University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI)

 - Class of 1995

Page 211 of 426

 

University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1995 Edition, Page 211 of 426
Page 211 of 426



University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1995 Edition, Page 210
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University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1995 Edition, Page 212
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Page 211 text:

t heir jockey for poMtio the line. Photo Courtesy of the Sailing team o o hthev events inclui ichconsiiteJol ie competition coac One of fe lac nother club team that faced varsity competition from other universities was the University of Michigan sailing team. The team was comprised of approximately 35 members, each of whom had to pay minimal dues in order to cover travel costs and other expenses. Among the schools that they competed against and visited in their travels were: Navy, Tufts, Stanford, Brown, University of Hawaii, Tulane, and Old Dominion. Members joined following a mass meeting in the fall. Many people on the team had joined without having any prior experience. The regattas were competitive, however, as older team members were able to teach newer members techniques in practice. Practices were usually three days a week, arranged in order to accommodate the schedules of team members. They practiced on Baseline Lake which was located 1 5 miles from campus. The season lasted from the beginning of September until Thanksgiving. Then, the team stopped competing during the winter except for an occasional race over winter or spring break. Following spring break, the team resumed practice, and competed until June. They did so despite the fact that team mem- bers ' leases ran out at the end of the winter academic term in April. Like many club sports, the non-coinciding calendars between the racing and academic sessions led to many inconviences for team members. This was just one example of the many conflicts which must be overcome by members of club teams. Despite these and many other inconviences, the sailing team continued to recruit and attract many university students to the team each fall. Like all club teams, this initial recruitment pro- cess, and throughout the year, were crucial to the continued vitality of the clubs. by John Taylor Whelan 205 Inside Sports

Page 210 text:

yncl: w i mm 1 11 The synclii ' onirod s vim team cojiducreu .ijjht tor t vo t ' iccJ " ike most other club sports, the University of Michigan synchronized swimming team received little recognition from the University itself, and even less from the students and fans of the University. However, this did not stop them from competing strongly in the Big Ten and against nationwide competition. These teams were always among the top teams in the conference, and usually among the top ten in the country. The sport was recognized hy the Interna- tional Olympic Committee as a fully sanctioned medal event. Throughout the United States, there existed enough talent and drive to help place the United States in medal contention at each Summer Olympic games. Almost all of the members of the national team participated at the collegiate level where synchronized swim- ming had found a niche. The sport had risen into favor with athletic departments due to 204 Inside Sports gender equity mandates at the collegiate level. Schools often found that the female dominated sport of synchronized swimming could help counter balance other sports which had widened the disparity between the ratio of male and female athletes at universities. In order to compete on such a competitive level, the Michigan team usually practiced five times each week at Canham Natatorium. Practices ran year round, though actual competitions did not begin until January each year. Once competitions began, the team traveled to several Big Ten competitions, including the Big Ten Invitational which Michigan hosted at the end of January. The climax of each season came at Nationals where the Wolverines went head to head with the best schools in the country. In 1995, Nationals were held at Stanford University at the end of March. Chip Petei The team consisted of 1 1 active members. During competitions, the team would compete in a number of events in which they were judged on their routines. The events included: solo, duet, trio, and team (which consisted of 4-8 members depending on the competition). Captains of the 1995 squad were Sheri Gritt and Chrissy Jacobs. They helped coach Becky Trombley develop a strong team while promot- ing the sport and the program within the university in order to draw fans. One of the activities that they established in order to increase public awareness was the public swim which was held in April at the natatorium each year. by John Taylor Whelan H ' .petition tr " ' osityofMk er travel cc Members WK



Page 212 text:

While they may not have graced the cover of Sports Illustrated or received endless reviews by the national sports media, the University of Michigan cheerleaders were as important a part of M ichigan athletics as any other sports team. The same degree of excellence and commitment was demanded from cheerleaders as from the football and basketball players they supported. The team ' s purpose was to add an extra team member on the field or court: the fan. Selection to the squad was as serious as that of other teams. The 16 men and women on the squad were selected from a field of 100 students through a series of tryouts. Those who made the cut showed up on campus in August to prepare for the upcoming year. The varsity team cheered not only for the football team, but also the men ' s basketball team. However, the commitment did not stop there. The team had other goals: regional and national competitions and performances. The 1994-1995cheerleadingteamwas one of the strongest teams in the nation, as well as the best cheerleading squad to represent the University in a very long time. Early season practices and weightlifting conditioned the squad for their difficult routines. Yet, through all the hard work, the team managed to keep their pep by mixing up workouts with fun. " Every practice or game was a 206 Inside Sports

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