University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI)

 - Class of 1999

Page 87 of 490

 

University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1999 Edition, Page 87 of 490
Page 87 of 490



University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1999 Edition, Page 86
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University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1999 Edition, Page 88
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Page 87 text:

usical performers, along with dancers, are other highlights of the Art Fair. Music from all different parts of the world filled the streets and kept the enthusiasm alive. all over Ann Arbor are filled with booths and people, leav- ing traffic and congestion prob- lems for many. Thousands visited each year, bringing disruption to this quiet summer town. Fair patrons admire the nu- merous works of art for sale. Art- ists and dealers nationwide con- gregated yearly for this three day event. Special Events 81

Page 86 text:

ANNUAL ART FAIR ATTRACTS MANY-GIVING HEADACHES TO OTHERS In the summertime . Adriana Yugovich vendors from Athens, Ohio, are busy tending to their tye-dye t- shirt stand. The Summer Art Fair provided many shopping opportunities to all. by Jessica Hermenitt Once students left Ann Arbor for the summer, the city became a peaceful place. Families strolle through the Diag on sunny weekend days and the few students who stayed for summer sessior quietly studied at outdoor cafes. Life became relaxed, even boring, until the middle of July whenj suddenly Ann Arbor awoke as |H the capital of art, food and en- ' - " tertainment. .-I3 The Ann Arbor Art Fain brought artists from all over the! country to the University ' s cam-j pus. Life in this corner of the! world dramatically picked up beginning July 14 when artists! began setting up their shops on: 1 1 State and Main Streets, as well .. t ' as on South University. Yh,n |i had been a secluded summer ULlil academic atmosphere now reeked of elephant ears and j fajitas. The chipper of squirrels i was drowned out by garbage . trucks cleaning the trash onL thousands of Art Fair patrons, jl The Art Fair was vacation 1 time for residents of Ann Ar- bor. " Everyone who lives here leaves because of the raised prices and the unbearable sight and smel of trash, " said senior English major Christen Kinsler. The interruption of the peaceful atmosphere of University life in the summer was welcomed by some and rejected by others. Those old enough to frequent the bar enjoyed the drink specials anc activity. For Ann Arbor businesses, the Art Fair brought in business much like football Saturdays, move-in and move-out. Art Fair visitors stampeded towards local restaurants to quench their thirst and hunger, while stu- dents shunned the raised prices of their favor- ite Friday night dinner spots. Transportation was another headache for many Ann Arbor residents. Those who had to travel through the center of the Art Fair drove miles out of their way to avoid the flooded streets. There was one good part of this chaotic time of year in that students profited by creating parking lots in their front yards. For $5- 10, Art Fair patrons could park in front of fraternity and sorority houses, as well as on the front lawns of other off- campus houses. Although this was a plus for some students, others fumed at the parking tickets they received. " I ' m sick of the Art Fair after the first day. There are just too many people in the same area. You have to go completely out of your way to get anywhere you need to go, " said junior anthropology and zoology major Adriana Yugovich I Sabrina Kidd. B i Gary Bishop mixes a batch of his special sweet popcorn. His special recipe originated in Germany in the 1800 ' s. I 80 Art Fair



Page 88 text:

WELCO bv Jaime K. Nelson photo courtesy of McGrath Studios le Michigan League is a common site for banners that welcome back all students. During the summer, first-year students at orientation were invited to walk through the fountain toward the Diag to symbolize the beginning of their college years. The transition to college and moving into resi- dence halls for the first time was overwhelming for many first-year students. For this reason, the Office of New Student Programs created a week-long Welcome to Michi- gan program to smooth this transition. " We use Welcome Week to minimize anxiety and capitalize excitement, " said Jennifer Cross, Coordinator of the Welcome to Michigan Program. " Students have the abilities to get questions an- swered, meet people, and most of all feel confident that they made a good choice when they chose the University, " Cross said. Welcome week kicked off with the New Student Convocation in Hill Auditorium. Students met President Lee Bollinger and were able to feel like a part of the University tradition together as a class. Convocation was followed by Escapade and Artscapade which were open houses at both the Union and the Museum of Art. " As a freshman, I used these events to find out about campus and make things less overwhelming, " said junior psychology major Laura Fajardo. Other main events included Union block parties, where dances were held at each of the media unions, Community Plunge, which involved volunteering in neigh- boring communities, and workshops held by various groups on campus. Maize Craze on Elbel Field was a highlight of Welcome Week as the new class watched the 1997 National Champion Wolverines play the University of Notre Dame on the big screens of Crisler Arena. " We wanted the new class to support their team together rather than huddled in individual dorm rooms, " Cross said, " It helps to feel a part of the University. " Beyond the large events, each new student had an option to attend numerous smaller happenings, such as the Recreational Sports Day. Groups also offered events based on ethnic or religious preference. The last event of Welcome Week was the Resi- dence Hall Association (RHA) Pre-Class bash on Palmer Field the night before classes began. Music was played and there were food and games with prizes. " I was busy moving in but plan on using the Welcome Week activities as a way of meeting people, " said Jessica Young, first-year student in the School of Engineer- ing. " My hall has already gotten to know each other through some of the activities. " 82 Welcome Week

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