University of Nebraska Kearney - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Kearney, NE)

 - Class of 1947

Page 1 of 168

 

University of Nebraska Kearney - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Kearney, NE) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 168 of the 1947 volume:

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Sponsored by the Student Government Hssociation ot the Nebraska State Teachers College at Kearney GOLD MHXINE WHRDROP, Editor-in-Chief BETTY GROSH HUNT, Business Manager NORMH LEWIS, Hssociate Editor IQMES BELSCHNER, Hssistant Page 3 Page 4 SENIORS ' ' ' So shorf a fime ago, you sfood before fhe gafeways of our campus, fimid, hesifanf, bewildered liffle fresh- men, looking down a long hallway of years, reaching for fhe sfars, wondering whaf fhe fufure held in sfore for you. Today you pause once again before fhose gafeways fo sfep across fhe fhreshold info a new role, having fraversed fhe hallway of years, having complefed fhe final chopfer in fhe book enfifled College Career. You are proud wifh a righf fo be proud for you have indeed accomplished greaf fhings. You are eager fo fry your new-found skills and fo achieve fhe success fhaf so righf- fully belongs fo you. You are confidenf of your abilifies for you have grown from fhaf fimid youngsfer fo leaders among men, learned, mafured odulfs. You wonder where fhe years have gone. We wonder Too. lf has been our privilege fo share fhe innumerable memorable experiences of college days wifh you, fo work wifh you, laugh wifh you, and progress under your guidance and wifh your help, fo laud your honors and hold you as ideals, fo make your acquainfances and fo become your lifelong friends. We would fhaf we could fell fime fo sfand sfill, buf such a fhing is nof possible. The day of graduafion has dawned and you are ready. Relucfanfly buf proudly, . . oh, so proudly . . . we wafch you go. Down fhe avenue and info fhe waifing world. Y , Ilnnnrcmznm- Page 6 The startled eyes of a freshman, glancing shyly from schedule card to room number and back again . . . long lines at registration time when a casual "hello" blossoms into a life-long friend- ship . . . the thanks in the eyes of a veteran soldier home safe from the War . . . the Words of the color song around an open camp fire . . . the thrill of a marching band on a football field, blue and gold uniforms gleaming . . . cheers from a thousand throats as the team comes forth to play . . . scuffling through the leaves on the Way to a cup of coffee at the corner hangout and the dry, pungent odor of burning leaves . . . three bus loads of singing students rounding the last hill to Wayne . . . a ridiculous costume worn to a Sadie Hawkins dance and packed carefully away to remember. H game of bridge at the Kave before dorm hours and a coke . . . the lilt of an orchestra coming from the gym on a Friday evening . . . Sunday evening dates to the movie and the long Walk home . . . the shrill cry of a barker shouting his wares at a carnival and the gleaming candles held by dark- robed chorusters singing Vesper carols . . . the first flake of snow falling softly and silently over the Nativity scene on the campus lawn . . . heads bending low over books as semester exams draw close. The smell of hot popcorn on a frosty Winter evening, or the clean, fresh smell of a Saturday wash . . . misty eyes as proud hands touch the gold of a sorority or fraternity pin . . . a Ne- braska sunset smeared upon the blue canvas of the west . . . the quiet voice of a convocation speaker explaining school policies and principles. Friday morning scrambles for Hnte- lope news hot off the press and eve- nings at the library poring over refer- ences or practicing in symphony . . . candlelight initiation services and solemn words of an honorary organi- zation . . . a robin's song and a soft south breeze fortelling of spring , . . a new Easter bonnet and church on a Sunday morning . . . summer plans discussed among friends and calls of "Good luck" and "Remember When'7 . . . hands reaching out for that long- clreamed-of and well-earned diploma and the strains of a recessional. H11 these things are college. May we, through this book, recapture for you the memories, the dreams, and the experiences of those wonderful years. That is our aim . . . to help you remember. STAFF' I FOREWDRD ' ADMINISTRATION ORGANIZATIONS ATI-ILETIOS FEATURES Page 10 Center of your classroom activity was the Hdministx-ation Building, pictured above. When you were a freshman, these portals wel- comed youg now ihey form the threshhold io a successful ic-morrow. CAMPUS vrnws - Down the avenue of shady trees, the twin towers of the Hdministration Building could be seen, a symbol of cool, inviting, spacious buildings and classrooms, offer- ing lasting friendships, unforgetable experiences, and vocational preparation. You came . . . and you found there all that you had hoped for: a campus equally beautiful in Winter or in summer, pleasant living quarters, recreational provisions, Well-planned Curriculums, and an interested and competent faculty and administration. The corner stone of the main building Was laid in l904, north and south Wings added in 1910 and l9l2, and the auditorium completed in 1916. Housing classrooms and clubrooms, the Hdministration Building, located at the hub of a nation, has indeed been the hub of college activity. fn- Lf Page 11 is s.,.,,-Nami A Where the girls lived and what the boys lived for was the Eva I. Case Hall. DDRMS Case Hall, home of college women since 1930, was the center of many of the college's high jinks. lts three floors were filled with girls from many states. The spacious first floor reception room was not only the ideal spot on the cam- pus as far as the men were concerned, but it served as the site of many in- formal, after-hours dorm meetings. Living in Case Hall was exciting and pleasant. Hlways pleasant and efficient was house- mother of the girls' dormitory, Mrs. Eliza- beth Thomas. and her assistants. Page 12 ... , l M, W . W., .. .mm . fl A .i.' 'L .'f".rv - WW? y 2 e- jet -'twiilufl ,Qs fs?5Q'- I t W. EE , , ., ,gym ,B .H -R ' wf ' . ' it s 'xiii ...ig .sweep ffl? -L? .Is wflgfmrl 'S' 5 1:5 f5'gF,:e l,'Tg,'f.l:5' H ,,,f'r55, A g , '4'TW.1! .sail ' Tfgxr 53 "gigs Y :N-. A256 '. NM We ,M Nil ' 525 Egg' 'S EEEYE A : SIN " tl- ni. n Ewa HH fmzf.-ts.. 'K E A MA sf W' - ' .'lfff1w:w ELA milfs -is - Q sein- - ,ss 5 I XMMYQ as wg Mx- Bus 1 if is a ' as ' -2 Here we get a glimpse oi Frances Hmen studying Shakespeare in her typical Case Hall room. is -Y we it ,msg xmas E laws-gg H 5 is W We Wt ,. EWR m E m if Q nc nw iw um may as Erected in l939, Mens Hall will always be regarded as one of the most beautiful buildings on the college campus. Through- out the year, it was filled to overflowing with veterans, tor the most part, from every theatre of war. However, all occupants had a common bond and aim-to secure an adequate education. Living together in Men's Hall brought this one common goal into a harmonious whole. Cornpariionship and friendliness radiated from its structure. Besides being a hutruck lor 120 fellows, Men's Hull housed both the cafeteria and the Kampus Kave. Known to all as "Mom", Mrs. Berthalynn Pratt kept busy looking after her boys. Home of the boogie beat and the f morning newspaper, the beautiful reception room ot Men's Hall was a iavorite meetingeplace. Page 13 3: Scene ol the year's college dances, swimming meets, and basketball tou n th C ll Health cmd recreation being an indispens- able item on any curriculum program, the college gym was indeed a popular place. lt provided for the teams classrooms and dressing rooms, and an excellent basketball floor that this year could not begin to ac- comodate all the enthusiastic fans who crowded in to watch. The swimming pool was open daily tor any student who cared to try his waterwings, the ping-pong tables were by appointment only. The gym floor on Friday evenings was transformed into a gaily decorated dance floor for the after-game dances sponsored and promoted by the Student Council. H Kickapoo Ioy luice stand was set up in one Elaine Brun "cheesecaked" lor the photographer while Coach Charlie Foster's swimming class looked on. Page 14 r eys, was e o ege Gym far corner for the Sadie Hawkins dance, and a goal-post platform erected for the crowning of the Homecoming Sweetheart. The nightly practices of Norris and his l-laring orchestra were often held in the gym, and its facilities used in the Trivalley high school meet of the Women's Flthletic Plsso- ciation. "Wesleyan Falls" flowed and rippled down one side at the homecoming football game, and shouts of merriment were heard as an unusual council trundled in on Kan- geroo Court day. Highly-competitive and exciting intra-mural games were also played upon its floor, and all recreational fa- cilities were in constant use the year out. lncluded in the residence hall for men were the college cafeteria and kitchen where wholesome, appetizing, reasonably-priced food was prepared and served daily by Miss Lawson, and where hungry students were prone to gather and drool. Clubs frequently met in the beautifully designed faculty din- ing room tor impressive and long-rernerrr bered initiation services. Green Terrace assumed a new role this past year, by playing host to veteran tam- ilies awaiting completion of the housing units. lt continued to serve as Faculty lVlen's Club l-louse, and was the scene of many a faculty party. Student teacher Delphincx Shoup smiles at a lepeeful of small fry in the H. O. Thomas training school. Pl. O. Thomas School served you Well as a training ground for the future. Ex- perience, as offered in Fl. O. Thomas, was of invaluable aid to potential teachers. Plble supervisors and willing tiny tots brought into play all the skill and knowl- edge you possessed. Student teachers at H. O. Thomas received not only good ex- perience, but many a suppressed smile over the antics of a citizen ot tomorrow. Headquarters of your pals, the place to go for a good time, was the Kampus Kave. Besides furnishing super-deluxe rnalts at pre-War low prices, the juke box was all for free. Hnybody and everybody with an extra half hour made it their business to be at the Kave. The hand- painted murals, which depicted every phase of college lite, served to cheer up even the most depressed eager-beaver. The serve-yourself booths were the ideal spot for your crowd to hash over the latest, even if it meant eight to a booth! Fun was king at the Kampus Kaye. Page 16 Though we watched the space for spec- ials, we accepted a pre-war priced malt from Mrs. Rose Wardrop. director of the Kampus Kcxve. Introducing a new element in the col- lege atmosphere was the erection of the veterans housing units. No longer were all the men that roved college corridors eligible bachelors. Many were family men. The first group ot housing units con- tained accommodations for twenty fam- ilies. The unit was comprised of tour buildings, which contained a variety ot apartment sizes to suit the individual needs. The utility, the one-bedroom, the two-bedroom, the three-bedroom apart- ments were filled with homey furnishings, also supplied by the government. Veterans Village Wrote a Charter in Flugust of 1946. This Charter provided for the general election ot a council to form the policies ot the village. The tive council members choose one ot that group to act as mayor. The head man oi the pint-sized community throughout 1946 and 1947 was Elton Toops. X A-he-e Melia!-5 L QE ...sz Whether you liked meatballs or clam chowder, it was bound to be good if it came out of Mrs. Elton Toops' veterans village kitchen. Dreams came true lor veteran lami- lies like the Henry Miskos upon the completion of the housing units. Elton Toops. 5 h o W n with wile, Diana, served as mayor of the vil- lage. Page 1 7 '-Anmrursmwro n ms, an N- x v R-in H if ,L Kimwtlg H :mmm QM H5221 :fm pl 559 X N' il H2523 mm am saws -'Mn fm sw H955 BW X E . B E ,E .5 as .sf 'xx sig rbi-x 4. K X, xr! wi M fa' Q' af nk ff Hifi Wm yky,,,g!,. 5 A I , ,N Q -1.2 .xxx 1 Q X 2 'X B! Q 5: V 1 Q- fi,-,s,,- -ls ,Q ss as ma sag: HMS mash! AN U an H, ,A Assx 'X' Us xx E iuqxx w sf an an ss mmm amass U' if B mass an ,Q an Mi f 15 w f1.k gms E , x 195 1 X wif I or If 5 I We H, yn 51, H ,K F Q -Q 9 L, '- 1 STUDENTS HERBERT L. CUSHING, Educator In 1936 a man, Whose ideals, hopes, and aspirations were to have far-reaching ef- fects, Walked into the administration build- ing of the State Teachers College ot Kearney and assumed the presidency ot the institu- tion. lt was fortunate that this man arrived when he did for in the ensuing years his strong hand was of immeasurable help in guiding the students ot Kearney College through that tumultuous period that We now call the prelude to War. The story of our president's lite is well- known to all students for it is typical oi the desire for education and success of many. l-le was born in the little city of Ord, Ne- braska. ln high school his apparent interest in education Was evident for he registered for a normal training course, and upon grad- uation he accepted a position as teacher of a rural school in Valley County. Ht the end of two years he Was employed in a hard- ware and implement store, Where after tif- teen months he had earned and saved enough money to attend the Grand lsland College. Records indicate that he participated in numerous college events, Was active in basketball, debate, college publications, and served as president of the Y.M.C.H. and a literary society. I-le augmented the depleted hardware funds by Working in a salebarn and a shoe storey he knew the true meaning of Working to be educated. Page 20 Miss Beverly Haxby was of invaluable aid W h e n let- ters, records, cmd statistics were needed. Sixteen years later he completed Work on his Masters Degree at the University of Chicago and the University of Nebraska. Twenty-two years after this, he received his Doctor ot Education Degree from the Ne- braska Wesleyan University. Editors Wardrop cmd Lewis discussed B lu e and Gold problems with the President, who was not at all per- turbed. W PRESIDENT When war was declared in l94l and the young men in our colleges and universities were called to the army, navy, and marine camps, this man, then president of Kearney State Teachers College, saw hundreds of fellows whom he had come to know inti- mately step forth from the roles of students and assume the roles of fighting men. Many of them did not return. During the dark days of the war, he kept his college alive and functioning, and upheld the ideals, prin- ciples, and high standards which have al- ways been maintained. Men, who saw life in every part of the world, were proud to sit once again in the class rooms of Kearney College. A Touching upon the personal life of our president, we find that his early ambition was to become-not a college president- but a railroad engineer or a cowboy ac- cordion player! His leisure time is spent in fishing or in reading such books as "Days of Our Years" by Pierre Van Paassen or "Of Such is the Kingdom", listening to the Con- certo in C Minor or to Fats Waller's "Keep- ing Out of Mischief Now", discussing eco nomics, or baking angel food cakes. Pan- cakes, maple syrup, ham, eggs, and coffee rank high on the food list as Well. Even presidents have most embarrassing moments, and he recalls when a friend and fellow classmate, on the occasion of his first date, removed the chair from behind him at a high school junior-senior banquet. l-lis proudest moment was when he became a father. Today, son, Herbert, lr., plans on entering Harvard Law School in Iune, and daughter, Margaret Qnderson, hopes to be located in Omaha where her husband, upon his dis- charge from the army, will be associated with an Omaha hospital. Grandson Greg- ory, age two, hasn't quite decided what his plans are as yet. Yes, he is known to all students and loved by all. He is liked for his sincere interest in each individual, his friendliness, and his ef- ficient administration. Few men would have been equal to the tasks which have con- fronted him and which have been brought to a successful completion. We can all be justly proud of him-as in- deed we all are. His name? Herbert L. Cushing. V e t e r a n s received con- sideration when Del Dcmker, Veterans Director, and the president got together. Page 21 School activities and poli- cies were clarified when President Cushing spoke at convocation. N Hhce M Robinson. Dean of College Women. .M Y. 5 " :P 221 IE: . ......,.:. E ,...,.,.,.., k .,: ..,.v.. K f . ALJ if -- iloor office. Ready to help you solve that weighty problem or maybe just glad to have a good talk were the deans ot the college. Miss Pllice M. Robinson, whose second- tloor office was a popular spot, took a genuine interest in the perplexities facing her college girls. By her soft-spoken, pleasant manner, many a girl has re- College W o m e n were ol- ways welcome in Dean Robinsons pleasant second- DEANS ' turned to the trials of college life with a gleam ol hope and the desire to conquer the situation. Not only by serving as dean, but by teaching several English and Latin classes, Dean Robinson had an opportunity to know and understand the college students. Hnother popular spot on tho second floor was Dean Robinsons bulletin board Where you could either read the latest news bulletins or Lil' Plbner. I-lead man for the men was Dean Ber- nard Stutheit, whose office was crammed from the start with an assortment of fel- lows. Changes in schedules and dormi- tory regulations were among the topics that occupied his time. The men of the college respected Dean Stutheit because they recognized his ability to dig them out when they were in pretty deep. .Fld- vice was a very valuable thing when it came from a man like Dean Stutheit. Dean Stutheit's job was even bigger this year, due to the large number oi veteran enrollees. ln that regard, there was a drastic change. The men outnumbered the women two to one. Besides all of these advisory duties, Dean Stutheit managed to teach several English classes. He Was, indeed, a busy and popular man on the campus. Page 22 Dean Stuiheit took time out to demonstrate the peck method ol typing. Two lin' gets and plenty of eraser are the necessary tools. Bernard F. Siuiheit. Dean ol College Men. L. Hdams i II. L. I-lhrendts H. I-luchter P. Campbell K. Carlson F. Carroll Louise Hdams HB., N-ebraska State Teachers College at Wayne, H.M., University of Nebraska. Supervisor of Grades 5 and 6 at the H. O. Thomas Training School. Harold L. Hhrendts HB., Nebraska Wesleyan Universityg PLM., Uni- versity ot Michigan. Department of Speech. Harry H. Huchter HB., Southeast Missouri State Teachers College, M.S., State University of Iowa. Physical Science Department. W. E. Bruner B.S., PLM., Ph.D., University of Nebraska. Depart- ment of Biological Science. H. E. Burke HB., H.M., Ed.D., University of Indiana. Director ot H. O. Thomas School and of the Teacher Place- ment Bureau. 'Killed in traffic accident Ianuary, 15, 1947. Phyllis Campbell B.E., National College ot Education, Evanston, Il- W. E. Bruner 'B. E. Burke H. E. Cerny I. Conrad linoisg Graduate Work at Chicago Hcademy ot Fine Plrts, Evanston Qcademy ot Fine Hrts, Chi- cago, and the Society ot Pirts and Crafts, Detroit, Michigan. Plrt Department. Kenneth F. Carlson B.S., Nebraska Stat-e Teachers College at Kear- neyg Graduate student, Colorado State College of Flgriculture and Mechanic Pirts, Fort Collinsg MH., Colorado State College ot Education. Department of Vocational Hrts. Floy C. i Carroll FLB., Knox Collegep B.X. in Library Science, HM., University of Illinois. Librarian. Harold E. Cemy FLB., FIM., Graduate student, University of Iowa. Department of Music. Iennie M. Conrad HB., Nebraska State Teachers College at Kear- neyg HM., Columbia Universityg Graduate student, Leland Stanford University. Social Science De- partment. lust a last minute talk before heading homeward occupied George Arnold. custodian, and Donald Fox. science instructor. Coaches Copeland, Foster. and Dinger lined up ior inspection and the cameraman. Page 23 L. Copeland D. Donker .V G- Doughty M. Elliott T. Elliott P- Evetl L. Failor ' C. Foster D. Fox D, Gm-,eu Leland C. Copeland B.S., Nebraska State Teachers College at Wayne. Physical Education Department. De-1 Danker HB., Nebraska W-esleyan Universityp PLM., Colum- bia University. Veterans Hdministration Hppraiser and Director of Veterans Housing. Gavin L. Doughty HH., St. Ioseph Iunior College, B.M., M.M., Kansas State University. Department of Music. Marjorie I. Elliott B.S., Iowa State Teachers College, M.S., State University of lowa. Physical Education Depart- ment. Thomas Elliott M.D., University of Nebraska. College Physician. Paul L. Evett Fl.B., HM., Colorado State College of Education. English Department. Leona M. Failor B.S., M.Fl., Ph.D., University of Nebraska, Graduate Student, University ot Southern California. Edu- cation Department. Charlie H. Foster HB., Grand Island College, PLM., University of Denver, Coaching School, University ol Nebraska, Hastings College, University ot Denver, Nebraska High School Hctivities Hssociation, Lincoln, Ne- braska. Physical Education Department. Donald E. Fox PLB., M.S., Ph.D., University oi lowag Graduate student, University ot Nebraska. Physical Science Department. Delia M. Garrett B.S., M.S., University oi Nebraska, Graduate stu- dent, Colorado State College, Fort Collins, Iowa State College, Plmes. Home Economics. Vfhile "the lady known as Lou", played by Delia Garrett. robbed the miner, in the person ol B. F. Stutheit, the audience succumbed to the western ilavor ot the faculty skit presented at the Christmas Carnival. Seen draped artistically over a bale of hay in the back- ground, probably dead from hay- tever, was Robert House. The la- culty calmed their nerves at the bar, while watching the goings-on. Page 24 Here's one tis h story you could believe, lor Dr. Fox, Roland Welch. a n d Hlbert Fox had the p r o o t belore your eyes. The big on e weighed 19 pounds, and the other two 17 pounds each. Some catch! Dr. Failor relaxed in her ott-duty moments by playing a bit of some- thing soothing on the organ. Eleanor Haines I-l.B., Luther College, PLM., University of Iowa, Graduate student, Iuilliard Institute of Music Hrt, New York City. Department of Music. Mildred E. Hansen HB., Nebraska State Teachers College at Kear- ney, Graduate student, University ot California, University of Missouri. Department of Biological Science. Q Beverly Haxby BH., St. Mary's College, Notre Dame. Secretary to the President. Naomi R. Hoff HB., Hastings College, HN., Presbyterian School ol Nursing, Chicago, Illinois. College Nurs-e. Dorothy Holcomb HB., University of Nebraska. Secretary of Pub- licity. Robert W. House B.F.I3l., Oklahoma H 6- M College, M.M., Eastman School of Music of the University of Rochester. Department of Music. Helen Istcxs FLB., PLM., University ot Nebraska, Graduate stu- dent, University of Indiana. Languages. Minnie E. Larson FIB., Nebraska State Teachers College at Kear- ney, Graduate student, Chicago Hcademy of Fine Hrts, FLM., University of Chicago. Hrt Department. Carrie E. Ludden B.Ed., Nebraska State Teachers College at Kear- ney. Department of Biological Science. Leola Ludden B.S., Nebraska State Teachers College at Kear- ney. Secretary to the Registrar. E. Haines M. Hansen B. Haxby N. Holt D. Holcomb H. House H. Istas M. Larson C. Ludden L. Ludden Bernice D. Mantor B.S., Iowa State Collegeg M.S., University ol Ne- braska. Home Economics. Lyle E. Mantor HB., Iowa State Teachers Collegeg FLM., Ph.D., University of Iowa. Department of Social Science. LoDesca Nyquist Miller PLB., Nebraska State Teachers College at Kear- ney. Supervisor of the Kindergarten at the H. O. Thomas Training School. Mary L. Morse B.S., M.S., University of Michigang Ph,D., Univer- sity of Minnesotag Graduate student, Pennsyl- vania State College. Department ol Physical Science. Theodora S. Nelson B.S., Nebraska State Teachers College at Kear- ney, M.S., University of Illinois. Mathematics. The pride ol workmen over fine equipment was expressed in the admiring glances Otto Olsen and Kenneth Carlson gave their cabinet ot tools. Freda Plaza p e r m i t t e d School Nurse, Naomi Hoff. to bandage her ailing linger. student, University of Nebraska, University ol Washingtong FLM., University ol Iowa. Education Department. Clara Ockinga BS., University of Nebraskag M.S., Denver Univer- sity. Commerce. Otto C. Olsen FLB., Nebraska State Teachers College at Kear- neyp B.S., The Stout Instituteg PLM., University of Missourig Graduate student, University ot Wiscon- sin. Department oi Vocational Hrts. Mildred M. Payne B.S., Central Missouri State Teachers College, HM., University of Missouri, Graduate student, University ol Iowa. Commerce. Gail F. Powell HB., Nebraska State Teachers College at Kear- neyp Graduate student ol the University ot Chi- Edna T. Nigh cago, University of California. Education -Depart- FLB., Nebraska Wesleyan University, Graduate ment. B. Mantor L. E. Mantor L. Miller M. Morse T. Nelson E. Nigh C. Ockinga O. Olsen M. Payne G. Powell Il. W. Powell C. T. Ryan B. Skinner E. M. S-:nithey H. G. Stout M. Stouternyer R. Welch D. Williams M. Williams H. Yingling R. W. Powell B.S., North-east Missouri State Teachers College, FLM., University of Chicago. Education Depart- ment. C. T. Ryan HB., Washington College, Ed.M., Harvard Univer- sity, Graduate student, University of Wyoming. English Department. Blanche Skinner HB., FLM., Colorado State Teachers College. Su- pervisor ol Grades 3 and 4 in the H. O. Thomas Training School. Edith M. Smithey HB., Nebraska State Teachers College at Kear- ney. Registrar. H. G. Stout HB., Nebraska Wesleyan University, Graduate student, University of Chicago, University of Southern California, PLM., Ph.D., University of Nebraska. Education Department. Malvina S. Scott Stoutemyer B.S., Fremont College, HB., Colorado State Col- lege, Graduate student, National Kindergarten College, University of Chicago, George Peabody College, HM., Columbia University. Supervisor of Grades l and 2 in the H. O. Thomas Training School. Roland B. Welch HB., Morningside College, Graduate student, University ot Nebraska. Commerce. Dorothy C. Williams HB., Nebraska State Teachers College at Kear- ney. Bursar. Mary E. Williams HB., University of Wichita, l3l.B.L.S., University ot Michigan, M.S., Fort Hays Kansas State Teachers College. Plssistarit Librarian. Harrie-t E. Yingling B.S., MH., University of Iowa. Physical Education Department. Radiating the art ol gracious living were Delia Garrett and Bernice Mantor. as they saw their reflections in gleaming silver. Keeping Kearney College in the spotlight was the task ot Dorothy Holcomb. Secre- tary ol Publicity. Page 27 Page President, Reuben Wagner. plotied senior sneak dcxy plcms with Wallace Walker cmd Eunice Scxuthofi. X' 'swf i KWH.: Ein Bw U qi ,ii-5 Q K imvwux a 5 ' Q mi Pl ploy-by-plcxy description of Kecxrney's I-lntelopes in action was given by Iohn Mitchell. KGFW an- nouncer. mn DU B. SENIOR. Rnd so you became that senior. The book is dedicated to you, remember? You are the individu- als with the laurel on your brows, the degrees at- tached to your names, the grins upon your faces. You have succeeded in achieving the ultimate goal of every eager-beaver in this institution . . . a college X education. Not too long ago you arrived on the threshold of N.S.T.C., waving a high school diploma, wearing a letter sweater, and fully intending to revolutionize the place. Every person from way back has had the same idea. You were surprised when the dizzy whirl did not stop in awe at your announcement, "Well, here l am. We can start now." You found that in our college, deeds speak far louder than words. Unless, of course, you're I. C. Mitchell or l'Pooch" Bell. i ln the swiftly passing years, you made a place for yourselves, you chalked up honor after honor. Fourteen of you became Who's Who Hmong Stu- dents in Hmerican Universities and Colleges. More than a few of you were called to war and returned to find your class made up of the kiddies for whom you were baby-sitters in pre-war days. But at long last, even Mr. Minnick got through. You were the leaders on the campus, our kings, our queens, our sweethearts. We might well add, our heartthrobs. You carried the team through to victory, led the band, published the paper, drank the coffee. You were active in all fields, you were wonderful. The caption says, "Our Seniors." Some- one has to claim you . . . we proudly do. With heavy books, but light spirits, these seniors trudged to their classes. ' Page 29 ttf, xx Ji X Q5 SENIDRS ' ' ' WILLIHM HNDERSON Hinsworth FRHNCIS BELL ----- Kimball Caledonian 15 Intramural Debate 15 lnter-Col- legiate Debate 45 Extemporaneous Champion 19445 Debate State Champion 1944-19455 Inter-Collegiate Forensic Conlerence5 Football 45 Basketball 25 K Club 45 Pi Kappa Delta 4, Vice-President 1945. ESTHER BHLLHGH ---- Burwell Band 25 Orchestra 25 H Cappella Choir 25 Hpol- lonians 2, Secretary G Treasurer 1946-19475 Y.W. CH IOHNNE BHRBER - Vallejo, California Student Council 25 Delta Pi Beta 45 Blue and Gold Staff 25 Flntelope 2, Editor 19445 H11-College Play 15 Radio 15 Pl Cappella Choir 35 Girls' Sextette 25 Girls' Octette lg Madrigal Group 15 Press Club 15 Sigma Tau Delta 1. LLOYD G. BHYSDORFER - - Kearney Hntelope Staff 25 H11-College Play 35 Radio 15 ln- tler-Collegiate Debate 15 Band 15 H Cappella Choir 15 Xi Phi 25 Pi Kappa Delta 15 German Club 2, Vice-President 19425 Press Club 1. NEVH IHNE HHRRIS ---- Plxtell Student Council l, Vice-President 19465 Sopho- more Class Oilicer 19455 Women's Council 15 Who's Who Hmong Students in Hmerican Univer- sities and Coll-eges in 1946-19475 Christmas Queen 19475 Freshman Essay Contest Second Place Win- ner l9445 Delta Pi Beta 45 Hntelope Staff 2, Editor 19435 Blue and Gold Stall 1, Editor 19465 Hntler Stall 25 R11-College Play 15 Radio 35 F1 Cappella Choir 15 Pi Kappa Delta 3, Secretary 19465 Sigma Tau Delta 3, President 19455 Xi Phi 2, Treasurer 19475 Press Club l, Secretary 1947. ROBERT HHRRIS ---- Hmherst Who's Who Hmong Students in Plmerican Univer- sities and Colleges in 1946-19475 Phi Tau Gam- ma5 Social Science Club 1. SYLVII-1 HHWTHORNE - - Trumbull H Cappella Choir 45 Band 15 Orchestra 2, Band G Orchestra Librarian 1939-19405 Y.W.C.H. 25 Hpol- lonians l. MHRGHRET IOHNSON - - Kearney Delta Pi Beta 35 Pl Cappella Choir 2. THOMAS IOHNSON - - - Kearney Phi Tau Gamma 45 Pre-Medic 2. W Hnderson I-'. Bell E. Ballugh I. Barber L. Bay dorlez N I Harris R. Harris S. Hawthorne M. lohnson T. Iohnaon Page 30 It's knot what you thought, but Dick Peterson certainly didn't have a board look on his face when he pointed out to Nick Mitchell the latest thing in woodworking. Otis Miller wasn't hav- ing any part ol it, thank you. WILLIHM BLHCK ---- Kearney Caledonian 15 Social Science Club 1. DORH BURT ----- Gibbon Plspasians 45 Social Science Club 15 Stage Crew 1. VERNE DOWERS ---- Kearney Men's League Secretary 19465 Who's Who Hmong Students in Hmerican Universities and Colleges in 1942, 19475 Christmas King 19425 "Dandy Duke" tDande1ion Dayl 19415 Phi Tau Gamma 35 Pinte- lope Stall 4, Editor 1942 and 1946, Business Man- ager l9465 Blue and Gold Stall 25 Ftntler Staff 25 Pill-College Play 3, Business Manager 19465 Radio 25 Intramural Hthletics 15 Le Circle Francais 15 Sigma Tau Delta 3, Secretary 1942, President 19465 Press Club 1, President 19465 Y.M.C.Fl. 2, Vice-President 1941, President 1942. BETTELEE FRHHM - - - Kearney ' Delta Pi Beta 45 Hntelope Staff 25 Band 35 Orches- tra 45 Choir 45 W.Ft.H. 25 Beta Pi Theta5 Hpollo- nians5 Press Club 15 Naiads 1. IESSIE GILPIN - - - Grand Island Student Council 1, Secretary G Treasurer 1944- 19455 Hlternate Sophomore Xi Phi Flward 19455 Delta Pi Beta 4, Vice-President 1944-1945-1946, President 1946-1947, Holly Queen 1946-19475 Or- chestra 25 W.Pt.Pl. 4, Vice-President 1944-1945, President 1946-1947. EVHNGELYN KHLSTORM - Brule Orchestra5 Sigma Theta Phi 4. BENIHMIN KEELEY - Wilmington, Delaware Social Science Club 1. FRHNCIS KOLHR ---- Wolbach Phi Tau Gamma 45 Intramural Sports. GERTRUDE LHNGIN - - - Imperial Women's Council 19365 Sigma Theta Phi 15 Tri Tau 25 Phi Theta Kappa lg Catholic Club 2. ROBERT LEWIS ---- Callaway Class Vice-President 1940-19415 Men's Council 1941-19425 Phi Tau Gamma5 Football 15 Basket- ball 45 Track 45 President of Men's Hall 1946, Vice- president 1942-1943. W. Black D. Burt V. Dowers B. I-'rahm I. G lpxn E. Kulstrom B. Kenley F. Kolar G. Langin R. Lewis Page 31 H Lola H. Lukes I L. McDowell R. Meline O Miller I Mitchell N. Mitchell R. Moore V. Mortensen K Noonan HILDH LOLH - Spring Valley, California Student Council 1, Freshman Class Officer 1944- 1945, Women's Council 1, Secretary 1946-1947, Sigma Theta Phi 1, Blue cmd Gold Staff 1, Busi- ness Manager 1945-1946, Band 1, Orchestra 2, H Cappella Choir 1, Pi Omega Pi 2, Treasurer 1946- l947, Xi Phi 1, Secretary 1946-1947, Catholic Club 3, Secretary 1945-1946, Home Economics Club 1, Naiads 2, Treasurer 1945-1946. HLBERT LUKES - Long Beach, California Men's League 4, Y.M.C.H., Secretary 1946-1947, Band 1, Spanish Club 2, Rural Club 1. LOIS McDOWELL ---- Trumbull Y.W.C.H. 2, Home Economics Club 2, Women's League 2. ROBERT MELINE ---- Kearney Men's Council 2, Who's Who Hmong Students in Plmerican Universities and Colleges in 1946-1947, Phi Tau Gamma 31 Treasurer 1946, Flntelope Staff 1, Blue and Gold Staff 1, Hntl-er Staff 3, Intramural Debate 1, Radio 2, Intramural Sports 4, Latin Club 1, Social Science Club 1, Press Club 1. OTIS MILLER ----- Oshkosh Student Council 1, Phi Tau Gamma 2, Vice-Presi- dent 1946-1947, Football 3, Basketball 4, Track 1, Intramural Championship in Basketball 1938, Pre- Med Club 3, Veterans Village Council 1, K Club Z, Vice-President 1946-1947, Xi Phi 1, Who's Who Hmong Students in Hmerican Universities and Colleges 1946-1947. IOHN MITCHELL ---- Kearney Student Council 3, President 1945-1946, 1946-1947, Freshman Class President 1943-1944, Men's League Secretary 1944, Who's Who Hmong Stu- Sculptress supreme was Kay Noonan. Whose work was admired by Kathryn Noyes. Doro- thy Oliver. and Marian Wardrop. Page 32 dents in Plmerican Universities and Colleges in 1945-1946, 1946-1947, Christmas King 1944-1945, Sophomore Xi Phi Hward 1944-1945, Phi Tau Gam- ma 2, Blue and Gold Staff 2, Photographer, Intra- mural Debate Champion, State Champion in De- bate, Oratory, Discussion, and Extemporaneous Speaking, National Oratory Contest Finalist, Ra- dio 3, Inter-Collegiate Forensic Conference, Foot- ball 3, Pi Kappa Delta, President 1946-1947, Sigma Tau Delta 2, K Club 2, Social Science Club 1, Xi Phi 2. NICK MITCHELL ---- Kearney Phi Tau Gamma 3, Football 3, Basketball 1, Track 1, K Club 3. ROLLHND MOORE - - - Cambridge Football 3, Basketball 2, Track Z, K Club 2. ' VIOLH MORTENSEN - - - Hardy Women's League Council 1, Treasurer 1946-1947, Sigma Theta Phi 3, Secretary 1945-1946, Vice- President 1946-1947, Home Economics Club 3, Sec- retary 1945-1946, Pi Omega Pi 2, W.H.I3t. 1, Treas- urer 1945-1946, Y.W.C.H. 1. KHTHLEEN NOONHN - - - Scotia Women's Council 1, Who's Who Hmong Stud-ents in Hmerican Universities and Colleges in 1946- 1947, Sigma Theta Phi 2, Treasurer 1946, Blue and Gold Staff 1, Ftntler Staff 1, Catholic Club 2, President 1945, Sigma Tau Delta 2, Vice-President 1945, National Federation of Catholic College Stu- dents, Hpollonians. R Minnick K Noyes ,rf ru a W, ROBERT MINNICK - - - Stromsburg Phi Tau Gamma 35 Radio 25 13111-College Play 45 Orchestra 25 H Cappella Choir 15 Plpollonians lp Y,M.C.Fl. 1. KHTHRYN NOYES ---- Kearney Sigma Theta Phi5 Flntler Staff, Business Manager 19465 Y.W.C.H. 2, Vice-President 19465 Sigma Tau Delta Z, Historian 19465 Tironians 15 Home Eco- nomics Club 1. DOROTHY OLIVER ---- Shelton Qntler Staff 1940, 19465 13111-College Play 1940, 19465 Sigma Tau Delta 35 Xi Phi 2, President 1946- 19475 Latin Club 15 Y.W.C.H. 25 W.H.H. 15 Social Science Club 1. , IHMES OLSON - Wood River RICHHRD PETERSON - - - Kimball Student Council 15 President, Men's League 15 President, K Club 15 Who's Who Hmong Students in Qmerican Universities and Colleges in 1946- 19475 Football 45 Basketball 35 Track 3. ROBERT POLSKI - - - Loup city M-en's Council 19425 Vice-President of lunior Class 19465 Phi Tau Gamma 45 Blue and Gold Staff 1946-19475 Orchestra 15 Catholic Club 4, President 1946-19475 Mathematics and Science Club5 Xi Phi 15 Who's Who Hmong Students in Hmerican Uni- versities and Colleges in 1946-1947. KHTHRYN POWELL - - - Kearney Women's Council 15 Sigma Theta Phi 4, Presi- dent 1945-19465 Xi Phi Z5 Pi Omega Pi 2, Secre- tary 19465 Sigma Tau Delta 15 lnter-1:'raternity- Sorority Council 15 Flntler Stall 15 H Cappella Choir 25 Y.W.C.Pl. 15 Tironians 15 Who's Who Hmong Students in Hmerican Universities and Colleges in 1946-1947. Page 33 Earl Winters. shown at left, looked d a i 1 y lor important correspondence, which might be sent out by Viola Mortensen and Helen Reishauge, who Worked for the Deans. I. Olson D. Oliver R. Polski B. Peterson K. Powell CLHRH REEDER - - Columbus Hspasians 3. HELEN REFSHHUGE ---- York Student Council 25 Womens Council 15 Iunior Class Secretary-Treasurer 1945-19465 Who's Who Hmong Students in Hmerican Universities and Colleges in 1945-1946, 1946-19475 Sophomore Xi Phi Flward 19455 Pi Omega Pi Freshman Hward 19445 Sigma Theta Phi 3, Vice-President 1945, P r e s i d e n t 1946-19475 Inter-Fraternity-Sorority Council 1, Treasurer 19465 Blue cmd Gold Staff Z5 H11-College Play 15 Radio 15 Intramural Debate 15 H Cappella Choir 15 Xi Phi 2, Investigating Sec- retary 19465 Pi Omega Pi 2, President 19465 Pi Kappa Delta 4, Presid-ent 1944, Historian 19455 Sigma Tau Delta 1. ILENE REFSHHUGE ---- York Student Council 35 Women's League Council 3, President 1944-19455 Who's Who Hmong Students in Hmerican Universities and Colleges in 1945- 1946, 1946-19475 Christmas Queen 19445 Homecom- ing Sweetheart 1946-19475 Sophomore Xi Phi Flward 19435 Sigma Theta Phi 4, President 1944- By reading the latest Flntelope, Robert Lewis, Francis Bell, and Robert Spelts kept up on what was new. Vittles, however, were more vital to Robert Polski. who got in line lor lunch at the College Cafeteria. 19455 Inter-FraternitySorority Council 15 Hntelope Staff 15 Pl Cappella Choir 15 Orchestra lg Sigma Tau Delta 25 Xi Phi 25 Y.W.C.Pl. 4, Cabinet 35 Social Sci-ence Club 1. ROBERT ROHDE - - Ravenna Football 25 Track 15 K Club. IHNNETTE SIMSHHUSER - - Hmherst ROBERT SPELTS ---- Kearney Men's Council Vice-President 19465 President, Caledonians 19465 Inter-Fraternity-Sorority Coun- cil 15 Intramural Debate 15 Football 35 Track 15 Intramural Z5 Veterans Club 15 Tironians 15 K Club Vice-President 1945-1946, Treasurer 1946- 1947. VERLE STUCKER ---- Hnsley Caledonian Fraternity5 Football 35 Basketball In- tramural 35 Track Intramural 2. REUBEN WHGNER - - - Culbertson Senior Class President 1946-19475 Phi Tau Gam- ma, President l, Treasurer 15 Hntelope Staff 15 Blue and Gold Staff 2. C. Reeder H. Refshuuge I. Refshuuge H- Rohde Page 34 I. Sin-ishauser R. Spelts V. Stucker R. Wagner Flntelope bigwigs, Verne Dowers and lim Bowers. weighed the pros and cons ol printing problems. IOHN RUMBHUGH - Phillipsburg, Kansas Phi Tau Gamma, Football 3, Track Z. EUNICE SHHTHOFF ---- Miller S-enior Class Secretary-Treasurer 1946-1947, Zeta Chi Hlpha 4, Secretary-Treasurer 2, Band 1, Or- chestra 2, H Cappella Choir 2, Plpollonians 4, President 1946-1947, Y.W.C.Fl. 3. ROBERT SEVERNS - - - 1-loldrege Caledonians 2, Pre-Medics 2. DELPHINH SHOUP - - North Platte Delta Pi Beta Z, Catholic Club 3, Secretary 1946- 1947, Zip Club 3. HLONZO SIEBENLIST - - Kearney WHLLHCE WHLKER - - - Lebanon Men's Council 1, Student Council 1, Senior Class Vice-President 1946-1947, Caledonians 2, Football 1, Basketball Z, Track 1, Social Science Club 1, K Club. MHRIHN WHRDROP - - - Kearney Student Council 1, Secretary-Treasurer 1946-1947, Women's Council 2, President 1945-1946, Delta Pi Beta 4, Treasurer 1944-1945, Holly Queen 1945- 1946, President 1945-1946, 1nter-Fraternity-Sorority Council 2, Hntelope Staff 2, Blue and Gold Staff 1, Hntler Staff 2, Radio 1, Band 2, Majorette, Or- chestra 3, Pep Club 1, Y.W,C.H. 4, Sigma Tau Delta 2, Home Economics Club 3, W.H.H. 1, Xi Phi 1, Who's Who Hmong Students in Flmerican Universities and Colleges in 1946-1947. K. D. WHRY ----- Kearney RUTH WENDELL ----- Hxtell Student Council 2, Sophomore Class Secretary- Treasurer 1944-1945, Iunior Class President 1945- 1946, Women's Council 1, Homecoming Sweet- heart 1945-1946, Band 1, Orchestra 2, Personnel Manager 1946-1947, H Cappella Choir 3, President 1944-1945, Naiacls 2, Vice-President 1946-1947, Home Economics Club 2, Treasurer 1945-1946, President 1946-1947, Tironians 2, President 1944- 1945, Stage Crew 1, Flpollonians 4, Y.W.C.l31. Z, Treasurer 1943-1944, Xi Phi 3, Vice-President 1946- 1947. EHRL WINTERS - - - Lexington Veterans Village Council. I. Rumbaugh E. Scratholf R. Sevex-ns D. Shoup H. Siebenlxst W. Walker M. Wardrop K. D. Wary R. Wendell E. Winters r ffifeiw fe f A Q , wf1!3 J 3,31-1 ug 'fl , 3 Megi NfL.xQi.1l5iiiwJi ..4 iA"mw."4dl Rober! Harris, Buck-Q-Month Club Director, uccepied dollar bills from junior class payees on Q Tuesday morning. Stogehonds Wallace cmd Iesier cd- justed cr spotlight ior c forthcoming performance. Page 36 Librarian Robert Kennedy checked out cr book to Laverne Hutchins, who planned to do some eager- becxvering. lunior class ollicers were William H. Long, president, Clifford Peterson. Barbara King, Helen Dailey. Robert Hunt. and Eloise Dickerson. J' U NIURS Hnd then, of course, there were you juniors. You are a vital part of any phase ot college Work. 'Without you there would be no seniors, Without the seniors there would be no dedication, without the dedication there could be no book. Which probably would be for the best. You are the potential leaders of tomorrow, the eager-beavers of today, the bewildered littlepeople of yesterday. Under the capable direction of your president, Big Bill Long, you elected officers from the assortment ot left-over sophomores and not- enough-hours seniors assigned youg at the yuletide season the carnival calls--which could have only been yours-of "Play Bingo" resounded down the hallwaysg in spring you faced the perplexities ot a senior breakfast with a stout heart and small budget. You were a jolly and care-tree group ot individ- uals. You studied long, hard moments . . . now and then, you planned great undertakings and secretly wondered who would have the ambition to carry them outg you were always on the gog you were into everything. Q . TL 4 I I .. - . '!1'.i s 1,In,lf '.'-'- ft it-'2. '51 ,ein-gg ' :' IJ". iffftsl A -10 W libs N "" ii' 734 is I .' ,Hg QQ-5 Q, 2. Zig Dependable, friendly, eager, a little crazy but Wonderful . . . tl'1at's you, The class of l948. J' U NIEHS First Row: FRHNCES HMEN. Wilcoxg RHY HNDERSON, Funkg STHNLEY HNDERSON, Kearneyg VERNON HNDER- SON. Funky CHHRLES BHCON, Kearneyg ELHINE BRUN. Kearneyp HHRRIETT CONGER. Grand Islandg CHRL C O R N E L I U S, Kearneyg HELEN DHILEY. Omaha. F. Hman R. Hnderso R. Davis M. DeBrun Second Row: RICHHRD DHVIS, Kearney: MHRIORIE DEBRUN- NER. Lodgepoleg ELOISE DICKERSON. Champion RUTH DUNBHR. Kearneyg ROBERT FHRLEY. Kear neyg LEONHRD FOREMHN, Kearneyg LOUIS GIB SON. Broken Bowg BEVERLY GOLDENSTEIN, Kear- newg MHRGHRET HHRRIS. Flmherst. H. Hee R. Hemphill R. Hunt F. Hurdle L. Hulchins H. Ibsen R. Iesier H. Kersenbroch B. Killhcxm B. King T. Lewis W. Long G. Luce L. Marrow Page 38 S. Hnderson E. Dickerson V. Hnderson C. Bacon E. Brun Third Row: HHROLD HEE, Lexington 5 RICHHRD HEMP- HILL, Ocontog R O B E R T H U N T, Mindeng FRHNCES HURDLE, Morscotg LHVERN HUTCHINS, N o r t h L o u pg HHZEL IBSEN. Keorneyg ROYHL IESTER, Kecfrneyg OLIVER KHSPHR, Prolgueg ROBERT K E N N E D Y, Memo. R. Dunbar R. Farley L. Foreman H. Conger C. Cornelius H. Dailey I.. Gibson B. Goldenstein M. Harris Fourth Row: HERMHN KERSENBROCH, Ogcdlololg BHR- BHRH KILLHHM, Potterg BHRBHRH KING, Plmherstg TREVH LEWIS, Gilobong WILLIHM H. LONG, Brolndong GLENN LUCE, Central Cityg LELHND MHRROW, Lincolng IEHN MHY, Hardy: CLHRENCE MITCHELL, Plu- rom. 1 1 I YOUR H d-the-table discussion progressed nicely in YWCQ wiih Wilma 0. Kaspm, R' Kennedy Sall, Verlcr Peterson cmd Gertrude Lcmgin, the chief participants. I. May C. Mitchell Page 39 D. Neal D. Nicholson B. Nielsen C. Peterso V. Pelerso W. Hector I. Rice G. Richter H. Rundquisl H. Ryan First Row: Second Row: DONNH NEHL, Odessclg DEHN NICHOLSON, Superiorg BURL NIELSEN, Kearney, CLIF- FORD PETERSON, Kecxrneyg VERLH PETER- SON, Gothenburg. deny HHRWOOD RYHN, Danbury. P1 3' -1- 1 d Fl dramatic highlight of Shakespeare! "Merchant of Venice" was dramcxtize by Gerald Richter, Ella Mae Sizer, Leonard Foreman, and Dean Wallace. E, Toops Page 40 WILLIHM RECTOR. Cheyenne, Wyomingg IHCKSON RICE, Kearneyg GERHLD RICHT- ER, Kecrrneyg HRDELLH RUNDQUIST, Min- W. Sall lffdxtor Maxine Wardrop pointed out year- book problems to stall member Barbara King, while Gerald Richter. another BGG member, apparently debated the issue. Third Row: Fourth Row: WILMH SHLL. Hxtellg LORRHINE SCHMIDT, ELTON TOOPSI Gfwld 1512111421: DOROTHY Pooleg HAROLD SIEBLER, Loup ony, LEROY WHGNER' KeGmeYf MHXINE WHRDROP- Ke-ameyg KENNETH WHTKINS. Grantg IHCKIE WEDEMEYER. Ravennag HUBERT WELTON. Scottsbluffg CLHYTON WILCOX. SIMS, Kearneyg ELLH MBE SIZER. Keolrneyg MHRIORIE SODERHOLM. Holdregeg CHTH- RYN SPELTS, North Platte: VIRTUS SUHR, Gibbon: VERLH WILCQXI Gibbon: HLICE Kearney. WINK. Kearney. L. Schmidt H. Siebler L. Sims E. M. Sizer M. Soderholm C. Spelts V. Suhr M. Wcxrdrop K. Watkins I. Wedemeyer H. Welton C. Wilcox V. Wilcox H. Wink Page 41 gr gamma Shirley H o m 1 i n g clis- played her artistic abili- ty while fellow sopho- mores looked on. fgfasf'ssiJQ?3msQ.2r 3515 gin? Ugkgermghg, Q-Iwi! mn Wg? Lf ' M M K egg E M E .. .nj lu .. WE gi QI E ,,. X f -,.. .E' E -Hawes mmm? 'Eirgw Nga: HEEQEZ,-iii-In nn rfsiffw -Bin H K W H X, Bl me ar A wb H 2-gm .fgggyakjilmggiia M gl-mm sm me Q2TmB og3.'f"5'5 im Km SEB rrii if me Ez? There was no tallletale Q 7 M 1 M ir rr W,- Nrf ff? H .. if "' M min 1 H!! I N . were gray in Larry Martin's Saturday wash. .2 E if fri sl?gxss me , gm WQQZH-'e sxiihgmsm wiggle mn re awww HBE 1 lfsriiiln ERS!! ss EVE Wm aims Q Qui my an Page 42 ' mix gn me K n gl' gm -.1 . H 4 M M - X Q A rx fr :l i -- 3, .a.:.: ss are Eng sf wr Ewen agar, HQM B Ex egg N was r 2 E Ama lf as me m ww w Saws., Wikis E .gem 'L The voice with the smile belonged lo Gerry In- nes. whose switchboard style was Watched by Dora Mae McGrew and Belly Hunt. ,4- wp. Vs! Elected as sophomore class officers were Bob Hauver president Gretchen Story Louise McMahon. Dick Hack, and Don Patton DPHDMO ES H11 of a sudden you were sophomores! lt seemed like only a year ago you were freshmen, full of youth and spirit. Sophoniores were like the filling in a sandwich, just in between-in the middle of every- thing. You began to get in gear in your sophomore year. You were members of every organization on the campus. Soon you were plotting as many as six engagements for every evening. YWCH, band con- certs, initiations, sororities, fraternities, and sports all clai'ned your attention. No longer was college life rnerely for studyingg in fact, you were getting along swell in everything but school. You knew all the ins and outs of college life, by nowg ycu were even directing the green freshmen around. It was amazing what only one year could do for a student. Ht times you doubted whether or not there was anything more to learn. Htter a bit of investigation and a few semester tests, you changed your mind. You became a junior. SDPHOMDRES First Row: CLIFFORD HLEXHNDER, Pasadena, Califor- niag LENORE HLLEN. Parksg BETTY HNDER- SON, Mindeng NED HRNOLD, Elm Creekg BEVERLY HUSTIN, F rankling ROBERT HYRES, Ke-arneyg RICHHRD BHDURH, Loup Cityg DONNH BHILEY, Venangog WHYNE BECKMHN, Broken Bowg IHMES BELSCH- NER, Hmherst. C. I-llexander I.. Hllen H. Beiebenner C. Bleek R B g Second Row: HNN BETEBENNER, Gibbon: CHHRLOTTE BLECK, Riverdaleg RUSSELL BOGUE, Shel- tong KHROLYN BOHY, Taylorg DORIS BOW- DEN. Doniphang IHMES BOWERS, Kearneyg EDDIE BROWN, Kearney: IOSEPH BUETT- NER. Grand Islandg ELLIS BURTON. North Platteg ERNEST BUTLER, Kearney. H. Carson M. Clabaugh I. Conser V. Davis R. Dethlofi H. Dexter W D y H. Gard B. Gasion W. Gogan D. Graf G. Hansen R. Hanson I H y Page 44 N. Hrnold K. Bohy B. Rustin R. Hyres R. Brxdu D. Bowden I. Bowers E. Brown Third Row: HLEXHNDER CHRSON, Keclrneyg MERRI- BELLE C L H B H U G H. Guide Rocky IHNE CONSER, Millerg VIRGIL DHVIS. Kecrmeyg ROY DETHLOFF. Homptong HHZEL DEXTER. Hmelicrg WILLIHM DREYER. Keorneyg BOB EVHNS, Sheltong GLHDYS FOSTER. Benkel- mong DOROTHY FROST. Overtong WILLIHM GHLLHGHER. Odessa, NI D. Bailey W. Beckman I. Belschn I. Buettner E. Burton E. Butler Fourth Row: HRLO GHRD. Keozmey: BHRBHRH GHSTON. Normomg WILLIHM GOGHN, Hrccxdictg DHR- LINE GRHF, Doniphcmg GORDON HHNSEN, Kectrneyg RICHHRD HHNSON. K e or r n e yy IOHN HHRDY, Wounetctz IENHLDB. HHRING. Fronkling NORRIS HHRING, Kecrrneyg WIL- LIHM HHRRINGTON. R i v e r t o ng ROBERT HHUVER, Kearney. ,Y ...'2, 4. - - W' ., W M 3 T M Grcbbing cm Hntelope was the Friday m g B. Evans G. Foster D. Frost W. Gallagher objective of Mariana Zulouf. Hileen Zutaver and I. Haring N. Hating W. Harrington R. Hauver Gretchen Story. Page 45 E R. Huwlhome R. Hayes D. Hock H. Hogslrxnd S. Homling B. Hunt P. Hurl y G. Innes D. Iesier M. Iones M. Kurner First Row: HGNES HHWTHORNE, Trumbullg ROBERT HHYES, Yorkg DICK HOCK. L e X i n g 'L o ng HLLENE HOGELHND. Bloomingtong SHIR- LEY HOMLING. K e or r n e yy BETTY HUNT, Kecrrneyg PHTRICIH HURLEY. Meme. D. Kleemeyer I. Korcek P. Litil Second ROW: GERHLDINE INNES. Kecxmeyg DON IESTER. Kecrrneyg MHRIORIE IONES, Overtong MHX- INE KHRNER, O cl e s s cry DOROTHY KLEE- MEYER. Thczyerg IOSEPH KORCEK. Ocontog PHULS LITTLE, Kearney. Sophomores, Gretchen Siory. Lora Siel. Hileen Zutavern, and Doro- thy Siever. pressed rncmy cr pleut when it ccxme to getiing ready V M 5 for cm exircx special date. Page 46 H. McClure I. McClymont D. McGraw W. McKinney L. McMahon D. Marienuu L. Martin F. Marymee Third Row: HHROLD MCCLURE. Riverdcrleg IEHN Mc- CLYMONT. I-I o 1 d r e g eg DORH MHE Mc- GREW, Orleonsg WHYNE MCKINNEY. Kear- ney. Fourth Row: LOUISE MCMHHON. Hrnoldp DOUGLHS MHRIENHU. Kecxrneyg LHURENCE MHRTIN. Beaver Cityg FRHNK MHRYMEE, Blctden. Fifth Row: VIOLETH MESEN. Son Iose, Costot Ricorg LOIS MILLER. Fullertong MHRY MOORE, Keorneyg LHRHEH MULLENDER, Hllionceg URSULH MUTCHIE. Eddyvillep ROBERT NHLL. Curtisg IUNE NHMH, Sheltong HNN NELSON. Grinnell, Iowcx. Sixth Row: PHYLLIS NELSON. Illxtellg ROBERT NEL- SON, Kecrrneyg NORMH OCHMB. North Platteg LESLIE OLSON. Millerg MHX OS- BORN, Torrington, Wyomingg GERHLD OSWHLD, Hurorcig NORMHN OTTO, Kectr- neyg FRHNK PHRISH. Miller. L M Il M. Moore L. Mullender U. Mutchie R. Nall I. Numa H. Nelson R N I N. Ocamb L. Olson M. Osborn G. Oswald N. Otto F. Parish Page 47 P. Parker R. Patterson D. Paltorx M. Pechl D. Petlegrew M. Pierson M T. Shoemaker B. Sholkoski T. Sibbill D. Siebenaler L. Siel D. Smith H First Row: PHYLLIS PHR KER. Broken Bowg RHLPH PHTTERSON, Hnsleyg DONHLD PHTTON. Kecrrneyg MHRY PECHT. Loup Cityg DHWN PETTEGREW. Gothenburgy MHRTIN PIER- SON. Gibbong MHRGHRET ROHDE. Raven- ncxg BONNIE S H N D E R M H N. Lexingtong PHYLLIS SHMUELS. Eustisg NHNCY SCHHTZ, Kearney. Second Row: TERESH S H O E M H K E R, Grand Islcmdg BERNHRD SHOTKOSKI. Loup Cityg THOMHS SIBBITT, K e CI r n e yg DOROTHY SIEBENHLER. Kimbcrllg LORH SIEL, Rivertong DICK SMITH, Lodgepoleg HHZEL STHF- FORD. Keorrneyg DOROTHY STEVER. Stromsburgg GRETCHEN STORY, Molxwellg GEORGE SWHNCUTT. Franklin. Open-air bridge highlighted the day lor Bill Gallagher. Gerald Oswald. Bill Harrington. cmd Bllan Warren. Page 48 ss rx ss 5. ss 5' N. While B. Teichert I Ubb M. Wilson V W te an P. Samuels N. Schatz D Sf G. Story G. Swancuil Third Row: BERTHH TEICHERT, Sto pletong IOHN UBBEN, Hildrethg SHIRLEY VEHL, Keorneyg BHRCLHY WHDE, Keorrneyg LHVON WHG- NER. Loornisg DEHN WHLLHCE. Kecrrneyg VIRGIL WHTTS. I-Iuntleyg ELHINE WEBB, Odessog WHLTER WEDDLE, Kearney. Hy: E w as r. is W X ' . L ,AL-. M. ,l F H' H H car .. V .. ,. Fourth ROW: k NORMH WHITE. Silver Creekg MHRION WII.SON, Oxfordg VERDIE WINTERS. Kecrr- neyg DON WISE. Lodgepoleg KHTHLEEN WORTMHN. Wood Riverg LEITH WYMHN, Gibbong MHRY IO ZOOK, Cozordg MHRIHNH ZULHUF, Lexingtong ROBERTH ZULHUF. Lexingtong HILEEN ZUTHVERN, Dunning. V B. Wade I.. Wagner D. Wallace V. Walls E. Webb W. Weddle D W K. Workman I.. Wyman M. I. Zcok M. Zulauf R. Zulaul H. Zuiavern Page 49 Dance hand director, Norns ing, improvised cx bit on arrangement lor the band whxl Norma Ocamb. Mary Pechi Phyll Nelson, and Harrieit C g studied. Teddy Eloe cmd Gloria Bruner sold tickets to Woody Deeb and Keith Iorqensen. who were planning to attend the freshman party. Page 50 You sow double when you looked ot Keith cmd Kenneth Weider-span. You figure out which is which, and who is who. Cutting fancy capers was Betty Io Sprout. mcxjorette for the college marching band. The officers ot the lreshman class were Weldon Iohnson. president, Robert Imming. Betty Io Sprout. and Wayne Rhoudes. FRESHMEN Remember the day you came? You can't have forgotten! The green hats, the registration lines, the rows and rows ot sophisticated upperclassmen, who gave you the speculative eye, when you meeklf walked past are never to be forgotten! .Flnd than the way you jumped everytime your name vfafz called! Don't pretend that you didn't shake in yo dirty saddles. You know better. "Kangaroo Court, Where justice reigned," vcr: a looming nightmare on the horizon. Why had you, in a playful mood, stolen an upperclassman's pad- dle? You trembled. What was in store for you? Hn egg shampoo with all the trimmings, a peanut raco, a vocal solo. Hny one was terrible!! You livcd through it all, even it your mother hadn't had any cardboard boxes for two years. The slightly grimy green hats were shed at last, to your surprise and pleasure. You were once more an inconspicuous student. Life was as it had always been, nevertheless, you were a freshman once. Don't ever forget it. 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M my ,IW W M , :mv Y":x :KF , 'J First Row: IEBNNE COE, Hlmag IOHN COMSTOCK, Hnsleyg DHN CONWHY, Ke-arneyp IHCK COOK, Holden, West Virginicrg VIVIQN COOLEY, Lexingtong VBN COPELHND, Clarksg TOM CORBITT, Oxfordg DOYLE CORLISS, Kecrrneyg EILEEN CORTNEY. Sidney: CLHRENCE COURTRIGHT, Beaver Ciiyp IOE CRIST, Flnsley. Second Row: IHMES CROSS, Kearn-eyg CHRL CROZIER, Kear- neyg DHWN DAGGETT, Kearneyg HHRVEY DHN- NELS, Frankling IHMES DAVIDSON, Hurorag BILLY DHY, Mason Cityg PHYLLIS DRY, Camp- bellg HNTHONY DEEB, Kearneyg WOODROW DEEB, Kearneyg CHHRLINE DEFOREST, McCookg HLBERT DIEDERICH. Kearney. Third Row: DONALD DUSEK, Blue Hill: RUTH EBIVIEIER, Berlrcmdg DONHLD EDWHRDS, Kearrreyp FLOYD ELLIS, Shelton: FRHNK ELLIS, Shelton: THEO- DOCIH ELOE. Hnsleyg HELEN ERHZIM, Hazardg MERRYLU EVHNS. Sheliong DUHNE EWER, Pleasarltonp ROBERT FERRY, Holdregeg RHY- MOND FIDLER, Cambridge. Fourth Row: IHMES FINLEY, Ordp LEWISE FOREMHN, Kear- neyg GERRLD FRHNK, Chaprnanp IHMES FRHZIER. K e arn e yy MHRYHNN GHLLHGHER. Odessag LEO GHLLOWHY, Fullertong EMMETT GHNNON, Kearneyg GRHNT GHRD, Overtong ROBERT GHRDNER, Hnsleyg IHMES GHRRISON, Hlmcrg IHCK GHRSKH, Kearney. The freshman class pondered cm im- portant problem under leadership of Page 55 President Weldon Iohnson. Fifth Row: MHRY LOU GHRVIN, Kearneyg EUGENE GEIS- LER, Pleascmtong HLLEN GILLMING, Kearneyg HOWHRD GLENN, Hildrethg DHRRELL GRHSS- MEYER, Kearneyg CHROLYN GROSH, Kecrrneyp HHROLD GZEHOUIRK. Loup Cityg KENDHLL HRM, Saronvilleg THEODORE HHNLEY, Hayes Centerp LILY BNN HHNSEN, Kearneyg RHYMOND HHNSON, Loomis. Sixih Row: OREN HHRDIN, Keczrneyg ROBERT HBRDING, Flrcadiag HHROLD HHRDY, Kearnevg HUGH HHRRINGTON, Rivertonp MHX HHRRIS, Craw- fordg SHIRLEY HHRRISON, Kecrrneyg BETTY HHRVEY, Cozadg ROBERT HHRVEY, Ogallalag WILLIHM HHYES, Medford, Oregong LYLE HEBB, Halseyg REX HELLEBERG, Kearney. First Row: IOY HENDRICKSON. Fllmap RICHHRD HEN- NINGER. Gibbong LLOYD HENKE. Daltonp CHR- ROLL HERRMHNN. Hmherstg LEONHRD HERZOG. Kearneyg VIRGINIH HIGGINS. Kearn-eyp GUY HIXON. Hnsleyg GLEN HOPKINS. Rivertong NORMB HORKY. Sargent: IHCK I-IORNER, Kear' neyg DUHNE HOUCHIN. Kearney. Second Row: RILEY HOWHRD. North Platteg LLOYD HOWS- DEN. Huntleyg CONSTHNCE HUBERS. Kearney: DELTON HUBERT. Uplandg CI-IHRLES HUNNEL. Kearneyg WILLHRD HURDLE. Mascot IEHN HURLEY. Yorkg DHVID HUTCHESON. Bassett PHTRICIH IB SEN. Upland: ROBERT IMMING. Kearneyg DHLE INGRHM. Kearney. Third Row: WELFORD ISBELL. Roanoke, Virginiag BETTY IHCK. Eustis: GEORGIA IHCKSON. Kearneyg RONHLD IHCKSON. Ogallalag LEE IHCOBSEN. Lexingtonp MHRK IHCOBSEN. Kearneyg LLOYD IELINEK. Frankling RUBY IELKIN. Frankling DHLE IILLSON. Daltong HRDYCE IOHNSON. Kearneyg DORIS IOHNSON. Orleans. Fourth Row: ORVENE IOHNSON. Bradyg WELDON IOHNSON. Kearneyg CHHRLINE IORDHN. Kearneyp KEITH IORGENSEN, Kearneyg ROBERT IUNGLES. Sweetwaterg HLEXHNDRIH KHPPHS. Keorneyg DONEVIEVE KHPS. Elm Creekg VVILLIHM KEEP. Elm Creekg HSHFORD KELLY. Sloat, Californiag LEO KELLEY. Carnbridgep RONHLD KENNEY. Hmherst, Fifth Row: HRLENE KENTON. Kearneyg HENRY KEYSER. Kearneyg LYLE KILLION. Lexingtong MHRGHRET KING. Kearneyg DONHLD KINGSLEY. Denmang GRETCHEN KLEIN. Lincoln: DOROTHY KNIGHT. Wheatland, Wyomingg NORMH KNOTT. Gibbong STHNLEY KOUBH. Kearneyg LORENE LHIER. Eustisg SHIRLEY LHNDIS. Kearney. Sixth Row: ROBERT LHNGIN. Irnperialg ROBERT LHRSON. Leloanong MHRILYN LHUB. Omahap HNNH LEE. Kimballg HHROLD LENGKEEK. Kearneyg HHZEL LEWIS. Kearneyg NORMH LEWIS, Gibbong CHR- ROL LINE. Eddyvilleg HUDREY LOCKENOUR. Cambridgeg WILLIHM B. LONG. Frankling MIL- DRED LUEDTKE. Hrcadia. Freshmen Ioan Hlthouse Kathryn Broth ers. Carolyn Anderson. and Rat Chapnrcxn Page 56 devoured the latest happemng oi Dlck Tracy. w' mg! we ew Q J 5 ' ,N iq -1 YW ' airy. """' " A A . Lx . 3955- ef jffign wx 1- ggg tixazwg ' Q. K, hx X if uf Q YS, rf X vga .,- W , ,W YL ,U M ' " ?'1f7IfW H7- ,J 11 id? . Q gf Y , . 4,3 Qf Wg 1 J 15" 4 ,J , -1- S. 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' ij , , , x- V 'lm Jai fif2?2-f sig 5 5 j L, , w 5 ,K t 5 I, A 4 W, Y H Q J i , i 3: if Q,-25,3 gig 5 -5 'W my A '. , gi -' if 'ga 5 111 kj: V 4 U M ,ik ,ew M wmv? V 335' V ,Q , A M ,af ' wif' 'A - ' .' fe' 5 ' ' 5 -. 2' A 4 5? 5 f vb F5 ,ga Qx,..,. L. M- x 1. EY'-'515'T ' .B 4.idf"5 v Alike! 5 " ,, ,, uf., W ' W, Leg: - 54 212: mf .P . 5 " M . ., ,. , z y ' W . F .:Y,.,. 95.15 1 I V .2 34 1' .QL 1 ' ' 1 4,54 . I f -L, X J RH- 2, Vw, KH gil 15 " ' ' , , -,gg-gg, W I gk 5 :53: 41 ' . , .', , Q . N A N- H 1- -. xx' J 4? 4 ei. 4 - Q.. N - A S fm, -Q ' ff-E15, wex ' E I 'if U .. if ig , I H - , .... :-: M " :iw T We af N EK-E :fr WM? 1 .'-xii' .. if ' P sgglizmmi., - 4 NV: gi ! V, 1 , u lf , , in X Ar' 170.3 Hgh , . , A1533 13 T N- 1 f f aff? 11' x x f - 9 ,, 3 rf:jfg'gi,i,.f - ' " ' Y R. may V ' M E zgwgzfg, Q ' ' fx , fr Q d 35515 S- f 1 V1 N 'EV ,gf K .N K 'gk ' . f., V- V - T12 J H '1 5 X f i I Q5 X. Va. Q: - ffl ,Wi , . ,gig ,Q 5,-rg 5 1 , - ,: - 'f W Sz Y I , ""lQA2C , l' ' 2 I A ga W .zu , A, Q. .. M W '- 2 ,V ff if fig A f f ff " ' ' - :xg 1 1 ' T r-fg: ,A .V,Ak Wig, , N3 , li. ggygf I KE 4 I 3" Q ,, J Free moments were spent in thc Campus 59 Cale by Dale Orth, Paul Peterson, Clillord Page Edwards, and Iack Cook, shown here trying Old Lady Luck. First Row: IERENE LUHN, Cairog IHMES LYDIHTT, Lodge- poleg ROBERT LYNCH, Kearn-eyg KENNETH Mc- CORD. Kectrneyg NEHL MCCORMICK, Central Cityg BETTY McKEE, Lexingtong WILBUR MEKEE, Lewelleng CONSTHNCE MCMHHON, Ft m h e r s tg OTTO MHRESH, Ordg BONNIE MHRSHBLL, Ed- dyvilleg GLENN MHRSHHLL, Beaver City. Second Row: ' COLLEEN MHRTIN, Kearneyg LEO MHRTIN, Kearnleyg LESLIE MHSON, North Plcrtteg MHRY MHSON, Hrcadiag WENDELL MEHRS, Kearneyg DOUGLHS MELINE. Kearneyg ROSHLIE MER- CER, Kearneyg ETHEL MESSICK, Benkelmang IOSEPH METTENBRINK, Kecrrneyg CYRUS MIL- LER, Kearneyp HENRY MISKO, Ord. Third Row: KHTHLEEN MOHBTT. Sidneyg PHTRICIH MOHHTT, Sidneyg VERNON MONHSMITH. Kear- neyg W H R R E N MONNINGTON. Overtong WIL- LIHM MOOMEY, K e cc r ne yy WILBUR MOORE. Lexingtong DEHN MORGHN, Ple asuntong DHRLINE M O R T E N S E N, Hardyp GORDON MORTHOLE. Culbertsong RICI-IHRD MULHOL- LHND, Waterville, Maineg IOHN MUTCHIE, Eddy- ville. Fourth Row: IEHN NHMH. Sheltong CLHYTON NEHL, Odessag HRLENE NELSON. Uticay FERN NELSON, Hxtellg HNNH NEWCOMB. Pcmxtong ROGER NORHLL, Bertrclndg GEORGE NORRIS, Chapmang LYLE NOVOSHD, Ordg WILFRED NUERNBERGER. Kearneyg BETH NUTZMHN, Bertrandg MHRY BNN OLBERDING. Kearney. Filth Row: TWILH OLSON. I-Iildrethg DHLE ORTH, Plymouthg CECIL PHTTERSON, Flnsleyg MBE PESTER, Broken Bowg MHRGHRET PETERSON, Kimballp KEITH PETUEBN, Stamford: MRRY LEE PITT, Dunningg FREDH PLHZH, Bcryardg IUNE POD- KONYHK, Lewelleng VERLH POLLHT, Cozoldp LEROY P-OPE, Flrnold. Sixth Row: RUSSELL POPE. Hrnoldg IOHNNE PORTER. Kear- neyg RHLPH PORTER. Hrcodiay ROGER POUL- SON, Kearneyg LEO PRICE, Broken Bowg IOE RHESTON, Kearneyg ROMHINE RHSMUSSEN, Kearneyg FRED RHYMENT. Kearneyg MHRION REYNOLDS, Tekamahg WHYNE RHOHDES, Mc- Cookg DONHLD RICHHRDS, Shelton. f n . 2-. 1,622 , 45,2 J. 'N q i? 14 1 x ,J 33 g Q if A532 1? A Y vm TWT .a: ff wa. f his -1 ,H .3 -xl. -. R, by bg- - X ...4 .1-fr - fy Q? ' -' W . , ,ima L. mn' 5 .,, Y , . pdl' fi- E vi' -31 we-X , N. ' :U .aff 5 2,5 ' 'yl'9ff5i7I 'z?5'S.L, gi S222 , ,K , .man rn Q .ng-.E I L an . .,? Xxx X 2255 'mg ff LMI: ,N F 1 e , . ,, - ,gi wx, 4 -sf ,, VA: 3 W , WI ' f-wif? , , 5 " sm 1 1 "gig as 1' .1. .- 1 ji I' A .7 V- . X5 gg: ,. '1 V52 , .2 fwswii 'F E ,I ' B Qxkgld ' ,, - ,- - -, at T ' 2 Q1 x 10, Ne. A A 5 'iwiffwfx N .fgfi 2 ' .. pix-V - , , :H . ' 5: M W xf . K 5 NA, i ' " f 1' ,Q ,a Q ' 1-in E gf ' , E , si Q. ' yay wW:a :.2a',':'wf'm,-1: 2? ., ....: - H-xi ,Mg . QQ, :wisp gif! 'V M Q X7 2-I 1, ,e 'f . K. 1 - gf rw. l if , ' ' ' 'J K -1 L' " M525 'i ' , A ii, r A 2 " ' 'E .M ' if f f g vi mf V pq Q x-'-19 W ,A -K , Q Wi ' Hu Q, 1 '1 ww 4 X ., X 1 3 4 1 ,EEZ ,.f..-N , W LX Am wi 1x, ,, .gap wa fix' .slam A x x W U , w Wx, ,,.: . I G 4 L , ,K , if A , -I J , J K E K., in V431 ' QL 1 .ws 5' as , ' W A155 2 sf m E ,fp I A g, wg? 3 A ,E li f . -az: :zz b M ' 'Q , ' " :EI .5 ',.. . ,x , vi . W7 im -1-SHE? ni.. I M sw fn-, . :,.:.. .:. 5. ss ,MSL 55 M ,N V 'ekwgb :wsu ,gl ,.:g::..:,:,Q.,,.,.l.: :J pw Iwi - , b, i 71 ' J f""1x- ... ,X , if N eg ' f V. .ws A Q15 , .Q-R wi 2 I 'dz' V 1 6 ' t 2, I , . Y . 3 3, fp? . Q 3' A Q, r . f :F" .e- sq bn M Q , , . ,, 3' .N ' 1 2 i A ':' ' If 5 M5252-g ,Q ' f., A ff' if '1?'Qffif,.M N 3 - 'QQ EM: , U, ...W , f. A Age. 7 : .lj I, Q lid' -. ., F H H5311 B ,.:2:,.:,:,5. . gg 1 :fy ' S-HW Y E A- X , 'wg ,Mp ii Z H, V 1. ,WV A- fm 1,5225 ,, L i fa V f ' 5, L 4 dxf 7 ' X, Ki 1' .. N . A fggvjsxfvii, ,Q ,wi 1 , Wf21?Q7ff1g J 9 .- WK. Gy , , w'.1a'g:,3? I 4 -f- , - A x ' piiiiiffifafif "si - .-, ,..,. I X M I Q? f f' .gf nii 1 I A., -4 , I ' 1, -2- 1- ,AY 1 :sg -'fi' ' 1 , W fa - I gg! if f ix -:emi ti! - 're vi. i. 4 554 NY, WELCOME! Pls We completed another circle of time and the year "l946" went on the shelf labeled, "Finished Business," we paused to review tlie past, to make plans for the future, and to wel- come you-students of second semester. Mid-semester found most students in a flurry of activityg it found you Waiting in long lines fo become members of our student body. M Norman Diflenderler Miss Dorothy Klein Geogrfmhy English Gustafson D. Hdams W. Hllison G. Baker I. Baxter R. Beach D. Becker I. Becker W Messman I. Hanzal P. Harvey H. Hendricks L. Herrmann P. Houtchin R. Iackson F. Iennett M Syisma W. Monk D. Nickel I. Oberg D. Pavelka R. Peterson I. Patska G, Reiner so H. Taylor I. Taylor N. Taylor O. Thunberg R. Toyama K. Urwiller G. Vannie First Row: DWIGHT HDHMS. Culbertsong WILLIHM HLLISON, Kearneyg GERHLD BHKER, Kearneyg IERHLD BHXTER, Gibbong ROBERT BEHCH. Plrnoldg DOROTHY BECKER. Sumnerg IHCK BECKER. Sumnerg IHCK BENDLER, Mason Cityg RICHHRD CLHRK. Kearneyg WILLIHM CONWHY, Kearneyg DHVID CRONIN, Mindeng CLHIR DEMILT. Dickensg KEITH FREDERICKS, Kearneyg KENNETH GOTOBED, Kearneyg WHLTER GRIFFITH. Kearney. Second Row: BRUCE GUSTHFSON, l-loldregeg IOSEPH HHNZHL, Omahag PHILIP HHRVEY. Ogal- lalag HHRLHN HENDRICKS, Loornisp LOWELL HERRMHNN, Hmherstg PRESTON HOUTCHIN, Kear- neyg RUSSELL IHCKSON, Paxtong FRHNCIS IENNETT, Daltong IHMES KELLY, Exeterg STHNLEY KNOTHE, St. Pauly IOHN LHNCHSTER, Kearneyg TREVH LHNGE, Gibbon: BETTE LHNGENBERG. Suttonp LEWIS LINDSTROM. Elm Creek: ROGENE MHRROW. Lincoln: SHIRLEY MHRYMEE, Bladen. AND WELCOME BACK Upon these pages We present you newcom- ers who took an active part in those future plans and who made the undertakings of the new year successful ones. We present the tac- ulty who joined our ranks, our three post- graduates, and . . . lo-and-behold . . . Wayne Monk and Gene Wilkinson of semester one. Don't ask us Whyg it we knew we'd tell you. Francis Ferry Walter Peterson Philip Shelmad n Kearney Kearney Kearney Bendler R. Clark W. Conway D. Cronin C. DeMill K. Fredericks K. Gotobed W. Grill th Kelley S. Knotbe I. Lancaster T. Lange B. Langenberg L. Lindstrom R. Marrow S. Mary M Richey D. Schwab B. Sedlacek H. Sell R. Sheen D. Shoemaker M. Shreve R. Simon Wacker P. Walker D. Webb G. Weiss I. West N. West G. Wilkinson V. Yann Third Row: WHRREN MESSMHN, Strangg WHYNE MONK, Elm Creekg DONHLD NICKEL, Hxtellg IUNE OBERG, Plurorap DONHLD PHVELKH. Fairfieldg HLBERT PETERSON. Dannebrogi IERRY PETSKH, Ordg GLENN REINERTSON, Hazardg MHRIORIE RICHEY, Stockvilleg DELORES SCHWHB. Suttong BERNHRD SEDLHCEK. Grand lslandg ROBERT SELL, Starnfordg RUSSELL SHEEN, Overtong DOLORES SHOEMHKER. Grand lslanclg MHRVIN SHREVE, Kearneyg RHLPH SIMON, Newton, Iowa. Fourth Row: MHBEL SYTSMH, Bradyg HRTHUR THYLOR, Kearneyg IEHN THYLOR. Kearneyg NOR- MEIN THYLOR. Kearneyg OSCI-IR THUNBERG. Gothenburgg RUTH TOYHMH. Cozadg KENNETH URWILLER. St. Michaelg GLEN VHNNIER, Hildrethg LEROY WHCKER, Memphis, Tennesseeg PHUL WHLKER, Dixg DONNH WEBB. Plrcadiag GLEN WEISS, Irnperialg IOYCE WEST, Belvideref NORMH WEST, Belviderep GENE WILKINSON, Mindeng VERNON YHNNEY, Kearney. Cum Laude . . BENIHMIN KEELEY . . Kearney Cum Laude , . IOHN MITCHELL . , Kearney Cum Laude . . GERTRUDE LRNGIN . . Imperial WITH HO OR On that freshman college day, when you bade Mama and Papa farewell and wondered how you could ever master room locations much less than subject matter, you little dreamed that you, of the graduating class of l947, would be the students to receive the high- est honor the college could bestow, that of cum laude. Three of you were selected as cum laude students: Gertrude Langin, lmperialg Benjamin Keeley, Kearney, and Iohn Mitchell, Kearney. Three of you received honorable mention: Helen Refshauge, York, Lloyd Baysdorfer, Long- mont, Colorado, and Dorothy Oliver, Shelton. Your selection was based upon scholarship, superior ability, diligence, and industry. "With honors" you g r a d u a t e d, and N.S.T.C.ers We're proud to have had you as fellow classmen. Honorable mention . . . HELEN REFSHRUGE Honorable mention . . . LLOYD BHYSDOHI-'ER Honorable mention . . . DOROTHY OLIVER York Longmont, Colorado Shelton WW DR. Fl. E. BURKE, H man of scholarship and of learning, EDUCATOR and FRIE D "The memory of Dr. H. E. Burke will live long in the minds of those who were privileged to be associated with him. His life will serve as an inspiration to those who loved and re- spected him," So said President Herbert L. Cushing concerning the contribution made by the late Dr. Fl. E. Burke, director of the H. O. Thomas Training School, and Director of the Placement Bureau and Coordinator of student teachers. Dr. Burke was fatally injured when his car was struck by a westbound freight train on a grade crossing at Shelton, Nebraska, late Wednesday evening, Ianuary 15th. Funeral services for Dr. Burke were held Ianuary 20th in the First Christian Church. Three former pastors of the Christian Church in Kearney were among the large crowd of relatives and friends who gathered for the services. The Reverend Will Sessions, lr., for- mer Christian Church pastor, in his funeral message, cited Dr. Burke for three devotions: "his devotion to his Work, his devotion to his family, and his devotion to his God." His death was mourned by students and faculty alike, as well as outside acquaintances. R. W, Powell, fellow instructor, said that "above all, H. E. Burke was a tried and true friend, and I shall long cherish his memory." IoHnne Barber, who served as Dr. Burke's Placement Bureau secretary, made known her admiration for her employer in the following statement: "We who have worked for him realize the total loss of a leading educator, an efficient and untiring worker, and of a man who was not perfect but great." - Dr. Burke served his community and his church throughout his life. He was also a lead- ing proponent for the improvement of the teacher status. His memory will serve as a guide for you who plan to enter the teaching profession, for he left behind an example of service that will last forever. Page 65 HELEN and ILENE REFSHHUGE, York. COLLECTGR' ITEMS These were the people you heard about. They were among the leaders in every field at NSTC. Sometimes it seemed that you could hear the reverberated sound of their names floating down the corridor. They were that much a part of the college, they were students just like you. They struggled to their eight o'clocks, they crammed for tests, and they hollered "Hi" to hundreds ot students. Their biographies and achievements were recorded with the select of every college, in a book ROBERT POLSKI, Loup City. called, "Who's Who Hmong Students in Pimer- ican Universities and Colleges." Neva Harris, Helen Refshauge, Dick Peter- son, Marian Wardrop, Ilene Retshauge, Kay Noonan, Otis Miller, and Iohn Mitchell dis- cussed issues in Student Council, while Who's Who representatives were active in all tour ot the honorary organizations. Scholarship and leadership students elected to Xi Phi were Iohn Mitchell, Kathryn Powell, llene Refshauge, Marian Wardrop, Dorothy Oliver, Helen Ref- shauge, and Neva Harris, Helen Retshauge, lohn Mitchell, and Neva Harris expressed themselves in activities of Pi Kappa Delta. Otis Miller Kathleen Noonan Oshkosh Scotia Page 66 Kathryn Powell Robert Ha rxis Kearney Hmhsrst MHRIRN WHRDHOP, Kearney. IOHN MITCHELL, Kearney. Kathryn Powell and Helen Retshauge prac- ticed the art of business administration in Pi Omega Pi, while those skilled with a pen and who contributed to the Hntler were Verne Dowers, Helen Ratshauge, Dorothy Oliver, Marian Wardrop, Ilene Retshauge, Neva Har- ris, Kathryn Powell, Kay Noonan, and lohn Mitchell, Sigma Tau Delta members. Not con- tent with. contributing only to the Hntler, these Who's Who students, Bob Polski, Iohn Mitchell, Bob Meline, Kay Noonan, Neva Harris, Verne Dowers, Marian Wardrop, Ilene Retshauge, and Helen Retshauge published the Plntelope and Worked on the Blue and Gold. VERNE DOWERS, Kearney. Dick Peterson, Otis Miller, and lohn Mitchell wore "K" letters, symbols ot physical prowess. Verne Dowers, Neva Harris, Dorothy Oliver, and Helen Retshauge acted in all-college plays. They were also active in Women's Council, Men's Council, religious groups, and music clubs. Every club in school, every part of college lite was ot importance to them. Their achieve- ments were more than could be measured in the concrete sense, they left something fine for others. Kearney State Teachers College has benefited by their presence. Robert Moline Dorothy Oliver Kearney Shelton Neva lane Harris Dick Peterson Kearney Kimball Page 67 -nncAN1zA'r1oNs ' Eiexwi AND ? I fp 1 DCIETIES '- Pg 69 TI-IIS IS YOUR. GUAPLANTY ' ' Ti. Q- M M :-: , N Qitisiaj "" . ' A , . 5 I -:., C .-V.. t . - W' T Q s 2, I ' 4 - -mm .-Ms.. Student Council members voiced opinions on pressing problems, at a typical weekly meeting. Page 70 X x x 1 i-is-' H group of students gathered before the door of the faculty committee room on a Mon- day evening and the patter of little feet charging down the hall, could mean only one thing: Iohn Mitchell, president, was on his Way to another Student Council meeting. The hours spent behind closed doors, the hushed voices discussing a secretive matter or the raised voices arguing over some par- ticularly debatable issue, resulted in innumer- able accomplishments. Thanks to the time and effort spent by these students, the activities of N.S.T.C.ers were prominent among the col- leges of the state. ln early fall, the K-book, handbook for stu- dents, was edited by Council member, Cathryn Spelts, to acquaint newcomers with Kearney College. Special summer meetings were held to plan for and arrange the welcome of fresh- men students, and a mixer held the first week helped strangers at once to feel a part of its student body, and to truly appreciate the friendly atmosphere of the college. During registration, Student Council members con- ducted a campus tour to acquaint newcomers with buildings and classrooms, and as the year progressed, the terrors of Kangeroo Court Were instigated by the same group. Under the sponsorship of Dr. Mary Morse and Mr. Holland Welch, and under the efficient direction of lohn C. Mitchell, president, assisted by Vice-president Gerald Richter and Secre- tary-Treasurer Marian Wardrop, the home- coming parade and dance was one of the finest. Campus decorations and floats were in THE PEOPLE, YES abundance, the annual freshmen-upperclass- men tug-of-war resulted in a decision for the green caps, and the day's activities were cli- rnaxed by the crowning of Ilene Refshauge as Homecoming Sweetheart. October found Council members engrossed in preparation for a Sadie Hawkins day race and dance, as well as the sponsoring of weekly dances after each football game in the college gym. On Sadie's day, the ladies? of the cam- pus "took out" after their dreammen and en- tertained them at a hilarious evening dance, complete with hill-billy orchestra, costumes, and joy juice stand. Hs the winter stormed on, the Council orig- inated hour dances sponsored by various or- ganizations at the Kampus Kave and began preparation for the Presidents Ball in early spring. Meetings of the officers of the Buck-PL Month Club Were Council-sponsored. Hccomplishments of the Council this year in- cluded one which shall be acknowledged and appreciated by students in years to come. In collaboration with sister colleges, the Council Student Council bigwigs, Iohn Mitchell and Gerald Richter, occupied their time with government affairs. Student, that is. prepared a liberal arts degree petition to be presented to the State Legislature, Yes, the Council Was a highly important group on the campus. Their Weekly meetings marked the beginning of more than one out- standing activity. Through their endeavors and the proficiency with which they carried these endeavors out, they fulfilled their purpose: that of self-government and student betterment, well. They brought not only recognition to the students at the Nebraska State Teachers Col- lege in Kearney, but they set forth ideals and formulated new activities that will be followed to good advantage by groups in the future. First Row: Dr. Mary Morse. Mr. Rolland Welch. Io!-lnne Barber. Dawn Daggett, Flnthony Deeb. Hoy Dethlofi. Second Row: William Long, Otis Miller, Clarence Mitchell. Iohn Mitchell, Hrlene Nelson, Ilene Refshauge. Third Row: Gerald Richter. Cathryn Spelts, Dean Wallace. Marian Wardrop. Ruth Wandell. M Page 71 First Row: Miss Dorothy Williams, Dr. H. G. Stout, Lloyd Baysdorler. Helen Dailey, Marjorie DeBrunner, Ruth Dunbar, Iessie Gilpin, Neva lane Harris, Hazel Ibsen. Second Row: Hilda Lola, Robert Meline, Otis Miller, Iohn Mitchell, Kathleen Noonan. Dorothy Oliver. Robert Polski, Kathryn Powell. Third Row: Helen Reishauge, Ilene Refshauge, Hrdella Rundquist. Ella Mae Sizer, Cathryn Spells, Marian Wardrop, Maxine Wardrop, Ruth Wendell. Dorothy Oliver glanced over the uneasy group around the table in the Faculty Dining Room and grinned, "Find now We'll read the essays, please!" Plpple polishing and banner toting had been eliminated along with other campus hazing, but Xi Phi hopefuls were still required to write and read essays on assigned subjects before being admitted to active membership. scholarship Standards for this honorary fraternity were high: membership restricted to twenty-four, such selection being based on a scholarship average of B, plus outstanding leadership, fellowship, and participation in campus organizations. Hmong the activities of this busy group Page 72 were the annual awarding of the ten-dollar Xi Phi award to the outstanding sophomore boy and girl at Honors Day Convocation, the formal Christmas dinner at the Fort Kearney Green Room, and the .spring dinner held for the first time with other honorary organizations of the campus. Eleven oi the fourteen selected as Whos 'Who students were Xi Phi members, while Dorothy Oliver, Shelton senior, was elected president. Other officers included Ruth Wen- dell as Vice-president, Neva lane Harris as treasurer, Hilda Lola as recording secretary, lessie Gilpin as corresponding secretary, and Dr. H, G. Stout and Dorothy Williams as spon- sors. Q ALITY TELLS -- Xi Phi officers turned an attentive ear Io the instructions ol President, Doro- thy Oliver. as she discussed member- ship lists. THE ITCH OF LI -- Literary lingo was the topic of Sigma Tau Delta board meet- in s ith Verne Dowers re- Q 1 W P siding. When you came upon an individual bent over a heap of blank paper, tearing his hair. you almost knew it was a Sigma Tau Delta member. These were the creative creatures of the campus. But when spring came, "The I3lntler" proved to be Worth the hair-pulling, and these literary-minded students were proud of their publication. Cathryn Spelts, Plntler editor, was kept busy reading copy for the only purely literary publication on the campus. The booklet made its debut in the early spring, and was rapidly purchased by interested stu dents. The financial end of the proposition was the responsibility of Gerald Richter. Sigma Tau Delta president, Verne Dowers, kept the organization running smoothly with the aid of Calvin T. Ryan, English department head. l-le also profited by the advice of Marian Wardrop, vice-president, Maxine Wardrop, secretary, Kathleen Noonan, treasurer, and Ruth Dunbar, historian. Monthly meetings, under the direction of Iohn Mitchell, featured a Wide variety of pro- grams. The Christmas and spring dinners saw members in their best bib and tucker, banquet- ing at the Fort Kearney Hotel. The famous Hspoonbread breakfast" held at the Ryan home, featured not only Mr. Ryan's famous spoonbread, but plenty of extra food for literary appetites. Sigma Tau Delta was adequately repre- sented in Who's Who, by entering nine mem- bers, which is fifty per cent of the total mem- bership. Hlso, this organization had the addi- tional honor of containing within its ranks, both the Homecoming Sweetheart and the Christ- mas Queen. First Row: Mr. C. T. Ryan. l'oHnne Barber. Verne Dowers. Ruth Dunbar. Neva Iane Harris. Robert Melina. Second Row: Iohn Mitchell. Kathleen Noonan, Kathryn Noyes. Dorothy Oliver. Kathryn Powell. Helen Reishauge. Third Row: Ilene Helshauge. Gerald Richter, Ella Mae Sizer. Marjorie Soderholm. Cathryn Spelts. Marian Wardrop. Maxine Wardrop. Page 73 P1 Kappa Delta members and sponsor, H. L. Hhrendts, D. Wallace, L. Buysdorler. M Harris, I. Mitchell, E. Sizer, G. Wade. F. Bell, and H. Relshauge discussed tournament rules, while top debaters, I. C. Mitchell and "Pouch" Bell laid plans for a trip to Bowling Green, Ohio. Pi Kappa Delta members were always to be recognized by the glib tongues they possessed, by the way thier bags were perpetually packed for tournaments, and by the careful scrutiny they gave each opinion that was ex- pressed. The highlight of the forensic year came with the Pi Kappa Delta National Tournament at Bowling Green, Ohio. Kearney members, how- ever, were to be found at the State Intercolle- giate Forensic Plssociation Tournament, the Nebraska University Speech Tournament, and the Rocky Mountain Speech Tournament. Heading this year's soapboxers were Iohn C. Mitchell, president, Bob Parkins, vice-presi- dent, Margaret Harris, secretary-treasurer, and Helen Refshauge, corresponding secretary. Meetings were held informally once each month throughout the year. Page 74 ' Kearney's Pi Kappa Deltans were nationally known for their forensic endeavors. Iohn Mitchell was given an outstanding speaker's award in the National Debator's Magazine, While Bob Parkins and Ella Mae Sizer won third in the old-line Oratory Contest at North- Western. Hlso, these three members hold spe- cial distinction keys in the national organiza- tion. Under the guidance and direction of Mr. Harold L. Hhrendts, faculty sponsor, the Zeta chapter of the Pi Kappa Delta promised to and did indeed bring home honors galore to Kearney State. 1 HEAR YOU TALKI Latest results on the Kearney lnvi- tational were computed by H. L. Hhrendts and Dorothy Holcomb, while visiting coaches looked On. Pi Omega Pi members. Hazel lbsen. Kathryn Powell. Viola Mortensen. Brdella Rundquist. Helen Dailey. Hilda Lola. Betty Hunt. and Maxine Wardrop. gave Lorraine Schmidt and Helen Heishuuge a big send-oil when they left tor the national convention in Chicago. ACKGROU D is IMPORTANT When the streamliner pulled out of the city of Kearney on Christmas Day, l946, it had among its passengers two very chic, eager, and enthusiastic young ladies, Helen Ref- shauge and Lorraine Schmidt, selected by members of Pi Omega Pi to represent the State Teachers College at the three-day national convention in Chicago. With Helen Refshauge serving as president, Kathryn Powell, secretary, and Hilda Lola, treasurer, the honorary commercial fraternity fulfilled its purpose: that of promoting interest in commerce among commercial teachers, Miss Mildred Payne of the commercial department, and Miss Dorothy Williams, Bursar, were the fraternity's sponsors. When February 6th through 14th Was des- ignated as rush Week of sororities and frater- nities, the group sponsored by Harriett Ying- ling and Paul Evett, and under the direction of Dean Nicholson, president, Frances Hmen, sec'- retary, and Helen Refshauge, treasurer, were responsible for setting up all rush rules and enforcing the same. "ls everybody happy?" might well have been the cry of the lnter-Fraternity-Sorority Council, for theirs was the ticklish business of satisfying the needs and the desires of all greek organizations on the campus. Informal business meetings were held once monthly to decide on party dates, and to supervise plans for dances, teas, and dinners. NOW ABOUT THOSE RULES - - ing rush week rules. Page 75 Inter-Fraternity-Sorority Council members Gerald Richter, Iessie Gilpin. Marian Wardrop. Hlo Gard, Kent Ryan. Frances Hman Hazel Ibsen. Harriett Yinglmg and Helen Refshauge listened to the instructions ol Dean Nicholson. president. concern Plans for the improvement ol their village were discussed at the monthly meetings oi the Veterans Council by members Earl Winters. Leith Wyman. Iaclc Cook. Elton Toops, and sponsor. Del Danker. GOOD NEWS FOR VETERANS ln the Wake of the recent war came the re- turning G. I. For the best interests of him and his family, the government provided housing units for his use, While he attended college. Kearney State received its share of veterans and units. Founded for the purpose oi aiding the occu- pants of the housing project, the Veterans Vil- lage Hssociation was established. The set-up Was exactly like that of a village, with a mayor and a council, elected by the residents. The veterans displayed their cooperation in campus activities by carrying off first prize for the float they entered in the Homecoming pa- rade. Plnother of their activities was the village picnic, held late last summer. This year's mayor, Elton Toops, was given assistance by Del Danker, the director of the veterans housing project. Ht a regular monthly date, you could find the residents of Veterans Village, holding a meeting concerning their welfare and interests. Veterans wives. Verdie Winters. Betty Mitchell. Claudia Lukes. Pauline Welton. Marjorie Peterson. Willa Moore. Beverly Miller Ioyce Long. Doris Moomey. Marie Stucker. and Virginia Misko. established a council ol their own and took charge ol the social activities ol village life. Page 76 First Row: D. Mortensen. C. Winn. V. Pollat. H. Nelson. B. Stenihem. G. Bruner. B. Evans. M. Iones. Second How: I. Nama. L. Schmidt, M. Soderhom. P. Nelson. T. Olson. G. Babcock. C. Blakeman. M. Clabaugh. I. Rosenthal. Miss Ludden. D. Burt. LITTERATEURS The oldest organization on the campus, the Plspasians by name, was founded with the pur- pose of teaching parliamentary law to its members. But not only do the Hspasians man- age to teach parliamentary law, they have plenty of fun on the side. Hmong their lighter activities were a masquerade party, a Christ- mas party, and also a formal dinner, where the pink and silver organization colors were predominate. With officers like Phyllis Nelson, Darline Graf, Lorraine Schmidt, and Iune Nama, and the sponsorship of Miss Carrie Ludden, the Hs- pasians Were the right club to belong to. It was an honor to be a Zip Club member. Not only were they among the chosen few allowed to sit on the main floor at basketball games, but they followed the team with all the spirit they could rally, and from the way it sounded, they had plenty of it. The Zip Club displayed their interest by at- tending and sponsoring football trips to Hastings and Wayne. Bonfires before big events displayed the farsightedness and in- genuity of this club. The field of school spirit was not their only interest, but they also served as ushers for all college events, and managed a booth at the Christmas Carnival. TEAMED - UP - Ready to accompany the team on a trip were Zip Club members. I. May. Miss Ludden. C. Sear. I. Coe. M. Evans. G. Bruner. C. DeForest. P. Parker. D. Stever. D. Foster. I.. Wagner. I. Nama. D. Siebenaler, K. Wortman. D. Siebenaler. B. Ru- genstein. M. Peterson. I. Nama. S. Marymee. O. Iohnson. B. Hunt. B. Farley. and G. Hansen. - Page 77 "Yipe!" said the editor and the book was begun. "Whoop-la!" shouted she and the book was at an end. But in between that "Yipe!" and "Whoop-la!" there was bedlam. The "baby", as the Blue and Gold was fondly called, was born Hugust, l946. Editor, Maxine Wardrop, floundering in the childrens end of Harmon Pool, suddenly decided to dedicate it- to the seniors. Not long after, she began won- dering which year of seniors would even see it completed. First came the signing of printing and en- graving contracts, after which the dummy was laid out and the mad dash for film and flash- bulbs began. The camera was a tempera- mental darling and often went off by itself, which resulted in some rather unique and un- distinguishable shots. lohn Mitchell resumed duties as staff photographer and could be found at all campus activities to "shoot" a few ESPECIALLY FGR YOU Blue and Gold editors, Maxine Wardrop and Norma Lewis, checked up on finances with business managers, Betty Hunt and lim Belschner. people. Other staff members-some of whom haven't appeared for duty as yet-were Em- mett Gannon, Barbara King, Bob Meline, Dean Wallace, Helen Befshauge, Bob Hayes, Kay Noonan, lollnne Barber, and Gerald Richter. Norma Lewis became Hssociate Editor and long afternoons were spent over the coffee cups with the editor, thrashing out the latest problems and making long and hilarious trips to Lincoln. Business Manager, Betty Grosh Hunt, busied herself trying to pay the bills of the above two and pounding the pavement with lim Belsch- ner, Plssistant, Elaine Webb, Bob Polski, and Don Boyd, selling advertisements. The "baby" took a lot of bring up and more than once became a problem child. It is the result of a year's commotion and hectivity, but an enjoyable one. We hope you have en- joyed it too. Hold it! said staff photographer John Mitchell to staff members, Dean Wallace. Helen Reishauge. Kathryn Noonan. and Bob Melina. Page 78 1 Copy writing was the main con- cern of Emmet! Gannon. Ioanne Barber. Barbara King. and Gerald' Richter, while .Bob Hayes, Don Boyd. and Elaine Webb seemed interested in the contents oi the Blue and Gold filing cabinet. WHE IS NEWS? Editorialisls, Verne Dowers and Barclay Wade. lound plenty ol work to do on the weekly Qntelope, as did business man- agers, lim Bowers and Margaret Peterson. You liked to burst into print every Friday, didn't you? Well, the Hntelope staff kept their eyes and ears open and you could bank on the fact that there would be plenty of scoops for the Friday edition. The head newshawk was editor-in-chief, Verne Dowers, and right on his toes was Bar- clay Wade, assistant editor. The problem ot selling advertisement was tackled by Idmes F. Bowers, who was aided by Margaret Peterson. They were the nucleus of the newspaper, but ot great value were the numerous reporters who hit their beat every week. ln tact, every time you walked by the crackerbox Plntelope office, you could see them either jammed in fifty to a square inch, or hollering at Dowers or Bowers to "open the door." and Bettelee Frcxhm. Pounding the beat for big news was the weekly task ol Don Iester. Ioan Hlthouse. Lloyd Baysdorier. The "voice of the friendly college" as the new nameplate said, hit the news from boiler room to chemistry lab, and it did it unbiasedly and accurately. The lllntelope covered every- thing that was newsable. No wonder the paper table was the popular place in college on an early Friday morning. I-ldditional Fl n t e l o p e stuff members were Norma Lewis, Dawn Daggelt. Herman Kersenbrock, and Bob Meline, who were kept busy tracking stories. Page 79 First Row: V. Hunspaugh, D. Mortensen, H. Lee, C. Rnderson, C. Winn. B. Marshall, S. Mcxrymee, H. Nelson, C. Blcxkeman, D. Oliver. Second Row: Dr. Morse. Miss Elliott, Miss Holcomb, H. Dexter, H. Lockenour, D. Kaps, V. Pollat, L. Hllen. M. Richey, I. Hlthouse, B. lack. Third Row: I.. Wagner, V. Wilcox. M. Soderholm, B. Bugenstein. E. Hnderson, B. Hnderson, D. Frost, B. Nutzmcrn, H. New- comb. H. Dailey. SOBERLY RECOGNIZED Freshmen girls will long remember the first organization they came in contact with on the Kearney campus, the Young Women's Chris- tian Plssociation. This religious organization understood that the first days of a college career Were pretty rough sledding, so they provided a Big Sister for freshmen girls. Big Sisters came in handy, not only for advice and information, but as a get-acquainted factor in college life. The YWCH was always active and always busy. Hmong their first activities were the Marshmallow Sing at Kearney Lake to Wel- come new students, and the membership and installation dinner. Then later on you heard of them again when Dr. Kirby Page visited the campus under the sponsorship of the YWCH and gave a convocation program. That week Was also the Week for the Vlforld Student Service Fund, and the offering was supple- mented by the receipts of a sacrificial dinner, The Christmas Carnival Was the brainchild of the YWCH, planned and supervised by them, and half of all the money Was given to the Estes Co-op Fund, which Would enable representatives to attend the Estes Park Con- ference. YWCH also played hostess to the Student Christian Movement Conference which Was held on the Kearney campus early in the spring. First Row: F. Hurdle. O. Iohnson, T. Lewis, K. Noyes, H. Dunbar, M. Moore, H. Rundquist, Miss Williams. Second Row: M. King. I. Relshcxuge, I. Stafford, C. Martin, C. Iordcxn, D. Knight. Mrs. Nigh. Third Row: D. Johnson, F. Spangsberg, G. Iuckson, L. Miller. H. Heishauge, V. Cooley, M. Casey, B. King, H. Conger, Dr. Failor. ' On the steps of the Catholic Church, Emmett Gannon. president, discussed club promotion with Father Tschida. CALM CENTER IN A BUSY WHIRL Few persons remember the year l9l6, but on that date students on the campus organized the Catholic Students Hssociation. Their pri- mary purpose was the promotion of catholic action and the enrichment of spiritual lite, and since that time the club has taken an active part in campus activities. ln their comfortable room on third floor, Catholic students met for religious and social meetings every second Wednesday evening. Under the sponsorship and guidance of Bev- erly Haxby and Father Tschida, members pre- sented for discussion religious questions and problems. Discussion included such topics as "marriage" by Father Tschida, and a first-hand account of the Vatican City, Rome, by Herman Kersenbrock. On the first Sunday of each they JOOKGG Over ine volumes. month, members received communion in a group. Catholic students could be found not only delving into religious problems, but planning and participating in social activities as Well. The Christmas Breakfast at the Fort Kearney Hotel was a highlight of the year, along with the fall and spring picnics, and a spring ban- quet. Pl most recent accomplishment of club af- filiates Was the organization of a choir to sing at one mass each month throughout the year and at Wednesday evening devotions during Lent. Robert Polski and Emmett Gannon served as presidents for the group, while other officers included Shirley Veal, Gertrude Langin, Ber- nard Shotkoski, Hldon Sobieszczyk, and Hlice Wink. First Row: H. Wink, S. Veal. U. Mitchie. K. Wortman, G. Gallagher. P. Mohatt. K. Mohatt, E. Cortney. D. Siebenaler. Second Row: Miss Haxby. D. Siebenaler. K. Noonan. M. Olberding. H. Lola. I. Mutchie, M. Boyd. B. Harvey. Third Row: E. Gannon. B. Shotkoski. B. Kennedy. E. Geisler. T. Shoemaker. G. Langin, H. Sobieszczyk. ' Fourth Row: W. Gogan. L. Mason. H. Kersenbrock. L. Herzog. D. Clayton. R. Kenney. L. Henke. First How: V. Shudcx. B. Bissell. H. Hansen. E. Yanney. L. Galloway. Second Row: R. Lukas. D. Morgan. K. Norris. B. Hays. D. Boyd. G. Frank. Third Row: H. Hdams. G. Hanson. Mr. Ruchter. H. Hardy. I. Garska. READY TO HELP The brother organization of the YWCH was the YMCH, the Young Men's Christian Hsso- ciation. While perhaps a bit smaller than the Women's group, it was just as busy. YMCH members not only cooperated and helped plan all YWCH activities, such as the Christmas Carnival, but had the honor of having Eugene Yanney elected as Chairman of the District Council. Realizing that physical fitness was an im- portant part in any school program, the YIVICH organized an intra-mural basketball team. Officers for this year were Robert Hayes, president, Donald Boyd, vice-president, Fllbert Lukes, secretary, and Robert Bissell, treasurer. Mr. Harry Huchter served as sponsor of the or- ganization. The Lutheran Student Hssociation had as its aim and ideal the promotion of a healthy social life and strong Christian character in every member. The highlight of the year's program was the installation of officers in the sanctuary of the Kearney Lutheran Church. Wilfred Nuernberger was installed as president by Mr. Otto Olson, the club sponsor, and Reverend Walfred Nelson. H standout among the social activities of this organization was the annual ice-skating party, which was plenty of fun for everyone. The Lutheran students also sponsored a most successful Christmas ,Carnival booth, featuring not only nylons but soap chips as Well. IDEALS BECOME DEEDS iff or Ht the installation service in the Lutheran Church were club members T. Olson. G. Reinertson. F. Nelson. R. Norall..R. Hnderson. P. Nelson. Mr. Olson. Reverend Nelson. L. Schmidt. W. Nuernberger. R. Ebmeier. H. Ibsen. V. Anderson. V. Vanmer. First Row: B. Hunt. C. Cornelius, I. Stucker, E. Yingling. M. Pecht. B. Farley, G. Hansen, H. Lee, B. Stransky. B. Long. Second How: L. McMahon. C. VcmCcxmp. B. Hustin. R. Cronin, I. Young, P. Wilmot, E. Giesler, D. Iohnson, I. Petsku. M. Sytsma, K. Workman. K. Urwiller, C. Miller. I. Lydiatt, M. Pierson, M. Harris. D. Conway, N. White. Miss Ludden. Standing: C. Bacon. Mrs. Hansen, M. Shreve, C. Courtright. PAYS TO K OW "Hunt Nellie's indigestion" and "Uncle Wil- lie's gout," were common topics for discussion among a particular group on the campus known as the Pre-Medics, Pre-Nurses Club. This club, organized to promote the welfare of the students interested in the profession of medicine, was made up of those preparing themselves carefully and scientifically to answer that ever urgent call, "ls there a doctor in the house?" The monthly meetings planned and pre- sented by president, Bob Hunt, vice-president, Louise McMahon, and secretary-treasurer, Mary Pecht, featured special programs at which leaders in the profession discussed re- cent advances in the medical field and con- ducted various and educational experiments. Sponsors were Miss Carrie Ludden and Mrs. Mildred Hansen. Candlelight and gleaming silver were char- acteristic of the receptions given after the con- certs presented by music groups at the college, by Hpollonian Music Club members. Recently organized for the purpose of developing ap- preciation of good music, club members held monthly meetings at the homes of the spon- sors, Mr. Gavin Doughty, Mr. Harold Cerny, Mrs. Robert Haines, and Mr. Robert House, at which time programs were presented under the direction of officers Eunice Saathoff, Fran- ces Hurdle, Esther Ballagh, and Helen Dailey. Other members Were: I. Pllthouse, C. Berreck- man, M. Bolin, I. Coe, L. Failor, T., Hanley, S. Hawthorne, L. Hutchins, C. Iordan, H. Kappas, M. King, B. Minnick, H. Smith, G. Story, V. Vannier, D. Waggoner, R. Wendell, and Q. Zutavern. PERFECT REF LECTION run Hpollonian officers and sponsors, Mrs. R. Haines. E. Saathoif, Mr. R. House, I-I. Dailey, Mr. G. Doughty. Mr. H. Cerny, F. Hurdle. and E. Balluqh paused lor the photographer on the second floor landing. n i i Council members. D. Graf. H. Hundguist. E. Sizer. Miss Hobinso n. H. Lola. R. Ebmeier, V. Mortensen. H. Conger, H. Relshcluge, C. Martin, M. Olberding. and M. De runner look on as Kay Noonan models lor the annual style show. Did you ever get low on the jingle-jangle in your pockets? Well, I guess! lt you did, l bet you knew that the Women's League was the right organization to touch in a tight pinch. However, the Women's League loan fund was only one of the helpful activities oi this organi- zation. Pit the beginning ot the tall term, the League held a get-acquainted dance for unacquainted and slightly bewildered freshmen. Right on the heels of this activity was the annual style show, which pictures exactly what to wear where and why. The Women's League was right behind the Student Union drive and in order to boost the total, a bond was purchased each year tor this fund. Later on in the first semester, the Women's League presented its Christmas pro- gram to the all-female audience. Then toward spring, the Coeds entertained their mothers at an appropriate program. Hnother League acr- tivity was the purchase ot a bond to buy a silver service set. lt was planned that this set would be loaned to all campus organizations, tor their convenience. Behind all the activities ot the Wome:1's League Council which was headed by Mar- jorie DeBrunner, Viola Mortensen, Hrdella Rundquist, and Hilda Lola, with the guidance and advice of Miss Pllice Robinson, dean of women. This executive body at their monthly meetings planned the activities that kept the organization, not only moving along smoothly, but kept the interest of all the girls in college. Page 84 Hnother monthly Women's League meet- inq convened with president Marjorie Delirunner in charge, while Viola Morten- sen, Brdella Rundquist, Hilda Lola and Dean Robinson wait to partiicpate. i GOOD INTENTIONS In rx huddle over dormitory hours were Council members D. Huck. D. Conway. D. Boyd. B. F. Stutheit, L. Marrow. R. Deeb. E. Gannon. B. Lewis, V. Shodcx, D. Patton. and C. E. Mitchell. Bright letters on a blue background-"Men! Your convocation is today!"-could mean but one thing: the third Thursday had again rolled around and a Men's League meeting was in progress. These strictly stag convocations just didn't originate overnight, however. Each was the planned product of a group of men who called themselves the Men's League Council and served as an executive committee for all men enrolled in college. Their purpose was the sponsoring of interesting programs of activity for men and the promotion of scholarship, loy- alty, school spirit, and school pride. Meeting the first Monday of each month with Leland Marrow in the role of president, the Council took an active interest in campus af- fairs. One project was the organization of a new group on the campus known as the Men's League Radio Club. If you tuned in for the late ME WHO PLAN BEYO D TOMORROW news and got instead "Calwad Iones . . . calling Slick Chick . . . via HaWaii" it probably was a radio hopeful practicing to obtain a license and operate Station WQSUG 9. Under the su- pervision of Harold Hardy and Mr. Harold Cerny, students could do just that. The "Stag" cheering section who made their debut at the last basketball games with unique yells and clanging cowbell, was another of the Council's undertakings. Council convoca- tions featured films on sports and the care of sports equipment. Officers for the Council were elected at large by the men of the college. Plnthony Deeb served as vice-president, Clarence Mitchell, secretary, and Emmett Gannon, treasurer. Mr. Bernard F. Stutheit, Dean of Men, acted as sponsor. I5 N X i X X Page 85 The Christmas spirit reigned in the minds of Treva Lewis. Miss Delia Garrett. Mrs. Lyle Mantor. and Viola Mortensen. as they prepared a Christmas basket lor the needy. You could tell a Kearney coed by her ap- pearance, her poise, and her apparel, espec- ially if that girl was a member of the Home Economics Club on the campus. Food, as well as dress, however, was an important concern of this group of future home-makers, for they were skilled in culinary arts, dress designing, and the improvement of the home, school, and community. SOUP ' ' SALAD With Miss Delia Garrett as local sponsor and Mrs. L. E. Mantor as the state sponsor of col- lege clubs, president Ruth Wendell, and other pfficers, Treva Lewis, Geraldine lnnes, Finn Nelson, and Lorraine Schmidt, helped plan and promote first semester activities: the fall picnic at Harmon Field in honor of freshmen students, the candlelight initiation service for new mem- bers, and the Province Workshop Meeting in Lincoln attended in October with other mem- bers. Calendar events continued with the sending of gifts in November to foreign children, the contribution to the Children's Orphanage in Omaha, the annual Christmas party in Case Hall Reception Room, and following an Ellen H. Richards dinner and a style show and tea honoring high school students, members trav- eled to Hastings in March to attend the State Home Economics Flssociation meeting. Pl tor- mal dinner recognizing the 20th anniversary of the founding of the local club was a spring affair. Top positions held by Flrdella Rundquist, who served as State Chairman of College Stu- dent Clubs, and by Viola Mortensen, selected as State Representative. First Row: Miss Delia Garrett. Mrs. L. E. Mantor. Lenore Hllen. Betty Hugenstein. Verna Hunspaugh. Carrie Io Blakeman. Doris Bowden. Vivian Cooley. Ruth Dunbar. Second How: Barbara Gaston. Darline Graf. Hllene Hogeland. Betty Hunt. Geraldine Innes. Georgia Iackson. Treva Lewis. Mildred Luedtke. Lois McDowell.. ' Third Row: Viola Mortensen. Hnn Nelson. Rrlene Nelson. Phyllis Parker. Helen Retshauge. Ilene Reishauge. Hrdella Rund- quist. Lorraine Schmidt. Teresa Shoemaker. Fourth Row: Deloris Siebenaler. Dorothy Siebenaler. Marjorie Soderholm. Betty Ioe Sprout. Eunice Sterner. LaVon Wagner. Marian Wardrop. Ruth Wendell. First How: Miss Marjorie El l i o t t. Finn Betebenner. Elaine Brun. Dawn Daggett. Bettelee Frahm. Second Row: Iessie Gilpin. Lily Flnn Hansen. Shirley Homling. Hilda Lola. lean May. Third How: Phyllis Samuels. Dorothy S t e v e r. Virginia Wareham. Ruth Wendell. Roberta Zulauf. MERELY TERRIF IC If you could do a flashy dive or a speedy side stroke, you were "in" as far as the Naiads Were concerned. These were the girls who pre- sented the Water pageant each fall, and who could be found at the college pool every Wed- nesday afternoon. Chief paddler for the Naiads was lean May and her assistant was Ruth Wendell. Dorothy Stever took care of the minutes, while Elaine Brun managed the organization's programs. Hlthough the Naiads are infants as far as or- ganization founding is concerned, they have a loyal following of swimming enthusiasts. 4 i The originators of the "Rag" at the Christmas Carnival, all Press Clubbers were active journalists, and they were proud of the fact that they were the latest organization on the campus. With Verne Dowers serving as editor- in-chief, Betty Hunt, associate editor, and Neva lane Harris, business manager, the Press Club fulfilled its purpose, that of coordinating cam- pus publications. Paul Evett could also be seen at the monthly meetings in the role of faculty sponsor. Serving as a means of getting acquainted and initiating new members, the Press Club held an informal dinner in the spring. UNDER EW MANAGEME First How: Mr. Paul Evett. loan Hlthouse. Ioftnne Bar- ber. Lloyd Baysdorler. lim Belschner. Second Row: lim Bowers. Dawn Daggett. Verne Dow- ers. Neva lane Harris. Betty Hunt. Third Row: Don Iester. Norma Lewis. Bob Melina. Margaret Peterson. Gerald Richter. Fourth Row: Cathryn Spelts. Barclay Wade. Dean Wal- lace. Marian Wardrop. Max- ine Wardrop. ii. fa i x f Iessie Gilpin, president of the Delta sorority, relieved "Richard" of the job of opening the door for other A Page 88 sorority presidents: Helen Refshcruge, Sigma, and Hazel Ibsen, Zeta. X1 Social activities occupied Frances Hmen, Helen Reishauge. Iessie Gilpin, and Dean Nicholson, Inter- Fraternity-Sorority officers, as they charted plans lor their representative organization. THE CCIETIES Christmas caroling and a Cookie Shine . . . a Mother- Daughter Tea and black blazer jackets . . . a bulletin demanding the capture of two vicious characters and a Kave smoker. Grade "Fl" meat and an antelope head . . . a Holly Ball and a pledge song . . . the old pressed corsage in a dresser drawer and the gleam of a sorority or frater- nitylpin . . . these were indicative of the many activities and affairs sponsored by the Zetas, Deltas, Sigmas, Cals, and Phi Taus. Kearney College offered a world of club life, true, but the greek organizations developed the social activities and friendships so necessary in the life of every indi- vidual. Organization affiliates were represented in every club on the campus, they won the honors, and they were the leaders among leaders. Organization affiliates spon- sored hour dances and decorated Homecoming floats, fraternity fellows sold bids for Union bonds and cam- paigned at election time. "Zeta," "Delta," "Sigma," "Cal," "Phi Tau," . . . when you arrived, these names were just unreadable greek letters. Qnd then you became that hopeful, that rushee, that pledge, that active. Today you cherish every inci- dent, every memory, every friendship. Your sorority and your fraternity has been the highlight of your college career. Bob Zimmerman enlisted the aid of Caledonian pledges to save him from the snipping scissors of rival Phi Taus. K gl X E Page 89 Page 90 ., First Row: Miss Elliott. I. Hlthouse, C. Hnderson, B. Hustin, H. Bacon, I. Barber, H. Betebenner, G. Bruner Second Row: H. Campbell, P. Chapman, D. Daggett, C. DeForest, M. Evans, B. Frahm, I. Gilpin. P. Grosh Third Row: L. Hansen, H. Hogeland, N. I. Harris, C. Hubers, B. Hunt, I. Hurley, P. Hurley, M. Iohnson Fourth Row: O. Iohnson, B. King, M. King, G. Klein, S. Landis, T. Lange, H. Lee, N. Lewis. Fifth Row: T. Lewis, I. McC1ymont, B. McKee, I. May, R. Mercer, E. Messick, D. Neal, H. Nelson. Sixth Row: M. Pester, M. Peterson, M. Pitt, I. Rosenthal. W. Sall, P. Samuels. B. Sanderman, H. Schatz Seventh Row: N. Schatz, C. Sear, D. Shoup. E. Sizer, B. Sprout, R. Stenihem, D. Stever, L. Starch. Eighth Row: D. Waggoner, M. Wardrop, M. Wcxrdrop, V. Wareham, I. Wedemeyer, H. Wink, C. Winn BLITHE S To hear such a statement as, "Rnd this is my mother, my grandmother, my great grand- mother, and my great, great, great . . didn't necessarily mean that you were in a home for the aged. lt more than likely took place at the Homecoming Fllumnae Luncheon of the Delta Pi Beta Sorority, for Delta girls had the tradition of playing "mama" to pledge "daughters" until formal initiation took place and coeds affiliating with the sorority became actives. On the first and third Tuesdays of each month the sorority met in the college gym or in the home of an active for business and cul- tural meetings, and to make plans for the social and campus activities of the year. The Deltas, under the direction of lessie Gil- pin, president, decorated a car for the Home- coming Parade, and entertained alumnae at a luncheon in the Fort Kearney Hotel. The hotel was again the scene of a Delta affair as some hundred couples danced to the music of the Moclernaires at the Holly Ball. lessie Gilpin, crowned by Miss Mariorie Elliott, sponsor, be- came queen for the evening. Hs rush season drew near, Delphina Shoup, rush chairman, met with other cabinet mem- bers, lean May, Wilma Sall, Maxine and Mar- ian Wardrop, Plnn Nelson, and Nancy Schatz, to plan the rush breakfast held in the Green Room. Thirty-seven of the college Coeds se- lected by members as rushees indicated their choice of sorority by attending the Preference Dinner. Ht the tea in March and at the beau- tiful formal initiation ceremony in Hpril, these Holly Queen Iessie Gilpin reserved the lilzst dance for Ralph Patterson at the Delta Holly Ball. Big shots among the Deltas were, standing: I. May. M. Wardrop. Wilma Sall, I. Gilpin. B. Sanderman, and H. Nelson: seated: D. Shoup. Miss Elliott, and N. Schatz. PIRITS. . girls pledged themselves to promote the leadership, scholarship, and fellowship of the organization and became active members. However, before accepting these Delta hope- fuls as sorority sisters, actives gave them a hilarious Plpril l:'ool's party and pledges re- taliated by a Pledge Return Party. Plnother suc- cessful year was completed by the Mother- Daughter Tea given in May at the Case Hall Reception Room. Delta girls demonstrated their leadership, scholarship, and fellowship by the election of Neva lane Harris to reign as Christmas Queen at the annual Carnival, and the selection of Marian Wardrop and Neva lane by a faculty committee as Who's Who Hmong Students in Hmerican Universities and Colleges. Maxine Wardrop served as editor of the l947 Blue and Gold, while loPlnne Barber played the lead in the all-college play. Each honorary organiza- tion on the campus had several Delta repre- sentatives. The sorority was not only the largest on the campus, this past year, but perhaps one of the most active. Delta girls were proud to have been wearers of the golden arrow. Page 91 The problems of Sigma activities rested upon officers M. DeBrunner. G. Innes. M. Pecht. K. Noonan. V. Mortensen, and H. Reishuuge. who termed 'Kathleen Noonan ideal Sigma girl when she was crowned by Miss Dorothy Holcomb, sponsor. Dear Diary: Hs l look back over this year at college, I feel it was one of the most significant years in my life. I truly can say my expectations of col- lege life have been fulfilled. I became a so- rority girl. Q This year held many traditional festivities for we Sigrnas-hostesses to the Tri-Sorority Tea in the Y.W.C.H. room, the Homecoming Hlum- nae Luncheon at the Fort Kearney, the Christ- mas Carnival with our traditional Sigmagrams, and Christmas caroling followed by the "Cookie Shine" which our patroness, Mrs. C. T. Ryan, held for us in her home. .Qt the Home- coming Dance in the gym, Ilene Refshauge was crowned Sweetheart of the day. Then came the first semester rush party, f'Winter Wonderland Club," at which Kath- leen Noonan stepped through an enlarged Sigma Dairy to be presented as the 1947 Sigma Sweetheart by Miss Dorothy Holcomb, our sponsor. Toastmistress for the club that night was Shirley Homling. Something new went on our calenders this year when patronesses and advisors of the sororities on the campus gave a "Hearts Des- sert Supper" for the actives in February. Pin- other "new" was the October Homecoming Parade when we had our first sorority float, and the honors awarded to our Sigma girls, Helen and Ilene Refshauge, Kay Noonan, and Kathryn Powell, who were selected as Who's EXCLUSIVELY Who Hmong Students in Hmerican Universities and Colleges. February also brought rush week. Twenty- one girls chose Sigma Theta Phi as their so- rority and twenty became pledges at the din- ner held at the Ft. Kearney Hotel. Informal ini- tiation, Legendville Iury, box lunches and storybook costumes, will never be forgotten. Hvenging informal initiation, pledges held an Hpril Fool's Party for actives, and climaxing rush activities was the beautiful and inspira- tional formal initiation ceremony. No wonder the candles of the triangle of Sigma Theta Phi mean so much. Find there was, of course, the spring formal to the music of Norris and his Haring Orches- tra in the Crystal Ball Room, the spring break- fast honoring the senior girls, and our Mother- Daughter Tea in Case Hall Reception Room in May. Find now, Just before I turn off my light to dream of things to come, I Want to thank our officers: president, Helen Refshaugeg vice-pres- ident, Viola Mortensen, secretary, Mary Pecht, treasurer, Kathleen Noonang rush chairman, Marjorie DeBrunner, and news reporter, Ger- aldine Innes, for a grand year filled with pleas- ure. Most of all, I Want to thank our Sigma sisters for a genuine friendliness this year. 1 I "Penny" Nelson. YOURS 1 First Row: Miss Holcomb, E. Hnderson. I. Bartels. D. Becker Second How: D. Bowden. K. Brothers. R. Christensen. I. Coe Third Row: H. Conger. E. Cortney. H. Dailey. M. DeBrunner Fourth How: D. Graf. I. Hardy, I. Haring. I. Hendrickson. Fifth Row: S. Homling. P. Ibsen. G. Innes. G. Iackson. Sixth How: E. Kalstrom. H. Lola. D. McGrew. I.. McMahon. M. Mason. First Row: D. Mortensen. V. Mortensen. H. Nelson. F. Nelson Second Row: K. Noonan. K. Noyes. T. Olson. M. Pacht. Third Row: F. Plaza. V. Pollat. K. Powell. H. Relshauge. Fourth Row: I. Relshauge. N. O. Rice. B. Rundquist. L. Siel Fifth How: N. Snow. F. Spangsberg. C. Spelts. B. Strcmsky. Sixth Row: V. Vannier. S. Veal. N. White. M. Zook. Page 93 Frances Hurdle Hazel Ibsen Donevieve Kups Beth Nutzmcm Eunice Srxalhcii Marjorie Soderholm Bulb Toyama Elaine Webb Hileen Zulavern Page 94 Dr. L. Failor Frances Hman Belly Mae Hnderson Eslher Bullagh Carrie Io Blakeman Merribelle Clubaugh Phyllis Day Ruth Ebmeier Tops in everything were Zeta officials, F Hurdle. F. Hman. H. Ibsen. B. M. Hnderson. and Eunice Scmthoff. MADE TO ORDER.. Lilies of the valley, a star, a three linked chain, cmd a lamp of knowledge designed the new crest of the Zeta Chi Fllpha sorority to be used for paper products and for jewelry. On the motto ribbon were the greek Words which stated the sorority's ideals: the promotion of social and cultural life in college, the encour- agement of scholarship, and the building of higher ideals for future womanhood. Not only new to the Zeta sorority this past year, however, was the crest, but there were the black blazer jackets edged in white and bearing the greek letters of the organization, as Well. H coed wearing this jacket was dis- tinguished as a Zeta affiliate. Zeta Chi Hlpha, the newest sorority on the campus, began activities with the Fllumnae Luncheon on Homecoming Day. Sorority mem- bers, under the sponsorship of Dr. Leona Mae Failor, participated in events of the day by decorating and entering a float in the Home- coming Parade. On every first and third Tues- day of each month, president Hazel lbsen, met with sorority members and other officers, Betty Mae Hnderson, Eunice Saathoff, and Frances Hurdle, to conduct business meetings and plan social activities. H card party was given first semester for unaffiliated college girls, followed in Decem- ber by a Christmas breakfast and Methodist Church services. Dinner at the Fort Kearney February llth, carrying out the valentine theme, was the scene of the Zeta Bush Party. LaVern Hutchins and jack Becker were soloists for the evening. On February l9th, Mrs. Mai: Wolf, sister of sorority member Betty Mae Hn- derson and first president of the Zetas, enter- tained the sorority at a dessert supper in the banquet room of the Grantham Cafe. I-lt the Christmas Carnival, fortune-teller, Frances Hurdle, in her gipsy tent on second floor, delighted the superstitious and the sus- picious by foretelling happenings of the fu- ture, revealing deeds of the past, and expos- ing secrets of the present, There was also a dinner for the installation of new officers at the hotel, and then in true sorority fashion, Zetas entertained their moth- ers at a spring tea in Case Hall. Pls warm spring days brought the school year to a close, members and alumnae met for a last get- together at an out-of-door breakfast and for- mulated plans for the coming season. The Zeta year was an eventful and a suc- cessful one. Food was the main concern, when Zetas entertained rushees at a art . Dr. Fuilor oured, while Hazel P Y P Ibsen. sorority president, looked Page 95 THEM WERE THE DAYS . . Candles, stuck in empty bottles, flickered fit- fully and cast grotesque shadows on the walls, as stout-hearted cops patroled the Crystal Ball Room of the Fort Kearney Hotel in search of two vicious characters . . . Phi Taus, of course. For the scene, as you may have guessed, was the Bowery Ball of the Caledonian Fraternity, and the hunted men: Gerald Richter and Iohn Mitchell, When plans were formulated for the Christ- mas Carnival and organizations on the cam- pus were busy building booths and rehearsing skits, the cries of the Caledonians could be heard advertising "Battling BZ" and "Mauling Murl" of wrestling match fame. No holds barred and bones broken at will drew large crowds to the ring on third floor, where the referee was laid low far oftener than the par- ticipants. Other activities of this ever-active group was the first semester smoker at the Fort Kearney Hotel, followed several weeks later by the first semester preference dinner in the same setting. Caledonian pledges flustered the females for a time by appearing on the campus wearing huge Sinatra bow ties of blue and gold, fraternity colors. The second-semester smoker was held in the Kampus Kave and the preference dinner again in the Fort Kearney Hotel. Caledonians were also active participants in the Homecoming Parade, receiving honorable mention with the float they decorated. Honors Won by the Caledonians included Ralph Patterson's being chosen as an Hll-Con- ference guard in football, and Dean Wallace's placing first in the mens divisionof the col- lege annual oratorical contest. Together with colleague and fellow Caledonian, Royal Iester, Dean also placed in the inter-mural debate tournament held on the campus first semester. Organized in l92O, the Caledonian fraternity was, this past year, under the sponsorship of Mr. Kenneth Carlson. The purpose of the group was the bringing together of those men having mutual interests, the promotion of the social Welfare of its members, of college spirit, and of the best interests of the student body, there- by making a good college even better. What purpose could be finer? ft K Full of ideas and plans were Hlbert Black. Wally Walker, Clarence Mitchell. cmd Kent Ryan. Caledonian head men. Page 96 Some ex-convict was loose at the Bowery Ball, and from the looks of Dick Badura, cop Bob Spelts had him covered. IS First Row: Mr. K. Carlson, C. I-llexander. B. Hyras. M. Beller. I. Belschner. I. Bendler, H. Black. Second Row: D. Brown. B. Brown, C. Carlson. I. Cook. C. Cornelius. I. Crisi. D. Christiansen. Third Bow: R. Deihlolf. W. Dreyer. D. Dusek. R. Farley. I. Finley. B. Gallagher. H. Gard. Fourih Row: B. Gardner, I. Garrison, H. Glenn. B. Gogan. H. Gzehoviak. I. Hanzal, G. Hixon. Fifth Row: D. Heck. L. Howsden. W. Hurdle. W. Isbell. R. Igster. B. Larson. B. B. Long. Sixth Row: G. Luce. H. McClure. N. McCormick. W. McKinney. I.. Martin. C. Mitchell. W. Nuemberger. Seventh How: M. Osborn. F. Parish. R. Pailerson, B. Roberson, K. Ryan, V. Shada. B. Shotkoski. Eighth Row: I. Simanek. H. Sintek. R. Sobieszczyk. R. Sobieszczyk. I. Ubben. C. Van Camp. G. Vannier. Ninih How: L. Veal. W. Walker. D. Wallace. P. Wilmot. L. Witiers, B. Zimmerman. Page 97 THAT'S NO JOKE, SON! When the Student Union is completed sev- eral years from now, there will hang upon one Wall a beautiful antelope head. This antelope, shot by Eddie Brown on a hunting trip to Wyoming and the second largest bagged in the l945 season, was presented to the college and President Cushing at a February convo- cation by Bill Long, Phi Tau. To aid in the drive for funds so that the Union might become a reality rather than remain a dream, Phi Tau Gammans sold bids on a War Bond at the Christmas Carnival. Ht the climax of that eve- ning, fraternity member, "Skeet" Nicholson reigned as Christmas King. Phi Tau Gamma, the oldest fraternity on the campus of Kearney State Teachers College, was organized in l9l5 by twenty-five charter members. Thirty-two years have passed since that time, and Phi Tau Gamma is still one of the leading organizations on the campus. From the first meeting in fall at Binger's Dinger to the last formal dance in May and the crown- ing of the Phi Tau Sweetheart, through the stag dinners, hour dances, business meetings and rush activities of each semester, the men affiliated with Phi Tau Gamma have made an enviable record. Five of the eight men on our Student Council were of the fraternity: Iohn Mitchell, Gerald Richter, Otis Miller, Bill Long, and Hnthony Deeb. When a faculty committee selected stu- dents for Who's Who Hmong Students in Hmerican Universities and Colleges, five of the six men chosen were Phi Taus. This honor was conferred upon Otis Miller, lohn Mitcheh, Robert Meline, Robert Polski, and Verne Dowers. Dean Nicholson was selected as Christmas King, and the fraternity also achieved honors in the field of athletics when Iohn Rumbaugh was named on the I-lll-State Football Team. There were basketball stars: men like Bob Lewis and Dean Nicholson. Bill Long was recently elected vice-chairman of the newly formed National Student Hssocia- tion. The fraternity was also represented in the field of journalism with Verne Dowers as editor of our school paper and Iames Bowers, busi- ness manager. Business manager of the Hntler, literary publication, was ferry Richter, who also served as first semester president of the group. Fit mid-term, Dean Nicholson took over duties as chancellor. Yes, the members of Phi Tau Gamma ex- celled in every field and had reason to be proud of their fraternity. When one says that Phi Tau Gammans were leaders among men . . . well . . . that's no joke, son! Professor C. T. Ryan addressed the Phi Tau rush dinners. Mr. Harold Hhrendts. Gerald Richter. and Herman Kerssnbrock seemed en- grossed in the topic. Page 98 Leaders in the Phi Tau fraternity were O. Miller. H. Kersenbrock. B. Harris. E. Burton. G. Richter. D. Nicholson. B. Long. and B. Kennedy. First Row: Mr. H. Hhrendts. P. Baker. I. Becker. R. Bissell. H. Bogue. D. Boyd. I. Bowers. E. Brown. Second Row: I. Buettner. E. Burton. E. Butler. T. Copeland, C. Crozier. I. Davidson. H. Deeb. W. Deeb. Third Row: V. Dowers. F. Ellis. L. Galloway. T. Hanley. G. Hansen. N. Haring. B. Harrington. R. Harris. Fourth How: R. Harvey. B. Hauver, B. Hayes. H. Hemphill, R. Hunt. I.. Hutchins. M. Iacobsen. B. Kennedy. Fifth Row: R. Kenney. H. Kersenbrock. F. Kolar. R. Lewis. B. Long, I. Lydiatt, D. Marienau. L. Mason. Sixth Row: W. Mears. B. Seventh Row: D. Nichols Eighth How: I. Ryan. I. Ninth Row: R. Wagner. Meline. O. Miller. B. Minnick. I. Mitchell. N. Mitchell, B. Nall. on. D. Orth. D. Patton. H. Polski. G. Rector. W. Hhoades. G. Richter. Rurnbaugh. T. Sihhitt. G. Swancutt. E. Toops. R. VanOrnam. B. Wade. K. Watkins. W. Weddle. C. Wilcox. M. Wilson. B. Yanney. G. Young. 411' Page 99 on his high stool, directed the The hum of warming bus motors, the clack of crammed suitcases being firmly fastened, the rattle of a violin as it banged against the case . . . these were memorable noises to the members of the Kearney Symphony. Hs is the custom around here, musicians in the sym- phony orchestra hit the road once each year. This year the touring dates were March 3rd, 4th, and Sth. The neighboring towns were the recipients of their talent both at afternoon and evening performances. Ht conclusion of their tour, the college group presented their concert for the benefit of fel- low classmates and interested hometowners. The formal concerts featured music at its best, in all three instances. The fall concert, held November l9th, featured as guest soloist, Mr. Robert House, cellist, as did the March l8th concert. Later in the spring, you could find Conductor, Harold Cerny. perched chestra through a difficult number. The Kearney Symphony Orchestra presented three formal concerts this year, plus a concert tour of neighboring towns. orchestra members donning suits and formals as they prepared for their final appearance on May l3th. Under the direction of Mr. Harold Cerny, the orchestra met each Monday and Thursday evening to get in some practice. Other organi- zation officers consisted of LaVern Hutchins, managerg Esther Ballagh, librarian, and Ruth Wendell, personnel manager. The personnel of the orchestra consisted, in the main, of college students. However, there were many chairs occupied by business men, housewives, and high school students. The sixty individuals enrolled in the orches- tra, lent their abilities to the following positions: First Violin: Paul Harvey, Ruth Christensen, Mary Evett, Kenneth Lotspeich, Fldelbert Bon- ner, Eugene Cerny, Hilda Lola, Pllexandria Kappas, Shirley Harrison, Benjamin Keeley. MAKE MI E M SIC Page 100 Second Violin: LaVern Hutchins, Leone Zim- merman, Beverly Soderholm, Marjorie Soder- holm, Martha Christensen, Ralph Barry. Viola: Pearl Cerny, LaVon Gibreal, Sylvia Hawthorne, lanice Bate, Esther Ballagh, Helen Dailey. Cello: Robert House, Esther House, Refshauge, Iames Christensen, Bass: Bettelee Erahm, Edna Nigh, Hlexander Carson. Flute: IoHnn Mundorf, Marian Warclrop, Hileen Zutavern. Oboe: Dorothy Waggoner, Eunice Saathoff, Gerald Young. English Horn: Dorothy Waggoner. Clarinet: Robert Harvey, Rodney Wendell, Kenneth McCord, Rex Helleberg. Bass Clarinet: Walter Courtright. Bassoon: Theodore Hanley, Carleton Ber- reckman. Horn: Don Boyd, lack Parren, Don Hicks, Frances Hurdle. Ilene The management of the orchestra was handled by Lavern Hutchins, Esther Ballugh. and Ruth Wendell Trumpet: Ralph Spongberg, Ruth Wendell Romaine Rasmussen, Gerald Frank. Trombone: Hshford Kelley, Von Sidman Marjorie DeBrunner. Tuba: Thomas Silobitt. Tympani: Herman Kersenlorock. Percussion: Woodrow Deelo, Harold Smith Glen Reinertson, Walter Courtright. Harp: Mary Elaine VVallace. Page 101 In the Christmas quartet were Walter Peterson, Ella Mae Sizer, Charline Iordan, and Lavem Hutchins. The candles flickered as the black-robed choir members slowly met at the center of the stage and took their places. ln the candlelight you read the program of Christmas music, and you were filled with the spirit of the season. The Pl Capella Choir, in addition to present- ing its annual Christmas concert, presented a formal spring concert, which featured small groups comprised of choir members. The H Cappella Choir, under the direction of Eleanor Haines, became familiar with the best in vocal music. Every Monday and Wed- nesday as you climbed nearer third floor, you had proof positive that the vocalists combined both harmony and beauty. VERYTHI YOU WA When choristers elected officials to perform executive duties, Dean Wallace assumed the position of manager, Rodney Wendell, per- sonnel manager, and Dora May McGreW and Merrylu Evans, librarians. The forty-one choir members, While repre- senting a variety of voices, also offered an excellent cross-section of college students. Hs with all collegians, the thought of conducting a concert tour Was appealing. ln View of this fact, the Pl Cappella members hit the road on Plpril 21st and 22nd, and visited many Ne- braska towns. Hlthough the trip Was hard on overworked vocal cords, it was a big success. More of everything you Want was just what the choir offered this past year. First Row: G. Story, S. Hawthorne, M. Hsher, E. Sizer, D. McGrew, B. Kappas, N. Harris. Mrs. Haines, V. Wareham, L. Storch, P. Nelson, M. Mason, G. Bruner. I. Hlthouse. Second Row: Fl. Hawthorne, L. Miller, I. Stafford, E. Messick, R. Wendell. C. Martin. F. Nelson, T. Olson, B. Sanderman. D. Bauer. M. Evans, P. lbsen, C. Iordan, M. King. Third Row: C. Pscherer, I. Rosenthal, R. Stenihem. D. Iester, G. Frank, H. Smith, R. Gardner, C. Rlexander, L. Herrmann, H. Hendricks, R. Larson. B. Frahm, H. Zutavern, P. Wear. Fourth Row: G. Reinertson. I. Becker, V. Sidman, D. Wise, C. Herrmann, R. Kelley, R. Wendell, W. Peterson, W. Barber, I. Hanzal, I. Lancaster, D. Nicholson, D. Wallace, D. Boyd. S. Barrett. Page 102 Pictures by Don Lyon The band let off plenty of steam at the Wayne- Kearney football game and cheered the team to a thrilling victory. HARMO The Kearney band could rouse the most lag- ging spirit to cheer for the Hntelopes, when they tooted on their instruments. The striking blue and gold uniforms identified them as among the outstanding contributors to school spirit, both at home and in other Nebraska colleges. The formal fall and spring concerts found them on the stage, giving not quite as peppy a performance, but showing commendable new Pictures by Don Lyon Highsteppers were Bettelee Frahm. Betty Io Sprout. and Marian Wardrop. Kearney majorettes. talent in overture as well as march. Flfter the concerts, band members were entertained at receptions, given by the Plpollonian Music Club. Serving as soloists in these concerts were Hshford Kelley, Ralph Spongberg, and LaVern Hutchins. Mr. Robert W. House acted in the capacity of conductor, and Mr. Harold Cerny assisted with the sponsorship. Other organizations chiefs were Pllexander Carson, business man- ager, Eunice Saathoff, personnel manager, Ted Hanley, librarian, Bettelee Frahrn, drum major, and Betty Io Sprout and Marian Wardrop, majorettes. First Row: L. Hutchins. T. Hanley. C. Courtright. C. Berreckman. H. Kenney. W. Deeb. F. Nelson. H. Larson. M. Wardrop. B. Sprout. Mr. House. B. Frahm. Second Row: R. Wendell. G. Young. K. McCord. B. Harvey. K. Bohy. E. Ballagh. D. Bailey. B. Stransky. H. Schatz. M. Peterson, E. Suathoff. P. Harvey. Third Row: G. Frank. C. Simmons. F. Hurdle. G. Story. Fourth Row: D. Nicholson. R. Spongberg. N. Hating. V. Higgins. H. Carson. V. Vunnier, L. Hose. W. Barber. I. Lancaster. W. McKinney. V. Sidman. H. Kelley. T. Sibbitt. Page 103 mn sms Bob Parkins and Ella Mae Sizer. orators oi Wide-spread fame, were slate champ- ions ancl national finalists in last year's old-line oratory coniest. r 'u Page 104 im H Q5 L T .fi ' 7 'wig B gr 5 5 swim e K M35 5 535 23525 5 H sa iigf MSM A E H 'A if fs sm -wi Q52 W e Sw sa? gg HW r in HT gl H H' ii . W ir- sim M M K Egfr? 25:23 Q-359 mmf grim H W :Q if ' M -M rw ' Ma 555 fimgmg H Wxmmgx Bwgmw . mga, is T5 is sm- if 1 if mfs , -are " 7.1 N we ge -ew-egg 1 a wwe we sax Finalists in the infra-mural debate contest were Dean Wallace and Royal Iesier. Dawn Daggeli and Lily Hnn Hansen. E is 54.535-sm 1 s w sf ir- gms- ai me YHTESE E gran mm: 'wx H top-flight debate team for four years. Iohn Mitchell and Francis Bell, debated their last round before graduation. Mr. Harold Hhrendts. speech department head, congratulated Lily Hnn Hansen and Dean Wallace. oratory winners. We felt justified in featuring Bob Parkins, O'Neill freshman, and Ella Mae Sizer, Kearney junior, in this year's book. Last spring, Mr. Parkins and Miss Sizer, first place Winners of the State Oratorical Contest, each placed third in the National Oratorical Contest at Evanston, Illinois. This honor came too late for recog- nitiong We, therefore, took this opportunity to say, "Congratulations!" These two students Were representative of one of the busiest departments on the college campus-the speech department. This past year the speech department had numerous phases of activity, and among the outstanding interests of the speech enthusiasts was debate. The "Resolved: That labor should be given a direct share in the management of industry," issues kept debaters probing into magazines and periodicals. Ht the close of the first semester debate tournament, Dean Wal- lace and Royal Iester, Kearney juniors, took top honors, While Lily Hnn Hansen and Dawn Daggett, freshman Women's team, placed second. Kearney also started the intercollegiate de- bating season by sponsoring an invitational tournament on our home campus. The two- day tournament was attended by debaters from colleges all over Nebraska. WHERE'S THE OPPOSITIO ? Tournament plans were the center of in- , terest as Iohn Mitchell, Francis Bell. Decm Wallace, and Mr. Harold Bhrendts dis- cussed a trip to Lincoln. Page 1 05 Bob Ryres announced a round-table discussion with Dean Wallace. Royal Iester. and Barbara King as participants. February 15th saw Dean Wallace, Royal Iester, and Francis Bell heading for Denver and the Rocky Mountain Speech Conference. Fol- lowing close behind this cross-country trek, de- baters Dawn Daggett, Lily Hnn Hansen, Iohn Mitchell, and Francis Bell headed for Lincoln to attend another forensic standout. Hnother trip made by the lester-Wallace, Hansen Dag- gett teams was to the State Teachers College at Wayne, Nebraska. Qt this time, Lily Finn Hansen, first place winner in the Pill-College Oratorical Contest in February, and Dean Wal- lace, Winner in the men's division, participated in the State Oratorical Contest, each placing second. George Wade also placed second with his Peace Oratory. The speech department offered not only op- portunities to those students interested in de- bate and the development of keen minds on controversial issues, but presented programs for the enjoyment of all. Each weekday at 4 p.m. the twist of the dial on the radio would bring you a program "originated in the second floor studios ot the Nebraska State Teachers College in Kearney." These programs featured recitals of the music groups, monthly talks by President Cushing, panel discussions by col- lege students on timely and important topics, and on Friday afternoons, campus news over "The Hntelope of the Hin" When an actor, a debator, a speaker, or an orator of the speech department at Kearney State stood up to talk, we could rightly say, "We hear you talking." For speech students at Kearney State had something to say. Students in the Speech Correction class received instruction in the correction ol detective speech in small children. It was one of the two Classes of its kind in the state. You turned the do-dad to the- right, the thinqa- majig to the left, and it was simple as could be. Hnyhow it was to Lee Barton. control operator Page 106 lor the radio programs. Gerald Richter, as Drmce Ferdinand, proposed to the Princess Miranda, Iocnne Barber. as Papa Minnick looked on. O LY MAKE-BEL EVE Hiter weeks of nightly practice and line re- hearsals . . . in Shakespearean costumes and upon a blank stage . . . on May lst, a delighted audience watched the imaginary characters come to life in a memorable performance of "The Tempest." Under the direction of Calvin T. Ryan, "The Tempest" featured an all-star cast. Proud Papa of daughter Miranda and ruler of the enchanted island was Robert Minnick, who with the wave of his magic wand could bring forth spirits like Frances Hurdle, who, in turn, brought about the strange and fantastic hap- penings ol the ship-wrecked crew: Barclay Wade and Glen Marshall. Daughter Miranda, demure and beautiful, was IoPlnne Barber, who fell in love with Prince Ferdinand, Gerald Richter, survivor of the storm and lost son of King Hlonzo, usurper of Milan. King Qlonzo, Harriett Conger, searched the island for his son, with the help of faithful followers Cathryn Spelts, Dora Mae McGrew, Frances Hurdle, and not so faithful followers Howard Glenn and Dwight Pldams, who had murder on their minds. Dean Wallace, slave of the island, became devoted to two other survivors of the wreck, Carl Cornelius and Helen Refshauge, and they plotted the murder of Minnick. There was mur- der, magic, and romance throughout. Carl Cornelius was made up and did a line job ot acting in the role of the drunken butler. ln the role of Caliban, slave ol the enchanted island, Dean Wallace received instructions from director, Calvin T. Ryan. 'HATHLBTICS Page 1 08 7521 ' AND f 1, Z - - . LETTERMEN Page Kearney Flntelopes displayed their counter-oifense at the Wesleyan-Kearney game, according to the instructions given by Coaches Foster. Copeland. and Binger. Kearney College contributed its full share to the sensational boom in sports activity throughout the nation. The expected post- war avalanche of sports enthusiasts was even more tremendous than the most wild- eyed dreamer had ever predicted, and in- terest and enthusiasm mounted with every passing day. With pre-war college enroll- ments equalled, and in countless cases sur- passed, the potential athletic strength was at an all-time high. Last tall, Coaches Charlie Foster, Leland Copeland, and George Binger were greeted by one hundred and twelve gridiron hope- fuls. While this array of manpower would bring the lovelight into any coach's eye, it presented quite a problem of "sifting out" and then finally forming the best possible squad, the one with the greatest all-around strength. The Qntelope gridsters had a successful season, in which they won six, lost two, and tied a single game. This Kearney eleven was a well-balanced club, with a rugged, hard- charging line, and plenty of speed and power in the backfield. Page 110 Pls in the case of football, basketball en- joyed a popularity it had never known be- fore, it reached an all-time peak. Present facilities were unable to care for all those who would have liked to see the "tall boys" do their stuff. Gymnasiums were packed to the galleriesg standing room only was the cry heard at game time. NSTC did its part in pleasing the spectators as the Hntelopes provided their share of thrills and sports en- tertainment. Many of the college games were combined with the local high school games to heighten the interest. The games were played in the Iunior High Huditorium to care for the large attendance. More than one hundred candidates an- swered the pre-holiday call for basketball players. This huge squad was composed of the almost unbelievable number of twenty- eight lettermen. Here again, Coach Fosters early job was to sort the material. The twenty-player varsity selected to carry the colors of Kearney represented players from seventeen Nebraska towns. The roster showed five members from each of the freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior classes. Hmong the many players on the Pl and B squads who proved themselves capable per- formers, were the two three-year veterans, Bob Lewis, Calloway, and Dick Peterson, Kimball. These two men we singled out by way of introduction to the team, with all due respect to every other member on the squad. Hs the number of basketball aspirants in- creased, it became apparent that an intra- mural program of some type would have to be inaugurated to provide an outlet for the "surplus energy" stored up in the male students on our campus. The basketball intra-mural program this year was the big- gest in the history of the school, and more students took part in the program than ever before. lntra-mural athletics has indeed found its place in the sports setup on our campus. lt has been discovered that those who "make the team" are not the only ones who need healthy recreation, that muscles need to be exercised as well as the mind. The broad intra-mural program has given an opportunity to all to participate in re- creational activities. Other sports offered by the athletic department at NSTC include swimming, table tennis, baseball, and golf. In spring, Hntelope cinder-pounders started workouts early, some hopefuls brav- ing chilly February weather for the spring sport, Hs warm weather became more plen- tiful, workouts were begun in earnest. Pl large squad of men answered Charlie F os- ter's call for timber-toppers, weight-men, and sprinters. Promising underclassmen as well as vet- eran letterrnen shuffled the cinders energet- ically and enthusiastically as winter ended and the track season was on. Kearney cin- dermen gave heavy competition to every opponent, they were out to break previous records and they broke them. The coaches who guided the athletic pro- gram, gave due importance to the "physical fitness" phase of college life, and promoted good sportsmanship, loyalty, courage, and school spirit throughout the entire personnel, were Charlie Foster, Leland Copeland, and George Binger. Under their skillful super- vision and through their untiring efforts, the athletic department of the Nebraska State Teachers College at Kearney made a proud and enviable record. H last and exciting game was witnessed by Plntelope fans who traveled to Wesleyan to see the Kearney-Wesleyan upset. Page 111 Page 112 if Rntelope fans yelled mightily as Phyllis Samuels led cheerleaders and crowd in backing the team. FDDTB LL " With over a hundred pigskinners raring to go, Kearney's football was at nearly pre- war level. Coach Charlie Fosters spirits were boosted by the abundance of size and speed, necessary for a successful ball club. However, every other college in the confer- ence were possessors of the same soaring spirits. Despite stiff competition in every fracas, the Hntelope balltoters smashed their way through for six wins, two losses, and one tie. Hdding further glory to the old Hlrna Mater were Iohn Rurnbaugh and Ralph Patterson, who gained berths on the all-state eleven. Every gridster contributed his share, and with the backing of over six hundred avid fans, a successful season Was completed. R. Bad ru haliback "Which way did he go?" was the cry in the York Panther football camp, when NSTC played host in the first game of the newly organized Nebraska College Conference. The elusive backs, Dick Peterson and Cecil Patterson led the Fosterites in the l6-O Win. The initial touchdown of the season began when Dick Badura snatched a pass inter- ception on the 1ocal's 46 yard line. Cecil Patterson feinted his way 27 yards to York's 8 yard line, and Verle Stucker plunged through to pay dirt. Highlighting the game Was the checking of York's offensive splurge, when Iohn Rurnbaugh intercepted a pass, and ran ninety-six yards to the York goal line. Fans' joy turned to dismay when a clipping penalty brought the ball to the Kearney 28. P1 recovery added another touchdown, and with a place-kick by Ba- dura, the Hntelopes gained their first vic- tory. D. Peterson B. Rohde I. Humbaugh V.. St cker halfback tackle end halfback M Wilson , tackle F Bell H. Davis R. Imming L. Murrow C. Patterson center tackle center end halfback The Hntelopes managed to scrape a 7-U victory in the always hard fought, tradi- tional clash with the Hastings Broncos. Cecil Patterson, chief trouble-shooter for the Pin- telopes, scampered over the Bronco payoff stripe in the opening Canto, to provide the winning margin. In contrast to the canny passing ability of the Broncos, was the Hn- telopes' smashing ground offensive. Mike Schellhase, who started at left end to re- place the injured Iohn Rurnbaugh, turned in the top defensive job by an Plntelope player that far along in the season. Other standouts were Francis Bell, Robert Rohde, and Verle Stucker. Hn oddity of the game was the recording of only one fumble. ln a chilly north wind on a Saturday night, Coach Fosters boys marched down the gridiron twice, clirnaxing long drives to send the Chadron Eagles home in defeat. When the final toot was tooted the score- board read l4-U in favor of the Hntelopes. Early in the first quarter the Eagles worried the locals with their consistent gains, but were stopped cold after a few minutes of play to offer no scoring threats. Passes clicked between Cecil Patterson, Lee Mar- row, and Mike Schellhase and scrappy driv- ing was the magic potent that won the game from our sister college. f Hs Wesleyan moved in, Dick Peter- son carried the ball for a two-yard gain for Kearney. Page 113 D Bcxalhorn C. Bacon W. Beasley I. Belsclmer D. Conway end tackle halfback end halfback With a last minute touchdown saving the day, the Plntelopes tied Nebraska Wesleyan 6-6 in a homecoming game before 3,000 fans. Holding the Kearney offensive to a rnurmur, the Plainsmen scored in the sec- ond quarter to go ahead at the half-time intermission. Hn interference ruling in the fourth quarter on an attempted pass catch put the pigskin on the Wesleyan one foot marker from whence the score was made seconds before the final whistle. Though retaining their unbeaten record this far, the Hntelope victory was a costly affair, With the announcement that Francis Bell, star Kearney pivotman, suffered a fractured skull in a pre-game collision with a Wesleyan gridster and was out of the lineup the re- mainder of the season. The Plntelopes flashed their old-time pow- er in clipping Sterling, Kansas, 32-0. lt was a field day for the once stymied Flntelope offensive as scoring honors Went to five dif- ferent players. Late in the opening quarter, Verle Stucker plunged over the one yard line to make it a still even game, with the score reading, 7-0. However, on the second play of the second half, Cecil Patterson broke through for a 75-yard touchdown jaunt that completely demoralized the Kan- sas squad. Hfter this, it was all our game. Lee Marrow and Kent Ryan accounted for two touchdowns, and Weldon Iohnson crashed through the Sterling wall in the last few seconds of the game. Qt the close ol a successful football season Theodocia Eloe was chosen as K Club Queen. Page 114 C Cornelius D. Dusek B. Gard M. Gill guard guard center guard Hopes for the conference crown were jolted when the high-riding Doane Tigers defeated the Plntelopes, 13-7. The sparkling passes and deception ot the church-school men, Kasparek and Lyness, stole the show. Kearney's lone marker was scored by Dick Peterson, who plunged over from the three yard line to climax a steady 62-yard march. Badura added the extra point. The closing moments of the game were filled with tire- works. H 70-yard kick moved the Tigers within striking distance of the Plntelope goal. Dick Peterson kicked to the Flntelope 48, where the visitors took possession. Things began to snap, when Lyness heaved to Gossart on the 12-yard line. .Flnother aerial sent the ball straight to a Tiger, and into the end zone. Verle Stucker turned in one oi the finest displays of defensive lineback- ing ever witnessed on the lllntelope gridiron. Dick Badura's pair ot conversions were the difference in Kearney's triumph over Wayne's hustling Wildcats, 14-12. Kearney punched its way to the Wildcat goal, on a 59-yard march in the opening canto. Max Osborn surged over to score the initial counter of the game. Lanky Iohn Rurnbaugh snared a Wayne aerial in the second period and hustled 35 yards for the second Kearney tally. In the third period, the Wildcats really got on the ball by staging a 43-yard march to the Plntelope goal for their rnuch-needed score. Later in the third stanza, Wayne grid- sters struck back with a 72-yard goalward march. Bob Rohde was the mainstay of the Plntelope forward wall, while the line backing tactics of Stucker were the spark- plug ot the Kearney backtield. D Harding B. Hauver D. Hock I. Iacobsen D. Iillson tackle hallback guard hallback guard Page 115 'F ' ev' " ,',E"" 1 nr -isa sms Mn' I gmss sim assassin wa . -na S 58,885 mums EEE-s ss Mud baths Were at a premium on the Peru gridiron, when the I-lntelopes wallowed through the slippery turf to capture their sixth win, 20-l2, at the expense of the Peru Bobcats. Holland Moore came through with a spectacular running job, despite the hindrances of the Weather. Flntelopemen, Verle Stucker and Paul Peterson also turned in outstanding performances. When they received the opening kickoff, the Kearney men surged through an opening lead, Which they never relinquished. Moore skirted left end, and began a 35-yard jaunt which put the Hntelopes Way out in front. Bob Imming completed the grand slam by grabbing a midfield lateral and racing 54 yards for the final Kearney marker. Terminating the grid campaign under miserable weather conditions, Kearney's Qntelopes were upset by a spirited Midland eleven. The game Was strictly defensive and both teams made little headway on the ground, Neither eleven Wanted the pigskin and as a result there was a total of 37 punts seventeen of which were made by the Hn telopes. Midland's lone touchdown came in the first few minutes of the final quarter Ioe Chrisman recovered a Kearney fumble on the four yard line, and Bevoe Hill slipped off tackle with the winning tally. The con- version failed, and that was the Way the game ended, 6-U. Woody Davis was the Kearney standout and he received plenty of aid from Bob lrnming and Verle Stucker. M. Quillen K. Hyun M. Schellhuse B. Shotkosk halfback hallback end guard Page 116 W Iohnson halfback I. Kelley O. Miller H. Misko R. Moore M. Osho n tackle end halfback halfbclck halfbctck Rnd there you have the football season. You can see at a glance, now, how the season ended. Kearney came out third in the Nebraska College Conference scramble. You see the scores, the players, but there was something more behind this football team. There was a student body, full of enthusiasm and pep. The Pep Club formed the nucleus of the school spirit, and with their leading, every student backed the boys. The rooters dis- played this interest by attending out-of- town games in chartered buses. Two buses journeyed to Hastings to see the Hntelopes gain another victory, and three buses took oft for Wayne, complete with pep band and cheer leaders, Where the locals again came out on top. Kearney, "the ever-friendly college," kept her title unmarred by showing her friendli- ness to other colleges in the conference. The college played host to Hastings, Wesleyan, and Midland fans who traveled to see their respective games on the NSTC field. Yes, it was a fine season of football, played by regular fellows, who were in the garne not only to Win, but to play their best. Cecil and Ralph Patterson, veteran Flnsley iootbollmen added spark to the Hntelope line-up, B Spells E. Toops tackle haltback l. T Page 1 1 7 The Broncos grabbed in vain as "Skeet" Nicholson prepared io heave a baskei and chalk up another poinl for the Flntelopes. Play-by play descriptions by Iohn Mitchell, KGFW sporis The Kearney Pep bank kept everybody on their ioes, when announcer, aided home fans in lollowing the Plnielopes. lhe team was off the floor. Page 118 mtfi .1 it 5? 132 . E s K if K. . 1.1.55 xi. -xi r H wg its ,r 1 f.. . . .,,,'? M i R. Moore. K. Ryan. H. Misko. H. Glenn. W. Monningion. D. Nicholson. R. Bogue, M. Osborn. B. Lewis. Couch Foster. P. Baker. I. Simunek. C. Cornelius. O. Miller. D. Orth. W. Walker, D. Peterson. G. Rector. D. Clayton. BASKETBALL Kearney Visitors Nebraska Central ....... 52 34 Fort Hayes .......... ..., 4 9 77 Billings .,.... ..., 7 6 29 Hastings .... .,.. 3 U 47 Doane ,,.. 48 37 Wesleyan .. .... 86 47 Midland .... 45 44 Peru ....... ,,,, 4 9 69 Chadron ,.., .... 4 4 57 Chadron ..., 54 82 Hastings .. ,,,, 44 39 Doane .... 53 48 York .. ,,,. 58 66 Peru .. ..,. 58 54 York ., ,.,. 63 79 Wayne ..., 44 51 Midland ,... ..,. 5 9 38 Wesleyan 44 51 Kearneys Qntelope made a successful start on the maples by downing Nebraska Central College, 52-34. Filter a ragged first halt, Kear- ney settled down to the business at hand. Cornelius paced the second halt ottensive, while the floor play of Lewis was outstanding. Cornelius hit for 15 points, Peterson, 12, and Nicholson, 8. Fort Hayes College of Kansas displayed too much height and shooting class in rolling over the Hntelopes, 77-49. Cornelius was high man tor the evening with 19 points. H. Settles led the Kansan attack With 18. Dick Peterson gar- nered 2 points, the first time in two years that he has been held to less than 10 points. -....g.s. wig... is msgs. t. qs... ti Vis me sm Es-ms lt B EE ,, . .,.,.,. g . H H we H Y s I ---.:: ssfgss ass if--WE ..-- ggmgsgix -.1 , ,sig rggsg- H - Z , ,.,. ,. 12. -'-. 2115543 Ek11yfg,,i. Q sl, QU: lg M ijt ig p . s . .1 as , --P: . W E.f:.g,..., H 'X -1 W H 1 va, .,.,. I ,V we ifrfggu if H wi .Ui E in Q ,Z-Lg..-1-:3.'::E'-Q - is . srlgtiiig ..: H 2 '.. 2 Q I H H S 'X s it ' H . .... ' 3:12-f.f.f. .. H is H ll - H H if ' ..j.,1.x.5- - H H H H sg - H H im ..,.. 1-1 - s 5 fs is H -it -H .' K ....: 152. -se-Kees P? . '-,W fgsi - m s Ju its - .i .: 5a: .3.:,'g3 Z igfsism we sp M i'5 .5:g.. ,.,.,:5 ' .:z +2f- .9 W Q.: 1 H - its H Q . ,fs wt . s .. H H r H 2 sf. 5 1? E . H H H ,EQi1Z1 .. 1. s i 5 s 5 sg H . E5 5 ' 4 Q Q .fx y-.Qi . '12 PW Q ' f my ' if " lst Es.: D. Peterson forward D. Nicholson forward Page 119 sail' s 5 we . E543 Coach Foster planned strategy cmd plays that kept the Kearney men right in the game. Ill snappy passing Illntelope five completely snowed under the visiting Billings Polytechnic quintet, 76-29. Bob Lewis really cut loose with his uncanny shooting and clever ball handling, connecting for 9 points, and setting up many more with bullseye passing. Fourth game of the season and Hastings' second half attack proved too much for Kearney, and the Flntelopes went under, 47-30. Kearney jumped to a l5-8 lead after lO min- utes, but Hastings rallied to tie at halftime l7- all. Whitey Sieckmann sparked Hastings with 19 points, while Mclllece hit for l3. Dick Peter- son paced the Plntelopes with 10. Despite a cold night around the hoops, Kearney defeated Doane in easy fashion, 48-37. Hntelope reserves were in action about half the time and performed capably. Russ Bogue and loe Simanek turned in sparkling games, and Max Osborns aggressive play under the H. Misko W. Monnington R. Moore D. Orth M- Osborn forward guard forward guard 9UUFd Page 120 Q l R. Bogue W. Christiansen D. Clayton guard guard guard backboards was a big factor in the Kearney cause. It was "Nicholson's Night" as the Kearney Hntelopes rallied superbly in the final seven minutes to roll past Wesleyan, 64-47. Nicholson sparked this 20-point surge, and his ball-haWk- ing and fiery play featured throughout. "Skeet" connected for 26 points, while Peterson and Cornelius chimed in with ll each. Bogue's three timely fielders in the second half added to the scoring parade. H sharper eye at the free throw lane proved the difference in Kearney's 45-44 victory over Midland. Nicholson, with 8 cashed free throws in lO attempts and four fielders, paced Kearney with 16 points. Peterson followed with lU. Vosseler and Wilhelms kept the Warriors very much in the ball game with l5 and l3 points, respectively. 3 .W -1 If E 3'- t mm 4, ,P 5' E .' ... Q w, i , 5 5 3 H, E3 il? - EZ S .: f as 5 - .is :Q -if SE .1 - H ig I if ....... I wk 3 yfgisj Q O .vw ,.,.a wr --L' it P " ' ,rx sf ' Q qi? " RQK 5 A , W- 5 . ' -3 , '55 E V A M . - H :.:Q:?355' : r fi 4 A :Q . - H A C Cornelius I. Finley B. Lewis B. H. Long O. Miller center guard guard center center ln a game more evenly fought than the score would indicate, the Plntelopes fell before Peru, 69-49. Kearney faced a half-time deficit of 40-27, but their comeback drive narrowed the gap to 8 points with 7 minutes left. The rangy Bobcats broke the Kearney victory string at five. Kearney lost to Chadron in the first of a two- garne series, 62-54. lt was a rough battle all the Way, with 44 fouls called. Behind l9-35 at halftime, the Hntelopes came to life in the final period, with Peterson leading the way. Peter- son flipped in l3 counters, and Simanek con- nected for l2. Groves led Chadron with 2U points, Immediately on the heels of one Chadron defeat, the locals dropped the second game, 57-44. The contest was disrupted by numerous fouls, with a total of Sl personals for both con- tenders. Kearney upset the favored Hastings Broncos, 44-39, in a thriller. Kearneyites took advantage of their free shots to nip the church-schoolfrnen. Outstanding feature of the game was the tight defense of the Hntelopemen. Lewis and Os- born carried on the work under the baskets. Kearney stymied Doane by whipping them 53-48 on their home floor. Dean Nicholson went on a scoring spree to the tune of 2l points, Ht the middle period, the game was deadlocked at 21-all. During the second half, the winners pulled away to gain an easy lead. -s-. 1 "Skeet" Nicholson grabbed the ball and Was off for a couple of points. 5- Typze of scoreboard Blue and Gold fans liked, which was also indicative of the Hastings-Kearney game in which the Flntelopes charged to victory. Page 121 ms ,rv K ,, . ,. tg., Mfg, '69, li fftfa Q sg 33 wif' E 1' we rms 5 Xi.-E H SLgwl,w 1 4 . ,gr 1, : tt . A 657, ' gg, f " 1,5 Q,.:,.,:::3::i.f 2 ' V: ' l , Q . 1,,1-25:21 fm 1l,rswrf,i1 . N 4 its-egg ' i lr, , ,. Q - ' w . Mtg? .:fg:.-' . Ks iris ' t , ,, ,ri ms-:H E 1' F: --it ' 2 P' ,iss gwgsm 4:2- v 'V - si.: msg J. A, -:-sua, 1:2-. .. frm. :.- .W , ,f. :V .- , IW ' ,, 2 fgg,:,:f',-'- -.,-I-:is -,. ..,. are Y A ., . - N . .ff .- 5 .::.::Ea: 392 . sw- . s .s1g'fm,,'s- .- it .1f" i,'-:H , lst S-rlffiiiwf-Qt ' QM 'ir -. X If f'-h'w.1f1 Yi ' 5 - W7'iL,.,w ,fr ' ' if' 'X S' '3 . K -pil. . . -, , rf" . 1 nf ', 'L if NI "1 X X. . ' '- Liv- . 4-SP? I 1 w wf f r,W"- his L ' N 5' f 1" ' I' f 41 Le is-rd. ' iff r' :-:-f+- -':-::s:S.1j.. ' "il sgi M M wr 33 -Q - - ' t ft 1 ., if ,-I-M ls. . .55 :Eli iv , ' , , i,?:rw Sta. S if-r X Q f as if M Z Q fs WV ? :L 1' . ' - - r M- ry ,rf tri' ,, X yr: F - 1. + 1-:H l , tg, Q-:1-0 w . . r w :rw 'Q 551-5 5 fir' tt "2 g zxzwegir- ' ' ff r -'f ,t 'x m -P 7- .-: -1 -L A Y - ,-2 fr 7 - , .aa -.- .,, W , V 4 Su :' '12-3557 "1 lkl- , L ' 0Q:Q!4A A X f , , , Q, . f ,-v H fr wp 1-:,r. 5. Qsggissrt Q ' ' - -1, ,,yE,,.3 ., Agri I xg, T li, X F In ti rl if , . 4 -- ,L .ji::Qea::s:'..,-, 1,-1- - '-rg:-'--2.:'--jg, 1 ,V if: V I 'Y f lf- ' m I ' , " .. E22 'T ' 5. 525 1' " - Gi ' if N " 'W ' ' 'Haw es W - fr? . ,, f-1 .. 1 , 4 , 1 . 2 K 1 1 ,, H -M -WW 1.-,L . f - V -we . -HN .-.--is l .. i Zigi gs X r tg M sg f 1, gg X u. ,... 5 3' . in 53,93 ..,f'gq.V?Jg . - , 4 X T Leroy Pope Gordon Rector Kent Ryan forward forward forward The Kaeding brothers read a tale of woe for the Illntelopes in a cage campaign, which fin- ished 66-58. Kearney men were cold in the be- ginning of the game, but a last half scoring spurt narrowed the gap. Kearney gained revenge on the Peru Bob- cats by dumping them 58-54. Hfter a nip-and- tuck battle to the midway point, the Hntelope men pulled out for a lead. The final moments looked bad as Perumen pulled a series of buckets, to a 54-51 deficit. However, Kearney men continued their scoring spree to make the final tally read "Victorious" The Kaedings came through again to topple Kearney 79-63 in the fifteenth game of the season. During the initial moments of the game, the two teams were on nearly even terms. The game was close until a final surge spelled doom for the Kearney quintet. Kearney tripped Wayne 51-44 on our own hardwoods. The Hntelopes snatched the ,lead after one minute of play, and were never ser- iously threatened. Dick Peterson rounded a tally on 20 points. Continuing their winning streak, the Hnte- lopes rolled over Midland 59-38. The visitors made a game of it though Kearney kept the lead. It was the last home game for Peterson and Lewis, and these men really made the buckets on their final appearance. Nebraska Wesleyan raced to a half-time lead, which led to defeat for the Qntelopes, 57-47. Dick Peterson was high man while Carl Cornelius and Dean Nicholson trailed close be- hind, Kearney ended the season with nine wins and nine losses. Dick Peterson became the leading Plntelope point getter with 16.7 points in 14 contests. Dean Nicholson was close behind with 16.0 markers. Bob Lewis was the outstanding play- maker and passer on the Kearney floor. Hll in all, Kearney stacked up fourth in the hotly contested Nebraska Conference Circle, and displayed an all-round team, with plenty of teamwork. I. Simanek H. Sinfek E. Smith I. Ubben W. Wcryker center forward guard forward forward Page 122 The mon behind the Hntelopes Conch Charlie Foster. :E The crowd watched intently when Q Hastings-Kearney tip-off took place. aa, 55 E334 Page 123 .Q . M L . . W., W .Mf W. W MEMM - 5:4-as M 5.5 . Wzfwfwxim :WMI ff .M mf W 45, 5::wgy:gf::wmgg'gfq5 zwiiggmygzmyi gwi EQmW2"M'f -mia MN Hfswm. H, 1 M. 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Q gs Page 124 to I 'K f K t eww?-H .wt Mme., x Coaches Foster and Copeland proudly posed with Kearney cmdermen on a rare unsmny day in spring TRACK . . With one hundred rnen reg- istered, Coach Charlie Foster held high hopes for the track season, not to mention the golf and tennis outlook, which was also bright. Kearney tracksters entered nine contests ot skill, including two out-of-state re- lays at Boulder, Colorado, and Lawrence, Kansas. Plnother highlight ot the cinder season came when Kearney played host to the Nebraska College Conference contenders on May 15th and 16th. Twelve letterrnen added to the power ot Kearney's team, when they participated in three dual and three triangular meets. Robert Lewis-Callaway hurdle Merlin Quillen-Beaver City sprmt Page Leland Copeland supervised the intramural teams, and a last and exciting game could be seen almost every evening. 126' I TRA-MURAL First Bow: W. Isbell. W. Hurdle. L. Hows- den. I. Garrison. C. Simmons. W. Burtrufl. R. Norcrll. C. Courlright. Second Row: L. Wacker. R. Hemphill. G. Hixon. V. Copeland. W. Cassell. G. Mor- thole. K. Wiederspan. F. Marymee. K. Vliederspan. Third Row: B. Wade. C. Bacon. D. Con- way, B. Hauver. B. Conway. H. lmming. Hmong the many thrilling attractions of a great sports year at Kearney was the very successful and colorful intra- mural leagues under the supervision ot Leland Copeland. Basketball play started with fourteen quintets, each team playing the others once, Only a single club dropped out during the sea- son, and every postponed contest was played at a later date. Upset followed upset throughout the season, and all the oddities in the books of maple play occurred. During the first half, play was dom- inated by tour quintets, Vets Village, Varsity lntrarnurals, the Hope Shots, and the Sixth Hvenue Wolves. Vets Vil- lage emerged the victor for the first halt honors, with Bob I-lauver's Hope Shots challenging, down to the final night ot play. The second-halt story was also close, last, and interesting. Each one of the thirteen teams Was capable ot pulling an upset at any time. Forecasting play was strictly hazardous. Hauver's Hope Shots made oft with the bunting, and the stage was set for the play-off tilt between the Hope Shots and Vets Vil- lage. Pttter a seesaw battle in the open- ing minutes of the contest, the Villagers jumped into the lead and ran oft with the championship, 42-25. ln a tive-day balloting to nominate the all-intramural team, Mike Schell- hase, Bob Hauver, Clarence Mitchell, Harold McClure, and Iep Byrum were named to the quintet, with Max Harris and Keith Weiderspan tied for utility men. Harold McClure topped all scorers with a season's total ot 301 points in 24 games. First Row: I.. Bauer. G. Norris. E. Ying- ling. Mr. Huchler. D. Morgan. V. Shader. Second Row: C. Evans. L. Novosad. L Kelley. W. Barber. D. Best. D. Huber! I. Buettner. Third How: I. Ryan. H. Rasmussen. W McKee. D. Spangsberg. I. Sicrffard. D Melina. Firsi Row: L. Witters. D. Wise. R. Class D. Lemons. D. Smith. H. Kelley. M. Harris Second Row: H. Deeb. R. Kennedy. F. Kolar. D. Boyd. E. Burton. H. Nall. W. Mears. P. Baker. W. Weddle. Third Row: B. Marler. I.. Pope. V. Stucker. L. Marrow. C. Miichell. B. Rohde. E. Toops Firsi Row: H. Peterson. D. Brown. C. Carl- on. R. Gardner. R. Dethlolf. Second Row: D. Dusek. I. Belschner. H. McClure. I.. Veal. S sz ma Lefi to right: L. Howsden, D. Brown. B. Gard. D. Best, V. Stucker. E. Burton. C. Carlson. D. Meline. B. Hauver. V. Shada. M. Harris. team capiains. I-ln unideniilied player charged toward the basket and received Q luceful ol ball. Page 127 Page 128 K Clubbers, under ihe direction of Dick Peierson, president, gathered in the gym for cm important business meeiing. Jessie Gilpin discussed W.Q.F1. matters with ihe cabinet and sponsors, THE LETTERMEN "Come on, Peterson!" . . . "Sink another one, 'Skeet'!" . . . "Your pep! Your pep! You got it now keep it be careful don't lose it . . . your pep!" Gay uniforms marching down the field . . . hoarse voices shouting praise and encourage- ment . . . a gleaming bonfire and the color song. These cheers and that praise were for you. You were the K men. The letter you wore stood not only for your prowess on the gridiron, the court, and the cinder track, but it stood as a symbol of courage, loyalty, and fair play. There were Women among you, too. They were active in basketball, tennis, badminton, and swimming. They realized the importance of a Well-rounded college curriculum and the advantages to be gained from the field of athletics. You and they were tops in good sportsmanship. "I-le's a man . . . Who's a man? . . . He's a Kearney man" . . . that "he" was you: the Hntelopes of Kearney State and the Qntelope Does. "Skeet" Nicholson was deep in "Love" at the Water Pa eant des ite the antics Q 1 P o! Dorothy Stever. Page 129 SITUATION NORMAL AGAIN The men with brawn and brains who could shine at any sport, Were sixty-six in number. Hs the official organization for all college sport- ing activities, the K Club provided many min- utes filled with thrills and excitement, whether it be on the gridiron, basketball court, or cin- der path. You could scarcely forget the Home- coming game or the Peru-Kearney thriller, could you? K Clubbers looked pretty good on the dance floor, too, as proved at the K Club Dance, held at the Kearney Hrrnory. Hs a climax of the social evening, Theodocia Eloe, Hnsley freshman, was crowned queen of the club. Throughout the year, K members were in- terested in not only providing sports for them- selves, but seeing that most everyone got in on the fun. Following this urge, they sponsored the all-high school activities day, besides handling the Big Ten high school track meet. On the sideline, at local football games, you could find K Club members selling programs to increase their treasury. Alt was an honor to be a "K" man. Those men who lettered in a sport were able to earn a besides receiving a sweater. So the sig- nificance of having sixty-six men who were qualified for the honor, was apparent to all. On the second Thursday of each month, Dick Peterson could be found conducting the club's business meetings, which were planned in or- der to promote "courage, loyalty, and clean sportsmanship." Other "K" officials included Otis Miller, vice-president, William Gogan, secretary, and Robert Spelts, treasurer. Under the sponsorship of Coach Charlie Foster, and wtih the Blue and Gold way up front, Kear- ney's athletes managed to gain their share of berths in state honor positions. Iohn Rumbaugh was named end on the H11- Nebraska College Conference Team, Ralph Petterson gained honor as a guard on the same team, and Dick Peterson was awarded honorable mention in the position of back. Ralph Petterson was also noted as a guard on the Little l-lmerica round-up. First Row: Coach Foster. Mr. Copeland. Clifford Hlexander. Charles Bacon. Francis Bell. lim Belschner. Don Boyd. Dan Conway. Carl Cornelius. Hoy Dethloff. Second Row: Donald Dusek. Iim Finley. Hrlo Gard. William Gogan. Bob Hauver. Dick Hock. Bob Lewis. Bill Long, Leland Marrow. Otis Miller. Third Row: Clarence Mitchell. Iohn Mitchell. Nick Mitchell. Rolland Moore. Dean Nicholson. Max Osborn. Dick Peterson. Bob Rohde. Iohn Humbaugh. Kent Ryan. Fourth How: Bernard Shotkoski. Ioe Simanek. Ever! Smith. Verle Stucker. Elton Toops. John Ubben. Lyle Veal. Barclay Wade. Wallace Walker. Marion Wilson. ' Page 130 First Row: D. Stever. I. May, I. Gilpin. D. Neal. I. Wedemeyer. W. Sull, I. Numa. Second Row: R. Beiebenner. D. Bailey. P. Samuels, E. Webb. E. Brun. K. Bohy. GETS A MAN'S VoTE Did you often get no answer when you Called Susie lane on a Monday night? You might have known she was at W.Pl.Q., Womens Pithletic Hssociation, either playing a fast game oi volleyball or any number of sports. Or maybe she was on the W.H.H, picnic, or perhaps she was at the State Womens Hthletic Hssociation, or at sports night in Hastings. Not only did the W.Pt.H. provide plenty ot recreation tor college girls, but it entertained liott and under the direction oi lessie Gilpin, president, was the treshmen girls sports night. But it seemed that entertaining the freshmen was not enough tor these sports-minded girls. Later in the year, they played hostess to the entire college at a play night. Plctive? You betcha! M. Elliott high schoolers trom surrounding towns at the WHH. Play Day. Hlso among the entertaining enterprises of the organization, sponsored by Miss Harriett Yingling and Miss Marjorie E1- I-'irst How: P. Carlson, I. West, C. Seat. O. Iohnson. I. Numa. L. Starch. M. Gallagher, T. Eloe. Second How: F. Nelson. V. Cooley, V. Vcmnior, T. Olson. B. Harvey. B. Soderholm. M. Richey, N. West. 'TI-IE EDITORS 132 GRABBAG P9 Rnna Lee cmd Carolyn Winn tried cz green hat on for size, while upperclcrssmcm, Marjorie DeBrunner made the sale. Thenlcrwr ccxughrt up with Woody Deeb Impcrrhcl Jurlsis Rndy Spelts and Ii looked cis ihough there was study Mr. Rycn's Shcxkespecfe c l crss got Ilene Refshuuge hxt Kangeroo Court mg ahead for Wxnslon Whxtney who underway wxth Q recrdmg gsslgnmeni wxih Q bong and Q hlile red wagon goi 1115 c ca r g o from the textbook 11 for the next class perxod. Even upperclassmen sto o cl in line! This group awaited the opportunity oi receiving their class cards. "Theres nothing like an egg sham- poo." Qt least that's what I-Inn Bete- benner told Ca ro l yn Winn as she Pflid for her Crimes at KUHQU00 Director Norris Haring and his two ac- COUTL :ornplices announced the arrival of the Honorable Kangeroo Court Iudge. MISCELL NY Defense Httorney, "Skeet" Nicholson 'N ' pleaded the freshman case with his H I ii W l --ff' Honor?, Francis Bell. Clarence Courtright "took" it, while Registration matters occupied much oi Classes had begun at last lor Lora Bill Long poured it on. the time of Miss Edith Smithey, seen in Siel. who got busy on her Zoology conference with Iackson Rice. laboratory assignment. Page 135 Leo Galloway, Phi Tau pledge, was folly freshmen in ridiculous costumes Life in typical Vet's Village style was beheaded every few minutes for the added color to the Homecoming Pa- demonstrated by lack Cook. This float benefit of the spectators w h o wit- rade. took first prize. nessed the Homecoming Parade. Delta sorority members observed homecoming activities by sponsoring an alumnae luncheon. The Green Room of the Fort Kearney Hotel was the scene of the Sigma luncheon. i f , its The C a rn p u s Cafe was a popular place with NSTC students after all football games. Her Royal Highness, Queen Ilene Refshauge, smiled for her court, as did her attendants, Iocmne Barber, Neva lane Harris, Marian Wardrop, and lean May. 219522-W' ' , 'A VA 5 X., 5 5 ,,, lf 1 4 A : Freshmen tugged indust their Hldon Sobieszczyk paused a mamem with friends ia glance at a book, before leaving for the clay's activilies. To keep in step and play a march at the same lime was the chief concern of NSTC's marching band. riously and as a result fhrew Theodocia Eloe reigned as K Queen at the an hals in the air. nual K Club dance. Cals gof up early homecoming morn- ing to prepare their float for ihe pa- fade. "C'mon fellas!" was the thought of Rex Helleberg and C. O. Vancamp the I-lnfelope fans as they wafched the played a fast game of ping pong after Kearney-Wesleyan 6-6 tie. the game to warm up, Page 137 rnrn Hrlene Nelson pinned up Q Sadie Hawkins poster, While my me mm gs 1, tv. Eff' ir. ff" 1. M3233 if . P335 eager gals and reluctant guys looked on. tm Not K. P., but what Dick Clayton and G e r u 1 d Wilson were peeling led hordes of hungry stu- dents. Roy Dethloli was "ketchecl" by Wilma Sall, and C C1 s e Hall dorm meetings included interesting programs cmd helpful talks. sn sms H number of Daisy Maes and L'il Rbners could be seen as these students cut the rug, Dogpatch style. w tw Gordon Hansen announced the winners of the costume prizes as likely-looking contestants Dr. L e e Failor and Mr. Gavin Doughty looked as though t h e faculty dinner was a pleasant event for them. Mr. Leonard Forman opened the door to their new Veterans Village apartment whxle Mrs. Forman carried in the last 1tem Q-an nm M vt-ml ta it tt use 'W tw M ,fa I K - HWM?H. mewsx W REMV mg feewi-We t-fs 'g an mmm ms X--wma H HB wi was W max tw mmm ta ts K i ts z ts ta B ta Clean corridors were the aim oi James Lydiatt. student jani- K tt K 2 Frances Hurdle. Zeta fortune teller, predicted the Iuture oi a Christmas Carnival client. H .C m"'WQ' i.w if k M: In the rootin', t o o t i shootm western faculty s k i t, Mr. Gavin Doughty showed his hronco-bust ing quality by riding the wildest rocking horse ever built. rm. Residents of Case Hall paused to admire the beauty oi their Christ- mas tree. Page 140 Visiting debators tried their luck at a game of indoor hockey at the Christmas Carnival. Nominees for the coveted honor of Christmas King and Queen stopped their busy schedules lor a picture. xi it E r H 1 t Q 7. ,r Y A i X A E E? s. it 3 Q L A Fin aerial View of the Sigma booth Flnother royal personage of the Christ- S i n g in g in authentic Gay Nineties showed the popularity of S i g m a- mas season was Jessie Gilpin, Delta style, Ella Mae Sizer. Ioanne Barber grams. Holly Queen. and Bonnie Sandsrman entertained the crowd at the Cal's Bowery Ball. With great melodramatic drama, the Deltas presented the skit, Dorothy Stever portrayed "Pa", while "Ma" was characterized "He I3lin't Done Right By Nell" for C h r i s t m a s Carnival by Verla Peterson in the Case Hall, turn-of-the-century skit. audiences, ln an arc ol light, the Na- tivity scene lent a Christ- mas atmosphere to the col- lege campus. With true western gusto, the taculty enacted "The Shooting ol Dan McGrew." The Christmas Carnival culminated in the crowning of Christmas King and Queen, Dean Nicholson and Neva lane Harris. at the dance following the Carnival. Page 141 l X From that first warm lall clay when eager freshmen donned green caps and strutted about the halls, to the equally jubilant day when they dofied them and became tull-fledged mem- bers of the student body . . . . through the extra-special events, like the convocation where Francis "Pouch" Bell. recovered from football injuries, received a handsome watch from the K Club M dig ses is ss, V, ,M M:3i2'le?l3AL:'3fmH sgzrassQggZT5'?glFfgkis-s n amass: gm ms- -su 3553 Est' oriiest iii XXX -3538 - is -:WW g- 5- sf ri : lgmlirfe C M We - mam,-suit - Jenn M M ,,f.,.,,r 'X wittcrgyty v " l W. Q ,535 tl Hhkrgvga .522 AWE ,135-rg IBKRSQ, gg-su W, , , .ftrstgrrt fm rg H1521 Wtnfsr-r1'f'Ht UQ, - grggmmtxrs-stef ' 'es 'Lsf-views'-,Lures Xi may W gg' , 'ass '.,.' t"E5H'?Kg,fgw mfm. Islas if-.ff-:wig -an we eww- W rrggea' Niffmg Exfsfiannft 235 Jie 5Z"i:5:'-ff-- iii ' F342 :?iig,5'f?'2fn5 WWW-f 'LgfQ?,Q1 ES L ewes- if L U ' N 'sms mm, fi sas-er., -'MHM'4 ,sis ' H Mmm 'rr 'Q rss I If ' Wim CQ it "5 is -f wists., iit wgf mlm' 1: 9,-:ii E Lys .:.t' WX saw-fe, 5-is rsggygen-:sat-'ra s sm is H3552 H gs, New if - u ' Z 5 A W s , y st- ,,'7,E sr' ig.. swf wirw H',w-t.. 'H- ,W .tes gunna: fs-4 s Q- 'serv :Q New s is gas 431572 . . . . to semester report cards at which some individuals crowed with delight upon the discovery oi an unexpected "Fl" or renewed resolutions to "dig deeper" . . . . or the discovery ot another campus writer, Mr. Roy Long, Hmherst freshman and Winner oi the Iunior Chamber of Commerce Qmericanisrn contest and a fine portable radio ....until that February day when a pledge ribbon, signityging preference and admission to a Gree organization, was' pinned by cr proud sorority "mother" upon an equally proud sorority "daughter" . . . . up to the final "whoop-la" ot Edi- tor, Maxine Wardrop. as she pointed out the last page to associates, this book has been tor you. Especially for you. "Afar in lhe wesl where fhe green valleys run And lhe sweeping hills dip lo lhe plain, Rise lhe gray, sloried walls of lhe home lhaf we love- Alma Malerl We hail lhee againl 'Nealh lhy shade we have gazed over valley and plain On lhe scenes lhaf enraplure lhe eye, And our hearls lhrill wilh pride as lhe Blue and lhe Gold Proudly floals 'gainsl lhe evening sky." Qdams, Louise ......, Qhrendts, Harold ...... Flrnolcl, George ...... Huchter, Harry ..,.A. H FACULTY A D STUDE FHCULTY 23 19, 23, 74, 98, 99, 105, 106 135 127 Binger, George ,.,,,.,,,,, ..,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Bruner, W. E .,.,,..,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,, Burke, H. E. fdeceasedl .,,,.,,,.,.,,,,,,,,,,, Campbell, Phyllis .,.... Carlson, Kenneth ...... C ..,.....23, 100 ..........23, 65 28, 97 Carroll. FIOY -,......... ....... . ..........,.............. 2 3 CSTHYI Harold ..,..... ......,..,...,.,...... 2 3, 83, 100 Conrad, Jennie ......,.,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,Y,.,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,- 2 3 Copeland, Leland .,,...,.. ,...... ....... 2 3 , 24, 110, 126, 130 Cushing, Herbert L .,..,.. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 2 0, 21 D Danker, Del ...................,.. ...,...,.,,,4, ,,,,,,,,,,, , ,,,,Y 2 1 , 24, 75 Dillenderler, Norman ..,,, ,,.,,,, Doughty, G ' ............ Drake, Mirigrilxul ........,.. Elliott, Marjorie ........ Elliott, Thomas S. ..... . . .,....... 24, 83, 139, 140 E 24, 80, 87, 90, 91, 108, 128, 131, 141 Evett, Paul ..,,.......... ......,,.,,,....,,,..,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 1 8, 24, 87 F Failor, Leona ..........................,....,.,...,........,,........ 24, 25, 80, 94, 95, 139 Foster, Charlie .....,.,...... 23, 24, 109, 110, 119, 120, 123, 128, 130, 137 Fox, Donald .....,.. ...,......,,................,.......... , ......,. . ..,........ 2 3, 24, 25, 139 Garrett, Delia ..... Haines, Eleanor ........ G H 27, 86, 141 .....,18, 25, 83, -102 Hansen, Mildred , ....,. ....... ....,.,..............,. ,.............. 25 , 8 3 Haxby, Beverly ..,... .....,,....,...................... 2 0, 25, 81 1-loft, Naomi .,.,........1.... ........ .,..,..,....,......,......................,., 2 5 , 26 Holcomb, Dorothy ...... House, Robert ........ lstas, Helen ...... Klein, Dorothy ........ I K Q 18, 25, 27, 74, 80, 92, 93 ........25, 83, 100, 103, 141 62 L Lawson, Beulah ..... ,. Ludden, ' Ludden, Leola ........ .. Larson, Minnie ....... . Carrie ....,,... M Mantor, Bernice .... . Mantor, L le .. .......,., ..... . . Miller, LoDesca ,.,... , ,,,,,, Morse, Mary ....... ,..,,,.,,,..,, N Nelson, Theodora ,.... .............. Nigh, Edna ,,,..,....... . ,...., . O Ockinga, Clara .,,.. ...,... Olson, Otto ,.,,,. .,........ P Payne, Mildred ..........,, ...,.......,,. Powell, Gail ...........,.......... .,..... Powell, H, W. ,..., ................,. ...... . Pratt, Mrs. Berthalynn ........ .....,.,...... Fl Robinson, Filice M ........, ...,.......... Ryan, Calvin .........,.,.. .....,........ S Skinner, Blanche ............., .,..... Smithey, Edith .....,.,.,.......... Stouterneyer, Malvina .....,.. Stout, H. G ......,........i......... ....... Stutheit, Bernard ........,.... ...... T Thomas, Mrs. Elizabeth ....................... W Wardrop, Mrs. Rose ........ .....,........ Welch, Roland ............. ,...., Williams, Dorothy ........ ....... Williams, Mary .......... .............. Y Yingling, Harriet ..... .............. STUDENTS T1 DEX 25 .......25, 77, 83 ........,.26, 27, 86 .,......26, 71, 80, 100 ,...,....26, 80, 100 26 ...,...2B, 82 26 26 ..,,,..18, 27 13 18, 27, 73, 98, 107, 134 .......,....27, 135 72, 141 24, 85, 141 12 .......25, 27, 71 .......27, 72, 80 .....27, 75, 108, 128, 131 Ftclams, Dwight-Culbertson .,.,.........., ..........,.............,...............i.. 6 2 Fldams, Harold-Kearney ...,....,...........,............... ,...... .....,..,.... 5 2 , 82, 108 Qden, Howard-Kearney ..........,..,............... .. ..,.................................... 52 Qlexander, Clifford-Pasadena, Calif ....... 44, 97, 102, 130, 132, 139 Qlexander, Marilyn-Hayes Center ..........,............,..........,....... .. ...... 52 Qllen, Lenore-Parks .......,,,,,......,.....,,.,.......... . ........ . ..,,.,....,....... 44, 00, 88 Qllison, William-Kearney .......,........i.....................,,.......................... 62 Fllthouse, Ioan-Kearney .... ......., 5 2, 56, 79, 80, 97, 90, 102 Hmen, Frances-Wilcox ....... ........ 1 2, 38, 75, 80, 94, 95, 134 Flnderson, Betty-Minden ......., Hnderson, Carolyn-Ord .............. Plnderson, Elda-Gothenburg ....,... Qnderson, LaVerne-Kearney ....... Qnderson, Roc?-Funk ................,. Qnclerson, Si ney-Kearney ......, Rnderson, Stanley-Kearney ..... Hnderson, Vernon-Funk ,... ........... Hnderson, William-Hinsworth ...., Hrnold, Ned-Elm Creek ............. Flrthur, Francis-Fircadia ..,...... Fisher, Margery-Kearney ............. Flugenstein, Betty-Sidney .,............,. , .......... 44, 80, 94, 95 53, 56, 80, 90, 142 93 53, 80, 82 53 39 . ,..,.. ...39, 82 30 45 102 77, 80, 86 Hunspaugh, Verna-Gothenburg ........ ...... 5 2, 80, 86 Hustin, Beverly-Franklin .................. .......... 4 5, 83, 90 Hyres, Robert-Kearney ............,......... ........ 4 5, 97, 105 B Baalhorn, Dean-Cozad ........,.........,. .......,..................,..,.,. 1 14 Babcock, Geraldine-Finselmo ..,.... .................,..... 5 2, 77, 135 Bacon, Charles-Kearney .......... ........ 3 9, 83, 114, 126, 130 Bacon, Harriet-Gothenburg ...... .......... ..... ..........,..... 5 2 , 90 Badura, Richard-Loup City .......... ........,........... 4 5, 95, 112 Bailey, Donna-Venango ........... ..,..... 4 5, 103, 100, 131 Baker, Gerald-Kearney ........,. , .... .... .............................. 6 2 Baker, Harold-Miller .... .......,....., .........................,.................. 5 2 Baker, Paul-Kearney .,....................,........,.....,...... 53, 99, 119, 127, 139 Ballagh, Esther--Hmelia .,.......,...........,,........... 30, 83, 94, 100, 101, 103 Barber, Ioilnne-Vallejo, California .,....,.................,............,............ 71, 73, 78, 87, 90, 107, 136, 141 Page 144 Barber, Wayne-Vallejo, California ................ 53, 100, 102, 103, 127 Barrett, Sterling-Dix ...,...........,................ ...... .,,.....................,.. 53, 102 Bartels, lean-Campbell .......,............... . ........,....... .... . .53, 93, 140 Bartruli, Wayne-Eustis ...i... ........... 5 3, 125 Bauer, Dorothy-Gibbon ..... ..........,...1............... 5 3, 102 Bauer, Larry-Sumner ....,........ ....... ,.....,..... ......................... 5 3 Baxter, Ierald-Gibbon ............... .1.....................,,.................,..., 8 2 Baysdorler, Lloyd-Kearney .... . ...... 30, 64, 68, 72, 74, 79, 87 Beach, Robert-Hrnold ..... ,...... . .... . ...................................... 5 2 Beahm, Ralph-Hlma .........,........ .............,...............,........., 5 2 Beard, Carol-Kearney, .,.....,........... ..... ..... . ..... 5 2 Beasley, .William-Sc uyler ............ .,...... 5 2, 114 Beckman, Wayne-Broken Bow. ...... .... ....... ........ 4 5 Becker, Dorothgr-Sumner ..,.. ,.,.... . .. .........,....... 62, 93 Becker, lack- umner ..................................,,,......... ............ 6 2, 99, 102 Behrendt, Lila-Poole .........,........,........,..,,,,................................,,..,..,.. 52 Bell, Francis-Kimball ,.....,............. . ...............,............................,.,...... .. 34, 74, 104, 105, 113, 128, 130, 135, 142, 143 Beller, Murl-Loup City ....... , ...,..............,....,.,........,,.,..................,,,. 53, 97 Belschner, Iames-Flmherst ............ 45, 78, 87, 97, 114, 127, 130, 135 Beltz, Lloyd-Rrnold ........,.,..........,...,.................,,,. ,..,,,..,,,. ..,.,,,,...,.,,,,,, 5 3 Bender, Robert-Hvoca, Iowa ...........................,.... ..,......... ...,.,,,,...., 5 3 Bendler, lack-Mason City ......,................ ........... S 3, 97 Benzler, Theodore-Kearney .... ...........,..,... ,.,., ,,,,,, ,,,,,,,, 5 3 Berreckmann, Carleton-North Platte ................,.......,...,... 53, 100, 103 Best, Donald-Upland ................,.,,,.,..,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,..,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,, , ,53, 127 Betebenner, Flnn-Gibbon .............................. 42, 44, 87, 90, 131, 135 Biggerstaff, Lyle-Qrnold ....... Bissell, Robert-Kearney ..... Black, William-Kearney ....... Blakernan, Carrie-Merna ..... Bleek, Charlotte-Riverdale ...,. Bliss, Harold-Kearney ............ Bliss, Rodnely-Kearney ....... Bliss, Boy- earney ........... Bogue, Russell-Shelton ..,... Bohy, Karolyn-Taylor ,..,.,..,... Bohn, Marie-Gibbon ..... . ........,,, . Bonsack, Elmer-Wood River ........ . ...........,,....,....,.,... 52, 82, 96, ss 99 97 ....,..52, 77, su, ae, 94 99, 119, 120 ..,,.42, 45, 100, 103, 131 . .,..........................,....... as C Barton, Lee-Fort Laramie, Wyomi ng ,,,,... ........,...... ..............,.,,....,, 1 0 5 Bowden, Doris-Doniphari ..................A.....-.........-------- --4.- ----4-- 4 5 , 95, 93 Bowers, Iames-Kearney ......A... ,.,,. ,............. ....... 3 5 , 41, 45, 79, 87, 99 Boyd, Don-Su erior ...,.......... 53, 78, 82, 85, 99, 100, 102, 127, 130 Boyd, Eileen-lgaxton ......... ........,....,....... ,.......v. -.-----.-.--,--1-----------4---'---- 5 3 Boyd, Mary-Paxton ........................-....A----.-..--, .--,----,---.-------------------A 5 3, Bl Branson, Lewie-Lexington ....... .............-.-- 5 3 Brawner, Wilbur-Wilcox ..,., -------4-4------'--'- 5 2 Brothers, Kathrzn-Dix ....,,.... -------v---- 5 2, 50, 93 Brown, Eddie- earney .,... ....... 1 , ..1-1----"---------' 45, 99 Brown, LeMoyne-Chapman ........ ..,-. - .1----,-------'---- ------ 5 2 Brown, Richard-Loup City ,..... ........ 5 2, 97, 127, 137 Brown, William-Loup City ...... ....,.............,........................ 5 3, 97 B1-un, Elaine-Kearney ................. ......,...............-........ 1 4, 39, 97, 131 Bruner, Gloria-Shelton ...,........................ 50, 53, 77, 90, 102, 134, 135 Buettner, Ioseph-Grand Island .,.................YY,.....-...-..-., 1 --.--- 45, 99, 127 Burr, Robert ...,.........,......... . .............----1. .------,-.,.-------1,----,--,------'- ----------- 5 3 Burt, Dora-Shelton ..,....... . ........Y., -A-------1-,-- 3 1, 77. 135 Burton, Ellis-North Platte ..,. ..r......... , -1----,,,- 4 5, 98, 99. 127 Butler, Ernest-Veterans Village ......... .,.,..,,.............. 4 5, 99 Callahan, William-Kearney ....,.. Cameron, Iohn-Kearney . ........ . Campbell, Fllice-Kearney . .... ,.,.,.....128 , ...........,... 53 90 Carlson, lillan-Kearney ,...... .. -,',,------------------- 53, 135 Carlson, Clayton-Hnsley ,.., ..,... ....----.----1,----- 5 3 , 97, 127 Carlson, Phy lis-Bartley .........................................-- ,52, 112, 131, 142 Carson, Pllexander-Kearney ............,.....................-..---.,--,- 44, 100, 103 Casey, Mildred-Oconto ..............,......,...................... .---.---.----1------ 5 2, 80 Cassell, William-Garden Grove, California .......... .............. 5 2. 126 Chapman, Patricia-Falls City .............................. , .------- 52, 55, 90 Chapman, Robert-Ravenna ,............ .... ......,......... ......---,--11-,....-,-, 5 3 Christensen, Ruth-Miller ............v.....,. ---------- 5 3, 93, 100 Christiansen, Dwight-Harvard ........,.,. ------,------,,, 5 3, 97 Christiansen, William--Harvard .........-..-., -------1--- - .-53, 120 Clabaush, Merribelle-Guide Rock ..... ,..., ...,................... 4 4 . 77, 94 Clark, ichard-Kearney .,,...................... ,.,. ...,.,...........---------.------- 5 3 Clark, Robert-Kearney .........,...,.......... ...............,.-------.--,--,-,--- ------ 5 3 Clayton, Richard-Central City .....,. ,...,.,... 5 3, 81, 119, 120. 133 Class, Roger-Wymore ................. ..... ,... ...,......----,-,----- 5 3 , 127 Coe, Ieanne-Pllrna ............................ ...-.------,--,-,--,.-- 5 4, 77, 93 Comstock, Iohn ....,.................................. .....................-....------ ---------- 5 4 Conger, Harriett-Grand island ........., .......-----...,.-- 3 9, 49, 90, 94, Conser, lane-Miller ......................... .,.....,.......-.. . ....-1..-------1,.1-,-----,--- Conway, Daniel-Kearney .......,.................... 54, 83, 85, 114, 126, 130 Conwa , William-Kearney ..........,,..,,,,.,.,......................,.... ......... 6 3, 126 cook, luck-Hoiden, Wes, v1,g1,,1,, ..,................. 54, ve, 97, les, 138 Cooley, Vivian-Lexington ...........,........ ....,......... 5 4, 80, 95, 131 Copeland, Van-Clarks .................................,.................. 54, 55. 99, 126 Corbitt, Tom ........................,........... .......... ......................, ,1-....-... -,------------ 5 4 Corliss, Doyle-Kearney ..,..,.....,...................,,.....,...,....... . ..................... 55 Cornelius, Carl-Kearney ..., 39, 83, 97, 107, 115, 119, 121, 128, 130 Cortney, Eileen-Sidney ...............,............,,..,.............,.... . ....., 55, 91, 93 Courtri ht, Clarence-Beaver City .... 55, 83, 100, 103, 126, 134, 135 Crist, Cgeorge-Qnsley ............................,...................-...-.----...- v ---,-,- 55, 97 Cronin, David-Minden . .........................,.......... ............... .......,,.... 5 3 , 83 Cross, Iames-Kearney , ...,. .... .............. 5 4 Crozier, Carl-Kearney ....,.. .,........ ....-.... 5 4 , 99 D Dailey, Helen-Omaha ...................,.. ......... 3 7, 39, 72, 75, 90, 83, 93 Dannels, Harvey-Franklin .......... ......... . ,....... ...........,.-..---.-.-,..-..,- 5 4 Davidson, Iames-Hurora ......... .....,.......,.......................... 5 4. 99 Davis, Richard-Kearney ....... .... ,...... ....,..... 3 9 , 113 Davis, Virgil-Broken Bow ......... .-.--....-.---.-- 4 4 Day, Billy-Mason City .,.......,.......................,.............,.......................... 54 Dag, Phyllis-Carnpbel .....,.........,.,..........................,..,.......... 54, 94, 140 De runner, Marjorie-Lodgepole ,... 36, 38, 72, 84, 92, 93, 100, 134 Deeb, Hnthony-Kearney ...............,,,........ 36. 55. 71, 85, 99, 127. 139 Deeb, Woodrow-Kearncar ...,..,......,...,..,,...... 50, 55, 99, 100, 103, 134 DeForest, Charline-Mc ook ....,......,.........................,.. 55, 77, 90. 132 DeMilt, Clair-Dickens ....,..........,., .,.........,......,...............,.................. 5 3 Dethloff, Roy-Ham ton ..,,... , ,,,.. ....... 4 4, 71, 97, 127, 130, 135, 138 Dexter, Hazel-131me11a ................... ..........,.................................... 4 4, 80 Dickerson, Eloise-Champion ....... .......,...,..,....................... 1 2, 37, 39 Diedrick, H1-Kearney ..,... .,..,.......... ...................,.......................,......... 5 5 Dowers, Verne-Kearney ...................... 29, 31, 35, 67, 73, 79, 87, 99 Dreyer, William-Kearney ....... ..................... ,............ ...,.... 4 4 , 97, 106 Dunbar, Ruth-Kearne ...........,..... ..,................,...... 3 9, 72, 73, 80, 86 Dusek, Donald--Blue Hill ......,,.......... E Ebmeier, Ruth--Bertrand .............. Edwards, Clifford-Kearney ,,., Edwards, Donald-Kearney ..,.. Ellis, Floyd-Shelton ............... Ellis, Frank-Shelton ............... Eloe, Theodocia-Qnsley . ,...., Erazim, Helen-Hazard ......, Evans, Bob-Shelton ......... Evans, Claude ....,,.......,.,,...,... Evans, Merrylu-Shelton . ,...., Ewer, Duane-Pleasanton ...........,..., F Farley, Robert-Kearney .................. Ferry, Francis-Kearney ..,..... .... Ferry, Robert-Holdrege .....,..,.., Fidler, Raymond-Cambridge .... . 97, 115, 127, 130 ....,,...54, 82, 84, 94 100 .........50, 54, 114, 131, 137 77, 90, 102, 45 134 ,.......36, 39, 77, 83, Finley, Iames-Ord .,...,................ ........ 5 4, 97, 121, Forman, Leonard-Kearney ..... Forman, Lewise-Kearney ........,..............,..,.......,............,.,.......... 54, Foster, Dorthea-Benkelman ......,.,......................... - .........,....,....... 45, Fox, Hlbert-Livermore, Iowa ......................,,...................................... 87,90 100 102 103 137 Frahrn, Bettelee-Kearney .... 31, 79, 97 63 55 55 130 40, 139 139 77 25 139 103 Frank, amid-chepmm, ,..........,..........,....,, ' ,.... , ,s11, azj 1001 1021 Frazier, Iames-Kearney , .,.... Fredericks, Keith-Kearney .,......,.. 54 Frost, Dorothy-Overton 5,1 .................... , .---,,.-- 45. 90 G Gallagher, Maryann-Odessa .......... .........................,..---. 5 4, 91. 131 Gallagher, William-Odessa .,.................,..,......,.................... 45, 43, 97 Galloway, 1..eo-Fullerton ,..,.., ................,................,....... 5 4, 82, 99, 135 Gannon, Emmett-Kearney ...................... 52, 54 78, 81, 85. 108. 139 amd, Rrlo-Kearney ,,,,....,,,........ ...4z, 44, 75 157, 115, 127, 128, 130 Gard, Grant-Overton ....... ...........,......,..........-.---.-,.,,,,.,----.,-,----- 1 -- 55 Gardner, Robert-Hnsley ...,.. ...............,..........,.. ...... 5 5 , 97, 102, 127 Garrison, Iarnes-Hlma . ....... 55, 97, 126, 135, 138 Garska, Iack-Kearney ..,.......... ....................,.,,....... 5 5, 82 Garvin, Mary Lou-Kearney ........ Gaston, Barbara-Norman ,. ....,... Geisler, Eugene-Pleasanton .... ,,., Gibson, Louis-Broken Bow ......... 86 ,.,.......54, 81, 83 .........115, 124 54 Gill, Marvin-Kearney ............... Gillming, Hllen-Kearney ..........,.......,,..............................,.....,........... Gilpin, Iessie-Grand Island ..,.........,........ ............ .....,.............,..,,..,,... 72, 75, 87, 98, 90, 91, 100, 128, 131, 141 Glenn, Howard-Hildreth ,,,,,,,,.,,,....,..,.........,,,,............. 54, 97, 119, 128 Go an, William-Qrcadia ...............,....,........,........ 44, 81, 97, 128, 130 Goigdenstein, Beverly--Kearney ...,.... ...,....,,.,....... ,.............,.. 3 9 Gotobed, Kenneth-Kearney ....,.,..... ......,,........................ Graf, Darline-Doniphan ................ Grassmeyer, Darrell-Kearney ,.,,. Griffith, Walter-Kearney .........,..... G1-osh, Phyllis-Kearney ......,..,... Grow, Charles-Leap ity ............ Gustafson, Bruce- oldrege .,.,....... .,........44, 84, 86, 63 93 90 ..........,134 62 Gzehoviak, Harold-Loup City ....,.... .,..,..... 5 4, 97 H Ham, Kendall-Saronville ...,................,,.,.........,.................................. 55 Hanley, Theodore-Hayes Center ..,..........,...,,... 55, 99, 100, 103, 135 Hansen, Gordon-Kearney .,..........................,.,......... 44, 77, 82, 83, 99 Hansen, Lily-A Hnn-Keamey ,...,.,............. 19, 52, 55, 87, 90, 104, 105 Hansen, Ric ard-Kearney ..... ......,.............,........,.... , ,......., 4 4, 82 Hanson, Raymond-Loomis . ..... .....,............,......,...........,........ 5 5 Hanzal, Ioseph-Omaha ........ ..,,.... 6 2, 97, 102 Hardin, Oren-Kearney ........... ....,.,,...,. , . ,,.. 54 Harding, Robert-Qrcadia ....., . .,..... 54, 115 Hardy, Harold-Kearney ....... .,,..........,,...,,,,.,..........,., . ...,.,. 5 4, 82 Hardy, loan-Wauneta ............ ..... ,... ,.,.,,.,,.. ...,.........,............... 4 4 , 9 3 Haring, Ienelda-Franklin ..,... .. .,.............,.,...................,..,..,...... 45, 93 Haring, Norris-Kearney ,..................... 45, 49, 99, 100, 103, 118, 135 Harrington, Hugh-Riverton ......,,.,................,,.........,.........,..........,..... 54 Harrington, William-Riverton ..... ............................. 4 5, 48, 99, 134 Harris. Margaret-Hrnherst .....................................,................ 39, 68, 74 Harris, Max-Crawford .....,... ,. ...,.....,......,....,.,.,..,.,..,......,.,..,... 54, 83, 127 Harris, Neva lane-Kearney ......................................,,......,................. 30, 67, 68, 72, 73, B7, 90, 102, 136, 140, 141, 142 Harris, Robert-Ftmherst .............,.,.,........,,........,,,,,,..., 30, 36, 66, 98, 99 Harrison, Shirleg'-Kearney ,.., ....,.......... ,,..,,.,....,,,,.,,.... . ..,....,,,..,,. 5 4 , 100 Harvey, Betty- ozad ........,.. ,. .,,,, 54, 81, 100, 103, 131 Harvey, Phil ip-Ogallala ...,,,,,,,,,..,..,......,,,.,.....,...,.,..,,.....,. 62, 100, 103 Harvey, Robert-Ogallala . ,.,,.,,....,...,........,,,,,,...,.,....,,, 55, 99, 100, 118 Hauver, Robert-Kearney . .......,..,............................,.................,...,.,... ,. 45, 39, 99, 115, 124, 126, 127, 128, 130 Hawthorne, Hgnes-Trumbull ,......... ........................,.,.,,.............. 4 6, 102 Hawthorne, Sylvia-Trumbull ....,......................,..........., 6, 30, 100, 102 Hayes, Robert-York ,... .......,....,,........,.,,. - ...... 4 6, 78, 82, 99, 136 Hales, William-Medford, Oregon .....,, ...,,.,.,,,.,.,,.,.......,,...,,. 5 5 He b, Lyle-Halsey ............,......,...,.... ,......,.,.,.........,.,,..., 5 5 Hee, Harold-Lexington ................,. Helleberg, Rex-Kearney ............ Hemcinhill, Richard-Oconto .' .... Hen ricks, Harlan-Loomis ..... Hendrickson, kg!-Qlma .... ...., Henlce, Lloyd- alton ................ 1-1enninger,Ftichard-Gibbon .,.. Herrmann, Carroll-Pimherst Herrmann, Lowell-Flmherst .,.... Herzog, Leonard-Kearney , .,.. 100 ........38, 99, 126 102 ........56. 93, 135 81 ....,..,56, 102 ......,.....62, 102 81 Hicks, Don-Kearne .....,.........,.,.. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,..,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 1 00 Higgins, Virginia-lgearney ,.,.... ...........,,...,,.,, 5 7, 100, 103 Hixon, Guy-Qnsley ,...,. ..,,,,.,....,,,,,, ,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 5 7 , 97, 126 Heck, Dick-Lexington ...,......,,.,...,.,,,, ..,.,,,,,, 4 3, 45, as, 97, 115, 130 Hogeland, Flllene-Bloomington ...... ..,,,,,,...,...,,,,...,,,,,.,,, 4 6, 86, 90 Hornling, Shirley-Kearney ..... , ..... .............. ,... 4 2 , 46, 87, 93 Hopkins, Glen-Riverton ....,..,...., ,,,,,,.,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 5 7 Horky, Norma-Sargent ......,..,. ,,,,,,, ,,,,,,, , , ,57, 77 Horner, lack-Kearney , ...... ....... , .. ,,,, ,.,,,. , , 57 Houtchins, Duane-Kearney ...,... ..,..,,.,.,,.,,,....,...,, 5 7 Houtchins, Preston-Kearney ..... ,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 6 2 Howard Riley-North Platte ,......., .,.,,,......,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 5 6 Howsden, Lloyd-Huntley , ..,...,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,, 5 6, 97, 125, 127 Hubers, Constance-Kearney ,....,. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 5 B, 90 Hubert, Delton-Ufgland ..,......,..,. ...............,...........,.........,.. 5 6, 127 Hunnel, Charles- earney ........ ...................,. , ........,..,.,.,,.,..,,.,,,,.,,,.,,. 5 7 Hunt, Betty-Kearney .......,,.............,............. 42, 46, 75, 78, 86, 87, 90 Hunt, Robert-Minden ...,..,......,..,.,...,.....,.,..,.,.,.. 37, 38, 77, 83, 99, 112 Surdle, Frances-Mascot ............ 36, 38, 80, 83, 94, 95, 100, 103, 140 urdle, Willard-Mascot .,......,.,,...,...,.,..,,,....,.,.,,,,,,,,,..,, 57, 97, 126, 139 Hurley, lean-York .........,............. ,...,,. .,,.,..,.,.,..,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, .,,,.,,,,,,,,, 5 7 , 9 O Hurley, Patricia-Merna ..............,. ,..,.,,,........ ......,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,.,,,,,,,, 4 6 , 90 Hutcheson, David--Bassett ........., ,.,...,.,,. .,...,......,,,..,,.,....,,,.,,, ,,,,, 5 7 , 102 Hutchins, LaVern-North Loup ............ 36, 38, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103 I Ibsen, Hazel-Kearney ...... .,.....,,.,.. 3 6, 38, 72, 75, 82, 88, 94, 95 Ibsen, Patricia-U land ,...... ...............,,......,...,, , 57, 93, 102, 140 Imming, Robert-Eearney ....... ........, 5 1, 57, 109, 113, 126, 139 Ingram, Walter-Kearney .,.,............,, ...,,,,,,,.,,,,,,.,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 5 7 Innes, Geraldine-Kearney ....,..,........... ..,..,.,....,.,,, 4 2 46 86 92 93 Isbell, Weliord-Roanoke, Virg' ' ,me ........ ..,,.,..,.. ' .,,,,., 1 55, '97, '12s Page 145 1 lack, Bett -Eustis ........,.................... Iackson, geo:-igia-Kearney ,,...., Iackson, Rona d-Kearney ..,,.... Iackson, Russell-Paxton ....,.. lacobsen, Mark--Kearney ,.,,. . Iacobson, lack-Lexington .,.,.. Iacobson, Lee-Lexington ..... Ielinlce, Lloyd-Ravenna ....... K 6, 28, 32, 64, 67, 88, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 78, 99, 104, 105, 118, 128, 130 80 .......i.56, 80, 86, 93 ......,..57, 99 ..........115 57 Iellcin, Ruby-Franklin ,......,.,. ......,...,,...,,......,.........,.,.,.....,............ 5 7 Iennett, Francis-Dalton ....... ..,....,.,..........,...................................... 6 2 Iester,,Don-Kearney ,... ....... , ...,...............,..,.,.,.............. 4 6, 79, 87, 102 Iester, Royal-Kearney ........,,.......... 19, 36, 38, 42, 97, 104, 106, 140 lillson, Dale-Dalton ,,..................,........,,..........,..........................., 57, 115 lohnson, Hrdyce-Kearney ..,.... ...,...............................,.................... 5 7 Iohnson, Doris-Orleans .............. ........,..,.... - ............ 5 7, 80, 83 lohnson, Margaret-Kearney ,.... .. ................,................,..... 30, 90 lohnson, Orvene-Brady ............ ........ 5 6, 77, 80, 90, 131, 142 Iohnson, Thomas-Kearney ...... ...................,........,............. 3 0 Iohnson, Weldon-Kearney ...... .,.......,....... 5 1, 55, 56, 116 lones, Marjorie-Overton .,.,...... .........,,..,.....1... 4 6, 77 Iordan, Charline-Kearney , .... ....... 5 5, 56, 80, 102 lorgensen, Keith-Kearney .......... .,.....,...,....... 5 0, 56 Iungles, Robert-Sweetwater . ....... , Kalstrom, Evangelyn-Brule ......... Kappas, lille-xandria-Kearney ,.... . Kaps, Donevieve-Elm Creek ......... Korner, Maxine-Odessa ...,....,..... Kasiaar, Oliver-Prague ,.,,.., .......,..., Kee ey, Benjamin! earney .....,..,.,.... . .,..,.....,.......,..........., 57 31, 93, 100, 140 100, 102 80, 94 31, 64 Keep, William-Elm Creek ,.....,........,....,., .......................,.,.......... ....1. 5 7 Kelley, Hshtorcl-Sloat, California .............,...... 57, 100, 103, 127, 135 Kelley, Iames-Exeter ,,... ..,..,. .,.. ,..,....,,...........................,..........,........... 5 3 Kelley, Leo-Cambridge ...,..,.........,,,. ...,.......,...........,............ 5 7, 117, 127 Kennedy, Robert-Merna ...., . ..,,,... ,....,..... 2 9, 36, 39, 81, 98, 99, 127 Kenney, Ronald-Flmherst .,...,,......,. ...........,...,.... 5 7, 91, 99, 100, 103 Kenton, Plrlene-Kearne .,..,..,,,,...,.....................,.............,.............1..... 56 Kersenbrock, Herman-Ogallala ............ 38, 79, 81, 98, 99, 118, 134 Killham, Barbara-Potter ........................................,........................,.... 38 Killion, L le-Lexington ........ .............................,..,,......................,....,.. 5 6 King, Barhara-Flmherst ....,... ......... 3 7, 38, 41, 78, 80, 90, 106, 140 King, Margaret-Kearney ......... ........ .....,.............. 5 6 , 78, 80, 90, 102 Kingsley, onald-Denman ...,.......,................,.... .,,............................ 5 7 Kleemeger, Dorothy-Thayer ........,.........,........ ................... .... ,... . 4 5 Klein, retchen-Lincoln ,, ......,,,.......,.,.......,,,...... ......... 5 7, 90 Knight, Dorothy-Wheatland, Wyoming ........... ......... 5 7, 30 Knothe, Stanley-St. Paul .,,.....,,.,.,......,..........,... ................. 6 3 Knott, Norma-Gibbon .......,,............. ..........., . ................ 5 5, 57 Martin, Laurence-Beaver City ......... .....,., 4 2, 47, 97, 137 Martin, Leo-Kearney ..,.................... ,,,,...,....,...,..,..,.. 5 8 Marymee, Frank-Bladen .,..,...,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, 4 7, 118, 126 Marymee, Shirley-Bladen ,......,. ...,...,., 6 3, 77, 80 Mason, Leslie- orth Platte .....,.,.,,,,.,.,,......,, ......,,,.,...,..,.,.,.. 5 8, 81, 99 Mason, Mary-Hrcadia ....................1........1.,.....,.........,............ 58, 93, 102 May, lean-Hardy ....,.......,..,.....,.................,................,...,,.,...,.....,..,,..,.., 77, 87, 90, 91, 108, 128, 131, 136, 140, 141, 142 Mears, Wendell-Kearney , ..............,...................................... 58, 99, 127 Meline, Douglas-Kearney .....,..,,.,,...,,.,,,..,..........,.,.,.,.,., . ,,,.,,.....,, 58, 127 Meline, Robert-Kearney ....... ,.... 7 , 29, 32, 57, 72, 73, 78, 79, 87, 99 Mercer, Rosalie-Kearney ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,, 4,,,,,, ,,,,,,44 5 8 , 90 Mesen, Violeta-San lose, Costa Rica ,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,, ,,,,,,,, , , ,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,, 4 6 Messick, Ethel-Benkelrncm ,..,,,...,..,,,,,., . .,,.,,, , ,,,,,, 59, 90, 102 Messman, Warren-Strang ,,,,,..,......,., ..,.,. .....,,,,,,,.,,,,, 6 Z Mettenbrink, Joseph-Kearney .,,..,. ......,,,,,,,.,,,, 5 9 Miller, Cyrus-Kearney ,,,,,,,.,,, ,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 5 9 , 93 Miller, Lois-Fullerton ..,.,,.,,.........,....,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,..,,,,,,, ,,,47, 80, 102 Miller, Otis-Oshkosh ....,,..,.,.,,.,,,...,.....,.,,,,,.,.,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 32, 66, 71, 72, 98, 99, 117, 119, 121, 130 Minnick, Robert-Stromsburg ....................,.,,..............,. 33, 48, 99, 107 Misko, Henry-Ord ....,..................................,......,........, 59, 117, 119, 120 Mitchell, Clarence-lllurora ......,,,.,...,,,,,,,,...,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 42, 71, 85, 96, 97, 127, 128, 130, 139, 142 Mitchell, Iohn-Kearney 1 ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Mitchell, Nick-Kearney ......,,.., ,..... ....,.,............ 7 , 31, 32, 99, 123130 Mohatt, Kathleen-Sidney ....,. Mohatt, Patricia-Sidney ..,...,. Monasmith, Vernon-Kearney iiifww-NWI:ff:flfff::::::5B, 81 Monk, Wayne-Elm Creek, .,.,,.,.,,,... , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,..,,,,,. 62 Monnington, Warren-Overton ..... ........,..................... 5 8, 119, 120 Moomey, William-Kearney .,.,... ,..... ,........,...... .....,.,....,.........,..... 5 8 Moore, Mary-Kearney ,....,.,.,.., .,.,.....,.,,,,,,,,,,.,.,.,.,,.,,,,,.,,,, 15, 47, B0 Moore, Holland-Cam ridge ...... ,.,,.., . 232, 117, 119, 120, 130, 135 Moore, Wilbur-Lexington .....,,....,.,,.,.,..,....,,,,,,,,,..,,.,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 58 Morgan, Dean-Pleasanton ....,...........,.......,.............,........1.. 58, 82, 127 Mortensen, Darlene-Hardy ,... .....,,............,........,,..,,...... 5 9, 77, 80, 93 Mortensen, Viola-Hardy ................ 29, 32, 33, 75, 84, 86, 92, 93, 134 Morthole, Gordon-Culbertson ,,,,,,,, ,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 5 9 , 126 Mulholland, Richard-Watervilleu-'Numm Mullender, Lalilhea-.Fllliance ........ Kolar, Francis-Wolbach .....,. .......31, 99, 127 Korcek, Ioseinh-Oconto ........, . ....,. ................. 4 6 Kouba, Stan ey-Kearney ................... .... ....... 5 7 L Laier, Loreen-Eustis ........,.... . ....,. ........r.......,........... v ..... 5 7 Lancaster, Iohn-Kearney ..... ...,...... 6 3, 100. 102. 103 Landis, Shirley-Kearney ...r.. ...,..,.. 11... ............. 5 7 , 90 Lange, Treva-Gibbon ..,...,....... ..,,.1....,........... 6 3. 90 Langenberg, Bette-Sutton ....... ..........,.............1......... 0 3 Langin, Gertrude-Imperial ..., ,.............. ..... 3 1, 39, 54, 81 Langin, Robert-lrnperial ....., . ..........r.............,..r..........,,., 56 Larson, Robert-Lebanon ..... .......... 5 6 97 100 102 Laub, Marilyn-Omaha ...... . . . . 103 56 M Lee, I-lnna-Kimball ....,............ .1....1... 5 6. 80, 93. 90. 134 Letf, Donald-Wilcox .................. 1......... ......................... 4 0 Lemons, Dave-Crawford .... .............,.................................................. 1 27 Lengkeek, Harold-Kearney .....,.................................................,,....,.. 57 Lewis, Hazel-Kearney .,,,,..,..,.,.......,.................,..,........,........,..........,... 57 Lewis, Norma-Gibbon .............,.. 19, 20, 55, 57, 78, 79, 87, 90, 142 Lewis, Robert-Callaway .r.................. ......... ...............,....... ,.... .....,..... 34, 85, 99, 119, 121, 123, 125, 128, 130, 134, 140 Lewis, Treva-Gibbon ......,,...,,..,...,,....,.,......,...,,................ 38, 80, 86, 90 Line, Carrol-Eddyville .....,.,....,......................,.......,.......,.............,...... 57 Little, Paula-Kearney ............................ ..,..........,..,.... S ........................ 4 5 Lindstrom, Lewis-Elm Creek .......,...................................................... 63 Lockenour, Rudrey-Cambridge ........,.....,............,.......,,..,..... ,,.. . 57, B0 Lola, Hilda-Ord .......,........ 6, 7, 32, 72, 75, 81, 84, 87, 93, 100. 140 Long, Roy-Hmherst ..................................................,.....,..,................., 142 Long, Wiliam B. tLittle Billl .....r..............,..........,............ 57, 03, 97, 112 Long, William H. tBig Billl ..,, 37, 38, 71, 98, 99, 121, 130, 135, 140 Luce, Glenn-Central City ................................................,,,....,- 1.....- 3 3. 97 Luecltke, Mildred-Hrcadia .........,........i.....................................,..... 57, 86 Luhn, Ierene ............................,.......,..................... ...i............. 5 3. 140 Lukes, Qlbert-Long Beach, Calilornia ....,..... ................. 2 9, 32, 82 Lydiatt, Iames-Lodgepole ..,...,.................... ....... 5 8, 83. 99, 139 Lynch, Robert-Kearney ...............i...........i ........................ 5 9 McClure, Harold-Riverdale ........ McClymont, Iean-Holdrege ........,.. McCord, Kenneth-Kearney ,............... McCormick, Neal-Central City .......... McDowell, Lois-Trumbull ............. McGrew, Dora May-Orleans ..,.,., McKee, Betty-Lexington .........,... McKee, Wllbur-Lewellen ...,. , .......... ...... , .......47, 97, 127 90 100, 103 32, 86 47, 93, 102, 134 127 McKinney, Wayne-Kearney ............. .....,.... 4 7, 97, 100, 103, 118 Mutchie, loan-Eddcyville ..,,.....,,,.,.. ,,,,,....,.,,..,, 5 9, 81 Mutchie, Ursula-E dyville .......,....,... ......... 1 5, 47, 81 Nall, Bruce-Curtis , .... ..., . , ...,...,.,..,..,,, 47, 99, 127 Nama, lean-Shelton ..... ., .......,.,..,,,.... 58, 77, 131 Nama, Iune-Shelton ..... .................... 4 7, 77, 128, 131 Neal, Donna-Odessa ......... ...................,........ 4 0, 90, 128, 131, 141 Neal, Clayton-Odessa ..,..............,................,.....,............................... 58 Nelson, Hrlene-Utica ........................,......... 58, 71, 77, 80, 86, 93, 138 Nelson, Fern-Flxtell ,..,..... ..,.,,....... 5 8, 82, 93, 100, 102, 103, 118, 131 Nelson, Mary Flnn-Grinnell, Iowa ,.........,..,,.....,.....,,.,.... 47, 86, 90, 91 Nelson, Ph llis-Flxtell , ..,,....,.,.,.,..,.,,,....,.,,.,,.,,.....,.,, 46, 49, 77, 82, 102 Nelson, Roiert-Kearney . ,.,.. ..,.....,...,..,..................,,,......,..,....,............ 4 7 Newcomb, Qnna-Paxton .......,.,.....,...,,,.........,,.,..,...,,,,...,........,.,.... 58, 80 Nicholson, Dean--Superior .....,....... .40, 75, 88, 98, 99, 100, 102, 103, 118. 119. 121. 128, 129, 130, 134, 135, 140, 141, 142 Nickel, Donald-Hxtell ..............,............,.....,.......,..,......,.......,........ , ..... 62 Nielsen, Burl-Kearney ..... ...........................,..,........,,..,........,......,....,,... 4 0 Nielsen, larnes-Kearney .....,,...............................,...,.........,........,........ 118 Norall, Roger-Bertran ..........................,.................,,....,..... 58, 82, 126 Noonan, Kathleen-Scotia .... 6, 32, 66, 72, 73, 78, 81, 84, 92, 93, 140 Norris, Kennon-Chapman .................................................... 58, 82, 127 Novosad, Lyle--Ord ......,..........,.,,..i......,,..........,...........,................. 59, 127 Noyes, Kathryn-Kearney .............., , .,,,...,. 32, 33, 73, 80, 93 Nuernberger, Wilfred-Omaha ..,.. ..,......,.......... 5 9, 82, 97 Nutzman, Beth-Bertrand .................,... .......,, ...,... 5 9 , 80, 94 Oherg, Iune-Hurora .............................,......,........,....,......................... 62 Ocarnb, Norma-North Platte .......................................,.........,., 47, 49, 93 Olberding, Mary Flnn-Kearney .,..,.,..,.....,....................,... ...... 5 9, 81, 84 Oliver, Doroth -Shelton ..,.. ........... 7 , 29, 32, 33, 64, 67, 72, 73, 80 Olson, Iames-Nllood River ..........,.........,.....,.,.........,.........,................... 33 Olson, Leslie-Miller .................. ......,.........,.....,......,.,,..............,,,.., 4 7 Olson, Twilla-Hildreth ..,..................,.............. 58, 77, 82, 93, 102, 131 Orth, Dale-Plymouth ......,..,.......,.,,,,....,........,......... 58, 59, 99, 119, 120 Osborn, Max--Torrington, Wyoming, ......, 47, 97, 117, 119, 120, 130 Oswald, Gerald-I-'lurora ..,.....,.....,......,.,,....,..,....,.. .... ...,...........,,... 4 7 , 48 Otto, Norman-Kearney .,,.....,,.,............., ,............,.,.,...,,., ....,,,..,,....... 4 7 Parish, Frank-Miller .......................,. .......... 4 7, 89, 97 Parker, Phyllis-Broken Bow ,...... .....,.... 4 8, 77, 86 Parkins, Bob-O'Nei11 .......,,....... ......................... 1 04 Patterson, Cecil-Plnsley ....., ..,......,.. 5 8, 113, 117 Patterson, Ralph-Qnsley ..... ...,,... 4 8, 91, 97, 117 Patton, Donald-Kearney ........ ............. 4 3, 48, 85, 99 Pavelka, Donald-Fairfield .... Pecht, Mary-Loup City ............ McMahon, Constance-I-lmherst ,......,. ....................................... 5 9 McMahon, Louise-Hrnold .............. , ............... 43, 47, 83, 93 Maresh, Otto-Ord .i..........................,............-...-......,.............-.....-- .-.... 5 9 Marie-nau, Douglas-Kearney ,..,...,.....,...... ........,....i....i........i.....,.. 4 7, 99 Mqrler, B ron-Carlsbad, N. M ........,..,......................,..,..,....,,......,..... 127 Marrow, Keland-Lincoln ...... 15, 38, 85, 113, 124, 127, 128, 130, 134 Marrow, Rogene-Lincoln ............ , ............,...........Y.......................... 15, 53 Marshall, Bonnie-Eddyville .............,........,..,.,........1..1..........-....... 59. 30 Marshall, Glen-Beaver City .....,.. Martin, Colleen-Kearney ,,..,,... Page 146 .......58, 80, 84, 102 49, 83, 92, 93 Pester, Mae-Broken Bow .........,... ..................................,.... 5 8, 90, 142 Peterson, Hlhert--Dannebrog .............................................................. 62 Peterson, Cliiiord-Kearney ............,...,......................,,................... 37, 40 Peterson, Margaret-Kimball .,.,.... 58, 77, 79, 87, 90, 100, 103, 142 Peterson, Paul-Madrid .........,.............,............................,......,.... 59, 140 Peterson, Richard-Kimball .,.......... 5, 31, 33, 67, 112, 113, 119, 130 Peterson, Verla-Gothenburg ..................,........,...,......, ,12, 39, 40, 141 Peterson, Walter-Kearney ..,....,.,,......,.....,.......,.....,....... ....i..i ..... 6 3 , 102 Petitjean, Keith-Stanlord .....,.............i................................................ 58 Pettegrew, Dawn--Gothenburg ...... .. ....,..............,. 48 Petska, Ierry-Ord ,.., ............................ . s ....... 52, 83 Pierson, Martin-Gibbon .....,............ 8 Pitt, Mary Lee-Dunning, ...........,.. Plaza, Freda-Bayard .............. 3 ........58. 90. 141 ......,..26, 59, 93 Podkonyak, Iune-Lewellen ........ .............,.... 5 9 Pollat, Verla-Cozad .... .........Y ......-----,--.. 5 9 , 77, 50, 93 Polski, Robert-Loup City ..A. ..... ....... 5 , 33, 34, 56, 72, 99 Pope, LeRoy-lllrnold ,......,...,..v .... ---,.-.--v-------,- 5 9 . 122, 127 Pope, Russell-Hmolcl .,........Y. ...,-,---,---,-- -A----4-,--A-4-4 5 3 Porter, Ioanne-Kearney ......, Porter, Ralph-Hrcadia .....,..... Paulson, Roger-Kearney ..... Powell, Kathryn-Kearney ...... Price, Leo-Broken Bow.. .... , ...... . Pscherer, Marjorie-Kearney .... Quillen, Merlin-Beaver City ,.............. 93 58 66, 72, 73. .......,6, 33, 1 16, 125, 128 Raeston, Ioe-Kearney ....,...,..........,............ ......-..-,--.------,-.-- 5 3 Rasmussen, Romaine-Kearney ........ ,...... . . ............ 58, 100, 127 Rayment, Fred-Kearney ..... ........ ............ .......... ....................,.. ......... 5 9 Rector, Gordon-Cheyenne, Wyoming ...................... 40, 99, 119, 122 Reeder, Clara-Columbus .............,..........................,..,.......,....,...,..,.... 34 Refshauge, Helen-York ...,........,....,.....,.,.......................A........................ 7, 33, 34, 64, 56, 68, 72, 73, 74, 75, 78, 80, 84, 85, 88, 92, 93, 140 Reishauge, Ilene-York ,,.. ................,.............................. ,...,....,.,.,.. . . 34, 66, 71, 72, 73, 80, 86, 93, 100, 134, 136, 142 Reinertson, Glenn-Hazard .,.,.............................A..........A....... 62, 82, 102 Reynolds, Marion-Tekamah ........... ...............,.....l.A.........................A. 5 9 Rhoades, Wayne-McCook ..... ....... 5 1, 59, 99, 138 Rice, Iackscn-Kearney ......,...... .......i. 4 0, 135, 139 Richards, Donald-Shelton ,..,,... ..................,........,.,...,......i...............A. 5 9 Richey, Marjorie-Stockville ,................... .................... ,,,,..., 6 3 , 80, 131 Richter, Gerald-Kearney ..................,..........,.,...................................... 4 , 71, 73, 75, 78, 87, 98, 99, 107, 108, 139 Riley, Velma-Gibbon .,.. .. ..,,,,,...,....,..............,..i................................. . 60 Roberson, William-Holdrege 106 60 Robinson, Edward-Kearney . ...... . ........,.,.......................... . Rohde, Margaret-Ravenna ,,., . .......,.........,........................ 48 Rohde, Robert-Ravenna ...,.. ......... 3 4, 112, 124, 127, 130 Roper, LeRoy-Kearney ...... ...........,........,..........,....... 6 0 Rose, Louis-Hrnold ......,........ .....,............. 6 1, 100, 103 Rose, William-Hrnold ,.... .......,........ .....,...................... 6 1 Rosenthal, Ieanette-Gibbon .,......,.............,..... - ............ 61, 77, 90, 102 Rowe, Phyllis-Loup City .,....,.........,,.....,..,.,.............,,...............,.. 61, 112 Rumbaugh, Iohn-Phillipsburg, Kansas .... ......... . .....,..,.................... . 89, 99, 112, 124, 128, 130 Rundquist, 1-lrdella-Minden ..,....... 39, 40, 72, 75, 80, 84, 86, 93, 136 Ryan, Iarnes-Loup City ......................,.....,...........,.......... ....... 6 1, 99, 127 Ryan, Kent-Danbury ....,......,.. 40, 75, 96, 97, 116, 119, 122, 128, 130 S Saatholl, Eunice-Miller ..,..., ..,.,..,,...... 6 , 28, 35, 83, 94, 95, 100, 103 Sall, Wilma-Hxtell .....,.,.,......................., 39, 40, 90, 91, 128, 131, 138 Samuels, Phwglis-Curtis ......,......,.......,....,..... 49, 87, 90, 112, 131, 136 Sanderman, onnie-Lexington ............ 49, 90, 91, 102, 132, 139, 141 Santo, Faythe-Stapleton .........................,.......,..,...,,...,.,................,.,. 61 Saum, Burnell-Farnam . ...,.......... ,,.......,..,..., ..... .....,.,.............,....., 6 1 Schatz, Helen-Kearney ........... .....,.., 6 0 90 100, 103 Schatz, Nancy-Kearney ...... , ...... . Schellhase, Myron-Kearney ,...., 96, 91, 141 139 86 Scheurman, Iohn-Sidney ,,..,.. ,.,., 1 ,....,,,,,.. ..,,.., ,.,.,...,, . 6 0 , Schmidt, Lorraine-Poole .................. ....,...., 1 5, 41, 75, 77, 82, Schwab, Deloris-Sutton ...,.,............... ,,..,.....,......,.. ....,.,,.,.,,...,,, 6 3 Sear, Colleen-Kearney ..................,.,.,., . .,,., ...,,,, , 60, 77, 90, 131 Sedlacek, Bernard-Grand Island ...,....,,...,...........,.,,,.,..,,,,,,.......,,..... 63 Sell, Robert-Stamford ,.,.... ,. .,.....,,, ,,,,. .,........,.,,........,,.,, ,,,,, ..,, ,,,...,,,,,,., 6 3 Severns, Robert-Holcirege ,..........., ,........ ............,..,,..,.,.,,,,,,,,,..,,,,,,,,,, 3 5 Shada, Victor-Kearney .......... .. ...., 60, 82, 85, 97, 106, 127, 132 Sharp, Georgia-Kearney ..............,...,,,...,.,,,,..,,,,.,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,.,,,,,,,,,,,, 61 Sheen, Russell-Overton .........,................,,,,,,,,...,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,.., ,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,, 6 3 Shelrnadine, Phillip-Kearney .,..,,,,. ,..,,.,, .,,.,..,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,. , , , 63 Shoemaker, Delores-Grand Island ,,,,,,, ,,,,. ,,,,,,.,..,,,,,,.,,, 1 ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 6 3 Shoemaker, Teresa-Grand Island ..,......,......................,........, 48, 81, 86 Shotkoski, Bernard-Loup City .,,.....,,,........,., 48, 81, 97, 116, 130, 135 Shoup, Delphina-North Platte ,.....,,.......... 2, 16, 35, 90, 91, 136, 142 Shreve, Marvin-Kearney ..,..,.....,., Sibbitt, Thomas-Kearney ........... Sidman, Von-Norton, Kansas ,........ Sieloenaler, Deloris-Kimball .,.....,. Siebenaler, Dorothy-Kimball ......, Sieloenlist, Pllonzo-Kearney ........ Siebler, Harold-Loup City ...,.... 99, 100, ..,...,..61, 100, 102, 103, ...,.......6l, 77, 81, 86, .......48, 77, 81, 86, 103 118 140 140 35 Siel, Lora-Riverton ......,....,.,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 4 6, 48, 93, 135 Simunek, Ice-Wahoo ..,....,.....,. . ..,. ......, 6 1, 97, 119, 122, 130 Simmons, Clayton-Orleans .,.,....... ,..,....... 6 1, 100, 103, 126 Simon, Ralph-Newton, Iowa .,..,,,,,,.,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 6 3, 100 Simshauser, Iannette-Plmherst , ...,., ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , 34 Sims, LeRoy-Kearney ...........,,,.,,, .,.,,,, ,,,,,,,., ,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 4 1 Simek, Qrlei h-Elba ...,....,.....,.......,...,..,,,..,,,,.,,,,,,,,,, , .,,,,,,,,,,, 61, 97, 122 Sizer, Ella 1t7lJae-Kearney .,...,.,,..,,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, . --A----..---....... 2, 19, 40, 41, 68, 72, 73, 74, 84, 90, 101, 102, 104, 141 Slobodny, Ioseph-Kearney .............,........................... ., .....,........,...,., 61 Smith, Dick-Lodgepole ...... , .......................,.......,,,,....... .,....,.. ...... 4 8 , 127 Smith, Evert-Kearney .....,., ..,.... 6 0, 122, 128, 130 Smith, Harold-Kearney ......... ...,......,.. 6 0, 100, 102 Srnolik, Hgnes-Sar?ent ........... .........,...................,.. 6 0 Snow, Neoma-Wal ace ..,.....,,.,. ..... ............,,..,,.,.......... 6 0 , Snyder, Stanle -Kearney ..,.........,..... .......,,..,..........,.....,......,... Sobieszczyk, Qydon-Louie City ............61, 81, 97, 106, Sobieszczyk, Raymond- oup City .,.,........,,,.,..................,......,..... 61, Soderholm, Beverly-Holdrege ........,,............,.,,..,.,.,,,.,.,,.,., 61, 100, Soderholm, Marjorie-Holdrege .........,..,,.. 41, 73, 77, 80, 86, 94, Spangsberg, Donald-Kearney Spangsberg, Fay-Kearney ............,.................,.,,,...,,.....,.,,,,, 61, 80, Spelts, Cathryn-North Platte .,.... 2, 41, 71, 72, 73, 87, 93, 134, Spelts, Robert-Loup City .......,..........,,.,,.........,.....,...,,., 34, 96, 117, Spence, Iohn-Elm Creek ........,,..............,,.,.,,,..,,,....,..,.,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,61, Spongberg Ralph-Kearney ,...... ,...........,. ....,,...,,,,,,., 6 0 , 100, 103, Sprout, Betty Io-Franklin .,...... 50 , 51, 60, 86, 90, 100, 103, 132, Stafford, Idell-Kearney .,...............,..,..........,,,...,...,..,,., 1 ,,,,,,,,, 48, 80 Stafford, Iesse--Burlington Ict. , Mo .,....,,.,..,.,,.....,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 501 93 61 137 97 131 100 127 93 142 128 134 118 137 102 127 Stall, Eleanor-Gibbon ...... Stenjhem, Ruth-Gibbon ....... .........61, 77, 90, 102 Sterner, Eunice-Merna ......,........,.............................. ......,............. 5 1, Stevens, lack-Kearney ..,..... 86 Stever, Dorothy-Stromsburg....46, 49, 77, 87, 90, 128, 129, 131, 141 Stever, Douglas-Stromsburg ,............. .... .................... ...... ......... ......... 6 1 Storch, Libbie--Omaha ....................,.,..,.,..,.,................. 51, 90, 102, 131 Story, Gretchen-Maxwell ............ .....,.. 4 3, 45, 46, 49, 100, 102, 103 Stransky, Bonita-Madrid ....... .,.................. 6 1, 83, 93, 100, 103 Stucker, Iack-Kearney ....... ...... ,....,.. ......1... , ...,.,................ 8 3 Stucker, Verle-Hnsley ........ ........ 3 4, 112, 127, 130 Suhr, Virtus-Kearney ...........,. ............,........,,..,.... 4 1 Swancutt, George-Franklin ..,... ..................... 4 9, 99 Switzer, Calvin-Kearney .......... ...,.,, ., Bl Sytsma, Mabel-Brady ........,.,........... ....... 6 2, 83 T Taylor, Hrthur-Kearney .,.... ,.,.,...,, ,,,,. 6 2 Taylor, Frank-Lewellen ..... ,...... ..... 6 0 Taylor, lean-Kearney ............. ..... 6 2 Taylor, Norman-Kearney ......,,.. ..,.. 6 2 Teichert, Bertha-Stapleton ........,,.,,........ ......., ,....,............ . , ..............,.. 4 8 Thunberg, Oscar-Gothenburg .,......... .,....... ,,.,....,,..... ....................... 6 2 Tollelsen, Lois-Kearney ,....... ......... ..................,.....,................,.,.,,...... 6 0 Toops, Elton-Grand Island ............ 17, 40, 76, 99, 117, 127, 128, 130 Toyama, Ruth-Cozad .........,........................,.................. ,,............ . ..62, 94 Triplett, DeWayne-Kearney ..,.,.............,..................,...................... ,, 60 U Ubben, Iohn-Hildreth .,...,...,..,.,.,...... ........ 4 8, 97, 122, 128, 130 Urwiller, Kenneth-St. Michael ........ V VanCamp, Charles-Kearney ...,... ...,. Vannier, Glen-Hildreth .......,..... Vannier, Verna-Hildreth ............ VanOrnarn, Robert-Hardy ............ Vanover, Benjamin-Starn ord ...... , ................. 60, 83, 97, 137 ,.......61, 82, 93, 100, 103, 131 Veal, Lyle-Elm Creek .,...,......,....,,..... .,,.,., 6 1, 97, 127, 130 Veal, S irley-Kearney ...........,..............,. .............. 4 9, 81, 93 W Wacker, LeRoy-Memphis, Tennessee ,..1,... .... ..1...........,........ . . .63, 126 Wade, Barclay-Kearney .,....................., 49, 79, 87, 89, 99, 126, 130 Wade, Geor e-Gibbon .....,..............,,,...............,,...........,.......,.... 74, 106 Waggoner, gorothy-Kearney ...,.,....,.........,.......................,. 40, 90, 100 Wagner, LaVon-Loomis .... .....,..,,.. .....,........... , 4 9, 77, 80, 86 Wagner, Reuben-Culbertson ..............................,.,,.,.,.......... 28, 34, 99 Walker, Paul-Dix .................,..........................,.,....,......, , ..................,... 63 Walker, Wallace-Lebanon,,,.6, 7, 28, 35, 96, 97, 119, 122, 128, 130 Wallace, Dean-Kearney? ..................,..................................................... 19, 36, 40, 49, 68, 71, 4, 78, 87, 97, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 134 Walline, Charles-Hxtell ..... ......................,..,.................................. . 61 Wardrop, Marian-Kearnegf ....,...,,,,.,....,.,.........................,....,............ 6, 32, 35, 67, 71, 72, 73, 7 , 86, 87, 90, 91, 100, 103, 136, 137, 140 Wardrop, Maxine-Kearney ...,...... 20, 41, 72, 73, 75, 78, 87, 90, 142 Wareham, Virginia-Kearney ...... , .......,,.,............ 61, 87, 90, 102, 139 Warren, .Fllan-Overton .............,,,......,.,......................................... 59, 61 Warren, Luella-McCool Iunction .,........ .........,................,... 6 0 Wary, K. D.-Kearney .............,.,,...,......., .......,..... 3 5 Watkins, Kenneth-Grant .................. ...,..,, 4 1, 99 Watts, Virgil-Huntley ..,,...... ............,.......... 4 9 Wear, Patricia-Farnam ...... .........,,.....,... 6 0, 102 Webb, Donna-Hrcadia .................. .....,.....,............,,. . .,............., 6 3 Webb, Elaine-Odessa ...,. .,............... ....................,..... 4 9 , 78, 94, 131 Weddle, Walter-Kearney ......................,,................,............. 49, 99, 127 Wederneyer, Iaccitllelyn-Ravenna ........,... 41, 90, 108, 128, 131, 141 Weiclerspan, Keit -Culbertson ..,.........,.............................., 50, 60, 126 Weiders an, Kenneth-Culbertson .........,.,......., ....,,...... 5 0, 80, 126 Weiss, Cglen-Imperial .......,.....,,........,,................,...,.....,...,.....,............ 63 Welton, Hubert-Scottsbluff ....,,.,..... ,.,,,,. ...............,.....,...,.......,......,,,, 4 1 Wendell, Rodney-Qxtell ...,.........,.......,,,....,.,..... 61, 100, 102, 103, 118 Wendell, Ruth-Rxtell ..............., 6, 35, 71, 72, 86, 87, 100, 101, 102 West, Ioyce-Belvidere ................. ,..,,.. ......................,....,.............. 6 3 , 131 West, Norma-Belvidere ..............., ,..,,. ..............,,.......................... 6 3 , 131 West, Wilma Iean-Comstock .,.... , ....,,....,,.......,.....,,., 61 White, Norma-Silver Creek. .......... ..,,..... 4 8, 83, 93, 132 Whitneig Winston-Litchfield .,,,,.. ..............,,... 6 1, 134 Wiest, obert-Kearney .....,.,,,.... .,........,,,...,,.,,.. 6 1 Wilcox, Clayton-Gibbon ....., ......... 4 1, 99, 106 Wilcox, Ver a-Gibbon ........... ...,,.,.,,...,. 4 1, 80 Wilkinson, Gene-Minden ..,.....,.. ,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,, 6 3 Williams, Patricia-Kearney .... .............,,,.,.,,,,,,,.,,, 6 1 Wilmot, Paul-Wilsonville .,.,. .,......,,,.......,,,.,,. 6 1, 83, 97 Wilson, Gerald-Oxford .......... 138 Wilson, Marion-Oxford .,,,......... .....,,...,.,,...,, 4 8, 99, 113, 128, 130 Wink, Hlice--Kearney ................,........,., ,...,,,,..,,..,.,.,..,..,. 4 1, 81, 90, 106 Winn, Carolyn-North Platte ..........,..,..,. 60, 77, 80, 90, 108, 134, 135 Winters, Ear -Lexington .......... ...,,,......,...,......,.,.,.,,...,.,.,... 7 , 33, 35, 76 Winters, Verdie-Long Beach, California ....,....,.....,,.........,..,,..... 48, 76 Wise, Don-Lodgepole ...,.................,............,...,. ,,,,,,,,, ..,,, 4 9 , 102, 127 Witters, Lee-Sidney ........,............................... .,,.,,, 6 0, 97, 127, 139 Worrell, Doris-Cozad ...........,......,...,,,., ,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,, 6 0 Wortman, Kathleen-Wood River ........ Wyman, Leith-Gibbon ...,.....,...,........ Wyman, Phyllis-Vets Village ....,..,...,.. Y .....,.49, 77, 81, 83 76 Yanney, Eugene-Kearney ,,,....,,.,,,,, ,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,., 6 0, 82, 99 Yanney, Vernon-Kearney .......,.,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 6 3 Yingling, Earl-Kearney ...... ....... ,..,..,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 6 0 , 83, 127 Young, Gerald-Lexington .............,. .,,,,,,,, , 60, 83, 99, 100, 103 Z Zimmerman, Bob-Htlanta ,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,, 1 5, 60, 89, 97 Zook, Mary Io-Cozad ,,.,,.,... .....,.,...,. ,,,,,,, ,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 4 9 , 9 3 Zulauf, Mariana-Lexington ,,.,.,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 4 5, 49, 108 Zulaui, Roberta-Lexington ,,,,.,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 4 9, 87 Zutavern, Flileen-Dunning ..,,... 45, 46, 49, 94, 100, 102 Page 147 1 ' X 1, K b 1 Ni 'R l' NWI V"1aiI if Mi.- ' 1e"5g:f?g gm! fb! rmkwfw-1 117 ' W,., J 1 .152 w'?Q?'313wf1W3-15:1! ,i , 1'..gM4,f-'M' Wu, '-Jw ,-JL!" .M H0 eg 3' xx 4 1' ,M gn, 1 4 . ,MVN pf M 524 14- vu, mi QQ J ,Ni , wx , ,, ZW ,. 1 W - 'iflx Qfx .ff I " ' I 'Mk f. - MGM' .2 ', 'fr ' V U' f w,T'1.fW's'ss1.Tf'-H ' 59' 522' U, g.. ,"'iwf"If,WJ M. ':2ff.z' , ,,,. u U , an Nw "' 'f f ",' 'V A 1.5 wwf-ubnv ,, ,Z Wg, K ,Q L'-if 1 ws M,-W3 ,,,1-in 'ff q W j.,.lL,.:.: , ,, ,W- in ' WH' ,!Zaf'f5NY1' W Q, ,lb -,I 54m,,,1,gy::-,1if,Lk14- f:wS'3f2'i?fi',1f-"J 'Q , Su M,,,.:f'e!5gg,-,e'gg?e5fnffZ-ESQh yi. aa 5, xv Q1 1. V9 !::v,.ufil,Wg4 ,, f ,, g Y ' , X X H J' N I w 1" vb 'Milli 'W M:'5:14x.41:Jf1f I ZEHWQLQ' X k -II2::::T Nan xW' :Mag E 5-ff., dm G QU CJ rm Cl 'rs 6 A A 1 - 1 l "I'll bring the Coke" 'F MIDWAY COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY Q SUPERIOR CLEANERS School Supplies 'Jcmsso Stationery Notions afffff" Hosiery COSMSUCS We-ctr Clean Clothes ReadY't0'WeaV "'Cmftsmen in Keeping Things New" 9 9 KAUFMANN 6. WERNERT 5-10-25c Store In Kwmey Since 1908 LIBERTY DRY CLEANERS 2013 Central Avenue Dial 26031 Page 149 PLATTE VALLEY I STATE BANK KEARN EY, NEBRASKA Capital, Surplus, and Profits 585,000 We are a store that always has the college man in mind. Clothes you see here are up to the minute and correct. A Good Place To Bank 4+ ill Im iullllsw-,M ewapammwwmw- Member of Federal Deposit lnsumn C rporatinn Now Is the Time to Modernize Your Home Stop in for a free modernizing estimate and have your home a. place of convenience and not just living quarters 0 The Home of Satisfactory Service KEARNEY PLUMBING Cr HEATING C0. Bert Wallace Kearney, Nebraska Dick Wallace Page 150 Q Compliments of the CENTRAL CAFE PHOTOGRAPHERS 0 To the College Students 25 years of service to the for residents of Kearney 40 years under the careful management of MATTSON STUDIO GEORGE PETERSON 0 O For the Entire Family Shop and Save at Kectrney's Newest Department Store Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your Money Back SEARS ROEBUCK AND COMPANY Kearney, Nebraska Phone Phone 2141 2141 Page 151 Shop at Ruter's 0 B rucewood D resses Nelly Don Dresses Rothmoor Coats and Suits Swansdown Coats and Suits Bender 84 Hamburger Dresses K Parnis-Livingston Dresse s Costume Jewel ry-Handbags-Gloves Slips-Gowns-Scarfs-Luggage WORLD Theatre O Always the Best in Motio n Picture Entertainment Page 152 ..-X Millinery Q ChiIdren's 84 Infants' Wear Phone 31791 for Program Details and Q Starting Time RUTER'S THE FASHION V -,-- .- - - ... -4 P, ,W 13 "" , : -r -SHOES- FOR MEN FOR WOMEN Florsheim Rice O'NeiIl Massagic Gold Cross Weyenberg Tweedies Air-O-Magic Connies Footsaver Health Spot 58 Years of Dependable Service Kearney's Finest Laundry and Dry Cleaning Plant Year after year your cheery greetings, enthusiastic spirit, and wholehearted good fellowship have made our servin ou a rivileffe and a Ieasure. D Beyond Compare for Skill and Care 1 ' 'I f , I I - zyzic ACLEANIRSE' ' ' Phone 24501 R. G. Downing' W. K. DOWNING KEARNEY HARDWARE COMPANY 2014 Central Avenue Phone 23251 O QUALITY MERCHANDISE Housewares - Hardware Headquarters for all Sporting Goods 9 FRESH FRUITS-VEGETABLES-MEATS 0 A Complete Line of Canned Goods 6 Everything you need for that midnight snack or spring picnic . . . yes, and economy shopping for the college ma,n's family at the NINTH AVENUE GROCERY LLOYD HENDRIX, Owner Page 153 Buy with confidence at HlRSCHFELD'S 0 Om' Clothes Must Make Good or We Will ' Stetson Hats-Cooper Shorts- Interwoven Hose o 'Mg Ilirsclnfelel 65. 0 ALWAYS RELIABLE O 30 Years of Progress Kearney North Platte Gr" 7 BOOTEME NOVELTY FOOTWEAR FOR LADIES VITALITY RHAPSODY MERRY - GO-ROUND QUEEN QUALITY O POPULAR PRICED SHOES FOR COLLEGE MEN WINTHROP NUNN BUSH 9 2218 Central Avenue Kearney, Nebraska 0 A STATE-WIDE ELECTRIC SERVICE OWNED AND CONTROLLED BY NEBRASKANS 0 . .5 I 4 .m!.l., 5 U N E E NlM'S 4 Take your choice: either dig into your studies today or dig in the ditch tomorrow. The business world of today has no opening for a dance. 0 Page 154 FORT KEARN EY NATIONAL BANK of KEARNEY O Complete Banking Service 0 Member Federal Reserve System Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Congratulations To The Class of '47 0 RAINBOW CAFE 'fWh,ere Friends Meet to Eat" Fountain Service Gifts Prescription Drugs H. H. HAEBERLE DRUGS Phone 20291 2118 Central Ave. Kearney, Nebraska I"0l08l" E06! or at roloer tibief af roloer riced 0 fnllrzqy, Kajaiafukz, Page 155 J 0 , We Appreciate Your Patrouage 0 c. PENNEY Co. Kearney, Nebraska Quality Food Delioiously Prepared Oourteously Served EVANS STUDIO Official Photographer for Individual Pictures for the 1947 Blue and Gold 0 TASTY TEA RooM 9 WEDDINGS THANKS GRADS, sfrumo PORTRAITS ENLARGING WGW B6 M 58813119 You COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY 0 9 BUSY BEE SHOE SHOP 1215 P Street, Lincoln, Nebraska Page 156 9 A VARIETY STORE HOSIERY - LINGERIE - MILLINERY STATIONERY - SCHOOL SUPPLIES S 'Q L 4' . 425333, mu I ' CONGRATULATIONS, OLASS OF 194'7! Ill 1- J IW- .Expertly Fztted by X-Ray QUALITY MERCHANDISE FINE WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIR Roblee Mode Arts Jarman Air-Step Buster Brown Beverly Jeane KEITH'S JEWELERS "Everything in Music" BAHR-SCHAAL MUSIC COMPANY 0 2309 Central Avenue Opposite World Theatre Emmett A. Bahr Frank Schaal Page 157 BODIN SON HARDWARE Your Patronage Is Appreciateol We Strive to Please For that After-Show Snack or Afternoon Pick-me-up, Join the Gang at Kearney's Newest and Smartest THE CHOCOLATE SHOP K'EARNEY'S OLDEST AND FINEST Pianos Philco Radios Sheet Music Philco Refrigerators Recordings Maytag Washers r'MUSlC can ' PRIVATE DINING ROOMS I FOR ALI. OCCASIONS ff, H T' V- - 'V - ,,---, :w .....'Q gli 5 EEE 5 E li None Too Large or Too Small I3 if E E 'I Su I 'Q I ll I-it its . I I R Fl! Q M Luncheons- Dinners- Receptions l A .sg 1 " N N - g AP AQ Wedding Breakfasts " ,S . I a t 1 Stag Parties Scene of All the Important College Social Events Crystal Ball Room - Green Room - Italian Room - Club Room HOTEL FORT KEARNEY Page 158 CONGRATULATIONS To the class of 1947! 9 QUALITY DRUGS The eyes of tomorrow will be on you WA'-GREEN SERVICE Look Your Best by Choosing Jewelry of Q Good Taste and the Latest Style Try Our Fountain Service 0 0 Watches, DIAMONDS, Silver HAWTHORNE IEWELRY PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED EXACTLY AS ORDERED BY YOUR DOCTOR The Favorite "Coffee Pot" 0 Where Students and Instructors Associate 0 iiMeaIs ikFountain Service :lunches -LeRoy Owner Page 159 STATE JOURNAL PRINTING CO, LINCOLN. NEB N -, .,...,,..,...L ,..a,,,,,,.....,.-....f,,..f.....- - ,. f ,. 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Suggestions in the University of Nebraska Kearney - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Kearney, NE) collection:

University of Nebraska Kearney - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Kearney, NE) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

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University of Nebraska Kearney - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Kearney, NE) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 1

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University of Nebraska Kearney - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Kearney, NE) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 1

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University of Nebraska Kearney - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Kearney, NE) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

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University of Nebraska Kearney - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Kearney, NE) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

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University of Nebraska Kearney - Blue and Gold Yearbook (Kearney, NE) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

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