University of North Texas - Yucca Yearbook (Denton, TX)

 - Class of 1970

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University of North Texas - Yucca Yearbook (Denton, TX) online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 504 of the 1970 volume:

I came to North Texas seeking the keys to unlock the pattern of my own life and the puzzle that is me. I found new experiences, new faces, new adjustments, new in- terests as I tried to make the pieces fit. I sought truth, direction. But en- countered frustration, disappoint- ments. As the pieces fell together I saw college life as a self-contained unit of freedom, joy, sorrow, suc- cess, failure, responsibility. I longed to grasp understanding. I came eager to experience life and to discover things for myself. As I pursued my goal, I sought to ma- ture, to broaden my beliefs . . . and to change. Even my restless adjust- ments were a learning experience. I felt I was together . . . alone . . . rushed . . . relaxed. I experienced a bond, a unity . . . free will, inde- pendence . . . u Itnwu v, puns" V a awwwa-qit wt '- I,Ve always pictured college life as a frantic race e a constant rush. Seems like everyone is always going someplace. I cant help but get caught up in the rush; yet I wonder if any of us ever stop to think where were going, or are just pulled With the action. I found myself in a totally new world Where numbers replaced names. As I joined the scramble of students that raced daily to and from class, I realized that the faces I noticed were no more real to me than wax. Even my professors re- mained distant to me e often iden- tified as Mr. XYZ. In seeking my true identity, it seemed I lost it. I tried to discover myself among the masses. Seemingly endless days often drifted into abbreviated nights as I sought to unlock the realms of Whatever ttknowledge" might be. I guess Iive really changed since I came to North Texas. Iive come to realize how much there is to know and how little I do know. Al- though many late nights have found me one among many ponder- ing the significance of philosophy 0r geometry, Iive become aware of the many things I can learn other than in the classroom and in books. Iive seen myself grapple at ab- stratcions and marvel at reality. Iive put aside half-truths and sought the whole. College isnit. the mass I once thought it to be. Iive come to see the individuals. Itis been fascinat- ing to watch them develop, their Views, their intellect, their matur- ity. I respect them for their opin- ions, even though I cant always agree. Iive seen individual students change, too. TheIVire proud and self- confident. They have a strong sense of identification with each other and they recognize and respect each others feelings, Views and goals. Even in crazy moments of just blowing off steam. Iive sensed a common identification with other students as they probe below the surface of others, seeking justifica- tion for accepting or rejecting their principles for living. live gazed with something Close to awe at the many diversified tal- ents individuals possess. Their abil- ities are evident everywhere; on stage, screen, air, and campus. It seems that college blends tech- nology and creativity into educzr tion to teach students. to utilize their own talents. It is a link of mat- uration as we adjust to one world while preparing for another. I expected college to guarantee me a new sort of freedom - the privilege to do as I chose. Then I realized one never escapes pres- sures, restrictions - old ones are merely replaced by new. But now my c 0 n C e p t of freedom has changed. Whatever happens does so because of what I do. I select my own friends, study what and when I feel like, and am solely responsible for my own time. Pve really just become aware of what freedom is. I guess I never really appreciated it before. Iive encountered people with ideas different from mine. But then a democracy must allow room for dissent. Sometimes dissent comes through the signs and rhetoric of protest which express individual opinion and loyalties. As dissent swept across the natioxfs college campuses, North Texas was no ex- ception. Moratorium Day protes- ters expressed their personal be- liefs in the Vietnam war issue. J us- tified or not, this too is freedom - ages 01d. As I leave North Texas, I sup- pose P11 always remember the big campus events, but little things Will always mean a lot to me too. Pve done some crazy things but the friends Pve made Will last a lifetime. In more serious moments too, I found those Who shared a com- mon goal and became instrumen- tal in locking together still an- other piece of my puzzle. I can still hear the fall air ring- ing With the sounds of GiVe ,em Hell Mean Green and a cracking of helments and pads. Student in- volvement reached a peak as North Texas indulged in the sweet taste of Victory. Besides the ever present com- mon bond in ideals, I became aware of a unity in school spirit, a deep feeling of pride, and a re- alization of school prestige. Each student became an important working part in the Mean Green Machine. For a brief time each week, I saw one hundred yards of lush, green carpet burst alive with un- paralleled grandeur. I saw stu- dents rippling to their feet to see the action and then, like domi- noes, falling back again. I saw life personified in a game of football-the effort, the strug- gle, the cheers, the silence, vic- tory, defeat, but always team- work. Learning to be a part of a team, to issue a combined effort, to be- come one among many and still remain one is as much a part of college as term papers, dorm rules and final examinations. Itve learned what it means to share with others in times of Vic- tory as well as in times of de- feat. Then, too, Itve realized that there are times in life when win- ning or losing is not a Vital factor and when itts better not to keep any scores; for often times scores dontt reflect the most important element a true, noble eifort. There,s something to be learned in every facet of life here at North Texas. Athletics not only train the bodies of its partici- pants, but the minds as well. Hon- esty, fair play, sportsmanship and loyalty are prevalent 0n the field, court and track as well as in the stands. Athletes prepare strenuously for the decisive battle of compe- tition. Muscles strain under the tension of contact. Each face re- fiects signs of exhaustion. But moments of excitement drain fa- tigue and lend another surge of energy. Again I realize that each new experience, each new contrast - hope versus achievements, de- feat versus Victoryeprepares me and those like me to face life. If Pve learned one thing in col- lege its to live for now, not to rely on past glory to see me through or future actions to cover up my mistakes. Its the present that matters. For yesterday has come and gone, and tomorrow is still only a Vision; all I have is NOW! YUCCA ,70 N ORTH TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY Denton, Texas Volume 63 Barbara Deck Editor Linda Woodall Assistant Editor Patricia Boynton Owen Carter Margaret Connell Evelyn F isher Don Hubbard Jimmy Jones Harry Kocurek Susan McDaniel Shirley McLendon Donna Witkowski Section Editors Cody Curry Don Roberson Photographers Diana Legault Cover Design TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction UNIVERSITY Administration Academics . C lasses HONORS Who,s Who . Beauties . Honor Professors . CAMPUS LIFE Sports . F ine Arts F eatures . Greeks Organizations . Closing Index . ADMINISTRATION Changing Ideas, Policies, Methods Symbolize Kamerickk 2 Years as NTSU President The name Kamerick and the word change have become synonomous to North Texas. In his two years as president of NTSU, Dr. J ohn J . Kamerick has become a symbol of new ideas, new policies and new meth- ods. Change is the word to describe a year that saw increasing student responsibility, greater faculty participation in policy- making decisions, and changes in some of the administrative structure of the uni- veristy. Change is also the word to describe a campus that saw an all time high in on- campus enrollment with 15,024 students registering in the fall, and a change from the 3.0 grade point system to a 4.0 sys- tem. North Texas saw the establishment of the first co-ed dorm, a loosening of the reg- ulations for womenis housing, and an in- crease in the student voice in campus mat- ters. Change came to North Texas, but it came quietly without the usual disruptions that-accompany change. Dr. Kamrick explained that North Texas has accepted the change smoothly because the university has gradually shed its role as guardian of the student and has taken on the role of educator for the students. After coming to North Texas, Dr. Kamerick studied the university situation and devised his own set of goals for the school. Some of the changes that evolved from these goals are: 0 a detailed code of student conduct written by students and faculty which provided guarantees of due process for students. 0 the creation of a faculty senate to aid in policy-making decision affecting the uni- versity. 0 work on the positions of an ombuds- man to facilitate student-administration communication. The university has also had to cope with the increasing number of students enrolling At left, Dr. Kamerick looks over some work in his office with his secretary, Virginia Briscoe. Later, he reads one of the numerous volumes in his private library. highly each year. Enrollment has set records each year for 19 consecutive years with more and more students coming to school. "We are dealing with a considerably older student today," Dr. Kamerick said. About 60 per cent of the students are 21 or over. nThe enrollment has shifted rapidly away from the freshman and sophomore years? Dr. Kamerick said. To keep up with the changing students and their Changing educational needs, the university has had to change. In a speech this year, Dr. Kamerick said tcontinuedi 3 second k! 10 Kamer dent of NTSU Dr. ear GS presz of h al mg r u D many became re- Senate and , y tions Faculty were Above he talks mnova The ZS ts that prOJec ! i ty. FORUM th lk wz mg a wa ished. students wh eour le tak i through the campus Educatiorfs Goal, Cultivate Wisdom tcontinuedt ttWe need emphasis on the development of a different kind of excellence than we are currently developing. "We may need to develop better profes- sionals, better specialists, better technology, but our greatest need is to spend more time on the cultivation of Wisdom in more human benefits? ttWe should decide first that the primary goal of a good education system is to pro- duce an intelligent, civilized human being, and secondarily, and at a different time probably, to produce the specialist or pro- fessional? Kamerick said that in a free society the role of the university must first be to help students gain enough knowledge to make the wisest possible choices. One of Dr. Kamerickts favorite sports is handball. As often as possible he plays a game with several of his colleagues on a court at Fouts Field. The General Classroom Building, scheduled to be open in the Fall of 1970, is another building in the master plan at NTSU. Regents Elect Chairman, Create 3 Doctoral Degrees Personnel, policies and practices of NTSU fall under the jurisdiction of the Board of Regents. The nine board members are appointed by the governor with approval of the State Senate for six-year terms. The board elected its first new chairman in the last 20 years in its first Fall meeting. A. M. Willis suc- ceeded Ben Wooten as chairman of the regents. Wooten had been chair- man at North Texas since the schooPs first board was formed in 1949. In an era of constantly advancing technology, a university must be a progressive, constantly changing institution of learning. In keeping with these standards, the NTSU Board of Regents established three new doctoral programs in govern- ment, sociology and library service and approved plans for the building of a multi-million dollar art build- ing. Still other progressive changes are scheduled by the board. Applica- tions for ten new degree programs have been made. The regents re- quested additional degree programs in journalism, psychology and child- hood education. North Texas is expected to have an enrollment of 20,000 students by 1975. The Board of Regents and the administration will continue its progressive theme to maintain progress and meet the educational needs of the next decade. Members of the North Texas Board of Regents are, standing left to right, E. C. Pannell of Fort Worth, Ernest Schur of Odessa, Carroll Sullivant of Gainesville, James Lawson of Dallas, Berl Godfrey of Fort Worth, and Sessions Wortham of Houston. Seated is Chairman A. M. Willis of Longview. Gov. Smith Appoints Three New Regents Former North Texas student, Davie James tJimt Lawson was appointed with Berl E. Godfrey and Gus Sessions Wortham to the NTSU Board of Regents by Gov. Preston Smith. Lawson was a journalism major and served as an editor and an associate editor of the Campus Chat, and was a member of USNT. Godfrey is a Fort Worth attorney and Wortham is chairman of the board of the American General Insurance Co. in Houston. James Lawson tLL Berl Godfrey and Ses- sions Wortham t R t ePictured at right. Two additions to the campus this year were the new library and Kerr Hall. The library, pictured above, was scheduled to be opened in January, while further expansions were planned for a later date. Kerr Hall, NTSUCS first coed dormitory, although not fully completed, was put into service in the Fall. J. J. Spurlock Vice-President of Academic Affairs William C. Linvdley Vice-Prwident of Student Affairs residents John L. Carter wbovw Vice-President of Fiscal Affairs James L. Rogers welozw Vice-President of Administrative Affairs John H. Hargrove Business Manager John Matt Howard Director of Buildings and Grounds Dr. Witt Blair Director of Placement G. W. York Director of Admissions Administrative Officials Dr. Wayne Adams Director of Alumni Association Richard A. Geer Director of Housing Dr. Edward C. Bonk Director of Guidance M. C. Sutton Dean of Students Sutton Chosen For New Post In order to give better service to the student, the Board of Regents removed the position of Dean of Men and created other administra- tive offices. M. C. Sutton, former Dean of Men, now serves as Dean of Stu- dents. A physical education teacher for several years, Dean Sutton spent one year as Dean of Students at Thomas Nelson Community College in Hampton, Va. before coming to NTSU in September of 1968. Dean Suttonis primary task is to co-ordinate the work of Associate Deans Nancy Dickens and Jack Wheeler and Assistant Deans Harve D. King and Gloria Adams. He is concerned with all areas of student life and works closely with William C. Lindley, Vice-president for student affairs. With the reorganization of the Student Services Division, the va- rious deans hope to improve both the quantity and the quality of service to students. tcontinuedi M. C. Sutton, former Dean of Men, now serves as Dean of Students. Harve D. King became assistant dean of stu- dents in the fall while M. C. Sutton, former dean of men was appointed dean of students. Post Changes Define Duties for Efficiency tcontinuedt Dean King said that the reshuinng clearly defined the duties of the staif so that assign- ments could be carried out more effectively. One of the major projects of the Student Services Division this year has been the re- vision of the student code of conduct. The rules have been clarified and now appear in written form. Students may appeal any de- cisions they consider unfair. Also, new freedom in class attendance was given to the student with the publication of new university rules on absences. After a thorough revision of the University Class Attendance Policy, the faculty senate concluded that responsibility for class at- tendance rests with the student. As a result, attendance reports are no longer submitted to the Registrar and students are to be graded "on the basis of intellectual effort and performance." Dr. J . J. Spurlock, Vice president for aca- demic affairs said, ttThe change in philosophy is putting more responsibility on the student and minimizing the university in loco par- entis? Previous rules had been in effect for twelve years. tcontinuedt Miles Anderson, Assistant Vice-President of Academic Affairs Wheeler Appointed T0 Deanis Position tcontinuedi Associate Dean of Students Jack Wheeler holds the post most nearly equivalent to that of Dean of Men. He is primarily concerned with problems affecting the male students at North Texas including on and off campus housing, fraternities and student conduct. Dean Wheeler has been an employee of the university since 1958 when he was hired as a student counselor. In 1961, he received both a bachelors and a mastefs degree from NTSU. While at North Texas, he was presi- dent of seven university organizations. Dean Wheeler formerly served as director of student activities and director of student housing. Harve D. King, assistant dean of students, came to Denton from the Gary Job Corps Center in San Marcos, Tex., where he was orientation counselor. Dean King, who is originally from Denton, has been a public school educator for 22 years. One of his jobs is dealing with the federal work study program and on-and off-campus jobs for students. Dean King works closely with the Texas Employment Commission and the Denton Chamber of Commerce. "I hope that we can provide job openings for every student that needs one? he com- mented. "Unfortunately, there are not always enough jobs to go around, and I feel that there are more students in need of financial assistance than those who apply. tcontinuedi Jack Wheeler Associate Dean of S tudents Friendly Campus Impresses Dean tcontinuedi Dean King, who said he came to North Texas because of the ttfriendly, congenial at- mosphere on campus? is the first Negro administrator to serve during a long term of school. ttWhen I came to North Texas for a job interview, I was very impressed with the student body. As I walked around campus, I noticed that the students seemed very friend- ly. I also felt that being familiar with this community, I could render a greater profes- sional service here at North Texas than I could in some other location? Much of Dean Kingis time is spent in counseling students. "I have not yet had an unpleasant relation- ship with anyone. I appreciate the attitude with which the students have accepted mef, Harve D. King Assistant Dean of Students Deans King, Sutton and Wheeler pause from their work to share a moment on the light side. Miss Nancy Marie Dickens Associate Dean of Students for Women Nancy Dickens, associate dean of students for women, gives the welcoming address at the annual Mortar Board banquet. 32 Dean Dickens Brings AWS T0 NT A new era began this year for North Texas women students with the form- ing of the Association of Women Stu- dents tAWSl, a womexfs governing body operated by women students. Miss Nancy Marie Dickens, dean of women at NT since 1968, was the primary initiator of this change for women students. ttWorking with women students to help them as much as I possibly can is my foremost duty as dean of women. 111 try to help them whenever and in any way I can? Dean Dickens said. It was in keeping with this policy that Dean Dickens, with the assist- ance of Assistant Dean of Women Gloria Adams, supervised the estab- lishment of AWS, the first organization at North Texas to coordinate the activities of all women students. Now all women automatically be- come AWS members upon registration at the University, and a booklet of guidelines for conduct is issued. AWSts aim is to further the respon- sibility and unity of women enrolled in the university. Through AWS, women students will be able to make their wishes and ideas known. tcontinuedl McConnell Made No Hours Dorm tcontinuedl When Dean Dickens came to NT, she felt women lacked overall cam- pus leadership. This void has been filled by AWS. North Texas coeds now voice their ideas through a governing body made up of fellow students who rule themselves with- in the guidelines of the university administrative policy. Another change in the NT cam- pus this year was the establishment of a no-hours women,s dormitory, McConnell Hall. A girl must be 21 years of age before she is eligible to live in McConnell, but once there, residents have their own door key to come and go as they please. Thus, coeds obtain more responsibility for the direction of their lives. llThe program has worked out so well, the next step will be to include more people in the system. Instead of relying solely on age to determine eligibility, the next probable step will be extending the regulations to include all seniors. Liberalization of hours for other women students is also under con- sideration by the Womenls Stand- ardis Board on Which Dean Dickens serves as advisor. Questionaires were distributed to all women stu- dents living in residence halls at North Texas. They were asked to express their opinions on such di- verse topics as later curfews for ancy Dickens, associate dean of tudents for women, deftl and loria Adams, assistant dean of tudents for women, tcenterl talk ith a member of Mortar Board. women students under 21, organiza- tion of the Womenis Standards Board, and dormitory rules. The data will be used for further self- regulation by women students. Dean Dickens is chiefly respon- sible for these changes and along with them has re-introduced an idea lacking on many campuses. tiNo one is more interested in student life than the student. The university system must provide for the incorporation of student ideas through student representation? Gloria Adams Assistant Dean of Students for Women Dean Dickens and her assistant attend a meeting of AWS. Mrs. Rachel Mays Director of Food Service Roy K, Busby Director of Public Informatio I and Publications A. B. Swenson General Manager, University Store G. V. Edgar, M.D. Director of Health Service Administrative Officials Richard A. Harris Ler Dr. Harold Farmer Below Dr. David A, Webb Righw Director of Computer Systems Director of Student Union Diector of Libraries Building Instructors Air Complaints, Express Ideas in Senate As Faculty Caucus Seeks to Modify NTSU Policy The Faculty Senate, a group of 47 teachers from all disciplines on the North Texas campus, means many things to many people. It was designed to bring faculty members out of their shells, to aid them in having a voice in university policy and to offer an outlet for gripes, questions of policy, and frustrations. Dr. Don Beck, Senate parliamen- tarian and member of the speech and drama faculty, believes the pri- mary task confronting members of the faculty caucus is to tisee how creative we can be in using the in- strument for the general welfare of the university. t, President J ohn J . Kamerick, who originally suggested the creation of such a representative group, sees it as gthe primary voice of the faculty in expressing convictions or opinions on a wide range of topics of campus- wide significance? Another definition of the Senate is tan exercise in participatory democracyfi But these definitions do not tell what the Senate will do. Indeed how creative can it be? What will it do about the problems facing North Texas? One thing it will do, according to Dr. Kamerick, is enable individ- ual representatives to consider the health of the entire university com- munity when making decisions in- stead of merely the health of only one department or division within a department. He includes faculty, students, administration and, to some extent, the Board of Regents and state officials in the sphere of interest to be considered and dealt with when making university policy. itThe walls can be high in the departments? Dr. Kamerick says. iiOne of the great things I hope for is that Faculty Senate will move people out of their tight shells into wider circles of association. The old idea of the university held together by the heating system has to go? Several senators have indicated that the group may have already served the purpose of tearing down some of the walls. One instructor stated his feelings about the asso- ciation with teachers from other disciplines this way: itI have been amazed to find that there is some fascinating research being done on this campus in the departments of history and English and others, not just in the fields of science. Dr. J ack Cross, vice-chairman of the Senate, interprets the faculty groupts role as that of a vehicle through which any faculty member can bring up ideas for consideration. ltBefore the creation of the Sen- ate? he said, tiwhen a professor had a better idea on a university matter or a complaint, he had nowhere to go with it? Under Senate rules, however, the University Committee is obligated to consider all matters brought be- fore it and either send them to an- other committee for preliminary in- vestigation or place them on the Senate agenda to be considered by all members at the next meeting. One change in university policy has already been brought about by the Faculty Senate. The group rescinded existing statements of University policy governing class at- tendance. Early this fall a resolu- tion was passed stating that class attendance would be left to the dis- cretion of the individual student. Other matters some senators ex- press interest in and believe should be taken up by the representative body are the creation of an ombuds- man post, improvement of univer- sity alumni relations and formula- tion of criteria for promotion of faculty members. But, to quote one senator, ttwhat the Faculty Senate ultimately be- comes is up to its members? Below is a cross section of the 47 members of the Faculty Senate in session. The Senate meets the first Wednesday of each month to discuss and initiate policy pertaining to the general program of the university. This fall the Faculty Senate was responsible for revising the mandatory class attend- ance policy. Dr. Jack Cross, vice-chairman of the Faculty Senate, addresses that body in one of its sessions. The Faculty Senate was organized to give the faculty members a broader role in, policy making. A variety of moods is reflected by the senate mem- Below, Dr. Jack Cross, vice-chairman of the bers as an, issue is raised during one of the first Faculty Senate addresses a hearing. Dr. Cross has meetings. Members are elected by various academic been instrumental in bringing about the many faculties of the university. Various committees changes the Senate has brought to the university. emerge from this group. ACADEMICS College of Arts 31 Sciences . . . School of Business Administration . . . . School of Education Aerospace Studies Division . School of Home Economics School of Music . Graduate School . COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE Renovations Sweep 17 Departments During the year there was a major reno- vation in the 17 departments of the Col- lege of Arts and Sciences. Nearly half of the departments have new chairmen and two more changes were foreseen. The new philosophy chairman is Dr. A. Y. Gunter, appointed in September 69; physics, Dr. Jim Sybert, appointed in Sep- tember y69; acting chairman for chemistry, Dr. Charles Skinner, appointed in Septem- ber t69; economics, Dr. Kendall Cochran, appointed in February t69; geography, Dr. Terry J ordan, September ,69; government, Dr. Fred Gantt; and Dr. H. D. Holloway appointed in February 1970 as chairman of psychology. Aside from these staff changes, Ph.D. programs were added in eight areas: biolo- gy, chemistry, physics, mathematics, his- tory, English, government C70t and li- brary service C7OL Dr. Frank H. Gofford, Dean of College of Arts and Sciences. Radio-TV students prepare for broadcast over station. KNTU. Ab0veQ Student drama majors prepare costumes for uTwelfth Night? BelowJ Dr. Joe E. Barnhart explains a theory in his philosophy class. Student artist molds styrofoam for spring art project. chemistry major, Sharon Beatty, works on an experiment in the Freshman chemistry lab. tAboveT Art student works on a modern statue in sculpture class JBelowT North Texas artists use new outside facilities for creative projects. ART DEPARTMENT Art Show Depicts African Culture An African Art Exhibit shown early in fall ,69 was termed hone of the best" by Dr. Mack Vaughan, acting chairman of the art department. The African art exhibit included re- ligious masks and sculptures, carved and constructed by tribal west Africans. Two faculty art shows were also sched- uled for the year. The department pre- sented the annual senior art show in the spring; exhibits of new faculty work; and the Voertmants Award, and annual com- petition sponsored by Voertmans, campus and book gift stores. Future plans for the department include a doctoral pr gram and a new building. A program on the doctoral level was approved by the Board of Regents in 70 and is waiting approval of the Co-ordinat- ing Board in Austin. The classes are scheduled to begin in the fall of T71. The new art building is planned to be put into use in 1972. The building will in- clude a teaching gallery, a small audi- torium, and new facilities for photography and film making. "We are still expanding while waiting for the move into the new building," said Dr. Mack Vaughan. Dr. Mack D. Vaughan, Chairman Patience and skill are needed by art students to wbovw paint pottery, Uer sculpt and welow shape pottery. BIBLE DIVISION Churches Finance Biblical Studies Beginning With the fall semester of 1970 the Bible Division will be designated as the Department of Religion. The change, granted in 69, is due to the curriculum of the department which teaches courses on all aspects of religion; not just about the Bible. The Bible Division exists at the expense of supporting churches. A Bible Chair made up of five demoninations supports NTts Bible program. The faculty consists of leaders from churches supporting the Bible Chair. These include Church of Christ, Methodist, Cath- olic and Baptist churches. Enrollment in the department reached 500 in the fall and rose to 512 in the spring during the ,69370 semesters. Speakers planned for the spring included Father Schumacher and Dr. William Mor- gan to speaks on the Catholic, Protestant schism at the United Church Center. tAboveh Two students find the Baptist Student Center lounge a place to study. tBelowh Dr. Russell Ware, chairman of the Bible explores passages of the Bible in his Old Testament class. Dr. Russell Ware, Chairman peaceful division, BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT tAbovet Students discuss specimens in animal ecology, the life and habits Center To Study Of fish. Environment Factors Dr. J . K. G. Silvey, director of the Bi- ology Department, enthusiastically helped organize an exciting new idea for North Texas this year. The project involved the founding of a center for environmental studies, not just biology, but inter-discipli- nary. The center, Which will hopefully take effect by September of ,71, would cover studies in fields of air, water, solid waste, man in relation to his environment, and sociological and economic impact of en- vironmental factors. Last years concentration on the water pollution research was extended into 1969 to study rivers, as well as reservoirs. Dr. Silvey was named as the Chairman of the committee for Flow Memorial Foun- dation which worked to secure free electro- cardiogram examinations financed through donations and the foundation itself. Further happenings in the department included a research grant awarded to Dr. Vernon E. Scholes by Houston,s Manned Space Craft Center. The research is an at- tempt to determine the presence of infec- tion in cells as related to their chemical al- Br. J. K. G. Silvey, Chairman terations associated with the disease proc- esses. BIOLOGY Below Students study specimens in Animal Ecology, life history and habits of fish. Abovw Graduate students practice surgical techniques. Bel0w Graduate student John Redman researches enzymes. Doug Fodge discusses histology, types of tissues, with his freshman zoology class. CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT Department Begins New B.A. Degrees The Chemistry Department began new bachelor of arts and bachelor of sciences programs in Fall of 1970. The HA. pro- gram allows a student to major in chem- istry and obtain study in a wider area. The BS. program provides a strong foundation for graduate work in positions in industrial chemistry. Extensive remodeling of the Chemistry Building continued With completion ex- pected for fall of 1970. The new building would have 50 classrooms each capable of seating 100 students and a departmental library. An integral part of the chemistry de- partment is the Integrated Laboratory Se- quence. The ILS is a series of laboratory courses, beginning with elementary tech- niques building progressively from the knowledge of previous experiments up to special research projects and interviews in various analytical and physical sciences studying both organic and inorganic com- pounds, said Dr. Charles Skinner, depart- ment chairman. Dr. Charles G. Skinner, Acting Chairman An undergraduate student weighs materials in a private research lab. A North Texas graduate student can be found tions by titration technique in a chemistry lab. Each day finds chemistry students working in labs. tAbovet Graduate students are often called upon to use the glove box containing nitrogen gas in their work with volatile chemicals. tLer Students work on experiments in Dr. Bradyts organic lab. ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT Grants Promote Teaching Research This fall, in conjunction with the soci- ology and political science departments, the economics department sponsored the in- terdepartmental Black Studies. A $10,000 grant was awarded to Dr. Wil- liam Luker by the National Science Foun- dation to research the training of high school teachers. Work on the project will begin in 1970 in Waco and El Paso. Dr. Luker will study of the outcome of the teacher trainings as well as future effect the improved teaching will have on the students. A $38,000 grant was awarded by the Na- tional Science Foundation Institute to the economics department to research better training of high school economic teachers this summer. The Health, Education and Welfare De- partment has announced a grant to Dr. Lewis Abernathy to research the Employ- . . . . . . . ment Analysis for Local Government Of- Dr. Martm Davzdson glues an zllustratwe lecture on the prmczples ficials. of economics. Dr. Lewis Abernathy instructs students in Economics 314, Black Community in the US. Dr. Kendall P. Cochran, Chairman AboUd Class discussion invokes laughter . , . into Dr. Thomas HalPs lectures. Dr. James Carolyn R Chard deftj and Dr. Lee leler UzghU dzscuss a Shakes- M . Linebarger lectures to his modern drama pearean passage With D 7" Lloyd J 8f f r ey drama class on Shawk Major Barbara. Dr. Gerald Kirk and Dr J. F. Kobler concentrate during English department Executive Committee meeting. ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Program Doubles In Second Year The English departments graduate program more than doubled in its sec- ond year. From a Ph.D. program that began with 25 graduates it has grown to 60 with 400 studying for masters de- grees. A course in Afro-American Literature was also offered for the first time this year. ttThe course has been very popu- lar and we plan to offer it in the sum- mer? Dr. E. S. Clifton, chairman of the department said. The department also publishes an in- ternational scholarly and critical quar- terly journal ttStudies in the Novel? Dr. J ames Lee of the faculty edits the pub- lication which contains contributions from internationally known scholars. Dr. Sam Henderson and Dr. J ames Lee are also general editors of a series of pamphlets about Southern writers. Dr. J erry Vann began a remedial writ- ing laboratory for students needing help with compositional writing. The lab is staffed by faculty members on a volun- tary basis. Dr. Clifton said that one of the most significant changes in the department tAbovei Dr. Ernest Clifton, Chairman tBelowi Dr. M. S. Shockley ad- was the more etficient distribution work dresses his World Literature class, English 222. and responS1b111ty throughout the de- partment. Dr. Philip Smyth, Chazrman. tAbovet George Kraft controls tapes for students in the foreign language lab. tBelowt Students take a laboratory quiz over their days work. FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT Department Hires 15 Teaching Fellows The addition of teaching assistants in the North Texas Foreign Language de- partment began this year. There were approximately 15 assistants in French and Spanish working towards their mas- ters degree within their respective fields of study. Members of the language faculty have participated in various conventions throughout the academic year. In November, North Texas hosted the American Association of Teachers of French. In October several members of the faculty traveled to Houston to at- tend the South Central Modern Lan- guage Association. Additions to the faculty during the 69-70 year included Dr. Jean Zupan- chich. The language d e p a r t m e n t offers Bachelor of Arts degrees in French, Spanish, German and Latin. Masters de- grees are offered in French and Spanish. Eiww U :15 :1: Travel posters adorning the walls of instructofs office hint at possible rewards open to foreign language students. Foreign language instructor, James E. Alvis, uses the COed learns a language through the use Of tapes in the master control to monitor his classes. language lab. GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT Geography Appoints Jordan as Chairman Dr. Terry J ordan assumed the duties of chairman of the geography department in fall of 1969. Dr. Jordan is a graduate of SMU and received his doctorate at the University of Wisconsin. New courses added to the geography curriculum this year were cultural geogra- phy, agricultural geography, quanitative - methods in geography, history of geographi- cal thought, advanced economic geography and population geography. Members of the geography department attended the Symposium In Cultural Ge- ography at Texas A8LM University and the Southwest Division of the Association of American Geographers in Dallas. Dr. Lee Knox, faculty member, was also honored as one of nine professors in the Honor Professors section of the yearbook. Professors were selected a by a USNT com- mittee early in the academic year on the basis of activities in and out of the class- room. Lee Knox lectures to class on historical geology. Joan Stahl and Virginia Veal use fossils to aid in studying the different regzons on maps. Dr. Terry Jordan, Chairman Sparse class listens to afternoon instruc- tion. GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT Dept. Sponsors Lecture Series The government department once again sponsored the Distinguished Lecture Series. Featured speakers this year included Pro- fessor John Gillespie 0f the University of Toledo, Professor Frank Sorauf of the Uni- versity of Minnesota and Professor Albert Meyer of the University of Michigan. New courses were added and a Ph.D. program introduced in the spring semester. The courses added were in the fields of black studies, American government in politics, public administration, political socialization and comparative federalism. Graduate enrollment also increased. KThe department has shown a definite increase in the graduate programs. We have approximately 50 students on the graduate levelf Dr. Fred Gantt, department chair- man stated. The department also gained two new in- structors this year With the addition of David Turner and David Martin. Dr. Fred Gantt, Chairman Graduate student instructor lectures to an afternoon class. HISTORY DEPARTMENT Enrollment Increases; Studies Expand The History Department completed its second year of courses in graduate work successfully. tTWe,Ve had an enrollment in- crease 0n the Doctorate level and Master Degree," said Dr. J ack Scroggs, department chairman. The history department also completed its first full year of regular classes in Black History. NWe,ve seriously been thinking of expanding the studies to include a study tAbovet Students study a supplemental text, Rendevous With Destiny, in African History? Dr. Scroggs said. A in History 262. tBelowt Dr. Lawrence Kelly lectures to his history course in African History has been im- class about reform movements and Darwinism. proved. Two part-time black instructors, Miss Thomazcna Dixon and Charles Keener, were also added to the departmentts staff. Three other members of the faculty par- ticipated in writing the history of the Dal- las Cowboys. The study is scheduled for future publication. Dr. Jack B. Scroggs, Chairman JOURNALISM DEPARTMENT Chat Goes Daily; Adds Wire Service A new decade began for North Texas journalists with the approval of a graduate program, the newspaperts switch from a bi- weekly to a daily and the addition of As- sociated Press wire service. In March, the Coordinating Board, Texas College and University System, approved two masters degrees: the MA. in journal- ism and the master of journalism. The Campus Chat became the North Texas Daily on J anuary 20 when the Pub- lications Committee voted to change the newpapefs name after 53 years of publica- tion. Outstanding journalist for the 1969-1970 school year was Nancy Kemplin, news edi- tor of the North Texas Daily. She was named the winner of the W.R. Beaumier Memorial Award. 1 The Campus Chat and the university yearbook, the Yucca, were both awarded All-American awards for 1969. tTop righU Mike Billert watches Candy Chestnut as she places pictures on the print dryer. tRighU Daily page editor, Sue Pet- tit, types an editorial. tLer Keith Shel- ton, Daily sponsor, goes over a news story with a sophomore reporter. Journalism Abovd Candy Chestnut, Daily wire copy edi- tor, looks over copy from the AP news wire. RighU Daily Editor George Flynn and Wanda Davis lay out page one on the light table Be- low Yucca staff members, Verlie McAlister, Linda Woodall and Evelyn Fisher, place class pictures in alphabetical order. Dr. C. G. Sparks, Chairman tBelowt The library offers a quiet Students learn modern library techniques in classroom study. place for study and references for research a ers. LIBRARY SERVICE p p DEPARTMENT Department Offers 2 New Programs NTts Library Service plans to offer two new graduate programs in September, 1970. The department will begin courses on the doctoral level and offer a six year course in library service specialization. The six year program will offer one year beyond the masters degree and will enable students to receive a professional specialization cer- tificate. According to Dr. C. Glynn, chairman of the department, library service currently has a larger graduate enrollment than any other branch of the College or Arts and Sciences. The graduate program is ac- credited by the American Library Associa- tion. The departmentts undergraduate pro- gram prepares majors for positions as as- sistants in large libraries and as school li- brarians. tAboveO Dr. B. G. Nunly explains a theorem in a spe- cial problems graduate class. tBelowt Grad student, Mike Keisler, aids freshman, David Mugg, with problems in College Algebra. M ATHEM ATICS Dr. John T. Mohat, Chairman DEPARTMENT Doctoral Program Initiated In Fall The math department awarded its first doctoral assistantships in fall 1969. The program was approved in 1967, but classes did not begin until this September. The department was also awarded a grant under the Education Professions De- velopment Act. The program is set up as one year fellowships for students who are interested in a career in junior college teaching. ttWe are very pleased about the grant. There were only a few awarded through- out the country and we are the only in- stitution in Texas to receive one in mathe- matics," said Dr. John Mohat, chairman of the department. The undergraduate curriculum also un- derwent a remodeling process. Changes in- clude a three hour course in calculus and a three hour course in elementary functions. In the fall an undergraduate seminar in selected axiomatic theories was presented 60 by the department. Dr. Laurence Maher discusses homework, graph prob- lems, with students in his Elementary Functions class. hBelowh Graduate student Charles Stevens explains a theorem to students in his undergraduate class. Dr. Nick Vaughan discusses theorems in a graduate math course. tAbovei Students reflect mixed emotions to Dr. Mikulais lecture. tBelowi Dr. Joe E. Barnhart listens to a student discussion. Dr. Donald M ikula lectures in his Philosophy of Art class. PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT Young Department iiGetting Knowni, NTis philosophy department has a new chairman this year, Dr. A. Y. Gunter. "Since this is the second year for the de- partment, we dont have many students in the department. We have been busy let- ting students on campus know that we are now an established department? Dr. Gun- ter said. A major project of the department is the activation of the philosophy club. Another project they have been working on is the arrangement of their library holdings. Several of the profesors in the philoso- phy department will take part in the En- vironmental Teach-in. Dr. Gunter said the department hopes to have a masteris program, but "above all, we want to develop a good undergraduate program." "Many departments deal with just the technical side of philosophy, but our de- partment attempts to give courses which are relevant both to human needs and con- tmporary hangups without losing sight of the technical side of philosophy," Dr. Gun- ter said. Dr. Addison Gunter, Chairman PHYSICS DEPARTMENT Degree Obtainable In Four Fields The use of the physicsi department Van- De-Graaff nuclear particle accelerator has greatly increased in 1969-1970. The ac- cellerator, carrying three million volts of power, is used to accelerate particles into nuclei enabling detailed study of element breakdown. This year brought a broader base to the physicst departmentis degree program. A student may now obtain a degree in one of four fields of physics 9 solid state phy- sics, nuclear physics, atomic physics, and theoretical physics. The physics depart- ment will gradaute their first Ph.D. this spring. iOur doctoral program has arrived. But, we are concerned with the excellence of our undergraduate program? said Dr. Jim Sybert, chairman of the physics depart- ment. HWe are trying to improve the level of our undergraduate studies by persuading high school students with greater ability to come to North Texas." Physics instructor, Dr. Thomas Gray, works on machines in basement of Physics-Math Building. Dr. Jimmy R. Sybert, Chairman Abovw Virginia Rawlings explains physics equation. Below left to righU Dale Alsop, Dr. David Seiler and Clayton Teague measure properties of solids. $$a Left to right? Jerry Callahan and Kuo-Ing Chung adjust the nuclear mag- netic resonance spectroscope. Above Students measure light refractions on crystals. Below Dr. Thomas Gray uses frozen nitrogen to retard reactions. PSYCHOLOGY Department Joins Arts and Sciences Fall i69 the department of psychology began its first year as a department in the College of Arts and Sciences. Previously it had been a division of the School of Edu- cation. The administrative move was also a move from the Education-Home Economics Building to the Men,s Building. In the fall, the psychology department submitted proposals for a Ph.D. degree and an additional master degree in clinical psychology to the Coordinating Board to be offered in fall of 1971. Enrollment in psychology courses for the fall semester reached an all-time high of 709 undergraduates and graduates. The department also established a de- partmental charter Which included com- mittees, composed of undergraduates and graduates having student representatives with two students on each committee. Fall 69 was also the first year for the Psychology Club. This club, for under- graduates and graduates, is in addition to the honorary fraternity Psi Chi. Dr. Harold D. Holloway, Chairman tBelowi Mrs. Paula Hawthorne talks with psychology student. Psychology instructor gives lecture to a beginning psychology class. Psychology Department Students take part in a learning experiment conducted in D K evin Kennellys psychology class. Abovw Dr. Donald Whaley explains a programmed learning approach to his abnormal psychology class. Left abovw Dr. Earl Cooker conducts an experimental psychology class in the degrees of humor. SOCIOLOGY ANTHROPOLOGY ' DEPARTMENT New Instructors Added To Dept. Fall ,69 marked the first year for the sociology-anthropology department to be separated from the sociology-economics de- partment with Dr. Hiram J . Friedsam as director. Four new instructors were added to the department in the fall: Dr. Elizabeth Alm- quist, Dr. James Kitchens, Miss Barbara Butler, and Billy J 0e Lutes. Miss Butler, of the anthoropolgy facul- ty, has been working on the NTSU Histori- cal Collection in the Historical Building. She worked with student volunteers to put the collection in order. The sociology-anthropology department, in cooperation with the government-eco- nomics department, is participating in a study of the Black Community of the United States. The department also reecived seven fac- ulty research grants during the year. Dr. Hiram J. Friedsman, Chairman tAbovei Students take a test in sociology class. tBelowi A sociology teacher lectures to an advanced sociology class. 5mm PR meamv Bruce Jackson and Jack Maher edit wire copy for broadcast on radio station KNTU. Dr. Reginald V. Holland, Chairman Drama students prepare for a make-up class. Be- low Dr. Don Beck receives notes used by students in a group painting session. SPEECH AND DRAMA DEPARTMENT Second Station Tunes In On FM The Speech and Drama department "turned out With the addition of KNTU- FM, North Texas States second student- operated radio station. The station made its first broadcast in November, featuring news from the campus scene to the inter- national span and music ranging from the pop NTop Fortytt t0 the sounds of easy- listening. Bill Mercer, faculty station manager, member of the Speech and Drama faculty, and radio voice of the Dallas Cowboys over KNTU, lends 20 years experience to the station. Mercer expressed the aim of the statiorfs format to be the following: "At KNTU- FM, we seek to give the radio station the personal relationship With the audience that it used to have in the days before TV? The fast tempo of the Speech and Drama department continued With the produc- tions of "110 in the Shadet, ttTwelfth Nightt, and "The Guest? The university debate team captured trophies and honors at the Texas Tech tournament in several competitions, and the department initiated new approaches in aiding speech-handi- capped children in a joint program of NT and the Irving School System in the Hear- ing Therapy Clinic. Dr. Reginald Holland looks at Cyrano DeBergerac statue given to him by his daughter. Mrs. Ruth Zepeda tests Bob Gathings on responses evoked 0n the Elec- trode Placement Auditory Test. Dr. Ted Colson shows class in oral interpretation how to project expres- sion towards audience in oral reading. Dr. Clifford E. Hutton, Dean Dr. Neeley explains assets and liabilities to his 137 Accounting class. tRighU Instructor discusses the four phases of manage- ment to a Management 382 class. SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Counsel Coordinates Business Goals The School of Business Administration has a new dean this year, Dr. Clifford E. Hutton. One of the many projects of the newly appointed School of Business Administra- tion dean was the organization of a Stu- dent Advisory Counsel. The counsel, com- posed of the officers of organizations in the business department, coordinates goals of the department. itI think the activities should be centered around the students. Naturally, it is helpful to me to know the students, wishes? Dr. Clifford E. Hutton said. A new IBM 360-50 computer has been installed this year to expand the use of the computer facilities. The comptuer will be used by 10 departments for instruction work in regular courses and many special problems, research, thesis, and disserta- tion courses. Also, for the first time, North Texas has a degree program in distribtuive education at the undergradaute and graduate level. The instruction is in merchandising, mar- keting and management of personnel. Dr. Horace R. Brock Dr. Vernon Payne Dr. David R. Fitch Accounting Business Education and Finance and I nsurance Secretarial Administration iLer Students practice punch card techniques on IBM equipment iAbovei Business students study contracts in a Business Law class. Dr. Kenneth Cox M anagement Students work on daily exercises in typewrit- ing class. sRighU Fashion M erchandising students prepare an advertising campaign. Dr. Hale A. Newcomer Marketing School of Business Wm w-wue-M - Dr. J ohn R. Carrell General Business I Graduate student Suzanne McCall explains the channels of distributive marketing. Business instructor lectures to class. Below Stu- dents study taxes and tax forms. tAboveJ Dr. Matthews, Dr. Curry, Dr. Cross, Dr. Smith, Dr'. Beamer and Dr. Daugherty speak to a member of the faculty in an executive meeting. Dr. Dwane Kingery, Dean SCHOOL OF EDUCATIO Education Divides Into Six Divisions Re-organization of the department was a major step for the School of Education this year. Fall 70, the school was divided into six divisions. The divisions and their directors are: elementary, Dr. James H. Dougherty; secondary, Dr. Jack Cross; counselor-edu- cation, Dr. George C. Beamer; inter-pro- fessional studies, Dr. John Curry; higher education, Dr. J . C. Matthews; and educa- tional leadership, Dr. Paul Smith. In the fall, Dr. Wayman Dever, faculty member in the secondary division, became North Texas first full-time Negro faculty instructor. Also new to the faculty were Dr. Sue Collier and Dr. C. A. Hardy, in- structors in the elementary and secondary levels. The experimental program in secondary education began its second year fall ,70. "We plan to extend this program in 1971? said Dr. Dwane Kingery, dean of the School of Education. The program was ini- tiated to give students more flexibility in learning under more than one faculty mem- ber. Dr. George C. Beamer Dr. Paul Smith Dr. James H. Daugherty Director Counselor-education Director Educational leadership Director Elementary education Below Students in team teaching learn how to use the opaque projector. nlbovd Judy Fredricks and Bettye Montford practice using the film strip projector. Dr. J. C. Matthews Dr. Jack Cross Dr. John Curry Director of Higher education Director Secondary education Director I nter-professional education MW ;n. .z:- .-..vu; anv Team teaching students divide into small groups to discuss specific teaching problems or learn how to use the tape recorder. School of Education 4Above4 Students in Education 345-349 prac- tice threading the movie projector. 4Below4 Dr. John Plunkett instructs Education 345-349 students in the micro-teaching lab. 4RighU Stu- dents participate in a class discussion in ex- perimental team teaching. xgswmwymep INDUSTRIAL ARTS DEPARTMENT Additional Courses Update Services "In its efforts to provide better services and products for our society, industrial technology must remain in a fluid and ever changing state. As a result, the subject matter content for industrial arts, which of necessity must be derived from industrial technology, is constantly changing? said Dr. Earle B. Blanton, director of the in- dustrial arts department. Because keeping the departmentts cur- riculum up-dated is crucial, additional courses were added at the upper level in drafting, wood, metals, and plastics. Also, a Faxitron X-ray machine is now available for students working in the area of metal- lurgy of welding. A new digital analog instrumental sys- tem, combining the best qualities of digital Dr. Chester B. I ngraham instructs industrial arts students in the and analog operations, is available for stu- use Of the pneumatic control system. dents studying digital circuits. Dr. Earle B. Blanton, Chairman Industrial arts student works on project at the electric arc welding station. PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT Ments PE Divides, Obtains TEA Grant A split in the Ments Division of the Physical Education Department was ini- tiated this year. A change in the organiza- tion of the athletic department, Which for- merly included inter-collegiate athletics and physical education, created an inde- pendent athletics department to be headed by Head Football Coach Rod Rust and a recreation department to be headed by Dr. J ess Cearley, former chairman of the phy- sical education department. The Texas Education Agency awarded a grant of $50,000 to the department to expand North Texas, Driver Education and Safety Program. The increased demand for driver education teachers facillitated the need for expansion. ttIn the future, we hope to have a major on the doctoral level, not just a minor? Dr. Cearley said. "We will need to add to our graduate level courses? "An evaluation of the department is cur- rently taking place? he added. ttRevision is needed in order to meet North Texas' growing needs? Dr. J ess Cearley Chairman Physical education students participate in volleyball game. Students end up in a heap attemtping to gain points in a wrestling match. 80 Dr. I rma Caton Students demonstrate basic shuffle Chairman step in tap class. mmgmmwm Volter straddles horse during gymnastics skill test. Students practice routine on uneven paral- lel bars in gymnastics class. PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT Division Sponsors Master Classes Two master classes, a self-evaluation program, and a workshop prgram for the summer were the activities of the Woments Division of the physical education depart- ment for the ,69370 year. In February, Dr. Janet MacLean lec- tured and directed a workshop on recrea- tion. Later in March, the department in cooperation with the Modern Dance Club brought Erick Hawkins, modern dance master, and his company on campus for a performance and two master classes. Planned for the fall were additional courses in swimming and a course for the handicapped to be taught by a physiology expert. Enrollment in activity courses increased as sports and dance classes went coed. tAbovei AFROTC cadets march in parade. tBelowi Members salute as t1Old Gloryh is raised in front of the Administration Building. Col. Prof. R. E. J. Scott Chairman AEROSPACE STUDIES DIVISION Scout Troop Forms Through AFROTC Under the direction of the North Texas branch of the AFROTC, the first Explorer Scout units were established in the Denton area for boys 15 to 19 years of age. Air craft exploration is their theme, based on Air Force concepts. Other projects for the past year included bi-semester faculty luncheons, with cadets entirely responsible for preparing an in- formative format related to their current activties. The Ramada Inn in Irving was the site of the traditional Military Ball. The Ball featured skits by the ROTC and Arnold Air members. A new precedent was instituted this year with the iiFormal Retreat? a ceremony to formally sound taps and lower the flag on Monday afternoons. The ceremony, com- plete with bugles, was designed to renew patriotic feeling. The 1970 Mardi Gras was attended by 41 of the local cadets and 20 Angel Flight members. Sherri Griffith alters dress in tailoring class. tBelow1 Diane Philips cuts out coat in junior sewing class. SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS Home EC Revamps Curriculum Format The department of home economics un- derwent several changes in curriculum dur- ing the 169370 year. A course in family living, oriented to- wards the problems of marriage, was added to the curriculum and the chemistry re- quirement was changed from 131-132 to 141-142, the course for majors. In the area of clothing and textiles, the classes were divided into experience levels to separate those coeds who have had none, little or advanced clothing experience. In March, Mrs. Naomi Albanese, Dean of Home Economics at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro arrived on campus to assist NT.facu1ty members in evaluating and formulating future plans for the department. Further evaluation took place through the use of questionnaires given to majors and working graduates. The department also established a de- partmental library for faculty and stildents. Dr. Mary Evans Dean Ler Miss Lloyd sings and plays to nursery school children, demon- strating to her class how to handle children. Ulbovw Student home economist studies material in textile class. Bel0w Sherry Wood, Debra Crouch, and Sandy Canine sew fabric in textile class. SCHOOL OF MUSIC Enrollment Listed As Second Largest The North Texas State School of Music was named the second largest in the nation when its fall enrollment reached 936 stu- dents, by the 1970 Music and Artists Di- rectory. The school was also awarded the Award of Merit for the performance and promo- tion of American music during the 1968- 1969 school year by the National Federa- tion of Music Clubs and the American So- ciety of Composers, Authors, and Pub- lishers. The department was one of the first to have an electronic music lab in the nation. The Electronic Music Center, began in 1965, consists of two complete labs, a teaching studio, a workshop and en experi- mental area. "The Center is for the composition of new music and the production of new knowledge in music? Mr. Merrill Ellis of the music faculty said. The North Texas Lab Band was invited to appear as the official ttbig bandtt at the International Jazz Festival held June 17- 21, 1970, in Montrieux, Switzerland. The School of Music emphasized two new teaching techniques: the use of tele- vision replay in conducting applied music, and the use of pianos equipped with a set of headphones and two switches Which en- ables the student to hear only himself for individual study; practice with small en- semble groups; or perform with the entire class. tAbovei Merrill Ellis, director of the electronic music composition lab, instructs students on synthesizer. tBelowi Kenneth Cuthbert, Dean. Douglas Wiehe conducts freshman musicians during re- hearsal. Above0 Woodwinds rehearse music in lab. Below Elementary education majors practice visual aids for future use in instructing music classes. .. . V V : . .1 mm $3th mm: minim u; umm mmwmmw mum; K II. 2:30?th tAbovw Composition students work at synthesizer. tBelowt Ronald Thomas, graduate student, spends many hours per- fecting his skill at the organ. tAbovet Future teachers learn to motivate ele- mentary students to music. tBelowt Doug Parsons practices the organ in the Recital Hall. School of Music hAbove left and righU Leon Breeden, associate music professor, conducts two sections of the lab bands. hBe- lowh Drummer John Hall rehearses with the 1 0010012 Lab Band. Dr. Robert Toulouse, Dean GRADUATE SCHOOL Reorganization Brings Upgraded Standards The spring of ,70 was a total of 2,902 students enrolled in the graduate school. Of these 2,902 students, 1,968 were work- ing toward masterts degrees. The number represented an increase of 129 over last year. In the same period there were 934 doc- toral candidates, an increase of 152 over last yearts enrollment. The total graduate enrollment represented almost half of the students working toward graduate level de- grees in the golden triangle area. ttThrough administrative reorganization the school has increased the number of stu- dents while upgrading standards. The re- sult is a larger number of quality graduate students? Dr. Robert B. Toulouse, dean of the school said. As a result of a faculty senate action, the Graduate Council now has two student members from the Gradaute School with voting priviledges 0n the Council. Four new degrees are now being offered, two mastefs and two doctoral. The mas- terts degrees are in public administration and art. The new doctoral degrees are in government and library science. The PhD. in library science is a joint effort with neighboring Texas Women,s University. John Reed, graduate student, lectures to a general psychology class in addition to working toward his degree. hAboveh Graduate student uses a guinea pig in a biology experiment. hBelowh Graduate student duties include filing data for the psychology department. hAbove and belowh Chemistry graduate student works with test tubes that are in an isolation cham- ber. CLASSES Graduates O O O O O O O O 92 Seniors 96 Underclassmen . . 128 raduates: A-Rat Alexander, B. J . Alford, Morris L. Allston, Rose B. Althaus, Marlin C. Armstrong, Andrew J. Barrington, Barbara F. Bartlett, Jack A. Baxter, Raymond D. Bennet, Linda A. Bitters, Walter L. III Black, Bob G. Bliss, Walter E. Bournonville, Ann Brunett, Norma J. Burch, James O. Cade, Stanley G. Calvin, Richmond E. Camp, Frank A. Cercone, Claudia L. Chase, Janie A. Clark, Judith L. Coater, Mary C. Congleton, Carol A. Congleton, Michael W. Connor, James T. Coyle, Sandee Cranfill, Billy R. Crawford, Jack C. Culpepper, James S. Cunningham, Marion C. Daghestani, Burhandeen Deen, Gary W. Dickson, Mary J. Dixon, Thomazena Dorsey, Evalena E. Dorsey, Paul W. Edgar, Robert T. Eggers, James M. Ellis, Cheryl A. Fabianke, Lloyd R. Denton Houston Corsicana Fredericksburg Dallas Throckmorton H ouston Dallas Van Alstine Cleburne F ort Worth Kaneohe, Hawaii Pittsburg, Kan. Dixon Dallas Denton Denton Denton Dallas Plano Duncanville Denton Denton Denton Bells Rowlett Keller Alpine Dallas Denison Damascus, Syria Dallas Dallas Garnett, S.C. Waverly, N.Y. Fort Worth Richardson Irving San Angelo Rosebud Fahring, Linda L. Fortmayer, Gary W. Freeman, Kenneth C. Germer, Russell K. Gilbreath, Derwin R. Gongre, Charles E. Griffin, Herbert A. Griffin, Mary A. Harlan, Bill J. Heydman, Allan W. Hinson, Glynda K. Johnson, Steven L. Keen, Charles V., Jr. Kersey, Jim E. Kyle, Joyce E. McKenzie, Charles R. McLeon, William W. McMurray, Marilyn K. McReynolds, E1aine Mahan, Linda Mathis, Jerry L. Meacham, Larry GA Menn, Marta Millet, John P. Moore, Ola Mae Morwood, Linda L. Moss, King II Movnt, George R. Mozingo, Wilma L. Newman, Mike L. Okamoto, Shinya Okoh, Samuel E.N. Osborn, James R. Owen, Jacqueline Palermo, Don C. Parks, Raymond L. Perkins, Karen A. Peterson, James A. Phillips, Gerald W. Pippin, Louis D. Pitts, Carolyn Prather, Vicki L. Pratt, Grady L. Ramig, Louise N. Ratledge, Wilhert H. Anahuac Gretna, La. Fort Worth Ogden, Utah Houston Orange Clarksville, Ark. Hernando, Miss. Brownwood Cherokee, Okla. Dallas Abilene Wichita Falls Dallas Jasper Springhill, La. Denton El Paso McCamey Tyler Dallas Troy H ealdton Dallas Tyler Fort Worth Harlingen Dallas Borger Corpus Christi Dallas Agbor, Nigeria Fayette, Missouri Wichita F alls Denton M idland Ponta Falfurias Rockdale Amarillo McKinney Dallas El Dorado, Ark. Fort Worth East Point, Ga. Graduates: R 0d-Zap Rodriguez, Richard L. Rousseau, James A. Rutledge, Johnny C. Sanderson, Latheta J. Shafeeq, Samuel Shaver, Herbert D. Shavers, Barbara A. Shockley, Larry D. Siebenthall, Curtis A. Stephens, James R. Swafford, Michael D. Takacs, Kathy J. Tan, David K. Thomas, Ronald F. Thompson, Dwight 0. Thompson, Philip W. Torres, Rolando Turner, Frederic L. Uehara, Michiteru Van Winkle, William Wagner, Patricia D. White, Randall D. Wiley, Virginia Williams, Victor G. Worley, Doug Yarbrough, Richardson Yearwood, Jacqualine Young, Linda A. Zapata, Abel 0. Lo vington, N . M ex. H enderson M cK inney Earth Rawalpuidi, Pakistan New Freedom, Pa. DeKalb Bonham Wichita Falls F ort Worth Broken Bow, Okla. Waxahachie Dallas M idland F ort Worth Crane Valencia, Venzuela Denton Tokyo, Japan Whitney Benton Gatesville Graham Kansas City, Kan. Quanah Bonham Jackson, Miss. K ress Tyler Seniors: Aaron, Dan Adair, Mary L. Adams, Cecil Adams, Diana Adams, Kay L. Adams, Patricia A. Adlof, Bobby G. Agnew, Mark A. Ainhart, Judy Airhart, Teresa A. Albright, Lauren Albritton, Lu J . Alewine, Russell L. Alexander, Mike Allbright, Gregory D. Allen, Pamela E. Allison, Richard T. Althaus, John P. Anos, Stephen F. Anderson, Eddie L. Anderson, Elizabeth 0. Anderson, Stuart N. Andrus, Scott Arey, Gary C. Arledge, Thomas K. Armes, Dianna L. Armes, Ronnie D. Armstrong, Dona Jo Armstrong, Larry W. Armstrong, Lynn Armstrong, Marc A. Arons, Jeanne I. Ator, Anna E. Austin, Amy R. Autry, Shirley J. Axtell, Lester S., III Aymond, Dale E. Ayres, William D. Baber, Janette A. Bailey, Thomas D. Lewisville Tyler Houston Fort Worth Dallas Arlington Sherman Odessa Garland Arlington Bridgeport Lewisville Dallas Denison M exia Mount Pleasant F ort Worth Temple Fort Worth Dallas Dallas Chico Dallas Garland Richardson Fort Worth Fort Worth Abilene Eastland Fort Worth Dallas Dallas Gainesville Jacksboro M cGregor Tyler Dallas M idland H ouston Dallas Blair, Larry L. Baker, Robert R. Baldwin, Jeffrey W. Ball, Linda S. Baltzelle, Beverly R. Balusek, Janet P. Banks, Christopher E. Banks, Toni L. Barber, Gerald L. Barber, Jesse L., III Barber, Margie Barbour, Bernie C. Barker, Calvin A. Barkley, Patricia Barks, Martha Barnes, Corliss W. Barnes, Gloria Barnes, Riecky D. Barnett, Joe E. Barnes, Gretchen J . Barrett, Dean Allan Barrett, Terry M. Barringer, Lynn A. Bartlett, Sallie R. Bartoli, Diane Bartoli, Larry W. Bason, Jim P. Bass, David W. Baszile, Fayetta E. Bauer, Robert J . Beaird, Deats H. Beck, John 0., Jr. Beck, Trey Beckham, Ernest E. Beckworth, Marcelene Beene, Jay E. Beleck, Marvin A. Belew, Thomas E. Bellamy, J ohnnie E. Benedict, Dwaine Bennett, Cecelia M. Bennett, Stephen R. Bentley, Paula Berkley, Mary Pot Bernhard, Karen E. Garland Valley Station, Ky. Houston M esquite Saginaw Taylor Galveston F ort Worth Weatherford M idland Dallas Sanford Dallas Ennis Harlingen Whitney F ort Worth Whitney Krum Channelview Denison Blackwell Denison Snyder Denton Dallas Denton Los Angeles, Calif. Port Arthur Albany, N.Y Big Spring Denton Normanna Dallas Longuiew Friona Tyler Paris, Tex. Dallas Dallas Dallas Linden Corpus Christi Dallas Victoria Berny, Charles L. Edinburg, Tex. Berry, Giles C. Dallas Bertovich, Francis J . Smithfield, Pa. Beydoun, Nasser M Beirut, Lebanon Bibles, Joye Burnet Birkelbach, June T. Georgetown Birnberg, Carol K. Corpus Christi Biven, Rebecca Ann Irving Black, Scott Houston Blackshear, Ronald L. Grapevine Bleckley, Michael L. Paris, Tex. Bobbitt, Cynthia North Little Rock, Ark. Bolen, Letaine Hurst Bond, Everett W., Jr. Bay City Bonnecarrere, Keith L. Dallas Bonner, Kenny R. Sweetwater Bowen, Lewis Jacksboro Bowers, Teela Clarksville Bowling, James D. Fort Wright, Ky. Boyd, Marilyn R. Dallas Bracken, Jennifer L. Dallas Brady, Robert D. Dallas Brogg, Kathryn L. Grapevine Brashear, Marge B. Dallas Braude, John M, Dallas Brazelton, Judy C Crane Brendel, Don C. Mascoutah, Ill. Brinkley, Dan H. Bowie Brinson, Margaret C. Dallas Brisendine, James H., Jr. Mesquite Broholm, Ruth H. Fort Worth. Bophy, Joseph D. Dallas Brown, Fichael Haddonfield, NJ. Brown, Eddy L. Keller Brown, Fred W. Dallas Brown, George R. Crowell, Tex. Brown, Laura F. Fort Worth Brown, Thomas D. Big Springs Brown, Tommy M. Hurst Brownfield, Jan Raymondville Brunner, Stanley Mineola Buccolo, Arnold W Toms River, NJ. Buck, Dennis W. Dallas Buck, Richard D. Denton Bullock, Marce Mount Pleasant Burchfield, Roy E. Sherman Burgess, George B. Irving Burnett, Nancy A. Denton Burnim, M. L. Teague Burris, Boyd, III Lewisville Burroughs, Tom H. Lewisville Burton, Charles V., Jr. Richardson Burton, Jerry N. Houston Bush, Beverly A. Maryville, Mo. Butler, Malcolm K. Fort Worth Bycz, Joseph P. Johnson City, N.Y. Cage, Katherine A. McKinney Cagle, Garner L Dallas Caldwell, Billye Houston Call, Rebecca B. Albuquerque, N. Mex. Callaway, Gary L Bellaire Campbell, Ann Rogers Campbell, Dan Rogers Cano, Luis R. Corpus Christi Cantrell, Scott Dallas Captain, John F. Houston Card, Donald J. Garland Carey, Frank Grand Prairie Carlson, James A. Pecos Carlson, Nancy J. Dallas Carman, Elizabeth J, Roanoke Carney, Robert R. Weatherford Carpenter, Carol J. Dallas Carrell, Kim A. Fort Worth Carreon, Susana Dallas Carson, Larry D. Springtown Carter, Anita Fort Worth Cartee, Shirley L. Kerens Casillo, Albert A., Jr. Huntington, NY. Cavasos, Randy L. Cleburne Cavasos, Eduardo J . Laredo Cavender, Mike - Dallas Cawthon, Joseph P. Dallas Cerasaro, Victor J. Endicott, N.Y. Cerow, Jacquex A. Clayton, N.YA Ceynowa, Susan E Chamberlain, Marshall V., Jr. Chambers, Richard C. Chaney, Robert K., Jr. Chase, Andrew S Chester, Johnie D Decatur Childress, Robert C. Waxahachie Chiler, Catherine C. Vienna, Va. Christian, Kathleen F. McKinney Christopher, Sharon A. Fort Worth Christopher, Tom R. Fort Worth Clark, Linda K. Marshall Clark, Palmer Carthage Clark, Susan E. Goldsmith Clasbey, Kathryn E. Dallas Clay, Ernestine A. Dallas Claybon, Vicki N. Lufkin Cleveland, Wanda SA Burger Clifton, Ted W. Gladewater Coates, Billy J. Corsicana Coats, Margaret A. Arvada, Colo. Cobb, John R., II Honolulu, Hawaii Coffield, Sandra Hickory Creek Coffnrian, Rosanne Dallas Cogdell, Nancy A. Argyle Seniors: Cohen, Lynne Coker, Charlotte Coleman, Cynthia Coleman, Gary G Collins, Donna J . Comer, Martha K. Conlee, Robert M. Conner. Carolyn J. Conyers, James A. Cook. David C. Cook, Donald M. Cook, Douglas E. Cook, James M. Cooper, Carlton Copeland, Gelea Corbett, Charles R. Cornelison, Jean Couch. James L. Coursey, William D. Covington, Carolyn Coy, Carlos Coyle, Thomas D. Cralk, Gary C. Crane, James E. Cranford, Rohert S. Creel, Sandra A. Crouch, Raymond L. Crump, Vernon R, Cull, Carroll Cummings, Linda C. Curtis, Robert L. Czaplicki, David J. Czaplicki, Linda L. Dale, Wynette Dane, Robert M Daniel, Virginia S. Danner, Marion S. Darst, Sylvia J. Davis, Affie T. Davis, Alan C. Fort Worth Alesquite Denton Breckenridge Whitewright Gainesville Dallas Fort Worth Dallas Dallas Andrews Pecos F ort Worth Plainview Texarkana, Tex. Charlotte, NC. Dallas Dallas Arlington Richardson San Benito Lewisville Abilene Pennsville, NJ. San Diego, Calif. Loving Den ton Dallas H ouston Gainesville Texarkana, Tex. Syracuse, N.Y. Syracuse, N.Y. Dallas Denton Dallas Fort Worth Spokane, Wash. Marshall La Grange, Ill. Davis, Ann M. Davis, Billy A. Davis, Bridget M. Davis. Charlcie A. Davis, Judy A. Davis, Lynn N . Davis, Michael A. Davison, Larry W. Dawson, John L., Jr. Day, Linda S. Deck, Barbara G Deel, David I. Delatorre, Carlos M Denison, Margaret A. Dess, Jay A. Deviney, Samuel RA Dewberry, Glenda Y. Dian, Albert Dickman, Mark J. Dillon, Michele E. Dinwiddie, David L. Dobbins, Gary J. Dodson, Carolyn P. Donovan, Thomas J. Doyle, Fred R. Achinney Garner Denton Galveston Waxahachie Denton Denton Graham Denton N ewcastle White Settlement Abilene Galveston Denton San Antonio Azle Tucson, Ariz. Arlington, Mass. Brooklyn, N.Y. Dallas Denton Dallas Arlington Waxahachie Dallas Doyle, Sherry Drewry, Paul E. Driver, Joe L Dubberly, Ina R. Dubman, Hedy Dudar, Lynn Dulak, Jean Duncan. Jennifer Duncan. Patricia Dundas, Doris Dunn. Dan A. Duran. Carol N. Duran, Richard J Dutton, David Eads. Norman D. Eads, Wanda F. Earles, Sarah E. Ebert, Patricia J. Echols, Lyndon W. Edie, Sharon Edwards, Bennie L. Edwards, James B. Edwards, Michael B. Edwards, Ray D. Eichman, Preston A Ellis, Jean M Elrod, Bonnie L. Elwell, Tony J . England, Linda D. Erhardt, Marvin T. Ethridge, Lonnie G. Eubank, Sharon A. Evans, Brinda G. Evans, Edward E. Fagor, Francis L. F arina, Theresa Farmer, Leslie J. Farris, Robert S. Fay, John R. vFeeler, Rachel A. Copeuille Dallas Garland Frisco H ouston Dallas Dallas Abilene Fort Worth Denton Fox, Okla. Valley Stream, N.Y. Laredo Hurst Tyler Tyler La Marque Texarkana, Tex. Garland Dallas Tyler M idland Dallas Smithfield I ruing Oskaloosa, Iowa Dallas Gilmer Lancaster Big Spring Weatherford Vernon Jacksonville Garland Dallas Irving Aubrey Beeville Dallas Fort Worth Ferguson, Terry E. Fertitta, Frank J. Fewell, Jonie B. Finklea, Charles L Finley, Nancy L. Finn, Kathleen J. Fiorini, Sandra Fisher, Laura S. Fisher, Jack D. F itzgibbons, Patric N. Flagg, Gordon D. Flowers, Judy B. Ford, James M. Fore, Joe L. Forest, Joyce M. Fortson, Carolyn D. Foshee, Robert C. Fouts, Rosemary D. Fox, Pamela J Fraley, Jana S. Francis, Gail Franklin, Eddie W., II Franklin, Linda L. Fraze, Bernice Frazier, Gloria E. Fredericks, Judy Freeling, Karen L. Friedman, Beverly M. Frith, John E., Jr. Fry, Jane K. Fuhrmann, Michael Fuller, Billy Gaecke, Chuck Gagliano, Linda Gahan, Timothy M. Gallia, Elizabeth F. Gambill, Sheryl W. Garibay, Jane F. Garibay, Samuel Garrett, Dave L. Garrett, Gwendolyn M. Garrett, Linda KA Garza, Hogla Gassiott, Glenn C Gay, Laura G. H urst Dallas Abilene Dallas Dallas Dallas Woodcliff Lake, NJ. Texarkana, Tex. Texarkana, Tex. Irving Grand Prairie Whitesboro Orange White Settlement Houston K ilgore Dallas Dallas Tyler Pecos Dallas Orange Dallas 1W CK inne y Orange Richardson Oklaunion Dallas Denton Arlington Lindsay Argyle Lewisville H 0 us ton El Paso Dallas Big Spring Galveston Galveston Dallas Dallas Fort Worth McAllen Cleveland, Tex. Arlington Geistman, Gerry L. George, Deanna K. Gibbs, Karen Sue Gilbae, Gene J. Gill, Janey Gillespie, Suzanne Gipson, Margaret A. Gwins, Carolyn L. Glass, Carol J. Glenn, Kathy Glotfelter, Robert P. Godby, Hubert L., Jr. Godman, Lori A. Goff, William M., Jr. Goins, Linda R. Golembiewski, Georganne Gorman, Kenneth Graves, Oneida E. Gren, Cathy Jo Green, Thomas R. Green, Verna L Greiss, Mary Marleen Gresham, Sara J. Griffith, Cherie L. Griffith, Sherry Grigsby, Dickie W. Grigsby, Larry D. Gross, James D. Grounds, Linda S. Gmbbs, Steven C. Guerra, Tito Guerrero, Daniel R. Guinn, Orville A. Guinn, Sheila H. Gumataotao, Evelyn G. Gustafson, Deborah W. Haggord, Larry Hahnl, Carl M. Hahnl, Judy A. Haley, Charlotte L. Dallas Odessa Waco Tyler F ort Worth Big Spring Mount Pleasant Dallas Kirkwood, Mo. Denton Grand Prairie F ort Worth Irving Houston Dallas Wichita Falls San Antonio Dallas Fort Worth F ort Worth H ouston Denton M ineola Dallas Cleburne Dallas Cleburne Temple Van Alstyne Dallas M cAllen Brownsville Daingerfield I ruing Agana, Guam Galveston Stanton Dallas Dallas Amarillo 'Haley, Kathryn M. Halfpenny, Louise Hall, Jim A Hall, John H. Hamilton, Jeanne Hamilton, Jeffrey N. Hamm, Paul R. Hammerle, Pete Hankins, Garland Hardeman, Ronald D. , Harden, Jim R. Hargrove, William Harris, Cheryl Harris, Cynthia Harris, John DA Harris, Johnny Harris, Margaret J. Harris, Robert W. Harrison, Marie Hart, Dennis Hartwick, Judy A. Harvey, Margie L. Haslund, Stephen L. Hatfield, Nancy A. Hatton, William J r. Hawkins, Deborah Hawkins, Thomas H. Haynie, Linda K. Hays, Michael Healer, James Heins, Susan L. Helmick, Mike Helsley, Jane Henderson, Joyce Henderson, Ronnie Henry, Eddie, Jr. Henson, Patti Herren, Phyllis Herring, Thomas Hick, Bette Hicks, Carole Hicks, Charles Hicks, Susan Hightower, Cliff Hill, Constance Waxahachie Denton Kopperl Dallas M arque, Tex. Denton Garland Garland N ewcastle Wichita F alls Longview Richland Dallas Cleburne Goodland Granbury H ouston Waco Dallas Lewisville Dallas Fort Worth Lake Jakson Borger Gladewater F ort Worth Dallas Gladewater Winters Sweetwater Beaumont Bynum Van Linden Dallas H ouston Corsicana Tyler Fort Worth Plano Grand Prairie Richardson Manteca, Calif Spur Dallas Hill, Jacqueline E. Hill, Kathie L. Hilsabeck, Judy Hilson, Linda C. Hire, Maretta Hobbs, Molendia Hooker, Joseph P. Hogan, Karen A. Holder, Bill Hollar, Galen R. Holle, Nancy K. Hollingsworth, Annelle Hollinshed, E. Ronald Holt, Carol Holt, Dorothy L. Hopper, Richard A. Hooten, Fran Hopkins, Douglas J. Hopkins, Michael C. Horn, Esther J. Horton, Charles C. Howell, Patricia A. Hubbard, Ronnie D. Huett, Vanna L. Huff, John R., Jr. Hugghins, Richard G. Hughes, Shirley A. Hukill, W. Ryon Humber, Mary L. Hummer, Jeanne A. Hunt, Karen L. Hurlburt, Edna R. Hurley, Carolyn Hurst, Barbara E. Ingram, James D. Irvine, Robert M. Ivers, Katherine E. Jackson, Carl W. Jackson, Yvonne R. Jahnel, Mary A. H ouston I rving Fort Worth Dallas Gainesville H ouston Gainesville M cGregor I rving Pilo t P0 int New York, N.Y. M arshall Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Odessa H o uston Grand Saline Garland Galveston Waco T yler Gainesville Cedar Rapids, Iowa Waco H urst R ichardson H 0 us ton Lampasas Fort Worth San Bernardino, Calif. M cGregor Dallas Jameson, Janita Janavarias, Stella Janca, Benjamin Janes, Wayne Janus, Evelyn Jay, Jessie Jaymes, Maurice Jenkins, Beverly Jenkins, Gary Jenkins, Mary Jenkins, Sharon Jennings, Cindy Jepson, Robert Jett, Linda Jimmerson, Eddie Jr, Johnson, Bertie Johnson, Coy Johnson, Janice Johnson, Mary E. Johnson, Nancy Johnson, Peggy Jo Johnston, Anita Jones. Alvin Jones, Edwin Jones, Gayle Jones, James Jones, James M. Jones, Jim B. Jones, Jimmy C Jones, Marjorie Jones, Nancy S. Jordan, Sonny Joyce, James P. Juarez, Alexander Juno, Carol Kasiske, Stanley Kasper, Annabel Kauer, Judith Keaster, Gary Keeny, John III Keller, Mary Kelley, Frederick Kelley, Tommie J0 Kemplin, Nancy Kendall, David C. San Antonio Arlington Alice Dallas Wharton Richardson Valley M ills M elvin Lewisville Seagoville Sherman Fort Worth Little Rock, Ark. Dallas Kerens Dallas M arlin Dallas Tyler Dallas Waco Perrin Denison Farmersuille Ferris Dallas Denison Fort Worth Fort Worth Freeport Dallas Berger Addison Dallas Dallas Grand Prairie Doss Burkburnett M iami, Fla. Dallas N ocona Cameron Arlington Valley View Dallas Kennedy, Michael J . Kerr, Richard D. Ketner, Billy J. Kilgore, Killyon, J effrey H. Patricia A. King, J ohn C. Kirk, Virginia N. Kirwan, Gary C. Kissinger, Thomas R. Klarfield, J ohn C. Klein, Ricky D. Kline, Alan Kocurek, Harry A. Kooker, Lynn Korkmas, Anthony J. Knackstadt, Carol J. Krajcar, Sandra L. Krebbs, Marit Klorczyk, LeRoy H. Krumm, Carol A. Kupferman, Stanley G. Kutin, Alex L. Kyle, Edward H., Jr. Kyle, Thomas C. LaBay, Joe E. New Providence, NJ. Justin M elissa I rving Houston Garland Garland H ills, M ich. M cK inne y H o uston Bloomfield Dallas F ort Worth I tasca Denton Tyler Edgewood Odessa Dallas Baytown Richardson Aberdeen, Md. Odessa Dallas Odessa Dallas 0 La Cavera, Nanette Landers, Brenda Landers, Lou Anne Lane, Richard K. Lang, Marieke L. Langford, Calvin R. Langford, Michael J. Lankford, William T. Lapinski, Mary Ann Lathan, Barbara J0 Lauck, Carol A. Laudadio, Robert L. Lay, Linda G. Ledbetter, Brenda K. Lee. Claude E. Lee, Danny Lemons, Keneth Lenamon, Mary Leonard, Roger D. Lescalleet, Carol A. Lescalleet, David F., Jr. Lewallen, Beth Lewis, James T. Lewsader, Donald Li, Eddy Yick Wah Lieb, William E, Light, Sue Lightfoot, Kathryn Lea Lightfoot, Skip Lilly, Harold E. Limones, Manuel R. Lindsey, David L. Link, Louise P. Linker, J o Lisner, Tracy D. Loccisano, Dennis 0. Long, Jan Long, Walter D. Loudermilk, Tim Louvet, Renee S. Bellaire Denton Grand Prairie Amarillo Pampa Wink Rangoon, Burma Dallas F ort Worth F ort Worth F ort Worth Penn, Pa. Dallas F ort Worth Sarasota, Fla. Kerens Pampa Albany Haskell San Antonio Richmond, Va. Dallas Dallas Roswell, N. Mex. Hong Kong Gruver Fort Worth M idland Denison Longview Del Rio Robert Lee Dallas Sherman Tyler Middlesex, NJ. San Angelo Odessa Brownwood Dallas Lower, Janice C. Lucas, Kenneth H. Lucas, Marjie L. Lumpkin, Beverly A. Lund, Dee LOW, C. L. Lucas, Gay Luscombe, Nancy Lutes, Lois Lyles, Charles McCampbell, Eugene McCarley, David McCarter, Chuck McCarter, Teresa McCarty, Carol McCarty, Wade McClanahan, Connie McClish, Patricia McCord, Kenneth McCormack, Michael McCrum, Kerry McDaniel, Larry McDaniel, Linda McDaniel, Susan McDonald, James McDonough, David McFarland, Gail McFarland, Joyce McGee, Carol McGee, Nancy McHan, Venita McKay, Donna McKee, Pat McKee, Sherry McKinney, Charles McKinnis, Penny McLaughlin, Patrick McLean, Patsy McLemore, Philip McLendon, James McLendon, Shirley McLennan, Don McMurry, Olga McMurry, Paul McNairy, Stewart Grand Prairie Longview Pecos Fort Worth El Paso Lewisville Dallas M iles, I owa Waco Decatur Pampa Dallas Corsicana Corsicana Snyder Snyder Graham Dallas Grand Prairie Fort Worth Garland Dallas Fairfield, Ohio DeSoto H oaks Dallas Grand Prairie Wills Point Dallas Fort Worth Abilene F ort Worth Dallas Lipscomb Dallas Big Spring Garland Houston Fort Worth Houston Tyler Dallas Levelland Levelland Dallas McNatt, Glen McNeel, James McNeill, Jean McNulty, Stacie McPeak, Cindy Mabry, Paula ' MacDonald, John Mace, Barbara Madison, Joanne Maggard, David Mahaffey, Jim Mahan, Mike Maher, John Mahler, Marsha Malcom, Alvin Malmstrom, Royd Maloney, Marilyn Manasco, David Mankus, Richard Manning, Christine Manzay, Jewel Maples, Melvin Marceleno, Maria Marcontell, Dave Marecle, Kenneth Mariner, J eannette Maris, Ross, Jr. Martin, Kay Martin, Linda Martin, Michael Martin, Nancy Martin, Sherry Martin, Toni Martinek, Judith Maschek, J amie Mason, Roy Massey, Gayle Mathies, Willie Maus, Stephen Maxey, Randal Bedford Corsicana H ouston Berger F ort Worth F ort Worth Richardson Dallas F ort Worth Arlington Hot Sprinks, Ark. Carrollton Dallas Dallas Garland M eluin I rving Denton Dallas Dallas Kaufman Gunter Dallas Waxahachie Waco Berger Dallas Corsicana Garland Sanger Houston Arlington F ort Worth Ennis Fort Worth Frisco Fort Worth H ouston San Antonio Longview Maxwell, Patricia May, Steven Mayfield, John Mayne, Dianne Mays, Stanley Meadows, David Medlin, Donald Meek, Carolyn Meek, Karolyn Meier, Mary Meredith, Steve Mewhinney, Jim Mickey, Gerald Milan, Mary Miles, Robert Miller, Betty Miller, Deborah Miller, Glen Miller, Georgia Miller, Linda Miller, Margaret Miller, Mark Miller, Martin Miller, Sally Mitchell, Charles Mitchell, Gary Mitchell, Karen Molaison, Cheryl Monashkin, Suzanne Monday, Dianna Montgomery, Jimmy Montgomery, Marilyn Moody, David Moore, Danny Moore, Gary Don Moore, Gloria Moore, Kathleen Moore, Larry Moore, Peggy Morris, Charles Dallas Weatherford San Antonio Richardson Chilton Dallas Denton Jonestown, Pa. Sulphur Springs Wellington, Kan. K rum Corsicana Dallas Sweetwater San Antonio Pensacola, Fla. Denton Denton Dallas Olney Clovis, N. Mex. Fort Worth Baytown N. Miami Beach, Fla. Deer Park, Tex. Odessa Copeville DeKalb Archer City Tyler Tyler Tyler Liuorno, I taly Dallas Dallas Morris, Donna R. Morris, James G. Morris, Nancy Janzmn Morrison. Julie A. Morrison. Robert E. Mosely, Hazel Mosely Robbie A. Mosely, William F. Mottern, John L. Mowaer, Linda Mullen, Anthony Mullin, Jeanette Murphy, Jack E. Murphy, Jeff D. Murphy, Susan M. Mussina, Beverly A. Myers, Kenneth Myers. Linda A. Nash, Linda F. Nash, Mary K. Nason, Cheryl S. Neeley, Steven Neeley, Darrel Neuman, Louis C. Newhouse, Dorothea L. Corsicana Dallas Fort Worth Akron, Ohio Kerrville Dallas Dallas Coppell Denton Denver, Colo. Bloomfield, NJ. Daingerfield Dallas Brock San Antonio H ouston Lamesa H illsboro Galveston Dallas Arlington Gatesuille Springtown Gatesville Leuelland Newman, Pamela Nichols, Tony M. Nichols, Mary A. Niederer, Janis Niemeier, Barbara F. Nikirk, Linda L. Noland, Robert L. Norman, Gail J. Norman, Larry Y. Norvell, Mickey B. Nugent, Donald P., Jr. Oestreich, Rodney R. Offenbacker, Linda L. Ohm, Sharon S. Okerberg, Margaret R. Oliver, Robert W. O Nea1, Vicki K. Orsburn, Marsha Orvick, Karson P. Osborne, Paul F. Oswalt, Kenneth G. Overcash, Sharon L. Owens, Ellen Oxford, Larry Panfilli, Archie F., Jr. Panfilli, Jackie L. Parker, Clayton L. Parker, Wallace B., Jr. Parratt, Gregory S. Pate, Gail Patrick, Phillip F. Patterson, Edward W. Payne, James F. Payne, Janie D. Payne, Peggy Jean Payne, Roland E. Pearce, Barbara L. Pearce, Mary K. Pedigo, Dwayne L. Peacock, Stephen F. Dallas Quanah Tulia Ovilla M cGregor Alvord F ort Worth Odessa New York, N.Y. Cisco Dallas F redericsburg Denton Pasadena Dallas Denison M esquite Dallas Corpus Christi Dallas DeSoto Fairfax, Va. Wichita Falls Texarkana, Tex. Galveston Irving Sherman Aztec, N. Mex. H ouston Dallas Alexandria, M inn. I rving Dallas Texarkana, Tex. Sherman Denton Dallas M esquite Pilot Point Dallas Pendleton, Steve P. Pendleton, Sandra Y. Perkins, Jean M. Perkins, Phil Perlman, Martin S. Peterson, Carl E. Petitto, Joseph S. Petrash, David L. Pettit, Sue Petty, Allen E. Phillips, Dennis W. Phillips, Mary E. Phillips, Sandy K. Pierce, David E. Pierle, Edmon, Jr. Pina, Ida L. Pinnelli, A1, Jr. Pittman, Billy Gr. Plotkin, Larry W. Poe, Richard W. Pool, Cathy A. Poole, Janis E. Pope, Mary E. Porter, Tom K. Powell, Jon T, Powell, Kenneth W. Prather, Dona1d R. Pratt, Johnny L. Prevost, Cynthia E. Priddy, Zelle Pritchett, Theresa L. Procter, Marjorie Pruitt, Reva J. Puckett, Phillip J. Pugh, Eugene H. Puryear, Don C. Putnam, Richard R. Putzel, Marcia A. Pyka, Larry M. Raborn, Leslie A. Rammage, Eugene H. Ramirez, Adrianne Rangel, Juan A. Rann, William C. Raper, Linda C, Dallas El Paso Palestine Duncan, Okla. Aberdeen, Md. Richardson Chicago, Ill. Baytown F ort Worth Dallas Tyler Dallas Borger Milford, Conn. M arfa Port Lauaca Stephenville Quitman Houston Texarkana, Tex. H enderson Dallas Odessa Amarillo Longuiew Graham Dallas Borger Galena Park Carbon Dallas Dallas Linden F ort Worth Colon, Rep. of Panama Weatherford Gainesville Fort Worth Fredericksburg Dallas Dalhart H. Matamoros, Mex. Corpus Christi Decatur Dallas Ratliff, Larry R. Redman, Terry L. Reeve, Ed Reevs, David M. Reid, Barry F. Reid, Martha Ann Reilly, Peggy Reist, Don C. Reiter, Peggy J0 Reynolds, Janet M. Reynolds, Nila M. Rhodes, Barbara L. Rhodes, Norman P. Rhone, Linda B. Rhone, Robert C. Rice, James C. Rice, Sheila S. Richardson, Sharon L. Ricketts, Johnnie G. Rietz, Marilyn J. Ritchie, Juan C. Roark, Nancy Robbins, James T. Roberson, Linda K. Roberts, Elbert A. Roberts, Ginger Robertson, Bob Robertson, Linda J. Robinson. David C. Robinson. Roy B. Robinson, Sharon D. Rodgers Lana G. Rodgers, Margaret R. Rogers, Connie L. Rohne, Oscar W. Rollins, Patricia Rosenthal, Beverly S, Ross. Patricia S. Round, Sharon L. Rowland, Melva A. Rowlett, Anita D. Rowntree. Beverly Rucker, Payne, Jr. Ruiz, Joe A. Rush, Penny R. Grand Prairie Niles, M ich. Eustace M esquite Annandale, Va. Waco Dallas Longview M uenster Springtown Richardson Dallas Eastland Tyler Tyler M CK inney F ort Worth H ouston Cleburne San Antonio Galveston M arshall Breckenridge Rio Vista Richardson Wills Point Sherman Denton Wichita Falls Weatherford M cA llen H 0 us ton E uless Graham Cranfills Gap F ort Worth F ort Worth Vernon Garland Fort Worth San Antonio Dallas Dallas Rockspring Conroe Saage, Susan Sabo, Carol T. Salazar. hiartin Samson. Madelyn C. Sanders, Charlesetta Sanders, Nancy D. Sangalli. John D. Savage, Sondra A. Schaible. E. Joann Schmidt. VVilIiam D. Schmitz, Jan Schreider. Charles Schrade. Rita Schroder, Marcella B. Schultz. Robert A. Schulz. Ronald W. Svhweim David E. Scott. Jane Scott. Judy Y. Scranton, Frank W. Scroggina Gary Scroggins, Rebecca J Scale Donald B. Scale. Larry D. Seaman. Leslie A. Soedig. Larry R. Self. Don J. Seitz. Beverly A. Selander. Ilene Gr. Selby. Steven Sell. Steven W. Serna. Dontato A. Shackleford. Tommy D. Shaddix, Sharon G. Shade, Forrest Fuller Shnfor. Barbara J. Shzxmhurger. Nancy S. Shannon. Elnora L. Sharkey. Robert W. Shaven Karen L Bartlett Levittown, Pa. Strawn San Antonio Odessa Brou'n IWI'IIS, NJ. Texarkana. Ark. Dallas Dallas Cannonsburg, PCI- Benton Hereford Rou'lett Beaumont Gainesvillv Aialrme Dallas Gatesvz'lle Tyler Dallas Bridgeport Nomna Palestin e Weath Prford Dallas Olnpy Sherman Denton Houston, Denton Purl: Forest, III. San Diego Denton Buyfuu'n Danton Furpus Christi Kilgun UUIH'SIUII .Uiddlvsrnx; NJ. 'I'm'urlcmm Shelton, Shelline D. Shipp, James S. Shirley, Cheryl E. Shirley, Karen A. Shores, Buster H. Sibley, Tom Silman, Cynthia E. Silman, Joe L. Simmons, Judy C. Simpson, Robert H. Sims, Jo A. Sims, Louie E. Sipes, Eddie A. Sisco, Bill Chandler Skelly, Susan Alan D. Alvin L. Clark E. Eddie L. Gwen Jennie Joy L. Linda P. Loren E., Jr. Lorraine Nathelie J. Otis J . Robert W. Sally L. Teresa M. Smith, William E. Smothers, Pamela M. Sneed, Billy G. Snow, Herry E. Sousa, Arthur A. Sparks, Jo Ann Spradley, Susan G. Spradlin, James G. Springer, Barbara A. Spurgeon, H. Gene Stacy, James R. Stagg, Richard S. Stallings, Linda G. Standfill, Berita K. Stanley, Jerry P. Odessa Dallas Borger Crowell Austin Garland Texarkana, Tex. Texarkana, Tex. Dallas Dallas Denton Thackerville Bridgeport Rogers Fort Worth Waco Paris, Tex. Dallas Bowie Boerne Dallas Fort Worth Bryan Dallas Fort Worth M cGregor F ort Worth Gainesville Dallas Albany, Tex. Ballinger Garland Soddy, Tenn. Texarkana, Tex. Dallas Dallas Culver City, Calif. Snyder Dallas Tyler Grapevine Wichita Falls Fort Worth Little Rock, Ark. Dallas Starnes, Jay Starr, Dianne Startzel, Susan R. Steele, Joyce E. Steitle, Ernest M. Stephenson, Cynthia L. Stephens, Karen Y. Stephens, Robert E. Stephenson, Joe N. Stevens, Sharon S. Stewart, George E. Stewart, Judith K. Stewart, Lisa Stacker, Carl H. Stokinger, Karen E. Stone, John M. Storey, Marilyn E. Storm, Peggy R. Strain, Patricia Strum, Anne L. Strum, Mike E. Sublett, Susan Sullivan, Billie G. Sullivan, Jerry L. Sullivan, Mary A. Sullivan, William F., Jr. Sumuel, Estella P. Svatek, Daniel L. Swanberg, Geoffrey M. Swanson, Leslie K. Swatloski, Donald W. Swatloski, Joyce M. Swenson, Douglas R. Tallant, Larry E. Tandy, Marsha L. Tannehill, Mike E. Tanner, John B. Tauro, Anthony A. Taylor, Carol T. Taylor, Gary Taylor, Joyce Y. Taylor, Judy Ann Taylor, Kelbert E. Taylor, Larry A. Taylor, Mike Grapevine J acksboro Dallas H illsboro San Antonio Wichita, Kan. Oklahoma City, Okla. Dallas Longview Irving Odessa Weatherford Richardson Tyler Richardson Texarkana, Tex. Houston Temple Royse City Derby, Iowa Jefferson City Dallas Bowie Wichita Falls Denton Houston Odessa Fredericksburg Dallas M ineral Wells M arlin Lorena Duncanville Denver, Colo. Dallas Abernathy Gainesville H ighlands, N .J . Port Arthur Denton Dallas Wichita Falls Richardson Wichita Falls Dallas Taylor, Rita G. Teeling, Patrick A. Teer, David W. Telford, Barry B. Tessmer, Jon F. Thieleke. Barbara J. Thiem, Carolyn R. Thomas, Ann Thomas, Judy Thomas, Pamela L. Thompson, Carmella D. Thompson, Judy A. Thorne, Paul E. Thornton. John M. Thorp, Norma J. Threadgill, Karon K. Timpa, Gerald L. Tinsley, Eloise C. Tischler, Garry L. Talbert, Paul J Tolleson, S. Leslie Tomlin, Bobby E. Tomlin, Joseph V. Tonks, Harry D. Torres, Mario G. T rammell, Roy W. Treadaway, Frank B. Trimble, Linda F. Trojacek, Pauline Turner, Dennis C. Turner, Kerry F. Turns, Ronald D. Tyler, Linda L. Upchurch, Barbara Uribe, Omar D. Vandergrift, Robert W. Varga, Taulee Vasquez, Arthur Vaughan, Daniel A. Vazquez, Steven R. I wing Dallas Garland DeKalb H ouston Craig AFB, Ala. Galveston Irving Farmersville Richardson Azle Gladewater Dallas Grand Prairie Denton H enrietta Dallas Taylor Pilot Point Dallas Kilgore Bowie Berlin, N.J. Manasquan, N.JA Torreon, Mex. Richardson Carrollton Dallas Dallas Dallas Grand Prairie Dallas Carrollton Dallas Laredo Dallas Dallas Galveston Dallas San Antonio Veal, Virginia Vega, Guadalupe B. Verver, Patricia Vicroy, Beverly E. Vinson, Christi Jo Vogel, Kathy L. Vrla, John P. Wagner, Jacquelynn C. Waldrop, Larry E. Walker, Charles D. Walker, James L. Walker, Maurice A. Walker, Paula C. Walker, Roy D. Walker, Royce L. Walker, Sharon K. Walton, Ronnie Ward, Jo Nell Ward, Ron Ware, Paul K. Warlick, Roy C. Warren, Terry Lee Watson, Elouise Watson, Michael D. Weaver, Esta A. Webb, Janet K. Webb, Kay Webster, Charles N. Welch, Betty Welch, Linda G. Welch, Maxine L. Wende, Ruby L. Weniger, Carol Wesson, Ronnie Wheatley, Ervin A. Wheeler, Van A. VVheelus, Charles S. Whetstone, Gene B. Whitaker, Barbara A. White, Billy D. Arlington, Va. Harlingen Dalas F ort Worth Fort Worth I rving Ennis Flynn Dallas Redwater Irving Coolidge Fort Worth Dallas Mount Pleasant Dallas Tyler Denton F ort Worth Denton K ilgore Andrews Haskell F risco Seagoville Farmers Branch M arshall I ruing M oody Hooks Seagoville Cisco Houston Dallas Scott AFB, Ill. Levelland San Antonio Dallas Longview Sherman White, Jane White, Jimmy M. Whited, Jim Whiteley, Harold L. Whiteside, Brenda K. Whitson, Wayne B. Whittenberg, Sandra K. Wiesen, Max Wiggen, James Wiggen, William E. Wiggins, John T. Wilbanks, Kathleen R. Wilcox, Diane L. Willhite, Michael R. Wilkins, Terry W. Wilkins, Virginia D. Williams, Barbara J . Williams, Bobby L. Williams, Carolyn K. Williams, Donald E. Williams, Eddie G. Williams, Gary Williams, John D. Williams, Lilly Williams, Michael J. Williams, Phillip G. Wililams, Ronald L. Williams, Sherry L. Willig, Elaine G. Wilson, Candace Wilson, Mary S. Wimberly, Leslie D. Windle, Donald R. Witt, Cheryl R. Witt, James Wood, Donna L. Wood, Linda G. Woodard, Janet Woodburn, Margy A. Woods, Carol J. Woods, Winford D. Woodward, Moid L. Word, Gay Work, Charles W. Workman, Sandi K. M and Dallas Dallas N ewcas tle M idland Garland Richardson Denton San Antonio San Antonio Clifton Howe Dallas Weatherford Houston M cAllen Ve rnon Sherman M cA llen Texarkana, Tex. Dallas Denton H untington H ickory Creek Weatherford Duncan, Okla. Houston Coolidge Garland Wichita F alls M esquite Waco Wichita Falls Dallas Frisco Longview League City M esquite I rving N ormanna Fort Worth Houston Fort Worth Edinburg Dallas Wright, Marsha A. Wright, Rica Wyatt, Jimmy D. Wynn, James C. Yachmetz, Stephen S. Yancey, Garry D. Yeager, Patricia A. Yeakle, Alwyn LA York, Mildred Young, David E. Young, Kathy S. Young, Laura J. Young, Lee Anne Zaoina, Bob Zamorano, Lydia A. Zant, Lawanda G. Zhanel, Paula J. Zorns, Harold M. Zotz, Paula M idland F ort Worth Lamesa San Angelo Silver Spring, Md. Tampa, Fla. Denton Brisbane, Australia I rving Bedford Big Spring Ennis Boyd Cameron Underclassmen Abadie, Jim G430 Abel, Steve F10 Abner, Diane $opm Abramson, Hillary Fr Adair, Donald G10 Adair, Ronald Q10 Adams, Delores 0319 Adams, Jim Fr Addington, Terri Gd Adkins, Ginger 91$ Aguilar, Ralph GM? Aquirre, Mario 010 Airhart, Brenda $opm Aishman, Ricky Fr Akita, Byron F1$ Alaman, Grace Fm Alaniz, Daniel Fr Alderson, David $opm Aldridge, Linda Sopm Alexander, James G19 Alexander, Karen Sopm Alexander, Robert $opm Alexander, Robert 0$ Alexander, Sherri 01 Allen, Cynthia GHj Allen, Elizabeth Fr Allen, Janice GT$ Allen, Joan F1O Allen, Lana $opm Allen, Phyllis 010 Allen, Rita Q$ Allen, Sharon Sopm Allert, Marian Fr Allison, Janice Mw Almand, James $opm Alyarez, Veronica 07$ Ambrose, Warren, Jr. F$ Anderson, Catherine 010 Anderson, Diane $opm Anderson, Jean Fr Anderson, Jo Nell $opm Anderson, J anet F10 Anderson, Kathryn F10 Anderson, Ritchie Sopm Anderson, Rita FH Anderson, Wayne Qlj Anderson, Andrea Sopm Andrews, Leatrice bSopm Angenend, Lyn F0 Anschuetz, Mary Sopm Anthony, Rupert M10 Arceneaux, Cynthia 010 Archer, Deborah F19 Archilla, Linda U10 I rving Graham Dallas Breckenridge Tyler Tyler Houston Tahoka Dallas F ort Worth Dallas Odessa Garland I raan Seattle, Wash. F art Worth Dallas F ort Worth Pittsburg, Tex. Shreveport, La. Dallas Dallas Whitesboro Big Spring R ichardson H 0 us ton H itchcock Fort Worth Palmer M eridian I rving Griffiss AFB, N .Y. Bandera Bridgeport Waxahachie Dallas Fort Worth Lewisville San Antonio Arlington Haskell F ort Worth Arlington Garland Dallas Rotan El Paso Weatherford Denton Dallas Garland Baytown De Queen, Ark. Dallas Archilla, Melissa $opm Dallas Arechaga, Peter 60pm Santiago, Chile Armer, Larry F10 El Dorado Armstrong, Robert U0 Irving Arnett, Doris $0pm Irving Arnold, Linda 8013?0 Vernon Arnold, Jan 60pm Orange Arnold, Sharen arm Orange Grove Arntson, Pamela FH Downers Grove, Ill. Aschner, Milton Q19 Dallas Ash, Karen Fn Denton Asher, Mary 010 Denton Ashmos, Vicki 60pm Dallas Ashford, Hugh Om Texarkana, Tex. Astin, Paula Sopm Stamford Ashton, Danyce F10 Amarillo Athanas, Theodora 60pm Marshall Atkins, Claudette 80pm Van Atkins, Robin 07$ Dallas Ault, Richard GM Fulton, Mo. Ault, Sherry FH Amarillo Aureli, Harry UFH Amarillo Austin, Bob U$ Fort Worth Austin, Linda Fr Pleasanton Autry, Jeannie $opm Dallas Auery, Chris GHQ Dallas Aycock, James F10 Haskell Baier, Cheryl $opm Waco Bailey, Judy Fn Garland Bailey, Mary M10 Vernon Bailey, Priscilla Mn Hubbard Bailey, Steve Sopm Greenville Bain, Janice $opm San Antonio Bair, David FU Houston Bailse, David GEO Garland Baker, Billy Mr Harlingen Baker, Gordon UH Houston Baker, Ronald MU Denison Balentine, Aleta Fm Dallas Ball, Mary Fn Fort Worth Ballard, James U$ Denton Ballard, Robert MM Gainesville Ballenger, Joan F1j Fayetteville, Ark. Bankston, Jenna $opm Dallas Banner, Mary O?m Nederland, Tex. Barcus, Barbara UH Waco Bardin, Sherry F10 Dallas Barker, Carol $0pm Midland Barkley, Martin 60pm Dallas Barlow, Rosalind Sopm Dallas Barner, Randy FH Graham Barnes, Carlton G710 Garland Barnes, Charles $opm Vernon Barnes, John $0pm Fort Worth Barnett, Danna $opm Breckenridge Barnett, June $opm Albuquerque, N. Mex. Barnett, Sara UH Dallas Barnhart, James $opm Garland Barron, Jennie F10 Denton Barnes, Joe $opm Denton Beggs, Shirley A. $opm Ennis Beidleman, L. Elaine Fr Dallas Belcher, J0 Lynn Fr Denton Bell, Cindy $opm Dallas Bell, Linda M. $opm Houston Bell, Mike J. F10 Dallas Bell, Nancy B. $opm McKinney Bell, Pamela J. FH Dallas Bell, Sandra S. KFIO Westbrook Belt, Patricia Mn Corsicana Bemiss, Karen D. $opm Florham Park, NJ. Benavides, Robelilu Fn Haskell Benedict, Brenda G. Fr Dallas Benedict, Rita S. Gopm Dallas Bennett, Frances L. F10 Arlington Bennett, Janice D. GHQ Midlothian Bennett, Teddy B. Fr M idland Benington, Gary L. UH Odessa Bergmann, Timothy S. F10 Hurst Bergstrom, Karen A. $opm Dallas Bergvall, Craig D. $opm Wellington Berry, Charles D. U$ Dallas Bertram, Robert C. Fr Austin Berthune, Michael L. 60pm Dallas Barron, Jeanne N. F19 Bartel, Richard R. F10 Barton, Rhoda C. Fr Bartkowigk, Gerry B. $opm Bartlett, J erry R. MD Hurst Fort Worth H enderson Dallas I tasca Barton, Keith E. $opm Arkansas City, Kans. Bartone, John N. F19 Bass, Cindy U19 Bassham, Linda $opm Bassham, Sharon 63m Bast, Susan K. G319 Batten, Ann Louise F10 Battenfield, Candace F10 Battle, Charles Sopm Batts, Fredda Sopm Baughman, Robbie wr Baxter, Bill 910 Baxter, James C. Fr Baxter, William F. F10 Bearden, Sue wr Beaty, Susan Mn Beavers, Barbara S. On Beavers, Cynthia D. F10 Beck, Debra 0310 Beck, Ruby F. 010 Beckman, Janet E. $opm Beckner, Charles L. U$ Bediford, Debra L. Sopm Beeson, Carolyn J. F19 Beeson, Janet K. 019 Canton, Mass. Fort Worth Sulphur Bluff Sulphur Bluff Cleburne Houston Benton Fort Worth Waco M oran Abilene Dallas Dallas Big Spring Fort Worth Odessa H ous ton Vera Gainesville S tonewall Sherman Weatherford Fort Worth Longview Bettis, Marilyn wr Biggiers, Phyllis Q10 Bililngsley, Mary Fr Bills, Sandra Gopm Bilotta, Frank $013M Bilotta, Sherry Sopm Birowell, Jerry Soph Biser, Dan $opm Bishop, James Fr Bishop, John, Jr. wr Bissett, Scott 010 Black, Jayne 01$ Black, Linda Fr Blackburn, Joe M0 Blair, Bobby FH Blair, Frankie HMO Blakeney, Judy $opm Bland, Kathy F10 Blanton, Doug Fn Blue, Ron WW Boelter, Bernice Sopm Bogert, Sharon GHQ Bohannon, Garen F11 Bohort, James Q10 Bollheimer, Ron M19 Bomar, Donna F1O Bommarito, Cathy F10 Bonner, Carol G19 Booker, Susan 010 Booker, Sheryl 9119 Boone, Jerry Fn Bordner, Melinda Fr Bourek, Kathy Sopm Bowden, Angelia U6 Bowen, Jack wr Bowen, Janabeth Sopm Conway, Ark. Temple Dallas Dallas Fort Worth F ort Worth Waco Beaumont Snyder Tampa, F la. DeSoto I taly, Tex. Dallas Linden Dallas Dallas San Angelo H 0 us ton Ozona Fort Worth San Antonio Garland Perryton Vernon Dallas Gainesville J acksboro Dallas H 0 us ton Tyler San Antonio Bridgeport Garland Corsicana Bryan Littlefield Bowen, Richard W. Fr Dallas Bowen, William K. Fn Lewisville Bowens, Gladys L. U10 Mount Enterprise Bower, Barbara J. Fr Dallas Boyd, Marge E. Mn Forestburg Boyd, Martha F10 Teague Boyd, Rebecca 010 Lewisville Boynton, Patricia Fr M ineola Box, Debby Fr Poteet Brackeen, Judy 01 Weatherford Bracken, Patricia FH Dallas Bradberry, Dom E. Qr Grand Saline Bradford, Brenda Fr Denton Bradley, Bert D. Q$ Austin Bradley, Mark R. avg Wichita Falls Bradley, Nora Sopm Sweetwater Brake, Brenda Fr San Antonio Branam, Jo Ann Fd Denton Brandenberger, Kathy C. 010 San Antonio Branning, Deborah $opm Dallmr Brann, Michael E. F10 Lewisville Brannan, Barbara L. 019 M ineral Wells Brannon, Richard S. F10 Columbia,rS.C. Branstetter, Janet A. GHQ Dallas Brantley, Pamela L. Fw Irving Brasel, Julie $opm Houston Braun, Barbara A. $opm F ort Worth Brawner, Thomas E. Sopm Dallas Bray, Bonnie 0:19 Fort Worth Bray, George H. 910 Fort Worth Brazell, Lawrence R. F19 Dallas Brazil, Jeannie F0 Mineral Wells Breeler, Burnett MU Houston Brennion, Martha 010 Longview Brewer, Stephen M10 Richardson Brewster, Lynda F. CFH Richardson Bright, Henry 60pm Seminole Briley, Beverly A. Q10 Winters Brimer, Karolyn K. F10 F ort Worth Brinkley, Janie M. Sopm M cGregor Brinkman, William $opm Denton Britain, Ruth A. $opm Arlington Britt, Mary A. Fr El Dorado, Ark. Brittian, Jane Fn Denton Brochu, Amy Beth U10 Dallas Brockett, Janice L. F10 Aubrey Brooks, Susan Jaune 50pm Fort Worth Brouse, Chris Lynn Fn Arlington Brower, Kenneth R. Q10 F ort Worth Brown, Brenda 010 Corpus Christi Brown, Cynthia S. $opm Claude Brown, Darlene 01$ Irving Brown, Linda 60pm Fort Worth Brown, Stephens B. $opm Dallas Brown, Susy 010 Brownlee, Phyliss Um Brumbalow, Arlee T. Ur Brumbelow, Glena A. F 10 Brunson, Beverly Fm Brust, Randall D. Fr Bryant, Ann $opm Bryant, Nadine L. GrJ Bryson, Neil A. $013M Buchanan, Sharon L. 6710 Bugno, Toni M. Uld Bull, Shirley J. M19 Bullard, Brenda C MD Bullington, Marcy $019M Bumpass, Sylvia L. MIO Burnstead, William A. $opm Bundock, Lewis G. FH Burch, Dwight M. FH Burgoyne, Joe M19 Burke, Betty J. Sopm Burke, Carol Sopm Burke, John J. 07$ Burkes, Helen S. F10 Burkett, Kenneth W. Ur Burkholder, Jack S. Fr Burks, Beverly R. 80ph Burks, Bobby L. Qr Burnett, James H. M$ Burnett, John R., Jr. Sopm Burney, Linda J. 019 Burnim, Mellonee M10 Burns, Donald L. F1$ Burns, Linda F1Q Burrell, Carol A. Sopm Burton, Benelle 60pm Bush, Dennis C. Sopm Butin, James W. 60pm Butsch, Trudy E. $0pm Byers, Cynthia S. U10 Bynum, Diane L. 010 Byrne, Jim, Jr. OD Caffey, Judy A. Sopm Cain, David L. Fm Caldwell, Barbara M. MD Callaham, Doyle J. Q$ Callaway, Linda F. MD Calvert, James wepm Calvert, Sue Q10 Cameron, Tamarra 019 Campbell, Larry B. Mr Campbell, Marty L. Fr Campbell, Michele Sopm Campos, Bertha Z. 010 Candler, W. Mike 010 Cantrell, Janlce L. 0$ Capers, Sherry Fr Carlisle, Cindy D. Sopm Carlock, Jan F10 Carlson, Anita J. $opm Carmichael, Karla D. 019 Chamberino, N. Mex. F ort Worth Decatur Odessa M cAllen San Antonio Fort Worth Garland M ineola St. Louis, Mo. Houston Abilene Whitesboro Denton Henderson Dallas F ort Worth Spencer, Va. Dallas Denton Waco Richardson Fritch Dallas Sanger F ort Worth Fort Worth Hot Springs, Ark. White Oak Gladewater Teague Buchanan Dam Lubbock Houston Gainesville Pasadena, Tex F ort Worth Dallas Arlington Dallas Dallas Dallas San Antonio Dallas Breckenridge Houston I rving Dallas San Antonio Sanger Dallas San Antonio Mercedes Dallas Borger Dallas H ouston M CK inney Dallas Cleburne Carmichael, Kathie $opm Carneal, Susan U1$ Carney, Kenneth Sopm Carona, Suzette Sopm Carpenter, Karen Sopm Carr, David Mn Carroll, Judy Sopm Carson, Georgia F10 Carter, James M10 Carter, Katherine F1$ Carter, Margaret F19 Carter, Roy Sopm Cartwright, Cheryl F10 Castle, Judy Fr Castle, Linda Gopm Castellano, Abraham 01$ Caswell, David Qr Caton, Barbara F19 Cauley, Carolyn Sopm Cavender, Vicki $opm Centofanti, Joseph 019 Clabre, Margaret Sopm Chaddick, Mary F10 Chaffin, Carol F10 Chamberline, Carol Sopm Chambers, Jane F10 Chambers, Mary 60pm Chambers, Reed 01? Chance, Frances $opm Chance, Maurice Ur Chandler, Terry Ur Chaney, Jeanete 01? Chaney, Joetta Sopm Chantly, Maria $opm Chapin, Kathy F0 Cheek, Yvonne avx$ Cheung, Sun Hung 60pm Childres, Debra F10 Chilton, Gayla F19 Chisenhalf, Linda MS Christ, Candi Sopm Christian, Bonnie FU Christian, Deborah $opm Christian, Elizabeth U10 Christie, John Sopm Clancy, Tom F10 Clanton, Vandy F10 Clarke, Bruce $opm Clark, Benniem 019 Clark, Billy F19 Clark, Charles Sopm Clark, Kathleen 010 Clark, Kathy Fm Clark, Susanne Fr Clark, Tamara Sopm Clark, Thomas Sopm Clay, Carolyn F1$ Clay, Gary $10 Clay, James am Cleboski, Linda Fr Hays, Kan. Dallas Weatherford Dallas Fort Worth M esquite Dallas Dallas Texarkana, Tex. Garland Crosby Andrews Fort Worth Perryton Honey Grove Comstock Sunset Hurst Dallas Dallas Fort Worth Fort Worth Plano Fort Worth San Antonio Linden M cK inne y Richardson San Antonio Abilene Weatherford H ouston Dallas Dallas Carrollton Dallas Hong Kong Irving Killeen Benton Fort Worth Corpus Christi Corpus Christi H enderson Frisco Dallas Denton San Antonio Austin Houston Dallas Valparaiso, I nd. Dallas Waka Odessa Dallas Tyler Odessa Dallas Houston Clegg, Albert $opm Clements, Christopher $opm Clemmons, Mary F10 Clemans, Gayla J1O Click, Linda Fn Cliett, Ann G10 Clifton, Delma Sopm Clifton, Tom Fr Clinkinbeard, Alan Mn Clinkinbeard, Michael $opm Clinkinbeard, Theresa GU Clow, Ann 03w Cludius, Kathi Q10 Clyburn, Fredda 60pm Cobb, Cherilou U$ Cobb, Michelle 010 Coble, Cynthia Mm Coburn, Billy $opm Cochran, Ruth Qr Cockrell, Carolyn Q16 Codner, Fredressa GVH Cofield, Renee FH Cohen, Steve 019 Cohen, Steven F10 Cole, Candi 010 Cole, James Fm Cole, Patsy Fr Cole, Sheri Q30 Coleman, Camile F19 Coleman, Cathie Sopm Coleman, Tona F10 Collier, Twila U19 Collins, Cherilyn F10 Collins, Grady Fr Collins, James Ur Collins, Linda 019 Collins, Michael U19 Collins, Ronnie Sopm Collins, Ronnie Sopm Collins, Ross Mn Collins, Tamera 0:30 Collum, Tommy Ur Compton, Nancy 00 Compton, Peggy U$ Conatser, Diane F19 Connie, Sandy $opm Connell, Margaret 69H Conner, Tommy Fr Conoley, Jane FH Conrady, Emily Fr Conway, Richard Q133 Cook, Gene Fr Cook, George M10 Cook, Henry $opm Cook, Jerry Sopm Cook, Linda Fr Cook, Terry Sopm Cook, William F1j Cooley, Sam Q$ Coon, John U0 Dallas Dallas San Antonio Crawford Dallas H illsboro K illeen Gladewater Denton Gainesville Waco Southlake Dallas Garland Dallas Wichita Falls Commerce Dallas Texarkana, Tex. Terrell Wichita Falls M cK inne y Dallas H ouston Fort Worth Garland McAllen West Columbia Dallas Fort Worth Arlington Woodward, Okla. Richardson M esquite Kermit Belleville, NJ. Irving Port Chester, N.Y. Garland Garland Richardson Abilene Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas M exia Dallas I rving Windthorst Dallas Sanger Dallas M arshall Van Richardson Van Dallas Alpine Lubbock Cooper, Cathy E. Fr Cooper, Margaret L. Fr Cooper, Sharon G?H Cooper, Tyrone Bernard a:lj Corkin, Linda Sue $opm Cordell, Barbara J. 010 Cordell, Clifford UH Corley, Nancy F0 Cornelison, Jo L. GV$ Cornish, Sam W. 010 Cosota, Suzie T. Fw Costin, Karen $opm Coston, Mike B. FH Cotten, Connie 019 Cotton, Delva Fr Courtney, Cynthia FU Cowan, Carrie L. Fn Cowan, William F. 010 Cowart, Don FH Cowne, Sharon Gayle F19 Cowsar, E. Jeanette Fr Cox, Carol $opm Cox, James Pete F1O Cox, Jeanne D. $0pm Cox, Jerry D. 010 Cox, Vickie D. $opm Cozby, Fred E. FH Cozby, Marilyn 0910 Crabb, Diane E. F10 Crabtree, Virginia F1$ Houston F ort Worth Odessa F ort Worth Denton Sherman I wing Dallas Dallas M esa, Ariz. Dallas Sweetwater Mesquite Gainesville Houston Trafalgar, Ind. Fort Worth Garland Denton Richardson F ort Worth Arlington Ralls Irving F ort Worth Cleburne Dalhart Dallas Glenview, Ill. Fort Worth Craft, David E 010 Craft, Hugh M0 Craft, Richard Mr Craft, Shirley $opm Craig, Christi 60pm Craig, Randall Fn Cramer, Le A. a3$ Crane, Cynthia Fm Craven, Michael FH Crawford, Diane M10 Crawford, Jack FU Crawford, Marnie FU Crawford, Michael Sopm Crider, Lucy A. HVH Crim, Steven Sopm Crist, Kathleen 07$ Crosby, Catherine N. F10 Crossier, Jane C. F1j Cross, Susan Ur Crouch, Debra Jo $opm Crouch, Jesse C. Sopm Crow, Susan OH Crozier, Edwin FH Crummer, Richardson UH Azle Wills Point Dallas Azle Dallas Cansel, I nd. M cAllen M uleshoe Richardson Tyler Alpine M cAllen Borger Fort Worth Denton Dallas Dallas Dallas Denton Euless Grand Prairie Dallas Denton F ort Worth Cmmp, Claudia L. Gopm Dallas Cullins, Guy Austin 0119 Tyler Cummings, Anna J. Fr Dallas Cummings, Marion A. Sopm Gainesville Cummins, David C. Ur Belton Cunningham, Elizabeth A. Fr Sherman Cunningham, Margaret U10 Albany, Tex. Cunningham, Sheila A. FH Dallas Curry, Billy A. F10 Tahoka Curry, Cody R. Ur Dallas Curtis, Ronald W. Ml? Clarence, N.Y. Dagen, John L. $opm Duncanville, Tex. Dailey, Lou Jean F10 Castro Valley, Calif. Dalton, Dana L. F16 Pampa, Tex. Daly, Sally Margaret 60pm M etairie, La. D Angelo, Nancy Leonette S1? Joshua Daniel, Michael L. 60pm Dallas Daniel, Sheila 010 Plainview Daniels, Evelyn Jewel Sopm Houston Daniels, Perry E. $opm Longview Dansby, Randy Sopm Bowie Darnell, Deborah Fr Haskell Darby, Liz Fn Fort Worth Davenport, Janice K. Fn Dallas Davidson, Beverly 0Q Teague Davidson, Dena GD Dallas Davidson, James U10 Bradenton, Fla. Davidson, Virginia Fr Irving Davis, Alice $opm Dallas Davis, Arliss w$ Graham Davis, Belinda Fn Marshall Davis, Candice $opm Houston Davis, Carole Q19 Dallas Davis, Werbalyn Q$ Waco Davis, James Ur Mesquite Davis, James F10 Godley Dickson, Margaret G10 Diehl, Rosemary O10 Diggs, Barbara $opm Dill, Cathy 010 Dillard, George Q19 Dines, Mary Q10 Dippo, William Old Doak, James On Dodson, Carol 010 Dohm, Louise $opm Donahue, Patricia $opm Dolan, Ann Fr Domke, Martha FD Dooley, David $opm Dooley, Tim $opm Doran, Yvette U30 Dorr, David Ow Dorsey, Cynthia Sopm Dorsey, Robert, Jr. $opm Doshier, Robert MU Dossett, William Fr Doty, Kenneth $opm Dougherty, Vicki F$ Dougnerty, Ernie 60pm Denton Dallas Houston Dallas Longview Fort Worth San Antonio Dallas Breckenridge Plano Dallas Dallas Fort Worth J us tin Sunray Richardson Dallas Waco Galveston DeKalb M esquite Dallas Euless Alamo Davis, John $opm Davis, Judith $opm Davis, Rennetta Fr Davis, Sharon HMO Davis, Susan F1O Davis, Sherian MU Davis, Thomas U$ Davis, William Sopm Dawson, Judy 00 Day, Linda $opm Dean, Jimmy $opm Dean, Sally Fd 'Deats, John FH Deck, Dorothy F10 Deckard, Donald 019 Decker, Cynthia wepm Deggie, Sandra U19 Delaney, Mary 50pm Delgado, Conchita UH DeMerritt, Ann Sopm Demonbreum, Donna F10 Denman, Gwendolyn M10 Dennis, Bobby M6 Dennis, Colleen 60pm Dennis, Ricky Sopm Dennis, Terrie MU DeRouchey, Jeanne Fr Derrick, Kirby F10 Deskin, Sherrie ONO Dickson, Brenda FH F ort Worth, Denton F ort Worth Dallas Denton Gary Dallas Troup Sinton Dallas Dallas Denton Big Spring Fort Worth Denton Richardson Tyler Ada, Okla. Dallas Tulsa, Okla. I rving K ennard Gainesville Dallas Denton Garland Perryton F armers Branch Plano Dallas Douthit, David Qr Doves, Cynthia F0 Dowd, James Fr Downes, Brian $opm Downs, Robert Sopm Doyle, Cathy Fn Drake, Eddy F1O Drake, Regina Sopm Draper, Kenneth $opm Drew, Mary Fr Dreyer, Ladene Mr Drolet, Pat Q10 Drummond, Venita FH Dry, Carla Sopm Duckworth, Nancy 00 Duesman, Leo F19 Dugan, Bill F10 Dugger, Margaret J. $opm Dumas, Elise 010 Dunbar, Glen Ow Dunbar, Steven $013M Duncan, Donna F19 Duncan, Rebecca UH Dunham, Shari Sopm Dunlavy, Claudia $opm Durham, Elsie F10 Durham, Mary OM Durrett, Duane UH Duvall, Kathleen FH Dvorak, Jeanette FIO M exia Terrell Dallas Cambridge, M ass. Roscoe Copeville I dalou H ouston Azle Haltom City Fort Worth Fort Worth F ort Worth Fort Worth Borger Pilot Point F ort Worth Lewisville Fort Worth Dallas Belmont, Calif. Henrietta Phillips Denton St. Louis, Mo. Denton Dallas Weatherford Dallas Dallas Dye, Alane $opm Dyke, Lane $opm Eastman, Douglas Sopm Eatherly, Lynda wn Eberhart, James wlj Ebert, Ronald Mn Eckel, Jesse Ur Eckenrod, Karen Fr Eddington, Helen 019 Edgar, Patricia Fn Edgerley, Janene Sopm Edmiston, Janice 3319 Edmonson, Connie F1O Edwards, Jerry WHO Edwards, John Sopm Eisenkraft, Diane 010 Eilder, Linda U0 Elling, Helena 010 Elliott, Ellen U$ Ellis, Linda $opm Ellis, Judith FH Ellis, Susan M10 Ellison, David Sopm Elmore, Lee Or H ouston Tyler Burkburnett M idland Lewisville Texarkana Cadwell, Kan. San Antonio Amarillo Fort Worth Dallas Dallas Grand Prairie Rotan Grenville Dallas K ilgore Abilene Grand Saline Dallas Fort Worth F ort Worth Texarkana Dallas Farrell, William G310 Faulkner, Michael L. Sopm Feagin, Janis A. 60pm Featherston, Diane w'$ Felderhoff, Diann M. 010 Felker, Joann F10 Ferguson, Donald P. $opm Ferguson, Regina Mm Ferguson, Walter 01 Ferrell, Lawrence 010 Ferrell, Milton U1$ Ferrill, Deborah Fr Ferrin, Nancy L. 910 Fick, Christine E. 60pm Field, Lyn Fm Fields, T homasene Fr Filis, Gina $opm Filogome, Vincent J. F10 Finch, Dennis W. wepm Fincher, Cynthia $opm Findley, Patrick On Fink, Alexis A. Jr Fisher, Becky F10 Fisher, Evelyn 03H Dallas F ort Worth Wylie Denton M uenster Fort Worth Tyler Wellington Grand Prairie Dallas Wake Village Denton M esquite Richardson Dallas F ort Worth Grand Prairie Yorktown Garland Dallas Fort Worth Dallas Fort Worth Winnsboro Emerson, Mina F10 Endicott, Donna C. $opm Engel, Gene Q$ Eoff, Pamela Om Eppler, Marylin Ur Ernst, Donna F10 Erwin, Patricia A. UH Eubanks, Carol S. Sopm Eubanks, Candace A. MD Eubanks, Kay Fr Eubanks, Melita S. $opm Eubanks, Nelse R. Ur Eugster, Donald Gene $opm Evaldo, Angela D. Fn Evans, Jacqueline Sopm Evans, Janet $opm Evans, Kevin L. On Evans, Norma S. Mn Evans, Vernon D. SopM Ewing, Cheryl U$ Fadely, Christine L. Sopm Faggard, John M. M10 Fair, Glenn UH Fair, Rhonda Sharon U$ Fair, William R. $opm Fanette, Mary E. $opm Farley, Deborah Kay Fn Farley, Robert B. F10 Farquhar, James E. $opm Farr, Virginia L. $opm Snyder Corpus Christi Rosebud Dallas Mesquite Fort Worth Scurry Longview H ubbard M CK inney Texarkana, Tex. M cK inney Gainesville Longview H 0 us ton Dallas M CK inne y Dallas F ort Worth Dallas Dallas Poteet Weatherford Dallas Odessa Beaumont Dallas Goliad Gainesville Dallas Fisher, Kathryn M$ Fisher, Nina Sopm Fisher, Wayne UH Fishkind, Ellen Ur Flanagan, Lindi Mn Flanery, Margo Fr Fleming, Joseph O$ Flemmons, Gary QV$ Fletcher, Kenneth Sopm Fletcher, Tara 01? Flood, Michele 010 Florey, Randall F10 Flora, Jonathan Fn Flores, Linda $oph Florey, Marion ONO Flournoy, Patricia Sopm Flowers, Daniel 00 Foerster, Patricia 60pm Folkes, Hugh Sopm Foltz, Kevin F0 Foote, Debi Sopm Foreman, Judy wepm Forrest, Charlotte $opm Forrest, Patricia FH Fortenberry, Barbara wr Fortier, Gary Sopm Foster, Burl Q10 Foster, Nancy Sopm Fowler, Mary Sopm Fox, Jerolyn Sopm Frankes, Sharon Mn Fralin, Cheryl Q10 Francisco, Don 60pm Franks, Brenda Mn Frazier, Carrie Ur Freeland, Susan Fw Freeman, Russell M$ Freidkin, Janee 011$ Frith, Larry M$ Frith, Linda U10 Frye John F1$ Frymire, Susan $oph Filler, Lee F10 Fullilove, Dorothy Sopm Furr, Willma Fn Furstenberg, Julia Sopm Gabriel, Rodney Sopm Gaddis, James U10 Gagan, William F10 Gaither, Lewis $013M Gage, Jerry F19 Gaither, Lyndon Sopm Galassi, Darlene U10 Gallia, Barbara Sopm Dallas M CK inne y Tyler Dallas Dallas Garland I rving I rving Richardson Dallas H urst Dallas M esquite Dallas F ort Worth Lake Jackson Dallas Houston Dallas Houston Alvin Fort Worth San Antonio Dallas Richardson F ort Worth H u tchins Dallas I rving Dallas Waskom Dallas Plano Snyder F ort Worth Dallas M idland Dallas Dallas Denton Z ion F ort Worth H urst Shreveport, La. H ouston Dallas San Angelo Dallas Richardson H urst Denton Dallas Beaumont Dallas Gallivan, Frank M. F1O Galloway, Maryleda F0 Galyon, Charlene O. Fr Gant, Joyce E. U10 Garcia, Ester E. On Garcia, Gilbert C. UH Garcia, Miramar FH Gardner, Elaine M. Fr Gardsbane, Barbara Mn Garland, Dorothy J. 01W Garland, Gary D. 010 Garland, Jerry L. $opm Garner, Daniel B. 60pm Garner, Marilyn Mn Garrett, Beverly D. 80pM Garrison, Jean F. UH Garza, Ben S. Mw Gatewood, Marcia M. F10 Gatlin, Cathy S. wr Gatten, Mary D. Fr Gatton, Phillip G. F0 Gavigan, James P. $opm Geisel, Susan L. $opm Gentiy; Alice Mr Gentry, Billy G. Sopm Gentry, David L. 010 Genzer, Ronald J. M10 George, Robert E. Sopm Gerhart, George A. Sopm Gettys, Charlotte J. $opm Gibbs, Kathryn $opM Gibbs, Sherron K. S0pm Gibson, Corine $opm Gibson, Karen G. $opm Gibson, Patricia G. $opm Gibson, Zack L. UH Giddings, Brenda C. aH Giffin, Richard C. 01? Gilbert, Barbara C. SopM Gilbert, Elizabeth FH Gilbert, Stacey J. $opm Gilbreth, David $0pm Gilliam, M. Robin $opm Gilmore, Donald F. 80pm Gilmore, Jan K. Fr Gilmore, Peggy K. Fn Gilreath, Carla G. U$ Gisi, Carla J. FH Givens, Gary P. U10 Gleason, Kenneth D. $opm Glenn, Milton W. Qr Glover, Janet K. 60pm Gloven, Ted A. F1$ Goben, Janeen A. $opm Arlington, Va. Lewisville Denton Cleburne San Benito Fort Worth M esquite Denton Shreveport F ort Worth Wichita F alls Gainesville Richardson M oody I rving Houston Corpus Christi Dallas Jacksboro Richardson Dallas Gulfport, Miss. Richardson Texarkana, Tex. F art Worth Weatherford Fort Worth Kilgore Dallas Decatur R ichardson Gainesville Waco Fort Worth Dallas Dallas Stamford Carizzo Springs H ouston Denton Anton Fort Worth San Antonio Tulsa, Okla. M cGregor M idland M esquite Fort Worth Big Spring Southlake Denton Dallas Nuimberg, Germany Richardson Godwin, Peter M10 Goerner, Karen F10 Goff, Jaime MD Goins, Willis U10 Golden, Joe Sopm G011, James 010 Gonzales, Freddy Upw Gonzales, Oralia UH Goode, Ella wr Goodell, Thomas Mm Goodman, Jon GFS Goodman, Linda FH Gordon, Brenda Fr Gordon, Gary 60pm Gorham, Linda $opm Gordon, Lynn Soph Gross, William $0pM Goswick, Barbara $opm Goudeau, Sherry 0.310 Gouge, Debra Sopm Graefing, Susan Fm Graham, Frances Fr Grauso, Janet Sopm Graves, Ellis Fn Gray, Bill Sopm Gray, James Um Gray, Linda MU Gray, Noralyn Hr Gray, Pamela Fr Green, Beverly OTH Green, Douglas Sop10 Green, Lynne SopM Green, Norman Ur Green, Larry $opM Green, Peggy UH Gregene, Lisa HFH Greene, Lizzy UH Greer, Cynthia NH Greer, Donna UH Greer, Kathi Hr Greer, Lindslee Fr Greer, Theodore UM Gregg, Gary G'H Griffin, Brenda UH Griffis, David Sopm Griffin, Don Gr Griffith, Karen UH Griffith, Martha 80pM Grigis, Cynthia 010 Grigson, James UH Grille, Robert Ur Grimes, Debby Fr Grisham, Claudia Mr Grissom, Larry Sopm Groce, Suzete $opm Groening, David Mn Groom, Constance Mm Guillory, Janet $0pm Guinn, Dorothy F1j Gullo, Charlsis $011M Dallas Smithville Beaumont Gatesville Dallas Snyder Dallas Del Rio H earne Dallas Alpine Denton San Angelo Dallas Albany, Calif. Andrews San Antonio Odessa Bossier City, La. Arlington Irving Amarillo Lake Worth Tyler Tyler Dallas Pilot Point F ort Worth San Benito Dallas Sweetwater Dallas Richardson Carrollton Garland M idland Houston Garland Burkburnett M exia M cAllen Dallas Willingboro Sadler Garland Garland Dallas M esquite Dallas DeKalb Takoma Park, Md. Dallas Hurst Richardson Sumter, SC. Duncanville Guthrie, Okla. Grand Prairie Houston Houston Hall, Margaret MU Dallas Hall, Orval UH Dcnton Hall, Robert 07H Denton Hall, Robert UH Whitestone, N.Y. Hull. Teena Ow McAllen Hall. Yvette FU Los Alamos, N. Mex. Ham, Cynthia tFU Amarillo Hamilton. Bill 011d Danton Hamilton, Jim $0pM Denton Hamilton. Kathy U110 Grand Prairie Hamilton, Martenzie $opm Pittsburg, Tex. Hamilton, Michael ONO Denton Hamlin. Mickey $opm Lucas Hammerle. Betsy $013M Garland Hummerle, Pete UH Garland Hand. Bruce G70 Henderson Hzxnes. Charles UN Dallas Hanvs. Philip Mld Dallas Haney. Hurry 030 W. Homestead. Pa. Haney, Jerry 80pM Fort W'orth Haney. Marie UTD Mountain Home Hann, JoAnn MVIO Odessa Harders, Alan UH Tyler Hardin Beth 030 Dallas Gumfory, Joel Fn Gunn, Debbi Gm Gustafson, Dayna Sopm Gustafson, Lawrence Sopm Guthrie, Alice $opm Guthria Janit 010 Gutierrez, Charles Mn Gutierrez, Robert Fw Guyer, Rebecca Sopm Haas, Dennis U10 Haas, Diana arH Hackett, Arthur arm Hackett, Charles Sopm Hackney, Elizabeth Ow Haddox, Andrea F1Q Haddox, William 80pm Haferkamp, Diane Gr Hagen, Gary Fr Haggerty, Audra wr Hale, Danny NH Hale, Ken NH Hale, Thomas Fr Haley, Brooks 00 Haley, David UH Haliburton, William Sopm Hall, Cerroll Mn Hall, Charles Old Hall, Georgia FG Hall, Kathryn Sopm Hall, Liz $opm F ort Worth Dallas Decatur Seabrook S tratford Waco F ort Worth Fort Worth Denton Dallas Houston Bellaire Denton Gainesville Abilene Abilene Gatesville Bedford Longview Ochelatata, Okla. Henderson Dallas Dallas Stephenville Gainesville M idland Waco H ouston Dallas Port Arthur Hardin, Phil 80ph Hardy, Lynne 60pm Hargett, Lillian I. Sopm Hargrove, Ron L. NH Harless, Nancy S. U19 Harman, Mary B. MU Harmon, Paula J. Gm Harmon, Trice A. $opm Harrell, Judith A. Fn Fort Worth Henderson Melissa Denver, Colo. Grand Saline Talia Fort Worth Waco McGuire AFB, NJ. Harrington, Leslie Sopm Rolling Meadows, Ill. Harris, Faith E. SopM Harris. James 080nm Harris, Kitty Fm Harris, Linda A. 80pM Harris, Nancy C. 030 Harris, Odis H. Mm Harris, Robert C. Sopm Harris, Sheron 60pm Harris Wanda S. OH Harrison, Cynthia A. Sopm Harrison, Cynthia L G10 Harrison, Larry M. F19 Hartensteiner, Kenneth J. 60pm Hartley, Brenda G. 01$ Hartley, Gayla R. 60pm Hartman, Martha J. UH Harwell, Collen B. SopM Hatchet, Annette OD Hatton, Richardson L. M10 Hawk, Teddy A. 60pm Hawkins, Judy L. UH Hawkins, Sandra J. $opm Harvey, Maureen Y. F1$ Hayes, Jim GU Haynie, Theresa UH Hays, J. Mel MU Houston Dallas Lubbock Richardson Dallas Weatherford Dallas Linden M arshall Gainesville Tyler F ort Worth Dallas Arlington, 1W cK inney Berger Ballinger Waco Richardson Den ton Seagouille Houston Kirkwood, 1110. Dallas Longview Plano Hays, Shelly A. UF$ Heacock, Cathy $opM Head, Albert L. Fn Headrick, Joan C. 06 Healy, Anne Q$ Heath, Jimmy 60pm Heflin, Sharon K. UH Hefner, Linda D. FH Heissenberger, Karen B. Q0 Heitman, Margie L. 01 Helton, Linda $opm Hemphill, Jacqueline R. GU Henderson, Charley M. Sopm Henderson, Cynthia L. $0pm Henderson, Dave L. Fr Hendrick, Bert E. Fn Henrichs, Calvin D. Ur Westfield, NJ. Dallas Sanger Gainesville Dallas Denton M esquite Wichita Falls F ort Worth Dallas Dallas Houston. Gainesville Dallas Bonham I ruing Sweetwater Henry. Carol L. Ulv Roswell, N. Mex. Henry, Francis M, 60pm Henry, Jerry D. F$ Henry, Mary E. $opm Henry, Patricia A. Fn Henry, Susan G. UH Henson, Wesley N. 0119 Herendon, Charles C. Sopm Hermann, Larry W. 60pm Herschkowitsch, Alex W. Soph Hess, Diane E. F1j Hester, Debra J. HMO Hester, Janice G. Soph H ouston Grand Prairie Weslaco San Antonio Odessa Clarendon Waco Grand Prairie Dallas M uenster Dickenson Amarillo Hiatt, Rex C. Fr Hibbs, Cathy UH Hickey, Jerry W. G7H Hicks, Laura J. 60pm Hicks, Sybil J. Qr Hicks, Willie S. OH Higgins, Kathy 0:10 High, Ronald H. $opm Highfill, Jack W. Qr Hildebrand, Sherrie L. F10 Hill, Dan R. FD Hillebrandt, Allen M. 010 Hillendahl, Anne Fr Hilterbrand, Diane $opm Hilz, Judy K. Qr Hinkley, Hal G. F10 Hindman, Betsy U10 Hinojosa, Walt Sopm Hines, Linda FU Hinton, Vickie A. 0719 Hitchcock, Nancy A. O10 Hitt, Charles L. F1? Hodel, Ronnie R. Q10 Hodge, Cathy A. UV$ Dallas Dallas Dallas Decatur Texarkana Dallas Arlington Beaumont Valley View Austin M iami, F la. Lakehills Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Denton H ouston Cleburne Dallas Ennis Richardson Crawford Dallas Holveck, Ann M$ Honea, Floyd Sopm Honn, Susan UH Hopkins, Cynthia Ur Hopkins, Donna Sopm Hopkins, Karen 60pm Hopkins, M. Marcia UH Horany, Nancy Fr Horn, Sherry a4119 Hornbeck, Joyce Sopm Horne, Jo Ann Sopm Homer, Joe F0 Hoskins, Lyn U1? Hostetter, Thomas Fw Hotis, Christina Ur Hott, Judi Go Houston, Robert Sopm Howard, Sharon $opm Howes, Wendy Fw Hubbard, Erlene $opm Hublein, Barbara $opm Hubley, Grover Gn Huebel, Karen Sopm Huffhines, Jo Ann Sopm Grand Prairie Dallas Decatur, Ill. Garland Waco Dallas F ort Worth Olney Greensboro, NC. San Antonio Henderson Denton F ort Worth Dallas San Angelo Dallas Waco Tulsa, Okla. Houston F ort Worth Dallas Midldnd Denton Dallas Hodge, Sue u?d Hodge,.Yvonne UH Hodges, Anna UH Hodges, Bunny UH Hodges, Kaye Q'w Hodges. Sharon 60pm Hoffman, Deborah GFH Hoffman, Jackie Fr Hogan, Patricia $013M Hogan, Sally Ur Holbert, Kim $opm Holcomb, Blaine $opm Holder, Carolyn Q19 Holder, Lana UH Holgate, Susan F10 Holland, James Ur Hollar, Brenda Sopm Holloway, Terry U$ Holley, Cindy $0pm Holleyhead, Felice UH Holliday, Joe K. U$ Hollingsworth, Paula G7$ Holloway, Sarah 60pm Holmes, Camille Sopm Holmes, Christy SopM Holmes, David FH Holmes, Karol Ur Holmes, Sara F10 Holsapple, Debra FD Holt, Jessie Fr Tulsa, Okla, Irving F ort Worth Austin Abilene Dallas Burkburnett F ort Worth Dallas Corpus Christi San Antonio M ission Lancaster F art Worth Dallas Pearce. Ariz. Garland Denton Dallas Dallas Dallas Denton Sherman Paris, Tex. Lubbock Dallas Athens, Tex. Austin Dallas Houston Hughes, Deborah F1Q Hughes, Donald D. av Hughes, Dorothy J. Sopm Hughes, Kay L. F19 Hughes. Randall Sopm Hughes, Sam W. UH Hughes, Walter L. 60pm Hulse, Alicia A. Um Humphreys, Sharon R. Gd Humphries, Cheryl R. ONO Hundley, Cynthia K. $013M Hunley, Travis $opm Hunt, Shirley M. UH Hurd, Don Jose Mm Hurst, James U10 Hurt, Marva A. SopM Hutcherson, Betty D. Mm Hutchins, Dale R. 530 Hutchins, Mary L. F1j Hutchinson, Archie L. $opm Hutchinson, Catherine L. Fn Hymer, Debra K. F10 Iannone, Michele Fr Inee, James D. wr Ingle, Norman R. U7H Ingram, Patricia A. Fn Innes, Lynda R. F11 Ivey, Patricia E. Sopm Dallas Sherman Texarkana, Tex. Houston Grafton, Ohio Texarkana, Tex. Gainesville Dallas Dallas Richardson N acogdoches Overland Park, Kan. F ort Worth F ort Worth Baytown Galena Park F ort Worth Denton I rving Grand Prairie Wylie Fort Worth H ouston Cleburne Garland I ruing Dallas Denton Jackson, Bruce A. 60pm Oklahoma City, Okla. Jackson, Deborah S. Sopm Jackson, Kathy E. $opm Jackson, Linda 01 Jackson, Lynn Soph Jacobs, Cheryl E. UH Jahnel, Nancy GM Jakstas, Donna E. F0 James, Jim H. Sopm January, Kathie R. F10 Jasuta, Karen MU Jefferies, Patricia V. Sopm Jeffers, Kathryn P. Sopm Jeffery, Leonard C. 01' Jeffrey, Janice L. Sopm Jeffrey, Nikki $opm Jenkins, Kim 07H Jenkins, Verna F1j Jensen, Sondra J. MD Jerden, Nanette 69w Jeske, Sandra F10 Jetter, John A. 60pm Jimison, Hurshall L. F19 Johnson, Beverly J. Fr Johnson, Carolyn L. $opm Johnson, Cassandra On Carbon I rving K ingfisher, Okla. Sherman Denton Dallas I rving Belton Walnut, Calif. K illeen Dallas Dallas H 0 us ton Richardson Denton Denton Grand Prairie Dallas F art Worth Olney Nevada, M 0. La M ieada, Cailf. Dallas Dallas Wichita Falls 561; $5,; Johnson, David a3? Johnson, Gordon F10 Johnson, Gwendolyn de Johnson, Karen $opm Johnson, Linda M10 Johnson, Nancy Soph Johnson, Pamela 019 Johnson, Rebecca 03$ Johnson, Ronda GHQ Johnson, Ruby GTU Johnson, Russell 0710 Johnson, Sandra 60pm Johnson, Thomas FH Johnston, Ben Soph Johnston, Jimmy U10 Johnston, Patrick $opm Jonas, David Sopm Jones, Carol U9H Jones. Danny 0H Jones, Deborah 07m Jones Dinah Grm Jones, Ginger Gopm Jones. Janis 0510 Jones. Jerry $opm Jones. Jim UH Jones, Kenneth Um Jones, Kenneth HMO Jones, Lynda 60pm Jones, MA Susan Fm Jones, Martha Mn F ort Worth Little Rock, Ark. Dallas Austin Dallas Richardson Pampa Livington Stamford DeKalb Richardson Dallas Lake Dallas Tulsa. Okla. Odessa San Antonio Garland Vernon DeKalb K rum Port Arthur Dallas H ouston Lubbock Friona Garland Old Glory M oran H ouston Temple Jones, Melinda wopm Jones, Michael F10 Jones, Peggy Fn Jordan, Janice Sopm Jordan, Jimmy 010 Jordan, Linda Sopm Jordan, Martha UH Jorkon, Miki Sopm Joubert, Shirley $opm Juarez, Delma FH Jungman, Jean Sopm Kamp, Linda Fx0 Kappus, John OH Karlen, Frieda 60pm Karlen, Judy FH Kasper, Jim U19 Kaszynski, Eric Sopm Kaufman, Karolyn F19 Keas, Ike HMO Keeny, Linda 0310 Keglouits, Mary $opm Keil, William F10 Kelley, Jay Anne Sopm Kempe, Russell F10 Cleburne Dallas H ouston Brownfield Tyler Odessa Dallas M ount Vernon Texas City Presidio Irving Denton Dallas Dallas Dallas Willow Grove, Pa. Roanoke Dallas Denton Dallas I rving Willingboro, N .J . Dallas Dallas Keller, David OFH Kelley, Tommy MU Kelley, William 010 Kennedy, Karolyn 80ph Kennedy, Patricia $opm Kennemer. Candace GFU Kennemer. Samuel Fr Kettlety, Warren F1O Kiger. Sharon HFU Kiker, Richard 171 Kilgore, Edward Mm Kilgore, Janice 80pm Killen, Judy Mr Killough, Kathleen Q10 Kilmer. Kathy UH Kimmel, Garland Fn Kinder, Janet GU Kindle, Valerie GM King, Alfreda 80pm King Delta Sopm King Michael 011 King, Patricia a:lO King, Ronnie GHQ King, Sheila F10 Kinnamore, Linda M10 Kinslow, Philip Wv Kirk, James $0ph Kirkland, Johnny Sopm Kiser, Carlton Ur Kitchens, James 60pm Klar, Debbie FU Klasen, John Sopm Klem, Alan Q10 Knapek, Carolyn U$ Knezek, Kay G70 Knight, Daniel GU Metairie. La. Midland Texarkana, Tex. Rotan Houston Garland Dallas Denton Groves Dallas Groesbeck Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Lewisville San Antonio Garland Dallas Denton RAF Bentwaters Suffolk, Eng. Austin Dallas Dallas Weatherford F loydada F ort Worth Weatherford Orange Dallas San Antonio H ouston Arlington Dallas Austin Amarillo Knott, Betty 0. Qr Knox, Thomas L. Sopm Koenig, Charles Soph Kooker, Cheryl L. Fr Koons, Kristine $opm Kosco, Michael E. 80pm Kotecki, Jerry $0pm Krasusky, Edward S. Sopm Kresse, Charlotte S. Fn Kretzschmar, Kathryn $opm Kriss, Michael A. F10 Krough, Barbara E. $opm Krug, Marion S. Fr Krupski, John J. F1$ Kuehn, Sylvia $opm Kulakoff, Randi 60pm Kuten, Claudia K. Ur Kutin, Richard E. Sopm Kyle, Linda J. Q$ La Barba, James A. O10 Lacefield, Beverly A. 010 Lackey, Dee Ann F10 Lacy, Billie J. Fn La Follette, Pamela A. HF$ Lair, James L. Fr Laird, Janetta S. F10 Laird, Patricia A. 60pm Laird, Patricia C. FU Laird, Stephen D. On Lakey, Pauline E. Sopm Lakin, Bob 0:13 Lallier, Robert M. Fr La Londe, Georgia J . 60pm Lancaster, Gary P. U$ Lancaster, Linda E. F$ Landers, Cladene Mr Landers, Jo Delle F1j Lane, Brenda A. Fn Lane, Eddie E. W'H Langella, Leslye 07$ Langford, Richard K., Jr. FH Langston, Linda K. Q11 Lapp, Bradley G. 80pm Laredo, Esther $opm Larigaay, Terri L. U411? Larsbn, Larry E. Gm Lasseter, Lynn L. FU Lassetter, Stephen M. $013M Latham, Karen $opm Lathrop, Bruce L. U10 Laurel, Richard Sopm Lawhon, Randy J. Mn Lawley, James S. U$ Lawrence, Jean A. $opm Lawrence, Jerry W. Sopm Lawrence, Susan E. Qr Lay, Gary R. Fn Layfield, Francette Q10 Layne, Allan R. $opm Leake, Truitt G. Sopm Odessa Benton Fort Worth Denton Dallas Dallas Dallas Verplanck, N.Y. K illeen Dallas Dallas Glenview, Ill. Houston Cambria Heights, N.Y. Wichita F alls Fort Worth Odessa Odessa Jasper Dallas Christi Albany San Angelo M cK inney Corpus F ort Worth F ort Worth Hamilton Benton Fort Worth Hamlin Glenview, Ill. Dallas Lewisville Bowie F ort Worth Collinsville Grand Prairie Waco Denton Denton Denton I ruing Farmers Branch Dallas Dallas Dallas E uless Dallas Tyler Western Springs, Ill. Laredo Tyler Dallas Dallas Wills Point Teague Joshua Rhome M esquite Decatur Lebowitz, Ed $opM Lee. Becky urn Lee. Johnny 010 Lee, Sherry 03H Lee, Stacy Fr Lehrmann. Gail arH Leinweber. Katina SopM Leiterv Nancy SopM Leith, Sara Sopm LeMaster. Cathey Gm Leonard, Jerry MU Leonard, Lawerence 80ph Leonard, Mary Sopm Leonard, Pamela GHQ Leopold. Amelia OVH Letz. Stephanie Mn Levelsv La Verg 60pm Levin, Marilyn UH Lewis, Cindi M10 Lewis. Daniel SopM Lewis, Robert UH Lewis, Russell U$ Lewis, Shari HTH Light. Janette 60pm Licht, Melanie OW$ Lilley, Kathleen $opm Lilli, Mary dr$ Lillie, Mary UTU Lilley, Robert Q0 Limb, Tom GM Lincoln, Alberta Md Listen, Robert Ur Listen, Xan UH Little, Carla SopM Little, Wilmer Mn Livingston, Martha UH Lockhart, Asa M10 Lockley, Gwynne 60pm Lofstrom, Brian UH Lokey, Jan Ur Lomonaco, James Ur Long, Donna FH Long, Michael Fn Long, Terry F10 Lord, Carol Fr Lorenz, Marvin Mr Loudon, Stephanie FH Lovelace, Sue $013M Lovelace, Alene F1j Loving, Norma $opm Lovvern, Dana Fr Lovvern, Michael F1j Lowe, Kay Ur Lowe, Sharon Sopm Dallas Amarillo Paris, T ex. Dallas Columbia, SC. Old Glory Bellevue, Wash. Dallas Denton Dallas Dallas Portland Dallas Dallas F ort Worth Old Glory Teague El Campo Warner Robins, Ga. Dallas Little Rock, Ark. Deer Park Dallas Port Arthur Fort Walton Beach, Fla. Algoa Dallas F ort Worth Dallas Richardson Lubbock Baton Rouge, La. Levelland Benton, Ill. Tyler Dallas Tyler Abilene Lake Bluff, Ill. Farmersville Dallas M cAllen Dallas Garland Dallas Denver, Colo. Davenport, Iowa Brown'wood Plano Giddings S tamford S tamfo rd Tyler Dallas Luby, Leralynne U10 Lucas, Winston Sopm Luerno, Larry F10 Lueb, Patricia wlj Luker, Cynthia Fr Lummus, Deborah F10 Lumpkin, Shirley Sopm Lund, Bitsy Fr Duncanville Longview El Paso Dallas Galveston Linden Fort Worth El Paso Lutz, Gary F10 Olympian Fields, Ill. Lowe, David F0 Lowe, Tom H10 Lund, Chris G19 Lund, Nancy Sopm Lutes, Jerry Sopm Lybbert, Blair 019 Lyman, Lynne F10 Lynch, Janet 010 Lynn, Juanita F1j McAlister, Verlie Mn McBee, David Mn McBride, Linda 03H? McBride, Richard 019 McBride, Sandy Sopm McCall, David U0 McCann, Flora Sopm McClaran, Melda Sopm McCellan, Kenneth U6 McClure, Betsy FH McClure, Mary Qr McConnico, Mary M10 McClure, Patsy $opm McCollum, Thad Sopm McCool, Donly Sopm McCracken, Terry 010 McCuistion, John UH McCullough, Penny Fm McDonald, Linda Fd McDermott, David U0 McDevitt, Connie 010 McDonald, Kathryn Ur McDonald, Laurie U$ McElhannon, Mary Sopm McGee, Mary Fn McGilvray, Patricia On McGowan, Marva Fr McGrue, James 010 McGuffin, Martha Sopm McGuffin, Mary Sopm McKelrey, Mary $opm McKinney, Michael Sopm McKinney, Reeca F10 McKissick, Michael UH? McKithan, Cathy Gm McLellan, Anne F$ Dallas Snyder Dallas Dallas Waco El Paso H ouston Atlanta, Tex. Garland Abilene Fort Worth M CK inne y M illsap Grand Prairie Dallas Fort Worth Waco Corpus Christi Richardson Abilene Grand Prairie Greenville F ort Worth Athens Electra Irving M esquite Dallas Dallas Dallas Richardson Dallas Hapeville, Ga. Lewisville Groesbeck H ouston Waco Lodi Lodi Houston Tyler Plano Dallas H o uston Arlington McLemore, Marvella $opm McLemore, Rickey OM McLeod, Mary F10 McLuckie, Fred Sopm McMath, William $013M McMeans, Margaret F1j McMeans, Robert MU McMillian, Mary Sopm McMinn, Becky a:lj McMinn, Ted OVU McMurry, Randy $013M McNair, Joanye On McNamara, Patricia M$ McNeil, Jan OH McPherson, Clifford F1O McQuaid, Celia FH McQuaig, Kathleen Fn McQuery, Alan Sopm McQueen, Sharon Fm McVean, Kathy MS McWhorter, Mary U0 Maayeh, Gayle ONO Maberry, Robert 01? Macj, Brenda Mr Mack, Susan wld Macklin, Sami G5H Madden, Jeanne 60pm Maddox, Melinda GHO Maddox, Michael $0pm Maddux, Jo Kathryn GHO Frog Madill, Martha F1O Madon, Jacquelyn F10 Magart, Cynthia Fn Maher, Jim F0 Maher, Carol $opm Alvin F ort Worth Longview Dallas Denton Longview Longview I rving F ort Worth Dallas Bridgeport DeSoto Tyler San Antonio Shamrock M ineral Wells Tulsa, Okla. Vernon Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Richardson Waco Dallas Winston Salem, NC. Arlington Dallas Dallas Beaumont The Pond M cKinney Plano Shreveport, La. Dallas Dallas Massey, Elwood Um Massey, Hugh Sopm Massey, Kim G51? Massey, Peggy U711 Maston, Sandra FU Matheis, Jayne FH Matheson, Larry Ow Mathews, Eapen F1j Mathison; John Fn Matter, Earl GF$ Matthews, Janice F1j Matthews, Sandy $opm Matthias, Marcia 911? Matula, La Verne $opm Mauldin, Jacquelin Sopm Mauldin, Vicky ONO Maus, Sharon Fr Mauzy, Janet On Maxwell, Cynthia MIO Maxwell, Carla Q10 May, Brenda F1$ Mayes, Nancy F10 Mayfield, Linda Mn Mays, Beverly Q10 Amity, Ark. Stamford F ort Worth Wills Point Garland Grand Prairie Clande Denton Sanger Bowling Green, Ky. Jackson, Miss. Denton Fort Worth Abbott Lancaster F ort Worth San Antonio Hurst Corsicana Dallas Houston Dallas Collinsville M idland Mahoney, Phyllis 50pm Makuta, Doris 07H Malaby, Raymond 010 Malazzo, Vita QHQ Mallard, Dave FH Malone, Deborah F10 Malone, Michael Um Manley, Steve $opm Mann, Christopher $opm Manning, Douglas GFH Mansfield, Bill Mn Maples, Barbara FH Marks, William 07H Marks, Linda SopM Marlar, Edson Mm Marler, Nancey GVH Marquis, Michael FH Marsden. Joyce UH Marti, Christina Sopm Martin, David SopM Martin, Debbie FH Martin, Jeannie Fn Martin, Mike O10 Martin, Nancy FH Martin, Shelly 019 Martin, Sophenia GU Martin, Wayne $opM Grand Prairie Garland Texarkana, Tex. Dallas Abilene Garland Vernon Dallas I rving Deer Park Dallas Decatur F o rdyce R ich ardson Dallas Dallas Grand Prairie B rad y H ouston M esquite Waco M uleshoe Gainesville San Antonio Cleburne Dallas Arlington Martinez, Anibal U10 Mazatlan Sinalou, Mex. Martinez, Rey 0110 Mashburn, Ernest SopM Texarkana, Tex. Fort Worth Mays, Ella $opm Mays, James $opm Meador, Patti UH Meadows, Dale 019 Medlin, Sharon Soph Medlock, Susan FU Meeker, Floyd Sopm Megason, Bettye Mm Meggs, Mary UH Mendoza, Rudy $0ph Menefee, Jackson Ur Mercado, Rosa $opm Merck, Thomas $opm Merrell, Majory Fr Merrill, Ronald Sopm Metcalf, Barry Q10 Metcalf, Janice ONO Metcalf, Keith F10 Meyer, Richard QH Michlik, Mary 0710 Middleton, Richard Ur Miles, Deborah $opM Miles, Phyllis F1j Miles, Rita Ur Miller, Jerry 03H Miller, John U$ Miller, Judith Fm Miller, Don Q11? Miller, Jerry MU Miller, Kathy F1$ Houston Arlington Denton DeKalb Dallas Richardson Denton Dallas Dallas Ranger M cCamey Puerto Rico San Antonio Dallas Texarkana, Tex. Panhandle Dallas Panhandle San Antonio Dallas Ballinger Richardson F ort Worth F ort Worth Abilene Levelland M ilan, M ich. Robstown Denton Weatheriord Miller, Linda Fn Miller, Mary F1j Miller, Melinda UH Miller, Randy 0710 Miller, Susan Ur Miller, Troy 010 Miller, Warren U$ Mills, Philip Mn Mills, Sherry GEO Mills, Shirley $0ph Millwee, Tom OH Mindlin, Jamie UIQ Minger, Peggy Fr Miner, Becky G'n Minton, Theresa Fr Mirkes, Cynthia Soph Mitchell, Charles M19 Mitchell, Damon Fm Mitchell7 Libby Sopm Mitchell, Johnie 010 Mitchell, Linda Fn Mitchell, Dean Fn Mitchell, Rebecca Fn Mitchell, Richard Sopm Dallas Dallas San Antonio Richardson Bellmead M exia Lake Bluff, Ill. Richardson Dallas Gladewater Big Spring Hurst Richardson Grand Prairie Dallas Dallas Denton H o uston Gainesville Dallas Tulsa, Okla. M esquite Denton Breckenridge Morgan, M. Dean Mr Morgan, Mededith Sopm Morgan, Patricia 0110 Morphew, Marilyn Sopm Morrison, James Ur Morris, Murial Mm Morriss, Burt M10 Morrow, James 0119 Morse, Michael Sopm Morwood, Kathryn F1j Morton, Gary Sopm Moser, Betty F1j Moser, Kathie GFH Moses, Virginia Sopm Mosley, David Fr Moss, Michael GM Moughon, Linda U$ Muchmore, Frances $opm Muller, Debra Sopm Muhl, Mary GFH Muhl, Rene F1O Muirhead, Greg F1j Muhl, Beverly Sopm Mulkey Michael Mlj Houston Marshall Garland Paris, Tex. Fort Worth Amarillo San Antonio McAllen Abilene F ort Worth Fort Worth Wichita Falls Greenville Clute Decatur I rving Gladewater Waco Dallas Waco F ort Worth Denton F ort Worth Garland Mittag, Kathy FH Austin Moad, Jane $opm Bridgeport Moak, Christi F0 Hurst Mobley, Dickie FH Garland Moffett, Margie Qr Farmers Branch Mohon, Nanene FH Lubbock Molsbee, Rebecca GFU Gaznesville Molten, Alma UH Dumas Mondragon, Nelda Qw Mercedes Monroe, David $opM Weatherford Monroe, James On McKinney Montgomery, Jacqueline $opm Denton Moody, Sarah U19 Garden Grove, Calif. Mooney, Charles wr Clifton Moore, Barbara Ox? Temple Moore, Ellen Fn Richardson Moore, Gary F1O Grand Prairie Moore, George $opm Houston Moore, Jerry Ur Cleburne Moore, Patricia $opm Dallas Moore, Rebecca Sopm Dallas Moore, Shannon Fm Tirrenia Pisa, Italy Moore, Sharon Fn Dallas Morehouse, Sam GH$ Dallas Moreno, Elsie FH Dallas Moreno, Gloria Ur Spur Moreno, Norma Mm Houston Moreno, Yolanda Gr Mercedes Morgan, Becky FH Alvin Morgan, John Sopm Fort Worth Mullendore. Jerry W. 60pm Frisco Mullen Walter E. $opm Garland Mullins, Karen A. 07m Fort Worth Munchrath, Ellen M. GJH Windthorst Muncy, Janet E. S0pm Fort Worth Mundt, Steven A. Fn Dallas Munsch, Drue Ellen Fm Fort Worth Murdock, Gerry E. UH San Antonio Mureen. Sigrid L. UH Dallas Murphy, Carolyn F. UH Pasadena, Tex. Murphy, Deanie F1j Houston Murphy, Don W. $opm Fort Worth Murphy, Kathleen R. Sopm Beaumont Murphy. Shirley S. Qr Irving Murray. Jane 60pm Abernathy Murray, Roland Um Abernathy Murray, Vicki d7m Amarillo Murrell. Jimmie $013M Georgetown, Tex. Murray, Deborah J. Fr Wills Point Myers, Buddy Lee $opm Odessa Myler, Rick SopM Wharton Nacol, Michael E4 07H Throckmorton Nancev Kathryn UH Thornton Nance, William T. FH Garland Napier, Nichie L. GHQ Hurst Nash, Jay A. Um Dallas Naylor, Martha UPIO Fort Worth Neal. Debbie K. $0pm Dallas Nebe. Robert F. 60pm Houston Needham, Betty Ann 60pm Lewisville Neeley. Bruce A. UTH Gatesuille Nelson. Gwendolyn L. a7r Texarkana, Tex. Nelson, Janet R. SopM Chicago, Ill. Nelson, Linda Louise OH Dallas Nelson, Susan Mellisa U7H Tulsa, Okla. Newton, Carol E. Qr Perrytown Newton, Judith Mm Tyler Nicholas, Connie arm Fort Worth Nichols, Dean Q10 Bowie Nichols, Janet Ur Lancaster Nichols, Lynn $opm Dallas Nichols, Pam 91 Tyler Nicholson, David 60pm Bellaire Nicklas, James wr Springtown Nielsen, Carl FU Dallas Nielsen, Karen F10 Fredericksburg Nierman, Donald 010 Dallas Nieto, Carlos M$ Corpus Christi Nita, Anne ij Garland Nix, Dana UH Azle Nix, Joyce Sopm Clarksville Noack, Kenneth $opm Chillicothe Nodwell, Paula 0710 Irving Norman, David 60pm Ocala, Fla. Norman, Wayne Gr Temple Norris, Susan $opm Tyler Novotny, Mary Fr Houston Nowlin, Nancy $opm Oklaunion Noyes, Debra F10 Arlington Nuckles, Thomas Mr Denton Nunley, Ross $opm Clarksville Nunn, Cindy Gopm Overland Park, Kan. NwadieL Grace $opm Issele Uku, Nigeria Oake, Karen Fn Gainesville Oakes, Beverly Q10 Fort Worth Oberndorfer, Reed Sopm Yardley, Pa. LYBrlen, Kathleen $opm Paris, Tex. Odell, Norman Fr Munday Odle, Neal 010 Bowie Odom, Doug Mn Grand Prairie Odom, Joy Ur Baytown Oglesby, Melvin Gm Hereford Oglesshy, Patricia $013M Dallas O Grady, John Fm North Bergin, N.J. Olderog, Ronald $opm Richardson Oliver, Janice $opm Denton Olson, Sharon 019 Dallas O,Neal, Gail Qr Richardson O'Neal, Roderick GM Vernon OyNeill, Peggy Fm Dallas O Rear, Dan 010 Denton Orr, Patty M$ Monahans Orrell, Rosemon FH Monterrey, N. Mex Osborn, Joel Fn Friona Osborne, Jon SopM Denton Ott, Hope U$ Plainview Ousey, John Ow Dallas Owen, Mary Sopm Fort Worth Owens, Janet Ur Dallas Owens, Michael F19 Grand Prairie Oxford, Kitty Sopm Factor, Alan avg Padgett, Donna $opm Page, Gary MIQ Page, Mary $opm Page, Pamela Urn Page, Sandra Sopm Page, Tulane Sopm Paine, Frederick ah? Palmer, E. Marilyn Ur Pannell, Beverly 60pm Parker, Carolyn 010 Parker, Debbie WHO Parker, Gabriel Fr Parker, Gary 019 Parker, Karen $opm Parker, Michael Sopm Parker, William Sopm Parkman, Cindy F10 Parks, Robert Sopm Paris, Paul Gopm Parker, Liz 60pm Parr, Elizabeth Jr Parrish ,Betty Sopm Parrish, Teresa SopM Parsons, Chris Sopm Parsons, Loydell FH Partridge, Janice OF$ Pasafiume, Denise FU Patmore, Margaret Sopm Pontiac, M ich. Longview F t. Hood Denison Larchmont, N.Y. San Antonio Cisco F ort Worth Olympia Fields, Ill. Mount Pleasant Waco Dallas Dallas Denison Dallas Scott AFB, Ill. Belton Los F resnos F ort Worth Abilene R ichardson Pleasanton Gorman I rving Bridgeport Dallas Bowie Dallas H o uston Dallas Patterson, Michael Fr Patton, Roy F19 Paul, Suzanne Fr Pavey, Colleen Sopm Dallas Richardson Dallas Texarkana, Tex. Pavoni, J ohn Fm North Grafton, M ass. Payne, David Sopm Payton, Mimi F10 Pearson, Charlotte Fr Pearson, William F10 Pearson, Jimmy 019 Pedigo, Linda Sopm Pedigo, Sandra 019 Peek, Linda 0719 Penker, Mary Jane 019 Penland, Rosemary Mn Penn, John F19 Penturf, Linda F10 Perez, Norberto $opm Perkins, Ruth $opm Perry, Wilbert F19 Perryman, Martha Sopm Pertuit, Edward Mn Peskuric, Kathleen Q$ Pettie, Patricia Sopm Plano Little Rock, Ark. Dallas Hurst Richardson Denton Pilot Point Grand Prairie F ort Worth Dallas Fort Worth Texarkana, Tex. Brownsville Denton Tyler Richardson H addonfield, N .J . H ouston Brenham Petrash, Linda K. 019 Baytown Petree, Karen E. On Paris, Tex. Petty, Karen 0710 Dallas Petty, Maxine M. Mr San Antonio Petty, Sharon E. 010 Goldsmith Pflibsen, Robert C. Fr Montgomery, Mo. Phelps, Kenneth L. 80pm Gainesville Phifer, Cassie C. 60pm Dallas Phillipi, Virsinia L. 80pM San Antonio Phillips, Dana A. U$ DeKalb Phillips, Deborah A. O3H Dallas Phillips, Gloria J. Winona Piccola, Rogari OH Dallas Pierot, Cecelia E. U 10 Dallas Pille, Bonnie C. Fm Dallas Pinkerton, Donald R. Um Tyler Pinkerton, Steve D. FH Plano Piott, Danny C. SopM Irving Piper, Paula FU Andrews Pittard, Linda D. Sopm Dallas Pittman, Dana L. F19 Fort Worth Plapp, Greg Bill M$ Fort Worth Platt, Janice L. Hm Richardson Pless, Dale M. Ur Big Spring Plexco, Pam M11 Galveston Plummer, Patricia A. Sopm Pasadena Ply, M. Gayle WU Brownwood Poehls, Shirley A. WW Lorena Poff, Trudy 019 Ennis Polk, Joseph Don F1O Fort Worth Pollock, Robert D. M 1- Dallas Poncik, Beth $opm Dallas Poncik, William V. 019 Dallas Ponder, Paula A. Fort Worth Pope, Patrick G. Odessa Popp, Mary L. Sopm Abbott, Tex. Porter, Alice Leslie Sopm Gordon Porter, Charles P. Sopm Dallas Porter, Clarence M. Ox? Texas City Porter, David W. $opm San Angelo Porter, Pamela S. F10 Dallas Porter, Susan M. OVH Irving Porterfield, Darrell G. 01$ Texarkana, Tex. Pounds, Larry F. Sopm Decatur Powell, James M. $oph.x Newton, Kan. Powell, James M. F10 Stamford Powell; Kay Fn Irving Prater, Charlsye E. FH Dallas Pratt, Kiona H. Q?n Denton Pratt, Nancy $opm Fort Worth Pratt, Steven D. F19 Dallas Preskitt, John T. Ur Dallas Price, Carol A. Gopm Dallas Prewitt, Paula Fn Cedar Hill, Tex. Prince, Donald R. U?H Dallas Pringle, Robert W. Sopm Dallas Prior, James F1j Lubbock Proano, Pablo $10 Quito, Ecuador Propes, Pamela A. $opm Henderson Pruitt, Mary S. Sopm Waco Redden, David Fr Redfox, Mary U10 Redwine, Don Sopm Reece, Linda 07H Reece, Randi U10 Reecer, Randy arm Reed, Belinda 0710 Reed, Durlene U0 Reed, Janie 0310 Reed, Kathleen F10 Reed, Mary UH Reed, Phil Fm Reese, Deborah Sopm Reese, Mary GEO Reeves, Sandi F19 Reichle, Pat Sopm Reid, Linda Fr Reid, Mary Mn Reinema, Loren Um Reiter, Cheryl Mn Reiter, Lynn Fr Remley, Chuck MU Remley, Patrivia W30 Renout, Michael L10 Denton Corpus Christi Decatur Dallas Dallas Lockney Gainesville Dallas Garland F ort Worth Fort Worth Smithfield Waco Knox City San Antonio M idland Arlington Grand Saline Chane, I ll. M uenster M uenster Denton Benton Houston Pruitt, Patty M10 Pullen, Thomas MD Pybas, Margaret F10 Quinn, Bob UH Quinn, John 0530 Raatz, Kathy Soph Radetsky, Dona Fr Raef, Boyd UH Ramos, Frank UH Randle, Kennyth 010 Randles, Janis $opm Rangle, Yolanda Fn Rankin, James 01d Rann, John GVH Ranne, Eddie SopM Rapp, Rose Fr Ratliff, Alan Jr Ratliff, Forest 010 Raub, Steve FU Rawlins, Patricia FU Ray, Harry U19 Rayfield, Charles Qr Ray, Jacob 07$ Read, Randy U$ Read. Sally Sopm Read, Terry U$ Reagan, Duane $opm Real, Bob Fr Readon, Michael Fr Redd, Cynthia F0 M esquite DeSoto Gainesville Lancaster Grapevine Edmonds, Wash. F ort Worth A marillo Waco Waco Carrollton Dallas Graham Decatur Westbrook Dallas K ilgore Fort Worth Dallas Dallas Fort Worth Springtown Texarkana, Tex. Kilgore Odessa Odessa I rving Dallas Tyler Prairie View Resch, Kevin FU Rettig, Linda Ur Reyes, Joe MD Reyna, S. Miguel Sopm Reynolds, Kay $013M Reynolds, Marsha $opm Reynolds, Mary F1j Rhodes, Becky $013M Rich, Paula Gr Richard, Carolyn Sopm Richardson, Judy 019 Richardson, Lee U10 Richardson, Rix GHQ Richardson, Sadie M0 Richie, Joe Sopm Ridenoun, Karen OVD Riefler, Karen am Rigney, John Sopm Riley, Erasmus G10 Riley, Larry 00 Riley, Paul Fn Rios, Leo 011$ Ripperda, Timothy $oph Rivera, Cheryl GFD Rivera, Ermelinda Fr Roach, Martha Gm Roach, Wilma Fn Roberson, Don 60pm Roberts, Jacquie Sopm Roberts, John U19 Roberts, Lynn F10 Roberts, Martha Sopm Roberts, Michael Fn Roberts, Ronda UH Roberts, Sue Fr Robertson, Mandy F0 F ort Worth Dallas Floresville Dallas Cleburne M idland Denton Odessa Fort Worth H ouston Crane Odessa Dallas I tasca Vernon R ichardson Dallas Terrell San Antonio Anaheim, Calif. Dallas San Antonio Killeen Dallas Alpine Freeport Houston Denton Corsicana Corpus Christi Omaha S tratford Lubbock Waco S tratfo rd M cAllen Rubin, Marsha A. QH Dallas Ruff, Rosemary F1d Pasadena Rupe, F. Lynn GH Mesquite Russell, Cynthia G7U Dallas Russell, Hal W. Fn LeMars, Iowa Russell, Ralph E. Fr Denver City, Tex. Ruth, Linda S. $opm Atlanta, Tex. Rutkowski, Elizabeth F10 Dallas Sainsott, Gay Robin $opm Dallas Sallee, Susi Sopm Richardson Sample, Dorcas J. 0710 Charleston AFB Sample, Linda Fn Waco Samuels, Lawrence 071$ F ort Worth Sanchez, Jesse Mn Stanton, Tex. Sandberg, Larry Kent $opm Alamo, N. Dak. Sanders, Connie F10 Lamesa Sanders, Linda J. Q6 Athens, Tex. Sanders, Marja-Terttu MD Dallas Sanders, Raymond W. U$ Wellington Sanders, Rebecca A. Fn Cleburne Sanderson, Cindy $opm Galveston Sandlin, Sandra K. F0 Dallas Sanford, Judy A. $013M Carthage Sansom, Patricia F1j Greemiiie Robertson. Mary G. $opm Robinson, Jan $opm Robinson, Joyce M. F10 Robinson, Maureen E. Sopm Robinson, Randolph 01$ Rockstroh, Valerie d?n Rock, Sharon Ulj Rockwell, Katherine F10 Rodgers, Jerry UH Rodgers, Robert S. $opm Rodiquez, Rodger R. 010 Rohoe, Walter J. M$ Roland, Charles Um Rolan, Cheryl Dee 0119 Rose, Diana Darlene Fr Rose, Margaret S. Ur Rose, Myrtle F. $013M Rosenbaum, James R. Ur Rosenberg, Celeste A. Fn Rosenberg, Sue A. Jr Rosenfield, Linda S. F10 Ross, Jean A. Mm Rostolar, Janis Claire 07m Roth, Barry Fr Rothenflue, Donna J. Fr Rounsefell, Karen L. Fm Rowden, Judy U10 Rowe, Robert B. an Rowe, Robert G. 01$ Rowland, Michael L. Sopm Denton Texarkana, Tex. Dallas Austin Dallas San Antonio Houston Longview Dallas Fort Worth San Antonio Lima, Peru L0 ngview Waco Den ton A rlington M arshal 1 Alexandria, Va. Dallas Dallas Houston Denton F ort Worth Dallas Lawton, Okla. Bayou La Barte Dallas DeSoto Dallas Richardson Santiago, Tommy UH Sartain, Robert On Saski, James 80pm Satterwhite, Matt a?d Saunders, Ramona U710 Saxon, Suellen 60pm Saxon, W. Trent UH Sazama, Judy FU Scaff, Juanita M10 Scarborough, Linda GFH Schachterle, Linda 80pm Schaeter, Teresa Haw Scheer, Dennis Fr Schierloh, Vicki 50pm Schliech, Catherine S0pM Schmidt, Katherine 0 1 Schmidt, Lana FIO Schmitt, Paul UH Schmitz, Paula U10 Schneider, Jennifer FH Schnorbus, Connie UVH Scholze. Debbie hgcpm Schramm, Marilyne U10 Schroeder, Carol U7U Schuchard, Pamela GFH Schultz, Betty $opM Schulze. Dixie 80pm Schultze, Janet $opm Schwaim, Sandra Sopm Schwartz. Faye Fr Roscoe Perrin San Antonio Panhandle Decatur Beaumont Sacramento, Calif. Dallas Decatur Sachse Englewood, Colo. Dallas Dallas H ouston Dallas Dalhart Aloody Houston Lindsay Big Spring Marshall Houston Victoria College Station Fort Worth Dallas Denton Dallas Mineral Wells F ort Worth Schwennsen, Sandy 07H Scoggin, Kathy Fr Scott, Clarks 0110 Scott, Daniel U0 Scott, Lynne FH Scott, Molly Ur Scott, William Fx0 Scottino, Jody F10 Scribner, Barbara 01? Seaberny, James $opm Sealy, Diane 0119 Sebastian, Michael Mn Sedeno, Gilbert UU Seebach, Marianne U330 Seelbach, Linda FU Seibert, Marjorie Q$ Seidel, Richard Fr Seidenberg, Marilyn am Seifert, Jody SopM Sell, Daniel GHQ Sellers, Sharon UH Selman, Kara $013M Sesso, Sara Sopm Settle. Vivian UH F ort Worth F ort Worth LeRoy, N .Y. Water Memphis, Tenn. Tyler Anson Arlington Texas City Azle Houston Dallas San Angelo Arlington Burleson El Paso New Braunfels Dallas Carrollton Park F orest Dallas Phillips Santa Rosa Kilgore Sewell, Donna U19 Shafer, Chris F10 Shafer, Victoria Fn Shankle, Willie SopM Shanks, Sharon F10 Shavers, Dongloria UH Shaw, Patricia U?H Shaw, Phyllis 91$ Shea, Elizabeth M10 Shelton, Marcy 60pm Shepard, Chiquita 6319 Shepherd, Steven $opm Sheppard, Nancy $opm Shingle, Betty NH Shipp, Dixie UH Shireman, Linda F10 Shively, Timothy O10 Shobert, Stanford 60pm Shouse, Larry 010 Showers, Glenn F10 Sidle, Robin 80pm Siewert, Tricia F1j Sihvonen, Denise 0:19 Sikes, Joy Sopm Simmons, Ann U10 Simmons, James ONO Simmons, John UH Simmons, Wiliam $opm Simmons, Wilton $opm Simon. Donna FH Simpson, Ernest Sopm Simpson, Shirley 010 Sims, Arnetta $opm Sims, Dan F10 Sims, Kathy UH Singleton, Gary NH Singleton, Linda MID Silvey, Roy $opm Skaggs, Karen 00 Skaggs, Sharon Mr Skeeters, Ed 010 Skiles, Martha Fm Slack, Joyce 010 Slack, Randy 010 Slagle, Jack 00 Slavson, Thomas Fn Sloan, Virginia $opm Slovak, Sam $opm Smalls, Howard Mn Smelker, Janet Ur Smith, Anne Fr Smith, Bill Sopm Smith, Bruce Fr Smith, Carolin Fn Smith, Celestine Sopm Smith, Cheryl Gal? Smith, Connie 010 Smith, Danny FH Smith, Debra FH Smith, Deborah Sopm Hurst Tulsa, Okla. Corpus Christi Longview Mount Kisco, N.Y. DeKalb M arshall Galveston Gainesville Brownwood Tyler Fort Worth Dallas Houston H ighlands Arlington Garland Fort Worth Arlington Arlington San Antonio Abilene Richardson Austin Garland H ouston Dallas Dallas Grapevine Fort Worth Dallas H ereford Dallas Garland Corsicana Odessa Fort Worth Vernon Denison Denison K ilgore Austin Harlingen Denton K ilgore Graham Dallas Dallas New York, N.Y. Beaumont Richardson Denton Dallas Dallas M cKinney Arlington Dallas Dallas F ort Worth Los Angeles, Calif. Smith, Don R. J10 Smith, Donnie A. 010 Smith, Florence E. U10 Smith, Iris E. Sopm Smith, James P. Fr Smith, Janet K. Fn Smith, Karen S. 60pm Smith, Lynnette 03$ Smith, Jerry W. UH Smith, Jimmie D. Q10 Smith, Judy 010 Smith, Karen H. Mr Smith, Karen S. Fn Smith, Kathy E. F1j Smith, Kim L. G19 Smith, Marcus G. Fr Smith, Marilyn D. F0 Smith, Mary S. Fr Smith, Neal E. FH Smith, Ricki L. Q10 Smith, Robert D. 010 Smith, Robin $opm Smith, Roy G. $opm Smith, Sandra K. Fr Smith, Sandy J. Sopm Smith, Sharon U10 Smith, Sharon V. UH Smith, Shirley M. F1O Smith, Steve G. Sopm Smith, Terry W. $opm Smith, Vicki C. Fn Smith, Virginia S. F1j Smith, Wayne S. M$ Smith, W. David F10 Sneed, Charles M. QlO Snider, Bonnie R. 50pm Snider, Garry L. Ur Sorensen, Linda F. $opm Sosebee, Paula Sopm Sosebee, Steven D. 010 Sparks, Judy D. FU Sparolini, Paula A. $opm Spears, Donnagene $opm Speck, Cecil T. G$ Spence, Bob 0310 Spiller, Jane A. F1? Spindle, David L. 60pm Spinelli, Michael J . $opm Spivey, Danny R. Sopm Springer, Don W. GI? Sproule, Pamela J. $ophf Spurrier, Barbara L. Q10 Squibb, Sally Sopm Standfield, Stan C. F10 F ort Worth Odessa Dallas Fairbanks, Alaska Snyder Houston 'vewisville Dallas Dallas Dallas Fort Worth Grdnd Prairie El Paso F ort Worth Corpus Christi Dallas Graham Fort Worth San Antonio Bedford Dallas Gladewater Goldsmith Dallas Fort Worth Wichita F alls Dallas El Paso Sherman Sherman Dallas M elissa Waco S n yder K illeen Dallas Fritch M ineral Wells Dallas Abilene Lewisville blonterey, Calif. Richardson Lamesa Dallas Bridgeport Sanger Lawrence, M ass. Hobbs, N. Mex. Jacksonville, Tex. Brownsville Fort Worth Sherman Dallas Standifer, Cheryl Fr Stanford, Debbie J. F1$ Stanislav, Mary Ur Stanley, James M. 91' Stanley, Lala B. $0pm Stapler, Margaret 0'11? Stark, Pam MI? Starling, Janelle L. Fr Starr, Sheila G. U17 Steindam, Jane Sopm Stephens, Dennis E. On Stephens, Dennis $opm Stephens, John P. Fr Stephens, Michael C. Fr Stephens, Paul B. Um Sterrett, Johnnie L. Sopm Stevens, Dick Fr Stevens, Karen $opm Stevens, Marilou Fr Stevens, Suzanne Sopm Stewart, Carla UH Stewart, Charlene A. F10 Stewart, John C. U$ Stewart, June P. Sopm Stickley, Christine C. J19 Strike, Yvonne J. UH Stilwell, Gail Q10 Stinchcombe, Karyne K. $opm Stinchcomb, Teresa F1$ Stockhoff, Carolyn L. Fr Stockton, James I. OH Stockton, Ronnie W. $opm Stoetzer, Debbie F19 Stogner, Linda N. Fr Stokes, Terri A. Sopm Stolp, Mickby $oph3 Fort Worth Lewisville Allen Dallas Boyd Denton Borger Garland Jacksboro Plano Breckenridge White Oak F ort Worth Pampa Fort Worth Dallas Dallas Richardson Tyler F ort Worth Lewisville M uenster Sherman Corpus Christi Warminster, Pa. Radford, Va. Plano Dallas Fort Worth Greenville Dallas Wichita F alls Irving Paradise Keller Corpus Christi Stone, James 80pm Stoudenmier, Karen Uv Stout, Cynthia $opm Stovall, Ruth 60pm Strader, Daniel F1j Stratton, Dusty Sopm Stayer, Lori 911$ Streeter, Carlos Sopm Streeter, Jennie U$ Stribling, Juliet Sopm Strickert, Nancy Ow Strong, Steven Fr Strother, Barbie 03H Stroud, B. Gayle 010 Stubbleiield, Juliette Mn Stuckey, John Mn Stutts, Pat U19 Sullivan, Majel Soph Sullivan, Sharon Sopm Sullivan, Steve Sopm Summerall, Richard Sopm Summons, Donald WU Sumner, Eddie F1j Suniga, Thomas U10 Swaim, Kathy Fr Swamner, Jo Fn Swanson, Jack F1$ Sweat, Douglas U10 Sweeney, Michael 0U Sykes, Sandi F1O Dallas Orange Galveston Georgetown Lewisville Dallas F ort Worth Santiago Overton San Angelo Grand Prairie Denton M esquite Tyler Texas City Pampa F ort Worth Richardson Pilot Point Wichita F alls Dallas Wichita F alls Carrollton A us tin Arlington Plymouth, N.C. Dalhart Grand Prairie Dallas Sherman Tackett, Margie 80pm Dallas Tadlock, Connie UH F risco Tafelski, Shirley F10 Dallas Takacs Eva $opm Waxahachie Tankersley, Paul 01$ Terrell Tanner, Billy Fr Graham Tanner, D. W. UH Gainesville Tate, Catherine Fn Fort Worth Tax, Stanley UH South River, NJ. Taylor, Carolyn 01$ Dallas Taylor, Elizabeth G710 Corpus Christi Taylor, Julianne FU Dallas Taylor, Larry UH Denton Taylor, Lynn $opm St. Clair, Mo. Taylor, Silvi Fr Richardson Telford, Marsha Sopm DeKalb Temple, Linda Sopm Dallas Terrell, Jeanne $opm Canardaigua, N.J. Terry, David F10 Loraine Terry, Michael F10 Denton Terry, Susan 01? West Hartford, Conn. Thames, Cathy $opm Dallas Thatcher, Charla 0519 Irving Thiele, Larry V. Mr Clifton Thiem, Patricia 91H Thomas, Charles 80pm Thomas, Cynthia F1Q Thomas, Ernestine M$ Thomas, Gayle GTn Thomas, Jacqueline GM? Thomas, Michael 010 Thomas, Vicki F19 Thomason, Jean F10 Thompson, David F1j Thompson, Deborah Fr Thompson, Donna 010 Thompson, J an Sopm Thompson, Letitia UIQ Thompson, Michael UH Thorne, Carolyn Fn Thornton, Brenda Ur Thornton, Linda U10 Thorp, J ames FH Thurman, Pamela M 19 Thurmond, Becky $opM Tibbitts, Jo Anne U19 Tibbs, Virginia Fr Tidwell, Scotty 80ph Tiller, Vickie 010 Tilley, Dana SopM Tobias, Susie F0 Todd, Ross F1j Todd, Terry 910 Tolbert, Jerry $013M Tollefeson, Donna Q$ Tomlin, William U10 Tomme, Elizabeth FU Thompkins, Gayle U$ Toney, Janice Soph Townsend, June F10 Toups, Julie Fr Trahan, Janice Mr Trammel, Linda UH Trent, David M10 Tresenriter, Marcia $opm Trice, Bobby Sopm Tricks, Bob UL! Treitsch, Terry F1j Triplette, David $opm Tripoli, Marie ONO Trojacek, Judy 019 Trufares, Deno Sopm Tullgren, George Sopm Tuohy, Kathleen $opm Turbeville, Randy Sopm Turlington, Joyce F1O Turner, Bruce $opm Turner, Mary Ml? Turner, Pamela U$ 'Ilerentine, Robert MS Turner, Rosalind F10 Turner, Tommy 01$ Tutle, Peggy Fr Twyford, Janette FH Galveston I rving Denton Dallas Dallas Lubbock Wichita F alls Denton Fort Worth Richardson Flossmoor, Ill. Houston I rving Dallas Tyler Lewisville Van Alstyne Van Alstyne Houston Dallas Austin Borger Alexandria, Va. DeKalb Gainesville Dallas Amarillo Abilene Nacogdoches Fort Worth Dallas Dallas Eielson AFB, Alaska H enderson Pittsburg, Tex. Garland Bellaire Baytown Gainesville Corsicana Dallas Anson Ulysses, Kan. Garland Dallas Fort Worth Dallas Wichita F alls M anchester, N .H . Dallas Gainesville I rving Dallas Carrollton H urst H ouston Grand Prairie Dallas Cleburne Denton Tychsen, Roger 010 Tyler, David UH Udd, Theresa F10 Uhn, Ruth $opm Ulmer, Carolyn MU Ulrich, Craig $opm Uncapher, William wr Underwood, Kandi F10 Underwood, Ronald $0pm Underwood, Sylvia 01$ Upchurch, Larry $opM Upchurch, Pam Sopm Urban, Robert Fd Vaccaro, Jeanette F1$ VanderMeulen, Danise 019 Vandergriff, Trvin 019 Van Houter, Phala Fr Van Meter, Viki U19 Vann, Nancy GI? Van Winkle, Patsy Sopm Vardeman, Laura SothA Vaughn, Ann F10 Vaughn, Monty F0 Vawter, Susan G'$ Veal, Gregory Ur Venner, Melissa Sopm Ventura, Cindy F1O Verver, Conrad UH Viles, Linda Soph Villarreal, Irma Fr Vincent, Jan Sopm Visser, Marie Mr Wade, Regenia Mm Wadesworth, Donald Sopm Waggoner, Ronald Sopm Waggoner, Sheri F19 Wagner, James G10 Wagner, Polly $0pm Wakefield, Bill 60pm Waldrep, Patsy 010 Walker, Barbara UH Walker, Charles U$ Walker, Deborah Fr Walker, Donna Ur Walker, Glynda Fr Walker, Johnny U$ Walker, Judith Sopm Walker, Kathy U10 Walker, Kathy Sopm Walker, Margaret F10 Walker, Susan On Waller, Jo Anne U$ Walter, Marilyn F10 Walter, Sondra Fr Minneapolis, Minn. Tyler F ort Worth Richardson San Antonio Dallas Wichita Falls Dallas Bowie Saginaw M esquite Texarkana, Tex. Dallas Wichita Falls Dallas M cK inney Arlington Dallas Odessa Alvarado H o uston Bay Village, Ohio Richardson F ort Worth Lewisville Waco Dallas Dallas Grapevine San Antonio Burkburnett Dallas F ort Worth Richardson K ilgore Vernon San Angelo Pampa Durant, Okla. Salt Gap Throckmorton Dallas Irving Fort Worth Dallas Weatherford Ardmore, Penn. Texarkana, Tex. Danbury, Conn. Dallas Dallas Dallas Bellaire H ouston l77 Walton, David L. 80pm Dallas Ward, Carolyn S. 010 Freeport Ward, Cheryl L. UrU Dallas Ward, Daryl A. 010 Houston Ward, Virgil W. FH Sanger Warmerdam, James S. Fr Lewisville Warnstaff, Kay W. U10 Marshall Warren, David G. U10 Fort Worth Warren, John E, 0719 Odessa Warren, Johnny R. Sopm Dallas Warren, Narva D. Um Dallas Warren, Johnny Sopm Dallas Warren, Suzanne F1O Fort Worth Washington, Lois 60pm Texarkana Waskom, Sharon D. 010 Fort Worth Waters, Dyxnris R. UIO Dallas Waters, George L $opm Rumson, N.J. Watkins, Andy $opm Dallas Watkins, Gail Fr Dallas Watkins, Theodore 07H Dallas Watson, Barbara J. F10 Amarillo Watson, Cindy J. GHQ Houston Watson, Jannie E wepm Fort Worth Watson, Lawrence D. 0710 McKinney Watson, Max W. F10 Sulphur Springs Watson, Melissa ij Henderson Watson, Richard A. Sopm Grand Prairie Watson, Richard W. F1j Belton Watson, Keith Ur McKinney Weatherall, Catherine F. U10 Midland Weaver, L. Diane Fr Dallas Weaver, Marietta B. $013M Odessa Webb, Michael R. $opm Denton Webster, David A. U10 Taylor, Mich Weeks, Kerry A4 U10 Plano Weir, Frances A. Ur Dallas Weirus, Madelyn J. $0ph; College Station Weis, Rita Sopm Dallas Weise, Susan A. Fr Haskell Welch, Jerry R. U10 Abilene Wells, Eugenia L. F10 M idland Wells, I. Robert F10 Dallas Welsh, Leila M. Ur Dallas Weatheim, Joyce L. Fw San Antonio Wesley, Joe Mr Ranger West, Carol A. Mr Irving West, John M. $0pm Dallas West, Karen K. UH Pleasanton Westbrook, John D. III $opm Rule Westdyke, Polly L. F10 Dallas Wheeler, Donna L. GV$ Dallas Wheeler, Peyton III 80ph Redbank, N.J. Whisenant, Cheryl L. Ur Tyler Whisenant, Tony W. Mr Stanford Whisenhunt, Brenda J. UH Houston Whitaker, Angela R. F10 Grand Prairie White, Dale L. Jr. Fr Roanoke White, Daryl G. $0pm Mesquite White, Debbie L. 019 Houston White, James F1O Dallas White, Jim Fr Dallas White, Judith 60pm Houston White, Linda J. F10 San Antonio White, Linda P. $0pm Anahuac White, Marilyn K. 07'10 Fort Worth White, Mary L. Mn Grand Prairie White, Rynda K. F10 Abilene White, Sally Qr Cleburne White, Steve Sopm Denison Whitenight, Judith Fn Arlington Whitakker, Kenny Fm Dallas Whitted, Michael F1Q Fort Worth Whittenberg, Fran F0 Dallas Whorley, Tom Mr M ineral Wells Wickersham, Glenn H. Jr. Sopm Dallas Wilbanks, Harry Fm Sherman Wilbanks, Philip D. 60pm Plano Wilburn, Leslie E. U0 Gilmer Wildman, Donna 80pm Kermit Wilfred, Teresa F0 Garland Wilhelm, Cindy Fr San Antonio Wilkite, Charles UH Decatur Wilkins, Debbie A.4J10 Carthage Wilkins, Susan L. Q$ San Antonio Wilkins, Amy S. $opm Fort Worth Williams, Carol A. 076 Richardson Williams, Chima L. Sopm Austin Williams, Heather M. Sopm Dallas Williams, Jane Ann FQ Richardson Williams, Joan A. OI? Garland I79 Wililams, Joel V. Ur Williams, John G. 010 Williams, Joyce 01? Williams, Judy Mn Williams, Laura F10 Williams, Linda M. F10 M arlin Tyler Kansas City, Kan. Garland Olney Dallas Williams, Marcia 3 Williams, Mary K. Fr Wililams, Norman C. 010 Williams, Paulette Sopm Williams, Robert M. 019 Williams, Roy 010 Longview Carrollton Fort Worth Wichita F alls Dallas Cleburne Wililams, Valerie D. F10 Williamson, Guy P. Fr Williamson, Kathryn A. $opm Wilford, Jann E. F10 Willingham, David L. 0119 Willis, Janice R. Sopm Dallas Denton Pearland H ouston Denton Dallas Wills, John J. Mn Wilshire, Larry D. F10 Wilson, Deborah L. F10 Wilson, Donald D. MO Wilson, Jill F19 Wilson, Nancy K. G450 Tyler K eller Dallas M arshall I rving Dallas Wilson, Robin G. Sopm Wilson, Ronald R. MD Winchester, Marian Sopm Winkler, Jean C. Fm Winslett, Micheline Mm Witkowski, Donna J. G10 Bellaire Odessa F ort Worth Sherman Tripoli, Libya Dallas Witten, Cynthia A. On Witten, Martha A. Sopm Wittke, Eugene R. 06 Wollan, Darrby J. F19 Wolny, Catheryn L. Fr Womack, Gigi $opm M ay Pearl May Pearl New York, N.Y. Richardson Rochester, N.Y. Anson Denton Helotes Henderson Womble, Larry B. Ur Wood, Betsy B. Sopm Wood, Carol L. Mn Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Wood, Carolyn J. Fn Charles L. Sopm James T. Sopm Janeda L. 01$ Jeffrey C. 010 Jo Anna Ur John M. U$ Richard U10 Sandra J. 60pm Sandrea K. 010 Teresa U19 Woodall, Linda K. U19 Woodard, Vicki L. Sopm Woodby, Kathleen R. 010 Woods, Nancy J . Sopm Woodby, Linda Sopm Wooten, D. Jeanie wepm Des M oines, N. M ex. Wooten, Fredna J. 010 Workman, Mike $opm Wortham, Evalynn UH Worthy, Valorie N. OH Dallas Texarkana Amarillo Denton Sherman M idland Stanton Dallas Dallas Pasadena, Tex. Dallas Lewisville Dallas Benton Fort Worth Carrollton Cookville H ous ton Dallas Turnersville Wren, Evelyn F. $0pm Wright, Gloria D. M10 Wright, Kathy S. 50pm Wright, Nancy M. Sopm Wright, Ronald L. MU Wrotenbery, Anne $0pm Wylie, Robert W. U10 Wylie, Sandra K. UH Wynkoop Charles N. Qr Yager, Sharon K, $opm Yarbrough, Velta M. 010 Yau, Elsie P. 01$ Yeargin, Ricky E. F10 Yearout, Pamela S. OH Yenne, Harlan S., III 01$ Yingst, Sarah K. 017 York, Jackie M. 50pm York, Jim 0., Jr. $opm Yosten, Susie 030 Young, Alice K. U$ Young, Denice G. OM Young, Denise S. $opm Young, John R. Sopm Young, Keith M. $opm Youngberg, Nancy L. $013M Young, Ted R., Jr. GFH Yount, Gary W. $opm Zalkovsty, Charles R. Sopm Zelazny, Richard D. $opm Zeldin, Basha L. Fr Zellers, Sandra K. wr Zgabay, Pat 60pm Ziebarth, Randy J. Fr Zimmerman, Zandra Fn Zinninger, Georganne OH Plano Houston Archer City Westfield, NJ. Denton Grand Prairie Sanger H enderson Beaumont Dallas Justin H ong K ong N acona Garland Dallas Houston Denton Ashdown, Ark. M uenster Richardson Euless El Paso Crowley Austin Tyler Dallas Denton Dallas Dallas El Paso Fort Worth F loydada Pampa Houston Bloomfield, Ky. ohn Stone James Deming Senior, Texarkana, Tex. unior, Houston Class Presidents Mike Berkley Gary Flemmons Sophomore, Dallas Freshman, Irving 'ch WMAW. gks,? NationaOOOOOQOOQOOOOOISS YuccaOOOOQOQOOOOOOOOOZOO National WHOtS WHO Thirty-eight students will join an elite group of students chosen to appear in the 1969-70 edition of ttWhots Who Among Students in American Universities and Col- legesF Each year North Texas students are selected from more than 1,000 colleges and universities in all 50 states. Presidents of student organiza- tion, faculty members, USNT Sen- ate and former Whots Who mem- bers nominate the students. A joint committee of faculty members makes the final selection. The nominees are rated accord- ing to their outstanding scholastic achievements, service and leader- ship qualities. LINDA CAROL MILLER, a senior from San Antonio majoring in music and mathematics, is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, Alpha Chi, Pi Kappa Lambda, Kappa Mu Epsilon, NTSU Symphony Orchestra, NTSU Marching and Concert Band, and various Chamber ensembles. She has also held the office of treasurer in Mu Phi Epsilon. LYNN KOOKER, is a senior ele- mentary education major from Den- ton. She is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, Student Education Association, Association for Child- hood Education, Psi Chi, Kappa Delta Pi, Delta Zeta, and Mortar Board. She also has been named the Outstanding Student in Ele- mentary Education. THELMA SUE HENLEY, a senior mathematics major from Nocona, is a member of Delta Psi Kappa, Womenis Recreation Association, Alpha Chi, Women,s Professional Club, Student Education Association, MOrtar Board, and Kappa Delta Pi. She is also vice-president of Senior Mary Arden and treasurer of Alpha Lambda Delta. MARK MEDCALF MILLER, a senior secondary education major from Denton, is the president of Gamma Theta Upsilon, first vice-president of Alpha Phi Omega, and a voting member of the Student Activities Committee. He has served as vice-president of Gamma Theta Upsilon and Chaplin of Alpha Phi Omega. DIANNE STARR, a senior elementary education major from Jacksboro, is a member of the Junior Mary Arden Club, the Woments Recreation Association and Alpha Lambda Delta. She has served as sergeant-at-arms of Kappa Delta, vice-president and pledge trainer of Green Jackets, president of Kappa Delta Pi, secretary of Senior Mary Arden, and membership chairman of the Association for Childhood Education. She is a member of Mortar Board, the Supreme Court J ustice of the USNT, and a junior senator. JAMES W. BAIRD, a senior biology major from Roswell, New Mexico, is a member of Talons, Beta Beta Beta, Alpha Chi, Blue Key Club and the American Institute of Biological Sciences. He is the scholarship chairman for Lambda Chi Alpha. KATHRYN HALEY, a senior biology major from Waxahachie, is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, Alpha Chi, Delta Sigma Theta, and Mortar Board, She is also treasurer of J unior Mary Arden and secretary of Beta Beta Beta. PAT McLAUGHLIN, a senior political science major from Garland, is a member of the Inter-fraternity Council and president of the student body. He has been president of the sophomore class, freshman senator and parliamen- tarian and president of Lamba Chi Alpha. DIANA MARSHALL, a senior speech major from Odessa, is a member of Pi Kappa Delta, Alpha Chi, Young Re- publicans and the Varsity Debate Club Traveling Squad. Miss Marshall, president of Mortar Board, was selected the Outstanding Student in Public Address and has received forensic honors in various competition. E. CLAYTON TEAGUE, a doc- toral physics graduate from Bow- don, Georgia, is the president of the Society of Physics. He was named to the 1969 Yucca ths Who and is a member of Sigma Pi Sigma Physics honor society. CARLA BRICE, graduate student in secondary education from Sul- phur Springs, belongs to the Stu- dent Education Association, Young Democrats, Kappa Delta Pi and Sigma Delta Pi. She has served as treasurer of Zeta Tau Alpha, cor- responding secretary of Green J ack- ets, and secretary of Alpha Lamba Delta. DAVID L. PETRASH, a senior or- gan major from Baytown, is a mem- ber of the American Guild of Or- ganists. He has been treasurer and president of the NTSU Guild Stu- dent Group, and secretary of the Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. He has been named Phi Mu Alpha Sin- fonia Outstanding Freshman Male Music Major, 1968-69 Yucca Who,s Who in Keyboard Music, and 1967-68 Pi Kappa Lambda Out- standing Sophomore Male Music Major. MARILYN J UNE RIETZ, a senior music major from San Antonio, is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, Alpha Chi, Mortar Board, chamber music, Pi Kappa Lambda, Young Republicans, Baptist Student Cen- ter, Collegium Musicum and the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra. She is Sigma Alpha Iota program chairman and principal cellist and secretary of the University Sym- phony. She was given the Pi Kap- pa Lambda Freshman, Sophomore and J unior Award, Sigma Alpha Iota Freshman Achievement Award, Sophomore Honor Guard, Theodore Presser Scholarship Award, Mar- jorie Fulton String Award, Mortar Board Outstanding Woman in the School of Music and the NTSU Alumni Outstanding Junior Stu- dent Award. GENE PHILLEY, a senior piano major from Oklahoma City, Okla- homa, has been named the Out- standing J unior and Senior Male Music Major, the Outstanding Music Male Major, winner of the Theodore Presser Foundation Award, and' the Amarillo National Artist Award Competition. J OE FRANK TAYLOR, a junior history major from Mesquite, is a member of the Young Democrats. He is parlia- mentarian of Talons and has served as reporter of Phi Eta Sigma. He has also served on the Associate Supreme Court of J ustice 0f the USNT. TOM LOWE, a junior biology major from Snyder, is a member of the Young Democrats, Model UN Club, University Space Planning and Building Use Committee and the USNT Planning Board. He is NTSU co-ordinator of the Na- tional Student Association. Mr. Lowe has been freshman senator, sophomore class president, interim senator and chairman of the Presidents Committee. He is a National Science Foundation Scholar and a 1970-71 Scholar t0 Eng- land. ED GARCIA is a senior double-bass major from Kingsville. He is the principal double-bassist with the NTSU Sym- phony Orchestra and a member of the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra. He has been selected to perform in the NTSU Honors Recital. He was also a finalist in the Midland-Odessa National Young Artist Competition and a soloist with the Texas A811 University Civic Symphony. ERNEST EDWIN BECKHAM is a senior physics major from Dallas. He is a member of Iota Lambda Sigma and was chosen Outstanding Physics Major in 1968. JUDY DAVIS, a senior secondary education major from Waxahachie, is a member of Angel Flight, Young Demo- crats, Student Education Association and the Homecoming Planning Committee. She has been a sophomore senator and secretary of the USNT, secretary of the Student Activities Committee and president of the Green Jackets. SARAH FRANCES TAYLOR, a senior mathematics maj or from Bradford, Arkansas, is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha and the NAACP. She is the historian of Kappa Mu Epsilon and has served as chaplain of Green J ackets and a debator in the North Texas Forensic Club. Miss Taylor has received a letter in debate, was appointed to the Stu- dent Conduct and Disciplinary Board, and was selected as one of NTSUts two representatives to Texas A8zM,s Stu- dent Conference on International Affairs. LOU ANNE LANDERS, a senior Spanish major from Grand Prairie, is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, Student Education Association, Sigma Delta Pi, Mortar Board and Alpha Chi. She has been secretary-treasurer of the Tri- Service Club and summer missions chairman for the Baptist Student Union. MICKEY L. BURNIM, senior economics major from Teague, is a member of Talons, Inter-Fraternity Council, Young Democrats, West Dorm Association, Student Activities Committee, and the Student Disciplinary Appeals Committee. He is president of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, was president of the junior class, Vice-president of the USNT, and sophomore senator. Brunim also received Mortar Board,s Outstanding Man Award during both his sophomore and junior years. VAN ALLEN WHEELER, is a senior chemistry major from Levelland. He has been Sigma Phi Epsilorfs recording secretary and scholarship and athletic chairman, Talons president, senior senator, and the vice-chairman for the Greek Governmental Council. He is also a chemistry recitation and lab instructor and research assistant to the Welch Foundation Grant. DONALD C. PALERMO is a graduate student in college counseling and student personnel administration from Bryan. He is president of the graduate class, president and past treasurer of the North Texas Doctoral Club, secre- tary of the graduate student counsel, and is a member of the following: the Presidents Committee of USNT, the Freshman Orientation Committee, the Student Education Association, Gamma Theta Upsilon, and President Kamerickts Committee on Recreation and Leisure Activities. He was a member of the Government-Pre-Iaw Club and past sponsor for the International Club and the West Dorm Association. PEGGY PAYNE, a senior speech pathology and audiology major from Garland, is a member of Mortar Board, Alpha Chi, SEA, Alpha Lambda Delta. She has been treasurer of Sigma Alpha Eta, secretary of Junior Mary Arden and reporter-historian for Tri-Service. JACQUELINE ELAINE HILL, senior mathematics major from Houston, is a member of Kappa Mu Epsilon, Angel Flight, Green J ackets, Mortar Board, Alpha Chi, Young Democrats and the Afro-American Student Union. She is also vice-president and Panhellenic Council representative for Alpha Kappa Alpha. MARY BANKS, a graduate student in musicology from Grapevine, is a member of Mu Phi Epsilon, Pi Kappa Lambda, Mortar Board, Alpha Chi, Alpha Lambda Delta and the Music Educatorts National Conference. She has been named Outstanding Sophomore, J unior, and Senior Woman in the field of Music. She has received the Mu Phi Epsilon Den- ton Alumnae Chapter Award, the Mu Phi Epsilon Senior Sterling Achievement Award and the Mu Phi Epsilon Denton Chapter Triangle Award for Scholarship. ORVAL HALL, J R., a junior sociology-psvchology maior from Denton, is a member of Blue Key, Alpha Chi, Student Activities Committee and the Student Disciplinary Review Board. He is president and student adviser of Phi Eta Sigma, Outstanding sophomore man, Vice-president of the Baptist Student Union, president of the USNT Senate, and Vice-president 0f the student body. DOYLE D. SMITH, graduate student in speech and drama from Bedford, is a member of Phi Delta. Kappa, Phi Sigma Kappa, Alpha Psi Omega, the University Players, Texas Speech Association, Speech Association of America, National Teachers Association, and Texas J unior College Teachers Association. He has received the theatre technician award, and the Kourri Award for outstanding contribution to the department of speech and drama at Midwestern University. GARY MIZENER, a senior music major from El Paso, is a member of Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Chi, Pi Kappa Lambda, Baptist Student Union, the concert band, and the NTSU orchestra. JNO L. HUNT, a graduate student in musicology from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, graduated from NTSU in August of 1969. He was given the Outstanding Sinfonian Award and a teaching fellowship at NTSU. He is a member of Alpha Chi, the Blue Key Club, and Pi Kappa Lambda. He has also held the offices of parliamentarian and president in the Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. BENNIE M. LEETH, a graduate student in industrial arts, is from Hich. He is a member of Alpha Chi and has been treasurer of Blue Key, president of the Industrial Arts Club and secretary-treasurer 0f Iota Lambda Sigma. NANCY N. JONES is a graduate student in English. She is a member of the Home Economics Club, Alpha Chi, Sigma Tau Delta, Kappa Delta Pi and the Linguistic Circle. ALLISON SLOAN, a graduate student in physical education from Fort Worth, is president of Delta Psi Kappa and sponsor of the Tap Dance Club. She was Yucca Whots Who in physical education in 1969 and the Outstanding J unior Physical Education Major in 1968. KATHY IVERS, a senior business administration major from Fort Worth, is a member of the Market- ing Club, Alpha Lambda Delta, and the freshmen orientation commit- tee. Miss Ivers has served as presi- dent of Alpha Chi, Vice-president of Beta Gamma Sigma, reporting secretary of Mortar Board, Iris cor- respondent for Phi Chi Theta and first Vice-president 0f the Senior Mary Arden Club. She was ap- pointed to the Sophomore Honor Guard and given the Phi Chi Theta Key Award. KARLEEN ANN BARLOW, a senior English major from Pasadena elected as ths Who in journal- ism, is a member of Mortar Board. She is president of Theta Sigma Phi and vice-president of Sigma Tau Delta. Mrs. Barlow was se- lected the Outstanding Sophomore Reporter in journalism, appointed to the Sophomore Honor Guard, and served as Campus Chat news Editor. Yucca Whohs Who Students were chosen in Novem- ber to receive the Yucca Who,s Who Award for 1970. Selections are made on the basis of outstanding work in their major fields of study. Academic achieve- ment as well as extra-curricular activities are considered When mak- ing the choice. Various departmental and divi- sion heads or appointed committees make the selection. The honorees usually have a senior or graduate standing. The Yucca Staff presents this annual local honor. CDT. LT. COLONEL ROBERT MORRISON Aerospace Studies J AMES NANCE Sociology and Anthropology DIANN HARMS I nsurance KARLEEN BARLOW E nglish LINDA BUTTRILL Secretarial Administration J O MURCHISON Mathematics TUCKER JOLLY, Instrumental Music CAROL TAYLOR Secondary Educatlon . . LY N N K O OKER E lementary E ducation JEWEL MANZAY Speech Pathology DONALD SWATLOSKI M anagement J AN PEAVY M usic E ducation J ENNY TUNNELL NANETTE LACAVERA Library Service Physical Education MARK MILLER BARBARA NIEMEIER Geography Accounting GLORIA GONZALEZ Spanish TERRY REDMAN PHILLEY Physical E ducation NANCY KEMPLIN Journalism WESLEY THOMPSON Biology SARA GRESHAM Business Education DEAN PARKS Lab Band DAVID KENDALL Finance SHINYA OKAMOTO Art J OHN HOFFMAN History DALE CLETCHER Government CAROL MAYO Vocal M usic n i :mmumma '3 5 QxFEiESinia . if K$KSQN14$ , mun ROBERT FERGUSON Physics THELNITA FINCHER ; T DIANA MARSHALL Home Economics . L - ; v j: . ' , Public Addresw Communication CHERYL BUCHANAN French MICHAEL DREWS MICKEY BURNIM Chemistry E conomics RICHARD ZEPEDA I ndustrial Arts KATHY WOODBY Radio-Television BEAUTIES semi-FinaliStS o o o o o o o 210 FinaliStSOOOOOOOOOOOOZII Semi-Finalists Seated: a to U Martha Jones, Newman Club; Linda Robertson, Delta Zeta; Pam Plexco, Maple Street Hall; Joyce Eaton, West Dorm Association; Standing: Lynn Nichols, Alpha Phi; Cynthia Dorsey, Alpha Kappa Alpha; Jan Trahan, Phi Mu Alpha; Becky James, M u Phi Epsilon; Janice Bain, Sigma Alpha Iota; Earnye Wyles, Delta Sigma Theta; Shelline Shelton, Kerr Hall; not pictured, Janice Craze, Zeta Tau Alpha. g E x 0 1n Kerr Hall t S O C n e r a K acqueline Evans Oak Street Hall Linda Hilson Sigma Nu 111 O irley Lumpk Street Hall Maple h S Jacquelyn Mauldin South Bruce Hall m a n O D C M Y h t a K Zeta Tau Alpha licia Merchant Chi Omega ally Miller Alpha Delta Pi Debbie Neal Kerr Hall 1mm mm 3 dun mm Rn I ty 1 Kim Smith F encing Club Honor Professors Honor Professors Named by Committee Express Views on Students and University This year, nine outstanding professors at North Texas are being honored for their serv- ice to the university in a new section of the Yucca. In this section, each of the honor professors has been given an opportunity to express his Views on one of two subjects-the col- lege student of 1970 or the role of the university. The comments which were re- ceived appear in the Yucca uncut and un- edited. The USNT Senate passed a bill on Oct. 5 recommending that outsanding faculty mem- bers selected by a student committee be featured in the 1970 Yucca. iiFor several years? commented Senate President Orval Hall, Jr., iioutstanding stu- dents had been honored in the yearbooks for national and Yucca Whois Who Awards. We felt that outstanding faculty members should be given similar creditW The committee, composed of representa- tives from the USNT Senate, Green J ackets, Talons, Blue Key, Tri-Service, Alpha Phi Omega, Panhellenic Council, Mortar Board and one candidate at large, named the fol- lowing nine faculty members as honor pro- fessors. Dr. James L. Baird, assistant professor of English, is a USNT Senate sponsor. He was Chosen for his attention to students and Honor Professor David R. Fitch was chairman of the all-campus blood drive held in the fall. student affairs, his support of the FACE project and his relationships between NT and the community. Dr. Don E. Beck, assistant professor of speech and drama, is also a senate sponsor. He began FORUM! and helped to originate the Faculty Senate. Dr. Imogene Dickey, former Dean of Women, is now a professor of English. She was chosen for her work in bringing Meritum on campus. Dr. David R. Fitch, chairman of the division of finance and insurance, was chairman of the A11 Campus Blood Drive. He has also been a speaker for numerous clubs on campus. Dr. Lee G. Knox, assistant professor of geography, was honored for his work as co- ordinator of homecoming activities. Dr. Charldean Newell, assistant professor of government, is a sponsor of Mortar Board, Tri-Service and the Government Club. Dr. B. G. Nunley, assistant professor of mathematics, was cited by the committee for his attention to students and student affairs. Miss Rita Pilkey, assistant professor of health, physical education and recreation, is Green Jackets sponsor and a Faculty Senate representative. Grant B. Williams, assistant professor of music, is a sponsor of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and director of the Chapel Choir. Dr. James Baird, assistant professor of English, makes Students Search a point in a lecture to one of his classes tabove ler. Later, he carries on an animated conversation with a For Better Life visitor to his office taboue righU. The need for instruction, for re- search, and for scholarship in the humanities has been explained by such men as Cardinal Newman, W. E. B. Dubois, and John Milton, who are much better thinkers and writers than I. If anyone in the academic community does not un- derstand the importance of these pursuits, I urge him to read the works of these men and others whose scholarly reputations are well established. But it remains for me to explain why I have taken time away from those normal activities of a univer- sity professor in the humanities to become involved in student affairs and to become concerned With stu- dent problems. I think that if what is learned in the classroom does not help the student to live better and happier, the instructor has no busi- ness teaching it. A teacher should always be ready to show how knowledge should mean something to a living person. Furthermore, I am interested in studentst ideas and problems not just because they are students, but because they are people. Talking with, working with, and living With other people, helping them With their lives, is, in my judgment, What any intelligent person would want to do, whether he was in the academic community or not. I have the incredible good luck not only to Dr. James Baird, pauses in the hall of the Language be able to do these things every Building to talk with another faculty member. Dr. Baird day, but to be paid for it. What is one of the sponsors of the student senate. more could anyone ask for in his whole life? College Student of 1970 Will Present New Challenge and Responsibility Although it may seem paradoxial, I sense that the college student of 1970 is both more and less difficult to communicate with in the world of academia. On one hand, he is, in McLuhanese, more sense-oriented, aware of being under-30, intolerant of irrelevance, and impatient with yellowed notes, boring lec- tures, and itivory towerti dwellers who only talk a good social progress game. The arti- ficiality of academic life seems bound up with irrationality and boredom, scholarly nomen- clature, industrial job-preparation, status- bound professionalism, judgmental grades, unexamined requirements, and deadly mem- orization. His age makes the present more important than the past; his concerns make the present more important than the future. Yet, most of education tells dead menis tales and raises future man,s hopes. But he is now. Now is the ghetto, Vietnam, the moon, Chicago, existential moments, and iiMidnight Cowboy? On the other hand, he is more open, au- thentic, creative, human, concerned, value conscious, individualistic, and appreciative. He responds to innovations, is open to new insights, tolerates differences, and genuinely seeks an answer to the question, itIs that all there is? This strange combination of ying and yang presents a college professor With both a challenge and a responsibility. The challenge is to devise new ways of transfering informa- tion and attitudes, new techniques of relat- ing to students both individually and col- lectively, and fresh commitments to what it really means to teach. The responsibility is to attempt to answer questions that stu- dents are asking, to develop and learn to live with temporary systems, and, in rather simplistic terms, to "give a damn? Dr. Don Beck, USNT Senate sponsor and originator of FORUMI, pauses in the Speech and Drama Building Uer. At right, he takes time to catch up on the news. Today, the student Moonwalks, moratoriums, mini, maxi Beads, beards, brotherhood Rebellion, reflection Love Peace Why? Why not? Inspiration Knowing, studying, learning, criticizing. Admiration Kindness, concern, idealism, impatience. Aspiration. Dream. Tomorrow, the establishment War was. Peace and love are. Beauty is. I mogene B. Dickey Dr. I mogene Dickey, former Dean of Women, grades papers in her office in the Language Building. Todayis Students Seem Concerned The college student of today has been characterized as being the bright- est, the most concerned, the most active; to being the most rebellious, the most militant, the most disturb- ing to the general public or any col- lege generation. Students can be found Who verify each of the views, but none of the Views can be sub- stantiated in general terms. A more objective view is that most students today go to class, prepare their work, are concerned about their fellows, their school, their family, their com- munity, their country, their world. Given the full attention of their teachers, they can become in the four years they work in college What all of us would have them become. It is this concern, this effort, this under- standing on the part of the faculty that is the primary role of the Univer- sity. This is, in fact, the true measure of the success of the University. Dr. Dickey, who was honored for her work with Meritum, searches for a book in her library. Improvement Seen In World of the 1970ls I have always been a cock-eyed optimist, a believer that each generation of man will be an improvement over the one before, that the new generation will be able to find solu- tions to the problems of the day, and that the world of the 1970s will be a better place to live than that of earlier decades. The idea that there were some halcyon Good Old Days in the past is a myth. In the days of the nickle beer and good five-cent cigar, a man made a buck a day after ten hours of hard work. The Good New Days lie ahead if we have the vision to recognize them as good days, the stamina to keep searching for ways to make the tilmpossible Dreamii become a reality, and the emotional stability to keep our ttcoolfi This faith in the future is confirmed, at least for me, by the observation that the typical college student of today is far better educated than his parents were during their college days. Incidently, the Old Man really didnt walk seven miles to school through the snow as he now states. He probably ginned around in a Model ttAt, Ford, complete with fox-tail tied to the radiator cap, and took part in dance fads that would make pres- ent collegiate dancing 100k Mid-Victorian. Chances are that Dad was a swinger. Also, by and large, the 1970 university students are more concerned about the many problems facing our society than their parents were back in their own school days eoften referred to as "Neanderthal Daysit by the younger generation. The parents were equally idealistic but more prone to say ttyou canit fight City Hall? The new breed feels that he personally can contribute to a better world and is willing to challenge City Hall, General Bullmoose, or the University to rectify a wrong, bring a religious, social, educational, or governmental institution into the Twentieth Century, or focus attention on a glaring un- solved economic, social, or environmental problem. Let us hope that this youthful ideal- ism and enthusiasm is tempered with good judgement and a respect for democratic processes. Over the past ten years at North Texas, it has been my privilege and pleasure to have more than my share of outstanding students. The number of real student leaders seems to be increasing each year. I see more positive leadership from the officers of student govern- ment, of professional organizations, and of service groups. With the increase in the aver- age age of the student body each year, a product of decreased underclass and increased upperclass and graduate enrollment, I foresee more involvement in serious causes and proj- ects. The students, the University, and our society will benefit. Dr. David Fitch, chairman of the division of finance and insurance, makes a telephone call from his 017ice tabovel then pauses before returning to work tbelowl. Students Arentt Sure What Society Expects Frustration would perhaps be the one word I would choose to classify the state of being of todayts stu- dent. I do not mean to imply that students do not have goals and objectives, but that students are not at all sure what society expects of them. They are constantly con- fronted with the 01d philosophy, tiDo as I say, not as I dofl Stu- dents are encouraged to think for themselves, to exercise initiative, to seek truth, to demand an educa- tion. At the same time if a student does these things he is often penal- ized by this society for not adhering to the totalitarian atmosphere of his environment. If a student attempts to think for himself, he is sure to run afoul of the guidelines imposed by an- other generation. So he must not exercise his thought processes, but rather adhere to the restrictions imposed on him. If a student does exercise initia- tive, he is criticized as a rebel or troublemaker. Students, I believe, want to know the truth. In most cases, students are honestly seeking the truth. At the same time the ac- tions of those they have been taught to respect seem to indicate that truth, after all, is unimportant. I believe very strongly that a university exists solely for students. The students needs must be Dr. B. G. Nunley, assistant professor of math- ematics, talks with a visitor and takes a telephone call. satisfied by the university. Stu- dents have a sacred right to de- mand an education from a univer- sity. Yet, if they exercise this right to demand an education, they are too often put down with remarks such as: itYou are not able to judge what constitutes an education? Despite the frustration of todayis students, I am convinced that the majority are good citizens capable of making contributions to the wel- fare of our universe. I have faith in today,s students. If we, as university people, do a good job with them, we will have better students tomorrow. Miss Rita Pilkey makes a point on a chart 0er and keeps a watchful eye on her dance class taboveL 70 Students Act On Their Dreams The college student of 1970 is really the same as the students of previous yearsethe same hopes, dreams, but with this exception. Today,s student has a little more desire, initiative, and courage to do something about these dreams and ideals. He is trying harder to change that Which he thinks should be changed. With the increase in re- sponsibility for his actions, and other signs of democracy in our university, the student will gradual- ly change to support those innova- tions that are good, rather than oppose those that are bad, recog- nizing that a positive program will be more fruitful than a negative one, even though both are in the right direction. Miss Pilkey, sponsor of the Green Jackets, poses with some members of the group at a fall meeting. Dr. Lee G. Knox, assistant profes- sor of geography. Dr. Lee Knox, one of nine honor professors named this year, studies a map of Texas with a student iabouei and in his office ibelowi. Student Body Is Unique at NT It was a most pleasant surprise to find that I had been selected as one of the outstanding professors at our University. Long ago when I first arrived at North Texas as an instructor, 3 pro- fessor I greatly admired made the statement ttif there were no stu- dents there would be no need for a faculty? This has had a great infiuence on me and has led to my close association with the student body. I have found that the students are truly the heart of the University and that the students at North Texas are truly unique in being both energetic and dynamic. They have made their university campus one of friendship and learning. It is a pleasure to work with such a group whether in classes, in com- mittees, or as individuals. As I consider my profession I often think that it is one of the few areas of employment where you are always associated with young people and I have never regretted entering the teaching profession. Dr. Charldean Newell, assistant professor of gov- ernment, works at her desk tabouei and returns papers to one of her government classes highly. Below, she takes time to catch up on her filing. Students Now Learn In Free Atmosphere The university of the 1970,s does not differ markedly in its primary functions from the university of past decades. The dissemination of bodies of knowledge and the development of critical facilities re- main paramount among the universityts functions. However, the student of the 1970s differs from the students of the 1950s and the 1960s in that he is both desirous of and capable of learning in a less restrictive atmosphere than that ap- propriate to the previous security-con- scious generations. The current college student differs also in that he believes one of the two princi- pal functions of the university, the de- velopment of critical facilities, takes prec- edence over the other. His emphasis on the enlargement of critical-analytical skills, together with his idealism, at times does him a disservice by causing him to overlook the importance of reasoning from facts, as well as intuition, emotion, or opinion, and t0 eschew the validity and utility of established institutional struc- tures, even when those organizations and policies could work to his advantage. Nevertheless, the ability of todayts stu- dent to evaluate existing university and social practices and his humanistic out- look may well be the key factors in pro- moting innovations necessary to solving critical socio-economic-political problems of the 1970s and 1980s Certainly, this outlook and ability have prompted needed reforms in his current environment, the henna .vwwlww,g a Grant B. Williams, assistant professor of music, finishes up some paper work in his office tabovei. Later, he rehearses the Chapel Choir trighti. Communication with Teachers Needed, Open-end Thinking Involves Risks The student of today wants counseling and he wants it regularly and on a continuing basis. To say that now you take this course, then you take that and then you finish with such and such, is obviously inadequate. Indi- vidual, reciprocal, open-eyed, open-minded in- volvement in creative thinking and communi- cation with a teacher is what a student wants. Of course, this kind of open-end communica- tion and thinking involves certain risks for both . . . something new might get started . . . change might be incited . . . new approaches might be given and taken and strong impact and impetus might be felt. After all, we are not impervious to our fellow human beings . even a hermit is vulnerable, or else why would he be a hermit? Some people get to be tihermits in the head? And strangely enough, these people are sometimes called iistudentsf, sometimes iiteachersfi Individual, reciprocal, open-end involvement in creative thought and communication is stimulating and exhilarating and far more conducive to the successful aging of mankind as opposed to untimely demiset than the blind, narrow-minded, non-involvement of cynicism, apathy or dull destructivity. De- structivity is based upon hatred and hatred is an offspring of fear. Fear takes time . we learn tare taughti to fear. Many of to- day,s students are experiencing a fear which is springing from the cumulative repercussions and frustrations that are resulting from un- creative thinking and unsuccessful communi- cation both world-wide and campus-wide. Let me continue a moment, directly to the student: I dontt know anybody thatts more important than a person . . . and especially to himself. There are no peripherally situated egos. From your Viewing point, you are the center of everything . . . the central point from which you may tor may noti be able to relate to or reckon with anything. Knowing this, if I fail as a teacher to really listen and gain in understanding by being aware of your perspective, then the best I can offer are routine ramblings and seriously weak at- tempts to advise, counsel and help you. The sharing, weighing and considering of per- spectives and values is one aspect of love that you and I and the world need now and alwaysi. The worlds needs are great, many and immediate. I can tell you that important among these needs is your perception and consciousness of what is, based upon keen, continuous tmoment t0 momenti awareness of what is happening inside your mind tknow yeurselD as well as what is happening around you. Only on an individual basis do I begin to know a persons wants or needs. The student of 1970 wants to be talked with, not to. I believe he is here to investigate and gain respect tif he doesntt have it alreadyt for his own creative potentialities and to have laid a foundation, hopefully, before gradua- tion, upon which to begin to learn about his chosen field. MEAN GREEN sports Break another tackle for five. Lead the fast break e drive under the basket for the score. Falter a step and be edged at the tape. The long putt hangs, then drops. We always try to win. Sometimes the best isrft good enough and we lose. Speed, coordination and power. Thafs the name of the game . . . HOMECOMING 1969 Festivities Parades, Bonfires and Victory! Perfection is the only way to describe the 1969 Homecoming. A week of pep rallies, parties, frantic preparations and parades culmi- nated in the coronation of the Homecoming Queen and a thorough blasting of Homecoming rival Wich- ita State. Only Wichitats Shockers were dissatisfied With the weeks outcome. ttFantasyIand,t was the theme of the 1969 Homecoming. Perhaps the most colorful sights were those pro- vided by the numerous dormitory and fraternity house decorations and the floats in the Saturday morning pre-game parade. The col- orful floats, representing the stu- dents own ideas on ttFantasyland" went under such titles as ttThe Original Mean Green Machineh and ttFlights of Fantasy? NT quarterback Steve Ramsey shakes The Original Mean Green Machine hands with Wichita captain before Home- and physics department mascot. RIGHT: Points on the Spirit Award were given to organizations bringing in the largest amounts of bonfire wood. Needless to say, the flame was visible for miles. BELOW: The pride winning Homecoming float by Kappa Delta and Lambda Chi Alpha, ttFlights of Fantasy? LEFT: Greeks spend long hours pro- ducing the materials to make up their elaborate floats. ABOVE: USN T President Pat McLaughlin crowns 1969 Homecoming Queen Leslie Langland. BELOW: Home- coming Queen runners-up Nicky Wilson 0er and Pam Matthews. Torchlight Parade Opens Weekend The Homecoming shifted into high gear Friday night with a torchlight parade to Fouts Field and ended With an inspired 47-0 defeat of Wichita Statets Shockers. The Talons led the torchlight march to the bonfire-pep rally. At the bonfire sit, USNT president Pat McLaughlin introduced the Homecoming Queen, Leslie Langland. While a crowd of 500 looked on, the new queen threw the first torch on the bonfire and min- utes later the 100 foot fiames were visible against the sky for miles around. After the bonfire, the crowd dispersed to either the Madrigal Singers and Lab Band concert in the Music Recital Hall or the Homecoming Dance in the Woments Gym. The dance featured the Texas Southern Uni- versity Toronados of Houston. Saturday morning broke bright and clear for perfect Homecoming weather in contrast to last yeafs mud and rain. tcontinuedt Eagles Shake Shockers, Win Homecoming Game Next came the Homecoming paradeea bright procession of bands, decorated cars, colorful floats, bicycles and college clowns. An Air Force ROTC color guard, a detachment of AFROTC cadets and the Angel Flight led the parade. Maple Street Hall won the award for best decorated dormitory with over 100 members. A wizard at the end of ttthe yellow brick roadtt surrounded by Dorothy wearing a NT sweat- shirt, the tin man, the lion, and the scarecrow carried out Maple,s Homecoming theme, ttThe Emerald City is Mean Green? a play on ttThe Wizard of Oz? A rainbow with the wicked witch of Wichita sailing by arched over Maplets porch to complete the theme. 17,300 fans cheered the Eagles on to a 47-0 blitz over Wichita,s Shockers. Steve Ramsey set two new NCAA passing records. Ramsey broke the national career passing completion and the total yardage marks. RIGHT: Cedric Hardman throws a Wichita runner for a loss. BELOW: Guard Glen Hollo- way MD and End Bob Helterbran t8U lead the blocking for Leo Taylor. Steve Ramsey 244 Football The Mean Green aerial machine observed the centennial year of college football by continuing its winning ways through the 1969 season. Coach Rod Rustts Eagles won seven of ten games, leaving numerous broken passing and receiving records in their wake. The Eagles set eight national records, broke 21 college records, tied six others and berthed six NT players on the honorable mention All-American football team. North Texas was 1969ts second most prolific passing team as the Eagles two principal Wide receivers, Barry Moore and Ronnie Shanklin, joined the list of the nationts top ten all-time pass catchers. Safety Bernie Barbour became the third leading national career punt returner while quarterback Steve Ramsey became the owner of career pass- ing, total offense and scoring records. In short, North Texas had everything but the Missouri Valley Conference cham- pionship. A crushing 15-13 defeat by Eagle nemesis, Memphis State, put an early end to North Texas,s hope of both an undefeated season and the conference championship. Although the seasonts three defeats ruined Coach Rust,s hopes of that elusive undefeated season with its accompanying bowl bid, the fans did not go home disap- pointed as the Eagles won every home game with their high scoring pro-type offense and ground grudging defense. The Tulsa runner is tough, but five Mean Green defenders bring him . . d , ' th d. SW Loulslana OWN" gen Eagles Win Opening Game The Eagles shifted into high gear with their first game against South- western Louisiana by overwhelming the outmanned Bulldogs 40-6. The first score of the game came in the second quarter on quarter- back Steve Ramsey,s 40-yard pass to flanker Ronnie Shanklin. The Ramsey - to - Shanklin combination proved so effective, Ramsey re- peated the act for two more touch- downs in the same quarter; then capped a final first half drive with a three yard scoring toss to tight end Bob Heltebran. Meanwhile, the North Texas de- fensive unit found the situation to its liking. The Eagles defense, led by end Cedric Hardman, repeated- ly crashed into the Southwestern backfield, dumping the Bulldog quarterback 11 times and limiting their opponents to minus 32 yards rushing. Ramsey threw a fifth TD pass in the fourth quarter before turning over the helm to backup quarter- back Joe Milton, but the damage was done. Ramsey had completed 35 of 52 pass attempts for 495 yards. Memphis St. Eagles Lose Big One to Tigers Memphis State put an early end to North Texas,s hopes for an undefeated season, grounding the Eagles 15-13 in their second game. North Texas started the scoring on its sec- ond possession With a 76-yard fourth and seven fake pass-punt play bringing the ball to the Tiger ten. Four plays later, Ramsey threw a two-yard scoring strike to Ronnie Shanklin. Memphis found its running game in the second half and promptly used eight consecu- tive ground plays to set up a final 21-yard scoring pass. The PAT failed, tying the score 6-6. TOP: Quarterback Steve Ramsey prepares to receive the snap from center Willie Parker. ABOVE: Coach Rust gives final instructions to Bernie Barbour on his point after attempt. LEFT: Leo Taylor finds the Louisville line crowded. The second Memphis score was gifted t0 the Tigers when Eagle fullback Jim Swords fumbled at the end of a 16-yard run, setting Memphis up on NTts 31. The Tigers last six yards, then threw a 37-yard TD pass. With 7:15 remaining, Ramsey engineered a final touchdown drive for the Eagles, which culminated in halfback Leo Taylor driving into the end zone. Bernie Barbour kicked the point after to pull the Eagles ahead 13-12. Memphis retaliated on its next possession. With the aid of several key plays and a pass interference call, the Tigers drove into posi- tion to kick a winning 36-yard field goal. Head Coach Rod Rust looks on as his Eagles ramble over Southwestern Louisi- ana. Flanker Ronnie Shanklin is almost home free, but a Wichit a defender makes desperate shoestring tackle. Drake Bulldogs Edge NT End Mike Cavender beats his defender for reception. A Viral strain of the Memphis blues followed the Eagles to Iowa for their confrontation with the Drake Bull- dogs. The Eagles became painfully aware that Des Moines was no place to be under the weather as an inspired Drake squad outhustled and outscored the Texas invaders 27-23. The Eagles, apparently still Hat from their loss the previous week to Memphis State, appeared just to go through the motions. Still, even an average performance would normally have been enough for a win over Drake in the seesaw battle. But the Eagles were their own worst enemy. The Bulldogs easily stopped NTis weak running attack, then capi- talized on six intercepted passes and an Eagle fumble to emerge with the victory. Weber St. Eagles Find Running Room North Texas discovered its long lost running game against Weber State and, with the aid of a tough defense, trounced the Wildcats 35-13. Eagle fullback J im Swords and halfback Roy Myers teamed up to produce 285 yards running and two touchdowns while the Eagle defense bottled up the Wildcats in their own end of the field, setting up Ramsey,s two short TD passes to tight end Bob Helterbran. The defense added a score of its own when end Cedric Hard- man recovered a Weber State fumble in the end zone. Linebacker Steve Atchley grimaves as Wichita makes a, first down. WATCH THE FAKE. Quarterback Steve Ramsey can kick, but sometimes gambles on fourth and desperation. RIGHT: Glenn. Tucker recovers a fumble. New Mexico NT Wins 30- 12 In their fifth game of the season the Eagles recovered from a 12-7 halftime deficit to overcome New Mexico State 30-12 in a second half rally. The game was closer than the score would indicate. Five Aggie fumbles resulted in two Mean Green TDts and a Bernie Barbour field goal. Both teams were ham- pered with costly penalties totaling 243 yards for both sides. Three of the Eagle touchdowns came on Ramsey passes, one to full- back J im Swords and two to half- back Leo Taylor. The final NT TD was a one-yard dive play by full- back Bob Wyatt. ABOVE: Flanker and running back Roy Myers runs into trouble against Wichita. A Weber State runner hnds trouble all RIGHT: Glenn Tucker 062 puts the around him. wraps on a Louisville player. 250 Loulsv1lle Halfback Leo Taylor fumbles against Wichita, but nothing could help the Shockers. North Texas won 47-0. Eagles Thrash Cards The Eagles defeated Louisville 31-13, but it took three quarters of concerted effort to wear down the under-rated Cardinals. The Eagle defense emerged as the real winner in the confrontation. Louisville came to Eagle country possessing the top running game of the MVC. The Mean Green line first contained the Cardinal rushing attack, then picked off two inter- ceptions when Louisville was forced to throw. Leonard Dunlap ran one of the interceptions back 54 yards for a TD, his second on an interecption in the season. Bernie Barbour made the other intercep- tion, then added injury to insult by kick- ing a field goal four plays later. NTts running game picked up on its own. Running backs J im Swords and Leo Taylor kept the Louisville defense honest While Ramsey riddled the Cardinal sec- ondary with pin point passing. Taylor scored twice, once on a 1-yard plunge and again on a 26-yard end sweep. Flanker Ronnie Shanklin rounded out the scoring with an unbelievable snare Of a 6-yard Roy Myer blasts through the Shocker line for good Ramsey pass. yardage. Barbourts Goal Trims Bearcats When a team is trailing 30-7 at the half, ifs easy to give up. At halftime in Cincinnati, thatts the way it stood. North Texas went to the dressing room at the end of the first half trailing Cincinnati by 23 points. But character will make itself felt. The Eagles did not fold. In the rain and mud, quarterback Steve Ramsey passed for two touchdowns, including a record 91-yarder t0 Ronnie Shanklin. Then Ramsey sneaked over for the third TD in the third quarter to cut the Bearcat lead to 30-28. But in the end, it was Bernie Barbour who saved NT from a humiliating defeat. With the rain coming down and 1:25 remaining, Barbour booted a pressure packed field goal through the uprights for the win. ABOVE: Coach Rust takes time out during a practice session to ponder game problems. LEFT: Linebacker Steve Atchley puts the grab 0n the ball carrier. Eagles Bury Wichita, Ramsey Sets Records North Texas easily wrote off mistake-prone Wichita State, burying the hapless Shockers under an avalanche of passes 47-0. In the process, quarterback Steve Ramsey established himself as the most prolific passer in college history, setting two NCAA records and extending one he already owned. Ramsey wasntt the only Eagle to be red hot against Wichita. The Eagles defense, led by middle linebacker Richard Gill, pounded the Shockers for four interceptions and five recovered fumbles. When the Eagles couldntt score conventionally, Coach Rust relied on left footed place kicker Bernie Barbour to kick field goals of 26, 30, and 37 yards. Eagle reserves completed the rout. Fullback Dave Woods ran in from the 9-yard line and backup quarterback Dave J ones became the games leading rusher With a single carry, an 80-yard touchdown run. Tulsa uShank the Flankh, Ronnie Shanklin gets a step and a TD against a slower defender. BELOW: ' Fullb k J' Swords h fl ld d a ain t Hurrlcanes Downed 42.16 Webechmtgn as a e ay g s g m The Eagles reached their maxi- mum potential against unfortunate Tulsa, calming the Hurricanes 42- 16. Defensive end Cedric Hardman led the Eagle charge and personally accounted for nine tackles, three assists, a pass interception good for a touchdown, and otherwise forced the Tulsa quarterback into con- stant flight. Ronnie Shanklin was as brilliant on offense as Hardman was on de- fense. The shifty wide receiver turned in his finest game of the season, catching eight passes for 118 yards and three touchdowns. Split end Barry Moore was right behind Shanklin, picking up four receptions for 90 yards and one TD. Roy Myers Q40 gets running room around left end Is confronted by a linebacker via Steve Sullivants UN devestating block . . . gr, Versatile Bernie Barbour, place kicker, safety, San Diego and linebacker puts one up against Tulsa. Joe Miltonisholding. Eagles Lose t0 Aztecs 42.24 The Mean Green was officially desig- nated as the nations second best passing team in the seasonts final game as the nations number one passing team, San Diego State, bombed the Eagles, 42-24. The first half looked like a Texan stam- pede as the aggressive Eagles snatched four interceptions from the Aztec quar- terback. The NT offense took advantage of the steals and, with the aid of two crucial fourth down gambles, built up what appeared to be an insurmountable 24-7 lead. Linebacker Lyndon Fox was personally responsible for two of the in- terceptions. But the teams seemed to switch roles in the second half. Quarterback Steve Ramsey suffered three interceptions in his first four attempts. To add to the humiliation, San Diego added two more swipes in the half as well as recovering a fumble and an onside kick. The Eagles will have another oppor- tunity to play the Aztecs. The San Diego team will be NTts first opponent of the 1970 season. Bounces off the tackle . . . And scores standing up-Touchdown! Dependable tight end Bob Helterbran catqhes one Of his two touchdowns Fullback Jim Swords follows good agamst Weber State. blocking against Louisville. North Texas Eagles 1969 A 7-3 season and second place finish in the MVC would be an enviable record for almost any football coach, but for Rod Rust, it was his . least successful season since assuming the head FOOtball scoreboard coaching position at North Texas. Rustls two previous seasons were 7-1-1, 8-2-0, and now 7-3-0. His three year record stands at 22 wins, 6 losses 13 Memphis State and a tie. Thatls a won-lost percentage that will stand with the nationls best. 23 Drake If the Centennial year of: college football wasnt the year of the undefeated season and bowl bid 35 Weber State for the Eagles, it was a bumper year for breaking 30 New Mexico State records. Quarterback Steve Ramsey personally set 7 NCAA records in 1969. He combined with 31 LOUiSUille flanker Ronnie Shanklin for an 8th record and already owned another game record, number 9, from the 168 season. 47 Wichita State And how does this sound for two wide receivers on one team? Ronnie Shanklin had 144 catches 42 TUZSG for 2,465 yards and 31 TDs. Barry Moore picked up 140 catches for 2,183 yards and 12 TDs. Both career totals are in the top ten all-time pass catching lists. Coach Rust loses eleven of his starters through graduation, but speaking of 1970, Coach Rust says, 7Itlll be different, to say the least, not having these great seniors around. But we will be looking forward to the challenge . . .7 40 SW Louisiana 31 Cincinnati 42 San Diego State FRONT ROW: David Jones, Carl Hayes, Ed McDonald, Jimmy Franklin, Cedric Hardman, Richard Gill, Bernie Barbour, Ret Little, Perry Pruett, Clarence Jackson, Bob Wyatt, Fred Woods. SECOND ROW: Mike Roberson, Roman Ramirez, Mike Marr, Bob Helterbran, Wilmer Levels, Mark Quinlan, Wes Ballou, Garry Yancy, John Pysznyski, George Bray. THIRD ROW: Mike Briscoe, Bob Tricks, Lennie Givens, John Edwards, Lyndon Fox, Mike Sturm, Chuck Mills, Glen Holloway, Steve Atchley, Jim Moffitt, Roy Myers. FOURTH ROW: J. D. Roberson, Glynn Hachtel, Joe Allen, Louis Roche, Mike Cavender, Glenn Tucker, Steve McCoy, Joe Milton, Carl Hayes. FIFTH ROW: Tom Gipson, Steve Sullivan, Barry Moore, Calvin Hinderman, Ronnie Shanklin, Leonard Dunlap, Steve Ramsey, Jim Sword, Jim Brews ter, Willie Parker. BOTTOM ROW: Vic Williams, running backs coach; Rod Rust, head coach; Corky Nelson, defensive linemen coach; STANDING: Fred McCain, offensive backs coach; Boy Way, oifensive linemen coach; Gary Ness, freshman coach; Bill Brashier, defensive backs coach. Coaches Build Enviable Record A tipoff to Rod Rustis coaching philosophy can be found in his annual speech to his players. iiThis is your football team? the players are told. wWe coaches just want to be a part of it, help as much as we can and have fun doing it? To Rust, a large part of the iifuni, in com- petitive sports is Winning and, whatever Rustis formula, he and his North Texas players and staE have their share of Winning. Former defensive line coach Herb Ferrill moved to full time duties as golf coach in 1969. Two new coaches filled the vacancy. Corky Nelson took over as defensive lineman coach and former North Texas rushing star Vic Williams joined the staff as a graduate assistant. Williams was the leading rusher on Rustis first North Texas team in 1967 with a 7-1-1 record. Other assistants include Bill Brashier Who is in his second year at NT as defensive back coach. Offensive backs and receiver coach Fred McCain is in his 20th year on the staE. 30b Way, Offenswe hnemen coaCh: ls "1 hls FRESHMAN STAFF: Roman Ramirez, Alan Heydman, Ted Posipisil, Don Sixth year on the staff, and freshman coach B ar d ell Gary Ness has been on the staff three years. ' 259 Six Eagles Picked for All-MVC TOP LEFT: Barry Moore, split end and a top NT re- . . ceiver in ,69. ABOVE: Bernie Barbour, punt return and SIX Honorable Ment10n All-Amencans place kick specialist. BELOW: Defensive end Cedric Hardman. Graduation Will take a heavy toll on North Texas. The six Eagle team mem- bers named to the All-Missouri Valley Conference squad, and coincidentally, the honorable mention All-American squad are all seniors. Coach Rod Rust will be hard pressed to find replacements as capable as the players he is losing to graduation. Several of the All-MVC Eagles were chosen to participate in the post season games. Quarterback Steve Ramsey ap- peared in the East-West Shrine game and the Hula Bowl. Offensive guard Glen Holloway was also in the East-West Shrine game. Flanker Ronnie Shanklin and defensive end Cedric Hardman played in the Senior Bowl. All-Conference split end Barry Moore became one of the nations top ten all-time pass receivers, and safety Bernie Barbour retired from college football as the third ranking punt specialist of all time. OTHER TEAM SELECTIONS second team Mike Marr60ffensive Guard Willie Parker6Center Richard Gi116Line Backer Steve Atchley6Line Backer Lyndon F0X6Defensive Sophomore of 1969 Honorable mention Bob Helterbran6-Tight End Glynn Tucker6Defensive Tackle J im Brewster6Offensive Tackle J immy Franklin-Defensive Tackle Chuck Mills6Line Backer Leo Taylor-Halfback J im Swords-Fullback Leonard Dunlap6Defensive Back RIGHT: Offensive guard Glen Holloway, 6-3, 245, a pre-season Playboy All-American. BELOW: Flanker Ronnie Shanklin, a 6-2, 177 pound speed merchant and the conferencek leading pass catcher. BOTTOM RIGHT: Quarterback Steve Ramsey, 6-2, 207. Ram- sey was also All-MVC in 1967 and holds 8 NCAA records. TOP: Tackle Johnny Mathison U47 brings down a Navarro runner. BELOW: End Kirk Strittmatter picks up extra yard- age against Navarro. Freshmen Eaglets Suffer Winless Season The five game season of the North Texas Eaglets proved to be a long and difficult one. The Eaglets looked less than impressive as strong opponents, injuries and a weak bench teamed up to limit the Eaglets to a dreary 0-5 season. The freshmen lost their opening game to Navarro J C 7-6. A tie was Virtually assured when the Eaglets scored in the third quarter, but a fumbled center caused the PAT to go wide. The TCU Wogs never let NT into the ball game. The Wogs scored 27 points in the first half, then coasted to a 27-7 Win. In the next game the Eaglet quarter- back, J 0e Mashek, almost engineered a fourth quarter comeback against the Uni- versity of Houston, but the Kittens out- lasted the Eaglets 31-28. The Eaglets lost again to the Arkansas Shoats 28-6. Freshmen quarterbacks Tom- my Nelson and J 0e Mashek combined to hit on 25 of 38 passes in a losing effort. Losing was becoming monotonous by the Eaglefs final game with powerful Cisco J unior College. The Wranglers didntt make the situation any better, run- ning and passing over the outmanned Eaglets to the tune of 48-6. Even so, the season was not without its bright spots. Quarterbacks Joe Masjek and Tommy Nelson both showed them- selves to be capable field captains. End Kirk Strittmatter and halfback Shelton Perdarves consistently caught passes in heavy traffic while running backs J im Davis and Eddie Washington proved to be consistent ground gainers. ABOVE: Eaglet linemen close in on Wog runner. BELOW: Petty Hunter 6U and Kenneth O,Neill defend against Navarro pass attempt. RIGHT: Shel- ton Perdarves QD catches a pass against TCU. TEXAS STADIUM Eagles set for Move to New Facilities The beginning of the 1970 football season will see the mean and green Eagles preparing to move into Texas Stadium, the most elaborate football facility short of the Astrodome. The change represents a major gamble by North Texas in its striving for a place in the ranks of the major college football powers. The move to Texas Stadium was set into motion when Missouri Valley Conference Commissioner DeWitt Weaver proposed to the NTSU ex-letterments association that North Texas be the first college to play in the Cowboys new stadium in Irving. The proposal, made in August of ,69, came as a surprise to Athletic Director Jess Cearley and university administrators. The wisdom of moving a team which averages less than 10,000 attendance per game into the 65,000 seat Texas Stadium seemed expensive and de- batable, but negotiations with Cowboy and stadium officials were opened. The contract was finally sealed in November. North Texas agreed to play the first game in the stadium in 1971 tthe Green-White spring gamei and as many games as de- sired in the new facility for the next three years providing SMU is not playing in Dallas the same weekend. Originally, NT was scheduled to play Memphis State in the fall of 70, but construction difficulties caused a postponement. Although the move to Texas Stadium does represent a financial gamble, its purpose is financial gain. Sports News Director Fred Graham, in his appraisal of the "battle of the budgettl in intercollegiate athletics, noted that costs soar at such a rate that it is difficult to stay even, much less gain ground. The increased ex- penses, as explained by Dr. J ames Rogers, vice-president of administrative affairs, made it necessary for NT to look for additional funds. Gambling on Texas Stadium was one of the surest and most readily available methods of building a stronger and more financially stable ath- letic program for the university. University and Texas Stadium officials are banking heavily on the attraction of the facility itself. Once the ttcurioush and the 20,000 NTSU alumni of the Dallas- Fort Worth area become familiar with the Eagles, the hope is for an epidemic of ttMean Green Fever." Besides the excitement of college football, the stadium itself will be like no comparable structure in America. The stadium is partly covered to protect specators from inclement weather, has an artificial turf, direct freeway access, theatre seating, escalators and acres of parking facilities to accommodate the hoped for sell-out crowds. If all goes well and the new stadium attracts Big Eight and Southwest Conference opponents as expected, the Eagles could become one of the football powers of to- morrow. Cheerleaders Spirit Leaders Raise Funds For Road Trip Being a member of the varsity cheerleading team re- quires more than just showing up for an occasional game to shout a few patented slogans. Their job, win or lose, is promoting team and crowd spirit. It involves long prac- tice, some frequent foolhardy gymnastics, patience, a sacrifice of social and academic life and enthusiasm. Such enthusiasm sometimes requires doing more than is expected. When a low budget prevented the cheerlead- ing squad from accompanying the Eagles to San Diego for their game with the Aztecs, the pep squad began a campaign of its own to raise the necessary funds from Denton merchants. The result -e $1,300 was raised, and the cheerleaders accompanied the Eagle football team. CHEERLEADERS 1969-70: Carol Weniger, Robert Dane, Tom Barret, Kay Burgess, Frankie Change, Stewart Mc- Nairy, M arsha M ahler, Bob Quinn. J 0e H amilton 266 Basketball Coach Dan Spika found a familiar problem in his fifth year as head basketball coach at North Texas, a lack of height. To counter the weakness, the name of Spika,s game was speed. Teamwork, speed, a brutal defense tagged by fans as the "karate presstt and the support of fanatical fans helped the Eagles earn their best record in recent years. The Eagle fans filled the miniature Mens Gym to capacity for almost every game. The packed gym was known as the "snakepit" in the MVC circuit, and when Drake Coach Maury J ohn referred to the NT crowd as ttthe worst in the nationii after losing a double overtime game the crowd welcomed the tag and the slogan became the trade- mark of the 1969-70 season. The student supporters were overly enthusiastic at times, but opposing teams could find no lack of spirit at NT. None of the Eagle opponents left the noisy confines of the Mens Gym as a winner. The seasonis record could have been bettered. At one point, Spikais crew had four of five starters injured with three consecutive losses resulting. Even worse, the Eagles tallest starter was deemed ineligible for spring competition. In spite of these difficulties, the Eagles finished with a 18-8 overall record. The rec- ord included a 9-5 MVC tally, good for a third place finish in the conference and highest ever in the MVC for North Texas. NT Off To Slow Start A swift but rusty Eagle team opened its season with a three- game road trip. NT took on the Demons of Northwest Louisiana in its first game, dumping the stub- born Demons 96-90 behind the shooting of Herb Larkins and Joe Hamilton. Four other Eagles hit in double figures to stop a late Louisiana rally. The Eagles faced highly regarded Colorado State in their next game. The Rams proved their reputation was not to be taken lightly as they forced the Eagles in 31 turnovers and a 82-60 loss. J oe Hamilton hit several long jumpers in the first half to keep NT in the game, but lack of board strength and a second half cold streak brought about the defeat. The third game against Wyom- ingts Cowboys was almost a replay of the previous game. NT lead al- most the entire game, but went cold in the last 10 minutes of sec- ond half. The Cowboys took the advantage and played a flawless final quarter to beat the Eagles 94-82. Al Shumate MD and Ephriam Mc- Daniel t 55 T go over a Tulsa player for the rebound. The Ea les returned to the noisy con- fines of liens Gym for their first home Eagles RUb Out Undefeated Bearcats game with Stetson,s Hatters. Stetson won the opening tipoff but after that the out- Drop Game t0 Marquette classed Hatters were never really in the game. Al Shumate led Eagle scorers with 19 points including 7 of 7 field goals and 5 of 6 free throws. The Eagles forced 28 turnovers from the Hatters and led as much as 25 points before Coach Spika turned loose his bench in the second half. The Eagles traveled to Milwaukee for an engagement with the nationally ranked Marquette Warriors for their next tilt. Marquette demonstrated the advantages of superior height and strength to the Texas team. The Warriors controlled the boards and blasted the Mean Green 83-60 in what was to be the Eagles, worst defeat of the season. North Texas returned from its road trip with a hot hand and promptly used it to rub out previously undefeated Cincinnati 89-71. A tenacious full court press and a rabid pro-green crowd apparently rattled the Bearcats into 22 turnovers. J oe Hamil- ton and Crest Whitaker topped the scor- ing with 23 points each. The high scoring Arizona Wildcats were promptly squelched by the Mean Green 98-83. NT utilized a tough full court press and a blazing fast break to overwhelm the Wildcats. The taller, but slower, Arizona team fell behind in the first half and could never recover. The Eagle defense dampened the Wildcats top scorers while three Eagles hit over 20 points; Crest Whitaker with 29, J 0e Hamilton with 26 and A1 Shumate with 24. Nevada Southern met a similar fate, bow- ing to the Eagle press 98-91. The Southern team offered stiff competition, however, as the score at half time was deadlocked at 41-41. The lead changed hands several times in the second half before Eagle light- ning struck. Trailing by two points with three minutes remaining, the Eagles ran off 12 straight points in two minutes to stay ahead for good. An outmanned and outgunned Southern Colorado team fell to the Eagles 96-74 in a game which saw a multitude of mistakes on both sides. Center Mort Fraley domi- nated the game, virtually controlling the boards with 28 rebounds while dumping in 28 points. The score could easily have been astronomical were it not for the frequent turnovers by the usually sure-handed Eagle crew. Crest Whitaker followed Fraley in scoring with 25 points. Unfortunate Arkansas Tech was the victim of a school record scoring spree by the Eagles. Coach Spika emptied his bench but to little avail. The final score was 126 76 with four Eagles hitting in double fig Neil Adams Q42 misses a shot. Larry Tucker 621 tries for the rebound ures. but gets an elbow for his trouble. Tucker sank both of the resulting chari- 268 ty shots. Right: Al Shumate t40i tries for a rebound. Joe Hamilton, the Eaglest uCourt General" wears a quizzical expres- sion after being knocked down in a loose ball scramble. Whitaker is injured and a three game streak begins. Coach Spika is unhappy with the situation. RIGHT: Ephriam McDaniel appears to as- sist a Bradley player. INJURIES WRECK TEAM Eagles Slow Down North Texas met Memphis State in their next engagement. The Tigers proved to be one of the few weak powers in the con- ference and were easily dispatched by the Eagles, 86-77. Neil Adams had a sharp de- fensive night against Memphis, snaring nine rebounds and creating 11 Tiger tum- overs while being credited with several as- sists. After their Memphis victory, the Eagles traveled to Peoria for a game With the Bradley Braves. A six game winning streak and unsmudged valley record was prompt- ly broken by the Braves to the tune of 91- 86. The loss was costly to the Eagles. For- ward Neil Adams received a severe ankle sprain which was to hamper his efforts un- til late in the season. The Mean Green bounced back against the Billikens of St. Louis, winning a close one 67-62. Reliable Joe Hamilton led the Eagle scorers with 27 points. Mort Fraley was second in scoring with 16 points. But the final outcome of the game was de- termined by the free throw line. The Eagles were outscored from the field, but hit on 21 of 24 charity shots to ice the game. The Eagles came back well-rested after a two week final exam layoff and proceeded to blast Wichita State 81-77. The Eagle cagers streaked to a 41-33 halftime lead, but the Shockers came back and fought to within one point in the closing minutes of the game. The upset-minded Shockers almost pulled off the victory, but in the process fouled the wrong man. J 0e Hamil- ton swished five free throws in 90 seconds to save the game. The Tulsa Hurricanes were the next vic- tim of the Eagles, falling 93-77 to the de- light of a capacity crowd in Mens Gym. The victory, however, proved to be a weak- ening blow to the title hopes of a team already riddled with injuries. Number two Eagle scorer Crest Whitaker injured his right leg in a layup attempt. It was to be near seasonis end before Whitaker could regain his previous form. To make matters worse, NTts tallest player and starting center was deemed ineligible for spring competition. The end result was the loss of three following conference games. North Texas began a disastrous road trip with Fraley out, Whitaker injured, Hamil- ton with a sore wrist, and J im Struck in- jured with what proved to be a fractured foot. The Eagles lost the first road game to defending champion Drake, 95-84. Cincinnati quickly jumped on the 2thrash NT" bandwagon. The Bearcats worked over the unbalanced Eagles 84-69 in a return taste of their experience in the Mens Gym. IN DOUBLE OVERTIME Drake Falls to NT There was no slack in the Eaglestsched- ule. NT traveled to Louisville to meet the Cardinals. As expected, the Cards felt no sympathy for hometown boy Joe Hamil- town, humiliating the Eagles 71-60 while holding conference leading scorer Hamilton to a meager 3 baskets in 21 attempts. Things began to look up after the Eagles returned from their unhappy road trip. Crest Whitaker returned to the lineup and injured players began playing with their former poise. Perhaps even more impor- tantly, the Eagles were back within the friendy confines of Mens Gym. The con- ference leading Drake Bulldogs, however, did not find the scene to their liking. The Bulldogs left the snakepit as losers in a double overtime defeat, 91-84. Disgruntled Drake coach Maury J ohn had only a single comment on the game, ttThis is the worst crowd in the nation." The slogan became a familiar one. NT fans adopted it as their own for the remainder of the season. Weak sister Memphis State was the next team to face the red-hot Eagles. The game started slowly, but as expected, the Tigers 10st handily to NT, 82-70. Hamilton was the leading scorer for the Eagles with 22 points. Al Shumate, the conference third teading rebounder. LEFT: Tall story e a giant Bethel player passes to team mate. The "snakepit" or Mens Gym, home of the Mean Green and scene of mayhem, curses, exortations and assorted noisemakers. A super fan, one of the ex-Marines boosters, adds to the general noise level. BELOW: Neil Adams appears to have a helping hand as he drives in for a layup. LEFT: Al Shumate MW hovers three feet above floor level in search of a loose ball. EAGLES FINISH TOUGH NIT Passes NT Tough but little known Bethel College was the Eagles next opponent. The Mean Green was hard pressed to contain the rugged Wildcat offense, but managed to come out on top' 84-65 after losing the lead several times. Top scorer in the game was J 0e Hamilton with 27 points and a rapidly improving A1 Shumate with 25 points. North Texas added another notch to its victory belt with a 83-75 victory over the Bradley Braves. The televised contest kept viewers attention as the Bradley team re- covered from a 15 point deficit to bring the game within five points in the final minutes. The Eagles, forced to scramble to stay alive, were almost undone by costly and clumsy turnovers. Crest Whitaker led Eagle scoring with 24 points. The Mean Green found the going tough in the second half against the St. Louis Billikens, but coasted to a 86-82 win by virtue of a first half 15 point lead. The Billikens outrebounded the smaller Eagles, but couldn,t match NTts torrid 50iZ; hit- ting pace. Crest Whitaker continued to raise his scoring average, sinking 27 for high point honors. Whitaker found plenty of support with A1 Shumate, Neil Adams and Joe Hamilton scoring in double fig- ures. The Eagles ventured into Tulsa,s Hurri- cane for their next game. At Tulsa they looked as though they might have left something in Mens Gym. Coach Spika at- tempted to use high scoring J 0e Hamilton as a high post decoy against the muscled Hurricane team, but Tulsa stopped Hamil- ton cold with two points from his high post position. The Eagles returned to their regu- lar game pattern in the second half, but it was too late. Tulsa won easily 97-80. The Louisville Cardinals wandered into the snake pit and found that the Eagles were not the walking wounded of their first match. After a close first half, the Eagles poured in 14 straight in the second half to pull ahead of the startled Cardinals to stay. The final score was 98-80 and as the score would indicate, the Eagles domi- nated virtually every facet of the game. Wichita States Shockers were the final opponents of the Eagles. Normally the Eagles do not perform as well on the road but the hope of a National Invitational Tournament berth added adrenalin to the Eagles, drive. NT came off the top end of a 84-79 score to clinch third place in the conference. Disappointment came with the victory. The hoped for NIT bid went to Louisville, a team with a record identical to North Texas. Neil Adams FRESHMEN SHOW PROMISE Compile 5-9 Season The 1969-70 freshman basketball team compiled a respectable 5-9 season despite a schedule heavily loaded with junior col- lege opponents. The freshman team was also relied upon to provide opposition to the varsity in scrimmage competition. Despite the training and scheduling limitations, the freshmen performed creditably 5nd several squad members are expected to break into the varsity starting lineup next season. Benjamin Sayles, a 6-5, 205 forward was among the more impressive players on the squad. Sayles averaged 32.2 points per- game, hitting at a blazing .616 clip. Sayles also led the team in rebounding for the season with 197 rebounds. Johnnie Cole- man, a 6-5, 210 forward, followed Sayles in the scoring department with a 19.6 av- erage while hitting .455 percent. Coleman was also second in the board-cleaning de- partment with 150 rebounds. Jim Cox, a 6-9 center, will add des- perately needed height to the Varsity squad. Robert Baily, a tall guard at 6-2, averaged 12.1 points over the season. Baily specialized in outside shooting and proved to be a master of the fast break as well as a tough rebounder. Another Speedster, 6-3 Tim OtHearne, teamed with Baily to work an effective fast breaking of- fense, scoring 8.2 points a game in the process. RIGHT: James Albright BELOW: Johnny Coleman 6449 BELOW RIGHT: Tim O,Hearn Q39 and Johnny Coleman M40 ABOVE: Forward Kenneth Eubank C360 BELOW: Guard James Albright RIGHT: Top scorer on the freshman squad - Ben Sayles. EAGLES UNDEFEATED IN SNAKEPIT Lose 8 0n the Road The Ments Gym, or snakepit to op- ponents, was a happy home for the Eagles. Within its noisy confines, the Mean Green could seem to do no wrong. In the last two years on the home court, North Texas has won 26 of 27 games while stacking season records of 15-10 and 18-8 back to back. This year the Eagles won 14 straight in the Gym, but could manage only a 4-8 record away from home. The total was good for a third place standing in the Missouri Valley. Last yeafs NCAA finalist Drake repeated as the valley champion, but one of its two losses was to NT. The second place team, Cincinnati, went to the NIT as did the team that tied the Eagles for third, Louisville. Many fans be- lieved the Eagles should have received the NIT bid instead of Louisville, but a crush- ing 97-80 road trip loss to Tulsa played a part in eliminating the Eagles. So it was a year of ups and downs for the Eagles. At one point even title hopes were being entertained by the squad, but injuries sidelined four starters and three losses resulted. Considering injuries and the fact that the Eagles were the shortest squad in the conference, their high stand- ing was a remarkable one. RIGHT: Mort Fraley J im S truck Larry Tucker N orman Williams All Conference Selections Much to the disappointment of Eagle boosters, only one North Texas player was placed on the All-Missouri Valley Conference team. Two more were named to the Honorable Mention team. Joe Hamilton, 5-10 guard, was named to the first team for the second consecutive year. Hamilton was the leading scorer for the Eagles and second in the conference with a 22.3 average. Guard Crest Whitaker was placed on the Honorable Men- tion team. Whitaker had virtually cinched a berth on the first or second team until he was sidelined with a leg injury. Even so, he averaged 17.8 points a game. A1 Shumate was the second honorable mention choice. Shumate, a quiet team player, emerged at seasonts end with a 15.6 average and was the conferences third leading re- bounder. ABOVE: Joe Hamilton, First Team All-MVC. RIGHT: Al Shumate, Honorable Mention All-MVC. ABOVE: Crest Whitaker, Honorable Mention All- MVC. 280 Coach Chuck Garrett, Head Coach Dan Spika, Coach Bill White. Spika Coaches Eagles To Record Season- 18e8 Coach Spika began an aggressive "We have no height. To win, we must run. To win, we must utilize our full court press to take the ball away from our opponents be- fore they can utilize their superior height? Such was Dan Spikats philoso- phy when he took over the head coaching job five years ago. The job was not an easy one. The not- so-Mean Green was the perennial cellar resident of the Missouri Val- ley Conference; a breather for the rugged valley teams. NTts op- ponents were the pride of Ameri- can basketball, including teams like Cincinnati, Wichita, Louisville and the University of Houston. Many of the MVC teams were nationally rated and frequently one or the other was the national champion as well. recruiting campaign, particularly on the junior college circuit. It took time, but his efforts finally began to pay dividends. Last year NT had its first winning team in MVC competition, finishing in fourth place. In 1970, the Eagles finished even higher with a 18-8 record, good for third place and only nar- rowly missing a berth in the Na- tional Invitational Tournament. Each year has seen a gradual im- provement in Spikats team record, now standing at 58 won, 69 lost for five years. All in all, it was a great year for Coach Spika and North Texas basketball with hopes of greater ones to follow. Some fans are never happy as wit- nessed by this billboard graffiti. No complaints were registered for the 18 wins. A SEASON FOR WINNING Eagles Scramble to Third Place Valley Finish VARSITY SQUAD: Norman Williams, Jim Struck, Neil Adams, H erb Larkins, Ephriam M cDaniel, S tanley M enn, M ort Fraley, Chuck Green, Al Shumate, Jerry Merck, Crest Whitaker, Tom Wolf, Joe Hamilton. Basketball Scoreboard Northwestern Louisiana $81 Wichita State Colorado State Wyoming Stetson Marquette Cincinnati Arizona Nevada Las Vegas Southern Colorado Arkansas Tech Memphis State Bradley St. Louis $93 $4 A269 Tulsa Drake Cincinnati Louisville Drake Memphis State Bethel Bradley St. Louis Tulsa Louisville Wichita State conference games Tennis 70 The North Texas tennis team looked like a probable conference powerhouse in 1970. The Eagles were Missouri Valley Conference champions in 1969, and with only one player lost to graduation, chances looked good for a repeat as top net club. Coach Ken Bahnsenis squad, lacking a senior netter, is deep in talent but light in experience. To alleviate the situ- ation and gain experience throughout his lineup, Coach Bahnsen alternated his seeding arrangement. However, in early season play, Danny Haddox was seeded No. 1, Steve Buck was No. 2, Tom Aber- crombie was No. 3, No. 4 was Bill Un- capher, Jim McCracken was seeded No. 5 and Dixie Mabe was No. 6 with fresh- man J ohn Winger attempting to break into singles. In doubles play Abercrom- bie and Uncapher were NTis first doubles team. The No. 2 team was Haddox and McCracken. TENNIS TEAM: Kneeling - Bill Un- capher, Jim McCracken, John Winger. Top Row - Dixie Mabe, Steve Buck, Danny Haddox, Tom Abercrombie. ABOVE: Bill Uncapher serves to opponent. LEFT: Steve Buck returns with an overhead smash. ABOVE: Top seeded Danny Haddox demonstrates acro- batic form. LEFT: S teve Buck plays in close to the net. Eagles Favored In MVC Golf Coach Herb FerrilPs swingers captured their eighth Missouri Valley Conference title in nine years last spring. And only one player is missing from the championship lineup-Jerry Greiner, Who also won the MVC individual crown in 69. The returning lettermen are Hale Baugh, Guy Cul- lins, Bill Powell, Tom Porter and Dennis Walters. Of the letter winners, only Porter is a senior this year. Porter and squadman Gary Kirwan and Randy Moore are the only seniors 0n the 11-man squad. Just as in 1969, Coach Ferrill had another class of sophomores with great potential. Three of the rookies placed in the top six in spring qualifying. Bernie Averett, Fred Cobb Memorial Scholarship Winner, ranked third. David Stanley was fifth and Ross Collins Jr., sixth. The fourth sophomore, Bobby Henson, stood ninth in spring qualifying. Ferrill was particularly pleased with scores in team trials in February. Powell was the eight-round leader with 575 strokes, or 71.9 strokes average per round. Cullins was second at 582, followed by Averett 589, Walters 590, Stanley 591, Collins 593, Kirwan and Baugh 595, Henson 602, Porter 603, and Moore 604. Left: Bill Powell tkneelingl and Guy Cullins line up a putt. Above: Bernie Averett lines up an iron shot to the green. David Stanley, fifth in spring qualifying. Above: Guy Cullins and Bernie Averett walk to the green. Below Left and Ross Collins works his way off the fair- Right: Hale Baugh. way. Guy Cullins misses a close putt. TOP VARSITY GOLF SQUAD: Bill Powell, Guy Cul- lins, Bernie Averett, Dennis Walters and David Stanley. Right: Golf Coach Herb Ferrill. Ferrill Leads NT To Winning Years After 19 years of coaching Eagle football teams and serving as golf coach, Herb Ferrill left the football staff in September 69 to devote full time to the North Texas State golf program. In addition to his present duties as golf coach and golf instructor in the physical education department, he assumed management duties of the 18 hole North Texas Golf Course. Ferrillts squads have won the Mis- souri Valley Conference title eight of the nine years. The 1969 team tied for fifth in the NCAA tournament and won the valley title. ttThe 1970 Golf team looks like a good onef, Ferrill said. "You have to say wetre the team everyone will be looking to beat. We have a new $100,000 remodeling job on the course to work with, and four of our five starters are back from last years team. We also have some new players who may be able to break into the starting lineup before conference play begins. Last year we won the conference championship and ended the year rated seventh in the offlcial national standings. I wouldn,t be surprised if the 1970 team does as well or better? t m m h c S E 288 Track - ,70 Winton tPopi Noah is in his 43rd year of coaching, one of the longest tenures in the state in any sport. Of the 43 years, the last 23 have have been at NT. Popis track team of 1970 includes a bevy of top sprinters, two strong weightmen and quality depth overall. All together, another promising year seemed to be in store for the Eagles. Barring another epidemic of injuries or other misfortunes such as demoted the Eagles to a second place MVC finish in 1969, Coach Noahts squad appears improved over last year in every event except the pole vault. Most of the veterans were sprinters tbest outdoor performances in parenthesesi 4 Carl Jackson 96 and 21.41, Ed DeWitty t9.61, Dan Svatek 9.7 and 21.81, and Ver- non Evans t21.5 and 48.1 in the quarteri. ,Add to those schoolboy All-American Phillip Lusk of Corpus Christi and you have the makings of point potential in the dashes and short relays. Lusk is a blue chipper with these high school eredentials: 9.5 in the 100, 20.9 in the 220, 47.1 in the 440 and 24.9 in the long jump. The field leaders were javelin thrower Bill Schmidt t260-10, 1970is best Texas toss yeti and diSCUS hurler BOb Vander Drift. Both proved in winter practice meets to be headed for better performances. NCAA competitor Schmidt reached 27241le in a Feb- ruary meet and has ben known to hit an occasional 280+ in practice. Vander Drift threw the discus 171-6 in a December meet. There were ample competitors in the hurdle events with 53.1 Jimmy Jones the leading entry. JOnes hit 53.1 in the intermediates and 14.8 in the high hurdles in 1969. A number of winter practice meets outdoors had the Eagles in top competitive trim. 2Our onlv concern now is for them not to peak out too soon and then slump? said Coach Noah. 7We11 keep our hopes up as long as we avoid that and injuries." Tracksters Tough In Early Meets As expected, the Eagle track team proved tough to beat in early winter competition. North Texas blew into March, winning over a host of Southwest Conference teams at the South- west Recreation Track and Field Meet, placing in 16 of 17 events to clinch the meet title over fa- vored Rice. A second place finish at the Ar- lington Relays followed with long jumper Mike Neeley and javelin thrower Bill Schmidt breaking meet records and J ove Gomez and Phillip Lusk giving winning per- formances. The next meet at Texas A8zM produced another second place finish. Carl Jackson won the 220, Gomez the mile, Bob Vander Drift the discus, and Dennis Stephens took the 880. NT won its own North Texas Relays next. Jimmy Jones paced the Eagles by Winnig both hurdle events. Other winners included shot putter Don Rhode, pole vaulter Bill Gambrell and high jumper Joe Stephens. Nancy Walker tcenteri was crowned the 1970 N T Relay Queen. Left is Princess Frances Chance and highw, Princess Linda Weaver. Long jumper Mike Neeley leaps 24 feet, inches to set an Arlington Relay meet record. Discuss thrower Bob Vander Miler Jove Gomez breaks Eric Hillaker runs second. tape. Fourth from Left: Don Davis, Ed Dewitty and Dan Svatek in the 100. Don Davis strains as he wins the 100. Ed Dewitty follows. Dennis Stephens and Doug Walker. 29! Sprint medley team of Phillip Lusk, Carl Jackson, Ver- non Evans, and Dennis Stephens strike a pose after Below Left: Three miler Tom Hess. Below: Vernon setting a record 40.6. Evans wins the 440 in 49.1. William Gambrell, silhouetted against a rainy sky, wins Pemm Estes combines muscle and fiberglass in the pole the NT Relays pole vault. vault. 293 Jimmy Jones Hhird from ler leads and wins the NT Below: Tom Hess and Jove Gomez lead a muddy three Relays high hurdles in 14.6. mile race. Dan Hopkins warms up in his speciality, Jesse Casavoz appears the discus. Pemm Estes clears the crossbar. 880 man Dennis Stephens. Egg; Sprinter Carl Jackson Shot putter Don Rohde. FRONT ROW: Carl Jackson, Doug Walker, Tom Hess, Glen Cole, Billy Little, Tom Clarke, Jove Gomez, Roger Rod- riquez. SECOND ROW: Dennis Stephens, Dan Svatek, Jimmy Jones, Fred Cozby, Waverly Washington, Jesse Casa- voz, Mike Bleckley, Joe Barry. THIRD ROW: Coach Winton 1P0m Noah, Gary Lancaster, Dan Hopkins, Don Rohde, Bill Schmidt, Pemm Estes. FOURTH ROW: William Gambrell, Eric Hillaker, Jim Lintner, Bob Vander Drift. FIFTH ROW: Joe Stephens, Ed Dewitty, Don Davis, Stephen Standefer, Rodney Walter, Steve Winslett, Vernon Evans, Oren Smith, Phillip Lusk. NOT SHOWN: Mike Neely and Crest Whitaker. 1970 Track Schedule Feb. 28 Southwest Recreation usb Fort Worth March 7 Arlington Relays 12nd1 Arlington March 14 ASzM Triangular 12nd1 College Station March 21 North Texas Relays 11st1 Denton March 28 Corpus Christi Invitational 15th1 Corpus Christi April 3-4 Texas Relays mo place1 Austin April 11 J ohn J acobs Invitational Norman April 17-18 Kansas Relays Lawrence April 24-25 Drake Relays Des Moines April 30 NT-UTA-ACC-Howard Payne Abilene May 8-9 MVC Championships Des Moines May 16 Ty Terrell Meet Beaumont May 29 Meet of Champions Houston June 6 Ox Cart Relays Karnes City June 12-13 U.S. Federation Meet Wichita June 18-20 NCAA Championships Des Moines Intramurals Program Offers Varied Activities Athletic ability and the need for partici- pation exists in many forms at North Texas. The intramural athletic competition program, headed by Dr. Don Bailey and students assistants, recognizes this need and has created a diversified slate of activi- ties for athletic competition by students and faculty members within the university structure. As ability, time and interest allow, stu- dents may participate in intramural com- petition in football, basketball, tennis, track, swimming, softball, wrestling, Weight lifting and other less strenuous but competi- tive sports. Intramural Tennis competi- Coed Basketball tion. Ex-Marines surround a rebound. The Kappa Alpha quarterback passes against the Kappa Sigs. SDX guard Gene Abrahamson guards a Hawk rebounder. Jubilant Toilet Bowl winners celebrate. Badminton Basektball Chess Football Gymnastics Softball Table Tennis Tennis Volleyball Weight Lifting Wrestling Intramural Champs B.S.U. Spinning Wheels Phi Kappa Theta Texans B.S.U. Uncle Birdies Zebras 1969 B.S.U. Sigma Nu Texans Sigma Phi Epsilon Tau Kappa Epsilon-P.E. Club Sigma Delta Chi forward Owen Carter out- maneuvers assistant varsity basketball coach Bill White of the Graduates. FINE ARTS The arts are an integral part of student life at North Texas. Students are offered a variety of entertainment from a full- fledged musical to an informal student re- cital. For many, North Texas provides the first exposure to opera or to the symphony. Visiting performers such as professional actor Bob B. King habovw or the Dallas Civic Ballet often combine talents with student performers hsuch as the lab band member belowy CANT TAKE IT WITH YOU Zany Sycamores Open t69 Season ttYou Cantt Take It With You," the Pulitzer Prize winning comedy by Moss Hart and George S. Kauf- man, opened the University Play- erst 1969-70 season on Oct. 28. The 1936 Broadway success cen- ters around the zany Sycamore family 9 Papa Sycamore, a fire- works inventor; Mama Sycamore, an amateur artist and playwright; and Alice, the sane member of the family. Alice tplayed by Kristi Liem of Richardsom is in love With her bossts son, Tony Kirby, tArling- ton junior Alan Klemx But she knows her romance will end when the elders Kirbys come to dinner a night too soon and find the Syca- more family in their usual uproar. Before the production could open, the players had to solve'such prob- lems as finding and keeping a cage full of live snakes, and teaching cast members ballet and how to play the xylaphone. tAbovet Ed Hack Pressleyt accompanies Essie Sycamore tCarol Triggt on the xylophohe. KBelowt The Sycamore Family gathers for dinner in a scene from the University production: HYou Cantt Take It Wzth You? W Abovw Mama Sycamore Margaret Rosa works on a portrait of Mr. Depinna. RighU An inebriated ac- tress, Gay Wellington, makes a late night appearance at the Sycamore house. THE GUEST NT Players Stage New Jeffrey Drama What happens when an aging mother at- tempts to regain her youth through her beau- tiful daughter and her friends? NT ex Ransom Jeffrey explores the pos- sibilities in his taut, bitter comedy, "The Guest." The play, Which won a $2,000 prize from the American National Theater Acade- my, was produced for the first time by the University Players. The mother Darla, played by Hurst junior Gini Elliot, complicates her daughtefs ro- mance by trying to impress her boyfriend David who is The Guest for a weekend. Al- though the situation is real enough, the char- acters are merely symbols of roles played in all societies. In the climatic scene from ttThe Guestf David tPeter Wellew becomes frenzied when he realizes that the mother and daughter have manipulated him according to their plan. David interrupts an argument between Darla tGini EllioU and Lucy tBarbara Jarvis; hmmmameWm . A Darla and David contemplate their moves, while Lucy ebackgrounde plots to ensnare the guest. David feels the need for a cigarette as the weekend progresses. Lizzie Angela M itchelU describes her unsuccessful husband-hunting trip to her father and brothers. Ler Lizzids brother Jimmie Alan Klem and Snoo- kie Helen Schijw provided comic relief for the resi- dents 0f the rain-starved town. AboUd Jimmie listens to Lizzie rant and rave about her lack o a husband. 110 IN THE SHADE Wild West Musical Is Semestefs Finale A wild west extravaganza, i110 in the Shade? opened in December in the first full- scale musical ever produced in the new Uni-e versity Theater. The Tom Jones-Harvey Schmidt musical is built around Lizzie Curry, a spinster who is convinced that she will never be beatuiful. Angela Mitchell, TWU graduate student, student, starred in the role. Lizzieis father and two brothers try to find her a husband, and local Sheriff File is their prime target. The situation is complicated, however, when itinerant con man Bill Star- buck arrives and offers to take Lizzie away with him. Lizzie greets her friends with picnic fare and a song. Lizzie discovers her self-worth through Starbuck Hahn Williamsi, then tries to convince Sheriff File Noe Lauckh that he wants to marry her. hLef h Sir Andrew hBic Fergusom gets more than he bargained for in his return bout with Sebastian. hAboveh Norman Green appeared as the simple steward Malvolio. TWELFTH NIGHT Look Alikes Cause Merry Confusion ttTweIfth Night? the University The- ater,s annual Shakespeare production, opened in March With audience reaction described as ttremendoush by Dr. Robert Black, director of the play. Susan Heimer and Harry Reinwald starred as the twins tViola and Sebas- tiam in the classic tale of mistaken iden- tities. The comedy erupts when the twins, separated by a shipwreck in their childhood, return to the zany country Illyria and cause look-alike bedlam among the foolish inhabitants. Admirable performances were turned in by Alan Klem as Feste and J oe Lauck as Sir Toby Belch. The two team up with Maria tplayed by Pat Howardi and Sir Andrew Augeuecheek tplayed by Bick Fergusom and devise a plot to make a fool out of the simple steward, Malvolio. Norman Green tMalvolioi and Ferguson provided excellent interpreta- tions of their comic roles. tAboveJ Sir Andrew, Feste tAlan Klemj and Sir Toby Moe Laucki contemplate Malvoliots downfall. tBelowi Sir Andrew and Sir Toby of being feign innocence when Maria tPat Howardi accuses them drunkards. Wilfred Higgins, associate professor of art, explains one of the paintings on display in the art gallery. ART EXHIBITS AfrotArt Show Highlights Season An all-faculty art show opened in the NTSU art gallery in September, 1969. Some 40 pieces of art, representing 19 artists were presented. Works fashioned from various media including oil, sculp- ture and weaving were shown. November featured an 1Over Thirty" exhibit of paintings from the 1930s, and in December, a pre-Christmas show of student work was held. African artifacts from the private col- lections of Mrs. Eugene McDermott and Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Marcus of Dallas, Jack Lenor Larsen, Inc., Segy Galleries of New York and the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts were shown in February. Lithographs made by the traditional limestone process were displayed at the Christmas student show. Students view Kimba, the goddess of maternity, at the African Art show. Abovw A coed is bewildered by a west African sculpture. Uiighw Viewer pauses before early tribal statuary. LECTURE SERIES Poetry, Defense Lecture Topics Lecturers for the 1969-70 season ranged from a music critic to an astronaut, and their topics ranged from poetry to self-defense. Poet Milton Kessler opened the Lecture Series with readings from his books "A Road Came Back? published in 1963, and "Called Home? published in 1967. Paul Hume, music critic for the Washington, D.C., Post, spoke at the second Festival of Texas Com- posers in December. He lectured on The High Cost of Ignorance." The Association of Women Stu- dents brought Frederic Storaska, self-defense expert, on campus to lecture and demonstrate his tech- niques. Former astronaut Scott Carpen- ter made an Alpha-Chi sponsored appearance in March. His topic was William Stringfellow, former editor of "Rampart? talks with Dr. James "Man in Space and Under the Baird of the English faculty and other visitors after his lecture. Sea." tLer An audience of only 50 people heard poet Mil- ton Kessleris lecture. hAbovw Kessler reads from his two published books of poetry. aer Frederic Storaska teaches a coed to de- fend herself. Abovd He makes an AWS-spon- sored lecture to NT women. MMN Beloud M usic critic Paul Hume spoke to students. RighU Scott Carpenter spoke on Man in Space and Under the Sea." 3 Camerata Bariloche, an Argentine chamber orchestra, made an appearance in Denton as a part of the North Texas Fine Arts Series. hAbovet Rock singers in the award-winning musical come- dy ttYour Own Thing? hRighU Alberto Lysy was the l4 featured soloist with the Camerata Bariloche. FINE ARTS SERIES Fall Series Includes Rock Musical, Ballet The award-winning rock musical, ttYour Own Thing? the Dallas Symphony Orchestra and Civic Ballet; and an Argentine Chamber Orchestra were featured in the fall semester of the Fine Arts concerts. The Dallas Symphony performance was the first concert of the season. A capacity audi- ence heard the symphony play Mozartts Sym- phony No. 41 in C major and Mahlerts Sym- phony No. 1 in D major. tcontJ hLer Marjorie Tallchief appeared in Stravinskyhs Wire- bird? hAbovw The Dallas Symphony Orchestra played the first Fine Arts Series concert. FINE ARTS Lysy Featured Camerata Bariloche, the second performance of the year, featured violinist Alberto Lysy as conductor and soloist. The Argentine chamber orchestra played a repetoire rang- ing from classical to contemporary music. The Dallas Civic Ballet, featur- ing Marjorie Tallchief, performed three ballets, hLes Sylphides," "An- nabel Lee? and "Firebird" in Oc- tober. "Your Own Thing? a rock ver- sion of Shakespearehs hTwelfth Nighth, is the story of Viola and her twin brother Sebastian. Viola, disguised as a boy, gets a part in an all-male rock band. The corps de ballet of the Dallas Civic Ballet performed "Les Syl- phides." FINE ARTS December Highlights Pianist, Opera Duo Fine arts performances continued in De- cember with the appearance of concert pianist Ann Schein and the presentation of two operas by the School of Music Opera Work- shop. Miss Schein made her Denton appearance, her first in the United States this year, on Dec. 5. She has toured Europe several times and has played in both Carnegie Hall and the White House. The Opera Workshopts performance of Schubert,s ttThe Conspiratorsf sometimes known as ttThe Domestic Wart marked the debut of that opera in the Southwest. The workshop also presented Purcellts "Dido and Aeneas," the first important opera written in English, as a part of the same program. Ed Shaughnessy, drummer for Doc Sever- insen,s band on Johnny Carson,s "Tonighttt show, appeared with the 1 O,clock Lab Band on February 9. A flute and piano duo, Jean-Pierre Ram- pal and Robert Veyron-Cacroix, played the first Fine Arts Series concert of the spring semester. Ed Shaughnessy, drummer on Johnny Car- sorfs ttTonighLm show, appeared with the 1 OtClock Lab Band during a Sunday after- noon concert. tLer Eugene Conley rehearses. tAbovet Jean-Pierre Rampal and Robert Veyron-La- croix. Members of the NTSU A Cappella choir sing out during their concert in Denton. STUDENT GROUPS Lab Band Plans European Trip Although guest performers ap- peared frequently at North Texas, students themselves gave the ma- jority of the concerts during the year. The 1 Otclock Lab Band released an album to help raise funds for a trip to Switzerland planned for the summer of 1970. The band also performed throughout the school year for various functions. They ap- peared at the opening of One Main Place in Dallas. The Madrigal Singers presented a series of concerts during the year. Attired in 16th century English costumes, 'they performed songs from that era. The A Cappella choir made their annual tour to cities in Texas and to New Orleans, La. during se- mester break. A combined lab band gave a con- cert in the Main Auditorium in De- cember. Characters in the National Theater of the Deaf's produc- tion of tthanarelleht used only manual language. Actors with masks served as narrators. DEAF THEATER Company Stages Two Productions The National Theater of the Deaf, a theater company using manual language, mime and simul- taneous narration, performed at North Texas in March as a part of the Fine Arts Series. Two plays, Moliere,s tthnana- rellett and Dylan Thomas itUnder Milk Wood? were presented by the players. The first is a farce dealing with characters whose problems are few and whose lives are simple. Moliere gives them a series of ri- diculous circumstances to cope with, and the result is hilarity. ttUnder Milk Wood? is the story of a day in the life of the people of Llareggub, a Village in Wales. The National Theater of the Deaf was founded in 1967 by the Eu- y gene OtNeill Memorial Theater Foundation and a federal grant tAbovet from the Rehabilitation Services. Character in "Sganarelle faints" because of her weak stomach. tAbovet Actresses converse in manual language while trightt jester narrates the play. The Arts in the 708 - Works of art have always reflected the time of their creation. With the beginning of the ,70s, a new era in the arts was becoming more evident than ever. At the request of the Yucca, four members of the North Texas faculty discussed their views on the changing arts in the 19705. Although the four did not always agree on specifics, they did agree that a new spirit of coopera- tion among various artists will probably become a reali- ty during the decade. The most dramatic result of this spirit could be the blending of art, drama, music and dance into a single creative form. Merrill Ellis, director of NTls electronic music com- position lab, points out that the ancient Greek word mousikos, from which the English word music was de- rived, actually described drama, poetry and dance as well as musical sounds. It is possible that a new defi- tion of the word ttmusicf including filmed images, color design, space and lighting as well as electronics, will be formed. Dean K enneth Cuthbert At North Texas, joint productions are becoming more and more frequent. Dean Kenneth Cuthbert of the School of Music said, "We will be working cooperatively with both the drama division and dance classes in the near future? Such productions as the annual Alpha Psi Omega musical show the success of cooperation between music and drama. ttllO in the Shade? produced in December, was the first full-scale musical ever staged in the Uni- versity Theater. Plans also called for a modern dance show to be produced there in the spring. Dr. Robert Black, chairman of the drama division believes that "In the future, opera performances as well as regularly-scheduled, full-scale musicals, will probably be staged in the University Theater? The nature of the productions themselves may well change drastically in the next 10 years. If folk art is as it has been said to be in the pastl a reflection of what is to come, then the emphasis today,s "hippie cultureh places on audience participation in music will become more popular. "The audience should be enveloped by the music in a pleasant way? said Ellis. ltThey can even become a part of the composition by making sounds creatively? Ellis has occasionally tried this technique in his dem- onstration lectures. The tlinstant creative act" is often a failure, he admits, but it is an essential part of audi- ence involvement. According to Dr. Black, there will also be a new in- terest in the relationship between the theater and its patrons due to the overall new interest of the public in the arts. However, Mack D. Vaughan, chairman of the art de- partment, sees a paradox in the current public image of art. ttOn one hand, we have seen an intensive and serious search for new concepts, expressions, media and combi- nations of media unparalled in the history of art. It has been inevitable, on the other hand, that we have also seen a certain amount of gimmickry and shallow- ness which opportunists seek to publicize during such times." Merrill Ellis, director of the electronic music composition lab. Experiments in Cooperation Dr. Mack Vaughan, chairman of the art department. For the next decade, Dr. Vaughan sees the beginning of a movement toward greater significance in art which he calls "more concern for art than for non-art? Experimental music and theater, now growing more rapidly than ever, will find new life on university campuses. The college theaters of the past, sometimes described as "museumsl, will see drastic revisions in the ,70s. Rapid development of the avant-garde theater, possibly even on the North Texas campus, is almost assured. ttThe university theater will become less and less conservative? said Dr. Black. "Our problem in avant- garde theater will be to manage the new drama in such a way that we maintain the taste we are striving for with productions of the classics. itHowever, we will definitely be affording space to give life to the new theater? he emphasized. In music, computers will probably play an increased role in composition. There are, explained Ellis, two methods of using digital computers in composition. The first method entails programming the computer to ac- tually "inventtl the music. With this method, creativity is involved in programming but the possible mathemati- cal combinations provide an infinite number of compo- sitions. Ellis estimates that one NT music student has spent over a year and a half developing this type of computer programming. The second method of composition using computers involves their use as synthesizers to develop and mix sound waves. Although a complete orchestral sound can be synthesized in this manner, more interesting pos- sibilties involve the production of sounds that cannot be produced by conventional instruments. Despite the growth of electronic music, traditional works will still be important. ttI dontt thing electronic music will replace any- thing," Ellis said. tiIf something is replaceable, it wasnit important in the first place. All forms of music fulfill a need, or they would not exist? The future of the arts at NTSU promises to be a bright one. With the completion of a new art building sometime during the 1970s, NT,s facilities will' be among the most modern available. Dean Cuthbert promises new instructional techniques in music, including the use of instant-replay television and programmed learning. According to Dr. Black, there will be more opportunities to work professionally for the student in the theater, especially in the areas of design and lighting. Through faculty research funds, allocated by the Faculty Research Committee, the electronic music lab will conduct even more experiments. tlI would also like to see the integration of the literature and some under- standing of electronic music at the undergraduate level? commented Ellis. The role of the university in the i70s Will be to pro- vide encouragement for experimentation in the arts while maintaining high standards of production. ttThe function of the university? conluded Ellis, "i to explore new ideas and thoughts. Something new is not necessarily good. The idea is to be more than just revolutionary? Dr. Robert Black FEATURES Happening "70 Happening i70 Happening ,70 began in i69 dur- ing that short time after registra- tion, before dead leaves start to foul the park pond and as the grass turns a little more brown each day. Sister, brother, black, white, they groped, blindfolded, toward one an- other, touched and held on. Hands joined and held through the Oc- tober Moratorium, an abortive "Everybody,s Day," the November Moratorium trip to Washington, a tribute to President Kamerick and a dorm food protest. tItts beautiful? they said, the guy with the beard and long hair and the one with the cashmere sweater. The happenings of 1969- 1970 brought them both together when, for a few moments at least, the sun shone. Park Happening The sun was shining that after- noon in October when the parade of participants arrived in the park behind the Art Building. Students and friends pitched their cloth and wood tents, painted trees and trash cans and hung swings from the oak tree limbs. Near the center of the park a group built a walk-in tent out of two 12 x 8 American flags. David Lent, ringmaster and orig- inator of the event, strung amp wires and crowds began to gather. Those that gathered ate water- melon and pineapple, played hop- scotch, read the signs, listened to the music and played on the tire swings with the carefree manner of little children. They rubbed shoulders, the beau- tiful and the not-so-beautiful, the right and the left, the peaceful and the militant. They blindfolded one another in the park that afternoon, each touching and feeling to ttknowl, the other. A short blonde with a sorority pin sat on the grass crying. "I never knew anything could be so beauti- ful? she said. But a few only saw a flag used as a tent. Happening brought freedom of speech. Chief security officer Robert Wallis, with two campus patrol- men, entered the park and tore down the tent. As he left the park, flags under his arm, a girl handed him a flower. But the mood of the happening was too firmly set. They were too busy singing the Beatles song, ttGive Peace a Chanceti to jeer Wallis and his patrolmen. The afternoon and evening were peaceful. Music played in the park, students watched films and a light show and the crowd broke into small sensitivity groups. Several thousand people had attended the event at one time or other that day. They felt it was something special, something beautiful. Moratorium That same afternoon, in the Union Building, USNT voted by a wide margin not to support the Na- tional Student Association in its Oct. 15 Moratorium on the war in Vietnam. Moratorium was to happen on every college campus in the coun- try. It was a product of McCarthy ttChildren Marchers." A single day to question American involvement in a foreign war, Moratorium was to be a day to express concern over the future of the country - to con- front the issues involved in US. war policy in Vietnam. The day, Oct. 15, began at North Texas the way it began all over the nation. A requiem mass conducted by Father Arthus Sargent was said in the park with prayers for the war dead and for peace. Several hundred attended the mass. Student leaders of the event urged students to cut classes for the happening and many classes were dismissed. But students not in classes came to Moratorium to learn. They attended the teach-in that morning in the Business Adminis- tration Building. They listened, spoke and voiced opinions. They confronted the issues. tcontinuedl In a carefree manner, happening partici- pants did their own thing from relaxing in the sun to playing hopscotch. war Thousands assembled in the park for the sensitivity gathering where Blindfolds in place, students attempted to people, tents, watermelon, music and communication were plentiful. ttknowtt each other through the sense of touch. Students sat quietly on the lawn of the Government- Sociology Building listening to Moratorium Day speakers. Above right, Everybodys Day originator, David Lent, speaks with reporters. Happening ,70 On the lawn in front of the Govern- ment Sociology Building, all parts of the academic community spoke. Faculty members, left and right, discussed the war. And the day went on . . . the Memorial Rally, the open Forum on Vietnam on the steps of the Speech and Drama Building and the torchlight parade around campus. It was a day distin- guished by intense two-way communi- cation and a lack of violence. Everybodyts Day If M-Day had been too intense, much of the tension was relieved by David Lentts ttEverybodys Day? It yvas planned, Lent said, to promote a multi-media research center at North Texas. It was to have been a day for every- body and tttheir own thing." Lent promised 150 trumpet players playing "Hey Judett as the sun rose over the Administration Building, a school-wide early-morning salute to the flag, a day of no classes and a day of parades. Th'ose Who waited to be awakened on the morning of Oct 23 by "Hey Jude" were late getting up. "Everybodyts Day," if it had been planned at all, fizzled. General Electric came to a general halt. The event was more spectacular in its aftermath. Lent told a USNT investi- gating committee his rights were violated When William C. Lindley, vice-president for student affairs, called Lent,s parents the night before the event. tcontinuedt Many students attended the Moratorium Day "teach-inh held in the Business Administra- tion Building to listen, voice their opinions and hhconfront the issues." Happening ,70 Lindley admitted making the call but said, "I never quetsioned Davidis mental health? The investigating committee public- ly censured Lindley. President Kamer- ick said Lindley was acting within the scope of his authority and Lent urged a re-examination of Lindley,s respon- sibility. NAACP Protests Black students became quite vocal over the method used to select the 25 Yucca Beauty finalists. Members of the NAACP and the Afro - American S t u d e n t Union tAASUh pointed out that only one was black. One said that over the past ten years, out of 80 judges, none were black. The Yucca Staff said this was not true. About 70 black students and some white supporters gathered in front of the UB to protest the selection. The protest included a march on Presi- dent Kamerickis office with a list of demands for change. That afternoon, administrators an- nounced a new set of judging guide- lines. For the fall beauty contest, an additional group of 18 girls would be chosen by an integrated panel of judges. The blacks were still in opposition to the decision but, while more pro- tests were planned, accepted the new slate of 43 semi-finalists. Yucca editor, Barbara Deck, who had been away from campus at a journalism convention during the con- troversy, said concerning the protests, ttI think we were railroaded? Washington March Moratorium came again. The observance was originally set up to become a day longer each month. The November Moratorium was held Nov. 13 and 14. November M-Day was much less outspoken than the October observ- ance. That month, the focus was to be in Washington. While the campus had been most receptive to the first M-Day, the city was not. tcontinuedi The November Moratorium was fo- cused on the "March Against Deatht, in the capital. quh EVENmf cc RACO SM VCR. umyafwu I'kliffgim 3 V Nam 46 JMQWWM W15 553W vgawfzmmsjdfm 1mm: L 9141! ? rxulov Happening 070 ttWe felt that threats from the com- munity showed that these people are so completely hostile to the idea of peace, trying to tell them would only alienate them further? said Tom Lowe, NSA campus coordinator. Organizations on campuses through- out the country chartered buses to carry students to Washington. Denton police escorted two car- 'loads of 14 Washington-bound Mora- torium participants out of the city. The 14 joined 10,000 others in a ttMarch Against Death." No organ- ized M-Day discussion was held on campus. Twenty-seven USNT sena- tors, representing only 2,700 students, again voted down a senate proposal to support the Moratorium. Kamerick Day NTSU President J ohn J . Kamerick had his day e literally. USNT unanimously passed a bill designating Dec. 10 a day to honor the university administrator. Irwin Wingo introduced the bill and even- tually became coordinator for the event; but it was a happening that everyone could participate in. tWe just want to tell him what a good job he,s done? Wingo said, and almost 10,000 students and faculty members signed a petition saying so. The president was honored at an assembly in the Business Administra- tion Building on his day. There was a telephone message from Gov. Preston Smith, congratu- latory telegrams from state leaders and the Denton mayor proclaimed the day ttPres. John J . Kamerick Day in the city. Many various campus orga- nizations gave him a plague, certifi- cate of merit or letter of commenda- tion. Dr. Kamerick, only halfway through his second year as university presi- dent, proved his popularity with stu- dents and faculty members alike. ttHe has planted and nurtured prog- ress? a speaker at the event said. Everyone seemed to agree. tcontinuedi NAACP members Hopi march to the Administration Building to protest the Yucca Beauty Contest. In the vice-presidentts office tcentev they demand an audience. At right, M -Day supporters leave for Washington. President Kamerick, above, accepts gifts from various campus organizations at Kamerick Day ceremony. Below, student and faculty members alike attend the assembly for the president. Happening 70 Dorm Food Boycott While there was enthusiastic support for the administrator, many were still dissastis- fied with the administration. Most particu- larly with the matter of the dormitory food service. The quality of dorm food is a universal stu- dent complaint; but girls at South Bruce Hall went one better than the usual dinner table gripes. Every resident of South Bruce boy- cotted the evening meal the night of J an. 15. Complete with signs and chants, the girls gathered outside the cafeteria doors when they opened at 5:20 pm. They urged other residents of the double hall not to eat. The girls carried signs reading ttVariety is the spice of life? ttGive slop t0 swine? and Not even grade B, meat? The cafeteria served only 25 per cent of the meals normally served. Most of those who crossed the picket lines were boys from Terrill Hall called in by the dietician. ttWe did this because we,ve had no re- sponse to our complaintsf said Kathy Tuogy, one of the boycott organizers. tcontinuedt Bruce Hall residents did more than just complain about dormitory food they boycotted the cafeteria to protest food quality and service. Seeking peace and freedom, students pitched tents tabovef and settled back to enjoy the sensitivity gathering. Seek ing academic freedom, students enrolled in the Free University i tcentew. Bottom, a student makes his mark -- for peace. Happening 70 Mrs. Joanne Heatley, assistant dieti- cian for Bruce, disagreed. "As far as things like boycotting go, we ignore thatfi she said. But after the single-meal protest and further complaints from dorm residents, university officials admitted that they were looking for alternatives to the pres- ent dorm food service system. Free University As the more flashy events of the year grabbed headlines and student attention for a few days, a more subtle happening occurred through the year. Students established a Free Universi- ty, a school headed by students and taught by students . . . a chance to study anything of interest outside the North Texas State University institu- tion. The Free University, one of 450 such schools operated in the United States, was organized by the committee-staff of the Burning Bush. Coordinator William Farmer termed response to the first se- mester ffoverwhelming? The first fall, 645 students signed up in sixteen courses. They studied sub- jects ranging from ffWilderness Sur- vivalii to ffZen Macrobioticsfi More than 100 chose ffSensitivity Training? a continuation of the first October park happening. An almost equal number registered for 28 different Free University courses in the spring. More faculty members began teaching courses and the school attracted more Denton residents. A most significant happening, the Free University seemed to be an inte- gral part of the academic community. Andso... . . . it was a year of happenings. From the emotional sensitivity gath- ering in the park to the more scholarly Moratorium rallies, Kamerick Day, the dorm food protests and the establish- ment of a Free University - students, in concert, made known their thoughts, their needs. It was a year the university met stu- dent power and found a way, even if perhaps not always the best, to use it. It was a year that brought people to- gether and, sometimes, separated them. It was a year that has brought us to now, and perhaps to understanding. The happenings combined together became ffHappening f703, Faculty members, left and right, discussed the war. involvement in V .etnam. y t .l n u m m 0 C C .l m e d a C a e h t ...l O s n 0 ul .5 C a II U a e; C n a U r e s b 0 y a D m u .l r 0 t a r MO r e b 0 t C 0 e h t g n .l r u D spoke on US. GREEKS Potpourri . . IFC . . . . . . anhellenic ororities . . raternities Greek life can be a kalidoscope of ex- periences that blend to create a unique sense of pride and belonging. Experiences like the excitement you share with your little sister at her first big milestone of pledgeship, or your fraternity letters across a jersey worn to compete in a Greek Week feat that recalls a bygone age, or meeting girls through rush that will one day be your sister to share the mystic bond you know. The Greek life can afford an opportunity for involvement like youive never known before. It is the allegience to a cause that comes through responsi- bility to something more than yourself. mmmww t . The relavency of the Greek Way was challenged by ome. Others said it died. Some stood by the Sldelines to say the Greeks are stero-typed; and their pagentry was scorned. Yet others realized their worth. They recognized the Greek spirit as an antithesis t0 the general apathy The running of relays, the building of floats and the election of a candidate all required the spirit and determination triggered by the ideal in which they believe. IFC Frat Council Raises Grade Requirements The Interfraternity Council continued ex- pansion of activities and raised standards for the 16 campus fraternities. In January, the IFC voted to restrict the grade requirements for all prospective rushes by raising the grade qualifications to a 2.2 overall average for all males, except second semester freshmen who were allowed a two-point average over the previous 12 semester hours. A carnival for the kids at Denton State School was co-sponsored by the IFC and Panhellenic Council for Halloween. More than 1,200 children attended the day-long event. Officers of IFC were: Brooks Haley, pres.; J 0e Hensley, v. p.; Ronnie Mason, sec.; Bruce Perlstein, treas.; and Pat Naler, parl. Brooks Haley, president of IFC, talks with a North Texas Daily reporter. tFirst rowl Lynn Barringer, president; Ronnie Mason, secretary; Joe Hensley, vice-president; Bruce Perlstein, treas- urer. tRow twol Gary Friday, Kappa Sigma; Bob Cundiff, Kappa Alpha; Harold Swann, Sigma Phi Epsilon; Mike Woodward, Tau Kappa Epsilon; Micky Burnim, Omega Psi Phi; Bruce Weber, Pi Kappa Phi; Jerry M iller, Phi Kap- pa Sigma; John Holmes, Phi Kappa Theta; Greg Cornhole, Delta Sigma Phi. tRow threel Tony Marre, Pi Kappa Alpha; Johnny Harris, Geezles; Doug Boise, Delta Epsilon; Tommy Garrison, Theta Chi; Pat McLaughlin, Lambda Chi Alpha; Larry Norman, Sigma Alpha M u; Pat Naler, Phi Kappa Theta. tLeft to right? Jackie Hill, Carol Burrell, Becky Guires, Elizabeth Parr, EhxlihGeQTge; Judy Bracken, Annie Simmons, Chris Lund, Cathy LeMaster, Sharon Crumbaker, Joanne Waller, Betsy dewn, Helen King, Karen Wooten, Lizzie Green. tSeatedt Rica Wright, Sally Miller, Gayla Vogt, Kaye Williams, and Tommie Kenas. PANHELLENIC COUNCIL Cooperation Is Council Goal Composed of the eleven sorormes on campus, Panhellenic Council has its goals to maintain on a high plane, sorority life and interfrater- nity relations and to cooperate with the university in its eiforts to main- tain high cultural, educational and social standards of sorority women. The Panhellenic Council again this year sponsored Greek Side Story at Panhellenic Preview, and decorated a Christmas tree in the Administration Building. Members also sponsored a program With the Association of Women Students, ttPrevention of Assaults on Women? that featured self-defense expert Frederic Storaska. The sorority rep- resentatives worked this past year to coordinate standard rush, pledg- ing, initiation procedures and other areas involving sororities. Every Christmas the Panhellenic Coun- Panhellenic officers included Sally cil traditionally decks the Administra- Miller, pres.; Rica Wright, 151; v. p.; tion halls. Gayla Vogt, 2nd V. p.; Kay Wil- liams, see; and Jan Schmitz, treas. ies it I O r O S Ferguson, Regina Sproule, Pam Gibson, Karen G. Tarrant, Pam Archilla, Melissa Bast, Beverly Burges, Kay Chance, Frances Charles, Debbie Clark, Linda K. Davis, Arliss Farina, Theresa Fletcher, Tara Glenn, Kathy Greene, Lizzy Hatcher, Annette Henley, Thelma Sue Hunt, Martha Jefferies, Patricia Johnson, Sue Lovelace, Sue Maddox, Brenda Mathews, Pam Meador, Patti Miller, Sally Perryman, Martha Plexco, Pam Pope, Deborah ADPis Mix Beauty, Talent Alpha Delta Pis combined both beauty and talents to gain campus and community recognition. The so- rority co-hosted with Delta Sigs to give a party for the children at Cum- berland Presbyterian Home. Also, ADPis donated a turkey to an under- privileged family a hanksgiving. Beauties incl tied gSally Miller, Yucca Beauty L 2 M Writy was a foster faml y - a Korean child named Bernidita. Other ADPis active in Angel Flight included Marsha Wright, Arliss Da- vis, Martha Hunt, Brenda Maddox, Sandy Smith, and Annette Hatcher. Fall officers were: Sally Miller, pres.; Marsha Wright, v. p.; Thelma Sue Henley, treas.; and Kay Burgess, sec. Alpha Delta Pi members and their dates pose at their annual spring masquerade party. ADPi pledges and KAs fraternize at a mixer. Winter, Suzanne Wise, Cathy Word, Gay Wright, Marsha Robinson, Pamela J. Roderick, Sharon Rucker, Susan Samson, Madelyn Schnorbus, Paula Schultze, Janet Shahan, Gail Smith, Connie Smith, Sandy Stolp, Mickey Thieleke, Barbara Willhite, Nannette Wilson, Barbie Wilson, Susi Lincoln, Alberta Simmons, Annie Ward, Daryl Warren, Norva Banks, Toni Barlow, Rosalind Brooks, Eva Caldwell, Billye Carr, Deborah Carr, Dorothy Dewberry, Glenda Dorsey, Cynthia Earles, Sarah Ellis, Carolin Forest, Joyce Harris, Evelyn Hayes, Deborah Hunt, Shirley Hunt, Marva Johnson, Cassandra Johnson, Janice Johnson, Peggy Jones, Jerrion Jones, Rita Kennard, Lou Vetl'ice McLendon, Shirley Mays, Beverly Ann Montgomery, Carol Reed, Wanda Richardson, Sadie E. Smith, Thelma Smith, Lorraine Taylor, Carol T. Taylor, L. Marian Tucker, Dimple Urps, Brenda Wagner, Jacquelyn Waters, Dymris Wilson, Nicky Wright, Diane Wright, Gloria ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA AKAs Affilates; Become National In October the local chapter of Alpha Phi Beta got their national charter to afii Alpha. J anice J ohnson president of , members were named to ths Who: Sarah Taylor, Jacqueline Hill ma- tionaD and Carol Taylor eYuccaL Fall officers were: Carol Montgom- ery, pres.; Dorothy Carr, 1st v. p.; Nicky Wilson, 2nd v. p.; Dimple Tuck- er, sec.; Beverly Mays, treas., and J anice J ohnson. Darl. AKAs cheer the Eagles with a eeShoo bop shoo booby doo." Alpha Kappa Alphas toasted their fall pledges at a reception at the Holiday Inn. Brackeen, Judy Alpha Phis sing "The Look of Lou? to Gambill, Sheryl win second place in sorority sing song. Lee, Sally Chaney, Jeanette Allan, Lynn Anderson, Andrea Bentley, Paula Berkley, Mary Brownlee, Phyllis Bynum, Diana Campos, Bertha Chesney, Suzanne Cladius, Kathi Cole, Candi Frazier, Carrie Hall, Teena Harris, Cynthia Henley, Marsha Janauaris, Stella Jensen, Sandy Kinder, Janet Lawson, Donna Laxon, Toni Lucas, Marje McKithan, Cathy Mahler, Carol Morgan, Camille Nichols, Lynn A Phi Elaine Yarbrough competes in Greek Week stilt race. ALPHA PHI APHis Place 2nd in Sorority Event The 44 members of Alpha Phi placed second in sorority division of Sing Song for 1969. A Phis Cbntinue to Win as they took top hon6rs . 'th the Phi Kappa Sigmas for their ' mingL float. Board and Ma, 6 ey, Marketing Club sweetheart. Fall officers were: Polly Madsen, pres.; Ellen Owens, 1313 v.p.; Lynn Allen, 2nd v.p.; Stella Janavaris, sec.; Georganne Golembiewski, trea. Alpha Phis and Phi Kaps constructed an award-winning Homecoming float. Owens, Ellen Price, Carol Prim, Marsha Rediger, Deborah Sanders, Nancy Smith, Charlotte Smothers, Pam Sparolin, Paula Tarsia, Nancy Vogt, Gayla Weatherall, Cathy White, Mary Whitsitt, Julia Witkowski, Donna Witt, Carol Woods, Nancy Pledges sponsor a campus shoe shine as money-making project. ALPHA XI DELTA Sorority Holds Yearly Pink Rose Formal Sigma Eta was one of the three local sorori- ties to go national this year, when the chapter was formally installed as an affiliate of Alpha Xi Delta last Novemh' lta monorary Englism and Alpha Beta Alpha monorary libraryy Their fall officers were: Cheryl Rolan, pres.; Elise Dumes, v.p.; Kathy Clark, sec.; Sarah Yingst, treas. Diane Harrison creates sorority mascot for Homecoming. Rolan, Cheryl Visser, Marlies Clark, Mary K. Gibson, Corinne Booker, Susan G. Childers, Debbie Davis, Carol Dumas, Elise Fair, Rhonda Gilbert, Stacy Greer, Donna Harrison, Diane Hejl, Martha Hicks, Kay Hodgkins, Sherrie Jakstas, Donna Jasuta, Karen Jones, Melinda LeMaster, Cathey Lund, Chris Otwell, Cindy Rowe, Kathy Stilwell, Gail Yingst, Sarah K. V. Pres. Members welcome new pledges after fall bid acceptance. Alpha Xi Deltas plan spring rush skits. V. Pres. Reece, Sandi Schultze, Dixie Hobdy, Ann Guyer, Becca Anders, Vicki Anders, Zona Arnold, Brenda Bostick, Gene Brown, Jo Anne Bulltington, Marcy Chapman, Cynthia Cobb, Cherilou Cross, Susan Danner, Marion Davidson, Dena Duncan, Nancy Eatherly, Lynda Fraley, Ana Greer, Kathi Henry Susan Holt, Carol Hurst, George Anna Jameson, Janita Jones, Ginger Jones, Nancy Knackstadt, Carol Krusz, Karen La Londe, Georgia Lenamon, Mary Lewis, Cindi Lund, Dee McGriffin, Martha Merchant, Alicia OtNeil, Vicki Parr, Elizabeth Patmore, Margret Chi Omega owl salutes the Eagles. CHI OMEGA Sorority Sports Honor Award The Chi Omegas continued to maintain their outstanding scholar- ship record for the tenth consecu- tive semester. Two members, Dee Lund and Linda Buttrell, were named to ths Who. A busy fall was kicked off when members teamed with Kappa Sigs to make Homecoming house decora- Dixie Schult SErVedEas aMNT ma- jorette, Marion Danner, Nancy Walker for Green Jackets; and Cindy Lewis, Dena Davidson, Linda Eatherly, are in Angel Flight. Spring plans include the spring pledge class presentation at Denton Country Club, a visit to Cumber- land Presbyterian Home, and par- ticipation in Greek Week. Fall officers were: Dee Lund, pres.; Nancy Jones, v.p.; Susan Cross, sec.; Vicki OtNeal, treas. Reichwell, Patricia Rowe, Margret Sainsott, Gay Shafer, Barbara Smith, Patricia Stewart, Lisa Sullivan, Mary Anne Sullivan, Sharon Taylor, Corolyn Trigg, Tammye Walker, Nancy Walker, Toni Wetmore, Linda Ab0vw Chi Omegas participate in Greek Week bike race. BelouU Chi Os host a faculty tea in the fall. , W vakxw3$m V1 Pres. Olson, Kris Langland, Leslie Tadlock, Connie Dickerson, Tommy Adams, Diana Armes, Dianna Ashcraft, Dianne Bass, Charwynne Brown, Barbara Browne, Bonnie Clements, Lorraine Colley, Lydia Curry, Cynthia Ann De Weese, Vivian Foreman, Judy Forrester, Karen Gault, Jo Marie Genovese, Linda Gunn, Debbie Hefley, Janis Good, Katherine Henry, Katha Jameson, Malyna Jenkins, Linda DELTA GAMMA DG Sister Crowned Homecoming Queen Homecoming was an exciting time for the Delta Gammas as they saw their sister, Leslie Langland, crowned Homecoming Queen. The Gamma Nu chagter supported their national philanthrop i . ject which 15 iiSight 11 fgblindi, by reading 9 V Eiggg Christmas bro giir 1 MEG to the Sig Ep house to host a p53; Roberson, Heart FunMdr Beauty. Fall officers were: Linda J enkins, pres.; Wanda Mathews, v.p.; Patti Bryson, sec.; and Tommy Dickerson, treas. Happy DGs celebrate at a Halloween costume party. Thor0ughly Modern Milli? was the theme of Delta Gammak rush skit. Delta Gammas work to elect Leslie Pledges smile Langland Homecoming Queen. Jones, Anita King, Helen Lankford, Teresa Matthews, Wanda Riddlesperger Carol Rowntree, Beverly Saxon, Suellen Spaulding, Kathleen Strain, Anne Weaver, Linda White, Debbie Wooten, Karen Delta Phi Epsilons pose after the reception honoring their new national status. Fishkind, Ellen Brinberg, Carol Arons, Jeannie Crumbaker, Sharon Barber, Janetta Brown, Susy Dubman, Hedy Levin, Marilyn Waller, Joanne Members plan spring rush. DELTA PHI EPSILON Sorority Gives Hanukkah Party Delta Phi Ep on, formally Phi Wyles, Earnye Yancy, Evelyn Baker, Ruth Frazier, Gloria Thibodeaux, Brenda Harlan, Della Brewer, Barbara Brown, Gwendolyn Callaway, Linda Faye Conley, Delores Garrett, Gwendolyn Gipson, Margaret Goode, Ella Fair Henderson, Helen Hoques, Mary Helen Jackson, Renee Jean Batiste, Helen Jones, Marjorie Leverett, Andrea Lewis, Tanza Mathies. Willie Mayfield, Ruth Mosley Robbie Nelson, Shirley Patton, Marion Perry, Sharon Roquemore, Patricia Stubblefield, Juliette Washington, Lois Y. Williams, Carolyn K. DELTA SIGMA THETA Sorority Boosts Greek Cooperation Delta Sigma Thetas boosted sorority cooperation when they sponsored the fall semester ttProbate Showft The purpose of the show was to bring the various NT pledge classes closer. In this same spirit of sorority harmony, the Deltas gave a coke party for the three sororities to go national: Phi Deltas, Alpha Phi Betas, and Sigma Eta. The sorority raised money for Biafrians in their ttCents per Inchh campaign where waists were measured at two cents per inch. In the 69 Sing Song competition, they placed third and plans were made for their annual formal in March. Outstanding members are many: Kath- ryn Haley, Whots Who in Biology, Mortar Board; Gloria Frazier represented NT in MVC queen contest; and Earnye Wyles was a semi-finalist for Yucca Beauty. tAbOUet "Tripping in a soulful Spin with DST? tAt ler Members and pledges gather for pictures after fall bid acceptance. Sorority sisters compete for honors in the three-legged race held as part of Greek Week activities. Delta Zeta pledges perform at Probate Show sponsored by Delta Sigma Theta. Alum and members combine commemorate Foundefs Day. Christian, Deborah Wood, Janedo Daly, Sally Marti, Christina Craig, Christi Davidson, Robin Davis, Alice Deason, Nancy Edie, Sharon Geer, Nancy Guthrie, Alice Heissenberger, Karen Hockaday, Joan Holland, Donna Hurley, Carolyn Kenas, Tommie Leverington, Kathey Matthews, Sandy $3?3:53,1 $2:3 38 DELTA ZETA Nichols, Mary DZs Support N. . B b Service Project Oliver, Dianne This yeafs Delta Zeta calendar Orsburn, Marsha . . . Included many commumty serv1ces. They worked With the Pi Kappa Alphas to collect canned foods for a Thanksgiving drive in cooperation Poff, Trudy with the Denton, County Welfare Raborn, Leslie A . DZ ' - Robertson, Linda gem S also $95393? 1331; Rogers, Connie Savage, Sondra Schenck, Betsy Schmitz, Jon L - y; , Sillfirsy 851131011 Christian, Angel ' ; Donna S e y, usan Holland, Green J ackets, and Sharon Edie for Green J ackets. Fall ochers were: Sharon Edie, pres.; Donna Holland, sec.; and sparks, Jo Ann Susan Skelly, treas. Specht, Melody Watt, Lisa Wilson, Sandra Wright, Nancy Delta Zetas and dates groove at their Christmas dance. OAbOI'W Kappa Deltas sponsor Sprite and trike raw during Cuwk Week. UH righU KDS sprqu up the ramp for fall rush during work week. Trons. 3442mm Helen lelor, Kathy KAPPA DELTA KDs Awarded O a Thanksgl , worked with 5' Outstiifidipg Km 1n WHds ths, 330 Jusiticefws ' 1 Mellor an Hogan, Sally Davis, Carole Britain, Ruth Brasel, Julie Alexander, Sherri Asher, Mary Balkey, Mary Beth Beasley, Susan Beeson, Janet Burrell, Carol Hark, Beverly Flournoy, Gale Foster, Linda Franks, Brenda Gamble, Anne Gorham, Linda Grantham, Glenda Langston, iLnda Neuman, Donna Okerberg. Margaret Oxford, Kitty Piccola, Rosari Qualtrough, Courtney Reilly, Peggy Rollinst Patricia Saage, Susan Sewell, Donna Shraunert Jane Starr, Diane Stoudenmiert Karen Westdyke, Polly Witt, Cheryl Wright, Rica tAt ler Members work ,round the clock on their awar winning float. tAbovet The Delta Sigma Phi activit award went to the Kappa Deltas for the second consecu tive year. Other leaders on campus are Julie Brasel, Head of Elections Board; Poly Westdyke, Rica Wright, Donna Sewell, Mary Beth Bal- key, Susan Saage, and Cheryl Witt for Tri Service. In the fall, KDs combined with their other chapters from TCU, SMU, and East Texas to sponsor their Charity Ball at the Fairmont in Dallas. Proceeds from the dance were donated to the Crippled Childrents Hospital in Rich- mond, Va., the sororityts national philan- thropy. The members donned western attire to usher for the NT play tt110 In the Shade? Another campus endeavor they supported was reading to one of the blind students. Fall officers were: Sue Foster, pres.; Mary Beth Balkey, V.p.; and Glenda Grantham, sec. McDonald, Kathy Adams, Janell Harpool, Sally Hilson, Sally Abbott, Susan Allen, Pamela Anschuetz, Mary Aston, Karen Bailey, Mary Berglund, Sandy Boyd, Karen Bronar, Betty Bullard, Doris Capruzzi, Suzi Clark, Tamara F armer, Kitty Fick, Christine Fiorini, Sandra Gay, Laura Geistman, Gerry Zeta Tau Alpha pledges perform at Probate Show in coopera tion with other sorority pledges. ZETA TAU ALPHA Zetas Known As Beautiful Women Janice Craze, E70 Sig Ep sweetheart; Phyliss George, Kappa Sig sweetheart and Miss Denton EYucca Beautyh Lin- da Hillson, Sigma Nu sweetheart EYucca Beautyn and Yucca Beauty Kathy Mc- Donald are reasons Why Zeta Tau Alpha staqggjgf , cheferI aaers Carnivwgmger and Marsha Thanksgwmgw s p a EEyepwgg m FfZas ; 3? migiexs gcmtinued ii der Puif Football; Eplayoif against the Alpha Kappa Alphas. Fall officers were: Eloise Tinsley, pres.; Susan Spradley, v.p., Karen Shir- ley, sec.; and Linda Hillsen, treas. George, Phyllis Hilsabeck, Judy Mahler, Marsha Maurphy, Kathleen Myers, Carol Pinkerton, Laura Pittard, Linda Pritchett, Theresa Rhodes, Becky Rose, Kathy Shirley, Karen Shramek, Rosemary Spradley, Susan Sunderman, Rita Tinsley, Eloise Weniger, Carol Wilcox, Connie Winton, Cynthia Zetas place first in powderpufit football in the playofic with Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority. Members competed for Theta Chi award in 1969 Greek Week. Fraternities Kissner, Michael Cook, Bob Blend, Stephen Garcia, Arthur Blend, Neil Brant, Jeff Goldhirsh, Robert Kozolchyk, Henry McCIanahan, Gary Norman, Mark Norman, Larry Orr, Eric Phillips, John Sonkin, Jerald Stein, Ben Eva Takaus, Sigma Alpha Mu Sweet- heart. SIGMA ALPHA MU Precedent Set By ttFlush-Bowlt, Win Sigma Alpha Mu continued to rank first in scholarship and set a new fra- ternity precedeht'kwith: the bi-annual ttFlush BOWI- Games?UIDuring the fall semester Sammiesibeat- then Pikes in the football Flusht-Bbwlgandiplanned a soft- ball playofftfbyr the springi5rTwo consecu- tive Victories by either fraternity makes the fixtureftrophyt permanent in that house. L " , ' y- Fall officers fOrSammies: Larry Nor- man, prior; Arthur Garcia, V. prior; and J ohn M. Blend, redorder; and J ohn Phil- lips, exchequer. Sammies proudly bear trophy from Flush Bowl Game. Boyce, Doug Buck, W. Dennis Bulino, Andrew Garcia, Guillermo Hodges, Gary Kennedy, Mike LaLumia, Joe Murray, Mike Nuekols, Craig Paternostro, Ronald Poe, R. Wayne Rice, James Richter, Steve Roberts, John Shelogg, Thomas Spieker, Donald Williams, Michael Delta Epsilons hustle new freshman at their house. DELTA EPSILON DEis Remodel Fraternity House Members of Delta Epsilon com- pletely remodeled their house inside and out, on 1110 W. Hickory, and filled many hours With community services. In November the frater- nity helped the Denton Chamber Ht Wt nuaI 4w wgewitmwm t W wecond in scholarship and placed in the fra- ternity football intramural division. Fall officers were the same as those in the spring tsee picturesi with the exception of Wayne Poe, who became pledge trainer. Ab0vw Delta Epsilons held a clean-up campaign in cooperation with the Benton Chamber of Com- merce. At righU Pam Persful, Delta Epsilon sweetheart. Below Brothers plan strategy during a time out. Delta Sigs Claiborne, Dan Beals, Neil Miller, Steve Ross, Jim Barron, Louis Bass, David Blair, Smith Boles, Jerry Brown, Mike Brunner, Howell Chaney, Robert Cooper, Gail N. Cornwall, Greg Crawley Wayne Crummel, Richard David, J. M. Fischer, Rick Flowers, Daniel Hall, Charlie Hammerle, Joe Hammerle, Pete Jaremko, Matthew Lewsi, Tom Liggitt, William McCullough, Jerry McGarry, Vincent Maenza, Frank Patrick, Brian Saxton, W. Trent Schyler, Steve Sell, Steve Tallant, Larry Vayghn, Charles Williams, J. Marvin Wooldridge, Quinn Zahra, Edward DELTA SIGMA PHI Delta Sigs Pick International Girl The Dream Girl of the Gamma Xi chapter, Connie Garland, was selected the international Dream Girl of Delta Sigma Phi at their national conven- tion in Denver, Colorado last August. During Greek Week the Delta Sigs sponsored their annual chariot race 1 : pated 111 Smg Song A Christmas party at the Cumberland Presbyterian Chlldrens Home was 00- -hosted by the Delta Sigs and Alpha Delta PiS. Thei1: Spmx Ball Weekend slated for spring was to be held at Lake Murray. Outstanding Delta Sigs wereL Pete Ha : ' merle,AttOr11ey General of US- the youngest chapter supervisor. Danny Flowers, Delta Sig pledge trainer, is presented a pledge paddle by the newly initiated Delta Sig pledge class. Connie Garland, local chapter candidate, was chosen as I nternational Dream Girl by Delta Sigma Phi. V. Pres. Harris, Johnny Parks, Ramond Hollar, Galen Carlson, James Auld, Michael Ausburne, Lee Boulware, Larry Brown, Chester Brownlow, Russell Edmundson, Raymond Gilbert, Leonard Gomez, Reynalde GEEZLES Fraternity Excels In Athletic Field Many Geezles are numbered among outstanding athletes at North Texas. Among these are James Ivy, Missouri Valley Con- ference linebacker; James Gibson, assistant coach for NT; Mort Frailey, basketball; Tony Reese, free agent for the Pittsburgh Steel- ers; and Jerry Merck who is the high point mgmg g; g and they; a for childre site of their Homecoming party and their Christmas party was at the Marriot in Dallas. Spring semester was filled With a Valentine party, Easter party at Marriot, Round-up at Lake Mur- rary, Oklahoma, and rush smokers. Fall officers were: Tommy Rowe, pres.; Raymond Parks, v.p.; Ray- mond Edmuson, sec.; Jerry Rove, teas.; and Jimmy Reed, sgt.-at- arms. Margaret Rowe, Geezle Sweethart Geezles discuss the possibility of gcing national with Sigma Alpha E psilon. Heuman, Bob Kennedy, Ronn Leal, Mario Locke, Randy Lopez, Juan Orvick, Phil Paciello, Tommy Rowe, Tommy Scroggins. Gary Walker, Ralph Walker, Johnny Wiesen, Max Cundiff, Bob Lawson, Billy DeWeese, Carl Durham, David Ellsi, Jimmy Frazier, Joe Harvey, Roy Heiser, Chuck Hughey, Bob Lankford, William Lasseter. Steve Mathews, John Moore, Art Moore, Michael Neblett, Mike Olderog, Ronnie Pledges of Kappa Alpha are greeted during bid acceptance. KAPPA ALPHA KA,s Hold Annual Old South Ball The Southern Gentlemen of Kappa Alpha were among the tihouse buildingt, fraternities this past year, When they did construction on both the inside and outside of their house. KAis known on campus included Bill Olderog, Whois Who; Steve Ramsey and Jim Swords for varsity football. Social life included the Dixie Ball in December, a Homecoming party and they plan their Old South Ball for May. Members served the community With a Thanksgiving car wash to raise money for an underprivileged family, gave a Christmas party at Denton State School, and proceeds of their annual Greek Bowl game with the Sigma Nus go to the Cumberland Childrenis Home. Clifton, Ted w. ; , KAPPA SIGMA Ray, Thomas ; . ?fiiitRsocssft 13: : , , . ' T Kappa Slgs Re-Do House, Plan Race Awalt, John I' ' L Kappa Sigmas revamped their house Baganz, Paul Bailey, Larry Bass, John Birdwell, Jerry Blassingame, Dean Brobst, Gary V Callahan, Steve L t ' , x llllams, t - the Ugly for eifort Cranfill, Davey Dutton, David Estes, Steven Frazier, Rob Friday, Gary ' ' . nual spring f0 521311333 $131 ael - ' The . fraternity. sponsored a Viking Hi11iard,Wi11iam V .. y .- party 1n the sprlng and held a rush ' party the second semester at the Fair- mont Hotel. Fall officers were: Gary Friday, grand master; Pat Reese, grand treasurer; and Kappa Sig quarterback throws over onrushing linebacker in intramural grid Danny Wiliams, grand scribe. clash. Phyliss George, Kappa Sigma Sweetheart Isham, Dewey Jackson, Bobby Jeter, Gary Langford, Michael Llewellyn, Randy Maddox, Michael Malmstrom, Royd Mann, Christopher Parker, Gary Peacock, Stephen F. Pillians, Jim Pond, Steve Pond, William C. Poller, Frank Reese, Frank Schmitt, Paul Seedig, Larry Shelton, Randy Stowe, Jack E. Tarwater, Roy Tomlin, William C. Waldrop, Larry E. Walthall, Mike West, John Westbrook, John Williams, Danny Driver, Joe Wootton, David Cooper, Joe Richardson, Lee Atchley, Danny Baldwin, Jeffrey Barnett, John Bean, Frank Bollheimer, Ron Bond, Larry Brinkley, Carl Brooks, John Costa, John Crouch, Raymond Dane, Robert Edwards, Michael Gaines, Byron Gray, Dan LAMBDA CHI ALPHA Lambda Chfs Take Spirit Trophly, Honors e fd5d the Spirit :honors when elected US the Lambd Fall officers 5 -- egghlm, pres.; Jim Monroe; v.p.; L , treas.; and Jeff Baldwin, sec. hAbovd Margaret Patmore, Lambda Chis Crescent Girl and president of the Crescent Girls Club. hRighU Lambda Chi and Kappa Delta pledges collect for Canned Food Drive. Foster, Linda Dennis, Terrie Krusz, Karen Kuehn, Sylvia Laird, Jan Reilly, Peggy Patmore, Margaret Royse, Elizabeth Stuckey, Phyllis Trigg, Tammye Yingst, Sarah Weis, Rita m 2; Fantasy , M7 in in 417er Lambda Chis and Kappa Deltas captured the Homecoming Sweep- stakes with the float pictured above. Haley, Brooks Henson, Bob Hubble, Jerry Joe, Harry Laird, Stephen Little, William McLaughlin, Pat Mahon, Jim Meyer, Richard Monroe, James Petty, Allen Preskitt, John Roberts, Allen Roberts, Steve Simmons, Richard Smith, Steven Stuckey, Schuyle Taylor, John Vinson, Bob Burnim, Mickey Banks, Christopher Brown, Jimmy Mitchell, Harold Adams, Cecil Bennett, Joe Dauchan, Davy Dixon, Bobby Edwards, Bennie Franklin, Eddie Harkless, Lawrence Johnson, Harold LeVels, Wilmer Livingston, William McCampbell, Eugene Redd, Charles Simpson, Johnny Johnny Simpson plays Santa Claus for the under- priviledged children of Benton County. OMEGA PSI PHI Queis Pariticpate In Active Year An active year for members of Omega Psi Phi began with Home- coming float work, victory party and the move into their house on W. Prairie. 1: the Danton State ' included an ican Colleges . . nd, UniVersities and Yucca,s Whois Who in Economics. In sports, Omegas won the frater- nity championship in basketball intra- murals, and placed in track and tennis in the spring of ,69. Cynthia Prevost, Omega Phi Phi sweetheart. PHI KAPPA SIGMA Phi Kaps Build Winning Float Phi Kappa Sigmas worked with the Alpha Phis to create an award winning float-hOld Eagle in the Shoe" h for Homecoming. Later a 2 bgm and their v a dance at pres.; Floyd Hensley, V.p.; John Jones, sec.; Ed Jones, treas.; and Kenny Long, pledge trainer. JoLynn Belcher, Phi Kappa Sig- ma Sweetheart. Mewhinney, Jim Bell, John Ponce, Lalo Griffin, Jim Allbright, Gregory Arnold, Doug Bell, Roger Bossart, Stephen Brieden, Gus Burk, Eddie Cannon, Frank Chandler, Terry Cohagan, Rick Collins, Ronnie Cook, Charles Dodson, Lee Engel, Gene Foshee, Robert Gibson, Millard Hensley, Floyd Jones, Ed Jones, John Kilgore, Jeffrey Kyle, Tommy Long, Kenny Meharg, Buddy Miller, Jerry Remley, Bill tTopi Phi Kaps show off their award winning float for best visual ehect, iiOld Eagle in the Shoe? The Phi Kaps co-sponsored the float with the Alpha Phis. tAbovei Top Phi Kaps were recognized at their annual awards banquet in the fall. tRighU Phi Kaps gave a Hallo- ween party for children of Parents Without Partners. Ripperds, Timothy Robinson, Roy Robinson, Scott Singleton, Gary Stanton, Dan Todd, Thomas Wardlaw, Larry Willingham, David Naylor, Patrick Gorman, Mike Sedberry, Brian Bailey, Donald Carrell, Kim Connor, James Gonzales, Hector Hacker, Frank Hedman, David Holmes, John Kelly, Brian Lange, Tommy Morton, Gary Nelson, Ken Pollan, Phil Sefert, John Simmons, Danny Vasquez, Michael PHI KAPPA THETA Group Supports Service Projects Men of Phi Kappa Theta ex- celled in community service proj- ects this past year. The fraternity had a Christmas canned food drive for an underpriviledged family, warked in affiliation with a church to determine the needy families in the area, entertained the Cumber- land Presbyterian children, and sponsored a ttpie throw" in Denton Center to raise money for Denton State School. Outstanding members include Pat Naylor, pres. of-Phi Eta Sigma; Ken Nelson, Talons; Tom Connor and Bill Harvey, Blue Key. Dallas was the scene of their an- nual pledge Sweetheart Ball. Par- ties were numerous with house par- ties, a lake party for members and their dates, and a hay ride party. The fraternity recognized 26 girls by making they tiSmall Phish this past year. The girls are selected on their interest in the fraternity and helping them with various rush functions. Spring plans include more work for the Cumberland Presbyterian Home, the spring formal and par- ticipation in Greek Week activities. Fall officers were: J ohn Holmes, pres.; Tom Connor, v.p.; Frank Hackerd, sec.; and Mike Vasquez, treas. Pat Hogan, Phi Kappa Theta Sweet- heart. CEQILE L. mean green bird V Phi Kappa Thetas salute the Mean Green with house decorations and preparation for the Homecoming game with Wichita State. Phi Kappa Thetas and dates picnic at Lake Dallas. Members sponsor a pie throw to raise money for Denton State School. PI KAPPA ALPHA Pikes Re-locate; Back Blood Drive Members of Pi Kappa Alpha spent semester break making a move from their former house on N. Locust to 1029 W. Hickory. The famous Pike fire truck, symbol of Pike chapters nationally, was used to promote the school- wide blood drive. The fraternityixworlgled :w1th xihe Delta Zetas forx c drive f0 X :5 x z Pikes on campiuh zvvere Jbe Hensley, v.p.; of IFC, and beorge Clark Who won the over-all wrestling championship for NT. Fall ofiicers were: Tony Marre, pres.; Candelario Elizondo, v.p.; Donald Bren- del, treas.; Carlos DeLatorre, sec.; and Victor Richter, member-at-large. Jane Garibay, Pi Kappa Alpha Dream Girl Delatorre, Carlos Clodfelter, Gary Brendel, Don Walther, Glen Brown, Thomas Clark, George Dalton, Forrest Dunlap, Cole Elizondo, Candelario Faris, Terry Garibay, Samuel Goff, James Hensley, Joseph Johnson, Auvie Jones, Bob Judson, Levis Kinley, Dennis Leonard, Jerry Marre, John Phillips, Randy Richter, Victor Ricks, Robert Roelse, Robert Sullivan, John Veazey, Fred Wiggen, William Zorn, Kenneth hAbovw Pikes set clownish pose on the chapterk fire hBelouQ Pikes and dates gather at the annual engine, a symbol of Pikes throughout the United States. Dream Girl Formal, which was held at the Adolphus Hotel in Dallas last spring. Sibley, Tom Pullen, Thomas Smith, Danny Austin, David L. Barrett, James Bond, Dan Brown, James Faris, Terry Frederick, Michael Gormly, Rob Griffin, Don W. Harper, Leslie A. Harrison, Doug Honea, Frank Jones, Kennith LeClaire, Douglas W. LeClaire, Gene Lee, Johnny E. Lewis, Daniel McCarley, David Mosley, Bill Newman, Louis Roelse, Robert Sciaba, Anthony Sullivan, Bill Weber, Bruce Weesler, John Williams, R. Michael PI KAPPA PHI Fraternity Strives For Charter Pi Kappa Phis are striving to work in close harmony with both the ad- ministration and community to get their national charter. Members Weber,I V Fall oHicers were: Bruce Weber, archon; John Wessler, ec.; Tom Sib- ley, treas.; Bill Mosley, warden; and Louis Newman, hist. Pi Kappa Phi latches on to a long pass for first down yardage in Greek intramural play. Abovw Alpha Phis and Pi Kappa Phis lend their time to help the children at Denton State School. Below Pi Kappa Phis welcome Pam Fox, Pl Kappa th Sweetheart alumni to Homecoming. vxtxz6 Mason, Ronnie Phillips, Vic Berkley, Mike Shipp, Charlie Ball, Richard Bierds, Drew Black, Ken Brown Thomas Dess, Jay Faulkner, Michael Franklin, Ronald L. Grablachoff, Vic Grizzaffi. Luke Guinn, Phil Kautsch, John Larson, Charles Lewis, David K. Longbotham. Jim McMullin, Douglas MCNeel, James Mahan, Bob Morrison, James Richardson. John Rowe, Larry Shafer, Randall Smith, Wayne St. John, Harry SIGMA NU Chapter Dominates Greek Athletes Sigma Nus were the dominant figure in Greek athletics this past year, when they won lays during Sigma N tary Institute in 1869. OHicers for the fall were: Bruce Duffy, pres.; Drew Bierds, v. pres.; Steve Grubs, sec.; and Charlie Shipp, treas. Linda Hilson, Sigma N u Sweetheart Sigma Nus look tired but victorious after winning the Greek Bowl Game, 35-7 Sigma Nus won their 15th semi- annual rope-pull last fall over Theta Chi. 1Above1 Sig Eps capture first place in fraternity intramural foot- ball. 1Above RighU Sig Ep pigs baffled sorority girls in 169 Greek Week event. 1Below1 Lizzy Greene, Sigma Phi Epsilon Sweet- heart. SIGMA PHI EPSILON 22-Man Pledge Class Initiated By Sig Eps Sigma Phi Epsilonf founded in 1901, ini- tiated their largest pledge class this past semester wit11 22 km , T otal member- of Denton. Fall brou ; sweetheart, ' A Was Wmdent. The girls assist With rush and parties. Outstanding members included Van Wheel- er, president. of Talons, and ths Who selectee; Mike Keith, USNT; and Tim Barrett, varsity cheerleader. Fall officers were: Harold Swan, pres.; Gary Saba, v.p.; J immy Strawn, sec.; J im Kilbain, comp. Loba, Gary Geistman, Alan Strawn, Jimmy Swarm, Rex Barrett, Terry Board, Hal Bounds, Kirk Bryan, Murray Bryan, Paul Cannon, Bryan Carter, Roy Cline, Stephen Cook, Lloyd Edwards, John Elan, Mike Elkins, Gary Gartman, D. R. Green, Curtis Haas, Dennis Hardy, Samuel Hinsley, Mike Hill, Gordon Johnson, Jerry Johnson, Jimmie Keith, Michael Kupper Andrew Leak, Harry Lindley Michael Marlar, Edson Miles, Gregg Mashburn, Ernie Mims, Sam Minke, Terry Morris, Jim Ohland, Bill Oliver, Jim Paschel, Mike Pate, Gregg Patterson, Bob Pierce, Bill Richards, Sonny Rohde, Walter Saba, Tommy Shaw, John Smith, Richard Swann, Harold Tosch, David Tucker, Rick Watson, Doug Watson, Richard Wheeler, Van Willis, Wade Worsham, James Zimmerman, Harvey Nelson, Berta Sig Eps compete in Greek Week Sing Song. TKE house decorations won first place in. homecoming competition. Maus, Stephen Wheatly, Ervin Zajicek, Ray Kelley, Joe Bilotta, Frank Bravenec, Ed Bunzel, Dave Carlton, James Cerasaro. Victor Cowam William Craft, Richard Delario, James Dennis, Rickey Ellis, Robert Fleckman, N. D. Givens, Gary Gondo, Suzuo McMurray, Randy Mahan, Mark TAU KAPPA EPSILO TKES Win House Decor Tau Kappa Epsilons got off to a successful semester when they won Homecoming house decorations; JWith "Wichita .7 S on cam- B le, nay Bandu;et.;' Famows: i-TKE iiliimlii are Ferrante dtheigghergV the Let- termehijhQaiir-Jnevx? albumana- tures "theykrgSW'eahedart of TKEW and Hugh Hefner, publisher of Playboy maga- zine. Mendoza, Rudy Mullendore, Jerry Pertuit, Edward Peters, Greg Peterson, James Puckett, Phil Rammage, Eugene Reinema, Loren Ressler, Victor Sarrett, Charlie Sosebee, Steve Spencer, Thomas Stephenson, Joe Wysong, Michael Below Nationally known TKES, Ferrante and Teicher, are greeted back stage by their local Abomg J0 Ellen Seidule, Tau Kappa Epsilon brothers. Sweetheart. Theta Chi members get acquainted with prospective rushees at a fall smoker. Garrison, Thomas Guynes, Doug Jackson, Dennis Fredrickson, Steve Ballow, Wesley Bashton, George Black, Scott Burchfield, Roy DeFratus, David Dillehay, Tom Duckworth, Michael Dwyer, Michael Ewald, William Foster, George Herren, Ray Kelly, Mike Laudadio, Bob McKay, Paul Mayhall, Jack Miller, Mickey THETA CHI Greeks Remode Old, Plan New The Theta Chis are currentl conducting an extensive remodelin program on their new house at 62' W. HickoryNThe fraternity has al ready bought the land on. the pro posed "site of Fraternity Row Wit the intention ofteventually buildin a new house. Their fallv social calendarjinclude a.Homecon1ing,dance, annual Sigm NuPTheta:Chi.-'1fope pull and 'part and the 'aniiuale'semi-formal pledg paddle; presentatiOnt . I The" all-Greek .1 ttOx-R'oast" Wi top off Greek aetivities. Planned fo the spring semester'whs their bi annual rope pull, the SpringvDrea t Girl formalfat Lake Murray. Outstanding; members includ Bob Quinn, varsity cheerleade Talons; Wesley Ballou, varsity foo ball; Bruce Perlstein, Talons an treas. of IFC; John Wiggins an Mike Dwyer of the Talons. Actives welcome potential pledge to their new house. Abovd Bertha Campos Theta Chi Dream Girl. Below and At RighU Rushee learns about Theta Chi. Moore, Larry Odom, J immy Page, Gary Perlstein, Bruce Puckett. Mark Quinn, Bob Ramirez Albert Ray, Carl Rowe Robert Sambach, Dean Saunders. Jimmy Scholze, Terry Shimp, Steve Smith, Loren Wells, Gordon Wiggins, John ORGANIZATIONS Introduction . . . . . . . Student Government Service............ Professional. . . . . . . . Departmental . . . . . . H0nor............ Miscellaneous Religious . . . . Publications. . The organization plays an important role in the studentis life. Afliliation With an organization represents involvement with the student body, administration and community. Af- filiation with an organization represents a sincere desire to grow and learn beyond the world of the individual. The organization represents a challenge to the university student, requiring him to show creativity and willingness to work, demanding a little extra effort. This extra effort makes an organization successful and useful. The organization pro- vides an opportunity for each student to develop and polish the skills that he possesses, and aids in acquiring others. Each organization has a different purpose and a different activity. a; 0 me C 0 m in q B: 01101er It ijpy 57!? Students regulate the campus govern- ment, try offenders and listen to appeals; students protest and demand rights; students perform musicals, portray char- acters, and present concerts; students gather the news and publish the periodi- cals; students explore, research, discuss, evaluate and emplement change; stu- dents cater to the needy, lost, and handi- capped. Behind each effort there is an organization, refiecting the involvement of the individual with others serving the student body. Pat McLaughlin, USN T president USNT Orvall Hall, president of the USN T senate New Petition Election System Seats Record Number of Student Senators A record-breaking 58 senators were seated on the USNT Senate this fall when a new election by petition system was initiated. According to a bill proposed by ex- senator Orval Hall and passed by the senate in the spring of ,69, a petition bearing the signatures of 100 supporters elected a student to the senate. How- ever, problems of apathy and absentee- ism still existed. ttWe still have the same delinquency problems as far as absences are con- cerned and the same lack of support for committee work? said USNT President Pat McLaughlin, Garland senior. He added, ttDon,t count the fall semester as a failure. It was a new thing and With all new things there are problems? A fall semester of ttEverybodiest Days" that failed to appear and month- ly moratoriums, some of which did ap- pear, found the senate in turmoil con- cerning a proposal that they support a moroatorium. The bill failed 27-20. Further trouble came in December when a bill to observe December 16 as a ttday of peace at North Texash pre- ceding the Christmas holidays was in- terpreted by some senators as being a moratorium support in Christian cloth- ing. The resolution, however, passed 20-9. The long awaited, much delayed Fac- ulty Analysis and Course Evaluation tFACEt appeared in December with financial backing from the senate. Other senate action included a voter registration drive on campus and in the community, support of John J. Kam- erick Day, the joint passage With the Faculty Senate of an Ombudsman to serve as a trouble shooter between stu- dents and administration, and support of a name change for the campus news- paper. Gail Stilwell, USN T secretary Members of the Senate meet for discus- USNT pushes political sweatshirts on local Denton issue. sion in an assembly. referendum was a hotly debated subject on campus. USN T supports ttKamerick Daytt by soliciting signatures for Senator Dale Bronstein presents a petition in front of the Union Building. in a fall senate meeting. tcontinuedt Senator Dale Bronstein, Fort Worth senior, introduced numerous bills to the body. Many, such as ttThe Cause that Refreshesh calling for a student-faculty private club, the ttBeautiful Bronstein Bellissima Bell Billtt urging an abandon- ment of the present bell system and a Monthly Moratorium Queen bill were bogged down in committee. Other controversy came when some senate members objected to the use of the words ttJesus Christtt in the opening prayer and requested the use of the word ttGodtt in its stead. By the end of the fall semester, a total of 91 bills had been introduced to the senate. Executive officers ride in the USN T H omecoming parade entry. AWS Association Gives Coeds Home Rule NTSU women were allowed a greater freedom in running their own lives when the Association of Women Students tAWSi was introduced to the campus in the fall. Under AWS the women themselves make their own rules. One of the first projects AWS con- ducted was a questionnaire to determine coedst feelings regarding present dormi- tory curfews. The results of the poll re- vealed that the majority of the women were satisfied with the regulations. AWS also determines dormitory dis- cipline. The Women,s Standards Board, a judicial body composed of the residents of each dormitory, hears complaints and tries regulation offenders. In January AWS brought Federick Storaska, nationally known self-defense lecturer to the campus in the first of a proposed series of programs for coeds. Other programs were to include speak- ers on drugs, abortion and contraceptives, and mixing marriage and a career. SEATED LEFT: Karen Alexander, 11. pres.; Kay Webb, pres.; Marilyn Palmer, 2nd 0. pres.; STANDING LEFT: Dean Nancy Dickens, adv.; Karen Hopkins, hist.; Gretchen Barnes, sea; Elizabeth Parr, parl.; Cindy Bass, treas. A short skit demonstrating the way campus life used to be is presented to the group at a fall meeting. Service APO sweetheart Lydia Cauley adds beauty to Homecoming parade. ALPHA PHI OMEGA APOs Aid Lost, Confused Students Alpha Phi Omega members assisted lost and confused students during fall and spring registrations. Members manned the information booth in the foyer 0f the Ad- ministration Building. Various other activities and service projects were undertaken by the APOs, national service fraternity. These in- cluded gathering wood for the Homecom- ing bonfire and playing in intramural football. They also gave a Christmas party along with the Green Jackets, Tri Service and Talons for the underpriviledged children of Benton. Spring activities included the Ugly Man on Campus contest in March, cleaning the pond in the park and ushering at Student Activity Committee events. APOs planned a Denton clean-up cam- paign in conjunction With the Omega Psi Phis. FRONT ROW: Dr. Gerald Brenholtz, advisor; Lanny Battle; Jack Bowen; Dan Hochstetler; David Walton; Dennis Turner, pres. SECOND ROW: George L. H. Holland III; Buzz Wheeler 111; Billy White; Donato A. Serna; Don Wells; Mark Sinclair, cor. sec.; Phillip F. Patrick, rec. sec.; John McCalib. THIRD ROW: Jim Paterson; Jimmy Heath; J. Wel- don Pippin; Mark Miller, v. pres.; Doug Odom; Bill Little; Alan McQueary; Roy Siuley. BACK ROW: Jesse Hill; Gil Gillum; Bob Harris; Gordon Franklin; Ike Korkmas; Ron Armes, treas.; Lewis Bundock; Charles Mitchell; Rick Barnes; Charles Zalkousley; Karle Jackson. NAACP Chapter Protests; Gains Membership Protest, national recognition and growth highlighted the activities of the NT chap- ter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People this year. The organization upset the annual Yucca Beauty Contest in October by pro- testing the procedures used for selecting the final beauties that would appear in the yearbook. The contest was postponed for two weeks and resulted in a decision by the Administration. The NT chapter received national rec- ognition at the 60th national convention of the NAACP in Jackson, Miss., last summer. The 2nd place award for out- standing work in civil rights activities was received by chapter president, Janice J ohnson. The organization set forth a member- ship campaign in an effort to respond to the national call for more members and to increase local membership. The chap- ter goal was 300. Members gather for rally in front of UB to Yucca Beauty Contest. protest alleged discrimination in STANDING: Bill Bohmfalk; Rose M. Reed; Gayle Thomas; Brenda Haynie; Delva Cotton; Christine Heath; Lorraine Smith, sec.; Kathryn Haley; Doris Oliver; Deborah Smith; J anice Johnson, pres.; Americus Hawkins, Jr., treas.; John Rowlett. SEATED: Bobby Watkins; Carolyn Richard; Narva Warren; Qwen Dennim; Daryl Ward; Linda Aldridge; Eddie Jimmerson, J r., v. pres. GREEN JACKETS G J,s Active In Community Service Service to the community and univer- sity was characteristic of Green Jacket activities throughout the year. Green J ackets were active in almost every facet of student life as they performed services such as manning election booths, decorat- ing goal posts, reading to blind students, passing out grades and card packets and sending good luck telegrams to the Eagles on road games. The organization mem- bers ushered at fine arts productions and graduation ceremonies and also served as helpers at North Texas home track meets. Spring plans included an Easter egg hunt for Denton children and the collect- ing of food for underpriviledged Denton families. Members present President Kamerick with ttGreen Jackettt on "Dr. Kam- erickts Day." SEATED: Beverly Jenkins, rec. sec.; Carole Davis, hist.; Sheila Starr, parl.; Dianne Starr; Sara Leith, v. pres.; Judy Davis, pres.; Van McNeil; Jayce Marsden; Mary Penker; Willie Mathies, cor. sec. STANDING: Mary Bailey; Nancy Walker; Miss Rita Pilkey, spam; Sherry Griffith; Sherri Alexander; Brenda Follis; Barbara Schribrer; Donna Holland; Debbie Schultz. FIRST ROW: Glenn Gassiott; John Preskilt; Steve Laird; Dennis Haas; Rusty McKee; Jimmy Deming; Joe Ballenger. SECOND ROW: Jim Rosenbaum; Bruce Perlstein; John Barnett; Mike Dwyer; Carl Brinkley; Dan Svatek. THIRD ROW: Steve Neale; Ken Nelson; Tim Barrett; Bob Quinn; Frank Camp, 12. pres.; Bob Miller; Andy Kupper; Larry Brink- ley. TALONS Talons Seek Image As Spirit Oriented Talons, a men,s service organization, reorganized this year to become predomi- nately a spirit organization to promote school athletic functions. ttWe feel that North Texas is becoming a major sports college? Frank Camp, Talonst vice-president said. "With the move to Texas Stadium, NT will be turn- ing over a new sports image and Talons should do so, too? The Talonsi biggest project of the year was organizing the homecoming bondfire. This year they sponsored a Christmas party at the Golf Club House for under- priviledged children in conjunction with APO, Green Jackets and Tri-Service. The fall Talons pledge class purchased a cannon to fire at NT football games. Serving the student body and adminis- tration, the club helped with freshman Talons signal another Mean Green touchdown with the ringing of the orlentatlen and ass1sted Coach iiPOIy bell. Noah With the teams at spring track 410 meets. TRLSERVICE Service Club Aids In Many Projects The women,s service club, Tri-Service, entered its second year of service by spon- soring and aiding in a variety of projects during the year. During the fall registration members maintained an information booth in the Administration Building. Later in the se- mester the club ushered at drama produc- tions, read to blind students, sponsored a Christmas party for underpriviledged chil- dren in the Denton area, worked in the All-Campus Blood Drive, and co-spon- sored With other campus clubs the ttGood J ob, Dr. Kamerick Dayt, honoring the president. Spring plans included initiation of a tutoring program in which club members would help children from the Denton area With problems related to their major fields of study. President Melonee Burnim discusses new project at fall meeting. The fall pledge class numbered 15. FRONT ROW: Joan Hunter, spon.; Carolyn Holder; Susan Day; Linda Collins; Debby Leach; Margaret Hall; Carolyn Richard; Marsha Rubin; Mary Dines; Kathy Kilmer; Donna Greer; Marilyn Palmer. BACK ROW: Linda Grounds; Melonee Burnim, pres.; Nancy Wofford; Donna Sewell; Polly Wesldyke; Ricki Smith; Mary Johnson; Sally Squibb; Susie Hendrix; Brenda Whisenhunt; Joy Cummings; Mary Balkey; Lynne Green; Susan Saage. Professional ALPHA BETA ALPHA Librarians Give Saturdays to Kids Alpha Beta Alpha, professional library fraternity, spent Saturday mornings working with children in the Denton Public Library. A story hour was con- ducted in which members told stories to children and helped them select books. In November, Dr. Paul Kruze of the North Texas Library Service faculty, spoke to the group and presented slides of his travels in the Orient. The slides included scenes of Oriental libraries. A tea, co-sponsored by library service faculty members, was held homecoming. A Christmas party was held for frater- nity and faculty members and Christmas stockings were presented to faculty mem- bers. Ten members were initiated in the spring at a formal brunch held in Marquis Hall. Several speakers were scheduled for the - . . . . s rin semester. Club preszdent, Ken Gorman plans chapter pr01ect wzth vzce preSt- p g dent Jenny Tunnell. FRONT ROW: Joan Thayers; Wynette Dale; Connie McDeuitt; Margaret Harris, treas.; Oralia Gonzalez; Barbara Car- dell; Judy Rihardson; Ken Gorman, pres. SECOND ROW: Karen Jasuta; Kay Hicks; Terry Schaefer; Karan Freeling, rep-hist.; Laura Brown; Mary Kottkamp, 390.; Barbara Rhodes; Pat Thomas. 414 AXS officers in newly redecorated research laboratory. tLT Randy Rains, Vice Master Alchemist; Frank Carey, treas.; Marc Armstrong, Master Alchemist; Tom Folsom, Master of Ceremonies. ALPHI CHI SIGMA Chemistry Majors Promote Research The Beta Eta chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma held free slide rule instruction classes in the fall for freshman chemistry students. The fraternity of chemistry majors seeks to serve as a communication bridge between faculty and students on an in- formal level while promoting interest and research in chemistry. The local chapter was instrumental in the renovation of the chemistry building, assisting the faculty in the shifting of offices and sensitive laboratory equipment into redesigned quarters. Alpha Chi Sigma members become part of the professional chapter upon gradua- tion. The professional chapter exchanges scientific information between members and encourages talented high school and college chemistry students through the distribution of scholarships. ALPHA PSI OMEGA Wild West Musical Clubts Production A merry musical wild west story of love and romance, ttllO in the Shade" was the featured presentation of Alpha Psi Ome- ga, the honor fraternity for drama stu- dents. The musical, the first in the University Theatre, was originally produced by Da- vid Merrick in 1963 for the Broadway stage. The play has an old west setting and principally involves a western woman played by TWU student Angela Mitchell, and two suitors, a tough sheriff played by NT junior J oe Lauck and a con man who isnlt-the rainmaker played by NT senior John Williams. The eternal triangle de- velopes as the production flashes through bright-eyed actors who radiate enthusi- asm. And as everyone hopes, the heroine wins in the end, but the audience is the real winner. Members of Alpha Psi Omega spent over eight weeks in rehearsal for the musical and all the work on the produc- tion is headed by members. The group was the only drama department organiza- tion to present a musical. a have, players rehearse roles for tt110 in he Shade? At Right, Homecoming car dvertises latest production. TOP: Sylvan Salem; Johnny Williams, pres.; Lee Geer. LEFT: Dan Martin. SEATED: Reed Chambers. STANDING: Carol Trigg; Gary Calloway; Sharon Enlow; Gini Ellett; Bob King; Linda Koller. ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY Cadets Active In Civic Services The Arnold Air Society, a professional honorary service organization composed of selected AFROTC Cadets, was en- gaged in a full and varied rangfe of activi- ties during the 1969-70 school year. The activities included passing out IBM card packets to registering stu- dents in the fall and spring semesters; a fund raising car wash held at Carswell Air Force Base; a Thanksgiving turkey dinner with their feminine counterpart, Angel Flight; a turkey shoot and a Feb- ruary trip to the New Orleans Mardi Gras. The Arnold Air Society worked with the Angel Flight in soliciting contribu- tions to the spring Heart Fund Drive. Last year the two organizations were awarded a plaque for their outstanding contribution toward the success of the Heart Drive. Other spring activities included a joint breakfast With the Angel Flight at which new pledges from both organizations were introduced and Angel pledges were presented with roses. In May, the organization performs its last official function of the school year by cleaning the Denton Aquatic Center pool in preparation for its summer open- mg. FRONT ROW: tLi Bob Kaszczuk, Don Parker, Stacia Reed, Bob Morrison, Jim Abadie. SECOND ROW: rLi Jim Lomonaco, Gary Garland, Wade Boykin, Paul Fulbright, Steve Pryor, Ron Liddell, Bob Gerhardt, Randy Noblitt, Michael McCormack. THIRD ROW: tLi Bill Kuykendall, Steve M aus, Curtis Ledgerwood, J ack Slagle, Douglas Chaplin. tAt ler Arnold Air members assisted by Angel Flight members distribute card packets during fall registra- tion. rAbovei M embers welcome pledges into the organ- ization following initiation. Springs ofhcers: Barbara Niemeier, sea; Mark Sinclazr, treas.; Roger Ellis, pres; and Roscoe Hambric, v. pres. BETA ALPHA PSI Speakers Highlight Accountants Year Beta Alpha Psi, the National Profes- sional Accounting Fraternity, featured several speakers during the school year. Fall speakers included Louis Kessler, President of the American Institution of Certified Public Accountants; Paul Riley, a law professor at WTSU, and Bill Mer- cer, radio-TV voice of the NFLts Cow- boys. Spring speakers included Dr. Paden Neeley of the business faculty; Dr. Dixon, a University of Michigan exrhange pro- fessor; John Brooks, director of the NTSU employment service; Dean Clifford E. Hutton of the NTSU School of Busi- ness and various student speakers. Other activities included assisting the residents and staff of the Denton State School in preparing income tax, and free tutoring sessions for students taking Ac- counting 317. Field trips were taken to Moore Business Forms in Denton; Mer- rill, Lynch, and Pierce of Dallas and the Federal Reserve Bank in Dallas. ' RHHIVI -" Fall officers: Donald M. Jones, faculty vice-president; Cynthia Bobbitt, U. pres.; Diane Anderson, sea; Joe Fore, treas.; Joseph D. Brophy, pros. FIRST ROW: Mark Wilkerson; Jesse Sanchez; David Caswell, sea; Roy Warlick; Mike Willhite; Lonnie Ethridge. SECOND ROW: Steve Pendleton; Ed Smith; Andrew Arendt; Rick Lescalleet, sr. v. pres.; Richard Delle; Richard Wood. THIRD ROW: Jerry Flusche; Jim Bujarske; Norman Caswell; Michael Hays, Jr., 0. pres.; Randall Dansby, treas.; Marion Cunningham. DELTA S GMA PI Business Club Tours Studios, Factories Delta Sigma Pi, the international pro- fessional business fraternity, showed films in different areas of business in their fall meetings. Members saw films in areas of marketing, finance, and management each month. The organization took a field trip to General Motors in Arlington in Novem- ber. They also toured KLIF and J ameson Studios of Dallas in December. Six new members were initiated in De- cember and a dinner was held at the Tropicanna Inn to welcome them into the organization. Planned for the spring semester were speakers for regular monthly meetings and a held trip in March to the Taylor Publishing Company in Dallas. nuirll $2212: 12:11: a aS 11:21:11 2:11:13 tscoa;- Members boost school spirit with sign at football game. memorates the chapterts founding. Delta Sigma Pfs Outstanding pledge Rick Lescalleet receives fraternity award. Pamela Terry Delta Sigma Pi sweetheart. DELTA PSI KAPPA Sorority Serves; Attends Conventions Delta Psi Kappa, national honorary physical education sorority, provided services at several campus activities dur- ing the fall. Members ushered at home football games, and sponsored a breakfast for alumnae at Homecoming. They also ushered at the modern dance concert and attended the Texas Associa- tion of Health, Physical Education and Recreation in Corpus Christi. Planned for the spring was a trip to Oklahoma City for president-elect Betty Shingle as the chapter delegate to the national convention. Membership requirements for the so- rority are a 2.8 the previous semester and a 2.5 overall average. Delta Psi Kappa members practice for intramurals. FIRST ROW: Nan LaCavera, treas.; Betty Shingle, chap; Nancy Carlson, sec.; Katha H'znry, pres. SECOND ROW: Reva Ebert, spon.; Michele Dillon; Thelma Henly; Linda Nash, U. pres.; Beverly Brown; Jamor Hilliard; Dixie Schulze. t Club o$cers prepare ribbons for the fall pledging ceremony. Active presents pledge u-ith ribbon during initia- tion ceremony. WW . GAMMA THETA UPSILON um x U Biafra Situation Nigeriatfs Topic Gamma Theta Upsilon, national geog-e raphy fraternity, presented a speaker from Nigeria in one of their fall meetings. Sam Okah spoke to the group about the Biafrain situation. e The groupts annual fall picnic was held. . - . t , e L in December at Shady Shores on Lake . MM L t ,, ' ' ' Dallas. ' 4 . 7 , L During the spring semester, the club H E T4 L: ; heard several other speakers at their reg- ; ular monthly meetings. Other spring ac- : t I I e t 'i r- tivities included an annual picnic and a ' L banquet to be held in April. The fraternity, which requires a ttBh - ' t ' t average in geography and an overall ttBtt average, initiated six new members in the Ir. S iLoN A I I I fall. Left: Mark Miller, pres.; James A. Spiro, sec.; Mary Lapinski, treas.; Paul Bieneman, spon.; Francis Bertovich, v. pres. KAPPA DELTA PI NT Club Installs New Area Chapter Dr. Dwane Kingery, dean of the School of Education, spoke at the fall meeting of Kappa Delta Pi, honorary education fra- ternity. Thirty-seven new members were initi- ated at a formal banquet during the fall semester and plans were made for a sim- ilar ceremony in the spring. Requirements for membership are a 3.2 grade point aver- age, junior standing and enrollment in an education class. In December, the group traveled to Wichita Falls to install a new chapter of Kappa Delta Pi at Midwestern Univer- sity. Other fall activities included enter- ing a car in the Homecoming parade. The fraternity planned to send their president as a representative to the bi- annual national convocation in Boston, Mass., in the spring. SEATED LEFT: Barbara Upchurch, hist.; Sandra Harper, treas.; Nancy J son, 11. pres.; Dianne Starr, pres. STANDING LEFT: Dr. Jack Cross; Dr. ley Earp; Dr. James Daugherty, sponsors. Dr. Dwane Kingery, Dean of the School of Edu- cation speaks at the fall initiation banquet; M embers and guest enjoy dinner at a banquet held in the fall. 422 uEATED: Stuart Anderson, pres. STANDING: Charles Arnold; George Kraft; Joyce McFarland, v. pres.; Carol Con- leton, treas.; Gary Shaw; Gerald Callahan; Susie Fisher, sec. Pam Thurman; Carol Abel. KAPPA MU EPSILON Math Club Assists Departmental Test Kappa Mu Epsilon, national honor so- ciety in mathematics, assisted the North Texas math department in administering the Putman Foundation Scholarship Test to freshman math students in the fall. Speakers at fall meetings included Dr. William P. Latham 0f the NTSU music faculty and Mr. McPherson of the TWU mathematics faculty. McPherson spoke to the club on calculus. ,, Pledges initiated in the fall sponsored Wm; L t L t a display of mathematics publications on mm; x the third floor of the Physics-Mathe- " r .- t L matics Building. In December, members of the club co- sponsored a Christmas party with grad- uate math students and presented gifts to faculty members. ' appa M u Epsilon officers ride in the H omecoming Parade. MU PHI EPSILON Province Governor Visits Chapter Mu Phi Epsilon, international profes- sional music sorority received a Visit from their Province Governor, Edith Pfautsch in November. A formal meeting was held at which a musicale was presented. The sorority held two rush parties in October. "Cinderella Goes Through Rushti was the theme of the informal party. A tea at the home of patron Merrill Ellis was the formal party. The annual fall recital was presented in November. The organization also cele- brated its 66th year at their ttFoundefs Day Tea" at the home of Dale Peters. Spring rush was held in February dur- ing which formal and informal rush parties were given. A recital presented by the patrons and alumnae was held in March. The chap- terts annual spring recital was scheduled for April. The groups service project included music lessons and activities at the Cum- berland Presbyterian Childrents Home. FIRST ROW: Noralyn Gray, rec. sea; Becky Thurmond; Mickey Gower; Joanye McNair; Cathy Pool; Linda Miller, treas.; Barbara Molinare. SECOND ROW: Lindy Jackson; Twila Collier; Lis Roberts; Martha Hartman, cor. sec.; Jill Street; Charlotte Forrest; Jennie Smith, pres.; Sherron Gibbs, hist.; Barbara Gilbert. THIRD ROW: Kathy Williamson; Pam Newman; Nancy Vann, u. pres.; Charlcie Davis; Charlotte Key; Becky James. 424 LEFT T0 RIGHT; Stella Janavaris, treas.; Cindy Harris, sea; Linda Timble, v. pres.; Pat Drolet, pres. PHI BETA LAMBDA Business Majors Tour Companies Phi Beta Lambda members Visited the computer operated administrative offices of Ling-Temco-Vought in a November field trip. The Club, a busi- ness organization for all NTSU busi- ness majors, planned another field trip in March to the United Computer Corporation of Dallas. The members of Phi Beta Lambda, in conjunction with members of the Texas Wesleyan College chapter, or- ganized and sponsored an April state convention of college business majors in Fort Worth. The convention fea- tured extemporaneous speaking and vocabulary development. The organization also sponsored a convention of high school Future Business Leaders of America at Dal- las in February. A May picnic at Runaway Bay capped the year for Phi Beta Lambda. Pat Drolet, club president, rides in homecoming parade entry co-sopnsored by Pi Omega Pi. PHI CHI THETA Sorority To Send Coed To Chicago Phi Chi Theta, national businesswom- enhs sorority, planned to send Pat Drolet, national counselor, to the national PXT convention in Chicago. Alpha Nu chapter staffed a reception room at Homecoming, and aided in the all-campus blood drive in October. Miss Gloria Adams, assistant Dean of Women, spoke on the "Concept of Moti- vation" at the January initiation service. Seven new members were initiated. Other activities included a Founders Day luncheon, annual picnic at Lake Dal- las, speakers, and pledge parties. Membership in Phi Chi Theta is open to all women majoring in business, eco- nomics or secondary education with busi- ness as a first teaching field. Members and pledges get to know each other at fall pledge party. FIRST ROW: Claudette Atkins; Cathy Owens; Judy Stewart, sec. SECOND ROW: Pat Drolet; Shirley Bull; Linda Trimble, v. pres.; Debby Christian. THIRD ROW: Leslie Raborn; Linda Gray, treas.; Leslie Wimberly; Kathy Wensley. FOURTH ROW: Johnnie Bellamy, pres.; Donna McKay; Sherri Pettijean. FIFTH ROW: Connie Rogers; Virginia Williams. SIXTH ROW: Marilyn Palmer; Pat Mc- Kee; Patty Pollins; LaVera Levles. PHI DELTA KAPPA Education Fraternity Counsels Students Phi Delta Kappa, honorary interna- tional education fraternity for men, in- augurated a study project inviting 100 high school students to North Texas dur- ing the year. The project was designed to introduce the students to North Texas and acquaint them with the campus. Pupils invited were recommended by their high schools as outstanding students. Students were invited from all over the state to the one-day program. In the fu- ture, the project will continue on a larger scale, lasting for several days. The organization scheduled several speakers for their monthly spring dinner meetings. Nick Kourelas, a reformed dope addict, spoke on the consequences of dope addic- tion at their March meeting. Dr. Lott 0f the North Texas biology department spoke to the group in April Members attend fall dinner meeting at which Dr. Don Beck of the NT on new fascinations in biology. speech department is speaking. Don Marth, pres.; Tom Gee, hist.; Dr. John Curry, sec-treas.; Dr. Forrest Rollins, U. pres.; Dr. Don Casey, spon.; Dr. Fred Thomas, area coordinator. Is shim UKPPR Officers ride in H omecoming parade car entry. PHI EPSILON KAPPA Members Attend State Meeting Phi Epsilon Kappa, a men,s fraternity for physical education majors, attended the annual meeting of the Texas chapter of the Association of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation held in Corpus Christi in December. The fraternity also sent representatives, in April, to the na- tional meeting held in Seattle, Washing- ton. The club sponsored a J anuary gymnas- tics tournament in the Ments Gym in which the hrst five places in each event were presented a certificate, and the best all-around athlete was presented a trophy. The organization, which requires a 2.5 over-all average, initiated 12 new mem- bers in the fall. Several speakers promi- nent in the field of Physical Education addressed the members in the fall. FIRST ROW: Bill Hunt; Dr. Jess Cearly, span. SECOND ROW: Danny Connally; Harold Whiteley, v. pres.; Darrell Neely; Larry Kyle. THIRD ROW: Steve John- son; David Curl. FOURTH ROW: John Raducha; Jesse Crouch, pres.; Dwight Thompson; Ray Lewis. PI OMEGA PI Panel Discussion Sponsored By Club A panel discussing the aspects of stu- dent teaching was sponsored by Pi Omega Pi, national honor fraternity for under- graduate business education students. The panel was set up in February and those attending were able to ask ques- tions concerning student teaching. Members presented several speakers at their fall meetings. Among these were two teachers from Mesquite High School who spoke on future business leaders of America. The group also gave a homecoming tea for ex-students and faculty members. Ten members were initiated in the fall. Dr. Payne, head of the North Texas busi-' ness education department, spoke to the group and several other speakers were scheduled for the spring meetings, and initiation for spring pledges was planned for March. Several members converse while decorating Business Education Suite for Christmas. xx; . 'x. H rwx ...- . x FRONT ROW: Patricia Wagner; Stella Janauaris, v. pres.; Linda Whitely, pres.; Kay Martin, sec.; Johnnie Bellamy. SECOND ROW: Margie Barber, treas.; Judie Blackwell; Charlotte Coker. SIGMA ALPHA ETA Speakers, Trips, Fill Clubts Year Sigma Alpha Eta, national speech and hearing therapy organization, presented several speakers in their monthly fall meetings. Dr. William Ollum, and otolaryngolo- gist from Denton, spoke to the group about laryngectomies. Other speakers in- cluded Dr. Dyer, a plastic surgeon from Dallas, Dr. Whaley from the North Texas psycology department and Dr. Beck of the NT speech department. In December members raised money to buy Christmas toys for underpriviledged children. Several speakers were planned for the spring semester and field trips to clinics related to speech therapy in the local area. Members also started a speech and hearing pathology library last year in the clinic. Additions are made each year. The library is for the use of students majoring in speech and hearing therapy. Deats Beard demonstrates speech therapy techniques to club members. FIRST ROW: Kathleen McGananon; Carl Taylor; Marilyn Morman; Cathy Carmichael; Lynn Riley; Lynn Hanson. SECOND ROW: Steve Wilson; Lynn Hollingshead, treas.; Barbara Caldwell; Betty White; Shirley Hughes; Cynthia Prevost; Jewel Manzay; Cynthia Hicks; Marcia Putzel; v. pres.; Sandra Price. THIRD ROW: Deats Beard, pres.; Mary Dines; Sandy Earley; Peggy Paynes; Pat Gawn; Arcadia Garcia; Norma Tharp, rec. 390.; Pat Bulla. SIGMA ALPHA IOTA Musicians Assist In Day Nursery Members of Sigma Alpha Iota, the pro- fessional music fraternity for women, spent the greater part of the school year working with the children of the Denton County Day Nursery. Coeds taught the children songs and continued their initial program of copying sheet music for the partially-sighted students. During the fall semester, Sigma Alpha Iota held both formal and informal rush for prospective members. In December six women were initiated into the club. Graduating seniors were treated to a farewell party in J anuary by the Club. Spring activities included second semes- ter rush parties, the spring recital and the initiation of spring pledges. Membership in the music fraternity re- quires six hours of music With a 3.0 grade average in music and a 2.8 overall grade average in all other courses. FIRST ROW: Jo Hodgis; Marilyn Schramm, cor. sec.; Linda Randsdell; Majorie Proctor, treas.; Ann Phillipp; Carol Marlow; Diana Downing; Janice Bain. SECOND ROW: Susan Patrick; Margaret Brunback; Kay Milstead; Jan Pate; Sheila Walker; Kathy Baisdon; Mary Wilson; Kim Smith. BACK ROW: Susie Brown; Melonee Burnim; Nancy Deason; Lane Dyke; Linda Reinhold; Sharon Anderson; Virginia Fairchild; Stacy McNutty; Martha Williford, pres. SIGMA DELTA CHI Men Allow Coeds To Join Fraternity Sigma Delta Chi, national honorary journalism fraternity for men went co- educational in November. Club president Tom Kelley said, ttWe feel that the time has come for Sigma Delta Chi to become a real society, and since women are able to do the same work in the journalism field, they should be able to join SDXW The organization began a project in the fall Which was the production of slides for area high school journalism departments. Members sent their president to the national convention in Sari Diego in No- vember. Two speakers were planned for meet- ings in the spring and the annual spring banquet co-sponsored by Theta Sigma Phi, the national sorority for women, was held in April. SEATED: Tom Kelley, pres.; Terry Kelley; Worth Wren, Gene Abrahamson; H. E. Williams; STANDING: Brian D uchin; Larry Grisby; Barry Wood; Keith Bonnecarrere, sec.-treas.; Dr. R. Westmoreland, spon. 432 SIGMA TAU DELTA Society Performs Student Services Sigma Tau Delta, a national honor society in English, initiated ten new members in the fall cere- mony at the home of Dr. Mary Whitten, sponsor. The club, which offers its services to the English department, gives English majors an opportunity to get together in an informal setting to discuss common interests. STD performs a variety of ser- vices to all students as well as English majors. Members of the club tutor interested students on an individual basis free of charge. STD has also initiated a pre-regis- tration program for English majors. A loan fund that is supported by student-faculty contributors to pro- vide money for needy English ma- jors is sponsored by the organiza- tion. LEFT: Joyce McFarland, sec.; Pat Elbert, treas.; Karleen Barlow, v. pres.; Kay Adams, pres. BELOW: Karleen Barlow pins Worth Wren at fallinitiation. Joyce McFarland presents rose to new member at initiation ceremony. 433 SAAD Designers Visit Dallas Film Studios Highlighting the activities of the Stu- dent Association of Advertising Designers this year was a visit from Tom Young, Art Director of Keitz-Herndon, a film making firm in Dallas. Films made by the company were shown at the October meeting. The group later took a field trip to tour the company,s plant. Jack Unruh, Art Director of the Year for the Dallas-Fort Worth Art Directors Club spoke to the group about his travels in England at their November meeting. Planned for the spring semester were the annual advertising competition and an awards banquet. An advertising exhibition composed of works by prominent Fort Worth-Dallas advertising agencies was planned to be held in co-ordination with a day of speak- ers 0n nTotal Designt, in March at the North Texas Art Building. SAAD holds monthly meetings the sec- ond week of each month. A speaker is scheduled for each meeting. Cap Pannell, v. pres.; Paul Souza, pres.; Jo Linker, sec.-treas.; Dr. Mack Vaughn, sponsor; Rudolph Fuchs, sponsor. Jack Unruh presents slides of his travels in England at a meeting in the fall. SEATED: Kathi Sims, project chairman; Carole Hanson, sec.; Toni Walker, hist.; Diane Oliver; Nancy Deason, U. pres.; Larry Grigsby, pres.; Sandi Workman, treas.; Judy Fredericks; Carol Taylor. STANDING: Dr. Howard Smith; Dr. Charles Clark; Miss Bess Townsend; Dr. Louise Allen; Dr. John Plunkett; Dr. Reginald Hinely, sponsors. SEA Club Begins New Service Program Members of the Student Education As- sociation initiated a new service program in the fall. The organization began a teachefs aid program designated to free teacherts from time consuming menial tasks and allow them to concentrate on teaching. SEA members work in classrooms as teachefs aids in area schools. Work in- cludes grading papers and making out tests. Larry Grigsby, SEA president, said that much favorable comment had been re- ceived concerning the program and that the club would continue its teaching aid activities in the spring. SEA members also had a look into future teaching trends. In December they observed Plano schoolsl experimental teaching methods using team teaching conducted in classrooms Without walls. SEA is a professional club open to all secondary education majors. Club mem- bership was 604 members in the fall. Club President, Larry Grigsby, introduces guest speaker at a fall meeting. THETA SIGMA PHI Women Journalists Hold ttMix-Inst, The Beta Kappa Chapter of Theta Sigma Phi, the woments national jour- nalism fraternity, worked on several proj- ects during the year. The annual Matrix table dinner, given in conjunction With Sigma Delta Chi, highlighted the spring semester for the members. A reception was held at homecoming for exes by the organization. Fall pledges decorated the Journalism Building for Christmas and erected a Christmas tree in the main hall of the building. Hazel Mosley served as pledge president in Charge of the fall activities. "Mix-Instt were sponsored in the fall and spring semesters by the club to en- courage girls in the journalism depart- ment to become better acquainted. Pres- ident Karleen Barlow considered this to be one of the main purposes of the or- ganization. Qualifications for membership in Theta Sigma Phi are active interest in journal- ism and a high scholastic standing. Theta Sigs discuss plans for a ttMix-Inft The pledge party was held in the Journalism Building in October. FIRST ROW: Betty Meagerson; Marty Lewis; Dimple Tucker; Hazel Mosley; Linda Woodall; Mrs. Barbara Cole- grove, spam; Sheena; SECOND ROW: Susan Pfeifer; Verlie McAlister; Judie Killen; Candy Chestnut; Donna Witkow- ski; Sherry Kunka; Karleen Barlow, pres.; Cheryl Snapka, U. pres.; THIRD ROW: Sue Petit, 390.; Susan McDaniel; Shirley McLendon; Nancy Burnett; Mary Johnson; Linda Lay; Barbara Deck. Departmental Religious And Honor Publications Miscellaneous Organizations ACCOUNTING CLUB Scholarships Go To 11 Members Four banquets, guest speakers and scholarship awards highlighted activities for the Accounting Club. Mr. Lewis Kessler, president of the American Institute of Certified Public Acountants spoke at the first fall ban- quet. Bill Mercer, voice of the Dallas Cowboys and announcer at Eagle games, was the speaker for the second fall ban- quet. At the banquet, Mercer presented the $500.00 Haskins and Sells Scholarship Award to Barbara Niemeier for outstand- ing scholastic achievements and partici- pation in activities. Other wards included five $250.00 scholarships from the CPA. fund, three $250.00 scholarships from Collins Radio and two Mobil Oil schol- arships of $250.00 Spring banquet speakers were Don Meredith, former Cowboy quarterback and Frank Clark, T.V. announcer. SEATED: Diane Anderson, 390.; Barbara Niemeier,pres.;Susan Kelly. STANDING: Mike Irvine, Dan Campbell, Bobby Tomlin, treas.; Mike Cody, Jim DeLoach, v. pres.; Joe Fore; Gary Reese. Barbara N iemeier aids Lewis Kessler at fall bu17et. Lewis Kessler speaks at fall banquet. ALPHA LAMBDA SIGMA Library Fraternity Initiates 15 In Fall iiAlways Library Servicei, is the motto and programming theme of Alpha Lamb- da Sigma, the honorary library service fraternity. Membership is by invitation only and in November fifteen new members were initiated into the organization at their annual fall initiation banquet. During the year, members sponsored a coffee for returning alumnae at home- coming and had a dinner in December. Mr. Paul Vagt, Dean of Learning Re- sources at Tarrant County Junior Col- lege, spoke at the dinner. Spring activities include an initiation breakfast for second semester pledges. Alpha Lambda Sigma colors are green and White. Their fiower is the gardenia. Welton Horton converses with Linda Dugger at fall initiation ceremony. SEATED LEFT: Linda Wilson, Ann Swain; Verna Evans, pres.; Frances Vaughn, treas. STANDING LEFT: Kay Krochman; Claudia Dickson; Ronald Tester; Linda Dugger, v. pres.; Weldon J. Horton, 360.; Michael Smith; Polly Clarke; Wayne Gray; Sally Wiant; Pat I redell. 439 ANGEL FLIGHT Group Visits Mardi Gras The yearts highlight for the Angel Flight was a February trip to the New Orleans, Mardi Gras where they repre- sented NTSU AFROTC in the various parades and activities of the city. The Flight financed the trip With money earned in the fall from a car wash held at Carswell Air Force Base. In December the group sent Christmas packages of cookies, candy and Angel- grams to their adopted Air Force Military unit in Vietnam, the 632 Combat Sup- port Group. The Flight turned its attention to the local Heart Fund drive in February, c01- lecting contributions from Denton busi- nesses. In March the group donated food packages to needy families of Denton County. The group,s efforts were officially rec- ognized in March at the Military Ball held at the Hacienda Inn in Irving as each member was formally introduced to the assembly. FRONT ROW: Lynda Eatherly; Sandy Smith; Betty Bronar; Deborah Christian; Suellen Saxon; Judy Williams; SECOND ROW: Major Corser, Advisor Annette Hatcher; Marsha Wright, Operations; Marieke Lang, Commander; Regi Ferguson, Drill commander; Carolyn Richards; Arliss Davis; Vicki Anders; Malyna Jameson; BACK ROW: Phylis George; June Birkelbach, Exe. Commander; Sherry Grimth; Karen Forester; Doris Speegle; Dena Davidson, 440 Adm. Officer; Carolyn Taylor. STANDING: Dr. W. R. Demouget, William Medley, Don Redd, Mike Kelly, Jim Bob Jones, pres.; Don Hughes; Scott De Lee; Blair Lybbert. SITTING: Diana Marshall; Suzie Hendrix, sea; Diana Bynum, pres.; Kitty Harris, treas.; J ulie Leavelle; Lynna Williams. DEBATE CLUB Team Debates Presidenfs Stand President Nixonts proposal that the federal government share a percentage of its revenue with the states was chosen as the national topic for this year by the American Forensics Association. During the year, NTts word warriors debated at Wichita Falls, Abilene Chris- tian College, Texas Christian University in Fort Worth and Southern Methodist University in Dallas and Dartmouth Uni- versity in New Hampshire. The team, coached by Dr. William L. Medley, Jr., also participated in the Houston National Debate tournament where debators Mike Kelley, sophomore from Dallas and Don Redd, sophomore from Amarillo, defeated teams from Dr. DeMougeot checks on debator registration during a fall tournament. Georgia, South Dakota and Kansas. tBelowt Club officers riding in car entered in Homecoming parade. ELLEN H. RICHARDS Speakers Lecture On Opportunities "Career Opportunity in Home Econom- icst, was the theme this year for the Ellen H. Richards Club for Home Eco- nomics majors. The group learned of opportunities in Home Economics education abroad from an exchange student teaching in Peru at a fall meeting. Mrs. J 0e Tender, coordinator of Head- start activities in Dallas, spoke to the group on opportunities in child develop- ment. Mrs. Nellon, demonstration agent for Texas Power and Light Company, spoke to the group about the new Radar Range. In November 28 chapter members at- tended the Texas Home Economics Col- lege Convention at Baylor University in Waco. A Silver Tea was scheduled for the spring semester to raise money for a scholarship fund. A seated tea was planned for the spring semester honoring graduating seniors. Ellen H. Richards officers ride in Home-coming parade. Joy Cummins, pres.; Anita Johnson, v.p.; Janet Mauzy, sec.; Nancy M cGee, treas.; M ichele M artin, rep.; Shirley Lumpkin, hist. New member receives her pin at fall initiation ceremony. Jose Hurd, v. pres.; Cindy Coleman, publicity chairman; San- dra Wzlson, pres.; Nancy Torczynslci, treas. Club members view fashion trends at full meeting. FASHION DESIGN CLUB Fashion Club Sees ttFort-Nightt, Showing A speech by two fashion designers from the Dallas area and a field trip high- lighted the fall activities of the North Texas Fashion Design Club. In October, club members attended the British ttFort-Nighttt exhibition at Nei- man Marcus in Dallasea two week showing of the latest British imports. Later in the fall Sandi Guthrie and Ellen Townsend, fashion designers spoke at a meeting. Plans for the spring semester included either a fashion show or an exhibit of fashion plates and a field trip to Tarkland in Dallas. A guest speaker, Ditsy Schultz, a fash- ion designer employed by Honey Tog fashions was scheduled to speak later in . . , the ear. Jose H urd presents new fashzon deszgns at February meeting. y FENCING CLUB Foilers Place In SMU Tournament NTSU fencers lunged their way through a successful fall campaign. In October, members fenced in the Mustang Invita- tional Tournament held at SMU. In the menis foil division, Clayton Bockbrader and Don Hubbard took first and second place honors. The Amateur Fencers League of Amer- ica held six tournaments and NT fencers placed in all of the foil events. In the spring, NT fencers entered the Southwest Qualifying Tournament for the World Games, with the hopes for a berth to the World Games in Torino, Italy. Fencers also planned to participate in the Annual Spring Mustang Invitational at SMU and the Annual AFLA Collegiate Championships at Baylor University. In 1969 competition, J anet Grauso and Cindy Posey placed in the top ten college women,s division and Don Hubbard, in Kim Smith and Janet Grauso score simultaneous touche's during a the top ten college ments division. practice session. BACK ROW: Betsy Schenck, 360.; Barbara Deck; Janet Grauso; Kim Smith; Team member Kim Smith was a Jane Bagwell; Sherry Hilliard; Gloria Browning, spon.; KNEELING: Ray Yucca Beauty winner in the fall. 444 Cano; Martin Johnsen; Don Hubbard, pres.;Eric Johnson. IA CLUB Drive Increases Spring Membership The Industrial Arts Club, an organiza- tion concerned with development of tech- nical and scientific skills as used in in- dustry, initiated 15 members in the spring. The club hosted the regional meeting of the North Texas Industrial Arts Associa- tion in February. During the fall and spring semesters, club members made field trips to several area plants including General Dynamics of Fort Worth. By observing techniques in these plants, members learned more concerning their own field of interest. The entire club attended the Texas. College Industrial Arts Association meet- ing held at Texas A8zM in February. There, club members exchanged ideas with Industrial Arts majors from colleges all over the state. Club members work on various projects during the year. SEATED: Bill Smith, v. pres.; STANDING: Roy Trapp, spam; Harold Richardson, pres; Ron Ebert, sec-treas.; Wade McCarty, rep-hist.; Barry Metcalf; Dr. McLeod, spon. IOTA LAMBDA SIGMA Fraternity Attends State IA Meeting In February, Iota Lambda Sigma, honor fraternity for Industrial Arts ma- jors, attended the Texas Industrial Arts meeting at Texas A8LM. Requirements for joining the club are a 3 pt. overall average and you must be either an industrial arts major or be ac- tive in the field. A field trip was planned in the spring to General Dynamics in Fort Worth and to Texas Instrument in Dallas. ttIn the future, we as a club would like to work close with the Industrial Arts Club on projects and guest speak- ersf, Joe Williams, secretary of the club said. "With the combined membership we would have a larger audience and could draw more technical speakers? Club member works on project. FRONT ROW LEFT: Billy White; Ron Ebert; Richard Zepeda; Alex Wied; Stanley Joe; Barry Metcalf; BACK ROW LEFT: Steve Mabry; Wade McCarty; Joe Christian; David Maggard; Bill Smith, pres.; Joe Williams, sec.; Ed Listol. 446 John Tanner, pres.; Scott Cantrell, up. of programs; Danna Adams, v.p. of promotion; Jack Starling, Sponsor; Joe Meissnee, Co-sponsor; Marsha Henley, Secretary, Secretary; Bobby Dennis, v.p. of membership. MARKETING CLUB Speakers, Tours, Highlight Year Speakers, picnics and studio tours highlighted the year for the North Texas Marketing Club. Field trips were made to various distributive organizations and adver- tising media in the Fort Worth-Dallas area. Members toured the Jameson Film Studio, producer of commercials, and radio station KLIF. Speakers at monthly meetings fea- tured prominent businessmen from area manufacturers. Social activities included a fall pic- nic at the Dallas Corinthian Yacht Club. A second picnic was planned to be held there in the spring. Also planned for spring was the annual marketing conference to be held on the North Texas campus April 8. The conference is CO-sponsored with North Texas students by the Dallas Sales and Marketing Executive Club. Club officers ride in Homecoming parade. MODERN DANCE CLUB Club Performs At State Convention Advancement and recognition of the dance as an art form and development of grace and beauty in its performance are the goals of the Modern Dance Club at North Texas. The club danced at the state physical education convention in December. The dancers financed their trip through the sale of Tupper Ware. The club performed as dancers at the North Texas School of Musids opera "Dido and Aeneas? They also served as performers at the spring concert in the University Theater and in an abstract dance performance at the Burning Bush. Other activities included the sponsor- ship of choreographer and dancer Erick Hawkins and Company in February. Hawkins presented the performance and assisted the Dance Club With instructions in technique. Dancers work on various class ects. Jerry Sullivan, sec.-treas.; Vicki Noak, v. pres. pres.; Steve Strope; Vicki MENhS PE CLUB Club Shows Film Of NT Football The Physical Education Professional Club for Men presented several films during their fall meetings. Gary Ness showed films of the NT football games. Other fall activities included a car in the Homecoming parade and participation in the NT intramurals. The club meets twice a semester to determine which events to participate. Club objectives are designed to further interest men in professional fellowship and to stimulate growth Within the pro- fession. The club sponsors several different events, ranging from recreational night for the campus blind students to' sports films for all students. FRONT ROW: Larry Kyle; William Hunt, pres.; SECOND ROW: Dwight Thompson; Danny Connally; David Curl; Darrell Neely; Jesse Crouch; Harold Whiteley. STANDING: Tom Kelley, student business manager; Smith Kiker, Yucca sponsor; Dr. James Lee, English depart- ment; Roy Busby, public information; John Beam, student representative; David Wooten, student representative; Dr. R. C. Bradley, School of Education; Pat McLaughlin, USN T President; 0. E. Schuford, chairman, journalism depart- ment; H. E. Williams, Campus Chat associate editor; Keith Shelton, Campus Chat sponsor; SEATED: Terry Kelly, Campus Chat associate editor; Cody Curry, Yucca photographer; Barbara Deck, Yucca editor; Dr. Robert Hughes, English department and Publications Committee chairman; Shirley McLendon, Yucca oganizations editor; and Cheryl Snapka, Campus Chat editor. PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE Publications Committee Acts on Bill; Christens Newspaper with New Name The Publications Committee, governing body of North Texas publications, was given the task of christening a newspaper. In February, the Campus Chat began daily publication and a bill proposing a name change was read to the USNT Senate by Dale Bronstein, student sen- ator. The Publications Committee adopted the proposal and printed forms calling for Student suggestions were distributed on campus. From the names proposed by stu- dents and the committee, the North Texas Daily was chosen. George Flynn, Dallas senior, was named editor. The purposes of the Publications Com- mittee are to elect the editors of the campus newspaper and annual, and to plan for the changes necessary to keep campus publications abreast of the times. Committee members include three fac- ulty members from outside the depart- ment of journalism, the journalism de- partment chairman, the publications sponsors, the director of the public in- formation office, the editors of the news- paper and annual and their associate editors, the student business manager, and three students chosen by the USNT president. This year the committee designated its meeting time as 30 class days after the beginning of each semester. UNIVERSITY PLAYERS Comedy, Satire First Productions Four plays were scheduled for produc- tion by the University Players during the ,69370 drama season. Beginning in October the luxurious halls of NTSU,s ultra-modern theater echoed with laughter at the lines of the opening production, ttYou Can,t Take It With You? Kaufman and Hartts com- edy was directed by Boyce Pennington of the drama department. In November ttThe Guest? visited the University Theater. The premiere per- formance of NT graduate Ransom Darla tplayed by Gini ElleU and Lucy tBarbara Jarvist struggle for Davidts Jeifrey,s play left audiences shuddering hPeter WelleU attention during a climactic moment in ttThe Guest? from the ahtlcs 0f Darla, the dommeermg and neurotlc mother. FRONT ROW: David Dorr; Jack Presley; Katherine Schmidt; Steve Pratt; Sigrid Mureen; Sharon Enlow, pres.; Dr. Robert Block, sponsor; Bick Ferguson, v. pres.; Barbara Jarvis; Gary Ramey; Billy Baker; Sylvan Salem. BACK ROW: Dawn Jordon; Johnny Williams; Susan Heimer; J0 Cornelison; Alan Klem; John Coffman; Sara Hess; Reed Chambers; Werner Powers; Rita Anderson; Becky Finch; Helen Weiker; Sharon Chmielewski; Chuck Moore. tBelowt The Syca- more family gathers for dinner in a scene from ttYou Cantt Take It With You? WOMENAS RE. CLUB Play Day Highlights Student Activities A Play Day was the highlight of the year for the Physical Education Profes- sional Club for Women. Dallas, Denton, and Fort Worth area high school students attended the Play Day to become ac- quainted with what the North Texas Physical Education department had to offer. The program was set up so each student could participate in each activity offered for at least ten minutes. In February, a speaker from Indiana University talked to area colleges about area recreation. A speaker from TWU presented a pro- gram in October on hairstyles and also presented fashion ideas to the club. A week-end house party was scheduled for the spring semester. A11 physical edu- cation majors were invited to the slumber party. The annual Materials Program was per- formed by the junior class in the fall. It was a total of everything the physical education majors had learned through their J unior year. Faculty members reminisce at Homecoming coffee sponsored by RE. club. tBelowa Jamie Mindlin drives in for a shot during intramural basketball practice. , v mmh t V 1:3,; A mum in. SEATED: Dr. Irma Caton, spon.; Jamie Mindlin, v. pres.; Kim Friedel; Nan LaCavera, pres.; STANDING: Jennifer Brixey; Gail Lehrmann; Judy Sanford; Liz H all, treas.; Peg Coats. Julie Brasel, rep.; Trudy Butch, v. pres.; Linda Bassham, treas.; Dixie Schulze, sec.; Janet Ragsdale, pres. ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA Society Awards Tuition Scholarship Each year Alpha Lambda Delta, honor society for freshmen women, presents a scholarship to an outstanding member. The scholarship, which pays tuition for one semester, is awarded to a deserving member with outstanding scholastic achievements. The 1969-70 recipient was Patricia Gibson, sophomore elementary education major from Dallas. The tuition fund is financed through dues paid into the organization by its members. The society is open to freshmen women who have a 3.5 over-all grade point aver- age at the end of their first long term semester at N.T. Formal initiation for over 100 girls was held in March at the United Students Center. Other activities included monthly meet- ings, and a lecture on "Cathedrals in Europe" presented at a fall meeting. BLUE KEY Blue Keys Collect thoys for Totstt Blue Key in addition to its annual Whots Who Banquet, co-sponsored a Christmas toys campaign and aided in registration during homecoming as part of its activities this year. The national honor fraternity for men manned a booth for alumnae registration during homecoming in November. In December along with the Ex-Marines, members collected ttToys for Tots." January saw the initiation of thirteen new members into the fraternity. A ban- quet honoring the new members featured Dr. Quinn McKay, head of the Depart- ment of Business Enterprise Research at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth as its speaker. Membership in Blue Key requires a 3.0 average on a 4.0 scale, junior standing, membership in two clubs and a past or present office in one club. Blue Key member registers Exes for Home- coming activities. Club president, Coker Thomas speaks to group at fall meeting. Blue Key officers ride in H omecoming parade. 454 LEFT: Barbara Niemeier, treas.; Diana Marshall, fall pres.; Kathy I vers, rec. sec.; Nancy Kemplin, cor. sec.; Peggy Payne, spring pres.; Gerry Ellis, hist. BACK ROW LEFT: Mary Milam; Dee Lund; Dianne Starr; SECOND ROW: Marilyn Reitz; Linda Ball; Paula Bently; THIRD ROW: Jackie Hill; Jennie Smith; FOURTH ROW: MORTAR BOARD Kathryn Haley; Carol Hanson. Section Meeting Hosted By NT "Direction,, was the theme of the North Texas chapter of Mortar Boardts October state wide section meeting at NT. The section meeting, which was at- tended by Mortar Board members from Texas and SMU, featured Dr. Don Beck of the NT speech and drama department. Group communication and experimenta- tion was the keynote of Dr. Beckts ad- dress to the group members. Mortar Board members, all senior women, are elected by the outgoing mem- bership in the traditional spring "Calling Out." No coed may be an active Mortar Board member for more than one voting session, and no campus may have more than 24 national members. Other requirements include an overall 3.0 01.0 systemy grade average, involve- ment in campus activities and leadership ability. Other university activities for the year included delivery of the Honofs Day . . ' . Convocation and sponsorship of an April Dzana Marshall, Cathy I vers and Nancy Kemplin nde in car entered m Banquet for the Board of Regents. Homecoming parade. Richard Burgess, sec.; Patrick Nayor, pres.; Bill Bonds, treas.; Jerry Jones, v. pres. PHI ETA SIGMA Society Presents Scholastic Awards "The basic purpose of Phi Eta Sigma is to create a certain status for freshmen men who have achieved an outstanding grade point average and have contributed outstanding service to the university? Pat Naylor, club president said. In keeping with its basic purpose, the national honor fraternity for freshmen men presented two awards this year. One, the J . C. Matthews award, was presented to a freshman with a 3.8 and above grade point average. The other is an annual award presented to an outstanding freshman whose over-all grade point aver- age is 3.5 for his first semester at North Texas. These awards are presented at the University Day Ceremonies. The organization planned a formal din- ner initiation for May. Scheduled to speak at the banquet were President J ohn Kamerick, and former club president, Orvall Hall. Club members pldn model UN. Day held in the spring. CIRUNA Model U. N. Held In Austin Fall activitities for the NTSU chapter of the Council on International Relations and United Nations Affairs included a seminar and a trip to Austin. Early in the year the Club sponsored a seminar on ttBiological and Chemical Warfare, on campus. In November they attended a model U. N. in Austin along with students from high schools, colleges and universities throughout the state. In October the club maintained an in- formation booth on United Nations Day. Slated for spring activities was a model U. N. to be held in St. Louis, Missouri. SEATED: Howard Cove, secretary general; Mary Anne Marty, under secretary for correspondence; Walt Hinojosa, asst. sec.-general. STANDING: Nancy Deason, under secretary for financial affairs; Keith Mitchell, under secretary for public relations; Gay Garrett; David Speaks; Patrick Neal, executive secretary. BACK: Pam Long, president. EXvMARINES ASSOCIATION Association Takes Care Of Its Own Old leathernecks never die and the Ex- Marine Association keeps them going. Ex-corps members on campus have set up quarters on Fry street and there they meet for bi-monthly meetings and social gatherings. The goup takes care of its own. EX- Marines suffering scholastic dilemmas can obtain tutors or find a refuge for studying at the house. A library containing information on Veterants Aid is accessible to all ex- servicemen. This year the club fielded a football team in intramural competition and ploughed their way into second place. In December the club collected toys to be given to needy children in the Denton area. In addition they gathered "Cards for the Corpsf Christmas cards sent to Marines in Vietnam. Members collect toys during their ttToys for Tots" campaign in December. FIRST ROW: Tom Ancell; David Frender, hist.; Corky Childers; Bob Rice; Bob Schaefers, pres.; Fred Gonzales, 0. pres.; SECOND ROW: Allen Foster; J. P. Jones, 890.; Galand Brunson; John Hancock; Bob Dix; Rodger Mahoney, treas.; Jim Gilliard; Tim Brown; Robert Gaff. INTERNATIONAL CLUB Variety Musical Sponsored By Club The International Club sponsored a fall variety show featuring its own members. The program was musical in nature, with Indian songs using Indian instruments, Oriental and Latin American songs, and Russian and African dances. Authenticity was the keynote as all of the acts were performed by members of the nationality being represented. The club, composed entirely of mem- bers of foreign countries, held a swimming party in September and a dance party at the Methodist Student Center in Decem- ber. Plans were made by the organization to procure an International Club house near the campus for students who need a temporary place to stay. The club has about 50 members from various countries of the world. SEATED LEFT: Jane Glass, treas.; Mike Uehara, pres.; Lynn Hoover, sec.; STANDING LEFT: Dr. Riddlesperger; Nabil AbuFadel; Samir Ayoub; Gleason Cheung Sun H ung; Dr. Foster. Chinese members perform Oriental Dance. African members perform Native Dance. Young Democrats discuss political issues with the club president. YDtS Young Democrafs Sponsor Speakers The Young Democrats tYDst organi- zation proved to be a hotbed of political ideas and constructive dissent during the 1969 school year. The YDs were active in the fall sup- porting the National Moratorium October 15 and backing the NAACP in its protest of the Yucca beauty contest two weeks later. The club also endorsed several na- tional, state, and local candidates for elected positions. William C. Lindley, vice-president for student affairs, became a campus contro- versy when he banned press coverage of a proposed meeting between him and the club members. The YDs took action re- questing a referendum on the question of giving Lindley two weeks to appear at an open forum or resign. The matter was later dropped. At their first meeting of the semester Don Gladden, former representative from Fort Worth spoke. Gladden had been a candidate for lieutenant governor against Ben Barnes. Other prominent liberal democrats addressed the organization throughout the year. Ann Pulliam, Secretary. Young Democrats IV Nwi ?wzm H: 2W NM ; x V .xniyq Vow: w; ,M h wwsknww .r L A '- ers "'wq, 1.3, E V! w n Wax m KYMH ?.x D supports NAACP protest ' Anita Carter, Treasurer e Yucca Beauty Contest. Sharp Pulliam, Vice-president 46l STANDING: Bob Antonatos; Dan Campbell; Michael Whitted; John Althoucs; Dwight Thompson, pres.; Alwyn Yeakle; Robert A. Mize; Herb Ninness; Harold Holmes; Gary Sorensen; Dr. Jack Watson, spon.; Frans Ruem- polhammer; Carl Contrata; Nabil Abufader; SEATED: Jove Gomez; Samir Ayoub; Martha Jones; Nina Fisher, sec. Charlotte Forrest; Sharon Allen; Lilliam Hargett; B everly Wilson, U. pres.; Dennie Travis, v. pres. SPINNING WHEELS Cyclists Roam Denton County A new organization has pedaled its way into NTSU, the North Texas bicycle club, Spinning Wheels. From a lone rider the club has now grown to approximately 55 members. The Spinning Wheels, an extension of the NT Physical Education Club is spon- sored by Dr. Jack Watson of the RE. faculty. In the early fall about 20 of the mem- bers took a six mile tour of south Denton county. Later, riders packed sack lunches and rode to Shady Shores Lake for an all day picnic. Other activities included overnight campouts, on campus racing and evening rides through Denton for the spring se- mester. ABOVE: Spinning Wheels ride in Homecoming parade. BELOW: Club boost school spirit with sign at basketball game. O 0 1g10us d R SEATED: Angelia Bowden; Marsha Tandy; Kay Hicks; Anita Johnston; Jan McNeil; Orval Hall, v. pres. STANDING: Britten Wood, adv.; Tom Donaldson; Bert Bradley; Eddie Jimmerson Jr., pres.; Russell Ware, ass. dir. BAPTIST STUDENT UNION Baptists Rebuild Mission Centers Members of the Baptist Student Union showed love in action in the Bayou City of New Orleans during the five day "Proj- ect Amis? Approximately 90 students spent se- mester break painting various mission centers, performing in folk music and drama groups and rebuilding churches destroyed by hurricane Camille. ttProject Amish was given a chance to work on a person to person basis with members of minority groups. Special activities during the fall semes- ter included a trip to Atlanta, Georgia for the ttMission ,70 Conference? and an international Christmas party. The club also sponsored folk music and drama groups, freshmen meetings, Wednesday luncheon counters, vesper services and clean up work in southeast Denton. The establishment of a coffee house, revival of a BSU yearbook and the or- Exes attend homecoming luncheon spon- ganization of work projects on Saturday sored by BSU at the Baptist Student were planned for the spring semester. Center on Avenue A. Majorie M cN umee works in throject Amish cleaning Jeanne Barron spends semester break repairing churches in New up rubbish left by H urricane Camille. Orleans as part of the BSU project. M embers rehearse folk music for their fall program. The group also sponsored folk music and drama preentations as part of throject Amis? 465 FRONT ROW, LEFT: J91?c Kerringan; Ken Paukert; Harry Kocurek, pres.; Michael Moss; Bob Farley; John Althaus. SECOND ROW: Mary Jo Goss; Gayle Hurban; Connie McDevitt; Ida Pina; Elizabeth Rutkowski; Beth Kingsley; Mary Ann Martinsen; Oralia Gonzalez; Pat Morgan. THIRD ROW: Sherry May; Mona Voth; Yolanda Morenao; Barbara Gallia; Ermelinda Rivera; Cecelia Bennett; LaVerne Matula; Paul Jones; Lawrence Kelly. FOURTH ROW: Paul Hamm; Tommy Lange; Rene M uhl; Rev. Jim M iller: Bill Acker: Yvette Doran; Catherine Driscoll; Marie Tripoli; Jerry Flusche. NEWMAN CLUB Catholics Provide Food For Needy Activities of the Newmans were full and varied for the 1969 school year. Funds for various Catholic charities and food baskets for needy Denton fam- ilies were financed through the painting of fences. Other activities included an ad- dress by Rev. ttHootyt, McHugh and presentation of his film documentary on the Biafran situation. A hootenanny, various educational movies, dances, several speakers, and visits to the sick in local homes and hos- pitals and the initiation of weekly saying of Mass at the United Center rounded out the year,s activities for the Newmans. Organized in 1893, the Newman Club was designed to guide Catholic students in developing their faith and enriching their lives through fellowship and com- munity service. The three-phase purpose of the club stresses the students spiritual life as well as educational and recreational activities. The club encourages its mem- bers in the study, discussion, understand- ing and practice of their faith. Rev. M CH ugh speaks to members on the Biafran situation. Newman bobs for apple at Halloween party sponsored by the club ABOVE. BELOW: Activities at the clulfs Halloween party included crystal ball reading Harry Kocurek attends Sunday Mass. ABOVE. BELOW: Coed prepares cookies for guests at Halloween party. Keith Shelton, Sponsor I ORTH TEXAS DAILY ' Chat Renamed, Paper Goes Daily Spring 70 brought two major changes 0 North Texast student published news- paper. The bi-Weekly, winner of 51 A11- . merican awards, became a daily in Feb- :uary. The change to a four times a week publication also resulted in a name hange. Formerly the Campus Chat, it as renamed the North Texas Daily by he Publications Committee in January. I arlier in the year a bill proposing a hange in the paperts name had been in- roduced on the floor of the USNT enate. During the fall semester an AP wire achine was added to the one room office ending an air of professionalism as well :s increased news coverage to the campus. Summer CHAT staff: Left Bob Anderson, Brenda Johnston; George Flynn, Edwina Salaun, Terry Kelly. Fall CHAT staff: tLeft, on raiU H. E. Williams, Terry Kelley, Sue Petit. SEATED Brenda Johnston, Dan Watson, Cheryl Snapka. Right, on rail George Flynn, Larry Grigsby, Nancy Kemplin, J ulian Williams. Dan Watson, photographer 1969 Summer Editor. Edwina Salaun. 1969 Fall Editor, Cheryl Snapka. FIRST ROW: Larry Mitchell, Candy Chesnut, Garylyn Sampson. SECOND ROW: Terry Kelly, Nancy Kemplin, Gene Abrahamson, Dan Watson. THIRD ROW: George Flynn, Bettye Megason. TOP: Julian Williams. Tom Kelley, NORTH TEXAS DAILY business manager LEFT, and assistant, Memo Garcia. 469 Pat Boynton, honors. Donna Witkowski, Greeks. Evelyn Fisher, fine arts. Susan McDaniels, administration and Shirley McLendon, organizations. Owen Carter, sports. academics. YUCCA ,70 Yucca Arrives Despite Setbacks "Somehow the 1970 Yucca was pub- lished despite an inexperienced staif and a delayed Yucca Beauty Contestf editor Barbara Deck said. Yucca staff members met disapproval from the NAACP over questioned racial equality in the annual Yucca Beauty Con- test. Production was delayed while the contest was re-scheduled under new guidelines. The 1970 Yucca features two changes. The yearbook has been reorganized into three main sections: the University, Hon- ors, and Campus Life. Color shots in this yeafs Yucca have been split to spread the Don Hubbard, index. color throughout two sections instead of Linda Woodall, assistant editor and confining it in one section as has been features. done in previous editions of the yearbook. Verlie M cAlister and M ary Johnson, assistants. Max Donning, Dan Kunkel, Candy Ch nut and Martin Vandiver, lab assistan The Yucca staj?r poses in front of Joe T. Garcias in Fort Worth after delivering the December deadline. BOT bar a Deck, editor Don Roberson, photographer QUESTIONS FOR A DECADE: 1970-80 Heavy altocumulus clouds parted briefly March 7, 1970 to unveil the "eclipse of the century? The moon, like a decade of time, moved slowly to blot out the rays of the sun just as time has blotted out another decade e the 60s. The total eclipse did not last. The moon, continuing in its travel, revealed the sun again, just as the movement of time has revealed a new decade -- the 703. In a decade, new questions will arise: Will Den- ton be wet by 1980? Will mail-in registration free North Texas students from the iiblood, sweat and tearsii of registrationis grueling encounter? Will this crowded campus get worse, or will North Texas become a pedestrian oriented campus? Will the draft lottery continue to decide man,s future in the manner of a roulette wheel, or will a volun- tary armed service once again let man iido his own thingfi Wet or Dry? These are questions of the 70s. tiVote Denton Weti, is the cry of many travel weary students of North Texas State. But maybe Denton is already wet. Beer cans and bottles can be found littering streets in Denton. The booze was bought somewhere besides Denton, maybe Dallas, maybe Fort Worth, or even Oklahoma. The thirsty travel at least 40 miles to purchase the forbidden liquid, then return to consume it in the quiet of their apartments or even dormitory rooms. Bootlegging has become a common and profitable sideline for many students. The fact is Denton, for all practical purposes, is already wet. Its legal dryness doesnit stop the consumption of beer. Itis here, whether or not the voters of Denton approve of it. A six pack of beer in a retail store might cost $1.40 in Dallas. Figuring an average of 3 cents per mile traveling expenses, an 80 mile round trip raises that six pack cost to $3.80. But resi- dents of Denton keep traveling. Some say that the possibility of Denton going wet is merely that - possible, but not probable. Some townspeople who oppose liquor in Denton hold influencial jobs in the city. Denton is dry legally. But realistically it is as wet as a cold beer. Even though the travel weary may not receive rest, the road to consumption may be shortened. Some people think that Lake Dallas may be voted wet soon. tcontinuedi Mr. N.T. Student tLer fills out his punch cards for registration in the privacy of his own backyard. He waits patient- ly tRighU for the mail delivery which will bring him his schedule for the new year. QUESTIONS Consider Registration 1980 Mr. N.T. Student wontt fight the pushing, shov- ing crowds of registration this year. Mr. Student, like the 20,000 other students at North Texas, will enjoy registering at home instead of fighting the masses. No matter where you live, New York, Alaska, or Europe, registering will be as easy as filling out a punch card. Mail-in registration might work as follows: each student, planning to enroll would send the regi- strar, in the form of punch cards, his courses and time preferences. The IBM would correlate these cards and presto - instant registration. This situation is, of course, purely hypothetical. However, some form other than present day regis- tration will soon evolve. Mail-in registration, sum- mer registration, or some other form of pre-regis- tration might be the answer. Need for a simplifi- cation of present day registration is definitely at hand. Will it take until 1980? tContinuedi , BUlLDlNG use 1. - EXIsTiNG - PROPOSED NORTH TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY CAUDH-L BENTON. TEXAS m SCOTT COMPREHENSRVE :mimncrs CAMPUS PLAN L ""5"5 A page from the Master Plan booklet shows proposed changes for the N.T. campus. N.T. students cross streets during rain inkfront of U.B. QUESTIONS Pedestrian Campus The light turns red, the sign flashes ttwalktt, and the cattle move across Chestnut between the two white lines, while the angry machines wait un- til the lights flash green, allowing them to devour the North Texas campus. The NTSU Administration has proposed to make North Texas a "pedestrian oriented campus? This would be achieved by closing Chestnut be- tween Avnue A and Avenue C, Avenue B and Avenue C and Avenue B between Maple St. and Highland St. The proposal has been blocked sev- eral times by residents who complain that inac- cessability would reduce the value of their homes. The school has also requested the following streets be made one-way to allow better flow of traffic: Welch, one-way south of Hickory to Eagle Drive; Avenue A, one-way north from Avenue C to Bernard; and Maple, one-way east from Ber- nard to Avenue D. North Texas for pedestrians only. tContinuedt QUESTIONS ttGREETINGSW This is the salutation informing you that your num- ber is up. What,s your number? If you were lucky enough to be born on J une 6, it is 366. But if its Sept. 14, "Stick that chest out, stomach in, get your thumbs along those stripes . . 3, How does it feel to be number one? Perhaps Uncle Saints famous appeal, ttI want YOUK should really read, "Whatts your number? The current draft lottery plays with a young mants future as if it were a game of roulette. Some congressmen have proposed that the draft lottery be abandoned in favor of a voluntary armed service. This would go into effect June 30, 1971. Many have said this system would not work. But itts pre- dicted that a change in the current method of selecting men to serve will change in the 70s. tContinuedi II QUEST ONS Death and Reincarnation Are yearbooks on the way out? Sales would have one to believe so. College yearbooks are in a depressionary phase. Soon they might die. But they might be reincar- nated from the grave to take the form of yearboxes, magazines, records and slides. Yearboxes are square cardboard boxes containing photographs with explanations, otball sched- ules and souvenirs of the past year. Bi monthly, seasonally or by semester published magazines might also eventually serve as a replace- ment for yearbooks to record the events of the past year. The most revolutionary yearbook replacement might be records and slides. Students could pur- chase a 331A rpm stereo record with 35mm color slides and a hand projector e to listen and watch the pa t year in review. Sounds of the year recorded on the disc might be ttNumber 25, number 25 please? "There will be a test over the last six chapters next timet and "BOOOOOOOOOOW Unless yearbooks change with the time, they may die before their time. Aaron. Dan Abadie, Jim Abbott, Susan Abel, Carol Abel, Steve Abner, Diane ................. 128 Abrahamson Gene Abraimson, Hillary Abufader, Nabil ............ 459 462 .Accounting Club 43 Acker, Bill ................... 466 Adair, Donald ................. 128 Adair, Mary ................... 96 Adair, Ronald ................. 128 Adams, Cecil Adams: Delores 128 Adams: Diana ........... 96, 354 447 Adams,G10ria . 32 33 Adams: Janell . Adams: Jim 12 8 Adams, Kay 96, 433 Adams: Patricia ................. 96 Adams: Robert ................. 27 Addington, Terri ............... 128 Adkins, Ginger Adlof, Bobby .................. 96 OAerospace Division ............. 81 Agnew, Mar .................. 96 Airhart, Brenda ................ 128 Airhart, Judy .................. 96 Airhart: Teresa ................. 96 Aishman, Ricky ............... 128 Akita, Byron ................. 128 A1aman,Grace ................ 128 Alaniz, Daniel ................. 128 Albright, Lauren ................ 96 Albritton, Lee . 1 Alderson, David Aldridge, Linda . . 1 Alewine, Russell Alexander, B. J. Alexander, James Alexander, Karen Alexander, Mike A1exander,Robert .............. 128 Alexander Robert E 28 A1exander,Sher1ri ....... 128 360 409 Alford Morr15392 Allan, Lynn A11bright,Gregory A11en,Cynthia A11en,E1izabeth Allen, Janice Allen, Joan Allen, Lana A11en,Louise . . . Allen Pamela . 1 . . Allen: Phyllis Allen Rita A11en,Sharon Allert Marian Allison Janice Allison, Richard Allston Rose Alman 'Alpha 13eta Alpha .Alpha Chi Sigma OAIpha Delta ............... 344 OAIpha Kappa Al ha ............ 346 OAlpha Lambda elta ........... 453 0 Alpha Lambda Sigma ........... 439 0 Alpha Phi ................... 348 oAIpha Phi Omega 0 Alpha Psi Omega 0 Alpha Xi Delta Althaus, John . . 1 Althaus: Marlin . . Althoucys John ................ 462 A1varez,Veronica ............... 128 Ambrose, Warren .............. 128 Ancell, Tom Anders, Vicki Anders: Zona 352 Anderson, Andrea ........... 128,348 Anderson, Bob 486 Anderson, Catherine 12 8 Anderson, Diane ........ 128,417,438 Anderson, Eddie 96 Anderson, Janet Anderson, Jean ................ 1 28 Anderson, Jo Nell .............. 128 Anderson, Kathryn Anderson, Miles . . Anderson Richie 1 8 Anderson, Rita ............. 128,351 Anderson: Sharon 431 Anderson: Stuart Anderson: Wayne Andrews, Leatrice Andrus, S oAngeI Flight ................. 440 Angenend, Lyn ................ 128 Anos, Stephen ................. 96 INDEX Anshuetz, Mary ............ 128,362 Anthony, Rupert 28 Antonatos, Bob Aquilar, Ralph Aquire, Mario ................. 128 Arceneaux, Cynthia ............. 128 Archer, Deborah ............... 128 Archilla, Linda Archilla: Mellissa ............ 129,344 Arechaga, Peter 29 Arendt, Andrew Arey Gary ................ Arletige Thomas ................ Armer, arry . . Armes, Dianna . . Armes, Ron Armstrong, Andrew Armstrong, Dona Armstrong, Larry Armstrong, Lynn Armstrong, Marc Armstrong, Robert 9 Arnett, Doris ................. 129 OAmold Air Society ............ 416 Arnold, Brenda ................ 352 Arnold:Char1es ................ 423 Arnold, Doug ................. 380 Arnold, Jan .................. 129 Arnold, Linda ................. 129 Arnold, Sharon ................ 129 Amtson, Pamela 219 OArt ........................ 42 oArts and Sciences, College of ....... 40 Aschner, Milton . Ash, Karen . . . . Ashcraft, Dianne . . ....... 35 Asher, Mary ............... 129,360 Ashford, Hugh 29 Ashmos, Vicki Ashton, Danyce OAssociation of Women Students ..... 405 Astin Paula 1 Aston, Karen Atchley, Danny Athanas, Theodora Atkins,C1audette Atkins, Robin Ator, Anna Auld, Ault Richard. Ault, Sherry . . Aureli, Harry . . Ausbume, Lee Austin, Amy Austin, Bob Austin, David ................. 386 Austin, Linda ................. 129 Autry, Jeannie ................ 129 Autry, Shirley 96 Awalt, John .................. 374 Axte11,Lester .................. 96 Aycock, James Aymond Dale Ayoub, Ayers, William Baber, Janette ................. 96 Baganz, Paul ...... . . . Bagwell, Jane . . . Baier, Cheryl Bailey, Donald ................ 382 Bailey, Judy .................. 129 Bailey, Larry 374 Bailey,Mary ........... 129,362,409 Bailey, Priscilla 29 Bailey, Steve ................. 129 Bailey, Thomas 96 Bain, Janice ........... 129,210,431 Bair, David 29 Bait, Larry .................... 197 Baird, James .................. 227 Baird, James W. ............... 190 Baisdon, Kathy ................ 431 Baise, David .................. 129 Baker,Bi11y Baker, Gordon Baker, Robert . . Baker, Ronald Baldwin, Jeffery Balentine, Aleta Balke ,Maxy Ball, Mary Ba11:Richard Ballard, James ................ 129 Ballard: Robert ................ 129 Ballenger, Joan ................ 129 Ballenger, Joe ................. 410 Ballou, Wesley ................ 394 Baltzelle, Beverly ............... 97 Balusek Janet Banks, Christopher Banks, Toni Bankston, Jenna Banner, Mary .......... 129 OBaptist Student Union .......... 464 Barber, Gerald ................. 97 Barber: Janetta ................ 356 Barber, Jesse Barber: Margie Barbour, Bernie Barcus,13arbara Bardin, Sherry Barker: Calvin . . . Barker: Carol . .......... 129 Barkley, Martin ................ 129 Barkley, Patricia ................ 97 Barks, Martha 97 ..... 199, 200, 433, 436 Barlow: Rosalind 346 Barner, Randy 29 Barnes,Car1ton ................ 129 Barnes, Charles ................ 129 Barnes, Corliss ................. 97 Barnes, Gloria .................. 97 Barnes, Gretchen Barnes: John ................. Barnes: Rick .................. 407 Barnes: Riecky ................. 97 Barnett, Danna ................ 129 Barnett: Joe Barnett, John . . . Barnett, June . . . Barnett, Sara . Barnhart, James Barns, Joe ................... 129 Barrett, Dean .................. 97 Barrett, James ................ 386 Barrett: Terry .............. 97,391 Barrett, Tim 410 Barringer Lynn ................ 97 Barrington, Barbara .............. 92 Barron, Jeanne ................ 130 Barron, Jennie ................ 129 Barron, Louis ................. 368 Barte1,Richard ................ 130 Bartkowiyk, Gerry Bartlett, Jack Bartlett, Jerry Bartlett, Sallie Bartoli, Diane . Bartoli, Larry . . Barton, Keith ................. 130 Barton, Rhonda ............... 130 Bartone, John ................. 130 Bashton, George ............... 394 Bason Jim .................... 97 Bass, harwynne 354 Bass, Cindy ............... 130, 405 Bass, David Bass, John Bassham, Linda Bast Beverly Bast: Susan .................. 130 Baszile, Fayett ................. 97 Batten, Ann .................. 130 Battenfield, Candace Battle, Charles Battle, Lanny . . Batts, Fredda . . . . . ..... 130 Bauer Robert .................. 97 Baughman, Robbie Baxter,Bi11 Baxter, James Baxter: Raymond Baxter1William Beaird Deats Beals Neil Bean, Frank Bearden, Sue Beasley Susan Beaty, usan ............... 130 Beavers, Barbara ............... 130 Beavers: Cynthia . Beck, Debra . Beck,Don.. .... Beck, John .................... 97 Beck, Ruby .................. 130 Beck: Trey .................... 97 Beckham, Ernest ................ 97 Beckman, Janet ............... 130 Beckner, Charles ............... 130 Beckworth,Marce1ene ............ 97 Beene,J .................... 97 Beeson, JCilrolyn 310 Beeson Janet .............. 130, 360 Begs ,8hir1ey 130 Bei Iseman, Elaine 130 Belcher, Jo Lynn ............ 130, 380 Beleck, Marvin 97 Belew, Thomas 97 Bell, Cindy ................... 130 Be11,John Bell: Linda Bell, Mike . . Bell Nancy . . . . . ..... 130 Bell, Pamela .................. 130 Bell, Roger Bell, Sandra Bellamy, Johnnie Belt, Patricia Bemise, Karen Benavides, Robelyn . . Benedict, Brenda. Benedict, Dwaine Benedict, Rita Bennett,Cece1ia Bennett, Frances Bennett, Janice Bennett, Joe Bennett, Ste hen ............... Bennett, Te dy ................ Bennington, Gary 1 Bently,Pau1a ........... 97,348, . Berglund, Sandy Bergman, Timothy Bergstrom Karen Bergvall, draig Berkley, Mary ...... Berkley, Mike . . . . Berlstein Bruce Bernharc1,Karen Berny, Charles ................. Berry, Charles ................. Berryh iles Bertram, Robert OBeta A1pha Psi Bethune Michael .............. 1 Bettis,Mari1yn ................ -1 Beydoun, Nasser .Bible Bibles, Joyce Bierds, Drew Bieneman, Paul ................ 4 Biggiers, Pthlis ................ 1 Billingsley, ary ........ . Bills andra ....... Bilotta, Frank. Bilotta:Sher1ry OBiology . .............. Birdwell, Jerry ................ 3 Birklebach June ......... 98, 211,4 Birnberg, arol 98 3 Birowell, Jerry Biser, Dan ................. 1 Bishop, James ................. 1 Bishop, J ohn ................. 1 Bissett, Scott ................. 1 Bitters,Wa.1ter ................. Biven, ebecca Black, Bob Black, Ken ................... 3 Black, Linda .................. 1 Black, Robert 3 Black, Scott ...... Blackburn, Joe . B1ackshear,Rona1d Blackwe11,Judie Blair, Arthur B1air,Bobby .................. 1 Blair:F1-ankie ................. 1 Blair: Smith .................. i Blakeney, Judy ................ 1' Bland, Kathy ................. 1 Blanton, Doug ................ 1 Blassingame, Dean .............. 3 B1eck1e,Michael Blend, ' Blend Stephen ................ 3 Bliss, alter OBlue Key Blue, Ron Board, Hal ..... Bobbitt, Cynthia . . Bodiford Debra Boelter, Bernice Bo ert, ySharon Bo annon, Karen Bohmfalk, Bill Bohort James ................ 1 Bolen,1Letaine ................. ' Boles, Jerry 3 BoIIheimer, Ron ............ 131, 3 Bomar, Donna 1 Bommarito Cathy .............. 1 Bond,D Bonk, Edward Bonnecarrere, Keith Bonner, Carol Bonner, Kenny . . Booher, Susan . Booker:Shery1 . . Boone, Jerry Bordner, Meylinda Bossart, ,Stephen ............... 3 1 Bostick, Gene ................. 3 Boulware, Larry ............... 3 Bounds, Kirk ................. 3' Agony and Ectasy: The Making of a Yearbook Publication of the 170 Yucca was agony and ectasy for the 10-15 running members of the staff. The ectasy came with the completion of the book and the winning of the Yucca-Chat football game by a squeezing margin of 18-12. The agony included the Black protest against the annual sponsored beauty contest, "George iiFlashii Flynnls diving catch into the bushes during the final quarter of the foot- ball game tthe ref ruled the shrubbery out of boundsl and the nine month communal living in room 105 of the Journalism Building. If the Greeks thought Chilton Hall was unfit for human occupation, they should have pro- tested J 105. Ten men and women lived in one room a little larger than a two-girl room at Maple, with no food service, no privacy but continual noise pollution. Our greatest enemies were inexperience and the mys- terious person who emptied our miscellaneous box into the trash can. In that box was all the Greek copy and pictures, plus bits and pieces from everything else. Like all annual staffs, we suffered the usual flood, famine and abuse. Everyone felt persecuted, had their good character maligned and typed daily resignations. Pat Boynton swore sheid never work on another Yucca, and Susan McDaniel didnit want to talk about it. Only Evelyn Fisher seemed optimistic, but then shes a freshman. Owen Carter, our ex-marine and militant sports editor, attempted to restore peace and order in the office with ingt. Carterls monthly clean up campaignli but with every scrap of paper being something somebody needed, we YUCCA STAFF Editor-in-chief ......................... Barbara Deck Assistant editor, classes editor, features editor ...................... Linda Woodall Administration editor, academics editor ............................ Susan McDaniel Beauty editor, Who,s Who editor ............................... Pat Boynton Closing editor ........................... Cody Curry Fine Arts editor, Honor Professors editor .............................. Evelyn Fisher Greek editor ....................... Donna Witkowski Index editor, introduction editor .............................. Don Hubbard Organization Editor ................ Shirley McLendon Sports editor ........................... Owen Carter Photographers ............. Cody Curry, Don Roberson Lab Technicians ....... Candy Chestnut, Max Downing Daniel Kunkel, Martin Vandiver Other staff members ...... Mary J ohnson, Patricia Lueb, Verlie McAlister .Michael Billert, Max Downing, Mary J ohnson, Thomas Kelley, Terry Kelly, Paula Knight, Daniel Kunkel, Thomas Laxson, J ames Lewis, Shari Petry, Donovan Reese, Stephen Summy, Martin Vandiver, Dan Watson, Worth Wren Other photographers . . . couldn,t throw anything away. With the office a continual mess Shirley McLendon found she couldnit find anything and placed the whole crew under suspicion of theft. Donna Witowski was the office party girl and pica stick thief. Linda Woodall had the gall to finish her sections ahead of time and ran a running battle with the sponsor all year about captionless pictures. Cody Curry, our national award winning photographer, surprised everyone by engineering a first rate closing section, and he, a business major. Couple with him Don Roberson, a physics major, and you have the dynamic duo of Yucca photography. Mary J ohnson, Verlie McAlister and Tricia Lueb came late, but became Don Hubbardis little office elves as he chained them to the chairs to check the "4,000 plusll names of the index that he typed single handedly. Then there,s our yearbook sponsor, Smith Kiker. For all his troubles, he was told to go fly a kite? But it was' all in fun as a mischievious Yucca staff plotted to win the $300 office party in the kite flying contest sponsored by KLIF, a Dallas radio station. I supose, though, that the biggest agony and ectasy was experienced by Max, Martin, Candy and Danny, the hippie printers upstairs. They had to guess what our pic- ture requests really meant. BARBARA DECK Special Credits COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS: by Cody Curry and Don Roberson. COVER DESIGN: by Diane Legault. FEA- TURES: Introduction copy by Linda Woodall; Happen- ings i70 copy by Julian Williams; Closing copy by Cody Curry; special eclipse photograph by Don Robertson; other closing section photographs by Cody Curry. SPECIFICATIONS The 1970 YUCCAis press run was 5,000 copies. The paper used on the 496 pages was 80-pound Javelin Dull. Headlines were done in Goudy Bold, with kickers in 14 and 18 points. Division pages were in 48 point Goudy Bold. Introduction copy was set in 10 point Century Schoolbook. Body Copy was set in 10 point Century Schoolbook and the classes section and index were set in 8 point. Marvin D. Evans Co., of Fort Worth, printed the YUCCA. The cover was produced by Universal Book Bindery, San Antonio. The coveris grain is monkey on green base cover. Bourek, Kathy Bournonville, Ann ............... 92 Bowden, Angelia ............ 131, 464 Bowen, Janabeth ............... 311 Bowen: Jack ............... 131, 407 Bowen, Lewis .................. 98 Bowen, Richard 132 Bowen, William ................ 132 Bowens, Gladys 132 Bower,Ba1rba11a ................ 132 Bowers, Teela .................. 98 Bowling, James ................. 98 Boyce, Doug 336 Boyd, Karen ..... Boyd, Marge ..... Boyd, Marilyn 1 . Boyd, Martha ................. 132 Boyd, Rebecca ................ 132 Boykin, Wade ................. 416 Boynton, Patricia ........... 132,470 Box,Debby132 Brackeen, Judy ................ 132 Bracken, Jennifer 98 Bracken,Pat1-icia ............... 132 Bradberry, Doran Bradford, Brenda Bradley: Mark ................. Bradley, Nora ................. 132 Bradley, R.C 450 Brady, Robert . . Bra g, Kathr 11 Bra 6, Bren a ..... Branam, Jo Ann Branderiberger, Kathy Brann, Michael ................ 132 Branning, Deborah Brannon, Barbara Brannon, Richard Branstetter, Janet. B11ant,Jeff ................... 365 Brantley, Pamela ............... 132 812561, Julie ........... 132,360,453 Brashear, Marge 98 Brande, John .................. 98 Braun, Barbara ............. 132,354 Bravenec, Ed 392 Bray, Bonnie Bray, George Brazell, Lawrence Brazelton, Judy Brazil, Jeannie Breeler, Burnett Brendel, Don Brenholtz, Gerald Brennion, Martha Brewer, Barbara Brewer Stephen Brewste11,Lynda B11ce Carla Brieden, Gus Bright, Henry ................. 132 Briley, Beverly 132 Biime11,Ka.rolyn 132 Brinkley, Carl .............. 376, ,4$0 8 Brinkley, Janie . . . . Brinkley, Larry ..... . . . . Brinkman, William .............. 132 Brinson, Margaret Brisendine, James Britain, Ruth Britt Mary ................... Brittian, Jane ................. 132 Brobst, Gary ................. 374 Brochu, Amy ................. 132 Brockett, Janice ............... 132 Brohoim, Ruth 9B Bronar, Betty .............. 362, 440 Bronstein, Dale ................ 404 Brooks, Eva Brooks, John Brooks, Susan ................. 132 Brophy, Jose 11 ............. 98, 417 Brouse, Chris ynn .............. 132 Brower, Kenneth ............... 132 Brown, Beverly ................ 420 Brown, Brenda . Brown, Chester ..... . . . . Brown, Cynthia ............... 132 Brown, Darlene ................ 132 Brown, Eddy .................. 98 Brown, Fred ................... 98 Brown, George ................. 98 Brown, Gwendolyn ............. 357 Brown, James ................. 386 Brown, Jimmy ................ 378 Brown, Jo Anne Brown, Laura Brown, Linda ................. 132 B11own,Michael ............. 98,368 Brown, Stephen132 Brown, Susy ........... 133,356,431 Brown, Thomas 388 Brown, Thomas D. Brown, Tim Brown, Tommy Browne, Bonnie Brownfield, Jan Browning, Gloria ............... 444 Brownlee, Phyliss ........... 133, 348 Brownlow, Russell .............. 370 Brumbalow, Arlee .............. 133 Brumbelow, Glena .............. 133 Brunbach Margaret ............. 431 B11unett,o11ma ................ 92 anner, Howell ............... 368 anner, Stanley ................ 99 Brunson, Beverly ............... 133 Brunson, Goland ............... 458 Brust, Randall Bryan, Murray Bryan, Paul .................. 391 Bryant, A1111 .................. 133 Bryant,Nadir1e . . . . . .133 Bryson, Neil .................. 133 Buccolo, Arnold Buchanan, Cheryl Buchanan,Sha11on .............. Buck, Derinis Buck, Richard Bugno, Toni .................. 133 Bujarshe, Jim ................. 418 Bulino, Andrew 336 Bull, Shirley ............... 133,426 Bulla, Pat .................... 430 Bullard, Brenda ................ 133 Bullard, Doris ..... 36 Bullington Marcy . Bullock, arce . . . . Bumpass,Sy1via . . Bumstead, William .............. Bundock, Lewis Bunzel, Dave Burch, Dwight Burch,James Burchfield, Roy Burges, Kay .................. 34 Burgess, George Burgess, Richard ............... 456 Burgoyne Joe 133 Burk, Ed ie .................. 380 Burke, Betty 133 Burke, Carol .................. 133 Burke, John 133 Burkes, Helen ................. 133 Burkett, Kenneth .............. 133 Burkholder, Jack ............... 133 Bu11ks,Beverly . . Bu11ks,Bobby . . . Burnett, James Bu1111ett,J0hn ................. 133 Burnett, Nancy ............. 99,436 Burney, Linda 133 Burnim, M, L ............ 99,207,378 Burnim,Melonee ........ 133,411,431 Burns, Donald 13 Bums, Linda Burrell, Carol Burris, Boyd ................... 99 Burroughs, Tom Burton, Benelle ................ 133 Burton, Charles ................. 99 Burton. Jerry Busby, Roy Bush, Beverly . . Bush, Dennis ..................... 133 OBusiness, School 01' ................ 70 Butin, James ..................... 133 Butler, Malcolm 99 Butsch, Trudy Buttrill, Linda Bycz Joseph Byers, Cynthia ................ 133 Bynum, Diana ......... 133,348,441 Byrne,Jim ................... 133 C Cade,Stan1ey .................. 92 Caffey, Judy 133 Cage, Katherine Cagle,Ga11ner .................. 99 Cain, David . . . . . Caldwell,Ba11bara Caldwell,Bi11ye ........ Call, Rebecca 99 Callaham, Doyle ............... 133 Callahan, Gerald ............... 423 Callahan, Steve 374 Callaway,Ga11y ............. 99,416 Callaway Linda 133,357 Calvert, Calvert, Sue Calvin, Richmond Cameron, Tamarra .............. 133 Camp Frank .............. 92, 410 Campbell, Ann ................. 99 Campbell, Dan .......... 99, 438, 462 Campbell, Larry 33 Campbell,Ma11ty . Campbell, Michele Campos, Bertha . Candler, Mike ................. Cannon,B11yon ................ 391 Cannon, Frank Cano, Ray Cantrell, Janice ................ 133 Cantrell, Scott Capers, Sherry Captain, John ................. 100 Card, Donald 100 Cardell Barbara 413 Carey, rank .............. 100,414 Caxlisle, Cindy 133 Carlock, Jan .................. 133 Carlson, Anita Carlson, James Carlson, Nancy ............. 100, 420 Carlton, James 392 Carman, Elizabeth . Carmichael, Karla Carmichael, Kathie Carneal, Susan Carney, Kenneth ............... 134 Carney, Robert ................ 100 Carona, Suzette ............... 134 Carpenter, Carol ............... 100 Carpenter, Karen ............... 134 Carr, David .................. 134 Carr, Deborah .................... 346 Carr, Dorothy .................... 346 Carrell, Kim ................. 100, 382 Caroll, Judy Carreon, Susana Carson, Georgia Carson, Larry ................. 100 Ca11tee,Shirley Carter, Anita Carter, James Carter, John ..... Carter, Katherine Carter, Margaret Carte1, Owen Carter, Roy . Ca1111w11gh1,Cheryl. Caruzzi, Suzi Casey, D011 Casillo, Albert Castellano, Abraham Castle, Judy .................. 134 Castle, Linda 134 Caswell, David Caswell, Norman ............... 418 Caton, Barbara Caton, Irma Cauley, Carolyn Cavasos, Randy ................ 100 Cavosos, Eduardo 100 Cave, Howard ..... Cavender, Mike . . Cavende11,Vicki . Cawthon, Joseph ............... 100 Cearly, Jess .................. 428 Centofanti, Joseph Cerasaro, Victor ............ 100,392 Cercone Claudia ................ 92 Cerow, acques ................ 100 Ceynowa, Susan ............... 100 Chaddick Mary Chaffin, Chamberlain, Carol Chamberlain, Marshall Chambers, Jane ................ 134 Chambers, Mary 134 Chambers, Reed ........ 134, 351, 416 Chambers, Richard 100 Chance,F11ances . . Chance, Maurice . Chaney, Robert . . Chandler Terry Chaney jeanette ............ 134,348 Chaney, Joetta ................ 134 Chaney, Robert ............... 368 Chantly, Maria Chapin, Kathy Chapman, Cynthia .............. 352 Charles, Debbie ................ 344 Chase, Andrew Chase, Janie ................... 92 Cheek, Yvonne ................ 134 lChemistry ................... 47 Chesney, Suzanne .............. 348 Chester, Johnie ................ 100 Chestnut, Candy ........ 436, 469, 470 Cheung, Sun Hung ............ 134,459 'Chi Omeg a 352 Childers, Corky ................ . . Childers,Deb11a ............... 11 4, Childress, Robert ................. 100 Chiles, Catherine .................. 100 Chilton, Gayla .................... 134 Chisenhall, Linda ................. 134 Chmielewski,Sha11on ............... 351 Christ, Candi ..................... 134 Christ1an, Bonnie Christian,Debo11ah Christian, Elizabeth Christian, Joe Christian, Kathleen Christie, John ................. 134 Christophe1, Sharon ............. 100 Christo 1191, Tom .......... 100 Clabre, argaret . Cladius, Kathi . . . . Claiborne, Dan . . . Clancy, Tom Clanton, Candy ................ 134 Clark, Benniem ................ 134 Clark, Beverly ................. 360 Clark, Billy 134 Clark, Charles ................. 435 Clark, Charles W ................ 134 C1a11k,Judith Clark, Kathleen ................ 134 Clark, Kathy 134 Clark, Linda .................. 344 Clark, Linoa .................. 100 Clark, Mary Clark, Palmer Clark, Susan .................. 100 Clark, Susanne Clark, Tamara ......... Clark, Thomas Clarke, Bmce Clarke, Polly Clasbe,Kath11yn Clay, arolyn ................. 134 Clay, Ernestine ................ 100 Clay, Gary Clay, James Claybon, Vicki ................ 100 Cleboski, Linda ................ 134 Clegg, Albert Clements, Christopher Clements, Lorraine ............. 354 Clemmons, Mary ............... 136 Clemans, Gayla ................ 136 Cletcher, Dale ..... . . 205 Cleveland, Wanda . . Clifton, Delma Clifton, Ted ............... 100,374 Clifton, Tom .............. 391, 136 Cline, Stephen 391 Clinkenbeard, Michael Clinkinbeard,y Alan Ciinkinbeaxd, Theresa Clodfeiter, Gary ............... 384 Clow, Ann ................... 136 Cludius, Kathi 136 Clyburn, Fredda ............... 136 Coates, Billy .................. 100 Coates, Margaret .............. 100, 452 Coates, 92 Cobb, Che1ilow ............. 136, 352 Cobb, John 100 Cobb,Miche1e Coble, Cynthia Coburn, Billy Cochran, Ruth Cockrell Carolyn Codner, redresa 1 . C0dy,Mike Coffield, Sandra Coffman,Joh11 Coftman,Rosan11e .............. 100 Cofield, Renee 136 Cogdell, Nancy ................ 100 Cohaga111,Rick 380 Cohe11,Lynne ................. 101 C0he11,SLeve Cohen, Steven Cokc11,Charlotte ............ 101,429 Coker, Thomas ................ 445 Cole,Ca11d1 Cole, James Cole, Patsy ................... 136 Cole,She11i ................... 136 Colegrove,Bai1ba11a . Coleman, Camile . , . Coleman, Cathie Coleman, Cynthia Coleman,Ga11y ................ 101 Coleman, Tona ................ 136 Collier, Twila Collins,Che11ilyn ............... 136 Collins, Donna 101 Collins, Grady Collins, James ................. 136 Collins, Linda .............. 136,411 Collins, Michael 136 Collins,Ron11ie ............. 136,380 Collins, Ronnie L 136 Collins, Ross Collins,Tame11a ......... Collum,, Tommy ........ Come11,Ma11tha Compton, Nancy ............... 136 Compton, Peggy ............... 136 Co11atse11,Diane 136 Congleton,Cai1ol ............ 92,423 Congleton, Michael 92 Conlee, Robeit Conlev Delo1es Connalin Danny ............ 428, 449 Connell,Marga11et .............. 136 Conner, Ca1oly11 ............... 101 Conner, Tommy 136 Connie, Sandy Con11011,James Conoley, Jane ................. Co11111,ady Emily Contiata, C311 ................. 462 Conway, Richard Conyer,s James . . Cook, B0 b. . . . . Cook, Charles ................. 380 Cook, David .................. 101 Cook, Donald ................. 101 Cook, Douglas Cook Gene Cook, George ................. 136 Cook, Hemy 136 Cook, James .................. 101 Cook, Lloyd .................. 391 Cook,Te111y 136 Cook, William ................. 136 Cooley, Sam Coon, John Cooper, Carlton Cooper, Cathy C00pe11,Gael Coope1,Joe .................. 376 Cooper, Ma1ga.1et ............... 137 Coope1,Sha11011, ............... 137 Coope1, Tony ................. 392 C00pe1,Ty11011e 137 Copeland Gelea 101 Corbett,6ha11es ............... 101 Co11bin,Linda ................. 137 Co11dell,Barba11a Cordell, Clifford C011ley,Na11cy Cornelison, Jean Cornelison, J0 Cornish, Tom C01111wall,G11eg ................ 368 Cossota, Suzie . . ....... 137 Costa, John Costin, Ka1en Coston, Mike Cotton, Connie ................ C0110n1Deb1a Couch, James ................. Couch, Jesse .................. 449 0Council on International Relations and United Nations Affairs 4r Coursey, William ............... 101 C0u11t11ey,C nthia .............. 137 Covington,a11olyn ............. 101 Cowa11,Car11ie ................. 13 7 Cowan, William ............. 137 392 Cowa11, D011 137 Cowne,Sha110n ................ 137 Cowsar, Jeanette ............... 131 Cox, C Cox, James Cox, Jeanne Cox,Je1111y Cox, Vickie Coy, CallOS Coyle, Sandee .................. 92 Coyle, Thomas ................ 101 Cozby, erd .................. 137 Cozby,Ma11ilyn ................ 137 C1abb,Dia11e 137 C11aeree,Vi11ginia .............. 137 C1aft, David 137 C11:aft Hugh 137 Craft, Richard C11aft,Shi11ley .............. Craig, Christi .............. 137,358 Craig,Randa11137 Cralk,Ga1'y .................. 101 Cramer Lee .................. 137 Crane, Cynthia ................ 137 Crane, James ................. 101 Cranfill, Billy .................. 92 Cranfill, Davey ................ 374 Cranford, Robert Craven,Michae1 Crawford, Diane Crawford: Jack ................. 92 Crawford: Jack C .............. 137 Crawford, Marnie . . Crawford Michael . . . Crawley, ayne Craze, Janice Creel, Sandra C1ide1',Lucy .................. 137 Crim, Steven ................. 137 Crist Kathleen ................ 137 Cros y, Catherine Crosier Jane ................. 137 Cross, jack ................... 422 Cross, Susan ............... 137,352 Crouch,Debra137 Crouch: Jesse Crouch: Raymond ........... 101: 376 Crouch Sue .................. 377 Crow usan Crumbaker Sharon Crummel ichaxd .............. 368 Crump Claudia ......... . . , . Crum ,Vernon Cu11,a1'roll . . . 1 . Cullins, Guy .................. 138 Culpepper, James ............... 92 Cummings, Anna ............... 138 Cummings, Joy ............. 411, 442 Cummings, Linda Cummings: Marion Cummins, David Cundiff, Bob Cunningham, Elizabeth Cunningham,Ma1'garet ........... 13 Cunningham, Marion 92, 418 Cunningham, Shelia ............. 138 Curl, David ............... 428, 449 Curry, Billy 138 Curry,C0dy ...... . 138,450,471 Curry, Cynthia . 1 . . 354 Curry, John .................. 427 Curtis, Robert Curtis, Ronald Czaplicki, David ............... 101 Czaplicki, Linda ............... 101 D Dagen, John .................. 138 Daghestani, Burhandeen ........... 92 Dailey Dale, Wynette Dalton, Dana Dalton Forrest ................ 384 Daly, gall ................ Dane,Roge1't .............. D Angelo, Nancy Dan1e1,Michael. Daniel: Sheila . Daniel, Virginia . . . Daniels, Evelyn ................ 138 Daniels,Per1'y138 Danner: Marion ............. 101,352 Dansby Randy ............. 138,418 Darby, ................... 138 Darnell, Dzeborah ............... 138 Darst, Sylvia .................. 101 Dauchan, Davy ................ 378 Davenport Janice .............. 138 Davidson,everly138 Davidson, Dena ......... 138, 352, 440 DavidsonZJames138 Davidson, Robin ............... 358 Davidson, Virginia .............. 138 Davis, Affie Davis, Alan Davis, Alice . Davis, Ann ...... 1 Davis, Arliss ........... 138,344,440 Davis,Be11nda 138 Davis, Billy Davis, Brid et ................. 102 Davis, Can ace Davis, Carol 350 Davis,Ca1'ole .......... 138,360,409 Davis, Charlcie 120 Davis, Dean Davis, Herbalyn Davis: J. M. .................. 368 Davis: James .................. 138 Davis, James T ................. 138 Davis, John .................. 139 Davis, Judith 39 Davis,Judy ........... 102,194,409 Davis, hymn .102 Davis, ichael Davis, Rennetta Davis, Sharon . Davis, Susan .................. 139 Davis, Sherian ................. 139 Davis, Thomas ................ 139 Davis, William ................. 139 Davison,La1rry Dawson:John102 Dawson, Judy .............. 139,431 Day, Linda ................... 139 Day, Linda S ................. 102 Day, Susan ................... 411 Dean, Jimmy ................. 139 Dean, Sally Deason Nancy Deats, john .Debate Club Deck,Ba1'ba1'a . Deck, Dorothy Deckard, Donald ............... 139 Decker, Cynthia Deel, David Deen, Gary DeFratus, Davis Degge, Sandra Delaney, Mary Delario, James Delatorre, Carlos ............ 102,384 Delgado, Conchita 139 Delle,Richa1'd DeLoach, Jim 1 1 . ODelta Epsilon . ODelta Gamma . . . . oDelta Phi Epsilori .............. 356 oDelta Psi Ka pa ............... 420 oDelta Sigma hi ............... 368 IDelta Sigma Pi ............... 418 oDeIta Sigma Theta ............. 357 0 Delta Zeta .................. 358 DeMerritt,Ann139 Deming, James ............. 182,410 Demonbreum, Donna ............ 139 DeMougeot, William ............ 441 Denison, Margaret .............. 102 Denman, Gwendolyn ............ 139 Dennim, Queen 408 Dennis, Bobby ............. 139, 447 Dennis: Colleen . .139 Dennis: Ricky . Dennis,Te1'rie .............. 139,377 DeRouChey Jeanne ............. 319 Den'ick K1113 ................ 139 Deskin, Sherrie 139 Dess, Jay ................. 102,388 Deviney,Samue1 102 Dewberry, Glenda ........... 102,346 DeWeese,Ca1rl 372 DeWeese, Vivian Dian,A1bert 102 Dickens, Nancy ........... 32 33, 405 Dickerson, Tommy 35 4 Dickey, Imogene ............... 229 Dickman, Mark ................ 102 Dickson, Brenda ............... 139 Dickson, Claudia ............... 439 Dickson, Margaret ........ Dickson, Mary Diehl, Rosemaw . . Diggs Barbara . . D111, Cathy ................... 139 Dillard, George ................ 139 Dillehay, Tom 94 Dillon, Michele ............. 102,420 Dines, Mary ........... 139,411, 430 Dinwiddier,y David 120 Dippo, William Dix, Bob .................... 458 Dixon, Bobby ................. 378 Dixon, Thomazena .............. 92 Doak, James .................. 139 Dobbins, Gary Dodson, Carol Dodson, Carolyn . . Dodson Lee 1 . . Dohm, Louise . Domke, Martha ................ 139 Donahue,Pat1'icia .............. 139 Donaldson Tom ............... 464 Donovan Thomas .............. 102 Dooley, avid Dooley Tim Doran Yvette .............. 139,466 Do1'1',David ............... 139: 451 Dorsey, Cynthia ........ 139,210,346 Dorsey, Evalena Dorsey, Paul ................... 92 Dorsey, Robert ................ 139 Doshier, Robert Dossett, William Doty Kenneth ................ 139 Daugherty, James .............. 422 Dougherty Vicki Douglas, Chaplin . . 1 Dougerty Ernie Douthit David . . . . . . .140 Doves, Cynthia ................ 140 Dowd, James Downes, Brian Downing, Diana Downing, Max Downs, Robert ................ 140 Doyle, Cathy ................. 140 Doyle, Fred .................. 102 Doyle, Sherry ................. 103 Drake, Eddy .................. 140 Drake, Regina ................. 140 Drapei' Kenneth Drew,Ma1'y Drewry Payul Drews, Michael. Dreyer, Ladene . . . . Drisc011,Catherine .............. 466 D11ve1',J0e ................ 103,376 Drolet: Pat ............ 140, 425, 426 Drummond, Venita 140 Dubberly, Ina Dubman Hedy Duchin, rian Duckworth, Michael Duckworth, Nancy Dudar, Lynn ................. 103 Dugan, Bill ................... 140 Dugger, Linda ................. 439 Du gger, Margaret ............... 140 Dulak, Jean .................. 103 Dulsman Leo 0 Dumas,81ise Dunbar, Glen Dunbar, Steven Duncan, Donna , . . Duncan, Jennifer . Duncan, Nancy . . . Duncan, Patricia Duncan, Rehecca Dundas, Doris ................. 103 Dunham, Shari Dunlap, Cole Dunlavy, Claudia ............... 140 Dunn, Dan ................... 103 Duran, Carol ................. 103 Du1'an,RichaId ................ 103 Durham, David . . . . . Durham Elise . . . . Durham: Mary Dutton, David Dunett, Duane Duvall, Kathleen Dvorak, Jeanette 1 Dwyer, Michael ............. 394, 410 Dye, Alane 140 Dyke, Lane ............... 140,431 E Eads, Norman ................. 103 Eads, Wanda 1 3 Earles, Sarah Eatherly, Lynda Eaton, Joyce Eberhart, James . . Ebert, Patricia .................... 103 Ebert, Reva ...................... 420 Ebert: Ron ...................... 445 Ebert,Rona1d ................. 140 Echols, Lyndon ............... 103 Eckel, Jesse .................. 140 Eckenrod, Karen ............... 140 OEconomics ................... 49 Eddington Helen .............. 140 Edgar, G. .................... 34 Edgar, Patricia ................ 140 Edgar Robert .................. 192 Edger1ey, Janene 40 Edie,Sha1'on .............. 103,358 Edmiston, Janice . . . . .40 Edmonson, Connie Edmonson: Raymond OEducation, School of Edwards, James Edwards, Jerry 140 Edwards, John ............. 140, 391 Edwards, Michael ........... 103,376 Edwards: Ray Eggers, James .................. 192 Eichman, Preston Eilder, Linda Eisenkraft,D1ane Elizondo, Candelario Elkins,Ga1'y OEllenH. Ryichards Club Ellet, Gini Elling, Helena . Elliott Ellen Ellis, Carolin Ellis, Cheryl Ellis, Gerry Ellis, Jean ....................... 103 Ellis, Jimmy ..................... 372 Ellis, Judith ...................... 140 Ellis, Linda ...................... 140 Ellis, Robert ..................... 392 Ellis, Roger ...................... 417 Ellis, Susan ...................... 140 Ellison, David .................... 140 Elmore Lee .................. 140 Elrod, onnie ................. 103 Elwell, Tony ................. 103 Emerson, Mina Endicott, Donna . Engel, Gene . . . . England, Linda . . 'Eng1sh Enlow Sharon goff, 9a$ela ppler,a1'ylin Erhardt, Marvin Ernst, Donna Erwin, Patricia Estes, Steven ............ 374 Ethrid e, Lonnie ............ 103,418 Euban s, Carol ......... 141 Eubanks, Candace .............. 141 Eubanks: Kay ................. 141 Eubanks: Melyita ............... 141 Eubanks, Nelse ................ 141 Eubanks, Sharon ............... 103 Eugster,Dona1d Evaldo, Angela Evans, Brinda . Evans: Edward 1 . Evans, Jacqueline . . . . 41, 213 Evans, Janet .................. 141 Evans: Kevin ................. 141 Evans, Norma ................. 141 Evans: Verna ................. 439 Evans, Vernon ................ 141 Ewald, William ................ 394 Ewing, Cheryl ................. 141 oEx-Marines .................. 458 F Fabianke, Lloyd ................ 92 Fadely, Christine ............... 141 Faggard John ................. 141 Fagot, rancis . . . Fahring, Linda Fair, Glenn . . . Fair, Rhonda Fair: William .............. Fairchild Virginia .............. 431 Farina T e1'esa ............. 103,344 Faris,Te1'ry .................. 384 Farley, Bob .................. 466 Farley, Deborah Farley, Robert Farmer,Ha1'old ................. 35 Farmer: Kitty ................. 362 Partner, Leslie . . . Farquhar, James . . . . Farr, Virginia . . . 1 . . . Farrell, William . . ............. 141 Farris, Robert ................. 103 oFashion Design Club 443 Faulkner, M. L .............. 141,388 Fay, John ................... 103 Feagin, Janis ................. 141 Feathe1'ston, Diane Feeler Rachel .............. 103 Felder off, Diann .............. 141 Felker, Joann ................. 141 oFencing Club ................ 444 Ferguson, Bic .............. 351, 308 Ferguson, Donald 141 Ferguson, Re ina ....... 141,344,440 Ferguson, R0 e1't 206 Ferguson, Terry Ferguson,Walte1' . . . . Ferrell, Lawrence Ferrell, Milton . . . Ferrill, Deborah . . . . ..... 141 Ferrin, Nancy ................. 141 Fertitta, Frank ................ 104 Fewell Jonie .............. 10 4 Fick Christine ............. Fiel L,yn Fields Thomasene .............. 141 Filis, ina Filogomo, Vincent Finch, Becky Finch, Dennis ................. 141 Fincher, Cynthia ............... 141 Fincher, Thelnita Findley Patrick Fink, exis Finklea Charles Finley, Nancy Finn, Kathleen . . . . 1 1 . Fiorihi, Sandra ............. 104, 362 Fischer, Rick ................. Fisher, Becky ................. 141 Fisher, Evelyn ............. 141,470 Fisher, Jack .................. 104 Fisher:Kath1'yn Fisher,Lau1'a .............. 1 Fisher: Nina ............... 142,462 Fisher, Susie .................. 423 Fisher, Wa ne Fishkind, llen ............. 142, 356 Fister,Rona1d ................ 493 Fitch, David .................. 230 Fitzgibbons, Patric ............. 104 Flagg, Gordon . . Flanagan Lindi . . . Flanery, argo .. Fleckman N D Fleming, joseph 42 Flemmons Gary ............ 142, 182 Fletcher, Kenneth ........... 1 2 Fletcher Tara .............. F,lood Michele Flora, yJonathan Flores, Linda Florey, Marion Florey, Randall ................ 142 Flournoy, Gale ................ 360 Flournoy Patricia142 Flowers,an.ie1 ............. 142,368 Flowers, Judy 104 FIusche Jerry .............. 418,466 Flynn, eorge ............. 468, 469 Foerster Patricia Folkes, Hugh . . . Follis, Brenda . . . Foltz, Kevin . . . . Foote, Debi Ford, James 104 Fore, Joe ............. 104, 417, 438 0 Foreign Languages F01',eman Judy ............. 142,354 Forest, Joyce .............. 104,346 Forester, Karen 40 Forrest,Char10tte Forrest, Patricia Forrester, Karen Fortenberry, Barbara ............ 142 Forth, Vicki .................. 448 Fortier, Gary ................. 142 Fortmayyer, Gary ................ 93 Fortson, Carolyn Foshee Robert ...... Foster, Allen F aster Bruce Foster, Burl ................ 142 Foster, George ................ 394 Foster, Linda ................. 360 Foster: Nancy ................. 142 Fouts, Rosemary ............... 104 Fowler, Mary ................. 142 Fox, Jerolyn 142 Fox, Pamela Fraley, Jana ............... Fralin,Che1'yl Francis, Gail .................. 104 Francisco, Don ................ 142 Franklin, Eddie 104,378 Franklin, Gordon .............. 407 Franklin, Linda ................ 104 Franklin, Ronald ..... . Frank, Robert . . Franks, Brenda . Fraze, Bernice Frazier, Carrie Frazier, Gloria Frazier, Joe Frazier, Rob .................. 374 Frederick, Michael 386 Fredericks, Judy ............ 104435 Frederickson, Steve 394 Freeland, Susan ............ Freeling, Karen ............. Freeman, Kenneth Freeman, Russell ............... 142 Friedel, K Frender, David Friday, Gary Friedman,Bever1y .............. 104 Frith, John 104 Frith: Linda OFrog, The ................... 157 Fry, Jane .................... 104 Frye, John ................... 142 Frymire, Susan ................ 142 Fuchs, Rudolph ............... 434 Fuhrmann, Michael Fulbright, Paul ..... Fuller, Bi11y . . . . Fuller, Lee ................... 142 Fullilove, Dorothy .............. 142 Furch, John .................. 124 Fun', Willma .................. 142 Fursienberg, Julia .............. 142 G Gaddis, James ....... Gaecke, Chuck . . . Gagan, William ................ 142 Gage, Jer .................. 142 Gagliano, rKind ............... 104 Gahan, Timothy ............... 104 Gainesy Byron ................. 376 Gaithei', Lewis ................ 142 Gaither, Lyndon ............... 142 Galassi, Darlene ............... 142 Gallia, Barbara ............. 142, 466 Gallia, Elizabeth . . . . 104 Gallivan, Frank ...... . . . . . Galloway, Maryieda ............. 144 Gaylon, Charlene 144 Gambill, Sheryl ............. 104, 348 Gamble, Anne 360 OGamma Theta Upsilon Gant, Joyce .................. 144 Garaby, Jane ................. 384 Garcia, Arcadio ................ 430 Garcia, Artha Garcia, Ester Garcia, Gilbert Garcia, Guillermo Garcia, Memo ................. 469 Garcia, Miramar ............... 144 Gardner, Elaine ................ 144 Gardsbane, Barbara ............. 144 Garibay, Samuel ............... 384 Garland, Connie ............... 369 Garland, Dorothy .............. 144 Garland Gary .............. 144,416 Garland Jerry Garner, Daniel .................... 144 Gar11er,Ma1'ilyn ................... 144 Garrett, Beverly ............... 144 Garrett, Dave ................. 104 Garrett, Gay .................. 457 Garrett, Gwendolyn .......... 104,357 Garrett, Linda Garrison, Jean Garza, Hogla Gassiott, Glenn ................ 104 Gatewood, Marcia .............. 144 Gatlin, Cathy ................. 144 Gatten, Mary ................. 144 Gatton, Phillip ................ 144 Gault, Jo Marie ................ 354 Gavigan, James ................ 144 Gawn Pat . . . Gay, Laura . . . . Gee, Tom 1 Geeir, Lee ................. 3 58, 416 OGeezles 370 Geisel, Susan Geistman, Alan ................ 391 Geistman, Gerry Genovese, Linda Gentry, Alice ................. 144 Gentry, Billy Gentry, David . . . . . Genzer, Ronald ................ 144 OGeography ................... 154 George, Deanna George, Phyllis ...... 214, 363, 374,440 George, Robert ................ 144 Gerhardt, Bob Gerhart, George Germer, Russell Gettys, Charlotte Gibbs, Karen ................. 105 Gibbs, Kathryn ................ 144 Gibbs, Sharron Gibson, Corinne Gibson, Karen Gibson, Millard ................ 380 Gibson, Patricia Gibson, Zack Giddings, Brenda Gier, Richard .................. 27 Giffin, Richard ................ 144 Gilbert, Barbara Gilbert, Elizabeth Gilbe1',t Leonard 370 Gilbert: Stacey ............. 144, 350 Gilboe, Gene 105 Gilbreath,Derw111 Gilbreth, Gillespie, Suzanne . Gilliam, Robin . . . Gillum, Gil ................... 407 Gilmore, Donald ............... 144 Gilmore, Jan Gilmore, Peggy Gih'eath, Carla 44 Gipson, Margaret ............ 105,357 Gisi, Carl a Givens, Carolyn 10 Givens, Gary .............. 144,392 Glass, Carol Glass, Jane ................... 459 Gleason, Kenneth Glenn, Milton ....... . . . Glotfelter, Robert .............. 105 G10ver,Janet ................. 144 Gloven, Ted .................. 144 Goben, Janeen Godby, Herbert Godfrey, Berl ............... 22, 23 Godman, Lori ................. 105 Godwin, Peter Goemer, Karen . Goff, Jamie Goff, James Goff, Robert Goff, William Goins, Linda Goins, Willis .................. 145 Golden, Joe .................. 145 Goldhirsh, Robert .............. 365 Golembiewski, Georganne ......... 105 Gomez, Reynalde Gondo, Suzuo Gongre, Charles Gonzales, Freddy Gonzalez, Gloria ............... 203 Gonzalez, Hector 382 Gonzalez, Oralia ........ 145,413,466 Good, Katherine ............... Geode, Ella ............... 145,357 Goode1l, Thomas ...... . . Goodman, Jon . . . Goodman, Linda ............... 145 Gordon, Brenda ............... 145 Gordon, Gary ................. 145 Gordon, Lynn 145 Gorham, Linda ............. 145, 360 German, Ken .............. 105, 413 German, Mike 382 G055, Mary ..... Goss, William . . . Goswick, Barbara . . . . . . . Goudeau, Sherry .................. 145 Gouge, Debra .................... 145 .Government ..................... 55 Grablachoff, Vic ............... 388 OGraduate School ............... 88 Graefing, Susan ................ 145 Graham, Frances ............... 145 Giantham, Glenda .............. 360 G1auso,Janet .............. 145,444 Graves, Ellis . . . . . . . 45 Graves, Oneida . . Gray, Bi 11 Gray, Dan Giay James .................. Gray, Linda ............... 145,426 Gray,Nora1yn 45 Gray, Pamela ................. 145 Gray, Wayne .............. 145,439 Green, Beverly Green, Cathy Green, Curtis Green, Douglas ................ 145 'Gi'een Jackets ................ 409 Green, Larry ................. 145 Green, Lynne .............. 145, 411 Green, Norman ............. 145, 308 Green, Peggy 145 Green, Thomas ................ 105 Green, Verna . . . . Greene, Lisa .................. 45 Greene, Lizzy .......... 145,344,390 Greer, Cynthia 14 Greer, Donna .......... 145,350,411 Gree1',Kathi ............... 145,352 Greer, Lindslee ................ 145 Greer, Theodore ............... 145 Gregg, Gar .................. 145 Greiss, Maryy .................. Gresham, Sara Griffin, Brenda . . . . . . . . Griffin, Don ................ 145 Griffin, Don W ................. 386 Griffin, Herbert Griffin, Jim Griffin, Mary Griffis, David Griffith, Cherie Griffith, Karen Griffith, Martha Griffith Sherry . . . Grigis, Cynthia . . . Grigson, James Grigsby, Dickie Grigsby, Larry ...... 105, 432, 435, 468 Grillo, Robert ................. Grimes, Debby ................ 145 Grisham, Claudia ............... 145 Grissom, Larry ................ 145 Grizzaffi, Luke Groce, Suzette Greening, David . . . . . Groom, Constance .............. 145 Gross, James ................. 105 Grounds, Linda ............. 105, 411 Grubbs,Steven105 Guerra, Tito .................. 105 Guerrero, Daniel ............... 105 Guillory, Janet ................ 145 Guinn, Dorothy ............... 145 Guinn, Orville ................. 105 Guinn, Phill Guinn, Shelia Gullo, Charlsie Gumataotao, Evelyn Gumfory, Joel Gunn, Debbi Gustafson, Dayna 14 Gustafson, Deborah ............. 105 Gustafson, Lawrence ............ 146 Guthrie, Alice .............. 146,358 Guthrie: Janit ................. 46 Gutierrez, Charles .............. 146 Gu tierrez, Robert Guyer, Rebecca Guynes, Doug ................. 394 H Haas,Dennis .......... 146,391,410 Haas, Diana 46 Hacker, Frank Hackett, Arthur Hackett, Charles Hackney, Elizabeth Haddox, Andrea . . . . Haddox, William . . . . . . . . Haferkamp, Diane .............. 146 Hagen, Gary .................. 146 Haggard, Larry ................ 105 Haggert ,Audra ............... 146 Hahnl, arl .................. 105 Hahnl1Judy .................. 105 Hale, anny .................. 146 Hale, Ken ................... 146 Hale, Thomas 1 6 Haley, Brooks . Haley, Charlotte . Haley, David 1 6 Haley, Kathryn ...... 106, 190, 408, 455 Half enny, Louise .............. HaJi urton, William ............. 146 Hall, Carroil 46 Hall, Charles ............... 146,368 Hall, Georgia 46 Ha11,Jim Ha11,John . . . . . Hall Kathryn . . . . . . Hall, Liz ................. 146, 452 Hall, Margaret .............. 146,411 Hall, Orval ............ 146, 402, 464 Hall, Robert .................. 146 Hall, Robert R ................. 146 Hall, Teena ............... 146, 348 Hall, Yvette. 146 Ham ric, Roscoe ..... Hamilton, Bill ....... . . . Hamilton, Jeanne .............. 106 Hamilton,Jeffrey106 Hamilton, Jim ............. 146,374 Hamilton, Kathy ............... 146 Hamilton, Martenzie ............ 146 Hamilton, Michael .............. 146 Hamlin, Mickey ............... 146 Hamm,Pau1 ............... 106,466 Hammerle Betsy ............... 46 Hammerle, Pete ............... 106 Hammerle Pete ............ 146,368 Hammod,1VIichael .............. 374 Hand,B1'uce .................. 146 Hanes, Charles Hanes, Philia Haney, Harry ................. 146 Haney, Jerry ................. 146 Haney, Marie ................. 146 Hankins, Garland .............. 106 Hann, Jo Ann ................. 146 Hanson, Carole ............. 435, 455 Hanson, Lynn ................. 430 Hardeman, Ronald ............. 106 Harden, Jim .................. 106 Harders, Alan ................. 146 Hardin, Beth Hardin, Phil Hardy, Samuel 391 Hargett, Lillian ............. 147, 462 Harg'rove, John ................. 26 Hargrove, Ron ................ 147 Hargrove, William Harkless, Lawrence Harlan, Bill Harlan, Della Harless, Nancy Harman, Mary Harms, Diann . . Harmon, Paula Harmon, Trice Harper, Leslie ................. 386 Harper, Sandra ................ 422 Harpool, Sally Harrell, Judith Harrington, Leslie .............. 147 Harris, Bob .................. 407 Harris, Cheryl ................. Harris, Cynthia . . Harris, Evelyn . . . . . . . . Harris, Faith .................. 147 Harris, James Harris, John Harris,John11y Harris, Kitty ............... 147, 441 Harris, Linda 147 Harris, Margaret Harris, Nancy ......... Harris, Odis .................. 147 Harris, Richard Harris, Robert Harris, Robert Harris, Sheron Harris, Wanda ................. 147 Harrison, Cynthia Harrison, Cynthia Harrison, Diane ................ 350 Harrison, Doug ................ 386 Harrison, Larry ................ 147 Harrison, Marie ................ 106 Hart, Dennis .................. 106 Hartensteiner, Kenneth Hartley, Brenda Hartley, Gayla Hartman, Martha ............... 147 Hartwick, Judy ................ 106 Harvey, Margie ................ 106 Harvey, Roy .................. 372 Harwell, Colleen Haslund, Stephen 106 Hatcher, Annette ....... 147, 344, 440 Hatfield, Nancy 106 Hatton, Richard Hatton, William Havey, Maureen Hawk, Teddy Hawkins, Americus . . . . . . . Hawkins, Deborah .............. 106 Hawkins, Judy ................ 147 Hawkins, Sandra ............... 147 Hawkins, Th omas Hayes, Deborah Hayes, Jim ................... 147 Haynie, Brenda ................ 408 Haynie, Linda . . . . . . . Haynie, Theresa Hays, Mel Hays, Michael .............. Hays, Shelly .................. 148 Heacock, Cathy Head, Albert Headrick, Joan HeaJy, Anne ..... Heath, Christine . . . Heath, Jimmy .......... Hedmon, David ................ 382 Hefley, Janis Heflin, Sharon Hefner, Linda ................. 148 Heimer Susan ................ 308 Heins, Susan ................. 196 Heise1z, Chuck Heissenber er, Karen ......... Heitman, argie . . . Hejl, Martha ..... Helmick, Michael Helsley, Jane Helton, Linda ................. 148 Hemphill, Jacqueline ............ 148 Henderson, Charley ............. 148 Henderson, Cynthia ............. 148 Henderson, Dave ............... 148 Henderson, Helen Henderson, Joyce Henderson,Ronnie106 Hendrix Susie ............. 411,441 Hen1ey,1VIarsha ............. 348 447 Henley, Thelma ........ 189, 344, 420 Henrichs, Calvin 148 Hendrick, Bert Henry, Carol Henry, Eddie ................. 106 Henry, Francis ................ 148 Henry, Jerry . . . . . Henry, Katha . . . . . . Henry, Mary .................. 148 Henry, Patricia ................ 148 Henry, Susan .............. 148, 352 Hensley, Floyd ................ 380 Hensley, Joseph Henson, Bob Henson, Patti Henson, Wesley ................ 148 Herendon, Charles . . Hermann, Larry . . . , . . . . Hen'en, Phyllis ................ 106 Herren, Ray .................. 394 Herring, Thomas ............... 1 06 Herschkowitsch, Alex Hess, Diane Hess, Sara Hester, Debra ................. 148 Hester, Janice ................. 148 Heuman, Bob ................. 371 Heydman, Allan Hiatt, Rex ....... Hibbs, Cathey ................. 148 Hickey, Jerry ................. 148 Hicks, Bette .................. 106 Hicks, Carole ................. 106 Hicks, Cynthia ................ 430 Hicks: Kay ............ 350,413,464 Hicks,Lau1'a .................. Hicks, Susan .................. 106 Hicks,Sybi1 .................. 148 Hicks, Willie .................. 148 Hieks, Charles ................. 106 Higgins, Kathy High, Ronald ................. 148 Highfill, Jack ................. 148 Hightower Cliff ............... 106 Hildebram1,Sherrie ............. 148 Hill, Constance ................ 106 Hill, Dan .................... 148 Hill, Gordon .................. 391 Hill, Jacqueline ......... 108, 196, 455 Hill, Jesse 407 Hill, Kathie Hillebrandt, Allen Hillendahl, Anne ............... 148 Hilliard, Jamor ................ 420 Hilliard, Sherry ................ 444 Hilliard, William Hilsabeck, Judy 08, 6 Hilson, Linda .108 215, 362, 388 Hilterbrand, Diane .............. 148 Hilz, Judy ................... 148 Hinckley, H31 ................. 148 Hindman, Betsy ............... 148 HinelyL Re mginald ............... 435 Hines,1.4 .................. 48 Hinojosa Walt ............. 148,457 Hinsley, Mike ................. 391 Hinson, Glynda ................. 93 Hinton Vickie Hire, Maxetta 'History Hitchcock, Nancy .............. 148 Hitt, Charles .................. 148 Hobbs, Molendia ............... 108 Hobdy,Am1 .................. 352 Hochstetler Dan ............... 407 Hockaday, Joan ............... 358 Hocker, Joseph ................ 108 Hodge, Cathy ................. 148 485 Hodge, Sue .................. 149 Hodge, Yvonne ................ 148 Hodges,A11na ................. 149 Hodges: Bunny ................ 149 Hodges: Gary ................. 336 Hodges, Jo ................... 431 Hodges, Kaye ................. 149 Hodges, Sharon ................ 149 Hodgkins, Sherrie .............. 350 Hodel, Ronnie ................ 148 Hoffman, Deborah Hoffman: Jackie Hoffmany John Hogan, Hogan,Pa1'ticia . Hogan, Sally. Holbert Kim . Holcomb, Blaine . . Holder, Bill Holder: Carolyn Holder: Lana ................. 149 Holgate, Susan 149 Holland, Donna Holland, George 40 Holland: James ................ 149 Hollar, Brenda Hollar Galen Holle,Na11cy ..................... 108 Holley, Cindy .................... 149 Holleyhead, Felice Holiday, Joe ..................... 149 Hollingshead, Lynn . . I-Iollingsheady Paula. Hollingswort, Annelle Hollinshed, Ronald. Holloway, Sarah Holloway, Terry Holmes, Camille Holmes, Christy Holmes, David Holmes, Harold ................ 462 Holmes: John ................. 382 Holmes, Karol Holmes Sara Holsaxgile, Debra 49 Holt 2110! ................ 108,352 Holt1Dorothy 180 Holt: Jessie .................. 149 Holveck Ann ................. 149 0Home Economics, School of ....... 82 Homes, Gomez ..... . . . Honea, Floyd. Honea, Frank . Honn, S Hooten, Fran ................. 108 Hoover, L 1111 ................. 459 Hopkins, ynthia Hopkins, Donna Hopkins,Doug1as 108 Hopkins, Karen ............. 149,405 Hopkins, Marcia 14 9 Hopkins, Michael Hopper, Richard ............... 108 Hoques, Mary ................. 357 Horan , Nancy ................ 149 H0111, sther H0111, Sherry Hornbeck, Joyce ............... 149 Home, Jo Ann . . . . . . . Horne, Joe ....... Horton, Charles . . . . . . . . H01ton: Welton ................ 439 Hoskins, Lyn ................. 149 Hostetter, Thomas .............. 149 Hotis, Christina ................ 149 H011, Judi ................... 149 Houston, Robert ............... 149 Howard, John .................. 26 Howard, Sharon Howell, Patricia Howes,Wendy Hubbard, Don Hubbard, Erlene Hubbard, Ronnie Hubble, Kerry Hublein, Barbara Hubley, Grover . Huebel Karen Huett, Vanna . . Huffhines, Jo Ann .............. 149 Hugghins Richard Hughes, beborah Hughes, Donald Hughes, Dorothy Hughes, Kay .................. 150 Hughes, Randall ............... 150 Hughes, Robert ................ 450 Hughes,Sam ................. 150 Hughes, Shirles ................ 430 Hughes, Walter ................ 150 gaih ey Bob 111, Ryan Hulse, Alicia .................. 150 Humber, Mary Hummer, Jeanne . . Humphreys, Sharon Humphries, Cheryl Hundley Cynthia Hunley, ravis Hunt, Bill Hunt, Karen .................. 108 Hunt: Martha 34 Hunt: Shirley Hunt: William Hunter, Joan Hurban, Gayle 466 Hurd, Jose ................ 150, 443 Hurlburt Edna 10 Hurley Carolyn Hurst, Barbara Hurst George Anna Hurst, James Hurt, Marva Hutcherson, Betty Hutchins, Dyale ................ 150 Hutchins:Mary ................ 150 486 Hutchinson, Archie ............. 150 Hutchinson, Catherine ........... 150 Hymer, Debra ................. 150 I Iannone, Michele ............... 150 01ndustrial Arts ................ 78 OIndustrial Arts Club ............ 445 11196, James . . Ingle, Norman Ingram, James Ingram, Patricia Innes, Lynda ................. 150 0 International Club ............. 459 Olota Lambda Sigma ............ 446 Iredell, Pat ................... 439 Irvine, Mike .................. 438 11vine,Robert ................. 108 Isham, Dewey 357 Ivers, Katherine ........ 108,199,455 Ivey, Patricia 50 Jackson, Bobby Jackson, Bruce Jackson, Carl Jackson, Deborah Jackson, Dennis Jackson, Kathy . . Jackson, Linda Jackson, Lynn Jackson, Renee ................ 357 Jackson, Yvonne ............... 108 Jacobs, Cheryl Jahnel, Mary Jahnel, Nancy ................. 150 Jakstas, Donna ............. 150, 350 James, Becky ................. 210 James: Jim Jameson, Janita Jameson: Malyna ............ :440 Janavaris Stella ..... 109,348, 425,429 Janca,Be11jamin 1 James Wayne January, Katnie Janus, Evelyn ..... Jaremko, Matthew 369 Jarvis, Barbara ......... 351, 304, 305 Jasuta, Karen .......... 150, 350, 413 Jay, Jessie 109 Jaynes, Maurice Jean Batiste,HeIe11 35 7 Jefferies Patricia ............ 150, 344 Jeffers,ath1'yn Jeffery, Leonard ............... 150 Jeffrey, Janice ................ 150 Jeffrey, Nikki ................. 150 Jenkins, Beverly ............ 109,409 Jenkins: Gary 109 Jenkins, Kim Jenkins, Linda Jenkins, Mary ..... Jenkins, Sharon Jenkins: Verna Jennings Cindy 109 Jensen, andy .............. 150, 348 Jepson: Robert ................ 109 Jerden, Nanette Jeske, Sandra Jeter, Gary ................... 375 Jett, Linda ................... 109 Jetter, John .................. 150 Jimison, Hurshall 50 Jimmerson, Eddie ....... 109,408, 464 Joe, Harry 377 Johnsen Martin Johnson, Auvie ................ 384 Johnson: Bertie ................ 109 Johnson, Beverly ............... 150 Johnson, Carolyn 150 Johnson, Cassandra .......... 150, 346 Johnson, Coy . . . 109 Johnson, David . Johnson, Eric Johnson, Gordon Johnson, Gwendolyn ............ 152 Johnson, Harold 378 Johnson,Janice ........ 109,346,408 Johnson, Jerry 391 Johnson, Jimmie ............... 391 Johnson Karen ................ 152 Johnson, Linda Johnson, Mary Johnson, Mary E Johnson, Nancy Johnson, Nancy Johnson:Pame1a Johnson,Peggy . Johnson, Rebecca . Johnson, Ronda Johnson, Ruby Johnson, Russell Johnson, Sandra 15 Johnson, Steven ............ 93, 428 Johnson, Sue 344 Johnson, Thomas Johnston, Anita ........ 109,442,464 Johnston: Brenda Johnston: D011 ................... 152 Johnston: Jimmy ................. 152 Johnston, Patrick ................. 152 Jolly, Tucker ..................... 201 Jonas, David ..................... 152 Jones, Alvin Jones, Anita Jones: Carol Jones, Danny Jones, Deborah . . Jones, Dinah Jones, Donald Jones, Edwin Jones,Gay1e J0nes,Ginge1 Jones, Janis .................. 152 Jones:Jerrio11 J0nes:Jer1'y Jones, Jim 10 Jones, Jim ............ 152,384, 441 Jones: Jimmy ................. 109 Jones, John Jones: Kenneth R. Jones, Lynda . . Jones, Martha . . . . Jones:Ma1'jorie Jones: Melinda Jones: Michael Jones, NanCy ................. 198 Jones, Nancy S ............ 109,352 Jones: Paul 466 Jones, Peggy .................. 152 Jones, Rita ................... 347 Jones, Susan .................. 152 Jordan, Dawn ................. 351 Jordan, Janice ................ 152 Jordan, Jimmy ................ 152 Jordan, Linda ................. 152 Jordan, Martha ................ 152 Jordan, Miki ..... . . . . Jordan, Sonny . . . Joubert, Shirley OJoumalism Joyce, James Juarez, Alexander Juarez, Delma ................. 152 Judson, Levis Jungman, Jean Juno, Carol .................. 109 K Kamerick, John J Klimp, Littlldaa ' a a A 0 Kagga D it: 0 Kappa Delta Pi OKappa Mu Epsilon ............. 423 I Kappa Sigma Kappus, John . . . . Karlen, Frieda Karlen, Judy . . . . Kasiske, Stanley Kasper, Annabel ............... 109 Kasper, Jim .................. 152 Kaszczuk, Bob ................ 416 Kaszynski Eric ................ 152 Kaver, Ju ith ................. 109 Kaufman, Karolyn .............. 152 Kautsch, John ................ 388 Keas, Ike .................... 152 Keaster, Gary ................. 109 Keen, Charles .................. 93 Keeny, John .................. 109 Keeny, Linda ................. 152 Keglouits, Mary Keil, William Keith, Michael . . . . . Keller, Mary .................. 109 Kelley, Frederick ............... 109 Kelley, Jay ................... 152 Kelley, Joe ................... 392 Kelley, Mike .................. 441 Kelley, Tom ............... 432, 450 Kelley, Tommie109 Kelley, Tommy ................ 153 Kelley, William ................ 153 Kelly, Brian .................. 382 Kelly, Lawrence ............... 466 Kelly, Mike 349 Kelly, Terry ........ 432, 450, 468, 469 Kempe, Russell 152 Kemplin, Nancy Kenas, Tommie Kendall, David Kennard, Lou . . . Kennedy, Karolyn Kennedy, Michael Kennedy, Patricia Kennedy, Ronn Kennemer, Candace ............. 153 Kennemer, Samuel Kerr, Richard Kerringan, Jeff Kersey, Jim ................... 93 Kesker, Lynn ................. 188 Kessler, Lewis ................. 438 Ketner, Billy ................. 110 Kettlety, Warren ............... 153 Kigger, Sharon Kiker, Richard Kiker, Smith .............. 4 50, 471 Kilgore, Edward . . . 153 Kilgore, Janice Kilgore, Jeffrey 80 Killen, Judy ............... 153436 Killough Kyathleen Killyon, atricia Kilmer, Kathy Kimberly, Leslie ............... 426 Kimme1,Garland ............... 153 Kinder, Janey .............. 153,348 Kindley Valerie 153 King, Alfreda King, Bob King, Delta King, Harve King, Helen King, John ......... King, Michael ...... King, Patricia . . King, Ronnie . . . King, Sheila .................. 153 Kingsley Beth Kinley, ennis Kinnamore, Linda Kinslow, Philip Kirk, James .................. 153 Kirk, Virginia ................. 110 Kirkland Johnny .............. 153 Kirwan,Ga1'y ................. 110 .18, 19 20, 21, 409 Kiser, Carlton ................. 153 Kissinger, Thomas .............. 110 Kissner, Michael Kitchens, James K1ar,Debbie . . K1arfield,John Klasen John Klein, Ricky 110 Klem, Alan ........ 153, 351, 306, 309 Kline Alan 10 Knackstadt, Carol Knapek, Cairolyn Knezek, Kay Knight, Daniel Knott, Betty Knox,,'1110mas54 Kocurek Harry ......... 110, 466, 467 Koenig, Charles ................ 145 Koller, Linda ................. 416 Kooker, Cheryl Kooker, Lynn .......... 110,188,201 Koons, Kristine 154 Korkmas Anthony .......... 110, 407 Kosco ichael ......... . Kotecki, Jer . . . . Kottkamp, aty . . Kozolchyk, Henry. . . . . . Kraft, George ................. 423 Krajcar,Sa11dra ................ 110 Krasusky, Edward .............. 154 Krebbs, Marit ................. 11 0 Kresse, Charlotte ............... 154 Kretzschmar, Kathryn ........... 154 Kriss, Michael ................. 154 Krochman Kay Krolczyk LeRoy Krough arbara Krug, arion Krumm, Carol Krupski John ................. 154 Krusz, aren . .352, 377 Kulakoff, Randi Kunka, Sherry Kunhel, Dan .................. 470 Kupferman, Stanley 110 Kupper,And1'ew ............ 391, 410 Kutin, Alex ...................... 110 Kutin, Claudia .................... 154 Kutin, Richard Kuykandall, Bill ............... 416 Kyle, Edward ................. 110 Kyle, Joyce Kyle, La1'1' Kyle, Lin a 15 Kyle, Thomas .............. 110, 380 L LaBarba, James ................ 154 LaBay, Joe ...... LaCavera, Nanette . Lacefield Beverly . Lackey, ee .................. 154 Lacy, Billie .................. 154 LaFollette,Pame1a ............. 154 Lair, James Laird, Janetta .............. 154377 Laird, Patricia 154 Laird, Stephen ......... 154,377,410 Lakey, Pauline 154 Lakin, Bob ................... 154 Lallier, Robert 54 LaL onde, Georgia ........... 154,352 LaLumia, Joe 336 OLambday Chi Alpha ............. 376 Lancaster, Gary . . Lancaster Linder Landers,131'enda . . Landers, Cladene ............... 154 Landers, Jo Delle Landers, Lou Lane, Brenda Lane, Eddie Lane, Richard ................. 11 Lang, Marieke .............. 111,440 Lange Tommy ............. Langeila Leslye Langfor, Calvin ............... Langford: Michael ........... Langford,Richa1'd Langland, Leslie ............... 354 Lan ston, Linda 154,360 Lan ford,Te1'esa . . .' ............ 355 Lankford, William ........... Lapinski, Mary ....... . . Lapp Bradley. . Lare110,Esther Larisay, Terri . . . . . Larson, Charles ................ 388 Larson, Larry ................. 154 Lasseter, Lynn ................ 154 Lassetter Stephen ........... Lathan, arbara Latham, Karen Lathrop Bruce ................ 154 Lauck, arol Laudadio, Robert Laurel, Richard ................ Lawhon, Randy Lawley, James Lawrence, Jean ................ 154 Lawrence, Jerry Lawrencey Susan . Lawson, 8illy . . . Lawson, David Lawson, Donna Laxson, Toni Lay, Gary Lay, Linda ................ 111,436 Layfield, Francetti Layne,A11an ................. 154 Leach Debby ................. 411 Leak i-Iarry .................. 391 Leake, Truitt Leal, Mario Leavelle, Julie ................. 100 Lebowitz, Ed ................. 155 LeClaire, Douglas .............. 386 LeClaire, Gene ................ 386 Ledbetter, Brenda .............. 1 11 Lee, Becky ................... 155 Lee, Claude Lee, Danny Lee, James ................... 1 Lee,John11y ............... 155, 386 Lee: Sally 34 8 Lee:She1'1'y Lee: Stacy . . Leeth, Bennie . . . . 19 Lehrmann, Gail ............. 155,452 Leinweber, Katina .............. 155 Leiter, Nancy ................. 155 Leith, ySara ................ 155, 409 Le Master, Cathey ........... 155, 350 Lemons, Kenneth 11 1 Lenamon, Mary Leonard, Jerry Leonard: Lawrence Leonard: Mary Leonard: Pamela ............... 155 Leonard, Roger ................ 111 Leopard, Amelia ............... 155 Lescalleet, Carol ............... 11 1 Lescalleet, David ............... 111 Lescalleet, Rich ............... 418 Letz, Stephanie ................ 155 Levels, La Vera . . . . . Levels, Wilmer . . . . Leverett, Andrea ............... 357 Leverington, Kathey 358 Levin, Marilyn ............. 155356 Lewdllen, Beth Lewis, Cindi ............... 155, 352 Lewis, Daniel Lewis, David Lewis, James Lewis, Marty Lewis, Ray ................... 428 Lewis, Robert ................. 155 Lewis, Russell ................. 155 Lewis, Shari .................. 155 Lewis, Tanza Lewis, Tom Lewsader, Donald . . L1, Eddy . 0 Library Service ................ 59 Licht, Melanie ................ 155 Liddell, Ron .................. 416 Lidgerwood, Curtis ............. 416 Lieb, William ................. 111 Liggitt, William ................ 369 Light, Sue ................... 111 Light, Janette ................. 155 Lightfoot, Kathryn ............. 111 Lightfoot, Skip ................... 111 Lilley, Kathleen .................. 155 Lilley, Robert .................... 155 Lilli, Mary ....................... 155 Lillie, Mary ...................... 155 Lilly, Harold ......... Limb, Tom Limones, Manuel. . . . Lincoln, Alberta .............. 155,346 Lindley, Michael Lindl dely, W. C ...................... 324 Lindsey,Dav1d ................ 111 Link, Louise .................. 111 Linker, J0 ................... 111 Lisner, Tracey Listen, Robert Listen: Xan Little, Carla Little, William Little, Wilmer ................. 1 55 Livingston, Martha Livingston, William Llewellyn, Randy Loccisano, Dennis Locke, Randy ......... Lockhart, Asa ......... Lockley, Gwynne Lofstrom, Brian Lomonaco, James Long, Michael ................. 155 Long, Pam ................... 457 Long, Terry .................. 155 Long Walter Longbotham, Jim Lopez, J Lord, Carol Loudermilk, Tim . . Loudon, Stephanie . . . . . . . . Louvet, Renee ................ 111 Lovelace, Alene Lovelace: S Loving, Norma ................ Lovvom, Dana ................ 155 Lovvorny Michael Low, C 1... Lowe, David .................. 156 Lowe, Kay ................... 155 Lowe, Sharon ................. 155 Lowe, Tom .................. 156 Lower, Janice ................. 112 Luby, Jeralynne ............... 156 Lucas, Gay ................... 112 Lucas, Kenneth ................ 112 Lucas, Marjie .............. 112,348 Lucas, Winston . . . .56 Luce1o Larry . . 1 . Lueb,15atricia . . . . . . Luker, Cynthia ................ Lummus, Deborah Lumpkin, Beverly 1 1 2 Lumpkin, Shirley ....... 156,216, 442 Lund, Bitsy Lund, Chris Lund, Dee ............ 112, 352: 455 Lund, Nancy 156 Luscombe, Nancy .............. 1 12 Lutes, Jerry .................. 156 Lutes, Lois ................... 112 Lutz, Gary 516 Lybbert, Blair .............. 156441 Lyles,C11arles ................. 12 Lyman, Lynne Lynch, Janet Lynn, Juanita ................. 156 Me McAlister, Verlie ........ 156,436,470 McBee David ................. 156 McBriL1e, Linda ................ 156 McBride, Richard McBride, Sandy McCalib John McCall, McCampbell, Eugene ......... 112,378 McCann, F101a MCCann Helen ................ 360 McCa1ley, David ............ 112 386 MCCarter, Chuck ............... 112 McCarter: Teresa ............... 112 McCarty, Carol ................ 11 McCarty,Wade ......... 113,445,446 MCClanahan, Connie 11 McClanahan Gary .............. 365 McClaran,e1da ............... 156 McClellan, Kenneth ............. 156 McClish, 1331;111:121 ............... 112 McClure, Betsy ................ 156 McClure, Mary ................ 156 McClure, Patsy ................ 156 McCollum, Thad ............... 156 McConnico, Mary .............. 156 McCool, Donly ................ 156 McCord, Kenneth McCormack, Micahel McCracken,Ter1'y .............. 15 6 McCrum, Kerry ................ 112 McCuistion, John ..... T: ....... 156 McCullough, Jerry .............. 369 McCullough, Penny ............. 156 McDaniel, Larry . . 112 McDaniel, Linda 1 . 11 McDaniel, Susan ........ 112,436, 470 McDe1'mott,David .............. McDevitt, Connie ....... 156,413,466 McDonald, James 12 McDonald, Kathryn ...... 156,218, 362 McDonald, Laurie McDonald, Linda McDonough, David ............. 112 McElhannon Mary ............. 156 McFarland, ' McFarland,Joyce ....... 112,423,433 McGananon, Kathleen 430 McGarry Vincent. .............. 369 cGee, arol McGee,Mary McGee, Nancy McGilvray, Patricia McGowan, Marva McGr,ue James ................ 15 McGuffin, Martha ........... 156,352 McGuffin Mary156 McHan, enita McKay, Paul .................. 39 McKee Pat ............... 113, 426 McKee, Rusty ................. 410 McKee, Sherry McKelrey, Mary McKenzie, Charles ............... 93 McKinney, Charles McKinney, Michael McKinney, Reeca McKinnis, Penny ............... 112 McKissick, Michael ..... 156 McKithan, Cathy 156,348 MCLaughlin,Paty . McLean, Patsy McLean, William ................ 193 McLellan, Anne ............... 156 MCLemore, Marvella ............ 157 McLemore, Phillip .............. 1 12 McLemore, Rickey ............. 157 McLendon: James 12 McLendon, Shirley 112, 347, 436, 450, 470 McLennan Don ............... 112 McLeod, Mary ................ 157 McLeod, Pat .................. 445 McLuckie, Fred ............... 157 McMath, William ............... 157 McMeans, Margaret ............. 157 McMeans, Robert . . . McMillan, Mary . 1 . McMinn, Becky ........ McMinn, Ted ................. 157 McMullin, Douglas .............. 388 McMurray, Marilyn .............. 93 McMurray, Olga ............... 1 12 McMu1'ray,Pau1 McMurray, Randy ........... 157,392 McNair, Joanye ................ 157 McNairy, Stewart .............. 112 McNamara, Patricia ............. 1 57 MCNatt, Glen McNee1,James McNeil, Jan McNei1,Van .................. McNeill, Jean McNulty, Stacie McNumee, Marjorie McNutty, Stacy McPeak, Cindy McPhe1son Clifford ............. 157 McQuaid,Ce1ia ................ 157 McQuaig, Kathleen157 McQueary, Alan ............ 157407 McQueen, Sharon 57 K'McReynolds, Elaine .............. 93 McVean, Kathy ................ 157 McWhorLer, Mary .............. 157 M Maayeh, Gayle ................ 1 57 Maberry Robert ............... 157 Mabry, aula Mabi'y, Steve MacDonald, John Mack, Brenda . Mack, Susan . . . . . . . . Macklin, Sami ................. 157 Madden, Jeannes ............... 157 Maddox, Brenda Maddox, Melinda Maddox, Michael ............... 157 Maddox, Michael ............... 375 Maddux, Jo Kathryn ............ 157 Madill, Martha ................ 157 Madison, Joanne ............... 113 Madon, Jacquelyn .............. 1 57 Maenza, Frank Magart, Cynthia Maggard, David ................ 113 Mahaffey, Jim Mahan, Bob Mahan, Linda ...... Mahan, Mark . Mahan, Mike Maher, Carol Maher, Jim ................... 157 Maher,Jo11n .................. 113 Mahle1:,Carol Mahler, Marsha ............. 113,363 Mahon, Jim 377 Mahoney Rodger .............. 458 Makuta, oris ................. 158 Malaby, Raymond .............. 158 Malazzo, Vita ................. 158 Malcom, Alvin ................ 113 Mallard, yDave ................. 158 Malmstrom, Royd' ........... 113,375 Malone, Deborah. Malone: Michael Maloney, Maril 11 . . . . Manasco, Davi ................ 113 Mankus, Richard ............... 113 Manley Steve ................. Mann, Christopher ........... 158,375 Manning, Christine Manning, Douglas .............. 158 Mansfield, Bill 1 58 Manzay,Jewel ......... 113,201,430 Maples, Barbara158 Maples, Melvin ................ 1 13 Marceleno, Maria ............... 113 Marcontell, Dave ............... 113 Mareeie, Kenneth .............. 113 Mariner, Jeannette .............. 113 Maris, Ross .................. 113 oMarketing Club ............... 447 Marks, Linda ................. 158 Marks, William . . Marlar, Edson . . . . . .158, 391 Marler, Nancy ................. 58 Marlow, Carol ................. 431 Marquis, Michael ............... 158 Marre,Jo11n .................. 384 Marsden, Joyce ............. 1,58 409 Marshall, Diana ...... 190, 206, 441: 455 Marth, D011 427 Marti, Christina ............. 158,358 Martin, Dan 16 Ma1tin: David ................. 158 Martin, Debbie ................ 158 Martin, Jeannie ................ Martin, Ka ay ............... 113,429 Martin, Linda ................. 113 Martin:Michae1.. . . Martin, Michele . Martin, Mike Martin, Nancy Martin, Nancy L ................ 158 Martin, Shelly ................. 158 Martin, Sherry ................ 113 Martin, Sophenia ............... 158 Ma1t1n, Toni .................. 113 Martin, Wayne ................ 158 Martinek, Judith ............... 113 Martinez, Anibal ............... 158 Martinez, Rey ................. 158 Martinsen, Mary ............... 466 Ma1'ty,Mary .................. 457 Maschek, Jamie ................ 113 Mashburn, Ernest ........... 158, 391 Mason, Ronnie 388 Massey, Elwood ............... 158 Massey, Gayle ...... . . Massey, Hugh . Massey, Kim . . . . Massey, Peggy ................. 158 Maston, Sandra ................ 158 OMath ....................... 60 Matheis, Jayne ................ 158 Matheson, Larry ............... 158 Mathews, Eapen ............... 158 Mathews, John Mathews, Pam Mathews, Wanda ............... Mathies, Willie ......... 113,357,409 Mathis, Jerry 93 Mathison, John ................ 158 Mattei, Earl Matthews,Janice . . Matthews Sandy . Matthias arcio Matula, aVeme Mauldih, Jacquelyn .......... 158,217 Mauldin, Vicky ................ 158 Maus, 811211011 158 Maus, Stephen ......... 113,392, 416 Mauzy, Janet 158 442 1 Maxey, Rahdal Maxwell, Carla Maxwe11,Cynthia Maxwell, Jane ................. Maxwell, Patricia ............ 114, 359 May, Brenda .................. 158 May, Sherry .................. 466 May, Steven .................. 114 Mayes, Nancy ................. 158 Mayfield, John ................ 114 Mayfield, Linda ............... 158 Mayfield, Ruth ................ 357 Mayhall Jack ................. 394 Mayne, ianne . . Mayo, Carol . . . Mays, Beverly . . . Mays, Ella Mays, James .................. 160 Mays, Rachel .................. 34 Mays, Stanley ................. 114 Meacham Larry 93 Meador, 2atti .............. 160, 344 Meadows, Dale 160 Meadows, David Meagerson Betty Medley,W111ia.my Medlin, Donald ................ 114 Medlin, Sha1'on ................ 160 Medlock, Susan ................ 160 Meek, Carolyn Meek, Karolyn Meeker, Floyd Megason Bettye ............ 160, 469 Meggs, Mary . . . . . .160 MehalgMBuddy . . Meier Meissnee Joe Mellor, Mendoza, Rudy Menefee Jackson .............. Menn, Marta ................... 93 OMen s P.E.C1ub Mercado, Rosa Merchant, Alicia Merck, Thomas ................ Meied1th, Steve ................ 114 Merrell, Marjory ............... 160 Merrill, Ronald 160 Metcalf,Ba1'ry ......... 160,445,446 Metcalf, Janice 160 Metcalf, Keith Mewhinney, Jim ...... Meyer, Richard ............. 160,377 Michlik,Ma1'y ................. 160 Mickey, Gerald ................ 114 Middleton, Richard Milam, M Miles, Deborah Miles, Gregg .................. 391 Miles, Phyllis ................. 160 Miles, Rita ................... 160 Miles, Robert Millar, Glen Miller, Betty .................. 114 Miller, Bob ................... 410 Miller, Deborah ................ 114 M11191, Don .................. 160 Miller, Georgia ................ Miller: Jerry ......... . Miller, Je1ry Ann ...... Mille1, John Miller, Judith Miller, Kathy Miller, Linda 160 Mille1, LindaC .............. 114, 188 Miller, Margaret Miller,Ma1'k 114,189, 203,407,421 Mille1, Martin ................. Miller, Mary .................. 160 Miller, Melinda Miller, Mickey Miller, Randy ................. 160 Miller, Sally ........... 114,220,344 Miller, Steve .................. 368 Miller, Susan . . . Miller,Troy . Miller,Wa1'ren . . . . Millet John Mills,Ph111p Mills, Sherry .................. 160 Mills, Shirley ................. 160 Millwee Tom ................. 160 Milsteaci, Mims, S Mindlin, Jamie Minger, Peggy ................. Minke, Te1ry ................. 391 Minor, Becky ................. 160 Minton, Theresa ............... 160 Mirkes,Cynt11ia Mitchell, Charles ............ 160,407 Mitchell, Charles . . . . Mitchell, Damon . Mitchell, Dean Mitchell, Gary Mitchell, Harold Mitchell, Johnie Mitchell, Karen ................ 114 Mitchell, Keith ................ 457 Mitchell, Larry ................ 469 Mitchell, Libby ................ 160 Mitchell, Linda ................ 160 Mitchell, Rebecca Mitchell Richard Mittag, Mitten Martha Mize, obert Moad, Jane Moak, Christy ................. 161 Mobley, Dickie ................ 161 oModem Dance Club ............ 448 Moffett, Margie . . . . . . Mol1on,Nanene . . Molaison, Cheryl ............... 114 Molsbee, Rebecca .............. 161 Molten, Alma ................. 161 Monashkin, Suzanne Monday, Dianna ............... 114 Mondragon,Ne1da .............. 161 Monroe, David 16 Mom'Ioe James ............. 161,377 Monroe: Martha 377 Montgomery, Carol ............. 347 Montgomery, Jacqueline . . ....... 161 Montgomery, Jimmy . . Montgomery, Marilyn Moody, David Moody, Sarah ................. 161 Mooney, Charles ............... 161 Moore,A1't ................... 372 Moore, Barbara ................ 161 Moore: Chuck ................. 351 Moore: Danny Moore: Ellen Moore, Gary .................. 114 Moore: Gary .................. 161 Moore, George ................ 161 Moore: Gloria ................. 114 Moore:Jer1'y ................. 161 Moore: Kathleen ............... 114 Moore,Michae1 ...... Moore,01a .............. Moore, Patricia ................ 161 Moore: Peggy ................. 114 M001'e,Rebecca ............... 161 Moore: Shannon Moore,Sha.1'on Morehouse, Sam Moreno Elsie Moreno, Gloria ................ 161 Moreno:No1'ma Moreno: Yolanda Morgan, Becky ................ 1 1 Morgan, Camille ............... 348 Morgan, Dean ................. 161 Morgan, John ................. 161 Morgan, Me1edith 161 Morgan, Pat ...... Morman, Marilyn Morphew, Marilyn Mo1'1'is,Cha11es . . MorrisZDonna115 Morris: James .............. 115,391 Morris:Muria1 ................. 161 Morris: Nancy ................. 115 Mor1150n, Bob 416 Morrison, James ............ 161, 388 Morrison, Julie 115 Morrison Robert 115,200 Morriss,13urt ................. 161 Morrow, James ................ 161 Morse, Michael .Mortar Board Morwood, Kathryn Morwood, Linda ................ 9 Morton, Gaiy . . . Mosely,Haze1. Mosley, Robbie . . Maser, Betty Mose1', Kathie ................. 161 Moses: Virginia ................ 161 Mosley, Bill 386 Mosley, David ................. 161 Mosley Hazel ................. 436 Moss, ing .................... 93 Moss: Michael .............. 161,466 Mottern, John 15 Moughon, Linda ............... 161 Movnt, George ................. 93 Mowaer, Linda Mozingo,Wi1ma Muchmore, Frances ............. 161 Mueller, Debra Muhl, Beverly ........ Muh1,Mary Muh1,Rene . . Muirhead, Gregg . . Mulkey, Michael ............... 161 Mullen, Anthony ............... 115 Mullendore, Jerry ........... 162,393 Muller, Walter ................. 162 Mullin: Jeanette Mullins, Karen Munchrath, Ellen Muncy, Janet ................. 162 Mundt, Steven ................ 162 Munsch, Drue ................. 162 Murchison, Jo ................. 201 Murdock Gerry Mureen, 1ig11d Murphy, Deanie Murphy, Don . . . . Murphy, Jack . . . . Murphy,Jeff . . . . . . Murphy, Kathleen ........... 162 363 Murphy, Shirley Murphy, Susan ................ 115 Murray, Deborah ............... 162 Murray, Jane ................. 162 Murray, Mike ................. 336 Murray, Roland ............... 162 Murray, Vicki ................. 162 Murrell, Jimmie ............... 162 oMusic, School of .............. 100 Mussina, Beverly ............... 115 Myers, Buddy ................. 162 Myers, Carol .................. 363 Myers, Kenneth ............... 115 Myers, Linda . . Mylar, Rick Nacol, Micheal Nance, James Nance, Kathryn Nance, William Napier Nichie ................ 162 Nash, jay .................... 162 488 Nash, Linda ............... 115, 420 Nash:Ma1'y 115 Nason,Chei'y1 ................. 115 Nay101,Ma1tha ................ 162 Nay101,Patrick ............. 382, 456 Neal, Debbie .............. 162: 221 Neal, Patrick 457 Neale, Steve .................. 410 Nebe, Robert ................. 162 Neblett, Mike ................. 372 Needham, Betty ............... 162 Neeley, B1uce ................. 162 Neeley, Darrell . . . . ...... 428 Neeley, Steven 115 Neely Darrel . . . Nelson, Bertha Nelson, Gwendolyn ............. 162 Nelson,Janet162 Nelson, Ken ............... 382, 410 Nelson, Linda ................. 162 Nelson, Scott Nelson:Shi1'1ey ................ 357 Nelson, Susan ................. 162 Nemeier, Barbara Neuman: Donna Neuman Louis ................ 386 Newell Charldean .............. 240 Newhouse, Dorothy ............. 115 ONewman Cl ub ................ 466 Newman, Mike ................. 93 Newman, Pamela . Newton, Carol . Newton, Judith ....... . . Nicholas, Connie ............... 163 Nichols, Dean ................. 163 Nichols: Janet ................. 163 Nichols: Lynn .......... 163,210,348 Nichols,Ma1'y .............. 116 357 Nichols, Pam ................. 163 Nichols: Tony ................. 116 Nicholson, David ............... 163 Nicklas, James Niederer, Janis 116, 417, 438, 455 Nierman,Dona1d ............... 163 Nieto, Carlos . . . Nikirk, Linda . . . . . Ninness,He1'b ...... . . Nita, Anne ................... 163 Nix, Dana 163 Nix, Joyce ................... 163 Noayck Kenneth 163 Noak, Vickie Nobli1t, Randy ............. 416 444 Nodwell Paula ................ 163 Noland,1lobert ................ 116 Norma11,David ................ 163 Norman,Ga11116 Norman:La1'ry ............. 116,365 Norman, Mark 365 Norman Wayne Norris, usan ................. 163 INorth Texas Daily ............. 468 Norvell, Mickey Novotny Mary ........ Nowlin, Noyes,Deb1'a .............. Nuckeis,'I'110mas ............... 163 Nuckols, Craig ................ 336 Nugent, Donald Nunley, B. G. ................. 233 Nunley Ross ................. 163 Nunn, indy ................. 163 Nwadiei, Grace ................ 163 O Oake, Karen .................. 163 Oakes, Beverly Oberndorfer, Reed O Brien Kathleen Ode11,1x1;io1'man . Odle,N . . Odom, Doug . . Odom, Jimmy Odom, Joy ................... 163 Oestreich yRodney .............. 116 Offenbaciwr, Linda ............. 116 Oglesby, Melvin ............... 163 O 1esby,Pat1'icia ............... 163 OGrady Joh n ................ 163 Ohland 13111 .................. 391 Ohm, S aron ................. 116 Okamoto, Shinya Okerberg, Margaret Okoh, Samuel 93 OIderog Ronald ............ 163,372 Oliver, ianne ............. 359, 435 Oliver, Doris .................. 408 Oliver, Janice ................. 163 Oliver, Jim ................... 391 Oliver, Robert . . . . . ' Olson,K1'is . . Olson,Sharo11 ..... . . . . . 0 Omega Psi Phi ................ 378 O Nea1,Gai1 .................. 163 OiNea1:R0derick O,Nea1, Vicki O,Neill ,Peggy ................. 0 Rear, Dan .................. 163 Orrell, Rosemon Orsburn, Marsha Orvick, Karson Orvisk, Phil Osborne, Jon . Osborne Paul . . 1 Oswziilt, Kenneth ...... Ott,H ope Otwe11,Cindy ................. 350 Overcash, Sharon .............. 116 Ousey, John .................. 163 Owen, Jacqueline ............... 93 Owen, Mary 163 Owens, Cathy ................. 426 Owens, Ellen 116,349 Owens, Janet 16 Owens: Michael ................ 163 Oxford, Kitty .............. 164,361 Oxford,Lar1'y ................. 116 P Paciello, Tommy ........ Factor, Alan ........... . . . Padgett, Donna ................ 164 Page,Ga1'y ................ 164,395 Page Mary ................... 146 Page, Pamela ................. 164 Page, Sandra .................. 164 Page, Tulane .................. 164 Paine, Frederick 164 Palermo Don .................. Palmer, arilyn ..... 164,405, 411,426 Panfilli,A1chie Panfilli, Jackie Panne11,Beve1'1y 164 Pannell, E. C. .............. 22,434 Parker, yCarolyn ................ 164 Parker: Clayton ................ 116 Parker, Debbie ................ 164 Parker, Don .................. 416 Parker, Gabriel Parker, Gary. Parker, Karen Parke1,Michae1 ................ 164 Parker, Wallace ................ 116 Parker, William ................ 164 Parkman, Cindy ............... 164 Parks, Dean 204 Parks, Ramond ............. 93, 370 Parks, Robert ................. 164 Paris, P3111164 Parr,Elizabeth ......... 164,352,405 Parratt, Gregory 116 Parrish, Betty ................. 164 Parrish, Teresa Parsons, Chris . . Parsons, Loydell Partridge, Janice . . . . . . . . Paschal, Mike ................. 391 Passafiume, Denise Pate,Gai1 .................... 116 Pate: Gregg Pate: Jan .................... 431 Paternostro, Ronald ............. 336 Paterson, Jim 407 Pat'more Margaret .1,64 352, 376, 377 Patrick,13hillip 6,407 Patrick, Susan ................. 413 Patterson, Bob ................ 391 Patterson, Edward .............. 116 Patterson Michael .............. 164 Patton,Mari011 ................ 357 Patton, Roy .................. 164 Patrick, Brian .. .369 Paukert, Ken Paul, Suzanne . . Pavey, Colleen Pavoni, John Payne, David Payne, James ................. 116 Payne, Janie .................. 116 Payne, Peggy .......... 116,196 455 Payne, Roland 16 Paynes, Payne ................. 430 Payton Mimi Peacock Stephen Pearce, 132111121121 ................ 11 Pearce: Mary ................. 116 Pearson, Charlotte .............. 164 Pearson, Jimmy Pearson, William Peavy, Jon ................... 202 Pedigo Dwayne 116 Pedigo, Linda , . . Pedigo,Sand1'a . Peek, Linda Pendieton, Sondra .............. 117 Pendleton: Steve ............ 117,418 Penker, Mary .............. 164,409 Periland,Rosemary146 Penn, John ................... 164 Penturf Linda Perez, orberto Perkins, Jean Perkins, Karen Perkins: Phil .................. 117 Perkins, Ruth ................. 164 Perlman, Martin ............... 117 Perlstein, Bruce ................ 395 Perry, Sharon ................. 357 Porry,Wi1bert ............ .164 Perryman,Martha ....... 64, 344 Persful, Pam .................. 367 Pertuit, Edward ............ 164,393 Peskuric Kathleen .............. 146 Peters, re .................. 393 Peterson, 2111 ................. 117 Peterson, James 93, 393 Petitt, Sue ............ 117,436,468 Petitto, Joseph ................ Petrash, David ............. 117, 192 Petrash, Linda 65 Petree, Karen Pettie, Patricia Pettijean, Sherri Petty, Al1en ............... 117,377 Petty, Karen .................. Petty, Maxine ................. 165 Petty, Sharon ................. 165 Pfeifer Susan . . . . . . . .436 Pflibsei1 Robert . . . . . Phelps, kenneth ............... OPhi Beta Lambda .............. 425 0 Phi Chi Theta ' Phi Epsilon Kappa ............. 428 ' Phi Eta Sigma ................ 456 0 Phi Kappa Alpha .............. 384 0 Phi Kappa Sigma .............. 380 0 Phi Ka8pa Theta .............. 382 Phifer ass1e ................. 165 Philipp, Ann .................. 43 Philley, David .............. 192, 203 Phillippi,Virginia165 Pillians, Jim .................. 375 Phillips, Dana ................. 165 Phillips, Deborah ............... 165 Phillips, Dennis ................ 117 Phillips,Gera1d ................. 93 Phillips,G101'ia ............ 165 Phillips, John . Phillips,Ma1'y . . . . Phillips, Randy ................ 384 Phillips, Sandy ................ 117 Phillips, Vic .................. 388 .Philosop hy ................... 62 'Physical Education, Men s ........ 100 .Physical Education, Womenis ...... 100 .Physics ..................... 63 OPi Kappa Phi ................. 386 OPi Omega Pi ................. 42 9 Piccola, Rosaxi ............. 165,361 Pierce, Bill ................... 391 Pierce: David ................. 117 Pierle, Edman ................. 117 Pierot, Cecelia l6 Pilkey Rita Pille, onnie Pina, Ida . . . . Pinkerton, Donald .............. 165 Pinkerton,Lau1'a ............... 363 Pinkerton, Steve Pinnelli, A1 Piott, Danny Piper, Paula .................. 165 Pippin, Louis .................. 93 Pippin, Weldon ................ 407 Pittard, Linda .............. 165,363 Pittman, Billy ................. 17 Pittman: Dana ................ 165 Pitts,Caroly11 .................. 93 Flapp,G1'eg .................. 165 Platt, Janice .................. 100 Pless, Dale P10tkin,Larry. Plummer Patricia Plunkett, John Ply, Gayle Poe,Ric11a1'd Poe Wayne P091115 Shirley165 Poff Tludy ............... 165 359 165 Po11an, P1111 Pollins, Patty Pollock Robert Ponce, alo Poncik, B61211 Pond, teve Ponder,Paula . . . P001, Cathy Poole, Janis . . . . Pooler Frank .......... . . 3.75 Pope, Deborah ................ 344 Pope, Mary 117 Pope, Patrick Popp, Mary Porter, Alice .................. 165 Porter, Charles Porter, Clarence Porter, David Porter, Pamela Porter, Susan Porter, Tom .................. 117 Porterfield, Darrell ............. 165 Pounds, Larry ................. 165 Powell, James ................. 165 Powell, James M ................ 165 Powell, Jon .................. 117 Powell, Kay .................. 165 Powell, Kenneth . . Powers, Werner ...... Prater, Charlsye Pvather,Dona1d Prather Vicki .................. 93 Pratt, Grady ................... 93 PraL1,Johnny ................. 117 Pratt, Kiona .................. 165 Pratt,Na11cy .................. 165 Pratt: Steven .............. 165, 451 Preskitt John .......... 165,377,410 Presley, Jack .............. 451, 302 Prevost, Cynthia ........ 117,379,430 Piewitt Paula ................. 165 Price, darol ............... 165,349 Price Sandra ................. 430 Priddy, Zelle ................. 117 Prim,Ma1'sha Prince, Donald . Pringle Robert . . . Prior, ames Pritchett Theresa Proano, ablo ................. 165 Procter, Marjorie ............ 117,431 Propes, Pamela ................ 165 Pruitt,Ma1'y .................. 165 Pruitt, Patty .................. 166 Pruitt, Reva .................. 117 Pryor, Steve .................. 416 IPsychology ................... 65 0 Publications Committee ......... 451 Puckett, Mark Puckett, Phil Pugh Eugene ................. 17 Pullen, Thomas ............. 166,386 Pulliam Ann 460 Pulliam, Sharp Puryear, Don . . . Putnam Richard. . . . .17 Putzel Marcia .............. 117 430 Pybas, Ma1ga1'et ............... 166 Pyka, Lany .................. 117 Q Qualtrhough C-ourtney Quinn, B0 Quinn, John .................. 166 Raatz, Kathy166 Rabom,Leslie ......... 117,359,426 Radetsky, Dona 166 Raducha, John Raef, Boyd Ragsdale, Janet. Rains, Randy . Ramey, Gary Ramig, Louise Ramirez Adrianne Ramirez, Albert Rammange, Eugene .......... 117,393 Ramos, Frank 66 Randle: Kenneth ............... 166 Randles, Janis ................. 166 Rangel, Juan ................. 117 Rangle,Y01anda ............... 166 Rankin Joimes ................ 166 Rann, ohn Rann, William ................. 117 Ranne, Eddie ................. 166 Ransdell, Linda ................ 431 Raper, Linda Rapp, Rose .... .. Ratcliff Forest ..... Ratledge, Wilbert . Ratliff,A1an .................. 166 Ratliff:La1'1'y ................. 118 Raub, Steve .................. 166 Rawlins Pat1icia ............... 166 Raye, Carl ....................... 395 Ray, Harry ...................... 166 Ray, Jacob ...................... 166 Ray, Thomas ..................... 374 Rayfielfii, Cgiarles .................. 166 Read,R Read: Sally Read, Terry .................. 166 Readon, Michael .................. 166 Reagan, Duane ................... 166 Redd, Charles . Redd, Cynthia Redd, Don . . . . Redden, David Redige13Debo1'ah Redmai1,Terry ............. 118,203 Redwii1e,Don 166 Reece, Linda Reece, Randi Reecer, Randy Reed, Dui'lene Reed, Janie Reed, Mary Reed, Phil Reed, Rose: Reed, Wanda Reese, Deborah . . . Reese, Frank ..................... 375 Reese, Gary .................. 438 Reese, Mary .................. 166 Reeve, Ed ................... 1 18 Reeves, David ................. 118 Reeves, Sandi 166 Reichle, Pat ............... 166, 353 118 Reid:Ma1'tha Reilly, Pe gy .............. 118,361 Reinema, oren ............ 166,393 Reinhold, Linda 431 Reist, Don Reiter, Cheryl . . Reiter, Lynn Reite13Peggy Reitz, Marilyn Remley, B111 .................. 380 Remiey, Chuck ................ 166 Remley, Patiicia ............... 166 Renout Michael ............ 166,373 Resch, Kevin 16 Ressle1,Victo1' Rettig, Linda Reyes, Joe ................... 168 Reyna, Miguel Reynolds, Janet Reynolds, Kay ................ 168 Reynolds, Marsha .............. 168 Reynolds, Mary Reynolds, Nila Rhodes, Barbara Rhodes, Becky ...... Rhodes, Norman . Rhone, Linda Rhone, Robert Rice, Bob Rice, James Rice, Shelia Rich, Paula 168 Richa1'd,Ca1'01yn ........ 168, 408, 411 Richards, Carolyn .............. 440 Richards, Sonny ............... 391 Richardson, Harold Richardson, John Richardson, Judy Richardson, Lee Richardson, Rix Richardson, Sadie , , Richie, Joe ................... 168 Richter, Steve ................. 336 Richter, Victor ................ 384 Ric ketts, Johnnie Riddlesperger, Carol Riddlesperger, James ............ 459 Ridenour, Karen ............... 168 Riefler Karen ................. 168 Rietz, Marilyn ............. 118, ,;33 Riley, Riley, Larry .................. 168 Riley, Lynn .................. 430 Riley, Paul ................... 168 Rios, Leo .................... 168 Ripperda Timothy Ritchie, oan Rivelga Cheryl . . . . . 168 Rivera, Ermelinda ........... 168,466 Roach Martha 168 Roach,Wi1ma ................. 168 Romk Nancy ................. 118 Robbins, James ................ 118 Roberson, Don ............. 168,471 Roberson: Linda ............... Roberts, Allen ................ 377 Roberts, Elbert ................ 118 Robe1'ts,Ginger ............... 118 R0be1'ts,Jacquie ............... 186 Roberts, John .............. 168,336 Roberts,Lynn186 Roberts, Martha Roberts, Michael ............... 168 Roberts, Ronda Roberts, Steve Roberts, Sue . . . . Robertson, Bob . . 11 Robertson, Linda ....... 118,210,359 Robe1'tso11,Mandy .............. 186 Robertson, Mary ............... 169 Robinson, gDavid ............... 118 Robinson, Jan ................ 169 Robinson, Joyce ............... 169 Robinson, Maureen Robinson, Pamela Robinson, Randolph ......... 169, 373 Robinson, Roy ............. 118, 381 Robinson, Scott Robinson, Sharon Rockwell, Katherine Roderick, Sharon Rodgers, Jerry Rodgers, Lana Rodgers, Margaret .............. 118 Rodgers, Robert ............... 169 Rodriquez, Richard .............. 94 Rodriquez, Rodger ............. 169 Roelse,Robe1't 386 Rogers, Connie ......... 118,359,426 Roge1's,James .................. 25 Rohde, Waltei ................ 391 Rohne, Oscar Rohoe Walter Rolan Charles 9 Rolan, Che1yl .............. 169, 350 Rollins,Fo1'1'est ................ 427 Rollins, Patricia ............ 118,361 Roquemore, Patricia 35 7 Rose, Diana .................. 169 Rose, Kathy ......... Rose, Margaret . . Rose, Myrtle Rosenbaum, James Rosenberg, Celeste Rosenberg, Sue ................ 169 Rosenfield, Linda .............. 169 Rosenthal, Beverly Ross,Jea11 Ross, Patricia Rostolar, Janis Roth, Barry Rothenflue, Donna Round, Sharon Rounsefell, Karen Rousseau, Janes Rowden, Judy Rowe, Kathy . . Rowe, Larry .................. 388 Rowe,Ma1garet ............ 353,370 Rowe,Robe1't ................. 619 Rowe,Robe1't .............. 169,395 Rowe Tommy 371 Rowland, Melvia ............... 118 Rowland, Michael Rowlett, Anita Rowlett, John 408 Rowntiee, Beverly ........... 118,355 Royse,E1izabeth ............... 377 Rubin,Marsha ............. 169,411 Rucke1',Payne 118 Rucker, Susan Ruem olhamer, Frans Ruff, osemary ............... 169 Rupe, Lynn .. Rush, Penny Russell,Cy11thia . Russell, Hal .................. 169 Russell,Ra1ph Ruth, Linda .................. 169 Rutkowski, Elizabeth ......... 169,466 Rutledge, Johnny 94 Saage,Susan ........... 119,361,411 Saba, Gary 391 Saba, Tommy ................. 391 Sabo, Carol 11 Sainsott, Gay Salazar, Martin Salaun, Edwina ................... 468 Salem, Sylvan ................ 351, 416 Sallee Su51169 Samback, Dean ............. Sample, Dai'cas ............. Sample, Linda ................ 169 Sampson Ga1ylynn ............. 469 Samson,1Vladelyn ........... 119,345 Samuels Lawrence169 Sanchez, Jesse Sandberg, Larry Sandra, Marja, ................. 169 Sanders, Charlesetta ............. 119 Sanders, Connie ............... 169 Sander,s Lind21169 Sander,s Nancy ............. 119, 349 Sanders:Raymond169 Sanders: Rebecca Sanderson, Cindy Sanderson, Latheta . . . . Sandlin,Sand1'a ................ 169 Sandord, Judy ............. 169,452 Sai1galli,John ................. 19 Sansom, Patricia Santiago, Tommy Sartain, Robert ................ 170 Sai'rett, Charlie ................ 393 Saski, James .................. 170 Satterwhite, Matt .............. 170 Saunders, Jimmy ............... 395 Saunders, Ramona .............. 170 Savage, Sondra ............. 119, 359 Saxon, Suellen ......... 170, 355, 440 Saxton, Trent .............. 170, 369 Sazama, Judy . . Scaff, Juanita . . . Scarborough, Ken .......... Scarborough Linda .......... . .170 Schachterle,11inda .............. 170 Schaefer, Terry ................ 413 Schaefers, Bob Schaeter, Teresa Schaible Joann ................ 119 Scheer, bennis ................ 170 Schenck, Betsy ............. 359,444 Schierloh, Vicki 170 Schleich, Catherine 170 Schmidt, Katherine .......... 170, 451 Schmidt, Lana 170 Schmidt, William ............... 119 Schmitt, Paul .............. 170,375 Schmitz, Jan .............. 119,359 Schmitz, Paula 107 Schneider, Charles . . Schneider, Jennifer Schnorbus, Connie Schnorbus, Paula ............... 345 Scholze, Debbie Scholze, Terry Schrade, Rita Schramm, Marilyn .............. 170 Schribrer, Barbara .............. 409 Schroder, Marcella .............. 119 Schroeder, Carol ............... 170 Schuchai'd,CPame1a SchufordC Schultz, bebbie Schultz, Robert 19 Schultze Janet ............. 170 345 Schulz, Betty ................. 170 Schulz,Rona1d . . . . 119 70, 352, 420, ,45221 Schulze Dixie Schur, rnest Schuyler, Steve ................ 369 Schwalm, Sandra ............... 170 Schwartz, Faye ................ 170 Schwartz, Faye ................ 170 Schweig, David ................ 119 Schwennsen, Sandy ............. 170 Sciaba, Anthony ............... 386 Scoggin Kathy ................ 170 Scott,dla1'ks Scott, Daniel Scott, DeLee Scott, Jane ................... 119 Scott, Judy Scott, Lynne Scott, Molly .................. 170 Scott, William ................. 170 Scottion, Jody ................ 170 Scramm, Marilyn . . . . . Scranton, Frank Scribner, Barbara Scroggins, Gary ............. 119,371 Scroggins, Rebecca 11 Seaberi'y, James ............... 170 Seale, Donald ................. 119 $9319, Larry .................. 1 19 Sealy, Diane .................. 170 Seaman, Leslie ................ 119 Sebastain, Michael .............. 170 Sedberry, Brian ................ 382 Sedeno, Gilbert ................ 170 Seebach, Marianne .............. 170 Seedig, Larry .............. 119375 Seelbach, Linda 170 Sefert, John Seibe1t,Ma1'jo1'ie . . . Seide1,Richard . . . . . . . . . Seidenberg, Marilyn ............. 170 Seidule, Jo Ellen ............... 393 Seifert, Judy ................. 170 Seitz, Beverly ................. 119 Selander, Ilene Selby Steven Self, 0n .................... 119 Sell, Daniel Sell, Steven Sellers, Sharon Selman Kara Serna, Sesso, Sa1a ................... Settle, Vivian Sewell, Donna Shackelford, Tommy ............ Shaddix Sharon Shade, orrest Shafeeq, Samuel . . . Shafer, Barbara . . . . Shafer, Chris Shafer, Randall ................ 385 Shafer,Victo1'ia . . . Shahan, Gail ....... . . . . Shamburger, Nancy ............. 119 Shankle, Willie ................ 171 Shanks, Sharon ................ 171 Shannon, Elnora ............... 119 Sharkey Robert ............... 119 Sl1ave1r,1191'be1't ................. 94 Shaver, Karen ................. 119 Shavers, Barbara ................ 94 Shavers, Dongloria .............. 171 Shaw, Gary Shaw, John , Shaw, Phyllis ........... Shea, Elizabeth . Shelogg, Thomas . . . . . . . .336 Shelton, Keith ............. 4 50, 468 Shelton, Marcy ................ 117 Shelton, Randy ................ 375 Shelton Shelline ............ 120, 210 Shepa1',Chiquita .............. 117 Shepherd, Steven .............. 171 Sheppard, Nancy ............... 171 Shimp, Steve 395 Shingle Betty .............. Shipp,Cha1'1ie ................. 388 Shipp, Dixie .................. 171 Shipp, James ................. 120 Shireman Linda ............... 171 Shi1'ley,dheryl ................ 120 Shirley, Karen Shively, Timothy Shobert, Stanford Shockley, Larry Shores, Buster . Shouse,Lai'1'y ...... . , . . Showers, Glenn ................ 171 Shramek,Rosema1y ............. 363 Shrauner, Jane ................ 361 Sibley Tom ............... 120, 386 Sidle, obin .................. 171 Siebenthall, Curtis ............... 94 Siewei't, Tricia ................ 171 ' Sigma Alpha Eta .............. 430 ' Sigma Alpha Iota .............. 431 9 Sigma Alpha Mu ' Sigma Delta Chi ' Sigma Phi Epsilon ' Sigma Tau Delta .............. 433 Sihvonen, Denise ............... 171 Silman, ynthia Silman, Joe Simmons, Ann Simmons, Danny ............... 382 Simmons, James ............... 171 Simmons, John ................ 171 Simmons, Judy ................ 120 Simmons, Richard .............. 377 Simmons, William .............. 171 Simmons, Wilton ............... 171 Simon, Donna ................ 171 Simpson, Ernest ............... 171 Simpson, Johnny .............. 378 Simpson, Robert ............... 120 Simpson, Shirley ............... 171 Sims, Arnett .................. 171 Sims, Dan . . . . , . Sims, Jo . Sims, Kathy . . Sims, Louie . . . . . . 120 Singleton, Gary ................ 381 Singleton, Linda ............... 171 Sinclair Mark .............. 407, 417 Sipes,E1ddie .................. 120 81500, Bill Sivley, Roy Skaggs, Karen ................. 171 Skaggs,Sha10n ................ 171 Skeeters, Ed .................. 171 Skelly, Susan .......... 120, 359,438 Skiles, Martha ................. 71 Slack, Joyce .................. 1'71 Slack, Randy .............. 171,222 Slagle, Jack ............... 171,416 Slavson Thomas ............... 171 Sloan, Allison ................. 198 Sloan, Virginia . Slovak, Sam . . . . . Smalls, Howard ................ 171 Smelker, Janet ................ 171 Smith,A1an .................. 120 Smith, Alvin .................. 120 Smith, Anne .................. 171 Smith, Bill ............ 171, 445, 446 Smith, Bruce 171 Smith, Carolin Smith, Celestine Smith, Charlotte ............... 349 Smith,Chery1 ................. 171 Smith, Clark .................. 120 Smith, Connie ............. 171,345 Smith, Danny ................. 171 Smith: Dann 9 Smith, Davi Smith, Debra. . . . . . .171 Smith: Deborah ............. 171,408 Smith, Don 127 Smith, Donnie Smith: Ed Smith, Forence ................ Smith, Gwen ................. 120 Smith, Howard ................ 435 Smith, Iris ................... 172 Smith, James ................. 172 Smith, Janet .................. 172 Smith, Jennie ................. 120 Smith, Jerry .................. 172 Smith, Jonnie ................. 455 Smith, Joy ................... 120 Smith, Judy .................. 172 Smith, Karen ................. 172 Smith, Karen S. Smith, Karen S. Smith, Kathy ................. 172 Smith: Kim ........ 172 223, 431, 444 Smith: Linda 120 Smith: Loren Smith: Lorraine ........ 120, 347: 408 Smith, L nnette 172 Smith: arcus Smith ,Marilyn ................ 172 Smith ,Mary .................. 172 Smith: Michael ................ 439 Smith: Nathelie ................ 120 Smith,Nea1 Smith, Otis Smith, Patricia Smith: Richard. . . . . . .391 Smith: Ricki ............... 172,411 Smith: Robert 172 Smith, Robert Smith, Robin Smith, Roy Smith, Sally .................. 120 Smith, Sandra ................. 172 Smith, Sandy .......... 172, 345, 440 Smith, Sharon 1'72 Smith, Sharon V. Smith, Shirley Smith, Steve .................. 172 Smith, Steven ................. 377 Smith, Teresa ................. 120 Smith, Terry . . . . . . Smith, Thelma Smith, Vickie ..... . . . . Smith, Virginia ................ 127 Smith, Wayne .............. 172,388 Smith,Wi11iam Smithey, Gary Smothers Pamela Snapka heryl ......... 436,450,468 Sneed, 13i11y .................. 102 Sneed, Charles ................ 172 Snider Bonnie ................ 172 Snider Garry ................. 172 Show ,1'Ien1'y O Soc-Anthro Sonkin, Jerald Sorensen, Gary ................ 462 Sorenson,Li11da Sosbee, Steven Sosebee Paula Souza, Arthur . . . . Souza:Pau1 . . . .434 Sparks, Jo Ann ............. 120,359 Sparks, Judy 72 Sparoliyni,Pau1a ............. 172,349 Spauldin ,Kathleen ............. 355 Speaks, avid ................. 457 Spears, Donnagene ............. 172 Specht, Melody ................ 3 59 Sgeck, Cecil .................. 172 c peech and Drama .............. 68 Speegle, Doris ................. 440 Spence, Bob .................. 172 Spencer, Thomas ............... 393 Spieker, Donald ............... 336 Spiller, Jane .................. 172 Spindle, David . . S inelli, Michael . . . pinnihg Wheels . . . Spiro, James .................. 421 Spivey, Danny127 Spradley, Susan Spradlin, James ................ Springer, Barbara .............. 120 Springer, D011 ................. 172 Sproule, Pamela ............ 172,344 Spurgeon, Gene 120 Spurlock, James ................ 24 Spurrier, Barbara ............... 172 Squibb Sally .............. 172,411 Stacy, ames 120 Stagg, Richard Stallmgs Linda ................ 120 Standfie d Stan ............... 172 Standfill, 3erita ........ . . . Standifer Cher 1 . Standforti Deb ie . . Stanislav . . . Stanley, ames ................ 173 Stanley, Jerry ................. 120 Stanley, Joe .................. 446 Stanley, Lala ................. 173 Stanton, Dan ................. 381 Stapler Margaret ............... 173 Stark, Starling, Janelle Stames, Jay .................. 189122 Starr, Dianne Starr, Sheila ............... 17 Startzel Susan Stayer, 0111 Steele, Joyce Stein, Den . . . Sbeindam, Jane Steitle, Ernst Stephens, Dennis ............... 173 Stephens, Dennis E .............. 173 Stephens, James ................ 94 Stephens, John ................ 173 Stephens, Karen ............... 122 Stephens, Michael .............. 173 Stephens, Paul ................ 17 3 Stephens, Robert .............. 122 Stephenson, Cynthia ............ 122 Stephenson, Joe ............ 122,393 Sterrett, Johnnie ............... 173 Stevens, Dick Stevens, Karen . Stevens, Marilou . Stevens, Sharon Stevens, Suzanne ............... 173 Stewart, Carla ................. 173 Stewart, Charlene .............. 173 Stewartheorge122 Stewart: John .............. 173,373 Stewart, Judith ............. 122426 . 490 Stewart, June ................. 173 Stewart, Lisa .............. 122,353 Stickle ,Christine .............. 1'73 Stike, 17 Stilwell, Gail .......... 173,350,403 Stinchcomb, Teresa ............. 17 Stinchcombe, Karyne ............ 173 t. John, Harry ................ 388 Stocker, Carl ................. 122 Stockhoff, Carolyn ............. 173 Stockton, James Stockton: Ronnie . . . . Stoetzer, Debbie . Sto er Linda Sto es, erri Stokin er, Karen ............... 122 Stolp, ickey .............. 173,345 Stone James 174 Stone: John Storey, Marilyn ................ Storm, Peggy ................. Stoudenm1er,Karen .......... 174, 361 Stout C nthia 17 Stovail, Stowe, Jack Strader Daniel ............. 174 Strain, Patricia ............. 122,355 Stratton, Dusty ................ 173 Strawn, Jimmy ................ 391 Street, Jim ................... 373 Streeter, Car1os ........... Streeter, Jennie ...... Stribling,Ju1iet ...... . . . Strickert Nancy ............... 174 Strong, teven ................ 174 Strope, Steve ................. 448 Strother Barbie ............... 174 Stroud, ayle ................. 174 Stubblefield, Juliette ......... 174, 357 Stuckey, John 174 Stuckey, Phyllis Stuckey, Schuyler .............. 377 0 Student Association of Advertising Designers .......... 434 0 Student Education Association Sublett, Susan . Sullivan, Bill ........ Sullivan, Billie Sullivan, Jerry Sullivan, John ................. 384 Sullivan1Majel 174 Sullivan: Mary ............. 122, 353 Sullivan: Sharon ............ 174, 353 Sullivan: Steve 174 Sullivan: William ............... 122 Sullivant, Carroll ................ 22 Summerall, Richard ............. 174 Summons Donald .............. 174 Sumner, Eddie ................ 174 Sumue1,Estelia ................ 122 Sunerman, Rita ................ 363 Suniga, Thomas Sutton, Marvin Svatek, Dan ........ Swafford Michael. Swaim, Khthyn Swain, Ann Swanber, Swarm, arold Swann, Ken Swarm, Rex Swanner, Jo .................. 174 Swanson, Jack ................ 174 Swanson,Leslee122 Swatloski, Donald ........... 122,202 Swatloski, Joyce ............... 122 Sweat, Douglas ................ 174 Sweeny, Michael ............... 174 Swenson, Andrew ............... 34 Swenson Douglas .............. 122 Swoffor , Lynn ............... 373 Sykes, Sandi .................. 174 T Tackett, Margie ................ 17 Tadlock, Connie ............ 174,354 Tafelski Shirley 147 Takacs, ............... 174,365 Takacs, Kathy 94 Tallant,Lar1'y .............. 122369 oTalons ..................... Tan, Davis 494 Tandy,Ma1sha ............. 122,464 Tankersley Paul ............... 147 Tannehill, Mike ................ 122 Tanner, Billy ................. 174 Tanner: D. W .................. 17 Tanner: John .............. 122447 TarrantP . . . Tarsia, Nancy . . Tarwater Roy . . Tate, Cat erine ................ 174 OTau Kappa Epsilon Tauro Anthony ............... 122 Tax Stanley .................. 174 Tayior, Carl 430 Taylor, Carol ....... 122, 201, 347, 435 Taylor, Carolyn Taylor, Elizabeth Taylor, Gary Taylor, John Taylor, Joyce ................. 122 Taylor, Judy ................. 122 Taylor, Julianne ............... 174 Taylor, Kelbert ................ 122 Taylor, Larry . . . Taylor, Larry . . Taylor, L 1111 Taylor, arian Taylor, Mike Taylor, Rita .................. 123 Taylor, Sarah ................. 194 Taylor, Silvi .................. 174 Taylor, Tyson ................. 444 Teague, Clayton ............... 191 Teeling, Patrick ................ 1 23 Teer, David .................. 1 23 Telford, Barry Telford, Marsha Temple, Linda Terrell, Jea1me Terry, Michael ................ 174 Terry, Pamela ................. 419 Terry, Susan .................. 174 Tessmer, Jon Thames, Cathy Thatcher, Charla ............... 174 Thayers, Joan ................. 413 0 Th eta Chi ................... 394 OTheta Sigma Phi .............. 436 Thibodeaux, Brenda ............ 357 Thiele, Larry Thieleke Barbara Thiem, axolyn ................ 1 3 Thiem, Patricia . . . Thomas, A1111 . . Thomas, Charles . . Thomas:Cy11thia ............... 176 Thomas, Ernestine .............. 176 Thomas, Fred ................. 427 Thomas: Gayle ............. 176,408 Thomas, Jacqueline ............. 176 Thomas, Judy ................. 123 Thomas, Michael ............... 1 76 Th omas, Pamela ............... 123 Thomas, Pat .................. 413 Thomas, Ronald Thomas, Vicki Thomason, Jean Thompson, Carmella ............ 1 23 Thompson, David .............. 176 Thompso11,Deborah ............ 176 Thompson, Donna .............. 176 Thompson, Dwight 94, 428, 449, 462 Thompson, Jan , . . 176 Thompson, Judy . . Thompson, Letitia . . . Thompson, Michael ............. 176 Thompson, Philip Thompson, Wesley Thorne, Carolyn ............... 176 Theme, Paul ................. 123 Tharp, James ................. 176 Thorp, Norma ............. 123430 Thornton, John123 Thorton, Brenda ............... 1 76 Thorton, Linda ................ 176 Threadgill, Karon Thurman, Pam ............. 176,423 Thurmond, Becky 176 Tibbitts, Jo Anney Tibbs, Virginia . . Tidwell, Scotty . . Tiller, Vickie Timpa, Gerald Tinker, J0 ................... 434 Tinsley, Eloise ............. 123, 363 Tischler, Garry 1 23 Tobias, Susie Todd, Ross Todd, Terry .................. 176 Todd, Thomas ................ 381 Tolbert, Jerry ................. 176 Tolhert, Paul ................. 123 Tollefeson Donna .............. 176 Tolleson eslie ................ 123 Tollett, Raymond ............... 22 Tolsom, Tom ................. 414 Tomlin, Bobby ............. 123,438 Tomlin, Joseph ................ 123 Tomlin: William ............ 176,375 Tomme,Elizabeth..176 Tompkins, Gayle . . Toney, Janice . . . . Tonks, Harry Torczynslci, Nancy ............. 443 Torres, Mario ................. 123 Torres, Rolando Tosch, David Toups, Julie .................. 176 Townsend, Bess ............... 435 Townsend, June 176 Trahan, Janice Trammel, Linda Trammell, Roy ................ 123 Trapp, Roy .................. 445 Travis, Dennie Trent, David Tresenriter, Marcia Trice, Bobby Tricks, Bob Trietsch, Terry ................ 17 Trigg, Carol ............... 416, 302 Trigg Tammye ............. 353,377 Trim 1e, Linda ......... 123,425,426 Triplett, David ................ 176 Tripoli, Marie .............. 176466 oTri- Service .................. 411 Trojacek, Judy ................ 176 Torjacek,Pau1i11e123 Tucker, Dimple ............. 347,436 Tucker: Rick 319 Tufares, Deno ................. 176 Tullgren, George ............... 176 Tunnell, Jenny ................ 202 Tuohy, Kathleen ............... 176 Turbeville, Randy . . . Turiington, Joyce Turner, Bruce . . . . . . Turner, Dennis ................ 407 Turner, Frederic ................ 94 Turner, Kerry ................. 123 Turner, Mary ................. 176 Turner, Pamela ................ 176 Turner, Rosalind ................ Turner, Tommy ............ 176,373 Turns, Ronald Turrentine, Robert ............. 176 Tutle, Peggy .................. 176 Twyford, Janelle ............... 176 Tychsen, Roger ................ 177 Tyler, David . . . . . . . . 177 Tyler, Linda .................. 123 U Uaccaro, Jeanette Udd, Theresa Uehara, Michiteru Ulm, Ruth Ulmer, Carolyn ................ 177 Ulrich, Craig .................. 177 Uncapher, William .............. 1 77 Underwood, Kandi 177 Underwood, Ronald Underwood, Sylvia OUniversity Players ............. 451 Unruh, Jack Upchurch, Barbara Upchurch, Larry ............... Upchurch, Pam ................ 177 U1ban,Robert . Uribe, yOmar . . . a .......... . . . . 347 T ..................... 402 V Vander Drift, Robert ............ 177 Vander Meulen, Danise ........... 177 Vandiver, Martin ............... 470 Vandygriff,I1win .............. 177 Van Houter Phala .............. 177 Van Meter, Viki ............... 177 Vann Nancy ................. 177 Van Winkle, Patsy .............. 177 Van Winkle William Vardeman, aura Vasquez, Arthur ........ Vasquez, Michael Vaughan, Ann . . . . Vaughn, Daniel ................ Vaughn, Charles .................. 367 Vaughn, Frances .................. 439 Vaughn, Mack .................... 434 Vaughn, Monty ................... Vawter, Susan Vazquez, Steven ............... Veal, Gregory ................. Veal, Vir inia Veazyey red Vega, Guadalupe ............... Venner, Melissa ................ Ventura, Cindy ................ Verner, Conrad ................ gether, Pgatriclia . icroy ever y Viles,1:inda . . . Villarreal Irma . . . . . Vincent, Jan .................. 177 Vinson, Bob .................. 377 Vinson Christi 124 Visser,1VIarie 177, 350 Vogel, Kathy ................. 124 Vogt, G Voth, Mona .................. 466 Vrla, John Wade Regenia ................. 177 Wadsworth, Donald ............. 177 Waggoner, Ronald .............. 177 Waggoner, Sheri Wagner, Jacquelynn .......... Wagner, James Wagner, Patricia Wagner, Polly . Wakefield Bill Waldrop, Waldrop, Patsy ................ Walker, Barbara ............... 177 Walker, Charles ................ 1 24 Walker, Charles ................ 177 Walker, Deborah Walker, Donna Walke1,Glynda ................ 177 Walker, James ................. Walker, Johnny ............. Walker, Judith Walker, Kathy Walker, Kathy L ................ 177 Walker, Margaret ............... 177 Walker, Maurice Walker, Nancy Walker, Paula . Walker, Ralph. . . . . . . Walker: Roy .................. 124 Walker, Royce ................ 124 Walker, Sharon ................ 1 24 Walker, Sheila ................. 43 1 Walker, Susan ................. 1 77 Walker, Toni .............. 353, 435 Waller, Joanne ............. 177, 356 Walter, Marilyn ................ 177 Walter, Sondra Walthall, Mike Walther, Glen 384 Walton, yDavid .............. 178,407 Walton Ronnie ................ 12 Ward, Carolyn ................ 178 Ward,Chery1187 Ward,Dary1 ........... 178,346,408 Ward, Jo Ne11124 Ward, R011 . . . Ward, Vir i1 . . Wardlaw, arty . . Ware, Paul Warlick Roy Warmerdam, James ............. 178 Warnstaff, Kay ................ 178 Warren, David ................. 178 Warren, John ................. 178 Warren, Johnny 187 Warren, Narva .......... 178,346 408 Warren: Suzanne ............... 178 Warren, Terry ................. Washington Lois ............ 178,357 Waskom, Sharon Waters, Dymris ............. 178,347 Waters: George Watkins, Andy Watkins, Bobby Watkins, Gail Watkins, Theodore Watson, Barbara . Watson: Cindy . . . .178 Watson, Dan ............... 468,469 Watson: Doug 391 Watson, Eloise Watson, Jack W1tson, Janine Watson, Keith ................. 178 Watson, Lawrence .............. 178 Watson, Max ................. 178 Watson, Melissa ................ 178 Watson, Michael Watson, Richard Watson, Richard W. Watt, Lisa Weaver: Esta . Weaver, Linda . . Weaver Marietta . Webb, bavis . . . . Webb: Janet 12 Webb: Kay ................ 124, 405 Webb: Michael 17 Weber, Bruce Webster, Charles Webster, David Weeks, Kerry ................. 178 Weesler, John ................. 386 Weiker Helen ................. 351 Weir, rances ................. 178 Weiriis, Madelyn ............... Weis, Rita ................ 179,377 Weise, Susan Welch, Betty Welch, Linda Welch,Ma.xine Weller, Peter . . . Wells, Don ..... Wells, Eugenia Wells, Gordon ................. 395 Wells, Robert Welsh, Leila Wende, Ruby Weniger, Carol Wensley, Kathy ................ Wertheim, Joyce ............... 179 Wesley, Joe .................. 179 Wesson, Ronnie ............... 124 West, Carol 79 West: John ................ 179 375 West, Karen Westbrook John ..... 179,375 Westdyke Pony 1755, 361,411 Westmore and, Reginald . . 432 Wetmore, Linda Wheatley, Ervin Wheeler, Buzz ................. Wheeler: Donna ............... 179 Wheeler: Jack ............... 30, 31 Wheeler: Peyton 719 Wheeler: Van .............. 124, 391 Wheelus, Charles ............... 124 Whetstohe, Gene ............... 124 Whisenant, Cheryl .............. 179 Whisenant, Tony ............... 179 Whisenhurit Brenda .......... 179, 411 Whitaker, Ahgeia 179 Whitaker, Barbara White, Betty 430 White: Billy ........... 124,407,446 White, Dale 179 White,Dary1 .................. 179 White, Debbie .............. 179,355 White, James White, Jgne White, Jimmy ................. 125 White, Judith White, Linda White, Linda P ................. 179 White: Marilyn 17 White: Mary ............... 179,349 White: Randall 94 White, Rynda ............... White, Sally ...... . . White: Steve ..... Whited, Jim 125 Whiteley Harold ........ 125,428, 449 Whiteiy, Linda 355 Whiteni ht, Judith .............. 179 Whitesi 9 Brenda .............. 125 Whitsitt,u1ia ................. 349 Whitson, Wayne ............... 125 Whittaker Kenny 179 Whitted, Michael ............ 179,462 Whitten Fred 373 Whitten erg, Fran .............. 179 Whittenberg, Sandra ............ 125 Whorley, Tom ................ 179 Wiant, Sally .................. 489 Wickersham, Glenn . . 179 Wied, Alex ....... . Wiesen, . Wiggen, James Wiggen, William Wiggins, John .............. 125,395 Wilbanks, Harry- ............... 179 Wilbanks, Kathleen Wilbanks, Philip Wilburn slie Wilcox, Connie ................ 363 Wilcox, Diane ................. 125 Wildman, Donna ............... 179 Wiley, Virginia Wilfred, Teresa Wilhelm, Cindy ................ 178 Wilhite, Charles ................ 179 Wilkens, Amy ................. 179 Wilkens, Debbie Wilkens, Susan Wilkerson, Mark Wilkins, Terry. Wilkins Virginia . Willforci, Jann . . 1 . . . 18 Willhite, ,Michael ............ 125,418 Willhite, Nannette 345 Williams, Barbara Williams, Bobby Williams: Carol Williams, Carolyn Williams, Chima Williams, Danny Williams, Donald ............... 125 Williams, Eddie ................ 125 Williams, Gary ................ 125 Williams, Grant ................... 235 Williams, Gu180 Williams,H. ........... 432, 450 468 Williams, Heather 79 Williams, Jane . . Williams, Joan . Williams, Joe . . Williams,Joe180 Williams, John ................ 125,307 Williams, John G. 180 Williams, Johnny .............. 351, 416 Williams, Joyce ................... 180 Williams: Judy ................ 180, 440 Williams: Julian ............... 468,469 Williams, Kathryn ................. Williams, Laura ................... 180 Williams, Lilly .................... 125 Williams, Linda ................... 180 Williams, L nna Williams, arcia Williams, Marvin .................. 369 Williams: Mary ................... 80 Williams, Michael ............. 125,336 Williams, Norman ................. 180 Williams, Paulette ............... ,.,,.180 Williams, Philli .................. 125 Williams, R. Mlchael ............... 386 Williams, Robert .................. 180 Williams, Ronald .................. 125 Williams, Roy .................... 180 Williams, Sherry .................. 125 Williams, Valerie .................. 180 Williams, Victor ................... 94 Williams, Virginia . Williford, Martha .. Willig, Elaine . . . Willingham David ........... 180, 381 Willis, A. Willis, Janice Willis, Wade Wills, John ................... 180 Wilshire Larry Wilson, Barbie Wilson, Beverly ................ 462 Wilson, Candace Wilson, Deborah Wilson, Donald ................ 180 Wilson, Jill ................... 180 Wilson, Linda Wilson, Mary Wilson, Nancy Wilson, Nicky. Wilson, Robin . . Wilson, Ronald . Wilson, Sandra Wilson, Steve Wilson, Susi Wimberly, Leslie Winchester, Marian Windle, Donald ................ 125 Winklei', Jean ................. 180 Winslett Micheline Winter, Suzanne Wintori, Cynthia Wise, Cathy Witkowskiy Donna . . Witt, Carol Witt, Cheryl ............ Witt, James . Witten, C nthia Witten, artha . Wittke, E11 ene Wofford ancy Wolian, barrby ................ 180 Wolny, Catheryn ............... 180 Womack, Gigi ................. 180 Womble, yLarry ................ 180 'Women s P. E Club Wood, Barry .................. 432 Wood, Betsy .................. 180 Wood, Britten ................ 464 Wood, Carol .................. 180 Wood, Carolyn ................ 180 Wood, Charles ................ 180 Wood, Donna ................. 125 Wood, James Wood: Jeffrey ...... Wood, Jo Anna . . . Wood: John . . Wood, Linda . Wood, Richard Wood, Sandra Wood, Teresa 180 Woodall Linda ......... 180, 436, 470 Woodar1i,Janet ................ 125 Woodard, Vicki ................ 180 Woodbum Margy 125 Woodby Kathlee Woods, 63.101 Woods, Nancy Woods, Winford 12 Woodward Moid ............... 125 Woody Linda ................. 180 Woolri ge, Quinn . . . . . . Wooten, David Wooten, Fredna Wooten, Jeanie . . . . Wootton, David Word, Ga ay Work, Charles Workman, Sandi ............ 125,435 Worley Doug .................. 94 Worsham, James . . Wortham, Evalynn . Wortham Gus Worth ,Valerie Wren, velyn 18 Wren, Worth ............... 432, 433 Wright, Diane 34 7 Wright, Gloria .............. 181,347 Wright Kathy 181 Wright, Marsha ......... 126, 345, 440 Wright, Nancy 181: 359 Wright, Rica ............... 126,361 Wright, Ronald ................ Wrotenbery, Anne .............. 181 Wyatt, Jimmy ................. 126 Wyles, Eamye .............. 210,357 Wylie, Robert 181 Wylie, Sandra ................. 181 Wynkoop, Charles .............. 181 Wynn, James ................. 126 Wysong, Michael ............... 393 Y Yachmetz, Stephen ............. 126 Yager, Sharon ................. 181 Yancey Garry ............. 126,373 Yancy, velyn Yarbrough, Richard .............. 394 Yarbrough, Velta .............. 181 Yau, Elsie ................... 181 Yea er, Patricia 12 Yea e, Alwyn Yeargin, Rickey Yearout,Pame1a ............... 181 Yearwood, Jacqualine ............ l94 Yenne, Harlan Yin st, Sarah .......... 181,350,377 Yor . . .26 York, Jackie York,Mi1dred ................. 126 Yosten Susie Young,y Alice Young, David ................. 126 'Young Democrats ............. 460 Young, Denice Young, Denise Young, John Young, Kathy ................. 126 Young, Keith ................. 181 Young, Laura ................. 126 Young, Lee Anne .............. 126 Young, Linda .................. 94 Young Ted Youngherg, Nancy Yount, Gary .................. 181 oYucca ..................... 470 Zahra, Edward 369 Zaikovsky, Charles ............ 181,407 Zajicek, Ra 100 Zamorano, Zant, Lawan a Zaoina, Bob .................. 126 Za ata, Abel .................. 94 Ze azny Richard ............... 181 Zeldin, Basha ................. 181 Zellers, Sandra 181 Ze edai Richard ............ 207, 446 I eta rIiau Alpha ............... 362 Zgabay, Pat .................. 181 Zhanel, Paula ................. 126 Ziebarth, Randy ............... 181 Zimmerman, Harvey Zimmerman, Zandra Zinnin er, Georgeanne ........... 181 Zorn, enneth ................ 384 Zorns Harold ................. 126 Zotz, Paula .................. 126 THE YUCCA GANG Dart Board Don, Granny Fisher, Young Ann Inosent, Beautiful Kodo, Denny Do Hafen, Calvin Carter, Exakta Kika Photo sponsoU, Hubie Hubbard, Donna Galore, Goldy Bold Deck, V. J. Poppins, Shirley Power, Pat GTO, Off Campus Housing, and Betterlate Thanever. 1 mmmeuvsmwvw-m


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