ""'--i . . AGAIN AND AGAIN, Calvin Cooper, Stan Bracey and Leslie Smith circle the University track in preparation for Big Eight competition, .HSM 1 1974 OUTDOOR TRACK SCOREBOARD Arlington Invitational-- OU placed lst Arizona State dual meet-- ASU--89 OU--66 John Jacobs Invitational OU placed 2nd Kansas Relays 440--OU placed 3rd Distance Medley--OU placed 4th Mile Relay--OU placed 4th Two Mile Relay-'OU placed 6th 26 Mile Marathon--Terry Zeigler--lst Drake Relays Sprint Medley Relay--OU placed 1st Big Eight Championship OU placed 6th Determination was the key word as the Sooner tracksters set out to spring back from their disappointing '73 season. Coach J.D. Martin began things by scoring victories in the recruiting field. The team depended heavily on the success of runners such as Randy Veltkamp and Terry Zeigler to lead them from the Big Eight cellar. The Big Red track team made a strong showing at the Kansas Relays, placing third in the 440 and fourth in the mile and distance medley. The Drake Relays saw the squad capture the number one spot in the sprint medley relay with a time of 31211. The Big Eight Tournament proved a big surprise as Veltkamp took first in the 880. Veltkamp went into the May 12-18 competition apprehensive, his knee slightly injured during the previous Monday's practice. It wasn't until Wednesday that the Sooner track star could even support himself. Yet Saturday found him well, well enough to capture the half-mile trophy and help place the Sooners sixth in conference competition. 62 Eff! ip v- THE SKY'S FALLING, or so it seems to a Utah Aggie as Mike Phillips i891 slaps him to the ground in OU's second victory of the season. lNTO MY ARMS chants Dewey Selmon l91l as he proceeds to smother a yardage attempt by a Baylor ballcarrier during third-quarter action in OU's season opener. DOWN COMES BILLY Brooks l82l as a Wake Forest defender manages to topple one of his dazzling runs during the 63-0 OU rout. ' K 57, wi Q l fi W Q N f' .. 'N '1gx"L.. 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Q .- wi ,- T' ' 3 a L1 v lt was little more than a cake-walk as the 1974 Oklahoma Sooners danced through the Big Eight Conference. Gobbling up such delicacies as Buffalo pot pie, braised Wildcat tips and tossed Tiger salad, the fabulous Big Red welcomed the dessert, the conference championship. Of course the final topping, the Associated Press National Championship, was a grand finale. The gridiron luncheon had some pretty exciting courses. Colorado: Wonderous Joe Washington bolted to the biggest day of his career as a near perfect OU per- formance buried CU 49-14 at Boulder. Kansas State: Oklahoma unleashed a deadly assortment of T.D. bombs to destroy KSU at Norman 63-0. The Sooners returned five punts for 201 yards and did not permit K-State to cross the 25 yard line into OU territory. Iowa State: Although it wasnlt reflected in the score, OU's 28-10 victory over ISU was an impressive tribute to Sooner might. Missouri: The crowd of 61,826 who braved the wet and dreary weather saw OU roll up their 17th victory but saved its biggest roar for half-time when it was LEFT: THERE HE GOES screams the Colorado defense as Joe Washington C241 scrambles away with the ball for a big gainer in Boulder. BELOW: sc 5' x as 3 3 5 Sw' ar announced that Big Ten giant Ohio State, ranked number one in the national polls, had been upset by the Spartans of Michigan State, giving OU a chance to grab the top spot. Kansas: The Sooners struggled for three quarters before subduing lowly Kansas 45-15 in Lawrence. On the third play from scrimmage the Kansas quarterback rolled to his right and started to pass to his tight end. Finding him covered he cut back over his right tackle and ran 73 yards for a T.D., leaving 45,000 fans astonished. OU led only 21-14 after three quarters as the Sooner defense waited for the mistake-ridden offense to get it all together. OU unleashed for a 24 point burst in the final quarter to end any doubts. g Nebraska: What may have been the best offensive team, from a fundamental standpoint, in OU's football history reached a majestic peak in the battle for conference supremacy with the Corn- huskers at Lincoln. Failing to complete a pass throughout the game, the OU squad watched as Randy Hughes turned into an interception terror, and victory materialized in a comeback score of 28-14. A COMPLEX NETWORK of defensive players unfolds as Anthony Bryant l71l and Jeff Cox C541 pierce the Colorado offensive line. Season finale "Poke-Choke" lt wasn't the end of a season. lt was the continuation of an unending gridiron glory. The 1974 victory over the Oklahoma State Cowpokes was OU's twenty-ninth straight unbeaten game, excluding forfeits, and twentieth straight victory. It was the topper to the first all-victorious Sooner season in eighteen years. The chilly Saturday saw OU resting uneasily on a "number one" throne through three quarters of the contest. The upstate rivals were playing like wildmen and had driven 82 yards to score on the Sooner defense, a feat unaccomplished throughout the' season. As well, Abby Daigle had popped two field goals of 53.and 33 yards for OSU, the latter putting the Cowpokes on top of the score, 13-10, with 5:33 left in the third quarter. The OU fans weren't shivering just from the sub-freezing weather and twenty mile-per-hour winds. They might have been a little bit scared: Those seldom-felt,-fears crumbled though, within a span of eight minutes as the Sooners switched gears and the Cowboys displayed their all-too-famous "POKE-CHOKE." Three fumbles on the part of OSU set up three OU touch- downs. Finally the stage was set for the f ultimate error. Leonard Thompson, who scored the OSU T.D,,,La,ncl wise. displayed himself l ,ig,r.,,ei gram d manner throughout the gah1'e,-lirgot to pick up the ball on a Sooner kickoff. The longest on-sides kick in football history was recovered by the Sooners on the Poke 10-yard line, setting up the final Sooner score. l,'ll 1 The season was over within- minutes and a month's wait found the Sooners in possession of the national cham- pionship, OU's fourth. And Sooner fans, could only hopelifor a bigger laugh nekti year as the "bedlam" series between OU and OSU continues. we Tsar so if 1974: Year of a tearr if A .fi . . Q. 1 ,y N . -5 rl 1974 Oklahoma Sooners. Above--Front row: Joe McReynolds, Tony DiRienzo, Edward Williams. Tyrell Jackson, Steve Davis, Scott Hill. Shane Corrotto, Lee Hover, Bob Stacy. John Carroll. Second row: Butch Hill, Pat Hussey, Joe Washington, Grant Burget, Randy Hendricks, Frank Rohr. Jerry Reese, Greg Hut- chens. Keith Thomas, Richard McCampbell. Third Row: Ted Phillips, Bill Dalke. Gary Gibbs, Jim Littrell. Rod Shoate, Calvin Harris, Russ Williamsonj Marty Brecht. George Davis. Kyle Davis. Barry Switzer. Fourth row: -Jaime Melendez. Gary Bailey, -John Roush. Jay Holman, Reed Coody. Gary Bishop, Don Morton. Larry Duke. Terry Webb. Fifth row: Chez Evans. Dave Hudgens, Brent Cargill, Jeff Emel. Leo Martin, Mike Vaughan, Truman Westlall, Michael Spencer, Wayne Hoffman, Billy Brooks. Sixth row: Larry Tate, John Barresi, Joe Hale, Jim Helms, Gene Hochevar, Rex Norris, Larry Lacewell, Jack Baer, Bill Shimek, Wendell Mosley, Jerry Pettibone. Below--Front Row: Tinker Owens, Doug Pearson, Kerry Jackson. Mike Birks, Tony Peters, Ken Crosswhite, Terry Myers, Randy Hughes, Bob Berg, Sidney Brown, Larry Briggs. Second row: Clyde Russell, Eric VanCamp. Horace lvory. Waymon Clark. E. N. Simon. Ron Waters, Jerry Foster, Roger Owens, Gary Young. Jamie Thomas. Steve Larghe, Third row: Ralph Kulbeth, Todd Dutton, Jeff Bodin, Gary Barnoski. Jell Cox, Jimbo Elrod, Dennis Buchanan. Obie Moore, Steve Kunkle. Robbie Green, Steve Ludwig. Fourth row: Jim Taylor David Sullivan. Dick Dutton, Tyrone Armstrong. Lonnie Wright, Rick Evans. Anthony Bryant, Jim Dodds, Drake Aridarakes. Jerry Arnold. Fifth row: Kirk Killion, Craig Lund. Gary Potters, Mike Mitchell. Marshall Cantrell. Duane Baccus, Mike Phillips, John Randolph, Dewey Selmon. Victor Brown. LeRoy Selmon. Sixth row: Don Jimerson, Don Duncan. Steve Barrett. Galen Hall. Warren Harper, Bobby Proctor, Ken Rawlinson, Barry Brady, George Waldrond. David Bentley 31 if ' fs. 'F lajl K . A 1 V A L N, I 3 -9 V v T I l-ir . -I. 11' Xi n it 'ff 0 . - i -1f X, l 4'-.1 - ' .' - . 3 NV' a f r QE ry., ji I, ,Qi V QM wg' XXX f tg 5 -L, ' 'ii Y Ii' A Vi V v - Nil! . T G ' I T r 'P---s, A .sv i ' lg ' . 1. 1 - t .1 .' : 'X f 4' W4 c '. f - 1 1 1 f A tit eer ' 1' . 1, fi 'NX , 1 s v . -"-- K F - A J I 4..-..z ' ' f- 5 l PF , " Rl . . i 1 X 57' . 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V ' . I 1 V Q 14 K- ,' Ll N 1 l , Q TV - .Ly . V . V - , . I girl! , . s A . ,. ,11 1 ge A ', f n A a . .1 fc ' , . . s -A egg . I J ,i . - if 'T - a-. iQ5tf As. 1 Q. 1--A sri.. ., . .and individuals Tony D1RleU20 l3J. kiflkef Ron Waters l35i, strong safety Jerry Arnold l74J, offensive tackle Barry Switzer, head Coach W -if ' n"V' l Fr. '5 Season Record: ll wins, 0 losses l r .4 ,,.,.. - 'ff 3' I " 3332- Associated Press National Champions 'I . ,. .s ,- ,. 1 .., ,. , ,, Billy Brooks 1821, tight end 1 974 FOOTBALL SCOREBOARD Sooners Baylor A V ' Sooners Utah State I I "fy , X lSooners Wake Forest ' , Q, 5 -ix A Sooners Texas K -. ' V i. U Sooners Colorado 'tariff ff' F .. ,. v Sooners Kansas State fi V 1' Sgonerg Iowa State xi rl Sooners Missouri ' , 32- T -' 'amiga Sooners Kansas Vif Sooners Nebraska - . Sooners Oklahoma A ' 2' ' FT State sg? Following the 1974 Sooner football season, people were always asking the question, why? Why did we go un- beaten and why were we named the National Champions of college football? ls it because we had so many out- standing individual players or was it because we had a great football team? To answer l'd have to say we were an outstanding football team. Sure, we had our stars. A player like Joe Washington, Randy Hughes or Rod Shoate is gifted and his ability is readily recognizable. But it takes more than one man to make a team. This year's Oklahoma football team had the usuper stars" but it also had players not recognizable unless you had a program. Of the 22 starters on our national championship team, ten were not highly recruited. ln fact, if the 'tthirty scholarship" limit had been in effect three years ago they probably would not have been recruited at Oklahoma. Imagine the type of year we might have had without Rod Shoate, Ron Waters, Gary Gibbs, Wayne Hoffman, Tinker Owens, Terry Webb, Jerry Arnold, John Roush, Jim Littrell, and a quarterback named Davis. Without outstanding coaching, patience, and dreams which became realities these athletes might have played in another color than red and white. Our team success was not solely due to the action on Saturday afternoon. There were the men who were the scout-team throughout the week, collecting just as many aches and pains as the starters, contributing equally to our national championship. Over the last 26 years there is no other University in the country that has been as successful as Oklahoma in football. The 1974 National Champioins had great individual players that were committed winners. We had a pride not seen in any of our opponents. Under the tensest situations there was a cool confidence because we believed in each other as individuals. Oklahoma fans only saw eleven players on the field at one time. But to explore deep within the past of OU football many faces that make Satur- day's game an enjoyable one. Oklahoma will win another National Championship someday! We'll win it for the same reason: great coaches and players who do their job so unselfishly as a team. Steve Davis, OU Quarterback THE LAST STRETCH of a practice run finds sophomore Brad Swartout gasping for air as the squad prepares for the Arlington Invitational. as ig' ing 2 ,fic Cross country squad nabs Federation crown Returning five lettermen under the teammate leadership of Ron Fick and Don Franklin, the OU cross country team charged into the 1974 season. Finishing eighth in the Big Eight Conference the previous year, Coach J.D. Martin knew he and his squad had nowhere to go but up. "The key to success in cross country is having several team members running in about the same time," said Coach Martin. "lf you can have four of five guys running as a group, you can beat a lot of people." The end result of countless practices was the Conference Championships where the Sooners climbed three notches to claim fifth place. One of the high points of the season was the first place victory captured by the OU harriers at the US Track and Field Federation Championships. Under the able direction of Martin, OU's most experienced head athletic mentor who has coached for over a decade in Norman, the Sooner cross country squad was determined to climb even higher on the Big Eight totem pole. 1974 CROSS COUNTRY SCOREBOARD Arlington Invitational 2nd USTFF Championships lst Big Eight Championships 5th SOONERS 32 Arkansas 23 SOONERS 18 S. Methodist 23 SOONERS 21 N. Texas St. 42 LEFT: IN THE STRETCH are tracksters in the final dual. BELOW: NORTH TEXAS STATE finds the going rough as Oklahoma blasts ahead. nv' va-A ,Q-f . at 'S-6.31411 . -D whf-1, ,gy K ,- All ts ' - .. gf ie -642mg-.as ,. 'E-5"-T4-T' I .,,-.k-m.. .-.3-.,:,y,L,'V. .-,M A I ,, ., - .. -' f - ' 0- A ',, , - -..w,-. , - ' . V ng-' -4---9 ' ' - ,i. .1 L--A 'c 4 4.55 1 f W 3. U. A J 1 1 , 1 A ff. n .J X! . - 1-' 'I V . N , ' " --QM .Q - ...... h . 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Yet deterrninmmn of the 1umgram's Rwss and the present 'head coach, Pamw Zim have a stwmg gmup. IW Wim ivxer1:i9QI and Greg Evan-Ibmmgje have g,aine+fd individual NCAA mam- pilcmships while wmpgmiang ffm A Anmhef big moblem staging the Somew gymnasas in the tame Aww iowa 54331665 SEFEHQHEQFIQH an the cmwn as wew as the chamf ma-msh.ip. lm- the iw me-ru wean, amiga Nebraska 1196451 :md Cnlosado 1219681 have the Cywgilwbnes time top march iam the In spite owl these p1rob11ems..Zi8rt and hm crew have messed mn, camwming second in ww ference wmpewiifbimn in 1974. Simms: me Fw was rw!! snihedullml mo campewmz in any dmais umm me mach Zim immd another way' to keep- hm men Dklahfoma iam vfarmus in-Q mwfianal Iiuuarneyrs im the duration of 1974. Fnllmvmgq this plan me team 'travel-ed fam, atwndirziwg Husky Classic in Houston, the C1mmgo Midwes1 Gpvm and the Rwkv Mmm-mam Spawn m mmvar. falw meets alliow aw' gymnwasazsv in expwmm-enm with than WUJMWES., get rid of eawliy Seaman ymefs and End wi how me mam im viheiv pefformwanxzef' explained Xian I 1975 squad wmked hard and bound ms fdarify practices snared learning new "cumpuiSGries." The old m m'puIsnry exercises had been used in mmpetiximm for the Last four years and learning me new zaeemiuses was difhcuh as WEN as cmfusumingi 'Yew Zim ish me new wuizmes were buena: and mane in vtheinr wshmiqmwe. EWS gymnastics team ew .countered eviihar mlwara-gash Team Sim was mwiiuceed from 15 m 12 pear with each seam required in enter three all awund mem and two specialisis in fe-arch event imfsieudl of Iwo aM armmn d. and fem as in 7 U was remain-rmmofm www at mfrrmwams is :hmmm as Tung Rupert perilwmg a www 7' V' fi gif? ABOVE: THE HECTIC RIPPLES of the water in OU's new indoor pool are the only sign of John Hager as he practices his dives in preparation for the Big Eight Championships, held in Stillwater, Oklahoma. RIGHT: MIND AND MUSCLES tense, Bill Hough and John McLintock ready themselves for the 100 yard backstroke competition in the February 8 meet against OSU held in Norman. We re going to be more diversified at the Big Eight." Bob Connor 'F-l'EL.4-?V"'l"' '- An recruiting drive as w Qfdgtgrmination to challenge Kansas for domination of the Big Eight syviFi71i'gmirrg'sc,ene opened the season for Head. nb' Connor lead a piadk 'of 'Big' Red recruiters to come up with some sqimeam ad ditions-ZjfiL1QaIraiy.l.Page 5a'nid' 'Brude Wells both prep All-American swimmers as well as Graham lVlcl.intock, a junior college All-American and a transfer from the California area were OU bound before August opened the doors of Norman. For the first time in his three year reign at OU, Connor was faced with the opportunity to work with a team of great depth. t'Last year we had to pick out the events we were going to try to score points in and we didn't even have entries for the 200 yard butterfly Much of Connor's pre-season op timism rested on OU's individual strength. The 1974 season saw the Sooners capture six gold medals at the Big Eight meet. The goal for 1975 was nine such trophies. Gold medalists returning to the Big Red swimming squad were Dick Pat tengal C500 yard freestylel, John Hager fone-meter divingl, Bill Hough C100 yard backstrokel, John McLintock 1100 yard and 200 yard breaststrokel and the 800 yard freestyle team of Sam Guild, Bruce Bockus, McLintock and Pattengale. I " MQW' All L mm 'twuut ...Uu.t..Nx 1 ' rl'i I f T -1 fffm-' 55 vt. N -- . 'i :Z K G ,V ri A " ., sid " ,A . ff J .H A Y., -f'-' X si ' . . A I v E A K I I , Is., 1' If , I , ' Y ' 'flaw ' 4:5 of :HN A v. A I .f ., A 'wg if f I i i J? jr- il gli: ,.- ' ' I 'lil ,tg 1. if 1 M? g L Qadfgh L Connor bags prize recruits LEFT: POOL SIDE HUMOR is exhibited by the Sooner swimming squad's team shirts, pointing to their enthusiasm and hopes for capturing the conference crown. BELOW: A RARE QUALITY of team spirit comes from the entire squad of Big Red tankers, as they cheer on John Hager and Dick Pattengale in the free-style competition against defending Big Eight champion Kansas. gf, ? V- - , 1. il - ""! S 21? x'S i 2:1 7.7 A 1 A' W 1, ' ' . . . - 3 ' 3 7 lv 4 i 11 ,f 'N A M , Q swf- ."'. G5 N Q ' J' , ff , gf! ' 1 ' t if A i 5, " i t A ". F "' 1 F ,Q r L s A M' i L! . r if 'vw f , N 'P .. 1. I ,V J. ' . A? 6 . -ALJ! ikvxx Y i :Y-'kj' 'Y I Y. J kv Ev ' L. " snr J, or gy L ' A it f ' A f .4 ' L' '- I " 1-.r A R L -- -1 ---A -L A - ' N Q' 'Lb 4 V - ., ---'Qs K YV t . 5 I-if .A L? 1 , M . , v,,, 1:11 S 1, .,,. V ,, 1- P 1 Vi If I I I vqi. Yvi V f V 'W-:wif . I I i il ,,i Q? 4 J S! Injuries can be a very critical factor in any athletic squad's performance. The 1974 indoor track team knew more than most as they limped to a seventh place finish in the Big Eight conference, plagued by numerous injuries. This was not the case for the 1975 assemblage of "pneumonia downersf' emphasized head track coach J.D. Martin. Healthy and ready to go, the squad was power packed. Lost to graduation was Brad Winter who was the Big Eight indoor pole-vault champion as well as Wavie Reed. That was about all. A new combination of cindermen formed a most formidable squad. Aiding 4 Q At' Ll we I mtl. ' " fll ii Wg l.,..-,,MiJ't I- A a fl- LE ABOVE: A FINAL SURGE of power brings Mark Millerto the finish line of the 60 yard high hurdles and victory to the Sooner cindermen at the Sooner Relays held in Oklahoma City. I 'I . . , f .W if ni frsvff F 9" La I M T ...AMT skins Wi4 N .- ML 5 -1 rf.-Jr A v I, fv . " v- ' A Y ,lit X' .fr.,,"- ' .. 5 - ,- S i'imiii"' ' i f P' 1 ii I I - A qfififlg aj 1,7 . 7 . . St ' V 5-zlfff 'f, Q-"H "9'9"5'w in 2-' 'F v " 'rl '52, J: U g ? A f f H, 5 3 iq A f 2. ,t i , mf' "rr" " ic 3, .1 W .43 Q 1, , ,ml Jag: j kv' 1 1 W ijgif x asf iffy l rf -lfwrf' wh' Wm A V SH . g ,sr ',iJ5'vf1lj "' its Hua? , ,fra - jaw. 5 I , 4. ttf- , 1 if 'f' AA 1 ff' Hi' Ji mlm' M' " LL. 'I ar' ii! .M 'Zi Q-5:1 I 1 ll IC K. if X. O ,qv .V If ,.,:,iK:S?L,,,E' Y -2.5 3: ,, . -. it - 4 . I .1':l. 'fz .Y .' . I '1 5 " '-'i V H if i1'1.7RiR 1 r.f?f?:'fi,f f. -i 11, 1,1-,'.f':?ffJ5rf,fI 253533. jfgfj gf 'iS'F'l'r -I-f if 1' t l"Q 15.'Q'tg,L13:-"lUl:',Y' fm" VL ,V-fjqyj-1"iQ gi' . sf 14- . 4 , gf, 'slr fgffij is Q-zh'Q1,3 my .lla Nif54'g11fiI9'iIfJ:?,a '21 :iff "ffm: 4191 8? . . ABOVE: WELL WORN FROM endless practices at the walkways of Oklahoma Memorial Stadium, better known as Pneumonia Downs, a pair of shoes air out from the window of one of OU's indoor trackster's home. ABOVE RIGHT: THE MAGIC WAND changes hands from Calvin Cooper to Gary Vorpahl as the Sooners try to add the mile relay to their list of wins at the first annual Sooner Relays. FAR RIGHT: UP AND OVER the bar goes Oklahoma's Tim Riley in the pole vault competition of the Sooner Relays held in the Myriad Center. the Sooners was Randy Veltkamp, conference outdoor 880 champion. Returning to the team was Gene Stoner, Big Eight high jump champion last year as well as Mark Bodenhamer, demonstrating his talents in the 440. Spicing the 1975 season was the first annual Sooner Relays. Held at the Myriad Center in Oklahoma City, the relays were a complete success, financially as well as athletically. The Sooner cindermen placed a man in every event except the triple jump and succeeding in rolling up 80 points to easily outdistance defending Big Eight Champion Kansas State. .,-,. , - h Y i F72 ' ..- LM V" ' , 4 1, m vp, , J , , W M 1y!'iX 'N ' fs 'X' 'VN -' 1, I - gy 'Exif 'Q- 3, ,az uf. Qigrg1.3?g5"f2? JF:-Q v., 'ffm YE: A u.....g..,..-f1:...: 4. , v N11 K w f 4 1:4 x n' 11, ., Lx, fvkv-H11 'Nw -- VLA' , v',m,f.1, U ,, f. 9, ,mmm ,K W "W ',v".'.'z-,H J,1 Y 'lk A -K. 6, X' f F5 1, . ., -3-is Q ,mg -1 .W . M tx gi INTO THE AIR goes Jay Williams as he attempts a field goal against a tough Missouri defense. DOWN THE COURT blasts the Sooner round- ballers as Jay Williams C241 leads them into a fast break aczainst Missouri. Sooners roar into rankings IN PERFECT FORM, Sooner standout Alvan Adams 1331 prepares to dunk the ball as an ex- cited Big Red audience looks on in the OU fieldhouse. Nr 4 7 1 l 1 1 1 Never has the coming of a basketball season at OU been so shrouded in mystery as that of 1975. As the Big Red roundballers practiced for the upcoming season in the early months of the fall semester, speculation as to their abilities was everywhere. Coming out of a good showing through the 1974 schedule, head coach Joe Ramsey's squad had all - the talent it could want. The dependable power of Alvan Adams along with the backup abilities of Rick McNeil, Mike McCurdy and Billy Graham as well as the energy of sophomore Eddie Fields formed an awesome lineup. Much pre-season speculation was silenced as -the squad from Tulsa University clipped the Sooners in their opener at the Myriad Center. Was this an omen for the rest of the season, or just the concealment of a time bomb, ready to explode? Boom went the bomb and so did the questions. The Sooners were all vic- torious in their next three outings. The high point of the winning streak was the battle against the fifth ranked Gamecocks of South Carolina. In atight ' contest, OU emerged the conquerer. Not only was this a big win, but it put OU into the national rankings at number I 19. Armed with determination and a spotlwithin the national basketball elite, the Sooners charged ahead into the depths- of the 1975 schedule. :ZS .L swf' I" BELOW: HGIMME THAT BALL!" say Rick McNeil 1501 and Bob Pritchard f41J as they vie for a rebound in the conference battle against Mizzou here in Norman. RIOHT: INTENT ON SCORING, Rick McNeil C501 stretches to the limit in hopes of cutting lVIissouri's lead. The Big Eight rival won the contest though, 77 to 66. BELOW RIGHT: ON THE AIR goes Sooner basketball as Dave Hart and fellow KGOU workers prepare to bring the Colorado game into the homes of OU students. Everyone knows a national rankin does not mean a team will always win. Big Red basketball fans were rein- troduced to this fact. As quickly as thel national notch had come, it went. The Sooners accumulated an im- pressive home record of 5-1 before leaving for the road and California. There, the OU club found only defeat at the hands of UCLA as well as San Diego State. Next came the Big Eight basketball tournament held at Kansas City. Though the tourney had no effect on the eventual battle for the conference -- ji MQ- -' 'TH5' :f'..Ei'f" ,:r4r .,.,,-7. LJQKA . ii., l il ,. I . Y f I ' J A Q g WN "eil, . if L crown, the fight for its title was vicious. OU found itself struggling for no less than fifth place against a surprisingly rugged Missouri squad. The end result even there was defeat, as well as sixth place in the tournament. Certainly the OU cagers were down, but not out. They opened their quest for conference domination with a bolt of lightening, striking hapless Colorado, 113-62, a Sooner field house alI-time- high. Again hopes rose and fans began to have recurring dreams of glory. s g.rs:: g ' ' .1 '.:t . Q , HER lf a Titl hopes ride ........ -N vva -,-L A V- 1 1' , Q N fgq' U 5, , .I "K is ' FF,"-Ai J g ' k V, . 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A E3 V ' if 3. fri A T if .I L M H ff: ,N l -' if' QE -Y' YJ, A. I i .. .wi " "' qv' NJ ef Xa. ' .9 -,I ' i f L Nr I --L i To l ' l i 'fiwli . ,-.lsy L' , V "WR , ' l ' r ' L 1 ii- -Q i- Q - A V , ' ' I N ' ' ' - - wr - -"ff ld 1 1: Xl Q-Yip.. lj-5 'Q I -Tp, in ,V l. J, I 'is 'E F l ' .1 - 'I - - 1 f 'X... 1. 4 1 l -' " , P ' 2241 1-9 lT'S ADAMS AGAIN as Oklahoma's star center rises among a mass of roundballers, to place two points on the board for the Sooners as Bob Pritchard l41l looks on. sappear WlTH ENDLESS ENERGY, Billy Graham i251 gracefully tips the ball towards the basket as Alvan Adams C331 gives him support against a blistering Kansas defense. --.., ,Afhavpii-t if Apt ,VL X -aux X V l. iid? A., I A 1 . Q- ' vi ' - - A . W! . - --' - - -. oy Tl'lOL1Ql'1 Sooner lfJBSli9lfb6ll faI'lS WGYC 'JTO Win a ballgame7 ygu have got to l'1O199fUl, 39am the bubble burst- The move the ball crisply and sharply and Sooners df0PP9d their next two we are not doing that." 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IFN:-mlb, F1Qp',.':1:if fi: ,Ir'uwi1ZfuEaE'Qla':?wlMw ,u1.H1,:'TfEgp31'.v1:12? 'JJ Rim-y WINS usb ,,,1, rmffxfwwwyf Q 'iw -4 Xl ABOVE: A BANANA SPLIT seems to be what 167 pounder Jeff Callard has in mind for Aggie Ron Ray. Callard won the bout 5 to 4. BELOW: THE REF'S LEGS spotlight 118 pounder Shawn Garel as he totally dominates his Aggie enemy, Billy Ree. ABOVE: A DETER- ABOVE: "TURN HIM OVER!" scream the Sooner wrestling fans as Jeff Callard shoots for the pin against Aggie Ron Ray. Many strategists felt a pin if -4-' il' ,, it 1 rw i 1 T - W , ' 41. . I Vl l ml, I I t ia 44 ' mal by Kilgore.or Callard would be the key to beating OSU. 7' ,,., -. ABOVE: A DIVING THRUST gives OU's defending national champ Rod Kilgore a takedown and two points against Jon Jackson of OSU. I 1 gf- wg y 1. , . 1, - -2' 3 V- Ts la A it 5 Q W- - I EC' 1 f"'i lil - 4 3 2 VF 11 - f- - :Tw Fl .- -s..... Xt t, A I , . J, - i if ' Y' Ph" S' ll- all ' I - 0 .ni ' la ' . :if 1 5 1 . . eg i ' 'L U." v 1 ,J ffm -T I, ' ' ...V f',FlN-:TIN 1 is ff., V it tl -A , :- IVIINED GAREL foilsa desperate attempt by Ree -1 , 1.11: ,to escape. The talented sophomore won the ' 1 I' If .gill match 6 to O. A . ' fir-x' 'inf if Ei 'A IEE 1 -Q L .. - . ,, ' r' Natal . 1 - - 1- - as . A-on ' T Us I ABOVE: THE BEST KIND of back seat driver, head coach Stan Abel urges Kenny Nelson on in his bout with Cowpoke Billy Martin. The date was February 7 and the place, the OU fieldhouse. The occasion was the 89th renewal of the state's greatest sports rivalry as the Sooner wrestling squad prepared to do battle with their OSU counterparts. State pride was not the only flame heating the affair for the dual had national overtones. OSU stood at number two in the national rankings while OU held the fourth notch. lt was indeed a celebrated match. This piece of the "Bedlam Series," the never ending rivalry between the Sooners and Cowboys, was possibly the most contested throughout the year. lt usually meant not only a fight for wrestling supremacy in Oklahoma, but in the nation as well. Of the past 44 national championships in collegiate history, 34 have been grabbed by OU or OSU. Bedlam More particularly, the February 7 Bedlam match was a big one, for the OSU grapplers had won 12 duals in a row over the Big Red. In December of 1974 the Aggies downed OU 26-13 in Stillwater in what was the battle bet- ween number one OSU and the number two Sooners. Since then each squad had dropped a bit in the rankings, but the fire never cooled off. ln honor of the match of the season, the Oklahoma Daily sports staff declared the preceding week "Pin an Aggie Week" in hopes that OSU's big lead in the continuing series, 67-15-6 might be cut. The big Friday riot came, as well as an overwhelming number of OSU sup- porters, to Norman. The fieldhouse was packed thirty minutes before mat time, mme fans arriving two hours early. ggies Escape bel's Aces The full house which attended the wellepublicized wrestling match between OU and OSU at the Sooner fieldhouse certainly got their money's worth. Each individual bout lived up to its pre-match billing. Yet the Cowboys might have felt like their dollars went a little further. as the final score gave them a close victory of 20-14. Although OU led only once, the furthest OSU could pull away was six points following the 150 pound match. That match was one of the critical points in the evening activities. OU's highly regarded Brian Beatson had lost a disappointing 10-4 decision at 142 pounds, and Sooner wrestling mentor Stan Abel put the load on freshman Kevin Young. hoping he could bring the Sooners back into the matchr Young nearly accomplished the goal. He put unbeaten Poke star Paul Martin on the lesser end of the score. throughout the bout. Allowing a late escape and a takedown with 13 seconds in the final period, Young narrowly lost to the Aggie ace. ' The score of the Bedlam Series matchup teetered back and forth as Sooner standouts Jeff Callard and Rod Kilgore were both victorious. Then the closest OUAOSU match in recent years boiled down to the heavyweights as Sooner Bill Kalkbrenner faced Jimmy Jackson of O-State. The evenings score stood at 14-14. Kalkbrenner took an early lead with a takedown but just 28 seconds into the second period it all ended. Jackson surged up and took the Big Red heavyweight with him. Down they carrie and Kalkbrenner found himself on his back and within seconds, pinned. OU and the hopes ofrstopping the Aggie winning streak were stopped. But the bedlam goes on. N 5 us-1 gn 'lx l' ...-,,.,,z'5'- gif' di Q- .: Ss, Y 'fel- 'ni if H" 1' E i ANTICIPATING THE BATV1-E Wm, the gmpplms :hp Oklallorna matmen warm up below a jammed from Wisconsin, ranked number three nationally, h+?lClh0ll5E' ABOVE THE SIX MILLION dollar man. Jeff Callard. keeps a light hold on his formidable foe. Ron Ray of OSU LEFT DETERMINED TO TIRE lm hapless Aggie foe, Shawn Garcl rides Billy Rue. hoping lor an eventual pin and six points for the Big Red, OODBI N D 65 nty- Q CV CHHS Qc Nj D 350 1 'T'- 5559-lm Il - GW, 14 Rod Shoate, Football d Kilgore, Wrestling Bull Severns Baseball 'S' Q1 N Q www A if la 1 T-YQ' 1: -'V ffwi, ,, Ma'-"' 3 1 QJ- V ll Q qu' f HJ' Q "s .Z 11" f 'Cin if I 1-H 1 gnu:- LEFI' Randy Veltkamp Track ABOVE Joe Washmgton Football BELOW Jeff Callard Wrestling ,vi V ly l ' 1 T' 'F ' , . , I. 5 x D 4' ,Q ' - ' Sr sf l I 4 ' Y , 5 , L Q 1 , b 1, 1 . y A I .9 'Q ' Y I - 1 .' ,153 , Il: .. . ' f I, F . " . 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W HOLDING A POSITION equal in importance to any other sport included in the intramural schedule, ping pong requires quickness and concentration. as shown by John Marshall as he readies to return a serve at the north base tieldhouse. With the beginning. of the spring semester, 1975, came the biggest ac- tivity on campus, spring intramurals, The various sports open for student participation gave nearly everyone an area to display their special talents. Basketball was the headline sport in January. Yet the following weeks brought such varied activities as racquetball, swimming, wrestling, softball and track and field. The semester's schedule concluded with the Sooner Cycle "500." Participation was at an all-time high. Ray Thurmond, director of intramurals, predicted that over 13,000 students would have had a part in the OU in- tramural program by the close of the year in May. Beyond this, there were always coaches, referees and of course the spectators. 1' Like most activities on today's campus, intramurals were plagued with lack of money and facilities. Yet the growing enthusiasm for Sooner in- tramurals could only point to bigger and better things, THOUGH ONLY FOUR racquetball courts are available to the students at OU, it is an extremely popular sport and an integral part of intramurals. Pounding a serve, Doug Miller hopes to advance in the racquetball competition by defeating Vance Sanders, Inffafzliifals Run, Punt and Pass Housing lmenl Best Pass: Neil Swanson Best Punt: Mark Babin Best Run: Marvin lmos Housing lwomenl Best Pass: Mamie Hickerson Best Punt Polly McLean Best Run: Mamie Hickerson Horseshoes Mixed Doubles: Cathy Massad, Jim Bowles Women's Singles: Mamie Hickerson Men's Singles: Peter Sharp Men's Doubles: Don McGregor ' Golf Individual: Brian Burleson Men's Housing: Charles Worcester Independent lmenl: Mike Parker Sorority: Carrie Askins Handball Doubles: David Montgomery, David Vanderah Singles: David Montgomery Mixed Doubles: Karen Guither, David Montgomery Table Tennis Men: Yervan Arakelian Women: Karen Steinkirchner Mixed Doubles: John Chang Men's Doubles: Wiriya Tjaksa 1974-1975 Volleyball Sorority: Alpha Chi Omega Co-Ed: Walker 11 and 12 Fraternity: Beta Theta Pi Housing fmenl: Parker lndependent: Spikers Cross Country Overall: Nolan Grayson Bowling fmenj Greek: Phi Delta Theta Housing: Parker House lndependent: Champs Bowling Qwomenj Greek: Alpha Phi Housing: Walker 7 East lndependent: Fighting Pineapplettes Run, Punt and Pass -Fraternity: Best Pass: John Edwards, Beta Theta lPi Best Punt: Jim Stover, Delta Tau Delta lBest Run: Bob Stuart, Alpha Tau Omega Men's Housing: John O'Dell Sorority: Men's lndependent: Nolan Grayson Best Pass:Susan Ross, Alpha Chi Fraternity: Frank Barry, Sigma Alpha B I. Omega . Epsilon UW mg 1C0'edl Best Punt: Cay Papagolos, Alpha Chi Women's Housing: Sheri Snyder, Greek: Sigma Alpha Epsilon Omega Adams Hgugingg Walker and B281 Run: Pat lVlCGlOtl'1lll"l, I Sorority: Marsha Ray, Chi Omega lndependent: Co-Ed Team 'Omega Badminton ' Men's Doubles: Scott Seefeldt Women's Doubles: Kathy Cusack Mixed Doubles: Ron Reinke IVIen's Singles: Khan Zafar Izhal Basketball Marathon Men: Applejacks Women: Black Peoples Union Basketball fone on onej Women: Joyce Porter Fraternity: Mark Louglin Housing: Kyle Travis I 'Y E - i 4 p- fm- .4-1 ft 11--1-' ni" I " " WA' ll 1 gggp:,,.,.::!f' P' :.'2':ll'.".!..-""....""2 ef- 1 . K : .Ak -'Q .r 245s4:'if55l f HOOPS AND NETS are key words in spring intramural's biggest sport, basketball, as Dave Faulkner pumps a field goal, hoping to advance Delta Tau Delta in the greek basketball standings. Intramural spectacular The bedlam of the first days of fall classroom activity and the fervor of Oklahoma football--it always seems to go hand in hand at OU. Yet Oklahoma football doesn't necessarily mean Barry Switzer, Owen Field and Joe Washington. To the average Sooner student names like the intramural field, Ray Thurmond, the Hombres and the Legal Eagles were just as vital, as gridiron temperatures rose. The sports spectacular tabbed intramural football was as much a part of the Sooner September days as Dale Hall. At the base of all the activity was the OU Intramural Athletic Office, directed by Ray Thurmond. Thurmond has been involved with coaching, instructing and athletic administration at OU for over a decade. Heading a more than ample staff, his office began the 1974-75 year by organizing the more than 2000 students registered for intramural competition, a great part of whom had their eyes on the football field. Crisp September winds were soon mixed with the buzz over upcoming intramural 'battles. Rumors of 200 pound lines, super-star backs and womenls squads equal to any male team flew. across the campus as Oklahoma Daily rankings increased team pride and senses of competition. Campus wide involvement and en- thusiasm, a situation which grows each year, produced in 1974 a exciting in- tramural football season unparalleled in past years. lt comes as no surprise from the organization which involves more students than any other campus wide group, intramural sports. spices fall at OU HOPES FOR SACKING the quarterback are mentor for the Holman House Heroes, eventual dashed for one defensive player as the offensive university housing champions, launches his aerial . attack in the nick of time. fl 59' an fm VT" . ...Kim .v 'if P7 ,- ff 'fl' uf- I - 5. . A.,-, f 1 A 0 . -'ff-'r"'wf-f'vlluf'l""1"'-"-vf-'-nilOlhnev- , .1i.x4'v-wp .,-arm r-4 -vw'-bmw... .sr ' ' ' ' ' ' "' 4' "HQ J' -v.-'br-jf!-qwrus,qjg.1:1i1:i"4 ABOVE: THE QUARTERBACK SNEAK may be for yardage against a tough Sigma Alpha Epsilon an old play but it still has use as Mike Brown, defense. BELOW: THE DUST RISES as the quarterback for Delta Tau Delta fraternity dashes quarterback for the Legal Eagles. a team con- Q.. is.. if g, ,arf -nd. --,V . .,, 'lv-'-'ULAX ., ., 1- H- ' viii".-f X' . .1 1 - .s'M -..x .f .. ruff T " x fr l sisting of University of Oklahoma law students, blasts a long bomb down the sidelines of the in- tramural field. Men's Intramural Football Championships Greek Sigma Alpha Epsilon 13 Beta Theta Pi-B 2 Independent Hombres 26 Filth 0 Housing Holman House 13 Sager House 0 Playoffs Hombres 31 Holman House 7 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 6 Hombres O Women's Intramural Football Championships Greek Kappa Alpha Theta Zfpj Delta Delta Delta 0 Housing Cross 7fpj Muldrow Gfpj Playoffs Cross 18 Kappa Alpha Theta 7 ' wg: w M, gg, I. " i"- :- 1A H15 "'::":', 1. -,.'-eEsia:::- ...,. , riwfiig Wim? 4 : A .V.., . ...,. if Q .L iga . I x ,.,.,: Ziff? , ,f Eiim' X ..:,22 . -J 1 1 ' 52? Iii. -ff. f .ff ..,., - ::a:.,,1.:, 5' ' 4' 32:21 15 '11'- ':'1:1 ' ""' Mi: Q ,,,,, f,,.,,.! f z A':' '2"" ' '- ' 6 ,,., 1 f "2'- if g . 1 g, f 5 ., , l ik:-. "gg 3 I , rzifa 3.fff?!i,ff ' .:., --:- - ,F2-- A . --:- - 5' QQ---' T! ---:-: f ' . ' """' Y, ,.., w wswm .y ' wr ..,, I , " ""' : ""' : 3-2 L "" . - ' SQ? ' . " ' H., ..,.,. 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'fffXf""WN Rm 5,55--3kf.f.1L'55ZfN, W A 35, ,,f3S?L,,3Qmx Q M wfwvsgg f E - .Q-'.j':g5vf,g Q -Zgiggk , , ,- Q 'W-Q,5y 71?IQ1" , mg, W- 1,5 W, .. ,VZ , U A.. W,,f4,,:.2nX .X 5 A353 H - . ff' ,uv-1.1:-.:px,. . A ---- .fr 3 QV 'ljpwfz 1-' :- 103 w,.fyL,sgfe-311-An. ' W fi ' ,.Nwff'2QWinyeQ, -mf Q' I fm J -IQQQQQMQ 5 i ,f if -Qigiwihg ,ie f 'f 3.1, W mvw giiq fs, Sf? " f 1 a . 2 M ! sufi f arm- - 325354 Q .swf N ' Rf E '- Xe, lr , f we E 2 1. -. , 'rvif-vim in - W J.. - . A F ,fn 1 -f-5vwggf?wif,3'- if iq - ' ""' 1 ...ff 9 W WN., - V-X' " "QQ: ,f , fu 5: ' E f' f --- Mm., W"WM..., .QW M I Fw? K 'v.fN'w Kmwwigwwwvvy ,Q W, egkgzsgm' m X. :-:q:.:.:.:.:.:- f.i.1l:f-91 f e . Ara.-,S . "-l V 'Z ci? V, . H ,,,.... . . g Q,', Q. 5 Suv X J' ffl, 'Wk f : iii ' iggrfki' 'fwrag ws-'Y :fi , ff sal? W5 . ' -15523, gg- y R ,,ff1 YZMJfQ'b- rr" ' My Q Qtr. President Paul F Sharp ABOVE: MAN TO MAN discussions occupy the rare spare time that President Sharp and Joseph Ray have. RIGHT: TOPICS OF TODAY engage President Sharp with a student between classes. Administrative heads assist president Dr. Paul F. Sharp served his fourth year as University of Oklahoma president in 1975 after becoming the university's ninth president on Aug. 16, 1971. The president was the administrative head of the university. Assisting the president in administering various areas and projects within the university were two provosts and five vice-presidents. Sharp is beginning his tenth year as a lecturer for the American Council on Education, and this past year alone he has been involved in institutes for presidents, as well as academic deans, of institutions of higher learning. 2 . i . it P DEEP IN THOUGHT over the day's agenda is President Sharp. 'vii g.. dis. J ' ,a .. A.:A 'I LEFT: CENTER FOR STUDENT DEVELOP- MENT is just one of the agencies under Dr. JR. Morris, vice-president for the University Com- munity. ABOVE TAKINGABREAKfrom his busy day of ABOVE: THURMAN WHITE ACTS as vice- activities is John Orvin Dean vice president for president. Assistants serve as force behind Academia LEFT: FACING NEW PROBLEMS is Dr. Gene Nordby, vice-president for administration and finance. . Ti , , ll ABOVE: FUND RAISING ACTIVITIES are just one of the functions performed by the office for University Development headed by David Burr. Hunsberger heads academic program The Provost: it's an office most Sooner students aren't aware of but one which is vital to the functioning of the University. Dr. I, Moyer I-lunsberger is responsible to President Paul Sharp for all internal academic affairs. As well, l-lunsberger heads up plans for the complete Sooner academic program in addition to the budget of the University. His duties also include the controversial area of tenure decisions and faculty appointments. RIGHT: A BIG LOAD of work faces Dr. l. Moyer Hunsberger as the University Provost. BELOW: FLOODS OF PAPER are a regular part of Barbara James job as secretary to the OU Regents. Pro ost .itt X ' . 7 Q " 4 . . .Q L. i i Y Regents , rims, Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education 'fi' 'T T tv . . ' . 1' '-' " S I 'wtf 'Yr' i " ' , ' 'V Li iv 4 P T- M - f, n - T . T -4 1: ' ., .- " V ' '.Z N --' N36 A 5 ,mg gg If-3' fl :X F' Jas. 3 J 'lk 1 +1 af P 'fb ' 'A F Y -0- M N.,-. . w ' f- A T A LN ' . Q-, , I A ...... ur D 1 '23,-I Q '. 5 ,. , f r . 1 '- , . . ,. W ,N li K . , ., sis?-. z.. 'fi ' T . f V. . 6 f ' 'T . -rr HQ F?'7::i"fi.r: . 3 ' N ' i ' " ...R ,- A . . - .f H ' A I The Oklahoma State Regents -for Higher Education include Rubye Hall, Bob Allen, John Patten, Secretary, John Vater, Jr., Russell Vaught, E.J. Dunlap, Chancellor, Joe Gary, Vice-Chairman, Exall English, Chairman, Goodwin Broaddus, Jr., and G. Ellis Gable. In J l OU Board of Regents Q -4 ' V' t i -T l 71 532:3 4 ' ' J :xy , It I ' Jw The OU Board of Regents includes V MQ, Jack Santee, Tom Brett, Walter Pl , Nevvstadt, Richard Bell, KD. Bailey, Bob " Q ', I Mitchell, and Mack Braly. ff , Xt' 1' Established by the constitution of the State of Oklahoma, the State Regents for Higher Education 'are responsible for determining overall plans and policies for all schools in the state's higher educational system. The OU Board of Regents serve as the overall governing board for OU. Concerned with the monetary aspects of the University, they gave approval for the Lloyd Noble Center located south of campus as well as other aspects of University expansion. w 233 M sa V sv was bt. Boren "broom" sweeps into office A piece of the national electionvyear spotlight was on the Oklahoma gubernatorial race. In a season of new political faces, Oklahoma voters were faced with one of the newest. David Boren, a state representative from Seminole and a professor at Oklahoma Baptist University had announced his candidacy for governor in the early part of 1973. A poll taken at the time in- dicated less than 5 per cent of the state's voters knew who the man was. Also in the Democratic circle for the state's highest office were Governor David Hall and U.S. Representative Clem McSpadden, both formidable political opponents. Early indications were that Hall on the basis of his in- cumbency would secure the nomination. Yet a network of scandal involving state contracts tainted the Governor's name and in the primary he was able to garner only 23 per cent of the vote. Boren was able to capture the Democratic nomination in a surprising victory over IVIcSpadden. He went on to crush Republican Jim Inhofe in the November 5 election with 67 per cent of the statewide vote. With the change of power, the state is awaiting new ideas and new ways, from a new face. ABOVE RIGHT: GOVERNOR DAVID HALL addresses a group of Oklahoma City merchants in his battle to retain his office. RIGHT: A TEMPORARY OFFICE in the Capitol Building houses the busy work of governor-elect David Boren after completion of one of the most spectacular political climbs in state history. Governors yy X 10,1 -S +I' 'firm 'f a is i I r fa- ,411 c'. X I I D- , Z1 sr ., 2 ' ,?', A V' ' ,R It . LEFT: ARTS 8a SCIENCES DEAN, Dr. Paige E. Mullhollan pauses while checking the current class schedule. BELOW: "COME IN TOKYOT says Pamela Beason as she listens to foreign tongues in the language lab. .. ,...,., -- fe X Future e.e. cummings begin here The university's largest college, the College of Arts and Sciences again in 1974-75 attempted to provide its students with an understanding of today's complex world. Controversy again arose early in the academic year over the college's requirement of two upper-level foreign language courses for graduation. Despite suggestions from students that foreign culture courses be substituted, the language requirement nevertheless stood. But the college did continue its provision of allowing students to plan a flexible major. With approval of the collegeis Executive Committee, students were allowed to design a major and draw up a schedule of courses to meet their individual needs. PICK A CARD, any card while hunting down an anthropology book as Barbara Ives does in Bizzell Memorial Library. -3 " -32 5 i7+9P.w-L1-gl vi JIUI if-L... FQ. elite is -ia - :: J q A L . E gm PEE I I i 5 I ',,,J , ,,-Y" . ,.,..-f' , I I i'. I t r I I 1 Jw S33 f i 1' I , 'W 1 .rtt 9 im fwsye tees Business Administration off! FINGERS IN ACTION are a familiar sight at the College of Business Administration. ABOVE RIGHT: "MY QUALIFICATIONS ARE . . ." seems to be the basic line Ron Fraglone uses at his interview. RIGHT: DR. NICHOLAS BALOFF heads the College of Business Administration as dean. 000229, "QU Tx 535 Lis. P Ten-keys mean more Howard Hughes' A broad undergraduate major program could be found in the College of Business Administration at the University of Oklahoma. An upsurge in the enrollment figures of the College of Business Administration occurred as a greater number of business students appeared on campus. Students in- terested in a career in Petroleum Land Management could follow a planned program after obtaining a major in business management. The college courses led to a degree of bachelor of business administration. The college also offered, with the cooperation of the College of Education, the degree of bachelor of science in business education. A student could, in addition, complete the requirements of the Oklahoma standard teaching certificate while working toward the bachelor of accountancy degree or the bachelor of business administration degree. Education ., 5 -. -Us , ,Ji LEFT: HKILROY WAS HERE" and so are the marks of other students who occupy this desk. BELOW: DEAN OF EDUCATION Dr. Richard Wisniewski takes time out from routine duties. iq., - K ix- fl. 'J-1 wg , LW. 'Riley ,,."'Ql-'tfahA.Q ' ' ' ' Teachers teach future teachers Preparing students for teaching careers in the public schools was the function of the College of Education. The college operated through teaching certificate programs and courses in professional education, general education, and specialized education. Cooperation with the College of Business Administration enabled the college to offer students a bachelor of science degree in business education. Majors in the college consisted of art, bookkeeping, clerical practice, business education, early childhood education, elementary education, foreign language teaching, home economics education fvocational and generall, journalism education, language arts education, mathematics education, music fin- strumental, vocal, combinedi, physical education, science education fbiological, earth, physicall, social studies education, special education, and speech and drama education. STUDENT TEACHING FINESSE is acquired through the program set up by the College of Education as Janice Lawrence helps fourth graders. X IMS? 3: i Nt- gl, i- " ..1.z'-jim 1 1 -.W N.:-3 -' ir - T 1 ina.. - -,ii :..ri gi .-,.p,,rci'wL.'.:. r: .Ji A-2 , , , 1, .EUQIUQQHUQ -.r,,Af-'1,,, .Q-sch. ,Q-. I" -' . 'ii 'l'i.p BELOW: CHANGING THE CONTROLS to get the right effect takes concentration for Joe King. Degrees in sixteen engineering fields meteorology, pre-architecture, en- vironmental science, and information and computing sciences were offered by the College of Engineering. The College was organized into several schools and departments. each of which ad- ministered programs of study or curricula. A student became eligible for a bachelor's degree in the appropriate field upon completion of one of the curricula. Some majors in the college included aerospace engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, engineering physics, environmental science, geological engineering, in- dustrial engineering, meteorology, natural gas engineering, and pre- architecture. Engineers major in T-squares, clouds RIGHT: THE DELICATE TOUCH is used by George Thomas in working on the wires of his nuclear engineering project. BELOW RIGHT: ISSUES AT HAND concern Dr. William R. Upthegrove. fife- 2, iw? XJ' Environmental Design i 1 l l ,Q N. -N r.-s-frank? I ,QE , i9 1. '- A - ' -- i ' s .jg in E- 63. -NNN V 1 .,f ,- l A -lc? "gf-? , 'ia " 51- -1 1-'Wi-I f4 Hi. ,QMS gm, .- 3 .Eh M "DIG THIS DESIGN," says Henry Hepburn as he creates environmental designs. 4 l l . fi X ,lr W X A JN. l - . f .l fr If 1' . ii! ,r-- - ' llfzfr... . N ' X: x gl r g -, x X. . X x X X . 7 xv. 5. ' M . , , N N 5 ' t ' l . DEAN MARLIN R. HODGELL presides over college of Environmental Design. ARCHES AND ANGLES combine with a steady hand to make a new design. Frank Lloyd Wright becomes a hero A bachelor of science degree in the College of Environmental Design with its approved multi-disciplinary program of 126 hours, included courses in communication skills and the cultural, natural, physical, and social en- vironments. Undergraduate programs in architecture and in construction sciences were also offered. Students interested in careers in architecture usually began their undergraduate work through collaborate programs in a major field within the Colleges of En- vironmental Design, Engineering, or Arts and Sciences. The student, after completion of his undergraduate work, continued professional studies for the master of architecture degree in the School of Architecture. Fine Arts KEYS TO PLAY from Bach to Bachman-Turner Overdrive await a fine arts student. Expressions come from fine arts Composed of the School of Art, the College of Fine Arts provided professional training in preparation for the degrees of bachelor of fine arts in art, art history, or art history education, and a bachelor of arts in art history. The School ot Drama, offered programs of study in all phases of theatrical production leading to the degrees of bachelor of fine arts in drama and bachelor of fine arts in dance. The School of Music offered' courses for attainment of the degrees of bachelor of music and bachelor of music education. Q-T PW' v , xr, If , na sa' R :qt xx U I Y ABOVE: PAINTING A PHOTOGRAPH, Eloise Tillman recreates a special scene. CREATING A MASTERPIECE from fine arts students is the dean, Dr. Gordon Atkinson. vp" RY ,. J ' -itvf, " it-I . way ji 'lr ' Hs 5 I ngi lr l , -ff? I- E' 1 ' .7215- ' . S A Y ,Q ' A' I v' Q Jir i" 'gif '- K 'Ig' 'I ' 'lf Lf v iii' IN F57 D lcigfitrftx fjil tf, F 1: - N 1 -- - - A ' C -1 is : 2' Nfl wg ,':'gw7v,4 I 'l 1 , '-1.,lwg.:'.lQ5 I f Esau Graduate College . x .Zi-.K-,Ii I xt :ju Lugwsgiqrlfrq in .., QM! H . , -5'lfts1fl'1' S4122 ..-"cw1r' -W." " ' '. fr-' ,1v:'1-ff'5g5.5-'if 'E '-.1 539 , 4, fi? fo 'ii-Sli Q I 5529 V ., -lit XXX X N MU rl -' 1' N' X F 1 5 'Q rt 4- x r , 2 W2 rzsliswg f V 1 io ,gon oo . r it nr .rtf,,r,,arr'..ssr A , . I , . f,. 1 V-3,OO.f.?f'OOg:.0OOW 5+ ' it Wiliwit '1 af' Q0 I' m Qooloooollolol if-N' ' b5'0"3'0o'cfo is oooovmr-SQSWQ -. 0,:,Q9MM- -4 'i lkllfekif-J'f "" fffi'-W 'WYQQSXQQ 'www' ' ' it H 'QA lfowow ai' emwoow N rx err " 'J - Xt --mm Eslllligr-y1?.':"a'2'ati:f2i5A.AQ55 ff IVlaster's and doctoral degrees in a d wide variety of disciplines were offere on the Norman campus by programs and the Health Sciences Center campus. Under the general requirements were responsible for the ' ' d' 'dual direction of the programs of in lV1 students. Grads finish- what now? LEFT: STUDYING BEHIND BARS is Iranian Ph.- D, candidate, Rajabali Kiani'Aslani as he prepares for a graduate college exam. " MVHSI7 vi-azmvwazo 50 MISHEIAINII ...uw no au nisaamnn WONDERS OF ART hang above the head of Dr, VARIETIES OF BOOKS confront the graduate college student working towards a higher degree. Atkinson, Dean of the graduate college. W ,u i at 54 it 33? if Will the next Perry Mason please stand? Although the College of Law did not prescribe a fixed course of pre-legal studies, applicants were urged to concentrate on English, the social sciences, business, or some of the humanities. The English language, both written and spoken, was an essential tool for a lawyer. Most students chose to pursue undergraduate studies in either arts and sciences or business fields. A bachelor's degree from an approved institution was required for admission, and students must have taken the Law School Test CLSATD prior to their application to the College of Law. ABOVE LEFT: CANYONS OF BOOKS tower over first year law student Richard Mildren as he studies torts in the law library. ABOVE RIGHT: "HOW'S IT SPEl.LED?" questions Dr. Robert Wright. Dean of OU's law school as he thumbs through a dictionary. RIGHT: THE WISE OWL of the OU law building. famous for late night paint jobs by the engineers, stands as a symbol for' educational excellence. Law Liberal Studies XS 5 pn, PROBLEMS OF LOCATION are always of in' terest to Dr. Roy Trout, Dean of the College of Liberal Studies. at ' 'W tra, Studies examine soil profiles to frog legs A combination of guided independent study and intensive resident seminars were featured in OUls College of Liberal Studies. It was primarily designed for adults who continued their jobs or professions while studying. The curriculum encompassed three areas-- humanities with fine arts, history, literature, philosophy, and religiong natural sciences with biological, earth, and physical sciences, and social sciences with anthropology, economics, history, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology. LEFT: A VARIED CURRICULUM is one of the benefits of OU's College of Liberal Studies which first-term student Jean Manning enjoys. . .N -ef--s-' A lm--'-"LW-1'--ri BACHELOR OF UBERAL Q if,3iG5'L95 MASTER OF uaemtt , STUWE5 sruoies summon , F' ig .rt L. 4 ..,....w- '?sf5fFiriar'a: nncwzuvrnvs "5r 1 1- . """"""'fS """"'L lllllts 'nllouuclpil Mm smug , nintclfll !i"""'G wit .ur mast.-ru S Cllltlllllulllll --- " 'n' f :ti-f1'fii:4 wY.itQr9..9t0' . - "flfff1l.'7fl ., ,ivviitsiiewlm BLS UEEREE A LONG TRAIL of studies lies before the student aspiring for an undergraduate as well as graduate degree. i mis ntsm Degree in University College? Impossible During the time freshmen were enrolled in the University College, they received guidance and counseling to assist them with their academic progress. Advisors experienced in working with students helped them select major fields of study. As soon as a student completed at least 26 hours of college work with an overall average of "C" or better and had satisfied other requirements, he was admitted to the college from which he wished to receive his degree. BELOW: MASSIVE LECTURE CLASSES always haunt the typical frosh year, as discovered by Chris Rojas. RIGHT: A BUSY SCHEDULE always confronts Dr. Jerome Weber, Dean of the University College. BELOW: lT'S SOMINEX CITY for a typical fresh- man. as he wades through the jungle of first semester studies. ,..,z:..f ,l..Q..'Q U Il:'l..,, N iq. N. gli Q u ' sf C U U ' vljiim qw l I I 0,0 0 1,37 I niversity College it ,fl Denhstry FAR ABOVE: "ONLY ONE CAVlTY," says Jo Loots as she cleans Glynnis Blacks' chompers while lab assistant Linda Pollaro observes. ABOVE: ADMINISTERING DENTAL STABLIZATION is Dunn Cumby, a third year student. LEFT: DEAN OF DENTISTRY, Dr. William E. Brown takes time out from watching students. Open wide for future dentists kj l Applicants in the College of Dentistry completed satisfactorily a minimum of 60 semester hours, fulfilling the prerequisites in the biological sciences, chemistry, and physics, and cumulating an average of "C" or higher. A bachelor of science degree in dental hygiene was also offered by the College of Dentistry. ,ggi an 1 ZQ K' Health 5, x, 4 9 -gf2rn5:f:::1:5:::::xg5:5g,e:gq f Q . .. . .... . 5' 352:-l:IE'E15E1?Ci'211236 .Efztij -5222.31P'fi:-:2.'f?ES4tE'.4:f5sESE'I? Z'555'55'5f'fWEil32ES152113f.EfF',:E?f:5e':Ei?:?1': f ?5x?.f:f:':2 1 '- " I' :..,.,,.1...i:., ..,,:1:f52:: ,.,..3..::,,,,2,-,:.-M... ,W,,1,4,.. ..Q,.:.,,...,:...,:.r.:1. X . 5 , ,- .MM , . .. . ,W .,i.,.-VH.. . ....... , ,., ..,. , .-1-. ..,.. ....... , .. ,.,.,,..,,w.,.,w..,i.v.W,,,,,K,M,..w . . , -.---, . . . ...... ,N Programs build better bodies 12 ways Undergraduate degree programs in radiologic technology, physician's associate, occupational therapy, and physical therapy were offered by the College of Health. In addition the college also offered non-degree programs in the fieldsnof medical technology, radiologic technology, and respiratory therapy. RIGHT: "AND IN THIS corner we have ..." explains a teacher in the radiology lab. I, ., ,I if :el 5 . . I3 Q I- , . 1 I , I vi , 1 X ,ff I ...f VP , M! r' Y -A V f f M' .ree , I . t il + 14 - X rm: "mQj. 1g,L5? 5-' 'O ABOVE: LISTENING AND LEARNING, Carma - ,.. -fl tif r. i'.:xA l ."iw'. ABOVE: DR. PHll.I.IP E. SMITH, dean of the College of Health, pauses from his activities. K H 5' 22 if 5? fins .Ati ..., .,,,, A Broad field part of medicine Students who planned preparation for entrance to the College of Medicine were encouraged to achieve a major in whatever field was of greatest interest to them, acknowledging that the truly educated physician possessed a broad background. LEFT: DR. THOMAS E. LYNN stands as dean of the College of Medicine. 54" A f ABOVE: A CROWDED LECTURE provides stimulus for med-students. " p L tg-5 ggi' W LEFT: MIXING UP CONCOCTIONS, Bob First '4.V an .4 VA4 1 N tests out an idea, X T ,. iz 52 - X, " 11, r , , fzmvlati 5 'ff X N "" ' walffw-it jg 'iv ,, viii!! 'yum ., ' . V ' , , i P! wi ,, wendy? Degrees come a la Florence Nightingale A bachelor of science in nursing and a master of science degree were offered by the College of Nursing with a nursing major. After completing the bac- calaureate program, students were eligible to write the examination for licensure as a registered nurse. Nursing school prepared the student to do many things: practice skilled nursing care in different health care settingsg cooperate and lead within the health team and as a citizen within the communityg search for new knowledge in nursing careg and encourage changes for improving health care delivery. Students with competent knowledge and-or background content in an area could receive credit through advance standing examinations. Courses in the general nursing education could be taken on the Norman campus or at other two- or four-year colleges. The Health Sciences Center campus in Oklahoma City also offered nursing major courses. ABOVE RIGHT: THE SCRUB TEAM-'Ruth Anne Price and Mary McGiffert prepare for their job. RIGHT: DEAN OF NURSING, Gloria Smith ponders the day's activities. FAR RIGHT: HITTING THE BOOKS, a large part of nursing, finds Debbie Duke deep in thought. ursing 153 1-,,, il... U11-ff--If I we I . Qi? Pharmacy A NEW CONCOTION is mixed up by Alicia Crisp, a third year student in OU's College of Pharmacy. MORTAR AND PESTLE is a common sight among the varied equipment found in the Pharmacy Building. A BIG SMILE comes over Dr. Blissett, Dean of the College of Pharmacy, as he pauses in his office. How about curing the common cold? A bachelor of science degree in Pharmacy consisted of a five-year program. The College of Pharmacy provided a training program that qualified those who graduated for the general practice of the profession as well as any of its various specialties. i l ' . l E I H 3 ,ij .. i f.s.1'.'F.- ,A A ,EX . ' 'l if pf,- .-U: A M if I UBEGUILED BY BIRDS" is the new display that David Ross, Mitch Codding, and Tom Yound prepared for Stovall Museum. J oumey thru Sto all Museum... by Jack Kilgore Most people think of museums as places that house old and dead things. But why not approach the museum from the viewpoint of the people who owned some of the artifacts on display? This gives you a new outlook on your ancestors, to say the least. Stovall Museum is a good place to start the nostalgic trip back through the ages with your own personal guided tour. Go back way before time and study the fossil skeleton of a huge mammoth, first cousin to a mastodon. And then there's the leg bones of a Brontosaurus . . , his knee is eye level and his shoulder touches the ceiling. Natural wildlife exhibits abound on the first floor, and if you've never been face to face with a grinly bear here's your chance. Upstairs, the museum houses many artifacts of man, from vases and urns of ancient Greece to clothes worn less than a hundred years ago. There's even a portion of a tile floor excavated from a house of 11th Century Syria. Put yourself back in time. Think about walking on that tile floor, pondering such domestic problems as replacing ii. AUSTRALIAN BARK PAINTINGS catch the eye of Mr. and Mrs. Elton Ellion while touring Stovall Museum. I I i I 3 I si' is: F-'g',4,,. a personal guided tour the water urn your child broke. The pieces of it are in the display case to your left. And what about that Samurai suit of armor? Was there a lump in your throat as you donned the black-lacquered metal to do battle? The items on display in a museum may outline the story of mankind, but they also lead people to a misconception about what a museum is for. 'LMuseums are storehouses for the future," said David Ross, director of exhibits, L'We keep items so they can be studied in the future. "But now is also the future," he added, "and the mundane things we throw away today will be the museum pieces of tomorrow. It's a never ending cycle." The items on display represent only about 10 per cent of the artifacts a museum may own. The Stovall Museum displays roughly three per cent of its 2.7 million items. The rest are stored in various buildings on campus, available for research. Each collection is the responsibility of a curator, and the museum has 18 of these professors, one of whom is the director of the museum, Dr. J.K. Greer. Each curator is responsible for his collection, adding items to it and using it for research. Five research laboratories use the various collections. An extreme example ofthe difference between what the museum owns and what it displays is the two rat specimens it has mounted and on display. Some 30,000 more are in storage, available for research use. "Using the rat specimens," Ross said, "a researcher can arrive at a data'base from which he can draw comparisons of specimens he has collected. He can perceive changes over the years. "Another example where museums played an active part in research was when scientists were studying the if M ff? ,sdc5.s55,Kw6 problems of DDT," he said. "By measuring the thickness of egg shells stored in museums, and comparing this data with egg shells found today, the scientists were able to conclude that DDT was causing the shells to become thinner and thus weaker." Ross noted that some of the collections havenit been touched in years, but that some of them, such as the insect collections, are in constant use. "By holding in trust well-documented collections, and making new surveys, researchers can see changes," he explained. Another item which gives only an indication of what the museum keeps in storage is that Brontosaurus leg bone. The museum does own the rest of the dinosaur. "I-le's just a pile of bones in a warehouse," Ross said, "and if he was assembled he would be just about the length From fossils to live goldfish - Stovall Museum has it all .b'.Kf, ,m I f,.'v E V l if il ,,g HOUSE OF FOSSILS, Stovall Museum offers displays like the one Dana Simpson observes. -.3 , fgif "Please don't handle the merchandise... of the Stovall Museum. We simply clon't have anywhere to display him." A brand new, modern display area at the front of the building has a new exhibit, "Beguiled by Birds," which shows mankind's fascination with the feathery creature. It also includes specimens of many birds found in Oklahoma. "We try to vary our displays from time to time,', Ross said, "and whenever we get the chance to set up a new collection to exhibit, we make the change. "Besides our 'Beguiled by Birds' show, we have a new exhibit of football equipment and uniforms," he said, "and it includes a 1915 uniform alongside a modern, tear-away jersey." Further proof that the museum is more than a dusty archive is Marge Farwell, director of education. She puts together tours and special programs for various visiting groups. "We try to give these visitors as accurate a representation of the facts as possible," she said, "and we also want them to leave with a sense of wonder about their world maybe mankind doesn't have all the answers. t'Our most popular program is on the prehistoric animals," she continued, "and this is the only museum in Oklahoma that has a large fossil collectionf' The museum also conducts workshops, mainly for children. One subject is studied intensively in each six to eight week course. "Currently we are holding a workshop on animal behavior for the childrenfl she said, "and they are allowed to see specimens up close, including live ones. So far we've had them examine crickets, gold fish and mice." Workshops for adults are also offered, covering such subjects as nature photography and heirloom crafts. "I consider the tours and special programs to be ex- tensions of the exhibits," she added, "and we bring things out of storage that may be of special interest to a certain group. "The people can actually touch some of the items," she said, "and this makes the artifacts alive and real." "We do our best to evoke a feeling of the past," she said. Q nm ., fr- "Teacher- V :wx 1 t I i mug-Y A .r ' K W' ff - g if tijifil- V " Y' V W ' . 'V 'IF 1 T, 5 ' f ,I A V -g Q an : ,hh :I 1 . T .. , . I . i l Y - ,, X I . ,A - J ,' ' gl 1" l .g a ' ' I - 4 .. - If A' il' V V ,I v f.v' ,',N ' E -R-:vi Y Ixg.-' '.'l.fhf.' W -. 4 g " ' "' 5 ky ' 4T Iyer ..- .A S .X Egfr- ' .fa ' PX PRAISING A PAPER for her student is Sherri Foutz, participating in the student teaching program. by Don Huntington On August 31, 1974 the teaching field at the University of Oklahoma took to a new direction under a new clean of the College of Education. Replacing the late Dr. Robert Ohm, Dr. Richard Wisniewski accepted the challenge of heading the college that had the responsibility of teaching teachers. The college spent its time studying the psychological, physical, emotional training that a person would need to teach in the school system and which they would en- counter when they sought jobs. The college, in trying to prepare the student to take the responsibility of teaching, organized and instituted many programs. ln the primary courses of the college a program currently in progress gave students just starting in the education curriculum a taste of in-class service. This was clone with the teacher aid program. Under this program students were placed in various levels of schools from primary to secondary educational level schools to see if they had the ability to cope successfully with the problems of a classroom teacher. These experiences, though not as stringent as regular teaching, gave the student his first taste of the classroom. The next phase of the teacher's education in the college, was designed to give the student a use of various psychological aids with which to handle all types of problems with students. They were also designed to aid the teacher in coming to grips with their own personal problems that might arise while they taught. They were an arming device to help the teacher more fully understand the student, himself and to enable the student to get the most out of his education. The teacher practicum course was designed to aid the student teacher to be more organized before he or she stepped into the classroom. The course was designed to I need ou 77 MQ "" :-' , My ,is a .2 ff' V1 Ml CN TOP: USING NEW TECHNIQUES in her student teaching program is Dianne Kouns. ABOVE: STUDENT-TEACHER RELATIONSHIPS are strengthened by Phyllis Thompson during a class. give observation, orientation and evaluation of the possible situations that might be encountered in the classroom. Hopefully each teacher, on completion of the practicum course, will be better prepared to enter the classroom and to prepare a comprehensive program to help students learn and enjoy their learning. lt was the intent of the program of student teaching at OU to enable prospective teachers to gain understanding and appreciation of the role of the public school teacher, the human relationships that are involved, the respon- sibilities entailed, and the factors that affect professional growth in the teaching profession. From the student teaching experience each prospective teacher should gain feelings of confidence, competence, and security in per- forming the work of a teacher. Through orientation prior to student teaching and in the early stages of it, the student teacher could gain a clear understanding of what was expected of him as he engaged in student teaching. I-le could become aware of the r Classroom encounters Nw UL 'Y LISTENING AND LEARNlNG is a process both the students and student teachers experience as Sherri Foutz finds out. .hu multiplicity of relationships that he may tend to take for granted. Specifically he could be made fully aware of the time and study requirements, school policies regarding student teachers, and the school and community customs that must be dealt with. ln addition to these courses, two courses were recom- mended for teachers and prospective teachers. A media and technology course was offered to make the teacher, and the prospective teacher, aware of all the media techniques and materials at their disposal. The course, required by state law, acquainted the teacher with the use and selection of these materials to provide the most sf encourage student teachers comprehensive program to present to the young learner. Also, a class dealing with the exceptional child was in the process of becoming mandatory for all prospective teachers. The course gave the teacher a glimpse of the exceptional child to aid in the discovery of the child at an earlier age. The study encompassed both the child who was con- sidered to have some form of learning handicap and the child who was exceptionally gifted. The course, which could help teachers to recognize either type of child earlier benefitted both the teacher and the student. The handicapped child who had trouble learning, if recognized earlier in the education process, had a better chance of recovering from the handicap or overcoming the effects of the handicap, both physically and emotionally. The child who was exceptionally gifted, if recognized earlier would not be subjected to classes that seemed too slow or boring and would not become disinterested in the joy of learning. The child would not have the chance of being labeled "troublesome" or Iistless or "one that pays little attention" but would become a child that would receive attention to help develop and cope with the talent that he had. With a new dean and a comprehensive, alive program and faculty the College of Education became fully qualified to take on the task of preparing teachers to teach. Q ,- 'i N , 3 , . . V 'I at ' A I H ABOVE: GIVING SPECIAL ATTENTION is Dianne Kouns. LEFT: ILLUSTRATIONS IN CHALK get a point across for Phyllis Thompson. f gf , ms. All :fu r i dll Ml l 1 1. ,ll E , l. 1 f ,mtg v . .M i,:,VQ:m,.i-I 'um Arts and crafts to wlthdrawal. . . lCE CREAM SOCIAL is in the air as Rick Rector gathers with other DAVID STEINBERG PRESENTS a fabulous show of comedy and Students to enivv 109 Cream P1'0Vld9d by the Cemel' f0f SY'-ldefli commentary in the OU Fieldhouse courtesy of the Center for Student Development during Howdy Week. 1 .,,'r mr 9 ' -' Y xc, U 1. ,Q of r sf if v,,,.iL. . 1, Q lffki 'Q' n.Q,7-xi ' ,440 .5 lk, ,- . ..-4" W.-ef " 1 f-,gnxz 1 4,-fe-Va-.' ,.,:7L 3,35 --1 ,V -X-,un f..,1,- NAT,- WS , .. .. . - I, -Civ' 25' 'jf gy, .gg 'ii Wm ' V ,Exe ,,, 5" Z 'F , , 1 - ' fif .r mf ' X. Li gk, is 7:33 f If -457r5:fge'fw.-EV lf? ' thy .wx s u -. ". 4 f ' 'H ' Y li" f ef. . gi L' 1141 ' 'J grrmi' A 4 2Quff7'p4'5'f 3--'Iwi ' A .l Y 4545? r sg? 'ffm ' Y 1.1" 4 44'-5. 1 swf, aff 2 'fs' r'F.,g3'1'g ' 1 1: 'xi I . 2. ' 11' if fp ' V zfl 3 I Ag W - . . 4 X f ,I Deve opment l 'I Center for Student Development by Brian Husted ln this age of consolidation, conglomeration, and proliferation, the complaint was often heard that the in- dividual is ignored. People were often frustrated by classifications and numbers, and run ragged by the all-too- common bureaucratic experience of "going through channels." The analogy of a rat in a maze was painfully accurate. Amidst twenty-odd thousand other students, could one individual at the University 'of Oklahoma get the solutions to problems like "Where do I go . . ." or 'Tve got a question about ..." Could he or she receive some personal tread face-to-facel attention? You bet! On page sixteen of the Students' Omnibook, an im- pressive list appeared of interests and service available to students at OU: from arts and crafts to withdrawal, film services to test files. All you really needed to know, however, about all these subjects could be summed up in four words--Center for Student Development. This became the fifth year of operation for the Center, which combined a vast array of services and opportunities under one roof in Hester-Robertson Hall. Operations were broken down under three broad divisions to attack seven major areas of student interest. But don't let all the official names fool you. The Center, above all else, was dedicated to one ideal: every student is a person, and the most im- portant consideration of the University is to provide an educational experience relating directly to that particular person's needs, goals, and desires. The first general range of services dealt with the educational aspect directly. Needed a tutor before that exam? All that was necessary was to look over the test file to see what was expected. Educational Services could handle it. Apparently it worked. The number of students requesting tutors in the first two weeks of class doubled over the same time last year. That wasn't all. Educational Services also arranged for study skills to improve a studentls ability in the very essential technique for 'Lbooking it." There was a long list of extracurricular classes averaging enrollment of almost 1,200 students each semester for topics as diverse as "Consciousness Raisingf' photography, yoga, and cooking. Counseling for students with academic problems was also available. A second area of student interest was student development counseling. The student-operated crisis center, Number Nyne, open from 6 p.m. to 4 a.m., was included here. In addition to one-to-one counseling, students could receive drug and sex education and marriage counseling. A particular area of emphasis was THE MOST POPULAR service provided by the Center is the test file located in Hester-Robertson, which makes a wide assortment of recent tests available for study to OU students. lt i i 4 4 . F . f' ,4 its ' . ., ' ' .j,,,.1E-lv i 4 .1 s '. '55f5'I1,iFr . ' A -,,',, V5-Eff?-:Z ' :lift 1 ,..J UNDER THE DOOR goes the latest issue of "What's Happening This Week . . ." a weekly publication put out by the CSD to keep students informed about campus happenings, 1 - I te? I x s i.. 'mul f ' if,-. f mx, University Community serves many areas Veteran's Affairs, including vocational, personal, and academic help. ln general, these programs and others in student development involved the improvement of human relations and the solutions to problems encountered by students in dealing with the university community on an individual or general basis. By far the largest function in the number of manifest facets was concerned with the coordination and spon- soring of numerous student services and campus activities. Ever wonder who stuck those "What's Happening" newsletters under your door? Here's your culprit. They also printed up newsletters for commuters and parents. This part of the center was the busiest. The Arts and Crafts Center, student travel, films, trams, Moms' and Dads' Day . . , these folks had a finger in almost every kettle cooking around campus. Needs and interests of OU's minority and international students were considered here, too. Students could get help whether they were new to this country, or planning to be new to another, soon. Staff members advised and assisted during International Week in order for students to gain greater knowledge of and contact with the different cultures represented around them. Minority students' RIGHT: HEALTH CARE PROBLEMS are the constant concern of Goddard Health Center director, Dr. Donald E. Robinson. BELOW: "WHAT'S UP DOC?" questions an OU student as he takes advantage of Goddard Health Center's services. ,f ff' lay' 4 i TA Q Qs' Goddard focuses on student health ai.: -CL flip' 4-sa!-.'rg-',,:gg1j1""'?1WF - .'n.-- vzz' is .55 , ' '-fx ' 'M "P V . .'.,,'-"-J' ..:-Nw .lfaefatf ' " .N -- .Fx i' V -. -' I I wtf!-ff-f7'.f'f'sf'f'3":.f--4'-1143221"i4g'.5+ig . frev,2,t11lt,AV..,:,4f!'-lwfyqx 3 ,-wi., gi.. l""",--7'-1" ff ""'5"-MTS'"'?L"f?"l'1fwhi.s '- "VV WE- ' .Eire-HH" " ' l - -"i"l-1-swf-. -"1.w3!5!f,ll":-F -: my 4 - 1: .riff V - ' 'ir' fi' v ' ll K f .gii!if:fz.isii:g:5.,.-f 'tit-lmsf- A-PPQL ' ' . .. - . - - .,r7:.L.,,.:jg'- -' . " . M L-A'1Ni42.E:Q ' . ,fi .,e.a.72f,rv.1 ii. 'cf .2524-.s 9--Jl5.:5'- ' , Fil -" -- .gr 5P'Q3'1i.---xyav 9- 1-'SX T' -'.. V " . WING: 'X' ,f?." 1r fart.. , V '- ' Ar. ,., Q 'f:if'!3Lg,. 'x Q "qi", ' ' , 5' .vm 32- . T. H- 3- .K ,iffig T 'i' me -, V . - i., , n , .-1' -F- 4- -' T ' . .- QQY.-P ,lfgf . -. ii im -i...,... I- Y -x . ' ' K- U :nw , , X . . . Q. qisvw x., My 1 . I i n ii nr ' .E V ' ' ' ' --if " -'rigvf-ai" ' - 1 EW-1-5Efir53r':-1:-ffT:'f :xv-fr M. . - 1 :iii L-iif ifl f s ,. I -" ' ' ' ' ALS' V 47 M-QYQV, ..--.sznl ., gl . - -J e.-Y - - -. sq., ...c F, ,,.., , - ..:?-s-- ...L-i.ea.i 1" 'a"1i?' 2:'.z- ,.., . 5 "W"-I-f3lil"2. L -.,, V .sa-1 ,-' W PYT" :Qu fb- " -- ' sf-faiit g Y v LT E'- -Z'?4:-2"':Ei ' f-I-ra-5.5 35 5:33 -. . . L affairs were of special concern. Everyone here at the university deserved to be heardg this included those persons who might decide to attend OU after already establishing themselves in the world. The Women Returning to College Program, new this year, was a good example of new directions the Center was taking to serve the entire student body. Again from the Omnibook: "Students need opportunities to be heard. Providing these opportunities is the business of The Center for Student Development. Students need to be heard. Listening is the responsibility of every staff mem- ber." LEFT: FROM THE MEASLES to mononucleosis, OU students are always able to turn to Goddard Health Center for medical care. BELOW: THE OFFICE STAFF for the University Community include Romona Craig, Wilbur Walker, Harold Ray, Jack Miles, and Carolyn Alston. Seated is Vice-President JR. Morris. -pf - 3555.-asf ' :,.. L I I ":' . I Y 1 .:I'. " '. """' 3 '- X W? .,,, 1 I? Vuuq 1 I -'-- ----- - N -zfq e w gi ,,:.,, A ,.,,,, .,:. , . . an , Ax 5 mu Q x X' I s X -5 6 is 'Y ,MTS ...,... z W . . , .,... ia 4 H . xg J wi ': ,,,, 1'w1Q,2: . - 3 ii "'5 , f ' ' .. fr! 12 E ee ',i -9 ,..,.,.,.,,.. :N I 4, : : N X xx ,EK 'Q Egg E d. Q M, 52 Q, xX fx dqf, vllk 2 If M 5 if H V I V6 " ?f4L I Eff ' Q ff 2' E 1 ' W W f f 5 if Q ff c 'Q F ff M " as? 'Hifi 5 . nu 9 it N aa:-:,:.-5:-52:--:-.-.:::i:i.:'1v:-:, . if 1A,. ':i1i:3ig1iQ 3. 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Somewhere in between the time he was born and the time he would die, right after his high school graduating class got married and the other half secured a vice- presidency with some large firm or another, there came a time when the average person had to face that unique, if somewhat frightening, experience of being a college fresh' man. It wasn't the fact that his French teacher wouldn't speak a word of English that was frightening. lt wasnit that if he wanted the June issue of a magazine he had to go to the Physical Science Center but if he wanted the April issue of the same magazine he had to go to the Home Economics Department that made him afraid. 'Sgr' '. lt wasn't even that the first upperclassmen he asked directions of sent him to the faculty men's john that was frightening. Mainly, it was the realization that for at least a year, he had to live in the dorm, famous for its rabid RA's, sleezy suites, and erratic elevators. But if the freshman learned nothing else in his first year at OU, he learned that the key word in coping with the housing situation was "adapt" Adapt when you walk in your first day of college and find your roommate has a pet boa constrictor and begs you "not to tell the RA." Adapt even when you hear your next door neighbor rehearse his 'fPride of Oklahoma" act on the trumpet 24 hours a day. Adapt when your suitemate uses the bathtub to develop his photos. Adapt even when 400 foreign students get on the elevator with you and snicker, all in some foreign language or another. Adapt, freshman, adapt or die. The freshman dorm resident was such a hand at compromise, in fact, that virtually nothing bothered him. How about those favorite dorm pranks? Sticking the floor spook down the trash chute. Or tying up your roomie with his pajamas on, leaving him in the elevator, and punching all the floors. After all, dorm rats had to do something to break the monotony of hardship after hardship. Though the average freshman learned to endure almost anything, one of the evils that plagued his daily life was ggtig gsfrdf none other than the elevator. It was bad enough that the fifty-first person the elevator stopped to pick up invariably decided to squeeze in be- tween your left elbow and the guy to the right's kneecap. But did the elevator have to get stuck inbetween floors when you'd decided to accompany the whole twelfth floor to the ground? Though things seemed bad, freshmen could tolerate them. They couldn't tolerate, however, the wonderful person who found it necessary to ride the elevator down from the second to the first floor. More than one 10th floor has gone into convulsions when, late for the tenth time in two weeks to his Spanish class, the elevator stops at nine eight, seven, Freshmen get tooched ' - novel in one part ir Tooch: getting the bum end of the dealg catching trouble. V v V 3 sit: ew f fun ff Y q,..,-a-A vi . , , i 4- PQ'- W BACK TO SCHOOL balloons were part of the Howdy Week activities that Patti Parish and Kim Davis took care of. six, five, four, three, Cwith no one getting on at any of the floorsl and finally two where a conservative, upright businessman walks on the elevator, adjusts his tie, and then holds the "door open" button down while he casually checks his fingernails for any excess dirt. The minutes drag on and finally, in utter desperation, a nervous student finally says it: "Uh, sir, I hate to be a bother--but, what are you doing?" "Oh," the man says, arching his eyebrows, "I'm waiting for my wife." The freshman gulps, "Uh, sir, where is she?" "She's clearing our OCCE account--it shouldn't be more than 30 minutes." More than one conservative, upright businessman has bitten the dust this year. Mail from home was always a big event at the dorms. It's a big event because everyone in the center crowds around the mailboxes at 11:01 a.m. in a mad attempt to insert their key in the box before anyone else. The crunch that ensues would be the perfect lab situation for Compromise 1 113 Clf you will move your right big toe a half a millimeter to the southwest, I can move my right index finger enough to get my key out of my pocket.l It all works out, though, and everyone gets into their mailbox to find everyone else's mail but their own, and once again the daily mailbox ritual is complete. "Key word to a freshman's trials and tribulations-adapt..." Speaking of- rituals, the one ritual that hounded every college freshman was that pile of clothes on his floor begging to be washed. lf the student could have eliminated six things in his dorm life it would have been, without a doubt, laundry, visitation hours, homework, class, dorm meetings, and the need for sleep--in that order. Although the freshman found ways to eliminate the last five things fhe never slept, went to class, or floor meetings, or did homework, and the 11th floor had unlimited visitationl he found the first somehow always popped up when he least expected. Because it couldn't be ignored and it wouldn't do itself, the freshman had three choices in dealing with his laundry situation. He could C11 take it home to mother, C21 do it himself, Q31 or let the clothes rot and streak to class. To take it to mother automatically necessitated that the freshman go home. Since it was terribly bad for his Joe College image to be seen going home with a laundry bag, the freshman often opted to do it himself. This dealt with still yet another problem: how to operate the washing machines. First came separating the clothes--the whites and reds go together--let's have some school spirit about this thing. The average freshman usually poured half a bottle of bleach and a 59 cent box of ivory snow laundry detergent in the washing machine only to find that lo and behold, he had i - f' ' . . . 7" WT f f 1 A , may ee --ff w as r' if--.gif-fi f f ' if '?"lf5','sf' ' ,A xx , -'u:'.j-1 1 1, , ' - , S54 53 .xp vw, If ' -. E: 1,-fax. ,Eni x 5713.1 -me-'t i , F 4, il'll1Yig:":' ' Ev' lf? fl ,Q h' ' xlx . in F i f fill' . . i. 'fm , . . if -V -.:T'ii.Qs . 't , 4. ..., .- 1 - . Q. - -A-X, f ' -'X ' P- . . . . i 1' . . . - ,' -jf i .- if -.YJ J 'i I 3 X Q ' 14-gp, .. '. . , , ,i 1 ', Q 1 ,. ', , N. 25" .2 ' , ,. ' , i . I - ig. 5 ' ' fful gli. ds ,V rg. J Q I . .2 Vik ,XZ I 1 Q ' "'f'V'?'R f 7 1 , MI- Y""i' 5 'CD N H s- 4 .fri-r.'2r..33 no quarters. Tooch city. Run to the student store. Big sign: We will not give any dumb freshmen quarters for the washing machine. Run to the OCCE office. Big sign: No quarters. One thing left to do. Buy a piece of bubble gum at the student store and pay for it with a dollar bill, Get change. Nine dimes and nine pennies. Forget the laundry. Along with the laundry, forget the cafeteria. All freshmen forgot the cafeteria. Who ate in the cafeteria anyway? Not freshmen. Maybe postal workers, but not freshmen. Fresh- men ate pizza, submarine sandwiches, coke, beer Clots of beerl and Denco darlings. Who cared if the food in the cafeteria wasnft first class? Nobody ate it anyway. Sure, there were problems in the dorms. But, then fresh- men learned to adapt. Despite roommate, laundry, class, homework, cafeteria food, wrong mail in the right mailbox, and elevators, the freshman was the only being on earth capable of lying on the rock in the dorms that OU tried to pass off as a bed and said, "Gee, isn't college neat?" Q Dorm residents get a "taste" of college life 1111--A IT COOKING UP BREAKFAST for hungry dorm residents is Bertie Stockton in Couch Cafeteria. That's scrambled eggs brewing. wi .M W5 2 2? 140 l ldams President Coun l Adams council meets weekly In her second year as Adams Center President, Liz.Kaleda initiated a variety of functions for McCasland, Muldrow, Tarman, and Johnson Towers. Included were keg parties, steak dinners, and shared parties with the other major housing centers. During the weekly meetings held in the cafeteria's private dining room, the dorm presidents assembled for dinner and discussion of upcoming activities. Each dorm president was also responsible for periodic office duty. Adams President Council--Front row: Liz Kaleda. Second row: D99 D22 Vallghn- Alice Bavlss. Carolyn Mandelbaum Ste Stanley Kleinsieiber. Chet Rowland, Bill Diggs, Jeanett Dobbs. Brinkley- Bruce Howerton. Stephanie Herren. Third row: Charles White. McCasland 10, 11, 12 Manhandlers select speakers Front row: Kathleen Malone, Jennifer Burger, Deirdre Vaughn. Patti Parish, Cindy Thompson, Liz Kaleda, Sherri Lauer. Annmarie Paris, Leoana Loftis, Kem Shrum, Karen Merriman. Eecl Retrac, i Naj Nhuk. Second row: Barbara Merritt, Jan Knox, Alice Bayles, Jeanie McGaughey, Maggie Boothe. Third row: Melanie Haines, Carolyn Mandelbaum, Territa McFarlin, Denise Henning, Karen Myfelt, Michelle Addison, Cheryl Hawkins. Floors 10, ll, and 12 of lVlcCasland Tower attained a uniqueness. in that they were the only upperclass women located in that tower of Adams Center. The 12th floor residents added an extra luxury to their dorm living with a lounge and color television. The girls acquired the Manhandlers as their nickname. Several service projects flourished which included emerging cultural in- terests. A select number of public speakers were invited at various times also. V ,- is f - - s f sa ' -Y i a L P gg I ' T i r ' 5 Wi ,fa rr-dk Y,-r ur ' fe - P ' Q ' i' ' J ' F' a ' 5' r.' P ' g dj g 7 5 g , 1: Y' L I..- 1 t 1 ,E . l.,1','f"? 'W- 10 5 n 1- gfwjs ' W I 7 V 9: lffw " Front row: Sheri O'Hara., Tina Hargis, Betty Jones. LaDonna Calton. Lajuana Allcorn. Cindy Wahl. Rhonda Polen. and Carolyn Laws. Second row: Susan Wilde. Phyllis Pethoff. Martha Grunt- meir. Lori Forkey. Astrid Adams. Dianna Forthman, Sally Cundiff. McCasland 2, 3, 4,' 5 Floors sponsor carnival booth McCasland floors 2, 3, 4, and 5 joined forces to accomplish a great deal of work and to, subsequently, upgrade the quality of dorm life. These dorm residents focused their interests primarily upon intramurals, Howdy Week, Dad's Day, Mom's Day, and the yuletide season. Sponsorship of a booth to entertain underprivileged children at the Campus Chest Carnival was also a major source of satisfaction and unified the group. Representation to a large number of campus organizations was inherent among these residents. Yi ...:. 5 . 'Xml and Lori Gassmann. Thrid row: Jolando Koop. Stephanie Herren. Ginny Hall. Elena Gamble, Ann Guinn. Linda Holden. and Kathy Wagner. Fourth row: Susan Craig. Gracie Evans. Peggy Bookhout, Nancy Goble. Karen Franknecht, and Jane Woody. ,x DRUMMING UP SPIRIT for dorm residents is the OU cheerleading squad during a pep rally. , P - 5. ll- , NA, . 1. . ii'-, K F N T. . f'2'1 . Z A 'G+.r?'fhNr1 ' ff F4524 A s ii ' f-if V.1y,,4j -A-.I L 1 ' '. ':7:.ifi.,4,,, . L I 1 i' ' ' 'l' 1 142 Front row: Joe Sontheimer. Faith Ann Farmer. Pattl Hall. and Pal Chronister. Jeanine Whitney, and Rick Downey. Fourth row: Stan Thompson. Second row: Laura Bateman. Davis Tripp. Beth Stoops. Nate Tarver. Kevin Bean, Bill Wright. Karen Huether. Larry Helwig. Carl Harkrider. and Sandy Vogle. Third row: Diane Phegley. Terry Hall. Jacque Thomas. Paul Tobin. and Melody Ball. .nomar 1 Cate President Council Presidents improve communication Overseeing all activities undertaken by the occupants of Cate Center was the Cate Center Presidents Council. Led by Bill Wright, the council enacted many traditional and new ideas. These helped strengthen the communication, between all dorms and served as an example to the other major housing centers. Regular meetings were held where individual dorm presidents submitted questions and methods for improvement. Then, these presidents reported back to their dorms. Thus, responsibilities were handled in a very beneficial and rewarding manner. J ABOVE: THE ROUND TABLE provides studying grounds for Paul Goolsby and Phil Kramer. RIGHT: MORE MUSCLE, LOTS more muscle is what David Uhland is helping Tim Robb have. n i , 143 , - I V 1 D , i .1 .N 1: . l li ll i , , K li u 4. 1 1 ,.i- ' 3 i l . r . x a ' Y l A 'Q' . L . ' 1.4 A-t - . C? nz - 0 - ,- X f N ' . -. s - - I T zz- wg J, . C Hg -V'., 1 'FK .X lvl.. AQW, 'C rp- " .rx with in Front row: Virginia Pangburn. Jann Sheller. Kim Meek. Tedra Third '0W1 Calhy Edwafdi Debra OV'-Ile' R'3Vn0la WPSY- Vlfkl M4-Clufg. Vicki Gregory Sabrina Smyghe. Second row: Sharon Perrin. Leslie Wisner. Mollie Barnes. Susie Remington. Laura Henshaw. Susan Shawver. Deborah Tahsuda. Janice Hanrahan. Hfhn- MGWBTW Chew- Kar'-'V' l"lUQh?5 Karee Keck. Mary Kaye Moisani. Linda Hecker. Jan Strandlie LOCKED OUT RESIDENT. Cynthia Downes. waits for her roommate. House attains top marks Varying amounts of recognition were assessed Baker House during the school year for doing hard work in many areas of college events. The dorm established their intramural skills with membership on Cross Center's top-rated football team. Intramural enthusiasm was continuous for all sports. Representation on Campus Chest committees and a dominant part in the campus carnival for underprivileged children made for an extremely valuable and self-fulfilling year. Baker R F i ta . ' A '- -..l":El - r, Davis-H amill Women utilize free time The women of Davis and Hamill Houses displayed an adeptness at utilizing free time for worthwhile projects. Both dorms kept extremely busy with individual projects and housing center involvements. An at- mosphere of easy living reigned for all residents which applied towards a harmonious mixture of social and scholastic proceedings. The residents took part in pre-Dallas functions as well as the traditional events which preceded and followed Christmas. x'xx 'll .nyc Front row: Debi Moore, Kris Martin. Suzie Lane. Cheryl Madden. Sherrie Hudson, Debbie Dickson, Kristin Williams, Sandi Hall, Peggy Godfrey, Susan Summar and Stephanie Gallad. Second row: Kathy Black, Patti Hall, Lynda Lasarsky, Sandy laiennaro, Charita Williams, Debbie Lancaster, Glenda Ford, Brenda Cockrum. Paula Payne, Fran White, Debbie Spriggs, Pat Twomey, Jan Henson, Cindy Baltierra, Netta Mason, and Nancy Shipman. Third row: Terri Knapp. Angela DeGiusti, Tracy Vanderburg, Patty Malloy, Mimi Moreland, Natalie Conrad, Karen Schnackenberg, Mary Callaghan, Darien Quattlebaum, Beth Helwig, Polly McLean, Jacqute Shores, Karen McCormick, Liz Studler. Cindy Lapis. and Jan Bennett. . , , al? Forbes .I , F 'o l mul 'F' 'K uf-' l mln, ill ills WN dams , 'n FDWBCS Evans t t 'A ' Para-medlcs interact socially Designated as a para-medical dorm, Forbes House of Cate Center involved its residents in many campus and community activities. The fall semester began with officer elections with these residents providing the necessary leadership throughout the year. Many social gatherings were attended by all residents with special attention given to the celebration of Halloween with a costume party. Interaction with other housing centers contributed towards a wellfbalanced year, mixing social en- joyment with scholastic achievement. Herrick Social calendar encourages activity Deriving campus and faculty awareness were the residents of Herrick House as they took interest in the sequential events of Howdy Week. Likewise, their social calendar reflected widespread efforts in entertaining various dorms. Slated on l-lerrick's agenda were dorm meetings which kept all informed of current and future happenings, dorm projects to improve living qualities, and other services to assist the community. The residents were proud of a prosperous and busy year. 2 R. ill? L ,lwl,f',":"'lH',flli 4' gg. . 5 1 I K 'A e , x 5 ,iilimlili ic, . , l ' M . N ' if if wxlf gmmff 'L E' 4' t is .1 - ri-tiff: -T i Ly XA Q l 3 'iv' xr fn -- 'i it g ' -- A W , A N Y X uit .. Y 1 .', I . z. V-3 ' l " ' " ,Ag H A: k N j K .5 lx H e 1 L f a . A ff -.. ' fl", , 'SX t '1 l -. ' 'Q V' V FY , -I ,Q l- 1' Ag. , f '11, ' ' -'I 4 vf 4 . , 4 at r if . " V -vfrswfi . L , V r ?', 21 K I' It-V' I,-i A iffy, Front row: Cris Anna. Cindy Garrison, Diana Drlsko, and Wendy Sayles. Second row: Carol Bridwell, Vickie Porter. JoAnn King, Annette Steidley, Paula Barefoot. and Tommie Nicholas. Third row: Carolyn Novotny, Susan Brown, Randy Sanders, Lisa Moore, -8 6 I N A PERFECT AIM should win the game for Carl Lynch as Darl DeVault observes. Carol Harden, Debbie Dixon, Cherri Bailey, and Karla Dana. Fourth row: Pam Unruh, Tiena Chamberlain. Sally Geiger, Olivia Herlin. Virginia Gumey, Sandra Vogle, Jackie Holloway. Maura Murray, and Cindy Vogle. z 146 Front row: Kenneth Bagley, Alben Risley, Reg Padgett. Mark Cross. Tim Barzellone, Randy Knight. Mark Benge. and Kevin Fox. Second row: Perry McGrual. Kenneth Koch, Scott Pruett. Jack Ely, Kevin Bean. Tim Moberly, Eric Alcouloumre, Peter D. Robertson. Mike Mavery. Bob Merideth, Bill Collins, Tom Byers, Bob Jett. Brad Murray. Kevin Danner, Nate Tarver. John Grant. Jay Jones, Joel Roberts. Karl Bums. Danny Strunk. Kid Curry. and Jim Benton Jordan Group selects official mascot "Steemie" was an extraordinary feature on the OU campus. He was recognized as the official mascot for Jordan House. Another first was the center's formation of a musical group entitled, Rainbow Boys Band. As usual, activities were numerous and were often slated in conjunction with Mc- Spadden House. McCurtain-Lawson i Houses learn from involvements Industrious involvements were qualities shared by McCurtain and Lawson Houses in regard to the myriad of campus activities characteristic of the year. Areas encompassed by these dorms included Campus Chest, Dad's Day, and intramural sports. Both houses learned a great deal from the various modes of participation and ended the year with much satisfaction and educational knowledge. lm!-ll Front row: Lisa Haggard, Evelyn Fairchild. Jane Hanus, Suzanne Tipton. Cindi Baten Barbara Brooks Tarpley, and Dianna Bolt Second row: Erma Clark. Carla Balcer, Diane Chronlster. Terri Pavlovifh. Debbie Kelsoe. Carole Barnes. and Renee Laakman Third row: Mamie Hiukerson, Bonnie Brudigam. Sherri Hawley. Nancy Quigg. Rita Cole. Laura Bateman. Kathryn Cook..Claudia Warren. Mary Richey. and Joyce Johnson. Fourth row: Suzy Sot. Howard. Cindy Smith. Lou Ann Dunlap, Terry Sullivan. Martha Clark. Margaret Howard. Mary Thompson. and Susan Dennis, McSpadden-Sager Front row: Jennifer Derebery, Klm Russell, Randy Hicks, Gary Smith, Philippa Brown, Scott Carrell, Faith Farmer, Martha Bick- ford, Nancy Scurlock, Karen Mansour, Jay Pool. Second row: Vanessa Tucker, Patty Nixon, Mary Jo Thompson, Gretchen Kelley, Celeste Rowe, Teresa Cravens, Lynn Holz, Kelly Kim- .5-Yft' ..' .A l -sfjgs-Q , I rf' ff' Residents put up decorations Sager's male residents coupled with the McSpadden women concluded the year with a merited list of activities. Sager took second place in housing football. Just after football season was over, a banquet to honor the high finish was held for all residents and their dates. Decorations prevailed for Dad's Day. Second semester was highlighted by a service project. McSpadden House invited various faculty members for dinner. 1.,"?.', .,f.. li'-f' pail, . ,. , l"..' -..I' airy- ,N A , I - - . . , -, 4 vp.- . w l .4 P , . .f , .lj ' I 147 brough, Jeanne Huibsch. Third row: Phll Clampltt, Bud Duke, Hue Crowtler, Dave Posey, Bob Vincent, Steve Ambum, Larry Alspaugh, Judy Cannon, Lynn Barton, Max Tahsuda, Dave Dorsett. Fourth row: Tom Munn, Scott Pope, Don Thronton, Bill Dow. Dale Kuschneriet, John Maley, Keith Gannaway. '.--,,1.,-,- ' --Y .L fr' 4 .5 ' . ,-,tg 1 ? '-ii E Q 1 'K ici." I a ef' x , , , cg . x, V. Fi. f I simon ,A -. ff' I Q -:Ji f Q 2 fnxzgf V smtz ,I - ix' 3 3.302 u g 4 ff' - T K 'Ti 1 ' ji ji Kp s ' . e J . all 5 K sq, .. V t ,?"3 y , 9 :fir Y I-.. A 2, I-.:,,V'V ,:fg,. V . J . 1 - -A is Neill-Oliver A . :fs Front row: Freeta Stokes, Afsanek Ansari, Larry Lewis, Charles Peoples, Russell Kelly, Robert Carpenter, and Alexis Crenshaw. Second row: Denise McGruder, Dana Emmons, Llnda Brown, Sherry Gassaway, Sandra Fisher, Ken Wllllams, Kevin Thomas, Danny Gray, Andrew Cullen, and Keith Burkhart Third row: Jeanine Whitney, Kathy Kllewer, Casandra Russell, Jerene Petersen, Angela Barrens, Jacqutta Ragsdale, Richard Bailey, Kenneth Werder. Michael West. Nathaniel Taruer and Mllm will 'HE Q Q l in fi. 5 ff Sullivan. Fourth row: Melinda Sanderson, Gina Beebe. Joanne Wllson, Margo Wlebold, Linda Marshall, Stacy Lord, and Evelyn Laird. Flfth row: Trish Prince, Catherine Borg, Chris Mathews, Resa Yost, and Teri Thomas. Sixth row: Suzanne Gillian, Bill Thornton, Jody Deacon, Michael Lowe, Bobby Woodard, Phll Baer, Pete Ferguson, Mark Horst, Craig Engles, Pat Carey, Jay Lawson, Andy Tharp, John Scull, and Michael Pierce. Related dorms celebrate vacation Commonly denoted as brother-sister dorms, Neill and Oliver Houses once again enjoyed several shared, activities. But, both dorms had frequent get- togethers with other groups. 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" 1 11 ., . - . --' W,.-.?,AgQ!f: .f'-- N .,:.,... ., KX 2 I I., M 1 1 11 ..1., 1 ' 11 " V '1""' W 1 "1' 1 . 1' DONATING DIMES at a keg party are AXO's and DU's. Greeks do other services- by Sue Petersburg Parties and vice and everything high priced, That's what sororities are made of. Porsches and cheer and kegs full of beer, That's what fraternities are made of. Valid? Not by far. Besides the obvious social activities that Greeks par- ticipated in last year, they also lent a helping hand to numerous projects for the betterment of the community and supported various national charities to help the less fortunate. Each Greek house took part in charitable work of some kind. National organizations contributed to included the BULL'S EYE forthe kids and members of Campus Chest. Heart Fund, Easter Seals, Muscular Dystrophy, March of Dimes, and the National League for the Blind. Money was raised for these charities in various ways. For instance, the women of Alpha Phi sold heartshaped lollipops to collect for the Cardiac Aid Foundation. Other houses made items which they donated to the organization: the Kappa Delta's sent puppets that they made during fall rush week to the Crippled Children's Hospital in Richmond, Virginia. At Christmas and Halloween, several sororities and fraternities combined efforts to give parties for orphans and crippled children. Greek Work Day in the fall was a day for all Greek pledges to come together and share their day with underprivileged children at a picnic. During Greek Week in the spring, a community project was undertaken: Senior Citizens Day brought the "old folks" and the uyounger generation" together to eat ice cream on the South Oval. Many students were surprised to learn how easy and interesting it was to "sit a spell" and talk to these people about days gone by. The two largest fund raising projects on campus were the "Dance Marathon" for Muscular Dystrophy and the "Run to Dallas" for the March of Dimes. Each spring the men of Sigma Phi Epsilon hold a dance marathon resembling "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" The dance started with a concert featuring Cheech and Chong this past spring. After a short break, the marathon began. Although given not all parti if-TZ? Wi CHRISTMAS CHEER is spread to underprivileged kids. breaks to eat, to catch a quick cat nap and to answer nature's call, the dancers were all but dead at the end of the dance. Each couple was sponsored by local businesses for the time they spent dancing. Plus, each Greek house sup- ported its dancer by going door to door collecting donations. In all, over 38,000 was raised. A Winnebago going down the side of l-35 south to Dallas following a runner might have looked strange to some, but this runner represented OU's second largest fund raising drive. The "Run to Dallas" was sponsored by the men of Delta Upsilon and the women of Alpha Chi Omega. Work started the first week of classes with correspon- ABOVE: BOY BREAKS THROUGH at Greek Fun Day games. BELOW: MCDONAl.D'S LOVERS, at a picnic for kids. .ofa 4 fr. :gi 1: . to alkgr., U 9 lo, s 9 0 U U 3 9 -rj., V' Usd . J '3 , 390995, 1- " tax' 3 'ss te" it 'fo c Jgqkgnqii-3 9 "ix - -'-W'Y5"'fvf'I'. or 5 u a u 19- ,. gms-f gi.: ifrugv ff sg rg A, .lm Q51 afx-. Run, run, run, and then... dence to parents, alumnae and hometown businessmen asking for contributions. The first real moneymaking oc- curred on October 5 at the Wake Forest game. Alpha Chi's and DU's stood on street corners and went to Norman restaurants to collect money. October 9, a dance was held in the Alpha Chi parking lot. Held basically for publicity reasons, the dance nevertheless brought a profit of 3,5100 from students donating money. Rally day was held the Thursday before Dallas weekend. Speakers included Barry Switzer, head football coach, Steve Davis, Sooner quarterback, Cathy Kidd, UOSA president, Margaret Melton, Norman City Council member, and Bruce Morren, 1975 campaign director for the March of Dimes. They gave pep talks for both the March of Dimes and the Texas game. After a pass of the football from quarterback Steve Davis, the Alpha Chi's and DU,s were off and running. As Morten had said, they ran because "strong legs run so that weak legs can walk." Everyone arrived in Dallas tired, but ready to beat the hell out of Texas. They did, but in more ways than one. Together the Alpha Chi's and the DU's raised 33,500 As can be seen, the Greek system participated in something besides itself, Greeks were active participants on behalf of others. Q FASTER ,RUN FASTER, cheer members of the run team. EXHAUSTION CATCHES UP with an AXO after running. 1 K ,, . Y , ....pw-Qajliw.---r,,. W ,f.....s sfs- - lf lc A ,,,-,lfmzgmf I. .3 , fb. ' - i - xf ' ' f:3'Qfig"'5fi-r l -1:95 -',g1gIf-fw f Q I 3 - . kj X' . W I l 3'j,,l'g f"f'N,, IIE gm I , ' nf 1-- '.. -"i . I1Q i -Q5f"'F"k'1f.+4,QfVl 8'-'E .5 ' , au f ..r,i Y.- ABOVE RIGHT THE LONELY STRETCH 15 falthfully run. BELOW TALKING IT OVER IS coach Barry Swltzer. mf ssssifgif OU maintains strong Greek system Tulsa senior Grant Billingsley headed the Interfraternity Council this year. He was a public relations major and an active member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. Billingsley was the sports editor of the Sooner Yearbook his junior year and was selected to be one of ten members of Pe-et, a senior men's honorary, his senior year. According to Billingsley, "The strongest point of Greek life is that it has something to offer for everybody. "The system is large and diverse enough so that everyone has the opportunity to find what they want. "Greek life itself isn't for every individual, but it is good experience just to be exposed to it." Billingsley and IFC led OU Greeks beyond the university community as they stretched into the Norman community "The strongest point of Greek life is that it has something for everybody." as well. Greeks reached out to others in such activities as Greeks Fun Day in which Greek pledges sponsored a picnic and day at the park for the less privileged children in the area. Further, IFC sponsored Greek Revue--an act made up of Greeks from several houses which traveled to military bases throughout Oklahoma and Texas and performed before hundreds of servicemen. A third project of IFC was Greek Summer Camp at Goddard Youth Camp in Sulfur. This was a camp, staffed JOE JOHNSON, IFC DIRECTOR ig -A-A GRANT BILLINGSLEY, IFC PRESIDENT by Greek counselors, for youth that would not have the opportunity to attend such a camp. "The Greeks are a vital and important force in this area," Billingsley said. "We constitute quite a portion of the on- campus students." As for the opinions of non-Greeks toward Greeks, Billingsley had this to say, "The non-Greek view of Greeks with negative connotations is slowly changing, it is an eventual process. "The best way to change this attitude is through the growth of the systems as it is growing right now--through parents and friends, and through ,Greeks themselves." According to Billingsley, OU has one of the strongest Greek systems in the country. Approximately 2,600 people were involved in Greek life here this year. And the OU Greek system has not ceased to expand. There were two new colonies this year, Delta Chi and Sigma Alpha Mu. "We are hoping to build one at a time," stated Billingsley. "We want to stagger the growth so that beginning , . , Q, ' tl' 1.1: ,. . fa., , . . g... A -v, V ,AF-s V' - I 'nf ugh K 4 "C I, .lt inf, . f .1 F' . it . ' . Q -9 1 - 'r 15. ,. - - , . , ,H V , . . W V Q.. , , l, . ,, ,.o.',:,.a-.- .zg A .. 'Q' H, , .. 0. , : 0- ' 4' 1' fu? Q ,- 1 .f--1: ., g . , v , Q ' s -r -- . F 4 .- I' wi . -'-'.' '.'."l . a 12.-. gf' if 3 'UT . 3 . -N v v . 1 I., ff' - V, .6- , Qfzltff' CATHY BROWN, PANHELLENIC PRESIDENT colonies don't pull against each other." "Greek life allows people to meet each other. It is sharing of ideas. It is working together for common goals." Common goals pull Greeks together "Be Greek, not just an individual in a house," was the main emphasis in panhellenic this past year according to Cathy Brown, panhellenic president. This philosophy was first put into effect during fall rush. More girls than ever before signed up for rush, and a larger percentage pledged houses. First semester was concerned with revamping the framework of panhellenic. A new court system was set up where justices were chosen by qualifications listed in applications, whereas before, presidents of the 13 sororities alternated the duty. The constitution and by-laws were also redone. Cathy's main objective as president was to "let everybody have a chance to be a part of panhellenic." She -MS 9959 A sw., "No longer does there seem a need to defend the Greek system. It now defends itself." and delegated responsibilities including chairmanships assistant chairmanships to different women representing all of the Greek houses. Panhellenic's first project after rush was Greek Fun Day. A large group of pledges from all sororities and fraternities took children from the Norman Junior Police and Little Brother programs to Andrews Park for a picnic. The children loved it, but the pledges had just as much fun playing games with them. .-.A r ff. hi. W1 at: j l . .. i , r 1. "lift . 'I' ' f.' 4 if - fy " . :K . jiri " it . Q M ' '5f3i'if .c4.1. ' .Li l firm lt' "F r - i fits- f, M ,,.a4.f .f. . T 'A " 1 -' . fs' R 5 la? 4. I . , it fig' JL +4-.4 1 N . ' ., y . 'Q' 1 4' ' ' Wm "V .'Xi:"i' ir" .4-ggi 'H " ' Alt., l,"JJ':r3l if 'Q' 'Q' 'g if - 'Jay' .5g.aJ? X -1'j1'.31 g i ' l Q' 1jt3 ,, , , -. ,QLQ L 1- rf, 1. ,f H.. -5' jon, ,Nw Z CHRIS PURCELL, PANHELLENIC DIRECTOR i r "lk 'S- af btij. f- A jf- .x 5 ' 1 . . , 'l! L?!. '- 1 "..A . . . --1 git 1-' 1 -N' m f m'.x"Pl fs -qv 2' A 'vs ' 1' ,..T11"' of its jUl'1lOI' TTlQlTllJ2I'S bYll'1QS UP DEW panhellenicys goals Should be, ideas for Greek unity. Greeks join forces, work together gEntertainment for Dad's Day weekend was provided by Greek Revue. Directed by Clyde Boyd III, the show in- cluded a cast of 50. Billed as "Side by Side," the show traveled to Altus and Shepherd Air Force Bases, to Fort Sill Army Base, and to Central State Hospital. Panhellenic also participated in helping with the university Christmas Store. Members of each sorority donated money and presents for the store to sell at inexpensive prices. Second semester, panhellenic sponsored a plant sale for three days. Approximately 30 members from each house helped in one way or another. Money raised from the project was used for scholarships for Greek women. Panhellenic convention was held in Norman this spring for members from UT, OSU, KSU, KU, MU, and of course, OU. Members from each university traded ideas on what Greek Week held in March honored outstanding in- dividual Greeks, alumni, and housemothers. Senior Citizens Day again proved a large success. Panhellenic didn't keep from working when spring ENTERTAINING MILITARY BASES in Greek Revue is Nancy Malosky. semester ended. Greek camp, cosponsored with IFC, was again a huge success. Twelve Greek men and women served as counselors for a week at Camp Goddard for children from the university community. The camp was totally funded by Greek moneymaking projects. Rush tour took members of all sororities to highschools to "Rush Greek." High school seniors were able to find out what being a Greek is all about. Cathy Brown said the biggest asset of panhellenic this past year was Chris Purcell, director of sororities. She helped the sororities to help themselves as well as each other. The houses came closer together through these efforts. Where is the Greek system going? Cathy Brown said, 'LThe Greek system is definitely gaining strength. It is branching away from its previous social separation and it has this past year proved to others and to itself that it has more to offer than parties and good times. Greeks were involved more than ever in community and university projects. No longer does there seem a need to defend the Greek system. It now defends itself." Q I ,iii it . I -V ,fir 9 gg . ' titffirff Iyjxy , Q 4 V at I '1 "' 'f ::.. if' I ,- ,-L '--'j 5gQi'..-, 5775 3 . F?1u..-4l. BELOW: EXCHANGING NEW IDEAS for Greek unity are junior panhellenic members, while ABOVE: SNACKS FOR ALL during the meeting. "bt ' 1 6 IFC coordinates 23 fratemities As a governing body of 23 fraternities on the OU campus, Interfraternity Council also served as the coordinating group for men's Greek activities. Chapters were represented in the IFC congress by the individual house presidents and a representative from each chapter. In its meeting every two weeks, the IFC acted as the legislature and organizer of fraternity activities geared for the benefit of the Greek system, the university and the Norman community. Supporting chapter involvement in campus activities outside the Greek system, many Greeks became involved in Campus Activities Council, student courts, Howdy Week, Aardvark Week and UOSA Congress. Working with Panhellenic to provide self-government for the entire Greek system, IFC helped to sponsor many Greek programs including Dad's Day Greek Revue, Greek Week and Greek Camp. lnterfraternity Council--Front row: Tom Hess. Bob Weiss. Bill Bennett, Lawry Moore, Hugh Robinson, Bill Triglelh. Tom Doerner. Karlin Gramlich, David Kuhn. Gary Graham, Don McGregor. Sieve Hall, Second row: Mark Doremus, Glen Johnson. Scott McKee. Stephen Kniali. Sian Baker. Randy Cowell. John Frame. Mike Cocperman, Grant Billingsley. Rex Urice. Clark Millspaugh. John Funk. Jess James, Gary Myers. Third row: Randy White, Bill Patten, Robert Ogborn, Bud Tippens. Paul Nelson. David Hill. John Thomas. Ken Peiia, Jim Glazer. Demetrious Bereolos. IFPC initiates Greek Fun Day Front row: Bob Purgason, Daivd Robinson, Jeff Niemeyer, Michael Donohoe, Jim Burdette, Dennis Lewelling, Second row: David Ruble, Chuck Garrett, Richard Resler, Richard Wise, Steve Prunce, Steve Jordan, Third row: Bo Perkins, Kenne Anderson, Brian Yenney, Keith Cressman, Pete Wheeler, Walker Beavers, Paul Goolsby, Fourth row: Wes Perry, Clint Smith. Fifth row: Mack Mahoney, Robert Malone. , l I li The lnterfraternity Council Pledge Council, the unifying group for fraternity pledges and associate members new to the Greek system, undertook as its main goal for the year to re-evaluate and redirect IFPC activities. Seeking greater involvement by pledge classes during the first year at OU, IFPC began the year by changing the usual Greek Work Day to Greek Fun Day, This replacement for the traditional Work Day was a Sunday afternoon picnic for all Greek pledge classes where they entertained nearly 100 Norman children. IFPC also became more closely related to the Interfraternity Council by having representatives attend IFC meetings. !4. I , 'i . if 1 J r A rr, - sa' KEEPING PUBLIC RELATIONS up for Panhellenic is Lisa Bassett, who serves coordinator for media news in her office. as the go fri sf AA -4 ,lA. t!l:4 ff u els e' fffif if ' I f- . lol iq 1 ll ri -. ,J-. ral I ,nu .nu ull! ann nd. lu!! The Panhellenic Association, governing body of sororities on the OU campus, served also as the coordinating group for women's Greek activities. Panhellenic was 'composed of the president and panhellenic represen- tative of each sorority house on campus and an executive council of five women. In their bi-monthly meetings, Panhellenic delegates concerned themselves with Panhellenic or other Panhellenic--Front row: Charlotte Barnett, Lisa Bassett. Patti Gilliard, Kristie Kay. Lyn Parrish, Susan Neustadt, Cathy Brown, Debi Koch. Cindy Snodgrass. Second row: Cheryl Chandler. Cheryl Laughner, Jackie Farley, Annabel Jones, Jan Eskew, Laura Kennedy. Shelley Label, Nan Trachtenbarg, Martha Thomas. Sara Millspaugh, Emily Denning. Third row: Anne Brenner, Millie Hays, A 1 I . Panhell sponsors leadership lab Greek activities. Panhellenic sponsored projects and programs geared to benefit individual houses, the Greek system, the university and the Norman community. Members worked on committees which, in conjunction with IFC, planned special projects such as Greek Week, rush booklets, Greek exchange dinners, Greek Fun Day, Greek Revue, Greek Camp, Senior Citizens Day, and a Leadership Lab in the spring. Theresa Wright. Christine Hall, Debbie lVlcCoullough..Claudia Loy. Lee Pedersen, Cindy Donalson, Missy Bonar. Chris Purcell. Fourth row: Sheila Sewell. Michele Manning, Susan Good, Debbie Dernoncourt. Barbara Beames. Jan Askins, Pat Collier. Susan Hollinger. Melissa Mayfield. iihfpr Y - M-xlfr , Y 1-"fi- vp aww V 4 ,- I fri? 2 . ., , 1 ' 1 ' A - 'vue v r ,J TOP: TAKING A BREAK from her duties as Panhellenic secretary is Susie Neustadt. ABOVE: AROUND AND AROUND go the pledges and children at the Greek work day picnic. 55 916 me if--" , 'i' 1 fl 'L i-I5 ' U '-I , , ,gr r ii W-i Y A , Wi V 'M i ii i i i M i Q, ,A "nf "i .ii E ii , ,Nm ,Y I Panhellenic officers--Cathy Brown, president lseatedig Kristie Kay, treasurer: and Charlotte Barnette, secretary. 1 THE FAVORITE MEETING of Junior Panhellenic was, of course, the picnic at the duckpond. I D 1 sf is 1 s A rm' r "1 J .CN QE N, N.a 'i All I as 1, ,, Q. , . 51.0- r,i ,"' 4 A I 5 J ai Pegfi- Junior Panhellenic entertains children Composed of one representative and the pledge class president from each house, Junior Panhellenic was a coordinating body designed to govern OU's sorority pledge classes. The council worked with ln- terfraternity Pledge Council to hold Greek Fun Day. Pledges had a picnic at Andrews Park in which they entertained children from the Norman community. Junior Panhellenic also raised money in support of Greek Camp, a summer camp for underprivileged children. Front row: Kim Anderson, Gracie Evers, Vickie Redick, Sharron Turner, Blythe lmel, Susie Curry, Ginger Tyree, Karen Kautz, Betty Jones.,Second row: Lisa Brock, Mary Ferguson, Kate Hawthorne, Nancy Robertson, Laura' Leidernen, Kelly McDugan. Jane! Stolnancl. Third row: Maria Paris, Kay Burns, Phyllis Dakil, Lee Ann Kuzel. Fourth row: Tris Kring, Leigh Ann Ebert, Dolly Berryhill. Jackie Taylor, it DC, 45"-3' 4- 'l i QQ 41 id". Y' 1 Y-1 J ,I -rf -- .flJd8!wg2f:g M Q41 , J ,.-A .f nr.. --Jr 'M-Us :i -.J -D F4'r..l J' 1,...Q.vf',f'..3 L , p J lill- A J --., A f- an ----A - .- fv1i'?5-1,13 Helen C. Bunks, Angela Thomas, Jacqueline Brown, Chris Jackson. Linda Brown, Karen Thigpen. The first Black sorority, Alpha Kappa Alpha, was founded in 1908 by a group of young women on Howard University's campus who saw a need for unity of ideas and purpose. Since then, the women of Alpha Kappa Alpha have strived'to maintain the ideal of service to all mankind. The women of Alpha Kappa Alpha on OU's campus conducted fund raising and service projects throughout the year. Their main concentration within their organization was true Sisterhood and loyalty through working together to achieve a common goal. Service, fund raising serve as goals lpha Kappa lpha -sei lpha - Chi Omega "DON'T SEND MY Boy to Texas" sings Vicki Brezney as the march of Dimes run to Dallas kicks off. , 'Y' Alpha Chi house receives "face-lift" Returning in the fall to a newly remodeled house and to forty new pledges, Alpha Chi's started the year fantastically. October 12, with a pass of the football from quarterback Steve Davis, the Alpha Chi's and the Delta Upsilon's were off and running to Dallas to raise money for the March of Dimes. Two new trophies for the highest overall gradepoint among other sororities and ABOVE: SAILING THROUGH THE crowd is a pass from OU quarterback Steve Davis to a DU runner, beginning the run to Dallas. RIGHT: Jean Ann Skinner, Pat McGlothlin, Sandy Brantmeier, and Sheryl Rice crowd the door to greet rushees. for intramural participation were added to our collection. Also during the fall semester, the traditional October Fest and Red Carnation Ball rounded out the social scene. After winning University Sing in the Spring of 1974, the Alpha Chi's elected to join forces again with the men of Lambda Chi Alpha for a large act in Sooner Scandals. The fun and friend- ship shared this year in Alpha Chi will remain with everyone for a long time to come. A i , I l . ,4 Front row: Pam Schroeder, Mom Murphy, Lorrie Raper, Dotti Davis, Kelsie Harris, Kathy Fox. Gina Coffman, Second row: Jari Askins, Cindy McCall, Pam Litschke, Lix Wilkes, Susan Irwin, Pi Askins, Cathy Arrington. Third row: Gail Seikel, Jane Nicholson. Peggy Gentry, Pat Collier, Beth Smith, Pam Gentry, Karen Webb, Cathy Coffman, Jeanne Wagstafl, Jeanne Yarberry. Fourth row: Kathy Steen., Melanie Reeves. Cay Papagolas, Debbie Shepherd, Nancy Moore, Porky Randall, Sheryl Rice, Sandy Sanger, Fifth row: Laura Sole, Robbi Hobbs, Stevie Cohlmia, Marla Lambert, Pam Savera, Cheryl Dominica, Pixie Marlar, Christy Blalock. Sixth row: Lorna Butler, Adele Rice, Sue Hall, Susan Ross. Nancy Lauback. Kim McCrory. Linda Tarplee, Simone Van Arsdell, Lynn Hanson, Nancy Robertson. Seventh row: Debbie Ritter, Sue Petersburg, Linda Motsenbocher. Debbie Smittle, Kim' Rimpau, Shelley Colbert. Jan Gaede, Jean Ann Skinner, Suzy Johnson, Mamie White. Eighth row: Lorri Finch, Lou Ann Coffman, Lisa Jameson, Nancy Herndon. Mita Mlnnett, Kate Hawthrone, Palty Cunningham, Becky Wagonseller, Cathy Moyer. Ninth row: Julie Arrington, Terri Bell, Vicki Brezney. Paula McKown, Karen Groves. Barbara Payne, Janet Mullen, Suzanne McCombs, Debbie Mar- tinez, Connie Cassody. Shelley Myers, Terri Bouffard. Tenth row: Becky McDonald, Christy O'Connor, Margaret Wade, Michelle Murcer, Kim Kriter, Denise Reynolds, Cherry Woody, Donna McClain, Phyllis Thompson. Eleventh row: Marie Cook, Sherri Foutz, Mary Frazier, Lynn Sherry, Dianne Kouns, Anne Edgerton. -wa- f -iiv rv, ,. Y, ,.,. , bf, 53 Wwe E - s f ., -1-J 1-ks. L lrzl 4-?y,s:, 5- 11, .-."-v- Front row: Linda Landau, Leslie Epstien, Beth Galoob, Fonda Schepps, Mindy Gardner, Marla Weinstein, Susan Neusiadt. Second row: Susan Bernard, Barbara Panchuck, Sheryl White. Kay Burn, Diane Haley, Brenda Parker, Debbie Fischbein, Shelley Label, Nancy Levin, Cheryl Chandler. Third row: Debbie Siirin. Nan Trachienbarg. Rochelle Levand, Jeannie Clark, Janet Palmberg, Karen Kamp, Laura Leiderman, Gayle William. , 'B QQ. L 4 l' x 1 .. Q W Gift ws Q - il if C ,-,X r E ' x it 4 R- N ,T s X il W i if ,, LEFT: "WE'LL CALL YOU" say six Alpha Ep- silon Phis while sharing phone duty. BELOW: A NEW HOME is found by Kay Burn as Charyl Chandler pins on her pledge ribbon. 'S'-. 'Yr CRAMMING FOR TESTS occupies an evening for Brenda Parker, Nancy Levin, and Debbie N NK Alpha Epsilon Phi Parties spark AE Phi enthusiasm . Communicating as sisters was the primary step to attaining unity. In Alpha Epsilon Phi, everyone became involved by uniting and by becoming more aware of the meaning of the word 'sisterhood'. Campus involvement was demon- strated through AEPhi's representation on the Panhellenic Executive Board, Mortar Board, Angel Flight, intramurals, and the OU Band. In the spring and fall, parties helped spark enthusiasm and excitement. involvement in the Norman com- munity, university and Greek system was stressed. This helped everyone experience a successful year. lpha Gamma Delta AGDS treat kids on Halloween RIGHT: "PALMS TELL ALL," says Becky Blanton as she reads a tiny trick-or-treaters future. X. -,.-... -P., Scholarship, leadership and sisterhood were emphasized in Alpha Gamma Delta as members and pledges participated in both social and altruistic activities. Parties such as the Halloween Mountain Party and the Christmas gift exchange kept the Alpha Gam social calendar filled. The members and pledges collected money for Cystic Fibrosis and the AGD Founders Memorial Fund. Also a party was held for un- derprivileged children. ABOVE: SHOOTING THE BREEZE are John and Dotty Graham, Rene Boehm, and Zanne Slaten. RIGHT: MYSTERY IDENTITY REVEALED of this young guest as an AGD pins on his name tag. I-xt. I I ,X 5 fffgq D' 'Q , . I ' M ...Oi N 1 v, O rr 53 'IA il. 5 use-ny! 1114, n I 1 A .Q L Z-'f-12"-r"ffrfxv'f-e "v "liJf'ff'i1zl?f f' ""1'f 'a. msn. ,J 12"'v'f,r'fef'ege:Je-Srf. , r.'.1F4i3aef-ae-'lazmrrme Front row: Claudia Warren, Anne Sherwood, Ann Wolfe, Dabney Smilh, Mary Lea Emery, Eileen Bishop. Kathryn Coob, Nancy Bowman, Millie Hayes. Second row: Rene Boehm, Anne Brenner, Wanda Bell, Kay Boyles, Daphne McClellan, Margie Nathman, Adell Gaines, Becky Blanton, Beth Anderson, Sharron Turner. .X V, Cai r 101 x-. V i 4 4 'ze-, ,SA Y w-if' Q KQTVV v a? 5 ll , ' , l X Kathy Osbom. Margaret Howard. Nita Howell. Third row: Shelley Stout, Laura Thompson, Cindy Tyner, Cindy Ruhl,'Vicki Hut- chinson, Susan Love, Jaci Brown, Christie Wright, Maureen Crotty, Lisa Cash, Vicki Redick, Mamie Hickerson. Virginia Haas. . -we-3 .,,-. 'iqA.'l,, tv,....-,,. ., -1. H f - i'l'LG.ar' Q , .,,. ir, -1 b - -.lr-Q Q--r ll f ' V, ,J a N L. X sf, J i .,,i'n ." iii wi 1 -.. Ng --zu -S - '1 l Ntfl 4.4 4 AY" ' gi-a .e I .. - K 'A "r"!q.32f,f N ,,-A 'XM P ..wl-nm 5 X.J Front row: Laurie Gatchell, Missy McNair, Carla Williamson, Gail McAlister, Jana Teevan, Karen Suplee, Karen Kautz, Rhonda Perin, Roxanne McMurtre, Gerry Nathman, Diane Dycus, Laurie Wiggs, Julie Jacobs, Diane Campbell, Cheryl Laughner. Second row: Mom Schmidt, Lindy Tope, Sonya Lee, Debbie Rutherford, Kay Spindler, Karen Montgomery, Lee Seegal, Linda Early, Lori McCullough, Tonya Feightner, Gayle Plshkin, Janice Jindra, Pam Bugg, Julie Gibbs, Ellen Hatcher, Candice Holt, Ann Shlller. Thlrd row: Kelly Murchison, Valarie Comstock. Sue Becle, Dolly Berryhill, Joan McKeever, Nanci Pooler, Laurie Floren. Jina Jacobi, Lisa Wasemlller, Marilyn Baker, Janeva Tillie, Carolyn Manning, DeeAnn Walker. Cindy Morphew. Charlotte Fox. Susan Morgan. Diana Harrell, Kim Thompson. Nancy Mellon, Kathryn Forbes. Fourth row: Elizabeth Ryan, Nancy Fisher, Sheila Sewell. Fifth row: Sharon Sorensen, Carey Pouthit, Jackie Farley, Kim Claxton, Sixth row: Joan Hamer, Cindy Rubac, Kristie Lee, Viann Sigle, Toni O'Shan, Susan Prater. Gayle Turnell, Debbie Siekman, Sydney Brainard. Window, Left: Ann Gaebe, Susan Johnson. Lisa Long, Karen Ottaviani, Jenniler Just. il? ', V if NT? I 'V 1 , . i --v-5, Phi-Esta adds air of relief Strengthened by the contrasting traits and personalities of each -member, Alpha Phi is a group of women united in sisterhood. Living in the house during the past year was a learning experienceg knowledge was gained not only through the sharing of laughter and joy, but through sorrows, tears, and frowns as well. Members were able to gain further insight into themselves and into one another during fireside chats and sisterhood parties. Other parties such as Christmas Formal and Phi-Esta added a light air to campus life as they tem- porarily relieved the tensions of classes and schoolwork. Overall, Alpha Phi served as a basis from which its members could reach out into the university community and prepare for later involvement in society, ABOVE: "HOOK 'EM HORNSV' Alpha Phi pledges entertain members with a "Beat Texas" skit. TOP LEFT: PRACTICING FOR SCANDALS excites these Alpha Phis, in preparation for the show. LEFT: FIRST AND TEN on South College, the Alpha Phis make use of their spacious back yard. lpha Phi ee ii' S A. ' e.-. ,f M' -.- if' J. - rlf 1...- Front row: Salley Alley, Pali Stapleton, Cathy Brown, Diana Joseph, Debbie Laine, Jan Vernard, Amy Stewert, Susan Colslon, Second row: Judy Wilburn, Stephanie Coleman, Leesa Hulse, Jan Welter, Robin Pierce, Jackie Mitchell, Linda'Rademacher, Susan Holzinger, Melanie Glasser, Linda Faulkner, Laura Kennedy, Robin Shadid, Shelley Briscoe, Paula Flippen. Third row: Charla Hardin, Bunny Richards, Gail Sloan, Dana McDaniel, Mary Wight, Linda Breault, Toby Brown, Stephanie Chambers, Kelly Hannitan, Lynn Morgan, Tina Farha, Pat Miller, Janis Milroy, Debbie McCullough, Cathy Nickels, Robin White, Vaneesa Jones. Fourth row: Gracie Evans, Becky Hulsey, Vicki Woodward, Alison Hodges, Cindy Johnson, Mary Ann Rivera, Karen Young, Kim Anderson, Beth Lisko, Sherrie Arterburn, Judy Pinson, LeAnn Allgood, Janis Bumpas, Kathy Riley, Fifth row: Marsha Ray, Sue Kiehl, Jane Tully, Lisa Bugg, Debbie Miller, Sheri Hand, Robin Caldwell, Vannette Hale, Linda Threlkeld, Betsy Fox, Becki Payne, Janis Montgomery, Carol Craig, Kim Walker. Sixth row: Kathy Blackstock, Eleni Collis, Liz Carson, Gina Smith, Kay Pryor, Brenda Brown, Susan Cox, Lisa Brixey, Nancy Malosky, Diana Storm, Vicki Lake, D.D, Boume, Dana Farha. Seventh row: Lucy Miller, Jerianne Unger, Candy Loving. Terry Foster, Jan Stewart, Patti Gau, Kathy McGraw, Megan Willhauck, Patti Carry, Michelle Sleem, Tina Lorance, Nancy Shanks. LEFT: MOMENT OF JOY is shared by two Chi Omegas. BELOW: "HEY, BIG DADDIESU sings Janis Milroy, Delt little sis in a Delt Dad's Day skit. l""5 KU 13' 'sir-s Y... iN, 9 K ff! N. z .if ,fi gn 'f ' 'N TRICK OR TREAT? is the spirit of the Chi O's as they prepare for the "Owloween" party, N Chi Omega Greek Revue attracts Chi Os At the close of the school term 110 Chi Omegas looked back over a year filled with action and accomplishment. Chi Omega earned membership in scholastic and ,honorary societies and participated in campus-wide activities. Seven girls represented the house on the Greek Revue Tour, and members of Chi Omega and Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity produced a large act for Sooner Scandals. All activities rounded out a year of accomplishment that Chi Omegas considered to be very distinguished and very diversified. --.X 'RQ i ,-. .33 f Q .:': ,Y-Z Pg Delta Delta Delta Pansy Pile highlights fall Focusing on sharing, the Tri Deltas participated in two fund raising projects, one being the annual football give-away. The funds raised were split, half going to a scholarship, the other to the Oklahoma Children's Hospital. Dad's Day festivities were highlighted by a skit performed by the pledges in honor of the Dads. . Near the first of November, the Tri- Delts and the Thetas shared a weekend of fun at the Pansy Pile. Friday night, prior to the dance, the Tri-Delts gathered for a hayride and a little country and western music. RIGHT: HOME SWEET HOME is a good place for Barbara Hoppe to spend a lazy afternoon. 'KWWL 'Pali' b, .NUT , qv, tt., if ABOVE: OUTSTANDING SENIOR WOMAN Betty Read relaxes after receiving her award. RIGHT: HITTING THE BOOKS is a large part of college, as Nancy Hatcher discovers during finals. WE! M F E' 5' .i.T- ?g:?gf A .J ,S r 1 "fr :www ei----iii -5 e G Af! .f F ,sv . I l l I ,- i 4. Front row: Mary Abernathy, Blythe lmel, Rhonda Broyles, Kristi Schad, Suzette Foreman, Walli White, Karen Taylor, Lea Rumley, Patty Wood. Second row: Cindy Snodgrass, Nancy Grissom, Jayne Livingston, Rebecca Brooks, Shawn Shadlcl, Mary Gruenig, Susan Thomas, Susan Kemp, Carolyn Pugsley, Paula Benge, Robin Pennell, Third row: Becky Hoppe, Gina Godfrey, Jamie White, Nancy Cox, Lucy Cuaderes, Jayne Folks, Cathy Warren, Ellen Garrison, Jo Ann Hugg, Pam Binniclter. Fourth row: Barbara Hoppe. Claudia Bradford. Cathy Fox. Nancy Shields. Karen Crosby. Judy Kee, Wendy Simpson. Leigh Ann Kuzel. Fifth row: Joan Goth, Cindy Faulkner, Ann Ruble, Kathy Bigbie, Elaine Bradley, Betty Read, Lynn Perry, Judy Hamra, Cece Farha. Sixth row: Jean Ford, Laurie O'Brian, Marcia Guthary, Jeanie Hulsey, Laurie Winchester, Susie Baker, Roslyn Moncrlef, Ruth Ross, Bena Boughan. Seventh row: Betsy Bassett, Suzanne McGlaugl-illn, Rhonda Renner, Beth Briney, Cathy Carter, Diane Sheets. Eighth row: Donna Perry, Tonya Hinson, Connie Jennings, Susan Garetson, Connie Carroll, Kathy Willis, Marilyn Huey, Susan Carney, Ann Heard. Ninth row: George Ann Bucholts, Vicky Vineyard, Gina Hunter, Ellen Porter, Debbie Koch, Lanie Bertalan. Sara Snodgrass, Jeri West, Billie Fair. Tenth row: Lisa Bassett, Jennifer Lamer, Terry Daughtery, Mary McClure, Marilyn Maurer, Gayle Weaver, Sheree Shlrey, Amy Deaton, Nancy Hatcher, Jodie Jennings. I .lf l l :EC R i..l......- x S 'fi We 5 1 1 v " fx -S ' . ff 5'-i , L gli, , B "K M -V V i f Front row: Michelle Lott, Lu Ann Shaw, Christi Clayton, Bonnie Peck, Barbara Braswell, Marcia Heinze, Cheryl Richaidson, Lana Gardner, Second row: Theresa Wright, Barbara Bowling, Brenda Watson. Suellen Sjuilin, Maria Bainhill. Elaine Vitali. Rhanda Thompson. Denise Ulclridge, Linda Chenoweth. Lynn McDaniel. Third row: Betsy Faxson, Debi Carev, Joan Hogan, Judy Waithley. ,f 'ii Janet Stothand, Terry Cotterell, Jo Stewart. Nancy Fulmer, Gayla Estus, Pam Holtzclaw, Cathy Snook. Fourth row: Shelley Hume, Cheryl Hatfield, Lynn Vinsjard, Susan Wegener, Susan Ham. Vicki Longhoffer. Denise Holden, Susie Becker. Martha Beckforce. Fifth row: Nicole Wright, Cindy Lambert, Julie Pittman, Jo Ann Klar. Barbi Norton.4Carey Jezek. Marilyn De Janette. Marcia Harman. Sixth row: Libbi Bowman. Mary Luthy, Julie Brymie. Ruth Sch- midt, Cindy Evans. Anna Van Nort. Kathy Allen. Linda Boyle. Seventh row: Peggy Sugg. Andi Acree. Susan Fellon, Jan Teel. Nancy Trapp, Penny Storrie. Melissa Mayfield. Eighth row: Sharon Blackburn, Deblilev Campbell, Diana Davidson, Ann Peterson, Janet Warreick, Vickie Summers, Annette Troup, -Debbie Uleser, Anne Pundt, Vicki Cone, Jane Olson, Rhonda Autrey, Judy Pippin, Anita Weeks, Cindy Winter. Rosemay Bartlett. Ninth row: Carol Grice, Lisa Reegan, Ulendy Krise, Jill Clements, Margaret Riggs, Kathy Becker, Jana Cunningham. TE mg wget' rdf? LEFT: HANCHORS AWAY DG'S," sing Mary Luthy and Randa Thompson in a fall rush skit. BELOW: CYCLING AROUND CAMPUS, Sheila Dorman and Libby Bowman pedal in front of the DG house. Delta Gamma -3. 'V ' r' fqpyr' Q - - 1 f - ,, ,, .-f tn , ,, . I f- 3 I . g- , -.iffY'- - I- ' I f 5 . . -,. - A , ., . -. .I s. A .gf - . ' ' Kiln?-a Z" 9 It' 51 if 1'-P 3 ,ii 4 - Tl 'f i " Li . 'LF IA , M . gxlfgxii. 4. 7 1 . 1..7,.-i' 3-Q- if 'QFD i f rl' "LW : ' lil -C: 1 .4 'V 4 '-,b f i'T"!:r?'rF Q. -if A I. -F '. A V 'I V."-' I . ,. , , . 7 W- , . - 'Y K X - If - QL. .I ,A A 04" :fungi N I" I , ,xl-7.x .Lv V. V . N f ' . ' K f .- 1,1 g.. '.,,, , 1 ,.' ' 1 .W 4 ,JM - A -I I-1" fws' . .-' ' P-'fur I " . -14' 1' !'-- fr' ' -ff -- :,,' . 'W' " - . I - 45 4112-.Tw T514 iiggv, H ,D i sq, 'I , -. z ' , 1 . . , ' .gf ' , ' Y 5 ' 'L!4 'QI ga-. -' .ij ,S :ants ,-X2 ' "1-vi . . - LEFT: FOOD, GLORIOUS FOOD obsesses Pam Holtzdaw at the Greek work day. Hilton Inn holds Christmas formal It was a big year for the Delta Gamma sisters. After an exciting rush, the DGS calendar of events started rolling with sisterhood parties and functions. The DGs rallied the No. 1 Sooners to victory with a Texas dinner. It was followed by the Big Sis-Lil Sis party. The two biggest events of the year were the Christmas Formal, held at the Hilton Inn, and the Pinafore Party. Sisterhood did not just exist within the house, but within the community as well. The community projects included: UNICEF, Muscular Dystrophy and Aid to the Blind. . ...lv il if C1 iwllu-an intein :qu alll! Hung lur- 1 i Q 2 my . 'I 'Q F NY l r Q. V ., L A N LQ' J, lu" Front row: Lynn Carey, Kellie Pitts, Janelle Fox, Barbara Jane Brown. Bobbi Kowalski, Angelique Roland, Brenda Ball. Pam Hampton. Second row: Jan Eskew. Charlotte Barnett. Joni Johnson. Vicki Ruff. Jan Harris. Paula Darias, Carla Ward. Pam Smith. Cindy Hutsebaut, Susan Wilkerson. Maggie Hall. Third row: Sonjia Helling. Nancy Norman. Nancy Ewing, Patti Patterson. Evelyn Ryals, Pat Bodine. Carol Johnson, Judy Graham. Fourth row: Susan Drake. Cathy Rinehart. Melissa Smith. Betty Jones. Darian Quattlebaum. Nancy Deplois. Karen Cochran, Lynn Gauchat. Sue Maerker, Elaine Binkley. Fifth row: Jackie Taylor, Cindy Donalson. Valerie Barbour, Penni Anno, Suzanne Andres. Andra Paulos. Lydia Haferland, Marilyn Ferber. Robin Fransisco. Kathy Luckowitch, Vicki Howard. Sixth row: Melissa Landers, Anne Mockley, Jane Sullivan. Marian Milner, Annabel Jones. Jan Fritschen. Linda Marburger. Rebecca Mirjanlch, Jane Cundith. Seventh row: Ann Cargile. Dana Murrah. Becki Eckroat. Lou Ann Key. Gina Portwood. Pam K. Smith, Carolyn Findlay. Melissa Legg. Kay Vaughn. Karen Steinkirchner. -.s-.Q a ,, , Hillbilly Serenade kicks off year To develop a more complete woman through scholarship and participation in campus organizations is one of the many goals of Gamma Phi Beta. Psi chapter of Gamma Phi Beta began the year with a hillbilly serenade. This serenade was in preparation for the annual hayride to Lake Thunderbird. Throughout the year, the house par- ticipated in many social events, such as the alma mater dinner, scholarship dinner and the Pink Carnation Formal with another chapter of Gamma Phi Beta. The OU chapter also sent a counselor to the national Gamma Phi camp in Vancouver, Canada which is sponsored for underprivileged children. g " . I Oiwrum 5 "'r 'Q Efcma1.Uie,, is Ps ,.:s.,V... I Q 'wifi-Q: " fs' - 5351 F,J,:,.:,x :Sv ff I my ,: . T il" , ,, .1- f -, ..... i-..,,-., ,I f Q:-.3 it gh-Jgy,g3g1p?!yA' tug X. TOP LEFT: LEADERSHIP IN ACTION shows Jan Eskew, president, holding an informal house meeting. TOP RIGHT: ABSORBING THE BOOKS in- volves Janelle Fox and Kellie Pitts before mid- term exams. LEFT: PLAYING LIKE PROS are Kathy Rinehart, Judy Graham, and Rebecca Mirjanich before an intramural clash. Gamma Phi Beta Kappa lpha Theta RIGHT: BEAUTIES AND BEASTS inhabit the Theta house during the Halloween dinner. Thetas term lil brothers "Pansies" A new little brother program called the "Theta Pansiesn was instigated early in the fall by Kappa Alpha Theta. Also in the fall, the women of KAT leaped onto their tricycles andppeddled to a glorious victory in the Phi Kappa Psi 500. Second semester was highlighted by singing and dancing the way to fame and fortune by joining forces with the men of Delta Tau Delta in Sooner Scandals. As another stimulating year on the OU campus drew to a close, the women of- Kappa Alpha Theta discovered that it truly is "Neat to be Greek." RIGHT: SOME ENCHANTED EVENING is shared by Selby Saxon, Carter Ellison and John Saxon. BELOW: HDELTA TAU SWEETHEARTH sing the Delts to Charrie Burton when she becomes a Delt Lil Sis. 41' ,4- if E. OS to Front row: Sue l.aBoon, Tara McLendon. Cheryl Harmon, Mary Stancliffe, Nancy Reeves, Sharon Torrence, Kim Massey, Janet Davis. Second row: Melissa Warner, Sally Anderson. Sue Scott, Marguerite Steed, Pam Treece, Debbie Braithwalt, Lisa Brock, Amy Harris, Pam Pierson, Page Campbell. Third row: Julie Alexander, Eydie Leeds. Susan Walser. Mary Short. Mary Gray. Elaine Johnson. Karen Kinnert. Lisa McBride, Krista Jones. Amy Jenner. Fourth row: Marita Abernathy, Terri Clanton. Mary Thomas, Mary Hoff, Kathy Neustadt, Susan Belcher. Terry Trussell, Debra T .4-. S al- ni., 4 u .. A ji ,,y .5 Ari D W Bedingfield, Mary McClure. Fifth row: Maribeth Koons, Betsy Beams,'Valarie Harnest, Elizabeth Ladd, Jacque Humphrey, Gayle Gerlach, Joy Sutton, Ann Gable, Mary McCall. Sixth row: Julie McCall, Cindy Miles, Muffin Hone, Sheila Unruh, Joy Donovan, Jeni Cook, Laura Godfrey, Fawn King, Rita Herlihy, Joan Herlihy, Jane Stancliffe. Seventh row: Phyllis Rice, Phyllis Fraser, Maria Tulley, Beth Goodall, Charlene Berry, Kathy Newman, Kim Guffy, Terri Galt, Keywood Deese, Ginny Huston. Eighth row: Maria Paris, Carrie Neal, Paula Rodgers, Jane Frantz, Carter Ellison, Susie A -, 4.. - h l -i .ard Suiile, Kathy McKiddy. Ninth row: Denny Gilmore. Peggy Stover, Nancy Carnes, Jenny Mclvor, Kathy Creel, Debbie Harden, Joan Clayton, Lee Pedersen, Lyn Parrish, Susie Lynn, Gwenn Fair- banks, Chanie Burton, Carolyn Koch. Tenth row: Kimi Morris, Selby Saxon, Shannon Sadler, Lynn Gaugler, JX fv as ,iff ' rye mf Front row: Debbie Beech, Laura Bateman, Nancy Erickson, Robbie Lillard. Dawn Kutz, Christine Hall. Michele Manning. Mary 3:3 o 40 ram ca Dj' x t P .iv . 1 15' I . I. .. l N' . Brumage. Second row: Sue Munro, Jeanne O'Brian, Sally Pribyl. Kali McClung, Mrs. Vera Anderson, Vicki Goodknight, Pam Cuplin. Melinda Mayes. Third row: Susan Craig, Jan Curry, Kelly McGugan, Mary Ann Stephenson, Susie Dowdy, Cherie Howell. Marcia Gilliland. Tracy Traverner. Fourth row: Mary Enoch. Peggy Horton, Nancy Shipman, Sandy Hall, Phyllis Dakil, Suzy Smith, Pam Leonard, Debbie Fulmer, Dale Furman, Fifth row: Sue Ann - Q i 31 Evens, Dale Owensby, Diane Dernoncourt, Mary Moore, Robin Fleming. Dianne Pattison, Patty Brandell. Cindy Mayes. Mary Maxeiner. Sixth row: Dina Kincaid. Dianne Brown, Linda Westervelt, Sherry Watson. Leslie Davis, Janice Galegar, Rhonda Adams. Martha Wyatt, Ann Gardenhire. Seventh row: Susan Good. Toni Toups, Liz Worsham, Susie Troutman, Debbie Taylor, Debbie Dernoncourt, Marilyn Prentice, Karen Lamb. . I ,, 4 ii' fm f -Pe' 4 ,, HAYFEVER STRIKES Karen Booker and Mark McGee at the Kappa Delta hayride, law? -ills QX3 'J-"'3'4l"-w.4f, ,, B5 Kappa Delta A SOONER TOUCHDOWN brings a smile from Debbie Fulmer, Ruf-Nek Queen. SISTERS SING ALONG during an evening get- together at the Kappa Delta House. Puppets spark national philanthropy Participation was a key word for Kappa Deltas. KDS kept busy working and helping in various campus activities. Executive positions were held in Howdy Week, Campus Chest, Angel Flight, Mortar Board and Tassels. In a more far reaching effort Kappa Deltas made puppets for their national philanthropy, Cripped Children's Hospital in Richmond, Virginia. Socially the calendar was kept full with a tree trimming party at Christmas, the Winter Rose, and a luau in the spring. Exchange dinners, teas and after-hours parties helped to keep the Sisterhood close and to join the KDS with the Greek and the OU com- munities. W Front row: Mary Bee Musser, Paula Elliott, Kristin Miller, Jane Shelter, Martha Graybill, Laurie Dwen, Karen Kimmel, Terrye Sneed. Carissa Flora. Nancy Lee, Debbie Riggs. Jeannie Dickey. Second row: Kelly Christensen. Leslie Baison. Sara Millspaugh. Diane Whiteside, Paula Woodruff, Ann Morely, Claudia Loy, K.T. Shoemaker, Kristie Kay, Krissa Baylor, Kathy Ferguson, Mary Ferguson, Sherry Jenkins, Nancy Miller. Third row: Shauna Estes, Diane Tolson, Vicki Tolson, Annette Phillips, Lisa Powell, Leigh Kirkwood. Minda Goldsmith. Caren Cook. Cindy Massey. Kathy Ingram. Marlha Purl. Leigh Ann Zachary. Mary Ann Alquist, Fourth row: Suzie Baumgardner, Janice Flora, Linda Helm, Maudie Bigham, Cindy Crowl, Rebecca Perot, Lee Reynolds, Barbara Butner, Mary Ge Walker, Sherri Short, Leigh Ann Ebert, Della Field, Rica Dodson, Connie Dunlap, Susan Bunny, Fifth row: Robin Moss, Holly Million. Kathleen Kuhn, Melissa Boucher, Jahn York, Sherry Halhorn, Janne McLendon, Sally Barry, Diane Tchakerides, Glenna Jackson, Becky Brewer, Lisa Gholston, Julie Henderson, Janice Huffman, Debbie Curry. Patti Shoemaker, Liz Exon, Sixth row: Jeannie Colgate, Kay Hendricks, Marsha Lowrie, Tamela Jones, Lory Hathom, Valerie Young, Chris Monsour, Judy Barger, Stephanie Cecil, Judy Abbott, Kris Scott, Lisa Schmidt, Beth Ming, Mary Jane Herndon, Carolyn Kuhn. Marian Anderson. 's lm " E.-'l':'. E' G 1 1 -we-.:,w,1.w f 'ui ' rr- fi,-' 1 WHEN IT RAINS, it pours as the pledges battle with the members to go on wall-cout. Kappas celebrate 60th anniversary Promotion of Greek, campus, and civic relations was again emphasized by the women of Kappa Kappa Gamma. Participation on both individual and group levels achieved chapter in- volvement in a variety of activities. School began with the formal pledging of 31 new pledges. This year's founding date was especially significant as the chapter celebrated its 60th an- niversary. The philanthropy project selected this year was Cancer Research. Tag Day, held before the Missouri game, saw Kappas individually canvassing areas near the stadium for donations. l E .9 . - . x .,L " 1" l ,H . I 'Fi :I new , ' v y" " ,- " M49 -"' gvw r , A ,N N xL,Vm,L4-Qffyn. ABOVE: KAPPA-QUE NOT BAR-B-QUE serves as the theme for a party. LEFT: STRUMMIN' THE STRINGS for her sisters at a big sis-lil sis party is Kathleen Kuhn. Kappa Kappa Gamma if filfff , ,"": T ,, Pi Beta Phi Traditional activities--a super rush, annual pledge-member party, walk-out, and, of course, Big Sis-Lil Sis--were again part of the 1974-75 school year for Pi Beta Phi. Pi Phis had an annual Halloween Party for underprivileged boys with the ATOS. Pi Phi's major philanthropy was once again raising money for the Muscular Dystrophy Dance Marathon. For the second straight year the Pi Phis teamed up with the Sigma Chis working all second semester on another great Sooner Scandals act. TOP RIGHT: IT'S A SCANDAL beams Debbi Moy about winning best choreography in Scandals '74, ABOVE: "ERICA IS PREGNANTV' exclaim the Pi Phi's as they watch "All My Children" on TV. RIGHT: "GO, SOONERS, GO!" Diane Vaith, head cheerleader, helps cheer the Sooners on to victory. Q. lux ff Pi Phis enter Sooner Scandals 4f.i1q "lr ul' ll' l R 2 Sharon Goclwin, Ellen Staford, Emily Denning, Kathy Ritts. Sue Ann Mackey, Sara Mahaffey. Tenth row: Dusty Dean, Annie Rogers. Michelle Meredith, Janet Gibson, Cindi Meyers, Jamie Holder, Patti Bechfold, Tracie Overturf, Robbie Spector. Eleventh row: Mindy Holbrook, Karen Jennings. Twelfth row: Ellen Calonkey, Barbara Beames. Michelle Guier, Nancy Davis, G.K. Rafferty. Thirteenth row: Lanna Harris, Genie Griffin, Melissa Henley, Fourteenth row: Pa! Henry, Carol Carter, Diane Vaeth, Kathy Cash. K., Egg lpha Skpna Phi . not. RIGHT: EVENING AT HOME at the apartments is shared by Linda Westervelt and Steve Kniatt. BELOW: ON TO VICTORY for the Alpha Sigma Phi football team in an intramural game. 14 6-w Alpha Sigs continue to expand Yes, Virginia, there's still a chapter of Alpha Sigma Phi at O.U. Alpha Sig influence extended from the floor of Student Congress all the way to the intramural fields. Alpha Alpha Chapter continued to expand its numbers in spite of its three years without a house. The vibrant spirit of the chapter was augmented by the initiation of several new members to the Little Sis organization. Alpha Sig continued to be an active fraternity with its eye on future expansion. if THE GLORIOUS SCREEN of the TV occupies Marla Johnson and Gary Chess. I 1 F 1 .' 111 - Front row: Steve Fielder, Tom Hall, Lisa Hicks, Bruce Tacketi, Lynn Gauchat, Stephen Kniatt, Terry Womack. Second row: John Canavan, Lee Seegel, Richard Marley, David Bott, Gregg Chess, Scott Morris. Bill Lamebull. Third row: Richard Dunn, Linda Westervelt, Mike James, Timothy Hightower, Ed Blrdshead. .4 lww, 1 il X KA ' L . Fourth row: Pete Johnson, Robert Ross, Paul Snenson, Bill Mathis, Gllberl Morris, John Paul Ross, Marilyn Rice, Chris Wesselgren, Jeff Pruitt, James Slayton, Paul Whinery, Ron Graham, Randy Cowell, Bill Diggs, George Cornelias, Mike Bartlett, Dennis Pascale. Wi. at A 2 Front row: Jim Jaworski, Marc Morton, Windler Schweer. Scott McKee, Glen Cochran, Sara Millspaugh, Marsha Lowery, Mary Bee- Musser, Barbara Stoldt, Bob Pergason, Dan Steele- Lucy Cuadxeres. Steve Aoelscher. Second row: Rick Duvall, Bill Duzan, Bob Dukes. Mark Thetford, Kelly McCoy, Steve Rowland. Third row: Sharon Godwin. Sherry Bates, Gary Beach. Charlene Berry. John Luke, Nicole Wright, Glen Johnson, Susan Garetson, Suzette Foreman. Fourth row: Doug Queen, Billy Hamilton, Bob Stuart. Tim Height. Ann Ruble, Susie Marshall. Tom Mullen, Pete Godfrey, Judy Kee, Bill Coleman, Linda Motzenbacher, Bill Duke. Sharon Davis. Karen Blackburn. Lee Stranathan, David Balloff, Joe Rogers. Fifth row: Don Douglas. Gary Davis, G.K. Ralfety, Laurie Stevens, Missy Berry, John Payne, Tony Faith. Bruce Pendleton, Bill Moon, Don Jorskl, Kirby Croisant, John Piper. Sixth row: Mrs. Frances Wierman, David Adams, Bill Queen, Mark Patterson. Tamela Jones. Bob Simon, Jeff Denning, Trip Brander, John White, Janet Mullen, Bill Stewart, John Rodgers, Stan Erwin. Seventh row: Emily Denning, Richard Kimberlin, Mike Kimberlin. 9 , v' 'Flu' 'lx 'v i. 1 Mike Crutcher, Wendell Cavin, LarrymDickerson, Coy Jenkins, Dan Howard. Fred Braden, Chuck Garrett. Brian Lindsay. Eighth row: Bill Bonner. Richard Martin. Ken Purgason. David Fath. Don Naileh. Devereaux Jones. Larry Seale, Fawn King, Ron Shepard, Alan Simpson, Peggy Sugg, Jim Garrett. Ninth row: Rick Scott. Neil Lynn, Steve Curley. Rick Liester, Cappy White, Pete Dysert. Marc Miller. Rick Davis, Alan Fleet, Steve Percefull, Fred Dowell, Gil Lewker, Tenth row: Dave Edwards, Gary Parsons. Steve Morgan, Burle Steelman, Lloyd Spraggins, Parker Chapman, Steve Burton, Kyle Wood, Chris Reynolds, Hap Hearndon, Rob Gardner. Campus involvement key for Taus Grades, intramurals, campus ac- tivities, and a more active alumni in' volvement were notable areas of achievement for the ATO's in 1974- 1975. Campus involvement was an im- portant priority for the men of Alpha Tau Omega. Taus held prominent positions in Greek Revue, Student Congress, Sooner Scandals, and the Interfraternity Council. The men of Alpha Tau Omega and the women of the Pi Beta Phi sorority sponsored a Halloween party for the Little BrotherfBig Brother organization in Norman. LEFT: PAINTING FOR CHARITY in the ATO-Pi Phi Handicap Project are Trey Boyd and Nancy Antonelli. ABOVE: TAKING IT EASY on a warm sunny day, ATO's find a great place to relax. LEFT: SERVING HIS TIME for the Delta Gamma's as a houseboy, ATO Mike Lortz serves a 'Rx DG meal. alf- Beta Theta Pi Scholarship and Intramurals were the major objectives of the men of Beta Theta Pi. For the fourth consecutive semester, the Betas achieved over a 3.0 house grade average. They also con- tinued their pursuit of the campus in- tramural trophy. Betas still found time to maintain an active social calendar. The year started with the traditional Victory Party followed by a joint party with the SAES during Dallas week-end. The highlight of the social year was the 50-year-old Beta Barn Dance. Grades, activities, intramurals, and parties--these bound a fraternity into a brotherhood. RIGHT: FALL PLEDGE DUTIES occupy this industrious Beta pledge before a November party. f4,f Q' ABOVE: BOUNCING AT BARNDANCE are Katie Shoemaker, Sherri Short, and Randy Sch- wab. RIGHT: THE BIG PAYOFF is contemplated by a Beta at the Dad's Day Casino Party. , I Betas maintain high grade average .M .1 , . ' 1 , rl.-:.,t'f? ,-... , I X V A' Y. ,'f'1- ' I -' ' "'- ' ' Q '- T- - :f TT: ,J 'T' ' X .- rj . .D ff' -s"fl 5-'5?f'7" , 'fi -I l -il l. if , -.ii , ' f ,J- '3 .f7:72::, ' ' N my .I T I x T "T .. rm "il ! ri -4 an i -.. ,Wy N sgi QQ A Gt Q.. 5 5 2 'af' 'M - 47 itll -h f.. Jl L. A, a E, E, X- ! '.i I ., f ,V . A wee,- . ui. AA ', in f l 4 - . H .YJ -43 t , X 1 ". 1 F P l ',a:v' -MQ ' L.-. ' 4 , 41 P' " " 5 -- l S' ' . . 1 , K. , .a , 'h I if 4-I J" Q 'gg' Au". 'I I-" f , A t if - -fr K i l X.fl ' An ' . X ,- Front row: Robert Lockard. Donald Lynn Stuart, Jim Gibbon, Michael Neil Vick, Charles Geister, Mark Lisle, John Munger, Robert Neville. Roger LeGrant. Fisher Niemeyer. Stephen Jordan. Warren Kruger. Second row: Dick Herlihy. Troy Emde. Edgar Morrison, Scott Bandi, Dan Sadberry, Elizabeth Murphy, Steve Van Aken, Tom West, Mark Curnutte, Bill Gossett, Richard Campbell, Samuel Sesson. Third row: Rick Gibbon, Mitchell Merryman, Donnie Maxwell, Ronald Krieger, Jack Rayburn, Mark Scott, David Oshel, Bruce Bicklorcl, Raymond Harris, Larry Dinkens, Ed Norfleet, Bill l-lerlihy, James Doughty, Charles Jenkins, Danny Heatly, Douglass Huth. Donnie Hughes, Fourth row: Scott Rogers, Kym Hagar, Randall West, Larry Snyder, Kenny Gibson, Mike Winner. Harry Sherman. Mike Shelby. Clark Millspaugh. Brant Ruttnian. Daniel Jordan, William Martin Sullivan. David Rainbolt. Brent Cooper. David Fisher. Fifth row: Gary Watts, Gail Watkins. Richard Baptist, Bob Morgan, Paul Brown, Michael Hall, Mark Gudsey. Kyle Toal, Jim Rayburn. Kevin McGee. Mardeus Massad. ,- David Welch. Brian'Cockrell. Sieve Cockrell. Kenneth Kemp. Larry LeBarre, Greg Wallace, Jeff Haley. Sixth row: Roger Steed, Carl Holiday, James Mclntyre, Brad Hoopes, Andy Bishop, Dean Luthy, Larry Eclzards. Daniel Rocks Urice, John Klabzuba, Tony Bumpus, James Read, Kym Schomemake, Mike Mordy, Ronnie Crosby, Marshall Wilson, James Charloe, Robert Turner, Mike McCullough, Tom Stapleton, Pat Campbell, Robert Cowan. Lance Williams. Jerry Colclazier. Seventh row: Mike Doughty, Mark Woegner. Dan -Boling. David Diamond. Alan Synar, Kevin O'Halloran, Richard Cape, Kelly Longanacre. 'Z' af ,aw .. in 'fe .fa HHH!! HHH!! , :J I' ,.. .' 1 ,- . ,.f-. I' yy, Q , V. , 'f' X A -ff'-W H. fu-' J fy Ni. . c. .. Y- .DI Front row: Grant Billingsley, Tim Sloan, Bob Bates, Bud Field, Tom Stalcup. Brian Billings. Dick Attaway, Tom Ashwood, David Kraker, John Frazier, Rick Davis, Second row: Paul Butcher, Mark Hawley. Torn MfDonald. .lay Gilliam. Paul Perry, Greg Schober, .luhn Langston. Rossie Robinson. Max Cook. Spence Carson. Third row: Tim Miller, David Hart, Steve McCraw, Tim Fagan. Jim Baker, Jim McCall, Mary McCall, Don Joseph, John Frame, Jane Siancliffe. David Hasbrook, Kevin White, Phil Mabry. Fourth r Rob McDonald. Randy Polk, Greg Hlnson. Mike Braun. Jim Mike Brown, Bob Carter. Ed Aust. Kathy Carter, Rick Lutz. Burkett, Doug Perry. Fifth row: Jim Murphree. Stan Baker. K Portz. Sieve Kinnett. Karen Kinnett, Phil Thompson. Bo Vahlberg. Ron Wortham. Joe lngram. Jim Stover, Marla Lam Steve Scoggin, Sixth rowi David Harris, David Donnell, Russel. 'loin Renegar. Mark Mindeman. Steve Jeter. Ted Konr Mike Stevens. Laura Kennedy. Andy Johnson. Jim Ye Seventh row: Rob Maier, Mike Beaudoin, Steve Smith. Howell. Jay Lunger, Scott Troy, Doug Auld. David Robinson, Gilbert. Marsha Ray, Matt Roy. Eighth row: Mike Lambert. Choate, lid Dakil. Stan Ballew. Steve Chandler. Roh Winn. Gillhorn. Mark Stillwell. Rob Berry. Barry McBee, Don Dur John Dwyer, Tim Brassfield, Rick McNabb. Dale Mitchell, D Miller, Vance Sanders, Gene Kriska, John Long. is . .rf , N-1 '1 aff . af? Q 1, ww -3 vp-5 'i ABOVE: "HIT ME AGAIN" says David Robinson and his father at Delt Casino Night. Delts dance into stardom Activities was the name of the game and Delts were found nearly everywhere: in IFC, Student Court System, Student Entertainers, UOSA, and the Media information office. Scandals was surely the highlight of the year: the Delts danced into stardom with the women of Kappa Alpha Theta. Emphasis was put on academics as well as activities, the house grade 'point requirement being raised from 2.0 to 2.25. The worsening economic plight of the nation hit home in the Delt House as prices soared. New ideas to cut costs were always welcome, as one Delt suggested to the chapter, t'Maybe we ought to all start using the facilities in Dale Hall!" T l I Delta Tau Delta "DAD'S ARE GREAT" cheer the Delt Little Sisters in a Dad's Day skit. ABOVE: "AT EASE, MEN" orders Sergeant Rock while posing with Mekong Delta party attire. 1,1 Q, 9 I-.YW Delta Upsilon RIGHT: HOME SWEET HOME offers a place to study tor those dreaded final exams. H... fr . H I F I X it xx 1. ..-142.2 ABOVE: UP, UP, AND AWAY goes the winning volley in a DU game. RIGHT: RUNNING FOR CHARITY IS Ron French in the March of Dimes Run to Dallas. DU-AXO Run to Dallas eams money Once again the men of Delta Upsilon were off and running for the March of Dimes. This year the DU's, along with the women of Alpha Chi Omega sorority, ran a football from Norman to Dallas in hopes of raising more money than their Texas coun- terparts. And they did--to the tune of 3s3,5oo. It was a very rewarding ex- perience for both the DUs and the Alpha Chi's. Scholarship has always been a prime concern at DU and, as tradition, DU maintained a superb house average as well as having two of its members chosen Top Ten Freshmen. Special congratulations went to Wes Grigsby and Demetrius Berelos for this fine accomplishment. Last, but not least, was the added pleasure of welcoming new house parents, John and Janette Butler. I R 1. y I i -li.---" If In ef tw' few? :Wm 4-o Q' L. K-L. Front row: Stephen R. Hurter. Debra L, Dixon, Bruce McDonald, lireamla Wat:-.on. James Grigsby. Tim Patterson. Russell Shaw. Second row: Craig Hurwlg. Jim Cooper. Tom Hess. Jeannette Butler. Pam Cuplin. Tim Dowd. Rick Oyler. Ron French, Gary Collins, Barry Oyler, Jeffrey A. Lawnlck, Gregory Hayman. Page Heller. Kris Ludlam. Third row: Marc Chambors. Susan Smiley. Doug Stussi, David Clay, Sid Long, Richard Butler, Rick Grigsby, Wesley Grigsby, John Meek. Mike Brothers. Fourth row: James Fresemer, Julie Nees. Joe Smith, Rob Littlefield, Joel Betow, Dan Hibbard, Steven Moon, John Funk, Steve Pipkin. Fifth row: Paul Wesohe, Stan Horst, Tim Lee, Vivian Lyman, Henry England, Duff Andrews. Stephe Rehrig, Mark Rupert, Dave Doughtery, Debbie Dernoncourt, John Benson. Y grafts. l fy' E ii' I zlffftw lim Q' gif Kappa lpha As the 1974 school year began, the brothers of Beta Eta chapter of Kappa Alpha made a committment to return their priorities to the traditional and historical values that KA was founded upon. The idea of the "southern gentleman" was once again stressed. Socially, the KA life revolved around the historical firsts which the chapter pioneered. In commeration of being the first fraternity in the state, the brothers had a Thanksgiving Founder's Day Banquet to start their sixty-ninth year on campus. Second semester included Old South Week with a Dixie Dance attended by chapters throughout the country to celebrate KA's oldest and most famous party, started here in 1920. .. KA returns to traditional values RIGHT: ENJOYING POLITICAL DEBATES during an election year is a familiar sight at the KA house, BELOW: THE TRADITIONAL LANDMARK of the KA house is the cannon in the front yard. ,4'N Q1-is --- V-V"'lJ. ..,..Ql""Q.ZTU'fQE' :-r"f-1---' f' .ex . , ,, v, 'P I af-. X. N.. x A ,K ' fir' V' ,c.. :IFE 'A . V It x . - 1. .IE X f . KY. , . SKILI. AND CONCENTRATION are the keys to these KA's success in foosball. 5 t 4 is '4 If ' f ui' ' 5' 'fi V ' sffhfz' ' Q 1- i' '2 H' 0. i H5 ' .- 1 ' 51" X f Qiff L L ' ip ,ff ,. rg- 2 1. 't 1.-4 -. ,v J., Front row: Danny Ovcrland, Stephen Favors, Brent Murphy. Rfivmond Gahan. Neil Vitale. Paul Hunt. Jim Winget. Second row: IV1ilcIie:lIl.ee,Cur!is Symus. Richard Morgan. Kun Fore. Bill Gvcidie. Michael Cordell. Red Stout ll. Randy Surtees. Jeff Briley. Joe Anucn. ,- Kappa Sigma RIGHT: lT'S THE END of a long day for the Kappa Sig elephants during k'New Year's Weekend." wr.. +- iligl' -o5'v..i,,xN, , ,pmt '2" I, J . fi' ' '- gf .N I - ll-if p '- ' ' . Ii. : sax. -1 wil, Xl Q 1i? ,:lIv'l1ll I , N ' L 1. Q t I ' "-I K '-., Anlh ' A A. r - 1 1-' 'w ' i .F ' J Y"v : 'rr. , Q' 7' '. r ,. . Hi gl-1TS.RZ,rji,i Q ,V I 5 x ." lrlvlljvlwy S. ' V. -- y i , , -Q ,ii .. I in dj ' N -' . ' ima, ' g j K- 'T 1 E 'W' x'1g6anf.ll.HL.i.a Pledges sponsor chestnut roast Beginning the year with the Victory Party, the men of Kappa Sigma prepared for an active year. The pledge class had a new social event for their members, a chestnut roast. They then'-sponsored the Dream Girl Coronation and Ball. This was followed by the famous RIGHT: "DOWN, BOBO, DOWN," demands Beth Ann Anderson, preparing to end her Kappa Sig ride. ABOVE: lT'S PARTY TIME for the Kappa Sigmas and their dates at the Blue Onion. barn-burning 'l-IELLAZPOPPIN' party. The New Year's Party with its circus elephants was a campus favorite. Other parties included the Rose Formal, Spring Formal and Senior Banquet. Kappa Sigs participated in all phases of campus life, from Model United Nations to Campus Chest to cannon borrowing. 1974-75 was another memorable year at the Kappa Sigma 'Lhome away from home!" i Syl Sz.. 5, :Sf X 1. fy ui' jf X X Ei Fl -.1 3 f v YQ, .... i i ni ES!! gl 2 I fb- I ' li E355 Qi! Il SIE ISI l lf! 11: H111 JJ. - X, IRI 'i T ' li it it Egg: 'J J Q EI ,-x Url' V L lr 6 sd E N 'L -l V IW! I Wi' r J! 'E 15 I fc' I in Front row: Jim McColl. Sam Sheets. Bob Riddell, Kip Hilishafer, Hal Revelle, Mike Woods. Phil Thomas. Eph Lobaugh. Second row: Mark Hurd. John Snodgrass. Richard Broom. Steve Boyls. C Kaligmrm. Jon Don: Joel Payne, Barbara Franklin. Bill Chenall. Third row: Pal Brecinrmn. Angelique' Roland. Jack Dnmico. Roger Carlson. Barbara Merritt. John O'Brien. Mom Hughnes. Janeva Tillie, Jack Watkins, Susan Reecl. David Dayvault, Arnold Blake. Jack Gator. Fourth row: Bill Hemingway. Lou Ann Key. Jim DeCIaire, Joan DeClaire. Steve Long. John Clarkson. Bill Hough. Jim Adair. Mark Howerlon. Jim Ashley, Steve Mahaney, Mike Bunney. Richard Burk. Joe Chism, Jay Flaherty. -9 1 A I i . ,, 1 A K Q' - ' x 1 . . ,, . 1 xl' , 1 Front row: Scott Malowney, Chris Scott. Scott Yarberry. Bob Canlield. Steve Kowalski. Tommy Burns. Second row: Matt Moore, David Dibble, Steve Rugeley, Richard Burger, Pete Riley, Bransford Shoemake, David Beasley. Third row: Mark Bolinger. Steve Gaede, Brian Kinney, David Beck, David Gamble, Fourth row: Dan Lott, George Justice, David Orrell, Richard Johnson, Howard Sheets. Fifth row: Greg Eddingion, Gary Brandon, Phil Ferrero, Karlin Gramlich, J.B, Taylor, Doug Anderson, Randy Briggs, Tim Miller. Sixth row: David Cameron, Gary Wightman, Gary Chandler, Joe Baldwin, Paul Roach, Barry Hurley, Paul Joiner, Don Crowell. Seventh row: Bob Stewart, Blake Morley, Randy White, Leonard Thill, Andy Turner, Bill Schoellhorn, Brad Blake, Ronnie Davis. Keith Kressman, Steve Grayber. Phil Lewis, Tim Jones, Jim Benninger, Paul Tobin, Ed Edminster, Lew Murray, Dennis Davis. Eighth row: Steve Henderson, Charlie Ramer, Bill Sell, Brad Griffin, Cam Countryman, J.O. Wood, Gary Schilling, Bill Burleson, Gerry Badgett. Ninth row: Jack Claxton, Keith Lessly, Russ Duren, Rick March, Tim Thompson, Mike Mitzner, Mark Kingsolver, Mark Brown. Y W6 1 i f , .cf is ff Qu :,- . ' - Y " :QE " ' -. F""' F" f f so if L . , , ,L , .i 1 Claw-V- ,, , ' ,L 1:.I7: ' - f ir--re , eg. .1 P' J. ef ,A y rl , ,, 1 it '11 -' ' Qi t I its ' Ei!-fi? Ki. LEFT: WILD, WILD WEST is the spirit of the Lambda Chi Western Weekend. BELOW: RAKING IT UP are Richard Johnson, Karlin Gramlich and George Justice as fall drops in. TWO FOR FOOS at the Lambda Chi house, participating in a favorite game. 3 .:.-.Xt : n f 'L ,4 V. Q . 'c-- '.,...,-A-V 'ef Lambda Chi lpha '-. ' fix. . v Lambda Chis start speaker's program A spirited national convention at the ,University of Tennessee and an associate member class of 33 men 'kicked off the year for the Lambda Chi's. For the first time in seven years, the Lambda Chi's entered Sooner Scandals with the women of Alpha Chi Omega sorority. A speaker's program was also initiated at the house, giving the members and associate members a chance to hear from various organizations, both on and off campus. Western Party and the Christmas Party in the Fall, along with Tradewinds and the Valentine Formal in the Spring were a welcome break to the day-in, day-out schedule of classes. sm. no it W2 51,5 Phi Delta Theta RIGHT: ORGANIZING THE FUNCTION seems to occupy Scott Weihle's mind at the Pre-Dally Rally. l'ffff'fi- .Nu ABOVE: FUNCTIONING WITH FRIENDS is what the annual Pre-Dally Rally is all about. Phi Delts sponsor Pre-Dally rally Scholarship, moral rectitude and brotherhood--these were the ideals which the men of Phi Delta Theta continually reached tor. The Phi Delt's emphasized the concept of a brotherhood made up of individuals with distinct personalities and characteristics. These individuals participated in varying activities on campus and in the community, but they became united in friendship through the brotherhood of Phi Delta Theta. The men of Phi Delt tried to do whatever they could, whenever they could, for one another as brothers--no member of Phi Delta Theta ever stood alone. J 47 4 ,fv Q . Q I 6152 ,- flag e' 's if Eiga, fr' bmi' I . mi I I . f . y I ., " . ' N -1 ' :ii 'I nf-F fix ' Qu. - "" - 'ggi A -:,.j:.p .lf 5. ' V' V-Q-.4re,g1.'...,, 1, I, 54" :K ,Y L' , .:Prf:':ij. iw I 4-12,9 Hx- szziaigm ' .' 2 3""4 ., ' 'G ,H - ,V r-- f' -,.,..'-:..i.f.' f .- L V. 1 g-vw. .. 'f 'V ffl, lx " gp -A ' ' 19 '-45. .1 .. S 1 fgtffwifiktitaieiiril . .,, .yl M, i ,Q .,., ci- s . EGM? vf Y : .ig . .V.iL',,',,: ,,--e,5..'., -tw--C4 F .'2::1am.-" -Mgr,-:1--.ff. "H 1 ' ' .,"'T ff+'?g9-15:q?t17,,f' 4ffv ix- -4, :.- .' eg'-he . ,- 14 32,31 ,: .V'.s,,55.-..fi- -- uf: 7 ' ' ' 'ii A-25 'f was -V -1 gtyarlsewwft-:2,ggs 'E , tfqlieiygg.,-T?,f.Z-. 1 ,Q ,fygiq ,fc-: -IH Sheff, 1 -.. - awgg, 'ci--1 if ' ff sf: 'g5ff?m,f.fw.'.eL . 1. 335145. -izif fe 5 ev- f ,JM .4 W ' 4'K5?-'Z' hilgw A I ..zf,1. ' . Hariri ,- --1-1 -2:94 2 + 1-1 1 " 5?'7'.7- , A ', -z , gli-'i" iz. 's " IQSS.: .1 2,41 . J- M44-:' If ', -. r' T:-1 ' ' 1 41 fr W1 , is N -"4 HAMMER IN HAND a Phi Delt prepares to nail the Tigers for homecoming decorations prior to the OU-Missouri game. QQ? - 1. . . . . 5 1- J x---'w '1 5-Q ' .J -41: :-'1- - 2' V1-4 -- an-v .,..,- 4...-1-f ff.--vu .YJ ,,V-...,..,,,1 2-1-i .,.l....V.....,V .7 j.,,..,....1....1., ,,.-A , 1. .-lq..a4 '-ix.-...ii-,i, A ff- 4 --4 ..--.- -.--- -. .4-fh'i-- fr-1. "I '-1 - J-, 'f V 7-.qgvi A-3-Q-S'-5-. Q. kk? V Y gi- -.-4-4...-.. H.- . . , W V X X ., , . ll " ill EE: l 35... l l ill Hi lit ,, f"" l , ' ' 1 . 'W VPN"-f"':' 'llshwj' "l7"'i'ad"if4TMmiL--iw:-viii?" wwf'-if . i. ', 1 I '. , 'i iii ii we ' ,i- . V 1 "Vi, "" . l '- ' Hi.-V " - i. ' ,ai " ' "ff , ' " H , .fl "P ,- ii. 'A ,s i wi " ALJ Front row: Robby Berry. Neil Mass. Doug Hoffman, Jim Gill, Richard Churchill. Tim Costelow. Rod Miller. Second row: Jim Wolf. Rick Miller. Mark O'Rolte, Doug Haunschild. Steve Sigler. Dan Foltz, Terry Putnam. Bruce lVlcLinn. Don Williamson. Third row: David Stein, Mike Miller. Herb Reiker. Lee Gibson, John Lodge. Bill Huffman. Jeff Noble. Pete Elder. Jack Anthony. Tim Brauer. Craig Kennemer. Thom Finley. Fourth row: Craig Keitz. liilsier Hill. Jell Patton. Bob Hume. Bill Bennet. Jeff Watts. Steve Gibson. Randy Williamson, Craig Lirey. Don Manson. Robert Quinell. Jim Welch. 2 :,E,.. ..,,,,. if M' -0 "'r!'Yv I , Nga- ,. . "-" ' 'illlliil iii f' N? .tglnu-um ' -1- ff liiiill . P H., nw' 4 1 Eu - , ...si Hai ,,Vv f'X 'r-3 5- rr - vu 4,-. C i 14 'S , . - A KJ L, .har ' . I i fl L Front row: Brent Parker. Don Miller, Hugh Robinson. Mike Donahoe, Kent Goff. David Slief. Second row: Mike Sullivan. Brian Sullivan, Bob McNeIlis. Vic Owens. Terry Hurd. Third row: Robert Sireight. Paul Dorsey. Mark Dorenis. Ahmel Say. Bruce Parker. John Wright. Fourth row: Dicky Wise. Max Bouidischwiler. Mark LeDous. Mark Tally. Steve Agee. v Phi Psi 500 offers competition With the acquisition of 21 pledges, the men of Phi Kappa Psi enjoyed a social surge on campus. Numerous functions and parties took place, highlighted by the Phi Psi 500 in the fall and the Penthouse Party in the spring. Besides social activities, Phi Psis also stressed academics. The member grade point average was among the top five of all fraternities during the past two years. Because they had basically freshmen and sophomores in the house, the Phi Psis expected only to gain membership and maintain the strength of the Alpha Chapter. The men of Phi Kappa Psi continued to be a contributing factor to the success of the OU Greek com- munity. CHALLENGING THE MIND with an exciting chess match is one of the many Phi Psi pasttimes. 1 l., ABOVE: SCOPING THE PLANS for the Phi Psi 500 Tricycle race are a Chi O and the Phi Psi coach. LEFT: LINING IT UP for the big shot is Hoart Robinson with Dennis Lewelling looking on. Phi Kappa Psi RIGHT: LITTLE SIS PLANS are discussed by Muffin Hone and Randy Corp. BELOW: A NEW ADDITION to the Phi Kap house was built during the summer. guuullll --1-.QM K' 1-'a "i"' -,a-f,'w "4 " ' Phi Kaps open new recreation facility Growth and expansion laid the foundation for a great year at Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity. A tremendous Dedication Banquet to officially open the new dining and recreation facility was held in September with alumni and charter members from around the country attending. The strong bond of trust and friend- ship between the Phi Kaps enabled them to take active part in MUN, in Greek Week, in Campus Chest, in University Sing, in hosting a Christmas Party for orphans, and in winning awards for banners and homecoming decorations. Socially, the Phi Kaps boasted their annual affairs with such large parties as the Christmas Party, the Black and Gold Formal, and the popular all campus Sorority-A-Go-Go. 'PPFFFPFPPFF r Y 5 CARD SHARK SKILL is shown by two Phi Kaps during a game of spades. T, .':-Q row: John Deilamette, David Guyer, John Aulick. Gary Joe LeClair, Alan Bravo, Jerry Bowzer, Phil Hess, Phil Paul Nelson. Second row: Milton Walter, Bobby Myers, Kiser, Carol Mendelbaum, Janet Gibson, Laurie Gatchel, Heath. David Graham, Jim Hankinson, Steve Hanklnson, avid Nelson, Ellen Siatford, Missy Bonar, Marilyn DeJarnette, hird row: Frank Penn, Mark McGee, Gene Muse, Muffin Hone, on Sickles, Dan Mills, Peter Whipple, Tom Canfield, Tom Lackey, ike Isaac. Tommy Field, Randy Corp, Tommy Hopkins, Mike Phi Kappa Sigma wr, ir .T X l Y., 4.3 . dd! f rw' lf Gandara, Austa Fronterhouse, Paul Jaqua. Fourth row: Charlie Clay, Mark Krittenbrink, Paul Gray, Robert Malone, Paul Fitch, Doug Wheeler, Mark Clausen. Kenton Keller, Claude Drabek, Keith Moore, Wally Hartman, Elliot Fieler, Sam Rose, Bob Gun- ning. Top row: Mike Welch, Todd Malmbert, Tim Dunlap, Jocco Hitt, Hal Smith. Dick Mahoney, Mike Sween, Rocky Bradford. Dave Power, Gary Graham, Andy Kidd, Tim McGraw. Skip Ray, Russell Lilly, Chris Steves, Mike Heath, Mark Thompson, Hal Sewell. .aa Qi., if ve t- 4:31 xx Front row: Dave Hill, Kathleen Malone, John Pereles, Sue Bullard, Dave Pointer, Lisa Long, Tim Creedon, Kim Claxton, Dan Bathhurst, Ray Shotner, Jean Cordell. Glen Johnson, Ann Gaebe, Ernie Hllls, Second row: Ted Krigbaum, Blair Ball, Blake Farrar, Dave Burja, Gaylo Pishkin, Ed Johnson. Bob Sunday, Mike Sullivan, Rich Cotton, Sieve Stout, Ernie Johnson, Jack Wilson, Ron Cummings. Third row: Capi Seeger, Willy James, Nancy Erickson, Gary Watson, Suzette Jackson, Jo Jordan, Missy McNair. Lisa Thierfelder, Barbara Brown, Jeannie Harris, Brenda Ball, Debbie Hood, Lynn Whittaker, Mary Morris, Rick McMurray. Fourth row: Teresa Stanton, Rick Resler, David Hope, Kay Jaclson, Martha Burja, Tim Benton, Mike Friend, Gary Pittman, Mark Buntz, Glenn Roach, Mike Moore, John llleman, Gary Jenneman, Lawrence Lanman, Keven Clarke, Evan Douthit. Fifth row: Bill Trigleth, Carey Douihit, Paul Marriott. Bob Durrin, Jim Cooper, Selby Saxon, Keith Gasaway, Mike Brown, Warren Hamblet, Ron Keys. Sixth row: John Geftne, Mike Meyer, David McClesky, Keith Logan, Mike Casebeer, Ann Mockley, Bob Mlt- chell. Tim Kenney, David Stockwell, Mark McClintock. Seventh row: Mike Cannon, Dave Ballard, Allan Robbins, Phil Luech, John Martin, Gary Mayfield, Jerry Rimele, Rick Hahns, Mike Weaver, Mark Marley, Pay Kuykendall, David Ligon, Rick Maxwell, Wayne Fleming, Steve Prince. Em flint Pikes participate in house retreat Associate members of Pi Kappa Alpha and the Little Sisters of the Shield and Diamonds joined the rest of the house in participation in the house retreat, and leadership, academic, and education programs. Each man was himself and a Pike as well. The Pike's and the women of Alpha Chi Omega joined to host a Christmas party for the underprivileged children of Norman. In the spring, the Pike's joined members of Gamma Phi Beta sorority in Sooner Scandals. LEFT: FOOTBALL FEVER PROFITS are earned by John Martin from parking cars at the Pike house. ABOVE: UP AND AWAY goes the ball in an afternoon game of volleyball. RIGHT: FRIDAY NIGHT POKER is a favorite pasttime at the Pike house. Pi Kappa Alpha Ti I X QI 'X U p 'Q i J ,ffl of . ,-,W ' - me F' Front row: Mark Wauahdooah, Jim Busenbark, Craig Rainey, Steve Knight, Bob Grimes. Second row: Larry Moore, Dave Rittenhouse, Angela Sangirardi, Steve Nowakowski, Chuck Walker, Jeff Hanrahan, Ross Longley, Nancy Bowman. Third row: Bob Ogborn, Larry Allen, Mike Metghalchl, Mike McMullen, Cinda ' H don, Dave Wilson Nancy Fisher, Pete Sangirardi, Karen Cochran. nt ony Cochran, John Wayne Franklin, Mike ager . ' ' A h L. ,if ai. Thompson, Robert Bibens. Fourth row: Dave lVlcElhaney, Leslie Epstein, Steve Baldwin, Kurt Landers, David Cox, Steve Doty, Jan ' D J h, Rand Cundith, Marc Cadwell, Larry Besenfelder, Mike e ong y Knox. Fifth row: Fred Bass, Edward Besenfelder. Guy Lynn. John G , Jeff Seal, Bill Bagley, Lenardo Smith, Jim Baker, David YEVQ Tam, Ron Scoggins, James Hendricks, Brent Foreman, Leonard Essary. Pi Kaps move into new house LEFT: ON THE BALL during a pool game are Steve Novakowski and Kurt Landus. BELOW: SHARING INTELLECTUAL ENRICH- MENT is an important part of Pi Kappa Phi brotherhood. -.. . l n A ,X may Pi Kappa Phi To start off the fall semester, Alpha Gamma of Pi Kappa Phi moved into their new residence at 1714 Chautauqua, thus ending their three year stay with the Alpha Gamma Delta sorority. The usual and unusual social func- tions were held all year: Open House, Stranger in a Strange Land, Dallas Weekend, Bedlam Ball with the OSU chapter, Founder's Day, Rose Ball and small impromptu get togethers just to hash over old times. Participation in campus activities helped cement a firmer relationship with those outside the chapter and the Greek system. l l rr , mi-' ,f. 1 Sigma lpha Epsilon SAES emphasize total involvement With the new year, the brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon looked forward to new experiences in community, scholastic, and athletic involvement. After the usual important job of repairing the house, the men of Okla. Kappa were ready for the school year ahead of them. The painting of Miss Hettie Loar's house was the first project for the brother's of SAE, with the Victory party, football games, social functions, and the Christmas party still in front of them. Community involvement, social ac- tivities, scholarship, and intramurals all combined to bring another enriching year for SAE. RIGHT: SHOOTING THE BULL on a fall af- ternoon are a group of Sigma Alpha Epsilons. RIGHT: AGONY AND ECSTACY of pledgeship is experienced by Rick Bramlett. BELOW: A HELPING HAND is lent by the Sig Alphs to Hettie with painting her house. IL- E in .". fx 2 . GQ: L L51 ff. A I LC ET LIT 1 MN ."'5b, ' "--r. t. .., .. -, . ,-- ,!. 1 J .. i , 1' 7e'.f r H "ly: 'ff 9 T ' I P" mt' 1-P! f..' I ,V . F:-I f' lil' ,J A K A " lf NF? 1' I' b'jQf:'q A V at ,- , , . Ai. ,, ,bv 1, ' ' , .fl "V 'C , ,.' - A N "1" ' ev! i' I 1 fn i r . I V A if T i W N ' I 1 S -Q, ',,?.l,'::f'i,5-':9.f'.: X 4 , Q, -4 g . ' ' .f iigvfiz-5:.u "7 Q - X Laid! " - '-,"---5:41-,ag re ' ' r A S -lic. k .- - ,, if-7 .3 441 B , M 'W 5' ' ' - ,, " -A ' :. ' it s if X me K .3 .ga .g 11 7 ,- W ' 1 ' ,A ' t I3--. 1 f'QQ- ,,.,, I if J, 1 . Y .fn xx E, .K 'J f Q, Y- ,, ' T H! 'E ' L - faqs. M 1-sg :RT . , , f .4"L9"'!" f w "V L f" -139 A 1 12935 X ' ' r nl J Q ...S hw H. iii Q. .,,,, ,qt ,YQ 1 ' '54 , i' V -M. .ar-f A' 'T' ' ' 'A . K ,h ...-me w ' . '- " . , ', i ,,i 1 ' .,-. ' r .-i ,. -. -' .L g. 45 ,'jr:g'jv1,g:.Q,1.7,rf4, 1 ,gl I ily. 2 e. .1 - . use g A N A, . , ,. .,,,., I ,I-, s, ' 13 A .Q - in f A -1 ,RL Q . . Sm . , ,hl,?x.1b'. ,A , ir Front row: David Hindman, Don Trimble. Bob Remondino, Cindy Miles, Chip Dudley. Tom Doerner, David Adkins, Jean Dooghman, Mike Shroyer. Keith Crites. Mariberh Koons. Bruce Hernandez, Ray Kellow, Mark Pierce, Tood Gtaybill. Second row: Ed Hone, Bob Monnet, Frank Barry, Cary Myatt, Jon Baxst, John Mabrey, Floyd Simon, Chuck Perrin, Eddie Edwards, John Dodson, Bob Dye, Deane Miller. R.K. Arnold, Rick Cooper, John Oare, Paul Tisdal. Jane Frantz, Susan Simmons, Don Pettyjohn. Third row: Chris Borba, Sue Ann Mackey, David Potts, Lynn Morgan, Steve Porter, Kelley Work. Mark Husband, Jim Kelley, Joe Pepe, Julie Henderson, David Graybill, Mike Cooperman. Fourth row: Andy Knight. Tim Cluck. Paula Benge. Joe Smith, Rick Bramlett, Tim Gilbert, Mike Loar, Randy Anderson, David Glass, Mike Boettcher, David Walker, Carol Crockett, Jim Peschl, Curt Wilson, Becky Ray, Brian Bingman, Chuck Saffa, Vince Howie, Mike Bradley, Fifth row: Bill Wolfe, Mike Tibbs, Randy Sullivan, Robert Bell, Bill Curry, Wes Perry, Clint Smith, Mark Maddox, Bob White, Bud Tippens, Cathy Cash, Ron Downing. Ted Jacobs, Randy Hess, Jeff Romine, Henry Latimer, David Logan. Sixth row: Tom Merrill. John March, Steve Simms, Steve Raybourn, Chad Jordan, Charles Tumey, David Thompson. Jeff Lunday, Pat Burnette. Stewart Hope, Alan Munson. John Gilbert, Russ Patterson. Kevin Craig. K aa., ng: -Nev, V s' . it -M My IQITIH ff My .I V V , o 1 -a, ',4 , . I' Chl A i hi 'lx fi-V1 -'V ' o 9 I, VI 5 r 1 Slgma Ch1s host . . - 1 annual Derby Day , X .fr Initiation of new brothers, par- fl , ticipation in all aspects of university life, I and of course, plenty of parties, helped ' , ' the year to pass quickly for the Sigma Q ' Chis. ' I Individuals of Sigma Chi were represented in the IFC Executive I., X X Committee, the varsity cheerleading ll' A squad, and Student Congress. Spring semester was highlighted by the annual Derby Day festivities. The women of the university's sororities vied for the coveted trophy awarded to the group with the most points in a variety of events. xx N ,V N, veg. 1 , I W r ,. i J .z V 'Wy ,sr ' ' sq x TOP RIGHT: NEW LITTLE SIGMA, Lisa Brock eats dinner with Robert Nuzurn. ABOVE: YOUNG AT HEART are Patty Cun- ningham, Tony Kahman, Becky Rider, and Johnny Cook at the Sigma Chi Baby Bawl. IMPORTANT DINNER GUEST, Dr. J.R. Morris enjoys the meal given in his honor. N. wt ev 'fig' 421 ,559 Troop, Deborah Campbell. Jim Gasaway, James Carry. Fourth row: Dave Mahone, Mike Mount, Pat Quinn, Bill Carter. Joe Hukills, Tony Kahman, Phil Kramer, Dave Kuhn, Doug Vaughan, Shelley Label, Keith Knutson, Danny Franklin, Marilyn Gasser, Gary Stevenson. Fifth row: Randy Weichbrodt, John Neptune, Terri Smith, Janice Lawrence. Jim Parks, Susan Stehr, Wade Stanberry, John Weichbrodt, George Gorishek, Cliff Whitesell, 'K ri I .A ,i Y Mary Clayton, John Clemmons, Diane Vaith, Roger Barthel. Mike Malone, Phil Smauder. Sixth row: Bill Logsdon, Larry Riley, Mike Rlney, Jim Edwards, Buddy Wright, Clyde Schoolfleld, Steve Peake, John Montgomery, Marc Ross, Mike Dunlap, Gary Myers. Kathleen Kuhn, Britt Radford, Robert Nuzum, Graig Morgan, Front row: Wayne Brown, George Wilkinson, Mike LeFlore, Bob Gary Richards, Steve Johnson, Kenny Anderson, Terry McGuir Legg, Mike Harris, Jimmy Ray, Joel Miles, David Carder. Second Steve Gust, Ron Phelps. Third row: Chris Hamm, Buck Buckholt row: Jim Bodine, Bob Shackleford, Eugene Eng, Stan Marshall, Craig Smith. Fourth row: John McDavis, Mike Smith, To Lamell. Fifth row: Tom Caudle, Rod Fogarty, Bo Perkins, Ma Wood, Sixth row: Steve Vance, Mike Moore. I LFE ABOVE: "RIDE 'EM COWBOYS,', two cowgirls cheer at the Border Dance. BELOW: THE HOBO HILTON, built by the pledges, becomes an essential part of the Hobo party. LEFT: STYLE'S THE WORD for these hobos at the Hobo Convention. Sigma Nus stress pledge program Renewal was the key note in ex- pressing the spirit of the Sigma Nu's. A recognition of the need for revitalization of the house helped to spur the chapter's growth and development. Inherent with these changes was the acknowledgement of the increasingly important role of the pledge with regard to responsibilities he might hold and decisions he must make which might vitally affect the chapter's future. As always, the Sigma Nus participated in a variety of activities covering almost every phase of campus life from the small get-together to the work involved in the greater concerns of the com- munity. Sigma u KM? flwig ' 34366 f '1 -ve' .ZW 'I 4, ' 1 Front row: Mike Jackson, Bill Bretches, Gary Choat, Don McGregor, Stan Tacker, Brian Burleson, Phil Fidler, David Graves. Roland Rodriguez. Larry Van Hoose. Butch Brumley. Mike Allen. Second row: Brian April, Rob Schilling, Scott Coyer. Randy Smith, Mike Lehman. John Assalone. Bruce Petitt, Mark Branum, Richard Nellis. Jim O'Bannon, Scot! Seefeldt, Tom White. Third row: Brooke Harry, Trey Minton, Steve Leverich. Chuck Bilyou, Jerry Seelelclt, Fourth row: Mike Newbourn, Steve Hall, Bard Black, Bill Matthews, Bill Garris, Brig Miller, Bob Colbert, Steve Eischeid. Doug Summers. Paul Godsby, Mark Laughlin. Ray Ackerman. Bruce Light. Mike Bell. Fifth row: Richard Morgensen. Paul Wagner. Sieve Hall. John Light, Steve Hukill, Jeff Burrow, Brad Farnsworth, Darrell Moore, Andy Hall, Greg Gingrich, Larry Scott, Ken Petta. Jim Ashford. Kirk Rizley. Sixth row: Tim Oden, Dave Davies, Mark Lepak. Scott Stoll, Kevin Broam, Scott Castle, Kim Davis. Mike Withers. 1 H ,Swim LEFT: INTRAMURAL FOOTBALL TROPHY for the 1973 championship is shown oft by a little sis. BELOW: FATHER KNOWS BEST as a Sig Ep pledge discovers at the father-son meal. if XYZ.: ' .Eh V ,fa Sigma Phi Epsilon LEFT: "MM-MM GOOD" is all the food cooked by the kitchen crew at the Sig Ep house. Sig Eps take part in tri-chapter party Twenty-eight men became associate members of Sigma Phi Epsilon during fall rush. In preparation for the OU- Texas game, the Sig Eps participated in a tri-chapter party in Dallas with brothers from UT and North Texas State. Other parties included the Victory Party, Christmas Party, GOGH, highlighted by the crowning of the Girl of the Golden Hearts, and Sam's Place, the spring rush party. The third annual Muscular Dystrophy Dance Marathon, iDance for Those Who Can'tl, was held in the spring semester. Sig Eps were active in many other campuswide activities including Greek work day, MUN, Campus Chest, homecoming, student Congress, Howdy Week, Greek Revue, and in- tramurals. ,ref ei' name feim,z'v5f'z?i'arffJ .W Kappa lpha Psi -J' ...N 7 Front row: Rod Shoate, Sheila Howard. Clyde Moore, Mildred Montgomery, Cheryl Hawkins, Michael Pierce, Tobyiha Battle. Brotherhood becomes part of program Founded on January 5, 1911 at Indiana University in Bloomington, Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., found a place at the OU campus April 14, 1973. The Kappas were involved with Back row: Russell Kelly, Samuel P. Jenkins, Albert Lee Powell J Michael Augustus, Territa McFarlin, Brian Nichols. Daniel Hopkin several social and service activities including pre-enrollment counseling sessions, holiday benefit dances, and various projects in Oklahoma City and Norman. An auxiliary women's group, the Kappa Hearts, augmented the frater- nityis functions and worked closely with members to help achieve a true spirit of brotherhood and sisterhood in the fraternity. if s , si' . y Sammies build prominent chapter Reorganization of Sigma Alpha Mu at the beginning of the 1974 fall semester brought a four year absence from campus to an end. During the first of school, a few determined people started what became a prominent chapter of a national fraternity. Sigma Alpha Mu, known as Sammies across the country, had functions with neighboring sororities, as well as, participating in national contests with other chapters. QW V l ' l d-V,.f l -E' .-' ' .. , - -rf if 1 I l ug E l . 1 wi Q kr if Aly Q L4 t asar ' is V . 3 L'-. 'lf' T' I 1 S " , F A ' 1 ll l T X Sigma Alpha Mu LEFT: i'I'LL TAKE OVER," says the new Sammie president. BELOW: AN INFORMAL MEETING finds Sammies making plans. all gg 51.51 I ll I 2 -Q L lllei'all5g"Ar2: l'tiiEFfiaf1l aliillflll-4 53:13 :,l g W in g .llllyllulll I famfil LY Y Qgygyi 'T iq-5 it 1 A f , tif: ittt ' Musik L ,,:.5,.,, A1 '41 1 ' 0171 . " .,Q:-1 " W elf S . - 4 .... A J x l p 'T .,, -.ll f h' , - . V W H5 l A N - 1 - 'V ' .i.., '. ff ,1- L '-I l Q. 91- Wife' 5, . 1 ' ,I if gszffl ' . 1-' '- -- " ' 'i fi mfwfwff Q sr? 11. X Front row: Bob Weiss, Ken Wexler, Mil-me Weiss, David Silver, Second row: Larry Markus, Kevin Gould, Stuart Gorelick, David Bloom, Jon Orenstein, Mark Llnsky, Ron Sckinopskie. l l l w w w l in , -rt.. stai rs hi Gamma Delta I -1 55, I , I I ,I I . , I ' 1 A third place finish in the Condon Cup for the most improved chapter of Phi Gamma Delta, and a weekend retreat got the Fiji house off to a great start. Graduate relations was one of the strongest points of the Fiji house. Last year the Fiji's hosted astronaut Eugene Cernan and former Governor David Hall at an alumnae dinner. Brotherhood through membership made Fiji's proud of their activities. Front row: John Findley, Robert Ott, Allen Terrill, Fred Kress. Mac Oliver, Fred Wright, Bill Vickers. Second row: John Johnson, Jerry Shelton, Pam Smith, Micky Walsh, Dorothy Rahill, Bob Reams, Suzy Baker. Bill Johnson, Richard Butts. Kurt Robinson, Melish lflu Legg. Joe Lackman, Susan Reynolds, Richard Storts, Bernie Sussman, Third row: Grant Keener, Sheryl Boyer, Gary Car- penter, Randy Shockey, Ralph Shadid, Jimi Glazer, Tex Reams, Phil Frazier, Mark Clements, Warren Allen, Steve Kneale. Chuck Enos. Fourth row: Mark Medley, Bob McCormick. ,fer ,, r Q i if? Fijis vie for 'II I ' Condon Cup honor FIJI ISLAND PARTY brings a festive atmosphere for Tex Reams and Joe Laakman. IILII , ISUIID I "'w.,,+-I A : ig- li I- al S I . 4 F ll ' '. -- , L - 'n ' ' . ,H 7' Q U, . T'i' AJ :rt .1 , . sf , 1,5 . if-'g.w1..'. 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S it ff nag? r. f -f , lxgflkfywz :Ili-is-79, mirage ' :'15:?xi'EiAlF-A :gd w7,fQ . T ' zjfff-S 1 I -my K 14 Y 1 .33 ', ,. ,,5-,4-gy91-?y,,.,cx'..1,,' 43. ,xr ,Q':'?"ii1m.f,ll1Nf:af,'q ,Lp-5 xllflxg -TJ I' T' V1--if 'li 'I A-v .1 'zulwf' I 4'-"757."jlf:"""N3-5'MT4fI".k1: X .'!.5c"V ' " ""4 T' I" pl" '- W .. -Q ,Hg :tl ,glrxv . Ln.: 'Q U- :QSZQ .-Lk., 'Y jkx.H.vi.:xx,e.S. -Jax? I .ai V, : TE flf- is :'ffEFk5"'i5'::t-f:.,i -ffvlff -. 53' 5?is'fL:'1i:i'f-5'??gf4??ff5:33i:fsf-ii- ff: ' I ' ' ART FOR SALE on the South Oval draws bargain IVlAN'S BEST FRIEND seems lonesome at the moment while waiting faithfully for his master to return fr hunters. class. , , , ,ffwi1ae,g.,,. ,,4i.i,,5.,1MmM Mmm X .-S 5 I 5i1EhfQ4lAii,.- 3 .I - :- .qf , fl" I . sw FINGERS IN POSITION, Dennis Cawi and Marjory Cornelius work on music technique. .4 B341 YQ. ,yxk A UNION RALLY brings supporters together against military drafting. 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L, , In lr ' Q -,Elfgzfqrez Lt, L -.J YN li,l.:mq-:r,.iJ'-LAL.,'i . ld-:azgx Am.-M , ,-. -.. L. I ..n..f.f. .w I ---reams - - "-f' ' """'Fc1us.i.af:w:.,5,r.' f .331 - 'gf I 7324 L , ' I' Q .V IJ "IT'S THE NUTS." seems to be the best reason for ' ff 3 L 4, thig squirrel to climb trees. T rn"-'7 ls: ' .,f- ,1,til'l' KT' 'I 1 fs Fri.- ff lf in qi ,, . sci 4 1 114 . I if . if I Vx xy , f I I Q TTL.: , .ZHJA K , fi' 'I "l ing l f"l"' Q i 4 Nc. .N A 7 1 " +57 'Ee gi f -A if li ABOVE: BELIEVERS EXPRESS OPINIONS as they gather on the Oval. LEFT: COLLEGE AND KNOWLEDGE seem to go hand in hand. c, .ML is: 2 fs? 93' YM A n day- Just another da TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1974. Just another day in Norman, Oklahoma? Not a chance. Prom midnight until midnight, sunrise until sunset, people were busy doing the expected and the unexpected. Our photographer spent a solid 24- hour period filming the usual and the unusual, to give a varied look at what goes on in Norman and what OU students do. He found very little activity on this particular early morning from midnight on until Norman started awakening as the sun did at 7:15 a.m. What were the basics of the day? Temperature-wise, the day's high climbed up to 64 degrees and the low dipped to 40 degrees. The weather was fair and mild winds were light and variable. Headlines in the paper--in local news, students were rallying for an art professor's tenure-'Dr. Victor K. Youritzin--by circulating petitions, voters were going to the polls to decide bond issues and a 1 cent city sales tax, and this was the last day students could drop classes with a passing grade. On the national scene, President Ford made his first visit to Japan to talk of security, nuclear non-prolife-ration, and oil. 24 hours or 1,440 minutes or 146,400 seconds in orman? In sports, the Sooners were preparing for the clash with the Nebraska Corn- huskers with their record ot 9 wins and no losses. Campus activities included meetings of Revolutionary Student Brigade, Kappa Delta Pi, UOSA Student Congress, University Scholars, and a Spanish Club tutoring session. To some, the daily routine of life may have seemed much the same. But think about it. No two days were exactly the same, just as no two people are. What were you doing on Tuesday, November 19, 1974? For most, going to classes fafter all, that's what we're here forl was a common part of the program. But what about before classes, inbetween classes, and after classes were over? What did we do? Anything and everything. Sooner activities ranged from attending UOSA meetings to playing pool at the Golden Cue. Sometimes the days didn't seem to give us enough time to do everything we would have liked to have done. At any rate, this portion of a day caught in a glimpse records what people do at the University of Oklahoma in a small ration to what they did during the school year 197475. On the next 20 pages you will see what one photographer was able to catch on camera in a 24-hour period, photographs trying to record a day in the life of Normanites. PHOTOS BY CLIFF TRA ERSE o o o ff? it After midnight "WATCH YOUR STEP," says Terry Williams as he and buddies Kenneth Franklin and Myron Shoate alight from the elevator at the close of visitation hours in the Towers. 12:03 12:06 PIN BALL WIZARD Bill Diggs tries his luck on this mean machine in the lobby of Adams Center during the wee hours of the night. -.V x""'-.-. '-1. "MH- NAM gg.. fn., ' ,' T 'W ' l..3fi.f':tL:.i"v x. .SX Yi LX Z WHO CAN' SLEEP when the gang gets tagether cm the 'Mu fiom of Walker Tower to go over the days activiiies? WHEN HUNGER STRIKES students can always depend on the studeni swre in 'Walker Tower no matter what time of day or night it happens to be. 12:30 a.m. BURNING MYDINIAGHT is common ma Whose Mano IIffEfE?F lam night swxziwfzg, Tamer Offers La in a anemia! Mowmge Em studying. W U, Elm? 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V 1?QfQ!K'?lWCi FYTFTQEFQSin-iari1w1irii6vH95?iQv1rwiminliliwa mink rl . 4-l, iUNf1IIR?J'kiCykk ?F'49ifJNWlfFfKCE1-,J Wiuigix fifiiivmu lahwil iii 11193522 mm Eidwilhrmsf fikanaxivdf EM? ips nm ffwr i 1 i R 5.334-4 -wif mi- ,1 If , A A ' 9 K 51gk viii 5 5.15 nf: 4- ff 7 IL- 'E I , .QW ,...,.........a-.1 HM ff rx w ......,....., W f 1 :MJ I -:wumw , Lp way., 'fyiL:LT'iTel1 wfiwj-x w L A ' 4 'Uk' X sjomfzv-:,f5:,mI U. L , lg ww lr 1 I -.2 "A 1.511 ,X 1 ,f Q i I L ,W A ..,Q,,l1j,,I , 1 Y 1 . X ' 17' fl 'N " ' l d sp. as of th l l , lllr ONERSIN ACTION Dradice 'day byfiliy' f0'Pf0dU59' winding teams in all spoxgts. ABOVE: varsity sketball players practice layfup Shotsland techniques. What are athletes doing on a typical clay such as thig? Practice, gpractice, prac1ice.'No,matterfwhat 'sporty u'ca'n findfthe athlete Wdrlmig,-out in'l1is owli sufraundin'gs. 5- ,JE Wil' " 1 Wtttw tt 'tt 3 l I 1 :J V-45 " Norman's skyline is silhouetted as the sun sets on this day, November 12, 1974 ,, 5 256 The sunt has set lfl the west ABOVE RIGHT: THE SUN SETS and Norman nightlife begins. At 9:10 p.m. a variety of -people doing a variety of things, beginning with book worms at the Bizzell 'Memorial Library. RIGHT: FOOSBALL AND POOL 'serve as favorite pastimes for thecollege ,grew at 9:25 p.m. in the Jockey Strap on campus comer. BELOW: THOUSANDS OF WORDS' to be read, and Pi Askins finds aideserted dining room at. the Alpha Chi Omega house perfect for studying at 10:10 p.mi wM,p,,,,,,,,, rg, ii, ., A : ' I h 1 K ig Ht X - iv Ti 'Q X at f,,, 1' .- ' T '-ff: 711.5 4 it L 1Q,.' s?,,-. , - - " p JI I i'oi'3Hl,7 G 5 I it w A It . lr'7'pdv Q! I-'I rf L i, 'F , t v 9 ,A-2 K, at . lg 4 1 . -rs 1 vi Is,r"- -- 'S " ' ' 1 1 ' -1 , I! X r f ,'. , fa ,X-H JFK? '91 , . 1 1 ' ,, il -.4 is - 'f, ..'-- - f-is X il' --- ' - ' " 1 --:- i 1 ,,,,,, , 2 -. -- in ' , yr ' O , ,- Q . - , -- -A-M A. ,S V -f ew -. -.-H r F 5' ik. if .L, 1 1 or " 1 if 1 1-I' Z """" X A - J 4 , W. WNW... M 21 ,,, .... --if W f X L A i I " 3: , 1x I f as ' fl 'Q' 4 -1- ff: l If A W' i ix I .... N- 2 4 'ing ., qw' w f 'f r I ,.v- 257k of 7:20 p.m 1 v 'L v .4 ABOVE: MAESTRO IN MO'l'lON, Ainslee Cox conducts the Oklahoma,.City Symphony Orchestra at 8:15 p.m. Evenlng entertainment in the big city is close enough for Norman residents to enjoy. BELOW: EXCITING INTRAMURAL GAMES are held In the evenings for every sport imaginable. These volleyball players keep things going at 7:45 p.m. - CONGRESS MEETS AGAIN as members of 'UOSA discuss topics of importance such as Professor Yourltzin's tenure. 258 JL: W3 E , -. A E 'P' Ll . 1 V. , fi' 'S i A THE PARTY'S OVER, and so ends the date for Robin.Fleming and Tom Heydman at the Kappa Delta house. Day is done, but there's Q veg 'THINGS ARE COOKIN' at the Blue Onion Club in Norman at 9:45 p.m. A live band and dance floor make a good combination for those dancers who want to "cut a rug." Partying will continue past mid- night until 2:00 a.m. at least. Another day in the life of Normanites is over, 'but there will be many more days--of course, none of those days, will be quite like this one. Each day finds people doing what they do best either in the classroom, on the intramural field, at the Congress meeting, or in the library. As the days turn into weeks, weeks into months, we soon have quite a collection to call a year. The year 1974- 75 consists of days such as the one caught by our photographer. Just think of the enormous amount of activities that he did not catch on camera. Soon, the years will stack up one upon another, until four years of college will be nothing more than memories, both good and bad. But there will be days that linger in the mind, maybe because of something special that happened. Maybe one of these pictures will make you remember something special, maybe not.U more to come HJTI 259 1, -V Z- - THE CLOCK STRIKES TWELVE and marks the end of this day, as the presses continue to run for the next issue of the OKLAHOMA DAILY. 1 ,I Mg 1 1 .... ,. ,N I:j:1Tgg. . ,v . L "1""' M22 Classes 5 Q 2? f 5 K 1 'f Q 2 ,i u 'M !. 7 65372. Q. Q31 ,V if . .... sziz - . .-..:., , i '-2:55522-I :9.::,.. 5' 5 w al -Ld N? ::::::: Y 4 . ..,: ,,.G, A , 5 'ffmk xp T W me,-ws f ' 2 3291 Qi 3 ,f 1" y ,,.. ,zzl L .Q is h ,ff 2 ii A 4 fr T rg 4 ' - 3 : ::::: g , ,V., .v 1 ., My t i N44 sf- ig' '7 H., .,A. ........ Q , ,. I, fl A ,.,.,.,.,. ,.,.,., -f f: sEasasasase:i1g::i7 , 1 1 I R? IC, A ?. ..,,., , A lul' if v' Krabi! X X gc I x 'X R " E , gf. 'Mg I 4 'Wg ff" E Q 5 '13 'g ' 2 Q H. f' 1, -fm D M 41 W "' 1 1 - ..- ,Q . 1" -If ff ,ff FHLMY ' , .NN og' ' ,V "j55?'M, . 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Y- ll M ft? -l ici. , it l ",,gt,j "" ,ii I , f " ' V l rf , 1 ' :SN-r.fi-fllfzf, :dr All ii l t ntl-Si i 1 r , lvl 3 Y . l 'I . ' ' r T are i Q ' ,t ,ts I: tl l wi. , le- 1 -.lf 'yin .ll Ll, 'lt l ii f ' ill V' V , an , l A i ' - i'?i.i' 1 , .l 1 i if nl., t M vig :"'1,t.. ri i . fri' ' A, ,4 ,S i., . 5' A- If' 'r ll ll l P. , . , ...a v V I , il ' , " 5, .t ,ll ,ti i x Lil in : i tw J . - , l ae:-,Q 3 i,,,-'a' is 2 , tg: 'lm , km , as l 'f lm: ' gl' ' . : 4 i - 4 W 'big W . , E-.-wa:-egg.. I. F 542 -fl' ,P A .. f X I . V lm l 4 i , ., 4. ll l W' 4 v S ' ,f l lt .1 V . , its-9 A' J' 'Z-fl i W I "1 M ' ll ll i ' ' l I . , J - Q- , . F N '1 'I i LP lu' , "':' b ll fr y, ' , . -I l ' , 'l l' 'l 5' :ina Nl" l ,-- ,i .. :A ,l si, 4, 5, -M xx Q ill ' , li , .'. 1, : :li i L Se Fl lors . -555: "': -15:-i, David Ackley, OKC. Art. Janet Adams, Norman. Hume Economics: Steve Agee, Wichita. Kansas. Economics: Zia Ahmed, Dacca. Bangladesh, Economics: Larry Allen, Russellville. Arkansas, Engineering: Sharon Allen, Norman. Microbiology: Rick Alston, Norman. Accounting, Jeffrey Anderson, Moore. Accounting: Suzanne Andres, OKC. Journalism: Pamela Anno, Midwest City. Social Work: Mike Archer, OKC. Urban Studies: Donald Amold, Norman. Pharmacy: Tom Ashwood, Muskogee. Finance: Zolfghar Askari, Gatchssarn. lran, Industrial Engineering. Jarl Askins, Duncan. Journalism: Robert Avery, OKC. Accounting: Salvatore Azzarello, Liverpool, New York. Business: Stephen Ball, Glenpool. Language Arts: Debra Barns, Tonkawa. Zoology: Jeff Barrington, Mineola. New York. Journalism: Roger Barthel, Ponca City. Accounting. Russell Bebb, OKC. Microbiology: Kathy Becker. Blackwell. Elementary Education: Opal Bejcek, Davis. Elementary Education: Michael Bell, Ok- rnulgee. Finance: Stephen Bell, Norman. Chemical Engineering: Leslea Bennett, Stigler. Journalism: Bets Bernhard, Lake Forest, llllnois. Journalism. Gary Berry, Norman. History: Buddy Bibb, Okemah. Math Education: Andy Bishop, Seminole, Accounting. James Bishop, Del City, Psychology: Bette Blttman. Norman. Home Economics: Sidney Black, San Leandro. California. Physical Therapy. Karen Blackbum, OKC. Special Education. David Boeck, Ann Arbor. Michigan. Architecture: Cathy Bolton, Frederick. Nursing: Bill Bonner, Tulsa. Marketing: Bena Boughan, Fairview, An- thropology: Bonnie Bourquin, Purcell. English: Jim Bowles, Shawnee, Psychology: Kay Boyles, OKC. Piano. Dorothy Bradhsaw, Norman, Elementary Education: Michael Brandle, Norman, Marketing: Gary Brandon, Tulsa. Accounting: Howard Braun, Oak Park. Illinois. Marketing: Bill Bretches, Tulsa. Business: Gayle Brldgman, Maysville, Special Education: Rebecca Brooks, Ardmore. Business Education. Dianne Brown, OKC, Dietetics and Nutrition: Dwight Brown. Norman. Political Science: Llnda Brown, OKC. Fashion lllustrarion: Vicki Brown. Chickasha, Social Work: Frances Brownlee. Norman. Education: Nat Bryant, Choctaw, Pharmacy: Thomas Buchanan, Fort Lauderdale. Florida. Organ. Jana Burkett, Norman. English: Suzanne Bullard. Norman. Psychology: David Burja, Norman. Ac- counting: Richard Burk, Duncan. Economics: Rhonda Burnside, Norman. Pharmacy: Rick Bush, Alexandria. Virginia, Mathematics: James Busko, Wilburton. General Engineering. """ o seniors Karen Callaghan, Norman, Marketing: Jeff Callard, Norman, Engineering: Mark Cain, Malvern. Pennsylvania. Psychology: Debbie Cameron, Norman. Special Education: Cathy Campbell, Muskogee. Pharmacy: Patti Campbell. Tulsa. Nursing. Wendy Castelli, Del City. Public Relations: Connie Cellers, Kansas City. Kansas. Fashion Mere chandising: Ernie Cermak. OKC. Marketing: Isaac Chance, Norman. Business: Cheryl Chandler, Tulsa. Speech and Hearing: Al Chapman. Norman. Broadcasting. Stan Chase, OKC. Broadcasting: Melanie Chung, Jamaica. West Indies. Accounting: Annetta Clark, OKC. Geology: Ted Clark, Purcell. Business Ed: Dan Clawson. Norman. Accounting: Jean Clayton, OKC. Psychology. . John Clemons, Midwest City. Psychology: Wllllam Coggin, Midwest City. Management: Alan Conner, Duncan. Accounting: Caren Cook, OKC. Psychology: Carl Cook, Lawton, Business Management: Glenda Cook, Norman, Physical Education. Marie Cook, Duncan. Interior Design: Michael Cook. Anadarko. Political Science: Jlm Cooper. Norman. History: Mike Cooperman, OKC, Psychology: Michael Cordell, Duncan. Finance: Richard Cotton. Danville. Kentucky. Math Education. Donna Cottrell, Moore. Elementary Education: Carol Craig, Guymon. Ballet: Jimmy Craig. Moore. Geology: Karen Crosby, Ardmore. Fashion Merchandising: Carol Crockett, Dallas. Texas, Fashion Merchandising: Mlke Crutcher, Claremore. Microbiology. Paul Culver, Moore. Advertising: Billie Culver, Moore. Journalism: Peggy Culver, OKC, Microbiology: Davarpanah Faramarz, Tehran. lran, Architecture: Beverly Davis. Duncan. Education: Chuck Davis, Del City. Journalism. Jim Davis. Mountain View, Arkansas, Pharmacy: Nancy Davls, Ponca Clty, Ballet: Ricky Davis, Anadarko. Physical Education: Beverly Dawson, Texoma. Zoology: Dave Dayvault, Wichita. Kansas. Accounting: William Deaton, Welty. Accounting. James De Claire, OKC. Accounting: Keywood Deese, Ada, Accounting: Jim Dennis. Norman. I-mance: Molly Denson, Norman. Education: Debbie Demoncourt, OKC. Accountingz Mark Diehl, OKC. Zoology. sy-pf -Q Q 4. Jil I ,V A yu, S 'Nl 'WX 1 , , ll - - 5' . Y " l 'Q Ib A F - . V ,, 5 .. 7 . . -' ' 52? X- '.-., ' .,",'1 A 'll I l 1 . I I ' V l s-J' I 1 ,J 1 1 1 'J' + lllll 'l ci v. gg -, fl , tr l ls-wil WP-A sfml 3 '1 l , l'l.'l" U 3 .rg .-5 A1 1-V 'l i Y V X' ' .-is : Tx - r , , .W RU 4' ii, I. ., i iiii 1 14 l i .,l, , 5 ' , A ...ry i ,M y -. ,sy My .. fy i it 1-5 , i . , ' ' I l . 5 l Q i . - t V 'W 4 , ki . 1 5 .1 5 M M 1 t, t lx ' I t . l QT? I o 7 . I llilm ' i ,xiii , c ,gy : fc? . . N :W 1 if if J 1. l ' . i it "' i ni, . r, , - L 1 f 1 .1-ff , i ,,- 'fi , - ll ,R , Af l-si J 1 .f' ' f s E it L' N. if, X P7 F ,fr i , i ri at , il ' '!g:.."' tt- lf-.3 if 3 K ,. A 'mf' I f l . ln, Ju. i t rf' .-'H - .Q . lie. . T ' 6 r' , , ." 4 gif . .4 . -9.5, V l 5' ' I' W' 1' "1 I -' V ' '53 v u fl .. It a ir. -fi ' "Pwr-' ...lt 5' . fat. is .. v -Q , .. aa' if I ' . .. Tx' T . ' it .' ' 1 " i i - L 'l - -in ' J 1 ' J l U.- V uw' fi-21' ' iii: i I. I a v., ffv. ' il ' ' ' . .1- . i Xi rl 1 -I Y N. e. As -L Y i , . T T .53 , ri '.. . , fi rf .F Tix ' I T 'I i 6 ' ir '- "' ki-a ' ' c P I i . l t l '- , X 'M' vig .. ..,, ,-aL' - . Q' . ,N lwg If nec? . ji "tin-. :l ? L . 5: T 1 tlg ,Q xiii? 'Xin i t -Hitler' W... ,, ,.., in ? it V loc' ll Wim.. v . ll' "'Ww. . 'TW ' W 1 ' r" - ' '. 1 'r 'A ll' ' ,Q . . " : es . ' Niiifz, N - 1 t W i - L-': .es-1:e':7Lf2?i11.'. . ' 55 wx -'IM E I yi l ' ' V. .nf 6+ 1 i E i Y - --- Q? . i XM., f. ' . ffl, ' '- . - - ,- N- i 2 . . N cz! .. j N ' . ' if 'F i JP., emi, 1: .LQ-. A H, -, .qw ... -'xi ' if- i If hi '3-. '..i o rf-11 N i' xl P I 1" in' ' in 1 War t i ' ' . ave . ' .- g I lf ' .. . ' 1 'L . . ii l ui! :Ti 4 i i it P - Q--f i lv ' 1 It A .F . i W ll... til. -xm- ....... . SQYNOTS I -:----:- Q .....- i Frank Dillan, Ada, Marketing: Larry Dinklns, Shawnee. Finance: Richard Dixon, Houston. Texas. Petroleum Engineering: Gary Dolle, Norman. Psychology. Ted Donaldson. Snyder. Texas. Geography: Janet Doolen. OKC, Education. Dorotha Dougherty, l.Qid, Physics. Tlm Dowd. Tulsa. Political Science. Patricia Dowling, Edmond. Pharmacy: Joseph Dugan. Dallas. Texas. Geophysics: Linda Dunham. Placentia. Calilornia. Dance: Lauren Dwen, Tulsa. Education. Delayne Dye, Norman. Geography: Janis Ed- wards, Enid. Music Education. Elaine Elliott, Battle Creek. Michigan. Interior Design: Gary Ellis, Moore. Accounting. Linn Elston, Tulsa. Journalism: Deborah Emanuel, El Reno. Music: Linda Emery, Tulsa. Special Education: Chuck Engles. OKC. Zoology. Eddie Erwin, Tulsa. Petroleum Land Management: Hossain Eslarjani, Abadan. lran. Petroleum Engineering: Jeffrey Eslep, Norman. Business: Leslie Estep. Norman. Dance. Debbie Epsteen, Norman. Education. Leslie Ep- stein. Omaha. Nebraska. Psychology: Jan Eskew, Clinton. Education: Nancy Faler. Norman. Fashion Merchandising Audrey Falk, Dallas. Texas. Interior Design. Jackie Farley. Tipton. History: Vanessa Farmer, Midwest City. Social Work: Cindy Faulkner, OKC. Education. Linda Faulkner, OKC. History: Mark Felton, Tulsa. Zoology: Steve Fielder, Norman. Journalism: David Fisher. Perry. History. A .g2fl ' .:2::EV,.:, . , , Jayne Folks, Hobart. Journalism: Lee Ford. Tulsa. Psychology: Sherrl Foutz, OKC. Education: Elizabeth Fox, OKC. Art History: Don Franklin, Norman. Recreation: Mary Frazier, OKC, Fashion Merchandising: Gary Frost, OKC, Pharmacy. John Funk, OKC. Accounting: Dale Furman. Bethesda. Maryland. Marketing: Steve Gaede, Bartlesville. Psychology: James Gallagher. Nor- man. Architecture: Lawrence Gammon, Norman. Chemical Engineering: Cathy Garfield, Dallas. Texas. Pharmacy: Krlston Garrlott, OKC. Industrial Engineering. Jim Gasaway. Enid. Business Management: Gayle Gerlach, Chickasha. Political Science: Pattl Gilliard, Norman. Special Education: Melanie Glasser, Enid. Special Education: Glna Godfrey, Madlll, History: Murna Gokey, Tecumseh, Education: Judy Goldenberg, Stillwater, Language Arts. Mohammed Gorjestanl, Neshed. Iran. En- vironmental Deslgn: James Gorton. OKC. History: Bill Gossett, Moore. Accounting: Douglas Graham, OKC. Engineering: Patty Greene, Altus, Education: Vlc Grlder, Altus. Marketing: James Grlflln, Bartlesvllle, Electrical Engineering. Jeanne Grlltin, Del City. Education: Stanley Grimes. Houston. Texas. Political Science: Nanw Grissom, Ardmore. Public Relations: Ann Grover. Tahlequah. Social Work: James Gunderson. Norman, English: Kerry Frank Gunn, Duncan. Mechanical Engineering: Bob Gunning, Enid. Environmental Design, I J'l" 4 ,ef 1 . W .. , . :--s . . f' . ll il ni. X .T ' iv . ,i i Q K , . m 5, , , Nr l V .. : f r ' a . i, i -iii ill ' 47: , "wr-.fiat J . A 7 Q 'tt l j ii in I blu f f l ' M732-li' ....... "' - '- EL J ,gi "" w i' A ri 'L h 1 4 U , , in H f . H ,I . Q . l ' .. -Ai ! 'M .l- tn' if xx ., i , fl gy, i ..:. is 4 t .5 W X .V e-4 M '4 11' N " gui: H J J . J it it l fi? Jil Lulu-.t ,ww mi., it J.: ,N J gy i' ri 4' 1 . ,, I 1. irrtv' . ai ' . i- ,, 1 . n . we . .. 5 . , . -:ti--2' . . Wm: nj.. .- ,r , i. in lr i i ,,'i . . 'W i I v .rf Fe fiat' af 1 1 i , :il i 7 l 1 W I 47 ' ' 1-In--0 I' --- , r r x '- ,ttjd - 1 ,' N 'Kal' l PV 4 zhbrsmnft 2" I A V Y ig qi' . w, 1 n, ' sg- , ,- 9,5 3" f f rr , 'ik Q V Y! , :W I X r ' ""' . X ,X Wg ,. l:f.,g9!'fl X, I X . 5 ' l ,h i X X XX . 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J ' .- ' X V .XXX JAH ' --EEF: 'T X E V , ' Y X , , it TXXTX Y W TT? ! "- my nXXXXit'. .f 1 , ' 3 - or X .iglid b , XX E XXXX , X . ' .V Z, . XX , Q ' X f ' : 1 X X X . X l i , at XI: .: ll' 3' : -' sa X 4" l X"XX "T at 6 i,v,,2..:yi,, ,,..,,,.1 i keg. X ',, I - A ,X X . X A X sr V I 1 X ' y ,Q .,wlN-HX, """ ' - " - - 1 . -' X 1 15,-if I ,WX if-ZXL .r s.,x ll, , a , , u 4212.-Q.: ,X ,, 2 r.:,X. ll ti my lwfrliflfly i " " f'V4,-Tr 1' ll ll X f . ll , we i - SQl'llO1'S 0 Christine Hall, Lawton. Qualilied Mathematics Education: Kathleen Hall. Tulsa. Speech and Hearing: Robert Hall, OKC, Photography: Lynn Hamilton, Littleton. Colorado. Journalism: Judy Hamra, Lawton. Speech and Hearing: Carol Hand, Norman. Fashion Merchandising: Bob Hartsoclt, Norman. Finance. .lack Hays, Norman. Lab Technician. Karen Hays, Dallas. Texas. Fashion Merchandising: Steve Henderson, Elmore City. Journalism. Bill Hen- drick, Lawton, Civil Engineering. Randy Hengst, Norman. Education: Cathy Henry, Tulsa. Recreation: Richard Herlihy. Enid, Chemistry. Tom Hess, Washington. Accounting: Dale Hill, Tulsa. Mathematics Education. Keith Hoflman, Bartlesville, Nuclear Engineering: Denise Holden, Duncan. Nutrition: Frances Holman. Altus. Education. Bill Honker, Norman. Environmental Science. Tehranl Hooshang, Long island. New York. Mechanical Engineering. Elaine Hoover, Norman. Accounting: John Hope, Pauls Valley. Journalism: Donna Hopkins, OKC. Art Education: Steve Horner, Bixby. Speech Education: Carol Horton, Norman. Advertising: Douglas Howard, OKC. Architecture: Rex Howard, Ponca City. Special Education, Robert Howard. OKC. Architecture: Juanita Howell. Salina. Journalism: Mike Hronpulos, Enid. Bu:-.rtess: Leesa Hulse. McAlester. Elementary Education: Ginny Huston. Houston. Texas. Home Economics. Cyndi Hutchinson. OKC. Management: Mike Isaac. OKC. Psychology. Terry Jackson, Norman. Accounting: Angela Jacobs. Tulsa. Education: William James, Lawton. Business. Masoud Javakl. Norman. Mechanical Engineering: Rita Jett. Wetumka. Marketing: Ben Johnson. Norman. Pharmacy: Cynthia Johnson, Dallas. Texas. Special Education. Lee Johnson. Heavener. Education: Marla Johnson. Pryor. Sociology: Monte Johnson, Mulclrow. History: Richard Johnson. Tulsa. History: Susan Johnson. Tulsa. Business Education: Paul Joiner, Dallas, Texas. English: Chester Jones, Sallisaw, Accounting. Don Jones, Norman. Law Enlorcement: Marta Jones, Edmond. Home Economics: Don Jorskl, Muskogee. Pharmacy: Donald Joseph, Norman. Letters. Candace Kahle. Braman. Mathematics: Curtis Kahle. Newkirk, Pharmacy: Laura Kennedy, Pawhuska. Social Work, Darlene Kidd. OKC. Management: Karen Klmmel, Tipton, Interior Design: Karen Kinnett, Shawnee. Radio and Television: Carol Klrkham, OKC. Art Education. David Kraker. Palos Verdes. California. Business. Allen La Rock. Anthony. Texas. Finance: Janice Lawrence, Okemah. Elementary Education. 'zllv g seniors Allan Lee, Vancouver, Canada. Pharmacy: Chun Kong Lee, Vancouver. Canada. Architecture: Lee Nancy, Norman. Social Work: Barbara Lesser, Mitchell, South Dakota. English: Nancy Levin, Sioux City. Iowa. Education: Waln Lindley, Anadarko. Zoology: Judy Livengood, Norman. Marketing. Terry Livengood, Norman. Marketing: Bill Logsdon, Edmond. Accounting: Ross Longley, Altus. Microbiology: Helena Luk, North Point, Hong Kong. Communicative Art: Cliff Lydlck, Norman, Journalism: David Lynn, OKC. Business Ad- ministration: Carolyn Mandelbaum, Western Springs. lllinois, Special Education. Michele Manning, OKC. Speech and Hearing: Lucinda Mannlnq. Norman, Advertising: Brenda Marshall, Tulsa. Marketing. Linda Massey, Bart- lesvllle. Business Education: Jeffrey Mathews, Norman. Architecture: Mellnda Mayes, Richardson. Texas. Geography: Susan McBay, Tulsa, Psychology. Haynes McBride, Virgin Islands. Public Relations: Paula McCown, OKC, Public Relations: Ellen McDonough, Norman. Spanish: James McElvany, Norman. Accounting: Ben McGill. Claremore, Education: Floyd Mclntyre, Kingfisher. Chemistry, Deborah Mclver, Tulsa. Sociology: Deb McKee, Duncan. Home Economics: Ken McKinney, Sligler, Accounting: Susan McSpadden, Houston. Texas, Spanish: Randy Meadors, Wetumka. Marketing: Jan-Meadows, Caddo. Journalism: Maria Medina, Norman. Microbiology. Nancy Medley, Tulsa. Nursing: CA. Melin, Shawnee, Accounting: Pamela Mercer. Norman. Elementary Education: John Merwln, Lawton. Zoology: Mary Musser. Enid, Home Economics: Mohamadg Metghalchl, Tehran. lran. Mechanical Engineering: James Millard, Lancaster, Penn- sylvania, Zoology. Joe Millard, Tulsa, Public Relations: Janet Miller, OKC, Journalism: Kristin Miller. Corpus Christi. Texas. Spanish. Tim Miller, OKC. Advertising: Warren Miller. Norman. Finance: Elaine Mlllwee, Norman, Nursing: Daniel Mills, Albuquerque. New Mexico, Land Management, Dale Mitchell, Des Moines. lowa. Accounting: Richard Monard, Anadarko. Nuclear Engineering: Stan Monroe, Norman. Philosophy: Jeff Moore. Pauls Valley, History: Mathew Moore, Tulsa. Political Science: Melinda Moore. Tulsa. Psychology: Joe Morgan, Enid, Pre Med. Thomas Morgan, University Park. Texas, Engineering: Debbie Morrlson, Sapulpa, Speech Pathology: Tom Morrow, Walnut Creek. California. Business Administration: Howard Motley, Norman. Accounting: Dianna Mount, OKC, Pharmacy: Clair Mulder, Rock Valley. Iowa. lowa, Pharmacy: Gale Mullen, OKC. Journalism. . "..- V . -1 ilj i .... 4 U r 7 1- A ,- ., Mi i 4, ' r X 11 iiiimiiielht LM X I ' 1" . r V A . A, ,- it . .tummy ri iv. fn' it tit "" L ii: rrtiiefiirrf H Y H U ' f l . " W ' ', 1 l SEL' 'S ag! Writ r' l R 1 i .... . . 1 'i t , r, 1 . f x . . r B. . . 9 U ,U "M i Y.. . . .rr ,nail . . . l ' - . ' x ,f .ffl i 1 W. l, W1 A S: 1, i 'E . A 'a Q A ikf--v l 'Wa l v. ' It LE? if i YW!! ,ld U, YY!! .V . if , I , is J ' -1 i 5,1-any . 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H , H.. 1 - . 1 ' . . g' 'fi - - ' - i- t t' - . .," ' F t. fr ll 'A ' '. t V 1 ' J 'l ff.. 9 1 ,l r - it it t . ' ' it rrl - list ' P G i r2:rQ 'iii 4399 are .tri , , Ann .- trym-'v,rup:--r,tns4, 1 t hy' 1 Z' . 'lx .4 'I ?' ' .A ' , . , r ,' ji .f Y? X A A - . :rug lean adaul if fs . , f- J -s. sf i if xy-,ie . r'.l' . '-A ' ,Jr ,Q i X 'K' Fl! if ' lfff r.. .... ff' fig . ,Q it ' f fist, ii -cl I, J -Jig?3t? It W mggmyi iigs ifw,qyi i 'W" Y Mgr- in! itil il! V ' ,X 31 , i lied I V' L, I " " - V 4 -,'b "t l ff A ii tis . , I i ..tMi. iiii ff .WMM '1 , 9 .Fai l E li .2 J tw f"" l'WMfi JL. .s ,. Q. l . I 41.3-..4i.4'.. ...s,,. QQ.. 4 i arf' '1" Fa ..' .. as i :t tc. v -i Y - ,I 't V' V , 1 'tk trttisw- t i ' " 'ily E l i ww i it l Wifi: 'ESU-' - ' i ' fi 4"1t.T' l 4 3 - f ' i kg, , ll., . i 'i1 it , . ' lc i2 'J . ' V. i , A '-, 'P E . -A ' f . i .4 X i- - i . A ffl ' ' - f it 'til graft, Y ji' N' .. i,.i W ,- .. ,-fy .. . 1 . , .,, , V' i " i . 'l 'i 7- i yi. .fywwtw iMm:.i M- i. timmmtn ' ik I ' A 1 sq-'Z , . f' - 5 : K" l ' x' .V-3 i l l' V ' ' i'9w iF.u 45+ 53 i , ' .' i O fi ' X ' t Pi' M t i , ,. T, i?iQFw i, igqf il Lt hum J G x "2 M, it JUL. li V it V 1 ,V . ,iii . , afzfrif l 5, EU: . - SGI'llOI'S I , .,:..., - :2 ,,,, .::, Robert Munro. Bethany, Architecture: Susan Munro, Montclair, New Jersey. Elementary Education. Steve Murphy, Stonewall. Chemistry. Margaret Myers, Cushing. Lab Technician: Richard Myers, OKC. Microbiology: Christie Neal, Stilwell. Kansas, Marketing: Karen Neal, Greenville. Texas. Physical Therapy. Bill Nedbalelt, Midwest City. Zoology: Nelson Newman, OKC. Finance: Gary Noonan, Gaithersburg, Maryland. Special Education: Robert Odom, .Norman Education: Robert Ogborn, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Law Enforcement: Rita Ortloff, Tulsa. Drama: Steve Osborn, Norman. Psychology. Cynda Ottaway, Snyder. Language Arts: Janie Overton, Fletcher. Education: James Parks, Okemah. Accounting: Janell Patterson, Tulsa, Psychology. Joe Pattison, Tulsa. Psychology: Michael Patton, Norman. Electrical Engineering: Patricia Patton, Norman. Fashion Merchandising. Andra Paulos, Bryan. Texas. Advertising: Lee Pedersen, Midwest City. History: Frank Penn. Wagoner, Computer Science: Ann Peterson, OKC, Special Education. Keith Plllich. Hamburg. New York. Advertising: Judy Pinson, Tipton. English: Judy Pippin, OKC. Advertising. Gary Pittman, Wisher. Mathematics: David Pointer, Herndon. Virginia. Marketing. Carl Pomeroy, Norman. Chemical Engineering: Juliana Poorman, Houston. Texas. Sociology: Randall Poyner, OKC. Engineering: Susan Prater, Pryor. Mathematics: Sally Pribyl, Tulsa, Anthropology. Preston Pugh, Norman. Management: Wanda Pugh, Del City. Spanish. Ken Purgason, Tulsa. Mechanical Engineering: Kathleen Quire, Lindsey. Speech Education. Lynn Raburn, Lawton. Math: fDavid Rader, Altus. Architecture: Christopher Randall, Springfield. Missouri, Advertising. 27 o seniors Karen RaPP. Fair Lawn. New Jersey. English: Jim Ray, OKC. Finance: Betty Read, Roswell. New Mexico. Math. Virginia Reed, Lancaster. Pennsylvania, Speech and Hearing: George Reid. Norman. Geography: Debbie Reinarts. Winona. Minnesota. Math, Marc Rice. Norman. Management: Deborah Riggs, Tulsa. Anthropology: Margaret Riggs, Tampa. Florida. Anthropology. Dave Rigiroui, Shawnee. Architecture: Carolyn Ritchie, Tulsa. German. Jeanette Ritter, Atwood. Accounting: Paul Roach. Houston, Texas. Finance: Ross Robinson. Minnetonka. Minnesota. Marketing: Joe Rodgers, Norman. Mathematics: John Rodgers, Clinton. Finance. Jan Rogers, OKC, Journalism: Suzanne Rogers, Vian. English. Michael Rolen, PomFret. Maryland. Letters: Sam Rose, Tulsa. Land Management. larry Rowe, Duncan. Business Management: Steve Rowland, Tulsa. Electrical Engineering: Jane Rueb, OKC. History, Karen Rush, Norman. Social Work: Roger Rush, Norman. Education. lllayne Sacharln, Memphis Tennessee. Journalism. Nancy Saied, OKC. Education: Jerome Sartor, OKC. Mechanical Engineering: Marge Satterfleld, OKC. Fashion Merchandising: Doris Scally, Yukon. Art Education. Amy Schtpper. Norman. Marketing: Greg Schipper, Norman. Marketing: Beverly Schram. Lawton, Nursing. Bill Sell. OKC. Accounting: William Shacltellord, Tecumseh, Land Managementi Jerry Shadld, OKC. Pharmacy: Nancy Shanks. Enid, Journalism. Mary Sharp, Tulsa. Recreation: Sherl Shaw. Barnsdall. Math: Jane Sheffer. Tulsa. Medical Technician: Linc Shepherd, Tulsa, Political Science: Anne Sherwood, Perry. Piano: Phil Stevers, Tulsa. Special Educationz Susan Simmons, Ardmore. Fashion Merchandising. -L 1? iiii .ii TF? -. i lk llll ' ' . l T r li :T T l . t' . 'V tal E. , . f L14 A i K . is-fhl55fflHTQf-a.l i , . .St ' l.i fi" '5'., ig-gi ,I Y. .T V4.2 'P' M illi J., ' - ' ""' Q TJ! if . riff ji'-4. 'si' 'gl ' 1 . ,:'!- . 4 W Liu iii? It 1 i K ii i!-' H L' a I-1'-". "H"-1-' ,Kin .... 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H l A mg XXX' A t X xx 'L+ J w X ,V 1 1 i I X I . r ' ' 1 f . il ,."l'Z47f3r--- .13 - ,,.f.Q.-.'-j-f- 1 X 111-12" , -0 Q'.LJf.":.!'Q, 1 Y x z ,WWHP X, i ll I l ,, . l ,3 iii - li X '. il 'Y .Xl-5 lie si l ,.. ,X Xi XX XX . .. i izi il' it ,iq H, .ii Eialiii fi.' " Wi 1. iiiililn X tilt' if F I I :Ge lit A Y N N 4 A f 'X i i ti liighif 3 lil ,74E?'igg youth' f 'ii Xeqk i V r A Nz' .-- 1 I .- H ' I " ' -it . I , ,s X, . X XX 9. X'X X GX ' 'l X31 ' X i Xi 5 mf- . H , ' .- ". . . ,Y it W? l i x' X, X X. ii , f Xnii tw ff' Quiz' X WXXL X X ,XJ 'gi l ,. '- i ' ' , 59? r . -- .I :NX - -: i 5 'z , .1 w- , e - X, 5 T t . ' V' ' - . 4 .i I , i V 'ix i ., . S Q A f "Ut wer . ...I .. nm. t vat-if-vm'-' vrgT':.ii fj""Ti ' 'X 1 X l T Nfl" .il T nr . l" if l i ly- 'l . ..' V i . it . l. Wi- i T v T. -. " -i ii ' ' " ,. "" ' J " W XX Q ,AX .13.X , ,X XX X. X iawlh . . X' ., ., A . ri gtk., L .XX ,XX ' , G I ,' I Y 1 35 tt' ' fV'- 5 'V l?"', f E3 . Eff it- mitllil :N T ii L T . . X -- e- ! XXX'Xj" XX, X I was - . ' a f X X X ' will i l illilii. iiiguiiiifli nik A W li ui lil nf P: -...D qi: 'i X , , WP X , F' XXX.. lip' i 5 X F, - . t i 2 , - , i . . 4 X ., .i i iffy, ,J XX -, X . A X.- .. XXX , X e.i'.af T 'r iid... Mar r. A ff : i ' wp- XX .X ,X 5.1 fi. ' ' , infifx ' ,i 'fl ' i t i. i' . i ' i i 1 ' 1 --Sit - , 5 XXX ' l Q' :fn 7' XXX T X tr .X 1:4 X ml . .,. 1-QNX . 4 N .XB .1-ZX ,Xfj XX l, at . X: i. i. .,X.h,X i i 1 . if seniors 0 2 1 Gregory Smlth, Ardmore. Finance Thomas Smith. History. Davld Snedeker. Chickasha. Business Jan Sparkman, Shawnee, Special Education: Stephen Spicer, Neosho. Missouri. Marketing. Deborah Stalcup. Norman. Special Education. Neal Stanley, Norman. Mechanical Engineering: Ronald Stevens, Del City, Engineering: BIII Stewart, Davis. Electrical Engineering. Brenda Stewart. Bristow. Elementary Education: Bob Stewart. Tulsa. Anthropology. Dennis Stone, Ardmore. Finance. Clark Storms, Norman. Finance: Janis Strandlie, Stoughton. Wisconsin. Journalism. Lee Stranathan, Enid. Finance. Marrie Street. Bel Air. Maryland. Journalism Pam Stueckemann. Jetmore. Kansas. Special Education. Dwight Sublett, Muskogee. Zoology: Vickie Summers. Purcell. Elementary Education. Tai Lun Sun, Norman. Pharmacy: Kitty Sullivan, Atlanta. Georgia. Public Relations. Joyce Sutton, Tulsa. Advertising. Wayne Swanson. Norman. Education. Thomas Sward, Arlington Heights. Illinois. Electrical Engineering. Laurence Sykes. Pine Bluff. Arkansas. Lihrary Science. Bruce Tackett. Norman. Joura nalism. Diana Tague. Ralston. Pharmacy: Cathy Tammen, Broken Arrow. Nursing: Behnam Tavakkolian. Tehran. Iran. Mechanical Engineering: Ralph Teehee. Norman. Accounting. James Terrell. Austin. Texas. Electrical Engineering. Nancy Terrell, Seminole. Education. Sue Thom, Norman. Journalism. Craig Thomas, Altus. Drama. Martha Thomas. Tulsa. Speech and l learing1 Daryl Thompson. Mobile. Alabama. Mathematics: John Thompson, Norman. Zoology David Thom. San Antonio. Geologyx Susan Thornburg, Norman. English. Johnna Thurston, Norman. Accounting. Paula Tigner, Ada. Special Education. Laurie Tilman. OKC. Special Education: George Timmons, Garvin. Education. Terrl Tock, Altus. Special Education. 2 0 seniors Kent Torrence, OKC. Accounting: Jean Townsend, Frederick. Social Work. Stephen Trenton, Stillwater. Drama. Judson Troop, Lawton. Journalism. Sue Tullius, OKC. Accounting. Jane Tully, Carnegie. Accounting. Shirley Tumbleson, Yukon. Nursing Michael Twaddell, Arlington Heights. illinois. Business. Howard Tyler, Wetumka. Pharmacy. Hisano Uesugi, Japan. Accounting. Ghassem Vatani, Ahadan, lran. Architecture: Hilda Velez, Lawton, Spanish. Christopher Venters. OKC. Pre Med. Mike Vick, Norman. Petroleum Land Management. Janet Vitt, Banlesville. Journalism: James Vollnlc, Tulsa. Business. Milton Walters, Enid. Finance. Mary Walton, Norman. Chemistry. William Waterman, Norman. Accounting. Gary Watts, OKC. Engineering. Mark Wauahdooah, Lawton. Political Science Linda Weddle, OKC. Accounting. Jon Weichbrodt. Ardmore. Engineering. Paul Wesche, Tulsa. Management. Tom West. Norman. History: Michael Westmoreland, Marietta. Psychology. Carol White, OKC, Special Education. Kathy White. Noble. Education Richard White, Norman, Laboratory Technology. Scott Wiehle, Ralston. Psychology. Gary Wightman, Bartlesville, Advertising: Linda Wilcoxson, Elk City, Accounting. Bruce Wilkerson. OKC. Speech Communication. Curtis Wilkins. Fairview. Botony. Glenda Wilkinson, Watonga. Nursing A Robert Wilkinson, Norman, Special Education: Andrew Williams, Norman. Political Science: Charley Williams, Pryor. Engineering Douglas Williams, Midwest City. Chemistry: Scott Williams, Tulsa. Political Science. Deborah Williamson. OKC. Language Arts: Debby Williamson. Tulsa. .Journalism Ronald Wilson, Tecumseh. Accounting: Martha Winter, OKC. Arts and Letters. David Wolfe, OKC. Management, Wesley Wong, Ponca City. Psychology: Dan Wood, Madill. Advertising: David Wood, Madill. Interior Design: Michael Woods, Shreveport. Petroleum Land Management. Robert Zenegler, Wauconda. illinois. Sociology: Cheri Woody, Enid. Social Work. Mark Worstell, Los Alamos. New Mexico. Engineering: Theresa Wright, Muskogee. Physical Education: Linda Wulft, OKC, Psychology: Jeanne Yarberry, OKC. Advertising: Odie Yoesting, Shawnee. Pharmacy. 4 as ' 2 I, xiii? . ....... f f- "3 I 'E' rf' 'V I . . . I i x ., , iq i W Y - l r . 'fl I '-, i lil 'I' , il ,. 1. i Q ' it 1 l-'ff it lf: 'l ' V ' V "" f- iii ' ' , it . I . lx . 1 ' ' I , rl . 1 , . ' xry .Y .W ' fri l r - -I EQ : t X., 'Y Q- A-A Al W-'g Y i ll is it YJ, 'f ,sf . Ll li ll Nl I V l li A if 1 V i' ri ..., H.. . Q ,lv - . l't"" 'iff' . . Li' U 'P V- 'W "" :w i 1 ,ini M 'w it "" ' iff U ' , . I, ' , ii U' l if f 'N-M, l I li ' QI f i .3 ll T! f' L ' Lis.. f::"' r . " 'L , . i i rss lin, , Y ,, ,i , .tt. i ' .nr Jilllil V y o u ' Qwtrlci ii: r ij. ,N ill? l Q ,.. E-, iliil l t ' l l i r r lt h ,- . i.- i itll" ,t .. 'ity-x 'X . XMLJ ' . W . sf A 4 rv, W lil' K Wt J ww i 1 irqlfii l 1 , ,J ir , . L.. "s. . 1 4. Q ' .X WXNW A ,. ir , I . i ' ' ,g.- '11 ,.. ill-.ill 4- I " 'H i 'Z ' lf L 9 r R . lg, 'Ti- F., N it i . N . V 1' -'iikifwiw i t I X 4, ,,,, ,ww i . ii, ,y y . i y .3 G. i GIA I ., vi i r. Q . N ri ,,t l iv ,, . WH, .ii .4 xiii ur. .r . ri, yr i t '- - : 1- . - 2 t- . . l i e A V' r s -ti i 4 1 Ji' i all gill l i . -' :QW I U l ...YF ' if it il gn' ,e i gf' -lil g' i lvl. l ,I 'Q il ll! If i' 4 1 fi i ri i i' . i it . Y H P ill lt ' V' ' 7k'f:itlQ'.t.uf 3.3- rl OJ i ' ' R i3 , f ' A ,V xr-If l l L ve- - Q 'l l' -Q14 1 M .I-1 K.. ' ... .. A -- luv' DQ' v x ',.v'f,,.n-v+a.,,:u gill ANDING SENIOR WOMAN Betty Read her trophy from Dr. Paul Sharp, OU's Qi 5 M SOUVENIRS FOR SALE intrigue buyers at the Texas State Fair during the OU-UT Cotton Bowl football clash. Tl ag 0 juniors Ann Abernathy, Altus. Home Economics: Cindy Adams, Nor- man. Accounting: Paul Albert, Elk City. Political Science: Gary Alexander, Concord. Calilornia. Management: Lawrence Alspaugh, Tulsa. Business: Vicki Ammerman, Miami. Education: Doug Anderson, Duncan. Mechanical Engineering. Cathy Arrington, Canadian. Texas. Business Education: Marilyn Baker, Tulsa. Mathg Steve Baldwin, Dewey. Norman: Ball Blair, South Holland. Illinois. Business: David Balloff, Concord. Tena nessee. Public Relations: Neal Barnes, Norman. Pharmacy: Ronald Barnes, Midwest City. Petroleum and Land Management. Michael Bartlett, Ponca City. Engineering: Crissa Baylor, Germany. Physical Education: Mike Bebb, Wichita Falls. Texas. Journalism: David Beck, Conroe. Texas. Land Management: Stephen Bennett, Norman. Radio and TV: Doug Bergman, Tulsa. Accounting: Dee Berline, Caldwell. Kansas. Occupational Therapy. Charlene Berry, Tulsa. Social Work: Marsha Blumenthal. OKC. Education: Margaret Boothe. OKC. Pharmacy: Mark Boremus, Lakeland. Florida. Mechanical Engineering: David Boston, Tulsa. Marketing and Management: Barbara Bowling, Blackwell. Ac' counting: Nancy L. Bowman, Claremore. Accounting. Paula Brandle, Norman. English: Mary Brannon, Norman. Political Science: Patrick Brennan, Tulsa. Environmental Science: Anne Brenner. Taos. New Mexico. Finance: Randall Briggs, Tulsa. History: Richard Broom, Marlow. Radiology: Mary Brumage, Ruston, Louisiana. Education. Tony Bumpas, OKC. Public Relations: Richard Burger. OKC, Accounting. Tommy Burns, Tommy Caldwell, OKC. Education: Kelly Callaway, Norman. Home Economics Education: Charlie Caly, OKC. Pharmacy: Deborah Campbell, Marietta. Speech and Hearing, , nr-H 1 x -f an I ew C154- m" 'QT' .Q 'Er lah A ' J T-l S G' FN E 'br ny! v. 4515411 tean so srscf r t i mac f . tx- W, at ' I. , 'rv "'.. FT V . Af-is ,Q 'N "' at 46.5 AA 'N 42- -wr M llli Kb- ' 5 -s Q 5: -.- kill Rx X GTQX .FTM ls Q 4.4 E f , ' fiii , 'gif : 'uv Yr. i'.:F H1 - , iw img W' -IE., I 1- N. Q ,Tx-ax, I. I t EA' lv . 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I 5 .QC -LL ,Z .K i it 2,7 A , i . , ' I F H, J.: I I 4 1 A-. v it l l . . X f rl r 'f' T rg , V V V ,, Q Jr jak.. . V T at t ri . . A rat Hz. 3. ty -I -: - e- i . ' 5 za . if L -g' T HS T ' ,RL fggym l ' V J- . Q I X . I , I . - U "': I ' "TF pf t B .aff W 3 A "1 J M W 4 r- , I Ts F 1 K V X ,X 1 il it nc "' A ,, N A f 4 '- x X ' A 'R f ' .1 K Xa Tr" ." - If Q 'I 'if -' ' -r gf ff- - f --4 ,pi ' 1 FT. ,Jw Ar . l ,A 4 Ili n . -1 . ..r,. ...Q , - . J , ' C ,-fs. Pl, T 1 1 fl ini- . i - . ' ' H' "M l . -4- f.. 'MF 3.4, 5 1- if. f- , Q1 4-1 ,,f, 2 , J ,I ...I , " , j' --L '3 . .-HAL gt ,L I- 'f ,fu A255155 ' ia. -in A A ii ' L, ' 5 sw, ' I lr- 4 Q. gg-gl 4,5 ,lp Q 1, 1' fit l E .X on . ' 1. ' - l" NE 'iillil , 7 ,. ,X W N .N N uw ... f:, 2: Z' , . 5' V-ov vs. A N - 7 QL, y il. , ,Egg , .E . X .if . 4 T ill! - 1 i rl 'B fi, we-i' i' -ft eff ..-s ,s ,,., .1 ,,i L -kj, -7, 1 Y., 'vu 1 'I . " 1 ', V i ' . -' 111 lxg ' ' . Y, , f. I In f E -T T , H. , i 1 ' r rr I ,., -V ' X .. A 1. V1 T T TT 4 MT l ll E ' eff l eff' -' ' ' -rj lf' - 14 QL Q,z'L M741 4:1 p 1 . 34' - f . ,J V i . . Q 3 , i ah ...aa dn "L 1 - ,-. . l' ,ss- AQ'- 'ZEQ f'-T -Lf- fv A Q, N ' Pi-a fy, lx- il? l -ttf ' ' ' Y 1. , ' 1' , i ' '3 4. V 3 M ,if ll: .31 7- " 7' 41 W ,.,-, M Gr. '-Y ,r K jing It : i AL -N 9 lx si f v' . ' , J P Juniors! iw John Canavan, New York, Political Science: Bob Canfield, Norman. Political Science: Ronnie Carr, Elk City. Environmental Design: James Carry, Midwest City. Environmental Design: Michael Casebeer, Tulsa. Business: Connie Cassocly, Covington. Accounting: Roberta Cering. Tulsa. Recreation. Bobby Chaffin, Seminole, Spanish: Joseph Chism, OKC. Geology: Susan Clawson, Norman. Accounting: Glen Cochran, OKC. Finance: Robert Cocke, Seminole, Business: Louis Coleman, Tulsa. Business: Gary Collins, Tulsa. Accounting. Caren Colvert, Amarillo. Texas. Pharmacy: Vicki Cone, Tulsa. Business Education: Eileen Cook, Anadarko. Microbiology: John Cook, Tulsa. Advertising: Gerald Cox. Heavener, Pre-Dent: Kathy Creel, Bartlesville. French: Kirby Croisant, Muskogee. Ac- counting. Preston Cross, Del City, Social Work: Patty Cunningham, OKC, Speech Therapy. Mark Curnutte, Vinita. Accounting: Jan Curry, Sapulpa. Psychology: Phyllis Dakil, McAlester. Dental Hygiene: Jean Dafrah, San Francisco. California. lnterior Design: Connie Davis, El Reno, Journalism. Shirley Davis, Paden. Social Work: Doug Dellasega, Pittsburg. Kansas. Management: Jeanett Dobbs, Tulsa, Engineering: Karyl Dossey, Lawton. Public Relations: Don Douglas, El Reno. Letters: Jeff Downey, Tuttle. Music Education: Mike Dunlap, Barilesville. Marketing, Richard Dunn, Lawton. Pre-Dent: Steve Eischeid. Edmond, Public Relations: Ken Elliott, Bartlesville, Economics: Paul Erben, Seattle. Washington. Engineering: Stan Erwin, Tulsa. Zoology: Dana Farha, OKC. Home Economics: Tony Fath, Tonkawa. Design. ,. 'L 7 f-99 ,, ,A 4 'Nr P I X IK I i I -Q: x ..' ,I gr I .I Ag-3: f V xhwa. r N X WY ,- N, f I :T rs, - P ,. Hz, ' W X 1 1 K W .' ' er, 1 ' . ,Q I 1- ,gn 1-P i . i s , 1. MAX Q E RW J L- I my " 'U A As. ix 1--1' I ,I ' .F wx EQ! 4 U V' ' 7 'fav-' ! . IL j YY . V x jx-AV5Hv:'. . u - , . B Y- ' W. tl ' -.1 X "' . 3 . , E X ,. "7 , 6... - iii ,L Mlm. 1 :I " -it " fm'-ki. T4 i 5' ss 'N . i, fl' i- N .L .51 X V f- L ' ll :1 tg -e , ' il 1 r, All A 1- D' la. xc' v- " i li 9, U 1 K. .A it Y , ,Q 1 K J , Q' ' is , ' JJ my -fl s l' 5 T 7 ' 1 X Tift J' M., if A I ? A s A x S 5 h b ,A A A vig A, -L gjjfrq .aff g J- tw ' wi' -f tfimi A L . xi s. if '-'F . ,Q - ' ..t ii P' 2 . , Pi ,IQ E' bi 5 Tw' Nllf V P-14' 1' Di' 'l tl ff ll 4 '. mf' A ft ii. ll tl' it , Q' 9 fb A A it ' l ll 1 L , A il ' , 3 E135 N' iii ,,,' K it il 3 P- 1 F .Sl ,, ,f',I Q K .ef-V J fl dl it , 5 X ' ai ., -. A ' it ,- tilt! '." V 'I , ', ,s f' it 1, - ls' ii -4 it p' Dr' as ...if t X D as A .-ff - a c .ang if at L A' fi . it he A it f it 'L if: vip: f.f'k,.s': V- , A it ,f it .1 X' ' 'ja it 'ga "ef, ,1j'Ngli.i,g gf, ' I , I J-F I . ., l - .lx ,-1' A I J Ai- 'vi YA ki J! i.. F 9,99 A 4 kit A . V W -Q? P 514 c , f :J g Y ji Al, 5 4 - 3 A' Q , U I 12 J 5 if it -fit-E rig 9 4. aff " -5 r i. i . .K X ll -V 4 A' in X .-us. V ii i. ' ii -4 . L+ .pq f-' , fy i I ' ia, . . Y Rf , , fflbi ' '. ' - ' f' s. , ,W , -g, . 'is 'J AA juniors Q li? " Tom Henshaw, Sapulpa. Accounting: Tim Hight, Tulsa, Jour- nalism. Ernie Hills, Medlord, Music Education: Dawn Hollingsworth, El Reno. Drama: Candice Holt, Stilwell, Pre'Med: Susan Holzinger, Minneapolis. Minnesota. Fashion Mer- chandising: David Hornbeck, OKC. Architecture. Diana Harrell, McAlester. Journalism: Lanna Harris, Dunhill. Fashion Merchandising: Millie Hays, OKC, Education: Mary Heckler, Norman. Education: Raymond Held, Billings. Montana. Math: Page Heller, Bartlesville. Engineering: John Henderson, Norman, Biology. Vicki Howard, Moore, Language Arts: Martha Huff, lnola. Microbiology: Jo Huggs, OKC. Physical Therapy: Shelley Hume, OKC, English: Debbie Hummel, Okmulgee. Medical Technician: Glen Jameson. Norman. Engineering: Paul Jaqua, Norman. Accounting. Jim Jaworski, Chester. Pennsylvania, Finance: Coy Jenkins, Vinita, Political Science: Sherry Jenkins, Duncan. Interior Design: Janice Jindra, Medford. Finance: Andy Johnson, Dallas. Texas. Management: Glen Johnson, Okemah, Finance: Amon Jones, Norman. Journalism. Annabel Jones, lrving. Texas, Political Science: Jonna Lea Jones, Edmond. Business: Timothy Jones, Duncan, Business: Debbie Jorgensen, Midwest City, Psychology: George Justice, Ponca City. Accounting: Liz Kaleda, Tulsa, Physics: Richard Karasiewshi, Liverpool. New York, Chemistry. Craig Keitz, OKC. Finance: Kenton Keller, OKC. Pre-Med: Bruce Kerr, Midwest City, Accounting: Cynthia Kidd, Bartlesville. English: Richard Kimberlin, Victoria, Texas. Petroleum Land Management: Mark Kingsolver, Broken Arrow. Journalism: Leigh Kirkwood, Kansas City, Missouri. Letters. JoAnn Klar, Tulsa. Advertising: Jan Knox, Houston, Texas. Engineering: Michael Knox, Tulsa, Zoology: Dwight Kouri, Chelsea. Speech Communication: Walter Kowalski, Winnetka. Illinois. Psychology: Ron Krieger, OKC. Zoology: Michael Kroll, Hennessey. Speech Communications. David Kuhn. Midwest City. Political Science: Vicki Lake, McAlester. Languages: Mike Langford, Tulsa, Marketing: Rick Lankie, Tulsa. Accounting: Jay Larson, Milan. Illinois. Ar- chitecture: David Leader, Bartlesville, Math: Debby Lebeda, Medford. Nursing. Pamela Leonard. OKC. Advertising Design: Jay Levy, Norman. Finance: Randy Lierly, Tulsa, Architecture: Mark Lisle, Norman. Business: Clark Long, OKC. Finance: Vicki Longhofer, Enid. Art History: David Looper, OKC. Engineering. Bruce Lundin, Norman. Radio and TV: Graydon Luthey, Nor- man. Letters: Caron Lyman, Andover. Massachusetts. Business: Mark Lyons, Pryor, Zoology: Sue Mackey, Lawton, Speech Therapy: Richard Mahoney, OKC. Journalism: George Matetich, Tulsa. Land Management. We o juniors Pat Mandeville, Tulsa. Zoology: Rick March, Duncan. Zoology: Pixie Marlar, Claremore. Fashion Merchandising: Richard Marley, Atoka. Engineering: Bob Marsh, Fort Sill. Law En- forcement: Richard Martin, Dallas. Texas. Finance: Terry Maulding, Norman. Education, David May, Norman. History: Cynthia Mayes, OKC. Advertising: Melissa Mayfield, Medical Technician: Mary McCall, Norman. Letters: Gwen McCormick. Seminole, Education: Susan Mc- Creery, Chickasha. Nursing: Kimberly McCrory, Bartlesville. Advertising. Mary McClure, Enid. interior Design: Debbie McCullough, Norman. Speech Therapy: Patricia Mclver, Tulsa. Business: Scott McKee. Tulsa. Advertising: Dalene McMakin, Norman. Nursing: Kirk McQuiddy, Tulsa, Accounting: Suzanne Mercer, Norman. Physical Education. Michael Miller. OKC. Business: Karen Mills, New Orleans. Louisiana. Accounting: Sara Millspaugh, Texas. Finance: Jackie Mitchell, OKC. Fashion Merchandising: Linda Mobley, OKC. Liberal Studies: Carol Moore, New York, Math: Richard Morgensen, OKC. Business. John Montgomery, Hobart. Journalism: Mary Morris, OKC. Education. Pam Morris, Houston. Texas. Business Management: Marc Morton, Tulsa. Advertising: Rodney Mosley, Midwest City. Microbiology: Tom Mullen, Tulsa. Communications: Rachel Mullen, Tulsa. Political Science. Gene Muse, OKC. Pre-Med: Gary Myers, Tulsa. Zoology: Robert Myers. Midwest City: Shelley Myers, OKC. Business Education: Larry Naifeh, Norman. Law Enforcement: Steve Nance, Ard- more. Broadcasting: Paul Nelson, OKC. Finance. Frank Newman, Coweta, Marketing: Kathy Newman, Tulsa. Drama: Jeff Noble, Tulsa. Accounting: Mark Nunnery, Okemah. Interior Design: John O'Brien, Midland. Texas. Land Management Carole 0'Dell, Haileyville, Nursing: Michael Odom, Norman. Advertising. Dale Owensby, Naperville. Illinois, Education: Frances Palmer. Tulsa. Pharmacy: Annmarie Paris. Bartlesville, Elementary Education: Mary Parker, Seminole, Social Work: Ann Parks, Seminole, Pharmacy: Gary Parsons, OKC. Zoology: Bill Patten, Norman. History. Steve Peake, Tulsa. Pharmacy: Bruce Pendleton, Pryor. Pha macy: Bruce Petitt, Norman. Pre-Dent: Meloyde Petko, Antiocl California. Respiratory Therapy: Julie Pittman, Houston. Texa Early Childhood Education: Rhonda Poolaw, Mountain View Arr-ountingz David Power, Overland Park, Kansas. Marketing. Jeffery Prewett, Del City. industrial Engineering: Doug Queen, Tulsa. Finance: Britt Radford, Tulsa, Advertising: Greg Radosevich, OKC. Accounting: Chris Reynolds, OKC. Joura nalism: Peter Riley. Quakertown. Pennsylvania. Accounting: Debbie Ritter, Midwest City, Public Relations. Daniel Rogers, Tahlequah. Anthropology: Stephanie Rosin, OKC. Microbiology: Carl Ross. Tulsa, Petroleum Engineering' Marc Ross, Tulsa, Business: Mark Rowland, Tulsa. Microbiology Edward Rushing. OKC. Microbiology: Ann Ruble. Tulsa Business. . , Iv: 1 .. H fi 'll I: if QTL' f lfffgi,-7 , i M 'wg , . ,A is .sf i WI? ,.- "' ' ' , 0- ,C 1',,'- as .ai Q . '. fs-:sf ' g I , ' V' . r -4 r-5. -'V ' S A al. A f Q f - ,- if-i,, in X r :X , ji Q ,- Sli' l , i i N ' V, A 11' "'F"' ' -3- 5 , 2. J.: -,Gi ' i A s ' T -i A -fi t ii "1 if I ll "WY" 'fl 4 A L. All 5' .. . '-4 '11 . 5 . F if 'F ' 2 5 - . 1 4. , l A , I at-, 'P ff ' , w if-' ,, . 'E fw 1 Q5 3- , -Y QL- Q39 -A 4 -fi .1 A ., - .ffiiil QE' -dr if il :f 0' , S-l Q 1" It l .il -I t l 'L . ff- . E r..Iqyi'i .AIA ,.. f l ilb .. l i ellis-vi? x , - 3: Ml 1 ,-'W r- ,, ' .f T I , i " Y ' il Q In ,ia F lilfi 1 5. !-- 0 M 3, Wg gr , ir-f' W1 A Nfl, .1 4.3, A ' g v s K . ' . ' - i ' "" 45, , 2 , lr, ,, '-" " .I .,,- it ' - at A i., - , , ' - 1 X A 4 -Lf. .- ' " 1 ll ' 1 . 'f' ' ' - .e I' 1 ., K Q X Q -: 6 5, A., ' A ,,, ig! 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' ll 1' xl , l f - 5 ' T1 -., 'l ' ,si . . - si .. ss, 1 ., I .,, Y , A4 ,AA V wa , ' 7 F A Ft. li -1 f' "' - juniors :::.:.. .M lf: ni mi .1 w rwals' wff . ssfff-I--sifii N my p VI' -.aa gg- '2f,, nc. 'Hr 3.5, 'am 475' L. 'Q-f -f. LIT' I 55- A 'J R g l.-v ihx-,vf fx r an . ' X fn uf' lik' -M L A al Ba. Ah . lff 1.- X 1 I TQ if 475' ,, ' i ' fi at . ' 1 i ' . we 1 fa . , - M Q GT ir... 2 1 3 fa M ,sg 1 ,.,a, .. 'gn v Y-f if ff , T if , if si .Abe . de A ik eff l I '1' A ll 4 .l W, ir, .J . fl f . rf A 5. I. i ' ,L .- 7 4? -. .I 1- 'gangu ,,, Q 4,4 T A f - x l 1- ii x r get ' A .49 125' ' . ls. 'L' Aa .EP Lil . it . ., .N e 3, , gig! I' ' ,f'. , 'SP' i X -. '-' 'tk' 4 it ' 'V ii. 2: . 1. N. 5 V I y N ..- Q is fm. aa ii f 1- f r: 5 1 ' , Nr, , "Ti "V -"7 RN ' '.-f 7 f 5. 1 A cf , T , . .4 Elizabeth Ryan, Duncan. Zoology: Carol Sayre, Norman. Math: Gary Schilling, Davis. Education: Windler Schweer, Covington. Business: Ronald Scrinopskie. Topeka. Kansas. Psychology: Wendy Shaub, London. England. Education: Gregory Sims, Midwest City. Business. Jim Slayton, Norman. Petroleum Management: Trip Smith, Chattanooga. Tennessee. Engineering: Vachel Smith, Noble. Accounting: Kathy Steen, Norman. Speech and Hearing: Scott Stephens, OKC. Business Management: Chris Steves. OKC. Broadcasting: Jennifer Streightoff, Franklin. Indiana. Physical Therapy. Barbara Stoldt, OKC. Advertising: Mary Stringlield, Norman. Instrumental Music Education: Donald Stuart, Duncan. Ac- counting: Peggy Teuscher, Edmond. Education: Leonard Thill, Bartlesville. Accounting: Anthony Thompson, OKC. Finance: Kim Thompson. Moore. Business. Laura Thompson, Tulsa. Sociology: Mark Thomson, Ponca City. Accounting: Janeva Tillie, Richardson, Texas. Psychology: Marylee Trigg, OKC, Journalism: Susie Troutman, OKC. Ac- counting: Doug Vaughan, Amarillo, Texas. Psychology: Becky Wagonseller, Bowie. Texas. Elementary Education. Jeanne Wagstaff, Chelsea. Fine Arts: Larry Walck, Ardmore. Political Science: Andrew Walding, Tulsa, Business: Dee Ann Walker, Levittown. Pennsylvania. Math: Chuck Walker, Lawton. Public Relations: Jack Watkins, Richardson. Texas. Petroleum Land Management: Michael Weaver, Healdton. undecided. . . QE' 'juniors Randy Weichbrodl, Ardmore. Advertising: Ellen Weigant, Tulsa. Pharmacy: James Weigant, Tulsa. Business: Debbi Weser, Norman. Special Eclucation: Mark Wesner, Cordell. Political Sciuncez Peter Whipple, Midwest City. Social Studies: Cappy White. Tulsa. Marketing. John White. Memphis. Tennessee. Aerospace Engineering: Jonathan White, Norman. Math: Randy Wood, Arlington. Texas. Political Science: Rhonde Wood, Bartlesville. Engineering: Liz Worsham, OKC. Accounting: Christie Wright, Rogers. Arkansas, Special Education: Nicole Wright, Tulsa. Urban Studies, I ? ,, ix ,,.- if-FF s 'Tlx' QI! l 7' 'T' m 45 Mqfe, - S- N nv Q AL ,435 Q .4 L C 1 V 7 . IJ .. f " 'NJ A 1' 5 1 k X , .J KX ir it s 1" ll mas Q 5 'li V513 L ,SZXZW W -' K AJ A ...rl "' I' ',- ' t ' . A if. t f .4 ,ma :: lf i K 'x I K A 1 D I r I . ' , ' 1 Q. H.. J , 2' , l l': li 'i JV 1 ur - ,-14 tag ui'-1,31 , f, -rf W ..1, 1 .ry . 'YQ 6 5 g i . . . .1 -A - ' A ' 4 i 1 ' ...s .ss 1.1: ' LD ' fs P :,. ' ' itil Juv Y so n V. H. l . A 9' -is "ri-5 if ' - ,,., ff f ' i -'-A -3, ' M ' lit- 4 ' ' -4 7 , Q' 'EF -5 . 'rs " ,. 1 V I ,A i ,-,, V- l ' 1' . ix A ' , '31 A .. 5 l ll' 1 L A A I-If T u 'QTEK ' f 4 A Q, ' gl i , .. 2: A , . W 3 xg ' . ' Q55 Q:-'JH' 4 4115 'I 1 ' .dw , A ,T 'l L - ez f J. if... f - ' 21 .-f J wt .. 5: .fl -r-teh-'z ' I T 7. :M ,, - ., 6--3. YN .f . V 'T' ' ll .f . ' -. I In ' '. .A A M ' ' an 5-' di '- an 5 ' , , -- - al is t rr, - - ,J iff' 'L?'I:.-. .,. P--ik Ffifri fgg' ' ,flu fr . . -fl xv' ' K 734 . " T "s Q74 as A ., W 1 ' ' A F 'ff Tn' sy U 3 f , l i R, 9, ggi lg, R W W.. au- i gg. . Q .. 'L ll .i . W . 'i. - A 'IG A - al A .5. , li -as X f ll V 1: 5: rm :Q '43 "' ' 'TT l A 5- ,M r I fs- ' . . i in rl' l 'F- s l 'L 0 A Alfi':.'K AW' ' f 'J ri 2-Y? -1 -Y-., 4 .V VX T'-if 'as ' Q 5 er: gf X. !..,r. , .945 tl 'gf' J l il, 'i 'S Q .I ,r N 'i Q. , 4. tl : lE"r .4 ,dy 'E' QL ,, QWW' ji i ,ual ,L . Mil l ' 'fits A .Q rv.. , llll , Al' fl. W v V, l J xx, 'n P .f . , W' M- ,- D., L .- l will G l V r 'F x A J r .utilf FTF -f ... M.. - . . ' " ri Q I gg J 2 Cu-1-t-ns ,Qi S' .. . .v Rr J rf ,At mler a 4 J ss. 'fe G' Q. nm, . :glam . . . tl Mui N.-v ' .N .. l A fast --v F! 459 'RQ AA A .or 1' n, 33 ., A , A 1 .1 I Ar r-A ' ,X l. C ers: X I.. -ln 1 ' . ri i Q i I 'EL fa viinw. s, Y 6.51: tn 0 .oy lt lp I A' n ,. V . l Xi is Ji- r-1 T N M in :tu 1 B- X , l . V W Si All 9 l - ' 1 L' .. f' . . .N my x Q .. 'f , -' .iff f 'A 1. J ' W". l , f . 4 'Q 5 .J fi .. r.. sophomoresortise' Q...., .-:- 5 ' " Andi Acree. Norman. Fashion Merchandising: David Adams, Rosewell. New Mexico. Chemical Engineering: Michelle Addison, Lawton. Education: Terry Ainsworth, Tulsa, Nursing: Cecilia Aley, Bethany. Marketing: Kelly Allen, Palo Alto, Caliiornia. Zoology: Debbie Atlee, OKC Nursing. Rhonda Awtrey, Ponca City. Lab Technician: Gerald Badgett, Chickasha. undecided: Treasa Bagley, Hobart. Physical Education: Elizabeth Bake, OKC. Mathematics: Jim Baker. Tulsa. Pre Mecl: Stan Baker. Tulsa. Pre Med: Max Baldischwiler, Ok- rnulgee. Pre-dental. Brenda Ball, South Holland. Illinois. Fashion Merchandising: Sue Barnett, Norman, Pharmacy: Lisa Bassett. Cushing. Business: Cynthia Baten, Edmond. Occupational Therapy: Alice Bayles, Blackwell. Pharmacy: Carol Bearly. Roswell. New Mexico. un- decided: Susie Becker. Blackwell. Nursing. Morgan Bell, Norman. undecided: Bill-Bennett, Dallas. Texas. Finance: Elaine Bertalan, Eileen Bishop, OKC. Psychology: Sharon Blackburn. OKC. Interior Design: Ralph Blackman, Tulsa. Architecture: David Bloom, Deerfield. Illinois. Pre-Dental. Janet Blubaugh, Medford. Accounting: Rene Boehm, Tulsa. Nursing: Melissa Boucher, Tulsa. Nursing: David Bott, Lawton. Accounting: Daniel Bowling: Blackwell. Business: Jerry Bowzer, Bnrtlesville. Accounting: Brock Boyett, Fairfax. Virginia. Ara chitecture. Walt Bozeman, OKC. Engineering: Elaine Bradley, Sherman. Texas. History: Trip Brander. Tulsa. Journalism: Anan Bravo, OKC. Business: Lisa Brixey, Muskogee. Business: Marti Broderick, Madill. Journalism Charles Brooks, OKC. Ar- chilecture. Cindy Brooks, Smiths Parrish. Bermuda. Fashion Merchandising: Barbara Brown, West Point. New York, Physical Education: Mimi Brown, Duncan. Journalism: Debra Browning, Del City, Nursing: Steve Bruton, Muskogee, Architecture: Bill Burleson, Albuquerque. New Mexico. Pre-Med: Richard Campbell, OKC. Pre-Med. Jennifer Carey, Broken Arrow. undecided: Marc Chambers. Fairbanks. Alaska. Accounting: Gary Chandler, Broken Arrow. Accounting: Melinda Cherryhomes, Midland. Texas. Education: Linda Chenoweth, Harrah. Home Economics: Kelly Christenson, Roswell. New Mexico. Foreign Languages. Richard Churchill. Tulsa. Business. Terri Clanton, Vinita. Accounting: LaVerne Clark, OKC. Nursing: Christie Clayton. Peoria. Illinois, Business: Ray Clock, Tulsa. undecidecl: Karen Cochran. OKC. Education: Michael Cole, Ardmore. Accounting: Bill Coleman, Tulsa. Engineering. Mike Conner. Tulsa. Microbiology: Jeni Cook, Enid. French: George Cornelius, Piedmont. Accounting: Tim Costilow, Jay, Finance: Terry Cotterell, Midwest City. Pre-Dental: Sam Countryman, Guthrie. Business: Sharon Cox, Heavener. Nursing. William Crichton, Tulsa, Philosophy: Tom Cronin, Owasso. Accounting: Ronnie Crosby, Ardmore. Marketing: Jana Cun- ningham. Tipton. undecided: Pamela Cuplin, Bartlesville. French: Steve Curley, Broken Arrow. Zoology: Diane Curtis, Pryor, Business. 2 :' . 0 sop homores Eric Davis, Blackwell. Accounting: Sharon Davis, Muskogee. Social Sciences: Mark Dale, Davis. Business: Diana Davidson, Ardmore. Dietetics: Dennis Davis, Lawton. Geological Engineering, Marilyn DeJarnette, Ponca City. Business: David Dibble. Norman. Business. Bob Dodson, Pauls Valley. Engineering: Joy Donovan, Tulsa, Journalism: Michael Doughty, Claude Drabek, OKC. Pre-Med: Tim Dunlap, ldabel. Engineering: Russell Duren, Tulsa. Engineering: Robert Dye, Houston. Texas. Engineering. Lee Ernst, Bartlesville. Art: Ed Edminister, Houston. Texas. Civil Engineering: James Edwards, Enid. Accounting: Lynda Eichelberger, Elk City. Education: Ann Ellison, OKC. Modern Dance: Mary Emery, Skiatook. Zoology: Nancy Erickson, OKC. Nursing, Gayla Estus, Ponca City. Business Education: Cynthia Evans, Mcltlester, Business: Nancy Fajen, Guymon. Education: David Fath, Blackwell. Accounting: Eliot Feiler, Brooklyn. New York. undecided: Geoffrey Ferrer, Lawton. Microbiology: Marilyn Ferber, Midwest City. Political Science. Tommy Field, OKC. Business: Alan Fitch, OKC. Architecture: Karen Flowers, Lawton, Language Arts: Dan Foltz, OKC. Public Relations: Margaret Fowler, Tulsa. Physical Therapy: Janelle Fox, Waynolta. undecided: Phyllis Fraser, OKC. Social Work. Jan Fritschen. Tulsa. Journalism: Debbie Fulmer, ldabel. Ad- vertising: Janice Galegar, Ada, Art Education: Beth Galoob, OKC. Business: Terri Galt, Tulsa. Marketing: Ann Gardenshire, Ardmore. Medical Technology: Grey Garen, OKC. History. Keith Gasaway, Norman. Pre-Med: Laurie Gatchell. OKC. Ballet: Jack Gater, OKC. Meteorology: Bill Geddie, OKC. Journalism: Charles Geister, Tulsa. History: Lisa Gholston, Amarillo. Texas. Public Relations: Kim Glazer, Tulsa. Broadcasting, Vicki Gondknight, Tulsa. Anthropology: Jami Graham, Elk City. English: Terri Grantz, Cement. Nursing: Paul Gray, Political Science: John Greve, OKC. Engineering: Greg Groom, Tulsa. Music Education. Virginia Gurney, Harrah, Physical Therapy. Mike Hall, Anadarko. undecided: Thomas Hall, Lawton. Business: Billy Hamilton, Bartlesville, Psychology: Cathy Hanks, Midwest City. Physical Therapy: Jerry Helm, Binger, Pharmacy: Robert Howell, Tulsa. Environment: Kim Hauger, Tulsa. Zoology. Carol Hahn. Tulsa. Respiratory Therapy: Melanie Haines, Alma. Home Economics: Lyn Hale, Tulsa. Nursing: Carol Harden, Tulsa. Nursing: Raymond Harris, Norman. Architecture: David Hart, OKC. Political Science: Gregory Haymon, Tulsa. Accounting. V l 1. l " 7 Pl' ' 'E .V Ei.. . ffl -qw , id! I X v 'il R V ... -a N QS' J " x t 1 1 .4 1? ik! .. , .., :V ,.g: -V4-.-ya ' i i ' L-Q, i i A '1- V. ' , WA ' J W Bl' .X ll"-ri NV ,i .if - ' V , '. " , ".. ei: ' W' L dl . PJ' aff: it l .. .45 ' V455 liliilffi if V- A a - ' " Taft' , ' ' 1 E V' . . 1 iv , 4 -1. ,. 'X '- , - XM X , L -xv ' A T .. -x A 8 'ra .. Q 54 -i., A' 'ii i. "1 .A 4: J as i z- , V. J. ' T' .V , f'-fr -4, . ' " ' t if 1 AA 4 limi A V, -1' i VM ' ' ' fx' ,A se My - I .J - wi 3 'fl' 1 .1 Pl A ' "' .Q- i v gf, ' J ' Q D 4 . i Vi if . V , 4 V V l E ' il ' E . no f- . T Tai fi ' 'i J V . , Q , A , .Vl. , V I 4 5. ' ' '.: :. 'R 9 ,,, ,QV - 'eil H-K' .ep ,L i 4 -3 T i i -V 1'9.' 'I , ', B' E :- .I f fr V. if in gi - - ' l' Q A 1-J T' l ' . ' F ' Q Q, xgfwe-, "' 3' V 3 3- , ' J"'f i' " C' X Q I' Q 0' iii, L ,W v iss V. 'T Ffa- 'I T ' W, I Q5 if-j :V i rgig, 1 lli, .ws t " , .' 1 Fi? Z'-l l 'T l ' Fl' TT? " ' u ' A' ' g ' 'L- il' ' , A f i .A -i ., 4 5" f . ,- f- - '- 0- 'r ' ., 2 4. V " '- fi' ' Q , . f . , V, - , . . . ., l V , L i, N -' " fic- I1 f N if' 'N' - .W ' ' i ' "wi : ". V 4 -V ' i ' ff' L 1-3, K. ' " "N ra N. H K' WJ P f 1 ':1:"' ll? , al A ' "E cw , Q . -ii i' ii- ' 1 A . I .f N ' , ii , il, ff , --A if . V . T :- psf-an 1" 'Q ir- L. T7 l H ' -4 g. ' 2 2 D In A 5' il'ii'7!5" :az K' T - .C . A. --c .L 73" - ,. ' w " Q 'vi H I 5 J VV' la V Bs zgl ff A Y , lu V ' X in A All " : as. " . ..'. ' N J '-, 1 A,. , ' ...J . W i 1 N J axis .9 x. . X' tr V ' - ' V ii Ah V. ii ski VV .15 Aa' - v - :'E ,:35'Q. lr E oi 1 ' ' vs V Sf .f s n no l ' 9- 2 iii 2: -az ll '-'Q 'W li i' 9 T' f, .. ""i'l"'g' fmr' Y L I ll l N 4.5.-'I' ES- l '. V ,we gi? , ga? 3? sophomores 22,35 K , 5M-71' 1, Ei 1, ' W ' ff Ti Linda Helm, Broken Arrow. Nursing: David Helms, Tulsa. I , ' , '- fl wx I X" V' Zoology: Bill Hemingway, Woodward. Land Management: ' A 1 ' - ' 5 '- ,U -. Tommy Henthorn, OKC, Accounting: Steve Hnelscher, Norman, ' Q 6 ' 5' ,I ' 'cs " " A A 4. Pre-Dental: Peggy Horton, Lawton. Medical Technology: Janice A :L ' Pl ' " -2.-A . 'Q TIF Huffman, Norman. Political Science, " 'Z' 1 . fx V 1,1 , , -' . X -.1 r ' 4 J,-i .mai ai Q J 1 - , " Vf' ' is 1-A . . , H , it . 5- I ' l 4 X ak- rj. A yy J, KA: ': Robert Hume, OKC, Accountingztlacquie Humphrey, Chickasha, . 3. V5 3 : ' 1: :R . 6- 1'-if i pa ' X M T. A ' Business: Paul Hunt, Edmond, Geophysics: Mark Husband, Elk ' l. ,V 7 H ' W ' I H V " A 'R' City. Accounting: Devereaux Jones, Broken Arrow. Finance: I " 9' ' ' f Q? I " 6 - - . G - 1 V-1: Suzette Jackson, New Orleans, Louisiana, Business: Jina Jacobi, "-4" . 1 L 't 'CL g -'E U ,nv , OKC. Letters. A . f if , , A ,X -f 05 . -' ful in Elf-' ,l 'lkwil ' E' '," 1 . A' ' 'J f 132-'Yi fir Fm""""' ang, if ' 17 1 - .- -- , , 5" 'Nl' 'V gl l 'V X Karey Jezek, Prague, undecided: Suzi Johnson, Ada, Fashion e .,. A 9. S Av -B A 1 rl I gg gg Merchandising: Diana Joseph, Sapulpa. undecided: Jennifer Just, , A 1 hw - "1 'T "' 4 Tulsa. Pre Med: Brenda Keeling, Claremore, Medical Technology: C7 1 - N 'f fs--9 - ,II 1 ' . X ' Deborah Kelsoe, Eufaula, Pre-Med: Paula Kemp, OKC. Phar- ! ,J --1' , . -' .- 'Rfk m559- I' f , . X. TF, - ' ' :Q N , - ' ' lg' 7' ' 7' E Fw' 5- 1,1 I Dina Kincaid,Tulsa, German: Fawn King, Enid. Nursing: William l' wl if if V, ' V Kluepping, OKC. Physics: Kim Kriter, Blackwell, undecided: i : lla. . r 3 P ,ht Russell Kulbeth, Norman, Public Relations: Mary Kumler, OKC. '- r - il 4' " "' , -3 1 r W' " I" s Advertising: Kord Kurisu, Honolulu. Hawaii. Architecture. i ' A ' - - . ' if ..- A . -'- X ' - - V ..- it - - r Y ' . ' xflll' I S ll .- fx .3 J ' ' 1 'lc QU .- ' I s in X to " ' ' a I Ed Kurtz, OKC. Architecture: Jannie Lancaster, Ada. Business: - 5 : . v 'ft K' H 'J' - 9 fm Thomas Landers, Marketing: Sherri Lauer, Granite, Education: I ,tdwi ,I-I Q 4 X A 59 Marvis Lee, Kailua, Hawaii. Business: Gil Lenker, Rockwell, H R gp r -i 13 i ' " " 3 vs. i I r X as 6- A Pharmacy: Dru Light, OKC. Accounting. f' fa' Lg .4 'r - 1- -5. , ca ': lil X I ' - A I , . . V' t f , l P 3. ,f , .J J y - ts 1 . 4 as ,E f .ie - .1 it Q I'-f A .ssl ..s Y ' ' X l'?1:k' 1 . E : :X Elizabeth Ladd. Chickasha, Business: Leanna Loftis, Holdenville. '. ' ' I, 4, uf -A.- Nursing: John Luke, Ada. Management: Robbie Lillard, Tulsa. ' Y ,- ml-i' ' undecided: Christy Lilly, OKC, Dental Hygiene: Felda Looper, '5 5 Q 15' l , ' "' ,HQ ' ' ,,, os In 2 I , U Mr 45" Miami. Political Science: Dan Lott, Bartlesville, Zoology. - .- f,x L " Q .. -,.- V "Y - .... -Q s f.. 1- .. l 3' csv J, 1-P ,- ' 15.1" ' C V ' , iff? ef 'f 1' 2' 14 " ,'i..Q' IA V A 'X , -fkxx f! ' ,V 1. ll 1 iw ff fx, W2 ij + I- V . 2 1 ,. I NIJ QS Q rw, I9 .1 - v ,1 8 ,A va T4 fi' , 4. +I' I 1. i . 'f "F-fn -. , lik V1 -V..- .,., .4- ,--. L... , F sl 1537 ' 7 1 - J. :L'. 'lgzwi .J ,jg Ly gggayu fi , -4 ' Q wJ, - Y ,url . PAV! Q 4 -N 21' ,.. N. fi: 5 . JJ: Hi 'S PM "ff: Qi ni-ff: F 1 A 'B .N-i '-J rw-f " ,- ifx-i 1- ., 5551, ll A . pfmnfrsr a . , ... ' . Est 2 -1- ' 42 as e 163 Vu VVV , 1. ,Keg gg -'r ' K 3" I' ,l , S R J" ' 'xwxx uw A -3 2- h I Q ll -f Q gg V. fc-Q H 1 V14-fs, ,L V VV ,V V V + A . ,t ,V X T., r'.?'.tVV J' l' l T:-Tlnll . 'I Prrv ' ' 'L-. T ' rr l -V. ', Ti V V 1 V "dl 1 ,ue A, U I " '. . l l t V , QE:-in . " 3 E .-if T. T ' ' B T S sophomores 0 Marsha Lowrie, Tulsa. Nursing: Rich Luedke, Garnerville, New York, Accounting: Steve Mahanay, Frederick, Petroleum Land Management: Nancy Malosky, Dallas, Texas, Broadcasting: Don Manson, Wichita. Kansas. Meteorology: Linda Marburger, Norman. Nursing: Janette Markes, Waukomis, Accounting. Jo Mathews, OKC. Nursing: Marilyn Maurer, Cuncan, Geological Engineering: Donald Maxwell, Pauls Valley, undecided: Karen Mays, Tulsa, Journalism: Daphne McClellan, OKC, Social Work: Katt McClung, Tulsa. Business: Lynn McDaniel. Tulsa, Psychology. Becky McDonald, Bartlesville. Physical Therapy: Karen Mclver, Tulsa. undecided: Connie McReynolds, OKC. Journalism: Marsha McRulz. Tulsa. Education: Claude Medearis, Norman. Political Science: Jerimiah Meyer, Muskogee, Professional Writing: Kathy Meyer, Muskogee, Anthropology. Ff7.V" T - lr " 5. in - -' lr ff-"l T3 if ff? it -T Doug Miller, Norman. Psychology: Marc Miller, Arlington, Texas. 3' 'uljlf ' , ' "Q V1 ' 4 'V V Accounting: Debbie Mitchell, Broken Arrow. Nursing: Robert , 4, Q, ' N r x ,ag V Mitchell, OKC. undecided: Denise Montelbana, Tulsa. Nursing: - " "i' -" -we 1. Q VV 'gt' - Richard Morgan, Holdenville. Business. ' ' es- - '- r -t' WJ: . flxys -f -. '+A t l Y ' T - - 'Z-'Sf - ' T . V nes:-.VVP: V T . John Morris, Lawton. History: Dale Moffett, Ardmore, Pre-Med: V ' ' if 7 ji 'V- Cindy Morphew, Enid, Social Work: Kelley Murchison, Plano: : l ' 7' V' A V 'fi tt' Texas. Physical Education: Gary Myatt, Altus, Business: Karen it 3 VQ V t 'V " , -- g - Mylelt, Frankfort. Kentucky. Music Education: Don Naifeh, Tulsa. 1 f.,,. V - 455, lq.., fg?Q. V Political Science. 4- 41,5 X r. i.. L -L tl 'Al - 'T . mr"f for 'f .gf LV V V '11 t - ,g Q . VV . f- ' ' l . l" ., I ir- -xf V -Vg l I , ' , Cf., r, , 45 ei ' f tr - .V - A . ur 511 V X V -. XL: TRIS' .J rl. is '5 , 1 Q.. .st mi Gerry Nathman, Tulsa, Business: Carrie Neal, Clarendon. Texas: Education: Cathy Nickels, Miami. English: Mike Niles. Norman. Public Relations: Barbara Norton, Lubbock. Texas. Broadcasting: Janie Oakley, Tulsa. undecided: Tim Oden, Altus, Journalism. o . 4 . 0 sophomores 3 QUI- 1 rf' x i xr'-'fi 9 1 'df' -ask lim of llw ,llzllrvlllfin igfifig ' 'T'-5555? P I.. -- , ity... i l Anne O'Grady. OKC. Anthropology: Karen Osborn, Tulsa. Dance: Kathy Osborn, Claremore. Accounting. Larry Owen. Lawton. Accounting: Brent Parket, Okmulgee. Business: Patti Parish, OKC. Journalism. Russ Patterson, Tulsa. Marketing: Joel Payne, Midwest City. Business: John Payne, Wewoka. Pharmacy. William Patterson, Tulsa. Zoology: Bonnie Peck, Shawnee. Psychology: Joe Pepe, El Paso. Journalism. Steve Percefull, Tulsa. Economics: Jim Peschl, OKC. En- vironmental Designz Gayle Pishkin, OKC. Psychology. Randall Polk, OKC. Zoology: William Pool, Del City. Education: Kevin Portz. Tulsa, History. David Potts, Okmulgee. Business: Martha Purl, Bartlesville. Ballet: James Rayburn, OKC. Business: James Reeves, Bethany. Music, Margaret Reeves, Bethany. Music: Lee Reynolds, Norman. Journalism: Charles Ramer, Medina. Ohio. Engineering. Vicki Redick. Wilmette. illinois. Pre-Med: Kathryn Ritts, Ft. Worth. Texas. Accounting: Hugh Robinson, Okmulgee. Business. Joe Rogers, Tulsa. Pre-Med: Paula Rogers, Tulsa. Education: Pam Roper, Tulsa. Nursing. -ot 42.51. 4 .- r-'li . 1 A41 1, .. , ' Ti : ' " t lffs-gf W. gf A 'Q V . ,Q " , , 1 -1 - lit? Q i r as .vi ii, y A -.Q r V pr 4 A ' s., . .N 21 V ...IQ in "1'Q . fy -. i . LL , R ses. it lA I ' Y- r 3' l VE 2 -es 5 S . I vp u-DL, 1 1 X? "ali . 'Y A wx V 17 . Q 1 1 U 'Y ' t 3, S. -rin ': '- 4 gi In A" Bl . P W lt' .:' . 1 -'.. , E ,. - ,f .i f xxvl ' af . ks -. L 1 I T.. ' ' .f ' l i M-M l. 'Q' Q V 'ro 5 'lx 'T' i V I-.-73. Q ti, l r ir, T64 . 1 A F -. ,-1-Y -Y i V .X 'ai 3' - ,, -1- X l .s . .421 , . H 4 ir ' Mr ' ty , l , 1 Lit J Y jk. A ,Q ' - l W .QI l ir kalifi :xg 'I' I A ,. X 'X 2 ., ' . . 1 , L .' l,iL,,r at V " l E ' 2 -1- , 'N .. ., .mil 1 ' fx ,- , . S T X X . s ff T 1 i f ' l i :fs ni V l at A ff- Q9 i I 1' 11- -I X i- ' W A kt X A lg i X 1' Q T' l 'E 4 'l , 4 f' it 'z lt . X '? '-- ,A ' ,X. i , J 5' . lil , ' ,H 3 5, ' Xl: Z 'S- 43? 5'5" R?-7 X X -1 X an 44 . as . W I he . A P F5-'TI'-'Tlx P 6 7 .I . ' -2-. is' - X rf' ' . . XMy, , 9qXXAX Xi. x X-A ' 5, 2 l 73 I J . X e fffx 1 X! X- il l fb li :XF Xw . -X ,X i' X X ,X ara g ii ' Q 3 ll F- . lf l li X lf f .l X - , A X . l gi: , 0 gy- 2X :XL -XX Q ,L , 'JL X .A-X Ai. ,. - -X. ' 'fs-:Q-'l 5 1, - ,S 7, l 4 kl' 'ff 'N - S '- V u .iw f 'E ,-, ev, in- ,, J 1 V X , s- . iii' ,Y .-.,X our gl Susan Ross, El Reno, Pre-Law: Becky Rowe, Duncan. undecided: Debbie' Rutherford, Norman. lnlerior Design. Evelyn Ryals, Muskogee, Nursing: Michael Sanders, Tahlequah, Music: Vance Sanders, OKC, Advertising, Selby Saxon, Norman. Pre-Med: Clyde Schoollield, Math: Mary Beth Schweer, Covington, Education. Lee Seegel, OKC. Nursing: Howard Sheets, Duncan. undecided: Sidney Schaefler, Pink. Animal Husbandry. Paula Sawyer. Norman. Nursing: Robert Streight, Okmulgee. Pre-Mecl: Nell Svoboda, Lisle, lllinois. Medical Technology. Trip Swain, Tulsa, Accounting: Karen Swanson, OKC. Math: Curtis Symes, OKC. Art. Ron Shepard. Tulsa. Philosophy: Sherri Short, OKC. Fashion Merchandising: Alan Simpson, Tulsa, Management. Neil Sisson, Blackwell. undecided: Jim Slemaker, Broken Arrow. Microbiology: Gina Smith, Lawton, Journalism. Pamela Smith, Lawton, Nursing: Phyllis Snoddy, Tulsa. Nursing: Chris Sparks, Norman, Business. Kay Spindler, Houston. Texas. Accounting: Bob Stayton, Tulsa. Accounting. sophomoreso ..-.-V--- i l Xf, miwmwaviniiwfmf ewiq i wv.. 'i y fm ..i -X v i QW X, Dau we i ell i Xie. 'u-.14 -ii, .. if... .,ig,:g,,, ,ij V -VL 'L ,551 L .,. ,J NJ? l f .. fe.- fi 1 gif . I . 4 , 1, .W if-. ,J 1' 1. limi I if tie: 0 sophomores Bob Stuan, Tulsa. undecided: Peggy Sugg, Tulsa, Nursing Business. Neil Swanson, Tulsa. Finance: Alan Synar, Muskogee. Ac' counting. Mark Talley, Okmulgee. Pre-Med: Barbara Tarpley, OKC. Accounting. Linda Tarpley, OKC. Dental Hygiene: Sharron Turner, Lawton. Dental Hygiene. Karen Tate, Sand Springs, Business: Julie Taylor, OKC. Anthropology. Kathy Taylor, OKC. Journalism: Jan Teel, Joplin. Missouri. Zoology: Mark Teter, Tulsa. Zoology: Diane Tchakirides. OKC. Advertising. Nancy Trapp, Midland. Texas. undecided: Ellwyn Thomas, Elk City. Engineering: Cynthia Thompson, Midwest City. Education: Pat Thompson, Garland. Texas. Dance. Victoria Tolson, Pawhuska, Education: Anne Van Nort, OKC. Fashion Merchandising: Vicky Vineyard, Lawton, Speech Therapy: Billy Ware, Ardmore, Law Enforcement. Cathy Warren, Dallas. Texas. Speech Education: Janet Warrick. Edmond. Nursing: Lisa Wasemiller, OKC. Nursing: Mike Waters, Davis, Pharmacy. Brenda Watson, OKC. undecided: Susan Wegener, Midwest City. Business: Cleve Welsh, OKC. Pre-Med: Don West, Del City, Chemical Engineering. Linda Westervelt, Tulsa. Business: Denise White, Sand Springs. Political Science: Mamie White, Tulsa, Psychology: Carla Williamson, Norman. undecided. Kathi Willis, Norman. Math: Linda Winchester, Clinton. Zoology: Cindy Winters. Poteau, Nursing: J.0. Wood, Chickasha. Geology. Anne Yarbeny, Norman. Dental Hygiene: Scott Yarberry, Houston. Texas. Engineering: James Yeatts, Pauls Valley. Business. Karen Young, Norman, Accounting. Sheryl Sullivan, Duncan. undecided: Randy Surtes, OKC. ll ?"fv T ': fa, gn 5 C--A C ' ' i' A I.:- N 1 it i' V K A 'F'-2' , , an - - '51 . ' it I Ti A Q7 fr' X, 'Qrtsag ii t ' ' A ar- 2 , 1. H1 Q' T J-l A R c , ,6- gf 1 5"" . 'nftl-1. .Iii "i' TE-Ll QU Al 6' 'J + T V if-we-S ,Q 4- l L "F " E- li X V I, iltlixxlheys pl V 1 AA ima- Ah, 'AV sf:-,fL . - HL X , J.: , , X , i A x ,: Q la S ' V -'. N 3 6- 1 fra' i ' e- x I, " . V' Y 'fif H i E A iLl'.f' A . T IIA iii, 7. 21, Fkf' 1. y j, F , I - : 'i ' : -.. fy , fr , Q, gg, .. it Eze ,-M 4, , ' V ,kgl . I ,. V i X , V , . I . . i' . 1 ,v- . i Q A KI! ' ty, 'K' . JR 3 -ix l Q... lllza--fall' ll ,f -f E 2.. CTZX- H Fi' ' Ex G . .Q Ig 41:-i ' U P 1 2 1. W, .-:U '41 y tftlil " " M?" A155 F? Q.-J unit? . it ... l 4 f li-t J AQ.. 1' -f - r . , a ' U j . x li Nl i' lx - Riga ' t. l R , - . , m ' I I ' 5 - Xu ., 1, F l figs on ff l V' J gi: .Ii if" -ff 1-e A v r P 'T fl' -r A 1 1 i 1 , T , .Z ., , , V, I . . X 6 . N -K , I: . 1j"' Y' ,. . if . fi 711 AA' sophomores 0 9 .Was 'ap A 553 f' H' A..." 4,3 1 jg' Q- ka 'Nh ," N ' S m tg? C . W .. - E m.-. - A I , . . - -- " I Trf' ml' -fb 'hh ' ' 5 X NA -,W X M, Nh g A vu.-'Ai 4' . . -f J,-4, ,. - . ' . tu AQ. A" g-.'-' v', Qziigiqb A -M, - ' . . ' - 1- 4. . "--, , -N V -fl.-LQ-'.'. ...S - '. ,.--..:. .V . , I, D 4 l.4L:Tx,g4z'n - ' 4. .au ,, --N4 4-Zz. - - r"W f- 7' ' . an . ,. ' . . ' , A- ,' ' --1. xg, A - - 2-.-ei-5 3- f ..'l4Hlig .Ek . ,',,' 6 w-'.--A: ' -vu , D xv ,- M- "1" ' ' ,U -vu., L,- . - A .. fA:,4 A ' '.,,,Q.s W --'- ffq .. ' 2, A T' M..-. I Y, 1 , 1. x KJ.: 4 X .- fr. " Nfl!! E?-'f4i3-Qf 4-is ,,-4 F4 .X ' rs-4,5-a-g.g .f-fig .Q-'wk ees gee ,ee Wifi? , I freshmen 1 Carol Adamson, Madill, Accounting: Jim Allen, Midwest City. , w, -- At ,Y 'f . ,- U Political Science: Ron Allen, OKC. History. Chuck Anderson, E ." -rv. 't 'lv .f T- r 'Ty ' ff ' Seminole. Physical Education: Kim Anderson, Dallas. Texas, f 'L " l 222 i 4 f i-lt l if undecidedg Phillip Applegate, Chickasha, Psychology: Julie 7.9 '3 Q '-7 1' l - '- 3? 4- Arringtnn, Canadian, Texas, Education. ' l' . .., , -y -- . 1 .f J' eff- Y' L. . 4 t , yi- J , ,f .Y if - . t., . 1 g N . me A ah A -ff ,:!.r.st . .- John Armen, Midland, Texas. Pre-Dentg sandy Austin, asf- ,, -V ff' .- .ix ' 3 Fr- 5- T . 'QT."" 3 M lv' f -7 tlesville, Education, Bill Bagley, Henderson. Texas. undecided: - .Sgr 4 , f t 5' 5 ' V A' ' ..,, ' Kenneth Bagley, Hobart, Journalism: Belinda Baker, Tulsa. TTT' gf V 5 B- I undecided: Stanton Ballew, Guthrie. Accounting: Jan Barrett, ' X, 'Z le '15 HF 'F 95 " I 3' 5- OKC. French. -tg -.- . . - , Q".x :lv . ' -' f: , Q A . i JL Q. 4,1 , I , J ,, -an j I J. . .Q 1. - ,4 X ' I A ,: 1-uf. - A new ' I ' Carl Barrington, Marlow. undecided. Kenny Basden, Norman, I . 'ffm ,l -Y ' I L V , V Engineering: Stacy Bates, Ponca City. Accounting: Kevin Bean, ' , i fl ' f ' ' St. Louis, Michigan. Geology: Neill Bear, Tahlequah, undecided: X X , A- ' I David Beasley, Tulsa, Meteorology: Debbie Beech, OKC, ' "-'T 1? 1 , in "- TZ.. 1: "' "' F21 G X i 2. Physical Therapy. , , ' ,. , l ,-. A, Qj-L Y, 5 g -Y 'iii le- A .leaf -"2"'f,. T A L A t 1 Mark Benge, Tulsa, Pre-Med: Jim Benninger, OKC. undecided: X 4'LI' i" .. V If ' - 3, Tl W 'v f-Y l V Lisa Benson. Texas, undecided: Robert Barry, Petroleum i ' ' V, XX ' J l. ' ,g"7 ' , ' Engineering: Robert Bibens, Norman. Pre-Med, Gary Badzinski, l lk'-it Q ' X ' Y- 2 Ph Enid. Psychology: Mary Bakunowicz, Rockford, Illinois. Phar- if " " 5,1 'LT' 3- L- t ' 4 -, K' "N '5- macy. I Q' QQ: l 54-'L , A . '- l E . V 1 l ' . -ry-fl P .- i . r e xi 1 HY KW . Y A ' X me .44 A .Aa A S time Linda Bateman, OKC, undecided: Brad Balke, Tulsa, Business: 'fr e F- T' ' V' "' .V ,H - Jeffrey Biggers, Tulsa, Pre-Dent: Eddie Birdshead, Anadarko, ' t . ,. I - 'Y I A , Pre-Dent: Mike Birdsong, Duncan. Management: Pamela N ne. A T J- 44- vg Blankenship, Del City, Chemistry: Roger Bonham, Tulsa, Ac- Q P- 9 'Z 1- " y Y i counting, 'Q .LF Q, ' . A " 3' M fi ' f A ' ,' . , 4 1 ,A . .-x I V B .- I- '-,ff I ,- - . Y af'-a.,JL lilu, R -4-ze J' f '--' " N' 1 44 iii freshmen 0 N' 'Q Peggy Bookout, Dallas. Texas, Spanish: Tim Bowlan, OKC, undecided: Elizabeth Bowman, Tulsa. Pre-Med: Franni Bowen, Carlsbad. New Mexico, undecided: Paul Boyd, OKC. Psychology: Steve Boyls. Tulsa. Business: Debbie Bradley, Tulsa, Business. Cindy Bradley, Drumright, Pre-Med: Roderick Bradway, OKC, undecided: Richard Brady, Gladstone, Astronomy: Barbara Braswell, Shreveport, Louisiana, Pre-Med: Tim Brauer, Chickasha, undecided: Kristy Breitenkamp, Enid, undecided: Becky Brewer, OKC, Medical Technician. Lisa Brock, Midland, Texas. Journalism: David Brown, Norman. Journalism: Jaci Brown, Garber. Speech and Hearing: Patti Brown, OKC, undecided: Laura Bryan, Rockford, Illinois. Medical Technology: Lisa Bugg, OKC. Ballet: Janis Bumpas, OKC. Fashion Merchandising. Jim Burdette, Broken Arrow. PreeMed: Jeanne Burnett, ldabel. undecided: Joel Busby, Chickasha, Aerospace Engineering: Kim Cain, Muskogee, Math: Linda Cantrell, OKC. Business Ad- ministration: Hal Cantwell, Tulsa, Psychology: Rick Cape, Tyler. Texas, Finance. Tommy Cargal, Blair. Business: Holly Carr, Austin. Texas. Zoology: Wendall Calvin, Houston, Texas. undecided: Parker Chapman, Tulsa. Pre4Med: Mitch Charloe, Miami, undecided: Bill Chenhall, Haskell. Pre-Med: Patti Cherry, OKC, Journalism. Martha Clark, Dewey, Business: Mark Clausen. OKC, Business: David Clay, Tulsa, Architecture: Jill Clements, Tulsa, Sociology: William Cochran, Dallas, Texas, business: Cathy Coffman, Pauls Valley, Speech and Drama: David Cobb, Norman, Pharmacy. T , t J , . ,,, Q: ,- 'S 1: 3, N- 1 , 15: 1-gif at it X. A . -1' . J' Y iv,' , - at 1 Ah A .. 4 sf f at ,fi i X4 B' ' I "- ' t' I -if' - F3 rr.: Q .J y-fi? , ,sg-. ' D , ' 17' , ff?-Ex,-.fin .nl - -,Af'ty., rt. f K ' r , i U 'Vi T .. - 1 J 1 c r 3 2 Q l . . -v .- V 'H Jia 6 3, a m . - .. . I- -K RQ if A f 1' Q ,, ir -4 .f -. i2 A .. t I H L 1 l V'f'f g l .. t .-f - . I ' wegsj.. , ' 1: if ,It 5-i 'I' 1, ,P ,.- ai' QW 4 , , Mideast -. 5' - r 'W' J - I at , t -ef , .ct ik ' 'l -' as ' 1 9. ' 'E , Q X Jr- K '7 ,Z E. X Ag- ,ag A -W g K I , .- . 'Q id M .-1 --il- 'v - n - fam- its J iff' 4 ' I, W' . ff- 1 f j -war , r l , . T it e F e ,. " 5- 'lin' . 'Sv ' "R 'A I- Q as ' "W ' ' P95 f " eil X -,SM W it A W .',, ' 'if' YA A if L-A V ri A 'V 1 ., ,Q 'gi '-il K.: gil? 'illlfflygfiill' n.,.,.'- ,,,, A ,LI Ai Li- New 9 freshmen Laura Cohen, Birmingham, Alabama, undecided: Rita Cole, Dewey. Business: Debbie Collins, Moore, Accounting: Linda Coltrane, Chickasha. Business: Natalie Conrad, Muskogee. Zoology: David Cook, Laverne. Business. Kathryn Cook, Anadarko. Nursing: Ann Cooper, Norman. Physical Therapy: Julie Cosentino, Overbrook. undecided: Patricia Cowart, Miami, Florida, Nursing: Susan Craig, Midland, Texas. Journalism: Maureen Crotty, Okmulgee, Pre'Med. Cynthia Crowl, McAlesler. Art: Thomas Crowell, OKC. Den- tistry: Susan Curry, Tulsa. Broadcasting: Kathleen Cusack, OKC. Pre-Med: Janet Dabner, Tulsa. undecided: Janet Davis, Norman. Pharmacy. Mike Davis, Seminole. Engineering: Rod Davidson, Enid, un decided: Teresa Davidson, Bartlesville. Architecture: Jody Deacon, Pauls Valley, Zoology. Lawrence Dickerson, Poteau. Political Science: William Diggs, Sapulpa, Pre-Med. James Dismukes, Tulsa. Engineering: Bronwyn Dollins, Hart- shorn. Nursing: Michael Donohue, Hurst. Texas. Math: Paul Dorsey, Bartlesville, History: Jim Doughty, Tulsa, Business: Fred Dowell, Muskogee, Psychology, Patrick Downes, Tulsa. undecided: Bob Dukes, Tulsa. Pre-Dent: Rick Duvall, Tulsa, Management: Gail Durrenherger, Tulsa, undecided: Diane Dycus, OKC. Political Scienceg Linda Earley, Bartlesville. Art Education. Leigh Ann Ebert, OKC, Pre-Med: Eddie Edwards, Amarillo, Accounting: Jennifer Emde, Perry, undecided: Gracie Evans. Houston. Texas, Business: Nancy Ewing, Purcell. Sociology: Tina Farha, OKC, undecided, ,ff 2 ll? T P 'gl l F1 5 -1 f: - Hy ,, R ' l, 'kgs - ' :- . . 1 u " 5- ' ' IA ' l ' Pix Q ' v . - il f . l e--"l"P fs" T 2 gi Q me XE 3 . ' W s gg, r -I. gg, 6 J . 1 ' -. 1 a- Yr 1 . ' x. W W' r' P -spa 7-q i . 'dit j -JJ T T "' T' P '. -- ' l ' 6, -as 'DL' 2. Q- A. 5 Y 'Y were A- Q15 43, ',v'1'f ' ': fl .T ,, A ' -4 . K- 'r '-i 41- 1-K -. L' T V' .l h - '- fa .' T , xl, f' ii A il , , Q ,K , 1' 'WF 5: a ' ,- , ' ""v Q: 57 " 2, I 'S ' xg r ll l 1 51251 X! 2 4 .T , ' I ' 1 ,N f it ' ' ' 1 . " . , t- 1 5-4. X 5.41-s Ast '-it-:iia ff - 1 P Y' V' T ' . l 7, rf, .,..'-- ,Q-as 'af x I Y ' W 'J if H I - A . . i A inf ,f A.: . -1, . T J ff s i' ' rr -Y N , Y- , " ' . ,, A' ' - i TI r. .F 4'4 ' lrg to 5: A Q 2 'll rl- 4 Q9 , 1- Tl! ' P' Pi - , fwfr 'K i f fi f 1 1 . g :I 4 l. S, i, Y vf - ., Q ..- N ,., S- -'- er. Q , 6- , 6 H .- A 'rx i :,. .fi - 'li .. .-,. .. Ari .L ' M rl fvwt .ff t r., - Q x e All l l VI K Ay. ling. ' ii" ' X5-of 'f ,.,,, ,iw . . is ,rr li '44lMT?LT'!!5"71l. A V l ' 2 ww' A .- .. .4.wif'b' -' - u 1. i ' ...J . - ,. 1 ,fe Y: 'lips 3 il X ,I Krug X Q, - 5 ac. ll 2 GI Y i ,,, r V Q, 5. . ,, .4 M I l ... V12 ' ,fi :aff if . ,g , , , N ' 'l' AK :Tri - ..'!-1 - phil A '21 ,r V. , . Yi ' fl 1 'i l H.: W U Y X T -VV: lp V is T' l .A , , I wr' , 1 l. T 2 M 3- l . ILA vsp l-- " 'MH - QF!" 'W T Qihq - it H- 1 my M Y 'W ' , " . W Q Ei z?" ' , ' 36 . X N -I . iz. fa it tt T eb E . - V 4 " 'vi : . V Y f ZX i ' l.. Ja , VV in .V -. -V ., ' Pi N V -I af- 'val , : V t V - - V ig. iq-,Q f Q na? .nit .,.- W y I v al. A ,X K+.-"T iii , 'j l , , - . ,,jf.,Y,,, -34 , -4- I. x w '- ' Y f'3 ,Z V J... ',. i . F X, '. ffaiqjaiff V A . m , Q u. nh il i 571' - T25 l IL ' -i f' , Y ff K' . . U . 1 . i"""l7 ' -idk . V. i T -":..53:f Fi fi ill . YT ' P P ' ' ' "fi, " r ,La ' 6 . is if D- ,F 5 'U df. I ' YY, V V, ,' ' .. r 4V X ' - . 1---1 , i . - -r lik Ja - xt .4 i y ff? ,,. -- i i l W ,, . . 1 .1 l . V i'l"'.,VV i K V.V- t , ' ' - , -.. , Q -e , 1: :fi -5, N '- M, V 7. '. i .,. V h i ie, vi, M K ':--4, 5. f " '- fi J Sli e ct. K ' ' , .' ' ..Lffie l Ai H l . 'Si ' im. , freshmen ' Becky Feldner, Tulsa. English: Bob Filgas, Tulsa. Pre-Med: Marlon Fisher, Mountainburg. Arkansas: Pharmacy: Randy Foraker, Moore. Nuclear Engineering: Kevin Fox, Tulsa. An- thropology: Dana Francis, Norman. Advertising. Barbara Franklin, McAlester. Dental Hygiene: Karen Franknecht, Houston, Texas. Physical Therapy: Nancy Fulmer, Holdenville. undecided: Ann Gable, OKC. French: Raymond Gahan, OKC. Engineering: David Gamble, Pawhuska. Pre-Med. Elena Gamble. OKC. Physical Therapy: Keith Gardner, Ard- more. Biochemistry: Lanna Gardner, OKC. Nursing: Chuck Garrett, Tulsa, Pre-Med: Timothy Garrett, Mannford. Pre-Med: Dan Gary, Denison. Texas. Chemistry. Karen Gattis, OKC. Accounting: Jonna Geitgey, Jet. Pre-Med: Brian Geister, Tulsa. Pre-Med: Gavin Gerondale, Pryor. Pre-Med: Peggy Gillespie. Enicl. Pre-Med: Jimmy Givens, Frederick. Chemical Engineering. Roxanne Gocke. OKC, Engineering: Laura Godfrey, Salt Lake City. Utah. Education: Pete Godfrey, Madill. Business: Kent Goff, Norman. Business: Mike Gracie, Star City, Arkansas. Pharmacy: Stephen Graeber, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Engineering. David Graham, OKC. Pre-Med: Ron Graham, Tulsa, Pre-Med: Mark Green, Hampton, Virginia, Journalism: Lyn Greenamyer, OKC. undecided: Tim Gregg, Enid. Journalism: Barbara Grey, Midwest City. Art. Brad Griffin. Barllesville. Architecture: Ann Guinn, Tulsa. Pharmacy: Steve Gutherie, Norman, Engineering: Ann Hall, Tulsa, undecided: Sandra Hall, Tahlequah, undecided: Susan Ham, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. - freshmen Rick Hans, Altus, Television Journalism: Annette Hanson, Tulsa Pharmacy: Connie Hamer, OKC, Journalism: Ellen Hatcher: McAIester, Political Science: Debbie Hays, Tulsa, Vocal Music: " Gregory Hays, Fayetteville. Arkansas, Business: Richard Hayter, Tahlequah, Astronomy. Danny Heatly, Lindsay, Accounting: Linda Hecker, OKC, un- decided: Marsha Heins, OKC, undecided: Denise Henning, OKC, Nursing: Doug Hensley, Tulsa, Business: Rita Herlihy, Enid, ' undecided: Carol Herndon, Tulsa, undecided. Hap Herndon, Tulsa, Aerospace Engineering: Mary Herndon, OKC, Art: Nancy Herndon, Chickasha, Nursing: John Herrington, Ada, Music Education: Douglas Hillshafer, OKC, Physiology: Mamie Hickerson, Altus, undecided: Lisa Hicks, Lawton, undecided. Timothy Hightower, OKC, undecided: Cindy Hill, OKC, Fashion Merchandising: Douglas Hillshafer, Norman, undecided: Myron Hilton, Great Falls. Montana, Business: Ron Hipp, Edmond, Political Science: Debbie Hixson, Tulsa, Accounting, Robbi Hobbs, Norman, Art Education: Ross Hodges, Tulsa, Pre- Med: Mary Hoff, Tulsa, Dental Hygiene: Joan Hogan, Tulsa, Pre- Med: Dennis Holdsclaw, Moore, Art: Tommy Hopkins, OKC, Business: Robbie House, Tulsa, Political Science. Ed Howard, OKC, Journalism: James Howard, Norman, Are chitecture: Margaret Howard, Bruce Howerton, Tulsa, un- decided: Tom Hudlburgh, Norman, undecided: Patricia Hulsey, Broken Arrow, Pre'Med: Mark Hurd, Muskogee, Radio and Television, QQ' rin ,,E1kili"7 l I . u :ix ' .1 ,I za ,z l 'x -,-" fit. 1-, mr---f N . ,.x,' gi ai i Il I AIII I 6 A da -Qi 3 an c -- T' iw 415. .rg ' e .- . it i ,TT ' 7 - fu i 1 ,, 7' ii L' -me T l is . wi. . 1. in - ii" Y i ' df-92: se .21 N1 last- 02 A l .. ,. -1,11 Nut' , i .f " ifliia . 5 FE . . 1 ' , A .A ' f' i -12zf:5i'f2m'.ii.1t-11 5533 .Liar .,,., - PTT Y . I ' 1 ' l , E l W ,WW I-.FI I II I ' ' ,I I 1 ' miri 'l lwdf : if os 'Cl '. - ' 1- T' l .S W" -ll .- I ,, I I , I I A ' . f T Ja.. " s .4 71552 l e - if T 'F i .cf . I I II -., , , ,. 85 'zf I fn j "'I 'kr qs. 2 S ',""s, .1 -431. fi' Q , .vg -- , .Q f Ii 'v, I TIF' I if " ,I-X, V 4 vi V' I V i . W -, A 1 rriifa T f rf -1 2 ':. ll, l A In N A ,Img az, s. E -,- . . .' ' x- f ' 1. gm . ' A :QQ . .4 - ,Lg -4' . vf ,xi T'- X A N.sE: mnr'a 0 ...fr xv y I ,fu 1 7I Ia 'YI I - I I IA V- as-:'T IA- I H A ' .- f l 'il - H lv ,I Q Q II, dt t I I ? an. av .4-23' . I . 1- . 'L T T is . T ii 1. j -A- ' .A ff 1 I 'i 1 i ' , ' ,A , U ff, H gil -3 A-4 l l- r-"Milli -z: . -v 'vs . i W Qu ,rw K , .Iv -I l -' 4. i -- r M -5 r M is ,f il Q .a .r " 3 as , 'T f xi fi ,A n, or , Tx "V ' J ' gt ' li jf X' " ' ,ffg" ',-1 J of f i.. ' ' l' K 4 Q' Q 57 "I 1, ' 'E s' ' M y -. 4. A 'vi as ,-- ' - J .t f ,SE .A .f . 4, .. :, " 1-1 5" s Q fig. A -5 A, N 1 A Ll fl' . .- gifs?" T 4, il' ' -J H .,, ' 1 " , - QXBRRL-Q' A mf . 5 . A ' 5 ' G, VG. ' A6 'i .'v,.2-ag, ,ar-1-, I- , -I xl- ,r LT ' ,c in , ' 1 1 'V X i 5 . 1 , ' X j .fc 1. L "ill 2 - ' 'iw V ,fi ' li I' 1 ,5 1 .J x '3 4: N 'Q I TTT .T 'x A Y I I .-' , vi , tl. , .: V . . ' NJ' Qi lap . P. 41. f"', " 'XZ with , Z -, 'A .- 1 i ,' . 1 , -9 V l ' AE .Ji T K I- ""' il 'H Ak f' X freshmen! Diane Hust, Sallisaw, Journalism: Vicki Hutchinson, OKC, undecided: Sandra laiennaro, Tulsa, Business, Frances ln- derrieden, Naperville, lllinols. undecided: Ronnie lngleman, OKC, Engineering, Jlm lnskeep, Enid, Accounting: Mark lsom, Moore. Engineering. Glenna Jackson, Altus, Accounting: Tom Jackson, Tulsa, un' decided: Ted Jacobs, OKC, undecided: Mike James, OKC. Business: Amy Jenner, Norman, Accounting, Walter Jenny, OKC. Journalism: Jana Jobe, Norman, Physical Education. Glen Johnson, Weleetka. Pharmacy: Karen Johnston, OKC, French: Karla Jollief, Tulsa, Chemistry: Betty Jones, Tulsa, undecided: Krista Jones, OKC. PreAMed: Pamela Jones, Eufaula, Physicians Associate: Vanessa Jones, Altus, Physical Education. Camille Lauth, OKC, Fashion: Jay Lunger, Norman, Business: Bill Kaufholz, Arcola, Pennsylvania, Architecture: Marie Kautz. Sea Brook. Texas, Accounting: Mary Kennedy, Bartlesville. Nursing: Andrew Kidd, OKC, Petroleum Land Management: John Kimball, Bums Flat. History. David Kirkpatrick, Tulsa, Engineering: Karyll Kiser, Midwest City, Physical Therapy: Michael Kitchens, Tulsa, Political Science: Stanley Kleinsteiber, Pryor, Engineering: Carolyn Klewer, Norman, undecided: Steve Kellmorgan, OKC, undecided: Phil Kramer, Weatherford, Business Warren Krugar, OKC. undecided: Diana Kuhlman, Altus, Journalism: Paul Ladner, Fairview Heights, lllinols, Arts and Sciences: Cindy Lambert, Richardson, Texas, undecided: Russell Lilly, OKC, undecided: Brian Lindsay, OKC, Accounting: Lori Larson, Rockford. Illinois, undecided. if 'freshmen af, 1 , sf' '1- --'f5gg,f1 gl-. sf . fl '- "'-5 " . Q, .H . Vg 'HPS' .L-rf'-1f'e1'i"'9'f'-'A' ., . ff'?"P -i.:Qwff 5511431 , 'ai T4if.'i4g1iQ-Affh '13 F ' "Tim .w:f'3P5s.1'1if' fx fir? N gf.: 45,5 '-5 4"- .f+3zCfQ:v'x if.2+,'i ' N Q - f N 4 ,e' . ' .iw ,.f we -'TJ -L - , .1 ll, :HJ ,iq-LK -3 .1 U-'J HK fr- 3' a -'fu 51-V in .pp A rfffvrr-.' H- rr, ' yr- if ,, . 1 ,.,, -..1. 4 .,,,-g,:.,,,4ff- --1 -K. ' , F 'Q E 5 ,L :LQ-1 - .,K x, 3-s -,-mv .. 9 X L, 5' 'I ,vw lm .' V., A -, fi. if , V M1145 ' 10 Q? " Ir " w tf - X ,jg ' Y ,Ji s" -.Lf l fggsxf. ' Q. .. ,, , ' tx "TW -f ' iz, i 952. L A . 31,5-3-N. .K A T -Q.:-" .' T' ' ' ' l ':.f.-f55l. Qffiegllii? 'fans -fa f .- Sefsigt at 3, 'fx we ?-J A, i 1 x N Vsyiai , . , 1 ,.H,R-My 1-... ,. wh . a"Qt,,"f6,f2.: ,,s,4jA1"',QiT-"' Q , , -angle: +1459 1- A. ,e . 1 fat- " - W " ' N ' -'. '. 7' - . -L." .. J!" 1-1 if N - 'Q , , ,.: u' '-7 , - . W" ,nw -. , fs i sf . X fer' '-. - A 4,,. ',. J.,-gslnf 434 .N ,,.... Q- A, - .-,,,,,.,,j.- Nm., 3. .HTF Q :Q 'af--iyiw .- elif?-.1.Q'f,,Wi ,f-,.,.: ,J 'S ' ': 2 - 5b'1-31.21, 11231 --' W --N1 T T. .ww 4,: Hx . liflrs X-Fx 4: .' . '4i35 of me -' yu gs 'fi 'fr' .G V: 'TQL-.g Lliiii-1 24, ' I Pam Lathrop, OKC, undecided, Monica Lawrence, Okemah Advertising: Dennis Lewelling, Tulsa, Business. Kathy Lindgren, Miami, Florida, Business. Brooks Lindsey. Tulsa. Music: Randy Linville, Pampa. Texas, Zool0QV: Eph Lobaugh, Tulsa, undecided. Kenneth Long, OKC, Business: Sid Long, OKC. Accounting: Don Longcrier, Austin, Texas, Engineering. Michelle Lott, Norman, Medical Technician: Cindy Loving, OKC, undecided, Jenny Lowe, Midwest City, Business. Neil Lynn, OKC, Pre-Med: David Mahvi, Charleston, South Carolina: Ted Malmberg, OKC, Business. Robert Malone, OKC, undecided: Scott Malowney, Tulsa, Chemistry: Kim Marks, Norman, Sociology. Darla Martin, OKC, Business: Mary Martln, OKC, Political Science, Pam Martin, Los Altos, California. Kim Massey, Seminole, Ballet: Sue McCaslin, Hartshorn, Nur- sing, Judy McClendon, Tulsa, Nursing, Mark McClintock, Moore, Accountingg James McCormick, Tulsa, Pre-Medg Steffi Moon, Ponca City, PrefMed. Kathy Moyer, OKC, Physical Therapy: Suzanne McCombs, Houston, Texas, English: Randy McConnell, Springhill, Louisiana, Political Science, Phillip Lewis, Tulsa, Chemistry: Rick Liester, Tulsa, undecided: 'Fi ' ' bxdl 'g,- ,X 'X N 7' 'T 'T ' 'tl 2 , 'iii'-' V 471 75 N -.. in V , i . x - AL J. , r' K' , V3 .. T T . Y , "- . ' 4, I CT! i eff 7 in " . Ll - , ' r -Qs! Fr' ' .35 ine, 'Z5 I "df-QT ggi, ,?," ahh Yak I Y ,J dn I 'seziaf A gh k fly ' 1 L 2 .- 8 'ir JA. fv- l .N -L U Ii: I l Ll ff? V W -H. inn i L. .- 9. l -' N 41 nt. il - . ' - ,, , .. if 1 , ,, 'A Zllll' vb- lbiszgil l l in r A . K H Vs W 1: c g gs 4 .., ,TQ .. ll- ff.-'s l , " 114 X wt 97 " 1 . ' M- "T 43" W N MJF ' 2. -7. 'S g, e. .3 ' X 'f r . W ,S X -J 45, 411.1 . , I I .H ia I is l I7 Q . ' A " 551 l A ia Q - I -El ' T T C' T , " T 2 na X , ... ff- an A f f -E 'Q TQ "':. jig-':q'?""' H H T ,Hu-V ,al " 'bu-hr. Fr af Y JW., P , C+' I-.-f :rs Vi e w K, f -1- f A - - H - 3' ,. VANS. A.. I -, ,Y if-.:,?',1 l, . 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It Y Xa ,S 1 A , ,FF QQ T ., f .f' I .Y , it 7 A ' . . I s 1. A t 1 A WV. - H J freshmeni Cheryl McFerron, Tulsa. undecided: Mark McGee, Norman. Business: Larry McGill, Tulsa, undecided: Kelly McGugan, ljloldenville. Business Education: Doug McHard, Tulsa. Business Administration: Kelly McKay, Tulsa. Business: Terra McClendon. Tulsa. Dance. Rick McNabb, Durant. Journalism: Bob McNellis, Norman. Business: Karen Merriman. OKC, Nursing: John Meyerson, OKC, Petroleum Land Management: Debbie Miller, Duncan. undecided: Rick Miller, Durant, Architecture: Mark Mindeman, Tulsa, Business, Mary-Kaye Mossiant, OKC. Business: John Molson, OKC. Engineering: W.R. Moon, Chickasha. Political Science: Kathy Moore. Tulsa. undecided: Mary Moore, Okmulgee. Pre-Med: Michael Moore, OKC, undecided: Craig Morgan, Tulsa, Business, Marvin Morgan, Altus. Accounting: Mary Moreland, Bismarck. North Dakota. Dance: Lew Murray, Tulsa, Pre-Med: Lee Ann Myers, Shatteck. Speech and Drama: Bruce Nacci, Norman, Business: Bryan Neal, Tulsa. Business: Phillip Noland, Ardmore. Pre-Law. James O'Bannon, OKC, Business: Barry Oyler, Tulsa. Ac- counting: Bruce Palmer, Okemah. Physics: Michalle Palmer, Pryor. Engineering: Bruce Parker, Okmulgee, Business: Dee Ann Parker. Guthrie. Business: Patti Parker. Ada, undecided. Georgette Patak, Perry, Psychology: Mark Patterson, Alexandria, Virginia, Engineering: Sherri Patton, Tulsa, Business: Paula Payne, Del City. Nursing: Greg Pearl, Camillus, New York, Pre- Dentalq Tim Patterson, Business Management: Brian Pierson, Country Club l-lills. llllnois, undecided. John Piper. Rapid City, South Dakota. Engineering: Pam Preston, Bartlesville. Dental Hygiene: Susan Price, Barrington. Illinois. Modern Dance: Jim Purcell, Wagoner. History: Rhonda Perrin, Dallas, Texas. Drama: Phyllis Petkoff, Lone Wolf, Dietetics: Robin Pierce, OKC, undecided. 'freshmen Pam Pierson, Tulsa, Pre-Dental: Paulet Pittenger, Tulsa, Piano: Alan J. Pitts, Duncan. Electrical Engineering: Kellie Pitts, OKC undecided: Patrick Plumb, Tulsa, Engineering: Gina Portwood, Snyder. undecided: Debbie Powell, Hollis, Pharmacy. Janna Powell, Guthrie, Accouiing: Kevin Proctor, El Reno. Pre- Nled: Dick Pryor, Norman. Business: Anne Pundt, Tulsa, Business: Bob Purgason, Tulsa. Engineering: Darien Quattlebaum, England. Early Chilhood Teaching: Bill Queen, Tulsa, Engineering, David Rainbolt, Shawnee. Finance: Stuart Rains. Tulsa, Ac- counting: Porkie Randall. OKC. undecided: Michael Ray, Duncan. Engineering: Skip Ray, OKC, undecided: Lisa Reagan, OKC. Voice and Piano: Lisa Reames, Guymon, undecided. , nf ,i Q !Q,Q'Q ' ' -'er Q ' 4- .qs .6 1. 2 Q Q, 6 QS i Q, --L. ,A U , , .. ., , Q Q li: Q " Q 4, - 1 -f. . 'uma' lxf i- ,W , ,. ' 1:4 . - ,. i ,, eg ' Q .Q : ,J --.f I Q QQQ . , - , -. - . H: s , ll'-Y ' ,. Q -Q . QQQ ., . , Q ,QQ ..QQQQ. . ,Q Q I f i W A v Q 1 QQ 'if qt, 3 1- x 'R gg -l Q-f - i lf 2 :L Qa Q4- 1'iQ Q '.JQ. .rg,Q,!QQ ' ' , f", LL i .v ij , gi f ., " -' 0. ' - 'Ja 1 is 5 ' '- I 1- AA f-' T. ff- if-W . V -- .... .. , Q, 'Q.QQ WQ , QQ,QQ Q ...T gg . Q ,.,.,LQ Q . Qi, i Q ,,.. K, . .1 X i , 4 , Q -Y Q Q :Q ' Q . l R Q ' Q QQ " 1: I V'-Fly 'T li l 3,3 H l A. T. it as ,tgp ' XJR 4' l ' . 1' P: fx :Q"':.f -A-in Q I It A TT, . QQ...-...L.,u .YL ' ' ' if . , .,:..i '-' ' Q 85353551 ' . .-in 5' ' .' M. -l-'Q',.1..aq!l:x: 1" 'iii-ahh: QQ ,Q , UQ , . .-.-IH Eddie Reeder, Tulsa, Business: Nancy Reeves, OKC. Dental Hygiene: John Renner, Norman. Pre-Med: Hal Revelle, Ardmore. Biological Sciences: Richard Rhea, ldabel, PreflVled: Harriette Ray, Fort Worth, Texas. Ari History: Michael Ray, Duncan. Engineering. Davey Roark, Midwest City. Pharmacy: Donna Richardson, Moore. Journalism: Nan Richison, Muskogee, Nursing: Bob Riddell, Tulsa, Marketing: David Rippee, Wichita. Kansas, Pre- Dentistry: Allan Robbins, OKC, Engineering: Dawna Robertson. Midwest City, Business. Chris Rojas, Altus, Physical Therapy: Randi Rowe, Tulsa, un- decided: Chester Rowland, Westerville, Ohio, Business: David Ruble, Tulsa, Chemical Engineering: Steve Rugeley, Norman. Pharmacy: Cindy Ruhl, Durant, Pharmacy: Alan Salmon. Lind- sey. Law Enforcement. A A-t-f-51" l' Q. ' Sf' X: 1 Q Q, ,QQ ff rn- ' l ' N ' -,. Q ,, f i Q A i G- 5. if ' W ' , -- , 1 . 1 f' I 'R LQ l ' i . ' , 2 , " f i -' is ll, : ' Yi' in . ,fy Q 'z ., 9 ... -5. Q Gr fm ' Q' Xa -. . . ' fi 'S' 5' 1. 'Y , - . rs ' I' i. J T. 2 ,F-' . lt' ., l' A N 'A' l n il 1 Qi, 7-:Q ,. Q- , effing 5 ,IQQQQZQQ 1 ,yt QQ gg g -. if -tele J :J fi , 4, ' ' , ' , H- ' ' 2 'Y ' ' "' Q' J ' x .il ' Na- - ...fy 1, uw s . BL .... - - , P?-L A A .+- wr fn.', T as - freshmen 0 .gf A ggi- Y, -fi .- ..:.4li1fv-ll' 'il - 3f',T':Ll 06,1 -,t,.,1 ,, wtf. .Q -tlzssrfif E51 w -1- . ' ' gait' Q -jx... . . f- . ,.r R . H V '.-.cgi 'f iz.. X, "3 ,,,-. 25" ' . In rl "Qld, r'--I,-, , .- 'U .. tr 4- .. 71.0. .,X .. their .tu -.L s I l i, X ...rf -, .4 y'l 95, -it as-7 I , ,, . 159- r ' ' T 1 qj.. 4, ' 1. T T. T i Irrhs K ,s-,vi " t 1 T... . - 1 1 AT .li -. tv- . ' A In-A 4 . ,in if pf - :Els M ' fs . .vg -'r -l ' 5' 47, AL ' ., , ., -r-, X -3.13 .2 rf' - .a Nl i Bl Ap,Ii5?f83. W , t, .r 4 . P vt f i . t f , .Z f 11, Y: 1 . . - .. - 1 r, ,lil iii gulf' P2 '7 1 , st: J , -w A .fag 'Q ', L . ' lg R ' ' to , I ' . L ff . 'ef Al L VV, Warren Sanders, OKC. undecided: Peter Sangirardi, Brooklyn, New York, Accounting: Pam Savera, Altus, Business: Phyllis Sauls, OKC, Journalism: Michelle Savage, Hartshorn, Ac- counting: Stauffer Neal. Norman. undecided: Burle Steelman, OKC. Pre-Med. Janet Stolhand, Ponca City. undecided: Shelly Sublett, Muskogee. Music Education: Brian Sullivan. Norman. Business: Mike Schween, Tulsa, undecided: Rick Scott, OKC, Business: Robert Scybist, OKC. Journalism: Larry Scale, Tulsa. Radiologic Technology. Lori Sellers, OKC, undecided: Mike Sewell, Tucson. Arizona. Architecture: Robin Shadid, Altus, Speech Therapy Sam Sheets, Enid. Accounting: Elizabeth Sheldon, Bartlesville, Voice Per' formance: William Shirk, Tucson. Arizona. Political Science: Bransford Shoemake. Tulsa. Business. ff-61' t, . .. .. H , Fw' X - l" .Eg ,N . "r, " ' X , .. ' ff. Paul Snedeker, Chickasha. Chemistry: Kathy Snook, OKC, X' l will--V t' ' Y' fl NX r' " undecided: Debe Snow, Ponca City, Art: Robert Sorrels. Ed- -Agr 5, V -A ,H ix 3: 1. 4, - , A h' ' mond. Engineering: Lloyd Spraggins, Jackson, Tennessee. Pre- , L -1 4 I fb." 5 1, A I V X " " Law: Karen Springer, Norman. Journalism: Suzanne Stamper, l, 6-' I 't or 3' gl 1 '- ' ' -f - ' l . Hugo. Medical Technician. X ' A l l ' 1 tl N, , , A , f ll 4 N. , A ' , iz -f 5 i , ,,- -N 41 9 I vi. :J 4 i . li ' . lr! - l - , in - ' 'TLT' , ' " ' x r ' l l V' - ...I l. . Ken Shouse, OKC. Engineering: Kem Shrum, Merced. California. . - V ' r - 5' undecided: Mary Ellen Simpson, Del City. Medical Technician: 3.',1., :, ,il 5. r- 2 2. I 3 f Swat .J in V" Michele Sleem. OKC, undecided: David Sliel, Tulsa. Business: 75 Q K . . H 'X A David Smith, Norman. Business: Patrice Smith, Lawton. -1 A f A4 ' ' K ' if 95. 1 Education. .fi it T' T is T T JP ' l . f - , .V V is 'iff ' 1' ' '1 r '-1 T - . ri., , . ' " : ' . ,,-. are ,K .. 5 'ff Platt mf' -ky ? , :gif .J, 2 . , .:.tr'v.' ' ' A A . Us i " in tif :Q A , X rg , .13 in 3,-8.1 ill? ' freshmen Nancy Starks, Stillwater, undecided: David Stein, Birmingham. Alabama, Business: Susan Steiner, Bartlesville. Education: Mary Stephenson, Harlshorne. Physical Therapy: Jo Stewart, Tulsa. Inhalation Therapy: Mark Stillwall, OKC, Pre-Med: Diana Storm, OKC. undecided. Mike Sullivan, Tulsa, Business: Pam Sullivan, OKC, Art Education: Mary Summers, Carnegie. Business: Maria Tully, El Reno, Letters: Kenneth Tackett, Pampa, Texas. Computer Science: Mike Tarpley, OKC, Engineering: Maria Tasi, Springfield, Missouri. Journalism. Tracy Traverner, Bartlesville. Journalism: Vicki Tebow, OKC, Business: Mark Thetford, Tulsa. Pre-Dent: Mary Thomas, Tulsa. Banking: Phillip Thomas, OKC, Engineering: Susan Thomas, Pawnee. Business: Jayne Thomison, Shidler. Engineering. Michael Thompson, Garland, Texas, Engineering: Paul Thompson, Ada. Engineering: Carlene Thrasher, Del City, Physical Therapy: Paul Tobin, Tulsa. World History: Sharon Torrence, OKC, Home Economics: Toni Toups, Bartlesville, Nursing: Tom Tracey, Tulsa, Business. William Trafton, Williston, North Dakota, Accounting: Kyle Travis, Wichita, Kansas, Pre-Med: Terry Trussell, Midwest City. undecided: Andrew Turner, Tulsa. Pre-Law: Dave Turner, Ok' mulgee. History: Cindy Tyner, Norman. Social Work: Joel Utley, OKC, undecided, Mike Utsler, Moore. Engineering: Steve Vance. Norman. Engineering: Jim VanHoose, Ft, Worth. Texas. Engineering: Robert Vernon, Bartlesville, Business: Denise Vickers, Enid, Acting: Valynda Vinyard, Sapulpa, Pre-Med: Kathy Wagner, Bartlesville. Medical Technology, Lisa Watkins, Tulsa, Fashion Merchandising: Lloyd White, Moore. Engineering: Steve Warner, Norman, Math: John Weber, Nor- man. Pre,l.aw: Anita Weeks, Okmulgee, uncleicded: Sheila Weigant, Tulsa, undecicled: Steve Wells, Tulsa, Business Ad- ministration. J' NX W A X 1- N: wi '-r w fr '1 'f . I W. 'V T7 l wi, , l, . , l 1- '- - In : A "fs ' ' i ' .A 1.1 V V l' X " ,. "Sf h ,'i,,5,g 5. 'i 417 Q1 1 41 i y : t ,atc it V n, A A ' i N2 4 1 Q, 2 i' K ,J , X i ,, , 'P Q 5,735 . : - fi f h A 1 1: '. f x '- . :fn mi rf' ' ' 'i E -a .2 ,Fl F .W 'A lt fn. Y' E' its ' 7 A lil .V 4. -Jr? .4 H +1-sf .ii if gf- 'Wea ..'-.2 , ...1 i J' ix X l a l .f 4 Zglx. 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Political Science, Debi Winegarten, Tulsa, Fashion Merchandising, Richard Wise, Okmulgee, Pre-Med, Rick Wolfson, Tulsa, Business. Debra Wooley, Ann Arbor, Michigan, Drama: Kyle Wood, Tulsa. Business: Jane Woody, Barilesville, Music Education, Robert Wootten, OKC, Architecture: Mary Wroblesky, Ann Arbor, Michigan, Drama. Cindy Wyrrick, Tulsa, English: Kimberly Yones, Tulsa, un- decided: Jahn York, Fort Worth, Texas. undecided, Steve Zoller, Frederick, Engineering: Mary Zuvanich, Weston. Connecticut, Education. Y fu -41' ' -ri 1'-. li , it x Q . . x i X l' A 'li 7? A L i I' XY if '-4 A at ww YMXXE Q. M WWW QE , 315 V it e, -.,: " ! I ig. . K R , MW A . , 1. Y ,fr .,.. .' ' A ' X ,.-.,.,,......, ,. Zwlff 1 ..-1... ...:aE?z::sasasasasasas'az- I a:a: ::"- 5: ' ig 22:5 -:F I EE 2 -my'-2:a:a:s:a:aaaa: ""' -5-I '- :::::::z: ::::::::::::-:-::.. Q:--gf' ' 2 - .,, -2 -' 1,5-Q:i :5,.g 'iff g H: , -- '-'- . 6 ,.,.,. ,, '-'- - , , " ' f" " ' ,- V 41 - - JM? 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First lady leads UOSA The 1974-75 OU Student Association IUOSAJ seemed to be geared to erasing the past image of student govern- ment severing the once ever-widening gap which has existed between the UOSA and the university ad- ministration for so long. Led by the first female UOSA president, the OU student government attempted an about-face this year trying to make the UOSA more open and responsive to its con- stituents. UOSA President Cathy Kidd and her approxinately 300 appointees worked toward a common goal of openness-- open records, open office hours, open appointments-- trying to bring student government back to the students. In an election year where openness was a major issue in almost all political campaigns, the Bartlesville senior made it an important issue in her presidential campaign--and it was appealing enough to OU students, who had witnessed several L'closed" student administrations for the past few years, to sweep the female into Ellison Hall, home of the UOSA. Sweeping the election by almost 4,000 votes, Kidd has not seemed to have lost her enthusiasm for the office--or her following. It's hard to say exactly what was Kiddis calling card--her openness, her enthusiasm, the fact she was a female--it's only conjecture. But a major factor had to be that she was a fresh, new face Ieven though she had been in Congress since October of the preceding yearl and the political organization of her campaign workers. Working to oust the "old Ellison guard," Kidd, led by her campaign manager and former congressman John Johnson, wisely avoided a personal campaign, and ran on issues ignoring the personal attacks of her "old guard" opponents. She even volunteered to appoint the losers to important offices ignoring the spoils system so often apparent in the past. But "old guard" politician Dennis Barnes, a Bessie senior, refused taking with him the 'gspoilsf' of his followers. Kidd did appoint primary opponent Mark Curnutte to the Student Activities Council and offered fellow opponent . is fi Q i :ig it if -'I IA 1 5 5 ' 4 ii i ii 1 1 A 1 1 ! J 1 ii .1 2 ii li 1 1 -1 i 5 1 l iff ii.1' ' ' gif 5 ' g .1 225 i. 7' ' , 1 0 t Q .... 1 9 s 7 ' , . xx .W 1 if .. V5 I . f V 3 SERVING AS SECRETARY for president Cathy Kidd is Jim McGoodwin. L fits if fw istfr -mi" Zia Ahmed a similar position which he declined. Campaign manager Johnson decided to forego graduation a year and served as Kiddis secretary and executive assistant. Even though student government at OU is divided into three branches--the executive led by Kiddg the legislative chaired by Jim McGoodwin, an Oklahoma City senior, and the judicial, overseen by courts administrator Ken Coe--for the first time in its six year history, only two splits seemed evident. The executive and the legislative branches almost functioned as one unit which surfaced both pros and cons. The system of checks and balances was utilized sparingly and Kidd had little trouble getting her programs approved by Congress. Under the present system, executive actions must be approved by a majority of the unicameral, 50-member Student Congress with a two-thirds majority required to override a presidential veto. All external actions require the approval of OU President Dr. Paul F. Sharp with the final say resting with the OU Board of Regents. The two major--and most controversial--issues of the 1974-75 UOSA centered around a fee increase for Goddard Health Center, and a court case involving the rights of student athletes as provided in the OU Student Code. Kidd appointed a seven-member committee, chaired by Jo Ellen McDermott, Oklahoma City senior, to study the health center and a possible fee increase. Upon the recommendation of the committee, the present 355 per semester student health fee was increased to 315 per fall and spring semesters and 57.50 for summer semesters effective the summer of 1975. Due to the increased fee Goddard services will be increased and more doctors will be added to the center. Students were denied a vote on the fee increase. A nine-point bill of particulars sparked the court case on athletes' rights: student athletes were 11 denied use of student courtsg 21 severely limited on female visitation in athletic dormitoriesg 31 permitted no food, 41 drink, or 51 TVs in their roomsg 61 forced to a strict dress code in E, W STUDENV J! :Sn 3'1" . ,', wk -3, Q if fff 'l li -l 'WEL , '.11?,:., iS71'E. TENANT LEGAL FAIR on the South Oval finds Ron Sturgeon, Suzanne Dick, and Jim Berlowitz around refreshments. dormitory cafeteriasg 71 often denied meals or forced to wash dishes as a disciplinary measureg 87 often subjected to room searches without their consent or prior knowledge, and 95 forced to keep their rooms in specified conditions. Kidd, through her athletic liaison redshirted center Dennis Buchanan, an Oklahoma City junior, took the case to student courts charging the Athletic Department with denial of the rights of the student under the OU Student Code, which was approved by the OU Board of Regents in 1968. Kidd won the case, since meeting with members of the Athletic Department and a compromise was worked out-- much to the chagrin of the Athletic Department and its officials. Although not quite as controversial this year as in the past, allocation of the S195,000 UOSA budget sparked argument among the almost 100 campus organizations requesting funds for campus-wide activities. The allocation policy was changed again this year and only groups who showed an interest in raising equivalent money was funded. Each year the UOSA is awarded approximately bsfv:-. ,- ' ,ist -my Sk S200,000 from the student activity fee to allocate into seven student accounts including four UOSA and Ellison Hall operating accounts, campus organizations, Residents Action and the Campus Activity Council. ln an effort to familiarize not only herself, but also the OU Board of Regents with pressing university issues, Kidd took three swings around the state visiting with the regents in their homes. Congress Chairman Jim McGoodwin ac- companied Kidd on the visits. At students' requests, Kidd and her Congress initiated a 3,590 per semester commuter meal ticket for university cafeteriasg organized the Oklahoma Students for Higher Education KOSHEJ, a student lobby group which also involved students from Oklahoma State and Central State universities, opened a bankeite in Walker Tower, and established committees to study the purchase of football tickets, the University Book Exchange, and a city-wide mass transit system, a carryover from Joe Bill Strealy's administration. ,Miki ,at gmsiw wt OSA funds campu R O I H .-v 'S v gp -R .jx INDIAN STUDENT MEETING draws Jeff Standingbear's attention. Internal student government changes included eliminating the UOSA treasurer and turning the UOSA accounts over to the internal auditing office, and the creation of a student assistance center inside Ellison Hall which combined several offices, including the student information office, and created an ombudsman to hear complaints. Several paintings were also rented from various campus groups to adorn the walls of Ellison Hall. Student Congress, behind the able leadership of Jim McGoodwin, a former congressman who was not in Congress at the time he served it as chairman, also got involved in university tenure disputes, unauthorized student code changes by the university administration, and the military recruiting squabble in which many students objected to allowing military recruiters on campus. The judicial branch, capped by the student courts, handled its approximate 80,000 cases it has been handling annually since student court inception in 1969. The courts are organized into a four step hierarchy starting with the university housing courts, traveling through the UOSA traffic and Superior Court, then the Judicial Tribunal, and the buck stops with the OU Board of organlz ations NTERNATIONAL STUDENTS DISCUSS today's problems. Regents. Only about five per cent of appealed cases ever reach the regents, court officials reported. The eight housing courts--Cross, Cate, Wilson, Walker and Adams centers, University Apartments, Interfraternity Council and Panhellenic--have 54 justices. The two traffic courts have 30 justices and meet five days a week. The Superior Court has five justices and hears traffic appeals and appeals from the housing courts, who usually only hear minor cases involving infractions of the Student Code. All in all, it was probably not a bad year for the UOSA--at least better than the past few administrations. But the real test will come in the next few years when we see if the new 1974-75 student government image can be maintained. ra, 2 Qf .1 3 . .. , 'ti . , . . asf! motion picture journalism Hollywood producers- SHOOTING THE SCENE on the student production "lt Took Me A Hundred Years To Become 21 years old and Lord Look at Me Now" is producer-director Steve Chalmers. What's so different about the University of Oklahoma's Film Department? Among its unique qualities are the numerous op- portunities that it offers students as far as creativity is concerned. Every assignment is a challenge to create. However, before one is actually able to create, he must first learn how to properly manipulate the equipment offered by the department. Students rising to this challenge meet the job market head on, ready to cope with technical and professional demands, as well as, esthetic problems. Furthermore, the OU film department equips students with a spacious soundstage, synchronous cameras and recorders, plus lights and editing facilities. Also aiding the film student is Ned Hockman, long time photo-journalist and founder of the department. Hockman takes a personal interest in all his students. He encourages students to work on their own, but utilizing his reputation, he also obtains grants for group projects. Most recently, Hockman has been behind a film on the state legislature, a park and recreational film and a promotional film made for Lion Country Safari--all these were done by OU students. As far as the motion picture sequence in the school of motion picture journalism 0 " ou ain't seen nothin' yet..." 4 MOTION PICTURE SEQUENCE students "on the sound stage with the Mitchell" shoot a required production. W5 C Mix motion picture journalism 1' MOTION PICTURE MAJORS shoot "What Do They Do In There?" on the grounds of the Oklahoma State Capitol. The work is for the Masters degree of Bill Marcus. Film makers journalism, a broad liberal arts background is encouraged. Traditional journalism courses, as well as courses in drama, history and English are also required. Electives in psychology and philosophy are advocated. In this day of the image, the motion picture department opens the door for students to a wide variety of job op- portunities in television, advertising, news, teaching, public relations and, of course, motion pictures. The University of Oklahoma Cinema Department is gaining a growing reputation in the professional market for providing graduates who are competent in all levels of film- making. Today the OU Film Department, tomorrow Hollywood. .Z produce own creations ur'-, n ', -, QC D,l. J . , P Higgs 3949-90 .D.i.. .I-4, I 5 -.I .5 . - I .5 .U 'D I if D I I ntl Q33 58938 9282 09962 il FCI DQ' QC DC OC! 09 0.81 0:9 8104 88 51 Q ,....::: motion picture journalismgfgg gg X Nam frfamfrg wi, " 4 5 453' fi:-Wrriiiwffif-wr' american indian student organizationiathletic council Group stresses heritage With a common denominator heritage, the American Indian Organization joined forces to pride among themselves. P 91 .:.:-:4 - ' 31 ,--qqq- -- -.-1 -.. -,. .r, -..- -Q- wg., wa-. - , , Q- , 4 . -Erma .. , . "' . ... . 7 ...,.. .Wm . ,,- .--L., -vf..k,, , ..... , -....-- .......-..-...... -.....-- ..... -....-.. . 'E h..- 1 'J-'7.S-"'.ii-ii.. .Til CT'.T..'N ff f"fi1,r Z --1-1 -.H t... 1.--.9 - .---- ,-.-.-.-- s 1.-e - --1 -..,. .. Q.---, -.. . . ,' -.--.-.. ...- FF ""' mv 9-fi 1: ..... I L-62" 1. 4? f' Ar-XA utxau ,KJ American lndlan Student Organization--Front row: Susan Arkeketa, Delbert Roberts, Rhonda Poolaw, Conrad Galey isponsorl. v- , . 'm 1, ra - 3 by Athletic Councii--Front row: Terry Rupert, Dr. Virginia Morris, Wade Walker. Chuck Smith. Second row: Ken Ferris, Don Syncox, Russel Buhite, Roy Male, John Buzbee. Council aids program Fencing Club--Front row: William Mershon, Doug Graham, Linda Moblei. Eddie Needer. Second row: John Vondell, Glenn Simp- son, William John Crichton lll, Ken Fore, Chuck Walker. Royal order protects animals A new addition to the organizational world in Soonerland was the Royal Order of the Squirrel. Organized to promote national legislation to protect wild fur-bearing animals from com- mercial exploitation, the club has seen its numbers grow. The "Little Brothers of the Claw" helped sight squirrels on the OU campus and in Norman. iiiiiii fencingg royal order of squirrelsg K. Fencers swash but never buckle Affiliated with the Amateur Fencing League of America, Fencing Club competed in collegiate and open meets and tournaments across the state. Members conducted classes, held exhibitions and sought to improve their skill with the foil and sabre. Royal Order of the Squirrel--Front row: Bobbie Kowalski, Linda Hoferland, Marilyn Ferber, Elaine Brinkley, Jan Fritschen, Rebecca Marburger, Marian Milner, Melissa Landers, Cathy Rinehart, Judy Mirjariick, Jan Eskew. ln tree: Scott Seefeldt, Bobby Colbert, Paul Graham, Second row: Jane Cundith, Annabel Jones, Lvdia Francis Butcher. Jeff l'lHWl4ll'IS. ,fi5.""Si'll beta gamma sigma Beta Gamma Si ma -Front row. Dean Nichol B 9 - ' s alofl, Dr. R.E. Evans. Mr. R. Van Auken. Dr. J. Fuller, Second row: J. Baker, F.J. Rogers. D. Marshall. J. Bell. S. Ratlifl, J. Huggins. W. Browning. Serving as the national honor Society of the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business is Beta Gamma Sigma. Initiation into the society is the highest Third row: J. Roach, S, Beck, S. Carroll, K. DeSpain, R. Oswald Fourth row: J. Tully, C, Barnes, D. Gillogly, T. Paugolatos, T. Case Fifth row: J, Herring. L. Weddle, W. Deaton, W. Irons. B. lmel. M Top business majors named honor the faculty of the College of Business can award. Membership is restricted to the upper 20 per cent of graduate students, 3 per cent seniors, and 2.7 per cent juniors. Siansberry, R. Barrett. Sixth row: A. Bishop, J. Wilkinson, L. Spann. Seventh row: R. Hedges, W. Logsdon. R. Branstine, T. Tabor. J ln., As.. 1 ll-vv:4'Ql. , A . 1.14-fr'Kr,,,. L V. - lvl 29 'Y if N A 4 .gs .r . r.-1' K: ,wg Er I ....-.-- ........- pa-5.4 I l I 2. sf, ' . ' lfi- .,'1. I., . X Kappa Delta Pi--Front row: Elizabeth Howell, Debra lnuln, Francis Brownlee, Sue Monroe. Christie Hall, Jan Walla, Connie Marken. Second row: John Hutcheson, Jean Tucker, Tervle Dlonisio. Yi E-rw' ' - l Pamela Mercer, Opal Bejcek, Barbara Dominey. Kathleen Younger, Lahoma Friedlander, J.W. Renner. kappa delta pi Club serves public schools The physical science building, room 322, was the home for one of the more active service fraternities on the OU campus. Kappa Delta Pi, the national educational society, met once a month to enjoy business meetings as well as speakers. The projects which commanded the attention of Kappa Delta Pi this year included decorating the Education Building with the art work of children in the Norman public schools. A project called "short term teachers" was organized so that the Norman schools could utilize the services of Sooner education majors whenever a substitute teacher was needed. rf 1 .iw fnelshadow boxgkappa psi Creativity found in Shadowbox Latest fashion trends became the primary concern of OU's fashion arts club, Shadowbox. Members modeled for retail stores in Norman, participated in field trips, modeling clinics, and sponsored a trip to the Apparel Mart in Dallas. Fashion Editor Joan Gilmore from the Oklahoma City Times presented a slide show of her trip to New York markets. .4' , : fidhf " 'V a - .- . n , l 'I 0 I "'-' 'O fl' .r - ll- -1 . Shadowbox--Front row: Patricia Patton. Jamie White, Phyllis Coley, Gloria Groom, Sheri Piachek. Second row: Clara Dumas, Lanna Harris, Kathy Ritts, Katie Shoemaker, Marilyn Cochran, Third row: Gail Hickman, Claudia Bradford, Lala Gonzales, Jana lf l " ' +1 1 . . 'rss' 4 ff za 1 e -1: K K in in . N i ' ' A -A . -f-"ri " tg ' f fl' 1 ' 'A Q if "15'+f . f- 1 .f-i - ' .- 4: 1 is 5? fi - " ' ri 1.-vtwr 47, . 'Wa ' i A -' Ei ' UQ" , , 1" 1 lt tl, .., A . . . y . ,:, . t , A ,. i A f . -' ' ' A , 1 - Q ,Pali My 5 X nf' 'nf it ' U . W . N A f' .. ' f. . e '-1 . 3- ff' 5 1 i. thy. V 5 -,V , I I .xp ' I' , i nf' L ini, IV lxf- .J fe ' 4 I A Qt' Z K' 1 I-1 A, l, 7 if ' , i fl, 5 Z Q-5. 1' -A "'-L, v l 'Q J ' id.--7 ' l r au-Q lf X' 1 7 7 C' aw 1' f lg-A i K E ' " l A ., V - ' il W. i P , ., ' Y- , l " Q- - 1 3' A ' .fy r' .r.,, , -at 1 Q Q, - ' " '45, as 57 X Jin an - X In Ka a Psi--Front row: Karl Foreman, Jim Davis, Don Larimore, Ben PP Stan Wood. Second row: Sam Stauffer, John Harms, Johnson, Ronnie Thomas, Randy Koontz. Third row: Fred Chan, Cort Windel, Roger Johnston, Howard Tyler Jr., Dennis Maples. Fourth row: David Gierhart, Bob Simmons, Kenneth McCall, Jr., Ed Yoesting, Mike Abbott, Fifth row: Randy Jeppesen, John Benson, Ray Floyd, Curt Harlln, Mike Kanady. Sixth row: Scott Copson. Ambrose Luk, Jim Hatfield, John Simmons, Dave Wedel, Dr. RA. Magarian, Neal Barnes, Clair Mulder. '53 ek- 7 Cunningham. Camille Lauth. Fourth row: Rita Jett, Karen Crosby. Susan Felton, Carole Hand, Angela Thomas. Back row: Janet Adams, Micki Freund. Kathy Holt, Sherri Short, Claudia Fosnes. Blood drive proves success A professional pharmaceutical fraternity devoted to scholarship, leadership, and service, 1974-75 ac- tivities for Kappa Psi included par- ticipation inthe OU Blood Drive and the VD Speakers Bureau. Kappa Psi also took part in the Christian Family Health Center, the Cerebral Palsey Center, Science Day and Pharmacy Week. Kappa Psi was reactivated in 1971 and is now the main component of all pharmacy related activities. Since reactivation the fraternity has emerged as the only men's professional phar- maceutical fraternity. its gm: lr . l Engineers Queen candidates: Julie Diane Hudspeth, Vicki Goodknight, derson. in K - YM7 'EP fs. ' iiaxltxb , 'PQI , .. 1. sf . . Alexander. Robin Shadid, Vicki Brezny, Julie Hen- ggzrf ' Y. 5 engineers C QEMWWW 5 Engineers sponsor open house Engineers' Week is the largest un- dertaking ofthe Engineers, Club. During the week's activities, engineers elect their queen for the next year and sponsor an open house which in- troduces students to many people in industry. Last but not least, the Engineers, Club observes the traditional St. Pat's celebration. This includes a St. Pat's Dance, an engineering banquet, election of St. Pat tor the year and a large number of parties. BELOW: QUEEN KATIE SHOEMAKER, 1974 Engineers' Queen, clowns around with engineers and '75 queen hopefuls at an engineer party. .sr ee? Members donate services 'l The goals of the service fraternity, Alpha Phi Omega, were to assemble college students in the principles of the Boy Scouts of America as embodied in its Scout Oath and Law. The group provided service on campus by serving as messengers in Model United Nations and donating blood to the OU Red Cross Blood Drive. alpha phi omega' ,, . i::2 -l it his , L 15: , .352 x ' K Q71 V' 'iw' mfg. ,,g:-',',,i,:2f N - , I W , . I'llZ.i5:llIlZ.ifllli-Qllhmvi 1 ' ' A. .. V MH X 'U Pl- Alpha Phi Omega--Standing: Michael McCook. Steve Bunting, Greg Dixon, Bart Dixon, Nancy Fisher. Reese Allen. John Yung. Seated: Joe Millard, 'rw , N. it it . Cloyal knights of old trusty LOYAL KNIGHTS OF OLD TRUS'I'Y-- UNHOODED GRADUATING MEMBERS: 486, Fred Timpsong 487, Marc Logang 488, Larry Herbstg 489, Neal Stanley. w -'19-,,r.' 4 t.. , - . 4. ,,v',I:: ,M ' .1 as-, ,i 'L " f-et, . tg? , A ' .Q I -. ...U .4-Mg"-. ,.-1,, -, 4V,.,,,'. . u..1 .' ' . .3., 3 ,A,,1,t ' 4, f J' W H' im" ,rg rit, nw- .. - ,v, ,, 1- 4 ,-,, V Q, Q 347.1 '.,, ,,i,,k . , m.I,. U .U I, 1,1 ., ., ,. , Zjvrlr-.il 'f- J -4 Y k Engineers comprise secret club The highest honor an engineer may achieve at OU, members of LKOT are comprised of students dedicated to engineering. Only some 500 engineering alumni, over the past 44 years, proudly wear the key of LKOT. J I ,,f1K..4, ,V I- 5 , xl -V-,m v . ,I 3 s v,. , v , . , K ii ,T american society of mechanical engineersggamma gamma! W Mrrf 2,3 A 1' l lil ,qs- -,M ASME--Front row: Mac Taheri, Mike Ramsey, Jerry Southern. Second row: Doug Graham. John White, Mark Worstell, Kerry Gunn, Cary Bloyd, Third row: John Francis lAclvisorl, Prabhakar P. Rao, Mark Doremus, John Munroe, Q. l Q -- i , r, O M111 Gamma Gamma--Front row: Paul Butcher, Lee Pedersen, Tlm Biffbafa Beanies- I-BUY3 Kennedy' Jan ESk9W' Third WW? David Milla, Second row: BBW Read' Cheryl Chandler, Jan Askinsv Miller, David Pointer, Marian Milner, Kim Davis, Terry Womack. Student branches aid university The student branches of the national technological societies, American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the American Institute of Astronautics and Aeronautics sponsored speakers throughout the academic season. Through such programs the members of these organizations hoped to promote their individual development as well as the knowledge of the university community. Group plans Greek-Week Three years of service to the Greek community as well as to the University culminated in the honor of Gamma Gamma for a few select Greeks. During the year Gamma Gamma members went on recruiting trips to promote the Greek system. They also helped plan the All-Greek Bash and Greek Week activities. rw, K O mortar boardjtassles Mortar members sell corsages A group of the most outstanding senior girls on the OU campus, the goals of Mortar Board were scholarship, leadership and service to OU. Money for a scholarship to a deserving student was earned by the group's efforts to sell boutonnieres on Dad's Day and cor- sages on Mom's Day. ,QS :UQ- x N xl Mortar Board--First row: Betty Read, Barbara Beames Patti Dowling, Anne Sherwood, Lee Pedersen. Second row: Susan Prater. Cynda Ottaway, Pallas Ford, Jane Tully, Bobbie Lee EJ- rn. M910 Tassles--Front row: Simone VanArsdell, Jolie Jacobs, Leigh Kirk- wood, Mary Hoak, Jane Stancliff, Jennifer Streightoff, Debbie McCullough, Eileen Cook. Second row: Patty Brandell, Pam Cuplin, Caren Colver, Sue Ann Mackey, Karen Taylor, Kathy Newman, Kim Thompson, Marylee Trigg, Ann Ruble, Jennlfer Berebery, Third row: Susan Good, Mary Jo Renner, Cathy Sayre Ellen Clark, Sheila Sewell, Candice Holt, Annabel Jones, Cheryl Laughner, Janice Jindra. Pam Mitchell KJ at f ,gl UJQOJ ix'J , q it .S I x"x, fu' tml all M" ll h , lrsfxi' Sf LHB-it iiahfllll 'lmtg X3 5- VA u yfgg Debbie Dernoncourt Third row Martha Gravbill Jan Askins Kristin Miller Helen Banks Lisa Farrell Cheryl Chandler Popcom Balls a1d fund drive Tassles represents the most active of the Junior women on the OU campus Selections for membership in Tassles is based on scholarship and activities and are chosen by the members of Mortar Board The goals of this group include increased scholastic excellence among its members as well as increased ac tivities I' . P y . .Ia I N - . 'tx ' 1 ' J ' .A -' l 5 M . N . . , , ri' I ' lip 1 K N .r 4 .7 ' . af , , 5" 'H ' ' ' ' 'rl iv if - ' 'n f" . A . V V tl 'l , .nV' ,- l 3' 1 f. A! L. -E A. . . ,".,'fv 75' 'nil' . 'A J r, J ws. an Q-312 i -2 ,' , , v . K ' N , , O . H ' .1 ' -e wr mmf'--H... 'ln ' 525,15 'J f IRI. l ' 'E V919 Y ia ll U .. E ,lxilz ',m--:1,Y,!,,.x-ng I i is 4 , e. L . ' .:1b.,'55v.1'i .-1. '- .lneelft fig. '. Q 1 E , . . ,wi . J- 7 . .lt :ov 125 no in in QW" I'- Pe-et--Front row: Bob Wilson, Grant Billingsley, Paul Butcher TOP Ten Ffeshmen Fmnt WW Cllff Hudson Bruce Bernard Cflgbby Back row Bill Wright John Randolph Demetrius Back YOWI Zia Ahmed, .lack Kerfooi, Tim Tabor, Mark Anderson Keith Nlcl irlind Second row Bill Patterson Kevin Portz Wes Bgrggluq "Ten Best" promote scholarship Pe-et, an Indian word meaning "Ten Best," is the name representing the oldest men's honorary organization on the OU campus. Pe-etis membership was determined by leadership, scholarship and commitment to responsibilities. A highlight of the year for members of Pe-et was during the missouri football game when a "peace pipe" was smoked in the end zone with members of Pe-et from the University of Missouri campus during pre-game activities. Besides promoting scholastic excellence, Pe-et also selected the Top Ten Freshmen from the 1973-74 academic year. Top Ten Freshmen, like Pe-et, were selected on the basis of academic records and campus as well as community activities. 'J ff X 3 fri? --eg cf? Q Z.. M Opresidenfs leadership class PLC--Front row: Kathy Mullins, Janna Powell, Kim Walker, Randi Richman. Second row: Cindy Bradley, Rose Sharp, Paul F. Sharp. Carol Hatch, Katie Hawthorne, Krista Jones, Diane Sheets, Amy Deaton. Martha Gruntmeir, Debbie Hays. Linda Dillard. Third row: PLC--Front row: Lisa Schmidt, Maria Tully, Kathy Blackstock. Second row: Mike Kinkaid, Vicki Tebow, Linda Stoia. Karen Elkouri, Mary Ann Stephenson, Anna Jackson, Paul F. Sharp, Rose Sharp, Faith Ann Farmer, Ginny Hall, Brenda Brown, Third xx -Xf' row: Joseph Ray. Lewis Patman, Robert C. Hutton, Tim Hightower. Larry Dickerson, Scott Stone, Eddie Edwards. Rob Matheny. Blake French, Joe Otto, Kenneth Long, Larry D. Cannan. Brent Cooper, Steve Zoller, Jimmy Givens, Joey Blackard, Douglas B. Voiles, Tom Stapleton, Ubs Perry. Jeff Niemeyer. Jim Allen. Greg Wallace. PLC encourages involvement Hearing several speakers from the university community as well as around the state, the President's Leadership Class consisted of sixty freshmen students. These people received membership in PLC because of out- standing leadership and scholarship exhibited in high school. Meeting at University President Paul F. Sharp's home to discuss activities, PLC also aimed to develop the leadership qualities of its members. PRSSA--Seated: Roger Mitchell. Second row: Tom Rogers. Debbie Brislcey. Billie Culver, Paul Culver, Third row: Chuck Walker, Kitty Sullivan. Paul Dannelley, Rex Wheeler. SPONSOR PAUL DANNELLEY guided PRSSA in activites. xx, .sq ffm wg qffe PTSSG .ginfei Chapter nominee receives internship The collegiate branch of a national society, Public Relation Students Society of America hoped to further the opportunities of its members in the field of journalism. Once a month, members of OU's PRSSA went to luncheons in Oklahoma City to meet with members of the local chapter of PRSA, the professional society of the same name. Here speakers were heard and students were able to discuss jobs and such with professional businessmen. The chapter was proud to have its nominee for a PRSA graduate scholarship accepted as final recipient. Wi1e'ia AW e'fQwi3,,2fQ sooner rally council 1' Cheerlezxclcrsf-Front row: Violet Withington.,Meli5sa Boucher. Pride of Oklahoma Marching Band at the Barham Bowling Back row: l-rc-ufa Stokes. Diane Vaeth. head. is displayed by an unidentified member of the Texas pep Tally. 154 , hi . .1 Above: Sooner Rally Council--Bob Wilson, Kathy Newman. Bob Frccta Stokes. Oewight McWilliams, Melissa Boucher. Robert Colvert. Below: Cheerleaders--Barbara Bowling. Ronnie Vestal, Nuzum. inot pictured Linda Helms. James Carryi Violet Withington. Burba Denson, Diane Vaeth. Roger Barthel. -4 'H' 'ii .- ,f"l.v"Q'l"l X2 I- -ar J 2. H'-' c oi il i Q ig VV, .Y -'CQ rorr R ' I 1 -ll as ' Q Y V--.....,.-...ir....- -WY!- UJ. Q at Q 4,A. Vi . ,D . .. -fn Aifiwf A I ' Q' PAX al. I ' f 1' ' E V - X . it V.-. N 3 I U ,. v- , - . r i Bar .- gf A - Q. . ' -tt - G , V qi, V ,ua V In EI 'H N .pal . if 5 1 ,x 'Q i ii' , qv I , ,gf - " . . Q' -'i - 1 I Lf, i -1 agyvtlvvfitgfbf 8 , if wg! x v . ,, 1'-.lt ' r' .1 :Q I w- s 1 e - i- - . V... u I -a' -', 4 .. -f .. ' ' . ,,, "" - 1' .l.L:,:J'..LL '- is- I - l X - .'t- 'T' 'ff' 'fl -MT? "' T . 'V V. ,'-' 'f ' ' ' 1. t YT 5 I ,L r Q Q -xt .. . M-, ...., , , g i , V ng- Y Q 5 Council votes cards out With nationally recognized athletic squads and screaming fans of all sorts, the University of Oklahoma obviously needed a central coordinator for spirit and spectator enthusiasm. The Sooner Rally Council was the answer. Aiding in the coordination of the OU cheerleading squad, the Sooner Rally Council also helped in promoting enthusiasm for Sooner spring sports, which sometimes were overshadowed by the fervor of OU football. Probably the most controversial segment of the Council was the OU Card Section which performed at all the home football games at Owen Field. During the 1974 gridiron clash between OU and OSU the Card Section decided "spontaneously" to put on a show of flying cards rather than one of coor- dinated card handling. Reaction to the display was immediate and heated. In the wake of the controversy the Council voted to eliminate the Student Card Section for at least the 1975 football season. THE PRlDE OF OKLAHOMA-'Director--Gene Thrailkill. Terry Ainsworth, Reta Aldworth, Ron Allen. Peggy Amrine, Bill Andrew, Don Annesley, Laurie Asseo. William Austin, Randy Badgett, David Bailey, Jim Baker, Steve Baldwin. Melvin Barker, Gene Basden, David Bauman, Mindy Beeman, Brad Benson, Ed Besenfelder, Lawrence Besenfelder, Robert Black, Janet Blubaugh. Lawrence Born, Nancy Bowman, Nancy Brad- shaw. Robert Branstetter, Jaci Brown, Michael Brown, John Bryan, Dorothy Burns, Karl Burns, Mary Butner, Thomas Byers, Michael Bynum, Robert Canfield. Larry Cannon, Linda Cantrell, Richard Carmen. Roy Carman. Holly Carr, Cheryl Carroll, Steven Castleberry. William Clanahan, Vicki Coates, Helen Cochran. Steven Cockrell, Sandra Cohen, Carol Coleman. Christia Cone. David Cook, Jerry Cooper. Russell Crain. Rob Crumpley, Jane Cundit, Kevin Danner, Melinda Davidson, Steven Davidson, Dennis Davis. Michael Davis. Palmer Davis, Vicky Davis, Vaun Day, Mikel DeJongh.'James Denney, Mike Dick. Steve Diehl, William Diggs. Rosemary Dorman, Steven Doty, Michael Douglas. Jeff Downey. James DuBois, Phil Elkins, Dayna Enix, Leonard Essary, Haydn Evans, Sam Evans, Vicki Evans, Randy Evers, Nancy Fajen, Ramona Fields. Richard Flanagan, Angelia Folks, Kevin Fox, John Franklin, Mary Franklin, Steven Freeman, Gary Gagnon, Cathryn Callad. Kathrine Gannaway. Drew Gardner, Bill Gassett, Martha Gassett. John Geffre, Phyllis Gilbert, John Goodwin, Jill Goodyear, Stuart Gorelick, Jami Graham, John Graham, Michael Graham, David Green. John Greve, Dennis Grimes, Greg Groom, Nancy Hale, Joseph Hall. Thomas Hall, Dennis Hampton, Jim Hankinson, Annette Hansen, Jane Hanus, Nina Hargis. Henry Harris. Revonda Hawley, Sherri Hawley, Keith Henderson, Susan Henthron, John Herrington, Lisa Hicks, Ernie Hills, Kathleen Hogue, Dawn Hollingsworth, Patricia Hulsey, John Humphreys. James Hunsberger, Foy Gurst, Stephen lnnis, Michael Jain, Suzanne Jansing, pride oi oklahoma O David Jenkins, Paul Jensen, Karla Jolliei. Lisa Kauley. Martha Kemm. David Kirkpatrick, Jair Klarfeld, Stanley Kleinsteiber, Susan Lake. Mark Lanman, Deril Lees, Larry Lees, Brooks Lindsey, Jerrie Lindsey, Robbie Lindsey, Guy Love, Anita Loyd, Debbie Manning. Joe Mansour. Karen Mansour. Janette Markes. Panela Martin. Gail McAlister, Daphne McClellan, David, McCleskey, James McElhaney, Denise McGruder, Richard McKee, Steven McKitrick, Jaycee Melton. Dan Merriman, James Miller, Martha Mills, James Mitchell, Alan Molson, Donna Moore, Margaret Moore. Cynthia Morphew. Mark Myers, Mitchell Myers, Bryan Neal, Mike Neese. Stephen Nowakowski, David Oaks, Anne O'Grady, Michael O'Hare Gregory Oliver, Marianne O'Neil, Kathleen Osborn, Dee Parker, Wayne Parker. Sharla Parks. Susan Parks, Kathleen Patterson, Valorie Pedigo, Melvin Penn, Mary Penney, Phyllis Petkoff, Larry Polk. Tomi Polk. William Pool. Debbie Powell, David Quate, Nancy Quigg. Randy Ratzlaft, Michael Renner, Richard Rhea, Tim Rhodes, Adonna Roberts, Gary Roberts, Nancy Rogers, Victor Rook, Linda Rose, Nila Rose, Janice Runge, Charles Sanders, Michael Sanders, Brent Sanner. Tim Sawyer, Anne Schaefer, Gary Schaffner, Paul Shannon, Ken- neth Sharpe, Thomas Shilling, Ron Shook, Jacqueline Smith, Sheila Smith, Jack Sommers, Dan Stiffler. Ryan Stramp, Mary Stringfield. Shelly Sublett. LaNell Svoboda, Gayla Tenney, Linda Tenney. Steven Terhune, Charles Teter, John Tharp, Tevin Thomas, Jayne Thominson, Deborah Thompson. James Thompson, Gregory Tiffany, Robert Tipton, Joe Troop, Edward Tuell, William Van Dyck, Kristi Van Ness, Lawrence Vark. Steven Waggoner, James Waldron, Charles Walker, Daniel Warren. Janet Warren, Lisa Watkins, William Watt. Mark Wauahdooah. John Weger. Vickie Wenninger. Jon White, Stephen Wiley. James Williams, Scott Yarberry, Frances Zimmerman. tvs? :::,:: . R5 Oruf-neks An OU football game wouldn't be the same without the Ruf-Neks. They were responsible for generating much of the excitement of Sooner football games. They were mainly remembered for the L'booms" from their shbtguns after the fans chanted "Boomer Sooner" following a touchdown. The Ruf-Neks continued their little Ruf-Neks--Front row: Rick Gann, Bill Lamebull, Second row: Al Sherer, Wes Jones, Third row: Dennis Pascale, Steve Moore, Mario Ramirez, Debbie Fulmer, Luke Farshacl, Keith Ogle, Tom Heydman, Kevin Clark, John Pereles, Jim Allison, James Hood. Schooner tradition maintained by club sister organization. These girls assisted with rush smokers and attended club meetings. After a busy two week period of campaigning, the Ruf-Neks chose Terri Bell as their reigning queen for a year. The group also maintained the Sooner Schooner and the two ponies which powered it, Boomer and Sooner. Back row: Brett McCormick, Willie Cloud, Richard Dunn. Mike Mackley, Rich Cotton, Glen Johnson, Mark Buntz, Paul Buntz. On Schooner: Wes Bledsoe, Terri Bell, Marc Smithen. Q . l GOT IT exclaims Ruf-Nek queen Terri Bell of Alpha Chi Omega sorority as she is presented to the OU-Missouri football crowd, escorted by Mark Buntz. swrczrzze'-'-121 -A' F u' li' -cr::,-.z, fi?" I"'!'."L.1' 7' r'i'f:3 1 1-4 v i if - .Vp Q ffl . , ., i A if' ' i l 2- 'gfilr gs .iv- SX3 22' im lx 'isp A 'W V ie ,- .'-lv ,i r 'S tid 'nn-:EN-Q-ii-3 . ' E 'W 'i .nf -- Yi-Lf. -5 fl is EEG' -jfsnu- -'ii . 'L35lU!s', f ' I me fwwwvfwf-m+ --- H 7 me TU V, ,..,...e-W... ay A. V ec.-13 B if-' 'F P ' ,,..z:'!f 3.1 1 .L -e --. N' 4 1---J ., 2 L .,,,. . .F .4 is-M-fag A l ak NEKS ii. i Rui-Nek Litile Sisters--Front row: Lee Ann Welch, Jamie White, Fleming, Millie Hays, Cindy Mayes. On Schooner: Marc Smiiheri. Vicki Goodnight, Laurie Floren. Second row: Sue Maerker. Terri Bell, Melissa Legg. Debbie Fulmer, Becky Rider, Vicki Brezny. Robin Q BELOW LEFT: ONTO THE FIELD comes the Sooner Schooner, a familiar sight at OU football games which is maintained by the Ruf-Neks. BELOW: A ROYAL SMILE brightens the face of WN Ruf-Nek queen Terri Bell as she contemplates her award. if Lgcfifi' ei Am of-5'PX'?' J.: 1, in '-c""' ?M'E zfmhx fm is , ,, . wtf. campus activities councilicampus chest Campus Chest--Front row: Christine Hall, Linda Chenoweth, Mark Curnuite. Second row: Dean Luthey, Barbara Beames, David Fisher, Pam Mitchell. Katie Shoemaker, David Bloom. Spaghetti dinner bolsters Campus Chest A board composed of the chairmen and chairwomen of various campus- wide activities and a number of specially appointed members, the Campus Activities Council met periodically to make sure that plans created did not overlap or duplicate themselves. Howdy Week, Dad's and Mom's Day were part of the occasions under the direction of the CAC. The OU Speaker's Bureau which brought such personalities as Leonard Nimoy to the OU campus was also under the direction of the Council. I 'Q 'tab X Student Activity priority of CAC Charitable causes were supported by Campus Chest through collection of money from within the university community. Along with this purpose was the desire to do so in such a way that the work would be an enjoyable job. During Campus Chest Week the group sponsored Kid's Day simultaneously with the Carnival, Casino Night, a spaghetti dinner and meal give-up. 1Y" CAC--Front row: Darrell Moore. Barbara Beams, Lisa Bassett, Kim Davis. Back row: Kevin O'Halloran. Caren Colvert, Alan MaryLee Trigg, Cindy Donalson. Eric Alcoyloure. Second row: Synar, Mark Bolinger. Tom Mullen, Lean Duthey. Clark Millspaugh, Larry Van Hoose. iii' fm my -J' 75 sooner scandals I university sing ff' - it .t,, z ' 1 I 't g I - l 'I I l , -. X "' " 'K X 1 ,, ,Tl '+lf.I. :g:'.: ' -- af.. -f'-: xi .t Wk 1 "llI.:.: 'Z 1 ' T' fa A -5 s . 5: , r - QL.: - ' ' H 2 'Lg 5 1 3 1 15 ff il -1 . . .I , V' ' "' S' X . r- ll"1t 1 H Sooner Scandals--Front row: Frank Duncan. Emily Denning, Rodgarg, Alan Synar. James Parks, Peter G. Graves. John Caren Colvert,Andy Bishop, Clark Millspaugh. Second row: John M I ,J h F Sing complements Mom's Day The 1975 production of University Sing took on a whole new image in its performance on lVIom's Day, April 12. The theme of "Give My Regards to Broadway" was highlighted by bright costuming, hand choreography, and a continuity play. Competition was high as University Sing saw more than fifteen groups try out for a spot in the show. At both performances the groups played to a packed house of proud moms. University Sing--Front row: Todd Jacobs. Marilyn Ferber Second row: Melissa Landers, Vickie Neel, Cindy Donalson. Third Ly C v J I b A b I J TOW1 I1l'1 DTE-'. ina 1 EICO l. hfla E OVIGS. Scandals emphasizes student creativity If the fall at the University of Oklahoma is highlighted by Sooner football, the spring must surely find its highpoint in Sooner Scandals. A huge stage production hightened by the sense of competition, Sooner Scandals caught most everyone's attention. The Executive Committee of Sooner Scandals worked laboriously to coordinate the many student acts and dances which would eventually make up Sooner Scandals, 1975. Continuity acts were used to smooth the flow between variety acts comprised of fraternities and sororities as well as students from independent housing units. Scandals was the student body's annual chance to lampoon university life, college experiences as well as the OU faculty. ll' Qi C7 . 4. . 'l V. if 131' af' ivwrfislsfffiw 9 clad's day "s " X172-1 Dad's Day--Front Row: Linda Chenoweth, Caren Colvert, Ana nabel Jones, Leigh Kirkbood, Second row: Alan Synar, Kim Davis, Larry Van Hoose. Group plans Dad's Day s Various activities were planned for dads by the Dad's Day Executive Committee. The activities included theater productions, campus tours and a rap session with the OU football coaches. The card section paid tribute to dads during half-time of the Missouri football game while the "Pride of Oklahoma" performed. R xv DAD'S DAY DINNER highlights the Dad's Day weekend for Dr. J. R. Morris as he dines at the .3531- F t X at ,gy px ,im 'lg ' D 1 , - . -2 l :gf-B-141.1 Sigma Chi house. sg? as model united nationsldad's day! 'RA Y-1 -V . X"7 MQDEL UNITED NATl0NS..Fy0ng row: Jan Egkgw, Pam row: Marsha Ray. Janice Huffman. Mary Ann Knuuer, Janna McConahay. Caren Culvert. Jo Ann Klar. Second row: Elmer Powell- Bafbafa Beames- Knutter, Linda Chenowuih, Leigh Kirkwood, Doug Graham. Back THE DICE FLY as dads enjoy a casino party at the Delta Tau Delta house. MUN session educates students The international flair among OU students was brought out at the annual Model United Nations conference held in the early spring. Here a realistic situation corresponding that of the United Nations centered in New York City was developed so students could gain a greater insight into the world wide problems facing us in the modern world. Delegates received great help from the Model United Nations staff. The delegate information effort was a dynamic new innovation designed to make the session more accurate and to make preparation easier for the delegates. This improved research and made the session more realistic. ff? 3,55 'iitf '. '.si?v..,.. ,if lou alumni association Alumni Association reaches its 75th and 100,000 The University of Oklahoma Alumni Association reached its 75th an- niversary in 1974--the same year that the organization grew to include more than 100,000 graduates and friends of OU, 20,000 of whom are dues-paying active alumni members. The story of the Alumni Association in 1974-75 is best told pictorially, about people, programs, and events. Paid members of the OU Alumni Association received six issues per year of the Association publication, The Sooner, plus a copy of the Alumni Sports Letter after every football game. Other advantages of paid mem- bership were Alumni Tours, including chartered trips to Sooner "away" sporting events, the mail order sale of Sooner Pride items, a 'tSooner Discoveries" book club with discounts for members and, of course, activities in local communities. Local alumni activities helped stimulate development, student recruitment, alumni membership drives, MS X SIX YEARLY ISSUES of the OU Alumni Association publication, "The Sooner" is one advantage of being a due-paying alumni. special educational programs and social events. In September the comedy team of Larry Bledsoe, a 1961 graduate, and Curt Schwartz, 1960 graduate, highlighted the annual Coach's Banquet given by the Oklahoma City alumni organization. Through a bequest to the Alumni Development Fund from the late Jasper P. Baldwin, a 1913 business graduate, two OU professors and two graduate students were honored for excellence in the undergraduate teaching year. Baldwin Study-Travel Awards were made this year to Dr. Peter Brueckner, modern languages, Dr. Mary Rowe Whitemore, zooloQVS Guansu Sohn, modern languages, and Billy Don Russell, electrical engineering. The Alumni Development Fund also aids fifty students each year through its scholarship program, while about 800 additional students were assisted through a short-term loan program available to all full-time students. OU's highest honor, the Distinguished im. l"WHii1mxy,,, It's 016705 Genemtlon Service Citation, is awarded each year by the Alumni Association and is the equivalent of honorary doctorates given at most universities. Among the honorees for the past year was ballerina Yvonne Chouteau, OU artist-in- residence. Other honorees included CR. Anthony, Oklahoma City, J. Clarence Karcher, Dallas, Dr. Pete Kyle McCarter, Norman, and Julian J. Roth- baum, Tulsa, The Association also honors its own outstanding members each year by induction into the Alumni Hall of Fame. Ten alumni have been so honored since the Hall was founded in 1970, including this year's additions, W. Bryan Arnn, Oklahoma City and Roy Cartwright, Tulsa. -ai' rx? 345425 . . . , "M W OU alumni BSSOCIBUOU . wwf' tariff l' K 1 ri lx l l l 1 1 l l r R .WM F I.. 'Y ? J' e- , f gl 4-.,. Y 4 MQMENTS QF LAUGHTER overcome Chouteau and her husband Miguel Terekhov, Distinguished Service Citation recipient Yvonne Chairman Of flame at the Uf1iV9l'5ifV- i ll l lux W' , at THE BIG HIGHLIGHT of the annual Coachs graduates Larry Bledsoe 1961 and Curt Sch- Banquet was a comedy team of two OU Waltz 1960 STUDYATRAVEL awards were made yearto Dr. P. Brueckner, Dr. Mary Whitemore, u Sohn and Billy Don Russell. .--are A sr.Rfliii..s 'M 9 uosa HEAD OF UOSA, Cathy Kidd holds executive power. Kidd heads govemment The executive power of the UOSA was vested in the Student President, Cathy Kidd, who was also the first woman to serve. Presidential elections were held once a year and were elected by the majority of UOSA members casting ballots in the elections. The UOSA President has the power with the approval of Student Congress to nominate and appoint all officers not otherwise provided for in the UOSA Constitution. The President represented the UOSA on all official occasions and coordinated all student activities ser- vices. The legislative branch of the UOSA was Student Congress. Student Congress consisted of fifty students from various housing districts who were elected by their constituency. They attended weekly meetings and com- mittee meetings. Congress had three executive officers, chairperson, vice- chairperson, and secretary. The third branch of student govern- ment was the court system which was established in 1968. The court system consisted of the Superior Court, the Traffic Court, the Housing Court, and the Judicial Tribunal. In the courts students were allowed to speak with an attorney before questioning and had all the rights guaranteed in state or federal court. 4 , . , LEFT: AN OU KID tries his hand at a UOSA fund- " A-y raising event. BELOW: MANNING THE PHONE .4 is attorney general Tom Rinney. "li :"saw.x fs 'af- Llosa O misfmf lstudent services corporation Mft WHIPPING UP BURGERS is part of SSC's job. SSC shows movies Student Services corporation was created to provide retail service for the University Community at the lowest prices possible. As a non-profit cor- poration Student Services tried to do this with the Walker Tower Student Store, the Ellison Hall Snack Bar, and the Student Services Cinema Society. Besides low prices, the Student Store in Walker Tower was open those hours most compatible to student schedules. During finals week it was even open all night. The store was the largest and most complex enterprise of SSC. The store also housed the UOSA Bankette and the refrigerator rentals. The Bankette was purely a service and to continue it must cover its operation cost through service charges. The refrigerator rentals, like rnost other operations, was a service at the lowest possible price. All money that rental sales generated was spent to pay bills, keep prices down, and im- prove service. Ellison Hall Snack Bar primarily Student services offer low prices served the commuters. Open from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., the Snack Bar served breakfast, lunch, and snacks. The Student Services Cinema Society tried to bring movies that appealed to this specific campus audience. Friday Flix was the Cinema Society's weekly presentation in Dale Hall aiming to appeal to all students at one time or another. Prices were geared to cover operating costs. Student Services was owned by all students at the University through the Student Association. J , 'W e.e?'W?lli5i,.s 0 air force reserve officer training corps Cadets leam leadership The primary concern of the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps is to prepare college men and women for entrance into active duty service of the United States Air Force. This is ac- complished through classes about aerospace, military associations with the contemporary world, management techniques, and leadership qualities. Leadership principles are taught through the element of a group organized along Air Force lines and run by the cadets themselves. Air Force ROTC is not all business, however. AFROTC cadets organize and par- ticipate in a wide variety of social and extracurricular activities, including intramural athletics, field days, an AFROTC Cadet Ball, as well as a formal military dining in. Air Force Student Officers--Front row: Warren Harklns. Jack Blankenship, Carol Milner, Keith Hoffman. Second row: Johnny O. Haikey, Gus Luzzi, James Henderson, Steward H. Spanler, Third row: Bruce Roberts. Mark Johnston, Fourth row: Terry J. Bennett. Stephen W. Kniatt. fix ' 'v Ti' ' X t Ti' 5 Air Force Stalfers--Front row: Debbie Tanner, Col. Gary L. Tresemar. Maj. Don Divers, Elsie Marler. Back row: Maj, Wallace R. Lale, Glyn W. Casey, Harvey N. Nye, Bill Howell, Jimmy Wyatt. . r N 91, Jbe, N emi 1' 4 ., Gt it +7 air force reserve officer training corp 0 N.-fm, r-V'-1 ' S r M x , I 'SLR- x l" ' ABOVE: KEITH HOFFMAN is Cadet Colonel of BELOW: MARK DICKESON STANDS at atf ABOVE: PENS AT THE READY, cadets listen the OU Air Force detachment. tention while two cadets strike the colors, attentively to a class lecture. WT Ill Y Y A I A Ar' .ir V if l I I , :W x If X .. 1 l 7 . I- A l 1 , l A ei' s .. ', 2-'Pl v k -. " 1 lt! a' 5 f aj, seimtlangel flight Angel Flight wins trophy Sponsored by Arnold Air Society, Angel Flight worked throughout the year to serve the Air Force, the university, and the Norman community. Members sold football programs, assisted Air Force recruiting efforts, aided the Norman chapter of the Red Cross, and attended cadet functions, among many other activities. For their efforts, Angel Flight received the Samuel E. Anderson trophy at National Conclave for best supporting their Arnold Air Society. Angel Flight--Front row: Jean Terry, Julie Henderson, Cindy Donaldson. Shelly Stout, Janet Detter, Jean Volker, Marilyn Maurer. Second row: Sabrina Prewett, Sherry Short, Karen Kiker, Kathy Steen, Patricia Patocky, Cheryl Laughner, Kathryn Forbes. M' jk 3.0 fmt 1 -an Angel Flight Officers--Front row: Dianne Campbell, commander. Second row: Kathy Truitt, information: Julie Jacobs, operationsg Jeannie Clark, liaison: Jina Jacobi, liaisong Betty Read, executive commander. Third row: Karen Lamb, materialsg Kathy Steen, pledge trainerg Major Donald Divers. advisorg Liz Worsham, comptrollerg Debbie Taylor, administration: Carolyn Manning, historian: Lisa Bassett, rush chairman. - ..- 'A "' L , A 1 E 1 r?5-Lit - ,, Xl. . f rs - vf-f-'-"": ' l ' . lflf J 'i 1' 1' . -2 2- ll, are A if f 'ff' . , "W A ' . 2 -1 , U - J X arty? . - r ' V ayag ' 1 7 - fu R ' If rf ,, .V . , .. W ,-.fr ,bf ' N . 2 ' z '- 9- -G: .V ,, f . ,- T . -f 1 . I H 'V ,' f ' QQ A . f-.A F' 'Wx' F? , J 'ff 5 7 ' ' Q 7, f I q i l 'px .f 5.1 V Jin- v7 , ,Nz N, T' ' 5, 1 , 11, V. - 4 ,V ' . V at , N ' -, '- l N . KI X 5 l 'Qc X lf J ' l.ll 'T x l if f ? b X I I if I' r A 1: ff' S- 9 ' f 1 i ,.,, Mx l .B I vi 1 h J- Jkt L' f 'Q tl f 1 M ffl-X "f x x, 1 ' rl. ' 4 T tg, I '4 I lrl l Z tl N at X ll w ,,l ' J ' F ll fs 'll X 1 -. A .Cf xy ll! V x " til My ,H -Q S. gs N ' 1 J J fi 'N 4 1 X 3 A ! I - X TQ Tx N A f ', f! A, f -S ' ,gill V, .., 1 . gf U xt lip i. V, 1 Q, V ,. Lff.. , V 4 , l Viaff x K I , - ' .xx L vie ' ., f fy! A i N il .gi Third row: Ann Parks, Matha Graybill, Pi Askins, Beth Galoob, Julie Jacobs, Dianne Campbell, Jan Jacobi, Major Divers. Fourth row: Colonel Tresemer, Carolyn Manning, Annabel Jones, Caren Colvert, Marylee Trigg, Debbie Taylor, Jina Jacobi. Fifth row: Melissa Mayfield, Candice Holt, Lisa Bassett, Diane Dernoncourt, Karen Lamb, Liz Worsham, Michelle Manning, Kathy Truitt, Jean Clark, Betty Read. . - all-1 ' X1 I ' ' '4 L Sv 1, S-. Nxt I . 'T gl' Consulting the Air Force survival manual during finals are Jina Jacobi. Jeannie Clark, Dianne Campbell, Major D. Divers, and Johnny Halkey. ,E an ' - - iw: I :QQ E 'I . 1 '?K ZR Arnold Air Society--Front row: Col. Gary Tresemer, Elsie Marler, Major D, Divers. Second row: John Haskell, Ricky Kelly, Johnny Haikey, Thomas Singer. Third row: Bruce Robens, Keith Hoffman, Fourth row: John Snider, Kathy Rambo, Stewart H. Spanier, Gus Luzzi, Fifth row: Steve Spurrier, Paul Easter, Richard Ramsey. Sixth row: Terry J. Bennett, Glen Michaelson, Russell Garrett, Richard Horton. sa arnold air society Waddy squad National HQ Pledged to support the Air Force, AFROTC, and interests of aerospace in general, the Walter R. "Waddy" Young Squadron of the Arnold Air Society kept service to the university and Norman communities as its prime object. Through such projects as the fall and spring blood drives, helping local CAP cadets, and collecting canned goods for needy families, the squadron showed its concern for the welfare of the community. As national headquarters this year for the Arnold Air Society, the Waddy Young Squadron served as the leader of the organization from the time it was chosen at the AAS National Conclave in the spring of 1974 until the end of March. sgrgg at inf, will army rote Army offers leadership The young men and women in Army ROTC satisfied their desire for responsibility and leadership while pursuing their degree. At the same time, these students enjoyed the experiences they encountered while working toward a common goal. Army opened the door to immediate management experience both being invaluable assets in future civilian careers. Army RCTC graduates were an important national asset and were sources of significant contributions in every field, civilian as well as military. Army instructors--Front row: Captain George Jacubec, Major Anauve Oklahoman Colonel Aaron ll Walkcr isthc professor ol Marshall Harrington. Lt. Col. Willard Rodgers, Major Robert mllllaryscxnnce indthcsenxorarmy officer at OU Barrett, Sgt. Major Joseph Belyea. Staff Sgt. Frederic May. f'- In ,'1"a ' ' N . 5 A ' l .V 47 Q f 7" 54 W I ' if' I ' Army secretaries--seated: Mickey Tyo. Standing: Debbie Jeffri Judy Cassily, Carolyn Clark. 25. Colonel Walker, Caclel Colonel Sieve Powell. University Provost Di. Hunsberger. and Cadet Colonel Jim Bishop pose at the Provosfs office during the promotion ceremony for cadets Powell and Bishop. army rotc O-Jew .1 K 'Ev fa rf 14.31. nt lex, -MTW f ilw' tsl i '.::,l.l' A lil l ,S , l i : l.,-ll f ,, in l 1- ly.. - flaw" u +1 1 Ijf' lil 12" ' Q img fvlilil Q llfl aff!" x xxgil ill as -ss.-I ,4-N,-Q Y-,.k Lvfxq ,I ,. X 'K 'Q , ' -ff, , ,. rim, Ygv ' Fr A 'Fi - . 4 .u b. ' ' if f, , ,.,. , ' 4 ' X U9 . -'97 J , .1 , 1 1 Q ,gm v, ' ij '23 1 N, ..., V I - - -.-.. . .. A- f. ,v 'Q -wx fl , if , . WW? S' M Oarmy rotc SIIVIULATING BATTLE-FIELD CONDITIONS reaction course are Kevin Holdredge, Bartlesville during a training exercise at Fort Sill leadership junior, and James Ezell, Bethany freshman I "WM it fx NX l BRIEFING THE CADETS is Captain George Jacubec with Marla Wilkerson and Kathy Blanco at the Fort Sill leadership reaction course. -'Hr-1 il DISCUSSIONS AT BREAKFAST occupy Dr J R Morris and Cadet David Pointer during the 1974 ROTC advanced camp at Fort Riley Kansas K L r . a L,I,,rI.,1:ijJ, . U r A,.Y - L. ,ie 0 7 m. I -I A-is iff: I I Qtl 'r -l L x g ' i X 5 f p l y Ilia' I f N . fait' T" Crusade reaches students Campus Crusade for Christ began in 1951 at UCLA, primarily as a movement among sororities and fraternities. ln 1954, the Bruins were national champions, and by that time, nine out of the starting eleven--including Bob Davenport ltwo-year All Americanl and Don Moomaw lthree-year All Americanl were active in Campus Crusade. Since then, Crusade has spread to hundreds of campuses all over the United States and over half the major countries in the world. lt concentrates on four basic concepts which are called the "Four Spiritual Laws." Once a week, Crusaders meet for Leadership Training Class in the Student Union. In these classes, Christian leadership principles and concepts are discussed and debated. Further, Crusade has parties at places like Lake Thunderbird and various parks every month. Through all these activities, the people in Campus Crusade learn to laugh and live and grow in the spirit of God. According to Skid Logan, OU Crusade director, Campus Crusade for Christ involves people uwho came to college to find out how to make a living, but rather found out how to live.'l 4 r. 5 campus crusadegwm 9 N i sgj3?c'5iriFggX? O publications board Acting as publisher of the Oklahoma Daily and Sooner ,75 was the OU Publications Board. Consisting of representatives from the two publications, the Student Association, the School of Journalism, the President's office, and the Em- ployee's Council, the board selected the editors of the publications and con- sented to staff appointments. lt also developed an outline of policies and procedures for Daily and Sooner '75 staff members. f 1. if 1-L..-1... l A Publications Board--Seated: Gail Peck. Jim Bradshaw, Paul Dannelley. chairman: Janet Vitt. Charles Coulter. Standing: Bob Carrell. Charles T. House, David Frilze. Jane Stancliffe. Fred Weddle. No! pictured: Tom McCurdy. Joseph Ray. Dan Gibbins. Judi Freyer. Debbie Ritter. Jim Paschal. Linn Ann Elston, Pub Board sets policy guidelines DISCUSSING THE MINUTES of the last meeting are Pub Board members Gail Peck, Jim Bradshaw and Paul Dannelley. 6. publications board O JA. , -six . . , , . -., ,. ,Ag ll r 35 2'f O lilnlln D ' -W L . Ab. ST " - , L 3 "U-4-J r' TZ 1- ' ."'T.. W Advertising department--Seated: Dennis Donaldson. Back row: Joyce Merida, Susan Sasso, Rick Hans, Joe Pepe, Tim Miller. Left: Mary Helen Montgomery, advertising and business manager for the Oklahoma Daily, checks the day's ads. The advertising department located in Copeland Hall not only sold ad- vertisements to appear in the 1975 Sooner and the Oklahoma Daily, but the staff also handled advertising bought by the Sooner. Work naturally included contacting potential advertisers and regular buyers to set up ad campaigns for them. The student staff wrote, sold, designed and checked ads that ap- peared in each publication. This gave advertising majors a chance to perform their profession in realistic educational situations. Q:-, Backshop sets Daily, Sooner '75 Handling the technical production of the Oklahoma Daily was the job of the Journalism Press. For the first time, they set, pasted-up, and did color separations for the 1975 Sooner. The student staff worked Monday through Friday beginning at 2 p.m. Newspapers were printed five times a week during regular school sessions. 'l 71 . i Y-L-VU,:1,,..f,,,t-.'i"' jf-i -.f t . ' fl J if fi' ,."l I Z ' ,r u x backshop 0 J-Press employees use facilities to set and pastesup the Oklahoma Daily and Sooner '75. vw ., ' t xl .A .X it l-' f'ln 1 lr' hi H ' . -, i .1414 N. - ' A15 ft r l -1 1 x 'jzsiffd X , ,s.f'N Journalism Press--Front row: Don Hiatt, Ron Plnnell, Ardell Gardener, Bob Salmon, superintendent. Second row: Jerome Laizure, Dwight Withrow, George Bowen, Doug Kounter, Third row: James Squirrel. assistant superintendent: Keith Miller. pressroom foreman: John Phelps, Susan Spann, Melinda Madden, Marti Broderick, Tina Neff. Glenn Elmore. Not pictured: Becky Bell, Bill Johnson, Lee Johnson, Rhonda Poolaw, Janet Pugsley, Donice Reeves. r if if . . sms g business office Office keeps publications in order in ,ff 7 22" 5 1 i -- v , ' . ,, ll "A ' 191 5 ' O it 5 r A '-'- ' , .-s 1 - A , , I l - - J s, I I " " f' l ! , x -K M if ,lvgil " 5- .' i . .sql ,3 ' l N f i , Q ,fue ' f 1 ', .pls U " ' .L I 5 -. f 1 . - 1' g V ,1'f'I-933 5. f I t A ' f. - .1-'::Li'."t 1' 'ssl " -.EI - 5Ei:::i1E,:?1Wli:'r'f.ftniiiagiziixZ . A , 7 ...... .. ,. ,. nf 15"-55"i'z-Y-iiilii-ifi3?E:3'5S35'- ' ' - 'rrzv' '-'::.r.. fha. ig-1-. . - . -g ' ' f P55522:543iii'---izfffiii-.niilzirivA ,ii i, A I mites::lf225,E'QEEE5:1:::11:33:51:eng. 1' - lf t 1:2-rig" ..'--3-:p".'g: n-451-1,",1 ' ,JV 1 N , 41113-fliiilfriz:,-,5n1kifigiq+:1i5i. li A gl , ri - snare.-s.351212:-wmaivfff-.eff Az: 1 i1,3j-Zgigigajgtu.-1 gt S,-fy. -"cb, .I T F gssgsszxifzfgibfiilfflfi , -it - M M Jeanne Bishop. clerk 99455: I l1"'L ,r ---" . ' lf tr Q, ii, ig ,V V ,ii , Qi , ,-:il-s -:E : 1 i I 2 f v 1 Z-, 711 O.: - ly , .,T,, L A-. A ltmhifk 9 P' ,v,, V if . s V1 ,iw ,. c.1f,-: : A f Sandy Fore, accountant Marge Peters, chief accountant pn. i 1 . iv, l Handling affairs behind the scenes was the job of the Business Office for Student Publications. Director Fred Weddle was in charge of such things as billings for ads, subscription rates, classified ads, and all accounts for publications. Clerks in the Business Office managed billings for ads while selling and distributing the Sooner Yearbook. Also accounting and operating smoothly played an important role behind the counter of the Business Office. si. ABOVE: CALCULATORS AND TYPEWRITERS BELOW: AN INSTRUCTOR TOO, Fred Weddle, clutter the Business Office as the complex matters Director of Student Publications is usually found in of OU student publications are put in order. the Business Office directing affairs. 47 A' ,T ,. 1 4' -wx ' J 3 'I Receiving daily photo assignments and distributing them to staff photographers was the job of Oklahoma Daily and Sooner '75 photo editors. For photographers, printing a picture and making deadlines developed their techniques. 5' '. P ' , I' " " Q ' I . nf Q' I9 v :ffl Photographers--Judy Graham, Matt Roy, Steve Wells. ,, .i nkq U- B -W - ' -3-Q, K. H' l Monica Lawrence, clerk-typist for Sooner '75 inf pq: 'E s J 5 I . " . ,i , ra P se, ' I.. l 1. - .V -,....V.,, 6 photographers O photogs see with camera QZMXMZ2' 'sooner yearbook JFK YEARBOOKERS TO BE, high school students JAMES F. PASCHAL served as editorial attending the Oklahoma lnterscholastic Press supervisor for the '75 Sooner. Association held annually, are addressed by Sooner '75 editor Debbie Ritter. l l'A" if 13535 WW' Qtffvf mil, Sewer Skater . si sooner yearbook 0 was Stars' .5 1. Staff produces 5 71st edition - ., - L T , F ' if B f qi. N T 11, 1,5 . A more traditional type book in size X hml ff 'Q l X 113 and cover color was created by the '75 A-9 "N Ti by X -X l T W Sooner staff. Included in the book were TEH , .1 1lr l student essays, coverage of the large as , , ' ' J well as small events, graphic designs, V' , All ,,L"' 'nj and original division pages to set the p ,l 'li 1 -4 X Sooner apart from past years. ,H Rl -"Q-iffbgyfff 5 4 More color was added to the book " lf' S' featuring the senior class while the rest l T5 of the class section was divided by class B' W L4 i QQ, rather than college. The 1974 Sooner gi, Q ' won the All-American and Medalist A awards. EDITOR AT WORK in the Sooner yearbook office is Debbie Ritter, better known as Tex. Sooner Yearbook--Front row: Joy Donovan. Kevin Portz, Jane Stancliffe. Second row: Evelyn Ryals, Cathy Arrington, Nancy Fisher. Third row: Susan Holzinger, Keywood Deese, Sue Petersburg, Debbie Ritter, editor, Fourth row: Lee Reynolds, Nancy Shanks, Margaret Wade, Pam Litschke, Debbie Fulmer Back row: Kathryn Forbes, Jan Fritschen, Tim Marlow. A , f?,jQE Ooklahoma daily Daily informs campus Fall editor Janet Vitt and spring editor Linn Ann Elston led their respective Oklahoma Daily staffs in reporting "Whats happening" whether on the state, local, or national scene. Both paid, positions and lab students for News Gathering supplied the Daily with both features and news. wif' ' Jgxkc . 7-2. ' a- , ' 1 -Q Ao.. , - fn , ,, ,.. , , Aft- g,.'N.g - gg l ' , I-an 'i-.G-'Q 'f"'i'l".,, ff 'H-1-. - ff-,. . -,. ' W- ima- ,QTY 5,'i 4 2 gf-, , .. 7.5 ' ' . "4'1ff1i?5?'fi'.ff'ffr"'vf:?l?1'i Oklahoma Daily Staff tfallj--Front row: Steve Webb, Vince Kidd, Randy White, Janet Viti, editor. Second row: Candi Petre, Linn Ann Elston, Bruce Campbell, Scott Bowles, Marva Crawford, Elaine Vitt, Chuck House, advisor. Third row: Glenn West, Brenda Miss, Chuck Davis, Jim Bradshaw. Nancy Shanks, Don Hun- tington, Andy Spitler. Fourth row: Tim Marlow, Joe Mollard, Rick Oyler, Stan Nelson, Lynn Hamilton, Jan Meadows. Michael Lee. Fifth row: David Fritze. Mike Limon. Jack Rix, Grant Williams. Sixth row: Gail Peck, Lewis Pulley. ' Hi' ii- -- ' '5 - H, . - -' , l r l".-if A, , oklahoma daily Q an A Ax! V! 1 all wk. , ruth. - N - K Y ,U - J' V , .4 K- P MQ. X F t sz ,A f Z ' . 1 , - A - IT ll V 5. :xl l . V K . .i if Q ,wi n fra-J . y. ' if 1 J' "-1:45 . .iq X' if - A ff 1- :E i -if y l 1 fi, f- y r Q ,A X .w , N l.m5wv. 3.- M: x .Xa .,.f J? Q..-.,., 1 1 'Z' 53, ,ji ' ww ifli ' ,, 1 ' A . .W 'Sf' 'A gf Q' ,, 1 I 'thi .A is 4. . Q V I .L I ,w i k S .Q 1 'N " .ix .. ., . 5, H 5 X - II A . ,-- ,. 1 4 5, N fg. it- - " f. fs- F - -w 1 - --if 'GH gc ' . 31 W- 5!Fgf4f,Iw5',.4. 1 ,fs-5, . dugg' . .W 5 .W ':y5,.-. Q A'-Ao h um' f -F ,I Q ' 53133 J, L r Y 'x l ' ...fv- it :Vx v- I A ' 75' XL X " - .1 L. 2 fi i ' A f' "MZ i " 'Q -ff? 'iii f H ,-5 : ,Ml ' A 'fl ll, 1 I . l Xi 'wwlikz Y, -.--1:22 .L vm P 1 1 A ,fy P' ,, - 'sfw 2,9 , if 1 1 , .1 I . xr x if 1 4 ' 1,4 GTF 'L ' z+ 7' v' . . ,, , , --1.1 -f WN ef' y N..-V"" if 4 .+:i,,i V, H Oklahoma Daily Staff Qsummgrl--Front mwg Dgn Hunlingionv Hamilton. Back row: Dee Whiteley, Judy Hargrove, Cliff Morrison. Peggy Ingram, Kristy Wallisch. Keith Whiteley, David Witt, Lynn 8dilOf3 Steve Webb. l i' " f' .l r Y ,bf ' l P ' . . il -. ,Q if ' 1- E. .--1, ..: A521- :4 -f ' . H Q. JWL..f,A',? : ,,:-'Ql- ,gl ' ai' i i :pf - L..M-A-M M.-- v I l NEW SPRING EDITOR Linn Ann Elston makes plans with Gail Peck. W ,.s"ft V 'i ii "' Iii! "H, a ff In , I 'Q .- A -I S1115-wx . .1.':.' .' ? -..1""a ' 9 -04 ' . wax . '5 - -.4 'I - ' T 31- :z 'xi AQ 'lfflglx ' XX 1m"I,i +r 4' if -"+"'5lIZl1I1ii'wF"5- Qgfi?Si.,,,Ef O publications Y Q . ws... LV M' S ---"' 'L J'-Q4 L A W , 1 " i ' -L-sw. n ABOVE: CREATING A PLAN for the Sooner '75 are editor Debbie Ritter, academics editor Lee Ernst, and sports editor Kevin Portz. ABOVE RIGHT: "WHAT A DAY," sighs Oklahoma Daily editor Linn Ann Elston. 1.1-'f"" I-"cg, '-'tx "Let me talk to the editor- in-chief. . . " me-us!r1""'m X vu-v E51-Q . X ' s n.s - 9 HX 1' K.. .'. H-.iii a 0, . g.: ' , Q 1 .- 0, l'l.'1 ,. s ,ff u 1 ' " Rig 'A uf 1- - J' Putting together a yearbook and a newspaper may seem like an ordinary job. Except for the fact that journalism students who work on these publications have to squeeze in working hours inbetween classes and studying. Working on the Sooner '75 required volunteer efforts Ckind of like the Red Crossl and people willing to sacrifice late night hours usually used for sleeping. It involved much more than the actual pages you'll see here. It meant doing things over and over again until they were right. Not everything went right, but learning comes from experience. Oklahoma Daily employes put together those pages of print you usually halfway see at breakfast and read more thoroughly during class and end up lining the bird cage with. Lab students in Journalism classes developed style and learned all that went on in an actual news room. Just think someday the works done by people on the newspaper and yearbook may be done by the same people out there in the grown up world. Y U 1 will 'H ' . 1 J Q - 0 ,Ag , D' 6?-, 613 Publications O X l 5 wi'yfQLy, lu TOP LEFT: PUB. BOARD MEMBERS Gail Peck and Jim Bradshaw discuss the minutes. ABOVE LEFT: PASTING UP NEWS requires a steady hand. 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' 5 'Y' '5 ' 41 ' 55 5. 'M' 5 L Q M 5 5 5 .55 5" 5 ' 5 5 ' 5 5 5 ' Ssg5::g:g5.:s.:'5 "'f. 55: "'---5. :: :':5 5' 46 W , A Q ' """ '5'- 'L f 4.. 2 Q 5 5 , IKN. 1? 4 555 r V 3, 3 I A I a i 1 j V .f.,..,O-:gikjjzi QT , ml I js . A f f 5 4 AM r I .?:F+.iwfvsrva-wwwwf wife or it 1 i" iii .- um. " i ., gang tif. i .fit '- ii ' tin . ui., .. is -, i . ' ll ii . . I .i 'vig s. ' ,V kv, , Uri- , V it in 'il H iw 1 In it , T M X Y i wwf I it J ari Askins "I have been an active particpant in campus organizations and activities. My freshman and sophomore years I spent most of my time working with many different committees. During my junior and senior years l felt that I should narrow my scope of activities to the areas where I could contribute the most. l do not feel that a person can be ef- fective if he joins every organization. There is a need to be selective and join those in which a person can be most effective. "My current activities include past president of Alpha Chi Omega Sorority, Secretary of Mortar Board, Secretary of Gamma Gamma, Senior Class Secretary, and Panhellenic Scholarship Chairman. I am also vying for a position on the first OU women's golf team."-- Jari Askins . xx A is at -.G-r 'S The Sooner Standout award is designed to honor students who have made a major contribution to the University Community, Students receiving this award are not necessarily those who have participated in the most activities. but rather those who have made some significant and meaningful contribution to the university. This is not a popularity contest, but an attempt to recognize certain students who have spent their time and efforts in bettering the university. F I , I .... 499' " David Balloff 'fWhen I was a freshman at OU I did not know too much about the non- academic activities that were open to a student. Throughout that year I learned what areas were open for students and where I might best try to put my ser- vices. I always have liked helping people and finally decided that the area around student government interested me most. "Since that time I have put all my efforts into student government and I feel I have helped to clean up some of the problems it has been faced with. I saw many problems with the student insurance program and found that the students were getting the short end of the deal. As a result of this, the policy this year is going to be much more complete and it will serve the students better. "I have also been Director of Student Information which did all of the public relations for the student body. "Also on the university level I was elected to Student Congress. One of the main problems that I have seen as a student congressperson is that there is a big split between the Greek and In- dependent people. I have worked very hard to bridge that gap. I have voted on all bills the way I felt was right for the student body. I think that openminded- ness is a key word. "I feel that in all the activities that I have been involved with I have helped to make this university a better one and I am continuing to make it a better place for all of us."--David Balloff Wg jimi., , , 1 ,.. -V ., I A Eimfiff 'E 2ffj.,TIfs,fjffr1: .Y -A ,Z-i.IPiJ.,.?Y X ' ,, ,.- W. -:.-- - ,- 1,1 ' f 'ful :j'gqgiy,. Y fi L T ill" l V li V - Jan Eskew ul feel that my major contribution to the university was being President of the General Assembly for the sixteenth Oklahoma Model United Nations. "From my experience on Model United Nations through delegation work and staff rapporteur for Security Council, I was selected to be the first woman President of the General Assembly. The Oklahoma Model United Nations is a very educational experience for both delegation and staff members. The OMUN is a simulation exercise in world peacekeeping. During the session l met many people from around the country and from within the university. During these three days everybody associated with OMUN is united for one cause--preservation of world peace."- Jan Eskew ' Q"- , - I II If ri' .nj " . I-A, I ' I-V: .' H ' ' ii .. V-I H Jackie Farley "I feel that leadership is a very im- portant aspect of success. Very often, a leader is judged by the type of organization he leads. I have been associated with many organizations during my educational career, but something that I feel very strongly about has brought me greater satisfaction than being named to Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities or to the Dean's Honor Roll, and that has been my involvement in the rise of Women's Athletics at OU. I feel women have the right to compete if they want to on the collegiate Ievel. I have always loved basketball and this year for the first time l've been given a chance to really compete. "Our team, though lacking in financial support and facilities, is building for teams to come. As captain of this team I believe that I have had an impact on the freshman who are just starting on sports. I've tried to instill in them the pride one must have to represent a university such as OU. "The entire women's program needs support and leadership. Most of the participants are freshmen and have a long road ahead. I'm glad that I've had the opportunity to help lead these girls for a year. I hope that my enthusiasm will be remembered for it is that spark that ignites success."--Jackie Farley ,fri iw! "I feel my main contribution to the university is through involvement in campus activities these past three years. I served as president of the Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity from May 1974 until June 1975. This gave me an op- portunity to become involved in the lnterfraternity Council and the University Community. "This past summer I had the privilege of representing the University of Oklahoma as a student intern in the Governor's office at the State Capitol. This program is under the direction of the State Regents for Higher Education. It gives the undergraduate student a first hand view of the workings of our state government in Oklahoma."--Glen Johnson ,As- ATS? T . , m- h - 'rig xx A u Q' -9- -5 4 .N 'L 5 .:. 'X ,.- 3 '- , -we X A sf I L - ll N, . QQ' if plgjgjgggfil. .'1'L2JgS-Q U. ff: if 'V light 3-awcfrar W-'Tail-"l9i'J.'f2:-1.ll.'Efirf. ffi'j4"T I I it 'I 'ri li iff ': Ll -'. eM"fa"'ff gg J 311195 ' ci-. .. was eu if- F'-fl'-l'i'J-i4 "'- i:',' 'IJ-"--I n.. if - is '1- Parks 2111! ijt". fy ii AQ. . aj- -ft - e '-" ,411 irir i J Q f "My major contribution to the university has been through my in- volvement in Sooner Scandals. I have been involved with Sooner Scandals in various phases for the past four years. "As Business Manager of the 1974 Scandals the financial success of the show was my responsibility. The 1974 show was the biggest financial success in the history of Scandals. However, this success had to be achieved without altering the quality of the show. "As chairman of the 1975 show I have encouraged as many people as possible to get involved in Scandals. This year there were more acts to apply for admission to the show than in any prior year. Scandals has more people involved through the acts and staff committees than there have been in recent years. In my opinion the goal of my campus activities is involvement, and I feel that Sooner Scandals has certainly been successful this year in getting people involved."--James Parks :ENEEE FOR STUDENT DEVF' UNIVERSITY commurw' Eu. MICIEM Wljlft , 5 me sus REE! 059.5 .1 . , Qu wnguncgmngi 0-UJPEMERSE' E E 16 Afwrgs. .y sriai.tFEB.15':'Xl41"D mm, Mauser. ONLY'- Q: 30 Qlfiihunuj PX. 2:f.----. ,, 'rnci1'9Qw.ee KL Au-. 'gwyfff-2,15-Q"EJ'f1+ - - l' 'f mi l2:.1xx1eAr'11mvM I I Fa.ummen8w Pasmonl PFW A E Y' , ,. icy I I I Hilti? E A I ,I HESTEF1 , , i 'I ' HALL lt- IJ I A i If L I I. Vt.: 2 g :fffzfi .E f 4 ' 2, I ' J E nf 1 n L i.iEN1Bggg y WOJYJPJI .. 'I Qrond prix .Q f mechanic I AE mais I feb. is Wim It figs? TJ' .QQ-j'fii-jiri-?5if.E1 I -X ,- 1-E2 L-2. is W-'E Qi, . " J ' 2-.-if 'il ' '-,W 47- " '. -.f.. I , ' fl 6- ,' Y ,.g-. .- - ' ', , :yi-.A .- - E' . ' ...aiu ,.I- Y- . -'V ., . Q .1 - I .- - -W-5-,f.f..fg iff-1.2 ,. - -E I I" .mfg , N 3 14'-'."rE,, I 1' .- .t- I -E. . -. E-'Ev-"1,fi.' ,t .1 Elf. . .V L, E... , V. Jian. .typ -Y -NF .:,y...,ia, I- - ' , , ...L ,. ., John Rogers MW hen I started to college in the fall of 1971, the image of the University of Oklahoma was at best mediocre. Along with many members of my freshman class, I was concerned by this. I entered student activities in the hope that I might be able to do something which might help improve the image of the University. 'tBy serving as Mom's Day Student Chairman and Dad's Day Executive Secretary, I was instrumental in planning and directing two of our universities rnost important student activities. The festivities we display for our parents play a large part informing the opinions of people outside the University Community. My chair- manship of ticket sales for Sooner Scandals continues my attempts at student leadership, participation, and contribution. "Beyond contribution, I feel that my personal objective of improving the university image has, to a degree, been accomplished."--John Rogers 'J I f F f' Sl 1 If 1 ' 1 I I I ,J 'I ilvfl riglvvgt , 5 qv- Y. V 7' I., Y 'V .ag ,f' , is "H .ffm vg- l 1 T' . - , -rfxl v ,L : .lr 'f U-5, 31- 'J' ' ' ,. fa' N 'I 3 ., . V- lf' a-ja" I 25' .f if 1 , L, J i i. .I ,L fs i ' I l 'tx .- ' 'I I X 1 angst? lluxznxp , .nz-u ru 2 it Vi -f-5--fy-.4 -reef?it-7-1,-'1ii:.g'vjdTn3-igsq-g.y-A If Q '- 1-'nil :L-'Ei' Q 712- H+1.ifjs in ,, ' .. 2' ,.,!' 5 If -' :ii llgu5"1',l',lli'lI1.i li. I-itll,"l'l"'g3f:5.V.ril: . j."j.H..lIlii.i IIE, A :I ,V .V V W: In WM ,UN-R ,.l!E5i1'A1-,gmsEgg.,,..'Ii..,w,mQ!g..yIIIIJMgFEHl.,N,,.... F, V til- 71- ,1,.a, -mg. .i..-,.,.1.i .Q in Qt: -. ,H V ll I tl- Quai V! tum- kv:g4iig.FEiggiut:h,l!!rilull -vElIl'iyzmH,.Y'-,Mill .A 1' I' ' 4 -1. H X humlu 'ill-,iiasw !.,J,,5ii..1, all ,'j11W1iiIN,... "'l-dimming' m1'i 5..r' MH.. Larry Van Hoose "I feel that I have contributed to the university through my work on Campus Activities. Through these various ac- tivities I have been involved and worked with people from all walks of life. For example, as Community Chairman I worked with the three Gubernatorial candidates, Dr. Sharp, Mayor Dunn, the Norman City Council, the Norman Human Rights Commission, and chairman of various civic organizations to help further improve the relations be- tween the University Community. "As Publicity Chairman for the Muscular Dystrophy "Dance for those Who Can't"g I was one of its initiators. From this the university received good publicity from all over the state. I feel that this is beneficial in that the University of Oklahoma gets some good publicity instead of all bad as is often the case. It helps show those outside the University that we're not alla bunch of radicals bent on the destruction of society."--Larry Van Hoose Abel, Stan 46 Abbott, Mike 316 Abernathy, Ann 274 Baker. Baker. Baker. Belinda 290 Jim 281, 214, 327 Marilyln 274 Baker, Stan 281 Baker. Suzy 225 Bakunowicz, Mary 290 Baldschwiler. Max 281 Ackerman, Ray 222 Ackley, David 263 Acree, Andi 281 Adams. Cindy 374 Adams, David 281 Adams, Janet 263, 316 Adamson, Carol 290 Addison. Michelle 281, 140 Adkins, David 281 Sgee, Steve 263 Ahmed, Zia 323. 263 Albert. Paul 218, 274 Alcoyloure, Eric 330 Aldworth. Reta 327 Alexander, Gary 274 Ainsworth, Terry 281, 327 Air Force 340-341 Aley. Cecilia 281 Allen, Jim 324. 290 Allen, Kelly 281 Allen, Mike 222 Allen, Larry 263. 214 Allen. Ron 290. 327 Allen. Sharon 263 Allen, Warren 225 Baldwin, Steve 274. 327, 214 Ball, Blair 212, 274 Ball, Brenda 281, 212 Ball, Stephen 263 Ballard, Dave 212 Ballew. Stanton 290 Balloff, David 274 Balofl, Dr. Nicholas 106 Banks, Helen 322 Barker, Melvin 327 Barnes. Neal 274. 316 Barnes, Ronald 274 Barnett, Sue 281 Barns. Debra 263 Barrett. Major Robert 344 Barrington, Carl 290 Barrington, Jeff 263 Barry. Frank 217 Barry, Sally 10 Barthel, Roger 218, 263 Barltett, Michael 274 Barton. Lynn 147 Barrett, Jan 290 Basden, Gene 327 Basden, Kenny 290 Bass. Fred 214 Alpha Chi Omega 166-167 Alpha Epsilon Phi 168-169 Alpha Gamma Delta 70-171 Alpha Phi 172-173 Alpha Phi Alpha 224 Alpha Phi Omega 318-319 Alspaugh, Larry 147, 274 Alston. Carolyn 131 Alston, Rick 263 Amburn. Steve 147 ASME 321 Ammerman. Vicki 274 Amrine, Peggy 327 Anderson, Chuck 290 Anderson, Doug 274 Anderson, Kim 290 Anderson, Mark 323 Anderson, Jeffery 263 Anderson. Randy 217 Andrew, Bill 327 Andres, Suzanne 263 Angel Flight 342 Annesley, Don 327 Anno, Pamela 88, 263 Applegate. Phillip 290 April, Brian 222 Archer, Mike 263 Army 344-346 Arnold, Donald 263 Arnold Air Society 343 Arnold, Rick 217 Arrington. Cathy 274 Arrington. Julie 290 Ashford, Jim 222 Ashwood. Tom 263 Askari, Zolfghar 263 Askins, Jari 263. 321, 322 Askins, Pi 342 Assalone, John 222 Asseo, Laurie 327 Atkinson, Dr. Gordon 110, 111 Atlee, Debbie 281 Augustus. Michael 224 Aulick, John 210 Bassett, Lisa 281, 330. 342 Baten. Cynthia 281 Batema n, Linda 290 Bates. Stacy 290 Bathhurst, Dan 212 Battle, Tobytha 224 Bauman, David 327 Bayles. Alice 140, 281 Baylor. Crissa 274 Baymert, Charles 218 Beames, Barbara 330, 333 Beams. Barbara 321, 322 Bean, Kevin 290 Bear. Neill 290 Beasley, David 290 Beason, Pamela 105 Bebb, Mike 274 Bebb. Russell 263 Bearly, Carol Beck, Richard 148 Beck, David 274 Becker, Beech. Kathy 263 Debbie 290 Beeman, Mindy 327 Bejaek. Opal 263, 315 Bell, Becky 351 Bell, Mi ke 222 Bell, Morgan 281 Bell, Robert 217 Bell. Stephen 263 Bell, Terri 328, 329 Belyea. Joseph 344 Benge, Mark 290 Benge. Paula 217 Bennett. Bill 281 Bennett, Leslea 263 Bennett, Stephen 274 Bennett, Terry 340, 343 Bennlnger. Jim 290 Benson, Brad 327 Benson, John 316 Benson, Lisa 290 Benton. Bereolu Tim 212 s, Demetrius 323 Austin, Sandy 210 Austin, William 327 Avery, Robert 263 Awtrey, Rhonda 281 Azzarello, Salvatore 263 Babin. Mark 94, 281 Badgett, Randy 327 Badzinski. Gary 290 Bagley, Bill 290, 214 Bagley, Kenneth 290 Bagley, Treasa 281 Bailey, David 327 Bake, Elizabeth 281 Baker House 143 Berebery, Jennifer 322 Bergman, Doug 274 Berline, Dee 274 Bernard. Bruce 323 Bernhard, Bets 263 Berry. Charlene 274 Berry. Gary 263 Berry, Robert 290 Berlalan, Elaine 281 Besenfelder, Ed 327, 214 Besenfelder, Larry 214 Besenfelder, Lawrence 327 Beta Theta Pl 194-195 Bibb. Buddy 263 Bickford, Martha 147 Biggers, Jeffrey 290 Billingsley, Grant 156, 323 Billman. Bill 148 Bilyou, Chuck 222 Bingman. Brian 217 Birdshead, Eddie 290 Birdsong, Mike 290 Bishop, Andy 263, 331 Bishop, Eileen 281 Bishop, James 263 Biship, Jim 345 Bittman, Bette 263 Bizzell and Brooks House 143 Black, Bard 222 Black, Glynnis 115 Black, Robert 327 Black, Sidney 263 Blackburn. Karen 263 Blackburn, Sharon 281 Blackman, Ralph 281 Blackstock, Kathy 324 Blackard, Joey 324 Blake, Brad 290 Blanco. Kathy 346 Blankenship, Jack 340 Blankenship, Pmela 290 Bledsoe, Larry 335 Bledsoe, Wes 328 Blissett, Dr. 119 Bloom. David 281, 330, 226 Blubaugh, Janet 281, 327 Blumenthal, Marsha 274 Boeck. David 263 Boehm, Rene 281 Bolinger, Mark 330 Boettcher, Mike 217 Bolton. Cathy 263 Bonar. Missy 210 Bonham, Roger 290 Bonner. Bill 263 Bookhout. Peggy 291 Boothe, Dave 140 Booihe, Margaret 274 Borba. Chris 217 Boremus. Mark 274 Boren, Gov. David 104 Borges, Ed 148 Born, Lawrence 327 Boston, David 274 Bott, David 281 Boughan. Bena 263 Boucher, Melisa 281 Bourquin, Bonnie 263 Bowen, Franni 291 Bowen, George 351 Bowlin, Tim 291 Bowles. Jim 263 Bowling, Barbara 274 Bowling, Daniel 281 Bowman. Elizabeth 291 Bowman. Nancy 327, 214, 274 Bowzer, Jerry 281. 210 Boyd. Cary 316 Boyd, Paul 291 Boyer. Sheryl 225 Boyett. Brock 281 Boyles. Kay 263 Bozeman, Walt 281, 148 Bradford. Claudia 316 Bradford, Rocky 210 Bradley. Cindy 290. 324 Bradley. Debi 291 Bradley. Elzine 281 Bradley, Mike 217 Bradshaw. Dorothy 263 Brady. Richard 290 Bradshaw, Jim 359 Bradshaw. Nancy 327 Bradway. Roderick 290 Bramlett, Rick 216, 217 Brandell, Patty 322 Brander. Trip 281 Brandle, Michael 263 Brandle. Paula 274 Brandon, Gary 263 Brannon. Mary 274 Branstetter. Robert 327 Branum, Mark 222 Braswell, Barbara 290 Brauer, Tim 290 Braun, Howard 263 Bravo. Alan 210, 281 Breitenkamp, Kristy 290 Brennan. Patrick 274 Brenner, Anne 274 Bretches, Bill 263, 222 Brewer, Becky 290 Brezney, Vicki 329 Bridgman, Gayle 263 Briggs. Randall 274 Brinkley, Elaine 313 Brisky, Debbie 325 Brixey, Lisa 281 Broam. Kevin 222 Brock. Lisa 218, 290 Broderack, Marti 281 Brooks, Charles 281 Brooks, Cindy 281 Brooks. Rebecca 263 Broom. Richard 274 Brown. Barbara 281, 212 Brown, Brenda 324 Brown, Cathy 157 Brown. David 290 Brown, Dianne 263 Brown, Dwight 263 Brown. Jaci 291, 327 Brown, Mike 212 Brown, Michael 327 Brown. Mimi 281 Brown, Patti 281 Brown. Philippa 147 Brown. Vicki 263 Brown. William 115 Browning, Debra 281 Brownlee, Francis 263. 315 Brueckner, Dr. 335 Brumage. Mary 274 Brumley, Butch 222 Brunette, Pat 217 Bruton. Steve 281 Bryan. John 327 Bryan, Laura 291 Bryant. Anthony 67 Bryant, Nat 263 Buchanan, Thomas 263 Bugg. Lisa 291 Buhite, Russel 67 Bullard, Sue 212 Bullard. Suzanne 263 Bumpas. Janis 291 Bumpas, Tony 274 Buntz, Mark 328, 212 Buntz, Paul 328 Burdette. Jim 291 Burger. Jennifer 140 Burger. Richard 274 Burgett. Grant 24, 64 Burja, David 263. 212 Burja, Martha 212 Burk. Richard 263 Burkett, Jana 263 Burleson. Bill 281 Burleson. Brian 222 Burnett, Jeanne 291 Burns. Dorothy 327 Burns, Karl 327 Burns. Tommy 274 Burnside, Rhonda 263 Burr. David 101 Burris. Steve 148 Burrow. Jeff 222 Busby. Joel 291 Busenbark, Jim 214 Bush. Rick 263 Business Administration 106 Busko, James 263 Butcher, Paul 313, 321, 323 Butner, Mary 327 Butts, Richard 225 Buzbee. John 312 Byers, Thomas 327 Bynum. Michael 327 Cadwell. Marc 214 Cain. Kim 291 Cain, Mark 264 Callaway, Kelly 274 Callard, Jeff 264 Calvin, Wendall 291 Cameron, Debbie 264 Campbell, Dianne 342, 343 Campbell, Cathy 264 Campbell, Deborah 218, 274 Campbell, Patti 264 Campus Activities Council 330 Campus Chest 330 Canavan, John 275 66Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow? -- Macbeth Prepare for it. The earlier you begin a life insurance program, the less you pay. Find out about the CollegeMaster plan. Call the Fidelity Union College Master 35 Field Associate in your area: RACZKUWSKI ASSOCIATES 730 Asp, Suite 104 329-5951 "Let us carry the ball for you. " fl . 15? 5 my 1. if 1. .p -Jigga' ' I A mtl' if .Lvt-1 ,.., ' ' -lv, f - I , lj, 'Q sy "".,l4 'if ,. ' S' 4- ., V .'4 4 ff""' ' f f '. my ,, ., ' '. 'V' . . C211 le g Maste1z. ag, Sp if Canfield. Canfield. Cannon. Cannon. Cannon, Bob 275. 327 Torn 210 Judy 147 Larry 327, 324 Mike 212 Cantrell. Linda 291. 327 Cantwell, Hal 291 Cape, Rick 291 Carey, Jennifer 281 Cargal. Tommy 291 Carman. Roy 327 Carmen. Richard 327 Carpenter, Gary 225 Carr, Holly 327, 291 Carr. Ronnie 275 Carrell. Scott 147 Carroll, Cheryl 327 Carry. James 218, 275 Carter, Bill 218 Casebeer, Michael 275 Casey, Glyn 340 Cash, Cathy 217 Cassity. Judy 344 Cassody, Connie 275 Castelii. Wendy 264 Castle, Scott 222 Castleberry, Steven 327 Cate Center Presidents Council Cellers. Connie 264 Cermak. Ernie 264 Cernan. Eugene 225 Cerring, Roberta 275 Chatfin. Bobby 275 Chambers. Marc 281 Chan, Fred 316 Chance, Isaac 264 Chandler. Cheryl 264, 321. 322 Chandler. Gary 281 Chapman, Al 264 Chapman. Parker 291 Charloe, Mitch 291 Chase. Stan 264 Chenhall, Bill 291 Cheoweth, Linda 281, 330, 332. 333 Cherry. Patti 291 Chenyhomes. Melinda 281 Chi Omega 174-175 Chism. Joseph 275 Choat. Gary 222 Chouteau. Yvonne 335 Christenson. Kelly 281 Christie. Jeff 148 Chung, Melanie 264 Churchill. Richard 281 Clayton. Mary 218 Clements. Jill 291 Clements, Mark 225 Clampitt. Phil 147 Clanahan. William 327 Clanton. Terri 281 Clark. Annetta 264 Clark. Carolyn -344 Clark, Ellen 322 Clark, Jean 342 Clark. Jeannie 343, 342 Clark. Kevin 328 Clark, Laverne 281 Clark, Martha 291 Clark. Ted 264 Clarke, Keven 212 Clausen. Mark 210. 291 Eskew. Jan 265, 313, 333, 321 Clawson, Susan 275 Claxton, Kim 212 Caly. Charlie 210 Clay. David 291 Clayton, Christi 218, 281 Clayton, Jean 264 Clemmons, John 218. 264 Clock, Ray 281 Cloud, Willie 328 Cluck, Tim 217 Coates, Vicki 327 Cobb, David 218, 291 Cochran Cochran Cochran Cochran Cinda 214 Glenn 275 Helen 327 . Karen 214, 218 Cochran, Marilyn 316 Cocke, Robert 275 Cockrall, Steven 327 Coffman, Cathy 291 Coggin. William 264 Cohen, Laura 292 Cohen, Sandra 327 Colbert, Bob 222 Colbert, Bobby 313 Cole. Michael 281 Cole. Rita 292 Coleman, Bill 281 Coleman, Carol 327 Coleman. Louis 275 Coley, Phyllis 316 Coltrane. Linda 292 Colbert, Caren 275, 322. 330 331. 332. 333. 327 Cone, Christa 327 Cone, Vicki 275 Conner. Alan 264 Conner, Mike 281 Conrad. Natalie 292 Cook, Caren 264 Cook. Carol 264 Cook. David 327, 292 Cook. Eileen 272. 322 Cook, Glenda 264 Cook. Jeni 281 Cook. John 218, 275 Cook, Kathryn 292 Cook. Marie 264 Cook. Michael 264 Cooper, Ann 292 Cooper. Brent 324 Cooper, Jerry 327 Cooper, Jim 212. 264 Cooper. Rick 217 Cooperman. Mike 217, 264 Copson. Scot! 316 Cordell. Jean 212 Cornelius. George 281 Cornish. Bruce 148 Corp. Randy 210 Cotton. Rich 328 Cosentino. Julie 292 Costilow. Tim 281 Cotterell. Terry 281 Cotton. Richard 281 Cottrell, Donna 264 Countryman, Cam 281 Cowart. Maureen 292 Cox. David 214 Cox, Gerald 275 Cox. Jeff 66 Cox. Sharon 281 Coyer. Scott 222 Craig. Carol 264 Craig. Jimmy 264 Craig. Kevin 217 Craig. Ramona 131 Craig. Susan 292 Crain. Russell 327 Cravens. Teresa 147 Creedon. Tim 212 Creel, Kathy 275 Crichton, William 281, 313 Crisp, Alicia 119 Crites. Keith 214 Crockett. Carol 217, 264 Croisant. Kirby 275 Cronin. Tom 218, 281 Crosby. Karen 316, 264 Crosby. Ronnie 281 Cross. Preston 275 Crotty, Maureen 292 Crowell. Thomas 292 Crowl. Cynthia 292 Crovvler. Hue 147 Crumpley. Rob 327 Crutcher, Mike 264 Culver, Billie 264, 325 Culver. Peggy 264 Culver. Paul 264, 325 Cumby. Dunn 115 Cumming. Ron 212 Cundith. Jan 214 Cundith. Jane 227, 313 Cunningham, Jana 281. 315 Cunningham. Patty 275 Cuplin, Pamela 281, 322 Curley. Steve 281 Curnutte, Mark 275. 330 Curry, Bill 217 Curry. Jan 75 Curry. Susan 292 Curtis. Diane 281 Cusack, Kathleen 292 Dabner, Janet 292 Dad's Day Committee 332 Dakil, Phyllis 275 Dale, Mark 282 Dannelley. Paul 325 Danner, Kevin 327 Darrah. Jean 275 Davarpanah, Earmamarz 264 David. Connie 275 Davidson. Diane 282 Davidson. Melinda 327 Davidson. Rod 292 Davidson, Steven 327 Davies, Dave 222 Davis, Beverly 264 Davis, Chuck 264 Davis. Dennis 282, 327 Davis, Eric 282 Davis Hamill 144 Davis. Janet 292 Davis. Jim 264, 316 Davis. Kim 222. 321. 330, 332 Davis, Michael 327 Davis, Mike 292 Davis, Nancy 264 Davis. Palmer 327 Davis, Ricky 264 Davis. Sharon 282 Davis, Shirley 275 Davis. Steve 24, 43, 66 Davis. Vicky 327 Davison, Teresa 292 Dawson, Beverly 264 Day, Vaun 327 Dayvault, Dave 264 Deacon. Jody 292 Deaton. Amy 324 Deaton. William 264 DeClare. James 264 Deese, Keywood 264 DeJarnette, John 210, 211 DeJarnette, Marilyn 210, 211, 282 DeJongh, Mike 214. 327 Dellasega, Doug 148, 275 Delta Delta Delta 176-177 Delta Gamma 178-179 Delta Tau Delta 196-197 Delta Upsilon 198-199 Denney. James 327 Denning, Emily 231 Dennis, Jim 264 Denson. Molly 264 Dernoncourt, Debbie 264, 322 Dernoncourt, Diane 342 Detter, Janet 342 Dibble, David 282 Dickeson. Mark 341 Dickerson. Larry 324 Dickerson, Lawrence 292 Diehl, Mark 264 Diehl. Steve 327 Diggs, William 292, 327 Dillan, Frank 265 Dillard, Linda 324 Dionisio, Teryle 315 Dinkins. Larry 265 Dismukes, James 292 Douglas. Michael 327 Doughman. Jean 217 Doughty. Jim 292 Doughty. Michael 282 Douthit. Carey 212 Douthit. Evan 212 Dow, Billy 147 Dowd, Tim 265 Dowell, Fred 292 Dowling. Patricia 165 Dowling. Patti 322 Downes, Patrick 292 Downey, Jefl 275. 327 Downing. Ron 217 Drabek, Claude. 210. 211, 282 Drumright, Keith 55 DuBois, James 327 Dudley. Chip 217 Dugan. Joseph 265 Duke. Bud 147 Duke, Debbie 118 Dukes. Bob 292 Dumas. Clara 316 Duncan. Prank 331 Dunham, Linda 265 Dunlap. Mike 219. 218, 275 Dunlap, Tim 210, 211, 282 Dunn. Richard 275, 328 Duren, Russell 282 Durrenberger. Gail 292 Durrett. Bob 148 Durrin. Bob 212 Duvall, Rick 292 Dwen, Lauren 265 Dycus. Diane 292 Dye. Bob 217 Dye, Delayne 265 Dye, Robert 282 Earley, Linda 292 Easter. Paul 343 Ebert. Leigh 292 Edminster, Ed 282 Edwards, Eddie 217. 324. 292 Edwards, James 282 Edwards. Janis 265 Edwards, John 94 Edwards, Jim 218 Education 107 Eichelberger, Lynda 282 Eischeid. Steve 222, 275 Elliot. Ken 275 Ellison, Ann 282 Elkins, Neal 148 Elkins. Phil 327 Elkins. Randy 148 Elkouri, Karen 324 Elliott, Elaine 265 Ellis. Gary 265 Elrod, Jimbo 64 Elston, Linn 265. 358 Emde. Jennifer 292 Emery, Linda 265 Emery. Mary 282 English 108 Engineering 108 Divers Dixon. Dobbs, Dobbs, . Major Don 340. 343. 342 Richard 265 Jeanett 275 Rick 148 Dodson, Bob 282 Dodson, John 217 Doerner. Tom 217 Dolle, Gary 265 Dollins, Bronwyn 292 Dominey, Barbara 315 Donaidson, Cindy 330. 342 Donaldson. Dennis 350 Donaldson. Ted 265 Donohoe. Michael 292 Donovan, Joy 282 Doolen, Janet 265 Doremus, Mark 321 Dorman, Rosemary 327 Dorsett, Dave 147 Dorsey, Paul 292 Dossey, Karyl 275 Doty, Steven 214. 327 Dougherty. Dortha 265 Douglas. Don 275 Environmental Design 109 Enix, Dayna 327 Engles. Chuck 265 Enos, Chuck 225 Epsteen. Debbie 265 Epstein, Leslie 214, 265 Erben. Paul 275 Erickson, Nancy 212, 282 Ernst, Lee 148, 282, 358 Erwin, Eddie 265 Esfarjani. Hossain 165 Essary. Estep. Estep. Estus. Evans. Evans. Evans. Evers. Evans. Evans. Ewing. Leonard 214, 327 Jeffery 265 Leslie 265 Gayla 282 Cynthia 282 Gracie 292 Haydon 327 Randy 327 Sam 327 Vicki 327 Nancy 292 Ezell, James 346 W IM, ,.,Wna1w'.a.w1...-ip: J t, .W ffww' f1ff,1, 3, ,,,, ...5. 1 4 Convenient Locations Serving The University of Oklahoma Community I, I 'gi University Book Exchange i U NAIN stoRi5 I I union Lobby Hester-Robertson 731 Elm Ph.325-3511 900 Asp Pl'i.325-2171 'lx ... . . t Memorial Stadium U ' 180 W. Brooks Pl'l.325-5341 tj I D G I I 1700 Asp Pl'l,325-1797 A ,, . .I II I IIIEI . 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I wva,,y"lj ,Mflllwilt 3 my co, ",.h..W" '.-"' ,Qi -"' "2- U ' -'WF ,- ..-UL 34, ',.q af .1 ', az ' ,.n.""""e-"", ,.n"' 1, -ul. .al " - ' ,Mb .-""-- 'T' 'f """" -IN-:I JI..-Kg, I. ,.-U-.J ,Q ".,,, " -A, ..i,g""-fx 'f' Q4 f ' " - ' ' i 1 - A+- U sw. .ng -a T Aa 5, .,,f-W' 'U K.. . A E -0 See U B E for. W ' i ' - i, Q Textbooks I f School Supplies I ' Art 8. Engineering Needs X PE Equipment 4 5' Greeting Cards .K . , , i . X Gifts I -- nfl!" ' -' ' ' xx fl.-oi I- , :A II I 1' . '-'vu , " ' .-f., 1' .sf - Q-'saw - -"'1..,,l X u ' 6. ' -"V , i In I, , .X ,x I I ii. ....I -I ', 1 U 1 .i.., II I 2- f 1 I U tl H I,-' if ' n X, I , ' I, -.AA,'-1-U-4 I ' vl H II' 'ku' V. .. UNIVERSITY BOOK EX CHANGE-Owned and operated by The University of Oklahoma U Grice, C 32 Fajen, Nancy 282. 327 Faler. Nancy 265 Falle, Audrey 265 Farha. Dana 275 Farha. Tina 292 Farley. Jackie 265 Farley, Joe 148 Farmer, Faith Ann 147, 324 Farmer, Vanessa 265 Farnsworth. Brad 222 Farrar, Blake 212 Farrell, Linda 322 Farshad. Luke 328 Fath. David 282 Fath. Tony 275 Faulkner. Cincy 265 Faulkner, Linda 265 Feiler, Eliot 282 Feldner. Becky 292 Felks. Jayne 266 Felton, Mark 265 Felton, Susan 316 Ferber, Marilyn 282, 313 Fergason. Christy 275 Ferrer, Geoffrey 282 Ferrero, Phil 275 Ferris, Ken 67 Fidler, Phil 222 Field. Tommy 210, 211, 282 Fielder. Steve 265 Fields, Ramona 327 Fieler, Elliot 210, 211 Filgas, Bob 292 Fillmore. Steve 148 Findley, John 225. 275 Fine Arts 110 Fisher. David 265 Fisher, David 330 Fisher, Marlon 292 Fisher, Nancy 214, 275. 318 Fitch. Alan 282 Fitch. Paul 210, 211 Fitnimons. Keith 148 Flaherty, Jay 10 Flanagan, Richard 327 Fleet, Alan 275 Fleming, Robin 275. 329 Flemming. Vickie 275 Fleming, Wayne 212 Floren. Laurie 329 Flowers. Karen 282 Floyd. Ray 316 Folks. Angelia 327 Folks. Mike 148 Foltz. Dan 282 Foraker, Randy 292 Forbes House 144 Forbes, Kathryn 342 Ford. Lee 266 Ford, Pallas 322 Fore, Ken 313 Foreman, Brent 214 Foreman, Karl 316 Fosnes, Claudia 316 Foutz. Sherri 124, 126. 127, 266 Fowler, Margaret 282 Fox, Elizabeth 266 Fox, Jan elle 282 Fox, Kevin 292. 327 Frame. John 331 Francis. Dana 292 Francis, John 321 Franglone. Ron 106 Franklin, Barbara 292 Franklin, Danny 219. 218 Franklin, Don 266 Franklin. John 275, 327 Franklin, John Wayne 214 Franklin, Mary 327 Franknecht. Karen 292 Fransisco, Robin 275 Frantz, J ane 217 Fraser. Phyllis 282 Frazier, Mary 266 Frazier, Phil 225 Freeman, Steven 327 French, Blake 324 French. Ron 213 Freund. Nicki 275, 316 Friedlander. Lahoma 315 Friend. Mike 212 Fritschen, Jan 313, 282 Frizzell, Renee 275 Fronterhouse, Austa 210, 211 Frost, Gary 266 Fulmer, Debbie 185, 328. 282 Fulmer, Nancy 292 Funk. John 266 Furman. Dale 266 Gable, Ann 292 Gaebe, Ann 212 Gaede, Steve 266 Gagnon. Gary 327 Gahan. Raymond 292 Gaines, Adel 275 Galegar, Janice 282 Gallad. Cathryn 327 Gallagher, James 266 Galbraith, Douglas 275 Galoob, Beth 282, 342 Galt. Terri 282 Gamble, David 292 Gamble. Elena 292 Gamma Phi Beta 180-181 Gamma Gamma 321 Gammon. Lawrence 266 Gandara, Mike 210, 211 Gann. Rick 328 Gannaway, Kathrine 327 Gannaway, Keith 147 Gardenshire, Ann 282 Gardner, Drew 327 Gardner, Keith 218, 293 Gardner, Lanna 293 Gardner. Robert 275 Grey, Caren 282 Garfield, Cathy 266 Garrett, Chuck 293 Garrett. Russ 148, 343 Garrett. Timothy 293 Garris. Bill 222 Gary, Dan 292 Gasaway, Jim 218, 266 Gasaway, Keith 282, 212 Gassar. Marilyn 318 Gassett, Bill 327 Gassett, Martha 327 Gatchell, Laurie 282, 210, 211 Gattis, Karen 293 Geffne, John 212, 327 Geister. Brian 293 Geister. Charles 282 Geitgey, Jonna 293 Gerlach. Gayle 266 Gcrondale. Gavin 293 Gholston, Lisa 282 Gibson, Janet 210. 211 Gierhart, David 316 Gilbert. John 217 Gilbert. Phyllis 327 Gilbert, Tim 217 Gill. Jim 275 Gilleland, Marcia 275 Gillespie, Peggy 293 Gillard, Patti 293 Gingrich, Greg 222 Givens. Jimmy 293, 324 Glass, David 217 Glasser. Melanie 266 Glazer. Jimi 225 Glazer, Kim 282 Gicke, Rozanne 293 Godfrey, Gina 266 Godfrey, Laura 293 Godfrey. Pete 293 Goff. Kent 293 Gokey. Murna 266 Goldsmith, Charlie 275 Gonzales, Lala 316 Goocl, Susan 275, 322 Goodnight. Vicki 282, 329 Goodwin, John 327 Goodyear,-Jill 327 Goolsby. Paul 222 Goodner, Chuck 275 Gorelick. Stuart 327, 226 Gorishek. George 218 Goriestani. Mohammed 266 Gorton. James 266 Gossett. Bill 266 Gould, Kevin 226 Graeber. Gracie Stephen 293 ike 293 . M Graham. Doug 266. 321, 213, Graham, David 210, 293. 211 Graham. Gary 210. 275, 211 Graham. Jami 327, 282 Graham, John 327, 353 Graham, Judy 313 Graham, Michael 327 Graham. Ron 293 Grantz. Terri 282 Gray. Paul 282, 210. 211 Graybill, Graybill, Graves. Graybill, Graves. David 217 Todd 217 Peter 331 Martha 343, 322 David 222 Green, David 327 Green, Mark 293 Greenamyer. Lyn 293 Greene. Patty 266 Greeson. Fred 275 Gregg, Tim 293 Greve. John 282. 327, 214 Grey, Barbara 293 Grider, Griffin, Griffin, Griffin. Griffin, Grisby. Grimes. Grimes. Grimes. arol 275 Vic 266 Brad 293 Genie 276 James 266 Jeanne 266 Wes 323 Bob 214 Dennis 327 Stanley 266 Groom. Gloria 275, 316 Groom, Gerg 282, 218, 327 Grover, Ann 266 Gruntmeir, Martha 324 Guinn, Ann 293 Gunderson. James 266 Gunn. Kerry 266. 321 Gunning, Bob 210. 211. 266 Gurney. Virginia 282 Gurst, Foy 327 Gutherie, Steve 218. 293 Guyer, David 210, 211 Hagerdon. Mike 214 Hahn, Carol 282 Hahns. Rick, 212 Haikey, Johnny 340, 343 Hines. Melanie 282, 140 Hale, Lyn 282 Hale. Nancy 327 Hall, Andy 222 Hall. Ann 293 Hall, Christi 315 Hall. Christine 267, 330 Hall, Da vid Gov. 104, 225 Hall, Ginny 324 Hall, Joseph 327 Hall. Kathleen 267 Hall, Mike 282 Hall. Robert 267 Hall, Roger 276 Hall, Sandra 293 Hall, Steve 222 Hall. Thomas 282. 327 Hall, Tom 148 Ham. Susan 293 Hamblet, Hamilton Warren 212 . Billy 282 Hamilton, Lynn 267 Hampton, Dennis 327 Hampton, Dennis 327 Hand, Carol 267 Hand, Carole 316 Hand, Sherri 276 Hankinson. James 276 Hankinson. Jim 210. 211, 327 Hanks. Cathy 282 Hanrahan, Jeff 214 Hans. Rick 293 Hansen, Annette 327 Hanson, Annette 293 Hanus, Jane 327 Harden, Carol 282 Hargis. Nina 327 Harkins, Warren 340 Harlin. Curt 316 Harms, John 316 Harner, Connie 293 Harrell, Diana 276 Harrington, Maj. Marshall 344 Harris. Henry 327 Harris, Jeannie 212 Harris, Lanna 276, 316 Harris. Raymond 282 Harry, Brooke 222 Hart. David 282 Hartman. Wally 210. 211 Hartsock, Bob 267 Haskell, John 343 Hatch, Carol 324 Hatcher, Ellen 293 Hatfield, Jim 316 Hauger, Kim 282 Hawkins. Cheryl 140, 224 Hawley, Revonda 327 Hawley, Sherri 327 Hawkins, Jeff 313 Hawthrone. Katie 324 Haymon, Gregory 282 Hayes. Jack 267 Hayes. Jay 218, 219 Hayes. Karen 267 Hays. Debbie 293, 324 Hays, Millie 276, 329 Hayter, Richard 293 Heath. Jeannie 210. 211 Heatly, Danny 148 Heath, Mike 210, 211 Heatly. Danny 294 Hecker, Linda 294 Heckler, Mary 276 Heins. Marsha 294 Held, Raymond 276 Heller, Page 276 Helm, Jerry 282 Helm. Linda 283 Helms, David 283 Hemingway, Bill 283 Henderson, James 340 Henderson, John 276 Henderson, Julie 217, 342 Henderson, Keith 327 Henderson, Steve 267 Hendricks. James 214 Hengst. Randy 267 Henning, Denise 140, 294 Henry. Cathy 267 Henshaw, Tom 276 Hensley, Doug 218, 219, 294 Henthorn, Susan 327 Henthorn, Tommy 283 Hepburn, Henry 107 Herbst. Larry 320 Herlihy, Richard 267 Herlihy, Rita 294 Hernandez, Bruce 217 Herndon, Carol 294 Herndon, Dayne 294 Herndon, Mary 294 Herndon. Nancy 294 Herrick and Hume House 145 Herrington. John 294, 327 Hess. Phil 210, 211 Hess, Randy 217 Hess. Tom 267 Heydman, Tom 328 Hoak. Mary 322 Hobbs, Robbi 294 Hodgell, Marlin 107 Hodges. Ross 294 Hoff, Mary 294 Hoffman. Keith 267 Hodcl, James 328 Hoelscher, Steve 283 Hoferland, Lydia 313 Hoffman. Keith 340, 341, 343 Hogan. Joan 294 Hoge. Stewart 217 Hogue. Kathleen 327 Holden, Denise 267 Holdsclaw, Dennis 294 Holman. Frances 267 Hollingsworth, Dawn 276 Holmes, Kevin 148 Holt, Candice 276, 322, 342 Holt, Kathy 316 Holdredge, Kevin 346 Hollingsworth, Dawn 327 Holz. Lynn 147 Hone, Ed 217 5 ,Mil we . is Q.. A SW if will your ew hom COIISCYVC energy ? YES! IF YOU USE BOTH GAS AND ELECTRICITY FOR THE JOBS THEY EACH D0 BEST. lt's becoming important for homeowners and builders to think about conservation. IF YOU'RE BUILDING A NEW HOME, YOU CAN DO A LOT TO HELP CONSERVE FUELS. Make sure you make efficient use of both available forms of energy. There are some jobs that natural gas does best, and there are some only electricity can do. It takes both forms of energy, working together, to achieve the greatest efficiency. YOU'LL HEAR OKLAHOMA NATURAL TALK A LOT ABOUT THE NATURAL ENERGY HOME. That's simply our way of describing a home that uses all available forms of energy in an efficient manner for the sake of economy and conservation. FEW PEOPLE REALIZE THAT OVER 931-. OF THE ELECTRICITY GENERATED IN OKLA- HOMA IS PRODUCED BY BURNING NATURAL GAS AS A BOILER FUEL. By using natural gas in this manner, over two-thirds of the potential energy never arrives at the customers home or business for his use. When natural gas is used directly in the home for the jobs it does best. . . it is very efficient. This is the reason Oklahoma Natural developed the Natural Energy Home program. A program of conservation that urges everyone to utilize both gas and electricity in an efficient and economical manner. This con- cept can add years to the availability of natural gas. ASSURING THE PUBLIC A CONTINUING SUPPLY OF OUR VITAL ENERGY FORM IS OUR PRIMARY BUSINESS AT OKLAHOMA NATURAL. CALL US SOON. natural energy O , HOME 4 OKLAHOMA NATURAL GAS COMPANY -its 2' '85 M51 ew Hone. Muffin 210. 211 Honker, Bill 267 Hood, Debbie 212 Hooshang, Tehrani 267 Hoover. Elaine 267 Hope. David 212 Hope. John 267 Hopkins, Daniel 224 Hopkins, Tommy 210. Hopkins. Donna 267 Hopkins, Tommy 294 Hornbeek, David 276 Horner, Horton. Horton. Horton. Steve 267 Carol 267 Peggy 283 Richard 343 House. Robbie 294 Howard. Howard. Howard. Howard. Howard, Howard. Howard, Douglas 267 Ed 294 Margaret 294 James Rex 267 Robert 267 Sheilah 224 Howard, Vicki 276 Howell, Bill 340 211 Howell, Elizabeth 315 Howell. Juanita 267 Howell, Robert 282 Howerton, Bruce 294 Howie. Vince 217 Hornopulos. Mike 267 Hickerson, Mamie 294 Hickerson, Mamie 294 Hickman, Gail 316 Hicks. Lisa 294 Hightower, Tim 294. 324 Hill. Cindy 294 Hill, Dave 212 Hill. Scott 43 Hills. Ernie 276. 312. 327 Hillshater. Douglas 294 Hilton, Myron 294 Hindman, David 217 Hipp, Ron 294 Hitt, Jocco 210, 211 Hixson, Debbie 294 Hudson, Cliff 323 Hudiburgh, Tom 294 Huff, Martha 276 Huffman. Janice 283, 333 Hukills. Joe 218, 222 Huibsch, Jeanne 147 Hulse. Leesa 218. 267 Hulsey, Patricia 294, 327 Hume, Robert 283 Hume, Shelley 276 Hummel. Debbie 276 Humphrey, Jacquie 283 Humphreys, John 327 Hunsberger. Dr. 102, 345 Hunsberger, James 327 Hunt. Paul 283 Hurd, Mark 294 Husband, Mark 217, 283 Hust. Diane 294 Hutcheson, John 315 Hutchinson, Cyndi 267 Hutchinson. Vicki 294 Hutton, Robert C. 324 Hudgins, Glenn 218 laiennaro, Sandra 294 llleman, John 212 lnderrieden, Frances 294 lngleman, Ronnie 148, 294 lnnis, Stephen 327 lnskeep. Jim 294 lrwin. Debra 315 lsaac, Mike 267, 210 lsom, Mark 294 lves. Barbara 105 Jackson. Suzette 212, 283 Jackson. Terry 267 Jackson. Tom 295 Jacobi, Jan 342 Jacobi. Jina 283. 342, 343 Jacobs, Julie 342 Jacobs, Ted 295, 217 Jacubec, Captain George Jain. Michael 327 James, Barbara 102 James. Mike 295 James. William 167 James, Willy 212 Jameson, Glen 276 Jansing, Suzanne 327 Jaqua. Javaki. Paul 210, 276 Masoud 267 Jaworski, Jim 276 Jeffries, Debbie 345 Jenkins. Coy 276 Jenkins, David 327 Jenkins, Samuel 224 Jenkins. Sherry 276 Jenneman. Gary 212 Jenner. Amy 295 Jenny. Walter 295 Jenson. Paul 327 Jeppesen, Randy 316 Jett. Rita 267. 316 Jezek, Karen 283 Jindra. Janice 276. 322 Jobe, Jana 295 Johnse n. Andi 276 Johnson, Ben 267 Johnson, Bill 316. 225 Johnso n. Cynthia 267 Johnson, Ed 212 Johnson, Ernie 212 n, Glen 276. 328. 295 Johnson. Glen 212 Johnson. Lee 267 Johnson, Marla 267 Johnso Johnso Johnso n. Monte 267 n, Joe 156 Johnson, John 225 Johnson, Richard 267 Johnso n. Susan 267, 283 Johnston. Karen 295 Johnston. Mark 340 Johnston. Roger 316 344, 346 Joiner. Paul 267 Jolliei, Karla 327, 295 Jones, Amon 276 Jones, Annabel 276, 313. 322, 332. 342 Jones. Chester 267 Jones, Don 267 Jones. Devereaux 283 Jones, Jonna 276 Jones. Krista 324. 295 Jones, Kristy 295 Jones, Martha 267 Jones Pamela 295 Jones: Timothy 276 Jordan and McCurtain House 146 Jones, Wes 328 Jordan, Chad 217 Jordan, Jo 212 Jorgensen, Debbie 276 Jorski. Don 267 Joseph. Diana 283 Joseph. Donald 267 Justice, George 276 Just, Jennifer 283 Keeling, Brenda 283 Keener. Gran! 225 Keriood. Jack 323 Keitz. Craig 276 Kelbeth. Russell 283 Kelley. Gretchen 147- Keller. Kenton 210. 276 Kelley, Jim Kellmorgan, Steve 295 Kelly. Russell 224 Kelly, Ricky 343 Jackson, Anna 324 Jackson, Glenna 295 Jackson Jackson , Kay 212 , Mike 222 Kellow, Ray 217 Kemm. Martha 327 Kemp. Paula 283 Kelsoe, Deborah 283 Kennedy, Laura 267 Kenney. Tim 212 Kiani, Rajabah 111 Kidd. Andrew 210. 211, 295 Kidd. Cathy 336 Kidd. Darlene 267 Kiker, Karen 342 Kimball. John 295 Kimberlin, Richard 276 Kimbrough, Kelly 147 Kimmel. Karen 267 Kincaid, Dina 283 King. Fawn 283 King, Joe 108 King, Kenny 52 Kingsolver. Mark 276 Kinkiad, Mike 324 Kinnett, Karen 267 Kirkham, Carol 267 Kirkpatrick, David 295, 327 Kirkwood. Leigh 276, 332. 333 Kiser. Karyll 210, 211, 295 Kitchens. Michael 295 Klar. JoAnn 276 Klarteld. Jair 327 Kleinsteiber. Stanley 295, 327 Klewer, Carolyn 295 Kloepping, William 283 Knapp, Rick 148 Kneale, Steve 225 Kniait. Stephen W. 340 Knight. Andy 217 Knight. Steve 214 Knox, Jan 140. 276 Knox. Michael 276 Knox, Randy 214 Knutson, Keith 218, 219 Knutter, Mary 333 Koons, Maribeth 217 Koontz, Randy 316 Kouns, Dianne 125. 126. 127 Kouri, Dwight 276 Kowalski. Walter 276 Kraker, David 267 Kramer, Phil 218, 219 Kress. Fred 225 Krieger, Ron 276 Krigbaum. Ted 212 Knter, Kim 283 Krittenbrink. Mark 210, 211 Kroll, Michael 276 Krugar. Warren 295 Kuhlman. Diana 295 Kuhn. Dave 219. 273 Kuhn, Kathleen 219 Kuykendall. Kay 212 Kumler. Mary 283 Kurisu. Kord 283 Kurtz. Ed 283 Kuschneriet, Dale 147 Label. Shelley 218, 219 Lackey, Tom 210. 211 Lackman, Joe 225 Ladd. Elizabeth 283 Ladner. Paul 295 Lake. Susan 327 Lake, Vicki 277 Lake. Maj. Wallace R. 340 Lamb, Karen 342 Lambda Chi Alpha 2044204 Lambert. Cindy 295 Lamebull. Bill 328 Lancaster, Jannie 283 Landers, Kurt 214 Landers. Melissa 313 Landers, Thomas 283 Landus, Kurt 215 Lang, Mike 94 Langford. Mike 277 Lanman, Lawrence 212 Lanman, Mark 327 Larimore, Don 316 La Rock, Allen 267 Larson, Jay 277 Larson, Lori 295 Lashley, Mickey 51 Lathrop. Pam 296 Latimer. Henry 217 Layer. Sherri 140, 283 Laughlin, Mark 222 Laughner. Cheryl 322. 342 Lauth, Camille 295, 316 Lawrence. Janice 107, 218, 267 Lawrence. Monica 296, 353 Lewis. Phillip 296 Leader. David 277 Lebeda, Debby 277 LeClair. Joe 210, 211 Ledbetter. Jack 335 Lee, Allan 268 Lee. Bobbie 322 Lee. Chun Kong 268 Lee. Marvis 283 Lee. Nancy 268 Lees. Deril 327 Lees. Larry 327 Legg, Melissa 225. 329 Lehman. Mike 222 Lenker, Gil 283 Leonard, Pamela 277 Lepak, Mark 222 Lesser. Barbara 268 Leverich. Steve 222 Levin. Nancy 268 Levy, Jay 218, 277 Lewelling, Dennis 296 Lierly, Rnady 277 Liester, Rick 296 Light, Bruce 222 Ligon, David 212 Light. Dru 283 Light, John 222 Lillard, Robbie 283 Lilly, Christy 283 Lille. Russell 210, 211, 295 Lindgren. Kathy 296 Lindley, Wain 268 Lindsay. Brian 295 Lindsey, Brooks 296, 327 Lindsey, Jerrie 327 Lindsey, Robbie 327 Linsky, Mark 226 Linville, Randy 296 Lisle. Mark 277 Litschke. Pam 355 Littrell. Jim 66 LivenGood. Judy 268 LivenGood, Terry 268 LKOT 320 Loar. Hettie Miss 216217 Loar. Mike 217 Lobaugh, Eph 296 Logan, David 217 Logan, Keigh 212 Logan. Marc 320 Logsdon, Bill 218. 268 Long, Clark 277 Long, Kenneth 296, 324 Long. Lisa 212 Long, Sid 296 Longcrier. Don 296 Longhoter, Vicki 277 Longley, Ross 214. 268 Longobucco, Alan 148 Loftis. Leeana 140, 283 Looper, David 277 Looper, Felda 283 Loots. Joe 115 Lott, Dan 283 Lott, Mischelle 296 Love, Guy 327 Loving, Candy 296 Lowe, Jenny 296 Lowrie, Marsha 285 Loyd. Anita 327 Luech, Phil 212 Luedke. Rich 285 Luk, Ambrose 316 Luk, Helena 268 Luke, John 283 Linday, Jeff 217 Lundin. Bruce 277 Lunger. Jay 295 Luthey, Dean 330 Luzzi, Gus 340, 343 Luthey, Graydon 277 Lyd8ck. Cluff 268 Lyman. Caron 277 Lynn. David 268 Lynn, Guy 214 Lynn. Neil 296 Lynn, Dr. Thomas 217 Lyons, Mark 277 Mabrey, John 217 Mackey, Sue 217. 322, 277 Mackley. Mike 328 Maerker. Sue 329 Maddox, Mark 217 Magarian. Dr. RA, 316 Mahone, Dave 218. 219 Mahoney, Richard 277 Mahvi, David 296 Male. Roy 67 Malmberg, Ted 296 Malmbert, Todd 210, 211 Maley. John 147 Malone, Kathleen 140 Malone, Mike 218 Malone, Robert 210, 211, 296 Mahoney, Dick 210, 211 Malowney. Scott 296 Mandelbaum. Carolyn 140 Mandeville, Pat 277 Manning. Debbie 327 Manning, Jean 113 Manning, Carolyn 342 Manning, Michelle 342 Mansour, Joe 327 Mansour, Karen 14.. 327 Maples, Dennis 316 Marburger. Linda 313 March, John 217 March, Rick 277 Markert, Connie 315 Markes, Jeanette 327 Marks. Kim 296 Markus, Larry 226 Marlar, Pixie 277 Marler. Elsie 340, 343 Marley, Richard 277 Marlow, Tim 355 Marsh, Bob 277 Marshall. John 92 Martin, Darla 296 Martin, Mary 296 Martin, Pam 296 Martin. Pmaela 327 Martin, Richard 277 Massey, Kim 296 Matetich. George 218, 219, 277 Matheny, Rob 324 Matthews. Bill 222 Maulcling, Terry 277 Maurer, Marilyn 342 May, David 277 May, Frederick Staff Sgt, 344 Mayes. Cindy 329 Mayes, Cynthia 277 Mayfield. Melissa 277, 342 Meadors. Randy 218 Medley. Mark 225 Melton, Jaycee 327 Mellendorf, Dave 148 Menda, Joyce 350 Mendelbaum. Carol 210, 211 Mercer, Suzanne 277 Mercer. Pamela 315 Milroy. Milton, Janis 175 Walter 210. 211 Minton, Trey 222 Mirpanic, Rebecca 313 Mitchell. Jackie 277 Mitchell. James 327 Mitchell, Pam 322, 330 Mitchell, Rober 325 Mobley, Linda 277, 313 Moffett, Debbie 218 Mom's Day Committee 332 Monnett, Bob 217 Monroe, Sue 315 Montgomery. John 277 Montgomery, Mary 350 Montgomery. Mildred 224 Moon. Moon. Moore Moore Moore Steffi 296 W.R. 297 . Carol 277 . Clyde 224 Darrell 222, 330 Merrill, Tom 217 Merriman, Dan 327 Merriman. Karen 140, 297 Merritt, Barbara 140 Mershon, William 313 Merwin, John 218. 219 Michaelson, Glen 343 Miles, Cindy 217 Miles, Jack 131 Mildren, Richard 112 Miller, Brig 222 Miller. David 321 Miller, Deane 217 Miller. James 327 Miller. Kristin 322 Miller. Rick 297 Miller, Tim 321. 350 Mindeman. Mark 297 Miller. Michael 277 Mills, Dan 210, 211 Mills, Karen 277 Mills, Martha 327 Moore. Kathy 297 Moore, Keith 210. 211 Moore, Mary 297 Moore, Michael 297 Moore, Rusty 148 Moore, Steve 328 Moreland, Mary 297 Morgan, Craig 218, 297 Morgan, Lynn 217 Morgan, Marvin 297 Morgensen, Richard 222, 277 Morozuk, John 331 Morris, Dr. JR. 101. 131, 218, 346 Morris, Dr. Virginia 67 Morris, Mary 212. 277 Morris, Pam 277 Mortar Board 322 Morton. Marc 277 Mosley. Rodney 277 Moss, Joe 148 Mount. Mike 218 Millsapugh, Clark 330, 331 Millsapugh. Sara 277 Milner. Carol 340 Milner. Marian 313, 321 gn--x .2 Moyer. Kathy 296 Mulder, Clair 316 Mullen, Rachel 277 Mullen, Tom 277, 330 Mullhollan, Dr. Paige 105 Mullins. Kathy 324 Munn, Tom 147 Munroe, John 321 Munson, Alan 217 Murray. Lew 297 Muse. Gene 210. 211, 278 Muse, Gene 210, 211, 278 Myfelt. Karen 140 Myers, Robert 278 Myers, Shelley 278 Myers, Lee 297 Myers, Gary 218, 278 Myers. Bobby 210, 211 Myatt. Cary 217 McAlister, Gail 327 McCall, Mary 277 McCall, Kenneth 316 McCasland House I2, 3, 4, 51 141 McClellan, Daphne 327 McClendon. Judy 296 DcCleskey. David 327 McClintock, Mark 296 McClure, Mary 277 McCombs, Suzanne 296 McConahay, Pam 333 McConnell, Randy 296 McCormick, Bob 225 McCormich, Brett 328 McCormick, Gwen 277 McCormick, James 296 McCreery, Susan 277 McCrory, Kimberly 277 McCullough, Debbie 277 McElhaney, James 327 McFarland. Keith 323 McFarIin, Territa 224, 140 McFerron, Cheryl 297 McGaughey, Jeanie 140 McGif'fert, Mary 118 McGill, Larry 297 McGee, Mark 210, 297 McGraw, Tim 210 McGregor, Don 222 McGruder, Denise 327 McGugan, Kelly 297 FIRST NATIONAL BANK IN NORMAN aes we ea 5' ,- McHan:l, Doug 297 Mclver. Patricia 277 McKee, Scott 277 McKitrick. Steven 327 McKoy. Kelly 297 McMal-tin Dalene 277 McNabb, Rick 297 McNair, Missy 212 McNellis, Bob Nacci, Bruce 297 Naileh, Don 285 Naifeh, Larry 278 Nance, Steve 278 Nash. Bob 94 Nathman, Gerry 285 Neal, Bryan 297 Neal, Carrie 285 Neal, Christie 269 Neal. Karen 269 Nedbalek, Bill 269 Needer. Eddie 313 Nellis, Richard 222 Nelson, David 210, 211 Nelson, Paul 210, 278 Neptune. John 218 Newbourn, Mike 222 Newman, Frank 278 Newman, Kathy 278, 322 Nhuk, Naj 140 Nichols, Brian 224 Nickels, Cathy 285 Niemeyer, Jeff 324 Niles, Mike 285 Nixon. Patty 147 Noble. Jeff 278 Noland, Phillip 297 Noonan, Gary 269 Norby, Dr. Gene 101 Norton. Barbara 285 Nowakowski, Steve 214, 215 Nuzum, Robert 218 Nunnery. Mark 278 Nye, Harvey N. 340 Banklng w1th is like having a bank O11 CEIIIIPIIS Call 321--4200 AND TRUST COMPANY calc O'Bannon. James 297 O'Brien. John 278 O'Dell, Carole 278 O'Grady, Anne 286. 327 O'Halloran, Kevin 330 O'I'lare, Buzz 148, 327 O'Neil, Marianne 327 Oakley, Janie 285 Oaks, David 327 Oden, Tim 285 Odom, Michael 278 Odom, Robert 269 Ogborn, Robert 214, 269 Ogle. Keith 328 Oliver. Gregory 327 Omnicron Nu 347 Ortlotf, Rita 269 Osborn, Kathleen 327 Osborn. Karen 286 Osbom, Kathy 286 Osbom, Steve 269 Otto, Joe 324 Ottaway, Cynda 269. 322 Parker, Bruce 297 Parker. Dee 327 Parker, Dee Ann 297 Parker, Mary 278 Parker, Patti 297 Parker, Phil 210 Parks. James 331, 269, 218 Parks, Sharla 327 Parks, Susan 327 Parrish, Jackie 50, 53 Parson. Gary 278 Patak, Georgette 297 Patman, Lewis 324 Patoclty. Patricia 342 Patten, Bill 278 Patterson. Bill 323 Patterson, Janell 269 Patterson, Kathleen 327 Patterson, Mark 297 Patterson, Russ 217, 286 Patterson. Tim 297 Patterson, William 286 Pattison. Joe 269 Patton, Michael 269 Patton, Patricia 269, 316 Patton. Sherri 297 Paschal. James F 354 O.U. Alumni Association 334-335 Paulos' Andm 269 Overton, Janie 269 Owen, Larry 286 Owens, Tinker 42 Owensby, Dale 278 Palmer, Bruce 297 Palmer. Frances 278 Palmer, Ken 46 Palmer, Michelle 297 Paris, Ann marie 140 , 278 Parish, Patti 140, 286 Parker. Brent 285 Payne, Joel 286 Payne. John 286 Payne, Paula 297 Peacock. Elvis 66 Peake, Steve 218. 278 Pearl, Greg 297 Peck, Bonnie 286 Peck. Gail 359 Pedersen. Lee 269, 321, 322 Pegigo. Valorie 327 Pendleton, Bruce 278 Penn, Frank 210, 211, 269 Penn, Melvin 327 Penny, Mary 327 Pepe, Joe 217, 286 Percefull, Steve 286 Perrin. Chuck 217 Perrin, Rhonda 297 Perry, Wes 217, 324 Petersburg, Sue 355 Peterson. Ann 269 Petillo. Keith 148 Petitt, Bruce 222, 278 Petko. Melodye 278 Petkoff. Phyllis 297, 327 Petta, Ken 222 Pettyjohn. Don 217 Pesehl. Jim 217, 286 Piachek, Sherri 316 Pierce. Mark 217 Pierce, Michael 224 Pierce, Robin 287 Pierson, Brian 298 Pierson, Pam 298 Pillich, Keith 269 Pinson, Judy 269 Piper. John 297 Pippin, Judy 269 Pishkin, Gayle 212, 286 Pittenger, Paulet 298 Pittman, Gary 269, 212 Pitts, Alan 298 Pitts, Kellie 298 Plumb, Patrick 298 Pointer, David 321. 269. 346, 212 Polk, Larry 327 Polk. Randall 286 Polk, Tomi 327 Pollaro, Linda 115 Pomeroy. Carl 269 Pool, Jay 147 Pool, William 286. 327 Poolaw, Rhonda 278 Poorman, Juliana 269 Pope. Scott 147 Porter, Steve 217 Portwood, Gina 298 Portz, Kevin 286, 323. 355, 358 Posey. Dave 147 Potts. David 217, 286 Powell, Albert Lee 224 Powell, Debbie 298, 327 Powell, Janna 298, 333, 324 Powell, Steve 345 I Power, Dave 210 Poyner, Randall 269 Prater, Susan 269, 322 Pribyl, Sally 269 Price, Alan 148 Price, Ruth Anne 118 Price. Susan 297 Prince, Steve 212 Proctor, Kevin 298 Preston, Pam 297 Preston, Pugh 169 Prewett, Jeffery 278 Prewett, Sabrina 342 Pundt, Anne 298 Purcell, Chris 157 Purcell, Jim 297 Pugh, Wanda 269 Purgason, Bob 288 Purgason, Ken 269 Purl. Martha 286 Pryor, Dick 298 Quate. David 327 Quartlebaum, Darien 298 Queen, Bill 298 Queen, Doug 278 Quigg, Nancy 327 Quinn, Pat 218. 219 Raburn, Lynn 269 Rader, David 269 Radford, Britt 218, 219, 278 Raclosevich, Greg 278 Rahill, Dorothy 225 Rainbolt, David 298 Rainey, Craig 214 Rains, Stuart 298 Rambo, Kathy 343 Ramer, Charles 286 Ramirex. Mario 328 Ramsey, Joe 47 Ramsey, Mike 321 Ramsey, Richard 343 Randall, Christopher 269 Randall. Porkie 298 Randolph, John 323 Rao, Prabhakar P. Rapp, Karen 270 Ratzlaff. Randy 327 Ray, Becky 217 Ray, Harriette 298 Ray, Jim 270 Ray, Joseph 100 Ray. Marsha 333 Ray, Michael 298 Ray. Skip 210, 211, 298 Raybourn, Steve 217 Rayburn, James 286 Read, Betty 270. 273. 321 322, 342 Reagan, Lisa 298 Reams, Bob 225 Reames, Lisa 298 Reams. Tex 225 Rector, Rick 128 Redick, Vicki 286 Redmon, Chuck 54 Reed, Virginia 270 Reeder, Eddie 298 Reeves. James 286 Reeves, Margaret 286 Reeves, Mike 148 Reeves. Nancy 298 Reiber. Dave 148 Reid, George 270 Reinarts, Debbie 270 Remondino, Bob 217 Renner, John 298 Renner, Mary Jo 322 Renner, Michael 327 Renner, J.W. 315 Resler, Rick 212 An tradl-HON ' ' ' 83years in the business.That's experience Q OKLAI'IOMA'S OLDEST JEWELERS X J DOWNTOWN MAYFAIR WINDSOR HILLS 2730 S. Chautauqua 329-4928 The Most Beautiful Shoes TRIM FOR ACTION Meadow Gold 'VIVA' Dairy Products ln The World ' ' ' vlvA ze Milk vivA Ice Milk VIVACo a eC ese o ur .. . .. Wi. . . LOOK YOUNG -STAY YOUNG State of Oklahoma 309 WEST BOY Df NORMANDKLAHOMA 73069 BRYSDN, INC. Retrac, Ed 140 Revelle, Hal 298 Reynolds, Chris 278 Reynolds, Lee 286, 355 Reynolds, Susan 225 Rhea, Richard 298, 327 Rhodes, Tim 327 Rice, Marc 270 Richardson, Donna 298 Richison, Nan 298 Richman, Randi 324 Riddell, Bob 298 Riggs, Debora 270 Riggs, Margaret 270 Rigirozzi, Dave 270 Riley. Larry 218 Riley, Peter 278 Riley, Tim 76 Rimele, Jerry 212 Rinehart. Cathy 313 Riney. Mike 218, 219 Rinney. Tom 337 Rippee. David 298 Ritchie, Carolyn 270 Rittenhouse, Dave 214 Ritter. Debbie 278, 354, 355. 358 Ritter. Jeanette 270 Ritts, Kathryn 286 Ritts, Kathy 218, 219, 316 Rizley, Kirk 222 Roach, Glenn 212 Roach, Paul 270 Roark, Davey 298 Robb, Tim 148 Robbins, Allan 212, 298 Roberts, Adonna 327 Roberm, Bruce 340, 343 Roberts, Gary 327 Robertson, Dawna 298 Robinson, David 197 Robinson, Donald 130 Robinson, Hugh 286 Robinson, Kurt 225 Robinson, Ross 270 Rodgers, Joe 270 Rodgers, John 270, 331 Rodgers, Lt. Col. Willard 344 Ridruguez. Roland 222 Rogers, Daniel 278 Rogers. Jan 270 Rogers, Joe 286 Rogers, Nancy 327 Rogers, Paula 286 Rogers, Suzanne 270 Rogers. Tom 325 Rojas, Chris 298. 114 Rolen, Michael 270 Romine, Jeff 217 Rook, Victor 327 Roper, Pam 286 Rose, Linda 327 Rose. Nila 327 Rose, Sam 210, 211. 270 Rosin, Stephanie 278 Ross, Carl 278 Ross, Marc 218. 219, 278 Ross, Susan 287 Roush, John 40, 42 Roy, Matt 353 Rowe, Becky 287 Rowe, Celeste 147 Rowe, Larry 270 Rowe. Randi 298 Rowland, Chester 298 Rowland, Mark 278 Rowland, Steve 270 Ruble, Ann 322 Ruble, David 298 Rueb, Jane 270 Ruf-Neks 328 Rugeley, Steve 298 Ruhl, Cindy 298 Runge, Janice 327 Rupert. Terry 67 Rush, Karen 270 Rush, Roger 270 Rushing, Edward 278 Russell. Billy Don 334 Russell, Kim 147 Rutherford, Debbie 287 Ryals, Evelyn 355. 287, 358 Ryan, Elizabeth 278 Ryder, Becky 329 Sacharin, lllayne 270 Saffa, Chuck 217 Saied, Nancy 270 Salmon, Alan 298 Sanders, Charles 327 Sanders. Michael 287, 327 Sanders, Warren 298 Sangirardl, Angela 214 Sangirardi. Pete 214 Sanner, Brent 327 Sartor. Jerome 270 Satterfield. Marge 270 Sauer, Ken 148 Sauls, Phyllis 298 Savage. Michelle 298 Savera, Pam 298 Sawyer, Paula 287 Sawyer. Tim 327 Saxon, Selby 212, 287 Sayre, Cathy 322 Sayre, Carol 278 Scally, Doris 270 Schaefer, Anne 327 Schaeffer, Sidney 287 Schaffner, Gary 327 Schilling, Gary 278 Schilling, Rob 222 Schmidt, Lisa 324 Schipper. Amy 270 Schipper, Greg 270 Schoolfield, Clyde 287, 218 Schram. Beverly 270 Schwartz. Curt 335 Schween, Mike 299 Schweer. Mary Beth 287 Schweer. Windler 278 Sckinopskie, Ron 226 Scoggins. Ron 214 Scott, Larry 222 Scott, Rick 299 Scrinopskie, Ronald 278 Scurlock. Nancy Scybist. Robert 299 Seal, Jeff 214 Seale. Larry 299 Seeieldt, Jerry 222 Seefeldt, Scott 222. '313 Seegel. Lee 287 Seeger, Capi 212 Sell, Bill 270 Sellers, Lori 299 Selmon, Dewey 42 Selmon, LeRoy 42, 64 Severns, Bill 55 Sewell, Hal 210 Sewell. Mike 299 Sewell, Shelia 322 Schackelford, William 270 Shadid, Keith 218 Shadid, Ralph 225 Shadid. Robin 299 Shadowbox 316 Shanks, Nancy 270, 355 Shannon, Paul 327 Sharp, Mary 270 Sharp, Dr. Paul 100. 324 Sharp, Rose 324 Sharpe. Kenneth 327 Shaub, Wendy 278 Shaw, Sherl 270 Sheets, Howard 287 Sheets, Dian 324 Sheets, Sam 299 Sheffer, Jane 270 Sheldon, Elizabeth 299 Shelton. Jerry 225 Shepard. Linc 270 Shepard. Ron 287 Sherer, Al 328 Sherwood, Anne 270, 322 Shilling, Thomas 327 Shirk, William 299 Shoate, Rod 39, 43, 65, 224 Shockey, Randy 225 Shoemake. Bransiord 299 Shoemaker, Katie 330, 316 Shofner, Ray 212 Shook, Ron 327 Short, Sherri 287, 316 see? Short. Sherry 342 Shouse, Ken 29? Shrum, Kem 299, 140 Shroyer, Mike 217 Sickles, Don 210 Sievers, Phil 270 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 216-217 Sigma Chi 2184219 Sigma Phi Epsilon 2224223 Sigma Alpha Mu 227 Silver. David 226 Simmons, Bob 316 Simmons. John 316 Simmons. Susan 217, 270 Simms, Steve 217 Simon, Floyd 217 Simpson, Alan 287 Simpson. Glenn 313 Simpson, Mary Ellen 299 Sims. Gregory 278 Singer, Thomas 343 Sisson. Neil 287 Slayton, Jim 278 Sleem, Michele 299 Slemaker, Jim 287 Slief, David 299 Smauder. Phil 218 Smith, Clint 217 Smith. Chuck 67 Smith, David 299 Smith, Gary 147 Smith, Gregory 271 Smith, Hal 210 Smith, Jacqueline 327 Smith, Joe 217 Smith, Lenardo 214 Smith, Pam 225 Smith, Pamela 287 smnh, Phillip 116 Smith, Randy 222 Smith, Sheila 327 Smith, Terri 218 Smith. Thomas 271 Smith, Trip 278 Smith, Vachel 278 Smithen, Marc 328, 329 Snedeker. David 271 Budweiser. Ulla Of lllllu .Zunf.Q.oafiufpqaau,GnA ilu-u2hdBaf.-4 ll! WIESI-Sillli llfill ll ll! MIIB vtovn -mann .nun-.ours va.-4 -oungn cow-an J.:-.ww-.11 va.-.ne- 'X Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 232-6133 when you say Budweiser. You've said it all! Sit ST? We Snedeker, Paul 209 Snider, John 343 Snoddy, Phyllis 287 Snook, Kathy 299 Sommers, Jack 327 Sooner Rally Council 326 Sooner Scandals 331 Sorrels, Robert 299 Southern, Jerry 321 Spanier, Steward 323, 340 Sparkman, Jan 271 Sparks. Chris 287 Spicer, Stephen 271 Spindler. Kay 287 Spraggins, Lloyd 299 Springer, Karen 299 Sprow, Carma 116 Spurrier, Steve 343 Stalcup, Deborah 271 Stamper. Suzanne 299 Stanberry, Wade 218 Stancliffe, Jane 355, 322 Stanford, Kerry 320 Stanley, Neal 271, 320 Stanton, Teresa 212 Stapleton, Tom 324 Starks, Nancy 299 Statfor, Ellen 210 Stauffer, Neal 298 Stauffer. Sam 316 Stayton, Bob 218, 287 Steen, Kathy 278, 342 Stehr, Susan 218 Stein, David 299 Steiner, Susan 300 Stephens, Scott 278 Stephenson, Mary 300, 324 Stevens. Ronald 271 Stevenson, Gary 218 Steves, Chris 210, 211, 278 Stewart, Bill 271 Stiffler, Dan 327 Stillwell, Mark 300 Stockwell, David 212 Stoia, Linda 324 Stoldt, Barbara 279 Stolhand, Janet 299 Stoll, Scott 222 Stone, Dennis 270 Stone, Scott 324 Storm, Diana 300 Storms, Clark 270 Storts, Richard 225 Stout, Shelly 342 Stramp, Ryan 327 Stanathan, Lee 270 Sirandlie, Lee 270 Street, Marrie 270 Streight, Robert 287 Streightoff. Jennifer 278, 322 Stringfield, Mary 279, 327 Stuart, Bob 288 Stuart. Donald 279 Stueckemanri, Pam 270 Student Services Corporation 338-339 Sulett. Dwight 270 Sublert, Shelly 299. 327 Sugg, Peggy 288 Sullivan, Brian 299 Sullivan, Kitty 270. 325 Sullivan, Mike 212, 300 Sullivan, Pam 300 Sullivan, Randy 217 Sullivan, Sheryl 288 Summers, Doug 222 Summers, Vickie 270 Summers, Mary 300 Sun. Tai lun 270 Sunday 212 Sussman, Bernie 225 Sutton, Joyce 270 Svoboda, Lanell 327 Swanson, Wayne 270 Switzer, Barry 47 Sykes, Laurence 270 Symes, Curtis 287 Synar. Alan 330, 331, 332, 288 Syncox, Don 67 Tabor, Tim 323 Tacker, Stan 222 Tackett, Bruce 270 Tackett, Kenneth 300 Tague, Dianna 270 Taheri, Mac 321 Tahsuda, Max 147 Talley. Mark 288 Tam. David 214 Tammen, Cathy 270 Tanner, Debbie 340 Tarpley. Barbara 288 Tarpley, Linda 288 Tarpley, Mike 300 Tasi, Maria 300 Tassles 322 Tate, Karen 288 Tabakkolian, Behnam 270 Taberner, Tracy 300 Taylor, Debbie 342 Taylor, Julie 288 Taylor. Karen 322 Taylor, Kathy 288 Tchakirides, Diane 288 Tebow, Vicki 300, 324 Teehee, Ralph 270 Teel, Jan 288 Tenney, Gayla 327 Tenney, Linda 327 Terhune, Steven 327 Terrell, James 270 Terrell, Nancy 270 Terrill, Allen 225 Terry, Jan 342 Teter, Charles 327 Teter, Mark 288 Teuscher, Peggy 279 Tharp, John 327 Thetford, Mark 300 Thierfelder, Lisa 212 Thill, Leonard 279 Thom, Sue 270 Thomas, Craig 270 Thomas, Ellwyn 288 Thomas, George 108 Thomas, Mary 300 Thomas, Martha 270 Thomas. Phillip 300 Thomas, Ronnie 316 Thomas, Susan 300 Thomas, Tevin 327 Thominson, Jayne 327 Thomison, Thompson Thompson. Thompson, Thompson, Thompson, Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson: Jayne 300 Anthony L. 214, 279 Angela 316 Cindy 140 Cynthia 288 Daryl 270 David 217 Deborah 327 John 270 Kim 279. 322 Laura 279 Mark 210 Mary Jo 147 Michael 300 Pat 288 Paul 300 Thomson, Mark 279 Thorn, David 270 Thornburg. Susan 270 Thorton, Don 147 Thurston, Johnna 270 Thrasher. Carlene 300 Tibbs, Mike 217 Tiffany, Gregory 327 Tigner, Paula 270 Tillie, Janeva 279 Tillman, Eloise 110 Tilman, Laurie 270 Timmons, George 270 Timpson, Fred 320 Tippens, Bud 217 Tipton, Robert 327 Tisdal, Paul 217 Tobin, Paul 300 Tock, Terri 270 Todd, Gary 210 Tolson, Victoria 288 Torrence, Kent 271 Torrence. Sharon 300 Townsend, Jean 271 Tracey. Tom 300 Trafton. William 300 Trapp, Nancy 288 Travis, Kyle 300 Trenton, Stephen 271 Tresemer, Col. Gary 342 340. 343 Trigg, Marylee 279, 330, 342, 322 Trigleth, Bill 212 Trimble. Don 217 Troop, Joe 218, 327 Troop. Judson 271 Trout. Dr. Roy 113 Troutman, Susie 279 Truitt, Kathy 342 Trussell, Terry 300 Tucker, Jean 315 Tucker, Vanessa 147 Tuell, Edward 327 Tullius, Due 271 Tully, Jane 271, 322 Tully, Maria 300, 324 Tumbleson, Shirley 271 Turner. Andrew 300 Turner, Sharron 288 Turney, Charles 217 Twomey, David 218 Twaddell, Michael 271 Tyler, Howard Jr. 316 Tyo, Mickey 345 Tyler, Wally 148 Tyner. Cindy 300 Uesugi, Hisano 271 Uhland, Dave 148 Umfleet. Mike 54 Upihegrove, Dr. William 108 Utsler, Mike 300 cg, X AGAl:l-FDFID-JAFIINIICJN 8 NIULDROVV In sulrauce PHONE 405-321-2700 111 North Peters 0 PO, Box 790 0 Norman, Oklahoma 73069 "Our people make us No. 1" Downtown Shopping Center 516 W. Main Vaith, Diane 218 Van Arsdell. Simone 322 Vance. Steve 300 Van Dyck. William 327 VanHoose. Jim 300 VanHoose, Larry 222, 330, 332 Vanhless, Krlsti 327 Van Nort, Anne 288 Vark, Lawrence 321 Vatani, Ghassem 271 Vaughan, Deirdre 140 Valez. Hilda 271 Venters, Christopher 271 Vernon, Robert 300 Vick. Mike 271 Vickers. Bill 225 Vickers, Denise 300 Vincent, Bob 147 Vinyard, Valynda 300 Vinyard, Vicky Vltt, Janet 271 Voiles. Douglas 324 Volinic, James 271 Volker. Jean 342 Vondell, John 313 Wade. Margaret 355 Waggener, Steven 327 Wagner. Kathy 300 Wagner, Paul 222 Wagonseller, Becky 279 Wagstaff, Jeanne 279 Walck. Larry 279 Walding, Andy 218, 279 Waldron, James 327 Walker, Aaron 344 Walker, Charles 327 Walker, Chuck 214, 313, 279. 325 Walker, Colonel Aaron 345 Walker, David 217 Walker. Dee 279 Walker, Wade 67 Walker. Wilbur 131 Walker. Kim 324 Walla. Jan 315 Wallace. Greg 324 Walsh, Micky 225 Walters. Milton 271 Walters, Mary 271 Ware. Billy 288. 218 Warner. Steve 300 Warren, Cathy 288 Warren. Daniel 327 Warren. Janet 327 Warrick. Janet 288 Wasemiller, Lisa 288 Washington, Joe 24, 40, 65. 67 Waterman, William 271 Waters, Mike 288 Waters, Ron 43 Watkins, Jack 279 Watkins. Lisa 300. 327 Watson, Brenda 288 Watson, Gary 212 Watt, William 327 Watts, Gary 271 Wauahdooah, Mark 214, 327, 271 Weaver, Mike 212, 279 Webb, Terry 42 Weber. Dr. Jerome 114 Weber. John 300 Weeks, Anita 300 Weddle, Fred 352 Weddle, Linda 271 Wedel, Dave 316 Wegener, Susan 288 Weger, John 327 Weichbrodt, Jon 218, 271 Weichbrodt, Randy 218. 279 Weigant. Ellen 279 Weigant. James 279 Weigant. Sheila 300 Weiss. Bob 226 Wenninger. Vickie 327 Weiss, Mike 226 Weiss, Tom 148 Welck, Lee Ann 329 Welch. Mike 210 Wells, Steve 300 Welsh, Cleve 288 Wesche, Paul 271 Wesner, Mark 279 West, Don 288 West. Lynn 300 West, Tom 271 Westervelt, Linda 288 Westmoreland, Michael 271 Wexier, Ken 226 Wheeler, Doug 210 Wheeler, Rex 325 Whinery, Paul 300 Whipple, Peter 210, White, Bob 217 White. Cappy 279 White, Carol 271 White, Denise 288 White. Jamie 316 White. John 279. 321 White, Jon 327, 148 White Jonathon 279 White, Kathy 271 White. Lloyd 300 White, Mamie 288 White. Richard 271 White, Robin 300 White, Tom 222 White. Thurman 101 Whitesell. Clitf 218 Whiting, Melissa 300 Whittaker, Lynn 212 Wicks, George 218 Wiehee, Scott 271 Wlghtman, Gary 271 Wilbor, Stark 218 Wilcoxson, Linda 271 Wilde. Steve 300 Wiley. Stephen 327 Wilkerson, Bruce 271 279 Wilkerson, Marla 346 Wilkins, Curtis 271 Wilkinson, Glenda 271 Wilkinson, Robert 271 Wilkinson, John 300 Williams. Andrew 271 Williams, Charley 271 Williams, Candace 300 Williams, Douglas 271 Williams, James 327 Williams, Scott 271 Williamson. Carla 288 Williamson, Debby 271 Williamson. Deborah 271 Willis, Kathi 288 Wilson, Bob 323 Wilson. Dave 214 Wilson, Curt 217 Wilson, Jack 212 Wilson, Ronald 271 Winchester, Linda 288 Windel. Curt 316 Wineganen, Debi 300 Winter, Martha 271 Winters. Cindy 288 Wise, Richard 300 Wisniewski. Dr. Richard 1 Withers, Mike 222 Wolfe, Bill 217 Wolfe. David 271 Wolfson. Rick 300 Womack. Ten'y 321 Wood, Dan 271 Wood, David 271 Wong, Wesley 271 Wood, Kyle 300 Wood, J.O. 288 Wood, Randy 279, 218 Wood. Rhonde 279 Wood, Stan 316 Woods, Michael 271 Woody, Cheri 271 Woody, Jane 300 Wooley, Debra 300 Work, Kelley 217 Worsham, Liz 279 Worstell. Mark 321, 271 Wooten. Robert 300 Wright, Bill 323 Wright, Buddy 218 Wright, Christie 279 Wright. Fred 225 Wright, Nicole 279 Wright. Dr, Robert 112 Wright, Theresa 271 Wroblesky, Mary 300 Wulff, Linda 271 Wyatt. Jimmy 340 Wyrrick, Cindy 300 Yarberry, Anne 288 Yarberry, Jeanne 271 Yarberry, Scott 288, 327 Yeatts, James 288 Yoesting, Ed 316 Yoesting, Odie 271 Yones, Kimberly 300 York, John 300 Young. Karen 288 Younger, Kathleen 315 Yount, Mike 218. 219 Zenegler, Robert 271 Zimmerman. Frances 327 Zoller, Steve 300, 324 ay may I l 1 PHILLIPS PHILLIPS PATRONRE YOUR NEAREST DEALER YOUR PHILLIPS DISTRIBUTDR 600 S. Jones 405-321-1709 D OIL C0 S xi? me-1' aw ups ups and and and downs "It was the best of times... Associated Press named the Oklahoma Sooners the number one football team in the nation after their undefeated 1974 season. All-Americans among the national champions were: Joe Washington, Rod Shoate, Dewey Selmon, LeRoy Selmon, John Roush, Randy Hughes, Kyle Davis and Tinker Owens. Coach Barry Switzer was named "Coach of the Year" by both AP and United Press International, as well as, the Walter Camp Foundation, Football News, Sporting News and the Washington Pigskin Club. It was the worst of times... Flames rose high on the fourth floor of Hamill House, a women's dormitory in Cate Center, on February 10. The fire started due to faulty wiring and ended with the evacuation of 156 girls from Hamill House and adjacent Forbes and Herrick Houses. Two people were injured and the residents of Hamill House were required to move to Walker Tower for the remainder of the semester. It was the age of wisdom... A 36-hour-olcl baby boy suffering from a deadly heart defect was wheeled into an operating room at Boston Children's Hospital Medical Center one day this year. He was anesthetized, and then technicians covered his body with a plastic blanket over which they placed cracked ice. When the baby's body temperature had been lowered to 77 degrees, doctors hooked him up to a heart-lung machine that pumped cool blood throughout his body until his tem- perature had fallen to 68 degrees. The pump was then turned off and the child lay in a state of suspended animation-- his heart was still and all blood cir- culation ceased. Dr. Aldo Castaneda and his medical team then began to rearrange the blood vessels leading from the boy's lungs to his tiny heart. ln less than an hour, surgery was completed, the pump was turned bacck on and began to recir- culate rewarmed blood, and the baby's mended heart began to beat again--with life-maintaining results. It was the age of foolishness... Chester Martin, a San Francisco City College student, became the World's Fastest Hot Dog Eater in early December as he cleaned up 16 frank- furters in four minutes. When asked to what he owed his success, Martin replied, "I was hungry and l had some good elbow action." ups . K if Yin, was' W le- f., gf ft' it' 1 fi u f f . ,. wtf' and and Wu downs It was the epoch of belief... Despite the federal indictments, convictions and resignations of several top government officials due to the Watergate Affair, people in the country continued to move on and sustain a belief in the American system of government. Under President Gerald Ford, a new vice president, Nelson Rockefeller, was chosen and approved in mid-December. Watergate defendents were tried throughout the year and former president Richard M. Nixon was par- doned by President Ford. It was the epoch of incredulity... On the state level, Oklahoma Governor David Hall was indicted on six bribery counts in late January. Earlier, Hall pleaded the Fifth Amend- ment in order to avoid testifying before a federal grand jury only weeks after he had fired one of his top appointees for using the same legal device. It was the season of light... On September 18, America's last known prisoner-of-war in Indochina, Emmet James Kay, spent his final night in captivity. Kay was a civilian pilot for a U.S. government airline when he made a forced landing in Laos 16 months earlier. It was the season of darkness... The Oklahoma State Legislature seemingly ignored the first amendment to the U.S. Constitution and passed a resolution condemning OU for allowing political activist and proclaimed Communist Dr. Angela Davis to speak on campus. Senator Mary Helm CR-Oklahoma Cityl supported the resolution on the grounds that the parents of OU students would be opposed to the Davis speech and therefore they would object to the use of some tuition money for the funding of Davis' visit to OU. Senator Jim Hamilton KD-Poteaui had other grounds for support of the resolution: "Why should we give any assistance . . . lend any credence to an avowed Communist?" Wh we 1 .WL ups and and do n down I It was the spring of hope... Head basketball coach Joe Ramsey and cagers Alvan Adams and Tom Holland toured Yugoslavia with the Big Eight All-Star Team during the summer. They won only two out of eight games, but they left the country as winners in the goodwill department. As Coach Ramsey said when they returned home, "A great deal was gained by having an exchange CYugoslavia's team toured the Big Eight schools last winterl. We found all the propaganda both countries had on each other wasn't necessarily true." It was the winter of despair... Hurricane Fifi hit Hondruas, a small republic in northeastern Central America, in mid-September leaving approximately 6,000 people dead and 100,000 homeless. The storm caused 351.8 billion damage and destroyed 90 per cent of the country's banana,crop-- it's main export. We had everything before us... g The United States economy fell victim to recession and inflation simultaneously. While a six-year-old girl in New York City wrote to the North Pole asking Santa to forget the dolls for Christmas this year and bring food instead, the cost of living continued to rise throughout the U.S. ln January, President Ford proposed his unational recovery program" in a somber State of the Union message. His program included three factions: 11 a series of tax cuts to slow recession 21 tax increases to smooth over the energy crisis 3l budget economies to ease inflation.. There were doubts all across the nation as to whether or not the program would workg the answers lay only in the future. We had nothing before us... Leonard Nimoy, star of television's science fiction hit "Star Trek," made a guest appearance on the OU campus at the end of January. Speaking to an overflow crowd in Holmberg Hall, Nimoy had this to say, "Space travel, concern with ecology, the energy crisis-- all are from the science fiction of yesterday." We were all going direct to Heaven... ups ups nd and an downs ,ws was its A, ,. fm d n OU students donated a total of 925 pints of blood during a week long blood drive in February. The effort to collect the blood was sponsored by the Red Cross along with the Arnold Air Society and Angel Flight service organizations on campus. The final two days of the drive brought 499 students to the Armory to donate--more donors than in any other two-day period in the history of the drive. We were all going direct the other way... Israeli president, Ephraim Katzir, stated in early December that Israel has uthe power to produce atomic weapons. If we need to, we will do it." Russia lent support to Syria, so that in the event of a new Mideast conflict, Syria would have a stockpile large enough for 35 days of warfare. The United States continued bombing in Indochina, In Rhodesia, an unidentified resident screamed to an inquiring reporter, "The only way to deal with black nationalists is to show them the business end of a gun!" Heavy house-to-house fighting broke out in Eritrea, Ethiopia as a forceful band of guerrillas crept into the city and began blasting army positions with automatic rifles, mortars and bazookas. 'LThe island of Aphrodite is now the island of the devil," cried a retired Greek civil servant on Cyprus after four weeks of war between Greek Cypriots and Cypriot Turks. ln short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only. ' ' L , QM M N L: M D s ,M x " ' ' " Rm. l .Q x .. u Q- v -- .. Q U Yx., tm K- M -, M1671 X, , . U U U A ' .' V V s -. , 4 snr 1 V .Q N' MW 1 Y 'M bt 1,-f u-,J -, 9: ,. ' A 'R'-.. , Vg. . ,I ' 1, 'a lag' sf A wt U . w., tw l H Mgmt W-flaw W ' f' v A ' H rf, . r , fa! J'gvb,:il ffl . ' r , ' f 'fr' N 'yan' Ng v. . .F A lf-. ' ..':' ,L l l' .l , . .V ,J ' W. ' f . ' " lwrgl.-'Jw I v H H ' I' We see in ourselves all the special elements that make people individuals. We admire, perhaps worship, the qualities of life which are always present in the world around us. In quieter moments, our search for grandeur becomes simplistically apparent in the animals around us. Freedom, togetherness, curiosity, awareness. Mu..-.W .- . r -Q., fu: . .,-... r . I - l - 'N ath' 925 'f . l will H . BW-Z Q . . K T'- v, ,, - rv' rs' v --, Q I L,-l -.li J., .- - "-'- -...- S l H V- r pg. , A 'Lg - M www , "X, Q . ' . " v V.,- X 1 A 1 - ,JRE ww. w I :wx-1 Qty ll-l Mx S e E -..... ,.,'w.,g.-..' . .,' 'I l lcLll"lw:w'Wv A Q- tw rr e l. l 5' ., . A23-, 4" ht, V 1, ,U wp va'-V-were W: ,AEM A . TG'i'fM1gl'E 'rid . ' ' ... ,.. ,... I F5-was A.. F . 'mi Aw fx . fm v 1 1 an V .wwf ....... We learn from youth. Such child-like qualities can show us much about life and its secrets. Secrets of sharing, new experiences, and friendship from ponytails and pageboys. We progress from wide-eyed innocence to a more realistic "grown-up" way of thinking. How much have we learned. Caring, helping, growing. photos by Randy Carter ., 1 The Sooner 75 has been based on the xdea of reporting the year From cover to cover the reporting is done with facts faces and places ltl1s hoped that this sort of gournahstic en deavnr will create as a lasting memory the history of the Unwerslty of Oklahoma during the 1974 75 academlc year ln an objectlve manner Though such a collectlon of thls nature may be inviting at is lacking A segment of the actions of in dlviduals ns more than factual lt ls human and beautiful l L e e e e e " 777 7 . or iles A 3 , , 4 , , , i W Y i i i M I Il 7 V 7 7 'W I x , I X w ,I l 1 i l w I . , ,I 5. A ,ZW - -, l ,Q lf- ,r ,,, , .-- ,. ,, , , l r X J , . X, N l It 1 l l l 'I ,-N I 1 ' V ll - l l l xl an ' . , r ' 1 Q l 1 , 71, Y , ,, V W v- -n Yri ' l r 385 Our days together here and now, may turn out to be the best. We have but a short time to sample this existence, for soon it will become laden with the complexity of the modern world . . . out there. Who will we be and what will we do? Will we remember all the things we've said and done? Come, my friend, and enjoy the times which are now. Independence, ambition, goals. From youth to agedness. Living on past horizons that offer a multitude of thoughts. Memories of past ac- complishments become sharper. A journey almost complete, but not quite. Each fleeting second seems more precious than the last. And sometimes we wish we could do it all over again. Wrinkles, wisdom, and fond memories. Today, though its eventual STILLNESS is unquestioned, its momentary BRILLIANCE is unequalled. Debbie Ritter editor-in-chief Kevin Portz sports editor Lee Ernst academics and honors editor Sue Petersburg, Kathryn Forbes special copy editors Jane Stancliffe greek editor Lee Reynolds, Mary Kumler housing editors Jan Fritschen organizations editor Paul Butcher, Debbie Fulmer classes editors Gary Wightman circulation manager Cliff Traverse, Jim McCall, Randy Carter, Matt Roy, Michal Thompson, Paul Southerland, Dave Burja, Judy Graham, Steve Wells, Bennett Gardner, Russ Garrett, Jay Wilkerson photographers Monica Lawrence, Shelley Myers, Cathy Arrington index Bill Williams cover design Jim Murphree sports staff Tim Marlow, Susan Holzinger, Pam Litschke, Jackie Austin, special copy staff Nancy Carnes, Joy Donovan, Keywood Deese, Nancy Shanks, Carolyn Clark, Vicki Brezny, Margaret Wade greek staff Julie Arrington housing staff Bill Crichton organizations staff Barbara Stoldt, Bob Stewart, E. Wayne Doyle circulation staff The Sooner, seventy-five, yearbook of the University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, was reproduced in a one-book format. eight and one-half by eleven inches, hardbound. Printing was offset on eighty-pound gloss enamel paper. All four-color was done by OU Journalism Press. Body type was photo-set in Souvenir light, italic, bold. OU Journalism Press did type-setting, paste-up and color separation. This publication, printed by the American Yearbook Company, Topeka. Kansas. is issued by the University of Oklahoma and authorized by Fred W. Weddle, Director of Student Publications, 2.300 copies have been prepared and distributed at no cost to the taxpayers of the State of Oklahoma. The publication was financed by subscriptions and the sale of space at a cost of 544,702 C 2 opinions expressed herein are those of the editor or writer and do not necessarily reflect the views ofthe University administration and Publications Board The University is an equal opportunity institution. 'i I Q . . 531415 A' 4" wierd' 4 . MA? 4 f f ,- 1 "fi5.' - ' f ., f. Kunz ' f f ' 4..?'.',, : 1 nfl, - I in 'i E' YY .2 - g P?Y11Q3??sg,' " " NESS .-"f,E'f ,, -' 4'-"Hg 5. f 1:15 Q 5225 'ef -'GSW' 'a 4 A. '.,1'+. f e x " M.: f?'fsgs'a,w .V 'fat -...:1' :Ljz, A2"": x' ' , g " 33 H3152 A's:11:frs.f?5-"z, ' H X 1 ffgli .f,f'f5':-52.1-'P' 8 -. .4. ,- 4 A ,-'fic' 5 YN- in P21325 , 11, .vi 51 - Q -'Q'-il? 21 2,1 P-' IC: 42. " f5i 55491262-:1if1?f' ' 3? if""L,,4, w.,,f,g,q,:,. V, H LN' H MQ ri' fgff' Q '- fh S 713' neat 7 as-.z, . 4, 1 ' Z947'f.,,- 1 25 Jfnflx :gg 1" 4101 figvg . 23112: Q5 ., ' iff Pri.. 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