University of Mississippi - Ole Miss Yearbook (Oxford, MS)

 - Class of 1898

Page 1 of 236

 

University of Mississippi - Ole Miss Yearbook (Oxford, MS) online yearbook collection, 1898 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1898 Edition, University of Mississippi - Ole Miss Yearbook (Oxford, MS) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1898 Edition, University of Mississippi - Ole Miss Yearbook (Oxford, MS) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 236 of the 1898 volume:

wx 54. 7 I l ' 4 11. . . " as .S if . frm' .-1 D , A , - lf' an f'. 53 'v , CJ' - ' 4 . wg: - ,l J 1 14 1.,'1 A , 0 , f 1-V '3,"' f-7. - vfhi 35. 0 ' f " 1 4- - , , . , "' "3 ." ,A 1 'zwJ53f:-'1 , 4, ., . Y, . . J' . -.,.' - r,.'1f' ,,.-. - . A, . - -." 3, A. ,l f '3 Tt?E,'v' r.. 'V P , a 34'-V I . W ' ?'!'v:.,V 3' .Z Y. "1 1 'ia' 'J . I ' iv ffl 1 5' 5 'ff "Q:'I3f5f '.'f I f xii: -I ' if . ' x ". ' x' ' jkgffyi "- 'flvifgzf - , 5 IW 'if' '3 'fs .. .. . Y. f , , .. ' 0 ..-. - rx--. 'v- x - f -- , I ., . . 1. V uh A ,G ..- ' ' ' o 4 - ' 5 'qii 2, ws. vl - I ,f - V .N . 9.4, . V . . P 4- . - x ,v Q. 4.42, 4v3xA vi 'w 'T . 4 , . . . "-.' :za -'-'r"' ' af' ' 1:1-'..T j . 1. 4 ,-7 , .' ' . .. -'1 E. '54 I. .2 S.. 'uf'-X' ' H5335 . -'fu lr! . - , L g-.xifz gl 1 Af'-'sf . -.','. 1 '11 'U . .-I., , 35- AWur4qnMMUgm nIM1lmmM1uw .-T 1 "J, ff 1' 4 ' 'L x Hag, 'Q . . " 1 .V-f V ,245 F65 H . if , . 'D --"B v ,N H 4 0' . - ..-. fylqw -'S xnW Y' xnpf znfgvv Y , . .ry- 0' . 2 VV- -+V f..-' Kg. ,. 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JV' .Q-.,4Vf ' bg, K I aria W my U02 miSS" 1 w W1 + W if Riff 1 mow 5 mon r 5 ' F mon QGQ 1 l 1 I U79 5F SSiDDi n K 4 XXV' WWA WW' ig : 'K9f'c,f"X' BRANDON. ,5 '-' NASHVILLEQ iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii INTRODUCTION QWWWWW IJWWWWQ 531 SS 'wewuwwwwwww-nwwswwwvafwiwwiuwvgg 95 ii S5 S3 IC gs il :vw SS wwwwfwwwfw-rwcwwwww-rwwgg 55 S5 With due acknowledgement of .29 our indebtedness to the Board of Editors of '97, with thanks to those who have aided us in the prepara- tion of this volume, and with the hope that the result of our efforts may, in some measure, meet the expectations of our friends, .5 we present to you Volume Two of the "Ole Miss " of the University of Mississippi. .AC .99 .Al .99 U99 -The Editors 4 Tn glustime QQ. QI. Iozrmm: Ifidurutnr, Qiratnr, glurist, Statesman, f?at1:iut fillhu was thtirr EI iptufrs-snr in tht' Iluiurrsitg nf Zfllississipni this uulumc is affrrtiunatrlg drdirzrtrd I... Q. C. LAMAR EDUCATOR, LEGISLATOR. JURIST ,V N. .,1, I4 -I af' ' Y lilly' ' I 4. f . .,,,x,. 1. .1- slam -,,-Q. 2. :gl -. . - .AL Q ' 1, .- lkgt, "3 - 'mpg ,' ' Pig .X ,5 ,. .'- 51.51. WB, ' Cy -A . ,.-,f --,-tl. A - . . A r'J.. al ll.. ,4 1.3. '.',9. . I. T! S,-.,-wg . Vxgff, x 'x , 1 .v X- ... 'V'-1' ' ul "D - :,. 1' ' Yi' .ffm ar" .Q , ,' 'EN' u. . h'-gA- 'A .., , Q ' V t' n, ,' 4 F S - -' 1 . .-,' Q1 ' f I lx! 1-7 Q.-'. -'I ' .-rc 'swf'-bf? QQ . 0 v Y I -- 4 ..-.A ' -v . .Jy -.,- ", 6 f-fin., gb- -., :,4MA ,T A ' ,- ' . I 45' 141- ' -... iff" -fyfl ' . ' 5,1 1 -.4 I, , H " Y . ,f. ...A ' Q ' - 1 ' -, - - -. I ' -- F-A "' - x, Z' fl, Jyvkffa H , 2 '-, , ' .5 .5.r,'L, 'f ...f . ' 5-4--,,'. .w4'." " l " J . J 1' . . ' ' . . L ' ' ,Q . . 1 J- ' ---DU I- A I ,I , ..f1..,.,L't ,'l,i.l , Lp. , I' 1 . ,. . . , .rl .Nan ,Vi I . P 1 'mu I Z I- A ul .L s , ,5 . . ' - ' - ' 4 -n - . ' , ' K . S L ,. x, v . . , . ' u 'L if ,, , ' J' A 1 1 . r 1 1- Y.. 1 K --1 rv ', A" ' , x - v ' WL. C. Lamar, Professor .255 LAMAR'S, connection with the University of Mississippi began in I85O. At that time he was a practic- ing attorney in the town of Oxford, and in july of that year he was elected as Adjunct Professor of Math- ematics. He held this position for two years, resigning in 1852, and returned to Georgia. Later he came back to Mississippi, resumed the practice of his profession, and in 186o he was a member' of Congress from the First District. Tiring of public life and the fruitless efforts of Southern Democrats to avert the "inevitable conflict," when in June, 1860, he was offered the chair of Ethics and Metaphysics in the University, he accepted it and took up its duties on thevopening of the session of 1860-61. In May, 1861, having been elected Lieutenant-Colonel of the Nineteenth Mississippi Regiment, he resigned his professorsliip for army life in Virginia. In june, 1866, Colonel Lamar was again elected to the chair of Ethics and Metaphysics. He accepted. Owing to the scarcity of funds and the dearth of instructors, he did more than double duty, conducting classes in Psychology, Logic, and in Law. In janu- ary, 1867, he was relieved of his work in the College Department and was placed at the head of the Law School. In this school he served until june, 1870, when, owing to the condition of State affairs, he voluntarily resigned. This severed his final connection with the University. Of him ex-Chancellor Mayes has said: " There was but one voice from those who came in contact with him, in regard to Professor Lamar's efficiency. He was an enthusiast in his calling, whatever that might be 3 and that enthusiasm he carried into his professional work. As a member of the Faculty he was always wise and prompt in counsel, temperate and considerate, although ETH! where occasion arose, To his pupils he was always accessible and kind, companionable, inspiring them all with commingled sentiments of profound respect and personal regard. He was devoted to their interests. He felt that, for the time, he was the representative of the true principles of the science which he taught, and that he was indi- vidually responsible for the results of his teaching. He possessed in a wonderful degree the faculty of infusing his own spirit into all who sat under his instruction. It was his lot to fill three of the least attractive chairs in the Uni- versity-Mathematics, Metaphysics, and Law. Yet to each of them he gave a charm in the eyes of his pupils, alike 7 unusual and beneficial. Many of those pupils treasured up his instructions, and bore away with them rich fruits of their association with him g and, in the professional eminence which they attained, proved themselves successful chan- nels for the communication of the same benefits to others." During the seven years he was connected with the University his influence upon the youth of the State was wide and lasting. Of this, speaking for himself, Bishop Galloway has written: " He was the Gamaliel at whose feet I sat and from whose lips I received instruction. The thrill of that flashing eye, the tone of that magic voice, the strange magnetism of that magnificent presence, filling as it did the broad heaven of our imaginations and the loftiest ideal of my young ambition, have lingered and inspired me for more than half a jubilee of years." Hon. C. E. Hooker, in a memorial address, spoke these words: " The love and affection which he aroused in the hearts of young men was wonderful. I know of no criticism to which a professor can be subjected more to be dreaded than that of young men assembled from all portions of the State in the classes of a university. You will not find a graduate of that institution who was educated there during the period that Mr. Lamar acted as professor that does not feel for him and has not borne for him in all the changing stages of life that perfect affection and profound admiration that he inspired in the hearts of all young men who came in contact with him." ..:1,.11,zzzizzzzziiuiizi: N KX " 11 5251 35 Cs.. 1: ' ' '41 ff " X N A 'I - ' Irs- V .s?12f"e 'z fi it i l 'Ret ' N.. f :- H - - 4 -I-? 'w'li ,. llillill 1 ,,-fl" gif-If-fra 1 h e g:?ii 553. l is .di 8 Lamar Life-Calendar Born in Putnam County, Georgia, September 17, 1825. Entered Freshman Class of Emory College, Oxford, Georgia, August, 1841. Was graduated in July, 1845. Admitted to the bar, Vienna, Georgia, 1847. Married to Miss Virginia L. Longstreet, Oxford, Georgia, july 15, 1847. Removed to Oxford, Mississippi, November, 1849. Adjunct Professor of Mathematics, University of Mississippi, 1850-52. Returned to Georgia, summer of 1852. Candidate for Congress, Third District, 1854. QDefeated.J Returned to Mississippi, October, 1855. Plantation life at " Solitude," LaFayette County, 1856-57. Elected to Congress, First District, 1857. Reelected to Congress, First District, 1859. Professor of Ethics and Metaphysics, University of Mississippi 1860-61. Member of Secession Convention, January, 1861. Appointed to Confederate Congress, January, 1861. Lieutenant-Colonel of Nineteenth Mississippi Regiment, May 1861. Joined Methodist Episcopal Church, Macon, Georgia, July, 1862. Special Commissioner to the Empire of Russia, November, 1862. Judge Advocate Third Army Corps QA. P. Hill'sj, rank of Col- Y Y ! onel, 1864. Professor of Ethics and Metaphysics, University of Mississippi June, 1866. Professor of Law, University of Mississippi, January, 1867. Degree of LL. D. conferred by University of Mississippi, June, 1869. Offered chair of Belles-Lettres and History, Emory College, July 1870. 1Declined.l Elected to Congress, First District, November, 1872. Eulogy on Charles Sumner, April 28, 1874. Reelected to Congress, First District, November, 1874. Elected to United States Senate, January, 1876. Vote on "Silver Bill" against instructions of Mississippi Leg- islature, February, 1878. Defense of ex-President jefferson Davis against Senator Hoar's attack, March 1, 1879. Tilt with Senator Conklin, June 18, 1879. Reelected to United States Senate, January, 1882. Death of Mrs. Lamar, December 50, 1884. Appointed Secretary of the Interior by President Cleveland, March, 1885. Degree of LL. D. conferred by Harvard University, Novem- ber, 1886. Married Mrs. Henrietta J. Holt, Macon, Georgia, january 5, 1887. Oration, "John C. Calhoun: His Life, Character, and Public Services," April 26, 1887. Associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, january, 1888. Reiinited with Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 1891. Died on Monday, January 23, 1893, at Macon, Georgia. Buried in Riverside Cemetery, January 28, 1893. Removal and reinterment in St. Peter's Cemetery, Oxford, Mis- sissippi, October 26, 1894. in :4 A . - , , .. V . 7 u ' '. ' I 1 E." -1 . '. J ,-,-- -..vA,1.,' ' ..' 1 .' r Li "'ri2f'3?:4 "' r.-if-11.5 .-:Mix-Q I . 57 v sf . 1. . n rn . F IF A , . X v. 'o em: 3- v X 5 1.7512 'nn' 1 , AY 1-'. - 'KL' . 11 Xl I 4'. -I A .Kgye - f. 'g 4 J in: ,.'ly 5- d'5:,Lr'1 -A -. . . Q -.r fa 'I-.'-'a v. ', '5 -5512-?f'E. '-'fl .a- '2 fflfr' "JS -- ', .'7.r" ' - ' , 1 1, 'J --in-!"t " " ' I F V . . ,.,- , o 5 V 'l . -', '1' A' l , r -4 , up C' Q , '- , 5 K' -",'- . . 11., . ,J A' .,. , , n. F, A .N .N . ..' . u ,. E 6 1 'a, . ,-Q. . . -. . - La ' ' - .4 . , 1 .3 1,3 KA ," X . , r The Morning Glory nv XYALTER MALONE Morning glory, morning glory, Fragile as a fairy story, Robed in gowns of purple and of white and red, Diademed with dew, There are none so fair as you, Empress of the world of blossoms e the youth of day is dead. Lovely handmaid of the morning, KJXX K .iq X, Lowly earthly scenes adorning, ,fgv N, , ' -2 An enchantress who is peerless and is proud, X Dec d ' brilliant blooms 'mm N , X x ' Lik me of Tyrian looms, x ' Or th orien ' splentlors of a spangleal slinrise cloud. X -' 4' . N So I ponder and remember x ,Q f Q But amid the noonday splendor fx In a green and gold Septeinb , fx ey Fade away your bosoms tender, I have seen a maiden fair and frail as y ug J' fit As the dewdrops vanish from your feverish face, But she drooped and died. Ixfjfbx X I So you pant and pine I As you perish in your pride, 1 LQK' , G Ere the dazzling day's decline, For the blithest and the brightest vanis 1 wi ,flue nyrning dew.Q-.Ex Losing all your glowof color and your gladsomeness and grace . Morni glory, morning glory. I ffj--f g Fro ev tombstone old and hoary K g j f" NL -X X ' Do yo dy' blossoms go to meet her there? 'll ,K ,f ,f X G A X ' ' here in marvelous morn. I Xb f jxi , ' Xltickiiig roses with no thorn, 'J' ' , X-' fx In the xnpire of the an els, does she heed mv heart' esoair? 1- I k f K6- I sy K Q' ' f ' H aux, So I bless now, and kiss vou, K- ' l I gg ' or fi fr ' 'J Hx ' c " I X -:W "f n-.FZ arling, how I miss you! f'- y A Kg? 'XX 11555 1 K fn heave you are treading, sweet, to-day, X Z, 45 Does your bosom thrill XXX' - 7 ' i x - fi XVhen vou hear I love vou still +P' X fi -A - - ' ,Kava Arr v 1 v t - - y , - 7 - Xxx. Il 1 I , -knd are you still faithful svs eetheart to your lover far awa ?" 4 X Q y Y -5 z -51' H . ,. . s AF , -:J--mr ,a".'v - C..- .- t 4-S . 1-- ' Q 1 A lv '-ic?" f' ' 'Q ' K E ,E -A . 'M' A, ...rf M'-'-..k ff: ."5, :lc J' i - ,.' ' ' .I - . '.' . - 9' I A - It-'.f .. .-'f'-22' ' wil: ' j'--QI "L,-, . 1 " -Q, f ., U- 1-.7-'-, . .' 1 1.90: I lp A "ZA -4445 s " ,' lpn-.n.,f I A, x my ,A ' vvk. A'-fr' 5 'QQ-Qf".':1"fx lg, . 19.1 N .,..,,:,Jfv , Al.. -,,-.- .Tax .:Vf..- "..j,f' .J :- -ff-' --'--'- ' 5 'fi ':,:.P rf f - -'b . Alfa r ' s 'J xg ,v . 3 " 1- 31 A n . 3, ,QI ' . FP U ' . -..' 1' , I' l , vu , . , ,Ir '- A. J.. LQ ..-: - N' .H . Q 'U Q I? U my- ' 1 Q -5 Board of Trustees of the University oi Mississippi .25 .al HIS EXCELLENCY GOVERNOR A. J. MCLAURIN, EX-OEFICIO PRESIDENT First Congressional District Seventh Congressional District HON. J. A. ORR 11898-19045 ...... Columbus. HON. R. H. THOMPSON, LL. D. 11896-Igooy . Brookhaven. Second Congressional District State at Large HON. W. A. BELK 11898-19043 ...... Holly Springs. HON. E. W. SMITH 11896-19005 . . . Hernando. DR. T. P. LOCKWOOD 11896-1902l . . Crystal Springs Third Congressional District Ex-Gov. J. M. STONE 11896-19023 . . Jackson. HON. LEROY PERCY 11895-19025 ..... Greenville. HON- H- M- QUINN l1393'1904l ' Centerville- DR. YERGER H1cKs 11896-l902l .... Vicksburg. Fourth Congressional District HON. J. W. T. FALKNER 11896-19023 . . . Oxford. H A T R 8 6 d JUDGE A. H. WHITFIELD, LL. D. 11898-19041 Jackson. ON' ' ' DANE U 9 -1900, ""' Greua a' HON. LOUIS M. SOUTHVVORTH 11896-19009 . Carrollton. Fifth Congfessional District Ex Officio, the State Superintendent of Education HON- J- R- MCINTOSH 1.1393-19049 ---- Meridian. HON. A. A. KINCANNON ....... jackson. Sixth Congressional District Secretary of the Board LIEUTENANT-GOV. J. H. JONES 11896-I9OOJ . . Woodville. BEM PRICE, ESQ., ........ Oxford. J' Executive Committee HON. R. H. THOMPSON, LL. D., . Brookhaven. HON. J. W. T. FALKNER ..... Oxford. Dr. T. P. LOCKWOOD . . . . Crystal Springs. THE CI-IANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY . University. HON. J. A. ORR . . . Columbus. .al Treasurers HON. A. Q. MAY, State Treasurer, . . jackson. BEM PRICE, ESQ., Local Treasurer, . Oxford. 13 Instructors and Other Officers .al .al ROBERT BURWELL FULTON, M. A., LL. D., CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY. .al Faculty of Arts ROBERT BURWELL FULTON, M. A., LL. D. DABNEY LIPSCOMB, A. M. Professor Of Physics and of Astronomy. Professor of English Language and Literature, and of Belles Letlres RICHARD XVATSON JONES, M. A., LL. D. J. G. DEUPREE, A. M., LL. D. Professor ofChemistry, General and Analytical. Professor of Pedagogy. ALFRED HUME, C. E., D. SC. F. L. RILEY, PH. D. Professor of Mathematics. Professor of Rhetoric and History. RICHARD MARION LEAVELL, M. A., LL. D. JOHN WESLEY JOHNSON, M. A., PH. D Pfofeff-Sof of Mental and M0n'g.lCS2ggf3Phy' of Logic, and of Political Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy. CHILES CLIFTON FERRELL, M. A., PH. D. MISS SARAH MCGEHFE ISOMI Professor of Modern Languages. Instructor In Elocutlou- ALEXANDER LEE BONDURANT, A. M. THOMAS OVID MARRY, M. A. Professor Of Latin Language and Literature. Assistant Professor of Natural History. PAUL HILL SAUNDERS, M. A., PH. D. EUGENE CAMPBELL, Professor of Greek Language and Literature. Fellow in Chemistry. C. C. FERRELL. ROBERT DE LANIER, M. G. FULTON, Mus. ALICE M. BEYNES, Secretary of the Faculty. Proctor. Secretary to the Chancellor. Librarian .al Faculty of Law G. D. SHANDS, LL. D., DEAN OF LAW SCHOOL. T. H. SOMERVILLE, LL. B., PROFESSOR. Ex-CHIEF JUSTICE HORATIO F. SIMRALL, LL. D. Ex-UNITED STATES DISTRICT JUDGE, HON. ROBERT A HILL, HON. JEHU A. ORR, A. M. HON. J. W. T. FALKNER, HON. HUGH A. BARR, Lecturers on Law. I 4 5, QQ me f' I 1 FACULTY J. W. JOHNSON C. C. FERRILL A. L. BONDURANT R. M. LEAVELL G. D. SHANDS R. W. JONES E. CAMPBELL J. G. DUPREE A. HUME R. B. FULTON D. LIPSCOMB, P. H. SAUNDERS F. L. RILEY T. H. SOMERVILLE T. O. MABRY ' .N . Q4 bm. 1-'f"f.Q' " ' L sn Q Q I ' ' I Oni" 1 fix, 2 ,'-- . 4 'X 451.- '. w' ' I 'L-A ITS- .U " rf-51' - . ' fi- '. 'r va .-'ff fb G T mfr., Ag-l'i X' T I ,:..' 'D - , iv -f,-. :WHY 4 vb- ' - n f . ' n 1 . . A 1 n 1 ', . ' . -I I I . 1 .' 1 . . Q . 4, 'lj I . 1 eq. 1 F F Q Q rx' HY .1- K ,- .1 v I r ' - F Historical Sketch HE 6th of November, 1898, will be the Hftieth anniversary of the opening of the University of Mississippi, and it is but fitting that some word or memorial commemorative of that event should appear in this volume of OLE Miss. The readers are, therefore, invited to the consideration of a brief sketch of the history of the institution, in the earnest hope that anything tending toward a better knowledge and appreciation of the benefits the Uni- versity has conferred upon the State may be accompanied by an increasing loyalty and enthusiasm on the part of its alumni. VVhen Mississippi was admitted to statehood, Congress set aside one township of the public lands for the establishment of an institution of higher education within its borders. Out of the proceeds of the sale of this land the State University was founded. The management of the funds received from the sale of the orig- i11al grant from Congress was vested in the Legislature of the State. The Act of the Legislature of March 5, 1880, provides for the ascertainment of the indebtedness of the State on account of the Seminary Fund, and " that the sum of 532,643 be, and the same is hereby, appropriated for the year 1880, and annually thereafter, for the purpose of paying the interest due on said sum of 5544,o61.23." The Legislature has, in addition to this fixed income, from time to time made special appropriations to the Uni- versityg and within recent years the Board of Trustees has, through the earnest efforts of Chancellor R. B. Fulton, been successful in securing from Congress the grant of another township of land. In view of which facts, and the friendly attitude of the Legislature, the way seems clear for the continued and ever-increasing prosperity of the institution. The University has been peculiarly fortunate in having had its affairs managed by faculties composed of many eminent professors, and in having been presided over by distinguished Presidents and Chancellors. It is impossible, in this short article, to give mention of all who did noble service for the State as professors in the University, the best that can be done is to acknowledge the debt of gratitude we owe, and to express the pride we feel in having had 17 connected with the institution such meh as were justice Lamar. Professors Bledsoe, XVhe:1t, Quinche, Sears, Garland, Hillgard. Hogue. and others also deserving of mention. Fortunately. those who have been at the head of the insti- tution are not so many that they may not be named. In the order of their terms of ofhce they are as follows: Dr. George Frederick Holmes. Judge A. B. Longstreet, Dr. Frederick A. P. Barnard, Dr. john Newton VVadde1, Gen. Alexander P. Stewart, Hon. Edward Mayes, and Dr. Robert Burwell Fulton. all of whom are well and favorably known beyond the limits of any one State. The influence of these men and their colleagues has resulted in the substantial progress of the University from its very beginning. and has been potent in moulding the destiny of our State through those of its sons who were educated under their instruction. It is a noteworthy fact that a very large proportion of tl1e men of the State who have power and influence in their several communities have been educated, in part at least. at the State Universityg While many of its alumni have achieved prominence in other States. The enduring history of institutions, as well as of nations, is largely in the life and character of the individuals they have given to the world 3 and measured by such a principle, in view of the magnificent work of its noble-hearted instruct- ors and presiding officers in furnishing to Mississippi and the nation such distinguished alumni as have graduated from its halls. the University of Mississippi has set in motion immortal iniiuences and wrought for eternity in the souls of me11. ' In the lives of the men who have been intimately connected with the institution for the last half-century, whether as instructors or students, there is the highest inspiration for every young man who may in the future seek here prepa- ration for his life-work: and we that are to follow can pay no greater tribute to the worth of our predecessors than by emulating their lives and striving to attain the same exalted patriotism that shall result in the development of broad- minded and cosmopolitan characters. ,V , if 1 as , - ffflgc 5. x8 Ill' Hlma UR ALMA MATER, or in words of English tongue, . CF? ' ji 6 ell' Q' . 'X f 5' ' if ffl? 1, iff ' s v ISD 0 Our dear mother, O most dear! XVou1d that words were given to praise thee, XVould that pure love might furnish Words suiiicient. Oh, what a song divine Should we then sing! If only our Full hearts could utter what they feel! If lips could phrase our deep devotion! By sweetest memories art thou hallowedg By cherished blessings made most dear. Thy sons in one glad chorus join To give thee thanks, and still we feel That ever shall we debtors be to thy Sublime muniiicence. The classic lore Of ages past, the secrets of mysterious science, The golden wealth of wisdom hoarded In volumes vast of erudition,- All these hast thou with unwearied love Striven to bestow on us, sometimes too dull To garner thy most precious sheaves, Too dull to see where greatest blessings lie, And so have robbed thee of thy purest joy, The joy that givers get from gifts Received with joy. T9 QNX f New 4- S if 0 V I F, 30 31' EX 'S 'Q , ia ,ix Q X! 'A' X Cfzff ' . K , ii i! u X fl .V N! Z 5 ,BJ I ',' 4 I p g S. Z ' I WJ' 1 , ,T 1 5 1 I ' qi 'gr Y' H 1 h 15.0. 'B sf 5 ' I l 11 wg'- I v I - . fbzf 5' N v z, Q. 'AN f,.N '- ,J ,' Q ' ,,.,' '- -'TL' 'ri I Q . "Y Q .gr . I - .X Liv.-b.I ,, 9- . I Q9-' 'KL' '. vu- -- . X .rn ' "H".l. U. ,. X f , Q -' ,Q .gui A," fi. 'ia' u W, . yli . ga gf' gl , X r- 5- , s. ' . 1 ,.' 45.4 . "-w x 1- . v ' K ",-'A'u . r-V u 17 V- , - rgxl' .. t1efV7 .X .?, . I 0 :V - fa ' 2:7 :Nu -A x .LS A 1' An, ne f '- 4 1'-t:'9 ' j 11 -l','f -. ..- 5f'Q-.,- v,..r' C 5 -- Q . l I ic j- 1 ,yqftfx f t ' 0' F' 1 4' '-' - ' - . 7 A - X. , l , .,. -- . V 3 - 4 '- :"pA- g-A ' fa 4 ' I I -5-l "1 ' ' ' 41" v ' ' - I 4 . . ' ' " . . 'I v ' ,,. . x ' . .1 - .', JN A '5wh'Hx 1- iff 411' 9 V v Q 1 .1-,s , 5. K A u - ' 1 8.4-, -ltL'x v'--:G .' Pj- Y ..' ,..-' .,.. ' -' A '. 0 I x or-4,1-, " , -..Mx -+- , .-4.5- --4., n . s. A '.':'u, 56--" ,. f 4 X4 6 . 1 ' f' f Board of Editors of U Ole Miss" .al .af EDITOR-IN-CHIEF . R. E. WILBOVRN, J T J .al .al Associate Editors W. L. AUSTIN, 'I' ll' V' L. BRAME, JR., 5 .4 E M. G. FULTON, .1 W VV. H. COOK, T -Y E A. W. SHANDS, J K E ANNA WVINEYARD, 5' 1 .al BUSINESS BI.-KNAGER5IN-CHIEF . LAMAR H.-XRDX', 'lf A 9 .al .5 Associate Business Managers H. F. FISHER, .Y X ANNIE PHILLIPS, T .1 6 W. H. COOK, T N E, Sefrelagf .al ART COMMITTEE ,. A. W. SH.-XNDS, Chairman .ai LITERARY COMMITTEE . VV. L. AUSTIN, Clzairman .af- ATHLETIC COMMITTEE . H. 2I F. FISHER, Clzairman ivfc 'I -Q: f Ugg? A2f,a', .5 ' ' -A ' I V. 4 44.'7I", - Tw' nl f . l' 'JA . K. f-1.6 "W -1- L 49" 1vW:pv1 . ,- Alla. v O'-5.- 51-"'r limit 'I "1 '- r'A n f.7'f 'f. ' - -JA, --w,l If , .5 4 . g 'P '- Y-I Q A -. . 5 ' Q ,. . ztxlg' J 4 , ', f-U' ' ...QLQQIS V., ,- .. 1 05' " ' ' ' U U .'.,v x .. . Lf - -' ,4 . -. . v in f ,, -Q. . , .xx .Ar , ,1". V' J' ,. ,Ng Y 5' 5 . r -T- r ""Ax "1 va , .A 4- - ,1 w . I. ' K 9 f4l,'sq.'-?:'. . --'4.xl'.:x',' -, ' Jihitu' aux,-'.tM,,'. n-. D I 'si '. 'Jr n.,g1-. 1 n ,I inf ,. :Jai 1-f"',,'. ,LA - Q-7 ' T',.'.'.- ,rw-J..-1'--, ,,.,",a, . 9 ' -. 0- k 1'q , ,. , 'f'N'W."... .vg4',-nfs' 'f ' 'D r" --r '.'. Aw ooy'L" .:v.1y.4v"fo "g f .N " ,f4w .Y . Q it? 'g'.1',.1'.,-:gf 'rf kmfi 1 n ' , ' ' 59. ' Z' ' 1 ' '. ' f '- -f,. A I . Q'lIl ' ' -. ' .. . 41-. , f.,'--'-.4 - 5 -- ,, 1 , . Q . . Q .J , J . ' ' x 1 LAY? ,gtk-, ', I ' gggmn W "R if, 4 5 . ' n ,a I V . J n Q 4 tp 0 k., K 1 Z fn. BOARD OF EDITORS OF "OLE MISS" H. F. FISHER A. W. SHANDS W. H. COOK LAMAR HARDY R. E. WILBOURN ANNA VINEYARD W. L. AUSTIN M. G. FULTON ANNIE PHILLIPS LEX BRAME. JR. J 3. MC Q. 1. Jr 1 . 4 1 Hu 'Q Y' . A ,.' -r- -.5 - 1 x J vw v.1',..' A. it I Al-Aw? f. . X ,. 1' ' , P ,Q .. f xv ' fi . gf' 5T.'1lf'.'- 3.--I TQQJ ' 5- - U. - C- . 1 . , -221- Rf. 5511! ,- - , ' 1- -"ix A f , 3 .1 . -3- ' , ' Q. Q -' n ' ., , .Q . . rw -1 H, x 1, ,1 . 4, 'A , va 1? J. 132. .A A., - - rx Q r ' 74 , F. , I 1' " ' A 1 f 'JJ , W . ' .. . . nr . ' J , v '5 -v,.v.L. X 1 ,sq -4' Xe fs J 'A -T v-., .L 0 'T ,M 1. 1 . ' r 4 , , v ,I w 3 1 S ,r . 3- 0 I j ' 5 l uf. C11 0 ' - A 4- , , his-..!.: .-ly.-.I A ,ig '- " gg.: 13 .'-' -'.,'.1 V ,',' . ir-1' ' ' "1"',,'.'jf,, rgx- ' 'l -V -V , ,,.. K' ll "V.:?'4.f 5' ' . Y , 1.11. ,A , .f .lj ' .v,'-bf .f - . - x - . . .U .' - ,, , . 1 'f'-fir f ' x"5n'4. .-f V" ' - ' " "w.' . V , '51 X'-.Ulf ',f:.ffNg".I'., ,f 14 "W 1.-N,.-IA.--,4 - ,.,,..x.,.. ,. -IP .11 ',,L..i '92 C+-g."', 1, ,V --qi 'li' -'ff' W' ' t '21-' -' w fx.:"' : "Jr 4 n 5 v F V '-4 ' . A . 's - - V ' ,AAM - F N . vfxi-bl? . . ' 15:-'f'-4. . . 9 1' 3- - fi' 2. 'A - f. 'L' 5 - Lf-,X ' T51 "' 4-'L ' ' I-Zu .1 ' ,M ng' -"l Q4 6 N 5ri"': J f.'-nf'T- Aff: -4, ' r N- 4 The Ewafewnifies their establishment dl the 23 University oi mississippi 3 N . Q YQQKSQN lselected. l fs , 1, f "O college days that speed on wings so strong, "Lol at the midnight hour - f2 O college joys that last not long, not long, Gleams a light from Fraternity's high watch ' O college friends from whom we soon shall tower! X sever, Far away unto sunrise and sunset sea, ,J K if O college friendships made for aye and ever." Bearing hope, love, and faith to humanity." , fy XA All :W ,4 fff' eva PX gf I 454 -ss f X " Fraternity, it is not that each heart - " ' X Q7 ' Must gifted be with talents choice a11d rare, f l N A ,, . It is enough to have that nobler part, W 3 ' X237 What though one's genius proveth small and spare, L I W X l ' ,A ,'-, So faith and love be tnere? Y' A 'Tis not the handsome face or easy wealth, gig X4 K These thlngs touch but the grosser side of men 1 H ' 'Tis more, 'tis loyalty, the heart, true health, . To hear an arduous duty-call, and then 4 To breathe, Amen." f rl N , x ' ' . . -f 5 Si Ki' XS, 5' ,fi GC 'ii N' 7 26 x -" 5' X i 'T E71 ,P-Szhfdiva :nav F "qv QI. 3.45 K T54 -1 Y .1 ' 4 . v. ts 4, ."5". .-N , J .VK Q.. ,.I -r "'Q,'N -. - J 1 Q- .-,. g.:- uy :Q-, , ,751 xfx, .-.V 1 ,. . , -vw-I f 1 ,nn - , , .V 4- , X' 'ff 's T 7 .4 -H 'J' , V- i,:4'L 1'f.. A Lg' .' .'A..1 Q .jmqnr Qu' . 'A4'- t, A' .I'?'fl! n IJJ- N mln. sl-5 A Ctvfn 3 ' if gb' Q-.fl -:Q D--'T V 1-, ti. if x 1 ,..., f. , s- 4 ' Y -, 4' "" ' '- ' 'Z ' ,.,.., vf, -. -' - LMA-A ' ,,"q,.'f. X N JA' ,' Q . - ., ' , ' . .,',s '-. y"l3'x. ' 'V ',1q1 ,A -571' 1i1EA.' ' . .' l ,fl . ftvr. 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SIGMA GAMMA - PSI . UPSILON . CHI . BETA . ETA . KAPPA LAMBDA . PI . IOTA . . ALPHA ALPHA OMICRON . EPsILoN . RHo . Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity FOUNDED AT YALE IN 1844 Roll of Chapters . Yale Bowdoin . Colby Amherst . . Vanderbilt . University of Alabama . . . . Brown . University of Mississippi University of North Carolina . University of Virginia . . . Miami . Kenyon . Dartmouth . Central University . . Middlebury . University of Michigan . . Williams LaFayette TAU . MU . NU . BETA PHI . PHI CHI . PSI PHI . GAMMA PHI PSI OMEGA . BETA CHI . DELTA CHI . DELTA DELTA PHI GAMMA GAMMA BETA THETA ZETA ALPHA CHI . PHI EPSILON College of City of . - . - - Q Hamilton . Colgate New York Rochester . Rutgers . DePauw Wesleyan . Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Adelbert . Cornell . University of Chicago Syracuse Columbia . University of California . Trinity . University of Minnesota SIGMA TAU . Massachusetts Institute of Technology Chi Chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity REv. W. D. HEDDLESTON CLYDE JOHNSON A. W. SHANDS C. R. PETTIS T. G. IVY GEORGE CAIRNS H. R. SHANDS W. S. PETTIS W. M. STONE Je' Frater in Facultate P. H. SAUNDERS, PH.D. J' Fratres in Urine .al Fratres in Universitate Class of '98 W. M. HAIVINER H. W. BROVVN G. P. BONDURANT Class of '99 C. T. BECKETT HARPER JOHNSON Class of '00 F. P. IVY L. A. TAYLOR Class of '01 J. D. MAYS G. A. WAGNER D. G. ROSS S. F L P J. H. A E C. D. SMITH R. A. ALCORN 32 M. JONES M. WEST A. SMITH M. KING E. EDMONDS T. PERKINS . H. JONES T. JONES 'inf' fi. ff fag . W! Hi , DELTA KAPPA EPSILON FRATERNITY J' , 1 1- '1-"" ' V v. 1 f':"61a W A'f,z-wk 4' 1 " 'J 'L iihqlmc-' .vig 16511,-V' nl., w , A fy f1n'-- - '- Q- ' .V ' . I A-. ' .-f"5'r-hx'-' ,gy v .NA - ,., ' ., -fmt 'lfij' " '54 .TZEQ Q "1-'Lf-.gf5' f ' ..f, .-51 I 1 . , f' Z' 5 'xg-1 . -' .r,.kA' 'w 5 33.5, . .V-, ,I-vi! Q. , -tsl 'J K".f'yu '.'JL I - h f , rx? 5' ' - Tfv I ,A - 'vb' v 44 , ,M " " f ,. sly: 1 url - A I A ff F, ff .- f 1 .' 5' A L-' . .. 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'-if ,-.,.- -1 if Y-P' A Q 'i"?"!'5 14, r ' -4'l. .,J3'.-3 Q- 1. . 1, - . 'f - C-4 "F 4 " 44, ' Z-.4 '.'-.' 4 ,. ic. . h . - ' . ' - fi, . 1 V-ng? ,-L!?' 0 j, 1' I 'xi 5 1 f A up -5 1 J1--,,+..,. . , .. Q . 1 4 mi. 4 X.. sf. u.,-, xfa, 4 , , rs..' "4 - ' ' 'YP-.3 . 1' 1 n Aw H A 1 I A.-. . '..7'g-1. - .-if ,VN 1 ff af" MVK.-1 p im, gn ,eh ,B , 'H.9f25..74-Y u':fA'Ji.5---Q -,ff -., ' nu xv 'r - . 1 -1 . 1,-, - 1- ..,' ' 1 ,' . x- Q. I' 4 ei-fr f - K'- s'5' 'N ' 5' , .'1?"'k2- f 7. iv-. ...vs v 1-sl ' 1, xr , s 5- . '. 'JY-I-7115" In P A UZA. . 'I - :r . . 'Ipl tvjvm ., , ' 1. 'rg' . ff: -ad 4,1 -. 'tt 'yr'gf-45'-',' .arty gf' 'I .1 ' ' - YW' ' L - . . .x-.- Q Jffv-" 'Aging' fqduk ,1'.- . ' ' ft 'rx .T - 5 H". Aff .' ". W '.'. Q, Q -'P L'fQ.. gf " ,7 at.. f-N ' , , 4 A,Qg,-,L-'na V 1 ., s QQA- .,x ., '-.'. - -ei'-. 1' 4-4 'x e."1l.H' .-,. F"-I.'. . .- . . , ,' . , .' A'-"y',l,'. ylsg rs' I v"Jl..,4.. - .M- .-.' '-1, A' . . -., . x L: 'Qoa , ,,,,,.. .. . ' 1 Sf1Q:- .1-Y' " t " - '- t1"i.- " - 454 '. L 1. 3 1' -- .Fix .1 ' K5 8 . J I ,- ' X ',",:v4 4... A-' ' .' ,I .-. - .-J ' qx n . 4 N ' I M J A,-r.'7 'u' 1 'X , rw- ' ' ' . I ,A-rt '..... ' K? -J. lr ' '. ' - s,-1 '-.- 1 ' ".. -f -g .XA , 11. f: 1wg.,L gg. 1g6.r',-4: 5 Q si ' u',..g-f' . . f?r :.r2,'.-5' Q ,.-.. - uv. N -H N ALPHA DELTA EPs1LoN LAMBDA UPSILON PHI SIGMA TAU Fraternity of Delta Psi .aid FOUNDED AT COLUMBIA COLLEGE, l847 .25 Roll of Chapters 3 71 . Columbia University University of Pennsylvania . . Trinity College . YVillian1s College University of Virginia . University of Mississippi . Yale-Sheilield Scientiiic School Massachusetts Institute of Technology Phi Chapter of the Fraternity oi Delta Psi 5.25 ESTABLISHED IN 1855 .9 Frater in Facultate RICHARD NIARION LEAVELL, M. A., LL. D. .al Fratres in Universitate SCHOOLS OF SCIENCE, LITERATURE, AND ARTS Class of '98 JAMES XV.-XRSAW BELL CLARENCE ANDERSON DOUOHERTV WILSON PRIMM KRETSCHMAR BIARSHALL LOUIS PERKINS HIXRRX' D. PRIESTLEY, JR. MAURICE GARLAND FULTON CHARLES XVHEAT HINTON LEE BICGEHEE PORTER BENJAMIN SHERROD RICKS Class of '99 JAMES PELLEXV FAISON EDWIN RUTHYEN HOLINIES CLIFFORD POLK PERKINS XVILLIAINI CALVIN XVELLS, JR. JOHN JAMES XVHITE Class of '00 HUGH BARR BIILLER GEORGE KENNEBREYX' SMITH CHARLES RUFFIN WHITE Class of '01 FRANK ROBERSON ROBERT WEBB WILLIAMS SCHOOL OF LAW Class of '98 GORDON GARLAND LYELL JOHN HARVEY THOMPSON, JR. Class of '99 WILLIAM BARRY RICKS Fratres in Urbe JAMES MCLEMORE BAIRD JAMES ELIAS PORTER JOHN ROBERT STOWERS YNILLIAM 'VAN AMBERG SULLIVAN JAMES PORTER WILKINS 38 ,xl -is V Miss ' S an r 7 44 up 3 ff' K' + ' Y -a RJ' .7- - 'I ",,, sw, . LL N J' DELTA PSI FRATERNITY ,.-4-1 :- L-nm .1 4-du :Ani Q 'Ig ' s.. CHAPTER HOUSE. 5, ,. 5 I -1. ,A . ' 1' - . vu. ,g'f'.f,:,,4l-' . . P., N5 ., '. Q 3, N go.'5'f" . '-lt' ., . 1 - , A . ' r 4 I 'fl I 'ul '- 5. ..- r . r 5, . , yur., f-.,., .'14'!-'Alf'-i'. - . r..s--Mg' -'. -ul'-:'--."wf. A, n 5 " 451 'I 4-V7.5 'iffy 1 1 J l . . 'lg' .U.' 1' -In ' 4 'V .- I g 'bv' . A 4 0 4, .r,,,. 1 fra -' ' 1 iYi"I .. . 1 , X.. , - A 1. 1 'Cn' ,Pr ,, V .rag 1:0 J,-2 1 I' lv .,:,,l '..- , ' " Y F' f g"-4u.,f'fa4' nf' f . f "v ' '-r.. A ' ' . Q ' -, 4 -. Q-.'- ' ' 1 ' f ' ' l I A Y X -4. 1 Y , m.fgw'f4w-xt-2::'fN -. K I -'-4.-' -.' A-'U-.'..r.Axp, 'r'-. ' v .. - ff 15 'zu 7 Y' . .Rye t.n4',"5:vq' . . uTi'.'.v' ' ' Q' '..g vg- fl, . I - 1 - 1 .. 1-,5,R.s,J.-- ,'-.- , ,-, -1, ,' I .1 A' - Vg.. -',f, u., v ..- 1 1 L" vc .. 1 . 0: P 5 S Y 'J Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity 5.25 FOUNDED AT WASHINGTON AND JEFFERSON COLLEGE, 1852 Chapter Roll First District PENNSYLYANIA ALPHA . Washington and jefferson College PENNSYLVANIA KAPPA . Swarthmore College PENNSYLVANIA BETA . Allegheny College NEW YORK ALPHA . Cornell University PENNSYLYANIA GABIMA . Bucknell University NEW 'YORK BETA - Syracuse University PENNSYLYANIA EPSILON . Gettysburg Col ege NEW YORK GAMMA . . Columbia University PENNSYLVANIA ZETA . Dickinson College NEW YORK EPSILON . . Colgate University PENNSYLVANIA ETA . . Franklin and Marshall College NEW YORK ZETA . . Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute PENNSYLYANIA THETA . LaFayette College MASSAC HUSETTS ALPHA . . Amherst College PENNSYLVANIA IOTA . University of Pennsylvania NEW HAIVIPSHIRE ALPHA . . . Dartmouth College Second District VIRGINIA ALPHA University of Virginia 31.-XRYLAND ALPHA . . . johns Hopkins University YYIRGINIA BETA . . Washington and Lee University DISTRICT OF COLUMBI.-A ALPHA . . . Columbian University X'l.RGINIA G.A3I3IA . Hampden-Sidney College BIISSISSIPPI ALPHA . . . University of Mississippi YVEST VIRGINIA ALPHA University of XVeSt Virginia I Third District OHIO ALPHA . Ohio Wesleyan University INDIANA ALPHA . De Pauw University OHIO BETA . Wittenberg College INDIANA BETA . . University of Indiana OHIO DELTA . . Ohio State University INDIANA GABILIA . . Wabash College Fourth District MICHIGAN ALPHA . University of Michigan DIINNESOTA BETA University of Minnesota ILLINOIS ALPHA Northwestern University IOWA ALPHA . . University of Iowa ILLINOIS BETA . University of Chicago KANSAS ALPHA . . University of Kansas WISCONSIN ALPHA . University of Wisconsin NEBRASKA ALPHA . University of Nebraska AVISCONSIN Q-QAMINIA . . . Beloit College CALIFORNIA BETA . . Leland Stanford, jr., University Alumni Chapters Philadelphia, Pa. Pittsburgh, Pa. Meadville, Pa. New York City, N. Y. Baltimore, Md. Indiana, Indianapolis, Ind. XYashington, D. C. Cleveland, Ohio. Newark, Ohio. Springfield, Ohio. Chicago, Ill. Buffalo, N. Y. Kansas City, Mo. Twin City, Minneapolis, Minn. Denver, Col. Multnomah, Portland, Ore. Bucyrus, Ohio. Mississippi Alpha of Phi Kappa Psi JJ' 1857-1861: 1881- .JF COLORS-Pink and Lavender .25 YELL-Hi! Hi! Hi! Phi Kappa Psi! Live ever! Die never! Phi Kappa Psi! .25 Schools of Science, Literature, and Arts Class of '98 JESSE H.XRDX' DURLEY JASPER FELIX GUYNES Class of '99 THOMAS D. DAVIS Class of '00 YVILLIAM EARNEST FLOYD JOHN HIGDON SUMRALL HPINRX' MCCAIXE BURNHAM ETHELBERT J. HUBBARD WILLIAM ORMSBY RUTLEDGE Class of '01 JOIIN lXiIDDLETON FOSTER HARRX' SCOTT BUFORD ABRAHAM H. CONN .ai School of Law WILLIAM LANE AUSTIN H.fXRDY CLAY DEAR WILLIAM HIQNRX' COOK ROBERT DE LANIER 44 Q1 'KN fl? PHI KAPPA PSI FRATERNITY 'I 'Lua' . V f gi L3-fiiait-. 'A-'A. A yi: 'izixul I3.,fdr-ur-V ei ' 140, L FA : - .. .,,-., L".'f,'!7?1 Q' 'V ' - Q V . H .-,-....q -,,: -. ,- . I . , ,. 1. , A -:Y nk5fw.,l.'4," - -,' ri l, J, V v - 'N b ,- t. ' -- , .-ff: " " hr. .4 - f , .A 1-,... "- -. 5 vm- . , ,X . ,,1- 1 4 r ,, .Y . -gr,-.,.f-. . V, . - ,V '. 'f'Z- ' - ' ' -h-. - '1-ey: - H, A ' -W - ". ' ' ' - .x S .I 5. v-- 4 ' :'- - 1 u Q 1' . 17' fm, yer K a A ' f 4 - . ' ,' -""' xl-Y 1 Q S , rvg,, vi- VS .-X -N -F' '- --ff+2-I-'Pf-ffi - :wrt " -" - .4.f-- 4--. ,x . 0 , - . "Si -" -jf' -1. ' H '- '- . - x .. 'P' ,- ,' U. '.,.,'5.-3 5, .-4.1-:LL ,, If," 4 .if ' . . ':-f.:-'L ' 5 . . 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" . . :'-fll' ' v ' N! .N---. .J ,.,L,.i - . .' 'A "A , 1 'si Jib,.':? . .',,'r -' -' .'-. . " ,' .' ' A- 7 1 1"'x'2'5 H Q.. ' ,r V11 'ff 'I-, 'Si K. , V' .' 51. -J , .' , 3'-xv Yifllnr spy.. . .l 'r3fI'.,'S3"k my--':' V .nn ,Lf . fr, 'r- 719' 1415'- , ' ,'.:.' ash, ,- 'iw 1-.f 1 .f', ' , A . ' . .A if ','l""n':.i',-,'E5.:".l 'h s ,V ' ,', Au" 'V ' " ' "P . ""'x.""2i, .1 M 4 x X' gifs- v'-N-' Q - ' - f 'gl' ' 1 . '. . '- sy .. 'Xu-. ': .ami-.f'f-'. -75' 4 Q . 'A'-, ' 1 '. . 15 Z, 'ml .., I 3, 'L l I x v K Q . f K, " 1 T '. 5 ' f ,X .4. J ' .mr 14 , 1 ' ,,g,. A S .I X ' , 8 . I . 'vt . 4,1 ..1r!!5 M--,SI f ' V 1 ! "1 ' I 1' "Sl:,- 1 ' ,-' M . I v 1 ' ' ' , 9 .-J.-' 1 . A -. -. 4 5 I. Q' ol:lVd. ' .. -- . , 1 - ,- A.Q,n'."- M xi. I '-' ' 'V' " A ' ' "' I ' Lu 'A-Q , - x K . 1 D , ,fa - ' I. V , 5:4 . "' ' I ' ' N .i'N r ' s ' ' ' 'W' ' .- uf ., ,s I HJ AN ,h 3" 'qi L-.iff -4. 5' Vqf-P . h.,L..'1- . 7 'Y ' -Fa- .'x'r.,, 5 rv.- " 1 3. , 1 ' 5 fi. -f ,s , 1, ,, U5 1 ' fdln .,, P r ','. A IA . si Y? ALPHA CHI EPSILON THETA KAPPA OMICRON . PHI PHI . ALPHA RHO ZETA .- . TAU . . GAMMA GAMBIA SIGMA SIGMA First Province Sigma Chi Fraternity .al ESTABLISHED AT MIAMI UNIVERSITY, 1855 J' Chapter . . Pennsylvania State College Columbian University Gettysburg College . Bucknell University Dickinson College University of Pennsylvania Second Province Lehigh University . Washington and Lee University Roanoke College . Randolph-Macon College Hampden-Sidney College ALPHA TAU . University of North Carolina PSI . . . . . University of Virginia Third Province ALPHA . . . Miami University GAMMA Ohio Wesleyan University MU . . . . Denison University ZETA ZETA . Centre College ZETA PSI . . University of Cincinnati LAMBDA LAMBDA . Kentucky State College MU MU . . . XVest Virginia University ALPHA GAMMA . . . . Ohio State University Fourth Province THETA THETA . . . . University of Michigan LAMBDA . . Indiana University RHO . . . Butler University CHI . . Hanover College DELTA DELTA . . Purdue University XI . . . De Pauw University 49 Roll OMEGA . . KAPPA IC.-APP.-A X1 XI . . ALPHA ZETA . ALPHA IOTA . ALPHA LAMBDA ALPHA PI . ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA EPsIL0N ALPHA XI . ETA . . :ALPHA NU . ALPHA OMICROX ALPHA Psi . ALPHA BETA . ALPHA UPSILON ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA ALPHA ETA ETA . NU NU . . ALPHA T HETA ALPHA PHI . New York City Lincoln, Neb. Montgomery, Ala. Richmond, Va. Fifth Province . . . Northwestern University . . . University of Illinois Missouri State University . . . Beloit College . Illinois XVesleyan University . University of XVisconsin . . Albion College . . . University of Minnesota Sixth Province . . . University of Nebraska . . . . University of Kansas Seventh Province . . . University of Mississippi . . . University of Texas - . . . Tulane University . . . . Vanderbilt University Eighth Province . . . University of California . . University of South Carolina . . Leland Stanford, jr., University Ninth Province . . . . . Hobart College . . . . Dartmouth College . . . . Columbia University . Massachusetts Institute of Technology Alumni Chapters Indianapolis, Ind. Chicago, Ill. LaFayette, Ind. Philadelphia, Pa. Cornell University Xvashington, D. C. Springfield, Ohio. New Orleans. La. Cincinnati, Ohio. Eta Chapter of Sigma Chi Fraternity JJ' .20 COLORS-Old Gold and Blue .ai Fratres in Urbe CAPT. W. A, ROANE DR. A. A. YOUNG HON. JOHN C. KYLE .5- Schools of Science, Literature, and Arts Seniors XVALTER CHEW BREWER EDXVARD BUELL GIBSON JULIAN KNOX MORRISON HI'BERT FREDERICK FISHER GEORGE PIERCE JONES ARCHIE GILBERT ROANE Juniors DAYID OLIVER BRIDGFORTH RICHARD HENRX' LAKE BRADLEY THOMAS IQIIXIBROUGH, JR, LANDRUM PINSON LEAVELL Sophomores FRANK PAUL CASHBIAN NORYEL ROBERTSON DRUMMONDS BIANLEY BERRY LEAYELL ARINIISTEAD BIACON LEIGH JOHN DEV.-XNDO NIILLER XVILLIAIXI TEMPLE ROANE NVADE LEEROY NVATKINS Freshmen ARNACD BRVCE LEAYELL INIONROE GOODBRR MORG.kN ROBERT HERDIIXN SULTAN ROBERT EDWARD LONGINO JOHN BI'NY.xN RILEY ST.-XRK YOUNG J- School oi Law Seniors S.xMI'EL RALPII KNOX XVILLIAM B. YVATKINS Juniors JOHN ELMORE HOLMES DUKE RICDONALD KIMBROUGH HENRX' RIICI-:ER SPIGHT 50 Q 5- , Yr.. Fil, . A gi 1- ! 8 SIGMA CHI FRATERNITY fr n -1- J., D , . '.rU4,x', ' Q. '- 7' -E ' - -. 1 x."':?.'..u s ' '3f'?':Q." ' T' ' - ' ' 'ki V' V . 42 avg.. i,. p' LTA- ",.NT .v qv. YY. I ,t.':'.."AJ , CUQTJIY 1, 3.-Axh -X-L . . . - I - -f ', Hn'f,' ' P . .fL 1, nvxxx- .- "-fd' "1--H12 'HT 52' ' A- "d3'1.f'.w'. ,Q - '. Jxf"T9r11v . V '2"' ' ' " -- '-MWF' . 4 1.--4 A -s.. ,, 4 Y 'U L 1'1 lv ,--' ' -L 14, V-4,5 rf I, af ,Q 'Xu ur. .l A , -Vp. . 3' V. -I, '-y ' -' wr-'A " . .Q . M.. V. - x p- Q-37-, -- ' ' .A .WWHQ ' f F-- F"N ,Z 1, ,-C., . -1 .N . - .K -,ez-.4 , -if 4 ."l ",.-'Vg 1, 'f. '. ' '.'-' , : K' Q- --in .- L7 ,-'1':- , ., 7 Q- i. -.,I -.., vf' .Y -U . -. v , l .L f .. 3 f- ' J, I, L-' v C.: 1 - t ' I , A,0 I, :An .. Ll, gr-nfq . . t, q'1f.','..Q. ', 'H ' ' Z.. .' f J fr.1f,:x 4 , - . wig .. ".'-iff"-'-'L' :FIAT ' .-'. S ' ,' ' " "'r9' iff' f." 7' ' -. ,- Q .74-.V-4 ',,,.,A ,9, . I ,' 1' s'1, '...1 l 1 . -+'.. f'...- ff 'M ' .fa 's- w-f--.,m:- -.S 7. x,,A.-. -M". war. V . -4,-, f I -. ,. lu., X, ,av ,. J 1. 1-5" VH ' 'I 5. .1 . 4 4 U . .'-"' ,1- . I ,-1 ' - , ,- ' ':rg'I.' '14, ' . ' Ll" ."1". . " ' f If-:'."75-,', ,f"J".- '--: , ' ' . f.- . ,iffvth It nb' , V A . rlQ',x," ' , '.-, .-Q. rx- .01 ' -, ' ' L" 'L .' -Y , - JI 'I i :A ','. .-'. . .' l, 1' A' r!n'1 J-5?-1 1 Hg .' "ff4,,', '. r a Q . Q .'-4 ll- , i . is - 1 1 , . . p I l ir' A-'s ,' -2 01.2, 3 a Y 2. 'JP f Q Lug, f' .JI "I YH .,.' . .M H fgfi- .' 5-twjwp t V 5 -ff -"F" f-1" 5. ' K. 1 . . .Af 'J ..- u J1- ,fa -. W5 W I h ,n Q ' J. 1 7- x qgv .1 ' 1, . 4 A .. vv. ,- , , . - 1, It I f.. .. . ' ' f 1, v I ' 4 K 'X' . -. r v A N 4. .yin , N - - . ., , J' , 4 4 - ITT I 5"-'..: . , ' ATR fa 'av .ws Q. 'ffl '67 L s .:..-1.r.hu-n.n.4.4ni4d:aLqa4h1.L..-.-4 sw ' ' ' ' nina U 5 1 ' ' 32:4 .S I 'I is . -S L, of ' ' 7h M Ln' Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity FOUNDED IN 1856 AT UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA INCORPORATED IN ISQ2 Roll of Active Members Province Alpha MASSACHUSETTS BETA UPSILON . . Boston University MASSACHUSETTS IOTA TAU . Mass. Institute of Technology MASSACHUSETTS G'AMhIA .... Harvard University MASSACHUSETTS DELTA . XVorcester Institute of Technology CONNECTICUT ALPHA ..... Trinity College Province Beta NEW YORK NU ..... Columbia University NEW YORK SIGINIA PHI . . St. Stephen'S College PENNSYLVANIA OMEGA . . Allegheny College PENNSYLVANIA SIGMA PHI . . . Dickinson College PENNSYLVANIA ALPHA ZETA . Pennsylvania State College PENNSYLVANIA ZETA .... Bucknell University Province Gamma VIRGINIA OMICRON . . . University of Virginia VIRGINIA SIGMA . . . Hlashington and Lee University NORTH CAROLINA XI . University of North Carolina NORTH CAROLINA THETA . . Davidson College SOUTH CAROLINA DELTA . . South Carolina College SOUTH CAROLINA PHI . . Truman University SOUTH CAROLINA CQAMINIA . Wolford College GEORGIA BETA . GEORGIA PSI . . GEORGIA EPSILON . GEORGIA PHI . . MICHIGAN IOTA BETA MICHIGAN ALPHA . OHIO SIGMA . . OHIO DELTA . OHIO EPSILON OHIO THETA . INDIANA ALPHA . INDIANA BETA . ILLINOIS PSI OMEGA University of Georgia Mercer Universit Y . . Emory College . . Georgia School of Technology Province Delta University of Michigan . . Adrian College Mount Union College . Ohio Wesleyan University University of Cincinnati Ohio State University . Franklin College . Purdue University Northwestern University KENTUCKY IQAPPA KENTUCRI' IOTA TENNESSEE ZETA TENNESSEE LAMBDA TENNESSEE Nt' . TENNESSEE Ii.-XPP.-A TENNESSEE OMEGA TENNESSEE ETA . ALABAMA MI' . ALABAMA IOTA . ALABAMA ALPHA MU MISSISSIPPI GABIIIA LOUISIANA EPSILON COLORS-Purple and Old Gold . Central University . Bethel College . Southwestern Presbyterian University Cumberland University Vanderbilt University . . . University of Tennessee Universify of the South Southwestern Baptist University University of Alabama Southern University . . Alabama Polytechnic Institute . University of Mississippi University of Louisiana LOUISIANA TAI' EPSILON .... Tulane University IOWA SIGMA . MISSOURI ALPHA MISSOURI BETA . NEBRASKA LAMBDA PI ARKANSAS ALPHA UPSILON . . TEXAS RHO COLORADO CHI . COLORADO ZETA . . Simpson College University of Missouri XYashingtOn University University of Nebraska University of Arkansas University of Texas University of Colorado . Denver University CALIFORNIA ALPHA - Leland Stanford, Jr., University CALIFORNIA BETA .... University of California Alumni Associations Boston, Mass. New York, N. Y. Pittsburgh, Pa. Atlanta, Ga. Augusta, Ga. Savannah, Ga. Alliance, Ohio. Montgomery, Ala. Cincinnati, Ohio. Chicago, Illinois. Jackson, Miss. Chattanooga, Tenn. Kansas City, MO. Charlotte, N. C. Mississippi Gamma of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Q55 ESTABLISHED IN 1866 .al Fratres in Urbe B. T. Ku1BRot'GH J. T. CHANLER T. A. XYIGGINGTON XVILLI.-XM :XRCHIBALD J' . Fratres in Universitate Class of '98 L. BRAME, JR.. Jackson. Miss. S. A. BIORRIS-ON, Grenada, Miss. J. L. BYRTOX, Holly Springs, Miss. Class of '99 J. M. THOMAS, Shannon, Miss. .al SCHOOL OF SCIENCE, LITERATURE, AND ART Clas of '98 R. XY. SHIPP, Yazoo City, Miss. Class of '99 H. Y. SOMERYILLE, University. Miss. E. R. CREEKMORE, Pittsboro, Miss. L. H. MCGEHEE, Summit, Miss. Class of '00 I J. M. DYER, JR., Lexington. Miss. J. V. LEITCH, Canton, Miss. E. C. SHARP, Corinth, Miss. I. N. GILRIITH, Yazoo City, Miss. Classof '01 C. P. SE.-KBROOK, Grand Junction, Tenn. XV. I. MCKAY, Tyro, Miss. J. B. SUTHERLAND, Bolivar, Miss 56 'D- is w 11' SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON FRATERNITY Y I I-.., .V4- .,-'. I .M x . , 'Y 1:J, . .-'- ni .I A 1 : - . Atv, .L giz- 4- . , 'n'-4 ' r' . . '35 , y- 1- . , . 1 x , ,. . ' f an . . . . ' 1-...L .n..-vt .-ll. 1.4 - i ll L R x -f M4 -A XY: n1f't,,. ' A J . ,Lu , Cv- .: . - ,,' ' 1 -Y - , . V ,...' 'u'V5' . , A'N --'.o.,A-Q ' -V XL" ." A, 4 s ,, '..- . q Kg. ,' ,., .. 'M-. ' 1' P .A z vi b' I ' In 513 I4 , 'T x ' K ,B .A-. , '-, v-f . ,..j . ,A " , , ,"' ' A - ',. , . 0 5 'fr 1 ' .. , ' ' .Q I i X '- 1 'I ' f. l ...Q " ' ' " ' n u -.-5 4- '- u - , - x . I U- ,V - .rv . 'E' 4-' , 9-2 -x 'Q v., ' f V. ai, - '. v P.1'f.f 4-5 ' - ,. '. -- .. -I 5 1 . ' A ' ,- . I , 'z-. 3- . ' .1 ".x':'5' ', --v .fl H -' 'A 'J' . -V3-,iff . ww- 5-f -' 'Q ' L.. I. r. 31 'i-3' ' -TK v 4. u -.' f W , r . 4- -5. t Av' . .- ' , s ,-. ' f n - 1' - . , ' w Q . lc. 1. I, - . .. -5 ?'- ,, ' H--.' 'A ' Z ' .mf X- . , . 1 , JJ. 21:2 7 -- .' 3 . . 4,.'I',. Q-rt, , . f. - Lv.-W'-'.,f A . 'ing ,fi-1-Q,,iEv-L. f ,bf-S' - . -, if - , ,"' 'I vu 'i IAFNAQ fy' 1915 .R I 'r- 1 Q Phi Delta Theta Fraternity J' .25 FOUNDED IN 1848 AT MIAMI UNIVERSITY .25 COLORS-'Argent and Azure. FRATERNITY JOURNAL-The Scroll. Alpha Province Gamma Province-Continued BIAINE :ALPHA . NI-:W HABIPSHIRE ALPHA VERMONT ALPHA . MASSACHUSETTS ALPH.-A MASSACHUSETTS BETA RHODE ISLAND ALPHA NRSV YORK ALPHA . NEW YORK BETA . NEW YORK DELTA . NEW YORK EPSILON PENNSvLvANIA ALPHA PENNSYLVANIA BETA . . Colby University . Dartmouth College . University of Vermont . . Williams College . Amherst College . Brown University . Cornell University . . Union University . Columbia University Syracuse University . . LaFayette College Gettysburg College PENNSYLVANIA GAMMA . Washington and jefferson College PENNSYLVA NIA DELTA . . . PENNSYLVANIA EPSI LON . Allegheny College . . Dickinson College PENNSYLVANIA ZETA . . University Of Pennsvlvania PENNSYI.vANIA ETA x'IRGINIA BETA . VIRGINIA GAMMA . VIRGINIA ZETA . NORTH CAROLINA BETA KENTUCKY ALPHA . KENTUCKY DELTA . TENNESSEE ALPHA . TENNESSEE BETA . GEORGIA ALPHA GEORGIA BETA . GEORGIA GAMMA . ALABAMA ALPHA . ALABABIA BETA . MISSISSIPPI ALPHA . LOUISIANA ALPHA . . The Lehigh University . University of Virginia Randolph-Macon College . . Xvashington and Lee University . . University of North Carolina Centre College . . Central University . Vanderbilt University . University of the South . University of Georgia . . Emory College . . Mercer University . University of Alabama . Alabama Polytechnic Institute University of Mississippi . . Tulane University TEXAS BETA . TENAS GAMMA . OHIO ALPHA . OHIO BETA . OHIO GAMMA . OHIO ZETA . OHIO ETA . INDIANA ALPHA INDIANA BET.-I . INDIANA GAMMA INDIANA DELTA INDIANA EPSILON INDIANA ZETA . INIIIANA THETA IWICHIGAN ALPHA IIICHIGAN BETA INIICHIGAN GAMMA ILLINOIS ALPHA ILLINOIS BETA . ILLINOIS DELTA ILLINOIS ZETA . ILLINOIS ETA . XVISCONSIN ALPHA INIINNESOTA ALPHA IowA ALPHA . IOWA BETA . BIISSOURI ALPHA IIISSOURI BETA LIISSOURI GAMMA KANSAS ALPHA NEBRASKA ALPHA CALIFORNIA ALPHA . University of' Texas Southwestern University . . Miami University 0lIio Wesleyan University . . Ohio University Ohio State Universitv Case School .of Applied Science . University of Indiana . . Wabash College . Butler College . Franklin College . Hanover College . De Pauw University . . Purdue University . University of Michigan State College of Michigan . . Hillsdale College Northwestern University The University of Chicago . . . Knox College . Lombard University , University of Illinois University o Wisconsin University of Minnesota Iowa Wesleyan University , . University of Iowa . University of MissoIIri . Xvestminster College . Washington University . University of Kansas . University of Nebraska University of California CALIFORNIA BETA . LelandiStanford, jr., University Alumni Chapters BOSIOD. Mass., Alpha New York, N. Y., Alpha Pittsburg, Pa., Alpha Philadelphia, Pa., Beta Baltimore, Md., Alpha Washington, D. C., Alpha Richmond, Va., Alpha Columbus, Ga.. Alpha Macon, Ga., Gamma Atlanta, Ga., Beta . ' Nashville, Tenn., Alpha Montgomery, Ala., Alpha Selma, Ala., Beta Birmingham, Ala., Gamma Mobile, Ala., Delta Cmclnnati, Ohio, Alpha Akron, Ohio, Beta Cleveland, Ohio. Gamma Louisville, Ky., Alpha Franklin, Ind., Alpha Indianapolis, Ind., Beta La Crosse, Wis.. Alpha St. Louis, Mo., Alpha Chicago, Ill., Alpha Galesburg, Ill., Beta Kansas City, Mo., Alpha Minneapolis, Minn., Alpha Denver. Col., Alpha Salt Lake City, Utah, Alpha Los Angeles, Cal., Beta San Francisco, Cal., Alpha Spokane, Wash., Alpha New Orleans. La-, Alpha 4 61 Mississippi Alpha of Phi Delta. Theta .5-.al ESTABLISHED IN 1877 .25 Fratres in Urbe W. A. MCDONALD, '79 L. E. THOHIPSON, '85 C. L. SIYLEY, 89 RELBUE PRICE, '94 T. W. YATES, '87 ua' School of Law YVALTER WEATHERBY, ,QQ .al Schools of Science, Literature, and Arts Class of '98 LAMAR H.-XRDX', B.P. G. L. RAY, B. P. W. A. LUCAS. B. A. Class of '99 F. H. SMITH, B. A. W. M. RICHMOND, B.A. W. O. PRUITT, B.S H. L. MCCLESKEY, B.S. PAT HENRX', JR., B. P. Class of '00 R. N. WHITFIELD, B. A. R. L. PILLOW, B. A. E. B. HALL, B. A. Class of 'OI E. S. RAUCH, B.A. S. A. WITHERSPOON, JR., B. A. J. M. BROACH, B.S. J. A. SPANN, JR., B. S. 62 J' QT' - ,,- 5 ,f'9 3,4 ' Q - gQ'f' .9 f . 532:1- '53 nr. PHI DELTA THETA FRATERNITY .Wi 'Y J J J? 1571 .7 s" 4 - . ,,ef'gn M4535 ,Jig .1 . 5, A. - :WWF ' 2- 1595 . v . J. - ff fi. I Q . v ,- . , A x '- L.'1'f'." ' V " f kan - .I -A -,lkxwun ,.'-'4 y.L' -ir ' ' '. .AJ .I.,lA,,, Q, 1"'L.P5'. fl ' A-I .. . -- - A-.1--mv o '. 4 - qvkf-?,, 4, ' 'VXH -rw ..w .5 - , ,-,,l4- -. gi' f'q'..,-v ' -fr-L ' "h. 1' ' '. rg' L'- V - we-iff af 1. . :!'t..'sVh3Qg2j-H, T2-me l--'wif' ':fhX"Uff'F?-'.-' x - 1 4.1 J.:-'f-M. if !J.,n .If :.!i2u X ' ' l'f"' . '-2-A" kv .,F?"'A1Lk-tftg - Yrfjfh, C511 ,.. J -PW 'f " . .Ii U "L l 11' ' ' f. "J " 2'-.lil " fs." "", ,f'.'v-r A "- ' Q' ' X ?f'r-xf3."1 :..f"!":" f ,Q - - Q- f. -f -swf a '7. . . 0 " Q Q, f v.. wan .1 'N NH' 1 Delta Tau Delta Fraternity .2225 FOUNDED AT BETIIANY COLLEGE IN 1860. RAINBOYV FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF BIISSISSIPPI, 1848, S. A. CHAPTER. RAINBOW CONSOLIDATED XVITH DELTA TAU DELTA, 1886, PI CHAPTER J' COLORS-Royal Purple, Old Gold, and XVhite FLONVER- Pansy .25 Chapter Roll Grand Division of the South Grand Division of the West LAMBDA . ..... Vanderbilt University OMEGA . ..... University of Iowa PI .... University of Mississippi BETA GAMMA University of Wisconsin PHI . . . Washington and Lee University BETA EPSILON University of Minnesota BETA DELTA - . - . University of Georgia BETA KAPPA . University of Colorado BETA EPSILON . . . Emory College BETA PI . . . Northwestern University BETA THETA . University of the South BETA RHO . Leland Stanford, Jr., University BETA XI . ..... Tulane University BETA TAU . University of Nebraska Grand Division of the North ETA UPSILON . University of Illinois BETA ' ...... Ohio University BETA OMEGA .... University of California DELTA .... University of Michigan EPSILON . . , , Albign College Gi-and Division of the East ZETA . . . Adelbert College ALPHA . ...... A llegheny College IOTA . Michigan Agricultural College GAMMA . XVashington and Jefferson College KAPPA . . Hillsdale College NU . . . University of Pennsylvania MU . . L . Ohio lVesleyan University RHO . . . Stevens Institute of Technology CHI . . . Kenyon College UPSILON . . Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute BETA ALPHA . Indiana University BETA LAMBDA . . . Lehigh University BETA BETA . De Pauw University BETA MU . ..... Tufts College BETA ZETA . Butler University BETA NU . Massachusetts Institute of Technology BETA PHI - . Ohio State University BETA OMICRON .... CorI1el1 University BETA PSI . . XVabash College BETA CHI Brown University Alumni Chapters New York, Brooklyn, N. Y. Chicago, Ill. Nashville, Tenn. Twin City, Minneapolis Pittsburgh, Pa. Cleveland, Ohio. Detroit, Micl1. Grand Rapids, Mich. New Orleans, La. Nebraska, Lincoln New England, Portsmouth, N. H. Cincinnati, Ohio. Atlanta, Ga. 67 Pi of Delta Tau Delta .awk CHAPTER FOUNDED AS RAINBOW FRATERNITY IN 1848. CONSOLIDATED VVITH DELTA TAU DELTA IN I886 J- Frater in Facultate DABNEY LIPSCOMB, M. A. .al School of Law Seniors HARDEN H. BROOKS H. W. M. DRAKE Juniors HENRX' W. CAROTHERS R. E. VVILBOURN J. M. BYNUM W. A. BROWN J. R. BICDOWELL W. V. FANT G. G. BOSTWICK .al School of Science, Literature, and Arts Seniors J. F. POPE Juniors S. P. CLAYTON B. MCFARLAND Sophomores W. D. MX'ERS Freshmen E. T. BUSH W. W. JOHNSON J. C. KYLE, JR. 68 E. W. LIPSCOMB W. NV. GARTH DURELL MILLER W. N. HIITCHINSON R. H. HUNTINGTON fi' 41 'J' 1 pr 541 1' vb. DELTA TAU DELTA FRATERNITY J T fi n", ' . 4, ,., 'V... '. 8- .-,4 v .'wWaH?a . v - 1" :F . ?L. ,N vp 5w:fC.Q . ,TW .1..J .- -. -an "r . . "ff: -i -f MN 'f'l'l?f'5,' gf, n-...A ...A "- " 1 ' : -1 U J: Y , .1 , Iqgi If .B ' : . . Q ' r if ' "2-.eau n, , :LII i:-:..f.,- .r 1, 'f.ffT,2 2- 2 -4 ' 1 0 , . , H. . ,. . 1 , I 4 . , 1 'I 'F . P 0 - .. V .4 ., V.- Q ,.... ..- :i+,:,?..' . -.- .,:+,. ,A -L 1 .4- 51 'V ,I ' xT'r, 3 'A 'V ' Q" . ' .- ,f ."'.!' ., . Y. i.'1'," ,' '11 ' inf: P " ' ,su " .1 'W' .. v-., - il. il'-"- '.r'f' " -.Xi V...-,V :- -, v.. 3 ,-1- .w..,1 'K' '.' UW, v, , . - -, t.,.. 'vi .y x . 4. -hkf 'x - ' 5117? guy- Fifi- lcv... .'- ,,A..-1:,i' - . 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'- 'A V lghjfw-.p,,.-y: 5 . Pr li 5.23, 0-.T 1 -qc ' -' - ' G -', .15 7 - gf .751-..., ' ' .r- . X-J -ef " . ' lwf ' - . .- nf- -4 f ' -" ' . -.-Q 'H I ,n. ,,vh:T'Xl, ,. 'J 1. .F 5" -5-4-. '. :gh Q ' -. 'p' - --- -'--- --491-' Eh, - 'C' ...Q .5-A r 'I fn. is ' - f.'.1.n'f ply' -ifkn., -'4 , ..-.bf sg -Q' A , .. x, .-k,-Q-Q ' ' -v-4 - J ' .lik Q'- . V. N 3, Q lr k . 1 . .rl Q. . uhm- 4-'. ' Y W ."'. - .- ' :va L H 'f 5 "-'Qu ., .- 'gifs I z l - ' I" ' Lf ' W, ,Kb . ,rl .V A,l-g4,". . I.. -1' l x . ., T V: " Li :' ' ':' kr'-ga . ' -N .4 ' "g': . -xl , 1, , ' fy . -.,,. . K 1 - .. , yu ,,x. ' .'."F-1 Ld, ' -f. f . ,. -L ' -s ..j .A. -1 - ' - .5 "," 'if f' - ..- 4- . ' A ..v ,. '., , , 2:4-'x x.',"!"" ,E . , V., . .. , f, - . 'V 1 ,+f' '1"" 'J'--a ma ' , N . uf , if J" 7 '?,.-.'.1"": .f'. "Wx-4.. if . X-n . L. . J , ii- 1 Q. 0 ! ff -J .Lf i v.- - , . Vp f L .' I -'fl' . ,- ng I r 4 .', ..'1 ', 'ni '7'., 'Q . ' AH 1-f. 1.-.,v 1 - - 1 .-:- , , , "LD" ' ., nn, '-. ALA- , - 104'-.J N " ' Theta Nu Epsilon Fraternity .shi FOUNDED IN 1870 .29 Chapter Roll ALPHA . Wesleyan University BETA . . Syracuse University GAMMA . Union College DELTA . Cornell University EPSILON . Rochester University ZETA . . University of California ETA . . Madison University THETA . Kenyon College IOTA . Adelbert College KAPPA . . . . Hamilton College LAMBDA . Rensselaer Polytechnic School MU . . . Stevens Institute NU . LaFayette College XI . . . . Amherst College OMICRON Vllashington and Lee University PI . . Pennsylvania State College RHO . SIGMA . TAL' . UPSILON . PHI . CHI . Psi . OMEGA . DELTA L'Ps1LoN P1 PHI . DELTA Ii.-XPPA BETA EPSILOX .ALPHA Mt' . :XLPHA IOTA BETA RHO . :ALPHA GA3I3I.k 73 . University of Pennsylvania University of the City of New York . . . XVooster University University of Michigan . . Rutgers College . Dartmouth College Ohio State University . Swarthmore College . University of Kansas University of Virginia . . Bowdoin College . University of North Carolina . . Lehigh University University of Missouri . Hampden-Sidney College . University of Mississippi XV. H. COOK G. G. LYELL M. G. FI'LToN VV. L. .AUSTIN A. G. RO.-XNE Alpha Gamma of Theta Nu Epsilon -.55 .55 ESTABLISHED IN 1895 .al L. P. LEAYELL L. M. PORTER PATRICK HEXRX', IR. R. E. XYILBOTIRN D. M. KIBIBROUGH J. H. THOMPSON B. BICFARLAND J. D. BIILLER LA:uAR HARDY J. E. HOLMES H. D. PRIESTLEY, JR. G. L. RAY W. B. RICRS XvICTOR LEITCH WALTER NVEATHERBX W. P. KRETSCHAIAR Sophomore .I 2fFfj8:fE?zd8n1.YhB 74 v THETA NU EPSILON FRATERNITY A ...' X. A , 'A . , ,, ,. 1' '. ' . 'Q-'. V. w'L Q f , 1 --,,..' gg- ' -.- f 4 .7 '-'.. ...Z-gf-0 AA- 1-. .. . ,W ,fbi-I . Jw. ' , - 'idivi ' F . I rs .:, " Jyfff' ,'7-"41l".':' '!l,A5, , .JK ,-ulju. .gs All Y-'1-J' ' f . ' ' 'V' 1' " ' ' 5.-Sa - .4.. A . , -.. - -:Kg--fwt , . H3-.j , Pi? 'J' f"". 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N--' ., AA+ A li-1 1 - . 1' 'va' f' .,sv'.. , ,.. Y 4 -5.7-,-L 55- : ,,,Vt W k.,.F.:.'. ""lv-si" fl - - f,-xr' 'Q - .'g?..cx,..-L',.,,g'-' Baa' .j ?,' --4.-5.'gf.'H 0, ' .- x fl"-" fi up , .,.p -,,.m1-4'--..', - - 5.,g.,,,'!li- .nikxmlf Y 4 . t -Q-Kxln A. -. x 5,4-A 5-T. 'TT A' f fp -ray: an .A ' 1 ,h x . . e..,k4 V' .Af ' 1 - a if, 1? ' ' x. '1 4-.4 NW.- rl, :svn lf, ' 1.x 6 .' N 'r .V s 5 f ' -J., AA --'A .a- . . Hg. ,. :. . ..., ,. X. fr.- f : . .1 'vu' nb .Wh--' -0 v - ........,a U .0 me 41.5" - gjgjli fY,vA? .fx 1 . - f 1 v,,,- ,V f v ,. xl flgiwm Juxiw,-, 1.7.3 X Lx- rvgf,-un.: I, I 1. 1 ' 4 . rg. :lui-:.,g,L Q. 31, -v'I 'V' J. .,z,, . +"g1,f ' L 1 1 .- - '4..',,,-. 1.4 1 -f6:"'f'7f"r-'lf ,- I,L,,-iff - vs 1,7315 - "3 ,Q A sN.g-,L 'pts ,L 73-if L, .Qf,,, l , . ' V '. 1, . .-..- U - -ilvr nl Q Iv, W' '.,'p,g,,s .4 L,'. .V . my . ,I 157,151 .,' y 4' ,.- ffl .' -. V f I Q x 'P Y .Ayl'i . ko" L rl? A A . ,',5:- Y . .'. I - 5 .. . v ,' v- 1,21-.',.' N-Q"f+..x'41-f'..1 tu N as -f-.,-'4 J1'-r V .U I xx 1 Suv 'Ml "fd ". iN Y' P' X Q'-v" J 1 L I I ,, x..ajg.,.f - . 1 4., No' ,N Q. K ,U . ,A r - , . 4 ' . r 4 I L ,L bn,-1 . lr 43,1-. and svygf 04 x V.. - - . . 'J Ikrfl .4 Q.-. : v ',l, 'Q 15, I 1 1- - ,.'-..f..,f-f'g'1b'xf1. ,"1, X '. bi" -e?e,.vL' A S". 3 AP.. .I ,-.,. .. ,- 18. .-I, ry I O' AJ' J", L., U ' 1 1 . ,I 5.4.-. . , v 5: L 5,4 Q l'! v., --" -- -'x a. rw .1 1' v.V.. 1 ww, . k. Alpha of Sigma Tau .swf FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI IN 1896 .al COLORS-Green and Gold FLOWER-Daisy .95 YELL - Yi pity-re-lu, Tu-ra-zau, ANNIE J. CHANDLER JULIA MILLER MURRY CORRIE JONES AMY HUSTACE XI-152 dir 1973 9 f I J Sigma Tau. .al Sorores in Urbe LYNNE BRANHAM WEST .al Sorores in Universitate Class of '98 CARRIE GARY ELIZABETH COWAN ANNA VINEYARD Class of '99 MARGARET WARDLAW Class of '00 JULIA COMPTON 79 ELMA COLEMAN MEEK MINNIE BROWN MINNIE SMITH ENOLA TURNER 1 . 5 I A 1 . A, V. ,Af 'Q '- X V .. ., . . -L ' 5 . . ,, ' dt... -Z Ji. A,-5.,J.,,' u J-F y 1 Q , In " . . ,f ,VA ' -.:' x 5 1- -Z' - vQ',..n x -,., , -. , " . V 1' r' . J-4 -'S' "4 , . N 'V , -' -. - I 3- . ' .' I . ,x . , . Q 1v -. , .,,.-,:...f.. 3. Y jxJ"!'5 1.j4,i"A.-iv "',.vq .1 . -3, 5, , L - - , - -u '. f ' - . af ,Q 539' , ww. -,ij fu: -sl sv - h I, " Qi- ' 3 v 51 -" ,i-'Qu' 'A . G .stnvrs f b. '-fr, 5 , 3 ' .V A ' 4 u lu' . Y rt ll. YQIZWA ,-j. .- J -"Ag fr . 4 4 in . Q i ' 3 -L ' ' . 44.4 ." - '- . rv! :gh rl - 'v. , ' . 'U A, .1 1, . fr '4- . ' Q 5- . I 4 ' ", ' ' 1 'I il-25' .IN ,wh ' Q6 sllfgi l 1 'Lg 4' : .l4da44rnn1haLA4i.,,' Wk , il- 1 SIGMA TAU SORORITY " v.s Sy . , iw? gfwf, . f, -A . .li-V.."'!'7'R . - -. ,I .,- k, . , .D ' .' , ,,1. l 1.3 .Nr ,B . ", 5'g- ,'-.v . . . - '- .-v , 'uf' Q 1 2 'ut 5 '. 7' 'P 55 .MQ '., s. . ' f,,. N p vi 35 13" . Y 4, . .,w.- . ,.'-'ff 0:19, x,. ,iwfgak Q, 1 s. .nic -1,-"hr I ' . "ff: vyrt X 552. H I g 5 ' . lr: -1 "-eff , QM! "i '-! 4.9.7214-QT' ' -..ff :f.L.,., 1 'fn 5' 1 f" c'v ., . . - , rw I lf, x .'.'-"'7 3.1 EP f.:9x '.n 1 ,- r., K A.: n v ,l A Q n-fl . 1 F' 4 rj -. J . - ' 1 V l .-,052 Yf A-X-'QS V 4 f. :L "-vff' QL .s .. -,Q-"'f ' A I ,Vfw fl' ' v,.."1f1 J' ' f 'M v-'J' s-1-"1 ' 4 f' 'iv J ' wah?" ,-Syl' .' 'ily-I - .'. A Q 'fm ' r .4 rd . ' - v-v'.e . vf' ' . J4'.vQ,-',,S . r,f- .k.s.., , "Qu,'f. , I A 1 -v Q-Az.. - U,..,., , 1 .J "Tl: ' 7-'.l'L'.'p1: , QTIAID Jr- k.. - . .f. 'S' -'.-. V., N u -- A . ' .,. W ' ij.. "QW", 3.151 ' a-UF. --1515 J .,. 7.4, - f.+,,:...4-' 4.x V-fri., '.,l.. .. ', :ZQ-xj.'.,g"" E' Y.-.14-b "f 1 ' ::,,. ,- - ..f,,-- U g:4,, .H ' A r , . fb .,f J A i 4: ,Q .4 Y' 1 , - 4 1 ,1 5, 1 Y . pl- -4 ', 1 V ' . 1 1 i- 1 , .r-., .4 , Q ' 4 , 1' . '.'.- ,lg 1 l 1 ' '5' ,H '. g '.. - .,,,. . ,A 5 Y In A L fu. ' .4 . ' A 7 . , ' . -r r N -.J 1 . .Ai ,tk - 4 Alpha of Tau Delta Theta dd FOUNDED AT UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI IN 1896 .29 YELL -Alpha Pi ! Alpha Pi ! Beta Eta Zeta ! il1'6'A'L57 122.73 175 YQ, Tau Delta Theta ! .25 Soror in Urbe 'WILIIA ARCHIBALD .af Sorores in Universitatc Class of '98 CLARA BURT ALMA JONES Class of '99 KATIE ARCHIBALD ANNIE PHILLIPS RACHEL XVHITEXYAY NORIIA WILKINS A CIN of 'oo FANNIE RUTLEDGE MARY HERRON LOUISE PHILLIPS OLA PRICE SUE XVOODS CECILE XVOODS Class of '01 ELLA CLINGAN BIATTIE HARALLSON .25 Post-Graduate JEANE COURTNEY .25 School of Elocution and Oratory DAISYE BUCK 33 fn ?A,- ti I -4, , an .'- '-' . , -f',!'r , w,f1A.2fA .' . 3 3 :-n' .-VY-' - - f -A . . ,v --qu n nb .--, V LWWZ6 ,V ef ' YU. '- ' 1' X "UI I, V .v.'w1g'lL. '-'A' .'L:,1"".5 ,': .' . .- ',-' 1- .-. 17: ' J "J"'a- M 'v -" v.'.,1- - Hr,-fd N - TN 'f " , , .' V VT if T' ' ' . 4 '. -. g , 4 J." if ff ' wa. ." ' -1 -ya. L 4, A 1 1 ' at 1 .M-. A L 74. ,L , .. . . - ,.5,'u.'. .I . A .s. f!'i:j... ' 'l : ..l' .lynx .L fl! ., V -ILM' ' - 5:f" 'NFL '-,' '. Y-f, ' 1 -V v',5.f , ' u ,.' . Q -I , rf! 6- ' QQJQ '- WQA .lj ' sf" f 'f f 'I .'. --infv,-, . S' 'iauf' ' . ly-'Q K' v A RL' iff,-7-1"'fo-"' 5Ji".p" ,'5'V81:l'fT'71'ff:.7 ' Fjgff' f?I,'F'5' 17' "l"' 'fif .- 1' 1 ', V' ,QM V ' , ' . X , ..SA-5 ,. 1'4J,.,:"x.h,.,.- 'fs' , lag.-:...q-.5lj4,,,.-M-.rg 1, ,-'. U -,fp L- :- 1... - . .li Y .'-,'-f1'1:fk"'L9'1-".b. ,'f', , ., W' --,,"'54-3 -rw". A , ' ' ' .',' W' A"3' :,'?' 5 ' ' " l'." ' -1 N -"T'T? ,'A'.f F JI' . N, --,11' .-: .. ,,. .., A ..As.. A .., -..:, . . J in L+! f -.:f-1. ' x-. V' , 1 , - 1-. un- ' A,... 1- 4, I , I,,. ,, .1 .'A.,Jcs :., I.-.-x ' -. .54 . . "'," --'A w- 'arx '- f ..H., ,-- -Q. w I- .v . I ' 1 , . ' ., . , A. .f-b"-- -1 I .' ' v X I1 ld U yu ',, m..'i' -,. ms'-' 'Ju' lv! sa.. 'L' .I . ,jf -1 w. " 'Li -, gp I. ,5 onuucu TAU DELTA THETA SORORITY sg, '2 , 'V Li, , x 4-'J - A . L 4 . . f .. j.,. .' ,' AQ, .' .,- ,.., L' .fly 1,111 -- 34,7 1-lg' vu -' A , ly S4 . ' 5 , if . 5 u' ,v st, v X vu 1x u Gvzll - Q' ff T , ,Sf V Q,-s. vi' .f 1"-L -9' 1. 5 Y ' ', . v 1 ' ' -ifwift. ,-r, --5' xx 'ZA pv- 4-f'-'..- A- 4A, r .5...-..1f . 'I x, - 1.17 - A 'ff-gp. . 1: ' - ' 4 , lf. A - .xr..1.'i.'fY"A. - Q. - - 19 'jxn-'f g ' X S A . ' . ' '.' ..w , Jr' All ,... . I 'J lx- ' rg- f ifqx b 0 x 4 f'--ai AT" ,--' 14" ',. A5x"Tr J I '. rg .Q.:.,,L. V E-,wifi ,, vfp '.'-- u V.. x . n y V - rl , , .- ' 41- - ' ' . , ' 0.1-J . .. Q A u I 1 x 1 . . - 'H , 1 ' '-.L f q I l r . ' Y ' . n F1 - -' ' ' , ' H L n V L-. , . . ' o f 4.5 1 . 1. 1 1 ' 1 l A . 1 I 1 . A a ' . F- .4 I :T ' ! G .fix .Inf- -11 " l 'l""u. Iwi! .IU ' ' 'L 'v-' J. 7 . -N tl-24' ' 1- I 1 'I - 1 Other Fraternities Represented .23 .95 In Facultate R. B. FULTON, .Y '14, Chancellor R. W. JONES, .Y W, Via'-Charzceflor :XLFRED HLTBIE, If 9 ll, Pl'q2'SS07 qf Jlafhczzzafzks CHILES CLIFTON FERREL, lf H ll. Przyfessor W' Xlfoderzz Lazzgzzagas ALEXANDER LEE BONDFRANT, A' lf Przwwsor zyfAncz'vni Languagfs .29 In Collegio L. L. HENINGTON, If .4 A. W. HURT, If H Il W. H. H.-XRGROX'E, ll' .4 W. S. LESTER, If H ll J. M. STEVENS, 11' .4 W. F. TURNER, If H Il 37 - 14 .f.' ll 4. n Fraternities in the University of Mississippi J' .55 HE fraternity system was introduced into the University of Mississippi in the first year of its operation, and throughout its entire history such organizations have flourished in the institution. In 1848 the Rainbow, or VV. XV. XV., Fraternity was founded at this University: and, upon the consolidation of the two fraternities in 1886, became Chapter Pi of Delta Tau Delta. The Rainbow Division of Delta Tau Delta will, at its next annual conference. to be held in Oxford, Mississippi, celebrate it the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the Rainbow Fraternity. Among the prominent alumni of -I f J,-fi' ,L C. w. f Longstreet, Hon. J. S. Sexton, and Ho11. B. G. Humphreys. Chi Chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon has flourished in the University of Mississippi since the year pl ww' 1855, and it is rumored that within a year or so a Delta Kappa Epsilon chapter-house will be erected on Q If the college campus. Among the distinguished graduates of the institution who were members of this l chapter of the fraternity are: Judge A. H. XVhit'rield, of the Mississippi Supreme Bench, Hon. Edward Mayes, Dr. Jerry XYitherspoon, Judge Eugene Johnsong and Judge E. E. Bryant, of Arkansas. 0 4.. - . 1, in 5 f. . 'ffl 'E' . '34 ' " 7, 1 .1 ,f ' ,, ill, . ff s ' f 'fi y,l -'ll . A , " yei-gygfc' this Rainbow Delta Tau Delta Chapter are: Hon. H. L. Muldrow, Hon. A. A. Kincannon. judge J. C. l i ", 1 in f'f'rfr'v.' Q, 'L' 1 I y fit' ' ll .1 l.rr ' -W fl A l ly Delta Psi founded its Phi Chapter here in 1855, and is now the o11ly fraternity on the campus that owns a chapter-house. The building is quite a pretty brick structure, a cut of which appears on another page of this volume of "CLE MISS." Among the distinguished sons of Phi of Delta Psi may be named: Senator H. D. Money: Con- gressmen T. C. Catchings and XY. V. Sullivan: judge L. B. Valiant. of St. Louis: and Judge S. H. Terral, of the Mississippi Supreme Court. Mississippi Alpha of Phi Kappa Psi was established in 1857. The chapter was not reorganized after the war until 1881, since which time it has enjoyed an uninterrupted existence. Among those of its alumni more worthy of mention are: Lieutenant-Governor VV. I. Manning, of Arkansasg Judge XV. F. Stevens, Hon. W. P. Tackette, Dr. J. R. Tackette, and Dr. S. S. Carter. In the same year, 1857, Sigma Chi planted in the University of Mississippi its Eta Chapter, which was one of the two Southern chapters of the fraternity to be reorganized after the war. The chapter 'counts among its prom- inent alumni: Hon. Wm. R. Meyers, formerly Secretary of State of Mississippi, Hon. XViley P. Nash, Attorney- General of the State, Hons. VV. A. Roane, Thomas H. Spight, and J. R. McIntosh, well known at the bar of Mississippi. 39 Mississippi Gamma of Sigma Alpha Epsilon was established in 1866. It has, from time to time, received very valuable transfers from the strong chapter of the fraternity at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Mississippi. Among the distinguished sons of Mississippi Gamma are: Judge C. B. I-Iowry, of tl1e Court of Claims: Congressman Patrick Henry, and Attorneys C. B. Ames, George M. Mitchell, and W. E. Utterback. Mississippi Alpha of Phi Delta Theta began its career in the University of Mississippi in 18773 and, since that time, with the exception of Delta Tau Delta, which united with the already existing Rainbow, and Beta Theta Pi, which absorbed the Mystical Seven, no fraternity has planted an entirely new chapter in this institution. Though the Phi Delta Theta generation in Mississippi is comparatively young, among its more prominent alumni may be named: Hon. Monroe McClnrg, Hon. L. M. Southworth 3 Attorney Firman Smith, of Nashvilleg Hon. Shed Hill, and Hon. XV. A. McDonald. of the Oxford CMississippib bar. The Sophomore fraternity, Theta Nu Epsilon, was organized in the spring of 1895, and this session has seen the establishment of the ultra-secret honorary fraternity, " The V." Two sororities, Sigma Tan and Tau Delta Theta, made their appearance in the year 1896. As yet they are both strictly local. Each has its colors, its flower, and a jeweled badge, and enjoys the esteem and hearty goodwill of our entire Greek community. The Mystic Seven, Beta Theta Pi, Phi Gamma Delta, Chi Psi, Phi Kappa Sigma, and the two sororities, Alpha Beta Tan and Delta Gamma, have from time to time had flourishing chapters in the University of Mississippig but all are now inactive. The University of Mississippi has been the birthplace of one fraternity and three sororities, and the very best general fraternities have been glad to maintain chapters in the institution. The local conditions have had a tendency to intensify fraternity life in the University of Mississippi, and there is a very high degree of spirit manifest in all the existing chapters. Rivalry sometimes breaks the bounds of friendly emulation, but, notwithstanding occasional serious misunderstandings, the inherent Southern chivalry of the student body asserts itself in a most gentlemanly bearing on the part of all who wear a badge toward their rivals and the non-fraternity men. All the more thoughtful and broadminded students sincerely trust that the fraternities here will not fail to foster an honest and manly rivalry that scorns the littleness of soul that would cherish unfriendly feeling or refuse to do honor to substantial merit wherever found. Q0 -el.. ' 2"' X gens X Q Shakespearean Letter J' .55 I do beseech your grace let this letter be read lLove's Labor Lostl .al GXFORD, M1ss1ss1RP1, APRIL THE SECOND, 1898. ENTLE FRIENDS lfalizzs Cd7Sdl'J-GREETINGS AND SALUTATIONS TO You ALL fAs You Like 115.- 'A' I do desire with all my heart QAS You Like Ill to do observance lfVIid5llll1llZ6'7' Nzlghfs Dreamj to an April day Q Timor: of Atlzeasl. In a wood a league without the town, where wheat is green, where hawthorne buds appear, is a marvelous convenient place for our 1Jllz'a'szumuer Niglzfs Dream! lShakespeare's Fete Champetreb. I do beseech you then llllerthanl of Ilvzifrl, by this post that comes from valiant Oxford llfwzzjf V135 put you in your best array QAS You Like' Ill, choose your own company C,-Izzioay and Cleopalral, land whenj the worshipped sun peers forth the golden window of the east, and begins ?"'iA'is1 151' Y: ' '55 L bg, pp Y-L , - S,-iff. e sb ' 'L Egg in 1 I A to draw the shadylcurtain from Aurora's bed rR0me'0 ana' juliely, fwhile yet! the dew stands in the pretty floweret's eye l1ilIl,dSlHlllll67' ZVz,ghl's Dreamy join you with me to celebrate this feast lR1'rhard Ill. Be not afeard C Tempfsll that we may have the uncertain glory of an April day, which now shows all the beauty of the sun, and, by and by, a cloud takes all away Q Two Cenllelnen of I2'7'0l1lll 5 anorl envious sneaking frost that bites the first-born infants of the spring s L0z'e's Lab0rL0stJ, tandj falls in the fresh lap of the crimson rose llllidsammer 1VzQghl'5 Dreamy, linstead may comej the sweet south that breathes upon a bank of violets, stealing and giving odor 4 Twewlz ZVzQgl1ll. XVilt go with me? I will show you banks with peonied and lilied brims tTempesllg mwherel winking Mary-buds begin to ope their golden eyes lC'y11zbe!z'm'1g beds of sweet musk roses, lush woodbine and eglantine Ullidsummer.7Vig'hl's Drefami, Land in Shakespeare's Garden of Girlsl a chaplet of sweet summer buds ffllidsummer Nzighfs Dreamj g carnations, hot lavender, streaked gilly flowers, and the marigold, that goes to bed with the sun, and with him rises weeping 1 WI'7lf6f'5 Talel 3 daffodils that come before the swallow dares, and take the winds of March with beauty, violets dim, but sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes, or Cythera's breathg pale primroses, that die unmarried, ere they can behold bright Phoebus in his strength 3 bold ox-lips and the crown imperial, lilies of all kinds, the flower-de-luce being one! lVI.7Zf87'iS Talej 3 flrisj the many-color'd messenger with her saffron Wingsl Tcmprsllg rosemary and rue 1 Wim'4'r'5 Talej 3 daisies pied and lady-smocks all silver-white lL0zfe's Labor Los!! landl flower of this purple dye, hit with Cupid's archery fMidsummer Nzlgfhfs Dream 1. In tl1e forest here KA.: You Like llj exempt from public haunt IAS You Like Ill where the current makes sweet music with enameled stones 1 Tivo Gfllfffillfll of Vcroaal, we will find tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything fAs You Likr IM. As merry as crickets shall we be lHe11ry IVJ, under the greenwood tree LAS You Like Ill, and we will share a bounteous time in different pleasures lTimon W' Allzensl. I will tell you of what kind if you will give me hearingg wit shall not go slip-shod fKz'7zg Leary, mirth shall crack the lawyer's voice fTimon of Alhfnsjg we'll make a lip at the physician lC'0rio!anusJ and after some orations fairly spoke llllerrhanl of Vmicel ffew in millions can speak like usb lTempc'sll. There'll be music with her silver sound. Why silver sound? Marry, because silver hath a sweet sound and musicians sound for silver CRomeo aaa' juliell. 'l'here's one excels the quirks of blazoning pens lOlhe1loJ, she will tune her merry note unto the sweet birds' throat QAS You Like Ill, fandj sing the 92 song that pleaseth you lfhvzry IVyg two alone will sing tLeary, will with sweet melody sing lyllidszmzmer JV'1ght's Dreamy qof they bank whereon the wild thyme blows, where ox-lips and the nodding violet grows llllidszzmmer Nighfs Dream l. XVhat's more, we will perform rzllacbelhy an excellent play, well digested in the scenes llfamlef -,-Is Ibn Like lly. The green plot shall be our stage, the hawthorne-brake our tiring-house mfllidsummer .Yzlglzfs Dream J. They who play it are the men who work in Ullidsummer .Nzghfs Dreamy the studious Vniversity 4 Two Gentlemen of I 'erouay in this Athens Qof the Southy here l11fZ'0'SlUlllIll'l' A'ighZ's Dreamy, the best actors in the world, either for tragedy, comedy, pastoral, pastorical-comical, historical-pastoral, tragical-historical, tragical-comical-historical-pastoral, scene-individable, or poem unlimited: Seneca can not be too heavy, nor Plantus too light. For the law of writ and the liberty, these are the only men. O jephtha, Judge of Israel, what a treasure lHamle!y lhave Il. In the afternoon 1L0z'e's Labor Losly, while the west yet glimmers with some streaks of day ullarbefh y, we will with some pastime solace them, such as the shortness of the time can shape, in revels, dances, merry hours rL0z'e'5 Labor Losly. The stars, the stars above us, govern our conditions lLeary, and when the unfolding star, calls up the shepherd Uleasure fir Ilfeasurey, and will kiss the valleys first L lVz'nier's Taley lerey the blessed moon tips with silver all the fruit-tree tops 1R0meo and fuliefy, homeward will we bend our course LC'0medy of E rrorsy. He that outhves this day and comes safe home ' Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named : Old men forget : yet all shall be forgot 1 But he'll remember with advantages What feats he did that day lHenrv I'y. I pray you, then, remember fffamlely Q April the twenty-thirdy in brave Oxford, wondrous, well beloved. in Oxfordshire, to muster up thy friends QI-Ienry Vly and our celebration keep according to gShakespeare'sy birth 1 Twemh Nzghty 3 at the hour of nine this carol they begin: ' It was a lover and his lass . With a hy, and a ho, and a hey nonino, That thro' the green fields did pass, In the springtime, the only pretty ring time, With a hy, and a ho, and a hey nonino CA: You Like Ity. This letter is too long by half a mile lLove's LaborLostyg 'tis like a tangled chain, nothing impaired, but all disordered lMid5u111me1' Niglzfs Dreamy, yet one word more fkiclzara' III y. Let me entreat you I Henry V! y, play the scribe Q' T ilus Andronicusy. You are full of pretty answers fAs You Like Ily, you shall not say me nay QLozfe's LaborL0s! y. I am so full of businesses I can not answer thee acutely fAlZ's Welly. Let it be written in eight and six-no, make it two lines more 9 eight and eight flllidsummer Nighfs Dreamy 3 an answer of most monstrous size that will fit all demands 4A!l's Welly. Study day and night to answer QHenry I V y liny Will Shakespeards Words. Farewell-God's benison go with you Ulacbellly. Thine evermore 1 Hamlely. S. MCG. IsoM. 93 -X if ' , f -X 1 'V ,, ,- If M41 ', , Lf uf , Veal' Department of Elocution, Oratory, Shakespeare, and Debate .al .af HE authorities ofthe University years ago, appreciating the necessity of a thorough training in voice and expression, established as a separate department, the chair of Elocution. This department has been progressixe along all lines To day it has developed into more than a department of elocution simply it IS a department of oratorx in its best sense The course is ss ell graded and extends through a period of tvio x ears Ex erx effort is made to maintain a high standard and to make still further adv ances each succeeding A thorough study of the great orators of the great debaters their orations their debates and a literary and 1, 5 Y J . . . .U , . , . vocal interpretation of the Bible, Milton, and Shakespeare is the work of the second year. The great English master is studied thoroughly and well. Each year at least one of his great plays is presented to the public by the amateurs of this department. During 1897 the class presented on a great lawn "As You Like It." This year "A Midsum- mer Night's Dream" will be presented on the college green. "The accurate reprcduction of a Shakespearian play on the historical Shakespearian stage will go far towards giving a college audience a definite understanding of the play itself, as well as contributing to their appreciation of its purely dramatic qualities." Debates are interesting, and timely questions are annually discussed by members of the class. The question discussed this year was : " Resolved, That Julius Cmsar was the greatest man that ever figured in the tide of time." This department has kept alive in the University the spirit of oratory. Nine-tenths of the medals won in contests here and elsewhere in which the University is interested have bee11 Won by students of this department. The most brilliant young orators of the State have studied and gained their inspiration for wider efforts in this school. The present high standard of this department is due to the instructor, Miss Sarah McGehee Isom. Miss Isom was graduated from the Boston School of Oratory. She has studied with many of the foremost teachers of America, among the number the eminent reader and lecturer, james E. Murdock, 'LThe Nestor of the American Stage." She has visited Europe, and sought there the foremost teachers of London and other educational centers. She keeps in touch with the most advanced principles of her art. It was the Hon. john Temple Graves who said: "This department in the University of Mississippi is far in advance of any similar department in Southern colleges and universities." Such success "reveals a richness and versatility of womanhood which must stand not only as an argument but as a prophecy of what higher education can do." 94 Long Ago up K is JD w .Q ig-gs 'is LK .1 .25 .39 The Grad sat deep in meditation, Or was it but predestination Xvondering what in-botheration- That this great humiliation Gave his latest fond flirtation Should decrease the large inflation Such a sudden termination. just preceding graduation? Could it be dissemination He wrapped himself in cogitation, Of some wicked defamation And at last the explanation Of his blameless reputation Came flashing through his desperation By some imp of l1ell's creation? He was too slow in osculationl L'Envoi Since then the perfect adaptation Of our Grads to sweet flirtation Has filled with joy and admiration The female hearts of all the nation. if its lkzflgg EA 3:3 Rial Extra at ical 95 s ss p15 it V Q u1 .l m ATX Lyn. D fi is The Dead House J' .55 U ! gag HE Dead House looks out from a shady growth of forest trees upon the tennis courts and athletic field. It seems to cherish the secrets of its mysterious halls, and a sight of its dark interior is gained only with great dilhculty from without. The walls hold many niches that resemble windows, but red brick where the sash should be mock the eyes of observers. VVhat Windows exist are small and murky, l Jig ga affording hardly a glimpse of the interior. Students, in their aimless strolls on idle afternoons, shun 7 ' the vicinity of this lonely house. N d 2 lv It is only natural that an unattractive little building, alone in the woods, with no human interest tit f ff centered in it, should be left unnoticed by the passing world g that its name should seldom be spoken 6 among men. But why should one in traversing the University grounds on an errand of business, seeing that his course is leading near the mossy walls of the Dead House, turn suddenly, with a nervous clenching of the hands, and pass far around it? Why should the never-silent student lower his voice and speak in the fewest words when incidentally the Dead House is mentioned? During the civil war, the University Chapel was converted into a Confederate hospital. The dead, in the interval before burial, were removed from time to time to the little storehouse of electrical apparatus out in the woods, and the rigid sleep of the unfortunates who lay within those silent walls has left its memory among men undimin- ished by the flight of years. The thought of death comes involuntarily when one gazes upon that forsaken morgueg yet how little is known of the horrors that dwell within it! Death holds his court within that dreary place, intan- gible ghosts minister to his whims, stalking about the throne in ghastly grave-clothes, the red wounds of war gleaming angry upon their blanched and shrunken forms. Each day as twilight deepens, the spirits, emboldened by the welcome approach of darkness, assemble in the Chamber of the Throne. The king takes his seat, his grim, forbidding countenance almost softened into smiling, the dry, blue lips retreating from the yellow fangs, and his pale eyes glinting like emeralds. Dim blue lights appear at a sign from the throne, and the weird rites of evening are performed amid wailing incantations, the shadowy votaries moving to and fro, and marching in solemn state, preceded and followed by the lights around the king's chair. After the dismal ceremony is concluded, a window is opened by unseen hands and the procession glides out, led by the king. The green vine that brushes the window does not rustle as the ghastly forms glide through its branches, and the tall grass shows no sign of their footprints at the return of dawn. 96 When the spectral line is lost to sight, the window closes softly, and through the long hours of night the still- ness of death hovers over the house. Not a sound, not a whisper, except the timid moaning of the winds among the forest trees. Far across the level surface of the grove, the boisterous student songs and shouts gradually cease, the dormitory lights go out one by one, and everywhere night reigns, still, black, uncanny night. One solitary figure walks to and fro in the king's chamber, and his solemn tread intensifies the stillness, measuring time with unfailing regularity. The moon climbs aloft in the heavens, and its pale light filters through the vine that clings to the window, and plays in grotesque 'rigures upon the floor. As the moon rises toward the zenith the wavering light retreats from the floor and the hall becomes dark again. Out of the distance the town clock strikes in mellow, reverberating tones. Dismally the wind moans in the treetops and whistles around the corners of the building. Steadily the guard walks. The clock bell rings, and rings again. The moon beams in at another window, and the weapons of the grim sentinel glisten in the light. When at last the hours of darkness have Worn away and a cold gleam lights sullenly in the east, at the hour appointed for return the guard sees the glinting eyes of his chief peering in upon him. The Window opens noiselesslyg the sleeping vine moves notg the pale procession, as cold as the morning frost, glide in and stand in rank before the throne. Oppressive silence reigns for a few moments, then out of the distance a faint voice is heard calling out names in succession, and the spirits answer, each in his turn. After the roll-call the same faint voice is heard shouting: " Open, open the gates! The king has come to his fires again! Burn ! burn ! within the gates, ye everlasting fires I Ye vassals, come out to receive the king ! " A sound of distant rumblings, clanking of chains, creaking and slamming of gates is heard, and a sulphurous odor ills the room. The king stretches forth his hand : " Most wretched ghosts, where in the benighted world has your baleful mission led you? l' They answer: " Most honored King of Night, thou hast led us up and down in forsaken lands, performing thy majestic will." . The king : " What, O spirits, is the eternal will of the king? " Spirits: " That the night be made rife with tricks and apparitions 5 that mischief be done to all that live, that diseases and plagues be fomented while day is gone." The hall is 'filled with sulphurous smoke g the mingled noises in the distance continue, cries of pain and harsh words of command arise above an indistinct murmur as of voices of an innumerable multitude muttering and cursing, clanking their chains, and stamping their feet in utter unrest. The king arises: " It is Well 3 your work is done, come to me when tl1e day dies 5 begone." They turn about silently 3 they fade from view, the throne disappears, the king is not seen. The indistinct 97 murmur is changed to a prolonged shout of welcome. Then are heard again harsh commands and the lashing of whips: a thousand distant iron doors ereak on their hinges and close with a crash, and silence falls And now the sun rises smiling over the hill and bends his gaze closely upon the Dead House He kisses the cold walls coyly and caresses the waving tendrils of the vine as he peeps curiously in at the windows 111 a xam endeavor to behold the mysteries. .55 J Oblivion ,gl Xaught of the wasted years Strikes through the gloom. Savor of bitter tears Finds not the tomb: Death binds about the head, Languid and wet, Sleepy. dull poppies red: XVe shall forget. V TQ ,- i 1-its EL-15- X is U i i QS UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI , ...V , ,f,1g.,., , ll , ,g 'Q -21: q - . V1- Fw. . -. ,. .w -fs, -wQf,f'5'-' ..g'-'-" " . ff- - f ' .,,i ,-igm.-:fbi-. v'-- -15... . -.-'A'- g' jkgzwf Q. 1 ' .'-"if .Q.,s.'. ' -" I '. ., W' 'funn'-'. 4.5-" 2 f.-f 1 1. : A J A L: :V .wily .Jigs-if Vg .- Q . . I - 1 -. -4- 4- A In - - A fy X' f ' " ' . - , .., ,. 5 . .4 Q., -Y I O , ,I X.. ., , KJ.. K ,.4 A , -. . kv.-ir. , pe. I , tj.--,--f.-3.-P. X- . - , - Z' 4-Lo.,l.fT.vf!.. X 1 "1 . , . , ,I ' ' ' ,' 'u 9 s 1 I 1 p .' -f c V.. ' i ., rn. Lu . -. L .GL J L , r I 1 Q' , ', . 5.- 4 p s 1 1 f 1 .ff -- ,. fsxffhr.-'.,, . ,.. . A ' P c ,f!' 3' . - Y L15'?' ?'x N 151. A . ffl 1 ' . . -'bb t f- A . ,V V .V rv Qi? v f" .,,,. . . QI 'f?.C.',.,' ,I::'L'lT '1' ' . A '. Q - at R -'.-71 . . .,, ..', 1 .A 1 ..'. -x 4 K .I . ,Ac- 41 nQ' wx- uf ' ,, . . ' 1 . I., Q -fr.. Y M fr . ' 3 . ' I w, - . A s E. CAMPBELL . . HENRS' . MCFARLAND FANT . GUYNES ' RICHMOND MCDOWELL AM IS BELL BURNHAM BYNUM CAMPBELL CROSS DAVIS DURLEY EDMONDS FANT Hermaean Literary Society .al .25 Officers First Session Second Session President J. R. MCDOWELL . President . Vice-President EDMONDS . Vice-President . . Recording Secretary MCFARLAND Recording Secretary . Corresponding Secretary PANT . . Corresponding Secretary . First Censor FOSTER . First CenSOr . Second Censor SEALE . Second Censor . Doorkeeper SCALES . Doorkeeper . Chaplain -- . Chaplain .al Members FLOYD MCDOWELL SCALES FOSTER MCFARLAND SEALE GUYNES MCGEIIEE SMYLIE HARDY MCKAY STANDIFER HARGROXVE MILLER STEVENS HENRY' PRESSLEY STONE HOLINIES, E. H. RICHMOND WAGNER JONES, E. T RILEY WELLS LIPSCOMB ROBERSON WHITE, C. R. LONGEST ROWAN YVITHERSPOON IOI Phi Sigma Literary Society 5.2! Officers A. G. LOVE . . .... . President H. L. MCKLESKEX' . . Vice-Presidem H. R. SHANDS . . Secretary W. E. HOPKINS . . Censor J. K. MORRISON . . Chaplain G. L. RAY . . . . Doorkeeper J. K. MORRISON . . Treasurer .5- Members BRAMLETT, E. S. KIMBROUGH, B. T. MCKLESKEY, H. L. SULTXIN R H BROACH, J. M. KERSHAXV, E. H. PETTIS, C. R. TH VNIES H D BROVVN, W. A. LEAVELL, L. P. PETTIS, W. S. PODD HIRAM CROXTON, E. M. LEAVELL, A. B. PRUITT, W. O. VL XDLINTCTON A IJRVMMOND, N. LEAVELL, M. B. RAY, G. L. FISIII-:R, H. F. n LOVE, A. G. RUSSELL, L. M. VNIILIMIS R W FULTON, M. G. MABRX', E. L. RUTLEDGE, W. 'O. YVILBT. RNE W R S HARCIIS, J. E. MAYS, J. D. SHANDS, H. R. WILROX N E HOI-RINS, W. E. MORGAN, M. G. SIMRALL, J. B. XOUNG STARK JONES, S. M. MORRISON, J. K. SMITH, C. D. IO2 A. W. SHANDS . J. H. THOMPSON R. D. LANIER . D. M. KIMBROUGH R. E. XVILBOURN S. R. KNOX . . B. T. MARKETTE L. BRAME. JR. . ARNOLD, J. M. AUSTIN, W. L. BRAME, L., JR. BECKETT, C. BONDURANT, G. P. BOGAN, J. W. P. BURTON, J. BROOKS, H. H. BROWN, H. W. CAROTHERS, H. W. Blackstone Society .al .al Officers First Term Second Term . . President XV. B. XVATKINS ..... President . Vice-President J. G. MILS.-'IPS . . Vice-President . Secretary S. R. KNOX . . . . Secretary . Treasurer D. M. KIMBROUGH . . Treasurer . Chaplain J. BURTON . . . . Chaplain . Censor J. H. THOMPSON . . Censor . Sheriff F. H. PEPPER . . Sheriff . Doorkeeper ll . Doorkeeper .al Members COX, W. A. KNOX, S. R. RUSSELL. D. M. DEAR, H. C. LANIER, R. D. SHANDS, A. W. FALKNER, J. W. LYELL, G. G. SHELTON, T. M. GASSOWAY, H. A. lf.-XRKETTE. B. T. THOMPSON, J. H. GATLIN, J. M. MAHON, H. K. THOMAS, J. M. H.iRRIS, C. E. MCINTOSH. H. M. TURNER, J. M. HOLINIES. J. E. MILLSAPS. J. G. XVATKINS, W. B. HENNINGTON, L. L. MORRISON, S. A. WEATHERBY, W. HAMNER, W. M. PEPPER, F. H. WILBOL'RN, R. E IVY, T. G. RICKS, W. B. XVEST, F. M. KIMBROUGH, D. M. RUSSELL, L. V. COOK, W. H. 103 Eyes Blue eyes, tender eyes, Where the imprisoned sky-born hue Tells of a heart noble and true, All them believe. Brown eyes, loving eyes, Glorious with light, some one to bless, There dwells the soul of gentleness, Sorrows' reprieve. Grey eyes, earnest eyes, In whose glance truth and loyalty Unite with voiceless constancy, Tl1ey'll ne'er deceive. 104 Black eyes, joyous eyes, Sparkling, night-hued, wondrous with glee Home of laughter and jollity, Make some heart grieve. The Road Between I. ESIDE the rude trail leading up the slope of the mountain stands a cabin surrounded by two or three acres of half-cultivated ground, everywhere are seen signs of poverty. Not far from the cabin an old, half-starved mule wanders aboutg around the cabin door three or if four dogs are lying in the sun. A mountaineer and his wife sit silently smoking their pipes on the g doorsteps. It is half an hour since the wife joined her husband, and yet not a word has passed between them. She knits and smokes, and raises her eyes only at intervals. He smokes and thinks, and gazes at the treetops across the road. These mountaineers of the Cumberland are a strange people. They are morose, stoical, and silent, and always thinking and thinking. They even seem suspicious of each other. They come and go, they live, they die-but as no other class of people. They have their ways, and their ways descend from father to son. By and by the man speaks. Without taking his pipe from his mouth or his eyes from the treetops, he says: "Joe's a-comin'." " Reckon he ar'," replies the wife, without looking up. A quarter of a mile down the trail is a man walking slowly and carrying a rifle on his shoulder. Neither of those on the doorsteps have yet seen him, but their quick ears have detected the sound of footsteps among the stones. Soon he stands before them and lets the butt of his ride fall to the ground. " Howdy," says the new arrival. " Howdy," answers the man and woman in chorus. " Powe'ful hot." " Yes, powe'ful. " No more is said until Joe ills and lights his pipe and takes his seat on a near-by stump. Then the woman, her eyes on the ground, asks: " Reckon him orter do it, Joe? " " Of cose him orter," replies Joe. " Yes, for shore," adds the husband. " It'll be the ole man? " says the woman, after a short pause. ' me gf . 5 A. X11 -ill A b ., -. , ro5 " The old man, for shore." replies Joe. The wife grows pale and her fingers tremble as she plies her needlesg there is something like anxiety in her tones, when, after a pause of several minutes, she says: " I wish Jim wouldn't do it. I don't like this killin'." " Hev to kill," answered Joe, laconically. " Yes, hev to kill." adds Jim, as he arises and yawns and stretches his limbs. joe holds out his rifle to him and he takes it and examines its several parts, and nods his head with satisfaction. " You can drop him at forty yards," says Joe, as he pushes away the dogs which had arisen and were licking his hand. " From thirty-live to forty," answered the other, as he brings the weapon to his shoulder and sights along the barrel. 'R Got to make shore work," says jim : " come fur it to-morrer." " Reckon I will 3 day to yo'all." When the caller had go11e his way the husband sits down, refills his pipe, and makes another examination of the rifle. A long silence is broken by the wife's query: " What's the trouble, jim ? " " Same as befo'." " Ole man Taylor and our two hogs? " " Yes, he wants damages and I won't pay." " Gwine to kill him ? " " Fur shore." " VVish yo' wouldn't." " Got ter." That ends the conversation. When he had exhausted his pipe he knocks the ashes out and enters the cabin. He goes to the cupboard and helps himself to a drink of whisky. When he reappears at the door he stands for a moment looking about. " Gwine now? " queries the wife. " Yes, gwine now." He starts up the trail, while the woman never takes her eyes from her work. II. Two miles up the trail is Taylor's cabin. It is the same sort of hovel, with the same poor acres grown up in Weeds, and with the same signs of poverty without and poverty within. IO6 A woman sits smoking on the doorsteps, too, but she is alone. Her husband has gone down the trail with his rifle on his shoulder. " Gwine ter kill jim Green?" she asked, as he was leaving. " Reckon so," he replied, as he moved away. Two cabins, two wives on the doorsteps, two men with rifles on the trail between. At such a height above the sea-level sound travels a long distance. Both women hear the crack of a rifle by-and-by. After an hour or two Taylor returns home. When he had lighted a pipe and taken a seat beside his wife, she asks: Did yo' leave him down thar? " " Yes, I left him down thar," replies he. Two or three hours later a man stops before the other cabin and says to the woman smoking her pipe on the doorsteps: "jim's been shot." " Up thar? H she asks, pointing up the trail. " Yes, up thar." "'Lyin' dead? " " Yes, lyin' dead. Good evenin'." " Evenin' to yo'." 107 x . x 5 1 v I mf s v - , . 9 ' ' 'T v, .1- 71 , -. 741 .'.W. .. - .. -. s ,- 1 .5 . ,. . - ' I 'xW' . J ' ' ' Y 1 1 , A z'l!f', ,',.L Sw- A21 A , 'N I 5 -. . .MN A IJ L'-?Q.". '59, QF o,f 5 a ..- I ..-fy. J f 1' A - N .-A 'A' . ' 1.45 -1 .L 4 ,, . 9 .. - . TENN., JL' '. ri '- .Q 'Q 1 C W . - 'J'.""".?'!5 ., ,- ' 7-." , 'A " . -1 -.'-, ' " - . -s , ' -,"' "P"-T. I .s. .Y Y YH. 'L .sb H. gxvx -- gr. vu' - ,9 V 5,5 -,I . ew - fa ,L img. y 7--fi? Lg ' "' "' 'wwf '4'fm,,' -nv-'P' fam , , I . , 'P , u , .'. ' A 1 .' vw , , sf. ,, i, . L w,g4,'.,, 7-Q 11.31 .' V '-."" ""' . Q -.Pu .- -L ' -hr..-, '. Q'-1 . . I.. - .I I ,t iff.: .A,.,3.,k.',s2.HA V 1-i v,"--'.'."'ilu gil J- , H 1 -1- , W Q uf ,. , C' 341 1 '- f ' if Q , .vw . '.' 1 . ! . if 2 ,' . . A- -4 ,gf ,. Q ..,.. - 2 ' -' -I ' -1 '. "' .-5' ,Hoya I - + ,V 4-- . o lg - .J.n, .gf 'V' pr J YJ PY. 1 'L ii'i'995'i'ii'5'95'i'5'95'9i'i99?95'9'3'5'ii'5'i'3'5'5':: 5 3 23 5 ii 5 Rolls, Histories, etc., of the 95' 5 , . ii 5. various classes m the Schools yy 2 of Literature, Science, Arts, 9 and in the School of Law. yy 5 ii WWW fi' WW WW if QQ WW fi' WW Wi' Qi' Wi' iff if fl' WW WW Wi' 'QW 'QW Wi' ff QW 111' Wi' Qi' Wi' Wi' 'Qi' 111' if WW iff Qi' WWW WCW' P 'YI' 'ii' ..s,. . . n '4 1 . 'IN .L'. " ' 3. sy- 0. I s -f ' ..' . '.5I,a'If.7l If.. gf: I-. QI .I A :',Is -I 1 If ..' I . LI, aff I J . v . ,, I ik . II II -I,, I. I, I . -Q I 1 I. .I4,.,f-..-I.- I, .- - . 1,1 ,.f II III? sl IIIIIILSIIITY? 7 .G-:IR v4I:S6,:I,l'.I T-1. -I a.'3,:,II:-IGIA II fl ,XI I 1 II I ' ' ' f",-'--lf?-7 :jf-..-f:4,. ', '.- W: U,-, ",7'. ,Q 'I-,C.?I"- I I I , II I. I -I.IIII, III ..I .. .I-, IIII---I I I .I-10.33. 1,I,IKI-,L I,IIl:,':I?II IIpI1I-g,i'II,I-if , Q If? 1 I . I 1 I I .' :W ' '1.,..-, - -... ' --any - -' ' .- -x. .1 .IIQ , 'f-II' Irv 2,0 ' -.:.I.- 'jI ? 3, If -I ' , In' -I .M - z -:.II III -T,-f.I1, '. . -.. I - ' s I 'Q '4 - 1. -4 "I I Q. f 'T' -' 1 - .If III4 ,Q g ' .. , Q K QI . .IA ' , . XA N FY . ,:,.-." ,qi " -I Z I ' N. Jkvv-I V. '. 2 X I 'k . 14-Q'-'xr rp. 4-cz if'- Y :LI vu" - 'Y.,.--, f -., .."x1-. I QI TI, - 1 9 I, I x , -I- , I 'I IQI. ,II 1 W1 J 1 . ' KA.. Q 1 ,I , I . X 1' 4 s 's1A"" n P N uv '.' .b'f. .,"J - ' A3 .I 1:3 LY." .- '1'-4 . I -..o .. ' fs? n - 4: -Y ' h:'-f' JN, Y 4 4,1-. . Q S. M. JONES H. D. PRIESTLEY, JR. . W. P. IQRETSCHMAR . J. M. STEVENS Miss C. GARY III Class of '98 .algal Officers President . Historian . Class Poet .al COLORS- Navy Blue and VVhite. YELL-Hullaballoo, sis, boom, a 7 , X A Uznu Zfll even? ZHVTII Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer h! History of Senior Class . U' J' ay " NCE again, and for the last time, it becomes the duty of the Historian of the l98 Class to chronicle a ii few facts and observations concerning this, in many respects, Wonderful class. When this short is g account reaches our friends and fellow students we shall have completed our college course, and shall llllf? 1' Q be in a position to appreciate more fully than ever the real import of that familiar word, " Com- ffw f ' mencementf' VVe do not deem this the proper time or place to indulge in any criticisms of the other classes with which we have been so pleasantly associated, nor can we honestly indorse that intense spirit of rivalry that so thoroughly pervades most of our colleges and universities, as manifested in their class histories, and that leads to copious expressions of self-gratulation on the one side, and of contempt and derision on the other. Hence we shall confine the observations here made to those things that relate distinctively to the Senior Class. There are many things that impress us in taking a retrospect of the time elapsed since we first assembled as Freshmen. Some occasions we associate with joyful states of mind, others with painful states, according as such occurrences remind us of victories won or lost. We do not contend that we are an ideal classg yet, in justice to ourselves and to our friends, we feel constrained simply to enumerate a few lines of activity in which we have been prominent. There is no need for speciic facts and illustrations. Neither the time, the place, nor propriety demands it. I11 athletics we are easily in the lead. For two years '98 has held the championship in football 5 and this session our latent power in baseball needs only an opportunity for manifestation. In scholarship we are decidedly above the average. If any one wishes to contest this statement, let him refer to our record. Oratorical talent we possess, but would prefer not to stake the reputation of the class solely upon this accomplishment. Surely all the organizations of the University will suffer a serious loss by the withdrawal of '98 men from their ranks. Especially will this be true in the literary societies and in the Y. M. C. A. The '98 Class is the largest ever graduated from the University of Mississippi g and the career and success of each individual graduate will in subsequent days be earnestly watched by sympathetic friends. While in college we have labored earnestly and faithfully, and we have reason to believe that the majority have been impelled and influenced by a sense of duty. Soon we enter into the practical affairs of life, and the strength of the foundation laid here in college will be determined by our real success in subsequent years. And now to our friends and to our Alma Mater, to whom we would express gratitude for her fostering care, we say farewell ! II2 Senior Class Roll and Statistics .Akai ALVIN WOODSON AMIS, B. S. . . . . . . Hermman Literary Society. JAMES WARSAW BELL, B. P., .1 vf' ...... Hermzean Literary Society. MINNIE BROWN, S. S., S T . . . . . CLARA HELEN BURT, S. S., T .1 0 . . JOSEPH MEDICUS BYNUM, JR., B. A., .1 TJ .... ' Hermzean Literary Society. Conehatta Pontotoc, Oxford Oxford Booneville WALTER CHEVV BREWER, S. S., .l' . . . Black Hawk Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss EUGENE CAMPBELL, B. S. ............ Troy, Herniaean Literary Societyg 'Varsity Football Team 135g Class Football Team 135 1451 Fellow in Chemistry 1453 Associate 1 Business Manager of Universify Record 145. ELIZABETH COWAN, S. S., li T .... Oxford CLARENCE ANDERSON DOUGHERTY, B. P., J 'l" . . . Coldwater Tennis Club. JESSE HARDY DURLEY, B. A., 0 li' V" .... ' .... Herniaean Literary Society, Associate Editor of Um'zfer5z'ly Record 145. Oxford FRANK HENRY ERVIN, B.S. .......... . Columbus, Phi Sigma Literary Society. HUBERT FREDERICK FISHER, B. A., f .li ......... MOSS POiI1'C, Phi Sigma Literary Societyg 'Varsity Football Team 145 5 Class Football Team 135 145 5 Manager of Class Baseball Team 135 g University Orchestra 135 1453 Senior Debater 145 g Current Literature Club 145 g Athletic Editor of "OLE MISS " 145. 113 Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss MAURICE GARLAND FULTON, B. S., .J 'l", H rl' E ........ University, Miss V5 Phi Sigma Literary Society 5 Tennis Club 133 143 5 Current Literature Club 143 5 Local Editor of Universily Magazifze 123 5 President of Y. M. C. A. 123 5 second in 440-yard dash, Field Day 123 5 Phi. Sigma Anniversarian 133 5 Reserve Football Team 1335 winner i11 State Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest 1335 Associate Business Manager of "OLE Miss" 1335 Class Football Team 133 143 5 University Representative in Gulf States Intercollegiate Contest 133 5 President of Gulf States Intercollegiate Oratorical Association 133 5 Manager of Field Sports 1335 Editor in Chief of Universily Record 1435 first in SSO-yard run, Field Day 133 5 second in 440-yard dash, Field Day 1335 Senior Debater 143. ' CARRIE GARY, B. A., I' T . . ........ Oxford, Miss Class Poet. EDVVARD BUELL GIBSON, S. S., 1' ll' .......... Crystal Springs, Miss 'Varsity Football Team 1 I3 5 Class Football Team 123 5 Class Baseball Team 123 143 5 'Varsity Baseball Team 113 123 143, JASPER FELIX GUYNES, B. A., fl' H 'I' .......... 1-Iazlehurst, Miss Hermzean Literary Society5 Senior Debater 143. LAMAR HARDY, B. P., 40 .1 Q, H N14 ........... Meridian, Miss V5 Hermzean Literary Society5 'Varsity Football Team 123, Class Football Team 123 1435 Class Baseball Team 123 1435 Manager of Class Baseball Team 12 35 Captain of Class Baseball Team 1435 'Varsity Baseball Team 123 1435 Business Manager of " OLE Miss " 143. VVILLIAM HENRY HARGROVE, B. A., ll' fl ....... . University, Miss Hermaean Literary Society5 Chess Club 1335 Class Football Team 133. CHARLES XVHEAT HINTON, B. P., J 'I' .......... Clinton, Miss Tennis Club5 German Club 143, 'Varsity Football Team 1335 Class Football Team 133 1435 Associate Business Manager of - Lr7lI'Uf7'SZ'fj! Reford 143 5 second in 880-yard race, Field Day 133. CLYDE JOHNSON, B. A., .1 lm' E ...... . Senatobia, Miss Phi Sigma Literary Society. GEORGE PIERCE JONES. S. S., 1' .Y ........... Grenada, Miss Second in running broad jump, second in running high jump, Field Day 113 5 Assistant Manager of Field Sports 1435 second in Ioo-yard dash, second in 220-yard dash, second in pole-vault, Field Day 123. STEWART MARVIN JONES, B. A., J ll' H .......... University, Miss Phi Sigma Literary Society5 President of the Class of '985 'Varsity Baseball Team 113 123 133 143 5 Sophomore Salutatoriang Associate Editor of University Magasirze 133, Class Baseball Team 133 1435 Captain of Class Baseball Team 1335 Captain of 'Varsity Baseball Team 133 143 5 Business Manager of University Record 143. ' 114 ALMA JONES, S. S., TJ 6 . ' . University, Miss CORRIE JONES, S. S., .Y T ..... . Booneville, Miss WILSON PRIMM KRETSCHMAR, B. A., .1 'I", H .Y E ........ Greenville, Miss Vg K. K. K., Tennis Clubg Current Literature Club 143, Secretary and Treasurer of the Class of '9Sg 'Varsity Football Team 123 133g Class Football Team 133 143, Manager of Class Football Team 133 1431 Class Baseball Team 133 143. ERYVIN WTADSXVORTH LIPSCOMB, B. A., J T .I ........ Columbus, Hermaean Literary Society, Class Football Team 133 143. JULIAN KNOX MORRISON, B. P., 1' .Y ....... Grenada, Phi Sigma Literary Society. JULIA MILLER MURRY, S.S., 1' T .... . Ripley ISAAC LYTLE MULCAHY, B. A. . . Holly Springs, MARSHALL LEWIS PERKINS, S. S., .J 'I' ........ . Batesville, Tennis Club 133 143 5 'Varsity Baseball Team 123, Class Baseball Team 133 143. JAMES FERNANDIS POPE, S. S., .1 T J .......... Columbus, Miss M iss M iss Miss Miss Miss K. K. K.g Phi Sigma Literary Society, Leader of German Club 143 g Secretary and Treasurer of German Club 143 g Junior ' Ball Committee 133 g Ball Committee, Blackstone Anniversary 143 3 President Bell Buckle Club 143 3 Tennis Club 133 143 g 'Varsity Baseball Team 123 133 143 5 Class Baseball Team 133 143. LEE MQGEHEE PORTER, B, P,, .J V", H .V E, ........ . Jackson, Miss K. K. K., German Club 143, Tennis Club 133 143, second in Ioo-yard dash, second in 220-yard dash, Field Day 1233 first in I2O-yard hurdles, Field Day 133 5 'Varsity Football Team 133 5 Class Football Team 133 143. IRA SANDIFER PRESSLY, B. A. ..... . Carthage, Miss Hermaean Literary Society. HARRY D. PRIESTLEY, JR., B, P., J V", H rV E ......... Canton, Miss K. K. K. g Vice-President of the Class of '9Sg Vice-President of University Athletic Association 123 133 143 g 'Varsity Football Team 123 133 1435 Captain 'Varsity Football Team 1433 first Sophomore Medal 123, Class Football Team 133 143, Captain Class Football Team 133 143 3 Class Baseball Team 133 143 g Leader of Glee Club 133 g Leader of Orchestra 133 143 3 German Club 143g Junior Ball Committee 1333 Ball Committee, Blackstone Anniversary 143. I 1 5 GEORGE LATHAM RAY, B, P,, df J H, 9 .Y E ...... . Carrollton, Vg Phi Sigma Literary Societyg junior Medal 135. BENJAMIN SHEROD RICKS, B. A., .1 7" .......... Canton, K. K. K., Tennis Club 155 1451 German Club 145: Class Baseball Team 135 145 3 Manager of Class Baseball Team 1455 Glee Club 135 3 University Orchestra 135 145. ARCHIE GILBERT ROANE, B. P., 3 .l', 6 IV H Grenada, VVILLIAM MARTIN SANDERS: B. P. ...... . Portersville, Hermzean Literary Society. RoBERT WHELESS SHIPP, ss., 1' .4 E .......... Yazoo City, Miss. Miss Miss Miss Miss K. K. K.g German Club 1453 'Varsity Baseball Team 135 1455 Class Football Team 135 145, Class Baseball Team 135 145, junior Ball Committee 1353 Ball Committee, Blackstone Anniversary 145. MINNIE H. SMITH, S. S., .Y T . Oxford, JOSEPH BAKER SMYLIE, S.S. ......... . Wesson, 'Varsity Football Team 125 135 g Class Football Team 135 145. JOHN MORGAN STEVENS, B. A., ll' .4 .......... Augusta, Miss Miss Miss Hermzean Literary Society, Class Historiaug President of Hermaean Literary Society 135, Class Football Team 135 145, President of Y. M. C. A. 145 3 Senior Debater 145. ANNA VINEYARD, B. S., L' T ........... Helena, Associate Editor of University Record 145 g Associate Editor of "OLE MISS " 145. NATHANIEL EDWARD XNILROY, B. P. .......... Kileton, Phi Sigma Literary Societyg Representative in State Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest 145. I I6 Ark Miss 'Q' .rf -1 H ju 'I . 1 -nm .X-4, -14 -- "" ' Q .rv ' , 4, Wk se2'Si tg if? f' S -1 5 u 1, ,- -Q V .-3' 4:35, is A -L -Q SENIOR CLASS 1' 'XC' ...Q -Q X. Ax sg, ' u , ' - Y ,4...g4. ,-'17 4,11 1 in I v 12' 1- vffkfy. 'eh Jgjfi:-.kg -.gp :ff Y' ' I fu-. 'Q Aw I L- - fz. -5 .aj ' J i , ,1 u'-'- , . 6o1.x r . 'Pi -'xp V, .4 . 3" L-VV" I' I ., . .r-- Af' ,f lr '.'I ' 'V Q' 14, .. ,H4 ,'!'.. . A . , A , A :A . 3'f'lw' , ' '.' ,ig ' ,.' f wo' J? 'I ' w.-w'2 Q 4 xp L.,--J 1 K 11..- r"" rip! l'f x- . 'Ln '- if-,.. ., s'-P-13. . bf. 'bf'-'U - .' 15. 5 . I R Pj US, ". e',. .- .,1 T L, r w-I lf., ' 4-'bw' .f'f-. 4- 5 ' f-'f ' 5. .l . L , L5 I ., ,. . .v V nv- 'Lg .A-.Lg :qi o -:fun A I in 7. v '. 'L .u 7 A n . f ', A 1 . A V- - ,.,. L , 5 , ,fs h an x ,- , ' 1 -x -' '- .' . BIOTTO Class of '99 Omne tulit punctum. qui miscuit utile 11u1ci." CQLORS-Old Gold and Black. YELL-Yeui. vidi. vici. BID three C, L. of M., I. or M.. Nonagima novem f ,ya ,val Class Officers for Session '97-98 ,dsl LAXDRYBI PINSON LEAYELL . PATRICK HEXRY, JR. . . J. R. MCDOWELL . G. P. JONES DURELL BIILLER . IIQ President Yice-President Secretary Treasurer Historian unior Class History 2 it .al .al .li ,U V ' f ' ND it came to pass in the year of '95, in the reign of Fulton, the Tree Planter, who ruleth to this day, ft, K A R, that there arose in the land of Mississippi and in divers countries around about a mighty company of v V, lt N A A , youthsg and they girded up their loins and came together unto the University of Mississippi, which is 'Tv H52 if over against Oxford. And they came exulting in their strength, and entered into that institution as ,ii,j.f' the Class of '99, saying to those who dwelt within the place : " Behold, we have come to take charge." 1' And there was wonder throughout the campus, and the Chancellor arose and looked upon them, and said unto his brethren, the Faculty, which are all exceeding wise and valiant men : " Lo, it were better not to gaze upon these youths with unprotected eyes, but rather to contemplate them through asbestos, for they are warm." After this sort spake he unto them, and they hearkened unto his words. Nor did the Faculty, on account of the temperature of the class, banish them from the Universityg for, "Verily," said they, " it were better to risk singeing Ollf eyebrows and whiskers than for this institution, which we love in our hearts, to lose such a chosen band." So, through this, the first year of their sojourn in the University, the Class of ,QQ kept unto themselves an even and a winning gait, striving to live peaceably with all men who would meekly give up unto them the honors, and gracefully annihilating any stiff-necked tribes which foolishly rose up against them to dispute with them. Now when the year was done, Commencement came, and the warriors and maidens of ,QQ parted from one another with sorrow in their hearts, and went each to his own home to spend vacation in his father's house. So summer came, and passed by like a scorcher that scorches and tarries not, and the days of autumn drew near. And when tl1e ninth month was come, the Class of '99 arose and passed over to the University again 5 and when they had assembled in council they said among themselves: " Behold, we will run the school again." Then out of their war- riors they chose a leader, a strong man and just, and likewise chose they Secretary, Treasurer, athletic officers, and Historian, as was done by all Sophomores aforetime. ' The days and the weeks bestirred themselves and passed by, and the football season cameg and '99 arose and went out to iight against '98, a barbarous tribe, that know not the rules of Spalding nor fear to transgress his laws. Now it happened that upon that day the warriors of ,QQ were not feeling very well, neither did they half tryg so it came to pass that they were beaten just a little. Then again met 'QQ in council, and their looks were dark, and they said in impatient tones: "The Rubes have beaten us." Then arose among them many words and much gesticulating, and it is not known but that they had girdedthemselves about and marched from that hall as one man I2O and wiped '98 off of the earth, had not one arisen among them with soothing words and said unto them : K' Sophomores, ye are not children. The unknown tribe have beaten you a little: let it pass. Ye did not half try 1 for, verily, if ye had, there had been not one of '98 left to boast of his scars. So, rest ye easy, for the day of retribution will surely come with the springtime." So spake the seer, and his words were true, for in the spring of '97 the classes of '98 and '99 met on the base- ball diamond, and victory took the side of the brave, for in one day the hosts of '98 were beaten sorely, and the people could not distinguish the sound of '99's shoutings of joy from the sound of the weeping of '98 3 for they wept with a loud noise, and it was heard afar off. So the end of this year drew nigh, and Commencement came, and likewise came vacation. Then the summer passed by and autumn after it, and after that the frost came and the fever took a chase. And when the eleventh month was come, the Class of '99 reassembled at the University, being at this time Juniors, and the other classes came with them. Now ye will remember that this is a short year, on account of the late opening. The football was not known this year at the 'Varsity. Winter has passed with a wheezing breath, and behold, spring is at hand, as cornely and as fair to look upon as a Co-ed. of '99. The days that are History's merge into the days of the present, and lo, our task is done. Look ye into the records of the University, and ye shall see unnumbered accounts and testaments of the valor and strength of '99, very many of which, nevertheless, we have not repeated here lest any be offended, thinking that we boast. And finally, hearken ye who love accounts of war, whose souls delight in strife and carnage. Hear the story of this, the latest deed of '99, which we here record. It came to pass that the tribe of '98 slowly recovered after the ball game that was played in the year of ,9'7, and they lifted up their heads and became exceeding brave as their Wounds were healed, so that when this present springtime came, they said among themselves: "Surely, it was an accident, behold, we will iight them again." And the heralds arose and came from their council unto the boundaries of '99, and threw the spear dipped in blood, and said unto them: "VVe beseech ye, come out, if ye still play baseball, and contend with us, for behold, we would do you." So the warriors of 'QQ went out and fought against the warriors of '98, and slew them all, so that when they awoke in the morning they were found dead. This was done on Saturday before Easter, and the next day it rained. . HISTORIAN. I2I Class of '99, Roll and Statistics dd DAVID OLIVER BRIDGFORTH, B. A., -Y X . Pleasant Hill, WALTER AUGUSTUS BROWN, B. A., J T J . . Meridian, E. R. CREEKMORE, B. P., ll -4 ff . . . Pittsboro, VVILLIS WILLIAM GARTH, B. S., .1 T.1,la'ln' lu' . . . . Columbus, Glee Club, '97, Orchestra, '97, Orchestra, '98, German Club, '98, PATRICK HENRY, JR., B. A., 'P J H, ffl .Y H .... . Brandon, Hermman, First Freshman medal, Manager Class Baseball Team, Class Vice-President. EDWIN RUTHVEN HOLMES, B. A., J 'I' .......... Yazoo City Hermzean, Chess Club, Second Hermwan, Freshman Medal, Sophomore Salutatorian, '98, Class Football Team, '96, Reserve Football Team, '96. ALBERT VVAGLES HURT, B. A,, If I-I ll, df S . LIPMAN MILLER KAHN, B. P. Hermzean, Football Team, '96. BRADLEY THOMAS KIMBROUGH, B. A., 2' X, W 2' . . Miss. Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss . Courtland, Miss . Memphis, Tenn Oxford, LANDRUM P1NsoN LEAVELL, B. A., xx, H .rf . . . Class President, President Y. M. C. A., '97, First Phi Sigma Freshman Medal, Sophomore Salutatorian, '97, more Medal, Representative in G. S. I. O. A. contest for '98, ALBERT GALLITON LOVE, B. A. . EDWIN LEWIS MABRY, B. A., fl' Class Football Team, '96. I22 . Oxford . Trezevant, . Senatobia First Sopho- Miss Miss Miss Miss JAMES R. MCDOWELL, B. A., J 1' J, If lr 1-' ......... Holly Springs. President of Hermaean, '972 Class Secretary, Baseball Team, '98, Class Baseball Team, '97 and '98, S. T. H. A. A. BEN MCFARLAND, J T J, 6' .Y E ........ . Aberdeen, A Herniman 3 Tennis Club, 440-yard dash, '97, LOUIS HARPER MCGEI-IEE, B. A., f .4 H . . . . Summit, HERBERT LYNN MCCLESKEY, B. S., fb .1 H ..... Atlanta, Vice-President Phi Sigma, '98. DURELL MILLER, B. A., J T J ............ Shannon, Hermaean, Orchestra, '97, Orchestra, '98, Class Football Team, '96, Class Editor, '97-98, one-mile ru11, '973 Class His- torian, '97-98. CLIFFORD POLK PERKINS, B. A., .1 'l' ........ Batesville, Baseball Team, '96, '97, ,982 Captain of Class Baseball Team, Tennis Club. CHARLES ROBERT PETTIS, B. A., .I ll' L' . . . . . . Ellisville, W. MANDEVILLE RICHMOND, B. A., 41 .I H ,........ Port Gibson. Hermaean, 'Varsity Football Team, '95-96, '96-97 , Class Football Team, '96, Tennis Club. MISS ANNIE W. PHILLIPS, TJ 9 . . .Q ....... . Oxford, Editor "OLE Miss," '9S. ROY ROGERS, B. A. .............. New Albany, Ioo-yard dash, '96, 220-yard dash, '96, 440-yard run, '96, mile run, '96, running broad jump, '97, FAISON I-IEATHMAN SMITH, B. A., fb J H ...... . Oxford, Class Baseball Team, '98, LEMUEL AUGUSTUS SMITH, B. A., J ln' E ,........ Holly Springs, German Club, Secretary Sketch Club, Vice-President Webb School Club, S. T. H. A. A. 1 2 3 Miss Miss Miss. Miss. Miss Miss Miss Miss M iss Miss Miss Miss XY. CALVIN XVELLS. JR.. B. A., .J 'I' JOHN JAMES XYHITE. JR.. B. A., J 4- Glee Club, '97, Tennis Club. Hermaeang Tennis Club. MISS RACHEL XYHITEXVAY, B. A., T .1 H . . MISS NORMA MAI XYILKINS. B. A., T .1 H STUART PHILLIP CLAYTON, B. A., .J T .J .... Class Baseball Team, '97 and '9S. THOMAS DICK DAYIS, B. A.. 'lf ll' 'I' 35335 7 ! - 1-+ , :-ff-.gf + A ... ,ec.AA V V, E 1 .f 1 ! . Y -4 ,,i.'..a J'-lL"A E- B B ' I24 , jackson McComb Greenville Oxford Tupelo Sherman, Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss TY:----x , Y .' ,' . 1 f 9' ' ' . ., , J . i . Y A! lil.. Lf! .ff 1 A la, vlx. .X ,K Q 1 Q it :IST sl RM UR Xxx K L., Q xi' j at ze . . jw .J . , - 1. . V 'X A I ' -I ,, . , u X RX A .7 -V xx ...L - . - Y X K? x Ax X --ifxw Ji, Noon! JUNIOR CLASS 1 "L. A 1 "1 1' , 5 wf::. - ' H , 5-.,.1-, N 75 .rf 1a- T Q' I-fx ': g . Lyn Q I Li , 1 Q" n,. , ,,, , P- V - If-41 J 5 ' vxh- ' Q l, , -1 T S.- ,- 1-." .13 'Vp 4 0- 5: 1 J--n '. ' ' . V' Jag? H.. L. ' ,p .vi .,?.,- I 3. .,,1Z- Nw- Q ,"i'. 2.17. '... J C.-'Q ' .7.1-X.'P- . ..- .1 ,. ..,7Q0' ,f, nl .N .. .J ,A 4. rw:-.Ll A .- " xg, ', I . .-.' ' '-.v-' - 3 L N,',"f'-L-',f I I 'f ax . 'I Q. ,": . .1 , . -yn gl vi ff." '.r,'1 1 1 .RYA .,. I7 3' 1' . '-.11 . F ...'.flv', I , -.' lf: 5 ' .,-51 5 I -4, ,'."i,: ..- . x,'.'f J s it '-'.-.'j 1 ,'. .., .b "Q,-W7 'J - ,L '.viq,::.'1 .. V- , ,141 .- , '83, n,s..Ix.'.r.... ' ' .if-'k- 'x' - ,b. 4 54 T.," , - , -I . A. - ls, '1 A" 4 -tr Y 1 'vt ' 'fur' ' fx 4 1 ' 4 -- r 1 . ' r za..- . .-wr .1 .4,' U -' W, iehy Q , ' I 1 I I."- "' . '. .' , 'wr - "" 4 -u' ' . -'f-, ' , . - ' .A L ao 4 n ' I-I -.-.. . . 1 X. N"'t s' J -'-1 , .4 H . ' f Scfnplmqbmmmfe Qllass YELLS J! .29 COLORS-Crimson, Old Rah! Rah! Rah! XVhat's that thundered? The hot stuif class Of nineteen hundred. Gold, and Royal Blue ,M4 'fg'yr1zrln':n! .lvirlfuf Zfllf Mille atque uougenti. Q . Officers .al PRESTON EDXVARD SLO.-KN . President H.ARLEX' ROSEBOROUGH SHANDS Vice-President INIANLEY BERRY LEAYELL - Secretary MIARGARET H. WARDLAW Historian 127 U Sophomore Class History 65.25 HE class of Igoo has but little history to record. The efforts of its members have been directed largely along oratorical lines, and Sopliomores have been much in evidence in the various contests this session. For the data relating to the individual members of the class, the readers are referred to the class statistics in the following pages of this volume, and their most noteworthy history will be found inscribed in after days upon the pages of the Nation's annals. ' . ilu tg f iris-- nf:-+ T' PQ' 128 Sophomore Class Roll and Statistics Name. l Ffdf61'7ll'U'. l Course. Resz'a'ezzfe. l flonors Taken. ALCORN, RANDALL XVOODFORD .... BIGGER, 'SAMUEL YVILSON .... .. BURNHAM, HENRY MZCCABE ...... CAIRNS, GEORGE PIOLLOWVAY ..... CASHMAN, FRANK PAUL ...... . . CONN, ABE H ................... DAVIDSON, JUNIUS, JR ............ DRUIVIMONDS, NORYALL ROBERTSON. EASON, ANDREXY' XVILSON ........ EDMONDS, JAMES EZEKIEL . . . . . FLOYD, WILLI.k3I ERNEST .... . . GILRUTH, ISAAC NEWTON ........ HALL, ETHELBERT BARKSDALE.. . . HOPKINS, WILLIAM EDGAR ....... HUBBARD, ETHELBI-:RT JACKSON .. HUTCHINSON, XVILLIAM NELSON.. LANGDON, SYLVESTER LARNED, JRC LEAYELL, MANLX' BERRY ......... LEIGH, ARMISTEAD MACON. . . LEITCH, JAMES VICTOR ....... . . LESTER, WILLIAM STEWART ...... LONGEST, CHRISTOPHER ..... MAY, JAMES VERNON ..... MISTEREELDT, EDGAR ..... . .. MYERS, DURHAM XVILSON . .. .. PERKINS, HENRX' TRADER .... .. PILLOW, ROBERT LESSLEY .... . . ..I li' CPA .IA v Il 011 Y' .I Q Y' fb . . W .I V v V If .I .1 40 .Y II' li .-I .I li T E E ......JB. q. E ......lB. 11" ......lB. L. Il' 8 ..... 7. J ..... .l ,l .-I H T A. .1 E ..... I 17 ..... .I ..... E 9 ef.. ..... Clarksdale, Miss .... I Oxford, Miss ..... Harpersville, Miss. . l Oxford, Miss ..... Vicksburg, Miss .... Hazlehurst, Miss . Oxford, Miss ..... Hebron, Miss .... Arkabutla, Miss. . Bolivar, Miss .... Shubuta, Miss .... Yazoo City, Miss. Meridian, Miss. . . Hickory, Miss .... Jaynesville, Miss . . . Columbus, Miss . . Magnolia, Miss ..... Oxford, Miss ..... Greenwood, Miss. Canton, Miss ..... Plum Point, Miss. Gershom, Miss. . . Brookhaven, Miss Jackson, Miss .... Byhalia, Miss .... Senatobia, Miss . . Greenwood, Miss . -. . H, Left Tackle, Class Football Team. Right End, Class Football Team. l l Class Editor of CrIIl'Z'6'I'SI'U' Reford. l Left End, Class Football Team. i Center, Class Football Team. Y Secretary of Class, First Freshman Medal, '96-97. Manager of Class Football Team. --l f Full Back, Class Football Team, Assistant Manager of 'Varsity Baseball Team, Second Base, 'Varsity Baseball Team. 129 Sophomore Class Roll and Statistics-Continued Name. Fra!er1zz'zfj'. Course. Resz'a'e1zre. i lfonors Taken. ROANE, XVILLIAM TEMPLE. . . ROSE, HUGH BROXVN .......... RUTLEDGE, XVILLIAM ORnIsBY .. SEGREST, ROBERT ADONIRAM. . . SHANDS, HARLEY ROSEBOROUGH.. SHARP, ELMER CLINTON ........ SHINAULT, PERCX' ............. SLOAN, PRESTON EDXVARD .... STEWART, Hl'GH h"lCGEHEE . .. SUIIRALL, JOHN HIGDON ....... TAYLOR, LEROY ALEXANDER . .. XVALKER, XVILLIAM BYNUM .... XVATKINS, XVADE LEROY ..... WHITE, CHARLES RUFFIN ...... XVHITFIELD, RICHARD NOBLE .. V J J V ... dz J V .I 111 .l li li .4 A. .l 7 .I ......- ... Il' w In ..... 11' li' la' ..... H ..... B.P... B. A.. . Vaiden, Miss ....... , B.A... B.A... B.A... B. P... B. A.. . Olive Branch, Miss B. A.. . Bayou Sara, La ..... , B.P .. B.A... B.A... Oxford, Miss ....... B. S. . . Mt. Carmel, Miss. . ., Brandywine, Miss .. University, Miss .... Corinth, Miss ...... Oxford, Miss ....... Hazlehurst, Miss . . . B. A.. . Senatobia, Miss . . . Horn Lake, Miss. . . B. P.. . Aberdeen, Miss. . . . . B. A.. . Memphis, Tenn . . . . Pickens, Miss ...... Sub., Right End, Class Football Team. 1' Vice-President of Classy Manager of E 1 Class Baseball Team. President of the Class. g Gymnasium Instructor, Right Half - Back, Class Football Team, Cap- ig tain of Class Football Team. , The Young Ladies are as Follows: HAR.XLSON, BIATTIE . .. ...., HERRON, MARY .... .... KIBIBIONS, KATE .... . . . PHILLIPS, LOUISE. .. ... PRICE, OLA ........... ... RUTLEDGE. FANNIE ..... . WOODS, CECILE ..... . .. WOODS, SUE .... . ..... . WARDLAW, MARNIE ..... . . TJH TJ!-I TJH TJ TJH TJH TJ VV' H H. B.P... B.S... B. S. .. Oxford, Miss. . . . . Oxford, Miss .... Oxford, Miss ..... Ripley, Miss .... S. S. . . Jackson, Miss. . . . B. A.. . jackson, Miss. . . S.S... B.S... B.S... B.P... Biloxi, Miss. . . . . .. Trezevant, Tenn . . . Oxford, Miss ....... Historian of the Class. 130 1 SOPI-IOIVIORE CLASS 1 1 - V J Q.,- .-, ..: ' 4. M ' 1 f . 's - H 4 up X 1 X , 'wx x 1 1 V HEX' . 'AQ ' ,s .' .' X- , ,, .. , .4 fp , . 1 ' TQ-' , ,. ,I .X ,sn l , 3, . -f . A, .V " V . ad' , V ' EJ' -.unix . :"..,,'x . ..A', 1, 'I W -.xg . y, .N .U In X - .ff . '.-u ' " I " iz' 1 qgl lJ 1, ' I I 1 M. '. ' v v rj,,x' u , . , ' ,. . "4 Wg- w . ,. , 1 , .., 1'-0 . , V v "' bfi" 1'-'I' . ' n L X, , ll- - . .4 H ,Ei:'f"':.f is.. ,,-' L Mi. .U Mfg, " , ' ,. ,. . . 41, ,- y. - , .HQ , ',v4 , JI' . "J - .- "f'f.'f..,. .wff ,!"4:.'02'!.'Q.rl' s- J. R. . " '. - " ' 1.'.+'1fi '.I-,M W 'fl' V An r 1 I'-', 5. r 4 1 . 1 'V -r - H'-5-' . .x Y -5.-. Vw I. n.4'y r -fggj f X 1 2 X .SWMAN Q23 W COLORS-Blue and Old Gold. .29 YELL -XVe are the boys that are wide awake, The 1901 class is not a fake. VVe are simply the royal dough, In Virgil, Ovid, and Cicero. .al Officers L. M. RUSSELL . . . President E. S. RAUCH . . . Secretary A. B. LEAVELL . . . Vice-President J. C. KYLE, JR. . . . Treasurer STARK YOUNG ...... Historian S Freshman Class History .25 J' fl- ,f EOPLE say that to write a history of the world, a history of a State, or of any greai thing, you f ' '- must do more than write names, chronicle dates, and narrate events 5 that it is necessary that you X - sum up everything, tell the effects of these things on the progress of the world. So, " Write the History of the Class of IQOI,H they say to an humble scribblerg they allow him one page of " OLE fi' Q 1 1 Miss," in which to tell all the wonderful facts concerning our class: just as if half the number of , good qualities which it possesses, as if half of the stars of glory that lie glittering in its path, as if 23 'g f I the steps by which it mounts to the pinnacle of fame, as if all these could be written of in a page s xg '19 , lylffff, f or in a hundred pages. XXX H I 'V f' So, he must be content with admonishing you fthe worldj to watch this band as it stalks to if W, glory. 'K He that hath ears to hear, let him hear. Selah I" The ninth month, then the tenth came and passed, and left behind their tracks of red and goldg the November moon lent its silver to the red and to the gold. Then the fever's hand was stayed, and the half-a-hundred eager Freshmen crowded into the doors of the University. The poor upper-classmen, when they saw the brilliant path that lay before the Class of 1901, like "women, with hysteria, whose servants have left them during the season of house-cleaning," tore their hair, and said, "Verily, these men are too much for us." Five days passed. They found themselves in the chapel forging the first link that went to make the chain of the history of the class. Other meetings we have had since then, officers have been elected, colors chosen, various clubs organizedg thus each day we forge a link and the chain lengthens. VVe have not had an opportunity to gain our share of honors: "Still is virtue ever its own reward, because, forsooth, it getteth no other"g nevertheless we look forward to our glorious future when the moon of the Class of 1901 shall have eclipsed the smaller satellites of the other classes. VVhen 1901 is come and passed, when the bonds of our class are broken, who doubts but that we go forth from these halls, with lasting love for our Alma Mater and staunch faith in the glorious destiny of lhe class. 134 Freshman Class Roll and Statistics al Ji BENJAMIN VIRGIL CAUSEY, B. S. . . . Ebenezer, Holmes County. ULPIAN EVANS CROSS,B.S. . . . WEHlWmn,CmyComny Hermaean. MARLIN F. COLLIER, B. S., -1 7' . . . . . Oxford, LaFayette County, ERASMUS MANLEY CROXTON, B. A., 'P 1' Heath Springs, Lancaster County, JOHN MIDDLETON FOSTER, B. A., W ll' 7' . . . . Zeiglerville, Yazoo County, Heruiaeau. JAMES ERNEST HARGIS, B. S., fl' 1' . . . . L'niversity, LaFayette County, ROBERT I-IOXVARD HUNTINGTON, B. A., .1 T .I . Okolona, Chickasaw County, GENEVEVE HANSON, B. S. ..... Carrollton, Carroll County, ARTHUR H. JONES, B. S., -I ll' H ....... . University. LaFayette County, Baseball Captain, 1901. ELWYNJTHORNTON JONES, B. A., -I ll' E ..... Hernando, DeSoto County, Hernizeau. YVILLIAM XV. JOHNSON, B.A., -I 7' J ...... . Verona, Lee County, Mauaver of Baseball Team, IQOI. THOMAS STUART JOHNSON, B. S. . .... . Pleasant Hill, DeSoto County EDXVARD HULL KERSHAXV, B. A., fl' 5' . Oxford, LaFayette County, JAMIE DEVEREAUX MAYS, B. P., J ll' H, 0 f . Lula, Coahonia County, VVILLIAM LEROY MATTHEVVS, P. P ..... Oxford, LaFayette County, Orchestra. MONROE GOODBAR MORGAN, B. S., 5' X, 0 5' . . Hernando, DeSoto County, WILLIAM IRVING MCKAY, B. A., S .4 L' . . . . . Tyro, Tate County, Hermaean. 135 Miss Miss Miss S. C Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss JOHN BUNYAN RILEY, B. A., 5 .Y . . Hermaean FRANK ROBERSON, B.A., .1 U' . . . Hermaean. SAMUEL LAMB ROXYAN, B. A. . . . Hermsean. N. F. SCALES, B. A. . . . Hermaean. ANDREW J. SEALE, BA. . . , Hermzean DOYLE SEWARD, B. A. . . . . CORRIE DOVV SMITH, B. A., .1 li' E, di I , JOSEPH A. SPANN, B. S., W .I 6 . . VVILLIAM EVANS STONE, B. A., .I 11' E . . . Hermzean. JOHN N. STANDIFER, B. S., . . . . . Herrnzean. LEE MAURICE RUSSELL. B.S., flf S .... President of Class of 19011 Secretary of Y. M. C. A. Hebron, Lawrence County Pontotoc, Pontotoc County . Wesson, Copiah County Crawford, Lowndes County . Troy, Pontotoc County Ackerman, Choctaw County . Learned, Hinds County Pelahatchie, Rankin County Oxford, LaFayette County Oxford, LaFayette County Dallas, LaFayette Cou11ty ARNAUD BRUCE LEAYELL, B. P., 3 X, fb 2' ...... Oxford, LaFayette County Vice-President of Class of 1901. EDWARD SHELBY RAUCH, B.S., df J 6 ..... . Edwards, Hinds County, Secretary of Class of 1901. J. CURTIS KYLE, B. A., J 7' J ........ Oxford, Sardis, Panola County Treasurer of Class of IQOIQ Hermzean. FANNIE PARSONS, B. S. . . ..... . Natchez, Adams County Class Poet. STARK YOUNG, B. A., 1' -I, 4' 1' ...... Oxford, LaFayette County Class Historian. WILLIAM SPENCER PETTIS, JR., B. A., J ll' lf, 4' -Y .... . Ellisville, Jones County Editor 1901 on Unizfe1's1'z'y Rerord. . GEORGE GADSDEN BOSTWICK, B. S., J T .1 .... . Ripley, Tippah County 136 Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss' EUGENE S. BRAMLETT, B. S., 0 .Y JOHN MAY BROACH, B. S., fl' J 9, W ll . Meridian. Lauderdale HARRY S. BUFORD, B. P., Q A' Y" , . College Hill. LaFayette E. THOMAS BUSH, B. A., .J T .J . . ROBERT HERMAN SULTAN, B.S., ff, '17 f JOHN BURRUS SUTHERLAND, B. A., S A E PERCY P. SUTHERLAND, B.S. . HOWARD DAVIS THAMES, B. A., 0 Y DUNCAN L. THOMPSON, B.A. . HIRAM TODD, B. A., cb 2' . . . Decatur, Newton MISS ENOLA TURNER, B. A., Y T . . Greenville, XVashington County, GEORGE A. YVAGNER, B.A., J ll' E ..... . VVater Valley, Yallabusha County Hermaean. SAMUEL ANDREVV XVITHERSPOON, B. A., Q .1 H . . . Meridian, Lauderdale County, Hermman. A. VVAYNE WADLINGTON, B. A., fl' 2' .... Oxford. LaFayette County 137 . Oxford, LaFayette County County. County, . . Macon, Noxubee County, Oxford, LaFayette County. . University, LaFayette County, . University, LaFayette County . Poplarville, Pearl River County, . Harrison, Tallahatchie County County, M Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Y. AH 71 'I' A. . wa 1 .ut -I . -.1 131. 3754, I '-1 1 1 1 I'- ..v.. L .J. ' ' '- .I ' 5' . 34.14 RJQC4 .i F Ni' N-' " r" 4- .. 'L .Figf ra xx I L J ' Q... 5 , 4 K ., nr, .im ..1,, ,J- 'hr' A .N - gf.' " 44' - vx K r - s '.',", :' Y , if . ' . , .,'. Hx. I.-:I . . , wg, gr. 3, C I N -I . Wi. I a ,- ., Qui, af. ,R fag . ,, -f 1 -' ,171 K , S ,b N E! 'Q F. i' 1t. fr'-5. . xi! 31.5 Aga! .u,.a.1 1 I A- Q FRESHMAN CLASS A. my I n ' . Q ' rT I U IQ' ,W I A ' 'V S ' .Y- .gr , , , u 4 ' . 'Y A ' I., Q. 'auuwh ' C' jx' A vw. .: 43 'y9,'v2 N J, ,.z . 'L Q.. , . -'- ' Q: f ' 5141.-.5-1. Q,4,f. ' 4 - 4: f"f'-'P :nf . h. AR- D .1 Ek' .4 Y 5 Y . .',' .-' X 4 - . 1 4 1 1. A- J.. .I ...k,-!. ., I. Ti' Fa. f , ., .. ..r,,' Y., ,- .'f""-.' v ' 5.1. 7.. '- .I . 2 I-'Q' U. 1-"JH, , pw- on' 3 1'- ,f :Jasc ...N -,ig .'-1'f-.- r-. 2 .yu '. 'ltrgjf ,!- lv- ' .547 x -. """ '- '-2' . ..,q.--- , ,' ,.',,4., -w x V ..,, , .-K' .lr -' ,, J ff f- A '- -' .-"-.-': -. ,-'- ' 1 ,1 qv ,:'."5' Q - , . ,.. .. , v- -'S' .via 'I , . . 'wx u ' ' . . ,. .-?.ff- , .1 .L'.wv.' 'TEQ' 1' '- Y. ,' l !..V. ., xln- , H . - . l A Q 'H'-V. A, . - - 19, if0..,,.".'-1"-' .. ,.M,.Z.,r,x.7I, .V l'....,.L 1 3 . ru'-"7" 'Q " '. 4... .. -v .,,.,. - ..,..T, IEA . x-"Q u -.21 ' -a,..,,,f--., f f ' A.-'44 3- .i.- . f'?,' qflfdq f' pf, -"Nv,.F'4 1. "' - .- --. I .,' ' ' ,,-X., -5 ., ., 5... 4- . "ff L," iv: ' '. - , - m ','x'..vf'f'- ., ' ' . ' .--- ,- - -.f. 4 - 1 - - fd- "- N -V nf ."- ' .' -1.-: . ' '--gf' .- .. .W-.1 .1 '.4f.. f 1. L iv. .-'f' JI' - AQ: ,gli S,Q"fQf ', 21,35-. x,,,. x. tv QV- Y'-, . --'-' N. ...'. -. , ,. -- ' J- . I . " '..x- ".-.-.- . l, rl-. . nr.--V-,1', Q , ,- , X' un' -Q " .. . '- - '4.,N,i. Hvf-4 vi . -1' K 8, , ', . ,. Aw .x ' -, lo " .-. -.7..'w"- .-U, " ".. - 'f,- -' ' ' 1- w ' '4.s. 5, - W1,4 . vy' l- if, , -. ' , . , ", 'e v . - .- , Q -t,..,,.r.1 . -Av ' ,'1'x'- ' . '. . .A -.f ' . - ',,... UI! .""g'f' 1 A R., l , . Z.. I 4 . . . 1 , . f .- 1 K I V f . , I - x r- . - xg' r 4- . . ' I x I . . Senior Law Class .al .29 Officers Al'DLEX' W. SHANDS . . President S. A. BIORRISON . . . Vice-President H. H. BROOKS . Secretary and Treasurer VV. M. HABINER . . . . Historian .al .al History of Law Class of '98 ,. p .ar 4' "1g1z0ra2z!z'a legis 7167712.72601 armsaf." fs 2 . H F the truth of this maxim of the law the Class of '98 can give evidence, evidence, too, which is not hear- 4 i f Q LQ . X say, neither is it presumptiveg cross-examination has too often proven its relevancy and competency, KW "H" has established it as conclusive and strictly in persofzam. XX I I Only seventeen youths we were when Law of '98 first began to breathe the fumes of legal lore, :B on September 12, 1896, we first tackled Blackstone and began to make a history marvelous as 'tis promising. Chroniclers of ages to come will narrate the individual deeds of our heroes: the present historian will say merely that we've surpassed all previous records of the Law School. Grades of 1oo are common. With '98 "om7zz'a presumzuziur rife esse acfaug '98 dOesn't claim to know it all, yet it was necessary when they became Seniors to double the number of instructors in the Law Faculty, in order that they might be taught. It remained for them to give new life and vigorous impetus to Blackstone Clubg to lend increased enthusiasm to college sports and labors, and one of the largest firms of law book publishers in America, recognizing the ability of this Class . I4I of '98, in their junior year offered as a prize to the one who might win it a set of books famous and essential, " The American and English Encyclopedia of Law." '98 was the first class in a life of live decades to effect a bona fide organization, an example which '99 soon followed, and a precedent among many other wise ones, which succeeding classes, noting the doctrine of sfare a7ec1's1's, must regard. The Class of '97, noted for its excellency and copiousness in writing petitions, left '98 this heritage, which they have jealously guarded and increased. The "Lits." of '98 once challenged the aforesaid law class to play baseball, and insisted until it became a nuisance. 'Twas abated, however, and law was satisiiedg its end was attained, though we say naught of the means. The burden of proof is on the " Litsf' In the beginning of the current session the Law Graduating Class for the year was increased to thirty, among the number being minds of various degrees of dullness, some of them j2rz'ma facie wise. We have preachers and orators, we have doctors, professors, and lawyers galore, and when comes the fifteenth of June and thirty more LL.B.'s are turned loose on the South, their parting injunction from the professors will be, " VVell done, thou good and faithful servauts": and in time to come, when other youths read of Mississippians in Congress, they will go to the stone before the Lyceum and see written there in Law of '98 the selfsame names which made their country great. HISTORL-KN. 142 Senior Law Class Roll and Statistics .2525 VVILLIAM LANE AUSTIN, 4' ll' '1", H .Y lf ...... ' .... H arperville. Miss Blackstone Law Club, Associate Editor fvlIfZ'l'l'SI.fj' -llaga:ine'. '95-96 and '96-971 Junior Orator's Medal, 'QOQ Herinrean Representative Mississippi Intercollegiate Oratoxical Association, '96, Senior Debater, '97, President Class, ,971 Presi- dent Mississippi Intercollegiate Oratorical Association, '96-97, Associate Editor "OLE MISS," '97-QS, Current Literature Club. LEX BRAME, IR., 1' .4 H, ............. Jackson, Miss Associate Editor "OLE Miss," '97-'98, Blackstone Law Club, German Club. HARDIN H. BROOKS, J T J ............. Brooksville, Miss Blackstone Law Club, German Club, Secretary and Treasurer Law Class '98, GEORGE PERKINS BONDURANT, .I li' If ,... . . . . Lynchburg, Va Blackstone Law Club, German Club, Current Literature Club. HOWARD "VVHISKERS" BROWN, J lf lv' .......... Memphis, Tenn Blackstone Law Club, Stag Club, '96-97, Orchestra University, '96-97 and '97-98, Glee Club University, '96-97 and ' '97-98, Tennis Club, '96-97 and ,97-QS, one of champions in Double Tennis, '97, Captain Law Football Team, '97, Manager University Baseball Team, '9S. JOHN SHIELDS BURTON, JR., .Y .4 If ,...... Holly Springs, Miss Blackstone Law Club, German Club. VVILLIANI HENRY COOK, fl' ll' V", 0 .Y H ,........... Seale, Miss V, Full-back 'Varsity Football Team, '94-95 and '95-96, Record on Pole-vault, '94-97, Captain of Football Team, '94-95, Manager 'Varsity Football Team, '95-96, Associate Editor "OLE Miss," '98, Blackstone Law Club, German Club. HARDY CLAY DEAR, fl' l1"1" . ..... . Enterprise, Miss Blackstone Law Club. HENRY VVINBOURNE MAGRUDER DRAKE, .I T .I .... Port Gibson, Miss Blackstone Law Club, Current Literature Club. I-I-3 JAMES W. FALKNER .... Oxford, Miss Blackstone Law Club. JOHN M. GATLIN .... Biloxi, Miss Blackstone Law Club. WILLIAM MORRIS HAMNER, J fl, E .......... Water Valley, Miss Salutatorian Sophomore Class, ,953 Sopl1omore Second Medal, '95, Senior Debater, '96, Phi Sigma Representative Missis- sippi Intercollegiate Oratorical Association, '96, President Class, '96, Associate Editor Magazine, '96-97, Associate Editor "OLE MISS," '96-97, Blackstone Anniversarian, '97, Vice-President German Club, Current Literature Club, Historian Blackstone Law Club, '9S. CLIFFORD ESMOND HARRIS, .... VVater Valley, Miss Blackstone Law Club. SAMUEL RALPH KNOX, 2' .Y ........ New Albany, Miss Blackstone Law Club, Tennis Club. R. D. LANIER, 4' ll' 'I' . .... Brookhaven, Miss Blackstone Law Club. GORDON GARLAND LYELL, .I 'IQ H .V lf, li' li' li' Chess Club, President Tennis Association, Second Sophomore Medal, '93, Associate Editor Magazine, '94-95, Editor- in-Chief, ,QS-96, Hermzean Senior Medal, '96, first place of three Representatives for Tulane Debate, '96g First Honor and Valedictorian Literary Class, '96, Manager Football Team, '96 and '97, Editor-in-Chief "OLE MISS," '96-97, Business Manager Magazine, ,96-97, German Club g Current Literature Club. HUGH KIRBY MAHON . .... Hudsonville, Miss. Blackstone Law Club. BEN T. MARKETTE .... W'ater Valley, Miss. Blackstone Law Club. S. A. MORRISON, 1' .4 lf .......... Grenada, Miss. Blackstone Law Club, Vice-President Law Class, '98. 144 HUGH M. MCINTOSH .... Blackstone Law Club JOHN GRAY MILLSAPS . . . . . Blackstone Law Club FRANCIS HARLEY PEPPER . . . . . Blackstone Law Club. LEE VINCENT RUSSELL .... Blackstone Law Club AUDLEY WILLIAM SHANDS, .I li' If ..... . Edinburg, Miss . Cairo, Miss Vaughan's Station, Miss . Vicksburg, Miss . . University, Miss Associate Editor Magazine, '93-94, Stag Club, '95-96 and '96-973 Treasurer Tennis Club, Phi Sigma Anniversarian, '95, I one of Champions in Double Tennis, ,QS-96Q Single, '97, Phi Sigma Senior Medal, '96, one of Representatives to Tulane Debate, '96, German Club: President Law Class, '98, University of Mississippi Representative in Southern Intercollegiate Oratorical Association, '97 3 Associate Editor " OLE MISS," 983 Blackstone Law Club. TOM M. SHELTON . . . . . Blackstone Law Club . Union Church, Miss JOHN HARVEY THOMPSON, JR., J W, H .V E, ll' li' If ........ Jackson, Miss Tennis Club, Chess Club, '96-973 German Club, Blackstone Law Club, President Current Literature Club. VVILLIAM B. VVATKINS, f -l' . .... , . Aberdeen, Miss Blackstone Law Club. FREDERICK MILTON WEST, J ll' H .......... VVater Valley, Miss Tennis Club, '96-97, University Orchestra, '96-97 and '97-98, Glee Club, '96-97 and '97-98 g Blackstone Law Club. I45 ur Q1 M ' - 4 'Hun 2-3? '4 ul f-g,,-.--. :V , A f.,--U,,,, A , . fgurm 'ff '-. . ' ' 4 n ,. . ,-- . , ,KJ t'f. ... ' ' . ' v' f ,.' .V . - . ,Q J ..A"f-1 .1LQl' . '. "-4,'.Q-J N ' - -. . 1 1 . .-f?,.'1 x , , ' Q ' Q pq ,iv V.. pf ' - . 1' , '. ' 1 "'-..,-.+.'.'45'..'v ' -2-9, hiu. . .N X, - 4' -. -1, ,rv .--. -' Y bf' :- - ." f ' v '- rf 's yall... , - V.. '.v,.,,-,N ' J ' . F., gtk E I - I tu'-:J .:- ' 'gg .. 4,4'r.-ff I - Q-" 231-f.g,u-1 .'-Mufhfl ., f ., , v rn x 1 , :JI 'u ' X va-' ed zfc' Y.. , J"l p 'a -...,5.,'--- ' V51 f""'1"3 P- lv .... MH ' ', M: -. gyvfr 5 '11 .4 , zu.- -' . .Mr ' . a. ,Jyfj Lf' pi. 4. 'Wu at . J. .r44. 1-,U '. P .--,ffl 5 , l 1 ' . 4,:'.-xv ".-- - 1. x. 17' - '-- ,f lg.,- 'l fm: 1 -fir, ,:V 'xJ.'- 1"- f.Fx1"',' ,. f ' .-,nr -nt' 'D I-' I :'.,i.,'?'-Z -x -' 1 1 . Hr 'v , Q j, ,. 'wif ' Ag". 'LL ,Li 'JL-,. "Nw L' 'K 4. IZ 5' . ' - 4 Y . ' ' 1 " '-1 f , t . , . . .,. 1 . Il- 1 ix . A' 1 I 5 A . . -V' .Q . g,..v,-, . 'l ANI l', ' as. -.5 .N.. 4" 'pn-'r , , -5 - , ,f,.,..':.x--, . - - . f r an 'r-- 4 , ' ,,. ' ' 'j",f.', ' -' '.' " 1 w u" Lynx A ,H ' , 1 x .41 ,I ,-ff.: . -,,u. .-.4 3---'.H' ' 4 .1 ,u' I' t" ' -. "gi-.2 ' "'. .r.- v, . - Q. . . iff. I SI 5,15 byvi X 'vf ' : ii' ,T-L-'."f' J' ' ' x " Q, , 4' -.' , I IN 'JY.,!-'lf 'fl P I ' My .54 I4 V- ' ' ,I . 1 . ' - ' + A -1 ' Q-'fr' 4--'Ns-15. :Q x,4,z..,-.N.,f W ,,-.",,,J.f"-"1 ', ff,- . ""A g'.",t .. --' 'L '91 ' " -- -..'a " K' '- '-' -'C' ,. . . , r. ... , -, r . . . ' , 5 ' - '- I' Y,-, '.' ' ' - w -, , ' 'N ,' nvu 1.. . ' !'A . . ' x A Q 'a 'xg ,Q htm. ,lv -LN-1"fQ U ,.- ,A V ,X .u u. ' 1 nik 5 I f SENIOR LAW CLASS fi! '11- ,. 4 Q 1 ' 4 I . . - . 1 . W-a .. I :':-l 0' . w .- 14 'lf 4. . vq'- - ,, . ' Q Slot: A. a 4 J '. 5 ci .. gf., 4' V: 11.4, ,. fu. 3 . N., .I h s., I T' v -.. i . 1gq ' s V ' ' s-:I "W: "' .v ,Q L ' P ' - b - pf-ea 5 15 ' 'vt , lv ',.. . .1 rv vo -.-. J Q L-s-. .. ,-c. Sk' .153 unior Law Class .af .af Officers W. B. RICKS . . . . . . President WALTER WEATHERBX' . . Vice-President J. E. HOLMES . . Secretary and Treasurer R. E. WILBOITRN . . . . Historian .al v Junior Law Class History HE Junior Law Class, exclusive of those taking the double course, is composed of one more than a score of members, fully one-third of whom are graduates of this or of some other institution. More than one-fourth of them have taught school, and all are of such an age and deportment as bespeak a reasonable familiarity with the ways of the world. In the words of an old saw, some are wise, some otherwise, but it is matter for congratulation that for each and every member of the class, upon condition of his exercising proper diligence, there is a fair prospect of success and happiness in his chosen profession. As the Blackstone and Class Moot Courts have been this year combined, owing to the shortness of the session, no Juniors have as yet appeared as attorneys in any of the cases assigned for trial, only Seniors being allowed to practice in the class courts. They have, however, done faithful service as jurymen and chaplains, and they are awaiting their day in court next session with more or less impatience. In the contest for anniversarian of the Blackstone Society, participated in by three Juniors, Mr. J. E. Holmes was awarded the honor, while many nice compliments were passed upon the efforts of all the young orators who represented the class upon the occasion of its first public appearance. He who reads will see elsewhere in the pages of " OLE Miss," interesting statistics concerning the individual members of the class, so, this simple record need not be further extended. That the future history of each and every one of this little band of coming attorneys may record deeds worthy of grateful remembrance on the part of the Nation and characteristic of the followers of lofty ideals, is the earnest hope of every truly interested friend. 149 unior Law Class Roll and Statistics JAMES MILLER ARNOLD. c. T. EECKETT. A K E . J. W. P. BOGAN . . . H. W. c.aRoTHERs, A I A . . . da' German Club. 'Vice-President of Y. M. C. A. 1 Track Team. '95-'97: Manager of Track Athletics, '9Sg University Baseball Team. '98. WILLIAM ARTHUR cox .... H. A. GAssow.u' R. J. GRISHAM . 'WALTER J. GEX L. L. HENINGTON, K A . . J. ELMORE HOLMES, 2 x, Q N E . . Vice-President Tennis Association 1 Secretary of Junior Law Class, Anniversarian-elect for '99. T. G. IX Y, B. A., A lx E .... HARPER JOHNSON, B.A., .X K E . . German Clubg Liceutiate in University of Mississippi. '97-95. DUKE M. KIMBROUGH, B. A., E X, 9 N E First Sophomore Medal, '941 Associate Editor of L'nz':'ers1'L1' Record, '9S. P. M. KING, A K E ..... German Club. XV. B. RICKS, A. M. lGeorgetown College J, A 'l', 9 X E, K K K . . President of Law Class of '992 President of German Club, Orchestra, '98. C. XV. ROLAND . . . . . HENRY SPIGHT, S X . J. MURPHY THOMAS, 2 A E . XV. F. TURNER, U 9 ll - - - XVALTER XVEATHERBY, 'I' A 6, 9 N E - R. E. XVILBOURN, B.A., M. A., A T A, G N E German Club. Vice-President of Law Class of '99. Hermzean Senior Medal, '95: Salutatorian of Class of ,952 Fellow in English and History. '95-'96, '96-'97: Editor in Chief of " OLE 150 XVallthal, XVest Point, Fulton, Tupelo, Harrison, New Albany, Ashland, . Biloxi, . Tryus, . . . . . . . . Plum Point XVest Point, - - - - . Senatobia, Oxford, Durant, Canton, . . . . . . Poutotoc, Ripley, Shannon, . . Carrollton , Durant, . . . . . . . . . Scooba, Miss," '98. Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss. Miss. Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss. Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Q 9 1-ii -L - -f-A li- lil Ni?" il Q? 'ff' 5- lth ll I 1 ' ' V iii! qrirf' - 'N-...gy nandiii yi'-M www -- "' -. nm gf!!-'h.,, As . 13,5 .l' 1 1-xg. V, .. 1, ' on I ., . -, 1 , Aw- . . - . 4, H.. Xl- F-.ilxl r 1-as.: 5-sta.-sk EQSBDQ rant: Xb: xii :fini ujwimsq 1? Q,sl " JUNIIOR LAW CLASS 'NMI V .gl :www . ' J " Corinna at the Bath." A Sonnet .5 IAFTER OVID.J Tiptoe upon the marble steps she stands, Her raven hair in many a ringlet falling, Behind her stately head clasping her hands As some fair ocean nymph that o'er the sands Paces at eve, to some wild spirit calling. Another step, and then her rosy feet Have touched the edges of the scented stream g With eager haste the perfumed waters greet 'Her coming, as the goddess of their dream. Deeper she goes, and now the wave recoils And back in quivering tiny ripples flees, Intoxicate with beauty, now it boils XVith passion as it clasps her shapely knees, And now into its passionate embrace The maiden yields, and in its liquid arms Sinks, the embodiment of Roman grace, The fair Corinna with her myriad charms. O if it be a melancholy truth That in no future life my soul shall live, That in no spirit land eternal youth The blest elixir of the gods can give g O if it be when my short life is spent, .al The past! ah why does joy so thrill the soul, To think of by-gone days? 'Tis there repose The hopes, the dreams, of what was onceg a rose That blooms in men1ory's field, a sweetened whole. To-day, each youthful hope, once loved so well, That soared the luring skies, but blighted fell 3 Each boyish dream and fancy. robed so gay In airy nothingness, has passed away, And now we find that these, like all delights, XVere never known 'till gone, as Hitting lights. But, O memory, thou, too, hath a bitter sting! Some hideousness is couched beneath thy bowers 1 And from thy echoing bell doth sometimes ring A, strain which saddens all thy scented flowers. The decree of nature that I love no more, in But on this narrow World's space-bounded shore 3 Return to some primeval element, i Then let the cooling river be my path, ",, JAM? That I may chance to fill Corinna s bath. 153 I. The rose or her lip- Say which is the redder! Which sweeter to sip, The rose or her lip? With the honey they strip Surely wild bees have fed her! The rose or her lip- Say which is the redder! Triolets 5.29 III. Young Cupid, the traitor, Has cloven my heart. Each wise woman-hater Young Cupid, the traitor, W'il1 sooner or later Transiix with his dart. Young Cupid, the traitor, Has cloveu n1y heart I IV. Blue eyes that forbid, Red lips that consent! Why, the lashes have hid Blue eyes that forbid! And I-well, I did- I think, what you meant, Blue eyes that forbid, Red lips that consent! T54 Her bosom touched mine, As we moved in the dance, With a languor divine. Her bosom touched mine XVith the fire of old wine Of the vintage of France! Her bosom touched mine, As we moved in the dance In Football Times .29 .29 HE girl with the orange and blue ribbons streaming from her gayly decorated cart smiled triumph- . antly at the demure figure sitting in the trap opposite. The red and blue streamers Huttered around Q X j I ,,,,,ya the quiet little form in an awed and subdued sort of fashion, for the Louisiana State University team had W fulfilled the expectations of its supporters by scoring against the Mississippi eleven in the first half X jf ' i ff of the great Vicksburg game. The big fellow who sat by the side of the dainty Mississippi enthusiast - looked solemnly and thoughtfully across the white-barred gridiron formed in a wide, irregular band, A? formed of grandstand, bleachers, boxes, tally-ho's, and a three-deep line of eager humanity against the f-' ropes, to where a crowd of Louisiana " rooters " were shouting all sorts of incomprehensible things to the ,- accompaniment of a number of foghorns, which made the tantalizing " rah, rah" of the jolly Baton Rouge ' men more irritating than ever to his ardent Mississippi soul. A pair of the truest, bluest eyes in the world on "J ' looked bravely up into his clouded face, and a low voice whispered: "Never mind, Teddie, just wait until i f our half-back tries some of his bucks in the next half. We will beat them yet." The big fellow smiled, and whispered something in her ear that made her cheeks grow red and her eyes shine like two jolly, happy stars. But at the same time he realized that Mississippi's chances of winning were very small, and he remembered a roll of greenbacks in an envelope at the Carroll House that he wished was safely back in his almost empty pocket. When the umpire blew his whistle for the end of the first half, the Wearers of the orange and blue took one long breath, and then broke forth in such a pandemonium of joy as only a football crowd can make, for the score stood six to nothing for Louisiana. The girl in the cart still smiled condescendingly at the girl by his side, and he could see that the Louisiana man who accompanied her was grinning at them both in quite a patronizing manner. He bit his lip angrily. He had just determined to brace up, and was telling the owner of the wide-open blue eyes that " perhaps our boys will pull us out of the hole," when the " beastly Louisiana crowd" on the other side of the field sent their yell racketing through space. He glanced up quickly, and looking down that way saw one of the Louisiana half-backs speed down towards the Mississippi goal, turning over three ambitious youngsters, with red and blue jerseys on, as he ran, and place the ball behind Mississippi's goal posts for Louisiana's second touchdown. And then the whole scene, with its fluttering orange and blue Hags, and all its shouting Louisiana men, grew hateful to him, and he wanted to 155 fi' - Q- go over to where those tin horns were and knock somebody down with something heavy. He actually hated the pretty Louisiana girl in the cart opposite, who waved an orange and .-I Sf' -V -aj? I if f L "'Vj",'ii,Q ' lm:....mvg,. X -ff 'i ffs Y V, A X, blue Hag towards him and laughed-yes, really laughed at him and his companion! He remembered that roll at the Carroll and frowned, but a soft little hand caught his own as it lay amid the folds of his overcoat, and gave it a quick, warm pressure, while a pair of dear lips murmured, " That's all right, Teddie, our fellows will win the game for us yet." The ball was in the possession of the Louisiana men, and they had done such good E52 " ' f- service that the ball was once more far into the Mississippi territory. But the wearers of ,Q Qri5'7 ',:' 2 the blue and red made their last stand. Yainly the opposing line hurled itself against ' 5 them. Neither through the center nor round the end could they go. "Third down," said "flu ' 'L I the umpire, and from the supporters of the red and blue there came a mighty and increas- - p i f y ing howl of joy. as the ball went to Mississippi. ' fly, ' H But the Louisiana goal is very, very far away, and those fellows in orange and blue ' ff' 'K are terribly strong and quick. The ball is given to the heavy half-back. The forwards endeavor to make a hole for I by him. One down, no gain. The ball is given to the other half for a try around the end, V ? gi but one of the Louisiana men breaks through and tackles him behind the line. Two downs, no gain. i 'A 374, Then from the ranks of the faithful supporters of the red and blue there goes a despairing groan. It looks as ifthey never will make it. The signal is given again in a loud, ff, ' clear voice, and the ball passed to the low, stockily-built half. The interference is formed A splendidly, and down the field the half-back goes followed by his out-distanced pursuers, . u, while the frantic crowd, breaking through the ropes, scarcely give him time to make his touch-down before they surround him. And how the "rooters" strained their voices to T f the hi hest itch of endurance! l ' , g P Back to the middle of the field the ball goes, and in a few minutes it is again I X If 'ff in the possession of Mississippig and then the fellow in the trap smiled and took .nf X ,ff I heart. Anxiously he watched the Mississippi men throw themselves against the Q4 i Loiiisia1ia line, and to his delight he saw that line giving away inch by inch. The eff? X' X WX, 'I ball was slowly but steadily creeping down the field towards Louisiana's goal. The 'L ml A' thirty-yard line is passed, the twenty-tive, the twenty. XYill they be able to score 156 another touchdown, and thus tie the score? His brown eyes smiled down into the happy face by his side with some- thing of hope in them, but he saw the Louisiana man in the opposite cart look at his watch and nod reassnringly to the girl at his side, and, looking at his own watch, he realized that, play as they would, Mississippi would not have time to make another touch-down before time was called. And yet he hoped against hope. The little hand that again pressed his own was not withdrawn this time. It was too dark now for anyone to see, and somehow it comforted him to know that she was near and understood. The dear little form bent closer and closer to him-perhaps because it was colder, and perhaps because-well, who knew, any way? He needed sympathy, and it comforted him to have her near-so very near. And somehow he did not feel half as bad as he had thought he would when the horrid horns announced that Louisiana had won. Through the dusk he thought he saw the triumphant smile of the pretty Louisiana girl as she and her escort were driven rapidly away from the scene of their late victory: but a dear, loving hand pressed his own, and a dear little form nestled nearer and nearer to him, while a dear, sweet voice-the one that had sustained him through all his recent disappointment-said with a brave little ring to it: " Never mind, Teddie, you've won me lately, and that's something, isn't it?" And I, for one, agree with what Teddie told her-his lips almost touching her fair, soft cheek-" that winning a brave little friend like her was worth all the football games that were ever lost or won." ..- -,...',.,, 1.-1-g--f.-,,. 1 YY sI,2.gf.1s:,: W Y Y Y Y T-'0 1-'f-'oh ' 'ij ' X .4 . ,Q H it W N A J 3 1-.-.'-5'-'-IFN: ' ' rl 'st s ' nib , Avi? :j:2::,'.-" :tix 5 -A T X--R - FA.. X X YY Y Z vt o. - el 1191. i f, 7 QQ X ' - . W' x W'--f.. .-,- v V 5'-' 5 QR Qiir 'WTO '-it - A-"Iffaa'L1i: ,-. .. 5-.2 . f i x , fan: 'Lux 4' '. . ' Q s?,gfI-ffswffgxo -:- z.f, - f' vnu- 'Q X '- s i V' - 3 W ,X ' ,ply i lL I. W fa' 6 . yf v kgabwewat 9 i f fi" -32:5 39 NT JT r 1 ' ,.,'.r ,-,'. f if i . j 31:12. 13:25 - 157 ' - J' 555512 1. . U Q gm U4 tiff. " ' r W W W2 Hthlelic Departmentawa 5 ESQ gsm Football Officers Elected for 'Varsity Team of 1897 G. G. LYELL ......... Manager H. F. FISHER . Assistant Manager H. D. PRIESTLEY ........ Captain On account of the delayed opening of the University, due to the yellow fever epidemic, there was no Varsity team. .98 KRETSCHMAR, Manager CAMPBELL . . BELL . FISHER STEVENS HINTON SMYLIE . PRIESTLEY, Captain . PORTER, LIPSCOMB . SHIPP . . H.LXRDX' . '98, Fulton. Game played December 4, 1897. Class Teams 'oo ' Left End GILRUTH Left Tackle . LONGEST Left Guard . CONN Center . HOPKINS Right Guard . SHARP Right Tackle . RICHMOND Right End . DAVIDSON, RUTLEDGE Quarter HOLMES Right Half LEITCH, Manager Left Half WHITE, Captain Full NIYERS Substitutes 'oo, Shancls, Miller, Edmonds, Sloan. Score-'98, 163 'oo, Io. 160 5 SENIOR CLASS FOOTBALL TEAM. fx . 5'A ,,s-,,,' WU., .1- , vi-4 ,P , -,XA fx. ,, qui i, V I'-Li' x-.fi '- KQJ' ' z ,ir ' X :NPL , "-'.' 'JV . -ff" . in ' jK,q4."',5 1. -f:-4?-p A. 31' -1,5 rfxlf' : '. I p, x".-'-ll 1 , 1 . . 1, sq., rt J cl' f 5'-,'.-V' , , ., .. 1 - ian' 0 ' ' .l A., '-71' v ' I I 5 'fc 5. .-, 'fav ..-,- 4 I -'. .-..,'- ' n . - 1 1 A ' '." -v , . ' n' '.'-JV -' .- N 1. !.',..vw..' ,J,l, . L Aer , .A V- yak x -' yn , 1- N I -5-v-b 4"-'-?":' iyii . ' '. 1..,J..,.:-,mv .. .R ,' L' 'A ','r-vi ia . . I . . "" ' 4 .4 ,- ' - ." -. 7 x .4,ffy.'--- ' e -us-. .--4,11-' 'K'-' -1' il' '. 'n,"'fv'. r"" ' . .. ins b , . V ,., lv ul .. F- 1 2- nj 4 ,. .Kg . V-4' 1.-' K X A . .qi W8 s Q v F - , lf. - .A - L .' . ' ' "' ' 4 '-rl ' ' ' - 'I I . I- -.a , I Q ' .x. ' n A ' W 1. ' 1 4 ., ' 1 Q In -'N '3 :hifi ,sqf- ,-. ' 'Z ' . .H , . 1, . X- 5. t' n, 'JM . flv "9 I -- vx . 1 dji' M -' ' 'I r-Q U.. ,-I dv A, . '- H ' 1,7 5 1 .h .ESQ A rg". ov, 1 ' - 3.n. 4 ' 3 1 U-,A , - Baseball Q29 .93 'Varsity Team for 1898 H. W. BROWN ........ Manager W. D. MYERS . Assistant Manager S. M. JONES . . . . Captain C. P. PERKINS . Left Field. S. M. JONES . . Catcher J. R. MCDOWELL . Center Field. W. W. JOHNSON . . Pitchers H. W. CAROTHERS Right Field. L. HARDY . A. JONES . . Short Stop. E. B. GIBSON LAMAR HARDY First Base. J. J. WHITE . Substitutes W. D MYERS Second Base. H. SHANDS . J. F. POPE . Third Base. W. P. KRETSCHMAR . . OmClal Scorer 5 Games Played, '97 S fofe University vs. St. Thomas Hall . 9 to o at University Miss University vs. S. W. B. University . I2 to 4 at University Miss University vs. St. Thomas Hall . I2 to 2 at Holly SPl'iUgS, Miss University vs. A. and M. College . 2 to 5 at C0ll1l11bl1S Miss University vs. A. and M. College o to O at University Miss +Forfeited. 1 0 163 Class Teams J' J 1898 B. S. RICKS. Manager JONES, Catcher HARDX', Captain, Pitcher PRIESTLEY, First Base SHIPP, Second Base POPE, Third Ba se GIBSON. Short Stop B. S. RICKS, Left Field RAY, Center Field KRETSCHMAR, Right Field 1899 PATRICK HENRY XVHITE, Catcher PERKINS, Captain, Pitcher LOVE, First Base DAVIS, Second Base , JR., Manager MCFARLAND, Third Base SMITH , L. A., Short Stop SMITH, F. H., Left Field INICDOWELL, Center Field INICGEI-IEE, Right Field SCORE-'98 vs '99, 8 to IO 164 RRS- G72 -Ju VARSITY BASEBALL TEAM ,eg a s, W . o n s oy ' lb .-I ,X , - Y. 1 r J if , iw' . 1 4 , u .., f lg., . 1'-pd A 1 1' I ' Jed' x , , 4 .x ' 4 1 ,V v 1 A 4 'E'- 14, TENNIS CHAMPIONS . . .- -A . ,Kg .- ' 'I ' .W J 1 ' 'M ', I 'x 'U 4 4. x V , . 'ol' W u W M In va. vnu A mv ' ' H. W. BROWN A. W. SHANDS Tennis Association G. G. LYELL J. E. HoLIIES A. NV. SHANDS . . J .25 Officers . . . President . Vice-President . . . Secretary-Treasurer Executive Committee G. G. LYELL, Chairman S. R. KNOX B. S. RICKS L. M. KAHN R. H. LAKE G. G. LYELL N. F. SCALES S. L. ROYVAN J. E. EDMONDS J. E. HOLMES A. W. SHANDS A. H. JoNES R. H. HUNTINGTON J. MURRY M. L. PERKINS Members S. R. Kxox G. P. BoNDI'RA.NT C. W. HINTON H. W. BROWN E. B. HALL M. L. PERKINS B. S. RICKS S. WITHERSPOON P. P. SUTHERLAND M. SMITH P. H. SAUNDERS T. O. MABRY Track Team for 1897 .al .al Members H. W. CAROTHERS L. Mc. PORTER ROY ROGERS G. P. JONES T. R. BISHOP B. NICFARLAND M. G. FULTON G. C. BEANLAND D. MILLER C. W. HINTON G. D. MCLEAN .22 Events IOO Yards Dash-BISHOP first, JONES second. Time, II seconds. 220 Yards D3Sh-BISHOP first, JONES second. Time, 23 seconds. 440 Yards DHSD'-MCF.fXRL-AND first, FULTON second. Half-Mile RUN-FULTON first, HINTON second. Mile Rull-MILLER first. Time, 5 minutes and IO seconds. Running High Jump-BISHOP first, JONES second. Distance, 5 feet, 1 inch. Running Broad Jump-BEANLAND first, ROGERS Second. Distance, IQ feet, 1 inch Throwing 16-lb. Hammer-CAROTHERS first. Distance, 84 feet. Putting 16-Ib. Shot-CAROTHERS first, MCLEAN Second. Distance, 34 feet, I inch. I2O-Yafd Hurdle-PORTER Erst, BEANLAND Second. Time, 20 seconds. Pole Vault-BEANLAND first, JONES second. Distance, 9 feet. 168 i l" ,A 4 x , uf dn, 4 ,Q 3 'IIB TRACK TEAM u" I 4. I 5, '-A . 'arf' y. i. 'E . 4 O 1 1 'Y F' 'L Y M. fw 1 1, . ,,,.4.., Z ' GJ . -'-A v ' '-4.'-.-"'3. 1 ...I 5 4 w ' P' -.' P Q vk V ,nl -1 1 , . , 4 I , a . , , .H , ,Jfqv ,gg I A 'vrf 3, 'n 'QQ' 4 l,x ""0 A ' f.,t C-V-fl 4 v' HJ x . .5- -.f 'N ' I . ,n , A Y -- wiix., in ff. My r I IJ sv v , . -AJ v fl 1 ' 4 . I W, N , .sk I 'ry. I .Q .. -6 -,4 z .f A ! . . 4 ,r Q x w fx I1 K N A 5.. ., -. 1 1 Q-5 . x K, pri S. P X ' 44- ' 'xl' 4 O L, . 1 4 1 E37 N' .pf . ' 5 '-Yu' ' v f 9 r , , n 0 . 4' - 'K YL' " ' 4.4 .. . 1' 'K1 -3 ' ".'K'. 5 'AHF Ax," .' ' ,Jw-A: .xi-if "TEH 'r, P -1 fx V.. fe ff: INx 1 Y "-..".. '.' 4 L . 1- 2 . , . , . x - " - I'-s-nh' 1.1.1 r, .L 1 -,.' . x . .4 y X .Y lL M 'Vs v'-- . ,v ..e, , ff-Qfi'1Q5av -2 'V 'it' 'Q-"'K If sf' I ' A Q s ' .,Q'1-53' -. 'u , '. -4-'r . . If l .:-s- "wi " fi ' bfi Jw.-if I I r YY" :WL ul . 1 4 - , 6. ..!A, 1 - ,.'.'-y x ' -4-UE .ya .I 1..L . -0 ' 'rL', .l i.,,. ,far 35:1 f IA-,A X . 'Tw CA CHA NCEL.L.OR'S RESIDENCE LIBRARY AND CAMPUS I O ', rl , ,- s . I .I G, .- . fa- . 15 L .4-, A .'."1 :J-Y' 1. fn'-J Cf- ,J- -Q ,f - ' '- 4, .-,L .-K '- .'v-.J ,-- A 'r I , 5 1 1 Desolation .25 J' In the midmost might of the summer, And the blush of the day may be fairer In the warm high tide of the year, Than the gardens in God's paradise, As gay as minstrel or mummer, And the song of the birds may be rarer The glory of blooms may appearg Than the cherubini songs in the skiesg And the lips of the wind with its kisses May thrill like the taste of the wine, And the earth may offer its blisses With the smile of the sunlight a-shineg But never for me will they render For the darkness of death is made splendid A tingle of pleasure again, By your face, as the dark of the night And never my heart beat tender By the moon, with the stars attended, At the lisp of the summertime rainy And beauty from earth has ta'eu flight. 173 tx fa.. If .-., . '-5:3 f! 7 r X Statistics .aid N making up the following statistics, the committee encountered a great many difliculties. Not only was it impossible to reach all the 111611 in college, but a great many refused to fill up the question blanks, while many others handed in replies which, in their endeavor to make facetious, they had rendered utterly worthless. Then, again, quite a number of the blanks, when returned to the committee, contained answers to only a few of the questions. These causes combined served to diminish the number of replies, and in proportion to lessen the value of the statistics. The committee believe, however, the following to be a reasonably accurate average of the views and personal characteristics of the student body and accordingly present them to the public Dulx impressed with the xx eight and importance which the world at large attaches to dress one of the first questions asked was Who is the biggest dude in college? To a query of this 'Qwf . 1 f 'xr-I i NLL 1 X Q A , I" C", , if s aff - - !f I ll'.'H, .V 1 ' X 1' I . YY I I . ! N ,I NX,r, ll 4 . j U . . . ,, . f' , . "ii 1 A . " . . . . ' -AQQ I3 Mfg! nature, the vote was necessarily scattered, but as replies came in thicker and thicker, one name began to loom my I J into prominence. Wlieii the final count was made, Mr. G. P. Bondurant received a distinct majority, and is, x,b,j"f , . . .. . .. A 'A .'- 1 4 ' - therefore entitled to all the honor and distinction appertannng to his exalted position Mr. C. T. Beckett, of VVest Point, is adjudged by the majority to be the best-looking man in college. As in the preceding contest, there were many competitors for this honor, though in the end the battle narrowed down to two. It was long doubtful whether Mr. Beckett would carry off the palm, Mr. J. E. Holmes making a fine sprint for the goal. Mr. Holmes received second place. Another important question was as to who was the most popular man at the University. Here Mr. S. M. Jones led from the start, and won by a handsome majority. Miss Ella Clingan, of Jackson, was declared the most popular "co-ed." The next to be entitled to a seat in our "Temple of Fame" is Mr. R. E. Wilbourn, of Scooba, who is pronounced by the popular verdict to be the most intellectual person in the student body. It is no mean honor to be held the most intellectual of the bright minds assembled here, and We tender Mr. Wilbourn our congratulations and assurances of respect. Mr. G. G. Lyell, of Wesson, came in second. ' The result of the balloting for the greatest sleeper was that Dr. C. C. Ferrell was thought to be entitled to this honor, and he won by a handsome majority. Mr. Lee McGehee Porter, of Jackson, completely outdistanced all competitors in the race for the greatest lady- killer, and won in a walk over all others. '74 Mr. W. Lane Austin was distinguished as the best writer, Mr. XV. H. Hamner as the best orator, Mr. L. P. Leavell as the best declaimer, and Mr. G. G. Lyell as the best debater. Mr. A. W. Shands was declared the most egotistical man in the University. It must be said, however, that Mr. Shands had numerous close rivals for this honor, and it was not without a struggle that he won. His closest opponent was Mr. L. M. Kahn. The count showed that Mr. H. D. Priestley, of Canton, was considered the best musician in college. Mr. J. R. McDowell, of Holly Springs, had a large majority of the votes for the funniest man. The race for the most graceful dancer was a close one. There were many competitors, but the race finally narrowed down to two-Mr. H. D. Priestley and Mr. J. F. Pope-and the result was that each of these gentlemen received the same number of votes. As there seemed to be no way of settling this tie, we had to let it stand. The race for the biggest flirt also resulted in a tie between Mr. A. G. Roane and Mr. J. H. Thompson. Mr. Lex Brame and Mr. C. A. Dougherty ran neck and neck for the honor of being the biggest crank in the University. Mr. Brame managed to beat Mr. Dougherty by the close margin of one vote. The decision as to the laziest man seemed to be reached without much trouble, as Mr. M. L. Perkins was practically without opposition. Mr. Webb Williams also seemed to have a number of his friends who regarded him as the freshest man in the University, so that honor was duly awarded him. But the man who most completely outdistanced all his competitors was Mr. XV. P. Kretschmar, in the race for the most bow-legged man. There were other contestants besides Mr. Kretschmar, but this gentleman won, receiving something like four-fifths of all the votes cast. Various and novel were the opinions regarding the greatest need of the University. The conclusion reached by the majority was that money was the need most felt. With praiseworthy devotion, six-sevenths of the voters had remained true to the girls they left behind them. The other one-seventh, however, freely confess that they have been unable to withstand the charms of our fair sirens, and have transferred their allegiance to some University damsel. Sixteen-seventeenths of the voters admitted that they flirted. While this question was not asked on the voting blanks, yet we feel that we can safely say that ninety-eight per cent of the students have spent during the year all the money they could scrape up. This closes the statistics, and if they prove of interest to the reader, the committee will feel amply repaid for the time and trouble spent in collecting them. Srarrsrrcs COMMITTI-:r-3. 175 The vagrant western breezes blow, And dally with the whispering corn, The meadows gleam in gold and red, The clover nods its plume-d head, And floating clouds as white as snow, Eternal seas of blue adorn. September .25 .29 O love of mine, this summer weather Mocks me now for summers dead I No fleecy clouds and azure skies Are lovely as thy sunny eyesg No goldenrod on field and heather Makes summer when our joys have fled O royal June, could ever reign, NVith endless years beneath his sway, Could he unite this waiting heart To thine, O Love, no more to part, Our summers then would never wane, And life be one long holiday! But june is dead. His lavish hand Is cold as Winter's icy breath 3 And none remember now to say That june was royal in his day. And e'en the flowers that deck the land Shall withered lie eftsoons in death. 176 But winter can not chill the love That lives within that heart of thine, Nor dim thy bonnie eyes of blue, Nor make this loyal heart less true, Till warm and balmy skies above Announce again sweet summertime. Winner MuseELLnNEOos Qesniiiuzmiuoiiis Mississippi Intercollegiate Oratorical Association University of Mississippi A. 81 M. Colle N. C. WILLI.A.MsON, President F. H. BAILEY, Vice-President G. B. POWER, Secretary . J. R. TIPTON, Treasurer . .29 .23 Colleges ge of Mississippi Officers Executive Committee Mississippi College Millsaps College . A. 8L M. College . Mississippi College . Millsaps College . University of Mississippi F. H. BAILEY, Chairman M. G. FULTON M. BICCULLOUGH C. G. ANDREWS .al of Medal, 1897 . . . . M. G. FULTON, Unis ersitv Third Annual Contest, Jackson, Miss., May 27, 1898. Representatives of University C. R. WHITE, of Hermaean .... I . . N. E. WYILROY, of Phi Sigma 177 Gulf States Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest .al .al Colleges University of Mississippi University of Alabama Tulane University of Louisiana University of Georgia Officers IWIAURICE G. FULTON, President . . . University of Mississippi SHELBY MX'RICK, Vice-President . . University of Georgia JOHN D. NIILLER, Secretary . . Tulane University of Louisiana 1 -, Treasurer . University of Alabama .al First Annual Contest, March 4, 1897, New Orleans, La. .al VVinner of Medal . . R. S. VICKERS, of Tulane University of Louisiana Second Annual Contest, April 29, 1898, Oxford, Miss. University of Mississippi Representative . . . LANDRUM P. LEAVELI. 178 J. H. THOBIPSON H. W. M. DRAKE G. P. BONDURANT W. L. AUSTIN M. G. FULTON G. G. LYELL Current Literature Club .85 J Officers Members C. T. BECKETT W. M. H.-XBINER 179 President Secretary Treasurer H. F. FISHER W. P. IQRETSCHMAR R. E. WILBOURN he nixrtrsitg G rwrd. A Weekly journal of College Life. Devoted to the Interest of the Students of the University of Mississippi, appearing every Tuesday. Published by Classes of the University. U. M. VS. TULANE .ai Score, 14 to 6 .5 XVell, we are ahead of Tulane once again. Twice has she dragged the Crimson and Blue in the dust on the football field, and as many times have we done the same to the Olive and Blue. But what did you say the score was, "Kretch," in that baseball game-I4 to 6? The Tulane men were first seen upon the field in their gray uniforms, then quickly followed the 'Varsity in their blue and red suits. They went upon the diamond amid shouts and rah! rah! rah's! of the three or four hundred people who were there to cheer them on to victory. The game opened with Mississippi at the bat. Hardy, jones, and Myers, the first three men up, went out nicely on infield hits. We found Anderson not to be such a hard nut to crack after all, and were only waiting an opportunity to show him how Mississippi men go after a pitcher. Tulane EDITORIAL STAFF .al MALTRICE G. FULTON, Editor-in-Chief. J. H. DURLEY . . '98 D. MILLER . . ,QQ W. S. PETT1s,JR. . . lor Miss ANNA XIINEYARD . . '98 J. E. EDMONDS . . . 'oo G. G. LYELL . . Law, '98 D. M. KIMBROUGH . Law, ,QQ S. M. JONES. Business Manager. C. W. HINTON . . '98 E. CAMPBELL '98 then came to the bat, and, to their sorrow, found "Big Johnson" more than a conse- quenceg and quite frequently-I believe ten times-they went out to the tune of one, two, three. At the end of the fifth inning the score stood 5 to 2 in favor of 180 Tulane, then in the sixth Mississippi won the game, for Captain "Toby" jones cried out, "We want to score this time, fellows." And Mississippi did score, for at the end of the sixth the score stood 9 to 5 for the 'Varsity. Our chant, " We won't sit down until we make a run, hey !" seemed to rattle Tulane completely, and from that point the game was never in doubt. Special mention should be made of every man on the 'Varsity team if space would allow it, but our battery, Jones and John- son, deserve special notice. Seldom has prettier work been seen on a college diamond than was shown by these two last Friday, Johnson striking out ten men in all, showing good head work throughout the game, and to try to go to second meant sure death from the arm of jones. Tu1a11e left the field with hopes crushed, but with the thought, "Well, we will even up with you to-morrow", but to-morrow never came for Tulane, for the game re- sulted in a second victory for Mississippi. Score, 7 to 3. 7: 3' vk .fw'kg,'g47 W A f 'Z '41 , ,. S if .,, . , 'QV 5 af' fs 13' ' . 'X 'kit 'gl EDITORS OF UNIVERSITY RECORD Q, wr- 'vw ar-rwr .arglr . , I! V 4 a ! 0 4: ' Haj, I , llrux n 1 . . . X. 'L A . , 1 - 1,1 . "Q .. V+ J. M. STEVENS H. W. CAROTHERS L. M. RUSSELL H. S. MCCLESKEX' B. T. KIMBROUGH H. FISHER . AMIS, A. VV. AUSTIN, WY L. BREWER, VV. C. BROACH, J. M. BURNHAM, H. M. CAIRNS, G. H. CAMPBELL, E. CAROTHERS, H. W. CROSS, N. E. CROXTON, E. M. DOUGHERTY, C. A. DRAKE, H. XV. M. DRUMMOND, N. R. DURLEY, J. H. EASON, A. W. EDMONDS, J. D. ERVIN, E. H. FISHER, H. F. FULTON, M. G. A Y. M. C. A., 1897-98 GIBSON, E. B. GUYNES, J. F. H..-XRGIS, J. E. HARGROVE, W. H. HALL, E. B. HENINGTON, L. L. HOLINIES, J. E. HOPKINS, W. E. HUBBARD, E. J. HUNTINGTON, R. JOHNSON, T. S. JONES, A. H. JONES, E. T. JONES, G. P. JONES, S. M. KERSHAW, E. H. KIMBROUGH, B. T. KIMBROUC-H, D. M. KNOX, R. Members LEAVELL, A. B. LEAVELL, L. P. LEAYELL, M. B. LEIGH, A. M. LESTER, W. S. LIPSCOMB, E. W. LYELL, G. G. MABRX', E. L. MARRETTE, B. T. INICCLESKEY, H. S INICFARLAND, BEN. MCKAY, W. I. MILLER, D. MORRISON, J. K. MORGAN, M. C. PRUITT, W. O. RILEY, J. B. ROBERSON, F. . . President . Vice-President Recording Secretary . Corresponding Secretary . . Treasurer . Pianist ROLAND, C. W. ROWAN, S. L. RUSSELL, L. M. SANDERS, W. M. SEXYARD, D. SEGREST, R. A. STEVENS, J. M. STONE, W. E. SUTHERLAND, P. THAMES, H. D. THOMPSON, J. H. TODD, H. P. WALKER, W. B. WELLS, C. W. WHITE, C. R. WILLIAMS, R. W. XVILROY, N. E. WILBOLYRN, R. E. R L N X' - 'O D L l ,vig af' W. H. COOK M. G. FULTON LAMAR HARDY VV. P. KRETSCHMAR G. L. RAY 184 Q . H. F. H. F. FISHER FISHER H. W. BROWN D. MILI.ER . . H. D. PROF. PROF. H. D. W. W. W. B. PRIESTLEY . FRED. FRANKLIN FRED. FRANKLIN PRIESTLEY . GARTH . RICRS . D. INIILLER . F. M. VVEST . J. V. LEITCH H. W. BROWN . B. S. RICKS . . H. FRED. FISHER 185 Manager E Executive Committee Leader Instructor 2 First Violins Second 'Violin S Flutes Clarinet Guitars Bass Violin - V , W , , f-,,. . x "v-' ' ff , .'- 9 f,, 'K- al' X. Jw '- 4 fx -'nf at H612 Dlx .W- v"l H,-'.f.rf,-"'-L 1-: J fu., x.-' '- -, '.'+"'..7f' il' ..,1.y:n.v'T- . ,. '.f'i"rf'.Q-Jflv I . Q . rn". 3' ,jr ' -. f".1'x:5-'w -. . .K 4.'l!A I ug Sw x , Ifxfg LN. , s , vqw fl ,, -l..' ,u - uyj,1,-l.v1'f,g,"' .- A ' .f ,V .mg U . V K ... 1 yt N. 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A , . n ' 1 I ' I lx f W. l - , f 1 1 I , . ' f. . y .',. ,- 4 .n . , A f. 'E A ' . "' " . xf ., 2. 5 U, -my . -V, U. -' "Lf 1 - "Q yi. V' . Aw r. :z.v.- V' . , gf, .vTQ.:., .' x .'l ' xv sgfx W ' , I AMW., 21' s ' ,' . .. , , . -4 1 ' ' A .. 0 . , 1 . 4. 4 , A Y ,V , AQ-'VC' ' ' J .f 43 iii' A , iz, if fy .X Thi .,g?gg X? . 5 UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA ,?x. D.. 'ii' HV " , :+ .f-A- L f-'1 LPI' ".f' ' ' , ,,,.- , .. 4, , -gg. .A L,-. Q Mi. iw -1 -, I ,.,, H.. 4.,L,.t. A ft.. .. ,.,,.Y .Y -.: 'V'-,P -"4-4 '.'-'f -.M ...-3' , -,. ,'4w .H ,' 'Q 'f 42 v'f- '- I ..,r ,. - -,fx .,A. 5- :-" 4. A-. A .,, u ' ?.., fx !!zlf.'PA-,. , JN ,. A a -a, .4 -A .x ,L x -'A 55" '. .-.1 . 'L 1 ,f , L: -Q, 'f ..n. V - -1- .A-. . , N ., sn.. . s ' ,v . . .- V 7,1 - ' ' . I , I ,I , . V 1 - J w.J,A - .I if?" ,vm .h fri -'f -' . 5 . U 2' " .., ' 0 v. -' . 'F V V' .1 '. ,za 1'-bv ' ' - .LL .15 P- "' Ai Q . 4 uf ' - f - , -av'-N -- -K f-,' ff 19:1--'Q.. 4- - g . 4 4 ,..Sf- , -"-..e.,:l, , - 'f 1. '-rf -4.2, rf.. -15:31,-1.-,J . . . 11:NVj'.'f, X 4 -,. 1 , -fm' " ' X n 'V-w .Y-- ' ,be qv., s ' f-- 4.2-P.A.' A, I" nw' ,.. I vv?L1:!-'1f- 2" ' ' " s.. . -f f. - 'I -' ' -' ,JS kxn nz. , ",o3"11'.ixQ, ' --Tn - k"P,:':Y' 'Q' , ' .'. L' 0 sfff-" s"-M-Ji f- , - ,.-r ,411 1 ,"A,. . 1' if f,kxq.'. 4, .'. 233.5 f...M -A ie -QA L - rv' , ' ' 259, . ' ' .,,-'NJ, I bw 'gn ,h :.,..-. ,,.- - V, ,. . .4 I u xy- X .-, , ,gw ,V V I . -- , '. , ,A . , h .- -14 .wr-:,-af f- - . - , , f 4 .,, - -A ,f -.' -1-1-.. 1-ff-4 . W 2 , - ' .'. . 11,7 L -- -, -. 'N', ., . 1 1 1 - I f . . f. y - v y , --.- fy' 1 v - -v . '- ' 4-. '-' --': 1 - -7 H . - .. H V-..".,x.Lr,. Q' ,,K, ,J .1 ' , --V 1- X.-1. fl, A , I - I i' V 4, ' , ', ." . . .' ' , - .. ,..- . ' ,. ' , V, 1 . 'f - ff:-rf ,'.-':' U ' W 1, 4 ". ' ff'-Ly .'- --'.N L, 'A . .--1x 'u 1. . "" ' , . ,," gh ' 5' , 7" I p ',' 'fli -1-2 ' . ' ' ' ' .J---' 4 T . , . , " P- 3. '. 4 ' - -. -, , Q. , , A. 1, I., 'I , , . I R'-." Q ' 1 ' ,tx , - - 1 '. "'I':1 , -' ' '-' 0 ' 1 'A - , 1, ,B- -X., ' - ", I . . ,. G U.-l -A I L ll 'fr x - c,.xg4.Y "C fi..-'-s", ' ' '- ' .5 ' f Q' I.. ix - N-L QI w , 9 '. ' 1 ."-.. if ' ft " ' A A ' Ah, - w Av . . 4. 1, 4 'I' 9 ,. ., , - -. ,. .. ."'FZnSnQg:f, .S ..s Nj' ,, 4. -IM .- , . . ,-, A - .A , ,- .x-: ." -' -1 'ff V' . 1 '. 1.- , 1 xg-.K " N's .:"'1 "'. - v -,WV . AL 1 '41 . I r, 1-4, an r u , v 2ff9zQff2wf,ZZZZZZZ2ZZ CSESKSURQIETZ QU TREKS.WHLUS LEADEP POPE H. H. BROOKS G. P. BONDURANT LEX. BRAME C. R. XVHITE HARPER JOHNSON G. G. LYELI. J. V. LEITCH J. M. THOMAS L. A. SMITH H. D. PRIESTLEY R. XV. SHIPP I. N. GILRUTI-I Q2 Members Jr .s XV. XV. HAMXER L. MCG. PORTER B. S. RICKS, JR. C. XV. HINTON J. E. EDMONDS J. F. POPE W. W. GARTH 189 A. XY. SHANDS W. B. RICKS P. XY. KING M. L. PERKIXS C. T. BECKETT J. S. BURTON, JR. R. L. PILLOXV W. D. RIVERS YV. A. BROWN, JR. J. D. BIAYES C. A. DOUGHERTY XV. H. COOK St. Thomas Hall Association 1 656, Graduates of St. Thomas Hall now in University of Mississippi: .29 Officers W. D. MYERS . . . President C. W. HINTON . Vice-President I. N. GILRUTH . . Secretary W. S. PETTIS . . Treasurer al Members W. A. BROWN E. R. HOLMES J. R. MQDOWELL 1. L. MULCAHEY L. A. SMITH 190 J. F. POPE L. A. SMITH . MONROE BIORGAN N. F. SCALES . G. G. BOSTWICK J. M. BYNUM D. L. THOMPSON Bell Buckle Club .shi YELL-XVe're for gold, by gum Y XYe're for gold, by gum! XVe're for gold, by gum! Get your grammar, Sawnie's come I COLORS- Black and Blue. FLOXVER - Beech Blossom. .al Officers . . . President Vice-President . Secretary Treasurer Members T. G. IVY G H PRICE G. A. WAGNER 191 W. XVEATHERBY 23277 7, ,K . 1' Z 'HI' WH I I X ,,-. . ,fi Officers J. E. EDMONDS . . President XV. XV. JOHNSON . Manager W. R. XVILLIAMS . Critic L. A. SMITH . Secretary Members A. H. JONES Rox' ROGERS D. BIILLER F. M. XVEST 192 The Delta Club .al .al Officers VV. P. KRETSCHRIAR . . . President J. E. EDMONDS . Vice-President J. D. BIAYES . Secretary K. L. PILLOW . . Treasurer G. K. SMITH . . . . Historian Members R. W. ALCORN J. P. FAISON I. N. GILRUTH E. R. HOLINIES R. W. SHIPP W. R. XVILLIAMS .al .af Kappa, Kappa, Kappa .al .al COLORS - Green and XVhite. YELL - Hurrah-rah, hurrah--ray, Whiz-boom, zip, boom, K K K! Hi-ki-yi-ka, hi-ki-suappa, Hot stuff, no bluff, Kappa ! Kappa ! Kappa! Members W. W. GARTH J. V. LEITCH G. G. LYELL J. R. NICDOWELL, JR. J. D. MILLER J. H. THOMPSON, JR. I. N. GILRUTH L. MCG. PORTER H. D. PRIESTLEY, JR. B. S. RICKS R. W. SHIPP NV. P. KRETSCHMAR J. F. POPE W. B. RICKS J. M. DYER 193 Her Face .29 .23 VVind and storm held strife without, Densest darkness hung about, lvithin, a bright iire's warmth and cheer Defied the gloom g a table nearg A shaded lamp cast softened rays, A student sat with intent gaze Fixed on a page he strove to read, Nor to the wind or storm gave heed. He strove to read -he strove in vain- And not one thought could he retain. Time and again the lines retraced, Some words left out, others replaced. The letters danced and seemed to change, And then-a transformation strange- The letters gone, and in their place, The student gazed upon a face. A brow of purity so white, Cheeks faint-tinged with new-dawn's light, Lips, stray petals of a crimson rose, Meeting in curves of Cupid's bows. Eyes of beauty, sapphire blue, That found in the skies a kindred hue. Golden sunbeams formed the hair That framed this face divinely fair. 194 He dreamed, and gazed, and smiled, and dreamed, And the Winsome face to him, it seemed, Smiled back again. The lamp burned low, The embers cast a faint red glow, The storm and wind ceased their fight, The darkness fled, the moon shone brightg The student gazed, dreamed on and on , The book slipped, fell -the face was gone! The wizard owl with voice atune That was All .al .S- An invitation -that was all I The moon looked down witl1 wrinkled brow Upon the dreary, somber pall Of withered leaves that covered now The campus all. Screamed loudly from his haunted tree, Where ghosts were wont, and now were soon To dance and sing in gaiety, O'er misfortune. XVhat dreadful fate could e'er befall But all the ghouls that filled the air, The north-wind shrieked and hastened by Shriveling up each tender flower, lVith icy touch and blasting sigh- Alas! one spot had brooked his power, With piteous cry. And all the phantom winds that blew, Were naught but failures to compare In grief to one sad junior who XVas sorrowing there. So fair a youth to strike him down? He'd just received his sweetheart's call- Her wedding in his native town - That was all ! 12 195 He thought he heard the happy ring Of wedding-bells afar away 5 But to his ears they seemed to sing Naught but mourning-sad display Of suffering. He Did Not Reform .si .25 X fi L' morning sun shone brightly upon a green hill on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay, where a large 7 , farm house sat upon the summit, surrounded by a flourishing fruit farm. It was about the middle of .A the berry season. In a small grove of spruce pines near the beach stood a whitewashed cottage in the I tall grass, surrounded by no ordinary evidences of habitation, and a lean old man who sat in the shade X., near its door had not the appearance of a man who lived at home. His battered hat lay upon the X2L,,,:'Lj,7f ground beside him, and he ran his big hands at times through his thin, gray hair in a troubled manner. f . " Bill," he said to himself, " ye are back at Mr. Ellison's again, and have been well received. Stowed here in this bit of a cottage, away from the crowd of pickers, where ye can rest. Seven years ago ye ,ff,fy,gU . .1 v . . . ,ZQWQV if spent yer summer in this pretty grove, and by the Howly Turk, 3 e have seen rough sailing since them days. , ! Let's see 5 two years aboard the Mount Stuart to the Indies and back to San Frisco, and on around the Horn Two years of fishing and dredging, four months in johns-Hopkins with the Rheumatiz, a winter aboard the banana boats, two months on the bum, and here we blow again with the farmer, not a cent in the wallet. Ye are a failure, Bill g the drink and the sea have done for ye. Think of yer father, a Bishop in the old Church. Look at yer brothers, a curate one, the other Mayor of Kildare. Ye could have graduated at Oxford, but no, ye must be a bum. Yer life may not be as long ahead as yonder schooner's jib boom, and who'll bury yer then? who'll pay the priest? " ,l to New York. Two months in Brooklyn, then in the Ram to Cape Colony, and two years in the army there. The old man's wrinkled face was infinitely sad, as he thus communed with himself, and when he ceased to speak he sat for a long time looking pensively across the waters of the bay to the eastern shore, where the white cliffs and buildings gleamed indistinctly in the sun. I On the second day after the arrival of the Irishman at the farm, Mr. Ellison brought to the cottage two people, a man and a woman, and installed them, with apologies to O'Connor, the Irishman, in the second floor of the cottage. The old man paid his respects to the new comers in a courteous manner that was surprising in one of his unengaging appearance, but when they were in their own room and he was left alone again, he shook his head in a perplexed manner, and went about cooking his supper, carrying on a disjointed conversation with himself. As he sat down to eat, he said: " Bower, is it? Well, Mister Bower, it bates me entoirely, the way ye favor Tim Smith, him that left his belt knife sticking in the heart of poor John Sims at San Frisco." 196 Fruit harvesting in Maryland gives a few sun1n1er months of employment to hundreds of people from the cities of that region. For the most part they are of a very low grade of society, and the farmers treat them much as they would so many tramps or gypsies. They furnish them with rude, comfortless shanties for lodges, where they must do their cooking out on the ground and sleep in bunks constructed in ship-fashion. The poor creatures seem to enjoy this mean respite from the restraints of city life, and it is really pitiful to see them singing at their work, putting Howers in their hat-bands, and in other ways giving expression to the joy that everywhere accompanies out-door life and freedom. The next day after their arrival, Bower and his wife went out to work in the strawberry patches. O'Connor accompanied his house-mates, laughing and talking with the little woman, or rather girl, she seemed, but casting occasional keen glances at her husband. "A pretty bit of a gurl that, be me faith,'l he said to himself while at work, "and from Belfast, too. Sure, and it takes old Erin to make a rare woman. She's every bit of a lady, and not used to work like this, but slie's struck rough weather here. Run away from home with that chap. Poor little gurl ! And the gintleman with her ! 'Why, Bill, but ain't it just like being in ould San Frisco again to see that chap? Are the eyes of ye so far gone as not to recognize an ould acquaintance ?" He was unusually thoughtful and quiet toward midday, and when the dinner hour came he went to his cottage, and after eating a hurried dinner, sat down and wrote a letter, which he delivered to the farmer to be mailed 011 the Baltimore boat. "Kape mum, Bill," he murmuredg "let us hear from the Cap'n. Let Mister Bower be aisy, that's the trick, be aisy till we hear from the Cap'n.l' Several days passed at Ellison's Fruit Farmg the pickers lived on gaily at the campy O'Connor grew very social with his "lodgers," as he called the couple on the second Hoor of the cottage. But one morning the little woman did not go out to work. " Not well," her husband said, when asked about her. On the following day he reported that she was down with a fever. On the morning of the fifth day of Mrs. Bowers illness her husband did not come down stairs, and when O'Connor called out for him no answer came. "The gintleman slapes bloomin' well," said O'Co1mor, his heart sinking Within himg "he slapes well, indade. I think the Cap'n's letter ort to come in to-day's mail. If Mr. Bower will stay till that comes, its loikely he will go to Baltimore with bracelets 011 the wrists of him. The dirty villian! To murder a foine chap loike John Sims ! " When he saw all the pickers going out to work he thought it high time to find out why Bower did not come down. Going softly up the stairs, he knocked at the door, and receiving no answer, opened it and looked in. The Irish girl was alone in the room. She lay asleep upon the bed, her innocent young face turned toward the rising sun. T97 " Overboard," said VVil1iam O'Connor to himself. A folded paper on a chair beside the bed caught his eye. Witliout waking the sleeper the old man picked up the note and read it. It ran: UNORA-When you get well go home to your people. Do not expect to see me again. Good-bye. BEN." " The brute ! The murderous villian ! " the Irishman broke forth. " What's that, Ben, dear?" asked Mrs. Bower, waking. Too excited to think, O'Connor thrust the note into her hand. " Where is Ben? " she asked g then, as her eyes fell upon the first words of the note, she was seized with a vio- lent fit of trembling, and her pale face blanched still whiter. "Read it," she said, faintly. O'Connor read every word. The sad lines of her face hardened as she lay with her gaze fixed upon the wall. " He says go home-home -without him--no money to go-O Ben! Ben ! " The old man left the room. Seizing his berry tray he strode hurriedly out of the house to the fields and went to work without speaking to any of the pickers. Picking was goody all hands were busy while it paid. There is always enough time for idle talk and slow work when the fruit is scarce and little to be made by diligence. O'Connor did not seem to be in a hurry with his work, and the busy thoughts that teemed in his brain could have been surmised by any one who listened to the passionate mutterings which escaped his lips at frequent intervals. About ten o'clock he returned to the cottage, carrying a few choice berries, and ascending the narrow stairs that led to Mrs. Boweris room, he knocked softly at the door. " Come in," he heard her cry, excitedly. When the sick girl had seen him plainly she dropped back from the sitting posture which she had assumed and moaned bitterly. " Poor child! Poor babe!" said the old man. "Come, won't ye have a few foine strawberries? " She moaned, less audibly than before, and raising her big sorrowful eyes to his face, asked, hesitatingly: " Have ye-have ye seen-O no, of course not," and she hid her face in her hands and wept. " Come," said O'Connor, " let's eat some fresh berries and brace up a bit." She made no answer, but took the fruit and ate a few bites slowly, evidently striving only to please the old man. After doing what little services he could for her comfort, O'Connor left her alone and returned to his work. Raspberries were now ready for gathering. Picking went ahead as briskly as ever, and the days passed rapidly at Ellison's. Little Mrs. Bower slowly recovered from the fever that had siezed her, and within three weeks she was able to sit up and eat the rudely prepared food which O'Connor, who never forsook her, brought to her room. One evening after supper, when his charge was asleep, O'Connor sat alone before his door and communed with himself, as was his habit. " Mister Bower set sail just two days too soon. Man ! but weren't the Cap'n's men hungry for him? O well, 198 let the baste go 3 I should have hated to hear the gurlie cry when they took him. But the gurlie, poor Nora I . . . I wonder how much is in the wallet now." He took a dirty leather bag from his pocket and counted the handful of coins and brass checks that it contained. "Twenty-eight dollars. Bill, ye've enough o' the nasty stuff to take ye home already, and if ye knuckle to it through the rest o' the berry season, ye can go home to yer brother in good riggin'. Ye must quit this aivil loife and be a man, ye must, ye'll have to go home and reform .... But the little gurl, that bates me entoirelyg what shall I do with Nora? There will be about eight days more o' the pickin'. That manes foive or six dollars more. Thirty-four dollars-that won't carry the both of us. " "The old man leaned his head upon his hands and sat for a long time in deep thought. The lights had gone out up at the farm house and all noise had ceased at the pickers' quarters when O'Connor arose and went into his room. He moved restlessly upon his bed for a long time after retiring, and his last words before going to sleep came in a broken, weary voice, almost in sobs. "Ye'd better do it, Bill, mate, let the child go home to her mammy. Ye can kape a bit to get a drink or two, and what's the difference? If ye live another year, ye can get home then, and ye may live a long time yet. The gurlie must go to Belfast." I In a few more days Mrs. Bower was almost well again, and began to talk of going out to work, not knowing that the picking was so near its close. One evening she had eaten supper at her bedside and sat chatting with O'Con- nor. During the conversation he turned his eyes toward a high corner of the room, seemingly by accident, and espied a piece of paper sticking in a crack of the wall. " See that bit o' paper up there in the corner, clid ye chuck it there, lass?" he said, and without waiting for a reply he reached up on tiptoe and seized it. It was an envelope addressed to Benj. Bower, General Delivery, Baltimore, Md. 4' It's addressed to the gintleman that's left," said O'Connor, in a tremulous voice, handing her the package. Nora looked into the torn end and gave a nervous little shriek, then recovering herself, she ran her fingers into it and drew out a small roll of paper money. Both rose excitedly to their feet. " Thirty dollars ! " exclaimed, Nora. " It's Ben's moueyg he left it for me. Now I can go home. Ben was a good man. O Ben! Ben! " The old wanderer paced the floor excitedly. At length the woman raised her eyes to him and said: " May God bless ye, Mr. O'Connor. Ye've saved the life of me when I was sick, and now I can go home again. Ben could not lave me all alone and helpless. The Lord bless ye and him." "Aye, Nora, my gurlie," O'Connor answered. The next afternoon the schooner leaving Ellison's for Baltimore bore two passengers, a tall old man and a pale little woman, who sat together on the deck and talked merrily in Irish accent until the vessel reached the city and was moored at the marsh market dock. Leaving the schooner, they walked slowly along the market in the direction of Baltimore Street and disappeared in the throng. 199 011 the following morning there was a great stir and confusion at one of the deep water docks, where a passen- ger boat was setting out for Liverpool. XYilliam O'Connor, a shabbily-dressed Irish vagrant-sailor, stood upon the dock with his hat in his hand, and bowed and shouted to a woman upon the lower deck of the steamer, who could not hear one word that he said for the uproar. VVheu the vessel had moved down the dock with a mighty clanging of bells, whistling of engines, and swish and roar of water at the stern, and the woman upon the lower deck could no longer be seen, O'Connor replaced his ragged hat upon l1is head and walked aimlessly back towards the city. " XVhat's the game now, mate?" he asked himself. " Nothing in the bag but the price of a drink or two. Ye thought ye would go home to the Green Isle and be a man, but ye could not lave the little gurl. Now for another year at sea, a11d its loikely ye won't live through it. But have a drink, mate, have a drink or two." And he did take a drink, several of them before the day was gone, and spent the night upon the streets in a drunken carousal. Late in the night, on looking up from a seat upon a curb stone, his eye was caught by the figure of a man among the crowd that passed across the light which streamed from a saloon door. The old man sprang up hastily. " Bower! Smith! Tim Smith 5 " he called, and started in pursuit. But he staggered helplessly to tl1e ground and crawled back to his place bv the gutter. " Mister Bower, iudadef' he muttered, " I'll write to the Cap'n, faith, that I will." tg - A t . .f 'W Ge J TEX -i,., IQEXWX -U ,VA II' 'v via "Lily -12" 200 '98 Oddities Name. Nick Name. Usual Drink. Common Saying. Recreation. Future. BELL .......... DOUGHERTY. . . DURLEY ....... FISHER . . . FULTON ....... GIBSON HARDY .... .. HARGROVE .... JONES, S. KRETSCHMAR .. PERKINS ...... POPE .... .. PORTER ...... PRIESTLEY .... RAY .. ROANE .... . . STEVENS ...... Uncle Jim .... Butch .... . . Captain ...... Guts ........ Pretty Fellow . Gip ......... Cactus .... . . Sally . . . . . Toby . . . . . Madam ...... Perks ..... . . Shanks ...... Beeman ..... Sawed Off .... Deacon ...... Arch ........ 'Tother Butch Buck beer ............ yjohnson House! I chalk 1nixture...l Red lemonade ........ Condensed milk ...... VVhisky fstraightj .... Oscar Pepper ......... Bromo-Seltzer . . . . . . Oxford cocktail ....... Syrup of Figs .... . . . Coca-Cola ............ Holly Springs Bourbon Hot water tea ......... Peruna ....... . . . Lime water .... . . . jamaica ginger ....... Cold tea ....... . . . Stump water ..... . . . Dog gone . . - - Confound it .......... To the rear, march .... Take achase, won't you I'll just tell you ...... You're not so warm . . . Go to h-1 ............ Let's go to Y. M. C. A. Let's go to see Miss -- By grabs ......... . . I'll swear .... . . Hot tamale .... . . That's no lie .......... I'll tell you how it was By golley ............. If you see her ......... SI got another galq I down the road.. l X VVhistling .... . Biting at gags ..... Playing with cats .... . . . Playing chapel organ . . . Combing his locks ....... Swapping lies ..... Chasing grounders ....... 5 Asking professor ques- 2 tions ............... l l Prepping ..... . . . Yelling ............. . . . Bumming cigarettes . . . . . VVhistling "Fools' March" Primping Fiddling .......... . . . Loaing on campus ....... Going to U. F. C ..... . . . Going to his meals ....... Country schoolrnaster. Private in the rear ranks. Cuban general. Fiddler. Y. M. C. A. lecturer. Tooth puller. Country justice of peace. Parson. Fighting for Cuba. Baseball scorer. Resting. Pill roller. Reporter to Oxford Globe Sleeping. 5 Hopes to be a fraternity Q agent. Prohibition lecturer. Stump speaker. 2OI O OMIUFHIENUIIOTS .24 M G. FULTON J. R. TAYLOR DURELL MILLER T. DABNEY MARSHALL MARION G. EVANS H. A. SHANDS MISS A, VINEYARD WALTER MALONE 202 23159395999i9i'i'i5'5'i'i'5'i'i'i5'99i'i'Q' 9 Q 9 1 5' XXXBSESBSESBXXXEES CGMMENCEMENT 5 PROGRAMME 1595 Sunday, June twelfth : 11 a. m., Baccalaureate Sermon, by Dr. I. B. Hawthorne, Nashville, Tennessee. 8 p. m., Sermon before Y. M. C. A., by Dr. B. Hawthorne. Monday, June thirteenth: ll a. ni., Baccalaureate Address, by Hon. Hannis Taylor Mobile, Alabama. 8 Q. m., Senior Debate between members of Hermaean and Phi Sigma Societies. Tuesday, June fourteenth: II a. m., Prize Contest in Elocution between members of Sophomore Class. 8 p. m., Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association. Faculty Reception. Wednesday, June fifteenth: 11 a. m., Graduating Exercises. II p. m., Commencement Ball. -r iv, "gift ,, .,-. ,,..'1. 4 P2 1 'P."," . ., . , fb- 4, -yr fri -. A 1 . , ,.. M. 1 V. ,. ,U I, Q. I4 A ' Ir f? .xi tl . 1- , X ' 7 . J J Jw' I 1 f , A Ut , 'rl ,JH '. -, .Y-.Y . . 4 V ,.4. V - , xv- .. ,, 1 .. I it I" ' Nv.r,u,.:wf - - ., .. J 3. Y.,-'Ig ,lam HF, ,x .1-vfflvl 'N It l I! I. ,swf . ve- ' 'f ' 5-fr .- . W' -. , 4 - 1 '- - - f J uh L "'."'fH'f4N .e . V -'- ' - ..- . - ,a -nf -. -Q fafwe-w::f+ -Q 1 y , V 1 , L r 4: !,, ' 41 - l . ".'.. 4 .4 3. .,., I. XJLI,-V ., . ,, ,- fa. V.. .J if ,lk -M ,. Y Vi, Qui... ' Y 1 ,+. . I , J 4 A i 1 11 :J-1.1, -'. ' K. .'. A ' , ' ,, , , . .- ,. -' H ' ' ' .L-X ,. ' . .K 1 Q' x 3 ir.. A , W A4 ,. 5 - -N .wa W , ,. .,l. 5 ,, ,X y ,V V! V I . v , . 4. ' ,,' 2 .5 ' , '.N ' iff" .coP. ' ' - . V- . , , ' , ,v ,A 1 , , A ' . 4 - , ' ' A . - 1 - . ' 1 ' '..- 1 1 ' 1 1 4 , , , 1 f - ' I , Y , .5, H HY. 4 1 1 5-'A 5. 1:-1A 1 4 1- - A l fl, ,Wifi ' ' Hr ' ik,- WJ' if 'J -' 'ff 52.11, . -'.-we 'H u.,- :. .am --,Jr '.. -' ..f 4 1. 1' - w frfg, ,fl J ' , '. - v'r. , - - ,Q v, ' ' I 1 " 9 , ' 1. f 'J L ,ju ' ' . I 3 . A , ., .1 .4 ,1.'i: Introduction . Dedication . . . L. Q. C. Lamar, Professor . Lamar Life-Calendar . . The Morning Glory Q poem J Board of Trustees, University of Mississippi Instructors and Other Officers Faculty Picture . . . Historical Sketch . . Our Alma Mater Q poem I . . Board of Editors of " Ole Miss " Board of Editors of " Ole Miss " 1 photo 5 . The Fraternities . . . The Greeks Q poem 1 . . Fraternities' Frontispiece Delta Kappa Epsilon . Delta Psi . . Phi Kappa Psi . Sigma Chi . . Sigma Alpha Epsilon . Phi Delta Theta . Delta Tau Delta . Theta Nu Epsilon . Sigma Tau . Tau Delta Theta Other Fraternities Represented Qontents .25 .af PAGE. PAGE. 3 Fraternities in the University of Mississippi . S9 4 Shakespeare Club ........ 91 7 Shakespearian Letter ....... Q2 9 Department of Elocution, Oratory, Shakespeare, and Debate 94 . II Long Ago Q poem P ..----.. 95 . I5 The Dead House ......... 96 . I4 Oblivion fpoem J . . . . 98 . I5 University of Mississippi 1 picture 5 . QQ . I7 Hermaean Literary Society . . . 101 . I9 Phi Sigma Literary Society . . . 102 . 2I Blackstone Society . . 103 . 23 Eyes Qpoem 1 . . 104 . 25 The Road Between . 105 . 26 Classes . . . 109 . 27 Class of '98 . . . . III . 31 Class History . . . . 1 I2 . 37 Class Roll and Statistics . . 113 . 43 Class Picture . . . . 117 . 49 Class of '99 . . . . 119 . 55 Class History . . . . 120 . 61 Class Roll and Statistics . . 122 . 67 Class Picture . . . 125 . 73 Sophomore Class . . 127 . 79 Class History . . . . 128 . 83 Class Roll and Statistics . . 129 . 87 Class Picture . . . 131 205 Freshman Class . . Class History . . . Class Roll and Statistics . Class Picture . . . Senior Law Class . . Class History . . . Class Roll and Statistics . Class Picture . . . Junior Law Class . . Class History . . . Class Roll and Statistics . Class Picture . . . "Corinna at the Bath " 1 poem 1 . A Sonnet .... Triolets 1 poem 1 . In Football Times . Athletic Department . Football .... Senior Football Team Picture Baseball -'Varsity Team . Class Teams .... 'Varsity Baseball Picture . Tennis Association . Track Team, 1897 . . Track Team Picture . . Library and Campus Picture . Cl1ancell0r's Residence Picture PAGE. PAGE . 133 - 134 - 135 . 139 . 141 . 141 - 143 . 147 . 149 - 149 . 150 . 151 - 153 - 153 - 154 - 155 - 159 . 160 . 161 . 165 . 164 . 165 . 167 . 168 . 169 . 171 . I'j'I Desolation 1 poem 1 . Statistics .... September 1 poem 1 . Miscellaneous Organizations Mississippi Intercollegiate Oratorical Association Gulf States Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest Current Literature Club .... The University Record ..... The University Record, Editorial Staff . . The University Record, Editorial Staff Picture Y. 11. c. A., 1897-gs . X. Orchestra .... University Orchestra Picture German Club . . . St. Thomas Hall Association . Bell Buckle Club . . . Sketch Club . . The Delta Club . . Kappa, Kappa, Kappa . Her Face 1 poem J . That XVas All fpoem J . He Did Not Reform . '98 Oddities . . . Contributors . . . Commencement Programme Advertisements . . . 1'-X X 7 'M XC V2 CT 1' W I ii - if . ,I Cf ,. , ,QQ I L ' 'X XXX: 1 .. XE, ,W f lg Qc , iq . 5 C . L x 'Xs- XX 20 173 174 176 177 177 178 179 ISO ISO 181 183 184 185 187 189 190 191 192 193 193 194 195 196 201 202 203, 207 Dr.Tichenor's is the Antisepticeal gliicgagful NENERliiligligligliiliili Vvfzunds Cooling, etc' Soothing, ?iit?3biz. Comforting, Prevents Inflamrnat d S Cures C I M Harmless, and Reliablenaf 2.9! Everybody has something good to say about it. 5 15 Beware of Imitations ion an uppuration. o ic in an or Beastnai Pleasant The "woods are full of 'em" Only cents by druggists, Sherrouse Medicine Companyaet at Manufacturers and Proprietors, New Orleans, Louisiana. V l s l, px l A 208 m . Baird f0l' flllt dlldi S Fruits, Canned Goods, Cigars, .24 Tobacco, and in short everything that is found in a .5 .al First-Class Confectionery and Restaurant .H 5l5 5l5 515 HIE 515 Elf if 5lE ill5 515 5l5 Elf H15 Elf Summer Drinks and Ice Cream Served in style. .al Special efforts made to please the students, and We invite them to give us a call Telephone No. 3 North Side Square Oxford, Mississippi 4 I. v':., I ,.-. UUM 0 4 END for "A Souvenir of Bryan Day at West Point, Miss., in 4 P honor of Southern Female College," for that day witnessed fl' , ..fsvf51,A5 the largest crowd, the most splendid reception,.a' val .al and the cZ grandest oration recorded in Mississippi within the past twenty 5 years. .af .al You will also learn more of that college for young 4 l ladies which " The Great Silver Orator" delighted to honor. You aye 6 l will learn more of its departments of Literature, Science, and Math- Qg l A ematics, of its Elocution, Music and Art, of its advantages, as good i as the best, in preparing students for the New York School of cm l i Expression, or for the New England Conservatory, Boston, or for , 1 p Royal Conservatory, Leipzig. Address .al .al .ai .ai .ai J- .al .9 .99 J' Wes! ?0'nff W'-9'5" 1 lg if Cfshman, fares. 1 I . i O , , 0 JW! Ylfork 7' W ood J rznztnzy J ays fwffmffed Q ,zz-io-afazte P i 1. Therefore have it done at the .al Up-to-date Job 7, , 0 Printing Office, where it will be done in the l latest style and at most reasonable prices ....... 1 P 0 0 0 College Printing of all kinds a specialty. Mail gf J rm 1125? .al .al orders given careful attention, and will be promptly' filled ..... i p g ' me wrde for .yard-es and :Samples J. Qarbour, fgrep. 7 , l zoo Stenography Bookkeeping, Commercial Law, Correspondence, Arith- metic, etc., taught practically by mail, or personally at Eastman College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., the model business school. The .29 .99 el .25 .99 .8 .3 System of Teaching is based on actual experience in transacting the business of Merchandising, Banking, Transportation, Insurance, Real Estate, Commission, etc. J A U99 at MMMMM MEHEBEHEEW Wanted unemployed young men whose education has been finished in public schools, academies, and colleges, to write for our plan of HOME STUDY. We teach Cby mail and personallyl in a short time some useful vocation, and, what is better, get el .3 employment for our students .Al fa' .al By the old way, training for business costs years of apprenticeship, but the successful man of to-day is the one who is thoroughly prepared for his Work by the shorter methods of Eastman College .al A .93 , 'maj n .mrs f n , men. ,,,Z'5i::L?,.5"::'Z:zz.., -as , T ' in 'P s i ffvsfff 55 Sv- ,.,,,,'3zzzi,'1izf N. V. m Pgufii igi gg? P 55.00 Reward to anyone for first information of a vacancy for a Book- keeper, Stenographer, Clerk or Teacher which We suc- cessfully fill. We supply competent assistants to business houses without charge, and secure .5 J' .99 ai .3 Situations for all graduates of our Business and Shorthand Courses, an invaluable feature to many young people. Refer to Bankers, Merchants, and other prominent patrons in every part of the world. Address as above .al .99 .ai MMMMM WWWWM 210 Young Men Trained to be all round business men, or they may take up a special branch of business and be thorough in that. No better illustration of the value of a business education can be offered than the success of those who have graduated from Eastman Business College Poughkeepsie, N. Y., the most celebrated practical school in America. Instruction thorough. Time short. Ex- penses moderate. In writing mention this publication. Commercial College of Kentucky University WILBUR R. SMITH, President Write for Circulars el al LEXINGTON, KY. :?..:'i6.:R. Thorough, Influential, and Honored College. Medal and Diploma at lVorld's Exposition for sys- tem of Bookkeeping, including General Business Education. Hundreds of students in attendance the past year. Io,oco Graduates in Business. Business Course consists of Bookkeeping, Busi- ness Arithmetic, Penmanship, Commercial Law Merchandising, Banking, Joint Stock, Manufactur- ing, Lectures, Business Practice, Mercantile Cor- 3 respondence, etc. Cost of Full Business Course, M including Tuition, Stationery, and Board in a nice family, about 390. Y, Shorthand, Typewriting, and Telegraphy are gi Q3 Specialties-have special teachers and rooms, and can be taken alone or with Business Course. Special department for ladies. No vacation. Enter now. Graduates successful. In order to have your letters reach us address only, WILBUR R. SMITH, President. l.Exmc.1'oN, KY. 13 2II L Do You want a Situation Hs BGORRQQDQY, feltgfdllbkl' Ol' PDOIIOQYGDNI' ii Prof. Xl'ilbur R. Smith, for twenty years president of the renowned Commercial Col- lege of Kentucky University, gives special attention to his graduates i11 assisting them to secure situations. Cost of Business Course about 590, including tuition and board in a family. Prof. Smith has kept books, several years vice-president of a bank, XVOrld's Fair Com- missioner from Kentucky, and a reliable business man. Among the thousands of successful grad- uates of Prof. Smith, are loo in banks, and roo officials in this and other States. Awarded n1edal at XVorld's Exposition for bookkeeping. Lexington, Ky., the location of Prof. Smith's College, is noted for its healthful- ness and fine climate, has 25 churches and I I banks. Accessible by its many railroads. Prof. Smith's graduates are awarded the Kentucky University diploma under seal, an influential passport to business houses. If you wish a Business Education, or a knowledge of Phonography, Typewriting or Telegraphy at the least total cost, with a diploma from Kentucky University on grad- uation, we advise you to cut this out and write for circulars only to Prof. XV. R. Smith, Lexington, Ky. Young men desiring to attend a Business College will find it to their advantage to call at this oiiice before making arrangements elsewhere. The National Business College Roanoke, Virginia Is one of the ww ww Q if Q Q 'I 11 1 we Q Q 11 Q 11 Q if Q Q Q 11 11 11 11 ww 14 Most Popular and Successful Business Colleges of the South We assist our pupils into positions and Teach them how to make money with an education Patronize our school, We are Thorough, Practical, Complete Send for catalogue CHARLES E. ECKERLE President Roanoke, Virginia 212 WQWWWQWWWQWWWWWOQWWWQWWW? QQwg-newwe-rwcjwhwefyrgfgjfwedwwww rl? it , 1- Asif? llt' ,Y lf? '1,E',:ll3 jtlf'l"? t fl l' A - A ' all-5-.LA-Z 1 A inf ' ' ' V' I l ' lr up 1 ltaii Estate . J, ,I I wllll lflln- fl l nv3if??l"' H1L:a,2LL-'i" 1 -T-vw. ': : '111vI'.-'- l"'I l 1 at l +.fcslll 7- ,llllllw I , llME..alll1 llf'?:tflt'lrl tti ,l N lla-11, viii- ll' rifnggggjltll QL!! Law, lllrgllltllr ' MQ lj,tllllL" llll I' tlieif- f-U f'!'iiffEs'5.:I-Ek.fflrft,1.t ri . rgayllf, ,fwlwlv -' ,fl ml. . ,fi illll!flllll'lll'l'l I , 'gt nip. u It I Wg ,lytlllllallwllvl ll Ill l,,4lMw1vl I it 1 'tha I Y 'nl' Irwin I' , Mg' N L 'lv " VJ 'lla . QWQWWQQWWQW WWWWWWWQQWWWQ 1111 QI' if WW ff if fi' if if W0 fi' if WW if 01' Wi' Wi' WW fit 11' if iii' if 111' fi' From September I, '97, to April I, '98, students were placed into positions, from our school. who received 53,769.00 for March salaries. Our students were placed in North Carolina, New York, Indian Territory, Ohio, West Virginia, and Tennessee. Students sent in our care are carefully advised and looked after with regard to board, room, and influence. Special classes are formed for advanced students. Individual work given to all pupils. Each teacher a specialists in his line .... In Commercial and Shorthand work dl You learn to do, by doing." UZ Wh 1: 0 If 09 'C '21 Um mm on XR-Q qlqfqlsql 3333 -me-s-4-4 09490905 QQ"!Q 3333 iliiiiii -me-as-4-s 'tilt M3365 eggs 309953 aiii 3:5-:Q 450925 -30: 0 'C N-YL Ss I IIIIDOYIQYS CEA ilfwelerstand Sllversmltbs 140-142 WOODWARD AVENUE 5 ALAQ, DETROIT- MICH- izzDP:?:::.L:LM OOO0-O4JOO0-0-O-OO-O-OOO-OOOOOO-O-OOO-O-O-0-OOO-O-0-0-O-OOOOO0-0 ' HANDLE EVERYTHING 2 7 T s 1HE... RACKET STORE SELL EVERYTHING 25 TO 50 PER CENT. CHEAPERJ JTHAN THE REGULARS. GIVE US A TRIAL .al .al .al I J. W. Bowser A Oxford, Miss. 213 7 E r OO-O-O-O-O430'O'O'O'OOOOOOO-00O-OO00-OO-O-O0O-OOOO0-O-OO-OO-O-OO M. E. Keyseabealeal Staple and Fancy Groceries Fruits as Vegetableseat as at ahaha! Tobacco and Cigars Goods delivered at any time Southwest Corner Public Square Oxford, Miss lliverv, Sale and Feed Stable Hacks meet all trains Trunks carried to and from depot Good teams, single or double Give us a trial . . Phone No. I students' Trade somatea Barking 5, mambews A: Barry sf Zo., llieervmett 3,1 gf, Special attention given to Hack Work and Driving Teams. . . New Buggies and Fast Horses . . . Best of Service at Reasonable Rates v v 1 v v 0 U w I 0 H R p R nted on thggagpzls by A R d , t " 't ," ily d ge? U h e Ill? promptlyfilled 3's6ive a I J. B. BARRY Livery and feed Stable OXFORD, M ISS. llglacks meet all trains r m t tt t' ' ' to in grin? 33302332 Students trade Solicited 214 .72 .72 Cfzdion cF co. Zholesale and .7?eia17 .... 9 ' ruyyzsis JJ Joh? ..9Drapr1'elor.r of W 'Q 01110012 's Jieamboaf .yaiils we . . . and. . . golden .feadache Uablefs 'QA . . 61 7fez7.son J! Wanllaffan Jlzhtr . Clappls' .Zhe Jlzoes .fly .fhze of Weckwear Zrunks, Ways, and . . . .Zbe Cioilzhzy. . . J ammmmm mmwmmn jafzyszbzhns 0xforaC Wl:S'.S'I:S'.S'4UpI' 8 and :yuryeons JF 215 . . . aeleplmne Wa. 62 . . 017706 over from 's Qru-9' :flare 0 Z 711 ' U 'Q A ro Jo 0 efgjone Qc-'niaf Surgeon. . . Offfce nc-'xi io .yjlzofoyraplzfc Saliery 0xforaC WIZSSIZYJILIJPI. ACCOUNTS OF STUDENTS B. T. KIMBOUGH, Pas Sol-'C'TED ...- H. WOHLLEBEN,V P W. D. PORTER, C erchants 85 'farmers ank... OXFORD, MISS. DRAFTS cAsr-can AND GENERAL BANKING Busmzss TRANSACTED SITUATED UNDER CITY HALL ' Za!! order: Zavldsan d 206729 .5'a11z-fwfr .7?ook.s', Jiaizbnery, fewefry JZ?-.vi-Cal.rs food: al .fawesf .9304-.rlzle yjrzbes fdaiclr and hfvwelry Mark a Jpeozhlfy 0Xf0ra7, WIUS. 216 . .-. 1 11-5. Ulm .falzofoiyrapks w1?!z whzbfz Milf. . . oook 13' 17lusz'rkz!oa' wore. . . made by Zokeo. cyzveeny Mo Uxforaf .59-oioyrafer Duplzbafe Cgopfbs can be had any fhne .Iv-,,A,,xA,4 .,, , . 52 J 2 3 1 K l X , 2 v X 4 . c , K Q 4 X 4 L Q s 4 C 1 f c Q K 1 4 X 4 1 4 1 1965 5 3 4 s M982 3 2 2.962 D962 51965 3196? 5 K . 7 1 Q 7 5:99 ,wma Zzoo. woolly. . . Zoo Oxford " " Lioyrakr .2711 szfyfos .yafzoiogyrapfzzb work from Jmalfesi Wbzzkziure io . . .Lalfo Jzko 131 Crayon, Ydafor Caolors, aio., c-'io ......... Uxforad Wzlrs. . . .7Q'1r.s'!zaw Cleanhz-95 ..7?epah'hz.9g and 62 Z, JE ganfan d Joierafzbns carefulfy and .?romp!4y Dane . . . caarries' a full ,61'ne of 5' . H'M P cioilzs, Cassbzzeres ercfz cm! cufor ercb am' 1 Q . Z, gg, and oeskzns Mark sglfaranwfyd ,X 1,2 .slack all file Ibiza and 1017, be JfICBJf0 cfuzilbe 617183 , glad lo show my ,hw to all , , Jaflkfacflbn yuaranleead and fr ces Uxforad Mars. 0xfaraL wzss. ,,, ,,,,, ,,,, ,,,,,,, Zoonsorzhf jaarlor 5.0 fir fmperzhl Wa-fbsfy, lfze Jfmerzban Czhlven 0 560, 000 J azhf- up Ua,v1?a! J ami' of Oxford .Fai and Zggaxilrsf-cl cdd QQCZMS JY genera! Zankzhy u7?llSl3l6.S'S 6"'l-' fo! 00' Uransaciod folzn .lfannznyfon 5 2 ,mc prmwn, ?f0pfI'0f0f I fem forzbe, casluor 21 G. CU. Bllffdloo Q PL dwarf! usiaoo C H d Ng Dealer ihn cydoorwaro WZll'0A6-'S 8 an eonfecnonenes fowelr and ' Cfooks Cauilor See me F - d -y' 5 ' -5, Boys 0f9'9'I an , foie! .yaons Jpooiaofos Domestic fruits W7 j f S I IIJIICHI nsirumenis , M fart? T0B'x-Cfflg-x?C1iEgfC'1iE fancy foods, Jfr1'n.g.s', elo. I tion with above we h I AR CITY HALL Jpoozlvl Jfffenlzon cgzben lo WIND!! and Jpoclacle fdork 1' gi i J 3' ,1 0xlord, miss. Uxfoffff Will'-'f1'efPPf' .Eokoy foie! Ong, .iifozez on Ream- Jquafe. .fafefy ypenovaiod and aquif- poaf ilzrouyfzouf. . '. Jludonis' frado soizbifod. . '. . '. . '. of. . - , . 7'7" f 'QfZjf5jj,,,, Uxforaj Mzss. 14 21 LEWIS gl IVPKEEQAG hardware Queensware Ctnware Southwest Korner Square 0xford, mississippi llamps, Shovels, tongues, Bath Cubs Fine Pocket Zutlerv Razor Strops Hmmunition, Fishing Cacltle, Etc. Plumbing a Specialty Bogard 6: Logan... f fUXim1d Steam Laundrig. L6 Dealers in I Staple Hub JFHHCY GYQCQYIQS , I .... Work Done to Suit the Students .... Cigars, Fancy Candies, Canned Meats for Boys' Supper ...... i Satisfaction Guaranteed Students' trade specially solicited 5 Wagon on Campus on Mondays and i Saturdays .... Clothes li in delivered free of charge Oxford, Mississippi i Give me atrial ...... ' ' Mail Orders Solicited Also makes a specialty of ' I 1 Full Dress and Uniforms to Order DEALERS IN FURNITURELEB J. VVINKLEFQ QUEENSWARE , Q, ...Clie allor... Picture Framing a Specialty Ngvgltigg ings: Foreign and Domestic Woolens Free Delivery Oxford, Mississippi Starkweather Building ...1VIer1d1an, 1VI1ss1ss1pp1 220 Pure Airl Pure Water! .v f .r. Blue Mountain Female College at .al Pnfn Mnfnl Influence! 25 Years of Unbroken Prosperity :Jn LOWREY Sf BERRY' Pfopfietors ll-lg Students this session from 49 Counties in Mississippi, Blue Mountain, Tippah County, Mississippi 300166 Oflgrjsgfg oar ers Founded by Gen. M. P. Lowrey. Send for Catalogue l,I?r?,c!3:g:,aIfilZixi: ZQIE-Alglcglicgll 9'95'99Q'999?5'9Y29'7Q3'l995'9'5'5'Y'5'fl5fQfff12f?Q3Ql?f!i'L51i'3Qio!?3FQ?lQ2?9'!'3Q'5'5Lli?Q!?ff'?9'l' General 5 5 Our Facilities Southem'Agents we printed this book for ug 5 Smith Premier -'-1i"" Pflllllllg SCITOOI HIIIIUGIS are of the best A, ., Q X -A, 'Y -N- hg .J-al l if-A ' U CO' p 1 'P ,aj-5 k f' 'LN-y ,: J 3 ij " : N f K L ashville, Tenn. f ,x.NdZ.n4- ' A , The , , Largest 196 Printers, Lithographers manufacturing C s d stationerssbs 196 sjlfiitjgn me Steel and Copper Plate Engravers inthe Photo Engravers etc. at at South 7 221 ni Qwsity o i ssi ssippi 'founded in :sas ? For Zatalogue and full iniormation address the Zhancellor any ,gg Q35 Q, kgq 24 is-.2 ,gs Q Us 6 Q gal? JE .fi HQ: QQ I 9 .ji Will open its Forty-Seventh Session , September 15, 1893 I I U L All Schools are in charge of Specialists I., f rf i f, ,W i kt, lf pf 'li' sr: 1 ,1 I , gn,- f .577 'ff ' ' I ' I u .V .1 4 It wx X ,g VN il ' I if 'Dr 1 IIS DQDGYIIIIQIII of SCKIICQ l:lIQl'dllll'Q dlltl tht Hrts In the Department of Law the course requires two years for completion J J- Location unsurpassed in healthfulness and beauty .al Tuition is free to all students in all depart- ments excepting the School of Law .5 .al 222 Includes Schools of the Latin Language and Literature, of the Greek Language and Litera- ture, of the German Language and Literature, of the French Language and Literature, of the English Language and Literature, of Belles- lettres, of Mathematics, of Physics, of Astron- omy, of Chemistry Cgeneral and analyticall, of Botany, of Zool0g'Yf of Mineralogy, of Geo- 10gY, Of Mental and Moral Philosophy, of Logic, of History, of Political Economy, of Elocution, of Pedagogy .29 J .al .al Q .g .1 ni .1 .1 .A .1 .11 .Q .Q .1 1.1 .Q .Q .1 .1 .X q?ifif?f?f?f?f?f?f?Y?f?f?f?f?f?f?f?f?f?2-gh. JBeautitul Catalogue on Bpplication. All ala all 'lf' ici lui dll NSW lil Eli JJ. lt my 'Q' all ...Q til ut M W 5 .l. M W it it it it lu. lvl ill E55 U, ,I ill 395 ill it it ll M W Jil. gps N. J. HARRIS, PRESIDENT, JAcKsoN, Mississippi. ilwsigsgsgsgsgsgsgsggsgsfzgsiZsgsggggggiw K- Q. Q. 5. Q- Q. 1. Q. 1. Q. 1. 5. as Q. Q. 5. S. E. kg gd Positions Guaranteed To Graduates of Harris' Practical Business College School of Shorthand and Telegraphy Jackson, Miss. E are successors to L. A. Wyatt, at this place, and are prepared to give students the very best busi- ness training to be had anywhere. We are offering advantages FAI? superior to those offered by any other Business College, and at extremely low rates. Life Scholarship, 530.00 Don't think because the terms are low it is cheap work. It is thorough and on a parity with these hard times. Ours is one of the progressive, growing, and most popu- lar institutions of the South. "A business education is a necessity, and one who enters upon the duties oflife without the guiding influences has all the chances of success against him. We know of no better place for young men and young ladies to go for such training than to that wonderfully progressive institution, Harris' Practical Business College, jackson, Miss. It is doing more for the worthy, struggling boys and girls than any other Business College. Nineteen o its students recently secured positions within three weeks."-jackson Evening News. Q 4 1 . .v"' +1-., v 'sf 4 , I I iJr3:,,Q.F1... 99 t . ' 'N' 5.951751 1' l X 'QP' I' - - 1 , wav . ,N :J -v. V' -1 -'d " "' 77-r.' aj, ' I ,'. '- 151. ,- .iq 4 4 Lv I -, 'f 1. :.'T'. . -1 .V. C .CW A .A 42. -'xg P I r X1 Q ,.-. . A I 'K. 1' 'Q . 7 f fy .1 'v-.pf ' If r 'nrwr u. , . .- , .L , i. .Mx 4 Q4 .- 4' . v' . "'.. .' B ..- . A . ht, ,V .D X , I K Av af ' x J.. I-rf ff' , f',,A ,x,. 5-1 vi I' - Z," . ' -4? ' -.4-'Q . .1- . 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University of Mississippi - Ole Miss Yearbook (Oxford, MS) online yearbook collection, 1897 Edition, Page 1

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University of Mississippi - Ole Miss Yearbook (Oxford, MS) online yearbook collection, 1900 Edition, Page 1

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University of Mississippi - Ole Miss Yearbook (Oxford, MS) online yearbook collection, 1901 Edition, Page 1

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