University of Missouri at Kansas City - Kangaroo Yearbook (Kansas City, MO)

 - Class of 1947

Page 199 of 356

 

University of Missouri at Kansas City - Kangaroo Yearbook (Kansas City, MO) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 199 of 356
Page 199 of 356



University of Missouri at Kansas City - Kangaroo Yearbook (Kansas City, MO) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 198
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Page 199 text:

N APPHECI The yearbook has two general aims. First, it should be a real memory book, a kind of glorified family album, showing pictures of every student and faculty member connected with the school. Secondly, it should be the complete history of one year of school life. At first the yearbook was a memory album for seniorsionly. In the beginning, seniors exchanged pictures and, in some cases, pasted them into albums together with newspaper clippings to serve as re- minders of school days. In early days, class rivalries were intense. Since that time, we have substituted szhool spirit for rivalry between schools and today, you are graduated fiom a certain high school instead of from the class of 1898 or 1916. Eventually printed yearbooks came into being. In the late eighties, halftones were developed and some yearbooks used this new method of photo reproduction and began producing printed yearbooks. Tremendous possibilities opened up to enterprising editors with the new device for picture reproduction and began pro- ducing printed yearbooks. We might Wonder why annual editors did not start immediately to produce streamlined books similar to the 1946 All Americans. But things just don't happen that way. Yearbooks move slowly toward perfection, in the same way auto- mobiles do. It has taken the great automobile industry with its highly paid designers and engineers 25 years to get over the idea that an automobile ishould look like and be constructed like a carriage. Today the function of the yearbook is the same as it was before printed annuals made their appearance. It should still be a memory book, or family album of the school. Studies of yearbook sales show that the number of books purchased depends upon the number of people whose pfctures appear in the annual. TIU . This section of the Kangaroo you are now reading is known as the Bushwhacker, it is the yearbook of the School of Dentistry. It has been compiled and edited as a separate entity from the rest of the year- book, and was edited and composed solely by students of the School of Dentistry, and was not composed or edited by staff members of the rest of the book. As a matter of, fact, the first time the editor of the Kangaroo has seen or heard about our section was when the book was finished and delivered by the printer. This explanation is given so that there will be no wonde.ing as to why the Bushwhacker section is colonial in style and the rest of the book is mod- ernistic in style. Among those who gave invaluable help are John Streck, who assisted with photographs. E. L. Fox and Art Taubman assisted in obtaining information about the underclassmen, and Art Lind- quist, the Freshman Psi Omegan, helped by handling all affairs dealing with students on the 51st street campus. Our thanks also to Miss Helen Adams, Mrs. Genevieve Roth and Miss Bernadine Summe for proofreading and suggestions. And especially to Miss Mary Orr, Miss Ma'garet Potts and Mrs. Elizabeth Stroup, the unforgettable ladies in the accounting office who paid all the bills and kept the creditors from cur door. And if it werenit for Mrs. Mary Huffman and her help from the library, many a day would have been more tiresome. For this we want to express our deepest thanks. And to Kirk Hoerman for drawing the splendid cartoons, to Jim "Moose" Miller for the sports articles, to Bill Hulen- for the fraternity articles-and all others who so willingly helped, we say in deepest appieciation, Thanks.

Page 198 text:

bedicqted to can bean We, the students of The University of Kansas City, School of Dentistry, dedicate this 1947 volume of the "Bushwhacker', to our Dean, Roy James Rinehart, who has devoted his life to the upbuilding of our school and who has brought order, dignity, and na- tional acclaim to our institution. Not only do we appreciate these great gifts, but we want him to know of our profound appreciation for his interest in every student who comes here for dental instruction. The name of Roy James Rinehart will live forever indelibly impressed in the hearts of those who know him. "The educational policies of our Dean have led toward definite goals, but they have been sufficiently flexible to successfully meet the trends in dental edu- cation. His policies have been progressive, but well tempered with a sense of the practical values. He has Continuously encouraged better teaching, improved teaching methods and better standards of student accomplishment. Organizations such as the Council on Dental Education, the Curriculum Survey Com- mittee and the American Association of Dental Schools have been strongly supported by our Dean in his effort to keep the University of Kansas City, School of Dentistry, among the outstanding dental institutions of the United States. . "Dean Rinehart has made his counsel available to those in need of it and has welcomed constructive criticism. He allows his faculty much freedom of action and encourages initiative. "The students express their sincere appreciation of Dean Roy Rinehart's long and faithful service of thirty-six years to dental education and the dental profession, the deep interest and human understanding displayed in his contacts with student life, the loyalty and friendliness in his relations with his students.



Page 200 text:

WE LUUH HEAVE WARD Here we see the clean, unirnprinted sky, blown by gentle winds . . . peaceful again, free at last. Here, there will be no shaft of stone, no marble arch . . . no Gettysburg . . . no Flanders Field . . . Yet here was a great field of battle . . . where gal- lant men flew and fought, daring death, suffering death . . . triumphing over death. Their victories have made secure this sky-ancient altar of man's hope, symbol of his freedom, empire of his future progress. American's lift their eyes to the sky today . . . and remember the 'simple thanlefulness the courage and sacrifices of the men who made it forever free. Few people are callous or stupid enough to say that war is actually a good or desirable thing. But certain people contend that war exists to save the world from over population. Charming and heart-Warming thought, isn't it. Let's see if the bookkeeping of the first World War bears it out. We could use the second World War as an example, but there are countries on the earth today from which we cannot obtain a record of lives lost or money spent-besides it would be too appalling-so let's take the first World War. In that war, it cost 525,000 to kill one man. That's the offi- cial price tag on each of those little wooden crosses that bloom where poppies used to grow. Invested at a modest 5 percent, 525,000 would give a return of 51,250 each year. The average income for the head of a family in the United States prior to 1940 wasn't much over S1,000. It was and is much less than that in other countries. So it seems the world got stuck. We paid too high a price to get rid of those 17,000,000 men killed in the first conflict-men who might have been "excess population" to some, but not to the people who loved them. And now, with better equipment, the world, if allowed to enter another war is better prepared. 525,000 will be a bargain price for blowing a decent human to hell, and the number of dead will not be countable on even the latest adding machine. But gruesome figures, and deploring the monstro- sity of two recent World Wars will not stop the next. The one thing that can stop it is an aroused public opinion of hitherto unknown magnitude. We must convince the world, and perhaps even cram it down their throats until they digest it and it is assimilated by their brain--that we intend to have peace-even if we have to fight for it. Then we will have peace. And it is our responsibility, as educated professional men-as leaders, it is up to us to obtain peace, not by licking the boots of a foreign power, but by fighting for it if necessary. if -Then, thank God, there will be peace!

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