University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI)

 - Class of 1897

Page 1 of 402

 

University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1897 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1897 Edition, University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1897 Edition, University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1897 Edition, University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1897 Edition, University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 402 of the 1897 volume:

' a G. . .ILD he .... Leading Tailor. . .J 6.wiim-a: 5'- Q ir' -r' . Q v if co G gggyg-vis, 453' y vw 'ig 'FQ I-I , 1s:DE l s e ' ja jf ' N 1 fa 1 . for- A . To Order . . , and made by us, your clothes will defy criti- cism. Every garment you wear should be measured, cut and made to fit your figure to a nicety. There's no peculiarity of form or limb too mi- nute to be considered. To overlook them is to produce a misfit. No ready-made garment meets these minuter requirements of correctness. Our assortment of woolens blazes with pleasing novelties, and is too expensive to be equalled elsewhere. Don't ' be misfitted when these chances await. N0-2 East Washington St., - - NNN ARBOR, MICH ,Z-z-.5 lrxqnfynypi--,-' ' , ' 9 Smith Sturgeon Qo., ZQWQIQYS, SilVQl'SEiilihS, dlld SidIl0lIQl'S, Ave., DETROIT. ' 5555 Makers of Fine Programs, Menus, Invitations, Fraternity Dies for Sta- tionery, Society Emblems, Badges, Pins, Charms, etc. Designs and Estimates furnished on application. Correspondence solicited ....... 5555 MAKERS OF .THE '97 Junior Hop Invitations, '97 Senior Invitations and Programs '97 Junior Hop Programs, '97 Senior Hop Programs, '97 Freshman Banquet Menus, And a goodly portion of all the stationery, Fraternity Pins 5 and Badges used at the .... U. of M' BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS W HR'S Leading Book Store for Students and Book Buyers. Constantly in stock all the New and Standard Publications, which we offer at zo per cent. discount. Complete stock of text- books, Law and Medical, for all departments, at under prices. We make a specialty of fine stationery. Have you seen the latest U. of M. monogram? We have it. We engrave visiting cards, and do all kinds of plate printing and stamping. Agent for Waterrnan Fountain Pens. Mathematical Instruments and Drafting Supplies a Specialty. LIBRARIES BOUGHT AND SOLD. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. GEURGE. WAHR, Two Stores, UP TOWN--University Books, DOWN TOWN, 20 South State St. -ANN Anson- Main Street. 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Sf' ' T X X 5 I , . vb U wg , N ul .X 1 '19, ' ' x Il , ,Q': li , lllvrf r: ' X ' Y x ' N Wg .Q I n n I Sl . w xxlc, X X RR Mkt, , .NNXXNQ e X X K XXX, 'N ,Lt-.. ,.,-5. f ,X Qt X ' ' ' o wk ef AR fb . tion in the way of construcmon, v Q i : A ,J xx ' ill . . 1 'I -. HT.. 3 , t I Rafah 'inf A 'fwgxr J a. ' ' ' 1 "-X i"', . W ' " ' ' t-21' . . . . JL! ' ..Xt fb? X ' "' i I Z? nf , :J . w '. ll 4 rv N D sax 113 12? tx l . ' the country.-Official Report of Inspection by Railroad Commissioner of Michigan. - , YT: - -:Fail Y ., ..-rl, . nm-.:L :.-,, -W...-..l.... ' "Hi Y ------4::l:5: e:,i--,g.-n1gu:?:. u Z--iggezr.-- - 1-ii ' 57 EQ: -- , .4 W' 14 P "kg . Y k Y- "A V " ' if"'F:.:ii ' ' ' -'f' E- ' gf V--i."-7"LA f",, .4 Y 'F earn- 7 5' - f--2 H' ' 1 -""'-:?"- -Y . A ' ' H Y-'2 7 fi 7"5- - --'-- ' - -- V " iii- ,Sl"--HST' Q- - ' W3 'Y T' f-fi - .. '- fel s, -.- Zi Y -.-.QgA1:'Ali'f . --. , In I tligruiii-3.3 '-T '454-:"f'5:t:i""Q'kr fkizl. . 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RUGGLES, Gen'l Pass'r and Ticket Agent, CHICAGO. H . W. HAYES, Agent, ANN ARBOR. LADIES' KNoX SAILORS I Qgdgpced M 5017 .... I5 MAIN STREET. l ll 3 Makers of Correct Wearing Apparel For Men .... g ...KNCX HATS. J O . . .Lanapg and 011 . . . 'Students purchasing Lamps should examine our stock D before doing so, as We carry the largest assortment of any can house in central Michigan. K Our " Red Star" Oil, which gives a pure White light, Without odor or charing the Wick, can be obtained at no other place in the city. Money can be saved by purchasing 44 5. Main St., of us. Remember the place. 't Q ' AAAA!NAAf AA More Shoes-Better Shoes Burgks .Shoe House i Than at any other store in town. Ann Arbor, - Mich. rs. E AA E2 any , std - Mich. t Bere 's to the ZOIIQQQ IU bose ZOIOYS CU Q w ear. X if 6 1 m 'fvr-rw'-9-+1-M.. Summa nnuany bv the cnior irerarv GW and IIQHIQQITIIQ Basses x .,l 'E' 1. '. 7Yfqi'P2H2Zrv3' X I: Ls 4 'Y' fi- may fi is .",'.i.r':. 45, Jig fm 3.-eg 21 ,iff- ,Q , fjfgti? V41 .I ,wh fu ,VJ . .. 1 1 ' , '23, QI,-x .kg .K . iames Burrill Hngell, EE. D. in Rhode Island, 1820 Horn 13411 1550-53 1 S53-bo. ISOU-O6 1506-7I ISTI -. 1580-S1 ISS7 15137 Graduated from Brown University Studied in Europe Professor of Modern Languages, Brown University Editor Providence journal President University of Vermont President University of Michigan United States Minister to China Member of Fisheries' Commission Vnited States Minister to Turkey ,HM . Y ,A --fs v,--fn---fwfr" ' ,,,M ., ., ..-, 1 ,. -vryx 'err' ' '- ' 1zv'gx7?j1Q-'.Z'-TLJ3'3,1"'7,,-,tigil ' ,-f-'-,. -'-'M +' -' t -' ' ' 'l "LA 1 I 4 ! i i i i I i E i K i L I i i i i I i i i i I i I I I i I i i 5 V I L E V wwwq A K r -..i,.......,., .4..., , .-' . 101,--HTIIT1. , . , - ------m ,rw , ,..-..g.-,.. ' - - 11, 1' H -- 1, -v ---'r.f,v.1.... ,,, .V , ,g ,, ,: 1 ------'H-k-1. :-.A-. , --++-V---.i V , 4 4 r .J . ,'1 -V.,,:A,.,1p.,w-, ,. Escutcbeon of the University of michigan Cable of Qomoms . . . Book 0no RQQQIIUS TGCIIIW Gfddlldiilig ZIZISS BOOK CWO 'fraternities Book Cbroo Hrlolotics Book 'Four music Book Five 0manizations Book Six 0F a Literary nature P , V i. T I ' W W G I V 2 i L Z V ! l . s , 5 S x L o HOOK 0316 Regents ..... faculty ..... Graduating Class 0 Sownmgc rn moral vertu was his spcche, And gladly Wolcle he lerne, and gladly techc 6 4 H. Slafzdislz Bacleus, '99, f.-we 1 , Q, S. 'rv , Q A Q A 'M xr-- . 1 ,-, . L Y. Y' e. 12- F 5. JQ, A-, -4 ,QQ is .n Q.. R , ,. 'x U1 ,, 4, 1 f .. .1 1 1 .,, 5 M z 5 A 1 .-.- .... ...... .. . .-.-----'-1-an f 4- ' - I fa: 5 1 ...MQ Regents 190,426 1 ' 0 .z- ----.--':-- an' ,f W ' U9 9 . , . 19' ' F' 1 QONM55 J fiw if . . - . X 1 T'1-.94 L? Y 5 5 . 'gf 1 .9 A E f .WJ 9 Hi 7 Ly - '-:4 f:'J- 7' ---H xr- h 'Z Q. ' JAMES B. ANGELL, LL.D., PRESIDENT. HON. LEVI L. BARBOUR, Detroit, HON. WILLIAM J. COCKER, Adrian, HON. PETER N. COOK, Corunna, HON. HENRY S. DEAN, Ann Arbor, HON. HERMAN KIEFER, Detroit, - HON. FRANK W. FLETCHER, Agpemz, HON. ROGER W. BUTTERFIELD, Grono' Ropioiv, HON. GEORGE A. FARR, Grand Haverz, .i1--- JAMES I-1. WADE, SECRETARY AND STEWARD. HARRISON SOULE, TREASURER. TERM EXPIRES Dec. 31, 1897. " 1897. C6 ' 1899. 1901. ' 1901. 1903. ' 1903 SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION, HON. HENRY R. PATTENGILL, QTO December 31st, I8Q6.j HON. JASON E. HAMMOND, QFrOm january Ist, ISQ7., OFFICE AT LANSING. f --fv A A ' N ' D 1 ,.. ....,.., ,iq 3.5, ,A-Gy, , -.V-if .HAL 4 .M I. 4 I ...Q . . . , u x 4- '. -'n Am?" W" . 44 t A ' K ,., , VY ll V - " r. ' wx Diff 'f1:""1 . ,XY .- ' Q- ' is I le ,IK 5,1 , Ja. 0.7 , 4. mf . ax 1 ' ' - ' gt 5 A. ' r ' A 'J 1. . 'P fr. ' ' 'TU' 4 ..i I PT ' ,wel I ,f,.s ,, ,A I.. , ei'-71 f -f J . ' I. pr." , I J. .' ' .. - - 7 . . ' ' - f . . ff' "V V 'la je r K.. . vt '4-J . . A X ' x u I if A Vx , V - A ' 1 , 4 1 up Uv K1 1:51, sf J 2 .. , ,qi 7 " ' 'MQ' rg-, " ' uf .. , x4 , , N Quia., 0 4' Sf K 1 Avi' 'Q . ' ' 1 4 ' f. -we .eff .. ,M .. - - H , .-. fn . ..+ , . V Ii a' -i ' 81142 , 'ff' "'.1:v:d w. '-'v A P """"' . A' L ' ' . '-'K'.'T?5F4.lQ.f1v'1 'wiv' 'Y "1 .- ,- -, permanent Hpvointments and Hvvointments for terms Bonner Chill 0llC YNY. JAMES B. ANGELL, LL.D., NI' T, .... PRESIDENT- ALBERT B. PRESCOTT, M.D., LL.D., fb X, Director of the Chemical S Laboratory, Professor of Organic Chemistry, and Dean of the School of Pharrnacy. REV. MARTIN L. DQOGE, LL.D., if T, Professor of the Greek Language ana' Literature, ana' Dean of the Department of Litera- ture, Science, ana' the Arts. CHARLES E. GREENE, A.M., C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering, ancl Dean of the Department of Engineering. JONATHAN TAFT, M.D., D.D.S., Przyfessor of the Principles and Practice of Oral Pathology ana' Surgery, ana' Dean of the College of Dental Surgery, WILLIAM.H. PETTEE, A.M., Professor of Mineralogy, Economic Geology, ana' Mining Engineering. JOHN A. WATLING, D.D.S., Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry, EDWARD L. WALTER, P1-LD., if T, Professor of Romance Languages ana' Literatures. . ISAAC N- DEMMON, LL-D., Professor of English ana' Rhetoric. WILLIAM H. DORRANCE, D.D.S. A 2 A P ,P 1, ' . 'Dentistry anclx Dental Metallurgy., , mfeswr of mst the ALBERT H. PATTENGILL, A.M., A A fp, , p,-Ofmo, of G,,,k E' COULEY, M-E-s E CP, Professor of Mechanical Engi- WILLIAM J. HERDMAN, PH. B. M D A A CIP P ' Diseases ana' Electrotherapeutics. , , wfeswr of Nervous A "' 'W' Kilmer , 1 - - PRESIDEM wttiw af the Clumii "Z and Dean of: , g r, fafessof of the G1 Department of Litm ' r of Civil Engineering c ,s of the Principles a' rd Dean of the College s s Mineralogy, El0?l00lE' lpffdfiilt and Clinifdi s 2 Lan we pf Romance leg E s ' English and RIMM 'rvfessor 0 PWM i f , mfs-f-ff" lf Wil . of Mechdnifalpqi NJ Professor 0f Nmigle , I s . i . jig? I f iffig ' 1 iff: s -I .-TF'-QA! ' .sign ,ASR , . ,I q".-je,-' 5 , - 1 7 3, , ef J 3.,,,23 , for-V W si. ' .1I."'5 KH' s .ws ,i -,'P'I: .,..' .I , iff . .Wu v . In . g .If 3 " . . .1 L'-'57 ' 'Ib' 4fq.': H R I WOOSTER W. BEMAN, A.M., . , Professor of lkfathematics. VICTOR C. VAUGHAN, PH.D., M.D., N 2 N, CD X, Professor of Hy- giene ana' Physiological Chemistry, Director of the Lbfgiezzic Lab- oratory, ana' Dean ofthe Department of llleziicine ana' Surgery. THOMAS M. COOLEY, LL.D, A A fb, 412 A 41, Professor of American History ana' Constitutional Law. CHARLES S. DENISON, M.S., C.E., 2 41, Professor of Descriptive Geometry, Stereotomy, and Drawing. HENRY S. CARHART, LL.D., NI' T, Professor of Physics, ana' Direc- tor of the Physical Laboratory. LEVI T. GRIFFIN, A.M., B e U, ip A as, Fenner Professor of Law. RAYMOND C. DAVIS, A.M., A K E, . . . Librarian. VOLNEY M. SPALDING, PH.D., . . Professor of Botavgf. HENRY C. ADAMS, PH.D., Professor of Political Economy ana' Finance. BURKE A. HINSDALE, LL.D., Professor of the Science and the Art of Teaching. RICHARD HUDSON, A.M., . . . Professor of Hz'story. BRADLEY M. THOMPSON, M.S., LL.B., A K E, fb A dv, jay Profes- sor of Law. ALBERT A. STANLEY, A.M., . . . Professor of lkfusic... FRANCIS VV. KELSEY, PH.D., SI' T, Professor of the Latin Language- ana' Literature. JEROME C. KNOWLTON, A.B., LL.B., Z NP, 'D A KD, lV1QzrshallProfes- sor of Law, CHARLES B. NANCREDE, A.M., M.D., N 2 N, Professor of Snr'- gefy ana' Clinical Surgery in the Department of .lWea'icine ana' Sur- gery. Q FLEMMING CARROW, M.D., N E N, Professor of Ophthalmic ana' Aural Surgery ana' Clinical Ophthalmology in the Department of lllezlicine ana' Surgery. OTIS C. JOHNSON, PH.C., A.M., Professor of Appliea' Chemistry. PAULUC. FREER, PH.D., M.D., Professor of General Chemistry ana' Director of the Laboratory of General Chemistry. JAMES N. MARTIN, PH.M., M.D., A T A, Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Hfomen in the Department of Jlffeclicine and Surgery, , -N ,, .4...A V,-... . ,x . K 1 - .V f f 1 s HOFF D.D.S., A .2 A, Professor of Dental Materia NEL,Ylea'ica a1ia'SDentat jllechani-fm. ,S A C s 2 N, P ssor of the Theory ana' Practice GEORcll4Eeclifi1iIiz,n1h'4glini1ZzlMedicihjj and Of Pf1fh0f0!J'f "' me Df' of ' ine ana' Snrgffy- partment of 6 U ANDREW C MCLAUCTHLIN, A.M., LL-B-s A A 'Pr Pfoffm' of American fhstory. :IOSEPH B DAVIS C.E., n Professor of Geodesy and Surveying. ASAPH HALL JR., PH.D., Professor of Astronomy, and Director of the Observatory. LL.D,, , Professor of Geology. ISRAEL C. RUSSELL, C.E., WARREN , Histology. P. LOMBARD, A.B., M.D., Professor of Physiology and .FLOYD R. MECHEM, A.M., CP A Q, Tazfefm Pfvfff-'Of ef Law- IACOB E. REIGHARD, PH.B., A T, Professor of Zoology, and Director of the Zoological Laboratory ana' the Zoological jlluseum. THOMAS C. TRUEBLOOD, A.M., Professor of Elocution ana' Ora- tory. JAMES A. CRAIG, PH.D., Professor of Semitic Languages and Litera- tures ana' Ilellenistic Greeh. ALEXIS C. ANGELL, A.B., LL.B., A K E, , Professor of Law. OTTO KIRCHNER, A.M., CIP A 111, . . . Professor of Law. ARTHUR R. CUSHNY, A.M., M.D., N 2 N, Professor of Mamie Medz'ca ana' herapeutics in the Department of Medicine ana' Sur- gery. 'UUHN C. RGLFE, PH.D., .... Professor of Latin. J. PLAYFAIR MCMURRICH, PH.D., N E N, Professor of Anatomy. HARRY B. HUTCHINS, PH.B., A A 111, 111 A fb, P L , ,Dean of the Department of Law. mfesmr of aw, and TH21ZiAgyai12i320Ci':7E., LL-B-, 'D A in Professor of Lawnin charge of WILEERT B- HINSDALE, M.S., M.D., Professor of the Theory and ractzce of Medzczzze and Clinical Medicine, Dean of the Hom- . fjgfizzlzsgaliicltical College, ana' Director of the Universigf Hospital 5'Absent on leave. R ' 'I Uma, -'4um,i6'Q,L ag?" 'md ons? 09: in thftgff P ' .A , N ' f A 5 ,. 0, Professor of 5 wie? and Sumying 5 my, and 1sef,,,,, of , Pnjessor of Geology or of Physiology and S, T' P'0ff-'501' lU'Law,? ' Zoology, and D' dl Museum. mm. " Elocution and Om. Languages and Liters-I Professor of Law. Professor of Low. '- Professor of Moffffi J .lledicine amz' Sur- ,. Professor of offs' Professor of AMW' Professor of LW' M of law in chofgf of orl swf of W Tgzinlhm' ll. QW' of Hospifal he Unjyffflb' wx OSCAR LE SEURE., M.D., Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery in the llomceopathic lrfedical College, ROY S. COPELAND, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology, Otology, ana Peeelology, in the ffomosopathic llfeelical College. ROBERT M. WENLEY, SC.D., D.PHIL., Professor of Philosophy. ELIZA M. MOSHER, M.D., Professor fy' f6'gl.c'I2c', and Wornen's Dean in the Dejaartvzent of Literature, Science and the Arts. WILLIS A. DEVVEY, M.D., Professor of Ilffateria llleclica ana' Thera- peutics in the llomwopathic llleclical College. FREDERICK G. NOVY, SC.D., M.D., N 2 N, junior Professor of fhgiene ana' Physiological Chemistry. GEORGE IIEMPL, PH.D., , , junior Professor of Englislz. EDVVARD D. CAMPBELL, B.S., junior Professor of AlZdblfiCdl Chemistry. V FRED TAYLOR, PH.D., Z X, junior Professor of Political Econ- omy ana' Finance. JAMES B. FITZGERALD, M.D., , Director ey' the Gymnasium. FRED N. SCOTT, PH.D., , , junior Professor of Rhetoric. ALEXANDER ZIWET, C.E., . junior Professor of Matherrzatics. PAUL R. DEPONT, A.B., B.S., Assistant Professor of French, Regis- trar ofthe Department of Literature, Science, ana' the Arts, ana' Registrar of the Department of Engineering. CLARENCE G. TAYLOR, B.S., M.E., 417 A 9, Superintendent of Shojrs in Engineering Laboratory. JOSEPH H. DRAKE, A.B., A T, , Assistant Professor of Latin. GEORGE NV. PATTERSON, JR., A.M., S.B., 'I' T, Assistant Professor ef Physics. G. CARL HUBER, M.D., N E N, Assistant Professor of Histology. ALVISO B. STEVENS, PH.C., de X, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy. ""JOI-IN O. REED, PH.M., . . Assistant Professor of Physics. WILLIAM A. CAMPBELL, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Ana- tomy, ana' Secretary of the Faculty of the Department of llleclicine and Surgery. DEAN C. WORCESTER, A.B., 'I' T, Assistant Professor of Zoology, ana' Curator ey' the Zoological Museum. 'Absent on leave. WEWWWH' EREDERICI5. C NEWCOMEE. B.S., PH.D., Assistant Professor of Botany. . ,XJOSEISH L MA ' P ssor of Mathematics. RKLEY, PH.D., Assistant rofe MAX WINKLER PH.D., . , Assistant Professor of German. MORIT Z LEVI A.B., . , Assistant Professor of French. NSON, B.S., LL.M., 41 A fb, Assistant Professor of ELIAS F. 'JOH Law. A ' - ' A RBECK, PH.D., fb X, Assistant Professor of JULIUS O. SCHLOTTE Pharmacognosy ana' Botany. WILLIAM F. BREAKEY, M.D., N E N, Lecturer on Dermatology. A. LYMAN, A.B., . Instructor in Mathefnatics. GEORGE 0. HIGLEY, M.S., . Instructor in Genera! Chemistry. DAVID M. LICHTY, M.S., . Instructor in General Chemistry. JOI-IN R. EFFINGER, JR., PH.M., LL.B., an K if, 41 A cp, Instructor in Irench. ERNST H. MENSEL, PH.D., , Instructor in German. WEARLE W. DOW, A.B., B 9 Il, , , Instructor in History. CLARENCE' G. WRENTMORE, B.S., Instructor in Descriptive Geom- etry ana' Drawing. KARL E- GUTHE. PH-D., Instructor in Physics. TOBIAS DIEKHOFF, A-B-, . . Instructor in German. CLARENCE L. MEADER, A.B., A T, . bzstructor in Latin. ARTHUR G- HALL, B-S-, . . Instructor in Illathematics. CHARLES I-I. COOLEY, PH.D., A K E, Instructor in Sociology. IOS1-3I1ZZI?aE,i:.VANCE, LL.B., Assistant Liorarian in charge of the Law IIOSEPH CLARK, . Superintendent of the University Hospital, HAMILTGN REEVE, , Superintendent of Buildings ana' Groumh, :"Absent on leave. TDied oct. 20th, 1896. s . 50,0307 0 f Profes-IW' of . f, fs Hut - Instant 11,0 fgssof 3. of 2, U70 08 Dermatology 's autor an MaM,ma,iM . k General Chemistry, il General Chemistry? 3 's 5 5 4, lnslructoris Instructor in Gerfmzssif Instructor in History. P in Descriptive Gcom-2 I r I . . ilnslructor in Physusj Q I 1 Instructor in German., I Instructor in Latin- 1, r 9 3 'actor in Matlzematim., nstrlltlor in Saci0108Y' n in clmfgf af W N if s . 'mls f l.'niz'eff1U'H0W lb iyjlsiifgf and G'0Wi 5 2 ,, s ' 4 lv: I 0' , J. . :'e v5 ' yy . -1,- . .iff gif? - rs--. ,. ,, , Us 1, R... VIII fffhsl . '- ,gs 11 fx ,V Q fbi 4. ' Q' .dl X2-2' ,L Vis' f , if-sl ,.'q. 1' ,' shifts' J 'nn 1' , --. 'Hs ' 5 1 ' ..,vw I s... h.1Sf,.sjs ' Q -',' 3'1"' . s if vs5fY.V J A FS" . sf, ug, ' n0ll'RQ3IdCllf ECCWYCYS on SPCCIUI t9UICS IN' l896'97 JAMES L. HIGH, LL.D., A X, Lecturer on injunctions ana'Recei'uers. JOHN B. CLAYBERG, LL.B., A X, . Lecturer on lkfining Law. MELVILLE M. BIGELOW, PH.D., Q A Q, Lecturer on Insurance. HENRY H. SVVAN, A.M., Z NP, Q A Q, Lecturer on Admiralty Law. OSCAR R. LONG, M.D., Lecturer on Mental and Nervozcs Diseases in the ffomafopatkic .flledical College. FRANK F. REED, A.B., A A Q, A Q, Lecturer on Copyright Law. ALBERT H. WALKER, LL.B., , Lecturer on Patent Law. ofhfl' .-HNNWIMCIIIS Nl' l395'97 ALFRED H. LLOYD, PH.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. GEORGE A. HENCH, PH.D., Acting Professor of Germanic Languages ana' Literatures. HORACE L. WILGUS, M.S., Q A Q, , Acting Professor of Law. MYRON H. PARMELEE, M.D., Acting Professor of Gyncecology and Obstetrics in the ffomceopatlzic Medical College. EMORY D. LEASE, PH.D., , Assistant Professor of Latin. VICTOR C. VAUGHAN, PH.D., M.D., N E N, Q X, Lecturer on Toot- icology in its Legal Relations in the Department of Law. HENRY C. ADAMS, PI-I.D., Lecturer on tlze Railroad Problem in tlze Department of Law. ANDREW C. MCLAUGHLIN, A.M., LL.B., A A Q, Lecturer on Con- stitutional Law ana' Constitutional History in the Department of Law. RICHARD HUDSON, A.M., Lecturer on Comparative Constitutional Law in the Department of Law. CLARENCE L. MEADER, A.B., A T, Lecturer on Roman Law in the Department cy' Law. JONATHAN A. C. HILDNER, A.M., , Instructor in German. SIMON M. YUTZY, M.D., N E N, Instructor in Osteology ana' Assist- ant Demonstrator of Anatomy. LOUIS P. HALL, D.D.S., A 2 A, Instructor in Dental Anatomy and Operative Dentistry. ' A Instructor in Law. .M. JOHN W. DWYER, LL . THOMASW HUGHES LL.M., , , , mm-oaoffn Law. FRANKIW NAGLER B.S.,, .A Instructor in Electrotherapeutics. W'VI D JOHNSON A M B 6 II , Instructor in Ifistory. L . . , . 0, Q ' GEORGE REBEC PH.B., 6 A X, Instructor in Philosophy. Instructor in Zoology. FRANK R. L1LL1E,PH.D., . . . WAIT, PH.D., B 9 II, Instructor in Greeh, Latin and WILLIAM H. Sanskrit. ' ALDRED S. WARTHIN, PH.D., M.D., bzstructor in Pathology, IAMESIW. GLOVER, PH.D., bzstructor in llfathematics. LOUIS A. STRAUSS, PH.M., , , Instructor in Iinglish. EDWIN C. GODDARD, PH.B., , Instructor in Ilfathematics. HERBERT GOULDING, B.S., Instructor in Dc'5f7'lffI.Z'c' Geometry ana' Drawing. HENRY L. COAR, A.M., Instructor in Irlathematics. VICTOR E. FRANCOIS, . . . Instructor in French. PERRY F. TROWBRIDGE., PH.B., Instructor in Organic Chemistry, . ana' Accountant in the Chemical Laboratory. PENOYER L. SHERMAN, PH.D., Instructor in General Chemistry. DAVID L. DAVOLL, PH.C., fb X, Instructor in Organic Chemistry. ARTHUR LACHMAN, B.S., PH.D., Instructor in General Chemistry. CHARLES E. ST. JOHN, PH.D., A T, Instructor in Physics. OTTO E- LESSING, A-B-, . . Instructor in German. FRANK H. DIXON, P1-LD., C11 A 9, . . Instructor in Ilistory. JOHN R. ALLEN, B.S., M.E., Instructor in lllechanical Engineering. HERBERT H. WAITE, A.B., Instructor in Bacteriology ana' Dispdg- szng Clerk zn the Hygienic Laboratory. JOHN T- FAIG, B-M-E-, Instructor in hflechanical Engineering. CH " 'ARLLS A' RABETHGE, M-D-, Instructor in the Gymnasium. SYDNEY D. TOWNLEY, M.S. 9 - . Instructor in Astronomy. K . -' Q ildrig U f V' 5' OVW? .MQ W. Sc' W-avg bf iv uv nb Inslrlldvf -v in lmnulvfa kk? ,' . lamwa ggurblagy JAMES G. LYNDS, M.D., Demonstrator of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women, in the Department of tlledicine ana' Surgery. ALICE L. HUNT, ,,,, Assistant in Drawing. FRED P. JORDAN, A.B., Assistant in the General Library in charge of Catalogue. CYRENUS UG. DARLING, M.D., N E N, Demonstrator of Surgery and Lecturer on tllinor Surgery in the Department of llfedicine ana' Surgery, ana' Clinical Lecturer on Oral Pathology ana' Surgery in the College of Dental Surgery. BYRON A. FINNEY, A.B., Assistant in the General Library in charge of Circulation. JAMES P. BRIGGS, PH.C., Pharmacist in the University Hospital. ALLISON W. HAIDLE, D.D.S., A E A, Demonstrator of Dental .41 ech a n is m . JEANNE C. SOLIS, M.D., Assistant to the Professor of Nervous Dis- eases ana' Electrotherapeutics in the Department of Medicirze ana' Surgery. V JOHN B. JOHNSON, PH.B., Zoological Assistant in General Biology. THEODORE L. CHADBOURNE, B.S., M.D., fb A 9, N 2 N, Demon- strator of Clinical .Wfeclicine in the Department of Medicz'1ze and Surgery. JAMES SEYMOUR, PI-I.C., . . . Assistant in Pharmacy. SAMUEL A. MATTHEWS, M.D., Assistant in Pharmacology in the Department of flffedicine ana' Surgery. CHARLES D'A. WRIGHT, M.D., N E N, Demonstrator of Ophthal- mic and Aural Surgery ana' Clinical Ophthalmology ana' Otology in the Department of .tlfledicine ana' Surgery. CHARLES H. GRAY, M.L., 9 A X, . . Assistant in English. JAMES B. POLLOCK, M.S., . . . Assistant in Botany. WALTER N. FOWLER, M.D., Superintendent of the University' Hos- pital fflomcvopathicj, and Assistant to the Professo7' of Gynascology and Obstetrics in the .Homeopathic tlfedical College. MARY L. VVELLMAN LOOMIS, A.M., Assistant in the General Lib,- rary. GERTRUDE BUCK, M.S., A 41, Assistant in English. FANNY E. LANGDON, B.S., , Assistant in Botany. BURTON E. LIVINGSTON, Assistant in Botany. 4-viohU'i'v-'rl BEARTHA MQ' FISH Assistant in Botany. AN A. WOOD, . o Q . , Assistant in Museum. 'CLARENCE H. LANDER, A Assistant in Vertebrate Jforphology. ALBERT W, DORR, A.B., , , Assistant in Zoology. JULIET M. BUTLER, sorosis, . Af-siff00f in 20010.51- JESSE E. WHITSIT, B.S., . . , Assistant in Chemistry. ANNIE M. LUTZ, MQS., . A.-mimi in the zwzogaaz Latofafmy. ARMAND R. MILLER, fi' A 6, Assistant in Quantitative A nabfsis. HERMAN EJBROWN, B.S., Assistant in Qualitative Anabsis. JAMES G. VAN ZWALUWENBURG, Assistant in Qualitative Chemistfy. FRANK E. LOGAN, D.D.S., Assistant in the Clinical Department of the College of Dental Surgery. SAMUEL A. JEFFERS, A.E., . . . Assisffmf in Lario. ETI-IAN A. NEVIN, M.D., House Surgeon in the University lfospital. CHARLES E. WHITE, M.D., House Physician in the University Hos- pital. D. 'MURRAY COWIE, M.D., Assistant to the Professor of the Theory ana' Practice of Medicine in the Department of jlledicine and Sur- . gery. HOMER E. SAFFORD, PH.B., M.D., A T, N E N, Assistant to the . Professor of Surgery in the Department of Medieirze ana' Surgery. CHESTER B. BLISS, M.D., N 2 N, Assistant to the Professor of Ophthalmic ana' Aural Surgery in the Department of lllecticine ana' Surgery. CASPAR LAHUIS, M.D., Assistant to the Professor of Obstetrics ana' Diseases of Women in the Department of Zlledicine and Sur- gery. DAVID G' CUOLIDGE, M-D-, Demonstrator of Nervous Diseases ana Electrotherapeutics. GALEN G' CRUZIER, B-S-s . Assistant in PhySZ.0l09'. FREDERICK A. BALDWIN, , . Assistant in Ifistology. HOWARD E. BAKE T R, B-S-, I Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. H ' . OMAS BABURR, A.B.,V Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. MWIM, 'al' in 'le' M tant in Zoology, tant in Z00lggyQ 1t in Chemistry! ic ' al Laboraywg ,1 Ftaiive Anatms. ilative L in Qualitatiog. 7 Department 0 f Q ristant in Latin. Utffibl Hospital. University Hos- rr of the Theory edicine and Sur- Assistant to thi ine ana' Surgery. the Professor of en! of Medioioe sor of Obstetrics edicine and SW' W 5:0145 .Di-feasefs anafi tm in P111-'My' in 15-WW' tant may of Anatomy. ala, of Anatomy ijt ' N1 i ff' " FII 95321 , 515314, ..-.141-. . .. .,..4. . , Y H Y' .41-' , . .. t '?m1- ' AeA Anaelgisi ,.b,W LI LYDIA M. A. DEWITT, , Assistant Demanstrator of Anatomy. ARTHUR E. WEST, , Assistant to the Lecturer on Dermatology, JULIAN MCCLYMOND, M.D., N E N, . Assistant in Lfygiene. SUMNER G. BUSH, M.D., .House Surgeon in the Urzizrersity Ilospital fllomceooathicj, Assistant to the Professor of Surgery, andfnstruc- tor in IIIIIIIOI' Surgery in the Honzzeopathic Medical College. ALICE G. SNYDER, A E I, Assistant to the Worrzen's Dean in the Department of Literature, Science ana' the Arts. ALBERT E. GREENE, PH.B., B.S., A T. Assistant to the Dean of the Department of Engineering. ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL, PH.B., Assistant in Qualitative Chemistry. AUGUST E. GUENTHER, , , Assistant in the Zlfuseurn. CHARLES W. RYAN, M.D., Assistant to the Professor of Ophthalmol- ogy, Otology ana' Pfectology in the Horrzafopathic f11'ea'1'cal College. THOMAS VAN URK, Dispensing Clerk in the Electrotherapeutical Laboratory. CHARLES L. BLISS, B.S., Assistant in Physiological Chemistry. DUANE R. STUART, A.B., 'I' T, , , Assistant in Latin. Special HSSISUMS Ill the engineering I:3b0l'3f0l'v ROBERT A. WINSLOW, ,,,,,, ffounclry. JOHN M. SMOOTS, , fron Room. HORACE T. PURFIELD, I'Vooa' Room. E 3 fr.: 1gi?E: E 5,5-1, ...Z 'rg-B' gg --ng v,.'ff"-I 'tis -gl 4r.-.- ' -L '55-T-J---TT"':."PE Tri " '- - F' "- ' ' 'T 1 fa'-v'. iirvg-SXJ QI? '.: -Nu T-L5- to 'S A -we A' ' r'- - VE t io' -Es fl ai. Eff 4 L- -L, -- 'P .-1.-- ' -TL '- '1"' 791' 7- ' ' -L' -F' 1 -4 -'em-'!l'n!l6fZif 'T L I + , f' " "' ' . 'LT4:f '?1'1' TI---r-L-1... if T 1 "" 1-H "" A - -- ...-34:14 v:-- ' TAPPAN HALL. . 'vw . 4,3-, gi .A4,-- - V-:gpu9.,..'y-'.r -v - --, .-'sf "'0"t. "". IGSS of '97 ill ,AQ ,,i Ali i-A' Il' Department of lliteraturc, Science, and the Bm i r , , Bloomingdale, Wis. ROMANZO COLFAX ADAMS, . President Alpha Nu f3j. Vice-President, University Y. M. C. A. IU. , , , , . St. joseph. LEWIS BURTON ALGER, E X, Entered from Albion College, fall of '96. BAYARD HOYT AMES, . . . - Highlands, C010- Class Orator I-11. Union League Orator I-41. MARY JOSEPHINE ANDERSON, . Battle Creek- NELLIE FLORENCE ANDERSON, VUICCUI, Iowa- FREDERICK STILES ATWOOD, . . . . Saginaw, E. S. First in mile run L21 Second in half mile l2j. Third in mile UU. Freshman- Sophomore Field Day. STEPHEN COIQIE BABCOCK, al' T, .... Buffalo, N. Y. Class Social Committee LU, L21 Class Field Day Committee Ill. l2j. Comedy , Club L2j, LSI, L41 Cap and Gown Committee IQ. GEORGIA FARRAND BACON, , Pontiac, Executive Board, Woman's League L31 EDNA LENORE BALLARD, , r 'Ann Arbor, FREDERICK CHARLES BALLARD, , 'North Branch, GRACE FRANAUER BAMMEL, , Bay City, MARTHA WHITE BANCKER, I' fb B, Jackson. RUSH BANKS, , , r Novi IDA LEO' . RA BARBER, - Grand Rapids. ELMER SERENO BASSETT, Ann Arbor Ilrts i mingdales WiS. - HJ- li . A St. Josephgi t if ighlands, Colo. Battle Creek. Vincent, Iowa. 5. X , E. Saginaw, E. S. e f2j. Freshman- l Buffalo, N.'Y. if rn, m. cqmedi, A Pontiac. s 5 r Ann Arbor. t North Brancllg 8 K Bay Cir-E IaClLS0l1' , Noir? Grand Rapids' rbor. Ann A A it .nt ., .Ak ..,fg, EDGAR BATES, . . . . Bear Lake. EDWIN JENISON BEMENT, Z NP, ..... Lansing. Freshman Card Club Ill. Social Committee l31. Literary Vice-President S. C. A, f3j, Wrinkle Editor LBJ. Annual Ball .Committee ISI. Business Man- ager Wrinkle L-11. Senior Reception Committee I-41. LILIAN MARION BIGHAM, . . . . . Ann Arbor. IVALETA BOICE, . . . Lansing. Senior Reception Committe If4j. MAURICE BUFORD BONTA, . Harrodsburg, Ky. MABEL BOSWORTH, . . . . . Ann Arbor. ROBERT COLLYER BOURLAND, A A fb, , . . . Peoria, Ill. Class Social Committee flj. Class Foot Ball Team llj, l2l. Manager Class Track Athletics 1:11. Board of Directors Athletic Association Ill, l2l, f31. Reserves fl-. f2j. Freshman Glee Club Llj. Inter-Fraternity Freshman Card Club 11. Winner Shot-put, University Field Day E11 Freshman- Sophomore Field Day Izlj. Manager University Track Athletics f2j. Treas- urer Western Inter-Collegiate Amateur Athletic Association f2'l. Chairman Arrangements Committee, Sophomore Hop f2J. University Comedy Club l2l If-31, lil- EVA MAY BOWEN, , , Marathon, Ohio. Invitation Committee l:4l. CHARLES D. BRANDRIFF, , , Missouri Valley, Iowa. Arrangements Committee lf4j. LOUISE MARKS BREITENBACH, . Detroit. IMA GOULD BRIGGS, , . Battle Creek. EDWARD THOMAS BROWN, . . Wolcott, N. Y. JAMES LEHI BROWN, . . Pleasant Grove, Utah. SARA SPENCER BROWN, A F, ,,,,, Ann Arbor, President Woman's League I41 Editor Students' Christian Association Bul- letin L-11. t MYRTLE MAY BRUNER, A tb, . VVabash, Ind. Entered from De Pauw University in '95. RAY HZADDOCK BURRELL, . . . Ann Arbor. JULIET MQRTON BUTLER, Sorosis, . Ann Arbor. MAY MOR'FON BUTLER, Sorosis, . . Ann Arbor. ORMA FITCH BUTLER, , , Ann Arbor, FREDERICK MAGNUS BUTZEL, Detroit. Memorial Committee L41 ALBERT Auaxrs CAMPBELL, Leifers Ford, Ind, ' C ' Ann Arbor. 'BAQY'BISH0P CANFIELD' . ' il ' i Committee Freshman Banquet A L C ' 1 C mmittee U-I. Arrangements. ,ll T 2 , M - mii'iaa'2:E..'2Z1E.110Team ul. 521. l3l, I41- Cavfam Class Ba eau' I J an ager Class Ball Team lf3j. ' ' ' ' , Ann Arbor. LAURAIAUGUSTA CARPENTER, . I on Mountain. WILLIAM RANSOM CARPENTER, A T A, -a - ' ' Annual Ball Committee l3il- . , Coldwater. Freshman Banjo Club Ull- CI-IARLES FRISBIE CHUBB, "Varsity Track Team If3:I. Class Track Manager l4l. Vit. Clemens. GEORGE FRANK CLUKEY, . . . 1 " Chicano Ill. HARRY ARTHUR COLE, fb K T, 9 N E.. . - ' ' nh ' mt 3 4 . Executive Committee of GIGS, Banlo an ikirgrigements Committee of junior Hop f3j. A lBYRON HENRY COON, .... . Ann Arbor. HAROLD DUNBAR CORBUSIER, A T, , . Fortress Monroe. Va. ,Freshman Banquet Committee Dil. Manager Freshman Banjo Club lll. Fresh- man Track Team UJ. Annua Promenade Committee ISSJ. PAUL A. COWGILL, B. Pd., . . . . . Cassopolis. Entered from Michigan State,Normal, fall of '95. ,JOHN ROBERT CROUSE, A T, . . . Fostoria, UNO- Editor MIOHIGANENSIAN f4j. Invitation Committee Nj. KARL GUSTAV DAHLSTROM, . . , Ishpcming. HENRIETTA MARION DALLEY, Summit, Utah. EFFIE LYNCH DANFORTH, A A A, .... Ann Arbor. Enteredlwith '96, Freshman Historian Ill. Social Committee l2.l, I31. HORACE WARNER DANFORTH, . Denver, Colo. A Arrangements Committee 1:41. , 'ROBERT LOUIS DEAN, Q K Y, 9 N E, , , , Hingglalg, Ill, Oracle Board Dj. junior Social Committee f3j. General Ch ' ' HOP l3l- Forty Club Committee f3j, l:4j. Member Social Co31iiJIii:f?ellAi?.lor SAMUEL HANSON DOWDEN, B 9 II, . Greensburg, Ind. Entered from De Pauw University in '95, ANN A . ,E ,STUART .DUNVCAN, K K T, , Au Sable. Invitation Committee 1:41 . HAROLD HUNTER EMMONS - "President '97 Ill. Mana er of fuius C i i i i f Detroit' - - l aasar Company' f3j. President Students' Lecture Associatlon 4 T - . . , ments Committee IE. in masurer Gratoncal Assomanon Nl' Arrange' fiMARY LOUISE ENGELHA RD ' . Ann Arbor l.',,A. A - I ,, Blub tial. Isl AMELIA TERTIA FARNSWORTH, . . , , , Ann Arbor Freshman Spread Committee I21. Reception Committee 1:41. GUSTAVE HERMAN FERBERT, .... Cleveland, Ohio 1 Half and quarter, 'Varsity Foot Ball Team IQI1, 1:21, f31, 1:41, OCEANA FERREY, ...... Lansing Chairman Social Committee IZ1. Class. Historian I41. BERTHA MAY FISH, . . . . DORA CLEMENTINE FISHER, . Executive Board, Woman's League I31. ELLA MAYT.FITCH, . . JAMES HARMON FLINN, AI' T, FRANCES ALMA FOSTER, II B dv, . HOMER REDFIELD FOSTER, , COLMAN DUDLEY FRANK, . Arrangements Committee I41. GEORGE ERNEST FRAZER, . EDWARD FRANCIS GEE, . FAITH HOLT GILBERT, II B dw, WILLIAM HENRY GLEYSTEEN, , . , Recording Secretary, University Y. M. C. A. l41. AUGUST ERNEST GUENTHER, . . . EDWIN BRETT HART, . . NELLIE MYRA HAYES, A dr, DORCAS HEIUDEN, , . FRED HEFFELBOWER, . 1AMES HEGGIPI, . Thornton . Ann Arbor. . Clinton, Ia. Detroit. . Detroit. Benton Harbor. Toledo, Ohio. , Ann Arbor. , Ann Arbor. Detroit. . Alton, Ia. Sandusky, Ohio. Sandusky, Ohio Grand Rapids. Charlton, N. Y. . Ann Arbor. . 1oliet, Ill. ANNIE LOUISE HILL, . Detroit. Class Historian I:l1. ISADORE LEON HILL, ....... Detroit. Manager '97 Foot Ball Team 1 . Class Glee lub a n C f11f. M na er 'Varsity Re- serves 121. Dxrector At etic Association U1, 21, I31, Treasurer Republican Club I31. Secretary Athletic Association l31. I anager Ath- letics '99 Medics El31, I41. Manager 'Varsity Track Team I41. Member Board of Control 41. Reception Committee K41. IDA MAEEL PIODGDON, , . . - Lyons, Kas. Graduate Kansas State Normal School '90, r r 'A I .L ., I4 M, TT HODGE4 A Q, . ' . Auburn, Ind. JULIA J 0 liernher Executive Board Woman's League E31 HDNA- MARIE HOLBROOK, I' dv B, . . - Ann Arbor- S'oyoialiCommittee 1:41. ' Bli1RTONi JAMES HOWARD, . ' Iowa' Assistant in, General Chemistry E31 LEONEIDAS HUBBARD, JR., . Waldmll- Memorial Committee l:4J. CHARLES PARKYN HULCE, . . - Hillsdale- Entered from Hillsdale College, fall of '96. DEWITT CLINTON HUNTOON, A T A, , . . Waterford. Class Ball Team li3J. Arrangements Committee HJ. EDWIN HAYNES HUMPHREY, IP T, .... Detroit. ' tBusiness Manager W1'inlclcf2l. Busi- ' M er Oracle L2 . Assistan Busmess mag ' urer Athletic Association l3J. President ness Manager Wrinkle 3J. Treas Wrinkle Board MJ. Business Manager MICHIGANENSIAN HJ. Chairman I I Senior Reception Committee HJ. HARRISON CLARKE JACKSON, E A E, Chicago, Ill. Arrangements Committee MJ. LAMBERT LINCOLW JACKSON, , Ypsilanti, WILLIAM EDWARD JANES, , . , , , Saginaw, E. S, ' m University Glee Club l13J. Chair an Social Committee HJ. . . . . . Tonica, Ill. GEORGE DARWIN JENNINGS, GRACE WHEELER JENNINGS, Toledo, Ohio. JOHN BLAINE KEATING, il' T, , , , s Helena, Mont, Toast Freshman Banquet 1 . Annual Ball C 'tt 3 . S ' ' A DJ. Treasurer Class HJ. Forty Clubogiargilmgtige i3J, Sita' Committee IESSIEQKEITHQ - .... . Edwardsport, Ind. EDNA BALDWIN KENTQON, , . Springfield, Mo. ANN D . t IE ORCAS KIMLIN, , . Quincy, Ill. WILLIAM A N RCHIE KISHPAUGH, 0 Seymour Lake. BELL KROLIK, A F, , . C d . ' ' . Detroit. aP H11 Gown Committee MJ, GRACE LORD LAM , ' B' ' ' . Erie, Pa. CLARENCE HASKELL L ,J ANDER, Rockford, Ill. MAX LEVITT, , Q I I ' ' brand Rapids. A ALVA EDEN LYON, A . nn Arbor 5, -5 nn Afllnr, 1- 1 - lonig, Q Waldlon. , Hillsdgqe' , Waterford, Detroit. I8 L2l. Busi- President . Chairman Chicago, lil. Ypsilanti. ginaw, E. S. Touica, lil. Toledo, 0hi0- lelena, Mont.- :ial Cornmittet I. 3I'dSPOft9 ringfxeldi Mo' . QHlHCys ui' ieymour Lake' Detroit- . Efler Pl' Rockfflfdf Hi' ids.. Grand Rap l Arbtfr ADH lv 4' 3 l .s I., i .LA ',I. 1 .": - J, . lx , . F .r . lah. .V THEODORE CHARLES LYSTER, A K E, . . Sackett Harbor, N. Y. Reception Committee L41 LESTER ELMER NIAHER, B 9 II, fb A 111, 9 N E, , Chicago, III. Toastmaster Fraternity Freshman Banquet L11 Secretary and Treasurer Twen- tieth Annual Ball L31 Treasurer Forty Club L31 Social Committee L31 Class Base Ball Team L31 Chairman Arrangements Committee L41 Presi- dent Forty Club L41 JOHN BROWRR NICCREERY, . WILLIANI NIARSHALL, . ALLEN BIRCH NIARTIN, . . EDWARD HIRAM STORMS MARTIN, , , , FIERBERT ROGERS NIARLATT, LL. B., fb A fb, RALPH CLARK NIASON, . STANLEY lVIATTHEVVS, CD A 6, , . . . Reception Committee Freshman Banquet L11 Class Ball T Manager '97 L41 JOHN LIANCOCK MCCLELLAN, . EDWARD M. MCELROY, B. S., . . Graduate Michigan Agricultural College '93. KATE ELIZABETH MCFADZEAN, . SUSAN LAURA MCKEE, A fb, . . Class Social Committee L11 L21 L41 ANNA THORNE MCLAUCHLAN, A P, Invitation Committee L41 GRACE GRIEVE NIILLARD, Sorosis, ARMAND RUDOLPH MILLER, fb A 9, NORMAN J. MILLER, , WILLIAM AUGUST MOGK, , . Business Manager U. Of M. Daily L11 CHARLES ITUBICRT MOONEY, JUI.IA LOUISE MOREY, Sorosis, . . . . Detroit. . Ypsilanti. Riverside, Cal. Chicago, Ill. Warrensburg, Mo. . Ann Arbor. . Escanaba. eam L31 Base Ball Lexington, Ky. , Kalamazoo. Port Huron. Morrice Chicago, Ill. . Adrian. Kansas City, MO. Waterloo, Ia. . Ann Arbor. Lake Odessa. La Grange, Ill. Executive Board XVoman'S League L41. Invitation Committee L41 BENJAMIN CARL NIORSE, ,,,,, VICTOR ALPHONSO GEORGE MURRELI., LL.B., . VVILLIAM WILMON NEWCOMB, 'PT, Formerly with '93, , Alpena. Belleville, Can. Detroit. .... .... ....-.......-4... , . .. 2257.. ' A t.' I .vs it . I . N G G , Apple Creek, O, ii 1A CMARTIN W. NUMBERS, CLINTON SAMUEL OSBORN, . Grand Rapids- .BELLE LUCINDA OTIS, , , ,. . U . 0 . Ann Arbor, th-a01,eB0a1'dl:2J. InvitationCommittee 141. LlteraryV1ce-President S.C.A. iq, MARION ADELIA OTIS, C . . . A - - MH Arbor. Editor WoInan's Edition U. Of M. Daily. CHARLES BRAINARD PADDOCK, . . . WiChil21, Kas. Entered- in fall of '95 from Washburn College, Topeka. H K A 9, . . . Coldwater. EDNA LITTLEFIELD PADDOCK, . Concord. MILTON RAY PARMELEE, B.Pd., . . ' ' ' f M. Normalites. Chairman Organ1zat1on Committee, U. o ALICE CARY PATTEN, .... UC Kalb, Ul- T 'ears with Class of '96. Social Committee f2l. wo y HARRY GILBERT PAUL, ...... Peoria, Ill. Class Secretary Dj. ,Class President L2l, Oratorical Director ISI. Secretary Democratic Club Hi. President Alpha Nu Nj. President Oratorical Asso- ' ' ial Committee U1 cIatIon LH. Memor INEZ CHRISTABEL PERRIN, A P, . Detroit. Class Prophetess L41. 'JOHN H. PETRIE, , 51, Jghns. -JULIA PIKE, SO1'CSlS, Grand llapidsn LEWIS CLARK PLANT, , Nuuica. KLAAS POPPEN, , , n . Imrenthe. DOROTHY BELLE POPPY, Kendanvillc, Ind. WILLIAM GILBERT POVEY, , , , luctroitu 'Ifhree years with '95. 'Varsity Glee Club f2j, 1:31. ENNIE M JJ AY PRICE, , Jackson. Social Committee LQ, FLOYD HAMILTON RANDALL, West Bay City I ORLANDO SCI-IAIRER RFIMOLD - - - Class Vice-President L21, 1131, , . Saginaw' xv' 5' QIINERVA BELLE RHINES, K A 9, . Detroit .ap and Gown Committee L41 Executive Board, Woman? Leaggle' UL IEIERBERT 'MATTESON RICH' Middlevaue reshman G1 C1 . ' , ' ' - ' ee ub 1 Mana In Editor I der 4 President Students' 7 1 . :lo ' - Chr1stIan Asso ' tl g- g . man I 1. .ceptism COmmi1t22g1HJP4l- Chairman Invitation Committee Ml. Senior Re- '.! 'fig- ig l '-sr' . f 4 Q . sf,- F1 CD CD fr' Q .au R3PlllS. Ai .ll Afbgrg ' . C. A. fy m A1'b0T. 5' fllta., Kas, loldwater, I I Concord. . Kalb, Ill. f Peoria, Ill. Secretary i orical Asso- Detroit. C St. johns. I md Rapids. 'Q Nunica. 'Q Drenthe. 1 Illville,lI1d- . Detroit. 1a,CkS0l1- est Bal' Cm' W. 91 ginaw, , Dett0if'i ue, Ui' Midd1CVme'.1 nt srudemsi :fe senioft We I ,, i F. I r ' I I 'i H Ven. -S, " fs . ,' I , ff' .4 '33 'I ,..--W ...a i UAA J., , -V f ,, J, WILLIAM BARRETT RICH, B 9 II, 9 N E, , , , Chicago, Annual Ball Committee l31. Class Base Ball Team f31. 'Varsity Banjo Club E41 JOHN FREDERICK RIEMAN, . . . . , . Hadley. Graduate Michigan' State Normal '92. G Treasurer Students' Christian Associa- tion f4j. Chairman Auditing Committee IQ41 CHARLOTTE JEANNETTE ROBERTS, . . South Bend, Ind. LOUISE LOVING ROBERTS, . Ann Arbor. ELLEN CHAPIN ROGERS, Grand Rapids. CURT ROSENOW, . . . . Peoria, Ill. Vice-President U. of M. Chess Club l41. BRUNO LYONI-:L SCHUSTER, . . . Milwaukee, Wis. MUYQRAY MAYNVOOD SEARS, M. D., . Ann Arbor. HENRY ORMAL SEVERANCE, .... Walled Lake. President U. of M. Association Michigan Normalites I-il. IDA ELLEN SHAW, , ..... Clarksville, Ia. JOHN RAVVLINGS SHEEAN, . Anamosa, Ia, Class Base Ball Team I3l. BERTHA MARION SHERWOOD, Chicago. Associate Editor of Ifnlander HI. JOSEPH SILL, , . . . Detroit. KATHARYNE GRIFFITH SLENEAU, A dw, ,,,, Ann Arbor. Social Committee f2j. Editor MICHIGANENSIAN HJ. Reception Committee f4j. ARTHUR MAURICE SMITH, A A db, .... . Ionia- Manager Freshman Glee Club flj. Inter-Fraternit Freshman Card Club E1 . Editor Wrivzkle f2j. University Comedy Club 521. President lV1'1Inlfle 3 . Chairman Class Social Committee f3j. Chairman Arrangements Committee Annual Ball L3 . Forty Club Committee ISI, 4 . President University Comedy Club 31, I-11. Editor U. of M Daily 3 , IH. Managing Editor Wrinkle Nj. Editor 171116711167 f4j. Class Poet 141. Assistant Managing Editor NIICHIGANENSIAN f4j. IIERYEY MONTGOMERY SMITH, fb A 6, K F, , , Bloomsburg, Pa. Entered fall of '95 from Dickinson College, Pennsylvania. ji-:ssIE IIUNTER SMITH, II B 411, ,,,, ' Winnebago, Ill. Dailyilloard Ill. Chairman Social Committee flj. Chairman Invitation Com- IIIIIICC-l'l'8Sl.lID8D Spread l2J. Treasurer Woman's League If3j. Memorial Committee I-lj. SHIRLEY VVHEELICR SMITH, ,,,,, , Hastings Inlcuzdcr Prize 131. Daily Board f4j. Managing Editor S. C. A. Bulletin UI. Managing Editor NIICHIGANENSIAN l4j. Class President Dil. JOHN CECIL SPAULIIING, B 9 H, ,,,,, St, johns. ntcred with '98. v IH... '.j5:..a4'.4:A.- a-.. ........ ......,..- .,... - ,.....Q-,.-..- Q.......................-........,- .M Y . . G Newark, Ohio. CLINTON GEORGE STEWART. I - . ' ' Wesleyan Universiti' 111 95' Entered from Ohlo . Ann Arbor. . 2 X . . . ALBERT HENRY STONEMAN, . D ' Q, V - 0 F -h n Banjo Club flj. Varsity Ba - efC0mm1'teeW ms uiwiiIcrIIc:ANaNstAN L-ll. Arralxgemelau B C111 Freialliiriilalgdarildxolin Clubs L3l, l4i' Educ' 'Committee I-lj. ,MARTHA THERESA STURG15, ' Am' Arbor- ' Ann Arbo EDSON READ SUNDERLAND, . . - - D - 0 r. Ed.t U of M Daily L31 Managing Editor Lf, nf LI. Daily I41. President llglliiloisophical Society Dj. Invitation Committee L-ij. RICHARD Huss SUTPHEN, 9 A X. - - - D'?'la"Ccf 0550. Toast Freshman Banquet UI. University Glee Club IQI. UI. 141. Senior Re. ception Committee DH. GEORGE ROBERT SWAIN, . Lakepori, N. H. FREDERICK TYNDAL SWAN, i'f'lSflfH11, N. Y. . , , Grand Rapidg RALPH CONE TAGGART, A A fb, . ' ' Cl b UI. Invitation Committee Annual Ba Inter-Fraternity Freshman Card u f3:l. Arrangements Committee I-tj. , , Whcclcrslmrg, Uhio, WESLEY EWING TAYLOR, B 9 TI, . ' ' ' ' " Track Team Ill. UITICIC Board fzl, Treasurer Class Social Committee U j. 94 Auditing Committee I41. IDA BELL TENNEY, . Troy, Ohio. . , South Bend, ind. JOHN FREDERICK THOMAS, . . , ' ' ' ' Ed't r l7llll7'ldCY'l'1lil. Managing Editor President Adelphi Literary Society L3j. 1 O U. of M. Daily UI. Class Secretary I-11. FIRMAN T HOMPSON. . . . New Carlisle, Ohio. M Y MOCLEAN THOMPSON, , ,,., pontiac, AR C1355 P03955 ill- U- Of M. Daily Board UI, Ijlfl. Chairman Tax Commute! Freshman Spread l21. Memorial Committee UI. LILLIAN MEDORA TOMPKINS, A 41, 0 Y, Bay Ciiy, 4' N1 arahall. SIDNEY BEA-CH TREMBLE, Z , , , n , 8 'Manager '97 Base Ball Team L21 Assistant Manager Glce, Banjo and Mandolin Clubs 531, MONNA JULIA TUCKER, . Ann Arbor. PAUL HAROLD VERNOR ,,.. . ' ' Marshal TfaatfaasansaazzvffiiY on .0 lifl- 011' GRACE BUNTING WALLACE' --.. Port Huron- ' Member Executive Board of Womanis League Ui '97 Vice-President Ni -vark, Eghip Q' -Ann Arbqg arsit ' trrangeglinnif Y Ann AME Ann Arm l- Presidqr fiance, Obi, - Senior r eport, CN, tsdam, N, Y -rand Rapifl e Annual Br zrsburg, mole Board ll Troy, Oli lm Bend, Ir lanaging Editg I' Carlisle, Oll . ' Pontir Tax Commit A Bay Cir Marsli jo and Mandi . Ann Allf Marsll inches l3l- G r v Port Hlli residentlq T NELLIE MARGARET WALTERS, A A A, .... Ishperning. Finance Committee for Freshman Spread E21 Class Vice-President E21 E31 Senior Reception Committee E41 CHARLES LEE VVATSON, . . Cornnna. STELLA WESTCOTT, A fb, ..... Maywood, Ill. Oracle Board E21 Vice-President S. C. A. E41 Memorial Committee E41 SARA LOUISE WHEELER, ..... . Kalamazoo. JENNIE PATTERSON WHITE, .... . Peoria, Ill. Business Manager Woman'S Edition Inlclndcr E31 Executive Board Woman's League E21 E31 Editor NIICHIGANENSIAN E41 Reception Committee E41 ROLAND DARE VVHITMAN, Z NP, . .... Ann Arbor. Freshman Card Club E11 Reception Committee Freshman Banquet E11 Oracle Editor E21 Oratorical Executive Committee E21 Chairman Decoration Committee, Annual Ball E31 SARAH FRANCES VVILCOX, Sorosis, Adrian. Reception Committee E41 BENJAMIN GEORGE WILKINSON, , Battle Creek. THERESA GERTRUDE WILLIAMSON, New York, N. Y. JEAN WATSON WILSON, ...... Detroit. Associate Editor Woman's Edition Inlclnder E31 Treasurer Woman'S League E41 Cap and Gown Committee E41 MAE WOLDT, . . . Indianapolis, Ind. JOHN DAVID WOMBACHER, ...... Peoria, Ill. 'Varsity Foot Ball Team E31 E41 Elected 'Varsity Captain for '97 E41 MORRISON COLYER WOODARD, dv K E, , . Clinton, Wis. Entered from Northwestern University in Fall of '95. JED FOSS NVOOLEY, ,,,,, Kanab, Utah. DANIEL HUBBARD WRIGHT, Mason. ELIZABETH ZAHNER, ..... Saginaw. DCIMITIIICIIY Of EIIQIIIQCITIIQ FRI-:D LOUIS BAKER, . .... . Hillsdale. MARK BARY, . . . Detroit. ARTHUR NVOODNVARD BIRDSALL, , Lapeer. DEWARD AUGUSTUS BRITTEN, , , Ann Arbor. Formerly with '96, Arrangements Committee E41 FREDERICK PIENRY BURDICK, ,,,, Saginaw, E. S. Member '96 Freshman Glee Club E11 Member 'Varsity Glee Club E21 pf V Ml . 5, sul, 1 'Q .L - v ' . . Detroit. 2 '15 . . - ' M- WOOLSEY CAMPAII' , 3 . General Chairman Annual Ball ' ' 9 ' le 2 0 . Three years yv1thP9tiiadl-'Z3:':boE'3Y7r1i1I1i7f,itltilnfciommmee I 41, E31 Editor at GEORGE MOSELY CHANDLER, B 9 IL 9 N Ev - Chlcago' m' 'Arrangements Committee, Freshman Banquet U1- FHANK CULVER CHESTON, 111 A 6, Williamsport, Pa, RALPHk COLLAMORE, 9 A X, ' Toledo, O- Treasnrer University Y. M. C. A. i31- EMMONS COLLINS, . . Western Springs' Iu- CHARLES OLNEY COOK, .... . u . Detroit. mittee 11, Social Committee I2j, Qraelo - B t Com Chaggrig fggesiglii-leaciior Tkliiliileetic Board 31, Elica-President Athletic Association L31 Assistant Foot Ball Manager E4 . Financial Secretary Athletic Associa- tion l:4j. Class Social Committee 4 . . Saginaw. A WILL 'EARLES DEWITT, A T, . WILBERT SHEPARD DREW, . . Hillsdale. ELMER MYRON ELLSWORTH, . Thornville. THADDEUS LOOMIS FARNHAM, . Green Oak. Class Foot Ball Team L21. Class Base Ball Team, End, E31 HJ. Ball Team Llj, f2j, 131. 'Varsity Foot Ann Arbor. Alpha Nu representative final University Debate f3j. President Alpha Nu Ml. HENRY GEISMER, . . MELVIN ALBERTUS GILBERT, , , Bloomington, 0, HENRY THOMAS HARRISON, , , St, Lguig, ?REI?ERICK WILLIAM HENNINGER ,,,, Brooklyn, 0, Vaffsiiriiofgiallviize 8:,Sgf2.i2,i Tszsia Eili:.igi20r132.i1in' A""wC Bm' LOOMIS HUTCHTNSON, ,,,,' . . Ann Arbor. Clasflgljfaglgcllggggzleggginigggelgault 111, f31, 'Varsity Foot Ball Team, End CARLYLE KITTREDGE, , Ann Arbor. JOHN ALEXANDER LAMONT, .. Detroit. JOHN GORDON LEWIS, Sak Park, nl. . ELMER DANIEL LEON, D ' Dexter. WILLIAM FREEMAN MARTIN, Chicago, nl. THOMAS FRANCIS MCCRICKETT, , Bay City N I 1 E Ji' Dx, -1 " Detroitiii' ff mal Bambi aS0.I11. is ,. 1. I i wrt, Pg i nl, . 1 E iledo, is i iI1SS,I11. Detroit. :Jr Q1'3.Cie Ssoclation - c Associa- E Y 9 Saginaw, 1 - 1 Elillsdale. 5 i i bornville reen Oak. 1 arsity Foot 5 nn Arbor. ha Nu f41. ington, O. St. Louis. 1 Joklyn, 0. f letic BOMA P Kun Arbor. T earn, End Ann Arbor- k Park, IH' :hicago 11' Bay Cali N . . it JOHN HAROLD MONTGOMERY, .... Ann Arbor. Board of Directors Choral Union f3J. If-41. Treasurer S. C. A. L31 General Vice-President S. C. A. 1:41. HENRY EVANS MOORE, Saginaw, E. S. LYMAN 'FOOTE MOREHOUSE, , Big Rapids. CHARLES JOHN HOLLAND MORITZ, . Saginaw, W. S. WILLIANI FRBDERICK VALENTINE NEUMAN, . . Romeo. FAY DE VEAUX OLMSTED, . . . Detroit. E. GALE OSBORN, Owosso. Treasurer S. L. A. I-LJ. JOSEPH PERRIEN, JR., , . Ann Arbor. GEORGE CHARLES PRATT, , La Grange, lll. WILLIAM HARRISON RIPPEY, ..... Sturgis. Recording Secretary Engineering Society lf2J. Treasurer ff-31. President IQ. Business Manager '97 Technic 1:4-J. FRED COLEMAN ROBERTS, . West Elkton, Ohio. FRANCIS JOSEPH SEABOLT, . . Ann Arbor. WESTON SMALL, . . Amboy, Ind. CHARLES GILCHRIST SIMONDS, . , Schoolcraft. EMIL G. STRUCKMAN, , Bartlett, Ill. ARTHUR CHARLES TAGGE, . , Ann Arbor. MELYIN SUTPHIN TREVIDICK, Saginaw, E. S. ALEXANDER GEORGE UNSOLD, Detroit. FREDERICK ELWOOD VICKERS, . .... Ishperning. Vice-President Engineering Society fi-31. Technic Board f3j. Chairman Technic Board I-11. Chairman Cap and Gown Committee f4j. THEODORE VLADIMIROFF, , , , Philippopolis, Bulgaria. Entered from American Scientific Gymnasium, Saurokov, Bulgaria. CHARLES DISLMAR WEBSTER, , , , , , BAY CITY. Freshman Glee Club lflj. .Choral Union Librarian II!-ij, Dil. Tech. Glee and Mandolin Clubs HJ. Director '99 Freshman Glee Club. ROY RODNEY XVILEY, ,,,,,,, Peoria, Ill. Reception Committee Freshman Ban uet ubstitute on ' Foot Ball Team . q LIJ. S I 97 l2j. Secretary Class f2I. f3j. Class Cane Committee, f2j. Business Mana- ger Tech Mandolin Club IQ. Editor MICHIGANENSIAN f4j. Invitation Committee I-ij. ,L , .V I W ,E . ' 'Pr' , Q ."I, A . Ann Arbor. ALTERIHEMAN WOODS, - I 51' Committee L41 Au I 1 mg Iron Mountain. IRVING CHARLES WOODWARDa 'PA 91 ' - ' L4j. Chairm an Memorial Committee f A Depamnem of Law d CHARLES FRANCIS ABBOTT, A.B., , West Gar ner, Mass, Entered from Dartmouth College. CHARLES STEWART ABBOTT, - ADH Arbor' CHARLES WILLIAM AIRD, LL.B., Denon' Entered from Detroit College of Law. MAX WELLINGTON BABB, A.B., B 9 II, , , Mt. Pleasaflf, I8- ' University. Class Prophet L31 Washangtorvs Entered from Iowa.Wesleyan AUGUSTUS HOSTETTER BAER, . Belleville, Ul- Birthday Committee L31 GRANT. CHARLES BAGLEY, K E, Provo City. Utah- Editor MICHIGANENSIAN L31 JAMES F. BAILEY, . - 52lYefSViUe, Ky- CHARLES L. BARTLETT, . . . Battle Creek. , , Kansas City, Mo. A THOMAS ALBERT BERKEBILE, A X, Class President Llj. Class Representative in University Oratorical Contest L11. JAMES H. BLACKBURN, .... Mt. Vernon, Ind. Recording Secretary Class L3J. l CHESTER GROVES BROWN, A X, , Anderson, Ind. WALT'ElQ M. . CHANDLER, ..... Dallas, Texas. Inter-University Debate, U. of M. vs. Chicago University L3j. ROY 'ROSCOE COOMBS, , , , , , Defiance, 0, Class Manager Field Sports L31 H'ERBERT ALLEN DANCER, B.L., , , , Am, A,-bor, Graduate Literary Department '95. Treasurer Class L31 LUTHER FERGUSON DONAHEY, , , , . Napoleon, 0, THOMAS JESSE DRUMHELLER, , . wana Walla, Wash ,V . ' 0' I a1E:5i31?.aSe Bell Team LU- Reserves L2j. Varsity Foot Ball Team, Quar- FREEMAN FIELD, A A tb, fb A qi, K 0 B, Detroit T . . , . . . s 4 , 0 W0 Ye-HIS Wlth 97. Consolidation Committee, Mrcnxomaassxan-Ras Gas-ras L81 , ROBERT M. FOUTS' a .... , . . Troy, O 6 A ,V , ,AL 'ay Stl .I'I . 'IT I-gr. . if O 5' 44, ountaini DH Arbor Detroit. easants I3.. ashrngtonis leville, Ill, ityg' Utah. Irsville, Ky. tttle Creek. .s City, Mo. Contest L11. Vernon, lnd. derson, Ind. tllas, Texas Defiance, 0- Ann Arbor. lapoleon, 0' vaua, Wash' Team, Q Detroil- Es GEs'rAEl3l' Troy, 0 , Hal' HAIQRY YERSHELLE FREEDMAN, LL.B., Portland, Ore Entered from University of Oregon Law School. Corresponding Secretary of Class L3l. FRANK FORREST FREEMAN, LL.B., , Entered from University of Oregon Law School. ALRIQITI' J. GALEN, LL.B., . . . Entered from Notre Dame University Law School. Portland, Ore Helena, Mont RANSOM GARDNER GEORGE, A.B., A A fb, fb A dr, . . Ypsilanti Graduate Literary Department '93. 'Varsity Glee Club L2'I, L3j. Class Treas urer L21 Editor NIICHIGANENSIAN L31 JAMES SUMNER HANIDY, A.B., .... , Ann Arbor Graduate Literary Department '95. Comedy Club L2j, L3j, Class Orator L3J,W DAVID N. HARPEIQ, . GEORGE BLAIR HARRISON, . . Wll.l.IAhi LINCOLN HAR'f, A T SZ, Class President L31 PIICNRY NISPHI HAYEIS, Class Historian L31 CHARLES WILFORIJ HILLS, . ALBERT KOCOUREK, . Class Poet L31 CIIARLES THOMAS LAWTON, HAIQRY ALBERTUS MILLER, CHARLES MARTIN MILROY, KARL ROSWELL MINER, 'Varsity Glee Club Llj. CHARLES LEROY MOORE, Editor MIOHIGANENSIAN L31 IAM:-:S TIMOTHY NORRIS, jr-:SSE FRANCIS ORTON, A.M., . . . Graduate Literary Department '93, A. M., Cornell '95. . Milford Topeka, Kas Inverness, O Richfield, Utah. , Ann Arbor. Columbus, O. . Ypsilanti. , Dowagiac. Bellefontaine, O. Ann Arbor. . Sparta, Ill. Watertown, Wis. . Ann Arbor. WILLIAM HENRY PADLEY, , , , Howell. BAYARD TAMANUND RILEY, B 9 II, ,,,, Paola, Kas. Class President L21 Washington'S Birthday Committee L3j. ALBERT THOMAS ROGERS, JR., , , East Las Vegas, N. Mex. EMMET CHAUNCEY ,RYA1Y, PH.B , Entered from Scio College. ' Class Valedictorian L31 - DUANE CHARLES SALISBURY, , . . , . . , New Cumberland, 0, ADD Arbor' B A X, . Lawrence, Kas. FREDERICK B. STANLEY, A. ., Entered from Earlham College. CLARE HART STEARNS, fb A dv, ,,,, Kalamazoo Washingtonvs Birthday Committee Ll. Editor MICHIGANENSIAN faj, ' B S K 2 . . Rockport, Ind' ARCHIBALD STEVENSON, . ., , Entered from Purdue University. EDWARD FRANCIS WEHRLE, Entered from State University of Iowa. CHARLES EZRA WHITE, K E, ROY H. WILLIAMS, PH.B., fb A 9, dv A fb, Mt. Pleasant, Ia, . Niles Milan, O Class Vice-President l3j. I' f l jg ,I I', .l' I . - ,J nqb ' " "!Au' .7 Il' :'i22"lug:-mf ' q I wr I gl' Il 1 'J 1 , ,eif'14Lu- . .. Siyg,gg,gggi5,1ggg,g,g ' 3 .Q J , -.zffhv .... ' -fe 'gsiiin lg! if NX "3'3'1 -. M- - -A gg., 41 ' ff'.. - .1 .. mer1a1id,,0,2Q Ann Arbor? ence, Kagf. Kalamazoo. gkport, Ind! '1easant,:Ia. , Nlles, Milan, 0. ook CW fraternities... , 1 w eq- :,, ft1'w- Q ,. . . aimgJ"'p-'.'f-UL" f ' ' I , 'v5','h", . " ' -' A""f--w, ' E' -5 ' "W" 52 ' '.gw?i',ak, -'K-,P X , f f 1 Q K r 2 ,it QF 'L -. x 55411:j1".Q14iA:jgf,'f4-:Q, fgihlx M35 ,,-H11 Q gi I ,..-,mf-, ,- X M 'E 5' sf - ..., l. mfs 1 I ll Hx D, ,L mf,-S. 7 Gr' gi, se A 6 ' v 14?-Wim J' , -l"..flw' 55 ' f,.'j.'k Qgj. 1 vlfryg 2'2" jig 1. x , 4, f ,. ' z 5 af. . ,, fp 1:15 ,Y V. A. , Y I V- . jgfl'!4JaQ1g'2m:fLfQA, 0. A , ' a A A l KN.. ,. . . . . No Muse hath been so bold, Or of the new or of the old, These elvish secrets to unfold, That lie from others' reading, Q 0 ' J' 'fil'?f"f"f'V4fj.:,- '-- uf' " .ff 52 V- ' ,. 117 ,,f1'i,7,1-.,,.7Qi 44' gghg. ...fn 'fzyf U I 1. ,-1 l , . . . , ' 1--V, 14-,,,:..s-"hi,11fyf'f Lia. ,gn -r .- ,4 , ..1 . .5-en t gg.: ggy, 'mf gnu: J lv 4, V 1 A ., gm ' Q wa. " 51 k, 0 boi he unfold! eadingg ,-:'.,, .V -A: L, lgg -C ' .1 'wt A 1 .- ,' P1 -5, Me, .g'fLf1?z'z'.vh l?nrX'1g,v, 'QQ '15 F 1: v:,. 1, -0 nv A . . iz Qu- , vf ,Af -,f ,-.,,, '.l"' 4 ,F fl ,n . 1 .J 5. ln 5 3, Q, ' - .,,, E' AJ. '5 J ff ,lr ,-,-41' li .5 WT," .Q-Q .95 Tie' ,gn mx, Uv , sf' .fi .. 5 'V ...QU iff' ' ' f -3 -' 12 rqv-fwvfvx rat rnitv of bi Psi Founded at Union College, 1841 4 4 Roll 01' IHIPIMS ,ALPHA PI, . - ALPHA ,THETA, ALPHA M ALPHA ALPH ALPHA PHI, . ALPHA EPSILON, - ALPHA UPSILON, - ALPHA BETA, ALPHA CHI, - ALPHA PSI, U, . A, ' ALPHA TAII, - ALPHA NU, - ALPHA IOTA, . ALPHA RHO, ,ALPHA XI, . . ALPHA ALPHA DELTA, r . ALPHA BETA DELTA, . Union College , Williams College Middlebury College-, Wesleyan University , Hamilton College- University of Michigan Furman University University of S. Carolina , Amherst College , Cornell University , Wofford College University of Minnesota University of Wisconsin , Rutgers College . Stevens Institute University of Georgia Lehigh University ALPHA GAMMA DELTA, Leland Stanford Jr. University ALPHA DELTA DELTA, ,... University of California Hlumnl Jlssociations ASSOCIATION OF NEW YORK CITY, . . . New York ASSOCIATION OF MICHIGAN, . , Detroit ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH CAROLINA, . Columbia, S. C. ASSOCIATION OF ALPHA ALPHA, , , , Middletown, Conn. ASSOCIATION OF ALPHA XI, .... Hoboken, N. I. ASSOCIATION OF NORTHERN NEW YORK AND NCEWICENGLAND, , , , ASSOCIATION OF ALPHA RHO, , ASSOCIATlON OF WASHINGTON, , , ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN NEW YORK, ASSOCIATION OF -NORTHWEST, , ASSOCIATION OF CHICAGO ASSOCIATION OF PENNSYLVANIA, Q I A . ' Albany, N. Y. New Brunswick, N. Washington, D. C. . Rochester, N. Y. Minneapolis, Minn. . . Chicago, Ill. . Philadelphia, Pa. x,..,.,,"4v.y. ,, 1 i V ,VQ R K ,Ag Q Y 1 Unioh C611 illiams C WV V olleg, lebuw Collg Yan 'Univemii milton College VY Of Michigg nan Univergigl of S. Camui mherst CollegZA nell Univergini Vofford Colleggf y of Minnesobg ty of Wisconii Rutgers Colleg- tevens Instituil :sity of Georgf high UnivefsanQ 1 Jr. Universihf' ty ofCa1ifomE ,x L 1 New YOFE . Detwg Columbia, dletowll, Conf? Hoboken, N- V Albany, NWQ zrunswick, N-1 shington, a0chCStCl'a 1neap011Sv' M'E , Chlcagov Pg niladelphw' 'E . 2 s vw--'ag :gg-' "ff '-'Qi ,whisk ,.j-,v V 1175- ,rf- . 723.35 3 - - L7 ' ,H fl: ,S 1:-,-x 1 t -,Q , zgfa ' 3353? Jgigiil ' ,, 2 Y 1155: .T --ff. W, Y,':'l?-E-?,:' '-'2 'f-'Y " , , , ..,,:s-E- Y- Y--LA--f - -1-,1---f'. f':, ,,,,,,. . , H ,lfL::::4'L11: :L,,-r .. ,-,-, :.,, ,nib A., L,:f:,, Z, , W in-TAA , ---::: --N - -7:13--,,,::,.--Luvf,-12 -Ii" - 1' '-' ' ' W Q- ...wzgfw ,, - ,.,, YM, Drrlfn .Ph N1 lf. li' 1 v 1 5 1 3 , a .X , 1' 1 4 N . N 1 1 , 1 . .A ' w . . I , 1 A 4 E 1 'z 1 A 1 , 1 ' ! .N Y Q , i 1 ' '1 -l i X 1 . I , .I 4 -. 2 1 .J -I i I 4 , . . N I .H " fl 14, 5'..- , A . P LLL .L..4...,..x.... - .. - bi PSi 4 9 4 Alpha Epsilon, Established 4 4 9 Fratres in llrbe 1845 W BRADSHAW, D.D., A.M., '60 WM. W. DOUGLAS, A.E., '70 L DUFFY, A E., '93 JAMES F. BREAKEY, M.D., A.E., '94 Francs In llniversltate Z. KENT GRAHAM THOMAS JOHN WEADOCK HAROLD MARTIN BOWMAN RALPH RAYMOND BOWDLE CRAIG CARLTON MILLER JOHN BENJAMIN THIELEN IGNATIUS DUFFY CHARLES FISH RATHITON CHESTER LEIGH BENEDICT FRANK WILEY SHEPHARD JAMES ALFRED BARDIN HAZLETT NORTON CLARK LAFAYETTE YOUNG, JR. VERNOR ELIZA BUSH IAYX- .I RMK fu Vjux MN xx Q f -X "s" - 1 1 gk +9 .43-nk , , , .4 N KN, x,g,, 5 I sr., .- - - -...L -- an uno I XXXx X Xl X .11 Y G ' A I X , x X 1 X - - I Q SA. f. . , .. "5 -' mix Xi' I 1 fs"' I -?+ KO NI I , 'J' IRL. 'N - n X -1 . 'A 7- .' ' .-'I'.,., ,Qi ge.-.-... ' ' ' : J .li 1, L 7 li Hu ji' SS: .,Jh"'l"'5:'.'3 ' H l .. . S , I 'I 1 5 'Q fi F I 2,Q-3x.g-?54g2-11:17-..' : I 3, . . .. t1.,f.::-IA-,',,.g xx 5 a.0.'.':. 4 ness Eff , ' v '.'. Q'9','.'o' .Q .is 5. I ' W' v' 5 1 g G I H . ...Q-1 X -n.---:-""- -L ..:"'N .QPU 'I:L',E:"i1,f,KQ'.s'3 . ,...... .....:..7- 31: ..-A . I 2. I L .I . I if-'.-. .fiE".1,, . a ' , g.. C, t ,' 4 1, ,,,.,. . -L-. .'. ,, . ..- A. . - L'1'1f'-1---1 - -. :- - f' -1a-1fj':'-r2+--4122:-.r-:2'i?1Ha-A-:faf-- 55. I. ,I i v . , ...np Y A- N. - A -. .5 .' 4 ff -:.-.A-2-'N .--. 5- -1- -- - .. 5.3:-3:-.7!f3:597Z'q?I 7123932 552: . A, . . . V f 5,-'. .v '- -,.'.-.. .. -. Q .4 . ia -IIA 0-.I .' I JK. Lx I .--:N-,'i3,::g52d15Ej.j2f:Q-2:Eagzffqzj552-56 5 , .A 1, ., ,. . - A -: e w f'- - 6: 9 . aw -wa:-.-:-1: '1'f'Y'14 mf--Y . . ' .3-'l 5 E .. ' , ' ' .1 Z- .1 - .4-4. ' 520.8 g.:.', 3 rf J G E. le '71 ' 1 . i-'Ei' 'S-: 'fd' 1 . . . . . . .- 2 V Q ,.,.gO . .Z :P ' ' ' 1 L N sz .:'t:1xb..'o :on nk.'.':Xl- I --.- ,..,,, ,,,. .,. ' v Ill I :MII . 'v ". 3'-' N31 'Q n' 'fs' -Eb-4 W1 z"f G' L -1. uma I'fu"nn:a 'I S. I i'-'- n 4' '4 I 'ITA-"'5"' 1 -.-fm... IJ' u -.S , nxt. f...- ip T - .... , 4: A Y.,L,...+-Awvr X mt rnitv f Hlvba Ita bi Founded at Hamilton College, 1832 HAMILTON, COLUMBIA, y YALE, . AMHERST, . BRUNONIAN, AHUDSON, . BOWDOIN, . DARTMOUTH, PENINSULAR, ROCHESTER, WILLIAMS, MANHATTAN, KENYON, UNION, CORNELL, . PHI KAPPA, JOHNS HOPK MINNESOTA, TORONTO, , CHICAGO, , MIDDLETOWN, I I , ' , . . Hamilton College Columbia University . Yale University Amherst College . Brown University . Adelbert College , Bowdoin College . Dartmouth College University of Michigan University of Rochester , Williams College f the City of New York Wesleyan University , Kenyon College Union College . Cornell University . Trinity College NS, johns ,Hopkins University . University of Minnesota University of Toronto University of Chicago WfP7"1"" P? K- 'yd L Er ai? Ag ' DP'C'T'A .J gg' 1 X 1 s 1 I I ....H.,,,,,.,,,,,,,,, l I I I 6 I I . I I I 3, I I I I I 5 I, I 1 1, I i WI II. ' I 'i I v lpbd ltd bi 0 0 4 Peninsular Chapter, lktablished 1846 9 9 4 Frater in llrbe - JUDSON G. PATTENGILL, A.B., Pen. 773 fl'dll'9S ill fdfillfdik S THOMAS M. COOLEY, LL.D., Pen. '59 i ALBERT H. PATTENGILL, A.M., Pen. '68 I HARRY B. HUTCHINS, PH.B., Pen. '71 WILLIAM J. IIERDMAN, PH.B., M.D., Pen. '72 FRANK F. REED, A.B., Pen. '80 ANDREW C. MCLAUGHLIN, A.M., LL.B., Pen. '82 mms in llniversitate RANSOM GARDNER GEORGE, A.B., Pen. ,Q3, Law Department PHILIP DAGGETT BOURLAND, B.S., Pen. '95, Medical Department ROBERT COLLYER BOURLAND HARRY PATTERSON HERDMAN FREEMAN FIELD ARTHUR MAURICE SMITH ' RALPH CONE TAGGART 1898 CHARLES COY GREEN GEORGE CURTIS SHIRTS CLARENCE EDWARD GROESBECK GEORGE AUGUSTUS WOODRUFF JULIAN HARTWELL HARRIS EUGENE CHARLES WORDEN ERNEST GOTTHILD HILDNER ORESTES HUMPHREY WRIGHT 1899 EUGENE BERKEY JONES A MUIR BURTENSHAW SNOW BENJAMIN BRADFORD METHEANY WILLARD JOHN STONE ' HARRY ALFRED SMITH CHARLES HARTLEY WRIGHT 1900 g FRED LOCKWOOD BAXTER ARTHUR BURTIS, GROESBECK L. FRANK ARTHUR HATCH 5,95 . . , . '.:I.'1.L-F ' ROBERT CUTLER MCKEIGHAN 6413552543 '-'---:Q '- E , , 'JE V52-. -df-1: M- 1 - - ' 5x HAZEN SIUARI' PINGREE, JR. HJIIIJQEMEJIR .-::A S igggg gm. E ,A JAMES SHIRLEY SYMONS ,JIU-fElmmlWThI!g. 2- M L XF5 . . .B... 15255, sEHfs?"f2-Q. ROY C' WOODWORTH lBlWQ5W!51l1iENii:H11l!1" wI1IIIIu'PJir.uIIIuIwff"" 'ifififhi , 9.1- nun-n -1 ,ig ,3:'-3,1--"E 1.i 1,1 I , N v:g.:ff,:.,.f i., 'f :BE -1 .pu m?7'i5'3:f.154gi ' 'Il 1 ' '-EIQ IIL ,S gyT2:5?22i3?F'l E - Tlillllllllllllllll ,Eftg5f33, ' ' - L, .,, ,LJ . 'mu' H yup, ,n.wuuulr.47. we-2-J, .g . - Z' - -Z. Ari " IMI" fswws! 1!ii'E'5"F 'X I- Iziaig L I x - Eeffeifq-Y. ' "+fj.'F7- f--I I ' Sf?--,Q gary 'v '- li 1 V93 A ag iw- La - A Elin' . 54- gymj 'I .6 , 'l:JE.:J? " -- - - - ' " I ' - -H Y Ts?-Pi'-. -1-I-' 4 - Y ' "' ---H ----5AIKvs- ' -J .1 HI. ,i H ,EE 1 fraternitv of elta Kdvvd EDSHOII 004 M Fogmdedi at Yale University, 1844 ' 4 0 0 , Zbapter RGII 'Tl-II, . ' , Yale University , Bowdoin College 'Q'ETf' , Colby University SICQMA, , Amherst College PSI, . University of Alabama UPSILON, d , Brown University CHI, . University of Mississippi BETA, , University of North Carolina ETA' . ' University of Virginia LAMBDA, . , Kenyon College PI, t , , Dartmouth College IOTA, l, Central University of Kentucky ALPHA ALPHA, Middlebury College UMICRON, ' University of Michigan EPSILON, , Williams College RH0, , Lafayette College TAU, A . Hamilton College MU, Colgate University NU, , , of the City of New York BETA PHI, University of Rochester PHLCHI, . 'Psi PHI, , GAMMAPPHI, Psi OMEGA, V BETA CHI DELTA CHI, PHI GAMMA, GAMMA BETA, THETA ZETA, ALPHA CHI, GAMMA, , KAPPA PHI EPSILON, SIGMA TAU, 7 Q 0 DP..r,'rA DELTAQ . , Rutgers College . De Pauw College Wesleyan University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute . Adelbert College Cornell University University of Syracuse Columbia University University of California . Trinity College Vanderbilt University . Miami University . . . University of Minnesota Massachusetts Institute of Technology University of Chicago Dille . . -44 Vale Bilwdgin Com? Univeg Amhgrst crsity of Brown U Ultlveygb . nivem sity of Migsissii. Of worth Cargill fcrstty of Virgil, Kenyon C542 +a rtmouth C04 rsity of Kenmql' iddlebury ag., rrsity of Michigg Williams CdQqp Lafayette Colq Hamilton CMI fnlgate Univenl 'fity of Newllod rsity of Rochest Rutgers C6405 De Pauw Coftg rslcyan Univexil ytcchnic Inslilll Aclelhert Collt Iorncll Universit crsity of SYM? lumbia Univemg. :sity of Califvflll. Trinity Coll: rlcrbilt Univffsfl. Miami Uulvmmi Minnwni fechnvllli of Chicagi 'sity Of ite of ' rcI'Slly .5 - 5 it-Q 'IL in of f, s l is 4 -i : l' ni Ita Kappa Epsil n 4 4 4 Ornicron Chapter, Established 1855 4 4 9 francs In UIUC J. Q. A. SESSIONS, O, '56 R. C. DAVIS, A.M., O, '59 B. M. THOMPSCDN, M.S., LL.B., O, '58 W. S. PERRY, A.M., O, '66 J. T. SUNDERLAND, D.D., A '69 C. H. COOLEY, Ph.D., O, '87 H. W. DOUGLAS, B.S., O, '90 T.. B. COOLEY, A.B., O, '91 ' Fratres In llniversltate THOMAS STONE BURR, A.B., 9, '91, Medical Department KIRKE LATHROP, B.L., O, '96, . . Law Department RAYNOR SPALDINC. FREUND, O, '96, . Medical Department STUART EUGENE GALBRAITH, B.S., O, '96, . Medical Department ' 1897 JED BURT FREUND CHARLES BARTLETT DAVIS ORVILLE WILBUR PRESCOTT ANGUS SMITH IRVING NICCOULLOUGH BEAN JOHN CHARLES BRADFIELD FRANK COLBAUGH CONDON THEODORE CHARLES LYSTER 1898 WALTER HENRY IENNINGS WALTER HIIMPHREYS SHELBY HAROLD BUTLER WETMORE 1899 . FREDERICK AU-GUSTUS LEAS HARRY BARENT POTTER ROBERT BLISS POTTER ERNEST FREDERICK HARRINC-TON ' RODOLPHE RANSOM REILLY J'ULIEN HARRINGTON THOMSON GEORGE STUART BENSON, IR. RALPH EDMUND GILCHRIST FREDERIcK HERBERT GREEN 1 ARTHUR WHEELER PLUM .I . I, S ,.' -"A-. fl v rx.. 2.5, M 'Q e4 - :- .u ' 524' - - I 1 'IV1:'.:Til-. E' 1.2. ' 1 . we- E - " tffzls' S - ' ' ' .,'.,,-.m - '.-'. S. -,I Q .i ' I-g,f:.ms:-Har-s,e?'...- '1-eff, 'rl' 2 4-fifqsfaf-54119:-.1at . ff f - 'ew 1 - A t. 3 . E- - 5 . 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V, Juni. ,MU ' K,- GQS -' F4-HSS'-4"' ,'l'Y'g'- H4271 "a"1g'-i5'1l9"11!-'l1',,7':7? fs 'Sig'-,:.'f?q." 95741: 2 x 'n-,Z -Q' '34 4 ', fi, gt -- : '.".1 ., 'I ,. - -.-rw.-S-rf2c1"' 'p.!f75f4:4al?:.v-' --if f 4f93'1::9vffFA1 143 7 1- 1 5'-if ,- '-'iw' 'Lf-gain:-1-pq 'rf Wrii -- .' ef: f59.-fm.,Pffprwxfifk-wr.qgaga 'f?Zz,-f'mg- '..,-ASW-1 - : 34 4 , N if 3-n::a.:m,.-gm-Hg 5,gg3:.',fg.',3L ., 13.45. 21' 7--'+z4.-egg -- - 4--'- ' rf ., A- -f 7 4 '47'LT':Tgg:l- ,,n, 'T. - - C -' ' "1 -,:' -,,7f"- T". ALPHA -OF NEW YORK? Union University BETA OF. NEW YORK, . , Hamilton College, . ALPHA OF DELTA OF ALPHA OF AHPHA OF ALPHA OF EPSILON OP NEW YORK, Cornell University, , r , 1827 1831 1834 1840 i345 1858 1887 1890 -,hx H-lx U 1 -rf 1 QQ ' gr .M E5 'E 'fl 'gl 'E ,QQ li ,:ff.'1f4 4289: ' lf? sa 4 , 1 C fi 1 1 fv . W 11 R. 1 6 r J, -4,-1,1 31" Y .ves- -' S8 '-fa! 5: 11 'vi an J ,if 1827 18 3 1834 i I I8 845 49 3532! 1 1881 , I 858 . iq 51 ji A 1 ...g ',i. .. 89. 'Q J. -' --aa .E m A J 1 1- . . . . 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WAGAR WALTER CHANNING BOYNTON WILLIAM MEEK MCKEE EDGAR SERVIS COOLEY WILLIAM WHITNEY TALMAN ALATAN LEONARD CHARLES ATKINSON RALPH LOVELAND ROYS A LLOYD MONTGOMERY SHEPARD il' ,. 29 ,INN Z - 55 'N ,.. xx. N, :QI ..-we-"vw X """ 0 -.S SE .-'f.--,qw -11 if A 3- f., ,- -..':p,,, , ,,-'fzggw' 2' -':- -': 03:30, ff:-ff":ff,,,,,N " "" W.. :'1'.: -ry, V-QL"-51:-.. ' " . X - ' 'S5'f52!fPl:7':?ff'E lf". ""' "H: A" E E ' W :-,...-2: i ... 'Tiny .Ti 'lE!f3ZEii2iQ.3E:l,E3 9513415.32-5 :F "" "" -V. 1- 5125.5 2.5.3.1 j 1 n-:-, J. 1, -, - - .G - L- E -I A A 5- 5: :. 'J I -"H ' Zpsirzfzsrcvfswi-wr--1 L. .,.-:. -.: 000000000000 L.: 1 , '-E Mi- - 1-3-I .'1'f-:'.,:,.,I.4- 4 ' aa-. ---0 " 'III-R - - N1-M -1 ,- 11' "?2Lfs'?F',L:1f3,6.S:NEf-wwg-':'f-141. ' . ,E-.-:Eff-'Q IJ' - -' : -224:24-'12e.:f . N0-M513-fi!X.',7'.9e'1' , PAQ.-..-..2- - l , '3 0 - ".-.f.g-.g.3pi.1, As SN-tl. '--'QB ' v",' ', ' 0 i ': - - ,:-50.4. ,+ '.1-ir , '- -'i. - '. ', I N R mix 5 5 -,R - ,W:,a,.:m1R,w.Rg1fSR f.f,,J1 Q I - ., . . - f 3 N' 'l:4eQ- .IAQQIW-in S..-'l.-:Q.'-nav . l - L. r :ff --: II:5en1'.If.,.f-13R-- Syifwx vlf' I A r - :' ',. Z' - ' fgx L' 1,a'g.g,.q:,.L.-V354 'J 3:gi" '.,1:1h!- , Q, . ,., -' -- 'V 1 , ' 'f I: A -:Zf'5s:1r'5f0'51's . 515521. r 4- 1, Tv -Lf F . w - fffiii,-i'Jfg2-'ffl-1.R'q v.'-',!:J5 1: 5571-' "QS ' lliS H153325-f7r-55311523551-""'5"27'i:qt-Q' iyz- E ' 'f"3 j --Q 1-11-rigs 3fjPZ':.gZ-:Hifi L-Si: -C" 561, :F-L , -"2 !" .- "" H -if n' -' ff' '1"'.' Y- , "' .ff V 1-- B- "gm f'2""-.:.ii..,. -A Yi 'Z f-5 -A ..f?Irf"'- J' ..,..--.- J -L M A-, ,,. - ,W -D , U Sn... uh L-L -..,:-..- i fraternitv of eta Psi 4 4 4 Founded at the University of. the City of New York, 1846 4 4 4 A gbaptcr Roll PHI, . . , , , New York University ZETA, , , Williams College DELTA, . ' , , Rutgers College SIGMA, , University of Pennsylvania CHI, H , , Colby University EPSILON, , , , Brown University KAPPA, , , , Tufts College TAU, , , , Lafayette College UPSILON, , , University of North Carolina XI, , 1 . , , University of Michigan LAMBDA, . . Bowdoin College PSI, , , , Cornell University IOTA, . University of California THETA XI, , Toronto University ALPHA, .. . , Columbia University ALPHA PSI, . . McGill University NU, . . Case School of Applied Science ETA, .... Yale University MU, - . Leland Stanford, JR. University BETA, . . University of Virginia 3. .gf . ,114 ,,, .1 2 V Q5 Z2 ?- Ll uri" ,wk r 3 .9 ' va, 1 ' ', Q- 1 . 'Q I -. 5 'L 2' JA... ? 9 A 5 .g . ,.. A .lv .3 " ,H i 1 .iii X 23 5 f X, 1 ,V W ' V X, 5 Dr t 1 3 .55 efsiwf Dllegeff ollegejf .vania f Q 'erslty , rersity? ollege .ollege I olina P' chiganfl lollegeff mversityr, lifornia: iversity .- iversity-li iversityff Scienceifg LiVC1'Sity1 livCrSifYA Virginia u Q ' at v3 lz' L n :A IJ, 9' F -sf L. 1 11 '- H 3 , .A - 7 1: 1, I 1 : v ,- ,, 5 ,G 15 -4 .Ln :Q ,, ,I .1 H :F - 'as - ,V 5 s' 'n Q K,,- lg. .1 , 1 Y 1, H it , 4 rf X 4 fl ,WM -I N , 15' V14 r ZA, F if v w Q. u A M L 4 r ,x N 4 f 1 x n - .Q T .r .f , . m 91 1 m x 1 J 1 lr . Q 1 U 3 x .4 ,P Q l 1 I ta Psi J7 A +++ J Xi Chapter, Established 1858 ' + + 0 I Fratres In Facultate I HENRY H. SWAN, A.M., '64 'I JEROME CYRIL KNOWLTON, A.B., '75, LL.B., '78 Trams in llniuersiaate u KRW Delidfflilellf LLOYD CHARLES WHITMAN, A.B., '96 9 DWIGHT JOSEPH TURNER m2diCdl Dwdffmellf BENJAMIN RUSH BRADFORD TOWNSEND 1897 ROLAND DARE WHITMAN SIDNEY BEACH TREMBLE EDWIN IENISON ' BEMENT I898 , SCHUYLER SEAGER OLDS, JR. GEORGE CHICKERING STONE LEWIS WILSON BICCANDLESS ALBERT JOHN BRADNER PAUL MONROE PILCHER 1899 2 ROBERT WHITE NORRINGTON ROBERT GRINNELL 1 WILLIAM ALFRED COMSTOCK 1900 BRET NOTTINGHAM THOMAS LINTON ROBINSON 3 HARRY MIX ,SEDGWICK 3 E I--f--T ' - f A Jr,1v,!fI'1E: .y - ,,,, , 1. ,Z . , , uf 4.57: f -A --f"""f' - ..-,' J .rigbiiffifggiti"Aff-14:6fm.-,, -A ' 11-f -" L I-:Q 'T-T i WH,- fx' ' 1'5?fZg.75:!??x75ffy. " l '9-""'?- 1 - ,ff5'7Qcf' H1 " . wA:W7if 1 'Z-1 E A We , I.,AE,, :: I -f Wfi' 277244 . " 174: .A ff-.A galil!! ,gs 9i4-?'5+- I "haw 1 1. -' 1" ' 1 - J , :qt-1 8.5.5, L. ij., J, E! .lf cfzyh ' 1' ' ' "rv I' +I ,'-,:-j'x'- -,',j,, ' 'itzrf is .ah-.1"5'1,' 4 "" - -'. " 'BII'fff'Sf'E B122 I, . tl Q i, Lqf ---, 45, .. Q , ',Jl1 ' 4 3 '- - ! 1, li' .av fliahlwigffffs I -A in E LM Asahi? 4., L I, 17225217 ,I-.aff , '. Lc:f'.fJ:'I"'.i ,' - '..f :flw idly. l,',1jAk1', g5jf:2:gf'Zj!? 'vis-I-Y ,f 'j',j?Qf.f3?,ig,f'.5-.27 ' 51 Aj-g,3Q,u -L.E'!2"l!50 " ' A ' .-H1 ,. L U J :Tit W A v ,,. ,I Y, . ,,.:a.,....4-- O , , I K I 114. ' I, . if, " "-- -Fur., THETA, DELTA, BETA, SIGMA, GAMMA, . ZETA, LAMBDA, , KAPPA, PsI, , XI, , UPSILON, . IOTA, PHI, , PI, , , CHI, , , BETA BETA, ETA, , TAU, MU, , RHO, 'ffdlifllilil of Psi UPSHOII 0 0 4 Founded at Union College, 1833 g 0 9 4 chapter Roll . . Union University New York University . Yale University . Brown University . Amherst College . Dartmouth College Columbia University . Bowdoin College , Hamilton College , Wesleyan University . University of Rochester . . Kenyon College . University of Michigan Syracuse University . Cornell University . Trinity College . , Lehigh University University of Pennsylvania . University of Minnesota . University of Wisconsin 52.54 1 . ,Qs 1 ---i j? , 1 V5 L H + , Q- If ff?Ef79,N ia: iw fl," ill ,ww L 1"l 91:1 Q L .uk A ,-1 A. ffl ' SM , W, ' 'Sep gm ' ,Q u Q55 I 'ii' ' ' ill ,. 911 Tij, A Q .32 3 . ,A , - r . ,Lg .- IF' 1.-.1 P pix f 1 'H " I - Dlvefslhf , rsmtv Jnive' ' Jniversx Uuive uf st Co Rfk NCEE f th Co 6161 ll gg ? Univmifl I rin Co1lQ1gEi :on Collqgig Univexiff i Rochesfei you Cow 5 Univetsiifq L UniverSiiQ nity 1, Universif 'ennSYlW?f ,f Miami .f Wiscoli? .ek A sf A. E Z A 3 9 3 3 I Liz: i g , .f..., A 7 V4 125521 4 T ', f' I "7 . 4: 1 ,W 1. , f ..l , . 3. rf 3 . x - .3 ,HA Y ,JH . if .- 1.4 -if .1' X . D1 'f -1171. JW ffff. f T i R 5' . f ff Q x I I ,, 'r ' ,4- J L' 1 I , 'i,,2.1 "I 4 . 1 1 4. P1 'A I -. IL. - . -1 .-J' 'D JW, ,n. A Cf ' w f'. ef . xx :A ,.. v I . 1 h. lf. S." lr -e rl xi, 3 N Q? H 3 LT 5. L9 Fi i Pr: A . 3-. ' A , .. if 7 a r,,. ' M, 4 Y. x ,U 6.4 'fx Psi UPSH ll ' I -6 4' -4 Phi Chapter, Established 1865 6 -4 4' -0 Frams in Facultate JAMES B. ANGELL, LL.D., 2, '49 MARTIN L. D'OOGE, LL.D., dv, '62 EDWARD L. WALTER, PH.D., CD, '68 HENRY S. CARHART, LL.D., EJ, '69 FRANCIS W. KELSEY, PH.D.,, T, 'So GEORGE W. PATTERSON, JR., A.M., S.B., B, '84 DEAN C. WORCESTER, A.B., CD, '88 DUANE R. STUART, A.B., dw, '96 'Fratres in universitate GEORGE EDWARD BALL, '94, . . . Law Department WILLIAM ALBERT SPITZLEY, A.B., '95, Medical Department WILLIAM DOUGLAS WARD, A.B., '95, , Medical Department JOHN SHERRING PRATT, '96, , , , Law Department HARRY EDWARD BODMAN, sPH.B., '96, Law Department 1897 STEPHEN CONE BABCOCK JOHN BLAINE KEATING JAMES HARMON FLINN WILLIAM WILMON NEWCOMB EDWIN HAYNES HUMPHREY 1898 EDWARD BURNS CAULKINS HENRY THOMAS HEALD GEORGE WILLIAM COTTRELL STUART EDWIN KNAPPEN LEROY MORTGN FIARVEY ALLEN LOOMIS WALTER DWIGHT HERRICK NATHAN S. POTTER, JR. 1899 STANDISH BACKUS GEORGE EDWARDS FAY WILLIAM GRISWOLD CHESEBROUGH PAUL OLIVER WILLIAM LEE COOPER MATTHEW BEALE WHITTLESEY 2 1900 ' RALPH CLARK APTED ge WILLIAM CALLAN , RUFUS WHEELWRIGHT CLARK, JR. gig, 'C t FREDERICK STANDISH COLBURN ' 'if' THOMAS GARVIN DENBY ,vm LEIGH MARTIN TURNER , MARTIN HOWARD FOSS ROGER SYLVESTER MORRIS 5 7 ARTHUR WILLCOX NORTON MORRIS WADSWORTH MONTGOMERY 9 tt ' J!- ILL? SIDNEY JOHN STEELE , 'F 'fi6a1izft:1zxff.g..3 :E?? 1,13 N -ss JOHN JACOB WHITTLESEY I A gttfgm- p,,EL'Ei'glfE5 E, . t . 5,-.J Alb a I E 27 :-j, P+-E ,C f - E---:i ff-S .5 frat l'lliW f ld b Id i y a+ 4 + Founded at Miami University, 1839 4 0 0 L I chapter RGII Miami University . University of Cincinnati ' Western Reserve University Ohio University Washington and jefferson College Harvard University DePauw University Indiana University University of Michigan Wabash College Centre College Brown University Hampden-Sidney College University of North Carolina Ohio Wesleyan University Hanover College Cumberland University - Knox College w y University of Virginia Davidson College Bethany College Beloit College University of Iowa. Wittenberg College Westminster College Iowa Wesleyan University University of Chicago Denison University University of Wooster University of Kansas University of Wisconsin .4511 Ai'ar lai- 7 -Q gin llllllmml '..T,'f17TT:" D J- , ' .. .us -. -. F u- , ,, ,Q-- pj-- .1ff?EE:f1j,:p,,. 2' N I- .1f,.,-, .,- gL.l,',.." ' ' " ' 4 F5 I ' 'Qs' ' " 3- i Est:-. .a i ff- a"s-"" v ll N Z Ii 1' ' I I 1 ""-4- M ,of -,Je 3 4 ,T ' ...tu 'Nw W ' --f tx- l ' I-m1',, mx N U 1' . . a .fil"'f ' ' 1 ' lil "r-K. 9 . . X fi I"' t S K' 5 ' I' .' 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A in 'V 1.C'.'l.a - ,Az-,.a..g,' , .V LV':.y'rL1' " my AJ K - -1. , . K M w Q i Qp., '..VVtV5 ' QSVQ. - F 12'ig?!!q V - , :QV VL. u. Vw- .- 4 ' x .' ..-..1..Vf . .,'-":..' . . . :fe :, J , 53-IL 'V - .-V',- .' '. is . X -,if . ? , ' Q ew, ,-,V . if-,A LJ'f -a ,4 ' '-a3',L,n5fr. . uf' f-V ?3 .215 .1 vf V V ' a '-is-V, 2 . Q W-1,533 'Q' -14jk'7.,z 1' K "4-if VV ffzlz-. V J .' fiflffil Q - -1V. QL .3 - A, ,J ,y . I V .. . .V 5,5 .Iii . , , ,, ' , V1 'ffl 4 V , ' 3 iV"r nn-. 1 L'- -if ' K- e- .V ' Beta Cbeta i 4 4 4 I Lambda Chapter, Established 1845 4 4 4 fratres in llrbe A JUNIUS E. BEAL, B.L., A, '82 J. J. GOODYEAR, M.D., A, '76 GEORGE P. COLER, A.B., B K, '82 ELMER E. BEAL, A, '94 Fratres In Facttltate LEYI T. GRIFFIN, A.M., A, '57 WILLIAM H. WAIT, PH.D., P, ' 7 EARLE W. DOW, A.B., A, '91 WILLIAM D. JOHNSON, A.M., K, '93 Fratres in lltttaersltate mQdiC2ll Dwdffmttlf HARRY MACNEIL, B.L., A, '83 CHARLES HENRY MULRONEY, T, '98 HARRY SCOTT VERNON, A, '99 LEWIS STANTON RAMSDELL, A, '99 JAMES RICHARD RICHARDS, M. E, '99 liaw DCPGNMQIIY MAXWELL WELLINGTON BABB, A.B., A E, '95 BOONE GROSS, '97 BAYARD TAMANUND RILEY, A N, '90 RALPH EMERSON WISNER, '98 EDWIN RUCHER SHEETZ, Z f1J,'97 CHARLES GOLDSMITH COOK, A.B.,'96 CHARLES PUGH DAVIS, B.L., A B, '96 ROBERT BRADFORD UPHAM, 99 HARRY WARREN ROBINSON, A T, ,97 JOSEPH GORDON IHAMBLEN, JR.,'99 7 Dental Department C THOMAS BUDD VAN HORNE, A H, 799 Eifefdfv DQIMYIIIIQIII GEORGE MOSELEY CHANDLER WILLIAM BARRETT RICH SAMUEL HANSON DOWDEN JOHN CECIL SPAULDING LESTER ELMER MAHER WESLEY EWING TAYLOR CHARLES JACOB DOYEL JOHN MARSHALL PARKER CLIFTON RANNEY NORTON CHARLES GROSVENOR WHITE THOMAS ROBERT WOODROW GWYNN GARNETT, JR. JAMES LAWRENCE KOCHER HAROLD THOMAS GRISWOLD EDWARD CAMILLUS MULRONEY HARRY ROGERS HURLBUT GUY ENOCH STIRLING EMIL FREDERICK BAUR ALONZO HERBERT RAYMOND HERMAN WILLIAM HIPPEN RALPH HOUSTON VAN CLEVE ROBERT ELIJAH PEACOCK VICTOR CLARENCE VAUGHAN, JR. Praternitv of Phi Rap pa Ps 4 4 4 Founded at Jefferson College, 1851 4 4 0 Zbapter Roll PENNSYLVANIA ALPHA, . Washingwn ami ICQCYSOD College VIRGINIA ALPHA, . - - .- UHIVCTSWY Of Yirginia VIRGINIA BETA, . Washmgton and LCC University PENNSYLVANIA BETA, . . . Allegheny College PENNSYLVANIA GAMMA, Bucknell University PENNSYLVANIA EPSILON, . - PGHUSYIVHHIQ College VIRGINIA GAMMA, . HamPdeff'S1fiUeY College PENNSYLVANIA ZETA, . . . . Dlckmson College PENNSYLVANIA ETA, , Franklin and Marshall College OHIO ALPHA, . Ohjo Wesleyan University ILLINOIS ALPHA, . Northwestern University ILLINOIS BETA, , . University of Chicago INDIANA ALPHA, , , De .Pauw University OHIO BETA, , , , Wittenberg College DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ALPHA, , Columbian University MISSISSIPPI ALPHA, , NEW YORK ALPHA, . PENNSYLVANIA THETA, INDIANA BETA, , , INDIANA GAMMA, , KANSAS ALPHA, MICHIGAN ALPHA, , PENNSYLVANIA IOTA, MARYLAND ALPHA, , OHIO DELTA, , WISCONSIN ALPHA, , WISCONSIN GAMMA, , NEW YORK BETA, IOTA ALPHA, , MINNESOTA BETA, , NEW YORK EPSILON, , PENNSYLVANIA IKAPPA, WEST VIRGINIA ALPHA, CALIFORNIA BETA, , NEW YORK GAMMA, ,. NEW YORK ZETA, , NEBRASKA ALPHA, , MASSACHUSETTS ALPHA, , A NEW HAMPSHIRE ALPH 7 Q , University of Mississippi . . Cornell University , Lafayette College , Indiana University . Wabash College . University of Kansas . University of Michigan , University of Pennsylvania Johns Hopkins University . . University of Ohio . University of Wisconsin . Beloit College Syracuse University . University of Iowa . University of Minnesota . . Colgate University . Swarthmore College . University of West Virginia Leland Stanford, Jr. University . Columbia University Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute . . University of Nebraska . Amherst College Dartmouth College I I wg lx ,A ng' b J, A' 1' . gm ,lr Q? 4 f ' 1 Q Q' 1. Ji if ,RV 1 ,,. aft .5 V .i sf. 1, f 1' x 1 ,T s , 545 1-.3 94 4. J 1 ,X ' x 1' 'AA" ' Ei' : , n 1 T 3- " -2 1- .. . 1 g Ti! ' ,i5r' :fs ' --Y, Yi EY: 1,:,f- rjgg gif A ,Uli-QQ: X -gjlll, : H5111 Vqfiiiiu 1 35 1 J ' - " im" 1. .un g.,1f-fp--'14 -e5:'fiE3ffifff:'ii" . 51324231 E 2 :..ff.f'3i"'f'1f -... -3 l l f-":5l5"fi5i5' 5 ii ' " Q11 5 2 21 L 1 7" iiigiif if ' If f.--,iifi , , ,Y K 'N X . A N X X 605 - E.A.WRICHT, Puma ' 5 :'Yfff1' J'z'-YLTTW4'',i"'!'f-'i?:-YYY 5 ' x f 1 g ' " " " 41i'iff' -nn., '. 1.,, ,,,, 1 ' ' ,. V H,-g, - K' v, -r- ' v 1 4 I f 4 A f J J .1 1 0 r 'P Un . H f , 5 , lf A ,4 s . x..., ,. 1 .W I hi Kdlbpd Psi 4 4 4 Michigan Alpha Chapter, Established 1876 4 4 4 Frater in Facultate JOHN ROBERT EFFINGER, JR., PH.AM., 'gr fratres in llniversitate Law Department KARL EDWIN HARRIMAN HENRY LEITH GOODBREAD medical Dwdffmkllf CARLIN PHILIPS, Ph.B.,'96 FREDERICK THOMPSON WRIGHT,A.B.,,86 Kifefdfv Delidffmkllf HARRY ARTHUR COLE ROBERT LOUIS DEAN BARTLETT CHASE DICKINSON JOHN WALTER FRINK BENNETT ' WARD HUGHES RUSSELL MIX SIMMONS CHARLES BENJAMIN HOLE LEMUEL HOMER HOLE, JR. WILLIAM LYMON MACK THOMAS ALVIN NEAL EUGENE RICHARDS LEWIS CARLOS BANGS RIDER CLARENCE BAUM JOHN DAVID KILPATRICK GEORGE COIT DAVIS JOHN HENRY BARTELME ' THOMAS FLOURNOY JOSEPH JACOB WALSER WILLIAM WRIGHTER WOOD GRATTAN FOLEY 'A 'S454' PVT 2-'v d D n kc ff' 'Q-fx 1"f I V - 931 ly ' ' ' , fs F4 --.. -' u S Q Wm """L- I i A35 I - ' fi" fy- gf gi, Qi - -' 1 1 ..- I , 4 0 0 9 X " 'H J 7' lla. 'Ui f ,Qu-'FZ 31-..-f g-JLKAA?-H P, A n"" 'B' . ,ljif 'K o-I ' ' ' ' , '1 T L. 0 X .EZ I , 37' -LPS' "z, 1 ' , fi 7 J' ' 'G A ' ' f' ? I rfft- f J 'inf' -I 'fl 3 ' .5 A f 4 i 1 ' c-' X' R 42, .1 R' , I 5 I .. ' f' 1 ix 7' 7 I. 1 Q xi' ' , I IH N G V' D " I r. ly 1 Y tx , J NS Ik AF '4 JA.-- ' , gal A , -- Sw f -f Cla' I .G -- If r ' Q IQ: 5 ' J- 1 1, K 'IQ 1 i ' ' ' "U'IIh-'IZ , " Q' ,f " -",,.:..-..i D , , .Lg-:I -1 5 I ll 'N 1 f - 4' ' I ' P , Q . , V. - W 3-I- 5 -J-' ' I f' 3 I 7 1 4 ' 5 1 r?P' ' ' E 2 11 7 l 1 ' ff l' -S cl!! - A wh' 'f ' I , I L 4 1 v Tc li' I ' ' 'P J , I ,V 7: z C, x 1' . ' " 1 """""' 1' - -.- -1 fill 'uf ,1- 9' 'DN no-1 4 n ,M ,,,., .6-u7f7f4QQW..'-:2- W!-7 iwwh - X fraternity of elta llvsilon Q +++ Founded at Williams College, 1834 + ff 4 Zbapter Rell WILLIAMS, . . - . Williams couege AUNION, . . Union University HAMILTON, , Hamilton College AMHERST, . , Amherst College ADELBERT, . Adelbert Colle e . . 3 COLBY, . a, Colby University ROCHESTER, University of Rochester MIDDLEBURY, Middlebury College BOWDOIN, , , Bowdoin College RUTGERS, . Rutgers College BROWN U . . Brown University COLGATZE, . . Colgate University NEW YORK, New York University CORNELL, . . Cornell University MARIETTA, . Marietta College SYRACUSE, Syracuse University MICHIGAN, University of Michigan NORTHWESTER Northwestern University HARVARD, Harvard University XVISCONSIN, University of Wisconsin AFAYETTE- . Lafa ette Colle e COLUMBIA, , Columbia Universiciy LEHIGH, - . Lehigh College TUFTS, , . Tufts College DEPAUW, , . De Pauw University IISIENNSYLVANIA, - . . University of Pennsylvania T INNESOTA, I University of Minnesota SECHNOLOGYQ . . Massachusetts Institute of Technology LWARTHMORE, . . . . .y Swarthmore College ELAND STANFORD' JR-r . Leland Stanford, Jr. University C . ALIFORNIA, . ..... University of California YORK CLUB Q Q i' SYRACUSE CLUB PHHCEQSO CLUB ROCHESTER CLUB U ELPHIA CLUB GARFIELD CLUB QS ringfieldj WASHINGTON C P LUB NORTHWESTERN CLUB CLEVELAND CLUB RHODE ISLAND CLUB BUFFALO CLUB CLUB ALBANY CLUB NEW ENGLAND Us 'PENINSULAR CLUB qDetr01l li A if .5 iams dl herst 'lbert by .bury ntgers Lrietta Ji? 1 .sq Q : iii 1 V3 91 5, 1 'fi' 'a 'A Y' IO!! doin 8 CUC Y bla .ehigh TuftS l hm jr of OTC g ACUSE ., f Y .JV N-19 fp 3 in ft HESTQR , A ,, qspnvai' ESTERN f ILAND CL f?ZW4f,,Z5f?5V J - -'fW'f:gB"7" 3 Swffff' l5Rfgi2'34'05f4f5 ,. . x , f ,, 20,0 !6, - 66 aff-U fag? S 1, ,Z77,'f?2f'l'l. Ph ff ff- LU 'G"'g'Q'13ctf E J L X 0. ,. , , ,--4 "'1fwffQ'4'-'ca-f. -qc: -L-GI. , '!?1Wf'r'g-2 gr' 1 X 3. 3 xv 3 i I A 1 1 .Vi i ,E 4 .! li X . ,E 1 1 1 1 fl 'I' li i -N! 45- x ' f ,Q f QQ v 1 xA v -x ., ,A ll e . .r wr v W1 Qlfd UDSHOII 4 4 4 Michigan Chapter, Established 1876 4 4 4 Trams in Facultatc JACOB E- REIGHARD, PH.B. CLARENCE L. MEADER, A.B. JOSEPH H- DRAKE, A-H CHARLES E. ST. JOHN, PH.D. HOMER E. SAFFORD, PH.B., M.D. fI'dfI'2S ill UWM WILLIAM W. WETMORE, A.M., CID 'B K, HORACE G. PRETTYMAN, PH.B., '85 NATHAN IT. CORBIN, M.S., LL.B., '86 Hamilton, '61 THEODORE B. WILLIAMS, Rochester, '69 LOUIS ALBERT PRATT, B.L., '96 Fratres In llnwersltate IIZIW Department EDWARD SCHREINER I HOBAR T m2diCdl Depdffmkllf REYNOLDS C. MAHANEY Gl'ddlldfC SCDOOI CARL LUND, A.B., fb B K FRANK P. KNOWLTON, A.B. ALBERT EMERSON GREENE, PH.B., B.S. liiterarv Department 1897 BIRNEY HOYT, A.B. JOHN ROBERT CROUSE WILL EARLES DEWITT I 898 SAMUEL HILLS WARRINER CLARENCE HENRY BRAND FREDERICK MORRIS LOOMIS HAROI.D DUNBAR CORBUSIER CHARLES CURTIS WALLIN GEORGE HENRY ALLEN MERRITT MATTISON HAWXHURST ARCHIBALD WHITTIER SMALLEY ARTHUR JOHN FARMER ARTHUR MASTICK HYDE ALLEN HOWARD ZACHARIAS THOMAS STARR GRAY CLIFFORD GRIFFITH ROE JAMES HARVEY SAWYER LAURENCE LATOURETTE DRIGGS 1900 , NORMAN SWAIN ATCHESON -. 4-iv:-IJ" NP:-jfzi 9-,7:::.-Q A' H' I I' CHARLES HENRY REYNOLDS b,',-,ggjgf ,X ? E-'i,E'iL Q 5. HARRISON STANDISH SMALLEY is ,, ,. T? .I -is NELSON WALTER THOMPSON H3 Q' 7 y' STEPHEN PRENTIS COBB fl-pm f. my 112- I 61.7, ' fail 'jp -ff, g I' .IQ z ll . ag. I --- - 1 fb fy q Inf' U I -.13 5 az Jdgrf. 32 'A Fi I g ln Nf ,Ng Gam. 4. ,, 3 g S- 5' I H I l 15' H v,." Nr. ,Q I i .,, TW ' f ',- A-fa. ' A. I , . my ' 1 .,s,'::5 - 5 . fwf' g' 1 .HA ,, 54. . r q.-1 . " Ai 1 il ,Tbf 1. 1 .. -, " EJ -S, ! , -1-:7',Qf,E:4: Fihzarmliqgjl E NU l'1't':', , 53" "'f,.. 1' Hg... ...-lz:--'-if-an-51-if- --"'3E 'gin "ww '. "" ff " 7"-1 F- -4.1 1 5 ,rt--A B . -Hz . . . Qfjr 5 4, . , ., -1- H-"""" i Tk?-4 ':.-FRN ' :ffgivw-,sb "' Cf, nl U v,b:"?a 'xx ow ""s..g"1'ff'g - ' if V. . P 1 f 9 x Zi E, F. y i fi ,,.,..,, 'CC' FU 'CI Q2 fl 's ,,, A ,Q i "'TE!'a.5w'5FI rim. al: 3 .J 1 L+, f 1 K 'T a, Jl' E A 'L 1 1 4 fraternity of elta tau Delta 0 4 4 Founded at Bethany College, 1359 0 4 0 Zbapter Ron LAMBDA, . ,,,, Yancierbilt University PI t , University of Mississippi PIQI U Washington and Lee University BET,A DELTA, . - ' University of Georgia BETA EPSILON, .' - Q ,Emory College BETA THETA, , , University of the South BETA ZETA, Tulane University OMICRON . , University of Iowa BETA GAlVIMA, , University of Wisconsin BETA ETA, University of Minnesota BETA KAPPA, , , , University of Colorado BETA PI, , Northwestern University BETA RHO, Leland Stanford, Ir. University BETA TAU, , , . University of Nebraska BETA UPSILON, , , , University of Illinois DELTA , , University of Michigan EPSILOIW, , , , Albion Coliege ZETA . . Adelbert Col ege MU, ,, , Ohio Wesleyan University C1-11, , , , , Kenyon College BETA ALPHA, , Indiana University BETA BETA, DePauw University BETA ZETA, , Butler College BETA PHI, Ohio State University BETA PSI, . , , Wabash College ALPHA, . . . Allegheny College GAMMA, . . Washington and Jefferson College RH0, . Stevens Institute of Technology SIGMA, . . . . Williams College UPSILCN, . . Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute BETA LAMBDA, . . . Lehigh University BETA MU, A . ..... Tufts College BETA NU: . . Massachusetts Institute of Technology BETA OMICRON, . . . Cornell University BETAACHI, . . Brown Universitl' BETA OMEGA, . . University of Pennsylvanla - -.Jn-,r - ..A-vA-- - -- --p xx R' 5' My . F' 3, . . n-.g Q - JV, 'fa "HTS ?. '71 Q' hi ' s 13 E xr- U ,, , .W ,K .3 H ., , ?x I V A Qu,- Qf 5, Ai?-Q, iff. .-v 'rl' .. 'a . T' . . l fr: 'lf rt I --,x 1-Lv, ' 352- , K 1 X 'rjgx - . .il Q. I e A 1 ' x'v!..r 'Sea' I f '-.', 5. 'I- :" C . A: V! tu. M4- 5 ff. 'J 1- .15 l' ,I1 .1 1 .gn . My rf' 4 .faux V1.9 W ,.1 . xr s-1 . L, 1' T ,. .R .f 'V 1. xii N' Q!-f f Vx .- R. I ,Ji N 53? . '35 , i E114 wifi: fe. 5 Lg - fi 4 'X pt. K, .3 A- v , 4 . 'L ., .7 uf. if 'Q , ' :gf x 1: 70 .. .l"k' 'L r' .- ' A .n ,2' S -25,-, ', 'QT Q 1' . ' f":'. ,k Arg: ' ff! U 51 ,Lb ff f' ' iw. x". I ff ? , - J7'!"L . K , Q - I .r-ef N1 1.14: .' A' x . .I l ,' iw., A fs- .Yi wg? ., .s1ifu' v .fu , ,jf . 15, .N v . n"',lf- ' 'Ls W v ., . , A.--Q QU an-' .L ' l 4 if. 1 u Rn 4 -. . Vg-19 ,, r , 1 . f LA, V 4 F x lla dll DQ! d C ' 4 4 4 Delta Chapter, Established 1874 4 4 4 'Fratrcs in llrbe FRIEISLAND HOWARD PARSONS CHARLES FRANCIS VAUGHN fl'dfl'CS Ill ullWCl'8lIdlC GEORGE FRANK GREENLEAF, JR. WILLIAM RANSOM CARPENTER RUDOLPH ROSSEE BEST ' MARK BREWER BEATTIE JAMES WILLIAM MCEWAN GEORGE FORREST FIRESTONE DEWEY DEAN ROCKWELL DEWITT CLINTON HUNTOON WILLIAM HENRY CALEY, B K I 9 1, ,Q l , . Y . 4 I. I 1, . , . Q . ' - ..,.-...-..., - -Y I -,QA - . . , A , . V , .. ,, ,..,-..-.... ..-7-Ewa ,-,,,-,,,....,,-, N-E Al,.....,-,..,.....-l-- ! l . L I. v Fraternity of PM Delta beta Im' I ..,. 1-4 - I 1 ass. 'f"'1"'f.',-.fr ', ,rp h. lil P: in f ,.. , . , fi V..,qw .' . . . y Founded at Miami University, 1848 -i at + + + zmprer Rell Colby University Universify of Michigan -'n' - Dartmouth College A . Hillsdale College ' ' it ' Q University of Vermont UmVefS1tY Of Vlrginia Williams College Randolph-Macon College Richmond College - K I Amherst College I Brown University , Y I I 1 ,, I.. E A Cornell University lf- af- I , Union University inf li i'gg Q Syracuse University , Lafayette College S V I Pennsylvania, College fGettysburgl I' .Washin 'ton and jefferson College I 8 t Allegheny College A Dickinson College 4 University of Pennsylvania I Lehigh University 3 .Southern University University of Mississippi Tulane University University of Texas Southwestern University Miami University ' I Ohio Wesleyan University Ohio University University of Wooster I Ohio State University Indiana University ' Wabash College 2 I 1 l 1 5 it I Butler College i ' A ' Purdue University i Franklin College Hanover College ' f Michigan Agricultural. College Washington and Lee University University of North Carolina Centre College Central University University of Georgia Emory College Mercer University Vanderbilt University University of the South Alabama Polytechnic Institute Northwestern University - Knox College Illinois Wesleyan University Lombard University University of Illinois University of Wisconsin University of Missouri Westminster College Washington University Iowa Wesleyan University University of Iowa University of Minnesota University of Kansas University of Nebraska University of California Leland Stanford jr. University Case School of Applied Science University of Chicag De Pauw University Q , E- . gy in It 0 X. f . I . ii . . ,Y I .., Y Y, s' ' , ., , ' g ' ., i , I y . p' .,-P UVB!! '- of T0 q,,y:f1,.,,:.3i.,..,-V-..g-,--.,?,,. .,-,, ,A uw ' K f - - giggfgi., ,... .. W- vz- P Lf'-ga., f-fi ,, ' iff' E T,TA,,.,,,, V, Y . 3 I! rc7f:f1,.P!f,1'! llf. rv'---.....v. 7- -- f L I . 4 I i. r Sf 1 A A V 1 A. I 1 I 'fu if . 72: ww, . V - 1,4 ,' , ,- ,- '- . , ..: -,:, -,-- , - --V-V -- f J f W" f5+l'?Qii'P4 V ' 1"lii32fE.f1m""M3:Qi?5i521Lf6f"9!'a?fai1L.fIK" ff.-6 Fh .fu-w12:5'wif.1 Pb! Delta Cb ta 4 + 4 Michigan Alpha Chapter, Established 1864 4 4 4 'fl'd!l'2S ill UPN CLARENCE G. TAYLOR, M.E. FRANK H. DIXON, PH.D. THEODORE L. CHADBOURNE, B.S., M.D. CLAUDE JAMES PRICE CLINTON H. WOODRTJFEV Fratres in llnlvcrsltate EDWARD FRANCIS WEHRLE, PH.B., Law Department E. D. PALMER, A.B. J. A, MULLETT, Medical Department JOHN EVQRETT BURNETTE, Medical Department STANLEY MATTHEWS SILYIO HENRY VON RUCK HERVEY MONTGOMERY SMITH FRANK CULVER CHESTON ARMAND RUDOLPH MILLER IRVING CHARLES WOODWARD ROY MITCHELL HA.RDY CLARENCE WEBSTER RAYNOR OSCAR WILLIAM GORENFLO GEORGE BRUCKNER LOWRIE RALPH FLEETWOGD PALMER HOWARD PLATT TREADWAY CHARLES MARVIN PRESTON REGINALD D. STEELE FRED R- HOOVER RUSSELL B. THAYER WALTER S. FOSTER WILLIAM C. BROOKS JOHN WESLEY IUDSON ARTHUR R. WILLIAMS ARTHUR JUDSON BLEAZBY DAVID DENNIS STARR JOHN MORE PAINE it -..,QfsiSSZI3E7: SS '-fltxqiiil ' . - I f '..5:,,f5:s'ffb3 5 'C-A-.-.T, 'w a. -4,'....aief ' A .I ' f 5' , -.-' P' . , .- r .f '- . -2Lfj , 2 ' - - M" - b- L"".1f ' .- .. a fglgj ' if - "' ,,4--I -s-... L. H. I - Maxima.-i.3'.r LQ- .. , - - 'Quan-1-P - 2. 1 i ,--P-.........4.v L 5: ? 1 I, f 2 '13 I A. 1. I: f. 5 ,. i f i A S. It 1. Us I . n I S -A 4 k E I ,. . . , . I-. A , . il fi 2 I G C Y 'Sr If, I I S A 1 5 r J ,Fr ft 5 f st 6 A Ei r to I i . ':. .7 'fraternity of Sigma llvbd 6991011 4 4 4 Founded at the UruVers1tY Of Alabama, 1855 + 4- + Chapter Roll MASSACHUSETTS BETA UPSILON, . . .I BOSt0n University MASSACHUSETTS IOTA TAU, Massachusetts Instlglite of dTIeIelIno1ogy MASSACHUSETTS GAMMA, . . I . . arviar It ngerslty CONNECTICUT ALPHA,' ' - - Au flamy Ollege PENNSYLVANIA OMEGA, . - - ,eg GUY College PENNSYLVANIA SIGMA PHI, ' - e D1Fk1HS0H C011ege PENNSYLVANIA ALPHA ZETA, , Pennsylvania State College VIRGINIA OMICRON, . . - 3 UIUVCSSEY Oavlfgllilia VIRGINIA SIGMA, , , Washington an .ee niverslty NORTH CAROLINA THETA, ' . - - Davldioll C011Cgf SOUTH CAROLINA DELTA, . , , South Carolina College SOUTH CAROLINA GAMMA, - I W.0ff0fd Cfillegt GEORGIA BETA, I , UD1VCIS1ty of Georgie GEORGIA PSI, I I , Mercer UH1VCYS1tj GEORGIA EPSILON, . - -0 ,ETUOTY Colle? MICHIGAN IOTA BETA, , University OI Michigat MICHIGAN ALPHA, . - - Adrian Cvllesf GHIO SIGMA, . I , Mount Umon College OHIO DELTA, . Ohio Wesleyan Univnersitj 01.110 EPSILON, , . University of Clncmnat OHIO THETA, , . Ohio State Universitj INDIANA ALPHA, , Franklin Collegf INDIANA BETA, , , . . Purdue Universitj KENTUCKY KAPPA , . . . Central Universit TENNESSEE ZETA, , Southwestern Presbyterian UniversItj TENNESSEE LAMBDA, . . . Cumberland UUlVCTSlt3 TENNESSEE NU, , Vanderbilt UHlVCTS1lI TENNESSEE KAPPA, . . University of Tentgessti TENNESSEE OMEGA, . , . University of the on TENNESSEE ETA, Southwestern Baptist Un1verS1'f ALABAMA MU, , , . University of Alebgm MISSISSIPPI GAMMA, , University of MISSISSIPI MISSOURI ALPHA, . . University of Missoni MISSOURI BETA, , , Washington UH1VCfS1t ITNEBRASKAA LAMBDA PI, , University of Nebr2lSk COLORADO CHI, , . . University of Colorad COLORADO ZETA, ,, . . University of TJCIUF CALIFORNIA ALPHA, , Leland Stanford, Ir. Umyersil CALIFORNIA BETA, , . . University of Californl NEW YORK MU, , I Columbia Univers11 NEW YORK 'SIGMA PHI, , St, Stephens Collet ILLINOIS PSI OMEGA, . Northwestern Univers11 ,Wife .. . . ' "'f1ww-:wvvf-up-,f--. --. .-,.......,..,, ' - R 'rf'- . . hat' . , - A ty A If .f..,-,,.-.,.,..,,...,..,... I-I I J' 9, Q ex r el if Df 3? 6 e gf? 'gif .2 GY v f, 2 O W .E Q 1' .11 1 , YT , ' 4 -V iv. Ffa: Q . ."' x: rx..- i ?'d is ,ggi , 1X4 1 -A31 595+ -afvql Q .E xt, .43 u . 'fx'- iii '1' Q. fi '1 .5 NY iii? 5 'V "" eggg FR? -f A Fig ? wi iz -2 . f, Q I ,, .4J. hiv 4' ' avi. lg. Q15 'La' ' 1 'fit ,-, 4 -GHZ' . 'L All -.43 .11 . -.". 7 'ws - 6. , . ? . - 1' . 'I . .5 .4 R W Vg' .N A 1 , Q55 ip ' F' If , ' . z 1 F152 35,-,:,.. Wfffg- H3 J . -Q -.1 . , .'. 'I L sfaj I? -t'2"?1ff 31' if 3 .UQ Q' . 5.3.13 gif 1 's41"5v A giifatvf 5333 'QFQF : if :fl mm. ia ,BQ- Rr 1.1.4 in" fiifiiidf 'Iwi gig P' 1 '-1, L ch, iV5'.'T5f ffj . - flhm ll .A fjt' 4 Q5 4 gl I ,. .. I ff52 ' . ' wa. , :wig 1 .'5f1"P'1 . 11117 I fu-5 -Tr?" ' 113: '11 4 - lf W. , 4- ,Q ' ,155 'YH4. , o :vi 1.1 1' ..,, r 24' vu, at QE?"- "+ 152-S ig ..y , , ,fr gli JPL , af ' J ' mf H1 ,. Q12 7:ff in ' .I-I QV: '-" 'Q' ff I 1 ff vw.-, ggi . fs gb' fi Y +yg1 '43 ffUL -:F ,, , J SQQ 5 'J ",3i'i' ,gig y- K? -. ' nge! 'ff?f ,+ ' - 'IN .5- if -J .eg Luz?-' '5 41 r ' xl Q iz '53 1 v v ' ... 4 1 .sw f r fa 'A 'if I 1 I L, 'K sq,- vfiz YA A I. 'F I T X . Ima ,J -vs if 'i' 11 5 51"1e' Hz. --7 r 'Q ,-If 4. ., A. . 1 V 4 4' Q G I s , J I A I A g ,I 4 . T. 4 r In V-r . ta ff W if. ' A A 4 I I " 4 ,I mf ' , E - ' I if.. w K isllllil IDM EDSil ll Michigan Iota Beta Chapter, Established 1888 A 40+ CHARLES GLENN CHURCH ARTHUR DUDLEY JACKSON HARRISON CLARKE JACKSON BRADSHAW HILL SWALES HARVEY YEAMAN FRANK EDWARD BAKER WILLIAM DUNCAN KILPATRICK ALBERT HENRY KEITH BYRON HARRY KNAPP JOE CARLOS OSBURN JEROME BENJAMIN HARRINGTON CLIFFORD WALDORF CRANDALL CHARLES WOLCOTT KENT FREDERIC ROYAL SHERMAN DWIGHT GAGER NORTH LUCIENE AUSTIN WITTENMYER JOHN THEODORE MOUNTAIN SAMUEL LORD CHAMBERS HUGH WHITE CLYDE IRWIN WEBSTER .121 "" -,if 1 A:-""""' 22, ' Ah X N 'r S --A HAH ff' "' VU' HU 'B Efffrzr 14 Jill' ,H-, .Zjf 'as:. -'vffxi I if 1 65? EFHF ad JMB! FL uguq, va mfr- 'W' - -' -Trl '4 Q- -: - '-' ' "-up-. , - A . .Ir-,W-jj A -LEW , e---...-. 'F EZ' " ,,, , S -'-A '-- . if "5 ,. .A ,, D 14- . Fm, ,A ' '-,- ' - J-,. - ,4Y.4.: .ff X . L'-- ' Fe -wIH1f1'-':J'f3- 'KWH 'S-:ia 'JO -X - ' -fl ,: P-E' 'F f' ' I 'Fl' . "' 5' . if-7 34g 477 :inf ' 'S",a7+.jf 4.34 - -2 - -- I L+-:,.-: 2.12, Jv-1--,,T- X --Q. . "F"'-' 5 555 , - ..' , I--:7 '52 ,PA --L, 4 - ,- J .M f '.-E .. W 'v1'- . - . IZ, 'W' gli. I , -f 3... " ' f LL --' ' ,-'f'H"f2-'A,.. -Q-, I K, FA-, 3 I - . . -my . ' fL-.,..-f'- zlfif' AL '- - ill' - A., ' B-"4" , E ., .24 A -' - - ,I . A 1-'iff' ii?-HL '-x.-x' f ' ,LA-, , -3 4 -' .,.v 'A W - fc: - 1 "V ff' We me A " 5 7 Ewa " I:-'fc-EQ '-2-ff ' . ... fi.'BP2-Q51 LA: 2 "::'fE , 12 ' --- 'fa 1323 f '-S.??fllA.f 5 -'EC' S, -ff' " ""s" 1 ,. , 'iii'-n'I.' 1' I- ng' 'T 'I'-'JI' -F ' Z ' I ' ' . , . L Q 'eff' 1 ' fir ' Ei?' Jil .-Al. 'Q ,' I -rf?-21: ' 'ig : 04, -T 'P s' :mi f'3.: f,1-4: -N ,5,f3-2.2 f'- 1 .- rf- , ,yu . ..----U -K' Y . ',g... V --. - 4 .AQ x M.-,S-sg Ls -1 5, '--v -, . -,, v ,- - l .,. ,A - ..... ..... is I . ' . 1 I . , , 1 -..'...." ..i-..w..A,:C..I.-.-.- ......, . , L.. ,L C. iffdli lw el Uma Delta Zhi Founded at Union College, 1847 BETA, . . o GAMMA DEUTER EPSILON DEUTER ZETA, . . ETA, B THETA, IOTA, . ' . IOTA DEUTERON, .KAPPA, . . LAMBDA, . ' MU DEUTERON, 'NU DEUTERON, XI, , . OMICRON DEUTE 'PI DEUTERON , , RHO DEUTERON, 9 SIGMA DEUTERON, , TAU DEUTERON, PHI, , CHI, , 'CHI DEUTERON, PSI, , Cornell University University of Michigan . Yale University . Brown University , Bowdoin College . Kenyon College Harvard University . lWilliams College . Tufts College Boston University . Amherst College Lehigh University , Hobart College Dartmouth College New York University Columbia University University of Michigan University of Minnesota Lafayette College University of Rochester Columbian University - ' Hamilton College gp-mph , , . fwnr- .,,.,. 'X ., 1 KN-gf pi? X Drelffr, Pio ffnz. "W ' Q vflnrg.-:rf w - ,QL 0 l n K , I a 4 X 'I Q 1 1 1 . I . fr x , H Y 1 .. 'J H 1 4.7. YW J 3 f 'J M . 4. 1 ,W x 3 'w V ,p 3- 1 Y . .1 . , I 1 . U N ,J yn, 4 . .L ,D 1 'i 45. A 2? tn 1 ? '5 s t . '1 , 'K 1 I 'W 1, I L I in Mix-2 1,1 H - ,fi 4 H , '11 ' 4 M 4 1' 5 4 . Qi rn , Hg fx, 'vs 'W ja! 1'l'L , H' , - v 1 1, 3 -4 V ll 4:5 ' Uni 1, i. 1.1 is a 5 ,i S 'r Q. A , , -1 VE .1 ,-X -1 ,. V , 1 - E P 3 I I Ii 1 1 A 'KL-I I --4 5 1 E If I Ji 1 I .xi 3 an K 1 4 1 Mg . I I - D 1 R 'I '1 '4 ,u : 2 11 6 r E G 3 'Nvl 'r l . . 1 .ski 1 I , v I gl Hi ,,g ' i a A 5 'i. I 'i 1 Lv -2 1 L 1 'i Qfi 'Q J W2 'P X I 1 , L- , .L 1 ' ' , iv ,L ..: .V- 'xngx Q U . 51?- 54 F, wif: v! ,h 3 N E '. , it ,ul 179' 'gl' 1 nt. , 'H an . f 1. 2 'f A 1, ' 1' X. 9: 551 ,I 'J .ji , J ,'s'd 'f . -A5 -T' ' in - ri 'll VL , , 3 3.4 .. P3 H JIT '1 X1 'Si .Q Af A N . Q J 1 -, , I .A I Y rx' Yr 'PY'-+i. .,X-1 u ,Kr .,. xy lift.: x. Mngxafihiligtbmi 5-3zi1Eii4'EHn-5225 I nik, .... . . aims E h- ew :Wi A ww., hr Ibta Ita bi 4 + 4 + 'Gamma Deuteron Chapter, Established 1889 4 4 4 GEORGE REBEC, Ph.B. WOLCOTT HACKLEY BUTLER, Ph.B., LL.B. Ross CHAUNCEY WHITMAN, A.B., CHARLES HENRY GRAY, B.L. PAUL DARLING WRIGHT, B.L. +4 RALPH COLLAMORE RICHARD HUSS SUTPHEN LOUIS ALVIN KREIS WALTER MINTURN DEAN GUY VORHEES WILLIAMS FRANK 'VINCENT SACKETT MARTIN CHARLES HUGGETT CHARLES RUFUS MOREY FRANK JONES ARBUCKLE CHARLES EDWARD WEHRLE WILLIAM KEEPERS MAXWELL HENRY ELMORE WILKINSON CARL MUNSON GREEN FRANK POWELL LLEWELLYN RUSSELL ROY MCPEEK JOHN BRECKENRIDGE HITCHCOCK 3 1 f fraternity of Sigma bi t e+++ Founded at Miami University, 1855 I r M ++'+ , ZIMDWI' Roll ' A Dickinson College Columbian University , I I Gettysburg College A Lehigh University Bucknell University ' U Pennsylvania State College Washington and Lee University Hampden-Sidney College Roanoke Collegg . I University of Pennsylvania University of Virginia , University of North Carolina. Randolph-Macon College V Purdue University Miami University University of Cincinnati Ohio Wesleyan University Kentucky State College Denison University West Virginia University Centre College I Ohio State University Indiana University Butler University De PauWUniversity V Q Hanover College University of Michigan n Illinois Wesleyan University Northwestern University p University of Wisconsin University of nnnois 1 R Albion couege Beloit College 'Massachusetts Institute of Technology University of Chicago University of Missouri University of Nebraska University of Kansas University of Mississippi V Tulane University University of California A Vanderbilt University University of Texas University of Southern California Leland Stanford,' jr. University , Q Cornell University Hobart College University of Minnesota Columbia University ' Dartmouth College Hmmm Zbaptcrss Spfingflelda Ohio I LaFayette, Indiana Cincinnati: Ohio Indianapolis, Indiana ichlcagfb Illinois Montgomery, Alabama Washington, D. C. New York, New Ygrk - J 'V r 'J fy L, uf 41, af , I 4 , H., , ,.. qv., w X' X? i V: I. Ts I . if n Ep-row-'ly-v'v-wjpf 0'l""?'3f'93"'5","X 1 iv-nuff,-f ya-gfv-wg.-y. A V Y N I -we L yy i61fS5?fe'61'i 4, Y' 1 Q , x 3 - f 3 1 ,P ,A ., . I .' 3? f Q 1. xozfago if a Q f -K 14 'Lp-X ix' -4 JL LA 1: B-XJ. ,-.Xu Ex fxirtffir itikxffifi w64' -'figs' VJ fe 5, Kgatg 3 , V , 4,13 .f-1 .. V W , ... Ny "'f,,:? 256' fb" ,.-.. 5' fe. 7.-' .941 4' 6 Lv rg.. . . , V ,1. 'fe' ffsn, - :Pl fu- 301' Q ff vw! .fi i X -A 75 g .xx ,: 4 n ,gi L 4:2-rx---2 jr 13021 "' Dvfeicfo, ' . .,,.,f ,..,,,..,,.,.f-1-r--.,f.--1-...1 -1-gp4,,F,.,,.,.A,RYqNn Q W W YK ....., -. - -ww--...W-,.',,..-.-.Q ..- , M. ....... -if-f-' 1 V, ' . l v, . --. .,. , ,,. , .--.. , " 1 W . I ,k k , , X H , ,nf ..-....-1-Q-mv. F-.wg-v-:ff-'f-fu,--..1.. ,,-.1Z-V ,.1...--4...- , 1 .V Q. AL .' ,.,. t H N , .,Aai',L-l.f1,,ig-ginkp.2,1 y a - 1 i ,,V,,,,,, .,......A 0.-, aww-...wi ,4,,..7-,-..-.'-r- 'A 1. U'-1' 'I I . ...- Q I Y I P A V. . , . 1 'V'v wli""'f, 'L-7--as .Aruanqv-4.--H , . - . ' ' -' v-'P-'av-an-.:::.f .: :mf vm-.Q---1 f, 9- .ui .,,, . ' . r , . 'W ""' "v"-rvi,-fr'-1-v--9-....,v.-.-. if ru-41f:n',::-wufafqn M.. f.,...:f 3, ,..,,,.-.T-.-1-.1f,1-::,.f,:..,, 5 ,fa Y -, -wnqgg U... xx.-.. - - - ' -v- N ' ' -- - ' ' " 1' ' . "' ' 'X K"-,. Sigma bi C 44 + 4 Theta Theta Chapter, Established 1877 5 4 4 J 'Fratres in time JOHN W. BENNETT, A.B., LL.B., S2 WM. DURAND SPRINGER, B.S., A II Frater in Facultate FRED MANVILLE TAfYI.OR, PH.D., Q 'Trams In tlnlversltate , m6dfCdl Devdffmkilf BURT MATHER CARR, A 11, SAMUEL SCHULTZ, PH.B., A II, N E N SOLOMON S. LEE, A H HORACE NEWHART, A.B., H H KRW D2P3l'flllQIlf HARRY ANTHONY FENTON, A.B., A GEORGE KINGSLEY, JR., A E THOMAS ROLAND DEAN, A.B., A A JACOB MOORE BLAKE, E, A X JAMES MADISON HERVEY, A II WILBER HENRY COOPER, I' JOHN EDWARD EGAN, A MATTHIAS BOVEE PITTMAN, A A Literary Department 1897 - CARL HERBERT COOPER A LEWIS BURTON ALGER ALBERT HENRY STONEMAN A 1898 CARL SEARS KENNEDY ROBERT SOUTHGATE DANFORTH ARD EZRA RICHARDSON WILLIAM LEWIS LOVE ARTHUR ROY WREN 1899 ARTHUR DICKEY STANSELL HUGH LAW CHARLES FISHER DELBRIDGE A CHARLES AUGUSTUS LA FEVER FRANK S'gAPLES BACHELDER CLARENCE WRIGHT-WHITNEY 1900 LEROY WEBSTER BURTON OTTO GREENING EBBIE GEORGE BEURET GEORGE ELLIOTE GRANGER C e Legal fraternity of Pbi Delta PM 444W Founded at University of Michigan, 1869 KEIQT l BOOTH STORY COOLEY POMEROY MARSHALL JAY WEBSTER HAMI.LTON GIBSON WAITE 6 CHOATE FIELD CONKLING TIEDEMAN MlNOR DILLON DANIELS CHASE HARLAN SWAN MCCLAIN LINCOLN OSGOODE FULLER '4+. 0 7 mmm Roll iversit of Michigan Un y Union College of Law, Chicago Columbia University St. Louis Law School University of California Washington Law School Aibauy Law schooi Boston- University Cincinnati Law School, University of Cincinnati University of Pennsylvania l Yale University Harvard -University New York University Cornell University f ' University of Missouri University of Virginia University of Minnesota Buffalo Law School ,Oregon Law School University of Wisconsin Ohio State University University of Iowa University of Nebraska Osgoode Hall, Toronto University ' Law Department, Lake Forest University ' 1869 1877 1881 1882 1884 1884 1884 1385 1886 1886 1887 1887 1888 1888 1888 1890 1890 1891 1891 1891 1893 1893 1393 1896 1896 x K ff 'x .Iii X Nw .--... X H 'x - I If , . f 1 -,- f - X ' Lx Q - D Q Hn. an iff X 29' gf3, Q- U-:Jm .' n,. f 1', 757 l 1 J Phi Delta Phi , -6 4' -4 Kent Chapter, Established 1869 4 A 4' 4 I fratres Ill Facultatc HON. THOMAS MCINTYRE COOLEY, LL.D., A A fb PROF. HARRY BURNS HUTCHINS, Ph.B., A A fb PROF. JEROME CYRIL KNOWLTON, A.B., LL.B., Z II' HON. LEVI THOMAS GRIFFIN, A.M., B 6 I1 PROF. OTTO KIRCHNER, A.M. PROF. BRADLEY MARTIN THOMPSON, M.S., LL.B., A K E JUDGE JOHN WAYNE CHAMPLIN, LL.D. PROF. FLOYD RUSSELL MECHEM, A.M. PROF. ELIAS FINLEY JOHNSON, B.S., LL.M. JUDGE HENRY HARRISON SWAN, A.M., Z NI' PROF. THOMAS ASHFORD BOGLE, LL.B. HON. MELVILLE MADISON BIGELOW, A.M, Ph.D. fWebster Chapterj PROF. FRANKJFREEMONT REED, A.B., A A Q1 PROF. HORACE LAFAYETTE WILGUS, M.S. fSwan Chapterj JUDGE EDWARD DEWITT KINNE, A.B I HON. CHARLES RUDOLPHUS WHITMAN, A. . ORA ELMER BUTTERFIELD, LL.B., JOHN ROBERT EFFINGER, Ph. M., LL.B., 111 K -I' HERBERT ROGERS MARLAT1', A.B., LL.B., Literary' Department fratres In llrbe .,EQ M 1897 FREEMAN FIELD, A A fb! RANSOM GARDNER GEORGE, A.B., A A fb CLARE HART STEARNS EDWARD FRANCIS WEHRLE, Ph.B., Q1 A 9 1898 CHARLES GOLDSMITH COOK, A.B., B 9 H LUMAN WEBSTER GOODENOUGH, B.L., A T A OLIVER ALLEN LUDLOW, K A . LESTER ELMER MAHER, B 9 II RUFUS PERCIVAL RANNEY, A K E ERROL HENRY YERINGTON SPICER FRANCIS EDWARD STEVENS ORESTES HUMPHREY WRIGHT, A A 111 I 899 ARTHUR GILBERT ANDREWS, C.E., A E 11 CHARLES PUGH DAVIS, B.L., B 6 II SAMUEL ISAAC MOTTER, A.B. PHILIP WALTER SEIPP ELLIS GARY SOULE, CP K E ARMIN WILLIAM BRAND FREDERIC HARRY MORRIS HOUGHTON REED, A.B. WALLIS CRAIG SMITH FRANCIS LOUIS WURZBURG 'mranirv of Kam Sigma +++ .I y Founded at the University of Bologna, Italy, 1395 University of Virginia, 1867 C 4 4 9 A Zbdlml' RMI Louisiana State University y T1'i11i'fY College Davidson College I Mercer University Centenary College University of Illinois University of Virginia A U Pennsylvania State College Randolph-Macon ' College University of Pennsylvania Cumberland University' , University of Miflhigan Southwestern University Columbia University Vanderbilt University , , Southwestern Baptist University University of Tennessee , ' U- S. Grant University Washington and Lee University - Cornell University William and Mary College University Of Vermont University of Arkansas ' University of North Carolina Swarthmore College I - - ' Wofford College Tulane University A Bethel College University of Texas Kentucky University Hampden-Sidney College A Wabash College Southwestern Presbyterian University Bowdoin College Purdue University U I Ohio State University Maine State College I Georgia School of Technology University of the South Mi1lsaps,COllege South Carolina College- - Lake Forest University Bucknell University University Of Nebraska Jllumni Jlssociations I ALPHA ALUMNI, .... I . Yazoo City, Mississippi PHILADELPHIA ALUMNI CLUB, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania PITTSBURG ALUMNI CLUB, , , Pittsburg, Pennsylvania NEW YOEK ALUMIQII CLUB, , , New York City NEW QRLEANS ALUMNI CLUB, , , New Orleans, Louisiana GALVESTON ALUMNI CLUB, . , Galveston, Texas WASHINGTON ALUMNI CLUB, , Washington, D. C. CHICAGO ALUMNI CLUB, , , A Chicago, Illinois INDIANAPOLIS ALUMNI CLUB, , Indianapolis, Indiana 4 Q 2?V1.fbgw 44 41Y9JZg ZQQ-. D'ff1ClI,RIIflfl , "I -J' ' l?59lff-1235, .---1-. N X 1 -. V11 Nm :eww N., Kappa Sigma 5 5 + Alpha Zeta, Chapter, Established 1892 + +' + ALONzO JAY EDGERTON ARCHIBALD STEYENSON GEORGE ROY FOX EZRA WHITE BRIGGS HICE O' BROWN MCKAY KING MCINNIS CHARLES WILLIAM GIFFORD NORMAN EDWIN HOWARD GORDON GRANT CHARLES BAGLEY LEE J. ULLMAN FRANK RAYMOND SWEASEY WALLACE DUTTON SCOTT RAYMOND B. ALBERSON WILLIAM RICHARD OATES HUGH THOMAS GUNDRY LIONEL KING 1' ,.-. 54 V gif. -J Y,"-L' , X-'-J 'X -:'- fy: ,lg-:Q '- 1 F -?: : 2 , f5p2.::w,,,,,, , ,L-fy U m ' ,ig 'f,. . k f..2f"52f- 7 . .:-1,---'agp ':f Ar-11 ,I 'gy' - . f . ,. In Yl'V"5'.' IJ' A - 2 I r,-. v F.:-,. 4 -l-r F rn- r-1-r' 'EE Lim i'r1,'Ib'v i fbi .-: I: ?5H:n!"vg i " 5 I I, ' x"f'f',! ' E' 'V Af 'fwf' 'ff' ' ' 9 'VR i 2 1 'Qigiakiz H 'flint 3 Q ' ' f l.-1.-' I fin' ll l1lWIw7Tu.'F -:L , - - f , 51 VE T' ., 47"" "f ft4ei11 i'l- -'- i' " - t - .- :-:Jim 4-2-0 " ' .-uw n ......4.-L--L. -..i...... Q.. --. ., 7i"vf -I -.,- egal Pratemitv of elta bi ,544 n Founded at Cornell University, 1890 v '44-+ Elmvter Roll i Cornell University New York University University of Michigan University of Minnesota l Dickinson College C . Chicago College of Law g Buffalo Law School A Osgoode Hall-Toronto' X 1 ""' " ,. ,J 1 si' ,f if, D rn?-rrz, P2117 41- ,aff bf -f-h-,U-.-.v-Q ,,,.f.,!,,.,-,. ,- f,-.Q,-- - -. -4-W--,.-fs--Y--,-.--1 -,.,.,-...,, .W-...- ..-.nu -- A -., "745!f'f??'ii?"' fl If lid bi 404 Michigan Chapter, Establishecl I892 ,I + + + Frames In lionorarll JUDGE WILLIAM G. EWING JUDGE SAMUEL MAXWELL HON. JONATHAN P. DOLLIVAR, A.B. HON. ROGER Q. MILLS HON. ROBERT T. LINCOLN PROF. MARSHALL D. EWELL, LL.D. PROF. HERMAN V. AMES, PH.D. PROF. JOHN B. CLAYBERG, LL.D. JUDGE VICTOR A. ELLIOTT HON. JAMES L. HIGH HON. BENJAMIN BUTTERWORTH fratres In llnlvcrsitate- 1891 CHESTER GROVE BROWN THOMAS ALBERT BERKEBILE FREDERICK B. STANLEY A 1898 I DANIEL WEBSTER FISHELL WILLIAM HENRY FEINDT, JR. WILLIAM ROMINE BLACKBURN DUANE DARROW ARNOLD FRANK GRAY MASON HOWARD ION SHEPHERD HUGH HUSE HART CARL LEWIS FLOOD J. STERLING ST. JOHN JACOB MOORE BLAKE 1899 ROBERT DAVID MAGILL GEORGE HARRIS SMITH EARL VANDORN BROWN CHARLES-ARTHUR KLOTZ ALBERT DAVID STEVENS ., HENRY CATROW LEROY ALLEN WILSON A JOHN CURTIS AMMERMAN HARRY LANDOW CHAPMAN HAROLD HUNTER EMMONS JOHN CAMPBELL WARREN MULLETT EUGENE HARDING . ff-':,f' ,QE X ...W 1!.Ll.lvaA '1 .af-d -ic: y.,--,.-v-" , . I , Gamma Pbi B ta Sorority . 4 4 4 Founded at Syracuse University, 1872 ,Q + ALPHA, . . , . . U Syracuse University BETA, . V University of Michigan GAMMA, , University of Wisconsin DELTA, . . Boston University EPSILON, , , Northwestern University ZETA, , , -Ba1timoreCo11ege ETA, . . University of California if 3 W , :rw-jf:-'f-Q-:fvg-W ,-Q? .Q .TY :DRI , M o X ,-M -Y-4... WY. J 1 N. Ma -sl ' r s -- - , 1 49 Q. ' s K ' 31,59 " 3.5 4. x 1 rf ' N, mfr' N ,,,-,r,!.,- Nw- ...uv we Y F .., . . S O . W 1.5 JV. lj I . ' S J' ..'- 5, v , ul -, 1 v. J 1" V? 4 4 af 1, W 'v 1 .J Q. .5 , .N .5 as 'f w. . E, v-'L 4. ,X L ,. .I :ig 'v f 1 iv- rv nhmvcaspql M' , w?f'1'f Wg "5 ':'- 5737" Q. 4 Gamma Pbi B ta 4 Beta, Chapter, .Esta-.blishcd 1882 I + 4 Sorores in llrbe MRS. FREDERICK N. SCOTT, B.A., '84 MAUDE HICKS, ,94 FRILL G. BECKWITH, 794 ELSIE GRACE ANDERSON, ,QS MARGARET ALICE DOUGLAS, '97 . SONYCS lil lllllvtftlfdit 1897 EDNA MARIE HOLBROOK MARTHA WHITE BANCKER EMILIE AGNES FLINTERMANN MARY ESTELLE YOUNG EVA JANE HILL ESTHER BRALEY GRACE FANNY GOODMAN 1899 WINIFRED ALICE HUBBELL .KATHERINE FORREST BALLENTINE FRANCES LILLIAN PETIT ELIZABETH LORETTE SHERMAN CAROLINE BERTHA COLVER 1900 SADA AUGUSTA PLATT I. A A EDNA- BURINGTON X Sify I. X ' . ' - 1 X n' RUTH BURINGTON --,-, ZS. .-15 ' I l'. 'f ' N gl--' QE gigh- L "' 4 ' VAX mt- ' d iq ,313 Mun 'fl' ' V!'f. -4 2-,,,ffz::fZ75XfwflI'v.1f'- ., , - 4 W , ff-1 I eff- U .'- I, -nf' M., . ff I S 'F' ,Ab " We - 4 . g,,' -r' ' ,Q .--- I' i.u".,:'l.?: I. 'yi'-' Ar 4 .Wx - - ff' lf, 'f+1" ':. -. Q W ' 1" 15' , 1 lg " SWETF 25- f A! S I sm .Q f 'WF ' I i 4 ALPHA, DELTA, ZETA, ETA, , KAPPA, LAMBDA, XI, . SIGMA, TAIJ, . PHI, , CHI, ,A PSI, , OMEGA, GAMMA, lid Gdlllllld 4 4 4 Founded atr1VIississippi University, 1874 4 4 4 U A Zbavter Roll . . . . Mount Union College , University of Southern California . . . Albion College . Buchtel College . University of ' Nebraska . . University of Minnesota . . University of Michigan , Northwestern University, . University of Iowa . University of Colorado . . . Cornell University Wornan's College of Baltimore . . University of Wisconsin . ' Leland Stanford, Jr. University :V Y 4, , :, 9 3,15 E, 'E Url ffl -f M-" ZYZWTL qw-K-W., ,, . ii r' 'Hu 1 A ,"'y, , ' If kv xg, Y iv s --w . ,Hi ,1 . ,F fu! ' w I " ' """9'f'H N- L-r.11:.an.4:,i,""',.LzQ-.jififisff 4 Q1 1 ,kfqq Ita Gamma 4 + 4 Xi Chapter, Established 1885 4 4 + lionorarv memberi MRS. HENRY S. CARHART MRS. ALBERT B. PRESCOTT MRS. CHARLES B. NANCREIJE MRS. MORTIMER E. COOLI-:Y MRS. FRANK R. LILLIE SARA SPENCER BROWNE BELL KROLIK JULIA MIOREHOUSE ANGELL CLARA REBECCA BELL MARY ELISE DEVENY ANNA MORRELL BARNARD LAURA DOLESE GENEVIEVE LEIJYARD DERBY HENRIETTA PAGELSEN RUBY RICHARDSON ADA MURRAY SAFFORD 1897 , ANNA TI-IORNE MCLAUCHLAN INEZ CHRISTABEL PERRIN 1898 HARRIETTE HARI.AN LUCIE HARRISON SEELEY CORNELIA ANNMWILDING 1899 MARION STICKNEY HELEN MAY ST. JOHN 1900 5 3-uh S0l'0SiS 'QEQps'Daag.j , '4+0 SOROSIS , , New' York . . Establlished I875A COLIJEGIATE SOROSIS ,, 'University of Michigan Established IBBB I f 3 J Drcka.Bfz1'm, 0 . 1 F , -E 31 J Q ,IULIET 54 Mn N n -F' 5? Guan , BM I 3 BERT1 , Q , 1 5' ilihnummulg. MRS JAMES B ANGELL MRS PAUL R B de PONT MRS GEORGE S MORRIS MRS VICTOR C VAUCHAN MRS MRS MRS MRS MRS MRS LYDIA CARDELL CONDON, 'go GENEVIEVE CORNWELL, ,92 MARY BEATRICE COOLEY, ,QS ALICE BROWN, A B 96 LOUISE BRADFORD QWIFT, A B Wellesley 90 JULIET MORTON BUTLER JULIA LOUISE MOREY MAY MORTGN BUTLER JULIA PIKE CRACE GRIEVE MI'LLARD SARAH FRANCES WILCOX ALICE CHANDLER ANNIE HEGELER HARRIET LOUISE GEORFE MACY KITCHEN AMY ANGELL COLLIER EVANGELINE LODGE LAND FLORENCE GERTRUDE DILLON CAROLINE ESTHER PATTENGILL LENA ZULEIKHA HEGELER MAUDE HAYES THAYER MARGUERITE KNOWLTON CLARA TURNER BEATRICE OLLIE BELFORD BERTHA MARION GOLDSTONE OLGA KATHRYNE4 HEGELER CHRISTINE MARY LILLEY SYBIL MATILDA PETTEE MARIAN STEVENS ROBERTS LILIAN ANNA STEELE JANE OWEN TURNER IOWA fafifllifv of Pi B 13 bi Founded at Monmouth College, 1867 VERMONT ALPHA, COLUMBIA ALPHA, 'PENNSYLVANIA ALP PENNSYLVANIA BET OHIO ALPHA, . OHIO BETA, . NEW YORK ALPHA, MASSACHUSETTS ALPHA, Boston Umversmty MARYLAND ALPHA, Woman S College of Balfxmore ILLINOIS ILLINOIS ILLINOIS ILLINOIS INDIANA INDIANA MICHIGAN ALPHA BETA, . DELTA, EPSILON, ZETA, , ALPHA, BETA, ,C 9 MICHIGAN BETA, ALPHA, IOWA IOWA IOWA BETA, ZETA, LAMBDA, WISCONSIN ALPHA, LOUISIANA ALPHA, Newcomb Couege KANSAS ALPHA NEBRASKA BETA COLORADO BETA CALIFORNIA ALPHA A 2 UDIVCTSIIY of Kansas s UHIVCTSIIY of Nelfradfa COLORADO ALPHA: UHIVCISIIY of Colorado 2 Denver Umverslty , Leland Stanford r UDIVCTSIIY O 5 1 '- ax' -'.' fix-T1s5's, . - X E i? 5532: Z. If , ' 4 f,,fw ' K , 53- b , , if -'J' XQNSQQQS-ft ' '-Q.-,L ' ,' x "QR K X 'X .,.- f . 3Nx,. -' . -. I j f - X . lfimiw h 3114867 ll! I ill D wkaf, Plum. , , -pm .-.Q-v' --,1"'.Tf WLT , 4 ,,., .. ,. . r ' "3"'Tv,-Yi WE 1: ' . b f' '5511 ev.j:niQgrm4WM- QL. A ,c:,g-vm-Qww. - ,f u , ' AyL..a14'1.L-..4.A,jaf.Fs:'35.n-5.51-Qhlg'SF... . nil-1 1. . " " H ' - ' C ...ac-Q an-ravll?l'N'l' , s FQ' 49 5 I L Y -ww-rvw 1 P. ,Ill A 'J ,,Yf F - ' " " ' fi: Fw LHH .-.mi-.-, .XM ,, .- .5 Kimi. Pi B116 bi 4 4 0 Michigan Beta Chapter, Established 1888 + 4 + B0ll0I'dI'l1 mCllb2l'8 MRS. MARTIN L. D'OOGE MRS. FRANCIS W. KELSEY MRS. ALBERT A. STANLEY S0l'0l'C5 Ill UWC MRS. G. CARL HUBER HELEN G. WETMORE MRS. DAVID L. DAVOLL LIDA V. WHITE N. EDITH PURDUM MARY M. WOLFE, PENNA. B OLIVE FOGGY, IOWA A ' Sorores In llnlvmltate 67211111312 MARY BARTOL 1897 FRANCES A. FOSTER FAITH H. GILBERT JESSIE H. SMITH 1898 HARRIET E. BEARD REBECCA E. FINCH LAURA H. BEVANS FLORENCE L. RICHARDS FLORA A. SIGEL 1899 EDNA BEVANS GERTRUDE EDWARDS FLORENCE WETMORE 1900 GRACE ROBERTSON MARY E. WILSON ALMA M. ZWERK socierv of Kappa nam amma Founded at Monmouth College, 1870 PHI, . . BE-TA 'E-Bs-rLoN, . Psi, , . BETA BETA, BETA TAU, BETA ALPHA, BETA IOTA, GAMMA RHO, LAMBDA, , BETA' GAMMA, BETA NU, ,f BETA SDELTA, XI, . , KAPPA, DELTA, . IQTA, MU, , ETA, , BETA THETA, UPSILON, , EPSILON, , CHI, . BETA IZETA, THETA, - QMEGA, .. BETA ETA, " ZFWCP. ROI' .. . Boston University . . Barnard Cpligge - Cornell University Saint Lawrence University . Syracuse University University of Pennsylvania .4 Swarthmore College Allegheny College . Buchtel College Wooster University . Ohio State University . University of Michigan, . Adrian College I . Hillsdale College Indiana University De Pauw University , , Butler College, University of Wisconsin Chicago Assoeiate Chapter Northwestern University Illinois Wesleyan University University of Minnesota . Iovva State University Missouri State University Nebraska State University. Kansas State University Leland Stanford Ir. University 1870 Boston Cflfnell lflfuce 'lfthmore Allegheny Bechtel Wwster n State tllity of lndilna 2 Puzw rsityo Rite!!! sleyan fit! I Stlte i State I State 5 State yd jr. KGPDG KGPPU I . " . 44+ Gdlllllld Beta Delta Chapter, Established 1896 +04 PMTORCSSCS MRS. WILLIAM J. HERDMAN MRS. FLEMMING CARROW MRS. WILLIAM H. PETTEE , SONY!! Ill url!! ELEANOR PARKER LULU BARTLETT SOUTHMAYD IRSSICA MAUD MACINTYRE RUTH BECKWITH BERTHA CARMELIA BARNEY MILDRED TURNER HINSDALE Sorores in Universitat: GBEORGIA SMEALLIE, ,93 QMedica1 Departmentj ANNE STUART DUNCAN SUSANNE ONIUS MACAULEY MABELLE BARLOW TURNER ALICE MAY BOUTELL CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH KENNEDY BERTHA WRIGHT LAURA MINNIE RINKLE NELLIE MCKAY MARY PLANE HERRICK MILDRED LOUISE WEED FLORENCE EWING MACINTYRE ERIE MAUDE LAYTON MABELLE ELIZABETH GILLETT SOPHIE ROOD ST CLAIRE GERTRUDE BLANCHE IQENNEDY MARGARET RACHEL LAYTON GENEVIVE IDA BROAD FLORENCE WALKER ALICE MARY THORNE ' LUCILE CRANE MORRIS 1 NX Q., f in gl kip- f , -I b-'Q if mn fs N 'Xilinx ' f 4 ' I 11. : I V l' Nm . A 9.13: W fl" O I - - f . , ' . - ' ' Nt ffl " ' -5 ' A 'A - ' ,' f ' , .' " A NJA! -1. A0 A ' I .Q . 1 V . .4 4 - X I - ' 1 g, ,f, 1 ' . - I-R :.' . xr , ' I-' ' .-. V1 I ' ly. ' if -.I V 2 . j ,f! Ji 4, .vt Y ' f A!-' A ' V' 592 Al, ffgqlllilz lj-rf, an 1,7 fi Inl, ' 1, ff c . 1 ff' 77? 91 , v I' ' 'R-' If fffff - -'J ll- - - ' LRG . I rl' I A 43.-Q L...5.-p1.f?."'gv A if 1 nl 'sfsrg , All Q'-EIA? P' ', I' n- -.Jn - A I I '. i. 'v fl., A jf " f' 4' -fe ag.-r ef I 1, ' ' ' ' D , fit f' ef: ' V V ? ll! 'fb ff W I lf? 1 A 'ZA 1 I xff 'Q S 11,4 Itvv. y 'f,Y,il ,r A- 1 i ,V ' - ,ff x , 5 V-.2-'41 L A 1. X ' A ' rp u 7 'Wt lt . 'lf' A ld . If raternitv of Hlpba bi +09 Founded at Syracuse University, 1872 + + 4. i H6002 ZDGDWPS ALPHA, , ,... Syracuse University BETA, , Northwestern University ETA, , . . Boston University GAMMA, , De Pauw University DELTA, , , , Cornell University EPSILON, , . , University of Minnesota ZETA, Woman's College of Baltimore THETA, . . . University of Michigan IOTA, ,.,,, University of Wisconsin .mllllllli midlififi Boston Central New York Chicago Minnesota New York City g- KT! ? ,Z -1. A.. 141555 Iirwra, 4.4L 'P tv. S- X NW , 1 ' . Q. .Jail 5' . 4.1. P S , px , 5 Sr N 9 ffm , ,J ' s .. , l . 'S 'L . , . H gf 'F x STELLA 'VVESTCOTT LILLIAN IPM PM I Zeiifcg' Xeapi 'ev Xecpi .- 044 Theta Chapter, Established 1892 A +44 PGUPOIICSSCS -A MRS. JUNIUS E. BEAL MRS. ALFRED H. LLOYD U MRS. WILLIAM H. WAIT MRS. ROBERT MARK WENLEY SOYOI' Ill 'FGCIIIUGUC GERTRUDE BUCK, M. S. I Sorores In llrbe MRS. MINNIE BOYLAN BEAL EDITH HENRIETTA NOBLE I BESS HUTCHINSON ADDA LAURA STEVENS A NINA MAE HOWLETT A Sorom In llnlversltate ,I BEss BINGHAM STEVENS, A.B. 4, JULIA MOTT HODGE SUSIE LAURA MCKEE NELLIE MYRA HAYES KATHARYNE GRIFFITH SLENEAU MEDORA TOMPKINS MYRTLE MAY BRUNER I IESSIE MARION MACK JEANNETTE SMITH A GERTRUDE SAVAGE GRACE SARAH FLAGG . WINNIFRED SMITH MABLELEDITH HOLMES LOUISE DECKER I -I , ' :J-,Q A ANNE MCOMBER . '-" I "l'Jli122'g,?'g,,.y!g2'j f 2c1x?irf:::.:u',.f.V-V-..-.f, I-::,':'-' I N .NN , I' ,, lf. ,,.".'. 1 H RUTH ANNE BARTLEY P .::f,,..Qf.D, is QSRQXNL ,!5f2,,f:., f'- 1.15, .:4!,. ' -'.:4,w.:-:E-Q55 ' f ' . ,':pQ f 7',',g." S . FLORENCE ELIZABETH ALLEN .... 1' ,. igfwf ,fn-5. I- NIARY LOUISE BUNKER 'rff' ' Eff,-. ' ' MARGARET D MASON 1,11 1- fA,.V-2f?af2LriQff-ILQAAFRRRAL-4-sae,. I I- I ' - fE??i5Z'fi3"9T' 4 f ' 1 LOUISE SHEPARD -if? 12-112?fS.?ACi,2 - A:z1f1"?f'j',.- 131- "WZ, 'Z 'i.'ix2'i:2fgjf-.lxigig "z, K' .. 4 gfja-y7'I?' .'I- le 1,-"fy ,Q I "?fi2,,:a12"r, ,332 'iff 1' f I gl, uf?-,:, , MARIAN CLARA KANOUSE 3-'25 .- E5 ?fQQ'f'l '-wif?"f,511!:f"f'7T-'59i'5f?' 5P"'U' , , . - - . .- I 3 M v --fffj"f'fp-P324-'A. 5-.za-- 5 -,:." 1-. 1-1-:Eff .21 fwf R ARION HORTEIN SE LARSEN V?,j.'.5,i:.'.. 5 :urgf 'j.,".J-2, :T-'gi' 4' "ij . FLORENCE MOOERS HALL ici:-"s: . . L.1'w5 7 " 9' 71 vu' -3-1 " "'i-"Z S '- I :fi f ' .2 C'-5 ' A 2'-r 'L l25!i.tf"ff'.r'.-15. 'i-gI5f'5,l'g.' 'f ' MF J.: ' ...hx ' if " J ' ' ' " '1,N.' ,,1..: RL. -I -."..Q71 'hfvlfkl y,",f,'E-Q' ,T jgiffzfy, 'sg-44.2 Q ,A IRENE KATHRYN GODDARD - 3-in -- ff' :LQ--A A-,.- I - -'i' ,t.f: I .ggi g,,.z:l. ,.-35 1- 1, . ., . nz 4'-'3"l ,' LAX TD' JL 3- li' 1 ,, J 'l' Ll if Q l I IX I Sp I 'V r 'in -a 7 1 f J g O I, B f ' 4 5 4 4, Ak gg, if 'T f 4 M -'L' L I nr J! , bf' , J I 5-dw! , 1 L X 7 5 ? 1 5 1 J- : Y I r i " ' 'I 1 I 9 4 4- il J " 'V f I 5 L 5 ' " -v-1 U f -I at", 1.1 ' :A A Q ,,- ' .1 A 6 5, .sv 3 L11-.'! .- ,- i ' qv W V . ..., Q-, 9 J--T-, -'.,T':::'r- -. Ai' ' " '?""" A ' ' A h "' ' I 'A t - -' 9' f- - - - - 7- ' , .,,.-eZ? -.1.L7.5g3b -r l"'fff1.., uh? .--::-'Zf"-H"-f--:"-- - f -1' L: ff- -.T A :Lf-7,1 '4- +..i' -5-E'-J-' -"'e-""' --- I --A ' -2-:-. -:- .. . -.- I , Q 17 I 53 by 45 Societv ot Kappa Hlpba beta '44+ Founded at De Pauw University, 1870 ALPHA BETA DELTA tlllinois Wesleyan A-400 Zbdpttl' RQII De Pauw University Indiana State University University of Illinois University 1875, transferred to University of Illinois.j 1870 I870 1894 EPSILON University of Wooster 1375 ETA University of Michigan 1879-1893 IOTA T Cornell University , 1331 KAPPA Kansas State University 1831 LAMBDA University of Vermont 1331 MU 8 Allegheny College 1881-1887 NU Hanover College ' 1882 PI A Albion College 1887 RHO University of Nebraska 1895 TAU Northwestern University 1887 UPSILON University of Minnesota , 1889 PHI T Leland Stanford Ir. University 1 ISQI CUniversity of the Pacino, I859, transferred to Leland Stanford, jr., University.7 CHI Syracuse University 1890 PSI w University of Wisconsin 1890 OMEGA University of California 1390 ALPHA BETA Swarthmore College 1891 ALPHA GAMMA Ohio State University 1392 ALPHA DELTA Woman's College of Baltimore 1896 ALPHA ALUMNZE, , . Greencastle BETA ALUMNTZE, ., . . Minneap01iS GAMMA ALUMNE, , New York Citi' DELTA ALUMNE, , , Chicago fn' f" ' 4 L 1, , . Q x A F D. 1 , Q pf a I 14 lu I GDM .mpbd theta 1 +++ f , Eta, Chapter, Btablishcd 1879, Re-Established 1893 444 1 1188061812 mkmbkl' MRS. MARIE LOUISE' HALL WHLKER SOYONS ill UPN MRS. HENRY CARTER ADAMS LOUISE MATHER HARRIS LOUISA ANNA HARRIS Q SONPCS ill 1101027811816 KATHARINE JOHNSON, A.B., '90, Medical Department ARLETTA WARREN, A.B., '89, . . Post-Graduate 1897 EDNA LITTLEFIELD PADDOCK SUSAN FRANCES PATTERSON MINERVA BELLE RHINES 1898 IRENE MARTHA BLANCHARD EDITHA LEWIS DANN MATILDA AGNES HARRINGTON MAUD PHILIPS EDITH LOUISE RICE 1899 MARY LYLE REID 1900 JEANNETTE BLANCHARD LOUISE ROSSEEL GIBBS ,ocietv of Delta elta elta y +++ Founded, at Boston University, 1889 A - +04 Zbapter Rolls ALPHA, ., '. '. . . DELTA DEUTERON, EPSILON, . .A GAMMA, . -BETA, ZETA, ETA,. , THETA, . IOTA, KAPPA, SIGMA, , OMICRON, . NU, . LAMBDA, , . Boston University . Simpson College . Knox College . Adrian College St. Lawrence University Cincinnati University University of Vermont University of Minnesota University of Michigan University of Nebraska Wesleyan University Syracuse University Ohio State University . Baker University UPSu'0Nv - . Northwestern University r -wh - o-...--.wf--q- I L, Ihr A11 . Ph 17.11 1, i Jw I rv . QT' ' ,N ei if? V-3 Fifi .ug 'iff' 'L Q A 1 1? ,5- si lr if -'TT M, , , 35 .K ,IQ fe ff -u ff 5,1 w"N,-'r ce-.' ,.r - 4' '1 if ' , V f 7 , .t. ,- fw- , 1. x X It x Al, F r' 5, ' l L. s ,, i ' 5 ' x T ' if fn 'V J 6:1 " x gp, Q '. -v 4 .' I ,.. .. . , ua f v- 4: ' We ' XT ' -Q-1 , fx 'A Yi' 'Q-1 -A " 1 Lf 1, . I' . , e Q A - -- 3213-" L , f- I2 1 C' . . , 3-1 In 1 W. ffx if-if .r,., ' L, jlj. - ' 1. 1 'fw- 1 K ., 1 'Zz I, ' ' ig a' ' - H fn g, 5 -lk' ' , 54 if ly. - w,, '3' , L . . , . ,f', .- . . , , 2 ig, , iii' . ' J- , gk, x V .,, I 5- ,- . ff f il f Fm - .5 2-ff' -yy 15.112 f Ni 1 . I--h -- ,,,. " 'maj' ' Q ff'- . , gzv V' Na' -5l+'f'4.i.,fJ V-- - ,, ., , n --- ' 4: sn J? ,Z 4. L 1 A- Quai.. . -14?-r , - 1- , ,544- 'g v-Ax' .,g 'am' - ' ,LNEQL -- JB Q ' fgfggbf 1,1 .- M? A L. I "-3111-,-i,-' - -J 'Wir-7 . . -V 3. ,p 5-3-bf?-3,Qg".f 1 ilfdyl,-71. 1' -f--it -1. If ' 'fit ,. .53-E1 Q,-ul 1- --M ,-31: Fi-1--,53 . - 1m1'4,.. -' Af , I 'X -, -f-H, ' 3 -- ' if 'J vt 'nfl : M 5-i?'f:7FQ5f 3'1- A -1, J,,-,.U 5- '3- ., -1 fizafi-il. - , 5,11-gg 1g,,' . - ,... 'gg-,lv,3 ,, VAQA ,'-.V 5.31. lid Hd lid 0 6 4 Iota, Chapter, Established 1894 6 0 4 lS0lIOI'dI'V milllbtl' MRS. LIZZIE VOY MILLEN S0l'0l'CS Ill Ulllvtftlidit , 1897 NELLIE MARGARET WALTERS EFFIE LYNCH DANEORTH 1898 LUCILE ABIGAIL SHELLEY BLANC!-IE MARTHA YOUNG . JOSEPHINE PERRY POWELL 1899 CHARLOTTE LOUISE REICHMANN EMMA DAISY BURKE ' 1900 ALVENA DOROTHEA REICHMANN INGEBORG SOPI-IIA FREDLUND FLORENCE MILDON EDITH MERRIL POPKINS ' ELIZABETH BOULSOM Q- I, , A, 4 I in r ,'v , ..-.23 -.3 fra :-1 ,W T2 Ez. -'f - . ,Q , i 'i :nv ggi: 4 5 ' '.,' -' ,ff--" " - -25 f , 4 : 'ini ,- 3 5 d -Q., E -,, ,- ag ..-if -' - ' ..- -.-"' ""' gt' - ':l'!- 14,-S " K '3-T. "- ' ,.... .:.-,.,.. ,,1'. - 1' "'-v '-1 ga if cv -, 1-v,,:: ,,- 0 .--. 5'.:""'q ":'.'."""-1 f' J 'fra' .v 1 ,,. 'Nl P1 w 11,5 4 ii 1 ..... 4- ' E' .. - ,. E, .-.-, I , - S EE ' 7,9 E .ru-1--Las' fl ' - - ,X-., , . . dv-5 1 l I n ,, ,li I an .niq- , -- 1 9 -bn gf ' Q g-11 aff-':'fEf"E --:Y 5:5-L E f"""T ..-:.-Al!-Qq, , 1'lfU.'f!f' I1 5. fn 1 , S new of mba epsilon I ra ' 490' Founded at the Umversxty of Michigan, 1890 4 ALPHA, . . . University of Michigan e , m . Michigan Slpba Epsilon Iota 4 4 4 li0l0l'dI'Y milk!! ELIZA M. MOSHER, M.D. MARY PUTNAM JACOBI, M. D. FRANCES EMILY WHITE, M. D. EMILY BLACKWELL, M. D. SARAH HACKETT STEVENSON, M. D. A PMTGICSSCS MRS. VICTOR C. VAUGHAN, MRS. GEORGE DOCK MRS. WILLIAM I. HERDMAN MRS. WILLIAM A. CAMPBELL I SONY! Ill UID! JEAN SOLIS, M. D. ' Sorores in llnlvcrsltate GEORGIA SMEALLIE PENELOPE FLETT ANNA M. STEVENS HELEN E. AFFELD MARY L. COOK 'NIARY M. MCARTHUR SUSAN B. JARRETT MARY C. MCKIBBEN ALICE M. CHESLEY HELEN F. CLEAVES ANNA LOCIIE MARION NUTE FRANCES BARRETT GEORGIA O. ROBERTSON BLANCHE M. BUTLER FELICIA VON AUTENRIED ALICE G. SNYDER ELIZABETH P. RINDLAUB HARRIET V. BAKER MINTA KEMP X -0 X 'J ,v I., : ' .' I I " . L'-511 ' A -1 I 4:17 F- ' ' -,,--" 3 l In 'U Vg, gl I 'mf f ' , 1 'HIC 5i::""'J7' I' menus Q31 , ,ggy7'if:i,. . - 1. '79 gli' . I, ' wc, I 1 I . I I Vi F r"'4v 7, ji 'T MW J ' T I 4 'l I-. .I ' 41-.:.." J I ,tin I' 'Sf-A "-'f"'- l gx -Q i". ::" !"" I!" yn 1 F5 I vff Wie. sf? E ff, -, ', 'V I Iwi - I ::-.. 'Y c B ,, IZ ,I J Af 'QA Q . rJ 5 1 Y I i 1 E 3 I r m 1 i E s if v i V P Q Q E f L, ? i 5 4 11 : L 4 I P I 1 r FV t T I QV is I ni K H ,A ,. V Society of m ga Ps 444 Founded at Northwestern University, 1894 4 4 4 ALPHA, , , , Northwestern University BETA, University of Michigan I . H . . . if 4. :': " - .,Q 2, -3 ,-5 I . A -. my IIIQQG Psi 0 Beta Chapter, Established 1896 -+ Zbamr members LILLIAN TOMPKINS ESTHER BRALEV EVA I. HILL MARY DI-:VENY WINNIFRED SMITH GERTRUDE SAVAGE MARY ESTELLE YOUNG JESSIE MACK GRACE FLAGG JOSEPHINI-: DANIELS MARGARET THAIN LILLIAN COLE ADDA STEVENS 1899 P ? ,- 1-,..,,- . 5-. ' l',.' I if t hi l - 2 fraternity t llll Sigma mn Founded at thai University of Michigan, 1882 ALPHA, BETA, DELTA, EPSILON, ZETA, ETA, , THETA, IOTA, KAPPA, LAMBDA, MU, , NU, . A 1+v++ Zbapter ROII , . . . University of Michigan V 4 .A . Detroit College of Medicine . Universitylof Western Pennsylvania , ' , 4 , , University of Minnesota . . my . Northwestern University Chicago College of Physicians and Surgeons P. P . . U. Ohio Medical couege C . Columbia University , Lake Forest University . . University of Pennsylvania . . Syracuse University . University of Southern California ir I ful "m""7f'fN"?"'VVf'.Ty In A , Fx irfni I a' A Q" Q ' fs , I I , . I . , , ..I g ' , X . , y ,J .M 'i .gf .4 ,If,II,III -III . A I, .I . I I . . I II, ' 1 Z"N'5.I f ' , rtq, nfii r. rf hm I. K. f 1 ni? 4 . ' , .1 v ' 'Zi' , f v I . 1 .I II . 1 1 . I h If 1 I v 4 : . . I V, 1 , , p I h 1 r .. 1 . I I I . 1 , - . 1 ' 'A , -' ' , ' ' I II ,A x ' ,I 'I, , . I . I I I . ' . - K .f L I Y 5 fl 'il 'K xwfu' - 1 9 , , I4 ' 's,:. 1 .,' ' " ' l ' . ' X. ' k I . .I ' - ' ' , . - fu -'I4 . n ' gf- ,. .--,, 4 I I III, , ' ' " 1- II Sig. , , , . I . I I GSI, X. Iggy ,QI . . . . I . I, I. I I.I,IIII,IIA. I ""' '1f'+ v-4-........n. ., ' 'f Ww,WEmm Du Sigma mn 9 0 4 Alpha. Chapter, Established 1882 4 9 4 Trams ll fdttlltdtt VICTOR C. VAUGHAN, PH.D., M.D. CHARLES B. NANCREDE, A.M., M.D. GEORGE DOCK, A.M., M.D GOTTHELF C. HUEER, M.D. ARTHUR R. CUSHNEY, A.M., M.D. FREDERICK G. NOVY, SC.D., M.D. FLEMMING CARROW, M.D. J. PLAYI-'AIR MCMURRICH, PH.D. CYRENUS G. DARLING, M.D. SIMON M. YUTZY, M.D. CHARLES D'A. WRIGHT, M.D. JULIAN T. MCCLYMONDS, M.D. THEODORE L. CHADROURNE, B.S., M.D. CHESTER B. BLISS, M.D. HOMER E. SAEEORD, PH.B., M.D. ffdlfti Ill lllllwfilwt 1897 HOWARD A. IJAMS, B.S. GEORGE D. PERKINS JOHN H. KINCAID ROBERT D. WILSON GEORGE B. WALLACE WILLIAM B. LUNN RALPH N. GORDEN FREDERICK P. LAWTON 1898 THOMAS S. BURR, A.B. JOHN D. COVERT A. ERNEST GALE CLARENCE A. GOOD PARK HOWELL WILL MAC LAKE HERBERT H. WAITE, A.B. , MARK S. KNAPP, B.S. NORTON D. COONS. 1899 CLARENCE W. MEHLHOP SAMUEL SCHULTZ, PH.B. WILLARD H. HUTCHINGS, B.L. PHILIP D. BOURLAND, B.S. JOHN V. KEOGH FRANK W. NAGLER, B.S. ' -s si' f. 35 I I., ,,.. if LJ ' , H 2 ,QL it I Q I 4.-' I . 1 I: A K A 1 A ,Y A .fi .I- G, l I i I l - Q 4. s 5 L-- ff 4, 3 rr 'I l Il' 2 f. K g, 1 . 'I L, I i 1 r .4 w. I. my -'E 3 5 l V, 3: ,v f. I fi M lf. ' I ,I YT, I'- A. ., ry 7, 5 if I ,I 1 4 e , A 1 Z raternitv ot elta Sigma elta 4 4 4 I , Founded at the University of Michigan, 1882 0 4 0 Zhapter Roll ALPHA, , , , U , University of Michigan BETA, , Lake Forest University GAMMA, . , Harvard University EPSILON, , , University of Pennsylvania ZETA, University of California ETA, Northwestern University THETA, , University of Minnesota IOTA, . Detroit Dental College KAPPA, , , Vanderbilt University LAMBDA, , Western Reserve University MU, ,,,,, 4' Boston Dental College Supreme Zbapter Chicago Huxmarv zbaprers DETROIT AUXILIARY, .... DCf1'0if CHICAGOY AUXILARY , Chicago MINNEAPOLIS AUXILIARY, . , Minneapolis PHILADELPHIA AUXILIARY, . Philadelphia BOSTON AUXILIARY, , Boston nw, i..,,,...,f,... ,,.4. lf lllvku l'h:ln . 1 I E. 44. . 'J Q S ,3 . aj! ll I 1 L N 5 ,.v X X s lg l L7 x 1. D1 K 'J 3' . . 'vi -v va I 3 ,Y PY 1 I if r ' W, . A I s , x 1' X' V x 7"x1 N A -41 1, 4 1 Y I . 1 15 0 1 .gf X 1 1 .,, v? 4' 1 X J, v 4 114 A x , ,,.,, I """""" 9" '9'J'N"' "P'f""f'? i f 'Q Jw'-Uvk fr' -1+.qf,u-ur urn -q,5,n,wxu,w ,5 .X r 1--M" --W-95-Ui :.,.LI122.s...E::g.1.."'.':.z':9.2 ,.' -...' I " ' elta Sigma Ita -0 4' -Q !Xkdua!Ihapun5IEnabHShzd 1882 4' Ao 4 'FYGITCS IB fdtllldit WILLIAM H. DORRANCE D.D.S. ALLISON WILLIAM HAIDLE D.D.S. NELVILLE S. HOPE, D.I5.S. LOUIS P. HALL: D.D.S. FIJI!!! Ill Ulllvtfilldit 1897 JAMES CARROLL BLAIR FRANK RUSSELL FLETCHER FRANK WARD HOWLETT WENDELL HONVARD JOHNSON FREDERICK WILLIAM JOSLIN EDWARD LEONARD VAILE WILLIAM RACINE PURMORT ALBERT JESSE REED DI-ZLMER WILLIS STOUI' JAMES NORMAN VODREY, JR., A T Q I'iARRY DOUGLAS WATSON GUY HENRY DENNIS 1898 EDWARD JOHN ANDERSON IiARRY BROWN MCMILLAN ROY ARCHBOLD EDWIN KIRKHUEE MEIDLER LYMAN SMITH BROWN, A T A CLARENCE EDNVARD PEASE ALEXANDER H. KINMOND JOSEPH BISHOP STEWART THOMAS BUDD VAN HORNE, B 9 II ARTHUR EUGENE ALTHER CARROLL FLOOD CHASE PAUL RYTSON FURLONG CLAUDE ELTON IAIATHANVAY JAMES CLAY LONVRXE BENJAMIN VVARREN WELLS 899 -P z' ,hun I - . H'h 'VR',f fx I HH ,,.. ,,.' 11.2. ,240 5fgiE?5QfW4M-. WI UWfE.:JS-f.ff E 1' IH" ES ff f. I, 7 75,45 ' -L , 3, 1' 'H1 If 1 . . ,,,,,,....- Ju 42' ' 'fff 2745 f jg, 1 ,.. A I Y Q' pffff - W '1- 7 T It- -Q J-r 0 4 I y nn" .E l""1H""""Ti 'A-AIIS. E' ' 'S 'Q 1 -QX- 9' -- - ss - -. .,, ifg-11-" Y ! A fraternity of xi Psi Pbi 0 5 0 Founded at the University of Miclaigan, 1889 +L 4 4 Zhdlml' Roll ALPHA, , . . . University of Michigan BETA, New York College of Dentistry GAMMA, , , Philadelphia Dental College DELTA, Baltimore College of Dental Surgery EPSILON, . . . . University of Iowa ZETA, . . . University of Cincinnati ETA, . .... University of Maryland THETA, . Indianapolis College of Dental Surgery IOTA, . . . University of California LAMBDA, . . Chicago College of Dental Surgery KAPPA, . . Ohio Medical University 1fr4N'4I.l"LaLl I Y .- wg, Q1 ct' - ,L 1 1 J U A F L- . J 1 .c 1 1 ' 1 . ' 1 1.11 ' ,r1 13, W 'L 1 EH 1' -1 ' 11 1 l 4 11 1 1 1'., ' 1 1' 2 1. 1 1 E 11 l . WF 1 1 -N ' 11 1 1 1 N 1 1 N I 1 1 1L 1 1- 1 j 1 11 I . l 3 A 1 - ig-if 1 1 'H V NJ JJ 1 g- 1 1 i 1 1 1.1 1 -51 5 1' .El 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 PEE 1 N 1 . VV 1 1 1 1 g 1 1 Q 1 . I!-I 1 XP 13W ' 1,-.1 , - iii 1 1.1.1 Xi PSi Phi 4' 16 4' AUpha.CluqMzq,Ekudikhzd 1889 046 Fratcr In Um I-IEREERT JOHN BURKE, D.D.S., '93 Francs In llllversitatc CHARLES ALEXANDER CRYDERMAN, . . . Law Department SAMUEL KANE SCHARLOTT 1897 DANIEL TEMRLAR ERNEST EDWARD BUEE ALBERT J. DUBOIS FREDERICK JOHN KLEIN, 0 X ARTHUR W. SCHURz SAMUEL WILLIAM HUssEY LUMAN REED SLAwsON FRANK DWIGHT LOOMIs ALBERT JOSEPH WILDANGER ROLAND SWEETLAND MITCHELL 1898 GUY R. PALMER OLLIE W. WHITE RALPH JAY ROPER THOMAS C. REED CLAUD C. GOODES LESTER GEORGE PLATT LESLIE WARD PLATT CHARLES FREDERICK STEINBAUR PERCY ROBERT GLASS ARTHUR ALBERT BAKER CHALMERS J. LYONs 1899 WILFRED D. KIRK GEORGE M. RICHARDSON WILL C. BUTLER CLIFFORD F. STIPP HARRY C. ORVIS FRED C. URVIS .+- Frat rniv f Phi Zhi +++ Founded at the University of Michigan 1883. Incorpor- . ated 1895 4 4 4 8 Zlsapter Roll ALPHA, - .... University of Michigan BETA, Northwestern University L x Y E 537 72- :Li-' TEEEE ei" ". i 1. ff A WfvfGurPuuA. .,.,,,..-.ff-f ., ' -I fy -'rr' .'-v-,- . f-vw Lilff' ' QA if 'diva "J:-."A3u.x.s GH- ,ix . . Q ,i , w.,.'. , f,,.'. . .,. .. I I I ' I , I I I I I I I I I I I I I I a 5 I I 5 I I I I 'r , . 1 I' I E I I I I I I I I I v fi I, I I I I , I I I I I I I I I i I E I I X I I I ' I . 1 I I ,I I I I I I g I I- I Ii I I1 I, . I 7 I I I , I 55+ 1. ' rd I, I iy Ig g ' M- 31 r E L I f ,, - ' - :Nr ...,, . -. .., I ' 118+ Q 1 --PM-Ap-'H--if-. ., -Y, ,, ,. I -am. .41 . , W, V I . df.: .,-. , 1, ,r-f..,,.,,.. ..-,.,W,.. - ,.-.,, ,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,, -f fl., PIHL-,,, 1 m- mm.-,-,.-,,-,. .,., -,,,, W N A L i Pbi bi +44 Alpha, Chapter 4+ Trams In Facultate ALBERT B. PRESCOTT, M.D., PH.D., LL.D. VICTOR C. VAUGI-IAN, M.D., PH.D. ALVISO B. STEVENS, PH.C. JULIUS O. SCHLOTTERBECK, PH.C., PH.D. DAVID L. DAVOLL, JR., PH.C., B.S. fratres In llrbe WALLACE GILBERT PALMER, PH.C., ,QO ERNEST LEE CURTIS PHILIP SCHAUPNER Fratres ln llnlversltate FREDERIC JOHN KLEIN, '97, EZ II' dv, , College of Dental Surgery JAMES W. T. KNOX, PH.C., ,95. . Holder of the Stearns Fellowship MILES LUCIUS TROWBRIDGE, PH.C., '96 MILTON LYMAN TROWBRIDGE, PH.C., '96 URSA S. ABBOTT FRED JAY BARINGER FRED JAMES AUSTIN MARK BUTCHER HAWES JOHN NEWTON ADAMS HERBERT EUGENE TABER LEONARD SHORT LEROY EARL MINOT BURTON ALLEN SNVEET HENRY CLAY HITCHCOCK H -"S+-.-.-..?,.i,?--g Y If ,,.. V .,-.1-A ' -v we' ' -M . . A .1,-S,1:. .. ,N- .. A:..a 1897 HARRY SCHELLHOUS STODDARD WILLIAM HENRY NOLL P. WILLIS HICKMAN -1 X ' 'TI , Jigeqixi xi , A NNIE , -I X N '-lx - E: Q 'EZZSS I.. ,.,.4,L,a,,f, , -J yy : 43 " 4m 'U S .-'.QTs gs R, .ff gm: '-. X '5'5kTqE55Q, i'T2'l'5 K., BL .Zigi .lf I, IE-T-25f.a,,,Q.Z 14 Sip? , ', - ' 'fi 535-it-2 '5 : f, II.: 4.2i:-Z' 5,i2.:.fr- . 5s' S!g :2a.' ,',-y5.- If-I-....:.n.'.5:r..mrx, 1 FL-1,,,1qQ1 Q,5-. - . 5 -.Q ---S ag, - 5. . . 22-7-fflf'-3234-i,f. , '-u5H I .ja I f' ., ,A 1 -14' ,EJ E 3 ' - , 51' 1 "" ' ,-'F1:iPE. ' , 1 ., ..- uri: V V I -A .A---..SH q+J 2' 1 ',..:,.-- ,. , "jfs" 7"'A 'Z' ' -Az fir.: -If 5429 331:-gf "' :Ap - .?,x7:7,V,-Q In is - ,. j I 5Q..:f.I.'.L5:Ef,f -.1-frili . ,--,fffl2:I.2DE':I' . ,ff-A ' ,W - .Y ..,....,.-. , Y. ..Y,,..+,, , 5. v Ylvlfifl 1 I. E r Q 4 H I 5 V . ,. , , . -, Q ,- g. -7TTi,,'.1','25r,ra:-Yr'-Q v.-..,.. -- - - -A ' 1- Q, V , Q,,.,,-1-vff-- ,- A F xxx A-vw: L",L ,--rv - .vw ' V ' , U ,n,..:h7'1-- , . , .V .8-, 1 i ,Anil - 1 Am - V - VM, w V , T ' v-, , I E, ri 1, I 1 , M' , .1 ml x , 5 4. i M, if A 1 Lv iv f Y E 3' J : ei if Pj 'NL gt, in ia' H A L 5 . .il VF S, ii! A . wg . i F. A N 'rf 'ii' 'Lg 'VH b. ini ug in Vg Q 9 i, -il L 5 r' ' ,s is D 5 s ,. W l' P if I .L Q' si 1' 1 i ,A Il if ai ' I .ij : ' K Q i ,Si . i Q i H S gl '. li 7 1,2 1 X ' s I I S. Y 15 I1 li fl li l mi 1 15 1 ii g I is 72 'm is ii i li x 4 4 .A Y 1 -' Q, , B gg n . gb. K - 5 P 2 ,i i Q , '25, A 41 ' - 41 -' 'J.J:'+-+3-f'?4fw'f " V nf' ran rnitv of mu Sigma Hlpba 4 9 9 Founded at the University of Michigan, 1883 +n++ ALPHA, .... University of Michigan mvba mn, I888 nity uf Michigan ef llrvffnm Hfzjlzn. , kr e ll. of m. masonic lub J Organized, Febwary 1894 H fa oe o A rofficers, IS97 A ' A . President OSCAR P. COLE, .... . T' . VVILLIAM P. HARLOW, W1CC'PfeS1dC1jt HARRY C. ROBINSON, A - Secretary Treasurer ALPHONSO C. WOOD, ..... . Bonorarv members Law Department I HARRY B. HUTCHINS, PH.B. ELIAS F. JOHNSON, B.S., LLM. LEVI T. GRIFFIN, A.M. JOHN W. CHAMPLIN, LL.D.' I medical Bwilffmellf VICTOR C. VAUGHAN, BHD., M.D. U FLEMMING CARROW, M.D. FREDERICK G. NOVY, SC.D., M.D. SIMON M. YUTZY, M.D. CYRENUS G. DARLING, M.D. WILLIAM A. CAMPBELL, B.S., M.D. WILLIAM J. HIERDMAN, PH.B., M.D. JAMES G. LYNDS, M.D. FRANK W. NAGLER, B.S. CARLTON D. MORRIS, M.D. ETHAN A. NEVIN, M.D. A CHARLES E. WHITE, M.D. HERBERT H. WAITE, A.B. Bomoeonatroic medical Gollege ROY S. COPELAND,'eM.D. . . WILBERT B. HINSDALE, A.M., M.D. SUMNER G. BUSH, M.D. , Dental, Department H NELVJLLE S. HOEF, D.D.S. .WILLIAM H. DORRANCE, D.D.S. Eiterarv Ilenartment ELMER A. LYMAN, A.B. Eiigiiietklmlg HWGNMQIII MORTIMER E.'COOLEY, MF. JOSEPH B, DAVIS, QE, ALEXANDER ZIWET, C.E. JOHLN M. SMOOTS CLARENCE G. TAYLOR, M.E. THOMAS QRR ,-I 1 , . . V1 1 L. ,, J! 1.135212 ., 'Vw ' lm . ,, 4 w ' . . -I X , . . ef 3'- .-.,,,, M 'Y fi? 'L' 'fluff l :xii wh - T '12-,. V Q, 1- . Q pmii '-,'I:ff" . Y U, ., 5, N, wi' Lf., ,, if lf, 1 ,: ,ini 'ww L '-?V., A fEIwDf2 wfriri X f. It I. mmm 1 , f "-ui "'?ii77 if?53e i W?-'5tf3g-3 - Q L n x D. 'M' D I X-mv - ,,, X .1 ls B. 14-v Y .V 1 ,i+5'?f,El Q-'r ew. ff. ,. 'ng mn 3 UZ, M111 ,kg muses D-D51 -sl 'fer M, SHOW . silk' 'iw'- DJ2 A -I ik A., ,, . , , .'5Q.Qgi 1,5 - r. - Ur. - i W! ' 'QQQQ-I Mi. V, 1. ,Q qgprr-of"' Y 3 5 ,V 4, 'H Y 3 Y-v' A 3 i ll I J V X if K M P I -Vx f 1 i l 3. i I S i 1 I l 2 I I 1 a 1 3 4 f r 1 I 1 1 9 4 i J Q Y ! 4 3 5 ff - lf ? Q. 'w M f masonic lub 4 A 4 E'Hl2mbQi'S , Haw Ebepartment V. F. BROWNE, ,QQ E. G. BIELBEE, '99 J. A. BLAIR, '99 E. S. BLACK, '99 COLE, 799 O. P. H I CORTWRIGHT, ,QQ R. R. COOMBS, ,97 H. B. DRAA, ,QQ R. IM. DYE, ,QQ FRED FISCHER, '98 J. A. GREENE, '99 W. E. HURLBURT, '98 A. C. HEALEY, '99 E. E. HINDEMAN, Special E. F. IRWIN, '98 a e A. H. MCCLAIN, WADE MILLIS, G. P. MCCALLUM, j. H. NOTLEY, B. T. RILEY, L. L. ROBINSON, G. D. ROBBINS, J. R. STILLMAN, R. A. SMITH, SIGMOND SANGER, F. THOMPSON, E. T. TAGGART, A. K. WHEELER, L. A. WILSON, A. C. WOOD, I. N. IQINNE, '98 J. WHITING, A. I. LYND, '98 H. M. WALLACE, P. R. H. WILKINS, P. V. H. MOWLS, '97 mQ6llC6l DQDZINMQM 'A. R. ADAMS, Special W. P. CAFFEY, 'OO C. V. CRAFT, 'OO J. M. CRAIG, '98 J. M. CROCKETT, 'OO I. R. DURRENT, 'OO W. S. DURAND, 799 S. R. EATON, 'OO . W. P. HARLOW, '99 H. B. IQIRK, 'oo F. T. 'VVRIGI-IT, 'oo Effkfdfy Department R. M. BARNHARDT, Special P. E. COWGILL, '97 L. W. KING, j. H. F. MULLETT, ANDREW NELSON, F. A. SCOTT, R. D. SLEIGHT, W. H. TEFFT, H. HL WAITE, H. C. WATKINS, C. F. WATKINS W. M. WARREN C. M. MOONPIY M. R. PARMELEE j F RIEMAN H. R. FOSTER, '97 . . ' H. C. ROBINSON, W. C. KINIETZ, OO K E SALLMAN C. MORSE, 7Q7 . . R. MORRISON, Special F. T. SWAN Denta! Department G. D. EDGAR, '97 G. N. KIMBALL F. R. FLETCHER, 797 A. O. WRIGHT, ,QQ S. J. SCOTT ' Bomoeopathic medical Zollege S. P. TUTTLE, '98 Dwdffmkllf of Pbdfllidw J. W. VAN HORNE,',Q7 Ellgllltefillg DCPRNMQIIY M KANA ' 8 H. T. HARRISON, Q7 F. H. BURDICK, ,Q7 G. E. C , 9 1 I ,,,v4,.-- ...H -.,l P Ax' -,L gf.: -5:--,E-jk' - . - ,. ,1 77--. G-::.:...Tf. 7 A 5 i M1144 -'in-v04P -,1,,.-1-f , a.. f5L,,,,.f -, pkg. -gm .--- 'Y - ,,' 4? i ra V 1 44,1-:A x . A TTL 51135. fl? x ,ri HM Q JMR-,,...,. nf-1-1-J .V -Y,-7 VV ,Y - - -Y .--V , ..- v . ,.-.. --- .-Y. -.N-.470 v-. .T , ok QQ umucs .... ,. -Q' ' -4 I N1 ' , a,, ' za 1-V i ,- '- as ,Av , , I v ' . Q 1... Y . ' r ,fd 1 ,g .- Jn. ,,,.. - ---""""""'M Clear eyes and springing muscle and shortening Irmh With chin xnclrawn to a, tightening Grave and with gathered srnew 4+ Ixke a god g throat, f + ' ' : 4 'Wm , mf, H-N' mfmf V , xv ms Standish Ba ckus, ,QQ E I r If. v 'f 'E go, .Lk . ,r P 1' P' . . Pd . , X ff X Y . F I , I , F I , . ' f . . 5 'Q L' 5 1' I. gf .f . 3 Stal' lIC3.II1 A 0 1 Reviews of the Years Htbletucs 1 L " ' L ' A Q 000 0 8 2 0 , 9 2 li 5383 00 4 UDOOD 00064 30000 0 0 cg-,QQ O G' O I S A 0 I O N Or , 2 O Ogg f Q00 0:6 s-0,256 o c. , Ca!" Oo 1 I ,..1---- 1. L. HILL, ,97 EFORE the snow had left the ground in the early months of ,96, interest was already awakening over the coming base- ball season. It was a pleasure to the enthusiast to discuss the prospects, for there was every reason for hope to run hi h At no time in the history of base- g - ' ball at our University had the list of can- didates contained a greater number of players of repu- f the ear before were back, tation. Most of the team o y and rumors of the prowess of some of the newcomers l ' sion that Michigan would have added to the genera impres And when the men came out upon the field and prac- tion was increased. The tice was begun, the early anticipa candidates were playing splendid ball, and during the first week the play was as fast and ac- d cm Baggfnall Sgagqn curate as would usually be expecte if A ' T ' from an amateur team of a month's ll had candi- or anization. And the different positions a S dates so pre-eminent that there could be little doubt even ' h t m this early as to what men would finally make t e ea . . . . A A novel feature was introduced into the practice. professional team was ,secured to play a series of games. ' fi ' l. It proved interesting and to the team very bene cia Their batting was much improved by this constant prac- tice at competition tension. For the given conditions this method was very serviceable, but in the line of general ' ' t ado t policy it would probably not be a good one o p ' The men who composed the 'Varsity team were again. ' ' h ,unv layers who getting the best of practice, but t e yo O p 5551-s-. ' 1 I 7 I ' I I , MI ....IY..i...,.I.,fi........, ,....-anme,,vu-army-.1g.w.:,w..p.:-3.pyr.4gfayvrcf,111ffrr-3-ui5'filTimi.iv3'JfTkxHEW!?5ZitJ5i7'kZi'-Hi, "LTA -1- -Y , A-.L-,,-..--L'-,u-bAEA W p F A Y in V ' ' 'Y might have been getting development for thenext year lost the opportunity which playing against the 'Varsity would have given them. ' The Season proved to be an almost unbroken series of victories for Michigan. Few of the 'CC-2l1T1S H165 Sh0Wed themselves to be in the same class with her nine. De- velopments soon made it evident that no teams in the West could aspire to the championship but Michigan and Chicago., A schedule of five games had been arranged between the two colleges and a startling series it proved to be. The iirst game at Chicago was won on its merits b the home team. The second, a few days later A found Michigan in good form and an easy victory resulted. The third game . Y '37 was played at Ann Arbor, and in this TX, contest also Michigan completely out- X' Q played her opponents. The next was to have come off at Detroit on Decora- tion,Day, but the weather was char- ' acteristically bad and the great crowd that had gone down with the team re- x turned without seeing the struggle any . farther advanced. The postponed game was played on Michigan's home grounds soon after, and to the surprise of all Chicago won it. It was an exciting contest and the visitors won it by splendid batting. The iinal game was awaited with eager- ness in all quarters. It was to be played at Ann Arbor and all Michigan men expected certain victory. On form of the two teams this was natural, but at this stage a new element came into the contest. Through the latter part of the season, there had been disaffection on the team and discipline had been hard to maintain. Matters came to a crisis when two of the members played in a game on a professional team under assumed names. The news came to the management just before the date of the final game. A special meeting of the Board of Control was immedia- tely held and two days before the game these men were debarred from all further contests. This action came as a severe blow. By this and a previous ruling, three of the best men of the nine were taken from the team and H0 Hu-nan , fiine was given to fill their places. But the team with the hastily chosen substitutes went into the game with splendid spirit and played with grit to the end of a contest which they kept in doubt throughout, but which closed with the victors to whom all odds had pointed. It was a hard de- . . . . . h h h d feat for Michigan to take with the conviction t at s e a had at hand the stronger team. But it was taken manfully and the sentiment prevailed that the Board of Control's ac- tion had been a difficult step-but one in the right direction. During the winter a very successful indoor meet had been held. More entries were received for the different events than at any previous meet and all the contests were spirited. The candidates for the track team trained care- fully in the gymnasium, and although but cram nfmgflgg two of the team of the year before were in college, when the men took to the out- door work good material was found for all the events. The 'Varsity field day brought out somefast work and new records were made. Only one inter-collegiate contest was scheduled for this season, but the men had worked faith- fully. So when the dual meet with Chicago came off on Marshall Field, the deserved victory was forthcoming. Michigan won a good majority of the points. T The two numbers of Michigan's yearly athletic pro- gram which decide individual championships brought out vigorous competition. The Senate Trophy Cup Contest for excellence in all around indoor athletics received its second trial and the Iltdlbidlldl contests and ZIGSS Game: increase in entries, the general interest and the close contests satisfied those who fostered this event that it' would be a permanent. and valuable feature. The 'Varsity Tennis Championships developed some very pretty contests. The number of entries was- large and the la in was generally of a very good class. At P Y E present Michigan does not test her standard in tennis by inter-collegiate contest. The prospect of such competi- tion would undoubtedly increase the interest in the sport. If. She gave her tennis men the opportunity, Michigan might find additional honor accruing to her from this SOUICC, W - K g . In the inter-class contests throuhfmt the Year there was good work done in all branches. lVfany young players if appeared who will be valuable possibilities for the 'Varsity 3 squad. X e The base-ball championship nay- rowed downto the Freshman "Lits" and Freshman " Medios." The " Medicsf' won. 1 In the Freshman-Sophomore 1 5 . - I , . D meet in the spring, the '98 track team .. , , if easily defeated the QQ men, and in if is the fall the same classes fought' out l. fp A mmm f' the foot-ball championships, with -ty,' , ' r r 'sr,l f 'ft-' '98 again victorious. Q This year also marked the estab- lishment of an All-Freshman team i . for first year men of all departments. The team did not W start early enough to develop winning form, but fulfilled N its stated purpose of bringing out new material. l Two weeks before the opening of college in the fall, 1 the foot-ball candidates started preliminary work at Sand Q Beach. Enough men appeared to form a temporary line- X y up, so that when the field of training was transferred to P Ann Arbor there was no delay in starting sys- ? F001-Ball, tematic work. Never before had the Athletic 'p T f field been so teeming with aspirants for foot-ball 1 ' honors. Soon the crowd that came to watch became l 5 . 1 accustomed to seeing four elevens lined up and a good Q X knot of substitutes standing by to fill up any breach. g 4 '- i F In spite of the large amount of material to be sorted, the development of the team was rapid. After two weeks T the playing was fast and it was steadily gainingspeed. In 4 , v 5 - the early games, the team rolled up' points at its own will and the opponents were hardly an element-in the contests. Qne of the first games of the schedule that was important in deciding the team's standing was the one with Lehigh l i I l 5 Epi at Detroit. This was the only contest with an eastern Ei team and furnished some basis for comparison. The r 1, visitors wereoutclassed and outplayed at all points, and 1 .V i 1 : rr met their worst defeat for the season. Comparison with E the eastern leaders was necessarily indirectf but. it can l 1 i 1 1 1 gif. i lsr' pi .ll Y 4 . ' . mill!!! lllegein nyvork hdthe IIB v nmhi, and ll! giglto Afmr minthv ,nas conservatively be said that at this time Michigan was play- ing in much the same form as the great eastern quartette. The first uphill game of the year was played at Minneapolis. The trip and ground conditions operated against the team, and they met sturdy opponents. But they brought back a victory, although if-ax their goal line had been crossed. fi Michigan met her first defeat in . her last game. There had been every reason to expect a victory from Chi- U, 'llil cago. Michigan had played strong and consistent foot ball throughout her schedule -- Chicago had been erratic and unsteady. But there is certainly no sport more full of sur- prises than foot-ball, and the Thanks- ' T giving Day contest of '96 furnished Mm'-N' as sensational a surprise in' as exciting U a contest as had ever come off on a western gridiron. There was one great difference in the character of the play of the two teams. Michigan was playing her stock game of foot- ball, hard and steady, the game she could have been de- pended on to play at any time. Chicago seemed to have been trained and nerved to this one game. There could have been little doubt what the result of a series of con- tests would have been. But this one game, Chicago won by good generalship, by the most advantageous use of her greatest resource-a magnificent player in a telling place. The result of the contest was disappointing to the ardent partisans of Michigan. But more was gained by the victors than was lost by the defeated. True sports- manship loves the prospect of close, hard competition. All of that can now be expected from games between these colleges, and there will always be present the most im- portant factor of interest--the element of doubt. p Looking back over the year's record, we find no one sensational victory standing out as the landmark of this era. But the work of the teams has been of a high stand- ard, evenly maintained. The achievements of the several years preceding had placed Michigan in a coveted posi- I Z 5 5 1 E - -..--. ..,,. ...f--1 1, l Q 1 41 . 2 3 5 Q .-2 .52 ' . 4 tion in the athletic world. This year's work showed that she would hold it. It showed that her prestige was not due to accidental rise of lucky chance, but to energetic, sys- tematic work and to spirit. - Michigan for the first time this year grappled in earnest with the difficult question of professionalism-and settled it. Her action was revolutionary. She started to tem- porize, then resolved anew and drew the hard and fast line y regardless of where it cut. This seemed Inamgfql toward some of the players injustice and Q ingratitude. It is hard to shut off men who have erred under no existing rule. But the condi- tions in the west absolutely demanded it. Michigan from her position was bound to set the precedent and QS- tablish a rule that would admit of bu! one z'1zz'effp1fez'az'z'0n. It is hard to part with old favorites, it is hard for the old players to give up working for the name they helped 'make famous. But players and admirers both assent for the eventual gain of their college and for the advancement of honest athletics throughout the land. These sacrifices will pain most when the active seasons begin and the veterans are missed in their places. Other colleges may for the moment be less affected and hold a temporary advantage. But the rule which is now laid down will soon place all on the same fair footing. That is all Michigan desires, honest sport, worthy opponents and may the best team win. 0 0 4 952,453 XX ww x M 'l' ss ,frmi f EN NEW if 2 E 2 , - ' 2. is -S ei - "' 561. Sw Jef '-I: f-3215-. QE 1 gf" ' 'sf :ft s ii 1 gf: 25:3 .- : :'i ? '- ref 1 gl-lii'i-"- -ling -- - --4 -' f---+ -' A- .a -.s-E-t - . ..m ess -221, - -5-5 lf-ll -ella! :ilu ni .Mi , Eu -,fi at Q , E 4. , - ig - ,W -7 5 152 '- l 1- w --T-Q 1. a n s- - 4: 2 ffv-'Q .- .i'.- 1-E - 1 - unzip, ,,,.-s.hf..4c.1-:gi-2iT.1g5-fverzf .... isigsgj ..---..i,1-. ?-5,-I.: GYMNASIUM sl .r,' i if JET s S Z . T X 51 xi j , . .L .. I 1? 3 .Q l I U J X , Q 3 2 C 1 4 F , W e l ., 'l 1 .- '- K 741' . .5 f 1 7' 121,15 ' 4 1 , -. 'f ?fg'a:e - , ' , ' , , - . ff. '.. V,f1fx,gfI! 541. -4, ,.v..,.. - . ,fp . 1. . '.s..4 - -' 5- ' - 1- ,.. ' ,,,p.:.,..-,.. . gm--. -,, 51 ' Y., .-. ' ' ' ' ' " ' ' ZZ ' - hi. ' g- "fy , --1.-c .-, '-- .--.fs-'v'f115' ' 1' 21:-nf:-1' '... , X " "' ""' '- ,. X X. x ... ,su A , -r u- -T. .,,..- ...af 1.-:v'2,.,,, ?:yj3,......-- ..,T5.'7 ., , A , . 4- .f V . ,.. .5 -w.LJJ.lf. H . -----'V .... -I Z-,N A ......2.4..---A - H nn 1 I V-A V A , 0- I - in..- -' "' ' ,W . 1, .. K Q ,W A-- in A ,-. , . - , . N-, M.. ,.,., ..., . --- -- H- M,,,,-,,.H.....-'T'ff"'xi, M.. - , b, . N, - ,f W f.,.1. ,P m f W ' -Q - 1-iff. Qw--2'1fw?ffQ 1 X ,s..xsxx,Xxx5. - 1 , " ' ' aiiifx'Q?iif.1isE22ifiiX-11?WS'Q x 1- K I' n . 4 '1 : H , f 1 I , VH ' I . I ,V f. I ,, lngh g n . K . . ':?5'f'7'JQfV nf. 1 'V ' " " ' ,V .. ' , ' ' ' " 1 . As' 411 . A x- .X . . . ' A X ' in n-2 f ,,3..f,, H . 4 , V W M, ,. ,.,,,M,Wr94A , ,, ..,.- 5.14 4. fi 1 Ah is ZLMV - f ' ' 12'4'Q.v www... " .L .1 , . f. f A, fi, - 4 f . -.-, 1 --' -4 - x,-. . A 'if --A ,..l.-, 1, - -QQ' """' IM' -Y ' X " 1 vw-w-:Prim 'rust-'zvsifi '::O'T' i 6 Htbletic Hssociatlon + + + 0ffiCQl'S j. D. RICHARDS, '98, , . . . President O. H. WRIGHT, '98 L, . Vice-President H. B. POTTER, '99, - Recording Secretary ALLAN CAMPBELL, 99, . . Treasurer C. O. COOK, '97 E, , W. W. HUGHES, '98, Financial Secretary . Foot-Ball Manager A. L. C. ATKINSON, '98 L, . I. L. HILL, '97, . W. D. HERRICK, '98, H. HELFMAN, '98, . . Base-Ball Manager , T rack Athletics Manager , , , Tennis Manager . . Assistant Base-Ball Manager ml'2CI0l'S R. S. FREUND, '96 F. C. HENNINGER, '97 E L. D. VERDIER, '99 H. I. WEINSTEIN, '98 G. A. MILLER, '98 H, T. PIEALD, '98 HARRISON SMALLEY, 'oo C. E. GROESBECK, '98 G. B. HARRISON, 7Q7 L Board of Zontrol PROF. I. C. KNOWLTON, Chairman PROF. A. H. PATTENGILL PROF. A. C. MCLAUGHLIN PROF. G. W. PATTERSON, JR. J. D. CRICHARDS, '98, Secretary W. W. HUGHES, '98 ' I. L. HILL, ,Q7 A. L. C. ATKINSON, '98 L 5 HGVISGYV BORN PROF. T. C. TRUEBLOOD PROF. I. P. MCMURRICH PROF. A. A. STANLEY DR. J. B. FITZGERALD CHARLES BAIRD H. M. BATES J GEO. P. CODD 'Uarsiw foota-Ball am I C Season of 1896 4' Q 4' 0WiCQl'S A WARD HUGHES, '98, Manager C. O. COOK, '97 E, Assistant! W' D' WARD' Coaches JAMES ROBINSON, Trainer W. L. MCCAULEY, I H. M. SENTER, Captain FRANK VILLA, Captain C9301 K Y SENTER, '98 lrfl FERBERT, ,97 Ends, 4 GREENLEAF: 99 M Half Backs, CALEY, ,99 L I FARNHAM2 97 E PINGREE, 'oo L HUTCHINSON, 797 E W T kl, QVILLA, P. G. L F H B k HOGG, '99 L a s, - u ac s C S HENNINGER, '97 E ' DUFFY, '98 D CARR, '98 M Guards, BENNETT, '98 E BAKER, '98 E Center, WOMBACHER, ' Q7 L DRUMHELLER, '97 L Quarter Backs, FELVER, 98 E , RICHARDS, '98 'ff',kxl5'L!,.j:' Y . ' 1-f'iTf24fe...'i?ir..f3j4,'4'Q5'? 57 ' 7 '4" " 1 . .Ur fr- ..',f ., Q- qv , 4 . ' 'rv V , 1: . ...z 'e ""' .' J, ' ' 1. ',,. .f 1 :fm 572 Qs-Q ,, BA li -" vfiaz. L -G1 if 2-ti Qnr Jiffy ff: VW' 'ff :M '11 Y'f.f!?5' si- rwji, 1 ff ' - -Lu g,- - rf 1-"" L' 5- 1. . ,,": .',, ,. rf ,gg iifdgzfe i,P:f2f,,?2:.,',ijkg,5g ggfigygt x5fsk,'q,,i,.5jEjS,QjW2,g, wg "zu, 5314-Q',i1.2?r'E1'fr-war'+21F,2:'Tw1-:?::2'2'zffmwsr1?faHwT:ime.+f .r ' if - , .3 .4 .4-',,,f, 3,-.,-M. ww,--,,1", - -4-,5-,L-if f 1, , W af Y 'fr 5 'WW 1'1??'ai'12 mfiai' ' 1 , mr' 'zv M NRSQF ,, fr A-l' - "'- fa' 1-ww 1 IHNFHQN .,, 1 V - Us ' 5 c Y. adi- - A ,.V:A,-,.-...,--.,.-4g- Q.-.----"M ilfl Aff -.,-,3mN..L,. A if f S.. 5 Gs. -v Q. El". ,T Vu I I-U -., nm, ' Fm S.. ....- fav ,pq- Q I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I i I I I I . I I I I . I I I I I I I I I I I . . I I .I I I ,I I I II I ' Iii I , ,Q Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Nov Nov Nov Nov. 3, IO, 15, 17, 24, 31, 7, 14, 21, 26, 'WPSFIV foot-Ball Um 4 4 Season of 1896 4 4 ' Record at Ann Arbor, , Michigan 18, Normals , o at Ann Arbor, Michigan 44, Grand Rapids 0 at Ann Arbor, Michigan 28, C. of P. 81 S. 0 at Ann Arbor, Michigan 66, Lake Forest 0 at LaFayette, Michigan 16, Purdue , 0 at Detroit, . Michigan 40, Lehigh , 0 at Minneapolis, Michigan 6, Minnesota , 4 at Ann Arbor, Michigan Io, Oberlin , 0 at Ann Arbor, . Michigan 28, Wittenberg , 0 at Chicago, , , Michigan 6, Chicago , 7 Total score for Michigan, . . 262 Average per game, 9 26 Total for opponents, II k Average, .' . . 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 M. B. SNOW, Captain I Center, SAVAGE, '98 E POPE ' L ' 99 Tackles, Guards, CUNNINGHAM, '99 M SCHULTZ, '98 L AYERS, '99 E ' JUTTNOR, 'oo FLETCHER, '98 L LEHR, '98 D SNOW, '99 E CASPAR, '98 L Ends, BIRD, '98 Quarters, A FIRESTONE, '98 L - LOEB' 99 GORDON, '97L NEAL, 799 ' Halves, F 1 THOMAS, '98 u1BackS' HANNAN, ,QQ L . -" ' -'- s'f '. -. .,..,,. 5 . .. . ,. 'O' ' """ii- --.- --...........---,,,-.,.-Q.-. -....... Q 1 .akin A fs' . :gil 1 9 1 r 'Wil X l K iw' . 'UGYSH BGSQEBGII dll! xi 4 4 4 E 5 Season of 1896 ,ft ty 3 E W 3 0 4 4 . 6 0ffiCCl'S f 2 E. C. SHIELDS, . Manager- ii WARD HUGHES, Assistant Manager -ef . F. J. SEXTON, ,il . ,ft + . Ctdm f 9, , . M gg WATKINS, '96 PH E s ,ii . ' I r W.. F. HOLMES, C. E. WATKINS, Coach HOLMES, '96 H CONDON, '96 A CaPfain Captain Catchers gi MILLER, '98 Pitchers ll SCOTT, '98 L KINMOND, '98 D MCKENZIE, '96, Ist Base DEANS, '96 D, 3d Base BLOOMINGSTON, '96 L, 2d Base HOLLISTER, '96 L, Left Field lj , is LOWNEY, '99 M, Short Stop SHIELDS, '96 L, Center Field gait -N 1 MCKINNEY, '98 D, Right Field F 3 SIIDSIMIICS E HEARD, '98 M SHOWALTER, P. G. L I ii I N 5 fig 3 ' ie : A I 21, 'X "E i . .l3. . w 3 . 14 - 1 l if . .' inn? 'i -unsung. - . 0 I K ' -its-g -5-Q. V V NV H".-' an is . ' .reixsf-nu. . ' . ' XV 3 E --.--Q" .....i'?.i"3."sE E H -I ..l. ......,, - X i Y : f 30130 If V M ,X 1' " ' .-po-g A . ,1 f.-..A - , 5 vi , "'-"3.'rwa..-.-:-- ' . .gi ' r 'xxx get .... E. 3 N! FY , L: 5 7' Y :J 7 3 -x fl f'i 5 i ' ' Y ,, . 131. I b . I 1. A t w A 1 ' 2 f '- Q , 2 .K 4 Y :Q .w 4 I Q F ' I 1 1. ff.. H I-4 it 251 ,V if ,314- ' .if .JH .ei 2 if gtg Ggmiijf . 3 N l"X ,fx ffx 4l iifi I F I s Qi ,f A Q ' , T,-Q-, t F K b I- a vg -lv-idx ,.- , , A 29-'?!+'iFFFvX ,. - w ww ' R ., , ,.,, ,- ,, --1 . ,- , 'x Q- 4" 'Nw ff 4 ,ang ,A 21.3 35435. 636 0 I Cmheyg 4J"G ces.-1 mi' P b Da L Left Center Field 1 3 Qi I C I l l 4, iw 1 5 1 u 1 .Q v fi :J fl L L iq' J' , 52 "W .411 S-1, :fi 1. w J' Fi s . Qj ,4 1.52 1 3 F., -2 23 H ll' I f i in G. V, qw xy 1- N .V-, , -mf. Q LQ 9. ff i, w 7." ?t 'Li 31' :AJ :if .rr - 4 ,x fl -V .1 ..,f ,. 4 . .fx ,Q . .ij Im " 5 A ,V v . X 13.4 -:Q '-fn 13' 1' 11 . ei - 131: I' - , 1. LJ. fe Q' J 5923 Em ii. E9 if AQ' fi.. .Lx ,N nd . mf 1:3 'I y 4.1 ,J X! 45- f. Sufi 15. ' 3:75 .Z W I I , f,, ., ., NE" EV". 211.-f I-1 AY: ,gp 2+ 'aff , , , F 1' -1--4, x n 4 2 n ?""" " 'W- 'dimnls 'T 7: V' V ' JE! pg Q 55? Q.. . ..-. ...- ,. ,. .,.,.,f ..,. N.,.H,.z,:, ,QM ,,,U-qwtnifh A I, 1,73 H J F , li Www -V vt' I ' ' 4.11 " 1-X '.-ws. ' ' W 1 'N 4, - - --r . ,, 1: ' 1 - ., ----pa g ' " f f:34-'.,,4.,.igl-,J-'.Km?rf'f'-'5L -A K v ,.,,z'y . ' 3 v- '. ' , -,-Q ,V Y . ' v April April April April April April April April April May May May May May May May May May June June June June June Won, 4, 8, II, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 2, 7, 9, II, 13, 16, 20, 23, 25, 4, 6, 10, II, 13, 173 'Udl'Sill1BdS21Bdll team +0 Season of 1896 at Ann Arbor, at Ann Arbor, at Detroit, . at Toledo, Ohio at Columbus, Ohio, at Springfield, Ohio, at Indianapolis, Ind., at Bloomington, Ind., at Champaign, Ill., at Ann Arbor, at Ann Arbor, at Chicago, , at Madison, Wis., at Chicago . at Ann Arbor, ' at Ann Arbor, , at Oak Park, Ill., at Ann Arbor, at Ann Arbor, Arbor, at Ann at Ann Arbor, at Ann Arbor, at Oberlin, Ohio, 0 9 Record Michigan 20, M. A. C. Michigan 25, Albion, Michigan -, Detroit CRRIDJ Michigan II, Toledo Michigan 20, O. S. U. Michigan 13, Wittenberg Michigan II, Indianapolis Michigan 9, I. S. T. Michigan 5, U. of Ill. Michigan 15, Oberlin Michigan 16, O. S. U. Michigan 4 3, Chicago Michigan 7, Wisconsin Michigan 6, Chicago Michigan 7, Wisconsin Michigan 9, Chicago Michigan 9, Oak Park Michigan 20, U. of Ill. Michigan 4, Chicago Michigan I3, Toronto Michigan II, Detroit QLeague II Michigan 5, Chicago Michigan 9, Oberlin Total, 248 Total I2 Average, II -I- Average, 5 -I- Lost, 4, Tied, IQ Shut Outs, 2 4 P l f r l lllliS 0 4 4 ' Season of 1896 + + 4 WALTER D, HERRICK ,.... Tennis Manager spring tournament 9 First Prize, . . . C. W. SEABURY, '93 First Class Smgles' Second Prize, R. S. DANFORTH, '99 Second Class Singles, First Prize, . L. M. HARVEY, '98 E Second Prize, . . . G. B. CADY, '99 First Clnss Doubles, First Class Singles, Second Class Singles, First Class Doubles, 'G First Prize, SEABURY, 98, and HERRICK, '98 Second Prize, HARVEY, '98 E, and RUSSELL, '98 'Fall tournament First Prize, , Second Prize, Consolation Prize, . W. D. HERRICK, '98 . BUTLER LAMB, 'oo A. H. RAYMOND, 'oo First Prize, . CLARENCE RIPLEY, 'oo Second Prize, . A. L. C. ATKINSON, '98 L First Prize, HARVEY, '98 E, and HERRICK, '98 Second Prize, RIPLEY, 'oo, and KENNEDY, '98 X "'-ali. X 4: I uagg , 1...-.. ,...,-ly, ren ' b - ff..-.. .... - .,L,--,.,.1... V .43 Y' x5 Qi Y -T JV Is ffy: FW .N I' , . r Tiff? . pp M gf s 'Ji H-: .. VY' if el .- , , A, V . ,,.,..,. , - , . -l -,,u...- - - -A ' TFT? A A Y A, , Y ,LT , --- Y Y ,.,,1,..n-1 .,--...---- f "f Q J- 'M-Q., H..-If if Y Qxxggpgggri' Q'.'2L'.:l.-.UMW---1-f v-----A -- -f--W---' H -- " """"' " ' ' ! A A AA wx' HMH4.,,.,,,--,.---.--M-f----A'-A " ' " , ,N , ,,,,., - ,...,.,,,,y. fA,4unva.2-v..'-eiilf 'L-1' "Jil 1 4":fgf" " ' ' " "A . --... VA -.--x.--M -- f- -f----1---U -'-' -' 'N 'Mi' W- - V r - ' ' "" ' TZ"- ma.-llfil-1 --1- ' "W f 'vw ' W- 1 - A---Y - - - v -- v- f , 1' , xxhh , A M , Y ,,..,-- .. V V Y . .,,,,,',,,,,., ..-',,,-.-..- vw . . .UA H H V , ,A ..,,, ,.., , , I , , ,,,,,,,.-, , ' , W ,, 1, - .,, - ---- f -- f-f ' " "' " V ,- ,ff , -- ,, ,, - VW- 7459.2 ,ffcf -ri 4151?-?'45rf':5,L " ""'rF".'Q.m' Y 'vb ,H--nv """"" L,--W Y J.:-.W -A----'-V1 W' ' T"' " ,, , V - -"- ' """""' ' ,,,,, -,,, . ,.. - , ,,,,,,,-,,,,..,..1,f..:...,-,if VV- -T -V 'W-' ' - ' ,.,,...-2-"' ""F'c:'r"'0---"' "-' - 1' V , , f ' ' -W,-,,.,.,,. ,... . Q'..,::,4 " ' I. - -A.-'-'v---'-'-1-If "" x f f V , ,i A vw -M , ',,,,- , v---- X'--if--"-'W' ""' """ R. 1 ' ' ' - -NAIL, v, , ..,. .- ---fvf A- I ,L nr -,-,.----- , -1 -'- -N f ' ' i' ' " ' ..-,Q ,,,,,d, ,. , , ., f., - - -- '-' """ "U M-'J v h V W hh- rj, ,... ..-..-0 --- -----4' Y -"""' "A""' ' WA . E , 1 1 P nv N , , ,,, , - M- ""' " "" " 'QM' 1 gin Mlm M! Y, ,M ..-MA -.- - f - p V V - ., , , YvMk4.N, had-A V 4,,W -,,-. Lv. .Y H - . . k f Q --fn-f "A 'W k A -- - f, -f-,W ----W -"Y -' ""' A""""" " " 'M' ' W A ' 5 f 4 E 5. 5? L 5 ? A . El M I V- A- -Y W- v-----W -W-'W N-----N -K -' S'-W - Y - -Q -F I V-X,-f--W - xg., ,,.,,,,,,m-. . -. -..U F1 if 'Uarsity rack Team 4 4 4 Season of 1896 + + 4 0fficers ORESTES H. WRIGHT, , , , Manager DUANE R. STUART, , Captain KEENE FITZPATRICK, . Trainer AYERS, ,QQ E, , STUART, '96, VERNOR, '97, , BENNETT, '98 E, HAEGLER, '99 M, HEALD, '98, BAILEY, '98 E, , ATKINSON, '98 L, MCCONKEY, '96 L, THOMAS, '98 E, , MARSH, ,QQ E, , CHUBB, '97, DE PONT, S, , TRYON, . . WOODRUFF, '96 E, ST. CLAIR, '96, MATIIEWS, '98 L, MEINING, '98 L, LEROY, '96, . . . . Hurdles . 100 Yds. Dash, Relay Team . . . High Jump Hammer Throw Runs, Pole Vault Runs, Relay Team . . . Runs . . Bicycle Hammer Throw Runs, Relay Team , , Bicycle , , Hurdles . . . . Shot-Put , Mile Walk, Pole Vault . . . . Runs High Jump, Broad Jump . . . . Runs , Shot-Put R . Broad Jump 41 - 4 4, ,.f ,-. S 3 'ia' 7 + I fi ' II 7 easeflid kdm 4 4 4 VVILBUR KETTLESTRINGS, . Capfa-in R. B. CANFIELD, . Manager GATES, , , . . . Catcher EMMONS, , .... Catcher SHEEAN, n Pitcher and Center Field E, . . . Base CANFIELD, , . Second Base RICH, . Short Stop MAHER, . . - Third Base STREIB, E, . . . . Left Field IKETTLESTRINGS, , Center Field and PitChCI' FARNHAM, E . . . Right Field HUNTQON, , Sl1bSti1ZL1tC 4 4 4 4 4 ' ' ll 99 CGIC B656-'Bd CMI!! 4 4 Winner of 'Inter-Class Series, Spring of '96 4 4 WEHRLE, . . , Catcher APEL, , Pitcher MEHLOP, , First Base LAKEY, . Second Base KELLY, , Short Stop WILSON, . Third Base MCEWAN, . . Left Field MOORE, . Center Field MCKINZIE, , Right Field :f H-A...2, ww '98 footliall Ceann 4 4 4 Winner of Inter-Class Series, Fall of '96 4 I 4 4 SIMMONS, . RICE, . SMITH, SACKETT, NEWTON, . MCALVAY, MARSH, . OLSON, , GOLDSMITH-, RICHARDSON, , , DICKINSON QCaptainj, , DEAN, , 44444 Left End Left Tackle Left Guard Center Right Guard Right Tackle Right End Quarter Left Half Right Half Full Back Hllsfresbman footzball team 444 HATCH fCaptain lzjj, . . . ANDERSON, HOWELL, . CARR, MOORE, . MORELAND, CORBUSIER, CLARK fCaptain UD, BARTELINE, ATCHESON, BALDWIN. HODGMAN, Left End Left Tackle Left Guard ' Center Right Guard Right Tackle Right End Quarter Left Half Right Half Full Back 1 i in QW' . ,it ' -X -'fvf' -,,,f ft t . g ig., . N 1 t if .XZ K , x r eil I E 4 P ii ,yy wij L J w 4 f 1 L 1 .142 it i 1 l . . . 1 ' V, 1 1 ' 4 Q ' .il 'L ill' V ill- HA. fwfr ii- if gre, 3'- ,til 492. . 1? ii ', fi , s 4 . 31 i X 1? 5 'N I ii' 4 1 V . gi 'i p 1 ,,. if ,ini f ii it 4 ig'- HV -2 'ld' W, 59 fm w xi, '13 U1 x.", !i.i Fixx 'E D Q . 1 1 5 5 ' 1 si., if L- 26 5' H1 1+ 5 u P , , 1 I f?-g 3 . J oflfl Q iiwgli 4 1 ' dl'SiIV fidd QQ ' 4 '4 4 Jane 5th, 1896 4 + + I Won by '96. Seniors, 34 points, juniors, 26 points, Sophomores, 25 points 9 , 109 Yards Dash-First, Stuart, '96, IO 2-5 secs., second, Thomas, '98 220 Yards Dash-First, Stuart, 96, 23 secs., second, Thomas, '98 i 120 Yards Hurdle-First, de Pont, Sp., I7 2-5 secs., second, Ayers, '99 E 440 Yards Run--First, Heald, '98, 53 secs., second, Meining, '98 L 880 Yards Run-First, Duffy, '98 D, 2 min. IO secs., second, Matthews, , '98 L . Mile Run-First, Bailey, '98 E, 4 min. 58 secs., second, Woodruff, '96 E Mile Walk-First, Tryon, '99, 7 min. 56 secs., second, Paul, '99 Running High jump-First, Vernor, '97, 5 feet ro inches, second, Haegler, '99 M Running Broad jump--First, St. Clair, '96, 20 feet II inches, second, Martin, '96 L Pole Vault-First, Tryon, '99, IO feet 3 inches, second, Hutchinson, '97 E Putting 16-1b. Shot-First, de Pont, Sp., 35 feet 1 inch, second, Camp- bell, '96 L 3 Throwing I6-lb. Hammer-First, Bennett, '98 E, QS feet 7 inches, second, Harvey, '98 E 4 4 4 4 4 'Eresbmawopbomore 'Field ee + + 4 ' June Sth, 1896 ' 4 4 4 W011 by '98, Sophomores, 61 points, Freshmen, 35 points 'x 'v mas: Fa C011 58: 98L :es ces, 586011, Eeet asvoif' T U92 Dlldl lllwo ' 4 4 6 U. of M. vs. U. of C., on Marshall Field, june 13th, 1896 0 0 0 4 EWIIIS 100 Yards Dash-Patterson QCD, Firstg Thomas fMj, Second, IO 2-5 secs. Mile Walk-Gund1achfCj, First, Tryon QMJ, Second, 7 min. 25 I-5 secs. 100 Yards High Hurdles--Steigrneyer QCJ, First, Neel QCQ, Second, I7 3-5 secs. 440 Yards Run!-Meining QMJ, First, Heald QMQ, Second, 54 2-5 secs. One Mile Bicycle-Marsh QMQ, First, Peabody QCQ, Second, 2 min. 39 2-5 secs. 1 One Mile Run--Peterson QCD, First, Bailey QMQ, Second, 4 min. 52 3-5 secs. 220 Yards'Run-Thomas QMQ, Firstg Patterson, QCQ, Second, 22 3-5 secs. 220 Yards Low Hurdles-'Ayers QMQ, First, Chubb QMQ, Second, 28 secs. Half Mile Run-Calhoun QCD, First, Woodruff QMJ, Second, 2 min. 26 4-5 secs. Running High Jump-Vernor QMQ, First, St. Clair IMQ, Second, 5 feet 5 5-8 inches. , Putting 16-lb. Shot-Williamson QCQ, First, de Pont QMj, Second, 34 feet II inches. Running Broad Jump-LeRoy QMQ, First, Neel QCQ, Second, 2I feet IO inches " , Throwing 16-lb. Hammer-McConkey QMQ, First, Bennett QMQ, Second, ' I06 feet 6 I-2 inches. I Pole Vault-Herschberger QCQ, Firstg Tryon QMQ, Second, IO feet. Relay Race, 995 Yards-Won by Michigan, Meining, Stuart, Thomas, Healdg 1 min. 44 1-5 secs. Summary 100 Yards, , Michigan 3 'Chicago 220 Yards, , Michigan 5 Chicago 440 Yards, , Michigan 8 Chicago 880 Yards, , Michigan 3 Chicago One Mile Run, Michigan 0 Chicago One Mile Walk, Michigan 3 Chicago T20 Yards Hurdle Michigan 0 Chicago 220 Yards Hurdle, Michigan 8 Chicago Bicycle, , Michigan 5 Chicago High Jump, , Michigan 8 Chicago Broad Jump, Michigan 5 Chicago Shot Put, , Michigan 3 Chicago Hammer Throw, Michigan 8 Chicago Pole Vault, , Michigan 3 Chicago Relay Race, , Michigan 5 Chicago 55 L 1 1 1 2 I .I 1 , , 'z lj. '15 W., EL- Ln - 1. .f . ff 4- L, -4 5 1 L v .175 V Lv 4 vw. 1 wi 7', J 4. f F . I , kk. Q, 1' 2 A v P 4 l? la 0 ,f 4 1 4 r r, 7 sf O ,Q 7 . K 4 .. I. i Y 1 1 5 , I 1" 4, ai 1. Qi nu is '25 is li 1 2, i: 1 Llgif' 'J . sk- .EX 1.4 university of icbigan Records , 4 4 4 Corrected and Approved to Spring of 1897 4 4 4 F. N. Bonine, '88-1886 I00 Yards Run- G. H. Chapman, '96-I8Q3 . IO 1-5 R. W. Baughman, '98-1895 220 Yards Run-G. H. Chapman, '96--1893, . , 22 2-5 440 Yards Run-VV. E. Hodgman, '95 L-1395, . 50 3-5 880 Yards Run-M. E. Smith, Special-1893, 2 min. 8 3-4 One Mile Run--Paul Smits, '97 M--1894, . 4 " SI One Mile Walk-D. C. Worcester, '86-1885, 7 'C I5 I20 Yards High Hurdles-D. R. Stuart, '96-1895, . I7 220 Yards Low Hurdles--D. R. Stuart, 'Q6-1895, . 26 4-5 Running High Jump-P. H. Vernor, '97-1896, 5 feet I0 Running Broad Jump-J. A. LeRoy, '96--1895, 22 " 7 I-2 Pole Vault-C. T. Tryon, 'QQ--I8Q6, .... IO H 3 Throwing I6-lb. Hammer-C. E. McConkey, '96 L-1896, I06 " 6 I-2 Putting 16-lb. Shot-F. M. Hall, '96 L-1895, . . 44 " 3-4 Drop Kick, Foot-Ball,-J. E. Duffy, '90-I89O, , , 168 " 7 I-2 44444 Hmerican lnterlollegiate ,ecords 4 4 4 4 From the American College Year Book, 1896-7 4 4 4 I00 Yards Run-Wefers, GeorgetoWn?I896, 220 Yards Run-Wefers, Georgetown-1896, 440' Yards Run -Shattuck, A1I1hCISt-I8Q2, , in 880 Yards Run-Hollister, Harvard-1896, , 1 niin, One Mile Run-Orton, Pennsylvania-1895, , , 4 ff One Mile Walk-Borcherling, Princeton-1893, , , 6 ff 120 Yards High Hurdles, Wllhamsr Yale, -1391 Chase, Dartmouth,-1895 ' ' 220 Yards I:.0W Hurdles-Bremer, Harvard-1895, , , ,Running High jump-Winsor, Pennsylvania-1896, , 6 feet Running Broad jump-Mapes, Cglumbia-1891, . . 22 44 Pole Vault, Buchholz, Pennsylvania,-1895 H V Hoyt, Harvard, ,-.1395 - II Throwing I6-lb. Hammer-Hickok, Yale--1895, , 135 H Putting I6-lb. Shot-Hickok, Yale-1895, , 44 H 946 2I 1-5 4914 5646 23 2-5 5246 1546 24 3-5 I I1 I'4 234 7 1-2 II I'2 ds 97 ' lo 1.5 ' 22 2.5 2 iriiniii 4 ff 51 7 ,5 l - 26 5 feet I0 22 U 7 1.2 I C6 0 3 5 4661.2 44 as . 168 ff COYGS 1896-7 . 94'5 , 21 PS . 4914 1min.554'5 4 ac 232-5 6 u , 154'5 , 243-5 f Y I 23 I1I'4 II at gt 7l'2 Iii U IIN 'v . ,g , .IIT ' ji! ' 1---4 .1 , rw , Tp . --16 f , U. hh! 1 , In rq 1 westem I.-Z. H. H. H. Records 9 4 As Furnished by John G. Coulter, Secretary? 4 9 -. Crum QS. U. Maybury fWis.j S' ' 220 Yards Run-Crum QS. U. IJ , 440 Yards Run-Hodgman fMich.j 880 Yards Run-Palmer fUniv. of Iowaj Mile Run-Cragin QLake Forestj , , . Mile Walk-Bunnell QMinnesotaj . . 120 Yards High Hurdles--Richards fWis.Q , , 220 Yards Low Hurdles-Weedrrian Qlllinoisj, Running High Jump-Clark flllinoisi , , Running Broad jump-LeRoy QMich.j . . . 100 Yards Run ro . 22 5- 50 3'S I min. .59 4-5 4 mins. 33 7 mins. 31 1-5 16 2-5 26 2-5 Z 5 feet 9 22 feet 7 1-2 Pole Vault-Culver fNorthWesternj , , II feet - Throwing 16-lb. Hammer-Edgren fCa1.j 123 feet 9 1-2 Putting 16-lb. Shot-Hall fMich.J . . 44 feet 3-4 I Mile Bicycle--Burton QMinnesotaD . . 2 mins. 25 4 4 0 9 0 , , 2 w0l'ld S lildielll' RQCONS 0 0 ' As Furnished by Caspar Whitney 4 4 ' ' 100 Yards Run, . . - 9 4'5 220 Yards Run, - 21 4'5 440 Yards Run, . .- 48 P2 880 Yards Run, . I fflm- 53 2'5 One Mile Run, . 4 mms' I5 3'5 one Mile Walk, i 120 Yards Low Hurdles, 220 Yards High Hurdles, Running High jump, Running Broad Jump, Pole Vault, Throwing 16-lb. Hammer, . Putting 16-lb. Shot, , Drop Kick, Foot-Ball, 6 GC -5 3 2 . . I5 'S . - 24 3'5 . 6 feet 5 5-8 , 23 " 6 1 -2 II cc 9 147 " -- 47 " -- I68 " 7I'2 i ggi 'Udl'SiW lllCl00l' 7. ,QQ 4 0 4 V Held in the Waterman Gymnasium, March 27, 1897 + + + A 40 Yards Dash--Elbel, '00, First, Thomas, '98' E, second, Joyce, '99, third, 4 4-5 seconds 40 Yards Hurdle-Chubb, '97, first, Ayers, '99 E, second, Webster, 'oo M, third, 5 I-5 seconds Running High Jump-A K E Prize Cup, Vernor, '97, first, Flournoy, 'oo M, second. Won on toss. 5 feet 7 inches Pole Vault-Tryon, '99, first, Adams, '99, second, 9 feet 7 inches Putting I6-lb. Shot--Oliver, '99 L, first, Lehr, '98 D, second, Joyce, '99, third, 37 feet IO inches Hand Race-Stevens, '98, first, Richardson, '98 E, second Potato Race-Hodgman, '00, Hrst, Dean, '99 L, second Heavyweight Wrestling-Won by Kohout, '98 L Middleweight Wrestling-Won by H. K. Loud, '98 Lightweight Wrestling-Won by F. H. Loud, 'oo Featherweight Wrestling-Won by Ford, '97 Heavyweight Boxing-Won by Lehr, '98 D, by default Middleweight Boxing-Won by Porter, '99 M Lightweight Boxing-Won by Ramsdell, 'oo M, by default Bantamweight Boxing-Won by Cox, 'Q0, by default Featherweight Boxing-Won by Wheeler, 'oo, by default '98 Relay Team beat 797 Team, 3 laps, 43 seconds '00 Relay Team beat ,QQ Team, 4 laps, 54 4-5 seconds fb gi.: f' Book ? ur oooooo I J V - ' 1, ' in '. 2 f, i ,,. When griping Grief the Heart clofh wouncl, And cloleful Dumps the Mind oppress, Then Music, with her silvery sound, With speedy help doth lencl reclress. 990 V A Slzmdislz Backus, '99, 'ff' 'ff K-. r' 'W1"f0u ,' 1 -. K.. 11 - .. 1 I A P I N M -M M I III IV Y TI Fr Fr Sa. Sa WFWS , EA M G G A Y EQ x K 1 f ' is "'1:if4 I 3 'i ?1:35"- 5 University musical Societv A 0fficers FRANCIS W. KELSEY, PH.D., ,,,,, President WILLIAM H. PETTEE, A.M., , Vice-President and Secretary LEVI D. WINES, C.E., , , , , Treasurer ALBERT A. STANLEY, A.M., ,,,, Musical Director 9 9 + + + A . y 0I'I'iccrs PROF. P. R. DE PONT, President PROF. A. A. STANLEY, Director L. D. WINES, Treasurer ROSS SIJENCE, Secretary C. D. WEBSTER, Librarian BORN of Dil'2Cf0l'S MRS. WIRT CORNWELL D. ZIMMERMAN MRS. G. F. KEY H. W. DICKEN MISS EMMA FISCHER ' J. H. MONTGOMERY MISS ELIZABETH DEAN DR. A. W. HAIDLE DR. C. B. NANCREDE llist of Zoncerts, l896'97 . I. November ro, 1896-THE CHICAGO ORCHESTRA-Theodore Thomas, Director. II. December 16, 1896-CHORAL UNION-'fThe Messiah." III. january 8, 1397--CARL HALIR, Violinist, and J. ERICH SCHMAAL, Pianist. IV. March 5, I8Q7+-ALBERTO JONAS-Piano Recital. V. April 9, 1897-PLUNKET GREENE--Song Recital. 'Fourth Hnnual may festival, may ls, 14, and is Thursday evening, Miscellaneous Concert-"Stabat Mater"-Rossini Friday afternoon, .... - . . Symphony Concert Friday evening, ..... . Calve Concert Saturday afternoon, ...... Orchestral Matinee Saturday evening, , y , , "ArminiuS"-Max Bruch IHS! of Hrtists MME EMMA CALVE, . . . S MRS. FRANCES DUNTON WOOD, Opranos KATHERINE BLOODGOOD, . Contraltos JENNIE MAE SPENCER, BARRON BERTHALD, , Tenors J. H. MCKINLEY, GUISEPPE. CAMPANARI, . HEINRICH MEYN, . Ba1'1'f0I1CS GARDNER S. LAMSON, . . ALBERTO IONAS, , PIQHQSI HERMANN A. ZEITz, V1o11n1St f If . rwuyw 'ffr -ifflfimemf-,rv f F v . 1 0 4 R. P. WARREN, School of Music, , H. P. DE PONT, '97 F. H. HARRIS, '98 M, B. A. SWEET, 'oo PIH, SHORTS, QQ HFC? FUF0 BALLARD, 'oo M, . BATES, City, . MONFORT, 'oo M, L. O. SPRING, 'oo PH, S. B. DUDLEY, '97 M, J. C. WATSON, 'oo, 1 . A. A. H. S. F. S. WIGHTMAN, School of. Music, W. J. GILLET, ,QQ L, . F. H. BACRHAUS, City, E. SAUNDERS, '99 L, . E. P. DE PONT, City, . W. H. MARTIN, '98 L, N. D. COONS, '98 M, . H. G. SCHOCK, '97 L, H. P. DE PONT, H. S., R. E. SPRINGETT, '99 L, O. H. FISHER, ,QQ L, . A. J. KUYKENDALL, '99 L, G. W. LE VINE, 'gg L, D. ZIMMERMAN, H. S., W. MEYER, City, . F. A. CORBUSIER, H. S., D. M. DE PONT, H. S., D. A. BRITTEN, '97 E, FRED TRAVERS, 'oo, . , . il . .', 1 - - f-,- 2' , I V A . Leader Manager , 0 o V . Baritone ISt Trombone 2nd Trombone . ISt Tenor . 2nd TCI101' . Ist Clarinet . ISt Clarinet . 2nd Clarinet . 2nd Clarinet E-Hat Clarinet . Saxaphone . Piccolo . . Piccolo . Solo Cornet . Solo Cornet Solo Cornet . Solo Cornet . IST Cornet 2nd Cornet Solo Alto . Ist Alto 2nd Alto Snare Drum Bass Drum .Cymbals , Snare Drum , Drum Major 4 Q' Q. wit A ,f. Q.. 1 I I A if ii is 'D If if 5 E! . if I I is it :L i Y I E it 4 1 ti. I it U Zif i 5 a I. i I 1 4. I I f V . ff, Y X "-R, -. 'WCLZQIBAII ,mv V? .ef-, ,,f....,--.-::,,..T...p,-.Va-YV, fwxpwfa---Wy 1- - - v- - - - 1 - . .ff m.. ...wr . , J .,., ., 1 ' '2.- Af-f"-' -.V - -"' f1"" ffiifxx . , , N V , . mu h7, ,M ,T Y V fl ' ., f...,g jjj- 1 '- -' 4... ' ' " f' ' ' 4 . X 5 1 n 1 F' FD 511 Uv 'r' ,ug cu w Q ,U .U V A ' 'A"' "" O " E' 211100 Cn'-'ua UHOO 'FD ' --O -' ' 'Z Hamm CDF! '-443 :HCS lllliU6l'SiIV Klee. Banio and ZIIIIDS dlld0liIl 4 + 4 0ffiC6I'S BooNE GRoss, '97, . . . President J. C. BLAIR, '98, . Secretary G. C. SHIRTS, '98, .... Manager Executive Zommittee BooNE GROSS, ,Q7 J. S. PRATT, P. G. H. W. STANDART, '98 E. C. WORDEN, '98 W. J. O'BRIEN, '98 W. B. RICH, '97 P. W. R. C. R. C. 44444 GIQQ Elllb EUGENE C. WORDEN, '98, Leader R. FURLONG, '99 G. LAW, ,QQ H. SUTPHEN, ,Q7 J. DovEL, '98 'First B388 G. GEORGE, P. G. E. PEASE, '98 P TREADWAY ' 8 H. . , 9 1. S. SYMONS, 'oo ' SCCOIUCI B388 BooNE GROSS, '97 E. C. WORDEN, '98 S. I. MOTTER, ,QQ L. D. VERDIER, ,QQ 4a...,. - .fx "'--'SL--, we HPS! CCIIOI' W. R. WooD, 'oo A. M. WEBSTER, 'oo Stwlld Ctlwl' W. H. MCKEE, 'gg W. G. TALMAN, 'oo 51-F- 1-2--Q 1-we -- f ,J-: 5, 1 lfgvrx, 'M '05- Lazi - ,f f "' if R , V 9 , ria WCM 'RPR R? W W W W - 1LjffjVQ-Q-QQq, qn'of9qfjYKan2s rx Cal bs H ' . ..E R if E ' 1 : Y .JSR-11? ai mefp E13 :Eff 'T'i""" 'NE' "4 A - .-.-...v:.,,. ,. . -1'5" J' 'T , ,E. 13... A 4. Tx K. H v . I .w ' mandolin Zlub ., ,,5.f'LL q . v ,' HENRY W. STANDART, '98, Leader' ' A 5 ' 'first mandolins J. C. BLAIR, '93 F R HOOVER -7 H. W. STANDARWP . . , QQ . 1 second mandolins '... ,pk E, A' W. STONE, 199 i G. E. BALL, F A. B. GROESBECK, 'oo C. E. GROESBEC I, .4 ' . mandola 9 W- A W. J. O'BRIEN, '98 A A T ' ? .9 ECHO , 4 QV'. . T W. C. BOYNTON, '99 5 fum , ALLAN LooM1s, '98 f . A ggif i.. 1 A f Guitars 'I C. F. STEINBAUR, '98 A. H. STONEMANQQE . H. T. GRISWOLD, '99 PAUL OL1vER,'9f C. E. WEHRLE, 799 I Q , ai, ,,, 1 9. . 51 A A A Bamio Klub PT C I. S. PRATT, P. G., Leader . . V . . Banieaurines 9 J. H. THOMSON, '99 R. F. PALMER,'Q R. B. UPHAM, '99 C. F. STE1NBAUR,'9j 1550105 , , I .9 W. B., RICH, '97 W. L. COOPER,9. ,, . .4 Z9 ADAMS, 199 T Guitars , i g 1 29, in A. H. SToNEMAN, '97 PAUL OLIVERL5 Q' A H. T. GRISWOLD, ,QQ A C. E. WLHRLEM Q A 'j 3:15 ' mandolins y j A A J. S. PLQATT, P. G. A. B. GROESBECKI' if ECHO 9 W. C. 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Manager LOUIS ELBEL, . . . . Leader First CQIIOI' SQCDIICI CCM? G. GRANGER N. W. THOMPSON C, H. SLATER E. B. MEADE J. A. EVANS H. G. GYLE F. D. EAMAN ' l M. E. KAUFMAN H. S. PINGREE, JR. ' 'First Bass H. S. SMALLEY C. H. REYNOLDS G. W. MILLS V. E. BUSH 5260061 B385 LOUIS ELBEL R. E. POTTER R. C. WOODWORTH B. B. HODGMAN G. E. BALDWIN, W. S. FOSTER, R. L. LOVELL, , 'First mandolins R. L. LOVELL A. R. WILLIAMS Gllifdl'S W. S. FOSTER H. W. HIPPNE Flute G. E. BALDWIN X F, " "q"'1--- " -Ae,,..,.., cw- 4 4 4 4 4 freshman andolm lub 4 4 A4 0fffCCl'S , ' , President Manager , Leader Second manaolms C. D. COOL D. B. RICHARDSON ROGER MORRIS T f LK 'Dx Q L 'YL ,. . ei fm I- T I '- - E 3 . ' f f ' ' Egf-L X, 4. ff! 4a.....,L, ' , ff' I -6 1,5 f ,fl 6 ss: ,wen ONS 'gg' ar Q P S 1. 1, 1. 1 I gs Q I I- ,K Q A 1 1 1 11 I I i nf .ig 1:1 11. 3 Q 9 1 1 I 1. 1? 1? -Siu. In 91 U. .V 1 i 'N 5 I LE: N? A1 :I S 1- . 4,91 K1 'H' 1. E W ,I lie rl 4' 1-12- 1 lg W ff .N it A cv A Hi' I kr Vi n 4.2 S11 n. mst. 581 11153 11 1 ti. WN. 15.1 ' I x,s 1'- '1 ,I -1, li W. qi 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 C clmi Ice Klub 444 Engineering Department F.' H. BURDICK, S. B. COOLIDGE, C. D. TERRELL, H. T. HARRISON, First tenor H. T. HARRISON, '97 F. H. BURDICK, '97 F. A. BERGBCM, ,QQ 'First Bass S. B. COOLIDGE, '98 C. D. WEBSTER, '97 J. C. ARMSTRONG, ,QQ +++ 0ffiCCl'S 44444 . . President Secretary and Treasurer . . Manager . . . Leader SCCGIICI CCIWI' C. D. TERRELL, '93 E. A. RUMMELER '93 7 A. W. BIRDSALL, ,97 RAPHAEL THOMAS, 5960115 B685 99 G. E. STIRLING, '99 W. A. BIGGS, '93 F. L. BROWNE ,QQ 9 1. T. ST. CLAIR, '98 CQCDIIR dlld lill Zlllb 444 , Engineering Department M. E. HARTMAN, R. R. WILEY, , 'First mandolins M. E. HARTMANN, '99 J. T. MOUNTAIN, '99 R. R. WILEY, '97 1825233 . .1.2 . f . .....1 444 0ffiCQl'S NJ' ,,4- gb 5 i. I Nl 19h.9'u,,' I .11 15 A E111 f 'Ri2'Rff.1..zA..AA11 .1 .-.. I 1 -A 3 . ' ' ' ' "'.' 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TA," , 1: 4 . 33 A fr. .iff 4. 1. .511 -525 4 gf I I. 5, If I jg ii , ,RLSJZ , . ff ' :GQ gig.- . fgvf: if 1 f I A 3 I f . - 1,:.. , ul , . .1 ., ., I., im. N . r I f A? ,wiwf Mm-any ,fflmifvffw Q Wizw . W rf. H- " 'Jil- Slarzdzlvh Backizs, 799 'fi fa 9 .. I b in , H 1 gif . 'Y' L11 , . ,mf ,, .5 ' QE 1: , U F A . E , KI iff .- : ng , J- 'z 5 . S73 J- ,tg r., Wi 3. rf .s L . 4 sf! 5 E 1 r. -- i , l I i ,. ' 'r 4 f 1 I , xt rv 1 I 4 4 .,. 1 i ,,, if 'fi , 32 I . -E3 i ,ff-4 'Ji rm ..,.. v in LL. - 1 1 -1. 1., ...mn- L. :gh 0ratorv in the Universitv HAROLD H EMMONS .mg HANKSGIVING Day, 1884, there ar- rived in Ann Arbor a'man who was to elevate the subject of Oratory in the University from the depths to P P above even that which it occupied in Al' t the days when Professor Demmon, Professor Tyler and Professor Hutch- ins were its exponents, and before the rise of athletics, social organizations and the establishment of the elective system had overwhelmed it. This man was Thomas C. Trueblood. He "was by no means a stranger to college life, for he had taken a master's degree from Earlham Col- lege, and had studied elocution under the best teachers of this country and England. In I878, with Professor Robert I. Fulton, he established 'a School of Elocution which formed a part of the University of Kansas City. He also conducted the summer school in that subject at Chatauqua. Later he conducted classes in the Univer- sities of Missouri and Kentucky, and in the Ohio Wes- leyan University, spending part of his time at each. With this experience, in the smaller colleges, he deter- mined to see if in this, the largest institution in the West, there was any interest in this subject. The University authorities were Willing to allow him to make the experi- ment under the direction of the faculty, though he was not admitted to membership in that body. The courses, which were six Weeks in length, were optional, and were Open only to those who paid special tuition. About sixty immediately enrolled. The students of the Law Depart- ment soon began to petition for the permanent establish- ,wiszz T which it had sunk, to a position far lllll, g llllzllw' - ,P ' jj, K. -L--... N M gf, ggbf. .,.,,,, .1-.,-1. -f---- - ' ' ment of free instruction, and in 1887 the course was lengthened to ten weeks and made free. The Literary Department now petitioned for the same advantages, and thenext year Professor Trueblood was engaged for une semester in both departments, and a little later as Assist. ant Professor of Elocution and Oratory, being classed in the English department. In ,92 he was called to Prince. ton, but the interest that had been aroused here was S0 strong that the Regents placed him at the head of his own department and raised him to a full professorship, the first instance of such action among the leading Western col. leges. ' In this way was laid the foundation upon which has been built the splendid record in oratory and debate which the University now enjoys. And now a wordl as to the special machinery which has furnished the means for this result. Intjanuary, 1890, at theinstance of Professor Trueblood, a few enthusiastic students met to establish an annual intercollegiate oratorical contest, open only to undergraduates. Invitations were sent to Uberlin, Wis- consin, Northwestern, and Cornell Universities. All responded favorably except Cornell, who would not join unless allowed to send as her representative a graduate student who had won the prize in oratory during the preceding year. I The re- maining colleges formed the Northern Oratorical League, and later admitted the Uni- versities of Iowa and Chi- AHM ZEENHZ- cago. The constitution of the League provided forthe establishment of Associations in each college to form ifS groundwork, and so the Oratorical Association was im' mediately organized here with about forty members. Under this system the method of choosing the oratorsl t0 represent the Universities is as follows: Contests are held in the three law classes, and in the three upper classes of the Literary Department, to SGW i n s ,s representatives for the final University contest. The sen- ior classes are entitled to two orators apiece, and each of the other competing classes to one. The eight men who are thus adjudged winners meet in the final contest, and the winner here has the honor of representing Michigan in the Northern Gratorical League. Thus by a gradual pro- cess in which every contestant has an equal opportunity, is our best one chosen, and so effective has this method been that, of the six contests which the league has already held, Michigan has won five. The result of this system has been the increase in the number of contestants to be- tween fifty and seventy-five yearly, andin the membership of the Oratorical Association to eight hundred. But the interest thus aroused has ,not been confined to Ann Arbor. In 1894, the Chicago Alumni established a Medal and a Testimonial of seventy five dollars to be given annually to the student winning first honor in the University contest, which offer the Oratorical Association has supplemented with a testimonial of fifty dollars for the winner of the sec- ond honor. The preparation of this medal has cost the Alumni an infinite amount of trouble and a thousand dol- lars in money, but the result has exceeded all expectations, and it is a souvenir of which the receiver may be justly proud. The spirit has spread even beyond the alumni to a man who has heretofore had no connection with the University. Mr. Ferdinand W. Peck, of Chicago, has offered prizes of one hundred dollars and fifty dollars respectively to the winners of the first and second honors in the Northern Oratorical League. Thus the prospect opened up to those students interested in oratory is a very attractive one. In addition to the prizes, which practically amount to a scholarship in oratory, the suc- cessful contestant has the honor of representing the Uni- versity of Michigan against the leading colleges of the West But there is another and hardly less important branch of this department which deserves mention--intercol- 5 I . 1 v. 5, 1 1 4. 5 4 5, .V A 5 5 1 5 r E C A l 1 1 2 g . Z L 9 2 4 Q 7 i. .3 ... legiate debating. Prior to '93 the idea was unknown here, but in that year we began by a debate with Wisconsin, followed in ,Q4 and 795 by trials of strength with North- western, and in 796 with Chicago. Feeling that this method of single debates was rather fragmentary and un- satisfactory, Professor Trueblood planned a league which should include four of the leading western colleges, and within the last few months the matter has been pushed to completsion. Ferdinand W. Peck and Alexander Revell have guaranteed the testimonials, and annually hereafter in the auditorium at Chicago will occur the debate for the " Championship of the West." ' C t This in brief is the history of the rise of oratory in the University, and it is a record of which every student and alumnus may well feel proud. For in this depart- ment, Michigan occupies the position which belongs to her in all branches of collegiate activity--that of unques- tioned superiority. +09 fl., 1:,.':-VI, '.,,.4,--. L-fd v .1 1 f- ,- V ,4. A ' V 1' .. :wxu -. link.,-"4f..' 'uf -f- i. ref: .TP.' ' .v ,ff 2',. - I 4 . Nxt' at Ta 41Tf'1". ' "'..54fi'hv --ral X"f-vi.-1'-.V ' -' 1' -X ' . 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C . . .M-up-fl ,Q, r- ' .' - I u w 0 9 "lad 1 .rf-. ,.,, ' 'um -. us.w---..f--- .ww .- -. A 1: - . N 5+ 3- . ,1 ' iff' A if-3' " "N -3-gi Y --1 f- -,,1.'f-::'. ' ' A ...X-.:L' " ,'.'1f'f' - ,.-4, -k l Aw- , .ff - 44-,--..,,, , -......l.l " ' . ,.,: f - J .....4.......-...f5- --'A ' ,F mf" """"' .,, , 'I Y , K ,W ,, ,, .,,,,., .,.....-..-.- --. -.. WA, ,Arg Y - ,s-ai 4 , I ram- A, ,....-5, .- ., I V N A 7, ,LV G, A .L-N., I w H - ,,. .1 -,. -" -f ,.- - ff W' - 'Y I , . V f I 5 F , V . -V I ,Y .- :KV f ,, , - ' 34 s. 7' f 'mx 'ur-1-15-r-lr-r-'lv-1-1 Sllld IIIS' II Cllll' HSS Cidli ll 0 4 4 Organized, 1854. Incorporated, I893 4 0 4 , 0ffiCCl'S HAROLD H. EMMONS, '97, . . . - v President FREDERICK P. LAWTON, 197 M, . V1CC'PfCS1dCHf FRED C' BORST, 193 E, , 'Recording Secretary E. GALE OSBORN, '97 E, . - - Treasurer ALBERT REED, '97 D, , , , Assistant Treasurer DlI'CCf0l'S WM. R. BLACKBURN, '98 L CLARENCE W. WHITNEY, '99 E HARRY D. WATSON, '97 D GEORGE W. BEISEL, '97 Ph FRED W. JOSLIN, '97 D E550 14 S F' ,Yq.5EC0sD' . . OQTXENS F03 . ' O6 F0,J,,l..E'QQN MMS .2-5 QV P47 Us gf' flip U48 QQASS W . NQ. 0 Olp E4"?'rf9Q ?g "Wa Gov- 6 r FORTY-SECOND SEASON A XX awww' Students' Lecture Hssociatron 5 I: Q 'Q -5 Zi L -s NO' 1239 'Q 4 'L v' 0 5 a CSG, Chau.nceyM.Depe , - 0 " " TL4, 6 U' . vr. Leland T. Powers. vi 3' '2 gl Q rpg Bn if Boston Ladies'Symph9gy ,a 659. gt U VI 3 'ng . A r ' Orchestra. - wc, 11 , ' I2 9 Q ,j 0 Lua Charles A. Dana, Q - Ian, 21 4,1 2 , Q Q I.: xo , Ex. President Harrison. 'l-W ' 5 . 9, W6 W 'Luther Lg.. Mills. - Feb.12 ,f 3 2 93 E Gmc: Awnnu lusun. 'X -. Imperial offef. 9- ,Mar.I2 ,J 3 9' Oratorical Contest' - 19 f , oo Lucius Perry Hills. - QL 2 l " lohn Kengck Bangs. - Apr. I3 A Tlckegiuot nodnnlass ueclon-bun bg N 0 re on ln beg-rgfur , epven - . .... W., -N ,F H PAR?UE71 r S44-,-..m-Rovf.--.,.,,,,sqg,,?igD fd! fi dl Rss Cidli ll ' Q 4 + 0ffiCel'S HARRY G. VPAUL, '97, , . . Pres1dem L. C.'CRAMPToN, '99 L, Vlce Presrdent FRED.ENGELI-IARD, '98, . . Secretary , HAROLD' H."EMMONS, '97, . ..., . Treasurer W. R. BLACKBURN, '98 L, , Treasurer of Northern Ora.tor1ca1League A Executive Zommittee - PROF. THOMAS C. TRUEBLOOD 1. S. HANDY, '97 L H. I. MCCREARY, '99 C. E. THEOBALD, '98 L' A. S. KEPNER, '98 L J. S. LATHERS, '97 T. C. BACMEISTER, '98 A+++ " i FBXMRDEDTO' F0-R EXCELLENCE TN W KA ro RY I- .. 'Rafi NJ RSITYQ- f-A ' Jmrl f t L , i 45711 'I G , . 9 9 +2 If ,f if -'lf' X X Kxtx -I! v qix rg . r 4 5' V - Q 4. sig. gg' ' ,141 I X' 312231 .., 0 , :. X JI! ff' 'VE'-WN J Q- -. ' EFYN -' 5 'TI' ' Q, .ffjfrxx - ll., fn -ni-g - .- , ' ' W v . W QF 'Ki' ' ' ik ' Aff?-sei F fa? 0? 0 W fi xy, l JM A WRUN..-o 'ff 7-Y RR. N 11,1 f! . qu A ' gay' 529' if ff .' w-xbzli.-2-f , ' -fv qrrkqsg 12, 759 - r ua: , A.. '1 ' ... ' ' vw Jw ax X' . I ,, ,' .. Q'-Y K - f i N . ,. , V J . " 1.0 r'S H. bm . QM., spzdgp- , I 14 4,412 Q- -8 ,I ., ,gf f Q .1 , Qi, dv-9 :- U L 1. - :gm-an-1- - fg 'S 1-,QZA , 'E' - ' x' A F 7- I . W . if-'f r , ,f 'g--1 --- '- - A- . M N.., k -.- , .., VT-, 9-A--'-,1 - ff, -ul 4. -'- . - ,, .rv -- . ' 4 W fu , Mr- , ' pf ' f ' ' ,A Y - Z - ' f- , ' 1 r - . , , , TWH, . than 3,1555-5.5 is -fs 5 .Q ' 5 3 Q1 F N l X s A ',1,r.'1 1 v 4 x 5:5 ,- ill I -- , QM : EN Zemedv lub 4 4 4 0fflCQl'S Ag M. SMITH, ,977 .... President I. S. HANDY, '97 L, . , Vlce President W. C. BoYNToN, ,QQ E, . . Secretary E. P. DE PONT, S, , , Stage Manager H. I. VVEINSTEIN, '98, , , , Business Manager Executive Zommittee A. M. SMITH KARL HARRIMAN H I WEINSTEIN 4 4 4 4 4 Che Private Secretary 4 4 4 I By William Gillette 4 4 4 QPresented March 6, 1897, for the benefit of the Athletic Association and the Fruit and Flower Mission 3 Zas MR. CATTERMOLE, . DOUGLAS CATTERMOLE, . MR. NIARSHLAND, , , HARRY NIARSHLAND, , Rav. ROBER1' SPAULDING, GIBSON, , W , KNOX. .... PERKINS, , , EDITH MARSHLAND, EVA WEBSTER, , MISS ASHFORD, , MRS. STEAD, , S, Handy I , A. M. Smith T. J. Weadock W. C. Boynton- K. E. Harriman , D. H. Wagar , M. B. Snow W. M. McKee Gertrude Divine Tertia Farnsworth Mrs. S. Handy Blanche Phillips "'tllitlS.1ZU2Sal' troupe il + + 4 0fflCQl'S . H PROF. THOMAS C.VTRUEB.LOOD, . . General Director HAROLD H. EMMONS, , , , Business Manager A the Players H ' JULIUS CESAR, ...... Joseph H. Quarles, '95 OCTAVIUS CACLSAR, .Triumvirs after . Harold H. Emmons, ,97 A the death of MARCUS ANTONIUS, Julius Caesar, William C. Hull, '93 MARCUS BRUTUS, l , , James H. Mays,,P, G,'L CASSIUS, 9 9 Frank P. Sadler, '96 CASCA, 3 Coffsplrators , ' i Francis X. Carmody, ,97 CINNA, + fjilfsst . 4 9 one H. Hans, '98 TREBONIUS, l Caesar, l Oscar P. Cole, '96 DECIUS BRUTUS, 9 Albert O. Olsen, '93 METELLUS CIMBER, ,F , Charles G. Cook, '96 A SOOTHSAYER, , , , Charles G. Cook, '96 T1T1N1Us, . . . , Albert O. Olsen, '98 LUCIUS, Servant to,Brutus, . Wesley J. Wueffel, '98L ' SERVIUS, Servant to Antonius, . Duane H. W3g3I,',99 PINDARUS, Servant to Cassius, ' . Francis X. Carmody, ,97 ' CALPHURNIA, Wife to Caesar, . Almerene M. Orsborne, '96 PORTIA, Wife to Brutus, ,... Zena Thomson, '96 9 Pltbtidlw 2 Frederick W. B. Coleman Freeman Field Sollace B. Coolidge James H. Flinn A julian G. Dickinson Adrian D. Stevenson' .- I Charles Simons Q' C. M. Pritchard 93 Gaylord W. Gillis C. Borchardt Q Frank S. Simons Allen Zacharias P .4 ' Edward B. Caulkins Jefferson G. Thurber Q ' ' Kirkland B. Alexander joseph.Krolik ' , Edward B. Coolidge, Ir. Duane R. Stuart R SClldf0l'S, GIIZITGS, t'.'HffClladllfS, ETC. i l 1 5 4 R ,G P 5 i S ls gl M . V ' ' n! VW . - . V 3 X --nv-,..4u' v-QY.,yv,f-1: ' ..- .i- 'x W. ,vw . . W ,,. . . .' . , , Kf,.g,A',, 1 ., , . . Nw- -14-1-vqgv f,,- N ? f' inn "" P--..-.iw ,.5.qA5 S-- ,- ,y -41 - .u- -v o--ww-'Q Q-11" Lfh., -uv - irq.-r -Q.. , va., - , I K - A , .4 Y , . , " ' "" . ' .-J r.. of ' "',- 4,.rv""U 'K' V , V - . . , , , . , ". 'I-A-S -3 ' -, .4,--, J' f .. -31 I' ' .JS-I .1 -'A -V.. - - P ' 5 ' 'r-.W-,-,-.V-v'. I P- -v" ' 2- '. ' ...Af-".., , X v--'W -- .. .f-- ' . DQAL-J"'4Nv .r'0-u..n.-45 "".g. 8. - .' .' .- ? roy... 15" QQ? K V .-, .. g.13"'Q .-ggg. ' ,f-fxx f-'Al any . -- .. . . - ..,.-.,....., ,.,.- A ., ..,.........-.u.f......--.., Y, ,,,-..................A-,..A ., ,. .. .-,,-,.,,-- ,, , , , ,S I , ..,,, TAA K V' 1 s 1 Y 1 Kg, ..:-.-. ' i E' ' 7 '55 'J 32? 5 ff: Pi 5- 1 AE .E E E Q ,eu - , , ,J 1: fs fe 1:-.3-g.i,g,a Q aaa: .. ' E3 'ES 55.15-aggiiai.-1-E-Bas SHE? -ad- 1 X X. . fl - . .- if -Q .- 4 a Q ' :Sw I . 2 , ex 1 7 f .f i 1 i T V 'A 1 , 4 1 'r i ' 'l , T n V , . ' s r, , 1 .- 1. 1' a ,N !r' u. :ft '. ,y V vi n ,- QE .-4 . ,ja 41 K H Q - if . 1 y 4 : 1 Qi, , 1 ,b ., . ' 4 ,, 3" . 1.1" J A' I ,,, f , L-f,.v.. - . . ,. Ti' 1 H214 f Y i .Qu .. " ,,,,-, 'Q fn 15611 . .i,,. gif. . ' ff ' ':1gl.,','1 . V "-'Uuvw w . ,-v.. . . I gg . YQ 1?gf,l'-1',- -' k , . 4,5 iff. .A ' 3v',v gffgd ,352 'V 415 1, thi 'H Vg ?g.3g,:ix ,I 115- ,4 5' 'gf -,W 1. Q3 lpba Du lliterarv Society 4 4 4 Literary Department 4 4 4 0fffCCl'S HENRY GEISMER, '97 E, . . . . President ALICE NASH, 93, , - Vice-President C- LE ROY HILL, 99, . . Secretary EUGENE GEISMER, '93 L, . Assistant Secretary FRED C. ENGELHARD, '98, . ,,,, Treasurer delphi l:iIQl'dl'V Societv 4 4 4 Literary Department 4 4 4 0ffiCQl'S WILLIAM B. HARRISON, '98, , . . . President H. J. MCCREARY, 799, . Vice-President F. V. CARPENTER, '99, , , Secretary J. L. FRENCH, ,99, , . . . . Treasurer G. H. HANS, '98, ..... Repdrter IUQDSICI' iIQl'dl'V Society 4 4 4 Law Department 4 4 4 I 0ffiC2l'S PAUL Y. ALBRIGHT, '98, . . . - President A, F, CONNQLLY, '98, ViCC'PICSldCDt J. T. LAWLER, '98, . . Secretary C. E. THEOBALD, '98, . Treasurer ' e++' L jeffersonian lliterarv Societv 4 + 9+ f Law Department 9 . 4 4 4 . L 0ffitel'S A. S. KEPNER, '98, . . . . ,V i . . President A. I. LACEY, '98, . ...... Vice-President F. W. CHADBOURNE, ,QQ, . . . . . Recording Secretary EARL PETERS, '98, . . . . Corresponding Secretary . L. C. CRAMPTON, '99, . 4 , ..... Treasurer 444:44 M Air.. BCIUOII Qbdiillg Secietv 444 0fflcers R ' 'First Semester I. N. KINNEY, '98, ....... President F. M. BYAM, ' 98, ...... Vice-President E. E. GILBERT, '98, . . . U . . . Secretary I - H 5064315 Semester Q W. A. SEEGL MILLER, '98, .... . President J. M. BLAKE, 799, ...... Vice-President .- GEORGE C. FINFROCK, '98, . 9. . '. . Secretary 4.4444 :, . llincolnbebating Societv I 4 4 Law Department . S-L-TATUM, . . .. 5 . . . L. . President E- I- TISDAT-E, '93, n .4 . . . . Secretary Ei 'TY IY 'er K - . B Sumner ebating Societv 4274 4 9 Law Department 4 4 5 , officers C' N- DAVIDSON3 99: - - - . President I. M- HAWKENS, 99, . . . . Vice-President W- BERKEY, 99, ..... . Secretary wdSl7iIlQE0lltS iiiltlbddll 9 +++ Thirty-Seventh Annual Observance by the Law Depart- .7 ment 9 4 4 4 PRESIDENT HENRY WADE ROGERS, , Address Executive Zommittee B. T. RILEY, '97 E. S. BARTLETT, '98 MAX W. BABE, '97 A H. A. MOORE, '98 C. H. STEARNS, '97 E. G. SOULE, '99 W. E. STOVVE, '98 W. C. SMITI:I,'.:,99 C. A. KLOTZ, ,QQ 4 Q 4 4 9 ood ooernment 9 lllb 4 4 4 Ofticers , FRANK M. BYAM, '98 L, . . . . P5'CSidQ!1f W. R. BLACKBUEN, '98 L, . . . Vice-Pfesident J. STUART LATHERS, '97, .... . . Secretary FRED ENGELHARD, '98, .... 1 . Treasurer executive Zmllmitfef ' A. L. DAVIS, '98 L - 'H. I. WEINSTEIN, '98 YGTONI 3+4 C U. of mega. of Q. Debate MARCH 28, 1896 44.4 " Is the Principle of a Graduated Property Tax one which should be- adopted by the States?" '+4+ GENERAL RUSSELL A. ALGER, .... Presiding Officer C. j. VERT, '96 L P. Y. ALBRIGHT, '98 L EDMCND BLOCK, '96 L Zo ' I. P. WHYTE W. C. MITCHELL L. B. VAUGHAN 7 Won by the Affirmative--U. of M., 273 U. of C., 35 0 4 4 5 4 ' U. Qf mega. of Debate, 1897 lnkbigdll R2Dl'2S2llfdfiWS . W. M. CHANDLER, '97 L A J. S. LATHERS, 797 F. X. CARMODY, '97 ++f++ University tbratorical Qontest BAYARD H. AMES, '97, A ,,,, , , A , First fMichigan Representative in Northern Oratorical League Contest, 18971 CHARLES SIMCNS, '98, .... , Second . fA1ternate to Northern Oratorical League Contest, 18972 am!" .ar A A -, . - A A A A AA AA -A A H 744- A X, ,.."4 .r- L. .:. :V-""-"-""-"""'-f"xj -37 V.-:5-7.-.7f.,:-QA A - ' , fl!-,IAN , . A - - '-- ' , . A ,Af ,1 1, ...A . . M,--fu-Af ---1-V' -1, -Y - ' --H ' -Y' - A A , .. .. -V -.-4,... 1 --.---+-V-..... .- ... ---- - Y- ' "t, ,. 1. , ,- ..,.. .M . .Xf..r..,-. W.-...W ...-, ,-,. .. ,.-- .. - 4, , ,,.. -.-.,,, - gp-r - I . - 'A ,, f , .4 A - A , ,.- - ' - Y "' 1' ,. , 1 , , , - J- 1 5. F 1 5 ' fm' , 1 17 , VV" 1 H rf gf.- . ,if 1 1 'V ,K . A ,AJ Q- ,-A! 1. . , 5 A. 1 1 J! 11 11,1 41 "E: , '1 ,I 1 fd Z? 1 LQ1 P1 A! ,I 1 k 1 , 3 i1 Zhu-I4 . 5 7. - M V. .--M, .. A 1, . Y. ..- ,. 1. -- 1, .U-M x 1 . .. .1 .ff Q... -...,-.- ,....,..... 5 1 . , . . .. .,.f.. .v-f M, qw?--1 ..',f.-.i1 f.,.-.H...--.. ..v-... .M-. .--. ... -.. 1..--Q -vf,W---- -1-ff 4- f- fy '-.2-ww" 'ff' " " ' . " ' ' " "' 'L ' W ' "Wx Q 8 F . .7 , 1. . .--ffm .1 .W - 1 -. . -..--.,-.M.,......1 ,, ,.-4,..--.. ....., ,.a...-xt-. ,, A N A -- M-. :,,,.,, A-, ,,,,,.1... N- .. A 1 .- ,- -- -- 1 -- AA AA A 5 ., A ,, A , - , ., ,- - -,.-.-,wx-'V 51 -f f ,N N - A A A5,,,A,,.,,,,1 , if -I ...,,4...,.,,,.,,,.-1,-f.,n.,. -L-vi--'ls-rw -. av- -V -f - - - A K , -Aw A W A Ax A . - -. -- v -- 1 A A tiny, V-A,A,,,..A AA A -A AAHVAAAAJA 1 ,.,A1,-,.. 'off-.Aw-...---1---1-f -- mf-f -qu f"""'-P , . ' , A ..,. ,. Y..,,. -,.,,-f - Asif' QA-Q.--fxA.'w.,-A-Q:--,f -. -- ,.-xx.-- - 1 1 AA A AA ..,,, A ,.1... -W -. W, - Q , , If -, ' F . ' '. f 1 4 'X A F 1 ll. ot m. Dail 4 4 4 0fflC0l'S I. F. THOMAS, '97, Managing Editor O. H. Hans, '98, Business Manager Gditbrs E. L. Gmsnnn, '98 L H. B. SKILLMAN, '98 L F. S. SIMONS, '98 H .H. H. CORWIN, '99 F, M. Looms, '98 - n BUTLER LAMB, '09 9 Jltbletic EURO? C. M. GREEN, '99 Jlssoclate editors: W. W. HUGHES, '98 .Q A. M, SMITH, '97 F. A. Fucuc, '98 E S. W.1SMITH, '97 W. P. MORREILL, '98 . - CABOT IJULL, JR., ,QQ M. ' LOUISE DODGE, ,99 l l 4 1 he 13. of . aily. , ' 2 ' ' ' ' .um uwon. mcmou. rmnu, macu 5, um A rm mn-a can - iI9V19.Yls -ln f.XCELLENT RERFORIIANCE dCl'H1lfYB-IU -1 ' '-"f J - - """ "The Priva!eSecmary'8Tnll Be Ptescme:linProf1ssion1lSyk 'U 'flNlDlIkf'1- 13 unanniolhsdnafqul -uunpum-vang 'llhllkili illliilh Obs! 1 o ditors EDWIN H. HUMPHREY, ,Q7 President ARTHUR M. SMITH, ,Q7 Managing Editor HAROLD M. BOWMAN, '98 L Assistant Managingilzijditor EDWIN J. BEMENT, '97 - Business Manager .'HSSOClZlF2S GEORGE B. HARRISON, '97 L KARL E. HARRIMAN, S FREDERICK L. BAXTER, '99 LAFAYETTE YOUNG, JR., '99 JAMES S. SYMONS, OO STANDISH BACKUS, '99 CARL M. GREEN, '99, 5 4 T in 'Q 9 1 Yew ' . 55 ' ' -'.'. i-J"6I 'i ' I3 wink I Ax x 5 1. 4.5 A -1 . . v5,M' I 1 f ,,.g. , ' I gy-rf K' "T 4,415.55 A ,, ff..g.I: , A lg, . 'MR -.- I , I iz. , Q.. ?' Y vi U 1 .f. QW, r " n 2? I' ' e 1 4 1.2 'w 64,1 2.44 V - :wie A 1 ' N e a 'K ' ,' . 1 - 1 1111" ' . P 'ff-.J1 , 4, ' 1 . . - li 1 A Q1 , 1 ff: fi. s 1 1 11 5' . 1 - -, 1 V, . ' N 1, 1 1 111 11 11.51 1 11 '1 an 191 rf? 4 1 2-ii 5 T7 1 gg .1 H51 F ' 1 En ' uf A 411 uf 1 J ' 1 ' 1 1 ,1 .1 1 F' 1 ' 1 1-'.'1 4 1 15' 1 .-111 11 1 Q1 gs? 5 l'! 4. '1 if 1 1' 1 ' 14 ag: 1. -1 1,1 ff-.1 1 .1 lg. 1 fa! 1 -j ig 1 lg K fir nf ., 1 .. Q . 1 ' 1 1 n'- ' 1 ,. 1 1 ., .1 rf- .1 li 1 '1 1 1 " 1 1 1 1 -5 1 1. '1 1, 1 411 .. .1 ' ' I 1? '1 I" E l . J' 5 1 13 I ': ..' E xl 'E 1' - . 1 NL J Q' 41 Pun I J. 1 ?. 1 1 'J I 1 4" 1 if-' 1 -. 1 1, . . J. 1 -f. 1 if . 1+ 1 .ffk 1""l.1 .Ng 215.2 '..:'1 JE! f-:-r-,--- -fn -,,-N ..-,-.-.N-- . ..- N., ....-.. , 1 A c f va- tu 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M . ...L g, 1 ...JN A C e Ctclmic Annually -by the Students of the Engineering Department 4 4 4 A Editors F., E. VICKERS, '97, . . . . Managing Editor W, H. RIPPEY, '97, . . . ' . . Business Manager SUTTON VAN APELT, ,97, . . . Corresponding Secretary W. S. DREW, '97 L. P. COULTER, '98 .I ' 'iiii g li I N' 44444 UR lllldllikl' 4 4 4 ., Ediibrs , HERBERT M. RICH, ,97 , . , . Managing Editor ALLEN H. ZACHARIAS, '99 . . . B11SinCSS Manager KARL EDWIN HARRIMAN, S vom. sw... gg 9 ,Nt-mwvw ARTHUR MAURICE SMITH, '97 . 1...vUm- A mem-m 4 WILLIAM L. MACK, QQ I HAROLD M. BOWMAN, '98 L BERTHA M. SHERWOOD, '97 7 Faculty Ildvisorv Board PROF. F. N. ScoTT MR. L. A. STRAUSS 7 Student Jflctvisorv Board L. A. PRATT, '96 J. H. PRENTISS, '96 .F , , , The Inlandcr A Magazine oubllshed on the W- tunlh of och month during the college year, and devoted to the U!- crary Interests of ghe Unlvershyol Maf.hag.n..-f .n Established by an Classof'9l Ja-.wanna Edited and published by: BoagdofEditonc.hoeanjrom I among the Students ol the University d Michltlh- PrmxzdallhelnhndPrcsandmtendatthopoa- officzalAnnArborassuond4:1aSmaIlmanef..0.P Fa-ulehxthzNlainHa1landala1lnzwSdukrl- 7 ramen. 'IBN CENTS 'mn nouunms '11-un' iibigdll NSW! R ,000 A Annuallyg by the Senior Classes of the Literary, Law. and Engineering 'Departments 4 4 Q I A EGINPS . SHIRLEY W. SMITH, . .' . . . Managing Editor EDWIN H. HUMPHREY, . , Business Manager ARTHUR M. SMITH, . . .. Assistant Managing Editor KATHARYNE G. SLENEAU, . . . . Secretary and Treasurer JENNIE P. WHITE I A ALBERT H. STONEMAN Roy R. WILEY RANSOM G. GEORGE CLARE H. STEARNS . GRANT' C. BAGLEY CHARLES L. MooRE J. ROBERT CROUSE . :A Y AJ., -.-Q.. . 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'fl 47- -. r I , .'." .' 0.1" . ,IJ 4 f- fa T125 1 I I l the michigan Hlumnus 4 MONTHLY + Q +' Editors A' ' LoUIs ALBERT PRATT, '96 . . . . Managing Editor CLIFFORD GRIFFITH ROE, '99, .... Business Manager Dwdffmelif Editors .rf ISAAC NEWTON DEMMON, '68, Necrologist 2 FRED NEWTON SCOTT, '84, Communications 2 GERTRUDE BUCK, ,Q4, Literary Notes A 5, I 4 DUANE REED STUART, '96, Graduate Club Q GEORGE BLAIR HARRISON, '97 L, Campus News 5 'SUSAN LAURA MCKEE, '97, Assistant 0 4 0 + I YGCIC 0 , 0 + ' f Annually by the Sophomore Literary Class C A + + + ' I A , A Editors - ALLAN CAMPBELL, . . . Managing Edif0r CHARLES B, HOLE, , , Business Manager 9 EMILIE B. FLINTERMANN JAMES B- PEI-L CHARLES E. CARTRIGHT . CLARENCE W. WHITNEY MARY H. HUDSON HAROLD' T. GRISWOLD EDWIN A. DAVIS MARK BEATTIE .HGWSOYV Board ' PROFESSOR MCLAUGHLIN PROFESSOR SCOTT PROFESSOR DENISON It MR- STRAUS5 I 'Q l 1 Y f . , 4 5 4i..,.... .. .' A, , . " . . ,, A :'-. -11... -f'!""'-""W"4 ' '-J' ' the Dental SOIIYIIZII B 4 4 + B Monthly, by the Students of the Dental Department + + 4 u A Edit0l'S H. D. WATSON, '97, , , , Editor-in-Chief T. E. LOGAN, '96, . A . . Alumni Editor S. K. SCHARLOTT, '97, . . Department Editor W. C. MACY, '99, . , Assistant Department Editor R. N. FORBES, '98, . i . . . Business Manager J. W. MINER, '98, . . . Assistant Business Manager +4444 Cbehulletin 44+ Monthly, by the Students' Christian Association 0 4 4 , . EGIKOPS A SHIRLEY W. SMITH, ,Q7, . - . . . . . Managing Editor HOBART B. HOYT, '98 L, ,.,,, Business Manager I. Q. ADAMS., '98 L, . I , , . Assistant Business Manager CORNELIA WILDING, '98 9 9 SARA BROWN, ,Q7 A F. M. BYAM, '98 L f - R , '11 I , , ,r 5: '42 4 wif- Q, -14"-V, ft fi L5 I I r ix I I K P I D F Q. 1 I 5 J -.-, v., nf- Y- I -..... -.. .WW -..,,.w.,.-- . N ..... -,.-,.- -, '.A , P--------Aw--1 f-"W"':.1 "R " 3'1'fw:ef-,Q.T'.:fC21.f' 5,1 , - ,, . gN,. - ,www 'Q h . HWAgAnM- ., Q , ,.. ,,,,,.A ,..,.,,.,,., ,......, , . , . . , Fl!! .li -.354 -.44 3: ?:5,51gj,1gggg ,.:'f.f,j,nwf wif-5: 'LI,f17'i,1, .-. 2 ,, -.-gi-g,.,.............I-.,'l1 'L1vw.fm...-v5-,..-.x.,,......,..af:n'::s.14:Y'dvv-x--u-.H-v-f.,-.-v- X 4 X -Ag, - , ..i.-,,..,,A., -,. nr. A., N-- ...4--,AA-Ag.,,-.-,WJ 1,..-,,!,----,, - ,, -, 1, ,,:,,---, ,,1U,-,.,.'..L. ralzowqns-pgs-Q uuuqulgnic Lb m G C3 v-1-av-.-:fx ,s T' ., ,. junior Bop 9 Q 4 0ffiCQI'S C, F. RATHFON, X 'I', . . . General Chairman H, I. WEINSTEIN, Independent . , General Secretary R, M. HARDY, CD A 9, . . . . General Treasurer ' Zommittees f ' RQCCDWOII C. E. GROESBECK, A A 111, Chairman C. S. KENNEDY, Z X T. R. Woonraow, B 9 II Hrransements f W. J. O'BRIEN, 2 Lp, Chairman V C. C. WALL1N, A T F., V. SACKETT, 9 A X D. H. TROWBRIDGE, Independent 'IIIWKRWOI1 W. D. HERRICK, NI' T, Chairman A H. B. WETMORE, A K E RUDOLPH BEST, A T A DCCOYMFOII J. W. F. BENNETT, dr K T, Chairman A. H. KEITH, E A E - S. S. -OLDS, Z KI' sein QV W N V X Lk! A W X V, U I . vgrlfaf-' W it . "1 . Y .' .Q 4 N 1 33. ' ,. 5 : y SEQ-, . wh-p - mu! . aff' 1' ' Q15 s , .qi .ina V 2. , .1513 ' " ' 'vffllin . ,?1f'Q3i11F.9? '.1i!gf2,Fi , V yn":3,,'f'v I X , K 'I I.. 'J 'T-' ' . '1?:'7'21. - V l ' 'x. '::s,":3' ' 'Q '-f. F. . , yi .,. , . iq:-T, . X , ' . sw l X J : M Q X I I N .H il: ' Qi, ' Pdf. , v 'gh MWX- I WM. W x , x . L .Nl 'Xu ' :Nl X' 7... B 1 .--v v-- 4----"' ""' , SODIQOIIIOYQ BOD 4 4 4' Zommittces R. M. SIMMONS, CID K fif, .... General Chairman M. B. SNOW, A A CIP, .... Secretary and Treasurer A , , 'flwifdfmll - I. G. HAMBLEN, JR., B 9 II, Chairman R. R. BOWDLE, X AI' ' H. N. CLARK, XT Hl'l'dllQCIl1CllfS . W. A. COMSTOCK, Z NP, Chairman H. A. SMITH, A A dv . R. B. UPHAM, B 9 Il ' D2C0l'Zlfi0Il - C. L. BENEDICT, X NP, Chairman s G. F. FIRESTONE, A T A 2 H. R. HURLBUT, B 6 II RQCCDUOII A C. C. ADAMS, E 41, Chairman R. W. NORRINGTON, Z AI' - THOMAS NEAL, fb K 'I' W. C. BOYNTON, E Q H MARK BEATTIE, A T A ' .'HSSiSf2d W A MRs..P. R. DE PONT MRS. A. G. BOYNTON MRS. G. W. PATTERSON, JR. MRS. J. C. KNOWLTON +++,++. Fortv Klub 4 9 + 0fficers , LESTER MAHER BGII General Chairman JOHN B. KEATING, NI' 'I' ARTHUR M. SMITH A M' WILLIAM J. O,BRIEN, E 111 ' ROBERT L, DEAN, fb K T I R 9 ,I 1 9 i Vi' 5 . :xl M, EAL 0 , W i .. Davfei m 1.,a rein ,.1I. '1.j,1, I, A Qs., M, I .Vi XY K T WT T I ,mm , MRS. MRS. MRS. b MRS. MISS MISS MISS MISS MISS MISS MISS MISS 'll be Freshman Spread HELD IN WATERMAN GYMNASIUM, NOVEMBER I6th,.I897 9 + + I I Zltaperons ANGELL DR. MOSHER PATTERSON I - MRS. D'OoGE WAITE A MRS. KNOWLTON VAUGHAN I MRS. COPELAND MRS. SOULE Committees MISS KEATING, General Chairman 'lllvifdfimi MISS KNowLToN, Chairman SLATER MISS PATTENGILL RILL MISS BARTLAY MISS BALLENTINE Finance MISS BUNKER, Chairman ' STICKNEY I MISS ALLEN RYAN MISS WILLIAMS MISS DECKER Refreshment h MISS PETTEE, Chairman MASON- ' MISS WooDS DQLESE MISS DODGE MISS HUDSON Reception MISS CARHART, Chairman BURKE, MISS MCOMBER VAN VALKENBURG MISS D11-I-ON fl'QSbllldII Bdllqllil 9 + 4 ZOIIIMIUCCS .Hl'l'8llQ2m2IIf6 CHARLES H. REYNOLDS, A T, Chairman ARTHUR W. PLUM, A K E WALTER B. PITKIN G RUSSELL R. MUPEEK, 9 A X A S Recevtion K GEORGE S. BENSON, .A K E, Chairman FLORENCE M. HALL, A fb EBBIE G. BEURET, 2 X A Invitation J. 'WILKES FORD, Chairman ROGER S. MORRIS, tl' T Coasts R. C. APTED, tl' T, Toastmaster 1900, . .... FRED H. GREEN, A K E Independents, , FREDERIC R. SHERMAN, ZA E Fraternities, . . . LOUIS ELBEL Boys, . SIBYL M. PETTEE, Sorosis Girls, . . HARRISON S. SMALLEY, A 'I' Athletics, . , , , BUTLER LAMB Faculty, . . LEROY WEBSTER, E X Michigan, , . JOHN B. HITCHCOCK, 9 A X GJ ' EATS i4J fl l ,V '9 9 RET, -A anis, , i Q... zu AN, IIS ' I in ' o LLEY, ISTER, tCK, NIE H. IX .T E T .A .E .2 4,13 .SL ss, LERAM HB A IX 9 .X 1" fraternity freshman Banquet A 4 A 3 A Zommittees , HARRY M. SEDGEWICK, Z T, General Chairman I r HYYARQCMCMS If , , A . ROY C. WOODWORTH, A A fb, Chairman A . WALTER FOSTER, dv A 9 VERNOR E. BUSH, X 'If A - Reception W. W. TALLMAN, 2 dw, Chairman BRET NOTTINGHAM, Z 11' ' J. WILKES FORD, JR. . ROBERT C. MCKEIGHAN, A A111 - 'llWifdfi0ll T . W. C. RAYMOND, B 9 H, Chairman L W. CLARK, X Y, - DAVID STARR, 0 A 9 A cms A J. D. KILPATRICK, 'IJ K Y, Toastmaster 3 4 ' CLASS, . h .' . , ' , , james S. Symons, A A Q 'A GIRLS, . . ' , William Brooks, 419 A 9 Q FACUILTY, , , Lafayette Young, Ir., X 'I' 5' L. INDEPENDENTS, Lloyd M. Shepard, 2 fb K ' FRATERNITIES, . . Colton Maynard ' BOYS, , , . . Laura Rinkle, K K I' ATHLETICS, D ' , R. H. Van Cleve, B 9 H ' . ALMA MATER, Walter S. Penfield, Z NI' Em SJ ff ,ff ebster Society Banquet jANUARv 26, 1597 4 Q + PAUL Y. ALBRIGHT, .... . . . Toastmaster OUR GOD FATHER-DANIEL WPZBSTER, George Kingsley, jr, THE MISSION OF THE ADVOCATE, . J. H. Blackburn THE LADIES, .... . D. E. Minnis WEBSTER SOCIETY, . , C. E. Theobald AN ITALIAN ADVENTURE, . , W. M. Chandler CO-EDUCATION, , , Miss Grace Carlton OUR COUNTRY, , . . . . F. W. Mears THE GOLDEN GATE, . ' . . . I . . E. P. Hourihan THE DIGNITY OF OUR PROFESSION, .... E. C. Ryan THE ELEMENTS OF AN AFTER DINNER SPEECH, C. C. Middleswart CUBA LIBRE, . V .... . . J. Douglas Wetmore HOW BIG IS THE BAR ? . . . R. L. Weaver THE FRESHMEN, . THE IUNIORS, . . . . . THE, SENIORS, . . . . . . THE TENDENCY OF AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS, E. E. Gilbert L. C. Whitman . W. D. Scott E. H. Cassey . G. L. Sutter U. OF M., ...... THE JUDGE, I , . , THE EVOLUTION OF A LAWYER, , OUR APPETITES, , , , , . , . O. Laing .' C. C. Lones T . A. Berkebile C 4004.9 ' can Year artv A DECEMBER 15, 1896 + + Q . Committees MRS. LOMBARD, General Chairman mlwif Ildoertising MRS. PETTEE MISS SUNDERLAND 'HWY Citktti MRS- WAITE S MISS BACORN 'Cl'C6Stll'Cl' MISS COOLEY T. E. H. KA NE TE: H. R. D. H. C.Q M. I R.. J.I E.1 R.I C.C F. ly LEOIY . H. C f S. C. 11 P' H 1 . W. E Senior Zommittees I A 5+4 . Literary and Engineering Departments A A + + + RCCCDUOII EDWIN H. HUMPHREY, Chairman T. C. LYSTER R. H. SUTPHEN E. I. BEMENT A I. L. HILL H. M. RICH LOOMIS HUTCHINSON KATHARYNE SLENEAU FRANCES WILCOX NELLIE WALTERS - IVALETA BOICE TERTIA FARNSWORTH JENNIE WHITE Ilfrdllgtments . LESTER MAHER, Chairman ' H. CQIACKSON H. W. DANEORTH R. C. TAGGART A. H. STONEMAN D. C. HUNTOON C. D. FRANK H. H. EMMONS. D. A. BRITTEN C. D. BRANDRIFF T. L. FARNHAM Q TIIWTRUOII b . HERBERT M. RICH, Chairman M. W. CAMPAU . MARION OTIS R. R. WILEY MAY BOWEN J. R. CROUSE LOUISE MOREY E. R. SUNDERLAND ANNA MCLAUCHLAN ANNA DUNCAN ' 4 'Social WILL E. IANES, Chairman R. L. DEAN - SUSAN MCKEB C. 0. COOK 'EDNA HOLBROOK JENNIE PRICE l . mCm0fidl IRVING C. LWOODWARD, Chairman F. M. BUTzEL , STELLA VVESTCOTT H. G. PAUL X MARY THOMPSON LEONIDAS HUBBARD ' JESSIE SMITH ZW and GOWN FRED E. VICKERS, Chairman S- C. BABCOCK BELL KROLIK P- H. VERNOR . JEAN WILSON V I MINERVA RHINES U Iltldithw W JOHN F. RIEMAN, CHAIRMAN - E. TAYLOR W. H. WOODS 9. 1? I I5 1. ii I, I ,I 9' -..,.......H., -- 4 Ml' . 995. ..Iw'.n': ,Hx I xl-1 E Af. -id' I X .I i'f ,KY N .I ii i 1' .I . X u . . I- f- I. fi w man's eng X . 3 L . . . . . Q' ' 4 4' 4 - Qi EXQQIIWQ Board R J P' SARA SPENCER BROWNE, ,Q7, . . 'President ' M. IOSEPHINE NACHTRIEB, '98 M, , Vice-President .4 5 3. . QE. JESSIE MARION MACK, '99, I , Recording Secretary if GEORGIA FARRAND BACON, 7Q7 Corresponding Secretary A ii' ' T, JEAN WATSON WILSON, .797 LOUISE STICKNEY, '93 LOUISE THOMPSON, '98 ALICE GRAHAM, '93 ,Q FLORENCE SUNDERLAND, ,QQ IENNIE WOODS, '93 OCTAVIA W. BATES, A. B., JUNE A. BURR, '9713 MABEL MITTS, '93 FAVNNY GOODMAN, '93 ' . MINERVA B. RHINES, 797 .,,: th " D' E LOUISE MOREY, Q7 ' 8 REBECCA ELIZABETH FINCH, '93 ALICE MAY BOUTELLE, 9 1 G K , , . - I I , V 255 Q 2 ALICE GrRAY'SNYDER, ,QQ M . EMMA DAISY BURKE, 99 ' : 5. if If ' 'I , i 5 S 3 5 If UK' . I I sf - - r 'I . 25,2-I EH! ful' E. . 1' 5' I MRS. gf. f ". " I 3 f MRS. if g . 1' IE' I O ,, 9. ire we 1-L '5 2? 4125 ' 9,1 MRS I 9, Q MRS P ' MRS in' .lil E512 23: 9' xg if I? iw ffjf 3 if I E E Q I 'I 5 . ,-I ff a- S - 5 5,5 5 1 . r 1 . I MRS. I I' I MRS. i' 1-F MRS. ' MRS. Hdvisorv Board S MRS. MARY L. WALKER, President BRADLEY M. THOMPSON VMRS. W'ILLIAM H. WAIT ALVISO B. STEVENS MRS. LOUISiP..HALL ROY M. COPELAND MRS. JAMES M. GELSTON ALBERT B. PRESCOTT MRS. WARREN P. LOMBARD DNER S. LAMSON MRS. FLOYD R. MECHEM womenvs Gymnasium Zommittee ' I MRS. JACOB E. REIGHARD, Chairman 3 . ANGELL A DR. ELIZA M.-MOSHEI GEORGE S. MORRIS MRS. MARTIN L. D'O0G1Q GAR JAMES- B WILLIAM H. PETTEE I . A MRS. HENRY S. CARHART FREDERIC JORDAN 7 MRS. WILLIAM H. .WAIT MISS LIZZIE DEAN .P f HY!-H-:s fun. ' 'sy-.Q A-pays?" v fin-v lc., 0-.Y .I Y ,JJ jeff' EE .f Z -4. " ' ,-.4 '4bf gm A ,F F x 0 Q .9 .Q 'Q' ',-.lnl...- 1" -o--'yvs-Q -s-A-gn 'lf 3 W. 5, ...Q-Ili' ID'O0cs EQ-4 QEN W . 4 V I 1. uf 52 , it , I , .lv 1 Ii -A 1 e 4 4 1 E 1 1 4 -I 5 . -A' 12 , 1 , Y 1.-J V4 .Y h- ,. :L L, ' 1 ,i l' x .,. 4 W 3. . .. 4 af V ' L Fw' 3' .4 . , 4 .f ,N ? Q x F I the fruit and flower mission 0ffiCQl'S FLORENCE G. DILLON, '99, , , , Chairman MRS. JAMES N- MARTIN, . . . Treasurer LOUISE S. THOMPSON, '98 LE ROY M. HARVEY, '98 E ' HOMER E. SAFFORO, IM. D. O 4 4- + + ' cm umversirv Hssocianion of mum- -l -7 gan ltorma :tes f 4 + + A I 7 . 3 ' 0fficers HENRY O. SEVERANCE, '97, ,,,,. President WINNIE ROBINSON, S., ..... Vice-President 1 . MILTON R. PARMELEE, '97, , Chairman Executive Committee HENRY C. DOANE, '98, , Chairman Entertainment Committee F GRACE OTIS, '98, .... Secretary and Treasurer +++f+ Q' C5658 Zllll? 0fffCQl'S ALLAN CAMPBELL, '99, . . ,,,,. President CURT ROSENOW, '97, ..... Vice-President I STANDISH BACKUS, '98, . . . Secretary and Treasurer Q2 Executive Board 5 ALLAN CAMPBELL, '99, WALTER D. HERRICK, '98 I 54 CHARLES G. PALMER, '96 E 'S I . .1 Silld IIIS' Zbl'iSfidlI Hss idii Il I + + 4 0ffitel's HERBERT M. RICH, 797, . . . I . I President JOHN H. MONTGOIMERY, 797 E ' STELLA WESTCOTT, ,97, LOUIS A. PRATT, '96, . General Secretary JOHN F. RIEMAN, JQ7, . , Treasurer EDITH JENNEY, '98, . , Recording Secretary SHIRLEY W. SMITH, ,Q7, I . . Managing Editor Bulletin Directors , MARTIN L. D70OGE, LL. D. ROY S. COPELAND, M. D. a ALBERT B. PRESCOTT, LL. D. VOLNEY M. SPALDING, PH. D. WILLIAM J. HERDMAN, PH. B., M. D. HERBERT M. RICH BRADLEY M. THOMPSON, M. S., LL. B. JOHN H. MONTGOMERY FRANCIS W. KELSEY, PH. D. STELLA WESTCOTT WOOSTER W. BEMAN, A. M. , JOHN F. RIEMAN ' , General Vice-Presidentg .r-. ,. V -I "'o , ,-'II " 1, If I . 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Ei :- 6 fg ! -ii If nl. gf r, A1-U 1 JSF' , .7 LZCJ VP. . :mf 291 .,. ,. Xt?- F52 i I Fi-Q ff f li' MI :Pm-1' P951 iff ,L -s ,J I. 1. L lf 1. ? y i I I O Q 1' .,, , N ,Y .R fl 5+ '44 3,-. Q S viz. ,. U, .-, "T . ..,- I YOIIIIQ mQIl'S QDYISIIGII HSSOCIGIIOII 4 0 4 - 0ffiC2I'S G. G. CROZIER, '96 M, . . . . . President R. C. ADAMS, '97, . . . . Vice-President R. L. NYE, S, . . , Recording Secretary W. H. GLEYSTEEN, '97, , Corresponding Secretary C. T. TRYON, '99, . . , . Treasurer N. A. GILCHRIST, '96, . General Secretary . - X'-L Z?" N- X - fn ,H I F' veg, , lg ' ' ' ,L 'Inn , -. I -ff" ' :QI I f. III Il1I"' ""'- f'2f2HI 'III 'f - 4 . .I ' asm- I WI G, .4 - I - f ' T5 5' II' F' 'f 'Sf L' fa A I I " -2 Q 2 1 M I H, -IIIIII IQI II 9- If I ":",.r ' , ,.f,f,j...,,.FfEa-f.,:r:?'E'r 55. 6-uf - M,MILLAN HALL Republican Klub 4 4 4 Gfficers A. L. DAVIS, '98 L, .... . PII M. B. PITTMAN, '98 L, ViCC-PII G. R. HARPER, '98 L, . SG I. L. HILL, '97, ..... . Tn I . Executive Zommittee ' f P. J. BLossER, '98 L W. A. HOLZHEIMER j. Q. ADAMS, '98 L H. I. WEINSTE 44444 QIll0Cl'dIiC lllb A 0ffiCCI'S ARCHIBALD STEVENSON, '99 L, . . . . PI E. F. WEHRLE, 797 L, . . . Ist Vice-PI F. W. HENNINGER, 797 E, , , znd Vice-Pr H.'G. PAUL, '97, A , , Corresponding Se W. C. DOUGLASS, '97 L, Recording Se F. A. EMRICI-I, '99, . . . Tr 44444 Silver lub +++ 0ffiC6l'S I F. A. SWEET, '99 L, ,,,, , Pr J. A. HELLENTHAL, '98 L, . Vice-Pr E. C. RYAN, '97 L, , , , Tr D. J. TURNER, '98 L, , Se " , A ' ' "- -lj?1l+1irmD1'h1'E'1f-11f:'vf'."f'. "'."f'7'T'.' v- 1' -' - ' """"""""""""' A"------l-'----'H --. -.-:lr - -'- - .-, - ,, - -. -A--A L-. .-. . -.--.---...........I,.x MM., I A , .N L FEI s '98 - u 3. 5PIe i ent 4-Pre I ent --Pre klent Q Sec my gSec 1 ry Tre purer f eipfzg A I Wi? Wwiaff. .A SSRI' . A N., ,, 4,- dent ' :lent -A mrer A Gfddlldle lllb 4 4 4 0ffiC0l'S' MARY WILLIAMS, A.B., , , , , . . President DUANE R. STUART, A-B., .... Secretary and Treasurer Executive Zommittee ALMIRA LOVELL, A.B. CHARLES H. GRAY, B.L. 1 WILLIAM E. DAVIS, B.S. 4 4 4 4 4 ' v Pl7il0SODbiCdI Society 4 4 4 40fficcrs E. R. SUNDERLAND, ,Q7, ...... President GERTRUDE BUCK, M. S., V . . Vice-President A. O. OLSON, '98, ..... Secretary and Treasurer bilological Societv 4 4 4 I ' officers GEORGE HEMPL, Ph.D., . . . . PreSidCHf JOHN R. EEFINGER, Ph.M., . . ,H Secret21fY EIIQIIICQNIIQ 500201 WM. H. RIPPEY, ,Q7, . . L. P. COULTER, '98, . . C. W. WHITNEY, '98, . . M. A. GILBERT, '97, A. F. EVERETT, '98, M O. . LELAND '99, R. M. FOX, '98, E. M. ELLSWORTH, '97, , MURRAY BLANCHARD, '98, , 444 01'fit2rS . A First Semester 8 52601161 SQIIIQSWI' YCZII' 44444 , t President Vice-President . Secretary , President Vice-President , Secretary , Treasurer . Registrar , Librarian lfdlimllldllllidll Societv 4 4 4 0tficers W. A. DEWEY, M. D., , , . , ., President C. M. STEELE, '97, MARION WELLS ' 8 , 9 I - J. H. BALL, '98, , R. CLIFFORD, '99, G. S. HADLEY,, ,97, A. J. WOLFERT, ,97, BESSIE HUTCHINSON H. C. FIEBIG, '97, +++4+i mm: sway 0ffICQI'S . Vice-President Recording Secretary . Corresponding Secretary , - , Treasurer , President Vice-President . Secretary , Treasurer I I i ...ff ' vs.-, ' 1 I e 2 f 1 , ii . H I K , 'il A. II N , . ! .J r. 'J I , 1 I I . , F 'Tv' -"' A ' - f,, L '. 1 L Nw' Q r Senior Glass 0fticers - + + fr Literary and Engineering Departments + + + ' 7 . SHIRLEY WHEELER SMITH, . . , , President GRACE BUNTING WALLACE, . I' . Vice-President JOHN FREDERICK THOMAS, ,. Secretary ISHN BLAINE ..-ICEATING, . Treasurer OCEANA FERREY, . , Historian INEZ CHRISTABEL PERRIN, . Prophetess BAYARD HOYT AMES, . . Orator ARTHUR MAURICE SMITH, . . 4. Poet CHARLES FRISBIE CHUBB, . , Track Manager STANLEY MATTHEWS, . . Base-ball Manager I 022022 .mf- f.,'3AF"':' 'I 'W is i. 5 , 7, p. 4 , Al' : , W . if JE - 1 ,fair-'-Rlxl .truly X iii! ,Q W W m mi 'ff m m m m f' N W WI M -' i m m N mg i N N M Mn f A M N N M ,ll w HH M m ,f w m m w ug ,Q nm W m m im m am mr L 4 .15 m M LW W Sm m, W A I ,A can its j 'L it ,,., . 4 'f x"v5', f if fi ' .li ' 65 : : : : 5: E555 JIJEEEZ q.' :::: ff an an Q nl MAIN BUILDING a "' ' .. . .fy ' i....- L-Y-rr-..v-usiw "- ' -4 V -...... -..-.... ,-.,...... .-- .....-- Senior Glass 0fficersg 4' 4 43' Law Department 4 4 4 WILLIAM LINCOLN HART, . . . . ,. President ROY HUGHES WILLIAMS, g , Vice-President JAMES H. BLACKBURN, . , A Recording Secretary HARRY YERSHELLE FREEDMAN, , Corresponding Secretary HERBER1' ALLEN DANCER, . .Q . Treasurer ROY ROSCOE COOMBS, . Manager Field Sports DWIGHT ELMER MINNIS, . Sergeant-at-Arms HENRY NEPHI HAYES, , Historian JAMES SUMNER HANDY, , Orator ALBERT KOCOUREK, .... . Poet EMMET CHAUNCEY RYAN, , , , i Valedietorign . i, x rl- , 5552 jk max. - y ,ZR-x ,A-E-A'zzvezfknilii I Him QQ . ,, rielhfg- E-ink ,.gg-fi-Q95 Zz'-iff'-I1 i Efifiif? E 'M' 1' ni L pain' ' 4. 'f'o-f- - :Q "H 'fi jrL'fIf.' ,L . 1 1 I !f52i1f?" ?,iW . L41 A if fl' le gr, ' - -L'-E M- .Ll H Yi--lr?,-22,3 EWVRWF' LAW BUILDING is 4 .ff H f ' I, 5515 Lee-Pr ng Sec ng Sec Tre Field eant-at Valedie Pres em ,ent ge, nrer rts Q, ms His pian . 6 tor , f e oet . i ian I , 'iz--g ,M '-S v P Q 9 9 - .Q, :Q Qi 115 :J U s e e P ' r i 5 i 4 N ,Q ire i 1 1 . lf e f 26 at W if ' f 3 1 . I i .F JO I 4 , ' f 31 as 4 le' me iff X, . 31 , v be 1 f 5 Q - I if fl 3 N I A . Eri ,ex lv ' '. Y vc ' . N SQQZ We ' A4 56' 1. 6 '52 it i4 he 3? av-1 L 4 3' 'I gf ii ..- 1 5 x x 7 1 2 n 1 r .ra 1. . al. 1 39 5 1 W2 r' L14 2' Q::'1'!'L ff- ,.,a W. 252.3 1.,-SF. I -2 tl, ' ..r :Inv 'f lr .lrgji 3 . F' U ,. 'I , i 3 :-I .1 ' A f5 ,. Q7 YW '15 C i 'sr J .N ,A W. T , . F . 5. s- , 1 P I ' e if Qi 'El in Q W , 3: ,,.,1 QQ' B 5,- 5. 4 e 553-593. ' r' 93, 5 .F Li z 2 ,ix kk . ' 32:65, . 'lf 'Q . .12 1 'J ' ' eigfs 1 L -I :Qi 1 ' ,T I - W, 4, Vin, H- ,. W L E z , , , ,uid '. ' 14 ' g . nd di ' fi i -. , rx., f . ,, S X it 1 x t. x Sis' 5'1" 4. Pa "LL wx L, k ..- M. Ps' ef E4 qw rv X, Q Lfwf .X Rv Y, 2 if A' . ,5 . 2 Lu 5-if E? . nw y,. vfff 'Lvl A 1 --T 'JZ ., I 54 . -.5 1 Q-sr" 541. as-H Q 'fi H! .. . X. 5, fr,-, I iz .- uf url i:f1.A, :ft A f if - .5312 .- W.- ', 1251 is : .ki- ,Jn s., r '? I , f ,., , ,. ii 'I L2 , g? I fw ix: 7., 3 L 5,43 fa fn V ?? aI V Q: 5-'f'T 322' .lb ,. i p 5 51191 .X 'x R in Senior Zlass 0fficers A I A 4- 4 4 Dental Department ' A A 9 -Q- I GEORGE DANIEL EDGAR, . . .4 . President CARLOS Wf5.LTE'R PQUTT, , - Vice-President WILLIAM 'RACINE PURMORT, , Secretary A JOHN MILTON ROSENTHAL, Treasurer WA' QW W SL ,L A-L ' '2..L-4-f- Jlx I 5 ,- .fx ' "" ff 'yzjl llff I. I M I . f . ' A ff Z 'fit ld, 'A f,-ff la f , if L7 3 AWLUQ I ' , ff I. J I '--:ff-f+- f ,-,,... . . .l ,I f.!l,-.g , f f - 1 1 - 1 j f . fifee r f' I fl' we :T A fm ! , ff Mfg M- figzgggggyea tw:-rf ku-fag 19447 A I AV, gf'f',:-112' '-::'Pi:1'f T-1'-E-H -- M,,,,.f ,iw 1.7" gf-79. 5:41 .fg,j'-I 'ff' -cgi"-,5 Q gliggzffxS1413-21145-Iby.!l5,5f QW-ggi?-Q37-J!?1L5L,f, 429 - V J? ,L 222151:-.4 - M A, ' -1'A'WeTr 552211 Aiwliife -. S41f'nAW,v.:7'fl?5 'ev K2-few' I-will -1x!!.:..:g, -'-e -I: GST?-1f"' ' -.g.'.:,',p,:, 5:7-an -r.,-QW4 yxvsunfij rf 74" -'IL'-'f-!'.' . .J .. I fffffffgeezieieiffg ffm Af, fa' W' 551:-- T 4, h ' W 'W' ' ?n ' ' ff 'f "' A I .Z C-if , DENTAL BUILDING fl- ' r . K ts. 1 P+ M ' , .- 'v eg ...-..W-,..---Q, A---H - --Ae--H - " ""G""' ' ' " ' ' , ..,. . I If., e...-,,.,,g4 3533, . ,. . .. , -:Q -..J-vvn'!"l!"F"l-f "J"F':' " ---.1-qv-g.-xi-A-ss-asf 'vr ""'Y nv ' A . -w ap'-w"""W---Y--3'P"4 :'4""" """""""- ' A Senior Glass ffit r 4 4 4' Medical Department I GEORGE B. WALLACE, ' .... . Preside: HORTENSE V. BRUCE, Vice-Preside: RAYMOND D. SLEIGHT, . Treasur- CARRIE J. YOUNG, . Secretaa EDWARD S. FOGG, . . Orat- BENJAMIN W. KELLY, Historia ALBERT H. HAMMETT, . Po JOHN H. KINCAID, ,,,,,, , Proph Homoeopathic Medical College . CHARLES M. STEEL, ,,,,,,, Presidei ALBERT j. ELLIOTT, . Vice-Presiden LEONARD H. STEWART, , Secretan WILLIAM G. DECKER, .... Treasur- School of Pharmacy EVI BENJAMIN, . . . l . . . . Presided FREDERICK J. AUSTIN, Vice-Preside: EVA A. T. BACHELDER, . 7 Secreta: RAYMOND E. KANOUSE, Treasurl . . I ., . r. . ---,, .f, ' . ---.. . , ... . - . . A ,....!..4.'A A '-1.- H '- "f" f Tu -:A N N --A A ,y 1, 'lrr-"'f7'n.-0'-'cn-ff",- , r-.--1-f , - " " " '1L:"',.,r.4.,...4.1:.-. rv .- " -' -- E' - 4 - - .3,g.Lf2',.-pq, , . .,,-,.-...L.-..f:,.,.. . - ..-, ., .3 ..1-.',:.5.,.. ..,., .-.gr ',-A':.f'1- ..gI,:'. , Q ., ,,,,,,.,:..l1 5'.p7..,a,.. c,- ., ,, A. ,r ,.. 4,.v,,:-,7,.:.,4q..,,..f.,.,,.!........:,..,.--- .-.---f:,:.-Ai.-.-5 +.....b. WI. .,....,.......-..- . .. , ,, . ' ...--.--. ..--.-.,....L.-Q.,.-..l.....,-a+4:lL1-3--- +1xg.4-....,,-.....--,. .,, , ., . ,.L,,,.,,.,,.,-..'.,..,,,,,.,-...,,,,,,M,,, , , A , A Juni r Zlass 0fflcers + O 4 Literary and Engineering Departments HOWARD P. TREADWAY, . . . General Chairman CLARENCE E. GROESBECK, . Foot-ball Manager EDWARD B. COOLIDGE, Base-ball Manager JOSEPH M. THOMAS, . Track Manager HOWARD P. TREADWAY, WINIFRED BEMAN, Law Department . . . . Social Committee RUFUS L. WEAVER,A ....... President WILLIAM A. SEEGMILLER, . . ISt Vice-President GRACE H. CARLETON, and Vice-President CORNELIUS F. 'KELLEY, . Recording Secretary GEORGE D. RZDBBINS, Corresponding Secretary HARVEY F. AKE, . . . . Treasurer PATRICK H. O'DONNELL, , , Athletic Manager JEREMIAH T. SHEA, . . . J . . . Sergeant-at-Arms Medical Department CHARLES H. WILLIAMS, ,... . President CARRIE S. COLEMAN, Vice-President FANNIE DUNN, . . . . Secretary CLARENDON J. CoMBs, ...- . Treasurer Dental Department RALPH ROPER, ..... . President BESSIE HUTcHINsoN, . Vice-President STEPHEN D. MERCHANT, . Secretary HARRY M. VIEL, ..... Treasurer School of Pharmacy EDGAR SCHILLER, ..... ' . President AIMEE COULTER, Vice-President MARK B. HAWES, . Secretary LEONARD SHORT, Histerian ii 1 -avi-pw Q. i 3 Q. 3 3 I B. g. fr E -t E it 3. Q. li- Z E+- ., '- .xi ti' Qi I" .2 153 'I 'E "5 ITF, ' I ri 4 51 cg, .. ,F it- 5 if 5 i . E' 'E J .F .V 't H fi: I, -4 it .ik ,C Q. .P 'l, ii, if yn. l if. ,-2 it L ga I , 4 I fa 2 S. 'E ii it f ii 5-. 'fi E, :gg Sophomore Glass 0fficors +'94 Literary and Engineering Departments MATTHEW Mg JOYCE, . . . . . . . President - ' ,FLORENCE SUNDERLAND, Vice-President ALICE MANWARREN, . . Secretary JOSEPH A. BURSLEY, . . . Treasurer ALBERT H. KEITH, . . Base-ball Manager CHARLES T. TRYON, , , l Track Manager FREDERICK T. BROWNE, , , , Foot-ball Manager MONTGOMERY WEBSTER, .,., Orater LEONARD D. VERDIER, . . . Chairman Social Committee Medical Department D ' LESTER H. BEALS, .....i . President EMMA PEARSON, ' Vice-President CHARLES, M. WOOD, . . Secretary HIRAM D. PETERSON, , Treasurer ISADORE L. HILL, .... I A . . Athletic Manager Homoeopathie Medical College - DEAN W- MYERS, . . . ' .... President ROBERT L. JOHNSON, , Viee-President FLOYD E. WESTFALL, , . Secretary TISDALE S. WALKER, . Treasurer freshman glass fncers + + Q Literary and Engineering Departments ALLAN P. Cox, ........ President FLORENCE SPI-JNCE, . Vice-President DE. BURTON MEAD, . Secretary TIMOTHY NOLAN, Treasurer CHARLES FRANK, Crator RALPH C. APTED, . . Toastmaster CHARLOTTE WALKER, , Poetess GENEVIEVE DERBY, . . , Prophetess GEORGE D. WHEELER, . Base-ball Manager BURT HODGMAN, , I. , ' Track Manager HARRISONDSMALLEY, .... Chairman Social Committee Law Department ALBERT D. STEVENS, ...... . President JOHN E. EGAN, . ISt Vice-President ELLIS G. SOULE, and Vice-President CHARLES M. BUSH, , , A 3rd Vice-President HERBERT R. MACMILLAN, , , Recording Secretary DAVID M. WALKER, . Corresponding Secretary JAMES B. DREW, . . . . Treasurer STANLEY W. SINCLAIR, . Sergeant-at-Arms JAMES A. BARDIN, ...... Athletic Manager Homoeopathic Medical College SCOTT F. HODGE, ....- . . . President HARRY- D. OBERT, , Vice-President ARTEMAS W. BRIGGS, . Treasurer PAULINE R. WILSON, . . . . . Secretary C Dental Department LGRAN S. FLEMING, ..... . President FLORA M. SPORE, Vice-President .CARRONL F. CHASE, , . Secretary RENE M. HITCHCOCK, . . TreaS11rCf 'GEORGE E. MORDEN, . . Sergeant-at-Arms llniversitv ol icbigan Hlumni Hsso- ciations FOR YEAR 1896-7 0 4 4 Department of Literature, Science and the Arts WILLIAM J. COCKER, '69, Adrian, .... ' President CLAUDIUS B. GRANT, '59, Lansing, Vice-President LOUIS P. JOCELYN, '87, Ann Arbor, . . . Secretary JAMES M. CROSBY, 791, Grand Rapids, . . ' . . Treasurer Department of Medicine and Surgery EDMUND A. CHRISTIAN, '82, Pontiac, .... President G. CARL HUBER, '87, Ann Arbor, . Vice-President VICTOR C. VAUGHAN, '78, Ann Arbor, , . Secretary CYRENUS G. DARLING, '81, Ann Arbor, . Treasurer Department of Law THOMAS M. COOLEY, Ann Arbor, , , I President JEROME C. KNOWLTON, '78, Ann Arbor, Treasurer ELIAS F. JOHNSON, '90, Ann Arbor, , , Secretary School of Pharmacy CHARLES C. SHERRARD, '90, Detroit, .... President FREDERICK H. NICKERSON, '93, Greenwich, O., , Vice-President LOUIS J. SPENKER, '89, Toledo, O., , , Recording Secretary WALLACE PALMER, '90, Ann Arbor, Cor. Secretary and Treasurer Homoeopathic Medical College JOHN M. LEE, '78, Rochester, N. Y., ..., President ERNEST A. CLARK, '90, Ann Arbor, . . . Vice-President NELSON H. CHAMBERLAIN, '92, Los Angeles, Cal., , Secretary FRED I. PECK, '91, Ansonia, Conn., ,... Treasurer College of Dental Surgery LOUIS P. HALL, '89, Ann Arbor, , . . . . President DELLA C. GSTRANDER ADAMS, ,Q4, Toledo, O., , Vice-President ALLISON W. HAIDLE, '92, Ann Arbor, . Secretary and Treasurer '1:',V F' ' 'Hb-1 '.' 'L . ,Sect 6 "fp 1 4f'.:Yu .liz QT -V Aw -' TLV -,Jw :nt 13 U. i. .-.,- -V --ry-1 Book Six I a it rarv ' 0900 A . . Ami so 1 penned ' 4 , ,' rf ' It downg until at last it came: to bc, For length and breadth, the bigncssA that you sec N I ,004 N I I Q! In 1 l 4 F Y , , , Q 'M-. ' A . f V . . , . v , I - i. - , . t 1 Vx .ta U ' V' - ': T4 M K1 4 E 2 r 5 I i i 3 5 s i i I I .1 5 1 E l P I 5 5 Q r .Sl'IIlZll,I'.S'k Bkzckus, 'QQ. 1 f . I I X I Y. Q I, i I 1 E1 V V G s r .,.....--.- 1 .f, .aw V ,Jr 'H AQ .., L. . ' E5 ' . Q-,J . E -' ..j, ,i 'e 1 ,f - 8 427' the Importance of Graduate Studies . 1 PROFESSOR ROBERT MARK WENLEY ' HILE gladly accepting the invitation of tt A the editors to treat this subject, I could ' " have wished that the trust had been 5 ,Q f,,... committed to one rendered more famil- X' fi iar with it by long residence in America. A ,Flip Perhaps this obvious defect may be ?3J -lglwal compensated for to some extent by many years' experience of such work elsewhere, and by the fact that absence of preconceptions makes it easier to ry?-,LiQ?1,L,-p.f speak out. In what follows I shall try to keep specially before me the peculiar conditions and immediate prospects of your Alma Maier, whom Ixam proud to serve. The great mass of students, and nearly all their friends, are prone to pass graduate work by, not because unwilling to appreciate it, but rather on account of simple inattention. Attendance at a university they commonly regard as in itself a species of distinction, and the recep- tion of a degree in course at the close of four years' resi- dence is often thought to stamp the recipient as a finished scholar-as one who has earned the right to speak with authority and not as the scribes. Now, while one must admire the self-sacrifice of parents and children alike which so frequently constitutes the very possibility of uni- versity education, and while one entertains no wish to dis- parage the baccalaureates, it is right to remember, and to insist, that these are no more than beginnings. In the very nature of the case, exact scholarship in and profound acquaintance with even a single subject cannot be ex- L ,, ,A 5,1-as-lc, - - ' ' ' " ' A--'--'. ....-....-,..., Y V E E L E x f 5 2 I E 2 l s Q. x 1, F l i l 1 y E y . 4 A Q. I v. is K 1. 1. 5. I 9 W 4, . e i a l I 2 I 5 1 2 l v S E I x fi ji zu' I JE '11 I Z at 1 Yi Z J! 1- but 'SQ 'tg .mf pected of students at the close of the ordinary course, Granted that faithfulness has marked all the work, the highest result possible in the circumstances may be ex- pressed by the phrase 'fa good general education! Habits of intellectual honesty, of thoroughness, love of knowledge, and some vague conception of the vast intri- cacies of learning may have been formed. In other words, the scholar's spirit may have been awakened. More than this cannot be expected, because further than this the average student, entitled to place the magic letters after his name, has not had an opportunity of going. And so the young graduate, to say nothing of his admiring friends and acquaintances, often finds himself unconsciously inclined to attach far more significance to the title than the facts actually warrant. The means are taken for an end, the sorcery of "letters," su-ch is its subtlety, comes to masquerade as true insight. I Further, this pardonable tendency meets most con- genial soil precisely at a State University, and this for special reasons. An institution founded for the service of 'the country at large, and maintained for this purpose at continuous and appreciable sacrifice on the part of the whole body of citizens, finds itself confronted with two distinct duties, each of which is of the last importance, yet of such diverse kinds as to be conceivably in occasional conflict. . - Q15 In the first place, every State naturally, and most reasonably, seeks the raison a"ez're of its principal educa- tional organization in the provision of a first rate average of university training for all and sundry. The university must be organized primarily in the interest of the average man. In other words, its entrance requirements cannot be so stiffened as to cut it off from the best results possibly attainable by the prevalent school system, its degrees muSf not be dependent upon standards wherewith, after four years' further training, students thus prepared at the Ollf' set cannot reasonably be expected to comply. All thif, upon interpretation, means that the university stamp1S placed at the close of the undergraduate career, not 1119011 ripe scholars, but upon a'z'!zgem' lnapils who have eaj'0JW' many, ba! no! necessarzly all, conceivable advantages- 'fe Q . F' . l iq '-1---3' .. 4-ff--2"-w '- .. . ... .. - 'W'-2-'T-Wifi fir..- 1, IJ, . - A. N A , , M 4-s ,7..,.,...,...-.--,,.,,-X.. , . -,. . A -aw-c, A. ' . . 1 -.4 - 5 S 1 i 1 6 5 1 I -IQ . ,gt Bl r ary Q0 q 4 SE. Work: 'the' narjb Q ex. lu. H 'SSJ .lov of 6 VaSt i :tri Hillel' W More I an letter iring for an :s most and 'thi the serv is purp :' part' ted wit 3 import ds? the nd 5 on- for e of e at the two nee, HCI 3. I l'3.lIC 9 l C meI1'tS fesu S fe ill :ri LICCTQ '10 jlflwfel I1 le adv? 1 Ft 'I '-1.x hiSi 3 is POI' yy!! Now, the point to be remembered is that, as this is the result of the foremost service required of a State Univer- sity, its consequences tend to assume altogether undue im- portance in the eyes both of students and of the more im- mediate general public. I for one would be the last to decry this duty, or to minimise the undoubted importance of all that Hows in the train of its faithful performance. For the fact remains that these must stand in the forefront. But the consequent, and, as I have said, half-conscious inference--that no. other duties exist, and that the result- ant graduates have completed the circle of knowledge- can hardly be deprecated too strongly. A real university is something more than an advanced school, and its duty to the State can be fully performed only when it clearly realizes its duty to itself-to the interests of pure science, and the advancement of liberal learning for its own sake. Qzj In the second place, then, a university, be it a state or autonomous institution, has a plain duty to that higher learning of which it ought to be the special home. It is a commonplace that the greatness of a university does not depend upon. the numbers of students who throng its lecture rooms, upon the magnificence of its buildings, upon the ramifications of its organization, upon the splendour of its ceremonials, but upon the personal distinction of the men who serve in its professorial chairs, especially upon the eminence which their co-workers elsewhere accede to the heads of its greatdepartments. I am Well aware that ordinary undergraduate work can be done with passable efficiency by teachers who have not, and never will have, any such reputation. I know that there are professors who quail to show H '1 their students' s ' W' Ill -- -I I i f 71, V' 'T " if I - W 4 at -. ., M a openly all the ,.- q N Ax .y 92,2 Ns twig?-gg F714 ., . ff ."- '-Xt 1 'f "'?F.-fill I' . ' w f b O O k S a H d 4. .2 other avail- ia,f'.,Qi,j fs-:.ft.r,.,.-rlfiwg, ggg'-ssltlfgfifireaid Z1 f - -' ' 1 ---- ' li.'X'I" f . ' ,. ...'-5:'f- 'I " able resources Zag: I - ' '55 - ,L . I '252:."tf-2,4-Kiwi.-25,7-f"f".'. 'igfiijfi .A S P C C 1 21 1 t0 ..Frm'.....,.:4.ggfflllJf 'I ,:fg.-ff-l.fZ ' ' r "4-'-.-'f -'..1f..1.-'-'5':'11-T-' .. - - J'-'-W" -fl wa-'27a'.u 51' UC!!-!'.1Wf.'l. their Sublectf it and, I dare 'kg , P. M-fzfifta-'zifzyfffzgahi y 1 dfsugtglx -5 W'lW4i.j.,9!,-gif:rr,!yl,f7,-Wav!Q,-,01,,.-,..i say, such men HIM, 4.54.7 ,QNX QX , fgpt.-ff!Jf:Qi1'41-M141 are t . . Qi, yawn.-.W--?,ia.:?,??.,7,f:gli 'iz-6465, .173 , no mvafl- 5314.23 XT yt., ,f,'zf,f.,.-time itf,fzfV6.f'5.9..t4ff1t-,- rf., M ,trgz-at 'Y' YSL--Q XVIEZ, gpg-2. I .rt 'if I 'I 16.1, iff' Z-Li:-XIX ,,g,,,'4k.l,.l Sift! a -TE .iii Mhfilf-'5'ff,f' at ffffff. X.:.'f - 3 :fi A-4: cf' "if-vi f' l-" -ff! ffff wfzf .7341 Qwgw,,', 1, i.,j. 55, K ,QE ..-'lit-'l I ."yl,'Q4f,g, liisaf. W " I Q. .WWc!""!f!lf""ff!! 'isdjdllf 'li:tS?if1'. "ll'ff!5'f'-1-' 3rl' - 21,1-tff'351KiM"lIEIi!l ,WA a jff-1'4'1'? " , .. , ,- .5 ' "UT 'if1ff.f.f5f?.f.' .If nm, ,K W -'ff' .ff rdlnrf.-.1!flxI1E52" '+' -fr4l MEDICAL BUILDING. W' .4-ill HLIH QJ14lf-if'lf'IiCll'l'-'13 4 aj. , - , -F-u ably bad instructors. But they cannot be regarded as more than the merest day-laborers, wage-earn- ers, who do their darg and draw their pay. And so long as they acknowledge these their limitations-as one of my own teachers once did to me personally, thereby immensely increasing my respect for him-they must not be treated too harshly. But I submit that, except in very subordinate positions, they are wholly out of place in a true university, and this is proved by the fact that almost invariably when, by those accidents that will happen even in the best regulated families, they find themselves there, they begin to sophisticate-to induce others to take them for what they really are not. T his-unhappily perhaps- does not deceive their colleagues, but for a little, and most unhappily, it does gull their students to the subsequent harm of higher work. Such men can never inspire their pupils, because they themselves are not aware what the true spirit of a university is. The point to be noted here, accordingly, is that the university has a duty to itself in selecting for its services only approved experts, because they alone are able to lay most efficiently the foundation which the undergraduate course ought to provide. And this immediately raises the questions, Where are such men to be found? How are they to be supplied? The an- swer is obvious. The university must make them 5 and it can so do onlynby bearing its second duty-its duty to itself--continuously in mind. The higher scholarship, which is rooted in profound acquaintance with some spec- ial field of inquiry, must thus of necessity be a particular care. It is a curious fact, too, that the more distinguished a university is in this, the more itattracts students to its undergraduate department. For, no class is more shrewd than the student body in ffsizing up " instructors. Young men and women will flock to a university for the sake of a single man who is righteous in this particular, how much more if many of its staff be preeminent. In this way the second duty, little as , 1, m y A' , some recognize, stands f f 21 mflmately bound up gi W , W with the first, even al- 'fhsugh F1115 last be chiefest in the eyes of at ance of duty to the f ,, f": 'Q 11-7 '- I-7 - 1 -, af, '-,-q- -.-.p. 4 1, ra-,ML A f.'1 1 I. ,N ,,.:.4z'- I t.t 3 J' J . , Q-ph, - ' - - ffe:::s:s42 """' I ning , ., ' "T, -- - .ff r 4: I ENGINEERING BUILDING, n.. t ,,.' .,4 1' tgeteamg f' And 10l1s,aS. 9 thereby nllsl not ll H1 Very' lace in a lt almost Pell ever CS there, the them, lerhapg- and most llQSequent, pire their what the lted here, itself iii , because Jundation de. And' such men The an- zmg and it :s duty tO. holarship, ome spec? .ents to itS it .ire shrewfll , Yourig e Sake how mitll ris war little t ize, Slanllsii ID0l1lld . t, eVCl1. 1 7 laSl r e CYe5flli Peffofllli -th? ty to 1 l l l r i l I i 4 l l l I l l l l r uuu::.:-f-td o-Q 32 l lt ir gl i l l t State depends upon efficient men, but eiiicient men are Qnly to be obtained by constant remembrance of duty to the University as the centre, par excellence, of the highest instruction and research that the human mind can compass. Passing now from these general considerations, which, indeed, are perfectly obvious on a moment's refiection, it must be said, next, that special reasons exist for insisting upon the present and growing importance of graduate studies. Within the last iifteen years, all the great uni- versities of America have ceased to be mere colleges and have begun to realize the demands made by the higher learning in the matter of preparation. They have arrived at a common determination not to lag behind their European sisters in the most worthy rivalry for intellectual preeminence. For this several causes might be adduced. First, of course, comes the perception that such work must be done and well done. Closely connected with this are the demands arising from the marvellous extension of knowledge during the century now nearing its close. The sciences find application everywhere to-day in practical life, and the universities must train the men who are to continue the annihilation of space and time, and still further extend man's dominion over things material-the electricians, chemists, physicists, biologists, bacteriolo- gists, etc. These are they who put the chains of intelli- gence upon gross matter for the benelit of the race. The amazing development of society, too, imperatively calls for study, and furnishes forth all manner of fresh material, as yet but ill understood. New evils are everywhere arising, mainly because we do not know their causes. So recent are the huge aggregations of men in our great cities, the constant intercommunication in our large enter- prises, so unexpected is the strain put upon life by the complex intercourse which the telegraph and telephone, the railway, the marine engine, and the printing press have rendered possible, that we are only too apt to stand still in mute wonder, or unconsciously tend to be with the Iaudrztor L'67lZf07'Z.5 actzl Sociologists, political economists, experts in Hnance were never more needed. Whence is the need to be met if not from the leading universities? Furthermore, these material conquests, like these social changes, have brought in their train a new view of the meaning of this world and of man's nature. With its .Zagat-f 1-3 appearance many old doctrines, wherein multitudes once found support and so gave affectionate adherence, have gone incontinently by the board. Little understanding the reasons why, hordes have given themselves over to hopelessness or to dull acquiescence, often to an estimate of life which would be utterly ludicrous were it not so fearfully sad. Men--wise men disciplined by knowledge and strengthened in very fibre of their being by profound reflection-must,-perforce, and in the very near future, diagnose the sources of this unrest, read life in the light of recent discovery, showing what its larger meaning is, and so justify the rightness of that firmly based con- fidence now so far to seek. And, while occasional aid in this direction will doubtless come from those who have been fighting out the weary world in detail, the chief help must, as undoubtedly, be sought from minds carefully fitted in the only training schools--the universities-to comprehend the human sciences-morals, religious philo- sophy, psychology, institutional ethics, politics and history. Here, once more, mankind has a right to make serious demands upon the great educational centres, and, be it said, the changes that have so rapidly been over- taking our universities seem to be due in large part to an appreciation of these necessities. But the workers for the "spiritually indispensable," as Carlyle finely called it, who must assume at the bar of posterity responsibility for shaping the salvation of modern society will, as concerns our universities, assuredly come chiefly, if not exclusively, from the graduate department. For there alone will they have been equipped to understand the problems and to lay bare the lines of solution. I Once more, competition between universities is im- measurably severer than it was prior to 1880. And as railway communication has improved, distance no longer puts any seat of learning under serious embargo. Harvard x , draws upon all H , ss-N , the states 111 -- 1:2 ,,., .- ...if-mu' .f-2 ':- ' 1 -e---,-N. 5 ,6Zi-Nilffoaxg h U - f L , t eu 13.1011 or -ni f 1-- . :Qi 2 -sf-1.511 1 d t , " HW 4- E -.gi-Q HSI' gfa lla C , ,V , ' - -:-1. ears -,f - N ff sm V1 -fe' fr We ' N ew-.- Xe- T X l'1 S - . , SC ool. O, W' : A. - - - .... 2 '-.fum ,. ,QM . ,yr while Michl- ca:- .::- -e a gs, -., -9 1 MM, 5 ' 151 7 -A fr fsgv'f:.:S3 E fx, l ' " f fi f2?? 1 . ff-?a,24'?"4A1E' AF' f fl 2- ' ff' 5' I " A A l Z- W W TN irimix-111' , .. , 'J L ' --f i j -' 2- ' 1 - w area-me t A ff y :fa H tri Ze Zi- fi JW -N - --9? -2 fi af fa. ff' 4- W iff: . 4 -rf QA! -- . 1 1 M as . up vo .5-tg.: - nv--ful -...,., , ...n L ,A Aa t fly -' immn mm ' nrummmn lllIlIllI ' HH IVIIIIHIE lim nnruumnu Inu -Hn-.pu "s lf' fir 5, uf ' , ' E -1 F Hi E: u.flilll"V- -, -if ' YZ' .-T :Rg W 'U :t f-1. -: fx--: ": .n Q m.En un1 f.. 1. . VA ' 5- Q '-1.x ". ' vig.: ,3,2,,,,,,z.:.w:.- " 1 "rw-:film-L"-1--W ""'LE'tv'-' V- we 'v ......,..e-1--:-:,jj, L , ---f.-f .5 -...Nga-1-wg-'E 'Z-..f?" - -""'.I.." " - .---"'-f-""':.""YIT"Zl?1'.....-f+,,..-s:---a-sf"" . if?-"1'-f"5'i1"'-'1':""i"f':':T'f W LM ' - V I s f-,jf A . .Ml nr- . A A ,I-,. ' '- -:,-I A ' , I . 1-3,7 1, I, Qt' .. J -,ff OVQ1- onal 'Vll0 hav uef hel carefull 11 sities-t as philo UCS 3,11 to mak ares, and een over tart to a rs for th ed it, wh Lbility fo concern Qclusivel :will the us andtt ies IS " n no l0I1g Harvar NSl1P0na' states 1 Union f gradual le .Mich gan may be expected to,draft her students from the middle and far West, she is no more without serious competitor. Chicago has seated itself down upon her very skirts, so to speak, Wisconsin and Minnesota are becoming better and better able to retain their own immediate constitu- ents, Cornell bars the way on the Eastern border. If we are to hold our own as a university, and not sink to the level of a big college, we have no choice but to develop our graduate school, and in order to achieve this successfully the support of the stu- dents is indispensable. From this point of view, if for nothing else than for the sake of Alma Mater, graduate studies have assulned a new and unheard of importance. They cannot but be undertaken both by instructors and students if the university is to retain more than a shadowy or nominal supremacy. Substance needs to be added to size, or a decline will speedily set in. The metropolitan centre for the middle West Michigan cannot remain unless she is thoroughly prepared to hold her own with the best at once in the quality of her teaching, in the amount of her instruction on the very highest grade, and in the excellence' of the equipment wherewith she endows those who leave her halls. With a little support from the right quarters, there are some of us who are convinced that she can still lead. But, besides this spur of competition pushing univer- sities on, there is another contest, one becoming keener every day, that ought to have special interest and infiuence with all ambitious students. The competition between individuals grows apace. The equipment that might have more than amply sufficed for a professorship twenty-five years ago most would view as entirely insufhcient today. Original research, distinctive contributions to the special subject are fha gateways to preferment. The Doc- tor's degree has become nearly a sine qua non for all who aspire to an academic position 5 and not merely the degree, but the kind. of preparation attested by it. There are doc- tors and doctors, so much so that the source of the title, rather than the paltry fact itself, now commands respect. All the large universities are rapidly preparing men for the higher teaching, and in a few years the choice of Regents and Trustees, like the puzzledom of heads of departments, will be vastly extended. Nor is the range of 5 R if Q if ' "'7tso competition limited to this country. Very wisely for their own sakes, the prominent institutions are not afraid to make drafts upon Canadian, English, Scotch, and German talent when the precise article they require cannot be obtained from native sources. And it is to be remem- bered that the foreigner as a rule leaves home only for the most lucrative and honorable posts. Competition not- withstanding, there will always be plenty of room at the top, All this, as the most ordinary common-sense tells, points to the growing importance of graduate studies. They must be pursued by each and all who desire to rise to eminence, must be pursued, too, at the most reputable institutions, that is to say, at those where honest work and difficult work form the preludes to every advancement. Extensive preparation, thorough knowledge and some achievement will, in the very near future, be the sole aven- ues to the places worth obtaining. Finally, graduate studies must be accorded first-rate importance for their own sake. They widen a man's out- - ....,::."'---"""',, look, and sensibly aid 3 ""ivbd'X sa'-5 5 n a mi. A Eg -' Q "' in the formation of .dllr-ly, ,,., ,.,,,,g" , ra 'ME r-...ill N 5 ,,-1 lr gpg, . fr, t rhorr broader purposes up e Tfrlfnll ' in. ,li that alone redeem a r- ' l gully life from " middhng- " we 11. PJ', '5TffC -"Z."' .'E1.-3 ness." The great ma- ' ' "' "' jority, itis to be feared, HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE. remain content with a hand' to mouth career, passing the Heet days without clear perception of a high aim that may well demand years, for its realization. No worthy work was ever thus accom- plished, nor ever will be. To build one's personality into lasting achievement, persistent effort, consciously applied to one end through long series of weeks and months and, may- hap, half-generations, often dashed with the grey of weary waiting and slow consequence, is eminently necessary. Looking to all the circumstances in which well trained men now find themselves, application of this sort seems to be becoming more and more imperative. As Professor Kelsey admirably said in a recent fnlamderg " The point of view which a student should assume in deciding upon the kind and amount of his preparation for his life-work should never lie in the immediate future. He. should ask himself, no! 'What course will enable me at the earliCSf I ue. . ,rc possible moment to make a living,' but 'What course will enable me, at the end of fifteen or twenty years, to reach the highest possible position in my chosen calling?"' Wiser counsel was never given. But this is a difficult task, because it requires a union of those apparently contradic- tory qualities, self-confidence and self-sacrifice. Yet, it is nowise impossible, for precisely these qualities in due complement go to make the warp and woof of every human success. And above any other means at the stu- dent's command graduate study is calculated to frame and to foster just such pervasive purposes. From perception of what a man may accomplish the student passes to reas- onable ambition in respect to his own possibilities. In virtue of such training-by contact with minds schooled to accuracy, self-denial, and insight-he is enabled, first, to reproduce something of the teacher's worth, then, per- chance, to surpass his own mentors. For the motto of every effective instructor must be this,-So to infiuence the pupil as to transfer to him his own ideal of the special subject under consideration. When this has been attained, the learner ceases to be a mere receptacle, and is furnished forth'to react in his individual and living way upon the purposes and conceptions which have thus become bone of his bone and flesh of his fiesh. But, to this end long and intimate contact is plainly indispensable and nowhere, except in the Graduate School, can it be found. To embrace the opportunity, self-denial and self-suppression must nearly always be the student's first contribution. Yet, hard as these are, and meaning- less as they often seem in the eyes of youths eager to attack the practical business of life, they are repaid twentyfold by their results. For, after all, the search for truth, especially in this yearning age, constitutes the most worthy career that a human being can embrace. As there are inferior truths which serve life in its ordinary round, as there are intermediate truths which help in some sort. to discipline the mind and to occupy it through successive moments, so there is the truth which suffuses life .with light and constitutes an end in itself, because when eagerly sought, all other things shall be added unto it.' Th1s sufficiency of knowledge, in itself a kind of faith, an object of nigh religious devotion, constitutes the be-all and the end-all of every higher study. R4ZSiQIIdii0ll ...-.1l- PRIZE POEM BY C. FRED. GAUSS HE low and melancholy harvest moon Doth show his silver shield across the sky, His ghostly pallor frights the upstarted loon, From leafless brake the owl doth hoot and cry. The summer wanes, it is full autumn now, H' No more we while long twilight hours away, No bright-eyed blossom blows, no full-leaved bough Hides twitt'ring bird, late wanton of his lay. ' Lo, summer's latest, brightest-colored leaf, Slow-shivering from the barren branches down, Doth leave, as when the heavy-headed sheaf From golden fields is drawn, a waste of brown. Yet love I, in long autumn afternoons, H To sit and dream the livelong happy day, All heedless of the mournful farewell tunes Of fleeting birds that fly, far, far, away. 11 "1 Ilfyj A I , nugh i'-', own, TOWIJ.. H fail' IWIDOIDQSK FOUNDED ON FICTION --jg? UMPH. I've known lots of fellows that got struck on a picture of a girl they'd never P1 it seen and afterwards hunted up the girl and X married her and everything went as pretty as L g' l ' pie, but I know a yarn that discounts all that ' sort of .thing completelyf What's more I know it's true. It happened last year to a fellow that roomed just across the hall from me in a house down on Packard. Lots of times I've thought I'd send the facts to some psychology man, or to some theosophy society, it's queer as the queerest. just you listen and see if you can make anything out of it." The crowd settled as usual under a preface from Fred, and he went on. "The fellow was Billy Burdine, a kind of gentle, big-eyed chap, a junior when I was a Fresh. I didn't have much use for him around me unless I was blue or sick, but I liked him at a distance all the time, I guess it was because he made me think a little bit of my mother's people. I don't know how on earth he ever happened to take a liking to me, but he did, and I believe he would have told me this whole business sometime anyhow, even if I hadn't sort of forced his confidence. "Billy had a girl. Everybody in the house knew that much, and everybody guyed the life out of Billy about it. But, funny, Billy didn't seem to mind much. I had a sneaking idea that he rather liked it. I know that he used to like to talk about her to the fellows, and he used to lay it on so awful thick sometimes that we began to vgonder how such an out-of-sight girl came to train with illy. ff Not but that Billy was all right, you know, solid and decent and clever and all that, but he didn't have any style nor go. I guess we each of us privately held the notion that it was just as well for Billy's chances and peace of mind that she hadn't met us. "Once in awhile one of us would make a break and ask him to take us' to call. I-Ie'd smile in a kind of a shy way and put us off. We all agreed he was wise, but we did want the worst way to see that girl. We were sure that she was a la-la from all Billy said. Iove, I wish I could describe her as he did! Billy never used a ,bit of slang, every sentence was as smooth as silk, and you always kept wandering if his talk wouldn't scan. I-Ie said she was tall and slim, with smooth, brown hair that waved close down over her ears, and big, blue eyes. Her skin was white, oh awfully white, you know, and her lips like- like you read about. Billy used to say that her hands were long and cool and white like sprays of locust blos- soms. I used to think that the stuff he talked was usually awful goo, but I've made up my mind since that he wasn't a fool at all, only a poet. "I asked him one night if she was sweet. He turned round at me with the funniest look that ever you saw. It wasnlt sickish nor silly, it was, well, almost holy, and he just said the one word, 'Yes' in a kind of church way that made me feel peculiar. X "I-Ie was awfully devoted to her. Every night, rain or shine-moonshine-he went up to that blooming library about a quarter to ten, and got back about half-past, with his eyes as bright as dollars, and his cheeks as red as radishes, and even when he had settled down to work again he'd look kind of absent, .and go to studying on last week's lessons. "We used to tag sometimes, and try to spot him and the girl, but we never could. We thought Billy must be awful smart to fool us so, and it made us kind of respectful,'and by and by we stopped try- ing to catch them, it didn't seem juSt square. Z, Q, "Billy wasn't the kind to blow much dough on himself alone, but he used to mlld' ' me x1L, y r: -reakya n lof 33 11 6, bust y? WCIE3 A , Wishi d Hibit f and Qy I t Hes :hat Way HCT ,l.siS - ll lips her han mst tbl was usua - :C that He ou saw. 5 5 oly, i churchgjv .- u I .1 E Y 1 It I V G l f night,fia ming libra' .f-past, im . s as re'd.,Q wn tO lying - x pot hlmi , 1 Billy-1iQl115f 1 stoppeflsifflt -t seeillifl ff' ga. , ' ,.,. :1-4 U12 X in 3.1 -,L-.. , take her to everything. Funny thing was though that none of us ever saw him with her. We'd think we saw Billy sometimes, but it was always next to fellows, or to girls that were chromos, or girls that evidently belonged with Somebody else, and then, when we got home and asked him about it, it always turned out that the fellow we saw was not Billy at all, that he had sat in a totally different part of the hall. "One night, Thomas concert, when I sat down I found that I was about ten fromf Billy, just too far to speak, but I knew him this time for a sure thing I thought, and he was alone, not the ghost of a girl Within gun-shot. lknew he had expected to bring her too, for when I left the house he was just coming down the stairs all togged up and looking as happy as a dove. "He never looked around, that I saw, all through the concert, just sat there with a rapt and heavenly look on his face that was great. I don't remember much about the music except that there was a girl' in the gallery right opposite me that you could just feel all over that hall. I didn't have any spy-glass, so I couldn't tell much about her except that she had brown hair done low, and was dressed in White. "When the music was over I tried to catch that fel- low near me, but I missed him someway. Then I sneaked for home, and I got there long ahead of Billy, and had the boys all primed for him. "The minute he came fee. . . . ffaliigk. in we began. I asked him . , . Q . if she couldn t go, in a real , iff pitying tone and all the fel- kim ww' . . ' , f- .f,y- lows joined about how sorry " 4 " L they were for him. Then 4 . Z, he shut us up by saying that , f y , she could go and did go, ,,,,N,-A ' ,f and that the f both saw me X f X f --N 1 ,HW . ' I , I' UI toldjhim to let Lip, Zig that I had sat within ten I' fl, , toblovjjjgchf seats of him and that there X tx I X " X 1 Wasnft a ghost of a girl an Mk N y Q I U . within gun-shot of him. But g N lx M . f' l.,i is i t A ef I f' I if " ""i 7'xf 6 4 4 I X X 9' 4",,WX X 5 'fill t S X i X xx ,- - ,QT lk X ---1, xx bs tem 2 S he went me one better. He said that I was mistaken, that he had not sat near me at all, he told me where I did sit and that he sat just opposite. "You bet I yelled, and I asked him what she had on and he said white, that she always wore that. Well, I was crazy, I had seen her. But did Billy have a double? "Billy didn't always confine himself to talking about how stunning she looked. She had a soul for your life. jove, what a disposition! Even as a clock, and mild as a May morning, to be real original. He said that some- times when he went to see her he'd be as blue and dis- couraged as the deuce, and then shefd sit there and let him hold her hand, and she'd say things that sounded like a mixture of your mother and your sister-when she's decent-and your last best girl all in one. And times when she didn't say very much the goodness just seemed to ooze out of her fingers into Billy's soul. That isn't just the way he put it, but that's what he meant. She'd make him slick feed, too, he said, in her chafing-dish, and they'd have real nice domestic times together. "I knew Billy was-happy though he did act kind of queer at times for a fellow that was so dead struck on a girl that was so dead struck on him. I had the nerve to ask him once if they were engaged. He didn't get abit huffy, but he told me in a kind of mournful way that they were not. And I asked him why not. o "He didn't say anything right off, and then when he did talk it was the funniest lingo you ever heard 3 all about his having a strange influence over her, so that he knew -if he willed her to accept she would, and there wouldn't be any satisfaction in having a girl consent to marry you if she couldn't help herself. I couldn't make head or tail out of the mix, and he wasn't inclined to clear things up any. Naturally I inferred that he had some hypnotic influence over her, and while it did seem romantic it was as he said, rather awkward. The case was a poser,but,'by jove, I hit on a scheme. I told him to write to her. That way she would be out from his influence while she was making up her mind. He said that he did not kn0W tillieijjjf ,t re I t She j Weiii 0l1lJleP 7 l lking it r Y0ur " , 1' 5 I -Hd mill that s , I' 'ui and, s iere' and gt luundedgl -when 155 ' I e 3 And li , -s just seg ,d Thatii it rantp ,S d ing-disli, d actkiiij nf struck 'o . a the neriie .ro .n't get it Nay thatft ry en ard, all la' 6 IIl3.I'I' l 62. 0111 mallllc V321 1 ,wrie out , lmalilng , M5 .-,-gf, ., ,. that she would be altogether, but he would try not to send any mind-waves in her direction until he had had an answer to his letter. He did not seem at all satisfied, and acted awfully queer about it, but he wrote the letter just the same. And, say, it was a beaut! -love! 1 Cguld almost have married Billy myself for that letter! "He wrote it on Sunday, Monday morning he had an eight o'clock, his chum had one at nine, but I didn't have any till later. So when Billy's chum, Bert, started away about nine, he yelled at me to mail their stuff when the postman came, said it was on the table in their room stamped. Of course I said I would, and presently went in there to get it. There was some of Bert's ready and a letter of Billyls to his dad. In the middle of the blotter lay the letter, sealed and directed, but not stamped. Some stamps lay there, and I just smashed one on quick, for I heard the postman shout in the hall, and I skated down with it. "'You bet I noticed the address. Billy always called her just 'Amy,' and I was wild to know her name. The envelope said, 'Miss Cora A. Lane, Ann Arbor, Michi- gan,' no street nor number given. "That noon Billy whispered to me behind the hall- door in a kind of wrought up way to know where that letter was. I told him I had mailed it. He looked awfully startled, and kind of gripped hold of things generally. I was glad then that I had done it, for I could see that he would never have got up the nerve to do it himself. And by the way, Billy has been blessing me for it too, he says I was his mascot. "All that week Billy was queer, he didn't go to the library nor out walking nor anywhere. I was sorry for him and thought she took the deuce of a long time to answer him. I watched the mail a lot closer than Billy did, I noticed. "Finally it came, a little square envelope, with' tall, straight writing on it, and the paper was sweet like lilacs. It came in the afternoon, Friday, Billy wouldn't be there till six. I was anxious. The .thing was painfully thin. But then so are the envelopes they send you checks in- when they do-and lots' of other cheerful things, but so are the envelopes that invitations to faculty meeting come in. You can't go anything on thinness in general 3 and I wasn't enough of a philosopher then to make out whether a girl would probably write more or less to accept or to refuse. "Billy got there a little after six. I did have the decency to go get Bert and go down to supper and let Billy have it out either way all by himself. But right after I swallowed my supper I skated up stairs. Billy had heard me coming and was waiting at his door for me. His face was the most transcendentally beatiiied thing that I ever saw, he ought to have sprouted wings for the occasion. "I went into his room and he shut the door and locked it. He took me by the shoulders and set me down on the window-seat, then he began to walk up and down the room with that little letter in his hands. Billy had long hands, awfully thin and generally red, his sleeves were always too short because he was nervous and was ............ ,nazi .,,......-1 -4- ' .1-eff: -ef' -.., iifnr , , f" A I' 1 fiygfgf 'lj1iii1g,5AtZ,4 Weir? if f - 5L,fy,?gbf!" , 4 . A I - ff!! l,5n,O. Z -gf -:f3133'!-f I v p-- sgiirfsgsff PG, Riff' 1 wkipwfi WA- RN5Nh"f""Mt- Qqiigwmr EV -.ei 1. y I nfl X l I always pushing them up, and his coat was always short-waisted in the back because he was a good deal round-shouldered. Now his hands were red, and he had them crossed behind him over that short-waisted coat, and they shook and shook and shook with that letter. I got awfully out of pa- the way he acted and the way he looked. The idea of such a girl ac- tience with yfff'M'?'-5.4143 C tin h l 'Stiff ep Hg t at fy. ,,f,..44:,. ,, I got mad, too, pretty soon wimlgx . f ff b 2 ' ,. ,v M, . ,,, ecause he wouldnt say anything gi' ff 1 -Q2 ' ' :gf .fit fl and I sang out: flfrfibi-Gewfa.f.Y3S'mf.'fi 'lf' - giqfllii . is aw.innga-f:f'sfiga', - iL9ttf!.dlQiiijiytg-yi,.r?fs:s?i:?FalJ.zZy , ,,.fag11svff:t2ff4sv.j4,a I W 'i' "'5'SN'iQ' ff "1-fa' 979iif 'l 1,X,5hi?Q,'Z ligfmfgf ' pg ln! g.:3:g,gwg.53.',4g.gr,15j,- 'QE' iffy! , .-' - H 4" Q f 9"-M ' ' ,'1. Y. kqigfiwzeiwi 1' ' 51349 913- , 91 4' x . 1' Q NW 1344 QQ g26t12.55iS,X'i qllalliaff erin I I ki-12449 ' 55450, 12 My - ..fw14"2W,4'22f.a? 1 4'?:Qi' .Lg U gs g I- ,.f f M ,if iV I 1" f f 5 , ' 1, 5 ygfilalil' I lg ,, Z.,-,,. "jf-f A ri-iffy. ,444',,,' 7l',Ni'1i" ,Lf ,qgmy ylljfjf 1' 1,17 team I 'ff 7 I ff' f 'ff' I ' 0.1! 7 4. 14, l ' I 114 ,' 'fjfclllqgl ' :IWW f 'HW ' '71-'Ziff'-'f ,,'-,',f- 1. an Al, , 2252- .-as-,.s5.,f , if r-ff mf -Ekffffk f-'fl-in-Sa'gf ,Q ,l'filwg'.gl .-'Vf 59--' ' , f,, f ng f . nv, 4 f 1- 1 ' f ,.1'!' riff 4 'I f I 'fishy fr' V If Lulr f ' ff 19 M wut' if ' I' Q ff, - l,'L'1u4' , r v ' ., ' '.i'Ay:1'V1n1 I -:-v--14...-. K n , n- -4 . ff ,f ,f X ZQ fl 1 . - 4 ... L -I J, ll l -V. ' ',-'-.' 19' V' ,'-. 1 - .ian....-.-- .ml 0,-Af.. -4' ' 1 rf i'i'zliaf?.ar.,?"5" 'f 'Well, Billy, what is it any how? Did she accept?' "He turned around and stopped, 'No.' " 'She didn't?' CC cNO,7 " 'Then what the dickens ails you, what are you so tickled for?' "When I said' that last then he came and sat down by me and toldme the whole blooming business. And by love, 'what do you think? The girl he was struck on wasn't alive." F"""....... 3- I-AIX I v .J--'fi-0 'W 'V-' nf' 5 :ftw-lv 1 rt W1 ' I rhgiiheff' FQTF 4 I 11111 A ia if .rfigIirf,f5 l. lllytthgqte. QT yilielf , 1 Fling" for the: f 'Or any me Ld pdowiif sleeveslti 111f1.sYv2is:. Y 'JUN S always a' go'O'tif' vere .',,' i edt ver' jtlizitf look. Mi 1 a 1tfY:tS09!P anYfh?F?5?f X W E y..t1.1. r i l 3.3. ' , lgflfifzli' , "7Yi'i,j2,f io. .'.?:,4j,gi6 K . , . , viv. dpil. . ww ,- Q- 4' im The crowd seemed to regard this statement of Fred's as rather mournful than otherwise. He looked helpless a moment, then went on with some emphasis. "She hadn't ever been alive. There wasn't any Cora A. Lane at all." Here Fred leaned almost off his chair toward the crowd, and his voice was as from the tombs: "Billy just made her all up himself." Everybody was duly impressed at last. "Seems," Fred continued, relaxing, ffthat Billy was always a socia- ble kind of a fellow, just naturally fond of human society, and of society in the party sense, too, but society didn't have any use at all for him. He was too sweet and slow, and he didn't have any style. Billy wasn't pretty, either. "He had always been awfully in love with girls, just girls, you know, in general, ideals. But there wasn't a smooth girl in college that would look at him even once. "He said it wasn't so hard on him while he was a Fresh or a Soph to be lonesome and sat down on, because there were such an awful lot of fellows in the same boat. But when he got to be a junior, and all the fellows he knew and had any use for had their best girls and were so happy, it grew to be just unendurable, so he imagined he had one himself. just deliberately went to work and imagined her out of his own ideals of girls. And he thought about her and thought about her until she was as real to him as his Greek Prof, had a kind of separate ex- istence and character, though of course she was only Billy's poetic creation all the while-that is mostly, but that comes later. "She was really lots of company for him. You see he could imagine her doing and saying just the things he wanted to have done and said, so she couldn't help suiting him. They had some really beautiful times together.. "But one odd thing about it was that sometimes Billy would be conscious of a sort of oh-volition, I guess, on her part, and she would surprise him. That 1s.he would seem to be forced to imagine her doing and saying things that were really not in his own mind at all, and sometimes even, there would be an exception to what I said, and he would be somehow unable to imagine her as he had intended to. It was deucedly queer, and that part S of it Billy had never, he said, been able to explain at all before now. Now, he said, it was as plain as day, and he told me why it was so plain. I thought he was daft then, but I afterwards got to believe that there was something in it. He said,--" But just then one of the crowd, unable to control himself longer, broke out, " But if there wasn't any Cora A. Lane how did he get an answer to his letter?" This seemed to voice a common puzzle for every face turned eagerly on Fred with the same demand. "Well, you see, after all there was a Cora A. Lane. She had been in Billy's Livy class when he was Fresh, and that's probably where he got the name, but he didn't remember her at all even now. This letter was from that girl and Billy was crazy. You see the explanation that he had got into his head was that this was a special provi- dence in his behalf,-that through the " I time of his callow foolness he had been given the-the-oh the kind of astral' something of this girl to develop his . soul and raise him to her level, while - the corporeal existence of Cora A Lane llgu was not being pestered with -him in his- fool state. Heid just been going through was a course of sprouts, as it were, to get him ready, and now the hour had come, 5 E'-E Ei Fi' . E52 providence had acted, through me, to .sit-. fi-.- bring them together! Oh he was clean Q eet- .- ---. A. TZ off his base, I thought, and talking a lot of tommy-rot! ' "By and by he let me see the letter, it wasn't much to see. It said she was surprised, and couldn't under- stand, but would be pleased to receive an explanation in person the next Wednesday evening between five-thirty and six. A neat way to limit his call and make him feel just where he stood even if she did let him call. Billy thought it was no end gracious and delicate, and I thought it was rather fetching myself. I-Ie asked me to go up with him as far as the house and then go to the Libe and wait for him, she lived right near the campus. I said I would, of course, and I did. i . I v v , - 1 J 3 I L 1 P l 1 V I I 1 r l 1 E I S i i. Ax. . ,- gin ? H On the way up there, that next Wednesday night I asked him if he had any idea who the girl was, that is if he thought he had ever seen her. For a long time he did not answer, and then he asked me, very slowly, if I remem- bered the girl who sat opposite us at the Thomas Con- cert--oh yes he admitted to me now that all the stuff he had told us about the concerts was a fake so far as any actual occurrences were concerned-and I said I bet I did remember her. Then he said he knew that that must be his Amy, for a lot of fool reasons that weren't any reasons at all, I told him. QGuess I didn't tell you that it was his idea that that middle A. was for Amyj "He stuck to it that that was the girl, and I left him at the gate up there on South University Avenue in a kind of ecstatic state. "Then I went over to the Libe and waited for him. By seven I got tired and went home. And there was Billy in his room dressing all over again up to the very limit to go back up on South University Avenue again just as soon as it was a decent hour to call. Well, sir, what do you suppose he had- found out? It was the Thomas concert girl, her middle name was Amy, and most of all-now wouldn't it dazzle you-that girl had been having visions of Billy pretty nearly the same as he had of her. She was just back in college that second semester after having been gone two years-ever since the days of, the Livy class-and she was cutting a wide swath, for she was a stunner. But through it all she was keeping an eye out to discover the original of that vision that had been haunting her. And Billy was the man. So they were both prepared to make all kinds of fools of themselves over each other, and they succeeded. 'They got .married when school was out, Billy had tanks of cash, and they went abroad to finish their educa- tions. Everything goes as smooth as syrup, and you just better imagine that they're grateful to me for mailing that letter and hurrying up the fates. For they won't admit, you know, but that somehow or other they would have been mutually discovered by each other even without me, ln time. And there really does seem to be something sort of queerish about the whole transaction, so I, for one, haven't quite the nerve to lay it all to a coincidence. MAUDE CALDWELL PERRY. 5. ,Mar , rw:-1 .v N.. HAY.,-.2 , ,A ,. 'ef- ' fl t ,,-1 7 W i, V. 1 'V ' -1 Ji ! . . ,,-,, - I , , V 4. . ' - rug' lf- n- S. 1 k K , 'H g., 1. , . Y , K' i - . - I x' f f 9 ,' p' 'VJ ,. ,. .4 y, 'Seq 4- ,, V .2 if . Q ,, . . , .-, LJ. ., Jury., 6 1, 1 A j.... l MABLE EDITH HOLMES ONGS of insects all about- Leave us not a single doubt Young summer's here. Tiny eyes in green beds dare To open wide in happy stare And find it out. The song bird swells his little throat And sings with every tender note His gladness, clear. The heart knows, too, from every breeze That sighs and whispers in the leaves, What joy's about. Ah, wake! and feel what here the sun In broad munificence hath done: Then banish every somber fear ! , . Why further seek for proof, than here- Where songs destroy All sound of strife- That life is joy, And joy is life. :U ', 4 A 2 ' yi f 45 fi s S1111 , 1 ' ,,. Bi iffy' .72 H "iq, sf 5, hir! if ff'f1.'1' .I fi Til! I Wig.. Ly I li I , 1 , , ,yn i s K ' ' EALLADE UF YG 1 rmrlwcea mrcrxr .1-':. ,. ... M, ' -' ... , 1 F - 9 ,ian g 5? ' fP1'ize Humorozcs Poem.j plaisaunt autumn tyme ben come unto Ann Arbor towne, ' YeHur011'blinket in ye sonne, ye leaves ben falling downe From evereche campus tree about and evereche elm and oake, And in ye woods of Washtenaw ye noisie blue-jaie shroke. There ben in that there college towne one plaisaunt autumn day Amightie fyght, ye which ben hight ye merrie foot-ball play 3 And evereche. rattie student man and eke ye college swell, And eke ye prof and idle tute too numerous to tell Stode round about ye wire rope and watched ye warriors slugg, And evereche swell ben like to yell and smash his shiny plugg. And in ye grande-stand where ye iff! push do not so loudly swear Sate many a lade and damosel, ye which ben passing fair. y 8 Yclad they ben in giddie guise, in , r colours widout name, And mickle shriek and squeal they give to holpe along ye game. And whiles ye brutes did rash around and knock ye oders downe, Here ben a straunge thing happen in anoder part of towne. For downe ye maine street come a thing upon that autumn day, W Ye which when horses have yspied, there ben a ronaway. And e'en ye cable car ben seen to jump ye track from e fright, - And swounded evereche damosel to see this grewsome sight. And what this thing ben like to be ben nony man colde e tell, But all ben look askance at it and e only sed " Wottell ! " ,E-. It mought ben that a coal-stove ,L there ben coming down ye ave., ' But then ye legges ben longer than ' M ye legges ye coal-stoves 6, ly' Zz l have 5 Irma - ' , , It mought ben Don Quixote brave his ' X famous steed astrideg 24. fx' It mought ben that ye Devil caged I unto ye towne did ride 5 EI..-1 Y It mought ben that it advertised a 'S -' kinde of new tin-plate, Save that ye clothes ben worse to see than ye steed on which it sateg It mought ben many oder things, but nony man colde gesse, What fool colde ride in soche a way, or live in soche a dresse. t But nony one of these it beng it ben an errant Knyght Upon a hack-horse leane and slim, with mickle armor dight, 1 And very errant Knyght he r,4lill5!EEii'v i ben and must have like llll u y to roame Q l To ben yclad in soche U i f straunge guise and ride J Q mulflllf I so far from hoame. fell 'A m ill, i In mediaeval language he ,Qzr Ie - J H W! ben a noblesse Q' lm But now, God wot, up0I1 1 l- " X iff I lg A l Ehet nalgahe ben an aw- ' u sig t .' ll l lllllldu l x Q '-1: QQ 4' ,3"' Q Q y Q. ,S Q. K furn- ,.,.. .',3!LT:-c!14v',L':.:.gq,ggp-r ggj 1-f 2 ..l., l n l. T, . Q Q lv 4, l 1 li. ,N 1, sl L Q. Xu ll ll I , A . - Q if ' g t A , XN I sf Q 29-9 Q ' -I - " e A - Q 1? Q ' ' A ,N v . :H .N Ms , i Qll l. ' . 'FQ J N Ayk- XLVV ,N l f l sf, HY lvfiiiii H1115 ben,-4 I x His armour ben not overclene, its joints ben filled with rust His legges ben long and when he ridde ben trailing in ye dust. His spurs ben rattle on ye stones, his lance ben like to brake, It ben so twisted in ye frayes, it colde a grape-vine make, Ye straunger's helmet hiclde his face, but yet there colde be seen Ye whiskers crawling throgh ye cracks, and eke his roll- ing een. H So moche sensacioun to create, ye straunger had delyght, 5 A sixteenth century swell he ben, a ,,j rusty, dusty Knyght. .QT Ye straunger ridde up Packarde street my B, and mickle din gan hear, ' l ife And when ye straunger heard ye same, 'nnmunnwfg A V. 3 he pricketh up ye ear, ' ""J '1 Y' I 'A And whiles ye ear ben pricket up, ye N M - spurs ben prick also 10 H- X -u h Ye drowsie steed which thereupon ben 4 feel he like to go. 1573 Ye whiles ye straunger hied him to ye l ' Nu: .u, source of all ye din, My K L Ye noise ben get so loud that he ' X colde hear inside ye tin. X Y K "Now by my sworde, upon my Qs T is Q: worde," then quod ye straun- gef Knyght, U If this mought be a tournament, then I ben in ye fyght." And thereupon ye nag ben changed into a gallaunt steed, Ye straunger took a brace on him and ridde with mickle speed Q Ythrogh ye gate and on ye iield and round about ye track, And, sooth to say, ye damosels ben somewhat taken back. Ye student-men ben thinke this thinge to be a rnerrie joke, Ye straunger waved ye grape-vine lance till they ben like to croke. To see that straunger Knyght brast in ben stopped ye foot- ball play,- Ye coal-stove ben ye grandest thing upon ye field that day ! jr wi ' gmLimgmanA mM ........w....-,........ .. ..... 4.-f . , A A ,., . . x 4 - H. in ,dwg ,...-,,.. ...- ...A -.. 'l""""" ,',,,,...,N..., tt. X... ,. Ma.. .,...... ... .--...- ... ., . ., 'A B -f 4 J. A t 2' K. 1 'A V. I . 1 .J 4 4 ,. ,Av ' 4 f,4 if 3 n A fb. . . , r ! ,I ., ,Ax c f 4- V A ,. ,. , . f' li J H, . -. J , I . ' C 4 1 4 1 . And when ye straunger Knyght yspied all een ben turned on him, . y He spurred into a frantic pace ye coarser lank and slim. And Whiles he ridde, f'Gadzooks," he quod, "this joust ben merrie fun. 1 Come get ye ready, varlet Knyghts, ye tournament'si' begun." 'f He hied him strait unto ye spot where all ye warriors stode. He gessed when they ben see him come, they run way up ye roade. Full evil mishap cometh then unto ye straunger Knyght, And when he ben ydragged out, he ben a sorry sight. Ye tin look like a rattle that by baby's teeth ben chewed, Ye straunger thinke 'ye oder Knyghts ben mickle rough and rude. Ye Knyghts ytook ye grape-vine lance and stoke it in ye ground To say that on that spot, perchaunce, ye horse's bones 'ben found. r Ye straunger Knyght ywept full sore, and wished he mought ben ded, And shroke a deal of dreadful oathes, that better not ben sed. Ye oder Knyghts ben dubbed by him a packfof merrie fools,-- He did not ken, poor Wight, that he ben disobey ye rules. That e'en ben seen a tragedie within ye campus Wall, Ye leading actor of ye caste ben that same straunger tall. Ye Wicked student men ben take ye errant straunger bloke And string him up unto a tree yclept ye Tappan oake. And Whiles he hong, ye straunger long his een did sadly roll, Q Andfpsed, HI -gesse I ben suspended by ye MichiganiBoard Control." Q ARTHUR MAURICE SMITH I ia- A, i 1. f- v V Y . , Y , .- " , ' 'N--1 - N I i f ' 4 - j , I-A-V' ,' " " .'i . " ' 4 - L1 -F A - .. .. , ,w. , . J ,,., W- A., V ,,,,.,, -. . .. . I- ,,,,', W, W , V M fy 1,.v" . "ix ililnl i 01151554 ent's X . code, Y Hp'- yght,k l fwffd, ln yg' rs bent :d hej, it benif merrie rules. . " f..,, fi taiigf 7 blokC., Ke. l u Sadlyuz, 1,3 - ,Board MITH 0l'llliIOl'V D695 W. C. RANSOM, '48 i"'cj4 TER the contest for the location of the Uni- W' L. versity, in which Detroit and Ann Arbor were the most prominent, the first Board 'wg of Regents of the new institution gave it to Qi, Q the latter town, then a place of only a few hundred inhabitants, and accepted the forty acres now comprising the Campus, donated by the citizens, as the site for the buildings. The student who now enjoys the walks shaded with overspread- ing trees that lead to and from the stately structures that fill the grounds to nearly their capacity, can hardly realize the change that has taken place since that early day. The tract, at first a charming oak grove, had been cleared of its trees and was a field of stubble surrounded by a rail fence. The areas at the rear, front and sides, now built up with beautiful dwellings and costly churches and fraternity houses were utilized as corn and potato patches. But the Regents worked industriously and in September, 1841, the dormitory that now constitutes the north wing of the main building, and four of the professors' houses were ready for occupancy, having been completed at a cost of about 31oo,ooo to the University fund. There were "kickers" in those days the same as now, and not a few, whom it cost nothing, denounced the extravagance of mahogany hand rails and crown glass used in the construction of the professors' mansions as an outrage upon the taxpayers of the State. The residences, which perhaps were something above the ordinary at that time, would be considered very plain now, even as private habitations. The dormitory was well constructed and arranged en suite, each set of apartments consisting of a study, two up-fe -N 7" We is Cz .LZ N .,.' sleeping chambers and a wood room. The latter was also utilized as a lavatory and luggage room, and in a house- keeping way, like charity, frequently covered "a multi- tude of sins." To these suites were assigned three,'and sometimes four students, 'the upper classmen having the first choice, who usually preferred the fourth floor, as being, I presume, more in consonance with their exalted position in the college world. The furniture usually found in the rooms were a table or two, a lounge, a few chairs and a supply of lard oil lamps or sticks for candles Qkero- sene not being on the market in those daysj, and of course beds in the sleeping rooms where repose could be found after tarrying by the midnight oil. There were some that did that! Qccasionally a room afforded the luxury of a carpet, and now and then a clock was set against the wall, to remind one that "art is short and time is fleeting." The Faculty aimed to maintain a paternal care over the ways and methods of the students and to see that they did not get far aside from the 'feternal Htness of things" while under their, the Faculty's, tutelage. The rules to that end were manifold and far reaching and generally observed when not at variance with the boys' convenience or inclinations, which condition occasionally prevailed. In dormitory days students were expected to religiously " sport their oak " during study hours, and in no case with- out permission to absent themselves from their rooms later than ro olclock P. M. "Spiritus Frumentiv and ",Vinii Galici" were strictly tabooed and cards frowned upon. And still it would be too much to say that the popping of a cork in some sinner's room did not Sometimes indicate that the generous Falernian commended of Horace was making its round, and in candor it must be admitted that not infrequently the diabolical inventions of the "Adver- sary " ycleped euchre, whist, and that other popular diversion which modern euphonism calls "Pedro," but which was aforetime designated as f'Old Sledge," were resorted to to lighten up a little the monotony of college routine and 'drive dull care away! The professors rarely honored the students' rooms with their presence even for a call of ceremony. And that they should was of little need. Every student was known to them personally and 5 Q 'HS alsoii h0uSe-ill - multi-EQ lie, 'alldil 'mg thei mor: 3.Siil Uialitedlll lYf911ndiE V. Chairsl fs -il?e1'0? if 16 ifoundi Ome that: Ltlryrof the wall? .ngff eareover. that they 3 things? : rules to generally nvemencg prevailed, religiously case With? oomslatei nd 'illllnlg ned 11P0llQ P0PP1lfg"i 39 indicatf lorace-Wal mitted th ie " led1f0p, idgerv f of Ssors .ce even ras of fsOI13l1Y Hifi , - .t 4 X i '. g. img, . .- .':1l' 1 -'.':g5p. ' ' xjynii-N . "iiQl'1w. -1 ,MW . Who. ht., 1 , , r rt i, .. , 5"-Hx!!-3 rl x X, K A 1.'.i.yf-if ' ,-.yflfli 1 .1 "vsp L' .I ,grmxtg 1 l , 'frfjf l laid' 1 tl-.wrt ' ag: , ,.,,f, .W ,' they saw them all in their classrooms daily where advice or reproof, ifthought necessary, were of easy administra- tion. But for some years after the opening of the Uni- ' versity a tutor of Latin was employed who was required to room in the dor- mitory, as a sort of mentor and night watch so to speak. That the stu- dents had no great regard for the tutor in such capacity goes without saying, and that they exhausted their ingenuity in making the situation for him as uncomfortable as possible was not strange. Upon a time one of those worthies was detected as Paul Pry, with his ear, at the keyhole of a door, behind which a number of the boys were holding high carnival. He was seized legs and shoulders by half a dozen lusty fellows and swung off the head of the stairs with such im- petus that it was said he did not stop going until he reached home at Pontiac. The last tutor of dormitory days was f the universal family of Smith. The girls about town id he was ffjust too exquisite for anything," and the ollege boys avowed that the reason for the excruciating tie of his cravat, which was his especial pride, was "because he gave his whole attention to it." Be that as it may, he never tired of giving lectures upon 'fphysical holiness" and woe to the ill-starred Freshman who came into his presence en a'z's'lzabz'!Ze. Most of the students boarded around the town at private houses and hotels at prices ranging from one to one and a half dollars per week according to quality of pabulum provided. Occasionally some ambitious but impecunious student who wasworking his way through college, with a miner's outfit of frying. pan and coffee pot "grub-staked" himself, cooked his own rations on his study stove, and probably found them not less palatable than the more costly cookery assimilated by his fellows with more plethoric purse. In the rear of the dormitory was the woodshed, where space was assigned for the fuel lblluit-1 -l --and 5 T l K 1 I 1 -lg l belonging to each room, and it was the unpardonable sin for one fellow to "coon" wood from another fellow's pile. Wood cost, in those times of low prices, seventy-five cents to one dollar for oak and one dollar fifty for hickory per cord. The students sawed and split the cord wood into stove lengths themselves generally, as Saturday recreation, and shouldered it to their rooms on hods which Janitor Pat. Kelly, D. D. A. QDoctor of Dust and Ashesj, used to say would be ffloighter and more aisy loike if yez didn't have to carry it." At the corner of the woodyard on a high post stood the college bell. At one time it had been on top of the building and was rung by a rope that came down through the Hoors and ceilings. But the laggards at prayers and recitations insisted that the rope had made such a noise on the lath that they had not heard the bell, and for that reason they should not be marked for their short coming. So it was moved down and hung plantation style, to be rung by crank and long iron rod. Df a Saturday or Sunday morning the bell was sometimes found with its throat turned skyward, when it was the part of prudence to stand from under before ring- ing, as it was likely to prove a Pandora's box full of evil. In that olden time chapel exercises were held twice each day at which every student was required to be pres- ent. The bell summoned us to morning prayers at 6 o'clock in summer and an hour later in winter. The chapel was on the second floor in the south end of the building. There was the field where the seeds for the crop said to be most favored in Texas, were frequently planted. Cin one occasion the room was found filled with hay from floor to ceiling, while the Faculty cow which was generally pastured in the campus stood behind the desk quietly waiting for Dr. Wheedon's advent to begin the day's duties with the customary devotions. The ones responsible for that bucolical enterprise were never known, but some of the more worldly of the boys laid it at the doors of three embryo f'Theologs," who roomed hard by across the way. Morning prayers were followed imme- diately by an hour in the recitation room, and care was taken that the lessons most difficult of preparation should be taken up before breakfast This gave the boys a good t I ' J li I' .. S 3 ii Y . C. C I x Y, J. at 'Q .d me rn lg as it' lg- ,ce es- 6 fhe the the idy- led ich the the ,nes WH, the . by IDC' was Duld good E l 1 appetite for their matutinal meal, and kept them to their tasks the night before, as well. n .The most prominent and active of the students' organ- izations were the two literary societies, the Alpha Nu and the Phi Phi Alpha. They were of nearly equal member- ship and generally at variance over questions of college import. The elections of their officers were fruitful of bit- ter contests managed after the most approved methods of the political wire pullers of the iday. Both societies pub- lished monthly serials, the Alpha Nu the Sibyl, the Phi Phi Alpha, the Castaizkuz. ,They were made up of manuscripts upon almost every conceivable topic, more or less carefully edited and copied into a book to be read monthly for the ediiication of the hearers, and the glorifi- cation of the writers. At the meetings of the societies all business was conducted with closest reference to parlia- mentary usage, and questions of current interest discussed and decided as far as possible in that forum. The advan- tages derived by the members from such experience are manifest, and doubtless most of them appreciated the benefit of it through all their later lives. Three Greek letter secret fraternities, the first in the lield, established Chapters at the University within the same year. Beta Theta Pi, November 18455 Chi Psi in April, and Alpha Delta Phi, August 1846. These chap- ters soon became active factors in every possible phase of college politics not disdaining to clique with each other, or with the " Dogans " as the Neutrals were affectionately designated by the others, when necessary to the success of some favored scheme. Then, as now, each of these fra- ternities claimed superiority of membership, the fact being that each generally had its share of the best, and all were good, clever fellows. 'Professor Agnew, during his term as president of the Faculty began the noted war against the secret societies with what was known as the 'freeze out ' policy. It did not succeed as expected. The require- ments exacted from new students upon entering the Ulm- versity were evaded. The chapters continued to exist, though to some extent sub rosa, until at last after a number of the students, rather than remain by further subter- fuge, had left the University to complete their courses at .O Li ao ., R i. ,Lq.-..:.....,.-......3-U ., - - . A 4 gN,.,.,..4-W W.-.-. 1' ......,,-.. - A .J ..-. . rw. A ,, ,M ,.......,,-,--,,,+f- W 'f Union College, where they were welcomed by old Eliphalet Nott, its long time President, the Faculty fine morning found themselves Gthellos 'with occupa gone! Athletism at that early day "cut no figure' American colleges, and Ann Arbor was no excep1 Hazing in any form was of rare occurrence, although sc times the 'pf Fiery, Untamed Order of Bumptoniansv tre an exceptionally innocent Freshman to a quantum sa of HZO. at the pump, or introduced him to the ste realities of college life against the stuccoed wall. H Co at that time were a minus quantity, but occasionallj merry maids of town in the guise of troubadours moonlight lark, would essay a a serenade under the cc windows. But at the slight est echo of descending steps within, the group would take to flight and disal over the front stile like a herd of frightened deer. The great occasions of student life were the I Exhibition at the close of the second semester in! and Commencement at the end of the college year, in August. Each classman wa y signed a place on the progra """"'fff .. exercises, and their friends were ,Sf ally present in force from all pa the state to encourage them by presence and applause. The grams of exercises were freqi burlesqued to fit the peculiarit V 'Q-,. the speakers or to ridicule their th ' N, While possibly the great Miner' K ' not smile so radiantly upon the 1 of the young collegian as she upon the more profound oratc " the imported celebrities that ir p time harangue the melting muli g ip assembled in University Hall :gg "' g A hot Commencement day, it ir --P1 open to question whether the of ' " of pushing a brood of gradual of the nest did not inspire the average crowd with interest than the new. . It was the custom of the students to gather P 1Onf,7., , Cagfh hu ternef y 0 2 Yt s OH' 0 66, 1g appear, umdil L April was 'as y ram pf re uSl12 T parts oy their he prdi equently lr rities iQ, fthemess T .erva me she vatoryl tin late? all OIR? L -e old lllatemiii . 'lf-F -er all H- , -, 1, Nm, .H e ' , 4, .EH T FE! 1 :ith ' P' , ation- :" in tl 'C' f tg, 5 E , L -Ed L ll ht :Hg 1 , I 0 .L I 4 J l ' I l gloaming of summer evenings in front of the building and pass a season in story and song, a hundred or more bright, .joyous spirits, with enmities few, and friendships many and fast. But all of that is of the long ago and the prescribed limit of this theme does not permit further indulgence of the reminiscent mood. The times are changed. The old has become the new. Thousands of students now gather where scores only were present fifty years ago, and the market place of Damascus does not exhibit a more varied nationality than does the Campus of our great University on some festival day. For has not its fame ' taken to itself' the wings of the morning and flown to the uttermost parts of the Earth?" And are not the gifts made possible through the munificence of the State 'to be freely offered for the lifting up of all the ' P nauons. -0 -9 -9 'O 1+ Che River HARRI ET ELLEN HARLAN X .-....i. N the Huron, in the twilight, with the current slow, we . float, Where the waters plash and ripple, softly comes the last sweet note Of the black-cap's evening song, down the Glen, the banks along, Floating, listening, lingering, dreaming, with the sunset glory streaming O'er the tranquil, reedy river. Comrades old, the evening stillness lulls our hearts and l soothes each care, Gliding river, star-lit cloud-land, and the hay-sweet, still June air Make us wish to linger longer, while our faith in life grows stronger, Floating, listening, lingering, dreaming, with the weird soft moonlight streaming O'er the tranquil, reedy river. ' Q ' ll 1 g .7 , ' ' , I. ' WWfj5q4M: 45 . K' 1 yogi ! ,f T ? 2 ,, yi 1. f flf-'T'fl4 'f '3 ,- M . 4' 5 ' 0 WW s ,mt ' W1 f W E HM ,- t YW f ' 'X ' Ja g 39- 'fi' fl f ' ' vsf' M: ' A f guna, my lglflf m ,lr M I 'll I' Pali I' , I , , L v I . ' , I I ti NE. ' v x X K - X .5 E x It VM 4, fl 'T sf- , x ' f ...x .U x ft g tg A xii .km qi .,. 3-1 .if kr.. . f x -' V 1 M' K- V ' is 3.4. Z' .. XX El ' N 11X v. 1 I -r 1-1 or . 5 ' 1 hz T 1 , -x iixi l L V l . A wi x' 1. 'ti 3' L x 1 A l J 4 1 !' 2 sf. 1 xv -I V 6 Y. x. K. ' - 1 F4 u 2 42 A 'i C A H CD42 BIICCGIIQWS SOIIQ G. R. B HERE is no home--I remember the place, In a village famed for its ileece and lace, The sheep that grazed in the daisy's dell E, And the long summer days that me befell But the father he has been long astray And the mother died when he went that way- H , 5 Burn and pillage, pillage and burn, The home of my youth can never return. a ig 'ere There is no hope--I remember the prayer 'Q ii That, a prattling boy, I uttered there. " I wished for a jassmine flowered thatch, My own hearth-fire, the lifting latch. But hope only mocked, and fortune blind, Left me, in stubble, footsore, behind. Burn and pillage, pillage and burn, 2,3 For the hope of my youth will never return. There is no love--I remember the stream Where first she came to my youth's young dream, She helped me tend the flock of sheep, I heaped her over with flowers, asleep. , But a man from town he came that way, ' She named for him the wedding day. if Burn and pillage, pillage and burn, I For the love of my youth can never return. 3 fi! gif f ill sl 5 fit- i sf sl -. - ,wi ui HCC wa ms dfeaffFfQstg3? ' ':. '14, ,V e . ,rl ' ' 55, 7' I. f sm ', 1 1 Sl? 'f e .37 'I Lf iitigi-Lil I tj! unif y lksmgf I 'I Q 1 'f i as .. 1 I ' 5 JM? I -f f 5' N X - I . !v I Y- Eggy SKK N s ' X63 cf " 35013 BY FRED EMERSON BROOKS fCopyright by F. E. BJ Q OOD mo'nin' deah ole Mistus! I's ole Rastus done come back! An, so dreful glad to see yo' I I's weepin', fo' a fac'. An' when yo' heahs de story Dat I's a gwine ter tell, You' blessed heart I reckon Will jess begin ter swell Lake my ole heart's a-swellin' to see you' blessed face, A-smilin' me a welcome back to de deah ole place. Down dar's de ole log-cabin, wha' I was bo'n an' growedg An' dar's de ribbah iiowin' jess lake it allus Howedg Wiv bahfoot piccaninies gwine down to hab a swimg But dey don't know ole Rastus, dey nebbah heahd o' him. But in de Woods down yon'er by de ole persimmon tree, You bet some ole fat possum done get hes eye on me. I heah's de wattah-million jess a-laughin' at dis coon I Dey knows ole Rastus' failin': He gwine plunk 'em mighty SOOI1. One mule begin ter hollah, an' den de whole blame pack:- "Ole' Rastus ! Rastus ! Rastus ! 'Mancipation done come back ! " l but things donit look right thrifty aroun' de place jess now, Is dat because de mawster aint heah to show 'em how? An' is it true ole Mistus-dat you done lost you' hold Upon de ole plantation, till now it's gwine be sold? Not ef you heahs ole Rastusg now Mistus don' you smile Until I's done a-talkin'-I finish aftah while: I knows de "Mancipation" done set evah-body free, But I wah bo'n you' niggah, an' I's allus gwine ter be! I guess you recomembah when de sojers come along, A shoutin' to de niggahs an a-singin freedom's song! y O, dey was pow'ful noisy, an' diss jess what dey says- "Come along ole 'Mancipation, we gwine help you run away I " I was sahvent to de colonel all thoo' de awful strife, The colonel lake ole Rastus caze ole Rastus save hes life! An' way up in Mahsachusetts, I'd nufiin' else ter do, But sarve de deah ole colonel, lake I'd been sarvin' you. Dey done tol' me dat was freedom an' dat ilk ill Slabery was dead! ., , 4 in "ii n But de diff'rance, poo' ole Rastus couldn't . il . I ,ffl ! '4 ' 1- ill: tit-I I quite git thoo' hes head. li! I 'li w 5 i!:,!' I X141-i L,5g,ME:tg5ii7 Till one day de colonel dyin', leave hes A ia1yi:tf'1.4 money all. to me! 1 , . I r my A 'tg I, u W' i, ,F -i.,'g,y, It was den I knowed ezac'ly what's de .1!l,. . . , J ' if meanin'-" to be free I " I :li X "g gZ'I ii ,V 48.1-' rl-- ti . .JI r 1""-ffygi Fo' my heart was allus longin' jess ter go JH' E back home once mo', I An' behol' my blessed Mistus callin' "Rastus," fum de doo'! Though I seed a heap o' ladies, an' some on 'em pow'ful fine, I could nevah find a Mistus dat could smile as sweet as IDH16. 1 DWP pfjiiqn old -I Ii U Smile? l:l be! '18, gl ay- n is Y011 muff . 4 ?e, hes life do: V:,l 0, vm you, m an' dal? ,If .11 l, a couldn'fEE' ,-,:: 'JI .W N, KH . 1 ,,. .IN .355 .ll Q 150' de angels bounl ter listen as de wo'ds come out heli mouth, I Caze dey wants ter l'arn de di'lect lake dey heahs it in de South. An' den I buys a ticket, an' takes de fastes' cyarsg I wastes no time a-loafm' er a puttin' up de bars. I dress lake some poo' niggah-in dis hyer ragged suit- So de robbahs don't suspicion what I done got in my boot. Dey says dars heaps o' money-jess how much I done fo'git-1 An' now my deah ole Mistus I's gwine give you all on it! You gwine keep de ole plantation un'erneaf you Blessed foot, , V Becaze yo' owns ole Rastus wiv de money in hes boot! Now you Mistus, .stop yo' cryin, ! Dat money's all fo' you ! Fo' I wants ter sarve yoi, Mistus, lake I allus used to do. Dar haint no 'mancipation gwineset ole Rastus free, Fo' I was bo'n you' niggah an, I's allus gwine ter be! Den call de whole plantation, an' de neighbahs white an' black, . . y , . An' hab a celebration, caze ole Rastus done come back! ffl' .eave hesj . l fgt: W" rh8.l,S 9 9 4 ', 1? N fl? I l l',if'a'-jf' LN Y,-"ffl, '-" ?.'--1 ',. . , - .' , - -- , 4 - - , . css te .- Az -we -ff..-ff iff.-1 - .:1fvsf's-ff:fn-f-Mii.:-f't'1:Af:sfrff, 45,5 ,m,.-15:-:1'f,-:asf -P: ,, few., - 4 .,l. S1421 5,.... A-.,g.Lzg.,.. .ff ,fi-al it -Mfee'-3fi-2-Ehlff-fvffe 1 .y :Nw wo of Mwi-471'.vlrf--U'--",t"'lr.-"': .m.:f . 15 C21 lull 1 3.12-'lililgzeieLi?-?.?LezIff,lfffl, -"1"' "t' ' " ' - T . we-rea, 41 J. gf-in-,vp If v n ,V Q . -':'r 1 ffuil- "fm-T 531, ' .ml 'ffl N49 " M 4' l - ' "ul - - i-'k--'Hi -"-H - K v .vi-mai-I . " ' N! V - pr , N m,t,,,14g.5. .MQ Lit, ., ,.,. .v. M, 5.17 . All-.pxs, . 5 'lk 'lgg' ff- 1 f-1f'f."i-:eAi'- ff, -":,fgfj:i92. "j'lj,'g1i',7 5 1 f' eg - 1 omgkl- 1:11.-'eff'--1f'1:-l1ff'. " ff" '7 1 " 4' - 'Q I an S f .711-35,6 A 'Vw "' 4' 'Z f..,'14,.Llf5,k'l . :ii 312' lffifflfl-:15'2-Qlilfa5i"5S'if,s75'ffl.-":"'7 Y: A' ' ' I I l :A , 1' '.', ,M J r4s f A1 N Il V '--I 1, sta,- asifi sweet l -JH. 'Eli tml 'l 1.1: vs ff-. ,V ,pl '. 'ln 'F ,. ,xi lllali , "V w P . pil il: lei tic igzm mmni as 8 ollege Presi: dents AMY ANGELL COLLIER QQNVVVVVVNA ' N E of the rivile es of a large Uni- '+44+444444" I' 4444 versity is 316 poiibility of its con- 2 R . . . tributmg through its graduates, to liitb the progress of higher education in ll other circles than its own. Not only do the alumni carry the college NNW Y -WEN spirit to their new surroundings, ++++++++4++0z but to some of them it is given L 'N+ J to occupy positions where they are able to further the views and methods peculiar to their Alma Mater. Few universities have been as fortunate as that of Michigan in supplying presidents to other colleges during the first half century of its own career, not to mention the many secondary schools where Michigan graduates have been in demand from the iirst. Earliest in date of Michi- gan's alumni to become college presidents was ADONIJAH S'1RoNG WELCH, A. M., LL. D., of the class of 1846, and born in East Hampton, Connecticut, in 1821. Mr. Welch was admitted to the bar in 1847, and in I85O accepted the presidency of the Michigan State Normal School at Ypsilanti, a position which he held for fifteen years. In 1865, he went to Florida where he made his home, and in 1868 represented that state as United States Senator for a short time, being called in 1869 to be president of the Iowa State Agricultural College. He received his legal degree in 187 3, from the University of Iowa, and retained his executive work till his death March 14, 1889, at Pasadena, California. Next to Mrf Welch in time ofgraduation was PARK SHATTUCK DONELSON, A. M., D. D., ofthe class of 1849, and born in Massachusetts in 1825. After graduating, Mr. Donelson spent a year at the Auburn Theological Seminary, and was afterward professor of languages at Albion College. He was ordained to the Methodist ministry in 1852, and from Albion went to preach at Lansing, Michigan, till 1858, when he became president of the Ohio Wesleyan Female College, receiving his higher degree at his installation, from the Indiana Asbury University. In 1873, Dr. Donelson became min- ister of the Methodist Episcopal church in Toledo, and later at Lima, Ohio. He died at Dexter, Michigan, May 6, 1882. In the same class with Dr. Donelson was HOSMER ALLEN JOHNSON, A. M., M. D., LL. D. He was born in Wales, New York, in., 1822, and upon graduating in 1849, studied , medicine in the Rush Medical College, where he was later , professor of h siolo till , - ' 1859, filling thep slime clilaiir at -1 17 , 8 U --Q U U fi Lind University till he became 4, .flu Z4 president of the Chicago Medi- lg, ,F lil E ,X cal College in 1863. Here he J la. if-1' added to his executive duties, instruction in various depart- af' ' ,f X ments of medicine, and held . REGULAR HOSPITAL also positions of importance in several medical associa- tions of his own and other states. His law degree was conferred by Northwestern University. . Dr. johnson was eminent in his profession, of an attractive peibsonality, and highly esteemed throughout his long professional career. His death occurred in Chicago, February 26, 1891. One year later in college than Dr. johnson was LEWIS RANSOM FISKE, A. M., LL. D., a Michigan man by birth and education. Graduating in 1850, Mr. Fiske gained his master's degree at Michigan, and in 1854, became professor of chemistry at the Michigan Agricul- tural College, Where he stayed till 1860, during which time he was ordained a Methodist minister. From 1863, Dr. Fiske filled the pastorates of the Central Methodist church in Detroit, and at Ann Arborf Dr. Fiske received the degree of D. D., from Albion College in 1873, and that of LL. D. in 1879. In 1878, he accepted the presidency of Albion, and the associate editorship of the C'lz7'z'sz'z'cm Aa'- wmie. Dr. Fiske is still at Albion, Where he has shown great enterprise in improving the college's financial standing, as well as success in the duties of his position. Nextin order came EDWIN WILLITS, A. M., 185o, born in Otto, New York, April 24, 1830, but prepared for college inthe pub- lic schools of Michigan. After graduation, Mr. Willits became editor of the Monroe Commercial, and then studied law, being admitted to the bar in 1857. He was elected Prosecuting Attorney of Monroe County, and in 1863 was appointed Postmaster of Monroe. In 1873, he was a member of the Constitutional Commission, and in I876, was elected to the Forty-Fifth Congress, and was once re-elected, attaining considerable prominence. At the expiration of his term in 1880, he became principal of the Ypsilanti Normal School, and later, president of the Agricultural College at Lansing. Here, his admin- istration gave promise of much usefulness, but he remained in its charge only a short time on account of his appoint- ment as first Assistant Secretary of Agriculture at Wash- ington. He opened a law office there at the expiration of his service in the Agricultural Department, and he finally died in that city, October 23, 1896. Mr. Willits was a gifted public speaker, and a man whose ability commanded general respect. The class of 1858 included LEWIS MCLOUTH, A. M., who became successively principal of the- Lapeer Academy, of schools at Ontonaga and Owosso, and of the High Schools of Monroe and Bat- tle Creek. In 1876, he was professor of the Physical 'IIE' . 7 Sciences at the Michigan State Nor- X ix, ,,f mal School, and has since been presi- 'f 7 M N 7 lcwmwf dent of the South Dakota Agricul- , LL 3-Mm tural College, whence he resigned in '-aaa-,.f, .... I 896. Mr. McL0uth has been equal- fr inn- Successful as leciu I-er and teacher. 'gp - 3 - ' I - 1'gifggagiwgllgllllfflll'lille'"l'llln-- E 4 Qggggg-l1.iff' 9 . ji One of the most widely known of I - l'-....:'i'?, fa? .4 - Qjpnl Michigan graduates is 4' , 5 ffllllllg ,. ,,. I 7 6 3' . W - 'Q 3 ' 255152 T- ff fret - - A-ff f I 7 A T E I 4. .... . .... ...,. . .... ..... :.'e.4.a:s: q f5 ...---'.--1-1'i ff: '4 'V Y"-""T1-:LT-Y ,EJF-,:l.....5ni"f i PRESIDENT,S HOUSE T F i l x l 4 5 l 1 I 1 .1 :- . A l l' l 'Q 1. xl" T 186 S, dist 311,135 ceived Sldenc I rz'stz'an YAQ has Sho, J Y 1 5 flflancig IS P0s1tiof,l Qtto 111 the en Was in 1863 y he Was and in ld was -ce. At e, h1s ure at W expirationg ,nd he tinalli Willits inroe and :an State ice been ikotil 335 been :r and lely known -' N 15 , . CHARLES KENDALL ADAMS, A. M., LL. D., of the class of 1861. Mr. Adams was born at Derby, Vermont, january 24, 18353 he taught school during the winters from 1852 to 1855, removing in the latter year to Iowa, Where he fitted for college at Denmark Academy. Having attained his Master's degree in 1862, Mr. Adams was appointed instructor in Latin and History at his Alma Mater, becoming full professor in 18675116 then studied for some months abroad, and upon his return in 1868 was called to be Dean of the newly established School of Polit- ical Science at Michigan, and also was first to introduce there the use of the German Seminary system in historical work. At the same time, he became non-resident lecturer at Cornell University, to the presidency of which he was called in 1885. Dr. Adams resigned in 1892 for the pur- pose of devoting his time to historical writing, but decided, some months later, to accept the presidency of the University of Wisconsin, a position he still occupies, and where his arrival gave an immediate impulse to the work of the University. Dr. Adams's literary work is also noticeable. In 1872 he published -" Democracy and Mon- archy in France,', afterwards translated into German 3 and in 1882 appeared his perhaps most important book, " The Manual of Historical Literature." In 1892 he published the "Life and Work of Christopher Columbus," a timely contribution to the Columbian celebration of that year. Dr. Adams has also done much editorial work, notably three volumes of British orations, and in 1896 came the new enlarged edition of Johnson's Universal Cyclopedia, of which he was editor-in-chief. The degree of LL.D. has twice been conferred upon him, by Chicago University in 1879, and by Harvard in 1886, and he has enjoyed mem- bership in numerous scholarly societies. Another alum- nus who has experienced a varied life is a MARK WALROD HARRINGTON, A. M., Ph. D., 1868. He was born at Sycamore, Illinois, August 18, 1848, and attended the local district school until the age of ten, when he- studied for college at the preparatory department of Northwestern University. He spent a year at North- western, but attracted to Ann Arbor by the rising repu- tation of its University, he entered there and graduated in phi 2 . M I 4 1 5, ' 1 1 if x f tg ' H - .V X x 4, . A: r 4' , . r Mais. 9 21 H z 1 A 1.- ': if 9 ,11 E' 2 Q Q X, T I lx ,ri v xv X x E A '9 - .Ili 3 .3 ' 4. ' - f V. --a ,I ', 1 , .... ' E -9. i'tfA ,PN 4 'tl - . -K ...Q .f xg ,,. -.r 'l 4,l- ir iv, .F 4, . :qi 5 3' f 3 , N V2.1 i f I A Q, x 4 , iff 4 Vp , ,. 1 , I, .1 ' re' - 'JZ .Q 4 w, 1, Q . A .1.V, QQ ,Li H W . X H A f ,nf . Song for the Fatberlandmlsls FROM THE GERMAN CF ARNDT UR God, Whose hand the iron ma e, , d He would that none were minion. Hence gave the saber, spear and blade To man for right's dominion. ' Hence gave I-Ie him the haughty soul, The wrath that free he speakethg That quarrel just to bloody goal And e'en to death he wreaketh. What God hath willed we hold as right 'Mong faithful hearts unshaken, Nor dead our fellow-beings smite For pay from tyrants taken. But for disgrace and shame who fights We hew to shreds unsparing. Such man shall never German rights In German land be sharing! O Germ'ny, holy Fatherland! O love and faith we owe thee! Thou lofty land! Thou lovely land! Again our troth we show thee. The ban on slave and minion lay, The crow and raven sating! To Hermannfs iight we march to-day, And vengeance are awaiting. Then let it rage that rage but can In clearest flames and brightest, Un German, who with fellow man For Fatherland unitest! Lift all your hearts to Heaven on high, To Heaven your hands extended, And one and all in union cry: Our servitude is ended ! y HENRY R, KELLOGG Cbt Dom WALTER H. NICHOLS H, Where 's the toW'ring Dome, We knew in days gone by? Its presence on the campus W Was a joyto the eye. We Wonder Where it Went to, We cannot understand,- Was the journey that it took To a bright, happy land? n Did an evil-minded man, With a knife in a sheath, Climbing on the' college roof With a gritting of his teeth Give our Dome such a fright That it leaned out of plumb, And cut up other antics, That struck beholders dumb P Was it 'cause good Major Soule While rushing up the flag, Hung Qld Glory upside down, That made our proud Dome sag Or was our poor Dome weary? Did it long for repose From the tenor's rising plaint, The sopranols bitter Woes? 1 Engl" a - ' 5 . 'Sr' 7 P 'Q A, We asked of Father Ottley, But he just shook his head, While the tears came dropping down In mourning for the dead. Next we questioned Mister Reaves. He gave a guilty start l Fled the color from his face ! A-thumping Went his heart ! "Since the Dome is really gone, We just demand to know, Is it happy where it is, Above or down below?" Quaked the Sup'rintendent's voice l His knees together smote !- "The Regents said to do it, I had to heed the vote 1 " r L. i 5 i ks' X iv In-:gg 'E ..:-:EE pl ""2'l1YX fi' T 11151 i 5 ' ' " I h!Df1:hr QZESI 10----H ' 2 Qi -4-T-2"'3m'f-f 3? - --, ,N l Q -f-av: A ll -' xi Lax i If ' Qsrff"s4i X i 'Lvl ' lm ,f li, yin I l ll A If li' 'Ui X 'U p J it .Sl"l . "5 : 552552. r..-.., p:::::+ LYFE . s- N ' A 5 - s .n s , EI :E 3 , . 2 Tl C We looked up at the smoke-stack, And, in the rolling cloud, Saw a fiery charioteer With both his horses proud. He lashed them, and they galloped Off to their distant home. And, standing in the chariot, We saw our happy Dome! H Cale of two lletters SHIRLEY W. SMITH 1-1.1. 4 I JAMES BROWN LAWYER Insurance, Collections, and Real Estate Marshallton, Ind., Nov. 12, 1896. Y JDEAR TOM:-The office is quiet to-day Qas well as other daysj, so perhaps I can find time to get a few lines off to you before someone comes in with a hundred dollar retainer,for an unpaid bill for office rent. It's a chilly morning and my oflice boy has neglected to build my fire. Two reasons,-no boy, no coal, and my hands are so cold that it makes my "scribe" look like that of a really great lawyer. But to put these rather bitter jokes aside and speak plainly, I'm being plunged into a gulf of dark despair,- and deeper every day. Life is real, life is earnest,-ter- ribly so for the fellow that's down. I can remember my foot-ball days, only a year or so ago, when nothing but the stubbornest kind of pluck saved the day for us more than once and it seemed to me that the never-give-up spirit which I got worked into me then would carry me through anything. I have hammered away at an opposing line almost without effect till the last twenty minutes, and then seen things come our way at last, so often that I have thought that nothing could ever make me give up so long as I could breathe. But it seems to me now as if I were the other line, and that the world had pounded away at me till I couldn't hold much longer. I haven't made ten dollars in two months. Ten dollars! Good heavens! How I pitied the man who earned that much a week,- once! How I envy him,-now! You knew my hopes when I left college. Nan is waiting for me yet as patiently as ever, but I can't ask it of her much longer. I would try another location, but I owe too much here to leave honorably,-even if I had money enough to get somewhere else. Here I can see no silver lining to the clouds. I thought I could once last spring, when I got quite an important case. But my opponent was the Hon. Thomas Phillips, the leading lawyer of the county, as sharp as a Damascus blade, fluent, honest as day-light, sarcastic, eccentric and choleric. When the case came A on, the evidence showed up pretty well I for me, till old Phillips got at my client ' on cross-examination, and proved con- clusively that he was a scoundrel and that his testimony was a shrewd web of falsehood. The villain was smooth enough to deceive me perfectly. Phil- lips gave that man the worst tongue- lashing I ever heard, and though he didn't make any open charges against me, the idea spread around that he tacitly included me in it, and what poor chance I had before for success was gone. It was cruelly unjust to me, but I have had to bear the slurs made both openly and covertly ever since,-when I attracted any attention at all. Perhaps I am over sensitive and imagine more than there is in reality. But poverty and idleness and solitude are poor checks for one's imagination. After all, I suppose it's childish in me to complain like this to you, Tom. Maybe it is only the first sign of the break-up, to go back to foot-ball metaphors again. QA useless, old warrior likes to live in the triumphs of the past, you knowj. I know I'm losing heart and that's the worst of all. I dread the buffetings of fortune, in a way that I never did before. 50 Co, 1nAJ'f 'RT LY at lt i tens 1' .k, Ag IOPQSQI ellllyl. I 2 5 . l much. P 5 Ish to? ' to they' ,ey I gOt , I V Hon. + LIX, '-light, Z ' I came: , ty well I- fclientt i :d cone rel and'-F Id Webs smoothly, i PM ' :ugh hey- against pf that he I nd whatf 4' l 1 s' It wa attracted .tive compiaititti 'St sign :mrs agalniff' hs of pthat's4 fhlfg ttttt' , in a vq I .,v But I 2007291 give up, -yet. I fwmzii. The most cheeif ing I ever got on the gridiron was for a desperate, fflast hope, one chance in a thousand" plunge, that brought a touch-down and the game. And l'll play out ihzlv game if any man can. I hope that youill let me hear from you. Yours ever, ' JIM. 9 9 4 9 4 II PHILLIPS 8: BROWN THOMAS PHILLIPS LAWYERS 'Q JAMES BROWN Practice in all the Courts of g ' the State Marshallton, Ind., Duc. 8, 1896. Y DEAR TOM:-I donit know how to begin. "We have met the enemy and they are ours ! " would be far too tame and laconic, even if it 'had two doien ex- clamation points hitched on to it. I can't realize the change yet and can't make it seem as if it would last. But it's go! to last,--can't help it, so far as I can see. I am a rocket shot into the highest heavens and held there some way or other. I feel as an old soldier must have felt in the war, to be unexpectedly released from Ander- sonville and sent home on a furlough,-only my furlough is for good. If I can cork up this enthusiasm for a few minutes, I'll tell you how it all happened. But talk about your drunken men and fools being specially watched over and guided! They're not in the race with me! But per- haps this letter will lead you to think that I should be included in one or both these classes. However, to approach the matter? in a way more proper for a legal-minded young man, your deponent will depose as follows and say, to-wit: It's all on account of my foot-ball days that I didn't give up, and all on their account, too, that I bid fair to Win now. You see, it was a great subject of interest here this fall,--foot-ball was. It began two years ago, al Marshallton High School had a team then, whicl everybody near here except Warrensburg. r It wel same way a year ago, except that the interest wi greater. The two towns are only ten miles apart ai rivals in everything,-horse-races at the County base-ball in the spring, and trade and society all thi round. This fall, foot-ball excitement here ran hig was too blue to take much notice of it, but have le all about it since. The Marshallton boys were surf had a winning team and they bent all their energies, as their knowledge went, Qwhich wasn't very far, to 1 truthj, toward getting the county championship. T folks, too, got worked up, and one of the most inte ones was Mr. Phillips, whose son Herbert was capta half on the team. He didn't let his feelings run so far away with him as some of them did, but he anxious about that team as I ever was about ours. everybody expected to win, and when Warrensburg down and made a score of thirty-two to nothing z us, the whole "town, tively speaking, wore Mr. Phillips was wild. tried a civil suit against rensburg banker the ne: and before he got throug his argument that b agreed to pay the full 2 of damages asked, if tl might be stopped right The secret of W burg's success was not l 'sc' "" - find. A week or so the game, a traveling circus went into winter quarter: and a family of three brothers, "The world-famed, modern Sampsons, Signori Alberto, Tomaso and A Ryano," known in familiar speech as Bert, Tom an' Ryan, had entered the Warrensburg High School, ii by sheer thirst for learning as the citizens of Warrf said, or by twenty-five dollars apiece, as the citi: Marshallton maintained. Be this as it may, they al Gu? X -np-"-? .Sn -5-1' gd I I ch 3, Vent th was W HI 1 -, 1, , ve' C learue t t Sure the' v 0' t0 tell th Thebl 1I1l6IESlC anti l ', i . .tand , Y Fair the a l hlgh- ies S f l aPl21in at H111 muh ainst aW pe next through tat bankitag 1 if he right of W 1sI1O't 01' S0 luarters' famed, r 2nd 'om and il100la .Lf Mg. ' " it? .L on the foot-ball horizon to the Marshallton partisans about as Bluecher's troops did to Napoleon at Waterloo. 7 I think it was the very afternoon I wrote you last, when I was trying to fix my best chair, which had fallen down under me, that there came trooping into my office more people than had ever entered it before, since I began to call it Qin my humorous wayj, my place of business, When the delegation had taken stock of itself, it proved to be the Marshallton High School Foot-ball Team, en masse. I stared,-and so did they. There was a good deal of hemming and hawing and standing on one foot and thrustingof hands deep into trousers pockets and so on, but it finally came out that what they wanted was to get me to coach them. They had heard someway that I used to play. ' Well, the long and short of it was that I agreed to do it, if they would promise to obey my instruction to the letter. They promised in quick time and left with the understanding that I should meet them after school next day at their practice grounds. I had seen the other game and knew that all they had against them on the Warrens- burg team was "beef" without much quickness, and with practically no science. There was about two weeks' time be- fore the 'Thanksgiving game, and when a man doesn't know very much about the sport to start with, he can learn a lot in two weeks. So we practiced every day, first at the school grounds once or twice, and then secretly in an enclosed lot belonging to young Phillips's father, in order to give Warrensburg as many new plays as possible. The rule was "No spectators," but Mr. Phillips came down every night, and we couldn't keep him out because it was his lot. I never saw a man more interested in any thing than he was in the development of that team. He sent that boy of his to bed every night at nine o'clock sharp, and superintended his meals with a vigor that was rather irksome to the lad, I fear. But he made up for it by promising him a gold watch if he won the great game. Well, I might keep running on about the work, but I will spare you that and also a very iong description of the game. I was rather surprised that morning at being asked to occupy a seat in the Phillips carriage, but refused it on H, . lib I ,x v . V-" 41' ' .off -,ggi S .AQ 5 ,Q C u ,av the ground that I wanted to ride in the carry-all and keep the boys straight. I couldn't, someway, get over the scene in court last spring. When we got on the road it really seemed as if all Marshallton was going over to see the game, and the number of vehicles was only equalled by their variety. Not to stop for particulars, it was a hard fought bat- tle and I was really proud of the way the boys stood up before the weight that was against them. At the end of the first half, it was o to o. The Marshallton folks ,wanted to carry their team around on their shoulders during the in- termission, but I got the boys all inside the little coop which they had for a dressing room and shut the door on the crowd. Mr. Phillips, though, was in before I was and I didn't want to ask him to go out. But I did request him to help me rub the boys a little where they needed it, and with trembling hands, he followed my lead in adjust- ing bandages and guards, while I quieted and encouraged the players and urged them to "play hard till time was called, no matter how she went." Before the "between- halves" was over, I told young Phillips about what plays he ought to depend on and where it seemed to me the weakest place in the other line was. So they went at it again. But those circus fellows were wonders for the small sum of their knowlege of the game, and play as they would, our boys couldn't score, ghough their line held well against the other's bucking. Fifteen! ten! seven minutes were left. Five! and alad had to have time called on Warrensburg's twenty-yard line. Young Phillips came back to get a drink and as I saw him coming, something or other carried me back three years to the last game I ever played on the old D. A. C. grounds, and like a shot there struck me the foxey scheme that Billy worked that day for our last touch-down. You will remember it. I was ashamed not to have thought Of it before. But thirty seconds sulliced to explain it t0 Phillips and thirty more to the team, and by the time that Tony Ryan hobbled back to his place, every boy of OUT eleven was lined up for the final effort. Phillips gave 2 signal which had been used before, to throw the WarrenS- burgers off their guard if possible,-and the scheme which N i . ml? l' nfou ' C end rin little fe I Waiiiii .d in H it what d to :ircus vwlege Duldn 1er's lrin , me : Old D 3 foxe. ry U1 Very . Phi111P pw the W 1 saved the last 'Varsity game I ever played, Saved the 51-St game I ever coached a team for. Before the Crgwd kueyv what was happening, Phillips was within live yards of the goal, and though the full-back man- aged to stop him, the ball was over the line when he fell. Old man Phil- lips broke clear loose. He threw up his six dollar tile and when it came down he kicked 'a hole through it. That was a fair sample of how the . me spectators performed,-that is, ,those fd- fig from up ouriway. A goal made the if score six to nothing. The remaining Mm' " -IN, A few seconds were played out and in jf! less than ten minutes I had seventeen Q' different invitations to dinner. Mr. - Phillips gave me one of them and 8""' fairly pulled me away from the crowd over to where his horses were tied. I was rather excited and all my heartburnings and sorrows for the last six months burst out, and I told him pretty shortly that his injustice to me last spfing forbade my accepting' any favors from him. He just stood and stared at me and I walked away and left him. But next morning came the big surprise. When I went down to the office, I found him standing outside my door in the cold hall. I wondered what was up, but I didn't find out till I took him into my den and shut the door. The minute the latch clicked, he turned on me and blurted out: "Miz Brown, my language last spring was outrageous. I didn't mean to harm you. I .didn't believe that you had done any intentional wrong. I can see now, though, the injury I have done you. I apologize to you. I regard you as a gentleman, sir, and a brainy one, sir, whom it is to my credit to know. I have been looking for a young man like you for a long time, and had made up my mind that when I found him, I would offer him an interest in my practice. I am getting along into the time when a man likes to take life a little easier than he has before, and I need a partner. Will you join me? We can arrange the terms. I-I-I apologize, sir, I apologize." All this before I could get in a Word. Well, this letter-head will tell you the Hnal result. No, not the Hnal one, either, for if you don't come down for a couple of months yet, , L 1l'.,:-, , , . 'C ,SA A-1,0 Nan and I will entertain y Q y W f' X you together. M X g - Yours in clover, 1 Q1 .:+f'f'eg",. . . . .... 9 .4 1 JIM. I 9 .. A l ' i lt., -, I f FHM ' ++++4 0 Tl A 4 ard limes 1 'K ffl -ii-l H , H, melancholy croaking frog! i x 1 Why dost thou sit there all the day 'Mya-, And smile and weep and sob and sob . In that almost hysteric Way?" ,Q-giwjggl "Oh sir! this coat fits me so tight, MBNQRL-iii. I cannot, cannot, sleep at night! 4 ' But must sing on in fear and fright Qgrci' Because I know it is not right." . 5 -A 2 Thus quoth the melancholy frog. Q' F. R. C., '96. l 5 1 1 A' 'rg 1 ffrfggip-L, 1 x lo lze 11 fffsmiltif 111th Syer 1 M .Af 4, me -1 l .l 1 l ver, I ,ll il. -I 1 ,N 'qi ,ill N s -s xg fl fi NX-:, l ,. C 3. and sob p ue so tight 7 if p J, J Ei ll it il. 'l Y' 5 l' cl ,Q UT if 34 I ri' Pi, I d y I , 5 ' h 1 gf'-M n 5 t' fri " . fnghf f 32' t. I 'L i 1 f f ' Cq 96. .. 'big' 1 . fffg f l N 2 A' i I' V li xg' 1 1 e Zider of llormandie TO AN OLD AIR , 'LL pledge you in a drink that none 1 Have sung belittingly. 'Tis not the ale of Albion Nor wine of Italy. ' It is the juice the orchards yield . Where smiles beside the sea The land of blended wood and Held- The lovely Normandie. REFRAIN The rosy maid has filled the bowl, Then quaff its nectar free. It is the drink that: cheers- the soul, The cider of Normandie. The sunshine gives its golden hue, Its taste the bracing wind. Who sips it doth his youth renew, And sorrow leave behind, No more his weariness he feels Who doth before him see The liquor bright all care that steals- The cider of Normandie. Then freely quaff, it cannot harm, 'Twill quicken pulse and limb, vi The downcast heart has pow'r to warm, And brighten vision dim. And e'en upon the distant shore Of home and own countrie We'll drink a bumper running o'er To the cider of Normandie. HENRY R. KELLOGG DOL, BRITTANY, 1895. l'0Il7dldllllOIl FRANCIS POTTER DANIELS HAT thou hast been to me thine heart doth know The sorrow and the care of other years Have had their solace in the love' that cheers Even now my dark of life with warmth and glow, Still radiant with the joy of higher spheres, Although the cloud hath spread It's dun and umber shadow o'er thine head And, nigh to dea.th in toil and utter pain, Thou hast the sweet word said That triumphs over fear and renders weakness vain. Many a year ago in thee I saw The energy and strength and will of soul Such as to lead life to its utmost goal, And beauty, fair attempered without flaw, Making immortal in thy self-control The spirit of thy love,- The spirit that in modesty doth move Appealing to the highest human sense, Bidding man rise above To hope's divinest dreams and take his motive thence. To-day I view the hour-sands of, my life And seek to read the meaning of my years, To iind high prophecies hid in its fears, And in the minglement of peace and strife To wrest a message which but more endears Thy life unto mine own, And to the soul's high vision there is shown A life-work and a goal in sooth sublime, Which, to fulfillment grown, Will bear thy life and mine beyond the reach of time. i .2 --? . :fc . Q I k . gl . ,ill Q Ow .ij . 4 in .,,.f. V .sf , HICHCC . ears V. of time' Such sacrifice be ours as is revealed In delicatest wise and choicest hues In flowers, that embayed in morning dews, Do in the fullness of love's joyance yield Themselves to nature's impulse, nor refuse In high self-sacrifice To wither that the seed may thence arise, So that the race of flowers may never cease To smile on human eyes And tell the tidings glad of purity and peace. Seemeth such life a thing to wonder on,- Such life for us, who long have borne the cross And in life's stress and din have suffered loss, Till lips have ashened, cheeks been blanched and wan, So bitterly did care the spirit toss,- Sueh life a marvel seems, A fabric and a portion of our dreams! O doubt not, dearest love, it yet shall bel 1 The glory of it streams i Into our deepest life, we shall its fullness see I v . f -- K It-vi ., I '...., .. I.. .-Q 'r .- , 4.4, , I. hr, ' L.-H . - ,nm -, 4f: V' .5 my -I 1,4 V. I., ,, Cf- Q. Jw..-,--E - f.,l.7-- 4:5-'Ek:Qf','.!LfnT':ffrmfr bfi ,-.yf.f,i5y1f"" ,A ' ,Zg5,, ' n ' V - K A - V -N... . .A-4:9 . .ag I, 1 ,.,l-g.-f1,!,r-.,,,,,. - , f1 ""',.3,.,g.sg, fqygp "'9iI'h"' TU' V13 T141-f' 5"'l'K5".?',1iAi'A,l5 Bra "l"H'l'1L7'lf'I:4 'a f """"'3' ?'7LB"1f':i Q ., 1 ' ggg' rr-.,f.-.j.,. nn' - If 4.' PEZ '-igbfilh '5"4--'. r"'11 VPS we -. .gtv-ffl .: 'Lg '. 41--TEV. 3' . ' 1 '-. - - , . '- mrs- "f-fl -uri,-'C-1:-'I' ' S...P.2,,.,1.,,,v,..l., .. 1 5:-V . . ..hr.,,',g,,.19:, Q .W-, .,A ' 4,5 h--f'-- 5"'l7fE'1'.7"if-,"-'J-'-l,f: f-s'r'1"1 M" .'!w"' f:'5'-f"!':'!'9P:'i-" 9542! V, ' l1'f'5'ff'Y rf" 'V -3'i'y'-itll-if':l.':i" 3' v4'-',:',-i- 7' 2 R1'.f'x'AQ:5'ifl"''Jiffy''.' "-.'l4:ZJ'-i'5'ff:A 'f.'a 151 h .V 'f- V ,","- '- - .' . ,..,,Q , ,f. 4-, A ,. , -- . .--X .,- r I t. the wary Prof and Blase Sopb 5 V A. H. Z. W f 5 .... X Q.FQif'!i' -- --. .-.-. ijjjjjjf' IH PAKE this old Egyptian Prof W j To the Very blase Soph: ' "You must cease this constant Hunking, ii mu ' You must work, work, work." Said the Sophomore with a wink, "On your life, well, I don't think. And he gave his head a haughty, Naughty jerk, Q jerk, . jerk. 5 On the night before Exam ,E Ponies full that Soph did cram cgi "". With things he'd never heard of ,j X j , K a n N jg Neath the LM., sun. But the Prof saw thro' the trick, And forthwith inscribed his manuscript With Con. con COI1 fu ..,, ,f O ' - ' ,H Xl- g . j f. Vowed he'd make that Sophomore sick, 2 , ai .n f ' :V l IM I Che Benefactors of the University ALICE BROWN HE University of Michigan, although '23 supported by the State, is nevertheless '9 - deeply indebted to many private bene- Q 4 factors, and there are a few whose names bi? we as students always think of with grati- v Y tude, remembering what their generosity Qi' 9 Q ? has done for us. In the light of the enor- 9 Y mous g1ftS which other inst1tutions,espec- .9 Q ially Chicago, have lately received,we are gg Q Q perhaps in danger of forgetting the timely I y ' Q aid, which has often come to us, both in times past and lately, and of thinking ourselves slighted by donors. It is true we have received no fabulous sums, but that is not strange when we con- sider that the University is not dependent upon private beneficence, as are many other colleges, but that the State is its constant supporter. Benefactors are more apt to appear when they feel that the very existence of an insti- tution depends upon them, and, although a flourishing col- lege has constant needs, comparatively few persons of wealth, at first, realized that a State institution could want their aid. Accordingly, the gifts that have been received must have been prompted by a spirit of interest and confi- dence which makes them the more valuable. The names of some of our benefactors are familiar to all, as Water- man, Ford, Barbour, and others, but there are a great many more, seldom heard of now, and of whom we know only too little. Conspicuous among the early benefactors is Mr. Henry W. Walker, who not only gave largely himself, but was the means of raising a large subscription among the citizens of Detroit. Mr. Walker was a prominent man of that city, and was for some time connected with the De- troit Ffee Press. He was present at the inauguration of Dr. Tappan as President, and, after listening to his ad- dress, determined to aid the University. Accordingly he called on Dr. Tappan the same day, to find out what he could do. Dr. Tappan suggested that he should help raise money among the citizens of Detroit for building an obser- vatory, and Mr. Walker agreed to this. A meeting of prominent men of Detroit was held, Dr. Tappan addressed them, and very soon seven thousand dollars was raised. This was afterwards increased to ten thousand, and Mr. Walker himself gave four thousand in addition, to be used in the purchase of a meridian circle. Dr. Tappan pro- cured it when he went to Europe, and it is now in the east wing of the observatory, for which we are especially indebted to the enthusiasm of Mr. Walker. As many others of the large gifts to the University have been by subscription, we cannot know how many people are among our benefactors. The citizens of Ann Arbor have not allowed their Detroit friends to surpass them in this respect, and, in many cases of emergency, have stepped forward to supply the need. Soon after the inauguration of Dr. Tappan, a little over fifteen hundred dollars was raised among them for the library. In the fall of '59, some men and women of Ann Arbor, calling them- selves the Rogers Art Association, began to raise money for the purchase of a marble copy of the statue called "Nydia," by Randolph Rogers. The necessary amount, seventeen hundred dollars, was finally obtained by giving concerts, lectures, etc., and by charging an admission fee for several years to the room where the statue was kept. In 1864 the people of Ann Arbor again came to the rescue, and gave ten thousand dollars toward enlarging the medical building, which the Regents were unable to do without incurring debt. The '-gf next year the city of Ann .Q gg L . - as . 1--B 5 B 1 -l-- Arbor offered another ten a n-T-gn "' D' gi l thousand for removing and re- ,ew-, bf., 'I' building the observatory on L-fig-45559, ,V v:"' N' '-' ,"""" ' ' sq.-.1 , c,,v,L 4.,.g.,Q Q Q 5 ' Flin ml W5 the campus, provided an equal f- : L-P ,- ' .. , 17 EEE, i f 'EH Es . au? " 1 J Qi a M,!!.,'!lQ'-7-'E-:-. 1',M 'ws' a--:ggi in-fu.-'L ' ,"g,bN . ..-N . . 11-1'-.,x:xi-FL . .. A4 ga.,-1, ,ff-A, , ie.- aa ,:.,f.,q.3 :ft-v:...,gw-31.siiTf?'fv HOMCEOPATHIC HOSPITAL I man 0 K- 1 .i 1 l r ra'tl0Il l this ylmgly he fp what he ++ help raises ,- q . ZA an Obser. ff' jr it leeting addressed 1 5 and Myra to be used PPU1 pro- Q CSpeeially University how many ns of Aim ' to surpass emergency, in after the .VAI y 'n hundred' In the ialli lling theme aise money: atue called 1 try amount, id by giving lmission fredii g was kept-if :arne to thei rd enlarging mable t0 do 1. l ff l r r l f fy! , s M l 3 il F1 i 'i N t i F y. 'rr I yi F I l ll ,, il if 5 i ,ll is r ,ir 1 sf' ,,, M My it 9' i H l I ii al 'X '3 W 'Y gy i is XJ r 1 gr fa: rl f .1- rl. lf r U debt. ity of , inothef wing andfe yervatofll lded an amount was raised elsewhere, but it was decided to im- prove the old building and roads leading to it instead, and for this the citizens of Ann Arbor gave three thousand dollars, and the citizens of Detroit three thousand. Fin- ally, in 1875, the people of Ann Arbor again manifested their interest in the University by contributing four thou- sand dollars in aid of the hospital building. The legisla- ture had appropriated five thousand five hundred dollars for the hospital, and twenty-five hundred for its equip- ment, provided the citizens of Ann Arbor would raise four thousand for the same purpose,--which was speedily accom- plished. The Goethe Fund is another instance of the generosity of a part of the townspeople. Of the individual benefactors, those who have con- tributed to the libraries seem to be the most numerous. Some have given money, and some their own collections. Mr. Philo Parsons, in 1870, made the first large gift to the library, when he purchased the book collection of Professor Rau of Heidelberg. The collection was made during the fifty years that Professor Rau was in Heidel- berg, and, is a very valuable library in political science. It contains over four thousand volumes and five thousand pamphlets. Mr. Parsons has continued to add books each year to the collection. 8 The library had received some small gifts before, and Mr. Parsons's good example was speedily followed by others, the gifts increasing each year. In 1883, Mr. james McMillan, of Detroit, gave six thousand five hun- dred dollars for the purchase of the Shakespeare library of the Hon. E. H. Thomson of Flint. Mr. Thomson had been many years collecting this library, but he offered to sell it at a very low price, in order that it might come into the possession of the University. Mr. McMillan first gave five thousand dollars, with which the library was pur- chased and additions made to it, and he afterwards con- tributed frfteen hundred more for still further additions, so that the collection is now a very ine one. The Hon. Richard Fletcher some years ago presented the University with his fine law library. Mr. Fletcher was formerly one of the justices of the Supreme Court of Mas- sachusetts. The late Christian H. Buhl, of Detroit, also contributed a large collection of law books, and by the terms of his will left ten thousand dollars for the law rl' l 1 library. ' The other principal donors to the library are the late Dr. Ford and Miss Jean L. Coyl. Dr. Corydon L. Ford 1 was for forty years connected with the medical department '1 of the University. He bequeathed by his will twenty thou- sand dollars for the general library. Miss Coyl, of De- troit, made a bequest of ten thousand dollars as a memo- l rial of her deceased brother, Col. W. H. Coyl, who was a A ul r distinguished officer of the U. S. Army. Edward Dorsch - also bequeathed a fund of two thousand dollars, and Mr. 1 james J. Hagerman, of Milwaukee, gave twenty-five hun- dred dollars. Besides these, Mr. W. W. Murphy, Mr. C. M. Bur- ton, Mr. E. C. Hegeler, and Macmillan 81 Co., have con- tributed largely to the library. Mr. Burton, of Detroit, is 2 our benefactor in another way also, having recently offered 'l l a prize of one hundred and lifty dollars for the best essay T, on a subject in Northwestern history, the money to be 5 used in study the following year. Messrs. Macmillan 81 ,g - a Co., book publishers of London and New York, gave the T library one hundred and thirty-five volumes in 1869. a 1 These books were from their own publications. Mr. E. C. Hegeler, of La Salle, Illinois, has at different times given 'A books to the library, and he was also one of three to give , ji, 1,1 the chimes in the library tower. The other two were if 1 ft Mr. james J. Hagerman, who was mentioned before as a Y donor to the library, and Professor A. D. White, at that time President of Cornell. Mr. Hagerman contributed .A C A 1 l twelve hundred dollars, and the other two each two hun- .rj -I dred and fifty. K q But the libraries are by no means the only objects of '21 the attention of our benefactors. The art gallery, museum, iw and gymnasium, have all come in for their share, and the C ii list of donors to the art gallery alone is long. The two whom we have especial reason to remember, however, are of course, Mr. Randolph Rogers and Mr. Henry C. Lewis. Mr. Rogers, Ni who when a boy lived in Ann Arbor, ,g spy 5 I ' " i V .-1 gi- ' C I l Y I 99" E A I .. PP ff, 'tl ' v1' E ' 76153 ll I 'hu P UI ' s iw .. f- N l 'X n. LQ 1 Ss ,la sr' .1 1 .P X N nwidl- CTT X' l,41f'4. 14 m hulff lg- fY":."l'gffy T ' A I fa - ss affa . . ' - ..-, ef: 5 5-3311-2 .v 1' ' 4- , 9 . 1. '- 5. -is .f : 11 " .1-5 ggi," ,f f fl: Ag ' -1 .5.0 ff? ":g Q - ::. L -. '.7 " ll 'I - . "' ' .4 ' ffif,--' nr I -:- -4 -T :-3:5 -, ' J , . . , .A- F , f " 'rv n?""91"1 I "- a t v 1- I 1 l 747 3g,f:.,G -.5 ,',' . , 'al""f Mlkgn " 'J .g,1,f",i 1' E 1 45 fi I v ,, n . '5 y' , f v r r..-'-f-:lg us Lirfyi --t...-. K11fn,!7f Ar JJ X11 ' A 'Mi Q gi i.,V45,f, Q I, H I. gin 1.1! "HJ I I -lm ,, , ,141 'riff ":':- C24 M' hull? 1 H xln 'I ' Hi' hi, 'LY L - " R -.. !f'Q"11"l fi L"7if"F 'ni' ,, is .J z, -1- ff,,,4,,s ,,f,Qf. ..,n --v- 'ilf ,'1"'ll'f 'a.-.:- fff'4,,q,EQ2.,,ww"l J "5 Q 'Z ,A "ff '13 434' ff"' ff'7 "" .1 'iff J 9 Urn ' f :-:s..C' " - -vw .J sr ,Fi if '- 5 :ii ' P F f 755 H - ,i 3 ..,4,--bl 'iii A ,, "gps-"H ., -.----,--,V - ,..- 1-if ,Y -uf. A Q... W ,,,-,.,.. H" LIBRARY --9 " .-:--.-F:-' , f ' "7--17" ' ""-tal?-' .Vx U , I . 2,131-I F. F 1 . Sr and fOr the 1 t2 1 9 I Yale Ydfln ima. I iihiepallhe Cnty thdl T YS 5183, 'e l me at d . it ,inward D059 3-TS, and .Mr j. 'vellty-fivehu ' r. C. M, 'H' 1 C0-, have rr' lly of Detroity' , ecenlll Offere H ' the best esgy' Smoneytoyb 1 -. Macmillan, l 0l l l z Q A B 1 York, gave ll umes in 186 g I tx I , s Q ,i a PHS. Mr.E.Vgl f Ent times give " of three to giv :ther two we led before as, 5 . White, at tj, , ran contribute: v each two P l 7 r only 0bj6CfS fl? gallery, 111119611 r share, anim M ,ft gallery whom We all gmbefr ind0lPh s. in Ann gave the University the whole collection of original casts of his works, over one hundred in all. Mr. Rogers is toofamoug to make it necessary to say more about him, and we may be glad of his interest in this institution. Mr. Henry C. Lewis was aprominent citizen of Coldwater, and died in 1884 at Clifton Springs, N. Y., where he had gone for his health. His will provides that his large collection of paintings and statuary, which he had been almost twenty years in collecting, should be given to the University on the death of his wife or earlier, if she wished. The collect- ion has recently been moved to the University. It con- sists of about forty pieces of Statuary, and six hundred and fifty paintings, among which are to be found some originals of the best modern artists. Dr. A. E. Richards, formerly a citizen of this State, gave in ISSO a very valuable collection of coins, and in 1874, Governor Bagley gave the University a collection of ninety medals and also a table in which to keep them. Gov- ernor Bagley came to Michigan soon after its admission to the Union, and has always had a great interest in all State institutions. He was truly-a benefactor, not only on account of what he actually gave, but also on account of his earnest advocacy of generous appropriations by the legislature. . Of two of our greatest and most well known benefac- tors, it yet remains to speak, namely, Mr. Joshua W. Waterman and Mr. Levi L. Barbour. Their generosity is so well known to the students, that it is unnecessary to do much more than to mention their gifts. Mr. Waterman is a citizen of Detroit and a Yale graduate, but became so enthusiastic over the athletic interest here, that in Janu- ary, 1891, he offered to give twenty thousand dollars for a gymnasium, provided an equal amount could be raised by others. This was quickly done, and the offer accepted, as our handsome gymnasium testifies. The new addition to it is a witness to the generosity of Mr. Barbour. In 1894, he presented the University with a lot in Detroit, valued at twenty-five thousand dollars, the money from which was to go toward the building of an art gallery. Afterward, when the need of a Woman's Gymnasium be- came apparent to all, Mr. Barbour very kindly consented that the money be used for that purpose. . X, I 1 L uv 1 l J 5 . S' :T 5 4 Q 2 1. l 5 x Qi "7 P e al .r f 1 T5 J Y 5 if 0' 1, . 1' if .2 ' :1 ' ,: J! I rf- i 1 1 , J if l ,V ag. j , 9 'z 5 . '- g. ..-. fx ' -'iff . .,r ng- ,I 315. 535: -1 -- .- r : ... .v. -44.5- sqgq rf-1-Lf ' -4 xis-1, uv. 'ET'- F. ag-...Q-Qqp 4 7 1, 'Li 4 x grisl- g,l 11'- ,.,4l s. F NIH TQ' ,IMI n iff, 1 x. , Wi? 'i ' -. 31' ' . 1 A very important class of benefactors is still to be spoken of, a class which is, unfortunately, only too small, those who have given money for the establishment of fel- lowships. This means of encouragement and aid to stu- dents seems to have been looked upon with disfavor in the early history of the University, for the four scholar- ships which were established at the suggestion of Professor A. D. White, in 1859, were, in 1866 abandoned, as being "out of harmony with the policy of the University." Tbese scholarships were of fifty dollars each, two of them ofiered to students in the classical course, and two to those in the scientific department. Professor White himself endowed the classical scholarships, and the Board of Regents the other two. The prejudice against such rewards seems to be disappearing now, as there are several high school scholarships established for this University, and a few fellowships. In 1889, Mrs. Catherine E. jones, of Ann Arbor, established a fellowship in memory of her husband, Pro- fessor Elisha Jones. Professor jones was a graduate of the University, and for some time a member of the faculty. This fellowship, at present, yields five hundred dollars a year. Mrs. Clara Harrison Stranahan of Brooklyn, New York, has given a fund of twenty-five thousand dollars, to be called the Seth Harrison Scholarship Fund, in memory of her father. The income is to be used for the benefit of any descendent of Seth Harrison, who may wish to study in the literary department of the University, but, if there are no applicants under this provision, the income can be given to other students. Messrs. Frederick Stearns and Co., of Detroit estab- lished, in 1895, a fellowship of three hundred dollars for two years, and Messrs. Parke, Davis and Co., of Detroit, also gave in I8Q5-,96 five hundred dollars for the support of a fellowship in chemistry. The manner in which this was given is a good instance of the general ignorance in regard to the needs -' of the University. Dr. Freer was the A lanivul ,A means of drawing Mr. Davis's atten- tion to the College, for he called on Aff-w1's:f?t Ti'T"' lainie - - - 9' that gentleman in Detroit, introduced .-4-t'gf2f4i1.S ri- lif"i 5- rl :5 4...-' 4 'Q 'fiilfff'1'g l ." F'r'5 lir!IL'E5"f"c'5im4 Lqlgigl " L Q Er. " , ' J :T '13, '5l'i1',LrMq-21, 2--. .rg-:I lEn.f:l'Erl'.1lnJL,'-1-f-gd! .!.Q.95,q'lh,5llQl,,,.Jn .-' Hg? il. : :vim ll' I ll 'n.lhplglnIui " 'i l' vi- in ' W I "A 'I' " "' 5 'l i i',!igi1llIQf"ii'-iii' ' ' 'f. ' " We-va:lai:1g4i:niE:ilyI3lIia::n:eagle522ineiu::ea::gQ!t1'QI1If-.- A ' N' c-'elim MUSEUM 00 ment d Rid tb f0ur lof eds 3.3 D 0 irwof M. 'hite Om" T if hllnsel he against. .re are Sfrkitj IS Univergiff usband 21 graduate of the rooklyn, nd dollars, d, in iuernqrq r the benefit "" M T wish to-stil rg but, if tht Detroit estziyt 'ed dollarslf tis and hundred dolli ni u it 1 I , A fl income can-5 ali F i 7 Q .emistrY' i ' nc lnsta, , .' 31 to the -, Freer c Davis rl' he himself, and stated what he would like for the University. Mr. .Davis was very much surprised to learn thatrthe College wanted for anything, and said he wguld talk the matter over with his partner. The result was a tive hundred dollar check, which came very soon after. If the attention of more people of wealth could be called to the desirability of establishing fellowships here, we might be more favored in that line. The legislature has never en- tered upon this Held of support, and hence, other colleges surpass us in the inducements offered to bright students of small means. l The Chinese government must not be forgotten in a list of benefactors, for their New Orleans Exhibit, which they presented to us, in 1885, is a very valuable collection. It was through the efforts of Dr. Angell that it came to us. He learned that the exhibit would not ' f 'TV 'N - ff' be sent back to China, after the Exposi- T Q tion was over, but would be bestowed upon some public institution in this gf 0 E rf country. Accordingly he inquired if the :gp -5 : University could have a part of it, and -"--'--T,e,,w?m '- the whole exhibit was sent here, though other institutions had asked for it. A There are many other donors, whom space forbids us to mention, people who have contributed collections to the art gallery, etc. Then, too, the various classes that have gone out from college have usually left something to show their love for their Alma Mater. And let us not for- get another class of benefactors, who, perhaps, are more truly benefactors than any we have yet mentioned, though they have given no money. They are the men who have spent their lives here, working to make the Uni- versity what it is and, through whose efforts, the institu- tion has grown and Hourished. Although the list of material givers is still small., we can appreciate the more the gifts that have been received, while we hope for still greater in the future. Private. bench- cence has done so much for higher education in this coun- try, that even institutions of a governmental origin, like the University of Michigan, may expect private aid, and the tendency of late seems to indicate that she will not be disappointed. CHEMICAL LABORATORY Ill YOSQIMIQ GEORGE R. SWAIN Q E little wayside pool, unclean with mud And scarce two fingers deep, reflects the trees Wi foliage green and blossoms sweet that stand About, nor these alone, for mirrored too With sharpness no less clear, you see below The mighty peaks that rise on either hand So grey, so scarred with rain and frost and time. But see! Not only trees and peaks appear Below-so perfect as no picture ever was That hand of artist drew-but e'en the sky Itself with all its depths of cloudless blue. And how could all this be? Because the pool To heaven looked up, forgetful of itself- Nay, more-surrendering itself entire In utter self-effacement. Thus it lost Its own low smallness mean, and unto him That traveled past, revealed not itself, But trees and peaks and distant depths of blue. ff' . TW' 41+ l 1 ., fi U J .. l fy 'Qs C trees land . f 'kr A ime. F ,. X 1 Th' ol IIC. Mfr' " vvnyr, , N ,H ,'4 . ,.. . gf A, . :EW .,5ifif:i' T if -.xr . . R31 gl .W 4, "v -, V .--. ,ar li .1 'W' U 'u- . ff, 1" , . Fl ,Z yr. 5 N H.. ,.. i x X . X .Q h I Z P' 5, 1 ' ' f up W, ,I ,..- 4 x 'L' M I. J. X ATN JS all Q rw" r N Q I X 'g ri fy ' :fy N X M U72 BQIGIQG ROSQDIIG SAW a little rosebud That bloomed by the garden wall, Close by a lofty elm tree That stately grew and tall. The rosebud very lonely seemed As she felt the Winter's cold, That told of coming snow-flakes rThat would all the world enfold. That night the wind blew fiercely, And forth from the western plain, The storm god on his charger wild, Scattered the frozen rain., . 'Sq Tally if had 0 X ff? Q fl 1' 'EW we T ll5??f, 1e,p,g'f'.1.ff-Ax , He hurled in misty handfuls v- -.11 1.1 . . 01, I 4 4 Bright Hakes of the hurtling snow, Which threatened every How'ret That late in the Fall might grow. But the rosebud, slumb'ring sweetly, Knew not of the Winter night That turned the earth of darkness To a place of dazzling white, For the elm tree in compassion O'er the rosebud threw his leaves, Rather to stand all naked there Than to let the rosebud freeze. 4 - - p ,, V 3g,.....---..-...v-.i',.-. . -, . , ..,'-1-.-,-V--vb:-" :':T."r-"- a'1ff"a1f'1'1'r' ' A "--f-A A , .,,.,-.... rn-r -Mrnn xl, . . ,.!qrkv , .. ,,,,,,. ,..........M,9g,g.-M. ,,..,....................,...,--.--E,- Slliltz l7l'dlld0lIl MAUDE CALDWELL PERRY I ALLEGRO MODERATO ' AIT but a moment while I breathe my fill Of these sweet roses, Time, my gentle guide, What, may we never stay a moment still? Then slow thy steps their fragrant bower beside. What, never slower, just this steady pace? Shall we find roses in some other place? The world all roses? And the world is wide ! II ALLEGRO MOLTO O dear Time, hasten. At the green road-side, See, Love awaits me with auroral face 3 e His wings are wrapped about his breast to hide The gift he bears, I hunger for the grace Of that hushed hour when he shall kneel to me And I between his folded wings shall see,- O sweet Time, let me go the little space! y III ANDANTE CON MOTO Back where the cedar-branches interlace Forgetful of thy going tarried we. But past the drinking lips, the new embrace, Floated chill Twilight's garment following thee, And through the wood we heard the loud rooks call Why wouldst thou not the day one hour enthrall, To linger on our green enchanted tree? 1 41 ,.J- 1 in I V if .. 1.1, ' 'V' ALLEGRO VIVO , Lo, one beside me. Slender-footed she, And golden-voiced and happy-eyed and tall, Y With lulling arms. Her name is Memory. I No more can thine insistent tread appall, , For day the night's remembered charm shall bring, And through the night the morning birds shall sing, And in one swooning kiss be gathered all. V LE,NTo JF 5, The sullen clouds, that through the long sky crawl, I Devour my sunny world. A silent wing I Wheels in my dreary dream. 'The branches fall From the green cedar-tree, and every-thing Is dumb and seared. Beyond 'the hopeless hill I see' one cloud its passionate tears distill. , My numb feet falter with thy stolid swing. ff ADAGIO APPASSIONATO Tired Memory's face hides in her arm's pale ring, ' And calling Hope is dead. No daffodil W Tints the gray'smile of this prosaic Spring, Nor greenling cresses kiss the sober rill. :l to me 1 Thou dragst me, stumbling, to thy girdle tied, I cannot even linger where Love died, Though in his open grave the rains are chill! VII , .ALLEGRO FUR1oso ide, 3 ' de. P l lg I f Q, ,Y Fl a ,H ii e,"" l l . O T rant An el of Im erial will, lf lf l Xl Q9 lee L V . l lf' gg 1 ll It ll S P 49 I Ldrose me! I heard far lonely lips that cried 2 From the dead cedar! Loose me, though it kill! , 5 , I must go back! I will not be denied! . a ,, . dro0ksC ' O God, what shadows these the graywinds chase? renthfally O God, what black goal for the bleeding race? Oh swallowing dark! Oh pull of drowning tide! . 4 ." .3 V , IJ. ,l DQIIINQGII GEORGE F. PAUL IGH on the crest of Olympus, great Zeus reclined at his leisure, Picking his ivory teeth and smoking a pipe of tobacco, Peaceful, contented and blest with a wife, and a home and great offspring. Long had it been since he sent on Achaeans the woes with- out number, They in due time had met fate: the Romans and Huns had gone with them, So, likewise, the Crusaders and Chivalry great at the joustings. Now recommenced the reign of rest and affection and stillness, Many a lowing herd came home from luxuriant pastures Destined to die at the block, when fat- 5,,"' tened for excellent hinges, ,E A 3 2 Many an off'r1ng of hay .had filled the 1: R: z huge barns overflowing. ,K l fl Truly contentment did reign, the lands were at peace with each other. So the far-thundering Zeus had perched his feet high on the mantel, His aegis was hung on the hat-rack, his eagle was drowsily dozing. But as a storm is fore-told by silence so calm and oppres- sive, So were the slumbers and dreams to prepare Zeus for deep meditation. t , , 3,1 ,VI -1 ' .y If fri -' QI' , 'f'z'if,q -- . 'az . 1 V M1 a -1 . ir., . . , 12' .? , W W.. eclined he . 1? ' 'X Qu' home W0es withtf 'n Hllns had Q. mamh -"1 action and pastures when fatf, is ' X 'lf '- - f filled the the landil other. high on the as drowsily h-hL 4 nd oppres4 ug for deellf f. Sharp was the telephone call that resounded throughout the apartments, Waking the monarch that snored, and rousing him up in a hurry- Straight to the 'phone he advanced and stopped its melodi- ous music. "Ho, ship ahoy ! " did he cry, with the thundering might of a Fury, "Zeus is my name, I'm a lord, the high muck-a-muck of the big-bugs, Who, pray, of mortals art thou who dost seek our most lofty tribunal?" "Great is my name in the West, in the land of the jay and the blue-bird, Yet for the tribe that I rule kind Providence hasn't pro- vided ' Either a name or cognomen, nothing have we to be known by. Pray then, thy council convene, deliberate, question and ponder That unto us there may be a name and a place among nations." So spake the Freshman named Cox, the little ones, guide and defender, Spake and his words flew Wingless to Zeus Pater, lord of Olympus. Swift to the book-case he turned and grabbed for his ink and his paper, Tore from Sir Eagle a quill and wrote with the write of a lawyer, Folded the message and gave it to Mercury, telling him meanwhile, Quick unto Hera to fly. "Why?" ask you. Well, let's examine. Mercury unto the queen was to hustle and straightway Q inform her, After the dishes sheld done, to clean up the children and bring them Unto their father, the great, the model of modern barn- stormers. So they assembled and sat in convention, a handsome collection. And Zeus from his big office chair did speak unto them and addressed them. "Children of mine, a complaint has ascended from mor- tals in trouble 3 Strangest of all this lament, so listen and give me atten- tion. What shall we call the class that last in this its century quitteth , Halls now scholastic and old, renowned in . gf. the Michiganensis? , Haste, to the task, my bairns, and you, my Q spouse and my sister. 914 Five ambrosial dumplings to the first one QA ' A that answereth fittestf' f "Papa," cried Phoebus the bold, ffnaughty- '-an P4 naughts, knitty-knits I would call Q Q them." 5 A K "Base son of mine," answered Zeus, "with " ten grievous obols I'1l fine thee, Since with the world down below these names have no place or approval." Meanwhile had hard-handed Ares been pounding the limp- ing Hephaestus With old Nep's trident of brass, behind the door of the parlor. But after their noise had been quelled, trim Mercury lisped in a whisper: ' ' "Often I've heard of the sweat that has run from those cross-country chasers When in the hare and hounds race they are led by their lusty track captain. in llntoii l from 2 mg the lirst wou l Zeus ll!! flleey below ling the : d001' lercllfl' n fl'0Ill- g 18d by 'Mercuries' call them from me and surely 'twill make them quite temp'rate." "Bad is your pun," answered Zeus, ffwhile nary a run's to their credit. All has been talk so try not to make you a rope out of pebbles." Diana, the chaste, next arose and essayed her own modest op1n1on: 4 " Call them Oh! Ohs l long drawn out. Please style them i ' Les Miserables! " Aphrodite, the beauty, foam-born, smile-wreathed Aphro- dite, - V Spake in disconsolate tones: "Pray and why Q ' not call them the 4 What-Nots ?"" Thereupon 'spake Zeus to his wife: "Come, sweetness, why don't you tell us?" 512' 'A- fs YW e ! Y 2 what at our dinner we relished, x Think of the ease and the grace with which we might call them 'the Goose-eggs."' "All from the issue havelwanderedf' were the words of the master and ruler, All have forgotten their subject, these Topsy- X T like, troublesome youngsters. Since it is theirs o'er the century's ardor to cast a wet blanket, 'Being so hard to arouse, so slow and morose in perception, Call them the blankety-blanks and blankety-blanks it shall be, sir." Thus the decision of Zeus was accomplished and stood in fulfillment, Thus did the giver of all bestow on his loneself 'the s i F? A fi "Wh th n m dear I've beenlthinking of k W 5 4' f dumplings, d U i And thus shall it stand and continue clear up to the en of creation. Cbe Zampus memorials -ll. JEAN WATSON WILSON 1 Q FW 4 O man in a normal frame of mind wishes to be forgotten. When he leaves the field of fs, 9-N5 . , . I action he wishes those who come after him 3 to remember that he, too, was once a par- C9 ticipant there, and perhaps a prominent one. We have a number of practical evi- dences of this desire upon our campus, where memorials have been erected either by outgoing classes for them- selves, or by others in memory of men who have been prominent in the history of the University. The memorial of which we hear the most, perhaps, is the Tappan Oak, which is held in special veneration by the senior classes. This rugged old tree was given its name by the class of '58, who, in order to aid in the work of beautifying the campus, decided that each member of the class should set out a living memorial. Each graduate therefore brought a tree from the woods, which was to serve the double purpose of affording shade to the weary student of later years and of keeping green the memory of the planter, and these trees were planted in circles around an oak to which was given the name of Dr. Tappan. When work was commenced upon the library building in 1881, a number of these trees were cut down, but many of them still remain and could doubtless be identi1'ied with their appropriate names by members of the class. Twenty-five years later at a re-union of the class held in this city, it was decided to place a stone under the Tappan Oak that it at least should not be forgotten in the lapse of time. After some delay a large stone was ob- tained and placed under the tree. It had been the inten- 2 Ei A' fl 3' lb li . Q, I 1,- I 'fr 9 i I S the lield sri! me Rfterhim once a par. 3 Pfflminent Practical evi- ic memorials, C3 for them., J have been 5 perhaps, is eneration by ras given its l in the work b member of acb graduate rhich was to to the weary, the memory rd in circles .ame of Dr- g the re cut down, doubtless be mbgyg of the l of the class nt under the gunen in the tn the IIHZCI1 is -W: 7, ,M , ,SH wit, :Nt s .l' 1: if ,yi . 'if .1 ,f it 'T-'R If V, 5 . if , Sl! ff 5, ov 'fl .,. ,rf Af 35, .,. its 3.4 ni Lx 31' Il' ' sf' ' ,.. a 1,1 if 1. of , ti sb t 31. 1 ,X .sf V ,,. t 'X .4 r t.-,.. ..f V0 1' it Q R -J if i. ei A ,.-, :IZ X 5 1 l , 4 one wa? ii s .5 X, 6 xii Q s. x i .'., 1 ie s 3 5 4.,.- tion of the class to have an inscription cut upon the stone, but this has not yet been done. As it had been the custom of the senior class to hold part of the Commencement exercises in some convenient, shady spot on the campus, the space surrounding the memorial of '58 was finally chosen as the most suitable place for this purpose, and it has now become a regular part of the Commencement program that the Class Day exercises shall take place under the spreading branches of the Tappan Oak. Dr. Tappan, for whom the tree was named, and whose name is perpetuated in more than one Way in the city and in the state, was the first president of the University, hold- ing that position from 1852 until 1863. During that time he was untiring in his efforts to advance the interests of the' University and its growth was rapid. During his administration the dormitory system was abandoned, and it was through his efforts that a library, a museum, and an art gallery were started, that the astronomical observatory was built, and that the Law School and the laboratories for chemistry, physics and engineering were added. He did much for the advancement of education not only in the University but in the state. His fame, however, is not confined to Michigan, for he was Well known abroad as a philosophical thinker and writer. The Tappan Oak and its encircling trees are not the only ones which may serve as memorials. As early as 1845, the first class to graduate from the University set out a number of trees in front of the North building in the form .of XLV, and on the north side of the campus, outside of the grounds, is a large elm placed there by Professor Ten Brook at a time when the campus itself A was planted with grain. Later, a large number of trees were set out as part of a plan for improving the appearance of the campus and as Miss Far- rand says in her History of the University, "The long shaded avenues within and Without the j 1 ' - H .,. , ' 1 7- A--a-ILA., 1.14 ,ltti-45 ' '-'T , K i,,,, ,H-,ve-s. ,..'c..-e., .-.. ..,---f-----"-' campus perpetuate the memory of the tree planters of 1858, 1859, and r86o." Occupying a very prominent position on the campus, where there is no danger of its being overlooked, stands another class memorial, the "Big Stone," placed there by the class of '6z. It was through the suggestion of Dr. Winchell, Professor of Geology, that the stone was brought here. Speaking in Q, of 5 MA' the class-room one day of the '5' e , 3 , ' Drift Period, Professor Win- f3i"'2' hll kd th - .lifg Q pr-Z, , c e remar e upon. enum 'w W . b g if Z - 35 ber of boulders in tl'11SlOC3l1ty " ,eq 'F 'QM , ' which hadcome down from the 'U' " , in Lake Superior region at that ' ' I Q time. He said he knew of a 352' ' particularly fine specimen 1 Q ,Ia lg. " which was to be found near . Nxxxqlx ,nk ,, Q the depot and suggested that it ,Q . A by J,,,g5,.,f, would be a good idea if some 'TM one should raise it and place 0 '- ,Q 5 " it on the campus as a memor- -"' -MT? iei. The eleee immediately decided that it would be a good memorial for themselves, and steps were taken to raise the boulder. With the aid of workmen and machinery the task was accomplished in the spring of 1862, before the snow was off the ground. The rock, which weighs some seven or eight tons, was placed upon a stone-boat and a triumphal procession to the campus was started. Two spans of horses and two yokes of oxen bore the stone from which a banner floated in the air, and the class marched to strains of music up to the campus where the burden was triumphantly deposited in an advantageous position. An inscription, "The Class of I862,', was placed upon it and thus an undying memorial was assured them. In the University Clzronicle of May 15, 1869, appears this item: "'69, with the assistance of Mr. Goodhue and teams, brought to the campus on Tuesday a choice speci- men of rock which they propose placing on a foundation as a class memento. In size it compares unfavorably with that of H623 ' yet when placed it will be no less conspicu- Klee 2 On t w sf1ssi2,fa::pus,g Placed iheringif gaistion Of e sto - he was D Onepgalilllg al' of t Professor Wiiiii rs in this localit ne down from r reglflll at id he knew of has Specimen ' be found Inari .suggestedthatii . :pd idea if someii' i use it and . rpus as a memorfi' lass immediatelyi ,I for themselves? 1, r. with the aid? accomplished iii, l s off the grounds' eight tons, was? al procession horses and twiii a banner ns of music rhantly dgn, "Tile bus all 15, lr. Goodhue Y 3 choice g 011 3 Q0 less if if ,a, i , 1 ,W 6 . ' i 5 ous." This rock, called by some the "Calico Rock," was placed by the class mentioned under the elm tree which they had planted in front of the South building, and was an object of considerable solicitude on the part of the Seniors until after Class Day. The junior Class had planned to bury the rock, but being prevented made up their minds to make life miserable for the Seniors by keeping them in continual apprehension. They succeeded so well that for two weeks, we are told, a guard was kept over the stone through rain and shine, and the troubles of the Seniors were celebrated in the' following verse written by a Freshman of the time: " How boldly, too, almost alone, Night after night around their stone, They steadfast stand, with watchful eyes, Lest some vile wretches steal their prize." Between the Hpeb- ' ble" of '62 and the . "boulder" of '69, stands s ,H "' 1 'pf 1-'I vii-5: -f' 1 " KA . x '-'e ramp ",q-J., -I the statue of Franklin f , - .- 'wh 5' - r-..' ' "0 iaeing the walks leading - ,- el ,, , . . . '- ff ggi' if , n - to the Main building. 5 s ,7Af7,,5:.5?g., was - T . -' 'I 1 finaifi.f::Z5iwZrfkf.Q4rih i . This statue was erected t M 'rag-,ff.f1,.j,ar457.'i1p5a5QM ,. . 'ill 1. ll U ',""." fl' ri'-,"4'lfh 'nv JAH' if by the class of 1870. lla-f is 'Hy''-,.':ffiSz-fi,.'1'-lsoalaigigf . - " 'lb ' '-:fl-4"f'.-UJIIIWL''W On june Ist of that year, Q.. 753, 319 .'g.,.5,.LWzfgfL,:,5, -1- ' . , 'dh A'-If11,iii'-I-'5l.:,1Z-Eglllgg. at the close of the Class Q, jf . I-Ani Z.,-'JJ' . V., lu Day exercises, the class f' an?" ' JL 2-S"!2's 'AL ' -ur My marched to where the statue of Franklin stood waiting to be unveiled, ' iw and there the dedication speech was delivered. The Clzronicle of that date tells us that the speaker dwelt upon Franklin's high claim to the respect and admiration of scholars, on account of his untiring efforts for the advancement of science and education, and justly concluded that the class. of '70 could leave behind them no more fitting memorial. The class then joined in singing "Auld Lang Sync" and Franklin was left to his task of perpetuating the memory of the stirring class of 1870. . Nearer the center of the campus, a short d1Sta11CC ffgh 7l",y'.:JNl's+b'K .s-H -if ' . Q ,Lp - - -: 1-4:.ae, 2. E ---' 4, 1, I Yi pr tl 'K Eg 'E 1 is 1. it ,ue f. ll. I 1 if iw f if Q. 7 5 ,. ,. 3 A ti .l I w 591 rr i., V ni, .,i ,i !": ri ip, n li Y i ,i li ,-F 'X tix if " H' 1. north of the Library, stands a monument different in nature from the ones we have been considering. It was erected in memery not of the living, but of the dead. How many of those who have looked at the broken column with its somewhat somber background of evergreens, have stopped to find out about the men whose names are here inscribed? There are four tablets on the base of the column, each with a Latin inscrip- tion, bearing the names of joseph Whiting, Douglass Houghton, Carolus Fox, and Samuel Denton. The cenotaph was erected after the death of the Rev. joseph Whiting, which occurred just be- fore the first class graduated from the University in 1845. Profes- "'3,T Q s sor Whiting was one of the earli- S. est members of the University "- facult . He was in char e of one Y 8 of the eight original branches of the University, and with Profes- sor 'Williams was put in charge of the classes in Ann Arbor. These two men constituted the """" faculty at that time, Professor WIA 353 Whiting holding the chair of Greek and Latin. Dr. Douglass Houghton, "Michigan's first geologist," was a young man of exceptional brilliancy of mind. Be- fore he was nineteen years of age he was admitted to the practice of medicine in his native state, New York, and before he was twenty came to Detroit and delivered public lectures on chemistry and geology. He was the means of bringing before the Legislature a plan for the geological survey of Michigan and was appointed State Geologist by Governor Mason. One who knew him has said of him: "Labor and hardship had no terrors for Douglas Hough- ton, and although he died at the early age of thirty-six, he had performed an amount of work rarely excelled and made for himself a name and fame as enduring as the history of the Peninsular State." No one else knew so' si' ,4- Vlhg , ' wal" sr Erik the deadgii er en Column-Qi greens, i Latin inscfiplg, mes of Iosephii rss Hought0,iii ,ii 'mud Dentoniil efeCted aftgffiI Cufred just beig Zfaduatedfronii 8 ff' l 45- IC of the earli-,i the Universityji, n charge of onefj. mal branches ofii td with Profesii put in charges' n Ann Arborij, :onstituted the! lime, Professor.- l the chair WJ. first geol0giSfr of mind. admitted to th New York, Lelivered 15 the means re Geologlst rs said of jpguglas gof igduring as UC ,- , 1 ' , ,.r.- Q. ,H iq. , .48 ,w,f.1 4, n,. f,, .1- ,Jr "or 's o -s much about the minerals of the Lake Superior region as he did. He was drowned during a snow storm, on Lake Superior, on the night of Uctober 13, 1845. He had been appointed a professor in the University but had not taken up his residence here at the time of his death. How many are aware that there was once a depart- ment of Agriculture in connection with the University? It was started during the ad- ministration of Dr. Tappan, . and Charles Fox, an English- man who was rector of an ' Episcopal church at Grosse 1.4- Isle, was appointed Professor. -'L i - B He held the chair less than two Ti. years, when he died, and as 1. ,-. the State Legislature had in f-" the meantime established the i' sh Agricultural College, the de- .3 "'i g, .gr 'g,. I ' if partment was 'no longer main- J 3-1 ' tained. There is a work in "- ' K the Library upon the subject of agriculture Written by Mr. si it W ' 1- " FOX. - U, ""' P fo .. Dr. Samuel Denton was ' il- i not only a member of the Ni' .,.-,. ..-.Tr ..,,.- medical faculty of the Univer- af' "",, sity, but he was also one of the cdxb rirst Regents. He was on the F' . ,L-1 Board of Regents appointed La.-gr VH s ' u t.-f by the Governor in 1837. In c"vUL:"iG',yle ,f"""4-fs 1850 he was made Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine, and he held that position until his death, in 1860. ' Thus the history of the University from its first estab- lishment until 1870 is in a manner outlined by these several memorials. Others have been presented to the University by graduating classes, but as these have been placed 1n the buildings and not upon the grounds, they do not come within the scope of the present article. IN PRAISE. PrtzeSong. Words by HERBERT M. RICH. Music by A. A. STANLEY. with dignity. 4: f e. A ii1W?j.! -! Q vfzj 1 v M10 v O Mich-i-gan, We bring to thee Our hands, our hearts, our I . 22en'E'fE1r E' EF 5 51 g E F V y . i fb. Re JA U f fel 2 M TH e 3-fr - j hifi! . if J bi Hu - ron's brink the wa. - ters lava: While yel - low iields in A E Eff. TKT- e 1. if In I , 1' , .1 ' A anim our hem, our -11 shall wave, -1 lownelds ill, ' 1 1-it. P if? -W EAN Ui: 3.14 VE?'5gE'glg1aj.1Q We praise thee not for pomp and show, Nor boast thy riches' dazzling glowg But fruits of arduous toil we see Aaorn thy halls with dignity: With virtue's thrift thy fields have grown, Thy fame has passed beyond thine own. 'Ifhy sons are strong, thy daughters fair, And from thy halls with courage rare They go to keep thy fair name bright, On track and field with brawn and mightg In halls of law, in haunts of lore, On fields of pain, thy blessings pour. In parting, Alma Mater wise, Our hearts in praise to thee arise, Ouryeyes are full, our voices break, We would stay near for thy dear sake. But though the seas may roll between Our love shall keep our mem'ry keen. . , .. - J ' 1...-Q.. ' F ' ' is 1 ' A ' . ' -. ..u...,.-.n .. A THE UNIVERSITY. Words by HAROLD M. BOWMAN. M11SiC by A- A- STANLEY' Allegro ggifgigisg an umson' sing a song to the letters and arts, To the its i Vet 'v E gi 4 .l "I 1 mi: :HI g ' g ' . E? as - 45 V 5 5 5 ' F l. Como all ye good students from way back in Groom, From A I LPLEE -i 'd i ' in ss s ' 2' WJ TJ 's il? LW! Y' 'H ss ,f I V U . F- ss' ss . s - s ee a e sf s 5 F -1 s s J f .S. U-ni - ver - si- ty. We're mei of abrotherhood, men of Im,-Lts, i s s A ss s 0' l s Y MA f' s s P gg P s g L f if ' s g s 1agD'vJ' bf- Vgvggg gg Eu-elid to those sans degree, From Bo-lo - gna, Heidelberg, Gxford and Yale, Como . 43, J -L 1 i rg il qv 1 -par l' d l' -sb , 3 Q73 J. W' lt u ' - T ,, FINE. ' Men oig af- fm-i-ties,mjn of parts, And the U-ni-ver-si - ty. .' . 45 A A 7 l I s l M- ff was s s- 5 - ff NIJ il .H li in 3 11 i l .i0iI1 in Our C0111 - pa-ny, Come join in our oom-pa. - ny. If V , g g A -3 -g g cresc. V v dzm. KC , 5 F' 'ss I U F fglif , . sl? R s 1 fi i F' V FINE. Then a truce to our virtues of several stamp And all braggadooio! Let everyone wax most ecstatically glad And warble do-re-me-dog Change the German trombone for the flageoletg And don't let the Briton or Frenchman forget To play Yankee Doodle on Spain's clarinet And pipe it fortissimof s LL ' 1 lammyf Mmm mme thas uMn -'iv' nlf md' mlm of U!-Oifordmd S ...Lili ul-ver-ai m our UOUPPB 'ny DDP ul ' 'mirfi 4 . - 155 ,hi iq ,mg J. .ri -'A v ' if 5. : ' N' M r , - ,",1f+ -1, -,351 - 1 : . in X h gh , 1 1 VZ' Y l b bn-'lawn-bgp,-m PP' A u V u t A A :J aj 3 John Bull and King Wil - liain and he of the Porte, Come i F-ng X Q3 '1 5- 57 v F"""E J if in QW PFF1 ' . 3 -ri v bl- 1' 1 1 1 li f'T"',u 'EV J 4 0 4 d bl E V 4 , it V I f bo- Q in t- pp JN -N-A N Hitgiiggghvv 555442- ev Jryygoodlfellow, old duffer and spoi't,And We'll Warble a tune to the ' I 1 bl' 7 3 J J if- 4 J 3 1 A J-I 1 ' 'Dr f' rev X U li -I . If ' : V . "' " 4 , ' - 3 ?'J-ii-1 'fl-:J fiEJf V v Y - . W4 . Fg--,ZFX W--Z-YQFN. --Y,FX ,--L jd? I 1? CHORUS. D.S. QE if iaith it -F' ,F JA A F 'Q i fx' 61 p 4 , , - - M-3 0 -zu V :J - - 5. get T pi-an - o forte, In Vol- a - pnk chords all a - gree. Then its A I o"o if it ig i W id F bg .s J iz- ' gc , i . . 1, . , 4 I Z? V f I i , - v 1- 0- - -3- -0- -9- J-, . E f Hi Ls, L F E V I lg V . ' Q he o s s g -...- V DS 1 with the lefis and the pegs Then it's down to the L regs, . . And itis on with the song' and the dance! To the fiddle of Nero bow low, and be led By the Prex of the College de France, ' th u h, And when With our revelry lightly We re ro g Let us pledffe our regard in a student's adieu,-- O In Sanskrit, and Saxon, and sober Hebrew, Then ad iminitztvn advance. This song was not entered in competition. ,A ,,,, ,,,A..,.,- ---rw 1 . ,.+,,,-,,,..l4.+..,..-..,., . , lll' IMIIKS df? UIIQ I0 0lll' 0tll' Contributors Professor Robert M. Wenley Major Wyllys C. Ransom Mr. C. Fred Gauss Mr. Isadore L. Hill Miss Alice Brown Miss Jean W. Wilson Mr. Herbert M. Rich Mr. George R. Barker Mr. George R. Swain Thomas M. Marshall Mr. Mr. Walter H. Nichols HYIISIS Mr. Standish Backus Mr. Herbert Goulding Mr. Fred L. Baxter Robert W. Hyde Miss Laura E. Marshall Miss Amy A. Collier Miss Florence Wetmore Mr. Robert R. Mc George Mr. Harry C. Mower Mr. Mr. Fred Emerson Brooks Mrs. Maude Caldwell Perry Mr. Francis P. Daniels Mr. Harold H. Emmons Miss Amy A. Collier Miss Mable E. Holmes Mr. Harold M. Bowman Mr. Henry R. Kellogg Miss Harriet E. Harlan Fred R. Cutcheon George F. Paul Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Allen H. jacharias Edward L. Kilboum Ben B. Metheany Mr. Sutton Van Pelt Miss Achsah M. Harris Miss Margaret D. Mason Mr. Fred R. Hoover Mr. Ambrose E. Ranney Mr. Charles B. Parsons Mr. James E. Torrans i at wr .fr ,- .V -.. .- td Elllefson lmqe Caldwell C mms P- Dani lmld H. WY A- -Colliti' X llble E.. Holmdsi luold M. Iemy R, in-riet E 'red R. ieorge F. Paul kllen H Cdnrd L. ku B. Metheany anon Van Pelt Asha!! M largmt 'md R. Hooyer .mbrose E Ihaxles B I GVQYUSQMQIIYS fd IICIIQI' DGVS of '96-'97 V Q a N Wu. .,, 9, P. 4- --1, 43. 1-,,,,ggf's,," - -svn Z--!'ill5"1YI-'Ai',fl'."'w1""-fx""5?i5':1'a:'s'Q'ggbi"x' 1M-".M'- xx ""!'w9J" A' Ll lil l ' v ' . T' Wright, Importers, Kay, sg J ewelers, Art Stationers, R Q and Com pany, Engravers. . . THE LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF HIGH GRADE Badges Jewelry novelties """' ,Fraternity a'nd Statiotneru , H3525 140--142 Woodward Avenue, t DETROIT. October 1-Wheels start and grinding begins. ...mul I wwf' uongrs' lp, Y TRVEI3. . GRADE 'Ui D039 ln the United is l States,,i 26, 28. 1896. Oct. 1. Nov. -- Dec. 18. 1897. Jan. 5. Feb. I9 Feb. 22 April 16 june June 27 june 29 june 30 june go july 1 Zalendar tor l896'7 460 First Semester Begins in all Departments of the University. , Thanksgiving Recess of three days, begin- ning Tuesday evening, in all Departments of the University. QEvening.j Holiday Vacation begins in all Departments. University Exercises resumed after Holiday Vacation. CEvening.j. First Semester Closes. Second Semester Begins. QEvening.j Recess begins, ending April 26 QEveningj. Examination for Admission to the Depart- ment of Literature, Science, and the Arts, to the Department of Engineering, and to the Four-Year Course in the School of Pharmacy. Baccalaureate Address. Class Day. Alumni Day. Examination for Admission to the College of Dental Surgery. Commencement in all Departments of the University. The Commencement Oration is to be delivered by Andrew S. Draper, LL.D., President of the University of Illinois. THE HEATING PLANT GIBSQN 8a CLARK hotographers E Acknowledged Leaders in every branch pertaining Swtheal-t.1:1::::: 3 5 0ur gallery having been 2 entirely reiitted and newly furnished. : : : : : : : : ANN We are still at I2 West "" Huron Street. : : : : : : ARBOR MICE: , "ii O.. Qq.,3E.2-31,2 October 20-29---College exercises suspended while '97 elects oflicers. Y H HU, ..p, nf' Q89 mai' E n Y I ANN at , ARB-Q-R -1,-11' ,A ,fy---"ff WE! ,,--:.."""-ff' u omcefsv 1 ,J .,1.1. r ,vi lj' Riff! A r., Q29 Q9 SEQ S252 Q92 C S2192 25 5995 QQ QQ ' 5292 Q52 S262 2. 'l w v A J lr n ,I 4 I Q F 524 I ,I I a 1 ! YW , , 1 ' x f I 5 he gg 44, ' Q 31 :- g 3 1 , ISQ 1 ': W as 1. . Q r ' I Z r ' ' '55 I 1.',1"Q 1 1 a--ly ,R-LTQQ x fi -5 3 page - -'51, .e V zu, Fl .,.. . ,f ull Fifi V .,,A L, , 4: illliu, t 'a5j.5. ff Jw Sf .2 H21-'f' " F1213 -7ll'.i1, la ' 5 L' ,.,. -, ' mffi' Y ' flj l' fi-A .. :Z :Z .. .. .. . . ..S.. .. .. . .. .. .. . . t i S ,'iA 5 .e AND STL-:Amen-MP LINES Where ? NA 1 .v 1 ,LI-5 L N -5 B F' ik ' x ' 5 sf X 2 'S 11, 2 K X X . 5. 'fi ' -ff. Y 51,1 . '11 .. w X ,L w 1 , 1 rw J P5-f ' 1 S' 1 ,, 5 ,. m '13 fn 1, n - - r EVER'YWHI-SRE Specially Where uooooooooooooaoonnquqp... S S .-' Q Toledo, Howell, Owosso, 4 Mt. Pleasant, Clare, Cadillac, ' Frankfort, Saginaw, Alma, Bay City, Lansing, Flint, Grand Rapids, A. Manistee, Traverse City, and all other points North, South, South- East, and South-West. 333301 Q Car Ferl-ies Five Hundred Nile-Books on ' Sale. - Accross Lake Michigan . , Mil , to Manitowoc, Menom- Famg3'0l?sn3n1g:3gfsand e inee, Kewaunee and . Gladstone. Bicycles Carried Free H BENNETT J. J. KIRBY, W. . Gan'1 Pass.'Agen1:. Ass"c.Gen'1 Pass. Agent - E. S. GILMORE, Agent, Ann Arbor. A S -F Z li L C in Octoher 3o-Lehigh knocked skj-high - ,...V -v .,. . ,.. - , a.:Q::.w1+asf J. M. Allen, W. B. Franklin, F. B. Allen, j. W. Pierce, President. Vice-President. 2d Vice-President. Secretary. Zfw 466955 ST 8 0 0 ,IUNXNDNS ORGANIZED 1868. Thorough Inspections and Insurance Against Logs or Damage to Property by Steam Boiler Explosiong on Loss of Life and Injury to Persons thereby. INININAININV plows' . . . C. A. Maynard 8: Co., . . chocolates Areliable place for anything in 1? J THE GROCERY, Bakery, Heat or Confectionary Line. Come in pound ond bolf Give uggfjgll, pound boxes, at 60 cents CI pound. We get them fresb from the factory every . . . . STATE STREET. . . week. , , , We can give you O . . Ifyou are thinking of buying LOWNEY'S if you prefer---some price. ev Bicyc 6 This spring, you'cI better call Palme' 5 Pharmacy at Brown's Drug Store before 46 S. State St. November I-I5-Daily vaudeville performance by fraternity initiates about HOW. A P A' , ..., y 'T .. - e .... f e , . y ,, KRW iw. Pierce, 2, , 4 X M' I-08: losio ns thereby. guard 8g pm mf anything in GROCERY, ' at Conioctimwry in ns aCa1l. E STREET-. mmkinzvf QyClC .ww Dwz5"" :Fawn as gg-lil! .- 0ur new Zabinets are the most Jlrtistic Photo: I A STUDIO: wer made m nm' Hrbcr Cor. Main and Huron Sts. ' RENTSCHLER hotographer November 26-Herschberger defeats Michigan I' 'E ' xgffcrltx v X V ' My .J -. J gifs- nk xx .bhx Q .J 1Qp.nl gay ,K Xfx'1kIn'gx A' Qin 'ax v 4 'Vai my 1 C- I , Xblx I L X if 1 A fv misr -'Af DLT 'L WAX 1 xx 1 X x X I n NO' Yr' '1"here's a at at at at 1B!iC?3'?f- I for W I If mon an ae an in the field. Rough Roads . . . cause you no annoyance when You av o o o Vi' Cushion Frame Bicycle 6 f clllhlon 0 1- A s I ls hereevlcg Q , -- 1 f 4 y C I ,T '.7f'f'1j ' X if ' N 4. Q a..x.1 , X 1:55 I XX, 'A .v n n n -or a o an,aaa - ,f +--W' 'Q , ' ' ' F- aof' iiE :r11: .s,.f. .f-p gw mgr . M-. -- i I I- I Durability Increased Comfort Secured Appearance Unchanged SEND FOR CATALOGUE. ' Richmond Bicycle Company, 97 Chambers Street, RICHMOND, New York. INDIANA. December x-Dr. Mosher unlocks Woman's Gym- I .JF A all-f ie Bicycle 1 A It I ff' ff 5 , i 5 Q 1 ,511 - li' RT '14 .V ,if - ' f if ,.. ... i G .1 .V i 1 ,Q in th 4 Cfleli, , hen ,ll if 3 T i m xi, l gl' Ai .1 , ' 'if fi wx' M 5 fl J 3' .S i roNDf .fini ' ,514 ' Ulu' wow' r an , if The Store Dress Goods, Qi' fumimrg Silks, Gloves, Rugs Fine Hosiery, ff Zarvets Muslin Underwear, ll DWVQWS Ladies' Walking Hats, ll, Silverware Corsets, C 36.331551 esp ,V Bazaar Goods 0 Q o I + Lad I es F I ne S ho E551 Ml: F?ItiiN:'1fTREE1nd BUGS . , . . i ren e af OXV ra es. . Ladies Tailor-Made Suits My , , , M P5clE'tS.tul'B Repaxred and BICYCLE SUITS and SKlRTS.l I ' ----vsf-. -vs---- DRY GOODS Q FURNITURE If You ? T isn't your eyes 'ills . the light you use. The cmytblryg reolly hoste- ful cmd -' up-to-date " Improved Welshach Light W i'9""""" will end the trouble at Dress or once. .ai Three times the Negligee EK 2 light with half the gas. .al 5hil'tS, 2 Cheaper than kerosene. or Neck Dressings, 5 5 y Consult the For Sale only by The GOURLAYS oFa.55fTI:Y?c!-cl-clward Ave. ann Hrbor Gas Co' We Specialize Athletic, Golting, and Wheeling Outits. December 9-Father Finney reproves student for whispering in the Library. S ' ,'q. r .0 -5 00" cg O ao 9 3' '. ' O s ' ' ' Q Cf G U 0 0 Q X Q . ' 'Q .n , 'QQ3 Q0 . . ,. O.. . , lp.. . 5. . 0 0 fb O .. O .- Q5 h. ' ,O Quo 0 D V i , Sf" 7l11'2Yg: 0 Q ww O M :fi Sf. Q ll., Q 'I . ' I 9 Pi ' H ' 'CQ fl F35 H 'Y 1'T.?!fl!!32!X2xl!9f.ii3,Z'S MD 1 y, X WR ' A A A ' rw- -.., K.. ...- .,. A... -.-..-. ' , , .wwf-3 , ,,,4ie:1L.' REKA Fine Stationeru and Engraoing House, ll2l Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. COL-EGE INVITATIONS STATIONERY PROGRAMMES BANQUET MENUS FRATERNITY ENGRAVING WEDDING INVITATIONS RECEPTION CARDS MONOGRAMS COATS OF ARMS ADDRESS DIES I-IERALDRY AND GENEALOGY A SPECIALTY. COATS OF ARMS PAINTED FOR FRAMING. A11 work is executed in the establishment under the personal supervision of Mr. Dreka, and only in the best manner. H Our reputation is a guarantee of the quality of the productions of this house. ' AAfvxAAAAAAAAAA'VN3?xAfvxAAAA LII:-TCD ii iiisfssizaszgz.:1.f.a'.fia.:':.r" Whitmore I-IQUSE Lake. Summer Resort Only ten miles from Ann Arbor. Pleasure Resort for Students. Fine Dance Hall, Bathing, Fishing and Boating. First-class Fleet of Row and Sail Boats. Rates by day or week. Write for terms. D. F. SMITH, Prop. Q Lumber Yard Manufacturers ol? and Dealers in . H Saginaw Gang-Sauned Lumber Dealers in Sewer Pipe and Drain Tile Corner Zith and Depot Streets, Ann Arbor, Mich. Telephone Connections January 26-Third anniversary of '97 Glee Clubs farewell tour. Thanks- giving services in Dexter. The Royal Worcester Cycles embody all of the best known de- vices for perfect construction and correct adjustment. . . . . so A lady or child can now care for their wheel, because they can . . . easily understand its simple mech: anism .... Simple SO' Each wheel is most carefully tested and thoroughly tried before it is True sent out .... So E 0 New Ideas in bearings have re- . , duced friction fully one-half. C. . . Running Easy ff-fiffff WORCESTER CYCLE lVIAN'FG CO., Send for Catalogue. I5 Murray Street, New York- january 23-Hot water in the Gymnasium bathrooms. ' U v t knowh tfllttion 0 l r . ,L OW we srmple mechhh nrefnlly tested l before it is 'sf have IC'halfo ' ' 4. g3mZ!!U1!! My Thcg' K C. E LK - To Mackinaw A The Students' Favorite Route ' A 'ro MACKINAC The Coast Line to MICHIGAN SUMMER RESORTS TWO NEW STEEL STEAMERS The Greatest Perfection yet attained rn Steamboat Construction The Detroit and Cleveland Steam Navigation Co The Greatest Transportation Agency on Fresh Water. send for Illustrated Pamphlet v C007 me N" Address A. A. SCHANTZ, G. P. Agent, DETROIT. MICHIGAN. S February 1-Overloaded Ann Arbor street car jumps the track. Both passengers escape uninjured. , , , ,Whitmore Lake - - - Th's cut shows the Lake and Grounds in front of the Lalie House. Just the place for students to spend a. , A' Stevens! Prop' few days Good boating and nshing. A n1ce dr1ve of 10 rrules from Ann Arbor. Afvvx ,VNAA4NAVx,VN!vN!VVvx AAAAAA!VNA!NAA J. JI. Goodyear. , , .THE BEST, , , J. J- Quarry- p GO0DYEAR'S Drug Store. r Drugs and Surgical Instruments. fN AAAAAAAA""' EVERYTHING MUSIGHL ANN ARBGR MUSIC COMPANY 21 and 23 East Washington Street, fx vs THE few 5 BICYCLES O .aa ICE SAVERS , . You will iind the THE DRY AIR Leaders at . . . gg? Rainey Refrigerators and ICE CH ESTs BROWN'S DRUG STORE AT Ramblers at 5580. SchumacI1er'5 - HARDWARE STORE, Syracuse, Sterlings, Wintons, Eagles 68 S. MAIN STREET, and plenty of good, lower priced wheels. February 8.--Young lady comes clear from Ypsilanti to have dental work done in the U. of M. parlors. 'WH 'Q ,.,a!.1 s:e.-4 'fi-Q31 - iv " we 'pif-9 V "Hifi: -1-- -- - .. .. , - . --M e H 4 'Z - "' d .' f- W -' N" ' ' 'xii ,e A V an alters. -M -:WJ-"H"' Arbor. E J. J. Quarry. PFC. ii E i Di me Ja STORE at 530' V l lawns. Wmiil 5 'mi rk 0.1 mural" N J ' 1 Q.. . I ,'L I T fi 1 , . . IG, . 1 , wa ,,heels. 2f3 i A Monthlg Magazine Published in the .... CH GAN M N U 5 The oH-icial organ of the Alumni Society of the De- 19E9'fQ9P9. -Pf .fP0.ll"f7 -eorsitg oi Michigan . . and her Alumni. . .... partment of Literature, EVERY MEMBER , ' OF '97 SHOULD Science, and the Arts, SUBSCRIBE Detroit and oth - BEFORE . ' , er Asso GOMMENCEMENT ciations. Subscription Price for 1897-98, including the CoMMENcEMENT ANNUAL of '97, only " ONE DOLLAR lf6A r'N!X!XfNfN!NfNfN j. A. POLHEMUS Go To J. A. BROWN Livery FOR ond Hack . ' Service F1126 THE BEST GroccrieS 26 NORTH 37 EAST MAIN ST. wAsHlNc.1'oN s'r. You MAY THINK Hammerslough Bros. '-"""" flrlioe Stein-Bloch Co's Lowney,-5 CLOTHING Chocolates E.Fa2,f1::.2a:sz,23grQE,1ai1z 2533? 3 LINDENSCHMITT TLlttle7S gc APFEL 43 SOUTH av s. Mmm sr. STATE ST. February I2-I9-HOYSC show in all departments of the University. Awww- ,.,.,..,.... .....- . , X' ,"'.- c. - --- F l+lQl1ill,Zl.l-'Z ..Meats. . Washington I7 East Flarket Washington St. rangeris Academy School at OF as ancing Opposite - , School of 6 Music VIAYN ARD ST 22 fX!NfNfNfN!N fvvvvxfvvvxfvvvvvvx NfNfNfNfN"x"'N'VN AAAA 'RAA A,wvvvvxA.AAfvxAAAAAAfxAAfvvv W. J. BOOTH, QWM. ARNOLD, j. ll. SHEEHAN, JOHN G. WALZ, JR Pres. 4 lst Y.-Pres. . 2nd Y.-Pres. Assn: Cashier State Saving ami We do a general Keep your account Where Banking Business . R it is safe and convenient fN!Nf'NfNfXfNfNfN!NfXfNfNfNlN!N!'NfNfNfXfNfxfNfXfNfXlX!'s!N fvvNAAAAAxA6XxVAA'VN AAAAAAAA fXfXfNCfX6fXfX . I , mr bwestern BILLIARD UlIi0Ql'SiiV PARLURS fmedical School Fine Cigars and Tobacco PARKER, COLBURN 55 Sc SCHNEIDER Dealers in and Sporting Goods. This school gave the iirst graded Course of Medical Instruction in America. Its standards have al- Evays been high, and its rank the es . . , The regular course is four years With- conditions for advanced standing. The laboratories are large, the equipment complete, and the courses thorough. The clinical material -is very large, Many Ann Arbor men come to us for their lastyyear, we like them and Want more. For circulars of detailed infoma- tion address the Secretary DR.VN. S. DAVlS,fJR., AIGYUHB Special BEYUIBS at , H 2531 Dearborn St., 25 E. WASHINGTON ST. E CHICAGO, ILL Hardware, House Furnishings, February 19--Mr. J. Hop returns from Toledo. O 5 A EN ,Q . 6 . NAYN tt c58hierg -aunt where convenient n r N01 :he first gwdqd Instruction in winds have al- nd its Milk the Q is milf years for advanced 1 g, H161 HSE. aargd. yhel Many mme to 115 fog, , like them fm leuilvd infoma' ect!!-VY MVIS'-'R" hom Sf-9 CHICAGO' 'LL' 4 rtv . , . ARD Si.. v c .,n cc ' - , , The laowyer Who wishes to keep abreast of the tunes, as to the law of Corporations, should possess this excellent series of reports. Mr. LEWIS displnys good .Judgment and discrimination in his selection of cases, and his annotainons are unusually full and Vl1lLl1lbl9.n-G'l'86lL Baq, Boston. LEWIS' ANNOTATED Rain' ad W 0l'D0l'dIi ll RQDOITS THEY RELATE TO RHILROADS AND CORPORATIONS SD6Cidl naw B00kS 5 for Students " Blick's " Law Student's Re- view, 3 vols., - - 55.00 Common Place and Brief Book, 4.00 Evans on Pleading, - - 2.50 Q Q . Ford's Legal Analysis, - 1.50 7W 6S Descriptive circulars mailed on appli- cation, and exchanges made. E. B. MYERS 8: CO., Law Booksellers, I I22 Quincy Street, - CHICAGO 'Nl H M N PN N RN MN union oo oo Q oo 0 lil? imzill r Y 2.1 W g 0 l !.. HH Q umm was no oo ' 0 imlm PM NN I li ' -1 'W "2iiEi3'-, ' " ev- P f Wenle celebrates Washingtoxfs Birthday by February 22- ro essor y sending out a condition. ""f 1 i nteroollegiate Bureau or Academics Gostume COTRELL 8: LEO ARD 472 to 478 Broadway, Albany, f-1 - N-Y- MAKERS OF CAPS, GOWNS and HOODS to the AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES and for the PULPIT and the BENCH Illustrated Monograph, Samples, Etc., upon application- Class Contracts a Specialty. fNfNfXfg !VVVN AIVXA AAfVN just Style . . . Our selection oii woolens in the new eliliects and designs with our r skilled workmanship and tone oli garment will give you the " Just Style." Our Spring Woolens are liull oil novelties. We ask you to see them. With : : : A " Our Furnishings " gou are well dressed. ale' Wagner 6a Co., 21 S. Main Sit. ESTABLISHED 181 8. BROOKS BROS. Broadwag, Cor. 22d Street, New Yorkpflitg. Clothing and Furnishing Goods Ready Made and Made to Measure. In our department of Clothing to order Will be found a complete assortment of Scotch and English Suitings in " all the year round" seasonable and tropical weights and a large variety of other goods, giving the fullest opportunity for selection. In recognition of a general desire for appropri- ate ress for Outing purposes We have given special care to all articles embraced in this class. They include Knickerbocker Suitsg Red Golfing J acketsg Scotch hand-knit Stockings in suitable colors and designsg iolfing Caps and Gloves, Highland Gaiters, e c., e c. Our Furnishing Department contains an exceptionally ric and handsome line rep- resenting the best foreign makers and se- lected in London for this season's use. Catalogue, samples and rules for self- measure sent on application. February 29-Michigan Legislature makes 31,000,000 appropriation for the University. -.....- -, -- t , 1 , M: la., .-.Hy-,.A . ,N ,-, . . . - - . I ., - ,,...-.-..,....-.--...-.,--W - . , N.- . , . -fran: , . -sz" "' .gggq . .- -' ' .""'r!"v"'- 1' ,fs 1- Y-. 1 - V1 ' - "'ff". .:2f'fQv -1:'- i, -'L' 'Z ' ' " af . " NAR5 'Yr . , N. Y. e . 'lCH S 1818. BROS. O IStnot, p B 1 thing Goods ln Insure. othlng to Older 3, in "all the mP,,.,.wr.':r.? 8 lxselection. IE in for appf0Pf1' 5 'em-9 given mbflwl in Luuxkgf Sllllgs ,mn handgggf. eil I 5:34 Gainers, an dm jlld se' :S selfil' :Figian fvf. l 1 Double Shear Steel, Blister Steel Annealecl Tool Steel F Reamccg t 'llgvfilli English rr l 'Pics p Tool Punclalix ' Saws ggltll5kllclEDAL Etc gmclugllian Exposition ESTABLISHED OVER A CENTURY AGO Manufactory, Sheffield, England 9! John S ., New vmfx Wm. Jessop 8: Sons, Ltd, W. F. WAGNER, Manager Vvvvxvvvvvv vvvv VVVV THE ' WESTON Standard lloltm eters mmeters Milli-Yoltmeters M illi-Amrneters Etc. FUR LABORATORY USE These Instruments are Semi-Portable, and are the most convenient and accurate Standards ever offered for College Outfits. Weston Electrical Instrument Co. Wlhlifi. sf. NEWARK, N. J. March 6-Col. Weinstein's Fruit and Flower Athletes appear at Grand Opera House. L d' M' tu es of Give usa Call . Au the ea ftggbaitcgs, Largest Line of Pipes - V Cigars, and in the City., Cigarettes. At very Lowest Prices. .20 .29 at . . Hot Lunches . . S At all Hours of the Day or'.Night. OYSTERS . . in Every Style in Season. .al .al .ai Ice Cream and Soda Water and all Summer Beverages. HUYLER' S' " gggfgggg R. E. Jolly, Sc Co., Closing out Sale of Stationery, 13, S- Sf?-M0 St-, Sager B100k- AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAbA AAAA ESTABLISHED 1851 . EIMER Se AMEND, . . . Chemicals and Chemical Apparatus . . . 205, 207, 209, and zu Third Ave., Corner of Eigteenth Street, ' ' ' ' New York 5.55. Finest Bohemian and German Glassware, Royal Berlin and Meissen Porcelain, Purest Hammered Platinum, Balances and Weiglits, Zeiss Microscopes, and gl Bacteriological Apparatus, Chemically Pure Acids, and Assay Goocls.i,,,,M . E. V. Hanggterfer . . . Fi C f tg d CATERER as ae an at Chocolates, For Parties, Banquets, Etc. Corner of 4th and Washington, and 26th S. State. AAAAAAAAM WAVAnlAAAfsAQA'NAAAAAAAA Clofhiers Haffers Fine Furnishings Y ' 1 Noble s Star Clothmg House 35 south Main sf. ANN ARBOR mc:-1. ' l March 20-Freshman falls from cross-walk into State Street mud. -f-f-Q57-7.-...Y 'asf pw U 0' Nfilirl G -f me Q, 1 D cj D LL 93 'ew F Hwarded Second Prize if - e Glass H e 'f':',L"1' for 'fine Pomaiture A F Silver medal Q A gs,6ff- JE A d , , W . March 24-St t St t d gg d d F hman's body recov d , 1 A , NA ,A . 4 4 A -I Y, 4 5 .. 4 3. i V 1 . 23 ' 1 P 3 , F , ' 1 3 I Q 1 I , 1 O 5 - f A '9 N .. 5 , YL tg. I l F i i 0 'Z i I z L E F a F r 4 1. E. ,, E S ' r bE"',, . --,.,... 7f'Qf,"?b':,'-15-. E : I ,k iss Us kwin 1 - ' wigf e MI'fYff!?2 , ' ., 'fm -2: ,Y E wafdicze I E , 15 ,p-2? b. -:Qmg 1.5! f L -, , v " , A in , v- --l- We-AJ-K3 P4'5-1Q1'w0f:ff"ff' --EAP Affhiilhifliia' . W " 1-W, , ' - V: Lu, nw 'FHM :-2.25-:Ffh-.1: . 4 5 4111, fniv QU ' ' " "' HN, , 5' I. -.w'eV ' .'- 1-!','!evf',,,"A'f5!' .. , '..:, ,A - ' 1 1-,-- V ,Je .:. -'nwfefrfs , 12: ,:--.H +L A J 574 -A H - :::?!fs.zmf-1-. , .- 4. V Er. Tim? gagging in -'Q'-.Q . .... ' SYAIWHI A E ' . gif? ' 'Egg I' .,j,A:.. -, f - ""'1Yfi"-1? ' .iff 5 -'f ii, 5 h di, . fQij5,A3j"i'zf ' " bl1AlIl'HI .JI HU! - gsm: E A u .nl l Il 1 i1-' ' a E ' '4 zwl-f",-ff',fz l ,.: - ' ' f I ru mm ' I 16 sm-Es Q n - " ' - 1 E f , E AND slzlzs U S.. ' EBERHARDTS' PATENT NEW TYPE GEAR CUTTER rv ' Universally Used by ll. Gov. Arsenals, Universities, Technical Schools, all First-Class Electijical and Manufacturing Plants ggi ' V INJXINFJNILVXININJNZNZNIX W!"J'-l nv' .5 -1, N was ' , S Rik -- 11:6 ,N ,. A V ,f-,o,..-.,-.- 7 E L,o,:, ,, J ,A., .W mnrsmuusnm - msg, ig-- 1 . ir!! ' 1316 +.--: S ' I .--X Sha SPS 41 HW " , i --.is A i - H' hi .M . - E ps? 1:mg5gnfj ma 5 14- STV'-ES n lE a 1 v '. ,..-?--,i'...- , -f f-... Wagga AND SFZES f E A Ar C ,,...1..,.:: 12, E- , 7 :-vJ fm ,,g,,,,,1.,,.s .,.,. ,:?..,.' "'- V I I " 1 .x ,,,, , ,,x. ,,,i.1.,3-UQ,-qg1,1a,w:fmQq5QgLgEi,.l I I ami, Drill Presses, E E E -W ,... -:'--Q--Wf Rack Cutters, All High-Class Machine Tools NN? DQLJBLETRIPLE QUiCK ,511-RQK5 ' EBERHARDTS' PATENT EXTENSION BASE SHAPERS NIXIXI'-VX! GO LDEC B RH RDT March 274-University Band recognized as a. belligerent. 3? Q 3 3 - - -V. -. ..., ,..- , , , ,A-Y 4 V, 'MNH' UAV. lv , 4, . F. . . ff- .V . . - . , .. ..., A . ,V . - t. - - f ' . - -4 5 f'7-4-'Af,Q-,i-.'t1.g-:fm . .1-.-A 1, .. -g h-.,h,-, ' Y , -Un ,. , ,. . 'af l f X 7 X A 1 GEAR CUTTERSE Q UID sllzs 'I 'vida Techniul 'shaving Plants 1 --l 1 1 4 I N I ,V '1 I I S1890 ,NNT SHAPERS IARD ave you a Michigan Pin ? Remember We havejthe only line, at 3,11 pr1ces from 5oc. to 55.00 andfwill be glad to send some on selection to any addresss, at our expense. Leading Jeweler, 'fy ANN ARBOR. fVVvvvvvvvvs ININININ cg ,AX ,- .,gaf'.ij I WM. ARNOLD 7 T , .764 av Suit Cases cmd Trunks. 27 and 29 South M win Street. NAAA!VVVVVVXA! NAAA! f11InC1'ElS H H H No matter what camera you Want, it will pay you to buy it from us. What we know about the different makes 1S at your d1sposal We d rather sell you a camera that IS all r1ght than one that We can make a b1gger profit on-It pays US better to satlsfy you Calklns' Pharmacy April I One, George Wahr disposes of a 99 Oracle l il , . . I U 4, J , 0 I 1 . ' lu l N ' ' 0 M ' 0 l , l . - . r, r 1. , M5 t ,3 2 ll 53' '- , A. ' ry . Too Hmorlooo Revolution B W OHN FISKE. f!!usz'1faZea'1EdiZi'01z. Very noble volumes, containing 22 photo- Y I gravures of portraits and paintings, 15 colored maps and plates, and 280 text cuts and maps. 2 von., svo, 58.00, half calf, gut top, o12.50g half polished morocco, 5I2.5o. p - , " Three hundred illustrations, each with a clearly distinctive reason for its being, enrich and illuminate the text, and the introductory notes with which they .are accompanied are almost in themselves a biography and a history."-Brooklyn Stwndqfrd- Union. . w msoorlool wrnonoo or .Jonn Proto O n O The Discovery of America With some account of Ancient America and the Spanish Conquest. With a Steel Portrait of Mr. Fiske, reproductions of many, old Maps, V several Modern Maps, Facsimiles, and other illustrations. 2 vols., crown Svo, gilt top, 54.00, half calf, 56.50. 5 . The American Revolution o With a new Portrait of Washington, hitherto unpublished, and Maps, " 2 vols., crown Svo, 54-OOQ half calf, 56. 50. A ' The Critical Period of American History, 1783-1789. With Map, Notes, etc. Crown 8vo, gilt top, 52.00. The Beginnings of New5En:gland or, The Puritan Theocracy in its Relations to Civil and Religious Liberty. Crown Svo, gilt top, 52.00. The above six volumes, cloth, 15I2.00Q half calf, 510.503 half calf, gilt top, 52I.00. Solol by Booksellers. Sent, postpaid, by HoUGH'roN, MIFFLIN a oo. Boston. May I-Michiganensian Out. ' I 'S ldnmy, lin.: , . I-w-um erican d glan .m mf WP, an John V. Sheehan Sc Qo. AND BOOKSELLERS, 146 Woodward Avenue, DETROIT Sheehan 6a Co., s UNIVERSITY BOOKSELLERS, Ann Arbor, . . . Receive as soon as published all the new books from American and English publishers. If you are looking for something you can't find, or are seeking information about books or best editions, call on us. Our clerks are professional book-men of long experience who are equipped with the latest catalogues and bibliographies, and will gladly give you any information you desire. With our two large stores at Detroit and Ann Arbor, we handle more books than any other concern in the State, and offer our customers the benefit of our large purchasesi K Y . All Books sold at Reduced Prices. Large Dis- counts to Large Buyers. 5 , -v l3v- LADIES' FINE STATIONERY AND ENGRAVING. John V. Sheehan Sc o., DETROIT and ANN ARBOR.


Suggestions in the University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) collection:

University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1892 Edition, Page 1

1892

University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1894 Edition, Page 1

1894

University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1895 Edition, Page 1

1895

University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1898 Edition, Page 1

1898

University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1899 Edition, Page 1

1899

University of Michigan - Michiganensian Yearbook (Ann Arbor, MI) online yearbook collection, 1900 Edition, Page 1

1900

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