University of North Carolina Greensboro - Pine Needles Yearbook (Greensboro, NC)

 - Class of 1922

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University of North Carolina Greensboro - Pine Needles Yearbook (Greensboro, NC) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 304 of the 1922 volume:

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro JACKSON LIBRARY CO N86p 1922 c.2 UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES J JJaXlatMy £H Pine Needles NINETEEN TWENTY-TWO PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION North Carolina College for Women R GREENSBORO, N. C. g fHWEHIEDlEs m : f -ore ord We can wish for the readers of this little volume no greater pleasure than we, the editors, have felt in compiling it C(T „=£ mE HLEDLEs ifii i ii»n«flin DR. J. I. FOUST ColUge Father wmmwtm wmm rtHfiiiDLEs |iiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiillilJMiiiiiiiii- ' ii ' iii!ii!ni ' r; Helen Dunn Creasy Editor-in-Chief Wilmington, N. C. Editorial Department Vera Keech Organization Editor Tarboro, N. C. - Mary John class Editor Laurinburg, N. C. Augusta Sapp Literary Editor Greensbcro, N. C. Art Department Loula Woody Art Editor WlLMlNCTON, N. C. Kuby HoDGIN Picture Editor Greensbcro, N. C. Finance Department Ruth Kohn Business Manager Mt. Holly, N. C. Susie West Assistant Greensbcro, N. C. Luzon Wiley Assistant Charlotte, N. C. rtWt NEEDLE 438499 H ORDER OF BOOKS BOOK ONE THE COLLEGE BOOK TWO THE CLASSES BOOK THREE ORGANIZATIONS ■»:»»M:cc(iw»aw««K«« i« » «?w» BB HH EBBBEBBBBEBBBEEEBEBHBS BBBBBBBBBBBBBHBBBBBBBB BB BE rt«E?liiDlE Scsznsa II- -. itv ' ,,.r -v College Song College Motto : " Service " College Color, : White and Gold College Flower: Daisy We raise our vo.ces; let them swell und The rolling hills s s nd back Cf our triumphant song. For in one great unb.oken band, With loyal hearts and true. Your daughters sand, and, hand in ha Sing, college dear, [o you. Our college days And all too so But m the years that are ! Deep graven on each he Our motto, " Service, " will And service we will do. And as we serve, our hear O, college dear, to you! ftly by. Ma Dear Al: We never shall The gratitude we o A never-ending ( All honor to your And love we pie Unfailing loyally w O, college dear. you— we give, fi ' U iiHiiilllmlillllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllilllllllllllli: wwu ' 1 ' " ■■■ - X» m MMIliMlllllflilMlll lMlliflil mt Board of Directors A. J. CONNER Northampton County E. E. B.RITTON Wake County E. C. Brooks Wake County C. H. Mebane Catawba County J. D. MURPHY Buncombe County J. L. Nelson Caldwell County Joe Rosenthal Wayne County Mrs. J. A. Brown Colurr.bus County Miss Easedale Shaw Richmond County Junius D. Grimes Beaufort County rtHEKEEDU A«CM i:i-i:t- ' M;MXMiKtxHi :i:t:t.t lllllllllllill ' li Officers or Administration J. I. FOUST, LL.D.. President W. C. JACKSON, B.S., Vice-President of the College W. C. SMITH, LlTT.D., Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Elizabeth D. Young, M.A., Dean of Residence E. S. DREHER, M.A., Business Manager EMMA King, A.B., Director of Dormitories ANNA M Go E, M.D., Director Department of Hygiene and Resident Physician Eva M. Locke, M.D., Physician E. J. Forney, Treasurer Laura H. Coit, Secretary Mary Taylor Moore, Registrar Charles B. Shaw, M.A.. Librarian HOPE CoOLIDGE, Dietitian EsTELLE BOYD, Housekeeper Ethel C. Bollinger, B.P., Alumnae Secretary Grace Lawrence, Assistant Director of Dormitories Clara B. BYRD, A.B., Assistant to Treasurer Elizabeth Sampson, B.S., Assistant Librarian Grace Stowell, Assistant Librarian Rosa Oliver, A.B., Assistant Librarian ANNIE CUMMINGS, A.B.. Assistant Librarian Mary TENNENT, A.B., Assistant Registrar Lois McDonald, A.M., General Secretary Y. W. C. A. Jessie McLean, R.N., Trained Nurse Cora Beam, R.N., Trained Nurse Alice McKlNNON, Posloffice, Booths and Sla ' ijnery Anna Rogers, B.S., Assistant Dietitian Clora McNeill, Stenographer Sadie Walker, Stenographer Vivian Rogers, Stenographer Virginia Morrison, Stenographer Kathleen Pettit, Stenographer iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 1 m wm Early D ays N October 5, 1921, the North Carolina College for Women celebrated the thirtieth year of its activity with the biggest build- ing program and largest enrollment in its history. The first year of its work found three buildings, dormitory space for less than one hundred and fifty boarders, with a teaching force of fifteen, and an enrollment of 225 students. By 1 902 the faculty had increased to about thirty members. The library, which was for a time in rooms number 2 and 3, Main, had three thousand volumes. The training school had been built; the old infirmary, which is now a practice hall; the steam laundry, a large dining room, and a well-arranged kitchen all showed the growth of the college. By additions to the dormitories and by renting several neighboring residences the dormitory capacity was then about three hundred and fifty. An old annual of 1902 records the great comfort that had been given by the substitution of gas for kerosene lamps, the introduction of single beds, and the placing on every floor of por- celain baths. Courses were offered in three departments: the normal, the business, and the domestic science. There was also a special course in which a student could get training in vocal culture, physical culture, and industrial art. The course of study required four years for completion, after which the student received a lifetime license to teach in North Carolina. In 1919 the name of the college was changed from the State Normal and Industrial College to the North Carolina College for Women. In the fall of 1921 it was recognized by the Southern Association of Colleges as a standard college and became one of the six so honored in the state. At present there are sixteen buildings on the campus, six of which are dormitories, two class buildings, a domestic science cottage, the Y. W. C. A. hut, training school, laundry, and dairy. Dr. Mclver ' s residence is also on the campus. With the generous appropriation of the Legislature of 1921 three new dormitories were started, a new wing for Mclver, a new wing to the dining ».•■• :•:•:•:« •:•:• : •;» ; ■ »:• ' •:•:• " ' Mttfto,E; ».•.•: " :• :•:•:•: •:•:•:•:• " .•:•:•:•:•!•• " •:« |lllllllllllllllllllllllllllll[||||||||||lllll|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii||| hall, and a domestic science building were put under construction. The dining room was ready for occupancy when the students returned in the fall, and the new wing to Mclver and the domestic science building will be completed this spring. The three new dormitories will be open next fall to accommodate the three hundred and fifty or four hundred new students who are expected to enter. In the fall of 1921 the enrollment of students was 982 and the number of faculty members 109. The first class to complete the four-year course was the Class of 1896, with nineteen members. The Senior Class of 1922 has ninety-five members. Degrees are now given at the college in three different departments — music, arts, and science. There is a business department under the direction of Mr. E. J. Forney, who has been at the college since it was founded. The library, a building of two stories with 18,000 volumes, is entirely inadequate for the needs of the students, and plans have already been drawn up to treble its capacity. The infirmary, which was built soon after the foundation of the college, has been turned into a music hall, and a new infirm- ary has been built with seventy-five beds and all modern equipment. An efficient staff of two lady physicians and two trained nurses are in charge at the infirmary. The new dormitories contain every modern convenience, and sun parlors and sitting rooms provide a cozy and homelike atmosphere. The contrast between the comforts of 1902 — gas lights — with those today, the lighting fixtures, the long mirrors in the doors, the steam-heated rooms, and the beau- tiful sun parlors and sitting rooms — is interesting to note. The campus itself is considered one of the most beautiful in the state. Many trees, shrubs, flowers and green slopes give a lovely effect in the spring. Peabody Park, a woodland of fifty acres, is owned by the college and is kept entirely for the students. Walks and bridges have been put in, but aside from that it is undisturbed. The outdoor theater, where Park Night exercises are held at commencement, is in Peabody. Three members of the original faculty of the college are still in active service. Miss Gertrude Mendenhall, who taught mathematics when the col- lege opened in 1892, is still at her post and is steering the daughters of many of her former pupils through the intricacies of freshman math. Miss Menden- is W.WM ii l ,iiiiiiii ' ini l ,i!riii " iii l ii | ni | l ii m hall is a graduate of Wellesley and was a graduate student at Bryn Mawr. Miss Viola Boddie, who is at present head of the Latin department, taught the first students at the college the fact that " All Gaul is divided into three parts. " Miss Boddie is a graduate of Peabody Normal College, and was a student at Cornell University and at the Berlitz School of Languages, Chi- cago and Chautauqua. E. J. Forney, head of the commercial department and treasurer of the college, taught shorthand, typewriting and bookkeeping in 1892, and also served as bursar. inxxmju » i iiii( i i«l i) iWiWi i WE NEEDLEs ' vwswv " IHIIIIIinilHIlllllHIIHHIIIllllilllllllll mMiiDLEs ira Faculty ENGLISH W. C. Smith, Litt.D. Martha E. Winfield, B.S. Alonzo Hall, A.M. R. H. Thornton, A.M. Frances Womble, A.M. Dora Robinson, A.M. Aileen Turner, A.M. Miriam Bonner, M.A. L. B. Hurley, A.M. Mildred R. Gould, M.A. W. R. Taylor, M.A. Edith Pipkin, A.M. W HISTORY C Jackson, B.S. Harriet Elliott, A.M. Magnhilde Gullander, A.B. Marietta Stevenson, A.M. Beulah Lenfest, A.M. Louise Irby, A.M. Laura I. Cooper, A.M. MATHEMATICS Gertrude Mendenhall, B.S. Virginia Ragsdale, Ph.D. Member of the Cabinei-al-large Cora Strong, A.B. Florence Miller, A.B. Irene Templeton, B.S. jjpMiWiM ffl Faculty EDUCATION John H. Cook, A.M. Dean of School of Education A. P. Kephart, Ph.D. J. A. HlGHSMITH, A.M. Roy C. Holl, A.M., Ed.D. Etta Spier, MA. Lizzie Weatherspoon Ruth Fitzgerald Louie Lesslie, A.B. Kathryn Hagerty, Ph.B. Tompsie Baxter Louise Lancaster, B.S. Fleeta Cooper, B.S. Carolyn McMullan, B.S. CHEMISTRY Mary M. Petty, B.S. Elva Barrow, A.B. Katherine Wright, MA. Sallie Rutledge, A.B. MUSIC Wade R. Brown, D.Mus. Dean of School of Music George Scott-Hunter Gertrude Sousley Alliene Minor Alice V. Williams, B.M. Myra Albright Mary Coler Davis Olga Leaman Ellen Long Harriet Johnson Esther Crockett, A.B. Tillie Morlock •.• •:•:•:«•:•:•:•:•:•:• •:«: :».w« :«:« illllllllHllllUlllliiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHi ' acuity HEALTH Anna M. Gove, M.D. Eva M. Locke, M.D. Mary Coleman, B.S. Irene Emery Mildred Francis Anne Campbell Olive Hammond BIOLOGY J. P. Givler, Ph.B., M.A. Mary Robinson, B.S. Mary Seymour, A.M. Eva Campbell, A.M. L. Edwin Yocum, M.S. Bessie Noyes, A.M., Ph.D. Ruth I. Walker, A.B. ROMANCE LANGUAGES W. S. Barney, A.M., Ph.D. Chairman of Faculty of Language and Likralur Ralph Hankey, M.A. Alice M. Koehler, A.B. Majel Wood, A.M. R. March Merrill, A.M. Annie Beam, A.B. Germaine Villedieu Ihllll lil llilllil l lllllll l l ll ll l ' i ' i •.•■•i».«:«a»:«x 9:«c«:o:o:cco: ».« j! UiU •.•.• »»»!•»»»:•:•»»: ;o «kh»:m lllllllllilllll|l||llllimi ' Hilll! ' il ' lllilil!ll!lilimi Alumnae Association The work of the Alumnae Association for the year 1921-1922 has been a contini lion of the work begun last year. This year ' s officers and board members include: Maude Bunn Battle President Nettie Dixon Smith Vice-President Ethel C. Bollinger Secretary-Treasurer Board Members One Year: Mrs. Lizzie Weatherspoon, Mary Robinson, Mrs. Mamie Banner Gant. Tmo Years: Mrs. Julius Cone, Jane Summerell, Eleanor Watson. Three Years : Annie Beam, Leah Boddie, Lucy Crisp. The three chief interests of the association have been along the lines of increasing the membership in the association, the strengthening of the county organizatiens, and the beginning of the erection of the Alumnae Home. Owing to the fact that it is seeking this year to improve its financial s ' .atus, the asso- ciation has been obliged to stress the payment of fees. The response has been good, but the goal of 1 00 per cent membership of all graduates has not yet been reached. Since work on the erection of the Alumnae Home has been begun, the payment of pledges has also necessarily been urged. These two campaigns, then, for increased membership and for the building have been the chief work of the association for this year. Incidental to the carrying on of these campaigns has been the organization of the Class Secretaries Bureau. Great effort has been made to enroll the interest o f every graduate of the college in the work of the Alumnae Association through a secretary in each class and through the establishing of the Class Connection Fund. The Class Connection Fund was started by the Class of 1921. This class pledged, almost to a member, twenty-five dollars each, to be paid over a period of five years ' time in five-dollar installments; the fund to be used for whatever enterprise the alumnae were engaged in at the time of its collection: This class is now urging previous and coming classes to help make this fund a permanent institution, in order that the work of the association may proceed on sound financial basis. Aside from the two financial campaigns, there have been many other alumnae activi- ties of interest during the year. The building and establishing of the cafeteria has been the chief interest. Then, in addition to this. Founder ' s Day, the Teachers ' assembly banquet, the Christmas bazaar at the college, reunion dinners and meetings in the various counties, and the commencement reunions and banquet, have been of interest to all. The establishing of an Alumnae Council proclaims a constructive step in the alumnae rk. It has been planned that this council, composed of alumnae and college faculty, " " r I , T!!l!;i ' . ,iilh!li||l|!!liiii .! ' ;!i: ' , ' -T|!.i:i:ll!l|i!ii; UHl will meet regularly at the college and advise on matters of direct interest for the good of not only the college but the state as well. General office work has included daily correspondence, the publication of the alumnae quarterly, keeping of records, and the keeping of all accounts and rendering of reports. In conclusion, then, the outstanding work of the Alumna? Association for this year might be said to include: ( 1 ) The beginning of the erection of the Alumnae Home. (2) The establishing of the Class Secretaries Bureau. (3) The establishing of the Class Connection Fund. (4) The establishing of the Alumnae Council. (5) A resulting increase in membership in the Alumnae and Former Students ' Association. Miss Ethel Bollinc PtHtHEEDUs llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllH pmtwttuiEs These trees and stones are aud ' ible to me. These idle flowers that tremble in the wind, I understand their fiery syllables. " ' ■ " ' lHIWiiUllWiW HHB rtftfillDLEs -- ■i e 7 can sec fie sWonn Ci ' nes o its frees. ' •rccccco rccoKCMicoiM; : ; ; ? " :? w$M? M U 1 : ' Mm UK ' " Come, Jear oW comrade, you and I Will ileal an hour from Jays gone by. ' lilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll " No badge of sighs is this Sffl HEHEaaaaaiaaaaBBaBKaBa a I 1 a a a a a a a a a a a i BOOK II i a a a a a a THE a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a at la aaaaaaaaiaaaaaaaaaaaaaa aa aa rtU6WtM.Es •.•-•••-••-•••-•■ •• " : •:•:•:•:•:•:•:•»:•:•:«: - ii ' i ' iHii ' ii ' iii ' iiii ' iiiiiiiHiniiiiiiiii ' i ' i 1 " " 1922 Class Song " VN-ILW nHV- iz± i r j-tl =i==l==i= U r r T f P r f F — Copyright, MCMXX, by Agr.es -Camiady, Gr MiWMBilMWIlilil f! iHtHEEDU %4 M 4f M 4- Class Officers FALL SPRING Sarah Cannady President Martha Bradley Louine Murchison Vice-President Katherine Yoder Hazel Rogers Secretary Luella Koonts Helen Leach Treasurer Mabel Carpenter Jessie Baxley Critic Mary McDonald Murriel Barnes, B.S. Greensboro, N. C. Rachel Barwick, B.S. In woman than to study hmisrhxM lt 1. ' Dikean; Class Hockey Team (2. 3, 4); Vars Hockey Team (3); Intersociety Extension I reau (3, 4); Vice-rr. sid.nt Education Club ( " To sum up all. be merry, I advise. And as we are merry, may we still be wise. " Adelphian; Proctor (2): Fire Lieutenant (3); Class Athletic- Manager (Fall. 3); Class Basket- ball 11, 2. 3); Class Ilu.k.v Substitute (2. 3, 4); Education Club (4). Mattie Brite, B.S. Elizabeth Cily, N. C. Ulelphian; Proctor (1, 2); Eclu Mildred Burch, A.B. Greensboro. N. C. " Thy modesty is a candle to thy merit. " Elizabeth A. Calvert, A.B. Raleigh, N. C. Agnes Cannady, B.M. " The guide of life is common sense. ' " " That tall, richt guid-lookin " lassie. " Cornelian; Class President (Spring, 1); " Caro- Dikean: College Orchestra (3); College Chorus linian " Reporter (3); Chorus (2, 3. 4); Quill (3, 4); President Chorus (3); Fire Lieutenant Club (3, 4): Glee Club (3. 41; International (3): House President (3); Dikean President Relations Club (4); Cornelian President (Fall, 4). s Sarah Cannady, B.S. Oxford, N. C. Anne Cantrell, A. " Whate ' er she does, where ' er her steps she bends. Grace on each action silently attends. " Adelphian: Class Vice-President (Fall. 2): .Marshal (3); ' ' lass President (Fall, 4i; Dra- matic Club (4). " The hand that toll Difcean; Captain Va Winner Short Story dies " Stuff (3); " 1 Quill Club (3, 4); It (3, 41 ; Dramatic Clr ass Prophet; Collegiate Press Ass cey Team (2 (2); " Pine Ne Reporter (3 1 Relatii House of Editor-in-Chief North Carolina Florine Davenport. A.B. Columbia, N. C. Marie Davenport. B.M. " Mingle a little folly with your wisdo pie ilk, N. C. Ihkenn; ' ' lass Nask-l ball Team (2); Proctor 3); " Carolinian " Staff (3); Quill Club (3. " Carolinian " Reporter (4); Education Club Int.-rsneiety Conference Committee (4); i Cornelian; Chorus (1. 2); Glee Club (1. 2. 3); Cornelian Orator (2): Tennis Singles (2); " Carolinian " Reporter (4). UK i.s llmuKlit a fact. ' Dikean; Orchestra (1, 2. 3); Glee Club ( 1. 3); Proctor 2 : " Carolinian " Reporter (: Fire Lieutenant (2); French Club 3. 4); Ec cation Club (4): International Relations CI (4); Marshal (4). Gertrude A. Fox. A.B. Hickory, N. C. Emeline B. Goforth, A.B. Lenoir, N. C. " Plays well the game, ami knows the limit. Anri still gets all the fun there ' s in it. " " Of all the arts in which Nature ' s chief masterpiece is writing well. " Cornelian; Proctor 1 2 i . French Club ?,. 4); Education Club (4). Dikean; Proctor (1, ?. 3); Team i: ' . ?.); " Carolinian " Class Basketball An Editor (2): .N.C .ketball " I ' oraddi " staff I : . I . Editor-in-chief " Coraddi " (4); Quill Club (3. I); President Quill Club (4); Education Club .! . s.n.tan North Carolina S Collegiate Press Association (4); Class Poet. W Cleo Yedra Holleman, B.S. Cary, N. C. Hulda Holloman, A.B. Rich Square, N. C. ••Order is the greatest grace. " " The world means something to the capable. " Cornelian; Secretary and Treasurer of Bduca- Dikean; Intel-society Debater (Fall, 3); Dlkean lion club (41 Secretary (Spring, :: I ; Class Critic 13); Proctor (3); Fir,. Lieutenant (3); French ' luh (3, 4); International Relations ' lull CI. 41; President International Relations Club (4); Education Cluli (41: House of Representatives (4). Lila Ward Koonce, A.B. Wilmington, N. C. Juanita Koontz, A.B. Salisbury, N. C. ornelian; Class Treasurer (1): Cornelian Re- ording Secretary (2); " Masqueradcrs " I -. 3. ; Secretary and Treasurer " Masqueraders " 1 I . Chief Marshal 1 4). Elizabeth Lindsay, B.M. Taylorsville, N. C. " Her grace, ah! who could paint? House of Repr skill. " •y (Fall, Relations 4); Cor- She would fascinate a saint, I declare. " Dikean; Class Vice-President (Fall Club (2); Proctor (2); " Masquerad 4); Chorus (4); Chorus Secretary ( Joscelyn McDowell, A.B. Waynesville, N. C " Were she perfect, one would admire her more Lucille Mason, A.B. Sanford, N. C. ■■For she is wise, if I can Judge her; Dikean; Class Athletic Manag Hockey Team (2); " Carolinian " Reporter 3i; Business Manager " Ye Junior Shoppe " (3); Class Basketball Team (3): Hockey Sport reader (3); House of Representatives (4); A. A. Critic (4); Quill Club (4); " Carolinian " Staff (4); Tau Pi Delta. Louinc Murchison, B.S. Raleigh, N. C. Irene Perkins. B.S. Greensboro, N. C. farther than today. " Cornelian; Proctor (2): Fire Lieutenant (2); Class Athletic Manager i3i; Class Vice Presi- Adelphian: Chorus il. 41: ll|r» Club (3); Vice dent (Fall 31 Class llnrkrv ' iv.im ?.. 4); Atli- Hous, President 141; Edueatmu t ' luli ill m Cab, n.t ih Education Club f i 3 g j Branson Price, A.B. Chapel Hill, N. C. Sudie I. Rhodes. B.M. H Diki-aii; Oratorical Contest (3d place. 1 President i : ' I ; Basketball Team CI); " Caro! ian " Reporter (1. 4); Marshal (3); Y. W. C. Cabinet (3); Vic-President of Student Gove mem Association (4); Education Club ( French Club (3); International Relations C |3. 41; •■Maso.ueraders- 1 (3. 4); Tau Pi Delta Hazel Rocers. B.S. Jessie Rose, A.l ' J (L ' l ; Class Sit] i.,h Iiikean; class Athletic Manager (1); Class Basketball Team ill; rhampinn Tennis Singles i-l: A. A. Critic ll ' l: Proctor ( .i I : Tennis Sport Leader (2, 4); Class Hockey Team I L ' . :(. 4); Class Cheer Leader (3); President Athletic Clasa P.a.sk.il.all Tram (1); Fi Lieutenant (1); ciasg Baseball Team 1 3 French Club (41; Education Club (4); Tenn Club (4). Dikean; " Pine Needles " Staff ell; Proctor (2l Glee Club (2); Class Basketball Team (21 " Coraddi " Staff (3); Intersociety Extensio; Commute I); Quill Club (3. 4); Marsha (31; Education Club (4); Senate (4). V Josephine Weaver, A.B. Lexington, N. C. Foda White, A.B. Olin. N. C. " Who relished a joke and rejoiced in a pun, Rare compound of oddity. rolic and fun. " Dikean; Proctor (1, 4); Hockey Team Substi- A.B. ; l ' r.. ..tor (2); Fire Liei ;onant (2); Educa- tute (3); (Mass Treasurer (Fall, 3); Education tion Club (4); Tennis Club ( Club (1.. 1 May M. Meador. A.M. High Point. N. C. Germaine Villedieu, A.B. Paris. Fr; X jaWM : = HE SEN I OTIS w:e: choose T O WA1X vLITK PO.X VII DAMCE WITH " 1071X KITH N i l " 5 lllllllllllllllllHllllllllllllllllll ' lllllllllHillllliilMlllHIIilllllllllll PtHt WEEDLEs " " HS SEN I ORS (K CHOOSE MYRTLE WMMEH rani Wl -lyE Ml T K PL.AN WITH i oox. j s HIHK OAi iMiioM i iirii Cl ass roem A-down the long brown road. Of all our happy, golden school days. R,ch are (hey. full of friendships rare. Beautiful wilh the radiance of past years. Brightened by smiles, remembered for tears. Far. far beyond the blue of the horizon, Like stars on wintry nights, come the now faint. Now bright, glad beacons of the future. Wonderful are they, full of an infinite glory. Beautiful with the radiance of ideals and inspiral Brightened by hope, the haunt of consecrations. Smiling, a-throb with the joy of living. Come the radiant days of the present. Like friends, sincere and true. Rich are they, pulsating, glad and free. Wholesome, uplifting, worthy — Worthy, O College, of thee! Emeline Goforth. JIIIIHIHlllHlllllllllllltllllllllllllllUlllHIIIIIIIIIIHII fl History of the Class of 22 came to pass in the year one thousand nine hundred and eighteen that there befell a great sorrow in the land of North Carolina College, for, behold! the eldest daughters of the land took their departure out into thai vast and mysterious place called Life. And the hearts of their sisters were heavy in that they should see them no more. And there went out through all the country of High School heralds asking that new daughters be given unto the Alma Mater. Now in those days there dwelt in this country young maidens fair to behold, and they arose and came in answer to the biddings of the heralds. And they loved their Alma Mater and found favor in her sight. The maidens were called Twenty-two, and they were known by their colors, green and white. Now in those days it was the custom to prepare entertainments for the youngest born. And it came to pass that numerous entertainments were prepared for Twenty-two, and she arose and went thence adorned in festive raiment, and great was the rejoicing in all the lend at that time. But all was not merrymaking and rejoicing in this land of North Carolina College, for, indeed, it was a land of work and worry, as well as a land of delight. And, behold! Twenty-two did enter into it all with a brave heart, and did confront the monster Math with valiant courage worthy of daughters of the Alma Mater. It came to pass in those days that there did befall a great and ssrious plague called the influenza, which swept through all the land, and, coming at last to N. C. College, greatly disturbed all the people. And it happened that the trouble was so great that it was not permitted that any meetings should be held indoors. So in the early days of Twenty-two the whole band did assemble out under the open sky and did organize, and elect for their first president Mary Griffin of the land of Shelby. And the motto, " Con- quer, " they did take to go ever before and lead them on. In those days came cne saying, " Upon you all I must put a bondage, that this dreadful disease may be wiped out. And they were put in quarantine until Christmas drew nigh. Now it was rumored abroad that the bondage should not be lifted for the holidays, and there was sorrowing in all the land, for the maidens did yearn for their old homes. Then came that same one who had appeared unto them before, saying, " Arise, go thy way, for I say unto you that your bondage is lifted. " And, lo and behold! it was Christmas- And there was great rejoicing through all the land. And they arose and departed, and came unto their old homes, where they did remain one score days and two, rejoicing and feasting. And in the beginning of the new year they returned and took up their work. Now in thore days came examinations and swept through all of the land of N. C. College, favoring some and plunging others into the depths of despair. And from thence iiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiHiiiiHiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii: y A JWULHAAAAAAAXAtH|J EKEIOU: on the time did pass quickly enough. And Twenty-two did work and play together, and did sing together this song of her own making: Striving ever upward, To all our visions true; Our hearts we pledge, our loyalty To thee, O Twenty-two! And Elizabeth Calvert of the land of Raleigh was the second president thereof. And soon it was the month of June, and Twenty-two did arise and depart unto the land of her forefathers, a Sophomore Class, full of wisdom and grace. And when it was again September, Twenty-two arose and came once more unto her Alma Matei, and this wise and diligent class, with Branson Price as a leader, did begin the second yeui. And it came to pass that Twenty-two soon did plan for an entertainment for the youngest born of the Alma Mater, the Class of Twenty-three, that she might be made to feel more at home here in this new and strange land. And they sent unto Twenty- three invitations saying: Sophomore Vein Cii7 Masquerade On Saturday, the fifteenth, Just as the clock strikes ei -In, fele. Many folk Fr. Will gather fo As fiction lad or lass, come Join us and be gay — It is until ten-thirty We linger there and play. And it came to pass that in the month of November of the same year and on the eleventh day Twenty-two did assemble in the hut of the Young Women ' s Christian Association, and there did hold a ceremony, and it was called the Dedication of the Sophomore Fireplace. And the Class of Twenty-two was filled with the spirit of loyalty at that time and did feel closer drawn together. And in those days did come members of I wenty-two, strong and filled with the love of sport, and they did join with their whole hearts in athletics, and did win much praise for their valiant playing at hockey, basketball, and tennis. And the sophomore hockey team did put the enemy to flight and did win honor to its name. And it came to pass that Jesse Rose that same year was the champion tennis player, for she did win above all others. And the first half of the sophomore year did pass away, and it was the second half. And the class did choose Jocelyn McDowell as president, and under her leadership did accomplish much good work. And it came to pass that when the class was gathered together the thoughts of the elder sisters of the Class of Twenty did enter their hearts, for they did love them well. nHEHEEDU And they did prepare for their sisters a country fair, and a cloth was spread with much fine food. And they two arose, the Classes of Twenty and Twenty-two, and departed thence into the park and did there abide even until nightfall making merry and feasting. And in the same year came Twenty to her sister, Twenty-two, saying unto her, " We would that you, our sister, carry for us the chain of daisies at our graduation. " And the heart of Twenty-two was filled with exceeding great joy, and at the appointed time she arose and did as she was bid. And the fall of one thousand nine hundred and twenty was the third year. And the members of Twenty-two were called juniors, and they were more joyful than ever before. And they did choose Juanita Koontz as their president, and did begin work with great diligence. And straightway they did set up Ye Junior Shoppe and sold their wares in the public places to the multitudes that did gather there. In those days there came unto Alma Mater one who was the fairest of all, the Class of Twenty-four. And they found favor in the sight of Twenly-two, and to them Twenty- two was a sister class, and she in turn rejoiced and was exceeding glad that to her was given such a beloved little sister. And to these new sisters the Class of Twenty-two did send invitations, saying unto them: " Come, join with us in a class meeting. " And they did as they were bid, and the two classes were er.deared the cne to the other. And the fall and winter passed away and, lo! it was spring. And to Lucile Mason was given the leadership of the spring term. Now at this time the members of the class began to talk among themselves concerning the Class of Twenty-one, and they did send invitations unto them asking that they come to a banquet prepared for them after the style of the Dutch. And they did as they were bid. And the fall of one thousand nine hundred and twenty-one was the fourth year, and, lo and behold ! the Class of Twenty-two were called seniors. And it came to pass that as they returned this year unto their Alma Mater there was more dignity manifested among them, and upon them was settled much responsibility. And to this class was entrusted the instruction of the young of the school called Curry. Now the seniors gave to Sarah Cannady the leadership of the fall term, and to Martha Bradley the leadership of the spring term. And they did rule with much dignity and wisdom. Then, following the custom of old, the juniors, the Class of Twenty-three, did pre- pare for Twenty-two a banquet and sent unto her an invitation in the month of March, bidding her come to the feast which was prepared for her. And the seniors arose and went in to the feast with much rejoicing, and the juniors did likewise, and there was feasting and dance until the eleventh hour. And now commencement was at hand, and in the heart of Twenty-two was mingled joy and lamentation. And it came to pass that when the Class of Twenty-two had finished the things appointed to her that she should do, she departed and came unto a place called Life, and here she continues steadfastly to do service, even as her sisters did before her. PAULINE Lucas. flffflDlE Class Propkecy I dipped into the future. Far as human eye could see. Saw a vision of my classmates. And all the wonders they would be. IXTEEN years! . . . Could it be possible that nearly a decade had slipped past me since that fateful day in June, 1922, when I had stood with my ninety-three classmates and received that long-toiled-for " sheepskin " — that insignia of my aspirations, the " open sesame " — so I had thought — to the door of success. Sixteen lone years, most of which I had spent in seclusion from the world and in ignorance of what had happened in the great area of events and to the fate of my Alma Mater and the ninety-three who had been with me on that auspicious diploma- getting occasion. At last I was returning to the world and was making my first trip back to my college — the scene of the happiest years of my life. It was commencement that I was going to — the commencement of the Class of 1938, another Green and White class. News of the college had already come to me — how it was now the greatest university for women in America, and what a wonderful president it had in Martha Bradley. Martha, one of those old classmates. ... I would see her and hear of others. The train stopped and I got off to find myself in a huge modern depot. This could not be Greensboro. I must have made a mistake. But my eye caught sight of a brass plate which contained the reassuring words, " Teague Field, N. C. U. W. Station. Built by the Mizelle Construction Co., " I read. So Hazel has realized her college-day ambi- tion and gotten a station behind Teague Field! Memories of those dear old days began to throng to my mind, and half in a dream I allowed myself to be conducted by a willing Ethiopian, who had the letters " N. C. U. W. " on his spotless uniform, to the door of a nearby building. " Here yuh is, miss, " spake my dusky guide. " This here is the Alumnibus building of the No ' th Ca ' lina Unnyversity for Womens, what yuh wanted. Boss Ruth Higgins will see to yuh. " As I entered the large, empty room a paper which was on the table caught my eye. The word Carolinian flashed before me, and in an instant I was pouring over its contents. But how my old friend had changed! . . . " Largest Collegiate Daily, " I read. " Leased Wire, International Press Association, Wireless Service. " And this was a special alumnae issue. Fine! Probably some of the 22 ' s would be mentioned. Nor was I disappointed, for the headlines in no uncertain manner informed me that more of the Class of 1922 had attained fame than of any other class in the history of the institu- tion. I devoured every word of the article, and this is what I read: " The Class of 1922 has more famous figures in its ranks than any of the illustrious classes that have graduated from here. Its members have entered the fields of literature, AkWIJiJ art, science, education, and business, most of them having attained unusual distinction in their chosen field. " Government has claimed a goodly number. Five — Vera Keech, Katherine Yoder, Gussie Finch, Mary Katherine Liles, and Mozelle Hunt — are at present in the United States Senate. Mabel Stamper is Speaker of the House. Annie Bridges, Gertrude Fox, and Eva Lee Sink are members of the cabinet ; Katie Whitley is governor of North Caro- lina; Elizabeth Stanford, Collina Caldwell, Mary McDonald, and Mary York are in the foreign diplomatic service. " The world of business has claimed a great number. May McArn, Lucy Hunter, Clara Craven, and Foda White stand unparalleled among the financial wizards of America. Lila Ward Koonce heads the world ' s largest dye plants; Millie Kanipe, Ethel Kearns, and Florine Davenport are bank presidents, while Irene Perkins is president of the National Association of Bankers. Lila Bell is owner of the Transatlantic Aero Service, having been the first woman to circumnavigate the globe. Louine Murchison and Ruby Hodgin have accumulated millions in food manufacturing. Margaret Blair, Louella Koonts, and Elizabeth McCracken are also important figures in the realm of manufacture. " Joyce Rudisill, Clara Brawley, and Jessie Baxley have made names for themselves in the field of the novel; Huldah Holloman is author of the most important boo k of the century on ' Government ' ; Emeline Goforth is leader of the new school of poetry; Mary John is the modern Matthew Arnold, according to the estimate of her criticism by Helen Dunn Creasy, editor of the Atlantic Monthly. The latest play of Pauline Lucas is now being produced at the Ashby Playhouse in New York. This theater is owned by the well-known producer, Lucretia Ashby, another ' 22. Annie Pearl Dobbins has recently published the last volume in her series of ' Great Men and Women of North Carolina. ' " Several famous actors have come out of the class. Madame Germaine, formerly Marie Bonitz, has, in collaboration with her renowned husband, become the greatest Shakespearean tragedienne of the day. Elizabeth Lindsay has made her name in comedy and has retired as one of the wealthiest women of the stage. Sarah Cannady and Frances Singleton, the most famous dancers since Pavlowa, are at present touring Africa with their ballet. They have with them Mattie Angel, as pianist, and Myrtle Warren, as soloist. The business of the company is in the hands of Helen Leach, the financial expert. As a musical composer Agnes Cannady is known in two continents. Rosa Lee Watts, Sudie Rhodes, Olive Chandley, and Hazel Worsely are on the concert stage. The new musical magazine now published in Chicago has at its head Mary Louise Bender. " Some of the other great lights in world affairs that have come out of this class are Carey Batchelor, head of the sociology department of the University of Michigan; Zelian Hunter, the great evangelist; Rena King, the renowned surgeon of Johns Hopkins; Hannah Mae Fleetwood, the inventor; Mabel Eure, the costume designer; Daisy Hunter, Marie Davenport, and Mildred Burch, the great New York lawyers; Jessie Rose, holder of the world ' s swimming championship; and Juanita Koontz, the well-known educator. " And all this had come out of my old class! But what of the not-so-fortunate-as-to- become- famous ones. Hardly had I voiced my thought than two women, one with very dark hair, the other with very blonde, entered the room, both talking furiously. They looked strangely familiar . . . yes ... it was Joscelyn McDowall and Branson Price. " ' Josh ' Brans! " I exclaimed. . . Greetings were in order, and then I per- suaded the two to give me some information about themselves and the other non-famous ones of ' 22. Needless to say, they did not need much persuasion. HfilEltou " ' Brans, ' " said Joscelyn, " besides managing her husband and family, is city man- ager of Greensboro; but I have my hands full with those twins of mine. Grace Forney is primary superintendent of North Carolina. Oh, yes, she is married- — of course. But most of them are, for that matter. Oh, do you remember that time when Pete Murphy urged us to get married? " Kate Mitchell and Lucile Mason, the inseparables, are running rival newspapers. Margaret Heinsberger is in Africa, teaching the Ethiops how to cut up cats, and Sallie Tucker is managing our new depot. Elizabeth Foust is running a dancing school in New York; Liz Calvert is on the staff of Life; Mabel Carpenter is a government pure food expert; Connie Heafner is — " " Goodness! Do give me a chance, " ' Brans ' broke in. " Connie is teaching English in France. No; it ' s French in England. Charlotte Daughety is a grand architect, and Muriel Barnes is in business in Greensboro. And, would you believe it, Edith Cunning- ham and Julia Mae Southerland are in the movies! They ' re fine, too. Elva Rosser is lecturing in Honolulu. Rachel Barwick is coach of the national hockey team, and Jinsie Underwood is abroad, teaching the Scotch lassies the game. " Here Branson stopped for a breath, but started again before anyone had a chance to put in a word. " And, oh, yes; Athleen Turnage is running a bakery in Alaska and Ruth Teachey is selling typewriters in Mexico. Ethel Baugh is in Paris — at the French Academy, I believe. Gertrude Fox and Sarah Smith are farming oranges ... a new kind in Florida. Are there any others? Josephine Weaver? Oh, Joe is with some big New York publishing house and is doing quite well. Oh, I left out one or two! They say that Ethel Bynum has revolutionized the Latin language by her discoveries in that field. Mattie Bright has opened up a real estate office in Siberia. Rachel Ivey is in charge of the historical museum in Raleigh, and Cleo Holloman has turned farmer. And now tell us I was destined never to learn the end of that sentence, for I felt myself punched vio- lently in the ribs and heard a masculine voice utter these startling syllables: " Miss Singleton, will you kindly wake Miss Cantrell up? Miss Branson, will you please proceed? " Anne Cantrell. ' ; • ' ' I , : : • lUMIDlEs HI y UMjj Ik ANTOINETTE PARKER WIRTH Class Mascot Junior Class Song To stand upright and keep the faith And serve your high ideals, We pledge. O Alma Mater dear. Our efforts and our zeal. The Service on your banner spur Us on to righteous fight. We ' ll forge ahead, be ever true. Your daughters, Red and White The happiness of college days, Tne friendships strong and fast We ' ve found in working lqyally. In service to our class. We honor you, we offer you Our hearts, and may they be A proof of never-failing love For you. O Twenty-three. Ous sister classes, may we be As great, as strong, as true As you have been through all these year Your mottos ever new. Your spirits guide us on our way. And courage marks our fight. Success we ' ll find, we pledge its gains To you. O Red and While. am xVUI ' .V. I1ULES Class Officers FALL SPRING Josephine Piatt President Iola Parker Margie Humphrey Vice-President Martha Calvert Sara Harper Secretary Sarah Presson Alice Elliott Treasurer May Shearer Thelma Harper Critic Grace Albricht " rt m mm um im f PiMt NIEDLEs llit i lliliftllitillM i lliiy i tiMiliillilliM i i ' iilililliS nmk Junior Class Bedell, Margaret Cornelian CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA Blair, Mary N. Dikean NORTH CAROLINA Brake, Beulah Dikean ROCKY MOUNT, NORTH CAROLINA Bundy, Maude AMphian r. AIRY, NORTH CAROLINA Burchette, Mavis Dikean WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA Burns, Mary D. Cornelian WADESBORO, NORTH CAROLINA OTL Wk ■ mmnmmmim mm aQ Junior Class Earle, Alva Dikean NORTH CAROLINA Elliott, Alice Dikean RICH SQUARE, NORTH CAROLINA Ervin, Vera CATAWBA, NORTH CAROLINA Fulton, Elizabeth Adelphian WALNUT COVE, NORTH CAROLINA Gaston, Katherine BELMONT, NORTH CAROLINA Cornelian Goodman, Mavis Dikean LENOIR, NORTH CAROLINA ' ■ Tu- " — n MXXfMW . m miMmmmMMMMMM t Junior Class Goodwin, Miriam Dikean MORCANTON, NORTH CAROLINA Gray, Eugenia Dikean CARV, NORTH CAROLINA Harper, Elma Dikean TRENTON, NORTH CAROLINA Harper, Sara Dikean RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA Harper, Thelma Cornelian ROCKY MOUNT, NORTH CAROLS Harris, Virginia Aielphian ENFIELD, NORTH CAROLINA -HH ' MWiWW ' lil 1 - Junior Class Harrison, Sara Cornelian ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA Hawkins, Thelma Dikean DOVER, NORTH CAROLINA Hill, Eleanor Dikean KINSTON, NORTH CAROLINA Hodges, Eva Adelphian GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA Holleman, Dare Dikean CARY, NORTH CAROLINA Hudnell, Helene Adelphian •JEW BERN, NORTH CAROLINA jtiAUiU IDLES •.••• :•.••:•.•:•:•»•.•:••:••.••: •.•.•:•;•:•:•:•:•:•:•; .•; Junior Class Locke, Lucy Dikean HICKORY, NORTH CAROLINA Lupton, Mildred Cornelian EELHAVEN, NORTH CAROLINA Mann, Eunice AJelphian LAKE LANDINC, NORTH CAROLINA Matheson, Mollie Adelphian MOUNT C1LEAD. NORTH CAROLINA Maynard, Bynum Dikean BURLINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA Mitchell, Alma Cornelian WAKE FOREST, NORTH CAROLINA minnuiiiii i i Junior Class Presson, Sarah Cornelian MONROE. NORTH CAROLINA Redwine, Jessie Dikean SALISBURY, NORTH CAROLINA Reynolds, Anne Thorpe DUfean NORTH CAROLINA Rhyne, Maude Cor nelian BESSEMER CITY, NORTH CAROLINA Robinson, Elizabeth Dikean CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA RODWELL, SALLIE Cornelian MACON, NORTH CAROLINA e lillllliUlltlllllHIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIItilllllllllllllllllUIINIIHIIIIffi: WiftiiiffiMfiMMMMiMiMiHin iTii Junior Class SOSSAMON, SYRETHA Adelphian HENDERSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA Stone, Grace Adelphian GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA Stout, Agnes Cornelian BURLINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA Taylor, Pearle Adelphian WILKESBORO, NORTH CAROLINA Terrell, Virginia Adelphian RA ' -EICH, NORTH CAROLINA Thigpen, Elizabeth Adelphian TARBORO, NORTH CAROLINA Iillillllil ' ' |l|||||||lllllllllll||[ " .. . .. Junior Class Thompson, Alberta Dikean MEBANE, NORTH Van Poole, Ruth Dikean SALISBURY, NCRTH CAROLINA Watson, Frances AJelphian GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA White. Mary AJelphian WHITAKERS, NORTH CAROUNA Whitley, Lizzie Cornelian ENFIELD, NORTH CAROLINA Williams, Cliffie Cornelian WISE, NORTH Junior Clas Williams, Margaret Dikcan NORTH CAROLINA Williams, Stella Adelphian FLETCHER, NORTH CAiiOLINA Willis, Leah Cornelian 1NSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA Wilson, Florrie Cornelian LENOIR, NORTH CAROLINA Wood, Virginia Cornelian RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA Smith, Gertrude GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA .m-yyn. a-aaawwfesm iHE KEEPlEs IJlflMlll l fllMlfldlMlflii i Mlilif i il i f i f i ii i r i ilifiMi JUNIOR BIRDS ,t ♦ ' -t %■ ,■«» " ,«. ; a; -p.. — « .- @ m iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiifiiiiiTirfinninfiM s UHi Up- Our Junior If she had the brains of Vi, Iola Parker ' s eyes. The hair of Sara Harper. Mary Trundle ' s size. The voice of Mollie MatSeson, Mavis Goodman ' s grace, The ability of Mary Peacock To keep the juniors at a pace, The sincerity of Virginia Harri Stella Williams ' pep, The charm of Mildred Lupton, Matilda Lallimore ' s rep. Doiothy Clements ' talent. The knowledge of Mary Sue The dimples of Frances Waison- She ' d be the junior of our dr vvllJMJj r iiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHii UlilllDLEs A. C. HALL. JR. Class Mascot Sophomore Class Song A ll hail to Four and Twenty, The Lavender and White All hail our royal banner. Twill ever lead us right You lead us ever forward. As to our goal we press, And we will ever labor Our deep faith to express We pledge our love, our hono Our loyally most true, O class that (ills our vision. As now we sing to you. Chorus With love and honor leader. We pledge anew each day The loyalty we owe you For ever and for aye. We ' ll always, now ar Sing, Twenty- four, Proclaiming joyfully Our honor, loyalty d ever, to thee. »-»»T»:» ' ««oi»:tt»r»:»:»:»».»r«»: .».« m W MK n% ft- }M Class Officers FALL SPRING Mary Collins Powell President Helon Murchison Luzon Wiley yice-PresiJenl Alice Harrold Mary Ross Secretary Helen Reid Elizabeth Brooks Treasurer Ethel Royal Cleo Mitchell Critic Mary Grier lllliiPillliifllWWW .AklilMl irtHEiiDLEs n Sophomore Class, 1921-1922 Alderman, Madge Alexander, Marguerite Alford, Ruth Allen, Leata Anderson, Helen ashworth, adeline Banks, Addie R. Barnette, Lois Beam, Velm Bell, Edna BiGGS, RURIA Blakeney, Margaret Boyette, Florence Brannock, Mary Brittain, Carrie I,. Brooks, Elizabeth Bruton, Ellen Bryan, Thelma Caldwell, Edith Campbell, Ruth Canter, Sara Cardwell, Ida Cole, Rena Collier, Elizabeth Cordle, Ruth Creasman, Blanche Crowder, Inez Dallas, Ruby Dancy, Carrie Davis, Mary Elizabeth Dellinger, Irene Disosway, Kathryn Dixon, Dorothy Durham, Gertrui.f Fcrd, Ros Frye, Marita Gobbel, Mary Grantham, Gracf Green, Mary Greene, Maggie Bellf Grier, Mary F ' alls Grigcs, Sara Members Hamilton, Martha Hamilton, Sarah Hamrick, Evelyn Harrelson, Annie Harris, Rachel Harrold, Alice Hawkins, Pauline Hedgepeth, Bessie Heilic, Sara Virginia Henley, Blanche Hockaday, Kathryn Hodges, Beulah holbrook, beatrice Hollister, Katherine Holloman, Susie Hornaday, Annie Hudnell, Blossom Hutaff, Mildred John, Marcaret Jonas, Celeste Jones, Ellen Elizabeth Jones, Frances Jones, Nelle Irene Kasehagen, Lucile Kimel, Montie Kirk, Annje M. Ladd. Vora May Leach, Eva Clay LeRoy, Ina Mae Lindley, Edith McKfnzie, Beulah McKinnon, Katherine McRorie, Bertha Marston, Emma Martin, Margaret Mendenhall, Evelyn Mfnzies. Jane Mitchell, Clfo Moody, Esther Moore, Grizelle Morrow, Nell Louise Murchison. Helon Naylor, Elizabeth Norwood, Rebecca Powell, Lavinia Powell, Mary Collins Reid, Helen Roberts, Susie Robertson, Josephine Ross, Julia Ellen Ross, Mary Royal, Ethel Ruscoe, Gkady Sadler, Irma Sams, Willie Mae Sanders, Maie Scarborough, Rachel Sherwood, Louisa Simms, Gladys Simkins, Elizabeth Sink, Jewell Smith, Linda Smith, Virginia Stalvey, Daisy Stough, Feriba Sumner, Jewell Taylor, Maxine Templeton, Lorene Thurston, Jessie Wallace, Hester Warren, Sarah Waters, Irene Webb, Elizabeth Webb, Olive White, Margaret White, Sarah Wiley, Luzon Wilkerson, Carrie Lee Wilkins, Ruth Williams, Frances Williams, Louise Windley, Kathleen Woodley, Walker Woody, Loula Yates. Annie Lee UiHimTTIIIl ' niiliiiilliliilliiilhiillllili i iiii ii n r mmmmwrnB om rtHRIilDUs rtWEWMt I lllllllllllll llll ll l l l ll llllllllll l lllll l lll lll ll ll lllll l l 1 1 iHEHEEDU fe FRE hflEri -111 iflLES liiMiilMMiliiBf mmiinninniTHirfiri 33 Class Mono: " Onwa EMMA SHARPE AVERY Mascot Class Flower: Ragged Robin Blue and White Class Song Hear us, ye people, while we sing; Our hearts may they be true As we proclaim our love to thee, O Class of White and Blue! We each will ever think of thee. As onward we shall strive; May we always lo e thee as now, O dear old Twenty-five!. Chorus: While onward we are going, Helped ever by thy hand. May thoughts of thee Help us to be A blessing to our land. We owe to thee, O While and Blue, Much more than words express, And never can we show i Or faith, which thou hast ble Then to our Alma Mater dear, Who helps us as we strive. We ' ll give to her our loyalty, O Class of Twenty-five! AXUIIitt. 1.1 fijiWMiMlfillliPitiMiMiiMMMililiifl w pRE5nnm J ' AtyfcATt E Class Officers FALL SPRING Ruth Wilson President Rosalynd Nix Elizabeth Duffy Vice-Presidem Julia Frank Mary Belo Moore Secretary Elsie Warren Katherine Bell Treasurer Nannie Earle Mary Elizabeth Morris Critic Eleanor Daniels xmxm ►:•:•;«•;•:•:• ■»» r«: :c _4«l MBLEs -Z lx " WYxTxTf ffl r lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll! liii Freshman Class, 1921- -1922 Members Adkins, Belva Brandis, Frances Cranford, Elizabeth Albertson, Vera Braswell, Helen Crew, Ethel Aleright, Lesta Brawley, Frances Crews, Frances Alexander, Adele Brewer, Mattie Grace Crosby, Mary Helena Alexander, Elizabeth Bridcers, Margaret Culbertson, Jean Alexander, Harriett Brigcs, Thelma Daniels, Eleanor Mae Allen, Dorothy Sloan Brinson, Virca Davis, Beatrice Allen, Els ' e Broadwell, Theresa Davis, Dorothy Anderson, Clara Breck, Yetta Davis, Iva Andrews, Malissa Brown, Charline Davis, Merle Anthony, Margaret Brown, Jessie Harper Davis, Ruby Armfield, Eleanor Buie, Ann;e Belle Davis, Virginia Armstrong, Vircinia Buie, Katherine Deans. Edwina Arrasmith, Carolin-e Burras, Elizabeth Deaton, Martha Ashlin, Vircinia Burt, Mary Lois Denning, Mary Aycock, Claude Burton, Alice Dickinson, Bertha Aycock, Estelle Calvert, Margaret Dill, Jane Aycock, Lei.a Cameron, Rebecca DlMMETTE, EULA Ayers, Marie Campbell, Gladys Dixon, Joy Baggett, Miriam Campbell, Willis Doby, Lillian Bailey, Mary Canter, Sue Dodson, Nellie Baity, Clara Carpenter, Lillian Donnell, Rachel Banks, Nannie Carr, Morgia Bell Dosier, Winifred Banner, Love Carter, Virginia Doxey, Mildred Barnes, Josie Castelloe, Bonnie Duffy, Elizabeth Barwick, Winifred Cates. Alma K. Dulinc, Elizabeth Baughn, Esther Caudle, Lola Dulinc, Mabel Beacham, Lucy Caviness, Madge Dunn, Dollie Bear, Caroline Chears, Mary Grady Dunn, Frances Bell, Margaret Clark, Josephine Durham, Cornelia Bell, Katherine C. Clarke, Elizabeth Earle, Nannie —- Benbow, Willow May Clayton, Alene Eatmon, Bettie Berrier, Claudia Clayton, Helen Edwards, Jessie Bess, Luna Mae Clegg, Octavia Ellis, Sue White Bicham, Edna Clement. Mary Neal Ervin, Eunice Birdsonc. Marcaret Clodfelter. Bess Erwin, Harriet Black, Antha Cobb. Mary H. Ethericge, Elizabeth Blalock, Ruth Coffey. Frances Eubank, Madalene BODDIE, LELA Cole, Claytie Evans, Marguerite BONEY, ALLIE I llLL Conner, Mary Nell Everett, Edith Booth, Carolyn Cordle, Rachel Farber. Louise Bcswood, Hilda Coulter, Margaret Feimster. Margaret Bowles. Sadie Cox, Emily Fetzer, Dorothy Boyd, Lena Cox, Grace Fleming, Beulah Bradsher, Bessie Mary Craig, Jean Fleming, Esther £ MNgKiEDLEs Flythe, Nellie Ford, Edna B. Foscue, Clara Foster, Lois Fox, Nellie Franch, Julia French, Anna Fry, Hazel Gareissen, Marietta Garrett, Vircia Gatling. Clarine George, Beatrice Gibson, Janie Giles, Margaret Glenn, Mabel Goodwin, Mary E. Goodwin, Maude Gordon, Christine Gordon, Stella Graham, Mae Inez Greene, Erma Griffin, Helen Griffin, Vivian Grimsley, Rachaei Groves, Ida Gryder, Vona Hacins. Orathaniei Hall, Laura Hardin, Verdie Hargett, Susie Hargrove, Mollie Harkey, Katherine Harris, Goldie Harris, Mack Harvey, Edna P. Harvey, Helen Harwood, Lola Hatch, Ruth Hathaway, Elizabeth Hauck, Mary Catherine Haynes, Ethel Hayward, Ida Vivian Helms, Mary Frances Hendren, Dorcas Herrinc, Irma Hester, Lucile Hight, Catherine Hicht, Marcaret Hill, Randolph Hogan, Mary Holdford, Mabel Holland, Mary Hollifield, Emily Holt, Irene Holmes, Alethia honeyc ' jtt, ediih Hoover, Edith Hoover, Edna House, Virginia Howard, Esther Howell, Claire Hoyle, Frances Hudson, Annie Laurie Hughes, Hazel HUNSUCKER, MllDRED Hunt, Alice Hunt, Sara Hunter, Bessie Hunter. Clyde Hyder, Kate ackson, faustine ackson, Mozelle ackson, thelma acobs, Martha acocks, Mary ennincs, Emily ohnson, Elizabeth ohnson, Ethel ohnson. Faith ohnson. Inez ohnson, Viola ones, Annie Gertrude ones, Louise ones, Louise E. ones, Nelle Blair ulian, Gladys ulian, Lottie ustice. Julia ustice, Lois Kale, Clara Keith, Mary Frances Kelly, Lorena Kernodle, Alene Kerr, Esther Keziah, Essie Kilpatrick, Ruby Kornegay, Eleanor Kornecay, Mabel Lackey, Mary Lambeth. Caroline Lamm. Gladys Land, Mildred Laney, Lois Lancston, Ulma Latham, Mary Lee, Annie Elliott Lee, Elizabeth Leigh, Mary Lessem, Charlotte Lewis, Marjorie Litaker, Margaret Lively, Emma Livingston, Martly Loetsch, Antoinette Lonc, Naomi Lonc, Mattie Lone, Maurine Love. Sarah Lowe, Grace Lucas, Thelma McCutcheon. Kathleen McDonald. Harriet McEachern, Lina McEwen, Rachel McFadyen, Mary McFadyen. Miriam McKenzie, Deneale McKenzie, Margaret F. McLain, Maggie McLamb, Ethel McLawhorn, Ruth McLelland, Ola C. McNairy, Mary McSwain. Nellie Mabry, Lucy Mason, Mildred Mason, Ruth Mason, Sarah Mast. Johnsie Matthews, Velma Meacham, Hilda Meacham, Julia Meadows, Serena Mfde ris. Marc ret Mendenhall, Estelle Meredith, Lucile Miller. Mary Lee Miller. Mary Ruth Minor, Elizabeth Mitchell, Sudie Monk, Clare Monroe. Kate Moore, Cornelia Rose Moore. Lillian Moore. Mary Belo MOOREFTELD, EsslE aV.IWJ 1 Morgan, Kate Morris, Mary Elizabeth Munson, Louise Munyan, Ida C. Murphy, Mary Murray, Alma Murrell, Marjorie Nash, Ellen Elizabeth Nicholson, Irene Nix, Rosalind Noble, Edith Noble, Vendetta Northro p, Fannie O ' Neill, Dorothy Overton, Fidelia Owen, Ella Earle Owen, Mozelle Parham, Ruth Parrish, Julia Parrott, Elizabeth Parrott, Lisbeth Patton, Ida Iva Patton, May Musetta Pearce, Mary Frances Pecc, Carrie Opal Pegram, Mary Pendergraft, Mae Perkins, Nannie Phillips, Julia Piatt, Marion PlCKLESIMER, LaVINIA PlTTARD, HeTTIE Pollock, Carolyn Pope, Evelyn Potts, Elizabeth Powell, Josephine Price, Margaret Pridcen, Rosabel Pritchard, Margaret Procter, Mamie Ramsey, Pearl Rankin, Lois Ray, Evelyn Redfearn, Lena Reed, Grace Evelyn Reeks, Acnes Rhyne, Camilla Richert, Margaret Rives, Annie Lynn Roberson, Susie Wall Roberts, Louise Roberts, Margaret Roberts, Pauline Robertson, Margaret Robinette, Willie Robinson, Mary Rodwell, Josie Rocers, Paulette Rothrock, Elizabeth RUFFIN. THELMA Russell, Laura Sams, Pearl Saunders, Myrtle Sawyer, Eva Seals, Katie Belle Seawell, Neill Secrest, Willie Sharp, Anna Lois Shaw, Frances Shearin, Lillie Shepard, Gertrude Shepherd, Hazel Lucile Shiflet, Cleda Shipp, Annie Simmons, Nell Simpson, Hazel Skinner, [Catherine Slate, Irene Smith, Isabel Smith, Mattie Odell Sparger, Eloise Speas, Margaret Speicht, May Springs, Mae Squires, Margaret Steelman, Ruby Stewart, Nellie Stone, Mary Lenore Stout, Ava Strickland, Mary E. Swann, Mary Swicegood, Ruth Taylor, Alice Taylor, Beula Taylor, Mabel Taylor, Mary Rebecca Taylor, Mildred Thicpen, Lorna Thompson, Thelma Thornton, Lena Thornton, Margaret Thornton, Winnie Mae Throneberg, Florence Tiernan, Adelaide Tilley, Joyce Trudle, Florence Turner, Helen Turner, Helen Turner, Leta May Turner, Thelma Uzzell, Helen Venters, Lottie Wade, Georcia Wagner, Blanche Wakefield, Della Walker, Lucile Walton, Katherine Ward, Mycleta Warren, Charlotte Warren, Elsie Watson, Anna Way, Bennie Waynick, Alice Wedcincton, Emily Weeks, Celestia Welch, Grace Welch, Ona Marie West, Marcaret Whitaker, Susan White, Annie White. Cora White, Edna Falls White, Fannie White, Pauline Whiteley, Katie Wiley, Sara Wilkerson. Nellie Williams, Eunice Williams, Marion Williams, Mary Williams, Pearl Wilson, Kate Wilson, Ruth Wilson, Sybil Woosley, Thelma Wooten. Rachel Wray, Kittie Lee Yancey, Julia Yarborouch, Thelma Younce, Louise Zoeller, Dorothy ' OFKiTTTnTT llllli l l l lll l lllll l l ll lll ll l l l i llllllll ll l lllll •:«•:• »w cn»u%Kn» I ' vyyvwYVft-rr -rr " (TCmTSTlOTO " 77 iHflfflfiffifirti )m iiHf lit If f 1 1 rrmTT iffliiMtf ifi irrif PiWt HEEDlEs gfl rtlEjflJBtE am HAIL NEWCOIVjERsl £ AW ' Pl,v„, .-all l„ -,-r me lo-lav at your I ' ' - ' •■ ■ P«iod. 1 msh to see you .Juuus 1. Foist, President. ■t ' c B Lllw B IhW . Am — " ' " ; Ik " ' " ■■ ' ' fl yiSiill THE ROUND OF FRESHMAN LIFE l!l!!ilM!li[Miiiil!ill!illll!l|i|[i|)l!ll ! ii|lil!: ' ; ' ;il[!il:!l b t»:«i» ' «:»:»:c»:«tc«»:«t»:»:»:»:c«:«:»:»:w-?, j Adams, Elizabeth S. Andrew. Grace Archbell, Sarah Bagley, Eva Battle, Nancy Batts, Josephine Belle, Ada Mae Bell, Nita Kathleen Benfield, Stella May Boyd, Alice Brooks, Martha Brooks, Roberta Bundy, Louise Ithamak Carter, Blanche Cashion, Grace Crisco, Edith Clendenin, Frances Cochron, Mary Fay Collins, Lois Cox, Venetia Craig, Henrietta Cummings, Annie Dark, Margaret Dawson, Pauline Doll. Mary Special Class Members Dorton, Eugenia El lwell, Nellie Ferebee, Reba Fieles, Annie Louse Fountain, Claribel Gattis, Marcaret Gaylord, Ella Goldstein, Helen Grimes, Mabel FIarrincton, Eunice Harrison, Elizabeth Henry, Jennie Mae Johnson, Ella Louise Jordon, Pauline Keel, Dula Land, Jennie Latham, Vivian Louise Linville, Louise Loflin, Mary Love, Nell LoWDERMILK, EtHEI Lowe, Elizabeth Martin. Allie Mathews, Mary Miller, Minnie Miller. Rachael Monk, Margaret Moore, Mary Leona Moore. Mildred C. Neely, Doris Patton, Mary W. Peacock, Mary E. Peeler. Pearle Perkins, Maude Petway, Clara Phillips, Helen Phillips, Mabei. Phillips, Mary Raney, Carey B. Rankin, Alice Rankin, Elizabeth Rudd, Annie Shaw, Mrs. C. B. Shields, Leta Simmons. Leola Simpson, Selma Rose Sinclair. Annie Mae Smith, Mary Sossamon, Elizabeth Stowe. Della Strupe, Grace Teal, Pearle Thomas, Frances Twitty, Martha Walton. Virginia Weaver, Gladys White, Dorothy Whitmore, Myrtle Whittington. Effie Wilderson, Ollivette Williams, Mrs. Edith C. Williams. Gladys Younts, Mary Annis ■ ' : , ' : ; ; . ; 1 1 , i I ; r I i , m ■ i I M ■ : i I ! i ' 1 1 , ; ' I i i 1 i 1 1 ' ' , : i . ' ; ,■ I ; ; ' . ' .■ ' 1 1 ; ;- ! I 1 " I ; ' I : ■ 1 1 ■ ' ; , ■ ■ ' •:-• " •:• :•:• " •:•:•:•:••:•:•:•:•:•:•:•:» - : •■•■•-•.■ rt« i§Dlts AiUJiJ; «•»»»»»:•»»»:•:•»»:•:•:•:•:•]•:•»»:•:«• :• •: :•:•:•:• mim M HH HE HESHHaillSHSSHSSHSBHSSSH BaBEHSaBBSSBHEHHSBSHES HH BB imiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiii MARIE BONITZ President of Student Government Association ]mmmmmmmm mmm i " mxm. vMUJi j EH rtMfililDlE! iiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimniiii!!i!iiinmmi[i BRANSON PRICE Speaker of the House i WiiiWIiWi IIJJJj 1 wUllii |llllllllllllllllllllli)Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii[iiiiiii[iiiimiiiiiiimiiiH Miss Lena Kemodle, of the Class of 1921, who is now alumnae adviser to the Southern Student Government Association and chairman of the committee on Student Government extension in the high schools and junior colleges of the South. Miss Kernodle represented the Southern Association at the Northern conference held at Simmons College, Boston, Mass., in the fall of 1921, and gave a splendid report of this meeting at the Southern conference held at Sophie Newcomb College, New Orleans, La., in April, 1922. ■HHfHEEDlE snzm x ' Uiit t rnm mmmmmmm El rtHfelllDlt IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllll mmu iHEHEEDLEs To Blue Ridge From the land of the sky. Where the world is high. And each peak wears its night-cap cloud; Where the dead old day Has been laid away With a moonlit sky for a shroud; Where the balsam air Works a cure that ' s rare, And the crisp of the wind is health; Where the heaven ' s own blue Makes a saint of you. And the sunset ' s gold is your wealth; Where the dew is damp On your shivering camp. Where the ferns and mosses are pearled; From the land of the sky. Where the hills ride high, I salute — from the top of (he world. E. McNeil Poteat, Jr. illlllHlillllllllllllnlllllllllillllillllllllllllllllllHIIllllllllllllllllll w PI Tke 1921 Delegates To the Student Y. W. C. A. Conference, Blue Ridge Mabel Stamper, Delegation Leader Helene Hudnell Helen Anderson Sarah Virginia Heilic Matilda Lattimore Augusta Sapp Omah Williams Clara Craven Joscelyn McDowell Ruth Teachey Hester Wallace Florine Davenporte Susie West Mildred Hutaff Josephine Piatt Mildred Burch Rosalie Wells Thettis Smith Dorothy Clement Emeline Goforth Sara Harper 1 I PlHEHEEDLE: joscelyn Mcdowell Undergraduate Field Representative of the Y. W. C. A. of the following colleges: Farmville Nor- mal, Radford Normal, WLlliam and Mary College. Harrisonburg Normal. Georgia Normal and Indus- trial College, Eastern Carolina Teachers ' Training School. Wesleyan (Georgia), The North Carolina College for Women. Representative to the National Convention of the Y. W. C. A., Hot Springs, Arkansas, April 20-27. Illllh xtia Literary Societies DELPHIA, Cornelia, and Dike! Surely they are the recip- ients of unending love, loyalty and praise from every student of the college. Truly, Adelphian, Cornelian, and Dikean represent to every North Carolina College girl all that is best, the truest and most inspiring in college life. In her own society the student finds her ideal. She real- izes that in it is the best way of expressing her intellectuality, her prin- ciples, and her joy in service. And service is the goal towards which the three societies strive. They attempt, through a detailed organization and a definite plan of work, to be of service to the college and the state. •rtfcc :«K(K»:»:»»«:««»:»:c«».c»;».«:»A».»A»j» «. ■Of - arnnu, mxm rtHE NEEDLE ••:•:•:«:« Adelphian Society Song Shoulder lo shoulder, hearts filled with devotion, With purpose not aimless, but earnest and true; United by all of the lies of deep friendship. We bring, O Adelphia, our homage to you. We pledge to you loyally, long and unending. Loyalty, which will be firm, will be sure; Devotion, we pledge you, which never shall perish, And love, which through all coming lime will endure. With courage undaunted, we ' ll march ever onward. Up heights lo be won. along paths strange and new ; But, now and forever, one great band of sisters. We " 11 be, O Adelphia, still loyal to you. The Adelpkian Literary Society Albertson. Vera Albright, Grace Albright, Lester Allen, Leta Anderson, Clara Alderman, Madge ASHLIN, VlRClNlA ashworth, avel1ne Ayers, Marie Ayers, Vera Bagcett, Miriam Baily, Mary Barwick, Rachael Batchelcr, Carey Bell. [Catherine Bell, Lila Bell, Margaret Bell, Nita 3ess, Luna Mae Biccs, Ruria 3lakney, Margaret Members Blalock, Ruth Blanchard, Gimmie Boddie, Lela Boswood, Hilda Boyd, Alice Bradsher, Bessie Brannock. Mary Bridgers, Margaret Bridges, Annie Brite. Mattie Brock. Yetta Brooks, Margaret Brooks, Roberta Bruton, Ellen Bundy. Maude Burras, Elizabeth Burton, Alice Calvert, Margaret Caldwell, Collina Caldwell, Edith Campbell, Gladys Campbell, Ruih Cannady, Sarah Carr, Mary Louise Caudle, Lola Chandley, Helen Chears, Mary Clay, Ruth Clayton, Alene Cobb, Mary Cochron, Fay Collins, Sallie Lee Cordle, Ruth Coulter, Margaret Cowan, Sarah Cox, Grace Cox, Venetia Cranford, Elizabeth Daniels, Eleanor Dark, Marcaret Davis. Dorothy Davis, Iva rtH68HDLEs Davis, Laura Davis, Lillian Davis, Margaret Davis, Merle Davis, Ruby Dickinson, Bertha Dixon. Joy Dodson, Nellie Donnell, Rachael Dorton, Eugenia Dosier, Winifred Durham, Cornelia Durham, Gertrude Earle, Nannie Ervin. Eunice Erwin, Harriet Etheridce, Elizabeth Everette, Edith Farber, Louise Feimster. Margaret Folger, Nell Foscue, Clara Foster, Lois Franck, Julia Fulton, Elizabeth Gareissen, Marietta Gatlin, Clarine Gattis, Marg ret Gaylord, Ella George, Beatrice Glenn, Mabel Gcld, Ollie Mae Goldstein, H elen Gordon, Christine Gordon, Stella Grantham, Grace Graves, Ida Green, Maggie Bell Hall, Laura Harkey, Catherine Harris, Mack Harris, Rachael Harris, Virginia Haywood, Ida Herrinc, Ida Hester, Lucile Heilic, Sarah Vircinia Hockaday, Catherine Hodges. Beulah Hodges, Eva Holt, Irene Hotch, Ruth House, Virginia hudnell, helene Huches, Hazel Hunsuckle, Mildred Hutaff, Mildred Ivey, Rachael Jackson, Faustine Jacocks, Mary H. Jacobs, Martha Jenkins, Josephine Jones, Louise E. John, Margaret Johnson, Elizabeth Johnson, Faith Kale, Clara Kanipe, Millie Kearnes, Ethel KeLLEY, LORENA Keziah, Essie May Kirkman, Florence King, Rena Kohn, Ruth Kornecay, Ruth Land, Jennie Lee, Annie Elliot Lee, Elizabeth Leak, Gypsie Leigh, Mary Lewis, Marjorie Lesson, Charlotte Linville, Louise Livingston, Myrtle Long, Ella Lonc, Mattie Long, Maurine Mann, Eunice Massmore, Anne Mason, Sara Matheson, Mollie Mathews. Velma Martin. Allie Mast, Johnsie Meacham, Julia Medearis, Margaret McArn, May McKenzie, Beulah McSwain, Nellie McFadyen, Nellie McCracken, El McEwen, Rachael McDowell, Joscelyn McKinnon, Katherine Meredith, Lucile Miller, Mary T. Miller, Mary Lee Mitchell, Kate Mitchell, Annie Moore, Grizelle Moore, Ida Bell Moore, Mary Belo Moore, Mary Leona Monroe, Kate Murchison, Helen Murphy, Rebecca Mulder, Alleen Nash, Ellen Neelley, Doris Norwood, Rebecca Owen, Blanche Parrot, Elizabeth Patton, Mae Patton. Ida Pegram, Mary Peller, Della Pendegraft, Mae Perkins, Maude Perkins, Nannie Perkins, Irene Phillips, Mary Phillips, Mabel Piatt, Marion PlCKLESIMER, LaVINIA Pollock, Carolyn Powell, Helen Pridgen, Rosabel Pritchard, Margaret Proctor, Nannie Reid, Evelyn Reid. Helen- Rhodes, Sudie Roberts, Pauline Robertson, Josephine Robertson, Susie Wall Roddick, Jean Rodwell, Josie m Y m •»»:»» «:« »:«T» :».»; ©:•: : • o ;»:»;o:»»w«:«:M:t] l IHIHIIIIlllililllHi - Sadler, Irma Sams, Willie Mae Sanders, Mae Sawyer, Eva Scarboro, Rachael Setzer, Josephine Shearin, Lillie Shields, Mary L. Shepard, Gertrude Sincleton, Frances Sitison, Mae Sink, Jewell Skinner, Katherine Smith, Isabelle Smith, Mary Southerland, Julia SOSSOMAN, SyRETHA Sossoman, Elizabeth Squires, Marcarlt Stone, Grace Stout, Ava Stouch, Feriba Stowe, Della Stewart, Nellie Swicecood, Ruth T. Taylor, Mildred Taylor, Pearl Teal, Pearl Templeton, Lorraine Terrell, Virginia Thigpen, Elizabeth Thicpen. Lorna Thomas Thomas, Eva Thompson, Thelma Thurston, Jessie Trundle, Mary Turnace, Athlene Turner, Leta Mae Twitty, Martha Uzzell, Mildred Uzzell, Helen Warren, El ie Watson, Frances Weaver, Elizabeth Weaver, Mary- Weaver, Gladys Weddington, Emily Weeks, Agnes Welch, Ona Marie West, Susie Whitener, Zilda A. White, Annie White, Mary E. Wiley, Luzon Williams, Mrs. E. C. Williams, Stella Williams, Mary- Wilson, Sybil Dean Williams, Louise Winstead, Florence Wilkerson, Annie Roy Woody. Loula Wray, Kittie Honorary Members Albr:ght, Mrs. Myra Archer, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Barney. Dr. and Mrs. W. S. Beam, Miss Annie Beall. Dr. and Mrs. W. P. Bernau, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Boyd, Mrs. Estelle Buckner, Miss Harriet Coit, Miss Laura H. Connor, Mr. R. D W. Cummincs, Miss Annie Eluot, Miss Harriett Emery, Miss Irene Gudger. Dr. E. W. Gullander, Mrss Magnhlde Givler, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Hacerty, Mss Kathryn Highsmith, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Holl. Dr. and Mrs. R. C. Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Jamison, Miss Minnie King, Miss Emma Leaman, Miss Olca Lenfest, Miss Beulah Lesslie, Miss Louie Lindeman, Mr. and Mrs. E. C. McDonald. Miss Lois McIver, Mrs. Lula Martin McMullen, Miss Carolyn Mendenhall, Miss Gertrude Minor, Miss Alleine Merrill, Mr. G. March Racsdale, Miss Virginia Rutledge. Miss Sallie Rogers, Miss Vivian Seymore, Miss Mary Frances Scott-Hunter, Mr. and Mrs. Georce Spier, Miss Etta Stowell, Miss Grace Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Tennent. Miss Mary Thornton. Mr. R. H. Weatherspoon, Mrs. Lizzie M. Womble. Miss Frances Wills, Mr. Norman Young, Miss Elizabeth MMEMEIOU mHEHEEDU vvllJU j rttBllBLEs Cornelian Society Song In joy and praise ccme lei us sin With anthem clear and strong; Let all Cornelian voices ring In free, exultant song Of pride for that fa : r name we b To make us gladly do and dare. Whene ' er ' tis thought, whene ' e tis he We ' ll onward. upwar d ever mov Our footsteps forw rdpre sed. Together move in sis er love Unto the mot ntain ' crest To gain the fa e-spreading Which round the n lountair lies And give us un dersta iding n ew— Enlighten our eage eyes. May Cornelia ' s name have ne ' er a stain From any a daughter ' s deed. For her all glory will be given. And give her honor ' s need ; For firm and staunch we e ' er will stand Unlo each other true. And loyal to our noble band. Hers, yea, her own, our whole lives through. The Cornelian Literary Society Members Adams, Elizabeth Alexander, Marguerite Alexander, Elizabeth Alexander, Harriet Alford, Ruth Allen, Dorothy Andrews, Grace ARChBELL, Sara Armstrong, Virginia Arrasmith, Carolyn Aycock, Lela Aycock, Glennie Baity, Clara Banner, Love Barwick, Winifred Battle, Nancy Baxley, Jessie Beam, Velma Beachman, Lucy Becell, Margaret Bender, Mary Louise Benbow, Willow Way Birdsonc, Margaret Blair. Marcaret Booth, Carolyn Braswell, Lula Brinson, Verda Briccs, Lois Broadwell, Theresa Bryan, Thelma Bundy, Ithamar Burns, Mary Buie, Annie Bell Caldwell, Martke Calvert, Martha Calvert, Elizabeth Cameron, Rebecca Canter, Sue Card wel l, Ida Carpenter, Lillian Carpenter, Mabel Carter, Blanche Cashion, Grace Castilloe, Vonnie Caviness, Macce Clegc, Lucille Coffey, Frances Cole. Claytie Coleman, Elsie Collier, Elizabeth Conner, Mary Nell Conner, Mary cordell, rachael Craig, Nell mmui 1 iXmXYXyYYmYXYY PM EUffULES T ' W 1 3J iMlTllinllllTfflfimillliylOlll lliniilfllilfl lllllllllllllllllllllllll 1 III LL l v. Criscoe, Edith Harper, Thelma Loetsch, Antoinette Dancey, Carrie Hanck, Mary Land, MiLlred Dauchtry, Minnie Hathaway, Elizabeth Leach, Eva Clay - Davenport, Marie 1 Iarwood, Lula Lively, Emma Davidson, Pauline Harris, Marcaret Love, Sara Davis, Beatrice Davis, Crystal Harrison, Sara Harcett, Susie Love, Elizabeth Lackey, Mary Deaton, Martha Neal Dellincer, Irene Hacins, Orathaniel Haynes, Ethel Latham, Mary Loflin, Mary Dillon, Beatrice Height, Catherine Lowe, Grace DlMMETTE, BEULAH Height, Marcaret Lupton, Mildred Disosway, Catherine Doby, Eliza Hedgepeth. Bessie Henry, Jennie May Martin, Marcaret Mabrey, Lucy - Doll, Mary Hill, Ruby Mason, Lucille Deans, Edwina Hill, Randolph Mason, Mildred Drew, Bertha Holmes, Alethia Mendenhall, Estelle Dunn, Frances Hocan, Mary Mitchell, Alma Dulinc, Mabel Holden, Esther Moore, Cornelia Dulinc, Elizabeth HOLLOMAN, ClEO Moore, Nancy K. Ervin, Vera Eubanks, Madeline Hunt, Alice Hunt, Sara Moore, Pauline Moore, Mildred Fetzer, Dorothy Hunter, Daisy Morcan, Martha Fields, Annie Louise Hunter, Bessie Munson, Louise Fleetwood, Hannah Mae FIumber, Ruth Munyan, Ida Ford, Edna Hudnell, Blossom MURPHEY, SUDIE - - Foster, Beulah Foster, Julia Ann Hyder, Kate Isley, Mitylene MURCHISON, LoUINE McLain, Magcie Foust, Elizabeth Jennincs, Eula McRowe. Bertha Fountain, Clara Bell Johnson, Bertha McLawhcrn, Ruth Fox, Gertrude Johnson, Ethel McFadyen, Miriam Fox, Nellie Johnston, Viola Noble, Edith French, Anna Johnston, Elouise Nix, Rosalind Fry, Hazel Jonas, Celeste Jones, Ellen E. Nicholson, Frances Oakes, Ruth Gaston, Kathrine Gaston, Martha Le.e Gerrock, Mary Louise Jones, Frances Jones, Louise Overton. Fidelia Owen, Ellen Earle Gibson, Jannie Jones, Annie Gertrude Parkam, Ruth Gilley, Clara Jones, Mary Parker, Bernice Giles, Margaret Jones, Nellie Parker, Iola Graeber. Catherine Julian, Gladys Patterson, Ruth Graham, Maie Inez Kanipe, Bula Parish, Julia Green, Mary Kerr, Esther Peacock, Mary E. Grier, Mary Falls Kirk, Annie Mae Pett.t, Pauline Griffin, FIelen Griffin, Vivian KlRKPATRICK, VELMA Kiser, Almer Piatt, Josephine Pierce, Ophelia Griwes, Mabel KOONTZ, (UANITA Pierce, Edith -- - » Gryder, Vona Hall, Challie Harvey, Irene Koonce, Lila Ward Kilpatrick, Ruby Fearse, Mary Pope, Evelyn Keith, Mary Potts, Elizabeth 171 W liM ' «s iji = Lh— - - %— - .niiiilllllllMI i U " XXXJCX, •jj o:» ' «:«;o:«z«:«:».«;c«»:»:«:c«;or«r«T«T •emit Puch, Hallie Pettway, Clara Phillips, Helen Powell, Lavinia Powell, Mary Coll Presson, Sara Quinerly, Argent Rankin, Lois Rickert, Marguerite Rhyne. Camilla ROBINETTE, V ' lLLlE C. Ruffin, Thelma Roberts, Louise Roberts, Susie rodwell, sallie Rogers, Vera Ross, Julia rotchfield, nell Rudisill, Mabel Royal, Ruby Sapp, Aucusta Seals, Katie Bell Simmons, Nell Simpkins, Elizabeth Shepherd, Hazel Shipp, Anne Shiplet, Cleta Sharpe, Katie Sherwood, Louise Shuford, Pauline Sinclair, Anna Miss Elva E. Barrow Miss Viola Boddie Miss Miriam Bonner Miss Joy Brigcs Miss Clara Booth Byrd Miss Anne Campbell Miss Mary C Coleman Miss Laura I. Cooper Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Forney Miss Ethel R. Gorham Miss Mildred Gould Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Hall Simpson, Hazel Simmons, Ruth Simpson, Selma Rose Smith, Lena Smith, Sara Smith, Linda Sm.th, Thetis Smith, Mattie Odell Sparger, Elouise Speight, May Strupe, Grace Stroud, Annie Sumter, Jewel Stout, Acnes Swann, Mary Taylor, Mary Taylor, Mabel Thornton, Margaret Thornton, Lucille Thornton, Vinnie Thicpen, Martha Thornburc, Florence Trundle, Florence Turner, Helen Uzzel, Elizabeth Venters, Lottie Wallace, Hester Walton, Katherine Walton, Virginia Wade, Georgia Warren, Charlotte Honorary Members Miss Harriet J Miss Alice Koehler Miss Louise Lancaster Miss Grace Lawrence Dr. Eva M. Locke Miss Jessie McLean Miss Cora McNeal Miss Florence Miller Miss Virginia Morrison Miss Mary Taylor Moore Miss R. Murphy Miss Mary M. Petty Mr. and Mrs. Petty Warren, Myrtle Ward, Cleta Watson, Anne West, Marcaret Weaver, Josephine Weaver, Sara White, Sara White, Elizabeth White, Edna White, Dorothy Whitley, Lizzie Whitley, Kate Wilkins, Ruth Williams, Cliffe Williams, Frances Williams, Eunice Williams, Marion Wilkerson, Olivette Willis, Leah Wilson. Florie Wilson, Kate Wimbish, Grace Winston, Madeline Wood, Vircinia Woosley, Thelma Yates, Annie Lee Yarborouch, Josephine Yancey, Julia York, Mary Younce, Louise Younce, Mary Miss Dora Mae Robinson Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Rowe Miss Elizabeth Sampson Miss Marietta Stevenson Miss Ailsie Stevenson Miss Cora Strong Miss Katherine Wricht Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Scales Mr. and Mrs. W. C Smith Mr. and Mrs. E. Sternbercer Miss Gertrude Sousley Miss Alice Vaiden Williams ' C«MK««»»W» W »»W AM W! tJp - rrwmr v . ' iir,v rr PlHfHEEDlt •: . . «j»:«: : :«T «j» : : :«: ;c« : :c : »»:»»w«j«:«:« iiiiiiiiiHiHiiiiiiiiimnujiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii Dikean Society Song Dike, who speaks with reverberant grandeur, Through listening portals of true womanhood. Into thy vastness, we come now entrusting Powers as yet latent with will ' s hope imbued, Glad for the toiling, the common endeavor. Glad for the wideness of ways to be won, To do for the deed ' s sake, still keeping the vision, Trusting secure in the love ' round us thrown. Stamped with the beauty and light of thy image. We would go forth with a creative faith; Builders potential and makers of highway, Easing for others paths they may take, And as the sunset gives place to the sunrise, After us cometh the child of the dawn To fashion the fabric of dreams scarce completed. And serve thee forever. O light, farther on. The Dikean Literary Society Aeernethy, Clarissa Aderholt, Arminta Adkins, Belva Allen, Elsie Allison, Mae Anderson, Helen Angel, Mattie Anthony, Margaret Armfield, Eleanor Armfield, Rachael Armstrong, Mary Ashby, Lucretia Aycock, Claude Banks, Addie Barnette, Lois Barnes, Josie Barnes. Muriel Members Batts, Josephine Baughn, Esther Beam, Mary Sue Bear, Caroline Bell, Addie Mae Benfield, Stella Berryhill, Mary Biggs, Addie Black. Gladys Bonitz, Marie Boyd, Mary Elizabeth Boyd, Irene Boyette, Florence Bradley, Martha Brake, Beulah Brandis, Frances Braswell, Helen Brawley, Clara Brawley, Frances Brewer, Mattie Bricham, Mattie Brittain, Carrie Lou Brooks, Martha Brown, Charune Brown, Jessie Harper Burch. Mildred Burchette. Mavis Burt, Mary Lois Bynum, Ethel Cannady, Agnes Cantrell, Anne Carmon, Fannie Carr. Margie Bell Clark, Azile f Clark, Elizabeth Clayton, Helen Clement, Dorothy Clement, Mary Neal Clendenin, Frances Clodfelter, Bess Cole, Serena Coleman, Annie Royai Craic, Henrietta Craig, Jean Craven, Clara Creasman, Blanche Creasy, Helen Dunn Crews, Frances Crosby, Mary Crowder, Inez Cunningham, Edith Davenport, Florine Davidson, Fannie Davis, Mary Elizabeth Davis, Mabel Davis, Virginia Denim, Mary Dill, Jane Dixon, Dorothy Dobbins, Annie Pearl Doby, Lillian Doxey. Mildred Duffy, Elizabeth Dunn. Dollie Earle, Alma Edwards, Jessie Elliott, Alice Ellis, Sue White Eure, Mabel Evans, Marguerite Ferebee, Reba Finch, Gussie Fleming, Beulah Fleming, Esther Flythe, Nellie Ford, Rosa Forne v , Grace Frye, Marita Certen, Pauline Cobbell, Mary GOFORTH, EmELINE Goodman, Mavis Goodwin. Maude Goodwin, Miriam Goodman, Rachael Gray, Eugenia Green, Erma Griggs, Sarah Wall Grimsley, Rachael Gwaltney, Hazel Hardin, Verdie Harper, Sarah Harper, Elma Hamilton, Martha Hamilton, Sarah Harrelson, Annie Hamrick, Evelyn Hamrick, Georgia Hawkins, Thelma Harcett, Sue Harcrave, Mollie Harris, Marion Harrincton, Eunice Heafner, Connie Heinsberger, Marcaret Henley, Blanche Herring, Alta Hendren, Dorcas Hill, Eleanor Hiccins, Ruth holloman, hulda Holloman, Susie Holloman, Dare Holbrook. Beatrice Hollefield, Emily Hoover, Edith Hoover, Edna Howard, Esther Howell, Claire Hoyle, Frances Hornaday, Annie Humphrey, Marjorie Hunt, Mozelle Hunter, Lucy Jackson, Ruth Jackson, Thelma Jennincs. Emily JlMESON, RENA Jones, Eva Jones, Bessie John, Mary Johnson, Annie Jordan, Malona Justice, Julia Kasehacen, Lucille Keech, Vera Keel, Dula Kernodle, Alene Knight, Pearl Kimel. Montie Koonce, Luella Ladd, Vera Lamm, Gladys Lamberth, Carolyn Landon, Katherine Latham, Vivian Lattimore, Matilda Leach, Helen Ledbetter, Joan Leroy, Ina Mae Lindsay, Edith Lindsay, Elizabeth Locke, Lucy Littaker, Margaret lowdermilk, ethel Love, Nell Mann, Mildred Mason, Ruth Matthews. Mary Maynard, Bynum Meadows, Serena Mendenhall, Evelyn Menzies. Jane Mills. Mary Miller, Rachael Mitchell, Cleo Mizelle. Hazel Moody, Esther Moore, Lillian mocrefield, essie Monk, Margaret Monk, Claire Morris, Mary E. Murry, Margaret McDonald, Harriet McDonald, Mary McKenzie, Margaret McLamb, Ethel McEachern, Lena McNa!ry, Mary Naylor. Elizabeth Noble, Vendetta Norman, Cleta Northup, Fannie O ' Neal. Dorothy Patten, Mary W. Pearson, Louise Pearce, Janie Peacock, Mary T. Parkins, Lucy Pecc, Carrie Opal PlTTARD. HATT1E Powell, Josephine Price, Marcaret Price, Branson Reufern, Lena Redwine, Jessie Reynolds, Anne Thorpe Roberts. Margaret Roberts, Annie Robinson, Elizabeth Rogers, Hazel Rogers, Paulette Rose, Jessie Ross, Mary Rountree, Edith Rudd, Annie Rudisill, Joyce Ruscoe, Grady Russell. Laura Sadler, Maitland Sams, Pearl Seawell, Neill Secrest, Willie Shearer. May Sink. Eva Lee Slate, Ir ne Smith. Mary Smith, Yircinia Speas, Margaret Southerland, Lois Stamper, Mabel Stanford, Elizabeth Steelman, Ruby Stone, Lenore Strickland. Mary E. Taylor. Alice Taylor. Maxine Teachey. Ruth Tiernan, Elizabeth Tillery. Joyce Thomas, Frances Thompson, Alberta Thompson, Nell Thornton, Lena Topping, Sophrona Tucker, Sallie Uncerwood. Jinsie Van Poole, Ruth Wacner, Blanche Wakefield, Della W alker. Sadie Walker, Lucille Warren, Sarah Waters, Irene Watts, Rosa Webb, Elizabeth Webb. Olive Wells, Lydia Wells, Rosa Lee White. Foda White. Margaret Whittixgton, Effie Whitmore. Myrtle Whitley. Katie Wiccins. Elizabeth Williams, Margaret Wilson. Ruth Williams. Gladys Williams, Pearl Wilkerson, Carrie Windley, Kathleen wcoten, rachael Woody, Walker Workman, Sallie Worsley. Hazel Zoelier. Dorothy Honorary Members Miss Eva Campbell Mr. L. B. Hurley Miss Blanche Shaffer Miss Abigail Rowley Miss Caroline B. Schoch Miss Mildred Francis Miss Esther G. Crockett Miss Louise Irby Miss Tompsie Baxter Miss Fleta Cooper Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Williams Miss Mollie Peterson Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Shaw Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Yocum Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Cook Dr. Bessie Noyes Dr. and Mrs. A. P. Kephart Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Dreher Mr. Robert Russell m •iMTTMlI ' llil il l ' I ' i ' illll ' I ' l i piHE NEEDLE SB iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii A ! BI jj PI - • ■ v flA X ' ■ , W-r- ■pjl 1 ©1 B Zr » M If ■H T » = ■1% mr i V £- ' 4 7 ! ■ f §5 ' Lj " ■ ' ■:■ L PI TJ !■■ 1 ' . ' ' ' ' , ' , V v v : ' : :c«T««: : : r : i iK : : :«: . w mnnui Intersociety Debaters QUERY: Resolved, That the war debt of 1914-1918 should be canceled. Affirmative — Cornelian Society Daisy Hunter Iola Parker Negative — Dikean Society Mabel Stamper Blanche Henley :mxm Cr ■•■i mmmi ' -m mr A ltlWj THE CAROLINIAN ( III I 1.1,1- Hill ttmll VOLl „«,„. S.TU.D.Y. »««CH II. ..» « U „. E « U MADAME 11 AMU Eh ' A i TEARS IN " THE MASTER WILDER- PROF. E. C. LINDEMAN SPEAKS AT N. E. A. MEETING AT CHICAGO NELLE CRAIG CHOSEN NEW CAROLINIAN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF SENATE MEMBERS FOR NEXT YEAR ARE CHOSEN TUESDAY t:,:,- ' ; Sup.iwr Out Sup ports Two Principals HI M:mi. : ft,; v. ' ... grm in Thra rvv: MISS H. ELLIOTT AND GOV ' T II ASS Will. GO TO WASHINGTON Tl ' ES BLUE AND WHITES HAVE PEP MEETING THURSDAY AT NOON N. C. C. W. SUMMER TERM TO BEGIN ON JUNE NTH ; ' ■..; ' " .. ' ,: ' .:: BLAND ROBERTS IS SPMKER AT SUMHI VESPER SERVICES 800Studc ts £.i v. . ' ,-.. ' .1. ' ..... H:n- lh Cook Has |pr5tS ' 3-- s ADEIPHIANS ELECT TRUNDLE PREMIUM FOR TERM OF 1923 ssM CAROLINIAN REPORTERS The North Carolina Collegiate Press Association nt th - college publication Collegiate Pr Archive. Old :•■!•! and Ilia, k Wak. K.in-sl Stu.l.nl. ijii.-.-n s lllu.-s. liavnls.iniiin. i ' ar..]i-ian. i ' ..na.lii i. Sal. -mil.-. I .1. Oxford College Magazine. Flora McDonald Bull. tin. Linninan. The Mrs lip ..i th.- association incli ng held 111 October. ollna Magazini . Tunny B Thi- Twic. Technician, Mi jAUIU Tau Pi Delta (Flame of Service) Tau Pi Delta was formed at the North Carolina College for Women in the fall of 1921 by the Student Government Association. It was formed as an honor society to recognize the students who have shown themselves well-rounded leaders in college life. The eleven charter members were elected by the students on a basis of five quali- fications: (1) college spirit, (2) intellectuality, (3) special talents, (4) leadership, (5) character. One charter member was elected from the student body-at-large, six from the Senior Class, and four from the Junior Class. All future members will be admitted by the society on the basis of the same qualifications. The charter members are: Student Body Marie Bonitz Senior Class Martha Bradley Anne Cantrell Hazel Mizf.lle Branson Price Ruth Teachey Myrtle Warrei Junior Class Mary Sue Beam Matilda Lattimore Iola Parker Vircinia Terrell • EMS Weh £ rtlfUflDlEs mm- i: nnnx. - b IJllllllllJlllllJllllJJIllllllllJllllllllilllllllllllllllllllll •HfEASDLEs tmvXm.i Quill Club The Quill Club is a literary organization composed of those members of the Junior and Senior classes who, through work on the college magazine or newspaper, or through exceptionally good work in English, have shown particular ability and interest in writing. The club was organized in the fall of 19 1, with charter members coming from the staff of the Coraddi and the Carolinian. The idea of organizing a club of this type was originated by Mr. Thornton, who found the hearty support of the publication staffs and a few members of the faculty who are particularly interested in the furtherance of good literature on our campus. The purpose of the club is to bring together those persons who appreciate good literature, and thus stimulate them to produce original composition. Written contributions are brought to each meeting by every member of the club, and each contribution is criticised in an open, friendly manner so as to encourage and help along the amateur journalist. Officers Emeline Goforth President Virginia Terrell Secretary and Treasurer Faculty Members R. H. Thornton Charles B. Shaw Alonzo C. Hall Miss Frances Womble Miss Lois MacDonald W. R. Taylor Student Members Augusta Sapp Carey Batchelor Helen Dunn Creasy Anne Cantrell Virginia Terrell Joyce Rudisill Emeline Goforth Matilda Lattimore Elizabeth Calvert Nell Craig Mary John Mabel Stamper Hazel Mizelle Pauline Lucas Florine Davenfort Virginia Wood Jessie Baxley usu International Relations Club Officers HOLLOMAN, Hulda President Ayers, Vera Secretary Members Batchelor, Carcy Beam. Mary Sue Bridges, Anme Bundy, Maude Burns, Mary Dunn Calvert, Elizabeth Chandley, Helen Creasy, Helen Dunn Mae Fleetwood, Hannaf Forney, Grace John, Mary Keech. Vera Kin „ Rena Kirkman, Florence k.oontz, juanita LaNEON, KArHERINE Terrell. Virginia Wilson, Florrie Bonitz, Marie Price, Branson Stamper, Mabel Cantrell, Ann Yoder, Katherine McDonald, J. Liles, Mary K. Lucas, Pauline Mason, Lucille Peacock, Mary Reynolds, Ann Thorpe Rudisill, Mabel Sadler, Maitland Teachey, Ruth Education Club Officers Stamper, Mabel Pn. Barnes, Murriel Vice-President Holleman, Cleo .Sec relury- Treasurer Seniors ashbv, l.ucretia Barnes, Murriel BARW1CK, RrtCHEL Batchelor, Carey Bauch, Ethel Bell, Lila Bender, Mary Louise Blair, Margaret Bradley, Martha Bridges, Annie Brite, Mattie Burch, Mildred Bynum, Ethel Caldwell, Collina Cannady, Sarah Carpenter, Mabel Craven, Clara Creasy, Helen Dunn Cunningham, Edith Daughety, Charlotte Davenport, Marie Dobbins, Annie Pearl Finch, Gussie Fleetwood, Hannah Mae Forney, Grace Foust, Elizabeth Fox, Gertrude Goforth, Emeline Heafner, Connie Higclns, Ruth Holleman, Cleo holloman, hulda Hunt. Mozelle Hunter, Daisy Hunter, Lucy Hunter, Zelian John, Mary Kanipe, Millie Kearns, Ethel Keech, Vera Koontz, Luella Koontz, Juanita Leach, Helen Liles, Mary Katherine Lucas, Pauline McArn, May McCracken, Elizabeth McDonald, Mary Mason, Lucile Mitchell, Kate murchison, louine Perkins, Irene Price, Branson Rhodes, Sudie Rogers. Hazel Rosser, Elva Rudsill, Joyce Sink, Eva Lee Stamper, Mabel Stanford. Elizabeth Teachey, Ruth Tucker, Sallie turnace, athleen Underwood, Jinsie Warren, Myrtle Weaver, Josephine White, Foda Whitley, Katie Yoder, Katherine York, Mary i = mEHEEtUt m French Club Officers Frances Jones Pn Jinsie Underwood Vice-President Olive Webb Secretary-Treasurer Members Green, Mary Grier, Mary Harper, E. Hawkins, Thelma Heafner, Connie HcRRING, Alta Hockaday, Kaihryn Hodges, Beulah Holbrook, Beatrice Holloman, Susie Howard, Ruth Jackson, Thelma John, Margaret Jones, ' Mapi Braeme Jordan, Malona Kearns, Ethel Keech, Vera Kornegay, Mabel Liles, Mary K. Lock, Lucy McNairy, Mary Miller, Mary T. Montgomery, Julia Moore, Catherine Moore, Ida Belle Murchison, Helen Parker, Bernice Peacock, Mary T. Ayers, Vera Baxley, Jessie Bear, Caroline Bell. Edna Boyd, Elizabeth Boyette, Florence Brandis, Frances Braswell, Lula Brawley, Clara Brittain, Carrie Burns, Mary Caldwell, Edith Cardwell, Ida Cole, Rena Coleman, Annie Roya Cordle, Ruth Crowder. Inez Davis, Ruby Dellincer. Irene Dunn, Harriett Forney, Grace Foster, Beulah Fox, Gertrude Gareissen, Marrietta Gerrock, Lois Gilley, Annie Gilley, Claire Gcodwin, Miriam Dr. W. S. Barney Mr. R. L. Hankey Faculty Members Mr. Merrill Miss Annie Beam Miss Alice Koehler Pearce, Janie Pritchard. Margaret Rankin. Alice Redwine, Jessie Reynolds, Ann Thorpe Robinson, Elizabeth Robinson, Josephine Royal, Ethel Sesson. Charlotte Shuford, Peggy Sitison, Mae Sossamon, Syretha Stewart, Nellie Thicpen, Elizabeth Thompson, Nell Thornton. Margaret Underwood, Jinsie Van Poole, Ruth Waters, Elizabeth Webb, Elizabeth Webb, Olive Wells, Lydia West, Susie White, Mary Williams, Cliffie Williams, Stella Winstead, Florence Wcrsley, Hazel MLLE. VlLLEDlEU Mrs. Majel Wood r¥WTWIT|TIIIiT r Wr!W ' iili ' ml llllllllllllllllllll ' lllllllii ' llll Hlllllllillilill ' llililll FUtULES §rjv% : l ? 1 t - ; L®Fi« " yC v fMHfiftb Spanish Club Officers Mabel Stamper President Elma Harper First Vice-President Lavinia Powell Second Vice-President Sara Presson Secretary and Treasurer Mary Ross Reporter Members Elsie Allen Rachel Armfield Marie Ayres Carey Batckf.lor Clara Brawley Sara Canter Sue Canter Margie Bell Carr Virginia Carter Frances Coffe - Fanny Davidson Crystal Davis Dorothy Davis Iva Davis Bertha Drew Annie Gilley Claire Gilley Emeline Goforth Alice Harrold Elizabeth Hathaway Pauline Hawkins Connie Heafner Mary Frances Helm Mozelle Hunt Mildred Hutaff Mary Braeme Jones Malona Jordan Florence Kirkman Juanita Koonce Luella Koonce Mabel Kornecay Caroline Lambeth Lois Laney Emily Jennincs Miriam MacFadyen May McArn Elizabeth Etheridge Kathleen McCutchen Esther Moody Ida Belle Moore Kate Morgan Marjorie Murrell Bernice Parker Eva Patton Evelyn Pope Pauline Roberts Susie Roberts Elizabeth Robinson Mary Robinson Edith Rountree Maie Sanders Eva Lee Sink Mae Sitison Irene Slate Kathryn Skinner Gertrude Smith Linda Smith Hazel Simpson Margaret Squires Ruth Swicegood Lorna Thigpen Ruth Van Pool Anna Watson Ona Welch Elizabeth Webb Rosalie Wells Katie Whitley Lizzie Whitley Annie Royal Wilkep Cliffie Williams Loula Woody Annie Beam Ralfh Hankey Grace Lawrence Faculty Members Olca Leaman R. March Merrill Dorothy Rogers Caroline Schoch Mary Tennant Germaine Villedieu Majel W. Wood Classical Club Anna French Viola Jchnston Velma Matthews Thelma Woos_ey Beatrice Holbrcox E izabzth Brooks Ruby Dallas Esther Baughn Loui e Morrow Thelma Lucas LlSBETH PARROTT El!Zabeth Duffy Ann Thorp Reynolds Katkerine Buie Alice Burton Ethel Crew Jewel Sink Jessie Edwarcs Iva Davis Lois Lainey Edna Harvey Eva Sawyer Mary Belo Moose Orathaniel Hagins HP ;| llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll|iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiilllllllllllllllllll| MlfiK ura — H liMiii ii iiiiiii a UHJ« piHENEEDLEs iiiiiiiiiliilliillliiilllllllllllllllllllllliiiiiiiiiii ' iimi Chorus Officers First Term Acnes Cannady President Margaret Bedell Vice-President Florence Winstead Secretary Della M. Peeler Treasurer Second Term Olive Chandley President Rosa Lee Watts Vice-President Elizabeth Lindsay Secretary Alberta Thompson Treasurer Tke 1921-22 Entertainment Course CCORDING to the u;ual custom, a series of lectures, plays, and musical programs for the 192 1 - ' 22 college mil year was arranged by a committee appointed for the f I purpose. The program decided upon proved to be unusually delightful and worth-while. A group of lec- tures early in the fall by Dallas Lore Sharp was fol- lowed by the presentation of Eugene O ' Neill ' s astound- ing success, " Beyond the Horizon " by the Shakespeare Playhouse Company, with frank McEntee taking the leading role. Some weeks later Mr. and Mrs. Michitaro Ongawa, the famous Japanese players, appeared before the student body, demonstrating for their benefit some of the peculiar habits of the people of the Far East, and delighting them with interpretations of several Japanese songs and dances. In the early spring the Griffes Group, composed of Sascha Jacob- inoff, violinist ; Edna Thomas, soloist ; and Olga Steeb, pianist, pre- sented a musical program. These were followed by another group of musicians, the New York Quartet, including Edna Fassett Sterling, soprano; Florence Mulford, contralto; Wesley Howard, tenor; and Andrea Sarto, baritone, with William Reddick at the piano, all of whom are artists of unusual ability. Owing to the character of the numbers provided, the entire ccurse proved to be a distinct success. ' illMilllllllllllllll! g»« fe| S mxm tvyvvvn Mwy iiuniiiw rtWfWEEDiEs Glee Club Margaret Bedell, Manager Vocal Department May McArn Head Miss Olga Leaman Director Marie Davenport Pianist First Soprano — Margaret Bedell Mary Louise Bender JANE D.LL Harriett Dunn Margaret Medearis Lois Southerland Myrtle Warren Florence Winstead Members cond Soprano — Gladys Campbell Fannie Carmon Eleanor Daniels estelle mendenhall May McArn First Alto— Clarissa Abernethy Dorothy Fftzer Second Alto— Elizabeth Calvert Elizabeth Cranford Gussie Finch Instrumental Department Sara Harrison. Head Members Love Banner Elizabeth Calvert Helen Dunn Creasy Sara Harrison Frances Jones Gladys Julian Mabel Kornegay Eleanor Kornecay Matilda Lattimore Edith Roundtree Irene Waters % iME KE1DLE •»•«•«• « • :«o »; «»v.i:cc«« ; ;« »»»w:«lM IIIIIINIIIIIIIINIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIMI OFFICERS OF ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION Jessie Rose President Vera Irwin Secretary Lizzie Whitley Vice-President Stella Williams Treasurer Hazel Mizelle Critic LouiNE Murchison .... Social Commilte Ruth K.OHN Socio Committee mmmwmwwm mk? — — l ' -V. HUfWIlOiE liiiiiiinimii Senior Hockey Team Hazel Mizelle, Captain . . . Center Forward Jinsie Underwood Right Fullback Muriel Barnes Left Fullback Jessie Rose Right Inside Ruth Higcins Left Inside Martha Bradley .... Center Halfback Louine Murchison .... Right Halfback Jessie Baxley Left Halfback Sallie Tucker Right Wing Ruby Hodges Left Wing Eva Lee Sink Coal Rachel Barwick Substitute Margaret Heinsberger Substitute Mozelle Hunt Substitute Collina Caldwell Substitute • •••••••••• (.• M V0MXMBX ) llll- ' li ' lllllllilllllllllllllllH ' IIIIIIIIIIIHIill ' ll ' ll m » Junior Hockey Team Josephine Piatt, Captain Right Wing Mavis Goodman Left Wing Eunice Mann Right Fullback Lucy Locke Left Fullback Molly Matheson Right Inside Josephine Jenkins Left Halfback Ida Belle Moore Right Halfback Katherine Gaston Coal Maitland Sadler Center Halfback Sarah Presson Left Inside Ann Thorpe Reynolds Center Forward Vera Ayers Substitute May Allison Substitute •:•»: :• JiMroraoraMroA ! w i iii nn i MMin i r B$ EZl LSI. titlw B TT 3 j fc Sophomore Hockey Team (Champions) Ethel Royal, Captain Center Forward Anne HarRELSON Right Inside Margaret Martin Left Inside LucILE KasEHAGEN Center Halfback Olive Webb Right Halfback Helen Reid Left Halfback Martha Hamilton Right Fullback Velma Beam Left Fullback Monte Kimel Goaf Ina Mae Leroy Substitute (IRena Cole Substitute Helen Murchison Substitute Sarah Hamilton Substitute aHII Mill »»PII1WW mu Freshman Hockev Teai Iva Davis Center Forward Josephine Setzer Left Inside Irene Nicholson Center Halfback Julia Frank Right Wing Lucy Beacham Left Halfback Lois Brigcs Right Halfback Edna Ford Right Inside Irma Herrinc Right Fullback Elenor Kornecay Left Fullback Eleanor Kornecay Coal Josie Barnes, Captain Left Wing Elsie Allen Substitute Mary Ellen Crosby Substitute Caroline Bear Substitute Lela Boddie • Substitut, Maude Perkins . Center For-uard Elizabeth Sossamon . . ... ... Left Inside Jean Dorton . Left Halfback Elizabeth Adams .... . . Right Inside Mabel Phillips Center Halfback Gladys Williams Right Halfback Louise Linville Coal Gladys Weaver Right Fullback Nita Bell Left Wing Edith Criscoe Right Wing Sarah Archbell Left Fullback Frances Thomas Captain Alice Boyd Substitute Josephine Batts Substitute 223 ■.Mj.M»:MAM.o;«xcMiMM«ix : ]fii »iiw Section of the Tennis Club Mildred Hutaff Iva Davis Lizzie Whitley Virginia Armstrong Irene Dellincer Helen Reid May Sitison Lucy Locke Elizabeth Brooks Anne Haroldson Olive Webb Sarah Hamilton Ethel Royal Martha Hamilton Anne Thorpe Reynolds Mildred Taylor Hilda Meecham Anna L. Masemore Sara Presson Jessie Redwine Mary Gobbel LlSBETH PaRROTT Clatie Cole WMlWWifiMP ' ilfW ' l ' m r 22 -v - 4. yyyyyj PiWEMEEDlEs Section of the Tennis Club Louise Farber Katherine Harkey Janie Pearce Rachel Harris Rena Cole Suzie Robertson Emeline Goforth Edith Pearce Florrie Wilson Kate Hyder Margaret Martin Clara Anderson Anne Harrelson Eva Lee Sink Frances Thomas Jewel Sink Beulah Foster Virginia Carter Elizabeth Sossamon Marie Ames Elva Rosser Willow Way Benbow Alta Herring Jessie Rose Claude Aycock Mary Louise Carr Jinsie Underwood Edna Bell Sallie Rodwell Margaret Blakeney Elizabeth Thigpen Lena Smith WlLMA KlRKPATRICK May Springs Lois Barnett Beatrice Holbrock lIllliilllllilllllHIlllllillilllllllllllllllllllHIllllllHllllllllllHl liU r !gP F ' - WWWll WlilUlTOW Hiking Club Members Elizabeth Brooks Mary Louise Carr Iva Davis Elizabeth Simpson Mary Collins Powell Lizzie Whitley Edna Bell Rena Cole Mary Conner Ruby Hill Bernice Parker Jessie Rose Beulah McKenzie rtAEillDlEs Bsnni rtWEHEEOUs Club May Allison Fer;ba Stough Alta Herring Pauline Lucas Hazel Mizelle Annie Pearl Dobbins Helen Reid Elve Rosser Elizabeth Thigpen Ann Thorpe Reynolds Molly Matheson Lizzie Whitley Lucy Hunter Louine Murchison Rachel Barwick Ethel Royal Rena King Lena Smith Thelma Hawkins uwwMv iKaMamamMtt«»vxx m ».•.•.•»•.•».•.».•: -:•:•:• ' •:•-•:•:••• " iiiiimiiiiiiiiiii ' imimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiHiiiiiiiH imiEs Basketball Club of 1921 Lizzie Whitley Anne Thorpe Reynolds Loula Woody Florrie Wilson Rachel Scarborough Mary Collins Powell Mildred Hutai-f Jessie Rose Hazel Mizelle Rachel Barwick Emeline Goforth Mae Sitison H flHKX 8 ffl«IMi«MiiMiM i B« Basketball Champions, 1921 Marv Collins Powell Mildred Hutaff Susie Roberts Mildred Hutaff Loula Woody Rachel Scarborough EH EHHEEEEEEBEEEEEEEEEEEE BOOK IV FEATURE E ■IHHEEEBEEEEBEEEEEBEEBE EE EE .«. rtHRSiiWl Frances Watson, Prettiest Marie Bonitz, Wisest NELL Folger, Best Dancer FERIBA Stouch, Best Aihlele K L. A 1 B. 1 - f - 1 r? ■ % l n ■ Hi Ruth Wilson, Best All-round HHFNEEDtts Ckristmas Emeline Goforth, ' 22 Peace, peace and calm — An infinite deep silence — Breathing of wind among the silvery trees — Perfect and sweet, A far-away, low anthem. Borne by the Christmas, dawn o ' er land and seas. Gay, gay and glad — The sunbeams clear and dancing Penetrate through windows, decked in evergreens. Merrily and mad— The sleigh bells cheerily ringing. Bring back all hearts on Christmas day to dear home scenes. Twilight — deep calm — All hearts on earth are lifting Rich songs of gratitude— the snowflakes breathle Poor. rich. sick. well- To all the Spirit whispers: " Peace, peace on earth and free good-will to all. = miffiiiiwi A Hebrew Supper Louise Farber, ' 25. Adelphian As I sit at my window listening to the soft strains of " Humoresque. " all objects around me gradually grow obscure, and I am again at home. I enter the dining room. Tonight is Friday night — the beginning of the Hebrew Sabbath. The first thing that I see is my sweet mother, who is uttering a Hebrew benediction before three candles. How the candles burn! Their flames represent the hope and faith of the Jews. They flicker, then blaze forth with renewed energy. Those sofl words my mother is uttering I have heard from infancy, and they are so deeply planted within my heart that they can never be uprooted. An hour passes. Then my father, my two brothers with my baby brother, and my three cousins enter. They take their respective seats at the table. My father utters the Hebrew Kaddish, and my baby brother, who is four years old, attempts to say it also. There are the " Sahbbos Chalos " (Sabbath breads) at the head of the table. My father cuts them, and immediately the supper is served. Conversation usually touches upon different topics, but tonight the subject is about Russia and her suffering Jews. My mother has just received a letter from her sister, who asks fcr help, for money, for clothes. She is hopelessly crippled as a result of the war, when the Germans drove her husband and her from their home. We send money and clothes. She receives the clothes and sometimes the money. Money has to be concealed in a letter or else the Bolsheviks will take it. Once she received a letter, but the money that was in it was gone. Supper is now over, and as they arise from the table I am awakened from my reverie by the sound of ragtime and find that my eyes are not dry. r «V T V 7 V« IC« ' C ]l TKC T«. . A .«- I . - -v «--Q, rtMUU, Utyr HaHrjupraforH HAT is it that is old yet ever new; that changes yet remains unchanged; that charms alike the sad and gay; Warn that serves both past and present ? It is the play and jjj the makers of plays. Let us journey through the ages from the days of ancient Greece to 1922. Antigone steps forth, in her nobility, to represent the renowned age of Pericles, the chain of years, we see " Gibour, " the Passion Play, expressive of the drama of the medieval Franks. Immortal Shakespeare flashes into view with " Romeo and Juliet, " the culmination of Eliza- bethan art. Journeying further we come to the time of Louis XVI — to powdered wigs and silken hose — and see Rosta nd portray the folly of youth and age in " The Romancers " ; till finally the twentieth cen- tury dawns in its cleverness and charm — we, the modern age, see our own reflections in " Six-Cylinder Love. " What is true of the past we may prophesy for the future: a drama that, though changing, will still remain unchanged with its appeal to the ages that are to come. Passing do mxm c- « »:«;o;««:«:»» »c«»:«o:«:«:«»:c«.« ' ANTIGONE " ANTIENT DRAMA " GIBOUR, " THE PASSION PLAY MEDIEVAL DRAMA ' ROMEO AND JULIET -SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA THE ROMANCERS COLONIAL DRAMA SIX-CYLINDER LOVE MODERN DRAMA lIln ' iHi ' llilliillllilMiW l ' lHI!!. | N ' !lilll l! l | ' l ll1llllli|l ! i | lil|l rtWiiBLEs motto naiwTwn? IW i I i P ' i i i l ill ' l lliliW illWii fd 1l ' S [ifillM i l i MMiliif i ilililiiifMg ©n ICtfe in Oknmtl a AlI ' lJM « gj - " Fowl " " Gossip It was bright and early. The still morning air was interrupted by the occasional falling of dead leaves, which fluttered lightly to the ground and lay there, very quietly — waiting! A worthy descendant of the ever-famed Chanticleer awoke with a start! Quivering with some unexpressed excitement, he sprang quickly down from his roost and walked three or four steps; then, with a gleeful exclamation, he flapped his sides delight- edly with his wings and cried: " Cock-a-doodle-doo! " Far and wide the echo resounded! All was quiet for the space of a peck at a lone piece of corn, then in each neighboring barnyard, one after the other, a similar sound rent the air — a similar sound, yet how unutterably different! Bantam ' s high-pitched voice was followed by the deep tones of Rhode Island Red. Brahma hoarsely joined in. Each, in his own peculiar way, told to his fellows, as near as he could understand it, what he had just heard from a nearby barnyard. All was confusion, each cock giving his version of the exclamation. The cock that had started it all stopped in utter amazement at the weird and distorted interpretations that he heard. One exclaimed, " The cock is going to go! " Followed a clamor, out of which he understood only a few of the remarks, of which " What ' ll the dude do? " sounded shrill and questioning. Neighbors, friends and enemies hastened to enlighten the questioner. Then " Plymouth Rock and Who? " The enquirer was not going to miss a single detail. So on until silence. The leaves settled down with a shrug as the hens came eagerly out to try to pacify the agitated Lords of the Barnyard. The cock that had been in a disastrous fight with Dominecker the day before, filled with the delight of revenge, added with an exultant shriek, " Dominecker, too! " The first cock turned slowly around, walked back to the hens, and with all the disgust he could muster cried out: " I made an innocent statement, and look at the result. All these cocks have taken delight in turning and twisting it around until it in no way resem- bles what I said. That ' s gossip — ' fowl ' gossip — nothing less. " M. A. S., 23. III ' . " Broken Date Blues 1 ain ' t nobody ' s sweetie, ain ' t nobody ' s crush. Nobody calls me honey, nobody gives me a rush; Nobody sends me hot stuff, nobody shoots me a line; I ain ' t got no high-particular — nobody I can call mine; I ' m going off on a trip, going to take my last ride — I ' m going out to the lake and do a stunt called suicide! S. W. The poet says, " The night has a thousand eyes and the day but one. " Our actions go to prove that we forget this. Oh, Death! Everyone likes rides, flowers and flattery. They serve as mighty convenient factors in making a hit! One hardly thinks of them in a serious way. Yet they are a matter of life and death. Each day there are thousands of people just dying to ride . in a hearse; for flowers ... to decorate their caskets; for nice things to be said about them ... in their funeral orations! Where Is Thy Sting? It was one of those heavenly nights in June! The moon played hide-and-seek with the clouds. He had reasons — he didn ' t want to be the one to tell the tale. For forty minutes Archie had been pouring out his love. At last he came to the finis of the story. In conclusion he whispered fervently, " Natalie, I could die for you! " " I could die for you too, Archie. You bore me to death. " mxxxjut ¥ i ' YVV v 1 yvSWVW lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ««■ Adrift • T was in Paris and a fine spring day. As I sauntered down the street I was seized with that strange impulse of spring which always takes the form of wanting new clothes. Hardly had this impulse struck my heart than I passed " La Maison, " a famous designer ' s shop. I could not resist the temptation to enter. As I stepped into the dep:hs cf the velvet carpets and felt the spell of the soft shaded lights I felt as if I, too, could dengn and create the most beautiful costumes in the world. Madame must have understood the cravings of my heart, for she silently brought forth the most exquisite and delicate materials, which under my deft fingers were transformed into dainty dresses and hats. It was only then that madame broke the silence. " Ah, you must take them, " she said. " They are yours, created by you, and for you they shall be, for they make you look wonderful, something like — " " Hell ! Hell ! I tell you that whoever are given up to vanities shall suffer in hell forevermore. " I came to with a start. The day was beautiful, and I was seated in the sleepy little church, whcse echoes were ringing with the emphasis of a country preacher ' s sermon on " Vanity, " the vehement of which had waked me. M. J., ' 22. Fan cies I wish. I long, I hope, I dream— My thoughts in fancy travel. My dream thoughts to unravel. O vagrant thoughts! O idle dreams! Ye airy fairy fancies. When will my hazy head be free From such deluding trances! E. D., 25. The Man I Love The man I love, his face is round, Yes, rounder than a tennis ball; Always smiling, always happy — He has no rivals, he ' s my all. I cannot see him all the time, For he is far, so far away. And like a stealthy, cruel robber. He will not come out in the day. He is a tantalizing lover, And his charms ihey all may see; For he smiles on them as sweetly As he ever smiled on me. But he is kind, he is genth Despite the twinkle in h And he lavishes his riches On the beggars who are nigh eye; He keeps watch o ' er all the cities. O ' er lonesome vale and mountain path; He is tender-Oh. I love him! So free is he from human wrath. Would you know whom thus I worship. Worship most the month of June? Ah, my true love is no other Than the man you see in the 1HE NEEDLEs in farttrular [YVYVxTi ) - C- fnilllllllliiiiii iiiiiiiiii i i i i i H ii i i i i H i n i in iii i i i iiiiii ii iiiii iii •.•.•:•:•■.•:•:•■.•.•:•:•:•:•:•■.•:•:•:•:••:•:»»■» »tn«iw.Vi FPlHt NEEDLEs " i :l::illll!l 1 f M i 1 1 M 1 1 !i ; ; m 1 1 1 1 M t II M I M ! : In the Manner of Whitman And Under the Inspiration of Kalherine Caslon Katherine Caiton puffed and plodded up the hill; When she reached ihe lop she saw pine trees, broom straws, rocks, and red dii She liked to look at these, and gathered an armful of straw; Turning around, she went back home and gave the straw to her mama. Her mama made a broom out of it. Katherint rolled up her sleeves and heaved a deep sigh; She swept all night, she swept all day. Till Kalherine swept herself away. V. W.. ' 23. Voice (in hall of Gray) to maid: " Emma — oh, Emma! " Answer: " Why don ' t you call her Miss King like the rest of us do? ' Mr. Scctt-Hunter: " You should have seen the cold shcwer bath I took this morning! " Miss Gullander (rushing in Miss Elliot ' s office) : " Oh, Miss Elliot, have you heard the latest expression? " Miss Elliot: " No, what is it? " Miss G. : " Putting out. " Miss E. : " What does it mean? " Miss Gullander: " Well, I don ' t know exactly; but if you were to ask me to go shopping with you and I did not want to, I would say, ' I am not putting out ' . " S. H. (with indignation) : " Do you know James tried to put his arms around me three times last night! " R. W. (registering surprise): " Gee. what long arms! " Mr. Hurley (in Freshman English) : " Margaret, write a long sentence. " Margaret (a Fresh. English student) : " Life imprisonment. " n KWUL m mw? MNEKtEDiE S lilillliliMlliMMMl l lillliitiii B (§n ICtfe in Oknmtl l i;il ll lll ll l llll ll l l l l lll ll ll l ll l | j || ))|[[j||j||j||)|i; •1»:»%v»i :♦:•: »» • mumn " Fowl Gossip It was bright and early. The still morning air was interrupted by the occasional falling of dead leaves, which fluttered lightly to the ground and lay there, very quietly — waiting! A worthy descendant of the ever-famed Chanticleer awoke with a start! Quivering with some unexpressed excitement, he sprang quickly down from his roost and walked three or four steps; then, with a gleeful exclamation, he flapped his sides delight- edly with his wings and cried: " Cock-a-doodle-doo! " Far and wide the echo resounded! All was quiet for the space of a peck at a lone piece of corn, then in each neighboring barnyard, one after the other, a similar sound rent the air — a similar sound, yet how unutterably different! Bantam ' s high-pitched voice was followed by the deep tones of Rhode Island Red. Brahma hoarsely joined in. Each, in his own peculiar way, told to his fellows, as near as he could understand it, what he had just heard from a nearby barnyard. All was confusion, each cock giving his version of the exclamation. The cock that had started it all stopped in utter amazement at the weird and distorted interpretations that he heard. One exclaimed, " The cock is going to go! " Followed a clamor, out of which he understood only a few of the remarks, of which " What ' ll the dude do? " sounded shrill and questioning. Neighbors, friends and enemies hastened to enlighten the questioner. Then " Plymouth Rock and Who? " The enquirer was not going to miss a single detail. So on until silence. The leaves settled down with a shrug as the hens came eagerly out to try to pacify the agitated Lords of the Barnyard. The cock that had been in a disastrous fight with Dominecker the day before, filled with the delight of revenge, added with an exultant shriek, " Dominecker, too! " The first cock turned slowly around, walked back to the hens, and with all the disgust he could muster cried out: " I made an innocent statement, and look at the result. All these cocks have taken delight in turning and twisting it around until it in no way resem- bles what I said. That ' s gossip — ' fowl ' gossip — nothing less. " M. A. S., ' 23. — - r - M IwinlliiiilTflMTIIl lllllllll l llllllllllllllllllll l lllll l llll l llll l lllllll l l ll l l l l lll l ll l »:•:• ' .• :•:••:•;•:•;•;•;• :•;•;•:•• ' • " • ' ••• ' •• " ••• ' • ' • ' • " ' • r ymxi rtHfl!!Dtts llllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlM Broken Date Blues I ain ' t nobody ' s sweetie, ain ' t nobody ' s crush, Nobody calls me honey, nobody gives me a rush; Nobody sends me hot stuff, nobody shoots me a line; I ain ' t got no high-particular — nobody I can call mine; I ' m going off on a trip, going to take my last ride — I ' m going out to the lake and do a stunt called suicide! The poet says, " The night has a thousand eyes and the day but one. to prove that we forget this. s. w. Our actions Oh, Death! Everyone likes rides, flowers and flattery. They serve as mighty convenient factors in making a hit! One hardly thinks of them in a serious way. Yet they are a matter of life and death. Each day there are thousands of people just dying to ride . in a hearse; for flowers ... to decorate their caskets; for nice things to be said about them ... in their funeral orations! Where Is Thy Sting? It was one of those heavenly nights in June! The moon played hide-and-seek with the clouds. He had reasons — he didn ' t want to be the one to tell the tale. For forty minutes Archie had been pouring out his love. At last he came to the finis of the story. In conclusion he whispered fervently, " Natalie, I could die for you! " " I could die for you too, Archie. You bore me to death. " miiiiBiw Adrift ' T was in Paris and a fine spring day. As I sauntered down the street I was seized with that strange impulse of spring which always takes the form of wanting new clothes. Hardly had this impulse struck my heart than I passed " La Maison, " a famous des ' gner ' s shop. I could not resist the temptation to enter. As I stepped into the depths of the velvet carpets and felt the spell of the soft shaded lights I felt as if I, too, could design and create the most beautiful costumes in the world. Madame must have understood the cravings of my heart, for she silently brought forth the most exquisite and delicate materials, which under my deft fingers were transformed into dainty dresses and hats. It was only then that madame broke the silence. " Ah, you must take them, " she said. " They are yours, created by you, and for you they shall be, for they make you look wonderful, something like — " " Hell! Hell! I tell you that whoever are given up to vanities shall suffer in hell forevermore. " I came to with a start. The day was beautiful, and I was seated in the sleepy little church, whese echoes were ringing with the emphasis of a country preacher ' s sermon on " Vanity, " the vehemence of which had waked me. M. J., ' 22. e I wish, I long, I hope, I dream — My thoughts in fancy travel, And summon tripping dream elves in My dream thoughts to unravel. O vagrant thoughts! O idle dreams! Ye airy fairy fancies, When will my hazy head be free From such deluding trances! The Man I Love The man I love, his face is round, Yes, rounder than a tennis ball; Always smiling, always happy — He has no rivals, he ' s my all. I cannot see him all the time. For he is far, so far away, And like a stealthy, cruel robber. He will not come out in the day. He is a tantalizing lover. And his charms they all may see; For he smiles on them as sweetly As he ever smiled on me. But he is kind, he is gentle. Despite the twinkle in his eye; And he laxishes his riches On the beggars who are nigh. He keeps watch o ' er all the cities, O ' er lonesome vale and mountain pat! He Is lender-Oh, I love him! So free is he from human wrath. Would you know whom thus I worship. Worship most the month of June? Ah, my true love is no other Than the man you see in th E. D.. 25 l SHHHi , lli»A f fl Mil i iilif i mrTnTimnmninrrinninninn JIP in Partirular In the Manner of Whitman And Under the Inspiration of Katherine Gaston Kalherine Cailon puffed and plcdded up the bill; When she reached ihe lop she saw pine trees, broom straws, rocks, and r She liked to look at these, and gathered an armful of straw; Turning around, she went back home and gave the straw to her mama. Her mama made a broom out of it. Kalherine rolled up her sleeves and heaved a deep sigh; She swept all night, she swept all day. Till Katherine swept herself away. V. W.. 73. Voice (in hall of Gray) to maid: " Emma — oh, Emma! " Answer: " Why don ' t you call her Miss King like the rest of us do? ' Mr. Scott-Hunter: " You should have seen the cold shower bath I took this morning! " Miss Gullander (rushing in Miss Elliot ' s office) : " Oh, Miss Elliot, have you heard the latest expression? " Miss Elliot: " No, what is it? " Miss G. : " Putting out. " Miss E. : " What does it mean? " Miss Gullander: " Well, I don ' t know exactly; but if you were to ask me to go shopping with ycu and I did not want to, I would say, ' I am not putting out ' . " S. H. (with indignation) : " Do you know James tried to put his arms around me three times last night! " R. W. (registering surprise) : " Gee, what long arms! " Mr. Hurley (in Freshman English) : " Margaret, write a long sentence. Margaret (a Fresh. English student) : " Life imprisonment. " MUill Illusion, Delusion and Men tal Confusion (Love Letters as They Ain ' t Writ) HE winds and the elements combine against me, and you. Heart of Mine, are many miles away. How trite, how inane are the feeble attempts of my young companions to attract my interest, to arouse my enthusiasm. That power lies in your hands alone. Hold it there! Guard it safely! Some day perhaps it may mean more in both of our lives than we can ever imagine. Some day But why think of the future when the present is ours — the wonderful present that almost frightens me with the intensity of its beauty. And the past, rich in memories, rich in love, stands as a thing inviolable — a sacred jewel that can never be torn from us. You, my love. Heart of My Life, are the setting. Your glowing eyes are liquid pools in which my soul drowns itself, and being drowned, finds new, joyous life. Life and love — and you. What more could mortal heart desire? What heights are there left to attain? What pleasure unexpressed to one who has walked the mountains with you; whose faltering hands have felt your strong, firm clasp. Who could long for sweeter peace than the knowledge of a perfect love? My dear, I love you! I wonder if any man, even my own Heart ' s Life, can really appreciate, really understand the glory, the pain, the wonder, the fierce, unreasoning joy that is the love of a woman? You are my all — life — and love — and happiness ! There is nothing but you ! There has never been anything but you! There could never be anything but you. The rest of the universe is blank, meaningless chaos. Love illuminates everything! Love vitalizes everything! My spirit ' s kiss falls soft upon your eyelids. Good night. Dear Heart! Sweet dreams. c ove Lette rs as Tk ey .re Writ Dear Bill: The candy was the stuff. You are the sweetest thing to send it to me. I was starving to death. I can ' t hardly wait for Friday night. The O. Henry looks good to me. I saw a football game yesterday. The game was peachy, but the weather was roUen. Saw a picture this afternoon that was my idea of nothing at all. Had a bum ending, because — well, you know what I mean. There goes light bell. I must go, too. Mary. By Their Expressions You Shall Know Them = Mr Highsmith: " This is the situation. " Dr. Givler: " I will illu;trate that with a drawing. " Miss Cooper: " When I was in New York last winter — " Mr. Thornton: " Like the A ' erp York Times. " Dr. Barney: " I ' m sure — " Miss Elliot: " Perfectly idiotic. " Miss Lawrence: " I guess you may go. " Miss Elliot: " Take the world a thousand years from now. " Miss King: " Well, I don ' t see any reason why you shouldn ' t rtllMlDLEs Did You Ever See? Mildrel Lupton ' s green jumper dress? Marie Bonitz ' little leather notebook? Miss Womble ' s little " Sterno " ? Mr. Brown ' s flivver? Mr. Taylor ' s chickens? Marie Davenport vamp? Molly Matheson go to class on time? Mary Burns take junior dancing? Have You Heard? Of Mr. Hall ' s Puritan ancestors? What happened to Miss Womble ' s winter hat? Of Margaret Calvert ' s " Sweet William " ? That Helen Dunn Creasy " just loves " the Dd li Ven s? That Miss Elliot was in Europe in 1 92 1 ? " Dick ' s " account of Hardy ' s country? It H appens Every Day Goolosh. Eva Bagley gets a letter. Julia Maie has a date. A phone call for Joscelyn McDow Mr. Hall ' s red necktie. Virgie Garrett goes to Burlington. Blanche Henley goes down town. rmrn College Fruit Basket Peach Nita Bell Gooseberry Virginia Wood Pear (pair) Kate Mitchell and Lucile Mason Apple Stella Williams Tangerine HELENE HudnELL Crape Fruit Myrtle Warren Banana Sara Harrison Plum MlTYLENE ISLEY Orange Clarissa Abernethy Crape Josie Barnes Apricot Virginia Ashlin Pmnc I (?) There ain ' t any Lemon I UIU m Our Folks Back Home (Apologies io Author of " Bill ' s in Trouble " ) I got a letter, parson, from my daughter at N. C. C. An ' my poor heart ' s as heavy as ever it could be — To think the girl ' s future I had once so nicely planned Should wander from the path of right and come to such an end. I told her when she left us, only three short years ago. She ' d find herself a-plowing in a mighty crooked row; She ' d miss her father ' s council and her mother ' s prayers, too; But she wanted " Higher Education, " so what was I to do? I know there ' s big temptations for a youngster away from home. But I believed our Betty had the sand to go alone. And when she left I warned her of the ever-wailing snares That he like hidden serpents in life ' s pathway everywheres; But Betty promised faithful to be careful, and allowed She ' d make a reputation that would make us mighty proud. I got the letter Monday, and the story ' s mighty short — I just can ' t tell her mother — it will break her poor ol heart — And so, I reckon, parson, you might break the news to her: Betty was put in the senate; but she doesn ' t say what for. M. A. S„ ' 23. m iiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiililllllliiiiiiiiiinimniiii[iii My Man SAW him that first night. Never had I seen anyone so perfect. His face was a picture of intelligence and sympathy. He wore a smile that would have melted the heart of a Bluebeard. As fcr exciting admiration, he had King Arthur beat a mile. I was so taken aback I lost my breath. He did nothing but merely stand there in the library as calmly as if I had known him all my life. I was not able to speak. Finally I came dow r n to earth with a crash when Georgs said: " Oh, come on ; you will have a dozen chances to see him again. Don ' t get frightened ; he affects everyone the same way, and rather takes pride in the fact, I imagine. " During the next few weeks I was so taken up with summer school that I forgot my man. But destiny was favorable. I was soon to see him again. It was the last Friday night of summer school. I was feeling a little excited over a date with George that night, and I had a presentiment that he was going to say something he oughtn ' t. All at once I happened to remember my education paper that was far overdue. Saturday morning was the latest it could go in. I ran to the phone and, after much persuasion, canceled the date with George. I rushed upstairs for a note-book, and firmly resolved to do a thing I hadn ' t done all the summer- — study. I ran up the library steps, looked back, and saw him — My Man — looking at me! He wore the same expression that had thrilled me through and through that first night. I gave him one long look, and then forgot all about education papers, which instructors say are very important if you want school credit. I ran up to him and poured out my whole soul. I revealed to him my deepest secrets and most sacred ambitions. He was the best listener I ever talked to. Not once did he interrupt me, but always looked at me with that understanding smile of his. The second week after summer school George wrote me a long letter to which he added an interesting postscript. It went like this: " We are having a holiday tomorrow in honor of the unveiling of the statue, which they say is even more perfect than that one in front of the library you were so daft over this summer. " S. W.. ' 23. iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifmM EXAMS AT N. MISS Hanes Grocery % gg «ou, s ;, fisr Company IBONITZ ELECTED FIRST MEMBER HONOR SOCIET N. G. C. W. ALUMNAE BAZAAR CONDUCTED IN Y. W. HUT TODAY APT ERNOON CLARIDA ' S DISTRIBUTES LARCE BACS OF KISSES ■r Local Volunteer B nd, .„ A. Cabin.,. ,„ Enl.ru • turd.,. TEAS CAROLINA-VIRGINIA FOOTBALL GAME " ' nRKR.rWFlfo F SENIORS STAGE PLAY XINC ROOM TAKES ' ON FESTIVE AIR AT HALLOWEEN PARTY AT RECEPTION . Put On Feature rge Crowd; Lemon- red On Porch Of Do- HAVE PROMINENT SPEAKERS " " U, " «Sr - C W. STUDENTS BY BERNARD SHAW WITH MUCH SUCCESS ,., Never Can Tell " Played Be- fore Large Audience Made J Up of Facully, StudenU i and Tovrnpeople £ " 6 g 2 " You Never Can Tell " III IKEANS DEFEAT a CORNELIANS IN CLUBS TO APPEAR y »»™ -- f °» |KEAJS DEfEAT xT N.C.C.FEB.«U % r. - „, re . h„ C0RNEUANS _ c v::ita T Mur%. FFES oii)P TO p ANNUAL DEBATE - - ::XX i gri I5pfS concern SuERiliFoF ATW MONDAY Jfaifo N.C.C.T0 GIVE ' LADY 5MC .. rtT S - o rppn am wiii WINHFRMFRF S FAN ' ZEr £i- g ' °- M ML A f WHI WINDERMERE ' S FAN ' ir Wilde ' s Famou. Drama be Staged in College Aud- ilVfg, ;w- " OREEN AND WHITES TT ' R A vE program CELEBRATE 22nd IN HONOR OF. FACULT. date of proton ,s Apr. J STUDENT VOLUNTEER CONFERENCE BEGINS •T.x.« , FRIDAY AT N. C. C. W. Pre.ent C.I. Appe, Fifty Sm.ll Table. r Supper JUST TO REMIND US I !=: 11 " " ' Mwm xi irHYinmrrmmnmnn i fnmimnmnmn ir mniTmniii r f Tnmnr N. C. C. W. When I came up here I had money, ' tis true. And what happened to this I will now tell to you. For books and for pencils. And then for some more; For pens and for tablets. And for stamps galore. For hats and for shoes, And many other clothes; For carfare and fees- Trial ' s where my money goes! An itemized statement I ' ve given you in rhyme; And — you know twenty dollars Won ' t last all the lime! Daughter. P. S.— Enclosed find check? wMUlt mmmmmmmmmmmmmiim I Oh. ike " Tat ladies Club The.Ta± ladies Glut We walk Cvern) -m.o-r-n.i-n £. We cui dowTi each -rricaCt U z exercise " TUQC.nih) Rnd oh, how we£«el! • JillllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllHIIilllllllllllllllllll aVIIU ! For things we n When listing our effects, Beyond dad ' s comprehension And more than ma expect The Broken Student, 1922 ( With Apologies to Our Friend, Rudyard) er mention. For fashion ' s latest fancies, And all her needful frills, We have to take our chances And make a few small bills. — elected. I J l ittlrtfiflMMiliiliiftiM M I Wisk I Was-But I Am I wish I was a little rock That lie; beneath a Iree, And 1 had never heard of Math.. Or had ,1 heard of me. I wish I was a great big red Consuming, flaming fire; To burn up every Math, book Would be my great desire. I wish I was a great big rolling Ocean, or a sea, And all those crazy Math, books Were hurled down into me. I wish I was the teacher Of every old Math, class; I wouldn ' t make them work al all. Yet every one I ' d pass. M. L., 75. mm hWf W " iiiiiiimiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiM[iiiiimiiiiii| ;• ' ••:•:•.•:•:•:• Appreciation I he Pine Needles staff of I 922 wishes to thank all those who have in any way helped to make this volume materialize from a somewhat vague dream and several hazy plans to reality. Mr. Hurley has our sincere appreciation for all the helpful sug- gestions which he was always so ready and willing to give. Mr. Thornton, as a proofreader, is hard to beat, but most of all, we wish to thank him for his untiring efforts in regard to the make-up of the Annual. Miss Peterson has been ever ready with practical suggestions by which this volume might be " artistic. " To the Special Class, which has so patiently copied all the material, we give thanks. To Mr. Hall we extend our appreciation for his untiring interest and assistance. You that have planned, you that have worked out the plans, we thank you. %E : = IP ■■iililP r«T»:«»T«c«»:»:»:«: »:«:«!:»:»:«:«»» :».»:»A»:».» » •;« »:»»»:«:«:» " .«:«:«:« •.•:•:•.•».:•.:• illllllllllllll HHENEtPLt ff t«M(§DtEs k More than ninety universities, colleges and schools of the South favored us with their Annual printing contracts for the year 1922. This phenomenal record is the natural result of the high quality of workmanship displayed in all our publications, coupled with the very complete service rendered the Staff. •I From the beginning to the er.d we are your counselor and adviser in the financing, collecting, and editing of your book. J Surely if " Experience is the best teacher, " as an old maxim says, then our service must be supreme. Decide right now to know more about our work and service. Simply write for our proposition. " College Annual Headquarters ' J m - -v. 16 THE NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE FOR WOMEN CULTURE, SCHOLARSHIP, SERVICE SELF-SUPPORT Offers to Women A Liberal Education Equipment for Service Professional Training Well planned courses leading to degrees in Art, Science, and Music. Special courses in Pedagogy, Domestic Sci- ence, Household Art and Economics, Music, and Commercial Branches. Board at Actual Cost Tuition Free to Those Who Pledge Themselves to Become Teachers For Catalog and Other Information, Address JULIUS I. FOUST, President GREENSBORO, N. C. m PiHfHEEDUs MiMiifiiiliiitittliMM m (§ WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF SPORTING GOODS INCLUDING COLLEGE SWEATERS AND ALSO DEVELOP KODAK FILMS MAKE OUR STORE YOUR HEADQUARTERS PELL Where Quality Tells National Theatre GREENSBORO ' S NEWEST AND NICEST THEATRE The National Orchestra " Carolina ' s Finest " DO NOT FAIL TO VISIT THE NATIONAL THEATRE GREENSBORO, N. C. That Satisfied Smile Means Walk-Over Style COME TO HENDRIX SHOE STORE WALK-OVER PRINCESS PAT The Everyday Shoe for the Everyday Woman 0. HENRY DRUG STORE Cut Prices 365 !4 Days in the Year DRUGS SODA PERFUME STATIONERY Best Service 0. HENRY DRUG STORE JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE INSURANCE CO. Greensboro, N. C. Is proof that the South can build as wisely and well as any other section of the country. INSURANCE IN FORCE OVER $163,000,000 BROWN-BELK COMPANY One of the Thirty Belk Stores Head-to-Foot Outfitters For the College Girl Hotel Guilford Greensboro, N. C. i m GUILFORD CAFE GUILFORD CAFETE RIA GUILFORD TEA ROOM M. A. Stearne, Mgr. ' • ' Illlllllllllllllllllmilllllllllllllllllllllllll rtlENEEDUs EQUIPPED WITH MANY YEARS ' EXPERI- ENCE FOR MAKING PHOTOGRAPHS OF ALL SORTS. DESIRABLE FOR ILLUSTRATING COLLEGE ANNUALS, BEST OBTAINABLE ARTISTS, WORKMANSHIP AND CAPACITY FOR PROMPT AND UNEQUALLED SERVICE. PHOTOGRAPHERS TO " PINE NEEDLES " Address Requests for Information to Our Executive Offices 1546 Broadway, N. Y. C. -ifflS mn Able minT i nrffmniTmm Dixie Fire Insurance Company Of Greensboro, N. C. Capital $500,000 Officers Harry R. Bush President Edward G. Michaels Secretary William G. Davis Tr We Are Headquarters For Everything IN THE TOILET ARTICLE LINE Agents for Eastman Kodaks and Supplies. Films Promptly Developed Nunnally ' s Huyler ' s, Bell ' s Martha Washington and Johnston Candies GREENSBORO DRUG COMPANY " The Store That Appreciates Your Business " YOUR BANKING NEEDS Any banking service which you may re- quire is at your disposal here. Our departments include Checking. Savings, Certificates of Deposit, Foreign Exchange, Investment advice and infor- Whatever your need may he, you will find our service friendly and efficient. American Exchange National Bank GREENSBORO. N. C. R. G. Vaughn, President F. C. Boyles, Cashier THE William Foor Hotels Wm. Foor, Pres. and Cenl Mgt E. E. Robinson, Sec. and Treas. THE O. HENRY Greensboro. N. C. Wade H. Lowry, Manager THE CLEVELAND Spartanburg. S. C. W. P. Martin. Manager THE ARAGON THE SHERATON High Point. N. C. L30 Rooms, Each With Bat THE FRANCIS MARION Pittf NEEDLE COTTON STORAGE COTTON FACTORS Rucker Warehouse Corporation (Bonded) Greensboro, N. C. Capacity, 20,000 Bales Negotiable Receipts Issued IMPERIAL Home of Family Photo Plays CONTINUOUS 1 1 :00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M. PRICES 10 Cents ana 20 Cents ED. NOWELI S PHARMACY If You Need Anything Along the Line of DRUGS SODA PERFUME TOILET ARTICLES VISIT US Nurse ' s Register Phones 57 and 58 GREENSBORO, N. C. Compliments or a Friend rtHiiraiEs illlliilmlllllllllllilllmllil ' mll 1 ! I ' ! 1 ' , When in Wilmington Visit GOODMAN The Shop lhat Satisfies the Demands of Fashion and Good Tasle WILMINGTON, N. C. W. H. Fisher Co. Incorporated PRINTING, ENGRAVING DESIGNING Greensboro, N. C. Take Your Wounded Shoes TO O. L. HOLDEN Spring Garden Street Just Off the Campus GOLDEN RULE PUBLICATION CO, ELM STREET GREENSBORO, N. C. For All Kinds of PRINTING Visit Us Mrs. Pattie McN MILLINERY airy 206 N Elm St., Opp. City Hall Gree MSBORO, N. C. 10 Per Cent Of to College Cir i J. W. SCOTT CO. Greensboro, N. C. WHOLESALE DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS Goods Sold to Merchants Only Candy, Fruits, Nuts B. B. PURE CREAM KISSES Gate City Candy Co. 331 S. Elm St. Phillips Scott Just off the campus HOT LUNCHES And Food of All Kinds ro:«»:«««:»:o: ««;«or»:«Ko;»r ;t:»3»:»: :«:«.» » DIAMONDS JEWELRY SCHUSTERS Wilmington, N. C. Established Nearly a Quarter of a Century " Service Phil R. Carlton, Inc. Real Estate Rents, Insurance, Bonding Greensboro, N. C. Phone 637 FLYNT STUDIO west market street greensboro, n. c. Special Rates to College Girls I-N-S-U-R-A-N-C-E THAT ' S ALL Our specialty for twenty years. If experience and unexcelled service in surance matters appeal to you, then should write or call on ong MERRIMAN INSURANCE AGENCY Dix ie Building Greensboro, N (Established 1902) C. HEADQUARTERS For Confectionaries, best Candies of all kinds. Fancy Fruits, Jellies, Preserves, Pickles. Potted Meats, Fancy Cakes and many other delicacies. We cater to the wants of the college girls. S. G. Lohr Grocery Co. Phones 2717-2718 902 Spring Garden Street THE QUALITY SHOP W. F. Fraser, Manager The One-Price Exclusive LADIES ' READY-TO-WEAR Store of Greensboro Discount of 10. Slude College MEYERS DEPARTMENT STORE HEADQUARTERS for READY-TO-WEAR APPAREL OF QUALITY Dress Accessories, Millinery, Shoes, Dry Good Evening Gowns Greensboro, N. C. A. E. FELKER SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND ART WILMINGTON, N. C. W. Perry Reaves., M.D. J. H. Cooper, M.D. H. J. Lamons. D.D.. Dentistry ana 1 X-Ra ) REAVES INFIRMARY Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat GREENSBORO, N. C. Conyers Fordham Incorporated Prescription Druggists Phones 9 and 10 229 S. Elm St. Greensboro, N. C. Agents for Norris and Park Tilford ' s Candy DR. T. E. SIKES DENTIST BANNER BUILDING GREENSBORO, N. C. FOR STATIONERY AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES WILLS BOOK AND STATIONERY CO. AS A STUDENT You Will Find That the Greensboro Daily News Will greatly aid you. When you retui home it should follow. Get the hon folks on the subscription list of this gre; daily paper. They will enjoy it. Greensboro Daily News Greensboro, N. C. POOLE BLUE, Inc 204 North Elm Street Funeral Directors Ambulance Service Office Phone 420 Night Phone 1490 Battery Park Hotel Asheville, N. C. Thoroughly Rehabilitated Offers every attraction in the way of wholesome cuisine, efficient service and en- tertainment. Golf, tennis, fine saddle horses. Motoring. Concerts. Dancing. WILBUR DAVENDORF Manacer Go TO McDonald Andrews FOR CANDIES, CAKES " AND EVERYTHING " ' 9 ss 3 f SOCIAL AND BUSINESS STATIONERY PRINTED OR ENGRAVED Beautiful Styles from Which to Make Your Selections Wedding Invitations, Announcements, Visiting Cards, Etc., Printed or Encraved " JOS. J. STONE d? COMPANY " Printers and Binders 110-112 East Sycamore Street Greensboro, N. C. IIS c an excellent book from an excel- lent college. It is proper that all the friends of either should do busi- ness with an excellent bank. We are an excellent bank and give ex- cellent service. PROVE OUR STATEMENT BY TRYING US We Want Your Business ATLANTIC BANK AND TRUST COMPANY GREENSBORO, N. C. |! w RONIZE OUR (j ' A h- Jl ERTISERS j e , -t -• i -i -l fi AO w ;, ' , Autographs 7kn, J dtJw, dMiIiJuJiio K a Ma- ' S=L K. Jt au» $ ' Cy_ jMTw £i jU 0» - - L yy y jJ CuoL o ir 5) A- : Ac . . 1 £«=.. t- ..MMJjjM mAMI X«;M: It WO MV«]|]|VAT«V« UJ d tMmOLts Autographs si ■ Qxjt J O- CtJaA- Vol. jtAje. f ' To e a y . Zjm wwwnmi mw mm . m 1 •+ . ( 2 £ jz £ A


Suggestions in the University of North Carolina Greensboro - Pine Needles Yearbook (Greensboro, NC) collection:

University of North Carolina Greensboro - Pine Needles Yearbook (Greensboro, NC) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 1

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University of North Carolina Greensboro - Pine Needles Yearbook (Greensboro, NC) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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University of North Carolina Greensboro - Pine Needles Yearbook (Greensboro, NC) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

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University of North Carolina Greensboro - Pine Needles Yearbook (Greensboro, NC) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

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University of North Carolina Greensboro - Pine Needles Yearbook (Greensboro, NC) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

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University of North Carolina Greensboro - Pine Needles Yearbook (Greensboro, NC) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

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Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.