University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI)

 - Class of 2007

Page 111 of 392

 

University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 2007 Edition, Page 111 of 392
Page 111 of 392



University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 2007 Edition, Page 110
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Page 111 text:

k Mission State Members of the Muslim Students Association talk to students interested in joining the group at Festifall. Many cultural and religious organizations on campus used Festifall as a way to share their beliefs and reach out to potential new members. L. Worcester photo The University of Michigan Hillel, located on Hill Street, gives Jewish students on campus a place of community and learning. Hillel not only provided religious services, but also offered classes, holiday dinners, as well as social and philanthropic activities for Jewish students. }. Kalmus photo features ll 07

Page 110 text:

Reli by connie chan The First United Methodist Church stands on the corner of State Street and Huron Street. Many students found it easy to continue going to church while at school as there were so many churches located on or near campus. L. Worcester photo e. First Uni Methodist C Wesley Fo On Campus According to the United States Census Bureau, in 2006 there were between four thousand and 6.5 billion different religions in the world. At the University, many of those religions were represented by different groups and churches. " I go to CCF, " said junior history major Albert Yao. " It ' s a Christian fellowship that has a 1 on Asian Americans, but is open to everyone of all races and creeds. I enjoy it since it ' s a nice group of people to hang out with, and to further explore Christian theology with. " Religious student organizations like CCF were common on campus. In any given year, there were about fifty active religious student groups in existence. In addition, there were also many churches on campus, ranging in worship from Christianity to Sikh. However, between attending classes, keeping up on homework, and socializing, many students found it difficult to find the time or moi to attend services while at the University. For Jewish students, an organization called Hillel allowed them to connect with others who shared their views. According to its official mission statement, Hillel served as " an umbrella organization for over thirty student groups expressing a diverse spectrum of approaches to Jewish life. Peer-led groups give students important leadership skills as they enrich the larger comi " I like going to Hillel because it ' s a great place to go for Shabbat services on Friday nights, and I get to see friends there that I normally don ' t during the week. The other two places I like going to are the JRC (Jewish Resource Center) and Chabad House. " said senior aerospace engineering major Michael Eisenberg. The University tried to be respectful of all its religions. According to the student handbook, it offered Personal Reflection Rooms, where members of the University community were able to " meditate, pray and otherwise spend time in quiet reflect! m. " This respect of others ' religions was often observed in the dining halls of dormitories. " I ' m Hindu, and so I ' m a vegetarian, " said junior math and political science major Smrithi Srinivasan. " The dorms do have a vegetarian and vegan bar, which is but still makes it difficult to eat in the cafeterias. You basically had to eat a lot of the same things. " Also present on campus were more controversial groups, like Jews for Jesus and the Atheist Club. " I ' m Jewish, but not religiously, " said president of the Atheist Club and junior geology major Jennifer Wurtzel. " I don ' t believe in God, and I don ' t believe that this is a negative thing, contrary to what a lot of students on campus seem to believe. Our group gets together to discuss our thoughts about the world. It ' s very philosophical. " religion on campus



Page 112 text:

The Literature, Sciences and the Arts Building stands on State Street facing Angell Hall. The LSA Building re-opened in Fall 2006 after a lengthy construction project and was home to advisors ' offices as well as the Office of the Registrar. C. Leonard photo - ' LSA junior Jessica Lutz knew her way around Central Campus and as a Mary Markley alum, she also had a lot of experience navigating the Hill. However, when she returned to school this fall, Lutz found herself wandering an entirely different campus. " On my first day of class in Weill Hall, I ended up lost in the building. Finally, I had to ask a construction worker for help, " Lutz said. This story was common among returning students. Friendly construction workers were found in almost all of the new buildings as they scrambled to put the finishing touches on them. The smell of i paint and the shine of new floors graced both the new Public Policy building, Weill Hall, and the newly renovated LSA Building. The life sciences building projects were also completed this year with the opening of the Undergraduate Science Building, located on Washtenaw Avenue atop the Palmer parking structure, and the Biomedical Science Research Building across the street. The buildings were also outfitted with impressive new equipment and classrooms. Senior history major Mike Wrobel took note of the p > siriv changes around the University ' s campus. " I like the new buildings a lot, they are much nicer than the really old ones, " he said. However, Wrobel wasn ' t thril ,1 about the location of Weill Hall. " I have back-to-back classes in Weill, Angell, then back to Weill again. I ' m not sure how I ' m supposed to make it in just ten minutes, " he said. Fortunately, the new LSA Building didn ' t face the same criticism from the handful of students taking classes there. Equipped with the Dean ' s office, the Office of the Registrar, the ONSP office and several LSA department offices, the new building boasted an imposing size and a striking entrance. " The new LSA Building is impressive, " Wrobel said, after visiting the Office of the Registrar. It was not just new buildings that had the students talking, it was also the new wal outside of Mary Markley Hall. " I lived in Markley my freshman year when they started construction there, " Lutz said. The walkway bridging the gap between the Public Health buildings, served both an architectural and practical purpose. " When I lived there, we had to walk all the way around Markley, or through the Public Health building, just to get to Observatory, " Lutz said. LSA freshman Andy Reid offered a different persf on the matter. " I like walking under it in the morning, but I didn ' t know it was brand new, " Reid said. Still, Reid agreed that it provided a signifi :ant short-cut to class, and was grateful for that. " If I had to walk all the way around Markley, it would add a lot of time to my walk to class, " Reid said. Whether the new buildings added time to students ' commute, or subtracted time from it, at least one thing was certain, new construction projects assured that campus was ever-expanding and always updating to accommodate progress. 108 new buildings

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