University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI)

 - Class of 1995

Page 215 of 426

 

University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1995 Edition, Page 215 of 426
Page 215 of 426



University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1995 Edition, Page 214
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University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1995 Edition, Page 216
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Page 215 text:

The five-otvfive intramural basketball tournament found a sponsor in 1995. Right Guard Deodorant advertised the playoffs, and also gave the champions of each league a t- shirt and a stick ot deodorant. I eg Greg Kessler SJ egan in each of the different leagues. The play- ffs were structured to match up teams and indi- ' iduals with similar records from the regular sea- on of play. Competitors met in the playoffs in ingle elimination games with the winner, ad- ancing to the next round while the loser went lome. This process continued until a champion ras victorious in each of the divisions. Not every sport had a multi-week tournament r season. Some intramural sports and tourna- nents were concluded in the course of a weekend )r a single afternoon. Some of these events in- luded the free throw and three point contests, Ke swimming and diving competitions, and the ire-season volleyball tournament. In each of these ports, a winner or winning team could be de- lared by the end of a day or two of competition. Most of the players welcomed the opportunity :o showcase their talents in competitive play. They were given a chance to see if all their :raining and hard work at the CCRB or IM huilding had paid off. Jeff Burtka, a LSA Junior said, " All those hours of sweat and toil at the CCRB hegin to show their worth when you make a great play in the IM tournament. " LSA sophomore, Onuka Ihe, summed up the idea hehind intramural sports best when he said, " you really learn to appreciate everything that an athlete goes through to maintain or promote their level of play . It ' s hard enough for us, and we are only doing this in our spare time. Winning a tournament would he great, hut as long as I get to play, I am happy. " by John Taylor Whelan 209 Inside Sports

Page 214 text:

nd NOA.tHntil-.il ' :. e court eluding defenders who ach year Michigan students had the oppor- tunity to act out their competitive fantasies on the athletic field. The Michigan Intramural Department attempted to accommodate thou- sands of amateur athletes in dozens of sports. The types of sports offered for competition varied greatly. Some intramural sports included: three-on-three and five-on-five basketball, soft- ball, table tennis, tennis, swimming and diving, racquetball, and ice hockey. Some of the more popular sports were flag football, volleyball, and basketball. The basketball league was even partly sponsored by Right Guard. The company helped 208 Inside Sports advertise the tournament and passed out jerseys to the champions at the end. All the sports however, shared one common denominator as all partici- pants put forth tremendous amounts of effort in order to win. The basic format of most of the sports was that games and matches were played over a season which amounted to several weeks of play. The leagues were divided according to level of ability, so as to keep the games close and competitive. In most sports, there were several independent and fraternity leagues on which players could partici- pate. Leagues were established for both sexes while Greg Kessler a co-ed league also existed. Teams could joint q, v j CIlW simply by paying the entry fee and putting to- gether a team. Teams approached competitive play in several it- different manners. Some teams deemed it neces- , sary to practice on their own prior to league play, } while others simply showed up at the athletic site at game time. As Jacob Gin, LSA junior who was : lc participating in the five-on-five basketball tour- nament said, " I always try to keep an open mind prior to every game, but when I get on the court, I play to win. " Following weeks of season play, the playoffs " '



Page 216 text:

tfjfc Few Tiff an ;tices down on upon River. The Women ' s Crew team was the subject of severaljumoriabout thn aJhieving-University spgnsored-varsity-sWIus. This recognition would grnount to new equipment for the team, and the ability m - - compete antiwfn with the best schools in the country T he Michigan Crew team continued to strive towards several goals in 1995: hard work, rec- ognition, and victory. In order to meet all of these goals, the team worked and trained in order to perform their best at the CICR finals in May. The races, held in Worcester, Massachu- setts, represented the culmination of a season composed of sweat, toil, and anguish. The team raced head to head against some of the best competition in the country. Before CICRs could be raced however, the men ' s and women ' s teams had to make it through a season of practices both indoors and out. During the fall, the teams began the season by rowing on the Huron River each morning. The team was divided into two squads; the veteran rowers, the varsity, who had at least one year of rowing experience, and the novices, who had just joined the team and had relatively no experience in a boat. The novices practiced each afternoon, quickly becoming familiar with the eight person shells in which they had to row. The varsity squad awoke every morning at 5:30 AM for practice. The 2 hour practices enabled the squads to get ready for several races in the fall in such places as Boston, Pittsburgh, and Colum- bus, Ohio. The main preparation for the spring racing season, however, took place during the winter after the river froze. Each day the squads would labor on the ergometer rowing machines trying to increase their boat speed, stamina, and strength through constan and continuous practice. Var- sity men ' s coach, Greg Hartsuff, realized the importance of training indoors. He said, " You beat other boats by training harder than them during the winter. It is this time that is most crucial to building fast boats. " Varsity rower, Zole " Zoltan " Gombosi, added, " I realize the impor- Chip Perersor tance of training on land, however, it becomes quite grueling and monotonous after awhile. I really hate those machines. " The winter training reached its apex during spring break. The team headed to Tampa Bay, Florida for a week of intense training. Andrea Haas, a novice rower, said, " It is nice to train in Florida and get back outdoors, but it is a lot of hard work, not a vacation at all. " After the team returned from their trip, they began to prepare for their spring racing season which included races against such well-known schools as Georgetown, Virginia, M.I.T., Ohio State, and Wisconsin. With enough victories to qualify for CICR ' s, the team then headed off to Worcester for their national championship in May. by John Taylor Whelan 210 Inside Sports

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