University of New Mexico - Mirage Yearbook (Albuquerque, NM)

 - Class of 1938

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University of New Mexico - Mirage Yearbook (Albuquerque, NM) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 202 of the 1938 volume:

iirnii ' i r riiMiiii »i iwi i ' i ' ' iiimii iiiriM i!iitejiitii.wj ' T ( 8 VL - wJ J ' fc) • COPYRIGHT, 193S William Beeken, Editur Oscar Khiehtr, litis. Mi r. A i. ;.., ' j i,TM;i.;vfa-« ' j Blending the old with the new — new people, old mountains; new buildings, old architecture; new faces, old customs; new aspirations, old achieve- ments — the University of New Mexico stands timeless between the centuries, not all of one, but rather a part of all. In the following pages we have attempted to preserve tor vou one vear ot vour college life. Light and shadow, joy and sorrow ha -e gone to make up the picture hich e have fashioned. We have tried to capture and set down that elusive, glamorous, timeless substance from which memories come. You, who read, shall be the judges of how well we have succeeded. J, To the pioneers of Tomorrow — to the gallant Youth of the new generation whose destiny it will be to relive on the social, economic, and spiritual frontiers the high adventure of their fathers " conquest of the physical world, we respectfullv dedicate the IQ38 Mirac c. Their struggle will be bitter. Their reward glorious. I. FRATERNAL II. ATHLETIC III. ADMINISTRATIVE IV. SCHOLASTIC The slow of luminarios gives the campus a festive appearance for Homecoming. Even the stately Administra- tion Buildins does its part to welcome the old grads. The new Lilirary — pride of both architects and students. r fl II f ■ ■ ■ I ' -i..- ' J : -. The Administration Building — a symbol of New Mexico ' s prog- ress in education. Hokona Hall — iumi- narios give it an even more beautiful appear- ance at Homecoming. .iiei:t «:«.r» ■ ' ii ' »»»j J The Studfiit Union Huiltliii — a niunument to student cooperation. llll ' II ' Fraternal Mirage Beauty Queens Sororities Fraternities r = xm. rL. tS L xj 3e: X H V :_Jv Tlie Mirage STAGED A fi l EEN CONTEST A committee composed almost wliollv of faculty repre- sentatives selected Miss Margaret Kirkpatrick as Mirage Beauts ' (Jueen at the annual Mirage Beautv Ball. Chosen as attendants were Miss Juanita I-incke, Miss Virginia Harris, Miss Dorothy Seward, and Miss Willys Beyers. The committee reported that their decision was reached only after a lengthy i_leliberatio]i. The bevy of campus ro alt ' was presented ith cor- sages by Oscar Blueher, Business Manager of the 193S Alirage. MARGARET KIRKPATRICK, Beautv Queen K i ' 6jiiif fcC ' SililES iBvaUSX ' -- Pannellenic Council Composed of two representatives from each sorority, the Panhellenic Council is an organization based upon cooperation and harmony among the sororities on the campus. This organization is a branch of the National Panhellenic Con- gress, founded in 1881. In the go " erning of rushing and pledg- ing practices, the Panhellenic Council has accomplished some real good. The arrangement of social dates and the executing of business common to all sororities have been other activities of the Council. The Council works together for the good of the University, and by coopera- tion unifies the interests of all sorority women. The officers of the Panhellenic Council are selected on a rotation basis, the offices passing from one group to another. First row down: Fischer, Bratton, Murphy, Ross, Bebber • Second row down: Kimble, Zimmerman, Wood, Jones, Gibson. Homecoming Floats Reading from top to bottom : The Alpha Chi ' s come in cellophane and win first place. The Kappas skim over Ari- zona on skis. The Chi Omegas go balloon-busting. The A. D. Pi nudists skin the Wildcats. Hokona presents a bevy of beauties. -fvi I iDf flRD ■:.-. V Ci («»» : - •OS ' ,orv, fer lv ' ' ■ ' ' " • • " ., , • Second vo« O Alfc- ' • n Bebbev, 1 ' , Third rovv , n Beyers R° " Ston, CorUra " . ,,,h rosv » , „, „« • BoUon. » , ' Connor, •■ ' ' ' ,,, Za a , ,.,,,v across- . ' - , Firs. ° „ ' ; ' °cVcU, C X ;, ., r Hatiin • P ' : n l-o " ' - ' Amsiey, Ba ' e l.araNvay. Uin, = Journeay, 3 = ' „biey, P ' " " ' %w across. Alplia Cni Ome a F " ounded : De Paiiw Unversity, 1885 Alpha Gamma installed, 19 18 Acti-vrs: Henrietta Bebber, Katharine Bell, Willys Beyers, Ruth Bolton, Jane Cecil, Elizabeth Chappell, Elaine Connor, Helen Baird Kiel, Jean Maier, Jean Mollander, Lynette Newcomb, Sue Pollock, Chloe Robinson, Evodean Vidal, Lois Weeks, Jeanne Wickens, Harriet Zaiaha. PleJijes: Margaret Amsley, Maxine Bates, Dorothy Byrne, Theresa Connelly, Marguerite Cusack, Katherine Hamlin, Marilyn Hitchens, Velna Jackson, Mary Helen Journeay, Jean Laravvay, Joan Laraway, Helen Looney, Ruth Looney, Marcy Mcintosh, Kathryn Mohley, Barbara Pollock, Barbara Rankin, Reca Rogers, Bettie Sellard, Ruth Jean Smith, Esther Weber, Geraldine Voungblood, Janet Voungblood. i- i .. -w-- . Bran ° " across- k 1 V ' " ■ Her " " ' " " ■• Third r " " ' .er, L V . ., Crane, r; ' c et " , across- ' .., _. OSS- A g fa i M " . ' Fourth rov, = ? ■Irst rov " ' ' Buroett, C | ;„, ons » %„ across = ■ Brov " ' " CristV ' , • F ' " " jpr Scott, acro«?- ° plovers, ' -J Elayer gchroeder, Hatrr ' ° " l nes Georges, ,„,,. f ° r ' eorge ■ S ' ' rtari ' V : " ' ' ; ' Fourth ro- " uV-S fVc Sixth row Alplia Delta Pi Founded: Wesleyan Female College, 1851 Alpha Nu installed, 1920 Actives: Jeanne Baker, Naneluu Blair, Jean Branson, Barbara Brown, Marion Burnett, Mattie Chambers, Margaret Christy, Edith Clark, Margaret Crane, Gene Elayer, Betty Fischer, Margery Hamilton, RuthJ eron, Katherine Kimble, Margaret Kirkpatrick, Betty Milam, Gracia Mocho, Marjory Movers, Alyce Scott, Elinor Wolf, Patty Argaliright. PlrJgcs: Jacqueline Des Georges, Muriel Johnston, Julia Lewis, Eleanor Mullison, Evelyn Schroeder, Marjorie Smith, Carlee Stanford. Clii Omega Pounded: Uni ersitv of Arkansas, 1895 Pi Gamma installed, 192 Actives: Gloria Andreas, Mary Louise Bezemek, Charmian Blue, Theda Clarke, Meiha Fite, Mary Ann Garrett, Pauline Ham, Maxine Heichelbech, Betty Houk, Charlotte Luby, June Magruder, Natalie Murdock, Leslie Murphey, Mary Elii-abeth Murphy, Doris Ogden, Hettye Nan Osborne, Florence Pierson, Hildegarde Reiche, Helen Soladay, Vega Testman, Floriana Tigner, Betty Van Natta, Lee Williams, Mary Lou Williams, Pauline Williams, Fern Wood. Pledges: Alma Campbell, Pauline Cummings, Pauline Euler, Annabell Everett, Virginia Harris, Catherine Howell, Helen Hood, Rita McGinlev, Leah Jane Sicks, Charlotte Singer, Ruth Gaines Wilson. First row row Mo " ' ' ' , ,„ Van Mat " Osborne, SUCk .,,-,an,s. Whetstone, WUson First row ro v acro across Otero, Boles •„,r lohnson Harrison. " , ,„„ ViUs, - . :r4--r u!: oar.u.o Ka Vivatton, ' " :;j Lattaire ' - MolUlH (iem et • • FHth l- ' T " • S %th F ' lin ' Ke VUi row row ;eioUil rd row across-. across-, cross-. sto " . Sbec haii SV rlntier Kappa Kappa Lianima Founded: Monmouth College, 1S7 Gamma Beta installei.1, igi8 Actives: Mildred Bennet. June Bishop, Virginia Blain, Margaret Boles, Dixie Ray Boyd, Sammie Bratton, Margaret Burns, Virginia Burns. Betty Burton, Anita Clayton, Helen Currier, Virginia P nieling, Juanita Fincke, Lucille Ciarduno, Marita Gilbert, Mary Helen CJrahl, Mary Harrison, Helen Harwood, Martha Hathaway, CJeraldine Huliliell, Betty Huning, Lucille Honing, lane Iden, Marv Jameson, Martha Johnson, Maxine Kastler, Ruth King, Helen Kinnaird, Lucille Lattaner, Louise Lipp, Lucille Livingston, Ann Lucas, (Jenevieve Mollands, Marie Neer, Eloise Otero, Peggy Paxton, Mary Pollard, Louise Pooler, Harvena Richter, Ann Robertson, Camille Runyan, Dorothy Seward, Katherine Sheehan, Billie Springer, Barbara Strong, Parrie Van Hyning, Patty Vencill, Kitty Weber, Virginia Wills, Mary Lou Waha, Barbara Young, Helen Zimmerman. Pledges: Shirley Chesney. Peggy Hinson. ■ i " 1 strong. ' " chesnsN. . W ' aVia • Second across: across-. iili ,rJfeMt i! ' rft.«; t.aM ai . iia!rU;d jy _ „ . second vovv a -r; - . endves ■ Ross, Shannon Xbvaham,. uuph-- Gross, " ; ' ;= ' ;,oss•. ]a " « ' " ' Fourth row A Plii Mu l ' ' ()iinikHl : Wcsleyan Collcf e, 1852 Xi installed, iqi i Arli-vrs: Elizalieth Ann Carr, Alma Jones, Betsy Ross, Hetty Shannon, Lillyan Stewart. PlrJi is: Rebecca Abraham, Eleanor Brasher, Janice Brasher, Mary Chambers, Ethel Gros, Wilhelniina Melendres, Lillian Michail, Virginia Murphy, Polly Ryan, Shila ' ilev, Madeline Wriuht. f xl , second tosy er, - " " ,.:• B ' -U ' t Con° T " .. v acvo V,,d, Av - ' . Jones, .!- .- ' 1„-;;;;Hou.K -a. ,„ acvoss- J " sniith, S " ' .across- ' " ,„. jitratto " . across- Augie chebecV., K.ar in- Se.s, Bes , --;■;o v across Penney • " Kappa xMpha rOurulcil : W ' asliinLjtoii arul Lfc, 1S65 Rcta I ' hi installed, i ;2() Aitivfs: Liuiis IJfnuiIie, I)(irs;i Heiiton, ( ' l dt ' C ' (iiH) er, Kay llnuLih, C ' lois Kfvev, C ' urr I.nii , Frank Miiii . Wayne Rouse, Jack Sanders, August Sies, Moiitf Strcuig, Roliert Strung, . rthur Smith, W ' illlain Sharp, Porter Stratton, Roliert Scott. PlfJijrs: llemian . rchibick, Rohert Oean, Jack Haserdorn, Leonard Miscia. IVmy Gomez, Jack Peterson, Pete Sheyka, Dan Sullivan, Lawrence Ward, Ed Richard, Tom .McC ' afFerv. - First roNV . Friw «i i iiuwii |ff iau.HHi puu)iu Pi Kappa Alpna Founded: University of N ' irginia, 1868 Beta Delta installeii, 191 5 Actives: John Alter, Ellis Byers, Dale Bellamah, Charles Bassett, Charles Canfield, Melvin Cummings, Charles CoKgeshall, Carl Cook, Thomas Childers, Paul Dorris, Robert Doane, Leonard Fritz, Robert Frazer, Henry Franchini, tireste Franchini, Donald Gere, Charles Hagest, James Jenkins, William Kastler, Raymond Kenney, Robert I.ane, Wallace Lloyd, John Morgan, Arthur Morgan, Howell Melton, Anthony Nevers, Ralph Nielson, Albert Pease, James Faulantis, Willis Pennington, Stephen Reynolds, Gilbert Ross, Robert Snapp, Daniel Smith, George Smith, Emmanuel Schifani, Thomas Spero, Le Moyne Spero, William Sultemeier, Melbourne Spector, Peter Sterling, James Toulouse, Thomas Van Hyning, Keith Weeks. I ' tedijfs: Orval MacL ellan, Avery Monfort, Glen NLartin, CJeorge Watts. First roNV Thomas «-- ;,(. son I ' casc, Spero LaUii " ' " ' • Vhiid . , • Secon ' l NU " " ' " K„ f Stiles, vo • row SuUemier • :: ' uy- ' - ° " " ' " ' Pau Weeks. . Me-.nevsbagen. B U ,_ A ' l nluus, Av " ;, , Mickey ■WWOPW HPMMP Kappa bignia Founiled : University of Virginia, iS6o Delta Zeta installed, 1024 Acti-ves: Anthony Arniijo, Dirk Arnold, Bill Ashton, Herbert Kciiley, Bill Beeken, Ed Black, Paul Brock, Boh Buck, Loether Buck, Harry Butts, Charles Burton. Boh C ' onuell, Ray C ' orckran, Bill Cornelius, Joe Cramer, Jack Hailc, Tom Hall, Jack Henle , Jack Houk, Ray Keithlcy, Stanley Koch, James MarkI, Max Mattin ly, Austin McFaddcn, Mickey McFadden, Bill McCormick, Dick Meinershagen, Oscar OHicer, T homas I ' ilkinnton, Orvillc Paulson, Tom Quebedeaux, Neil Randall, Bill Roberts, Phil Shirley, Dick Shiiiipmaii, Bob Siufjcr, Jean Spencer, Claude Standlee, John Stewart. John Sudetth. Afton William-. Pledges: Howard Cohea. Frank Furb , Milton Ilanna, Phil Hood. Wilbur Lewis. Bill Magenheimer, oodro v NeSmith, V on Patterson, Dick Press -, Benjamin Shatter, Ike Singer, S. B. Skidmore. Lewi • Second ' .. Hood. V ouW J;;-;,::- Ha«er, S.n.er, • " •- - Va Jethe-tmer, O cer, PU,n across- l " " ■ fe. t,_ HigS ' " ' - ' Thompson • . " .hrelbev, V ■ ' ' ■ Gibson, ' ' »- ■ ' ■ t mm immnv i m ' Sigma Clii I-Ouiuicil : Miami I ' ni ersit ' , 18 1; Beta Xi installed, i ) i S Activrs: Homer Anderson, Oscar Blueher, llmvaril Hr.ittmi, C ' arlyU- Ki sr ri, Dnn Bums, Lewis Butler, George Castle, Bill Colby, Charles Currier, S. B. l)anc , Robert DoBell, Fred Evans, Gerald Gerard, Tom Gibson, Bud Cjreenbaum, CJeorge Hannett, Carter Havdon, George Higgins, Philip Howes, George Johnston, Kip Kelso, Sid Kirkpatrick, Bud Lewis, Dick Losh, Jack McManus, John McMullan, Dan Molloy, Si Nanninga, Albert Nohl, John Patchen, Bill Pickens, Walter Ruoff, J. B. Sachse, Cieorge Schreiber, Sam Shortle, A. G. Sinims, Al Simpson, Richard Strome, Charles Tannehill, Bob Thompson, Bill Wood, Frank Young. Pledges: Kenneth Balcomb, Ulmer Beatty, Woode Bosscmeyer, Duncan Duncan, Bini (iill, Burke Gleason, Richard ILannah, Ralph Harrison, ' I ' om Jolly, Marion Neimants, Roy Pettus, Harris Sharp, Tom Stribling, Fred Wilson. rovv : d o. across: „. Hannah, Hoxves. a " 0 -. K nnit ga, i " " Hutcheson .3» _ ; ' Magg ' ' ' j anning across . r Jones • S Xcl . ' Tan ' anWes, inev Vlebevt, J-: . ne, M«CK, .- . cavanaugh, W. vo. acvos s. „ „,, . P. :::. Mde.a.es, May «IM M m A %f i|ma Phi Epsium S Founded: Unlv ' tTsity of ' irginia, igiu N. M. Alpha Installcil, 1929 . ti■vl . : Jack Bradley, Pierce Beach, P ' llmund Cavanaugh, Barney CJardner, Bruce Benton, Roy Jones. I. A. Pananides, Franklin Mock, CJene Morris, Harlan Morris, John Saxton. Kenneth Weeks, Jack Ellis, Gordon Wood, Leo Harvey. Plriiffcs: Sam Melendres, Silas Henry, Gail Smith, Dan Ilalbcrslalian, John Peters, Oscar Syme, Leon Brewer. Reading from top to liottom: King entertains the Sigs in front of the Siili. The rally before the Tempe game was strictly informal. The Minerettes invade the Wolves ' lair. Governor Tingley gives the Lobos the once over. The " King of Jazz " gives the " cats " a treat. Phraterc: 1 ouiuicd : Lhiiversity of Cali- fornia at Los . ngeles l psil()n Chapter Installed i ()3 i Siil ' -C iil ' li-ri Lauijhtin: President: Helen Coni- stock ; Members: Martha Brins, Mary Carmignani, Nita Clark, Georgina Cogswell, Mildred Corder, Alice Cor- Held. Laura Jean Davidson, Jean Dunlap, Hertha Punkle, Jean Ellis, Frances Fitield, Julia Fritz, Mae Gil- bert, Betty Gordon, Dorothy (Jordon, Waded Goze, Margaret Hopcraft, Virginia Horton, Ency Jamison, Bar- bara McCJinn, Marybelle Montgomery, Ruth I ' arkhnrst, Clare Swayne, Amma Lou ' anl eusen, Dorothv Vi ian. H ' iciniilti: President: Lorraine Webb; Members: Emily Aquino, Sunshine Cloud, Pearl Goodson, Marcelina Herrera, Josephine Pinno, Mildred Rexroate, Barbara Roberts, Lorraine Webb. Liis Diimttas: President: Mary Fernan- dez; Members: Cordelia Abeyta, Sarah Baca, Evangeline de Baca, Vera Barela, Dolores Cordova, Mary Fer- nandez, Frederlca CJallegos, Julia Gutierrez, Josephine Jaramillo, Mary Lawrence, Connie Lemou, Audrca Orina, Caudelaria Ortega, Alvita Pa- checo, ila Sanchez, Nona Sanchez, Betty Stiner. First row across: Armijo. Baca, Brechtel, Brink • Second row across: Comstock, Corder, Corrteld, De Baca • Third row across: Dunkle, Dunlap, Ellis, Farrington • Fourth row across: Florence, Flory, Margaret Goze, Waded Goze • Fifth row across: Griffin, Hopcraft, Kerr, MacDonald • Sixth row across: Maio, Montgom- ery, Nannes, Pacheco • Seventh row across: Parkhnrst, Sanchez, Vivian. Reading from top to bottom: The Kappa Sigs don tuxs for their Winter Formal. A big crowd is on hand for the formal opening of the Student Union. The Homecoming Dance- — nuf said. Mil Atliletic Homecoming Queens Football Basketball Track Minor Sports r C (L Jx_jLr l Tlie Atlilete; HA ' E A QUEEN TOO To preside over the numerous and -aried acti ' itits of Homecoming, Miss Louise Pooler was chosen bv popuhxr vote of the student bodv as Homecoming Queen. The selection of Miss Gracia Mocho and Miss Billie McCarlev as attendants lent additional beauty and charm to the queen ' s throne. To the cheers of their assembled subjects, the queen and her attend- ants were crowned by Dean Bostwick at the Home- coming Dance. ii LOUISI POOLHR, Homccomiini O uccn r ' 4 Dolzadelli Shipkey Barne THE COACHES Putting all their efforts into producing winning teams for the University of New Mexico, the coaching staff can well be proud of the result of their efforts for the year 1937-38. Many have been their disappointments as they have watched injuries, scholastic difficulties, and just plain bad luck rob them of much-desired victories. Alwavs holding sportsmanship in the highest esteem, the coaches are the real leaders of the Lobos on all fields of endeavor. St. John Ruotf AND MANAGERS Receiving; little credit for their so necessary work, the managers are the true ini-sung heroes of any athletic team. The manager who sticks with a team for an entire season deserves certainU ' as much credit for his efforts as the letterman. The managers, by doing so much for so little reward, iiavc gained for themselves a liigh and enviable position in the rank of real Lobo boosters. Strome X, FOOTBALL Murphy r mik .« l Meincrshajien McDavid Felli hPiinffei.i Hanne Despite the difficulties of a new system of play under a new coach, the Loho squad gave an excellent account of itself in the 19. 7 sea- son. With many lettermen returning and several promising men coming up from the Freshman squad, promises of a good team next ' ear are exceptionalK bright. LOBOS 14 N. M. TEACHFRS o A potentiall ' strong Lobo eleven reversed last year ' s defeat bv the Mustangs from Sil- er Cltw " Beans " Renfro, an unheraldeii halfback, was shaken loose to score two touchdowns. Fellis converted with both scores. The Mustangs wei e allowed to peneti-ate New Mexico territory only once. Though the ' were no match for the stronger Tobo squail, the Feachers showed much fight ami spirit. LOBO.S DFNVI ' .R 12 In an intersectional game, tlie Lobos met a strong Denver University team. Tn the first quarter. New Mexico mixed spinners and re- verses for several effective gains, but a tumble on the n. L ' . 23-vartl line halted their march on the enemy goal line. Unable to score througii the solid l.obo line, the Warriors took to the air to score on two i I ' • ' - aj:4 f-- -- iiivtujj , " - 19 3 7 ' Renfro ■ long passes to All-Conference ] " ,nd Dreher. New Mexico suffered a heavv loss when Nie- mants was injured in the first quarter. LOBOS o AGGIF.S 5 P ' ighting one of the hardest battles In the thirtv meetings of the two teams, the Lobos and Aggies met in Las Cruces as a feature of the Aggie Homecoming celebration. While the Lobos lacked the punch to put across a score, they stopped one of the South- west ' s best touchdown machines. A thirty yard place kick by Wood of the Aggies which hit the crossbar and bounced over and a safety was the margin by which the Aggies were victorious. At one point in the game, the men of the Cherry and Silver held for four downs within the one-yard line. Outkicking the highly touted Miller of the Aggies throughout the game, Dw er was outstaml- ing for the Lobos. LOBOS 7 TEXAS MINES 7 Returning to their home field, the Lobos met the Texas Miners. The Muckers scored in the first half on a pass from Heineman to Arnold. The Lobos came hack to score with a long pass from Bassett to Captain Murpliv. Famed for their excellent passing ability, the Muckers failed to e(|ual tlie Lobo ' s aerial gains. Gardner Bassett Reviiolds Chirk FOOTBALL Hall Dwver Evans NcSmith Barlow i Play in the second half was ragged on the part of both teams. The Lobos had two chances to score but could not cross the last stripe. Woodrow NeSmith, New Mexico center, played an outstanding game in the line, and Dwyer again outshone the opponents with his punting. LOBOS o TEXAS TECH 27 Coach Shipkey and his men traveled to Lubbock to meet the Red Raiders of Texas Tech. The Wolfpack was unable to with- stand the power of the conference champions and were sent home stinging under a 27-0 defeat. The game was rough with many penalties being inflicted on both sides. In the closing minutes of plav, the Lobos came to life with an aerial attack that clicked. An interception of Nicmants ' pass on tlic lech 2i- ard line endeel the threat. LOBOS 15 TEMPE 7 With each team striving for its first Confer- ence victory, the Lobos met tiie Tempe Bull- dogs on Varsity field. Burns of Tempe opened the scoring with a 90-yard return of a punt. The conversion tfft M 3vl 19 3 7 Barlow attempt was good. Soon after this, Dwyer scored on a 69-yard punt return which made the score 7-6. New Mexico took a 9-7 lead when I- ' eUis " 40-yard place kick from a difficult angle arched squarely between the uprights. In the seconil half, the Lobo machine rolled smoothly, and after a downfield march with Niemaiits and Dwyer carrying the ball, Nie- mants scored on a line buck. The Lobos were again close to pay ilirt when the final gun sounded. Captain Murphy and NeSmith in the line and Niemants and Dwyer in the backtield turned in stellar performances. LOBOS 26 COLORADO COLLEGE 6 Accompanied by an enthusiastic crowd of rooters, the Lobos entrained for Colorado Springs. Although they entered the game as underdogs, the Varsity soon proved their mettle by scoring in tiie opening minutes of play on a touchdown from the six-yard Hne by Niemants. Dwyer, Clark, and Henley also tallied for New Mexico. The outcome of the game ruinetl the Bengal ' s homecoming. Lobo rooters, overjoyed by the unexpected victory, attempted an attack on tiie goal posts but were repulsed by the overwhelming numbers of their opjionents. Tannehili Niemants ' 1 ¥ ' dinger •I Snook r J FOOTBALL M artel ■«r Henley " " S Fritz Pilkington Hicks ' ' %N " -».. a LOBOS o ARIZONA 21 Before 7,000 fans, gathered to celebrate Homecoming on the Hilltop, the Blue Bri- gade of Arizona met the Wolfpack. In the first half the Lobos were able to check the powerful Arizona attack which was led by Walt Nielson, 215-pound fullback. In the last half, Arizona ' s many substitutions began to tell on the Hilltoppers and Tex Oliver ' s Wildcats chalked up sixteen points. LOBOS 7 FLAGSTAFF 6 The final game of the season saw a de- termined Lobo team edge out a fighting Flagstaff scjuad b - one point. Walter Clark ended his career in grant! style by scoring New Mexico ' s only touclulown. Clark gathered in a Lumberjack pass on his own 23-yard line and raced 72 yards down the sidelines to cross the goal untouched. Fellis, another senior, kicked the extra point which proN ' ed the margin of ictory. The Jacks came back to tally on a 3 -vard pass. The attemptetl con ' ei-sion was blocked by Steve Reynolds. in the uniform of the " L " for tiie last time were McDavid, Murphy, Clark, Hannett, Dorris, Meinershagen, anti lellis. " Q Fresl inian Footkill Although showing onl one win against three losses for the season, the 1937 F ' rosh sqiKul was rated as one of the strongest seen on the Hilltop in several seasons. A jinx, in the form of a series of injuries and had hreaks, seemed to follow the Greenies all season. l ' la ing their first game under the Cherry and Silver, the Freshmen soundly trouneed the Indian School Moliawks. The frosh backfield had a field day, running up 32 points. The Mohawks were able to tally only once. Travel- ing to Portales, the first ear scjuad was loser to Portales by a score of 9-0. The game was close and hard-fought all the way. A series of errors proved costly as the Frosh next fell before the Aggies, 24-6. Even in defeat, the Freshmen left with the spectators the impression that the Lobos were equally as strong as the invaders. Fatigued by an all night trip to Hobbs, the I ' rosli boweel to a stronger and more experienced Texas Tech squad by a score of 3 i-o. The Freshmen scrimmaged with the ' arsity all season and furnished them with plenty of competition. They were furnished with the plays of the Varsitv ' s opponents to run against the Varsity. Many able performers from the 1937 Freshman squad will help to bolster up next year ' s ' arsity. S, E% i Saenz, Lopez, Meinei hagen, Hannett, Binnelt. CJodding takes the center lump. L oho Basketnall Playing a comparatively steady game of basketliall most of the season, the Lobos wound up the 1938 season with a record of se ' en victories and thirteen defeats. The Conference standing of the team was influenced greatly liy the thirteen defeats, all in Border Conference tilts, landing them in fifth place. The Lobos were beaten by a fighting Socorro Mines Team as the casaba season opened. They retaliated the next game and came away with the Miners ' pick, shovel, and a 37-34 thriller to their credit. The Lobos were soundly trounced at State College the nights of January 28 and 2q to the tune of 58-32 and 60-49. The Lobos ' brilliant passing attack kept the wonder team from the Aggies from running wild. Meeting the Tempe Bulldogs next on their home court, the Lobos showed their stuff with a 49-39 victory. The game was hard fought throughout, ending with two Tempe first-stringers being sent to the showers for roughness. However the apparent inability of the Lobo team to win two straight games showed itself when the Tempe team, red-hot from the opening minutes of play, came out on the long end of the 58-30 score. The Texas Mines visited the Carlisle gym but were met by a roaring UNM team that showed a fine brand of basketball, taking the first of a two-game series 51-45. The old " Off and On " Lobo quint met them the next night, and true to form, lost the game 40-32, after leading up to the last eight minutes of the game. The two halves w ere a series of rough plays and fouls, a total of thirty-two being called by the officials. SJMJ Renfrci, Scer . McMaiuiv, Brock, DuBill. " The Chief " s ishe on Traveling to Albuquerque with a determination to win, Texas Tech was only half satisfied when the team left Saturday night. The Lobos, in the first game, jumped into an early lead. Carl Seery, first-year man, put the game on ice with his miraculous long shots. However the sec- ond game was all the Red Raider . Erratic passing anil poor offensive work left the Lohos with the jinx still with them, and also a 39-26 score. The return of the Flagstaff Lumberjacks saw a high-riding Lobo quint, led by lal Ciodding and Chief Saenz, break the season-long jinx and win two straight games. The Lobos displayed a fast offensive and a strong defen- sive throughout the two-game series. It was probably the best basketball that they have played this season. Jumping into the lead in the opening minutes of play, the Farmers of State College gave the Lobos a shellacking. At the end of the first seven minutes of play the score was tied at 12-all. Again the Aggie quint forged ahead to finish strongly with a 63-39 score. Again the following night the Lobos were humbled by a superior Aggie bunch. Breaking fast in the first period, the Lobos played the best ball that local fans had seen all season, but after the start of the second half, the Aggie aces built up the score to 65-42. The game was rough from the start and several men from both teams were sent to the showers. The University of Arizona five made it four straight by taking the closing games of the season. They were hard-fought, hard-played games, but the Lobos were not the inspired combatants which were needed to equal the Arizona five ' s efforts. Manuel Saenz, George Hannett, Emilio Lopez and Dick Meiner- shagen played their last game for the Lobos. Seniors to letter were Emilio Lopez, Dick Meinershagen, George Hannett and Manuel Chief Saenz. n p , 1 . .., J TracL racK The men of the cinders and circle jumped the gun on their opponents this year liy starting their training early in No -ember. The winder snows and the spring winds cut deepl ' into Lobo practice sessions, and a lack of material made many predict a disastrous season for the Lobos. The Lobos ' first taste of competition came in the State College Invitational Meet at Las Cruces. The Lobos showed the Conference members that they were definitely in the running by taking second place with a team of eight men. Out of the forty-six points garnered by New Mexico, Charles Tannehill, a new find of Coach John- son ' s, accounted for fifteen. With the result of the meet depending upon the outcome of the relav. the Lobos were defeated l v the Aggies. The defeat was made all the more liitter because of the fact that it was the first time that an Aggie squad had .1 If 15 w.in . t] a I,( l)o track team. First places were aliiuit c enl divided with Hiirlnii. M Fadden, lnhn-nii, Fria , and Fannehill being the (nitstandini; men for the I. olios. ' I ' he Loho track team ran awav froiTi an inexperienced Flagstaff squad to win ihc meel, S4-41. Fhe surprise of the meet was Frias who edi;ed out the Flagstaff two-mile ace, Liikus. t o win with a hmidred yards to spare. In a dual meet on the I. oho held, the Folios showed up well as they marshalled all Init three first places and look the I exas Miners into camp liy an X7-39 score, llvwer and Fannehill were high point winners of the meet, l)w er in the runnintr events and ' Fannehill on the field. lla ing little trouble in gathering ele en Hrst places, the . ri (Uia Wildcats won their dual meet from the Lolios S3-41. Fhis meet was held in connection with the state high school meet. Rolling np fortv-nine and one-third points, the University of Arizona retained their title in the Border Confer- ence Meet. Bv scoring twenty-eight points, the Lol ' os nosed out Texas Tech for third place. Fempe was runner- up with thirt -two points. Boxing While the eyes of the student body were fo cused upon the fortunes of the football and basketball teams, the Lobos were being well represented in boxing. Boxing is a sport that has continually found the University near the peak, of collegiate performance. With only two veterans, Paulson at 12 pounds antl Danoff at 165 pounds, to build his team around. Coach Willis Barnes recruited tournament win- ners. Bill Dwyer in the unlimited class and Tonv Armijo in the 155-pound class to add to his line-up. Later additions to the team who also proved themselves capable scrappers were Martinez at 115 pounds, Ortega at 145 pounds, and Cisneros, a Freshman, at 145 pounds. The Cherry and Silver " suicide squad " emerged ictorious over the Ari- zona State Lumberjacks, winning four bouts to two. Losses to Tempe and the University of Arizona were caused bv forfcitetl matches on the jiart of the Lobos. Due to the inexperience of the Lobo fighters, onlv one Border Conference crown was won. " Izzy " Danoff, 165-pound Lobo veteran, fought craftily through all opposition to bring the title to the Wolves ' lair. With all of this season ' s mittmcn returning next year, Coach Barnes can look f()r artl to a cr ' bright campaign in ' 9. JRv ■ i i •4-4-, ., Z.1Z it Thompson, Burnett, Singer, Coach Sacks, Conroy, Maltinsjly, Rowe. SsJ ' ■ ii ■: -fcTvaKi » ■ Asv;4i«B. Tennis Coach Benny Sacks ' racijiictnicn coinplctcxi a fairly successful season by winning three dual matches and dropping two. In addition, they placed second in the Border Conference Meet. Featured hy the win of Burnett and Conroy over former Border Confer- ence doubles champions. Pooler and Deakins, the Lobos took the alumni into camp bv a score of i i ' i their first taste of outside competition for the season. The three -ictories were chalked up at the expense of Texas Mines, the Aggies, and Flagstaff. The latter squad was shut out 7-0 by a high-riding Lobo racquetwielding combination. In the feature match of the day, Burnett defeated Hitt. Lumberjack number one man, 6-4, 4-6, and 7-5. The Lobos were saved fi-om a shutout at the hands of Arizona by the stellar playing of Thompson who won his match over Colzer. It was Rowe who saved the Lobos from being whitewashed by Texas Tech. He won his match from McCarty by scores of 2-6, 6-4, and 7-5. In the Conference meet held at Tempe. Arizona swept singles, doubles, and team honors. In the singles finals. Si Ganem, of Arizona, defeated Bill Burnett to take the crown. In the second di ' ision, in which plavers competed only for team points. New Mexico was second to Arizona. In the Hnal, Borquiest, of Arizona, -on over Thompson, of New Mexico. il »f. Dwyer gets off a long spiral against Tempe. Fellis ' toe again makes the ronversions good. Lopez tries for the reliound. Dwyer eludes a Liimherjack. - .--fjtSusl ' mv » t .? !■ S f l f . V f .,.■■ sa -«» . - i i. ' The cheerleaders set off the ground. The liaiui saliitt squad makes Lolios forget the game. The Texaiis salute band parades at the depot. s Texas. The Miners ' pep New Mexico. The Miners ' ' H I ' ? ?. . »d. h I m% ' M m k JiSt Johnson takes entries in the intramural swimming meet. The Pikes and Barbs meet in the basketball rinale. Shades of William Tell. The Kappa Sig titleholders take time out. One-half of the Pike racket wielding duo. I S " m m w ' lA fm •II ' u If SBf % SS m v ' ' " » ' t ' - • , BK ■ ' , ' flfl ! r- Where ' s that fraternity -social veneer? The one length free style. Swimmers ready! The wide open spares — and a hitt ' h-hlker. Just before the liill. -7 . « ( . . i ' t. V -y - ' ' ' - — , , r .. , i t ' - . ' " ( . »_ B« f et-t .y X ' V ' y. ■ ._ „« ' v .-f . r - ,. A The Cheerleaders— Gallagher, Armijo, and Cornelius. Go, New Mexico! Gallagher goes! ■ Ill Administrative Engineers ' Queens Administration Organizations if .f: h- ' - % i f J k - - -fl. Tlie Engineers HAVE A LEADING LADY Pro -ing to the satisfaction of the dubious that the frequenters of Hadley Hall — The Engineers — tlo have an eye for beauty, Miss J ne Tden was chosen as queen to reign over their annual St. Patrick ' s Day Dance. The queen was attended by Miss Maxine Bates and Miss Lois Weeks. The coronation ceremonies were conducted with all the pomp fitting for such a great day for all Engineers. . I i JANE IDEN, Engineers Queen Lireetin s broni Qovernor Tingley rhr()UL!;ii the mtHliuni of the Mirnijc 1 am happy to extend my y;reetings to the stiielents of the Uni -ersit ' of New Mexieo. To those students who this ear will complete their college courses I want to extend m ' best wishes for their success. I ' hev will go into many lines of en- tieavor, and I would like to take this opportunity to remind them that in New Mexico there is unlimited opportunity for the future — In the jirofes- sions, in education, in engineering, in chemistry, in social sciences, in all lines of work. More and more each year New Mexico needs men and women who have been trained in New Mexico, who know its problems and its people. Tliere are still " frontiers ' " to be conquered in New Mexico, and none should be more qualified for the tasks at hand than the trained sons and daughters of our pioneers of yesterday and today. To those yho are leaving school this year to enter their chosen fields ami to those who have yet to complete their training my greetings and sincere good wishes for the future. Sincerely yours, CLYDE TIN GLEY, Governor of Nciv Mexico. U. N. M. President James F. Zlmniernian I take this opportunitN ' to extend a personal Li;reeting to e ' ery stuelent in the L ' ni " ersit of Xew Mexico. The year 1 93 7- 1 93 S has seen many important developments in student aeti ities. [t is throutih tlie mediiini of tlie 1938 Minuji- that tliese activities will be pre- sented to us. The Miiuujf will reflect the alertness of a growing and acti -e student bod . Let me express m hearty appreciation to the staff of the Mirayc for their unselfish labor in the production of this annual. JAMES F. ZIMMERMAN, Prcsidmi. University of Nrzv Mexico. X ' - r D ean o f w omen Tlie primary aim of tlic Office ot the Dean of Women is to iielp women students li ' e a well i-ouiuieii college life by participation in L ' niversitv activities anc] by conscientious application to their academic work. This office is wiUing at all times to help individuals with their problems and to help oro;ani ations which promote a constructive program for the improvement of all L ' niversity students. LENA C. CLAUVE, Dt ' ini of n ' oiiirii. Dean of M eii All student acti ' ities, such as student government, athletics, publications, dra- matics, glee clubs, tlebate and all social Hfe on the campus bring to those who participate in them certain definite and constructive benefits which can not possibly be gained through the pursuits ot the pure academic side alone. The real alues result from participa- tion in these exti " a-curricular acti -ities with the proper spirit and understanding of their relation to the mental purpose of the University. J. L. BosrwiCK , Didii (if Ml funda- Cieneral College The General College is, tii ' st, a sort ot trv-out or proving-ground, and, second, a place for earlv speclali atlon. People with vague ideas about college or with insufficient preparation are giv ' en oppor- tunity tt) discover their own abilities. On the other hand, certain people who desire to restrict their work to a par- ticular fieki for a short time are given much greater freedom from require- ments looking to the attainment of degrees. The General College has definitely proved its alue in connection with the L ' niversity program. JAY C. KNODE, Dn,„. LtMlege ol ]r,diication I lie hmctlon ot the LollcgL- of Educa- tion is to ti ' aiii tcaclicrs, siipcr ' isors and administrators to meet the needs of the state in the Held ot education. As a means to this end, the pupils are taught how to meet problems in the art of teaching and the new meaning of the subjects of instruction. Graduation from tlie College of I ' .duca- tion meets the requirements of the State Board of Education for certification of elementary and high school teachers and also the requirements of the North Central Association of Secondary Schools and Colleges. S. P. NANNINGA, Dean. College or Engineering With the completion ot a heating laborator ' and the addition ot other improved facilities, the College of Kngi- neering is able to better prepare tiie student for his chosen profession than ever before. As never before, the engi- neer is being called upon to satisfy the needs of our modern social order. Alert to the changes hich are con- stantly taking place in the engineering field, the College of Engineering is attempting to broaden its field of instruction to more thoroughly prepare the engineer of the future. M. E. FARRIS, Dcau. I ' I i College oi Arts ana Sciences a Grcitlnate Scliool an Keeping p;ice with the growino; and changing needs of the dav is a niajor problem for every indi idiial. 1 here are those who would change the social order very quickly, and there are many who feel we must Hntl happiness and stability in re erting to the ideals of older and more conservative times. In a large L ni ersity, we feel the pres- sure of these forces. By intelligent study anil thinking, we seek to direct our efforts toward an undei ' standing of them, for happiness comes not in struggling desperately for the unattain- able, but in finding and accepting our place in life. Gi:ORGK P. HAMMOND, D.wm. College or Fine Arts The Board of Regents established the College of Pine Arts in the spring of 1936. Dr. George St. Clair was ap- pointed first Dean. The College of Fine Arts comprises three departments and one half depart- ment. The Departments offering cur- ricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts are Dramatic . rt, Music, and Art (Painting and Design). There is a two-year preparator - course in Architecture. Ihe number of students registered in the College of Fine Arts this year is forty-six. The actual number of students taking courses offered by this College is something less than six hundred. GEORGE ST. CLAIR. Student Louncil As the administrative unit of the Asso- ciated Students, the Student Council is called upon to perform many functions. Reprcscntati ' es are chosen from those students most acti e in all forms of activities on the campus. All disburse- ments of the Associated Students ' fimds are controlled by this group. Activities for the year included a poll Stanley Koch , , - i c i c J .. taken on the attitude or tlie student Body toward the R.O.T.C. A novel experiment was introduced when all students were given an opportunity to grade their professors. These ballots were prepared and the results tabulated by the Student Council. Much credit must be given the Council for introducing the Student-Manager system of government to this campus. The Student Council submitted this amendment to the students. The results of the new system can not be known yet, but the Council must be given credit for taking a step in the direction of progress. First row across: Stallings, Starrett, Minis, Kimble, Saunders • Second row across: Reidy, . shton, F asley, Jones, Burnett. ?tiicLMit Senate S L luki " the lc;uk-|-sliip ol I ' rcsiilcnt Charles Burton, the Student Senate ear- I ' ieii on Its duties tor the year in a hii hly successful manner. Directing the activi- ties of the annual Homecoming celebi-a- tion, the Senate was instrumental in making tliis e ent enjoNahle tor all. I he Senate also sponsored a series ot loiHim meetings which were held at intervals throughout the " ear. All students were gi en an opportunity to express their ' iews on campus problems at these meetings. C ' hjrlfs Burton PuDlications Board The Publications Board is the group which exercises control over all student publica- tions. After all arrangements lia ' e been made to the satisfaction of the Board, authorization is given to student publications and advertising projects. Fhe selection of the editors and business managers of the two major publications is anotiier duty of the board. A spring dinner dance, honoring staff workers, is financed by the Publications Board. The Chairman of the Board is Dean St. Clair, head of the Knglish Department. Top: Dean St. Clair, Dean Bostwick, Koch, Williani-N. Sanmlers • Bottom: Pickens, Beekeii. Blueher. THE LOBO Remaining in the t vicc- vcekl class and aiiding a i-oto- gravLirc section, the l.olxi gained recognition as one of the outstanding college papers in the Southwest. An active editoi-ial campaign was car- ried on throughout the ear. The editorial staff consisted of Lyle Saunders, Editor: Reynolds Johnson and Afton Williams, News Editors; John Morgan, iManaging Edi- tor; Jim Toulouse, Sports Editor; Margaret Burns and Richard Whiteman, Feature Editors; Margaret Burns and Billie Springer, Society Edi- tors; Lucille Lattaner and Helen Kinnaird, Girls ' Sport Editors. The Business Staff consisted of: Business Manager, Bill Pickens; Advertising Assist- ant, Bill Colby; Advertising Secretary, Dick Bluestein; Circulation Manager, Tom Childers; Solicitors, Harry Butts, Caswell Silver, and Ernst Blumenthaul. % First row across: Williams, Morgan. Whiteman, Butler, liurnj, Kiiiiiairil, Wooii, Pcarcc • Second row across: Mcza, Stewart. Hrailley, Jainiesoii, Weeks. ( Iiambers, Lattaner, I.iniler • I ' hird row across: (Jifford, Nelson, Sachse, Colby, .Anderson, McMullen. Hlomeiitlial. Gros. THE MIRAGE 1 I (I record the highlights of one school car is the task of the Miratjc. Loft - ambitions at the beginning of the school year ha e been sliattered h disappointments. To a lo al anti hard-worlving staff should go fidl credit for whatever favorable impressions are left with the student boil . Tlie editorial staff consisted of: Editor, Bill Beeken ; Associ- ate Editors. Claude Standlee, Henrietta Bebber, and Max- ene I ' ierce; Freshman J ' .ditor, Louise Starrett, Sophomore Editor, Gracio Mocho; Jun- ior Editor, Helen Kinnaird; Senior Editor, I ' liil Shirley; Athletics; Tony Armijo, Bill Roberts, and Afton Williams; Photography, George Brooks, Orville Paulson, and (ilenn Martin; Art, Dick Arnold. The business staff consisted of Oscar Blueher, Business Manager; J. B. Sachse, Assist- ant Business Manager; Dorothy Seward, Harry Butts, Emmanuel Schifani, Bill Wood, Virginia Harris. N ' irginia Blain, Albert Simms, II, George Schrieber, Marilyn Hitchins, Evelyn Schroeder. ' ' ut-her First row across: Standlee, Beliher, McFaddeii, Kinnaird, Pearce, Starret. Shirley, Arnold • Second row across: Mocho, Armijo, I.inder, Whetstone. Paulsen, WiMson, Williams, Jones • Third row across: .Anderson, Bntler, Sachse, Butts, Sharp, Blaine, Burton, Webber. 1 lie Band Under the capable Ie;uiership of Director William Kunkle, tlie Band lias proved itself to be a real asset to the L ni ersity. I he Band was on hand at all football games played at home, and much credit must be given this group for keeping Lobo pep at a high pitch. Iheir intricate stunts given between the liaKes at football games were appreciatei.1 In all spectators. The Band accompanied the team to Colorado College, and a large measure of credit is due it for adding to the enjoyment of the large number of rooters who followed the destinies of the Lobos. This group also appeared on several radio programs antl marcheil in ci ' ic and patriotic parades. No assembly was officially opened t)r ck)sed withoLit the playing of the Band. The organization tilled out a busy ear by playing for two concerts on the campus and tour concerts ilui-ing the I- ' ine Arts I ' estival. John Morgan, President; James Caldwell, ' ice-presldent ; Robert Under, SecretarN-Treasurer ; ' illiam Kunkcl, Director; Keith Weeks, Assistant Director. Tlie Orchestra AlthoLigli not appearing before the student boLly quite as o ften as the Band, the importance of the Orchestra to the University is not to be underesti- mated. Their faultless performances were the result of many hours of faithful practice under the able baton of Mrs. Grace Thompson. Many of the members of this group play in tiie Albuquerque Civic Orchestra, which is also under the leadership of Mrs. Thompson. The Orchestra appeared in several assemblies and was well appreciated by the entire student body. Tlieir talents were also aired over the ether waves via a local radio station. The Orchestra plaved for the Fine Arts Festival and was instrumental in making this event a success. Male Quartette The Male Quartette presented con- certs for the Albuquerque city schools, luncheon cluhs, American Legion, and many of the churches. A special pro- gram was gi en for the baccalaureate service of the Indian School. Mrs. Redman is di rector. Members are: Lloyd Patton, Cieorge Brooks, Lloyd Weide, H. A. Phillips. Patton Bronk;. Weide Phillip: Male Cliorus The Male Chorus, under the direction of Grace Thompson, appeared on radio programs ami on the spring concert. It is to be regretted that this group was not presented before the entire student body in an assembly during the year as their fine presentations were the result of many hours of tiiligcnt practice. Certainly the students would have proved an appre- ciative audience. Ciirls G iiariclte The (jirls ' (Juai ' tcttf j ;i -c programs tor tlic Albu(jLiL ' r(iiic city schools, and iiianv of the scr -icc clubs. High light of their season was the I ' .lks ' Mother ' s Da ' service. Mrs. Redman directs the Quartette. Members are: Sopranos, Helen Emily Zimmeiiiian and Jean Ellis. Altos, Sammie Bratton and [ulia Carroll. Ziinmerman Elli Bratton Carroll Girls Cliorus Departing from their usual custom, the (iirls ' Chorus, under the direction of Mrs. Grace Thompson, appeared on many radio programs this vear. Several operatic selections were presented for the annual spring concert. At intervals throughout the year, the group was presented before various local civic groups. w omen s Athletic Association Amon the- sports offercii b tlic ' onu ' n ' s Athletic Department in which girls may participate to earn their fifty points for entrance in the Women ' s Athletic Association, are h()cke ' . speedball, tennis, dodgehall, archei- ' , ping pong, and swimming. Specific points are awarded to win- ners, runners-up, and entrants in the tournaments in each field. When a girl has earned five hundred points, she is awarded a letter. Girls to recei -e letters this sear were Audrey Baer. Lucille Garduno, Lucille Lattaner, Eloisa Gutierrez, Betty Hun- ing and Ency Jameson. One thousand points earns a girl a sweater. This award was made to Juanita Fincke, Ena Dellinger, Floriana Tigner, Evodean Vidal, and Lee Williams. Juanita ' s and Floriana ' s awards were exceptional in that they -v ' ere earned in only two years of competition. In addition Floriana won a stripe, which is awarded for five hundreil extra points after earning a sweater. Other stripe winners were NLihel Downer and Ruth Heron. Among acti ities this year were Coc ' iperative Play Night, October 14, WAA carnival, March 11, and Intramural Sports Color Squad Play Day, May 14, where games were played on the basis of teams chosen that day rather than the usual intramural competitive basis. Fifteen members of WAA went to the University State Play Day at Las Cruces State College, April 29 and 30, where tliey competed in baseball, volleyball, tennis, ping pong, archer , and swimming. Initiation and a banquet were held May 4, at which time the number of this year ' s members was brought to forty. The plaque awarded each year in the athletic depart- ment by the instructors, Miss Dorothy Campbell, Mrs. Tom Letton, aiul Miss Soila Sanchez, for interest, number of points, attitude, cooperation, and sportsmanship was presented to Juanita Fincke. Officers: Lee Williams, I ' rcsident; Juanita Fincke, Vice-Presideni ; Ilcnrietta I5fl licr, Secretary-Treasurer. Sports Heads: Evodean Vidal, baseball; Bonnie Jordan, hiking: Lucille Lattaner, tennis; Floriana Tigner, hockey; Juanita Fincke, speedball; Lucille (Jarduno, archery; Henrietta Bebber, volleyball; Ruth Jean Smith, basketball; Louise Bernis, s viiniuinn; Rulh Heron, track and field; Sue Pollock and Margaret Byrne, recrea- tional games and .social dancing. Associalctl X omen Students (Jr ani .ccl on tlu- I ' ni ci-sit ' of New Mexico campus in tlie spring of IQ O, the Associated ' omen Stiulents has as Its aim the promotion ot a con- structive program of activities for L iii " ersit ' women. All regularU- enrolled wt)men students are mem- bers of the organization. A council, composed of one representati -e from several women ' s organizations on the campus, is the go erning body of this group. During I-reshman Week, the Associated Women Students aided new women students in orientating themseUes to college life. In order to better acquaint Freshman omen with women of the upper classes, a tea as given at the close of F ' reshman Week. The group also chooses Big .Sisters for Freshman women. On .St. ' alentine ' s I)a in the earl ' part of the second semester, the Asso- ciated A ' omen Students were sponsors of a complimentars dance which was ver well attended. The Associated Women Students HII a ' ital neeil in pi-omoting a feeling of cooperation and friendliness among University women students. The Co-Ed Code, a small booklet for women stutients, ct)ntaining a list of accepted rules of conduct for women students, was published in the early part of the year by the Associated Women Students. This booklet was under the direction of Maxine Pearce, editor, and Wanda Langford, art eelitor. officers: Katherlne Kirnhle, President; I.ce Williams, Vice-President; .Maxine Pearce, Secretary-Treasurer, Meniliers of the Council: Katherine Kimble, Maxine Pearce, Fernette Gilbert. Helen Baird Kiel, . lma Jones, Zenobia Gonzales, Peggy Paxton, and Lee Williams. n KHATALI First Row — Mims, Koch, Higgins. Fleck Row — Meinershagen, Dorris, Fritz. Second Ro — lia ' .aw.iN . Reiil , Buchanan • Third Fouruicd in iqi; with the aim of selecting tor membership the ten out- standing men of the Senior chiss, it is the diitv of Khatah to guide the traditions of the University among the men students. Members are selecteti at a tapping ceremony each spring on the basis of scliolarship, character, and service to the University. Khatah took an active part in the guidance ot Ireshmen during I- ' rcshman week, and hiter they selected a Sophomore ' igilance Committee to act as a disciplinar ' botiy to sec that campus traditions were being adhered to by Freshman men. Although the members of Khatali were indisldually outstanding in man fields, it is to be regretted that as a group they failed to render the full ser ices of which they were capable. . n oL:tstanding group ot Junior men were selected for membership in the spring tapping ceremony, ami it is hopct] that they will uphold the pre lous high record of achievement set by Khatali. MORTAR BOARD First row: Kiel, Ziminerinan, lUining, Dcinlap • Secuinl row: Kiiiililc, Miles, Bezemek. Maia chapter of Mortar Board, the lionorary society for senior women, was installed on the L ' niversitv of New Mexico campus in November, 1936, to supplant the local chapter of Maia which had been here since 1921. Its purposes include upholding the traditions of the L ' niversity and to this end to honor women who have achieved prominence in scholarship and extra-curricular acti ities. Mortar Board stands for service, scholarship, anil leadership amoiiLi; omen of the University. Many traditions are being perpetuated antl new practices instigated by this new campus organization. The 1937-1938 program included a stunt night in which campus talent had an opportunity to show its ability, and cups were awarded to the best groups among both men and ()men. The annual chrysanthemum sale was lield at Homecoming. A roll call of outstanding I ' " reshman women was presented to the student hotly in a general assembly to honor and introduce those women students who hail e itlenced so early in their college careers the ability for scholarship. Josephine Ridenour Jean Ellis Bettv Fischer Si nia Alplia Iota ignia ipna Sigma Alpha Iota, a national professional musical fratern- ity, was installeil on the L ' niversitv campus in June, 1935. This organization is primariU ' for tiie purpose of furthering the appreciation and stiuK ' of music among women pursuing some phase of music as a profession. Scholarship, interest in music, anti upperclass rating are the basis of election to membership. Ihe proposeci cancliciate must be a music student who has filled the entrance require- ments of the institution anti is taking a course fitting her for professional work or leading to a Bachelor ' s Degree. During the vear, the fi-atei-nit has sponsored a Thanks- giving Vesper Service, the traiiitional Christmas Carol Service, the John Scott concert, the MacDowell SiUer lea, campus sings, and piano and voice recitals. This group has done much to fm-ther the appreciation of music, not onI - for its members but for the entire student body. Sigma Alpha Iota is to be congratulateti on its excellent work for the year. The President is Josephine Ridenour: Vice-i ' resident, Sanunie Bratton; Secretary, Julia Carroll; Treasurer, Betty Fischer; and Chaplain, Marjorie Boyd. Delta i hi Delta Membership in Delta I ' lii Delta, national honorary art fraternit , is open to upperelass art majors of hiy;li scholastic standing in chosen art Helds. Founded Ma ' 2S, 1912, at the L ' nl -ersitv of Kansas, in ordei- to foster interests in works of art and to unite socially those Inning marked ability in art, the fraternity has grown until, at present, there are twenty-fi e chapters located in uni ersities and art schools throughout the countr ' . Activities for this year nicluded a block pi ' inted calendar of New Mexico, each designed plate showing some particular interest of the State. The making ot a scrap book of all activities sponsored by the fraternity was another project. The preparation and exhibition of art work of Alpha Alpha cliapter is to be sent to the natit)nal convention at Boulder, Colorado, June 1 4 to 18, IQ38. Delta I ' hi Delta will also pla ' an important part in the State Festival of the -Arts, presented amiualh b the College of Fine Arts, in sponsoring the cratt exhibitions. M,i, W illirlin Martha Brink Edma Pierce President, Mary Wilhelm; Vice-1 ' resident, Loraine Russel : Secretary, Martha Root Brink; Treasurer, Edma Pierce; Members: Loucile Huning, Mrs. Alice Da idson, I ' deanor Brasher, and F. F ' dward Del Dosso, Faculty Sponsor. Stine Burke Grandjean Engineering Societv Membership in the h ' .nginecriny; Society is open to all students enrolled in the College of Engineering. The aim of the society is to foster a spirit of cooperation and fellowship among all enrolled engineers. The annual whitewashing of the " U " in the Sandia foothills was the first activity of the year for the group. At the annual spring open house some of the latest discoveries in the field of engineering were exhibited to a large group of students and other visitors. St. Patrick ' s Day was a full day for all Engineers. The traditional green banner floated proutlK in the breeze atop a fifty-foot pole near Hadley Hall. The annual engineering edition appeared on bright-green paper. Later in the day, the Engineers ' Queen was crowned at the I ' ngineers ' dance. A cog of the well-lubricated engineer- ing machine was slightly damaged, however, when a group of culprits managed to displace the green banner. A feature of the day was the absence of the usual hair-clipping ceremonies. Brattiiii Howes C ' hanih DeLate C ouncil During 1 937-1 938, the Debute Council arranged a ery acti •e year for New Mexico debaters. The first activity of the Council tor the ' ear was the spf)nsoring of the Intramural Debate League. The Independent Women ' s team of Sails (iriflin and Virginia Pre att took the honors for the women. Paul Moore and Dale Bellahaina, representing Pi Kappa Alpha, were winners in the men ' s division. The final debate was between the above two groups and was presented before a student body assembly. The Pi Kappa Alpha team gaineil the decision of the judges. Home debates were held with College of the Pacific, Texas Christian University, Colorado College, PennsyNania State College, and McMurray College. Howard Bratton, Phillip Howes, Paul Moore, Calvin Horn, and Judy Sikes represented the Uni -ersity at different times in these debates. Virginia Prevatt and Mattie Chambers were chosen by the Council to make the annual debate trip. This ear the team ent to Colorado, debat- ing with the University of Colorado, University of Denver, Colorado Col- lege, and Colorado Agricultural College. Three of these debates were on the Nation Labor Relation Board question, while the one at Boulder was over the question of Censorship of Picture Magazines. Because Dr. Pearce, the regular debate coach, was quite busy with other duties, Willis Jacobs acted as coach. He proved to be a conscientious guide and coach. DRAMATIC CLUB Oil these two pages are shown scenes from " Dangerous Corner, " " Death Takes a Holiday, " and " Vellowjacket " — three of the most popular plays presented by the Dramatic Cluli this year. This organization is to he con- gratulated on being one of the most active groups on the campus. First row down: Everybody helps move books to the new library. The Band leads the inarch. I shot an arrow into the air . . . • Second row down: " Ma " Allen of Kappa Sig fame. " Cheeks " Runyan, Popularity Queen. Kastler and Paxton pose in front of the Sub. llh ' II ' ■ aL msr B ai - ' w j oaiv m Mi m.MM m • Scnolastic Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors f €X. _X c; ) CI i) 4 h i i e J liB K : — . . ' . ' ■ ■! Ill III I ■ II iiimwi I I m — ■T ' m-MW I II l i ■ I I IB I MM ■rM BBTK ' «( ' ■■■■•. ' «;»i l -■■nif ■ ' Wl " ' ' For Popularity I THEY CHOSE THIS LADY As a result of balloting at the door, Miss Camille Runyan was chosen Popularity Queen at the Mirage Beauty Ball. Miss Melba Fite and Miss Elinore Mullinson followed closely behiml in the voting. The queens were given a measure of masculine protection in the person of Ellis Byers who was given a crown as Most Popular Man on the Campus. CAMILLE RITNYAN, Popularity Queen . ■ ' Vt: J . - ' PW y ' ' !jUlimi«l ' eAiLff- t. ' mr 5 w tr ' %» ' w jWL.- a jr?r».- ¥r- ' »cr. " -f»: " « ' - ' ifc First row down — Kinilile and Paxton receive at the A. ' . S. tea for Freshman women • The Kappa Si)i;s put on shirts to get their pictures talien • Queen Pooler receives Dean Bostwicli • Second row down — Burton supervises the opening of a keg of beer • Spring days mean picnic days • Third row down — Hell Week-back- slapping suffers a decline • The staff photographer paid for this • T ' was Home- coming eve at I.e Grande. 1R« ■ i;-— , SSSZ u w- ' if •• • ?w• t«il«t m ■«.-.. 33- First row down — One guess, what ' s in llu- ran? What! I ' hose cheerleaders again? The Student Union Building • Second row down — Alumnus Seery speaks at Home- coining bonfire. Juarez, what more can we say • Third row dowm — Randall, Kappa Sig house engineer. Another Sub hull session. Believe it or not, it runs. m .. ij Fresh « ■,■ men ■St j » . F-WoJt vG .ia. ' - n ' ii.iiJi. vir- " 9 -T» " " .F ' - Tir «; 4ir--r«f k rietr., . - p-« «ii-« l? ' «W ' ' W " ' W • rX:- ' ' W- " ' - ' WF ' ' I ; ,VAlbuquerq " :: " i t Betty ;,A :«a;Uenve.. A buqv eV ' U ' e - • ' Srd-. Santa F ' VlaUe, • .one CUftord,; ' ,erque: . Betty; i ' " . ; ,f,ed; N d ; Mbuq-erque . , .. a , A ,, Betty ane., _ Fuller, Colorado Garrett, A buquer- „n-. GraW. • Four th 1 ack ; _ lbu- ■ft ' i y ' % ' " 1 ' ' ,-:i. P ' ' HrV It- ■ tSh.. . il»«C-4U :Mi.. . ' .ff r?,-- 2 UoV- bs-. m . Hannah ' " " " ' ' i ' ' Ro v „ ,,-is Virginia ' ' - q , , „ Rosa- War ' ,que. I , ., ,,V- lacl • , Pbii igh, Kay. - _-Hanu.... -, Hili ' g ' - ' " ::- Cimarron. Hov V, J . ,,eUon, __ , York City - « AU- -!X Beieri. 3onj- ' .Mbvu uerqrie l; 3,,,,; AU . nuerque: Lane, i .jf t si- ;;j«k; w fHiBai. KwiJI P Hi ML w im-i at: n ' gt " w t.. .tb h ncy- Retick, Maiy . Santa Fe- • Fourth ' ° " ;,,,,, uerque-- Lorraine , - JJMBKMp gSraw-. .J i, »«« |SlQlt ■Jl,.,fiB=I«J tl!li V - T-— .JW,.: " fllBif- ' - ' ? ' f:«« ' ,jo::-;» ; i(i»i. ' ji!:i!iP " -.-- ip?a»-j!.-, .ir " - -.--- ' :! ■-, ' SSf " -TiW ' - ' srr ' X ' . ' .i - ' IHB ' OT iVibarii, Sal " .. a. W ' vu " p-- . , ' Vhoma . ;. . ,Mbi.i- First RONV-Stratton, I g , ,„,e er, VS ,_V " " l„.r luaiiita, ; ' ; _. g nta •_. „. YountJ, u ■ Fait B i Martha, t " ' ,,.- , - Stio« ' ' " Vaughn- ' ■ vs rs? - ' Ih t s- ' " = " ;:; - " " noU; .Valker, Betty, ;,,,F..ther.t ' A ' fn querque ' - " ; ' if,h R; ' - I. ?.£poVot.ySue-.Cad- Sop] opnoniores ■:i ,jab f-m )ii. ■■sii..gS tp ' ' vrrtjM -ur-rm -Burnett, Man . ,,. Chr Uy, Kansas t-ity- ■!«, F-JiKKi ' ;R..ifflP " " afF ii «.- - ■;w- ' r«B» ' ' -T»t ! « ' . - - ■»:, i iJSts,r 9 ik:::s tw- ' ' ' 9r if yx:: ' mii:. ■mr mm .m. ? :» ' • ' ■ ' m-MBc-- - r y-- B w..?cy « -c. -f-. ■««? , C a ' i " " ' ;- Second •S " " . Raton • ' arjone,, J Tj„ -Mei h,. ,.. A bnqnefq» eomtner, J querqne-- Carlsbad- T - " I B» " ' ,. . Mbuquerq " ' - " • ' Second — u- Mbuqiit; " ! ' ' .. pierce, t- " " " -;-., Mmnesota- - - hird ivan ' " f ' „„. Florence, R HUdesatde .,„ ,n-. Ross, ' ■! , ,u, M " " j. Q.erV ' ' V .- ' - ' ,,e ■ 0 ven, j • J, , Albuquerque . , u- Mbuquerque- pierce, t- " " " -;-., Mmnesota- - - hird yn, ew o " . I Mary, " Carl; Belen. Seig -:j(ife ,,5 f «Hfe:.:»irtS ' ' " °9r6« . «» " ' -W ■■ Xfljr PWWfc ffj 38B .-?9 " Tf-WME ' ' •= -- ' ■ ' ■ " I W " ' 1I ' W ' " 9»r«eW«fc; m «,-:»- m m -- ' ii ' 9r --v- ' mr ' A -nmr BSli ai ' ««4fi»as!i ' -»°»— First Roiv ALLIN, ROBERTA San Francisco, California Arts and Sciences. BEBBER, HENRIETTA Albuquerque Education ; Alpha Chi Omega; Junior Class Secre- tary-Treasurer; Theta Al- pha Phi, Vice President; Phi Sigma; Phi Alpha Theta; Mirage, ' 36, ' 37, ' 3S, Asso- ciate Editor, ' 37; Panhellctiic Council; Student Senate. BLAINE, VIRGINIA Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Mirage, ' 36, ' 37, Assistant Business Man- ager, ' 37; Intramural Debate, ' 36, ' 37; Lobo, ' 35. BR.VTTON, SAMMIE Albut uerque Fine Arts; Kappa Kappa (Jamma; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll; Soph- omore Vigilance Committee; Girls ' Quartette, ' 36, ' 37, ' 3S; Mixed Chorus; Girls ' Glee Club. BURNS, MARGARET Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma ; Dramatic Club, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; French Club, ' 37, ' 38; W. A. A., ' 37, ' 38; Newman Club, ' 38; Lobo, ' 37, ' 38. SrconJ Roiv ARMIJO, LUIS Albuquerque Arts and Sciences. BEEKEN, WILLIAM Long Beach, California Arts and Sciences; Kappa Sigma; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll ; Soph- omore Vigilance Committee ; Mirage, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38, Associ- ate Editor, ' 37, Editor, ' 38; Who ' s Who in American Colleges and Univeisities, ' 38. BOWMAN, SAM .Albuquerque . rts and Sciences. BROWN, BARBARA .Mhuquerque Education; Alpha Delta Pi; W. A. A., ' 36, ' 37; College League of ' omen Voters. •36. BUTLER, ROBERT Dumas, Texas Education; Kappa . lpha; Football, ' 37; Transfer, Por- tales Junior College. Third Rniv ASHTON, WILLIAM Rhinelander, Wisconsin , rts and Sciences; Kappa Sigma; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll ; Soph- omore Vigilance Committee; Vice President Sophomore Class; Student Senate, ' 37; Student Council, ' 38 ; Inter- fraternity Council, ' 38; Hon- ors Group; Who ' s Who in . merican Colleges and Llni- versities, ' 38. BELL. KATHERINE . ' lbvi iuer iue Education; Alpha Chi Omega; W. A. A.; Lobo; College league of Women Voters; Student Christian Mo eu]ent. BllVn, DLXIE RAY Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa CJamma. BURNETT, WILLIAM Albuquerque . rts and Sciences; Phi Kappa F ' hi Freshman Honor Roll; Kappa Mu Epsilon; Band, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Tennis, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Basketball, ' 38. BVERS, ELLIS Lo -ington . rts and Sciences; Pi Kappa .Mpha; Football, ' 35; Dra- matic Club, ' 35; Student Senate, ' 37, ' 38; Interfra- ternity Council, ' 37, ' 38, President, ' 3.S ; International Relations Cluli, ' 38. Fourth Row BAXTER, BILLIE -Mbuquerque Education. BENNET, MILDRED Albuquercjue . rts and Sciences ; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Theta Al- pha Phi; Dramatic Club, Secretary, ' 38. BRASHER, ELE. NOR . lliu iuerque Education; Phi Mu; Delta Phi Delta; Hispanic Insti- tute; . ' rt League of New Mexico ; College League of Women Voters. BURNS, DAN Albuquerque General; Sigma Chi; Foot- ball, ' 35, ' 36. CAMERON, ALAN .- lbuquerque General. ..jmikMtSti. ' A di . „,-; M ' f ■ 9 tK I ; « (» i it; " ' -:-lC ' 9 !- " ' ir- k ' M .■TKi...JL : r. t. ■!■ «c M. C ' HAMliERS, MATTIE Albuqueniue Education; Alpha Delta Pi; Dramatic Club, ' iJ. ' 3 ; Varsity Debate, ' 37; I eba ' t Touncil Mananer, ' 3S; Kap- pa Omicron Phi, ' 37, ' i : Lobo, ' 37, ' 3S; Student Sen- ate, ' ?S; Radio Cniild, ' 3S ; Transfer, Texas State Col- lege for Women. CLAVrON, ANTTA Separ Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma. DEVENDORF, CiEORGE .Mbmiuerque Engineerins. EASLEV, BOB Dawson Education; Independent Men, Vice President, ' 37. Presi- dent, ' 3S; Student Senate, ' 37 ; Student Council, ' 38 ; Phi Alpha Theta. ARLANDSON, LEE Albuquerque Engineering. Si-cotiJ R01V CHAPPEIL, ELIZ. BETH Mountainair Education; Alpha Chi Omega; W. A. A.; College League of Women Voters. CONNELL, HARRIET Allniquercpie General. IK) BELL, ROBERT .MIniquerque Education; Sigma Chi; Foot- ball, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Basketball, ' 36, ' 37, ' 3S; Letter Club, ' 3S; Sophomore Vigilance Com- mittee. ELLIS, JE. N Albuiiuerque Education. FARR, DON Albuquerque Engineering; Engineering Society. TliirJ R01V CI.. KK, B. KB. RA .Mbuiiuerque Education. COOKSEV, B. F. Fort Sumner . rts and Sciences; Sigma Chi. DONALDSON, LOITS Albuquerque Arts and Sciences. ELLIS, WANDA Albuquerque Education. FEDERICI, WILLIAM Colfax .Arts and Sciences, Phi Kap- pa Phi Freshman Honor Roll ; .Alfred Grunsfeld Memorial Scholarship, ' 37; Honors Group, ' 38; Student Senate, ' 3S; International Relations Club, ' 3S. Foiirt i Rhiv CLARK, EDITH Albuquercjue Education; .Alpha Delta Pi. McD.WlD, INEZ COX .Mluiquerque Education; -Alpha Delta Pi; Dramatic Club, ' 35, ' 36; Col- lege League of Women Voters; ' 36, ' 37; Swimming Team, ' 37; W. A. A., ' 37. DUNKLE, BERTHA Ciallup Arts and Sciences; Phrateres. EPPICH. ROSE Fruitland Education; Kappa Omicron Phi. FIFIELD, FR.WCES .Albuquerque Education. wrmmt - m . » .?f ■ |. ' T ' - ' riff ' ffY ' yftTwi i • First Rfiic FINCKE, JUANITA Santa Fe Education; Kappa Kappa Gamma; W. A. A., Vice President, ' 38; Majors Club, Vice President, ' 37, Presi- dent, ' 38; Lobo, ' 37; Dra- matic Club, ' 37; W. A. A. Council, ' 38. FORSE, OPAL Albuquerque Education. GARDNER, BARNEY Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Sigma Phi Epsilon; Football, ' 37; Interfraternity Council, ' 38. HARRISON, THOMAS Roswell Education; Basketball, ' 36. HAZARD, JOHN Albuquerque Education; Kappa Alpha. SfconJ R01U FISCHER, BETTY Belen Education; Alpha Delta Pi; W. A. A., ' 36, ' 37; Dramatic Club, ' 36; Sophomore Vigi- lance Committee; Sigma Al- pha Iota, ' 37, ' 38, Treasurer, ' 38; Student Council, ' 37; Panhellenic Council, ' 37, ' 38; Student Senate, ' 38; Junior- Senior Prom Committee, ' 38. FRANKS, ATHOL .Ml uquertpie Education. GARDUNO, LUCILLE . ' Mhuquerfjue Education ; Kappa Kappa Gamma; W. A. A. Council; French Club, H.WVES, ELIZABETH Albuquerque Education. HERIZMARK, SIDNEY Santa Fe Arts and Sciences; President of Independent Men, ' 38 ; Student Union Committee, ' 38; Administrative Policies Discussion Group; Transfer, Uni ersit} ' of Colorado. Third R01V FISHER, RUTHE Lordsburg Education. FRAZER, ROBERT Barelas Engineering; Engineering Society. GILBERT, MARITA ANN Clovis Education; Orchestra; En- semble; Dramatic Club. H.VIHAWAY, MARTHA ANN Albuquerque Education; Kappa Kappa Ganuna; College League of Women Voters; French Club; Dramatic Club; Transfer, Christian College, Columbia, Missouri. HILL, MARJORIE . lbu(iuerque Arts and Sciences. Fourth Roiu FLINT, KITTY Carlsbad Education; Kappa Kappa Gamma. GOFF, ROBERT Providence Rhode Island Cxeneral. GRAH.VM, ROBERTA Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Alpha Chi Omega. HAYDON, CARTER Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Sigma Chi. HINSON, MARGARET Roswell Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma; W. A. A.; Transfer, Stephens College. m ■MP mmmiimmvm: ' j ' ' ' ' 9r ' 4it .. v - ' w Kwr st k ai jm jr - -o»iC f w r .v.: ' -» rs . -- First Rnii- IIIX, Rt)BERT Allniqucrque Arts ami Sciences; liaiul, ' 36, " 37. ' 3S ; International Rela- tions dull, ' 3S: LoIm), ' 37. KARSt) , LEE Brooklyn, New ' ork Arts and Sciences; Dramatic Chih ; Radio Gnild, Presi- deiit ; Transfer, College of the City of Ne v ' ork. KINNAIRD, HELEN Allniquertiue Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma ; . A. A. ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Lobo, ' 36, ' 37, ' 3S; Mirage, _ ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Sophomore Vigilance Com- mittee. LEWIS, FRANCIS Parsons, Kansas Arts and Sciences; Sigma Chi ; Interfraternity Council ; Football, ' 38. LONG, CURRY Albuquerque Engineering; Kappa Alpha. St ' coHii Ro-zv HUBBELL, GERALDINE Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma ; W. A. A. KASTLER, MAXINE Raton Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma ; Interna- tional Relations Club, Secre- tary; Lobo, Feature Editor, ' 36; Dramatic C lub. KoIlI.RR, MA.X .Mbuijuertjue . rts and Sciences; Sigtiia Phi Epsilon. LINDER, ROBERT -Mbuquerque . rts and Sciences; Phi Kap- pa Phi Freshman Honor Roll; Band, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Or- chestra, ' 35, ' 36; German Club, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Chemistry Club, ' 37; Lobo, ' 37; Mirage, ' 37. ' 38; Honors Group . vard, ' 37. LOONHS, CHARLOTTE Albuquer(|ue .Arts and Sciences Third Row HUNING, LUCILLE . lbu(|uerque .Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gainina ; Sophomore Vigilance Committee, Secre- tary; Delta Phi Delta; Stu- dent Council. KAUFMAN, JENNIE Albuquerque Education; Phi Kappa Phi Freshinan Honor Roll; Freshman Chorus; Dramatic Club, ' 37; French Club, ' 37; Lambda Delta, ' 3S. L.ANE, ROBERT .Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Pi Kappa Alpha; Boxing, ' 35, ' 36. LIVEXGOOD, WOODROW .Mbuquerque Education. LUC. S, ANNE -Allniqueique . rts .Tud Sciences; Kappa Kappa (iamma. Fourth Rniu JENKINS, JAMES .Mbuquerque .Arts and Sciences; PI Kappa .Mpha. KH B ■, C. R(tL Albuqueitpie . rts and Sciences; Chi Omega. LATTANER, LUCILLE Albu(iuer(iue Education: Kapjia Kappa Gaiinna; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll ; Lobo, ' 3 ' ' . ' 37. ' 38; Mirage, ' 37; Tennis ' 36, ' 37; W. .A. A., ' 36. ' 37. ' 3S; Poetry Club, ' 37; Student Senate, ' 38; Lambda Delta. LIVINGSION, LUCILLE Allnuiuerque . rts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma. MAVFIELD, RICHARD Albucpierque Arts and Sciences; Interna- tional Relations Club. •.;i)St, ,,? P»ait.J(K «r«»Br«4 eE T »...«• - F -.tr mt jf-rmf ' -v- »-xi--»m-.--Mp- l- ' ilit Kn-Tj MUHAKL. LILLIAN Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Phi Mu. NEER, LARIE Portales Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma; W. A. A.; Transfer, Stephens College. I ' ALLSOX, ORVILLE Chicago, Illinois Engineering; Kappa Sigma; A. S. M. E. ; Engineering Society; Kappa Mu Epsilon, ' 37, ' 3S; Lobo, ' 37, ' 3S; Mir- age, ' 37, " 38; Transfer, Mili- kan University, Decatur, Illinois. I ' noLER, LOUISE Albui)uerque Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma ; Dramatic Club, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Lobo, ' 36; Hoinecoming Queen, ' 38. PETERS, JOHN Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Sigma Phi Epsilon; Student Senate; Lobo. SrtoiiJ R01U Mt)NTGOMERV, MARY BELLE Albuquerque Education; Phrateres; Kap- pa Omicron Phi, ' 38; Trans- fer, Lindenwood College, St. Charles, .Missouri. OLSON, JANE . !buquer()ue Arts and Sciences. l ' . . l()N, PEGGY Socorro Fine Arts; Kappa Kappa (iamma ; Sigma Alpha Iota; Lobo, . ssistant . dvertis- ing Manager, ' 36; Student Christian Movement, ' 36; Dramatic Club, ' 36; College League of Women Voters; Student Senate, ' 37, ' 38; , . W. S. ; Mirage, ' 37. PICKENS, VILLI. M Los .- ngeles, California Arts and Sciences; Sigma Chi ; Lobo, Assistant Editor, ' 37, Business Manager, ' 38. PROVENCIO, OLILIA . nthonv Education. Third Roic MORGAN, ARTHUR .Albuquerque . rts ami Sciences; Pi Ka]ipa . lpha. OSBORNE, HETTYE NAN El Reno, Oklahoma Education ; Chi Omega ; Dra- matic Clul). PE. RCL, . 1. . KNE Cairo, Illinois Education ; Lolio. ' 37, ' 38 ; Mirage, ' 37; Dr. Zimmer- man ' s Discussion CIroups. PICKRELL, DONALD Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Transfer, New Me. ico Military Insti- tute. R. NKI , B. RB. RA .Mbuquerque Arts and Sciences; .Alpha Chi Omega; Dramatic Club, _ ' 3f . ' 37. ' 35 ; Lobo, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Honors (Jroup. Fiiurlh Row NEEL, ROSALIE Albuquerque Education. PACHECO, ALVITA Albuquerque Education. PENNINGTON, WILLIS Sullivan, Illinois Arts and Sciences; Pi Kappa Alpha; Football, ' 35, ' 36. POLLARD, MARY .Albuquerque Arts and Sciences. REEDER, BETTY Albuquerque Education; International Re- lations Club, ' 37, ' 38. r !.!•■ fe. ' .j« .rtfi»«k.Js M ' - 9r « .. v- ' v: ' : ' " san g t ffi .■m jf -v» r fr v- w-.r " x— » : ' " tn. fi- « h »•■ ' First l n iv RKlin, IHEOIIORE .Mbuquerque Education. RUBER rSON, ANN . lhu(iuer(|ue Education; Kappa Kappa Clainnia ; College League of Women Voters. ' 36; Dra- matic Club, ' 36, ' 37. SACHSE, J. B. Clayton Arts and Sciences; Sigma Chi; Mirage, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Lobo, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Band, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; International Rela- tions Club, ' 36, ' 37; Debate Council, ' 37; Orchestra, ' 36, ' 37; Assistant Business Man- ager of Mirage, ' 38. SEIS, AUGUST . lliu(juer(jue Arts and Sciences; Kappa Alpha. SIMMONS, ELAINE Albuquerque Education; Alpha Delta Pi. Si ' iuiiJ Roic REYNOLDS, STEPHEN Sullivan, Illinois Engineering; Pi Kappa Al- pha; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh- man Honor Roll ; Sophomore Vigilance Committee; Engi- neering Society; Junior Class President. ROPER, PATRICIA .Mbuquerque Education. SALAZ, JOE Albu(|uerque Education. SEWARD, DOROTHY Kansas City, Missouri Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Cianima ; Mirage, ' 38. SIMPSC)N, AL Alliu(|uer(|ue . rts and Sciences; Sigma Chi; Football, ' 37; Boxing, ' 38; Transfer, University of Nebraska. TInrJ Roiv RICF, B. RB. R. .Albuquertjue General; Phi Mu; Paiihel- lenic Council. ROSS, GILBERT .Mbuquerque . rts and Sciences; Pi Kappa Alpha. S.WDOV.M, BERTRAM Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Soph- omore Vigilance Committee; Sophomore Class President; Student Senate, ' 37; Athletic Council, ' 38; Dramatic Club, ' 37; Basketball, ' 36; Track, ' 37 ; Letter Club, ' 38. SHOOPMAN, RICHARD Long Beach, California Arts and Sciences; Kappa Sigma; Yell Leader, ' 36; Mirage, ' 36; Transfer- Long Beach Junior College. SINc;ER, ROBERT Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Kappa Sigma; Football, ' 35, ' 37; Basketball, ' 36; Lobo, ' 38; Transfer, University of Cali- fornia. Fourf f R01U ROBERTS, WILLIAM San Angelo, Texas Arts and Sciences; Kappa Sigma; Footliall, ' 35; Track, ' 3 . ' 37. ' 3S; Radio CJuild; Mirage, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38. RUNYAN, CAMILLE Santa Fe Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Dramatic Club; Lobo, ' 37; Popularity Queen, ' 38; Transfer, Scripps College, Pomona, California. SELLARD, BETTY .-Mbuquerque Education; Alpha Chi Omega. SHOR7TE, SAM .Miiuquerque Education; Sigma Chi; Football, ' 35, ' 36; Basketball, ' 36. ' 37. ' 3S; Letter Club, ' 38; Sophomore Vigilance Com- mittee. SESNEROS, CLEG Albuquerque Arts and Sciences. k I iv. mmiii,mi iS ' ' ' W ' ' m r ' ir- ' ' J:: ' ' ' m! Sfmk.m.. .2S . m.. . f- w r ,y .. .g,, . it L ia-jas. k h ' iiil Rate SI ' ECTOR, MELBOURNE . llniquer(n.ie Arth and Sciences; Pi Kappa Alpha ; Sophomore Vigilance Committee; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll; Dra- matic Club; International Relations Cluh. THOMPSON, ROBERT Santa Fe Arts and Sciences; Sigma Chi; Basketball, ' 36; Track, ' 37; Tennis, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; International Relations Club, ' 38; Sophomore Vigilance Committee. VAN HVNING, PARRIE ANN Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma. VVHITEMAN, RICHARD Roswell Arts and Sciences; Poetry Club, ' 37; Lobo, ' 38; Mirage, •38. Siiiind Rozv S TARRETT, MARY JO . lbu(iuerque Education; Student Council, ' 38; Phi Sigma, ' 37, ' 38, Sec- retary, ' 38; Poetry Cluli, ' 37, ' 38, Secretary, ' 38; Lamlida Delta, ' 37, ' 38, Secretary, ' 38; I.obo, ' 37 ; Independents ' Queen, ' 38; Transfer, Mills C-., liege. ' 1R. SK, WESLEY lbu(|uer(iue Engineering; Engineering Society. ID. I., EVADEAN (Jallup E d u c a t i o n ; . lpha Chi Omega; Dramatic Club; Col- lege League of Women Vot- ers; Newman Club; Student Christian Movement. WOOD, FERN -Mbuqurr ' iue . rts and Sciences; Chi Omega; Dramatic Club, ' 35, ' 36; Lobo, ' 36, ' 37; Panhel- leiiic, ' 38; I ' ep Scpiad. ' 37; Intel national Relations Club, •38. Third Rniu STRON(;, ROBERT Albucjuerque Engineering; Kappa Alpha; Junior Class Vice President; Student Senate; Engineering Society ; A. S. C. E., Secre- tary, ' 38; Sigma Tau; Kappa Mu Epsilon; Transfer, New Mexico State College. IRLJILLO, MIKE .Mliuquerque . rts and Sciences. VVAHA, MARY LOU Albuquerque . rts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma ; ' Fransfer, Alleghany College, Mead- ville, Pennsylvania. WOODMAN, Rt)BERT Cirand Rapids, Michigan . rts and Sciences; Pi Kappa . lpha. Fdurlli Row STEWARF, JOHN Roswell Arts and Sciences; Kappa Sigma ; Basketliall, ' 36 ; Lobo, ' 38; International Re- lations Club, ' 38. VALDEZ, FONY Albuquerrpie Education; Boxing, ' 37, ' 38. WESTFAI.L, BKRNICE Albuquerque Education. YELFON, ' IRGINIA .Mbuijuerque Education. mm. ' IPrmfKtML, m •X .n i iK f ?jr- V Tt- f - " j-.-.- - :;.a — ssc- (■ s oeniors • lP ' TIIE??l ' " ' ' «fflB ' lffli«tLL«i.., . ■5SS. :.,ij2Si ■. - -■■ w -, - ■»»- I First Roiu AI.I ' ERS, FRANK Alluiquerque BF.RRVMAN, EMILY Fredonia, Kansas Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Commerce Club, ' 37; International Re- lations Club, ' 37; Transfer, Kansas State College. BOLTON, RUTH Albuquerque Education; Alpha Chi Omega; W. A. A., ' 35; Lobo, ' 35, ' 36; Dramatic Club, ' 36; College League of Women Voters, ' 37. BVERS, JANE COVERT Roswell Education; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Dramatic Club, ' 35; Lobo, ' 35; Cacique, ' 35; Phi Sigma, ' 36, ' 37. CONNELLY, THERESA Albuquerque Second Rniv ALTER, JOHN Willard Arts and Sciences; Pi Kappa Alpha; Lobo, ' 35; Mirage, ' 35; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh- man Honor Roll ; Commerce Club, ' 37; International Re- lations Club, ' 38. BEST, JOHN Albuquerque BRINK, MARTHA ROOT Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Phra- teres; Lobo, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Delta Phi Delta, ' 37, ' 38; Ciirls ' Chorus, ' 37; Student Christian Movement, ' 36. ' 37; Phi Knpp:i Phi Freshman Ib.u,.. KnII. CARR, KDWARl) Sauta Fc Arts and Sciences; Transfer. Uni ersit ' of Penns ' l ' ania. CONNER, ELAINE Albuquerque E d u c a t i o n ; Alpha Chi C mega ; Dramatic Club, ' 56, ' 37; Lobo, ' 36; College League of Women Voters, ' 36; Phi Alpha Theta, ' 37, ■38. TliirJ Riiii ' ARCJABRKJHT, PATRRMA , lbuquer(|ue Education; Alpha Delta IM ; Mirage, ' 35; Sigma Alpha lota, ' 35, ' 36; Lobo, ' 35 ; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll; Student Senate, ' 35, ■3S ; Lamba Delta, ' 38. BEZEMEK, MARY i.onsF AUuiquel que Arts and Sciences; Chi Omega; College League of Women Voters, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Student Council, ' 36, ' 37; Big Sister, ' 36; Sophomore Vigi- lance Committee; Mortar Board, ' 38. BUCHANAN, ROBERT St. Louis, Missouri Arts and Sciences; Pi Kappa Alpha; Sophomore Vigilance Committee; Lobo, ' 34, ' 35; Phi Gamma Mu, ' 36, ' 37; Basketball, ' 33, ' 34, ' 35; Kha- tali, ' 38. C. RK, KI.IZABF I ' ll Albuquerque . rts and Sciences; I ' hi Mu. C-ON()VFR, CL ' i OF .Mlni ' iuerque Engineering; Kappa Alpha; A. S. C. E. ; Student Senate, ■38. Fiiurth Roil ' BEDEIL. LISIER ' ebster Grme . Missouri Engineering; Student Senate, ' 38; President of Senior Class; Engineering Society; Kappa Mu F ' psilon; Man- ager of Uni ' ersitv Half- Houi " Ratlio Program. HOLES, M. RG. RE r Rosuell . rts and Sciences; Kappa Kafifia Gamma. BURKE, ROBERF Tucumcari Engineering; Vice President of Engineering Society, ' 38; A. I. M. E.; Footbal ' l, ' 34; Tennis, " 37. CH. MBERS, .MARY Lovington Education; Phi Mu ; Trans- fer, Texas State College for Women. COOPER, CORA MAY Albuquerque mm ML . ' Vjmim " MW M Paik. »5 l W m iS . ir r V , H ' ■■ r ' Wr as CAULLOUDON, MARIETTE Albuquerque Education; Hispanic Insti- tute, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37, ' 3S; French Club, ' 37, ' 3S; Sigma Alpha Iota, ' 38. DOMENICALI, PETE Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Chemistry Club, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Band, ' 3s. ' 36, ' 37. ' 3S- EVANS, FRED Alamogordo Arts and Sciences; Sigma Chi; Lobo, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Transfer, New Mexico Mili- tary Institute. GASA ' AV, JOSEPH Parsons, Kansas Education; Sigma Chi; Soph- omore Vigilance Committee; Football, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Basket- ball, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Letter Club. ' 36, ' 37, President, ' 37; Kha- tali; Transfer, Parsons Jun- ior College. GLENN, VICTOR Vega, Texas Engineering; Sigma Tau; Kappa Mu Epsilon, ' 37, ' 38; A. I. E. E., ' 37, ' 38, President, ' 38; Engineering Society; Business Manager of Engi- neers ' Annual; Transfer, Amarillo Junior College. Sctu hi Rww COX, DOROTHY AIbuquer()ue Education ; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Dramatic Club, ' 37, ' 38 ; College League of Women Voters, ' 35, ' 36; Phi Gamma Mu, ' 37, ' 38 ; Lambda Delta, ' 37, ' 38. DORRIS, PAUL Santa Fe Arts and Sciences; Pi Kappa Alpha; Track, ' 35, ' 37, ' 38; Fui)tb.Tll, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38 ; Baskct- liall, ' 35 ; Khatali. FELDHAKE, CLARENCE Alliu(juer(pie Engineering; . . S. C. E., ' 3(1, ' 37, ' 38. GERE, DON WILLIAM Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Pi Kappa Alpha; Football, ' 35, ' 36; Track. ' 35, ' 38. c;oNZALES, MELA Albuquertpie Arts and Sciences. Fourth R01V CRANE, MARGARET Albuquerque Education; Alpha Delta Pi. DOWNER, MABEL Albuqueriiue Education; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Dramatic Club, ' 3+; W. A. A., Vice-President, President, ' 34; A. W. S., Sec- retary-Treasurer, ' 35; A. W. S. Council, ' 3+, ' 35 ; Cacique, ' 34; Phi Sigma, ' 38; Lobo, ' 33, ' 34; Big Sister, ' 35; Majors Cluli, ' 38. FLECK, MARTIN .Albuquerque Education ; Student Senate, ' 38; German Club, ' 37, ' 38; Kappa Mu Epsilon, ' 37, ' 38; Phi Sigma, ' 37, ' 38, President, ' 38 ; Phi Sigma, ' 37, ' 38, Presi- dent, ' 38; Phi Kappa Phi, Khatali. GILBERT, FERNETTE .Albuquerque Education; .Akiho Club, ' 34, ' 35, ' 36; Student Christian IVlovement, ' 34, ' 35, ' 36; Kap- pa Omicron Phi, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38, Vice President, ' 37, President, ' 38 ; Student Senate. GORDON, BETTY .Albuquerque .Arts and Sciences; Phrateres, ' 38; Phi Sigma, IVeasurer, ' 38; Transfer, Drake Uni- versity. T iirJ Rriiv CRISrV. CAROL Honolulu, Hawaii Education; Kappa Mu Ep- silon, ' 37, ' 38; Student Chris- tian Movement, " 37, ' 38; Transfer, Uni ' ersit " of Ha- waii. DUNLAP, JE.AN .Albuquerque .Arts and Sciences; Phra- teres; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh- man Honor Roll; Maia Freshman Honor Roll ; Col- lege League of Women Vot- ers, ' 37; Student Christian Movement, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Big Sister, ' 36; Sophomore Vigi- lance Committee; Student Senate, ' 37 ; French Club, ' 37 ; Secretary-Treasurer Senior Class; Mortarboard; Phi K.ippa Phi. FRirZ, LEONARD Raton .Arts and Sciences; Pi Kappa .Alpha; Mirage, ' 35; Lobo, ' 35; Sophomore Vigilance Committee; Junior Class President; Chairman Junior- Senior Prom Committee; Student Senate, ' 37; Student Council, " 38 ; ho ' s Who in .American Colleges and Uni- versities, " 38; Khatali. Secre- tary-Treasurer. GILBERT, MAE . ' lbuquerque .Arts and Sciences; Phra- teres; French Club, ' 37; Stu- dent Christian Movement, ' 35, ' 36 ' 37 ' ' 38; .Akiho. ' 36; Pi Gamma Mu, ' 38; Phi Gamma .Mu, ' 38; Phi .Alpha Theta, ' 38; Phi Kappa Phi. GR.ANDJEAN, GEORCiR .Albuquerque Engineering; .A. S. M. E. ' 36, ' 37. ' 38, I ' resident, ' 3S. iJS jr Vm :miaS ' ' ' ' W ' m ■ V " " ' " ' ' Wr tmea m " St W )T -t,c£ F a ir- g-WvBK a i4¥;ei«« »i !»rasM « " " " ■- ss First Roll ' HALL, Dt)R01HV Deining Arts and Sciences; Kappa Alpha Theta ; International Relations Club; Beauty Queen, ' 36; Transfer, Llni- versity of Arizona. HERON, RUTH Alhuquerciue Education; Alpha Delta Pi; W. A. A., President, ' 36; A. W. S., Vice President. ' 36; Student Council, ' 36; Athletic Council, ' 36; Lobo, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Sophomore Vigilance Committee; Dramatic Club, ' 35; Student Christian Move- ment, Council, ' 36; Majors Club, ' 37 ; Big Sister, ' 37. HITR r, WESLEY Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Dramatic Club, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37: Theta Alpha Phi, ' 3S; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll; Tiwa, President, ' 35; Mu Alpha Mu, Vice President, ' 38 ; Mirage, ' 36. JOHNSON, MARTHA Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma ; W. . . A., ' 35. ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Dramatic Club, ' 35, ' 36. KIEL, HELEN BAIRD .Mbuquerque Arts and Sciences; Alpha Chi Omega; Student Council, ' 35. ' 36. ' 37; Student Senate, Secretary, ' 36; Student Chris- tian Movement, ' 36, ' 37; Col- lege League of Women Vot- ers, ' 36, ' 37; International Relations Club, ' 38; Big Sister, ' 37; Student Council, ' 37; A. W. S. Council, ' 38; W. A. A., ' 36, ' 37; Student Union Committee, Secretary, ' 37; Junior-Senior Prom Committee, ' 37; Panhellenic Council, ' 38; Phi Sigma Al- pha, ' 38 ; Transfer, Univer- sity of Colorado. Second Roiv HANNAH, ERNEST Artesia Arts and Sciences; Band, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Pi Gamma Mu, ' 37. ' 3S, President, ' 38; ' I ' raiisportaliiin Club. ' 36. HIGCilNS, GEORGE Albuquerque . rt and Sciences; Sigma Chi; I ' hi Kappa Phi Fresh- man Honor Roll; Inter- fraternity Council, Secretary- Treasurer, ' 37; Lobo, ' 35, ' 36; Mirage, ' 36, ' 37, Busi- ness Manager, ' 37; Chair- man Student Union Commit- tee, ' 38; Who ' s Who in American Colleges and Uni- versities, ' 3S ; Khatali, Presi- deiit, ' 38. IDEN , j. NE Aliniquerque Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Dramatic Cluli, ' 35, ' 36 ; College League of Women Voters, ' 35. ' 36, ■37; W. A. . .. ' 35, •3(., -37. JONES, ALMA Dawson Education; Phi Mu; Presi- dent Zimmerman ' s Discus- sion Ciroui). KIMBLE, KATHERINE Santa Rita Education; Alpha Delta Pi; Sophomore Vigilance Com- Tiiittee; Big Sister, ' 37; Pan- hellenic Council, ' 37, ' 38; Student Council, ' 37; College League of Women Voters, ■35 ' 36, ' 37, " 38; W. A. A., ' 35. ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; A. W. S. Council, ' 35, ' 37, ' 38; Presi- dent of A. W. S. Council, ' 38; Student Union Commit- tee, ' 38; Mortarboard; Who ' s Who In American Colleges and Universities, ' 38. TliirJ Roiv HARRISON, MARY Albuquerc|ue Education; Kappa Kappa Gamma; W. A. A., ' 35, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; College League of Women Voters, ' 35; Dra- matic Club, ' 35, ' 36; Majors Club, ' 37, ' 38. HORN, C.VLVIN ; lbuquerque . rts and Sciences; Lobo, ' 36, ' 37; Debate Council, ' 38; Nlirage, ' 3(1; International Relations Club; ' 38; Pi Sig- ma Alpha, ' 38; Freshman Honor Roll; Student Chris- tian Movement, ' 3(1. JOHNSON, EUNICE Claunch Education; Lambda Delta, ' 38; International Relations Club, ' 38; Phi Sigma, ' 38; Transfer, Stephen F. .Austin State Teachers College. K. RI.IN, CJLENN Springer Education; Kappa . ' lpha; Band, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Men ' s Chorus, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38. KING, LOUISE .Albuquerque Fine . rts; Delta Gamma; Dramatic Club, ' 37, ' 38 ; Theta .■ lpha Phi, ' 37, ' 38, Secre- tary, ' 38; Sigma Alpha Iota, ' 38; Lobo, ' 37, ' 38; Student Senate, ' 38; Transfer, Uni- ' ersity of Arizona. Foiirlh Roiv HART, ROBERT .Miniquerque Arts and Sciences. HUNING, BETTY Los Lunas Education; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Dramatic Club, ' 35 ; College League of Women Voters, ' 35 ; Panhellenic Council, ' 36, ' 37, Treasurer, ' 37; Lobo, ' 36; Big Sister, ' 37; Phi Alpha Theta, ' 37, ' 38; Secretary Treasurer of Junior Class; W. A. A., ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Sophomore Vigi- lantes, ' 36; President of Mortarboard, ' 38. JOHNSON, GEORGIA, Aliniquerque Arts and Sciences. KENT, WILLIAM iAlbuquercjue Arts and Sciences ; Chemis- try Club, ' 36; Basketball, ' 36; Transfer, University of Arizona. KLOPOT, HENRY Brookline, Massachusetts . rts ami Sciences; Radio Guild, ' 38; Dramatic Club, ' 37, ' 38. - - : yK Tflhr .- " Mat . ■ - ' ' w mmmfmm wtimmA «s«£i..E3 ici KOCH, SrANI.EY AllnHiiH-rque Arts and Sciences; Kappa Sij;ina; Freshman Honor Roll; Rhodes Scholar Candi- date; Fditor of Mirage, ' 37; President of Student Body ' 3S; Khatali. LUTHER, MARY Albviquerque Education; Akiho, ' 35, ' 3 ' . ' 37; Kappa Omicron Phi, ' 37, ' 38, Secretary, ' 38; Student Senate, ' 37, ' 3S. McDAVin, PAUL Sullivan, Illinois Education; Pi Kappa Alpha; Football, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Basket- ball, ' 35, ' 36; Track, ' 35, ' 36; Letter Club; Cacique, ' 36; Student Senate, ' 38; Student Council, ' 36, ' 37; Junior Class Vice President; Senior Class Vice President; Kha- tali. MEZA, FRED Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Lobo, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Men ' s Chorus, ' 36, ' 37- Spanish News Service, ' 38. MORGAN, JOHN Raton Engineer; Pi Kappa Alpha; Mirage, ' 34, ' 35, ' 36; Lobo, ' 34. ' 35. ' 36, ' 37. Managing Editor, ' 37, ' 38; Band, ' 34, ' 35 36, 37. President, ' 36, ' 37; Men ' s Chorus, ' 38; Student Senate, ' 38; Kappa Mu Epsilon; Sigma Tau ; A. I. E. E., Engineering So- ciety; Junior Prom Commit- tee, ' 37, ' 3S. Srcoini Rail; LAXnoZA, FRED Albuquerque Arts and Sciences. M. niH)X, JAMES .Mlniquerque .Arts and Sciences. McC;iNLEV, ROBERT Alhu(|uerque Arts and Sciences. MILES. CAROLYN Albuquerque . rts and Sciences; Phi Kap- pa Phi Freshman Honor Roll; Dramatic Club, ' 35; Tiwa, ' 35, ' 3f ; Maia Fresh- man Honor Roll; Student Senate, ' 37, ' jS; A. W. S. Council, ' 38 ; W. A. A., Sec- retary, ' 37; B ' K Sister. ' 37; Phi Sigma, Secretary, ' 37, Vice President, ' 38; Mu . lpha Nu, Secretary, ' 38; Phi Kappa Phi; New Mex- ico .Anthropologist, Assistant Fditor, ' 38. MURDOCK, NATALIE Springer Education; Chi Omega; Ciirls ' Orchestra, ' 36; W. . . .v., ' 37; Majors Club; Col- lege League of Women Voters, ' 36; Transfer, Steph- ens College. T iiiJ Rhiv LOSH, RICH. RD .Albuquerque .Arts and Sciences; Sigma Chi; Lobo, ' 35, ' 37; 1 " - matic Club, ' 35. ' 3 . ' 37; Theta Alpha Phi, ' 37, ' 3S; International Relations Club, ' 36. ' 37; Debate Council, ' 36, ' 37. ' i - MATHEWS, BURGESS Washington, D. C. Engineering; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll; .A. S. M. E., ' 36, ' 37, ' 38, Secretary- Treasurer, ' 38; Engineers ' Dance Committee, ' 38; Edi- tor of Engineering Maga- zine; Transfer, University of Maryland. MEINERSHAGEN, RICHARD Higginsville, Missouri Education; Kappa Sigma; Football, ' 33, ' 3f ' . ' 37. ' 3 ; Track, ' 36, ' 37, ' 3S; Basket- ball, Club ' ( . ' 37. ' 3S; Khatali. Letter MIMS, FRANK Mountainair , rts and Sciences; Kappa . lpha; Dramatic Club, ' 3s. •36, ' 37; Theta .Alpha Phi, ' 36. ' 37. ' 3 ' ' ' Sigma .Alpha ; Inter-fraternity Council, ' 37; Student Senate; Debate Council, ' 37, ' 38; Khatali. NIELSON, R.M.PH , lliuquen|ue Arts and Sciences; Pi Kappa Alpha. I ' mirth R111C I.OV, . R IHUR .Mbuquerque Education; Dramatic Club, •35, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Theta Alpha Phi, ' 36, ' 37, ' 3S, Secretary, ' 36; Freshman Quartet, ' 34; Mens ' Quartet, ' 35, ' 36; Stu- dent Covuicil, ' 36. M. Y, LI.LA LOUISE Glendale, California Arts and Sciences; Pi Kappa Delta; Transfer, University of Redlands. MEULI, MAVNARD Hope, Kansas .Arts and Sciences; Kappa Mu Epsilon, ' 38; Transfer, Emporia State Teachers Col- lege. MOLLANDS, GENEVIEVE Taos . rts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Dramatic Club, ' 35, ' 36; Mirage, ' 35; College League of Women Voters, ' 35. OTERO, ELOISA ,Albuquerc[ue Education ; Kappa Kappa Ciamma; Dramatic Club, •35; College League of ' omen Voters, ' 35, ' 36, Sec- retarv-Treasurer, ' 36. - im.M.a i -UL ' I.J — l ' .U mmtimiK. m ■« - - m.. . f m w-is -ym -St - ssmf " ' Firsf Roiv I ' ARKER, TED AlluKiuerqiie Engineering; A. 1. E. E., ' 36, ' 37. ' 381 Secretary, ' 3S. POWER, BETTY Albuquerque Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Dramatic Club, ' 36, ' 37. RICHTER, HARVENA Allniquerque Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Gamma; Dramatic Club, ' 3 5, ' 37, ' 38; Radio Guild, ' 3S; College League of Women Voters, ' 35; Mir- age, ' 35 ; Lobo, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37 ; Poetry Club, ' 38; Girls ' Chorus, ' 35, ' 37, ' 38; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll. SEITSINGER, RALPH Miles, Ohio Arts and Sciences. SHELDON, JOHN Pasadena, California Arts and Sciences; Phi Sigiria, ' 37, ' 38; Student Christian Movement; Dra- matic Club; Transfer, Col- lege of The Pacific. S ' Cfjnil R01U PATTEN, LLOYD Gallup Education; Dramatic Club, ' 35; Men ' s Chorus, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Mixed Chorus, ' 37, ' 38; Men ' s Quartette, ' 38; Mirage, ' 38. POWER, MARGERY Albuquerque Arts and Sciences. ROBINSON ' , CLOE lularosa E d u c a t i o n ; .Alpha Chi Omega; Sigma .Mpha Iota, ' 37, ' 38- SHANNON, BETTY .Mbuquerque Education; I ' hi Mu; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll; Lobo, ' 35, ' 36; Dra- matic Club, ' 35; Mirage, ' 36, ' 37; Girls ' Chorus, ' 36; Col- lege League of Women Voters, ' 35, ' 36. ' 37; Pi Sigma . lpha. ' 3.S ; Lamiula Delta, ' 38. SHELFON, MARIE Almogordo . rls and Sciences. T iirJ Rd u P. ULAN ' FIS. JAMES Albuquerijue . rts and Sciences; Pi Kappa . lpha; International Rela- tions C lub, ' 3S. PROVINCIO, . FF. . nth(iny I ' ducation. ROMERO, MIGUEL Chamisal Education; Phi . lpha Theta. ' 38; Transfer, New Mexico Normal. SHEEHAN, KATHERINE El Paso .Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa Ciamma. SNAPP, ROBER ' F Phoenix, Arizona .Arts and Sciences; Pi Kappa .Alpha; Cacique, ' 35; Phi Sigma, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Dra- matic Club, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37. Fi url i Roii ' PEARCE, C. THERINE .Aibuquerqu ' j Education ; I.ambtla Delta, Secretary-Treasurer, ' 38; Pi Gamma Mu, ' 38; Educa- tional Society, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Phi Alpha Theta, ' 38; Phi Kappa Phi; Transfer, Sul Ross State Teachers College. REIDY, ROBERF . lbu()uerque . rts and Sciences; Sigma Chi; Pi Sigma Alpha; Inter- national Relations Club, ' 36, 37, President, ' 37; Inter- fraternity Council, ' 37, ' 38; Khalali; Ex-President of Senior Class, ' 38; Ex- Chairman of Student Union Committee, ' 38 ; Ex-Student Council. SANCHEZ, R. CHEL Willard Education President, Secretary A. W. S. Big Sister, ' 36; Hokona cil, ' 37. Phrateres, Vice ' 37 ; Las Damitas, Treasurer. ' 36; Council, ' 35, ' 36; 35, ' 36; Akiho, House Coun- SHIRLEY, PHILIP . lbuquerque .Arts and Sciences; Kappa Sigma; Football, ' 35; Men ' s Chorus, ' 36, ' 37; Mirage, ' 37, ' 38. STALLINGS, DENNIS Waterflow Engineering; A. S. C. E., Secretary, ' 37, Vice President, ' 38; Sigma Tau, Secretary- Treasurer, ' 38; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll; Oren W. Strong Award, ' 36; Orchestra, ' 36; Kappa Mu Epsilon, ' 37, ' 38; Stu- dent Senate, ' 3S; Student Council, ' 38. mmmmmm mmmmmmmmw -y. ' f ' :. wr am First RolU STII.F.S, LE ROY Allunjuerque Arts and Sciences; Sigma Phi Epsiion : Lobo, ' 35, ' 36. WAGNER. W. K. Alhuiiuerr|iie Arts and Sciences. WII.HEI.M. M.VRV . ilui(]iier(|ue Education; Kappa Omicron Phi, ' 37, ' 38; Delta Phi Delta, ' 37. ' 38; Art League of New Mexico. WILLI. MS, PAULINE Albuquerque Arts and Sciences. VEAROUT, ROBERT . llniquer()ue Engineerint; ; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll ; Sig- ma Tau Award; Harry L. Dougherty Memorial Prize in Engineering; Track, ' 35; Student Christian Movement. ' 34, ' 35; A. I. E. E., ' 37, ' 3S, Vice President, ' 38; Kappa Ntu Epsiion, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Sigma Tau, ' 37, ' 38; Phi Kappa Phi. Second Roiv STIEN, KENNETH Hagerman Engineering; A. S. M. E., ' 37. ' 38, Vice President, ' 38; Engineering Society, Presi- dent, ' 38; A. S. C ' E., ' 38; Student Senate, ' 37; Band, ' 35. ' 36, ' 37. ' 3S- WEEKS. KF.n II • Xlbuquerfjue Arts and Sciences; Pi Kappa Alpha; Band, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38 ; Assistant Director of Hand, ' 36, ' 37, ' 38; Lobo, ' 36. Will l. MS. LEE Las Vegas Education; Chi t)mega ; W. A. A., ' 36, ' 37, ' 38, Vice President, ' 37, President, ' 38; Majors Club, ' 37, ' 38, Secre- tary-Treasurer, ' 37; College League of Woinen Voters, ' 35; Dramatic Club, ' 36, ' 37; . . W. S., Vice President, ' 38; Student Senate; Transfer, New Mexico Normal Uni- ersity. WILLS, VIRGINIA Albuquertjue Education; Ka[)pa Kappa (lamina; Dramatic Club, ' 35, ' ? ' ■ Vt)RK, J. L. .Albuquerque Engineering; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll; Sigma Tau Award; Harry L. Dougherty Memorial Prize in Engineering; Chem- istry Club, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37; Sig- ma Tau, ' 37, ' 38, President, ' 38; Kappa Mu Epsiion, ' 37, ' 38, President, ' 38; Phi Kap- pa Phi. Third Row TESTMAN, VEGA Plainview, Texas Arts and Sciences; Chi Omega; Dr. Zimmerman ' s Discussion Groups. WEEKS, KENNETH -Mbuquertjue . rts :n]d Sciences. WILLIAMS, PAULINE Elizabeth, New Jersey Arts and Sciences; Chi CJmega ; Lobo, ' 36, ' 37; Dra- matic Club, ' 36, ' 37; Poetry Club, ' 37, ' 38, President, ' 38; Publications Board, ' 38; Stu- dent Union Committee, ' 38; Student Senate; Who ' s Who in American Colleges and Universities, ' 38; Transfer, San Diego State College. Wood, WILLIAM .Mbuquerque -Arts and Sciences; Sigma Chi; Phi Kappa Phi Fresh- man Honor Roll; Lobo, ' 35, ' 36, ' 37, Managing Editor, ' 37; International Relations Club, ' 37, ' 38, Secretary- Treasurer, ' 37; Mirage, ' 37; Student Senate, ' 37; Senior Class Vice President. ZIMMERMAN, HELEN EMILY Albuquerque -Arts and Sciences; Kappa Kappa (Jamma ; Dramatic Club, ' 35; College League of ' omen Voters, ' 35; Phi Kappa Phi Freshman Honor Roll; Girls ' Quartette, ' 35, " 36, ' 37, ' 38 ; Sophomore Vigi- lance Committee; Panhellenic Council, ' 37, ' 38; Student Council. ' 36, ' 37; A. A. S. Council, ' 37; International Relations Club, Vice Presi- dent, ' 37; Sigma Alpha Iota, ' 35t ' 36. ' 37, ' 3S; Pi Sigma Alpha, Vice President, ' 3S; Mortar Board. i. ,Vj3Su , s..m :, tk..-.-i»imi -,m m ' .: ■ m ,j ieT- ' wm-M ' m-n-m: L- - -- 7- " -- Ct . ' - : r , Advertising and Humor ii ' y " t y.yii ja:.gKgff ' BP sMgrr ' ' " TS: TT- ' - ; m-, ., v,m» ' mmmi -- -a! msifi " m ' - ' mi ! ' --TmB % $ «$»«S»«o «$»«4 «S «S $M$ «o « •{••S» «$ «S »%«S «$ «S»«$»«9 2»«4 ••$»»% - «$»«$ 4- I lo Our Advertisers . . . V ! ' % " Brighten the corner where you are " may be the title % of an old hymn, but it is also an excellent business I ' l maxim. I:- This year we have tried to brighten yottr corner, to i. make the advertising section of the 1938 Mirage as X attractive and readable as the rest of the book. % The use of color in this section of the Mirage has ? caused us extra trouble and expense. It is our way of :• expressing our appreciation of your support and of ♦ giving you an " extra something " to let you understand •!- the sincerity with which we sav, " TL-. !-. V ,, ' •:• ■ ± iid,iii X- ou. t t % % ? . .- " v . s .. - . ° t % t ♦ •I- ■ ■ ' 5 J ' J ♦ » ♦ % • ' Houser s Pliarmac 2I20 East Central Phones 1+20 — 293 — 294 IN BUSINESS FOR YOUR HEALTH JVc Cater to Your JVants Free Delivery t r t % t % I SPORTS EQUIPMENT % GOLF, TENNIS % BASEBALL J T t I % % % Sport Shop New Mexico School Supply Co. ± « %«o»«y «?i iTi ■t t ' -j V»? .;. 205 West Copper Phone 524 ' I t - v ' H ' X • ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦-K-«♦♦-:♦♦♦♦• ♦•x- ♦•M••:•♦♦• ♦ We Appreciate and tnank ail tnose kind rriends wno had a nelpin| liand in tne production or tliis 1938 Mirage. The Editor and Bus. M r. .{..{m5..j.,5.,{.,j.,j..j » .5. .j» , .,j. .5..j . , j ' fiC.dilP P ii mp mmmiKm ii ii M M ii . , -.ip.»y r . -a -tgr- " ' ' WWUm- L« k • -» J J» J»»J» •■J «?M?«»% A »J A A A ' » » - » A A A J»A AA A J» A»J»»J» i Diamond D own . . . n hold the girl you want until your wedding date ! • • • SEE THE NEW WED-LOCK DIAMOND ENSEMBLES Jroqq I he Jeweler " Albuquerque ' s Oldest Credit Jeweler " 318 WEST CENTRAL 4. t t V t Best commercial of the season was when Louis Schifani bought the " ears " of the Lobo for an edition. " Our policy, " one ear stated; the other exposited, " New York Life. " Tn case you ignorant, uncul- tured mugs are in the dark, " Ears " are little things that go up on the top of the corner of the paper, and they give stuff about the paper that it carries in stories when the paper comes out . . . Oh, well, you know . . . They ' re what Saunders gets funny in, and what Marble used to point to his edi- torials. There, now you know. That ' ll be all today, but watch for a quiz Tuesday. •X " t " X ' X ' I " ! ' J X " ; I I X " M I ' I H M 4- i " For Economy Drive The Thrifty FORD " 60 " or the " 85 " LINCOLN FORD V-8 Sales and Sei ' vice Cook Motor Co. t t •{• 300 N. 3rd St. Phone 460c i| I CREAMLAND DAIRY PRODUCTS Flavorfu Ice Crea m t ♦ t t V Albuquerque Co-Operative Dairy | 321 N. Second Street A AA AAA AAA A A ?- AAA A A A»% A » ' ' ' | ' ' t ! Finest Scenic Route Through the Bright Colorful Southwest {■■ 1% ' V BOULDER jyAM—fAbove) Man ' s greatest engineering achievement. METEOR CRATER— Near Winslow. Arizona — 600 feet deep and nearly one mile wide. DAYLIGHT SCENERY— it ' s scenery you ' re after, fly TWA. Ride comfortably in deep -cushioned seats, relax. AND SO TO BED— And it ' s a big full-size bed as restful and comfort- able as in your home. Here you ca7i dream your iray across a continent! GRAND CANYON — Nature ' s most colorfid inastcrpicc ill the heart of the Indian Country. Grand Canyon and Boulder Dam Flying is grand fun! Especially when you fly TWA — The Lindbergh Line. You can board a TWA plane in the evening at either Los Angeles or New York and pi ' esto! — overnight you ' ve flown from coast to coast in a giant Skysleeper and arrive the next morning at your destination fresh and relaxed! Less than 16 hours be- tween Los Angeles and New York. That ' s speed! University students delight in TWA ' s daylight scenic trips. For no other airline off ' ers the scenic beauty of the Lindbergh route. People who ' ve flown it tell us they find new wonders every trip — East and West — for the .beauties of Grand Canyon . . . Boulder Dam . . . Meteor Crater . . . Painted Desert . . . never " go stale. " And where can you find a thrill to match flying into New York, Chicago, San Francisco or Los Angeles at night ... on a TWA Skyliner. After classes are out you ' ll want to hurry home. Why not fly . . . TWA? Rates are sui-prisingly low. Just compare and you ' ll find it costs no vwre to fly. Charming hostesses serve delicious meals aloft . . . they ' re complimentary. Start your vacation off in a grand way. Fly home . . . for its grand fun to fly! Call TWA or any hotel, travel bureau or telegraph station for rates, sched ules and reservations. tOUTE OF THE " SKYCHIEF Nation M Ut .,mm. ,mk ' 2,-:ii ' :.Mt ' ' jutMhi L. , ' i,jL ' ,.4k J. KORBER COMPANY t • J J J 4 I J t t ♦ t I HARDWARE CHINA, GIFTS SPORTING GOODS PAINTS WALL PAPER FLOOR COVERINGS WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTORS PHONE 115 DODGE AND PLYMOUTH AUTOMOBILES DODGE BROTHERS TRUCKS SALES AND SERVICE PHONE 940 t t ♦ •5 t t ± .;...j„; .5 j,.j. j. KORBER BLDG., SECOND STREET BETWEEN COPPER TIJERAS, ALBUQUERQUE I t t H 1 ' l l l IH t 1 t ' J- . : ' ir ' TPf»r ' ' iJfflM«e E ' ' TB» ' JPP«w»ipmi 4•♦♦• ♦ ♦ ♦• ♦M • ♦ •M • -H ♦• ♦ •♦♦• ' ♦♦• • • • ♦♦• ♦ • ♦ •M H • ♦H t t t t t •J- t t ♦ t ♦ t t ♦ ± The University of New " On the Mile-High Campus " ALBUQUERQUE COLLEGES ARTS AND SCIENCES FINE ARTS EDUCATION ENGINEERING (All Credentials) (Fully Accredited) GENERAL COLLEGE GRADUATE SCHOOL Courses Offered in Departments of: Anthropology, Architecture, Art, Biology, Chemistry, Dramatic Art, Economics and Business Admin- istration, Education, Engineering, English, Geology, Government and Citizenship, Greek and Latin, Health, History, Home Economics, Library Science, Mathematics, Modern Languages and Literature, (French, Ger- man and Spanish), Music, Philosophy, Physical Education, Physics, Psychology and Sociology. W . I I L.A - New Adininistrut ion iiuildiiiK. ' ' - i ' ii ' i ' i 4 «4J«« « « « « M «2 « « J« » 4 « « « «» « « - « «J « « « j .X M M ♦♦•H •M " •M•♦ •J H •: " •K♦•H••♦• •X exico V -I- Two Year Courses in General College in Special Vocational Cur- ricula : Art, General Business, Home Making, Music, Quantity Food Service, Recreational Leadership, Sanitation, Secretarial, Soil Conserva- tion, Land Surveying. Courses Offered in Extension Classes and by Correspondence. t t ♦ t t ♦ t For a Unique Vacation We Suggest: U.N.M. fields sessions of archaeology, ethnography and human geography in Chaco and Jemez Canyons, July 30-August 27. The Field School of Art at lovely Taos. The Eighth Annual Field School of Indian Art at romantic Santa Fe, July 25-August 20. (Outstanding artists and experts of the Southwest and America teach in the field schools.) Regular summer school courses in all departments at Albuquerque. For Information, Address: Registrar, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque H- - ' -i- i-Ji ' -i--i- -i--H--i-4 --i--i ' ' i- - t PBae. ' Rgar ' r MgE y " w » " - ' ' ' ' niW4 ' - ' H- K WmUf ' KrW ' cifr •5- t Jtylz without extravagance e 2:yc) I NATIONAL I GARMENT CO. i " j-ii; West Central — M. OsoFF, M«r. t t ♦ ♦ ♦ t t M m « JmJ « • ••J % ? ■% ♦% ♦T T T %«.% %»%»$ A A AA V»t «{»« j »»S - Champion lifter of hot news is E. F. Goad ' s U Goo publicity department. A hard and long row has this gent to row. Picture, if you can, the job of making University news about teachers and tripe interesting enough to pass local and out-of-state papers. The Major did a good job in his first year, however, and we wish him well (if such a thing is possible in a razz section) in future combats with the editors of the Parajito Gazette. And if you don ' t think that boy has the University at heart, just try and sell him an ad sometime. i i - t t t t t t i Have your hair styled at ♦ The Varsity Shop ? See how much more pleasant Romance is. HENRY N. DAFIS International Winner VARSITY BEAUTY SHOPPE Phone 2833 1 105 South Harvard .5-. . .;, ♦♦♦♦♦•M " ! ' ; ! % % I t I % A6-P I t Dispensary and Cafe % SIRO CHIORDI, Prop. % WHERE GOOD FRIENDS MEET ♦ 907 South Second Phone 4357 ;.,r., ,j.,;,,;., 5..5..j.. ;„j..;..j,.j,,;..;..;..; 5..;..{ ;..; j..j..5 j..j j 5 .M•4 •H • •H•♦♦♦♦ ♦ •M-♦•H K•♦ - ♦ ' •♦v•H •K H•♦♦♦♦♦♦ H•♦ t I Tlie VARSITY CLUB t t (A Camptis lusliltition) Music tnat soothes wear- campus reet Music tnat natli cliarm ana rnYtnm JOHN M. MORGAN, Manager 600 N. University, Albuquerque, N. M. ..;..;..;..;..;. . ■ IWH ,A » ■T««W«» .(CV « ' !» ' ( " XP TT If T»Sr-- F= »P« - ' ' W General Repairing CLYDE MOORE MOTOR CO. specializing in Servicing FORDS and LINCOLN ZEPHYRS ♦ t t NITE SERVICE •| 212 N. 4th St. Phone 5066 f Realizing that we are not large £ enough campus figures to make the % drip column we, the following: % LOSH McMANUS and STROM E submit this PAID ADVERTISE- MENT in order to have some- thing to show our parents for all the dough they ' ve blown on us for the past years in college. We also figer that as long as one of our number is a great asset to the intramural program; that another is probably the best actor ever turned loose on the drama lovers; and that the third party is an artist who will dazzle his audience with his great (commer- cial) paintings, we feel that no book would be complete without our campus records inscribed therein. Vou stoogents owe us a vote of thanks for being such assets to your institution. (Pd. Pol. Adv.) I V For Life Insurance and Annuities i SEE HUBERT RILEY and GEORGE B. BYRNES Rfprese italives EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY % 114 South Third Phone 511 . «J «{».{M{MjM .{ « M .. J . » { }». M} M}M «. M » « t « « M » J «» QUALIFY FOR BUSINESS Good positions, promotion, advancement and bigger pay aren ' t matters of Luck — they are the rewards that come only to those who have prepared themselves. ALL-YEAR-ROUND COURSES IN BUSINESS Special Summer School in College Preparatory Shorthand and Typing. A 303 W. Central Phone 627 .M• • •H•♦♦ • • M ♦ ♦ •• • • ♦ ♦H • ♦H•♦♦ M H♦♦ ♦• ♦• ♦• ♦ Compliments of HAZEL SHOP » A« « »« » » « « «» | »» » «« j «« «i ii n »» i «« » »« » « » «« ««j— »j i: :: :: i: fvrr- ' nrr- ' n wiHMi 11 I iiiiiw i " niiiia ii ' iii ji wi i s . ift?fmta p ' ' ym ii ' ?f9 ' W ' .;„:„:„:„:„x. « - M- » K K« ' -:- " :« w : ' - - COLLEGE INN BOOK STORE NEW AND USED TEXT BOOKS ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT SCHOOL SUPPLIES ART SUPPLIES CRESTED STATIONERY PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS REMINGTON TYPEWRITERS Mr. and Mrs. Walter Fislier Pkone 1118 x .j,.;„;..;„;..:,.x •x•• • • • • ♦ • • •X " • •H•• • • • ♦•M • • • • ♦♦♦ ' X t t t 4- •5- t t t A Bo Goes to College " Yesterday, " writes one insured, " was a gloriously happv dav for us. We saw our boy, Ted, off to college. Of course, ever since he was a little fellow I ' ve known that even if I should not be here to help him my dreams for him would come true — thanks to the educational insurance policy I took out when he was six. I ' m thankful that I lived, but as a matter of fact, what with the depres- sion and all, I doubt if I could have found the money right now to send Ted to college. And that would have been heart-breaking for his mother and me. As long as I live I shall be grateful for the insurance that stepped in and lifted this load from my shoulders. " (An excerpt from a letter written to the New York Life Insurance Co.) % •5- t % % 4 t LOUIS SCHIFANI New York Life Insurance Company Phones: Residence, 938-R; Office, 4400 50S First National Bank Bldg. Albuquerque, New Mexico »j,.;. j j..;«;«;..;..j ;»,j t,.j..j,,j«.;.,t..;„;„;„;..;„;„;..;..;..;„»„j..;..;.. ..;..;-.;,.j..;..X ' " t-j " X " ; " t " : " ; " : " H " ! " X " ! « t t t t t itM jpmr er ' w r ' - mpii m Emmmm I1P " |«I ' ») ' VfflWH VS SgP W P WWf. X What ' s this? ... the Kappa Sig duck again?? . . . No, Herman, just Little Dolly " Activity " Bebber In her new Easter bonnet held over from last spring. Dolly, as all of you who are anybody who, holds the title of " Can ' t get a word in edgewise or nohow " Campus Champ. Of course it ' s just folklore ' round char, but ' tis said that Henrietta talked through one Pan Hell-ta-neck meeting, two Motor Boat meetings, and an Alpha Chi bull session . . . without taking a breath. t i t t t ♦ The Dieter Bookhuiding Company 1130 23rd Street Denver. Colorado Certified Binding For Piiblie Libraries - School Libraries School Text Books .AAAAAA.V ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•: : " X " : 4 ' Because this book is bound in a Molloy Made cover it will continue to be a source of satisfaction to you throughout the years to come. A good book deserves a Molloy Made Cover. The David J. Molloy Plant Western Representative Sam Babcock — 411 East 91st St. Los Angeles, Calif. 2S57 North Western Avenue Chicago, Illinois ,j».5m5 5 5. }. j ..5..5 j..I..5. . .{ .5 . .{ 5 4 " J 5 " .; " ; " .;..;. ' » » r " I •1 " ? t Yes — believe it or not — we ' ve got fine silk hosiery knit to your re- quirements just as though we ' d measured the length and shape of your leg. Now that skirts are shorter, think how important that is! No wrinkles, no bulges, no strain or twisting — and trimmer, sheerer fit from top to toe. Ask for Petite for small — Princess for average — Regal for tall. Individually Proportioned Hosiery Bv f 1.00 P ' ' P= " ' ' t ,.;..;..x•• • •• • • x •M■ H ' ■ ■ ■■ i uuL_«L ui I n mmtmmnmm mrwtm . K s . m»u mm ' ' ' m- - KS ' W - ' m 2 !! Tmfrwvi: .tfTWW ' ll !! ♦ • t t t t ± if 1.1. .i MM HflHi A Good Place to Start to Make Dreams Come True J. C. Baldridge Lumber Co. Everything for Building 401-423 South First Street X ' ' ' J " J « ' -x-: " : X " Students now have the dubious honor of boasting that their cam- pus has the greatest number of contests per capita of any other collich in the country. While most of these contests made them con- scious of local advertisers, the one that took the kiddies by storm was that which made ' em aware of the lucious legs that pound the campus. Campus cameramen used more film in two hours than they did in the last five Aggie games. Restricted from official contest photographers lists, was the name of John " How I Made Khatali " Morgan. Tt was discovered that Morgan had spent two weeks get- ting various coeds to pose for the contest zvilhoiit film in his camera! • • • Charm School Coeds took their work seriously in their most active year since its founding. Heist your glims on the pix of the Madamo- selle Starrett as she leads the girls in the one two movements. High- light of the schedule was a three- hour thesis by Prof. Haught on, " How to Make the Most of Your Personality " (Lobo, April i). I to Bill Beeken and Oscar Blueher on their excellent work as editor and business manager of the 1938 Mirage. We hope you will enjoy the book as much as we have enjoyed working with them. Best wishes to Bill and Oscar in whatever they mav undertake in the future. GCftB IRD GRAPHIC An,TS KANSAS CITY ■ BUILD INC M I S S O U M • m neaf wv w ' LMiiiViSiSf- ' ui wm i.iiwmNI ■ w - g " - ' m ' s app T r -y wym ' w: ' ki -JK- ..;„;..;„;..;..;..;..;..j..; j..j..;„;,.;„;..;..;„;..;..;..;..j,,j ;,.;,.j,.;.,;,.j„j„;..;..;..;..;..;..;.. t t FRENCH MORTUARY Thirty Years ' Service in Albuquerque t Phone 80 ■ ■■• 1 i «, •s " Nv « h..mLu J 1, The Chapel in the G a r d e n AMBULANCE Phone ♦ 80 I " ♦ ' % ' - " " " ♦ " ♦ " ♦ " ♦ " ♦ " ♦ " " V t V ♦ i (aSOISc tag ' s 522 WEST CENTRAL AVE. Sport, Afternoon Evening DRESSES SIZES TEN THRU EIGHTEEN ♦ % ♦ t t V % t t 1 t The 1938 flash scoop pix of the year was caught only last month at a meet- ing of Alortar Bored before tapping the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority like a keg of brew. The sistern make quite a touching scene in their purty jackets which are cut like a two dollar a day machinist ' s finger. " ♦ " ♦ " " ♦ " " ♦ " • " ♦ " » " t r T T T T T T T X t Sanitary Laundry Prosperize Cleaning: Your clothes not only- look better, but wear longer. i y. V t t il l (januents receive personal attention and inspection t t T % t % ± Phone 804 •im. ;Mi!mtr,:imA .A;. -REL p ' wefiSE: - Bg T i ff ' ' ' sm m ssrm ' ww ' -nm ' z " - ' ' wmr w ,r?8r3rr si. 5 Coniphments of JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE CLAYTON, NEW MEXICO % Gateway to World ' s Greatest Dry Ice Field — The Mile Hicjh City % When in Clayton, N. Mex. Stop at the Best — Costs No More PALACE HOTEL STRICTLY MODERN Once a Guest — Always a Booster I WANSER JEWELRY CO. ? •5 ♦ (Since 1919) T t t t t Phone 85 A. A. Carter, Mgr. ,5. 1919) Diamonds, Watches, Silverware Santa Fe Watch Inspection t t t •s • • t Mity Nice is good BREAD HOME BAKERY Compli III cuts of Clayton ' s Best ROBERT ' S BEAUTY SHOPPE fVe Have the Knack Pearl Wilson, Owner % t ♦ 4. ♦ •!• ♦ t I VAUGHN ' S DRY GOODS | PIONEER AUTO CO. t COMPANY " If It ' s in Clayton . . . It ' s at Vaughn ' s " % FORD V-8 Clayton New Mexico : A Clayton, N. M. Sales Everything for Your Motor Car i t Service X Phone 132 t t i I SILVER MOON CAFE Home of Juicy Steaks IDEAL CASH GRO. MKT. " Service With a Smile " Clayton Clayton, New Mexico T New Mexico z Texline, X Texas 3. 4. .MJ. :-4 : :..H♦•:•♦• ♦♦♦♦♦ ■ M•♦♦♦♦•5• ' ♦•H•♦♦♦♦♦ M• ♦ ••M• ♦•J•♦♦ ■{ " {•♦♦♦♦•■I " t t t t t t ♦ t t t t ♦ t t FINE PHOTOGRAPHS iTpHE BEST materials, workmanship, and constant - " - effort to attain perfection in our portraits has been our policy for over a quarter of a century. We believe that " Quality will be remembered long after the price is forgotten, " and quality in photo- graphs can only be attained by painstaking work and fine materials. The negatives of the pictures we made for this book are on file, and are available for duplicate prints. BROOKS STUDIO V 709 West Central Ave. Phone 389 .J .:..t.. . .;..;..;„;. .;..;„;„.„;..;„.„j„... fs. ' Wwii :mFiBss i • " -TjRs aPT-j H fl ftj- ' -wm :ermr- ' 9r ■Ti ' ■ ' ffiK ' " t t t t t •J- t t t EVERYTHING FOR THE AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHER Kodaks - Cameras Films - Etc. CERTIFIED Photo Finishing H anna 6 ' H anna Authorized Eastman Dealers 214 WEST CENTRAL t T i t t -K x-K : •H•• • •x H H H x •M K ♦• ♦• • • 4 " •J • ♦ f I E. L Washburn Co. J X Since 1883 j • ' T • i i KUPPENHEIMER GOOD | t CLOTHES t ¥ ? :{: CLOTHCRAFT SUITS i ♦ STETSON AND MALLORY HATS f J WALKOVER AND ♦ - FREEMAN OXFORDS -j- j MANHATTEN SHIRTS -j t AND PAJAMAS t t INTERWOVEN SOCKS V C T A ... . •!• ♦ Admiration Silk Hose for Ladies :• ♦ ♦ ♦ • t - Phone 163 122 S. Second -!• t t ■: •x • •x : " X x x x x♦♦•:•♦•x x x••x 4k . «k : X " X X " X " I " X ! : ' j x x : " X- V J » I J I J » V i I ' •♦•X- ' X— X X X ! !— X X " We dedicate the above " purty pig " to Poricy Porge Higgins — for we heard that Porky Porge was going into the " Piggy " business upon graduating this June. Cameron ' s cultured crooners, Radio Guild to freshmen, used the trophy award angle to make the campus cliques turn out some smasharoos in the way of micro- phone masterpieces. All the programs were well presented with the exception of all those who entered. t i f. Valliant Printing Co. Printers- Binders New Mexico ' s Largest and Most Modern Printing Concern Albuquerque, N. M. t X t r t I i I ..2 ;.. . . ; .j» .t..t.,j..;. j..j..j.,j„; , ,; j..2.. 2„;.,j„j..t., ..; t f t B Dine and Dance at LE GRANDE Albuquerque s Most Popular Care FRANK CECIL DICK Phone 481 - 923 Soutn Second Street ' ♦ ' -♦ " ♦—♦ " ' ♦— » " ♦ " " ' • ♦ For a Dance Band liith Style and Perfection . . . Engage S TEEDIE RAKESTRA X j ana ner ? COLLEGIANS I t PHONE 3901-W " ?!Eiffl5 ' »WS--,=i: " w y - M ' Tia g- .p j :irg jf7xt::w:L : imi .H•.J-J • •M••■ • • •S•♦ • ♦•M••■M••M " M••M•♦ ••H M» ♦ t I t t t t t t ♦ t RIDE A BUS Compliments of ALBUQUERQUE BUS COMPANY t % ■K- ♦•j .{» «5 « -» »5» $» »«5» «5««5»«j»«5»«5»«5 »I»»J»»5mJ»«j«»j««j»«j j i T I % T Coca-Cola I Bottling Co. I 205 E. Marquette Ave. Phone 3007 $ 4. " I HORSES! HORSES! ! ' AA»%AAA «- »%»% •♦•i-w-i-i " ;-;-;-- -;- Imperial Laundry make your clothes look and feel like new % i I t % IF YOU WANT HORSES, WE HAVE THEM. IF YOU HAVE HORSES, WE WANT THEM. PI KAPPA ALPHA Unlimited Zor ' ic Dry Cleaning System Phone 148 t ,.M•• ♦•M M•• • • ♦ •K••H••• • •H•♦♦•M••H•♦ • • •H „j..j..j.,j„ »;.,;..j.. .j«j., «.5..j« .;..; ..;..5 ;-.;«.I. . » »H J " . ..{.,j.,{. , 5.. . . -.5-H ! ' ' H W : ' 4- J. •I- t Shoes of Quality at Ridlon ' s Vitality - Peacocks - Foot Savers 417 West Central Phone 685 New Mexico ' s Most Exclusive Shoe Store ,, , „ „ „ „ „ „ „ . •vy i Phone 421 t t t ALBUQUERQUE LUMBER COMPANY 423 and 501 North First Street Albuquerque, N. M. Distributors of Benj. Moore Co. Paint Products Johns-Manville Products Standard Sanitary Mfg. Co., Plumbing Products American Radiator Co., Heating Products X ■! M X " W W I I I -J H H I H ' M 4 » ♦ .♦„V?.»? T " %-!- t :jt vif ' ■ ' aBr " ' ,9f9rs ! ' wi.sp ' w ij;:as: j " b j s ii iWfe gEarTfo- T:3!rrwmr ' w y-jrw ' Reported earlier in the year to be the annual spring formal of the Beta Xi chapter of Chi Omega, a dance was held at a local hall early in May. It was later discovered that Social Chairman Johnston of white cross fame had been coerced by House Manager Bud " Pug " Lewis to co-operate with the Chi Ohs! in flinging a joint hop. Questioned, Lewis answered, " To cut down expenses and pay off one of the mortgages. " •!• I WHEN YOU NEED FOOD ♦ ♦ Think of SAFEWAY ♦ ' A Complete Line of I GROCERIES, I FRUITS, ' X and I MEATS % t T V t ♦• • ' ♦ ♦• • • • ' • • ♦ ' ! • • • •M • ♦ ♦♦ • •M ♦ w ' I DEPENDABLE day, night, and Sunday, baggage service. % ♦ t t % Cold storage % j. Fur storage i t I SPRINGER i Transfer Company 117 E. Tijeras . ' veniR- i Phone 48 ,.j..5.,j..j.,j,,t..j..j„;„;,.j„;,,;„;..;„;„;..j„;..;..j..j..j.,j.»j,.j..j..j »J,.j. ;. t V t X % Artistic Portraits " Q " TONE CERTIFIED KODAK PRINTING Red, White, and Blue Prints t V t t t 1: T Picture Framing Foto-stats % — Reproducing and Copying of All Kinds and Sizes j- % ALBUQUERQUE | BLUEPRINT CO. I 224 North Third Street Phone 4824-W ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•X t " M " M ' -M " !- ' •■J ? ' t J ' t « . » ' « ' I I t Tne Torcli Tnat Guides Tne World . . . Is Liglited Lv El ectncit " It is the trained mind tliat is forever leading tlic world on to new heights of human achievement and that is con- stantly pointing the way to a better life for the human race. The strongest force at the command of these trained minds today is electric power. It opens unexplored realms of matter to scientific research. It takes danger and drudgery out of industrial labor as well as household tasks. It makes possible our great transportation and communication systems. In fact, there are few human activities where electricity does not play a helpful and important part. The great production and distribution systems of the electric industry have kept such perfect pace with the growing need for electric service that it is regarded today as one of the best examples of adjusting production to need in a changing world. When you are ready to use electric power, the power will be ready for you. ♦ t t X ALBUQUERQUE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY Arthi;r Prager, Vice-President and General Manager •%•-% »% • •• » ■ »% •■ V J iMmmm4i£L ' . V iw ; ' : iSiP».65SSE: Hi rw :-m:.;m :Tmmww ' jr]wir ' -wi KEUFFEL ESSER i SUPPLIES Looking for Better Book Values % V Students This store saved you $4,000 this year in re- duced prices and rebates. Let ' s double this figure in 1939. % % % t Text Books Engineering Supplies Sporting Goods Tennis Equipment Art Supplies Fraternity and Sealed Stationery College Pennants and Belt Buckles Sheaffer Pens and Pencils and Sets UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE Archie Westfall ' 32 STUDENT UNION BUILDING The Store Built for You ± X t i. •. »,X .{. .;«.J. . . .. 4. .4». .H••H••H••M•♦ ••H 4 K••M M M 4- « « » «• « • • » i» »%AA« «» %A« A « %« A » » • • «•• • «• « « • ■«« « ■•• ■• » « »% A » ■■ « » »» j « « A « A % « « A ■ A A A ' AAA» »i «t ii ii i A A ♦ I t frank MINDLIN CO. JEWELERS f ? ± 314 West Central 4•x•♦M•♦M••i " • • •J • • " H " ' ' MK••I • ♦♦♦ I • ♦ ' I ' •I• •x ♦- • ♦ •?mJ««J»«JmJ»«J» » ««J J»«J J«»J« J »J««J »J««J J« J»»J« «J« «J» ««JmJ»«JmJ» J» Jm AA J «J» » »JmJ «J«»J «J«»J»«J» J J«»J»»J»»J»«J« »J» »J» J «J» J «J-mJ» m V t SANTA FE NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY JOHN S. SHERRITT, President Home Office Albuquerque, New Mexico " J Neiv Mexico Institution " c R. W. HOPEWELL Air Conditioning, Heating, and f. Ventilation % Steel Building Specialties X ' 414 E. Central Ave. Phone 530 Y ' iiaajU,u,u,--wT--«BCHaL ' P; ' .,3!l?3i»l 3S2Sr ' 1 t t U. N. M. MEN have learned to depend on the store that offers as complete and authentic styles for the campus as could be found in any University city or town, of any size, anywhere. QUALITY IMENSWEAl 309 West Central .- llni(|uerque, New Mexico I t ♦ ± t t t t t J Pour a little gander sauce on the nega- tive and presto! ... a shot of Currier getting away with the Kappa Sig duck one Thanksgiving eve. . . . The arrows are coming from Kappa King ' s bow. Relic of last year ' s debates, is this unusual antique chair found in the north lounge of the Student Union Building. No, Herman, it ' s not the one that Wash- ington never sat in, it was however, occu- pied by that droopy diverter of the de- bate, H. Calvin Bratton. It is an un- usual after dinner story that does not have a quip or three about how good ' ole H. Calvin used to lock himself up in this chair so he wouldn ' t fall out while listen- ing to his " unworthy opponents " carry on their side of the argument about the NLRB. Fillup " Back in Oklahoma " Howes will be only too happy to tell you all about it. .;«;,.; t..; j.,;-.; ;..; ;..j ;..j ..;»,;.,j..;..j„j„j„j..; .;..;.. .. ,,;...„. t t I M A r ::kJ[ xceisior i aunar Laund i t i I EXCLUSIVE Sam tone Clean ers V t t t I t t Ph one 177 t t i .J. « . . „;„;„;.. I r rs ' .i .aii-aB .. :f! FlSE , MPSHET •ff KT aTHKr iC " -SK- ' i- ' . .T« ' ' HE? ♦ •J 4 I t X t t ♦ I t t I t t ♦ Participate with Those You Love in the Happiness t t That Floivers Bring X ♦ ♦ IJixie floral v ompany Phone 2345 219 North Mulberry Ave. t t t |«J» J»«J»«jM.J««J»4j« J»«J««J« JnJ» J«»t»«.t,» .J«»J »J« J. t,.J«»J «J» t,»J »J.» ALWAYS LOOKING FORWARD TO SERVING YOU WITH MERCHANDISE BEFITTING THE UNIVERSITY MAN Clothes You Are Proud to Wear % C. H. Spitzmesser X 103 West Central X I t t t 3: Mr. Patricia Vincel " Legs " Butler has the honor of being the greatest factor in the lack of student interest in our Lobo this year. What with all of his fancy fea- ture articles about himself and friend Sigma Cliis, he finished off a successful year for both parties, with the Lobo run- ning a long third. Things got so bad in the Butler feature articles that the busi- ness manager asked him to please buy advertising space to run his column in. The Dramatic Club, known to local audiences as Karson ' s Kandlelight Klub, also thrilled its directors with some super dramatic debauchery. Early acting, we must confess, was as stiff as a ten-day-old corpse, but the kiddies loosened up at the last furlong and gave good performances as reported by their stellar space grabber, Screwy Skeeter Williams. l-V% " I ' VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV AAAAA.!—;—!—! " : Tnanlx Brooks Studio ■I I t V To the Mirage and the University students ? for the privilege of making the portraits in t the 1938 Mirage. } Our constant efifort for twenty-six years has :j; been to make the finest quality photographs, ♦ believing that " Qualitv will be remembered | long after the price has been forgotten. " :!; t To this end we use the best equipment and | materials, and strive always for finer tech- t nique, and portraits that we are proud to sign. t •f t t t i ■xgrf mv: ' : vm msss TL ' " ' ' - w ' m ii M T ' -Krwy ' jpmr ' W- ' wmwM (Telegram found on desk in Student Union Building) EASTERN ONION FABLEGRAM EDITORS OF MIRAGE AND LOBO SOMEWHERE IN TROUBLE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS BOTH PUBLICATIONS GREATEST EVER IN HISTORY OF UNIVERSITY STOP LIKE YOUR PROGRESSIVE AND RADICAL EDI- TORIAL POLICIES STOP GIVE US HELL ALL THE TIME STOP WE LOVE IT STOP FORGET ABOUT ADVERTISING SUPPORT STOP POPEJOY WILL TAKE CARE OF ANY DEFICIT ARISING OVER EDITORIAL POLICY STOP LOVE TO ALL STOP PREXY (STOP) » » (And the answer found in a wastebasket) UNM PRESIDENT CAMPUS STOP YOURE BREAKIN OUR HEARTS PICKENS BLUEHER : 5..J«{•♦• • • • ♦•• ♦♦♦♦• ♦• •: ♦• •■ ♦•M• M " • ♦I t t t 4. t t A. R. LOSH CO. Distributor and Manufacturer ' s Representative for ROAD OILS AND ASPHALTS, CREOSOTED LUMBER AND PILING, PLYWOOD, EXPANSION JOINT, LUMBER, ROOFING, PAINTS, ROAD AND STREET SIGNS, CEMENT, LIME, PLASTER, BRICK AND TILE We specialize in Building Materials 912-924 North First Street Albuquerque, New Mexico H■ • ♦• • • •• •■r•• • • • • •X " : " • - • • • •M-: " K•♦• • • •! " t • i t Visit Our | • • i Modern t I Hardware Store I » ► ■• » ' •• •j»»j» t I I t COMPLETE STOCKS OF NEW ATTRACTIVE MERCHANDISE I Raabe Mauger Co. ♦ t t t [ 12-114 West Copper, in Albuquerque Since igo6 i I I Com pli III en Is of... University Service | Station I T. L. LETTON Proprietor 1924 E. Central t Phone 1S36 X A»%.;„;„«.,;.A.%A.;.A V t " ♦•VVV V ONN, WH lr WAS TWt CKSE AV W MAOf SUCH MPO ' ' ' ' " OGRyiA Of[AGERe tER .R.O G.ANOE BR.W,NO CORPORArfg a , T !B»i is .ixr i ■j Ai " J »j« j»«j» j»«5» j »j« j j» Jm »j» j»»j»j« m5» m.j.«j 5» «JmJ»«Jm The University Press Albuquerque (S i%i£ University of New Mexico ♦ •V ' % " » " 4, " »4 " FOOLISH PHRASES OF FACULTY FUTURE FRAMERS Dr. Sorrell: " Other things being equal. " Dr. White: " Now, back on the farm— " Dr. Donnelly: " We ' re gonna have a quiz FRIDAY. " Dr. Bell : " Just pretend you ' re a little sunflower. " Coach Johnson : " Ugh . . .Ugh . . . Ugh ! ! ! ! No! " Dr. Walter: " Yeh, but how ' s that tie up with race problems. " Dean Clauve : " I cawnt understawnd why all the girls go Kappa — . " Good Joe Bostwick : " You can depend on me ! " ♦ t ♦ t t I I The Sun Drug Co. t Brigcs and Sullivan, Props. % t Headquarters for Your Drug ' ♦ Requirements ? % t t I We Carry the Finer Lines of Toilet Supplies and Cosmetics Chanel - Guerlain - Yardley Molinard - Dengyel - Giro Barbara Gould - Coty - Etc. Sanitary Fountain Srrvice FREE MOTORCYCLE DELIVERY Phone 54 V % t t ;„;„;„;„;„;„;„;..;„;..; ,;.,;..;.,;..;.,;..;..»..;..;..;..;..;«.j..j ;.,;..»..j..j..j.. Albuquerque t ♦ t T I Theaters For Your Entertainment (America ' s Foremost Indian Theatre) A. % Sunshine (House of Hits) KiMo (America ' s For Chief (Where the Big Pictures Return) Rio (All First Run Pictures) Mesa (The Home of Action Pictures) Mission (Foreign Language Pictures Tuesday and Wednesday Each Week) GO TO THE MOVIES REGULARLY In No Other Way Can You Get So Much Out of Life for So Little! pfl m tui t -S L- aB B B nak- m:.:jE!mK: xi.:k : jr m M - TWRaaibJiCigiagnh ' . d : ■ »■-- ' afc .- -. aif.v. l m l. Wm.,- K ' l Mf In- li ..:W ' ' ' -1 u OC-» ::»- -Wtf.iatl!i i s .: ..i m.JiimkVi. S S99mA ' itSikSBT. V - ' i gtt-. an ' tttar. ' :.. Mmn ' CiT . rar - A L ■ « 1 ' VV ; ' |HH.«m, ' r; ;Vt «mi«r


Suggestions in the University of New Mexico - Mirage Yearbook (Albuquerque, NM) collection:

University of New Mexico - Mirage Yearbook (Albuquerque, NM) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Page 1

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University of New Mexico - Mirage Yearbook (Albuquerque, NM) online yearbook collection, 1932 Edition, Page 1

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University of New Mexico - Mirage Yearbook (Albuquerque, NM) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

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University of New Mexico - Mirage Yearbook (Albuquerque, NM) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.