University of Nebraska Lincoln - Cornhusker Yearbook (Lincoln, NE)

 - Class of 1966

Page 1 of 564

 

University of Nebraska Lincoln - Cornhusker Yearbook (Lincoln, NE) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 564 of the 1966 volume:

1 N r I w C , 1 i f V AQRBZET 'Ba1aQu,,,,fR nlzu ka' Editor Barbara Beckman Associate Editors Jim DeIVIars Nancy Baker Business Manager Jean Hoffmaster Adviser IVIrs. Wilma Crumley V ., I ', !1,' 'x 'V ll I I I 'lr 'Z b I ",-xv ','lI V 4' VV X , ' V - Iv ' ', ' 1 7, "','x'. ff' ay .,J 'v 'fl' lv V' V .' x ,UMM 1,7 t,..f'., .5:,',j ,A ' J 'a V: ,f ,.yL'1' l,." ' M' 1 '1"f,fQY,f ju' ., I 1'-I", Vp, - . X ,'.'- "o, ' ' ' ,, ' ,',1. ,' 'Uh' V-fx X41 XXLN Adu f vfll I ,VI tx FA X ,, 4 Vx r IN- is ,. V,H,', I, , V .,v, -, . .r'y, L, U-, Nav", , ,, ' I Vf,V A. 13? ,MQ .V ,-- .Au', k ,vm ,- 'V X I . 'Qu 'g q', ,LIgg!32",-Vw, -.- ', r ' ,K - ,f,Q.V. rj yr Q I' '.,V'.1r---, ,, lv ,-sp V: '1'VV,,,VMg A g, J My 'v A 4. f V, ,, ,, f .. '10-fVV',V .4-5 4 m, 'V ' l,,V 'V 'LV , -, .1vX '1, Wa K, ,V ,w , .1 5- AV, X 3 l,,,xgw'-.. -Un,-1 - V,.f 'E-.Q VU, 1. .1 ,, .4 V"f V 'L ,"' ' ' H .V ww , Q-3, '. rua- -11 . If " - V 'd - 1-, 1 1 ' I 11-AigVQ.1XxA,,,, c'Gtj.gx ,l'v.f1 lg . 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V V " qw. -- f .- 4 ,-nV1y,- '14 V.-:'-. , -' - - H, . , NN- ,V X 5, " . V - P .h V4 ,bf-. ,.., . ,. , 1 qgfwfa- Vx,,3.:,.i":nY4.TV-V, ,fV,,'.,! YT Dx .,' I, xx'-,VIL xi 2 5 1 , 'IRQ sfffvf Jf, . . V Vf-,V -X .V xv-Vw xy ..V. . ,V,V, . V , ,S . f ,H V .,,V.. , 1- .um wp V V --V , f .- V' V. 1, 1 V. 9,1 X- ':"'i1-x 'Lev --.X lfffvq E AE' -'z H" - " fhf U cw.-' 'SSW , ' . mfg- ' . 61.55 'A NP. 4,1 n ' 1 -:V ,V ff,-'- 11 Vx :X VV :V -, , .1 A cf V V ,fx ' 'L 'Q Q W " . U . , 1 -V+"-'M 3','f"f1"'f 'SS' ', ,X V , ,, . ,, I ...Vs ,. v V. .,, ,A X4 X,-typ ww Q - X... .,x QV.. J ,JV V, gg . ,1,.f-?',,, ' V W "X 'A 'L H -2 , "K ""V. . .f 'n -' vis" Mr X4 . '15 - 'ffl Vv V.-Sf: ' ' ',' C 1. -'L 'f N ' F 'N 'M V." ' . '1'I, u . V ' .fi 1" ,, v- '- V gr. -V VV V V' wk VVV ' V' V 'T -V-VV :LV 'ffm V. -A n A Pgfflf- ,nfs 4, nv Q A 4 I g- Iwi' ,tn ,C 01,174 - V. ' .- ' 4.. :.'."f 1 V V VV wg H VV 4 4,.,.,mQ .. VV , , . N , , ,V V, I - ' f- .nn-.--. I-5 Q1 V' - -QM . f. V ,-gi ,xg-., , 1 I fx fig .' .. ' V' Lfl n' -, '.V' 1 ' " V ' ' ,V .xx --:fx -x -V ' .A+ AW, l A ' 'ff-rf" - V V. .1 " " ' 5 i, .t-5, . lx-N 5 f J- k J, P . , l . , Q . H,L-1:." L , an-, mfr. In-f uw 1966 Introduction ....... Administration ...... Academics ......... Citation ....... Introduction ....... Royalty .............. Student Government Athletics ......... Residences ...... Greeks ..... Classes ....... The University . . The Student Student Scenes ....... Organizations ............ University of Nebraska Lincoln, Nebraska' Volume 60 l lx' 1 ral ..,., TVN U Q-. 9 9 A Wi IE IH I . E .4 Qi I ks 52 'ii . , 4, si-, 'HHH 'T .l '1' I. wuz L H. lk l I 2 l. TE U . 11 I EA ll E -L gi 5 1 1, 1, nh .IAA MHA WM 5 LL E NZM A .5 - FE la :SL Bl E. I fl -W -L. ,M if if li -I: ' M' lm hi V 14 -- 'mg W in :Z IL 1: 'A M it .14 mi ma Q 1. if 3 Q, an We -- -f- 'Q Ulla L 'BQ is ww 1" in 5' - Ha 5 lb .. sm ". -1 'H " W- 5 ' --ffgfi in .IL M Ah rfirjlin' S' 'U' .wif 5 I Ml I I I Y If' 5 Jinx- 'Q l , fu ' 1 - ' . 'ff -"-LT. ff! : l!-IFN Q ff" ff' V :Elf gf im ,Nm l I h " sl J.. Ill. 01 j -six A 'N-1 ,... lf' f-Qxg Q- 1 Au... NY, xx I if A I 'Ei' - "2 N lfqhur ,. M' if A xii 9 'QSC ti . t HF Mi ,Y 1. 4 Two clisfincf poles confinue o mogneiic growfh. Cify and Ag: consfrucfive offempf for ropporf. "Look fo fhe Eosf!" A new name offers visibilify fo long-seporofed focfions Af long losf-bearing fruifs of now common inferesfs- in fhe common esfoblishmenf, in common insfifufions. xx Q K, A I mf ,. gl ' X A ' X fe ' ' 4,1 , ' 6 1x4 ' T ll . .2 1 T W FJ A tl i 'fdgik jd, J ! f-74x ' 5 Q J x ' in ' , 'F J, 3 x 7 6 , I ju 9 5 ' ' W Q 0 bv ' is - "X X Q - H X I -L-finaly' ,J-v 1M if. ,, , A ' , Q ' 'J' A I ,.. . --- "' ' K 'g""' f?-YQQA ig, -iv. Q, ,-- V- "i....y iv- ,J ..-ltw ' Search for frue organizafional purpose-seek help wifh a i meaningful name. The anfiquafecl Council succumbs fo fhe fimesf a polifical sfruggle rises darkly from fhe ashes. "Who is supreme?" "How do I sfancl?" The almighfy sfanding aclmiffeclly becomes paramounfg "Nebraska Goes For No. lg" Big Red locally regislers fhe economic rise ancl fallp publicify allows nafional recognifion of a sfafef "King Foolball's" royal arena grows iis annual appendage the Coliseum crumbles. Perhaps... ,QI I . X ,N f ttf? . .Wx .Q ,-.Ju i ,Q h -.. - , -T ' - ' . ,fm . 3 - .5 4. W , Q., ..5!A,A' Q, ,- uf .. tww-.A ' 'F ,, 15-. .v.. ni ,t. ,..., P ". '32 , , , M V-M 1 , h,,,,,, X if A,.w,,,.w WV, M 4 ,Q ,via rc.- -" -'--,gf-4:13- - W 1.-.v v .'1lA'f-.-'Nvf?f-I. v 1- g,,' 51,75 ',.h. 1 AIYFI' -' .5, 4..- R J' ' ' ' 5 Z7 E' w,g,, ,- , .n 15 sV5'QW.f. ., ' ,LJ :ggi fzfq. ' ' . 'u I.--il. - ' f'-"zz, Jn, P' W. .gil ,,. A ! Expansion ancl change? Yes- buf change and recession also. Traclifion-a vicfim of fhe pasff Homecoming-an "lnnocenf" by-sfancler. Innovafion bears paraclox. ls judgmenl necessary? Will we ever know The resulfs? We will nof here survive fhe concise span. Administration .K -Q ,W 1.6 ,.L-5' . .1r.,.,.4JAgz+1fj ,125 L f.. r V -H-M... wi.. ' ..,,,. . L m,.YX-, 1. . .,,,. hfwile' uv! ' fp v 'i",'V'i"'l7""YH"', Q .iff-A-w. - 1.33"-'.'nL!:h F Nfl. ,"2 l 'V-A4 ' ,f-32 'Q -A -,.,:':j,v"? .,,v Y AA ' - if: , 'A "' 'ffiv "4:"I:-I-ve JF! 1, - 4 fl 3.4. qu, -N , -'wgm,9.i- . ' . - 4 . ' 1, I U A ,J vw., x X, '.-1. ' 'T-iijfnfj ,141.'j'f,'j.,"'5iv:Q-',li"':A"? . A '- 1' " " 'Jr .fwxf ftfigk'-'5-11-E--. M, s-.Jr :,lEg.5gf4,,'.7N:Q gb, - -1--ij 7.1 ,, r:,45'f1,-: J.J .. v f . ,' ., -, : ', iw' ,. " , ' QI' "1""4L.- ,- . ,, -- - - ,,-aw.-1 4, ,xi A f . 'M , -. , .QQ Lv' 1. 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Tx 7" my Morrison Tours Continent To Seek Foreign Markets To "Sell Nebraska" on the world market, Governor Frank Morrison headed a twelve-man trade mission to Europe. The delegates, representing the agricultural and manufacturing facets of the state, attracted the interest of businessmen in European countries. In addi- tion to gaining foreign publicity, Mr. Morrison spoke to the American Chamber of Commerce in Paris. At home the Governor originated NEBRASKAland tours to awaken new enthusiam for the state. As a re- sult a record number of out-of-state tourists visited the recreational areas and toured the capital. Encouraging economic progress, the chief execu- tive directed a drive to organize Congressmen and Governors of 12 states to give bipartisan support to the Midwest Development Program. Consequently the Midwest Resource Association formed with a per- manent office in Washington, D.C. to lobby for research funds, manufacturing benefits and agricultural interests. "Selling Nebraska" on a trade tourlof London, Governor Morrison traverses Trafalgar Square. Frank B. Morrison Governor To visualize the Regent's plans for expansion, Chancellor Hardin examines the NU "l.illiput." Regents Employ Engineers To Outline Expansion Draft Anticipating an enrollment of 25,000 by the early 1970's, the University of Nebraska Board of Regents commissioned a New York consulting firm to propose a long-range program of University development. Under the current six-year schedule, the Board made final arrangements for construction of a classroompffice building and a music recital hall. A new gymnasium for women, added chemistry facilities and renovation of existing structures completed the present plan. To avoid complication and duplication in higher educational planning, the Regents met with state col- lege governing boards to discuss standardization of the membership rules for national fraternities and soror- ities on campus to emphasize nondiscrimination. Back Row: R. Adkins, C. Swanson, vice-presidentg J. Elliott. Front Row: J. Welsh. V. Peterson, president: B. Greenberg. Chancellor Hardin Directs NU Modernization Project Through the leadership of Chancellor Clifford M. Hardin, the University adopted a six year 547.5 million improvement schedule and a 3525.4 million operating budget. To strengthen the physical science depart- ments, a portion ofthe assets provided money to furnish Behlen Hall with new laboratory equipment. Serving on the Board of the American Council on Education and as a trustee of the Rockefeller Founda- tion, Dr. Hardin improved out-of-state publicity. On campus the Chancellor supervised the recognition of two more instructors through Regents Professorships. Executive leadership encouraged the growth of the University assistance fund to off-set the anticipated rise in student educational costs. Utilization of Federal money provided by the "work study" plan resulted in additional scholarship aid to University students. l l 2 l l l C ,753 42 Clifford M Hardin Homecoming provides Chancellor Hardin Chancellor with a 1965 time-out and a winning guest. Merk Hobson, Vice Chancellor Dean of Graduate College i I 1 Joseph Soshnik, Vice Chancellor Business and Finance . , . G. Robert Ross, Vice Chancellor Dean of Student Affairs Administrators .prof Adam Breckenridge, Vice Chancellor Dean of Faculties V WX Helen Snyder Associate Dean of Student Affairs Administrators ' muon pl J ..,-. 5 o 1 :7 I3 u 'Gill 'Q 70 1' fs.-f It 11 28 Russell Brown Associate Dean of Student Affairs ii+7 i lj E gwi Wifi ,gi 1 l i Lee Chatfield Associate Dean of Student Affairs Richard Scott Associate Dean of Student Affairs I - M 4 l l 4 SM , gi l , M, in l ft sl 'i' Allen Bennett Samuel Fuenning Managing Director of Nebraska Union Medical Director Administrators 1 ' l l ' -1 Ti e l Q i I l l l M. Edward Bryan Frank Hallgren Director of Housing Director of Placement Norman Geske Director of Art Galleries Roy Loudon Director of Personnel Frank Lundy Director of University Libraries D George Miller Administrator of Physical Plant -,-,.1-- i Clayton Gerken Director of Counseling Service Administrators mlm fi Jack McBride Director of University Television Mrs. Jean Regester Student Activities Advisor i Edward Lundak I Director of Scholarships and Financial Aids 27 l i i i 1 fiil Bruce Nicoll Director of University Press r Frank Sorenson Director of Summer Sessions Richard Bennett Director of Special Business Services Edward Janike Director of Extension Division Harry Allen Director of Institutional Research Spirited Graduates Witness NU-CU Homecoming Clash Before the Homecoming football game with Colo- rado, members of the University of Nebraska Alumni Association, includinga group from California, attended a luncheon in Lincoln. Later in the season the Associa- tion sponsored a plane flight to the annual migration at Missouri and discussed a tentative bowl game trip. Second semester activities centered around the planning of a March vacation to Hawaii. After deciding upon an agenda, a large delegation of Nebraskans spent two weeks on the islands relaxing in the sun, touring points of interest and visiting historical sites. IBM cards completely renovated the filing system in the main office. With a mailing list of over 56,000 alumni for the "Nebraska Alumnus" newspaper, the new method simplified subscription processes in Lin- coln and the other fifty chapters across the nation. fi-H '3?'sf3g.sag-ral px., L H. cg i,114f'+-1-'- i Sally white Executive Secretary Nebraska Alumnus Editor Film Distribution Augments University Advertising Plan Acquainting high school seniors with the Univer- sity of Nebraska, the Public Relations Department produced a new motion picture "A Time to Decide." Potential students in Nebraska and across the nation viewed the movie designed to stimulate interest in the campus. Locally, the department scheduled educa- tional speakers tor civic associations and presented four Regents seminars for community leaders. Through different media, Public Relations pre- sented the image of the University in weekly radio shows and a television series. The news letter "Bulletin Board," published by administrators, kept the faculty informed about meetings and conferences. lnaddition to brochures and reports, the office helped with the distribution of the Builders' "First Glance" magazine. Jerry Petsche Kenneth Keller l I Assistant to Public Relations Director Assistant Director of Public Relations Foundation SuppliesMeans To Increase ETV Facilities With allocations from a total annual budget exceed- ing S700,000, the University ot Nebraska Foundation initiated several new programs. Funds donated by the Foundation financed improvements and expansion in the College of Law buildings and closed circuit tele- vision facilities for the College of Dentistry. Encouraging academic achievement, the organiza- tion endorsed 750 scholarships and loans to eligible students. To promote cultural interest on the campus, contributions supported purchases of paintings for Shel- don Memorial Art Gallery and displays for the Nebraska State Museum. The board recognized both levels of edu- cation by awarding eleven professorships for distin- guished teaching as well as prizes for outstanding work in undergraduate music and English courses. Herbert Potter Harry Haynie Secretary President Academics X-X 1 .J-mx..--' W X - U., .2 X. 3 ' sig' X "-'WX 'f'1I.- X X M X X XXX XM M vX.:.j, ,q.-,,,,, , 95:1 X " L' :Q QL-L1 ' ' 'C3'ff'f" 9 -X - f ,- GL?--H 'if , N -' -- , ,T XX ,X XX X X X .rx XI! 'X + 1 " Xb I 5 ,, Wu I F X XXX X MX .MM XXWWX EX mind 'X,' " - , 1 '1-gp. 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Wnig, , in A . .Is 1 '!,g4f7'f" , lu 'S x Gf-M? - 'F-f ff , -'-f I 41 P 'mums-me Ag College Widens Scope In New Academic Pursuits To accommodate increased utilization of East Campus, the University proposed a 1967 completion date for the Dental College's scheduled construction. Removal of the dairy herd to a new field laboratory in lVlead, provided the space for the relocated school. A shifting away from farming to "agri-business" brought Nebraska's basic industry closer to other fields of interest. To initiate the change the college offered options in various non-agricultural areas. The courses and training equipped the graduate with a combina- tion of managerial skills and a liberal college degree. In order for agricultural students to obtain a tech- nological background, the Cooperative Extension Service instituted a revised policy of study. The new program placed more emphasis on the specialized ap- proach as opposed to the general aspect of instruction. Q Y I4 " '-.1IJ'.'.- , itll. ru if. ' TV 71 . is - E. F. Frolik, Dean College of Agriculture iii 4. 1 , 1-if 11.5.5 V . A 4 VI sg, .. WI, Q , L :y .H l. Kit A K- -iz'-i 'l' ' . V mx - A ,. I Ga 77 -V V . 1 , ' 'V' Sf ff xf, W' ,, 2 wx 5 wg 5 Q E ,Eff 2 ww 2 ww T ,ga wh F Y 1 f ! N' K J I N4 in ii A ,L vYvg'??WyyvvvEv7 Block and Bridle Collects National Activities Awards Submitting a record of activities for the past year, Block and Bridle placed second in National Scrapbook competition. NU also received a third place Nlerit trophy based on senior achievements and a junior scholarship for knowledge of animal science. Entries totaled 281 in the tenth annual Block and Bridle American Quarter Horse Association Show and produced a class "A" exhibition. The organization added a S5300-prize Cattle Cutting contest to the event through cooperation of the Cutting Horse Association of Nebraska. Participating horses represented states from as far as lndiana, New York, Florida and Nevada. To keep pace with the rapidly changing livestock business, B and B invited guest speakers to present new trends. Members focused attention on various mar- keting practices in the Nebraska animal industry. Applying Trojan tactics on the Horse E3arn's mascot, a pledge makes a clean sweep for E3 and I3 initiation. .ga .t Agronomists View Products In Midwestern Farm Tour To broaden the group's scope, the Student Activi- ties Subdivision of the American Society of Agronomy traveled throughout farm states. In Stillwater, Oklaho- ma, members examined a cotton gin and a peanut plan- tation. Continuing to Bartlesville, the Society inspected the Phillips Petroleum Company's fertilizer headquar- ters. The tour then discussed planting with agronomists At the Society's national convention, members re- ' 4 ceived recognition for outstanding service. Burton Thomsen assumed office as the national recording sec- retary and aided James Sheppers as co-chairman of the Speech Contest Committee. Robert Schaffert and Gary Fick won National Merit Awards while Mark Classen took second prize in the national essay contest. . 9, at Arkansas and Kansas Universities. T et' 3'-Lb ! Investigating possibilities of hybrid in-breeding agronomists check effects of ultra-violet rays A ronomy Club: . Bgck Row: J. Warner, W. Amen, R. Jesse, J. Schepers, G. Hibbeler, D. Stock, L.. Schulze, S. Daberkow, W. Peterson. Fourth Row: C. Marxcle, R. Ronnenkamp, R. Schuerrnan, W. Dankert, D. Meyer, C. Juricek, R. Wiebe, R. Grams. J. Specht, C. Pohlman. Third Row, S. Schlager, I.. Brook- houser, R. Beckner, T. O'Hare, D. Bonne, D. Pearson, G. Larson, D. Eggleston, R. Carlson, l.. Reeder. Second Row: J. Miller, P. Harlan, F. Marsh, L. Grams, D. Softley, I.. Schulze, J. Criswell, P. Copley, D. Kanter. Front Row: W. Colville, adviser, V. Lechtenberg, D. Burmood, B. Thomsen, corresponding secretary, N. l-lelzer, president, J. Beals, recording secretary, R. Schaffert, treasurer, R. Schanou, J. Drew, adviser. ,I , Alpha Tau Alpha: Back Row: R. Bartling, G. Mueller. M. Peters, D. Sigler, R. Milligan, G. Vavricek, R. Skokan, J. Warner, L. Reeder, L. Douthit. Third Row: I. Bartling, L. Peterson, R. Wilson, D. Smith, T. Brubaker, R. Sedlak, D. Morgan, K. Erickson, M. Waclell, J. Boyle C. Pohlrnan. Second Row: R. Blede, G. Metzger, A. Wewel, D. Belot, R. Kelly, L. Kastanek, L. Herman, J. Leising, R. Becker L. Nippert. Front Row: R. Peterson, advisor, D. Eggleston, A. Blezek, T. Mzchalski, secretary, L. Viterna, president, N. Smith vice-president, R. Jay, L, Dedic, R. Dwyer, L. Schelm. ATA Agri-Business Tours Orientate Future Farmers Promoting both agriculture and East Campus, Alpha Tau Alpha held four instructive "Drive-ln" con- ferences. Members of the Future Farmers of America participated in the agri-business sessions organized by the professional honorary and Ag College advisers. Revisions of the Constitution headed the agenda for the fall chapter meetings. With improved regulations the Parliamentary Procedure Demonstration Team impressed upon active participants the importance of following orderly and accepted organizational practices. Emphasizing "Teacher Training" for senior stu- dents, ATA played a role in preparing vocational instruc- tors. Trainees reported experiences at the January Banquet, benefiting future agricultural educators. 1 i 1 Wildlife Club Stresses Use Of State's Game Resources Touring the State Fish hatchery at Gretna, mem- bers ofthe Wildlife Club gained the opportunity to study the habits of fresh water animals. In the spring men practiced fishing skills by catching catfish and carp at the club's annual fishing trip to Turkey Creek. Hunting expeditions to various areas of Nebraska allowed sportsmen to bag seasonal game. Wild meats such as antelope, deer and elk, imported from outstate filled the menu at the Winter Banquet. To support NEBRASKAland the Club conducted a project encouraging the University to allow for a Wild- life curriculum. Many similar colleges adopted such a program with graduates aiding the state as game com- missioners, conservationists and park directors. Wildlife Club: Back Row: S. Lucas. C. Dreeszen, G. Loseke, G Beck, R. Skinner, I.. Wilhelm, K.Tarbutton, J. Callan, W. Hake. D. Childress, S. Stedman. Fourth Row: M. Munter, R. Bierman, T. Talbott, L. Klein, R. Spencer, C. Osterndorff. J. Power, P. Tank, D. Colgrove. Third Row: D. Ruwe, R. Lind, B. Alberts, N. Barney, G. Zuerlein, R. Gooclding, J. Stubbendieck, G. War- rick, H. Davis, H. Vlach. Second Row: K. Force, K. Weichel, J. Herzog. L. Kastanek,,S. Schelm, B. Mills, J. Jensen, D. Beckner, T. Truman. Front Row: L. Morris, R. Fowler, B. Schole, R. Bellamy, G. Plihal, president, T. Cacek. vice-president, L. Engelke- mier, H. Wiegers, R. Frost, D. Seidler. 41 Rodeo Association: - Back Row: D. Vecchio, P. VanDervoort, P. Benze, B. Bedient, T. Scarlett, D. Olson, J. Reif, I.. Weichman, P. Rimmus, G. Jewell, M. Volk. Fourth Row: T. Cunningham, S. McGill, F. Mikes, I.. Nordhausen, D. Van Aokeren, D. Tonniges, J. Klinker, J. Panska, B. Bovee, S. Lucas, G. Hoesing, G. Fahrenbruch, T. Booker. Third Row: B. Hoyt, R. Koss, J. Bryan, J. Jones, D. Jones, l... Young, S. Foster, K. True, K. Axthelm, G. Plihal, G. Geiser, W. Peterson, S. Damrovv, S. Moseman. Second Row: B. McDowell, K. Fenster, J. Ridder, R. Chesley, C. Albright, B. Tooker, M. Marymee, P. Pieper, J. Kitt, K. Kitt, K. Frese, P. Goethe. Front Row: I.. Reisinger, M. Mills, R. Graske, C. Wilken, H. Hultgren, B. Terrell, D. Haskell, vice-presiclentq J. Stubbendieck, presi- dentg A. Friesen, treasurer: A. Reddish, J. McDowell, secretary. N. Cary. S. Miller, J. Elrunkhoist, K. Moore. I I Rodeo Club Increases Area I For Exhibition,Performance I Y I ' Financing and constructing a large, new arena I occupied members ofthe University of Nebraska Rodeo F Association. The "corraI" provided facilities for various I horse shows during the season and allowed for the i extra advantage of available practice space. I Nebraska Chapter actives produced the annual NU Rodeo with the club promoting and sponsoring the all- campus attraction. Contestants represented eighteen colleges and universities around the nation competing in all traditional events. A share of ticket-sale proceeds went to various charities in the Lincoln area. Club coeds sponsored a drive to make exhibition stock available for free-style at all times. Results of the project offered students the opportunity of using the animals in preparation for future rodeos. Shortening stirrups for a petite 'bronc-buster,' Rodeo riders 'reckon on' bruising competition. Hoping to "sell for more and buy for less," Aggies barter with the Alpha Zeta Bookman. AZ Backs Science 'Ag Day' For College-Bound Youths Nebraska Chapter of Alpha Zeta served as host for the annual "Science in Ag Day" held at the University of Nebraska College of Agriculture. Aimed at high school students, the event featured educational lectures stres- sing the scientific aspects of Agri-business relative to the present American and world economics. ' To encourage prospective college men to enroll at NU, members participated in group visitations to var- ious out-state schools. Discussions ranged from pre- registration fees and scholarships to opportunities for advanced education in various departments. At the annual Honors Banquet, Alpha Zeta recog- nized the spring initiates. Larry Leistritz, an economics major, received the Agricultural Sophomore Award for the highest scholastic record in the college. Alpha Zeta: Back Row: G. Wehrbein, l.. Boeckenhauer, T. Michalski, B. Riddell, R. Milligan, R. Johnson, R. Bellemy, B. Gengenbach, I.. Viterna, N. Clatanoff. Third Row: J. Specnt, T. Relmers, B. Thomsen, D. Meyer, G. Wanlgren, K. Olsen, M. Logan, W. Musser, V.L. ht b R.Shff .S dR :R.L'd llP.C l K.B .H .V' l'1S.Db K D. D. ec en erg. a er econ ow in va , op ey, eebe, G am, G net , a er ow, . Swoboda, Barber. Front Row: L. Leistritz, A. Frederick, I.. Grove, E. Jackson, treasurerp R. Schaffert, l.. Fischer, adviser: B. Snyder, presidentp V. Leibbrandt, N. l-lelzer, scribe: C. Bromm. .gif Using a transit to measure light pole distances, Ag Exec sets sights on an enlightened campus. Ag Exec Board Renovates Lighting, Parking Facilities To insure new East Campus improvements, the College of Agriculture's Student Executive Board worked in connection with the Dean's Office, planning the necessary adjustments. The Committee provided outside lighting facilities and also drew up plans to remedy the present overcrowded parking conditions. Sponsoring the Annual Ag Campus Barbecue, the Board gave incoming freshmen an opportunity to meet other first-year students. Held in the East Union, the event featured Pom Pon routines and University spirit songs. The administrators promoted the activity in order to acquaint the new-comers with NU functions. Exec Board helped in the Job Opportunities Day sponsored by the College. Majors in agriculture and related fields met with professional men from all fields of study in the expanding industry. Ag Exec Board: i Back Row: C. Bromm, T. Wehrbein, N. Clatanoff, V. Leibbranizit, D. Burmood, J. Binger. Second Row: M. Russnogle, B. Terrill, D. Eggleston, G. Craig, J. Turnbull, G. Libal, D. Snyder. C. Logemann. Front Row: L. Engelkemier, D. Meyer, l.. Grove, sec- retary, N. Smith, president, E. George, treasurer, D. Wilton, R. Gingles, adviser. Varsitlg Dairy Club: Back ow: l.. Deboer, M. Rousey, B. Thompson, G. Roe, K. Jensen, M. Hughes, l.. Surratt, l.. Bond. Second Row: G. Beck, I.. Wulf, J. Shue , D. Leader, J. Hahn, K. Volker, M. Mills. Front Row: I.. Crowe, adviser, D. Robertson, E. Jackson. secreta y treasurer: L. Dinneen, president: R. Drueke, vice-president: R. Skokan, S. Varsity Dairy Club lnspects Professional Milk Handling Through the sale of dairy products at the University Tractor Day and Nebraska State Fair, Varsity Dairy Club financed the annual spring tour of processing plants and progressive management herds. The chapter toured Wisconsin to study developments in specialized and large-scale manufacturing. The Products Judging Team, composed of Varsity members, traveled to Canada for experience in selecting and analyzing milk. At the annual American Dairy Science Association meeting the group placed third in competition among other student organizations. Competition consisted of the year's activities and the Presidents report. On the local scene the club sponsored the annual livestock showmanship contest. A few weeks before the exhibition, college students participating in the event groomed and trained the University animals. Wehrbei Lonnie Dinneen, presidentg Marcia Greg- erson, Varsity Dairy Princess, James Snuey, committee chairman. 1 alrwl ,Xi , .. Quin -. Tlfw- .... U '-was TAILORIN vu '- 'v by Vt .:' I .Heat KN , .-.yy .' 725:34 '-Dfw 'M 55'35?W :M u ' A ,z "f - 1 v , A' '4' V I if -,--. Y, . L' ' f fy- . ,.'. I . .I -Y .Y .Lf 'ali' .- .Qi..2'. , "fi-5' , '5 .. .. l-,g.4.z4..,. n-51-Q., v. 4 V 0 , ' 1 . 'P'-ui bla., nr.: '- -vw V AN ,Qi-S H. 'I Kq,,,..., .., . -Wifi? QP .rig 'Q , x A4 Wifi If if.. ' . ,1- .41 A 5:1 I" C 4 I -, r :L-jllgf s.-x V. , . 2E.ff.5n: E:?35g'igr . - 'rgff Q 1 L 1 if x X XX ,f , l 1-gl TX w 5 I , ff ,gf LW I - :J L: 616 I A , ' 1 H-m xxf 1'f"4i-:ff ' .354 wf F4 , -N 'W f,""A, '5' ' I 'f w ,J x ..... -- on Home Ec Majors Practice In New Management Units Coeds anticipated on-the-job training with the completion of two new Home Management Laboratories on East Campus. Designed for practical living, the houses provided students with instruction in each field of Home Economics. Trainees planned and carried out supervised household duties for a six-week period. In the area of curriculum development, the School created a new teaching center in Women's Residence Hall. The non-laboratory classes enabled students from other disciplines to gain an understanding of needed improvements in homes and better family living. Attempting to acquaint Home Ec students with a broader knowledge of the fashion world, the depart- ment of textiles proposed to sponsor a clothing tour of Europe. The trip promised visits to prominent clothiers in Ireland, France, England and Rome. 1 , " l S '-5,3 J A1 ' 1 Qjlf, E -uh A4- 1 ' , l L . T 1 Virginia Trotter, Director School of Horne Economics Omciron Nu-Phi Upsilon Omicron: I I l Back Row: M. Ekeler, L. Engelkeimler, M. Jennings, J. Quaring, J.Tnurber, J.Trumble, S. Cornelius, M.Tegtmeier, M. Reinmlller S. Cook, A. Dey. Third Row: B. Nlulliken, D. Lewis, C. Freeman, J. Otteman, M. Corr, P. Wagner, M. Russnogle, J. Binegar, B Slack, B. Barth, J. Luebbe. Second Row: S. Sato, J. Kaufmann, M, Melichar, M.'WilIey, J. Coufal, D. Brown, W. Laudeen, S Chen, J. Lee, M.A. Bors. Front Row: H..Ma.thers, S. Heybrock, J. Steele, J. Eucklin, V. Cline, president, Phi Upsilon Omicron S. Stork, president, Omicron Nug S. Crispin, K. Johnson, J. Goeller. S. Anderson. Proficient Post-Graduates Advise Home Ec Honoraries Working closely with the alum chapter, in Lincoln, Omicron Nu held a joint educational session on current research in Home Living at the University. The organiza- tion promoted a Graduate Night for Home Economics students to explain the advantages of advanced study and correct procedures for applications. Dr. Pauline Paul, O-N National President, discussed Home Econo- mics opportunities in the future to the NU honorary. As part of the annual Xi Chapter professional pro- ject, Phi Upsilon Omicron worked with the children at Whitehall Orphanage. Phi U's new National President- elect, Miss Agnes Arthaud, served as Extension Super- visor on NU campus for the School of Home Economics. Xi Chapter -worked on contacting alums-to up-date the records and to increase the understanding between students and professional home economists. Getting the jump on the pre-Christmas markets, Phi U's compare salesmanship to cooking skills. 1 f A 4' n -.. 1 Ce ts- . 4--------3.-..f----,-.517 S rl - . ,L lg .5. . .. -1- :T if Overcoming the confinements of hospital life, l-lE members pursue weekly reading rounds. Home Ec Club's Services Aid State Hospital Patients Traveling to the State Mental Hospital for the year's special project, Nebraska Home Ec Chapter taught home-making skills to the residents. After singing Christmas carols, the coeds gave instructions in mak- ing cookies, Halloween costumes and birthday cards. Wayne State Teachers College hosted the Univer- sity of Nebraska Home Economics Fall Workshop. The session, entitled "The Challenge," offered new ap- proaches in family development and advanced educa- tional opportunities. A panel of home economist experts discussed newdirectionsot nutritional food researchand progressive home living techniques to the delegation. At the annual dessert held in the fall, outstanding workers received Silver Spoon Awards. The event honored Ellen H. Richards, the founder and an influ- ential leader in the field of homemaking skills. Home Economics Chapter: Back Row: I.. Parson, B. Refior. I..NOrfer'1, K. Reimers, M. Schwisow, S. DuBois, P. Mercer, J. l-leath, K. Riddle, J. Hardessen l.. Renchen, C. Settles, M. Nisley, J. Fox. Fourth Row: A. Dunn. B. Wieseman, M. Detmer, C. Fintel, J. Dyer, M. Paulsen, C Rickertsen, J. Coufal, J. Anderson, A. Paider, P. Williams, K. Olsen, l.. Nelson, D. Polar, l. Cunningham, S. l-linds. Third Row S. Carpenter, C. Nispel, C. Vavricek, J. Mazour, C. Call, C. Gustman, S. Huebner, J. l-lynek, J. Duba, M. Retzlaff, J. Woten T. Walker, J. De-Vasure, F. Snyder, B. Olander, M. Stockton, G. Stevens.Second Row:J. Loreman, G. Stara, E. Biehl, B. Euller J. Faltys, M. Maas, l-l. Mathers. S. Cornelius, B. Klingman, B. Richter, A. Henneman, G. Wiggins, D. Erks, B. l-lerling, M. Warren J. Bennett. Front Row: K. Hendrickson, J. Bruha, N. Hahn, C. Logemann. J. Trumble, B. Milliken, secretaryq P. Wagner, S Stork, president: J. Thurber, vice-president: S. l-leybrock, E. George, M. Melichar, J. Kaufmann, V. Cline. 1 Q --1-. -' . 1 gl 1 Q" ' '1-1 . 21 ,1.'. ffl! ' ., ,,-.- - .2 - v run Hifzgiys A '?'Q'3'2gg' ,, , E Lula, V44. 'YSQE "iii: H' 1 :V-,,,vu1'e 513, 7-1 gf: A v. f.f1i,,fg,. f.l.'?Yf-iff 4:1 gf I.. 'g f ' H: '- ,V , , 111. -. 35' '- ij . ," g-' V. ' Q, V ,il .fi gag- .- ,aw 'zf-j 7-1 ' gf? 'ff gc fb'-15. 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Third Row: R. Heckman, J. McCall, J. McGinnis, C. Colson, J. Nammour, O. Osterholm, T. Hollancl, J. Patterson, R. Schwabauer, S. Berquist. Second Row: A. Smith, l.. Launer, J. Jones, J. Strateman, S. Murdock, N. Johnson, H. James, K. Woodward, S. Unthank, M. Nelson, S. McClymont, B. Grupe. Front Row: J. Novak, C. Gunlicks, M. Roeser, J. Graves, J. l-lempel, J. Probasco, K. Robertson, P. Bergstrom, J. Miller, C. Bieck. PBK's Consider Problems Ol Southern Negro Groups Former Nebraska Phi Beta Kappa member, Pro- fessor Charles Oldfather, described "A Day in Albany, Georgia," for the local chapter. The visiting Kansas educator told of assisting a civil rights worker in jail following participation in a Georgia integration incident. To familiarize students with current happenings in business areas, the group invited scholars to campus. Ernest Simmons, former professor of Slavic languages at Columbia University, recently visited the PBK's and commented on the "Soviet Policy Change." Reviewing development in U.S.-European relation- ships, Dr. Peterson discussed, "Europe and America- Twenty Years." While at the meeting, the Economics' chairman also analyzed the Common Market. Sigma Xi Guest interprets Various Instructional Ideas Visiting the University under the auspices of the national Sigma Xi lectureship program, Dr. Burrhus Skinner discussed "Technology of Teaching" as a de- tailed guide. For the seminar schedule the national committee selected professors making noteworthy contributions in the various phases of research. As a benefit of membership, pledges and actives received the "American Scientist" from the Society's national office. The magazine reviewed the advance- ments of the lecturers and described recent inventions. On the annual field trip, Sigma Xi members visited the Veterans Administration Hospital in Omaha. The group, interested in scientific research, toured the special laboratory of medicine and biology. Sigma Xi: Back Row: J. Deming, K. Nichols, J. Zimmerman, G. Hodgson, J. Rietsch, El. Brightfelt, M. Criswell, K. l-lurst, G. Meyer, S. Knuclson. Third Row: R. Smith, W. Odell, C. Colson, J. McGinnis, R. Den- ton, S. Davis, D. Schroeder, T. Carlson, N. Prigge, R. Sudduth. Second Row: A. Menke, G. Frenzen, D. Knievel, O. Osterholm, J. Kahrl, R. Leech, R. Sell, L. Cech, R. Hospodka. Front Row: D. Kauk, R. Holling, J. Novak, C. Eiieck, H. James, A. Smith, L.. Bjornsen, G. Deatsman. Pi Mu Epsilon: Back Row: l. Saberi, T. Brickner, L. Bonderson. J. Rosenberg. D. Johnston, N.Ar'lderSOr1, W. Dresselhaus. Second Row: R. Kennedy, R. Schulze, J. Johnson, G. Young, J. Reloensclorf, T. Moates, D. Nelson, C. Jones. Front Row: R. Tangeman, C f l S. Dickson,aclviser,A. Dornhoff, vice-president,J.Cosier, president: S. Bronn,treasurer: M. Mantel, secretary, w. ou a. J. Cooper. Pi Mu Epsilon Endeavors To Discover Math Errors Challenging members of Pi lVlu Epsilon to solve the mathematical mistakes, University professors pre- sented assorted arguments and theories at the fall meeting. After Dr. lVliller's discourse on "Some Nlathe- matical Fallacies," the participants debated the prin- ciplesandconclusionsderivedfromthetopicalquestion. By reorganization of the "Problem of the Week" Committee, a series of exercises appeared in the DAILY NEB RASKAN. Later the group printed the solutions and names of students submitting the correct answers. To stimulate greater participation in the biannual algebra examinations, the honorary increased the three cash prizes. The recipients won the awards in two levels of competion, beginning or advanced. Participants Review Laws At Pi Sigma Alpha Forum By conducting professional-student panel discus- sions, Pi Sigma Alpha attempted to stimulate members' awareness of governmental procedure. The tri-weekly topics covered phases of local and national government. Speaking to the group Mrs. Francis Drath, author of three textbooks on West Germany, examined the country's economic future. State political figures, Frank Marsh and Hugo Srb, debated the defects and possible improvements of the Nebraska Unlcameral. After a two year local absence, the national Pi Sigma Alpha organization reactivated Tau Chapter at Nebraska under the advisership of Professor Sloan. A major in political science and a B plus over-all grade average qualified students for membership. Pi Sigma Alpha: Back Row: J. Shanahan, I.. Maxwell, J. Stohlman, D. Ward, S. Mazurak, G. Duranske, J. Davis. Second Row: J. Shafer,-B. Ahmad, I.. Donat, G. Snowden, G. Lemke, L.. Johnson, C. Shattuck. Front Row: R. Oswald, B. Wright, J. DeMars, vice- presidentq B. Harding, president, C. Guenzel secretary: R. Sloan, adviser, D. Stover. School of Fine Arts 17-ngfil ,-...ga FE", Leroy Laase Speech and Dramatic Art Duard Laging Art Ema.nueI Wishnow Music f Z' X -.-7-v Erection of Music Complex Planned For Fall Semester Blueprints called for completion of the new music building in time for fall semester classes. Improved facilities permitted separate rehearsal rooms for the orchestra, band and the choruses. Centralized faculty offices on one floor and enlarged teaching studios eliminated confusion caused by cramped quarters. Woods Fellowships financed a year of independent research for two Nebraska professors. Pianist Audan Ravnan planned to write concerts for educational tele- vision while Joseph Baldwin spent the time studying experimental playwriting at Princeton University. Rx, Robert Beadell, NU professor of music theory and compostion, traveled to Northwestern University to compose and produce an opera. After spending several weeks on the project, the Nebraska writer saw the finished product staged in a Chicago theater. While conducting a sparkling performance, an unknown artist makes "metallic music." Delta Sigma Rho-Tau Kappa Alpha: Back Row: D. Erbach, R. Prier, A. Larson, R. Sherman, J. Peak, J. Droclow. Front Row: D. Olson, acl iserp N. Coufal, G. Duranske. president: C. Shattuck, vice-president, J. Adam. Debaters Host Tournament Drawing National Attention Following semester break the University of Ne- braska hosted 65 different colleges and universities at a three day tournament. The event offered two divisions of debate as well as competition in original oratory. To increase interest in forensics, NU sponsored the State Debate Tournament and Fine Arts Festival. At- tended by high school students from all parts of the state, the competition covered two weekends and gave winners the chance to compete in a national tourney. Four representatives traveled to Bloomington, ln- diana and the annual meeting of Delta Sigma Rho speech honorary. Carrying off the laurels, the University came away with the offices of both regional governor and national president of the organization. Masquers Host Production Composed Of Novice Cast In addition to sponsoring the "New Faces" produc- tion, Nebraska Chapter of National Collegiate Players planned and produced the premiere show. The new theater approach featured a cast composed entirely of individuals without previous stage experience. Helping facilitate the operation of the High School Fine Arts Festival, Masquers served as hosts to the visiting dramatic students. Chapter members assumed the roles of stage managers and play directors to make the Festival a more professional production. Faculty advisers, acting as judges throughout the year, announced theater winners at the annual Spring Masquers Banquet. Instructors selected the recipient of the "Dallas Award," presented to the person con- tributing the outstanding acting performance. Mas uers: Baca Row: D. Rosenthal, C. May, C. Dawson, M. Messmer, J. McConnell, B. Borin, D. l-leckman, S. Watkins. Row Two: S. Westerhoff, E Lawton. D. Harrison, S. Granata, J. Adam, R. Kierstead. M. Dobbins, J. Zastrow, P. Becker. Front Row: S. Bradford. C. Retnwisch, treasurerg F. Vybiral, vice-pr sidentp R. Maulsby, presidentg C. Howard, adviser, Mr. Timm, secretary, J. Guinty, S. Whittemore. fe-9 The magic of make up and grease paint transform Sally Arneson into "Carmen's" Farsquita. Howell Initiates Production Of Repertory Performance Altering the format for 1965-66, Nebraska Uni- versity Theater changed to a season of repertory pro- ductions. The new schedule involved presenting each play for four weekends instead of one. Two plays alter- nated every other week, providing audiences with increased opportunities to enjoy the performances. With the emphasis on entertainment, the Theater tackled a variety of shows ranging from the drama of "lVlacbeth" and impact of "The Blood Knot" to the hu- mor of "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf." Players also worked in conjunction with the department of music to perform Bizet's "Carmen" Laboratory productions and one act plays offered actors and directors the opportu- nity to experiment with new techniques. Launching a trial I-lowell Theater season, the range director sets up the first stage. lf! la University Singers University Singers Conduct Cultural Program Out State On a two day tour of five tovvns, University Singers carried the music of Bach and Handel to out state au- diences. The group also performed for the meeting of the American Choral Director's Association. Singers, an organization of upperclassmen, completed the year with a presentation of the "Block Sacred Service." During the winter season, the chorus took part in the University production of Handel's "lVlessiah." The seventy-seven members also conducted the annual Christmas Carol Concert with the Advent lVlotet Cantata and a series of foreign songs in native tongues. NU Madrigals Tape Songs For United State's Troops Recording vvith the Columbia Broadcasting Com- pany, the University lvladrigals made a radio tape of various traditional Christmas carols. Winter presenta- tions involved a public Christmas concert and a part in the Choral Union's presentation of "The lVlesslah." Accompanied by the University Brass Choir, the lvladrigal singers presented a Spring Concert of sacred music. Depicting the 16th century custom of singing while seated around a banquet table, the organization of freshman singers also conducted several perform- ances for different local civic organizations. i l University Madrigals Gamma Lambda: Back Row: K. Halter, D. Bellows, W. Cradduck, I. Vrtiska, l. Pearson, F. Waltemacle, J. Jess, C. Gilpin. Row Three: B. Aerni, S. Halter, C. Hoffman, J. Mollison, K. Wiegert, S. Eieall, l.. Bell, A. Cox. Row Two: E. Vahle, G. Neuhaus, I.. Stenlik. l.. Moller, A. Harms, D. Rasmussen, M. Bang, H. Hultquist, K. Boyce. Front Row: D. l.entz, adviser: J. Snider, adviser, R. Johnson, secretary: W. Sprague, vice-president, J. Ochsner, treasurer, R. Drews, president: D. Adler, R. Packway. Gamma Lambda Merchants Push Big Red Spirit Attire Encouraging a festive and colorful atmosphere at band practices, Gamma Lambda conducted a money- making drive by selling bright red sweatshirts to fall marchers. Other fund raising efforts involved donning aprons and chef hats for a mid-winter chili feed and presenting a banquet at the year's close. To maintain adequate size, the honorary fraternity added ten new members per semester. Actives se- lected pledges on the basis of ability and attitude. In addition to planning all band trips, the organization sponsored the card section for football games. Men's Glee Fetes Groups With Musical "Potpourri" Organized primarily for non-music majors, lVlens' Glee provided students with an opportunity to develop singing talent. The ensemble presented two perform- ances during the year emphasizing a combination of spiritual and classical music. Selections featured a requiem mass in Latin and Negro folk songs. On the off year of biennial touring, the group conducted a concert for members of the 4-H State Con- vention held in Lincoln. ,The sixty-three members, chosen by audition, closed the season by entertaining Regents Scholars and parents at the Kellogg Center. l Varsity Men's Gleez Back Row: P. Carlson, T. Golder, G. Buckler, l.. L.iss, D. Collins, J. Free, J. Hilt, S. Taylor, J. Morin, R. Beebe. Row Four: K. Willis, P. Hays, T. Jeab, R. Lichtenberg, L.. Dillon, S. Buda, W. Andersen, K. Arnold, P. I.yon, R. Meyers, P. Marsh. Row Three: F. Boesiger, L.. Young, R. I.ints, C. Ashman, I.. DeBoer, K. Remmers, B. Rueter, J. McCown, D. Manary. Row Two: D. Galbraith, B. Harding, M. Brichacek, S. Goldberg, A. Fiala, S. Frost, J. Rockwell, C. Kuster, A. Rowch. Front Row: D. Hartman, K. Gerlach, C. Ryan, I.. Berryman, V. Lacy, S. England, K. Quiriten, R. Dreamer, D. Ganz, director. f ' 11:.. nw-'qi-gi fi i :ig 'i Donald Lentz, Director University Bands NU Band Groups Strutters Into Three New Ensembles Reorganizing after the fall football season into sym- phonic, brass choir and collegiate divisions, the University Band served the school in various annual activities. lvy Day and Commencement rang with tradi- tion as the versatile groups performed. Sponsored by the Student Union Music Depart- ment, the symphonic band presented a spring concert while the collegiate division played marches for evening ROTC parades. Recordings of the previous year's music continued to sell, providing money for new instruments. While waiting for completion of the new music building, director Donald Lentz wrestled with problems of expanding undergraduate and graduate enrollment. Student desire to participate in public concerts created pressure on the already full-capacity University Band. University Band .-. .'..1T -, , -....--,...f... l - NU wncumsst. N B C Iwuufmrmlluvur rw " 29 5 - T N 4 A University Marching Band ""l 'mar 5' Jack Snider, Director University Marching Band We: Band Marches Third Time In Bowl Game Performance High-stepping with the new Cornhusker Sunshine Girl, Susie Kunc, the University Marching Band made a third consecutive appearance at a post-season football game. Jack Snider kept 160 musicians in tune as the band hailed Big Eight Schools in Orange Bowl festivities. Red caps and sweatshirts added an extra dash of uniformity to the marchers. The beanies replaced plum- med helmets for sideline sitting, while new shirts gave practice sessions an appearance of sharp organization. Selected members constituted a small pep band representing the university at out-of-state contests. Fans continued to hear sounds of Big Red during the winter season as strutting gave way to Coliseum music and the generation of NU basketball spirit. University Orchestra Orchestra Spices Program In Varied Musical Mixture In concert with mezzo-soprano Helen Vanni of the Metropolitan Opera, University Orchestra opened the 1965 fall season. Miss Vanni and the musicians per- formed several fugues by Mozart and Moscinni. The seventy pieces concluded the program with renditions of "Espana" by Chabrier and Howard Hanson's "Nordic" For the Spring Concert the orchestra honored the hundredth anniversary of Sibelius' birth with the com- poser's lst Symphony. Dennis Schneider, assistant pro- fessor of music, presented "The Hollow Men," a trumpet solo by Persichetti. The entire group then played "Slav- onic Dance No. 15, Opus 72," by Dvorak and the prelude to "Die Meistersingern by Wagner. Collaborating with vocalists of the music depart- ment, the organization staged the "Messiah" and the opera "Carmen" The ensemble also provided accom- paniment tor five singers in the Senior Soloists Concert. . r i T r i . , wa- .. Emanuel Wishnow, Conductor University Orchestra Primecl and polished SAl's add final touches to prepare for an upcoming sorority concert. SAI Searches Community To Help Korea's Orphans Canvassing local neighborhoods, Sigma Alpha lota conducted a drive to collect cast-off-clothing. Subse- quently, the sorority shipped the bundled articles to needy Korean orphans. Additional projects took the girls to children's homes and hospitals. Traveling to lVlil- ford's rest home, sisters sang Faure's requiem mass. Celebrating the chapters fiftieth anniversary, SAl's entertained former members at the Alumnae Christmas Party. Before the occasion, sisters studied choral works and performed Benjamen Brittan's "Ceremony of the Carols." In cooperation with the music fraternity and other sororities, members sanga requiem mass accom- panied by wind and brass instruments. A mid-winter bam party entertained the four greek-letter groups with square dancing and Wiener roasting. Sigma Alpha Iota: Back Row: M. Mantel, J. Wiebusch,T. Billiard, J Ficke. L. l-lenline. Second Row: L. Stander,J. Dorsey,l. J g s V. Varvel, J. Hudson. Front Row: L. Tubbs, tr surer, M. Cervin, A. Smith, president: K. Walters, vice p e d t I.. Haisch. secretary. Delta Omicron: Back Row: D. Rieschel, Judy Caldwell, Marian Sicklebower, C. Dawson, S M sh D S h Powers. Front Row: E. Hanti-worn, M. Haight, J. Jensen, secretary, B. Br p scle t R Hall e p es dent: A. l-lurlbutt, treasurer, K. Dean, adviser. D0 Directs Cedars Youths ln Yule Sidewalk Concerts Weekly song practices at Cedars Home prepared or- phans and state wards for downtown Christmas carol- ing. Culminating the year-long philanthropic project, Delta Omicrons accompanied the children to the cam- pus music building to present a spring concert. For freshman and sophomore music majors, the so- rority conducted a Saturday ear-training service. The sessions aided students in recognizing chords and in- tervals, a necessary skill for theory courses. Undertaking various other civic projects, Delta Omicron sang at the Tabitha Home, State Reformatory and Malone Community Center. A spring program re- placed the tri-sorority concert, offering the audience a variety of instrumental and vocal music, Sherry Marsh and Carla Dawson received two national pledge scholar- ships awarded for outstanding musical skill. Sherry Marsh critically examines the score of a DO sister's "noteworthy" performance 4' . f -- 'E ' .i 'r'l I - . . I, V .- fu, ...,.,..,, i ' .fi F" -- - ' ' 'G'L'f'4 V? ' lf' if 1 l ,i ,-'ti 3? 39.9 5 4115! P - t1 . -Q' .41- """1:gf,Sg,': . Transposing music from voice to saxaphone, Arlene Cauclill prepares for a pending exam. Mu Phi Serves Community With Musical Entertainment Participating in service projects throughout Lin- coln, lVlu Phi Epsilon presented varied musical programs to entertain orphanages and homes forthe aged. Several lVlu Phi's attended the organizations national conven- tion and met delegates from the recently formed Philip- pine chapter With a goal of fifty pounds of music to be sent to the new Philippine members, sisters raised funds by serving Friday lunch to Sinfonians. Clarinetist Keo Boreson won second place in the Lincoln Symphony auditions while Carole Peterson per- formed one of four leads in the University Singers pro- duction of the "lVlessiah." Senior soloists Carla Piper and Carole Peterson also presented vocal selections at the University Orchestra's Spring Concert. Mu Phu Epilson: Back Row: T. Lowell, J. Freeman, N. clelfreese, E. l-lead. Front Row: M. Anderson. treasurer: K. Deines, secretary: C. Peter- son, president: K. Wood. vi -president, K. Bareson, chaplain. Sinfonia Sparks Up Season With Original .lazz Masses Premiering Robert Edson's new jazz mass, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia presented the annual spring concert. Edson brought a quintet from Omaha to play the diffi- cult piece. The eighth performance of "Portraits in Jazz" also featured the Bach Singers with "Psalmcon- cert," an interpretation ofHeinz Zimmerman's "Psalms" Advertising receipts and proceeds from the jazz program financed three one-hundred dollar scholar- ships awarded to incoming freshmen. Members chose the recipients from musically talented high school sen- iors competing in the University's Fine Arts Festival. ln combination with the three music sororities, Phi Mu Alpha's sponsored a November concert. Under- graduate Gene O'Brien wrote a requiem mass forthe oc- Zimmermawe Bach Swingers study scores casion, featuring vocalists and instrument ensembles. preparing new forms of the master e music l l Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia: Back Row: V. Forbes, D. Rasmussen, R. Neel. S. Halter, R. Austin, R.-Covolik, L. Beldin, F. Walternade, I. Pearson, ' M 'D.l dRElb.ThdR -PR R.O tclKW tK I.. Moller, I.. Stehllk, J. Anderson, l.. cl.aln, tmun , . ee e ir ovy. . amp, rms e . . leger , Gunlicks, T. Grush, D. Janovek, J. Mollison, T. Martinez, G. Heinicke, R. I-lenrichson, M. Lamberty, I.. Schluckebier I.. Beerbohm, F. Troia. Second Row: A. Cox, I.. Bell, R. Hunter, C. Gilpin, D. Grasmick, R. Johnson, N. Bartholomew D. Jacobson, W. Bell, C. Ramsey, D. Hull, F. Schultz, D. Boyce, B. Franson. Front Row: R. Harvill, D. Adler, R. Drews B. Aerni, W. Cradduck, secretary, C. Hoffman, president: l-I. Hultquist, W. Sprague, vice-president: R. Packwood R. Hatcher, J. Ochsner, treasurer, M. Gruett, K. Halter. Sigma Alpha Eta: Back Row: S. McNally, B. Trupp. P. Hyland, J. Nedrow, T. Layton, S. Fisher, T. Fortune, L. Schmitt, M. Pekn .S d R w: S. Ric C. Bis ri ff S. Tethrow, K. Kreutzer, J. l-leideman, S. Me er, W. Bram- econ o e. c 0 . y mer, S. Cgberg, I.. Bragg, J. Hanson. P. Rasmussen. Front Row: D. Focht, J. Willits, M. Wilson, J. Tanner, vice-president: C. Abel, president: A. Speece, secretary, K. Swanson, treasurerg I.. Muff, M. Good Chicago Pulls SAH Prexy For Conclave's Workshops In connection with the American Speech and Hear- ing Association, president Christine Abel journeyed to Chicago to participate in Sigma Alpha Eta's National Convention. Discussion leaders conducted informal talks about research papers and possible plans for im- proving local chapters' community service projects. Sponsoring a yuletide open house, SAH key mem- bers and associates entertained students in the speech therapy department. After one coffee hour Dr. Knox of Kansas University spoke to the organization on the changing attitudes and responsibilities of the field. Study And Travel Precede Organists' Winter Musicale As a prelude to Howard Harison's lecture on the fine points of organ construction and tuning, NU chapter of American Guild of Organists went directly to the source and experimented with organs in four Omaha churches. The girls' group supplemented the education- al program later in the season with Myron Robert's discussion of tone modulation and harmonization. "Four Centuries of the Organ Chorale" comprised the theme of the musicians' mid-winter concert. The twenty-two members presented a selection of various arrangements covering the years from 1584-1966. American Guild of Organists: Back Row: D. Fuller, l.. l-laisch, M. Ablott, G. Be-dient, A. Smith, S. Paxson. Front Row: S. Brockrnann, K. Adams, D. Bemis, secretary-treasurer: M. Sicklebower, vice-president: Nl. Roberts, Adviser. School of Journalism pf' l . l..f' Developing practical skull by trial and error, darkroom scientists note tray-to-tray results. l- fffrolfl df 1 ,.- to jaw YlElELlu fl .-,, 351. j.4lk"'f"1'i if :21"w,J.-.- '- X 'vw' 3, -4' University J-School Claims Single National Recognition Confirming the progress of the School of Journal- ism, a team from the American Council forJournalism Education reaffirmed the quality of the school's meth- ods. The committee awarded NU's program the only five-year re-accreditation given to an American college. By producing an early morning newscast, broadcast majors gained apprentice experience while keeping classmates abreast of current developments. Advertis- ing classes wrote and produced both radio and tele- vision commercials for use in Midwestern states. Many students participated in off campus "final exams" as the J-School's field trip program expanded into one of the most extensive in the U.S. lVlore than 150 undergraduates participated in the operation of radio stations throughout Nebraska and the preparation of newspaper make-up and special advertising sections. i William E. Hall, Director School of Journalism KNUS Covers Competition With Play-By-Play Reports To understand procedures in radio communication, students broadcasted from KNUS regularly during the week and monitored Saturday home football games. Serving on board, writing copy and delivering the news- cast offered participants a realistic view of the media. For the armed forces overseas, the NU station taped a special Nladrigal choral Christmas program. CBS af- filiated stations throughout the country also carried the recording at a scheduled time Christmas afternoon. Staff members transcribed a speech delivered at the School of Journalism by lVlr. John Hlavocek, mem- ber of the KlVlTV news staff. The lecture described the varied experiences of a foreign correspondent covering the Viet Nam war and the Dominican Republic incident. .317 U 'JV X Mi X-. -...-..- '+P Q -an 9' Filling the KNUS student sound schedule collegiate clj's prepare post news platters KNUS: Back Row: L. Keating, R. Depa, G. Dornhoff, J. Rieger, F. Monnich. Front Row: G. Redding, M. Haba, G. Larsen, J. Wilken, J. Buchfinck. With televised lectures KUON enlivens history by providing greater understanding and depth. KUON Broadcasts All Day With Aid of ETV Network ln the fall of the 1965-66 season, KUON-TV com- menced a full-day of broadcasting for the first time in the studio's eleven-year history. The university channel received many films on public affairs, drama and music from the Nebraska Educational Television Network and from Midwestern Educational Television. Channel 12 produced 37 hours of in-school pro- grams per week and 18 hours of general interest shows each month. "Backyard Farmer" and Christmas spe- cials, done on a seasonal basis, completed the schedule. Not confined to the campus, cameras traveled to Omaha during the summer to work on a 12-volume pregnancy series. Production crews filmed a report on the closing of the Lincoln Air Force Base for National Educational Television and telecast the Nebraska- Missouri swimming meet from the NU Coliseum. While Girl Friday balances the time cards, camera 2 "clollies-in" for an ETV close-up. Theta Sigs Broaden Views Through Chicago Conclave To meet professional women in fields of mass com- munication, members of NU's journalism sorority traveled to Chicago for a "Theta Sigma Phi Weekend." Useful clues to future occupational secrets emerged as students accompanied pros through "A Day on the Job." EmphasizingprogramshelpfuItoactives, roundtable discussions informed members ofthe variety of career choices available to women journalists. Prominentfree- lance script writers and photographers as well as local professional women appeared at chapter meetings. Hosting an annual spring tea, Theta Sigma ao quainted prospective Freshmen and Sophomore JfSchoolers with the purposes of the organization. Newly-elected girls, holding at least a B average in journalism courses, became pledges of the honorary. 4-5 i Introducing a proctor's viewpoint to a contest Priscilla Mullins examines competitive content T7 vf CI? fNf !T'1 ,N vb 1 Theta Sigma Phi: Back Row: J. Wilken, S. Leonard, V. Rybin, J. Koepke, P. Mullins. Second Row: l.. Quinnett, K, Johnson, W. Luncleen, A. Chester. Front Row:C. Guenzel, treasurerp M. Hoegemeyer, president: M. Morris, vice-presidentg D. Stover, N. Hahn. I- 'L -5,- 'c.-'za Vi? Nfx Q4 ! f 1 .1-at -lv' . 1 - .:.-- J- .':.e-" , x fig5E1,p4!i.-'IFEVE 'illi- - EJ' J-j.':'..Z- Sig' .,- f J j it ff! wig - . -3.923 -" ' . V gjQ' ? :25 .p,. - ' ' 117 F . J X' nl y fi -i.-. QQ 'ir ' 'iggrk .-K' :IM ,G ' .ev- E I3 A gi W , vi 'waz 21 4'-it ss . - ,Ye ,- -,Y ', . Q-,g --., . -j - -I ie rlt.s4 if , T fl ni V X X Q ik ,. 1 , Applying J-School journalistic technique to practical problems, an SDX utilizes AP apprehension. SDX Debates Development Of News Reporting Media Gathering to exchange ideas about future profes- sional activities, men of Sigma Delta Chi journalism honorary probed problems in mass communications. To gain further background, members doubled as stu- dents and employees of newspapers and broadcasters. Accompanied by adviser Dr. l-lall, President Bill Tillinghast attended the SDX convention in Los Angeles. Among distinguished guests, American Broadcasting Company's Pulitzer Prize winner Malcolm Brown ex- plained newscasting techniques to the journalists. To increase organizational strength on the national level, the group discussed several proposals. Consider- ation of a merger with Theta Sigma Phi, a correspond- ing women's society, received the most attention. Tau Rho Strengthens Ties With Broadcasting lndustry Designed for students interested in television and radio careers, Tau Rho strived to bring together Ne- braska's professional journalists with University under- graduates. Through talks with mass communication experts, members received occupational insights. Organizing a trip to Chicago provided an opportun- ity for J-Schoolers to visit the annual convention of the National Association of Broadcasters. By informal dis- cussions at the conclave, TR's obtained advice from attending professionals from all over the country. Field trips to Fremont and Scottsbluff offered valu- able on-the-job experience. Participants took over the announcing, engineering and writing while employees supervised and gave practical recommendations. Tau Rho: Back Row: J. Wilken, L. Keating, J. Rieger, F. Monnich, DG. Larsen. Front Row: G. Redding, E. Brown, vice-president: I.. Morian, president: J. Reiser, N. Hahn, M. Haba. 1 I e WA jf Zgammmnm was 41 it S12 l Pubhc oumersw 2 CQYKYCLQ dmxq Xunvxm ,wf,,M,,,,,?..g-1 wif' V , U? ,L ag . 'AM R F fi? s 1 L fl I I I Y s 'xii . 5. 4, :M- fr 7: 4 . J E V .NH X ' 4 1' K : wi.. M ,ap--. W fsgn, 1 ., W A , - x ix A 4, v 81 TT a 'v K A M i 1 i 'W s I' Q7 'X Jlusq... - ,,g,V,-- --- 1 ,' 4' -I . 5 7 -Xiu ,-Q mr. . ,' 7 ,N . ji' 'iifvgff' . ' 'R -mega, ' . ' 1 - - ,. 11, - I ' W '-,'.Ls ,--f -.I . .19 ,, 1 I' in , H. -per, P - I :VAN F ' n f I TV Curriculum Reinforces Business College Training To broaden Educational Television instruction, the Nebraska Council of Economic Education financed a study of comparative systems directed by the Business Administration College. The series, a short version of the Professor John Coleman national film program, ap- peared each semester on the state ETV network. Scholarship aidfromtheCouncilenabled educators to participate in three week summer work-shops on economics. The program, taught by NU instructors, offered elementary and secondary teachers the oppor- tunity to audit the classes or to gain university credit. Presenting speakers at monthly convocations, the Business Roundtable attracted professors from the local campus faculty and from across the nation. Al- though aimed primarily at advanced degree candidates, the seminar welcomed all students from the College. Charles Miller, Dean College of Business Administration Advisory Board: Back Row: W. Lind, W. Glover, L L'ndahI, R. Doerr. Front Row: L. Sloan, J Lefko t easurer, D. Anderso , hai man, S. Eenecke, secretary, T. Schaaf. Participants Probe Banking At Advisory Board Forum Serving as a student-faculty liaison, the Advisory Board strived to promote better communications be- tween the two levels of university life. The organization sponsored panel discussions on graduate school ad- mission, data processing and financial investment. As representatives of the three branches of the military, Colonel Bowers, Colonel Yost and Captain Mullen discussed methods of fulfilling ROTC require- ments. The officers outlined the different opportunities and routes tailored for most service obligations. Prominent businessmen and professors combined to increase understanding of post-graduate procedures. The forum, conducted by Professor Torrence and two graduates, informally discussed future job interviews. Beta Gamma Sigma Study Reviews Business Methods To expand the chapters understanding of Beta Gamma Sigma as a national organization, Dean Charles lVliller spoke at the fall banquet. Discussing the "American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business and the Accrediting Function," Dean lVliller stressed enchanced marketing training standards. Three members received recognition from local business firms for outstanding achievement in particu- lar areas of study. The agencies awarded the stipends to juniors and seniors excelling in class work. As an honorary, Beta Gamma Sigma strived to re- ward scholarship and to foster business integrity. Students in the upper percentages of the Junior and Senior classes qualified for election to the society. Beta Gamma Sigma: Back Row: R. Aerni, D. l-lollman, l-l. Epp, N. Thacker, G. Krotter, J. Curran, R. Walker. Sec- ond Row: M. Zmarzly, G. Vrba, M. Morse, L. Wright, W. Haug, D. Havekost, R. Raymond. Front Row: H. Williams, P. McVey, vice-presi- dent, R. Miller, president, C. Burling, S. Rippe, R. Keslar. Phi Chi Thetas Visit Firms For Functional Suggestions Touring various places of business in Lincoln and Omaha, Phi Chi Theta members supplemented class knowledge with professional advice. To represent the local group, the Nebraska president traveled to Oregon as a delegate to the biannual national convention. At the yearly initiation tea, the honorary welcomed sophomores with a two point average in the College of Business Administration. After refreshments, Dean Charles C. Miller, guest speaker for the occasion, dis- cussed "Opportunities for Women in Business." To honor the organization's upper-class women, seniors received gifts during the annual spring banquet. The honorary also awarded the national citation and scholarship key to outstanding members qualifying as well-rounded University students in the college. Phi Chl Theta BackRo M Elason J J st ce J Ren er J B ss K Korte H At ate F ontRow J H ffmaster, secretary: I.. Carstens, College of Dentistry -...47 J' Q"3' I ,I .i ij r . v iii' , , Tubes, titraters and tanks occupy every inch - while technicians seek specific fluoride uses. ...ffx ...N 'Q 1 5 I,--5, ,,,. .-Q ., ,, t., Dent College Entrants Gain Methods Of Lab Perfection To introduce entering freshmen to the realities of dental procedure, the College of Dentistry permitted students to actively practice in areas of clinical work. The new program assigned frosh dentists to work with upperclassmen in fields of oral surgery, periodontics, general restorative measures and administrative serv- ice. Where inexperienced participation could not be allowed, novices acted as assistant observers. Granting fellowships, the U.S. Public Health Service enabled undergraduates with ability and desire to do research work. Recipients extensively studied the ef- fects of water fluoridation on tooth decay. Analysts also introduced cleft palates in mice, facilitating investiga- tion of origins and treatment for the infirmity. Ralph Ireland, Dean College of Dentistry Steve Muyr tolerates a mouth of wires realizing fifth grade conformity requires armored teeth. Dean Ireland Views System At Turkish Dental College Serving as dental advisor for Hacetteppe Medical Center, Dean Ireland traveled to the Nebraska-affiliated institute in Ankara, Turkey. Dr. Dogramaci, receiver of an honorary NU doctorate degree, served as adminis- trator in the Center's second year of operation. Located in the Student Health Building, the Dental Hygiene Clinic graduated the first ten women in June of 1966. Students qualified for two-year assistant certifi- cates, but most chose to continue study in preparation for a four year graduate teaching degree. With completion of construction set for the fall of 1967, the new Dental College on East Campus allowed for increased enrollment, doubling hygienist chairs from ten to 20 and enlarging frosh dent classes from 36 to 56. The structure also promised to aid improved instruction, research, curriculum, and personnel. ,ta ,-,4:'-- , 1, . With steady hands born of diligent training hygienists practice the "chair-side manner.' .1 Novice tooth grlnders practice drilling and filling amidst a maze of lights and steel-jointed arms. Routine drill of "a patient a day plan" allows extraction of mutual benefits J' College of Engineering Snort-cutting the ground-to-classroom distance, ascending engineers reverse an escape route. NU Regents Choose Davis To Coordinate Engineering Appointing Dr. John Davis to the post of Dean of Engineering, the Nebraska Board of Regents filled the vacancy left by lVlerk Hobson's elevation to Vice- Chancellor. Dr. Davis, a former irrigation specialist at the University of California, advanced from Chairman of the Department of Agricultural Engineering. New Unicameral legislation to improve University facilities resulted in plans for a modern science-engi- neering complex. Scheduled for construction within the next fevv years, the project blueprints called for multi-storied laboratory and classroom buildings. In order to study the engineering graduation re- quirements of 134 hours, the Regents appointed an evaluation committee. The group stabilized changing requirements by making proposals for future curricula. ,- E er Er' 5 ' '-has ..K. lr!! A John R. Davis, Dean College of Engineering E-Week Highlights Factors Of Engineering Curriculum Informing the public of student projects, E-Week emphasized the different aspects of the Engineering College. Co-chairmen chosen from engineering organ- izations arranged the four day program to encompass department presentations, tours and student picnics. In order to create interest in the activities, com- mittees planned radio and TV advertising as well as banners on "O" Street and in store windows. Nationally known speakers increased attendence at a convoca- tion while a banquet at Di Angelos closed the week. To honor academic ability various departments sponsored an awards presentation. For the second con- secutive year, Nebraska Blue Print Magazine aided the effort by publishing the E-Week program. 5. , ,Vg- Firing up the air cushion car for a trial spin, Deprctrng engineering advancements for medicine students defythe laws ofgravity and comfort. a student works an artificially engineered heart Sigma Tau Conducts Talks On Interviewing Technique Sponsoring a university convocation on job appli- cations all-engineering honorary, Sigma Tau, held panel discussions in the Union. The forums presented stu- dents with ideas on dressing when applying and in- structions on filling out personal information blanks. AI the initiation banquet, Dr. William Pharis ot Teachers College spoke on the technical opportunities in the teaching profession. Representing the Chamber of Commerce at a later meeting, Tom Panzing led a discussion concerning civil engineering employment. After receiving nominations from honoraries, Sigma Tau presented the highest citation in the college, the O. J. Ferguson Award. Steve Davis won the honor on the basis of scholarship, citizenship and ability. f 1 . . 3 SPT-. I1 Shining examples to fellow underclassmen Sigma Tau pledges push polish for points Sigma Tau: Back Row: R. Wagoner, R. Farritor, F. Ayorinde, D. Chin, G. Young, I. Saberi, H. Myers, J. Vittera. Third Row: J. Bonczynski, P. Corcoran, P. L.iewer, lVl. Suhr, J. Rebensdorf, D. Nelson, F. Corey, I.. Henderson. Second Row: D. Vodehnal, J. Larson, R. Bogott, l.. Logemann. H. Andresen, W. Fullerton, B. Peterson, D. Fairchild. Front Row: D. Rathjen, J. Nicholson, R. Klein, G. Newby, president: W. Orton, vice-president: R. Myers, secretary: J. Lydick, treasurer, L. James. AlChe: Back Row: R. Farritor, ID. Novacek, L. Groff. K. Arnold, L. Drbal, W. Buchanan. Second Row: G. Young, D. Nelson, R. Faubel, D. Kos. S. Martin, W. Dresselhaus, G. Taylor. Front Row: B. Aerni, W, Mitchell, secretary: R. Hoover, vice-presi- dent, W. Batten, president: C. I-lentzen, treasurerp A. Schroder, F. Salmen. AIChE Travels To Hallam During Initial NU Conclave Meeting for the first time on the Nebraska campus, the regional convention of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers toured the atomic reactor at Hallam and the Beatrice Ammonia Plant. Under- graduates then presented extra-credit projects with winners receiving one-year subscriptions to the "Pro- gressive Chemical Engineer" magazine. At a bi-monthly meeting, Dr. James Reinhart, Pro- fessor Emeritus of Criminology, examined Southern crime cases. Discussing details of a sample murder case, Reinhart detailed police and court proceedings. Leading a forum at a spring meeting, Dr. Elliot of the Economics Department analyzed student insur- ance needs. Concluding the year, an OPPD official discussed chemical water treatment for turbine feeds. AIA Constructs Snack Bar To Fill Redesigned Gallery Saving walks to the Crib, the'Nebraska chapter of the American Institute of Architects opened a snack bar on the first floor of Architectural Hall. Students took class breaks over rolls and donuts while listening to newly acquired stereos and tapes. Sending five delegates to the National College AIA Convention in Washington, D.C., representatives reported on national expansion plans. At the con- clave, conventioners elected the Nebraska candidate to the post of Regional Director of the Big Eight AIA. At an open meeting, Dr. Ping of University Planning discussed "Political Influences in Architecture." A later speech by Professor Henry Wright of Kansas State involved the architects responsibility to society. AIA: Back Row: B. Blair, J. Larson, D. Voss, J. Bentz, G. Rundquist, R. Klein, D. Bouse, D. Brennfoer- der. Third Row: I. Vrtiska, J. Anderson, J.Trom- bley, T. Kathka, D. Truckenbrod, C. Mack, B. Frasier, R. Twiss, K. Livingston. Second Row: B. Rempe, A. Becker, M. Jorgensen, D. Frese, W. Jacobsen, M. Moseman, E. Kodet, N. Kolder. Front Row: H. Andresen, N. Stark, M. Rueter, vice-president, V. Aufdemberge, secretary: L. Young, president: P. Watson, K. Willis, R, Psota. "Computerizing" simulated gridiron competition, engineers display an E-Week Husker victory. HKN Contributes Journals To EE Library Expansion In order to recruit new members, Eta Kappa Nu sponsored a smoker in the Union to orient freshmen and sophomore electrical engineering students. For a service project, the group solicited books and charts from faculty members and industrial organizations to expand the electrical engineering library by 15'Z,. Incorporating numerous small composites into one, members built a new display for 450 mugshots. De- signed to hold all electrical engineers' pictures, the board occupied a prominent place in Ferguson Hall. Building electrical circuit kits to augment yearly finances, Eta Kappa Nu contributed to departmental laboratories. -Manufacturing and packaging the kits, HKN sold the connections to incoming freshmen. Eta Kappa Nu: Back Row: C. Kruger, A. Popp, D. Fairchild, J. Vittera, l.. James, R. Kennedy, R. Klein. Front Row: B. Holden, W. Fuller- ton, secretary: W. Orton, president: B. Peterson, vice-president: H. Myers, treasurer: R. Bogott. Executive Board Sponsors Supplementary Study Plans Echoing the lnnocent's Protege Program,,Nebr- aska's Engineering Executive Board implemented a similar idea for the college. Students gained first-hand experience by working with Lincoln professionals in architectural-engineering offices and building firms. To inform the public of school functions and to publicize creative projects, the Board established a publicity committee. Sponsoring programs on KUON- TV, the group also handled all advertising for E-Week. Orienting freshmen to the College, Exec Board sponsored a series of "Introduction to Engineering" talks. First-year men heard representatives from various honorary societies speak on the extracurricular opportunities available to students in the college. P3 Ponclering pertinent problems in engineering panel members broadcast facts and publicity Engineering Exec Board: Back Row: P. Friede, l.. Young, D. Voss, J. Nicholson, R. Myers. G. Vaughn. Second Row: R, Psota. G, Newby, J. Bonczynskj, W. Gr l' N Na r de W. l-lansmire Front Row- D. l-la , A. Schroeder, W. Mitchell, vice-president: J. Rebensclorf, presl- oe mg. . v u , . l . y cient: F. Lefler. secretary: l.. Young, adviser, l ASME: Back Row: J. Mozdzon. R. Burke, C.ArnoId, N. l-littner. C. Rath, B. Strayer, F. Surber, L. Campbell, V. Noe, L. Sandersfelcl, S. Fluent. Fourth Row: J. Lydick, C. Bloyd, M. Suhr, L. Bonderson, l. Firdosy, T. Lisec, E. Johnson, G. Lloyd, M. Whitney, G. Slomstrom, R. Snell. Third Row: D. Rice, M. Witt, J. Chevalier, J. Weiss, D. Beck, D. Grams, R. Lowe, E. Sarmast, J. Stricker, A. Jack, A. Cook. Second Row: G. Newby, D. Johannsen, J. Grasso. E. Givens, J. Rosluncl, R. Schulze, G. Engel- kemler, G. Cerny, T. Chaillie, B. Menke. ASME Nets Gemini Movie For Missile Study Session To keep up with engineering and research develop- ments, the student chapter of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers viewed a motion picture on Astronaut White's space walk. McDonald Aircraft pro- duced the color film, entitled "What lt's Like Outside." Traveling to Omaha the society toured the Tip-Top Products Plant to examine the newest improvements in assembly-line operations. A visit to the Lincoln Branch of the Goodyear Tire Company enabled members to witness improved rubber processing techniques. In a forum on employment, ASME's heard Robert Oberline tell of DuPont's expectations of graduates. At a subsequent meeting, Jim Galen of Proctor and Gamble detailed innovations for industrial tools. Pi Taus Gather Brochures To Assist Grad Prospects ln order to aid mechanical engineers considering graduate study, Pi Tau Sigma collected and posted bulletins from various colleges. For future reference the group filed the notices by geographical location. Improving displays of engineering equipment in Richards Hall, members contacted industrial concerns for photographs of the latest in rockets, missiles and hydroelectric dams. To complement the new collection, the honorary purchased and installed new picture frames and glass to brighten up the building's halls. Contacting sophomore ME's, Pi Tau's held a smoker for the top one-fourth ofthe class. Honoring high schol- arship, Pi Tau Sigma awarded a Mark's Handbook, a book of graphs and charts, to a second-year student. Pi Tau Sigma: A Back Row: R. Lovve, J. Vanorsdol, S. Morris, L. Bonderson, C. Bloyd, R. Carmichael. Second Row: D. Johannsen, J. Grasso, A. Jack, E. N L S FI t F tR G N b Givens, . oy, . uen . ron ow: . ew y, M. Suhr, treasurer, J. Lydick, vice-presidentg R. Rice, presidentg R. Burke, s retaryg R. Nelson, adviser: R. Degenhardt. 1 Staff Growth Supplements BLUE PRINT Dimensions Reorganizing the Nebraska BLUE PRINT editorial corps, Engineering Publications Board increased the full time number of personnel from four to twenty. ln order to more easily delegate responsibilities, the board added one managing editor and five senior editors. Monthly published articles entitled "Research Highlights," written by University of Nebraska profes- sors, outlined variousfaculty projects inthe Engineering College. The "Scientific Sound of Music," a research story, described the electronic control of violin har- monics produced by advanced electronic amplifiers. As a charter member of the Engineering College Magazine Association, Nebraska BLUE PRINT sub- mitted to periodic financial checks. Procuring out-of- state industrial advertising, the organization acted as national representative for the magazine. . r- l Engineering the elimination of a final deadline copy correctors correlate pages and captions 990-. su xi Editor Business Staff: I A Schroeder D. Jacobson, T. Llewer. Nl. Connors, D. Ewing. la? Q .... -,:nr.,, .xx 42 J K-M' Business Manager: T. Liewer "r'f41i' ng- ...f. ., Junior Editorial Staff: Back Row: G. Kemist, T. Chaillie, T. McNair. Front Row: G Golter, J. Swanson, H. Rickel. .. 55: .fi "V 'i 4' . i , : ff ' 4 ' :sf :Sli . -. i qjlg-Wifi 'f L-.Q 'A r X ii-fF.,,rl3 .2 X. wif..-'. ,uw ' Y,--. . U , L-, '. H22 f ,1.. ,M ,.1A,i.:'i t QZIL . . if W "ny s P . -. T5 i.-1' 5 .g. ' Senior Editorial Staff: Left to right: R. Klein, A. Schroeder. I.. Headley. M. Nicholson, L. Young. IEEE: Back Row: R. Klein, R. Zentner, C. Kruger, G. Golter, V. Kotecha, I.. Campbell, J. Swanson, D. Morey, J. Vannier, B. Holden. Third Row: N. Kobza, P. Pearce, H. Semin, J. Johnson, D. Fairchild, B. Stone, I.. Henderson, G. Novotny, l.. James. Sec- ond Row: G. Bell, A. Dornhoff. R. Kennedy, J. Vittera, H. Myers, R. Pellican, G. Krueger, R. l.ohr, W. Orton. Front Row: W. Damm, W. Fullerton, vice-chairman, W. Robison, adviser: G. Vaughn, chairman: B. Peterson, treasurer, F. Lefler, secre- taryg R. Bogott, D. Acker, C. Jones. - IEEE Journeys Eastward For Professional Conclave To increase understanding of developments at other schools, members of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers attended the Chicago region- al convention. The forty-one Nebraskans toured busi- ness firms and viewed an industrial exposition. Coordinating E-Week efforts in the electrical engi- neering department, the group aided display designers. Supervising construction and computation relating to the exhibits, EE's merited the over-all trophy. Encouraging student entries in national thesis composition, IEEE sponsored a campus contest. Award- ing the winner with a check the organization sent the paper to the sectional competition for judging and captured third place for technical content. ASAE Promotes Farming At Tractor Safety Meeting Participating in projects designed to publicize agriculture, ASAE supervised Tractor Power and Safety Day. Former East Campus Engineering head, L. W. Hurlbut, received recognition at one booth while other displays recruited members and helped raise funds. During the annual student-faculty banquet, the society honored John R. Davis, the past Agricultural Dean, for outstanding university service. At the same dinner, the 1965 Hurlbut Memorial Award for scholastic performance went to Junior Dennis Sievers. Appointing Dr. R. W. Kleis to the Ag Chairmanship, the Regents filled a vacancy left by Dr. Davis's promo- tion to Engineering Dean. Students held a reception in the East Union to get acquainted with the new director. ASAE: Back Row: D. Sievers, R. Myers, W. Jacobson, W. Bishop, M. Paulson, M. Jedlicka. Second Row: l.. Engelkemier, D. Schulte, W. Woodside, F. Baumert, F. Christensen, F. Horn. Front Row: R. Akerson, K. Meier, P. Friede, secrehtaryg D. Hay, president, K. VonBargen. adviser: P. Corcoran. W Y. Chi Epsilon: Back Row: C. Borzych, J. Lewis, D. Rathjen, M. Nall, I. Saberi, J. Wagner. Second Row: K. Afshar, J. Bonczynski, I.. Loge- mann, J. Nicholson, J. Rebensdorf, P. Liewer. Front Rovy: R. Ohnstede, D. Vodehnal, vice-president, R. Weigel, president, D. Chin, treasurer, F. Corey, secretary, G. Swihart, adviser. Chi Epsilon Snags Second For E-Week Presentations Depicting the various modes of highway construc- tion, Chi EpsiIon's window exhibit at Gold's outpointed all but one other display. In other E-Week events, the civil engineers won second place in overall competition. For the first time the Nebraska chapter welcomed delegates from 60 universities across the country at the biannual national conclave. Dr. Ivan Vrest of the Bethlehem Steel Company led a panel discussion and forum on "The Changing World of Civil Engineering." To supplement the CE convention program, the NU society postponed initiation of pledges and installa- tion of officers until second semester. The innovations presented by the local organization served as model procedures for other colleges throughout the nation. ASCE Contacts Authorities For Graduate Opportunities Writing Civil Engineering alums employed in in- dustry, the campus chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers sent questionnaires to prominent gradu- ates. The group compiled the information on job possi- bilities and then filed the data in advisers' offices. Discussing employment applications, the district representative of Standard Oil Company led a forum for prospective employees. At a later meeting, Dr. Merk Hobson, Graduate Dean and former Engineering Dean, spoke on the "Values and Purposes of Graduate School." To promote a competition for upper level student theses, the honorary sponsored research work. After faculty members chose the best papers, ASCE awarded winners with a handbook of graphs and charts. ASCE: Back Row: T. Satchell, A. Schultz. R. Saathoff, M. Nall, J. Steinke, K. Afshar, C. Borzych. Fourth Row: R. Christ, J. Fischer, R. Fisher, l.. Loge- mann, G. Batterman, R. Lauritsen, J. Rasmussen, G. Slizeski. Third Row: D. Chin, J. Wagner. J. Moore, K. Brink, D. Vodehnal, J. Ragsdale, H. Mettenbrink, I. Saberi. Second Row: W. Hans- mire, I.. Koch, R. Weigel, K. Buesing, D. Sail. P. Liewer, M. Jess, D. Steinke. Front Row: J. Lewis, R. Ohmstede, W. Case, J. Bonczynske, presi- dent, J. Rebensdorf, secretary: F. Corey, treasurer: D. Rathjen, S. Gilmore. l Graduate College sf -L sa L, lf' Isolated from the current of college activity grad students sink into depths of knowledge ' A. . .,. A .W ,,,, i yr V. . . r, ,,.Wi.,..,, A ' 1 "" :V 'val , 'fn , ig, my-:"'t-1t' V "4 'Efx -' ' .- -. ' iw' .- 114' - 'fi-' ' if r' ig I V 'ir ,v v v F-217-gqiaji XM i r i. ., ' fi l i 1 .iraq 1 . 1 X-i l l Curriculum Addition Boosts Grad College Matriculation From two central administrative offices, Graduate College supervised the expanding masters and doc- toral programs of sixty-three university departments. The number of participating divisions increased by one as agricultural education resumed an upper level course of study after cancellation in 1962. Thirty East Campus students worked in the revital- ized area toward professorships in agriculture and posi- tions as extension agents. Research concerning oc- cupations related to farming involved undergraduates as well as candidates for higher degrees. With a total of 1809 scholars participating in all advanced studies, the College absorbed an 18? increase over the previous term. After completion of three semesters as chief director, Dean lVlerk Hobson predicted a 1970 graduate registration of 3056. 4.1 Merk Hobson, Dean Graduate College U of N Financiers Respond to Grad College Expansion Substantially increased funds donated to NU by outside sources kept pace with the graduate enroll- ment boost. Up 52,378,946 from 1965, the university received 258,667,237 to support technological research, special educational programs and scholarship aid. Financial gifts also helped finish construction projects. Dedication of Behlen Laboratory climaxed the physics departments transition into a new home as opportunities for scientific studies multiplied. Approximately one half of the students seeking higher degrees accepted stipends from the federal gov- ernment as well as from private interests. Grants specified as assistantships contracted one fourth of the recipients' time in classroom and laboratory supervi- sion while fellowships required no extracurricular work. Wizards of electronic fuses, meters and dials, grads intricately manipulate atomic accelerators. ,,,.c-.-1v"'4' fr fr'-:-::':d From practiced fingers of a graduate pianist, classic selections approach recital perfection. .--eff . -' 's - 23:5 ,!',Exfgiii-Q-fl':l,.:gr'r3,l'vr.- ' f l"' lrf T. 1 . ' rn Coffee-break seminars enrich grad scholars as a guest speaker probes literary problems. Calm in a sea of conglomeration, a grad student scans history to escape moving-day madness. 1 Y -'if Away from books into realms of practicality, an assistant turns theory into modern motion. A - 'f'! N' 1 fr - r if EEA b , f-:x Q 1, AX g - 1531.5 ' V, - f 4 ,gg ,, .1 2 .,v 1 'E I L-a gb 3 fix" -. E1 'x If ff 'XXI 1 Q ' i . P- af, , .....,,......T. Q ., his .' 3 --- gf f- g , 1 1. .N fx H Ein' , ,, A J - ,fi ' in +.. 'is , -S. f 'VL -2.9.4 .:, . ,HE ..,v -n.- x, f mxv ni, ' , , 'V 1 ' ,K , -. , J. 'Z' gs x 1 'L-X .f' 1' 1. . L-f -xi - W AN if if - 9 F - lp- -a . I- , U, -.un ,w.., mx! v 1 2 iff - . mfulseg- -T - ,fix- q kg I I - iv j 'A M1 X' Eid A . Q, ,Y K T -' - -- ' . -:J'!'---1-.EAT A . ,-.,ii5jf5fflE, ,ite . ,-,Q1 va- XL . A R -0lV4"..L ' , -J :vu suiiuliuuuihtmintns i 1 ll-qqullh!1!0 ' 3-I, an ..- N ..,. 44... 1 -an ""' "-' , ,ii .1 -.W ,, ,,,,,.... 410181 ' 2.5" -Q. 'al ,t Q-1 V., , 4 ,., wg, ., ,J if E .gg an Nb. 'A Yi' f? 'R . 1 V 1 "KM, ' , 7: Q. Qi, ,, .NK I N x 'A .. 'fy -51' E' 2 'vgx' RY xv. 1 X m 1' if 'X --meg W N. , aww rr Law College Launches Plan To Revise Auto Regulations In order to help draft more efficient motor vehicle codes, University law students joined state officials in investigating ordinances of Nebraska and other states. The six students involved hoped to submit ideas by 1967, making traffic regulations compatible with fu- ture needs. Students also advised farmers on tax and legal matters in conjunction with the Nebraska Depart- ment of Agricultural Economics and reviewed contract, incorporation, zoning, and water allocation disputes. Using an electronic computer, Law College con- ducted a three-month project to putallcurrently effective Nebraska statutes on micro-film. The project facilitated understanding concerning the history and application of the laws and created compact reference files. 53 as ' N 1: .. u. . ,, Q. i fs , s F, ,K 5 L X ,.A, . ,. af, ,- ' l 5 , 'L-V iff '25-4 Y gy x. sw David Dow, Dean College of Law Dean Dow Joins Committee To Revise Jury Procedure Improved instruction criteria for Nebraska juries formed the nucleus of a two-year revision project by a newly selected council of law affiliates. Dean Dow aided in synthesis of standard judicial information to be pre- sented during the pre-trial orientation sessions. To develop a symposium on penology and post- conviction operations, the H1966 Law Review" prepared arguments on various forms of prison conduct and management. Considerable commentary appeared analyzing imprisonment as a form of punishment. Centering discussion on parole' and probation tactics, the Review also featured concern for the rights of convicted persons. Comparison of American and in- ternational methods of justice facilitated members in gaining insight for bettering the penal system. With tension mounting for a mock trial debut, Gary Scritcmier rehearses a grade A case. 'M - Pondering the prospects for water allocation, novice lawyers survey Antelope Creek Dam. Resting the burden of 'proof' on the typesetter Don Eiovvmen scrutinizes l.avv Review galleys X,- 'x Y 'ui l . S I ., - x yi , 3 N 1, gg lf v I .1 A J-9, +n fi x " Q , sy -- I L r. , ' A ,...-1-3-f-""' .. Q Q, , -it 1- f,rA3 . r: N, ' .. 1 . I -- .x , nf, - I x ' I . , ,. 3 -.T "' A 1 va,-1 ,-,,..-f--'A E 594 mm! .44 75 'Q 1 1-'Ffa -QF' College of Medicine Ai W' v" 3 "Medicine Man" Dr. Gardner aids John Klarich to bone up on 'Osc:ar's' anatomical components. 102 4-ik fi.:,h 4, . . .. W-wx 'T 'E ' 1, ":' J: J W,-ui xi"ks.f'. -, r 'rr-' - -, -:.i..'A' A ' . :-1 i - fi i l"'f ' s. El, 2 x . . ,Al '-t' ' V 9 it 1 nw? H, i'.' fi. is fir 1 - ij Q' . 1- I X x 1 . . I Z l K . - 4+-Pr.-.'r' i 'fd V '. x, . .va 3 .Q N -in 3'-Fel ig ' fly, SQ i 5 of U ". ' ,I I 7 i A .l t .1 YN l l I mls. K x '--.ggi gf' 5 . . . 17 .,- Q, , ..- Government Consignments Allow Med College Growth By acts ot the State Legislature and the Federal Government, the College of Medicine received grants totaling nearly S616 million. The funds made plans pos- sible to add 189 new hospital beds and a Basic Sci- ences Building. Proposed changes included renovated clinics and increased enrollment of 20 percent by 1968. NU's Student American Medical Association rated an award forthe outstanding chapter in the region. In the SAMA Mead Johnson Scientific Forum, Dennis Lan- ders won the grand national prize for research projects while Howard l-lagglundtookfirsttor exhibitcompetition. Dr. Perry G. Rigby, assistant Professor ot Internal Medicine, received the Markle Scholar Award for Aca- demics. An addition to the faculty, Dr. Fay Smith, became the nation's only full Professor of General Practice. Cecil L. Wittson, Dean College of Medicine 103 pf.-':f,7T:.a,e.--..5.. Y . E ' . l, . i :Ng . i 1 ' i ' ' I Theta NU Features Advice On Professional Problems .11 'xii' Monthly meetings provided Theta Nu with speakers from both the medical and legal professions. Lawyers spoke to the group and attempted to explain the current legal-ethical problems in the field while doctors in- i formed individuals concerning hospital conditions. Visiting Lincoln General, men became acquainted with physicians and the different areas of study avail- able. Observation of surgical operations and autopsies improved the club's knowledge of treatments and ex- posed the group to the realistic side of medical practice. With the change in the grading system, Theta Nu revised the membership requirements. Entrance into the society depended upon the pre-med student re- ceiving a 3.2 average with a full-time schedule. Learning the fine operations of an anesthetizer, Theta Nu's anticipate resident responsibilities. Theta Nu: Back Row: A. Taube, G. Larsen, R. Kohlmeier, R. Seiler, B.McMuller1, L. Harvey. Second Row: V. Vahle, B. Byington, J. Kin- youn, D. Doud, K. Olds, J. Kenagy, R. Hausserman. Front Row: H. Vondrak, R. Newton, l.. Burgher, secretary-treasurer: J. Luckasen, presidentg R. Elliott, vice-president: R. Wilburn, D. Pont. 104 NU Meds: Back Row: M. McCaffree, R. Craig, C. Weeks, R. Hausserman, D. Deterding, J. Miller, D. Johnson, B. Turner, S. McPherson, R. Gingery.Third Row: M. Wallin, M. Collins, J. McCarthy, B. Galley, B. Jensen, K. Johannes, B. Bachus, J. Grimm, J. l-linkle, J. H nson. S d R w: R. B vver M. Mal v z W. F II R. F cl R. Ko rb r T. Fi K J.S nl ht P. Forsman A. Black a econ o o , o o, u er, lor, e e, 's, D c ec- e, , -- stone, R. Wolfmeyer. Front Row: M. LeRoy, B. Forney, G. Burbrldgeireasurerg M. ElIlo'ct,v1ce-president, S. Lagerberg, presl- dent, K. Maxwell, secretary, B. Seiler, J. Bauer, D. Stranberg. NU Meds Expand Interests With Doctor-Presentations Meeting once a month in the small auditorium of the Union, NU Meds listened to speakers from both the fields of medicine and University administration. Doc- tors from around the state presented diversified subjects ranging from surgery and treatments of all types to the psychological aspect of the Crucifixion, Nebraska medical students embarked on a field trip to Creighton University to examine the specialized facilities. The day-long tour provided discussions with researchers and observations of class operations. To study the newest techniques, the group visited the College of Medicine in Omaha. During meetings members supplied supplementary information on ap- plications and fellowships to fulfill NU Meds purpose. Lambda Tau Inspects Labs For VA Hospital Projects To further the knowledge of lab techniques, Lambda Tau toured the Lincoln Veterans Administration Hos- pital and viewed one of the few existing artificial kidneys in the Midwest. In conjunction with the laboratory's function in modern cancer research, doctors presented informative material from the specialized fields. Visiting the Omaha Campus of the University, the group inspected the Schools of Medicine and Nursing. Members learned about equipment and procedures available to encourage attendance at the Colleges. Nebraska Chapter, with twenty-six students, served as an honorary fraternity for medical technology spe- cialists. Based on the need for interest in the sciences, the society emphasized education and research. Lambda Tau: Back Row: K. Kearns, I.. Zuick, J. Rodgers. D. Gartner, S. Helm, l.. Smith, M. Biere, M. Willet. Sec- ond Row: I.. Grothe, B. Bockus, A. McAllister, R. Baker, D. Aurich, M. Lagerstrom, C. Finnell, E. Clark, L.. Larson. Front Row: P. Landolt, adviser, J. Takenaga, T. Abel, secretary: B. Leach, vice-presi- dent: J. Chaloupka, president, P. Power, B. Potter, K. Johnson. 105 School of Nursing 1 ' -J xv Nancy Oieson piays a pediatric Santa Claus as Randy Duryea envisions Christmas toys. 106 AccreditationRatingBoosts School of Nursing's Goals Exceeding minumum standards set by the State Boards, the University School of Nursing received full accreditation from the National League for Nursing. Under the new rating, the baccalaureate program af- forded the best education for professional practice and made possible Government funds for student loans. Designed to fully prepare future practitioners, the curriculum stressed a liberal arts and sciences educa- tion. Graduates became eligible for higher salaries in U.S. agencies and non-federal institutions and gained acceptance for advanced-study degrees. Omaha campus enrollment increased by fifteen per cent during 1965-66 and estimates promised fu- ture expansion. With the possibility of taking the last two years of training in the military service and receiv- ingfull reimbursement, two men registered inthe School. Irma Kyle, Director School of Nursing 107 Student Nurse Conventions Improve Vocational Insight "A Bridge to Tomorrow-Today": the theme of the National Student Nurse Convention initiated a year of travel for several students in the School of Nursing. After the Omaha coeds returned from the San Fran- cisco conclave, senior Sharon Bonham packed to at- tend the International Congress for Nurses in Germany. Delegates to the State Student Nurse Convention in Scottsbluff elected Louise Erickson as "Trail Boss," the state president of the Association. Forty-four NU nurses-in-training attended the autumn meeting. Receiving an invitation from the national headquar- ters, a senior class representative served on the Com- mittee for Recruitment. Functioning as a means to draw minority group members into the nursing profession, the committee held the first meeting in New York to out- line plans for implementation throughout the U.S. 5 .,,., Iii Illlll. fl he it v J? 10 8 X, ' ,ZA X15 ...xx PA fs.. 'st .mi 1? l lv A X x XXX With student nurses' elections looming ahead Omaha candidates devise campaign strategy if Fi -. l W9, X v-. XX X ' With double duty in store for next semester, Overloaded class schedules steal lersure time NU nurses check accreditation requirements. while Coeds improvise a make shift breakfast -za-" N --KW . . . ' 'Yi , I ' , +L ,l iw .5 ,X . "' l 2 ll U ,QV 1 . ' x bl ,- - N Preparing to demonstrate hygiene techniques to rural families, prospective nurses watch Miss Mason teach proper brushing. .E NUTS' Yfnui Fx,-X Q I over- I PhH ,I 3.3! ' ' TH' 1 icq? 5553-' ' 1 milf Y ' -5 . , eggs, fe. -1 ,wi . ......,.,,,, 4 , 3, - TW' A:'1v. Routing telephone traffic during a busy night Mrs. Kadlec relieves a deluged switchboard -A --Us n h 1 K 9 E A 3.5.-:ish . 3: fi , ' '2"'-'T' Druggists Finance Stipends For Academic Achievement To honor outstanding classroom performance, the University of Nebraska's Pharmacy College awarded various scholarships through organizations in the school. Several pharmaceutical manufacturers and so- cieties donated funds for providing the grants. After the contribution of several relics by Nebraska pharmacists, the college developed a museum to record the evolution of pharmacy. As self-appointed repre- sentatives, NU alums in the fifty states also searched for articles of historic value. The collection contained antique drug jars, a prescription file compiled at the turn of the century and crude drugs of the past. With the increased need for personnel in spe- cialized areas, the college expanded the graduate program. Ranking high nationally, twenty per cent of the seniors received assistance for advanced work. ' eq '-:QHQ 'rr' 1' ' ' Y 'Q ' -Q 4 .in 'iff -I in r gjfgfb-1--asf A ij ,J-tif .TSI r. :ja gli A' E.: I Ak5.j:.tJ . .Y 'N ',:'f'---' ,, ,L ,-- 4- 4 I 14.1 if ' , '1 2 . -."-5, ,X f , A. L,-, Sn. ,J-S. . 'I L .-tiff . ' if v- - 1' Rx ff ' A - 9 ., i Robert D. Gibson, Dean College of Pharmacy 111 APhA: Back Row: R. Robinson, J. Holmstedt, A. Shafiee, R. Miller, B. Beck, R. Ternes, J. Baird, G. Gunderson, R. Carpenter, R Anderson, H. Rodriguez, V. Padron, D. Hughes. Fourth Row: T. Romanak, M. Kottas, R. Rathien, D. Zink, J. Sueper, R Harder, G. Graff, D. Cruise, J. Wopata, M. Petersen, R. Spuit, P. Beck, D. Putensen, R. Valdez, D. Zessin. Third Row: D. Taylor, T. O'Neill, D. Eglite, R. Lambert. P. Tooley, G. Weyers, C. Sachan, M. McCormick, B. Phelps, M. Stuart, J. Brooke, D. Johnson, M. Ost, L. Norton. Second Row: R. Woodward, J. Cox, L. Orender, P. Madison, A. Stutheit, J. Wells, R. Lindquist K. McEIhose, K. Tuma, B. Wolvin, J. Fauss, J. Irvin, B. Lundmark, T. Rendell. Front Row: F. VanEngen, H. Hauschild, J Vandewalle, P. Wells, adviser, M. Bauer, B. Berry, vice-president, G. Street, president, R. Koozer, treasurer, L. Cloose secretary, G. Evans, B. Schnegelberger, J. Petersen, C. Sunderman. APhA Regroups Activities Of Pharmacy Student Body To commemorate the death of a member resulting from an automobile accident, the University of Nebraska chapter of Kappa Psi pharmacy honorary established the "Thomas W. Cunningham Memorial Award." The organization presented the prize, a Medical Dictionary, to the outstanding pledge at the annual senior banquet. During National Pharmacy Week, Kappa Psi spon- sored an exhibit at the college's "Open l-louse" celebra- tion. The display, entitled "What Makes a Pharmacist?", outlined the steps leading to a professional career. Donating money from the chapter treasury, the fraternity aided "Operation Santa Claus." The children of families on the Government Welfare Plan received Christmas gifts purchased with the cash contributions. Kappa Psi Creates Citation To Honor Frosh Excellence With the executive council appointing the respec- tive classes to standing committees, the American Pharmaceutical Association adopted a policy for arranging events of the College. The newly elected class presidents functioned as the corresponding chairmen. Acting as the staff for the College's publication, the juniors in the association edited and printed the "Scruple." Recording the happenings of the previous year, the 1965 edition presented the school's activities to the active alumni and prospective students. Conducting "Open House," the seniors' project involved setting up displays showing the various phases of study in the college. Other work comprised inviting a number of high school students for tours of the pharmacy physical plant and formulating the publicity. Kappa Psi: Back Row: D. Taylor, M. Ost, R. Miller, G. Graff, L. Orender, R. Lindquist, A. Shafiee. Third Row: R. Koozer, J. Cox, G. Gunderson, H. Rodriguez, R. Valdez, B. Beck, P. Madison, H. Hauschild. Second Row: G. Evans, P. Beck, J. l-lolmstedt, R. Robinson, G. Street, D. Zessin, B. Boyd, V. Padron. Front Row: M. Kottas, R. Lambert, treasurer, T. O'NeiIl, secretary, K. McElhose, president, D. Cruise, vice-president, R. Carpenter, P. Wells, adviser, R. Sachari. Kappa Epsilon: Back Row: B. Wolvin, K. Tuma, J. Wopata, B. Lundmark, l.. Norton. Front Row: J. Irvin president: M. Bauer. treasurer: Ei. Schnegelberger, vice-president. Kappa Epsilon Cites Coeds For Top Pharmacy Grades Promoting high scholarship, Kappa Epsilon recog- nized several actives. Among awards at the spring dinner, the fraternity for women students in pharmacy presented a certificate to the outstanding junior. Sponsoring a "Penny Dinner," the organization raised money for the Zada lvl. Coopler School Fund, a special scholarship for coeds in pharmacy. Addition- ally, the chapter sponsored a tour for high school girls through the Bryan Memorial Hospital Pharmacy. To revise the group's scrapbook, the pledges sup- plied material concerningthe charter members, awards and banquets. The pledges also completed the history of Kappa Epsilon at the University and made the copy available for pharmacy students at Lyman Hall. -er . C. Sunderman, secretaryp l.. Clouse Rho Chi Initiation Rewards Top Pharmacy Scholarship Consisting of both undergraduates and faculty members, Rho Chi served as the honorary fraternity in the University's Pharmacy College. Membership in the society required a ranking in the uppertwenty percent. Special activities of the organization involved four dinner meetings. Among assembly speakers presenting lectures on professional topics, a local psychologist spoke on the application of psycho-therapuetic drugs. Acknowledging the highest grade averages in the respective classes, a senior and a sophomore received recognition at the traditional banquet. Funds from the chapter treasury and a donation from a local drug com- pany made possible the presentation of the Gilmour- Danielson Award promoting scholastic improvement. Rho Chi: Back Row: R. Lindquist, K. McElhose. Front Row: P. Wells, L. Clouse. presidentg M. Bauer, secretary. Teachers College Qiliiiiiliiiili f i 4........ 'No Snag-, 0 i I Shaping and sawing the beginnings of a table, a future instructor exhibits artistic tendencies. - 4 f . . X schod- A r Y m V. 1 ,x Changes Indicate Growth In Business-Teacher Fields By revising the existing teacher-preparation cur- riculums, NU Teachers College placed a greater stress on the vocational aspects of office instruction. An addi- tional course in the field of secondary secretarial edu- cation helped prepare future commercial teachers. Reflecting the increased emphasis on business and distributive training plans, a specialist in the area joined the staff last fall. Several NU faculty members continued research on occupational guidance and at- tended special graduate programs to study American normal educational developments and problems. As a member of the Nlld-Plains Educational Re- search and Development Association, the University aided in preparing a petition to the Federal government for a regional educational laboratory, A joint staff from .-fl several Midwestern colleges designed the lab to study the effectiveness of instructional innovations. Walter K. Beggs, Dean Teachers College 115 UNSEA: Back Row: K, Bitner, secretaryf C. Potter, l.. l-luss, J. Wahlin, S. Allison, Front Row: l.. Bonneau. sponsor: J. Weymouth, C. Eiranting, pre de t K Be tzingentreasurerpK.Westerberg. UNSEA Hosts Orientation Of Future Business Group Providing high school students with a basic under- standing of Teachers College activities, the University of Nebraska Student Education Association sponsored an FTA chapter in Council Bluffs, Iowa. The Future Teachers traveled to Lincoln for a UNSEA-conducted tour of the campus and an audience with Dean Beggs. UNSEA members visited two conventions of the Student Education Association of Nebraska at Doane College in Crete. At the March elections, two candidates from NU competed for state executive positions. By attending the National Student Education Con- ference, a Nebraska delegate studied programs of other associations. Through panel discussions, representa- tives acquired plans to take back for local use. Frosh Tour PE Facilities As Guests of PEK Group Holding an open house for new students, NU's Phi Epsilon Kappa acquainted interested freshmen with the PE department. By explaining organizational opera- tion methods, the department director of Physical Education for men gave the prospective members an insight into the programs and functions of the group. Nebraska's branch maintained one of the three highest places in the national ratings of the collegiate honorary. Out of the 58 chapters, the University gar- nered commendations based on activity quality. Displaying outstanding academic achievement, two Phi Epsilon students received the Scholarship Key awards. lVlr. Miller represented the local fraternity by serving as National vice-president last year. Phi Epsilon Kappa: Back Row: J. Lytle, R. Long, T. Kroese, D. Fuller, J. Libal, J. Meeske, G. DeBoer, E. Kovar. Third Row: C. Ridder, J. Geier, K. Brunk, R. Douglas, R. Beran, l.. Foster, C. Miller, Second Row: R. Frakes, R. Witte, D. Frolio. M. Gorham. D. Presern, P. Allgood. P. Dunekacke. Front Row: N. Godden, secretary, T. Moore, M. Johnson, treasurer, J. l-lallhpresidentg R. Little, vice-president: D. Maurice, C. Wear. Meeting extra-classroom 'Tutoring' obligations, student teachers apply the stamp of admission. Delegate Broadens Outlook During Pi Lamb Conference Attending the national convention of Pi Lambda Theta, NU chapter's president traveled to San Francisco. Psychologists, educations and former Pi Lambs dis- cussed the various facets and standards of teaching. At monthly Pi Lamb meetings, Teacher's College instructors further acquainted the group with the pro- fession. Dean Thorpe discussed University certification process, enabling grads to teach in 39 states while Dr. Meirhenry stressed interviewing techniques. Composed of professors from the University and supervisors in the Lincoln system, a panel presented faculty expectations of student teachers. The associa- tion later honored junior and senior women having at least a B plus average with a spring party and tea. Pi Lambda Theta: , Back Row: B. deNoyelIes. R. Dymacek, P. Wood, M. Landgren, M. Kirkland, I.. Haisch, N, Williams. Second Row: G. Liven- good, V. Guenzel, M. Cornell, J. Holmqulst. M, McCartney, I.. Lane, E. Ruff, B. Rose. Front Row: B. Beckman, D. Meyer, secretary: S. Schwartz, vice-president: D. Eschliman, president, M. Rakow, l.. Schlechte, J. Johnson. 117 MEN Gains Skill Dividend In High School Classrooms To obtain on-the-job experience, NU chapter of Mu Epsilon Nu traveled to Nebraska City over semester break. Members of the national men's Teachers Col- lege honorary taught high school's classes for one day. Among the Awards banquet presentations, the or- ganization recognized John Hall, a Lincoln Southeast senior, with a one-year tuition scholarship. The society based the choice on faculty recommendations and an essay composed by Hall on teaching goals. Sponsored by MEN, Topeka, Kansas, educator Dr. Ken McFarland addressed an all Teachers College convocation. At weekly meetings Dr. Alfrey of University High discussed the "Future of Student Teaching" and Dean Beggs described the "School ofthe Future." Back Row J Wood D Rasmussen L l-luss R Smith W Herzog D Clark C Jones, C. Stewart, R.Williams, E. Dredge. Second Row R Samuelson J Hall T Peak M Grbson R Douglas T Layton J Peters, J. Scholl, R, Schipporeit. Front Row D Clifton adviser K Hill P Zimmerman secretary K Littrell G McAdams president: D. Bohremtreasurer, D. Carlson G Muller vice president D Martin NHRRF: Back Row: B. Zajic, G. Knight, D. Ernst, V. Martin, K. Clark. L. Huss, G. Meyer, D. Carlson, E. Dredge, G. Muller. Third Row: C. Dreesziri, J. Rembolt, P. Plummer, T. Pappas, D. Curry, R. Bringelson, J. DeFrain, J. Hall, M. Brazeal. Second Row: J. Stites, C. Getscher, H. Drake, V. Kirnberlin, S. Flebbe, J. Ralston, G. Overholt, A. Thomas. J. Persch, J. Kemist. Front Row: T. Tinstman, J. Walters, M. Klingner, D. McKeag, C. Drew, W. Hall adviser, D. Clifton adviser, G. Sherman adviser, D. Fenwick adviser. NHRRF Counsels Students On Advanced Enrollment Stressing the importance of higher education, NHRRF undertook a project at Lincoln High to advise students interested in attending college. Members also organized tours for Lincoln children to Pioneer Village in Minden and tothe Hallam nuclear reactor. Following a NEBRASLAIand theme, participants teamed up with high school sophomores to put on a variety show in Pershing Municipal Auditorium. The production resulted in funds for further activities and a better University-community relationship. On a two day visit from New York University, Dr. Evellyn Alpenfells evaluated the Foundation's projects. At a final banquet, the world famous anthropologist praised the group's workin developing human relations. Phi Beta Lambda Attempts FBLA Executive Training Sponsoring a Leadership Workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska Phi Beta Lambda hosted Future Business Leaders of America officers. Mrs. Fran Williams ad- dressed the group to define the role of public relations. To prepare students for job application, members attending the annual State Convention in Fremont participated in mock interviews with local business executives. Outstanding performance in the male and female divisions of the conclave's business skills con- tests resulted in "Mr. and Miss Awards" recognition. Guest lecturer Dr. LaVern Cox informed the NU chapter of current data processing techniques. Also speaking at a meeting, Dr. Gordon Culver clarified Phi Beta Lambda's goals and purposes at the University. Phi Beta Lambda: Back Row: B. Baxter, C. Leshbcugh, J. Rambo, D. Leach, R. Williams, R. Smith, C. Williams, B. Milligan. Fourth Row: G. Killer, E. McCune, D. Lee, A. Nutzman, S. White, D. Woods, L. Robin- son, J. Flanagan, B. Roberts, H. Strasheim. Third Row: D. Patterson. S. Sieck, E. Roberts, B. Krenk, B. England, J. Misner, K. Blythe, D. Jones, C. Starr. Second Row: S. Carlson, K. Wilson, K. True, B. Schmidt, D. Heim, C. Duey, J. Johnson, C. Adams, L. Anderson, T. Nowak. Front Row: D. Vasa, J. Onken, T. Svoboda, L. Velte, vice-presidentg L. Wegner, president: M. Johnson, advisor: L. Davison, treasurerg D. Donelson, S. Irmer. ll I l l QIK x 1 119 Air, Military and Naval Sciences lgw., ., ltifz -. A . -,,,.v.. ll 1l,l,, an I P? .FFP ,nil ipldl hh lQlilQ-A lpn ijulf PM up ju nl ljip ll if! lj h ll l Colonel William Bowers Air Force Colonel Carl Yost Army Captain Arthur Mullen Navy New Staff Members Devise Upperclass Course Option ' With the addition of new professors of lVlilitary and Air Science, the ROTC program at Nebraska attracted future officers by augmentingthe curriculum. A revised two year Air Force plan offered an opportunity for jun- iors and seniors to forgo the two years of basic studies. Advanced status brought cruises and summer camp at Fort Riley, Kansas, where trainees put class- room knowledge to use in natural surroundings. As undergraduates neared commencement, national af- fairs and military law complemented previous courses on the services' role in American and world events. Time spent by cadets entering medical school applied to reserve duty requirements, while the rank of captain awaited the NlD's. By enlisting for an addi- tional two years, students could waive service participa- ' iuriirmmmm . -Wm--., 5 tion during college while receiving monetary grants. 1 In anticipation of adverse drill field conditions, cadet Steve Johnson acquires seasonal attire. Air Force Clubs Entertain Local Sanitarium Residents Adopting two wards at the State Mental Hospital, Arnold Air Society and Angel Flight provided recrea- tion and friendship for patients from five to sixteen years of age. The groups sponsored a trip to the Ne- braska-Oklahoma game, visited the hospital at Christ- mas and decorated room walls with colorful murals. Six representatives from Nebraska's Joyce-Johnson squadron attended Arnold Air Society's National Con- clave. At the Dallas convention a banquet MC'd by Bob Hope and featuring President Lyndon Johnson con- cluded four days of seminars and business meetings. Completely revising the constitution and by-laws for added efficiency the fraternity instituted a modified . . . Arnold Air Society Staff: committee system. Projects and a merit awards pro- Back Row:o.wnuamS,aavssef,J.penaf.M.MerSe,s.MQefe - P. Mickel, D. Murray. Front Row: J. Doctor, D. Morris, O gram found new vigor under the revamped system. ceekson, commander: D. eankey, w. veaehrm. Angel Flight: Back Row: N. Binger, M. Casey, J. Bredthauer, J. Klimes, D. Jones, K. Tetro, R. Glenn, M. Kulish, P. Rhynalcls. K. Oberle, J. Mahar. Third Row: J. Brurnm, K. Jones, C. Peterson, M. Sims, S. Meier, J. Delbridge, l-l. Drake, B. Baxter, K. Costln, C.'l-tall, J. Christensen. Second Row: D. Bernard, M. Sicklebower, S. Sitorius, L. Grothe, B. Mullenix, M. Hardee. R. Larson, L. Qulnett. B. Atkinson, J. Meyer. Front Row: L. Haynes, C. Pohlman, C. Housel, B. Pflasterer, J. Warnsholz, B. Brown, M. Lester, commander: J. Gregarius, B. Armstrong, J. Groteluschen, D. Williams, sponsor. Staff Publicizes Prospects ln NU's Army Department By visiting three-fourths of the state's high schools, Army ROTC instructors informed college-bound Sen- iors of military opportunities. Traveling with University of Nebraska registration representatives to orientation programs, officers urged qualified students to enroll in the voluntary curriculum as college Freshmen. Five additional scholarships given to newcomers began the initial phase of a plan to subsidize a total of 20 students in all classes. Taking advantage of a new two year option, 25 junior college and NU second year men applied for the Fort Knox training session. Six weeks of intensive study at the Fort replaced the first four semesters of college ROTC requirements. As a preview of future summer camp, Sophomores visited Fort Riley, Kansas, during spring vacation. Forty-eight hours of regulation living and working conditions gave cadets a realistic view of the service. . 'rs . S" z 3 44 .1.iy- af' . 1-ai1.iq.2,yQLr1l. tif 1 X - vii , . if: . ' ' ,, 1 x r A ' ' iff 3.., . w.. , T Removing another obstacle to course completion, A - A ' -Ar.. Jgtllfg. A. -N A 'ai a camper utilizes 'dummy disposing' techniques. A ,ll-Yr V .5 7- -" J ,,... ....... , ' " " """"' " 1 A , . , T . JL. ' V FA ! L 5 , ffl, ti... . - -Q ,Wig . 'A 'A '- 1 .T . ' " it Ez.. " k . A fig A xfgirl' 'if' A l t "' . A . . 1 A as . I H E, X I In , ,, A . - . ' -"- .. ' , f f 'll 1 . nxllljg ' 5' Q 5 4 ' :All I Q T E3 . Aer' " If V 1. fr .f-1 an . 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X ici? 2 ETQWQQQT- , ef2rfArg.zffrfrr315AfGTri-ay: ' y Y , I. ff.-tzffm as-hggffqfqf v.7.gf,',j,gt.:.f'fg FFF!ir.jgf5r.gz'i,.,,'.vi-,,:g'y, '. 3 ff -Al,eflf1'l-.Q1fiL,'w3'9:53' -.Aqwl-B if-1fef.mf:-M4 -',-N I3 5 Qiisffjfifd,vf.7g:ig'l.'fQ5.Q:Eg' -.. , . jlry - c' '"'fl'fio1tz?Q-9.'if:f:'iitZtl'A'-Milf?zQtf':1ri'i.lgjfA5Aip-ilfiffifififfmgr to , im'-tv. sin d, M 5Q5-,!ff'?Q3P:if:EA.- veil, AA l ' A' A . A mf?--.5Q:,if...'.,i-1Ag-,,1f.:4E.At Affr'r.'f'l'ml...'f. 'i-.r2r1"I4- .fi , z"' 32-11--o.'.2ies'.1 ff?-"5!"',:"l' ,2A1:.if-sift t aim:-if rf -,gif-.'il mir, '- ""'iLL , . fha-" f f fel- :gl J-:3-:'A'.':.,.::,.'.,- 4 ,Zyl A,f'...4r gi 1. h.v,,',:,. r r KU., 1 1 ...Q 4-r.,, 4, a , U, -g1'-..A.-,,l,f,,- :.,., g .wi ,,-- 4.-I. 5,113---, I . 'H-Lf,L:Qif,:J?'!j7f"' A .'.4.9,:.q'.'fW3, i. 'gli ' "l1,-gf3f,EiQlF- Q-li:g'f5:g'IL, K.':3,,fil5l AWP - A 'Aff N: .i 'l1i1'?" "l"'?i:"f+-I6 '12'fhf-' ff T' WV. f ,.,.-TU... 4. :yi v':.A1!r iffy... .11-Nh Why.-!,.f.V 11. '1r,'!vr,5?49i.n,.Hi IA if .f TAI'-.fP'if?lA'f"'.',.1,mfH.-':n2wl'2'AAi1t -:.i,. '.v A.:-"r.l.'.5l.Q:f1o.L fl.:- To acquire physical proficiency by the rung, Terry Copple gains a firm grip on the task. 124 Practicing the ground level method of attack, crawling cadets contend for survival scores. 1 H-LP, . ' , "tai 5- -'. ..- . M:-f'..wL ,id A I l I J 4 Arm! Staff: D Bac Row: J. Mullens, T. Wiggins, M. Rudd. Front Row: P. Llndekugel, R. Brown, commander: J. Stamm - 1:-.iiigf With bayonets fixed, camping cadets simulate realistic ROTC resistance to an imaginary enemy. - i " ,:. " ' ,gmt -' .. t i n i J-id. -Wing:-f.-- ,A - ,3 1 V 1. , , K ' I ' -, .. 7'-AJ .M 4' - L-, gif- . L L Fig: .V . , . Q I ..,, Il ,.i.tEi'V: , :A H, W Q ' Y J' 2 , ,.- , .1 g ivv . V ' ' ' x- rf 8 I : W ii, -i . ' .,., V g K., ,- ' M 'l , .. ii.: 5 ma. ,, -- -4 Y' 5. 536: mf , ., ,KL Y ! .. af" Q'-an ' f-C r H634 nf' I alia", ' 'N ,Q uf ' 1 vt -ik. - . , ' .,-'L 0 .- ir ' ml I to Q I 5 it WJ N. V- 5. ' 'IQ ' - I i 6' 'Q - A 'P it " I ', Z4 ' - . ' .1 Y ' 5-'t i , ' F' ' ' I - f " 1-lv 1 .. Mi if-5' - 1 fi? .W 1 , i " if f,A l ,, n' fly, .P SAR , ' L5 . . r - , ,. . . ' "' -T-f Lg 1 R it A J' ..'w.:'7l'- ' -. aa. ! -I P v Q- .J 1 -I 'ln ' X . --ferret , d . . '-P!!-1,,..i f f., - ' , f '- -f X 1 I 4 '- , --In FQ s ' X. I' ' ,di rp-F vo:-,," L i 'Y ' . l ,- 1 1 i V A , . fa r-" iW' Q - 3 , V' i 'Q' 5' :, I , 1 tu, ,. 4 H . Y 1 , 'ffb ' ii + i 12 6 is 'cfs , , 5 f' . Q K . 9, wi P 1' . ,vid 54 r , Y -.'. 1-I U - Y'-'15 , ' li" V , K 1 I ' .Vi 3. - V ,,'- x i A' h , tx f 1. Fw- fr f i l.'v ' V- tb. , 'Q x. K - . g 4 Y I W1 X 'X -' L . 5 .1-' . I' '- . .x A 1. ' .1 s. 1-' . i"'QQ'?-Asif' ' , Y' '. . ' I A 5 . r "U 1 p. 1 .. ' ' 1 f - ' 5 bf, 1 ai: Nts' - Nux -...L f WXQKS- 'i ,Nh . A -Nw, Taking the Captain's advice to "beware of the barbs," an ROTC man finishes under the wire. Deciphering the details of terrain translation, Adolph Pokorny- ponders possible positions. M591 1 1 L-Nc Requesting designation of the next objective, detached trainees tune in the Army hot-line. 126 Rifle Team Coeds Triumph For Second Invitational Win Desiring to achieve larger membership, Nebraska's rifle team tripled the squad's coed enrollment. The girls won matches with women from Creighton and Iowa State Universities and entered the Nebraska Invita- tional lVleetto retain the championship trophy. In the Kansas Invitational Turkey Shoot, the men finished above three dozen groups from Alaska to Vir- ginia. Purchases of new target carriers and additional lighting fixtures improved the home range facilities. To promote firearm safety and to increase interest in the organization, members sponsored a Saturday morning clinic. Two of the initial sessions covered marksmanship positions and techniques for beginners. Rifle Team: Back Row: R. Bierman, S. Brocky, I.. Klein, J. Culver, A. Anderson, W. Lammli, J. Tiwald. Second Row: Z. Frost, A. Sixta, M. Becken- hauer, I.. Hecox, B. I-Iesterman, L.. Smith. Front Row: S. Grim, N. Wolf, R. Greene, C. Baade, president: B. Thomas, treasurer, C. Chapman, secretary: B. Viall. Cadence Countesses Place In Pershing Regional Meet Following a tradition ofvictory, Cadence Countesses captured first place in the Pershing Regimental Drill match. The coeds won additional honors during com- petition at Boulder, Colorado, and at Minneapolis. To defray expenses for activities and trips, the Coeds undertook several projects. An advertising ven- ture for an Omaha radio station and a university "Bridge Benefit" replenished the treasury. As a community service the girls helped a local chapter of Rainbow Girls form a precision team. Pre- ceded by a newly formed Salute Platoon, the squad performed at a basketball game half-time and the Army Ball. Pershing Rifles once more chose a Countess as Honorary Sponsor at the joint initiation banquet. Cadence Countesses: BKR PD ' JMt'SCl'1'SRi'1SDrtSl-ll SH'hIdCSI'1r'tTAbIASd ac ow: . omeuer, . arm, . erue, . as, . o, . oman, . rg an, . cwa z, . e, . uer, Third Row: C. Ekwall, V. Metzger, A. Peithman. P. Blue, L.. Blacker. J. Windle, N. O'Donnell, I.. Jiracek, F. Ogden, M. Al- berding. Second Row: N. Converse, G. Barrows, l.. Chatfield, B. Roberts, D. Strecker, S. Furse, E. Thomas, J. Buell, J. Joy. Front Row: D. Dering, I.. Shaw, K. Kersenbrock, R. Oestmann, S. Schmeeckle, commanding officer: L. Broyhill, C. Pressler, J. Cutright, J. L.aBeIle, 127 Navy Alters Course Choice To Attain Schedule Variety Headed by three new staff members the Naval ROTC Department prepared cadets for careers in sea- manship and flying by offering two and four year train- ing programs. An indoctrination trip to Camp Pendleton near San Francisco gave prospective marines a look at an additional branch of the Navy-the "Leathernecks." Academic superiority and leadership potential drew a Military Order of the World War Scholarship grant. The first annual S100 award honored a Nebraska Naval cadet for excellence during basic training studies. Enthusiastic trainees appeared for 6 a.m. practices of the White Caps precision drill squad. The group pub- licized the university military department by marching at high school sports events. Athletes among the mid- shipmen formed a NROTC team to play college junior- varsity cagers and other Corps units in the midlands. Navy Staff: Left to Right: M. Haynes. J. Adams, J. Curran, com mander f"--, Analyzing split-second Sonar signals, midshipmen coordinate efforts during sub sinking session. 128 Receiving navigational hints, a midshipman discovers the correlation between inches and oceans. smfarxff-5 FiF11.i55lin45'F2?i"+Y i Emphasizing the anthem-inspired atmosphere, Laying up a regional tournament score miCiShiDl'1'1e"Y add 'Color' 'CO DVS-game activities. a midshipman produces points at Purdue Pershing Rifles: Back Row: B. Shackelton, S. Ross, W. Wahlgren, R. McCoy, D. Gerke, G. Jones, T. Sabata, F. Wieland. Third Row: M. Berg- Iund, L. Betts, K. Rawie, J. Faier, G. Kropp. S. Haug. D. Growcock, G. Grondorg, M. Bradford, J. Black. Second Row: C. Amunclsen, D. Clark, J. Feather, J. Kruse, A. Schultz, E. Wright, G. Kula, D. Wagenknecht. Front Row: R. Swanda, G. Fox, L. Street, M. Hughes, S. Prior, J. Butler, C. Lundekugel, R. Ruff, T. Allan, W. Hussey. PR Project Nets Finances To Attend Drill Competition Working early Sunday mornings, Company A Per- shing Rifles cleaned Memorial Stadium after football games to earn money for functions throughout the year. Trips to Ames, Iowa, and Minneapolis for marching competition and a date dinner with Cadence Countesses demonstrated the benefits of the dawn exercises. With November came memories of a nation's tra- gedy as PR's sponsored a John F. Kennedy Memorial Program. Attended by all services, the simple afternoon ceremony received state-wide press recognition. Helping to coordinate regional efforts, members edited and produced a monthly information Report mailed to Pershing Rifle companies in the area. The group also traveled to Camp Ashland near Omaha to participate in Army ROTC spring maneuvers. Acting as mock-warfare aggressors, the fraternity provided realis- tic battle conditions for first year advanced cadets. Completing a wrapper by wrapper ascension, PR's ricl the south end of post-game remains. 130 -a:rnf"- , A gf'-9 1, qu ge-raft:----1-gi-g -:ray .lx 'g..-.1351 . .,.."1:,"11"5'T,.-3.43-'-'4gE'.:'1f! iafieiftgfsiire-i5.Se25:3:ff:sfss,lEs?f:-f,fj iff...-jj 53-'L-f:,g'g-fbi: ygeffygai 55 wt- Q ' 1 IF g--I" ,. -9-G .1' fr i. . S"'...r4-4' "1-f 1--' In-ff.. .-g"lg"'.. LIL! sm-1 ", -fzfwn' .- ,. f r--' A If g:.-':.- F3"2'gia.e71' 33-'li LL 3 : if 5 5 g:,,'E7,-.E..:L+-1 F-.LE-3 ,1g:..5,g1g5r':r1g3g ::m:gi:'5:.:-.::: i'ff'-Feb J?"HYFi?Lffi"?!'15515222 E'r1.:.- fl-555: 1551 2 : :1:' N-Q' If I.-I' SMI- I" F, 'rf t"".,-'f,:.vf"f.- r U I rs.. ':j'.,' -- lifts ':z':a Hu"'Z'Q"'r' 'LQ'-r7:,:1:fl,g fl-4 f ff- 2 rf 27 :Li -1'15,-5Q- 'Ea-1 ' A' -5.-'.-' es- rr: .--ff: I '- : -A zz g : 1 l Q ' R .f'gf'f--f','P-aff! -Eff -::SIfg':e 1: Z.: 5 ji gi ' -. si ---nr' . 'stil 4' .. A -,i-,-rw Q-..'.1.a A - V 'lf V K., - l I .l' f'g'fn4.-1 , .4 ,! I a' . 4. ' 1 ', ,A F--ggi-5' ',: F .ffl f : F ., --fl ft,-":9:,'t.'?' - a -. -A G. -4. .-A-I f-'f .. - -'Z' 1-PC: 'r .1 I 1.- ,ls ',,f'l 1 fy' 'l.,, q,"1' I I -' ', , ki '14 xi x km xq',5,'3,,""l g .E 1:1 '..gj.'5fg,:2"5 5, "A,-.19 ' I ,I A , t l A A s. x-pf, v,,.-1 1 5,47 -54 4 .,.' 4,5 ., an 'Q " ' 't'.'.'a Wi"-k K'ls"l!,:!1"1F4'-Kg' . - , , ,, ,W ,l A ,gt -ymy-3,12-.A ' .rags a,v...4'3 l H, , xxx Jr-ggi' 1,115.15 ,fps-Q .5 A W . - NJ' I 'al -nl N' if-" "'e " '- - Sl I s1i':t:,k::ixIx"tig23'ii! l T, ,L x vw. s -wifi 'l ,J . 1 ' . T K , P3 .S i.,--2.9 ,tsqtxgsyxfei i l ' l ' .ll fx L ,ix Lgf 5 - g ,Q '. 1 g .X XXASK gn Mx -QQ.gQ,Qq . ' , L Lk: R f' ' r kj l . 4 V N 1, Q -. X . X l,1,f:4'. . -- ii 5-, 5-g ' - . 'W -it l H -T xx . ,I W L I , M , . Nl- Y 1 N -5 W -t - ' x A' . 4 x 5 i K kt il ' tix Kaz.: A ' ' l ' X V . FH . 2 - 4 ' ai J 1, i ' , V , , .A K Q I I l 1 N ,A xl ,. , 'W 2,1 .3 -I tr.. .M .4 , I A A --,A my - D , gi., Lui, Y. 5 , , l. . , .,, ,,-'jf-,'.,,-' rv .,,,'a- 1-1 ' e 1, Q ,, .L4.T9':.1i.'gm2 f"'li2e43g?wL ' T5 't if' W .. -Ls? We' iff?-fi .,B-J.L-1'f-- Z rs, f n. .f' ' ' .pt ,toll-1.f5'ffEgfl A Q A-was .re . .-J +P wiing it row iff- -4, 1-f-9. wg. f-. ""'2i --l .-' ' 11-2 .vi J I ,, y , . . 'f ill 1,55 .,.. t ' '..g. .V-" ,, A ,g .- , LJGK ' -, L . '- vt g- .' r -Wx . f'-1 57"-A -tr l- r - i 1'-W l . . , 511:12 With inspection looming on the military horizon, PR's acquire 'M-1 hands' from stubborn rifle grease. National Pershing Rifles Staff: Back Row: D. Camp, B. Stigge, J. Belmont. D. Napoliello. Front Row: R. Skinker, J. Mullins, national commanderg T. Wiggins, M. Andrews. PR Group Gains Prestige Through Washington Office Establishing a bureau in Washington, D.C., national headquarters of Pershing Rifles military fraternity hoped to create friendly relations in Congress and the Pentagon. Public attention focused on the organization after the bestowing of honorary memberships upon General Maxwell Taylor and Harry Truman. Scholarship rated special consideration as units and regiments competed for recognition plaques. From over 150 chapter nominations the head office chose two outstanding students as recipients of S300 stipends. Installation of four additional groups from Califor- nia to Virginia culminated expansion efforts. Former drill and rifle teams received the charters in cere- monies conducted by the nearest active PR unit. , yt. at if ". it -. . i 5' ifii-i'f.-fi i.'f'ir"i ii ' 1 V an 4 as has ... 1: Q ll: Nia or at tiiiffi 12" 4,4 Y. 5 ,. U r ' fp? . - . W f.. -..,,,,...g-, ,assi i.-. F . i Y .,- a , ,:. W .1 t5l,.,,,V -. V 1...ifj . yi fi' W yy Q '-T i k... .59 1 'ef -. , . :ev sf - 7 af a '- ,Q 1 , 1 i fi -' 1 X :-1,sr",23if-g W' ' 5 .. -' -a ..:- . r. - .mg ,, if . -4 li! J ",ir":.iJjt:?5'H . A l' . I M. . 1 , ' - 'eral if ' i-a t L' f as 7. .- -f:.ac1--" ah r h . ,-f..--1,-,..1. -- ,Vg Demonstrating reverence for JFK, a PR salute punctuates solemnity. 131 Cifqfjon wx-- v W at I 5423, - . E1-,Tgn:"Tf-?W'Ma'V ,gif-,. .J 1 15 ' .s',"'.Qj w , Q5 "iff-f,,'f I ,- ,Q ' f 1 J , e.4:w.,, Y . - 2 '14-Lf "' I -- 7ff:'3:'5'.1.' i, 'f'f'.."V I ,rv -,M 6,4 ,P ., ' ', 1 ' ju yf ,-,..,.-33,-jf.. J' ',,- 1 ,, if ,5g'g-,253-.,1 1 34- ' f J' an w , A ' .v r -. In xl '51ffFf5' "" S51-H' fi 15-i:F'5 A Y, xx v Mx X . -2- QA V ii ." " f 'W . W s-B14-9-4? - -ff' lf,-' .-I7 7' 5i'i""5-L 1,593-fi-if ,iyqyv ig, , STUDENT COUNCXL 1 '. ,' :Z A -1 . G ,-L53 ' WW --22 -an N. ' ' J 411. ?' 453-ff" 'aa , P X. 'H-nf ' SWE-ff '-wr: A ' wwwwxxxs A A , --..- 'f ,am 1 . E: , . , . V 1 A X0 6 5 iv., ll ' tit 4m.gg3,gM .,,,, -,5,,, 4 X A NN P01 '2- J ' I QPQQ 4 , i'i".vz-:hid if g -gi 355 Q... lr -1, r JE' xg ,-:ya fs VI w 1 ' ,. E '-'F' ff-Ea if-'TY' 2 ' fu-fewfv ' -22 ' , . 11 if -1 P. - v if 5 'cz 'ii V'. E!! .- V.'v A g5.w: L 5 V r-Q jg ' E ss - 55 ,-,sv Sw 'm . ,ggmg .. gag 'fp ' -11 5? K ,JW is mx K2 E E 5 x sf ,E X . nu ,..', W ii ,Jem wgg 1 Dale Gibbs, Architecture Research PROFESSOR DALE GIBBS is presently interested in the development of certain architectural concepts and de- sign systems and the use of natural materials for con- struction. Stating that native Nebraska buildings reflect the principle of form following function, the professor studies the influences of various regional types such as barns, silos, grain elevators and other significant fea- tures on the prairie landscape. The "significant" struc- ture is noted for simple geometric shape, proportions, texture, shadow patterns and fenestrations. DR. ROBERT K. SAKAI, an authority in far eastern his- tory, is studying Japan's southern province of Satsuma. He is investigating the political and landholding sys- tems and the process of modernization during the Tokugawa period of 1827-1877. Dr. Sakai is also com- pletinga biography of Saigo Takamori, a nationalist hero who was instrumental in leadingJapan out of feudalism. ln addition to editing the annual volumes of "Studies in Asia," he has written articles including "Consolidation of Power in Satsuma" and "Satsuma-Ryukyu Trade." Robert Sakai, History P ri li . ll, Paul Johnsgard, Zoology DR. PAUL JOHNSGARD has traveled widely to discover previously unstudied species of duck, geese and swans. In his recently published "Handbook of Waterfowl Be- havior," he discusses all of the world's 145 known spe- cies, including the first complete behavior survey of the group. To understand the relationship between be- haviorial similarities and evolutionary affinities, Dr. Johnsgard studies such patterns as calls and mating habits. This year's investigations will lead him to study one of the remaining aberrant forms in the West Indies. PROFESSOR BERNICE SLOTE of the English depart- ment has just completed "The Kingdom of Art," a study of Willa Cather's ideas on the art before she left Ne- braska. The 226 essays, columns and reviews, 100 of which were previously unknown, cover the years of 1893-1896. By tracing the ideas which developed dur- ing the three year period and emerged in later writings, Miss Slote has uncovered revealing facts about Lincoln and Nebraska during the 189O's. ln addition, she has published "Keats and the Dramatic Principle" and col- laborated on "Dimensions of a Short Story." Bernice Slote, English "'P"I ' i HHH - it fl 0 H iff ' , " 'r i. -+ 1 2 if if I 5 ip ff ,fb rl Q is: 1 f if i li ' 7,1 ix? - Eg - L i if e ,Gs-J Preston Holder, Anthropology DR. PRESTON HOLDER is studying the relationship of the Missouri fur trade in connection with the village Indians of the Plains from 1700-1850. The extent of trading posts 75 years before Lewis and Clark greatly influenced the Indian cultures. With the anthropology department Dr. Holder is recovering data in the Solomon River area to reconstruct the life of the hoe farming culture of 1300. His previous investigations have taken him to sites in New Guinea, South America, the South Pacific and locations around North America. DR. OSWALD W. KOPP AND DR. FRANK E. SORENSON have directed the publication of a curriculum guide for adult education. The specialized program is designed to instruct illiterate or nearly illiterate men and women through the third grade level. A problem solving ap- proach correlates arithmetic, science and the fine arts into single lessons. Sponsored by the United States Office of Education, the outline will be distributed to classroom teachers across the country. The project has included the efforts of the Lincoln public schools and the Elementary Education Department. Oswald W. Kopp and Frank E. Sorenson Curriculum Development 136 Research DR. DUDLEY ASHTON'S interest in dance has led her to develop a practical skills test for the classroom. Covering modern, folk and square dancing, threejudges are further able to grade students objectively. An active writer, she has discussed the relationship between general history of education and the history of dance in the "Journal of Health, Physical Education and Rec- reation." Dr. Ashton has also outlined courses for the United States Department of Education and completed a test, "Rhythmical Activity, Kindergarten to Grade Six." DR. GALEN SAYLOR, chairman ofthe secondary educa- tion department, is presently studying the college choices of Nebraska high school seniors and noting their migration patterns. Comparing different types of European curriculum in secondary schools, he has in- vestigated the West German educational system and lectured at the Universities of Rome and Florence, Italy. Dr. Saylor's list of publications includes "Curriculum Planning for lVlodern Schools," "Secondary Education: Basic Principles" and "Junior College Studies." WN .. X Galen J. Saylor, Secondary Education 137 .FORREST E. BEHM, a 1941 graduate, was a member of the Cornhuskers' famed 1940 Rose Bowl team. In 1965 the University bestowed an Honorary Doctor of Law degree upon him. After serving as an officer in World War ll, he joined Corning Glass Works where he served for seven years at the Pressware Plant. He was chosen a vice president of Corning Glass Works in 1962 and named general manager of the Lamp Products Division. 1965 found Mr. Behm elected to positions of president and director of Corning Glass International. MARIANNE MEANS graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1956 from the School of Journalism. After working with the LINCOLN JOURNAL, she moved to the East where Sena- tor John Kennedy helped her find a job as a women's news editor in suburban Washington, D.C. ln 1959 the Hearst Syndicate offered Miss Means the chance to be- come the first woman in the White House press corps as White House Correspondent for the Hearst Headline Service. She returned to her alma mater in the spring of 1965 to address an All University Convocation. Liam Marianne Means Distinguished Alums FOl"I'eSt E. Behm GEORGE W. BEADLE received his Bachelors and Mas- ters degrees from the University of Nebraska in the field of science. NU presented him with an Honorary Doctor of Science in 1949. A distinguished career in the re- search of genetics culminated with the reception of a Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology in 1958. ln 1961 he was chosen the new Chancellor of the Uni- versity of Chicago. Chancellor Beadle has claimed the distinction of being the only college president in the world who has also won a Nobel Prize in any area. J. Lee Rankin l ll fl iw l R in .""' .Q George W. Beadle .Q , -I' 5 tri 'XX I , . , 4 ,fgffgiifig . ' Wifi' il- f. fzgixfgggw-5,4 ,,.q-7 e , 3,',pl.f.- 1 . -f -fu :L-Us Hf52T:'3X'?. ,. -' ' Walter H. Judd J. LEE RANKIN graduated from Nebraska in 1930 with a degree in Law. His career in government work began in 1953 with his appointment as Assistant Attorney General in the Department of Justice. In 1956 he rose to the post of Solicitor General of the United States, the man who actually represents the government in cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. The death of President Kennedy prompted the selection of lVlr. Rankin as the General Counsel for a seven man committee investigat- ing the presidential assassination and its ramifications. WALTER H. JUDD received both his B.A. and Nl.D. de- grees from the University before serving ten years as a medical missionary in China. He was elected to ten terms in Congress where his colleagues voted him one of their five most influential members in a 1962 Con- gressional opinion poll. lt was there that he fostered legislation that ultimately resulted in the U.N., SEATO and the Alliance for Progress. The GOP held Dr. Judd in such esteem that it chose him to give the keynote ad- dress at the 1960 Republican National Convention. 139 Distinguished Nehraskans John Cosier JOHN COSIER is one of the outstanding students in the College of Arts and Sciences. A high grade point aver- age and proficiency in campus activities combined to place him in the memberships of Phi Beta Kappa and Innocents Society. IFC found a "four year man" in John as he served as Scholarship Committee Chairman and Parliamentarian. As a Student Council represent- ative and Prince Kosmet finalist, he proved the respect shown to him by his peers. In his senior year he took on the responsibility of President of Phi Kappa Psi. GEORGE T. BASTIAN has served the Nebraska Alumni Association since his graduation in 1937. He holds a Life Membership in the Association and has been Direc- tor, member of the Executive Committee and President in the past few years. Named Executive Secretary in 1963, Mr. Bastian also allocates his time to serve as a member of the Trust Advisory Committee of the Nation- al Bank of Commerce Trust and Savings and Bryan Memorial Hospital's Board of Trustees. This year he has addressed local chapters from New York to Oregon. 140 Captain Donald L. Williams gf" A George T. Bastian CAPTAIN DONALD L. WILLIAMS has the longest tenure on the Air Force ROTC faculty. Having taught freshman, sophomore and junior classes and having acted as Tactical Officer both at the University and at summer training camps, he is well known to all the cadets In the Detachment. In his capacity as Arnold Air Society and Angel Flight adviser, he has given tirelessly of his energies during off-duty hours and has brought dis- tinction to the University by assisting Arnold Air Society in winning the second highest award inthe nation. 1 . 1 I 1 f '-1: ll Kent Neumeister mg lljh, I I , G, T I. . - IEA if .3 KENT NEUMEISTER assumed the role as the first Presi- dent of the newly-organized Associated Students of the University of Nebraska. His leadership guided the re- vamped Student Council through the early days of its existence and established it as a campus coordinator. RAM and Innocents Society found a voice to the student body in Kent. As an aspiring officer in the United States Army, he was the recipient of numerous awards and citations and became one of the top cadet officers in the ROTC Department during his senior year. NIRS. VIRGINIA TROTTER, Professor of Home Eco- nomics, has been Director of the School of Home Economics and Associate Dean of the College of Agriculture and Home Economics since 1963. Listed in Who's Who in Education and American Women, Dr. Trotter has been instrumental in expanding the uni- versity's home ec program. Author of several articles, Dean Trotter's present interest lies in the area of re- habilitation of the handicapped. In 1965 whe visited Turkey on a professional assignment inspecting home economic programs at two universities. Virginia Trotter 141 ,5 . . Skip Soiref -c. .nn ini: 722 'fn 'ite 'la "lu Q54 'mea 'Q fl' 'Qs' sump In VE i Q . i I EY' I im' ' ll! qu I- J . l ,,,. Paul A. Olson :. fitlfiii I I 'fifty fi' . isffzymzrif 3 , yi. rfffiififf W I -1 its 3555- aiu f?2r?if,iif,i,g', .lrrmgifkfsgtztilsrfl 1 . I I T ax .. 'P 1 it ' -1 1 c.l514s1lli'f .fe Q :': Qi 5- lv' ' LL, g 'z l, A-at-,. ,, g..:, gs .... . l . 4 ' l l . SKIP SOIREF entered NU as a transfer student from Brown University. In his relatively short career here, he has achieved a remarkable record as a campus leader. Service to his fraternity, Sigma Alpha Nlu, earned him the post of pledge trainer and the IFC chose Skip as its Treasurer in his junior year. Scholarship concentration payed off with membership in Beta Gamma Sigma, Business Administration honorary. These qualities of leadership and versatility promoted the selection of Skip Soiref as President of Innocents Society. SHIRLEY VOSS can look back upon her college career as one marked by diversity. She worked her way up through the ranks to become President of the Nebraska Union and also represented her sorority, Kappa Alpha Theta, as a finalist for the positions of Ideal Nebraska Coed and Nebraska Sweetheart. As a junior her capa- bilities in activities and scholarship were rewarded by her selection to the Presidency of Mortar Board. ln her freshman year she took time out to develop a lead- ing role in the Kosmet Klub Spring Show, "Fiorello." S l E PROFESSOR PAUL OLSON has for years been recog- nized as a scholar in the field of medieval literature. In more recent years his career has taken on the aspect of curriculum development. His nationally acclaimed ef- forts include an attempt to arrange literature material into a concentrated progression from kindergarten through the first year of college. Dr. Olson is also study- ing elements of composition and structural factors of grammar. Recently he was rewarded with the appoint- ment to head the Nebraska Curriculm Center. l 1 'J Shirley Voss Vicki Dowling VICKI DOWLING rates as one of the top scholars on Nebraska campus. Her election to Phi Beta Kappa proved her classroom capabilities well enough to make her the recipient of a coveted Wilson Scholarship. In addition to these endeavors, she simultaneously served as President of Gamma Phi Beta sorority and Vice- president of Mortar Board. ln the role of Vice-president of AWS Vicki took an active part in the questions of women's hours and senior keys. She was accurately tabbed as Ideal Nebraska Coed in herjunior year. Distinguished Nebraskans MADELI NE GIRARD served the University of Nebraska's Panhellenic several years prior to assuming the title of Executive Secretary of Panhellenic in 1949. Under her initial supervision and guidance, Nebraska received the first National Panhellenic Award given. In her 18 years of unremunerated service Miss Girard has ex- tended her tireless assistance and advice to include the independent organizations as well as the Greeks. Active in her community as well as the university, lVliss Girard participates in the Community Emergency Shop. ,L l, l 5, l i L l li. i: if Madeline Girard 143 Student Scenes J 'ffl E-1' VTY l 1 Xb ,,L I lr' ' w . ff. V -rf .H-'lfr if: ' .ifffafs . ,U . A'."v' ' 1 ' 54", ,-34' 41,1 4 vw -V . ,Ia m 4 N J-,fi 1,23 'I Q if J. 4 HJ. 1 ' T"i'?2I' li v,3,..'4 rf- '1 .f.,,1:, I- , , 7 f 'M 551: C' Q 14. .1 'vu -L ..ff. A., , I.. dfkrf digg 4 :gm ,,f. .iw ,w1,k1Z775? , -if n-mei' ,- sylv ,Lf is s M-M Yfiygfgd' rg - Lf: + 4 A-1 Pk x' 2174152 ' fn . 4, .8- G.- 3. :Y .. .v ... li-'W 5541 I: 45851, f Bw Vmfffl E, . r,-QJZLT. U 'fl-v' 5. -W :Vg , 31.57-1 N4 15' -'vii' , ,::Ayf"' i, e , f 3 :,Af'3. 13 ' . e. f ..-ffrf - :gf-al 1. 12,1 .' , - 4 ' lzldgf-l,n lL'5?f +-QYL :ij mf- -,EL sf I 1 0 :fx ,J 2, u K V R . 'Q , , an :gym x' fe , ,..' - w,,. vu sr ' J' f 2 if r 2' . i f Su.: 'IQ'-.5 I ' .1 . ' g u f '11, , J 1? r 5- I 1 if ' if- ' 5 v 5, 4 , N ' ' I in 1 ig W 4 , W '35 . .-.-:f1u w ,., ' ww. 4 - get V 5 . J' Mizz' .-" E' ' ' "fi AZ- - ' fa V . . e . . ,G A K f " , s fi' ,s ,I I? f' JS JJ Y ' x 1 'J ,L e .. A 'S v ' 2 1-ri I . . A, . " .- .f aff a f Q, W I A s ,- , 7 r 6-TX, . 1 , 1? I 1' 1 " ..., ,,,,., ,,-..-A ,4,,f v H... v J J ,- ' 7-,,,,-'- .- -f-T as QE, if . . , I .1 7 ivii- .- " sv -t .Z I I, A ,.. ,,.f-f ..--"' 4-1 . A ..-'-1 ,.-. "' I I ,...,.,+ - ,....a-1-W - 1 ----Y I I "M .f-1" 'IIA' .. f """",' j,.,f-f "' I M lf M, A., 5. ,., --5 I , rn. AJ-,,,..f 2' Q .9 -f 'hifi-, r' '- ' M.-Q .',V,',. h ,xx SQ, 'if x ,. I, ffl--.'m:. - V X. ,, V Rnqfi Lf '-. 4 1, . ,- ,h - - 5 I -P .331-. ,- '- ' Q- R 7.5-vi, ,x 5, 1 . xr 4-.Q -.ff-' A :fx wb E x 6 E I I 1- 'W'-5 I ' ' '-S.. ' I 1 I , N . ,.,,4f 7 N I i I z X. ,Ac I N 5 Q uw W, , ' I 3 1 IUQ ' , fg .5 Q -If I I 5 I r" ' D , A, I i 1 .A "' , I I 8 A 1 I ,,, ,f F- ...- ,. I , ,NM- I fIf'fQQfff I II I 1-'i'?'L"'!'-'i F 'Hw- Q U' bm E A I I ,.-v I i , ,AI ,I In I M1 I I - U ' I' . 1 fi ww , ij? it, . i ' ,g I I 'ua I I Q 'I ins 555 -. W -- Y Rx . 'I' x? f miuwk MX. "' A A Q .I , llllf iiljl . -ig ,I ' 'T I, J- , I II Q f , .., YY.. ' '1 I 2, . ', n, 1 r I if I I RQ ' fl!! K A. 1752! u.. 1 K' -. - 4- I I r I I 'r X ,J I' A+-,,,,.,,5 v -"" I X The days of "GenHemon's C"-dissolved. Mediocrify is scorned by cr place called Vief Nom. Sense fhcf sudden inferesf in posf-graducffe degrees, wives and babies f'Xx X x x xx X 'iq H 'K , xx Y A N X! O I, ga' Q., E W ii 21 i, "RED is your fovorife color THEY soy." Perhaps if's yellow or green. "Join KKp be o Cob!" Ill Hs yours lo choose. If you come wifh us, you'll never lose!" Welcome fo fhe ero of gun oncl groom. Acfivilies, like big business, boom in fhe spring. ln spile of all fl1ey grow ond prosper... possibly independenrly. 10 "?'i"??2 , 9' 1 ei- fel" - r I Ln I' f Il+ -..- L... ir .,,11 H. V W MH, an Q Vp-au. , n ye f' gr . A ' A -'Qu-7...... l- YQ: y V ' w - ng . AH: 1 f ,H L , ng '- I Kr' My L . ffl 7 J, 4 . 2 JI 2 El ni " 4 ,' f 1 : ' ,M ,Ti Y. 7 ' . I I , I F1 Q-1 b " PUT' ----Y--fm-- ,,,,, Y '14,-A il E ii W in Pizzacafed pariies and pseudo-inlellecfually sfimulafing hours spell social life for fhe modern sfudenf. The scholar can drown his doubfs in pipe ashes, franquilizers and ice cubes. No such shadows of inielligenlia Tempered fhe funclions of len years pasf. We dream of living jusf one l semesfer in fhe era of fhe ' good, "honesf" blasf and fa rs a gi fhe days of "Genfleman's C." Xe a d ii' 1 150 152 . 7 , . ,.. . . Y , .. Summer...exoaus for the shortest three months of the year. A skeleton crew of summer scholars remains behind in hours or courses. High school seniors orient in a day and a half to a system requiring four years of adjustment. Educators return revising superannuated knowledge or seeking one more degree. Weekends bring relief as undergraduates evacuate a summer pseudo-school. Then.. .desertion. The university waits and yearns for the fall transfusion to bring new blood. 1 91 912. .,1. .fi f , fl X Al,L X ' ew' 'y- gf f. 'A ,fs ' .5 f EX iw k ,Q 1? M. .1 3, ,Li Ax I f if ., . . 1-f - 1 1 1 X A In 54 Ju, ,ul fi! Q5 ,cl 3 b Pa .ii 4 ','fL?.:'1 L Y,.,kR.,, 5 1 V , "gi-wg xi ,X N' 31 , . .-- gf 'J I 5: 0 , , , - in M 1 'L:::2::f,, -,',,- wzi W Q x T-5. . - 5.-2-,. . , fjdr 751,53 'X--- .,-:.'- ...- Q , nl ,L 1 ':' -.f.. X 5' -W4 x P f w :gs -- .W 5-. -' fax-'ex' Y 'Af'f".Q W- V .... .,.-x .M r.- -.rf , s: , .. .-,. , xl ,3j,Lr..-5"-4 S ,'1E..'. 17 4- 1 1 -W A A .-f,,,- -1133.1 ,l u whiff!-,-f - 1 Mp , X ,.f5,.,.,1, .f -A f 4 we " 1 fi " . , if :"x" 413' - ' Rush Week...snowiest time of the year. Bewildered rushees wander Greek Row, confused by conflicting chants and claims. Production-line pledge classes arise amidst the chaos trading four days for four years. "Salty" KKG's ride the wild key and urge rushees to grab a heavy pledge wave for Kappa Surf City. 57 n. U. The Three Yard Dashmprospective pledges "toe the line," waiting the signal for the final rush. 155 ,IH FaIl...eludes NU as summer freezes into winter. 15,000 converge on a cramped campus as bulldozers and cranes race with student enrollment. i i Pre-season experts plan New Year's vacations while Big Red rambles and raises Husker hopes for no. 1. Everyone wonders not IF a bowl, but WHICH bowl. Fashion fads color the campus red and umbrellas keep stylish students undercover. The girls moving in start the movers moving out- endless busy signals echo from 435-2961 as life stirs again at 540 No. 16th. Unfamiliar faces . . . at first so frosh-awkwardly obvious. .. blend into sophomore anonymity. 157 Us ?l Lighthorse '131' breaks for a TD: one of the artists painting a bleak picture for Colorado Buffs. - IPL! .EET Fl HEHLE 'ON ' fa ,aff 2'--f -l ' - .::, lf' F . ll . 154' ' fe 1 b- . ,i.,,.i .-.-..-.-1 Barren displays and a display of power express a new Homecoming scope. Launching the festivities of a new reign, Candy May slips on the Coronation symbol. " f i .fx A , ,....,sNM f -,fu I" HOITIeC0ming...Innocents re-style tradition 1' :aff 'ff " J , . Watermills and gargantuan arrays -f., -'s '21-.X i give way Q , fl' to depthless decorations "-xy. :NWQQ , .4-g,,.,. , , , .N xx H. -srrnxm -- X I L . R .,ffx's'1 Shearing swings, R. Z' "ze-. ens- ,,,,gg-.'., ntl Q. 'U XL f:,1x i.'.A..'g ' " s -. . X lk. v Q , -,, Ei, ' . w-.., 1. . xx 1 'ln PW' , . 4,5 'ff I .fw- -fw- -MH" 4191 - ,jr 5 ..v'4' as homecoming loses a dimension. mum-smothered alums invade and Bob's boys stampede the Buffs lrii. x J' V 7 y V .- B x 5 -'-W ' nf Q . ,. AXSXHP 'x V' , f g.-2'1 I 'gf' '- fl -My I I X i A. I, -- iff-':: X r I , f ff D .1 ,AJP-M-1,1 .ff s .1 5. Q ,... .. 'f5'P'1""-frrf:-'fer-. yf f.-....., , ,-, ' " , 'ii' q . -A . ww rn- A. , I 1 Qt t N 477- 'I 1 - 1 4 .-A - ,. l R, , a o ., V ux., , t ' ., .5556 .,, ' 1 , -- '. - N' -,NL-:gut -- ' - 4,3 Ig:-1 L: I 1, ' S l " J-J ., -f " , , ' -...Y--is -f,.f-- 'QI r-V I '-2-,J N . ,- 5 1 ,- , f" sf-fic... ."f? . " 'I' ...fl 1' ,C ' ,. , - - 4.2 ' f fl '-rw ix' -' ,'- if "'re,:': W 17' -:91-4-7 , I. - .,, .f ,,-.N I . A., . ,f ' -41 f 'v .. mul ' . vj '- -Aff-.,v, A , 'f E-QF' ' ' ' , Q- 1 mu- ' J :T If -44' gy' ,IQL 'Q wah! N-,,4.?'B.-wg. '- 1., -. . 1-1 ' 'L 'ms ' 'W' ' 1 -' , iff " A .18 iv., . ,-- 'fr' -ls' J. ,, . A ,X , -, -s1v3:r'- 'iw ww P .7 A - '-:V ' -' . yy af gr ., Y'-L' ,, ,J , I. ,411 V, 1.1-.-f.,,. , 3. . 35, 1 ,SA .-1. -'74 .E . ,W -- num , rv ws' K . - vw, - I '. fr- . . ,,. 0" . 5' 'I " .ALT " -N ' 'f x,' Qu. 3 ' ' 0 0 Y I " L ?'1:f-H' I J! K ,, ,- . ---- . ".Q.-.- ' 1,-' .' .4 ' " - .nixgj Q:-. ,...g,g.5,g 5.1-1 43,75-AJ , ,,:-H.-M M , ,' .. , - ... - :A '--.. ,P , 5' -M, , ' -..mr - f -A, . Y- . -.,...' ,,"'.- ,, 3' ,- -'-J., -'!?'!l5,U,2. , 1- . . , , - , - , -sr. ,..f,..-, -YL -,L - ,Q 357 L, , ..4,. , . .. . l . zz - - - -1 I. - , .....,51',' .-.vga-AJ x --Q -ns ,mr '--' - ,JK wg--. 41, I -u 0 - Y n -M1 1 5 . , 4- 1'4- Fil'lalS...a scramble for the panic button follows vacation non-chalance as grave students bury themselves in the books during Dead Week. Campus life slows to tedious hours of studying- then a brief reprieve brings relief and another semester. ln an eleventh-hour effort to conquer finals, mandatory cramming brings new faces to study hall 162 Pledges complete final booking by queuing up to form the long, blue line. 'Ne 'No Gamma Phi Betas finesse and pass away precious remaining hours, shielded from impending doom by a "fortification" of protecting texts. 'N-ai J Arduous ascents give rise to fond memories of the comfortable ski lifts Vacations . . .diversions sidetrack good intentions as papers and projects fall victim to Thanksgiving and Yuletide cheer. Bundled coeds head for Winter Park before the matriculation to second semester- leaving only Easter until the final reprieve. 1 During vacation's lull, the lonely crowd of coffee and cigarettes replaces human companions. 165 csxxg , University Entertainment... a kaleidoscope of experiences. Schlesinger and Rostow interpret current events. Ginsber's poetry opens the eyes and mouths of the campus and Closes . l . Caught up in the mastery of flamenco rhythms the ears of Admlnlstratlo l"l. Carlos Montoya executes an intricate arpegio Surrounded by a sea of afternoon jazz fans, Dave Brubeck conjures up the magic of "Take Five." Z9 ' B .lg F l . 5 ... ., 1-..,'z' .xg 10. ,- ,x ' . ,'-xl?-'3'b3"7'ZE': " ,P-' . .-,fr-4-q:f,C4afN Y- S ., if .kf 1eii.Q-:gif 41' A mc uf f :-":.-:-r',x:.- ,-:r ' -2.521 , - - 4-New-'N-.' , n"ff8iN' " I ,?5f?'5?Ef7-flqi -'qf'l1l2'i'f.l 71 -, U -m,1m:i?r4.f.w - -giwpgff.-. T15-' ,J-21gzLf9G:y M nfl..- . .l,yvI,14':x. -N-,1QgBg5:fw. ,pi 'gx- -':5::w,L'-"-"."'2' i:iYiE.2e5'imE"' . 'gf' '?': '-1 f f u"'-W" NN A 'X 3gf,Rfjjvif:g:'5.'.' 1 gi . , ,j'V g?yaa2sx,fz,-. , JT-:g:',,L.ff1ff111,. -,:2ig:' 11.125 , meh. .:w9M'L' if-12"-1 'xygrfg g,:-af,,- ,Q-.gf 3- .- - - ,f,,F' , ..,gb.r5a',gr 'sgvfgy . .V '-'f-'Qian ,gg,4f,' - ' " -+ 'x"'i'X1 aw. KL nw - ,: Lash-.','rffQf M QM 11 . we-N-Xa Lzfwsi'-f--iii 'H'-114 4. . " ,gf .Lfgka-Q-'?g:ggg::f"f :'-:Lf : 1 Zi+f5:1Q5.fqv:: ' v X I' 'L-1gf:,u,:.1'.f'a., L -Q gkfrnf' ,. ,B . .:,.,.' ff 'LL "' Ji-xii. X9 -411. .vi w"f.:,' .415 ',."': f . X- f -' ,Qs-9:-,..11' 9 'Q-ffmkrf-11 ' - , 4 A ",333:7- Eli: lm " - "" iii? ': Y .5 -2,5 1 'Mk 4 fFrf?'1f' 'GU .1 L' V' 'ffl' .L -A-ur. --.-.an ' V ggj.?!:: , ,ia- x X W: r . 8 M ,.. ggi- '15 ,, ' .1 f:3'ff'i1i1-':'l, f 'Y - lfi., .14 ' Aff- 'f f .. 5. . -'-.y . ,' vc- HE T f 5 '. f. - ,qgxgi , 5 'Lvl gag, 1' ' -, '-'V-:'1K"?,'H '. E325 . - . - yr -,..1-1v.X51f..135S ' ff ' ? ' 1 -:'?Y?'37egZ :.Lff'+f5Jg'2'f'l':.-. V ' .bigza-'11J1-fag 'fz-Ai 55,362 121-5 3, ' ' :Ama-gLA7F"iXev5Q3.,-:.'-321 1 gf ' : . .555-:,:'P P , , . 1 .WSE , T'-ff ss A . J-. , , A ink i . :Til-1 '- gfi' ri IE, - Puff? ' X vff Z 'lm-'-a'A',"",,"-H, ,, P hr 'gil . V' w J, H " f p ' +5 . f1'2a4'ff1 ., 1 , 'P . i A - I .z 1- ' ll, ,4 Y' I A X 1 . q. fy- 4 K xl., -gi. 1- xx ' ' 1 if .If X f X X A 'rw I If QR 3.9 'Q H 5: 4 I 'P X Q84 V J D r i I Q g-idk v 1 N r,..,.,JG-,-I .. -:fl Q --'Q Q Mfg DO. 9.9m-f-N . ' 0 "St, , U' ' P 1 o -:QA Nw: , 1.9 i..,.,,, - I J f ,if ,S --g', ,r' Q? .4 W x .5 1 vi C v s ,N t r e' 2 'A .LQQVAA Minis. iii " ig.-rv . 'QL .Hp , ' 'I -wa-nb U 3 , v '. 'Q .V W., ...W CAA Z '-. ry ' " 1 'Q ,nib 'fm . S ,, ..,4.f id i . F- Y " f", -' . K . .. 4- A 'Q' 4, rg. . , W x. 4 n. 'U-:..!M 1 V - I' 1 ,v-...L . -Y x 31 1 'Q " rfwifff 'I Us' SW If J 7' W. pv- -X 'X t.-1 g-ls. 1,,.,. L Springmdecisions: FAC or econ, summer school or Estes, woodsie or a study date. Sundays at Hickman, weekdays at Burnett, always wondering why that prof in 324 doesn't give tests, so you put off studying for yours till May 23. Weekdays crawl on and on and on while weekends race by and students migrate to Kansas, Fremont, Omaha, anywhere "away." Dead Week kills illusions and students chop away at the scholastic backlog for the final effort. Exams are over...scheduIes erased... for three months. 171 Racing against time and a crumbling foundation, AXO's hurry to pinnacle the pyramid -r-I-w 94, BWOC's fbig wheels on campusl display Grand Prix style on the first lap of a vicious cycle. 'Lv I , X If nO' 5 Wrapping up last-minute repairs on a broken-down finger, an East Campus casualty retreats to a nearby aid station. Spring Day...young men go east where collegians compete on tricycles Punctured pyramids deflate to third place while coeds search for the elusive needle. Then winners and losers retreat, leaving only paper cups and hotdog wrappers strewn on the field of battle ww On a foliated throne, Ivy Day royalty indulges in regal parlance over new, mystic subjects. Ivy Day...cuImination of three years grooming. Time-worn traditions mingle with freshman awe and veteran curiosity Grill-crowd prophets predict as anxious candidates await the final selection. . .then elation, amazement, disappointment. Selectively psyching and puzzling prospective successors, a retiring hood grounds a new spook 'if' 4 -ffff' of xbxk ft 'Sf S , 475.5 ie- lf' Amidst a chorus of sisterly cheers and spontaneous congratulations, a new committee commander joins the ranks of the black masquers. 1' ' "f".'q .,. li maui.. 43 r r ll A . 'Q Hia ' FQ, L , 5 fsdxal vw. Graduation ...emergence from four years of shaping... from shadows into the stark of the material world. A long look ahead resting on a rolled, wrinkled sheet of paper bearing the words, "I can." light yu 5 I Future visions replace backward glances as black-garbed graduates lock into step. V . l K. N l lg l l. 1 SSS '45 Undergoing a practice 'pinning,' a trial-run officer passes the initial board of review. 176 'V'-if 'ff ." .1 Nl ,Fa-N q 1 U nw. ' ., . " L 'Au 3-' .1 . ,mr Yu -wr N'-I vxxi dl, ,, A ' C ' ,, ii 1 9 A "x, Q - to '- ? , ll J x sg' i ni - I is J gf if I 'ST Ending an arduous journey, doctorial recipients contemplate a future outside academic walls. Royalty 1 5 A CL 4 C? ,- X uc- If ,V 3 K ' ' V - , I Y Q K. I 'x V - --'f"'Sf+ - kigfif f' "Xb ft' -' sig r' : - E :f ig , 'I' 1 .Awfx ,- P I ' . 1 P A.: 1 ' 1 'Q 43. ,,.' 1 " J - I X 1 ..w W.-,,.:,J:fg, f . , :yum f' f. , F 'Q nfl-,rm away! lr-, M -:W 'ey 14 u x I. 'x rw 1 , v -H, my 4.. s N Q ,l,I,m:.,:'y . k X X ' -' 15: If Y , . 1- c Q ' I QI Y- , 5:45, ' '5,9ff'YQ- , ' mlitq' .511- gw :,' ' - 'wf:i.- '-Stk f' ' -f - x-f-1:54 W ,,f,- 'ZLL' ' -f '5fl" ':.f 1 'M Vps - X-,l. 'HT'--.,i1f ' 1 - . "mm gmxaf-, , f l ' Y , 1 19' Qs: "w,'g1:.S ,' I, ' ' Aff A .' . - ' 0 n 'H .MSW 1 mb, N . W . 1 , jj., 4413 -,Jug R3 J -' "1rvl'n' J ' , ' '-rl , . rhfxfl P! " ' Lu , 'I-5-. ' 'N .I Q f IQ K . WM..- ., 4:-J -w-I' .. 1. 1 , ., , : Mfr 7454 1 r' f, , .L ,LI :Z ' .0 I 11545 ful" ffm. 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Q , 1 ' 'as 1: ,HT mg mmf.: ?3iai?1:'t2.x 1 fs mffrrggz as.. we M 5121911 651.22 11 Ji.. im Q5 3 111v1- Q 1 1 1 1 1 171 11151 11111111112 3 1 ,G 1 111 11111 1111 112251111 11111111 ,ig S K it 11 Ziff - 111111 M df 'H 11 Q1 111 msg 1 5 1: xi :Sf ' 1 11 11gS11'gaz 11 11 11 11 W 11311 1 wg 1 Wag ' V 1 l lp-- f fbhuty Queen 1 'L ye? 1-Q 1 , me v 5, ,x U mm 4 1235252 A 6. TQ' "-353 , ' Finalists Roger Hansen Theta xi Mary .lo Sharrar Delta Gamma 192 Stu Wiley Phi Gamma Delta N A-fa -iii ,if au ll 'lar' 'Q n 5 gh 1' 5 1 Karen Noll Chi Omega Klaus Hartman Cather Hall Jackie Freeman Kappa Kappa Gamma a 1 Y Vic Hancock cm Phi , f' ' ' w Gary Klein Ag Men Becky Brackle Alpha Phi l -0 , x Susan Sitorius Alpha Delta Pi Buzz Brashear Kappa Sigma Susan Dowe Kappa Alpha Theta Finalists 195 -I Homecoming Queen Candy May Selleck Quadrangle .,, 4 n I . Q ,. D.,-1 , I-nr.: i!'f-'sf-if Ng Q., -f Homecoming Atiendonis Bonnie Brown Marcia Melichar Chi Omega Burr Hall Oufsfonding Collegioie Mon Gary Larsen Beton Sigma Psi Ideol Nebroskcx Coed Erma Winterer Kcxppo Delfo 198 xbin Nebroskcz SweeTheor'r Suzanne Young Alpha Delto Pi Prince Kosmet Frank Solich Sigmo Nu 1 Mold of Honor Nancy Anderson Koppel Kcxppcx Gomrno I Q l , x 1 Y gulf ' nf, .454 N ' J V l sb-tin, I , F k CD 5 Q1 Q as fl HL lf Y? 'gi an kits' 3 3' 5 I l a- l Z al ,-,ng I, 7 If m F4 la E1 ' -l ' ..-.'--- May Queen Sally Wilson Kcuppo Koppel Gamma i Y Activities Queen Pam Wood Del To Gommo Miss E-Week Carolyn Lyon Pound Hell I I ' I r Nf' . ii i Student Government , -1 , Y. ,ESM l ,-f. 'If 1 S ' I V Q tt 7:1 ' ' 1-'fr'-9 42 Q4 9 x i , H X H, M 1 5 Q Qt 756 , f 5 0 s 'K F s ' t Z I 'K ' xx . J .f , 'QQ' I N W , Q V t 'Q-6-J 2 . 'N ' 'J to "h t e55r0'F S -fhgfflarlygwolv A EDUC t THE t 153, J SUPPORT EBRASKA U NI R r!i,!wqfmEm,TEmAL 5, mnumswlc couucn' V ,Q Y . M. , , , ,-,H,-,... ,A 1-Y..- mv ..Y., - YHN- STOXERSYSTEM H .. . , , ,- f- .,.. ,, Y., ,,, w 1""f'::E11r"'YF"" r- ri , -1- - 11 YI 5 A A 7 NU llllvgcumeg NEBRASKA cswfffgzu - tear - new is N 'X K mi Q t , , 5 E A iv f 1- , f'f'v' """' fx A '1 "f N--X 1 x - -- ' 1 ,gf I -1 ' xllx ,' f z 9 sf A 1 ,rj f 'f 9 4,3 ' P. : 1' . 1 f L,.+f -- . ,A w - ff - f 4 , "1-'ff ., , ' 1 ' J ' V K umm. H 3 f' ,Al . f f .-J ' ik T, 9' 'gal' i ? ,F W --N . A,fg,.2 ' ' ,A ., 4 E 3 1' .fi f 1, x ,F -, -4 'Jw ,, Kas! l A I ,jr nv ... 'C I ik iff. la 3.31 - A irizff 5, ,ffj ab" -fig ..,4. QM PS" 9? -, V- 1 FS. ' , kg.. ' v an K N if w 5 ,Jn ,A . nn gg-7-1. 'Wx 5 AWS Creates Key System To Begin ln Fall Semester With a unanimous vote, Associated Women Stu- dents executive board approved a motion to extend the privilege of a key system to all senior Nebraska coeds. The program, effective the first semester of the 1966 school year, permitted girls to check out and return keys upon leaving and returning to the living units. Expanding hours for women living on campus, AWS extended the closing hours of houses and dorms. The newly adopted times increased weekday limits of Fresh- men till ten-thirty, Sophomores till eleven o'clock, and Sunday night till twelve o'clock for all girls. To promote better understanding of the campus and rules to students living in the city, the organization established "Lincoln Seminar." The orientation, con- ducted by board members, explained sorority and dor- mitory regulations andthe AWS workers' program. ii :i ., fi Q WI Before migrating South to a Miami vacation, kr 4...-f-1 L ,I ,I ." - ,Mfr l-lousemothers scrutinize AWS sign-in sheets bowl-bound coeds promote Christmas cheer. to find AWOL Coeds failing to beat the clock. 6 xx uf Q" hi .,...+ f, 7':J:w ik 9' l ini A 5 'N , JEL! tg: Kg! sg! QQ! x ' xg, K 3 W 'A S lain , ig? asf 6? A - A 4 : i -P . fr , I gr li VZZ, M W 4 xgv -' ' q- , 1 1 A ' , r 's xg' x I ' 7 ' '- r 1 Q 'H' ' v X 153 11 yy f N 'r 17. N- 1 f I f 7 Qfgggi K, I , 'L feirg, A K N, 3. 1142: f l Q 5 - fi' Y . A fd' A f., -A' - F' 1 :av 'W' "W fxm' 'V' H -hgi .. ,if T ,im -an 455, KJ I NN GS: -5 i V , 1 - - ff' 15 1 , W ' J' D' f fl FB ,Ui .f,t.,, v'.: , rl- l, lflgzg. 5 " A ' V' 'V , ' 1 11, 5:51 , I. ' ' , 'ui ' 1 ' 4 , 2 112, J V' A MK , ',5J',J5 1'9"-1-mi:.....f f V A Qu nl: 1. 3. , I ' A 4, 5 . Q fy' 1' :N if A' ir. I ' -I . J", ' 4' lb dr' Irv? 5 . '- 'fs Nu, , ,, ,. H I Perchecl on a tree high roost, spectators enjoy a bircl's-eye-view of the Greek Week gladiators. IFC Establishes Committee To Coordinate Publications Publications Committee, newly established by the lnterfraternity Council, assumed all journalistic re- sponsibilities previously held bythe Public Relations Committee. A new project, the Greek Newsletter, in- volved planning and writing a periodical five times a year for circulation among sororities and fraternities. ln an effort to improve health conditions and prac- tices in fraternities, IFC created the Health Committee. Working on a salaried basis, health chairmen from each living unit met monthly to discuss new ideas and attended lectures at the University Health Center. One colony, Pi Kappa Alpha, organized on campus in time for Rush Week and another, Tau Kappa Epsilon, reactivated an NU chapter. Considering future possibili- ties, the Expansion Committee planned further coloni- zation with University administrators and studied the feasibility of building fraternity complexes. 29 Panhellenic Adopts Change For Initiation Requirements ln an effort to improve standards and standings, chapters participated in training-school groups and sponsored a newaward. "Panhellenic Scholars" honored the girl from each house holding the highest average for the preceding semester. Adjusting to the changed grading system, delegates set 2.0 as the scholastic requirement necessary for sorority pledge initiation. Encouraging "Service to Country, Community, Cam- pus" Panhellenic urged sororities to fly American flags outside living units during the week-long fall workshop. The Panhell office acted as a central source of infor- mation and coordination for community service proj- ects to link the campus and the city of Lincoln. Guest speakers provided programs at regular Mon- day meetings and Gamma Phi Beta's Grand President spoke at an all-sorority convocation. The dominant theme of each discussion centered around the privileges and responsibilities of University women as Greeks. Kaye acts as hostess for the 'Panhellenic Tea while serving refreshments to visiting alumnae Panhellenic: Back Row: P. Maus, N. Baker, S. Anclerstrom, K. Kersenbrock, M. Stuart, M. Lester. Third Row: K, l-last-ings, D. Kiffin, J. Chandler, M. Dow, R. Laron, J. Tanner, L. Simons, P. Brennan. Second Row: K. Hoffaker, L. Ryan, L. Irish, J. Renier, A. Kotouc, J. Marshall, K. Deines, T. Lieberman. Front Row: V. Dowling, P. Teel, M. Fox, M. Iler. secretaryg D. Michel, president: E. Winterer, vice-president, N. Hahn, J. Henderson. 'I ri i .i I ii o , i I ri .xi iii E W , W,-.i 'FFL , J ia.- '-'s,4-Pe-u-v T 5: ,T , FFL , I im.. 7.4 ,rt If df ' I .rule gy? f .. I , 2 - U, 7-Aff ' :saw ,'f'-sire? "' ii x v f' p ' 2,-r 31? T55 7 1' ' -4, -.ff ' . wg in wi g,13,a:..?, A X "A "ma "F T ' 1 . I t' A I-Z es' -ff "4 " f..4:S" Uk' 'E 2.351-21? ig 5' 1:'Q'-9--'Q' 1 -LL- Le A, Lf. .. 4 ,. 1. ' yea.. nrqed In support ofthe Panhellenic Standards Week Chi Omega's show sorority row's true colors. Superior achievement sparks sorority smiles as Panhellenio rewards outstanding scholars. .1 e, l 'lis- Fl' f Quiz Bowl question hunters search texts, finding enigmas for the weekly war of campus wits. gk- ASUN: Back Row: S. Marshall, B. Beck, D. Snyder, D. Voss. l.. Orender, J. Kinyoun, R. Thompson, G. Larson. Third Row: T. Picker- ing, R. Samuelson, R. Pfeifer, K. Baker, D. Isman, R. Miller, C. Bromm, J. Binger, S. Morrow. Second Row: K. Westerberg, P. Wood, D. Cruise. S. Soiref, R. Lott, E. Aitken, K. Bitner, K. Weber, C. Guenzel. Front Row: W. Hansmire, T. Schaaf, J. McCIy- mont, L. Froiik, vice-president, K. Neumeister, presidentg WI. Coufal, speaker pro tempore, A. Taube, R. Neel. r Politics promotes pleasure for Phi Gam diners when a "Phi-line" forms for a queen candidate. Us U Junior IFC lnaugurates Aid To Reward Pledge's Merit As an incentive for excellence, Junior lnterfrater- nity Council created a new scholarship. The award pre- sented once a year, provided one semesters tuition for a deserving pledge without other monetary grants. Members used profits from the annual Ball and sales of "New Faces on Sorority Row" to finance the aid To encourage improved relations among fraterni- ties, the organization sponsored a year-long series of exchange dinners. Working on a regular schedule, houses traded two or three pledges for weekday meals. Representatives helped IFC sell fraternity life to high school seniors by conducting speaking tours throughout the state. Talks involved slide lectures and other aids illustrating the Greek system's advantages. Junior IFC: Back Row: K. Perkins, W. Strateman. S. England. D. Johnson, D. Piester, R. Lassen, N. Phetteplace, G. Hollings- worth. Second Row: B. Pauley, R. McNergney, K. Martinson, M. Wiese, M. Naeve, M. Sergent, R. Schneider, G. Slizeski. Front Row: M. Abrahams. J. Pershing, J. Iverson, secretaryq D. Dosek, vice-presidentg G. Hohensee, president, H. Gerelick, treasurer, R. l-lamer, C. Myers. 2 ICC Starts Award Banquet To Strengthen Co-op Bonds Promoting stronger ties among the individual houses, the University of Nebraska Inter-Co-op Council initiated an Awards Banquet. To recognize academic achievement, an executive editor of the LINCOLN STAR presented a trophy to the system's outstanding scholar. As part of the ICC speakers program, Dean Lewis Fowler of student affairs explained the expansion plans for residence halls. Later, at an all-Co-op convocation inthe Union ballroom, Nancy Childs led an informal dis- cussion on dating and everyday etiquette. Exchange dinners offered participants the oppor- tunity to observe differences in food preparation tech- niques. The project resulted in the formation of a com- mittee to propose kitchen production alterations. Inter Co-operative Council: Back Row: E. Kodet, W. Theis, l.. Stehlik, R.SheIclon, R. Clatanoff, T. Scarlett F o tRo D M o N Clata off vice-president: G. Muller, president: J. Kehr, secretary-treasurer. R. Nelson D F e Student Tribunal: I A I Back Row: H. Daub, J. Korshoj, R. Newton, secretary. Front Row: M. Martin, V. Dowling, vice-chairmang K. Johnson. chairman: R. Tate. , Sf Researching a prospective defendanfscase, Max Martin obtains a professor's opinions. Tribunal Changes Charter In Compliance With ASUN Although placed under thejurisdiction of the ASUN constitution in 1965, Student Tribunal operated with a separate charter. The group decided cases concerning individual student infractions while the ASUN court ruled on all questions related to organizations. Appointed to serve for one year terms, the seven- member board recommended action to take in charges of misdemeanors and repeated minor offenses. Acting on the advice of the student deliberative body, the Division of Student Affairs made all final decisions and retained responsibility for all judgements. Meeting bi-weekly, Tribunal conducted open ses- sions upon the request of the Dean of Student Affairs or the student. Following judicial construction, the court made use of defense and prosecuting witnesses. 2 Organizations a, f-1-.' - .f V ...1,.,r ,., fx, . ,,., , x Tfti O, 'KZ lf. v ' fr-n I?- ff 17' ,, . "": . 0-a--n.,.,,,....,,,,,m """"'- -. If 1 51'f'A'?"' 11 X 'T ' H 'HQ t wb- ! I 4 I J! cgi. PY' , xxi Q X f "' . K , , Tr is X is Q. D , - 1 , r"N 5 , X A j ' N ' lx ' ' x. x 5 .O Q xx 4 -1-""'-I ' N .L V, '-.,f T N I f f li 1 5 win " " - a ,- W 4 W. 220 V V-N Effgr. E 2 in V E5 I ' af it Shirley Voss President fag !"f'f"wi Vicki Dowling Vice-president Barbara Beckman Historian I i Jeannette Coufal Sec reta ry Judy Bucklin MB's Fill Ataturk Shelves With Audio-Visual Material Enlarging the successful "Books for Ataturk" exchange of 1964-65, Mortar Boards again sent edu- cational materials to Nebraska's affiliated University in Turkey. NU students and faculty contributed slides, maps, and pictures in addition to the 1800 books sent last year to fill the needs of Ataturk University Library. With the sale of more than 3000 mums, lVlB's boosted "Big Red" spirit and financed projects for the year. Black Masque Chapter served the campusthrough a graduate seminar, a scholarship luncheon and "Ac- tivities NU" stressing extracurricular participation. Five representatives flew to Laramie, Wyoming, for a regional convention where discussion centered on membership responsibilities. In the national sphere "The NIB Quarterly" featured NU as a leading chapter. i Patti Teel Treasurer 1 Linda CIBVBIBHC1 Y I if 1 P 1 w Virginia KCuzD Guenzel U A -.H G 'iffjf Dianne Michel P9l'Cy Wood Cultivating an East-West friendship, MB's repudiate scholastic distance. fsx 'Q' Jean Holmquist Jan Whitney Hibbs jsau, 'V"'...Ib"7 M3I'Sha L.eStel' Cassie Wild !If -X' ' 223 Innocents Amend Program To Aid Business Proteges Under the auspices of Innocents Society, the annual Protege Program underwent major changes during the year to encompass broader vocational fields. Several outstanding underclassmen had an opportunity to take part in the formerly all-senior program. innocents also revised Parents' Day by holding the event in the Spring as a University sponsored convocation. Traditional services rendered to the campus in- cluded the Liberty Bell Exchange with the senior men's honorary at Missouri. In addition the group assisted Administration by forming an Alumni Roundup Lunch- eon. A record-breaking attendance at the Society's Frosh Hop required both an additional dance floor and an extra combo while the sale of beanies again allowed freshmen to have a mark of distinction. Robert L. Wilburn Treasurer P- H 12' 5 -ii? " Z 'Eiga 35' ' .' fa, .'j"l ' 'J' A l'-'fl q'i,L-. I.-Af-l-f, p '- H -.--Hg-nj ,I ,, , ,al lk' X1-V Y ., -I .I I 'ii i 4 1:4 -, iiigiyr Q . ,,gyi, ,. N V5 L I lj-fain V Qui" ' I li l is il l AB l' iw ,r . It A ' l - ,fri-1 'iff' - ' l Y li, F". E cg- fl 5 N - if 5 !i'fi'L-Lf" V1 g John H. Cosier William A. Harding William A. Haug John R. Luckasen Kent J. Neumeister Francis L. CFrankJ Partsch Donald E. Pont DJ I Red Devils become Blue Angels for the biennial migratory flight to a Missouri football game. mx 1' 1 1 Barbara Beckman, Editor "Since you have nothing else to do over vacation..." 2 Jean Hoffmaster, Business Manager "Money, money everywhere-is any of it mine?" 1966 CORNHUSKER Faces Dilemma Of Campus Growth Combining the strictly regulated yet informal organization from past years, CORNHUSKER layout emphasized a modified mosaic design. A new approach in division page composition and style constituted the greatest alteration in the 1966 yearbook format. With a rapidly increasing enrollment, the staff faced the problem of creating a book to include all University students. The 1965 expansion's effect on both organizations and living units necessitated the reallocation of picture and copy space. Editors traveled to the annual Associated Collegiate Press seminar in San Francisco as the first NU yearbook with all senior staff members attending the fall confer- ence. Lectures and discussions suggested improve- ments in accordance with ACP rating requirements. ' ' 152. 'I .r I "Wi Jim DeMars, Copy Editor "l absolutely demand strict legibility at all times!" Nancy Baker, Photo Editor "l've risen to new heights in the Cl-l office!" GC Ac l 'KKEK NOW Kelley Baker, Managing Editor "Organization is my middle name." ini... -.al Mary Ann Deems, Managing Editor "Every girl needs orange bricks to boost her ego!" Fr: ff f::':: 'P is M Marian Sicklebower, Panel Editor Cindy Smith, Assistant Business Manager "Next week vve feature cutting out paper doIls!" Q 5 .La 4 g 0 V .,.... Dave Cummins, Managing Editor "What a way to ruin a good lunch!" Ken Beebe, Managing Editor "I wonder how long these names will stay here?" Al Brandt, Managing Editor "An ME on a goody run-where are all the SE's'?" 2 Section Editors: Back Row: M. Matousek, N. Carlson, J.PahI, P. Domeier, P. Maurer, I.. Tay! M N cl Second Row J R pp t S L J. Wilken, M. Brauer, l.. Bredemeier, S. Kathol, C. Mudgett, B. Eirackle, C Cronk te F o t Row S Phelps J B ge Overholt, T. Andreasen, W, Paxton, J. Walters, G. McCord, L. Sehroer. CH Outstrips RAG Team In Spring Football Frolic Rallyinga new staffaround football spirit, the CORN- HUSKER challenged Rag defenses in a spring exhibition game staged atPioneers- Park. A 69-O victory celebra- tion in honor of yearbook gridmen and grid-girls found the staffs refreshed around a fireside function. Newly painted walls with a Super-Ball spot motif led to other leisure-living features for Friday night work sessions. Artistic staff members searched second-hand stores to find such luxuries and brought back the per- fect addition-an overstuffed, over-used sofa. Holiday-spirited workers remained during the Christmas break to ward off the publishers wrath a lit- tle and to "work" a lot. Senior editors conducted a con- test to out-sarcasm each other while SE's proclaimed independence with a sign, "Protected by Pinkertons". Living in a "glass house" brings distractions as SE's urge the passage of a vital headline 228 Pub Board Augments Fees For NEBRASKAN Subsidy Negotiating improved financial programs, the Sub- committee on Student Publications studied income needs of the yearbook and newspaper. Earlyfirst semes- ter Pub Board announced a fifty cent per person increase in student fees allocated to the DAILY NEB RASKAN. To assist both the paper and the CORNHUSKER, Dr. Wilma Crumley joined the subcommittee, acting as a special consultant to the two staffs. A new arrival at NU, Dr. Crumley occupied a dual role as an advertising instructor at the School of Journalism and a faculty representative to the Student Publications Board. With more organizations appearing on campus, the body concentrated on reviewing all material distributed to the students. The committee attempted to filter out any questionable, superfluous or unauthorized matter before it reached the University population. Pub Board scrutinizes a sample publication while a pamphleteer applies the "hard sell." Publications Board: Back ROW: R- CV8v'lf0I'd. Chairman, J. HOIFYIBFL W. Gauger, J. Regest Front Row: C. Guenzel, J. Ross. T. Schaaf. 229 'x cg' Carole Reno, First Sem. Managing Editor: Jo Stohlman, Second Sem. Editorg Steve Hungerford, Second Sem. Managing Editor Marilyn I-Ioegemeyer, First Sem. Editor. Pgfwwwv Jon Kerknoff, Night News Editorg Wayne Kreuscner, Second Sem. News Editor. .Jim Buntz, Subscription Managerp Mike Jeffrey, First Sem. Business Manager. i Lx. ls. E Jim Pearse, Second Sem. Sports Editor, Jim Swartz, First Sem. Sports Editor. 'D' 1 New NEBRASKAN Stresses Improved Reporting Format Striving for better campus coverage and a reflec- tion ofthe University atmosphere, the DAILY NEBRAS- KAN brought about a change in layout and make-up style. Extensive articles by staff and outside columnists contained larger background and evaluation stories. First sernseter editor Marilyn Hoegemeyer traveled to Cape Kennedy to cover the Gemini Space Launch and to the ACP meeting in San Francisco. Comparison with other papers at the convention aided innovations. Second semester Rag St-aff achieved two firsts with the publication of a regular six-page paper and an ad- free editorial page. Doubling the number ofthe Busi- ness Assistants helped to meet the demand for more ads,and all-campus cartoons replaced syndicated forms. John Rasmussen, Circulation Manager, Connie Rasmussen, John Rasmussen, Dwight Clark, Night Business Editor, Business Assistants. Mike Kirkman, Second Sem. Business Manager. ...I Copy Editors and Staff Writers: Left to Right: N. Coufal, B. Giles, J. Morris, T. Victor, L. Quinnett, J. ltkin, R. lrey, P. Rhynalds. 231 i ti Aggie onlookers hear NU sportsman Mike Nerud testify Join East Union for 43M more fun' . - ,-'1g 'rt ,y--'vga-v:iHj.. 75' -. -. A ,.,, I 1 I ' , . 1 -' ,.f-'f1f'ifff"i .,' '5-5 i' '5""'v7?f , , f - . at -f eragmn X Q . , 1 'yQ?,i 'A'-fi Ami A ,, - iii, ' 111' . ' .3 ff-2..,....3ll. -f , in if : , gf 1- -4- , ,.-.J ir' "Q -' , . ,,,, , ,, W- K V Y M A --.w-4---- , ,, . f i Q- ..,. , ., 4 M- W- ---W A N, HH- , yf12f"'T e Y A ,V . if an My x wi b 'aiwf ' 5' 'G -v if .. ,, ,, ,-rg, A ,,,- --I,, 1, - . ,gr ' --'g7'f ' " A if -, 5 ' L A., rt .ff - , ,sie .l - , Contemplating "Tip-a-canoe and workers too," a coed swaps committee cares for gondoliers. Paulette Hruban swings a cagey disootheque at East Uniorfs country-style dance A-Go Go 232 Evergreens and spray snow grace the Dell as Unionites display white Christmas hopes. East Union Sponsors Trip To Visit NEBRASKAland Chartering a bus, University students headed for the sandhills to re-discover Nebraska. The Western Trip, innovated by East Union, toured numerous national parks and historical monuments. Resting tired feet, the visitors took time out for hayrack and horseback rides. To emphasize the educational side of Union, the members initiated a Lounge Series. Coffee and sofas provided an informal atmosphere as qualified lecturers presented timely topics and led discussion on Viet Nam, state history, capital punishment and income tax. Traveling to Dogpatch, the East Campus group renovated the annual Sadie Hawkins Dance into "Sadie's Discothequen complete with straw and a-go-go girls. Adding to the holiday spirit, carolers commemorated the first tree-lighting ceremony in conjunction with the traditional strains of "O Tannenbaum, O Tannenbaum," E st Union Board: Bgck Row: T. Wehrbein. K. Beebe. J. Trumble, J. Thurber, M. Fuhrman, C..Young, C. Brernm, M. Matousek. Front Row: D. Younkin. manager. G. Stevens. J. Coufal. president: R Johnson, ice-president: N. Hahn, secretary, l.. Viterna, treasurer, . Wahlgren. 2 i ff- ' .- , X Q ray ,QNX igi Y lvl xf . A ,113 f- 3 E4 J, Q., s- -. .., :I 3. J -nl '..'z . in ., I .,,k.q. 11 ,SL . 11 , V ,Y ' . 'Hill' ' '-1 : : x Y' ,,: vu,-,, - Y.-1,7 I' W-.. -Q ,',".LfA.-C -." , 1. '1l. ,Y :lux 1 K ' IMal l 1 f"'HHH , w , ' X ' t.w..'! ' . .. an., , . ,f. A ...M .,. 4 ll 2.4" L '-'ff , ,, ,- Q , . I HlHHA Q, L M? 11. -. J. , 3 4' . di Y, Es af s,,v'ffi yr?" ilu.'.......f' 'Q F. .if O H . L' I Ajiigr' 'T-Q JQINF,I-w4:q:: hitQX f. -, -I-j'T.+ ":--N- if , Qf ff 1 my aff' 3 , f?'5iii5?f k .4 f- V R412 1 1? 9 ..3,,.. A' V ,. 23 "1 ,, ,,.Y,w.4 .fy Y -..----' - --Q rf- " -sg---, .,,...q.a----G-EK' , 1 3f 1 ? v - Wsgeakr ka 'i Ar C,-'P sr- -Q7 fx if ..-4 2 YT' -.H 'uni 'q'.T.."? N1- V? Union Chairmen and Assistants: i S: Back Row: C. Pohlman, M. Tallman, E. Aitken, B. Beckmann, J. Christensen. Second Row: P. Wood, J. Howard, G. Ferrara, J. Marshail, J. Fauss. Front Row: E. Swoboda, l.. Johnson, B. Struyk, D. Miller, S. Baade. Lending international insight "a Ia Deutsch," Union venders voice German sales pitches. 36 Coeds choose a real print of an original copy in the 1966 dorm room revitalization excursion. x AUF Models Drive Kickoff Around Discotheque Motif "AUF AfGo-Go" replaced "AUFul" Night Carnival as a prelude to the All University Fund's annual drive. Students danced to the Warner Brothers combo in the Coliseum and contributed extra funds by patronizing carnival booths and concession stands. Participants elected Klaus Hartman Big IVlan On Campus, in lieu of the former lVlr. AUFul Ugly, while Pam Wood repre- sented sophomore coeds asthe annual Activities Queen. Soliciting from organized living units and Lincoln residents, AUF contributed the proceeds to five differ- ent charities determined by a campus poll. The Spring Faculty Drive aided the World University Service in bringing better education to underdeveloped countries i by financing scholarships and new facilities. l I Simulating a 'mod' mood on basketball courts, AUF sets the Coliseum swinging "A-Go-Go." 12? AUF BOARD: Back Row: J.. Marshall. D. Jentges, M. Martin, G. Plihal, D. Voss, J. Howlett, E. Aitken, M. Hardee, l.. Mahoney. Third Row: S. Spohn. B. Beckmann, C. Freeman, J. Snreck, R. Milligan, W. Minier, W. Kreuscher, J.-Binge-r. Second Row: C. Stilwell, J. Connell, D. Jones, ES. Armstrong, D. Maclay, C. Beermann, R. Rein- miller. B. Pflasterer, J. Fauss. Front Row: J. McClymont, C. Bedient, J. Carroll. treasurer, B. McMullen, vice-presidentg B. Beckman, president: K. Johnson, vice-president, J. DeMars, secretaryg J. Christensen. iv 2 1 rll.. L: :E ' i' -- N , Y ' l . l -V I . ll' , ,nl 5 l 'rl if arf. .N - ,-5. KK Steps Up Pro Staging To Enhance Spring Show Ranking in the top five percent of the amateur theatrical productions in the United States, Kosmet Klub opened the 1965 entertainment season with the "Unsinkable Molly Brown." Sets featured a mobile life-sized log cabin and a portable grand staircase. Expanding background effects to include more facets of professional techniques, the show sported a twenty- three piece orchestra and a cast of sixty-four. Fall Revue, the second annual project, arranged entries around the theme of "Historical Hysteria." ln- troducing changes in the program, planning committees set a time limit of twelve minutes on the skits in order to allow six rather than four men's living units to par- ticipate. Another innovation provided for trophies awarded for best costuming, technical and lighting effects and the most original musical scores and lyrics. gi . eg w t sg ri rr-ll los. : , wk V, . .it . lvl., .. .... in-na-il -lr, 4- '. E' li-aw. il W !"":. F. 1 l-.........I -f .gg Mapping out set strategy for the spring show, KK organizers plan a professional 'Business.' 238 Scorning the clrudgery of life in the backwoods Molly absorbs bright lights and Paris protocol "Belly up to the bar," shrieks Molly Brown as miners cavort through a Leaclville saloon. .5i5Cf"E.. uf , 3321? xl- ' Will? .nv -,-. M5 ji v. f. A515 b M Q- . .1 -g , r 3 :: QW ju ,A ,ki Y, X ma xg? - f f P x .XA ff, , a X, 4 X x 1 , I-I xg: vi ivipvifi fi' Nw, V V W ia! X 4 an X 3 E x ' igfqs xg: ii, a 1 yi I 1, V i?:0'- 2 7. U , A M . V , I f ff' Win FK if f w New mf? 171: Q. :W fl' my MN rw If? 1 i 1' III Fill I ii i l 1 yi ' 4 - - ilniiiama iii!! 5 Builders Coordinate SEED With Student Endowments Personality tests replaced the blind date system in a computer dance sponsored by SEED, Builders newest committee. Drawing from numerous organiza- tions, Student Endowments for Educational Develop- ment promoted the Nebraska Foundation. To reach potential NU residents, College Days workers traveled to high schools around the state and showed slides of University life. A question-answer period conducted by Builders followed the presentation. ln another freshmen-oriented project, members distributed "First Glance" magazine, introducing the basic aspects of Nebraska to in-coming students. A newspaper, "Special Edition," rounded out the publi- cations program by fully covering campus living. 4 "Only 50 cents!" gasps a delighted Sammie as calendar brokers negotiate door to door. O ,- 'x d 1'- Y I M' I ' Builders Chairmen and Assistants: Back Row: T. Michalski, G. Gunderson, J. Kushner, J. Kinyoun, G. Wahlgren, J. Kerkhoff. J. Anderson, J. Svoooda, S. Hey- brock. Third Row: D. Nolan, D. McDonald, J. Meyer. P. Wood, J. Ross, F. Seaton, J. Mahar, A. Boyles, D. Bernard, L. Overholt. Second Row: J. Vitamvas, C. Pauley, C. Bischoff, B. White, R. Glenn, J. Adam, P. Unthank, L. Olenberger, J. Palmer. Front Row: K. Weber, treasurer, J. Holmquist, secretary, P. Wood. vice-president, J. Alber, president, J. Coufal, vice-president, V. Guenzel, vice-president: L. Young, adviser, D. Focht. Logging extra hours for a high school press conference, workers apply "crafty" talents to create banquet favors. 4 Q Wa " ' 'A , xg' xg' 'Y Swv W, Q- Ffa " , , W1 6 f - iL 1 WS I R , R Y y 9 Q n n - . ,ky A , u 5 V xg? Q V yy l Q W w N Q 4' Leaving a coed with balloons in lieu of a clate, Terry Reitan takes off for the Corn Cob ranks. Leaving books for greener pastures south, Corn Cubs Gear Activities For Returning NU Alumni Based on the results of a student poll, Corn Coos re- evaluated the Homecoming proceedings in cooperation with Tassels. Attemptingto recreate the real significance of NU's fall tradition, the organization sought to honor alumni with a special program on Homecoming night and to accommodate students the previous weekend. Featuring three combos the week prior to the Colo- rado game, college members danced to 'pop' music and witnessed the presentation of the royalty. The George Shearing Quintet closed the festivities and provided post-game entertainment for all Cornhusker fans. By planning competitive pep rallies and encour- aging students to welcome players at the airport, Corn Cops channeled team support. Workers also boosted "esprit de corps" by placing cards for halftime flashes. ' K 3.2. X ' . KX g ,B X i X N x ' ' -' 'lei fl l it i i X ,MH , 1 ,.-iv NU's t'higl'1-flying" coach commences cle-briefing CODS vacate for the,Orange Bovvlspectacle. after completing a Husker airplane touch-clown. 4 Tassels Expand Festivities To Revitalize Homecoming In conjunction with Corn Cobs, Tassels revised the Homecoming schedule and procedure. To create an en- tire week of enthusiasm, the University held a college- style dance the weekend before the Colorado game and presented the 1940 Queen and the 1965 royalty. Miss Candy lVlay made personal appearances throughout the Lincoln area as a representative of Nebraska spirit. Gearing the festivities toward returning alumni, the group sponsored departmental coffees to reacquaint graduates with professors. Campus tours given jointly with Builders stressed changes to the former students. Various coaches representing several sports at- tended organizational meetings to explain rule techni- calities. With a broader concept of the athletic events, Tassels were better able to support Husker teams. ll l XX o .Xi Tassels transmute an amoeboicl cellophane mass to a multicolor, translucent Homecoming display. 44 Taking up pre-parade positions, Tassels rally-in before the traditional trek from Tower to Union. r V l . r , . .lr K ln , ' 4 , 1 . l , . ,X . ing," J I - With a feminine approach to sales psychology, Carol Sintek draws buyers ancl Tassel-points. gn I1 'i ii! Chaos prevails as Tassels attempt to out-maneuver the card-flash barker. n . H Ebb A -Q ,Q MQ. .J ' H- A ' r' Q v . v 1 ' , .. J f i ,, . i f.. r . . A 1 i f 1 . , I 4 W X ' ' + ' . A Q I I Q i I . . g 0 . 0 -4, . ' ' A ".V 5 Lx I AZ I . . , I - ' V 1 -'X , , I ' X 1 X I " X f.eaA.4.xtf2f .64m,1!:2Tx?r2 i 1..4....sA ,.. fri..- l a tin i 2- hs.. Tassels: Back Row: C. Egle, C. Sintek, M. Beilke, C. Sitorius, I.. Grosscup, C. Pauley, S. Ehlers, P. Hatheway, D. Dering. Fourth Row: A. Windle, A. Kennedy, P. Blue, C. Stoltenberg. J. Ross, W. Bergen, D. Yost, D. Hansen, L. Zuick. P. Wassenberg. Third Row: S. Yetman, K. Hastings, S. Tinan, L. Olenberger, C. Reiling, D. McDonald, L. Broyhiil, A. Blackstone, A. Block, L. Engelkemier D. Darland. Second Row: N. Converse, C. Bedient, J. Buell, J. Trumble, J. Thurber. M. Heckman, M. Gregerson, S. Sitorius, Ti Lieberman. Front Row: M. Hardee, N. Carison, D. Maclay, B. Armstrong, L. Muff, president: A. Kotouc, Secretary: M. Hughes treasurer, J. Domingo, C. Craig, C. Bischoff. 245 4. G"h Young Republicans Board: Back Row: M. Bowen, M. Hughes, P. Bowen, K. Brashear, C. Shattuck, M. Tallman. J. Amsler. Front Row: D. Miller, R. Weerts treasurerg J. Meyer, J. Reiser, president: J. l.aBeIIe. R. Wiebe, M. Ballard. Val Peterson Enters Race During First YR Conclave Speaking at a fall meeting of the Young Repub- licans, University Regents past-president, Val Peterson, became a candidate in the 1966 Nebraska gubernatorial A race. The ex-governor also expressed opinions concern- ing United States foreign and domestic policy. Prominent political leaders from Omaha and Lin- coln discussed the future of the Republican Party at a YR workshop. During the program members presented a panel forum on possible candidates and platforms. To establish closer ties with the national organi- zations, the club named formervice-president Richard M. Nixon an honorary member at the "Salute to Carl Curtis" reception. Students also took advantage of an all-University convocation to entertain Oregon Gover- nor Mark Hatfield at a recognition coffee hour. Selected the latest honorary member of YR's, Richard Nixon draws John Reiser's applause. 246 J-students scribble notes in a mock interview as Bolo I-laws stresses YD's political policies. YD's Generate Club Unity Through Vacation Project "Campaign Readiness '66" established a system of continuity in the Young Democrats' yearly schedule. The new program encouraged members to keep in con- tact with club activities during the summer months by attending county fairs and political fund-raising dinners. In another innovation for meeting agendas, the organization invited prominent speakers. Governor Frank Morrison addressed the group on political objec- tives while professor Campbell McConnell from the Uni- versity considered problems of government spending. To coordinate state, local and campus projects, YD's distributed information pamphlets, bumper stick- ers and booklets concerning up-coming candidates. Supporters from NU also participated in the traditional Jefferson-Jackson Day state money-raising banquet. '7 Young Democrats Board: Back Row: P. Chapman, M. Backnaus. M. Plattner, M. Kraus. C. Callan. Front Row: R. l-laws, vice-pres cl nt, E. Kruse, Tr e Booth, president: S. McCall, sec etaryi A. Rose, treasur r. 24 - 48 YWCA Cabinet: Back Row: B. Burrows, MJA. Deems, G. Mitzner, K. Oates, D. Jones, C. Be-all, C. Cockle, C. Kramer, B. Ahlschvvede. Second Row: D. Darland, S. Hall, L.. Olenberger, J. Williams, J. Jasperson, S. Diffenclerfer, B. Satorie, M. A. Whaley, T. Hoyt. F o l' Row: A. l-lunter, l.. Meyer, A. Block, secretaryg l.. Mahoney, 'ce-president, I.. Cleveland, president: C. Crosier, vice p es dentg R. Chesnut, S. Dose, D. Carlson. YWCA Develops Diversity ln Newly-Formed Projects Under the leadership of a new executive director, the University YWCA expanded programs to a broader field of interest. Mrs. Gordon helped organize two new committees dealing with "Love and Marriage inthe 20th Century" and "Cultural Tours." The former group en- tertained speakers at Women's Residence Hall while the latter brought programs to indigent families. Voter Registration Projects sponsored by the "Y" served to enfranchise Negroes in Jackson, Mississippi, and Denver, Colorado. Participants spent one week in aiding local authorities in a fight against discrimination. Directed by the National Student Assembly of the YM-YWCA, NU branch emphasized large-scale move- ments. Serving as national vice-president, a member of the local board encouraged a delegation to attend NSAY. Ag-Y Reviews Difficulties Accompanying City Living To inform the students on East Campus of local af- fairs, YMCA held meetings first semester to discuss various current problems. Important guest speakers from Lincoln treated topics ranging from city health to the growth of the University community. When the holiday season arrived, Ag-Y sponsored the annual Christmas meditation ceremony. To create a more cheerful atmosphere, the organization put on a Calypso Party featuring Caribbean songs and foods. "Estes Carnival" on East Campus raised enough money to send representatives to the Area YMCA- YWCA Conference in June at Estes Park. All living units participating constructed booths and donated the pro- ceeds from games of skill and refreshment stands. YMCA Board: Back Row: H. Walling, adviser, G. Ahlquist, K. Nath- an, I.. Johnson, T. Shepherd. Front Row: D. Nelson, J. Kruse, K. Olsen, president, l-l. Eloelts, secretary- treasurer, I.. Grove. Red Cross Assists Forces With NU Blood Contribution Sponsoring a blood drive in December, University Red Cross members took donations from NU students and faculty for the Department of Defense. The blood collected went to American servicemen overseas and to United States military hospitals at home and abroad. With a retreat at the Lancaster County chapter house, board members discussed and emphasized the problems confronted in working with the mentally ill. lVlr. Bruce lVlcSpadden, minister of Wesley Foundation, described opportunities in mental retardation work. During the Christmas season visitation committees gave parties for orphanage and hospital residents. After the holidays Red Cross recognized outstanding workers and the new officers at an Awards Dessert. Scouring Pioneers Park for exhibit specimens, junior scavengers present "fruits of the hunt." Red Cross Back Row A Clemons P Murphy R Campbell R Lankford S Thompson l. Lonnquist, P. York. Third Row: R. Oestmann, C Peterson C Bartlett M Ballard M Kulish D Yost R Schmierer A McGough Second Row: D. Darland, L. Wright, T. Andreasen K Oates S Wieckhorst K Westerberg V Metzger B White Front Row S.Turner, l.. Grosscup, C. Pauley, B. Trltes first vice president C Wilcl president M Lester second vice president J Connell, secretaryq N.CarIson. 2 4 Orchesis: Bapk Row: M. Chapin, D. Stutheit, R. Sauage, M. Hughes, P. Bockoven, C. Christensen, N. Shook, C. Hametz, M. Humrjnel. Third Row: D. Hughes, faculty advisory E. Schweigen, I.. lrwing, V. Mitchell, D. Murray, R. Novak,-T. Fox, C. Johnson, C. Kllng, l.. Henncks, J. Pester. Second Row: N. Powell, K. Olson, K. Fouts, K. Costin, J. Finnell, S. Dennis, S. Panelg, C. Rasmussen, S. Clair, M. Robley. Front Row: S. Hall, A. Liesueld, B. Fisk, secretary: S. Baade, president, S. Potter, vice-presldentg D. Black, G. Kerrol. Orchesis Repertoire Grows With Off-Broadway Scores Experimenting with a new approach to dancing, Orchesis choreography emphasized colors and moods in University programs. Routines to "Carousel," "The Creation" and "Step in Time" originated from weekly meetings, projects in the women's physical education compositionclassesorfromstudentimagination.Obtain- ing ideas from films, members introduced elastic tapes in numbers stressing shapes and interpretive designs. Students participated in other NU-sponsored activi- ties throughout the year. Practicing during first semes- ter, dancers performed in "Carmen," scheduled as a University Theater production. Orchesis also appeared in a fall program presented in conjunction with AWS during the annual Standards Week Convocation. AquaquettesShowDisplays Fantasies From Disneyland In a take-off on the various "lands" of Disneyland, Aquaquettes imitated characters, rides and amuse- ments in the annual spring show, "Dizzeyland." Under- water colored lights, body lights and sprinklers added special effects to the synchronized swimming numbers. Introducing male participants into the formerly all- female cast, the annual program featured a cowboy- cowgirl act. Student producers wrote and directed routines and fashioned costumes for the entire show. After the winter presentation Aquaquettes stepped up practices in preparation for the Amateur Athletic Union meet in the spring. With the emphasis on orig- inality and creativity, the group modified maneuvers from earlier shows for the Omaha competition. Aquaquettes: . Back Row: S. Richmond, M. Laing, T. Lindquist, J. Delbridge, V. Vallicott, M. Ducker, K. Salisbury. Third Row: M. McMuistion, B. Bowman, J. Hilton, K. Kelley, B. Quade, D. Crosby, N. Yost, I.. Schott. Second Row: L. McGrath, J. Donnan, I.. Totten, M. l-lolm, T. Webert, J. Bush. Front Row: E. Zeh, ad- viser: A. Dale, S. Sheridan, P. Blue, secretaryg K. Knight, president: J. Mason, L. Lynn, S. Holman. O Yell Squad Amplifies Spirit For Minor Sports Events To lend enthusiasm to sports usually receiving a limited amount of student support, Yell Squad for the first time attended several swimming and wrestling meets. Consisting of three boys and eight girls, the group performed routines and led cheers specially adapted to all of the winter and spring competitions. Alumni groups and Ak-Sar-Ben Scholarship win- ners witnessed a display of spirit during the Homecom- ing luncheon at the Nebraska Center for Continuing Education. To boost cooperation for the game, members presented a skit and refreshed memories of NU songs. Attending all football, home basketball games and pep rallies, Yell Squad executed both old and new num- bers. To practice a united image for the Orange Bowl spectacle, yell leaders initiated an echo-response using the south stadium to repeat COOOORN-HUSKERS! Yell Squad Back Ro J dR w J H d K H e so M H dges K MCM nus, F. C. Green, I... Foster. FrontRow: Phi Eta Sigma: Back Row: J. Frgar. J. Kohl, C. I-lamner, M. Messmer, W. Carson, C. Juricek, L. Moller, J. Schepers, V. Luebbe, B. Schole, R. Zitterkopf, D. i-lemsath G. Ahlquist, K. Stevens, B. Turner, J. Engdahl. Fourth Row: E. Steeves, M. Gibson, I.. Luzio, D. Janssen, P. Fager, M. Carlson, W. Ryan, M. Furrow, J. Miller, M. Duffek, M. Paulsen, L. Moll, R. Ronnenkamp, P. Mayfield, R. Shernan, J. Andersen, J. Dropow, R. Pfeifer. Third Row: S. Gold, J. Force L. Eickhoff, W. Blankenship, J. Chapin, J. Swanson, K. Jones, J. Samsel, J. Shreck, W. Damm, R. Nebuda, C. Bolton, J. Wilcox, R. Burton, C. Sweet- man, B. Staats, T. Thompson. Second Row: V. Hancock, S. Davis, R. I-leikes, R. Snell, T. Copenhaver, R. Sader, D. Novacek, T. Burger, F. Van- Engen. G. Olson, T. Densler, L. Reeder, M. Thomas, R. Laws, C. Weeks, W. Erhart. Front Row: W. Plosky, R. Gingery, D. Acker, J. Arnold, R. Basler i5V.SDreise4ha:11s6lIT. IVSIIZ, J. Schrekinger, president: G. Pokorny, secretary, D. Cummins, vice-president: L. I-lewes, faculty adviser, J. Skinne . tor, . c al, . less. v v Phi Eta Sigma Boosts NU With Orientation Assistance Following suggestions from Dean Chatfield, Phi Eta Sigma extended participation in campus activities. Nlen provided tours for University visitors during Ivy Day, Honors Convocation and New Student Week. Another project oriented toward new-comers involved the fall distribution of information and maps of buildings. Supported in programs by 126 initiates, the male Freshmen's scholastic honorary held two rather than one initiations to accomodate the new men. To increase membership, the group sponsored smokers for Regent Scholarship winners interested in joining the organiza- tion. Potential candidates met the University require- ment of twelve hours for one semester or twenty-four hours for two semesters with at least a 3.5 grade average. Alpha Lam's Initiate Forum On NU Academic Concepts Anticipating mutual benefits, Alpha Lambda Delta and Phi Eta Sigma held cooperative functions. A joint seminar provided students and the public with an op- portunity to ask questions and exchange ideas concern- ing the Honors' course and new grading systems. At the beginning of the school year, Alpha Lam's entertained at a tea for all freshmen women. Twenty sophomore coeds participated in fall initiation after making a 7.5 accumulative average. Spring initiation admitted Freshmen making a 3.5 average for 15 hours. Choosing recipients for National Fellowships and Scholarships comprised the main work ofAlpha Lambda Delta. The girls also publicized the awards and con- tributed funds collected from individual dues. Alpha Lambda Delta: Back Row: P. Layman, B. Thomas, D. Sieckmann, L. Hammer, D. Patterson, K. Miller, W. Bergen, C. Kassebaum, L. Velte, R. Schreiner, D. Loen- nig, M. Lorenz, L. Kiekhaefer. Fourth Row: A. Windle, A. McGough, M. Stilwell, G. Barrows, J. Sommermeyer, S. Griffin, S. Gordon, R. Kierstead, S. Henderson, A. I-Ienneman, S. Eno, L. Dierking. Third Row: S. I-lall, J. Rodgers, C. l-lousel, J. Marshall, D. Jentges, J. Freeman, M. Sims, J. Chand- ler, K. Oberle, P. Domeir, L. I-lurich, S. Ebel, M. Slie. Second Row: G. Scherer, J. Binger, B. Haskins, P. I-larris, K. McNeff, S. Schick, A. Daniel, C. Fox, J. Wahlin, B. Bockus, J. Adams, M. McFarland. Front Row: P. Wood, C. I-leileman, J. Buell, M. Losh, B. Ahlschwede, J. I-leath, treasurerp K. Costello, president, D. Groetzinger, vice-presidentg T. Lieberman, D. Ashton, adviser: S. Ehler, B. Wright. 252 Alpha Phi Omega: B k R : E. Ka ac ow ar Letheby, D. Boop, Staley, J. Brammer. Front Row: R. Friehe, J. Kruger, l.. Fiehn, vice-president: J. Carlisle, adviserg C. Splichal, president: W. Contryrnan, vice-presidentg L. Davison, secretary: P. Allen. ma. J. Kontos. J. Benton, T. Van Horn, R. Boop. Second Row: D. Brown, B. Anderson, R. J. Wilbur, R. Widheim. Third Row: M. Hroch, W. Nelson. W. Sampson, R. Ruff, R. Talbot J. Alpha Phi Omega Alleviates Congestion Of State Contest Confusion of the annual high school basketball tournament found order through an information booth staffed by Alpha Phi Omega. Members directed spec- tators to seating sections while keeping accounts of the scoreboard, vital statistics and upcoming events. Assisting with Band Day, another heavily attended activity, the group directed the flow of traffic following the lowa State football game. After a brief orientation, committees conducted prospective University students through NU landmarks, classrooms and living units during a series of weekend visitation programs. Emphasizing service both on and off the campus, Alpha Phi Omega distributed information and raised funds for the Lincoln-area tuberculosis drive. ln an- other community program, the National Boy Scout honorary advised local Scout troops in special projects. Directing efforts toward confused spectators, Alpha Phi Omega's guide basketball boosters. 253 People-To-People Board: Back Row: W. Luncleen, D. Jones, J. Swanson, S. Mathews, S. Helm, P. Kot, S. Morrow. Front Row: A, l3ryar1,vice-president: E. Schlaht, secretary, J. Bucklin, presidentg B. McMullen, C. Guenzel, treasurer: W. Hall. PTP Orients Newcomers Through Cultural Projects Serving approximately 100 foreign students atten- ding the University of Nebraska, People-To-People sponsored a series of weekly parties and programs. Monthly events ranged from bowling and bridge to Christmas celebrations. Tours ofcampusand excursions to state landmarks supplemented the social schedule. To help in-coming foreign students feel welcome, members wrote letters during the summer explaining University classes and customs. Correspondence also extended an invitation to participate in PTP. With residential space at a premium, committees initiated plans for an International House located near campus to eliminate transportation problems. The com- plex promised both individual and family living units. Foreign students battle with PTP opponents as kiloitzers call Canasta plays from the side. 4 f .Egg .13 ", -:A M .ji ,nvlgigiz ' " . 3 .,:- Iii, 2 ,E Y N f ,I ,i'2gni, ' SEG el E ., .' , - 5. . .f j V A, 2:-1:' ,' - . ' '- f . ' A. Ji e 242,221 ' V ' ' . ,I af . X lg. gj:s1v,.Q'f f fs- .' ii M , ,wg i Y L.-J2 ff-gig 5 is 4-H Club Ratifies Changes ln Organizational Structure Breaking away from tradition, University 4-H Club recommended a new amendment to the constitution. The policy proposed electing officers at the beginning of second semester instead of in September. Over 200 members, making the group the largest University interest club, voted unanimously in favor of the policy. Awardingthe "Alumni Service Plaque" to Dr. Charles Adams, Professor of lVleats, the club emphasized contri- butions to 4-H objectives and programs. The East Cam- pus professor accepted the honor during recognition ceremonies at the annual scholarship banquet. Selling short orders and meals at the Nebraska State Fair provided funds for sponsoringthe 1965 Inter- national 'Farm Youth Exchange program. Sheryl Abram- son, selected forthe IFYE tour, spent six months in the Phillipines studying the agriculture of the country. ltemizing fund-raising snacks for a booth 4-H'ers plan to 'reap' a State Fair profit .- fl 'A' 7 4 f X . L 4-H Clllb: Back Row: M. Nerud, M. Carlson, D. Krajnik, D. Stricker, T. Reirners, W. Magee, W. Hake, L. Jiskra, R. Cacel, T. Cacek, R. Kelly, A. Keim, L. Jasa, S. Renken, P. Mercer, K. Schepers, H. l-lultgren. Sixth Row: R. Sinot, D. Stork, L. Svajgr, P. Harlan D. Olson, R. l-lottovy, J. Leising, T. Drudik. M. Paulsen, L. Fuchser, M. Detmer, P. Wright, C. Rickertsen, M. Paulsen, B. Richter, M. Tosentrater, B. Klingman, A. Dunn, J. Coufal. J. Anderson, A. l-lenneman. Fifth Row: B. Bailey, B. Tooker, S. Roberts, L. Erickson, L. Rogers, R. Zerr, M. Nisley, S. Zellinger, S. Huebner, S. Schick, J. Woten, L. White, M. Klingman, C. Fintel, D. Pojar, B. Wieseman. C. Gall, J. Mazour, J. Thurber, J. I-leath. Fourth Row: E. Starr, G. Plihal, L. Kastanek, R. Frost, A. Anderson, K. Cooksley, D. Rickertsen, T. Talbott, R. Wolford, K. King, R. Stohlmann, G. Libal, L. Engelkemeier, R. Secllak. Third Row: K. Hendrickson, J. Loreman, K. Fink, J. Kaufman, S. Whidden, J. Fox, L. McGill, M. Schwiser, G. Huber, F. Lockhorn, M. Maas, C. Fitz, E. Erbs, G. Wiggins, L. Anderson, L. Hodgson, W. Lundeen, L. Williams. Second Row: R. Luehrs, L. Hurd, R. Reinke, M. Erickson. L. Rudman, adviser, R. Jorgensen, G. Libal, vice-president, V. Kline, president, J. Trumble, secretary, E. George, G. Stevens, N. l-lahn, D. Holstein, sponsor: M. Hutchinson, M. Nelson, R. Becker, Front Row: J. Miller, D. Eggleston, N Sanderson, R. Force, T. Wehrbein, M. Retzlaff, J. Duba, S. Cornelius, H. Mathers, J. McDowell, D. Kucera, K. Riddle, J. i-lardessen. Delian Union: Back Row: J. Bergman, A. Hai, M. Ahmad, S. Saleh, U. Coskun. Second Row: N. Ahmad, A. Khan, R. Bergman, I. Firdosy, K. Saleh. Front Row: I. Ergin, F. Kolar, vice-president, M. Roseberry, secretary- treasurer, C.Gustin, sponsor, A. I-Iarding, president. Literary Elevation Marks Delian Union's 92nd Year As the second oldest organization on campus, the Delian Union Literary Society provided members with the opportunity for discussion of literary controversies. Participating in debates, skits and musicals, individuals of the society augmented the new program with topics ranging from world issues tolocal interest. Social functions permitted an informal exchange of ideas to integrate the intellectual atmosphere. Foreign students developed international friendship through films and slides of different countries and cultures. To voice opinions on current events, graduate as- sistants and special guests formed biweekly panels. The world population problem, new math, the space race and "Friends of SNCC" constituted the agendas. fi PE Club Speakers Reveal New Teaching Techniques Sponsoring guest lectures at regular meetings, Women's PE Club furthered interest in the different aspects of physical education. Dr. Barnawell, professor of Zoology and physiology, emphasized the importance of both mental and physical health. Revealing some tricks of success on the gridiron field, Coach Bob De- vaney stressed the value of the various sports. To stimulate group spirit, all members attended a weekend retreat with Freshmen performing kitchen chores at Camp Kiwanis. A picnic orientation and a gift-exchange Christmas party constituted other recre- ational activities. During the spring banquet the Junior girl most promising in vocational aptitude received the Mabel Lee Scholarship for Physical Education. -Le Women's P.E. Club: uf? Back Row: K. Beggs, N. O'Donnell, D. Maclay, J. Snyder, C. Stoltenberg, G. Weber, L. Blacker, L. McDanneI, S. Holman, K. Williams, L. Schaff- hausen, L. Totten, S. Gloor, L. Irving, S. Seidell. Fourth Row: P. Lewis, D. Crosby, J. Andersen, K. Sorenson, B. Jost, D. Stutheit, C. Krueger, J. Grummert, J. Donnan, B. Rarick, C. Elliott, P. Lessig, L. Schott, M. Hill, V. Arnack. Third Row: L. l-llavka, B. Buckles, D. Jones, B. Stahl, S. Elliott, B. N J. K d N. Z b I P. W b t S. Sh 'd V. W 'd k ll L. A d L. Manstedt N. Converse, D. Fuller. Second Row: N. Shaw, B ass, u era, a e, e s er, en an, ei en e er, n erson, , I - . Johnson, J. Martin, C. Moseke, E. Augustyn, C. Chapman, J. Baxter, S. Frasier, B.. Smayda, J. McDonald, V. Light, L.Wiser1, S. Wallin. Front Row: M. Forbes, S. Snyder, M. Penney, adviser, S. Miller, adviser, B. Weaver, J. Aylor, vice-president, M. McCartney, president, D. Ashton, department chairman, L. Baumbach, secretary, J. Lavelle, C. Compton, E. Berck, R. Levinson. Council On Religion: t Back Row: C. Kramer, D. Field, I.. Meyer, A. McCallum. Front Row: D. Weimer, vice p e dentg J. Ransom, presldentg M. Rose- berry, secretary, W. Prange. treasurer. COR Unifies Denominations Through Theology Courses To coordinate more than 20 study groups of the separate religious houses, the Council On Religion com- piled a brochure listing all available courses. By urging members to sign up for the classes, COR cultivated un- derstanding among denominational organizations. "lnvest Your Summer" offered manyjob opportun- ities to students interested in semi-voluntary work on both a local and a national basis. The program encour- aged colliegiates to participate as advisers and leaders in camps sponsored by various church-affiliated groups. Well-known author of "The Gospel According to Peanuts," Robert Short, presented the University with a fresh view of theology. The COR lecturer explained the advantages of cartoons to express clerical tenets. ,fd Foreign Students Find Unity Through NlA's Orientations Striving to serve the University, the Nebraska In- ternational Association promoted social and cultural relations among various areas of the world. The annual presentation of "Cultures on Campus" acquainted stu'- dents and faculty with the customs and fashions of all the different countries represented at NU. Social dances provided informal atmosphere for orienting newcomers. ln cooperation with People-To-People, NIA collected outdated and unused books and sent the textbooks to foreign schools as supplementary library references. Cookbooks compiled and sold by members at the YWCA Bazaar paid the postage and shipping expenses. The Gourmet recipes filled a buffet-style menu as the inter- national chefs cooked varieties of homeland specialities. Practicing sales pitches for NIA's cookbook, Exec members visualize financial increments. 257 Athletics -"D 5. A . , I K ' A K 1. 'x .,v ' A-4 acui- f -461-4 --1-.--. V .0 vb" .. , R- . ' 4':.'.r,'..wff wr ' -' - L 4, , ...vi ,Ml r.,.1 h.J,." .v 1 f 51 "!xx"4,'1V ,- ',,.'j4-'ir"f'-'Z A J.. :J :.,,,,, .We 1 Af. if - ., ..i,"L-.-,-',-,331-f r . '5 fi . -'EWU' gk ' 1 -. qQ'y,i:l,K:Ag4? -NW-Q-5'-f Ja. , ..-if",-' 'H' J ,5,:.f. -. .3 ,Q ' ""'f.g:I.,,:4-I 'xr-A X' .-7,1 v f rm., .f -K 1 Q- an , -,,-.V pw 1 9 4 - 'I : . , W1 I 11 rv , 5 r, Q J " 'Urn ' AM I!-7. li- mf- I Mt..-f' .-. I. ,5- .'.- X ,law :Et V fligp QW V , ,3- rn 'hh 'Truim .fb ' sv ,. . .,.L is A :-,- ,. Q rf? .if WSL ' ' 3345: aiu. -1 711-F5 5: . '- .. ,.. , .1 gllfglfh., .1-s '1 A, Im. " -Q If , W ,Mft I v.-N V V ' .. -Ax. ,, ", x . .f4- ' -'f' If 1.2. . Q 1- .' - M. sr M lr , ,. v . ,. 7, R. ' - -.. 5 'I h A Ag . QW . -xv 'f'f'1'.' "1 ' ' uw. 5.1 Ts,-'sq .iiirixyjfx ' J 43' . 'A 5 ,nd , ffavgf fri, R ,ffwvn-3?n 4 s AQ.-152-1 '1 260 viz-- -my ,U . 9 f x v an v f qv. Q r -x -.-nu.-k-4,1 Lp: 5, PM 1 KWW1: ,u :L f , ,..,f-ggi, w . Iv A yay,-. 1. .,, ax- , 4 ,--I ff A -' Hvgf . . H, ,,g,..4 aw gm :EQ Ia H2 W as-- ai 5 af, x - -, W Y R x s. k4, . If.. .-.-.J Q N a .- rx 'ff ff ..-. .-X, 9. .Lx.,,. - ,girl-" Q ,. 7, ...A- 1 n '..,:.,,- f. -, J, .1...-- Ju me-n If . ..,,, :Ny "' -' -' ,M H" Q. ' 3.1" --Q' f. V:-M ...HL ..:-" ' -' ' W " - -ayny., T X -- 'Y 'W ...ff-,3'71,, g.: f- JJ .. A 'N-" ' .. ' A.?.'.1'.-'. " .. " -.- ,f...,'N' ,mag J. 1, ,,.. 'FS-f T- . .4- ,,. -'--. 'N 4 -, , J 1 ff 4 , nv, ...,. .NN K. . A.,-, 4- ..,. 4 4 y A' . . 1.- ... 1 -nu, . 4. ,J x, . , , " 'Q . -,Q .y 9 Q 4 ,- lfvlvwi W "1 ' of f V . .Q i A .' Q fx ' J , , uri A - . 4 QT! . ,Tl 58 93' f N. y- -. ' f. 1 . 1.v.,,n, L vu f su .41 4 -..',.-: D' ",..u v-' .- ,-.,. 'ur AQ' ,ff-J .. ,av -V .4- ' -- SP4 'K..fA '1- K "X, N, f x " 1 pw Q I 421' , 2 4 yu. , Jw - - , , W . Hg., ,W . -it 4. A v v ,:. if .-.A N' ,I V , . 1- - 'i .wg 'r' Lit- ' ' 1 13:1 kv, 4 . L, A N. 7Y x :ya " f f .,,w. ff?-3, o fbi. hx J- -i 13' -. 1,, . i ix Q Q, ,. ,mag , J -. ' , , F! . , hi 6 f 1 . : "iffy 1 1 ' , , :- S i"- , -:x ,bfi . . , . .. X, :- 1: A . X H . - it - my Ji, f fu, ,ww 'A' , , , .. i A Y . , A 3-A .74 V - " .. 5'- 'z . . '.-,- N .-, ' 54-N--f ds:37"' Y , 'wh . A-Q J ' 3' - ZZ' 'fy ,-f - 4 ' if vm , mi. L J ' ' 1 x 1 1 1 , . I if +-W 4. 'fy f 1:11 f A .9 K M. 1 1 Q "' . ,.,1 ., ,,.. My , Av -as 'w '-11+ ,ff -2+ ' 1,.- f p, -f' 'ins '- .'-' wwf" V gl, N 1., 5 ,- Q ' . ' SP' H ,O ,U 3, .Eb fn, . -if . " muff ' 'rn' 5, t N 4 v ' -. -A fn K . f A 1,1 -X." . Q., I V0 , ' f 4 1 L r : . 7 1 x I . . ' - ' 7 fig ' E r - "' I 'fl 5 ' -' if f 'lik QQ' 5 5 ' ' A' , frijl ff l , J - 1 HH. - M 1 ' l lIl 1, J ' f, 15, -14" - , ffHff!Lffr,,h" AI 11 ,..? 1 if , . . 1 V i 0 ,ln-V.,-A1.n,,,.g?1?! ' .Q -,f.. . '2 - ri . 1- .EQ":11lw,'-'!ff:,'7, w'4iY'?'?:5i"' . -4.1 zzz: uzldi-1:fha-v11Sf,'a-Y- ,. 5' iff "'fffE't?:fmir:5j:1vf.1'1-5"A 453 1" "1 JZEQLQ - -5 v-gf -.wr ,r-..- Q, A, ,urg- .W Y. 9 .,:.,. -. 14,45 Qu P' I, .W fvjft,-5v,QT5fy?,.,..f s. xv , , 1 :- 4- r V -ff: .F :-"- ,f g 6. ..'-"EJ 7 nl If" 1 f ' f 1 ,'?' , rv I ' 'fl 1 uf" f f I 1 ,- I j5,' 1 5, IA, ' , ,ff A 1. ,. f f I . I I f f , ' 1 ' 1 If i .. : 54 if ig! f all f' n 1' z P4 I 3 1 J. R. I .f : fe V iii 1, ' 'Q e ,li Kick returns by Frank Solicn alternately yield yardage and injuries demanding "canesmanship." Dejected by defeat with mission unaccomplished, NU gridders conclude a still successful season. Surf, Sun and Bowl Game Draw NU Followers South Husker fans flocked to Miami by the thousands for Nebraska's fourth straight bowl appearance. Shortly after the mass migration ended, a second started as Nebraskans headed directly for sunny Florida beaches. With the light changing from natural to artificial, Big Red fans prepared for a "night on the town" at any one of IVliami's many plush night clubs or steak houses. The city "opened up" days before January 31 and ac- commodated anyone with the necessary ID-MONEY. As "the night" drew near, the tempo increased and the parties intensified in size and volume, culminating with the ONE on New Year's Eve. After a rowdy welcome by visitors and natives alike, New Year's Day arrived- a day of recovery, upsets and the National Championship. Nebraskans watched in a state of shock as the Corn- huskers played catch-up all the way, finally bowing in defeat. Following the game came two-thousand miles in thirty hours as students returned for Monday classes. 267 Third Consecutive Addition Pushes Stadium to 63,000 In the wake of another banner season, the Athletic Department made plans for the third consecutive year of stadium construction. The 1966 addition, enclosing the north end, gave Memorial Stadium 5000 more seats and the largest seating capacity in the Big Eight. Rivaling the success ofthe gridiron season, NU's cage team piled up victories and attendance records. Overflowing crowds pushed ticket sales to the highest mark in 15 years and brought mid-season changes in the number of reserve seats and methods ofdistribution. With the outdoor track blocked off and all home meets eliminated, the Board of Regents studied the relocation of the quarter-mile oval. A committee sug- gested sites east ofthe Fieldhouse or on East Campus. William Dye, Athletic Director 68 Skipping dinner to guarantee front-row seats, early arrivals stock up for a three-hour wait. l 1'-Tv,q1i.f' . " vi ,N 1" 1' -iftl-1!f,,w- 1.Zrg5,r,':.'44'fQ,S?f? l W 2 It .2f1rf."fs1--4 l ,I O ll -,irxtz I 1 'S -' . 5-,X 5 1-,'347,, we . . - ft' James Pittenger, Assistant Athletic Director 1 l..,,. NE ,, r J ' -it fi .Ziff i ll '- 1-A "uw . ,fr v vw. mu 914504 mmm Sophomores Play Key Role In All-Sports Football Clash Driving for two touchdowns in the final quarter, sophomore Charlie 'Choo Choo' Winters led the Red unit to a 37-26 victory in the traditional All-Sports Day clas- sic. Ernie Sigler opened the scoring with two touchdown 'bombs' to fellow soph Dennis Richnafsky as the Whites surged to a 13-7 first quarter margin. White defenders killed Red drives on a pass inter- ception by Ron Pappas and a fumble recovery by Al Kuehl. The Reds bounced back to a 15-14 half-time lead and carried the momentum into the final period as Wayne Weber and Winters hit paydirt enroute to victory. Husker cindermen tasted defeat for the first time on the outdoor circuit as Colorado breezed by Nebraska 97-45 in the All-Sports Day battle. With victories in the 100, 220, 880 and 440 yard relay, the Scarlet and Cream rolled to a 42-37 edge on the track, but Big Red could muster only three points in the field while CU's Golden Buffaloes compiled a total of 60. All Sports Day Scores Football Reds Whites 37 26 Track NU OPP- 45 97 N - -. Jim Beltzer climbs into third on the final toss as form and determination provide the margin. Bob Cburchich drops back to the protection of the pocket while Red receivers fake and break. 269 Cipriano Guides Basketball To Record Breaking Year Joe Cipriano added basketball to NU's list of sports on the rise by leading the cagers to the first winning season in 16 years. "Slippery Joe's" tactics renewed pride in the sport and drew record crowds to the Coli- seum. Scribes rewarded Cipriano with the Big Eight Coach of the Year award after the NU mentor guided the Huskers to a second place conference finish. NU's baseballers made a run at the title as Coach Tony Sharpe's diamond crew returned to first division. The Huskers dealt Missouri two losses but dropped to second when Colorado swept a pair from NU. Frank Sevigne continued to develop top-notch thinclads with several individuals attracting national attention. Ten straight football victories brought the third consecutive Big Eight Coach of the Year award to Bob Devaney. The perfect regular season awarded NU the Big Eight title and a number three national ranking. Orval Borgialli, Wrestling Joe Cipriano, Basketball 5.9 assess in CROOK Frank Sevigne Track Ed Higginbotham, Tennis Dick Klass, Swimming O L ,. Wwe ,,5 ' -1 iw -NJ -Q-O3 Tony Sharpe, Baseball Robert Devaney, Football Jake Geier, Gymnastics Harry Good, Golf Foofboll .... Boskefboll. Wrestling .. Gymnosfics ..... Swimming. Track. ..... . Bosebcill . .. Golf ......... Tennis ...... 1965-66 Records ssistant Coaches l ! , r f4Ds 'If 1:- Mike Corgan Cletus Fischer Bob Gates Ike Hanscom Football Football Basketball Track 5 -fa--9, Carl Selmer George Kelly Don Langdon Tom Osborne Football Gymnastics Football . ,gg "" 9' ' - It 1 -cl - 1 gl 'E , ., ,H 'F 5 ifsifiifs X, if 'i X -1. 'ff'9EE'fxELZ1"3 .iffl :el . - f2f.ssm.ifszfffl Glenn Potter Les Roberts Jim Ross Basketball Svvlmmung Football 272 Football U' 'N Club' Rides To Victory With Help Of 'Biased Refs' Pitting beauty and brawn in an annual contest, N Club and Tassels dueled for supremacy on the basket- ball court. Aided by N Club referees, the football let- termen struggled past the weaker sex in a last second victory. Complying with the new Big Eight Conference regulations, monogram winners escorted game officials on and off the floor at all home basketball games. With finalists for N Club Sweetheart as guests at the date dinner, the group announced officers-elect and recognition awards. During the festivities, members crowned Georgia Merriam as the 1965 Sweetheart. Traditional Scarlet and Cream activities kept ini- tiates busy. In addition to selling western ties for the Bill Vincent Fund, the athletes voluntarily formed a work detail for the Lincoln Children's Zoo. XX ' Taking time out between presentation duties Sweetheart finalists await the official results N Club: Back row: Lynn Headley, Gail McAdams, Reg Scieton, Dale Parker, Ken Miller, Dave Frank, Tom Tipton. Third row: Dennis Walker, Keefe Lodwig, Harry Wilson, Coley Webb, Lynn Senkbeil, Bob l-lergenrader, Ron Fecht. Second row: Larry Wach- holtz, Bob Churchich, Richard Beran, John Scheer, Don Frazier, Jim Smith, Tom Nickerson. Front row: Tony Jeter, Sergeant- at-arrns: John Burchill, secretary-treasurer, Bill l-laug, vice-presidentq Bill Johnson, social chairman: Francis Allen, president, Freeman White, public relations, Bob Stickels. 1 1. NU Finishes 10-0 Year, Ranks Third In Wire Polls Perfect for the first time in 50 years, the Corn- huskers rattled off 10 straight wins while clinching the third straight loop crown and fourth consecutive bowl if appearance. The largest squad in NU annals set a 32- point scoring pace, led the nation in rushing and fin- ished second in total offense, gaining 4040 yards. Chosen by the prognosticators as the elite among college football teams, the Huskers racked up foe after foe and never dropped lower than fourth in the wire service rankings. The Scarlet gridders scored three consecutive shut out victories and rallied three times for come-from-behind conquests on the road to 10-0. Lineman Walt Barnes bagged consensus AlI-Ameri- can honors, while ends Freeman White and Tony Jeter earned accolades from several selectors. Associated Press chose eight members of the nationally ranked Huskers for the 22 man first unit of the All-Big Eight Demonstrating the 'spirit of the Cornhuskers 5ClU3d and thfee Others for the 59C0l'ld team- Bolo Devaney brings the fight to the sidelines Varsity Football: Back Row: D. Carlson, J. Murphy, J. Patton, l.. Narish, l.. Coleman, W, Barnes, R. Czap, R. Kirkland, C. Stith, I. Zimmer, P. Tatman, F. White, l.. Hansen. Fourth Row: B. Taucher, J. Brown, T. Jeter, A. Kuehl, J. Osberg, l.. Allers, l..Ser1kbeil, K. Car- stens, l.. Casey, J. McCord, R. Kudrna, R. Hoasoh, G. Brichacek. Third Row: K. Peterson, E. Siegler, M. Mueller, W. Weber, l.. Janik, D. Drum, T. Smith, D. Richnafsky, M, Kimmel, W. Meylan, M. Ziegler, B. Churchich, B. Alvarez. Second Row: S. Grell, B. Gregory, D. Thorell, B. Johnson, K. Brunk, M. Kennedy, T. Pappas, F. Ducla, B. l-lill, M. Worley, F. Solich, R. Poggemeyer, H. Wilson. Front Row: E. Johnson, student manager, L. Wachholtz, T. Vactor, J. Melton, coach, J. Ross..coach, G. Kelly, coach, R. Devaney, head coach, C. Selmer, coach, M. Corgan, coach, T. Osborne, coach, G. Sullivan, trainer, D. Bryant, sports information director. 4 1-auf Alone on a trip to the enemy camp, TCU's Kent Nix receives the official Blackshirt greeting. Shooting through an opening in the AF line, Frank Solich cuts inside on a quick opener. TEXAS CHRISTIAN: Rated number one in the pre-season polls, Nebraska moved well on offense in the opening game to crush Texas Christian University 34-14. The Cornhuskers racked up 384 yards rushing with 134 yards in the air and 21 first downs. Scarlet followers watched NU's offense click for two quick touchdowns as Bob Churchich fired a pair of look-ins to All-American candidate Freeman White. White snagged eight passes for the day as Churchich hit nine of seventeen attempts and Ron Kirkland paced the Husker ground game with 93 yards. The Horned Frogs gained only 15 aerial yards, but the rushing game netted 149 and two touchdowns to keep the Southwest Conference invaders within strik- ing distance until late in the encounter. Football Record Nebf. Opp, 34 Texas Christian ........,................. ....... 1 4 27 Air Force ....... ....... 1 7 44 Iowa State ..... .... 0 37 Wisconsin ...... .... O 41 Kansas State .... ....... 0 38 Colorado ....... ....... 1 3 16 Missouri ........... ...... 1 4 42 Kansas .............. ...... 6 21 Oklahoma State ...... ...... 1 7 21 Oklahoma .......... ....... 9 2 2 AIR FORCE: Flying through Falcon defenses for three quick touchdowns, Nebraska rolled toward victory but needed to fight off a desperate aerial barrage to win 27-17. Frank Solich ran 80 yards to paydirt on the first offensive play and the Huskers raced to a 21-O lead before most migrating fans completed the traffic-jam tour from Denver. Sophomore field general Paul Stein rejuvenated the sputtering attack of the slow starting cadets, driving downfield with 8 of 11 pass completions to pull within four points. Seven minutes later Solich bolted 40 yards through bewildered defenders for the clinching six-pointer. The sprint pushed the little scat- back's output to 205 yards and erased former Husker Bobby Reynolds' 15-year-old game rushing record. IOWA STATE: Romping to a 44-O win in the NU Big Eight season opener, the Huskers handed iowa State the worst beating by a Nebraska team since 1922. Larry Wachholtz paved the way for the first Cornhusker touch- down early in the second quarter by returning a punt from the midfield stripe to the ISU 4-yard line. Putting the game out of reach for Iowa State, Big Red engi- neered three tallies in an explosive third quarter after breezing to a 16-0 half-time lead, Padding the score Nebraska marched 47 yards in eleven plays for the final TD of the game. While the Husker machine amassed an impressive total of 497 yards, NU's Black- shirts held the Cyclones to 77 yards total offense and stopped ISU short of Cornhusker territory all afternoon. Choosing to play the ball instead of the man Larry Wachholtz thwarts a Wisconsin drive NU Iinemen stop defenders short of the pocket while Fred Duda waits for the pattern to open. 76 xi' ,411 .jf 1 ' 34' -.ff .- 'F 'l N13 Ignoring a Kansas State defender, Charlie Winters drives for extra yards and a first down. WISCONSIN: Trampling Wisconsin 37-O, Nebraska crossed the goal more times in one day than any Big Eight team in twelve previous encounters with the Badgers since 1895. Quarterback Fred Duda stunned WU early by setting up one TD with a 28-yard pass to Tony Jeter and scoring another with a 59-yard option play. Larry Wachholtz increased the Husker lead with a 24-yard field goal and two touchdown-producing punt returns. The final Cornhusker tally came with only 38 seconds remaining on a 13-yard dash by Ben Gregory. Posting the fourth victory of the season, the Scarlet and Cream amassed 381 yards and held the Badgers to 142 total yards. Fifty-six Husker players saw action as Coach Bob Devaney displayed Big Red's depth. KANSAS STATE: With Harry Wilson bulling 72 yards and Fred Duda passing for 103 yards, NU whitewashed the Kansas State Wildcats 41-O. A clipping penalty pre- vented Nebraska from scoring in the final seconds of the first period, but Wilson romped in on the first play of the second quarter. Quarterback Duda joined the ranks of the scorers late in the second period to put the Scarlet in front 21-O. The scoring parade continued as the Huskers put the game out of reach with Pete Tatman and Charlie Winters breaking loose for two touchdowns apiece. The Wildcats deepest penetration came in the final period when a drive went to the 13- yard line, but hardnosed play by Walt Barnes, Kaye Carstens and Lou Narish held the Kansans scoreless. 2 COLORADO: League-leading scorer Frank Rogers booted two field goals to keep CU in the thick of the scrap for 14 minutes before Nebraska exploded with a Fred Duda-to-Freeman White aerial bomb. The 95-yard pass play established school and conference records and sent Nebraska on the way to a 38-13 conquest. After the home run bolstered the lead to 14 points, NU paraded into the end zone twice more to earn a 25-point halftime bulge. The vaunted Blackshirt defense weak- ened late in the final stanza to permit the first TD in 17 quarters. National punt return leader Larry Wach- holtz scurried 111 yards and the Huskers' air attack gained 223 yards as the Scarlet prepped for the long- awaited "championship battle" with Missouri. IVIISSOURI: Lightning struck twice in six minutes at the 'Pit' in Columbia, as Bengal thrusts set Nebraska sprawl- ing with a 14 point first quarter deficit. The Huskers managed just two offensive plays while marching Nlizzou tallied two rapid-fire touchdowns. Then the na- tion's number two ranked team retaliated with full force in the second period, but a missed extra point and a scoreless third quarter left the Scarlet and Cream trail- ing with eleven minutes remaining. Nebraska marched goalward with the 15-yard assistance of a Tiger's com- plaint and Larry Wachholtz atoned for the earlier missed kick with a 26-yard field goal. The Cornhusker 16-14 victory tumbled the hosts from the Big Eight league lead and left Big Red with a perfect 7-O record. 1 i i l Sweeping past defenders, Ron Kirkland shoots the gap into Buffalo territory 8 Pete Tatman sights pay dirt ahead as a tide of Husker linemen roll back IVlizzou's defense. I 279 O Charging Cornhusker 'Blackshirts' deflect a Bill Fenton pass to force a KU fourth-down punt. KANSAS: Waltzing to a 42-6 margin, Nebraska used devastating overland drives to rip the Jayhawk defense for 510 yards and 28 first and tens. An early fourth down gamble set the pattern as the Huskers rushed for nearly a quarter-mile. En route to the winner's circle sore-footed Larry Wachholtz booted six extra points to tie the 55-year old varsity record for season PAT's. Ron Kirkland pranced 147 yards and 13 other- backs carried the ball through gaping holes opened by the interior offensive line. The crunching blocks and crisp tackles paved the way for three third-period tallies. With the 36-point advantage, Coach Bob Devan- ey planning for the future, cleared the bench and sent 36 members of the Scarlet reserves into battle. OKLAHOMA STATE: Fullback Pete Tatman burst into the endzone 38 seconds before the final gun to cap a fifteen play march and-hand NU a 21-17 victory. Fired- up OSU retaliated with a last-ditch drive, but NU's defense staved off the assault five yards short of paydirt. Oklahama State struck first by grabbing an NU bobble and charging eight yards to score in the first quarter. Nebraska's offensive machine assumed command 14-7 by sandwiching two six-points around the halftime intermission. The never-say-die Cowboys revived to tally ten fourth-period points for a 17-14 lead. Big Red then chewed up 75 yards and five minutes en route to the winning TD and Orange Bowl appear- ance against defending national kingpin, Alabama. Deep in TD country, an end grabs thin air, as NU's blanket defense tangles OS dreams. OKLAHOMA: Completing the first unbeaten season in fifty years, the 1965 Cornhuskers whipped Oklahoma 21-9 in the third come-from-behind victory of the sea- son. The Sooners capitalized on early Husker miscues to lead 9-O with less than ten minutes remaining in the first half. Under the direction ofjunior quarterback Bob Churchlch, Big Red bounced back to narrow the half- time gap 9-7. The tally came on a twenty-nine yard scamper by Charlie Winters. Half-back Harry 'Wilson spark-plugged the final Nebraska scoring drives, cross- ing the goal line twice on a 66-yard dash and a 38-yard pass from Churchlch. Completely dominating second- half play, the Scarlet and Cream finished the game with 411 total yards while holding OU to 229. "Bottled up" by a host of Sooner defenders Charlie Winters shifts into high and scores 22 ,11- -it ., M1 f 1 1. 'A , iL 2. 73 Freshmen Football: Back Row: L. Gooclenough, student manager: C. Fischer. assistant coach: D. Beechner, assistant Coach: L. Kramer, assis- tant coach: R. Gaddini, assistant coach: J. Melton, head coach: R. Inbody, student trainer, Fifth Row: S. Jarrnon, T. Casbeer R. Lints, L. Korpisch, C. McCarthy. R. Ahlschwede, W. Hornbacher, S. Buda. R. Best, B. Daiss. Fourth Row: K. Kusserow G. Thompson, R. Moore, J. Armstrong, F. Patrick, C. Ashman, M. Uzendoski, G. Johnson, J. Watson, Third Row: S. Goldberg L. Young, M. Brichacek, J. McFarland, J. Buda, N. Yannon, M. Raynondi, D. Kobza, R. Gustaff. Second Row: D. Galbraith R. Sheleheda, L. Rost, A. Fiala, R. Stigge, L. Cooper, M. Wynn, K. Quinten, S. Beechner. Front Row: J. Marsh, T. Penney D. Hartman, B. Harding, B. Liggett, L. Pearson, D. Davis, M. Green, T. Jubeck. Share of First Loop Title 'T -Q With three triumphs in four games, the Husker freshmen gridders kept a habit in the family by match- ing the varsity's conference crown. The loss eliminated an undisputed title, but the Frosh tied Kansas for the Big Eight's first official junior championship. Averaging 36 points per game the Scarlet swept past Kansas State, Kansas and Iowa State. A strong Missouri squad, however, broke down the Husker scor- ing machine and handed the yearlings a 14-6 defeat. Leading scorer Dick Davis and Tom Penney paced , the rushing game while Frank Patrick directed the neophtes' dangerous air game. Place-kicker Dennis Galbraith added 29 points, including 14 of 15 PAT's while punter Joe Armstrong averaged 40 yards per try. 145 Knocked out of bounds by ML.J's last defender, Bob Moore sets up a Husker scoring plunge Yearling Gridders Capture , -4 4...-3,-:ef-"'e" ' 2,1 'L W'T'E wp , , ,1, Q. I .V -.,,. I, A V , lm Lay I gi H . N . " 1- 'T' ' vb' V. -I ' .' Q 4 ' W ln H ,YV , ' H di W ' . , . f A use Q... , -iii! J, X, ,g t . .., 5 s-" A f I ". ' .-41' --.ak '- It - 'f ' V a I 14 ' -.Q - - ,MV W' .. ' A -1 - ,,A a . 53, . E L 49' ' xt' A W- V i an Y gif r "Tk QQ! ,Q ,, ' ,Q "'if"'zE W 2 .V A 1 -f-. ., , - W ---' ,,,. ,Li 4 1- W T Q V . ' .' . 1 1. ' Yi i :Aw Z . ,, '.-'-,j.- ' ' :E X a ' . 3 - 1, -V " . . - I - ze... t Blitzing through the offensive line, Frosh Mike Wynn zeros in on Iowa States signal caller. KANSAS STATE: Coach John Melton extended a person- al winning string as NU's frosh debuted with a 34-14 triumph. Melton's 22nd consecutive victory featured a 21-14 halftime margin as quarterback Frank Patrick netted 242 total yards, hitting 11 of 15 passes and rushing 11 times. Omahan Dick Davis mauled defenses for 116 yards, scoring three touchdowns while Tom Penney added another TD on a 90-yard ramble. The biggest statistical edge was in the ground game where the yearlings outdistanced KSU's apprentices 379-19. MISSOURI: Kicking off a weekend doubleheader, the Husker frosh bowed to Missouri 14-6 in the Tigers lair. The loss, before a host of migrating fans, snapped an eight game winning streak and evened the season slate at 1-1. Little Red held off the Missourians statistically, but the Bengals cashed in on two fumbles and two interceptions to notch the victory. MU capitalized on a 53-yard pass play to set up the game's first score. Nebraska retaliated with six as Frank Patrick threaded the needle on a 14-yard pass to Sherwin Jarmon. KANSAS. Spotting the Junior Jayhawks three points early in the contest, Nebraska battled back to rout the invaders 28-3. The freshmen tallied two times in quick fashion late in the second stanza and clinched the verdict with markers in each of the final periods. The Cornhuskers, paced by 195-pound fullback Dick Davis, handled the Kansans statistically gaining two yards for each one by the opponents. ln the first half alone Davis snagged a touchdown pass, ran six yards for another TD and carried the ball 16 times for 132 yards. Freshman Football Record NU Opp. 34 Kansas State ..................................... ....... I 4 6 Missouri ......... ....... I 4 28 Kansas ....... .... 3 41 Iowa State ...... .... 8 r Y 1 ' it-1 W1 is ., 125 ,.- .Ji ,K -,, 4' f --- 2 " Signal caller Frank Patrick spots a receiver tnwarting the Junior Jays recl-clogging attempt IOWA STATE: Racing untouched on a 75-yard punt return, Bob Best sent Nebraska on the way to a half dozen TD's and a 41-8 victory over ISU. The Cyclones converted two NU miscues into scores to move with in two points late in the second stanza. Husker giant Frank Patrick then hit five straight passes, the fifth a touchdown strike with only six seconds remaining. The Nubbins dominated the first half statistical columns and took command on the scoreboard with three more tallies in the second 30 minutes. Executing a perfect inward one and one half Terry Tice aide a Husker win over K-State. 284 Swimmers Rewrite Marks ln Loop And Dual Matches Setting three Big Eight records and tying another, Nebraska's swimming team finished third in the Confer- ence meet, 4V2 points behind second place Kansas. Cornhusker tankers, posting a 6-8 record in the regular season meets, broke five varsity marks and tied one. Aided by first place honors in the 50 and 100 yard freestyles, Keefe Lodwig led team scoring with 20 points in the conference match and l29V2 for the year. Dave Frank ranked second in season scoring with 71 points and contributed 11 points in the loop meet. Pacing Husker divers, sophomore Steve Sorensen captured second and third place in one and three meter dives in the conference race. The 400 yard freestyle relay team, composed of Lodwig, Rich Gordon, and co- captains Tom Nickerson and Frank, splashed to a 3:14.7 victory in Big Eightchampionship competition. Freestyle specialist Don Frazier times the dive to perfection, gaining precious seconds in the final lap of the medley relay. l if'-4---p . ,.., if . ..- L Swimming Record NU 84 Wisconsin STaTe ..... 20 Wisconsin ........ 84 Winona Stale .... 54 Kansas Sfafe .... 38 Kansas ............. 38 Southern illinois. 63 Oklahoma Stale .... 43 Macalester ....... 36 Minnesota ..... 69 Missouri ..... 32 Oklahoma .... 68 Colorado .... 22 Iowa ......... 28 Iowa Stale .... l P if "f-fri-1--,511 +P- ,- Opp. .....l7 74 .,....67 . .... 41 ....26 ....73 67 Sa ,, e - 3,3 .....56 57 32 52 59 26 63 Varsity Swimming: Back Row: Parker, Dale, Withrow, Taylor: Gleisburg, Robert, Lod-wig, Keefe, Frazier, Don, Gaeth, Kem Jackson, Mike, Tice, Terry, Nickerson, Torn, co-captain. Row 2: Liggett, Lee, Sutton, Doug, Marotz, Loy, Manager, Mills, Estel, Diving Coach, Dick Klass, Head Coach,'Robets, Les, Assistant Coach: Anderson, Roy, Manager, McAdams, Gayle. Front Row: Prentiss, John, Sorensen, Steve: Burchill, Jong Steel, Bill, Goetz, Steve, Gordon, Rich: Miller, Ken, Frank, Dave, co-captain. 28 5 Team Spirit In Loop Meet Sparks NU Mat Campaign Rebounding from a losing season to sneak past conference rivals, Cornhusker matmen finished fifth in the Big Eight meet behind national powers from Gklahoma, Oklahoma State and Iowa State. All NU grap- plers failed to reach the finals, but Nebraska racked up 15 points on Jerry Langdon's consolation victory and preliminary wins by Carel Stith and Ron Thon. Winning justthree matches, the wrestlers struggled through a losing campaign with 14 defeats. The team suffered from a bad ankle injury to captain Rick All- good and forfeited several matches due to a lack of men to fill the billets. Junior heavyweight Carel Stith won nine and lost two for the best mark on the team to bring Stith's two-year individual record to 23-4-1. Over the top and battling to assume command John I-lallgren grapples for an advantage point Varsity Wrestling: . Back Row: Hildenbrandt. Ron, Dobson, Duane: Hutchins, Alfred, Borgialli, Orvai, head coach, Stangle, Rick, Miller, Rich- ard, Cone, Tom. Second Row: Garcia, Ralph, Chin, Dennis, Allgoqd, Rick, Langdon, Jerry, Schroer, oe, Thon, Ron. Front Row: Kant, Bill, assistant coach: Gaylor. I-larry: Thompson, Leif: Stlth, Carol, Barencis, Benq Hallgren, John: Oswald, Bob, manager, 286 Piling up riding time, John Hallgren scraps for points in 167-pound action. In a desperate situation, an NU wrestler fights to stifle a final attempt for a sudden reversal. Wrestling Record NU Opp. 27 Omaha University .... ...... l O il Kansas State ...... ...... 1 8 14 lowa State ...... ...... l 5 O Oklahoma ............,...... ..,... 2 7 3 Colorado State College ..... ,..,.. 3 2 6 Wyoming ........,........... ...... 3 l 9 Minnesota ....... ..... ....., 2 2 l l Mankato State ....... ...... 2 0 5 Colorado ........ ...... 3 4 l2 Indiana State ...... ...... 2 7 O Iowa State ........... ...... 4 5 28 South Dakota .......... ...... l 3 5 South Dakota State .......... ...... 2 9 I I Northwest Missouri State ...... ...... 2 0 14 Missouri ........................ ...... 2 l 3 Colorado .................................. ...... 2 A Fifth in Big Eight Meet 287 288 Mastering the techniques of workmg Nebraska s Rach Baren completes the Varsity Gymnastics: Back row:.E. Allen: S. May: M. Johnsen: L.. Krueger: I.. Bills: J. Hurd: M. Haskover: D. Bonpeu: B. Christopherson: T. Traver: G. Sedervicius: J. Howard. Second row: D. Cutshall: J. Shadley: T. Van Horn: M. Sisel: D. Wilcox: V. Stone: D. Strough: J. Govaerts, F. Troia: J. Cuitak: D. Smith: B. Cutshall. Front row: D. Langdon, freshmen coach: L. Foster: A. Armstrong: D. Brewer: J. Inness: J. Scheer: J. Hessen: R. Eeran: P. McGill: B. Jones: R. Snotoro: J. G. Geier, head coach. Gaining momentum for a back flip dismount off the still rings, a Nebraska gymnast swings through the routine's final phase. Gymnastics Record NU Opp. 155 Fort Hayes State .... ..... 1 43112 145 Kansas Sfafe ...... 96V2 157 Mankato State ...... .. 175V2 152V2 Minnesota ....... ..... 1 65V2 150V2 Wichita ....... ..... 1 30V2 165 Oklahoma ..... ..... 1 18 165 Iowa Staie ........... ..... 1 89112 152 Air Force Academy ........ 168V2 152 Colorado ............... .... 1 62 165 Kansas ..... .... 1 73 Fourth in Big Eighf Meet 289 Cagers Sneak Past Rivals Into Big Eight Second Slot Nebraska's Cinderella roundball squad amazed pre-season experts by winning 20 and losing five to rank llth in the UPl's final poll. Molding the team around a fast break offense and pressing defense, Coach Joe Cipriano fused sophomore talent with upper- class experience to carry the Huskers to national rank- ings and the runner-up spot in the Big Eight. Serving notice of things to come, the Scarlet and Cream won six of seven contests before Christmas and advanced to the pre-season tourney finals for the first time. In the Big Eight flag race, the Huskers set the pace with a 10-O mark before forfeiting title chances with a pair of road losses to Kansas and Colorado. Team captain Grant Simmons gained All-Confer- ence honors and Nate Branch received honorable mention for All-American. Rookies Tom Baack and Stu Lantz added spark to the club. Baack hit 34 straight free throws, finishing the year with 851, accuracy and eclipsed the sophomore record with 386 points. Varsity Basketball: Back Row: G. Potter, coach: W. Campbell, A. Reiners, F. Empkey, S.l..ar1tz B o ch J C p n head ach Second Row G S D. Davidson, N. Branch, C. Stone, C. Webb, T. Baack, J. Clark, trainer. 0 o D F Hare R S 90 X ,I Slowing down the action, Jim Damm gives teammates time to scramble up an OSU fast break 71 70 75 77 71 69 92 61 76 82 82 83 86 45 85 81 81 71 70 70 73 88 85 Kansas forward Ron Franz goes high off the board to tie-up the rebound with jumping-jack Nate Branch. Basketball Record Nebr. Opp Wisconsin ........ Oregon State California ........ California ...... Texas ........... South Dakota Stanford ....... Missouri ..... Oklahoma ..... Kansas ...... Iowa State ....... Missouri. ....... .. Kansas State .... Kansas ........... Oklahoma ....... Oklahoma State Oklahoma State Oklahoma City.. Iowa State ....... Missouri ...... Colorado ....... Kansas ......... Kansas State ..., Colorado ...... D Oklahoma- State ? f H114 lf ' , u3 1 A dx I H ,: Y . , , ff r uf - .V ."' -rf...-f-3 I g..,-f""' . ,, ' dp ' '- nm 4 -djs" Q -avg X ., 1 , . .z "' AN if A LW L v f A , Wild in if A' 1-.N suffer Ks ,e. NHL" 101471 Cutting off Stuart l.antz'S screen,'Jim Damm slips past defenders for two. My -als. ww k , .,. ,N , Oklal'1oma's full-court drive comes to a quick halt as a Sooner guard meets NU's zone press. .ISL X -...- ,-K '-j,ig..'L--- k F59 9 ,Jo . '90 5: 630' he Q94 ' 'Ct KQ5 O' .V -4-gf' U ,, ze H g' in-rs .1 if I Xff F e h k t k Ro Jo d cl S gg D I D I C r Il a S ll rm, Denny, Powers, Bob. Second Row, e l. g d J P ge E l F ont Ro McConnell, Mac, Johnette, Ron- Wage d D 0 Oaches K t J Potrenslenn. ' Frosh Rally With Victories After Early Season Losses Off to a slow start, Nebraska freshmen rallied near the end of the year to close with a two and six record. The yearlings salvaged the last two contests, avenging two earlier losses, to prevent the lowest season since 1962 and bring the average output to 76.6 points a game, just 4 below the all-opponent season average. lVlcCook All-Stater Roger Leitner fulfilled advance billing with a 153 point production and a .19 average. Robert Wagner, Dan Shave, Denton Sullivan and guard Bryce Doebele followed in the freshmen scoring derby with 96, 78, 68 and 53 points respectively. Late-season additions Earl Page and Tom Line moved into the starting lineup to spark thejunior squad in the final three ball games. Coach Joe Cipriano's re- cruiting coup, bringing Page, Line and Mike Jordan away from California Junior Colleges at mid-year com- mencement brought rumblings from west coast scribes. 297 2' 2 A speedy exchange thrusts NU into the lead with first place leg work by Charlie Greene. Husker Cinder Men Notch Spotless Indoor Dual Slate High-scoring sprinters and hurdlers paced the Huskers to a perfect indoor slate and a 1-2 dual outdoor record. With Dave Crook setting a Memorial Stadium mark in the 440, Jack Cramer soared 6-534 and Jim Wendt ran a 1:49.23 half mile to add extra points. An injury felled low and high hurdles finalist Pres- ton Love in the Big Eight Indoor trackfest, but the Ne- braska squad surged to edge Oklahoma for third. The Cornhuskers finished 1-2 in the 60-yard dash and Wendt added support with a driving 880 victory. ln the loop's outdoor meet, "Outstanding performer" Charlie Greene scored 221!2 points and host Nebraska vaulted into fifth place on the pole of Dick Schnaible. Sparked by the 60-yard dash triumph of Greene, the Big Red delegation to the National Collegiate Athletic Association Indoor Meet wound up seventh. Greene also won the Federation 50-yard dash and anchored the 440 relay team to a Big Eight record time of :40.5. Varsity Track: ' h Back Row: W. Zersen, K. Tarbutton. T. Lillis, J. Wendt. J. Scherzberg, E. True, D. Walker. Second Row: R. Strand, captain: J. Beltzer, FZ. I-larvey, C. Greene, J. Nldrphy. G. O'Boyle. Front Row: R. Schnaible, D. Crook. J. Ryan, P. Scott, M. Altlzio, T. Mlllsap. l 1 I IA - 'L , 1 5 Nm'- ' uh .H r xx 4- .. .1 s , . . .Y , ,I 5 1,2 ' :- i is ' JE. rev. 1 A Off with the gun, Husker sprinter Dave Crook Down but not out-Dick Sohnailole misses fires from the blocks and leans into the curve. at 13'8" but rebounds for a silver medal. Outdoor Record ' 1f'iA 5711- QNX tit-N, ' jig.. Nebr. Opp. A 'V X V' A 48 Colorado ...... 97 ii 63 Missouri .............,......... ..... 8 2 First in triangular with Wisconsin and Houston. Fifth in Big Eight. Indoor Record Nebr. Opp. 74 Colorado ............. ........ 4 8 First in triangular with Kansas State and Drake. First in triangular with Wyoming and Iowa State. First in 440 Relay in Kansas, Texas and Drake Relays. Third in Big Eight. Cross Country Nebr. Opp. 21 Missouri .......... 34 29 Kansas State ....... 26 34 Colorado ...... 21 41 Minnesota ..... 19 First in triangular with Kansas State and Drake. Fifth in Big Eight. Bespectacled Charlie Greene kicks by OU's Jim Jackson flashing to a gold medal and the l-lenry F. Schulte Award. 299 F Ju 3 v ' ' -f - -- -...Z,.:':2i?,, HJ- .L-gswgwrf , Before and after, Cornhuskers get fat win by slim margin with round tripper against Missouri. .QL Clasning with CU's catcher on an attempted steal home, Nebraska's Jim Stevenson checks the judicial verdict. OO Baseball Record Nebr. Opp. 0 Morningside ..... 4 2 Morningside ..... . 7 4 Missouri ........ 0 5 Missouri ...... 2 2 Colorado ....... 3 4 Colorado ....... 2 2 Colorado ......... 3 10 Kansas State ...... . 5 3 Kansas State ...... . 2 1 Iowa State ...... . 0 2 Iowa State ...... . 3 5 Iowa State ........ 14 9 Oklahoma State ....... . 2 2 Oklahoma State ....... . O O Oklahoma State ....... . 2 3 Oklahoma ......... . l 2 Oklahoma .... . 0 3 Oklahoma .... . 2 8 Kansas ...... . l 0 Kansas ...... . 4 Huskers Rise From Depths To Vie For League Crown Ranking first in the conference in fielding and pitching, NU climbed within one game of the Big Eight Conference Championship after a second division fin- ish in '64 With All-American Stan Bahnsen and lefty Bob Hergenrader on the mound, the Cornhuskers open- ed the conference by sweeping a twin bill from defend- ing champ lvlissouri. Stumbling momentarily, Nebraska 2, dropped a pair to Colorado but reeled off nine victories in the next dozen games to forge back into the race. Kansas and the weather combined to spoil NU's chance for the championship. The Jayhawkers hit Ne- braska 4-G, dropping the Huskers into second place. Meanwhile rain canceled Missouri's lasttwo games leav- ing Big Red one game from the conference crown. .,. JO After the southern tour washed out, NU returned i-92 .-usage.-fgwa home only to suffer two defeats to non-loop foe, Morn- ingside. Combined' with a 12-6 league marky, the dual Oklahbma States anticipated Squeeze may fans loss still left NU with the best season since 59. as Larry BO,-nschlegl halts GSU advancement, Baseball Team: Back Row: T. Sharpe, coach: R. Stickney. B. Hergenrader, R. Brenning, B. Stickels, G. Neibauer, S. Bahnsen, C. Luther, J. Smith, J. Beck. manager. Second Row: R. Douglas, T. Snocla, C. Johnson, J. Stevenson, J. Roux, I.. Bornschlegl, T. Ander- son, G. Tunnison. Front Row: G. Flock, M. Zangari, F. Jones, F. Solich, J. Gaughan, R. Harris, R. Stangle, J. Wright. A 'N i X d gig, Lax K Q- 5.9 ""x Golf Team: ' Left to right: B. Saffer, T. Grace, F. Hilsabeck, T. Thomsen, W. lrnig, K. Mortensen, 5. Nelson, B. Pearson, H. Good, coach. Golfers Record Even Year On Early Season Victories Consistency and four returning lettermen aided the Cornhusker golf efforts as NU won tour straight matches while enduring the early season cold and rain. Low scores from seniors Bob Saffer and Tom Thomsen and accurate chip shots from sophomore Steve Nelson kept opponents on the short end of matches. After the strong start Nebraska found league com- petition tougher, losing seven of the next eight matches and finished the season with an even 9-9 mark. Husker linksters again participated in the Air 'Force's Pikes Peak Tournament and also hosted the Big Eight Con- ference Meet at Lincoln's new Holmes Country Club. Paced by Safter's 234 three-round total and a final round 76 by senior Kerm Mortensen, Nebraskajumped ahead of Missouri and Iowa State for sixth place. The Scarlet and Cream's final drive lett them at 974, twelve strokes short of fitth place Colorado and seventy-tour points behind titlist Oklahoma State. 302 Golf Record Nebr. l5V2 South Dakota ..... l5V2 Omaha U ...... llV2 Iowa State ..... l I V2 Creighton 2V2 Iowa State ..... 3V2 Washburn... 3 Kansas ............ 7 Kansas State ........ 0 Oklahoma State .... 'IOV2 Kansas ............... 6 Oklahoma ........ 5V2 Kansas State ..... l2 Omaha U ...... 8V2 Creighton ...... Sixth in Big Eight Meet. Opp. 2 V2 2 V2 3 V2 6V2 l 2 V2 l i V2 1 2 8 I 5 4 V2 9 89 V2 3 9V2 Only Tom Grace's solitary shadow scrutinizes an early morning practice on the silent green. ?-:.i - . .lr LL . ...L A. A. Timing a first-round return in Big Eight play, Kile Johnson moves to volley for game point. Tennis Record Nebr. Opp. 7 South Dakota State ..... ..... O 5 Hastings .... ..... ..... 2 . 7 Creighton... 7 Omaha U ...... ..... O 5 Drake ..... ..... 2 4 Emporia ..... ......3 1 Iowa State .... ..... 6 1 Kansas State ..... ..... 6 , 4 Washburn ..... ..... 3 5 Missouri ..... ..... 2 7 Omaha U ...... ..... 0 6 Creighton... 0 Kansas .... ..... 7 i Colorado .................... ........ 6 Y Tied for fifth in Big Eight Tennis Team: Netmen Log Spotless Mark In Non-Conference Meets Charging through an unblemished non-loop con- ference schedule, the Cornhusker tennis squad "met its match" against Big Eight foes. After vanquishing nine outside challengers without a loss, the Nebraska Huskers fell prey to a quartet of league rivals, salvaging only a single victory and finishing with a 10-4 season mark. Skeins of six and four triumphs sandwiched around a pair of losses built winning momentum before the netters closed the season with two more defeats. NU's team skidded in the conference's spring meet as Kile Johnson recorded Nebraska's only tally. The lone marker stood up, though, and carried the Huskers into a four-way dead heat for fifth place. Averaging better than a point-a-meet, Ted Sanko, Scott Nelson and Dean Beebee paced the team in the scoring department. Sanko and Johnson teamed up for a 7-7 doubles ledger, while Nelson and Beebee logged a season record of 8 wins and 6 losses. Left to Right: T. Sanko, D. Beebee, K. Johnson, S. Nelson, T. Tipton. 303 ,.4,F1,,f !. , I, ws, N' 1 f?Eu:if1sl xl 'If'fif, , xx. ... I-. ,MZ , D P Q I, 1 1+ -gs u 1 ' 963 Y - ai V 5 agzgyslftl .Q . ' ' f I 5 Y 1- , I , . 1-lx ' ,,g ,. in' .' - 5 - iff' -:cf v 'f -4": i 721 ff ff 'L wp 4 - vu 1 r -..S A ' ' Intramural Sports Program Faces "Growth Problems" Offering a total of 27 activities, Nebraska's intra- mural sports' program experienced a large increase in the number of individuals participating. Approximately 4,000 players took part in the basketball and flag foot- ball competitions and over 1300 in the volleyball matches. Lack of space forced multiple scheduling of games, with up to 25 basketball contests held each night on both East and City campus courts. In addition to the All-University Trophy, teams vied for co-op, fraternity, resident hall and departmental crowns. Phi Delta Theta copped the greatest number of all-university prizes with four championships. The intra- murual program also presented the Sportsmanship Trophy Ratings and Intramural Honor Ratings. Commanding the add-in for the point and game an IM competitor rallies for the return drive. Fighting for a reversal, an intramural wrestler attempts to stave off the pin and ultimate defeat. 30 WAA Increases Activities With League's Participation Due to increased participation in intramural activi- ties, Women's Athletic Association split teams into two leagues representing Greeks and independents. The two groups conducted a separate tournament with a final playoff between the champions to determine the overall champion and winner of the all-sports trophy. Adding pocket billiards to WAA's list of sports' ac- tivities brought many new taces to the Nebraska Union poolroom. Girls played pool in a tournament free of charge and instructors advised the learners while help- ing with the games. Intramural sports provided another new attraction for members interested in competition with other schools' teams. Traveling to Doane, Wayne, Concordia and Kansas University, groups competed in hockey, volleyball and basketball. Stretching for a tip-off, players try for the ball as 'eager' teammates prepare for court action. fir f .x N WAA Board: - Back Row: S. Yetman, D. Schmiecling, S. l-linman, C. Stoltenberg, I.. Broutman, l.. Jackson, P. Gefke. Front Row: M. Hughes, Intramurals Coordinator, M. McCartney, vice-presidentp K. l-luffaker, president, G. Hoyer, secretary, N. Converse, treasurer. 306 ..3'r A '," .N 1 'Lbs 'Fi' "ilk ,. : 4 ' ' - 5 "1 -.,. x 'A U, , , , . ,, ax Jn.. vrgwgzuffn r i : A s-'Q Af-f , 1 . . , R . 1 'F Q' I, .dfdwg ,Q ,ww-v H - F" 'Q Q- A 'll' 1 -31 ilas' ' uh-'iii-fx Q, A ,1'4't- N. ..-A ,W 4, , A-. ., 4 MI- Alll fi-S -.qiqfi-.' h --n -.p A n X-MQ: 1. ,Q 5-iii 'Q ,. K 1,1 .-Q., m X, 1, 5. .. 1 'ff' , m N l l 1 ai new-, 5 isp! fx 'x 'IN , s 45. 'ig "I, x O x wa ' wg s fx n as i- -75. I .tgknfx 5 'T 1 f '.1'::.gAf :- 'J 'L X u sl ,Lk wh .N 4,,. , 'Q-.'. Q , LH' Using strong net play, a tennis buff sets to stop an off-balance return 8 'Y H Executing a backhancl slam, a player bewilders unwary opponents. Stealing second base, a speedy thief narrowly avoids the keystone sacker's tag and an out. 309 Residences .5 O., 5 Ei 3.1 MH' - nigh, f ,, ..- ' M- ,.-,Y.,f. 1' - , W .J ,4- Lf i ri' 1? M A 4 1 M W 1, 9 1 W Km ' LN W W MQ --L14 ,N '1 :VWM 'W ,A35-. ,' 11 ., I . W mm 'Q N' 'V' sw" ,. -4 , WKAQQWMXMM M 9145 Q ,, Wm M at Q ,?af'W'3fm--www,w....,w Nlwxx f ' few:--1, . 1 M1-,.wawgV,m M'uQQfE2'MQiEwia4Win5m,'MQ :wx -WLM .- ' - ff iz. .-:gtg--:?f',.i I ' ' "Y" rf .V '-vfgguvrff. f 1 ' - 1-"i.':'? ' , - ' Y ,MlMHus3,mm,' s,,Ju MW , M1 . vymi' ,sk-by . . LAW 4 9 V P' Sung.- W-7? WW J U11 , .v Tim --.,E ,Th I I 4 l I ,. I L . 'Q-aim IW. Lm n 'Uni W -15, '51 W x .gi L1 'K L! V: 1 X wg , I ,W Ou' if I E14 M 'K 2 41 i I 'Pa "IS . fl . 'L' eg L' ' W 1 F:-Pixy' V iffgg. iifyiq I : . 'f5?ffi 5 F? .. ..u:!sxH'3: wi ' 1-. ' -v:..:fs .Hip 'Y-. .,-NVQ A W 1, u7":.:- W 'Q 51.25 ,l ' , I-iilfnn 'I 45.3 4. .- -7 - :Zn 1- B ax 5 -:,- CI- e Y' -2e.f:v"J2v3- an L ' .M -'TE Pound Hall Sets Precedent ln Coed Follies Production As the first independent residence hall to enter into competition, Pound Hall presented an original skit in AWS Coed Follies. The show poked fun at the rules and regulations connected with dorm living. Depicting the folbles of a young girl ambiguously named "Leslie," the theme mocked induction into the US Army. To promote cooperative spirit, the girls held a Halloween party with floors competing in skit contests. The all-female cast also evaluated the costumes repre- senting various units. Other competitions centered around decorated doors and Christmas window displays. Customary open house-coffee hours followed foot- ball games. ln honor of the University's new spring Parents' Day, the Hall put on an elaborate program with each floor decorating according to a particular theme. .l. Joan Spivey, President Arts and Sciences, Anselmo Row 1: Ahlschwede, Sharon, '69, Allely, Karen. '68, Anderson. Jacquelyn, '66, Augustyn, Ellen, '67. Row 2: Baxter, Barbara, '68, Bayless, Phyllis, '68, Borden, Susan, '69, Boyce, Barbara, '68. Row 3, Brainard, Diana, '69, Brown, Katherine, '67, Brown, Margaret, '69, Brown, Nancy, '67. Row 4: Carlson, Sharon, '67, Cavrtt, Sandra, '66, Chapman, Cheryl, '67, Chester. Arlene, '66. Row 5: Christensen Jeanne, '68, Claussen, Sandra, '67, Clifton, Joan, '67, Cornwell, Joan, '66. Row 62 Crawford, Sharon, '68, Crosby, Dianne, '67, Dasenbrock, '69, Dobbs, Patricia, 68 Row 7: Doner, Cora, '67, Engelkemier, Karen, '69, Erickson, Lois, '68, Evert, Mari- lyn, '66. Row 8: Falmlen, Vickie, '69, Farran, Barbara, '68, Fritz, Marie, '68, Gold- stein, Ina, '68. Row 9: Gruenther, Janice, '69, Gustafson,.Kay, '69, Hahn, Halma, '67, Hall, Cheryl, '69. Row 10: Hanson. Jeanine, '67, Harris, Pamela, '68, Hasse- brook, Gloria, '67, Hawley, Carol, '69. 34 .f . , , . ' I il I n -. ll , l 4 N ,l . l , im'-" Q5-F '- 5 af"- ge - , - l Q s 2 'i Fj rsgiwglg if-1.1" ' :1:"'7f- W-Lt" . 6 - 1 "fi jf' " 'QL .5 , .nz-Q' r ,--a .nv 'lf .-' l , ll ,Wi U' lf as l ,-dl T' -- f, -3 ' 5-3' " , ' ' ' A V sa ' .J -Fi-fl ' F " "Hei s t-,.l, l A. l TIL- , l Y ,W S f ' ' . A, 1. 1 'I l fs 'f 'f?ef.Y"f1 W l ll , r 5 - ""iTiAm Fil ' . 4- " lil N tri., f ,:. 6 x ll., , V2.1 ,- v , l i, axis, 1 , .sn . ...H Q 4 I 1 'I' 1 l will 776165 See Row 41494 if' K , if Dr ' if t i if Soliciting a purchaser for surplus tickets, A 6 o'clock date precludes weekly chores a coed advertises amid the billboard maze. as iroriers vie for equal time at the boards. an-L.: :Lal y-L1 ccauu cn , V. uvicun 5, Vu :anvil u., J. vp-way, v-we-plcqlvcilt,-v1.1 unto. au: u, J. va in uv-.ups :cu . , P-:L--so : .R-ffm? - A '+ ma- +5 1if"L"'S-ll ' . s iii, it' a' Q, - :'- 1 . i' 7' . L' ,gs ., , F f'ii i , 5 5 if , . ' :J 1' .l ,iw ,f l 'fitfs-. v "J ' lr-L55, N ' 'mffi 3,g?9,.," 2' r - 'ug' l ,A ' ' 'Y 751' Qvsfw . it ' ,gh if 'ii T K '7 ' ' 'Wh 3 gi Row 1, Heald, Betty, '69, Hellerich, Cynthia, '69, Hemphill, Patricia, '69, Henrickson, Minne, '67, Hickey, Barbara, '66, Hick- man, Nancy, '66, l-lolmstedt, Connie, '66, Horowitz, Tatiana, '68, Jacobs, Evelyn, '66. Row 2: Johnson, Bonnie, '69, Johnson, Linda, '67, Johnson, Susan, '69, Kallos, Elaine, '68, Kelly, Karen, '68, Killham, Judy, '67, King, Linda, '66, Knight, Bonnie, '67, Laughrey, Carolyn, '69. Row 3, Leners, Linda, '66, Lezotte. Sandra. '69, Lockhorn, Lucille, '69, l.osh, Mary, '68, Nlackenstaclt, Vicki, '66, Nlanion, Diane, '69, Mansteclt, Laura, '68, Mantel, Marilyn, '66, Martin, Eileen, '67. Row 4: McCIurg, Donna, '66, Meier, Linda, '67, Merz, Georgia, '67, Miller, Cecilia, '68, Milligan, Barbara, '69, Mitchell, Judith, '67, Moe, Barbara, '67, Moon, Bonnie, '67, Morris, Mona, '66. Row 5: Neimanis, Velta, '67, Norris, Carol, '68, Ochs, Bev, '69, Olmstead. Bona, '67, Olsen. Ann, '69, Page, Mary, '67, Pahl, Bobbie, '68, Polhemus, Sandra, '67, Pomajzl, Liz, '69. Pound Coeds Seek Space ln Dormitory Entanglement Six trips to the odd-numbered floors in the elevator and down one flight of steps finally brought Pound Hall Coeds to the right address. Scrutiny of the new home brought cries of "Where in the world is there enough room for all the necessities-the gold fish, the rubber plant from India, the bullfighting poster?" Converting the baggage room to a small scale "goodie wagon," several floors offered residents treats of fruit, candy bars and potato chips. Resisting the call to count calories, girls frequented the store and subsequently lost the battle of the bulge. Creating washday blues, freshmen found inexperi- ence a hazard when the not-so-precision dryers brought the smell of burning clothes. After ruining colored and pastel clothes, unhappy and disappointed young women realized too late the consequences of too much bleach. 'Out of sight, out of mindz' truants repress tests as a glaring tube offers midterm enlightenment. 316 K J , JL 'fm W ---X.. "Q -17' , P X - 1 I my f I ,W - .1 1 A "quick-drying" hair-do seems to be primary but the plastic bubble doubles as a study carrel ...A- T 'W - c .J-a'1, , ,4 ,..- " Q... Pranksters disrupt the Friday night race for showers, as missing curtains guarantee a room-by-room search. -,gf w "1-., " yt ir' l ., 6, lm V lf, 4: fl ' ll l fif- -if ,ld ' l 5,1 I I l - l -W I A t VY V fp. ' Y " nl ' 1 Xfl, ae X T,-3 lm ,, , A ,E I ' ,4 ' , 'i ' g lu 1' ' F" X l V ff, 11 V Q - K, -.'.'!..f! , ,, - , 7 er! " ', if 'S' ' 3' ' 1 , ' - l - , l S 'f . 1 ffl-1 ' I, La- . 'fl X -Y 4 gg, S, .L Q . ,. Id , " ii' si' R' i .Li W 1' , J, .fl l'l"?' ll S i- -,.',,rr, W. ,Jig N, 4 1. . : . .igfp-sq? , ,' - ,, nl , l F' l ' ' XV' 1:1 6 . P ,N fa., l 4' ,- .S : lj ?'R'lL 'N A ROW 1: Power. Patricia. '68, Prester, Judith, '67, Rainbolt, Linda, '68, Rathgeber, Verna, '67, Reddish, Anne, '68, Rogowski Sharyn, '69, Rqll,.l..lnda, '68, Romanoff. Ellaabeth, '67. Row 2: Ross. Diana, '67, Samson, Katharine, '68, Rath, Jean, '68 Sherwood, Virginia, '66, Shuey, Linda, '66, Slefken Jolene, '68, Slama, Carolyn, '67, Slocum, Linda, '68. Row 3: Smyth, Mary '67, Stewart, Susan, '67, Stine, Ellen '68, Stubbenclick, Peggy, '68, Suedmeier, Glenda, '67, Thomassen, Ruth, '67, Thomp: son Elizabeth '67' True, Karen '68. Row 4: Tuning Pamela '69- Velte Louetta '68- Villwock Janet '68- Vuvlstek, Paula '67,'Watsek, Ggwenz '67, Webster, Patricia, '69, Wells, Carolyn, '67, Wiernann, Mary, '66. Row 5:'Wiese,'Joe:Ann, '69, Williams: Carole, 67, Wlmmer, Ginny, '67, Wolfmeyer. Ruth, '67, Woster, Priscilla, '67, Wupper. Melinda, '66, Wynkoop, Sandra, '68. Q L ffjiggg, , , .- . lr 3' "' 'l lv , , P lg Q l ' 9 x si . Tflfnd 5 Q Snoopy extols the benefits of a "Big Sis," as Fedde frosh publish an upcoming fireside. Y Hall meetings give way -to a reducing parlor in Fedde's improvised type of 'Slenderamaf Mary Russnogle, President Home Economics, Staplehurst 20 4 , ,, .E ,, gi-1 V. 5 .f ' 'ii-H 1' ltr rs X f ' Q 5 RI? i v.. . Li 'I Y I . dr iffQif"'f1f"' i ,il l3'J.!.H I 41 X... " 5' A :iii Qxli l., i Q - Fedde Hall Pairs Residents In Big Sis-Little Sis Teams Promoting intra-dorm cooperation, Fedde Hall be- gan the year with a "Big Sis-Little Sis" program. Upper- classmen invited Freshmen to a popcorn-slumber party and throughout the year, especially during final exam- ination periods, sent notes of encouragement. At the annual Christmas Dance, Fedde residents presented escorts with "gifts from Santa Claus." Sec- ond semester activities featured a celebration within the dorm to honor St. VaIentine's Day and later a date function centered around an evening of roller skating. To devote a special day to parents and families, the coeds served as guides and pointed out special places of interest on East Campus. With the guests furnishing home-cooked favorites, members completed the event with a picnic-excursion at Pioneers Park. ri ilk' 4 y FG, Clothing projects dictate personalized patterns as Fedde girls cooperate with a nip and tuck. 417 01 lil-JF! , 3" -ev .,. 1 J, .L , 'I I L, ' .2 . J 5 -5: Q., 4- '., HV '59 l Y-' 'fi ,,'. fHI,,,5. 11... ., ,',:-fl , ,gif +- V' J- Q- Row 1: Anderson, Sandra, president, '66, Lockhorn, Fayrene, secretary, '68, Lewis, Dixie, treasurer, '67, Haecker, Carol historian, '67, Anderson, Mary, '68, Barth, Becky, '66, Behnke, Catherine, '68, Boyd, Carol, '67, Call, Charlene, '69. Row 2 Cline, Vicki, '66, Cook, Shirley, '66, Cooksley, Mary, '67, Cornelius, Sandra, '66, Cotton, Connie, '69, Crispin, Sandra, '66 Cunningham, Irene, '68, Dey, Ardythe, '67, Dunning, Linda, '69. Row 3: Fuhrman, Marilyn, '67, Gustman, Cheryle, '69, Hoff man, Rose, '68, Huber, Grace, '68, Jennings, Marian, '67, Klingman, Barbara, '69, Kohles, Sherry, '69, Kohtz, Sandra, '68 Krause, Kathy, '68. Row 4, Lehr, Donna, '68, Luebbe, Janice, '66, Mathers, Helen, '66, Mazour, Janice, '69, Novotny, Carol '69, Obrist, Joanne, '69, Paider, Arlene, '69, Palmer, Jane, '68, Peterson, Dee, '68. Row 5: Poulas, Caroline, '69, Richter Barbara '69 Rosentrater Mar ie '69 Smith Gloria '66 Tremain Veste '68 Whitne J n t 1 . s . g , : . . : . y. , y, a e , '68, Wiles, Susan, '66, Wil liarns, Patricia, '69, Wright, Rita, '68. A Love Hall financier monopolizes the bank in an after-dinner playoff. 2 1 j 1 Love Memorial Ships Gifts To US Army In Viet Nam Following good will and holiday spirit, the seven kitchens of Love Memorial Hall sent servicemen in South Viet Nam Christmas cookies and assortments of holiday candy. The coed's "world-wide" enthusiasm also entailed correspondence to former Love Hall residents in Morocco now serving as members of the Peace Corps. To promote international Week, girls invited foreign students for a dinner featuring a variety of popular casseroles at the various cooking units. At the October party, "Love Lodge" represented the hunting season with pheasant and corn stalk decorations. Encouraging inter-campus competition, the ma- jority ofthe members participated actively in intramural sports, taking second place in basketball. Emerging vic- torious in Spring Day contests, residents gleaned three event trophies and won the women's overall prize. Sandra Anderson, President Home Economics, Arlington v fa L The new stereo prompts impromptu routines, Threats of impending finals give way to reality as Coeds rally to pantomine "Happy Talk." as an impatient coed avvaits tutorialassistance. 323 11 BUR - .Q V. 4, ng H tj " ,Rf A V ms - ,Q ' K X112 F' ,,: V ' -," atv. if - ft. R 'ff if-.' .V . ' - 1 in-fy . Q -'gf rf? W Q X 1 , g Q-Y 'Y-1 'Du 'Ii' 5.-an-. asv! W 1 rw -NNN YQ... WY 111 'rf 'rv- lf' will 5.-L35 3? wg 5 1 'fly :W '-J' Miss Burr Hall lllustrates Ag Campus Talent, Poise To select a Miss Burr Hall, residents conducted a beauty-talent contest in conjunction with Burr West. The men served as judges and added a humorous touch with a mock style show. A choir, entered into an East Campus talent show and a holiday candy sale to raise funds for a new stereo, constituted other joint projects. Freshmen resident orientations occupied an after- noon during New Student Week to explain University .procedures and AWS rules for the newcomers. Upper- class coeds paired with the frosh at the first session and continued throughout the year as Big Sisters. Getting acquainted with members of Love Memo- rial and Fedde Halls, Burr East sponsored a fall tea. With mothers and faculty as special guests, the program featured singing and instrumental groups. In an ex- change dinner with Kappa Alpha Theta, the girls had an opportunity to compare sorority with dormitory living. Emerging surprised from a dummy doorway, Burr coeds find the way to foil April foolers. il , 1, Vt s -f' .. , j . - , , 5 , ' ..- '. - .. A.:"f' 'F'-T3- f ,Q ' " '- 14, V v A . 1 -4 .,A.' - ,. ' ' - .A-v-if ' ' A - - 1 V ,.,ajyf'::.- ' ' ' . v. - . LQQ arf: - '22 - F if : - an ' - .ani -- ' - 'L indulging in a midday popcorn feed, Burr residents depart from not-so-strictly observed diets. 3 2 5 i ' Hwgaf' .,ee'Wm'n'Q Kate Okamoto, President Journalism, St. Louis WRA Emphasizes Etiquette For Fashion-minded Coeds To observe AWS Standards Week, 'the Inter-Dorm Council sponsored a series of fireside chats on make- up, hair styles, fashions and etiquette. ln conjunction with the YWCA Love and Marriage Committee, the Residence Halls also presented panel discussions and speakers on "The Changing Role of Today's Woman." Starting the year with a get-acquainted tea in the WRA ballroom, girls took advantage of an opportunity to meet University officials. Administrators and coun- selors explained dorm and campus regulations and policies to any interested Freshmen coeds. While the mild autumn weather lingered, members entertained guests at several street dances held in the Piper parking lot. At Christmas time, dormies put in- genuity to work decorating room doors and halls and invited friends to view the seasonal handiwork. 4-4? . 701' .- IT1.tT Freshman Inter-Dorm Council: . I Back Row: P. Penke, K. Juffer, R. Brock, C. Calvin, M. Chase. Front Row: K. Okamoto, chairmang E. Wells, secretary, M. Rowoldt, treasurerg S. Weyers, B. Schole, vice-chairman, D. Sato. 6 " I.-'gb .' aI:"', 1 . 6 . W Mi-:Iv N - 1 AJ- Eg Q f ' xx W ' H fi - E v. , l H2 X , '4!?'14x' A 1 1 ,f L " Y ' Q ,ILM-fnMl5, , 'x X , Ab M X , is ,R iii! fx D, fm? JK - I - L Fm is 7-fail . W x , . - 'F X 3 ,. 'Q M :H Q1 'Q YW I 3 , - . "'X ' " I J' s, -J.-'qv-' w Wig, kt 1 A is 1 I 4 It :L ' 1 'N' '. I- 'H' A , xt-' V ., 1,e915,w A A-'gf , f ' ' 1 -wise fa . f' 21:11.-1 'f '-tif ' , ' I J . '-.41 ff Q." 21' F Q" xv H V uw L vir"v 15" 4 1 141- Pg 'J 'J 1 L ad V, .12 X JL, A Pseudo Fire Drills Arouse Girls To A Slow Response Sleepy dormies carried out required duties then thundered through WRA halls in search of the "right exit." The trauma-the first practice fire drill. Trouping wearily up the stairs, shivering coeds agreed that cold weather and midnight evacuations don't mix. Long and everlasting class lines and telephone lines oriented freshmen to the University of Nebraska campus life. The activity-minded residents joined com- mittees for an initiation into college leadership. With the first round of hour exams came relief or regret as coeds tirelessly strived to make the scholastic grade. Eating in the cafeteria, studying in the "morgue" and plotting capers in the wee hours brought a together- ness and many satisfying experiences in group living. As fond memories faded, the girls entertainedgreat hopes for the coming years as upperclassmen. 'S ,Z f' ,- 1' ' 4, Adding the much needed spray to her shoes, Mary Keim readies for Saturday study hall. 38 12 l ,:. L ,- , " rg--jxi . fin - r iw. . K -"E .lu AL-i,'!' :Q."'.I ' - :rv ,vw ,- I :,. Lf, V. LW '3' lr lil - 1" - J Ll' if 1' 1-' V' .fl .",- ' , , ' i' ' w- 'l " . .Y V , . .1 - l . L 2 K 1 s ji' ' i T,,..,g. A. wh. ,x:,,. A, .., 1 1. ,K . l ' A' . . 1, f -11. '.- i l . l Q' li ', 2 l .. 9 'I ' .hi ,tr Row 1: Green, Pamela, '69: Gregg. Suzanne. '69: Gutherless, Cynthia '69: l-lanke, Carolyn, '69. Row 2: Hansen, Judy, '69: Heise, Anna, '69 Hendrix, Susan, '69: Hill, Carol, '69. Row 3: Hoppe, Karen, '66g Horn- bostel, Laura, '69: Howard, Juanita, '69: l-luis. Connie, '69. Row 4: Hum- mel, Judith, '69: Hutt, Susan, '69: James, Patricia, '69g Jamison, Donna '69. Row 5: Jensen, Marilyn, '69: Johnson, Carole, '69: Johnson, Janet, '67: Klein, Regis, '69. Row 6: Klingman, Carol, '67: Kolb, Carol, '69, Krum- land, Karen, '69: Kudera, Judith, '69. Row 7: Larsen, JoAnn, '69, Lattin Judi, '69: Lewis, Priscilla, '69: Loschen, Judith, '69. Row 8: Lucas, Sally '69, Lyle, Brenda, '69: Major, Barbara, '69, Markham, Jan, '69. Row 9 Mason, Gaye, '69: May, Linda, '69. I -vfwx, , 1 A F7- S , 25,1 1:-A K . Q 'Q - ,J A .1 -1 Ak ,X If. X. ' vb ' .. .Q , ,ff 5 ' , gf mm 1 -f .v w .' I 1- 1-s' A -- ?' jTA ' H ' gf rv:-A 4 A f- A . -,".Yi'Q,,. " :HE ' w-am - , sv" I 1 'L A ?- , .- 'f wa , ,. -- A - ... ,., -... -. . ,, . .-- , - M . V rv! Q' jig K, Iifrlqn'-Q is u , :' '. lin" ' iii' . " 'kg J 'aj 'gf-' gf' J ..v 'E ' ff ' 4-..u ' - - was 4' 'uf ' ' 4 . , V f v4"'5".1- V x vb: , ,wx Q' - - A " ., "" ' v -Q , - -. T .. .f -f -g V: I- Z 5?--f fx iw-c F. 53:83 A iii? ,, lf' f wk A I 1 s L 'L 'Ji' I ' f 'I' I 1 Q' ff , , i' 'fi-7' iw 1 mf" V ' ' Ui? , hw L X Q- A , - ,um 2 X , f Q w f ,1' ,,,, I P. I :wwe www.. fi. KM im 5 si,-fame ,-my N PM in 1-,My ESQ' w- sf 'gg41,??iE Tw m s g ,H v, M M ATEQQZEQ? taiwan? i I 5 A . xxx ms'-4 nm, ' .'- 1 xx X R F,-4, ,Ms 1 ,A A swfbsmuwlxu '94 fm, sg S 15? Gif 1 rf f 41' ..- -mg-9 ' Cf .., 'I-3'f 42' "' 'ES' -.4 Selleck Student Assistants: . Back Row: G. Sindelar, C. Luther, J. Donat, G. Scholz, J. Caleca. Second Row: M. Lamm. D. Cook, D. Shef-field, I.. Armstrong, C. May, L. Clouse. Front Row: C. Rieken, J. Jones, A. Olsen, adviser: D. Stover, I.. Schlechte, M, Hughes. 57.1 : 1' -T., ' J., Y, XSQTQ' ' , 1 W. .,,, , .. , , . J -ff" OE Brawny battlelines form across the food frontier as athletic tastes clash with nutritional "needs" Marvin Almy, President Arts and Sciences, Greenwood 330 7 7' ,a ' f With Old-English Festivities M . v f I ' ' , lf ' F7 Selleck Denotes Christmas y t , l , i l. . li 1-" - A Amid seasonal decorations and carolers, Selleck celebrated Christmas with a Wassail and specialob- servance dinner. After the meal, RAM officers " ' ff announced the three best entries in the window decora- fr i. 6 tion contest conducted for members living in the Quad. ' -s, Cash prizes rewarded the winning designers' originality s and symbolic or humorous arrangements. ""' " To enhance intra-dorm relations, Selleck intro- ? 'ta 'himf :Ii duced coed ping-pong and billiard tournaments for male fi., 5, 6 ,I 6 51,51 and female residents.Outstanding scorers in the double 3 .-1,-I., i and individual events received engraved plaques. l Participating in the intramural sports program, 1' is Selleck actively competed against other living units. After taking the independent football trophy, Benton and Fairfield played for the All-University title. 1' kv .gf 5-6 -I-1 Row 1: Almy. Marvin, president, '67, Anderson. Larry, vice-president, '66, Jess, Mike. treasurer, '66, Bolton, Claude. '68. Row 2: Bowen. Douglas, '68, Caleca, John. '66, Contryman, Wesley, '67, Donat, Larry, '66. Row 3-:Dudden,l1?anny, '69, Dvorak, Rolland, '68, Erickson, Keith, '67, Farstrup, Greg, '66. Row 4: Fisher, Gary, '68, Fuller, William, '69, Gilmore. Steven, '69, Heftie, Ronald, '67. Row 5: Hopkins, Dennis, '69, Kern, Jere, '66, Lewis, John, '66, McNair, John, '67, Miller, Lynn, '66, Mullen. Owen, '67, Neumeister, Kent. '66, Pellican, Richard, '66, Ricket, Jack. Row 6: Rock, Quentin, '66, Sall, Dale, '66, Scholz, Gordon, '66, Settles, Dennis, '68, Simard, Robert, '68, Smith, Robert, '66, Suhr, Theodor, '67, Watson, Edward, '69, Witt, Merlyn, '67. Friday afternoon and spring weather signal the advent of SelIeck's mass-production car laundry. " '-'Trai ' 4?-' 4, i Yagi E L' Robert's Rules delay proceedings while a Selleck representative rises to a Point of Order. -.-MEL - ll, N FV jx '55, 'j ' 5 if " X Q.- . L, I , 3 -7f':,y3,1::'ia, Jl:,3f,, . , , lu, V ' ' '- v,' .4 . , . 5 l-123 .f - ' " is li, , ' ll ,nf K 7 1' ,, I I -,,,,,3, 1 l V' 5, S- ' lv" I X I vw. ' " l , ' - ,. g , , W 1 x ' I ' , 1 5: M' K ' l : , l . S ,- V 3, 1 1 1- ' LA , l 1.-, .1 . -YJ" Ag .ix .rw pi rt Y I , .L is "X 'f -' ' ' ' JE 1 'Fr ' A ' - " -, . Ng fi' ,gf X , 155 "' ' ,g , , - - 4: 41- is . f. " " , ' 1 V-'.5...,,u:'w,,.,.g:.fa71 51!'1',1'-ui 1143.71- 3 if ' :Ein Row 1: Heming, Judy, secretary, '67, Abraham, Bonita, '69, Abraham, Nancy, '69, Allison, Susan, '68, Anderson, Constance, '66, Anderson, Karen, '68, Armstrong, Lee, '66, Aurich, Diana, '68, Bachmann, Carolyn, '69, Row 2: Baker, Roberta, '68, Barnes, Frances, '69, Barr, Diana, '68, Bass, Rosanne, '68, Bauer, Kathryn, '69, Baxter, Judy, '66, Beck, Carol, '67, Beilke, Marleen, '68, Berenter, Carol, '67. Row 3: Bergen, Wanda, '68, Black, Sandra, '68, Blacker, Lani, '68, Bockus, Beverly, '68, Bomgaars, Thelma, '67, Bornemeier, Eugenia, '66, Bulgrin, Susan, '68, Burr, Jeanne, '69, Busacker, Patricia, '67. Row 4: Caha, Kathleen, '68, Callan, Marilyn, '66, Carson, Judith, '68, Chalupsky, Elaine, '67, Clark, Pam, '69, Closter, Betty, '67, Costello, Kathleen, '68, Cummings, Deborah, '69, Dawson, Carla, '68. Row 5: Davenport, Polly, '68, Davis, Carol, '68, Davis, Mary, '6gbDunklau, Linda, '68, Eaton, Susanne, '69, Ebsen, Nancy, '69, Ehlers, Sheryl, '68, Ealing, Janice, '68, Farris, Re- becca, ' . 332 1 1, V ag . r, Fy"1j- V? 'J -,4 I Y' Lu li if Q I 'gil 'I if 'K ' ,I AX "Selleck Silhouettes" illustrate sorority choices as two pledges practice post-rush propaganda. Selleck Quad Collaborates In Talent-Variety Premier To celebrate "Spring April Foolishnessu Selleck coeds combined with Selleck boys to sponsor a mock- vaudeville show. Uniting to produce humorous skits and travelers' acts, participants displayed assorted talents for the board of judging University professors. NU's AWS Week resulted in numerous projects to draw the dorm students closer together. Gus Three be- gan the activities with a hayrack ride for Whitehall Orphanage. Later, male guest speakers held informal panel discussions for Besseyaboutdatingand etiquette. Welcoming parents during open house, floors stressed various themes by unique decorations. Con- fetti and bright colors established Coucher's Mardi Gras atmosphere and flowers introduced Gus Three's spring mood for NU's newly established Parents' Day. RAM Council: Back Row: D. Groetzinger, M. Mullen, L. Donat, R. Dvorak, K. Erickson, L. Arrnbright, J. Miller. Second Row: L. Robinson, B. Brown, L. Taylor, L. Meyer, M. Stroh, D. Aurich, G. Weeks. Front Row: K. Costello, L. Anderson, vice-president: T. Suhr, M. Almy, presidentg J. Hemming, secretary: A. Oppliger, M. Jess, treasurer: P. Layman. 333 A "blind date diIemma" baffles Sheila Stubbs at the moment of decision ,.., 1 X Q. 2, Prompted by faithfulness to 'secret paIs,' a Selleck 'bunny brigade' fashions Easter offertories. 334 f l - : ' ' 1 L 2 ,lb ,- ,LQ Y' ' f "" " '-ii V ,il ' L i IFJ f 31 I a . I -,B I 1- 1, ' 1 fi fs. F ,L J 1 JG iw : ..v wr' i V A an , . I..- f Q i V' 'lg J. Row 1:Farstrup, Linde, '66, Flagle, Cheryl, '69, Forest, Marilyn, '67, Foss, Sandra, '68. Row 2: Freese, Janice, '69, Gerdeman, DeAnn, '69, Gilclersleeve, Renne. '68, Glathar, Linda, '69. Row 3: Goedert. Mary Ann, '67, Goodsell, Nancy. '67, Gragson, Linda, '69, Grotluschen, Suzanne, '69. Row 4: Gullberg, Julianne, '69, Haase, Rossell, '68, l-lall, Carol, '69, l-lam, Barbara, '69. Row 5: l-larano, Gail, '66, Harder, Nadele, '68, Heim, Diane, '68, Hendrickson, Nancy, '68. Row 6: Hibbeler, Evelyn, '68, l-lull, Susan, '68, l-lonke, Janice, '68, Hoover, Penelope, '67, i-loyt, Barbara, '69, I-lughes, Marilyn, '67, lkeya, Mary, '69, Janke, Lynn, '69, Janssen, Twila, '69. Row 7: Jasa, Lorene, '69, Johnson, Patricia. '69, Jones, Judy, '67, Jones, Patricia, '68, Jurgens, Jolene, '68, Kearns, Kathryn, '68, Kimbrough, Harriet, '68, Kingman, Kathrine, '69, Kinkead, Jane, '69. Row 8, Klein, Sharee, '68, Knoflicek, Kathryn, '69, Kosmick, Cynthia, '68, Kuehner, Janice, '68, Kuhr, Georgia, '67, Kurtz, Cindy, '68, Lamm, Mar' ian, '67, Lavelle, Judy, '68, Layman, Patricia, '67. Row 9, Lussetto, Minnie, '69, Marker, Doralie, '66, McAllister, Lee, '67, lg4rcCallung7Margaret, '68, McDannel, Linda, '68, Mclntosh, LaRayne, '69, Mclntyre, Nicki, '69, McKaln, Linda, '69, McNeff, erry, ' . 4 ju A -A ',I'l 5 5 Q I T' if '.-, .., Y- , f L -x L LQ Y C, l ' i l K ,' .f L-. ,,--.- A fl, iff- 11,1 . Rx 51 ,. rf.. Y., . Y' Q X N A if ' -f' ,l 1 , L 4 I ,A Q I ' 1 ' , '-+ Pondering possible mix-match coordinations, a coed weighs the choice of cotton or wool. 336 l 5 ,4"vlfa., it 7' Ti, V "AV . " Ml Row 1: Meyer, l.aVai, '68, Meyer, Linda, '68, Michael, Nancy, '68, Mihelic, Barbara, '68, Miller, Carol, '69, Miller, Jana, '69, Miller, Kathleen. '69, Moore, Mary, '69, Morton, Virginia, '69. Row 2: Muma, Mary, '67, Nelson, Lynda, '68, Novotny, Donna, '69,0'Hara, Sharon, '69, OIiver,Cor1nie, '66, Olson, Kathleen, '68, Oppliger, Ann, '68, Ott, Jill, '69, Panek, Sue, '68. Row 3: Pape, Julianne, '69, Papineau, Marian, '67, Pearson, Jean, '69, Pedersen, Florence, '68, Podoll, Gaynelle, '69, Pratt, Margaret, '69, Quade, Beth, '68, Recknor, Ann, '68, Reiken, Carolyn, '67. Row 4: Rihanek, Sandra, '68, Sagesser, Carol, '68, Schellenberg, Sandra, '69, Schultz, Dianne, '68, Schurr, Mary, '68, Sintek, Carol, '68, Smith. Cheryll, '68, Smith, Luanne, '69, Smith, Marilyn, '67. Row 5: Smith, Mary, '69, Spurlock, Cathy, '69, Stark, Deborah, '68, Stilwell, Mary. '68, Stroh, Mary, '69, Svoboda, Judi, '67, Takata, Jeanne, '66, Thomas, Barbara, '68, Thomas, Donna, '68. Row 6:Trenkle, Gloria, '67, Vybrial, Elizabeth, '66, Waid, JoAnn, '69, Wassenberg, Patty, '68, Weeks, Gayle, '69. Row 7: Wenske, Joan, '68, Wilkinson, Bobbie, '68, Wilson, Cheri, '68, Winans, Patricia, '68, Zumpfe, Carolyn, '69. y i ' . Q. N! " 'H-V q .- -'Mi : 1 If l ,. .Q ' . ' gf ' i .f ef S .. x " '- . ., ' , .--' x, If r ' 'L ' 4, ."- . i tp. :A . 1. Y- i - 'IQ .- fu- ffl 2 f ' .. ,- Q , W I . li A ij ' i rr- ' - it . pq a V i I l ,N A " ,P Q. l I I' ,, 3 'Q' ' , . l V. 1 , , 1. i, 1 fi x or be r as 1 4 W 1 1 1 r A Y? as ,,, 5 L A J L if-Zxff img -5 ' 4 ' 11 ,'ifGi,3 l V . A 41' l . A- -A vi gy'-- Y A -21.4.3 V. i., .. c'i"f"fi I ' f , i ' "':'3I"E51-'7?f1. -i il L 1 ' iii 174 "- ' ' , 'Q'-, I L' . ", '- ' ",,"""' iii, - WW, , V 'I A VU J ., Q it y ' gi! 1 ' nl . I "" . Y V h i 3 ' Q Selleck Ponders Problems Of inexperienced Freshmen Exploring the fascination of a new environment, Selleck freshmen quickly pieced together puzzles of floor plans and snake-like meal lines. More perplexing problems of washing and ironing, usually solved by re- liable mothers, stumped many young men and women as piles of dirty laundry accumulated in stuffed closets. Husky Huskers in shorts and T-shirts lounged in the dorm on week nights. Various contests such as push-ups and wastebasket cageball determined the lucky winner to run for goodies from the Snack Bar. New residents of the structural maze provided an air of femininity to the previously predominantly-male complex. The increased number of women from last year gave male members an opportunity to socialize during the evening within the confines of the quad. .a.c.4.. 'Tennis fever' summons an avid court devotee as warm weather brings closet rearrangement. 33 Cather Revises Regulations For Nomination Procedures To improve floor representation and legislation, Cather Hall held a voluntary constitutional convention. Attended by interested students, the meeting estab- lished by-laws providing for all-dorm elections. ln conjunction with the spring open house, the Cather Residence Association sponsored competition for floor decorations. Catherites vied for trophies by constructing displays and exhibitions of Old West sa- loons, Las Vegas night clubs and Paris bistros. "Arc Antics" provided Cather with a media to par- ody various campus institutions. The Kosmet Klub skit, first for the residence hall, satirized everything from greeks to administration. In a final plea the men emphasized Cather's cold heaters and thin walls. Toney Redman, President Arts ancl Sciences, Gering "4" Charm Council: Back Row: R. l-teikes, A. Harms, K. Hartmann, V. Thoendel, R. Lecotte. Second Row: J. Fryar, J.'l.udvvig, I-l. Argue, lvl Furrow, B. Watson. Front Row: J. Decker, social chairmang l-l. Rubottom. treasurer: T. Redman, president, D. Chamberlain, vice-president: R. Basler, secretary: R. McCall. 8 Q, ,if 'iqgag ' K l . . --1' PHE wr . ' .gl r , , f . 1 ,-, A 2 Q m , N 5 A E' , -0. . 3 Mead-, , , , Pg' ,Q 2711, V , . ,ig la- -if W' , Wi", W V Q.-f .4 I -, V 2" 7. 'f,,. ., , X , .. -V , ,- ,t 9, , , - 1: . M ,' , , my yugo- I. .. '-,arf uf , - I w f y, sv-:EH 4' E' Q ., A? fr' A' 'rr we V""'f"'YT' sg- . ' f f , -,Q , , 'Gif N. - ilat ' , " :QQ Q H .E 4 ' ' f ' V , ' fi. Ly 'Q - f .in W f J' 9' QQ' , "Q Y 6 A M- , 1 V -H H 1 - .Q 3 ', 1- 1 fr' -cf, , 3, w.'S2'f' U r , :.V. , , . w 5' ' ,f FI ' f m we H J 1 - " X- 'Zi ,, " . ' 'ff'- , 52216 - 225' Ffa? N N " aw, 2- - 5' ' 4, 34125 4- '-- " ' .w If ' 1 "1 - Rid . . - . 'f U w-., Q 5-f .X ' tv- I, H , we . x j ,1 5 w r 'Til' Row 1: Adero, Walter, '68, Alexander, Milo, '69, Amos, James, '67, Andre- sen, Harold, '66. Row 2: Anderson, James, '69, Argue, Harry, '68, Eiall, Joseph, '69, Barnes, John, '68. Row 3: Bartels, Roy, '68, Basler, Rodney, '68, Bioku, Samuel, '69, Bock, Rodney, '67, Row 4: Bragg, Michael, '69, Burnham, Arlie, '68, Castle, Larry, '69, Chaillie, Richard, '68, 339 we Making a final effort to forestall winter, Cather residents hit the field for just one more game Cather Hall Playing Fields Fall Prey To Landscapers Forming football games on a cement sidewalk "field," Cather men improvised as forbidding wires cut offformergroundsforsodding.Fromearlyspringthrough late fall, Catherites "frisbeed" before labs and exams. Disappearing furniture caused concern among dormies as bare halls and bare walls became evident. To combat hygienic white rooms, residents borrowed lounge furniture to add to already crowded rooms. Budgeting time between Kosmet Klub skit practices and open houses, Twin Towers' tenants found enough time to enjoy the two-to-one ratio of girls to boys. Shar- ing the same recreation areas, dining rooms and TV rooms with coeds, Cather boys presented amiable man- ners to foster female companionship. Chucking studies for more enlightening pursuits dormies hold an evening 'pillow talk' conference O ll f .s l rg: f 4 ' G ,Fil . se' as VF 'K' 5 K- gt if N 3 :E in l 'T' T1 , ' 7 777 p-XA V 5. 6-" 'I V 9, , - 'f f:,: 'ig 6 " 'I al i 5 by ' , , D, WL, , '-Li 'F-31:5 3 ,- ,-L li lb' Q, '?2ny- lxfiifs- ' -fi , 1 21. 1- -r ' + ' - 1 -1. 1, ' ' f'Z3i3,,' I -V ff? - QE, if V af- ,1QI'iF'i+ff '2slf'1,::1- r N 'Skin' , ' , 353. 4 -5 f Y' X x 'l x ix E Ml, i I . ., ik , f. ,. 5211- ' 5 fi' I-Q , -1 r :ki 1 ' ' I ir . jg: Q, , l A , 5, . ii' A ' .5 . i- ,-,. ll .ETSI 9:--J. ll",fii4lff EU' Y -I Row 1: David Richard '68- Deats Philip '69- Doctor Jerry '67-Donwer Dennis, '69, Row 2: Ebke, Terry, '69, Ender, David, '69, Enenbach, Craig, '69, Field, Donald, '66. Row 3: Finke, Ronnie, '68, Fox, Bruce, '66, Frasier, William, '69, Frecks, Gary, '69. Row 4: Frederick, James '69, Furrow, Michael, '68, Gatewood, Joe '69, Gibson, Mike, '68. Row 5: Gilmore. Jack, '66, Gleisberg, Robert, '67, Goecke, David, '69, Goulet, James, '69. Row 6: Haberman, Joe, '66, Hansen, Richard, '68, Harms, Allan, '67, Hartman, Klaus, '67. Row 7: Hatch, Kenneth, '68, Heaston, Gary, '66, l-leikes, Russell, '68, Heinernan, Dennis, '69, un 1 1,6 .i f .. , , . V .. ' if "'1f,Fl'- ima. , .,,- V--. ., . .. H , ing- I ,Ir I A :L Mu- 1 .. l lg A Y V .. , . . . , ,. A . . Vw F A43 J 'C ev ' A' ul: V Q " w lf' ' lass. ,,. '-E' - 'D j 554- Q.. I --14 Ji, kb uw " , 'NW SJ I 'T li 3 , I 4' L L- iv dr. i ., 1 : ' '1-:Meena . .,., I ,. ...- ,LEW , 3 V . iv Y..- Y an ev n . :lug-ng f. . l'!3 '5' Lb - . 4 W- l -.-.......,. . 4, . - ..,, N., , l .. ln'e.,u: tip, n 1 Il I N ml. I , v ll W, 1 WU Q71 V M .-A !E5E,51:13.g:-., , ., 1 3' Q , Ev, ly. 4' ' 1 ' 'EQ' Wild " ' .' ,ij 3 rv VX 1 .. , lg. L,,. 4 'In PE - -rg? Ill N l W l V ' . lv ii , N lm! . -gg, if ., . V 5 H 7 -1, ' , ,, Y Foregoing crammlng for tomorrow s quiz, ll 'Q-AV: f ' fi ap, ,i a resident resorts to solitary confinement -j.'2.:.j,g.. i f-. gjgjx- 5. I .5,, ,. ' 5, 'mga res ..y 35 .512 --,J A lf J-vfllgf? 71? il .z., 5 -life. 1 il:-: wir A : J' " ...lv , . ' A 'rl , 3.5: . .- if ' 6 .1 . . , " . .L ,. 1 , , ,. gs l :ef 1, X 'l 1 A l . ,B '..- l 1 1-D ll hi. c 4-:L ,, . : ...Q .2 , I ,- .' . 3 -H93 Lrg 'l . '. 'r le.. . , .E lll ll H V Z I. f I: 2 ' z I .3 W' ,bil .551 Y .aw-I . ,1 ' --1: 1.2 ,CJ . an "" iii Fi.. in l A .3 gre 8 --im' .'. .. of v n -I -iiiwq ,al Row 1: lmler, James, '66: Johnson, James, '67: Johnson, Richard, '66: Keifer, David, '6B. Row 2: Klutman, Ronald, '69: Kotecha, Vinod, '66: Krull, Richard, '66: Kucera, Richard, '6B. Row 3: Kusek, Michael, '68: Lee, Howard, '67: Lefler, Francis, '67: Lessig, Verle, '69. Row 4: Lezotte, Robert, '66, Loftus, John, '68: Lovejoy. David, '68: Ludwig, James, '68. Row 5: Luzio, Leon, '68: Manley, Eric, '69: Matzen, George, '69q w I es '66 Row6 McCrer Jerr '69 Meader Ga '66 Messmer Michael '68 Metschke MEX el. Jam . . I Y. Y. 5 . fy. : . . 1 . Harlan, '67, Row 7: Neemann, Roger, '66: Nichols, Harold, '67: Nixon, David, '69: Nardine, Gaylord, '66: Oehm. James, '68p Olson, Court, '69, Pfeil, Bruce, '69: Plisek, Carroll, '69. Row 8: Pollman, Dledrich, '66: Propst, John, '69: Prentice, George, '66: Redman, Toney, '67g Reppert, Steven, '68: Richardson, Barton, '68: Ridenour, Brian, '69: Rubottom, Harlan, '68. Row 9: Reuter, Marc, '66: Ryan, William, '68: Schulz Calvin, '69, Sennentz, George, '69, Shrader, Gordon, '6B: Slusher, Russell, '69: Small, John, '69: Small: field, Michael, '68, , ff . . dl . U H., , . A lf f 21 .54 5' 'il of 1 -- .... N' A Rik' ,ifiii f ii 6' A' 'F i , Q " ei ' ' ,ni l ' sg: 1.1, 6 .2, l ' ltfi- i . -'f , : -I x , - 4, -, .-fe t I fi, Qi . Vx la as :iii ,- '. ' ff: n 'W' . ' ' , . v A ,, f 6 'wie " ' fi.: i . 1" i-' X ,V is I' ' 4' lit,-r 'Li-Q 'r c 1' , me 1, 6 , . :gtg -, L, -l Q .i - i 'fl K 7'1" , 1 e Y' 'l . 35,4 ,Wy 'X P - R' 55.1, fi j 1 jr' - -af ' . gig! - . ,,,, A - " " yi' .' ,V ge t - . , ' 4, il' ' VL- - ' ,-+ .' 1 1.1 1 ,l , --f-' , an , ' 'Ju , ' af i , P1 ., xy l. ,.,. Y .ef :.. 12' ., '-4 ii ,r iii-il z xiii ' ' f r: 'ffy fi? f- TIF ,SY ff if we Z7 lf- i- , A .1:..i .i 2 - , .. ' .-'. ,Jie i 'H ' i isis"-1 " " -"S, gli, U ,ml 'r aw E' 3 ' V 2- 'i' i' -A "" 'Ji L - E -'x filg- Q l "V i X'f"'iii 54? Mk "",,1'2i-,'- 7? FZ? L ' 't .r ' T' 2 ' -1: 1 :.+. .,.i ,jg ' ,.- ,",e,,,4,i N'--, 'f .- . Ig I, .' . 2:15 X , ll ,551 53' 'I' - if l I 'Q' 'ml s' L Q Ui? I 5 aw: L "V ': M ,- ii 'K 'f",f . '1-fo 'ff . . 4' e, - E, 2' . A L ""' .:. V ,az ' . f' .5 11 A--gil. lk 1 " -V? , ,lem J- - 'Q Yifif w 0,1 ' .lx Row 1: Sohus, Steve, '69, Spacly, Clair, '68, Struve Paul, '67. Row 2: Svvagerty, Terry, '69, Tiaden, Nor- man, '68, Taiga, Omo, '69. Row 3: Thoendel, Victor, '67 Thomassen, James, '69, Umunna, Victor, '68, Row 4- Vancleave, Robert, '69, Wallwey, Loren, '69, Whitney Riel, '69. Row 5: Wiclhelm, Robert, '68, Willman, James '68, Woltemath, Charles, '69. Row 6: Wortman, Robert '69, Youngberg, Robert, '68, Zimmer, Charles, '68 Row 7: Zumbrunn, Walter, '69. V As victim of a roommate s short straw, a Cather man buys for goodie gorgirig. . F . is T . r. , 4, Tom Holeman, President Business Administration, Omaha Abel Holds Dorm Election To Initiate Hall Legislature Living in a new dormitory, residents of George P. Abel Hall organized and put into effect a governing body for the thirteen story building. Lacking a hall coun- cil for the entire first semester, Abelites contacted all 1,056 residents for suggestions on slating, voting and installation techniques for dorm elections. As a means for getting acquainted at the beginning of the year, individual floors held street dances in the patio in front of the dorm. Ushering in spring social ac- tivities, residents held a St. Valentine's Day "Massacre Dance" complete with cupids, arrows and hearts. Awaiting the completion of the adjoining girl's dorm, Nlari Sandoz Hall, the University Public Relations Department held dedication ceremonies in the spring. The Board of Regents, Chancellor Hardin and various administrative and governmental officials attended. Abel Executive Council: L A Back Row: J. Ready. E. Hilz, M. McNeil, J. Elelina, S. Jordon, C. Nelson. Front Row: F-2. Mehmken, secretary: W. Morton, vice-presidentg T. l-loleman, president: D. Janssen, treasurerg J. Arndt, residence director. 44 V l n ,ma Q v Li" Jffij 1' ,s , ,1 4 J 7' ww 1 1 +A' Q, - .' 'lg' . ul 7 if mr! ,.'-, ' 5- , .,-4. Q , . 4 , . VH: ai J :AJ , W .pr A .,. . if , 1- .1 M. Y f sf, 6 1' 3 Q 5 .ax M I . .. ,. V '- ii 'if if 1 QV '55 V " 1 , , .Lf ,l me 5 :Vf"' ' x f' , If 53. zu - A, , '- Q I ' 1 vV. ' A I . B, ,xp ,, lar, 4- . 1 - . ,, Sf- 5553, ms- ,x va., f x -, I V ,: , . ig VY .. V ' , ' Q Q' pl : 'fgpxx mul' , fax? : ,-e.,-.N-.iz-f. . , , lE,'Fi?':4 ' fe '. :': ' 'iii- ii t 5? lr 4 li EJ. ,,, X, , f Qi,-if 'lnr if " ' X' lil Q' Q , ?.f.- s ily? 'I :N in g X1 ."' ',, fi ee , . ' ., W 5 MH if , -I j t o . Fffrliflifadif- 1 , i 7 x, 754 " 9 v ' fiilflljig " , 1 ' i its " ,Ales -, ': ,Qi ef' rss:-231.1 1'5- Y' 75, V, if i Row 1: Schulte, Dennis, '67: Secla, Peter, '69, Settles, Douglas,'68. Row 2: Settles, Gorclon,'69: Shafer, Jack '66: Sich, Duane, '69. Row 3: Spivy, Clark, '69 Tuchenhagen, David, '67: Vlach, Harold, '69. Row 4: Voris, James, '69: Wagner, Ronald, '66: Woodbury l-larry, '6B. Row 5: Yost, Rod, '69: Zumbrunn, Walt, '69 Zuttermeister, Robert. '69. Abel Men Ponder Distance To Campus Activity Points Fine for journalism majors but exasperating for architecture majors, Abel Hall's location caused con- cern among residents. Braving wind and weather, students left the new "northeast campus" for a ten block trek to 7:30 Chemistry labs in the 501 Building. Awaiting the completion of the new girl's hall, Nlari Sandoz, dormies loomed around the tarp covered dining room door in search of feminine companionship. Until the opening, men found solace in "Batman," nights of poker and frequent weekend trips to Kansas. Turning the dorm into a practice field, Abelites took advantage of the buildings size and turned hall- ways into not-quite-so-straight quarter mile tracks. After a turn around the corridor, athletes calmed down to play shuffleboard or do the eternal laundry. 348 Noran Clatanoff, President Agriculture, Howells Pioneer Adds Four Rooms To Enlarge Resident Space Increasing the house living capacity to thirty-four men, Pioneer Co-op built a new 330,000 addition at the rear of the house. The two story concrete block struc- ture added four two-man sleeping and studying rooms, a new kitchen and enlarged dining facilities. Putting increased emphasis on scholarship and study halls, the house pulled the highest average of the four university co-ops. Members received the ICC travel- ing Scholarship and Activity Trophy at the annual all- co-operative banquet in the Nebraska Union. Putting aside books for social activities, Pioneer men held a South Seas Party at the Bali-l-lai Inn. ln an atmosphere of orchids, leis and grass huts, brothers and dates danced under artificial palm trees. Upon discovery, a guilty Pioneer dweller exclaims, Caught in the act of goodie-grabbing once more! f il l -i .n - ".-Wk. 1 " L , a ,,, few? r 'rl l -E-'Rf l X .r s 'Y ' if-RAT A- Q I ' -534,5 l I f Iv 5 ' 2 rirr f,.1r"f..' ra. - ., ' . ., Row 13 Baumert, Fred, '69g Bockus, Richard, '66, Carhill, Kyle, '67g Car- ney. Michael, '69. Row 2: Clatanoff, Noran, '67g Conley, Larry, '69g Fick- enscher, Keith, '69, Grandon, Raymond, '66. Row 3: Hansen, Donald, '68g Harder, Russell, '68, Jensen, Ronald, '69, Jeub, Thomas, '69. Row 4: Kehr, Alan, '67g Rowe, Dennis, '69, Scherzberg, Arnold, '66g Sterns, itevgrs '68. Row 5: Winkler, William, '69, Wendland, Jerry, '69g Wilkinson, m, . 349 Cornhusker Restyles Motif With Livingroom Additions Returning to school in the fall, Cornhusker Co-op members entered a completely remodeled livingroom. The front room featured new furniture, wood paneling, drapes and wall-to-wall carpeting. Announcing plans for construction of a new co-op house, the group began a building fund to help finance the new structure. With continued growth in size, Cornhusker in- creased membership to the highest number in history. The total enrollment for the 1965-66 year reached a new peak of fifty-six men on the house rolls. Heading second semester events, the Co-op marked the social calendar with the annual Spring Formal. Held at the Colonial Inn, couples dined in a candlelight at- mosphere followed by an evening of dancing. Edward Kodet, President Engineering, Belvedere, South Dakota Ready to volley, Co-op men find a broken 'bird in the hand' falls short of tennis prerequisites. O -ir w, H. ., Afternoon "sing-alongs" lend atmosphere to interrupted study sessions at Gornhusker Co op fy J' 1 J- ' in 'xi f 1 i i. I A id gf ' I ,Tri . f 1 - 1 X '23 l 9' ,ji-xx . I ,Q -I ,15 5 , ' .2 'T L AE Ii FN ff ' - W 1 l 'I' , Mi- ,r .I , XT.. - xr. ls H 1 "K Row 1: Albracht, John, '69g Carstensen. Dale, '68p Cordes. Michael. '69: Golter. Gary, '68, Golter, Jerry '68, Golter, Ronald. '66. Row 2: Kaufmann, Michael, '69g Kodet, Edward. '66, Kopecky Norman '69, Nakasato, Earl, '67p Nykodyrn, James, '67, Pesek, Thomas, '68, Row 3: Quady, Philip, '66, Rejda, Roger, '66, Schoen, Leroy, '68p Smith, David, '69, Stalioius, Philip, '67g Stehllk, Loren, '6B. Row 4: Stuck, Wayne. '69, Theis, Wilfred, '66p Walker, Larry. '69: Zuerlein, Gene, '69. 5 Qi , , , i V" - ng " il if W. 3' -.X 1 In R . W ' I, N34 Li x . U David Frese, President Engineering and Architecture, Omaha Co-op Bolsters Competition For House GPA Skirmish Encouraging academic excellence among new members, Brown Palace Co-operative awarded a 3550 scholarship to the freshman accumulating the highest overall grade points the first two semesters. The house also promoted upperclass studies by presentinga trophy to the active member with the best grade average. initiating a Stepped up program of community serv- ice projects, the co-op sponsored a "Children's Day" for twenty-five orphans from several Lincoln orphanages. Following a springtime tour of the Nebraska State Capi- tol Building, brothers took the children to Pioneers Park for an afternoon of games and a barbeque. To attract new residents, Brown Palace produced a ten page booklet on the advantages of co-operative living. The brochure detailed monetary savings, frater- nity-like atmosphere and social opportunities. ""ing,s Eff' - 'a ' V. v-"5-'L A "-,f'r.'.r7b:' ' ' V -. , , -f gf. :.'L. "3."f,4'- ' . . , 2-3-ff.. '-P-'...-.5 - . xg ....x-gina, . 1" , ' ,.. , ...' ' Donning grubbies for the first spring fling, brothers drop afternoon classes and add sun-burned skin. 352 Checl- fluctuating weather conditions, a resident ponders possible wardrobes. :nl 13. vzi - 9. ,- 48' ' :- " - . 7 - i'."g,.-mr: ' ' . -f',--L51 -1" ' ' ' . V ,w1'h15- '-sgrn 1-SL" ,-..f ,Qi Row 1: Adams, James, '67, Bartek, Gerald, '68 Best, James, '69, Brockmeier, Wayne, '68. Row 2: Budler, Lawrence, '67, Crum, Steven, '68, Dargurz Michael, '68, Frese, David, '66. Row 3, Fricke Wayne, '68, l-lemberger, LaRue, '67, Jarchovv, John '69, Lerner, Paul, '68. Row 4: Lonowski, Delrner. '68 Manzel, Robert, '69, Meyer, Harlan, '68, Nelson Richard, '68. Row 5: Ohmstede, Richard, '66 Prange, William, '67, Reinke, Lester, '68, Schmee- ckle, Lloyd, '68. Row 6: Schroeder, Michael, '68 Sheffield, Doug, '68, Sheldon, Ray. '68, Strasburg Kenneth, '67. Row 7, strasnurg, william, '66, sum! van, Vincent, '66, Tramba, Norman. '67, Trausch Thomas, '69. Row 8:Widl'1alm, Michael, '68. 353 Burr West Council Grows To Give Men Equal Voice To meet the need for more representation, resi- dents of Burr West increased the size of the governing council. Bar lVl grew to fifteen members and added more executive strength to all of the floor offices. Ex- panded legislation allowed all men residents to have representation in organizing and formulating policies. ln Spring Daycompetition, men powered to second in the tug-of-war contest. Continuing the strongeremphasis on intramural participation, Burr West captured runner- up honors in the All-University Softball Championship. With interests in both scholarship and activities, the hall placed residents in both Alpha Zeta and Phi Eta Sigma. Burr men also took first place in the annual Block and Bridle livestock judging contest. -aff---fs-Q -- - 7- -- 131 ' gp ' F. . , ,D Lauren Boeckenhauer, President Agriculture, Wayne An empty mailbox again proves to be the long and the short of many a lunch hour excursion. 354 V 1 1 u J ..-1, '11,-r, ' nf -I 4. 7.1. E , .U . ., y, w 'p. 'r 15M uh f ,2u yf fW g f 14 wi f lu iu Q 1i : . l. LIIMIKIE 'lm?'PI'i1151Ai1 givzqftm 'fig 'hui' II hji? iin, HI ll? 1, H i1 a2 ,if rim 15 s!' ff-r'I'wfUf ,1 ' '1!WQfI"1" HL, I H, iam ln v 5 'Q u lg' Mix :Ik Ki nI"5 QnrI mis' Vglunffif :LH el :rl ll- la ll :F ff' it A, , ilmlf Q: lg! Ev , ', -ska V E' wi VV x A X If- T 5 1 If I Q N Q. 1 G' X X --1 1 ' 'W a . Af- 5.- ' 17 -' T' , -, .415 1 A f3's EFL-A S Galen Muller, President Teachers, Newman Grove Ag Men Fosters Projects With Social Service Work Spearheading participation in community and so- cial services, Ag Men pledges held a Christmas Party for seventeen boys from Whitehall Orphanage. Follow- ing a traditional dinner, the orphans and hosts played games, sang carols and opened Christmas presents. To increase house capacity by 14 members the co- op built a new addition at the rear ofthe house. After pre- liminary rezoning and financial preparations, brothers added a new dining room and housemother's quarters. To keep with the traditional meaning of Ag Nlen actives presented the annual Cowboy Party. Attendees and dates partied in a western-styled living room "saloon," complete with a room-length bar, a player piano, and a old-time floor show with dancing girls. ff!" :P,,.. Aiming for top archery grades, Ag Men convert a backyard into a make-shift shooting range. PM AI WUI kia: F L'-L. xw,,,' H f K ,lil fri 7 .,,.,j,,f A634 JH X x -vc- C0HeC'Cif'1g Contributions fOr Chafitb' COHGVS, Descending into the depths of Robbers Cave, members offerwreath decoration dividends. members explore possibilities for party sites, if a -'ww 1 1 1 2 ,.. 5 i i ' S ax 4 ' J is A a, ,,ggg' ai-' i' F ' M ,.,.,., Lg,.i 5 V -E i .,, i ii fszfg 1 Y me r-ia c 3 . ,if A S Teri ,Q - li, 4 in I , ., ' 1 H' 'fi of ! 358 ? '-BG i , T 2 In I Q s"'e, 'FT' Row 1: Vogt, James, president, 66, Rush. Nlarbro, vice-president, 66, Clark, Julee, 68, Susan, '66, Eckholt, Larry, '68, Fuller, Dorothy, '69, Gerlach, John, '66, Hiza, Douglas, '69 Kenneth, '67. Row 2: Huff, Patricia, '69, King, Jerry, '67, Kowrack, Linda, '68, Kruce, Gary, Lundeen. Wallis, '66, McLeod, David, '69, Onken, Judy, '66, Pabst, Susan, '69, Pivonka, Nancy Row 3: Popp, Arnfried, '66, Shaw, Vondra, '68, Wallin, Shirley, '6B. S Jim Vogt, President Teachers, Lincoln 0' grit. UNICORNS Add Members At Special Ballroom Party Sponsoring a fall dance for all unaffiliated ott- campus independents, UNICORNS increased member- ship rolls to a record number of 100. Displays featuring Peanuts cartoon characters on reserved bulletin boards in several University buildings implemented a cam- paign innovation as part of a new enrollment drive. In addition to the Robbers' Cave and Halloween parties, the organization initiated a Christmas "wreath- making" function. Proceeds from the sale of the door decorations went to the Viet Nam USO detachment. Second semester officers entertained the group at a banquet to recognize outstanding service. The two members with the highest scholastic average and total worker points received special certificates. l V. '1 97: 64 Com V bining social and service activities, LJNICORNS tackle Madonna Home repair tasks. 5 36 Towne Club Assists Child With Educational Donations Improving community welfare, Towne Club organ- ized tours and activities for the city's underprivileged children. In continuation of a four year tradition, a blind girl in Valentine, Nebraska received contributions of gifts and money from the Lincoln independents. To familiarize members with the University, the programs committee sponsored a series of talks by campus leaders. Dr. Carl Donaldson led a discussion on expansion of Union facilities while Kent Neumeister explained the functions of student government. Braving cold autumn winds, Towne Clubbers sold Orange Bowl souvenir hats before the Oklahoma foot- ball game. Proceeds from the project helped to finance additional philanthropic and social functions. Linda Miles, President Arts and Sciences, Lincoln Towne Clubbers contrive functional entertainment by combining records and decorative ingenuity. O M, h M.-XX 4 ' inf' 'USR 401. 4:1 , " .1 " I ang, X ,f L 1 ,V . tim!! ' P. " KW' 5 ss, 4 ',,? !'.Jf K--W 4- ,Q .' - ffffaffafiiww, wiv 1 ' - - i ' ",',-QQY , ' M -up-.R , 1? X f 1 31' ,1 QE. J A wif -3' 5. SL: rig Q Q?- . f v- JBA: nl ,H X 7 :,l 3 YH" 4511 Gi, Sk 'I V . ,L 3, -- 1-,"' MS.. ,I W -if ws' ,G 7. X 1. x X Greeks ,MJ U ffiffz? E73 ,. L: I A QV , ,-.ig:,QQgEL.L' sfmv 'Q' NL! Pl gmvpn 411704 af' ' ...- 75" f. F - 'I f. lsi-W , u 112: i , m , ,1 1 1 1 . HG?- r gil' N1 L H. " " 2-., D., ,- L I , 1. li . ' . l . K-C A IF 1 ' 'fm Q , . 4. A , " ' w .f 4 . , ,. ,. ,.. .,F K ss as gi 55' ' 1. ' ,w , I I L-ga mix, Msezfsf a 411 5 .. S ,,A,.. Y ,fx ' 'Wk -1: 5 34? , X x f , A . l H M W ' "f N 'X 15 1 47 , v U xl 5 '1' 1 I ,, xg' 1 M29 1' W H mg W, R . if 21:5 2 Qu . , ., . :W fi? .-S5331 2 Ss iff-if. ' Q 55? +- 'Ili if-3524 'fig V '21 .X .wx W X- 'Q L ' 553 U- ' , .QQ 2 Zzmfw 'lp Q.-. 'IQF9 ' ' ' ' ' '4 . if wi r Q, '. . . Q M... A435 s ,ff V . Y . Q' , 557, , - . - up 3 -9.1 J, 3325 , W f 7'-'VW Hlivti r Ei' ,. :Jak r' ' yu ., M- , iii? wif af: ai T-H MS' ,. W -www' J ful: wa 4, , LW' - A v ga. D - 5712754 J. E122 J Lyx 1 J 2 ii' xii Q Wi iv PM I L I X 1 3 66 f""3'5' f , R' 'x A P, IH L ,S f 11.1 I , 1 1 K. P g. -fi-fi pf s ,gy 6 1 'f' -'if 'f 'fl.'A'I, ,Y , E HZ 5- f Q W ' 5 4" i, W P q i ' ii' i mfii ' R X K Janell Quaring, President Home Economics, St. Paul Taking advantage of long-avvaitecl spring warmth and sunshine, Alpha CI'ii's improvise tri-cycling to peclal off winter dolclrums. AXO's Inaugurate Program Recognizing Faculty Fellow To foster personal relations between faculty and students, Alpha Chi Omega participated in the new Faculty Fellows Program. Conferring honorary member- ship on Dr. Robert Hough, the sisters and English professor exchanged ideas at Monday night dinners. Honoring Alpha Chi parents, the chapter sponsored a Parents Day apart from the University schedule. Mothers previewed a Hovland-Swanson sneak-showing of spring styles while daughters initiated dads as Brothers of Hermies in the Order of the Red Carnation. Philanthropic activities focused on the adoption of cabin of children from Cedars Orphanage. Each class planned a special day of games and refreshments with the group celebrating various holidays. Here Day also emphasized altruistic deeds as members delivered Easter baskets to Lincoln's Orthopedic Hospital. 367 New ADPi Alumni Chapter initiates Scholarship Fund Combining State Day and Founders' Day, Alpha Delta Pi held a banquet in Lincoln for alumnae from all parts of Nebraska. At the close of the evening Omaha alums presented three fifty dollar grants to the out- standing freshman, sophomore and junior girls with the highest averages. The newly organized Omaha group set up a fund for continuance of the scholarship aids. Pledges worked at the Whitehall Orphanage enter- taining girls from nine to sixteen years of age with small parties and regular visits. Sisters demonstrated the cor- rect way to apply makeup and other social graces. ' Creating closer house relations, pledges planned an afternoon picinic forthe entire chapter and challenged the actives to a football game at Pioneers Park. After the younger members proved the better athletes, the ADPi's returned to the house for refreshments. I, Yr A 5-.. TI 4 ' "T gan.. 'Jin-'vw -lx . Qs.,M.?w-Rm j . ff 2 V 'Li " ' ri 'iz All 8 Jon Ann Henderson, President Arts and Sciences, Lincoln ., .Qc . "asa . Q' 'fwii' i ,..-, .1 Enjoying pizza and pop during a 'night on the town,' ADPI pledges socialize at a picnic supper. ' I Hl'.F"'ff . - H . - F lei ' 'V"i 'f-g'.'- " f 1 2 -,. - 'f-sri, 1 7 Q 2' " f 7 l - " 'l if 7 - , .f ,.,, fi 1 . ,l, - ,a . , K ,- 1 " ,we .',,.,,.. ,,, i- - 6- , 4. - " ,z ,-" , -1- . 9: if ' 'Q -- bk, 13,3 1 4 ',l "' 1 ' ' ., '1 , ll- 3 . , A. , If-,,,, t ' N ui A A A 4' . , ,, 'I' 1 1, Y X- F rt- .fm V Ir' - 1 I - H: .M ,iw fy if-' , V n II , - - af 'A :JA L? . 1 ,H,,, V Q, . - l , i ' '4 , -,r--' ' L::L3'fgg, - ,Q A '- Ycrgrlgr A, V e V Q,,.,.',,j,+ N V .,,, .. '- l I I . giigm 4. " " ' , 1, - , ' ' -u r. Al l - , Q-I iff? X-L I A Ui" S' ,, , , ,J . , , , , we , 1 l ,. . . ,S . 2 fi , . wh Q., .A Q - ' Y ' B., " .- , f Y 4- 4' ' i " ,Q , ,, ' 1 4- , -' 'V Jr' "ii, if.. - 4 ' . gl ' .. - . 1,1 , , .V V A Q., D A I A ' ' f ' - ,.-1 1, .. ,H ' f 'ff' , ,'i' Row 1: Henderson, Jon Ann, president, 66, Jilek, Marilyn, vice-president, 66, Goodroacl, Marjean, I - - , ' - , . ' '- , " , I secretary, 66, Darland, Dede, treasurer, 67. Row 2: Arneson, Sally, 68, Ashby, Amber, 69, Barrett, , ' ' ' - -f, ,gill ' -' .L - 1, Susan, 69, Boel, Lola, 67, Brower, Diane, 69, Brumm, Jodie, 68, Callan, Catherine, 69, Carlton, Mari- ' , Jw., P, ' 9 '5 .b -.' lyn, 67, Chamberlin, Janet, 67. Row 3:Chamberlin.Judith, 67, Chase, Marcia, 69, Christe-nsen,Janet, 1, l l' . ' X- 1., 'K ,, l 67, Clifton, Sandra, 67, Corrigan, Kathleen, 69, Cronkite, Carla, 68, DePutror1, Dee, 69, Dinklage, .b - ' Yr -- 2:7 . ff- , Joyanne, 68, Drayton, Ann, 69, Flanagan, Jeanne, 67, Fletcher, Christine, 69, Goings, Dianna, 68, Qiv' ln ,I -. if . .V H .,J,,f Gordon, Anne, 67, Grant, Carolyn, 67, l-lagelberger, Susan, 68, Harris, Lynda, 68, Hartwig, Chris, ' ' ul... A . , V, M 69, Hastings, Karen, 67. Row 4: Hill, Cynthia, 69, Hinrichs, Carol, 68, Hyland, Patricia, 67, Jilek, ' ' - 'f ' 1- Gloria, 68, Keyser, Gayle, 68, Kuester, Kathy, 69, Lane, Linda, 66, Lawler, Pat, 69, Lyon, Carolyn, 69, Mach, Janet, 66, McGaffin, Sheryl, 69, Meyer, Della, 66, Nelson, Jean, 69, Nelson, Sherye, 69, Nodlinski. Vicki, 69, Norskov, Juliane, 68, Petersen, Genne, 66, Rakow, Mary, 66. Row 5: Roberts, Bonnie, 68, Salzman, Jan. 67, Schlueter, Carol, 69, Seaton, Fern, 68, Senf, Gloria, 69, Smith, Susan, 66, Sutton, Dorothy, 68, Penterman, Bobbi, 67, Pieper, Selma, 69, Powell, Nancy, 68, Powell, Peggy, 69, Queen, Carol, 68. Row 6: Sltorius, Susie, 68, Speece, Alice, 66, Swoboda, Betty, 67, Waggener, Zlgirley, 69, Walker, Tish, 69, Ward, Shirley, 69, Wirth, Rosangie, 69, Young, Suzanne, 66, Zier, JoAnn, 3 69 il' 5? 0 X A ,r WM A - 1 ' --237 H' . in ' V' EQ?" r' , .Nj-LA 1 y lg, fi Q -. 1, v , 4X A, .,f'ffVd'ff --Q.. . W lx if ,Civil 4, 'V M' 7.- 4' 'YK .11 ,Alia E if F :A B. he N il. -Q ' Y '-'fi' 4r,7. Q 1 95,35 ' M iifii - .srl-aw . K A 1 A'- 1.1 i- -in W' . A ,pa ww if 1,513 Fraternal Conclave Grants Dual Recognition to AOPi's Traveling to St. Louis, lVlissouri, for the forty-sixth National Convention, University of Nebraska's Alpha Omicron Pi's captured top scholastic honors among sister groups throughout the country. Zeta Chapter also received the Achievement Cup from the national organ- ization presented to outstanding local groups. Taking advantage of a free autumn Saturday, actives and pledges gathered in the house living room for the annual Fall Funday. After a session of popping popcorn and listening to radio coverage of the Nebraska football game, members utilized the remainder of the afternoon for a clean-up-the-house project. Charity minded AOPi's gained Panhellenic recogni- tion with the Madeline Girard Philanthropic Cup. Par- ticipation in the Easter Campaign, lVlarch of Dimes and separate class drives formed a basis for the award. 1 gf- Marsha Lester, President -. '- Arts and Sciences, Seward . 45, , . .. Tai . 5 ' J a . 'Pi ,.... l, . at A 'i lf 'W X Y--77 tw:-QQ' 4 Row 1: Lester, Marsha, president, 66, Devaney, Pat, vice-president. 66 Alber, Jacquelyn, vice-president, 66, Cramer, Carol, treasurer, 66, Arnold Patricia, 68, Arthur, Kathy, 68, Barrows, Glenice, 68, Baumann, Gwen, 67, Bedient, Carolyn, 68, Behmer, Cheryl, 69, Beneck, Sallye, 66, Bernhard Sandra, 69, Booth, Barbara, 69, Row 2: Bornemeier, Susie, 68, Braun, Paul- ette, 69, Bredthauer, Joan, 68, Broutman, Leslie, 68, Buell, Janet, 68, Burtch, Nancy, 67, Calstrom, Dee, 69, Converse, Nancy, 68, Crofford, Mary, 69, deFreese, Nancy, 68, Dennis, Sandra, 67, Dewitz, Claire, 67, Dokulil, Linda, 69, Eisenhart, Ellen, 69, Evenson, Margaret, 69, Falt, Jenefee, 69, Fleek, JoAnn, 69, Getscher, Cheryl, 66, Row 3: Gibbs, Linda, 68,. Glover Roxie, 68, Goedert, Cookie, 69, Grothe, Linda, 67, Hakanson, Vicki, 69 Hametz, Charlene, 69, Hardee, Marilyn, 67, l-leinke, Terry, 69, Helm, Sarah 67, l-lolm, Mary, 69, llg, Joyce, 68, Jakobsons, lrene, 69, Johnson, JoAnn 68, Kingston, Terry, 66, Langford, Jean, 66, Lawrence, Donna, 69, Law: rence, Geri, 67, Lind, Janet, 67, Row 4: Livers, Nancy, 69, Loomis, Lorraine, 69, Lunger, Kathy. 69, Markley, Michelle, 69, Maus, Paulette, 68, Merriam, Georgia, 66, Miller, Marilyn 66, Newhouser, Jayne, 69, Oestmann, Rita, 67, Olsen, Diane, 66, Petersen, Ellen, 69, Peterson, Suzi, 68, Row 5: Pohlenz, Peggy, 69, Potter, Susan, 67, Pressler, Carol 66, Preston, Susan, 69, Rein- miller, Rita, 68, Rolfsmeier, Kathryn, 67, Rolofson, Jeanne, 68, Rolston, Lynn, 68, Sasso, Candy, 67, Schmitt, LeAnn, 67, Sommers, Janis, 69, Sow- der, Sharon, 69, Row 6: Steckley, Susan 68, Stevenson, Pamela, 66, Thur- ston, Lynn, 66, Uden, Cheryl, 67, Vakoc, Jean, 69, Wallace, Alys, 69, Westerhoff, Sue, 68, White, Betsy, 67, Wiemann, Shari, 68, Wightmann, Debbie, 69, Wright, Linda, 67, Yakel, Martha, 69. 3 IV-, Susan Anderstrom, President Arts and Sciences, Ashton fx - i..:..,, , 1.,,,, T.. l ' 1 HJR A , t 1 ,, v l , 1 1 ,, , 5. .4 .. Row 1: Anderstrom, Susan, president,'66, Oden, Jane, vice-president, 66, Hoffmaster, Jean, vice-president, 66, Stoner, Carol, treasurer, 66, Achelpohl Jan, 68, Alberding, Mary, 67, Anderson, Gena, 69, Anderson, Sylvia, 66, Biles Betsy, 69, Bloomgren, Taffy, 68, Blue. Peggy. 68, Brackle, Becky, 68, Bredemeir, L '67.R 2,B b Jd 69-C 'C I 69-Cth Cth' 69, ana, ow us oom, u y, , asper, aro yn, , a er, a ie, Christensen, Linda, 69- Cochrane, Kathy 66, Co ,Virginia 66,Crawford, Cynthia 66, Davis, Mary, 69, Deems, Mary Ann, 67, Defilwall, Linda, 69, Domeier, Pat, 68, Ducker, Mary, 69, Durrle, Mary, 69, Fenimore, Betsy, 69, Fjelstad, Jane, 68, Frear, Jane, 68, Fouts, Susan, 68. Row 3: Harding, Anita, 69, Heiser, Judi, 66, Henderson Frances. 66, Hester, Mimi, 69, Hoffmaster, Anne, 69, Holland, Kathy, 69, Holly: Carol, 69, Hoyer, Virginia, 67, Hummel, Virginia, 67, Irwin, Linda, 69, Jackson, Linda, 68- J Karen 68- Jo nt Ja 's 66- K ' M 69- K nlorock Ka e 67, , ones, , , y , ni , , elm, ary, , erse , y D, Kinney, Jane 69- Larmon, Courtney 68. Row 4: Korte Kathie 66, Leamer Linda 69, Ludwick,'Georgia, 67, Mattson, ljebra, 69, Mattson, Dorris, 66, Maurer, Bat, 68, Meedle, Candace, 69, Meyer, Gloria, 68, Mitzner, Gayle-ann, 68, Modrell, Donna 66, Moclrell, Jacque, 69, Morris, Carle, 67, Morris, Mary, 69. Row 5: Moredick, Cheri 69, Mudgett, Carol, 68, Nelson, Terry, 69, Nicoll, Kathryn, 68, Norberg, Barbara 69, Rudolph, Rosemary, 67, Salisbury, Karen, 69, Saunders, Ruth, 69 Schaffhausen, Linda, 69, Schumacher, Pat, 69, Sennentz, Winnie, 67, Severin Sheryl, 69, Smith, Diane, 67. Row 6: Sorensen, Judith, 67, Soukup, Nyla, 69 Soukup, Sheryl, 66, Stahr, Jeanye, 66, Stephenson, Cheryl, 67, Stoner, Kathryn 68, Suder, Annette. 68, Ulbrick, Mary, 68, Unthank, Pat, 68, VanSteenberg, Ann 68, VanSteenberg, Carrol, 66, Wise, Susan, 69, Woodhull, Diane, 69. 372 Alpha Phi Standards Week Adopts Discussion Format "Culture, Character and Conduct," a theme of Alpha Phi's Standards Board, crystallized in the form of Monday night discussions. Speakers ranging from authorities on integration to experts on fine china pro- vided the Phis with a variety of information. During Standards Week the board asked a panel of boys to express opinions on girls' dress and social behavior. To emphasize the importance of academic achieve- ments, Alpha Phi recognized the outstanding pledge scholar at the annual initiation banquet. Based on the outcome of first semester grades, the award consisted of a pin presented by the active chapter. "La Dolce Vita" exemplified the italian atmosphere of the yearly datedinner. Decorations and accordion music set the mood as sisters entertained dates with a buffet supper held in the Alpha Phi backyard. Mrkg L 1, is ,, .,,, . , .Nz . '1. . , 2- - , ,v ,i'f r,.f ,ig 1 I 'v I, ,,' -- V A-.E in' M it ll . I ' l , - , 6 f,. ,lf vm?-'ev' r . , -' ui 1 ' li .. . l . A f fig v ' 1.31 1 'F 'V' 1' , l ,' il , f Q4 '11 - ii -9 A .F Qc "H- ,.- ,-1. tl rx 'AU' - -., ,V .4.,f,- I, i, , , , 1 A u r l 5 l l Ji. , ,, - i Q ii ..,-"J", ,.7 i ii i Oi .u H. ii A in T Yi i if 1 i i umm - .. .. -41 ,cg .iss Enthusiastic Alpha Phi novices generate house spirit with the formula for Derby Day success. 1- , 1 i - ii I i - A S 'iii i , i u u iii- - i i 'L i ug ar yi 2 r ,,, , ., H , i 1 .Q ."' 1 -521 ,1 3 in --.- .I i, ,C f .. i' NAIA 'H FN' , I F11 xi' fi Wi N" ii? 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Hi" F 7-.1 2 Ail' 4 Tizfl Y K M39 TE: - , 7,53 'sayin r, . Z ffl P 1 dl V I F ' ,1 E-X V! .A 5 fx -f .Egfr .-Q. ,.. ,, , -AQ? 'T -X 1' il . sf K, 5 ' ' , HS " :-1 , ' ' ii f ii 1 'MFE " Y t 3 374 4 :O Besieging Sigma Chi "Sweethearts," Alpha Xi Delta troubadours provide tuneful Valentine greetings. 1 ...egg , :V V. YJ., 52, V: W- V.-1,1 Y .jlleam-BF-Ai.,,EfwEVZ. 532,324-.,1f,:MA. Mi V j-N Q -W .I viii, -,Iii-F.f:,Y Q - K- : V 4:,i,VTV X VA Y .fi , X . , ,C L, .Y -V , A i .V Agqgr- , - 9 -15 P+, ,qw iii:-,V , t lj. , 4 , H .51 I 1 "Axis-5, Ak i-132 , ' ' ., , Qi -'V. wif V i ' V - K, . ' 1 V7 I 1 -' ,vs , LT T' ,. . fl xg 5 2 W " ' W I I ' l' ':- I' 1 I," ' - N lg El. 7 All t ' V li vi: N " V , ' ,-iu.Lgg,- A f' 'V - 5' 'V i 1 , A. 1 -V 'a if 'gl L fl 1:-159' ' i ' ,Q 'xi ' VV ' ' ' "v ' Y in Lil A 'V V Vlfw K" ' " " -'ia' B tmfuf ' - . 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" V 1. l Xing W, E ,lx -Ei.: ing N V I in ix 1 .1 V J if ii ,xl Y 'rugs . .- f 1 , A., ' g gy? xii IV, X 3, S- LV , :L X ri R X ' 5 ' 7 X I V E in 'Ui - ' ' J T' . V! Y' v " V ' -" "':.,., ' , 1 . In e - ig W i i f i ' : v i , . . N -- VJ - -A I- VV , Vfff-jf:,:, ' N " i 7 A . : x:M.V..-ig. , ' I ' ,: 'CI '- i . , A - . - - . . Q .. , ...g -E, J ix 5-:gf NU , ,L-wkff Ji, i Q VV' JV V 'wiki i: - 1-V Q , Q V- , b ' ' EFY5-531, Z -fif J vs QV' ' fi 1 V 1 ' 1 " W, -'QV .-fi 5' ,f 1 fn ,, by V V- ' .ragqi We V , -'LV if-H . , i 1 , , wg I V ,V Wk .f, V, ,v ., 43.-sg' , v - N 515' N A gw q 5,4 if i V V ' W ,, If , 1 N . if Q . 'mn -'ffl 5 - r Y PM Q QI ' ' '4-J W-P' ' f 9' ' Vt -' 7' 'Wig "..' if ' 7 :3-5 'T' ' l f V 'L h : , ' V r . b .,, A Y , ' Y 1 1' ' A-g ' -', .' X V EH it V ff lx ' i , me - ft 1' ' V' I' V' V- ' 1 f if W ,iv v X5 V 5 if 2, ,. V v ef 11. ,T A 5: . .V 4 v 65.3. V -I ,V V f' 2: Kathy Deines, President Arts and Sciences, Lincoln '4 l e., .11 3, -.. l f l l,' li ' 5 K l g, i , . , C. Alpha Xi Good Luck Wheel Spurs Husker Homecoming "The Odds Are on Our Side" blazoned from the casino wheel of Fortune as Alpha Xi Delta coupled with AGR's for the only three-dimensional Homecoming dis- play. The Monte Carlo inspired scene with players' names inscribed on chips urged "Big Red" on to victory. Abetting Cupid in the traditional February target- practice, Alpha Xi pledges hit the mark on campus with "Singing Valentines." Verses to the tunes of an Oreo commercial, "Happy Talk" and "Hello Dolly" surprized 3' "Sweethearts" and helped support an overseas orphan. Football mania outbounded the Stadium as mem- bers imitiated gridiron antics at a fall retreat. Following a barbecue and competitive singing, Freshmen satir- ized ill-mannerisms and demonstrated formal etiquette. 'IJ' . L A 'lf " ,, .. 7 . Y . -Q' . Q' 'r ,,frEiQ6EE5'5'i n., L W -.: ggi' ' tl, 1.7 if J .ji , ' .- I n I lx K . l, W, l I 4 ! , l i A,'4'- - , A 95- - A . V :J M JF? " limi, ,il N I Y, I i vi., , 55:1 1,-1,-L . , 51, ,Rf-,wi 4 T 5 " , ,-' ,rv J ' " v" ' t f " ' ' " l ,l 4 i l ro," Q L vi '1'-'r Y V lr ,es " 1 4- f -' . V ' 1 ' ' 4 . H' . . ' . - 2 2 je: --,v . . 1 : -4. . , ,,, i l . ,rn A.: 1-, ' ii., 1 P! Im?-J , , :Tier 1 J. -PM P ,, ,. , fi wi- WT gf':.,.s, ' 7' .- ws-S ' - ,. l 'rr 'T "' l E Row 1: McDowell, Jane, vice-president, '67, Thomas, Elaine, vice-president, '67, Cleveland, Linda, sec- retary, '66, Rice, Mary Ann, treasurer. Row 2: Adams, Cheryl, '69, Ahlschwede, Barbara, '68, Anderson, Lana.'67, Ballard, Meredil:h,'68, Bantz, Nancy,'68, Beckman, Lynn,'68, Beers, Beverly,'69, Bentzinger, Kathryn, '67, Berger, Diana, '68, Bischoff, Carol, '67, Brolyer, Mary, '69, Brosius, Marsha, '67, Bush, Donna, '69, Carlson, DeEtte, '66, Carter, Sharon, '69, Catterson, Sallie, '66, Dodson, Jackie, '69, Elliot, Sue, '69. Row 3: Ender, Ellen, '66, Farris, Pam, '68, Fenster, Kaner, '69, Fox, Marilyn, '66, Graham, Carol: '68, l-lansen, Becky, '67, Hansen, Deborah, '68, l-loig. Cynthia, '68, l-lostetter, Wanda, '68, Hughes, Linda, '69, Hurich, Leeta. '68, Hutchinson, Marjorie, '68, Jacobson, Susan, '68, Jones, Sheryl, '69, Kanouff, Carol, '68, Kotil, Judith, '67, Kramer, Carol, '68, Kreifels, Gerry, '66. Row 4: Kucera, Dianne, '69, Layton, Linda, '69, Lindgren, Kim, '66, Livengood, Geri, '66, Maronde, Donna, '69, McDowell, Betty, '69, Meyer, Joyce, '67, Miller, Barbara, '66, Miller, Gail, '69, Miller, Kathy, '68, Nowak, Toni, '69, Oberlin, Carole, '68, Pahl, Jo, '68, Parrott, Jan, '68, Perkins, Janet, '67, Potter, Barbara, '67, Reif, Joyce, '69, Remmers, Patricia, '69. Row 5: Richmond, Marsha. '68, Richmond, Suzanne, '69, Roberts, Sherri, '69, Ross, Linda, '69, Schneider, Shirlee, '68, Schultz, Sharon, '68, Shattuck, Cathie, '67, Shaw, Linda, '67, Smith, Judy, '66, Smith, Virginia, '69, Svendsen, Lorene, '66, Svvihart, Sally, '69. Row 6: Thayer, Vickey, '69, Tyree, Collette, '68, Ward, Elizabeth, '69, Weiss, Donna, '68, Weiss, Linda, '69, Welsh, Carol, '69, Wendt, Karen, '69, Westerberg, Karen, '67, Wiecknorst, Sherry, '67, Witt, Carolyn, '69, Wood, Susan, '69, Wright, Carolyn, '69. 375 Sea-going Chi 0's Navigate Coed Follies Clean Sweep Sailing to a first place with the Coed Follies skit "l-llgh Sea-ciety," Chi Omega won the award for the third consecutive year and retired the AWS sponsored travel- ing trophy. Sisters took another first the same evening as tive Chi-O ballerinas whirled and leaped to number one honors in the travelers act category. To provide encouragement for high pledge aver- ages, actives kept a freshman honor roll and recorded outstanding academic achievement. The neophytes aided in obtaining the Panhellenic Trophy for second place in all-sorority scholastic competition. As a new house project, Lincoln alumnae of Chi Omega began an owl collection for the local chapter. Collegiate members continued the venture by search- ing through old attics and investigating bazaars to ac- quire tiny replicas ofthe sorority's symbolic bird. ,- , ' , '11 .,f.:- '-,' A rf W ' ' ' ,I 1 V . if L 'V X P , V93 5 i c lg , A , rl xt" ' .- ll 'wig-ji. Q X -ff 4 Q 1 .. Y lv. fgxfw I-I I' H ' 4 lei' """'m ' if", if , Ext--',! - 'il' Vo -'T , L nf - 'K - r , '4 n 1 'r' ' xiii, I if-.Q I A -f M 4 ' 1 , ' - -,.. as at-11, 'W ff" 5 l""'i ,- i 1 l l li il 'i fl 4 A l i . I 3 , l W ' -an' 4 n TT, i , n I l ,L I " l, ,- rl 1 tl ' .I 4 ,, , get i 'Q My ull xv l HI? Sally Leonard knits her brow in perplexity as coach Linda Finks outlines perling procedures. 376 . 1 .C- ,.:1.f ' ,,. , f?f-"8'- , , , V. YQ, -Q: ,V 5 i , - , -- K A, V 5 :V k ,.-- , J :V V , ,. ,Q A. 5.. :.f, i I ,i il 'ii-1. - - V. r ,Ai 9. 4 Y' , - X. l L - 1 A - - ,x al ,Vi . 5 1 r. at - . ea: ' . F.: .R 1' 'iff' -- ' ' ' .1 - . ri-" " lr" ,. - F-rVV ', ' - . -2 ' ' V J' "' " D 5 'V " N9 .55-2 4 ,V ., . 'W .1 sr , qi . fr- ,fl V: ,V .l V! V v . V J 51 F ,kg VQJVVVSV V, ,, V i V 5 X V . ' W V ' ' ' ' 'Vx ,, ' ' " 'Jiri' ' , 3 -x .5 'f ,J n ' "J" ' V -' i 1 9 fl aff' V - N . K - i . 'L .L V V 5 1 , 1, 3 . V , - f 1 ' ,: 1-J, -VV '-- 'F' -:'u'f1'V.ff1'z-1 1,6 , " 'eh' . Q " ' f :V ff -r . , . 1, - '- . .' .' - .i L. V 'l'lfrf'.-"- -,fx ,ng ' 1-4 EEA 2 , - gf:-'f .R T1 4' H ' 5-'Q' , W if " 1 - .MV ,' 'H' 41' " f ii. ' fit, ., f qi gr - V ' AV . - 33 " ,Q 5-I, i -V V V 4 ik V Vi I- . V , VV V l r. " f :V .C V .- I - ' A A - f l i - ' H" ,A ,f' LI, l 'Q "4 l .ge i A " 1 A . 4 . 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V 'V' V: . , K 'Q Judy Tanner, President Teachers, Lincoln l Row 1V: Tanner, Judy, president, 66, Coufal, Jeanette, vice-president 66, Fligunger, Kathy, secretary. 66, Adam, Jeri, 68, Ahrens, Celia 69, Anderson, Marion, 66, Austin, Beverly, 69, Beokmann, , Barbara, 67, Bernard, Diane, 68, Binger, Jan, 68, Bowman, Barbara, 69, Brock, Ruth, 69, Brown, Bonnie, 67. Row 2: Connell, Janet, 67, Coufal, Nancy, 69, Dale, Alice, 68, Dick, Carol, 69, Diffenderfer, Susan, 68, Doering, Janet, 68, Ekwall, Cathie, 67, Gefke, Pam, 68, Gove, Ann, 69, Heath, Judy, 68, Heizenrader, Nancy, 67, Hirschbach, Starr, 69, Housewright, Carol 69. Row 3: Hoyt, Letitia, 68, Hunt, Mary, 69, Johnson, Genell, 66, Jones, Donnelly, 67, Juffer, Kristin, 69, Klimes, Jane, 68, Kudrna, Jeanne. 69, LaBelle, Judith, 68, Larsen, Helen, 69, Larson, Ruth, 67, Leonard. Sally, 69, Lockhart, Cheryl, 68, Lorenz, Mary, 68. Row 4: McCartney, Judy, 66, McCullough, Joan, 69, McMaster, Margo, 69, Matya, Cheryl, 68, Metzger, Vicki, 67, Meyer, Judy, 67, Moravec, Carol, 68, Musselman, Ann, 68, Newville, Sally, 69, Niehaus, Betty, 67, Noll, Karen, 68, Oates, Kent, 68, Peithman, Ann, 68. Row 5: Peterson, Christina, 69, Quinnett, Lois, 67, Reutzel, Romney, 68, Riddle, Kathryn, 69, Rieger, Joline, 68, Rodgers, Juliann, 68, Schlothauer, Janice, 69, Schwentker, Mary Lynn, 66, Shalberg, Bonnie, 66, Smith, Gayle, 69, Tassler, Judith, 69, Thurber. Joanne, 67, Trumble, Judith, 67. Row 6: Wallace, Cindy, 68, Weber, Katherine, 67, Weimer, Diane, 67, Weymouth, Jane, 66. Row 7: White, Susan, 69, Wiltse, Mary, 67, Wright, Mary, 66, Young, Crys, 68. Cindy Johnso tk ' 'L i Q.. V X Q, wiv-.X J iv' '5-J . ,V 4' - ,V V51 rank?-,V, 5 .rm A, , '-fum A . . fl n's candle travels from table to table before lighting upon a new "Delt" pinmate. xv TL . "7 w ife xfggf' . 77' ,i'1g5'i:, ig J gk- 5:3 . Z" ' .:- '+ -E-Q: i ' I X1 V, ,'f1V- - jrlv. 552 . 'Ii gr .fee -, ,V 'H' V ." ag ' V fzf QV "' , ll l A :il 13" L' , V 1.1 l 1 A 5 ai 1 -i - I ' 4' '- 5 q ,Q ji . . . . l lx, in V , ,Eg . fi 7 ! 'Tai 1. 34 V A i ' 'f 1 .. if i " 5 "2-5'-515 ' .f-,ysa:.:.:,f-Q, ""f" Fi? 1" -1 , VF: V,-"vi W ,Q ,-:Q Y I - 1 1 . I A f z , Tata-ul Q ., Eaiillg V U-,V fgfigvx, V ' , . . Q .f ' :Q , '--- T A-A ii ' I A 2' Q U . . .0 41"-3 V 1 i ' L , JT Q l, - ' ' X ' -X' ,fbi is 54- .SY ' ' f A ,rw 1 Z' ' l A A ff V 'ff -'--- -.--V - -A --li 1 - . , -Vis-" 1-111:-'I-. "' ' UT' ' ' """i 'JFT'-" TY, 'nfl , T1f1'1'Jv'::p,,V. , , .V f- f-,V I. ii .A ,, r .g.. ti- -1 .4 vs l ., ,1. V Y l V - JV V iff, f.. , 'wtf it V 'J-H 2 77 Ts? i' '1 5 Nl Y -'I' K Y:-'-if' ' lima-f.wf w - ' I-'11, if ' QV. Q ' ' -'g , ' , ' , ' 'H .1 ifv in' 'E-f4Qi'!f5'S . .ki . ' xllflll E: l-ff , , , I 'if " ' 'QP Q3 X " ' "' . fl C Q . 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Nebraska Tri Deltas Host Annual Leadership Council Centering attention on Nebraska's Kappa Chapter, Collegiate delegates of Delta Delta Delta met in Lincoln for the National Leadership School. Study sessions emphasized various ideas about rushing methods and pledge training for the Delta Data Program. Topics such as group organization and finance also received special discussion during the summer con- ference. An evening barbeque stressed social life and a hootenanny brought members together to trade new Tri-Delt songs. A banquet featuring the National Chap- ter "roll call" officially ended the week long meeting. Vigorous Tri-Delts yelled the loudest and longest to win the annual Sigma Chi Derby Day Spirit Trophy. Sisters also showed enthusiasm by teaming up to win the honorary Producer Trophy by selling the most to University Theater productions. 7 . i ' ' 1 'l "i, .N If yy' ' 4 , ., .,-U gif ' 'f :l ui 6 l . ' wall'-,L ' , Lil l V '4 " V: ii A 'Q' -.3 ' " of 'ui ,- l '5-Q' . I x iif' 4 ,il i ,-1 ., 3 l i ll ' , ., ' ' ,,,,, g , ' i 'fi l W Q l .. X A X "" A ll CP .At-I ,I"f.S A " '-W. Vi.. Q , . 4 , . -ff ' 2 " ?"'i1jgf . L. .n D ,, . . I l Il wg 5,4 ' s,,,. ,KS 'M' ' V. , ' . , ,fi , i f ile" V 1 pfgotgif V Yin ' ti F if L.. ' 1' 253 i ' as I 1 TH, ,N ,': ,i"Y - ,-V ,lug ' IJ l, SWF. XV i . A 'tix'- ' . lil, ai. I R 4 , lf i , .wi ,igwzfff ,, il . l . ' n V X " , l , Q - 1 Nancy Baker, President Arts and Sciences, Lincoln E ui -G "" Piling up Spring Day techniques, Tri Deltas base hopes on a Phi Kappa Psi footing to perfect pyramiding poise. Row 1: Baker, Nancy, president, 66, Churchill, Barbara, vice-president, 67, Bulin, Nancy, secretary, 66, Brauer, Mary, treasurer, 67, Anderson, Jane, 69, Andrea- sen, Twila, 68, Armstrong, Beverly, 67, Barley, Michele, 69, Barta, Sharol, 69, Bartolain, Karyl, 67, Bernhardt, Ruth, 69, Best, Pamela, 69, Biehl, Ellen, 69. Row 2: Biere, Marcia, 67, Bohling, Cheryl, 69, Bond, Judith, 69, Bradley, Ann, 69, Camp, Gloria, 69, Deines, Karen, 69, Dunlap, Cheryl, 69, Ebers, Joann, 66, Fry, Carol, 68, Furst, Jackie, 67, Gessner, Annette, 68, Ghormley, Margaret, 67: Gicldlns, Sharon, 67. Row 3: Glaze, Nancy. 67, Gloor, Susan, 69, Granata, Susan, 68, l-larmes, Ter- esa, 69, Haskins, Barbara, 68, Haynes, Tori, 67, l-leckman, Mary, 67, Hoemann, Jean, 69, Hubbard, Sharon, 66, Hunter, Lucinda, 69, Hunter, Sandra, 69, Hus- bands, Barbara, 66, lrvin, Jane, 67. Row 4: Jansen, Jane, 66, Johnson, Cynthia, 68, Johnson, Julia, 68, Kamler, Sandra, 67, Lakin, Diane, 67, Lamp, Joanne, 69, Leigh, Anne, 69, Ludlow, Kathy, 69, McCartney, Milta, 66, McCuistion, Martha, 69, Mitchell, Cheryl, 68, Oldaker, Lynda,A67, Phillips, Janice, 68, Row 5: Powell, Susan, 67, Rames, Diane, 66, Reifschneider, Ellen, 66, Reiling, Candy, 68, Rey- nolds, Susan, 68, Rice, Sandra, 66, Rice, Vicki, 69, Robinson, Joan, 69, Ross, Jane, 68, Schottler, Jane, 67, Schultze, Pam. 69, Shanahan. Judy, 66, Shelledy, Sarah, 68. Row 6: Stanley, Priscilla, 69, Stasch, Susan, 66, Stingley, Lynn, 69, Stockton. Marylou, 69, Sullivan, Patty, 69, Trank, Judy, 67, Weber, Janice, 69, Weiss, JoAnn, 66, Werning, Donna, 69, Whaley, Mary, 68, Wilken, Jane, 67, Wooster, Barbara, 67, Yost, Nancy, 69. 37 9 ' Q , ,. L- . l , l 1 . ' F ,g.g.l ri' , -"r T-f ' 1 ' 5. if .' in i ,, . - ,- ia J' a - 1 Ni .f"'Yk lit. - Ja, -I V . 7491. ii. 1 Delta Gamma windshield wizards complete post-rush "sticky business". Combination Unit Presents Yuletide Surprise To DGs At the annual Christmas party, the executive coun- cil announced the acquisition ofa mimeograph machine and an FM radio-stereo console. The presents, pur- chased as a part of a 31,000 grant by a Delta Gamma Alumna, benefited both the actives and the pledges. Holding a surprise birthday party for Margo, DG housemother, the house entertained guests at the cele- bration. Margo returned after a dinner with the juniors to be surprised with gifts from NU housemothers. With an original arrangementof the spiritual "Elijah Rock," Kappa Chapter harmonized to a second place trophy in the annual Ivy Day Sing. Sisters also received recognition as one member from each class served on the May Queen's Court. Not forgetting scholarship, Delta Gamma claimed two Phi Beta Kappa initiates, three Mortar Boards and a Fullbright Scholar. Jean Holmquist, President Teachers, Oakland 380 1 I I ' , ' , V, - . l ,, fr- ' X -3-l ' ' , ro ' fi -.."1 Z-inf? ua l ' Nl' , f . , . 3 :,' '- v' ,M l, - 1 ' N, 3 ' V. ,,,-,V p- -it 1 - l V ki 1 , A ki - ,A Iv 'Q ki I ,N I , . lx ,IM I I l , v ,ii 3- i .F "fi, l' 1 '- , !'4-' ,l Y j J I - ' 'L' - I , 'N f'7Ta',. V, I f f 4 i I , 1, me 3 q Q P' .N F P ' 'iff ' 1 f ' ' . 'i . ff .1355 ,x - . 1 5 J, . 1' -l fir W : :ry i 'f ' .rw :J-fibif "' , '14, nl- '-'. ,r ' y. , ffl! 4' q . ' " I ll . lil " 76, 'lil lf ' 1' , , lg ,, . v - ,.-', .', Jil, -Q . -,ir I , e .4 , ,W l ll f -' eff' . E . 1 , :-- JIT ,md '?'3iM,g'1: ' - .X l ' 9 - l2.Q,LIfF'i1- 7 , H L R . F A ,. ., ' , " if 1 - ' ' ,I ' . -F 1Tl',l'- -1, "vim ' ,nfl ff'-S-er 5'3" ff fl! ' Y . -, - - gf -5 ELA. .,,,i,,, im Nc... i f ,mfg 4' 'Q . - 3" ' f' A is J ,-, ' Le ,gf Y l l '1 S4 IT, ,' 5 4, ,If nj EV, J V , g, L - -- l 1 , l . if .1 .ly f- .. - , 1. - - -:El l-all 5,1 3 . Z f V "1 if E' . ' ' ll - iff, U 'ifdafzi ' L0 A i "il, 4193.-"if ' 'i 1' , 9. . - ll 1 ..' rl i , W.. ,lx V 'Tl ' , 1. :Iii '.',l, ' lx' V- I .' i , Llpxl l X. jxrlaljl - L 'J , ,Viv ! Q, -V V A li' 4 55' ' -J AF " 1 48' . ." '.'fl ,eg l 1f ,W Af A ' V ,j5l?4:'i --L me iii . X .I , 'T - . Y-45 ' ' ':. , V l ,I 1,- . ,, , . . ll l 5 ' ' ' l 'QR 3 is , L11 la ze X l 41 '. . , I , , , .. ,, l .Lf , vp gm X -.213 . 4 ' R, . A l -.- r -,1.a,-- ,- Z, .FA W K .,, UAu.,,p ,,.LQ,LI,.l iffy, MQQJ' " " I xiii. . l l.l R A ' 5' , 'll ' .fi .- 4 :'. ' . ., i i ,wif-1 -- ' " 4"' . 1 w , 'gf' 'T' - 'gi' .,-Y, - -- -3 - 1 .:s "-' ' J fa . '51 il. .ff Tit 'V S H' i 1, 9' ' if -' , 'E 1 'F l' 4 . ...g J ll: -J H , l l ' .X .. A, 1,2-1 pdf ,.'. cf 1.1. ,,,. lull, , '- "", P gfji 1-:V 4 . -I il, 151 . 'W by lg. ll- l, U J G'-pi., tl ls., gr, ll: 9 " , ,gi . , .. 34 V Y 1 :lil PJ' " 'YN 'HP' JJ i it -'ill rr' xg' ---qs ng , uf ,. 4 . - . f T-u - ' ' f " lin- .1 wr ,. l -l l "ff fx a we , .1 i i ' - f'jj,5 ' P ' ,f--sf le , . -, l ,, , wx ' 1. J n- ' . 251' 1 - ,PM ,- M Q. ling 'I ii, 1 :1 ' Lv. " 1 ,ll 'ffl ' ,7 ' H , T IW.-'u ' ", ' W FIT... P ." A4 '3.,"L.'i"r , ' 5 3 - ""'l lv X .' U 0- y 1 V W l l l 9 ' gl , ,,.-Q , f , X, Q, 'A i in X ,y , all , Q: .4 . .,, , li, L i ' - 0' ' ' ' il" Q, im' 1 4- y l . 11- , l , Row 1, Holmquist. Jean, President, 66, Kosman, Dianna, vice-president, 66, Hansen, Karen, vice- president, 66, Beckman, Barbara, secretary. 66, Wood, Percy, treasurer, 66, Anderson, Jan, 69 Baker, Mary, 69, Barber, Kathryn, 69, Beecher, Barbara, 68, Beerman, Charla, 68, Bollman, Vir: ginia, 66. Row 2: Bo er, Jane, 69, Boyles, Ann, 68, Brott, Patricia, 68, Buclden, Vicki, 67, Bush, Jane 69, Bush, Karen, Butz, Catherine, 69, Cockle. Cindy, 68, Collins, Sandy, 67, Cooper, Sue, 69, Costin, Kathie, 68. Row 3: Deger, Barbara. 67, Detlefsen, Barbara, 69, Devier, Susan, 69, Dierks Deniese, 69, Doan, Barbara, 69, Dort, Suzanne, 68, Durham, Mary, 66, Ebzery, Susan, 66, Elliott, Susan, 67, Ewing, Kathy, 69, Farrer, Nikki, 69. Row 4: Flebbe, Elizabeth, 67, Flebbe, Sandy, 68, Folsom, Susan, 68, Glade, Kathie, 67, Haynie. Dee, 68, Hedgecock, Pamela, 67, Hensley, Pat, 69, Highland, Susan, 68, Hilton, Janice, 69, Holinan. Sudie, 68, HopewelI,,Barbara, 69. Row 5: Hoven, Karen, 66, ller, Marguerite, 67, Jorgensen, Maryann, 69, Keller, Nelda, 66, Kling, Carli, 69, Lohaus Jeanne, 68, Loutzenheiser, Nancy, 67, Macla , Qonni, 67, McClymont, Patricia, 67, Miller, Ginger 68, Miller, Sharon, 69. Row 6: Navnn, Cheryl, 662 Nicholson, Alice, 69, Ostwinkle, Claudia, 67, Pack- ard, Vicki, 67, Parker, Kate, 68, Parkes, Claudia, 67, Peterson, Nancy, 68, Pohlman, Cathy, 68, Placek, Lynn, 69. Row 7: Reagan, Suzi, 67, Rediger, Kay, 69, Ross. Sharon, 69, Sandberg, Gay, 68, Saylor, Sherrill, 67, Schmadeke, Jane, 67, Sharrar, Mary, 68, Sitorius, Cynthia, 68, Smith. Margery, 69. Row 8: Spohn, Salgf, 67, Stites, Janet, 67, Swanson, Penny, 67, Tallman, Ann, 66, Thomas, Carol, Louise 6 Walt Leslie 69 Warnholtz Jane 67 Wells Ellen 69 Row9 Wheeler, Candy, 69, Wallace. . , . . , . . : . . - 1 66, Wiley, Ann, 69, Williams, Edwyna, 67. Row 10: Wilson, Marsha, 68, Wood. Pamela, 68. ' ,TT ,- 'Q sL.:'- , N : - ,,,- T5 ' 'fi 'ir 54, , l' ' 'Fi 4, 'fl . l' ,N -1 , . . l 33 x is i W l v r ' ,A fl-w ' 1,-Y., .-, L 1 , . ' 1 v , , .J v , T, if li 1: Qffwf it Y' , , ',.V .. . wg. ny, , W v Q' sf Q' .3 J.Z,F5:,Ji::.. .. , , 1 5,11-55U"!'f W' fi if ii. I . 1 , I, I A I i l A ix 'l Sneaking a study break, sisters Steal to Selleck to lick nocturnal hungers. Gamma Phi Pancake Feed Nets State Hospital Funds Raising money for the Nebraska State Hospital, Gamma Phi Beta co-sponsored a pancake dinner with Phi Kappa Psiasafall philanthropic project.GirIs waited on the tables while the fraternity staffed the kitchen. Holiday festivities prevailed as members hosted an informal Christmas date dinner. Dressed for bridge games and television-watching, coeds and dates toured the upstairs floors enjoying door decorations. Couples also visited the recently completed six room addition. Following second semester mid-terms, Gamma Phi's held a joint slumber party with the Chi Omegas. Half of the girls from each house exchanged rooms for the night with each sorority providing midnight snacks. In another inter-Greek project, sisters challenged the Kappa Kappa Gammas to a scholarship competition with the losers treating the winners to sodas. ,.,. 'V' faint xl X Q , v-'Vu , 'Jai-f' -,:" fy' ' 1. 'XA glk. -,J . ' 7 lv- . 4: " t .. . fl . 1 x 5 .- ,JL-'V ve, , x . . i Vicki Dowling, President Arts and Sciences, Omaha 1 ..i125::.1x,.L L -77 -F.-".4' W" "YW fi 47 ' ' 19, I 1 Jw 1 v ' ' " .177 N 951 - if 1' I if' .,11 I A f- . Wwe: - H ,g : , Q 1 1 "' 1 N11 V Q' -- L 231,23 ' 1 1 . in X ,315 ' 3-'. I' .' ' .1 , ' :ix 4 'W ,N I Q jx Q ,wtf 1 FQ, Q 2 45.-1. ' ' N ' in ' ,752 H1 1 , . 1, 1 1 111 fm E ,M , F4 ,L 5? X f ' - 1, 4' -5 wi A 1' 4- 1? dx 5 S. 'I 1 A ' , A. 1 'LT ' Q59 Lb 1 n 1 1152 X','f"fY1j 11: 1 L 2 2 W -ui gg-.' 1 'e W 1 -' 1 1511, 1 ii' 1 5? ' -' 1 - " 1' -' 3:-' - iz'-'M ig?-r . ...FH W'kLk ' . 1 w' w N ' 1 1 '11, '11 , as F: .1 K' nil Ts. 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V ., 1,1 ,1 iw. 1. 1. ,jf :I-V uh-F . !111H1I!51f1, -11 .1 3-131 -H1111 41' LI1 . W.. 1 1... v. . iv "' ., .11 'v .. 11 'ml , ,. 11,1 - V 1 11: Q 5 11. .il' N , . L- - 1.. l le! lgl f Y 'Hou kt JM I 3 Q i I 1 I ivfifir' ll 5 3 H, l 5 yi , i 92' ff' A ' ' f' -ff' ' I P- 4 .1 , 'l ll 7? :" ,f L? " ii Rf , i f i Row 1, Kotouc. Ann, president, '66, Johnson, Karen, vice-president, '66, Voss Shirley, secretary, '66, Eiitner. Barbara, treasurer, '67, Aitken, Elizabeth, '68 Armstrong, Kathy. '67, Beardmore, Mary, '68, Bray. Eileen, '68, Cattle. Becky, '69s Cockle, Sally, '69, Crabill, Jane, '66, Cunningham, Susan, '66, Curry, Susan '69, Dalling, Pam, '69. Row 2: Dewey, Pat, '68, Devereux. Susan, '68, Dieterich Martha, '69, Dowe, Susan, '68, Eichhorn, Kathy. '69, Encell, Carol, '66, Evans Ann, '68, Fauss, Jeanne, '66, Freimuth, Nancy, '69, Grasmick. Susan, '66 Gueck. Barbara, '69, Hancock, Paula, '69, l-lau, Nancy. '69, l-leckman. Diana '67. Row 3: Henderson. Kathleen. '68, Hoffman, Nancy, '67, l-foward. Jeannie '68, lhle, Gail, '68, Johnson. Bonnie. '68, Johnson, Carol, '69, Kennedy, Ann '68- Kathol. Suzanne, '68, Keim, Ardith, '69, Kessler, Linda, '69, Kimberlin Vicki. '69, koefoor. Gretchen. '68, Kuska, karl-iieen. 'ee Row 4, Lana. Kris. '67,' Lund, Christine. '68, Madola. Elizabeth, '69, Mahlsteclt, Pat, '69, Mattson, Marty '69, McClymont, Joan, '67, McGee, Sally, '68, Meier. Sarah, '67, Mellor, Susan '66, Row 5, Miller. Jane, '67, Morrow, Patty, '69, Morrow. Sally, '67, Nord, Nancy '68, Nutt. Nikki, '69, O'Connor. Ann, '69, Olmstead, Linda, '69, Peters, Caryl '67, Pokorny, Janet, '69. Row 6: Rasmussen, Kandie, '69, Renier, Joanne, '67 Robinson, Lynn, '69, Rolfe. Barbara. '67, Row 7: Ronin, Carol, '67, Schmidt Peggy, '69, Schlaht. Emily, '66, Skarcla. Susan, '66. Row 8: Sorensen, Beverly '69, Souders, Mary, '69, Strand. Carol, '68, Tetherow, Susan, '67. Row 9 Thomas, Sally, '68, Tudor, Anne, '67, Umberger, Vicky, '69, Van Horne, Patti '69. Row 10: Webster. Nan, '69, Wild, Casandra, '66, Wolvin, Bette. '68, Yost Dorothy, 67. Enthusiasm Prompts Effort For Theta Derby Day Win Donning yellow windbreakers and blue-jean cut- offs, Kappa Alpha Theta pledges demonstrated physical prowess to take first place in Sigma Chi Derby Day. Spirited actives aided the fraternal cause by sporting black derby hats and cheering tyros on to a 1965 victory. To provide needy families with baskets of assorted canned goods for a Thanksgiving Day surprise, Thetas joined with Sigma Phi Epsilon in auctioning off mem- bers for "Slave Day." The project advertised locally in newspapers and on radio gave Lincolnites the oppor- tunity of buying servants to perform household tasks. Christmas carols resounded from the Delta Up- sllon house and DU's and the KAT's shared seasonal spirit with children from Lincoln's Whitehall Orphanage. Cookies and cartoon movies followed Santa Claus' distribution of pledge class gift contributions. , .. .,.- Q 8 sgwii.. -' F ,. ' YN ST, I ' ' " - of-i ii.. w a' sie, -if 1-1 ,f' Preparing a new activity hopeful, Thetas offer an introductory course in interview techniques. 385 WWE? Panel Offers Social Goals To Kappa Delta Assembly Reviewing social graces, Kappa Delta sponsored a panel of five NU fraternity housemothers. The discus- sions stressed collegiate girls' clothing, manners and dating from the viewpoint of fraternity men. Members exhibited philanthropic spirit selling KD Christmas seals to raise money for support of a ward in the Richmond, Virginia Crippled Children's Home. Seasonal cheer also appeared as sisters invited Dean Snyder and Miss Girard to take part in the chapter's annual Christmas Party. A candlelight vesper service with the reading of the Christmas story followed the ex- change of gifts between pledge mothers and daughters. Providing "talking books" for the blind, sisters chose novels to be read and taped. The tapes, recorded in Lincoln, went to the American Institute for the Blind for distribution throughout the United States. Patricia Teel, President Teachers, Fort Collins, Colorado Q , 1 ..- x ' 1 - :cd I ""' .J ' If , ,cf ' 'C ' - H52-.I .4 it 1 ' " ' ,Ii 1 ,Q Q 'l .5 l V I 5, if Q' '12-QT - 1 0 .. " I II Q. r- I ' I lg- , I 5 1, I i I I ' '5-kv I A 1 is I -,X , If ' 511 H: l I' P 5 5 af' -,gl r , . C .MJ Aw-X,,I, A ,f 'I ogy. Isa. j ' 'fi gl 132- eL.f':: I I V I 1, - 11,-, L- i A ,Ip ,,,.q, .I - IIII I I V , V up Its, f lx, Ir nl I lrqijsx , if ' Q b l gb! wr V , I 1 J 'if' 'A i "' ,741 ,-,I 'ur ' V LF ff I- -I ' ' l 4, M 'I by . ' 21' ,, v 1,-,I-5 , ,, - s A , . rf. ', . L -' - . ' '-Ni, 4.:-A Q. Ii T' . 'I ..., - . .,, 1 . tiff' "Ia , 'r 'N-J ,, an . -typ, A H r nl, I I I 1 J 1 I I I P f I it 1 ' l K I 5 I ' ? l 1. vi iv f' I ,,, 7 A ,l ,ff ,, f - Izmf-gli -IA 8 ' I.. II- I: If .I 5. 551 1 -if fb if fill Ii II- i Ar if f- , iff I Gif ' ' riff . I ' V .- lf ' I 1 . .gf A. I Aff! el' I::r5g:'I' i ' jr 'I 1. 4:7 ' li I " l p.. X W , V' I' ' u A 1 l l 1 v l J J I 4 ll Formulating formal favor preferences, Kappa Deltas perform a pre-seleotion reconaissanoe. J, 'gf i"f7i ' lf' .ff-r 1 l""", an ,V it 1,-'l W YI SEL' N Q .v o-J' 'RY I K-Q ' l 'l-.ir W i H ,fr E 3 Z I Qgsiyf ,h,'vl,, l ' f - Il ' -- - '- V J 1, 'rv - ,-', , , , ff -, 'i if v V' 1 ' -' l, , " , ' l ' I - ' Y nw N - I . y- .gli W , V ,:, 1 ,W 'seg ., - rf f' 'fn' L: li . l 'Z i ' N ' , gem" 711 IHFSHEET: - :sz 1 ,lx - L 1 .,, , ,j , ', I ,.,f.s,,..e- - v V . gl an Y rg., 117 , jg J' 1-zz, NL, , Y Zig- -, fl '4 I ,i ' l' 'fluk Y' ... 22 , iv , xl-Elm.,-Q 1 , ., 1 , I .,.., . , . :FT:,,,-- - , -i-B: , W , 4- 777 -635, .Y.,- ,.,EN!,..,,., L V, if -Hr", A f l 1' 4' jr " A - if 15 ., ' ., , ,. .V l v 1' , ::, '. A- s : T' ,j,i,'-,,.g f g ,L 'R -' . w , uf. :,.:,,- ,T V 1 , il . ' f H -' A g .- Q5 ,fx -fl ,I -Y .. I . V' ll ' i 5 , NL- "U, " 0' .M L-. l af' X 1 6' i l l, QF? l 1-'al 6 f fm Y-v ,,. ,ff5 l 1 f 5 iQ Row 1: Teel, Patricia, president, '66, Whitney, Jan, vice-president, '66, Ostiguy, Judy, secretary, '66, Ambrose, Jan, '67, Andreaden, Jane, '69, Baird, Carolyn, '67, Berger, Deborah, '66, Bemis, Deanna, '67, Bennett, Peg, '67, Brandt, Linda, '69, Chandler, Julie '68, Clatanoff, Beverly, '69, Crow, Joan, '69. Row 2: Dean, Linda, '66, Domingo, Jan, '67, Drayton, Joan. '69, Durbon, Marilynn, '69, Ebel, Susan. '68, Ebert, DeAnne, '67, Filbert, Diane, '69, Fisk, Susan, '69, Glenn, Roberta, '68, Greg- erson, Marcia, '68, Grim, Sharon, '69, Hanna, Peggy, '69, Harrison, Lynda, '68, l-lecox, Elizabeth, '66, Heideman, Judith, '66, l-leileman, Carolee, '68, Hendrickson, Kathleen, '69, Hestermann, Barbara, '67. Row 3: l-licks, Barbara, '67, l-loegemeyer, Anne, '68, Hoegemeyer, Marilyn, '66, Hughes, Marti, '68, Jecllicka, Elaine, '68, Kot, Pamela, '68, Krjeski, Susan, '69, Kraushaar, Gail, '69, Lee, Diane, '66, Linders, Trudy, '69, Malone, Linda, '69, Marchello, Linda, '68, McCall, Carol, '67, McCartney, Patricia, '69, McKenzie, Jean, '69, McNamara, Joan, '68, McNeel, Constance, '68, Michael, Connie, '66. Row 4: Mitchell, Anne, '69, Morrissey, Sharon, '66, Myers, Marilyn, '69, Nedrow, Jeanette, '67, Nelson, Wanda, '69, Nilson, Linda, '66, Oberg, Sherilyn, '68, Oberle, Kathleen, '68, Overturf, Dee, '69, Parsons, Mary, '69, Pecha- cek, Barbara, '69, Robertson, Barbara, '67, Rogge, Beth, '69. Row 5, Rood. Mary, '67, Roseberry, Mary, '67, Ross, Peggy, '69, Salisbury, Linda, '68, Schou, Sheri, '68, Shoemaker, Diane, '69, Sibert, Bonnie, '68, Sicklebower, Sharie, '69,'Slie, Maryl.inda, '68, Staples, Lynne, '69, Steinbrock, Mary, '69, Sullivan, Mary, '68, Terrill, Terri, '67. Row 6: Toebben, Karen, '69, Victor, Toni, '69, Volenee, Donna, '69, Walla, Jane, '67, Walla, Vance, '67, Wallace, Carol, '69, Weidman, Jeanne, '69, Whitney, Susan, '66, Wilcynski, Joan, '69, Wiloyznski, Joan, '69, Williams, Dorothy, '68, Williams, Karen, '69, Winterer, Erma, '67. 387 Kappas Take Twin Honors Breaking Ivy Day Tradition Ivy Day bestowed double honors and awarded campus history to Kappa Kappa Gamma. For the first time since the Court's origination, one sorority received both May Queen and Maid of Honor in the festivities. As part of a new program, Juniors challenged the rest of the chapter to a scholastic duel. Outdone by the senior class, junior "hashers" served the elders break- fast in bed. Along traditional lines, an upper-class skit dramatized pledge naivety at the annual fall retreat. Members utilized the remainder of the afternoon postulating goals toward active sisterhood. "Mano Week" became the house password as Kap- pas prepared to honor the housemother for ten years service. At a special ceremony held in Mrs. Mahn's bene- fit, actives presented Mano with a scrapbook composed of poems and letters written during the week. l l A u gl, . I -- er - ggi rjigf 1.1 2 Lynne Irish, President l I , A K, w 1 it T Teachers, Kirkwood, Missouri hi vmlvfgghi . L, - V-L- 5: all . ,.,1," l T. ' fl f 'ri I 'V W i fa I - T as T. i i A X. -- V I L in I ,V V fjiizviigapi-W .,, in 1 .Y - P: Q- , L., T in , 4. I im, -- I. I V, A if .1 " i' T2 f it is T 1:1 r ll- 'l Vw' ' X n is-4 .Jr ,.: , i f rg, ' l T-4. l - . - ii: r -r L -5 i Q " ' ' J 'El fi " - F ' V . Y T N: 'E . -IJ . l , 4- . . ., ' A- to ' ef - --J r ii M I . I 3 lil ' f Wm 5' fi- 'i 4 i. 3-:F i ' f',,-'gf' or: l '11 1' , iligfi' f ' -r "fi rl , ,1., lx ir- its W- s - l ., F - I ,-5 v.f i :L -W VY. ., ,le .QQ A . T i , ' ' Q' X ' F X i 64-.A ,fl ,j it ll 2 H If 3 - , ' il r f . ff'-Af.ii2i:'.W ,Q-4 ,.'iL7W?'r-., L T' t' -in , . y i . Sufi .Q "Q at-K ' . ' - gf- 3 T 'Q A I ' , Q xl -. TQ , ,ii - 'lg' T " f' U-J A - lk ' v- 'T ll,-l .. g 3 Q-:, -. ' - an W ' bf 4 r : A -ll 'l vghy , i1. , 5l -X 1-gggxrfii 'Q' 7' 'N I , , I , ...N Q.: I gi! Eg.: I u: . TV: MIA vw - l xl! . L- L. I. 5 ' .-,g' -L , in, i -4 -1 l ily . - ll 4. . E fn"TT'T" ' " if f- ' Q .ff . I i ' . i ' rf! Q' 'V - A Ish .: .Q V1 il U it 1 " .1 - ' r - . , 17. -r .I 5 itil? 9 if . f I T at 7 ' . ill 'A A lr f l .f f - T F ' V Vw , 'VY V, Sy., K - Y y .A Y .... .Dr vii l 1 7 ,T G li-Q. 9 ,li T "gb i f -T . 'l, 5 if A ' il. 8 Satirizing American foreign policy, the Kappa's winning skit solicits United States aid for China. f 'Q Kira--'fr ' "ln" "3 'X , ' T71 T. Ii 1 .- , .5 '5 ?f5+. X 7 XM :X rn .X: wr- Xin? ,X VX X' X -r i .yi KX 4, X, ,mi ,XEXXJ A X V 1 , . XXXXX ,i J! 6 I , ,J Wil ll 'W 1' Q, 4 '- 1' A X Y rg' , gp, ,x i ig, W fe- Q., 5, - Xl,-l ,X .,, , ,X'r' ,X 'X L-' 2 - "2 ' -'V' -. ' is f' :'! . B -l ., 4 53:-h ' 1 - -' . f , ,lv , 1 54 5-., +,,. 1 ' X ' bw 5 i K., X 4 l. ,,. N 1 i 'X,- H 'j g A " arf i N V! lf X N ii ii 'E H , ' - Q Jjfir , ' 'Q 'f ' Y 9 - , ' ' - , ' 7. i 'E .' - N'f',"hZi '. . -,i"'." fW'Q,,:ac ' ' i, 5 -- X mf, 1 '55 . X - -fl XX 1- ,,2,.xX .F ' . WX., X, 1.0 .INN -X-XXX X , -' ,.i,ff : "'5 -"-"' , QQ -. , 4 "MU " ' - -' ' ill' 19-"Q ' J '31 J' 5 , in 4 ' " 'AH L" ' ' W - . ,--- X lv - X , " 1 " I f 1' i ff: -, 'l 1 ' ' Qi XXX-,fb A .N X-' ,, - f X 1 , ,-, "Mi , --,, X2 , X,-A .L nf H- f-4. Ti , i. , 2, il ,Q-:' W 7' .' J-.lf , A-N -,Q JH J Lf.. -L1 i' ' Av a - ' " ', F , ' f 5' - ' N q, .3 ,i 1 X",, b M -fly,-,. , ,. . .,-i .5,., a X. w, X ,- , X ' si- ' 1' 4- .- r ' X, 5 l 'tg-,Ji ' I ,, "" l X . X I: X-s 15 4 X.. , -1 X . , X - i . - ii 5 .-- . . X - -X f , X i X X , it ,. ...rw-4, , f f'- xi.,-li' 'i -- 1 , 1'--if 1. in! LX, if K Q "i - -i X 5 jr XX , 5 Q , X gifs," ,P 1 in 1 f.: , lil? 1 fl, " 23 V 4 X -- .3 ' LX... QNX I Q .. , . X X ,M .X . qve'7" I " , ,X J fv- i 'i iz- 151' 1,-9 ",: X' . ,g-f. 'fr' -,lei-v ' . -'i 'er - ..,ii,+, . J, r -' l'. "ff", ' ' l 9 Xl 'e , -, l ' XXXX Xa 'flwl ' il ' ' , , A --, ' ., 1.-L wif' fi' ,P F ' ig " ' ' X N S R , ' , - MX' ,. ll ,- X , ,X X ,X XL, l l Row 1: Irish, Lynn, president, 66, Hime, Susan, vice-president, 66, Unger, Carol vice-president, 67, Crosier, Cheryll, secretary. 66. Row 2: Schneider, Barbara treasurer, 66, Agee, Janie, 67, Amsler, Julie, 68, Augustin, Kathleen, 69, Baird Judy, 69, Bartlett, Cynthia, 68, Beshore,XJane, 69, Bishop, Susan, 68, Brock, Robyn, 67, Bulger, Ann, 69, Bystrom, Patricia, 67, Campbell, Anne, 66, Campbell, Susan, 68, Castle, Connie, 68, Cherry, Cindy, 69, Coffee, Sara, 69, Dean, JoAnn 69, Deitemeyer, Kathy, 67. Row 3: Dotson, Karen, 69, Dougherty, Anita, 67, Dow Alice, 66, Duncan, Susan, 69, Freeman, Carolyn, 67, Freeman, Jackie, 68, Fuchs Kathleen, 66, Gleysteen. Ann, 66, Glover, Barbara, 66, Glynn, Kathryn, 67, Guen- zel, Virginia, 66, Guilford, Mary, 66, Hall, Sue, 68, l-iamsa, Barbara, 66, l-landschuh Denese, 68, l-lapner. JoAnn, 66, Harris, Margene, 67, l-ledge, Martha, 68. Row 4 l-leinke, Paula, 69, Holmgren, Mary, 69, Hoppe, Elizabeth, 67, l-lunter, Anne, 68, Inman, Jennifer, 66, lseman, Toni, 67, Keating, Linda, 66, Kelley, Kathy, 69, Klotz Peggy, 69, Knight, Kathleen, 67, Kulla, Carrie, 68, Lindquist, Tycha, 69, Luhe Christine, 69. Row 5: Madden, Susan, 68, Melchoirs, Kay, 66, Olenberger, Laurie: 68, Perkins, Suzanne, 69, Petsch, Josette, 66, Phelps, Susan, 68, Probasco, Nancy, 69, RaDD. Mimi, 69, Rasmussen, Constance, 66, Reno, Carole, 66, Riggs Cathy, 67, Rohlfsen, Jan, 66, Rudin, Marianne, 66. Row 6: Schoening, Lynda, 69 Shook, Nancy, 69, Simmons, Barbara, 68, Smith, Cynthia, 67, Stephens, Mary 69, Stickler, Jeannie, 67, Stilwell, Catherine, 68, Switzer, Judi, 69, Tallman, Mary, 68, Tinan. Stephanie, 68, Trupp, Barbara, 67, Westering, Kathryn, 66, Wilson Pamela, 66. 38 , Phi Mus Suggest Designs For New Home In Complex Looking forward to the fall of 1967 and completion of the first Greek complex, Phi lVlus planned ahead for a new home. In charge of all furnishings, sisters dis- cussed decorations and color schemes. Hopes for a colored television set began to materialize as members collectively saved books of green stamps. Celebrating the 114th anniversary of Founders Day, Zeta Gamma traveled to the sister chapter at Nebraska Wesleyan. Honoring the original fraternal group, the two Phi Mu sororities hostessed a tea for area alums and toured the new Zeta Kappa house addition. As part of a national Phi lVlu philanthropy project, actives solicited funds from alumnae and the public for the U.S.S. Hope, American hospital-ship recently on a goodwill tour in Latin America. Locally, pledges sent l 1 l i C l ,Hx Q , st. i St. Patrick Day favors to old peoples' homes in the city. gl c g ' x . - 1. - Conjuring up Irish luck for senior citizens, Phi lVlu's prepare St. Patrick Day nutcups. 90 Natalie Hahn, President Home Economics, Polk v' '. li- l . i xi . ,ff Welcoming recent pledges Phi Mus entertain with a post rush week tea for new daughters I I l 'X -I 1 V ,I IX V J, x U -I7 LI, - I . , I ' 5 , 5 Q- -I I, ,. L. Q.. J Q., 45 ' .':,, ,g-T5 515. . I Y 'NJ YE? ' x..4 " . Q ' I2 . .1 , ,. :' . '-N A NII ' II, ,' 'Q-I -- v 'V .' . 1' 'I f I. "', I Q , I I I II I I f- '- ' in I' I. I I I-, x . , I I ,II L J AI I A X 1 lr I If , Ph 1 II I l " 'X -.I .I .. ,I ' If' "' 511.5 ii ' .I- ,I Th I ,I I s.. 1 ,I f ' lj' ' -V! I I.,, 451 L.. H J ,,y'r - .1 ,I A L. W - QQt7ae.?f." I, , VI' ' , I I ,F '4 I - - , ,I I. 6 , - 19 ' X Y ' I I, ,.',f'K I V I l .X Mk ' l , .L 1 'J ' L- , 3 , F, ,lv '? Y-1 I ly AFX.: iv Hn I' ' . I l 1 l WL ,,--7-' ,I -I1 W I. If l ,. 1 Il' ' YT A I X nik X , dv? I Q I ' a , U- an ,Q -Q 5,12 V C' ' C Ig? fi 1 '42 , A I A 1 2,1 , 5 . f ' V,.',"I , l f .xv u U I 4 I X I " 1 Q 1 E I... , Q, I A I 7- I I j?5?3Q" zxnfv. In-" , T l I, - , 1 X . , l 22525 , V K Q13 ' Row 1: Hahn, Natalie, President, 67, Bassett, Joanne, vice-president, 66, Radil, Jan, secretary, 68, Wentink, Shirley, treasurer, 67, Ball, Robyn, 69, Bannerman, LaRee, 69, Bilson, Judy, 68, Brennan, Patricia, 67, Brugh, Jan, 69. Row 2: Bruha, Joyce, 68,' Bybee, Judith, 68, Christensen, Catherine, 69, Clarke, Marilyn, 69, Dalka, Judlth, 68, Davidson, Linda, 68, Egle, Cynthia, 68, Fentiman, Tynette, 69, Fern, JuIIe, 69. Row 3: Frear, Jacquelyn, 67, Goodwin, Ruth, 68, Griffin, Carolyn, 68, Hagen, Cathleen, 68, Held, Margo, 68, Hruban, Paulette, 68, Johnson, Mau- reen, 6 , Kauk, Carolyn, 69, Kennedy, Cathy, 68. Row4: Kerchal, Sheryl, 67, Kolar, Cletas, 68, Kottas, Sharon, 68, Kovar, Bonnie, 67, Krieger, Judy, 69, Kuhr, Emily, 69, Lake, Laura, 67, Larson, Lynne, 68, Lichtenberg, Roselle, 67. Row 5: Logeman, Carol, 67, Long. Mary, 69, Martin, Joyce, 68, McCall, Sabre, 67, Meier, Ellie, 67, Meismer, Linda, 69, Myers. Lunda, 69, Parks, Susan, 68, Rarick, Barbara, 69. Row 6: Renne, Edith, 68, Reppert, Joyce, 68, Retallick, Kathy, 68, Ryan, Betty, 67, Ryon, Linda, 69. Row 7: Sanders, Marilyn, 69, Sayre, Lynda, 69, Severs, Cynthia, 67, Sheeran, Jean, 68, Sheffield, Dori, 67. Row 8: Smith, Janet, 68, Stahr, Carol, 68, Vogel, Pamela, 69. 391 ,:-Fii' Q- oy P so Q 1 ' "' 11 1 11, . B l im 11. .- I-I :fri 1 'T i . 1 1 1 ' l 41' 1 I Q kv ' asf' 11 ,irggrglf r t' 11.11 1 -1. , ' L .. 115 ' '4 . I .-'J Lil ' L- 342, ll-g'f1, iW11 1 "i til . 11 1-, Ms - , 1 1 I 1 J 'rf , il 1 1 wx D E If Mx 1, 38, y. nz" SLM- ' if 1' . . ' '1 'ff -10" lf 51 -l , Q 1- 1 1 -4.1 . -1 ' 1-i ttf 1 ' 1. I V V . V ' '. T :ll 1' 1 si' , ws , . ,,., W. ,. 16. . ,.,., ..: . 3-J - - .-:,., Q. . .. , .1 --. uf 1 ' ' , ' ar ' 13,1-.va-1-:QJQ11 1.131 1.3, Q , ,Q ,, Q I Q 1l, 1 Q, N 1 Y ,Q A 1 1 ,111 L 1 , l R. -1 , M, W1 1, 1 1 1 H W 11 lb 1' 1. I X 'X I 1 W M' 1 1 , .. 1 I xl " C ik X J qi 111:11 'P -5 ' ' EJ 33 'ei 6' f '1 11" , 131 ' . 1 .11 . rr - . 1,1 ,. , 5 V 11 . , .11 lf., 1"' 1' , 1 ' lxl' ' " -f yy, 11i,,, , 1. 1 as 1' '5 f 1: ' 1 . .. ' fig Y ,Q A Q Q , Q-,.i 11.1,-V: A H hw' 1' Vg ., -1-,-11, 12,1 '1 I J'.1 .V 17 IW. 7 .33 ,,1,iV 1 1 L -E1-W, 1 V, -11 .V .li- LA- ,. , tv Y lf, ' .1.1.115d ' ll ' " 'Q la 1 Hi Q '25 1 1,11 ' ' " 1 R111-53 an 1 ,E 6' 5 E? V "" .Ii -s 1-' '- 1 ' " I-1311, , as . -.s' 1 , . 'Q -'i ' ' .. " "' "-' ' ' - v all 1 -P11 . 1 .fr 1 1 11 . 1 1 .2 1-'fn-.11 1 nm 1 N1 fa 1 1 1 1 +16 ,,- 11.115 1 . ., 1, 1 M-NT. -' .1 1 we 11? x 'J "1 , 'E . . X 'x " ' , 'Q ' f M' Q B., .1 , 1 .1 ,A 5 ,--Q- 1 E. 1-1 1.51-41 --.Q 1253- -ff:-r 4: E.M-.: -rr I 1, 1' H 7 1 1.,1,.Q,Q,e11!23g.i111,., 1 If i ,1 1 ,M 'z '1 ' ' GPI ' 1 111"fL31" ff" 1,5i,3Q" 11 1: ' 5' 1 .1 .lraf-W1 '1 11- '- -4" ' 1 f.-1 ,1 ' W1 "' 1' -1,' .Q 7' 11 ' .5 1' 1 1 11 -1-1 111,511 : 1 +1 ' 1 1',55,,f ' , ,1i'f- ,1f, 1 . 4' E1 Us ' 1,121 1 Q. 51, X1 1 -571 1 11' 11615 ' ' 1 cr' F 1 A 1' J . . '- 11115-:f1'1lV-'SEE Sk X ' , ' 1 I 1,,,,1'l1 Q Q 1 0' Fillf 'cj N1 A , E' 1' '15, 1 . .. ' 15" ' 1 ' 11.11 1 w 1 vi- Q fs 11.-21 1 11- 1 -1 ,E 11 11 s' ' 472.1 1 1, 5 1 1 1 1-Q11 I N 1 -.3 l 1 1 .5111111111 1 N 1' 1 . ' 1, , n . 1 H , Em 1 Z ,HJ ,cv pi :X Q 1 1 - !111,,,111,1 1 Q: .fl is git. . 21 fn... 1 X1-..f:1' A' 1 -TS ' 1 1 . I ,..,,, , 1 1,1 'f "' :li '13f'11f" i ' F" ' f' 'T' "sf: f 1 1 " 1 1 1 .ls Xlliilff. 1 . 3 1 -1 fi.. 1 1 1 1.1 I' 'N' 11 11 , 1 --- .1 1 Ria--Ev 1-11-- .1-, r1.1 1 -Tl 1 .- J '91 1 ,1 1 .v - 1 ' 'lf'-1 1- ,.1 1 , Q1 ,,,1 ,.,, .,., , ..,.,5, , 11 .1 . 1 lk., 5, . 1, , .11 1 ' 11 'F 11 .11 1 -1 111 1. 1111" 1 12111 1 - 1 '11 1, 1 ' ' - - 41.1.1111 61. " "ll ' ,Ji , 19, -1:9 .lf I ' T If - 1 15" ' 11" 6- l - - 44' ' "Hu ' l 1 . -1. ' T.. J 1 ' W" ' 1"' J - 7 - " ' 1 1 L., V 1 l X f l 1 1 -,,'yg..f I 1 1 1 1 9 wiv, 1,21 N W '1-1 tg., 1, Q "!'.'EQ,l , -. 1 1. 1 J . .1 ella" F?T":'i "T ' i 'f LQ 52 'E'f '7' ,1'i2- mq-1uw1 .1sf,1 aria !"'9f"'i' i13'11 4 1 11 L ' ll 5 1 ' 5,11 ,1 1, - , 1 7 15 Q 1 Ri Row 1: Beel, Cheri, vice-president, 661 Hass, Becky, secretary, 661 Broyhill, l.ynn, 1 7 ' ' ' " Qi.: QE ,E 'JW' ' 441 " 1 treasurer, 675 Abel, Teresa. 671 Abel, Tori, 681 Adams, Connie, 671 Adarns, Mary, 1 1 Q M ' . 1 TN 1 661 Alberts.. Kathy, 69, Amundson, Jan, 6B:'AUdVeWS, Donna, 69, Anstine, Kath- - ' f 1 E .Q ' ryn, 691 Atkinson, Barbara, 671 Barber, Jaclve, 69. Row 2: Black, Susan, 691 Chat- 1 field, Linda, 671 Delbridge, Jan, 691 Diedrichs, Norma, 68, Dworak, Kathy, 681 Eldred, Carol n, 691 Fallon, Gay, 681 Farner, Mary, 665 Fisher, Margan, 661 Floyd, f W M J Y H Y-w, Y A A-'57-' u .WQZQQT U I lxtz Q in Stephanie, 6911 Focht, Diana, 671 Grunczewski, Carla, 691 Hall,Cen1l:h, 68. Row 3: ,i5""'s' i'1'i11 l1gQ'g'fT ' 1' -'1 - ,, ' A1 ' , Li Haun, Jacl, 681 Harvey, Ga1l, 681 Hayes, Ellen, 69, Hemphill, Virginia.. 65: H1nn1 11,111.4 -5,1131 15 3 - 1-f' . ' . ,-1 1- 1 - -.-.1 1 , Q Judy, 671 Jepsen, Holly, 691 Johnson, Nancy. 69: lSem1Sl2,JulaII'1a. 691 KIIHSGDDEYS1 A 'Q,a'Q1 1' 1 ' -'1' gathyg 651 Kuglelg Linda, 69gguEci53us'Le,t6916lEa1EgaMartl'gi 69g6L3anle, Lima? ffl- 1 Q ' 1 1' 1 , , MP1 Q44 Q ow : arson, osemary, 1 a in. a 1, , u wig, en. a YYTVT1 U 1 fwg' I' 11 ' , 2 'M 6 . N ,, A 68, Mason, Norma,691Macarelli, Laura, 69: McDonald, D1ane, 681 McFarland, Mary, . V. I Y 1 V 1.,, 1 H 1M , Q ,1 681 McManus. Kitty. 68: Miller, Susan. 67: Nloellendorf, Jo-Al, 691 Moller, Kathy, 41' AQ 3 3 12 1, Q 51' ,1- Q 695 Moore, Susie, 66. Row 5: O'Connor, Man, 661 Ogden, Francee, 681 Overholt, , Ks- Q ' Ga1l, 661 Overholt, Lynn, 681 Page, Carolyn,g8g Petggsogm, Fhalrlcltte, Ggbligteirsion, " , 1 " F ' C ' , 671 P'tt , J t, 1 Po ers, usan, 1 us, ic oria, 1 as on, N 1- - 4' JaDr?e:IZ9g Ranki:??32'roI5rr:fe671 Rashx,vSherene, 68. Row 6: Rawlings, Trudy, 681 Reams, Betsy, 671 Rentz, Susan, 681 Rose, Mimi, 691 Rosewell, Sherry, 67: Satorie, ,Q ,WD Bonnie, 671 Schock, Bobbi, 661 Segrist, Susan, 66, S1mmons, Carolyn, 69. Row 7: , 'I fir'--5 3 'I 311121 Slaughter, Jan 66, Steinme er, Sarah, 671 Stoltenberg, CaroIyn,.63: Swa1m1 Cheri, " ' 1 ' 1- ' ' 68. Row 8: Tidrick, Ginny, 6y8, Trombla, Jennifer, 681 Vallicottl, V1rg1n1a,469: Vrana, 14 F1 1 Bobbi, 69. Row 9: Walters, Ann, 691 Watson, Patricia, 681 Wnnclle, Judith, 68. - 'pl R 1 , . ,131 1s -1 ' 1 F"E7?' 5l5fifi iE f i? ' 55, T -f .nas 1' "-in '71 r 1 1. 1,ms a1-1 ' l'-.N1 ' - 'fi '11 15 . . . 1 ' A W 5 1 ,A V 1- , 1 1, , is' ,- . ,1 V' v 'll ,'f..s l li lk-if it 5 1 A s' J J J ,ii t TF 4- I 's P' A ,gQf 'p' Fvf 'r My pf X H . It ., , 1 l Ng . V F, Arif' A, ,gm P - 1-ww, -V - '-q ri I V I 'I .' ' , -. 'lr ru lv A mu 1, ,I lil l X ' ' f l VWTWW l . 1 l Susan Stuckey, President Teachers, Lexington ii, Vg, 1, -,, . .ll ll 51:11 ' 'il - na J is ff -Q-K.-hgh Mm W: sag gfgw A Pi Phi aims a sale's pitch at a young mark as Arrowcraft business sharpens interest. Pi Phi's Arrow Craft Sale Aids National Philanthropy Stuffed animals to candle-stick holders filled tables at the Arrow Craft sale. The articles made by workers at the Pi Beta Phi Settlement School in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, sold across the nation as part of a National Philanthropic project. Working to earn money for local charities, Pi Phi and Phi Gam pledges collected pop bottles from campus and Lincoln area residents. I At the Annual Dad's Weekend, Lincoln became the "crossroads" for Dad's of Beta Chapter. Sporting "Big Red" cowboy hats during the festive weekend, Pi Phi papa's watched original skits, porn pom routines and twirling exhibitions by Nebraska's new Golden Girl. With the intention of strengthening inter-Greek relationships, the seniors sponsored a Greek "Christ- mas Tea Party". The party given for senior sorority women gave members a chance to analyze the system. 393 SDT's Redecorate Interior To Satisfy Sorority Styles After an absence of two years, Sigma Delta Tau's reoccupied the old chapter house. Changing the pre- viously male residence to suit feminine tastes required redecoration of several upstairs rooms and a complete remodeling ofthe main floor through corporation loans. ln keeping with a local philanthropic program, Theta Chapter provided a Thanksgiving dinner for a needy Lincoln family. Sisters sent a turkey dinner to six people in conjunction with the Red Cross. Bringing about closer inter-house relationships, SDT's sponsored a fall retreat including a football game. Actives and pledges comprised the teams and the actives on the losing team received the opportunity of doing freshman duties for one ,entire day. , W-...sax-Qs. ' In Trudy Lieberman, President Home Economics, Scottsbluff Jig l . 1 Q Pledge daughters entangle mothers in a string maze during a Valentine party's obstacle course. 94 E Il:-f 1" -' 131 1 ix F I , L.,,4--nn--'F"f . QMA Q. s ! ,EE ,N ,191 Q' - '-+1 1 x Q QE 4 as gigzih E Jr? gf rl' A 1 J - 'ur fa fn. .i'i.W - " 2 . 'fi 1 WS .tgxwu ' ' : ' 1 I' ' 'S f ' .A , ' r v W., L' ' x A' lx Q 1 2 ' 'b 4 1.2. as ff , . -w Q.. mx 1: E ' gif 5 . -5. f :Il 'Q 4'2g5!' xf-41,1 .1 Y. , , ' af f Rwbisii' 5 W 'Y -1.2.11 M ' fi v .. " v "li Q1 2 -Rf .Am E. , .img , e in I. A V M ..,,A. an Ng I 1. '5 2- w 1 ' .1 1 - g ., '- ' ,L - -U , nv- f '.5"'F:':5E5'5"" .fire . iF"f'7" lf ' M. se-.11 , ' - il A 1 , ' ' fi M "Tu ', , . 1 , 5, i, iii .2 ,I M., ' . V 1- V E 1, M.. lit. T .,,., ,EZ ,SF I A - "M 63 , . l ki. Ms? 52 A Q s .4 -vi- ,fl . - ' it - w 2 'Q ,BM F ,Q h N v., , ,LH 5,4 , 'NE7 ,, .rg er, 5. 5, , e i mg. 5.5 ' . f 'T ' Q -vs.. lfh- " ,ggzfw ,,- . ' at-.i M, - , in ,-W ' I-4 gr ,, ' 4' 13. 451 ,.."'f:f- D. -M .-1 " ,.,,,',-E, ,',:,i' ,- ,-...ptr 1.5: X .li yx 7 4, ,-gig, iw. K L t.-. 2 1: , - ,, ' . , Z , 5 L. 1 C' E, , Q I it 4 , i f ll .fer J ' A ' 1, 3-r '-I I H V -if ,ij-'Jag- W, , Q 1 - ' A ,, f, i, r na' , J, i. ' .gn 'f' is 1 ' .-1 .fr A ' if Lf, .. V l. , vi. . 1-:A -V F 'fl L, ,. l "iz sw ?v.r-4 yy A I I-1,11 , r Q-if f, 1' .lf A ' V .. i ..: . . . ,,,, f, , I, , ,i H ,Q I 4 S ' i ', l,3, - 2: l H. if l ii f .5- 1 - .K gi - ' 5' ,lf " T '1 ri , , ,I V - , N 1- l - 1 ,ef 1 . ,, 5? i,i,,l, , e .rl V ,gif ,l ,. l.-,J ,n 1,3 , ' . " ,s ,l , P' '- '- ' W -gg.--347, I. -- LH, ., - 'Uris' 4-- , Q , I: s- , ! ' Q " i' l ll l N if ' - s- 1 t 3 Fl, is Q. ' V .fhf ' , A, H . A . fp fe r lf- l 5 4 X i PIM ' V V - . L- ,, ,i f , ij!-5"' ., ,, A ,. -,F - ,". .: " ','.,"' , Y '.'- ' , 4 fr 'Le - -.4 H '!'- j. , - Fi, qt 1 wx., AA! Q-iw, Vf- 2,9-NL V lx, K ,yr I, ' A " . ,:- -T 5 Ji , ,l ,W L, gi' Q' 1 ' X. 2, all ' ' Q'L'? 1' U 'T E l l "' iff- 7 1? 7134 - ' 'E' ,F i L,-. 1 ' .X ,iam - ll f. flfe. 7 4- S ,, ' ,af I --' 9 Yjf: iff! 5 'Jjjvi 1 5. ' ' 1 ,-'Y . "1 ', ' 1, , ,dj -T 'J if ' J Ulf-gf" ,iff x l . . 'Nj ' 1 wr i-if V ,, 4, . ip- il 'Fi f ' ' ,, , 2' 4' 'Z T ,gl ST n . , ,J , 1- A ,l fb ' Q T lvl 1 4.7-v' ," 1 ' . ' ,IN K Q, .T ' n .W- fr' 1 - lin: F. ,"' ,Z L . .,,,, QQ. . SQ e . I A . ,,, ,, ' '.,:..x g l ' 5 , , ' ,lx A S' ' I S I, fn , w-f 0 - X Ag, . ,.,,x , 1 L , : cw' he -- U iz 1 AJ . l U ' I .' Row 1: Ryan, Lizgnresident, 66, Maddison, Barbara, vicegresident, 66, Rhynalds, Polly, vice-president, 67, Johnson, Joell, secretary, 6 , Morgan, Carol-Sharon, treasurer, 67, ender, Eileen, 67, Brolyer, Bette, , Craig, Carol, 68, Dahl sten, Donna, 69. Row 2: Frost, Zoe. 67, Purse, Sara, 68, Groom, Barbara, 66, Hanthorn, Elaine, 66, Head, Elizabeth, 68, Hoover, Janice, 69, Jensen, Janine, 67, Johnson, Joyce, 69, Keenan, Lanita, 69. Row 3: Knott, Nancy, 68, Krohn, Kay, 68, Lundguist, Gloria, 68, May, Janice, 69, McGrew, Deanna, 69, McQuire, Sandra, 68, Mueller, Sharon, 69, Nicholson, Barbara, 6, Phillips, Carol, 69. Row 4: Ramsey, Jaye, 69, Roehrkasse, Kathryn, 67, Schou, Anita, 69, Schmeiding, Dean- na, 66, Schultz, Nancy, 69, Shadbolt, Sherrill, 67, Shildneck, Sally, 69, Shildneck, Susan, 69, Sixta, Ann, 69. Row 5: Spoe- neman, Mary, 68, Steffensen, Jan, 69, Stuart, Nancy. 66, Tincher, Barbara, 69, Wiggins, Gail, 69, Witte, Arlene, 68, Zllllch, Pauline, 66, Zimmerman, Linda, 69. 55 l A, l'. if L1 l 1 ' kv H is ,, , ,il , ul ' A 1 5' in gr - in X I Y 'Zu' I , l V Y r.g?F ly ,E " l . ' ii il 1 Ol ii, l ' 1 tx 5-'K+ at R wg, l' X ,. , r ,, .sl 'D i ,V m. 1 "l, ,n. V l v ll, H' Eagerly anticipating initiation, SK hopefuls add last minute touches to a traditional pledge song. 396 'lf' Sigma Kappa Revised Rush Provides Seminar Format pa initiated a three week concentrated schedule at the University of Nebraska. The agenda presented activities every other day with teas, style shows and panels with men discussing dating and social manners. To help strengthen national sisterhood, Alpha Kappa sponsored a "Province Weekend." Sigma Kappa chapters from Iowa State and Omaha University at- tended the three day session. Seminars on pledge train- ing, house management and rush headed the list of topics in the exchange of ideas. Delegates also toured the campus and attended a "Big Red" football game. ects, Sigmas began weekly visits to Lincoln's Madonna day visits, outings and informal coffee house. Liz Ryan, President Arts and Sciences, Lincoln 'Victim' of a late-afternoon Journalism 82 lab, Reaching a lofty objective in the SK trunkroom, JoelIJohnson receivesulate-plate"nutriment. Carol Craig launches into holiday preparations. 397 introducing a new open rush program, Sigma Kap- With renewed interest in community service proj- l-lome for the elderly. The program consisted of holi- Zeta Philanthropy Benefits Residents Of Cedars Home Following the recent trend of spending less time on homecoming displays, Zeta Tau Alpha sponsored a picnic for the children of the Cedars Orphanage in Lincoln. Money previously used to build the three-di- mensional moving displays purchased a television set and play-ground swing set for the home. ln the spring Zetas collaborated with the three other University Terrace sororities in furthering inter-Greek relations at the second Terrace Picnic. Sisters prepared and furnished food and provided a folk singing group to lead the picnic-goers in a song fest. For the third consecutive year, a Zeta won the Ne- braska Rodeo Association's Rodeo Queen Contest. The win retired the trophy bringing the prize to permanent residence in Nebraska's Beta Eta Chapter. Kay Huffaker, President Arts and Sciences, Clay Center 1 11. rl- , lp nil x MII '1 V ,, . '-f, . tl 'we' .1' l, " A l 'JN' 1 . A ,. . ill - A ,E - .a 1 Ll .a. T lr nfl, fteglf -V' , r g, eva-" Z ' I ' Lum 398 .+A l . 11.421 '-" me T Us T r 4 I I 9 - 'rl' Ji' ' A r I l nf? nn.. , QQ all ' 1 ' '- .viz As.. i i i i f X. ' A 2, Q-, 1 .l , if l I i ' -L' . 9 I n -15 5" 3 ,,-7' 2: V f:iT':'fg,' .A .' 'Mt -, l x HRV Xa 1. l y . A .EU- 'K 1 X -W K 'I ,. , 4. F , . 'rv' i . , , J, Y A f 1. 1' r yi . 4 li 'wi-4 . i i fi 4- K T 'fr '-41 .9 l - 1 .ff , .3-' 5 " ' iii -5. ' 1 lf .L 1 WZ., .W- 1 1, ' ii , 'i ll 5 A K. O lf l Q e, ,.-.. -. V - 4- ' 'L -,-. sfglgitfr 47,24 in , ' gm - W '- a-11?-::::r--f:v::':-.,":'::'5,j,1 -2 .Vg ,,.,",'l,a,-l"Z J. NLE - -. I r- , -J Providing Umotherly encouragement" for final exam success, Linda Selko offers incentive roses to daughter Linda Jones. Row 1: l-luffaker. Kay, president, 66, Schmeeckle. Sharon, vice-president, 66, Jaspersen Jean, vice-president, 67. Row 2, Antes, Jane, secretary, 66, Wisnieski, Diane. 67, Adamson: Catherine, 69. Row 3: Allen, Judy, 66, Allen, Judy, 66, Berney, Barbara 67. Row 4: Billiard Terri, 67, Bolich, Genia, 68, Bolin, Karen, 66. Row 5: Bondegard, Pat, 68, Bozarth, Gayle, Bush, Sally, 67, Byerk, Lynne, 68, Campbell, Janice, 68, Carlson, Natalie, 67, Casey, Mary, 67, Dose, Sandra, 68, Duhachek, Kay. 68, Eliason. Margaret. 67, Erickson, Jean, 69, Fardal Ruth, 66. Row 6: Fetty, Carol, 69, Finnell, Jane, 68, Freeborn, Coralee, 68, Gardner, Kerrol 68, Geiger, RoseAnn, 66, Glaser, Sherryn, 67, Glasson, Gloria, 66, Glaubius, Melanie, 67 l-lagedorn, Ruth. 68, l-lenninger, Audrey, 69, l-lenrichs, Linda, 69, l-lertzler, Vicki, 69. Row7 l-linman, Sandra, 68, Hoffman Jeanette, 69, Jones, Donna, 69, Julian, Claire, 68, Keenan Kathryn, 69, Kiffin, Debbie, 66, Kohlmeier, Carolee, 66, Krueger, Deane, 66, Lagerstrom Marcia, 67, Lamphiear. Susan. 69, Law, Sandie, 67, Layton, Roberta, 67. Row 8: Lindquist Diane, 67, May, Holly, 69, McGhie, Carla, 68, McKee, Martha, 69, McLeod, Helen 69, Miller Kathy, 69, Morgan, Barbara, 69, Morgan, Carolyn, 68, Oswald, Pamela, 68, Otto, Pamela, 69 Parker, Donna, 69, Philips, Kay, 68. Row 9: Reeves, Caroline, 69, Reisinger, Linda, 69, Rishel Dianna, 68: Roach, Cheryl, 69, Rose, Beth, 66, Rose, Susan, 69, Salem, Deborah, 69 Schlegel, Sharon, 69, Schole. Bonnie, 69, Schultz, Susan, 68, Schwenk, l.aDana, 68, Selko Linda, 67. Row 10: Severeide, Diane, 69, Smith. Leslie, 68, Strecker, Dessa, 67, Swanson Connie. 69, Thompson, Linda, 68, Wademan, Sally, 66, Walker, Marlaine, 69, Weber,Victoriaf 66, Wilson, Dolores, 66, Woods, Linda, 69, Yetman, S.isan, 68. 1 9 Acacia Secretary Secures Appointment To State Navy Alumni commemorated the chapter's 61st anniver- sary at the Founder's Day Banquet on Nlarch 12. Roy C. Clark, National Executive Secretary, spoke to the group and later received an Admiralship inthe Nebraska Navy. Traveling to Fremont, Acacians played Santa for the Masonic Children's Orphanage. ln other social serv- ice projects, actives migrated to the Nebraska Union to give blood for U.S. servicemen in Viet Nam. lvlummies, coffins and Egyptian temples accented Acacia's annual "Night of the Nile" party. Cleopatra paid a surprise visit to the social affair and discovered couples attired in togas and sandals. After semester finals, brothers recuperated while celebrating Aus- tralian style at the "Down Under" house party. William Hayes, President Teachers, Lincoln L-....-.,, 4 N Relying on last-minute fact fincling, Eric Brown studiously searches the revealing 'Cliff's Notesf 400 ass..-vac. :...3+e. ,-... .....,. . ' - , J gwwia 'Vi-is F :Est A , 333, gh, I ' I .-,. , ,i , , , M w H, , -Q, if vi, , li. 1 la. K '- N' 'gn' L ,v,,'.,i.L . .1 l im:-9. -Lx .. "'. M, I ilqig I IKFL Q. ,V 1 P 1 l ' Tlx... , 'M if gum, . ,fgff , 1 l A I v F i,4Iln 'NVE .lk F 'g Il , ll. .5 J "il ' 91 i ,f .1 , 5 , y , 'Q lil I 6 -yy - I F "Cutting costs" to meet the budget, Acacia 'repairmen' accidentally boost chapter expenditures. 'ui 1 ,E if :fi K- , l 1 YI 0 5, , - ,L 5. 1 V ,I ,f-,f ' ,A g 4 fn: A fJ2,i , Q mfg .i J- , f ,iimlx Kd,-R di V , xii ,IQ -Y E, , . i, HB xi fn1s4f:,wwA' IQ, V P11 ' - ' gi' , Q: 'Sf - in '-.i. ' i. " 3 ' V Ar. it i 'Y v-'lr i , - -JE ' .' 3 v-.DAB f I tri A Mfg- i fi awmg 18 -A Y ' 4:41 , ZA, Row 1: Hayes, William, president, '66, Francis, Don, vice-president '66, 'Zieg, Robert, secretary, '66, Moore, Byron, treasurer, '67, Bat- tensperger, Bradley, '69, Brown, Erick, '67, Clark, Douglas, '67 Filsinger, Duane, '67, Gemelke, Duane, '67. Row 2: Gemelke, Ronnie, '69, Gold, Stephen, '68, Harrison, DeWayne, '67, Higgins, Ralph, '69, Krueger, Eugene. '67, Lindsey. William, '66, Loos. James, '68, May, Michael, '69, Mcl.oed, James, '69. Row 3: Rhylander, Kenneth, '68, Schneider. Roger, '69, Turpyn, Rick, '69, Wirth, John, '69. 2 Predicting the possibilities for a week-end date, two practical pledges dabble in prestidigitation. kx 41 Rod Johnson, President Agriculture, Wausa as. -J 9 Q e. i Sw: ,a W 'W W . :W , 1 .. fa, - - 1 , ',.F, ' ' ' 'V '.,, ,, - 'Q-:U rig ' ' -' ' ,EU ""'-' ll: 5 K ' "Ti J ' I i 'Liga 1 : 3'-'i w ka., W k-.fl I ay 1 ,QE - f' , 5-53 cv I :vi l ,g - il, li I 'W ,.,,.- al. i, . ,.u, it ix - , I , e, 'ffl W- ics, . r 4 ' W W fa., ll , i - n l- ff ' -4' N ' ' ,,, , ,I 3, ,. i ' ' er , 2 i, iii ' S " ' ,Lu i. '- V -"R 15. ' .a .N ,E , A - ,ll Q ' i Y 'f i 'si ' ' Zz,-'ZF'TEFTi ii,-1" T5 3. if-I ' 'Gif I ' V '-nj L--j-ff-5f1" 'r ? "Y , , - H- W, A T ' ' ,. 1 ' , s ,pi - , 'Wi ' W f , ig , l ' l lr- W - , y, -.,-sv 15- Ill ' ' W, - W e in l ,A LA qi I ,W W ,fl l ' A U itll i il KQL 2 III i 1, N my l 'l ff, 3 W 73. f X A, ..,,, 1 W H 1. y , , t A, K . li , I i1 h - - N , L - ""' N l fb -V ' ' , 7 ,JM '12 'vii' 1, A . 1, i ,v 7 W If- 5 " ' P W" F' - -'. , . f "f y -it"e.'l-.f W l 5 Y ,F UPI J 'Q' 'l W W N - f , cs. , W - , 2 ar -: W i iii .1 ,.- -cs , . W ' X . Q . ' ' W . 'X ' fe., ,ui . 7 , 537' 7 5 K Y 2:15. W , "Q ' "'f'4TZ f 1 iii' 'jf' ,ip .?.J1,,' -V - ' -.,g ' ' ' 'wi 'Y' 'ir 'R ,li l ' in L 33 ' ,r Wf I -W?'if?-'gy W, ' e l ' W ,ti-. l 1 wig -. , - li- 1 ' - 1 ' Wi'-1 --' W ab", . 5 if .ff W W Q 5 'W a f e- 1 f .W ' gi W f i. ' I lf' fl" .. 'N' - l " 'W-' 1' '- " " ' Q ' ' yu 5 -F .. 'A y ., 1 I E3 Q 'Q " X W Row 1: Johnson, Rodney, president, '66, Beebe, Kenneth, vice-president, '67, Cada, James, secretary, '66, Miller, Robert, treasurer, '66, Allard, James, '68. Row 2: Anderson, Alan, '69, Bauermeister, Ronald, '69, Baughman, Roger, '68, Carlson, Marvin, '68, Cooksley, Kenton, '69, Daharsh, Mike, '68, Dickinson, Robert, '68, Engelkemier, Larry, '66, Eveleth, Douglas, ' 6, Fidler, William, '67, Force, Ken, '69, Fortkamp, Neil, '67, Frost, Robert, '68, Glaesemann, William, '68. Row 3: Gloy, Donald, '68, Hansen, Loren, '69, Hecox, Jim, '66, Herzog, James, '69, Hibbs, Jerrold, '66, Hoesing, Gary, '69, Jensen, Kent, '68, Jewell, Duane, '68, Jewell, Gary, '69, Kastanek, Larry, '69, King, Kent, '69, Lambert, David, '67, Leistritz, Fred, '67, Libal, Gene, '69. Row 4: Libal, George, '66, Lindahl, Loren, '68, Lucas, Stephen, '69, Madsen, Bruce, '68, McCord, Gary, '68, Mills, Bill, '69, Munter, Mike, '66, Nerud, Michael, '68, Owens, Robert, '68, Paine, Douglas, '66, Paulson, James, '69, Plihal, Galen, '66, Pomajzl, Michael, '69, Pomajzl, Stephen, '67. Row 5: Psota, Ronald, '67, Roe, Glenn, '68, Roslund, Jerry, '67, Ruwe, David, '68, Sanderson, Newel, '69, Schanou, Robert, '68, Schlines, Merle, '66, Seidler, Dale, '66, Stohlmann, Robert, '69, Svajgr, Larry, '68, Talbott, Tim, '68, Volk, Meredith, '69, Watson, Thomas, '67,Wel'1rbein, Gene, '67. Row 6: Wehrbein, Ted, '67, Weichel, Kenneth, '68, Wiese, Ronald, '68, Wilhelm, Lynn, '68, Wolford, Roger, '68, Wolford, Russel, '69. 1- fv- AGR's Prediction Portrays Snake Eyes For Colorado Functioning with Alpha Xi Delta, Alpha Gamma Rho supplemented homecoming spirit by constructing, "The Odds are on Our Side." A rigged, rotating roulette wheel, crepe paper dice and a barker depicted Big Red's tri- umph overthe University ofColorado's Golden Buffaloes. To uphold AGR tradition, actives turned on back- woods charm and captured the L'il Abner award. With the third victory in as many years the trophy earned a permanent place in the chapter showcase. With emphasis on community service activities, pledges canvassed the city on a honey and candy sale to raise money for Nebraska charities. The school for mentally retarded in Beatrice and Whitehall orphanage in Lincoln received money from the projects. N, .-'IIA K--Q- ' fl f'i7"3 f . . Q f :F Q A' V gk 1 I, ' A G N 6- K sv Lg! ill I W Kp A ,- i K -'ffl ii 'ji ' g Qfi1g".-- -M CH G F, , 31 had 321fE.i i ' 1 m. l D WI 9, K L la' I l e, K. 'Uff X1 :fQ9.'3" "I il . ii ',., .' ff --.... A I A u . hi . I Vowing vengeance on fleeing AGR pledges, Larry Svajgr rewires a victim of the war. 4 404 AGS Accents Scholarship ' r To Earn Schramm Award Scholarship represented an important facet of AGS life and received the top emphasis throughout the year. Actives and pledges used consistent studying to improve grades and on lvy Day won the E. F. Schramm award for the greatest scholastic improvement. Beginning the social year on a casual note, Alpha Gamma Sigma members donned jeans and sweat- shirts for the hayrack ride to Ashland. Attire became more formal when brothers rented tuxedos for the ,ni X--.A tg-zu.. : VK , , annual "Rose Formal" at the Knoll's Country Club. ,1,f,1:' Looking towards future professions, the chapter 'La ,.. .A .4-'g ,1 M'- stressed participation in Agricultural Campus Activi- .f,,.1., ' . ' ... , A,'. .. .. '.1 X ,. I. ,,.,-,'.,..-, .,,.- .- '1,, . 1' ,- .yf..1,,.f.A.-. 1 as 1- at 21 3- '3- r 1 .f , I -5. dw. 'L. rig- asa!" ties. For diligence and hard work, the house earned the vp: lr' A i--i . x li -lY4Q., '.'.qa".1 ' lm top rating in the senior division of crops and soils. ,1... '- ','.q,. . 1 -,.. ' ' Al pn -nl ,.... , , .. ,,. .. 1 .,.,,,.1, 1 N "' , ' --.'1'. vnuunv- A- - nu - ,.','., ou......n- ,- -1 .--,Ui r nj., -.......n , -4 ov ' ' '1 1 I nlaaoqlfol s'5r .,,""",' 'n,' ......-.....-4 vvv.. ..A.-3. - -1 -,4..............-' .azz :A-.J ".,f,,............1. 412: 511. ,"-. '1,n-11.....nvqn4 - .fu .-'- . . 3:1 'p,,,....,., X.. o - .,,:,U.... .. L . , ,. rlyy , , ,,,. ,it,lli t,,r , , -iii Q., s, A .... vA--- 2155121-"" wi X if ' ' ' ' . .,,, i' 'J ' -.Q f e -?,1ii1 , Qing r1gl'r." -,Ji , , , l Row 1: Grove, Lee, president, '66, Overy, Richard, vice-president, '66, Thomsen, Burton. secretary, '67, Cacek Ronald, treasurer, '66, Row 2: Barber, Donald, '66, Barney, Norman, '69, Beck, Gerald, '69, Cacelf, Terrance, '68, Carman, Glen, '66, Drueke, Richard, '66, Dreeszen, Craig, '69, Fox, Rodney. '69, Glathar, Dwalne, '68, Row 3: Glynn, James, '66, Groelz, Ross, '68, Hake, Wayne, '69, Jahde. Merle, '69, Jiskra, Alfred, '66, Kanter, Dwight, '66, Keetle, Roger, '69, Kleinschmit. Martin, '68, Krajnik, Duane, '69. Row 4: Magee, Wayland, '69, Miller, John, '68, Mills. Morris, '69, Nippert, Larry, '68, Purdy. Eldon, '69, Reimers, Tom, '68, Schelm, Larry, '66, Sohelm, Stanley, '69, Schluntz, Marvin. '68. Row 5: Schole, Bernhard, '68, Schuster, William, '68, Shoemaker, David, '68, Skinner, R b rt '69-S ht J s '68-S echt Terr '69-Stricker Donald '69- Thom son Brian, '66, Thomsen, Ronald 091 .D9C13me. 1D 1 Y, 1 1 1 1 D 1 '68. Row 6: Topp, Dale, '68, Wilton, Dennis, '68. v ii' Nu, xiii , 1 ,ig - i i i 2 5 i .rf .lf ' I ,ss i i . 'xii ,ii Wearing an expression of mock astonishment Lee. Grove, President a pledge pleads 'not guilty' to negligent duties. ASf'CUltl-IFS. SUDGVIOF K, into bat-taliions, a T-shirt change transforms brothers into the dynamic duo. 40 2 , 'i . W 15 Q , L , L ,,' ig 5 V ,aiwx - 5? 41 A .UU A. d ,fi 95? is If 12, ,lg f 1 'K ,Z is ,. - ,g , W 1 '25 iq 1 -1 . Q A . With time in his hands, ATO call boy Jim Schaller remains unalarmed while duty approaches. Q ' F 3 r. ii i i -, .ti ESEE --,, , , 5 """' "' ' " ' 1 I i g if B i 3 is . ffm 'I 'L iff ' 1 -:- -' "" 4 -af ,I JZ i Qi gi ,f ih: ii, ' if I 2 H H ! Y x f 3 gag 1 'll 406 Finding thirst-quenching answers in cold winter weather, ATO's prepare frosty Pepsi's in Nebraska's deep-freeze. N- V ,J V I 17.1 , i' 4 5- i mmi. 'iLi " T' 1 1 '. 'Tj i I 7 "Lx vw. y ,A JIJFI , 4- X i i i fiii, 'Q A if 1' f' w .i" i i gli iq e i - ii Q4 wi I QW A' 4: .- 21 f is i :Q he 4 f if !l' ml sg 41' 1 1, 9' 1 ,. -J x, 42' .Q- ,- in , TQ ' Q- - 'rr Q4 'W " i .A fl- , K :gi 1 i V-f:,I i i i l r 15 J: Af' Ulrv W' H 4:11 l fr' 1" . I., V, ,, Q- QE, Q' N' X ' ii .,, i ff' i ,- r Q' ' ' ' .rf L, H i 1 . 1 .Z "in:-ff l ' sv , ', lla , i .' ' . "fi I il i - S iii 4' ' i A a-.J - . 4? John Baldwin, President Pharmacy, Columbus ATO's Construct Quarters To Meet Expanding Needs Increasing the living capacity of the house to sev- enty-five, Alpha Tau Omega completed a new addition with an enlarged dining hall accommodation. Brothers moved into the renovated sections in the spring after using Union dining facilities first semester. With the dedication of a new national headquarters at Champaign, Illinois, the ATO's celebrated the centen- nial of the fraternity's founding. To honor the occasion National President, Dr. Sherman Oberlez, spoke to the chapter about fraternities and the college community. Exhibiting the Yuletide spirit, Tau's sponsored a Christmas party for White Hall Orphanage. Donating gifts, pledges and actives dressed as Santa's helpers and passed out presents to the homeless children. .. , 5.1, ,gn ' 'ix f ., i l . V up C N, 1 F ' ' l -. 5' . 'll I, ' l, :Fl K.. ,v ' "ff , -ug. .. Y l ,-, -xx . .in '.y" VL- 1 ' if A .E '. l i l f W ,ifdrr 1, lr' ,t 1 V I 'ZZ' - -' . -,L- .:7' -, - . , l- ,rl -, ,: ll' u ll , 11? ig! 5 ' Y Q ' I-Ml it - , U ., K i l i - if F ,lt 1' 1 1: ,W I--' gl., ' .,. 5 '12 ft. 'Q " " 'ine 'E l. " 9 . -'r,'L,,, 1 .fin A 'Z i l 3 E Row 1: Baldwin, John, president, '66, Milligan, Robert, vice-president, '67, Hartwig, Gordon, treasurer, '66. Row 2: Ailes, Gary, '69, Erickson, Robert, '67, Bull, Charles, '66, Clarke. Eston. '68, Clark. James '69, Clement, Charles, '66, Davidson. Steve, '66, Drum, Duncan, '66, Dugan, William, '66, Flnks, John '69, Foster, Larry, '68, Garrison, Wayne, '69. Row 3: Gist, Thomas. '69, Hanna, Tom, '68, l-lerbolsheimer: Gerald, '67, Houghton, Jack, '68, Johansen, Darry, '69, Jones, Ken, '68, Kelley, Robert, '68, Kroeger. D '68- K R '67' K llb J '66- l. k G ld '67- M t' J h '67. R 4: uane, , udrna, oger, , u erg, ames, I , uc ey, era , , ar nn, o n, ow Mayfield, Paul, '68, McMullen, Bruce, '67, Pglaeve, Michael, '69, Peter, Douglas, '69, Nygren, Larry, '66 Pohlman, Floyd. '68, Reiss, Randy, '67, Robinson, Bergamin, '69, Rodgers, Richard, '67, Russell, Richard '69, SCl'1alIee,Jame5, '68, Schlatter, Michael, '68. Row 5: Schneiderwind, Ted, '68, Sederavicivs, George: '69, Seeger. Robert, '68, Stasiowski, John, '67, Stickelman, Chat, '67, Stith, Carel, '67, Stych, Robert, '69, Swanson, James, '67, Swanson, Robert, '69, Sweetman, Charles, '68, Von Seggern, Donald, '69, Weichman, Denton. '69. Row 6: Welchman, F. l.., '67, Wunderlich, William, '6B. I ,ia ll l'i I 'ag 'lf PJ- 40 "Hurry with the m - atches," demand impatient actives as a frantic pledge fidgits for the flame. a ' i - . I ' ' ff' " fi: aff 1 -1. 1, 2..- " , .ig " ' '-f ,131 S' 'Tx' ' 'fl' flu "SS , , , M ' " ' 1 'J 1? , 3 lg, in jg-'iv' 3 "fa, ,L a L, in - v. ' ,Eg 'a , S, , - , 5, 1 ig, ii --, ,A -- .,.. :guy ,Q w , ug- -V 1 , :,,- JL 4' ,Lg 5 U-I' -. '- - - 1,71 -,,. - -- 1 'll N, '. gg-, : I-al N ., , i- :fl -:f ,--1 ,,- -,,.-5 rr . I " ?, , Q -Arg I, lrv, , 1.1! ' rl. -- -,', .Qi A ' 1 M- ,. .- M i il ,S uf J' 2 - r' , r fi 3, wi, J 4 , "" W iii, yi f , 11 ,- Q: 1 if , x " L-J, , 1 ' if , , . - f' A 1' 15, ff - . ' 'P i .3 q" ?""'s,vf:f 'fl'J- 52 '- 151' , -Q,'7ier-E- Y? ,.5'f?-Q, gt" 'l'E'- if 'fir' I.-,fx 1 ,I "lui ' ' Aff, 1 ',r. ' , IP, 1, .ar ...ini 5 Q . , -.,,. g .rm ...ry Msg, 'I V ,.., '35 I I. Jing -- Lvl ,t t ngfrl,-ii, - .J-, V- - Y . I 64, I a , '- - 4 ' J ei 1 1 ff , 7 ,Ax ,S 'T f 7 iii, S l 9 ' 1 -if " i L- L, li, ' ge ,V ,Q-gig at J' Q: ' ,', ,,,,, . P DEQ, .1533 , ' H. , Q . - 'lm gg", . gf ,ig-AT , Liv, W U 5,':,Q,,-Ib, Di Ml ,Z FA , , fer.. H "T" 1 . Z 3" X lift., 1 '- . :H 4,5 L- ,T 1' I-Lf'-,fri i" 'L Q' WW i, -' - ,f1,. , 1, ,:,if5,5L " I ,. .--f--,V if ' f'5yr,'k f A -' ' "f ' nr ' El 'Y fu,-' if? L- A. ' ' S ' 1 'E' xii, 'Nh M -1, . ... L, , x X , R. Zi' 4 . ' 1 r' I ' 1 ' - f V .L ..i-. ., ,.i. 3, .L ,.,, T, , , , , , F i. is L ,Q i,,i , i, f- ,,..f , , , nv . , .- . - . ,- - , , J - . , ,. as -.-if. -'i "L, 452' 4 ' 6' il' w- ' " li . ii-:Y .. . , " 29" 'QM'- r Emi V' 5:3 ,fill A ' ' ,- 5. f -' ., Vi, bg ' 'Ei "B w 1,751 - L ' i 'Q-1 'l A "' 'fl' 'PT ' ' Q JL- " 2' , V- ' - , ' -1 , - A ,sm 5,9 1 1. L ' '1' wi , va- -Q F i 5 5' " 1 'v ' P - find-L: l-'-M' - . - 1 Y' , - . 2 I gijk- ' g5hL,pJ1 li- g: H-Qtajfxi' ' .- , ., - .' . 1- , ' ,- V 1. A ,. ,- 7 , ,-.L . 1 L '-Y-, ' 14' 5 J gf ' Q.?q.1'fgQTf' L' - - " " 1' f J' ' 1 1:1 ' "' l H l , r F - Y q,,L H -:Z j: V . -1:51 L- , 'jgff W ,5 , Y' XL-"cf ' NH- . 1 Fail ' 4 ' ij x '-if jx 1 wi ,ix Qg,yfg:1 J XS W 'Hn' , J, ,Z 1 l -ig I X' ' K- 4F.,r.,,,1 -,-,HE - ,. 5.-1, ,wg a' U Q., - Y 1'-,wfriti ' 5 "5-..f"5x H A-'ig - ' -- - , .- . ,X ,.., 1 ,Q--1, , . W ,, - 4, l"' , ' 'ii l ', i ., '51, 'f Row 1: Miller, Stanley, president, '65, Brummund, Charles, vice-president, '66, Mumm, Ken, secretary, '66, Willman. John, treasurer, '67, Bartee, Robert, '69, Beeman, Kenneth, '69, Beerbohm, Larry, '68, Bredthauer, John, '67, Burns, Lyle, '69, Canarsky, Leonard, '68, Carlson, Carl, '69, Churchill, Melvin, '69, Coker, David, '69. Row 2: Daehnke, James, '69, Ellermeler, Richard, '68, Folken, Gerald, '66, Fox, Donald, '69, Fuehser, Steven, '69, Geisler, Roger, '69,' Glenn, Jerry, '66, Hansen, Donald, '69, Harnisch. Larry, '66, Hayforcl, Kenneth. '69, l-leinicke, Ronald, '69, Hellbusch, Jim, '68, Hohenstenn, Roger, '69. Row 3, Jones, Jerry, '66, Koch, Leland, '66, Krueger, Keith, '66, Lamb, Ivan, '67, Lamberty, Michael, '68, Larson. Gary, '67, Lassen, Robert, '69, Marotz, Loy, '67,Menke, Richard, '68,Menze,James, '68,Meyer, Darrell, '68,Milbourn, Douglas, 69, Nau, Richard, '67. Row 4: Nicolaus, Neal, '66, Niemoth, Robert, '68, Peterson, Gary, '69, Pfeiffer, Ron, '69, Reinmiller, Dick, '66, Remmeis, Kenneth, '69, Roehrs, Bill, '69, Roehrs, John, '66, Schatz, Stephen, '69, Sprague, Gary, '69, Stahr, Orval, '69, Stelzer, Dennis, '67, Taylor, John, '69. Row 5: Tonniges, Dennis, '67, Waak, Lonnie, '68, Wagner, Charles. '69, Wimmer, Dave, '69, Wimmer, Steve, '68, Wray, Terry, '68. .4-Q. , , . .. 1 ' ' V ,1- lh 5 'I l 1 ii IV 1 a i '11 ,ix i -1.- . H7 1. , . ,I , i . . Beta Sigs Use IFC Tutors To Raise Chapter Average With scholastic improvement as the chapter goal, Beta Sigma Psi adopted the Inter-Fraternity Council's tutoring programs to encourage better performance. Both pledges and actives attended self-help sessions to complement classroom instruction, and in one year raised the house average over four-tenths of a point. Evening festivities turned maritime as "Swords and Sailors" provided the theme for the Barbary Coast Party. Dates became swashbuckling pirates and hoist- ed the jolly roger over the night's entertainment. Showing athletic diversity, Delta chapter won two trophies in the men's Greek games. Earning a place in the top five finishers, Beta Sigs took third in the Pyra- , ,fr W Race and pulled to a second in the Tug-o-War. 'ia l li " " - l I its Pg ' Lk. .J X54 Y nr Stanley Miller, President Engineering, Lincoln Fad-conscious actives glance eagerly skyward, totrng the indispensable umbrella 'just in case! 4 Larry Frolik, President Arts and Sciences, Lincoln Betas Stress Scholarship To Earn Innocents' Trophy Creating a strong scholastic atmosphere, Beta Theta Pi encouraged pledges and actives to set up personal study schedules. With cabinet support for better grades, the house achieved one of the highest over-all fraternity averages and received the First Place Innocents Scholarship-Activities Trophy. Displaying traditional dramatic ability, members won first place in Kosmet Klub with the mock epic "Battle of Yorktown." The Betas also harmonized to win the Ivy Day Sing with "Alexander's Ragtime Band." Brothers and dates dressed in raccoon coats and as flappers for the Roaring Twenties Party. Speakeasies and green felt gambling tables provided the entertain- ment as the chapter recalled "Those Wonderful Years." 410 Fleeing from the monthly approach of the house treasurer, brothers brood over soaring bills. 4 3 kr. 5' -l . VT, gm 'iv' V. -Y ' xg 'V - if Q , W- 1 ' ' m l 1 - f link! .- .A .-,3: - A-U V D ' Y N. u V my - 'ef . RR ijf g w al.-V ,V W 7.7- s,,PQP. b .5531 I , H. F' W: 5 'H' ' .3 .V my 725 Y 41 '11 'ff Q72 . i 4 'la vii? 'bu ny 'ina 'WM YH' P 1' !.,:v vip fi in A I M ,- M L, V'i F 'xiii-1':5f? -515 .-sg, -Spy K5 Ui? Lx , K - K 1 J' , - ,, N -" f ,i "3 ., W K E5 N if? PZ EIQF6? -4. iii QI Q au ' 5, M .iggaigf 512 , gs 1 X E az w -'KW 5 ' .1,.. , .- - is 1 ..-nl. x A -if was ' " ,Fl 35, .gigs 1 w ws? iw H "H 2 :ag w y-,? -Q 1 I :nf QE 4 Chi Phi Social Maneuvers Begin with Nautical Theme Starting the social year on a nautical note, Chi Phi men entertained dates at the "Buccaneer Brawl." Sub- sequently, pledges and actives held the annual "Fire- man's Ball" with all of the attending couples wearing trench coats, rubber boots and firemen's hats. Promoting intramurals, the house grappled to fourth place in the All-University wrestling. Distance running proved to be a strong pointalso, as one member chugged up Highway 77 to win the Greek Week Marathon. Teaming with the Kappa Deltas before the Iowa State game, the brothers helped build house spirit while supporting the Cornhusker football team. The two units combined to win Tassels and Corncobs annual Yell-Like- Hell contest with a cheer of "Sink the Cyclones." Max Nall, President Civil Engineering, Edgar Row 1: Nall, Max, president, '66, Theis. Dick. vice-president, '67, Burow, Kenneth, secretary, '68, Cook, James, treasurer, '67. Row 2: Anderson, Gar, '68, Anderson, Gaylord, '68, Anderson, Jack, '69, Arnold, William. '69, Beckley, Stephen, '69, Caplinger, Michael, '69, Christensen, Mark, '69 Clark, Gerald, '68, Craig, Paul. '67, Connelly, Dan, '69, Currie. Alexander, '69, Elsenhart, Russell, '69. Row 3: Felt, Lawayne, '67, Fritz, David, 69 G l h K t '67- ' Th ' - ' - k V' t ' -H ll d K th '69- H l R d '68- Hr h Michael, '68 erac , en, ,G1lroy, omas, 67, Graves, Jon, 69.Hancoc , uc or. 68, o an , enne , , ous ey, o ger, , oc , Humphrey, Jack, '69, Inness, Ronald, '68, Jay, Robert, '69. Row 4: Johannes, Kenneth, '67, Jones, Bruce, '68, Kracke, Alan, '69, Kramer, Douglas '67, Krieger, Tom, '68, Magner, Ro er, '69, Menke, Bruce, '66, Messick, William, '68, Monnich, Herman, '67, Mulder, Daniel, '69, Napier, Michael, '69, Niederhaus, Ronald, '68. Row 5: Sslesby, Gene, '66, Pavelka, David, '67, Pennington, Charles, '68, Peters, Michael, '69, Radcliffe, WaIter,.'69, Ross, Larry, '66, Seewald, Wolfgang, '69, Sergent, Morris, '69, Snyder, Charles, '68, Sprleck, Terry, '67, Steckley, Clarke, '66, Taylor, William, '67, Row 6: Vance, Michael, '67, Wood, William, '66. With a soggy cigar and a slippery grip, juniors shower congratulations upon a pinned brother. -'U'F'!R',i .. mf.: --ia I A- ' 'Q ' 1 ' Qgf , ,QV- Getting a head start, an early-riser cuts a rapid shave. 4 Chivalry 'stands the test' as brothers ward off hunger pains while seating the housemother. Delta Sigma Phi Struggles To Pyramid Race Victory Generating house spirit,'Delta Sigma Phi rallied en masse to support brothers in the Greek Week games. The non-competing chapter boosters cheered team- mates on to victory in the men's Pyramid Race and a second place finish in the overall standings. and cheered teammates on to victory in the men's Pyramid Race and a second place finish in the over- all standings. Following the Husker winning streak, pledges helped create pigskin enthusiasm 'and raised funds with a "Car Bang." A '53 Pontiac painted the colors of the Jayhawks offered students an inexpensive oppor- tunity to relieve frustrations upon the impending foe. Socially, Freshmen feted actives to the "Apache Ball" at the Issac Walton Lodge. After converting the cabin into a cellar, couples dressed like French sewer- dwellers and danced to the theme of t'Wine, Wine, Wine." 44 Searching the files for revealing hour exams pledges inspect a prof's shrewd testing style. Q57---'f.Y Q- j-' -1- --1. Q-1, - ,- ,' ' " ,Y ' ' ' l "H v ' ' v ' , 'cl ' , In '47 I H -yz,-2 ' If 'ZH-'t 2. M' , , 'f' ,. . .A ,J 'il y ' " P , ul! 5 were fa J '- , T' ' ,f' 2173, N ,,TLl.u ., -. K :HT .5111-'Q . 4' V .1 VM.. :., ' rl 'J ' I 1 , L I ' , QQ' wr., cf , 'J Jnivlh- -, ,tara , X ,iff 'y ay X! 'J , X ,,, l i 1 ' Q l 1 ,, U 5, Q f . Q Dwight Bletscher, President - . ' ,- 'ui' - , A 4 l Teachers, Falls City l ro' ". ' , , ' 3- X 1-Ev I 2' I 1 Wg A XI L 'rl , - . f f' . ' - .' j ' 3 1 ,.. , I, . 6, , J , A '51, - lu, Ll". , 2, , .' H. ., 'J' P ' , -l.!.-w'l-'- if . ' -' ,L I..j ' 'K 1' w .I l,J.,1"j, .' ' ' 4:1 4 ,1 - 1 A, '-L ,R Q: -1 X 5 - , ' 5, , -T ,, .,.,. - f , We .l A , w -, X' V3 'nv Q KN "' , T ' J l ., ' ,J . ,X X ' ' ' ' 1 ,.- , 1. ' 'ff 1 ' ,1 T l , ,ll T 1 if , 6 y y y ' , 'E N ':':': 'Q '- l -- lb'-,il , QT., V - fl " "5" ' '. 'El 'vql 'W'-"iv -2 Ir av ' 2' "' l YT 3 8 lf ' ,U L, 1 1 el A, 1 .-.L N I ll ' ' FT, N 'A J ' 2X X , --,:51F' ' -r,,v-1-f---f- L ' .,' jg:1'1p.qig , l'.5' 1" '-L, ' ff " WG, 3 ' MAL' 57: M." ' ' V- l ,.,,,.g' 5 ,, ,5"I -J' ' ,H I ag' .Q .Qu ., V in -V in V .. L Jigs ,L IL!-WJ, j I 5,1 .5 W ,bi-.I 'AJS 1, X III-film Aft? v"', Y 1 rx -a Yjejl ,lv -li ' 1 aw -. L 4 X if ILL., ,- ..4, - V ,31.'-x-:...:4,, ,l...l, mi,-C. , .as 4 ..., A wx - --N-. , -'.f ,,, V, y - '15, , ,l f '-P-,1 A . fix, F I. N r FU Mzljl ,V -if ix, . 5 i. .6 Lfmig A tw Y ,ug V P Y-' -I4 K ,,' 'M , rl," H 'W '-l l ,I- T ," sw ,f -,- r' ,,- Q, - HA Y IJ I , ' G- "'- ' .-l - - fx- if -ri, V ' img? V C' Ju' i U: , N' .. ' fl - X ff V W 3 . Row 1: Bletscher, Dwight, president, '66, Glanlzz, Robert, vicegresident, '66, Sixel, Douglas, secretary, '66, Brandt, Allan, treasurer, '67. Row2 Adams, Charles, '69, Anderson, William, '69, Baird, Gerald, '66, ester, Charlie, '68. Row 3: Beldm, Lawrence, '68, Bohn, John, '68, Bourke, Harold '69, Cass, Donald, '67. Row 4: Colin, Ronald, '69, Dull, Alan, '67, Farkas, Jeffrey, '68, Hall, Richard, '69. Row 5: Haseloh, Gary, '69, Hendriksen Haase, '69, Hoeman, Terry, '68, Hollingsworth, Gary, '69, James, David, '69, Keller, John, '67, Kemble, Stephen, '68, Lippstreu, Kenneth, '69 Row 6: l.oos, James, '68, McAllaster, Cary, '67, Marrs, Ronald. '67, Martin, Larry, '67, Means, Steven, '69, Meyer, Bruce, '68, Moll, Lee, '68, Neel Ron, '66. Row 7: Ochsner, John, '69, Pressler, Edward, '69, Rawe, Ray, '68, Ring, Steven, '69, Samuels. Phil, '68, Schroer, Joe, '67, Schroer, L.ee '68, Smith. Lawrence. '68. Row 8: Sorrell, John, '67, Stanlslav, Max, '69, Stolcpart, Rick, '69, Taylor, Lawrence, '67, Thompson, Lawrence, '69 Windrum, Steven, '69, Wilcos. Robert, '68, Wolcott, Earl, '69. 415 Personalizing Delta Sig postal delivery, Rod Stark distributes bills to dubiously grateful brothers. 4 - ,711 fy! F ,llillll inn- Stranded by unexpected automotive difficulty, Combining spring fever with assignments due Delta Sigs summon auxiliary transportation. brothers devise an outdoor education system 16 Byron Vanier, President 1 Business Administration, Lincoln Delta Sig's Increase Ideas On Business Practicalities- To enhance awareness of management operations, Delta Sigma Pi toured several Omaha businesses. Dur- ing the trip members informally talked with executives of the Stock Exchange, Falstaff Brewery and various other firms to discover current marketing trends. Actively participating in a local fund-raising drive, the chapter received a Certificate of Merit from the Lincoln Muscular Dystrophy Association. For the Community Chest Project, Delta Sigs united with other fraternities to sell candy on downtown corners. Guest company personnel spoke to the brothers at monthly professional dinners. As part of the pro- gram, a vice-president of the Wilson Packaging Com- pany explained the computer programming setup. 47 .. H i Z -w fs 1-ifflii - l ,t at , le? 'ie 'Hg,,l 1 li 4. ' ,. ax J- " ' - wir., Row 1: Stark, Rodney, president, '66, Clark, Dwight, vice-president, '67, Dick- inson, William, secretary. '66, Sagehorn, Elliott, treasurer, '67, Anderson, Del- wyn, '66, Corner, Robert, '68, Duffek, Michael, '68, Glover, William, '68, Going, Rodney, '68, Row 2: Haley, Mark, '69, l-lawk, Gary, '67, l-lergenrader. Victor, '68, Herman. Bruce, '68, Hofeldt. Douglas, '67, Hynes, John, '67, Johnson William, '69, Kalvoda, Norman, '67, Kennedy, Patrick, '66. Row 3: Kersey, Ber- nard, '68, Larson, Roger, '66, Letheby, Ronald. '66, Lind, William, '66, Magnuson Veldon, '67, McNickle, Bruce, '68, McPherson, Samuel, '67, Moes, Donald, '67 Morton, Stephen, '67. Row 4: Roscoe, Ronald, '69, Rosenbach. Gary, '66 Sivers, Roger, '67, Sloan, Larry '66, Splichal, Clark, '66, Stark, Deloy, '68 Suhr, Rodney. '68, Ulrich, Steven, '69, Vanier, Byron, '66. Row 5: White, Richard '68, Workman, David. '68, Workman, Jerry, '67, Zmarzly, Michael, '66. i his is l Q l l , ' I i Y w '.. A t 4 .n 1 J -. ' 4 .45 xx, .1 I? 1 fy? . ix , 'if i. 51-25" QV fi if U: ..., H--x iii tn ni if H ex " 'F a - 19 A x P 'K -ik. - J.. ii W r.+ .' L4 -gi lf ffm ie P William Coufal, President Engineering, Schuyler .f" J, J ', A 1 , 4 ' l . KW s li X r N54 , ' :I -- y- , ' le. tus- A iv i tfiir , , 'if' ' g':,'ff.i. .ffgl l 5 if l Row 1: Coufal, William, president, '66, Isman, Dan, vice-president, '67, Miller, Richard, secretary, '67, Roberts, Donald, treasurer, '67. Row 2, Anderson, Thomas, '66, Bailey, Gerald, '66, Belmont, James, '68, Bolz Farrell, '68, Bradley, Kenneth, '67, Braun, Warren, '67, Brening, Glenn '67, Briggs, Duane, '69, Buell, Roger, '69, Camp, Donald, '68, Cattau Ga le '67- Connors Th s '6B- Dahl r n Ri h rd '68, Row 3, Dahl ,y.. .Oma., 89.08. - hem, Gary, '67, Eads, Jackie. '67, Earl, William, '66, Ehrlich, Doug, '69, Ensz, James, '66, Flower, Jerry, '69, Geier, Dan, '69, Golter, Gary, '69 Goodenough. Larry, '69, Grant, Ken, '67, Hake, Lawrence, '67, Harrold Dan, '69, Hellbusch, Leslie, '68. Row 4, Johnson, Stanley, '67, Klem, Robert, '66, Kreifels, David. '69, McLaughlin, Gary, '69, Messier, Neeld, '69, Metcalfe, Stuart, '69, Minette, David, '69, Monson, John, '69, Mueller, Marvin '68- M D 'cl '69 M C '69- N k R II '69, , , urray, avi , , yers, ary. . ova , usse , Paragas, Rod, '69. Row 5: Peterson, Ronald, '67, Pfister, Barry, '69, Phipps, Jeffry, '69, Rauscher, Bruce, '69, Redhead, Paul, '67, Robbins John, '69, Royal, Robert, '67, Rozmarin, George, '66, Rozmarin, Tom '69. Row 6: Rutz, Thomas, '67, Spurgin, Mark, '69, Stigge, Russell, '69, Tank, Rod, '69, Tooley, William, '68, Tucker, Robert, '69, Walton, Donald, '66, Wolf, Thomas, '66. Delts Host Historical Tour To Benefit LARC Children Entertaining children from LARC School, Delta Tau Delta pledges led a tour of the Nebraska Historical Society as part of the Help Week program. As an addi- tional project, brothers painted the Southwest Com- munity Center building and cleaned up the grounds. For New Year's bowl game spirit, Alpha Phi's and Delt's worked together making orange styrofoam Christ- mas tree ornaments. Proceeds from the sale went to the Lancaster Association for Retarded Children. Pre-collegiate sisters of the members attended a public relations dinner sponsored by the fraternity. The Delt's social calendar also included hosting the 19th annual Inter-Greek Bridge Tournament, determining the most skillful team through day-long elimination. Qlixlplrxrun.----'-s-1' n ' , ll . --SQL si . sul 'Y A liieilxg Q . dow l s Ms , Q C Sbllv ' ,de sf 'tr licl,a,i-Cleo. Ullwfm "2 i I x R, f gawk L' f'fd.L 0- 0? l6'!M,L4Y7M4ix Diverting pre-game spirit to fill charity coffers, souvenir salesmen persuade Union-bound fans. 49 -.f, 1-I E, I , Inf' V 4 3, 'xj,,.I , L J ' , ef - 2,3-Z ' K? -J. -4 '+-, 73 -sas' .- "QI x . U i .7-YUM QE. ., -Q1 r - ...Jn . ,JW 1 I-V 'FSU 5? ,., -, 1 in ."f f A, Q J . A-.Q-.3 T' 1 rl ,cf X? if 'xg ' 'sv N- ,W A' wx, wi 1 Q. ,Aga I S. r .ff , ai yi-v,'. mb if y f' di fl' -. .J -f Q Hrf' J R WV? M, Bs ,r -it WI . I . I -3 I ' 55 i .57 .,,W . L w. ,., X , Y. ' x mv 1 Q fl p Q A 1, . :- -I '-v ,., ,Mx fn .R U! if 2 EG Y ..I J .W a ,fu Y' Wk V i L, Z F wi , Q +1 J -1.. , , 1,1 hw! f ,Q ffiifif J , ' 1 -is ,ai ', i '71 :fel l" V l'f 1-- , 'r ' '. .i "Q .3 l I 'l an " ' ,fr M ini A i , 1 'QQ , Y- . V ' I, ig., , fb , Time waits for no quiz bowl answer,' discover DLJ's, quickly conferring on a bonus question. f' JL 'f' f Row 1: Tippetts, Edward, president, '67, l-lolyoke,Thomas, vice-president, '67, Novotny, George, '67, Houfek, Dennis, treasurer, '66, Alloway, John, '69, Bartholomew, Noyes, '69, Brodd, Roger, '67, Brooks, Michael, '68, Campbell, Rich- ard '68. Row 2: Collins, Marshall, '69, Compton, Larry, '67, Cooke, Robert, '69, Cooper, James, '68, Cntes, Richard, '67, Denzler, Tim, '68, Durham, Jim, '69, Erickson, Charles, '69, Felber, Alfred, '69, Fitzebald, James, '68, Floerchinger, Martin, '69, Ford, Robert, '69, Foster, Thomas, '66, Friend, Lee, '69, Fuller, William, '69, Galley, Robert, '69, Giles, Bruce, '68, Guggenmos, Jack, '67. Row 3: Gunderson, Robert, '68, Harms, David, '69, Higgins, Gary, '68, Hirsch, Roger, 66. Ho fman, Lawrence, '69, Hohensee, Eugene, 68, Houfek, Dave. '66, Hummel, Bob, '69, Johnsen, Jim, '69, Karel, Larry, '68, Kermoacle, Darrell, '69, Killinger, Stan, '68, King, John, '68, Kiser, John, '66, Kleppinger, Michael, '69, Koerber, Keith, '66, Kohtz, David, '68, Krager, Alan, '69. Row 4: Kunc, Dale, '67, Leapley, Naylon, '68, Liliedahl, Richard, '67, L.iliedahI, Roger, '68, Marlowe, Chad, '68, Martin, David, '69, Martin, Gerald, '67, McCarthy, John, '69, Mc- Mahill AI, '69, Meduna, Bob '68- Mills John '69- Mower Larry, '69- Murphy Patrick, '68- Nolan Michael '68, Novak Joseph, '69, Novemy, serene, '66, Novy, CIitton,"69, Nye, Michael, 'Ea-9. Row 5, o'Here, Mille, '69, bleen, Bail, '67, Peter: sen, Gary, '68, Rockwell, Richard, '67, Rodriquez, Jose, '66, Rogge, Gary, '69, Sanderson, James, '66, Schobert, Roland, '68, See, Richard, '68, Schweiger, Earle, '68, Smith, Stephen, '69.-Row 6: Sobczyk, Edward, '69, Stone, Bruce '66, Swenson, Greg, '69, Swenson, John, '67, Valdez, Robert, '66, Warren, Daniel, '69, Wiese, Michael, '68, Wilcox, Gaylord, '69, Williams, Theron, '69, Winchell, Kim, '69, Yant, Roger, '69. 2 Bruce Snyder, President Animal Science, Paxton 2,52 A is :V ., ' - ia- ' 1 l 1 1 A X Recent Renovations Create New FarmHouse Facilities Completion of an addition and an enlargement of the parking lot improved FarmHouse facilities last fall. The recently finished annex provided living accomo- dations for eleven more men and increased the total ca- pacity of the fraternity to more than sixty-five members. Twenty-six Lincoln restaurants contributed coffee and cups to the house's community service project. Brothers served coffee at the cafes throughout the day, contributing over'S2OO to the March of Dimes campaign. Teaming up with a trio of Delta Gamma's, brothers boosted chapter spirit with a first in coeducational bas- ketball. Weathering a strong challenge from the SDT- Beta Sig team, the dynamic duo won the Inter-fraternity Council's March of Dimes Basketball Tournament. l my-f i n-in w e t , 4 if l , ' , U , . K , 'vw Ari ,. """31' wr., .lg P1-I.-.- V l I . .-4 lu.- Z :Jw -.5 J raining for the Pyramid Race, Farm!-iouse acrobats stack up a potential Greek Week victory -a-. Ts fs. 1 : . ---R . -x 'u -2 .x,. , 4., .F' 5 ' 1. El' 1 , ,,, 3 vw 2 .L x .-fa V. ,V . yi F -? Kfff ss, f, VF", fl' . V X' ' f f , , . Q H W- r J l 433' 4 A mx ,-'ff 2- :V 3 .Q . 5 ' A ,,A 4 , A ' , w- ' N , , . if - r L .,, w K .- - . '1 'Y-cv s Gp - 3, v .Q AT 1 , Y Q , - f . ' pf if Q . up f ' 1 ' H ' 39 .L ,i,' Q -A ' 'Q ' i I E , E-' ,4 ' f ig 1 -Q Q . ' , si . Si- - I T E+? E- , M jx ua X .t V 1 H 754 1 K, '. Z ffl , , - Nd, V- 5 -3 I ' 1 of It 7 K 1 V f, Y ' " 'fr-, 4 '- 5 ,N , . ,i T- ff ,,,:. g K r I 1 A I .H f wig A rf Y Y' 4 ,xy G-ff 15 , 4 J - "' A A ,. 5 U W ,A EEF' A .4 1 Q, :fx V .1 -. W '5' ' My V 7 -5 A, -, N2 V M 1,'A 'af '14 ' Q 7 sg "4 Rf. A, Q31 .ki 3, LL 1 U fl! ,L 3 'mx 1 ,y ' , --If ' - Sl-I f 4 ,. ' W3-at 1 1- - ' . ' , ,,, . 4,11 -. Q-' vi . fg- fm T 1 I-'E YE' 5. ,S ' '. 4 . 4 Y 1 Q ,u r iid' xv ff, f, fi- 151' H , 3 J ' in , ni' . rs , v N v 'FE u Fil df' 'ff 1 Kappa Sigs Provide Pizza For Stolen Theta Pledges With colorful tempra-painted windows to establish a festive atmosphere, the Kappa Sig's featured three major dances, the Barn, Beach and Inferno Parties. For an informal function, the fraternity kidnapped the Theta pledge class and treated the unsuspecting guests to a catered Sunday evening pizza dinner at the house. Leading the cast in song and dance, Phil Zinga captured top billing in Kosmet Klub's Spring show. Attending members watched the brother portray the eccentric business tycoon, J. Pierpoint Fir-ch. Re-evaluation of the Kappa Sigma intramural pro- gram proved successful in the Class B Basketball Tour- nament. The organization earned the division's trophy Arts and Sciences Crawford by defeating Independent and Greek competitors. Debating best kinclling placement Kappa Sigs create atmosphere for an approaching pizza party. 4 4 5' -or 'WX4' Checking and cleaning the needed instruments, a brother prepares to give a battery of exams Phi Chi Actives Offer Aid To Incoming Pledge Class initiated upper-classmen of Phi Chi carried out a new program to financially assist the incoming fresh- man class. Actives joined together in an effort to supply used laboratory suits and medical equipment for the benefit of the pledges. Members also pooled microscopes for the use of the entire house. Socially, the chapterfurnished numerous additions to recreational facilities. A recently refinished billiards and recreation center together with a new stereo of- fered entertainment at fall house parties. Wives of the brothers of Upsilon Nu provided a welcome addition to fraternity activities. Besides par- ticipating in charity projects, the women organized a Candlelight Buffet Supper for student-husbands. N, , , I I X . . VI V rj I jg---I! W HD 'IR 'lm V X ri K Y ji , gf ' ii': 1 ,t 9' -ev-L ' ,EQ W' I ,if Z A Q if A , Q page-xi, as , to T if - F5 I 1-.a 1- R, L Fr: G-P n X ' , . 1 ff ' A ' -rjA'fF?2, 9:1741 ,. ' f r 1 T ,,, Nj -, vlrzj-w , V' ,' ,, -A .' - , ' ,- 47 3 ' 'J' -hi 2 A ' Row 1:Vance Gary president 66-Tushia Richard vice-president 66- Dondaldson John secretary 66' Robert Anderson treasurer 67: Anderson Joseph 67'Auchmody Joseph 66' Ayers James 68- Ayers Robert 68' Bauman Randell 69. Row 2: Baxter, Dave, '68, Blair, Charles, '67, Blatny, Richard,"69, Brewster, Frank, '67, Buchendorf, William, '67, Busicher, Gary, '68, Byars, Steven, '68, Casey, Lynn, '69, Cederburg, Carroll, '68. Row 3: Conley, Dean, '68, Copple, Ben, '68, Dasher, George, '67, Dietrich, Marvin, '66, Eakins, Kent, '67, Embury, Stuart, '69, Fowles, William, '68, Fredstrom, Dave, '69, Fritch, Charles, '68. Row 4: Gentry, Don- ald, '68, Gross, Gene, '66, Hald, Larry, '69, Hepper- len, Thomas, '68, Holmes, Richard, '68, Holyoke, Edward, '69, Jackson, Richard, '69, Jenny, David, '68, Knee, Steve, '68. Row 5: McElfresh, Edward, '68, McFee, John, '66, Mclntyre, Jay, '66, Kuper. David, '66, Markus, Wayne, '69, Miles, Richard, '67. Row 6: Newman, Charles, '66, Rada, Alan. '66, Rogers, John, '68, Schwarke, Eugene, '68, Work- hoven, Merrill, '68, Zetterman. Rowen, '69. 26 N , 0 'Q ' " " 1 f VA '- 1-e.zf.u..,l-,xldlz-I . E ' 6 " . 'V '. U : if A 1 Q f w i, af After an all-night stand on internship duties, Gary Vance, President a med student preps for a well-earned rest. Med'C""ef Omaha A 2 i rx' P .5 ,W I , 1' Q1 ' ' ' i 1-MF' 1 'i . Yi: 1 i, 1 'M ill! S5 i 'rg-.IK 5 i in , i .. f - i , f . :" V -. 2 IY,- ,I F X .2 if fr m I ,- Ea, ' P A P- L ' , Xfw. Kixzy A ,I ,m --3 17 1 f, If .A I ,, -V Q ri. if i .ig E' ,Ti , 7 . 1 1 t. ,' 1 N , , '., ,- 1' gi Q, -1-. K i. ,- ..a , i Checking patients for respiration count, a student-intern 'practices' medicine under supervision. Helpful Phi Delt Freshmen Race For Heart Research "Running for Your Heart" provided needed cash as Phi Delta Theta raised money for the 1965 Heart Fund. Earning a total of 1800 dollars in one afternoon, the pledges helped in bringing the "ATO Help Week" trophy into the house's collection. In addition, the freshmen made the drive the "Best Pledge Project" of the year. In intramurals the brothers splashed to the All- University swimming title. The Phi's also showed ex- cellence for the charity stripe and added the free-throw crown in the fight for the l-M championship. As a climax to the year, the house ranked high in the top twelve Phi Delt chapters in the U.S. For out- standing work in scholarship and over-all improvement, the fraternity received the gold star for achievement. ,Q-nl N 'r T' -me .rt-,U -. 1' 7 f ' - .,.-'-1f.- "if -Ei ' fir. ig ' at fr.-r.. ?5if',5g, gh- - 'Wil it 2 if ' ip., John Luckasen, President Arts and Sciences, Littleton, Colorado Wu , HE, -1 'aa t 428 lr:- Preparing to fathom the morass of finals, brothers break to alleviate the multiplying pressures. 5 'W l A L f e, L il qv fiif if ,, . , 9 cf, J.. ---, V- . 9 1 .: + 'vvi' Mal L i ' 7 Ti! 95 Wag " 'V , Il ,, by .1 fli - :' Aw fi - A if - jx ,L f 1 I 1 l 'H' r i -'- l-.-- fl: N I "1 ,I , l n L 4 L Y , ,w rd l I l , ' Ni, f I'11 rl P '- S Illf L1 "fr Wi, x Ta N5. - -i I. Abuvif: f' -1, V ' I 1 "1'xIi- i "'Q!:45F"fSq, 1 , 1, l... . 5 Row 1: Luckasen, John, president, '66 Haug, William, vice-president, '66, Huff Leslie, secretary, '67, Fuller, Russell, '67 Row 2: Abel, Roger, '68, Andrews, Grefg '68- Backlund, Mark '69, Bastian Je f i 1 v '68, Becher, Mark, '66, Beechnen' Sami uel, '69, Best, Robert, '69, Bolagf, Peter '69- Booth Nate '69. Row : Buch Edmund, '69, Burgher, Louis, '67, Camp: bell, Jim, '68, Campbell, John, '66, Camp- bell, James, '67, Coufer, Rodney, '66 Crabtree, Gary, '69, Daiss, Bill, '69 Ducker, Robert, '67, Fischer, Paul, '68 Folmer, Stephen, '67, Ganser, Jim, '67 Gatto, Dan, '69, Graham, Don, '68, Gray Gary, '68. Row 4: Heiser, Dave, '69 Holmes, Robert, '69, Hurd, John, '69 Hurlbutt, Robert, '69, Hurst, Richard i i 7 i 1 i i 1 '68, Iverson. James, '69, Kllngner, Michael, '67, Knight, George, '69, Knolle, Neil, '68, Kostos, Nick, '67, Langhoff Charles, '68, Lewis, Thomas, '67, Loose Terry, '68, Madson, Everett, '66, Mana David, '68. Row 5, McGowan, John, '69 McNair, Michael, '69, Minick, David, '66 Moore, Robert, '69, Newton, John, '67 O'Hara, Thomas, '69, Olsen, Daryl, '68 1 1 v S i i F Olson, Larry, '67, Osberg, Jim, '66, Ott- mann, Robert, '66, Peterson, Arnold, '66, Petsch, Thomas, '69, Pfeifer, Ronald, '68, Pratt, Peyton, '69, Quimby, Mark, '68. Row 6: Rledrden, Michael, '69, Rose, Jerman, '66, Rosenberger, Robert, '67, Salem, Chas, '67, Sommers, Wallace, '67, Stemm, Richard, '67, Strateman, Bill, '69, Stuart, Scott, '69, Sutera, Jim, '67, Tintstman, Thomas, '67, Unis, Joe, '67, Walters, James, '67, Weinman, Robert, '67, Wennersten, James, '69, Wilson, Steven, '68. 42 Phi Gams Score Triumphs ln Two Intramural Leagues Providing enthusiastic support for athletics, Phi Gamma Delta triumphed in two All-University divisions. Winning intramural tennis and horseshoes, the frater- nity challended for an early lead in the IM race. Acting as hosts for the annual section convention, the Nebraska Phi Gams entertained delegates from tour other regional chapters. A variety of seminars provided an opportunity to exchange ideas on improving rush, public relations, finances and pledge training. Celebrating the 118th anniversary, Lambda Nu Fiji's sponsored a Founders' Day Banquet on lVlay 1. Speaking to the various graduates and undergraduates, brother Harold Anerson, editor of the Omaha World Herald, emphasized the need for effective alumni relations. As final preparation for the Zoology practical Fur pledges take a last-minute count on bones. 430 Mike Gottschalk President Arts 84 Sciences Sidney 3'- 'J' I 3 auf' -. '74 - M' 6 P .Q 'q l 1. , r 51351: fi ' - " ,ew-51' -' ' ' . 5- fl V "1-.ai f f,..' 'flf"1 .I Hi , N ..?',,,a , t-- 1 J' fi ' , Y.- - fa - N 1-1 ll It Y 'pf -sq A, ,L .Ji ' A rf fl 1' . I-7 " Q, 1 rw , , ,... ., ,J '.,-l'-' . . 'L Pk--L ',,.,-4 Extending the parking zone from two to four hours, a Fiji freshman tampers with LPD's evidence. ,f qi Q X aus, gitgiit 'L 1 vi ., ,Y if 9. , I XA il V ,A A Ifgtdfin- . A , , exe. -- , V--as , . l l. l'- i . "' iw., J I H 'J wif 'i I il A' 'fl W ' 1 .pn -f l wtf, A Z-. -1 ax K Ei 2 .L ,H 452, ee. , ' -uf '31 , fl . , , if 3 ,M , 1 , I JF l , lv" K xg. 5 it ,A g .i ggi, Y k' I, 7',T,Pl :I Row 1: Gottschalk, Michael, president, '66, Wiley, Stuart, recording secretary, '66, Johnson, Curtis, corresponding secretary, '66, Krotter, Gerald, treasurer, '66, Ash, Timothy, '69, Ash, Patrick, '67, Beckman, Robert, '69, Binegar. Marvin, '67, Birkman, Lewiston, '67, Bryan, George, '69, Callen, Douglas, '69, Copple, Hal, '69, Denney, Daniel, '68. Row 2: Eisenhart, Fredroc, '69, Engdahl, James, '68, Enstrom, Larry, '66, Enstrom, Thomas, '67, Faught, John, '67, Freeman, John, '69, Gilbaugh, Steven, '68, Glenn, Dewayne, '66, Gogela, Louis, '69, I-laase, Tomm, '69, Hamer, Robert, '69, Irey, Clark, '69, Jensen, Bill, '69. Row 3: Johnsen, Rodney, '68, Karre, Richard, '67, Kenagy, John, '67, Knapp, Robert, '69, Knox, Greg, '69, Kohlmeier, Randy. '67, McConnell, Mac, '69, Miller, James, '69, Minier, William, '69, Mulder, Roger, '69, Row 4, Nelson, Daniel, '68, O'Shea, Peter, '67, Oster- miller, Dennis, '67, Peters, James, '68, Peterson, James. '69, Reitan, Donald, '68, Ruff, Steven, '69, Shearer, Richard, Keith, '69, Shurtleff, Donald, '69, Silver, Gary, '69. Row 5: Stratton, Lorell, '67, Strong, Harold, '66, Sumnick, Michael, '66, Tuttle, Bruce, '66, VanKat, Kenneth, '68, Walt, Renard, '67, Whitwer, Glen, '66, Yost, Dennis, '69, Zitterkopf, Ronald, '68. 431 Phi Psi's Capture Awards For Imaginative KK Songs Succeeding in filling the mantel with trophies, Phi Psi's displayed championship ability in varied campus activities. Describing "The Truth About Alfie," brothers cinched three plaques in Kosmet Klub's annual fall revue. The skit copped third place with the most origi- nal music score and best individual performance. ln intramural basketball competition, two house teams placed first in fraternity playoffs. A Phi Psi varsity athlete, Larry Wachholtz, also gained recogni- tion on the fraternity's All-American football squad. Proclamation of a weeklong program of activities honored thirteen years of service by housemother lVlrs. Hird Stryker. ln other activities, members joined the Gamma Phi's in presenting a charity pancake feed. Bill Marshall, President Arts and Sciences, Grand Island Determining degrees of depth and temperature, a kitchen patrol prepares for dish-dunking duties 42 4 3 I :H A, '4 F. ,va dna, fi-Ag, , 1. xi 'Q 5- . 1 3 75 'I JE' . Y' 371613 - --Je L ff- 355 r Q.-191, QQ y- ,Q sig, , I 3 6 WB' wb' he L14 l ,ij 1 , , 'H .1 WE ,E 3 A np . -,ag-, 1 8 A 44' V if -11 ' ' 3- X17 in UW 3 ,X 4, I X ex A .1 Q, ., 1? 5 I we ig .-wnszji u 1 4 X! .- 44' dl 122 A Q , 4 Q2 J Q, E ,iijhg 1. 1, xm, P ' il 1 , 5' if if as A wa Q ' E mils 4 Guy Haven, President Medicine, Omaha 3- -.,, 34 ""-sf 665 William Phi Rho's Canvass Omaha For Cerebral Palsy Funds Stressing participation in community service, Phi Rho Sigma assisted several charitable institutions in the Omaha area. Members organized the annual Christ- mas party for orphans at Child Saving Institute and later assisted in a fund drive for Cerebral Palsy. Scholastic achievement received the greatest em- phasis as actives prepared for future careers in medi- cine. All three nominees for Alpha Omega Alpha medical honorary came from the junior class of Iota chapter and Bill Eichner earned membership in Phi Beta Kappa. Social events offered the fraternity an opportunity to relax from the rigors of studying. Barn dances, the "Infamous Spaghetti Dinner" and a Spring Formal pro- vided mlxed entertainment for brothers and dates. A ' .,.-QM -' ...Af ' 'IT ' of i .' 1' An I I' T.. H . tvs, '6B: Larry Larry Cole, '66 El II Ech e 68 S h . ydo err ' S w, y Vogt, 67- John Aita, '68g Rich- B ell '66: John '67- Max OlT'l Ma k So e Tibbels, John Watso Checklrug tell tale signs of sprung fever future Interns practice physlcals on a Phu Rho brother vis ll ,fa r .3 .A -'S' --1 353 -J .V fl -J i, . YV A 4 Rush Push Adds Members During Pike Recolonization Utilizing a careful rushing and pledging program, Pi Kappa Alpha re-established a colony at the University of Nebraska after an absence of twenty-five years. The house showed a steady growth by increasing the first semester chapter roll from three to twenty-six men. Funds from the national organization's holding corporation furnished initial revenue for the purchase of the Gamma Beta chapter's living quarters. After completing the interior decoration, the members moved in during lVlarch and sponsored an open house. Several actives responded to an invitation and traveled to LSU to fulfill a national requirement for visiting other regional fraternities. ln addition, one- half of the brothers attended the National Convention. Q. i NZ S ' an X? fi E-1 i ig l 5 sz 'Z , ' , 5 , i Determining placement precision for furniture Pike decorators balance living-room locations . l.- initiating post-winter course competition, Pi Kappa Alpha golfers practice putts on a par five. 36 i 5 2 I l 7' -Y --If Y' :"',L , " as 9 9 fe 9-mme-, ,ff ' ' if -as l- A lyvei Completing the final coat, Pikes corner the painting problem before the occupancy deadline. lg' A K A aff 'IF President and Architecture, Omaha -1-,. -1-,N --wffp-, Y l . i ! 1 xii -2 -- - za" , , ,. A H . .. Ex' , , 2 -SQA, if V ' -'if -'dy few .14-. - ' 1- - we ue jf:-. 3 5 url.: F 1. aff! xv ,gf'lEE:2 -,Q Mir, T This In -,ilggg ,Egg , 1 l, , ,-My Ai' .-X . - E' A MQ, 1 if K ' 2 Row 1: Schroeder, David, president, '67, Fenlon, James, viceepresidenr, '68, Schroeder, Kent, secretary, '69, Bock, Dave, '68. Row 2, Brzezinskn Walter, '69, Gilbert, Donald, '67, Goedeker, Michael, '69, Grabow, Wayne '68. Row 3: Hansen, Neal, '67, Maguire, James, '68, Mahel, Craig. '69 Martinson, Craig, '68. Row 4, Mayfield, James, '69, Merten, James, '67, Miner, Bruce, '69, Seaman, Richard, '69. 4 ,,f 3" ,Z Oys- 1 z., A ui. 9 f rs . M3 i up iq , 9, Harold Chader, President Teachers, Central City 1 fm rm .L . ii 'Q' 1. liz XL - S 5 ,, ink fi. ea, 1- -an Kieij l ,E 1 -if ,,. L V " vi Y-f 'C A b v 'L?f':fT' ,M , .-f--. Y - i i W. ' -ot., -A.. A.' -Q - I 438 ,A A V www 5, ,.,,, .A., i 'f' Q- ,L , K gg: 1 fi- st' :Wim -. 'X f , ' 1 R'-,. ' ,,?igx5, 1 'f-2::"' '- - i iff. k M' V , 1 Li' 5, f , j iv, V- C , l Fi . .., ei.. . 12333 7, uf'-,' l s-. - 1- , 3 1 I is 'I lg .":sf?'-1 f, i 'J' ,i ,, .5 V5 , ff., X V - .W in 3-L. -4 1 - "ic Row 1: Chader, Harold, president, '68, Guretzky, James, treasurer, '68, Bogen, James, '69, Christol, James, '69. Row 2: Conrad, John, '68, Grasham, Michael, '69, Hookstra, Kerry, '69g l.oos, Larry, '67. Row 3: Lott, Earle, '67, McClanahan, Charles, '69, McKee, Robert, '66, Nelson, Joe, '69. Row 4: Phetteplace, Noel, '69, Pleas, Gary, '68, Plettner, Steve. '69, Samide, Michael, '66. Row 5: Wessluhd, William, '68. W X if 'H '-N Pondering possibilities of architectural designs 'Freshmen plan a patio for backyard recreation ff! , ,.,,',-,f.Y,i'a1-5 wk-1-.,, Passing time with tunes from a new stereo, Pi Kappa Pl'1i's steal a reprieve from books. Pi Kaps Observe Founding With Centennial Banquet Celebrating the lOOth anniversary of the founding of National Headquarters, Pi Kappa Phi held a Founders' Banquet. Many regional members attended the dinner at Congress lnn and George Driver, past national presi- dent and NU chapter graduate, spoke to the alumni. Turning to social events, the fraternity held a 'Coffin Party' with brothers and dates dressed as witches and ghosts. The house also sponsored a Christmas "anti-Formal." A beatnik Santa Claus advertised the party and everyone dressed in grubbies and sweatshirts. Hosting the District Ten Conclave in the spring, actives entertained visiting chapters from Iowa and Drake Universities. A banquet and dance finished the days's scheduled activities at the Nebraska Center. ,ov QX Perplexecl with problems of a 'leaping finessef Hugo Drax wishes for a kibitzing collaborator. 4 Heart Fund Nets Finances From SAE Charity Drive Through cold, mechanical failures and gloom of night, Sig Alph pledges' "Charity Chariot" traveled ninety miles for the Heart Fund. Over S600 resulted from the marathon gaining statewide press coverage. Under a new constitution, the Little Sisters of Miner- va served coffee after football games and surprised ac- tives by "stealing"the pledges for a Monday night sneak. The coeds also aided the SAE's in purchasing blazers by organizing car washes and drawings. Big Brother-Little Brother basketball teams and a revised house intramural point's system added interest to athletics. Combining feature films for informal eve- ning parties with Sunday afternoon speakers and tours provided a varied social atmosphere. Reacljusting the latest Phi Alpha acquisition, pledges initiate the SAE "dollar-a-mile" club. 40 Robert Wilburn, President Arts and Sciences, Beaver City I w ' 54. l r ,. - - ' -1 l 1633 ' 1-B Y ,"' W4 .' Fx W . . . , . - , vu., l t . 2'fv 3' 27" V ' "If 1:-..' 1 il, r K ra -.gf-rx! qu, b ala' lf' W Y 7 ' - ' ' V -. QIZIZP' 1 4 t W 3 l lfgf' 1 I L, A Jw-T, N f , .:.. l . ' IL .5 .f . . . -,Z Y - - 1- ' .,f .l ,- ' , g. mf , fl -V My . ' fur .NN .ill .1 . +L Y -', fin, . i gg l-ful ,wink ' ' ..- Y,-.-r, , . ..,,, I ' r fi .4 if H ' Li t, L 5 - ff-is 3 if l A, ','4 l' .. 7' if 1, .5 - " lm- JI ll I CE l l in 'fm v Q . ' fi' " I .til .9 , ' L' 'A '.'f'- .- ' T lt' 7, ' ' Wifi . if 'Til l , gl, s N' C I: l H-N' ri N i - 3. V V - 1. 1.-5-I s X 1: F7-U., 1 l'fr" f - " 2.9 " " -fiat' 'X f if H" "GV .1 t L:. '- r. ' gf.. . . 1. in ,l gif' ' 9. - , L ,fy .L , pil ll -,- ' - .. ' l -' : wi , 'l : . yt I i o ,lr A Ili Q 0 l . . .' ,fr ' - ' l , ' . . ,xl P J 4 .f Q , 1 l W-. L A iikjfll if -r - l la: Q . W MNU' Q1 ?' ' , ?" ' P -.Y ,M X .' ' l 's r x -1 .3-1. -L gl- :- V. .YP I 1 .gy 5 G Ayn ,, f.i:A:- ,g-,,:, Q..-1.554 . 4: . I ,, ,L Y, ,, 7' f QQ," 1' 'wif' ,., -' -'Q.J'Qlg2a":c- ,,f ,Q-Af Sneak attack tactics fail as actives capture unwilling stowaways .,2,,f- if A151 ,TL , 'll fr f ll 1 l . x iii 34 s- Yi-Je, , m gt., rg' l r 5, -,W k n 1 If 'cr' Row 1: Krizelman, Sheldon, president, '66, Soiref, Brian, vice-president, '66, Forbes, Stewart, secretary, '67, Lefko, Jeffrey, treasurer, '67. Row 2: Abrahams, Marshall, '69, Abrahamson, Hugh, '68, Alloy, Bill, '69, Bernstein, Steve, '66, Bervin, Ed, '69, Borden, Martin, '69, Bordy, Harold, '68, Braun, Marvin, '68, Decker, Glenn, '68. Row 3: Fleischer, lra, '69, Gerelick, Howard, '69, Ginsburg, William, '68, Goldberg, Sheldon, '69, Goodman, Andrew, '67, Halbridge, Bruce, '69, Kricsfeld, Barry, '67, Kuklin, Vic, '68, Kurtzman, Charles, '69, Row 4: Kushner, Jeffrey, '68, Leber, Abe. '68, Lewis Marshall, '69, Kort, Barry, '67, lvleiberger, Ira, '69, Novak, Gerald, '68, Perlman, Sary, '69, Riekes, Carl, '68, Rosen, Paul, '68. Row 5: Rosenbaum, Gary, '69, Rubin, Thomas, '69, Smith, Stuart, '68, Steinman, Jack, '68. Row 6: Wald, Steve, '69, Weill, Norman, '67, Weiner, Edward, '67. I 1 .1 Welcoming grads to a "Go Big Red" rally, SAM's cheer for a banner Husker victory. Sheldon Krizelman, President Business Administration, Omaha ,,..-4 ...am ' .nffm -f...-.vi ,.,,""" Q. ,,,f""""' Rehearsing a modern day folk composition, the 'Sammie Three' gets in tune for FAC. SAM Pledges Guard Blaze Till Huskers Beat Sooners For the third straight year, Sigma Alpha lvlu ignited a spirit bonfire before the fray with Oklahoma. "The Flames Will Fly Till the Sooners Die" resounded over the campus and exemplified the student enthusiasm. ln keeping with tradition, over one hundred alumni gathered at the SAM Founders' Celebration. Skip Soiref, President of Innocents, emceed the event and presented the Sammies "Man of the Year" Award to Dave Fellman, President of the Association of College Professors. Chapter members enjoyed a fine record of scholas- tic achievement with three upper-class Regents Schol- ars setting examples of good study habits. Two brothers also helped raise the house average while ranking first and second in the College of Business Administration. 4 Sigs Apply Garden Greens For Party Promotion Plan Background displays of crepe-paper jungles and paper-mache vegetables decorated the Sigma Chi House as finishing touches to the Jolly Green Giant Party. The Playboy Party took a different turn as broth- ers hired professional models to appear as bunnies. Stressing community service, the Sigs assisted with several city-wide projects. Both actives and pledges spent an entire afternoon cleaning buildings and cut- ting weeds at the LARC School for Children. Completed before the beginning of the second se- mester, a twelve room addition to the chapter house expanded living accommodations. increased cooking and dining facilities allowed the building to meet re- vised University and state building regulations. With spring fever attacking the Sig house brothers adcl depth to class absence rolls - ".' 1 V-if w - iq' sgs.," t',r I . 5.9- Unclauntecl by incomplete construction, Sig composite carriers serve notice of impending occupancy. 444 'wi' 31- 4.1 LW" E-F' T3 R FI? 14 f . jx., A, ,P V41 1 .Air , lf!-fl: ' u l x A I' V 'fi 4 . 'Ek . ' H i gf! V I N, I 1.17 ' ,, N - - U ie 'Tn l"- ,i f fd 4 ,, ,- :QW 1 T, E 4 'f Lf Y- -' F-, T fn., ' i if Y f ." vu' -rr :E- Q-i .-was-v 1 .Hsu H 'i1', ,ia - it xx-12 'Q ' if l.Q ti un L r .-me E if '55 n-. N b. ...xx I Q' , -I fi If fsggrx , J. f ., if .fin Li 'N J Q , "' -4 fmt 'PH JE sph. 3 .- -wav 5 'A441 ,pw . J' N A' ' hd' Vi' ' , V '4 ' ' ' ? ,l K , i f A:-b fin Eg A 'C ! -I , 1 N nil . 'K ' ' if L 'Q . - V , f Q 4 1 ffar, , A, 2 Q. 6 ra A ,4," A, . QQ? A . ' ' 'o ' A 7, 7. ' 7 , W I' QW fl: ,'.' 'Q 'C "J . 1 1,, .Q. ' pg-5 - J - . I.- A ,V - x I 'T ' , f V- Ki ff' -' 'Y' iff Y V 155' 1: f zizi' L: ' "" 1 -A-Q R xxx 1-J R V 1 1, xii .4 V !f'l"", K 4 Y Z f '25 ' A QW Q k.--, VU.:- . -Ax' V, :Lf , .., 1 1 , 44 Sigma Nu Captures Award For Civic Service Projects Enthusiasm and cooperation sparked Sigma Nu's participation in Lincoln charity projects. Rewarded for community service, the fraternity received the C. B. Schultz trophy for a third consecutive year. Celebrating the famed Forty-Niners' discovery at Sutter's Mill in California, actives organized a 'Gold Rush Party! Brothers and dates dressed as prospec- tors in search of fun and entertainment for the eve- ning. Couples hunted for lost mines and danced to the theme music of "The Dutchman's Yellow Gold." Frank Splich, Nebraska fullback, received first string recognition on Sigma Nu's All-American football team. The outstanding back later reigned as Prince Kosmet at KK's fall show, Historical l-lysteria. l 'r l l .Q V- ...,-fer. ' l, l ,J 'P' , I l '- .1 1 1, sl .fl Bill Mowbray President Business Administration Lincoln , ,gat 1 " ' -'- .W 3 i 5 ' .-- :.-Ft' T' fer-5. ' M Y, ., in , , l is C as l l , ll 1 ig X t 1 rl Q 'hh ,r,,.'.,,-' lr' ' 215 v. fl is FL" ---6. .- ' :Qi Row 1: Mowbray, William, president, '66, Colgan, Joseph, vice- president. '66, l-ledges, Thomas, secretary, '66, Koepke, Keith, treasurer, '66. Row 2: Allen, John, '67, Angus, James, '68, Anzalone, Mick, '69, Beam, Earl, '68, Bourke, John, '69, Brunl-Q, Kenny, '69, Bushek, Leonard, '67, Butz, Robert, '68, Case, Ed, '69, Duis, John, '66, Dyblie, Jay, '66. Row 3: Dyblie, William. '69, Frolio, Donald. '67, Jones, Robert, '68, Keller, Douglas, '69, Lanigan, David, '67, Logemann, Sidney, '69, Nlaack, Gary, '69, Meeboer, Richard, '69, Meeboer. William, '66, Moeller, Alan. '67, Mousel, Richard, '69. Row 4: Munson, Stephen, '69, Nelson, Douglas, '69, Nelson, Jack, '67, Nuss, Gary, '66, Osborne, Dennis, '67, Peterson, Robert, '67, Phil- lips, Del, '66, Pickering, Thomas. '68, Potts, Bill, '67, Rebman, Russell, '67, Rusanic, Arthur, '67. Row 5: Salmen, Fred, '66s Sanford, Gary, '68, Sayre, Charles, '67, Sayre, Jeff, '69, Shad- bolt, George, '69, Sinor, Keith, '68, Snyder, Gary, '6B. Row 6: Sorrell, James, '68, Spratlen, Terence, '66, Walburn, John, '67, Wallin, David, '69, Westerhold, Keith, '67, Willet, Steven, '67, Witte, Robert, '66, Zuspan. Bill, '67. if- dm 'L , 'K JFK, ,I JJ - l.f.zY'fl' L L 1 , -Xi Completing a semester of pleclgeship and a 'week of nelp,' an initiate dons the ultimate award. .II , - -im 5253 "s i, 1 i ' - , 'I 5' IQ, . ,- 7 ii I . - , s. I. 4 V if as - ' a it 155 1,1-I , 'S . 'Q' ., V ff' 1' 7. 5.2, ' 1 i W,- ll 4. , J , . K -1 -. -. ,,: i f i , -I . if - 4 N:-. gf' . , f - X .X F,-'d if i- g , 1 ll 1 H t J , i lt.-yr mul RQ'-. R W Planning on a Sneak retreat, a Sig Nu pledge prepares for a stealtny escape. Y -O' 'fr Iff 447 Charity Gains Contribution Through Sig Ep Servitude Working for donations of canned goods, Sigma Phi Epsilon joined Kappa Alpha Theta in selling pledges into "slavery." Raking leaves, cleaning garages and putting up storm windows helped to provide Thanks- giving dinners for needy Lincoln families. Annually strong in the intramural sports program, Sig Eps once more proved house athletic ability. lvlemberscaptured the Class C Basketball Champion- ship to sustain a four year winning record. The feat gain- ed recognition in the organization's quarterly magazine. Celebrating the 1000th initiate, Nebraska Alpha became the fraternity's third chapter to receive the distinction. The national president visited the cere- mony and spoke at a banquet honoring the occasion. Offering a floral apology for date demerits, a Sig Ep encounters an inquisitive obstacle. 448 Offering advice about sport coat specifications, experienced Eps urge a pledge to 'go madras.' 1 A ' ' r' ' "il 'Cf 1 lr ' ri Q ugly , :z . , ' l 44-57 5 655 '- W'-',1 i. Row 1: Kinyoun, James, president, '67, l-lansmire, William, vice-president, '67, Jorgensen, John, secretary '68, Schaaf Terry treasurer, '67. Row 2: Aalborg John, '67, Adams, James, '67, Adams, Gene, '67, Anderson, Nels, '68. Row Banta, Richard, '68, Beachler, Kent, '67, Benter, Richard, '66, Beranek, Brian, '69. Row 4: Berney, Richard. '69, Beverage, Roger, '67, Copenhaver, Thomas '68, Curry, Steven, '67. Row 5: Doebele, Bryce, '69, Domeier, Dennis, '68, Eickl hoff, Bruce, '68, Erikson, John, '67. Row 6: Farber, Wayne, '69, Fegley, James '- 'hl'6-F'B '-F 69, Flynn, Mic ae, 7, razler, ud, 67, remarek, Steven, 69, Frrck,Gerald' '69, Gemar, Dennis, '66, Gemar. Gerald, '66, Gless, Darryl, '68, Grummert, Wil lard, '69, Haessler, George, '69, Hall, Mike, '69, l-lolm, Mark, '69, lcenogle, Lanny '69. Row 7, irons, Timothy, '69, Kemist, Greg, '67, Kilzer, Tom, '66, Knoles, Jere '66, Kranz, Ronald, '68, Malovoz Mark, '67, McManaman Richard, '67, Miller charles, '69, Miner. Larry, '66, Morris, steven, '66, rviyl-iran, Robert, '67, Newl berg, Leon, '68, Nyffeler, Mark, '69, O'Gara, James, '68. Row 8: Perry, Lyle '69, Pumphrey, Roger, '69, Raasch, Steven, '68, Rath, Douglas, '69, Ray, Greg '69, Reinking, John. '69, Rolofson. Lyle, '66, Rudat, Scott, '69, Santoro, Robert '68. R 9. S hi th G '66- S h d T'm th '67- Smith, Thomas Steven, '67, Thompson, Gary, '69, Tyrrell, Leslie, '67. Row 10: Vannier, Jerald, '67, Vitosh, Michael, '68, Walker, Dennis, '67, Wanek, James, '68, Weber, Wayne, '67, Wertz, James, '69, Wertz, John, '68, Whitney, Charles. '68, Wustrack, ow - c o auer, eorge. . c ma , I o y. . '67, Stading, Ron, '68, Suhr, Meredith, '66, Thomas, Gregory, '69, Thomas Robert, '66. Q n Q Q , 5 "n .Q w .,- V A, 1 if-rs: N , C: ii , R F751 -S A . -Zrg.. at 'F 5 '-:1 'fx ,.i'?g' gli' wifi' 5, ,, ku EM. W . ..,.. 'XX 'Xa 5? 'JF- , if 'v if 'f. .5 S4555 'N . Tig- 3, i 'tr I ,. ,- .1 xx , , . 1 mf, ,ff if: J 1'3- K S Q n- --is 2' lf .s- I - r sl , ,gm 3 . B JK UL, gew' 4, Y. we i + + 'i in , if fwfwfii lf-Z, Y Q 1 .. Y- ggffcwgj' ' ' i 1sfgggg3-Z ...L "3'2'T5-" l -ff' " 25: 13 mmm , 491 Q .Haw .44- ' fr- L :Eu -.M L, if iii i ,"- rf., John Cooper, President Examining corporation conference requirments, Arts and Sciences, Lincoln seniors' contemplate future career possibilites. 1+ Ss 4,1 ....-K i MU? ' .1 With a round of Tru-Treat 'on the house,' Theta Chi actives christen the newly-added bar. 450 4 , U VMIWIW fi 9 I -. .Q i amid the labyrinthic new fire escape, plan escape routes of future sneaks. Theta Chi's Lewis' Trophy Initiates Freshman Award With over one-fourth of the members on Regents Scholarships and half of the pledge class receiving financial aid, Theta Chi received top scholastic rating from national headquarters. The Jimmy Lewis Award, to be presented annually to the freshman with the highest average, became a newly established tradition. Yearly membership expansion brought about the need for enlarged living quarters. By remodeling the third floor of the present house structure, brothers gained needed space for better study facilities. At regional convention, NU Theta Chi's gathered to exchange ideas with other chapters. The featured speaker, national president Howard Alter, addressed the conclave on scholarship and drinking problems. 6 ' ?frfi'r,,.. A, L--J '35 'Hi' 'J ':2fi'f" ' my XX il " 5 , 2777-7:5 a I l V' ' fl ' f all ' 7 ig l 1 Y g A , K' g uy, A . ft pg' J-.J l ' e " is-xy abs, .9 X rl i f . 'ol ' M- 1, K-:ti '- 2 '-5, Q Q ' -5, si :-- 5 . --1, '- - x u ' T gr V ' .J-gI:g.?'-,f ' - lf' X f ,-ini ' , 99M i ' w e 7 -' '- it t ' "1 '- f. fTfQi',Yi5j,Q, ' N u, - lt. , B in 1 to me 3 'iii' i W if li' il' W 5 - 55 'T ' -if-i t ' u ' ' ' Jr W 'tif ' r . S' ti J. V J. Fil? Q' 'T R ' 'r '- 5, j 'Al I EA J -, , .iillji-ZTW TTT 1 '-" I Qt' ,- ',+? " -11-' , T -as ' - i -J , ' "f Row 1: Cooper, John, president, '67, McCarty, Bryan, vice-president, '67, Gake. David, secretary, '66, Forsyth, lan, treasurer, '67, Row 2: Amelang, Loren, '68, Brown, David, '68, Conley, Paul, '66, Conroy, James, '69. Row 3: Gartner, Donald, '67, Hunnel, William. '68, Matthews, Allen, '69, McCartney, Robert, '69. Row 4: Meshier, William, '69, Novotny, Thomas, '69, Schlukbier, Alan, '67, Sitzman, Ricky, '69. Row 5: Taylor, Bruce, '69, Tedesco, John, '67, Tunnell, William, '67, Wallin, Jerry, '69. Xi's Promote Philanthropy y With Whitehall Contribution 8 tth As a community service, Theta Xi collected and donated unused tickets for the Thanksgiving Day foot- ball game to fifty-five Whitehall orphans. Members aided another charity by entertaining the patients during the State Mental Hospital's annual Christmas Party. Participating once again in the Kosmet Klub Fall Revue, the fraternity presented "Once a King Always a King, But'Once a Knight's Enough." Trophies for "Best Technical Effects" and "Outstanding Costume Design" rewarded the brothers for house preparation. Xi scholars maintained a third place ranking in Nebraska's Greek men's averages. The high scholar- ship combined with a high point total in campus activi- ties placed the house third in competition for the Innocents Society's Scholarship-Activities Trophy. Jim DeMars, President Row 1: Hogg, Mark, president, '67, Ewing, Dave, vice-president, '66, Rueter, Brice, secretary, '66, Cole, Robb, treasurer, "66. Row 2: Anderson, Kenneth, '69, Beasing, William, '68, Brewer, Douglas, '67, Brogden, Bob, '67, Carpenter, Roger, '66, Carraway, Gary, '68, Cisney, Claire, '69, DeMars, James, '66, Dotson, Larry. '66. Row 3: Eaton, Thomas, '69, Elliott, Max, '68' Frizzell, Ronald, '66, Gerdes W lie '69' Gre F.C. '67' H R '66- J b D I '67- K k , , y , , en, , , ansen, oger, , aco son, a e, , ren , Cary, '69, Krenk, Les, '68, Kreuscher, Wayne. '68, Kunzman, James, '67, Larsen, Thomas. '69. Row 4: Lievver, Thomas, '66, Majors, Ron, '68, MacDonald, Charles, '69, McNergney, Robert, '69, McQuistan, Neal. '69, Meyer, Gary, '67, Miller, Ken- neth, '68, Moles, Wayne, '68, Muller, Gerald, '69, Naden, Michael, '69, Nelson, Robert, '68, Olson, Dolaie, '66, Row 5: Pfeif- fer, Don. '69,Rathjen,L.ynn,'67,Rathjer1, Roger, '69, Rietsch, Donald, '66, Sack, Ronald, '69, Salmon, Micl'1ael,'66,SeiZer James, '69, Schneider, Dennis, '69, Schreiner, David, '66, Schwartz, Rod, '67, Shaner. Randolph, '67, Strasil, Ernest '68. Row 6: Sup, Ted, '67, Swanson. Loren. '66, True, Earl, '66, Weber, Ralph, '66. 452 Arts and Sciences, Lincoln u LGU., It 'A T, '. G' sul :, v ' -' DIOX71 s- ut L' S 'Q L - K fd , . Soliciting first semester opinions on lectures and labs, Don Goodrich distributes the doomed evaluation forms. I e ilg9l"i5ff"'F . I -LA . f--illlvg-'1'-l,q,,f , --,,, ,, 1- ,L - ., 4 ,'PLg4:'ggf- F, v. - . , qw , V ' , ' :if 'fir fifwe: .-:vw . X .l 3 ,V - 14 -.Mi " 'ii liiiif' 'f 1. 'Q' 'Y'-'TTY' 151'-'i'- ' :Elf - 9211 ,Y w--4?-f ' A. 7 '. - , A wk ,-. L 1' 'A r .il , r 1, Y iw. ,-,. W, J55l?n-mall, f -,4.iir.m, - , Us V- 'a-- -315. 'vb' 1' f V 4 -. 1' , , .-' 5 1.15 A H ' f . 5 ff: E V . V V L i Q. 2ka,1,f,.d,.-,,..,:lIH -. B M X 'Z f " 'i Don Goodrich, President Arts and Sciences, Omaha 454 lg Submitting the witch card to a final flight check TEKE's prepare to post a Halloween greeting Seeking silence for a serious study session, a TEKE retreats from dormitory dormancy. TKE's Consider Locations For Future Chapter House Visiting the University campus, national officers of Tau Kappa Epsilon helped to re-establish the fraternity locally. After receiving a charter, Rho colony planned to move into a house the following semester. To better understand the ideals of brotherhood, twenty delegates attended an area Leadership Confer- ence in lowa. Grand Officers informed the four-state participants of current developments in rushing meth- ods, social education and house organization. Combining with Zeta Gamma, the affiliated Wesley- an chapter, brothers conducted a spring hayrack ride. Besides social activities, members participated in the intramural volleyball and badminton programs while the pledges placed third in B division wrestling. L--li, ,i li , , Essex Considering reciprocal qualifications, TKE rush party participants review fraternity benefits. 45 ' x wr "'1. - PZ. -1' 2559 gn , ,lf -',f -.n . 'I Larry Drbal, President Engineering, Blair TR's Boast Representation In All Engineering Societies Promoting scholarship among members, Triangle ranked scholastically among the top six social frater- nities on campus. ln addition, brothers represented the house in every NU honorary engineering fraternity. Functioning with migrating Kansas University coeds, TR's organized the .lay Hawk Swamp Party. Amid scenes of marshes and overhanging moss, couples danced to the theme of "Running Through the Everglades." National Headquarters of Triangle initiated a program of house evaluation, rating chapters through- out the nation on scholarship, alumni relations, house projects and activities. Placing high in both service projects and scholarship for the year, NU's chapter received a top ten ranking in the national contest. UM., . "5 1 l - l i ' I., l it If , X , li l. U f , ff.-,' 'gf , av ,ri f.-,L M' l Ja "IW ir . F l l With the early appearance of southern winds, pledges clear windows of winter weather film. 4 Classes ., Q- Ef- 'u 55. f Wu H V Ruud. .N-kin ,A vnu- Iq...,, illruvs 3 mn. kr-4 1 .Jil-A ft-in ' xffb '1::219f1 35 Q QQE5? xx f - 5rxNs .9 gigzrz- fq f K! bb ,, , 5 rn . yr T V.- .-.- ....a. ln. 1 a R ,w 3 k s.Q. B! .4f'-my W "6 , .Vo -Wy Q Hfglq 55' kmQ'i f q V ' Q .illb ,W.g fai . i ff1F'::'w . , gm: 'f-453:41 - 4. ' F- Y: .A If H Nz . . ' at , ' - 'f ,, ' Y 1... , .., .., 4 'Ni v -I W 1 w Q - ,.,A :I ' 'f' ' 1 , i,Q '1 W 2 1 EgQ g 4 WE,"-ff X Q. in 'Q T.a.' U21 . '1 ffafwfff. rr- n-.-..- S.. .f-F: megs ---Z ,. 2 Frosh Conquer Transitions Into Collegiate Huskerland Stepping forward to a new life of expectancy, reluc- tant but anxious freshmen left high school days behind. On the move from the start, the novice college mem- bers fought luggage piles and triple-parked cars to find homes in dormitories, houses or apartments. Hopeful independency turned to reliance upon dorm counselors, Dad's checks and sympathetic pro- fessors. Soon homesick letters for parents switched to phone calls and visits to new-found friends. Adjusting to weekend campuses, hazing and wan- dering in the 'stacksf freshmen accepted the ordeals of first year college life. The four-point grading system met with frosh approval while upperclassmen hesi- tantly accepted the change. Giving the "O.K. stamp" to Kosmet Klub and football games, the beginning NU student joined the march toward conformity. . , "Are you kidding?" frets Sherie Sickleloovver as Liz Pomajzl outlines the deplorable news. "Go Big Red, Go Cornhuskers," chant Kernals anticipating another win. 42 Q , i S22 w iii ' gg ,V ,. E .3 gif ll- ,W fell ill ' if wx, 'Q " x I Adapting to college classes, Frosh learn lab necessities with microscopes and long afternoons. "One t R -42.25 r 1-' y se," counts Jane Anderson Following Cindy Hunter's trail proves easy - v , . as the supporters cheer hopefully for a strike. as the weekly jaunt to the "machine" reveals. 4 464 217 il. sea fs Q. Friday-noon-scavengers make the selection of a scrumptuous feast "a Ia your choice." English 21 keeps Dave Carter in the stacks saving a Cliff-hanging grade by handy notes. Seat Trading Sophomores Prefer East Stadium View Making the big move to East Stadium, Soph- omores discovered for the first time the thrill of watch- ing a football game in a position away from the end zone. With the field in full view, many faced new dilem- mas-keeping flash cards at a 450 angle from the nose and maintaining balance in the spirit line. With football season at an end, Sophs faced the inevitable field of scholastic endeavors. "l knew the four point system would never work" became a popular cry as many tried to rationalize D's and F's. For Sophomores succeeding scholastically and , ,N . 5. with sleepless hours on hand, "leadership" offered a possible panacea. Leading took the form of chairman- ship positions in varied and sundried organizations as many Used the tefm to ll-lstlfy Upper CI355 5Ul3eVi0VitY Playfully stopping for that much desired study break, over the recently arrived Freshman population. Gary Sprague sinks into absorbing Heurrerit events." FV N! Planning aheaci, Sophomores check out records as precautions against long hours of studying. 4 466 i l "Well l guess so," assents an agreeing coed, With AF procedure, a new president steps in, as long-range plans for the weekend unfold. as the gavel and flight command change hands. T' wwf- zi, 53 Q "Hold it," begs Curt Bromm as Vance Walla blindly navigates a door sill." 13 L1-5 L Fitting ln Extra Activities, Juniors Juggle Schedules With group requirements out of the way, preparing an "ideal" class schedule became foremost in the minds of Juniors. Looking forward to a semester of bridge and FAC, third year students registered for free Friday afternoons and tried to avoid Saturday classes. Realizing only one year remained, many concen- trated on raising the Sophomore average. A few, watch- ing friends elected campus queens, princes, BIVIOC, Mortar Boards and Innocents, discovered the value of organization, activities and good grades. Reviewing college manuals, third year collegians began making plans to attend summer school and pick up necessary hours for graduation. Other Juniors sought our resorts and out-of-state jobs to fill the last free summer with excitement and adventure before the senior year and job-hunting approached. Unpacking for a new year, a Junior makes an initial move, as the house silently awaits residents and a full schedule. 4 U.. we 4.4 af- '.,-""" .S tl Third graders parry a student teacner's direct question with raised hands or avoiding glances. Seniors 468 wusmi-5. " ll H v - H . , an.. AUM jf:-34 K. 'N-1 -.,,,, g. '5 -'efN.,l Q, I ' . ' l C '.. zwv-F' f 3 ' I 1- N lil!-ai 7. 'TNQ r . ' -- A 1 1-,W ,fm.:-.: . i l , X' wiv!!! comm: BOARD X l X ....- . ..-....- -5 , 4 '- ,nv 'Time, place and vvhere's that interview? moans an applicant searching for facts. Q", I'S'glQ'-' lvl- ' -. ' 71, rl--1 In proper attire, a Senior scans the 'latest' in deciding the tux vs. dinner jacket trauma. Seniors Ponder Fifth Year Over School, Job Conflict After filling out applications, fearing the draft and cramming in courses, Seniors still found time for bull sessions over past collegiate days. First blind dates changed to engagements while job hunting replaced campus activities and Monday night meetings. With the parting of faded sweatshirts, torn tennies and painted grubbies, the old gave way to the new as fourth year collegiate members dressed for business interviews. Pondering the future also brought many questions-"Will the campus miss me?" and "Will I get season tickets for the football games?" Answers evaded students as graduation approached. Counting the days ahead Seniors sensed the "has- been" feeling. Whether graduates shouted "World here l come!" or stepped on to the first rung of grad school, the future presented a puzzle waiting to be assembled. f . - , . -. -13? 'D -1- . I .4 Il . l l l fl t YT, rfpl: -x r.: W.. . ,t I l A J- V 75-in- ia If 1 ti. fill x l , , , i Ai P' l J . H0 x . i l bf. X I I 11- -Stagg -- .., -, 1. t LA 'J ,f ll' Row 1: Adams, Mary, Scottsbluff, Teachers, Pi Beta Phi, Family Project, N.H.R.R.F., UNSEA. Aernie, Bert, Columbus, Engineering, A.l.C.l-l.E., Gamma Lambda, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. Ahlstrand, William, Omaha, Arts and Sciences, Phi Kappa Psi, Phi Alpha Theta. Ahrens, Wayne, Grand Island, Engineering, Triangle, Chi Epsilon. Alber, Jacquelyn, Great Bend, Kansas, Arts and Sciences, Alpha Omicron Pi, Builders. Alex- ander, Thomas, Lincoln, Pharmacy, Phi Kappa Psi, A.P.L.A. Row 2: Allen, Judy, Auburn, Teachers, Zeta Tau Alpha, UNSEA. Allen, Judy K., Lincoln, Teachers. Andersen, Constance, O'Neill, Business Adminis- tration, Selleck. Andersen, Harold, Omaha, Engineering, Cather, American Institute of Architects, Sigma Tau, Newman Club. Andersen, Sandra, Arlington, Agriculture, Love Memorial Hall, Gamma Alpha Chi, Phi Upsilon Omicron. Andersen, Delwyn, Wausa, Business Administration, Delta Sigma Pi, Business Adminis- tration Student Advisory Board. Row 3: Anderson, Jacquelyn, Omaha, Business Administration, Pound Hall, Phi Beta Lambda, Orchesis, Red Cross, Union. Anderson, Kenneth, Kearney, Business Administra- tion, Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Anderson, Marion, Stromsburg, Teachers, Chi Omega, Mu Phi Epsilon, UNSEA. Ar1d9rS0r1. Thomas. COlUmbUSa Architecture: Delta Tau Delta, A.l.A. Andrews, Robert, Syracuse, Agricul- ture, AF-FIP. Anderson, Larry, Grand Island, Business Administration, Selleck, Corn Cobs, RAM. 46 4 . if . . . tx , , ..., ,L pi 53 ' in it TW l E Ai' In fi' v if ki ji II f " il l " l f l , 1 l ll I . TX 9 , ll, " 1" i f 1 J . X s I .7 -, X Y 1 ,Rx - ,Q Y -ii ' l 1 f i vsfi?:',.. - rr by . ' 53, - wx-E., I L vi W. ., , i 1, J i ig -if ' ,, 'l 4 . Y i . ,, ,Q ai ., -, , . I, i. te-. ' - ,A " iii ' fig,iiA" 1 if AL Y, ' L , '--.,, , 1 ' , ' - - '- -1, f -.9 L . - l ,,l J fa' L L 1 I Row 1, Anderson, Lowell, Geneva, Agriculture, Ag Men, Block and Bridle, University 4-H Club. Anderstrom, Susan, Ashton, Teachers, Alpha Phi, Panhellenlc. Angelcyk, James, Crete, Teachers, Triangle. Antes, Jane, Lincoln, Teachers, Zeta Tau Alpha. Arms, Judith, Omaha. Armstrong, J. Lee, Clearwater, Arts and Sciences, Selleck, French Club. Asher, LeRoy, Hazard, Agriculture, Farml-louse, Nebraska internationalAssociation, People To People. Austin, Gary, Burwell, Agriculture, Ag Men, Alpha Zeta, Block and Bridle. Bailey, Gerald, Schuyler, Teachers, Delta Tau Delta. Row 2: Baird, Gerald, Lincoln, Teachers, Delta Sigma Phi, Young Republicans. Baird, Sam, Superior, Business Administration, Beta Theta Pi, Corn Cobs, IFC. Baker, Nancy, Lincoln, Arts and Sciences, Delta Delta Delta, Cornhusker, Union. Baldwin, John, Columbus, Pharmacy, Alpha Tau Omega, Innocents, Kappa Psi, A.Ph. A., Corn Cobs. Bolin, Karen, Omaha, Arts and Sciences, Zeta Tau Alpha, AUF, Builders, Union, YWCA. Barber, Donald, Fairbury, Agriculture, Alpha Gamma Sigma, Alpha Zeta, Ag Economics Club, Ag Union. Barelman, Carol, Wisner, Teachers, Alpha Chi Omega. Barger, Deborah, Omaha, Teachers, Kappa Delta, Madrigals, MESSIAH soloist, University Singers. Barth, Becky, St. Paul, Home Economics, Love Memorial l-lall, Home Economics Ed. Association, Omicron Nu, Phi Upsilon, University 4-H Club. Row 3: Bassett, Joanne, Sioux City. Iowa, Arts and Sciences, Phi Mu, French Club, UNSEA. Bartlett, Margo, Scottsbluff, l-lome Economics, HEEA, Home Economics Club. Batt, Linda, Lincoln, Teachers, Alpha Chi Omega. Baxter, Judy, Palisade, Teachers, Selleck, Physical Education Club. Becher, Mark, Platte Center, Engineering, Phi Delta Theta, Senior Class Representative. Beckman, Barbara, Lincoln, Teachers, Delta Gamma, Alpha Lambda Delta, Pi Lambda Theta, Mortar Board, AUF, Cornhusker. Beckner, Raymond, Lyons, Agriculture, Ag Men, Agronomy Club, Wildlife Club. Beal, Cheri Jo..Valentine, Teachers, Pi Beta Phi, Angel Flight, Orthopedic Project. Beideck, Bonny, Lincoln, Teachers, Gamma Phi Beta, Bach Swingers, University Singers. Row 4, Bell, Robert, Lincoln, Arts and Sciences, Beta Theta Pi, Phi Lambda Upsilon, Pi'Mu Epsilon. Bemstein, Steve, Omaha, Business Administration, Sigma Alpha Mu, Hillel. Benecke, Sallye, Nebraska City, Business Administration, Alpha Omicron Pi, Deans Advisory Board: University Singers. Benter, Richard, Walthill, Business Administration, Sigma Phi Epsilon. Bergh, Cheryl, Plainview, Home Economics, l-lome Economics Club, Kernals. Berris, Brian, Alamo, California, Business Administration, Sigma Chi. Bianchini, William, Jersey City, New Jersey: Arts and Sciences. Binegar, Jayne, Sutherland, Home Economics, Burr East, Omicron Nu, Phi Upsilon Omicron, HEEA, Home Economics Club. Binger, Nanette, Lincoln, Teachers, Alpha Chi Omega, Angel Flight. Row 5: Bletscher, Dwight, Falls City, Teachers, Delta Sigma Phi, NSEA, Bockus, Richard, North Platte, Engineering, Pioneer Coop, ASCE. Bollman, Virginia, Sioux City, iowa, Teachers, Delta Gamma, ACE, UNSEA. Bornemeier, Eugenia, Elmwood, Teachers, Selleck, NEA, UNSEA. Borzych, Conrad, St. Paul, Engineering, ASCE, Chi Epsilon. Bowman, Janet, Red Oak, iowa, Teachers. Branting, Carol, Osceola, Teachers, Alpha Chi Omega, ACE, Dean's Advisory Board, Nl-lRRF, UNSEA. Brashear, Kermit, Crawford, Arts and Sciences, Kappa Sigma, IFC. Bridgman, Richard, Palisade, Teachers, NEA. Row 6, Cada, James, Clarkson, Agricul- ture, Alpha Gamma Rho, Gamma Lambda, Phi Mu Alpha, Eligible Bachelor, Kosmet Klub. Cacek, Ronald, Odell, Agriculture, Alpha Gamma Sigma, Ag Economics Club, University 4-l-l Club. Caleca, John, St. Woodhaven. New York, Arts and Sciences, Selleck. Callen, Marilyn, Ogallala, Teach- ers, Selleck, UNSEA. Campbell, Anne, Scottsbluff, Teachers, Kappa Kappa Gamma. Campbell, John, Omaha, Arts and Sciences: Phi Delta Theta. Campbell, Leonard, Omaha, Engineering, ASME, IEEE. Capesius, Ann, Pierce, Teachers, Gamma Phi Beta, ACE, Builders, Newman Club, Red Cross, Union, UNSEA. Carman, Glen, Riverdale, Agriculture, Alpha Gamma Sigma, Society of Mechanized Agriculture, University 4-l-l Club. Row 7: Bringelson, Deborah, Maxwell, Home Economics, HEEA, University 4-H Club. Brolyer, Bette, Lincoln, Teachers, Sigma Kappa, Delta Omicron, UNSEA. Brummund, Charles, Walthill, Business Administration, Beta Sigma Psi. Buckland, Robert, Lincoln, Arts and Sciences, Abel l-lall. Bucklin, Judy, Lincoln, Home Economics, Alpha Chi Omega, Mortar Board, Omicron Nu, Phi Upsilon Omicron, Nebraska International Asso- ciation, People To People. Buckner, Joyce, Lincoln, Teachers, Alpha Kappa Alpha, NSEA, Orchesis. Bulin, Nancy, Plattsmouth, Teachers, Delta DeltahDeltaI5F:l':1i Zeta Lambda, YWCA. Bull, C. Marsh, Omaha, Business Administration, Alpha Tau Omega, Red Cross. Bush, Karen, Lincoln, eac ers, e a amma. 70 ig in .,-- I y ... i., f 4 t l ,xr ll , , -- :-'- ff 1 .. . - ,, I .:. 1 . , :FL ii ' :wi 1121- . .ZF ,A yu, uv -' Q, T , I 'N l ' K ' ' . 1. ., r. ' .- li " wi l W . ,I is E l 1 - ,eff f 1' tw. ' l l I4l KI X I l P Kif'IMi'U53" xi ' ' .. 5,-it i- A i- - i. I , ii nm... N' Nbr t J ': ix Row 1: Carlson, De Ette, Bettendorf: Teachers: Alpha Xi Delta: UNSEA: YWCA: Young Republicans. Carpenter, Roger, Overton: Pharmacy: Theta Xi: Kappa Psi: APA. Carroll, Joseph, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Beta Theta Pi: Phi Alpha Theta: Phalanx: AUP: Lincoln Project. Carskadon, lhling, Edison: Agriculture: SMA. Case, Walter, Lincoln: Engineering: ASCE: Rifle Team: Judo Club. Caskey, Charles, Business Administration. Catell, Gary, Grand Island: Teachers: Sigma Chi. Catterson, Sallie, Oskaloosa, Iowa: Teachers: Alpha Xi Delta: Young Republicans, ACE: UNSEA. Cavitt, Sandra, Scottsbluff: Dental Hygiene: Pound Hall. Row 2: Clayton, Davin, Lincoln: Teachers: UNSEA: SEA: Nea. Cleveland, Linda, Lin- coln: Teachers: Alpha Xi Delta: Alpha Lambda Delta: Pi Lambda Theta: Mortar Board: YWCA President: UNSEA. Chester, Arlene, McCook: Arts and Science: Pound Hall: Theta Sigma Phi: Kappa Phi. Clement, Charles, Ord: Dentistry: Alpha Tau Omega: Xi Psi Phi: IFC. Clifford, Barbara, Lincoln: Teachers: Gamma Phi Beta: Pi Lambda Theta: NSES: Alpha Lambda Delta: People to People: Quiz Bowl. Cline, Vicki, Gothenburg: Home Economics: Love l-lall: Phi Upsilon Omicron: Alpha Lambda Delta: Home Coming Queen: HEEA: HEC: AWS Board. Cochrane, Kathy, Os- kosh: Teachers: Alpha Phi: CEC: UNSEA. Cole, Robb, Lincoln: Business Administration: Theta Xi: IPC. Colgan, Joseph, Omaha: Engineering: Sigma Nu: AIA. Row 3: Conley, Paul, Lincoln: Law: Phi Alpha Theta: Alpha Psi: Delta Theta Phi: Freshman Class Representative: Union: History Club: Young Democrats: NLS: ALA: NLSA. Cook, Shirley, Arcadia: Home Economics: Love Hall: Phi Upsilon Omicron: HEC: 44-l Club. Copner, Marcia, Gibbon: Home Economics: Gamma Phi Beta. Cornelius, Sondra, Wymore: Love Hall: Phi Upsilon Omicron: 4-l-I Club: HEC: Union: HEEA. Cornwell, Joan, Blair: Teachers: Pound Hall: NBEA: UNSEA. Cosier, John, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Pi Mu Epsilon: Sigma Pi Sigma: Phi Kappa Pls: IFC: innocent Society. Coufal, Jeanette. Seward: Home Economics: Chi Omega: Alpha Lambda Delta: Mortar Board Secretary: Phi Upsilon Omlcron: Omicron Nu: Nebraska College Queen: East Union President: Builders Vice President: HEC: HEEA: YWCA. Coufal, William, Schuyler: Engineering: Delta Tau Delta: Pi Mu Epsilon: UNSEA. Coy, Virginia, Lincoln: Teachers: Alpha Phi. Row 4: Crabill, Jane, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Kappa Alpha Theta: UNSEA: Cornhusker: Builders: Young Democrats. Cramer, Carol, Bellevue: Teachers: Alpha Omicron Pi: UNSEA. Crawford, Cynthia. York: Teachers: Alpha Phi: UNSEA. Crispin. Sandra, Lincoln: Home Economics: Love Hall: Phi Upsilon Omicron: Omicron Nu: HEC. Criswell, Jerome, Chappell: Agriculture: Burr West: Alpha Zeta: Agronomy Club. Crispin, Ronnie, Lincoln: Teachers: NSEA. Cromer, Fred, Bladen: Teachers: Pl Mu Epsilon: Phi Eta Sigma. Crosier, Cheryll, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Kappa Kappa Gamma: Angel Flight: Tassels: YWCA. Crosson, Linda, McCook: Teachers: Alpha Chi Omega: UNSEA. 3 it thin. .MO 9, B99- if - f-'l rzq Choosing a "girl's best friend" involves hours of window-shopping before taking the final step." 472 -, f W' ' ,-55" X 4 :-- 'Q L Egg:-ig - i , : l ' l i 7 v .xg K ,xl :tp an 1 ri V: I - ' 5. 10 LL'- . --. , . . vii ' 'A , l'qM'f' is qi 3' i l f ' 1 Il , ,, ,EEi:,,g.,,v - 'a:-5133 ,. le' F'-I ' Q I . a .. .-: W' 14 , lv' iffii li"-.117-: 9 f :fl-5 inf-ii-'fi' -- " ri :LT 'F A- . '- O . . , ROW 1: Cunningham, Susan, Lincoln: Teachers: Kappa Alpha Theta: Rho Alpha: UNSEA: ACE: Nl-lRRF: Little Sisters of Minerva. Damke, Susan, Lincoln: Unicorns: Builders: Union: Rifle Teams. Dickinson, William, Dix: Business Administration: Delta Sigma Pi. Dunn, Richard,Osceola: Agri- culture: Ag Men. Row 2: Davidson, Steve, Grand Island: Engineering: Alpha Tau Omega: IEEE: Union. Dean, Linda, Weston: Arts and Science: Kappa Delta: Spanish Club: Rifle Club: Young Republicans: Red Cross. Decker, Robert, Lincoln: Business Administration: Young Republicans. Delzell, Gerald, Sioux City: Business Administration: Sigma Alpha Epsilon: Phi Eta Sigma: IFC. Row 3: DeMars, James, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Theta Xi: Pi Sigma Alpha: Outstanding Nebraskan: Theta Xi President: Cornhusker Associate Editor: AUF Secretary: ASUN: IFC: Young Demo- crats Vice President. Devaney, Pat, Lincoln: Teachers: Alpha Omicron Pi: SAA: Pi Lambda Theta. Dinneen, Lonnie, Lincoln: Agriculture: Varsity Dairy Club: Newman Club. Donat, Larry, Bloomfield: Arts and Science: Selleck: Arnold Air Society: RAM. Row 4: Dotson, Larry, Lincoln, Arts and Science: Theta Xi. Dow, Alice, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Kappa Kappa Gamma: Panhellenic: Spanish Club. Dowling, Victoria, Omaha: Arts and Science- Gamma Phi Beta President- AI ha Lambda Delta- Mortar Board Vice President- Activities ueen- Ideal Nebraska Coed- AWS Vice . . D . . Q . . President: Student Tribunal: Panhellenic. Drake, Daniel, Friend: Agriculture: AEC. Row 5: Drbal, Larry, Blair: Engineering: Triangle: AICE. Dredge, Earl, Osmond: Phi Eta Sigma: Mu Epsilon Nu: UNSEA. Drueke, Richard, West Point: Alpha Gamma Sigma: Varsity Dairy Club. Drum, Duncan, Omaha: Alpha Tau Omega: PEK: Varsity Football: N Club. Row 6: Dugan, William, Fremont: Business Administration: Alpha Tau Omega: AUF: Young Republicans. Duckworth, William, Omaha: Engineering: Sigma Alpha Epsilon: AIA. Durham, Mary, Omaha: Teachers: Delta Gamma: ACE: UNSEA. Dyblie, Jay, Lincoln: Business Administration: Sigma Nu. Earl, William, Summit: Business Administration: Delta Tau Delta. Ebers, Joann, Fremont: Teachers: Delta Delta Delta: LJNSEA: ACE: Union. Ebzery, Susan, Sheridan, Wyoming: Delta Gamma. Eiser, Richard, Oregon, Missouri: Arts and Science: Beta Theta Phi. Eldred, Stephen, Red Cloud: Arts and Science: Ag Men. Row 7: Encell, Carol, Omaha: Teachers: Kappa Alpha Theta. Ender, Ellen, North Platte: Teachers: Alpha Xi Delta. Engelkemier, Larry, Murray: Agriculture: Alpha Gamma Rho: 4-ljl Club: AEC: Wildlife Club. Enstrom, Larry, Oakland: Business Administration: Phi Gamma Delta. Ensz, James, Beatrice: Delta Tau Delta. Eschliman, Donna. Valley: Teachers: Gamma Phi Beta: Alpha Lambda Delta: Pi Lambda Theta: UNSEA: Angel Flight: Young Democrats: YWCA. Evans, Gary, Aurora: gharmacy: Sigma Alpha Epsilon: Kappa Psi: APhA. Evans, Jean, Wallace: Home Economics. Eveleth, Doug, South Sioux City: Agriculture: Alpha amma Rho. rganizing tomorrow s lesson plans takes time, as student teachers finish last minute details. Seniors : :ST in-9.1-, w Vgggiggl, i -1 C, 5' i . 5 H id? F ii K .MP 5, iq ' . :li ,-, 5:11 X 1 'i 03' ,lb A 'F' l ra. Y' Row 1: Evert, Marilyn, Ogallala: Home Economics: Pound Hall: UNSEA. Ewing, David, Wayne: Engineering: Theta Xi. Fairchild, Dave, North Platte Engineering: Triangle: Eta Kappa Nu: IEEE: Sigma Tau: Corn Cobs. Faltemier, Joseph, Sioux City: Graduate. Row 2: Fardal, Ruth, Omaha: Busi- ness Administration: Zeta Tau Alpha: Phi Beta Lambda: Union: Young Republicans: YWCA. Farkas, Carol, Chicago, illinois: Teachers: UNSEA: ACE. Famer, Mary, Valentine: Dental Hygiene: Pi Beta Phi: Alpha Lambda Delta. Farstrup, Greg, Omaha: Arts and Science: Selleck: NIA. Row 3: Farstrup, Linde, Omaha: Arts and Science: Selleck. Ferris E., Archer: Agriculture: Triangle. Field, Donald, Omaha: Teachers: Cather: LJNSEA: Council on Religion. Fisher, Marian. Lincoln: Teachers: Pi Beta Phi: Cadence Countess' Secretary: ACE. Row 4: Fliginger, Kathy, So. Sioux City: Teachers: Chi Omega: UNSEA: Tassels: ALJF. Folken, Gerald, Richland: Engineering: Beta Sigma Psi: ASME. Foster, Thomas, Bellevue: Arts and Science: Delta Upsilon. Fostek. William. York: Arts and Science: Kappa Sigma.Row 5: Fox, Bruce, Red Cloud: Dentistry: Cather Hall: Delta Sigma Delta. Fox, Marilyn, Lincoln: Teachers: Alpha Xi Delta: LJNSEA: Panhellenic: Lincoln Orthopedic Project. Franke, Sherry, Grand island: Business Administration: Alpha Chi Omega. Francis, Don, Omaha: Engineering: Acacia: AIA: Arnold Air Society. Row 6: Frank, Eldon, Lincoln: Engineering: Phi Kappa Psi. Frederick, Allen, Kearney: Agriculture: FarmHouse: Agriculture Economics Club: Vice-President, Alpha Zeta: ASUN. Frick, D., Gering: Teachers. Frese, David, Omaha: Engineering: Brown Palace: AIA, lCC. Frizzell, Ronald, Osceola: Engineering: Theta Xi. Frolik, Lawrence, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Beta Theta Pi President: Phi Eta Sigma: Innocent: ASUN vice-president. Froscheiser, Carol, Lincoln: Teachers: Towne Club: ACE, UNSEA. Fuchs, Kathleen, Omaha: Kappa Kappa Gamma: Home Economics: Young Republicans: Union: Builders. Gahagan, Michael, Scottsbluff: Arts and Science: Sigma Chi. Row 7: Gake, David, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Theta Chi. Geiger, RoseAnn, Cozad: Arts and Science: Zeta Tau Alpha: YWCA: Union,Gemar, Dennis, Sutton: Business Administration: Sigma Phi Epsilon: Varsity Baseball. Gemar, Gerald, Sutton: Dentistry: Sigma Phi Epsilon: Delta Phi Alpha: Pi Sigma Alpha: Xi Psi Phi. Gengenbach, Burle, Grant: Agriculture: Burr Hall: Alpha Zeta. Genung, John, Glenwood, Iowa: Business Administration: Beta Theta Pi: Young Republicans.Gerelick, Hally, Omaha: Arts and Science: Sigma Delta Tau: AUF. Gerlach, John, Hastings: Graduate: UNlCORNS. Getscher, Cheryl, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Alpha Omicron Pi: NHRRF. :Lt ai 4 V "" '51, '15-"fl -1 van. 41 ,-s.-.j- xi 1 .3 . gr , , wif e- -l " ' ' ' . Qg.J"" V . .1 . .- , A 'l j' 59 if V 1 . ,J l . .I ll ',.,l.a.J QQ, -'3 nl, pp.-+' - -i V j -. Row '1, Gettman, James, McCook, Engineering, Sigma Chi. Gilmore, Jack, Omaha, Engineering, Cather, Eta Kappa Nu, IEEE, Phi Eta Sigma. Glantz, Robert, Harvard, Teachers, Delta Sigma Phi. Glasson, Gloria, Omaha, Teachers, Zeta Tau Alpha. Glenn, Dewayne, Ogallala, Dentistry, Phi Gamma Delta, Xi Psi Phi. Glenn, Robert, Omaha, Arts and Sciences, Triangle, Gamma Theta Upsilon. Gley- steen, Ann, Sioux City, iowa, Business Administration, Kappa Kappa Gamma. Glover, Barbara, Beatrice, Teachers, Kappa Kappa Gamma, UNSEA. Glynn, James, Palmer, Agriculture, Alpha Gamma Sigma. Row 2, Godden, Norman, Lincoln, Teachers, Phi Epsilon Kappa. Golter, Ronald, Campbell, Engineering, Cornhusker Co-op, IEEE. Goodroad, Marjean, Toronto, South Dakota, Teachers, Alpha Delta Pi, UNSEA. Gottschalk, J., Sidney, Arts and Science, Phi Gamma Delta President, IFC. Graff, Lyle, Dalton, Engineering, IEEE. Grandon, Raymond, North Little Rock, Arkansas, Business Administration, Pioneer House. Grasmick, Susan, Omaha, Teach- ers, Kappa Alpha Theta, UNSEA. Greer, T., Alvo, Arts and Science, FarmHouse, Pi Sigma Alpha, Agriculture Economics Club: NIA, People-to-People. Gregorius, Jane, Columbus, Teachers, Alpha Chi Omega, Angel Flight. Row 3, Grinage, Nola, Omaha: Teach- ers, Nettleton Manor, UNSEA, ACE. Groteluschen, Jean, Columbus, Home Economics, Alpha Chi Omega, Dairy Royal Princess, AUF, Angel Flight, Home Economics Club. Grove, Lee, Superior, Agriculture, Alpha Gamma Sigma President, Phalanx Military Honorary, Ag Economics Club, Alpha Zeta, Ag Executive Board, YWCA, President. Grummert, Willard, Fairbury, Engineering, Sigma Phi Epsilon. Guenzel, Virginia, Lincoln, Arts and Science, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Alpha Lambda Delta, Kappa Tau Alpha, Mortar Board, Pi Sigma Alpha, Theta Sigma Phi, Builders, Board of Publications, People to People, Student Senator. Guilford, Mary, Lin- coln, Arts and Science, Kappa Kappa Gamma. Haarberg, Mary, Wauneta, Arts and Science, Gamma Phi Beta, UNSEA, French Club, People to People. Haberman, Joe, Brock, Arts and Science, Cather. Ham, Gary, Benkelman, Agriculture, Alpha Zeta, Block and Bridle Club. Row 4: Hammer, John, Greenwood, Engineering. Hamsa, Barbara, Ord, Arts and Science, Kappa Kappa Gamma. Hansen, Karen, Grand Island, Teachers, Delta Gamma. Hansen, Margaret, Johnson, Arts and Science, German Club. Hansen, Roger, Fremont, Business Administration, Theta Xi. Hanthorn, Elaine, lndianola, Teachers, Sigma Kqppa, Alpha Lambda Delta, Delta Omicron, Pi Lambda Theta. Hapner, JoAnn, Omaha, Teachers, Kappa Kappa Gamma. Harano, Gail, North Platte, Arts and Science, Selleck, Cornhusker Beauty Queen, RAM Council. Harding, Bill, Lincoln, Arts and Science, Kappa Sigma, Innocents, Pi Sigma Alpha, Union Board, President, Union Program Council. Row 5, Harlan, Phillip, Beaver City, Agriculture, Ag Men, Agronomy Club, Flying Club, 4-H Club. Harms, Donald, Wilcox, Agriculture, Burr Hall. Harnisch, Larry, Scribner, Teachers, Beta Sigma Psi. Hartwig, Gordon, Norfolk, Business Administration, Alpha Tau Omega. Haug, William, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Business Admin- istration, Phi Delta Theta, Innocents, IFC, N-Club, Varsity Football. Hayes, William, Chappell, Teachers, Acacia President, IFC, Student Council, UNSEA, Young Republicans, Builders, Union. Heaston, Gary, Beatrice, Arts and Science, Cather, Phi Eta Sigma. Haas, Becky, Lincoln, Arts and Science, Pi Beta Phi, Yell Squad. Hecox, Elizabeth, Gothenburg, Teachers, Kappa Delta, Miss Block and Bridle, Miss Photogenic, Miss December Blue Print, Rifle Club, People to People, UNSEA. Row 6: Hecox, Jim, Gothen- burg, Agriculture, Alpha Gamma Rho, Block and Bridle Club. Hedges, Thomas, Lincoln, Arts and Science, Sigma Nu. Heideman, Judy, Lyons, Teachers, Kappa Delta, Sigma Alpha Alpha Eta, Council for Exceptional Children, UNSEA. Heise, James, Omaha, Arts and Science, Triangle, Corn Cobs. Heiser, Judi, Hastings, Arts and Science, Alpha Phi. Helzer, Norman, Aurora, Agriculture, FarmHouse, Alpha Zeta, Agronomy Club. Hemphill, Virginia, Tokyo, Japan, Teachers, Pi Beta Phi, Alpha Lambda Delta, People to geople. Henderson, Frances, Beatrice, Alpha Phi, UN EA. Henderson, Jon, Lincoln, Arts and Science, Alpha Delta Pl, Cadence oun ess. 474 -- - .. V -: -aa -- ,l . I, 1 , H : f - i.. if" ,, ' Y: . i ' ,v .P J - , ' ,-N f: , ,1-if ,. ,i , , I, . I y, , i, . i , . I Q'-i , .ha , . I f X fx Jvlij. l . V , ,rp ,. , , . F., My. - l 1 W-J ,i .:,+1"Qg ' :, it : 7 r -: r - Tl .M x 1: :jr S F -f .y Q x 0 H., .,,, i .l , i :iw W ," 'I 5 . ff I I ' " ali l, 4 "' fr L i 'Y 'N i j . EY'-fi . ,W .i , 5 , ,frm -PM L, ' i 5 , I , - Q., 3: ,i ,. .l v , . i 'z-' '. i i All Y 1-t'Q'.,.' 5 ALE "5-I i 1: wx H f .... L-x. i , f lg .":-V 3 51.255 - ' M i . i .91 --. :filly A IV C- f 'i flgl if M l , A 'ir l i . I, f I 1:1 Row 1: Henderson, Larry, Beatrice: Engineering: Triangle: Eta Kap- pa Nu: IEEE: Sigma Tau: Nebraska Blue Print: Engineering Toast- masters. Hendrix. James. Louisville, Engineering: Triangle: Phi Eta Sigma: Sigma Tau: AlCl-lE. Henline, Linda, Lincoln: Teachers: Gamma Phi Beta: Sigma Alpha Iota: University Singers. Heybrock, Sandra, Fremont: Home Economics: Burr Hall: Phi Upsilon Omicron: Builders: Home Economics Chapter: Gamma Delta. Row 2: Hibbs, Jerrold, Smithfield: Agriculture: Alpha Gamma Rho: Block and Bridle: 4-l-l Club. Hickey, Barbara, Omaha: Teachers. Hickman, Nancy, Kimball: Home Ecomonics: Pound: People to People. Hime, Susan, McCook: Teachers: Kappa Kappa Gamma. Row 3: Hiner, Travis, Scottsbluff: Arts and Science: Phi Kappa Psi. Hinrichs, Stephen, Sidney: Phar- macy: APhA: Kappa Psi. Hirsch, Roger, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Delta Upsilon: German Club. Hirschback, Kipton, South Sioux City: Teachers: Beta Theta Pi. Row 4: Hodges. Sandra, Omaha: Arts and Science: Alpha Chi Omega. Hodgson, Beth, Lincoln: Arts and Science Towne Club: Kappa Phi. Hoegemeyer, Marilyn, Hooper: Arts and Science: Kappa Delta: Theta Sigma Phi: Daily Nebraskan, editor: Gamma Delta. Hoffmaster, Jean, York: Business Administration: Alpha Phi: Phi Chi Theta: CORNHUSKER: Business Administration Executive Council. Row 5: Hoiberg, Eric, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Phi Kappa Psi. Holmquist, Jean. Oakland: Teachers: Delta Gamma. President: Mortar Board: Pi Lambda Theta: Builders: Tasse-ls: UNSEA. Holmstedt, Connie, Sutherland: Teachers: Pound Hall: Kappa Phi. Holmstedt, James, Sutherland: Pharmacy: Abel l-lall: APhA: Kappa Psi: Corn Cobs. Row 6: Hoppe, Karen, Anchorage, Alaska: Teachers: Piper Hall: ACE. Hoven, Karen, Seattle, Washing- ton: Teachers: Delta Gamma: UNSEA. Houfek, Dave, Clarkson: Engineering: Delta Upsilon: IEEE. Houfek, Dennis, Clarkson: Busi- ness Administration: Delta Upsilon. Seniors -A ' ' ' ,wi Qt. g. Eleventh hour "deadlines" accelerate farewells as Janet Mach's fiance avoids the late minutes. 475 A. 1 W 5 N M v y 4 2.9, , ,N 1 - 1 w C 1 1 ' Ii' 1 Elvis: 3, A W -gf :ii . , ll Q ' ' 'T 1 --. : wrt l, -5 :si in ill Q. . My ll , . Yi. l V- -i . 1 - I 4- , . l , b , :-if -' I ,il-me I- 5 l , ,- , V 'L 1 -, , N55 ' ly' :J -Ig V LL 'gsj 4 :A Y Q, A..-: ,, ' . 'Ji - :ta-f 'l ' l 'FP' A . , . A . , f' M.: 1 L ff ' lu? . 'M ,JN . .1 I I. f -1: J at i. :j "i:::1i.4'e3,i ' ' w -li' . "GL: Tl ..:' i :vi if gl- ii . ' lm. . , 4: ,. E 1,,. .-- .I ' 'I ' f ' V I '..l Seniors Row 1: Huffaker, Kay, Clay Center: Teachers: Zeta Tau Alpha: 1964 Rodeo Queen: WAA. resident: PE Club: Panhellenic Council. Hubbard. Sharon, Rock Rapids, iowa: Teachers: Delta Delta Delta: Red Cross: UNSEA. Hulac, Penny, Cgmaha: Teachers: Alpha Chi Omega: National Coun- cil of Teachers of English: Red Cross: Union: UNSEA. Husbands, Barbara, Lincoln: Teachers: Delta Delta Delta: ACE: UNSEA. lmler, James, Nelson: Arts and Science: Cather Hall: ACS. Inman, Jennifer, Lincoln: Teachers: Kappa Kappa Gamma: 1965 Daisy Chain. Irish, Lynne, Kirkwood. Missouri: Teachers: Kappa Kappa Gamma, president: Pi Lambda Theta: AWS Board: Panhellenic Council: UNSEA. Jack, Abram, Tekamah: Engi- neering: Triangle: Pi Tau Sigma: ASME. Jacobs, Evelyn, Gering: Arts and Science: Pound Hall. Row 2: Jansen, Jane, Carroll, Iowa: Teachers: Delta Delta Delta. Jeffrey, Michael, Lincoln: Business Administration: Beta Theta Pi: Alpha Kappa Psi: Phalanx: Kosmet Club: Daily Nebraskan, business manager. Jenkins, Tom, Lincoln: Arts and Sc1ence:Triangle..Jess, Mike, David City: Engineering: Selleck: ASCE: Gamma Lambda: RAM, treasurer. Jett, Robert, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Phi Kappa Psi. Jilek, Marilyn, Falls City: Teachers: Alpha Delta Pi: UNSEA. Jiracek, Lynn, Lincoln: Teachers: Gamma Phi Beta: Orchesis: ASUN: AUF: Cadence Countesses: Newman Club. Jiskra, Alfred, Crete: Agriculture: Alpha Gam- ma Sgma: Block and Bridle: 4-H Club: Czech Club. Jobman,.James, Gothenburg: Business Administration: Farml-louse: Corn Cobs. Row 3: John- son, urtis, Detroit, Michigan: Business Administration: Phi Gamma Delta: N Club. Johnson, Genell, Sioux City, Iowa: Teachers: Chi Omega: Red Cross, UNSEA: YWCA. Johnson, Joell, Washta. Iowa: Arts and Science: Sigma Kappa: ACE: French Club: Spanish Club. Johnson, Karen, Lincoln: Journalism: Kappa Alpha Theta: Kappa Tau Alpha: Omicron Nu: Phi Upsilon Omicron: Theta Sigma Phi: Activities Queen finalist: Homecoming Queen finalist: VY Day Court 1964-5: AUF. vice-president: Student Tribunal:Journalism Council.Johnson, Kile, Lincoln: Business Administration: Beta Theta Pi: N Club. Johnson,Richard, Ralston: Arts and Science: American Chemical Society Affiliates: Gamma Lambda: Phi Mu Alpha Sin- fonia, Johnson, Rodney, Wausa: Agriculture: Alpha Gamma Rho: Alpha Zeta: IFC: Wildlife Club: Union Board: East Union. Johnston, Barry, Lin- coln: Teachers: Beta Theta Pi. Jones, Jerry, Beatrice: Business Administration: Beta Sigma Psi. Rovxr 4: Jordan, Betty, Valentine: Dentistry: Gamma Phi Beta: Alpha Lambda Delta. Joynt, Janis, Lincoln: Teachers: Alpha Phi: UNSEA. Kanter, Dwight, Palmer: Agriculture: Alpha Gamma Sigma: Agronomy Club: Gamma Delta. Keating, Linda, Omaha: Teachers: Kappa'Kappa Gamma: Dean's Advisory Board: Yell Squad: UNSEA. Keenan, John, Kearney: Business Administration: Sigma Chi. Keller, Nelda, Broken Bow: Arts and Science: Delta Gamma. Kennedy, Patrick, Lincoln: Business Administration: Delta Sigma Pi: German Club. Kern, Jere, Ainsworth: Engineering: Selleck. Kiffin, Debbie, Lincoln: Arts and Sci- ence: Zeta Tau Alpha: Panhellenic. Row 5: Kilzer, Tom, Walthill: Business Administration: igma Phi Epsilon. King, Linda, Parnell, Missouri: Pound Hall: APhA: Kappa Epsilon: Rho Chi. Kingston, Terry, Stamford, Connecticut: Teachers: Alpha Omicron Pi: UNSEA. Kirk, Thomas, Neligh: Arts and Sciences: Farml-louse. Kiser, John, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Delta Upsilon. Klein, Gary, Scotia: Agriculture: Ag Men. Klein, Robert, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Delta Tau Delta. Knaak, David, Pierce: Agriculture. Knoles, Jere, Gering: Business Administration: Sigma Phi Epsilon. M4-A ki' A Comparing senior checks to the record, Dwight Bletscher tries erasing a no-graduation error . ',i?7'ff7 " Vi -.2 ' ii' ia aj' - . xii! -'N E V :E 1 3' -,Q N, r ' Q i -.Q P' V - ii' 'i 1 4 i . 5 V i ' i I ' 'T ii i I i i I Ji ii i Row 1: Koch, Leland, Winsicle, Engineering, Beta Sigma Psi, American Society of Civil Engineers, Gamma Delta. Koepke, Keith, Hastings, Sigma Nu, Alpha Kappa Psi. Koerber, James, St. Edward, Engineering, Delta Upsilon. Kohlmeier, Carolee, Craig, Teachers, Zeta Tau Alpha, ACE, Kernals, Red Cross, UNSEA, YWCA. Row 2: Kolb, Harold, Ashland, Agriculture, Abel Hall, Flying Club. Kodet, Edward, Belvidere, South Dakota, Cornhusker Co-op, President, AIA, ICC. Korshoj, Jim, Neligh, Business Administration, Beta Theta Pi, Beta Gamma Sigma: Phi Eta Sigma, Student Tribunal. Korte, Kathie, Cedar Rapids, iowa, Business Administration, Alpha Phi. 48 sf 'fi is 'gb ,yi L, . . is N U , 1 4 -. .1 i 4. A T' Row 1: Kosman, Dianna. Scottsbluff: Arts and Science: Delta Gamma: Theta Sigma: Tau Rho: AWS. Koteche, Vinod, Zanzibar, Tanzania: Engi- neering: Cather Hall: IEEE: Lincoln Jaycees: People To People: Nebraska International Students Association. Kotouc, Ann. Humboldt: Arts and Science: Kappa Alpha Theta. president: Phi Lambda Theta: lvy Day Court: NHRRF: Tassels. Kratochvil, JoAnn, Lincoln. Krause. David. Omaha: Arts and Science: Sigma Alpha Epsilon: NU-NIEDS. Kreifels, Gerry, York: Home Economics: Alpha Xi Delta: AVA: HEEA: UNSEA:4l-H Club. Kriesel, Ronald, Gurley: Agriculture. Krizelman, Sheldon, Omaha: Business Administration: Sigma Alpha Mu: president: Phalynx: IFC. Krotter, Gerald, Palisade: Business Administration: Phi Gamma Delta: Phi Eta Sigma. Row 2: Krueger, Diane, Lincoln: Dentistry: Zeta Tau Alpha: Student Dental Hygiene Association. Krueger, Glenn, Norfolk: Engineering: IEEE. Krueger, Keith, Plymouth: Engineering: Beta Sigma Psi: Cornhusker. editor. Kmll, Richard, Glenvil: Arts and Science: Cather Hall. Kubicek, C., North Platte: Arts and Science: Phi Kappa Psi. Kullberg, James, Hast- ings: Engineering: Alpha Tau Omega: Young Republicans. Kuskie, Susan, Big Springs: Arts and Science: Alpha Chi Omega. Lane, Linda, Kear- ney: Arts and Science: Pi Beta Phi: NHRRF. Lane, Linda, Lincoln: Teachers: Alpha Delta Pi: Alpha Lambda Delta: Pi Lambda Theta. Row 3: Lang- ford, Jean, New York, New York: Teachers: Alpha Omicron Pl: Dairy Princess Finalist: Miss lvlidshipmari 1964: Deans' Advisory Board: Con- servative Club: Red Cross. Lanning, Karen, Omaha: Teachers: Alpha Chi Omega. Larson, John, Omaha: Arts and Science: Phi Kappa Psi. Lattin, Patti, Fremont: Teachers: Pi Beta Phi: Sigma Alpha Eta. Lee, Byron, Woodbine, Iowa: Triangle. Lee, Diane, Valentine: Teachers: Kappa Delta: Phi Beta Lambda: UNSEA: Young Republicans. Leibbrandt, Vernon, Hayes Center: Agriculture: Burr Hall: Agricultureal Executive Board: Alpha Zeta. Leininger, D., Fullerton: Arts and Science: Kappa Sigma. Ire planning use of Diane Lee's gift, an audience awaits Batman. Seniors 479 48 " ,gzfifgi . , puffy, 'At 'w . . .. he . V 1,1 1. gf -. jg, ,. Q 'sth zu C, 0 Q -,-. Y T A' fl, 4 Ei ,MT1 - rw., if 1. I 1 ill '. gi . l.4k J., , ' fn. V, ' 1r,,I,E.'i S' V "',- "ik, lilk.Hillli,lli1il.Iii,lm.pL,Qg,,,l,,,Q,,,,,,, ' , J'-, fy -. A: ll Aix, , - M-he-1, , . - R , I. -f pw.. waz: mf ,I g I 40. If I -1-.P-dy H ' K N I I I rf I l I I I, -. It I i -lil Q - Qi ' H ii-' -erv-.,:ygr5..:, 5 ' L--.rw-v---vs-V---.lg-'..-, , .X , 1 . I i l y 1 r I . . ., V. .ja-li-at -3-F Ag 1 , , . J i fl --L . 1 b Gawain ,- '?. '15, . . . . +I jg, 1 .3 Jackie Alber and Cassie Wild take first steps A Y 'y as retiring presidents leaving campus politics. le' z,...,ig:'.' .IQ S s' Rini? T .I-ff .1 ? -A I- ' 1 -f l Row 1: Leners, Linda, Virginia, Teachers, Pound I-lall, UNSEA. Lentz, Gary,Wayne, Agriculture, Abel I-lall, Ag Economics Club. Lester, Marsha, Seward, Arts and Science, Alpha Omicron Pi, Mortar Board, Angel Flight, Red Cross, Young Republicans. Letheby, Ronald, Lincoln, Business Administration, Delta Sigma Pi, Alpha Phi Omega. Row 2: Lewis, John, Valley, Engineering, Selleck, Chi Epsilon, Sigma Tau. Lezotte, Robert, Ogallala, Architecture, Cather Hall, AIA. Libal, George, Lexington, Agriculture, Alpha Gamma Rho, Ag Executive Board, Block and Bridle, -4-I-l Club. Licking, Charles, Seneca, Agriculture, Ag Men, Block and Bridle. Row 3, Liewer, Paul, Lincoln, Engineering, Theta Xi, Chi Epsilon, Sigma Tau, Blue Print, E-Week Board, American Society of Civil Engineers. Lind, William, Bellevue, Business Administration, Delta Sigma Pi, Phalanx, Business Administration Advisory Board. Lindgren, Kim, Wahoo, Teachers, Alpha Xi Delta, UNSEA. Lindquist, Roger, Wausa, Pharmacy, Kappa Psi, Phi Chi. Row 4, Lindsey, William, O'Fallon, Illinois, Engineering, Acacia, Flying Club. Livengood, Geri, Lincoln, Arts and Science, Alpha Xi Delta, Pi Lambda Theta, UNSEA. Lockhart, Cheryl, Lincoln, Teachers, Chi Omega, ACE, UNSEA. Logan, Marshall, Diller, Agriculture, Burr Hall, Alpha Zeta, Block and Bridle. Row 5: Luckasen, John, Littleton, Colorado, Arts and Science, Phi Delta Theta, Innocents, Phi Eta Sigma, Theta Nu, Student Government, IFC. Luebbe, Janice, Beaver Crossing, Home Economics, Love Memorial Hall, Phi Upsilon Omicron, Ag Union, HEEA, Home Ec Club. Lundeen, Wallis, Lincoln, Agriculture, UNICORNS, Phi Upsilon Omicron, Theta Sigma Phi, People-to-People, 44-I Club. Mach, Janet, Gahanna, Ohio, Teachers, Alpha Delta Pi, Pi Lambda Theta, UNSEA. Row 6: Mackenstadt, Vicki, Leigh, Teachers, Pound l-Iall, NCTE, UNSEA. Maddison, Barb, Sioux City, Iowa, Teachers, Sigma Kappa, Phi Beta Lambda, UNSEA. Madson, Everett, Omaha, Arts and Science, Phi Delta Theta, Innocents, Phi Eta Sigma, Theta Nu, Outstanding Collegiate Man 1965, IFC, Builders, Daily Nebraskan, NU-Meds. Maldonado, A., North Platte, Arts and Science. Row 7: Malone, Bonnie, Wilber, Arts and Science. Mantel, Marilyn, Omaha, Arts and Science, Pound Hall, Pi Mu Epsilon, Sigma Alpha Iota. Marker, Doralie, McGrew, Home Economics, Selleck. March, Floyd, Alliance, Agriculture, Farml-louse, Ag Union, Agronomy Club. Marshall, William, Grand Island, Arts and Science, Phi Kappa Psi, president, IFC,'Kappa Alpha Pi, Kosmet Club. Martin, V., Falls City, Teachers, Mu Epsilon Nu. Mathers, Helen, Butte, Home Economics, Love Memorial Hall, Home Economics Education Association, Phi Up- gIl1orLOmLcCron, AWS, AAH Club. Mattson, Dorris, Omaha, Teachers, Alpha Phi, UNSEA. Maxwell, James, Franklin, Arts and Science, Cather I-lall, i am a Upsilon. O Tier! . so 'hfd Senio P?- .0 0. ,g,,'.'. ri ' , g'T'3fE':" ii." v ' 2:Q':f?:.fa, Q -,gf - , l " . v ' , " - f?'i:..a -ll" , , "I . 'i V ,J 2 , . my-Q .. V 5 5, Ll 31, in . in E lf.-iw , F . -H Q n r- Q ' A 2 '5 ' 5-gn .b'N 3: ,nl sslgx- -,. Y . wit. ee? L, i W :A it-I-.xi .4 '-up 1,5 . V gf- 'lay I L 5 I w Nye z, if - ' V l' - id F99 --f:5"f'.' Q -. ' "' ' 191. ' 5? " 2 H rf .4 N it wg.-.. 1 .g--ffipxf ni, fl.. . 5.1 -' Y .A .ef - , - -N ff ,L-J . 1 ' .. rl! -1 .lk -- New ff. . . ' 5 1 W .-.j.,.g:1 f , pzgtzgj y '. Q A 1 giilvzlfsk i 'I r i wiv. , M: 195.-, 5: 1 X l Y 1 l l l N R 1' , f l 7 Y w i? 1 ., , ' ii lg' ,. I l 4 F 1'-N E l . ' I . i ill. 5141 V l ,i ri U I' l Tl yi UH I 1 ,,. ,. ,. Lui 3 8:93 mg .. ., 'Y 'TI -i:?55'fi5i7Tfi ' T, " Q., 151 ' ., L X, K IE1' T, ' ---- 21,5 4 -L1fii::' " mg - ,. af. . , c A .. 3 ' f , , .-. .4 fin fN.'. L ,ij rflff W I.. -L L L ,rl .i U. -33,1 f P: L, ,l ' Ge: . L, sa 1 J. Wg, . ,Nl T l -fn' ' W' ' . " Y ' Tile'-Eff? Mi'-17 L' a "1-tii'2:'zvv f' "3 7, .V ., " .L ..... . -3'E?"Q "'? x ,'eg.,.g1g.-J' I , -. QQ .' -,fl i .1 , a' ' ..... ...ig V nga. wiwil ti fu lf" H ' 'F '. A f 4 Q ik L" " 7:52 ' 355.21 . ff -'PW MCE ,lf 15.1, - ,, -F . . x 11. 'f ' ' ,ogg ., " lr' 1-L -. 3 -we r 1:-Tv, - .iv ' - 'Q?fli,s"1 .5 P , x f 'V - , ' , ' H 'Jef '., 3: ' 1- T fy :Q ,EJ rw' 2. - K" .x "' I A -,QT .. . . Row 1: Maxwell, Kenneth, Lincoln, Arts and Science, Phi Kappa Psi, NU-Meds. Mazour, David, Lawrence, Agriculture, Ag Men, Corn Cobs, ICC, Agronomy Club. McCartney, Judy, Thurman, Iowa, Teachers, Chi Omega, Alpha Lambda Delta, Pi Lambda Theta, UNSEA. McCartney, Milta, Thurman, Iowa, Teachers, Delta Delta Delta, Pi Lambda Theta, Lincoln Board of Woman Officials, UNSEA, WAA, PE Club. Row 2: McClougham, Shirley, Valentine, Home Economics, Home Ec Club, HEEA, 4-l-l Club. McClurg, Donna, Atkinson, Teachers, Pound Hall, ACE, UNSEA. McKee, Robert, Lincoln, Arts and Science, Pi Kappa Phi, Pi Mu Epsilon, IFC. McNally, Susanne, Schuyler, Arts and Science, Gamma Phi Beta, Sigma Alpha Eta. Row 3, Meader, Gary, Omaha, Business Administration, Cather l-lall, UCCF. Meeboen, William, Bellevue, Business Administration, Sigma Nu. Melchiors, Nancy, Omaha, Home Economics, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Cadence Countess, Foreign Films, Cornhusker Beauty Queen Finalist. Meisenbach, Roger, Omaha, Engineering, Triangle, IEEE. 's..,, 1 5 ,f1Xj'Q.. ANKQQ , 'K Q . 5 -:Ji f wit 5 X 'Z ,., 5 s ,,, we ,Qiiif ,i -- - ,. . L 5 f it-1 B ,,,,. I ,Z-a la, 'f ,NEWS -Q X il-. 1 ' . QQ i.. .aa , siege i l , ' g - I,-.H el 2 , M :sir 'I 1 vi' w , Patlently redoing a job application, George Libal tries realignment procedures for a third time. 481 4 -: L. 'if ,U V . 'rw Row 1: Mellor, Susan, Millard: Teachers: Kappa Alpha Theta: Sigma Chi Sweetheart: UNSEA. Menke, Bruce, Crete: Engineering: Chi Phi: ASME. Merriam, Georgia, Lincoln: Teachers: Alpha Omicron Pi: 1965 CORNHUSKER Beauty Queen: 1965 N Club Sweetheart: Yell Squad.Meyer, Della, Falls City: Teachers: Alpha Delta Pi: Alpha Lambda Delta: Pi Lambda Theta: ACE: Tassels: UNSEA. Michael, Connie, Omaha: Home Economics: Kappa Delta. Michel. Dianne, Lincoln: Teachers: Gamma Phi Beta: Pi Lambda Theta: Mortar Board: Panhellenic, President: Union. Miles, Linda, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Alpha Lambda Delta: Towne Club, president: Student Senate: German Club, president: AWS. Miller, Barbara, Lin- coln: Teachers: Alpha Xi Delta: Alpha Lambda Delta: Pi Lambda Theta: YWCA: UNSEA. Miller, Larry, Gering: Arts and Science: Sigma Phi Ep' silon. Row 2: Miller, Lynn, Emerson: Engineering: Selleck. Miller, Robert, Seneca: Business Administration: Alpha Gamma Rho: Beta Gamma Sigma: Phi Eta Sigma: Corn Cobs. Miller, Stanley, Lincoln: Engineering: Beta Sigma Psi: IEEE: lFC. Morian, Lynne, Lincoln: Home Economics: Tau Rho. Miller, Marilyn, Lincoln: Business Administration: Alpha Omicron Pi: YWCA. Minick, David, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Phi Delta Theta. Modrell, Donna, McCook: Teachers: Alpha Phi: UNSEA. Moore, Milan, Sutherland: Agriculture: Parml-louse. Moore, Susie, York: Teachers: Pi Beta Phi: Little Sister of Minerva: UNSEA. Row 3: Morris, Mona, Grand Island: Arts and Science: Pound l-lall: Kappa Tau Alpha: Theta Sigma Phi. Morris, Stephen. Kearney: Engineering: Sigma Phi Epsilon: ASME: Pi Tau Sigma. Morrison, Jon, Scottsbluff: Business Administration: Sigma Chi. Morrissey, Sharon, Brainard: Arts and Science: Kappa Delta: Student Council: Red Cross: AWS: CORNI-IUSKER: Newman Club: Young Democrats: YWCA: People to People. Mowbray, J., Lincoln: Business Administration: Sigma Nu, president: Alpha Kappa Psi: IFC. Moxham, Ron- ald, Chester: Business Administration. Muff, Linda, Sioux Falls, South Dakota: Teachers: Gamma Phi Beta: Sigma Alpha Eta: Ivy Day Court: Tassels, president. Muller, Gale, Newman Grove: Teachers: Ag Men: Mu Epsilon Nu: Student Council: Inter-Coop Council: Corncobs: UNSEA. Mullins, Priscilla, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Theta Sigma Phi: Kappa Phi: Daily Nebraskan. Row 4: Mumm, Ken, Seward: Arts and Science: Beta Sigma Psi. Munter, Mike, Laurel: Agriculture: Alpha Gamma Rho: Block and Bridle: Wild Life Club. Myers, Harry, Lincoln: Engineering: Eta Kappa Nu: IEEE: Sigma Tau, Myers, Richard, Superior: Engineering: AlCl-lE. Nall, Max, Edgar: Engineering: Chi Phi. president: Chi Epsilon: ASCE. Nor- dine, Gaylord, Grand Island: Arts and Science: Cather l-lall: Theta Nu. Navin, Cheryl, Lincoln: Arts and Science: Delta Gamma. Navrude, Norman, Dunlap, lowa: Engineering: ASME. Neel, Ronald, Clarks: Teachers: Delta Sigma Phi: Phi Mu Alpha: ASUN: Union: UNSEA: Band: University Sing- ers. Row 5: Neemann, Roger, Nebraska City: Business Administration: Cather l-lall. Nelson, Dennis, Lincoln: Triangle. Nelson, Donald, Lincoln: Engineering: Triangle: AICHE: Pi Mu Epsilon: Sigma Tau. Nelson, Milton, Strornsburg: Agriculture: Burr l-lall: Ag Economics Club: 44-l Club. Nel- son, Ronald, Aurora: Business Administration. Neumeister, Kent, Nebraska City: Arts and Science: Selleck: Phalanx: Phi Eta Sigma: ASUN, president: Innocents. Newville, Nancy. Lincoln: Teachers: ACE: UNSEA. Nicholson, J., l-lerman: Engineering: Triangle: ASCE: Sigma Tau: Chi Epsilon: Blue Print: Engineering Executive Board: Nickerson, Thomas, Lincoln: Business Administration: Phi Kappa Psi: N Club. 82 U.. .., . , .VJ .. .W . ,-1: 3 of ..i i if A will ,ri-, . -:ji-i :t if A t N . fl- 'bi A if. , .-'H V. if l ' iv ' i 'ji , -u ' . , ' - . im .gi ' - A if f 'f ,N :. 'MMM iii' . , ' , api- " - 'ii f. it . ' -A ' .L j 1- f . 'F it V 'Q I :- ' 'ig' I GIS: H 15 , ,I . . ii. i' wf 'Q.,Ji. 'I li'.:'!: i i i : . il 'ff :"'.'. ,.- : T. ,, -'31 , :I i, vc Q' , .Y xv. i.: I ?",v 1 l X W . - . , .. : ' ii Row 1: Nicholson, Barbara, Lincoln: Art and Science: Sigma Kappa. Nilson, Linda, Oakdale: Teachers: Kap' pa Delta. Noll, Karen, Falls City: Teachers: Chi Omega: ACEI: UNSEA. Row 2: Norton, Linda, Elgin: Pharmacy: Kappa Epsilon: APhA. Novotny. Gerald, Clarkson, En- gineering: Delta Upsilon: IEEE: Pi Mu Epsilon. Nuss, Gary, Lincoln: Business Administration: Sigma Nu. Row 3: Nygren, Larry, Newman Grove: Agriculture: Alpha Tau Omega: Builders: Flying Club: Pershing Rifles: Young Republicans. O'Connor, Mari, Madison. Wisconsin: Art and Science: Pi Beta Phi: People To People: YWCA. Oden. Jane, Vermillion, South Dakota: Art and Science: Alpha Phi: Alpha Lambda Delta: Pl Lambda Theta. Row 4: Oglesby. Gene, Omaha: Busi- ness Administratlon: Chi Phi: Delta Theta Phi. Ohm- stede, Richard, Guide Rock: Engineering: Brown Pal- ace: ASCE: Chi Epsilon: Sigma Tau. Oliver, Connie, Grand lslancl: Teachers: Gamma Tau Upsilon: UNSEA. Row 5: Olsen. Diane, Wahoo: Teachers: Alpha Omicron Pi: UNSEA, Olson, Doble, Pawnee City: Art and Sci- ence: Theta Xi. Olson, Penny, Lincoln: Teachers: Garri- ma Phi Beta. Row 6: Oltmans, Steven, Lincoln: Agriculture: Ag Men. Onken, Judy, Glenvil: Teachers: Phi Beta Lambda:NBEA: Unicorns. Osberg, Jim, Min- neapolis, Minnesota: Arts and Science: Phi Delta Theta. '25 E j 483 Seniors - .-'ii "Ji"-am: ' :i.'!.:: -r ff., -V . :. . ' f 1' - ' ,lr f . ' . ' f Qu- ,-:Lf Q Q A fi 9 Tl i ff 5, W -- ffl W , 1 -Cf - " '.1:l El ii 7'- , i -1 1' I. . " I:-1' A " - ,. i ., .Q V-'A ll - - -'E W .ish -I Q, 2. +3 - 5 - f-jj ii - , ff , ll 11' ,gr , iii'-1 ' E . Y 4 Q 13: E44 , 5, ,H X, ir ' fi, AA ."" Y' sy a'-p Z 5 I. Row 1: Ostiguy, Judy, Western, Teachers, Kappa Delta, ACE, Newman Club, Red Cross, UNSEA, WAA secretary, YWCA. Oswald, Robert, Omaha: Art and Science, Kappa Sigma, Pi Sigma Alpha, Builders, Kos' met Klub, Young Republicans. Ottmann, Robert, Lincoln, Business Administration, Phi Delta Theta. Overholt, Gail, Omaha, Teachers, Pi Beta Phi, NHRRF, Orthopedic Project, UNSEA. Row 2: Overy, Richard, Pauline, Agriculture, Alpha Gamma Sigma, Block and Bridle Club, Union, 4-l-l Club. Pageler, William, Cedar Bluffs, Agriculture, Block and Bridle Club, 4-l-l Club. Paine, Douglas, Edison, Agriculture, Alpha Gamma Rho, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, 4-l-l Club, Young Republicans. Panska, James, Murdock, Agriculture, Alpha Zeta, Gamma Sigma Delta, Block and Bridle Club, Rodeo Club. l l L ii i ii L l-leedless of the cold, the steaks await the fire as the battle to light charcoal hits a stalemate. i,- Sharing work of a management house, seniors practice home making skills 44 Q , ,ff J "' i - "1 I wi , ' I 'fl l' ,, 'N' Lift .. .. iffy, Q . l 'hi N, . " " lj ' -1 lr I Row 1: Paulsen, Wanda, Oshkosh, Home Economics, Fedde Hall. Paxson, Sandra, Belle- vue, Teachers, American Guild of Organists, MENC: Mu Phi Epsilon. Pellican, Richard, Omaha, Engineering: Selleck, IEEE, HKN. Petersen, Genne, Papillion, Teachers, Alpha Delta Pi, UNSEA. Peterson, Arnold, Walla Walla, Washington, Arts and Science: Phi Delta Theta: Theta Nu, NU-MEDS. Row 2: Peterson, Carole, Lincoln: Teachers, Alpha Chi Omega, Mu Phi Epsilon, Pi Lambda Theta, University Singers. Petsch, Josette, Columbus, Teachers, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Nl-IRRF. Pfeiffer, Wayne, Fremont, FarmHouse, Alpha Zeta, Ag Economics Club, Builders, 4-H Club. Phifer, Marlis, Mason City, Home Economics, Burr Hall, Union, 4-l-l Club. Phillips, Del, Grand Island: Arts and Science, Sigma Nu. Row 3: Pleis, Rosalee, Lincoln, Teachers, Towne Club, ACE: UNSEA, Tassels, Student Council Associate, YWCA. Plihal, Galen, DeWitt, Agriculture: Alpha Gamma Rho, AUF, 4-H Club, Rodeo Club, Wildlife Club. Pollmann, Diedrich, Beatrice, Arts and Science: Cather Hall, Aviation Club. Popp, Arnfried, Beatrice: Engineering, UNICORNS, Eta Kappa Nu, IEEE. Pressler, Carol, l-lastings: Teachers: Alpha Omicron Pi, Cadence Countesses. Row 4: Quad. Philip, Norfolk: Arts and Science, Cornhusker Co-op. Quaring, Janell. St. Paul: Home Economics, Alpha Chi Omega. Rader, James, Omaha, Architecture, Kappa Sigma: AIA. Rakow, Mary, Ponca, Teachers: Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Lambda Delta, Pi Lambda Theta, Builders: Red Cross, Spanish Club, Tassels. Rames, Diane, Lincoln, Teachers, Delta Delta Delta: Red Cross, UNSEA. Row 5: Randall, Linda, Omaha: Arts and Science: Alpha Chi Omega: Union, CORNHUSKER Staff. Rasmussen, Constance, Omaha, Teach' ers, Kappa Kappa Gamma, AWS, WAA, Tassels: Young Republicans, Newman Club, UNSEA. Ready, Thomas, Pueblo, Colorado: Arts and Science: Sigma Chi. Reichel, Dan, Scottsbluff, Business Administration. Reifschneider, Ellen, Omaha, Business Adminis- tration: Delta Delta Delta. Row 6: Reinmiller, Dick, Seward, Teachers, Beta Sigma Psi. Reiser, John, Lincoln, Arts and Science, Kappa Sigma, Tau Rho, Young Republicans, president. Rejcla, Roger, Brainard: Arts and Science, Cornhusker Co-op: German Club, Newman Club. Reno, Carole, Alliance: Arts and Science, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Dailv Nebraska. Rice, MaryAnn, Westchester, Illinois, Arts and Science, Alpha Xi Delta, French Club: UNSEA, YWCA. 48 1 E A? L . , Asa" . .f ,. ', . . i i W li A 'Q' r A ' Ii 1- , 5 S, ...l 'VM a w A ' - hir- .nr - ' i - - s - - . - 4 H ' Af 'V f V "i L31 ,. wif. ' -3.-i." -' ' Vi -: Tj- EU' - ' ', 3 gaggsrf ,LQ V -.S ,E I, .Q -r ,- '-K' 7 W 1, . 5. ' Q l - ' s -1. 111, l -. '7' ' ' : i 'lt' J' e. "I 'l ' H9 zllil .Ji ,,. . 0.1 li, i I 1 i V? , l i M S. l xx 1 it i . C f . I i Y -nz-.14 ul?-, - wc- U .tt+f+ ii? .irq-' -a- i i-ea ee,.feaff,,, rlfwfeqgnv 't , ,gg ' A - .aa e.9,,,,1 5 ,i 9,51 Y A . . , - 'lil f, ' Ja, ': Debating graduation gifts, seniors choose pipes -1 1 ,ltr . . . . 'y as 'distinguished' presents for a plnmate-fiance if . 1 W 11 i. ' ' 'twin ffif' il?" . , TH-i.i '. if-.-Ir? ' 9' W, at ff. 'A 11. lj' "ii " P' ' -1.-.44 A.-.,l. ,n.,i- V if if- -:A Y i. .,i , 1 t..1.4,4-,Q . ,iM5l . , ,gg , , ,.. ' . , i za."-.,,1 ..,j.. - .,,3,f,a,?i . ii.ifk , ,iV,v .i J -' g, Nl, . ' ' J' - T ii' ' -. 'i ' fi' . V V i J, K U e, if . 1- gig F 2- H .V I l. vlifii-Q.. " Aft i N' 555. QQ ?9 "9fW?M 51. Seniors Row 1: Rice, Sandra, Cozad, Teachers, Delta Delta Delta, Young Democrats. Rickett, R., Newcastle, Engineering, IEEE, Rietsch., Donald, Wau- neta, Engineering, Theta Xi, ASME. Rikli, Ross, Murdock, Agriculture. Row 2: Rinne, Don, Dunbar, Agriculture. Robinson, Ronald, Ogallala, Pharmacy, Kappa Psi. Rock, Quentin, Valley, Engineering, Selleck. Rodriguez, Jose, Lincoln, Arts and Science, Delta Upsilon, Cuban Student Association, Spanish Club. Row 3, Roehrs, John, York, Arts and Sciences, Beta Sigma Psi. Rohlefsen, Jan, Sioux City, Iowa, Business Administration, Kappa Kappa Gamma. Roldfson, Lyle, Lincoln, Business Administration, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. Romig, Rod- ney, Alliance, Arts and Sciences, Phi Kappa Psi. Row 4, Ronnau, Richard, Omaha, Engineering, Triangle, AIEEE, Blue Print. Rose, Beth, Lincoln, Teachers, Zeta Tau Alpha, Phi Lambda Theta, UNSEA, YWCA. Rose, Jerman, Omaha, Arts and Sciences, Phi Delta Theta. Rosenbach, Gary, Randolph, Business Administration, Delta Sigma Pi. Row 5: Ross, Larry, Omaha, Arts and Sciences, Chi Phi. Rountree, Joan, Platts- mouth, Teachers, Gamma Phi Beta. Roux, John, Lincoln, Teachers, Phi Kappa Psi, N Club, Varsity Baseball. Rosmarin, George, Lin- coln, Business Administration, Delta Tau Delta. Row 6: Rueter, Brice, Wauneta, Arts and Sciences, Theta Xi, Phi Alpha Theta. Rueter, Marc, Wauneta, Engineering, Cather I-lall, Sigma Tau, AIA. Rush, Alixandra, Lincoln, Arts and Sciences, UNICORNS, Botany Club. Ryan, Liz, Lincoln, Arts and Sciences, Sigma Kappa, Phi Alpha Theta, Builders, Union, YWCA. Rynearson, W., Omaha, Engineering, Kappa Sigma, ASCE. Sail, Dale, l-lolclrege, Engineering, Selleck, ASCE, RAM. Salmen, Fred, Bellevue, Engineering, Sigma Nu, AlChE. Salmon, Michael, Wakefield, Engineering, Theta Xi. Samide, Michael, Matamoras, Pennsylvania, Pi Kappa Phi. Row 7: Samuelson, C., Franklin, Teachers, Beta Theta Pi, Mu Epsilon Nu, ASUN. Sandall, Keith, Bassett, Agriculture, Block and Bridle. Sanders, Jean, Thurston, Home Economics, l-IEEA, Kernels, Red Cross. Sander- son, James, Colon, Arts and Sciences, Delta Upsilon. Saracino, Carolyn, Lincoln, Teachers, Towne Club, UNSEA. Schaffert, Robert, Aurora, Agriculture, Ag Men, Alpha Zeta, Agronomy Club, Gamma Delta, Sigma Xi. Schelm, Larry, Ainsworth, Agriculture, Alpha Gamma Sigma, Alpha Tau Alpha. Scherzberg, Arnold, Loup City, Engineering, Pioneer l-louse, ASCE. 6 L5 fr sag Predicting "hoods," Marilyn Hoegemeyer and Shari Morrissey check fraternity prospects. ni E W' E--3 MM Seniors 48 Reading through the mail, Vicki Dowling gasps as the ietter's contents reveal the PBK honor. 8 5 1' i - If 'I' ,, mm - A i i e-S J, , ,233 1 , ,N V ' 4,1 X :Q V. i f "i Q . I is ' i' ' 1 K' - ,f -A 'I li - 1 4 . , J K' ,N ' E 4- : Q.. Q - ' , V '40 .r 1 V 5 A xc, X. . i If, : i i 3' - Q., , . v 1, , Q.- 'b,- f -. f-.1 I. , r f --f-5 , U fsiaamhii ' i ,. , E1 1 ,5' 'K x -5- -Q In 4' .1 . .. J ' It Y. U, :L-,H 'j ' , '- 1 I ' 'Y 'I V I A Y l xxti.. A 'X ' i O i D , N' , L ' 1, A I gr L , 'T . ': V , J ' ' . X Q , I , . ann .iw R1 i l A' 4 . ,'.. -' 9'. 1. 'Ir-Q' 'i I' J .. I 1 I i I i . M., , V ,'+ Y' A '-1 "V W W U . i Y ' N I PQ Q . 'PP-5 , .Lf ' ' "X-'i'fl'.l fl 'iv 3, f V H ' QU f -mlm , .333 , V .1 ui, ' ' ge: ,int fi' f- .- f, ' .' 1,3 1 ',.f1 -' .4LIf,w, Q. , rw- 55.2 QM. . ' MX 'VT' 3 jg-11' , . fig , -'if x I .wwf 1 ' 1 C. ' " i UQ' V' -.,,.,3l, fr 1 I Q L' ' ' r l 4 , ' 1 , A , ,V , . , '. ' ,Q Y ' 5? . wi ' i 9 'i V i if i 9-v is ,qi 'i' , A B i L . f.r ri' Pasting away memos, a senior files papers as pages assume four years' achievements. QL- r.- 1 ' 1' , 'x w rit' 1-L ,. I nf: . . ,qs HI H 48 'Q E 1' in? - ' K? is I-L V -u., V ' 9 he tl- L f , Lu. ti -.r A, V V v I '-.Q l . ,,- 7', uh' ' '- " .Tf . 1' v ' I .41 ' -v :. . ii' , ' -. ., - I' . - , If I ,xl . . . gg, ,tg if-Q-I "- 4 i gi gif 15' I' ,4 ,: jr .... ,.4i.T ET Y f Qfigjx 4 r " Q X: Row 1: Schlines, Merle, Wakefield: Agriculture: Alpha Gamma Rho: Block and Bridle. Schlothauer, George, Gering: Dentistry: Sigma Phi Epsilon: Xi Psi Phi: IFC: Kosmet Klub: Union. Schmeecle, Sharon, Elwood: Zeta Tau Alpha: Cadence Countesses. Schneider, Barbara, McCook: Teachers: Kappa Kappa Gamma: Pi Lambda Theta: UNSEA. Schock, Bobbi, Sioux Falls, South Dakota: Arts and Sciences: Pi Beta Phi: Alpha Lambda Delta: Builders: French Club: People to People: Red Cross: Union. Schreiner, David, Wayne: Engineering: Theta Xi: ASCE: Symphony Orchestra. Schrocter, Judith, Madison: Home Economics: Burr Hall: HEEA. Schwentker, Mary Lynn, Ogallala: Teachers: Chi Omega: ACE: Red Cross: UNSEA. Shafer, Jack, Hastings: Arts and Sciences: Abel Hall: Phi Alpha Theta: Pi Sigma Alpha: ASUN. Shafer, Jeff, Greeley, Colorado: Arts and Sciences: Sigma Chi. Schainost, Craig, Lincoln: Arts and Sciences. Shanahan, Judy, Oakland: Arts and Sciences: Delta Delta Delta: Alpha Lambda Delta Pi Sigma Alpha: Union. Schlachter, Stan, Holdrege: Teachers: University Singers. Row 2: Schlaht, Emily, Billinis. Montana: Arts and Sciences: Kappa Alpha Theta: History Club: People to People. Scholz, Gordon, Belle- vue: ngineerlng: Selleck: AIA. Schultz, Tranda, Lincoln: Teachers: Alpha Chi Omega: Cornhusker: Tassels. Schwartz, Sue, Hildreth: Teachers: Alpha Chi Omega: ACE: Pi Lambda Theta. Segrist, Susan, Kansas City, Mis- souri: Arts and Sciences: Pi Beta Phi. Seidler, Dale, Alliance: Agriculture: Alpha Gamma Rho: Block and Bridle: Rodeo Club: Wildlife Club. Shalberg, Bonnie, Lincoln: Teachers: Chi Omega: ACE: UNSEA: YWCA: Little Sisters of Minerva. Sherwood, Virginia, Elk City: Teachers: Pound l-lall: UNSEA. Shuey, Linda, Crab Orchard: Teachers: Pound Hall: UNSEA. Thurston, Lynn, Shelton: Teachers: Alpha Omicron Pi: UNSEA. Simmons, Nancy, Omaha: Teachers: Burr Hall. Sixel, Douglas. Lincoln: Engineering: Delta Sigma Phi. Skarda, Susan, Sioux Falls, South Dakota: Teachers: Kappa Alpha Theta: ACE: Aquaquetts: UNSEA. Row 3: Slaughter, Jan, Lincoln: Arts and Sciences: Pi Beta Phi: Gamma Alpha Chi: Young Republicans. Sloan, Larry, Ragan: Business Administration: Delta Sigma Pi. Smith, Gloria, North Platte: Home Economics: Love Memorial Hall. Smith, Judith, Lincoln: Home Economics: HEEA: UNSEA. Smith, Judy, Cozad: Teachers: Alpha Xi Delta: UNSEA. Smith, Robert, Wahoo: Teach- ers: Selleck: Gamma Theta Upsilon: Mu Epsilon Nu: UNSEA. Smith, Susan, Pender: Arts and Sciences: Alpha Delta Pi: Alpha Lambda Delta: French Club: Spanish Club: Young Republicans. Snitzer, Richard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Arts and Sciences: PhiAIpha Theta. Snowden, Gary, Lincoln: Law: Delta Theta Phi: Phi Sigma Alpha. Snyder, Bruce, Paxton: Agriculture: FarmHouse: Alpha Zeta, president: Innocents: Block and Bridle. Soffley, Dale, Grant: Agriculture: Agronomy Club: Flying Club. Soiref, Brian, Omaha: Business Administration: Sigma Alpha Mu: Beta Gamma Sigma: ASUN: IFC: Innocents, president. Soukup, Sheryl, Seward: Teachers: Alpha Phi: Angel Flight: Cornhusker: UNSEA. Row 4: Speece, Alice, Holdrege: Teachers: Alpha Delta Pi: Pi Lambda Theta: Sigma Alpha Eta. Spence, Dennis, Atkinson: Teachers: Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. Splichal, Clark, Lincoln: Business Administration: Delta Sigma Pi: Alpha Phi Omega, president. Spratlen, Terence, McCook: Arts and Sciences: Sigma Nu. Springer, Janet, Aurora: Home Economics: HEEA: Tassels: Union: Home Economics Club: IWA. Stahr, Jeanye. York: Arts and Sciences: Alpha Phi. Stark, Nancy, Lincoln: Engineering: AIA: Rodeo Club: Flying Club. Stark, Rodney, West Point: Business Administration: Delta Sigma Pi. Stasch, Susan, Cody: Teachers: Delta Delta Delta. Stauffer, Connie, Minatare: Agriculture. Stbasburg, William, Roseland: Engineering: Brown Palace: ALChE. Steckley, E., Lincoln: Teachers: Chi Phi: Corn Cobs. Steele, June, Lincoln: Home Economics: Phi psilon Omi- cron. Row 5: Stefanisin, Sandra, Lincoln: Teachers: Alpha Phi: Pi Lambda Theta. Steffensen, Diane, Omaha: Arts and Sciences: Alpha Chi Omega: Kappa Tau Alpha: Theta Sigma Phi. Stevenson, Pamela, Hastings: Teach- ers: Alpha Omicron Pi: Red Cross: UNSEA. Stone, Bruce, Brookings, South Dakota: Engineering: Delta Upsilon: IEEE. Stoner, Carol, Lincoln: Teachers: Alpha Phi: Alpha Lambda Delta: UNSEA. Strong, Harold, Rushville: Arts and Sciences: Phi Gamma Delta. Stuart, Nancy, Rushville: Teachers: 'Sigma Kappa: Alpha Lambda Delta: New- man Club: Tassels: UNSEA. Stull, Walter, South Sioux City: Arts and Sciences: Kappa Sigma. Suhr, Meredith, Hooper: Engineering: Sigma Phi Epsilon: ASME: Pi Tau Sigma: Sigma Tau. Sullivan, Vincent, Princeton: Arts and Sciences: Brown Palace. Sumnick, J., Waterloo: Business Administration: Phi Gamma Delta: Phi Eta Sigma. Suth- erland, Lynne, Elm Creek: Home Economics: Burr Hall: HEEA. Svendsen, Lorene, Lyons: Arts and Sciences: Alpha Xi Delta: Builders. 4 T' T . . U, " on .r l , -. V iff' T9 .4 1 ,TE f' ,' Q ' ,'l+l, l' '7 . , . 3 , 5-J' ' , .1-.' '- ,, '- QQ ' - e lr . . 2 .P A fa, is H . .- i .1 l 4 .- if ' +4 . l V. , - f . ii , l l ' 'P ,L 3 gba , V A ,rf f YQ, ,- , T' ig., ,..-- , 19 'C : V X .V xl , ...,., .. -..- . - 11' iY',..f- . -L J fr' v, ,M ll, 1 In 'il ' lu, l, .. Ag' l ,' ," H l le. . .' ,fl .f .l. ,frogs 'ev' rg gr -, , ' -. ,i . I ,, no ,. - ,. V f , .Ze glvviwu 1 Yevl I KT jf i I ,ww . fre , T 11. -ef' . Row 1: Swanson, Loren, Lincoln, Engineering, Theta Xi, ASCE. Swanson, Ray, Wahoo, Arts and Sciences, Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Swoboda, Donald, Stanton, Agriculture, Ag Men, Ag Econ Club. Takata, Jeanne, Hilo, Hawaii, Teachers, UNSEA. Tallman, Ann, Pueblo Colorado, Teachers, Delta Gamma. Tanner, Judith, Lincoln, Teachers, Chi Omega, Sigma Alpha Eta, vice-president, LJNSEA, Panhellenic. Teel, Patricia, Fort Collins, Colorado, Teachers, Kappa Delta, AWS Board, Pi Lambda Theta, Mortar Board, Panhellenic. Tessendorf, Gale, Platte Center, Arts and Sciences. Theis, Wilfred, Cold Springs, Minne- sota, Teachers, NEA, NSEA, Freshman Football, ICC. Row 2: Thompson, Brian, Ames, Agriculture, Alpha Gamma Sigma, Varsity Dairy Club. Thorell, David, Wausa, Agriculture, Block and Bridle. Thompson, Elwood, Lincoln, Arts and Sciences, Phi Kappa Psi. Thorell, Karen, Lincoln, Teachers, Pi Beta Phi, Pi Lambda Theta. Tomes, Mary, Schuyler, Teachers, Czech Club Queen 1964, NEA, ACE, Czech Club. Trites, Barbara, Norfolk, Teachers, Gamma Phi Beta, ACE, treasurer, CEC, president, Red Cross, vice-president. True, Earl, Lincoln, Arts and Sciences, Theta Xi, Varsity Track, N Club, Red Cross. Truman, Karen, Lanark, lllinois, Teachers, MENC, Unicorns. Turnbull, John, China Lake, California, Agriculture, Ag Men, Agronomy Club, vice-president, Ag Exec Board, Ag Builders, Row 3: Tuttle, Bruce, North Platte, Business Administration, Phi Gamma Delta. Unthank, John, Lincoln, Arts and Sciences, Phi Kappa Psi. Vahle, Van, Alma, Arts and Sciences, Beta Theta Pi, Gamma Lambda, Theta Nu, NU Meds. Valdez, Robert, Wahoo, Pharmacy, Delta Upsilon, APA, Kappa.Psi. Vanier, Byron, Hallam, Business Administration, Delta Sigma Pi. Van Orsdol, John, Waukesha, Wisconsin, Engineering, Pi Tau Sigma. Van Steenberg, Carol, Scottsbluff, Law, Alpha Phi. Vieth, Robert, Grand Island, Agriculture. Vogt, James, Seward, Engi- neering, Unicorns. f. Q. . ff' Quang Pm x i X Q LQ-unllt hill' ig V- A. A 'L'-.. X Sorting out notes to bequeath, a senior relinquishes a semester's work to supplement the files 4 O - 1 ..l i , I Q I 'F--15' li X w iv N My -al J', fs-X , ,gl ffi"' ff if 7' .if EP. A 'Ig' -E V gn! Lin! gg i", 5" 1? 7 as A y Q.: '1 . Y , '-' 1: , lim- E. :ia ' ', 5-'2 . Fi his - 4 1'--,IM 5 ' " ' JI ..... 5 , - ..ti 'V.-. 1 .-., Row 1: Voss, Shirley. Norfolk, Arts and Sciences, Kappa Alpha Theta, Delta Phi Alpha, Mortar Board, president, Union Board, Union Program Council, president. Vybiral, Elizabeth, Wahoo, Teachers, NEA. Wagner, Ronald, Pierce, Business Administration. Wademan, Sally, Nebraska City, Teachers, Zeta Tau Alpha, Cadence Countesses, UNSEA. Wallick, Glenn Roca, Business Administration. Walton, Donald, Hebron, Business Administration, Delta Tau Delta. Warrick, Gary, Kennard, Agriculture, Burr West, Block and Bridle, Wildlife Club. Webb, Jerome, Gering, Business Administration, Phi Kappa Psi. Weber, Katherine, Lincoln, Teachers, Chi Omega, N Club Sweetheart finalist, AWS Board, Builders, Red Cross, Student Senate, UNSEA. Row 2: Weber, Ralph, Lincoln, Arts,and Sciences, Theta Xi, NU Meds. Weber, Victoria, Lincoln, Arts and Sciences, Zeta Tau Alpha, Latin America Studies Exchange Program, People To People, Spanish Club. Wegner, LaVern, Fayette, Iowa, Teachers, Ag Men, Arnold Air Society, Phi Beta Lambda. Weiss, James, York, Engineering, ASME, Nebraska Blue Print. Weiss, JoAnn, Geneva, Teachers, Delta Delta Delta, FBLA,'Pl-ii Beta Lambda, UNSEA. Weller, Rex, Central City, Agriculture, FarmHouse. Westering, Kathryn, Omaha, Kappa Kappa Gamma. Weymouth, Jane, Sidney, Teachers, Chi Omega, ACEI, UNSEA, YWCA. Wheeler, Candy, Omaha, Teachers, Delta Gamma, Miss Rush Week, Nebraska Blue Print Girl. Row 3: Wherry. Daniel, Tecumseh, Arts and Sciences, Beta Theta Pi, Phi Alpha Theta. Whitney, Jan, Fullerton, Teachers, Kappa Delta, Mortar Board, Pi Lambda Theta, Cornhusker Beauty Queen finalist, Gamma Gamma, Homecoming Queen attendant, Jr. IFC Queen, AWS, president, Union, UNSEA. Whitney, Susan, Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, Teachers, Kappa Delta, ACE, AUF, Kernals, Red Cross Board, UNSEA. Whittington, Dianne, Lincoln, Teachers, Towne Club, ACE, UNSEA.Whitwer, Glen, Norfolk, Business Administration, PhiGamma Delta. Wiemann, Mary, Howells, Teachers, NEA. Wilburn, Robert, Beaver City, Arts and Sciences, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Innocents, treasurer, Theta Nu, Corn Cobs. president. Wilson, Pamela, Blair, Teachers, Kappa Kappa Gamma. Witte, Robert, Bennington, Teachers, Sigma Nu, Phi Epsilon Kappa. Row 4, Wild, Casandra, Riverdale, Arts and Sciences, Kappa Alpha Theta, Mortar Board, People To People, Red Cross. Wiles, Susan, Bennet, Home Economics, Love Memorial Hall, Alpha Lambda Delta, Omlcron Nu, ASUN, A-g Exec Board, 4-H Club, treasurer, Union Wiley, Stuart, Gering, Arts and Sciences, Phi Gamma Delta, Builders, IFC. Willey, Margaret, Omaha, ome Economics, Fedde Hall, Omlcron Nu, Phi Upsllon Omlcron, HEEA. Wilson, Dolores, Edgar, Arts and Sciences, Zeta Tau Alpha, Union. Wilson, Kathleen, Albion, Teachers, Phi Beta Lambda. Withrow, Taylor, Scottsbluff, Engineering, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, N Club. Wolf, Thomas, North Bend, Business Administration, Delta Tau Delta. Wood, Percy, Omaha, Teachers, Delta Gamma, Alpha Lambda Delta, Mortar Board, Pi Lambda Theta, Builders, vice-president. Row 5: Wood, William, North Platte, Arts and Sciences, Chi Phi, Gamma Theta Upsllon. Woods, Joe, Fairfield, Arts and Sciences, Newman Club, Young Democrats. Wright, Mary, Blair, Arts and Sciences, Chi Omega. Wustrack, Robert, Bellevue, Business Administration, Sigma Phi Epsilon, NAH- PER. Yip, Ching-Lit, Hong Kong, China, Engineering, AIA, CSA, NIA. Young, Larry, North Platte, Engineering, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, AIA, Engineer- ing Exec Board. Young, Suzanne, Oakland, Teachers, Alpha Delta Pl, Cornhusker Beauty Queen finalist, Delta Sigma Pi Rose Queen, Miss E Week, Nebraska Sweetheart, Sigma Phi Epsilon Pledge Sweetheart, Builders, Little Sisters of Minerva, UNSEA, Young Republicans. Zartner, Robert, Bellevue, Arts and Sciences, French Club, N Club, Varsity Wrestling. Zieg, Robert, Lincoln, Arts and Sciences, Acacia. Row 6: Zillich, Pauline, Bellevue, Agriculture, Sigma Kappa, Alpha Lambda Delta, LSA, Young Republicans. Zmarzly, Michael, Doncaster, England, Business Administration, Delta Sigma Pi. . ' 1 T ' - if 943121 ' .1 151 i, Q as -- 'PF' A L - 7-,.-. 1 i J 'P ' il ' rv I ' me me ' ' E' "psi-re l Q. ,Ii .Q,,. -", 5-5 ,- S I f x ' '59, J I' Q1 I F.. Y-ff ,. 1' l as . ' ,J 1' I Seniors NU Marrieds luggle Time As Work-Studies Overlap Hectic days for married students brought unique collegiate problems such as studying for two hour exams on Monday with weekend guests arriving Friday and preparing dinner in an hour between work and an evening class. Busy around the clock, NU marrieds juggled labs, baby feedings and entertained in-laws. Textbooks failed when couples searched for an- swers to lack of funds and time. Bedlam changed to organized confusion with the discovery of solutions such as "books plus laundry equals conserved time" or "night at the library minus movie equals money saved." "Normal" married life, a frequent dream, soon turned to reality when the husband finally earned a "sheep skin." Saying goodbyes to part-time jobs, class- rooms and parking fines, anxious greetings awaited a nine-to-five work day and a steady income. -Q..- Q., Y. -e -D' " -.-., . ..., -.. - i Helping out, Ron Schwartz empties the garbage as inside preparations near completion for guests. Ls , .-Q. W ' iff" 5: 'A .3 -,f,v,-I--1, : -iw'-V-A K f - , rl A - .' f- 1 Ending an 8-5 school clay, Duane Smith turns in a dental gown for daughters and bedtime stories. 42 5 Y, Q V , a will A T, ,iq vga 32 ,W "k""4eQve - w if 1 Lincolnites Race The Clock During Early Morning Rush Watching the clock and speedometer, Lincoln stu- dents daily sped down familiar routes, filling the parking lots and creating car jams. While avoiding jay walkers and student clusters on the march to classes, the seem- ingly infinite stream of cars and students ended with the eight-thirty chimes and a final mad dash. Townies always supplied the sheepish excuse for profs while sliding into classes a bit late-"I got a flat tire just as I left home" or "A guy pulled right out in front of me and..." Advantages of being a Lincolnite seemed dim when excuses failed for Dad at 3:00 A.lVl. Misery beset off-campus students with parking traumas, impatient waits for late riders and being of- ficial chauffeur and host for parties. Toleration with life came with the realization of freedom from AWS rules, proctors and long distance phone bills. 'T 'H i' A Eze I ,j"' V V- was : l ' A aj 1 i - ' All set for a home meal, Kathy meets 'the cook' as Joe Schroer 'nervously' awaits introductions. I T w l l 5 W V. Elk? -J- .z.....J.a - Majoring in home repairs, Fred Nlonnich paints and erases another job on the 'list of orclers.' 494 Q il ..1 -,. v , L I , l , I I ,Q ll. , llgrl L Ja Ii! l x l , N1 l ,i l l" 3,L1 '. 'J . , F ' -1 ' 1 ll""l T LV V , E H: , ' 1' ,l 'il VKQSZ-ij' V I 1' '-iff.-'SQ4-1311" H1 lx , .lf tw? "gig, 5 les: I 4' -5" H..-9' "mi 322215, ' 'ZW l r-ls., A W, , l g l., W Q' ,fl ll, 1 Q N ' ' ' l , ll ll 2, f ' ,, A ju-sIsIeslr5, ,! , ll.I, 1 l-'f - ,sy f 4- if U l l. W , et" ,V f l X , , . . l i n Row 1:.Abbolgt, Helen, '69, Aerni, Bert, '66, Andrews, Robert, '66, Barlett, Margo, '66, Beam, Kathy, '68, Bergh, Cheryl, '66, Blanchini, William, '66, Borzych, Conrad, '66, Bowman, Janet, '66. Row 2: Breoka, Judith, '67, Bricker, Edward, 68, Brldgman, Richard, '66, Bringelson, Deborah, '66, Buckner, Joyce, '66, Campbell, Leonard, '66, Carskadon, Ihling, '66, Case, Walter, '66, Caskey. Charles. '66, Row 3: Chamberlain. Mary. '69, Clayton. Davin. '66, Cunningham, Thomas, '68, Daffer, Robert, '68, Deitemeyer, Kip, '69, Dlnneen, Lonnie, '66, Drake, Daniel, '66, Dredge, Earl, '66, Ebner, Dorothy, '69. Row 4, Evans, Jean, '66, Farkas, Carol, '66, Fetterley, Diane, '69, Foner, Kenneth, '69, Fosdick, Sue '69, Greenawait, Bettg, '68, Grimit, Patricia, '67, Grinalse, Nola, '66, l-lam, Gary, '66. Row 5: Hammer, John, '66, Hansen, Margaret, '66, Hinrichs, tephen, '66, l-littner. Neal, '67, Iadky, Ellen. '69, Huss, Leonard, '67, Jensen, Richard, '67, Johnson, Ann, '69, Kelley, Dave, '69. Row 6: K'naak,.David, '66, Kratochvil, JoAnn, '66, Kriesel, Ronald, '66, Kujath, Fred, '67, Laughlin, Michael. '68, Leach, Donnie, '69, Lindquist, Roger, '66, Maldonado, Anthony, '66, Malone. Robert, '67. Row 7: McCloughan, Shirley, '66, McCormick, Mary, '68, McCoy, Evonne, '67, Marian, Lynne, '66, Moxham, Ronald, '66, Mullins, Priscilla, '6 , Myers, Richard, '66, Navrude, Nor- man, '66, elson, Ronald, '66. , A r , ng? X fl ' if. - T-,gf Q4 gil J " 1 M, 1 I 1 l 1 , -,ll Q f is if I 2' Ai , Y ' ' Lincoln Students 4 95 496 ,ff-:.5'r.q'i-. l . ,g ' ' . ' fr 7 .I .. . r. -: ,Q , , , :jf - . .. 1,32 ...N . ,gi-f. J Q N ,. rl, i .elk . HV , 1 il, 1' -x I- 1. - iff, V 2.11, in ,-,sh - H .1 v .,- J' as s , l N . Fd! M is ll f l In 1 .I if 1' w x-,QF b , xmy -11 , n, f . , juli' Us.. f 1 l l Ll V I A K "'l ill l 'Lf 5 ' 'A-rf Q.. V -' -' W .1 'gg LL .- , ' M, , N g l -,237 Y l l' iv-, -A V- .4 -F35 is . 'ff 'vi' L- 1.-fl 1 -1 " . f 1 - If Q ' 1 ' - Af 'XJ . -il . l ,,, I 5-X . fr L ,4',f"' FQ ...1 L '-.lisa W , 1: .il . , g, , 'J I ' B ' - .f-. 4 15.1,-.Jf-HEEL 53.5, 'leg' i-rilfhvuf ,..f- S -. .l , l . I Row 1: Newville, Nancy. '66, Norton, Linda, '66, Pagelen, William, '66, Panska, James, '66. Row 2: Paxson, Sandra, '66, Plosky, Wallace, '68, Prettyman, Edith, '68, Reeves, Duane, '67. Row 3: Rinne, Don, '66g Robinson, Ronald. '66, Rochforcl, Mary, '68, Samek, Thomas, '69. Row W 4: Sanders, Jean, '66, Satchell, Thomas, '67, Schalnost, Craig, Schlachter, Stan, '66. '66, 57 .1 Checking announcements, Lincoln girls arrive as Monday night clothes reveal need of ironing. 111' - "- ,Ng ,qfifq . Deliberation-concentration fills Lincolnites' spare time while waiting rides home. Lincoln Students "f"i"' 'TTT 5 ' j f' I Q' l.lp'I. lf' ' - v rr' if , , . ' . ,K -.A . i 9- , l ' , , 'I r Y i . 1 i z 3 . " Lg '- , , ' :I . lv, '. A jf' .. ' - ' c 133.25 It Y , U J '. 3' H ? i ev f .,, -V 6 .xi-if 11 J l NWI N , , ' Fi ,EF , iff 21 51 ii ii if A i l i A 1 A l E' lib L ... ' YF" -,Q :S , cial Q M ..s . ll 'f ' ll r v l I r ,... 1 .T 1 B L - , f Q -IQ, ,J 4 1 W -,',, rs - lg 1, if " l 4 5 - 5, 'ls - f' rw ,- in ffl- w J- ,' ' -5.5 N . ' U -1 ' ' ---- 1 32 l uf,Ff?i'4'i -r- Tv . e 1 + 5" fiiill - 4 ,f ,lj ,-2 fr , 5, ,Lf Row 1: Smith, Rook, '67, Smith, Sue, '68, Smolik, Harold, '68, Snavely Patricia, '67. Row 2: Snitzer, Richard. '66, Snowden, Gary, '66, Spence Dennis, '66, Springer, Janet, '66. Row 3: Stark, Nancy, '66, Steele, June '66, Stivers, Loren, '67, Tessendorf, Gale, '66. Row 4: Thompson, Craig, '67, Tomes Mary '66- Truman Karan '66, Turner David '69. Row 5' yan Orsdol, John, '66,'WalIick, ,f3lenn, '66g Weiss, Jarnes, '66, Willie, Sue, 69. Row 6. Wochner, William, 69, Woods, Joe, 66, Yip, Chlng4Lit. 66 Zartner, Robert, '66. 9 54 VQUHW Q--0 .gn- I S-in G?-52' -:D af-1-ll' l 1-"V V gl -u-eg -in ,. . .Rid ' .J .s, ,T-f' 4 h .Ugg fu ff' 1 L5 'Q ,-zQR,u f' K vi I ' if III ' -do 'C' fav ,, 1. , .-na.: Wg, f'-J. l -., 5' in- -'M 'li'-l'l F i - .-if '11 ' 23" '15 U.. . -,.1 'lift J -F ' ., ,J , J4f,,i,,1'! Y it , : , We 5 eff - I ' ,,ff,i:5', ,,, J f "' ff, 'va' 2 2 "U, ' J ' ,wx 5,1 , .,.p-4' 1, i . " 1 K ' - Lf ,f 1 l -'15?.fs,l .- 5 ' 2 :. ,-1-1--,,.e if " C . . 'A . l ri l' wjlfll , ,A l , , l I xx A :" f - F V: 'Turin' Q ' , R1 W A .' , J 'ni' 'Di i - 1, Lt. 'l E ls ,Eff I, 'i x, cpl xii , . 5,3 x if IF, X ,,.fv-' m"1',,,-3V It 5 ,vi .--3 . + :Y 1 ' 1 -'US l , I Row 1: Anderson, Sheridan, Anderson, Vlhlliam, Babbitt, David, Ban, Justin, Blatt. Lee, Bloom, Bernard, Boade, W., Boschult, Carl, Buell, James, Clare, Patrick, Cole, Larry, Collicott, Paul. Row 2: Cunningham, Lon, Cutright, Calvin, Diamond, Edward, Dietrich, Marvin, Donaldson, John, Dyke, David, Evertson, Larry, Fellrnan, Bob, Fowler, James, Fritz, William, Gerdes, Joseph, Gould, Ron. Row 3: Gray, Bruce, Gross, Gene, Gustafson, Klem- ens, Hansen, Stephen, Haven, Guy, Henderson, Joe, l-lo, Frederick, Hoeme, John, Hoff, Ted, Hofschire, John, Holsclaw, Marvin, Jones, L. C., lll. Row 4: Juel, Richard, Koenig, Duane, Knott, Russ, Kuper, David, Lambenty, Leonard, Lipp, Martin, Loecker, Thomas, Lund, John, Marsan, Richard, Martin, Fred, Mclntyre, Jay, Menter, Robert. Row 5: Merrick, Tom, Nelson, Bob, Newman, Charles, Nolte, Craig, Peck, Eugene, Peterson, Gayle, Peterson, J., Prokop, Robert, Rada, Alan, Ransdell, E., Reiff, Phil, Ricker, W. Row 6: Rotert, Larry, Schwed- helm, J., Seely, Ron, Shriner, Harlan, Sorensen, Mark, Stansbury, John, Stewart, James. Row 7: Tibbels, Ter- rence, Troyer, Gary, Truell,,John, Watson, Sam, Wilmoth, Jon, Wood, Larry. College of Medicine Seniors 499 Sophomore Nurses .LF :ffm 1 1 ll 500 "'-sv Row 1: Anderson, Nancy: Bates, Barbara: Channel, Linda: Christensen Karen: Cornette, Trudy: Curtiss, Janeen: Henson, Margaret. Row 2 Hermsmeyer, Mary: Heyne, Sheila: Hoffman, Angie: I-lollstien, Roxanne Hubble, Kathy: Johnson, Virginia: Kent, Linda. Row 3: Kopf, Patty: Lind say, Kathleen: Litz, Linda: Mattson, David: McAllister, Nancy: McLeod Sharon: Pyatt, Barbara. Row 4: Redding, Sharon: Rice, Linda: Ruila Anna: Salmen, Kathy: Stanton, Elizabeth: Thomason, Julia: Von Seg gem, Lynn. Row 5: Westerberg, Mary: Yocum, Becky. Junior Nurses ,..-A f., 1 My -4 'Q' wif' :fx v ix , MN A , X 'A' 33. 46" 'QP-4 if Row 1: Bayless, Maryp Blue, Connie: Brodie, Sandra, class sponsor. Row 2: Carter, Carolg Cary, Carolg Colgazier, Bertha. Row 3: Craig, Bettyg Echtenkamp, Donnag Erickson, Louise. Row 4: Graves, Janet: Holmberg, Sharong Junker, Helen. Row 5: Kaberna, Elizabethg Lam- brecht. Joyce: Marsden, Beverly. Row 6: Moehling, Sueg Motycka, Joanq Zillig, Nancy. Row 1: Bentley, Patricia, Boeckenhauer, Karen, Bonham, Sharon. Row 2: Carlson, Karen: Dietrich, Marjorie, Downing, Rita: Ford, Patricia, Funk, Susan. Row 3: Hansen, Ruth, Howard, Marilyn, Jasa, Jean: Kehm, Karen, Land, Donna. Row 4: Lee, Beverly, Petersen. Karen, Shaw, Sarahg Svoboda, Rose Marie, Wykoff, Karen. 502 Senior Nurses X-Ray Students .l' r N .f.. Row 1: Buchholz, Karen: Conroy, Jeanne, Row 2: Dahlkoetter, Carlene: Danahy, Susan. Row 3: Heitz- man, Janice: I-lolys, Betty. Row 4: Marks, JoAnn hlilcqray, Susan. Row 5: Vang, Nancy, Whitney, ar ene. College of Medical Technology I A... 5, lv, Row 1: Alexander, Beth: Carroll, Nancy: Cole. Juanita. Row 2: Kennedy, Karen: Lamb, Esther: Leach, Lynne. Row 3: Maixmer, Patricia: Peters, Mary: Seaman, Jo. Row 4: Townley, Mary Sue: Turecek, Mary: Unger, Alice. Row 5: White, Nancy. This is the last page of copy in the 1966 CORNI-ILJSKER. We were given a chance to work and this is the page that we have earned. This book is a capsule summary of a University and hours in its compilation have been the yearly destiny for a small group of people. Perhaps a sense of awareness of the college community is the first notice- able feature to this job. We notice that Maynard J. Furd and the "super blasts" are gone. Still, we caught a smattering of these old days in our short stay. It was a great night after that Oklahoma game. Our freshman year was the last time "outsiders" painted girls on Derby Day and we were lucky enough to make the last big King's Ballroom dance. But to us, it seems that we are a much quieter group than our predecessors. The seniors of "our" freshman year seem like the old time swingers and the universally-known "campus character" no longer exists. Perhaps, however, this year's freshmen might think of "us" as the swingers and the campus characters that are becoming a dying breed in "their" time. Perhaps our perspective has been warped by the legends related by misty-eyed alums and our own naivete. In spite of all, we dreamed of existing for just one semester in the good old days of a scant ten years ago. The "banned societies" are staging a comeback of sorts. Behind every "good" male organization is a "good" women's organization providing strategy and brain power. Tl-IEY will not long survive. The campus has outgrown the days of midnight meetings and "Strikes me funny." Some tell us not to worry. After all, Tl-lEY're not here anymore. Or are Tl-IEY? 4 - Many things vvill not survive the scholastically oriented campus. Viet Nam has seen partially to that. Good professors still leaveg the Legislature is not generous enoughg the city is not understanding enough. Lastly, it is the people on the staff that you come to know best. It is im- possible to complete the year without becoming attached to each one in a special way. The year is completed and you must thank someone for the chance. The CORN!-ILJSKER year is just one of many years in our lives. It is only one game in a life-long series of games. This game has been successful and We are thankful to have played in it. All one can ask is that he be given another chance to play another successful game in another time. IN RETROSPECT FII l lllllll. li A... Advertising ' if' " IQ if il 1 7, Q 'elf' , g s 31115 Z lllal ,.,,, .1..i,12,, XX 5 , JY, if-A-.J Ag... A 4-g I .f H .1 "T ' Q11 ..v. , ,, . "1 Q ' V 1. . "" . LK ,- -f - - , 'LV1' 113-1 , ,4 ' 1- X Y'-.LLL . 2' - fr A , , 5' ,,.'.'1""xf". P',,' . Y N- '-g-.. M X if Q 9 - M "7"Zf!a - A K f',,S.',!.I : . 4' u "NIL: iq!- 'f,g:' : Z,,,:f':, '5'.li',, iff H 'sn-'I' ii' Y Sinclair mf Sl I' 'A f- ,..... Q A. A. ff . 1 1 gli! nivll I grits-AffifAz, g ' , l . ! A, 2 , ' QV gg I ' fe' 4fi'f?f"f9q r ,RMA n ff, ' A , 1 -Q' + tiff gf? I i , ffl - V. I-1 I5 f if 5 Y " 4, +451 :?'v:'- Q' I. ,f,.,..-fji ' -M y -.13 .QUU4-b 3 11:0 Q 14 Q Q 3 eg 1--' 5 47,0 9 UIIKI1 ELCE 8. SON We Specialize in Reference b B d' M ri fs Li rary in ing, anusc p Books and Magazines Established in Lincoln, Nebraska, since 1917 2626 N. 48th Sf. Phone 466-2628 MILK DONLEY-DORT DRUG CO. BUTTER 2421 "0" St. Sickroom Supplies-Wheel Chairs Crutches-Etc. -FOR RENT OR SALE- ucs CREAM utrice Ends fn. K THE BANK THA-IHS CLOSEST TO THE CAMPUS nl I 'AA' HOME OF ,ff L Vi le , 76:3 CORNHUSKER nl' 5 lr .ggi-2,55 ' ' ' gm I V. A if I ' il ,, ACCOUNTS NATIONAL BANK OF CCJ1VI1VIER,CE Member F.D.I.C. TRUST df SAVINGS 0 LINCOLN .ji 1 '- ., i 5 ii Ki is 7 0 l v What the f Protecting i t A ,gg Hand A y ,E- Means f , I For You y i A . M. . , I L A I P f A I i . Q A, fx y .gp LI I ' " W I WOODMEN ACCIDENT MXH LIFE k.CMP.ilX' This dramatic sculpture which graces the south facade of the home office of Woodmen Accident and Life Company is a symbol of personal insurance in action. Woodmen Accident and Life Company, a pioneer in family protection, underwrites insurance policies that provide help in meeting the problems of sick- ness, accident, death and retirements, for individuals and groups. Woodmen Accident and Life Company serves 29 states including Hawaii. The Protecting Hand means career opportunities for men seeking a field that offers service, unlimited opportunities, and independence. E. J, Faulkner, President Woodmen Accident Th, I and Life Company f aiii Zfi'ffQ.5""g Lincoln, Nebraska 5 G A MUTU L LEGAL RESERVE CO NV - S 89 Where does education end? Copyright: john Deere John Deere Company, Omaha, Nebraska Everybody knows where education begins. It begins with that first hungry search for nourishment, and it goes on through that first word and that first step and that first painful punch in the nose. It grows taller as it grows familiar with letters and numbers and names of things and names of places, and answers increasingly more who's and what's and where's and why's and how's. Everybody knows where education begins, but nobody knows where education ends- especially yours, except you. And where your education ends depends mostly on you and how well you want to be able to answer questions like these- plus one more question, too asked ever so frequently- "What can you do for me?" XR Steinway Pianos fi Conn Organs It gf WM, Instruments Pilot Stereos . ,, . . .dl ' 1 '4 .I 4-ae I King and Buffett ,Nur-1' .Ff- NI fi I. .oJ'F' 1 I . f 1-+ I , SCHMOLLER 8. MUELLER PIANO COMPANY 1212 "O" Street 432-2729 Where campus friends meet' . . . Swatch, 'II3I R Street Next to Nebraska Book Store LUNCHES SNACKS Lincoln, Nebr. Congratulations to the Class of '66 FROM AN OLD NEBRASKA INSTITUTION Serving American Families Since 1906 OFFERING LIFE ACCIDENT HEALTH HOSPITALIZATION THE MIDWEST 1' 6 INSURANCE COIVIPANY OF LINCOLN, NEBRASKA CANDY MAY Photographed By Ken Schmieding of I-IAMILTON'S STUDIO Portrait and Commercial Photographers Corner 14th and P Streets 432-2426 THE PIZZA HUT f Now With Two Locations To Serve You lf! I 4 E 51 , - 4601 "o" sf. - ---'Wx E 148 N. 14th RRY! I 'T For Carry OUT or Dining In . Grder by Phone 489-4601 OPEN 11:30 A.M. EVERY DAY Rag Readini .. timely tid-bits fine features enticing editorials YOUR DAILY NEBRASKAN Mi' gl -9 .0 Planning With Pride Learningto make good finan- cial decisions is the constant challenge of the young busi- ness or professional man. The quality of these decisions will shape his financial develop- ment. Security Mutual men under- stand this and are prepared to provide information and guid- ance which will last a lifetime. Life insurance in today's world has new meanings. Quick-action, single-purpose purchases are out. Planning for the whole needs of the man and his family is in. This is what we mean by "Planning With Pride." Let a Security Mutual Man help you meet the challenge offinancial planning for a lifetime. Miihoijrq -. r i ,paig-g.:giii - aFprre,gryL....stnpk" T w fy - :Do iiiigeisiiig-gcangug . , Emdcryfwafklltzi illlehhla t4,, C.L..U.' -vH2,f5.lliEL-Q.HUldt, Career opportunities in life insurance are available in the "Growing World of Security Mutual." Those who qualify can look forward with confidence to a rewarding and interesting life-time experience. lfyou are interested, talk itover with a Security Mutual Man at any of our offices in Nebraska-or contact me. N. R. Hoelk, Vice President and Director of Agencies 200 North 15th Street Lincoln, Nebraska SECURITY MUTUAL LIFE NEBRASKA ml NEBRASKA UNION provides for your enioymenl-... Cafeteria, Crib N M Colonlal Drmng Room , See Us For Your Catermg Needs l Barber Shop Specralnzmg In Colleae Style Halr Cuts Games Area Bowling Bllllards Cards Program Events Lectures Films Nlusnc Programs Trips GREEN FURNACE 81 PLUMBING COMPANY, INC. 2747 North 48011-466-2377 "Serving Lincolnlcmd Since 1921" Stake your claim in Nebraska, the state where there is plenty of room to grow. Here you will find opportunity . . . in its vast acres of land, in busi- ness, industry and in the fine schools throughout the state. From border to border, Wherever you go, you'll find room in Nebraska to live, to learn, to rosper and to grow p The Gas Com K' 'N , rustic SERVICE hl '-'I HN -4 ., .2- Pan!! The Commonwealth Company 126 No. 11 Lincoln, Nebraska Your Savings Earn Sexaon five year certificates 4M2'Xp on one year certificates 4'Z: on passbook savings Figured on Daily Balances and Credited Quarterly FREE CUSTOMER PARKING PHONE 432-2746 XM? proudly present a new VICTORIAN splendor befitting Lincoln's oldest and largest... HQ 335322 NINTI-I 84 P ST. LINCOLN 432-6601 Charles F. Dolan General Manager Sarah Craren Catering Manager oL 1 L CONTINENTAL W Q ,-as Serving CONTINENTAL BUFFET Feafuring U.S. Choice Prime Rib of Beef - Barbecued Ribs - Fried Chick All You Can Eat o o Delicious...Sizzling STEAK ALA CARTE MENU I --- O Privuie Dining Room Party and Conference Rooms Call 434-2820 Lincoln 56TH 8- CORNHUSKER HIGHWAY We're Right Underfoot Cwithout being in the way! 3 Campus Locations ' Pound-Cather Halls 0 Abel Hall 0 Selleck Quadrangle PLUS Pickup and Delivery At All Fraternities and Sororities I CIIANING - I IAUNDRY a Williams Recording Service Professional Recording Tape and Disc Demo Service Elecirical Transcriptions. Taping Service. 33 'IX3' and 45 Production Recording Specialists The Horne of EC-19? Jas- '--if : 'Q "If You Can Hear H, We Can Record H." Call or Sfop In . . Sfudio and Sfore V. . . Insurance Counselors For Commerce ond Industry in? Lincoln Omaha 2650 N 48 Lincoln, Nebraska 68504 Ph 434 4745 JI T 111 . . FNTE INC' KINGSCREST DRIVE-IN RESTAURANT KING'S DRIVE-IN 3935 SOUTH ST. ROYAL ROOSTER GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN TUBS - BUCKETS - BOXES TO GO 40TH 81 SOUTH STREET 488-0985 KINCSCREST 432-2878 jar our un lime chnin 5 9 NEBRASKA BOOKSTORE For o Complete Selection of Art Supplies, School Supplies oncl Books Visit The NEBRASKA BOOKSTORE 5 "C lofhing for The Complecn' Genflemonu g UNIVERSITY 0F NEBRASKA -- LINCOLN ' 22042 R hz Qlfnpininis Walk pnnne 1127 neu FOR ENJOYABLE DINING KIN ' N gli ITQIFFET Fbo os N., f Q l KING'S AT 19th 'I840 O Sf. KING'S BETHANY 1340 No. Cofner Blvd. KING'S AT 47th 4701 O Sf. KING'S ALSO IN OMAHA I8 Iocationsj HASTINGS SCOTTSBLU FF 3:35, ff-5' Aff'-Q..J'fT1 ,,-"I'V7"v, V fnrfl ' f c- -A-j "I-vi.-g ,I xl Irf1..?.!4 .figi 1 -I " , Mal-ft QW --aff 'gf :-: ., "Q.?24V.3f..s,::::3hu2,.4 H I T? fa -1 oo ' ,X-I ', f ' 3' I :fi 0 A YM 22 S, 33:3 Wffip-1 5:1 1,44 T l -' ,T ,S-S- ies e-- Q. 4 f' - ff . , 'Q Tw,-ff ma-:'?,f1?f. EP-N .- Zia' iii 9' ff f I ff :-:i w fi A 4 f f, ,L J ,:'M1:214gA4h:7,2'ww:,. wi ' V4 -, , . 1 Q -z H3 ' ' f'!,31..:5: 2'1'f.b35?,'L'L9-'li-MQ?"wTi?:f 5' 9. ' T A , 0 -I-iffy. gg,V-5,',.A55131151-33f"J1YL'F":'f3f"t5gn,.g O' S Y" 4 f'f,w f.'3'1: :'-:- 5 ' M 'L E 1 ' x nfnr wlgwflh' N "l'l2I.I5 1 .T 0 :TT' Q HL ,fx S ff: I, I1 f I 933 F ,,,, , I as ff I I f , .-. ,fx mga 143 Q4 MlDIIIlES'l"S Tis, A J. s 295 ' E ? N, ' ' 4 fgiiconvenrlonl ' 455' . 55:--44 3 J I, CENTER , ,QQ QB I :-.M:g Q .. 1' I ' A 1 ' N -. vI1:'.j, I . ' -D 1 .... 1 , :Y I A A , W K it 11: it 0 . A, ' Pershing Municipal A j x T vt l . .lfrn Q ' I 1 Q W , J W .asf A Q 1 I iill ' ,I 1 I L wh LAT, 531 ,,,, v2..N ff . 1 1 Oy, I MVN. a nvnql 13. 4I,:, fi 5.3.11 I 1 ,-- A fi .T There must be a better wa .. V if +2 And there is. Helping you discover the better way is a large part of what college is all about. For more than 78 years Bankers Life Nebraska has been helping young people find the better way to plan their future security, even their careers. And continuing this tradition is letting us look for- ward to even greater achievements. ' BANKERS LIFE NEBRASKA Life I Health. I Annuities ! Pensions. Individual and Group The most talked about book on campus Filled With First National Bank ' checks - Any amount opens an account 0 No Minimum Balance required ' No Advance Service Charge ' Free-A liberal supply of Personalized Checks in a choice of colors 0 Nominal 10c per check handling fee AFTER checks are written Csingle deduction made on monthly statementl A Real "Natural" during College-A Great Beginning afiier Graduation FIRST NATIONAL BANK STPUSU Company of Lincoln KEN? Downtown at121:n and N Street mfg Handy Drive-in at 13th and l. NIEMBEH F.D.I.C. aad"""'o rl Af-I' ,Z U51 own - 4' Q JOHN cu gun!! xlolxn B' N-wilful unc, 9:33, ' 35704 Fl- ' . i NIWON 'Fun 1--et. 511'-75" ' uN9"' 456 K v 1' 7-5' Y, er Sm. sw-O09 5 ' x' ,. ,l-,Y Wigs A And K Hair. Styling f with the '-5 " 'V College Woman In Mi d wx lf X WQDW l306 N Sf. 131 So. l4tl1 504 So. 'l3fh Good Luck To S A L E S S E R V I C E 2 Graduating Seniors v 9 A From Lincoln's Largest.Exclusive APPLIANCE STORE Ilth E1 M St. Lincoln 8, Nebr. . . ,hm 432-5365 Diamond Bar 81 Grill Red and Ted Books and Supplies Hand, Smvicz To The CORNHUSKERS Is 'l'he Ambi'I'ion WHITEHEAD pH,u,,,S OIL COMPANY of The Campus Book Store 2537 Randolph Ph. HE 5-3509 1245 R Lincoln. Nebr There is a Whifellead O l Sf 1' ' flyl f d Y 1-ELEPI-IONE432-ease photoj Papher-S -5- lay.. PEIRTRAITS - EDNIMERCIAL 3 18 SOUTH 12TI-I STREET LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 0 REALTORS 0 MORTGAGE BANKERS 0 INSURANCE COUNSELORS H. A. WOLF COMPANY, INC. OMAHA- 1704 DOUGLAS LINCOLN - FED. SEC. BLDG. REAL ESTATE SINCE 1904 G0 BIG RED WENTZ PLUMBING 8g HEATING ConTrocTing Plumbing Repairing Siudenfs rolly for VVenTz Plumbing ond HeoTing! 1620 N St. 432- I 293 Your patronage has been appreciated May your Future Be A Rewarding One UNIVERSITY BOOKSTOR Nebraska Unlon E smart settmgs tor tme foods with Schlmmel In LINCCLN 8.0MAHA m Iiavaller The latest ln dmmg pleas ure-the Kavalier Restau- rant. It's a new, exciting setting for fine Schimmel foods. INDIAN HILLS INN Omaha Always the place to go for snacks . . . and ,for delicious meals. Itls a well- known setting for fine Schimmel foods. Hotel Cornhusker lincoln Golden pur Where everything from hamburger to steak has that good open-fire flavor. It's a popular setting for' fine Schimmel foods. Hotel Blackstone Omaha 4 KIRK fualloafi inc. .lx f -- 5- , v 1 , . . X 1 V X I . fl .I ' I ' -. -1 '-11 1801 O Sf. X H E LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 68508 + THE ' INlIlIMPllIlMllE MIlK IIIIINK "M WHULEMHW QUENTIN'S Smart coeds know that Quentin's Town and Campus is the answer for any occasion. Buy CI l961 CCRNIIIISKER 1311 M STREET LINCOLN, NEBRASKA QWM v4ssoc:Za6'es 432-7517 Lee D. Cool ...... ........ L inco n Harold Joyner ...... ........ L inco n Murv Barry ....... ..... L inco n Dick Welch ...... ..... L inco n A. H. Peters ........... ........ L inco n William Anderson ...... ........ L inco n Paul Yule .............. ........ L inco n Wilbur Heinke ..... ........ L inco n Dale Johnson ....... ........ L inco n Alex Allison ...... ..... L inco n Carroll Knight ...... ..... L inco n Floyd Crossley ....... ..... L inco n Ed Guthman ........ ........ ' .Linco n Arvid Barth ....... ......... H astings Ray Curry .............. ...... G rand Island Richard E. Durling ...... .............. Y ork Darrell Hinze .......... ....... B roken Bow Your U of N Student Insurance Carrier for 1965-66 Murunt or ummm msunnucz uomwmv 05: OMAHA"+,,w 0 hill"5lf222?'i'.HJl'i?'liQl32i'l?5' "' ""'a"a V. J. Skutt, Chairman of the Board I B D. D. Ulfers, President 5 2 ll Aalborg, John, 448 Abbott, Helen, 495 ABEL HALL, 344 Abel, Christine, 67 Abel, Howard, 441 Abel, Teresa, 105, 392 Abel, Tori, 126, 392 Ablott, Marilynn, 67 Abraham, Bonita, 332 Abraham, Nancy, 332 Abrahams, Marshall, 215 442 Abramson, Hugh, 442 ACACIA, 400 Achelpohl, Jan, 187, 372 Acker, D., 92, 252 Adam, Jerilyn, 56, 241, 377 Adams, Charles, 234, 415 Adams, Cheryl, 375 Adams, Adams, Adams, Adams, Adams, Adams, Adams, Adams, Adams, Connie, 392 Duane, 423 Gene, 448 James W., 448 James R., 353 Janet, 252 Jeri, 56 Katherine, 67 Mary, 392, 469 Adamson, Catherine, 399 Adamson, Jane, 327 Adero, W., 339 Adkins, Richard, 19 Adler, D., 66 ADMINISTRATORS, 16 Aerni, Bert, 59, 66, 86, 469, 495 Aerni, Richard, 76 Afshar, K., 93 Agee, Janie, 207, 389 AG EXEC BOARD, 44 AG MEN, 356 AGRICULTURE, COLLEGE OF, 36 AGRONOMY CLUB, 40 AG UNION, 232 AG YMCA, 248 Ahlquist, Gary, 252, 357, 470 Ahlschwede, Barbara, 248, 252, 375 Ahlschwede, Robert, 282 423 Ahlschwede, Sharon, 314 Ahlstrand, William, 433, 434, 469 Ahmad, Bashir, 53 Ahmad, Monsoor, 256 Ahmed, Nazar, 256 Akerson, Ronald, 92 Alber, Jacquelyn, 241, 371, 469, 480 Alberding, Mary, 126, 372 Alberts, Byron, 41 Alberts, Katherine, 392 Albracht, John, 351 Albright, Charles, 38, 42 Alexander, Beth, 503 Alexander, Milo, 339 Alexander, Thomas, 433, 469 Alfson, Jane, 366 Allan, Timothy, 130 Allard, James, 402 Allely, Karen, 314 Allen, Francis, 273, 289 Allen, Harry, 28 Allen, John, 446 Allen, Judith A., 399 Allen, Judith K., 399 Allen, Judy K., 469 Allen, Philip, 253 Allen, Robert, 357 Allers, Laverne, 274 Allgood, P., 116 Allgood, Rick, 286 Allington, Thomas, 101 Allison, Susan, 116,332 Alloway, John, 421 Alloy, William, 442 Almy, Horace, 243 Almy, Marvin, 330, 331, 333 ALPHA CHI OMEGA, 366 ALPHA DELTA Pl, 368 ALPHA GAMMA RHO, 402 ALPHA GAMMA SIGMA, 404 ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA, 252 ALPHA OMICRON PI, 370 ALPHA PHI, 372 ALPHA PHI OMEGA, 253 ALPHA TAU OMEGA, 406 ALPHA Xl DELTA, 374 ALPHA ZETA, 43 Alvarez, Barry, 274 Amack, Vivienne, 191, 256 Ambrose, Janice, 387 Amelang, Loren, 451 Amen, William, 40, 423 AMERICAN GUILD OF ORGANISTS, 67 Amos, James, 339 Amsler, Julie, 246, 353 Amundsen, C., 130 Amundson, Janice, 392 Andersen, Constance, 332, 469 Andersen, Harold, 469 Andersen, Jerry, 252 Andersen, Sandra, 469 Andersen, Wayne, 59 INDEX Anderson, Garwood, 412 Anderson, Gena, 372 Anderson, Jack, 412 Anderson, Jacquelyn, 256, 314, 469 Anderson, James H., 339 Anderson ,James R., 86 Anderson, Jane, 379, 469 Anderson, Janet Carol, 327 Anderson, Janet L., 381 Anderson 423 , Jerry, 241, 255, Anderson, Joseph, 426 Anderson, Judith, 324 Anderson, Karen, 332 Anderson, Kenneth, 441, 469 Anderson, Lana, 375 Anderson Larry, 119, 331, 333,469 Anderson, Laura, 327 Armstrong, Armstrong, Allen, 289 Beverly, 122, 237, 244, 379 Armstrong, Jan S., 383 Armstrong, Janice L., 470 Armstrong, Joe, 282 Armstrong, Kathy, 385 Armstrong, L., 330 ARMY ROTC, 124 Arndt, J., 344 Anderson, Linda, 256 Anderson, Lowell, 38, 255, 357, 470 Anderson, Marion, 65, 377, 469 Anderson, Mary, 322 Anderson iMcGinnisl, Nancy, 200 Anderson, Morris, 101 Anderson, Nancy, 500 Anderson, Neal, 53 Anderson, Nels, 448 Anderson, Richard, 411, 445 Anderson, Robert, 426 Anderson, Ronald, 112 Anderson, Roy, 285 Anderson, Sandra, 322, 323 Arneson, Sally, 57, 369 Arneson, Sally, 57, 369 ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY, 122 Arnold, Charles, 89 Arnold, Jeffery, 252 Arnold, Keith, 59, 86 Arnold, Patricia, 371 Arnold, William, 412 Aronson, John, 23 Arthur, Kathleen, 371 ARTS AND SCIENCES, COLLEGE OF, 50 Arvison, Linda, 327 ASAE, 92 ASCE, 93 Ash, Patrick, 431 Ash, Timothy, 431 Ashby, Amber, 369 Asher, Leroy, 423, 470 Ashman, Carol, 59, 282 Ashton, Dudley, 137, 252, 256 ASME, 89 ASUN, 212 ATA, 41 ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION, 258 Atkinson, Barbara, 122, 123, 392 Atwater, Helen, 77 Auchmorely, Joseph, 426 AUF, 237 Augustin, Kathleen, 353 Augustyn, Ellyn, 256, 314 Anderson, Sheridon, 499 Anderson, Sylvia, 48, 372 Anderson, Thomas, 300 Anderson, Thomas R., 419, 469 Anderson, William, 415 Anderstrom, Susan, 210, 372, 470 Andreasen, Twila, 228, 249, 379 Aurich, Diana, 105, 332, 333 Austin, Beverly, 377 Austin, Gary, 38, 357, 470 Austin, Ronald, 66 Andreasen, Jane, 387 Andresen, Harold, 85, 86, 339 Andrews, Donna, 392 Andrews, Gregory, 428 Andrews, Harry, 434 Andrews, Martin, 131 Andrews, Robert, 469, 495 ANGEL FLIGHT, 122 Angelcyk, James, 470 Angus, James, 446 Anstine, Kathryn, 392 Antes, Jane, 399, 470 Ahrens, Celia, 377 Ahrens, Wayne, 456, 469 AIA, 86 AICH E, 86 Ailes, Gary, 407 Aita, Anne, 327 Aita, John, 434 Aitken, Elizabeth, 213, 236 237, 385 6 Anderson 402 Andersen Alan, 126, 255, B., 253 Anderson Delwin, 76, 417, 469 Anderson, Douglas, 441 Anderson, Gaylord, 412 Anzalone, M., 446 APhA, 112 Apperson, Judith, 327 AQUAQUETTES, 250 Argue, Harry, 338, 339 Armbright, Larry, 333 Arms, Judith, 470, 493 AWS, 206 Axthelm, Donna, 361 Axthelm, Karen, 42 Ayers, Jerry, 441 Ayers, James, 426 Ayers, Robert, 426 Aylor, Judith, 256 Ayorinde, F., 85 Baack, Tom, 290, 292, 294 Baade, Clifford, 126 Baade, Susan, 236, 250, 366 Babbitt, David, 499 Bachenberrg, Steve, 424 Bachman, Philip, 123 Bachman, Roger, 332 Bachus, Bruce, 105 Backhaus, M., 247 Backlund, Mark, 428 Baden, David, 123 Bahnsen, S., 300 Bailey, Bruce, 255 Bailey, Gerald, 419,470 Bailey, Kathleen, 327 Bailey, Michelle, 379 Bailey, Richard, 424 Bailey, Stephen, 411 Baird, Gerald, 415, 470 Baird, James, 112 Baird, Judith, 389 Baird, Sam, 208, 243, 411, 470 Baker, Kelley, 213, 227 Baker, Kelley, 213, 227 Baker, Mimi, 381 Baker, Nancy, 210, 226, 379, 470 Baker, Roberta, 105, 332 Baldwin, John, 208, 407, 470 Ball, Joseph, 339 Ball, Robyn, 391 Ballard, Meredith, 246, 249, 375 Ballweg, Robert, 345 Bamdad, Ray, 345 Ban, Justin, 499 Bang, Michael, 59, 339 BANKERS LIFE, 519 BANK OF COMMERCE, 508 Bankley, Daniel, 122, 123 Banks, Arlene, 324 Banks, Elaine, 324 Bannerman, Laree, 391 Banta, Richard, 448 Bantz, Nancy, 375 Barber, Donald, 43, 404, 470 Barber, Jacqueline, 392 Barber, Kathryn, 381 Barelman, Carol, 366, 470 Barends, Ben, 286 Barger, Deborah, 387, 470 Barnes, David, 123 Barnes, John, 339 Barnes, Frances, 332 Barnes, Richard, 423 Barnes, Robert, 123 Barnes, Walter, 274 Barney, Norman, 41, 404 Barr, Diana, 332 Barrett, Susan, 369 Barrows, Glenice, 126, 252 371 Barta, Sharol, 379 Bartee, Robert, 408 Bartek, Gerald, 353 Bartels, Roy, 339 Barth, Becky, 48, 322, 470 Bartholomew, Noyes, 66, 408 Bartle, Margaret, 366 Bartlett, Carol, 241, 361 Bartlett, Cindy, 389 Bartlett, Margo, 470, 495 Bartling, Ivan, 41, 423 Kappa Kappa Gamma Bartling, Randall, 38, 41 Bartolain, Karyl, 379 Bartuff, LaVonne, 321 Bartzatt, Vicki, 383 BASEBALL, 300 BASKETBALL, 290 Basler, Rodney, 252, 338, 339 Bass, Janet, 77 Bass, Rosanne, 332 Bassett, Joanne, 391, 470 Bastian, George, 29, 140 Bastian, Jeff, 428 Battensperger, Bradley, 401 Bates, Barbara, 500 Batt, Linda, 366, 470 Batten, William, 86 Batterman, Garold, 93 Batterton, Kathi, 327 Bauer, James, 105 Bauer, Kathyrn, 332 Bauer, Marsha, 112, 113 Bauer, William, 433 Bauermiester, Ronald, 402 Baugghman, Roger, 402 Banman, Randell, 426 Baumann, Gwen, 371 Baumann, Walter, 423 Baumback, L., 256 Baumert, Fred, 92, 349 Bausch, Larry, 434 Baxter, Barbara, 119, 122, 314, 366 Baxter, David, 426 Baxter, Charles, 415 Baxter, Judith, 256, 332, 470 Bayless, Mary, 501 Beachler, Kent, 448 Beadle, George, 139 Beall, Constance, 248, 366 Beall, Stephen, 59 Beals, Dale, 40 Beam, Earl, 446 Beam, Kathy, 495 Beardmore, Bary, 385 Beasing, William, 452 BEATRICE FOODS, 508 BEAUTY QUEENS, 183-191 Bedient, Brune, 42 Bedient, Carolyn, 237, 244, 371 Bedient, Gene, 67 Beebe, Kenneth, 43, 227, 233,402 Beebe, Russell, 59, 66 Beecher, Barbara, 381 Beechner, Samuel, 282, 428 Beel, Cheri, 392, 470 Beers, Beverly, 375 Beeman, Kenneth, 498 Beerbohm, Larry, 66, 408 Beerhne, Don, 434 ,- Beermann, Charla, 237, 381 Beezley, Janill, 366 Beggs, Karen, 251, 256 Beggs, Walter, 115 Behm, Forrest, 138 Behmer, Cheryl, 371 Behnke, Catherine, 322 Behnken, Scott, 445 Beideck, Bonny, 383, 470 Beike, Marleen, 244, 332 Beldin, Lawrence, 66, 415 Belina, James, 344 Bell Gregory,.92 Bell Leon, 59, 66 Bell Robert, 411, 470 Bell Roger, 38 Bell Winsion 66 Bellamy, Raymond, 41 Bellamy, Ronald, 43, 346 Bellows, Donald, 59 Belmont, James, 131, 419 Belsky, Cynthia, 327 Beltzer, Jim, 269 Beltzer, Stephen, 424 Bemis, Deanna, 67, 387 Bemgtein, Steve, 470 Bender, Eileen, 396 Benecke, Sally, 76, 371, 470 Benger, Jeffrey, 424 Bennett, Allen, 25, 234 Bennett, Jane, 49 Bennett, Peg, 387 Bennett, Richard, 28 Benter, Richard, 448, 470 ' ll.i' 'll . EiiAiTw?'T .'-,,, i Z4 'lm '2fwf"""f" i 5'4'Z,"'5.J".SL"' Fiif 5 VN'l if ill I Aiea' "rigged 50" 5 ll Jill' , - Ai' lil' f,-,L , w,.,:g:.., lp A' - U "Tl" " . ,,,: '-va1e1iiiaeae '1r'fH"f"e' 'N' A 4 X fx fx f ' ',:: E if , L f 4 rrir 333535 muy ' ibigifxc 5 i ,megevinlfiffwa li-,.l,iillli,f,' -.1 "" t A ,... i , , -,if ., 1 4511 5" - li ,,,. ii J fl .,-'fwfilflf'i' l' Illia! "- ffl! rl'!llri,li'illllllZil ,if N will i i llqwlii ll ZH! 'I L1 :as 5 T' ,,, Y V . '7 1 3 'f AN lF You Joim ouiz aozozmf-You witi. rmve eeriemf or Exctueivif ourarmviua PLEDGE TzAiNiNc1." Becher, Mark, 428, 476 Beck, Bruce, 112, 213 Beck, Carol, 332 Beck, Donald, 89 Beck, Gerald, 41, 45, 404 Beck, Beck, James, 112, 300 Phillip, 112 Beckenhauer, Margaret, 126 Becker, Alexander, 86 Becker, Donald, 41 Becker, Patricia, 56 Becker, Ray, 255, 355 Becker, Roger, 41 Beckley, Stephen, 412 Beckman, Barbara, 117, 214, 226, 380, 476 Beckman, Lynn, 375 Beckman, Robert, 237, 431, 470 Beckmann, Barbara, 207, 222, 236 Beckner, Dennis, 357 Beckner, Raymond, 40, 357, 470 Bentley, Patricia, 502 Benton, Gary, 345 Benton, James, 253 Bentz, J., 86 Bentzinger, Kathy, 116,375 Benze, Patrick, 42 Beran, Richard, 116, 273, 289 Beranek, Brian, 448 Berck, Deann, 256 Bereuter, Carol, 332 Bergen, Wanda, 244, 252, 332 Berger, Diana, 375 Bergh, Cheryl, 470, 495 Berglund, Mike, 130, 345 Bergman, J., 256 Bergstrom, P., 52 Berquist, Barb, 52 Bernard, Diane, 122, 241, 377 Berndt, Dale, 355 Berney, Barb, 399 Berney, Richard, 448 Jay Pokorny -1:s:s:s -":f:f:::s:s:s' .r:s:s:s:z:z:s: ' - -f ' ' if'-H me Q Xi. 4 55525252 a-1 ' 'SZ ff 1' MM 5 " " '-' N l 1 N kara xi Q . .fe I "'If"lm ,-K ,f,.ib,.- , , ., . 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A I ' I' I ' ' - T ' M419 I "IF weeruvr coormnv LY Ilwmo 5Ll66E6T5 I1AKz1'H'601HiC reason, ou. viarozim, Ei? kowxu, AN' HELL sim AcoPfmu'1ssr.ff Bernhard, Sandra, 371 Bernhardt, Ruth Ann, 379 Bernstein, Steven, 442 Berris, Brian, 208, 445, 470 Berry, Boyd, 112 Berryman, Larry, 59 Bervin, Ed, 442 Beshore, Jane, 389 Besom, Jean, 383 Besom, Robert, 282 Best, James, 353 Best, Pan, 379 Best, Robert, 428 BETA GAMMA SIGMA, 76 BETA SIGMA PSI, 408 BETA THETA Pl, 410 Betts, Larry, 130, 345 Beverage, Roger, 448 Bianchini, William, 470 Bieck, Carol, 52 Bieck, Gary, 445 Biehl, Ellen, 49, 379 Biel, Robert, 355 Biere, Marcia, 105, 379 Biere, Nancy, 383 Bierman, Ralph, 41, 126, 345 Biernbaum, Bill, 297 Biles, Betsy, 372 Billiard, Terri, 63, 399 Bills, L., 289 Bilson, Judy, 391 Binegar, Jayne, 48, 324, 470 Binegar, Marvin, 431 528 Binger, Jan, 44, 213, 237, 252, 377 Binger, Nan, 122, 366, 476 Biniamow, Elaine, 395 Bioku, Sam, 339 Birkman, Lewiston, 431 Bischoff, Carol, 67, 207, 241, 244, 375 Bishop, Gary, 357 Bishop, Janet, 327 Bishop, Susan, 389 Bishop, Warren, 92 Bitner, Barb, 385 Bitner, Kris, 116, 213 Black, Diana, 250, 383 Black, John, 130 Black, Sandra, 332 Black, Susan, 392 Blacker, Lani, 126, 256, 332 Blackstone, Ann, 105, 244, 318 Blair, Bruce, 86, 441 Blair, Charles, 426 Blair, Delb'ert, 433 Blanchini, William, 495 Blankenship, William, 252, 424 Blatney, R., 52, 426 Blatt, Lee, 499 Bletscher, Dwight, 208, 411, 470, 478 Blevens, Robert, 411 Bley, Loren, 424 Biezek, Allan, 41 BLOCK AND BRIDLE, 38 Block, Andrea, 244, 248 Block, Lawrence, 423 Blomstrom, Gary, 89 Bloom, Bernard, 499 Bloomgren, Taffy, 372 Blythe, K., 119 Bloyd, Charles, 89 Blue, Connie, 501 Blue, Peggy, 126, 244, 250, 372 BLUE PRINT, 90 Boade, W., 499 Boardman, Phillip, 216,345 Bock, David, 437 Bock, Rodney, 339 Bockoven, Pamela, 250 Bockus, Beverly, 105, 252, 332 Bockus, Richard, 349, 470 Bode, Charles, 424 Boeckenhauer, Lauren 38, 43, 354, 355 Boeckenhauer, Karen, 502 Boehner, Thomas, 345 Boell, Lola, 369 Boelts, Hubert, 248 Boesiger, Fredrick, 59, 423 Bogen, James, 438 Bogott, Robert, 85, 87, 92 Bohling, Cheryl, 379 Bohn, John, 415 Bohren, Dennis, 118 Bolay, Peter, 428 Bolich, Genia, 399 Bolin, Karen, 399, 470 Bollman, Virginia, 381,470 Bolton, Claude, 252, 331 Bolz, Farrell, 419 Bomgaars, Thelma, 332 Bonahoom, Robert, 411 Bonczynski, Jack, 85, 88, 93 Bond, Judith, 379 Bond, Larry, 45 Bonde, Mary, 366 Bondegard, Patsy, 399 Bonderson, Lorne, 53, 89 Bonedrake, Richard, 345 Bonham, Sharon, 502 Bonne, Donald, 40 Bonneau, L., 116 Bonpeu, D., 289 Booher, Thomas, 42 Boop, Donald, 253 Boop, R., 253 Booth, Barbara, 371 Booth, Dale, 428 Booth, Thomas, 247 Borchman, Neal, 433 Borden, Martin, 442 Borden, Susan, 314 Bordy, Harold, 442 Boreson, Keo, 65, 315 Borgialli, Orval, 270, 286 Borin, Bruce, 56 Bornemeier, Eugenia, 332, 410 Bornemeir, Susan, 371 Bornhoft, Budd, 101 Bornschlegl, Larry, 300 Bors, Mary, 48 Borzych, Conrad, 93, 470, 495 Boschult, Carl, 499 Bourke, Harold, 415 Bourke, John, 446 Bourne, R., 77 Bouse, David, 86 Bovee, Robert, 42 Bowen, Barbara, 383 Bowen, Marilyn, 246 Bowen, Phillip, 246, 411 Bowen, Douglas, 331 Bower, Roger, 105 Bowers, Colonel William, 120 Bowman, Barbara, 250, 377 Bowman, Donald, 100, 101 Bowman, Janet, 470, 495 Bowman, Steve, 265 Boyce, Barbara, 314 Boyce, Dennis, 66 Boyce, K., 59 Boyd, B., 112 Boyer, Jane, 381 Boyle, James, 41 Boyles, Ann, 207, 241, 381 Bozarth, Gayle, 399 Brackle, Rebecca, 194, 228, 372 Bradford, Michael, 130 Bradford, S., 56 Bradley, Ann, 379 Bradley, Ken, 239, 419 Bragg, Linda, 67 Bragg, Michael, 339 Brainard, Diana, 314 Brammer, Wanda, 67 Branch, Nate, 186, 290, 291, 292 Brandt, Allan, 227,415 Brandt, Linda, 387 Brandt, Sara, 383 Branting, Carol, 116, 366, 470 Brashear, Kermit, 195, 208, 239, 246, 424, 425, 470 Brauer, Mary, 228, 379 Braun, Paulette, 371 Braun, Marvin, 442 Braun, Warren, 419 Bray, Eileen, 385 Brazeal, Michael, 119 Brecka, Judith, 495 Breckenridge, Adam, 21 Bredemeier, Lana, 228, 372 Bredthauer, Joan, 122, 371 Bredthauer, John, 408, 465 Bremm, C., 233 Brening, Glenn, 419 Brennan, Patricia, 210, 391 Brennfoerder, Dwight, 86 Brenning, Richard, 300 Brewer, Doug, 289, 452 Brewster, Frank, 426 Brichacek, Gary, 274 Brichacek, Melvin, 59, 282 Bricker, Edward, 495 Brickner, Thomas, 53 Brickson, Thomas, 407 Bridgman, Richard, 470, 495 Briese, Constance, 327 Briggs, Duane, 419 Brightfelt, Robert, 52 Brill, Frank, 433 Bringelson, Deborah, 470, 495 Bringelson, Richard, 119 Brink, David, 93 Brinkman, William, 424 Bristol, Philip, 441 Brock, Robyn, 389 Brock, Ruth, 326, 377 Brockmann, Stephen, 67 Brockmeier, Dale, 411 Brockmeier, Wayne, 353 Brocky, Stephen, 126 Brodd, Roger, 188, 421 Broderson, June, 327 Broekemeier, Terrence, 441 Brogden, Bob, 452 Brodie, Sandra, 501 Broyhill, Lynn, 126 Brolyer, B., 64 Broyler, Bette, 396, 470 Broyler, Mary, 375 Bromm, Curtis, 43, 44, 213, 423, 466 Bronn, Stephen, 53 Brooke, James, 112 Brookhouser, Lynn, 40 Brooks, Michael, 421 Brosius, Marsha, 375 Brott, Patricia, 381 Broutman, Leslie, 306, 371 Brower, Diane, 369 Brown, Augustus, 355 Brown, Barbara, 333 Brown, Bonnie, 122, 197, 327, 377 Brown, David A., 253 Brown, David E., 451 Brown, Doris, 48 Brown, Douglas, 441 Brown, Eric, 73, 400, 401 Brown, Linda, 327 Brown, Margaret, 314 Brown, Nancy, 314 BROWN PALACE, 352 Brown, Richard, 125 Brown, Robert, 411 Brown, Russell, 22 Brown, Shirley, 324 Brownlee, John, 411 Broyhill, Lynn, 244, 392 Brubaker, Thomas, 41 Bruce, Brost, 434 Brugh, Jan, 391 Bruha, Joyce, 49 Brumm, Jodine, 122, 369 Brummond, Charles, 408, 470 Brunk, Kenneth, 116, 274, 446 Brunkhorst, Joanne, 42 Bryan, A., 254 Bryan, George, 431 Bryan, James, 42 Bryan, Edward, 25 Bryant, Don, 274 Brzezinski, Walter, 437 Buch, Edmund, 428 Buchanan, William, 86 Buchendorf, William, 426 Buchfinck, John, 70 Art Graduate Lab Z - -ra Pa- -1 . ., ,r .,,, I- V I., g , i !, g ', fl fj Hifi' II .,,, '1 , I ,.. , jg N f f ? in 'AW "lllll:S' ! I-f-S 1 l I K fl.. ,,,,,, Q Ki if fylfll ff' ff PL . X --L-als, K vllllillililghml ' ,Ql,'l'fs:ll, , 1 Q N fic, ,l Ili IMI irfivlilsiqsiisliii j -N X Q ,I lIlllll,lllfl,slil' , 9 L2 3 ,,IIlIllllI' i1,.s-f ,5D, N i .g,, ,,,, , f- ,. Vw X ' . I F-35, 3-91, Sf, 'l'Huii.oiN6s Azz one Tame, M2-5 Ftercuez, Bu-r na wmr aces ou IN we ctii-ssmom THAT rzeALi.v coulvrai' Buchholz, Karen, 503 Buckland, Robert, 345, 346, 470 Buckler, G., 59 Bucklin, Judy, 222, 254, 470 Buckles, B., 256 Buckner, Joyce, 495 Buda, Joe, 282 Buda, Sam, 59, 282 Buddecke, Ardell, 327 Budler, Lawrence, 353 Budden, Vicki, 381 Buell, James, 343, 499 Buell, Janet, 126, 244, 252, 371 Buell, Roger, 419 Buesing, Kenneth, 93 Buffington, Martha, 383 BUILDERS, 240 Bulger, Ann, 389 Bulgrin, Susan, 332 Bulin, Nancy, 379, 470 Bull, Charles, 407, 470 Buntz, Carol, 366 Buntz, James, 230, 239, 433 Burbridge, Gail, 105, 433 Burchill, John, 273, 285 Burger, Thomas, 252, 456 Burgher, Louis, 104, 428 Burke, R., 89 Burket, Charles, 445 Burkley, Barbara, 366 Burklaund, Raymond, 424 Burling, Charles, 76 Burmood, Dwayne, 40, 44 Burnham, Arlie, 339 Burns, Lyle, 408 Burow, Kenneth, 412 BURR HALL EAST, 324 BURR HALL WEST, 354 Burr, Jeanne, 332 Burrows, Beverly, 248 Burt, Douglas, 101 Burtch, Nancy, 371 Burton, Robert, 252 Busacker, Patricia, 332 Busboom, Judy, 372 Bush, Donna, 375 Bush, Jane, 250, 381 Bush, Karen, 381, 470 Bush, Sarah, 399 Bushek, Leonard, 446 Busicher, Gary, 426 BUSINESS ADMINISTRA TION, COLLEGE OF, 74 BUSINESS ADMINISTRA TION EXECUTIVE COUN CIL, 76 Bussman, Robert, 345 Bustrom, Patricia, 389 Butler, John, 130 Butz, Catherine, 381 Butz, Robert, 446 Byars, Stephen, 426 Bybee, Judith, 391 Byerk, Lynn, 399 Byington, Robert, 104,411 C Cacek, Ronald, 404, 470 Cacek, Susan, 361 Cacek, Terrance, 41, 255, 404 Cacel, R., 255 CADENCE COUNTESSES, 127 Cada, James, 402, 470 Caha, Kathleen 332 Calandra, Cris, 327 Caldwell, Judith, 64, 327 Caleca, John, 330, 331, 470 Call, Ethel, 49, 322 Callan, Catherine, 247, 369 Callan, John, 41 Callen, Douglas, 431 Callen, Marilyn, 470 Calstrom, Dee, 371 Calvin, Cheryl, 326, 327 Camp, Donald, 131,419 Camp, Gary, 424 Camp, Gloria, 379 Campbell, Anne, 389, 470 Campbell, Janice, 399 Campbell, Jim, 428 Campbell, James, 428 Campbell, John, 428, 470 Campbell, Leonard, 89, 92, 470, 495 Campbell, Richard, 249, 408 Campbell, Susan, 389 CAMPUS BOOKSTORE, 521 Campbell, Willie, 290, 294 Canarsky, Leonard, 408 Cansler, James, 445 Capesius, Ann, 383, 470 Caplinger, Michael, 412 CAPTAlN'S WALK, 518 Carbone, Beverly, 366 Carhill, Kyle, 349 Carlisle, John, 253 Carlson, Carl, 408 Calson, Dale, 119 Carlson, Dennis, 118, 274 Carlson, Karen, 502 Carlson, Marvin, 252, 255, 402 Carlson, Natalie, 228, 241, 244, 399 Carlson Paul, 59 Carlson, Roger, 40 Carlson, Sharon, 119, 314 Carlson R. 52 Carlton, Marilynn, 369 Carman, Glen, 404, 470 Carmichael, Roger, 89 Carney, Michael, 349 Carpenter, Roger, 112, 452, 471 Carpenter, Suzanne, 49, 321 Carr, Paul, 123 Carraway, Gary, 252, 452 Carroll, Joseph, 237, 411, 471 Carroll, Michael, 411 Carroll, Nancy, 503 Carskadon, lhling, 471, 495 Carson, Judith, 332 Carson, William, 252, 357 Carstens, Julia, 383 Carstens, Kaye, 274 Carstens, Linda, 77 Carstensen. Dale. 351 Cartar, Carol, 501 Carter, Dave, 464 Carter, Joan, 395 Carter, Lynette, 324 Carter, Sharon, 375 Cary, Carol, 501 Cary, Nadine, 42 Casbeer, Tommy, 282 Case, Ed, 446 Case, Walter, 93, 471, 495 Casey, John, 434 Casey, Lawrence, 274 Casey, Lynn, 426 Casey, Mary, 122, 399 Caskey, Charles, 471, 495 Cason, Elizabeth, 327 Casper, Carolyn, 372 Cass, Donald, 415 CATHER HALL, 338 Cavitt, Sandra, 314, 471 Cech, L., 52 Cerny, Gene, 89 Cerven, Mary, 63 Chader, Harold, 208, 438 Chaffin, Cheri, 366 Chaillie, Richard, 339 Chaillie, Terry, 89, 91 Chaloupka, Jerrie, 105, 366 Chalupsky, Elaine, 332 Chamberlain, Donald, 338 Chamberlain, Mary, 495 Chamberlain, Janet, 369 Chamberlain, Judith, 369 CHANCELLOR, 20 Chandler, Julie, 210, 242, 387 Channel, Linda, 500 Chapin, James, 252 Chapin, Margaret, 256, 327 Chapman, Cheryl, 126, 256, 314 Chapman, Craig, 345 Chapman, Pamela, 247, Chairman, Richard, 346 Chase, Marcia, 326, 369 Chatfield, Lee, 22 Chatfield, Linda, 126, 392 Chatt, Michael, 423 Chen, Shirley, 48 Cherie, S., 126 Cherny, B., 52 Cherry, Cynthia, 389 Chesley, Roger, 42 Chesnut, Ruth, 248 Chester, Arlene, 72, 314, 315, 471 Chevalier, Jimmy, 89 Childress, Donald, 41 Chin, Dennis, 286 Chin, Douglas, 93 CHI EPSILON, 93 CHI OMEGA, 376 CHI PHI, 412 Christ, Rodney, 93 Christensen, Catherine, 250, 391 Christensen, F., 92 Christensen, Jan, 236, 314 Christensen, Jo Ann, 122, 383 Christensen, Karen, 500 Christensen, Mark, 412 CHRlSTENSEN'S, 521 Christiansen, J., 237, 396 530 Christiansen, Linda, 372 Christiansen, Michael, 346 Christol, James, 438 Christopher, Judy, 315 Christopherson, Burton, 289 Chromy, Kenneth, 346 Chudomelka, Connie, 324 Churchill, Charles, 424 Churchill, Melvin, 408 Churchich, Robert, 269, 273, 274, 434 Cimdins, Janis, 339 Cipriano, Joe, coach, 270, 290 Cisney, Claire, 452 Clair, S., 250 Clare, Patrick, 434, 499 Clark, Bonnie, 105 Clark, Danny, 130 Clark, Douglas, 118, 401 Clark, Dwight, 231, 417 Clark, Gerald, 412 Clark J., Coach, 290 Clark Julee, 358 Clark Kenneth, 119, 411 Clark Pamela 332 Clarke, Eston,,407 Clarke, Marilyn, 391 Clatanoff, Beverly, 387 Collicott, Paul, 434, 499 Collins, Dennis, 59 Collins, Marshall, 105,421 Collins, Sandra, 381 COLONIAL CONTINENTAL, 516 Colson, C., 52 Colville, W., 40 COMMONWEALTH CO., 515 Compton, Constance, 256 Compton, Laurence, 421 Cone, Tom, 286 Confer, Rodney, 428 Conley, Dean, 426 Conley, Larry, 349 Conley, Paul, 451, 471 Connell, Janet, 237, 249, 377 Connelly, Daniel, 412 Connors, Michael, 90 Connors, Thomas, 419 Conrad, John, 438 Conroy, James, 451 Conroy, Jeanne, 503 Contryman, Wesley, 253, 331 Converse, Nancy, 126, 244, 256, 306, 371 Cook, Allen, 89 Cook, Constance, 327 Cook, David, 346 Clatanoff, Noran, 44, 216, 349 Clatonoff, Ramon, 216 Clausen, Frederick, 346 Claussen, Sandra, 314 Claybaker, John, 346 Clayton, Davin, 471, 495 Clement, Charles, 407, 471 Cleveland, Linda, 222, 248, 375, 471 Clifford, Barbara, 383, 471 Clifford, Bonnie, 383 Clifford, Linda, 327 Clifton, D., 118, 119 Clifton, Joan, 314 Clifton, Sandra, 369 Cline, Gary, 346 Cline, Vicki, 48, 149, 322, 471 Cloose, L., 112 Closter, Betty, 332 Clouse, 113, 330 COACHES, 270 Cochran, William, 346 Cochrane, Kathleen, 372, 471 Cockle, Cynthia, 248, 381 Cockle, Sally, 385 Codner, Marcia, 383 Coffee. Sara. 389 Cogil, Stephen, 481 Coker, David, 108 Cole, Juanita, 503 Cole, Larry, 499 Cole, Larry, 434 Cole, Robert, 452, 471 Coleman, Langston, 274 Colgan, James, 445 Colgan, John, 445 Colgan, Joseph, 208, 446, 471 Colgazier, Bertha, 501 Colgrove, Duane, 41 Colin, Ronald, 415 Cooke, Robert, 421 Cooksley, Kenton, 255, 402 Coodsley, Mary, 322 Cookson, Orley, 122, 123 Cooper, James, 421 Cooper, John, 53, 208, 450, 451 Cooper, Lloyd, 252 Cooper, Sue, 381 Copenhaver, Thomas, 252, 448 Copley, Paul, 40, 43 Copner, Marcia, 471 Copple, Ben, 426 Copple, Hal, 431 Copple, Terrance, 124 Corcoran, Paul, 85, 92 Cordes, Michael, 351 Corey, Fred, 85, 93 Corgan, M., 274 Corn, Cecelia, 366 CORN COBS, 242 Cornelius, Sondra, 48, 49, 255, 322, 471 Cornell, Geralyn, 321 Cornell, Marjorie, 117 Corner, Robert, 417 Cornette, Trudy, 500 CORNHUSKER, 226 CORNHUSKER CO-OP, 350 Cornwell, Joan, 314,417 Cook, Dianne, 330 Corr, M-, 48 Cook, James, 412 Corrigan, Kathleen, 369 Cook, Sherry, 327 Cosier, John, 53, 140, 208, Cook, Shirley, 322, 471 433, 471 Dr. Edelmann X Ni 471 ,Y ff. U E., r 1' ff C, .4 X f f 310 ., 1: f' inn, A-5, MAKKING YOU ALL A9SENT FORTI-ll6 TEN-O-CLOCK LECTURE! -i--- oz is if NINE o'ai.ocn?l' Richard, 274 Skip Soiref Z' Curry, Douglas, 119, 445 Curry, Steve, 184, 243, 448 Curry, Susan, 385 Curtin, Kathleen, 361 Curtiss, Janeen, 500 Cutright, Calvin, 499 Cutright, Janice, 383 Cutright, Jean, 383 Cutshall, Bruce, 289 Cutshall, Don, 289 Czap, E60 'Wouz sumo mrs i-9 AN AIPHA Plll OMEGA -Annu. Iam Fino our Aaouf Him ie rm ues rrcuerwoizrmg tom, Hetnrut FRIENUDL COl.llZl'EOU9,09El7lEN1jCHEElZFUL,Tl'liZlFT'C amz, ctem a nalezewwf Daberkow, Stanley, 40, 43, 355 Daehnke, James, 408 Daffer, Robert, 495 Daharsh, Michael, 38, 402 Dahlgren, Richard, 419 Dahlheim, Gary, 419 Dahlkoetter, Carlene, 503 Dahlsten, Donna, 396 Dahms, Patricia, 327 DAILY NEBRASKAN, 230 Daiss, Bill, 282, 428 Dale, Alice, 250, 377 Dalka, Judith, 391 Dalling, Pamela, 385 Damke, Susan, 358, 472 Damm, Jim, 290, 291, 295 Damm, Wendell, 92, 252 Damrow, Sandra, 42 Danahy, Susan, 503 Daniel, Allison, 252 Dargurz, Michael, 353 Darland, Daletta, 241, 244, 248 Dasenbrock, Dinah, 314 Coskun, Ulku, 256 Costello, Kathleen, 252, 332, 333 Costello, Linda, 327 Costin, Katherine, 68, 122, 250 Cotner, Keith, 445 Cotton, Connie, 322 Coufal, Jeanette, 48, 49, 222, 241, 255, 377, 471 Coufal, Nancy, 56, 231, 377 COUNCIL ON RELIGION, 257 Cox, Allan, 66, 99 Cox, Henry, 23 Cox, Jerry, 112 Cox, John, 112 Coy, Virginia, 372, 471 Crabill, Jane, 385, 471 Crabtree, Cary, 428 Cradduck, Sharon, 324 Cradduck, Warren, 66, 99 Craig, Betty, 501 Craig, Carol, 244, 396, 397 Craig, Gerald, 44 Craig, Paul, 412 Craig, Ronald, 105 Cramer, Carol, 371,471 Crawford, R., 229 Crawford, Cynthia, 372, 471 Crawford, Sharon, 314 Crisp, Nancy, 324 Crispin, Ronnie, 471, 493 Crispin, Sandra, 48, 322, 471 Criswell, Jerome, 40, 471 Criswell, M., 52 Crites, Richard, 421 Crofford, Mary, 371 Cromer, Fred, 471, 493 Cronkite, Carla, 228, 369 Crosby, Dianne, 250, 256, 314 Crosier, Cheryll, 248, 289, 471 Crosson, Linda, 366, 471 Crouch, Patricia, 327 Crow, Joan, 387 Crowe, L., 45 Cruise, Don, 112, 213, 423 Crum, Steve, 353 Cuitak, J., 289 Culver, Gerald, 126 Cummings, Deborah, 332 Cummins, David, 227, 252, 452 Cunningham, Esther, 322 Cunningham, Lon, 434, 499 Cunningham, Susan, 385, 472, 490 Cunningham, Thomas B., 495 Cunningham, Thomas J., 424 Cunningham, William, 424 Curnow, Randall, 434 Curran, John, 76, 128 Curran, Thomas, 42 Currie, Alexander, 412 Curry, Barbara, 327 Dasher, G., 426 Daub, Hal, 217 Daubert, James, 424 Davenport, Polly, 332 David, Richard, 341 David son, D., 290 Davidson, Joyce, 395 Davidson, Linda, 119, 319 Davidson, Steve, 407, 471 Davis, Carol, 332 Davis, Dick, 282 Davis, Donald, 424 Davis, Harold, 355 Davis, Harry, 41 Davis, James, 53 Davis, John, 83 Davis, Mary Ann, 372 Davis, Mary P., 332 Davis, Steve, 252, 445 Davis, Terry, 327 Davis on, Lunn, 253 Dawson, Carla, 56, 64, 332 Dawson, Robert, 433 Dean, Jeanne, 389 Dean, K., 64 Dean, Linda, 387, 471 Dean, Max, 434 Dea r ont John 423 m I Y Deats, Phillip, 341 Deatsman, Gary, 52 DEBATE, 56 Deboer, Gary, 116 Deboer, Leslie, 45, 59 Deck, Deck, Paul, 441 Robert, 441 Decker, Glenn, 442 Decker, John, 338 Decker, Robert, 424, 471 Dedic, Larry, 41 Deems, Mary Ann, 227, 248, 372 Defnall, Linda, 372 Defrain, John, 119 Delfreese, Nancy, 65, 371 Degenhardt, Robert, 89 Deger, Barbara, 381 Degroot, Mary, 327 Degroot, Charles, 445 Deines, Karen, 379 Deines, Katherine, 65, 210, 375 Deitemeyer, Kathy, 389 Deitmeyer, Kepley, 495 Delbridge, Jean, 122, 183, 250, 392 DELIAN UNION, 256 DELTA DELTA DELTA, 378 DELTA GAMMA, 380 DELTA OMICRON, 64 DELTA SlGMA PHI, 414 DELTA SIGMA Pl, 416 DELTA SIGMA RHO-TAU KAPPA ALPHA, 56 DELTA TAU DELTA, 418 DELTA UPSILON, 420 Delzell, Gerald, 441, 472 DeMars, James, 53, 208, 214, 226, 237, 452, 472 Deming, John, 52 Denney, Daniel, 431 Dennis, Sandra, 250,371 Denoyelles, Bonnie, 117 Denten, Steven, 52 DENTISTRY, COLLEGE OF, 78 Denzler, Timothy, 252, 421 Depa, Raymond, 346 Depa, Roman, 70 DePutron, Adrian, 369 Dering, Dorothy, 126, 244, 361 Deterding, Douglas, 105 Detlefsen, Barbara, 381 Detmar, Mary, 49, 255, 321 Devaney, Bob, 271, 274 Devaney, Patricia, 371, 472 Devasure, Judy, 49, 321 DeVier, Sue, 381 Devereux, Susan, 385 Dewey, Donna, 366 Dewey, Patricia, 385 Dewitz, Clare, 371 Dewitz, Douglas, 456 Dey, Ardythe, 48, 322 Deyloff, J., 123 Diamond, Edward, 499 DIAMOND BAR 84 GRILL, 521 Diamond, Edward, 499 Dickinson, Robert, 402 Dickinson, William, 417, 471 Dickson, S., 53 Diedrichs, Norma, 392 Dierking, Linda, 252 Dierks, Denise, 381 Dieterich, Martha, 385 Dietrich, Marjorie, 502 Dietrich, Marvin, 426, 499 Diffenderfer, Susan, 248, 377 Dill, Alan, 415 Dillon, Leroy, 59, 346 Dinklage, Joyanne, 369 Dinneen, Lonnie, 45, 472, 495 Dirks, Beverly, 366 DISTINGUISHED ALUMNAE, 138 DISTINGUISHED NEBRASKANS, 140 Dittrick, William, 441 Doan, Barbara, 381 Dobbins, M., 56 Dobbs, Patricia, 314, 315 Dobson, Duane, 286 Doctor, Jerry, 122, 123, 341 Dodson, Jacquelin, 375 Doeble, Bryce, 297, 448 Doeging, Janet, 377 Doerr, Roger, 76, 214, 346 Doherty, Karen, 383 Dokulil, Linda, 371 Dolan, Kathleen, 361 Dolson, Carroll, 297 Domeier, Dennis, 448 Domeier, Patricia, 126, 228, 252, 372 Domeier, Rodney, 355 Domingo, Janice, 387 Donaldson, Carl, 24 Donaldson, John, 499 Donaldson, Nancy, 315 Donaldson, Phyllis, 383 Donat, James, 122, 123, 330. 472 Donat L le 53 331 333 Y y Y V I Donelson, Diane, 119 Doner, Cora, 314 DONLEY-DORT DRUG, 508 Donnan, Janet, 250, 256, 327 Donwer, Dennis, 341 Dorman, Ruth, 324 Dornhoff, Arlo, 53, 70, 92 Dornhoff, G., 346 Dorsey, Jo Ann, 63 Dort, Suzanne, 126,381 Dose, Sandra, 248, 399 Dosek, D., 215 Dosek, Richard, 433 Dotson, Karen, 389 Dotson, Larry, 452, 472 Doud, Dennis, 104 Dougherty, Anita, 389 Douglas, Robert, 116, 118 Douglas, Roger, 300, 411 Douthit, Larry, 41, 423 Dove, Barbara, 361 Dow, Alice, 389 Dow, David 99 Dow, Molly, 210 Dowe, Susan, 195, 385 Dowling, Dan, 424 Dowling, Victoria, 143, 207, 210, 217, 222, 382, 383, 472, 488 Downing, Rita, 502 Drake, Daniel, 472, 495 Drake, Halle, 119 Drax, Hugo, 349 Drayton, Joan, 369, 387 Drbal, Lawrence, 86, 208, 456, 457, 472 532 Dreamer, Ralph, 59 Dredge, Earl, 118, 119, 472, 495 Dreezen, Craig, 41, 119,404 Dresselhous, William, 53, 86, 252 Drew, Cary, 119 Drew, J., 40 Drew, Nancy, 17, 223 Drews, Rodney, 59, 66 Drodow, J., 56 Dropow, J., 252 Drudik, Thomas, 38, 255, 357 Drueke, Richard, 45, 404, 472 Drum, Duncan, 274, 407, 472 Duba, Jeanne, 49, 255, 324 Dubois, Sandra, 49 Ducker, Mary, 250, 372 Ducker, Robert 428 Duckworth, William, 441, 472 Duda, Fred, 264, 274 Duckworth, William, 441, 472 Dudden, Daniel, 331 Duey, Cheryl, 119, 327 Duffek, Michael, 252, 417 Dugan, William, 407, 472 Duhachek, Kay, 399 Duis, John, 446 Duncan, Susan, 389 Dunekacke, Paul, 116 Dunklau, Linda, 332 Dunlap, Cheryl, 379 Dunlap, Lynn, 327 Dunn, Anne, 49, 255, 321 Dunn, Jo Ann, 327 Dunn, Richard, 357, 471 Dunning, Linda, 322 Duranske, George, 53, 56 Durbon, Marilyn, 387 Durham, James, 421 Durham, Mary, 381,472 Durrie, Mary Lynne, 372 Duryea, Randy, 106 Duven, Daniel, 411 Dvorak, Roland, 331, 333 Dworak, Kathy, 392 Dwyer, R., 41, 357 Dyblie, John, 446, 472 Dyblie, William, 446 Dye, Scott, 441 Dye, William, 268 Dyer, Jean, 49, 324 Dyke, David, 499 Dymacek, Rosalie, 117 Dzerk, John, 411 E-WEEK, 84 Eads, Jaclyn, 419 Eakins, K., 426 Earl, William, 419, 472 EAST UNION, 232 Eaton, Susanne, 332 Eaton, Thomas, 452 Ebel, Susan, 252, 387 Ebers, Joann, 379, 472 Ebert, Deanne, 387 Ebke, Terry, 341 Dr. Albert C. Book llllllll I' s , 1 - . 'fi Wil. "-'.:' ll 2 ' I I IliIe"" ' -..- I I I IWIlI'I I l I llllw iI I ill ll 'l'Ls lll'I THE ' I 4 I' I 'Q PKEBIDEIIT il ' ' an -. I 3 2 :. -,f. '-'- 1:2,Ii'?-'ffl ill, N :zz . ND . , 'X ij: 1, 7 532. N I, P T WWII.. Ill I OII . S ' I III' ' A "" """'i'- I fs... 5i5i5255f2'.'E5iE5EEEiEE - Mi il Nik 1 415222 X Z I I I ' Q -,',e-.-,-'42, 'l'- f:g:gE3g3Eg1gEgEgE ,1 I ll X ,rf "il.lT5I.if6':iI, 1ll I: .l.' Us ,ilI:"III1IIIfl:':tI. . .mi Miiifll .-.iI!l'll!:?5l911-fiillli' I r -1 f. ' ' ,f-rg-I-II-'lil ,IIIII-ItIIfq:II'l'f-I'-2? I I "' " ' 1 qfzgggzfqilflgfls I ,.-I3lf!igffltII:fifIgfg32"Iiii., f 'milgiil--5-"fl 'iii-Effl.'.IfZ'2'iS.'.-"'3I'1Ii'I'le. - 'I' 'lilly "fi"-ul"N:-'F-"""' X -I Axww.. W - 3 I' 'D SAY HE skouto MAKE AN excettenr COLLEGE N5T2LlCT ' rzexig THE FILE ON HIM ewes HE Doeem Pun LECTURES-C3-R' uees uilokrilomi TEMIIIIIG meriloos sf I6 ui-mate ro communism." Ebner, Dorothy, 495 Ebsen, Nancy, 332 Ebzery, Susan, 381, 472 Echtenkamp, Donna, 501 Eckholt, Lawrence, 358 Eddy, William, 346 EDHOLM 81 BLOMGREN, 522 Edwards, Jack, 346 Eggleston, D., 40, 41, 44, 255, 423 Egle, Cynthia, 244, 391 Eglite, Dace, 112 Ehlers, Gordon, 434 Ehlers, Jean, 366 Ehlers, Sheryl, 244, 252, 332 Ehrlich, Douglas, 419 Eichhorn, Kathleen, 385 Eichner, Bill, 434 Eickhoff, Bruce, 448 Eickhoff, L., 252 Eickmeier, Linda, 366 Eisenhart, Ellen, 371 Eisenhart, Fredric, 431 Eisenhart, Russell, 412 Eiser, Richard, 411, 472 Eiserman, Louis, 433 Ekeler, Marguerite, 48 Ekwall, Cathie, 126, 377 ELCE 81 SON, 508 Eldred, Carolyn, 392 Eldred, Stephen, 357, 472 Eldridge, Larry, 423 Eliason, Margaret, 77, 399 ELIGIBLE BACHELORS, 182-190 Ellermeler, Richard, 408 Ellicott, Catherine, 327 Elliot, J., 19 Elliott, Max, 105, 452 Elliott Richard, 411 Elliott Elliott 381 Robert, 104, 441 Susan, 256, 375, Else, Mary, 324 Embury, Si, 426 Empkey, Frank, 290 Encell, Carol, 385, 472 Ender, David, 341 Ender, Ellen, 375,472 Enenback, Craig, 341 Engel, Scott, 441 Engelhaupt, Dale, 424 Engelkemier, Gene, 89 Engelkemier, Karen, 314 Englekemier, Larry, 44, 72, 74, 92, 255, 402 Engelkemier, Linda, 48, 244 ENGINEERING, COLLEGE OF, 82 ENGINEERING EXECUTIVE BOARD, 88 England, Beverly, 119 England, Stephen, 59, 215, 423 Engoahl, James, 252, 431 Eno, Susan, 252 Enstrom, Larry, 431, 472 Enstrom, Thomas, 431 Ensz, James, 419, 472 Enyeart, Margaret, 366 Epp, Harold, 76 Erbach, David, 56 Erbs, E., 255 Erhart, Wesley, 252 Ericksen, Erickson, John, 448 Charles, 421 Erickson, Danford, 423 Erickson Jean, 399 Erickson Keith, 331, 333 Erickson Kenneth, 41 Erickson Lee, 255 Erickson Linda, 324 Erickson Lois, 314 Erickson Louise, 501 Erickson Margaret, 255, 324 Erickson, Wayne, 357 Ericksen, John, 448 Erisman, Anne, 327 Erks, Deann, 49, 321 Ernst, David, 119, 433 Eschliman, Donna, 117, 383, 472 ETA KAPPA NU, 87 Etmand, David, 66 Evans, Ann, 385 Evans, Gary, 112 Evans, Gary L., 441, 472 Evans, Jean, 472, 495 Evans, Vicki, 366 Eveleth, Douglas, 402, 472 Evenson, Margaret, 371 Evert, Marilyn, 314, 473 Evertson, Larry, 499 Eves, Jeffrey, 441 E-WEEK, 84 Faubel, Richard, 86 Faught, John, 431 Fauss, Jean, 112, 236, 237, 385 Feather, James, 130 Fecht, Ronald, 273 FEDDE HALL, 320 Fegley, James, 448 Feit, Lawayne, 412 Felber, Alfred, 421 Fellman, Robert, 499 Felton, Edward, 433 Fenimore, Betsy, 372 Fenlon, James, 437 Fenster, Karen, 42, 375 Fenstermacher, Jay, 433 Fentiman, Tynette, 391 Fenwick, Don, 119 Ferrara, Cindy, 236 Ferrara, Virginia, 383 Ferris, Galynn, 456 Ferris, Ronald, 473 Fetterly, Diane, 495 Fetty, Carol, 399 Fiala, Adrian, 59, 282 Ficke, Janet, 63 Fickenscher, Keith, 349 Fidler, William, 402 Field, Donald, 257, 341,473 Field, Lynn, 383 Filbert, Diane, 387 Filbert, Marilyn 361 Filsinger, Duane, 401 FINE ARTS, SCHOOL OF, 54 Fink, Kathryn, 255, 321 Finke, Ronald, 341 Finks, John, 407 Finks, Linda, 376 Finnell, Cleo, 105, 250, 399 David Trask i A lsguvsnr umoxgT .-..Z"" 1 I Rfb ""lw THE COUN TRY TTHIQ ie Euzwett, Feu.As- H4215 LOOKIN Forz A aumate cotteae AN iziem' Aww HE HA6 VECIDEDTO 57?Y HERE 'I Ewerth, Connie, 383 Ewing, David, 90, 452, 473 Ewing, Kathryn, 381 Fachleman, Robert, 434 Fager, Paul, 252 Fahrenbruch, Gerald, 42, 355 Faier, J., 130 Fairchild, David, 85, 87, 92, 243, 456, 473 Fairchild, James H., 456 Fairfield, James, 123 Faling, Janice, 332 Fallon, Gay, 392 Falmlen, Vickie, 314 Falt, Jenefee, 371 Faltemeir, Joseph, 473 Faltys, Janet, 49, 324 Farber, Wayne, 448 Fardal, Ruth, 399, 473 Farkas, Carol, 473, 495 Farkas, Jeffrey, 415 Farley, George, 434 FARMHOUSE, 422 Farner, Mary, 392, 473 Farran, Barbara, 314 Farrer, Nikki, 381 Farris, Pamela, 375 Farris, Rebecca, 332 Farritor, Robert, 85, 86 Farstrup, Gregory, 331, 473 Farstrup, Linda, 335, 473 Fintel, Carmen, 249, 255, 321 Firdosy, lnayatali, 89, 256 FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 520 Fisher, C., 282 Fischer, L., 43 Fischer, Paul, 428 Fisher G., 331 Fisher, J., 93 Fisher, Marian, 392,473 Fisher Robert A., 93 Fisher S. 67 Fisk, Susan, 387 Fisk, Teri, 105 Fiske, Barbara, 250 Fitz, C., 255 Fitzebald, James, 421 Fjelstad, Jane, 372 Flagle, Cheryl, 335 Flanagan, Jeanne, 119, 369 Flaugher, JoCarroll, 366 Flebbe, Elizabeth, 381 Flebbe, Sandra, 119, 381 Fleek, Joann, 371 Flehn, L., 253 Fleisher, Ira, 442 Fleming, Richard, 30 Fletcher, Christine, 369 Fliginger, Kathleen, 377, 473 Flock, G., 300 Floerchinger, Martin, 421 Flower, Jerry, 419 Floyd, Stephanie, 392 Fluent, Stewart, 89 Flynn, Michael, 448 Focht, Diana, 67, 241, 251, 392 Folken, Gerald, 408, 473 Folmer, Stephen, 428 Folsom, Susan, 381 Foner, Kenneth, 495 FOOTBALL, 274 Forbes, M., 256 Forbes, Stewart, 208, 442 Forbes, V., 66 Force, Jack, 41,252 Force, R., 255, 402 Ford, Patricia, 502 Ford, Robert, 105, 421 Forest, Marilyn, 335 Formanack, Thomas, 411 Forney, Bruce, 105 Forsman, Patricia, 105 Forsman, Richard, 434 Forsyth, lan, 451 Fortkamp, Neil, 239, 402 Fosdick, Susan, 495 Foss, Sandra, 335 Foster, Douglas, 39, 239 Foster, Larry, 116, 251, 289, 407 Foster, Linda, 327 Foster, S., 42 Foster, Thomas, 421, 473 Foster, William, 424, 473 Fouts, Karin, 250 Fouts, Susan, 372 Fowler, James, 499 Fowler, R., 346 Fowler, Ronald, 41 Fowles, Lewis, 23 Fowles, Roseann, 383 Fowles, William, 426 Bruce, 399, 341, 473 Fox, Fox, Carlann, 252 Fox, Donald, 408 Fox, Garriel, 130 Fox, Jeanne, 255 Fox, Marilyn, 210, 375, 473 Fox, Rodney, 404 Fox, Terrance, 250, 366 Frakes, Robert, 116 Francis, Donald, 401, 473 Franey, Bruce, 445 Frank, David, 272, 285, 433, 473 Franke, Sherry, 366, 473 Franson, Bruce, 66 Frasier, Mark B., 424 Frasier, Mark R., 445 Frasier, S., 256 Frasier, William, 86, 341 Frazier, Clarence, 448 Frazier, Donald, 285 Frear, Jacquelyn, 391 Frear, Madalyn, 372 Frecks, Gary, 341 Frede, James, 433 Frederick, Allen, 43, 214, 423, 473 Frederick, James, 341 Frederick, Scott, 433 Fredstrom, D., 426 Free, James, 59 Freeborn, Coralee, 399 Freeman, Carolyn, 48, 214 234, 237, 252, 389 Freeman, Jacquelyn, 65, 193, 389 Freeman, John, 431 Freese, Janice, 355 Freimuth, Nancy, 385 Fremarek, Steven, 448 Frenzen, G., 52 Frese, David, 86, 216, 252 353, 473 Frese, Kathleen, 42 Frgar, J., 252 Frich, Kathy, 493 Frick, Delores, 473 Frick, Gerald, 448 Frick, Wayne, 353 Frickel, Garold, 38, 357 Friede, Patrick, 88, 92 Friedman, Roger, 434 Friehe, Robert, 253, 355 Friend, Lee, 421 Friendt, Glenn, 424 Friesen, A., 42 Fritch, Charles, 426 Fritz, David, 412 Fritz, Marie, 314 Fritz, William, 434, 499 Frizzell, Ronald, 452, 473 Frolik, E., 36 Frolik, Lawrence, 208, 213, 411,416,473 Frolio, Donald, 116, 446 1 Froscheiser, Carol, 361, 473 Frost, Robert, 38, 255, 402 Frost, S., 59 Frost, Zoe, 126, 396 Fry, Carol, 379 Fryar, John, 338 Fuchs, Kathleen, 389, 473 Fuchs, Roger, 423 Fuchser, Larry, 255, 423 Fuchser, Steven, 408 Fuenning, Samuel, 25 Fuhrman, Marilyn, 233, 322 Fuller, Arnold, 123 Fuller, Barbara, 49, 324 Fuller, Dorothy, 67, 116, 256, 358 Fuller, Russell, 428 Fuller, William, 105, 331 Fullerton, William, 85, 87, 92, 421 Fulton, Robert, 411 Funk, Susan, 502 Furman, G., 38 Furrow, Michael, 252, 338, 341 Furse, Sara, 126, 396 Furst, Jackie, 379 6 Gaddini, R., 282 Gaeth, Kenneth, 285 Gahagan, Michael, 445,473 Gake, David, 451,473 Galbraith, Denis, 59, 282 Terry Schaaf l l W7 7 l ro ao. rf: 4 mmwe-4 :ma ' ff-fa, 1fO'2B'r1'2LiZWF?"15'5SS??LEE1aZ06llSAHr'3l? Ht"LEl5aE'?Z C O A Al LI A '- Juer N0 WAYTU cizcumveur cuz wuzee negourkigliafursf 4 Gall, Clark, 255 Gallentine, Richard, 123 Galley, Robert, 105, 421 GAMMA LAMBDA, 59 GAMMA PHI BETA, 382 Ganger, W., 229 Ganser, Jim, 428 Ganz, D., 59 Garcia, Ralph, 286 Gardner, Dr., 102 Gardner, Kerrol, 399 Garrison, Wayne, 407 Gartner, Donald, 105, 451 Garton, William, 101 GAS COMPANY, 515 Gaskill, Nancy Ann, 327 Gaskins, Ken, 424 Gates, B., 290 Gatto, Daniel, 428 Gaughan, Joseph, 300 Gayer, Rebecca, 300 Gaylor, Harry, 286 Gefke, Pam, 306, 377 Geier, Don, 419 Geier, J. G., 271, 289 Geier, J., 116 Geiger, Rose, 399, 473 Geiser, Gary, 42 Geisler, Roger, 408 Geistlinger, Nancy, 361 Gemar, Dennis, 448, 473 Gemar, Gerald, 448, 473 Gemelke, Duane, 401 Gemelke, Ronnie, 401 Gandler, Neil, 346 Gengenbach, Burle, 43, 355, 473 Gentry, D., 426 Genung, John, 411, 474 George, Evelyn, 44, 49, 255, 321 Gepford, Karen, 207, 383 Gerdeman, Deann, 335 Gerdes, Joseph, 499 Gerdes, Wylie, 452 Gerelick, Hally, 395,473 Gerelick, Howard, 215, 442 Gerke, Daryl, 130 Gerken, Clayton, 27 Gerlach, John, 358, 473 Gerlach, Kent, 59, 412 Geske, Norman, 26 Gessner, Annette, 185. 379 Gerlach, Kent, 59,412 Gerelick, Hally, 395, 473 Gerelick, Howard, 215, 442 Gerke, Daryl, 130 Gerken, Clayton, 27 Gerlach, John, 358, 473 Geske, Norman, 26 Gessner, Annette, 379 Getscher, Cheryl, 119, 371, 473 Gettman, James, 445, 474 Ghormley, Margaret 379 Gibbs, Dale, 134 Gibbs, Linda, 371 Gibson, Cynthia, 366 Gibson, Michael, 118, 252, 341 Gibson, Robert, 111 Giddings, Sharon, 379 Gifford, Robert, 433 Gilbaugh, Steven, 431 Gilbert, Donald, 437 Gildersleeve, Renee, 335 Giles, Bruce, 231,421 Gillaspie, Robert, 445 Gillem, Alvan, 445 Gilles, Gregory, 424 Gilmore, Jack, 341, 474 Gilmore, Steven, 93, 331 Gilpin, Craig, 59,66 Gilroy, Thomas, 412 Gingery, Robert, 105, 252 Gingles, R., 44 Ginsberg, William, 442 Girard, Madeline, 143 Gist, Thomas, 407 Givens, Edward, 89 Glade, Katherine, 381 Glantz, Robert, 402, 415, 474 Glascock, Jacqui, 383 Glaser, Sherryn, 399 Glasson, Gloria, 399, 474 Glatanoff, Norah, 349 Glathor, Dwaine, 404 Glathor, Linda. 335 Glaubius, Melanie, 399 Glaze, Nancy, 379 Gleisberg, Robert, 284, 285, 341 Glenn, Dewayne, 431,474 Glenn, Jerry, 408 Glenn, Robert, 456, 474 Glenn, Roberta, 122, 241, 387 Gless, Darryl, 252, 448 Gleysteen, Ann, 389, 474 Gloor, Susan, 256, 379 Glover, Barbara, 389, 474 Glover, Roxie, 371 Glover, William, 76, 417 Gloy, Donald, 402 Glynn, James, 404, 474 Glynn, Joe, 456 Glynn, Kathryn, 389 Godden, Norman, 116, 474, 493 Goecke, David, 341 Goedecker, Michael, 437 Goedert, Mary, 335, 371 Goeller, Janet, 48 Goethe, Prudence. 42 Goetz, Stephen, 285, 433 Gogela, Louis, 431 Going, Rodney, 417 Goings, Dianna, 369 Gold, Stephen, 252, 401 Goldberg, Sheldon, 59, 282, 442 Goldstein, lna, 314 GOLF, 302 Golter, Gary, 91, 92, 123, 351, 419 Golter, Jerry, 351 Goltner, Ronald, 351, 474 Good, Harry, 271 Good, Merlene, 67 Gooding, Richard, 41 Goodenough, Larry, 282, 419 Goodman, Andrew, 442 Goodman, Lita, 395 Goodman, R. Scott, 456 Goodrich, Donald, 208, 446 Goodroad, Margean, 474 Goodsell, Nancy, 335 Goodwin, L., 318 Goodwin, Ruth, 391 Goold, Carol, 324 Gordon, Anne, 369 Gordon, Richard, 285, 445 Gordon, Sandra, 252 Gorham, Marshall, 116 Gottschalk, Michael, 208, 430, 431, 474 Gould, Ron, 452,499 Goulet, James, 341 Govearts, James, 289 Gove, Ann, 377 Govier, Joyce, 321 .. Grabow, Wayne, 437 Grace, Mike, 190 GRADUATE COLLEGE, 94 Graff, Gene, 112 Graff, Lyle, 474, 493 Gargson, Linda, 335 Graham, Carol, 375 Graham, Donald, 428 Grams, Dennis, 89 Grams, Leroy, 40 Grams, Robert, 40 Granata, Susan, 56, 379 Grandon, Raymond, 349, 474 Grant, Carolyn, 369 Grant, Kenneth, 419 Graske, Cynthia, 324 Graske, Roxann, 324 Grasham, Mike, 438 Grasmick, David, 66 Grasmick, Patricia, 42 Grasmick, Susan, 385, 474 Grasso, James, 89 Grave, Janet, 501 Graves, Jon, 52, 412 Gray, Bruce, 499 Gray, Gary, 428 Green, F. C., 208, 239, 251 452 GREEN FURNACE 81 PLUMBING, 515 Green, George, 441 Green, Loren, 441 Green, Michael, 282 Green, Pam, 328 Greenberg, B., 19 Greene, Robert, 126 Greenwalt, Betty, 495 Greer, Eldon Greer, Thomas, 474 Greer, Vernon, 423 Gregerson, Marcia, 45, 244, 387 Gregg, R., 38 Gregg, Suzanne, 328 Gregorius, Jane, 122, 366, 474 Gregory, Ben, 274 Grell, Stanley, 274 Grenier, Stephen, 445 Griffin, Carolyn, 391 Griffin, Sandra, 252 Grim, Sharon, 126, 387 Grimit, Patricia, 495 Grimm, John, 105 V Phi Kappa Psi , if i' ' r ei i Ju fri --" tiiif' 'ill 1 Xywii-"llQ'fr G ,f f J I ,i,lli7if,ii i F, , J- wif V ' fl I'. ii 'llli . 1 Wifh V w !!! A . 'IX JW li'l'ii"li+f ffl K N ff ,, Ii ilirlnir' ',N, fiat rin' V' .I f llviii x hxlvv . i ffm , - , X 4 7, . ,, D- 'fill ,' 'f ij fr- ' A 'i , ' "ff ,g 39' 1 Zfgftjlii i' if i . ..tim ,gif - , J:Ed-il-: lift", fmiiiag . ' V, 'g I ,I KU 4 r. Migizligii A - - ' N ...f,,f.f-2ffe'fia1i2- 2 . 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AFTER CHECKINI Youre FlNANClAL mczamfniz PAL, -foiifafru' eszoruaz'-9 Few You D ee iwpiez in one or TH' omerz cwest' Grinage, Nola, 474, 495 Groeling, Warren, 88 Groelz, Ross, 404 Groetzinger, Deanna, 252, 333 Groff, Larry, 86, 456 Gronborg, Gary, 130 Groom, Barbara, 396 Gross, Gene, 426, 499 Grosscup, Lynn, 244, 249, 383 Groteluschen, Jean, 122, 366, 474 Groteluschen, Suzanne, 335 Grothe, Linda, 105, 112, 371 Group, Larry, 456 Grove, Lee, 43, 44, 208, 248, 404, 405, 474 Growcock, Daryl, 130 Grubb, Linda, 321 Grudzinski, K., 77 Gruenther, Janice, 314 Gruett, Mark, 66 Grummert, Judy, 256 Grummert, Willard, 448, 474 Grunczewski, Carla, 393 Grupe, Barbara, 52 Grush, Terry, 66 Guech, Barb, 385 Guenzel, Cuz, 53, 72, 117, 213, 222, 229, 241, 254, 389, 474 Guggenmos, Jack, 421 Guilford, Mary, 389, 474 Guinty, John, 56 Gullberg, Julianne, 335 Gunderson, Gene, 112, 241 Gunderson, Robert, 421 Gunlicks, Carol, 52 Gunlicks, Ken, 66 Guretzky, James, 438 Gustaff, Ronald, 282 Gustafson, Kay, 314 Gustafson, Lemens, 499 Gustin, C., 256 Gustman, Cheryle, 49, 322 Gutheriess, Cynthia, 328 Guthery, John, 441 GYMNASTICS, 288 Haarberg, Mary, 383, 474 Haas, Rebecca, 251, 392, 474 Haasch, Richard, 433 Haase, Rossell, 335 Haase, Tom, 431 Haba, Myra, 70, 73 Haberman, Joe, 341, 474 Haecker, Carol, 322 Haessler, George, 448 Hagedron, Ruth, 399 Hagelberger, Susan, 369 Hagen, Catherine, 391 Hagen, Joel, 445 Hahn, Hilma, 314 Hahn, James, 45 Hahn, Natalie, 39, 49, 72, 73, 210, 233, 255, 390, 391 Hai, Abdul, 256 Haight, Mary, 64 Haisch, Larry, 67 Haisch, Lila, 63, 117 Hakanson, Vicki, 371 Hake, Larry, 419 Hake, Wayne, 41, 255, 404 Hald, Larry, 426 Hald, Margo, 391 Hallbridge, Bruce, 442 Haley, Mark, 417 Hall, Carol, 335 Hall, Cenith, 122, 392 Hall, Cheryl, 314 Hall, Jack, 123 Hall, Jerry, 116 Hall, John C., 118, 119 Hall, John J., 411 Hall, Michael, 448 Hall, Richard C., 415 Hall, Richard L., 411 Hall, Robert, 424 Hall, Sharon, 366 Hall, Sue, 250, 389 Hall, Wayne, 254 Hall, William, 69, 119 Halla, Brian, 433 Hallgren, Frank, 25 Hallgren, John, 286, 287 Hallgren, Otto, 69, 169, 269, 441 Halling, Ruth, 64 Halpain, Dale, 456 Halter, Douglas, 59 Halter, Ken, 66 Halter, S., 59, 66 Ham, Barbara, 335 Ham, Gary, 38, 43, 474, 495 Hamer, Robert, 215, 431 Hametz, Charlene, 250,371 HAMlLTON'S, 511 Hammer, John, 474, 495 Hammer, Linda, 252 Hamner, Charles, 252 Hamsa, Barbara, 389, 474 Hamsa, Rudolph, 434 Hancock, Paula, 385 Hancock, Terry, 411 Hancock, Victor, 194, 208, 252, 412 Hanschuh, Denese, 389 Hanse, Stephen, 434 Hanke, Carolyn, 328 Hanna, Peggy, 387 Hanna, Tommie, 407 Hansen, Deborah, 244, 375 Hansen, Donald L., 349 Hansen, Donald L., 408 Hansen, Edward, 433 Hansen, Judy, 328 Hansen Karen, 381 Hansen Lauren, 402 Hansen Margaret, 474,495 Hansen Neal, 437 Hansen Richard, 341 Hansen, Roger, 192, 452, 474 Hansen, Ruth, 502 Hansen, Stephen, 499 Hansmire, William, 88, 93, 213, 239, 448 Hanson, Barry, 433 Hanson, Jeanine, 67, 314 Hanson, Robert, 445 Hanson, Steven, 499 Hanthorn, Elaine, 64, 396, 474 Hanway, D., 52 Harano, Gail, 335,474 Hapner, JoAnn, 389, 474 Hardee, Marilyn, 122, 237, 244, 371 Harder, Nadele, 335 Harder, Russell, 112, 349 Hardessen, Jane, 49, 255, 324 Hardin, Dr. Clifford, 19, 20 Harding, Alan, 256 Harding, Anita, 372 Harding, Bruce, 59, 282 Harding, William, 53, 225, 234. 424, 474 Hare, Fred, 290, 292 Harlan, Philip, 40, 255, 357 Harmes, Teresa, 379 Harms, Allan, 59, 338, 341 Harms, David, 421 Harms, Donald, 355, 474 Harnisch, Larry, 408, 474 Harris, Lynda, 369 Harris, Margene, 389 Harris, Pamela, 252, 314 Harris, Robert B., 300 Harris, Robert E., 445 Harrison, Dewayne, 401 Harrison, Diana, 56 Harrison, Lynda, 387 Harrold, Daniel, 419 Harshaw, Marsha, 327 Hartman, Alfred, 434 Hartman Daniel, 59, 282, 441 Hartman 341 Klaus, 193, 338, Harvill, R., 66 A Hartwig, Gordon, 369, 407, 474 Harvey, Gail, 392 Harvey, Lowell, 104 Haseloh, Gary, 415 Hash, Jay, 123, 424 Haskell, David, 38, 42 Haskins, Barbara, 252, 379 Haskover, M., 289 Hassebrook, Gloria, 314 Hastings, Karen, 144, 210, 369 Hatch, Kenneth, 341 Hatcher, Robert, 66 Hatheway, Pamela, 244 Hau, Nancy, 385 Haug, Steven, 130, 346 Haug, William, 76, 225, 273, 428, 474 Haun, Jacqueline, 392 Hauschild, Harry, 112 Hausserman, Robert, 104, 105 Havekost, Dale, 76 Haven, Guy, 430, 434, 499 H. A. WOLF, 522 Hawk, Gary, 417 Hawley, Carol, 314 Haws, Robert, 247 Hay, Delynn, 88, 92 Hayes, Ellen, 392 Hayes, William, 208, 400, 401, 474 536 Hayford, Kenneth, 408 Haynes, Lenore, 379 Haynes, Michael, 128 Haynie, Dorothy, 381 Haynie, Harry, 31 Hays, Patrick, 59 Hazuks, David, 434 Head, Elizabeth, 65, 396 Headley, Larry, 91 Headley, Lynsworth, 273 Heald, Betty, 316 Heaston, Gary, 341, 474 Heath, Judy, 49, 252, 255, 377 Heckman, D., 327 Heckman, Diana, 56, 385 Heckman, Mary, 244, 379 Heckman, Randall, 52 Hecox, Elizabeth, 126, 387, 474, 476 Hecox, James, 402, 474 Hedge, Martha, 251, 389 Hedgecock, Pamela, 207, 234, 381 Hedges, Thomas, 446, 474 Heggen, William, 433 Heidman, Judith, 67, 387, 474 Heikes, Russell, 252, 338, 341 Heil, Mark, 355 Heileman, Carolee, 252, 387 Heim, Diana, 119,335 Heineman, Dennis, 341 Heinicke, Gary, 66, 408 Heinke, Paula, 389 Heinke, Terry, 371 Heise, Ann, 328 Heise, James, 456, 474 Heiser, David, 428 Heiser, Judith, 372, 474 Heitzman, Janice, 503 Heizenrader, Nancy, 377 Hellbusch, James, 408 Hellbusch, Leslie, 419 Hellerich, Cynthia, 316 Helm, Sara, 105, 254, 371 Helzer, Norman, 40, 43, 423, 474 Hemberger, Larue, 353 Heming, Judy, 332, 333 Hempel, J., 52 Hemphil, Patricia, 316 Hemphill, Virginia, 392, 474 Hemsath, Delroy, 252 Henderson, Gale, 372, 474 Henderson, Joe, 499 Henderson, Jon, 210, 368, 474 Henderson, Kathleen, 251, 385 Henderson, Larry, 85, 92, 456, 475 Hendrichs, L., 250 Hendrickson, Kathleen, 49, 255, 335, 387 Hendrickson, Minnie, 316 Hendrix, James, 456, 475 Hendrix, Susan, 328 Henline, Linda, 63, 383, 475 Henneman, Alice, 49, 252, 255, 321 Henninger, Audrey, 399 Henrichs, Linda, 399 Henrichson, Roger, 66 Hensley, Patricia, 381 Henson, Margaret, 500 Hentzen, Charles, 86 Heppernlen, T., 426 Herbolsheimer, Gerald, 407 Hergenrader, Robert, 273, 300 Hergenrader, Victor, 417 Herling, Betty, 49, 324 Herman, Bruce, 417 Herman, Larry, 41 Hermsmeyer, Mary, 500 Hertzler, Vicki, 399 Herzog, James, 211, 402 Herzog, William, 118 Hesson, James, 289 Hester, Meredith, 372 Hestermann, Barbara, 126, 387 Heybrock, Sandra, 48, 49, 241, 324, 475 Heyne, Sheila, 500 Hibbeler, Evelyn, 335 Hibbeler, Gerald, 40, 355 Hibbs, Jerrold, 38, 402, 475 Hickey, Barbara, 316, 475 Hickman, Nancy, 316, 475 Hicks, Barbara, 387 Higginbotham, Ed, 270 Higgins, Gary, 421 Higgins, Ralph, 401 Highland, Susan, 126,381 Hildenbradt, Ronald, 286 Hill, Boyd, 274 Hill, Carol, 328 ' Hill, Cynthia, 369 Hill, Karen, 118 Hill, Martha, 256 Hill, Robert, 339 Hill, Susan, 335 Hill, Thomas, 441 Hilsabeck, Richard, 69,441 Hilt, John, 59 Hilton, Janice, 250, 381 Hilton, John, 434 Hilz, Edward, 344, 346 Hime, Susan, 389,475 Himelk, George, 441 Hinds, Sondra, 49, 321 Hiner, Travis, 433, 475 Hinkle, John, 105 Hinman, David, 424 Hinman, Sandra, 306, 399 Hinn, Judy, 392 Hinrichs, Carol, 369 Hinrichs, Darwin, 357 Hinrichs, David, 424 Hinrichs, Steven, 475, 495 Hirsch, Edward, 31 Hirsch, Roger, 421, 475 Hirschbach, Kipton, 411, 475 Hirschbach, Starr, 377 Hittner, Neal, 89, 495 Hiza, Douglas, 355 Hladky, Ellen, 495 Hlavka, Linda, 256 Hoasch, R., 274 Hobson, Merk, 21, 95 Hodges, Sandra, 366, 475 Hodgson, Beth, 475, 493 Hodgson, Gerald, 52 Hodgson, Lennis, 255 Hodsdon, Gary, 357 Hoegemeyer, Ann, 387 Hoegemeyer, Marilyn, 72, 130, 387, 475, 487 Hoeman, Terry, 415 Hoemann, Jean, 379 Hoemen, John, 499 Hoesing, Gary, 42, 402 Hofeldt, Douglas, 417 Hoff, Ted, 499 Hoffman, Byford, 346 Hoffman, Charles, 59, 66 Hoffman, Jeanette, 399 Hoffman, Lawrence, 421 Hoffman, Rose, 322 Hoffmaster, Anne, 372 Hoffmaster, Jean, 77, 226, 372, 475 Hofschire, John, 499 Hogg, Mark, 208, 452 Hohensee, Eugene, 215, 421 Hohenstein, Roger, 408 Hoiberg, Eric, 433, 475 Hoig, Cynthia, 375 Holden, Barbara, 87, 92 Holder, Dr. Preston, 136 Holeman, Thomas, 344 Holland, Kathy, 372 Holland, Kenneth, 412 Holland, Thomas, 52 Holling, Roger, 52 Hollingsworth, Gary, 215, 415 Hollman, David, 76 Hollstein, Roxanne, 500 Holly, Carol, 372 Holm, Mark, 448 Holm, Mary, 250, 371 Holman, F., 315 Holman, J., 229 Holman, Richard, 441 Holman, Sudie, 250, 256, 381 Holmberg, Sharon, 501 Holmes, Richard, 426 Holmes, Robert, 428 Holmes, Tory, 456 Holmgren, Mary, 389 Holmquist, Jean, 117, 223, 241, 380, 381, 475 Holmstedt, Connie, 316, 318, 475 Holmstedt, James, 112, 346, 475 Holsclow, Marvin, 499 Holstein, D., 255 Holt, Craig, 456 Holtgrewe, Teresa, 361 Holyoke, E., 426 Holyoke, Thomas, 239, 421 Holys, Betty, 503 HOME ECONOMICS, COLLEGE OF, 46 HOME ECONOMICS CHAPTER, 49 Honke, Janice, 335 Hood, Kenneth, 358 Hookstra, Kerry, 438 Hoover, Floyd, 24 Hoover, Janice, 396 Hoover, Penelope, 335 Hoover, R., 86 Hopewell, Barbara, 381 Hopkins, Dennis, 331 Hoppe, Elizabeth, 389 Hoppe, Karen, 327, 328, 475 Horn, Dennis, 456 Horn, Fredrick, 92 Hornbostel, Laura, 328 Horowitz, Tatiana, 316 Hospodka, Ronald, 52 Hostetter, Wanda, 375 HOTEL LINCOL'N, 515 Hottovy, Ronald, 255 Houfek, David, 421, 475 Houfek, Dennis, 421, 475 Housel, Cathy, 122, 252, 383 Housewright, Carol, 377 Housley, Rodger, 412 Hoven, Karen, 381, 475 Howard, G., 56 Howard, James, 289 Howard, Jeanne, 189, 236, 251, 385 Howard, Juanita, 328 Howard, Linda, 324 Howard, Marilyn, 502 Howlett, John, 237 Hoyer, Virginia, 306, 372 Hoyt, Barbara, 42, 335 Hoyt, Letitia, 248, 377 Hroch, Michael, 253,412 Hruban, Paulette, 232, 391 Hubbard, Sharon, 379, 477 Hubble, Kathy, 500 Huber, Grace, 255, 322 Hudson, Joan, 63 Huebner, Joyce, 321 Huebner, Susan, 49, 255, 324 Huff, Leslie, 428 Huff, Patricia, 358 Huffaker, Kay, 210, 306, Johnson, Stanley, 419 389, 399, 477 Hughes Daniel, 112, 250 Hughes, Karen, 366 Hughes, Linda, 375 Hughes Lonnie, 366 Hughes Marilyn, 330, 335 Hughes Martha, 244, 306, 387 Hughes, Marvin, 45, 423 Hughes, Morris, 246, 250 Hulac, Penelope, 366, 477 Hull, David, 66 Huls, Connie, 328 Hultgren, Heide, 42, 255 Hultquist, Henry, 59, 66 Hummel, Judith, 328 Hummel, Mitzi, 250, 372 Hummel, Robert, 421 Hummel, William, 451 Humphrey, Jack, 412 Hungerford, Steven, 230 Hunt, Mary, 377 Hunter, Anne, 248, 389 Hunter, Lucinda, 379, 469 Hunter, Robert, 66 Hunter, Ross, 169 Hunter, Sandra, 379 Hurd, John, 289, 428 Hurd, Lois, 255 Hurich, Leeta, 252, 375 Hurlbutt, A., 64 Hurlbutt, Robert, 428 Hurst, Kenneth, 52 Hurst, Richard, 428 Husbands, Barbara, 379, 477 Huss, Leonard, 116, 118, 119, 495 Hussey, William, 130 Hutchins, Alfred, 286 Hutchins, Joel, 434 Hutchins, Steven, 411 Hutchinson, Marjorie, 38, 255, 375 Hutt, Susan, 328 Hyland, Patricia, 67, 369 Hynek, Jean, 49, 324 Hynes, John, 417 ICC, 216 Icenogle, Robert, 448 IEEE, 92 IFC, 208 lhle, Gail, 385 lkeya, Mary, 335 ller, Marguerite, 210, 381 llg, Joyce, 371 Iliff, Roger, 339 lmler, James, 342,477 lnbody, Everett, 346 lnbody, R., 282 Inman, Jennifer, 389, 477 lnness, Jimmy, 289 lnness, Ronald, 412 INNOCENTS, 224 INTRAMURALS, 304 Ireland, Ralph, 79 Irey, Clark, 431 lrey, Randy, 231 Irish L nne 201, 210, 388, 1 y Y 389, 477 lrmer, Sharon, 119, 318 Irons, Timothy, 448 Irvin, Catherine Jane, 112, 113, 379 Irvine, James, 433 Irving, Linda, 256, 383 Irwin, Linda, 372 lrwing, L., 250 Iseman, Toni, 389 Isman, Danny, 213,419 Itkin, Janice, 231, 395 Iverson, James, 215, 428 I Jack, Abram, 89, 456, 477 Jackson, Edward, 43, 45 Jackson, Linda, 306, 372 Jackson, Michael, 285 Jackson, Richard, 426 Jacobs, Evelyn, 316, 318, 477 Jacobsen, William, 86, 92 Jacobson, Dale, 452 Jacobson, Donale, 66, 90 Jacobson, Nicholas, 424 Jacobson, Susan, 375 Jacobson, Vicki, 366 Jahde, Merle, 404 Jakobsons, Irene, 371 Johannsen. Delbert. 89 Johansen, Darryl, 407 JOHN DEERE, 510 Johnette, Ronald, 297 Johnsen, James, 421 Johnsgard, Dr. Paul, 135 James, David, 415 James, Helen, 52 James, John, 433 James, L., 85, 87, 92, 339 James, Patricia, 328 Jamison, Donna, 328 Jamison, William, 346 Jan, Ronald, 357 Janda, Sharon, 361 Janik, Leonard, 274 Janike, Edward, 28 Janke, Lynn, 335 Janovec, David, 66 Jansen, Jane, 379, 477 Jansen, Ralph, 357 Janssen, Don, 252, 344, 347 Janssen, Twila, 335 Janulenica, Gerald, 434 Jarchow, John, 353 Jarmon, S., 282 Jasa, Jean, 502 Jasa, Lorene, 255, 335 Jaspersen, Jean, 248, 399 Jay, Robert, 41 Jay, Ronald, 412 Jeab, T., 59, 349 Jedlicka, Elaine, 387 Jedlicka, Leonard, 357 Jedlicka, Michael, 92, 357 Jeffrey, Michael, 230, 239, 411, 477 Jenkins, Tom, 456, 477 Jennings, Marian, 48, 322 Jenny, D., 426 Jensen Bruce, 105, 433 Jensen: Jack, 41 Jensen, Janine, 64, 396 Jensen, Kent, 45, 402 Jensen, Linda, 366 Jensen, Linda, 383 Jensen, Marilyn, 328 Johnson, Ann, 495 Johnson, Bonnie J., 385 Johnson, Bonnie K., 256 Johnson, Bonnie L., 316 Johnson, Carol, 385 Johnson, Carole, 328 Johnson, Curtis, 300, 431, 477 Johnson, Cynthia, 250, 378 379 Johnson, Darell, 112 Johnson, Denise, 383 Johnson, Douglas E., 424 Johnson, Douglas S., 105, 215, 456 Johnson, Eldon, 89, 126 Johnson, Genell, 377, 477 Johnson, Grant, 282 Johnson, H., 52 Johnson, James, 53, 342 Johnson, Jan, 117 Johnson, Janet, 119, 327, 328 Johnson, Joann, 371 Johnson, Joell, 396, 397, 477 Johnson, Joseph, 92 Johnson, Joyce, 396 Johnson, Julia, 379 Johnson Karen, 48, 72, 217, 2 37,385,477 Johnson, Kathryn, 105 Johnson, Kile, 411, 477 Johnson, Larry, 53, 214, 243, 411 Johnson, Linda, 236, 316 Johnson, Lowell, 355 Johnson, Marian, 366 Johnson, Margaret, 119 Johnson, Maureen, 391 Johnson, Mickey, 116 Johnson, lVliIton, 243, 423 Johnson, Nancy, 392 Johnson, Patricia, 335 Jensen, Richard, 495 Jensen, Ronald, 349 Jensen, William, 431 Jentges, Danelle, 237, 252, 383 Jepsen, Holly, 392 Jepsen, William, 433 Jess, John, 59 Jess, Mike, 93, 331, 333, 477 Jesse, Roy, 40 Jeter, Anthony, 263, 273, 274 Jett, Robert, 433, 477 Jewell, Duane, 402 Jewell, Gary, 42, 402 Jilek, Gloria, 369 Jilek, Marilyn, 477 JIM KING ENTERPRISES, 517 Jiracek, Lynn, 126, 383, 477 Jiskra, Alfred, 404, 477 Jiskra, L., 38, 255 Jobman, James, 423, 477 Johannes, Kenneth, 105, 412 Johnson, Ralph, 59,233 Johnson, Richard A., 342, 477 Johnson, Richard E., 411 Johnson, Rodney L., 66 Johnson, Rodney O., 431 Johnson, Rodney W., 43, 7 208, 2 34, 402, 47 Johnson, Steven, 121, 441 Johnson, Susan, 316 Johnson Johnson , Terry, 411 , Virginia, 500 Johnson, William H., 417 Johnson, William W., 264, 273 Johnston, Barry, 411, 477 Johnston, David, 53 JOHN VAN BLOOM 81 ASSOCIATES, 525 Jonas, Larry, 423 Jones, Bruce, 289, 412 Jones, Charles, 118 Jones, Christina, 327 Jones, Corwin, 53, 92, 339 Jones, Donald, 42 Karre, Richard, 431 Kassebaum, Cherly, 252, 315 Jones, Donna, 119, 399 Jones, Donnamarie, 356 Jones Donnelly, 122, 237, 254,, 377 Jones, F., 300 Jones, George, 130 Jones, James, 52 Jones, Jerry, 408, 477 Jones, Jon, 42 Jones, Judith, 330, 335 Jones, Karen, 122, 372 Jones, Kenneth, 252, 407 Jones, Larry, 456 Jones, Linda, 399 Jones, Patricia, 335 Jones, Robert, 446 Jones, Sheryl, 375 Jordan, Betty, 383, 477 Jordan, Michael, 297 Jordan, Steven, 344 Jorgensen John, 448 Jorgensen, Lois, 63 Jorgensen, Maryann, 86, 381 Jorgensen Richard, 255 Jorgensen Ruth, 38 Joselyn, Dudley, 383 Jost, Bonnie, 256 JOURNALISM, SCHOOL OF, 68 Joy, Jacquelyn, 126 Joynt, Janis, 372, 477 Joynt, Stephen, 101 Jubeck, Thomas, 282 Judd, Walter, 139 Juffer, Kristin, 326, 377 Juhn, Eae-Sung, 346 Julian, Claire, 399 Jungck, Richard, 101 JUNIOR IFC, 215 Junker, Helen, 501 Jurgens, Jolene, 335 Juricek, Charles, 40, 252, 355 Justice, Judith, 77 Kaarma, Eero, 253 Kaberna, Elizabeth, 501 Kadlek, Mrs., 52 Kahn, A., 273 Kahrl, J., 52 Kallos, E., 315 Kalvoda, Norman, 417 Kamler, Sandra, 379 Kanouff, Carol, 375 Kant, William, 286 Kanter, Dwight, 40, 404, 477 KAPPA ALPHA THETA, 384 KAPPA DELTA, 386 KAPPA EPSILON, 113 KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA, 388 KAPPA PSI, 112 KAPPA SIGMA, 424 Karel, Larry, 421 Karnopp, Dennis, 101 Karo, Max, 357 538 Kastanek, Larry, 38, 255, 402 Kastanek, Loren, 41 Kathol, Suzanne, 228, 385 Kathka, Timothy, 86 Kaufman, Janice, 48, 149, 255, 324 Kauk, Kauk, Carolyn, 391 Doyle, 52 Kaulins, Andis, 423 Kaup, James, 456 Kearns, Kathryn, 105, 335 Keating, Linda, 70, 73, 251, 477 Keenan, John, 445, 477 Keenan, Kathryn, 399 Keenan, Lanita, 396 Keetle, Roger, 404 Kehm, Karen, 502 Kehr, Alan, 349 Kehr, John, 216 Keifer Keim, Keim, Keller , David, 342 Ardith, 255, 385 Mary, 328, 372 Douglas 446 Keller: John, 415 Keller Keller 1 Keller, Kelley Kelley Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kenneth, 30 Nelda, 381,477 Kenneth, 30 , David, 495 , Kathy, 250, 389 Dennis, 347 G., 274 Robert, 255 Ronald, 41 Sheila, 366 Kemble, Steven, 415 Kemist, Gregory, 91, 448 Kemist, Julianna, 119, 392 Kenagy, John, 104, 208, 431 Kennedy, Ann, 244, 385 Kennedy, Karen, 503 Kennedy, Kathy, 391 Kennedy, Michael, 274 Kennedy, Patrick, 417, 473 Kennedy, Roger, 53, 346 Kennedy, Ronald, 87, 92 Kent, Linda, 500 Kerchal, Sherly, 391 Kerkhoff, Jon, 230, 241 Kermoade, Darrell, 421 Kern, Jere, 331,477 Kerrol, G., 250 Kersenbrock, Kaye, 126, 210, 372 Kersey, Bernard, 417 Keslar, Roger, 76 Kessler, Linda, 385 Ketchmark, Joseph, 347 Ketteler, Steven, 424 Keyser, Gayle, 364 Kharas, Charlotte, 383 Kiekhaefer, Linda, 252 Kierstead, Roberta, 56, 252 Kiffin, Deborah, 210, 399, 477 Killer, G., 119 Killinger, Stanley, 421 Kilzer, Tom, 448, 477 Kimberlin, Vicki, 119, 385 Kimbrough, Harriet, 335 Kimes, Jean, 361 Kimmel, Miles, 274 King, Esther, 361 King, Jerry, 358 King, John, 421 King, Keith, 255 King, Kent, 402 King, Linda, 318,477 King, Terry, 424 Kingman, Katherine, 335 Kingman, Nadine, 366 KINGS FOOD HOST, 518 Kingston, Terry, 371,477 Kinkead, Jane, 335 Kinney, Jane, 372 Kinyoun, James, 104, 213, 234, 241, 243, 448 KIRK MOTOR INC., 524 Kirk, Thomas, 423, 477 Kirkland, Myrna, 117 Kirkland, Ronald, 262, 274, 278 Kirkman, Michael, 231 Kiser, John, 421, 477 Kitt, Jerolyn, 42 Kitt, Karrol, 42 Klarich, John, 102 Klass, Klein, Dick, 270, 285 Gary, 194, 357, 477 Klein, John, 214 Klein, Leland, 41, 126 Klein, Regan, 86 Klein, Regis, 328 Klein, Robert, 477 Klein, Ronald, 85, 87, 91, 92 Klein, Sharolyn, 335 Kleinschmit, Martin, 38, 404 Klem, Robert, 419 Kleppinger, Michael, 421 Klessig, Cheryl, 366 Klimes, Jane, 122,377 Kline, V., 255 Kling, Carli, 250, 381 Klingenberg, Catherine, 392 Klingman, Barbara, 49, 255, 322 Klingman, Carol, 327, 328 Klingman, Margaret, 255 Klinger, Michael, 119,428 Klinker, James, 42 Klintberg, Jeffery, 441 Klippert, Donald, 456 Klotz, Peggy, 389 Klutman, Ronald, 342 Kmoch, James, 38 Knaak, David, 477, 495 Knapp, Robert, 431 Knee, S., 426 Knievel, D., 52 Knight, George, 119, 428 Knight, Kathleen, 250, 389 Knoflicek, Kathryn, 335 Knoles, Jerold, 448, 477 Knoll, Jeffrey, 208 Knolle, Neil, 428 Knott, Nancy, 396 Knott, Russ, 434, 499 Knox, Gregory, 431 Knudson, Lyle, 423 Knudson, S., 52 KNUS, 70 Kobes, Joseph, 441 Kobza, Daniel, 282 Kobza, Norman, 92 Koch, Leland, 93, 408, 478 Kodet, Edward, 86, 216, 350, 478 Koerber, Keith, 421 Koefoot, Gretchen, 385 Koenig, Duane, 499 Koepke, Judy, 72 Koepke, Keith, 446, 478 Koerber, R., 105 Kohl, Jerome, 252 Kohles, Sherry, 322 Kohlmeier, Carolee, 378, 399 Kohlmeier, Randall, 104, 243, 431 Kohtz, David, 421 Kohtz, Sandra, 322 Kolar, Cletas, 273, 391 Kolb, Carol, 328 Kolb, Harold, 347, 478 Kolder, Neil, 86 Kontos, James, 253 Koozer, Robert, 112 Kopf, Patty, 500 Kopp, Oswald, 136 Korpisch, Lawrence, 282 Korshoj, James, 217, 411, 478 Kort, Barry, 442 Kort, Tom, 52 Korte, Katherine, 77, 372, 478 Kortus, Joel, 297 Kos, Dennis, 86 Koss, R., 42 Kosch, Jane, 366 Kosman, Dianna, 207, 381, 479 KOSMET KLUB, 238 Kosmiki, Cynthia, 335 Koss, Robert, 357 Kostos, Nick, 428 Kot, Pamela, 254, 387 Kotecha, Vinod, 72, 342, 479 Kotil, Judith, 375 Kotouc, Ann, 210, 244, 384, 385, 479 Kottas, Michael, 112 Kottas, Sharon, 391 Kovar, Bonnie, 391 Kovar, Ernest, 116 Kovarik, Leland, 214 Koves, Charlene, 366 Kowrack, Linda, 358 Kracke, Alan, 412 Kraeger, David, 38, 355 Kraeger, Alan, 421 Krajeski, Susan, 387 Krajnik, Duane, 255,404 Kramer, Carol, 248, 257, 375 Kramer, Douglass, 412 Kramer, L., 282 Kranz, Ronald, 448 Kratochuil, JoAnn, 479, 495 Kraus, Marietta, 247 Krause, David, 441, 479 Krause, Jacqueline, 383 Krause, Kathleen, 322 Krausharr, Gail, 387 Krauss, George, 101 Krebs, Donald, 424 Kreifels, David, 419 Kreifels, Gerry, 375, 479 Krenk, Beverly, 119 Krenk, Cary, 452 Krenk, Leslie, 452 Kreuscher, Wayne, 230, 237, 452 Kricsfeld, Barry, 442 Krieger, Judith, 391 Krieger, Thomas, 412 Kriesel, Ronald, 479, 495 Krizelman, Sheldon, 442, 443, 479 Kroeger, Duane, 407 Kroese, Ted, 116 Krohn, Kay, 396 Kropp, Gregory, 130 Krotter, Gerald, 76, 431, 479 Kruce, Gary, 358 Krueger, Candace, 256 Krueger Diane, 399, 479 Krueger Eugene, 401 Krueger Glenn, 92, 479, 493 Kuster, Curtis, 59 Kyle, Irma, 107 L Laase, Leroy, 54 Labelle, Judith, 126, 246, 377 Lacy, Victor, 59 Lagerberg, Steven, 105 Lagerstrom, 105, 399 Laging, Duard, 54 Laing, Martha, 250, 392 Laing, Donna, 366 Lake, Laura, 391 Lakin, Diane, 379 Lamb, Esther, 503 Lamb, Ivan, 408 LAMBDA TAU, 105 Lambenty, Leonard, 499 Lambert, David, 402 Lambert, Ray, 112 Lamberty, Michael, 66, 408 Lambrecht, Joyce, 501 Lamm, Marion, 330, 335 Lammli, Walter, 126 Lamp, Joanne, 379 Lamphiear, Susan, 399 Land, Donna, 502 Landgren, Mary, 117, 327 Lawrence, Jeremy, 371 LAW, COLLEGE OF, 98 LAW REVIEW BOARD, 101 Laws, Richard, 252 Lawton, Everett, 56 Lawton, William, 434 Layman, Patricia, 252, 333, 335 Layton, Linda, 375 Layton, Roberta, 399 Layton, Thomas, 67, 118 Leach, Beth, 105, 366 Leach, Donnie, 119,495 Leach, Lynne, 503 Leader, Daniel, 45 Leader, Sharon, 361 Leamer, Linda, 372 Leapley, Naylon, 421 Leber, Abe, 442 Lechtenberg, Judith, 324 Lechtenberg, Victor, 40, 43 Krueger, Keith, 408, 479 Krueger, Lyle, 289 Kruger, Curtis, 87, 92 Kruger, James, 253 Krugman, Eldon, 347 Krull, Richard, 342,479 Krumland, Karen, 328 Kruse, Elaine, 247 Kruse, Joel, 130 Kubicek, Clarence, 479 Kubicek, John, 355 Kucera, Diane, 255, 375 Kucera, Richard, 342 Kuck, Lawrence, 239 Kudera, Judith, 256, 328 Kudrna, Roger, 274, 407 Kuehl, A., 274 Kuehner, Janice, 335 Kuester, Kathy, 369 Kugler, Linda, 392 Kugler, Oma, 324 Kuhr, Emily, 391 Kuhr, Georgia, 335 Kuker, Gerald, 495 Kuklin, Victor, 442 Kula. Gary, 130 Kulish, Mary, 122, 249, 383 Kulla, Carrie, 389 Kullberg, James, 407, 479 Kunc, Dale, 421 Kunc, Susan, 392 Kuncl, W., 339 Kunzman, James, 452 KUON, 71 Kupen, David, 499 Kupper, Dave, 426 Kurtz, Cynthia, 426 Kurtzman, Charles, 442 Kusek, Michael, 342 Kushner, Jeffrey, 241, 442 Kuska, Kathleen, 385 Kuski, Susan, 366, 479 Kusserow, K., 282 Landolt, P., 105 Lane, Linda, 479 Lane, Linda A., 117, 369, 392, 479 Langdon, D., 289 Langdon, Jerry, 286 Langford, Jean, 371, 479 Langhoff, Charles, 428 Lanigan, David, 446 Lankford, R., 249,411 Lanning, Karen, 366,479 Lantz, Stuart, 290, 293, 295 Lantz, William, 38 Larmon, Courtney, 372 Larsen, Gail, 70, 73 Larsen, Gary, 198, 208, 213, 243 Larsen Helen, 377 Larsen JoAnn, 328 Larsen Thomas, 452 Larson Alan, 56 Larson Garold, 40 Larson Gary, 104, 408 Larson John, 85, 86, 479 Larson, Lyman, 101 Larson, Lynne, 105, 391 Larson, Roger, 417 Larson, Rosemary, 392 Larson, Ruth, 122, 210, 377 Lassen, Robert, 215, 408 Lattin, Judith, 328 Lattin, Patti, 392, 479 Lecolte, R., 338 Lee, Beverly, 502 Lee, Byron, 456, 479 Lee, Diane, 119, 387, 479 Lee, Howard, 342 Lee, J., 48 Leech, Robert, 52 Letko, Jeffrey, 76, 442 Lefler, Francis, 88, 92, 342 Lehigh, John, 456 Lehr, Donna, 322 Leibbrandt, Vernon, 43, 44, 479 Leigh, Anne, 379 Leininger, Donald, 424, 479 Leising, James, 255, 357 Leising, Jerome, 38, 41 Leistritz, Fredrick, 214, 243, 402, 431 Leitner, Roger, 297, 411 Lelchook, Doris, 395 Lemke, George, 53 Leners, Linda, 480 Lentz, Donald, 59, 60 Lentz, Gary, 347, 480 Leonard, Sally, 376, 377 Leonard, Susan, 72 Lerner, Paul, 353 Leroy, Michael, 105,445 Leshbough, C., 119 Lessig, Pamela, 256 Lessig, Verle, 342 Lester, Marsha, 122, 210, 223, 249, 371, 480 Letheby, Ronald, 253, 417, 480 Levinson, R., 256 Lewis, Dixie, 322 Lewis James, 93 Lewis Lewis Lewis Lewis, John, 331,480 Marshall, 442 Priscilla, 256, 328 Thomas, 428 Laughlin, Michael, 495 Loudon, Roy, 26 Launer, Linda, 52 Lauritsen, Randall, 93 Lavelle, Judith, 256, 335 Law, Richard, 52, 346 Law, Sandra, 399 Lawler, Patricia, 369 Lawrence, Donna, 371 Lezotte, Robert, 342, 480 Libal, George, 38, 44, 255, 402, 480, 481 Libal, Gene, 402 Libal, James, 116 Lichtenberg, Ronald, 59 Lichtenberg, Rosella, 391 Licking, Charles, 38, 357, 480 Lieberman, Trudy, 210, 244, 252, 394, 395 Liefer, Rober, 347 Liesueld, Ardith, 250 Liewer, Paul, 48, 85, 90, 93, 452 Liggett, Lee, 282, 285 Light, Vicki, 256 Liliedahl, Richard, 421 Liliedahl, Roger, 421 Lincoln, Diana, 366 Lincoln, Susan, 228, 395 Lind, Janet, 371 Lind, Kristen, 385 Lind, Richard, 41 Lind, William, 76,417,480 Lindahl, Loren, 76,402 Lindekugel, Claude, 125 Linders, Trudy, 387 Lindgren, Dale, 355 Lindgren, Kim, 375, 480 Lindholm, Steven, 123 Lindsey, William, 401 Lindquiet, Diane, 399 Lindquist, Roger, 112, 113, 480, 495 Lindquist, Tycha, 250, 389 Lindsay, Kathleen, 500 Lindsey, William, 480 Lindvall, Ronald, 38,43 Line, Tom, 297 Lingo, Robert, 101 Lints, Robert, 59, 282 Lipp, Martin, 499 Lipp, Rochelle, 395 Lippincott, Jerry, 347 Lippstreu, Kenneth, 415 Lisec, James, 347 Lisec, Thomas, 89, 126 Liss, L., 59 Little, Rodney, 116 Little, Thomas, 441 Littrell, Kenneth, 118 Litz, Linda, 500 Livengood, Geri, 117, 375, .480 Livers, Nancy, 371 Livingston, Kenneth, 86 Lloyd, G., 89 Lockhart, Cheryl, 377, 480 Lockhart, Glen, 424 Lockhorn, Fayrene, 255, 322 Lodwig, Keefe, 272, 285 Loecker, Thomas, 499 Loenig, Dianne, 252 Loers, Wayne, 347 Loftus, John, 342 Logan, Marshall, 38, 43, 355, 480 Logeman, Carol, 44, 391 Logemann, Darrell, 347 Logemann, Larry, 85, 93 Logemann, Sidney, 49, 446 Lohaus, Jeanne, 381 Lohr, Roger, 92 Long, Mary, 391 Long, Robert, 116 Longsdorf, Ronald, 445 Lonnquist, George, 411 Lonnquist, Ladd, 214, 243, 249, 411 Lonowski, Delmer, 353 Looker, Daniel, 411 5 4 Loomis, Lorraine, 371 Loos, James, 401, 415 Loos, Larry, 438 Loose, Terry, 428 , Loreman, Judith, 49, 255, 321 Lorenz, Mary, 377 Lorenz, Stefen, 252 Loschen, Judith, 328 Loseke, Beverly, 366 Loseke, Gary, 38, 41 Losh, Mary, 252 Lott, Earle, 438 Lott, Robert, 213 Louder, Robert, 123 Loudon, Roy, 28 Lovejoy, David, 342 LOVE MEMORIAL HALL, 322 Loughran, Shirley, 324 Loutzenheiser, Nancy, 381 Lowe, Robert, 89, 126 Lowell, Terry, 65 Lucas, Sally, 328 Lucas, Stephen, 41, 42, 402 LUCILE DUERR, 521 Luckasen, John, 104, 208, 225, 428, 480 Luckey, Gerald, 407 Ludi, Janece, 383 Ludlow, Kathryn, 379 Ludwich, Georgia, 372 Ludwick, James, 338, 342 Ludwig, Ellen, 392 Luebbe, Duane, 347 Luebbe, Jan, 48, 322, 480 Luebbe, Verlyn, 252 Lueck, William, 38 Luehrs, Roger, 255, 423 Luhe, Christine, 389 Lund, Christine, 385 Lund, John, 499 Lund, Michael, 38, 423 Lundak, Edward, 27 Lundeen, Wallis, 48, 72, 254, 255, 358, 480 Lundehugel, C., 130 Lundford, Wayne, 445 Lundmark, Berty, 112, 113 Lundquist, Gloria, 396 Lundy, Frank, 26 Lunger, Kathy, 371 Lussetto, Minnie, 335 Luther, Clayton, 300, 330 Luzio, Leon, 252, 342 Lydick, John, 85, 89 Lyle, Brenda, 328 Lynn, Laura, 250, 392 Lyon Carolyn, 201, 369 Lyon, Phillip, 59 Lytle, James, 116 Maack, Gary, 446 Maas, Marylin, 49, 255, 324 Macarelli, Laura, 392 MacDonald, Charles, 452 Mach, Janet, 369, 475, 480 Mack, Craig, 86 Mackenstadt, Vicki, 316, 480 O Maclay, Donni, 237, 244, 256, 381 Madden, Susan, 389 Maddison, Barbara, 396, 480 Madison, Paul, 112, 347 Madole, Elizabeth, 385 MADRIGALS, 58 Madsen, Bruce, 402 Madson, Buzz, 208, 239, 428, 480 Magee, Wayland, 255, 404 Magglore, John, 434 Magner, Roger, 412 Magnuson, Veldon, 417 Maguire, James, 437 Mahaffy, John, 411 Mahar, Judith, 122, 241, 383 Mahel, Craig, 437 Mahlstedt, Patricia, 385 Mahon, Mary, 321 Mahoney, Linda, 236, 248, 383 Maixmer, Patricia, 403 Maixner, Robert, 445 Major, Barbara, 328 Majors, Ronald, 452 Maldonado, Anthony, 470, 497 Malone, Bonnie, 480, 793 Malone, Linda, 387 Malone, Robert, 497 Malovoz, Mark Thomas, 105, 448 Malzer, Gary, 355 Mamolf, Doug, 445 Manary, David, 59, 428 Manion, Diane, 316 Manley, Eric, 342 Mannschreck, Stephen, 239, 433 Manstedt, Launa, 256, 316 Mantel, Marilyn, 53, 63, 315, 316, 480 Manzel, Robert, 353 Marburger, John, 347 March, Floyd, 480 March, Terry, 424 Marchello, Linda, 387 MARCHINAG BAN-D, 61 Margaret, David, 434 Maricle, Chip, 40 Markel, Randall, 445 Marker, Doralie, 335, 480 Markham, Jan, 328 Markley, Michelle, 371 Marks, JoAnn, 503 Markus, W., 426 Marlowe, Charles, 421 Maronde, Donna, 375 Marrs, Ronald, 415 Marrson, Richard, 434 Marsan, Richard, 499 Marsden, Beverley, 501 Marsh, Floyd, 40, 423 Marsh, J., 282 Marsh, Philip, 59 Marsh, Sherry, 64 Marshall, Jennifer, 210, 236, 237, 252, 383 Marshall, Rebecca, 213, 234 Marshall, Stephen, 411 Marshall, William, 208, 239, 432, 433, 480 Martin, Dave, 119,480 Martin, David R., 421 Martin, David S., 118, 493 Martin, Eileen, 316 Martin, Fred, 489 Martin Gerald 421 Meedel, Candace, 372 Meeske, John, 116 Mehmken, Roy, 344 Meiberger, lra, 442 Meints, Connie, 329 Meier, Ellie, 391 Meier, Joel, 304 Meier, Kenneth, 92 Meier, Linda, 316 Meier Sarah, 122, 384 Martin, Janice, 64 Martin Jody, 256 Martin John, 441 Martin John, 407 Martin Joyce, 126 Martin Larry, 415 Martin Max, 217, 236,411 Martin Sidney 86 Martinez, Tony: 66 Meiselnbach, Roger, 456, 481 Meismer, Linda, 391 Melchiors, Kay, 389, 481 Melichar, Marcia, 48, 49, 197 Mellor, Susan, 385, 482 Mellor, Timothy, 456 Martinson, Craig, 437 Martinson, Keith, 215 Marymee, Michael, 42 Mason, Gaye, 328 Mason, Jodie, 250 Mason, Larry, 441 Mason, Norma, 392 MASQUERS, 56 Mathers, Helen, 48, 49, 255, 322, 480 Mathews, Steven, 254, 424 Mathias, Dennis, 123 Matousek, Maxine, 228, 233, 366 Matt, Paul, 445 Matthews, Allen, 451 Mattson, David, 400 Mattson, Debra, 372 Mattson, Dorris Rae, 362, 480 Mattson, Martha, 385 Matya, Cheryl, 377 Matzen, George, 342 Maulsby, Richard, 56 Maurer, Pyllis, 324 Maurer, Patricia, 228, 372 Maurice, Donnie, 116 Maus, Paulette, 210, 371 Maxwell, James, 342, 480 Maxwell, Kenneth, 105, 433, 481 Maxwell, Lawrence, 53 May, Candy, 56, 159, 196, 330 May, Holly, 399 May, Janice, 396 May Linda, 328 May Michael, 401 May, Stephen, 289 Mayfield, James, 437 Mayfield, Paul, 252, 407 Mazour, David, 216, 481 Mazour, Janice, 49, 215, 322 Mazour, Joe, 357 Mazurak, Cynthia, 361 Mazurak, Stephen, 53 Meader, Gary, 342, 481 Means, Marianne, 138 Means, Steven, 415 Mears, Claudia, 315 MEDICINE, COLLEGE OF, 102 Meduna, Robert, 38, 421 Meeboer, Richard, 446 Meeboer, William, 446, 481 Melton, J., 274, 282 Menke, A., 52 Menke, Bruce, 89, 412, 482 Menke, Richard, 408 MEN'S GLEE, 59 Menter, Robert, 499 Menze, James, 408 Mercer, Patricia, 49, 255, 321 Merriam, Georgia, 371, 482 Merrick, Tom, 499 Merrioh, Tom, 434 Merten, Robert, 437 Merz, Georgia, 316 Meshie r, William, 451 Messick, William, 412 Messineo, Diane, 383 Messler, Neeld, 410 Messmer, Michael, 56, 252, 342 Metcalfe, Stuart, 419 Metschke, Harlan, 342 Metten 456 brink, Harlan, 126, Metz, Philip, 434 Metzher, Gary, 41 Metzger, J. Smedley, 441 Metzger, Victoria, 126, 249, 377 Meyer, Meyer, Bruce, 415 Darrell, 408 Meyer, Della, 116, 369, 482 Meyer, Dwain, 43, 44 Meyer, Gary, 452 Meyer, Gaylen, 52 Meyer, Gloria, 119, 362 Meyer, Harlan, 353 Meyer, Jane, 241 Meyer, Joyce, 122, 214, 246, 375 Meyer, Judith, 366 Meyer, Lavai, 257, 333, 336 Meyer, Linda, 336 Meyer, Lloyd, 424 Meyer, Susan, 67 Meyers, Linda, 378 Meyers, Robert, 59 Meylan, Wayne, 274 Michael, Connie, 387, 482 Michael, Nancy, 336 Michaiski, Terrence, 41, 43, 241, 356 Michel, Diane, 210, 223, 234, 383, 482 Mickel, P., 122 431 MISLE CHEVROLET, 521 MIDWEST LIFE INSURANCE, 511 Mihelic, Barbara, 336 Mikes, Frank, 42 Milbourn, Douglas, 408 Miles, Linda, 214, 361, 354, 482 Miles, Richard, 426 Militzer, Walter, 51 Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, 256, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, 452 Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller 409, Miller, Barbara, 375, 482 Carol, 336 Cecilia, 316 Charles D., 448 Charles, 75, 116 Clayton, 38, 423 Douglas, 236, 252, 424 Gail, 375 George, 26 Ginger, 381 Jana, 333 Janice, 336 James, 105, 431 Jane, 385 Jerry F., 255 John R., 404 John R., 252 Kathleen, 375 Kathleen K., 399 Kathleen L., 336 Kenneth A., 285, Larry, 448, 482 Lynn, 331, 482 Marilyn, 371, 482 Richard A., 286, 419 Robert E., 76, 402 Roger, 112 Sharon, 381 Shirley, 256 Stanley, 208, 408, 482 Stephen, 42 Miller, Susan T., 392 Milligan, Barbara, 119.316 Milligan, Gerald, 41 Milligan, Robert, 43, 236, 407 Milliken, B., 49 Mills, Bill, 41, 402 Mills, Estel, 285 Mills, John, 421 Mills, Moris, 42, 45, 404 Mimeck, John, 346 Minette, David, 419 Miner, Bruce, 437 Minick, David, 428, 482 Minier, William, 208, 236, Misner, Jo, 119 MISS CORNHUSKER, 180 Mitchell, Anne, 387 Mitchell, Cheryl, 379 Mitchell, Judith, 316 Mitchell, Virginia, 250 Mitchell, Willie, 86, 88 Mitzner, Gayle Ann, 248, 372 Moates, Thomas, 53 Modenstein, Fay, 395 Modrell, Donna, 372, 482 Modrell, Jacqueline, 372 Moe, Barbara, 316 Moehling, Susan, 501 Moellendorf, Jo-AI, 392 Moes, Donald, 417 Moles, Wayne, 452 Moll, Lee, 252, 415 Moller, Kathleen, 392 Moller, Lynn, 59, 66, 252 Mollison, John, 59,66 Moneypenny, Robert, 123 Monnich, Fred, 73, 494 Monnich, Herman, 70, 412 Monson, John, 419 Mooberry, James, 433 Mozden, John, 89 Mudgett, Carol, 228, 372 Mueller, Charles, 456 Mueller Mueller , Gayle, 40, 355 , Joyce, 383 Mueller, Marvin, 274, 419 Mueller, Sharon, 396 MU EPSILON NU, 118 Muff, Linda, 67, 244, 383, 482 Mulder, Daniel, 412 Mulder, Roger, 431 Mullen, Arthur, 120 Moody, Cassandra, 383 Moon, Bonnie, 316 Moore, Byron, 401 Moore, Everett, 353 Moore, James, 93 Moore, Kathy, 42 Moore, Mary, 336 Moore, Milan, 423, 482 Moore, Pamela, 315 Moore, Robert, 282, 428 Moore, Moore, Moore, Stephen, 122, 123 Susan, 392, 482 Thomas M., 116 Moravec, Carol A., 377 Moredich, Cheri, 372 Morey, David, 92 Morgan, Barbara, 399 Morgan, Carol, 396 Morgan, Carolyn, 399 Morgan David L., 355 Morgan, Dennis, 41 Morgan, James, 434 Morgan, Scott, 38, 355 Morgan, Thomas, 411 Morian, Lynne, 73, 495 Morin, Jack, 59 Morley, Morotz, Morris, Morris, Morris, Morris, Morris, Morris, 482 Morris, 482 Morriso Morriso Morriss James, 424 Loy, 285, 408 Carole, 372 Donald, 122, 123 Julia, 231 Lloyd, 41 Mary, 72, 372 Mona, 316, 318, Steven, 89, 448, n, Frank, 18 n, Jon, 445, 482 ey, Sharon, 387, 482, 487 Morrow, Leslie, 38 Morrow, Patricia, 385 Morrow, Sara, 213, 254, 385 Morse, Michal, 16, 122, 123 Morse, M., 339 MORTAR BOARD, 222 Morton, Stephen, 417 Morton, Virgina, 336 Morton, Wayne, 344 Moseke, Carole, 256, 318 Moseman, Janet, 315 Moseman, Mark, 86 Moseman, Susan, 42 Mossman, Jim, 433 Motycka, Joan, 501 Mousel, Richard, 446 Mowbray, Bill, 446, 482 Mowrer, Larry, 421 Moxham, Ronald, 482, 495 Mullen, Margaret, 333 Mullen, Owen, 331 Mullen, Paul, 347 Mullenix, Barbara, 122 Mullens, John, 125 Muller, Gale, 118, 119, 214, 216, 357, 482 Muller, Gary, 357 Muller, Gerald, 452 Mulliken, Becky, 48 Mullins, J., 131 Mullins, Priscilla, 72, 88, 482, 495 Muma, Mary, 336 Mumm, Kenneth, 408 Munson, Stephen, 446 Munter, Mike, 38, 41, 402, 482 MU PHI EPSILON, 65 Murdock, S., 52 Murphy, Patrick, 249, 421 Murray, Daniel, 122, 123, 347 Murray, David, 250, 419 Musselman, Ann, 377 Musser, Wesley, 43 Myers, Cary, 215, 419 Myers, Harry, 85, 87, 92, 482, 493 Myers, Judith, 383 Myers, Marilyn, 387 Myers, Richard, 38, 88, 92, 482, 495 Myhren, Robert, 448 Mc McAdams, Gayle, 118, 213, 285 McAIlaster, Cary, 415, McAllaster, Nancy, 100 McAllister, Lee, 335 McArthur, J., 61 McBride, Jack, 27 McCaffrey, Mac, 105, 445 McCall, Carol, 387 McCall, J., 52 McCall, Roderick, 252, 338 McCall, Sabra, 247, 391 McCallum, Margaret, 335 McCarthy, Curtis, 282 McCarthy, John, 105, 421 McCartney, Judy, 377, 481 McCartney, Mickey, 117, 256, 306, 379, 481 McCartney, Patricia, 387 McCartney, Robert, 451 McCarty, Bryan, 123, 451 McClanahan, Charles, 438 McClatchey, Merrill, 423 McClendon, Gary, 424 McCloughan, Shirley, 481, 495 McClurg, Donna, 316,481 McClymont, Joan, 213, 237 385 McClymont, Patricia, 381 McClymont, S., 552 McComb, Glenn, 445 McConnel, Max, 431 McConnell, Mac, 297 McConnell, Dr., 74 McConnell, Nancy, 329 McCuistion, Martha, 379 McFarland, James, 252, 297 McFarland, Mary, 252,392 McFee, J., 426 McGaffin, Sheryl, 369 McGee, Sally, 385 McGhie, Carla, 399 McGill, Linda, 255, 361 McGill, Patrick, 289 McGill, Steven, 42 McGinnis, Jim, 52 McGinnis, Ronald, 445 McGough, Anne, 249, 252 McGowan, John, 428 McGrath, LuAnn, 250 Mclntosh, Larayne, 335 Mclntyre, Jay, 426, 499 Mclntyre, Keith, 101, 214 Mclntyre, Nicki, 335 McKain, Linda, 335 McKeag, Douglas, 119 McKee, Martha, 399 McKee, Robert, 438, 481 McKenzie, Jean, 387 McKinzie, Charles, 424 McLain, Larry, 66 McLaughlin, Gary, 419 McLeod, David, 358 McLeod, Helen, 399 McLeod, James, 401 McLeod, Sharon, 500 McMahell, Albert, 421 McManaman, Richard, 448 McManus, Mary, 251, 392 McMaster, Margo, 377 McMullen, Bruce, 104, 237, 254, 407 McNair, John, 91, 331 McNair, Michael, 428 McNally, Susanne, 67, 383, 481 McNamara, Joan, 387 McNeel, Constance, 387 McNeff, Marvin, 347 McNeff, Sherry, 335 McNeil, Michael, 344, 347 McNergney, Robert, 215, 452 McNickle, Bruce, 417 McPherson, Samuel, 417 McPherson, Steven, 105 McQuistan, Neal, 452 McReynolds, Connie, 329 McVey, P., 76 Naden, Michael, 452 N CLUB, 273 Naeve, Michael, 215,407 William, 421 4 Nakasato, Earl, 351 Nall, Max, 93,412,482 Nammour, J., 52 Napier, Michael, 412 Napoliello, David, 131 Nardine, Gaylord, 342 Narish, Louis, 274 Nass, D., 256 Nathan, Kenneth, 248, 357 Nau, Richard, 239, 408 Navin, Cheryl, 381, 442 Navrude, Norman, 88, 482, 495 NAVY ROTC, 128 NEBRASKA BOOKSTORE, 517 NEBRASKA UNlON, 514 Nebuda, Robert, 252 Nedrow, Jeanette, 67, 387 Neel, Ronald, 66, 213, 415, 482 Neeman, Roger, 342, 482 Neibauer, Gary, 300, 433 Neimanis, Velta, 316 Nelsen Stephen, 433 Nelson, Bob, 497 Nelson Curtis, 344 Nelson Daniel, 431 Nelson David, 424 Nelson, Dennis, 456, 482 Nelson, Donald, 53, 86, 456, 482 Nelson, Douglas, 446 Nelson, Douglas L., 357 Nelson, Gayle, 456 Nelson, Jack, 446 Nelson, Jean, 369 Nelson, Joe, 438 Nelson, Lynda, 49, 321, 336 Nelson, Melinda, 52, 255 Nelson, Milton, 355, 482 Nelson, R., 89 Nelson, Richard, 353 Nelson, Robert, 452 Nelson, Ronald, 482 Nelson, Sherye, 369 Nelson, Steven, 346 Nelson, Terry, 372 Nelson, Wanda, 387 Nelson, William H., 253 Nelson, William L., 347 Nerud, Michael, 38, 228, 232, 255, 402 Nestle, Susan, Neuhaus, Gary, 59 Neumann, Roger, 456 Neumeister, Kent, 141, 213, 225,331,482 Neumeister, Nesha, 383 Newberg, Leon, 448 Newby, Glenn, 85, 88, 89 Newhouser, Jayne, 371 Newman, Charles, 426, 499 Newth, Lynn, Newton, John, 428 Newton, Robert, 104, 217 Newville, Nancy, 482, 496 Newville, Sally, 377 NHRRF, 119 NIA, 257 Nicholl, Kathy, 372 Nichols, Carol, 321 Nichols, Harold, 342 2 Nichols, K., 52 Nicholson, Alice, 381 Nicholson, Barbara, 396, 483 Nicholson, Morton, 85, 88, 91, 93,456,482 Nickel, Paul, 123 Nickerson, Thomas, 273, 285, 433, 482 Nicolaus, Neal, 408 Nicoll, Bruce, 28 Nicoll, Kathryn, 372 Niederhous, Ronald, 412 Niehous, Betty, 377 Nielson, Stephen, 434 Niemoth, Robert, 408 Nilson, Linda, 387, 483 Nippert, Larry, 41, 404 Nisley, Margaret, 49, 255, 321 Nispel, Catherine, 49 Nixon, D., 123, 342 Nodlinski, Vicki, 369 Noe, Verdel, 89 Nolan, Michael, 421 Noll, Karen, 377,483 Nolte, Craig, 434 Norberg, Barbara, 372 Nord, Nancy, 385 Nordhousen, Loren, 42 Nordine, Gaylord, 483 Norris, Carol, 316 Norris, Robert, 445 Norskov, Juliane, 369 Northouse, Louann, 49, 324 Norton, Linda, 483, 496 Norton, Linda D., 112, 113 Notte, Craig, 499 Novacek, Dennis, 86, 252 Novak, Gerald, 442 Novak, Joseph, 52,421 Novak, Russell, 250,419 Novotny, Carol, 322 Novotny, Donna, 336 Novotny, George, 92, 421 Novotny, Gerald, 421, 483 Novotny, Thomas, 451 Novy, Clifton, 421 Nowak, Toni, 119,375 NU MEDS, 105 Nun, Mary, 324 NURSING, SCHOOL OF, 106 Nun, Mary, 324 Nuss, Gary, 446, 483 Nutt, Nikki, 385 Nutzman, Ann, 119 Nutzman, Margaret, 383 Nydodym, James, 351 Nye, Michael, 421 Nyffeler, Mark, 448 Nygren, Larry, 483 Oates, Kent, 248, 249, 379 Oberg, Sherilyn, 67, 387 Oberle, Kathleen, 122, 252, 387 Oberlin, Carole, 375 Obrist, Joanne, 322 Ochs, Beverly, 316 Ochsner, James, 66, 346, 347 Ochsner, John, 415 O'Connor, Ann, 385 O'Connor, Mari, 393, 483 Oden, Jane, 372,483 Oehm, James, 342 Oestmann, Rita, 126, 249, 371 O'Gara, James, 448 Ogden, Frances, 126, 392 Oglesby, Gene, 483 O'Hanlon, John, 441 O'Hara, Michael, 421 O'Hara, Sharon, 336 O'Hara, Thomas, 428 O'Hare, Thomas, 40 Ohmstede, Richard, 13, 353, 483 Okamoto, Kathleen, 327 O'Keefe, Lyne, 383 Okymoto, Kaye, 326 Olander, Bette, 49 Oldaker, Lynda, 379 Oldaker, Richard, 456 Olds, Kenneth, 104 Olds, Ronald, 347 Olenberger, Laurie, 241, 244, 248, 389 Oleson, Nancy, 106 ' Oliver, Connie, 336, 483 Olimstead, Bonn, 316 Olmstead, Linda, 385 Olmsted, Robert, 66 Olsen Anabelle, 316, 330 Olsen Daryl, 428 Olsen, Diane, 371 Olsen, Karen, 321 Olsen, Keith, 43, 248, 355 Olsen, Loren, 434 Olsen, Ronald, 347 Olson, Ann, 329 Olson, Court, 342 Olson, Dennis, 255 Olson, Dennis P., 357 Olson, D., 56 Olson, Gerald, 208, 252, 441 Olson, Glynn, 329 Olson, K., 250, 336 Olson, Larry, 428 Olson, Paul, 142 Olson, Penny, 383, 483 Olson, Steven, 101 Olson, Virgil, 452, 483 Olson, Oltman, Margene, 329 Oltmans, Steven, 357, 483 OMICRON NU-PHI UPSION OMICRON, 48 O'Neal, Barbara, 383 O'Neill, T., 112 Onken, Judy, 119, 358,483 Onley, John, 434 Oppliger, Ann, 333,336 ORANGE BOWL, 262 ORCHESIS, 250 ORCHESTRA, 62 Orender, Leon, 112, 213, 357 Origer, William, 411 Ormesher, Teddy, 445 Orr, Jeffrey, 101 Orr, Merlin George, 424 Orton, William, 85, 92 Osberg, James, 274, 428, 483 Osborn, Kathryn, 329 Osborn, Raymond, 433 Osborne, Dennis, 446 Osborne, T., 274 Osenbaugh, John, 347 O'Shea, Peter, 431 Oslesby, Gene, 412 Ost, M., 112 Osterholm, O., 52, 434 Ostermiller, Dennis, 437 Osterndorff, Carl, 41 Ostiguy, Judy, 387, 484 Ostwinkle, Claudia, 381 Oswald, Pamela, 399 Oswald, Robert, 53, 286, 424, 484 Ott, Jill, 336 Otteman, Joyce, 48, 324 Ottmann, Robert, 428, 484 Otto, Pamela, 399 Overholt, Gail, 119, 392, 484 Overholt, Lynn, 228, 241, 392 Overturf, Dee, 387 Overy, Richard, 404, 485 Owen, William, 101 Owens, Doug, 434 Owens, Robert, 402 Pabst, Susan, 358 Pachman, Susan, 395 Packard, Vicki, 381 Packway, R., 59 Packwood, Richard, 66 Padron, Victor, 112 Page, Earl, 246, 297 Page, Mary, 316 Pageler, William, 346, 484 Pahl, Bobbie, 316 Pahl, Jo, 228, 375 Paider, Arlene, 49, 322 Paine, Douglas, 402, 484 Palmer, Jane, 241,322 Palmer, Vicki, 366 Panek, Sue, 250, 336 PANHELLENIC, 210 Pankonin, Vernon, 344 Panska, J., 38, 42, 484, 496 Paquette, Jim, 346 Pape, Julianne, 336 Pappas, Thomas, 119, 274, 445 Pappineau, Marian, 336 Paragas, Rodney, 419 Parilek, Mary, 383 Park, Carolyn, 392 Parker, Dale, 273, 285, 411 Parker, Donna, 399 Parker, Kate, 381 Parker, Linda, 383 Parker, Scott, 424 Parkes, Claudia, 381 Parks, Susan, 391 Parrott, Janice, 375 Parson, Laura, 49, 321 Parsons, Mary, 387 Partsch, Francis, 225, 339 Paschold, Lynnette, 324 Passer, Dennis, 434 Patrick, Frank, 282, 283 Patter. G., 290 Patterson, Donald, 119, 252 Patterson, Henry, 434 Patterson, J., 52 Patterson, M., 315 Patton, Jerry, 274 Patton, Richard, 434 Paul, Chet, 434 Pauley, Bruce, 215, 433 Pauley, C., 241,249 Pauley, Lucinda, 244, 383 Paulsen, Marian, 49, 255, 324 Paulsen, Marvin, 252, 255 357 Paulsen, Wanda, 321, 485 Paulson, James, 402 Paulson, M., 92 Pavelka, David, 412 Paxson, Sandra, 67, 485, 496 Paxton, William, 228, 347 Peak, J., 56 Peak, Theodore, 118 Pearce, Philip, 92 Pearse, James, 231 Pearson, Brad, 243, 441 Pearson, Doran, 40 Pearson, Irvin, 59, 66 Pearson, Jean, 336 Pearson, L., 282 Pechacek, Barbara, 387 Peck, Dorothy, 366 Peck, Eugene, 499 PE CLUB, 256 Pedersen, Florence, 336 Peery, Barbara, 366 Peithman, Ann, 126, 377 Pekny, Marvin, 67 Pellican, Richard, 92, 331, 485 Penington, Charles, 412 Penkava, Robert, 434 Penke, Phyllis, 326 Penney, Thomas, 282 Penny, M., 256 Penterman, Bobbie, 369 PEOPLE-TO-PEOPLE, 254 Peregrine, Larry, 123 Perkins, Janet, 375 Perkins, Keith, 215, 445 Perkins, Suzanne, 389 Perkins, Ursula, 383 Perlman, Barry, 442 Perlman, Harvey, 101 Perry, George, 355 Perry, Lyle, 448 Perry, Philip, 441 Perry, Samuel, 443 PERSHING AUDITORIUM, 518 PERSHING RIFLES, 127 Pershing, John, 215 Pesek, Thomas, 351 Pester, Judith, 250 Peter, Douglas, 407 Peters, Caryl Ann, 385 Peters, James, 431 Peters, John, 118 Peters, Mary, 503 Peters, Maylon, 41 Peters, Michael, 412 Petersen, Charlene, 249 Petersen, Ellen, 371 Petersen, Genne, 369, 485 Petersen, Judith, 112 Petersen, J., 434 Petersen, Karen, 502 Petersen, Michael, 112 Petersen, Ronald, 419 Petersen, Wayne, 355 Peterson, Alan E., 101 Peterson, Alan L., 347 Peterson, Arnold, 428, 485 Peterson, B., 85, 92, 122 Peterson, Carole, 65, 366, 485 Peterson Charlotte, 122, 392 Peterson, Christina, 397 Peterson Constance, 392 Peterson Dee, 322 Peterson Gary E., 408 Peterson, Gary R., 421 Peterson Gayle, 499 Peterson James, 431 Peterson Kenneth, 274 Peterson Lawrence, 41 Peterson Nancy, 381 Peterson Robert, 446 Peterson Roland, 41 Peterson, Suzzane, 366 Peterson, Val, 19 Peterson, Ward, 40, 42 Petsch, Margaret, 119, 389, 485 Petsche, Jerry, 30 Petsche, Thomas, 428 Petty, Susan, 371 Pfeiffer, Donald, 213, 428 Pfeiffer, Ron, 252, 408 Pfeiffer, Wayne, 423, 485 Pfeil, Bruce, 342 Pfister, Barry, 419 Pflasterer, Barbara, 122, 237, 383 PHARMACY, COLLEGE OF, 110 Phelps, Barbara, 112 Phelps, Susan, 228, 389 Phetteplace, Noel, 215, 438 PHI BETA KAPPA, 52 PHI BETA LAMBDA, 119 PHI CHI, 426 PHI CHI THETA, 77 PHI DELTA THETA, 428 PHI EPSILON KAPPA, 116 PHI ETA SIGMA, 247 Phifer, Marilyn, 321 Phifer, Marlis, 324, 485 PHI GAMMA DELTA, 430 Pl KAPPA ALPHA, 436 Pl KAPPA PHI, 438 Pl LAMBDA THETA, 117 PI MU EPSILON, 53 Pinera, Antonio, 434 Pinkerton, Alan, 347 PIONEER CO-OP, 349 Pl SIGMA ALPHA, 53 Pl TAU SIGMA, 89 Pittenger, James, 268 Pittenger, Jan, 362 Pivonka, Nancy, 358 PIZZA HUT, 512 Placek, Lynn, 381 Plattner, Mark, 247 Pleas, Gary, 438 Pleis, Rosalee, 361, 485 Plettner, Steven, 438 Plihal, Galen, 41, 42, 237, 255, 402, 485 Plisek, Carroll, 342 Plosky, Wallace, 252, 496 Plummer, P., 119 Pock, Keith, 123 Podoll, Gaynelle, 336 Poggemeyer, Ron, 274, 433 Pohlenz, Margaret, 371 Pohlman, Catherine, 122, 236, 381 Pohlman, Charles, 40, 357 Pohlman, Floyd, 407 Pohlman, Mardell, 329 Pojar, Dorothy, 49 Pokorny, Gene, 252 Pokorny, Janet, 385 Pokorny, Jay, 126 Polage, Ronald, 38, 357 Polhemus, Sandra, 316 Policky, David, 434 Pollard, Robert, 243 Pollmann, Diedrich, 342, 485 Pomajzl, Elizabeth, 316, 468 Pomajzl, Michael, 402 Pomajzl, S., 38, 402 Pont, Donald, 104, 208, 225, 239, 449 Popp, Arnfried, 87, 358, 485 Potmesil, Gary, 347 Potter, Barbara, 105, 375 Potter, Carol, 116, 366 Potter, Glenn, 297 Potter Herb, 31 Potter Mary, 366 Potter Susan, 256, 371 Potts, YBIII, 446 PHI KAPPA PSI, 432 Philips, Kay, 399 Phillips, Carol, 396 Phillips, Edelbert, 446, 485 Phillips, Janice, 379 Phillips, John, 411 Phillips, Jolene, 329 PHI MU, 390 PHI MU ALPHA, 66 Phipps, Jeffrey, 419 PHI RHO SIGMA, 434 Pl BETA PHI, 392 Pickering, Thomas, 213, 446 Pieper, Paul, 42 Pieper, Selma, 369 Piester, David, 215, 411 Poulas, Caroline, 322 POUND HALL, 314 Powers, Susan, 392 Powers, G., 64 Powell, Kent, 445 Powell, Nancy, 250, 369 Powell, Peggy, 369 Powell, Rodney, 423 Powell, Susan, 379 Power, J., 41 Power, Patricia, 41, 105, 319 Powers, Robert, 297 Prange, William, 257, 353 Pratt, Margaret, 336 Pratt, Pelton, 428 Prebyl, Calvin, 424 Prentice, George, 342 Prentiss, John, 285 Presern, Donald, 116 Pressler, Carol, 126, 371, 485 Pressler, Edward, 415 Prester, Judith, 319 Preston, Richard, 423 Preston, Susan, 371 Prettyman, Edith, 496 Pretzer, Gary, 347 Price, Henry, 433 Prier, R., 56 Prigge, Norman, 52 Prior, Ronald, 346, 347 Prior, Stephen, 130 Probasco, J., 52 Probasco, Nancy, 389 Proett, Fred, 441 Prokop, Robert, 434, 499 Propst, John, 342 Psota, Ronald, 86, 88, 214 402 PUBLICATIONS BOARD, 229 Puls, Ronald, 38, 355 Puls, Victoria, 392 Pumphrey, Roger, 448 Purdy, Eldon, 404 Purinton, Denise, 77 Putonson, David, 112 Pyatt, Barbara, 500 0 Quade, Beth, 250, 336 Quady, Philip, 351, 485 Qualsett, David, 239 Quaring, Darrell, 38 Quaring, Janell, 48, 366, 367, 485 Queen, Carol, 369 QUENTlN'S, 524 Quimby, Donovan, 428 Quinnett, Lois, 72, 122, 377 Quinten, Karl, 59, 282 Raasch, Steven, 448 Rada, Alan, 499, 426 Radcliffe, Walter, 412 Rader, James, 485 Radil, Janice, 391 Radke, Richard, 445 Ragsdale, Jay, 93 Rahn, Janet, 383 Rainbolt, Linda, 319 Rakow, Mary, 117, 369, 483, 485 Ralston, Jane, 119, 392 Ralston, Lynn, 370 RAM, 330 Rambo, James, 119 Rames, Diane, 379, 485 Ramp, Paul, 66 Ramsey, Craig, 66 Ramsey, Jaye, 396 Randall, Linda, 485, 366 Randell, Terry, 112 Rankin, Carolyn, 392 Rankin, J. Lee, 139 Ransdell, L. C., 434 Ranson, S., 257 Rapley, Kathryn, 366 Vicki, 379 54 Rapp, Kristi, 315 Rapp, Mini, 389 Rarick, Barbara, 256, 391 Rash, Sherene, 126, 392 Rasmussen , Connie, 250, 231, 389, 485 Rasmussen Dean, 59, 66, 118 Rasmussen Jimmie, 93 Rasmussen John, 231, 239, 433 Rasmussen, Kandie, 385 Rasmussen P., 67 Rasmussen Ruth, 207 Ratcliffe, Brett, 123 Rath, Clifford, 89, 456 Rath, Douglas, 448 Rath, Jean, 319 Rath, Raymond, 347 Rathgeber, Verna, 319 Rathjen, David, 85, 93 Rathjen, Lynn, 453 Rathjen, Roger, 112, 452 Rau, Larry, 411 Rauert, Deloris, 329 Rauscher, Bruce, 419 Rawe, Raymond, 415 Rawie, Kenneth, 130 Rawlings, Trudy, 392 Ray, Gregory, 448 Raymond, Robert, 76 Raymondi, Michael, 282 Raznick, Gloria, 395 Readhead, Paul, 419 Ready, J., 344 Ready, Thomas, 445, 485 Reagan, Susan, 381 Reams, Elizabeth, 392 Rebensdorf, John, 53, 85, 88, 93 Rebman, Russell, 446 Recknor, Ann, 336 RED CROSS, 249 Redding, George, 70, 73 Redding, Sharon, 500 Reddish, Anne, 319 Reder, James, 424 Rediger, Kay, 381 Redman, Toney, 338, 342 Reece, Ronald, 347 Reeder, Lloyd, 40, 41, 252 Reeves, Caroline, 399 Reeves, Duane, 496 , Refior, Beverly, 49 : V Regester, Jean, 27, 229 Reichel, Daniel, 485, 493 Reif, Joyce, 42, 375 Reiff, Phil, 434, 499 J Reitschneider, Ellen, 379, 485 Reiken, Carolyn, 336 Reiling, Candyce, 244, 379 Reimers, Kathlene, 49, 324 Reimers, Thomas, 43, 255, 404 Reinera, Allen, 290 Reinke, Roseann, 255, 324, 353 Reinking, John, 488 Reinmiller, Mary, 48 Reinmiller, Richard, 408, 485 Reinmiller, Rita, 237, 371 4 Reiser, John, 73, 246, 424, 486 Reiser, Scott, 424 Reisinger, Linda, 42, 399 Reiss, Randy, 407 Reitan, Donald, 243, 431 Rejda, Roger, 351, 484 Remboldt, Joseph, 119, 411 Remington, Thomas, 441 Remmers, Kenneth, 59, 408 Remmers, Patricia, 375 Rempe, E trnard, 86 Renard, Hugh, 456 Renchen, Lois, 49, 321 Renier, Joanne, 77, 210, 385 Renken, Sandra, 255 Renne, Edith, 391 Reno, Carole, 230, 389, 485 Renter, Ladonna, 315 Renter, Marc, 342 Rentz, Susan, 392 Reppert, Joyce, 228, 391 Reppert, Steven, 342 RESEARCH, 134 Retallick, Kathy, 391 Retzlaff, Marleen, 255, 366 Rieschel, D., 64 Rietsch, Donald, 452, 486 Rietsch, J., 52 RIFLE TEAM, 127 Riggs, Cathy, 389 Rihanek, Sandra, 336 Rikli, Robert, 493 Rikli, Ross, 486 Rimmus, P., 42 Ring, Steven, 415 Rinne, Don, 486, 496 Rippe, Sandra, 76 Rischel, Dianna, 399 Riskowski, James, 456 Riva, Fred, 347 Roach, Cheryl, 399 Roach, Michael, 347 Robbins, John, 419 Roberts, Bonnie, 119, 126, 369 ROBERTS DAIRYLAND, 524 Roberts, Donald, 419 Roberts, Elizabeth, 119 Roberts, Les, 285 Roberts, M., 67 Roberts, Ronald, 38 Roberts, Sally, 324 Roberts, Sherri, 375 Roberts, William, 456 Robertson, Barbara, 387 Reutzel, Romney, 377 Reynolds, Susan, 379 Rezabeck, Edward, 441 RHO CHI, 113 Rhylander, Kenneth, 401 Rhynalds, Paula, 122, 231, 96 Rige, Diane, 329 Rice, Donald, 89 Rice Linda, 500 Rice Mary, 375,485 Rice, R., 89 Rice, Sandra, 67, 379, 486 Rice, Robertson, Donald, 45 Robertson, N., 52 Robinson, Benjamin, 407 Robinson, Lewis, 119 Robinson, Joan, 379 Robinson, Julie, 366 Robinson, Lynn, 333, 366, 385 Robinson, Ronald, 112, 486, 496 Robinson, W., 92 Robley, Marcia, 250 Rochford, Mary, 496 Richardson, Burton, 342 Richardson, Susan, 366 Richmond, Marsha, 375 Richmond, Suzanne, 250, 375 Richnafsky, Dennis, 274 Richter, Barbara, 49, 255, 322 Richter, Hollis, 433 Rickel, Howard, 91, 456 Rickey, W., 15, 434 Rickertsen, Bryan, 432 Rickertsen, Connie, 49, 255, 324 Rickertsen, Dennis, 38, 255, 357 Ricket, Jack, 331 Rickett, Robert, 486, 493 Riddel, Brian, 38, 43, 355 Ridder, Charles, 116 Ridder, John, 42 Riddle, Kathryn, 49, 255, 377 Ridenour, Brian, 342 Riebe, Donald, 347 Rieger, James, 70, 73 Rieger, Joline, 377 Rieken, Lois, 330 Riekes, Carl, 442 Rierden, James, 428 Rock, Quentin, 331, 486 Rockwell, Jerry, 59 Rockwell, Richard, 421 RODEO Rodgers, 377 ASSOCIATION, 42 Rodgers, Richard, 407 Rodrigues, Jose, 421, 486 Rodreguez, H., 112 Row, Glenn, 45, 402 Roehrkasse, Kathryn, 396 Roehrs John, 408, 486 Roehrs, William, 408 Roeser, W., 52 Rogers, John, 426 Rogers Leann 255 324 Rogers, William, 445 Rogge, Beth Elyne, 387 Rogge, Gary, 421 Rogge, Elaine, 329 Rogowski, Sharyn, 319 Rohern, Charles, 434 Rohlfsen, Jan, 389, 486 Rolfe, B arbara, 385 Rolfsmeier, Kathryn, 371 Roll, Linda, 319 Rolofson, Jean, 371 Rolofson, Lyle. 448, 486 Rolston, Lynn, 371 Romanok, T., 112 Juliann, 105, 252, Romanoff, Elizabeth, 319 Romig, Rodney, 433, 486 Romjue, Milton, 411 Ronin, Carol, 385 Ronnau, Richard, 456, 486 Ronnenkamp, Richard, 40, 252 Rood, Mary, 387 Roscoe, Ronald, 17, 34 Rose, Allen, 247 Rose, Beth, 117, 399, 486 Rose, Jerman, 428, 486 Rose, Mimi, 392 Rose, Susan, 399 Roseberry, Mary, 256, 257, 387 Rosen, Paul, 442 Rosenbach, Gary, 417, 486 Rosenbach, Gary H., 442 Rosenberg, John, 53 Rosenberg, Susan, 395 Rosenberger, Robert, 428 Rosenquist, Stephen, 445 Rosenthal, D., 56 Rosentrater, Margie, 322 Rosewell, Sharon, 392 Rosland, J., 89, 402 Ross, Diana, 319 Ross, G. Robert, 21 Ross, Jane, 229, 241, 244, 379 Ross, Larry, 412, 486 Ross, Linda, 375 Ross, Margaret, 387 Ross, Sharon, 38, 381 Ross, Steven, 130 Rost, L., 282 Rotert, Carry, 434, 489 Roth, Rose, 383 Round, George, 24 Rountree, Joan, 383, 486 Rousey, Marvin, 45, 355 Roux, John, 300, 433, 486 Rowe, Dennis, 349 Rowoldt, Mary, 326, 329 Roy, Nirpalinder, 89 Royal, Robert, 419 Rozmarin, George, 419, 486 Rozmarin, Tom, 419 Rubin, Renee, 395 Rubin, Thomas, 442 Rubottom, Harlan, 338, 342 Rudat, Cheryl, 383 Rudat, Scott, 448 Rudin, Marianne, 389 Rudd, Michael, 125 Rudman, Louie, 255 Rudolph. Rosemary. 372 . Rueter, Brice, 59, 452, 486 Rueter, Marc, 339, 486 Ruff, Elaine, 117, 318 Ruff, Ronald, 130, 253 Ruff, Steven, 431 Rulla, Anna, 500 Rundquist, Gregory, 186 Rush, Alexander, 486 Rush, Marbro, 358 Rusmisel, Carol, 383 Russell, G. Richard, 407 Russnogle, Mary, 44, 48, 320 Rusthoven, Terry, 434 Rutz, Thomas, 419 Ruwe, David, 38, 41, 402 Ruzanic, Arthur, 446 Ryan, Betty, 391 Ryan, Charles, 59 Ryan, Elizabeth, 210, 396, 397, 486 Ryan, William, 342 Rybin, Larry, 441 Rynearson, William, 424, 486 Ryon, Linda, 391 S Saathoff, Robert, 43 Sabata, J., 123 Sabata, Tony, 130 Sabari, lraj, 53, 85, 93 Sachan, Richard, 112 Sack, Ronald, 452 Sader, Robert, 252 Sage, William, 441 Sagehorn, Elliott, 417 Sagesser, Carol, 336 Sakai, Dr. Robert, 134 Saleh, K., 256 Saleh, Saleh, 256 Salem, Charles, 428 Salem, Deborah, 399 Salem, Fredric, 86, 446 Salem, Kathy, 500 Salisbury, Laren, 250, 372 Salisbury, Linda, 387 Sall, Dale, 43, 331, 486 Salmon, Michael, 452, 486 Salzman, Janet, 369 Samek, Thomas, 347, 496 Samlde, Michael, 438, 486 Samsel, James, 252, 423 Sampson, W., 253 Samson, Katherine, 319 Samuels, Phil, 415 Samuelson, Robert, 118, 213, 411 Sandall, James, 433 Sandall, Keith, 486, 493 Sandberg, Gay, 381 Sander, Drue, 355 Sanders, Jean, 486, 496 Sanders, Marilyn, 391 Sanders, Steven, 424 Sandersfeld, Leslie, 89 Sanderson, James, 421, 486 Sanderson, Newel, 255, 402 Sanford, Gary, 446 Sanger, Martha, 361 Santoro, Robert, 289, 448 Saracino, Carolyn, 361, 486 Sarmast, Edeen, 89 Sassen, Sharre, 366 Sasso, Candy, 371 Satchell, Thomas, 93, 496 Sato, Dorothy, 326, 329 Sato, Sharon, 48, 327, 329 Satorie, Bonnie, 248, 392 Sauage, R., 250 Saunders, Lynn 395 Saunders, Ruth, 372 Sawicki, Michael, 347 Sax, Joan, 395 Saylor, Dr. Galen, 137 Saylor, Sherrill, 381 Sayre, Charles, 446 Sayre, Jeffrey, 446 Sayre, Lynda. 391 Sbadley, J., 289 Scarlett, T., 38, 43, 216, 357 Schaaf, Terry, 76, 212, 213, 229, 234,448 Schack, Danny, 347 Schafer, Norman, 434 Schaffert, Robert, 40, 43, 357, 486 Schaffhausen, Linda, 256, 372 Schafice, A., 112 Schainost, Craig, 489, 496 Schaller, James, 406, 407 Schanou, Glenn, 347 Schanou, Robert, 40, 402 Schapiro, Harlene, 395 Schatz, James, 445 Schatz, Stephen, 408 Scheele, Kathryn, 366 Scheer, John, 273, 289 Schellenberg, Sandra, 336 Schelm, Larry, 41, 404, 486 Schelm, Stanley, 41, 404 Schepers, James, 40 Schepers, Kendra, 255 Scheppers, James, 252 Scherer, Gloria, 252 Scherzberg, Arnold, 349, 486 Scheve, William, 243 Schick, Sharee, 252, 255 SCHIMMEL HOTELS, 523 Schimmer, Betty, 321 Schipporeit, Richard, 118 Schlachter, Melvin, 346, 347 Schlachter, Stanley, 489, 496 Schlager, Steven, 40 Schlaht, Emily, 254, 385, 489 Schlatter, Michael, 407 Schlechte, Janet, 105, 327 Schlechte, Linda, 117, 330 Schlechte, Mary, 329 Schlegel, Sharon, 399 Schlines, Merle, 402, 489 Schlothauer, Janice, 377 Schlothauer, George, 239, 448, 489 Schluckebier, Lynn, 66 Schlueter, Carol, 369 Schlukbier, Alan, 123, 451 Schluntz, Marvin, 404 Schmad, Timothy, 448 Schmadeke, Jane, 381 Schmadeke, Marilyn, 329 Schmeeckle, Lloyd, 353 Schmeeckle, Sharon, 126 399, 489 Schmeiding, D., 64, 306 Schmidt, Barbara, 119 Schmidt, Chuck, 69, 169 Schmidt, Dianne, 329 Schmidt, Margaret, 385 Schmidt Patricia 329 Schmieding, Deanna, 396 Schmierer, Rebecca, 249 Schmitt, LeAnn, 67,371 SCHMOLLER AND MUELLER, 511 Schmucker, Robert, 357 Schnegelberger, Barbara, Schuster, William, 404 Schwabauer, R., 52 112, 113 Schneider, Barbara, 389, 489 Schneider, Dennis, 452 Schneider, Layson, 123 Schneider, Roger, 215, 401 Schneider, Ronald, 347 Schneider, Shirlee, 375 Schneiderwind, Ted, 407 Schobert, Roland, 421 Schock, Bobbi, 392, 489 Schoemaker, David, 404 Schoen, Leroy, 351 Schoening, Lynda, 389 Schole, Bernhard, 41, 252, 404 Schole, Bonnie, 326 Scholl, John, 118,347 Scholz, Gordon, 330, 331, 489 Schory, Chryse, 366 Schott, Linda-Rae, 250, 256 Schottler, Jane, 379 Schou, Anita, 396 Schou, Sheri, 387 Schreck, J., 252 Schreiber, Mark, 433 Schreiner, David, 452, 489 Schreiner, Rita, 252 Schrekinger, John, 423 Schwarke, E., 426 Schwartz, C., 126 Schwartz, James, 441 Schwartz, Rodney, 452 Schwartz, Ronald, 492 Schwartz, Susan, 117, 366, 489 Schweiger, Earle, W., Jr., 421 Schweiger, E., 250 Schwenk, Ladana, 399 Schwentker, Marylynn, 377 489 Schwiser, M., 255 Schwisow, Margaret, 49, 324 Scieton, Reg, 273 Scott, Richard, 22, 234 Scritemeier, Gary, 100 Scriven, Charles, 433 Seaman, Jo, 503 Seaman, Richard, 437 Seaton, Fern, 241, 369 SECURITY MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE, 513 Seda, Joseph, 123 Seda, Peter, 348 Sederavicius, Vytautas, 289, 407 Sedlak, Richard, 41, 255, 423 See, Richard, 421 Seeger, Robert, 407 Seely, Ron, 499 Seewald, Wolfgang, 412 Seglin, Steven, 101 Segrist, Susan, 392, 489 Seidell, Sherrill, 256 Seidler, Dale, 38, 402, 489 Schrocker, Judith, 489 Schroeder, Allen, 86, 88, 90, 91 Schroeder, David, 52, 208, 437 Schroeder, Kent, 437 Schroeder, Michael, 353 Schroeder, Susan, 383 Schroer, Joseph, 286, 415, 494 Schroer, Lee, 228, 415 Schroeter, Janice, 324 Schroeter, Judith, 324 Schole, Bonnie, 399 Schuchman, Elaine, 395 Schuerman, Robert, 40 Schuessler, Richard, 441 Schuessler, Thomas, 424 Schuetz, Schulte Leo, 423 Dennis 92 348 scnuitz' Albert, '93, ,130 Schultz, C. Bertrand, 23, 208 Schultz, Diane, 336 Schultz, Donna, 366 Schultz, Frank, 66, 355 Schultz, Nancy, 396 Schultz, Robert, 53 Schultz, Sharon, 375 Schultz, Stephen, 355 Schultz, Susan, 399 Schultz, Tranda, 366, 489 Schultze, Pamela, 379 Schulz, Calvin, 342 Schulze, Schulze, Larry, 40, 357 Loren, 40, 357 Schulze, Richard, 89, 214, 346 Schumacher, Matthew, 101 Schumacher, Patricia, 372 Schurr, Mary, 336 Schuster, Michael, 456 Seiler, Robert, 104, 105, 424 Selk, Gene, 423 Seiko, Linda, 399 Sell, R., 52 SELLECK QUADRANGLE, 330 Selmer, C., 274 Selzer, James, 452 Semin, H., 92 Senf, Gloria, 369 Seng, Jim, 434 Senkbeil, Lynn, 273, 274 Sennentz, George, 342 Sennentz, Winifred, 372 Sergent, Morris, 215, 412 Settles, Carol, 49, 321 Settles, Dennis, 331, 348 Settles, Gordon, 348 Severeide, Diane, 399 Severin, Sheryl, 372 Severs, Cynthia, 391 Sevigne, Frank, 270 Shackelton, Bruce, 130 Shadbolt, George, 446 Shadbolt, Sherrill, 396 Shafer, Jack, 53, 348, 489 Shafer, Jeff, 445, 489 Shaffer, Ronald, 43 Shalberg, Bonnie, 377,489 Shanahan, Judy, 53, 379, 489 Shaner, Randolph, 452 Smith 54 Sharpe, T., 271, 300 Sharrar, Mary, 192,381 Shattuck, Cathie, 53, 56, 214, 246, 375 Shaver, Dan, 297 Shaw, Linda, 126, 375 Shaw, Nancy, 256 Shaw, Sarah, 502 Shaw, Vondra, 358 Shearer, Richard, 431 Sheeran, Jean, 391 Sheffield, Dori, 330, 391 Sheffield, Douglas, 353 Shefte, Steven, 433 Sheldon, Ray, 216, 353 Sheleheda, Ronald, 282 Shepherd, Terry, 248, 355 Sheridan, Sally, 250, 256 Sherman, Gary, 119 Sherman, James, 456 Shernan, Richard, 56,252 Sherwood, Virginia, 318, 319, 489 Shildneck, Sally, 396 Shildneck, Susan, 396 Shoda, T., 300 Shook, Nanci, 250, 389 Shovlain, Gary, 456 Shrader, Gordon, 342 Shreck, James, 237, 411 Shriner, Harlan, 499 Shuck, Pamela, 329 Shueey, Ronald, 355 Shuey, James, 45 Shuey, Linda, 319, 489 Shurtleff, Donald, 431 Shurtz, Victoria, 383 Sibert, Bonnie, 387 Sich, Duanes, 348 Sicklebower, Marian, 64, 67, 122, 227 Sicklebower, Sherie, 387, 468 Sieck, Sondra, 119 Sieckmann, Donna, 252 Siefken, Jolene, 319 Siefken, Merlin, 357 Siegler, E., 274 Sievers, Dennis, 92 Siewert, Kathleen, 329 Sigler, Donald, 41 SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON, 440 SIGMA ALPHA ETA, 67 SIGMA ALPHA IOTA, 63 SIGMA ALPHA MU, 442 SIGMA CHI, 444 SIGMA DELTA CHI, 73 Simmons, Ronnie, 290 Simons, Linda, 210, 395 Sims, Marcia, 252, 366 Sindelar, Gary, 330 SINFONIA, 66 Sinor, Keith, 446 Sinot, Russell, 255, 423 Sintek, Carol, 244, 336 Sisel, Myron, 289 Sitorius, Cynthia, 244, 381 Sitorius, Susan, 195 Slack, John, 239, 424 Slack, Roberta, 48 Slama, Carolyn, 319 Slaughter, Jan, 392, 489 Slie, Mary Linda, 252 Slizeski, Gary, 93, 215, 456 Sloan, Larry, 76, 417, 489 Sloan, R., 53 Slocum, Linda, 319 Slote, Bernice, 135 Slusher, Russell, 342 Small, John, 342 Smallfield, Michael, 342 Smayda, Barbara, 256 Smiley, Ellen, 366 Snyder, Gary, 446 Snyder, Helen, 22 Snyder, Jayne, 256 Snyder, Kenneth, 423 Snyder, Marva, 329 Snyder, Stephanie, 256 Sobczyk, Edward, 421 Softley, Dale, 40, 489, 493 Sohus, Steven, 343 Soiref, Brian, 142, 208, 213, 442, 489 Solich, Frank, 199, 267, 274, 275, 279, 300 Sommer, Janis, 371 Sommermeyer, Jean, 252 Sommers, Wallace, 428 Sorensen, Beverly, 385 Sorenson, Frank, 28, 136 Sorensen, Judith, 372 Sorensen Karen, 324 Sorensen Mark, 434, 499 Sorensen Todd, 424 Sorenson K., 256 Sorenson Steve, 285 Sorrell, James, 446 Sorrell, John, 415 Smith, Allegra, 63, 67 Smith, Ann, 52 Smith, Cheryll, 336 Smith, Cynthia, 389 Smith, Darrel, 41 Smith, Daryl, 357 Smith, David, 351 Smith, Diane, 207, 372 Smith, Duane, 492 Smith, Gayle, 377 Smith, Gloria, 322, 489 Smith, Janet, 391 Smith Judith, 375, 489 Smith Judith A., 489, 493 Smith Lawrence, 415 Smith Leslie, 399 Smith Linda, 126 Smith Louetta, 324 Smith Luanne, 336 Smith Margery, 381 Smith Marilyn, 336 Smith Mary, 336 Smith Neal, 41, 44 Smith, Robert A., 118, 331, 489 Smith Robert Wm., 52 Smith Rock, 119, 497 Smith, Stephen, 421 Smith, Stuart, 442 Smith, Sue R., 497 Smith, Susan, 369, 489 Thomas, 274, 448 SIGMA DELTA TAU, 394 SIGMA KAPPA, 396 SIGMA NU, 446 SIGMA PHI EPSILON, 448 SIGMA TAU, 85 SIGMA Xl, 52 Silver, Gary, 431 Silvers, Roger, 417 Simard, Robert, 33 Simmons, Barbara, 389 Simmons, Carolyn, 392 Simmons, Grant, 290, 292 Simmons, John, 411 Simmons, Nancy, 324, 489 Simmons Randy, 329 6 Smith, Virginia, 375 Smolik, Harold, 497 Smyth, Mary, 319 Snavely, Patricia, 497 Snell, Randall, 89, 252,456 Snider, Jack, 59, 61 Snitzer, Richard, 489, 497 Snoberger, Delbert, 411 Snowden, Gary, 53, 489, 497 Snyder, Bruce, 43, 208, 422, 423, 489 Snyder, Charles, 412 Snyder, David, 44, 213 Snyder, Francille, 49, 321 Soshnik, Joseph, 21 Souders, Mary, 385 Sounders, Stuart, 434 Soukup, Nyla, 372 Soukup, Sherrill, 372,489 Sowder, Sharon, 371 Spady, Clair, 343 Specht, James, 40, 43, 404 Specht, Terry, 404 Speece, Alice, 67, 369, 489 Spence, Dennis, 489, 497 Spencer, Robert, 357 Spiekermann, Richard, 41 Spilker, Thomas, 423 Spivey, Clark, 348 Spivey, Joan, 207, 314, 315 Splichal, Clark, 253, 417, 489 Spoeneman, Mary, 396 Spohn, Sally, 237, 381 Sprague, Gary, 408 Sprague, William, 59, 66 Spratlen, Terence, 446, 489 Sprieck, Terry, 412 Springer, Janet, 489, 497 Spuit, Robert, 112 Spurgin, Mark, 419 Spurlock, Cathy, 336 Staats, Bruce, 252, 341 Stackhouse, J., 123 Stading, Ronald, 448 Stohl, B., 256 Stahr, Carol, 391 Stahr,Jean, 372,489 Stahr, Orval, 408 Staley, James, 253 Stalioius, Philip, 351 Stamm, John, 125 Stander, Linda, 63 Stangle, Richard, 286, 300, 433 Stanislav, Maxon, 415 Stanley, John, 101 Stanley, Priscilla, 379 Stansbury, John, 434, 499 Stanton, Elizabeth, 500 Staples, Lynne, 387 Stara, Grayce, 49, 321 Stark, Deborah, 336 Stark, Deloy, 417 Stark, Nancy, 489, 497 Stark, Rodney, 417,489 Starman, Carol, 329 Starr, Cheryl, 119 Starr, E., 38, 255, 357 Starrett, Fred, 491 Stasch, Susan, 379,489 Staska, Charlene, 361 Stasiowski, John, 407 Stauffer, Constance, 489 Steckley, Clarke, 412 Steckley, Edwin, 243, 489 Steckley, Susan, 371 Stedman, Stephen, 41 Steele, June, 48, 489, 497 Steele, William, 285 Steeves, Eldon, 252 Stefanisin, Sandra, 372, 489 Steffensen, Diane, 366, 489 Steffensen, Jan, 396 Stehlik, Loren, 59, 66, 216, 351 Steinbrook, Mary, 387 Steinke, J., 93 Steinman, Jacob, 442 Steinmeier, Robert, 52 Steinmeyer, Sarah, 392 Stelzer, Dennis, 408 Stemm, Richard, 428 Stephens, Mary, 387, 447 Stephenson, Cheryl, 372 Sterns, Steven, 349 Stevens, Georgia, 49, 233, 255, 366 Stevens, Jerry, 123, 423 Stevens, Kenneth, 252 Stevenson, James, 300 Stevenson, Pamela, 371, 489 Stewart, C., 118 Stewart, James, 434, 499 Stewart, Susan, 319 Stickels, Bob, 273, 300 Stickelman, Chet, 407 Stickler, Jeanne, 389 Stickney, Robin, 300 Stigge, Byron, 131 Stigge, Russell, 282, 419 Stilwell, Catherine, 237, 389 Stilwell, Mary, 252, 336 Stine, Ellen, 319 Stingley, Beverly Lynn, 379 Stith, Carel, 274, 286, 407 Stites, Janet, 119, 381 Stivers, Loren, 497 Stock, David, 40, 357 Stockton, Mary, 49, 379 Stohlman, Joanne, 53, 230 Stohlmann, Robert, 255, 402 Stolcpart, Rick, 415 Stoltenberg, Carolyn, 244, 256, 306, 392 Stolzenburg, Dennis, 424 Stone, Anthony, 424 Stone, Bruce, 92, 421, 489 Stone, Charles, 290 Stone, V., 289 Stoner, Carol, 372, 489 Stoner, Kathryn, 372 Stork, Delyn, 255, 423 Stork, Sandra, 48, 49 Stork, Terence, 38, 423 Stoughton, Barbara, 361 Stout, Don, 423 Stout, Judy, 321 Stover, Diana, 53, 72, 330 Stranberg, Dorothy, 105, 329 Strand, Carol, 207, 385 Strand, Richard, 434 Strasburg, Kenneth, 353 Strasburg, William, 353, 489 Strasheim, Helen, 119 Strasil, Ernest, 452 Strateman, William, 215, 428 Strateman, J., 32 Stratton, Lowell, 431 Strayer, Robert, 89, 456 Strecker, Dana, 383 Strecker, Dessa, 126, 399 Street, Gary, 112 Street, L., 130 Stricker, Donald, 255, 404 Stricker, Gerald, 89 Strobel Cor 424 Sup, Ted, 452 Surber, Frank, 89, 456 Surratt, Larry, 45, 355 Sutera, James, 428 Sutherland, Lynne, 324, 489 Sutter, Rober, 441 Sutton, Dorothy, 369 Sutton, Douglas, 285 Taylor, Cheryl, 318 Taylor, Denny, 445 Taylor, Donald, 112 Taylor, Gary, 86 Taylor, John, 408 Taylor, Lawrence, 228, 415 Taylor, Linda, 333 Taylor, Stephen, 59, 456 Taylor, William, 412 Suzuki, Janet, 315 Svajgr, Larry, 38, 255, 402, 403 Svendsen, Lorene, 375, 489 Svoboda, Jerry, 241, 424 Svoboda, Judith, 336 Svoboda, Rose, 502 Swagerty, Terry, 343 Swaim, Cheryl, 392 Swanda, Ronald, 130 Swanson Clarence, 19 Swanson Connie, 399 Swanson, G., 19 Swanson James, 92, 407 Swanson, Joel, 252, 254, 424 Swanson, Kenneth, 67 Swanson, Loren, 452, 490 Swanson, Penny, 381 Swanson, Raymond, 441, 490 , Y. Strob, Mary, 333, 336 Strong, Harold, 431, 489 Strough, Duane, 289 Struve, Paul, 343 Struyk, William, 236, 239, 424 Stuart, James, 428 Stuart, Mary, 112, 210 Stuart, Nancy, 396, 489 Stubbendick, Peggy, 319 Stubbendieck, James, 41, 42 Stubbs, Sheila, 334 Stuck, Wayne, 351 Stuckey, Susan, 393 Stucky, Craig, 123 STUDENT TRIBUNAL, 217 STUDENT UNION BOARD, 236 Stull, Walter, 424, 489 Stutheit, A., 112 Stutheit, Diana, 250, 256, 324 Stych, Robert, 407 Sudduth, R., 52 Suder, Annette, 126, 372 Suedmeier. Glenda, 319 Sueper, Jerome, 112 Suhr, Meredith, 85, 89, 448, 489 Suhr, Rodney, 417 Suhr, Theodore, 331, 333 Sullivan, Denton, 297 Sullivan, G., 274 Sullivan, Mary, 387 Sullivan, Patricia, 379 Sullivan, Vincent, 353, 489 Sulzbaugh, Atricia, 383 Sumnick, J. Michael, 431, 489 Sunderman, Cheryl, 112, 113 Swanson, Robert, 407 Swartz, James, 231 SWEDES, 511 Swedlund, Phyllis, 329 Sweetman, Charles, 252, 407 Swenson, Gregory, 421 Swenson, John, 421 Swihart, G., 93 Swihart, Sally, 375 SWIMMING, 284 Switzer, Judith, 389 Swoboda, Betty, 236, 369 Swoboda, Donald, 43, 357, 490 Sydow, Steven, 434 'I' Taiga, Omo, 343 Takata, Jeanne, 336, 490 Takenaga, June, 105 Talbott, Timothy, 38, 141, 255, 402 Tallman, Ann, 381, 490 Tallman, Mary, 236, 246, 389 Tangeman, Richard, 53 Tank, Paul, 41 Tank, Rodney, 419 Tanner, Judith, 67, 210, 377, 490 Tarbutton, Kent, 41 TASSELS, 244 Tassler, Judith, 377 Tate, Robert, 217 Tatman, Pete, 274, 279 Taube, Andrew, 104, 182, 208, 213, 445 Taucher, Robert, 274 TAU KAPPA EPSILON, 454 TAU RHO, 73 Taylor, Bruce, 451 TEACHERS, COLLEGE OF, 114 Tedesco, John, 451 Teel, Patricia, 207, 210, 222, 386, 387, 490 Tegtmeier, Dennis, 38 Tegtmeier, Richard, 445 Telford, Esther, 321 Templin, Robert, 445 TENNIS, 303 Ternes, Richard, 112 Terrell, B., 44 Terrell, Lyndon, 42 Terrill, Terri, 387 Terwilliger, Sonja, 383 Tessendorf, Gale, 490, 497 Tetherow, Susan, 67, 385 Tetro, Barbara, 383 Tetro, Kathleen, 122, 383 Thacker, Neil, 76 Thayer, Vickey, 375 THEATER, 57 Theis, Dick, 412 Theis, Wilfred, 216, 351, - 490 THETA CHI, 450 4 THETA NU, 104 THETA SIGMA PHI, 72 THETA Xl, 452 Thoendel, Victor, 338, 343 Thomas, A., 119 Thomas, Barbara, 126, 252, 336 Thomas, Carol, 381 Thomas, Donna, 336 Thomas, Elaine, 126, 375 Thomas, Gregory, 448 Thomas, Micheal, 252 Thomas, Patrick, 424 Thomas, Sarah, 385 Thomason, Julia, 500 Thomassen, James, 343 Thomassen, Ruth, 319 Thompson Arthur, 456 Thompson Brian, 45, 404, 490 Thompson Craig, 38, 497 Thompson Elizabeth, 319 Thompson, Elwood, 433, 490 Thompson, Gary, 448 Thompson, Gary W., 282 Thompson, Lawrence, 415 Thompson, Linda, 399 Thompson, Richard, 213, 433 Thompson, Ronald, 404 Thompson, Sandra, 366 Thompson, Sue, 249, 327, 383 Thompson, Tommie, 252 Thomsen, Burton, 40, 43, 404 Thon, Ron, 286 Thorell, David E., 38, 355, 490 Thorell, Dennis, 274 Thorell, Karen, 490, 493 Thurber, Joanne, 48, 49, 233, 244, 255, 377 Thurston, Lynn, 371 Tiaden, Norman, 343 Tibbets, Terrence, 434, 499 Tice, Terry, 284, 285 Tidball, John, 445 Tidrick, Virginia, 392 Timm, Mary, 56 Timm, Monty, 123 Timmermier, John, 424 Tinan, Stephanie, 207, 244, 389 Tincher, Barbara, 396 Tinstman, Thomas, 119, 428 Tippetts, Ed, 208, 420, 421 Tilwald, John, 126 Toebben, Karen, 387 Tomes, Mary, 490, 497 Tonniges, Dennis, 42, 408 Tooker, Robert, 42, 255 Tooley, Patrick, 112 Tooley, William, 419 Topp, Dale, 404 Tosentrater, M., 255 Totten, Linda, 250, 256 Towne, Carol, 321 TOWNE CLUB, 360 Townley, Mary Sue, 503 TRACK, 298 Trambe, Norman, 353 Trank, Judith, 379 Trausch, Thomas, 353 Traver, Thomas, 289 Trayer, Gary, 434 Tremain, Vestey, 322 Treukle, Gloria, 336 TRIANGLE, 456 Trites, Barbara, 249, 383, 490 Tritt, Cheryl, 383 Troia, Frank, 66, 289 Trombla, Jennifer, 392 Trombley, James, 86 Tropp, Barbara, 389 Trotter, Virginia, 47, 141 Troyer, Gary, 499 Truckenbrod, David, 86 True, Earl, 452, 490 True, K., 42, 119,319 Truell, John, 434,499 Truman, Karen, 490, 497 Truman, T., 41 Trumble, Judith, 48, 49, 233, 244, 255, 377 Trupp, Barbara, 67 Tubbs, Lorretts, 63 Tuchenhagen, David, 348 Tucker, Robert, 419 Tudor, Anne, 385 Tuenge, Carl, 433 Tuenge, Rodger, 433 Tuenge, Rodney, 433 Tuerk, Sandra, 329 Tuma, Kathleen, 112 Tuning, Pamela, 319 Tunnell, William, 451 WAA, 306 Tunnison, Gary, 300 Turek, Raymond, 434 Tureck, Mary, 503 Turnbull, John, 44, 357, 490 Turner, B., 105, 252 Turner, David, 497 Turner, Susan, 214, 249, 383 Turpyn, Richard, 401 Tuttle, Bruce, 431, 480 Twiss, Richard, 86 Tworek, Edward, 355 Tyree, Collette, 375 Tyrrell, Leslie, 448 Uden, Cheryl, 371 Ulbrick, Mary, 372 Ulland, Diane, 366 Ullstrom, Galen, 424 Ulrich, Steven, 417 Umberger, Vicky, 385 Umunna, Victor, 343 Unger, Alice, 503 Unger, Carol, 388 UNICORNS, 358 Unis, Joseph, 428 UNIVERSITY 4-H CLUB, 255 UNIVERSITY BAND, 60 UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE, 523 UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA, 62 UNIVERSITY SINGERS, 58 UNIVERSITY THEATER, 57 UNSEA, 116 Unthank, John, 433, 490 Unthank, Patricia, 241, 372 Unthank, S., 52 Urwiler, Joyce, 366 Uzendoski, Michael, 282 V Vactor, Ted, 274 Vahle, E., 59 Vahle, Van, 104, 411, 490 Vokoc, Jean, 371 Valcarcel, Luisa, 361 Valdez, Robert, 112, 421, 290 Vallicott, Virginia, 250, 392 VanAckeren, D., 42 Vance, Gary, 427 Vance, Michael, 412 Vancleave, Robert, 343 Vanderslice, Carol, 324 Vandervoort, Philip, 42 Vandewalle, John, 112, 357 Vandewalle, Susan, 318 Vanengen, Floyd, 112, 252 Vang, Nancy, 503 Vanhorn, Georgia, 383 Vanhorn, Thomas, 253, 289 Van Horne, Patti, 385 Vanicek, Leona, 324 Vanier, Byron, 417,490 Vanis, Joann, 321 Vankat, Kenneth, 431 Van Neste, Robert, 30 Vannier, Jerald, 92, 448 548 Vanorsdol, John, 89, 490, 497 VanSteenberg, Ann, 372 VanSteenberg, Carrol, 101, 372, 490 Vanvynckt, Janice, 366 VARSITY DAIRY CLUB, 45 Varvel, Victoria, 63 Vasa, Dona Jean, 119 Vaughn, Goebel, 88, 92 Vavricek, Charlene, 49, 324 Vavricek, Gordon, 41 Vecchio, D., 42 Velte, Louetta, 119, 252, 315, 319 Viall, Barbara, 126 Victor, Toni, 231, 387 Vieth, Gary, 43, 355 Vieth, Robert, 355, 490 Viglicky, James, 355 Villwock, Janet, 315, 319 Vitamvas, Judith, 241 Viterna, Larry, 41, 43, 233, 423 Vitosh, Michael, 448 Vittera, James, 85, 87, 92, 126 Vlach, Harold, 41, 348 Vodehnal, Dale, 85, 93 Voecks, Linda, 329 Vogel, Doris, 324 Vogel, Pamela, 391 Vogt, Daniel, 434 Vogt, James, 358 Vogt, Marlene, 324 Vogt, Terry, 434 Volenec, Donna, 387 Volk, Meradith, 42, 402 Volker, Kenneth, 45 Volzke, Cheryl, 329 VonBargen, K., 92 Vondrak, Harry, 104 Vondras, John, 456 Vonseggern, Dale, 296, 297 Vonseggern, Donald, 407 Vonseggern, Lynn, 500 Voris, James, 348 Vosik, William, 434 Voss, Donald, 86, 88, 213, 237, 411 Voss, Shirley, 143, 222, 234, 385, 491 Vrana, Roberta, 392 Vranish, J., 434 Vrba, George, 76 Vrtiska, Ivan, 59, 86 Vuylstek, Paula, 319 Vybiral, Elizabeth, 336, 491 Vybiral, Frank, 56 Waak, Lonnie, 408 Wachholtz, Larry, 262, 264, 273, 274, 433 Wadell, Marvin, 41 Wademan, Sally, 399, 491 Wagenknecht, D., 130 Waggoner, Shirley, 369 Wagner, Charles, 408 Wagner, Janet, 383 Wagner, John, 93 Wagner, Michael, 456 Wagner, Peg, 48, 49 Wagner, Robert, 348, 396 Wagner, Ronald, 491 Wagner, Rod, 297 Wagon, Charles, 33 Wagoner, Joan, 383 Wagoner, Robert, 85 Wahl, Terry, 433 Wahlgren, Gary, 43, 214, 233, 241,243,423 Wahlgren, William, 130, 423 WEAVER-MINIER, 516 Webb, Coley, 273, 290 Webb, Jerome, 433,491 Weber, Gary, 256, 383 Weber, Janice, 379 Weber, Katherine, 207, 213, 241, 377, 491 Weber, Ralph, 452, 491 Weber, Wayne, 265, 274, 448 Webert, T., 250 Webster, Nan, 385 Wahlin, Janet, 116,252 Wald, Joann, 336 Wake, James, 445 Walburn, John, 446 Wald, Steven, 442 Walker, Dennis, 273, 448 Walker, Larry, 351 Walker, Marlaine, 399 Walker, Rodney, 76 Walker Tish, 49, 321, 369 Wall, Milan, 441 Walla, Jane,387 Walla, Vance, 387, 466 Wallace, Alys, 371 Wallace, Carol, 387 Wallace, Cynthia, 377 Wallace, Louise, 381 Wallick, Glenn, 491, 497 Wallin, David, 446 Wallin, Fred, 441 Wallin, Jerry, 451 Wallin, Michael, 105,441 Wallin, S., 256,358 Walling, Hank, 248 Wallwey, Lorn, 343 Wallwey, D., 52 Walt, Leslie, 381 Walt, Renard, 431 Waltemade, Fred, 59, 66 Walters, Ann, 392 Walters, James, 119, 228, 428 Walters, Kathryn, 63 Walton, Donald, 419, 491 Wanek, James, 448 Ward, Douglas, 53 Ward, Elizabeth, 375 Ward, Shirley, 369 Warner, Jerry, 40, 41 Warner, Peggy, 329 Warnsholz, Jane, 122,381 Warp, Susan, 366 Warren, Daniel, 421 Warren, Mary, 49 Warren, Ralph, 433 Warrick, Gary, 38, 41, 355, 419 Wassenberg, Patricia, 244, 336 Watkins, Sandra, 56 Watsek, Gwendolyn, 315, Webster, Patricia, 256, 319 Weekes, Wallace, 239 Weeks, Craig, 105, 252 Weeks, Gayle, 333, 336 Weerts, Richard, 239, 246, 424 Wegner, Lavern, 119, 357, 491 Wehrbein, Gene, 38, 43, 243, 402 Wehrbein, S., 45 Wehrbein, Theodore, 38, 44, 233, 255, 402 Weichel, Kenneth, 41, 402 Weichman, Denton, 407 Weichman, Francis, 407 Weichman, L., 42 Weidenkeller, Vicky, 256 Weidman, Jeanne, 387 Weigel, Richard, 93 Weill, Norman, 442 Weimer, Diane, 257, 377 Weinberg, Helene, 395 Weiner, Edward, 442 Weinman, Robert, 428 Weinert, Jean, 383 Weisman, Gisele, 395 Weiss, Donna, 375 Weiss, James, 89, 491, 497 Weiss, Linda, 375 Welch, J., 19 Weller, Rexford, 423, 491 Wells, Carolyn, 319 Wells, Carolyn, 326 Wells, Ellen, 381 Wells, J., 112 Wells, P., 112, 113 Welsh, Carol, 375 Wendland, Jerry, 349 Wendt, John, 411 Wendt, Karen, 375 Wenke Wenne , Mary, 329 rsten, James, 428 Wenske, Joan, 336 Wentink, Shirley, 391 WENTZ PLUMBING AND HEATING, 522 Werner, Marjorie, 366 Werning, Donna, 379 Wertz, John, 448 West, Cheryl, 366 319 Watson Bryan, 338 Watson Edward, 331 Watson James, 282 Watson John, 434 Watson Patricia, 392 Watson Paul, 86 Watson Sam, 499 Watson, Thomas, 402 Watzke, Larry, 339 Weatherholt, William, 424 Weaver, Barbara, 256, 383 Westlund, William, 438 West, Steve, 445 Westerberg, Karen, 116, 213, 241, 375 Westerberg, Mary, 500 Westerhoff, Sue, 156, 371 Westerhold, Keith, 446 Westering, Kathy, 389, 491 Wetherell, Robert, 458 Wewel, Anton, 41 Weyers, George, 112 Weyers, Susan, 326, 329 Weymouth, J., 116, 377, 491 Whaley, Mary Anne, 248, 379 Wheeler, Candy, 381, 491 Wherry, Daniel, 411, 491 Whidden, Shirley, 255, 324 White, Betsy, 241, 249, 371 White, Freeman, 263, 273, 274 White, Gary, 423 White, Jody, 383 White, Linda, 255, 324 White, Nancy, 503 White, Richard, 417 White, Sally, 29 White Susan 119 377 Whited, Lawrence, 411 WHITEHEAD OIL COMPANY, 521 Whitney, Charles, 448 Wilken, Jane, 70, 72, 73, 228, 379 Wilkenson, Bobbie, 336 Wilkinson, Jim, 349 Willet, Miriam, 105 Willet, Steven, 446 Willey, Margaret, 48, 321, 491 Williams, Carole, 119, 319 Williams, Donald, 122, 123, 140 Williams, Dorothy, 387 Williams, Edwyna, 381 Williams, Gary, 123 Williams Harold, 76 Williamsi Jerry, 118 Williams, Joellen, 248 Williams, Karen, 256, 387 Williams, Larry, 255 Williams, Nancy, 117 Williams Patricia 322 WILLIAMS RECORDING Witt, Merlyn, 89, 331 Witte, Arlene, 396 Witte, Robert, 116, 446, 491 Wittman, William, 456 Wittson, Cecil, 103 Wittwer, Joseph, 445 Wobig, Mike, 357 Wochner, William, 497 Woitaszewski, Robert, 123 Wolcott, Donald, 433 Wolcott, Earl, 415 Wolf, Dennis, 243 Wolf, Nancy, 126, 366 Wolf, Susan, 366 Wolf, Thomas, 419, 491 Wolfmeyer, Ruth, 105, 319 Wolford, Roger, 402 Wolford, Russel, 255, 402 Woltemath, Charles, 343 Wolvin, Beth, 112, 113 Wolvin, Betty, 385 Whitney, Janet, 322 Whitney, Jan iHibbs1, 207, 223, 234, 387, 491 491 Whitney, Karlene, 503 Whitney, Michael, 89 Whitney, Riel, 343 Whitney, Susan, 387, 491 Whitney, Vernoda, 29 Whittemore, Sherrill, 56 Whittington, Dianne, 361, SERVICE, 516 Williams, Richard, 119 Williams, Robert, 24 Williams, Theron, 421 Willis, Keith, 59, 86, 423 Willis, Richard, 433 Willis, Sue, 497 Willits, Jo, 67 Willman, James, 343 Willman, John, 208 Wilmoth, Jon, 499 Wood, Katherine, 65 Wood, Ken, 118 Wood, Larry, 434, 499 Wood, Pam, 210, 213, 236, 241, 252, 381 Wood, Percy, 117, 223, 381, 491 Wood, Susan, 375 Wood, William, 412, 491 Woodbury, Harry, 348 Woodhull, Diane, 372 Whitwer, Glen, 431, 491 Wiber, J., 253 Wicke, Bonnie, 321 Wichalm, Michael, 353 Widhelm, Robert, 253, 343 Wiebe, Roger, 40 Wiebe, Roxanne, 246 Wiebusch, Harold, 424 Wiebusch, Janice, 63, 383 Wieckhorst, Sherry, 249, 375 Wiegert, Keith, 59, 66 Wieland, Frank, 130 Wiekmann, Mary, 319 Wiemann, Mary, 491 Wiemann, Sharon, 371 Wiese, Joanne, 319 Wiese, Michael, 215, 421 Wiese, Ronald, 402 Wieseman, Beverly, 49, 255, 321 Wiggins, Gail, 48, 255, 390 Wiggins, Theron, 125, 131 Wightman, Deborah, 371 Wilburn, Robert, 104, 208, Wilson, Wilson, Wilson Wilson Wilson 491 Wilson, Wilson, Wilson, Wilson, Wilson, Wilton, Wiltse, Cherrie, 336 Delores, 399, 491 Harry, 273, 274 Joan, 329 Kathy, 119, 329, Marsha, 381 Pam, 389, 491 Roger, 41, 423 Sally iCramer1, 200 Steven, 428 Dennis, 44, 404 Mary, 377 Wimmer, David, 408 WOODMEN ACCIDENT AND LIFE, 509 Woods, D., 119 Woods, Joseph, 497 Woods, Linda, 399 Woodside, Wayne, 92 Woodward, K., 52 Woodward, Robert, 112 Wooster, Barb, 379 Wopata, Joyce, 112, 113 Workhoven, Merril, 426 Workman, David, 417 Workman, Jerry, 417 Worley, Mike, 274 243, 440, 441, 491 Wilcox, Donald, 289 Wilcox, Gaylord, 421 Wilcox, John, 252 Wilcox, Robert, 415 Wilcynski, Jean, 387 Wileynski, Joan, 387 Wild, Cassie, 223, 249, 385, 480, 491 WILDLIFE CLUB, 41 Wiley, Ann, 381 Wiley, Stuart, 192, 431,491 Wiles, Susan, 322, 491 Wilhelm, Larry, 41 Wilhelm, Lynn, 402 Wilken, Claudia, 42 Wimmer, Ginny, 319 Wimmer, Stephen, 408 Winans, Pat, 336 Winchell, Kim, 421 Windhusen, Ted, 355 Windle, Ann, 207, 244, 252, 366 Windle, Judith, 126, 392 Windrum, Steve, 415 Winkler, William, 349 Winney, Jim, 123 Winter, Douglas, 424 Winterer, Erma, 198, 210, 214, 387 Winters, Charlie, 265, 281 Wirth, John, 401 Wirth, Rosangie, 369 Wise, Susan, 372 Wiseman, Willis, 434 Wisen, Linda, 256 Wishnow, Emanuel, 54, 62 Wisnieski, Diane, 399 Witcig, Mary, 361 Withrow, Taylor, 285, 441, 491 Witt, Carolyn, 375 Witt, Joseph, 123 Worley, Pat, 329 Wortman, Robert, 343 Woster, Pris, 319 Woten, Jeanne, 49, 255, 321 WRA, 326 Wragge, Pam, 180, 181 Wray, Terry, 408 WRESTLING, 286 Wright, Barb, 252 Wright, Carolyn, 375 Wright, Edward, 130 Wright, Janet, 366 Wright, John. 300. 445 Wright, Mary, 377, 491 Wright, Pat, 255 Wright Rita 322 Wulf, Lynn, 45 Wunderlich, William, 407 Wupper, Melinda, 319 Wustrack, Roger, 448, 491 Wykoff, Karen, 502 Wynkoop, Sandra, 319 Wynn, Michael, 282, 283 Yannon, Nestor, 282 Yant, Roger, 421 Yates, Jane, 383 Yaussi, Stephen, 445 YELL SQUAD, 251 Yetman, Susan, 244, 306, 399 Yip, ching-Lit, 491, 497 YMCA, 248 Yoachim, William, 122, 123 Yocom, Betty, 500 Yokel, John, 355 York, Paul, 249, 411 Yost, Dennis, 297, 431 Yost, Dorothy, 244, 249, 385 Yost, Nancy, 250, 379 Yost, Rodney, 348 Yost, Susan, 321 Young, Crystal, 233, 377 YOUNG DEMOCRATS, 246 Young, Gary, 53, 86 Young, Judith, 366 Young, Larry, 59, 86, 88, 241, 282, 346, 441, 491 Young, L., 42, 88, 91 YOUNG REPUBLICANS, 247 Young, Suzzanne, 199, 369, 491 Youngberg, Robert, 343 Younkin, D., 233 Z Zabel, Nancy, 256 Zajic, William, 119 Zangari, Dominic, 300 Zartner, Robert, 491, 497 Zastrow, Janet, 56 Zatie, William, 433 Zeilinger, Susan, 255 Zentner, Richard, 92 Zerr, Romona, 255 Zessin, Dean, 112 ZETA TAU ALPHA, 398 Zetterman, Rowan, 426 Zicafoose, Kirby, 423 Zieg, Robert, 401, 491 Ziegler, Michael, 274 Zier, Jo Ann, 369 Zillich, Payline, 396, 491 Zillig, Nancy, 501 Zimmer, Charles, 343 Zimmer, lvan, 274 Zimmerman, James, 52, 445 Zimmerman, Linda, 396 Zimmerman, Phillip, 118 Zimmers, Stephen, 133 Zingr, Phillip, 424 Zink, Dennis, 112 Zitterkopf, Ronald, 252, 431 Zmarzly, Michael, 76, 417, 491 Zuerlein, Eugene, 351 Zuerlern, G., 41 Zuick, Linda, 105, 244 Zumbrunn, Walter, 123, 343, 348 Zumpfe, Carolyn, 336 Zuspan, William, 446 Zuttermeister, Robert, 348 Zwink, Allen, 355 YWCA, 248 4 O 1966 CORNHUSKER Staff Editor ....................... .... . ..Barbara Beckman Business Manager... ................... Jean l-loffmaster Associate Editors ..... .... N ancy Baker, Jim DeMars Faculty Adviser ...... ............. M rs. Wilma Crumley Managing Editors Kelley Baker, Ken Beebe, Allan Brandt, Dave Cummins, Mary Ann Deems Section Editors Administration Carol Mudgett Athletics Maxine Burnett, Keith Krueger, Gary McCord Classes Mary Brauer Colleges Susie Pouts, Mike Naden, Mike Nerud, Bill Paxton, Susie Phelps, Lee Schroer, Jane Wilken Fraternities Sue Lincoln, Bill Minier, Bill Paxton Men's Residences Bill Paxton, Larry Taylor Photography Photographic Productions, Jack Riggle, U.S. Army, Journal-Star Publishing Co. Cover 1 lnter7CoIlegiate Press Mission, Kansas Typesetters Petersen Typographers Lincoln, Nebraska Lithographer Inter-Collegiate Press Mission, Kansas Royalty Pictures J. Richard Voges Edholm and Blomgren Business Assistant Cindy Smith Panel Editor Marian Sicklebower Military John S. Metzger Organizations Judy Mahar, Joanne Pahl Research Carol Mudgett Sororities Twila Andreasen, Joanne Pahl, Pat Maurer Student Government Charles Baker Student Scenes Lynn Overholt Women's Residences Mary Ann Deems Acknowledgements Beauty Queen Judges Robert Goulet, Nancy Childs, Connie Deterding, Dr. Robert Hough Don Pont Eligible Bachelor Judges Carol Lawrence, Grace Peterson, Dr. James Roberts, Rich Scott Maxine Sparks Individual Pictures Rappoport Studios New York, New York l-laberman Studios Lincoln, Nebraska In Addition Nebraska Union, I ' Board of Student Publications Typography: Headlines, 24 Trade Gothic Bold C5 Body copy, 10112 Trade Gothic Lightg Student Scenes copy, 10112 Trade Gothic Bold Extendedg Picture cap- tions, 8110 Trade Gothic extendedg Keys, 616 Trade Gothic extended light and boldg Royalty, 12 Gothic 18, 18 Trade Gothic Bold, 18 and 12 Spartan Book Roman and 1 8 Lydian Boldg Ath- letic records, 10112 Spartan Book light and boldg Division Page copy, 36 Spartan Bold Italic Cg Theme copy, 24124 Spartan Medium Italicg Index, 9 Trade Gothic Roman A. Printed on 80 pound Enamel Warren Cumberland Gloss. , , - , , ., ,, ,, ,W , , - , , ., , , A l wg A


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