University of Miami - Ibis Yearbook (Coral Gables, FL)

 - Class of 1958

Page 1 of 388

 

University of Miami - Ibis Yearbook (Coral Gables, FL) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 388 of the 1958 volume:

nineieen. handled a11.iZjQfiif- iii. ,5' ,w r .J-9:2f:':"'.':,, 5fWQm?Q5?fvL fl ig 'S '-:U-1, 1 HQ' M .,,. ' f, 'igggllw fs f . ff 7zfW'2Ef'?fgW?'WW"f'7 1 2 f ,1m.,?ffY.-gw , A. - ffsfw .E Q ,Q if '-fl ' Ash ww H Q. g4 ,z, A 33 ,5 ,A SQ? , V, 'yr ,ww I L UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI 1958 voLuME 32 Coral Gables, Florida 1958 Ibis Contents Campus Weather . . . I0 Skylines . . . I2 Other Phases . . I4 Administration Board of Trustees . . . . 27 General Administration . . 28 President's Ottice . . . 38 Features Ibis Beauties . . 42 Citations . . . . . 50 Homecoming . . . 52 Fine Arts Music . . . . 60 Art . . . 6b Drama . . 72 Activities Student Government . . . 80 Band ot the Hour . . . 86 Publications . . . . . 92 Sports Football. . . I08 Basketball . . I28 Other Sports . . I34 University Research . . . . I52 Evening Division . . . I58 Other Departments . . I60 Organizations Greeks .... . I68 Honoraries .... . 240 Other Organizations . 255 Graduation Medical School . . 298 Law ..... . 304 Other Schools . . . 3I2 Advertising . . 362 Index . . . 372 EcIitor's Note .......... . 380 Published and Copyrighted May, I958 by the Undergraduate Student Body ot the University ot Miami, Coral Gables, Florida WI ,., . ,L ,v-A.,.k. c.-M-,. ' Q 'U s V :tv nf va - y ' U' , K . " , Q nr I K, Ill!! k'fc X il 4 kgr 11 V' I 4: wg are I , w, .M 35 - 'e 4 ff Q M gp' M15 L " 'f ' ":AA'x C elro gli! .xl , af M. .1-. A-., x.AxL X ,.,- ., QQ R? A 'mfifgvmlw I ,Xi A r Slall ir 2 Q r Jacque Warren Pa+ricia'DuhalmeC l no fl Edifor-in-Chief Businesslvlanager ,, I V V Q E Y 4 M . ' of S.. . SEE 3 Y Alan Rusnalc Carmen Colon Sharon Nellon -Sw -:' , , -we rg aw, . . . . g 4,, P c ,.,o ,..,. gf? Pholo Ed11'or Assoclale Edrlor Copy Ecll+or ii 1 .1:g- gi, 51 M -fs A ' A no M, v Roger Reece Michael Thompson . Helene Rosner ig qq, Z UAA, 1 o gi. lrgr 1 ibrfs Ediror Layouf Eclifor Assisfanr Ecli'l'or ceo ,lrrr iee K A M N b ',. 'b TI ,Q 'L E1. . 351 C., gram K rrrr. i 2 55 r" ' "Qr.,, ' s. Gm . "Even though our time in history provides a threat, we must not let our fears destroy one of the character- istics that gives us our strength - namely, the freedom of the American university to search for truth, to in- vestigate, to analyze and to follow the course of reason." These words, uttered by Dr. James McFate Godard, UM's executive vice president and dean of administra- tion, ring out with powerful clarity. They also express Dr. Godard's credo: "to search for truth, to investigate, to analyze and to follow the course of reason." This is the doctrine which has shaped Dr. Godard's life. And it is because of his unending, unrelenting search for truth, his great ability as an administrator, his understanding, judgment and vision, that the 1958 I bil' is dedicated to him. IIIEHIIHN HH. JHMIS M. Huunuu Dr. Godard joined the UM staif in October, 1955. As dean of administration, he was assigned to trace and analyze the educational aspects of the University's pro- gress. A little more than a year later, he stepped into the post of executive vice president. A man with a three-dimensional personality-dig nity, dynamism and determination-Dr. Godard came to UM after having served five years as executive sec- retary of the Commission on Colleges and Universities of the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools which accredits such institutions in eleven southern states. Dr. Godard symbolizes the aspirations of the Uni- versity and, as a speaker on campus and off, carries word of those aspirations far and wide. ADMINISTRATOR, ADVISOR AND FRIEND, DR. GODARD MAY BE CALLED A LAYMAN WHO STRESSES THE RELATION OF RELIGION TO EVERYDAY LIFE Southern shies: it hliie dome tufted with cottorz. Different from the pdllor of smoke- chohed cities. A campus of cold steel, concrete, of 'wdrm friendship. The cizrripits for tomorrow. HMPUS '- 5 , i 5 sf ' fy . I' Q 1 Q ,,.D ' 9 x , 4 f' 4, ' .. QM, , ' "lu . . 4- , , f , ! - .f - V KW. 620 'W . -.Qi di 'u M t ' Q 'gi s X 4? ., Q . .X Q A a ' Q' ' , Wil., .K , ' kb QQ, 5 ' Q , , , Q1 " rf ' ,Q ag L 1: R,. 1 1 -, .. ,, r 1 EQ." - . fbi- -1 ,fjsilu 2 ieflqy ,, ' ,fL,.:, . ', a"??A F4 !. Qfkri' 'I uf1,.,..,., 0 O .1 's 'T 3,1 'z A 1' sn , A an ww w 1 w4":-',f'.. ' x . rg, - , J' t'A.aU X32 T ..-'I' '-5' ,I gf,,v9'.i-'ggi I I vw., ,U ip R 'I-M !j"'Qf'l'SJ , f -s-'rw Q 1 3 Q." xv:-we-.. ,gf " .iv Q- gm" ,Q- L,f.qf-qff ,, .- Lx, X ..,, in I , if 1 U' 'V tg ...Q ,I 2 'S c , ,Q E ,I J' 1 I I ,- 'ru ,Q 5. , x fs E15 A - ,. f-lm , ou- - , ,.... - - -Q7 H ,,,.fVW,.3Mij- vl,YlQ,,n + ,A u ,A , R an FW 2- ,a-, ,P r It . I ff Yi! .v4' .U T5 ?!?Y,.q1vA 152' 1 Y ?" ' a o f f '- X K. , s. 4 "Q Fw, 'gh . h V I ' 0 rn' " , L fi ' , 5 If va J ,. 9 ' - ,- -,Q QV .. ., tr A mi -u :4 4.715 - , ' - """ " ' - ..2. ' .s- - ' q 1 Yr' 1 -A . , V, g-,L-....,,,4f ,.. g:f1-fn-....,,,,,.,,, f-N113 .,,,,,,,W .,,..:-7, my ,Aff Q me-5. 'M 3' -2' ,Rf .wa 2 A- , . P L:4.g .,,3g!5-' ' i' , VW f." 'K I 'I .if .M K S., -N ww, - 'Q-1, - A . n I xx I! X 'Q '51 A 5 3 '4 N . 1 FH u 41' 5, I , V, fx L A: 4 Q' QT -Av-up .W 51 K. K-- I EATHER . . . mostly everything tropical . . . wonderfully warm, sooth- ingly sunny .... There is something radiant about a golden sun spreading its heat-giving rays from a gloriously blue sky. . . . There is something radiant about the sight of spirited students swelling over the campus in comfortable, lightweight attire .... et a change in the weather produces a change in the campus .... A rare touch of Winter creates a barren scene . . . when walkways normally overflowing with activity suddenly become empty . . . when lightly bunblde-up students appear only to dart quickly to and from classes . . . when doors and windows which are normally open are suddenly shut tight. . . . From brilliant to barren to bleak . . . when a usually bright setting turns dismally gray and damp . . . when a usually sun drenched-campus submits to a heavy down-pour of rain . . . when rain-dodging students cheerfully say: "just a rare case of bad weather!" 10 p 1' T ' 4 , i w f ie sd' , -wi W 'X -Er , Q L , 1. fi fin '4 S A :lg 2 Q' vf Z N, X 3 E X0 if A 4 bf Q ,4 W 1 , if 7' Vt K' X bf' Y Q' ,U , ' Mr k b, L N Qi 1 T sw 1 iw N ,f :V -Knsgfmuya? L fm U x M WX in 5 . f X, is W -S 4-mswv Q . :gif ,xl .-fl, ' -A 'His ,-- -me . , Q 3, vf il is R Mi' ,cs Q- 1 -u- z,, A fn ,L ,.,, ff-an . ,X +1 KYLINE. . . reaching always upward, sky- ward . . . ever climbing, ever grow- ing, seeking-forever seeking- knowledge, wisdom, the myriad secrets of the universe . . . carrying with it the pulse beat of activity and movement that echoes from the classrooms and from the open breezeways . . . within its doors a daily drama unfolds: discoveries of the unknown, realizations of the known . . . and beyond-beyond the doors, over the roof-tops, it scans a mighty metropolis--a metropolis that looks to its utmost reaches as a prominent seat of learning . . . its academic endeavors ever compara- ble to its physical beauty: graceful structures-the Merrick tower, the Ashe Building, the Law School- rising majestically toward the heav- ens, framed against a sub-tropical background, enhanced by graceful pines, azure skies, faint rustle of a breathless breeze-all of which lend themselves to the creation of a breathtaking skyline .... LD-NEW . . . The University of Miami campus is a vivid contrast of old and newg old landmarks linked with new ones, the memories of a thousand yesterdays shaking hands with the realities of today and the dreams of tomorrow, a happy union of past, present and future . . . where the old looks new and the new looks newer . . . A glance backward . . . The old is exem- plified by wooden buildings lying in the shadows of modern, massive steel structures . . . by the Anastasia Building to the North, a sturdy Spanish fortress with open patios and arched doorways which tell the story of a bygone era . . . by the Merrick Building whose streamlined beauty seems to deny a past that has weathered a devastating hurricane, a nation-wide depression and the impact of a major world war which saw it stand for over two decades as an imposing skeleton . . . A look ahead . . . The blasting of a bull- dozer, the sound of concrete, stucco and fiberglass being welded together and the sight of new skeletons in- troduce the "New Look": a symbol of progress for the future .... e ff 1 ,." , 55? ,. ' it .rags T 3 3,3335 m ga,-a X aa? tpp.,. , :.1,,'q:,1V '1' BSTRACTS . . . designs impressionistic . . . modernistic . . . communicative and uncommunicative . . . a myriad of finely woven textures, diametric angles and geometric patterns . . . through the latticed trellises . . above the circular staircases . . . beneath the glass-stained shadows . . . new formations springing forth . . in each a story . . . a picture . . . sometimes startling . . . some- times grotesque . . . but always spinning a creative web . . . fas- cinating designs that appear as widely-curved zebra-striped steps . . . a triangular staircase resembling a well of nothingness that goes down-down-down into the steep vacuum of a contour-shaped pit . . . a building standing as a monstrously gigantic spider with arms of steel immersed in a chorus of musical sounds . . . a lacey mantle of shad- ows forming dainty mosaic pat- terns . . . a steel railing resembling a trumpet . . . all abstracts . . . all created by both man and nature . . . ,.w"" wfvf ,ff ,MH M ff" ,W Q ,gk ,,,LA -W l silhouette f xx aft- fy , s 1 , - 4, - s ' at W sf 4:1 time A '-f-mf , H L+ a veil of black . . . Night . . . a time for reflection . . for relaxation . f . for research . . . for romance . . . Evening shad- ows . . . evening students . . . the steady drone of a professor-'s voice streaming out of a well-lit classroom . a boy, a girl sitting together on the shadowy shores of darkness wrappedin dreams . . . dreams . . . ambitions . . . aspirations . . . shar- ing the spotlight together even as the midnight curtain falls .... t Ss a s -,ss VL V WWW l E . f TQW 1 F l 5, ..,. 4 ,I gr Y r qi , , tt,, ,, , s -K -Jw J' as um. .--Q.. ...-..... . 6933 WMS :ma A .f-Q, Wzwk hx www, ,. ww ,Qc 'Q 2 5 'gglff gfi' K 0 f wi pxlgsww- Az .:- 3 '?Qwf'i2Lw1sJEl:Qt1li52 lfwreivx-, 2151 W, - 55255555-CfFJ.glQg3gz if 'i J .. 'f f L' ff wax 'GWSM Ir if . -wk gQ,ef5Q?:Q??5 .:zQf,3Wx,,gz Q -Q my W, 12Ae2:9i?iQf-fix Qtgiwyif 'ga M , f 23535 J ws' in Wg. 4aw N,Q,.3 1- . 1, LW: Q2 ,A ,Q 1 gy. ,, PM A, Fw 5 f , 2 ff? ,E s ,pf A wt isiiw iw, El ' QQ 143 .Y . L 3 , 5 ian, i A Q, 1 . ,Q f sv-ff i ,,.. 5 ? f t 1 X 7 1-P xr I 1 5 v x . . , : , W ,.:, ,. .1.,., 4, Af? ,. " T, AM 1 4 W 1 Q 3-is .um-b. X 5,-,fwfmm :mm ..,,:mx'ww'ww.Q'mxw.sww gk W ,W ,, , 44. x A1441 NJ X - Qin? , Qiyw 'Q .V Q3 ,, ,, Q, ,na 'f ig 3 ,, ,,'i.:d' Jkfr ' 1 , ' QW S7 'W , fximxiii Q, .. 2, qv' Q ,MMV my .Jaw -sa 4 --sgym , r' ' iw 1. if xv gf?-,ww N , ua, , A 1-Sw -v 'HR : E R , , N 9' 5: ,P J X- ,. 2 Q u L - x ' .J hm-1 "fP'9'ffiQN3'r S A r, Q., ,pawn x Q. Q , ' A .' 1 , X X-,Vu m '1 - , 1 Qif in 1 ,4 M W ,M .mf my r f' 'sf' fi ' 1:71 li. Q ex'- 4, ' 7432 ,f 'nil vw A-.sxf ss? Ak? My ,.,, x BPS ,.,,.. N- , A L ' 'W fr ff,-, ,agus QM 3-Z M? W J, , V5 l www .,, N. V 'S N ffhf Qs X 4, 623' W ,R ,,,wM,m-f ' s l ' I . v J . Wff , . 'i ' S, 'f' W ::. Mx, 4.7 f 3, Af 5 A . .Y -Y. .W ww- 3, , M- , .wv41.'m.,.... Zulu- S M 5313 , S 'ff wx. wi 3 X4 st, K-.NNN fgggf '95, ffxvd P ix 4, n-W halygn Qs., N yy qw' X . ' -sf LK' ,Egg . vm V .6 tfk A wmv . V91 J' nw' Tiff' h 1 M ,Q 1 swfiffing , M .Q ,N W mf: A WJ: 7' . wa'-,T , X gp A 1 fi W Q-.fag V , 53, Q , V f, - www . 'Q x v f . - 5 - fw ' K, , f :iff W 5 .fx ,, ' ,S qfmpwzx , .,5 ' ' ,' U . k 'M , ' ' "A.:,.ff W ' 'Fig N 1 'zfW?4awfua Q , 'Aj' 'A 5 LMA, ' if f 1 ,M ' mn' is .2 if g 5 ' L - ' 1 . .f J X , ,-fitw AVV, M ww, 4. 1 L' " ' 'A if gif? F' " 'K ' Fm, , ,, Y . I f S 'V 'I ,4fgQisism'iff fr,m ,,wf ..A w3sgW4ff4Q ,2 1f -1f'1 'ffif 4i eiff My ,L,.,, ,A,h , ,, ,, . A. . , 1 .,, f 1 Q , ' - 1 ., ' Qi 59: if H . if Q, ,f ' 3 , T -5 fk- ..,. f ' ,,,' , ' ' M ,A -f , ...G m:?fg?- A K 'f ' . . gk . gi' i N, U ww +11 1 V 1 A w ,f7w -fi' x 91 l ff? Bfiiiiiing ii bigger ami better iiriiifersizfy. Scale moiielx, bliiepriritf. PhDs for More who qziizlify. A frm' hami- Jhfzke, ii Jrrziie, some izii- ifice for the ftiideiit. Diligerit iziiminifzriztorf. r 1 HMINISIHHHUN af' l BOARD OF TRUSTEES: Front row: James Sottile, Jr., Daniel H. Redfearn, Dr. Gilbert Grosvenor, John C. Clark, Dr. John Oliver LaGorce, Sam Blank, Dr. .lay F. W. Pearson, ex ofiicio, Mrs. lone Staley Bisso, Daniel Mahoney, chairman, Charles F. Kettering, Robert Pentland, Jr., Harry Hood Bassett. Second row: Flem- ing G. Railey, Max Orovitz, Dr. John W. Snyder, J. N. McArthur, Hugh P. Emberson, John S. Knight, William Arnold Hanger, William H. Stubblefield, Mc- Gregor Smith, Arthur A. Ungar. Board Ol Trustees: Policymalcer For The University STABLISHING UNIVERSITY POLICY is a job that one man cannot accomplish by himself. It is the job for a committee, and at the University of Miami that group is known as the Board of Trustees. Comprised of 31 men and three Women, the board meets at least once a month to discuss business. Chair- man is Daniel Mahoney, who has been a UM trustee since 1952. He also is publisher of The Miami News. Meeting each week, except during the week that all trustees gather, is the Executive Board, headed by real- tor, Oscar E. Dooly. Purpose of the committee is to reduce and clarify the work that must be done by the entire Board of Trustees. Other prominent attorneys, bankers, industrialists, corporation executives, businessmen and community leaders make up the rest of board membership. Elected to one-year terms this year were John W. Schippmann, Jose A. Ferre and Judge Ray H. Pearson, who is to be the alumni representative, succeeding Pat- rick J. Cesarano. Members of the University Board of Trustees not pic- tured in the 1958 Ibis are Roscoe Brunstetter, Arthur Vining Davis, Mrs. Polly Davis, Oscar E. Dooly Cvice chairman of the boardD, Mrs. Eleanor F. Jennings, W. Alton Jones, Baron de Hirsch Meyer, Frank Smathers, jr., and George E. Whitten. Dr. jay F. W. Pearson, president of the University, is a member ex 0j?lCi0 of both the Board of Trustees and the Executive Board. Mr. Mahoney is a member ex ojicio of the Executive Board only. 27 DR. JAMES M. GODARD Executive Vice President, Dean of Adminisfrafion DR. CHARLES DOREN THARP Vice President, Dean of Faculties 28 The Vice Presidency: Big Job For Five Top Administrators MINDING THE STORE while the master is away is usually the only Work associated with a vice presidency, but at the UM office it is an all-encompassing job, requiring five top administrators. Ironing out faculty and administration problems, the members of the University's top echelon have a much ,more important jobg furnishing an economy-minded, businesslike system of operating the University itself. Investments and all other financial matters are handled by Eugene E. Cohen, who heads the UM business staff, from his newly appointed position as vice president. it THOMAS R. REESE Vice President DirecIor of Universi'Iy DeveIopmenI' I I I EUGENE E. COHEN Vice President Treasurer DR. H. FRANKLIN WILLIAMS Vice President Direcior of Communify Affairs 29 IRENE W. MORROW Assislanl Secretary-Treasurer SIDNEY B. MAYNARD Assistant +0 fhe President Happenings In The Americas And Executive Details EOGRAPHICALLY SPEAKING, the University of Miami is in the midst of the Americas, and because of this there is a great interest in the affairs of Latin America. Sidney B. Maynard, professor of Span- ish, works to keep President Pearson informed on such matters, using his post of assistant to the president. An officer required by the Universiry's charter, Sec- 30 retary E. Morton Miller attests to the legality of sig- natures on UM official documents. Members of the University's business department are Mrs. Irene W. Morrow, who also works with the secretary, and Victor G. Trivett, who checks all the expenditures made by the University. Director of staff personnel is Paul A. Hartley. PAUL A. HARTLEY Direcfor of Si'a'FF Personnel VICTOR G. TRIVETT Confroller 31 DR. E. MORTON MILLER Secrefary of 'rhe Universify Well-Staffed Counseling Plan For The Preplexed Individual TUDENTS who find themselves with a problem, big or small, can usually have it solved by any one of three persons in the Student Services Center: for the men, Dean Ben David, for the Women, Dean May Btunsong and for uspeciali' problems, whatever they may be, there is Dean Noble Hendrix, who counsels all students. Student service also is provided by Thurston Adams, who advises on matters concerning student clubs and other activities. Supervising the four major student pub- lications is W'ilson Hicks, former executive editor of Life. The man whose job affects all students is E. M. Mc- Cracken, head of registration. Chief of the 500,000-volume library is Dr. Archie McNeal. NOBLE HENDRIX Dean of S+uden+s BEN E. DAVID Dean of Men DR. MAY A. BRUNSON Dean of Women THURSTON ADAMS Direcfor of S+uden'r Ac+ivi+ies E. M. MCCRACKEN Regisfrar ls. 5 I ix DR. ARCHIE L. McNEAL Direc+or of Libraries WILSON HICKS Supervisor of Sfudeni Publica+ions S, V me K . fww -gym? . , V,-rw fa f mi' E fp DR. DAN STEINHOFF, JR. Dean of fhe Evening Division , A 5 , K ' , .-Q5 X - x - "fffiy9z?.eia , , 3, f .W j 3 , , f ' 1 -1'-'I .. . .. v ff " -. A .1 "' mei in ' fi . .- ,eff ev 7-wi'-IJ' ,,a:-1:1325-vw':!-. AEYWQ . H ,L ,L :S g,1-,,i,'q,f'- iiz'7f!g,,gf34 bgiK?1ti,,,,,: . , .V 2 1 'QT ,-"wi--'iz env JE' giqffssfify - ,J in 1- , , .- Q- ',:?s71:ii1ieMf2,'eiffs me-w, 1, ' ' I qzlisvif ti' if A ' Qs' Skiiiai M-'-Siwp geyiif , . ,5-'w.1w.1"-'wegifi g51,ff9f': J 1 S lr , .jg 1-Hail , kv , 1 ' f if . A- -is fmss2i,- ,. ,H 1, 111 sn u az. JS i as K' ..ffz'f2f'Si:i2 DR. J. RHS OWRE Dean of +l1e Graduafe School DR. WALTER O. WALKER Dean of +l1e Division of Research and lndus+ry 34 Via' Learning 'Round The Clock And In Summertime, Also AL STUDENTS are not day students, nor do they all attend classes during spring or fall. They're "special" students. In charge of the Graduate School is Dr. J. Riis Owre. The Evening Division, headed by Dr. Dan Steinhoff, is for students unable to at- tend day classes. Dr. Warren H. Steinbach super- vises the summer-sessions program. A control center for UM's research program is headed by Dr. Walter O. Walker. Arrangements for study abroad, student-exchange plans and related matters are handled by Dr. Ralph S. Boggs. 33 - . Wnwfw ' , 5 3 ' 151 l m sn t f xgrge, if . i mg W ' - Qjuiagj ...um - DR. RALPH S. BOGGS Director of the In+erna+ionaI Cenfer DR. WARREN H. STEINBACH Direc+or of Summer Sessions WILLIAM S. HOWLAND Director of Public Informaiion MALCOLM ROSS University EdiI'or Papers, Symphonies, Buildings, Keeping Tabs On The Alumni SPREADING THE NEWS is the job of William S. Howland, who heads UM's News Bureau. His staff sends news to local and national news media. Also in the editorial vein is the work of Malcolm Ross, who super- vises the UM Press. Mr. Ross produced the UM film, "Five Worlclsf' Mrs. Marie Volpe, in addition to picking artists for the symphony series, also acts as the orchestra's business manager. With an eye on physical growth of the campus, john J. O'Day directs UM's physical plant. Harry H. Provin heads alumni affairs, supervising some 60 alumni clubs. Carl Fien handles alumni correspondence. MARIE M. VOLPE Manager of +I1e Symphony Orchesira HARRY H. PROVIN Direcfor of Alumni AFFairs JOHN J. O'DAY Direclor of The Physical Planl' CARL FIEN Alumni Secrefary I AT THE PRESIDENT'S DESK OCCUR VARIOUS ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS INCLUDING THE SIGNING OF VERY IMPORTANT CONTRACTS A Busy, Busy Place For Administrators' Work HE PRESIDENTS OFFICE is as busy as a bargain basement in a large department store. The only difference is in the degree of dignity, but between the unlocking and locking of the office doors come eight hours of fast-moving business. Contractors with bids, faculty members with problems, administrators with questions-they eventually find themselves in the Pres- ident's Office. Head of the office, naturally enough, is the president himself. But vice presidents, presidential assistants and secretaries make up the rest of the corps. Situated on the second floor of the Ashe Building, the office is catacombed with smaller offices and make- shift "off1ces,', work spaces which are created by the arrangement of the administrative filing cabinets. SEEN THROUGH fhe glass wall +haI' separafes hallway and office are 'rhe recep+ionis+, a vice president and the caIIers. MAZE OF WALLS divides the PresidenI"s Office info smaller offices, one of which is used by secretary 'ro an assis+an'I'. .az ffyf wimezf-W-W xfi, 1-,wwfwWmi,,fw+ -,awmsmmramymw , ,Wen-. .. ,, .. 357 The lively side of campus life. Titles for pretty eoeds. Citations for those who deserve therrz. Late nights hiiild- irig floats, decorations. College, the happy life. 1 EHHIIHS SS? Q fi' of ncfa p i 5, y 795,33 flag Queen, QUEEN LYNDA is the 1958 I his dream of "a pretty girl." Selected from more than 100 contestants, Lynda is a Miami resident and UM senior. A commercial art major, she is in Pi Beta Phi and Gamma Alpha Chi and this year was Queen of the Engineering School. Six fair young ladies complete a vision of loveliness: the Queen's court. The Princesses are Elaine Andrews, Winnie Moss, Barbara Schulgen, Sonia judice, Lynn Gilbert and Vieve Becker. Elaine, a freshman business education major, is a member of Delta Gamma. Tri-Delt Barbara is a sopho- more, former Tempo princess and Bimini Queen and Winnie belongs to Alpha Epsilon Phi and Pep Club. Sonia, a sophomore fashion major, is a member of Burdine's Fashion Board and a princess of Alianza lnteramericana, international Spanish organization. Former ROTC princess, Vieve was Tempo girl of the month prior to becoming Tempo managing editor this spring. She is also a member of the I bit staff. A transfer from Miami University in Ohio and win- ner of third place in last year's Miss Miami Beach con- test is junior, Lynn, the last of the chosen seven. g6Ll"A6l,If'6L ,SZADLQQVL gyozine .fdnafr 1 l 1 w 'Y Www ,Minnie mam lynn 8l"f 1 Melfe BEAM' .Simian Jonah K r z:f,x,.umoaerf.s1m1,4h-:2mv- KJ5i? " f 7f1RNf2x1L'5R+.R'i12,.,,,,....... ' . A -dfvlem ""' ROBERT RECHTER was an outstanding siudenl' in fhe field of engineering, serving in +he Engineering Honor Society and 'ihe lns+i+u're of Radio Engineers. Elecied io Who's Who in American Colleges, Roberi also was chosen for membership in Omicron Delia Kappa, lron Arrow and Alpha Sigma Epsilon. Ibis Citations For 1958 IGHT RECIPIENTS of the 1958 I bis Citations rep- resent three segments of campus life: student body, faculty and administration. The four men and four women have been submitted by the Ibis staff, editor and adviser. These eight represent those qualities of DR. E. MORTON MILLER is one of +he real pioneers in +he hisrory of +he Universiiy. Coming here in I930 as a professor of zoology, Dr. Miller has climbed 'lhe adminisfraiive ladder +o +he posts of Dean of the College of Arrs and Sciences and Secretary of +he Universi+y. His Ph.D. is from Chicago. 50 MARLYN WEISS, an education maior, was vice presidenr of Nu Kappa Tau during her senior year. She also was a member of ASE, Alpha Lambda Delia, Phi Kappa Phi, Kappa Del+a Pi and Sigma Lambda Phi. Secretary of 'I'he Publicaiions Board, Marlyn also served in S'ruden+ Body Governmeni as senator. Most Ever Awarded scholarship, leadership and citizenship which have made the University of Miami the great institution that it is. It is with pride that I bis cites these outstanding persons for the contributions which they have made to their University and to the community. DR. CHARLTON TEBEAU, chairman of +he history depart- men+, has made ouis+anding con+ribui-ions fo 'rhe field of local hisiory. His la+es+ book, "Florida's Lasi Frontier," deals wi'rh 'ihe hisrory of Collier Couniy and has been a besi'-selling book in Sou'l'h Florida. His Ph.D. is from 'I'he Universiiy of Iowa. ROSEMARIE KASCHER capped her senior year as presidenf of Nu Kappa Tau. She also was a member of ASE and +he Wesley Foundafion. A music-educafion major, Rosemarie was a member of 'ihe Opera Guild and +he Concerf Chorus. She represenied UM on +he Collegiaie Council of fhe UN. DR. MAY A. BRUNSON, since becoming Dean of Women in I955, has esiablished a firm bui' humane policy in dealing wi+h 'ihe women sfudenrs a+ fhe Universify. A UM counselor since I946, she has acquired much experience in solving girls' problems. She recenfly received her Ph.D. from Columbia. I LEROY HOWE, as presiden+ of Sfudeni Body Government has been an ouisfanding s+uden+ leader. A member of Iron Arrow, ODK, ASE, Delia Theia Mu and Sigma Phi Epsilon, he has been on fhe Dean's Lis+ for four years. Leroy was vice presiden'r of Wesley Foundaiion and is acfive in debafe. DR. WILHELMINA F. DUNNING has made a no+able record in fhe fields of experimenfal paihology and cancer research since ioining 1'he Universify faculfy in I950. She is direcfor of ihe Cancer Research Laborafory, locafed on Sou'I'h Campus. Dr. Dunning received her doc+or's degree a+ Columbia. 51 Scenes From A Futuristic Homecoming Crowning . . . Tapping . . . Launching . . . STUDENTS AWAIT RINGING ihat signifies UM's 3ls1' Homecoming is underway. Week does no'I' s+ar'l' un+il bell atop S+uden+ Union is rung by ODK president. Honorary is annual sponsor of Homecoming. LAUNCHING SPECIAL WEEK with 'ihe official ringing of 'lhe bell are Lew Cohen, president of ODKg Dr. Thurston Adams, director of UM s'iuden'l' activities: Larry Fried- man, chairman of Homecoming. Space Idea Permeales Miami: OMECOMING at the University of Miami this year proved a true reflection of its times. It was a homecoming of the space age, com- plete with rockets and filled with the vigor of scientific rivalry. But parts of the University's Slst anniversary were celebrated on good old term fiwmz, in spite of the trend toward outer space. Numerous din- ners seemed to be the order of the week with such affairs as the M Club, Founder's Club and Past Presidents' banquets, not to mention the annual Law School Breakfast and a multitude of luncheons. Tappings by honoraries took priority the Hrst three days of the special week, when Omicron Delta Kappa, Iron Arrow, Nu Kappa Tau and Alpha Sigma Epsilon chose their new members. The anxious breathless- ness and the quickened heartbeats of all interested students and the dis- appointments of the would-be honorary candidates not tapped were forgotten, however, in the excitement and business of the Student Body Government reception and open house, and Alumni Day. Reigning over the total affair was lovely Marcia Valibus, who was officially crowned Homecoming Queen on the special Homecoming tele- vision show. A pretty court accompanied the queen. It included Nanita Greene, Mary Alice Sullivan, joan Drahmann and Carol Baldwin. Honoring . . . Playing . . . Dancing . . . Homecoming Of Beauties, Honors And Rockets MARCIA VALIBUS, l957 Homecoming Queen STATELY IRON ARROW MEMBERS begin +heir march for members early in +he day wi+h a roll of rhe 'rom-fom. 25 -Q' .J wigiilfc. 'RQQ-Q x '- 'iv ,gg Q , CHEERLEADER Helen Dyer prances around field to celebrate UM's only touchdown during Homecoming football game with the Maryland Terrapins. Hurricanes were out- played to the tune of I6-6 score. Gaiety, Color Of Homecoming Still Bright After Football Loss HE HOUSE DECORATIONS and annual parade that marked Homecoming this year could have been outdone in color, gaiety and imagination only by a New Orleans Mardi gras. Prize floats were shown at the game between UM and Maryland. Unfortunately, UM lost the game, but tears turned into cheers at the Homecoming Dance the next night. The four-band affair featured the sounds of Arnie Barnett, Juanito Sanabria, Buzz McKee and Sonny Bloch. PRINCESS Nanita Green and Mary Alice Sullivan talk happily with Queen Marcia as game begins. SMILES LEAVE FACES OF QUEEN AND COURT, JOAN DRAHMANN, NANITA, MARCIA, MARY ALICE AND CAROL BALDWIN AS UM LOSES GAME. 55 EXCITEMENT WAS TOO MUCH FOR CLASSROOM STUDY. MOST TEACHERS FINALLY GAVE UP AND LET STUDENTS GO TO "ALUMNlC" LAUNCHING Classes Halt As Engineers Launch Campus Rocket NYONE HERE that day might have thought Cape Canaveral had moved its site to the campus. But, no, it was just the engineering students, launching their own rocket in UM's backyard, in honor of Homecom- ing. Their baby was christened "Alumnic." Many thought the engineers were the laughing stock of the university when the missile rose only 18 feet DAYS OF PREPARATION wenl' in+o seHing missile up on main campus, buf rockel' was Iwo hours la+e for launching. ,fgr W- Nw- V -Y V wwf-mwfwveai and toppled over on its point. In fact, one local news- paper carried a headline saying that "Alumnic" went on the "Bumnik." But as one of the engineers said, UM's rocket was meant to rival the Russian Sputnik "in spirit only." That it did, and gained more kinds of publicity than all other Homecoming events put to- gether! It was truly the event of the Week. BRAIN CHILD RISES I8 FEET and 'rips over on nose, bul' wary engineer, running in o+her direc+ion, is 'Ioo busy Io see. .Www KY 4 w , 4, ww . ,vm -4 Q - Q gxp- Z if ,M u X h X Q oxgii O 1 . X 1 f :pf 3 Xgg , '-I 3252? V - ,410 Mau, the creative aui- mal. A gloh of clay made into a sculptured form. Symphonic tones float- iug through the air. "Is this a dagger?" from Macheth's lips. This thing called flue arts. Hsu Hum I v 'L Y 'wa 5 5 A : ? If N Q INFORMAL ATTIRE DOES NOT DISGUISE DIRECTOR JOHN BlTTER'S DIGNIFIED AND GRACEFUL MANNER AS HE REHEARSES WITH SYMPHONY Symphony Features Renowned Artists, Premieres THIRTY-ONE ILLUSTRIOUS YEARS of viewing and listening pleasure were commemorated by a Symphony season of nine pairs of concerts presented by John Bitter, dean of the School of Music, and other eminent conductors. Several premiere works were performed during the season, including a world premiere of "Four Danzas Sinfonicasn by julian Orbon, the first U.S. performance of "Chant et Orchestrai' by Heitor Villa-Lobos, and "Psalm for Orchestra" by former University of Miami music student, C. V. 1. Anderson. The incompleted Beethoven opera, "Vesta's Firej' was premiered on a dual program with the Christmas presentation of "Amahl and the Night Visitors." The work lay untouched in the library of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Vienna until 1953 and was later brought to John Bitter's attention by Dominique deLer- ma of the University's School of Music. Attendance in the form of a record crowd soared with the presentation of tenor Jan Peerce, only Ameri- can to perform at Moscow's famed Bolshoi Theatre, and guest conductor Fabien Sevitzky. Two Miami favorites, Yehudi Menuhin and cellist Leonard Rose, performed solo works and the Brahms Double Concerto to a highly enthusiastic audience. Other guest performers included the leading soprano of the Vienna Opera, Irmgard Seefriedg pianists Guio- mar Novaes and Gina Bachauerg noted violinist, joseph Szigetig and lyric soprano, Frances Yeend. Eminent guest conductors Arthur Fiedler, Heitor Villa-Lobos, and Howard Mitchell, displayed their matchless musical talents. M ex f , ,K we 5 1 W1 -L H 'f . N, W , f 5 Q L x85f f 1 ' "'f ay , ' as 4 , ' M 1 6:45 3 K' " gi -,, V ,Y K Q Q Y S: mu-my W 1 W? K iw A f'F ' swf- ff ' 1 X N x 'Q J! yt ww 5 S I x Www 'Nw ' I4. 2 fi HOW A CONDUCTOR FEELS abouf his own works may be seen in +he facial ex- pressions and bodily movemenfs of Heifor Villa-Lobos as he direcfs fhe firsi' U.S. per- formance of his "Chanf ef Orches+ra." The works of fhis Brazilian-born musician are played by all major symphony orchesfras foclay, alfhough fhere was a fime before fhey were accepfecl. Villa-Lobos also con- clucfed world premiere of Julian Orbon's "Four Danzas Sinfonicas" on same program. CURTAINS AND EQUIPMENT in audiror- ium frame Arfhur Fiedler af firsf concert. V J R pf , f T, , L3,2:?1" :' L 5' J Y Y K W 'fi Q mg i? I 5 . 1 Q Hg: ,- .,1 V 4' 5 fa my vw, . . 2 1' Mfg - - A ff A W.. xx S L A X if I as - ,s Q AWNHG. gif i - Wx X 'sea ew -21,9 g A mx wifi . wfgkg , ,JU '52 f fn 'Wig If ,W 4 A Kgs? S M K , ' d ,. ii 'fx Ig, I Q12 7' Y-3? 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K . , ww.f4f f Q ,HM P MT ,fmt wg is X fi- :Q- :f , KR sf., :- , ,. fffyfqvgfvzggi -,g. . s?lHwQ1.x,:ffaa2- W. , Nw' --59if?5SrXSff?F:f ig: "1 A ,. .wgyyifrffssg-mahzigff' fx mf gzlwgz l 1 i A gg Tiff 22,1 fax-,ij1ikQI5Qf'ff 1.1 ' ' "1 L Y K- an gag, gg 4, W ,, A ibhmgif .. 1 I , VIS x S K XA i 5-1:W+,i?w ,ggi ff Uv ,I 'Q' f x iw ' -ff.C'g '5 3 gay? . L. LL. My , , X . -Zi., :f f ,A My f in N L S' M i f g ss Q N 2 Y my Q f ' 'W 1 543 2 ,lm 'f a 2 f 5 QQ 'Y'xffifflgigiiylir,iivia, V ' - .. ..,. 9325: ' V xx A .X A A 1 A F K .Ig USM. , Eggfzfgsiyjtbg ' A 52 K Yi A . S' E H Q Q2 :, 4i5,A WW5,2fL'i W5 ' , '41, TZLY ,fi.l?5iTZfe5w52?.2XH45 K ,ua . M. . ,, Ly FSM 14:3 eg PM f . 'QS 42 , hazy ,YW iiiwvtz THE MORE THAN 500 PICTURES WHICH COMPRISE "FAMILY OF MAN" EXHIBITION INSPIRE AWE AMONG FEBRUARY LOWE GALLERY SPECTATORS C. CLAY ALDRIDGE, Direc+or 66 lFamily of Man' Top Show Of Lowe Art Gallery Year FAMILY OF MAN," easily the most significant ex- hibition of the Joe and Emily Lowe Art Gallery season, welcomed close to 12,000 spectators. Conceived by Edward Steichen for the Museum of Modern Art, the collection of world-famed photo- graphs embraced all aspects of human life. Stirring -scenes of men at work, in wat, in love and at rest accompanied an integrated prologue by Carl Sandburg and captions taken from classical writings. Other outstanding exhibitions included Americana from the National Gallery of Art and circulated by the Smithsonian Institution, the sixth annual National Ceramic exhibition, and "Things We Would Like to Own," unusual objetx cZ'fz1't. Facilities of Lowe Gallery, including its library with a significant collection of works on art history, are available to the students and faculty of the University on a membership basis. The Alfred I. Barton Wing, which had its formal opening in April, houses a permanent and priceless collection of American Indian Art. , ,ik ,MK ,,1 mm iam C. Q ' . Q"ialf ,. ww x -gy ,f 4 91:15 f NW! if ,. RESTING ON GROUND, students listen to explanation ot things they have seen from professor who tours with them. DIXIELAND JAZZ is played by Joe Whitecotton and Ed Sy- rak to entertain local band, whose members lent instruments. ORNATE FACADE of the church of the soledad is admired 'For its esthetic qualities by members of the art history class. mae .W ,km faiuiln MIXTEC RUINS, PREDATING THE RISE OF CHRISTIANITY, ARE SEEN UM Goes South Ot Border For Taste Ot Mexico Study AXACO SUMMER WORKSHOP, the first Sum- mer School to be established in Mexico as an integral part of an American university system, is the most noted of UM,s projects away from home. Numer- ous subjects including art, creative writing, cultural anthropology, archaeology, economic and social prob- lems of Mexico, folk dancing and costuming, history and Spanish, are offered. Students may acquire five to seven credit hours to- ward a college degree while studying in an ideal en- vironment. They may also perfect their Spanish on the shaded benches of the zocrzlo while concert and marim- ba bands play softly in this ancient New World city. Students do not look for television, American movies or fancy automobiles in this culture which is so ex- clusively its own. The tinal week of the workshop is spent, not in Oaxaca, but in the nation's capital, Mexico City. The group attends services in the Cathedral of Guadalupe and views Diego Rivera's murals in the National Palace, the Castle and the Park of Chapultepec. I s 5 3 5 5 5 ? 5 S 5 E Q if is 3 x E Q 3 'E Q 'z NEW YORK CITY SKYSCRAPER on one of the sets 'for Eugene O'Neill's "The Hairy A e" a tower over the University of Mi- ami theater staff: Fred Koch, Jr.: Gordon Bennett, Jack Clay, Delmar Solem, Roberta Baker, George Crocker, Charles Philhour. UM Theaters Provide Varied Drama Opportunities N innovation in the varied schedule of Ring Theater, the Children's Theater, has at- tracted attention of the younger set in the Miami community. The fall production of "Sleep- ing Beauty" with Jerry Thomas entertained its audience while UM students received valuable experience. The Spring attrac- tion, an original three-act play, "The Magic Ring," was conceived by student Chuck Franklin, using a Hansel and Gretel-like theme. George Crocker is the general director of the Children's Theater. The experimental play, an art form staged within the Rex Theater was represented by a play which was written, acted, directed and staged by students of drama. The plays, "Kim" by Judy Dynner, "The Conquest of Ramrod" by Joe Kabalan, jr., and "Open Arms" by John Robinson exhibited the most vital themes of those 70 written in Fred Koch's playwriting classes. Later in the season the Box Theater staff produced the premiere performance of "The Trysting Tree," an original folk opera by jacques Wfolfe. Burnsville, North Carolina, home of the Summer Workshop, invites students of drama each year to at- tend courses and get much-needed experience. There, at Parkway Playhouse, aspiring thespians learn acting, directing, lighting, costuming and set construction. The Ring's 1957 Spring gg schedule included Herman Mel- ville's sea tale, "Billy Budd," starring Fred Norman, and a rousing version of Shakespeare's frolic "Twelfth Night," with pause for presentation of Gar- cia Lorcais portrait of embit- tered Spanish aristocracy, "The House of Bernarda Alba," which featured Betty McKee. M. 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'Q 52 iii? 373 , , 'THQ' V 3 Q' 1 MX 02' 1 f 'G SJW 4 K ,, 8. , , . . QW-..1.,. .ma 4 f ,Av-s.,.v.,5:.,4f..:, . M ' : Y , ww 1. 5 f , 5255 M , b, i P My T F2 5 I h L . bs y. 1l3 ii 5 X H1 lvgggff ff-ff A. 1 335533 9 2421 59, 552. bfi?-1, I I WITH EXPRESSION 1'ha+ made play hilarious, Arnolphe shows desperation a+ fear Agnes's "naive're" has made 'Fool of him. SUFFERING SILENTLY, Arnolphe hears Agnes's Iover Horace fell plans to save her from wicked guardian-Arnolphe himself. SERVANTS, played by David Kearse and Lillian Malek, Iisfen ,carefully +o ArnoIphe's instructions fo foil Horace's plot. .-,, f..m.fa:..fwm.lf'f1faw.s.,enwxf1walesiaawiarsfrmarfeiiauas-a uuimlaxw- MoIiere's Neo-Classic Farce Provides Roguish Hilarily FARCE COMEDY may blossom and decay, but Moliere stands supreme. His "School for Wives," representative of seventeenth century Neo-Classical comedy, has been produced many times in the French theater. The pregnant comic possibilities of complex, almost cryptic, characters are promised in the sharp sketching of Arnolphe, one of the longest roles Moliere wrote for himself. The form originates from broad Roman farce and Italian ucommedia dell'arte," theater modes Moliere knew well. This year's production, first Ring directorial assign- ment of jack Clay, accentuated the playwright's life- long concern for the incongruity between artifice and nature, between mask and reality. The gaudy, roguish whimsy of Arnolphe CWilliam Stewartb contrasts in sharp relief to the serene comic portrait of his fiancee, Agnes QGrace Kleinb. Others in the cast included Ed Anderson as Chrisalde, Arnolphe's friend, and Leonard Rubin as Agnes' lover. The final effect of the Moliere play is something like a set of theme and variations, in chamber music, against a backdrop of Renaissance symbolism, the imag- inative horned forehead of the hoodwinked husband. PLEASURE AND PAIN are resulfs of Agnes's learning from "Maxims of WedIock" how she must behave when married. , -,4 . ,f:",.::?.l:w 2'w.'.1- .::,Ex',::-- Z:::". P4 A I .L 1. , 1 5 2 3 Nix Q ff? 'T H" In Qfievaezw. HQVEVMN ,WMWW E Y 41 ii . L LE ,Y , ' ' ' "??."iS'iIQi1 V , ' i ,iikwxfaw w if' f -. 4 Q,-fX,Qg,,w7 fy , ? Q L QQ , 1 ,Q,a.,Q . . 31112212 Q ,K M ,51 w M ww A f' ,I X' f wif? ' - N.-2 g, .., is , WH 1,9 , 3 48,5 w Q Q .J . KW A wif 3? W ,sf , M mfg " m 1 Wd' may , if 7 , N, 1 ' , ' -fx' 'D , L3 swf , Qyv - T., 5: WI. A . 7' Q U' 1 A . ' L6 - . F533 ,,w"' , Q 2 I wr K '!5g wfkijHX535.,3 ., A ' M - 1 , f . iff? ,g,2gg,f'QW'7"Yl ' U A Q- ,A '- ., ,M .W ' A - Wk' 1 " A ' wma. W ww ,, Q 'Q ffm, QSM: N., W QM My 1 get 'flwaiififl Ag m"'fg ww, fqvww, , ,U 1 1 3 Mitsic-on football or drill field. Campaign plans for the politician. Layouts for a stitilent pnblication. Bitsy stit- ilents applying thein- selves in activities. Ex- perience, teacher of all. EHVHIIS ,-K gi - V .,'- ' - . 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':.4.Q ."m 'N -5:1 'f .5 Af, xgl FEARING DEFEAT, All Campus Par'I'y presideniial candida'I'e Leroy Howe holds head in hands as he awaiis voting resulis. CAMPAIGNING UNCLE SAM sfops s'I'uden1's near Memor- ial Building 'lo acquaint them with plafform of Liberfy Forum. FEELING VICTORY, "candida+e" Howe becomes "presi- den'l"' Howe as he accepis handshakes from pariy members. Bea uty, Lectu res,Construciion All Part Cf SBG Additions AN AIRPORT GREETING to all incoming fresh- men and SBG was off to another activity-packed year that ran the gamut from orientation Week festivi- ties to the expansion of Carni Gras, a carnival with games and edible goodies. Feature productions this year included a modified lecture series, an addition of feminine pulchritude to the student directory and the return to campus of the Student Purchasing Service, designed to obtain student discounts from city merchants. SBG constructed a dormitory bulletin board and had steps built into the Merrick breezeway Wall to save time and necks of those accustomed to jumping. .lmgl m , I -......- .-...,........W -.......,.. TRAVEL-TIRED FRESHMEN FILE OFF SPECIAL PLANE AND ARE WELCOMED TO MIAMI BY CHEERLEADERS. WAITING BUSES WILL GO TO THE CAMPUS JUDICIAL DIVISION of Sfudeni' Governmenf, I'I1e Honor Cour'I', hears case involving money borrowed by campus pariy. DESTRUCTIVE FUN is enioyed by hammer-wielding male who sees I1ow badly he can wreck old car during Carni-Gras. 81 LEROY HOWE, Presidenl' ANN SPAULDING, Secrefary DICK CHAPMAN, Vice Presicleni' Like Federal Government, SBG Aims For Democracy BG SIGNIFIES a government elected by the stu- dents to serve them in all realms of campus life. This is Student Body Government. Like our federal government, SBG is composed of three branches: executive, legislative, and judicial. The top four officers and the presidents cabinet comprise the executive branch. Legislature is the business of the Senate, made up of representatives of the various schools. The judicial branch works through the Honor and the Appellate courts. DICK KN IGHT, Treasurer 5 w'f.mzf-w.-W1322'Xz,mw-W , rw, L1 5-'1x,' 'Wi . W 4A aizgjkf A , N ax I . , if . I 'Nav rv 1, M r' 6 1 V 1 KX 1 i 22- 4 , 5 3, 9 ' -WM ,-' V ffm' qu 4 ,, ww Aa sm? X 5 5' 5 SENATE: Front row: Jack Katzker, Barbara Seay, Harvey Ruclich, Larry Kuvin, Dick Chapman, Ann Spaulding, Dick Knight, Eric Raepple, Paul Siegel. Second row: Frank Gliozzo, Donald Gunn, .lack Dick, Deena Kleiner, Barbara Siegle, Pat Duhafime, Alan Caruba, Carmen Colon, Gerald Capps. Third row: Dick Essen, Bonnie Ferdinand, William Woodin, Marty Taplin, Barry Hyman, Lewis Broncman, William Locher, David Yelen. Fourth row: Paul VanDine, Sherman Carr, Stuart Abel, Carl Abel. HONOR COURT: Front row: Anne McGurry, Alvin Folancl, Elizabeth Kovachevich, Dave Bonner, .loan Merritt, Leroy Howe, Steve Slepin, Phil Mandina, Marshall Shapo. Second row: Mary Anderson, Bob Braham, Marv Weiner, Eric Raepple, Dick Essen, Blas Herrero, Dr. Thurston Adams, Nancy Reiss. 84 ERIC RAEPPLE adds emphasis lo argumenl' with upliflecl finger. He was +op clebafer al' FSU lourney. STEVE SLEPIN, defending his sland before "honor- able opponen+s," is an effecfive debafer from UM. RICHARD ESSEN, in adclilion 'lo debate honors, was 'rop exlemporaneous speaker al' Sweepstakes. """"'ll 1 DEBATE COUNCIL: Fronl' row: Richard Essen, Malcolm Ellis, Leroy Howe, Eric Raepple, Norman Broad. Second row: Al Capp, Sieve Kogan, .loan MerriH', Donald Sprague, Sieve Slepin, Blas Herrero. Debalers Champions Again INNING IS A HABIT for UM's forensic team. Recog- nized as one of the strongest entries in the nation, UM faced a formidable group of opponents this year. At the UM Invitational, though perhaps a bit "ill manneredf' the Miami debaters scored a powerful victory over their 'iguestsf' among them Notre Dame and Texas, which ranked first and second, respectively. They also scored triumphs at the University of South Carolina Tournament and at the Florida State Univer- sity sweepstakes. The squad stopped arguing at year's end, however, to form a chapter of Tau Kappa Alpha, national forensic honorary. DEBATE PARTNERS Blas Herrero and Malcolm Ellis, searching for a vulnerable poinl, compare no+es on speech being given by opponent 85 UM'S BAND OF THE HOUR runs 'ihrough formafion in pracfice for one of foofball game half- 'Hme shows. Band officers plan formafions, schedules and music in 'ihe spring 'For coming fall. Bancl Of The Hour Relies On Practice For Perfection HOURS UPON HOURS of practice go into the making of a spectacular football game halftime show or a spring i'Twilight Concert" in Eaton Hall. Members of UM's Band of the Hour follow a rigorous practice schedule beginning a week before school starts. Drills on the practice field are only part of the prepara- tion for a marching show. Band members, before going S6 through formations, must rehearse the music to be played. The band shack, just off Merrick parking lot, rings with the sound of practice music every afternoon. Here, out of uniform, the bandsmen begin to develop one of the intricate movements which impart such flashing color and excitement to the game's appear- ance. Band is complete even to glockenspiel. MUSIC WAS HOT, bu+ winfer was cold, and band mem- bers had +o don jacke+s and heavy sweafers for many drills. SPORTING BRIGHTNESS OF WHITE UNIFORMS, BAND MUSICIANS assume many comical aHi'rudes during pracfice, as displayed here by +his jazzy-looking UM clarinefisf. BANDSTERS DO A DRESS REHEARSAL RUN-THROUGH BEFORE THE GAME'S HALFTIME SHOW I -'A- 4 I , - X If - 1- yn Y M K WAITING TURN +0 go on field, UM band members wafch lcnoclc-kneed 'Fire-baton 'rwirler go up in smoke al Florida Slate. BAND OF HOUR lakes +o 'Field 'For show at FSU One nerv ous cornehsf ai' 'Far rigl1+ almosl' forgets its hme fo blow Florida Tour,Games,Concerts Part Of A Busy Band's Story DECADE HAS PASSED since Fred McCall began directing the Band of the Hour. Since that time, UM's musical marching unit has gained both national and international recognition. Providing halftime shows for football games is only part of the band's activity story. Between semesters, members are occupied with a concert tour of Florida. Spring finds them preparing for the "Twilight Con- cert" series. Commencement exercises also are part of the varied program. A beauteous aspect is supplied by the Hurricanettes, a number of dancing and baton twirling lovelies who help make the field displays complete. Leading the corps is Janis Wyatt. Officers heading the 135-member group this year were Idral Bowen captain' Anton Brees 1st lieuten ant Althea jones 7nd lieutenant and Mel Baker drum major These four had the responsibility of handling the band orientation program before school started when director McCall was ill Besides putting on exhibitions for all the home games in the fall the band also accompanied the team to Florida State University at Tallahassee NBC tele vision spotlighted the band during the Homecoming game with the University of Pittsburgh RAINY GAMES DONT DAMPEN SPIRITS OF THE HURRICANETTES OR OF UMBRELLA PROTECTED had aaa .4 Wm! K W? Wm 35133 JANIS WYATT, past Miss MajoreH'e of America does practice leap on drlll field 1 2 Q ' f , I "' 7 nw 7 , - I I ' ' n I ' 1 - , : 'S ' r M, afaililwiftk f 'Q 4' M o,j' ,a,'E'-limb , , 'yggzif f . .. 'WUT' If . 'Z air , ,. zfffgli y f ""- . F34 11 ' I ' ' ' . . . . i l V . ,...,t.....,t,.,.. - - .t.. , .-v, . EXW?" M I ag 5 2 il I , 2 53 FM 5 5 H, , "4 ,X,z as 4 , S STUDENTS ON THE OUTSIDE LOOKING IN AND STUDENTS ON THE INSIDE LOOKING OUT ENJOY PICTURE-WINDOW CARTOON DURING FOOTBALL SEASON UNUSUAL CALM in Student Union Patio gives opportunity tor tew moments ot study and relaxation before classes. 90 Students Use Facilities F THE UNIVERSITY is a uhomei' for its 13,000 students, then the area surrounding the Student Lake, the Student Union, is most certainly the living room of those students. A chapter to read in psychology, a book report to write for English, a small lunch to gulp down between classes, a "championship" match in ping pong-the Student Union is the place to do it. FAVORITE STUDY SPOT is upper lounge ot Student Union, which is used as a convention spot by campus organizations. ..,, , Mm, n.U ww- wi. 1 L W , W M, . - 4,5 ,gf .- .qw f .. 2.1 A AA My M9553 1: ' ...-. N- mf ' WW W , ,.. 5 2 gLQg,, ,. Y, 5 - V - I K V 2 K ' F " ?i"FfWf!'t5 .. f:,11f'kil:2153?i?Q',. " Y? ., .fm3gifxg.1,.. Q. 4,3353 -f .v - V - as .. 15,q1.5' Q. , , 31 4 x . . --ww . ww 1.112-Qzvxszfic, , itsfszfifeg WY ' iFf'1": 'PW' . Q .,., W- ES: ' 3 'Q 'J'w'-ww f? mv, f- f . xg,..:,,.. . KV, ' Z- ,f ,W:4s,1wf-.4 1 ww X4 " .1 , , ff, Y i ,A - QN QKLQ M g Q?i5g3f1?J.g3 A H Q.: WW . u p ffs . , . if f . , 5 .. A 7, ...J ' ., 15 L, " it mlm, ,W 4 . Vry, .K , QA Y, V, rm -gi X lv ..,.- f fiffffzww -1 wpwinmfx, rv - --1:17 ? ! Here's The Staff Of Ibis 1958 Seen Among uFamily Of Man" TO ILLUSTRATE the development of I bis, from an amor- phous mass of pictures and copy last fall, to the polished production that you see now, staff members had their por- traits taken amidst Edward Steichen's The Family of Man, a photographic exhibit by the Museum of Modern Art which appeared this spring at Lowe Gallery. The exhibit itself illustrates the complex story of growth. The Ibis staffers on these pages are looking their best. Appearance here is deceiving. It does not tell the story of the work they put into the annual. Neither does it tell of vaca- tions missed, dates broken, a class cut here or there, and sleep neglected. It speaks only of a modest pride at having a certain dedication to a certain University of Miami yearbook. In addition to the staffers listed, the following persons made contributions to our uidea that became a 'living' thing": sports writers, John Garcia and Joe McCarthy, pho- tographers, Dave Greenfield, Ray Fisher, Fraser Hale and Bob Rudoffg stall assistants, Diane Skor and Barbara Siegle. JACQUE WARREN, Editor PAT DUHAIME, Business Manager l ALAN RUSNAK, Photo Edifor ff. ,, r f 4 iff .4 ,WV wniwwxue we 5,-mmm WM mm mum, 5, , K I A . ,gif , - 5 af sag ,Ve 1 4 . a...-3 A wp, F' " -:uv gf!! Q 5 V ,, . -1 fl f 'ff Q W vin W, . ,A .Q . f 1 - f we 'wx w , 3-ffiffnf My ge , i5K??mwfwy,,w3:mwqa,,,.J W 1 ww., , J V, . 5, , i -x, Q-.,,....-....m.W..,,V.T f. QMMN 'A W .A., W5 v ,fu -M'-.Mg M - f,j1M:uM, .fn 1 U ' , ' , , .,,,M.... ,,A' . A , .,...m..,A, MW, -Swhwzvg M W . , Zyi I . ,, A Q , .ifff '- 11 Q-'fe' Q ': 'X PWSWSII PM IH lr MS, x wi. ,.,.. 1 'M 2 1 AA., Q 1 ., - Q f - '3 2 BOB BERGER, Phofographer BILL EVANS, Phofographer MALLORY FERRELL, Phofographer DAVE CU PP, Phofographer WALT LU KOWITZ, PI1oI'ogra pher VIC HELOU, PI1o+ographer ERIC RAEPPLE, Adverfising CHARLES CABELL, Adverfising 94 ARLENE COHEN, Ediforial Assis+an+ JOAN PATTI, Co-greeks Ediior VIEVE BECKER. C0-9I'66kS Edifol' wi RO FOOTNICK, Edi+orial Assisfani' RICHARD SICKING, Ediiorial Assisfani' HENRY EDGAR, Fine Ar+s Ediior LINDA SHARPE, Index Edifor 95 BUDDY WEISSEL, Fall Edi+or BOB McLAUGHLlN, Fall Managing Edifor TOM FOCHT, Circulafion Manager Practice In Photoiournalism An Aim Cf Tempo Magazine OLLEGIATE ATTEMPT at a professional type of photojournalism may be found on the pages of Tempo, UM's monthly pictorial magazine. A behind-the-scenes view of college life, with its humor, its success stories, its beauties and its heroes, is given in Tempo, which has been an award winner for the last eight years. With the playful feudin' and fussin' that accom- panies the pressure of tight deadlines and comical, light- headed, airy feelings which go with the sale of the magazine, Tempo this year published a total of seven issues, one more than in previous years. Buddy Weissel, while foresaking a few hours of his law studies, led the fall labor forces. Barbara Siegle, proving that the uweakeru sex is not so weak, held the whip during the spring. Around for the fifth semester to see that the magazine had money to go to press was Art Jacobson, business manager. MALLORY FERRELL, Phofo Edifor VIEVE BECKER, Spring Managing Edifor ae 2 ' Q K assi x 5 Izigigigii faxes: rits? a SK K '14 Nc V' 'Q f. 1 Q T I W:-- is ,Q Ass' ' mg f R 5 , . ,f 453,225 L f N A A ,,,, , I , - at -i wtfv, 1- 7i,.,g11f1gX . ,., W we, M f X A gi f . Z- v'.i':?f-i?5:'?3?!"1"t I :-.E S' img . X ii x 11-1' mi, fp W Q A of , L gags, asv -me 525 B? FRED PORTER, Editor JOHN GARCIA, Spring Managing Ediior BOB POLLER, Business Manager Cane Home A llMess" WOODEN CHAIRS are supported by telephone books for props. Tables are laden with Coke bottles and hamburgers or an occasional pizza for the hungry task force. The steady pecking-away at antique rypewriters can be heard. Then the scene shifts to the print shop just before deadline for The Hzzrricazne, weekly UM newspaper. The presses roll every Thursday, and the news events BETSY LISS, Fall Copy Ediior BARBARA SIEGLE, Fall News Edi+or Tlwouglw Paper's llNeat" of the Week hit the campus the following morning in the form of a tabloid, which has garnered twenty All- American collegiate ratings since its inception in 1927. Fred Porter, a journalism major, held the editorship of the weekly for both semesters. Business manager of The Cane, who also served both semesters, was Bob Poller. john Garcia moved from fall sports editor to managing editor in the spring. LORI FRIEDLAND, Fall Feafures Eclifor TERRY DRUMMOND, Spring News Eclilor LEW MERTZ, Spring Sporis Edilor 99 MIRIAM COHN, Spring Feaiures Eclifor JOE McCARTHY, Assisiani' Sporis Ediior FAITH ASBURY, Research Edi+or ALAN KRAIGER, Adveriising Manager ARLENE COHEN, Classified Adveriising PUBLICATIONS BOARD: Front row: Robert Poller, Grace Sfaub, Sd y Maynard, Dr. H. Franklin Williams, Fred Shaw, Daniel Murray, Bertha Fretdas, Wilson Hicks. Second row: Pamela Harris, Dr. Thurston Adams, Charles Penney, Noble Hendrix, William Howland, Fred Porter, Leroy Howe, Jacque Warren, Patricia Duhaime, Arthur Jacobson, Marshall Shapo. UM Board Backs Three Of Naiion's Top Publications NCE HAVING LOOKED over the Uni- versity's student publications, no one could doubt that there must be an efficient directive force behind them. That force is the Board of Publications. The board is composed of student editors and business managers, representatives of the ad- ministration and faculty, and representatives of each of the UM schools. Dr. H. Franklin Wil- liams, vice president and director of community affairs, serves as chairman of the board. Elemental in the guidance of student publi- cations, the board has the responsibility of mak- ing final choices for holders of the higher staff positions for publications. It directs policy only when absolutely necessary. Members of the board feel that the student editors should be given as free a rein in publishing as is possible. In addition to Hurricane, Ibir and Tempo, the M Book, a handbook for freshmen, and Folio, UM's literary magazine, come under the direction of the publications board. M Book is published during the summer and this year was co-edited by Art Cohen and Fred Porter. This tiny book is the oldest of the stu- dent publications. New students find it a useful guide to life at UM. Folio, edited this year by Ron Perry, makes an appearance once each semester. It contains original fiction, non-fiction, poetry and art by students, faculty or other interested persons. The fruit of the board's guidance and of the students, journalistic efforts can be seen in the publications' prize-winning records. UM is prob- ably the only university in the nation that can boast All American awards won by three of its publications simultaneously. Last year's I bis, edited by Robert Berry, won the coveted award for the eighth time. Tempo, edited in the fall of 1956 by Brian Sheehan and in the spring of 1957 by Art Cohen, also copped the award. It has won an All-American every year since its inception eight years ago. flzmimne added its 19th and 20th consecu- tive All Americans to its bonnet under Marshall Shapo, l956 fall editor, and joe Vecchione, l957 spring editor. llll "l7urMinmi rw li il. ra if wo' ,Ea ' ,Q ifffff rf 941 mm ij " fum! .g -5 ,WK ., W , q as igfkx :mm kww in ,, ff 51 VM f ,dwg , -. .. X f :M - . wl- PASS IN REVIEW! is 'llxe command given by lhe Wing Com- mander 'ro begin l'l1e parade in honor of +he visi'ring officials. PROFESSOR OF AIR SCIENCE AWARD for ou+s'randing senior is presenled +o Charles Rudd by Dr. H. F. Williams. EYES RIGHT! as while-gloved members of fhe AFROTC drill +eam march in precise ranks and give +radi+ional salu+e. THE CRY -of "Presen'l' Arms!" breaks 'Hue drill-field silence. Angel Flighl' members respond willn snappy salules lo colors. COL. TROY W. CRAWFORD, Commander 41W I .A by 3. fi 'x RIFLES are sfaclted in fhe regular milifary fashion. TACTICS, MUSICAL NOTES do mix as proven by AROTC cadet Flight Training Program Added To Yield Officers For Defense RAIN ING MEN to be future ofiicers in the U.S. Army is the main purpose of the ROTC program. It consists of a two-year basic course and a two-year advanced course, after which a cadet is eligible to be commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Reserves. Cadets pursue a program consisting of weekly drill periods and class room lectures. Cadets are acquainted with regular Army procedures when they have fulfilled the requirement of a six-week summer camp at Fort Benning, Georgia between their junior and senior years. Flight training is an innovation to the program. Upon qualifying, a cadet may take the training and obtain a private license by the time he is commissioned. AROTC BATTLE GROUP snaps fo Commander, Bernard Rosenbla'H', L+ .. ...i,. M , 4715-ckwi . BRIGHT helmef re- A CADET smarfly presenfs arms flecis Ba'Hle Group. during 'the Company inspecfion. LT. COL. OLIVER J. HELMUTH, Commander a'H'en1'ion during big semesfer inspecfion led by BaH'le Group . Col. Oliver J. Helmufh, and visifing Brig. Gen. Lyal C. Mefheny. One hundred thou- sunti feet Jtumping in u chorus. Funf' voice: huilding the din. Foot- hull in the cool of night -hig Jport. Butt, hil- Zumit, hirdies - little Jpottf. Competition. PHHIS V Q N N ' m up , MVS: A w .551 ' my 1' 4 5, , , , , f 'f,:f 3l,, J, W 1-: Wm 1 1 1 ,, .V ,J .N i""'f?, 'D Hg,-f W, . -V 2 fl' , -.W A We " W' 2-wffa. w 'W 1 4 W H f M1 . W W ww w ww M Q Q 1 21111 1 v":f 511 .. , QKI ' ' f ',,nJ'gZ 1: V ,, , , H' "wg?Wwf14 V, asia mf? in 1s,f5?ww' ANDY GUSTAFSON, Head Foo'l'ball Coach JACK HARDING, Direc+or of A+hle'Hcs STAFF: Dave Wike, Gene Ellenson, Earl Blaik, Walfer Kichefski, Andy Gusfafson, Don Cobb, Tom PraH', George Trogdon. 108 1957 HURRICANES: Front row: Claude Casey, John Varone, Paul Folmar, Ronald Lopyonski, Bob Rosbaugh, Byron Blasko, Thomas Bailey, Ernest Barnes, Fran Curci, Joe Plevel, Bonnie Yarbrough. Second row: Bill Hayes, Thomas Gardner, Fred Remmy, Jim Otto, Joe Roias, Bill Sandie, Jim Moskos, Harry Deide- rich, Theron Mitchell, Terry Stewart, Henry Martin. Third row: Bill Vasiloft, John Costello, Bobby Winfield, Nathan Kelly, James Crawford, Dan Coughlin, Joe Yetter, Bob Buonopane, Wayne Bertield, Don Wallace, Bob Stewart, Vester Newcomb. Fourth row: Phil Geatz, Vic Stenson, Al Dangel, Doug Hildebrandt, Stephen Byrnes, Bill Poole, Walt Corey, Jon Mirilovich, George Shultz, Frank Nodoline, John Burdsall, Charles Maddoch, Charles Diamond, Cary Freeman, Gary Greaves. F. Curci D. Hilderbrandt H. Deiderich C. Diamond B. Hayes V. Newcomb J. Crawford G. Greaves J. Plevel P. Geatz B- l3laSli0 MEMBERS or THE HURRICANE 1957 VARSITY FIRST STRING SQUAD 109 Hous'ron's Alternate Hands UM Qpening Loss 7-0 AIRBORNE CONFAB finds Gusfafson discussing game sfrafegy, which didn'f work, before landing in Housfon. I NATHAN KELLY, however, has differenf ideas when he aims his six-shoofer af a passing Cougar prey. EAT AND A BETTER than average Houston sec- ond team paved the way for a 7-0 Hurricane loss in the season's opener in Texas. For weeks Miami had been touted as a heavy favorite over the Cougars. However, some 40,000 fans and sev- eral more millions, watching via television, found out that even prognosticators make mistakes. Not once could the Canes muster a sustained drive as errors proved fatal and "beginners" bad luck prevailed. Pint-sized quarterback Fran Curci led the Hurricanes' effort with 75 yards in 11 carries but his second string squad did not back him up on defense. Houston scored its lone tally in the second quarter on two running plays by sophomore halfback Claude King and Cougar star Hal Lewis. King set up the touchdown on Miami's 26 and Lewis broke through the Miami line for the score from the left side. The biggest deficit Miami's first stringers suffered was a case of 'ifumbleitisl' as Cane backfield men dropped the pigskin six times in the contest. Three were very costly. Cougar lineman Hogan Wharton added insult to injury to the Canes during the road game for while giving his all to Houston, he also gave his uwheezing, sneezingu cold to five UM players. HURRICANE GUARD Dan Coughlin puffs on his "peace pipe" while being fiffed for a feafhered Indian head dress. ,ff ffft -- : H2 S rf 'Q 155 'wffvii xv, 4 1 . ., ,... 1 :W . jg, rj ,,.fk 7 E- f - i-Q. F5 ,Q ig dvi? ww -MLS jig, - 1 M V ,. Y, 5? M 83' W 5 , ' 4 5 fi , , 4, 'wtf f 5 Q? k ff. gag , ,J E 5 ? 1b if , VESTER NEWCOMB, Hurricane center, 'Iakes a breather between halves, thinking over 3rd and 41h quarI'er strategy. Baylor Bears Bow Down,13-7 As Canes Hit Comeback Trail RACKING UP 388 net rushing yards, the once- beaten Hurricanes made a dash for the come- back trail and thoroughly trounced the Baylor Bears 13-7 in the Orange Bowl. Getting 284 yards in the first half alone, the Cane backfield led by QB Fran Curci and Captain john Va- rone teamed with the forward line to whip the Bears. Curci revealed to Miami fans his split-second timing on pitchouts-one such play scored the first TD early in the first quarter. Both TDs were Curci to Varone type offensive drives. Miami's defenses tightened on the ground to hold Bay1or's scrappy Bears to only 17 yards but the passing of Baylor's Humphrey and Traylor saved the night stastically with 155 passing yards. WINNING PITCHOUT FROM CURCI TO VARONE IN SECOND QUARTER SEWED UP GAME AS THE HURRICANES CLIPPED THE BAYLOR BEARS, 'I3-7 112 ...war f. f. .www ,. H , W, ,, W- . 'M Lgfwrzmmmmg, www ' y , , , 3, x:mwmM'X gwwxwmfxrmswwwwwsumf : mWwM WawMQff-v'9H:mi.:" Third Game Jinx Stalls Canes As Terps Beat Statistics, 20-13 IT WAS JINX TIME in the Orange Bowl again as an underdog, the North Carolina Tarheel team, nipped past the Hurricanes, 20-13. Wfhipping the Tarheels in every statistical depart- ment, Miami nevertheless lost the game, holding on to a five-year third-game loss tradition. North Carolina held on to the aitlanes and used them for one score and many long gains. Tarheel half- back jim Schuler scored the first tally in the first quarter from the 16-yard line. In the second, Emil DeCantis CNCD took off on a pitchout and rolling to his right, uncorked a long pass to right half Ron Marquette for a 43-yard gain. Re- versing the play, Carolina scored from Miami's 33. In third quarter action, Miami drew blood and Va- rone and Curci again joined forces to culminate a 59- yard drive. With the ball on the 21, Curci hit Varone on a roll-out pass to the ten and the powerhouse full- back charged the remaining ten yards for the TD. Miami finished its scoring in the fourth when Varone and Bill Sandie racked up three 14-yard runs bringing the ball to the NC one. Sandie crossed tackle for the score. The Canes failed to capitalize on good breaks but their defense held the Tarheels to a meager victory. WHERE'S DEM LlGHTS"? yells quarterback Theron Mit- chell as NC fullback Giles Gaca downs him 'From behind. PITCHOUT IN MOTION-as Miami quarterback Fran Curci begins lat topl his long sweep around left end to begin the tamed option play. ln second trame, Curci spots his man Varone, throws, as the star haltback moves up fast to take pitch out. From there, the burly captain looks tor running space and proceeds to streak to the left sidelines into paydirt. 114 Wx. s . i a a A-w ill 1-ffm 125 f 9525? ' , J -4335 n f- ,iff-, yYf ww NW M, V J 432 H' x gr X A .Nagy Q? , 2 2 Y if L w i 351 W SJ g i 'E .. Ki ,: K --iw ., 'JE XA -- A Q. . Q3 fig " S VS M A figs I? Hwuwa M X ,eff Q g Q5 X5 wi? wg i X"5i9'ia '21 53 wk iw' qgM s.w 27 Q 2.7, f Em ww 5581 UM HOLD THAT POSE-seems +o be +he cono+a+ion here as Miami and Kansas square off on 'ihe 'firsi' play from scrimmage. FINAL SCORE showed specfafors whai' was +he Hurricanes' mos'I' no+able vic'I'ory during 'Phe season. Kansas Caught In Hurricanes, UM Wins 48-6 KANSAS'S JAYHAWKS fiew into Miami and landed right in the middle of a Hurricane as Miamiis Cane footballers blasted Kansas, 48-6. Miami partisans looked in awe as Kansas began the storm early in the first quarter when Wally Strauch scored from the one after a blocked punt and a personal foul set the Canes back to their own five. The aroused Hurricanes tried to rally back but the first quarter ended with Kansas leading the fray. In the second quarter, the Canes began to move. Bill Sandie marched across from the Kansas one for the first TD. Kansas could only hold the ball for four plays be- fore Curci cut loose and directed the second drive, scor- ing himself from the seven. Then from the ground, Miami turned to the air and Terry Stewart gathered in a Curci pass in the KU end zone for the third score. At the half, Miami led 21-6. The second half repeated itself. Kansas received the ball, Miami's defense stopped the Jayhawks cold and Miami took over and proceeded to score. As the third quarter ended, Varone intercepted a pass setting up a drive led by Theron Mitchell for the next score. Mitchell also scored the last TD after Kan- sas held the Canes twice on downs. Final statistics showed 32 first downs for the Canes compared to the Jayhawks, three. Miami ran a total of 502 yards while Hurricane quarterbacks proved their scoring potential with five of the night's touchdowns. DUANE MORRIS US, s+ar+s a righf end sweep in his own +erri'l'ory as UM's Bill Sandie breaks fhrough and makes one desperafe effori- +o s+op fhe hoi'-sfepping Jayhawker fullback. 116 asv' YS' W , W X, A Q aw Q. in ff .MW K fb was iw f . ,Q , Q 4 .W V f, if ' - ,"- , uv' M 1 A V -- ' 'S Canes Scalp Seminoles NO REST for I'he head man. Head Coach Andy Gusfafson pIo+s s+ra+egy on flighl' home after vic+ory over Florida SIa+e. During Road Game, 40-13 TRAVELING TO TALLAHASSEE for its second road game of the season, Miami trampled over Florida State, 40-13. It was Miami's game all the way but the Hurricanes didn't realize it until the second half. The Seminoles began proceedings early in the game with a 56-yard touchdown drive climaxed by Bob Nellums one-yard plunge for the score. The Canes bounced back and drove for 76 yards and their first TD. At the half, FSU led the Canes 7-6. For the Seminole fans a dream was coming true. But Miami had yet to show its superior play under pressure. In the second half, the Hurricanes went wild racking up 34 points and holding the Seminoles scoreless. Cane halfback joe Plevel crossed the Florida State goal line three times during the evening. Plevel also figured in one of the key plays of the evening. Late in the third quarter with the ball deep in Miami's territory, Gaetz took Fran Curci's 30-yard pass on the Seminole 45 and then lateralecl off to Plevel, who fled to the 30 where he was tackled. Bill Sandie, Phil Geatz and Byron Blasko each ac- counted for one touchdown apiece and Bonnie Yar- brough, Theron Mitchell and Al Dangle handled the Hurricane conversions as Miami rolled to its 40-13 win. MEANWHILE, BACK ON THE RESERVATION, THINGS LOOK GLUM TO THESE FLORIDA STATE RESERVES AS THEY WATCH UM DRIVE FOR A SCORE 118 VESTER NEWCOMB bids adieu fo his wife and boy iusf before leaving for Tallahassee and a game wifh fhe Florida Sfafe Seminoles. FRAN CURCI sfops fo falk over old fimes wifh some buddies from Miami affending Florida Sfafe. BAND OF THE HOUR JOINS CHEERLEADERS IN ROOTING TEAM TO GRAND VICTORY OVER FLORIDA STATE DIGGING yardage around Ieff end is FSU halfback Gerald Phily IZSI wifh Newcomb I54I in pursuif. UP IN THE AIR and noi' even a foofball fo call his own is UM's Fran Curci as he piles on FSU's Teague in an efforf fo half forward mofion. 2, 'iw :elif 5,15- x "W f 4 gg ..,. f ,Vi-gff igfg ., 3 A Qkgggefzf. :xi H: - Q - 19339, gm fig: My , X'1H1,1f3f Q M ,fl,, -ff, M, ,I I K t 'ff I yi 5, Q :Q Q. - ff 1 2' W, ,. fm M, K . ' 6,5 I uw ss ' . fl? , .f,Q:.f 2, . '-new? fi : l BOB RUSEVLYAN II Il, Maryland quarferback, hands off on a quick opener Io LH Howie Dare as Terp line opens big hole allowing halfback Io rip Ihrough for I3 yards. - RIGHT HALFBACK Bob Layman of RAIN FALLS on Universiiy of Miami's Ihird and four+I'1 uni'rs Maryland Shoals around Iefl' for I6' during pari' of game, Io add Io Iheir already dampened spirifs. JOHN BURDSALL, Miami lineman, pur- sues MaryIand's Hawkins during drive. OVERNOR COLLINS USES TELESCOPIC SIGHT . . . BACK BOB ROSBAUGH USES A MIGHTY CHEER . . GUARD BILL HAYES USES PAINFUL GRIMMACE . . . Gators Break 5-Year Slumpg Whip Hurricanes 14-0 FOR THE FIRST TIME in five years, Florida's Gators have powered their way to a victory over the Hurricanes. A 14-0 score crumbled Miami's record. Over 59,000 Orange Bowl fans watched as the Gators merely crushed a Cane offensive machine which prior to this game had been averaging 250 yards per game. The Canes never got past the Florida line led by tackle Charlie Mitchell. The running and yardage gained by Gator halfback, jim Rountree, outshined the touted battle between the state's two smallest collegiate quarterbacks, Miami's Fran Curci and Floricla's Jimmy Dunn. Florida dominated all the plays in the first quarter but a strong UM line held the Gators off until the end of the quarter when Rountree cut in from the UM one for the tally. The second quarter was a defensive battle highlighted by an unsuccessful field goal try by Florida's Bernie Parrish. In the second half, Florida completely stopped Mi- ami's offensive gains cold. Upon taking possession of the ball in the early stages of the fourth, Florida backs Dunn, Sears and Rountree joined forces to get the sec- ond Gator TD with Rountree making the final one- yard push, climaxing Miami's loss. WAYNE WILLIAMSON 1165, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA QUARTERBACK, STREAKS WIDE OF .ION MIRILOVICH i201 AS HE CIRCLES LEFT END UM END PHIL GEATZ C891 REACHES HIGH TO SNAG TOUCHOWN PASS FROM QB FRAN CURCI IN PITT'S END ZONE IN THIRD QUARTER ACTION TV Audience Watches H urrica nes Defeat Pitt, 28-I 3 HOT SUN and a better than usual Miami team gave Pitt coach John Michelson this battled look in year's tinal event. 124 WITH AN OUTLOOK to a better season in 1958, the Hurricanes finished up their so-so sea- son with a 28-13 victory over the Pittsburgh Panthers. The nationally-televised affair was one big case of double "fumbleitis" as both the Canes and the Panthers seemed to lose the ball at dangerous times. Fortunately, only the Canes took advantage of these breaks. In spite of having to play without Captain John Va- rone, who was still sidelined with a broken jaw, the Hur- ricanes literally ran the invading Panther off the field. Two early Pitt fumbles in the second period gave Miami the headroom it needed, and Pitt never again caught up to the Canes. The most impressive of the two Pitt tallies was a 35-yard pass by quarterback Bill Kaliden to Dick Scherer. But the real bright spot in this rather hot match came as the climax to the UM career of reserve half- back Terry Stewart. Stewart scored Miami's last TD on a spectacular 53-yard touchdown jaunt accented by his determined drive through most of the Pitt defense. Earlier in the game, little Fran Curci gave fans some- thing to cheer about with a 44-yard punt return as he fought his way to the Pitt 25. Curci also passed for two touchdowns and averaged 6.4 yards per carry. PHIL GEATZ, Universify of Miami end, fades back in'l'o PiH' end zone in an aH'emp1' fo snag a Curci pass. Aerial was blocked ai' Iasi' minuie. M? PITT'S TONCIC CHURNS TO THE RIGHT SIDE ON A QUARTERBACK-KEEPER AND ELUDES ONE MAN, BUT IS TRIPPED UP BY GREAVES UU 125 RIGHT HALFBACK Bonnie Yarbrough spli+s up- righfs for 'firsi' of four exira poinis wifh Curci holding. FOOTBALL FINALE Canes Hold 5-4-1 Record As l'Hot-Cold" Season Ends CHEERLEADERS con+agious enthusiasm echoes fhroughoui' the srands and provides sparks for +he players' morale during seas-on. 126 Grid Season Not Boastful, But lNol Losing' Says Gus THE TOPSY-TURVY 1957 football season came to a close with the Hurricanes holding a 5-4-1 record. It was not a boastful year but according to Coach Andy Gustafson's description, "Not a losing year." Coach Gus and his coaching squad have a big job this summer in developing a top-rate team to meet Big Ten competitor Wisconsin in the first 1958 game. Some consolation might be garnered, however, from the fact that only three lettermen will graduate this spring. Eyes will be focused on the efforts of the Mighty Mite, quarterback Fran Curci. The 142-pounder should prove to be the Hurricanes usparkplug to success." But a combination of the present varsity and the ad- dition of thirty frosh footballers should be the right recipe for Coach Gus and his Canemen in formulating a winning 1958 season. The "off" year has ended and a new era is beginning. CAPTAIN Pai' Crawford is +ense in 'Huis important momeni' as +he Hurricanes hold on the goal line. ww 1 BASKETBALL TEAM: Front row: Nick Hylwa, Manager. Second row: Marty Burdette, Joe Gardner, Dave Landis, Bill Talbot, Joe Munley, Gene Stage, Bob Bu HIC dM Ed fe DkB hlTB'llR k' N Nbl Leidy. Third raw: r ce ae, oach, E orris, C1on'r ras, ic erg' Hale's Boys Find Themselves As UM Posts Winning Season OACH BRUCE HALE'S UM basketball squad really found itself during the 1958 season. Its final 14-8 seasonal record, the best in four years, pleas- antly surprised the basketball mentor. Adding to the fact that UM's court quintet finally broke its endless .500 average, the Hurricanes were also considered for participation in one of the two top major post season basketball tournaments. The NCAA tourney was a probability but the National Invitational Tournament was more of a possibility. During the season, the Canes won seven our of seven starts beginning with an upset victory over Loyola of the South and ending with a runaway victory over Flor- ida State. Included in the winning streak were decisive victories over West Point and Oklahoma City. At the end of the season, the Canes possessed a re- spectable 79.2 per game scoring average. 1958 star and captain Gene Stage holds the total lifetime scoring record with 1,469 points while Ed Morris holds the re- bound and free throw records. The freshman squad finished an unbeaten year with 17 straight victories for the first time in UM history. 128 0 , I Cin ln, OFITI 6' E. FORWARD ED MORRIS "lays ii' up" in final quarter action againsi' Loyola o'fSoul'l1-Bill Rankin lI5l, Marty Burde'H'e l20l. . BX f ,mggfssffw aww 'WN-x...M "Wi ak!! 4 ,LQ ' 3' an f, 5? g J ug f 'Qifs?3P5' , at K ew, an xg 2 V 4 . S F 1 5 'QA f v.,4,??il w4i5,. , AH. 7 ffm 21, A AU. gg H4 ' 2 , "KVM, fu W x 1 K Q Cl ?r'fQ.xf? ,if fffgkf., .Q 5 ' 'Y X v 1 4 Q f f V 5 , 1 Ei? ,. if . v , 1553, id s wiv f 2 .-, fl? -. - M WLS? f Y va' M,-X Vi ' 5 K 31 Sw Al? - 1 1 , N -V- in . wr wgxg, fQi57ZQQ ke ,,. R? f? 5, X wmfgff Q 5 Ox W 5 wg jjilh :Z ,Ka Q - 'vf-flea y -QM K ff E3 ww ' ,M sf J 4: E Q 5 ci 2 XJ' fx J x 1' 4 if , 2 X Q Q W 'L 3 3 4. Q 4 as W1 S 5 V, ...,.: ,A , k3?V . 2 ' if , rv z 4 Y t V H J ,"""'f1rQ ggi " . .. 5 s ft. - , A . .lgigiifx 2 ' Af sv ,X Q 'q f 1 U W, 420 A h 4 ' iw: Q wj '-K K, J' A ' 5 ' 'ff 'W 'SWK' f . is A SEVEN-FOOT CENTER is a good s+ar+ 1-o any game-UM's Dick Berghoff goes up for +ip-oFF. was Miamn s cap+ain Gene Sfage, who holds UM's hlghesl' overall scoring record. Wllh 'lhe agnldy of a deer, Sfage is up in 'lhe air for a 1-wo-poinf "swish." CONSISTENT SCORER in 'l'he l958 season acfion . . . . . eg -Q V r qi, Ma , +V vw wxgl G 3 K .A , fy . .,,.,.,. 1 Wx ' 25 63 xi :reg V B fi 3 , Q 'A ff --,. X' 2: 'Q In f i f. in z ., ' Lgy' ' f iff 3 fa.: f qi. MIAMI'S TENNIS SQUAD BEGAN A NEW YEAR WITH NEW COURTS ON THE SITE OF OLD BASKETBALL COURTS-NETMEN NOW PLAY ON THE CAMPUS New Tennis Mentor RebuiIcIs Hurricane Nei Squad ANOTHER NEW COACH on the UM sports scene nlled one of the most important pair of shoes in Miami athletics. Former Indiana tennis coach Dale Lewis joined the Miami ranks following the spectacular ten-year career of Bill Lufler. Graduation deprived Lewis of the talents of Johann Kupferburger and last year's team captain, Ed Rubin- olf. A big six did return, however, to make that re- building not so tough after all. Included here are Allen Quay, Bob Bayley, Bob Rohe, Harry Rosen, Dick Walsh and John Capell. A two-letter man, Allen Quay from Ft. Lauderdale was selected as team captain. The 6-1 senior has twice been a member of the Davis Cup Team. Competing for top honors with Quay is Miami Beachite jerry Moss. Moss is the former National junior Champion and will be number one man on the Cane squad next season. Quay captured the title match in the Florida State Open Tennis Championships in Sarasota in the fall and the entire squad entered the City of Miami Tourney. MEXICAN TENNIS ACE Andres Connadieu re+urnecI in per- feci' form +o +I1e squad +his season affer Iwo years absence. BOWLEGGED RACQUETEER displays unusual form +o a'I- Iain exfraordinary resuII's during pracfice game on campus. 134 Q I 7. 'K K -k"'l1q. SQUAD'S CAPTAIN ALLEN QUAY SERVES DICK WALSH ANCHORED THE TOP THREE i NEWCOMER JOHN CAPELL HAD GOOD YEAR TENNIS SQUAD: Fronf row: Dick Walsh, Harry Rosen. Second row: Andres Donncdieu, Jerry Moss, Bob Boyley. Third row: Roger McCormick, Bob Rohe, Bill Minnick, John Cupell, Allen Quay, Coach Dale Lewis. Individuals Stand Our In Successful Cinder Season INDIVIDUAL STARS highlighted the 1958 season for Miami's track squad. But collectively speaking, the cinder squad united for a very successful campaign. Coach Bob Downes was very pleased with pre-season drills leading up to the first dual meet with the Quantico Marines March 22. This was Downes first season as var- sity track coach after replacing Lloyd Bennett who is now full time swimming coach. The nucleus for the '58 cindermen included team cap- tain Bill Bennett, Matt Allen, Bob Rosbaugh and Ray Heading. Bennett is an all-around performer and is be- lieved to be one of the top tracksters in UM history. The bespectacled speedster is top man in the hurdles, the high jump and broad jump as well as the 100-yard dash. He also runs on the relay team. A junior, Matt Allen, runs the low hurdles, -440-yard dash and in the relays. Rosbaugh is one of the heaviest pole vaulters to consistently clear 14 feet. Heading is one of the finest two-milers in UM track history. Other top names on the Cinder squad during 1958 in- clude footballer Harry Deiderich and Tom Dusenberry in the hurdles. Ernest Barnes helped in the sprints. Another football star, Gary Freeman throws the discus and tosses the shotput. Sophomore Frank Lloyd competed with Ben- nett for honors in the broad jump. MIGHTY HEAVE of sfandard coIIegiaI'e sI1o'I' pufs sfrained look on face of frack parficipanl' working ouI' on a'rhIe'I'ic field. MATT ALLEN IS LEADING MAN IN LOW HURDLES AND 440 D HOME STRETCH-Rounding a bend are 'three m- bers of 'II1e relay I'eam as +I1ey compefe for posif Under Coach Downes TEAM CAPTAIN BILL BENNETT IS EXPERT HURDLER AND DASH MAN END OF PRACTICE brings a smile of saiisfacfion 'Io Iired Iracksfer, who fakes worn shoe laces from his shoes. 'Es ONE OF THE HEAVIEST collegiaie pole vaulfers, UM's Bob Rosbaugh is a I'op poin'I' producer wiI'h I4-foo? leaps. A FULL STRETCH is necessary Io produce Ihe power wifh which discus hurler, George Smifh, gains greaI'es+ disfance. 5' SAND TRAP-an obstacle to all golters, doesn't plague this UM Iinlcsman as he uses a wedge shot to place his ball on the fairway. UM Golfers Have Busy Season As Coeds Enter Competition MIAMI'S GOLF SQUAD had a busy season. Supervisor Dr. William Heuson scheduled many matches for the reinforced links squad which now includes a girls' team that is ready to enter competition. The season opener was the Florida Intercollegiate Golf Tour- nament in March. UM held its biggest golf tourney in school history in April during the UM Invitational at the Biltmore Course. Participants included Columbia, Maryland, Carnegie Tech, Florida Southern, Rollins and Boston College. Leading golfers included team captain Bob Brue, former cap- tain Mike Elder, sophomore Lee Raymond, alternate captain Bill Sommer, john Sjostrom and Dick Cuardiola. fr ,N gf fx , y ef' 23 t.. f It E 5 SIGHTING IN on putt shot, UM golters talce ad- vantage ot good greens during practice sessions. A GREEN'S BREAK-AT THE END OF NINE HOLES, UM GOLFERS TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY TO DISCUSS STRATEGY FOR REST OF AFTERNOON'S TOURNEY ? I00-YARD FREESTYLE-Compeiifion is always rough in any 'frees+yle event and here a UM 'I'ankman is getting in shape. 140 UM Tank Squad Lacks Depth But Compensates wirh Wins COACH LLOYD BENNETT, now the University's full time swimming instructor, began the 1958 season with a shallow squad and finished with a shallow squad but it was a victorious team. About twenty new prospects did their best to add some depth to the tank squad. However, Coach Bennett relied very heavily on returnees Jack Nelson, Marty Redlich, Dick Joseph, Eddie Carrera and Dick Lahde. Nelson was a 1956 Olympian and a 1957 National AAU 100-yard butterfly champion while Carrera is the current National AAU junior 880-yard champ. The result-Miami's little swimming squad was one of the outstanding collegiate contenders in the South. And it met some of the top teams during the season including Florida State, the University of Florida, the University of Georgia and the University of Louisville. Of the newcomers, Coach Bennett used the services of Charlie Stagman, Dick Schenedorf, Bill Harding, Larry Schaeffer and Pete Laine to try to offset the club's lack of depth. Stagmann impressively broke the pool record in the 440-yard free-style event. DIVING was the weakest part of +he Hurricane squad this season bui' 'l'o look ai' 'l'his picture, only weak part is crowd. THE CAMERA'S CLOSE-UP LENS CAPTURES THE BEAUTIES AND THRILLS GRANDSTAND COACHING-wheiher H' be in foofball or in swimming can be found making i+self useful ai' some fimes. OF A RACING SPRINT-HERE UM SWIMMER APPROACHES THE END OF ONE LAP CHECKING HIS TIME wifh fhe sfopwaich, UM Coach Lloyd Benne'H' makes suggesfions +o swimming ace Eddie Carrera. 141 WHERE'S THE BAT?-out-Fielder Pete Sallato doesn't need a bat as he practices his stance. MIAMI BASEBALLER TRIES TO STRETCH A DOUBLE INTO A TRIPLE DURING ONE OF THE 1958 OPENING GAMES WITH QUANTICO MARINES AT UM FIELD Coach CampbeII's Efforts Strengthen Squad N OTHER NEW ADDITION to the coaching staff of the University's athletic department in 1958 was baseball mentor, Bob "Whitey" Campbell. Whitey took over the post previously held by Jimmy Foxx just as nine lettermen were graduating. Another problem was the absence of freshman pitching ace Ted Noto. Noto beat the Miami Marlins 2-1 in an exhibition game and was immediately grabbed by the Philadelphia farm club and sent to a class B team. Returnees to the UM nine included Roger Newman, Roger Frese, David Horgan and John Liska, all hurlers. Ed Contreras, Sheldon Dunkle, Jim Caudle and Angelo Mandis, all inlielders along with Pete Pergamo, Ed Harrison and Dominic Giacoboni, outhelders. Contreras, the big first-sacker, picked, up where he left off last season by pacing the squad in the two top departments. He was batting a hefty .551 at mid-season and was leading the team in runs batted in with 22. During the season, Campbell improved the club's power by hitting hard. The pitching staff still was not quite up to par but the Hurricanes did improve some- what over last year's record. Toughest 1958 competi- tion came from Florida and Amherst while the Canes looked good in their 12-game home stand in March. MIAMI HURLER ROGER NEWMAN GETS SIGNAL . . .STEPS ON MOUND AND WINDS UP . . . rs.sw.m..fw .Q -a..wwa.w1Wwmm:1:an.a. ,,,ffwm1a.e,,. eww ,app-Q-i1im,.W.a-'www mm.. UM HITTER TAKES OFF FOR HOME RUN JOURNEY. MIAMI STARTED '53 SEASON WITH WIN-LOSS TO MARINES BEFORE COLLEGE OPENER WITH STETSON OB "WHITEY" CAMPBELL I joined the athletic coaching ranks at UM this year and accepted two positions-head freshman coach and baseball coach. Whitey replaced jimmy Foxx as baseball coach. Foxx accepted an advertising position in the north. Campbell is a Miami grad- uate and prior to coming back to the University he had coached football and basketball at Miami jackson. "Whitey" Campbell BALANCES ON ONE FOOT, THROWS . . . FOLLOWS THROUGH IN TOP PITCHING FORM H's Harough 'For a base hiI'! Due +o Camp' beII's efforts, UM's power increased. Outstanding lntramural Men Get Presentations NDER THE SUPERVISION of Dr. J. M. Kel- sey, director of intramurals, and Norman Whit- ten, assistant director of student activities, the lintra- mural program took another big stride in becoming the all-important activity among fraternities. l One such move was the selecting of "The Week's Outstanding Intramural Athlete" award which bolstered and gave a new incentive to each participant. This award encompasses all extra-curricular sporting activity which is supervised expertly by the intramural staff. At the close of the year, Dr. Kelsey and his aids will then choose, among all the top men of each week, the outstanding mural athlete of the year. Any University student carrying the minimum aca- demic requirement of 12 hours is eligible for partici- pation in the intramural program, provided he has not previously earned a college letter in an event or has played professionally. Many times a prospective varsity player is noticed during intramural games. To provide year-round opportunities for participa- tion in recreational activities for many students is the aim of the University's intramural program. At the end of the school year the President's Cup is awarded to the team which accumulated the most points for the year in the various sports such as football, basketball, track events and many other activities. LONG HOURS on the mural field are spent to finish activi- ties which begin in the afternoon and go into early evening. THE INTRAMURAL BOXING PROGRAM PROVED VERY SUCCESSFUL AS SOME WELL FOUGHT BOUTS WERE VIEWED TO BE ALMOST WRESTLING MATCHES 144 AND THEY'RE OFF AND RUNNING AT THE INTRAMURAL TRACK FIELD AS THE OFFICIAL STARTER SOUNDS THE BEGINNING OF THE 'I00-YARD DASH . Y nfl I,k7 , I SOME COMPETITORS boasi' of unusual +alen+ and perform in some of 'Ihe more difficuli' evenis in in'IramuraI 'l'racIc. EXPERT COORDINATION is needed by pole vauI+ing en- Irees 'Io clear I'he bar which seemed so unconquerably high. 145 i IVIURAL FIGHTERS looked forward 'lo I-hal one minu+e resl' befween rounds +o receive helpful advice from handlers on furlher s'rra'Iegy. 'KILL HIM' seems To be wha+ mos+ of fhe fans are saying, bul' +he +wo young ladies sealed 'l'o +he righl' don'I' seem +o go along wi+h crowd. 146 THE REFEREE IS WATCHFUL FOR A POSSIBLE KO SINCE BOWLING aHrac1'ed many a young en+husias+ 'Io I'ry his skill or 'Io improve upon his game. A GOOD HIT BEHIND THE HEAD USUALLY FINISHES THEM COMPETITION WAS KEEN in mural handball as enfrees wi+I1, as weII as wi+I1ou+ experience, played +o aid 'Iheir organiza+ions in Cup race. MURAL FOOTBALL, despi+e being Iouch, proved Io be I'ougI'1 game as 'II'1e men hI'I' Inard wiih a IoI' of I1ear+ and showed a Iove for game. 147 HARD RUNNING and craf'I'y 'foofwork are esseniial 'ro fhe parficipanis Io form a winning combina+ion. Q 7 I UP, UP, UP go 'the gals on the opening tip-off in a women's intramural basketball game on the courts of -the University. Intramurals Otter New Plan For Future Co-ed Competition THE XVOMENS intramural department introduced a revised co-ed sports plan during the 1958 season to induce girls to take part in intramural activities. Mrs. Katherine Sample, director of Women's Intra- murals, dubbed the new plan "Informal Activities" and included two co-ed activities, tennis and volleyball. The plan worked and will be used concurrently with the regular season's events next year. The Women's program did not begin this year until October 21. The first item on the schedule was table tennis, with all-around woman athlete Pat 'Ierguson of the Vipers prepared to defend her many titles. In table tennis, Arlene Schemer and Rita Banamy of the Invaders defended the doubles championship. But Iota Alpha Phi won out over both groups and took the womenls cup for this first activity. Pat jerguson was whipped by Kathy Fliechner of IAPhi and Rita Benamy of Sigma Delta Tau in the Hnals. The Vipers did bounce back though and won their third straight Volleyball championship as Pat jer- guson led her team over Zeta Tau Alpha. The first group activity, volleyball, began in late October and was followed by basketball. A favorite of all the sororiries, baseball, was the major activity dur- ing the spring months. MOST EXCITING SPRING WOMEN'S INTRAMURAL ACTIVITY IS BASEBALL AS IN THIS SIGMA KAPPA VS. DELTA ZETA AFFAIR-GALS ARE SERIOUS mmmiaam. W ,, ,Wa iw A f .f wi ' 52: M w iw, ,. ix. 4, A ,MSW E L vw gy. , 1 Y .99 Ka 'fag ,mei Y An invitation of higher learning. Re- search in cancer, harri- canes, tropical fooilf. Night clafsex for the working fcnalent. A cen- ter of .vpecializeil learn- ing - the Unineryily. NIVEHSIIY 4 , A . if ...Q 4 r . wx. A af? .. -I un- , , ,, , E HL, SLIGHTLY TIRED AFTER A FULL DAY'S ROUTINE, LAB WORKER WATCHES FELLOW RESEARCHER COMPLETE AN EXPERIMENT IN EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT MlCROSCOPE'S MIRROR reflecfs +l1e silen'r, slerile world of bo+'rles and +ubes, invaluable +ools of a medical researcher. SMALL RODENT is given serum iniecfion by Dr. Wilhelmina F. Dunning, clirecior of cancer research ai' UM's Soui'l1 Campus. r 152 Scientific Research Program Probes Thru Various Areas EHIND the scenes of the academic program is the Division of Research and Industry. Encompassing the South Campus laboratories as well as the Marine Laboratory and Bureau of Economic Research, the di- vision is headed by Dean Walter O. Walker. Assiduously carrying out their work with the aid of grants from the government, industry and research foundations, the researchers conduct experiments on cancer and work with tropical plants in an attempt to solve the possibility of world food shortage. Hurricane conditions are reproduced in an airplane hanger to test various products' resistance to Wind velocity. Other re- search is conducted in economics, marketing, popula- tion trends, electrical engineering, air-borne allergy causes, sanitary engineering and radar. MICROBIOLOGY EQUIPMENT is sterilized by laboratory re- searcher betore beginning experiment on live chick embryo. i ETHANOL SOLUTION stands betore carton ot 'fertilized eggs tor experiment labovel. Egg shells are cracked lbelowl by lab technician, who puts live chiclc embryo into solution. 153 FROZEN HIBISCUS PETALS WILL SHATTER AFTER THE TREATMENT BY LIQUID NITROGEN AS IS SHOWN BY WORKER IN REFRIGERATION LAB SKILLED HANDS pass glass rod over hear of a gas flame 'Io make piece of equipmenf 'For experimen+ in Iabora+ory. 154 All-Encompassing Research Is Located In South Florida NOWLEDGE comes from many fields, and noth ing points out this fact better than UM's far reaching research program. Centered in South Florida, the only near-tropical re gion in the United States, the research labs Work largel to solve problems peculiar to this area. Hurricanes ar tracked with a campus radar unit, tropical fruits an vegetables are grown and studied and much work i done in the field of refrigeration, in an attempt to fin the best equipment for this climate. fa if Ji 3 7 .1-,x'3a:,,5,W ., 1 'X' " Aww w ' 4' 2 4 3 sw, L, W -Bl wr Q X 1 5 Y fr - A M-Q Marine Biology The Study Oi The Sea Around Us HREE MOTOR VESSELS, ranging from 18 to 75 feet, and a modern laboratory on Virginia Key are utilized by the University's Marine Laboratory. Fundamental research in tropical fisheries, ichthyol- ogy, marine biology and oceanography is conducted not only in Florida Waters but as far away as Chile and South Africa. The lab also carries out applied research for the United States government, the State of Florida, various West Indian governments and industrial or- ganizations. Problems studied by researchers range from prevention of shipbottom corrosion to the designing of submarine acoustical instruments. Investigations are also being carried out for the Rockefeller Institute on the general productivity of tropical marine waters with a view to increasing the world food supply from the sea. NEEDLE-LIKE FISH are examined under microscope ai' Vir- ginia Key lab +o deiermine characferisfics of ihe specimens OCEAN BOTTOM is seen Transferred inI'o kaieidoscopic pai'- I'ern by marine biolvogisi, who peers 'Ihrough radar viewer. FAIR-WEATHER CLOUDS hang in con'IrasI' above man-made hurricane +haI 'I'es+s resisfance of 'lypical Florida s+ruc+ure. COKES IN HAND, MOUTHS GAPING, LOCAL RESIDENTS SCRUTINIZE PIECES OF EQUIPMENT DURING MARINE LABORATORY'S OPEN-HOUSE PROGRAM 157 I I THE DARK IS LIGHT ENOUGH for lasl' minule review. Mosl- nighl' s+uden'rs crowd s+udying into lunch hour or coffee break while a+ iobs. UM's Evening Division Program Attracts Students By Thousands INTENSITY OF STUDY and eagerness to learn may prob- ably be found in greater quantity, percentage-wise, among UM's evening students than among day students. For these 4,000 knowledge seekers add to the already heavy load of the eight-hour Working day by enrolling in the Evening Division. The night school, under Dean Dan Steinhoff, offers degree courses, graduate study and general education non-credit courses. The last category consists of courses in which local citizens have expressed interest, including judo, silversmithing and astronomy for the improvement of a hobby or for personal enjoyment. Off-campus centers, the Edison Branch and Koubek Center, and extension courses at Key West and Ft. Lauderdale help to take the Evening Division to night students at greater distances. 158 l INDUSTRIAL TRAINEE is one of many who work in day-lime, bul' improve iob skill by evening schooling. CLAD IN PROTECTIVE smocks and aprons, nighl' ar'ris'I's gel' insighi' inI'o painling and composilion. GRAPHIC ARTS COURSES give sludenls knowledge of leilerpress operafions, bookbinding and eiching. I Radio-TV-Film Is Enlarged For More and Better Shows INCREASING ITS PRODUCTION and broadcast- ing facilities, the University's Radio-Television-Film Department aired seven complete television series and four radio series during the year. Department chairman Dr. Sydney W. Head added several new stalt members to supervise the increased production: former XVTVJ director Shannon Wallace and production crew member Wilson Griffith. Under the combined direction of program coordina- tor Paul Nagel Jr., Shannon Wallace and Wilson Grif- fith, the department produced the following television programs: Television Workshop, WTVJQ Miami View- point, WCKTQ Romance of Language, This Week at UM, Essay, Montage and The Camera, all on WTHS. Radio supervisor Jack Metzger was responsible for four radio shows including the University of Miami Roundtable, a half hour drama on Theatre X and This Wfeek at UM and This Week in Sports. Students benefited this year with the addition of a I rr., complete closed-circuit television system on North Cam- TAKE CAMERA TVVO-Communicafigng S1-uden+5 are pus for classroom practice and instruction. They also trained in closed-circuit television and radio productions. received valuable experience in local stations. DEPARTMENT STAFF: Oliver Griswold, Edgar Talbert, Muriel Hawthorne, Skip Beckwith, Dr. Sydney W. Head, Paul Nagel, Jr., Shannon Wallace, Wilson Grittith, Whit Ralsten, Elizabeth Rogers, Jack Metzger, Judson Tibbets and C. Henderson Beal. . - f, i , it ., V, i ,-,, .M,,,,-t,.,.t f,--i ...aa .,.,, s COMMERCIAL TELEVISION STUDIOS LET STUDENTS RUN OPERATIONS DURING UM SHOW AS IN WTVJ CONTROL ROOM, STUDENTS RUN AUDIO PUSH-UPS ON TV are performed by sIucIen'I' hosI- on WTV.I's TV Workshop. This scene-is from UM's "SaIuI'e Io SporIs." PINT-SIZED SCREEN is cameraman's view of ac'I'ion going on in TV siudio. The viewfinder frames scene 'I'ha'I' audience sees. ffdwff x s : iii ! wiv if 'H 2 i W, gli, ,V W 6 i A , , , . I, . ,.w,,,.,..W..,.h,M,f...X,,.,vM-e,-,,V ,fem-. - -A W 'LW 4 ..,,,.,....,,...4,.,,..v-1.f.-.s-.....eW.,,,.,,a-4Wfe,..,,,e.wwM,,L,,., if 4-Mfv-Mrfswwee' - Q f ' A W ,.,,d.,.....I.-wm........,-M-w- I. V , .. .. -4 . .... M .X... ,,L,,..A,M......l.,....x-Mme,-MmM RADIO-CONTROL ROOM ON NORTH CAMPUS SENDS LIVE PROGRAMS FROM UM VIA TELEPHONE WIRES TO LOCAL RADIO STATIONS FOUR TIMES A WEEK STUDENT NEWSCASTERS air a weekly reporl' on news and spor+s on WGBS radio +o keep public aware of campus evenI's. "READ LINE SIX," says producer during rehearsal preceding airing of weekly Theaier X dramalic show on WCKR radio. SIGN LANGUAGE is flashed by +he s'I'udenI' producer +o indicafe 'I'haI' 'Ihe subiec+ should move back a few inches. WEAKENED PATIENT IS FLANKED BY PAIR OF STUDENT NURSES WHO GIVE HER PHYSICAL SUPPORT AND LEAD HER BACK TO HER HOSPITAL BED Nursing Curriculum Concentrates In Two Fields MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE alone is not enough for graduates of the Nursing Department. The dozen instructors see to it that the 92 nurses-to-be and regis- tered nurses also get a sound background in fields which add to their understanding of the people with whom they will work. To gain medical knowledge, student nurses spend time at local hospitals and health agencies, among them DESK WORK is handled in addition to other duties ot student nurse. UNIFORMED STUDENTS absorb mentally and on paper remarks by nursing instructor. jackson Memorial, Mercy, Doctors' and Variety Chil- dren's hospitals and the County Health Department. During the nurses' interning periods they acquire first- hand experience in the handling of patients, young and old. Acting chairman of the department was Miss Gene Cranch, who replaced Mrs. Dora Blackmon. Mrs. Black- mon was on leave, studying for her doctor's degree. NURSE-INSTRUCTOR explains Rh factor with drawings on blackboard. CHECK-UP TIME comes 'For nurse, who reads docIfor's re- marks concerning +I1e 'Hny pa'I'ienI wI1o siands nexI' Io her. FEEDING TIME for baby is noi' looked upon as a chore by mos+ sI'uden'I' nurses, who look forward Io being mo'I'I1ers. fmewwwmfeawszfffwfxceef':ww'1-wfwfs. , ,H-1-as sr sz :f.v7'eHrw M f. , A STORY TIME 'For young pa'Hen'I' is in'I'errupI'ecI by mecIIc's inspecfion - buf I'I1e boy's sI'orybooIc mus'I come along. PLAY TIME finds s'Iuden'r nurse enferfaining baby, who is a bi+ apprehensive 'foward 'rhe funny, long-eared bunny rabbit 165 Man the .facial ani- inal. Fellowship with many tangentss the Greek, the independent. The :inging of hymnx. The cacophony of an ill- tztned piano. Stndentx ineetj student: organize, HHHNIZHIIHNS 1 av' EQi f , 'un W 5 it yin 5 fit un,- ea, ww WWW Se 1 gf QW 1 M ni 'vm-U ,WF 'M 5 1 Z , , sem? Gamma Delta Chapter OCIAL JACKPOT was hit by Alpha Delta Pi with its Diamond Ball, fraternity exchanges, participa- tion in Song-fest and intramurals. It also captured a place in Homecoming house decorations. The 106th Anniversary convention of the National Chapter was held in Nassau-via-the-Bahamas in June and Joan Odell was named Miss Ideal Alpha Delta Pi. There was national competition for this honor. Joan was also awarded the Mary B. Merritt Panhellenic award as outstanding sorority woman on campus. Other outstanding ADPis are "Angel" Chris Berk- heimer and perky little Helen Dyer, a Hurricane cheer- leader. joan Odell appeared in the limelight again by being tapped for Wfig and Robe, the Law School hon- orary for outstanding students. In addition to Working on the national Alpha Delta Pi philanthropic project, ADPis also provided special equipment and services for crippled children. i . i,ii .. One of the oldest sororities in the nation, the local QUEEN FOR A DAY, the rushee is the focus of all attention Gamma Delta chapter was founded in 1947 and is one and small tall: is the order during the "Ice Water Tea." of 83 national Chapters. - M1 . . " 5?iI"' li,2 D , 1 f it ' 1- " ' at ...- Q Wharf! ' A D ' --fi 'mf - f,r, ' vs '- L .-- t- - . W - "'- as , aii D 5 ADPIS HOST Theodore Gibson, local NAACP President: Eric Raepple: Anauta, an Eskimo: H and ex-governor Fuller Warren, panelists 'for Religious Emphasis Week integration discussion. J. Odell, Pres- J- Busile C. Berkheimer, V.P. L. Bennett H. Dyer, Sec. J. Boozer S. Stewart, Trecss. C. Bushong 168 X. .CUB LAST-MINUTE PRIMPING before lhe nexl class is done by lhe aid of +l'1e wall mirror in flue ADPi room. B. Campbell J. Doyle B. Harman S. Leybourne S. McKim J. Norton B. Seuy C. Clark M. Geller P. Hicks S. Lockhan' M. McWillicm J. Okell A. Seralin M. Cuiler P. Glass S. Hill L. Loucks M. Miller M. Presbrey 5. Sherwood U. Durdat B. Hansbargel R. Kelley K. Moson S. Nikoden D. Saunders C. Sinclo 169 2 SORORITY ROOM affords comforlable surroundings for members who 'rrade slories aboul' favorile currenl inl'eresl's. ,A 1 j 5 "lil-ij: J AW? A u V,A, . W1 .. 1 - Ayivg? -iji fy Q' I A 35' Wi. L' K .aw X,,,.f T ,"' we 3 . ,, ...,. adj C. Singer K. Thibodeaux C. Smith B. Trevi V. Sunday G. Vuldyke M. Thqiling A. Wesferkamp ve ' li tw. I -E! Ig ll Mumronoi - umxciusi - win vsnui HI AAQA' EWIAON 'WPI i l ACTIVES COLLABORATE after a rush par+y 'lo discuss wiih presideni' Karp merii's of girls who wish +o pledge sorority. Alpha Eta Chapier NATIONAL RECOGNITION was received this year by Alpha Epsilon Phi when it was awarded the national activities award 'for the most outstanding chapter in the country for 1957. This is the second time that the Alpha Eta chapter has received this honor. One of the oldest sororities on campus, AEPhi was established in 1928. Nationally it was founded at Bar- nard College in New York in 1909. The girls of AEPhi were very active on campus this year. Susie Karp was elected president of Eaton Hall. Patsy Karp handled the money for the Panhellenic Council and was also secretary of social welfare. Shelia Faber was one of the honored few who was tapped dur- ing Homecoming Week by Nu Kappa Tau. In the beauty department, Judy Garber was a member of the Tempo Court. On the social scene, the AEPhis enjoyed their annual Dream Boat Ride and Green and White Formal at the Hollywood Beach Hotel. Monday means white for the girlsg then both pledges and actives are seen wearing white dresses. P- K'-WP. Pres. L. Apt R, Cohen B. Fox J. Handelman S. Kafzmun P. Klein J. LiP5hll1 R- NUSSbUUl"1 G- Siegel, V- P. S. Bader S. Dine N. Friedlainder P. Hirsch G. Kay M. Kosberg R. Lowensfein E. Pollack BSh S CB' MDf .IGI SH 'T RKh CL 0 AM' CR'lIll - GPN, ec. . arne . or man . azer . urwi z . ers man . evens n . orrls . ISC Q P- Pfelwff Treas. B. Cohen L. Fleischer P. Goiliel: S. Karp B. Klein M. Levin M. Nevins L. Shapiro 3 if Y I f K I L1 I' SMALL TALK AND NEWS OF THE LATEST HAPPENINGS OCCUR DURING A THURSDAY AFTERNOON OPEN HOUSE IN MODERNISTIC AEPHI ROOM we x QA 2 sa s 'Qfifjfawli A 132 L 1 Jig 1 ' s f fs Q is ,wfk T K -M Q, X W ,Pay-1 ' 55,- 4 SM K- A. TS ff .. .sr X - ,gr if .Tm T 4 ul V+ av 3 5434? 9' , M532 . My Y a' 4 4' we V'L' A 'L'L J ll I ' x K A . M. Shapiro D. Uchim N. Sfarksfein A. Weiss -J. Straus S. Wigodsky M. Tamurkin B. Wolkenberg PLEDGES ON PARADE is presen+ed each 'Fall ai' +he Roney Plaza Holel. Each sororH'y's pledge presiclenl receives a bouquei' of roses in honor of fhe pledge class's "coming out" 171 iff? it 45? EHI ll , i YWaf5Q r Sa fs DEUCES ARE WILD-and so are carcl games-when girls gather for evening of moneyless hearis or con'lrac'I' bridge. "YOUR BOY FRIEND musl' have big fee+," quips a Chi Omega as she examines a pair of socks being kni'I'. Tas're'ful decoration of room is conducive +o relaxation between classes. 172 Upsilon Delia Chapter ON CAMPUS is the Chi Omega. Founded na- Arkansas in 1895, Chi O 1936. highlighted their year with A number of fraternity mix- throughout both semesters. was rounded out by a Found- annual Mother's Day Tea and a members of the sorority include Ann member of Nu Kappa Tau and Alpha Sigma Epsilon, and Ann Spaulding, secretary of the Student Body Government, and a member of Who's Who. Kay Brubaker was selected for Angel Flight and Margaret Sheppard was tapped by Beta Beta Beta. Dedicated to the development of the individual, Chi O members have adopted "Hellenic culture and Chris- tian ideals" as their motto. Numbering 112 chapters, Chi Omega ranks as one of the largest sorotities in the nation. - ' - . . T Ti . '. ,-'ff -' A A 2-' ' . ,V tw 11, Q 'Sgr :Q . -: 7 1 f tirii- 2.--2 ':-2 3 . 2 f Y. x .- on 91 il , . , ,... K J QF' Q ax il ss gg, ,5:i', , : gg .'.'c 5 5 3 v t- S fiifi, S. Swan-son, Pres. M. Adams M. Sheppard, V.P. C. Allen B. Brubaker, Sec. J. Bolek G. Davis, Treas. N. Beal DRESSED IN BILLOWY GOWNS THAT ARE A CONTRAST TO DARK CURTAINS, CHI OMEGA GIRLS APPEAR IN LAST YEAR'S PRODUCTION OF SONGFEST ' v- - A ,. , ' . . f . ,.,. fr- K, I l k.Vk . ,., A nf 1 II-' A I F 1 1 - ' 5 i f fry , . Q5 5 E .V 1' 2 Q .V y .Q V LJ., 5 ., I 'f W A V KW 1 WI- A 1 I IW M . . 1 wwf ' .., .4I. , I . e f . - .... 5 f- . . wk. ,wx ' X ' 3 - I . g"' QI I ir Q' f - ff' I ff wif X I. ,',, ' H ,..., - 'gl ' ' QW .-If I 'ILL Egg Q 5 X .D , V Af w V .: A K, A .. yy I M. Ferrell J. Bliss K. Chilcuff L. Greene P. Jasefson B. Boyd V. Culpepper M. Fosier A. Hammond E. Kassner J. Carmichael P. Davis J. Fridline J. Harding S. Kellogg S. Carier C. Dean D. Goscin M. Hencinski L. Kramer 173 Q M. Lamont A. McGarry J. Landwehr E. McKeriban M. Lucas M. Petersen F. McCrary P. Priicharcl 2 g X Mft M . M. M- I ,Af 5 . 5 4 fb j , , . - 3 P. Scoft A. Turner M. Wentz M. Zavitz 45.7 Alpha Chi Chapter . limi mn limi Qu YUM BEMUGGED AND SMILING GIRLS look on while Skip, 'their Dream Man, receives +he +riden+ from Peggy Hockaday. WITH THE COPPING of the coveted Scholar- ship Trophy for sororities and second place in Songfest, Alpha Chi chapter began a marvelous year. Members of Tri Delts were outstanding in many campus activities. Jacque Warren was Editor of Ibis and Queen of the AFROTC. Lonnie Robinson and Nancy Reiss reigned as Princesses. Lonnie doubled as a Tempo Beauty and Nancy as official hostess of SBG. Fibi Kovachevich served as vice president of Associ- ated Women Students and Carol Humburg was Sweet- heart of SAE. Carol and Barbara Lauck were also members of Nu Kappa Tau. Selected by Angel Flight were Ellie Lutz, Donna Argo and Judy Howard. Nanita Green was "M" Club Sweetheart and a member of the Homecoming Court. The Tri Delts also placed first in ticket sales for the charity football games between SN and SAE and played in the Powder Bowl game for the fifth straight year. Alpha Chi is one of 103 Tri Delt chapters in the world, the first of which was founded on the Boston University campus on Thanksgiving Eve, 1888. P. Hockaday, Pres. D. Argo M. Garry C. Humburg G. Lawson B. Marhieson L. Pike B. Rider M- Mwffox, V-P- M. Bisbee N. Greene E. Juerliing K. Lippoldf S. Mull R. Rcsco L. Roberls B. Louck, Sec. N. Chivers J. Howard E. Kovuchevich E. Lutz M. Myers N. Reiss J. Robinson M. Bott, Treas. J. Gclbreufh S. Hudson J. Laird C. Mciddlone M. Nobles C. Renucrf B. Rohrer 174 THE RESERVES BEAM APPROVAL DURING HALFTIME POWDER PUFF BOWL GAME AS QUARTERBACK FIBI BREAKS AWAY FOR A LONG GAlN R. Russell A. Sinkovetz S. SCl1nUrr J, Warren B. Schulgen G, Whipple L. Shank R. Wray MALE EXPERT is employed by charming Tri Deli-s +o bend chicken wire 'For eniry in +he Homecoming Parade. O'H1ers s'I'and by and supervise operaiion and occasionally offer advice. 175 U f"'. . MODERN SUITE in Panhellenic Building, 'ihough ii- evokes pride, calls for much Salurday housekeeping by 'I'he girls. lllH HMMH Beta Tau Chapter OLDING TRUE to their high ideals of friendship and sisterhood, Delta Gamma enjoyed another successful year of activity on the campus. Outstanding social events included Founder's Day, Anchor Cotillion, a Christmas bazaar and the annual Anchor Man Dance, where the Delta Gammas crowned Sigma Nu Jim Moskos their sponsor. Outstanding DG's on campus include Sue Farns- worth, senator of the student body, Jean Futrelle, secre- tary of Woman's Residence Council and Grace Staub, vice president of the Union Board of Governors. In the beauty department, Delta Gamma rated tops. Marcia Valibus was Homecoming Queen for 1957 and reigned as Orange Bowl Queen for 1958. Carol Bald- win was Citrus Queen and cheerleader. At the Military Ball "Angel" Carol was crowned AFROTC Queen. The national Delta Gamma project is aiding the blind, to which each member gives time. Delta Gamma was founded nationally in 1875, at Lewis School. The Beta Tau chapter was established on UM campus in 1946. K. Wagner, Pres. M. Anderson HOMECOMING RALLY is pepped up by 'l'he Delia Gamma skii' with Sue Gernon, quarter- g'TT:ku:.1 E'C6T,1,e,lNs back, demonsiraiing the Hurricane spirir over 'l'he coming confesr. Wafer girls sfand by. P. George, Treus. C. Baldwin 176 IT'D BE N-ICE TO HAVE MEN AROUND WHEN THERE ARE HEAVY DISHES TO TOTE, BUT DG'S MANAGE WITHOUT THEM IN CUTE KITCHEN NO M, Bgrgmqnn S. Cosh J. Dirvin J. FuIreIIe C. Hopper J. Lemna C. Morris P- PGVVY M' Sullivan 5, Black C. Combs K. Erskine S. Gernon C. Kempe C. Leverenz K. Neulon D- PGIETSOH M- VaI'b'-'5 P, Bracken M. Conyers S. Farnsworth B. Gravihe R. Laney M. Lewis M. Neff L. Reimcm P- WIIICIHS P, Burns J. Dickinson P. Flofken C. Guerard M. Leavitt P. McCaII J. Perry J. Roe C- ZIIDSIII 177 Omega Chapter , mn PHI lllSIlHN UNCROWDED DANCE FLOOR belies the fact fhai' the "Win+er Formal" was one of the year's biggesi' evenis. RED LETTER YEAR was made by the girls of DPhiE by sponsoring and participating in their annual "Pledges on Parade." At this highly successful affair the pledge class of each sorority was introduced. Other social events on the Delta Phi Epsilon calendar included a lovely Wfinter formal, Western party, Moth- er's Day Luncheon and Founder's Day Luncheon. The Omega chapter was established at Miami in 1939 and is one of 21 chapters. The sorority was founded nationally at New York University in 1917. Besides sponsoring such successful social events, the sorority also participated in the Campus Charity Chest drive and worked for the Heart Fund. Outstanding DPhiEs on the campus include Wanda Steinberg, president of Gamma Sigma Sigma, Joan Friedman, Arts and Sciences Senator, and Jo Ann Mil- let, Student Board of Governors and Secretary of AWS. Outstanding local alumnae include Mrs. Sidney Weintraub, chosen Outstanding Woman Citizen, and Mrs. Milton Sirkin, Winner of the Civic League of Miami Beach Award. L. Dulfon, Pres. B. Baron C. Blumberg J. Einhorn T. Fishman G. Goldstein S. Kleinman J. Millmon B. Robins l D. Brody, V.P. B. Beck A. Brocker B. Feuer J. Friedman J. Goodman E. Levick P. Murovchick C. Roth M. Sfiebel, Sec. J. Berezin C. Cohen L. Feuer L. Gilbert R. Grofz S. Lippiif S. Pass A. Ruskin L. Schwartz, Treus. M. Bernslein N. Dezen L. Fineberg M. Golden A- JGCOBSOI1 J- Miller l- POHGS G- Sulomon l Q, T Tx HE DELTA PHl'S, AT THEIR FALL FORMAL, SEEM MORE CONCERNED OVER THEIR MEN, WHILE THEIR MEN ARE INTERESTED IN THE FOOD , 1 if L, I ' ' ,"L - 1 A i i T ,A E . ,, A Q' K' Q if R -gag f' X if i ff ff ' ' I X Q .ef V ,Jw K MQW' wi fr lvivj ' Ti'r..,g I T I D. Sarnog J. Sfern Cisi.ssIi::iinn skmiiiffinqong DELTA PHI EPSILON pledges display 'Iheir "Barrymore" +aIen'I's before acfive members. W. Steinberg F. Wynne Laughier is prevaleni during fhe comic ski? presen+aI'ion ai' 'I'I1e pledge-acfive pariy. 179 QQa. YN i QR X QP LP GUESTS ot Delta Zeta during Religious Emphasis Week: R. Toomey, A. Taft, Mrs. O. K. Armstrong, W. Hicks. mn lun Beta Nu Chapter THE INTERFAITH ROSE AWARD was presented to the chapter which started off a very successful year for Delta Zeta. The girls proved their music abili- ties by copping lirst place in Songfest. . On the social calendar, the lovely Rose Ball and an- nual Christmas Open House headed the list. Delta Zetas participated in basketball and volley ball intramurals. They won the Forensic intramural award for good sportsmanship. Eager to give their time to help others, the DZs sponsored a Christmas party for the children of Variety Children's Hospital. Three Delta Zetas were honored by being placed in the "Who's Who in American Universities? Those honored were Herta Deichman, president of Delta Zeta, senior senator, Alpha Sigma Epsilon, and S.R.A. president, Althea jones, Nu Kappa Tau, Kappa Delta Pi, Alpha Lambda Delta and Gamma Sigma Sigma, and Diane Russel, Nu Kappa Tau, Phi Kappa Phi, Kappa Delta Pi and Alpha Lambda Delta. The Beta Nu chapter of Delta Zeta was established on our campus in 1937. It is one of 118 chapters. if " 4. ws H.: , 1, W A . HM Q X Q ws 1 . E Wi' A pi, , ., . , - ' 'fr .i g Q' . ' .--. . as I .... 1 W "1 xi ' f- ,H , . ggf1klgX:A,ff.' t 55. , an . w , , ..-25:1 - 21'm3T.4 I I it ' 3-R 6 iftwfhrlij ' " aw I . l K ' if ' . 'rllt H. Deichmontn, Pres. D. Andress BRIGHT-EYED QUEENS ruled Miracle Mile the night ot the Homecoming parade 'From this Akffslgzzllh tloat entered by Delta Zeta. The regal beauties and their page rode in splendor 'For a night. A, Cla,-k, 1,-ws, p, Botlqgh SPIKES AND STRIKES ARE THE PRINCIPAL INTERESTS OF DELTA ZETA WHETHER THEY RE PARTICIPATING IN INTRAMURALS OR ROOTING F-ROM SIDELINES K. Casey G. Davis P. Hodge L Leonard J. Matonis D. Nuckolls G. Sufz J. Whitehead N. Colliflower P. Duhaime M. Holland O. Luna A. McClure J. Olson C. Schneider D. Williams R. Curry P. Gianni J. Leiby Y. Manief H. McGuire V. Proulx W. Schoenling J. Worihingfon F. Daglis K. Higginbofham G. Leoffler G. Marshall C. McNamara D. Russell J. Tarpo C. Wrighf 181 l lll l '7' Q-1-jf:--- fa J i. SORORITY ROOM is as gloomy as memorable Blaclt Hole of Calcu'H'a before Iighl' goes on, revealing ultra modern decor. Rho Chapter OCIALLY, the sorority enjoyed a very active year. Pledges were feted at a party at the Thunderbird Motel on the "Golden Strip." Gals and guys donned fishing attire, and with rods and reels in hand they at- tended the annual Fishing Party. A lovely spring formal added to the year's attractions. Two new trophies grace the sorority room. One of the gleaming pieces of gold is for the ugliest "feather- less bipid" on campus which the Iotas entered in the Ugly Man Contest and walked off with first prize. Intra- mural table tennis championship was another "gold medaln title won by the girls. Iota Alpha Pi was founded nationally in New York City at Hunter College, in 1903. The Rho chapter was established on the university campus in 1946 and is one of 18 chapters. Politics interested Sandra Goodrich, who was secre- tary of the College of Arts and Sciences, and Evelyn Tower, a senator for the same college. Other outstand- ing members include Lynn Towle, a member of Gamma Alpha Chi, and Jane Neustein of Pi Delta Phi. - G. Garfinkle, Pres. L. Bolotin S. Horoviiz eus ein eisc ner Rodo . , . . K. FI l1 B. "THE SACK DRESS will become as popular on campuses as the lvy League SIN-fovile, SZQP J, Freeman look," an Iota Alpha Pi member relates io sisiers, who casi looks of disbelief. E. Tower, Trees. R. Friedman i :YE 3551 Q M9819 Se' Ia rw v A ac ii-f X.,- 'HPPH IIHPPH HOPING TO NET MARYLAND, UM Homecoming oppo- srhon KKGS ride flashy spori' cars in Week's parade. Delta Kappa Chapter MANY ACTIVITIES dotted the calendar of the Delta Kappa chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma this year. Kappas proudly walked off with the first place honors at Carni Gras and the Ugly Man Contest. Kappa Kappa Gamma also captured third place in Songfest and another third place award for its entry in the Homecoming parade. Outstanding social events of the year included the Alumni Christmas Formal, Spring party, and a break- fast in honor of graduating seniors. Individual members also brought many honors to the sorority. Ann Marie Bouse was rapped for Nu Kap- pa Tau. Rosemary Morris was chosen Sweetheart of Sigma Nu and Orange Bowl Princess. Mary Jane Plum- er, chapter president, was tapped for Delta Theta Mu, the College of Arts and Sciences honorary for outstand- ing scholarship. One of 84 chapters, the Delta Kappa chapter was established on the University campus in 1938. The sorority was founded nationally in 1879 at Monmouth University in Illinois. SONGFEST SAW KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA LOVELIES IN WHITE FORMAI. GOWNS ON THE STAGE WITH AN ORIENTAL THEME AS A BACKGROUND 184 TWICE A YEAR KAPPAS STAND BEFORE THE PANHELLENIC BUILDIN H, G AND JOYOUSLY AWAIT THEIR NEW PLEDGES WITH WAVING HANDS AND SINGING ,.x , . TQ ,. - fi , ., ' :wife I V V A-5' 1.1, , V- 1- A. 2. na ,. - ,, xg - fri , ,., ' - 9 I . . A .,,. . -- f X V753 up 4, 7, J-fg,-M 8, 1: M 2 i-gg., fy if . " " i 4 4 4 I ' V, Z 2 ' Hi ff ' 5, jf? A -3 5 M, .. xg., f. IZQ... 'W . J ?. iffy... - "" " ', 113' PM " ' X lik IJ -1- i Ji ? 'vX9.l? 521 "Q, ' , ' :w - .ffiy . gg' 2 1:11. Lg.-:,i?.t' Qvfie .A .., A I 7 "5 'LJ -- 91.5.-fi - if .f r S " . gg 'gs 4. f' . "ff1E:.L.. gfiivf , -Qfifi' T? -LAW ': ' L' '5f2i "T1? iflw-'QE . ffgifr f. , ' rf-ff-LQ ' cis- H Hx fflib AH- H , " I f' jf fi A,. ':f. ,, ,fv2f,?..:? I A J' 1 ,H- fu. 2 K ..f . 1, A- 'alia ' f .. ' B- if - Q K , , I '- .fy Kei . -. - , ' 1 .i 1 'i' f . gf ' fi -. X K , 3 .: .A .. . an V3.3 ...pk . Mi x ...., Vig i l ... I V, 4 . J , rl J E .. U ..., 5 ' A 25 N, f .I , 2 ' ,Q we . " -..H .. ..--.,. .-. .. .11-gf. , ' i l ww A ' ' A ' ' 1 ' I A 'f ' A ' war. z ivff"'wffHx,,' " .. f V, f. .1 - ...-1.gg54fA , i - I V? .f f I I ,, .. 1 '44, , 1. 'f K. .1 f ,-m f f 1, :' H., . .Q f -jj-' ,I .4 A S . . ,f A , . .' . ' ' - ' . X ' .5 - ' X1 ' . ' M. Plumer, Pres. J. Boumgarfner B. Filip, V.P. S. Black C. Carr, Sec. W. Butterfield A. Bouse, Trecrs. S. Cesarini S. Chamberlain F. Hufchings J. Daniels J. Janisch M. Hammock C. Lamofhe N. Hemp S. Lark B. R. Marfin Morris J. Paiin J. Pefe rs 185 P. Reybold C. Ridings M. Seese C. Smifh S. Welch S. Sfoehr K. Taggart J. Turner Z. Walker D. Zimmerman J. White S. Wood Aelgg IQHBI Qm: IL Jllk ll Q SORORlTY'S SCRAPBOOK is a record of charter activities. parties, and local alumnae and is always shown to the rushee PHI SIHMH IHMH Beta Theta Chapter PARTICIPATING in many and varied activities, Phi Sigma Sigma copped lirst prize in Homecoming house decorations this year to retire the trophy. Members of the Beta Theta chapter also amassed enough points to take second place in the race for the Spirit Trophy. Other honors accorded to the group in- cluded nrst place in Sun Carnival and second place in the Campus Charity Chest drive. The girls also found time to don evening wear and sponsor a pledge formal in the fall and their traditional American Beauty Rose formal in the spring. Outstanding members include Sally Brandes, presi- dent of Panhellenic Council, secretary of publicity for Student Body Government and member of Alpha Sig- ma Epsilong Joan Drahman, Homecoming princessg and Sandy Berman, vice president of Hillel House. Beta Theta chapter was organized on the University campus in 1947. Founded nationally in 1913 at Hunter College, Phi Sigma Sigma's motto is "Aim High." The sorority boasts 34 chapters which bear its colors of blue and gold. S. Brandes, Pres. J. Alpert L. Dean S. Friedlofncler I. Hayman E. Kaye B. Kulick B, Newhouse L. Wolfson, V.P. E. Blucher J. Drahmonn B. Goldin l.. Herman R. Kirschner C. uc man . om l. h R R L. Sheitelman, Sec. B. Cohen B. Engel R. Goldman J. Horowitz S. Kloteman l.. Leven J. Rashti J R T n B eld an S Green J Kamp S Koenig l Levison C S d . ose, recls. P.Cohe .F m ' ' - . dn BFS i w, 'fi S ,Q T72f+,SWi"i"'E Ju qi ,,q1qs,Wgfv ww' Qian 4 if Q R :IQ I' - Z' ' ' 3 2 A . f A in IIAAH A 35 Hwy we vw ff j 1 55324 aiu. 'K H 9 .,A, f 14111 K ? QQ ,, .mid , Q 'M ' 2 is J, AM, S Z HE? 'X fl IHMH W illa? 2' SOME MEMBERS listen a'Hen1'ively +o discussions during weekly meefings while others aH'emp'l' lasf minu'I'e cramming. "'l-rt mn lun Alpha Mu Chapter EWCOMER TO PANHELLENIC this fall was Sigma Delta Tau. The Alpha Mu chapter, which was installed in October, is one of thirty-four national chapters. National founding occurred in 1917 at Cor- nell University and is celebrated annually by members. Getting into the swing of things, SDT opened its year with a pledge-active affair, which also included a formal dinner and dance. This gala celebration was held at the Deauville Hotel on Miami Beach. The social calendar was rounded out with a lovely spring formal and weekly open houses, at which time men may visit the girls in their Pan-Hel room. SDT was honored by Hillel, when Dr. Donald Michelson presented the ambitious girls with a certifi- cate for outstanding service to the Foundation. Campus politics are activities which attract Phyllis Rosenblaum and Vera Sgutt. Other eager beavers in the chapter are Marcia Frankel, who is treasurer of Eaton Hall, and Rita Benamy. Rita is very active in intramurals and was tapped by Phi Delta Pi, the physi- cal education professional organization. s -fl.. fffaiif ' ll ii P. Rosenblum, Pres. M. Akin PLAYFUL NURSES adminisfer drugs fo fired-looking ferrapin during a Homecoming pep l:?plll,unl:'slZ' Bclaltllzn rally skif by girls of Sigma Delia Tau. The terrified ferrapin. incidentally, didn'+ recover. 188 N. Morrison, Trees. R. Benamy W-.. THURSDAY AFTERNOON IS OPEN HOUSE FOR SIGMA DELTA TAU, THE TIME BOY FRIENDS MAY COME INSIDE FOR A PLEASANT BIT OF CONVERSATIO'N 1 few "3 A iii' '. 1 .5 .Sl -. " fi filfiii. wi v? -, .. 3 . . , . . .W .,:' v it - ' . ww' H ' E ' , ' T - ..7:' H: .. 5325? +51 4, . ' ,,..,'a'I. 4 . . . . - 5 . 1 .1 fi I im. ig. hr 1 f I . new . 45? 9. Hi. . I -T . Ag MGX: 'fi ' ' i ' f , V. I X, 1 - .L 4 1' ff A 15 1 E ' .,,:. 31Q. r 3. t " .gi 9.1-3255 ' . i . ii. .. V ? K, in L: K . x JE I 1 -Q.. , ,My ne gg ' 4.1. , V . f P- ,QW my N Q-ag 3f:'5-ur ' 'T' "1'.'f V' "B ' "if Z .X ,mi 'f' . -. ff-41 Ji ' H M- fl-I M ft - aw I .4 I -.- I Q if .R A 11 11 2:51-f".. S' I '77 .ff 'iii 37.1 "X If J . -' ' N Q'i'-f 'J V af' ii, 'I L .Vw QV "" In i .HQ , -5 if y , if ,A 1 W Q I ' , . -187.23 'ii 1557 . . .J I I . if a A . of 4 -' .. F. ' M 1 -I'1 I' 'S . fl' f . ,... , .- K , x fig- KIA - Q . A vftv M4 ,513 f " ' . 2.5 K . S' A1 A J if - fi . fl A I if I . ' 1' W. . 4. i f A :Qs 3335. . ,X hi .Q ' gl l H-- v . . 'gg In .. fx g..f...sI 'II X.. nik. J. Berkson C. Danziger M. Frankel S. Gross K. Lowen1I'1uI S. Rein A. Samet G. Simon S- WGIHSIOCIK B. Breakstone J. Edeison J. Friedrich D. Kahn M. MeIe1 S. Rosenstrauch G. Schaffer S. Simon I-- WQFIJIOW N. Brown D. Feinberg M. Gordon M. Kcfzmon B. Mushlin E. Sack G. Sermone-to D. Steinberg L- ZISOGIK L. Cohen M. Fisher T. Gordon Pa. Lifimun R. Pector A. Salsbury V. Sguh' N. Wagner R. ZUCIieI'mGl1 189 fQi wb-AQV' lun lun HIPHH S9321 M -So Gamma Alpha Chapter "HURRY, THE SUN IS RISING" as ZTA changes chicken wire, paint, and napkins into a display for Homecoming. ONORS GALORE were won by the Gamma Al- pha chapter of Zeta Tau Alpha this year. Chief among them was the winning of the Spirit Trophy for participation in university affairs. Zetas' also won Sigma Chi Derby Day and placed first in Greek Week. This seemed to be the Zetas year for firsts, for they also won the Sun Carnival Ticket Trophy and first place in the Homecoming parade for marching units. Their float and house decorations took second place. Outstanding social events included a Founder's Day banquet, a Mother's Day banquet and an Alumni Christmas Tea. Many Zetas are outstanding in campus activities. Ellen Weicker is Sweetheart of Alpha Tau Omega and Secretary of Panhellenic Council. Gayle jenkins is Sweetheart of Pi Kappa Alpha and a varsity cheerlead- er. Bobby Gottlieb is a member of Gamma Alpha Chi. Gamma Alpha chapter was established on campus in 1958 and is one of the 98 national chapters, the first of which was located at Long Wood College in Farmville, Virginia. R. Gottlieb, Pres. J. Baylis M. Eastman J. Glenn G. Jenkins B. Lange M. Mcxcfarlan A. Pidone S. Shumway A. Biasco, V.P. V. Blair C. Epps R. Grarata M. Kahuna P. Lewis M. Maliga V. Reilly H. Sowell M. Klussmann, Sec. B. Calvano C. Evans H. House F. Kovich J. Lins C. Muller B. Rowand M. Stimmel J. Chase, Treas. K. Capers J. Glass P. House L. Kruttschnitt S. McCarron B. Phalp F. Sheffield D. Stoveken WASH THAT ZETA RIGHT INTO OUR HAIR" IS SUNG BY FOUR ZETA SAILORS IN THEIR SOUTH PACIFIC SKIT AT THE SORORITY RUSH PREFERENTIAL TEA .9 I - ' - 'uz -5 -, . .- I l . 1. X kk ' -kj x. I .,II J. Sfrag P. Weigel R. Walker B. Whi1comb E. Weaver B. Whiieford E. Weicker P. Wolferf -,Q-av!""7 HOLD THE PHONE is 'I'he word in Ze'I'a Tau Alpha 'For Ihis Homecoming parade floal' which won second prize for i+s seven sweeI'hear+s, giani whiie felephone, and perl operafor. 191 -. . Q I 5951. It 9 .2 llillllllllltttiilllllllll Q Illla ulllll ,R I MARYLAND GETS THE COLD SHOULDER for Home- coming and AXO +akes advanfage with this 'floai' en'I'ry. HJHH iiHI Umm . Gamma Omega Chapter THE FIRST YEAR of marriage is always the tough- est," a friend will advise a new bride. Probably the next toughest "first year" in any field is the first year for a sorority-organizing, planning, working, partying and, most important, building a good reputation. At any rate, that was the live-fold task that Alpha Chi Omega faced this year in its attempt to start a UM chapter. One of 78 national chapters, the local unit, Gamma Omega, started work with special plans for service projects and social events. Getting into the spirit of campus activities, the Alpha Chis won a first-place trophy at Sigma Chi Derby Day. They also participated in the Campus Charity Chest Drive, and in other service projects. Social life was highlighted by a gay Golden Lyre Ball, held at a local hotel. Fraternity mixers added to the social fun on weekends. Founded at Depauw University in 1885, the soror- ity's motto is "Together let us seek the heights." And for the UM chapter there are more heights to be sought in the future. E. Davis, Pres. D. Amrhein B Dudash P. Leischen S. Mumm P. Ruch J. Verr R- Sligeff V.P. C. Delorey P. Engel S. Lockwood P. Newcomb S. Rutecky L. Wilii J. Jacobs, Sec. D. Doran B. Hall L. Marks J. Paulich E. Scott S. Wood J. Smith, Treas. P. Droft S. Hinegardner T. Morris C. Rizzo M. Scott C. You g . fir '31 Nu Beta Delta Chapter PICTURESQUE Orchid Formal at the Bal Harbour was the outstanding social event of the year for the Sigma Kappas. Founders Day banquet and Hallo- ween party were also on the agenda. Many Sigma Kappas received outstanding honors this year. Betty jean Carpet was named Outstanding Senior Dormitory Womang Jeanne Mullin was the Out- standing Business Major of the Yearg Barbara Bein received the PEM award as Outstanding senior in Physi- cal Educationg Anne Grosholz was secretary of the School of Education. Philanthropic project undertaken this year was the Pioneer Home. The Sigma Kappa girls gave Christmas and Easter parties for the children. "One heart, one way" has been the group's motto since its founding in 1864 at Colby College in Maine. One of 66 chapters, Beta Delta came to the University campus in 1939. Since the founding many Sigma Kappa girls have become nationally known figures. Popular alumnae in- clude Margaret Chase Smith, senator of Maine, and Lillian Bud, noted authoress. . V H Q , V H R , W ' ., 5. ,t r MH llnvvn WFS 'Gil .as 1 5 'V ls, .. X, s t N.-4 1374 THE CORNER is devoted to light conversation as coecls and members ot Sigma Kappa get together cluring rush season. quail! it J. A i R t ' .., g Q ev 5 f .atr , ...1, , M, . ., .. .. . ea 141- ,, ' 1 ,N r . : " , 5 ,, , .. . gn . . it adm 1 vw' N.. . .. st- X . . r titre' s Y 3 1 :.. Q, vi mls., . ' rj .2 . "X" J a fm . it --,. 'Q ,., p I ' Y -'. . . if 1. ,Q ' A t I. J V' 7? . .M "-- X ' M 2 .. -. Q xx ' L if I V R V J EN-.J ' P ii t B s . y 'E 3-5 ' N N l , . -':- I y I I if ? f 1 V Y- . , 'fi ll I . . 7 V 3 , di, 'SY l 'lil ' ' Q "E':L:" ' . . 'W' 'X' 1. ""' 'J ,I P ' 'V""' KAPPA GOES UP for two points in iw" intramural basketball against DZ. S. Driscoll, Pres. R. Miller, Adv T. Filordi J. Kohler D. Pippinger K. Shaw A. Grosholz, V.P. M. Churchill G. Gunory S. McCormack J. Riley B. Snyder D. Wright, Sec. J. Coleman P. Green N. Metzier B. Rossi R. Tighe L, Herron, Treas, P. Davis R. Johnson J. Peterson D. Scorpinqto C. Woideck 193 A GROUP OF SORORITY GIRLS JOIN IN A WARCHANT CIRCLE AS THEY WAIT FOR THE NEW PLEDGES WHO HAVE GONE TO PICK UP THEIR BIDS Panhellenic Council BIG YEAR was 1958 as far as Panhellenic Council was concerned. In September its member sororities moved out of their wooden "shacks" and into glass, steel and concrete quarters in the Mary B. Merritt Pan- hellenic Building. The new home was named for Mi- ami's first dean of women. Within its fWO-StO1'Y L-shaped exterior are complete facilities for fourteen sororities. Each suite contains a social room for informal parties and chapter meetings. Also there is a conference room, a powder room, and even a kitchenette to satisfy mem- bers' culinary desires. Rushing caught Panhe1's eye too. It devised an en- tirely new rushing system controlled by the Dean of Women's office which met the approval of Miami's 500 affiliated women. The system features two rushing per- iods a year, four sets of parties, a handbook for rushees, and the well-known "silence" Panhellenic sponsored a workshop which was at- tended by oflicers and members of all sororities. The meetings were devoted to discussion of current problems. This years' administration was under Prexy Sally Brandes and Dean May E. Brunson, adviser. PANHELLENIC COUNCIL: Firsf row: Dean Brunson, Nanila Greene, Ellen Weicker, Jean Baumgarfner, Sally Brandes, Virginia Behney, Gerry Sue Siegel, Emily Davis, Mary .lane Plumer. Second row: Lois Dalton, Chris Berkheimer, Joan Odell, Karen Wagner, Roberta Gofflieb, Patsy Karp, Herta Deichmann, Kay-Chll- cuff, Rosemary Sliger. Third row:fJudiIh Goodman, Lita Weiss, Barbara Breaiksione, Sonia Black, Anne Grosholz, Anne McGarry, Grace Garlinkle, Sue Driscoll. 194- CONGRATULATIONS RING THROUGH THE MOB AS ELATED FRESHMEN PICK UP THEIR BIDS AT THE CLIMAX OF A THREE WEEK LONG RUSH PERIOD Interfrafernily Council ULL RECOGNITION was received by I.F.C. as an undergraduate affiliate council in December when it was granted a charter by the National Interfraternity Conference. N.I.C. Organized in 1 909, it is the corporate body comprised of all national fraternities which regu- lates fraternal affairs, sets standards of conduct, discip- line, and scholarship, and approves local interfraternity groups. Growth marked 1958 as in previous years. Three fraternities constructed new chapter residences on the row. A IOOW increase in permanent housing is an ac- complishment of which no other fraternity system can boast. Twenty-six national fraternities now have chap- ters on the UM campus and another is anticipating a charter, in contrast to only fourteen a decade ago. The Outstanding Fraternity Man Award and the I.F.C. Service Key were presented in the spring at the second annual I.F.C. sponsored Awards Banquet. Rushing was brought to the attention of I.F.C. which passed new regulations designed to improve the system. Bill Haas was the spring semester president and Parker Enwright was the faculty adviser. INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL: Fronf row: Frank Di Tullio, Jr., William Haas, Joseph Pairick, Reymond DeArriba, Alan Grauberi, Joseph Ross, Roy Laycock, Don- ald Carrow. Second row: William Cohen, James Dingfelder, Gary Snyder, Jack Micco, Stephen Doreson, Kenneth Witfich, Robert Anderson, David Huffnagle, Kenneth Lelchman, Thomas Pezzino, Joe Sugarman. 195 L J lPHH usual Ill BRIGHT EYES AND SMILE lighf up 'Face of Carol Mill- man as she receives 'lrophy signifying AEPi sweefhearfship Lambda Deuteron Chapter O MAKE good boys and better men" is the far reaching purpose of the Alpha Epsilon Pi frater- nity. The men of AEPi proved themselves this year by winning the prose reading cup and the volleyball cham- pionship in intramurals to place them among the lead- ers in the intramural program., The Lambda Deuteron chapter was active socially this year. Two formals highlighted the calendar, the annual Spring formal and a picturesque Sweetheart Ball. Guys and dolls dressed like "hoods" The decorations consisted of cobwebs, barrels, and fishnets. Thus the scene was set for the unique and mysterious Gangster Parry. On the tamer side of activities, the members got together for a pledge-active party. Alpha Epsilon Pi was founded nationally in New York City in 1913. The Lambda Deuteron chapter was established on this campus in 1947. The Lambda Deuteron chapter is one of 63, and the fraternity boasts of such famous alumni as Jerry Lewis, comedian of movie and TV fame, and Sidney Gordon, one of baseball's great names. l l B. Jacobs, Pres. D. Appleby A. Borinsky D. Dolinger S. Fniedman W. Gorclen N. Helberg B. Landsman M. Melinger B. Schwartz, V.P. . A. Aron H. Braxton J. Drogin M. Gallancler H. Gross D. Jaffe J. Morden L. Miller K. Rekant, Sec. D. Baiifcher M. Brown S. Fabric J. Goodkin G. Haas l.. Jay R. Marlin R. Molko S. Klain, Treas. A. Borinsky J. Cymrof M. Feldman J. Goadkind M. Hazzon L. Karel L. Mayer S. Moss 196 wwf. 5, .img . R Y' . 1 AEPI'S AND DATES ENJOY ROMANTIC ATMOSPHERE OF FAMOUS FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL, SCENE OF GROUP'S ANNUAL SWEETHEART DANCE J. Orland A. Rugendorf S. Serody S. Shoyer A. Pollack J. Schneider F. Shadruff T. Siegle L. Rabin K. Schneider L. Shick R. Small W. Rein E. Schwartz W. Shockeff L. Solomon M. Sfraff M. Strauss R. Waldman W. Wldrich 197 EXUBERANCE is fhe 'lickef ai an in+ramural frack meel' and AEPi's go along wifh 'I'he idea. nina win lnu Uliln Zeta Epsilon Chapter LTHOUGH ONLY SIX years old, the Zeta Epsilon chapter of Alpha Tau Omega has found its place among the Greek organizations on this campus. ATOS proved themselves able and creative by plac- ing first in the Unlimited Division of the Homecoming parade, with their unique float. The fraternity sponsored many social affairs, includ- ing its Sweetheart Formal, where Miss Ellen Weicker was informed that the ATOs had selected her as their favorite sweetheart. Many of the brothers were active in inrramurals and athletics. Bill Woodin served on the Debate Team and as a Sophomore Senator. Larry Fisher is a member of the swimming team and an IFC Representative. Del Martins was chairman of the Campus Charity Chest and member of the Uni- versity's male chorus. William Hutchinson, president of the fraternity, is a member of Arnold Air Society. Alpha Tau Omega was founded nationally at Vir- ginia Military Institute, in 1865. The Zeta Epsilon Swee+hean, Chapfef IS Ofle of SL1Cl'1 gl'O1lpS. f at ATO'S BOB SCHNEIDER se'I's 'them up with his long reach in volleyball playa TWO ACTIVES swap frai-ernily yarns for +he benefii' of a pledge ai' 'I'he ATO fable in the "slop shop." No one notices +he pledge side of +he bulletin board. 198 s ' -l THE BIG GUN FROM "PRIDE AND THE PASSION" WAS TH'E THEME FOR ATO'S HOMECOMING FLOAT LED BY THE CONVERTIBLE-PULLED ATOMIC CAISSON IVI , ' gy --' - ' 4 . ,,:.,. V jg 5 ,QIAV .1 Lk' ,Q 3 A Y is 5 E V. . V ,, 4. llu It F a ' , ,? 1 .,.a.:J . D I A .- A 1 1 A A N l' . I.1-Vv IFQ, ' I K I yky K I I I K I , al "l' ll I VQ I. J Tlx Lewis ',' 11 A 5 K f . L if ,. 5 I h A ' x i, I J ,. llvu- ...il ,W ,l i fi ff ' Mx min. Em . v A in E v , 1 EE K K I ' I ' I W. Hutchinson, Pres. J. Burkett K. Dixon J. Gasson A. Kummerlen, V.P. E. Burbank T. Druley M. Jones D. Marfins, Sec. T. Connell F. Ferren D. Keating T. Riley, Treas. C. Diamond L. Fischer C. Kern D. Lacob W. Merola J. Moniello A. Niefo 199 W. O'Rourke B. Ross J. Patrick B. Russell G. Pennel J. Scczrboro A. Perez D. Sifford R. Smith J. Sopher L. Tassi W. Woodin ' llllllllll lllHH ww ,1JL?e 5315" : i f "1 .L-M MARGARET LAMONT, Sweefhearf NEW SHIRT? Nope, new pin. A ius'I'-ini'I'ia'l'ed KA gefs ad- mira-Hon and pin inspedion from pre'Hy coed and male friend. Gamma Theta Chapter ALTHOUGH YOUNG, Kappa Alpha fraternity has already established itself on campus, ranking third scholastically among the other fraternities. Kappa Alpha makes an annual affair of seceding from the Union, and telegraphs the President just to make it official. For three days all KA members don the blue and gray uniforms in commemoration of the Confederate Cause. Socially, a picturesque Old South Weekend high- lighted the year. The annual cotton-pickers party was held, and at the Rebellion Ball their sweetheart, Mar- garet Lamont, was chosen. A southern-style Yule time was also celebrated with a party. Kappa Alpha was founded nationally at Washing- ton and Lee University in 1865. The Gamma Theta chapter was organized in 1950. Members are encour- aged to follow the principles of General Robert E. Lee, Confederate Army commander and humanitarian. Outstanding alumni include actor Randolph Scott, vocalist Pat Boone, FBI Chief J. Edgar Hoover and our Dean of Students, Noble Hendrix. BINDINGS OF KA SCRAPBOOK enfold a muH'H'ude of memories as well as hisforical record of group's acfivifies. FOUR KA BROTHERS TAKE A BREAK FROM THEIR ACADEMIC WORK AND FROM FRATERNITY ACTIVITIES TO HAVE THEIR OWN QUIET BULL SESSION - 'Q fiff.'.ff J. Buhrmcn, Pres. A. Brees J. Childers R. DeHond, V.P. W. Bush P. Covell D: Helip, Sec. R. Cullobre J. Fuller C. Dunn, Treas. R. Casper W. Gourluy .ig gf 4 I N G .af Q55 9' Kd W L q, I 4 1 I N. Grehl F. Hcrbershcw J. Hannon L. Hennings I X Q 95" My I -I, j lw f K L, L,.-. E . Y - ss.-In . 3 1 L I fi 2 icbvigq .L " N. Lailas R. Merzlak F. Rysfen R. Lee R. Parker J. Smith G. Lyons R. Radel A. Spencer C. McDonald J. Roberts C. Webster 201 Q .,,,llG,,"' jf' V. lllllw' . ,. 1 1 I MOM WESTERGARD is fhe cenfer of a'H-elnfion during affer- noon chars wifh fhe brofhers of Kappa Sig around fireplace. 1 . -, f,7i,s,7--7,M.a.1f.7f - .. a: -.1 7 7 - ..7.7...s,aa... .f..5'EfSi?.. - llnlln SIHMH 7 7 Epsilon Beta Chapter LACK AND WHITE Formal and the Star and Crescent Weekend at Naples highlighted the so- cial year of the Epsilon Beta chapter. The fraternity men participated in the intramural program and emerged with second place honors. They also sponsored a Christmas party, complete with a Santa Claus, at Variety Chil7dren's Hospital, which was their chief philanthropic project of the year. Cutstanding local members of the fraternity include! Charles Rudd, who is Wing Commander of AFROTCQ jack Dick, President of Pep Club, Thomas Graning, vice president of L'Apacheg and Ernest Rucenski, Alpha Kappa Psi, Phi Eta Sigma, and President of the Luth- eran Student Association. Kappa Sigma was founded nationally at the Uni- versity of Virginia in 1869. The Epsilon Beta chapter was installed at the University in August of 1939, and is one of 127 chapters. National alumni include Hoagy Carmichael, Lowell Thomas, Edward R. Murrow, Drew Pearson, Estes Kefauver, and Johnny Mack Brown. ir, , , ,,r,V,,,,W,,,, A .t........7.7. .. 7...-'QW , gm 1 71 7' 3 fl 4... Wi? -f. -wa av fsr 1 7 7 V- 'n . 59 -.L iv.. . 7. . -7. 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Y -7 7 ga 77 7 ,ea 1 7 1 i ' 7 - ' , 77 77.1. 715.77 wi fa. . X 7 . 27: 7 1 . "" - 7 .ww -7 . 5. 77:1 :iq . 1 K 7 7 ir Q S ' 1 ' .-71'ga1ffi' . ' ' in - iii we-ff? ffl. ra. iss! 5-V 1" P' 'P W. Carter, Pres. C. Rudd, V.P. R. Dahmer, Sec. E. Kucenski, Treas. R. J. A. R. Anania Angelo Avidano Banville J. Barnharl' G. Blankinship D. Chenowevfh W. Crow D. Bauske J. Boissonnaulf V. Giumbotti J. Dick R. Beach F. Bulawa J. Collins T. Dusenberry R. Beahy M. Caswell R. Cook L. Eariclc 202 R. Farrell A. Faze J. Gilmore T. Graning P. Gregg D. Going Grove C. M. Hannau P. Hedrich C. Hermanson P. Hoagland D. Holsrrom swf? Q a xii :iw ma' LW.. . - -A - me 5 f MARCHING HARE, AN OVERTURNED TURTLE ARE PART OF FLOAT DECORATIONS THAT LIE BEFORE KAPPA SIGMA HOUSE PRIOR TO HOMECOMING i. "fi 6. f f -, Q' - 1 ig .jf W M aku - wi- ? - ii I f I f - I I I To . ' wf?'?ii r I 55. A ' ., M ' ' .T ' 5- 1' 4 UQ. "F , Y 5 x .1 .V . X ' 5: 7" .Z i ,I T ' iii . ee f--fi . my ee U In ,-- B -3, Q .fe - 1 if I' ' wr? . 3 ' I i A .Tag 5 ' .fi , ":,: ., -5.5" ,xfqv it if f . 45, . . 1 , , hh ..g:f:f , ' f QM' - 'X . ' K Air ,- ,, : H N vp, ,,:::.,f V. . X . ..,. ,. ., H.. , , . .if - . - FQ.. .- . I... ., , I I I f I A ... A gf.: f f -mf ---' ' K dar- . i 1 -' :sw W .,.. .' - A L . QL. . K n I X , ,A k ef X I 4 ,ge - , . . Q zen f ' . ,.., f P- - R' X 3 I3 Q 'I X , , 5. . ,H . 5? . g 1. .,..,, .. . , . J 4 K ... -. H I r ... , Q L, , H an ?' ,. I ' . 3 gs'f22f,4ii ' 251 4332 I ' I ,,I, . I- Q no pg Wifi .... :if A ',"f1.fff1 X5 il if if .. . . P. Kokos D. Linn D. New 145, -. , , K K: '. E:?1-P . , . :g.. . , , ., .I,, . . 5 4 3 . , . , ... . ,. .1 BW , 5 . I . . if R5 N 'W . P F 9 . 4 I X 5 V V ,,: 5 , . ., V 44:9 ., , ...,..,. , . .L ...i g av 4 X- V '- , , A fi' f i . 1 3 . ., .I , I . ,.II, .Q ' . i . R. Howard S. Klutah C. Parramore G. Renuart R. Spangler G. Tofoiu A. Kaiser B. Knipscher M. Kornafel R. Mahaney R. Newcomb T. Pickering V. Samanich R. Spitz D. Wallace R. Kaylor W. Knoch T. Le.leune R. Mercatoris N. Nichols L. Pihs J. Schaffer A. Springer D. Walley M. Kline D. Knoil H. Levins J. Micco G. PclnccrH'i J. Press R. Skidmore T. Siephenson V. Wortmann 203 avvlfcem UR'-Ye 199' yxwlli if 'V , sas Y-islam' , A . , A Sgt 4 A GY 'T in f . A . THIS YEAR a new address was acquired by l'he Lambda Chi's when 'they moved info +heir quadrangle-shaped house. HMHHH lil llilun Epsilon Gmega Chapter HE MEN OF LAMBDA CHI made this a success- ful year for the fraternity by copping second place in the Homecoming parade and taking a first in win- dow decorations. They also placed third in the bitterly contested basketball intramurals. Socially, the Lambda Chis were in step with the rest of the Greek world. The Sweetheart Weekend, Roaring Twenties party and Christmas parties were highlights of the social year. Also at Christmas, the Lambda Chis visited Variety Children's Hospital where they gave gifts to the chil- dren. This is an annual philanthropic project. Founded in 1909, Lambda Chi has rapidly grown to become the largest college social fraternity in the coun- try with 159 chapters. The Epsilon Omega chapter was established on our campus in 1940, and has as its purpose the fostering of understanding. The fraternity boasts such outstanding alumni as former President Harry S. Truman, aviator Jimmy Doo- little and famed singer Frankie Laine. ' - 1525553 writ' lr v,4,.,.vqP1 xiqgg 3, ...M-. .M H ,. . . Fl YT 23' f -m 2 , 'a Q3 X. W., ma Wg., H. r , , sv Q 1 Q- grzsyjsa :. .5--Q fs-rqizfri iigliii ii, +i.ss,ai M fl sg t fl ' W a W ifaws- 'f:Zw"tip.fSsgei.w mi "2 W A milw- ,qfgwrzii "S,ifA.litfW?5ll,1ii' g,, .l,,2i.f,ig.f Misa! -rtiiitasli,25r , . , 5 ,rt Eagigigx , f H . is . i 'J ' , .. . -. . aff. ,,i,wA ng, ,tt X . .5 ,gf L p r -- -v-- 3 WA, 1-r-wat, 1, 2, an 'r 'fs-f.Y,y t . 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' ' 2 2' . 5 I' ' . ,Q A f .,,., fi! r -,aifftaiffla ' 1, -. , . K I . .-r. f le as . .rf A 11. -. , we-.-2.55 .. 31. , it-+H.gg4N.. . is .af . .. . s QQ.. . V, L . lm, .m...:A5,- N A , , ,Q .4 ..,.3:-e .,:N5- 31 f 3.5 S gay, tag, - 'N f F - 1 at , it f s it V7 I ai, ,S . ty. lik , f K -A .g g I ,V I, ga W jg V, ms 'f . 4 +-. w s its ' a: ..:-."g W: wigs, gg.. ,- 1 F 1 1 A A .ff if: - . 4. at if if we ss' . 'L-, QQH7 n ' ,fuck , Ha W 1 T1 I A ww. 5 I ' Q .Qi - f gg . ,Q eg 11,3 .3,:'- ' at 6 ' .pr " . 'f f H. Ruffolo, Pres. E. Adrian R. Davis, V.P. R. Bauer C. Saxon, Sec. W. Binard T. Brach J. Buell F. Burke M. Bernardo, Treas. W. Blifch J. Carlson fig. as Qifsaii, , i at U i if W' si? Q , . ' as ? J. Colson P. Copeland C. Cooke N. Cosfanfino 1 . :za rsafiatfiy im ..: ALL? grow, in f ,sivjpm , P 2 9 2 .S 2. rg f ali 1 sg? mi rfigilffi My . . Q . L. Crebassa D. Cunningham C. Eclc D. Dauenbaugh H. Eighmie A. Dominic 204 W " t gf. we t I ft J , -all? 7 Nw . . ., -.f A ff 'as , eflw, r fn ,EW fz . fa, ., .. 12.1553 ig V1 ' W V ' T. Donovan J. Fernandez 3 New i -: ' 45. mit s wt3fqi,z,5wy.,i . :V g Q 53fw?'z2fiTf3.P?3f,2 sfifffffffi f m niiifit 2. ef f' 2532 5' 1 . , . M 575.53 g.,v5ygEQ?ft.. W - we ' Fx. ,. " lil fa Y' 2 " , w' .H,gg ,A.....r1us2yy ,fir-ylw , .aff H - pn , fwfr-',g, H any we ' sage' W., .. ,fggfir .... Y. Yi Q .s -,.-,- ' 1, r 1' "3-1:-..: I Z' 0' at ifffiifs ' sf ' gn. . . N i' i' i"'f-5.,:a ijE' 5 t ,. ,. 'P ' , . Hrgzfgikegf - ' ,,.i1mEw y S. Fernandez A. Griffin W. McCurI'in W. Fischer B. Hindman A. Mazza R. Fleischer J. Lake J. Moon G. Goodwin J. Luning R. Morie . Z, 5 f L .inf L we 'H I QW Li. Q .. ...N UNDRESSED FOR THE OCCASION, Lambda Chi Alpha men puf finishing fouches on foil-clad Homecoming enfry. gf , 7 , QF Q, if . My, in I N ' :lf , L23 L' W f 29 J Nolan C Ogborn Pellegrnnl :lj- I . ,,,. A ww- w e I J. . . D. Pesccrtore h If m X 7 5 S R , I .f 4 N if ? I I I ff if F. Remmy R. Rosenberg J. Spaniola W. Spencer K I iIlifIfj:.ef,, f - .I ez, 1 -H 46?- .- I 974 X ,ru WU, 2 ...W . Ss. g g , 52 b I .,,,, 5 Ygygg S 3.5 51 i ,ff .Q f . If QI 25 4 'S C. Siugman R. Word A. Sfieglifz K. Wiffich V. Szymanski W. Wynne N. WoI1ers A. Zaspel TRADITIONAL SONGS boom forlh from Lambda Chis clur- ing Song'Fes'l', 'l'he singing compe+i'l'ion be'I'ween organizafions CAGERS won second place in +he Inframural Baske'I'baIl League wifh playmakers like Nick Cos+an'l'ino making fhis push shot 205 , Y .. f. , .6193-YQ! QVIIP 05605 MARGOT RIETZ, Sweetheart PHI limi limi Florida Delta Chapter N IMPRESSIVE LIST of achievements made this an activity packed year for the Florida Delta chap- ter of Phi Delta Theta. Headlining the year, the chap- ter sponsored the Homecoming Dance and Sun Car- nival, two of the outstanding campus social events. Phi Delts placed first in float competition in the Homecoming parade. The fraternity also won the Marl- boro Hi-Fi Contest, which gained a hi-li set for its proposed house that will be completed next year. A Toga party, in the Grecian theme, Christmas party, and the annual Dream Girl weekend brightened the social year for actives and pledges. Phi Delts were very active on campus. Richard Knight was treasurer of the Student Body Government, Warren Williams was president of AKPsi, William Haas, president of the fraternity, was elected vice presi- dent of the Interfraternity Council, and Joe Plevel was Captain of the 1958 Hurricane football team. Organized nationally at Miami University at Oxford, Ohio, the Florida Delta chapter was established on our campus in 1954, and is one of 121 active chapters. W. Haas, Pres. R. Alpin R. Bennett F. Burget W. Cornell R. Day J. Hendry R. Hunter J. Johnson R. Knight, V.F. F. Ash J. Bond J. Ccmpeill J. Costello W. Dey G. Hertzlield IC. Jackson L. Johnson J. Bolen, Sec. R. Bcihl J. Boozer R. Carr W. Cronnell N. Fleming T. Hoilleran F. Jaeger J. Kennedy M. McGuw, Treas. B. Barnett P. Boyd B. Carson C. Cudlip G. Hansen D. Howell C. Johnson C. Kimber TOO MUCH BLUE TINFOIL," DECIDES PRESIDENT BILL HAAS, WHO TALKS WITH A WORKER WHILE BUILDING A FLOAT FOR HOMECOMING PARADE A F H .725 - 2 ,, A , 'B" ' I L . 'li :gag --, ..fRf, xlhxll 5-err' V ,, '.,,. . 1 . . A i ' i 'V fix 1' I f - 5' . , ' J , W f AA ' A H f ll I R. Lane R. McMahon D. Murphy J. Otto J. Pierce D. Sanguesa V. Sfenson E. Swift T. Webb R. Lazcano R. Marcia T. Murphy D. Owens L. Presti P. Shew E. Stewart J. Tempest W. Williams C. Loft J. Morgan W. Murphy P. Palmer D. Purkey P. Snyder R. Siewarf W. Thomas W. Wimer R. McKeIz B. Morrison W. Murphy W. Peacon R. Purnell J. Stahl H. Sfidsen F. Waffs B. Winfield 207 4- .ji Y. 'XINJMXQ wax' ,, t ' .,..e ' -. '51, X E xi jing.. 'vigil f'5':' ap, 5 44- - 1-avvy EIPGL RUTH BERNSTEIN, Sweetheart PHI llsunl n Alpha Iota Chapter RIENDSHIP BINDS ETERNALLYH is the motto of Phi Epsilon Pi, one of the oldest fraternities on our campus. The Alpha Iota chapter was founded in 1929. Founded nationally at City College in New York, Phi Ep has 38 active chapters throughout the country. On the social calendar, the Phi Eps held their annual Carnation Ball, where they chose Ruth Bernstein as their Sweetheart. Hallowe'en presented an ideal theme for a costume party. Other weekend parties and mixers made their social calendar complete. Each year, before Homecoming, they hold their annual champagne party, where the fruit of the gods is in abundance. Many Phi Eps are active in Student Body Govern- ment, holding such olfices as senator and Bob Fields, president of the Pep Club. Well known alumni include financier Louis Wolf- son and Dr. Abraham L. Sacker, President of Brandeis University. Ken Kartman, associate editor of Coronet Magazine, also is a Phi Ep. J. Solomon, Pres. R. Adler M. Behrman J. Ellison C. Fink A. Goldberg R. Kasper A. Kufner A. Hochfelder, V.P. N. Amclur H. Bersch J. Esformes G. Frank D. Gottlieb R. Klee N. Laslco P. Sheifelmain, Sec. E. Ash J. Bloom G. Eskenazi J. Gerfler J. Greenblafl' H. Kupferberg M. Lehman A. Shecter, Treas. R. Averbuck R. Cohen R. Fields P. Glassman R. Kaplan N. Kurland A. Levy IT'S HALLOWE'EN AND PHI EPS AREN'T ABOVE FUN OF GAY 90'S OR CHILDHOOD, AS EVIDENCED BY THE MA-SQUERADE PARTY GET-UPS B. Lieberman P. Richman P. Lipman H. Sigelbcum S. Mason B. Silverman F. Ober M. Singer PHI EPSILON PHl'S make Iheir con'I'ribu+ion +o Hue annual Homecoming parade Ihrough Coral Gables by way of a beauiiful car, an aHrac'Iive girl, and an aH'en'I'ion-ge'I'+ing sign. 209 EE PHI SIHMH mn 'aww THE BALL is a bil' high, inside, bu'I- 'Ihis slugger is going I'o fake a cuI' a'I' if. Affer all, fhe winning run is on base. Alpha Zeta Chapter THE PURPLE AND WHITE of Phi Sigma Delta was carried to victory this year as the members won first place in both divisions of the hotly contested hand- ball tournament. Phi Sigs, occupying their new house a block off of fraternity row, enjoyed a party-packed year. A Roaring Twenties party was followed by a South-of-the-border Calypso affair. The pledge-active and the Spring formal were held at the Fountainebleau Hotel. At the annual Sweetheart formal, Cindy Weinstein was chosen to carry the traditional roses. Members of the fraternity are active in all phases of campus life. Henry Edgar is President of Delta Theta Mu. joseph Sugarman is active in the IFC and President of the Engineers Expositiong Edward Gold- berg was president of Hillel House and Richard Shen- endorf was a member of the varsity swimming team. The fraternity was founded nationally at Columbia University in 1909. The local Alpha Zeta chapter of Phi Sigma Delta was established on campus in 1949. It is one of 27 brother chapters. AMIDST THE MILLING CROWD THAT ATTENDED LAST YEAR'S CARNI GRAS WAS THE BOOTH OF PHI SIGMA DELTA, FEATURING BALI.-THROWING CONTEST H .ck-J TURNING BACK THE CALENDAR SOME ONE-THIRD OF A CENTURY, TO THE FABLED ROARING 20's, PHI SIGMA DELTA MEMBERS DANCE WITH DATES 'X'-2 X 1 ww 'I L. Silverman, Pres. R. Apfel A. Fiske L. Hirsch P. Lashinsky H. Marmor R. Rubin J. Shapiro J. Sugarman D. Rosenberg, V. P. B. Black N. Goldberg D. Jackowifz M. Lipcon V. Myerson D. Salzman S. Silberfein I. Tarzlow R. Gutfentag, Sec. L. Deutsch A. Goldfarb J. Kay H. Lyons V. Parisi R. Schenendorf C. Simmons A. Te.lIler J. Tucker, Treas. H. Edgar J. Hess G. Lashinsky A. Margolies J. Reich M. Shafircff L. smith N- Waldman 211 QA X V, Q AK? 7 Q N F? 1" by ll S My lag f 522557 535 77 I I VJIW 'D 01:X9'Cx GAYLE JEN KI NS, Sweeiheart Gamma Omega Chapter WINNER OF THE PRESIDENTS CUP for out- standing participation in intramural sports was Pi Kappa Alpha. The Pikes placed first in both "A" and "B" divisions. Individual championships included football, boxing, wrestling, golf and basketball. On the social side, PiKAs hit an all time high. They held the annual Dream Girl Formal at LaGorce Coun- try Club. Unique parties included a Ship Wreck party, Bar BQ, Morbid party and Suppressed Desire party. Members of the fraternity were also active on cam- pus. Dick Chapman served as vice president of the student body, George Tulin, John Dye, and William Locher were senators. Pikes hold the distinction of being the first frater- nity to build a house on Fraternity Row. The modern structure was completed in 1952. Love, truth and friendship are the three binding principles of Pi Kappa Alpha, which was founded at the University of Virginia in 1868. The local brother- hood, Gamma Omega chapter, was established at the University in 1939. MUSICIANS BREAK and conver- safion begins during cocktail party. R. Chorboiian, Pres. B. Baron J. Byrd J. Cook W. Dickman T- Frank R. Myers, V.P. T. Busceiita P. Carroll G. Cowles C. Duberson R- FUBTWBS. R. Color J. Cronenwett D. Durnln R- FUSCIISHI C. Gildoy, Treus. C. Brody T. Connell D. Davies J. Dye R- Giebler I CHILLY FLORIDA EVENINGS ARE A GOOD EXCUSE TO LIGHT THE CIRCULAR FIREPLACE IN THE PIKE HOUSE, A GATHERING SPOT FOR ALL BROTHERS T. Gilbert W. Johnson T. Lee R. Ludwig G. Meeker E. Nofo W. Priesfman M. Shorfle R. Wassenberg M. Haley D. Keith R. Lemois T. McMahon C. Monahan W. Ort M. Reynolds T. Southard R. Watkins J. Harris A. Koeze W. Locher L. Manson R. Mufsclhler F. Parker N. Rouse G. Tulin F. Whitcomb N. Hylwa S. Koikowski J. Lococo J. Maxwell J. Nesbit C. Persico T. Sanders L. Ulrey R. Wh-itcomb 213 fi' 051. pn--1-E ,WN fi? 2 it Xlli. .M . p 4,2 i f 'Y Ros AMY-'A PLEASANT HOURS are spent with Pi Lambda Phi's house mother, Mrs. Wetherall, who likes to talk with her "boys." III IHMHHH HI Omega Eta Chapter PARTIES HIGHLIGHTED the year for Pi Lambda Phi. They hosted an annual Mississippi Gambler party where a riverboat theme served as a background for festivities. Outstanding social event was the lovely Moonlight and Orchid formal, where the sweetheart was crowned. Other events included a Hallowe'en costume party, one of the most exciting parties of the year. Omega Eta chapter of Pi Lambda Phi was estab- lished on this campus in 1946 and since then has taken the lead in all facets of university life. The fraternity was founded nationally at Yale in 1895, and the local chapter is one of 33 throughout the nation. Each year, as its philanthropic project, the Pi Lam pledges work at the Variety Children's Hospital during Help Week. Active in all phases of campus life, the fraternity has representatives in Inter-fraternity Council, SBG, and won the baseball intramural championship. Pi Lambda Phi has graduated many famous men. Al Rosen of the Cleveland Indians and Tony Martin, famed vocalist, are among them. WAITING FOR DINNER, Pi Lam brothers sit on breeze-swept porch talking about campus topics and Saturday night's date. SKELETON BEGINNING ot house decoration for homecoming tincls members at work with girl friends. -Xxx .11 MN PLAYING IN THE HEAT OF A WARM MIAMI AFTERNOON, FRATERNITY BOYS TAKE OFF THEIR SHIRTS AND START A SPIRITED VOLLEYBALL GAME f 3...fg.:g - ., '. ,,,,f fwny f X. - QE, :lf , QfeiQ.,Yf3 ,Z F 1 fy? ' "" f'i,,'f Q xwfegx fs., .M , I 3' I 43, Q 7 ,... . ,. I ' , fi "'- ' -i 1 . Wwij I - wail... Wmff-...M ' V1.3 . M- "T L?" . .... . FEW .. , .... ' I A' 1, ' , , . I . . ,f ' . ,.,.i ..., . 7 M . - N, . 'eb-2 .f.,Xw. .. , . l- ,V . . ,I me rg , , - ' ,522 M, , , , A 'f ' I. 7 ' ix .V R. Siegel, Pres. N. Aronfeld J. Alaimo, V. Pres. L. Breflschneider H. Rudiah, Sec. M. Cohen E. Andich W. Cohen Q., fi.. f- 'V ,fa 1535 if .. ' lfiif N. -fi, . 4 3 b.,:.., . W-.Jay .. . Y? 1 .QQ P Q A I :,L:: . ., , . ,, .Y ,. . ' IW.. . . H 1 . -fu' HW I Hi it 4 . gi 1 . , A . .1 X if ff l ll .lb Y 1 W : ,"f fe .xjsfw 'T 5' . L. Friedman A. Meliz H. Golclvarg E. Morin Rauch R. Cooper R. Eller B. Emmons R. Segall E. Wagner J whne "l'VE GOT lT"' yells a player as he R. Gould H. . ' ' M. Fisher B. Greene R. Rubenstein S. Wiener makes graceful foss of volleyball 215 RQ ' f . ,A V ge? 1. I 1 I , - ., , N- 'WM G f' .X 'wg , , ,c ., HMH nun --W My l C GAROLE HUMBURG, Sweerheari' PS l l ll ll Florida Alpha Chapter NEW FRATERNITY HOUSE graces Fraternity Row. This is the home of SAEs, the newest ad- dition to the Row on San Amaro Drive. Enjoying the luxury of a house, the Sig Alphs spon- sored many social affairs, including their annual Paddy Murphy Party and Spring Formal, where Carol Hum- burg was chosen Sweetheart. Each year the SAEs present a trophy to the outstand- ing player in the Homecoming football game. Many SAEs are active in Student Body Government. Dick Piepers is Lt. Governor of the School of Engi- neering and Bruce Baird serves as the Governor. Charles Overstreet is a member of the senate and Charles Herr is deputy to the Attorney General. Sig Alphs are also outstanding in athletics. Ed Har- rison is a member of the baseball team, Iron Arrow and Who's Wfho. Bill Poole is on the varsity football team and Mel Baker is drum major of the band. Outstanding national alumni include Senators Stuart Symington and George Smathers, and governor Le- roy Collins of Florida. R- Slelflef, Pres. C. Acker M. Baker J. Bonomo C. Bunting B. Crippen T. Eden J. Hinson R. Jennings J. Tifzel, V.P. R. Anllo W. Bayley M. Brenan T. Chaffee S. Dole E. Harrison B. Hun? R. Johanan R- HOWSFTUHI SBC- M. Afwcfer J. Behanno D. Brown J. Cleveland W. Donahoo M. Harrison D. Jackson E. Ka-Hel J. Heilig, Treas. B. Baird L. Bernard R. Brown W. Conly T. Eden C. Herr H. Jennings W. Keeling FLORIDA GOVERNOR LeRoy Collins, an SAE alumnus, gave +he dedicaiion speech for newly opened frai' house. J R fb.. Q gg B1 D. King L. Lancasfer C. Linning D. Mar!-in R. King L. Lawler J. Luchf K. Nichill W. Kirkman W. Leary R. Luedke E. Norman R. Kuhns K. Lewis G. Maclnfyre D. Pal-chert TARRED AND FEATHERED LION refains li'H'le cligniiy a'Her being defaced. Painf remover, elbow grease resfores him. 9 J Q W4 5? We . . 5 .5 -' 1 1. 3 1 5' 2 6- f . r . fi g 5 3 ' p sf i 'R - R. Pieper W. Ridolf R. Schell D. Smith T. Thorne W. Priffie G. Roe W. Sherwood T. Smith S. Welsh B. Rhoads B. Rohe R. Sieder J. Souza J. Wilson R. Rhoads A. Rosche F. Simons W. Sution A. Worsinger 217 Rl' 'N f- :H 'fy W xg wi IHMH lPHH Mu - NW- R 'wr -' .. 1' 3 X. J. 'lm - -9 1' -gif f it X aff. lv s XX .M XQTXX. K 'xjr ig., 'xlf' . X . XXX .9 JK. my ' .... V . ' 4 ABBE UCHIM, Sweetheari ei -'-- i .,:. .: Wi 43 PE .ir vi . ' f. .s..... ' , EF 5 if A 4 i ...Jxitih ku S Zia. .. E -1.2 rfawxv ..-. . - .mga 'wffaagff sf:.z..m1 .A p .,...e,,f...-.sf M . .. .,W,, . . Lai 'tfifi S 9 M fix . '.:-.Ax.'.' .TY '32 fgfazt.. tg K, Q, . at ai .ist sf if 1- f-fi: ini. ... -, iq M .4 H-'t3"'l'.W:s1Ml24ltf -W ia. .,.. if. ni, . xy Ili , if visas VA . Qi. . Q ... ii it . ti . f . af. Q S' .9 3565? ,sf ss .af W . . , 5 .iff i , 5,j,M. 3 fi fd :yn .fait ts.. .. . . , ...,. , . ...N , . . 9 4. tt .. Q' Q . . Xe Nr 4- . ff.v3,.,.5f-. N... 1. i - 1 Mu Epsilon Chapter ACH SPRING, Sammy holds its annual Orchid Formal, where its Sweetheart is crowned. This year Abbe Uchim was chosen. Other social highlights included a Hawaiian pledge-active, complete with grass skirts, flowered shirts and leis. Levys were the attire for its western hayride. Later in the year there was a Swim dance at Miami Beach's Sagamore Hotel. The guiding principle by which the men of Sigma Alpha Mu try to live is one of moral aid and support, of loyalty and love. The Mu Epsilon chapter of SAM was established on this campus in 1946. It is one of 52 national chapters. City College of New York was the site of the founding of the national organization in 1909. Sigma Alpha Mu is well known on the national scene with such renowned alumni as Burt Lee, a popu- lar sportscaster, and Maxwell Raab, who is an adviser to President Eisenhower. Sammy participated in intramural sports this year, and Kenneth Leichman served as a lieutenant governor for the School of Business. ' . ' ' V wi 1' 3443? . 3-.ta Q, f J g.5z..r f2,- my In . 'ggi- f - ' Qgtgatv -4- - 1 ,. . . H ..,. -- ' A L - '- ' ' l 4 A 1 ifwgff ' Q' " -fl . - . f .spew Q' ,. . All 1 .QQSFHPZV -PM .M A - . .nfff-eil? ' V- , , , 1...w. ,pi k t i.tC.wwMllfv .. , Gvgiiiiswi-may 5. ,.. .- , K gg., ntl., ,mr V Q..- , . .. 4, , .J ,, ,......,,1.-.w.....f ,. nj, ., , Q 'lm' J Y . 1 ' f- r ff we ' ' .itsliiilf ' .ggi ' t , , ffif N mglwf :f.tiwtfPf'tf1 . vgfazl , .. - ' . . 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" 4 . . 5 ' ' , . . -' itgxfffi sag -- zgfvff ' - if. .. A ' wife - - f . Wag . r if Pfxiw,-L, . 1. 2 V- ,. , I . . ' " - - - a ' ' Y ' 'T f " - J i J . A 5 tFi'liff??li'f- ' K. Leichman, Pres. G. Bring J. Mont, C.P. S. Chazen I. Lassman, Sec. A. Cohen A. Alexander E. Curson S. Doreson A. Dorn 5. Esfrin M. Falk M. Perlowifz A. Marcus R. Freedman M. Gulker M. Klein R. lapkin D. Galishoff D. Herzberg D. Krasner T. Lederman M. Gordon S. Hirsch M. Krohn J. Levy T. Grad J. Kimmelman A. Ladis S. Lilien T. Reichman F. Meyersan P. Robins M. Okmin S. Road M. Marcus SOUTHERN FLORIDA isn'1' fropical enough for 'l'hese Sam- mys, enjoying fhemselves a+ Hawaiian pledge-acfive parfy. . ,,, , ., 4 i 1 l 5' . ' iiin F L . A S. Rosenberg L. Siegmeisfer C. -Rosenthal G. Siollman J. Rosenfhal H. Tisch S. Shriber D. Weiner SAM SWEETHEART, preH'y Abbe Uchim, gels loving hug from one of 'lhe broihers while ofhers hope fo gel a fum. la l g 'A.l - I INTRAMURAL FOOTBALL keeps SAM members on +heir a+hle+ic loes and gives +hem a chance lo enioy Florida sun and also to gef acquainfed wi'l'h members of oiher frafernilies. 219 QR? 4 MJF N :WY-an 9 ri'f'rv-to 21'-.."1' 13.9- " -1 :A -E item:-x v EDRYA BENCH ENSTEIN, Sweefheari' IHMH Una Gamma Phi Chapter -MANY SOCIAL EVENTS highlighted the calendar for Sigma Chi this year. Donning black derbies, they sponsored a Derby Day, a traditional affair. A hay ride, Calypso party and Hallowe'en party also were held. Climax of the year was the Sweetheart weekend held in May. Edrya Benchenstein was chosen. Many honors were won by the Sigma Chis this year. They placed first in Songfest and second in Home- coming float and house decorations. Members of the fraternity that are outstanding on the campus include Bill Bennett, captain of the track team, member of Iron Arrow and ODKg and Reed Toomey, Iron Arrow and ODK. The men of Sigma Chi are always striving to culti- vate and maintain the high ideals upon which Sigma Chi was founded. The purpose of the fraternity is to guide its brothers to a life of spiritual fulnllment. One of the oldest fraternities in the country, Sigma Chi was established on the University campus in 1942. The Gamma Phi chapter is one of 124 chapters which are bound by the cross and shield. A. PCI'HI1'gfOl1, Pres. B. Adams W. Bennett S. Brown M. Carnies R. Colosi A. Fischofer J. Hum, V.P. S. Adams V. Bilanchone D. Browne A. Carroll D. Correia J. Goff K. O'Gorman, Sec. J. Bagby R. Bouclreau R. Buckley J. Casey L. Cruz-Munoz P. Gross J. Blosser, Treas. E. Barrera: B. Broome F. Bunn R. Cashman R. Dahl D. Gunn FABULOUS SIGMA CHI HOUSE IS SCENE OF ALL KINDS OF FANCY STEPS AND UNFANCY COSTUMES AT FRATERNITY'S SHIPWRECK DANCE PFS? 1 J A ii 5 Um' J. Hamilton G. Lane G. Mulligan J. Northup D. Price J. Rushing G. Smith P. TO0J'ney J- Wiff R. Harre T. McNeily J. Newcomer D. Patterson R. Price J. Sacco B. Slullins N. TrlPP R- Vifhlie G. Hopps R. Moore N. Newhouser R. Peterson R. Rankin E. Schaefer J. Teison A- UmPhfeY F- W'l5on N. Kurtz C. Morehead B. Nvordlie J. Power C. Reichert J. Shouise J. Thompson T- Ward R- Young 221 IHMH .3322 3 1 1 N-K A 1,33 Gabe ROSEMARY MORRIS, Sweetheart Nu N ACTIVITY PACKED YEAR was climaxed by Sigma Nu with its impressive White Star Formal. Other red letter social events of the year included a Hallowe'en costume party and a Hobo party complete with a giant circus tent and horse feed. For the second year, Sigma Nu topped the Spirit Trophy. Also added to its list of achievements was a first place in basketball intramurals and third place in Homecoming Hoat and house decorations. Outstanding philanthropic project of the year was the annual Sigma Nu-SAE football game, the proceeds of which were given to the Paul E. Yarck Fund. Active local members include jim Moskos, Bonnie Yarbrough and Bill Hayes, varsity football playersg Pete Pergamo was the leading hitter for the Hurricane nine last season and Buck D'Amore was a freshman senator. The Zeta Beta chapter of Sigma Nu was established on this campus in 1948. Nationally the fraternity was founded at Virginia Military Institute in 1869 and there are now 123 chapters. Zeta Beta Chapter R Laycock, Pres. D. Anderson J. Brennan J. Duffin H. Grieve R. Kauth G. Lee M. Martin J. Moskos W Howley, V.P. C. Austin I.. Burton D. Dyson J. Hatch W. Keegan J. lopinto H. Meiners W. Pagett G Baldwin, Sec. C. Bader P. Cergizan R. Edwards C. Hayes R. Kirkwood G. MaConnon R. Miles C. Pettersen W enning, Treas. B. Braham J. D'Amore T. Focht D. Hogg A. Kraiger R. McNesby Y. Miller R. Porter SIGMA NU AND KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA GATHER ROUND WALLY FUTCH AND HIS ROCK AND ROLL BAND FOR AN AFTERNOON OF MOVIN' MUSIC Q.. . Vx 45' mf. ' fg 'fn L3 QS? . ,,,. E E , J. ' -I I iv'-4 r . Ai A Q 5, 1 Q A Y -vw 1 any . cw eww f..-aw Q ' ,ye -A A X , .1 , fy , 4 J V . . 'fl , , iz. ' xi , 'X if G. Rengel H. Sokul D. Smith B. Thomas A. Ricci S. Sansone T. Slarkey B. Wiifa R. Robinson W. Soni E. Steiger R. Wise S. Ross J. Suwtell R. Sumpier B. Yarbrough SIGMA NU BANNER in 'Ihe s'I'ands ai' a Thursday nighi' pep rally means lusiy voices Io cheer Hurricane gridders Io vicfory. 223 T T Qwllujf CORINNE CLASEN, Sweetheart BILL SUMMERS tries valiantly to prove that studying can be done beside a brother and his phone date. r IHMHi1HIiPSIlUN Florida Gamma Chapter TWO MORE HONORS were earned by Sigma Phi Epsilon during Homecoming Week festivities in the form of a second prize in the big parade and hon- orable mention in the house decorations judging. Outstanding social event of the year for the frater- nity was the annual Sweetheart Ball, a most appropriate function for the "fraternity of hearts." The active chap- ter formally presented the fall pledge class at a frater- nity banquet, and everyone spent a delightful weekend at Marco Island on the West Coast of Florida. Sigma Phi Epsilon is very proud of its alumni, which includes prominent gourmet Duncan Hines and musicians Ted Mack and Woody Herman. The outstanding member of the local chapter is Student Body Government president, Leroy Howe, member of Iron Arrow and Omicron Delta Kappa, who also is in Who's Who and is past vice president of Wesley Foundation. "Our constant aim is dedicated to a brotherhood made up of top grade men at the university." This in essence is the purpose of the fraternity. JOHN HOLLEN rushes up from his right safety position and is in the air to block this Theta Chi pass in intramural play. s HI-FI MUSIC, FOOD AND COLD WATER IN POOL ARE FEATURED AT SIG EP RUSH PARTY AND HOSTESSES DRAW ACTIVES' ATTENTION AS MUCH AS RUSHEES' Q a R+ AM 1 X P? I E 7 A: Fx Q i Q My 2. 'gt gs mf? ig s. if is QAQV m J. HoIIon, Pres. W. Sommer, V.P. D. Sprague, Sec. G. Anderson I 2 1 Fr f 'xi A. Q X M' Q, Q ,ff .-.., n 1 ' fx ....1 if ' ii R. Blisseff A. Bobal R. DeArriba D. DeHart R? f JI 15 H+. K I X4 . , . wfg"'i f ,, ,g V3 2 f . jg E . ' 52, fig , A 5 , 3 'l' 1 Q:-'i-i w i . I L a ' 'fi ' . 5 X l-. J, . Q I A nf ,.., . , . .3 .3 I up w 7 . .YI 'i ' fi? 3 7.6 6 K. .. .iff . , J. 5' if 'X V ff ff Q R f 3 X. gf T s s yi... Ng.. A , , gif W' , X . . V , W., 'Y Pl se- . . af- .Ha . U, If Este e M 1 . ,-kk K7 , X ffef - K Q z , J. Evans R. Joseph D. Neff R. Simpson H. Farr J. Lewis J. Novesky T. Trupiano J. Gunn R. MucDonneII D. Pelfon J. Tuck R. Jackson R. Mitchell A. Rose J. Weins 225 --.MD GRIEFI CHARLEY BROWN on +I1e Terra- pin is SPE's Homecoming 'Iheme Ji? .E iii , Inu Ilmn PHI PADDLES ARE PRESENTED Io Tau Dell' pledges as pari' of party program while fraternity acfives and dates Ioolt on. Tau Mu Chapter OCIAL FUN is one thing, but scholastic matters are equally important to the Tau Mu chapter of Tau Delta Phi, which had the highest scholastic average this year, according to the Interfraternity Council. More evidence of intellectual stirring may be found in the Tau Delt house, where trophies for debate, ora- tory and poetry reading are kept. Erudite as the brothers are, they don't spend all of their time discussing Spinoza and his ilk. A Lost Week- end Party, the annual May Dance and the inevitable weekend socializing dotted the Tau Delt calendar. Established at the UM in 1955, Tau Delt boasts of members that take part in student affairs. Among them are Fred Porter, Iron Arrow, ODK, ASE, editor of The Hurriczzne,' Alan Rusnak, photo editor of Ibirg Art Jacobson, Iron Arrow, business manager of Tempo, Joe Segor and Lew Cohen, members of Iron Arrow, ODK and ASE. Cohen and Jacobson both have been named to Who's Who in American Universities. Tau Delta Phi was organized at City College of New York in 1910 and it includes 50 chapters. WHAT PADDLES ARE BEST SUITED FOR IS BROUGHT HOME TO THE TAU DELT PLEDGES IN AN ALMOST UNFORGETTABLE WAY VIA THE SENSES PLENTY OF SCHOOL SPIRIT is ins+iqa'l'ed by 'lhese Hurri- cane foolball game-going Tau Della Phi brolhers and dales. WATERMELON TASTES GOOD ANYTIME, even on Tau Dell' weekend ai molel where +here's much 'lo do besides ea'l'. in 6' B s 'fir . '?'If ,fi , W ' if 1 is: ix 3 To i H Q 'i Q .-Q, Zi - Wm -5 A ' rl Ta' fi' , gi f.. fl , .. .W if A . i f H 5 sl fl sh A ii -in-, 1 .L Y as f Kr il as . 1:4 . f i ii gl' .3 x . . ' 1 ,.:- .. rv T . " 5 -. .. V. M, , tl Q I A th' 5 A A. Grnubert, Pres. L. Bronfman S. Fishman S. Gordon S. Kanzer l.. Katz B. Reid H. Schmerer M. Srfallman M. Nash, V.P. M. Ellis A. Foland I. Graubert D. Kaplan L. Marinello I. Reimer H. Schwartz B. Traeger N. Young, Sec. R. Essen L. Freeman A. Jacobson K. Kaplan S. M'iller D. -Richter A. Seidman A. Volvo T. Snyder, Treas. S. Fish F. Gliozzo B. Kanzer R. Kassner R. Poller A. Rusnak P. Siegel M. Wesson 227 s Q If :w ' 4' I v l . MERITTE MORGAN, Swee+l1eart P. Mandlina, Pres. I. Balkan M. Budd A. Dressler P. Morgan, V.P. A. Beller J. Cantor D. Eichler L. Greenbaum, Sec. J. Befisak M. Casway M. Fielo H. Steinberg, Treas. M. Blifsfein J. Dingfelder R. Flam lnu lI1SIlHN HI Tau Xi Chapter AU EPSILON PHI joined other fraternities on Fra- ternity Row this year with the completion of its 3100,000 house. The house, which sleeps 32 men, has a large recreation area and piped-in music throughout. Its social year was highlighted by its Sweetheart Formal, held at the Key Biscayne Hotel, where Meritte Morgan was chosen sweetheart. Many TEPs are active on campus. Shelly Dunkel is on the varsity baseball team, Ed Rubinolf was tapped for Iron Arrow and Harvey Stone is also in Iron Arrow and ODK. Tau Epsilon Phi was founded nationally at Columbia University in 1910. It now boasts a national of 47 chapters. The local Tau Xi chapter has been at the University since 1937. In 1950, TEP set a precedent by becoming the first fraternity to occupy its own house, located a few blocks from campus. Now the fraternity has taken the big step to Fraternity Row, and with the comple- tion of its beautiful house it joins the other groups on the campus. Q 'H' fri QW Y , 7' K . s Qllllg, 'iff 3 163.3 3 vsiiivaki t' .ax .Gifs . i m .l'1fr'li'i l it-' 5? we i , 1 ,:P.fAi.Q,.,,1, , 3 Mi' ,li A 1 ' tisi j-riff" Q3 ' 2, ' ill Lllilffi' ,,.y,:::,: 1-H fl . fill ? lzlllf II W ,fig i s l L A1 s E5 j,tl'3"r , xii' ' gg fri fl 'af 3 M 4 X . New 3 iam, f "4 .. fi-fl5il?sf?f5,',1e' :E"i ,: :lf if 3? Sita 22 3 LV 1.4 f . l 1 fr M5152 ,. -.: 3:"f" f . fixiwiis -K i f .- A ' W f .JW C .W 1. . ,. .. mug Ep, .... . , . W , fit ,y1,,g,,,!, 1 Sw- if gy 1 .53 its wg,.qy.g A .. Nurs."- Ega UQ, .gf .,... .gi -..., ,,...,. , ,K.,,,.,,,,! in 5 it if A 1 . El 2 Y ar N 3351 9623 ?'5ii1i..'i1t'jQ? 5335 K X r Q "1 lit l e .al if QU ., X ttf? r Ei. l. W r ., 5: li E1 13 gm... -. iii was 2' .:. "1 53.,g'l1j,l wfffiililiiiji- . Ir." , e , I , .J 7 WIN . VET'-QS. it 5, M25 N' v '. :g lrls1.T.,..i J. Fletcher B. Goldberg R. Goldstein J. Fliashnick B. Goldberg R. Gross D. Frankel P. Goldenberg P. Hoffman N. Gershon M. Goldstein P. Kramer 228 l15i5l-fill! ' 7l?',PF5?Qg22if'?5f'l1?f5? .N 1 153355315 Fiiiifillffilff is ega.MS,5.f5' new .... ., ,, wgwg..b.,, it , . " it J' 2' 1 K W ':f'sA.ta':1' r . --1:1 wma , ' w k " " ' V , .. ,. ...-.,. ..: fr.. N -1 ii , 3 .s.,,,.t N. if -. - .-i..'g- - A .,. . l '2'W." sf, mf! h , aan.-1.15-1,...... . ,.. ., ,. fffbimati fr '. .,i,M,, i gif. Wal ,eg ,:, .fgfw V ws Sgr? h . .tf,.,' rr P . F232 .1 . 'V Y gi My . 3 Q .g f N331 . . ..... ,.,.. Y f 91 .5. .. F ge ,r r it gi it l fi .a.?..fig, it Eh Y ifvffaev mai 'M' wi we if . we 2' .--. tm at z .1 ,,.. -.tt-1 5 ty tieirffit- ,ri entre. f 3 2+ Q" f , .ra it Y is ., Q 3. Q wg P 4 egg., eg X . Q 5 QW rf. .gafgisir .:- amy' . is fsft sa, tg-22.5 '- rg fs V. 3355? , ., sth at Wg fz , ' fl' , ,, ,. H . 9 K Vg,,:,'fg' .,.. Q 3551 . 4 as gig? 2 lisZ?T'ii tg gm? . + HSM Si gt K, Nfaief , YQ? 5' 'Qffi 'i ilrigmi' tml' Tas ft Q? Q . M fifth s gist.. '. 9, ,ga .fi 5 , E? 4 if Q far. tg. ratify sms is 5 QM? iss gigs 4 I, if ' Q .Va ..., . E l? 0 is , N-Y. riyrygfigi ..,. . ..,.,,,.. . ,,.., .,.. .... , i .......,, gf ' .1 ll i terra rg li- i. 1 is-i al .,... . ....-... , . ...gmt f 553 A 'Wa - ' X ' if may .5 . Dla ... .,.,- ., S ,,,. . J 1.1151 viii 'I' :1 Q2 1 JM sa. .,., . r M9 5 .s.-.-1 1 . :'i:: . ' 1 bi .9"f 5 Mx in if 1' ' :iii ' 232 1. 1 Y 5,25 M55 'Ri get fi Q fl? gf 'Si tal' Jil af zar Prince S I Yr 1 .1 . te. , flu? ii if .25 ig, Y H tall? if ill. 'tl Wei l Sf? r ta sf x 'sf' Z 4 til 'W rf' 1 1. as .f Q.. 1.2. '- if,.ei,a Z 29 M mas? Jail Elixir? . .1 '31 . ill. Ma 'li ' A A iggees - .if1 y1'.'f1cftt2W , ,iw wif al viwfy A EN" ' . f . will ii rg? Vifi kigfyfi U ii:W:i?f,. . 522 ef 52.15 3 ag WS. .s 13... iw. we Ha .2 mw ah ..-. !1:i..t.fas,r-iw :v .2t:1szff.ti -ui-rs . P. ' R. Maisel H. Rice I Q scoe E. Rarbinaff M. Opper P. Ruffenberg P. Mo OKAY BOYS, LET'S GET 'EM. TEPS DEMONSTRATE HURRICANE EXUBERANCE IN THEIR MEETING WITH THE TERRAPIN FOE DURING HOMECOMING -4 'iv ' -QI ,fl If " . Xa A' I .4., ...ME 212-ff ,ff ., 1 J IW 'Q' I .pin . .- , ff. 1 1" We I ' s.If 'I Q f.l' I: in s f! , I I 'Q w s '-QT'T I E IIII I IIE IIII HI I III I IIII 1 I I is . Insiead, members and fheir cIa'l'es enioyed evening of informal dress and good dance music. glggfrlrjfif H'ii'2i2ifZ'g D. Serns B. Usilaner R. Spiers M. Weiner 229 HALLOWE'EN DANCE a+ TEP house wasn'I a Iime for fancy cosfumes and funny masks. lnu llnvvn PSIHIN Gamma Delta Chapter BROTHERHOOD, SCHOLARSHIP and character are the far-reaching ideals fostered by the Tau ' Kappa Epsilon fraternity. Activities are the key words on the TKE calendar. Football fans know of the fraternity from the large bell that rings for every Hurricane TD. TKE won wrestling intramurals and placed second in touch football. The Gamma Delta chapter was established at the UM in October of 1949. National was founded at Illi- nois Wesleyan in- 1899. There are 151 chapters. In spite of its heavy activity schedule, TKE also sponsored many social affairs. A Bowery Brawl, Jungle party, Hobo Hop, and the Red Carnation weekend highlighted the year. At Christmas time TKE joined in the spirit by spon- soring a party for underpriviledged children. Many of the men of TKE are active in campus af- fairs. Ed McCauley is a member of Delta Sigma Pig Dick Retzler, Commander of ROTC, and Irvin Naylor, , ODK, Alpha Sigma Epsilon, Outstanding Business Stu- DIANE PELLEGRINI, Sweetheart dent for the year. RUSHING THE PASSER in a football game with ARTlST'S CONCEPTION shows a low-slung, ultra-modern plan 'For the AEPL a TKE discovers he's not going to make it. proposed TKE fraternity house which is to be completed next year. 230 CLEVER ENOUGH TO WIN THIRD PRIZE IN THE HOMECOMING PARADE IS THIS ENTRY BY TKE, FEATURING A GIRL RIDING A MARYLAND TURTLE . Wir 5 . . bg ,, 3 R ' ' . LII ., Q . 'I' . 3 .3.5 , ,4 .U . g L I di 1- 'FSIII .af - L ' f .ga I Zh ! 3 Yi fl E ' S .25 -- :m i + I . I ,fix in l I ,V -. xx iwiigff . .f.sl,,,,, g f v 'f f gg, . A-,-. ' fi A Nl... .X . - y y A. Z K ff.. W,Q.. 4 R I. Noflor, Pres. D. BeIfIore W. Collins E. McCauIey, V.P. J. Caldwell B. Cox R. Reizler, Sec. S. Connato P. Elmore L. Thomas, Trecs. J. Coffey D. Kaplan , Y in ' 2 4'-Q " L Q I5125.. f', r D4 Nw 3 sf Q 5127211 ' ' I I ,, 3,2 AVAQ :gg "?v- .V L' if 'f y 5,5 . f T I iff 4' , :: ' f . 2 I ,X 1 VL R. Levuck C. Townsend P. McGuirI E. Triona M. MargoIin M. Walz R. Taft R. Whiftenberg 231 CAR TALK and small I'aIIc eai' up unimporiani' minuI'es 'For an informal quarI'e'I' of 'Frei broihers- ffqf A if limi lui Tsai? it ?fQQD-Zz taiunllitiilawi . Qi PAULA LEISCHEN, Sweetheart BROTHERLY LOVE and all that sort ot stutt is exhibited by Theta Chi members in a particularly super-trienclly moment. Delta Epsilon Chapter PROUD RECIPIENT of the Scholarship Improve- ment Trophy for the past year was the Delta Ep- silon chapter of Theta Chi. Other notable achievements of Theta Chi included winning first place in the Home- coming parade and a second in window decorations. On the social side, the annual Dream Girl dance and Florida Festival were outstanding events. The fraternity also sponsored a Christmas party for the benefit of Variety Children's Hospital. The purpose of Theta Chi is the encouragement of loyalty and scholarship, promotion of understanding and development of personality among brothers. These high ideals were first established at Norwich Univer- sity, Vermont, in 1856. Founded on our campus in 1950, the local unit is one of 120 chapters. Outstanding alumni include Fran Striker, author of The Lone Ranger, and Sammy Kaye, nationally known bandleader. Many UM faculty members are members of Theta Chi, including Dr. Raymond Van Dusen, Dr. J. Riis Owre, Dr. Charlton Tebeau, Dr. Warren Stein- bach and Oscar T. Owre. MAKING GOOD GRADES paid oft tor Theta Chi, whose president, Charles Gruno, left, shows trophy to a brother. ANY BETS IT WILL FLOAT? HAVING MADE THEIR NAMES KNOWN ON LAND, THETA CHIS TAKE TO THE SEA-UHHHH STUDENT UNION LAKE 1- . ! M, A .M f f 1 W f . r .. h bg .il A A 'lv am x K tl 1 fl ff ' M KEN C. Gruno, Pres. : -1 fl? ., A ....-:-21 ,. ' Ai J W . X - LQ , uw ' ' if J. Albury 2'5?252fT?5?Z'f'i?W:.lY'.' NGESYQQ1 .,1. ..,gw.f,gf..f " - I ' -1? ,. .372 ' xfffffm f- -1' 3 I -1 45. ' 'A Izzy' . ti .7 , 3? I . ,V A W A if 'Fil W2 1, .Wm Sf 4 94 Q f 1. fm K.. I I . x X fb Q? If rw ,Q f W .WI . . eff 5 A I S. " X ,I f y a 1 . . . ..,,,..,q,.. ..,,. ,..., . . 4,.A,, A wwf- veg- 1 '34 ,L :MA , . . ...nz . .. .H - V Fwlwwgwaimf ,M . .. W -. ., fy , I ., . iilafliflx ' T i C. Brown R. Anderson T. C. Brow, Sec. D. Benfz R. Chuiser T. Pluso, Treas. R. Biancardi G. Dye A. Klonarls, V.P. Carpenier J. Ellington B. Evans D. Fogel N. Hornfist . . V I ' .. M - .-L 255 X.--F 'X , ,y gf m..,4,5f,. '+?Aa'E.1- W HM . ff' r - ' A .ly 3.3. QI ' gf? . aww 4.55 .yay 5.-I gg? .W .H ., if ' 'JV Mi' .ff ' e Q' as H. -M MQ ' TY A -L T R? X .f -Eos fir 'Lf ,,..:v.,zr7.,w . ' , , .x Q is if 2521.119 'V iff A .V ,-, ' H Fiat. f ,. -f -. -x . f .,: .:. 1 I ' f ii 1' Sf' - "f:.. . V, In 1+ " Q. ,- A ' ' 2" fv' D. Harris C. Honcinski R. Marten R. Oberg R. Pascale J. Smlllm M. Slellhorn G. Larson Maxwell W. Rosenvold D. Wilson 233 R. Wiemerslage I El mlm . 55.55 S .. '39 gmt' in 4 ll g -Exinumin mi HQ uum w -imfg 112 2 if if f. 519: I--E ' ' rf. 112:- Elffgii .. .. 25: 1 . ' 21.817959 I I I I n ' ll'-ra., G I I I I 4, I 1 W .6-"v N I -l- ll ifiliwi - f-f i. ll 3 L-v 1' z B Tw to in vllllwlllllln. Mlllllll' 6 w 4. fl --lull? l iz. ' 'J' 12595 f ... MIMI KOSBERG, Sweetheart lun HHH lnu Alpha Omega Chapter HE MOST OUTSTANDING pledge class of the year was the Alpha Omega chapter of Zeta Beta Tau, which was awarded the coveted Alpha trophy. ZBT also sponsored an outstanding philanthropic project by holding a Christmas party for Underprivi- ledged Children, complete with Santa Claus. Socially, the ZBTs enjoyed a red-letter year, holding a Calypso Island party and a lovely Blue and White Formal, which concluded the year's social events. Members of the fraternity are also active on the cam- pus. Norman Broad was elected freshman senator and is active on the debate team, Sonny Bloch, chapter president, was elected to Who's Who in American Col- leges and is the governor of the School of Education, Ed Weiss is a member of ODK and Iron Arrow. Zeta Beta Tau was founded nationally at Cobbe City College, New York, in 1898, and was established on the UM campus in 1946. Outstanding alumni of ZBT include Jack Benny, Radio-TV comedian, Bernard Baruch, statesman, Felix Frankfurter, Supreme Court Justice. H. Bloch, Pres. E. Auerbach D. Bookshester B. Burman M. Edlin J. Fleisher J. Goldstein J. Horland R. Katz R. Stein, V.P. M. Bellman B. Boro L. Cohn R. Endlar D. Freedman P. Goldstein J. Ifkoff S. Kerner S. Friedman, Sec. A. Berman N. Brood R. Dannenberg L. Epsiein A. Fniedland R. Gould C. Karp K. Lane J.Manton, Treas. A. Bern P. Brown B. Dick H. Fallis R. Ginsburg A. Holtz E. Karp L. Lapensohn SOUNDS OF SONNY BLOCH AND HIS BAND PLAY IMPORTANT ROLE AT ZBT DANCE THAT HAS ALL APPEARANCES OF BEING SLIGHTLY "FISHY" I 5 1:1 " A 'I , 'N' E, . V, Q16 ? ii Q. .itfzv 'Si' if SE ' 5. G . .ig X91 : v i , ...,., . I Q4 a . JA. g Rf 4 . ...WU . E 3 4 ,- 1 , .. .fn , A B. Lasky E. Mccks R. Mandeli L. Meiler R. Miller R. Pace S. Ma nfon D. Pafflerson M ' 1 ,L Q F. . YQ! I ' W A F' 255 '- g l -.. B .Vs -' ff .7202 Q Nik r ' ..Z,w f, ' A .5 N K ..,, f 2 S. Salomon R. Sanders A. Skop B. Stone S. Rupee L. Rogell B. Rogow D. Rombro .. -if NX . gi .Z . QW. Q . V23 -- if 2.1, . 1. 1 .W Q I , Q 1 2 . 3 It 1 .vtsiit ' I f- I H. Thalblum J. Vangrow S. Wahl W. Wiener 235 QT ' " , K, . me N - ' i ff? 2 K - . A ' W . M. Wolf R. Young H. Zane H. Zuckerman ATHLETIC ZBTs, aiming 'I'o win, fake acfive Parl' in inI'ramuraIs. f r I -E s llll uh. QIKKQX lIlHH IHMH HI h h x KK X xxxlfh 5 c A E 5 3 au ' "WX O FOSTER good scholarship among its members, T Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity presents a one hundred dollar grant to the outstanding student in the fraternity. This award is made each semester. Alpha Sig was founded nationally December 6, 1845, at Yale University. To commemorate the founding, every year the annual Black and White formal is held. Socially, it rivaled its larger competitors with a "Yah XYfoo" beach party and Spring Formal which was an outstanding affair. Alpha Sigma Phi is the tenth oldest Greek letter organization in the United States, and the third largest. The Gamma Theta chapter, which was founded in 1952, is one of the outstanding chapters in the country. Among the outstanding alumni of the fraternity, E. L. Cotton heads the list. He has helped the fraternity to establish itself on the campus, as well as spearhead- ing the drive for the building of the fraternity house, which will appear in the near future on Fraternity Row. RONALD STUCKER gets special say al' Blaclt and Whife Formal which commemorafes 'Fra+erni+y's founding al' Yale. WHAT A WAY +o honor fhe memory of a Founder's Day! The Alpha Sig brofhers can 'I-hink of no loeHer way +o celebrafe, and by +he looks of things, 'I'heir cla'I'es can'+ ei'I'her. 236 Other alumni are Vincent Price, actor, and Vernon C. Myers, publisher of Look magazine. T . :guy il".l'f'l' .ii 'i'. F7 v i fvifjgklik 2 'VFX V A if l il? yi? L34 i s 3 if, if 0 3 E .,... I . ' 'li 'ii'- l , A 555525 it -1 nigiinisf 9 Gif -M L if s' Zklyrwwliibis - will , S . w.sfiwa'w i in ,' ' c,rQsat.e2:.tmJ'ff'2tat W a, ' E' " yi . 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Y ,. g.L.!y.5l 5 slriifgtwnr., 5 T 5'.i.lif3g,9i ,MM55 a ., sl'gwif'ww-QjL.'v1gfS55 Q5 ?9'IjEi'it: ., ., ll.f'i?f.E2re H ff5f'5'hlQrQ.'?F.'Jrgg5wUsW2i3l'ii1'6-3 'fitgilhwif Mmm i.fwrf..i.rif.r:mi it .,wz.rwif A. xtiweat ?fZ5?if?75ffs?f.'Wl? gy Six? if '- 'I fix- """L.5f , "'A: 1'9'151:fe-' .fs.'z. 1 :'- ' '13 3 lil i ' fi . K m li' igfiiffxf.. ,. - ,. 4 K sit H 1 R. Asfere, Pres. J. Burns R. Koeval, V.P. G. Snyder J. Choikowski, Sec. W. Tools B. Beauchamp, Tregs. IIIIH I BEING THE NEWEST ADDITION to the Greek circle on campus did not stop Beta Sigma Rho from enjoying a sensational year as far as social events were concerned. A picturesque Calypso party opened the year, which was followed by a Suppressed Desire party. The Matzoh Ball party added spice to an already gay social calendar. Traditional pledge-active parties and Founders Day banquet completed the year's many activities. Beta Sigs lent a helping hand to the Variety Chil- dren's Hospital by giving parties for the children. Although new on campus, established in March of this year, Beta Sig has already contributed to campus activities. The fraternity won second place in Sun Car- nival decorations and participated in intramurals. The national fraternity was founded at Cornell Uni- versity, in New York, in 1910. Outstanding local members include Michael Litwin, president of the fraternity, who is a member of Alpha Sigma Delta and Phi Eta Sigma. Mike Nemeroff was selected Best Pledge of the Year. M. Litwin, Pres. M. Applebaum E. Gaboy M. LubeII M. Nemeroff M. Taper, V.P. R. Bender? B. Gordon M. Mermelsiein L. Rubin k L H. Mar s, Sec. M. Brenner . Kleinman R. Messer J. Ross H. Schwartz, Treas. L. Epstein S. Levin R. Michaels M. Schneider ,If x Va, 7 f s X N ' I ull ld' PATRICIA BARRIE, Swee+hear+ PIE IN THE EYE is uncomfortable 'For 'l'his Be'I'a Sigma Rho pledge, bui' his cIoI'hes slay clean. ii " :sian HH A up fl WM l PHI lawn HU Beta Delta Chapter OCIAL EVENTS highlighted the year for the Beta Delta chapter of Phi Kappa Tau fraternity. Bewitching Hallowe'en served as a theme for a cos- tume party in October. Later in the year, members donned their sheets and drank nectar at a toga party. Christmas served as the theme for another party. Cli- maxing the social year was the crowning of Sweetheart Alba Foglia at the annual Carnation Ball. Phi Kappa Tau fraternity was founded in 1906 at the Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. The Beta Delta chapter was established on the UM campus in 1948. It is one of 72 chapters across the nation. Advancing the highest ideals, the innate worth of the individual and the development of character are the purposes of the fraternity, whose motto boasts that it is the "Creator of Men." Outstanding local alumni include Ben David, Dean of Men at the University, and Randy Christmas, former Mayor of Miami. Architect Robert Little, a prominent MMM-MM-MM DELICIOUS! Favrening +00 Probably bm Phi Tau, is responsible for several of the University's the guests couldn't resist tempting Christmas party goodies. newest buildings- i dk K L kgs' tfiiinfi i , , gat' 35 ,gi iw fs M Q '-222 , , A at r X . 1 t a n if A . I j 5 t'r s - - "' ifft. YOU'D NEVER KNOW the weather was balmy outside with these Christ- Jli'5ci-,zzzera mas decorations, put up by Phi Kappa Taus for their special holiday party. J. Langen, Trees- J- Woiteser 238 Ill livin llHl Alpha Chi Chapter O PROMOTE mutual understanding, and to foster high ideals and develop personality are the far- reaching ideals by which the brothers of Pi Kappa Phi seek to pattern their lives. The fraternity was founded nationally in 1904 at the College of Charleston, South Carolina, and each year on December 10 the brothers commemorate the event with a Founders Day Banquet. Socially Pi Phis highlighted the year with their an- nual Rose Ball. A Suppressed Desire Parry gave mem- bers and their dates a chance to dress in any attire and any character describing their suppressing. The fraternity was established on this campus in 1947 and the Alpha Chi chapter is one of 70 national chapters. Men of Pi Kappa Phi were also active in the intra- mural program and sponsored a philanthropic project for the benefit of underpriviledged children. The notable alumni of the fraternity include Lloyd Bennett, UM swimming coach, Wally Butts, colorful University of Georgia football coach, and Henry Mac- Lemore, noted syndicated columnist. '95 f V . if si t af AQ HSM: Wai? at 4 5 ffl, , P A - , .V .,l. f, e:..,1 .fs,, U . ,g51k:g,5.tl-K. f, M v,.?55.,?,g.i.i Q 'V L i4f 7ffif Ll-Ti 7 f",g,'3-i f A Sf? f V if "'i . ssh if A D Cundy Keith 141615 - cg QQ? F4 ? lg: tgp AIAZTTAEEI PRESIDENT FRANK PAGE gives a bouquel' +o Mary Good- man al +he annual Rose Ball. She was 'lhe Sweefhearf of PKP. f fry. G,i+,,d,,ppCcCZiQ,. C-l'Niohol, THE PI KAPPA PHI TABLE in +he pa'I'io of fhe Sfudenf Union is a campus meefing D. Huflinugle J. Slormonf place where members and dares discuss currenf even'l's and sfudy when +he weafher is fine. 239 llN1HHIl' AN IRON ARROW 'I-hrusi' info fhe ground and other simple ri'I'es mark accepfance of anofher member info UM honorary. ff'dZ2f'W'52:rg5w Mraz E I fc H1334 i' iii?-535 Kiwi 3133550 .Q-5 L-P Q 11' LQ -' H-M 21.52 'Ip-at-5'5:3I5.'5 MI' 4 - ' f' , A+' .. .. .air . Ms.....,f-as Dr. T. Adams EWR? ' 'saiifgiiih 5' ,mga Vgwiifwf ii' I ' zr5'2?S'. rf". IV' ', " 5-"i r .- ?,?:, .. X HAY, fu , .lr Q i f 1 4 in- , . .5 . Y. if X 3 3 S fs Y fi r' ri 1 Us als- f., Vi ' g. MSW J.. V5 QM: Q 4 v ,A 5.5 5 gg Q if if 'l 5 - -V. .:. -::...., Iron Arrow THOSE ARE NOT the war drums of angry Semi- noles that are heard twice a year on campus, but are the sounds accompanying an exciting ceremony, the tapping of new members by Iron Arrow. Membership is the highest honor attainable by UM men. As old as the university itself, Iron Arrow came into being in 1926 when it was established by Dr. Bowman F. Ashe, the school's first president. The society attempts to take in all really outstanding alumni, faculty and administrative persons, in addition to student leaders. Members are noted for their ac- complishments in such fields as athletics, drama,'stu dent government, music, publications and many others. Iron Arrow holds a dinner both during Homecom ing Week and in the spring to honor new tappees. Chief for '57-58 was Marshall Shapo. Son-in-chief was joe Segor, and Larry Porter was medicine man. Not pictured are Ed Anderson and Bill Haas. 'EYQSRSTEQQL . ? Kr' , ..,,. T .. ..,.. . ,S r ..r. --" Z.. az.: .wr " ,' ' V' ' a N A '- ft gifs, V-.marie e ,ga g.:yi?w: rf' 3525711 ' A fr -"' L V- 1 U 3. K 5 - '- 2-:MX-.222f:' int IW Wi .5 "Tw . V ,iz f:g'gf.fwwl '."Yig,.:V Masai. F as ' fifi' gag, I. ...... , .M-5.,'i1?'f . Vs V , . , .mlfirmfimm -'W 3 4 M. Baker R. Barone W. Bennet? A. Brees M. Burdette 4. Z ,g,,ZiSf?l9i:,s.VKi2... , limi. .. ,X V5.'g5W?.' ' KY... 2'ii5'4'P, --.:-514' 1.f':3gw.f if n .- i.1:5VVvzu V gmt ., 1' t.V.V5f. umsggy i'llt'iri.iiiv 'V .f .. ,li.fLe.2 ., gff.1sf2iV.' ' ., . ,, "r" V V -, p , I - mf. M ',f.-.Wx . .V 'L f. " V Ls- 4525 . .... - v .' ' J ' -. '::'V:,- - . .-awe. f ,v.w 3lfVp3w.V. . if' .fs is rilifw .1 . -1 -i am ff?'::,V1 LV i m ' .f nil. Q L. Bu l 'g y ' ...saw Vi N15 sing mfr? rt ss -1- E . msn J, riff fl 2 2 X Q fa .5 . .... . Mg ri Kgs ' a Kgffggfsp - . ,lfiefsw ' l ing g21S A 'X V... ia it QYCSW fr' ' X532 I ,... , . ...5f:-:'.f:.::s 'Avail PW. L. Cohen -E? ..... . . a .... ... .... s - A eY...,p. f E . if 55.3 , x 4 gwsa, A, :A W ,sais E 5. ig fn. wg tl' ri... WJ .Q 9 as , ..,, . .,,.,. .,...,. , ,.,,. ...... , ,...... , . .. .iQe..:..F ' "1 N r. L. Friedman A. Goshgurian E. Harrison C. Hayes H. Holton L. Howe A. Jacobson J. Kelsey if 2Ff"'ffr?ftSf'ftt V ' ir f. w - arf'za.. Veitw23:1t'1Vf if r .rcr..w tf J ll "' r ' A fl if li- Wfiiffii Lili ,, l'7'lviili'fti .,.. , .Vi ' ,... . ..., , ..., A i.1iVVf . L f 1f,, U tra . S' it Q. 'S V , U . 3 f rigf "" "r"" ' ' wtf.. .1 2 . . s f w as V 'v is Mtffii? t3j.r 1.V.'.1V'.Vf-3' .rlisii as , 0 +V .mt VU Q- Q 5 . N- sf .agar '1 4 a.,V.g.V5.1 ':'5:f' .x.iag3::.:1fggs-. a. ..e.."51V.A??x,sg.. S'?gt1s',Twt5r1iAVv avbrwwr a:fw:iikfiiWV: Nz- YV 22551. we Wzfww . fir 'XY ti .QS - hlivgi ifg . S s-NrfCV'. 2, 3 1. 3 ig, X .f..VgyN . ,kgs an 6 .gifgygtylgxey -V.. . 1 W- , ii .: ...qi Vfga SV,-i,g 52:25 5.1, .gig WY , ,Liu : , 3515 Mr as- -r: 55 --:Q 5.5-.A I- .5 ' 52: ' V :fs -. +V , ff! wW'f:13 si., 3' A W J"'if?.s 'Vp ' V '- V ,- if - :A : f r. ' 1 Y W ""- fri!" ' f e w' l N5 "ii 'li' , - - ' .21-' J "ii N 'lk 579' .tl .VF fi' .ic i. 3- ti' .V Y V' 'V . :Tf:-tf1V-..ff"- H255 l im -,: ,, . ' , - ' Y V K Q 'iw .- ' . f'.'. - " '- V. " V 'i - 4, V- NSWCOTT1b C. Penney F. Porfer R. Rechfer R. Reece E. Rubinoff J. Segor M. Shapo A ' fr ,..,.. , airs ifilfifii i'?V!,l'JVl:f'V 35.Wa.1 1 .ff 25W M fi' ff ' 1 trim? 'Q V. ,.,, , , ,,,, V. V U iiifiari i 51 1 . V . - ar, 3 la' w . ' " -V L .Q g V 1 ,R r'-t ft. tj ,mae .:9,:.gg . . V i2'er?if5'I1: 1 imggp ,V..,, 5 V. 2.4122 g.,.gg.f11f.2v 'J Ir -' tts- awe:- . wh' -y. 'ima-Tl'w'+55fw-A s. V0'i5.:' H, . fic .X tL'V'iVw.5v.? ' 4 - - 'rin fum' sf laifiliiw 5' , V. 2: - iiiillfifhltz Vzmr A A . ,,, .iff V M fgfg.,5,::f.V I 02156 , Ve.. .. .V . ,. 4.5 f .c aw, .- -. ,...,.- ,.f.f.ec- ., ,,.,. V. .,,., ,xwfg .,,, 4gfsf.11,,, - 1 ..:. W .- ww Q' . "f' , 6 .ip J. V ,,. W -.-. 51 V rm.. -..- A N, Y k .s ..V, , : V. Wir. in -M . ,- firm.: V.g,. f ni. fl., Ygy, Vw . ,. K V. S. Slepin A. Snyder G. Stage H. Stone R. Toomey W. Weissel O. West 2410 N. Whiiren A A. M. Bouse B. Freiclus E. Goldstein C. Humburg A. Jones R. Kascher B. Lauck 4 A. McGcrry J. Odell R. Petech D. Russell G. Stdub ...al S. Tomhave M. Weiss Nu Kappa Tau ONLY UM'S TOP WOMEN are tapped each semes- ter by Nu Kappa Tau for achievement in scholarship and leadership, and for service to the University. The stringent requirement of a B average for five consecutive semesters shows the academic stress. Founded in 1957 by UM's first dean of women, Mary B. Merritt, NKT is the highest honor a woman can receive. In addition to promoting higher scholarship and character at UM, members annually sponsor a career workshop, for insight into future professions. Rosemarie Kascher was president, Marzi Weiss, vice president, Barbara Lauck, secretary, and Diane Russell, treasurer. Marilyn Ziegler is not pictured. ,mx "l'VE MADE lT!" is +l1e happy +l1ougl1+ +l'1a+ enters Carole CLUTCHING THEIR HATS in breeze +ha+ swepl' UM dur Humburg's mind during tapping ceremony in classroom. Homecoming, Nu Kappa Tau members march toward 'lapp 241 l ing ee. f ,Ii gsm H -zaf5i2:'s.::-'- t, -. ,1.,.-tt, X , fag.,-H: 5 M wal f ' 5 , .ik ,K ,E r 1 5, 92 Q , t.f,, ,Z.g lrl 3, ,if . .U . P - R. Barone W. Bennetf A. Brees L. Burns R. Chapman L. Cohen H. Deichmann A. Foland L. Friedman R. Friedman E. Goldstein N. Hoslelf L. Howe R. Kasdher Alpha Sigma Epsilon A MONOPOLY on outstanding members of both sexes is held by Alpha Sigma Epsilon, UM's only co- educational leadership honorary. Candidates must have maintained a 1.5 overall average and must excel in leadership, character, and service to the University. An innovation in the society's projects was the in- troduction of a "Student of the Month Awardf' given to an outstanding student in each school at UM. The honorary also continued its semi-annual "Invites" party, with student leaders as its guests. President was Larry Friedman, Joe Segor, vice presi- dent, Anne McGarry, secretary, Lew Cohen, treasurerg and Dr. Paul K. Vonk, faculty adviser. Not pictured are Sally Brandes, Alan Graubert and Winnie Still. E. Kovachevich L. Kuvin A. Jones B. Lauck A. McGarry J. Odell C. Penney R. Pefech - ft ' ?Y3'f?3I3T"fl' llillwiffitlif L - I -rf , . I li llllilsl ,,.. - il -I Q3 ix' ,li - . V- ... . as . e gay we .9 . . tmmtii my 5.3 mist, igzmfy .Q Wo, n ew . ,am mam, ,5.g5,,,. , ,w.,5..,.d. My , Q ,ver vw, H bQ"r52tf'wff ,V in :iris ww . L A ' ""' - "'1 aff? X . l . 25 3' R. Poller F. Porter R. Rechfer R. Reece H.. Reiseman B. Rosentblaft J- 5e90l' M- 5hUP0 P. Siegel S. Slepin A. Spaulding A. Speisman H. Stone R. Toomey M- Weiss W. Weissel 242 1 f z a?2.ri'?f'!' 5 ' 'WE 5 rf . ., s . 1A.... , t weak ' xx -W y ' .9515 1 1. Q. ff? ter .gg 1 gags X . sq A it Lf2'fi?' 5, 2 :fl 'w i N2 as 21- -is 3113 . wg. F N' M if , , . . .W .an . .. an , . 7 1 . r e ,. ..a.'.x,s., r fi , .. .. 5. . , f Qla w 7 ,ga Q if W . ','.Q1.i:f" Q 1312-f L fQf'.D2!f f ,A f ' r 'K A W X V A if L -i K hi. if res ist. K ga' . an f ' H A A A , gem w 1 f f J 5 ' - . :ag .gf ' A Dr. T. Adams R. Barone W. Bennett D. Bonner, Jr. A. Brees L. Burns L. Cohen B. David A. Folcmd L. Friedman R. Friedman L. Howe D. Kennedy R. Knight Omicron Delta Kappa COMPOSED OF outstanding men students through- out the country, ODK taps juniors and seniors who have maintained an over-all 1.5 average and have the qualities of leadership, character and service. Students are selected from publications, athletics, medicine, law and religious organizations, and many other lields at the University. Each year the Homecoming chairman and his assist- ant are appointed under the guidance of UM's Omicron Delta Kappa chapter, who are the oflicial sponsors of Homecoming Wfeek festivities. Lewis Cohen served as president for 1957-58, with the help of vice president, Robert Barone, secretary- treasurer, William Bennett, faculty adviser, Ben David, and permanent secretary, Dr. Thurston Adams. Not pictured are Gerald Kravet and Irvin Naylor. HOMECOMING BELL atop Student Union is rung by ODK President Lewis Cohen to signal the beginning of activities. E- lewis V- Newcomb C. Penney F. Porter R. Rechter R. Reece H. Reisemon B. Rosenblcxtt J. Segor M. Shapo P. Siegel S. Slepin H. Stone R. Toomey W. Weissel N. Whitten R. Barone W. Benner! S. Bloch H. Brower I ?5'7,fj2'l'fQ?r' : ir?.jffi?rirgr f W 1- , '-aff? . rffigiiff' L. Burns R. Chapman H. Edgar A. Figliola Who's Who THE 41 SENIORS selected to represent the University in the 1957-58 edition of XVho's Who Among Students in American Colleges stands for almost every possible field of endeavor in higher education. Students gain national recognition for work in many fields such as medicine, law, sports, student government, student publica- tions, religious activities and music as well as organizational leadership. Business and professional organizations throughout the nation use this publication to acquaint themselves with top graduates. Not pictured are Idral Bowen, William Haas, Barbara Siegle, Reed Toomey and Herta Deichmann. E. Goldberg E. Harrison J. He-ilig L. Howe A, jucobsgn A, Jones P, Kqrp R. Kascher D. Kennedy E. Kofvachevich J. Merritt I. Naylor J. Odell A. Pinfavalle R- Pleasanlon R- Polllsl' R' Refhfel' N- Reiss B. Rosenblaff D. Russell M. S-hapo P. Siegel A. Snyder A. Spaulding K. Wagner J. Warren M. Weiss W. Wright 244- M CLUB: Front row: Andy Donnadieu, Harry Rosen, Jack Putt, Vic Wcrtmann, Bill Bennett. Second row: Don Wallace, Bob Steiner, Nanita Greene, Ed Harrison, Bob Bailey, Angelo Mandis. Third row: Sheldon Dunkel, Joe Plevel, Bob Simmons, Ernst Swift, Bill Murphy, Ange Titeltidle, Dominic Giacovbone. Fourth row: George Rohe, Edward Carrera, Gary Greaves, Charlie Diamond, Phil Geatz, Roger Newman, Fred Yeager. Fifth row: Bill Talbot, Vester Newcomb, Ed Morris, Stan Koikowski, Marty Burdette, Joe Gardner, Gene Stage. M Club SINCE 1926, men who wear the varsity letter have been members of M Club. They know at first hand the value of sportsmanship, courage, and team play. These fine qualities are always evident at the M Club dances, after the football games, where the outstanding player award is made and the sponsor named for the next game. On M Day, in the spring, the club awards tro- phies to the outstanding athletes in diiterent fields. MONEY BUSINESS isn't tunny tor Bob Steiner, check writer: Bob Bailey, Ed Harrison and Nanita Greene don't agree. Coach Don Cobb was adviser for the 1957-58 year when M Club operated under the direction of Ed Har- rison, president, assisted by Bob Bayley, vice presidentg Bob Steiner, secretary, and Ed Rubinoff, treasurer. M Club recognizes unusual achievement in every phase of sports activity, combining all athletic elements in an honorary with an ancient tradition of good sportsmanship, and fair competition. Watching toss are Sweetheart Nanita Greene and Pitt spon- sor Carole Humburg, escorted by Ed Harrison, Bob Steiner. 24-5 ANGEL FLIGHT: Fronf row: Nancy Reiss, Jacque Warren, Lonnie Robinson. Second row: Chris Berkheimer, Judy Howard, Susan Gernon, Carol Baldwin, Cecile Grimes, Ellie Luiz, Donna Argo, Carol Leverenz, Carrol Leavifi, Capt. George Yoo. Angel Flight A NEW ADDITION to campus organizations is Angel Flight. The yearling is one of 75 national chap- ters. Organized to promote interest in the Air Force, it is the sister organization of Arnold Air Society. Mem- bers attend high school assemblies in the Miami area to explain the college AFROTC program. They also assist with plans for the Military Ball. Chosen by representatives of AFROTC, members must be outstanding students. Notable Angels include Nancy Reiss, SBG hostess, cheerleaders Lonnie Robin- son and Carol Baldwin, who is also Miss Dixie, and Chris Berkheimer, former sweetheart of SAE. Commander was Jacque Warren, deputy command- ers, Nancy Reiss and Lonnie Robinson, adjutant- recorder, Cecile Grimes, Comptroller, Ellie Lutz, and adviser, Capt. George Yoo. MEETING WITH THEIR "BROTHER" GROUP, ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY, A RECEIVING RANK, 2nd LieuI'. Carol Baldwin accepts con grafulaiory hand of Mrs. Louise P. Mills, counselor for women GHT MEMBERS HOLD THEIR BI-MONTHLY PARLEY AT OFFICERS' CLUB - V Q by f.4'.fzi r:xtz'amuslewaa ztz n3m ., a ,a RETIRING AIR FORCE ROTC QUEEN PAT WOLFERT CROWNS HlER ELATED SUCCESSOR, JACQUE WARREN, AT LAST YEAR'S GALA MILITARY BALL Arnold Air Society THE RICHARD SHADDICK SQUADRON of the activities and is also co-sponsor of the annual joint Mili- Arnold Air Society gained a sister organization this tary Ball at which its queen and princesses for the com- year when Angel Flight was added to the University's ing year are named and crowned. Reigning in 1957-58 list of honoraries. were queen Jacque Warren and princesses Nancy Reiss Arnold Air was established on the UM campus on and Lonnie Robinson. the "ides of March" in 1950, and is Squadron D-6. The society's marching unit tied for first place in the This national honorary for AFROTC members Ends Homecoming Parade last fall. its purposes in further developing the traditions and Reynaldo Anullo served as the 1957-58 presidentg spirit of the United States Air Force among cadets and Clyde Carter, vice presidentg Wfilliam Haas, secretary working for better American Citizenship. Arnold Air and David Cox handled the job of treasurer. also strives to promote good relationships among the Among outstanding national alumni, Arnold Air AFROTC cadets. numbers Lt. Gen. james Doolittle of "thirty seconds The organization participates in Orientation Week over Tokyo" fame, and the late Gen. "Hap" Arnold. ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY: Fronf row: Bill Hutchison, Mai? Allen, Edward McCarley, John Sakella, Jay Sedlik, Laurence Schworiz, Robert Zamis. Second row: Leon Smith, Blacky Srieglitz, Armand Durrieu, Irvin Naylor, Ray Johnson, David Cox, Charles Rudd, Clyde Carter, Robert Coolidge, Craig Kern, Rennie Anllo, Lewis Sherouse. -ff - - vf - N 1-,ffnw-mmm. iQrv Ww.ll EWR7bHWMMSaX9irWWk' ',4Hyw' "i2MSlKqY f ' 1391? CROWD VIEWS STATELY COLOR GUARD AND MARCHING UNIT OF PERSHING RIFLES AS THEY STAND AT ATTENTION DURING HOMECOMING PARADE Pershing Rifles UM'S CHAPTER of Pershing Rifles boasts two "Gold Achievement Medal" winners. This is the high- est national award attainable by Army ROTC cadets. Pershing Rifles is honorable enough in itself as it is one of the highest honoraries recognizing those ROTC members who have shown excellence in some aspect of the ROTC program. Candidates for the honorary are se- lected from the Air Force as well as the Army ROTC. Prerequisite for any aspiring soldier trainee is a "high degree of ability" consisting of an overall academic average of 1.0 and a 2.0 average in ROTC. Pershing Rifles' main purpose is to encourage, pre- serve and develop the highest ideals of the military profession. Devoted to increased military efficiency among its members, the group sponsors a drill team which com- petes in many national events. Members also find time to usher at symphony concerts. The group also provides a color guard at all UM football games. Pershing Rifles' capable officers for this year included Thomas E. Snyder as president, Sheldon D. Hittleman as vice president, Charles L. Spaide as drill master, Neal H. Schneider as pledge master, and Captain Hal D. Wfhite as adviser. PERSHING RIFLES: Front row: Daniel Kamis, Norman Edkins, Sgt. Arthur Findley, Capt. Hal White, Charles Spaide, Tom Snyder, Sheldon Hittelman, Neal Schneider, Theodore Engel. Second row: John Moscolo, Robert Shores, Jacques Andre, Jorge Crespo, Ed Adrian, Don Eckerson, Kenneth Dixon, William Kurtz, Robert Farrell. Third row: Robert Granat, Earl Burrows, Fran Steele, Leonardo Rodriguez, Frank Seidman, Howard Schwimmer, Myron Goldberg, Brian Harelik. na asa-Mm X w s mr ra Q if 1 nxaamaawsa-1 sm .-,I A f .gwsrawear e:4fsazsrr1mvN.sa SCABBARD AND BLADE: Fronf row: Edwurd Morrissey, Charles Spcxide, Carl Schuster, Edward Fleming, Gary Gowen. Second row: William Henning, Mor? Brown, cl R bl 1 M J M D M Retsce Miller, Curl Wright, Berncir osen of, oior times c evi . Scabbard and Blade THE NATIONS highest Army honorary, Scabbard and Blade, takes in only those outstanding Army ROTC cadets who possess leadership qualities. Members must also have a 2.0 average in military science courses and a 1.5 overall average. Scabbard and Blade became a part of the UM group of organizations in 1951 when it was established as G Company, 1 Oth Regiment. Promoting interest in and understanding of military affairs is one of the main objectives of this honorary. Cooperation among the military is also stimulated. CADET COLONEL Bernard RosenblaH' adorns Chuck Spaide with red ribbon +ha'l' signifies lapping by Scabbard and Blade- u Besides taking part in the University's semi-annual blood drives, Scabbard and Blade joins the Air Force in sponsoring the annual Military Ball. Here, as with the AFROTC, the AROTC queen and princesses receive the crowns of their offices. Susan Weissel reigned as queen with Carmen Colon and Rhona Berube. Officers for the year have been Rex H. Miller, pres- identg Carl Wright, vice president, Sam Smith, secre- tary, and Morton S. Brown, treasurer. The group may be recognized by its symbol, an eagle with crossed swords and five stars. AFTER RECEIVING RED RIBBONS, six cadets, iusl' 'lalcen in by honorary, kneel in lasl' rounds of serious lapping ceremony. ALPHA EPSILON DELTA: Front row: Barry Materson, Tom Stephenson, Rosita Petech, Harry Schultz, Lawrence Wheatman. Second row: Varrett Black, Paul Kinieciak, Nancy Haslett, Jack Herman, Robert Glasser. Third row: Fred Block, Michael Litwin, Charles Hirsch. Alpha Epsilon Delta IN ITS tenth year at the University, Florida Gamma chapter of AED has two purposes: encouraging high scholarship among pre-medical students and making possible association with others of similar interests. Members take part in the medical symposium, work in connection with the Student American Medical As- sociation and visit hospitals weekly to observe opera- tions and other medical functions. The founding chapter, Arkansas, will be host for a national AED convention in March, at which the an- nual "Harry P. Schultz" Award will be made. The honor is given to an outstanding pre-medical adviser, and was won by Dr. julian D. Corrington in 1957. Under the leadership of Rosita Petech, assisted by Edward Cohn, vice president, Paul Klite, secretary, and Lawrence Wheatman, treasurer, AED has had a suc- cessful and rewarding year. Alpha Epsilon Rho MIKES AND CATHODES are a way of life for members of Alpha Epsilon Rho, national radio-TV honorary. One of 41 national units, UM's Gamma chap- ter celebrated its seventh anniversary in September. An award as given at the AERho May banquet to honor the outstanding senior in the radio-TV depart- ment for the year. Local broadcasters attended. This group stresses both scholastic and extra-curric- ular achievement and interest in radio, television and broadcasting and therefore all these must be fulhlled for a student to become a member. President of the group was Orm West, jr.g vice presi- dent Bob Barone, and secretary-treasurer, Winnie Still. Assistant Professor of Radio-TV Film Paul Nagel spon- sors AERho. Among the honorary's national alumni are Edward R. Murrow, Niles Trammell and Mel Allen. ALPHA EPSILON RHO: Front row: Paul Nagel, Bob Barone. Orm West, AI Snyder, Ed Talbert. Second row: Roger Reece, Joyce Penlano, Virginia Behney, Ann Spaulding, Jack Metzger, Wilson Griffith. . l-1.11. .,, m wats. a M-v ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA: Front row: Olive Horton, Charis Schubert, Patricia Hanna, Betsy Liss, Nancy Overpeck, Gloria Konig, Ravona Caldwell. Second row: Sor Lian Ong, Ellen Zuckerman, Carol Stewart, Sandro Shumway, Norma Smith, Maureen Geller, Rebecca Munn. Third row: Goldye Naftulin, Shirley Kettle- man, Phoebe Gordon, Pat O'Day, Kay Biggs, Gayle Davis. Alpha Lambda Delta THE RECOGNITICN and encouragement of high scholarship for freshmen women is the important pur- pose of Alpha Lambda Delta. Members operate a tutoring system in partnership with Phi Eta Sigma, freshmen men's honorary. The Bernice Jacobs Trophy is given to the outstand- ing freshman woman and an annual award is made to the Alpha Lambda Delta members with the highest scholastic average for three and a half years. In the spring and the fall Alpha Lambda Delta holds installation banquets with Phi Eta Sigma and gives an annual tea for Dade County high-school students who have been chosen members of National Honor Society. Ofiicers for 1957-58 were Betsy Liss, president, Nancy Overpeck, vice president, Gloria Konig and Shir- ley Kettleman, secretaries and Pat Hanna, treasurer. Beta Beta Beta "O, LITTLE BUG in that big jar-you just don't look quite up to par." That's not the motto of Beta Beta Beta, the national biology honorary, but it's a known fact that its members have seen a number of dead bugs during their days in biology laboratories. Celebrating its tenth birthday on campus, the UM chapter encourages student research into biological problems. Members often hear noted lecturers concern- ing progress and problems in the field. To be eligible for tapping by Beta Beta Beta, a stu- dent must have a minimum of eight science credits and at least a 2.0 average in science. An overall 1.5 average is also required. Officers for the year were Albert Kessler, president, Lawrence Wheatman, vice president, Eve Fischer, sec- retary, and Dr. Burton Hunt, treasurer. BETA BETA BETA: Front row: Burton Hunt, Eve Fisher, Albert Kessler, Lawrence Wheatmon, Alan Graubert, Rosita Petech. Second row: Charles Hirsch, Walter Renn, Stan Dick, Stuart Warter, Robert Davis. DELTA THETA MU: Front row: Bryce Dunham, Dr. Paul Vonk, Doren Tharp, Melanie Rosborough, Henry Edgar, Sandra Ehrlich, Paul Siegel, Jewell Zimmerman, Douglas Anderson, Virgin-ia Meehan. Second row: Richard Schneider, Jerry Wetherington, Lawrence Wheatman, Sandy Ross, Martin Redlich, Ross Lewis, Leo Rinaldi, Marshall Shapo. Third row: Ellen Baum, Janet Guadagno, Carmen Colon, Mary Jane Plumer, Susie Marbey, Helen Ladenheim, Sue Tomhave, Francean Napilof Ravona Coldwell. Delta Theta Mu SERVICE AND SCHOLARSHIP are emphasized in Delta Theta Mu, a scholastic fraternity in the College of Arts and Sciences. Juniors and seniors possessing an academic average of 2.5 are eligible for member- ship on the approval of the Dean of the College. Sophomores are considered if they have a 2.8 average. Members sponsor a senior banquet and a faculty tea. Future plans include the prospective organization of a national group, with the headquarters in Miami. Heading Delta Theta Mu as president was Henry Edgar, assisted by Sandra Ehrlich and Paul Siegel, vice presidents, Jewell Zimmerman and Virginia Meehan, secretaries and Norman Anderson, treasurer. Engineering Honor Society ENGINEERS with junior standing and an academic average above 2.0 are eligible for Engineering Honor Society membership. Approval by the active members of the organization and three members of the engineer- ing faculty is also necessary. In February an award is made to the junior with the highest scholastic average, a presentation that high- lights the Engineers Ball. Under the sponsorship of Professor Jackson Sells, oflicers for 1957-58 were Robert Rechter, president, Richard Trissel, vice president, Jerry Brown, recording secretary, Wfilhelm Schmidt, corresponding secretary, and Loren T. Keller, treasurer. ENGINEERING HONOR SOCIETY: Front row: Jackson Sell-s, Wilhelm Schmidt, Richard Trissel, Robert Rechter, Jerry Brown, Loren Keller. Second row: Lawrence Kessler, Mel- vin Koven, Harvey Rudich, Edward Auerbach, Frank Dyce, Rolando Cuenca, Michael Mahoney. Third row: Nick Rouse, Clifton Wrestler, JeHrey Willis, Edwin Canter, Charles Latch, Alvin Foland, Robert Filer. Fourth row: Elliot Kramer, Howard Abrams, Michael Sofranko, Donald Haner, Harvey Stone. GAMMA THETA UPSILON: Fronf row: Riley Sfaafs, Fred Day, John Slack, Julian Bournier, John Ray. Second row: M. Kahaliss, Ken Zmuda, Sue Tomhave, Rod Emerson, Richard Kreske. Third row: Williiam Jenna, Jr., Richard Schneider, Al Ricci, Charles Schoup, Joseph Brusco. Gamma Theta Upsllon THEY KNOW' the world is round, but members of Gamma Theta Upsilon, national geography honor- ary, enjoy proving it for themselves, Organized at UM in 1949, the society is one of 33 national chapters. Furthering professional interest in geography, mem- bers of the Alpha Delta chapter make a presentation each year to the outstanding geography student. The honor, named for Dr. Oliver LaGorce, of National Geo- graphic Magazine, is the LaGorce Cartography Award. Field trips, a beach party and a spring banquet are main social events of the group. Eligible for membership are geography and educa- tion students with an interest in the field. President was john Slackg vice president, William Bournier, secretary, Richard Roth. john Ray was this year's adviser. Kappa Delta Pl KNOWLEDGE, DUTY, POWER is the motto of the education honorary Kappa Delta Pi. It was organ- ized on campus in 1950 to encourage high professional, intellectual and personal standards and recognize out- standing contributions to education. In order to be considered for membership, a student must be of junior or senior standing and have a 2.2 average. All prospective candidates are required to have the approval of the education faculty, the Dean of the School of Education and national headquarters. The honorary also participates in social events by having an invitation banquet each semester at which time interested students may learn more about the honorary. Head of the group was Katherine Maheras, presi- dent, Dorothy Brown, vice president, Ann Homan, corresponding secretary, and Verna Owens, treasurer. KAPPA DELTA PI: Fronf row: Sidney Besvinick, Dorothy Brown, Ann Homan, Katherine Maheras, Gloria Gray, Verna Owens, Marlyne Weiss. Second .row: Revo Moore, Phyllis Manson, Barbara Wolfson, Hilda Ringblom, Marior-ie Harris, Rita Dorner, Edna Curry, Selma Mirman, Lucille Maxwell, Alfhea Frederlcks. Third row: Josephine Parker, Frances Fox, Robert Davis, William Mooney, Dorothy Merry, Kay Arnold, Frank Needham, Margaret leidig. ,Dv-famsf, at.,,,-fqwi H W , . , irNfea,. was-rea mnsaeene.as..saamwwmmicwa 1m.m ...-...a LEAD AND INK: Fronf row: Dr. Thurston Adams, Sharon Nelton, Jacque Warren, Bill Rivers, Fred Porler, Wilson Hicks. Second row: Bob Poller, Carmen Colon, Ann Spaulding, Gail Calvert, Roger Reece. Third row: Arthur Jacobson, Alan Rusnak, Marshall Shapa. Lead and Ink OUTSTANDING STUDENTS working on The Hurricane, Ibis or Tempo for two or more semesters are qualified to become members of Lead and Ink. The publications honorary sponsors an annual spring banquet to present awards and to honor new members, who wear lead type slugs as symbol of their pledgeship. Among the presentations is an award for the outstand- ing freshman journalist. Mike Thompson and Terry Drummond were co-winners of this year's award. Between the clicking of typewriters and the scratch- ing of pencils, members find time to have an annual "Come-As-You-Were" party. Fred Porter was president of the honorary, Arthur Cohen was vice president and Jacque Warren, secretary- treasurer. Pi Delia Phi RECOGNITION OF EXCELLENCE in the study of the French language and promotion of greater un- derstanding of French culture and their contributions to the world, are the aims of Pi Delta Phi. Members must have completed French 501 with an averageof 2.0 in French courses. They also must possess at least a 1.8 overall academic average. Founded locally in 1952, the honorary holds an an- nual spring banquet at which time new members of the organization are initiated. This year's president was Helen Ladenheim, while Carmen Colon served as vice president. Jane Neustein was secretary and Henry Edgar, treasurer. The faculty adviser of Pi Delta Phi was Dr. William P. Dismukes. Pl DELTA PHI: Fronf row: Dr. Berfhold Friedel, Jane Neustein, Helen Ladenheim, Carmen Colon, Henry Edgar, Dr. William Dismukes. Second row: .Virginia Reilly, Karl Pond, Anne Tiger, Dr. Reuben Ellison, Muriel Lynch, Barbara Lauck. Third row: Jcphiana Pullos, Robert Vitale, Sandy Boss, Laude Carlos, Chrishne Morgenroth. HHllSSllINHli ALPHA KAPPA PSI: Front row: Dove Bonner, Frank Gliozzo, Bob McKe1o, Warren Williams, Norman Young, Bob R-ohe, Garry Larson. Second row: Anthony Volvo, John Heilig, William Haas, Robert Anderson, Edward Levinson, Henry Prebionca, Thomas Snyder, Irwin Reimer, Mariin Nash. Alpha Kappa Psi THE LARGEST professional business fraternity in the world, Alpha Kappa Psi aims at advancing oourses leading to college business degrees. It is also interested in furthering the welfare of other members and edu- cating the public to appreciate higher ideals. To be considered for membership, one must have a major in business and an over-all 1.5 average. Also, a prospective member must desire to learn more con- cerning the world of business. On its social calendar, the Beta Pi chapter includes dances and banquets semi-annually honoring pledges and actives. Among these is a Founder's Day banquet. Throughout the year, members take field trips to industrial plants in South Florida and sponsor speakers, forums and industrial movies. Each year, on the basis of grades, leadership and character, Alpha Kappa Psi presents a scholarship medallion to the most deserving male student. Heading the group were Warren Williams, presi- dent, assisted by Norman Young, vice president, Bob McKeta, secretary, and Frank Gliozzo, treasurer. LOUD SINGING makes good fun, if noi good harmony, 'For these Alpha Kappa Psis gathered around an old upright. 255 'DON MERRIFIELD, ED AUERBACH AND CARL ROTH INSPECT COUNTER BALANCE BRIDGE, AN A.C.E. PRIZE WINNER IN ENGINEERS' EXPOSITION Architectural and Civil Engineers "THE IMPOSSIBLE We do immediately," say mem- bers of the Architectural and Civil Engineers clubg "miracles take a little longer." ' With that attitude, and qualified by training in the engineering school, A.C.E. men make practical business out of their education. One of their proudest accom- plishments is the steel reinforced concrete bridge which was completed in 1957 under the SBG program. This structure spans a portion of the student lake and saves steps and time for students heading for class areas. Led by President Wayne Schunicht and their ad- viser, Milton Reeder, members visited the site of the newest addition to Miami's skyline, the DuPont Plaza. They made other field trips to the Portland Cement Company and the Coral Gables sewage disposal plant. President of the group was Wayne Schunichg vice president, Carl Roth, secretaries, Ed Auerbach and Jim Titsel, treasurer, Donald Merrifield. ARCHITECTURAL AND CIVIL ENGINEERS: Front raw: J. E. Branch, Eugene Bowen, Arthur Strock, Gerald Munier, Carl Roth, Wayne Schunicht, Dorn Merrifield, Ed Auerbach, J. L. Titzel, M. E. Reeder. Second row: Carmen Lunetta, Charles Willis, George Coates, William Rogers, Gregg Davis, James Chapman, George Tsiartsionis, Rene Aoun, Jose Villarroel. Third row: Alfred Shrader Jr., Stephen Reader, Alan Rubin, Carl Abel, Neil Persky, Robert Elliston, Don Janik. Fourth row: Thomas Matthews, Sanford Weisberg, Loren Keller, William Murphy, Dennis Murphy, William Musselwhite, William Austin, Alfongo Laton-i, Melvin Swain- son. Fifth row: Bill Marsden, Charles Pol-ly, Benny Stephens, Bill Bean, Ramon Kitzman, Bob Soady, Tom Butler. Sixih row: Alvaro Torres, Arthur Anderson, Donald Anderson, Joseph Brown, David Weaver, Michael Sofranko. f lmsemaflms A.I.E.E. MEMBERS EMBARK ON ONE or THEIR ACTIVITIES, FIELD TRIP MADE TO TELEVISION stuoio wTv.I IN HEART or oowNrowN MIAMI American Institute Ol Electrical Engineers UM'S CHAPTER of the American Institute of Elec- Still a youngster here, A.I.E.E. was established at trical Engineers is one of more than 200 student UM in 1956. Nationally, however, the organization 1S branches located at engineering schools throughout the the oldest and largest of all the engineering societies. country. It is devoted to the betterment of the profession of Members cite the visit by Walter Barrett, national electrical engineering and to encourage student pa1't1C1- president, as the most notable event of the year. pation in engineering activities. . A.I.E.E. set up and demonstrated the displays in the john Fridell was president, Samuel Sokol, vice pres- Electrical Machinery Laboratory for the Engineers' identg Gordon Boyles, secretary, and George Eicholtz, Exposition in February. treasurer. AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS: Front row: 'Leon Goldenblank, Samuel Sokoy, David O'ConnelI, John Fridell, Frank Lucas, Gordon Boyles, Jacob Black, Ernest Badia, Bruce Cochran. Second row: Donald Fletcher, Carl Vansl-Iura, Caspar Norigenna, Thomas Jones, Lawrence McCaveft, Charles La4Porte, William Stans, Ted Jenson. Third row: George Eicholtz, Charles Shields, Joseph Sherr, Steven Grooms, Ralph Newcomb, William Greene, Edward Crane, Howard Abrams, Frank Knauer, James Day. g..a9wm.sMwwmi,,ta,, iufgwwe A was -.fe'sewn1r1waMe vmEf5ff,'A- RIM. ZA DELTA SIGMA PI: Front row: Charles Eyre, Mario Camera, Richard Miller, William Hoover, Robert Register, William Webb, Bruce Jenkins, Patrick Zervas. Second row: Charlie Davis, Clinton Hallman, Paul Epperly, Gerald Ayers, Robert Burke, Rex Allred, .lim Moskos, Arthur Zuerra. Third row: Edward Robinson, Joseph Glazer, Harris Reibel, Peter Calo, Bob Buchelt, Dick Abdenour, Terry Brenan. WHAT'S INSIDE? Members take a peek at equipment in local industrial plant while on Delta Sigma Pi sponsored tour. Delta Sigma Pi FOUNDED ON CAMPUS in 1948, the local chap- ter of the international business fraternity, Beta Omega, is one of 82 such chapters. Delta Sigma Pi encourages the study of business and promotes scholarship and a higher standard of com- mercial ethics. It promotes closer affiliation between the commercial world and students of commerce. A prospective candidate for membership must have at least a 1.0 average, have sophomore standing and be in the School of Business. Highlighting the year is the Rose Dance each spring, a gala event at which the Rose Queen is chosen. The social calendar also includes a Christmas formal and a Founder's Day banquet. The group sponsors a number of dinners each year, with noted business and professional men from the Miami area as guest speakers. Heading the future businessmen were Robert Regis- ter, presidentg Willis Webb and William Hoover, vice presidents, Richard Miller, secretary and Bruce jenkins, treasurer. Faculty adviser was Charles Eyre. PRESIDENT ROBERT REGISTER KCENTERJ PRESIDES DURING FORMAL INITIATION AT MIAMI SPRINGS VILLAS. TO HIS RIGHT IS SPONSOR CHARLES EYRE 258 PHI MU ALPHA: Front row: John Myers, David Bonner, Anton Brees, Dale Willoughby, Legh Burns, Moe Turrentine, John Cosgriff, Sam Macaluso, Second row: Jim Hunt, Don Watt, Philip Siegel, Charles Webster, Donald Eward, Tom Thurlow, Bill Muff, Ken Skipper, William Blanchard. Third row: David Kennedy, Carlos Cabrera, Charles Penney, Gus Perry, Paul Shaver, Don O'Cook, Bart Midwood, Don Cook, Joe Whitecotton, Kurt Cieslik. Fourth row: George Roe, Mel Baker, John Heilig, Bill Ridolf, George Barish, Rex Pyles, John White, Don Zech, Budd Malchus. Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia BUSY, BUSY, BUSY as usual were the Phi Mu Alpha brothers, best known for their traditional spon- sorship of Songfest-Swingfest every spring. The music professional, which requires that its mem- bers be upper freshmen with a sincere interest in music, expects "Sinfonians" to have at least a C average. Phi Mu Alpha has been devoted to the cause of advancing music in America since its inception on Campus in 1937. The Beta Tau chapter was named outstanding chapter in the southeastern region for 1956-57. An annual Yuletide Concert, sponsored with Sigma Alpha Iota, the "All-American" concert and a "Miami Composers" concert were three main events on the Phi Mu Alpha agenda. The group also sponsored a jazz band for free enter- tainment for UM students and worked with the reli- gious organizations in presenting a Christmas "Tree Trimming" and Carol concert. Officers this year were Legh Burns, president, John Cosgriff, vice president, John Meyers and Moe Turren- tine, secretaries, and David Bonner, treasurer. Gene Cohen was adviser. Local notables included Legh Burns, of Iron Arrow, ODK, ASE and Who's Who, and Mel Baker, drum major of the Band of the Hour and also a member of Iron Arrow. PLEASING HARMONY arises from singing Sigma Chis, an entry in the Songtest competition sponsored by Phi Mu Alpha. SIGMA ALPHA IOTA: Front row: Claire Friedman, Pamela Harris, Roberta Weiner, Anne McGarry, Barbara Sikora, Ann Turner, Second row: Wilma Zapora, Annette Ratner, Goldy Naftulin, Rebecca Munn, Carol Evans, Joan Laird, Ronnie Risdon, Osarka Brummef. Third row: Gail Davis, Vivian H-irshhorn, Rachel Mazursky, Johanna Meier, Lois Friedland, Marilyn MacFarIand, Barbara Seay. Sigma Alpha Iota BOASTING of being the hrst Greek-letter organi- zation on campus, Sigma Alpha Iota admits into its selective circle only those girls who are outstanding in musical talent and have music as their major or minor. Members must ,maintain a 2.0 average in music sub- jects and a 1.0 over-all average. The national music sorority was founded at the University of Michigan in 1903 while the local chapter was installed in 1926. Its motto then became: "Life is short but music endures forever." Participation in both the Christmas concert and the All-American concert keep the music students on a busy schedule. The group's purpose is to further the development of interesting music. Leading the group were Roberta Weiner, presidentg Ann McGarry, recording secretaryg JoAnn Schindler, corresponding secretary, Barbara Sikora, treasurer, Ann Tuner, chaplain. Mrs. Frances Havey Bergh, professor of music education and music literature, was adviser. OFFICERS: Claire Frieclman, Roberia Weiner, president, Joanne Schindler, Ann Turner, Barbara Silcora, Anne McGarry. 260 4 RESERVE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION: Front row: Joe Freal, Charles Spaide, Tom Snyder, Alan Millen, Samuel Smith, Shelley Hiftleman, Bruce Dicksen, James Good, Maior McDevitt. Second row: Lester Cohen, Jack Mascola, Earl Burrows, George Crespo, Larry Fischer, Bob Farrel, Jacques Andre, Walter Donovan, Jack Kesser. Third row: Lloyd Collins, Dan Kamis, AI Greenberg, Harry Lewis, Andrew Peftis, Mann Davis, Sam Adams, Norman Lasko. R. ARMY ROTC CADETS are all eligible for mem- bership in the Reserve Officers Association, which was organized on campus in 1954. Wlith an eye toward developing leadership, citizen- ship and comradeship, R.O.A. took part in Homecom- ing Week. Also they worked hard to promote the campus Food and Clothing Drive. The organization participated in the campus blood drive and sponsored a ROTC scholarship fund for a deserving cadet. Members of R.O.A. didn't spend all their time at O. A. serious activities, however, as a picnic and a smoker proved to be the high points of the year's social events. UM's group, the Junior Chapter of the Corl Gables R.O.A., was lead by Sam Smith, this year's president. Al Millen served as vice president, while Major james C. McDevitt was adviser. R.O.A. is sponsored by the Army R.O.T.C. and has more than 1,000 chapters throughout the world. Other objectives of this defense-minded group include safe- guarding liberty, insuring domestic tranquility and providing national security. . whim' ' f . GETTING INTO FUTURISTIC HOMECOMING SPIRIT, ROA MEMBER ADDS OWN PERSONALITY TO AROTC FLOAT, A MISSILE, FOR BIG PARADE. 261 ALPHA DELTA SIGMA: Front row: James Richards, Bob Poller, Arthur Jacobson, Norman Young, Allen Altman. Second row: Peter Colo, Hank Didier, Jim Moskos, Allen Schecter. Alpha Delta Sigma FURNISHING the marketing students with vital professional information from some of the most suc- cessful men in advertising was a special service of Alpha Delta Sigma this year, which presented its eleventh annual Advertising Forum. The establishment of an advertising library and tours through newspapers, radio and television stations and advertising agencies were main activities of ADS. One of 46 national chapters, the UM group claims its biggest job is "bridging the gap between advertising theory and experience." Arthur Jacobson was presidentg Norman Young, vice president, Fred Porter, secretary, and Bob Poller, treas- urer. james F. Richards was the adviser. Gamma Alpha Chi MADISON AVENUE LADIES are not so rare these days, and there's a good chance that many members of Gamma Alpha Chi, national advertising sorority, will some day be donning gray flannel chemises and sprout- ing forth with some clever jingles of their own. In the meantime, though, they're keeping busy just majoring in advertising or related fields. Presenting a fall fashion show and initiating a news letter, "Psi News," kept the girls busy this year in addition to the spelling contest they sponsored during the fall. Frances Sherman was president for 1957-58, being assisted by Joan Ingoldby, vice president, Carol Mack- enberg, corresponding secretaryg Ann Clark, recording secretaryg and Roz Rocco, treasurer. 262 GAMMA ALPHA CHI: Front row: Marian Feif, Roz Rocco, Frances Shermon, Joan Ingoldby, Ann Clark. Second row: Donna Argo, Sondra Chorney, Lindo Phillips, Lynn Towle, Petey George. ILLUMINATING ENGINEERING SOCIETY: Front row: Robert Sorensen, Lawrence Dorfeld, Buzz Chcyce. Second row: Alan Plunkett, Ivan Graubert, Charles Wendi, James Shively. I. E. S. LIGHT BULBS have been used many years by car- toonists to symbolize thought, but to members of the Illuminating Engineering Society the light bulb and its electrical offshoots represent a way of life in the modern mechanistic world of today. Composed of electrical-engineering students, the or- ganization experiments with new practices being intro- duced into electrical engineering. Such study takes place at an illuminating laboratory at North Campus. Founded nationally in 1906, the I.E.S. did not be- come active on the UM campus until 1952, and has since played a leading role in campus activity. Heading the organization this year was Robert Soren- sen, president, assisted by Lawrence Dorfeld, secretary. Kappa Alpha Mu LENSES, FILM AND FLASHBULBS are standard pieces of equipment for members of Kappa Alpha Mu, a photojournalism honorary. Members increase their knowledge of photojournalism by snapping pictures for campus publications. Those persons in the community who are not St'L1- dents, but who show outstanding work in photography, are awarded professional or honorary membership. Upon graduation, KAM student members are eligible to become professional members of the National Press Photographers Association. The local Pi chapter was headed by President Alan Rusnak, vice president, Fred Porter, secretary, Jacque Warren, and treasurer, Mal Ferrell. l KAPPA ALPHA MU: Fronf row: lewis Fineman, Mallory Ferrell, Alan Rus- nak, Jacque Warren, Fred Porter. Second row: Buddy Weissel, Arthur Cohen, Marshall Shapo, Alan Snyder. - - l Q., gl MANAGEMENT SOCIETY: Front raw: Charles Thompson, Daniel Borowsky, Albert Brosius, Harald Bulger, Paul Hackett. Second row: Martin Berkman, James Walton, James Byrd, John Wersebe, John Kennedy, William Bingham, Benjamin Taylor. Third row: Joseph Cal-anadra, Julio Bula, Dwight Smith, Richard Mc- Vicker, Karl Coleman, Alfred Simon, Robert Barclay. Fourth row: Donald Owens, Robert McKeta, Robert Rahe, Robert Hendershot, Richard Burke, William Delong, Francis Gritzer. Management Society THROUGH RESEARCH, discussion, publications and guest speakers, the Society for the Advancement of Management familiarizes students with current business and industrial problems. It also aims to increase gen- eral interest in all phases of management. Open to students majoring in management and in- dustrial engineering, the group requires a 1.5 grade average for membership. juniors in other schools are eligible for membership if they are interested in man- agement or industry. The UM chapter, founded in 1954, was headed this year by Albert Brosius. Other officers were Harold Bulger, vice president, Daniel Borowsky, secretary, and Paul Hackett, treasurer. M. E. N. C. EVENTS OF THE YEAR sponsored by the Music Educators National Conference included a dinner held in honor of administrative officers of the Dade County Public Schools. Open to any student in the field of music education, M.E.N.C. works to create professional awareness by furthering knowledge of what is taking place in the field of music education. Founded on campus in 1949, UM chapter is one of 342 national units. Officers for 1957-58 were Dale Willoughby, presi- dent, Anton Brees, vice president, Claire Freidman, secretary, John P. Myers, treasurer, Dr. T. C. Collin, faculty sponsor. MUSHIC EDUCATORS NATIONAL CONFERENCE: Front row: Moe Turrentine, Jerry Pav, Stanley Garlitz, Claire Friedman, Anton Brees, Dale Willoughby, John Myers, T. Collin, Phillips Nichols, Carlos Cabrera. Second row: Sal Ronai, Wilma Zapora, Bunny Risdon, Maxine Kurtzman, Gayle Davis, Veronica McCormick, Lois Friedland, Barbara Sikora, Vivian Hirshhorn, Gol-dye Naftulin, Frances Weay. Third row: James Hunt, Budd Malchus, Albert Hall, Jr., John Bledsoe, William Saunders, Fred Streckfuss, Robert Parker, Don Zech, Jr., Gus Perry, Sam Macaluso, John Cosgrilt. 7 nail m 'ruxssffas nan Lai. V.X, MMM . ----Y '- ,. - -If J- Q mia ,gs PHI DELTA PI: Fronf row: Pat Jerguson, Joan Uiberall, Jane Olson, Russica Tighe, Grace Garfinkle. Second row: Marlene Riegler, Fran Kovich, Jo Ann Drew, Pat Wolfert, Sally McCarren, Phyllis Preiser, Barbara Whiteford. Phi Delta Pi SHOWING THAT women have their place in the World of sports, Phi Delta Pi, physical education pro- fessional for women, was organized at UM in 1952. Miami's Tau chapter is part of a national organiza- tion founded in 1916 at Normal College, Indianapolis. To provide a national affiliation for women in physical education is a chief function of PDPi. The group also assists the Women's Athletic Association. Physical education majors who are at least upper freshmen may become PDPis. Members must also have a 1.7 academic average. President for the second time was Maryann Zalewski. Other officers included Jane Olson, vice president, Russica Tighe, secretary, and jo Ann Drew, treasurer. Mrs. Catherine Sample acted as adviser to the group. Propeller Club FOREIGN TRADE and transportation are the main interests of members of the Propeller Club. Any stu- dents possessing these interests may join. The purpose of the club is to develop an apprecia- tion of the importance of the American Merchant Marine. The national club, founded on campus in 1947, was recently presented with a certificate of merit from the Propeller Club of the United States. Distinguished guest speakers are invited to the bi- monthly meetings. Also on the agenda is the Regional Propeller Club Conference in May. Officers for 1957-58 were Roger Pleasanton, presi- dent, Mike Brenan, vice president, David jones, secre- tary, and Robert Register, treasurer. Faculty assistance was given by john Dyer. PROPELLER CLUB: Front row: Mike Brenan, Louise Pleasanton, Roger Pleasanton, David Jones, Robert Register. Second row: Edward Fleming, Jr., Fred Sass, Edgar Casfrillo, James Riker, Victor Skalski, Bert Traeger, Carlos Alvarez. RADIO ENGINEERS: Front row: George Eicholtz, Lawrence Kessler, Jerry Brown, Alvin Foland, F. B. Lucas, Harold Holton, Robert Mersereau, Bert Forbis. Second row: Arthur Kanterman, Angelo Mandis, Ted Jenson, Fred Rudow, William Stalls, Oscar Segal, Leon Goldenblank, Harvey Stone, David Ricou. Third row: Attila Soltesz, Edwin Canter, Elliot Kramer, William Jones, John Self, John Sakella, Leonard Roque, Clifton Wrestler, Frank Dyce, Bruce May. Fourth row: George Boyles, James Day, Richard Borysiewicz, Roger Newcomb, William Crane, Herbert Abrams, Joseph Scherr, Robert Carr. Radio Engineers ACQUAINTING MEMBERS with professional as- pects of their field and further developing electronics are two of the aims of the Institute of Radio Engineers. This professional organization accepts only those students studying for a degree in engineering and carrying at least six Engineering credits. Radio Engineers has been numbered as one of UM's organizations since 1950. Members take part in numer- ous technical projects pertaining to radio and elec- tronics each year. Highlight of their social program was the traditional Engineers' Field Day. President was Al Foland, supported by Harold Hol- ton, vice president, Larry Kessler and Jerry Brown, secretariesg and Robert Mersereau, treasurer. Sigma Delta Chi A CAREER IN PUBLICATIONS is usually the ultimate goal of members of Sigma Delta Chi, pro- fessional journalistic fraternity. Upper sophomores with an overall 1.5 average who intend to enter the field of journalism are eligible. Sponsor of Tempo magazine, SDX also sponsors an annual press conference for high school journalists. Spring was highlighted by the Ribs and Roasts ban- quet, held with the local professional chapter. SDX also awards a UM scholarship annually to the outstanding male high school journalist in the Miami area. Fred Porter, president for 1957-58, was assisted by Al Snyder, vice president, Arthur Cohen, secretaryg and Roger Reece, treasurer. 266 SIGMA DELTA CHI: Front row: Bo-b Rudolf, Roger Reece, Fred Porter, Wilson Hicks. Second row: Arthur - Jacobson, Marshall Shapo. SOCIETY OF AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERS: Front row Harvey Rudich, Rinerio Cairo Basil M tt Ch l S' h I : , aro a, or es lmpson, 5 edon Olefzlcy, John Gill, Ronald Butter- worth, John Behanna, Nicholas Rouse. Second row: Walter Nissley, Frank Zaher, John Kalata, Ronald Munier, Carl Wrestler, Kenneth Human, George Tornell, Clifford Simpson, John Neilson. Third row: John Polyansky, Alfred Shroder, William Harding, Carl Pelterson, John Seherr, James Coquet, William Purdy, David Patterson. Fourth row: William Krug, Edward Hauser, Vernon Rigdon, George Erickson, Sheldon Kanzer, Ken Shipe, Bob Rosen, Robert Gilvie. S A E Th ' m h' . . . eta Sig a P I 'XWITH ALI. THE ATTENTION given to engineer- ing in this modern age, the Society of Automotive Engi- neers does not have a diicult time fulfilling its objec- tive in creating interest and furthering automotive en- gineering. Fairly new on campus, SAE was established at Miami in 1953. Putting on the Economy Run at South Campus and participating in the Engineers' Field Day were just two of the clubis major activities. SAEs also took part in the Homecoming festivities and in the annual Engineering Exposition on North Campus. Sheldon Oletzky was president with Basil Marotta vice presidentg Charles Simpson, secretaryg and Ronald Butterworth, treasurer. 7 UNITING WOMEN JOURNALISTS and confer- ring honor upon women who have distinguished them- selves in the field is the main purpose of Theta Sigma Phi, a professional journalism fraternity for women. Established at UM in 195 3, Theta Sig is composed of journalism majors who have outstanding publica- tion records and who intend to go into the field after graduation. All Theta Sigs have at least a B -average in journalism and a C overall average. The annual "Date With the Press" luncheon is held in conjunction with the Miami alumni group. Sharon Nelton headed the fraternity, while Jacque Warren was vice president. Susie Marbey was chapter adviser and Dt. Norman Buchan was faculty adviser. THETA SIGMA PHI: Front row: Susie Marbey, Nedra McNamara, Dr. Nor- man Buchan, Ann Spaulding. Second I row: Jacque Warren, Sharon Nelton. I lHHl OFFICERS: Front row: Wilkinson Wright, vice president: John Thompson, president: Herbert Benn, secretary. Second row: Hank Prominski, bailittg George Giourgas, treasurer: Richard Mills, secretary: Constantine Lantz, master of the ritual. Delta Theta Phi LAW STUDENTS of high moral worth, who excel in scholarship and leadership are eligible for member- ship in Delta Theta Phi fraternity. Founded nationally in 1913, the fraternity has 87 chapters. lt is the na- tion's largest legal organization. The local chapter, Cardozo Senate, was organized on campus in 1942. To promote high scholarship in the field of legal learning and to emphasize justice for fellow men are the aims of Delta Theta Phi. A big picnic for all the orphans of the Kendall Home is one of the projects sponsored by the group. On its social calendar are two main events, the Delta Theta Phi Founders' Banquet and the Delta Theta Phi Green and Wfhite Ball. Holding the gavel for 1957-58 was john Thompson, president. Wfilkinson Wright was Vice president, Her- bert Benn, secreraryg and Professor George Onoprienko was adviser. DELTA THETA PHI: Front row: Henry Prominski, Richard Mills, Wilkinson Wright, John Thompson, Herbert Benn, George Giourgas, Constantine Lantz. Second row: J. Fribourg, Louis Lesperance, John Fassett, William Seidel, Holmes Troutmon, Robert Griffen, Philip Ludovici, Jim Jeffers. Third row: Joe Roehl, Jolhn Howard, George Hero, Tom Gilman, Howard Duke, John Corrigan Jr., John Dreiling, Dave Kennedy, Walter Lehmann. fmt 1.1. Q-mswa zem l, Vt- 'ww PHI ALPHA DELTA: Front row: Thomas A. Thomas, Harold Knecht, Sid Goldman, Alax Paskay, Jay Cristol, Ronn Johnson, Joe Tomassi, Pat Ponca, John Gate, Second row: Owen Freed, Max Sprigelman, Louis Hatten, Larry Kuvin, Gasper Aldrich, Eugrene Short, William Moore IV, Emmett Moran, Dowd Solovey, HGl'0ld Phi Alpha Delta Spencer, David Price. MEMBERSHIP in Phi Alpha Delta legal fraternity is one of the highest honors achieved by any student in Law School. Eligibility requires a student must have at least a C average and be enrolled in a law school accredited by the American Bar Association. Prospective members may then be voted in by secret ballot by active members. The Richmond A. Rasco chapter, organized in 1946, has a two-fold service and social calendar, featuring such events as semi-annual pledges' luncheons and fall and spring banquets honoring graduating seniors and CAN'T BE A LAW STUDENT without law books. PAD's know this and capitalize by running the law school book exchange other outstanding members. A freshman orientation program is set up to help acquaint new students with their surroundings. Another project is the PAD book- store, from which all profits are devoted to needy students in law school. President for 1957-58 was Harold C. Knechtg vice president, Sidney Goldman, secretary, Joseph Tomassig and treasurer, A. Jay Cristol. Prominent national alumni include ex-President Harry S. Truman, the late Vice President Alben Barkley and ex-Florida Senator Claude Pepper. PHI ALPHA DELTA members listen attentively to ex-senator Claude Pepper give an address at their initiation breakfast. TAU EPSILON RHO: Fronf row: Howard Osterman, Howard Reiss, Donald Farber, Harvey Reiseman, Ro-bert Friedman, Eugene Alberis, Alden Druclter. Second row: Edgar Lewis, Norman Milclwoff, Kenneth Wollis, Gerald Mager, Harold Mornison, Lawrence Friedman, Harvey Robbins, Ronald Magnes. Third row: Marhn Budnick, Edward Gross, Richard Dalton, Joseph Padawer, Robert Loewenthal, Donald Zondell, Sidney Syna, Richard Gordon. Tau Epsilon Rho TRUTH, ETHICS and righteousness must reign in the legal profession. To carry out these ideals is the main purpose of Tau Epsilon Rho, Law School fraternity. Organized on campus in 1950, the fraternity holds a formal initiation dinner, a stag party and a dinner- dance for a full year of social events. Membership requirements include an undergraduate degree and at least a 1.2 average in the Law School. Among its more serious activities is the selecting of representatives to send to the National Fraternity Moot Court. Such representatives are selected through local participation in debate activities. Freshman who excel in Moot Court competition are eligible for the Brown Memorial Award. Law School intramural teams, legal speakers and bar clinics are other activities of the school, which are sponsored by TERho. Harvey Reiseman was president for 1957-58, Robert Friedman, vice president, Eugene Alberts, recording secretary, Howard Reiss, treasurer. Professor Edward Walterman was the adviser. MOOT COURT COMPETITION ON THE NATIONAL LEVEL IS DISCUSSED BY HARVEY REISEMAN, DELEGATE HOWARD OSTERMAN AND ROBERT FRIEDMAN 270 BAR AND GAVEL: Fronf row: Jim Flannery, John Corrigan, Jack Howard, Herb Benn, Norman Drucker, Dick Dalton, John Fasseh. Second row: Jay Fribourg, Arbie Axelrod, Irwin Kishner, Jack Thompson, Hank Prominski, Gerald Capps, Larry Friedman, David Kennedy. Third row: Ken Wollis, Louis Lesperance, Philip Ludivich, Joe Padawer, Constantine Lanfz, Don Faber, Dick Gordon, Ben Turner. Bar and Gavel LEGAL ACTION takes place at the Mock Trial, sponsored by the Bar and Gavel legal society, a law school group that was reorganized in 1953. Complete with defendants, witnesses, jury and attorneys, the trial presentation is held each spring. Awards are presented to the outstanding attorneys who take part. Tours of the local courthouse for law students were also included in the society's activities. Local judges, attorneys and public officials were in- vited to speak at the regular meetings. Service to the university, to the community, to the law school and to students is the purpose of the Bar and Gavel. This legal society coordinates scholastic and social achievements of the students. John Howard held the gavel as president for 1957- 58, assisted by Herbert Benn, vice president, joan Odell, secretary, and Norman Drucker, treasurer. Kappa Beta Pi COMPETING WITH THE MEN a little, woman law students have their own international legal soror- ity, Kappa Beta Pi. Entrance into the organization re- quires that a woman possess character, personality and integrity. The student must also have completed 11 credits with an average of C or better in law school. The main project of the sorority is the awarding of an annual book scholarship to the woman law student with the highest academic average. The view that law is only a man's profession is dis- proved by these ambitious women, who follow the mot- to of "there is a woman at the head of all great' things." One of 45 chapters, KBPi was founded in 1908 and was led in 1957-58 on campus by Mary Ann Mac- Kenzie, dean, Adele Weaver, associate dean, Arlene Hilliard, corresponding registrar, Roberta McHenry, recording registrar, Dorthea Bermorel, chancellor. KAPPA BETA PI: Fronf row: Julia Markus, Delores Pecor, Angela Weir, Evelyn Gobbie, Justice Charles Carroll, Cassandra Ryland, Pauline Hilliard, Adele Weaver, Harriet French. Second row: Irene Redstone, Roberto McHenry Helen Hope, Josephine Dolan, Mary Ann MacKenzie, 'Lucille Coughlm, Clara Bash. lUHS ADVISERS: Front row: Lewis Cohen, Anton Brees, David Bonner, Hayden Grieve, Gordon Gilson, John Kiriakis. Second row: Ronald Hollod, John Stormont, Matthew Allen, Sidney Greenstein, Budd Molchus, Dennis Dice, Jacob Kocis. Third row: Bernard Waltzer, Alan Bekkenhuis, Allan Altman, James Maloney, James Nissel, Alfred Griffiths. ASSOCIATE ADVISERS AND REPRESENTATIVES: Front row: Rudolph Chodubski, Nick Santzuiches, Bill Keegan, Dave Hogg, David Jones, Glenn Walter. Second row: John Shmerykowsky, Bob Patoni, Jay Hess, Tom Nelson, Ken McNamara, Quinto Tovigo. Third row: Stuart Fabric, Gerry Zinnock, Herbert Stein- berg, Tony Sabino, Matthew Rice. 272 OFFICERS: Froni row: An'ron Brees, Hayden Grieve, presi- denf, David Bonner, John Kirialtis. Second row: Gordon Gilson. NOISE GALORE! Making fhemselves heard in 'Ihe cheering section are fhe San Sab residents al' The weekly pep rally. Men's Residence Halls Association ALTHOUGH THE NAME has been changed, the purpose continues. The Association's prime aim since its founding in 1950 is to foster a spirit of fellowship and unity among the residents of the dormitories. This spirit is nowhere more alive than among the men resi- dents of San Sabastian Hall, located at North Campus. These ambitious students have demonstrated repeatedly their school spirit as a strong unit at many school func- tions and activities. Through participation in MRHA, residence problems are discussed and standards and regulations for the dormitory area are established. Each semester MRHA presents the Thomas N. John- son Memorial Award to the outstanding intramural player from the dormitories. The highlight of the year is the annual Dorm Dance, co-sponsored with the As- sociated Women Students organization. Every spring MRHA sponsors a political forum where the students meet candidates running for SBG oflices. Presiding at meetings during the year was Hayden Grieve, president, Gordon Gilson, vice president, john Kiriakis, recording secretary, Anton Brees, correspond- ing secretary, and David Bonner, treasurer. Arch Duns- more was the adviser. AN OVERSIZED FOOTBALL PLAYER, BUILT BY THE RESIDENT MEN, WELCOMES THE ALUMNI TO THE FESTIVITIES OF THE HOMECOMING WEEK L'APACHE: Front row: Dean Jackson, Charlie Cabell, Herb Rauch, John Weir, Dwight Smith, Tom Granning, Harvey Kupferberg, John Hood, Pete Cergizan. Second row: Nelson Newhauser, Robert Siegel, Warren Williams, Robert Kauth, Harvey Siegelboum, Fred Ullman, Len Bernard, Wayne Dahmer, Vic Wortmann. OFFICERS: Left to right: John M. Weir lSigma Chij, Dwight Smith lSigma Nui, Tom Graning lKappa Sigl. L'Apache PARTY, PARTY, PARTY are the three words that are the symbol of the party-loving members of L'Apache. The main requirement is that its brothers be in good standing with its member fraternities. The object of the organization is to bring together the member fraternities to stimulate inter-fraternal re- lations and provide a means for combined social events. Highlighting the year of social events was the Bacchus of the gods was present in overabundant quantity. Second on the list is the Apache party with all in the dress of the Left Bank of Paris. Official flower of the organization, first made known by the 1954 Ibif, is the four roses. Known chiefly for its parties, L'Apache has also been active in donating time and energy to worthwhile causesg the Tubercular Society of Miami has recently been its major job. Ofhcers this year were Dwight Smith, president, Tom Granning, vice presidentg and John Weir, secretary- treasurer. l.'APACiHE MEMBERS AND DATES FIND IT'S A LOT OF FUN TO ASSUME THE AIRS OF A BACK-STREET FRENCHMAN, ESPECIALLY DRESSING HABITS wi-vammxsamwnnwz -X 1a n samwzwmm,sa.aaamaww .,,m,., attwaaa aaa PEP CLUB: Front row: Edie Boren, Gordon Gilson, Bob Fields, Helen Dyer, Jack Dick, Ernie Swift, Margaret Lamont. Second row: Nancy Stein, William Cohen, Fritz Fischer, Malcolm Ellis, Robert Messer, Dennis Nace, Judy Edelson. Pep Club YEA . . . RAH . . . TEAM. With orange, green and white banners waving on high, the Pep Club led the frosh spirit section and the many pep rallies that helped raise the spirit of the school to an all time high. Made up of fraternity, sorority and independent members, the club was originated in 1950 to assist the cheerleaders in getting the students out to help the varsity athletic squads on to victory. Greeting frosh plane and train arrivals at the start of each school year, talent shows, and spirit points are just a few of the jobs of these hard working students. SELDOM-USED BOXING RING furnishes stage for cheer- leaders, who work to build student spirit before a big game- Assisting the Student Body Government in Orienta- tion Week is one' of the major jobs of this group. The UM Pep Club participates in the Southern Col- legiate Pep Conference which is held annually to dis- cuss similar "student apathy" problems. Another of the major jobs of the Pep Club is the often thankless job of assigning seats in the Orange Bowl and maintaining the student section. President of the group was Bob Fields, assisted by vice president, Charles Maxwell, secretary, Eleanor Lutz, and treasurer, Ernie Swift. ROUSING WELCOME for 'Fall crop ot freshmen is given by cheerleaders and un-unitormed band members at airport. TALENTED SKI CLUBBERS do fancy curves and swerves at special exhibition sponsored during Homecoming Week. - . . lg., f 2 .gg,sai, TV ' If viii? . 'M .Aw 3 Qgir t a ., . ffifliialf s ' i s ' li, ww 5+ YN5-Q-',,gg-H" , " M 4 ' - wwe-rw "tt,,ms-f-- 1- -J-.,--masse--eff Q B eg ar X, 3 r , M... -,af , A gg it .,.- M H- -. ,iowa-1 wa . ,.':e5s:.,,.:f ' - ' j 3,27 Qi,-,tirfqwif E ra., ,4 'www rf' ,e ' '.',':k:s :.g.. .,,. - .-2,1-'::5::,:s., wgggm ,,Vwf7V.e.,wz Q, ,-.az-,ff 3. 2 X15 - ,.w'gzt. .--,tan hw y' . H :- - H Q . 'it flea-"5 0 anis' i it ' .X-.4 -V-9, I.- -,wa wp ,ss -fa' ,QW-w, . tae.-'N f 3 -. V, .V,i3,Awmx,L , ,V ,,g, V, 3 ., K .g,,.wikfAigg?,,M,V 463.63giiZ,3W3,5g?,,,,,,4gm,,r A ,i fr . f f f -..,. . -f .. :.ef.. -f: L ' iam-,aw?H2a:. ,i , -V 't STUDENT UNION LAKE is scene of cIub's water ski prac- tices and shows, containing a multitude of tricks like this. Ski Club SHE-SKIERS AND HE-SKIERS-all members of the 8-year-old UM Ski Club-work hard at having a good time in their efforts to gain converts for their healthful recreation. And in spite of well-spread rumors, no academic credits are awarded members for their strenuous activities. The only requirement for member- ship is a genuine interest in the sport of water skiing. One big Ski Club event comes each spring when members appear at Gulfstream Park. Slipping into their Water skis, they daily race around the lake surrounded by the track and provide between-race entertainment. jumping, using one foot, and backward skiing are all seemingly difficult tasks that appear to be easy when executed by one of the graceful members. These fun-in-the-sun young men and women are not always "all wet," however. Once a year they gather for a dance in one of Miami's hotel ballrooms. President of the local group, part of the National Water Ski Association, was David Warren. Vice presi- dent was Fred Passonno, while Margie Baker served as secretary and Bill Poticha as treasurer. SKI CLUB: Front row: Bob Berger, Suzie Veach, Bernard Hertzfield, Dahl-ia Cohen, Dell Siddall, Marge Baker, Dave Warren, Bill Poticha, Daryl Seltzer, John Chizek, Kay McGinnis, Fred Passonno. Second row: Joyce Bernstein, Pot Lynch, Linda Rouge, Joan Girhardt, Joan Roden, Elaine Kuhny, Peggy Warner, Pat O'Day, Sue Russell, Olga Semaschuk, Gayle Valdyke, Sue Hill, Barbara Evans, Jo Ann Stragg, Maureen Shapiro. Third row: Bill Beach, Bob Kuperberg, Rob- ert Gryzich, Leo Bentz, Ray Siegle, Skip C-haves, Ed Bridgeford, Al Smilgus, Jerry Morton, Ron Kuhny, Bill Bigsby. Fourth row: John Harrison, Frank Hedges, Robert Harrington, Gene McKay, Rod Millen, Chuck Gutke, Doug Cohoee, Ken Schy, John Relish, Al Bernstein, Dale lePlant. nnnezaswf, -mmatwma-vepwawsi, fm .m re . --li.-av eff:--- slag-'Mn'-ua:-K we--2--fe f N1 - 'ill' di ,T the STUDENT NURSES ASSOCIATION: Front row: Marcia Carpenter, Bonnie Ferdinand, Jeanette Petry, Mrs. Hague, Leda Moe Staysa, Anne Marie Bouse. Second row: Jackie Howard, Shirley Bowman, Ruth Ann Ross, Sonia Lochner, Sandra Sadacca, Rita Marker. Third raw: Carole Merryman, Marilyn Ferwerda, Art Bot- nick, Sally Brctndes, Barbara Rabinowitz. Fourth row: Lynne Fitzpatrick, Juanita McCure, Kay Sunday, Sandra Brown. Student Nurses BABIES, ULCERS, SCAPELS and stitches all are of interest to the Student Nurses Association. This young organization founded locally in 1954 has varied interests and activities. Guest speakers are invited by these future Florence Nightingales to speak on all topics of interest. This group also carries on many service projects. At Christmas time it gave a party for the children of St. Albans Day Nursery. At the capping ceremony in the Fall this group as- sisted the Nursing Department by ushering, assisting in the ceremony and by serving at the reception afterward. The purpose of this organization is to unite future nurses and prepare them for their life's work. Any student majoring in Nursing is eligible for membership in this organization, provided the student is approved by the state board. CAPPINC-3 IS SERIOUS THING tor nursing students, whose candles supply light in darkened Beaumont Hall ceremony. OFFICERS FOR I958: Lett to right: Leda Mae Staysa, secretary: Jeanette Petry, president: Anne Marie Bouse, vice president: and Bonnie Ferdinand, treasurer. 277 .L L...nn.. 4 'Q '. g .i , l A.C.E.I.: Fronf row: Alma David, Norma Collins, Alma Kerben, Deena Kleiner, Joan Rosenthal, Elinor Sonfag. Second row: Dellie Gellert, Ronni Flax, Phyllis Katz, Helene Rosner, Barbara Stern, Yetfa Goldman, Charlene Cohen, Richard Dickman. Third row: Barbara Warner, Leanore Gaglianello, Estelle Zemmel, Marzi Weiss, Evelyn Goldstein, Joy Connell, Barbara Lehrman, Linda Grussmark. Fourth row: Lorraine Caminiti, Eleanore Pafo, Aniia Speisman, Barbara Wolfson, Susan Dunkel, Sandra Scholnick, Daisy Tibor, Charlohe Dean. A. C. E. I. "THAT ALL CHILDREN MAY LEARN" was the theme of a panel discussion on special education held this year by the Association of Childhood Education, International. Teachers in the field of gifted and re- tarded children served on the panel. ACEI gave a Thanksgiving party at the Kendall Children's Home with entertainment provided by the members. At Christmas they invited children from the Lejeune Home to dinner in the University cafeteria. Officers for 1957-58 were Deena Kleiner, president, .Ioan Rosenthal, vice president, Norma Collins, secre- tary, and Alma Kerben, treasurer. Faculty adviser was Dr. Alma David. ALFA INTERESTED in furthering good will among for- eign peoples are the women of Association Femina Latino Americana. Eleanor Roosevelt is an honorary member of this Pan-Am organization. Organized on campus November 3, 1954, ALFA celebrated its third anniversary this year with events that included a Pan-American exhibition, teas for for- eign students and a Mother-Daughter banquet. Capping the year's activities was a formal May Dance. President of ALFA was Adrienne Pintavalle. She was assisted by Ellen Weaver, vice presidentg Vanoni Bastos, secretary, and Omnis Bastos, treasurer. Sponsor was Dr. Gloria de la Vega. ALFA: Fronf row: Carmen Miranda Annis Basfors, Adrienne Pinfuvalle Ellen Weaver, Vanoni Bustos. Sec ple, Kay Crump, Sandy Shubin. I I ond row: Mary Gili, Grace Whip- ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS: Froni row: Joan Uiberall, Alston Fuirelle, Nancy Haslett, Elizabeth Kovochevich, Beverly Filip, Deena Kleiner, Roberta Goll- lieb. Second row: Rita Benomy, Natalie Wagner, Arlene Cohen, Rosalind Rocco, Ruth Ellen Walker, Mary Russell. Third row: Roberta Gottlieb, Joyce Forfgang, Evelyn Echols, Kay Biggs, Phyllis Engel, Susie Karp. Associated Women BOYS INVADE girls dormitories legally! Once every two weeks the Associated Women Students sponsors open house in the residence area. Also on the agenda are orientation programs for freshmen and transfer women, Spring Frolic and Christmas Carnival Dance. ll'70men'r World, a dormitory newspaper, was an inno- vation this year. Each year the AWS chooses the Woman of the Year, the outstanding graduating senior woman. Heading the organization for 1957-58 were Nancy Haslett, presidentg Elizabeth Kovachevich, vice presi- dentg Jo Anne Miller, Auston Futrelle, secretariesg and Beverly Filip, treasurer. Cavalettes A TAHITI BEACH PARTY takes the lead on the social calendar of the party-planning Cavalettes. Other outstanding events were the Christmas formal dinner- dance and the semi-formal initiation parties. Beta, the local chapter, was organized on the UM campus in 1948, only one year after Cavalettes was founded nationally at Gainesville. Members must have at least a 1.0 average and wish to promote better relationships between sorority and independent women, the aims of the organization. Heading the all-female social organization were Faye Montello, presidentg Cecelia Painter, vice presidentg Roslyn johnson, secretaryg and Helene Pares, treasurer. CAVALETTES: Fronf row: Roslyn Johnson, Cecelia Painter, Faye Mon- W lello, Mary Goodman, Nancyanne Richardson. Second row: Joan Slap- les, Phyllis Sfroup, Connie Poulos Colette Stephan, Margot Cabana. CAVALIERS: Front row: Robert Nalette, John Courtright, Merwin Disch, Ronald Mankowski, James Hughes, Robert Dykes. Second row: Yale Mask, Alan Gold- farb, Larry Schmidt, Dave Derrick, Bob Schalfner, Frank Santoriello, Andy Bobal. Third row: Ben Hidge, Pat Zervas, Bruce Barnes, Russ Choyce, Bernard Schettino, Leonard Laudisio. Fourth row: Ronald Bischoff, Johnny Thompson, Thomas Pluso, Sheldon Eisenman, Robert Anderson, Reimer Nielsen, John Connelly. Cavaliers FUN IS THE BY-WORD for Cavaliers, a party- loving organization. This society was organized on cam- pus in 1948 and boasts twelve national chapters. The Cavalier Carnation formal in May is the more conservative of the two main social functions of the year. It balances the "Mad Desire" party which tends to bring our the hidden talents of the group. Purpose of the Cavaliers is to promote friendship be- tween fraternity and independent students on campus. President this year was Donald Mankowski, presi- dent, james Hughes, vice president, Robert Dykes, treasurerg Merwin Disch, secretary. Chemistry Club A STUDENT AFFILIATE of the American Chem- ical Society, the Chemistry Club unites those students interested in chemistry and its related fields. This organization was established at the University in 1948. Its only requirement for membership is inter- est in some phase of chemistry. Group activity outside the chem lab included an annual picnic. Leading the group in 1957-58 was jack White, president. Herbert Siegel was vice president and Martin Siegel was secretary-treasurer. Dr. Alfred Mills is the club's faculty adviser. CHEMISTRY CLUB: Front row: Dr. Alfred Mills, Martin Siegle, Jack White, Herbert Siegel, Morton Brisker, William McCartin, Second row: Robert Davis, Anne Meyer, Margo Abramson, Gloria Cashan, Elaine Beatty, Michela Gunn, William Rosenblum. Third row: John Morgan, John Brantley, Joseph Stauffer, Wallace Williams, Alfred last. . f... .t ........t...,. W 4 - - f W 1 f W NfVe mmm . Y. amiwfemwrsmmwwaafs.-.MMWMMMW. M ni.rss1,ueae.w ,aM...,f W 1 s DRAMA GUILD: Front row: Dave Kearne, Jim Shea, Bernie Rosenblatf, Jerry Stanley, Robert Schwartz, Dave Enke. Second row: Judy Pass, Sue Walker, Mar- garet Lamont,'Joan DuBarry, Alvin Baird, Nancy Jarecz, Anne Shofner, Anita Hammond. Third row: Lesley Waugh, Dee Dee Winner, Mary Uhlmann, Barbara Kubick, Judie McCarna, Linda Kaye, Janet Eilender. Fourth row: Ray Alberts, Burton Parker, Arnold Popofsky, Jerry Kisker, Bob Jensen, Charles Frankie, Victor Helou. Drama Guild BORN AT UM IN 1955, the Drama Guild finds a double purpose in aiding the drama department and creating greater enthusiasm for the theater "Get in the Ring," an Orientation program presented to acquaint new students with the Ring Theater, is one of the main projects. The Guild also sponsors the Patsy Ann Clark scholarship, named after last year's president, to the summer drama workshop at Burnsville, North Carolina Bernie Rosenblatt was head thespian. Other officers were Jerry Stanley, vice presidentg Jim Shea and Rob ert Schwartz, secretariesg and David Enke, treasurer French Club IF THE UM displays a cosmopolitan atmosphere, the reason may be the French Club, which specializes in introducing French culture and thought to the campus A multitude of activities included a Christmas party, presentation of a French film series and sponsorship of the Black and White Ball The clubs treasury didnt mount from all this business since most of the proceeds went to Le Refuge des Petits, a French orphanage Henry Edgar might be considered the group s peren mal president This was his third year in ollice Daisy Tibor was vice president, Ilene Davis and Rona Marcus, secretaries, and Hilda Lokau, treasurer FRENCH CLUB: Front row: Helen Ladenheim, Rod Millen, Ilene Davis, Henry Edgar, Rona Marcus, Daisy Tibor, Hilda Lokau, Warren Anderson. Second row Enid Polan, Phyllis Stroup, Norma Smith, Bob Rascati, Parker Hodgman, Daniel Fitzgerald, Ray Siegle, Ralph Sylvia, Margot Kabana, Roneen Raleigh, Ronnl Flax - s ' v . - 1 u . ,, . . . . . . .4 A v 41' - , saw-we tr-,-a:::+.':.::: v:-:- -'--- ,f . 1.1 .v,. 1 c '. 1, .,.. , ' - ., GERMAN CLUB: Front row: Albert Ivanoff, Joanna Knoche, Anita Osen, Alex Pellini, Henry Edgar, Donald Traut, Melanie Rosborough, Robert Whitehouse. Second row: Arthur Adelmann, Anne Wrestler, Irma Stewart, Chrvistal Morgenroth, Carol Evans, Johanna Meier, Jean Timberg, Stuart Fabric. Third row: Rigo- berto Martinez, Robert Bryant, Albert Kessler, Richard Lichauco, John Brantley, Robert Selby, Richard Kaper. German Club BOTH THE GERMAN CLUB and Delta Phi Alpha are interested in promoting the language, culture and literature of the German people. The oldest language group on campus, founded in 1928, welcomes any student interested in German. This year the club presented a German Hlm series in Beau- mont Lecture Hall. The big event of Delta Phi Alpha is the annual tap- ping. Only those students are tapped who have a B average in five German courses. Officers of the German Club included president Alex Pellinig vice president, Tony Finocchiog and secretary, Anita Oser. Delta Phi Alpha members were led by Henry Edgar, president, Donald Traut, vice presidentg Anita Oser, secretaryg and Jack Katzker, treasurer. Iota Tau Alpha INTEREST in preserving Italian culture and a 1.0 average are the requirements needed to join Iota Tau Alpha. Members combine efforts to promote better relations between Italian and United States citizens. Their motto, "Always Worldwide Brotherhood," signifies that aim. They are also interested in acquainting the student body with the Italian way of life in order to increase their understanding of foreign peoples. Organized in 1955, ITA participates in the annual Homecoming parade. Language Week program is an- other activity in which they are very interested. Italian films and lecturers on the culture are all part of the program. Selected to lead the club were Oranzio Cartisano, president, Rosemarie Forno, secretaryg Lee Gaglianello, treasurer, and Anna Ceci Knabb, adviser. IOTA TAU ALPHA: Front row: Fran- ces Pillitteri, Francene Napoli, Ora- zio Cartisano, Rosemarie Forno, Lee Gaglianello, Jimmy Knabib, Anna Ceci Knafbb. Second row: Sal Vecchione, Charlotte Povia, Linda Phillips, Edison Marshall, Diane Ac- 282 colla, Rene Nussbaum, Ruth Kritzik. JUNIOR COUNSELORS: Front row: Joan Uiberall, Rosalind Rocco, Rita Marker, Marilyn Ferwerda, Roberto Gottlieb, Arlene Cohen. Second row: Sue Walter, Sandi Schuster, Barbara Zenkel, Barbara Stern, Mary Kay Miller, Bonnie Ferdinand, Judie Reich, Roslyn Miller. Third row: Carol Diamond, Eve Espinoso, Gold-ie Diamond, Toby Lieber, Cecile Grimes, Judy Mathias, Carole Merryman, Sharon Walters. Junior Counselors HELPING NEW WOMEN STUDENTS adjust to college life, as well as explaining and enforcing dormi- tory regulations, are the jobs of the junior Counselors. Constantly in contact with the resident women, the counselors provide a "listening ear" for any student needing to talk over a special problem. Along with their counseling, these girls help with Orientation Week. In a combined eifort with the Asso- ciated Women Students, the junior Counselors hold open house for new students. In another combined ef- fort, this time with the Men's Residence Halls Asso- ciation, they sponsor a dance. Junior Counselor co-ordinators also serve on the AWS council. Supervisor of the group this year was Rita Marker. Only upperclass women with at least a C average may become Junior Counselors. Pem Club MANY XVOMEN physical education majors and minors take part in the activities of the Pem Club. The organizations primary aim is to promote interest in athletics as recreation and in general physical educa- tion. Good sportsmanship is urged in all activities. One of the group's biggest projects is the assisting and coaching of women's intramurals. The girls also sponsor the Dade County high school Playday and par- ticipate in the Florida State Sports Day. Every spring they give a banquet in honor of graduating physical education students. President for the 1957-58 term was Barbara White- ford. Other officers included Marlene Riegler and Rus- sica Tighe, vice presidents, Frances Kovich, secretary, and Pat Jerguson, treasurer. Mrs. Catherine Sample served as faculty adviser. PEM CLUB: Front row: Fran Kovich, Marlene Riegler, Pat Jerguson, Barbara Whiteford, Russica Tighe, Jane Olson. Second row: Pat Wolfert, Roberta Sands, Rosalie Killian, Joan Uiberoll, Gale Ganary, Marilyn Marku, Marilyn Reinheimer. Third row: Elsie Guidofii, Sally McCarren, Phyllis Preiser, Grace Garfinkle, Jo Ann Drew, Joan Roden, Joan Anderson. 4 .if 'J .fZ,-QTY' 5 I wf ' 'E'gQwS5Q... N1 -li Radio-TV Guild RADIO AND TELEVISION, two of our chief means of communication, are of major interest to many students on this campus. Through lectures, social func- tions, and demonstrations, the Radio-TV Guild pro- motes an interest in the field of broadcasting, which is its main purpose. Regular enrollment in the UM is the only require- ment for membership in the Guild. Each year the Guild holds a banquet in cooperation with AERho, radio- television honorary, and Miami Council of Broadcasters. Ofiicers for this year were Bob Roberti, president, David Sperber, vice president, Howard Denn, secretary, and Don Podboy, treasurer. RADIO-TV GUILD: Front row: June Menahn, Donald Podboy, Robert Roberti, David Sperben, Andy Kuehn. Second row: William De- Sena, Lynne Hanken, 'Libby Buchi, Suzanne Hill, Judy rMayfa'iI', Pefef Hallinan. Third row: Allan Caruba, Joe Bolton, Pete Frehan, Joe Glover, Y Grant Coleman. Russian Club "YOLKA" is the Russian name given to the Christ- mas program held annually by the Russian club. This highlights a fascinating year filled with various events. Club activities include a series of Russian films of historical and cultural interest, exhibitions in the Rus- sian language laboratory and performances of music and art. Among the lectures that were given was one by Professor Fan Park who told of her travels in the U.S.S.R. during the summer of 1956. Officers for 1957-58 were Gordon Beane, president, Theodore Cary, vice president, Lydia Chippas, secre- tary, and Terry Ann Merriman, treasurer. Dr. and Mrs. Berthold C. Freidl were faculty advisors. RUSSIAN CLUB: Front row: Mrs. Evo Friedl, Dahlia Cohen, Lydia Chippas, Gordon Beane, Theodore Carey, Terry Merriman, Mary Ann Merrill, Henry Edgar Dr. Berthold Friedl. Second row: Charles Dietrich, Steve Slepin, Susan Kozic, Jackie Chapel, Jane Neustein, Irina Harrell, Diane Saunders, Yvonne Chippas, Martha Del Loveman, Nina Sokolofi, Gene Novogrodsky, L. Ledwell. Third row: James Loubriel, David Robinson, Stanley Tolkin, David Spenben, Tom Jarval, Rex Pyles, Allen Valero, Alan Bronner, Charles Blandeburgs, Jerry Scroggian, Earl Burrows. m,eaunusmamm waunummwmmmwm msmwmaamanxr -wwmnswwwmwmma -wlverawewtrsvwwa-www!-eeefanmiww me-wammm. mmm- a--- JM-rmmwm. X. M f.r,a - V M... . Wwmarrawe. . ...awww W- W,-,mi-----,Ei r SEA DEVILS: Front row: Kathleen McGuire, Larry Jasper, John Slack, Philip Shaver, Lamar Meyers. Sec- ond row: Paul McCabe, Frank Shippy, Ben Chambers, Saul Fish, Dick Reeves. Sea Devils DEPTHS SELDOM SEEN of the submarine world are penetrated by the exploring Sea Devils. Fascinating underwater mysteries are sought by the members of this sportsmen's club in the waters of South Florida. The purpose of the group is to promote interest in skin diving, underwater exploration and spearfishing. Qualifications for prospective members is a sincere in- terest in the aqua world and a desire to learn more about its inhabitants. Some of the members enter the annual Florida Skin-divers competition. President for the Devils of the sea was John Slackg vice president, Larry jasper, and the secretary-treasurer was Philip Shaver. Student Education WIT H THE CURRENT NATIONAL STRESS on education, Student Education Association members have been extremely aware of the importance of their pur- pose-developing a professional attitude in the teach- ing Held. Formerly known as Future Teachers of America, SEA sponsored Education Day and participated in the Stu- dent Florida Education Association convention. SEA also had its second Joint Education Council breakfast. A national organization, SEA was headed by Eleanor Pato. Aaron Berman was vice president, Estelle Zem- mel and Francine Friedwald, secretariesg Norma Col- lins, treasurer, and Dr. Richard Reed, faculty adviser. STUDENT EDUCATION ASSOCIATION: Front row: Eleanor Holleran, Linda Grussmark, Diane Skor, Estelle Zemmel, Eleanor Pato, Norma Collins, Judy Weiss. Second row: Charlene Cohen, Phyllis Preiser, Ronni Flax, Aviva Kaminetzky, Robert Gryzick, Barbara Lehrman, Phyllis Davis, Delores Wright, Deena Kleiner. Third row: Barbara Warner, Dellie Gellert, Marilu Behm, .lane Olson, Evelyn Goldstein, Nancy Smith, Maureen Geller, Roslyn Johnson, Charlotte Dean. Fourth row: Lorraine Caminiti, Lee Gaglianello, Anita Speisman, Barbcra Wolfson, Morlyne Weiss, .Ioan Rosenthal, Davida-Ann Pippinger, Phyllis Katz. STUDENT UNION BOARD OF GOVERNORS: Front row: Norman Whitten, Henry Edgar, Grace Staub, John Heilig, Dick Knight, Carmen Colon, Joan Merritt. Second row: Carolyn Carr, Hunter Brower, Jay Hess, Ed Kattel, Ned Umphrey, Sam Adams, Jane Olson, Steve Slepin. Union Board PROVIDING THE STUDENTS with all the avail- able relaxation facilities in the Student Union and co- ordinating its activities are the purposes of the Student Union Board of Governors. The Board has been in effect since it was created by the Senate in 1956. Its closed membership consists of fifteen permanent members and fifteen associates voted on by the Board when vacancies occur. Guiding the activities of the Board for the past year were john Heilig, president, Grace Staub, vice presi- dent, Herta Deichmann and Carmen Colon, secretaries, Richard Knight, treasurer. Norman Whitten was the adviser. Y. W. C. A. IF STUDENTS FORGET to say a Thanksgiving prayer when turkey time comes at the Student Union cafeteria, it's not the fault of the Young Women's Christian Association, for each year during Thanksgiv- ing they see to it that prayer cards are on the tables. Other activities for Y.M.C.A. include Easter and Hallowe'en parties at the Kendall ChiIdren's Home. Headed by Ann Clark and adviser, Miss Olive Hor- ton, the girls were hostesses for a foreign student tea. Officers of this organization which serves both the community and University are Lanora Morgan, vice president, Ann Ashworth, secretary, and jane Coleman, treasurer. YYVCA: Front row: Herta Diechmann, Jane Coleman, Ann Clark, Ann Ashworth, Susan Dunkell. Second row: Phyllis Bates, Joy Connell, Carol Stewart, Dianne Nlckolls. 286 llllllllll mn, CHI OMEGAS LISTEN AS HIRRELIGIOUS COLLEGIANS" ARE TOPIC CONSIDERED IN ONE OF FOURTEEN RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS WEEK DISCUSSIONS Student Religious Association AN INTEGRAL PART is played by the Student Religious Association in promoting and coordinating interfaith activities at UM. Established in 1942, the group is composed of the presidents, elected represen- tatives and directors of the religious organizations on our campus. ' SRA sponsored a leadership workshop early in the fall and also presented its annual Thanksgiving Inter- faith Concert. Both semesters, the group coordinated interfaith receptions for freshmen and transfer students. Well known for the part it plays in presenting the annual Religious Emphasis Week, where many speak- ers and new points were introduced to the students. SRA also shouldered an International Banquet at Christmas and sponsored "Christmas on Campus" for students who could not go home for the holidays. The group also awarded an annual interfaith scholarship. President of SRA this year was Herta Deichmann, while Ed Goldberg was vice president, Paul Van Dine, secretary, and Nancy Overpeck, treasurer. STUDENT RELIGIOUS ASSOCIATION: Front row: Ann Clark, Carolyn Reiff, Herta Deichmann, Joan Merritt, Tamra Mamches, Allan Metzger. Second row: Richard Klatte, William Burke, Robert Bondreau, Ronald Nelson, Paul Van Dine. , nib fi :. Q w.. 1fAiv,,wmse at- fxrt.At m1Z WESLEY FOUNDATION: Fronf row: Paul Van Dine, David Browne, Ivan Shaver, Nancy Reiss, Eululie Ginn, Sharon Nelfon. Sue Warner, Gayle Davis, Carole Merryman. Second row: Judy Harding, Nancy Krosse, Janyce Peterson, Nancy Hasleft, Judy Phillips, Alfhea Jones, Pa? Taylor, Sor Lian Ong. Third row: Anton Neugebauer, Leonard Harrington, Bob Selby, Dale Willoughby, Rod Millen, Richard Edwards, Gus Perry, Ray Siegle. Wesley Foundation IN ADDITION to religious events, the Foundation has a calendar filled with activities of every sort. An- nually there is the hamburger cook-out for new stu- dents during Orientation week in the fall. A swimming party later in the year and informal get-togethers are other social activities. Members take part in the Interfaith Jamboree and the Interfaith Thanksgiving Convocation. Wesley worked with Hillel in presenting the "Festival of Lights," a pageant commemorating the Jewish festival, Chanukah, and the Christian celebration, Christmas. Presiding over the group was Sharon Nelton, with the assistance of Nancy Reiss, vice president, Gayle Davis, secretary and Ivan Shaver, treasurer. ARM IN ARM in 'ihe 'Feeling of fellowship, 'Faculty and stu- dents pari-icipaie in the singing of religious and folk songs. 288 STARTING OFF the year's ac'I'ivii'ies is the annual Faculty- Sfudeni' dinner where everyone is able io become acquainted BAPTIST STUDENT UNION: Front row: Benny Stephens, Mary Olney, Joan Merritt, Noble Hendrix, Lynn Heeder, Donald Stokun, David Speber. Second row: Richard Kellett, Myra Lay, Carolyn Lilly, Rev. T. E. Lilly, Ronnie Lady, Vivian Morgan, Barbara Gibson, Don Payne. Baptist Student Union THANKSGIVING BREAKFAST in honor of in- ternational students is an annual affair held by the Baptists. The Union also advocates participation in small socials on Sunday evenings. During the Christ- mas season, it sponsors a Christmas Coffee. Celebrating its 20th year on campus, the Union serves as the link with the local church. Student leaders of BSU are Ray Feoris, president, Pat Garrison, vice president, Mary Olney, secretaryg and Wfilliam Wilson, treasurer. Canterbury House TO ENCOURAGE among Episcopalians the prac- tice of their faith is the purpose of Canterbury House, an organization established and maintained by the Dio- cese of Florida and the Diocese of South Florida. The Chapel is the heart of the life at Canterbury House and it is open for prayer 24 hours a day. Activities including service projects, social events and religious affairs are planned by student committees under the direction of the Chaplain, Father Donald Platt, with the assistance of the president, Rex Pyles. CANTERBURY HOUSE: Front row: Bob Woods, Jim Ullman, John Cleveland, William Duryea, Rex Pyles, Ron Elliott, John Caldwell, Richard Whipple. Second row: Frances Weary, Eve Espinosa, Sue Walter, Martha Platt, Father Platt, Father Morrison, Gertrude Morrison, Val Madeira, Patricia Kilgard, JoAnn Drew. Third row: George Maxon, Carol Miller, Patricia Hanna, Hannah Dietrich, Sue Tomhave, Elaine Beatty, Patricia Munnay, Beverly Johnson, Christopher Har- wood. Fourth row: Hunter Brower, Chad Brown, Bob Rockwood, Bill Booth, David Kennedy, Ove Jensen, Ronald Pascale, Fred Cole, Chuck Sunergren. 289 CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Fronf row: Allan Metzger, Diana Uhlich, Mrs, Arnold Volpe, Nancy Overpeclc, Lloyd Collins. Second row: Pai Roberts, .lon Froschner, Sol Bloom, Enid Polan. Christian Science SINCE 1942 UM students following the Christian Science teachings have had an organized religious group, which offers both fellowship and spiritual guidance. The organization sponsors annual Christian Science lectures on campus. Also, it maintains Christian Science literature boxes. The international group intends to further the work of the Christian Science movement. Heading the re- ligious organization for 1957-58 was Nancy Overpeck, president, Lloyd Collins, vice president, Diana Uhlich, secretary, Allan Metzger, treasurer, Mrs. Marie Volpe, faculty adviser. Gamma Delta NEXV EST RELIGIOUS organization on campus, Gamma Delta aims to disseminate the scriptural phil- osophy of life and to train Lutheran members for Christian service. The religious aspects are not the only ones enjoyed by the Lutheran students. A "kick off" party for fresh- men and Christmas caroling at Doctor's Hospital round out the calendar. The Gamma Delta members have a motto which they follow in all their activities, Gnoiis dia konizz or Knowledge and Service. Leading the organization this year was Carolyn Reilf. GAMMA DELTA: Fronf row: Marilyn Ferwercla, Carol Reiff, .loan Huianen, Bruce Lenhart. Second row: Kyle Miichell, George Eicholiz, Albert Erklcinen, Al Griffiths. 290 HILLEL: Front row: Alan Caruba, Edith Asher, Dr. Donald Michelson, Norman Goldberg, Sandy Berman, Nina Goldstein, Tamra Mamches, Sanford Weinberger. Second row: Miriam Gili, Judy Horowitz, Arline Bracker, Elsa Levick, Marcia Frankel, Gayle Simon, Selma Aron, Larry Deu-tsch. Third row: Gloria Keeti, Rhoda Boren, Carol Rosen, Lynn Kohn, Paula Bromberg, Sybil Horovitz, Elliot Curson, Martin Shaliroff. Fourth row: Shirley Kettleman, Myron Applebaum, Steven Halpern, Norman Waldman, Louis Rabin. Hillel Foundation THE FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS ceremony at Christ- mas was held to celebrate the Jewish Chanukah. Aside from Chanukah services and other religious activities the House is a place for informal social gatherings. Any student is offered fellowship and spiritual guidance. The Rickey Blum Memorial Award is given to the campus organization with the greatest participation and service to Hillel. This award is presented each spring. President was Norman Goldbergg vice president, Sandy Bermang 2nd vice president, Warren Wedrickg Newman Club CATHOLIC STUDENTS mixed their religion with spaghetti at the Newman Club dinner-dance held at the Knights of Columbus hall this November. UM's unit of the 600-chapter national organization holds two social events yearly to enhance its club activities. Newman Clubbers are dedicated to fostering spiritual life on campus and membership is open to full time Catholic students. They follow the Latin motto "coward cor l0quit01'," or "heart speaks to heart." In 1957-58 Bill Seemann was presidentg Dick Pesca- tore, vice presidentg Pepita Storch and Pat Shannon, secretariesg Gerald Renuart, treasurer. corresponding secretary, Edith Asherg recording secre- tary, Nina Goldsteing treasurer, Alan Caruba. NEWMAN CLUB: Front row: Ron Hollod,-Vincent Evangelista, Russ Swinehart, Dave Albano, Peter Hallinan, John Villiesse, Sam Macahuso, Frank Gliozzo, Kit Blanner. Second row: Michael Haley, Patricia Gerity, Sue DiSalvo, Anne Pennino, Carole Hol-ian, Pat McLavthlin, Angela Pucci, Priscilla Burns, Barbara Har- tung, John Hayes, Brian Bees, Sal Vecchioni. Third row: Virgin-ia Connolly, Eleanor Holleran, Dick Pescatore, Gerald Renuart, Bill Seemann, Rev. Thomas Anglim, Patricia Shannon, Pepita Storch, Agnes Penn-ino, Lee Gaglianella, Vera Lavelle, Judith Rogers, Lucille Dubois. Fourth row: Ccutherine Delorey, Darlene Corso, Carol Desauntes, Sally David, Barbara Kenzik, Arlene Cohen, Miriam Brown, Maxine Hartaoh, Judi Lemna, Isabel Mello, Millicent Martinez, Mary Spinas, Joanne George, Claudia Klug, Elaine Sigany, Kathleen McGuire, Gail Nolan, Gale Kozacik. Fifth row: Anna Ceci Knabb, Maureen O'Dea, Judy Allen, JoAnn Overman, Rae Stevenson, Cecile Renuart, Elaine Kuhny, JoAnn Strag, Alga Semaschuk, Margaret Lamont, Oell Steaftey, Rosalie Killian, Pat Dratt, Careen Rizzo. Sixth row: Buz Schubart, John Shmerykowsky, Leland Cupples, John Corrado, Al Avidano, John Muncey, Gerald Knight, Frank Savage, John Cope, Bob Hitchcock, Don Dessoy, Don Swan, Brian Gaine. Seventh row: Lawrence Murphy, Daniel Shaheen, Donald Belfiore, Arthur Herchen, Jr., Wil- liam Kennedy, Kenneth Gerber, Noel Paynic, Stephen Zoccoli, Tom Jessop, Gabriel Csiszar, Dick Cooper, Ernie Galinis, Ronnie 'Lemois, Larry OiMelia, A -Q - TVIFL ALPHA PHI OMEGA: Front row: Gilbert Borken, Jerrold Weissman, .lack Katzker, Robert Gryzick, Robert Newman. Second row: Stuart Coward, Ronald Sabel, Frank Kearns, Ronald Holloci, Alan Ulont. Third row: Leland Ginn, Jan Wrinkler, William Binard, Werner Almazar, Norman Block. GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA: Front row: Sandra Scholnick, Olive Horton, Rosita Petech, Evelyn Goldstein, Barbara Wolfson, Deena Kleiner, Anita Speisman. Second row: Aviva Kaminetzky, Jackie Smith, Arlene Franzblau, Millie Wilpon, Marcia Koven, Arlene Cohen, Third row: Alma Kerben, Wanda Steinberg, Phoebe Gordon, Barbara Ross, Gloria Koenig, Marzi Weiss. Fourth row: Ellen Zuckerman, Barbara Lethrman, Sue Weinstein, Barbara Warner, Rose Meyers, Gloria Keeti. 292 Gamma Sigma Sigma TORN DRESS? Pulled pleat? Those are everyday little mishaps that can befall the most careful girls. Knowing that, members of Gamma Sigma Sigma main- tain a handy sewing kit in each girls' rest room. But it's not all thimble and thread for the members of Gamma Sigma Sigma. They also operate a lost-and- found service which is located at the Information Booth in the Student Union. They cooperate with the fund drives of the Tuberculosis Association, Crippled Chil- dren's Society and the Miami Cardiac Horne. At Thanksgiving and Easter, food baskets are taken to the needy and the mentally ill. Christmas is an especially active time for the girls, since they also sell greeting cards for charity and sponsor a holiday party for needy children. President of the service-minded organization was Eve- lyn Goldsteing vice president, Barbara Wolfson. Dr. Ruby Warner and Miss Olive Horton were advisors. A CHANGE OF NAME occured this tall when Sigma Lamb- da Phi obtained their national charter. The national vice president supervised each member's signing the charter. OFFICERS FOR l958: Jack Katzker, president: Jerrold Weissman, treasurer: and Robert Gryzick, vice president. DURING REGISTRATION the bookstore swarms with pro- spective buyersg other times there are only stray purchasers. Alpha Phi Omega UGLY MEN become very popular around the time that Alpha Phi Omega, national service fraternity, spon- sors its annual Ugly Man Dance. This dance is given to raise money for its favorite charities. Decorating the Christmas tree in front of the Stu- dent Union is one of the many activities that this organization undertakes for the University and the community throughout the year. Among its various other activities is the semi-annual blood drive. At this time a trophy is awarded to the ROTC unit that donates the most pints of blood. The APO bookstore which is operated in temporary shack No. 944 is another service and fund raising project that this organization engages in. Founded on this campus in 1935, this organization welcomes any male student with a 1.0 average and an interest in assisting others. 293 Black, a gloomy col- or. Bat tbere'J bappiness in commencement. Bax- inexf, marriage, travel -an endlesf' Jerief of eventx are yet to come. A piece of paper with fancy type: a diploma. HHHIIHHHN ,, ' ' - ' , Q ' 'WW u ll. 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' :gy gy-M E 1' -if ,Q VZ,-'v'J,t:g he E , x rj- gf' ' L 'wif .4 , .1 , . 85' , P13 ,. ff 4vW"' I R s W 3 QW ' 5 M 4, Nw-f""Mwr School of Medicine B ORN IN 1952 out of a state legislative act, the University Medical School has grown into a strap- ping young adult and is planning to move into a medical sciences building early next spring that will house all of its departments. The medical building, which will be adjacent to jackson Memorial Hospital, where most of the clinical instruction now takes place, has long been the dream of Dean Homer F. Marsh. 298 DR. HOMER F. MARSH. Dean Medical students in this southernmost college of med- icine are drawn mainly from Florida residents, though some are from out-of-state. Laboratories and classrooms are also located at Vet- erans Hospital in Coral Gables. Already considered to be among the country's lead- ing young schools, the School of Medicine is one of the University's fastest-growing units. The first class graduated in 1956. Routine ls Difficult, Unending, For Medical School Students HE LIFE of a medical student is a hard one. His training is long while in school, and once gradu- ated, with a doctor of medicine degree he is still in training--for the education of a doctor never ends. But before he enters the world of anesthetics and appendectomies, the medical student must spend seven' years with his voluminous texts. The late-night, early- morning study sessions sometime seem insurmountable, though a cup of coffee, a cigaret and the concern of a loving parent or spouse can usually ease the enervating routine. He must be watchful of his own health, too. Then the doctor-to-be dons his graduation robe, pre- paring himself for the next step, internship for one year. The new doctor, at this point, has a better-than- adequate knowledge of medicine. But what he will gain in internship is that intangible quality which helps him to understand the doctors he will work with and the patients he will treat. He will become familiar with medical techniques, and he will begin to accept the responsibility of handling others' lives. GRACEFUL STERILE HAND ot a masked nurse moves with tluld rapidity as the outstretched palm ot a surgeon waits tor a scalpel 299 ELDERLY PATIENT lies relaxed as masked student doctor administers an anesthetic. Fellow intern watches procedure. HANDS TWIST to get in position tor the removal ot a sebaceous cyst from a patient's gluteus maximus. Medicine A-F VISITING DOCTOR assumes an informal s+ance as he discusses modern 'lech- niques which he uses in his pracfice. Diagram on boarcl supplements leaching. BAUM, ROBERT, Miami, Fla., M.D.g fIPAE 5, 6, 7, 8. BRAUSTON, BRUCE B., Miami, Fla., M.D.g CIJAE 5, 6, 7, V. Pres.-8. BROWN, HUGHES, Limona, Fla.: MD., Student American Medical Asso- ciation 5, 6, 7, 8. BROWN, MARCUS, Starke, Fla.g M.D.: Student American Medical Association 5. 6. 7. 8, BROWN, WILLIAM T., Miami, Fla., M.D.g ATU 1, 2, 3, Pres--45 CIDBII V. Pres.-5, Pres.-6, 7, 85 Catholic Medical Society Pres.-5, 6, 7, 8: Synapse Editor-8: Student Medical Association 5, 6, 7, 83 Editorial Board 8. BURGSTINER, CARSON B.g Okeechobee, Fla., M.D.g B911 1, 2, 3, 4, KKW 2, 3, 43 Arnold Air Society 3, 4, KIJX 5, 6, 7, 8. CHAMBERLAIN, EUGENE C. IR., Ft. Lauderclale, Fla., M.D.g AKK 5, 6, 7, 8. COLE, WILLIAM, Ft. Pierce, Fla., M.D.: IPX 5, 6, 7, 85 Student American Medical Association 5, 6, 7, 8g Synapse 8. CUNIO, IOHN E., Miami, Fla., M.D.g 'IDX 5, 6, V. Pres.-7, S3 OAK 5g Student American Medical Association 5, V. Pres.--6, 7, 8. DIAMANDIS, THEMISTOCLES I., Tarpon Springs, Fla., M.D.g IDX 5, 6, 7, 8. DRAWDY, ROBERT E., Tampa, Fla., M.D.g Student American Medical Association 5, 6, 7, 8. FALCONER, HUGH S., Tallahas- see, Fla., M.D.g AKK 5, 6, 7, 8. FERNANDEZ, ANTHONY A., Tampa, Fla., M.D.g GPX 5, 6, 7, 8, Catholic Medical Society 5, 6, 7, 8. FLEISHER, ARTHUR A., Miami, Fla., M.D.g AEII l, 2, 3, 4g fIPAE 5, Sec.-6, 7, 85 OAK 5, 6, 7, 3. FORMAN, LEON, Miami Beach, Fla., M.D.g BBB 3, 45 KDAE 7, 8, Synapse 8, Student American Medical Association 5, 6, 7, 8. s,.:,,c.s.: 1 Q . .. sn, 51 .V -51:-,,,:5gjQ:, i1a,n. 4, -5: ' 4 ' ,in gs ,Ee jr f L, fis ,24?lf.:3 'Irie t'5", - 12-QSQAVQ -, Elf Q '- as - Q M '. 4... "" 1 yi 'L I YAWNING INTERN baffles liring effecf of long hours over medical l'ex+s. GANT, GEORGE A., Pahokce, Fla., M.D.g QBIT 5, 6, 7, 83 Student American Medical Association 5, 6, 7, 8. GARNER, W,ADE H. IR.g Sanford, Fla.g M.D.g QX 5, 6, 7, 8, Student Council 6, 8. GEIGER, WILLIAM H., Leesburg, Fla., M.D.g TE41 I, 2, 3, 4, CIJAE 7, 8. GILES, ROY S., Ft. Myers, Fla., M.D.g fI1B1'I 5, 6, Treas.-7, 85 Student American Medical Asso- ciation 7, 8. GRINAKER, ARNE I., St. Petersburg, Fla., QX 5, 6, 7, 8. GRUMER, HOWARD A.g Miami Beach, Fla.g M.D.g CIPAE 5, 6, 7, 8. GURGANIOUS, EDGAR W. IR., Iacksonville, Fla., M.D.g AKK 5, 6, 7, V. Pres.-83 Christian Medical Society 5, 6, 7. HANSON, IAMES D., Sanford, Fla.g M.D.g QIPX 5, 6, 7, 8. HARRIS, MARVIN, Miami, Fla., M.D.g Synapse 8. HEARD, MILTON G., Deland, Fla.g M.D.3 QX 5, 6, 7, 8. HESTER, FREDERICK C., Wildwood, Fla.g M.D.g HKQ 1, 2, 3, 43 GPX 5, 6, 7, 8. HIRIBARNE, PEDRO F., Havana, Cuba, MD., 4:1311 5, 6, 7, H. HONIG, ALAN J., Miami, Fla., M.D.g fIDAE 5, 6, 7, 8g1IPHE lg Afbfl I, 2, 3g'AfI1A 35 AEA 35 Student Council 7, V. Pres.-85 Iunior Class Sec.g Senior Class V. Pres., Dean's List 1, 2, 3. HOWARD, ROBERT C., Orlando, Fla.g M.D.g GPX 5, 6, 7, Treas.-8. IARRELL, WALTER G., White Springs, Fla.g M.D.g HKCID 1, 2, 3, Pres.-4: AKK 5, 6, 7, 89 Student American Medical Association 5, 6, 7, Treas.-8. F-J Medicine IWW QM. I . 1 ,JVM .t N , E 'I' . 1. . THE ANSWER is noi' hard 'For 'The older, pipe-pointing physician, but +he a'Hen'hve sfudenl' s+ilI is puzzled. 301 se . GOGGLED STUDENTS Iis+en carefully fo de'I'ailed inslruciions be fore using Iabora+ory equipmenl' under supervision of medical teacher Medicine .I-M IONES, WALTER C., Miami, Fla., M.D., KA 1, 2, 3, 4, 'IPX 83 Student Council Pres.-8, Senior Class Pres., Student American Medical Association 5, 6, Treas.-7, 8. KIMBALL, SANFORD, Miami, Fla., 'IIFAE 5, 6, 7, 8. KNOWLES, ALBERT C., Bradenton, Fla., M.D., AKK 5, 6, 7, V. Pres.-8, Student American Medical Association 5, 6, 7, 8. LAKE, DORIS E., Sanford, Fla., M.D., AEI 6. 7, Pres.-83 Catholic Medical Society 6, 7, 85 Student Council V. Pres.-7. LANGFORD, GEORGE C., Tampa, Fla., M.D.g AKK 5, 6, 7, 8, Student American Medical Association 5, 6, 7, 8. LASKY, ALBERT S., St. Petersburg, Fla., MD., AKK V. Pres.-6. LETCHWORTH, GEORGE W., Sebastian, Fla.: M.D.g AKK 5, 6, 7, Pres.-8, OAK 7, 83 Miami Student Medical Association 5, 6, Pres.-7, 8. LOGUN, ALBERT G., Key West, Fla., MD., IIJAE 5, 6, 7, 8. MAMLET, LAURENCE N., Miami Beach, Fla., MD., QIAE, Synapse Copy Ed.-6, 7, Publications Board 6, 7. MARCADIS, ISAAC, Tampa, Fla., M.D. MARTINEZ, HUBERT G., Key West, Fla., M.D., 'IJX 5, 6, 7, 8, Student American Medical Association 5, 6, 7, 8, Catholic Medical Society 5, 6, 7, 8. MARTINEZ, HUGHES, Key West, Fla., M.D., CIUX 5, 6, 7, 8. MILLER, HERBERT A., Tampa, Fla., M.D.g IPX 5, 6, 7, 8. MILLER, ROBERT F., Orlando, Fla., M.D., CIPAE 5, 6, 7, 8. MILSTEIN, JOSEPH I., Miami Beach, Fla., M.D.g CPAE 5, 6, 7, 8. WIDE-EYED INTERN watches silently during throat inspec- tion ot elderly patient as a supervising doctor reviews work ot both students. Another patient has her throat medicated. GANGRENOUS TOE is carefully manipulated and inspected by student doctor, who tries to avoid discomtorting the patient. .. , sq-MMV,st.,..ss1.f,s,ms.sa1 . .. , .,a,m-mn. M-Z Medicine NANESS, CHARLES H., Miami Beach, Fla., M.D.g 'SPAE 5, Sec.-6, V. Pres.-7, Pres.-83 Student Council Sec.-6, Student American Medical Association 7, 8. NELLER, ROTH D., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.: M.D.g '-IPBTI l, 2, 3, 4. PACHECO, FERDIEg Tampa, Fla., fIJX 5, 6, 7, 8. PETTENGILL, HOWARD W., Coral Gables, Fla., M.D.g ITK47 l, 2, 3, 4, AKK 5, 6, 7, 83 Student American Medical Association 5, 6, 7, 83 Catholic Medical Society 5, 6, 7, 8. PLUMMER, RICHARD, Kendall, Fla., M.D.g 'TX 5, 6, 7, 8. RICHARDSON, KENNETH W., Bartow, Fla.g M.D.g AKK 5, 6, 7, 8. SANCHEZ, IOSE T. IR., Key West, Fla., M.D., YIJX 5, 6, 7, 8, Student American Medical Association 5, 6, 7, 8. SCHOCOFF, IACKQ West Palm Beach, Fla., M.D.g TECP l, 2, 3, -lg CPAE 5, 6, 7, 8. SILVERBERG, MARVIN M., Miami, Fla., M.D.g 'IPAE 5, 6, 7, 8g Student American Medical Association 5, 6, 7, 8. STOKLEY, SAMUEL P., West Palm Beach, Fla., MD., GPX 5, 6. 7, 8, Student American Medical Association 5, 6, 7, S. SWORDS, TACK K., Miami, Fla., M.D.g AKK 5, 6, 7, 83 Student American Medical Association 5, 6, Sec.-7, 8. TOOLE, REX F. IR., Marianna, Fla.g M.D.g 'DX 5, 6, 7, 8. TRELOAR, HUGH S., Daytona Beach, Fla., MD., GX 5, 6, 7, 8. WEIR, ROBIN S., Delray Beach, Fla,: MD.: fDBH Treas.-5, 6, 7, 8, Student Medical Associ- ation 5, 6, 7, 83 Student Medical Association 5, 6, 7, 8. WHITE, l RICHARD, iacnsaeoia, Fla.: M.D.g msn S, 6, 7, 8. i W, l CURLY-HAIRED TOT wa'l'cl1es with in'l'eires'l' as "+l1e nice man," a pedialrician, reads Hue vase hislory. X-RAY TECHNICIAN explains work of fluoroscope +o inferning medi- cal s+uden+s, who fhen will fake turns al' working with +l1e equipment. 303 School of Law EW STUDENTS gained a new dean this year after the retirement of Russell A. Rasco, who had been with the University since 1930. Replacing the aifable Rasco is James A. Burnes, who received his LLB. from Harvard. Rasco is now dean emeritus. Finishing their second year in the half-million-dollar Baron de Hirsch Meyer Building, law' students learn the broad principles of law and sharpen their education by attending court sessions in Dade County. 304 JAMES A. BURNES. Dean An air-conditioned library offers students law books from every state in the union and from every country in the world. t Fully approved by the American Bar Association, the Supreme Court of Florida and the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New jersey, the Law School offers a three-year program which culminates with the presentation of Bachelor of Laws degrees. A graduate may take the bar examination in any state. W. ABRAHAM, MAURICE A., Miami, Fla., LL.B., NBE 7. ALBERT, EUGENE M., West Palm Beach, Fla., LL.B., 1'IAfID V. Pres.-1, Pres.-2, TEP Sec.-6, Bar and Gavel 7, Dean's Committee 6, Barrister 6, Dean's List 1, 3. ALDRICH, GASPAR B., Habana, Cuba, LL.B., 'PAA 7. AMOON, HENRY A., White Plains, N. Y., LL.B., QKT 1, 2, 3, 4, A945 2, 3, 4, 5. APPLETON, ROBERT S., Miami, Fla., LL.B. BENN, HERBERT P., Lake Worth, Fla., LL.B., A945 7, Bar and Gavel V. Pres.-7, Lawyer Editor-7, SBG Senator-5, Barrister 5. BERGER, ROBERT B., Monti- cello, N. Y., LL.B., Lead and Ink 2, Tempo Chief Photographer-3, Ibis 4. BERGMAN, STANLEY, Miami, Fla., LL.B., Bar and Gavel, 5, 6, 7. BUDNICK, MARTIN, Miami, Fla., LL.B., TEP 5, 6, Bar and Gavel 6. CHANSEN, ALFRED R., Miami Beach, Fla., LL.B. DALTON, RICH- ARD T., Miami Beach, Fla., LL.B., TEP 5, 6, 7, Bar and Gavel 5, 6, 7. DISKIN, BERTRAM L., Miami, Fla., LL.B., TEP 5, 6, 7. DRUCKER, ALDEN N., Miami Beach, Fla., LL.B., TEP 6, 7, Bar and Gavel 5, 6, Treas.-7. EPSTEIN, LOUIS H., Miami Beach, Fla., LL.B FARBER, DONALD L., Davenport, Iowa, LL.B., AEII 5, 6, 7, TEP 6, 7, AEE 3, 4, A419 2, 3, 4, IFC 3, 4. FILIPPINI, ANGELO A., Miami, Fla., LL.B., IIKA 2, 3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4, ROA I, 2, 3, Pres.-4. FINE, RONALD L., Miami Beach, Fla., LL.B., AEII 1, 2, Pres.-3, 4: AAE 1, 2,.3, Pres.-4, AEE 2, 3, Pres.-4, SBG Pres.--4, IFC Pres.-4, Debator 2, 3. FISHER, P. GRAHAM, Miami, Fla., LL.B. FREIDUS, BERTHA L., Miami Beach, Fla., LL.B., Miami Law Quar- terly Editor-7, Dean's List 2, 3, NKT 4. FRIEDMAN, MALCOLM H., Miami, Fla., LL.B., AEH I, 2, Treas.-3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 'PHE 1, Dean's List 1. FRIEDMAN, ROBERT I., Miami, Fla., LL.B., AE1'I 4, 5, 6, 7, Miami Law Quarterly 5, Editor-6, Associate Editor-7, Wig and Robe Sec.-7, TEP 5, 6, V. Pres.-7, AEE 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, OAK 4. GOLDBERG, IEROME G., Williamsport, Pa., LL.B., NBE V. Pres.-4, Barrister News Ed.-4, Lawyer 4. GOLDMAN, SIDNEY, New York, N. Y., LL.B., A99 4, 'PAA Treas.-6, V. Pres.-7, Bar and Gavel 5, 6, 7, Barrister News Ed.-5, 6, Sports Ed.-7. GOSHGARIAN, ARMEN I., Miami, Fla., LL.B., Iron Arrow 4, OAK 3, 4, Who's Who 4, EAX 4, SAK? 2, 3, 4, Lead and Ink 4. GROSS, EDWARD A., West Palm Beach, Fla., LL.B., Student Bar Association Senator-7, TEP 5, 6, 7, Bar and Gavel 5. HARKINS, IOSEPH L., Amsterdam, N. Y., LL.B., A9115 5, 6, 7, Newman Club 4, Bar and Gavel 6, 7. HERO, GEORGE F., Hammond, Ind., LL.B., ASCII 2, 3, Bar and Gavel 6. HESS, ARTHUR H., Glendale, N. Y., LL.B., KA 1, 2, 3, 4, A9117 I, 2, 3. IACOBS, BORIS S., Chicago, Ill., LL.B. IOHNSON, KENDALL L., Lapeer, Mich., LL.B., A947 5, 6, 7. IOHNSON, RONALD N., Smeth- part, Pa., LL.B., EAE 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, KIPAA 7. IONES, ROBERT S., Warren, Ohio, LL.B., EAE I, 2, 3, 4. 305 A-.I Law Law J-S KENNEDY, DAVID T.5 Miami, Fla.5 LL.B.5 ATO 5, 6, 75 ASQ 6, 75 Bar and Gavel 5, Pres.-6, 75 SBG Senator 5, 65 Barrister 5, 6, Editor-75 The Lawyer 5, Associate Ed.-6, 75 Miami Law Quarterly Business Mgr.-6, 75 Dean's List 65 Who's Who 45 OAK 4. KESSLER, BETTY5 Forest Hills, N. Y.5 LL.B.5 NBE Sec.-75 Honor Court 7. KISHNER, IRWIN5 Miami Beach, Fla.5 LL.B.5 QAQ Sec.-65 Student Bar Association Senator-6, 75 Bar and Gavel 5, 6, 75 Dean's Com- mittee 6. KUVIN, LAWRENCE P.5 Newark, N. 1.5 LL.B.5 QAA 5, 6, 75 AEE 6, 75 Barrister 5, 6, Editor-75 Student Bar Association Sen- ator-65 SBG Senator-7. LANCE, THOMAS L.5 Lakewood, Ohiog LL.B.5 EX 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 75 QAQ 6, 7. LAW, ROBERT O. IR.5 Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.5 LL.B. LEVENSTEIN, LEONARD L., Miami, Fla., LL.B. LEVY, RONALD G., North Miami Beach, Fla.5 LL.B.5 NBE 5, Treas.-6, 7. LEWIS, EDGAR5 Miami, Fla.5 TEP 75 Miami Law Quarterly 6, 75 OAK 75 Wig and Robe 7. LIPMAN, IUSTIN 1.5 Miami, Fla.5 LL.B.5 QAA 5, 6, Treas.-75 Bar and Gavel Treas.-6. LIVEDIS, PHILIP A.5 Bristol, Conn.5 LL.B.5 ZX 1, 25 NBE Pres.-6. LOEWENTHAL, ROBERT 1.5 Miami, Fla.5 LL.B.5 TEP 5, 6, 75 Bar and Gavel 5, 65 Miami Law Quarterly 5. LUSTIG, IORDAN R.5 Bridgeport, Conn.5 LL.B.5 QEQ 7. MAGNES, RONALD E.5 Evanston, Ill.5 LL.B.5 TEP 6, 7. MILLS, RICHARD F.5 Akron, Ohiog LL.B.5 ABQ 6, Sec.-7. MOORE, WILLIAM T.5 Miami, Fla.5 LL.B.5 EAE V. Pres.-35 QAA 5, Sec.-6, 75 Bar and Gavel Sec.-5, 75 Student Bar Association Treas.-6, Pres.-75 Dean's Com- mittee 6, 7. ODELL, IOAN E.5 Coral Gables, Fla.5 LL.B.5 AA1'I 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres.-5, 65 NKT 6, 75 AEE 6, 75 KBII 6, 75 Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 65 Student Bar Association 5, 6, Sec.--75 Bar and Gavel 5, Sec.-6, 75 Barrister 5, 65 Homecoming Queen 35 Ibis Beauty 45 Miss University of Miami 35 Wig and Robe 75 Dean's Committee Sec.-75 Who's Who 7. PASKAY, ALEXANDER5 Miami, Fla.5 LL.B.5 QAA 7. PATERNA, ANTHONY F.5 South Norwalk, Conn.5 LL.B.5 NBE 5, 65 Newman Club 5, 65 Bar and Gavel 5, 6. POLUR, SAM5 Miami, Fla.5 LL.B.5 Bar and Gavel Pres.-65 TEP 5, 6, 75 EAX 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. PRICE, DAVID T.5 Miami, Fla.5 LL.B.5 ZX 1, 2, 3, 45 QAA 5, 6, 7. QUINTILIANI, ARTHUR E.5 New London, Conn.5 LL.B. REESE, NORMAN G.5 Miami Shores, Fla.5 LL.B. REISEMAN, HARVEY I.5 Miami, Fla.5 LL.B.5 QZA 1, 2, 3, 45 Wig and Robe 5, Pres.-6, 75 OAK 5, 6, 75 AEE 6, 75 TEP 5, 6, Pres.-75 Barrister 5, 6, Editor--75 Miami Law Quarterly 6, Associate Ed.-75 Student Bar Association Senator-6 Dean's List 1, 2, 3. RICHARD, ANDREW L. IR.5 Miami, Fla.5 LL.B.5 ABQ 1, 2, 3, 4. ROBINS, HARVEY E.5 Pittsburgh, Pa.5 LL.B.5 TEP 5, 65 Bar and Gavel 55 Lawyer 5. ROEHL, IOSEPH M.5 Miami, Fla.5 LL.B.5 ASQ 5, 6, 75 Bar and Gavel 6, 7. ROGERS, LESTER M.5 New York, N. Y.5 LL.B. ROTI-I, RUTH5 New Castle, InCl.5 LL.B. SCHWITALLA, ALPHONSE M.5 Sarasota, Fla.5 LL.B.5 Bar and Gavel 5, 6. SILVERMAN, BARRY5 New York, N. Y.5 LL.B.5 QEII 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4, 5, 6, 75 IFC 35 Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. SKLOW, ALVIN L.5 Richmond Hill, N. Y.5 LL.B.5 Arnold Air Society 25 Engineers Club 35 Institute of Radio Engineers 15 Pep Club 25 AFROTC 1, 2. 306 SMITH, PHILIP W., Miami Springs, Fla., LL.B., fIPAA 5, 6, 7. SPATZ, ALLEN, Miami Beach, Fla., LL.B., TEP 6, 7. STERN, WILLIAM B., New Bedford, Mass., LL.B., SBG Senator-6, TEP 5, Sec.-6, Treas.-7. SULLI, ANDREW, Tampa, Fla., LL.B.g SBG Senator-6. THOMPSON, LLOYD G. IR., Eau Gallic, Fla., LL.B., NBE Sec.-7. TOMASSI, IOSEPH F., Florida City, Fla., LL.B., CIPAA 6, 7. TROUT- MAN, HOLMES R., Huntington, W. Va., LL.B.g A9413 7. UMSCI-IEID, CLIFFORD, Miami, Fla., 'LL.B., IIKA 2, 3, 4, L'ApaChe 3, 4, CIPAA 5, 6, 73 Dean's List 1. VANDERZEYDE, RAYMOND, East Chicago, Incl., LL.B. WASSER- MAN, RICHARD W., Miami Beach, Fla., LL.B., TEP 5, 6, 7. WEIR, ANGELINE G., Hollywood, Fla., LL.B., KBII 4. WEISSEL, WIL- LIAM I., Coral Gables, Fla., LL.B., ZBT l, 2, 3, Pres.-4, Iron Arrow 3, 4, 5, Pres.-6, 7, OAK 3, 4, 5, Pres.-6, '73 Wig and Robe, 7, CIPAQIP 5, 6, 7, AEE 3, 4, Ibis Editor-4, Tempo Editor-7, Lawyer Editor 5, 6, Photo ELI.-7, KAM 3, 4, Who's Who 4. WOLFMAN, STANLEY, Miami Beach, Fla., LL.B. WOLIS, KENNETH A., Surfside, Fla., LL.B., TEP 5, 6, 7, Bar and Gavel 5. WRIGHT, WILKINSON D., Palm Beach, Fla., LL.B., ATS! 1, 2, 3, Sec.-4, ATQP Sec.-6, V. Pres.--7, Bar and Gavel Treas.-6, V. Pres.-7, IFC 5, Newman Club 5, 6, 7, Attorney General 7, Barrister 5, 6, 7, Lawyer 5, 6, 7: Who's Who 4. ZOELLER, EDWIN C., New York, N. Y., LL.B.S IIJAA 5. S-Z Law NO TALKING SIGNS WOULD BE OUT OF PLACE AS THESE SERIOUS-MINDED LAWYERS-TO-BE SILENTLY PROBE THEIR MANY TEXTS AND LIBRARY VOLUMES HOW TO ARGUE is important to a successful lawyer, points out a professor to his class. Strong and weak contentions are listed. Library Volumes Help Students Preparing For Legal Profession HE MARK of a well-taught lawyer is his ability to find his law. And to find the law he must know how to use a library. The library provides volumes for research as well as a reading room for studying. The University of Miami Law School, knowing the im- portance of proper research techniques, houses one of the South's leading law libraries. Supervised by Miss Harriet L. French, the library offers early laws of the Territory of Florida and the Hague Tribunal, plus a unique foreign-law collection, which is largely the work of Dr. Stojan A. Ba- yitch. The foreign-law library contains tracts from Latin America, the British Commonwealth and various European and Asian nations. The bulk of the library's volumes, however, are out of the ROWS OF BOOKS are sign of wide reading that collector's-item category. Most books deal with more recent must be done by law students to learn profession well. rulings, accounting for 80,000 volumes in all, BRIEFCASES REST at the feet of their owners during a break between classes. Grouped on a 'terrazzo patio between wings of the building, law students discuss all-important events concerning their work. REFLECTIVE MOMENT finds lawyer-to-be mentally review- ing what he has argued so that his case will be more logical. FULL NOTES facilitate work for "counsels," who must pay close attention to the long-winded speeches given in "court." Southeastern Regional Won By Moot Court Team LAW STUDENTS at the University of Miami all have an equal opportunity to enter what in actu- ality is a debate team, but is better known as the Moot Court. Questions, usually of civil cases, are brought up to be argued on the lloor by the future lawyers. , The mock Supreme Court has the chance to par- ticipate in several competitions. Among them are the Freshman Moot Court Championship, and the regional, the state and the national competitions. The team during the 1957-58 sessions was com- prised of Larry Porter, Buzz McKee, and Howard Oster- man. The three able debaters won the title at the Southeastern regional competition. Porter, McKee, and Osterman were also chosen to be the Miami represen- tatives in the New York nationals. The University delegation was advised by Miss M. Minnette Massey, assistant professor of law and assistant law librarian. The group must go through many trial decisions as well as the right to argue before the ap- pellate court. These events are all voluntary, and they afford all law students an opportunity to gain very practical experience in their chosen field of endeavor. 1 PANEL OF JUDGES, members of the Law school faculty, listens to student's arguments. The moclt court is realistic even to the clock and fla gs. A true court would have no greater dignity. 309 WIG AND ROBE: Robert Friedman, Thomas A. Thomas, James Burnes, Harvey Reiseman, Joan Odell, David Kennedy, Bertha Freidus, Mallory Horton. Wig and Robe WO YEARS OLD in january, Wig and Robe cel- ebrated its anniversary this year with its first formal tapping ceremonies. Tappers donning black robes and powdered wigs searched for prospective tappees. A local honorary founded to recognize scholarship and service in law students, Wig and Robe is comprised of those students who rank in the top three per cent of the total enrollment of the School of,Law. A point system is used to determine entrance qualifications for the organization. President of the honorary is Harvey Reiseman, who is also editor of the Barrister, associate editor of the Miami Law Review and president of Tau Epsilon Rho, legal fraternity. The other officer of the group is Rob- ert Friedman, who is secretary and also editor of the Miizmi Law Review. Law professor Thomas A. Thomas is adviser of Wfig and Robe. Dean's Committee AW STUDENTS, by means of this organization, are able to voice their opinions concerning the students, faculty and administration of the School of Law. It was thought that personal contact with the dean was the best Way expediently and efficiently to discuss problems. - It is a standard policy of the committee to have the person presenting a problem remain anonymous, there- fore the "gripes" range from professors' teaching meth- ods to suggested improvements for the law school buildings. After hearing the dilemmas, possible solu- tions are discussed, and 'often immediate action results. The Committee is composed of Dean Burnes, the presidents of all legal organizations, elected senators of the Student Bar Association, the editors of the law school's publications and three students selected at large from the law school. DEAN'S COMMITTEE: Front row: Joe Padewer, Bill Stern, Faye Becker, .loan Odell, John Gale, Dean Burnes. Second row: Larry Kuvin, Hal Knecht, Martin Garden, .lack Rogers, Herb Benn, Buddy Weissel. Third row: Pot Ronco, Owen Freed, Ed Gong, Jack Thompson, Walt Dingwald, Irwin Kishner. il-at w,nf,,.a.e1awsf.t,-as A --f W N , .11-c.-,Newt LAWYER Front row: Dan Murray, Herb Benn, John Corrigan, Irwin Kishner, Dave Kennedy. Second row: John Fassett, Steve Stauron, Henry Prom-inskfi, George Hero, Joe Padwer, Ben Terner. Publications Edited By .lournalistic Attorneys EADING THE LIST of the Law School's extra- curricular activities are three publications: the Barrister, The Lawyer and the Miami Law Quarterly. Most frequently seen is the monthly newspaper, the Barrirter, which informs the students of all current events, academic and social. Most of the articles are written by the student staff but several articles are also contributed by members of the faculty. Editing this year's newspaper was Harvey Reiseman. One of the best known legal journals in the country is the Miami Law Quarterly. It contains articles on some of the most current problems in law practice and plays an important role in assisting the judiciary, bar and law students to keep up-to-date on the latest changes in law. Bertha Freidus was editor of The Quarterly for the 1957-58 academic year. The Lawyer is the ofhcial yearbook for the school of Law. This publication is a synopsis of the events that occurred during the past academic year. In 1947 the magazine was founded to serve as a liaison between the Alumni of the Law School and their Alma Mater. The annual is distributed to the many graduates as well as to all the law students. Editor-in-chief of The Lawyer was Herb Benn. MIAMI LAW QUARTERLY: Front row: Larry Porter, AI Malniick, Clifford Alloway, Bertha Freidus, Richard Hausler, Gene Sanders, Lucille Fleisher. Second rpw: Ralph Ezzo, Jack Thompson, Edgar Lewis, Gerald Capps, Robert Friedman, William Kolodgy, Joel Dowdy, Harvey Reiseman, Michael Shapiro, Walter Ding- wald, Jay Cristal, Jack Ankus. 311 College of Arts and Sciences FIVE "WORLDS" are studied by the 5,000-odd students in the University's largest school: The World Around Us-clarified by the sciences. The World Behind Us-reviewed through history. The World Beyond Us-facilitated by the study of other languages, cultures and thoughts. The World Wfithin Us-brought to life by philos- ophy and psychology. 312 E. MORTON MILLER, Dean The World Above Us-continued in our spiritual experience. Director of this "world study" is Dean E. Morton Miller. More than 200 men and women, many with ad- vanced degrees, make up Dr. Miller's faculty. Approximately 900 courses are offered by the Col- lege. Degrees can be obtained in various fields such as medical technology, journalism and drama. ABNEY, CAROL I., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Human Relations, AAA 1, KAII 3, Dean's List. 1, 2, 3. ACCOLLA, DIANE E., Miami, Fla., A.B. in History, Dean's List 2. ADAMS, PATRICIA H., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Iournalism, AI' 2, 3, 4, PAX 3, 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3. ADCOCK, HENRY IR., Chicago, Ill., A.B. in Psychology, Psychology Club 4, Philosophy Club 4. AFRICANO, ROSEMARIE E., Hollywood, Fla., A.B. in Drama, Drama Guild 4. ALLISON, IAMES T., Wakefield, R. I., B.S. in Zoology. ANDERSON, DOUGLAS R., Coral Gables, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, CIDHE 1, 2, 3, AEA 2, 3, BBB 2, 3, AGM 2, Treas.-3, FA 2, 3, Dean's List 1, 2, 3. ANGELIA, IOSEPH I., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Zoology, Sigma VD 2, 3, 4. APFEL, ROBERT, Miami Beach, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, 'PEA 1, 2, Sec.-3, fIJHE 1, 2, 3, 4, SBG Cabinet 2, Dean's List 1, Latin American Sub-Commission 2. APPEL, NORMAN, Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Philosophy, TEfIP I, 2, 3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2. ARANOFF, SANFORD, Miami Beach, Fla., B.S. in Physics, Hillel 1, Z, Dean's List 2, 3. BALASQUIDE, DYHALMA, San Iuan, Puerto Rico, B.S. in Home Economics, ALFA 1, 2, 3, 4. BARCLAY, ROBERT I., New Rochelle, N. Y., B.S. in Industrial Engi- neering. BARNES, BRUCE E., Grand Rapids, Mich., A.B. in History, Cavaliers 3, 4. BARONE. ROBERT, Miami, Fla., A.B. in Radio-TV Film OAK 3, V. Pres.-4, Iron Arrow 3, 4, AEP 3, V. Pres.-4, Radio- TV Guild Pres.-2, V. Pres. 3, 4, Who's Who 4. BEAL, NANCY M., Coconut Grove, Fla., A.B. in Art History, X9 1, 2, 3, 4, Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sociology Club 2, Art Club 3, 4, Leadership Training Program 1. BEANE, GORDON L., Ft. Pierce, Fla., A.B. in Russian, AIIPA 3, Russian Club 1, 2, 3, V. Pres.-4. BECKERMAN, MARION I., Surfside, Fla., A.B. in History, EAYIP 2, 3. BEISWENGER, ROBERT I., Wheel- ing, W. Va., A.B. in Art, Dean's List 1. BELAN, IOHN IR., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Art. BELLOMIO, ANTHONY F., Rochester, N. Y., B.S. in Chemistry, AXA 2, 3, 4. BENNETT, WILLIAM F., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Psychol- ogy, EX 1, 2, Sec.-3, Pres.--4, OAK Sec.-3, Treas.-4, M Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Track 1, 2, 3, 4, Iron Arrow 4, Who's Who 4. BERMAN, SIDNEY I., Miami, Fla.: A.B. in Sociology. BERRY, ALLAN, Miami, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, Chemistry Club 4. BETOURNE, VERNON N., Kankakee, Ill., A.B. in Sociology, Psychol- ogy Club 2, 3, Sociology Club 4, French Club 1, 2. BIASCO, ARLENE I., Elmwood Park, Ill., A.B. in Speech, ZTA 2, 3, V. Pres.-4. BLACK, SANDRA S., Coral Gables, Fla., A.B. in Sociology, KKI' 1, 2, 3, 4. BLOSSOM, ROBERT M., Richmond, Ind., A.B. in Radio-TV Film. BLUME, DAVID M., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., B.S. in Biology, Cavaliers 1, 2, 3, 4. BORROW, HARRIET R., Morristown, N. I., A.B. in History and American Civilization, 1IPA9.3, Sec.-4, Dean's List 4. BONAMO, ANTHONY I., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Zoology. BOND, IOHN P., Miami, Fla., A.B. in History, 'IPAQ 1, 2, 3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. 313 A-B Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences B-C BOURNIER, IULIAN W., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Geography, FST V. Pres.-4. BOWMAN, SHIRLEY M., Hickory, N. C., B.S. in Nursing, Student Nurses Association 1, 2, Sec.-3, 4. BRENNER, IACK H., Coral Gables, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, A499 Sec.-1, Treas.-2, V. Pres.-3, 4, AFROTC 1. BRITT, ROBERT H., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Radio-TV Film, Miami Opera Guild 3. BRITTON, ADELLE B., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Spanish, Newman Club 1, Philosophy Club 4. BRONNER, ALAN M., St. Petersburg, Fla., M.A. in History, QIPAG 5, Dean's List 5, Residence Counselor 5. BROWN, BARBARA E., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., B.S. in Dietetics, Home Economics Honor Society 3, 4, Home Economics Club 2, 4, Dean's List 2, 3. BURKE, WILLIAM E., Highstown, N. I., A.B. in Drama, Westminster Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Student Religious Association 3, 4. BURMAN, BARRY N., Baltimore, Md., A.B. in Radio-TV, ZBT 2, 3, 4. BYSTROM, FRANKLIN B., Elmira, N. Y., A.B. in Radio-TV Film, A2415 2, Treas.-3, Pres.-4. CADAMURO, WILLIAM G., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Geography. CAMPBELL, BARBARA L., Chicago, Ill., A.B. in Psychology, AAII 3, 4. CARLSON, TERRYL R., Minneapolis, Minn., A.B. in Home Economics, Home Economics Club 4, Wesley Foundation 4. CARR, CAROLYN I., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Spanish, KKI' 1, 2, 3, Sec.-4, Spanish Club 1, 2, Newman Club 1, 2, Union Board of Governors 4. CARTER, CLYDE W., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Zoology, Arnold Air Society 3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, Wing Commander-4. CASSESE, THOMAS M., East Weymouth, Mass., B.S. in Zoology. CASTRO, ADA H., Vega Baja, Puerto Rico, B.S. in Home Economics. CATALDO, GRACE L., Turtle Creek, Pa., B.S. in Nursing. CHAMBER- LAIN, SUSAN, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., A.B. in Art, KKI' 1, 2, 3, 4. CHAPEL, IACKIE S., Richmond, Va., A.B. in French. CHATFIELD, IOE W., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry. CHILCUTT, KAY E., Columbus, Miss., A.B. in Political Science, X52 2, Pres.-3, Women's Residence Coun- cil 2, Treas.-3, Panhellenic 3, 4, Buseda 2, Sec.-3, Wesley Foundation 2, 3, Sec.-4. CHOROST, LINDA W., Coral Gables, Fla., A.B. in Art Education. COLLINS, IOHN G., Baltimore, Md., A.B. in Iournalism. COLLINS, RICHARD I., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Botany, EX 1, 2, Treas.-3, 4. COLON, ALBA E., Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, M.S. in Bacteriology. COLSON, IAMES R., Rochester, N. Y., A.B. in Philosophy, AXA 3, 4, Ski Club 3. COMBS, CAROL K., Evansville, Ind., A.B. in Radio-TV Film, AI' 3, 4. COOK, ROBERT L., Hollywood, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4, German Club 1, 2, Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 3. COPULOS, STELLA M., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., B.S. in Home Economics, Home Eco- nomics Club 1, 2, 3, V. Pres.-4. COWARD, STUART I., Iersey City, N. I., B.S. in Biology, A4119 2, Sec.-3, 4, Chemistry Club 2, 3, 4, Honor Court 3, 4. COYLE, RONALD D., Hamilton, ohio, B.S. in science Edumion. C-F Arts and Sciences CRISTOL, A. JAY, Miami Beach Fla: A.B. in Philosophy- fIDAA 3 4 Dean's List 3. CUPPLES, LELAND I., Little Rock, Ark., A.B. in Com- mercial Art, Art Club 3, 4, Ncwman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. D'AMIGO, LAWRENCE P., Union City, N. I., A.B. in History. DAVIN, EILEEN R., Watertown, Mass., B.S. in Zoology. DAVIS, EMILY C., Bir- mingham, Ala., A.B. in Art, AXS2 1, 2, Pres.-3, 4, Dean's List 3, 4. DAVIS, ROBERT T., Glen Cove, N. Y., A.B. in Economics, Governor 4- AXA Treas.-2, 3, 4. DAY, FREDERICK I., Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, B.S. in Geography, FBT Treas.-3, 4. DEEB, SAYED G., Beloza, Lebanon' A.B. in Economics, French Club 4. 1 DEICHMANN, HERTA M., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Government, AZ 1, 2, Treas.-3, Pres.-4, AEE 3, 4, Student Religious Association Sec.-2, V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4, Union Board of Governors 3, 4, SBG Senator 4, French Club 1, 2, YWCA 2, Pres.-3, 4, Who's Who 4. DEL CASTILLO, SARA A., Havana, Cuba, A.B. in English, AAA 1, 2, ALFA 2, 3, Dean's List 1. DELISA, WILLIAM M., White Plains, N. Y., A.B. in Radio-Tv, ECIJE 1, 2, 3, 4. DESAUTEL, BRUCE L., Grafton, N. D., B.S. in Geology. DE STEFANO, HENRY, Brooklyn, N. Y., B.S. in Biology. DICK, STAN- LEY F., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, AEA 3, 4, BBB 3, 4, AGM 3, 4, Chemistry Club 4, Dean's List 2, 4. DICKEN, BRUCE K., Old Fort, Ohio, A.B. in Art, Westminster Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4, ROA 1, 2, 3, 4. DI DOMENICO, CARMINE, Albany, N. Y., A.B. in Speech. DIETRICH, CHARLES W. -IR., Delray Beach, Fla., A.B. in Iournalism. DIXON, IACK L., A.B. in History, CIJMA 4. DRUCKMAN, KENNETH, Providence, R. I., A.B. in Economics. DUCHON, MARLENE, Miami, Fla., A.B. in English, AEI? 2, 3. EDGAR, HENRY A., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Economics and French, QEA 2, 3, 4, QHE 1, 2, 3, 4, AGM 3, Pres.-4, AFDA 3. Pres.-4, IIAQD 2, V. Pres.-3, 4, French Club Pres.-1, 2, 3, 4, German Club V. Pres.-1, 2, 3, 4, Union Board of Governors 3, 4, SBG 3, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, Who's Who 4. EDLIN, ABRAHAM, Miami, Fla., A.B. in Sociology. EDWARDS, EARL A., Hickory, Va., B.S. in Mathematics and Geology. EHRLICH, SANDRA E., Hollywood, Fla., A.B. in English, AAA 1, AGM 3, V. Pres.-4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, Ir. Counselor 3, 4, FTA 3, 4, Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4. ENKE, RALPH D., Homestead, Fla., A.B. in Drama, Drama Guild 2, 3, Treas.-4. ERDMAN, BEATRICE W., Springville, N. Y., A.B. in English. ERICKSON, ROGER M., Muskegon, Mich., A.B. in History. ERNEY, CLINTON T., Groton, Conn., A.B. in Radio-TV and Iournalism. EVANS, NORMAN, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., A.B. in History. EWARD, RALPH D., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., B.S. in Zoology, QMA 3, 4, AfIPA 3, 4, German Club 4, Band 2, 3, 4. FABRY, FRANCIS I., Alton Bay, N. H., A.B. in English, Symphony 1, 2, 3, 4, Sketchbook 1, 2, Ski Club 3, 4, Dean's List 3, 4i FARKAS, GERALD M., Pittsburgh, Pa., A.B. in Sociology, ZBT 1, 2, 3, 4. Arts and Sciences F-G FEINGOLD, WINIFRED L., Hollywood, Fla., A.B. in Sociology. FEIT, MARIAN P., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Iournalism, FAX 4, EA? 3, 4, Hurricane News Editor-3, Features Editor-4, Hillel 3, 4. FERGUSON, IOHN E., Brooklyn, N. Y., A.B. in American Civilization, Dean's List 3. FERRELL, MALLORY H. IR., Portsmouth, Va., A.B. in Radio- TV Film, KAM 2, Treas.-3, Pres.-4, AFROTC l, 2, 3, 4, Band 1-, 2, 3, 4, National Press Photographers Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Radio-TV Guild 1, 3, 4, ZAX 3, 4, Tempo 2, Photo Ed.-3, Photo Ed.-4, Ibis 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 2. FINOCCHIO, ANTHONY F., Coral Gables, Fla., A.B. in German, German Club 3, V. Pres.-4. FISHER, GERALDINE, Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in History. FLAGG, NORMAN L., Riverside, Ill., A.B. in Com- mercial Art, KE 1, 2, 3, 4. FLANNERY, GERALD V., Hollywood, Fla., A.B. in Iournalism, A2112 3, Pres.-4, Dean's List 1. FLINK, STANLEY P., Boston, Mass., A.B. in History. FOSTER, MARTHA I., Burlington, N. C., A.B. in Finance, X9 3, 4. FRANKLE, CHARLES E., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Drama. FRANZBLAU, ARLENE C., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Nursing, Student Nurses Association l, 2, 3, 4, EAfI2 2, Sec.-3, 4. FREAL, JOSEPH I., Philadelphia, Pa., B.S. in Chemistry, Chemistry Club 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, 4, Pershing Rifies 2, ROA 1, 2, 3, 4. FREED- MAN, HOWARD S., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Radio-Tv Film, Radio-TV Guild 4. FREEMAN, ELLIOTT L., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Mathematics, QH2 1, 2, 3, 4, Sociology Club Treas.-3, Dean's List 1. FRIBERG, HARRY I., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Iournalism, EAX 3, 4. FRIEDMAN, SEYMOUR L., Worcester, Mass., B.S. in Chemistry, AE1'I 1, 2, 3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. GEORGE, THOMAS A., Charleroi, Pa., B.S. in Chemistry, AXA 1, Sec.-2, Pres.-3, 4, German Club 3. GERMER, DAVID W., Burnt Hills, N. Y., A.B. in Psychology, West- minster Foundation Pres.-1, 2, 3, 4, Philosophy Club 2, V. Pres.-3, 4. GIBSON, ROBERT B., Milford, Del., A.B. in Journalism, EAX 2, 3, 4, Hurricane Copy Ed.-3, Parent-Age 2, Managing Ed.-3. GLASS, ELLIOTT M., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Zoology, German Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Chemistry Club 1, 2, Hillel 1, 2, Sea Devils 1, 2, 3. GOLDBERG, FAYE C., Gardiner, Maine, A.B. in Sociology, Cavalettes Sec.-3, 4, EACD 3, 4, French Club 4, Psychology Club 4. GOLDMAN, BENTON A., Great Neck, N. Y., M.A. in Economics, Dcan's List 2, 3. GOLDMAN, ILENE R., Coral Gables, Fla., A.B. in Psychology, F1722 3, 4, Cavalettes 3. GOLTZER, ROBERT, Miami, Fla., A.B. in Iournalism. GOMEZ- HERNANDEZ, EDUARDO, Humacao, Puerto Rico, B.S. in Zoology, Pre-Dental Association Prcs.-4. GRANAT, PEPI, Miami, Fla., B.S. in Zool0gYQ AAA 1, 2, 3, 4, AQA 2, 3, 4, AGM 2, 3, 4, Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 1, 2. GRAND, LAWRENCE T., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Zoology, ZBT 3, 4. GRANSTRA, FRANK C., Harbor Springs, Mich., B.S. in Chemistry, American Chemical Society 4. GRANT, ROY R. IR., Burlington, N. C., B.S. in Zoology. GRAUBERT, ALAN S., Titusville, Fla., B.S. in Zoology, TAIIP 1, 2, Pres.-3, 4, BBB 3, 4, Pershing Rifles 2, ROA 1, 2, Army ROTC 1, 2, German Club 2, Governor 4, AEE 4. GREEN- BLATT, IAY H., Vineland, N. I., A.B. in Philosophy, '-IPEII 2, 3, Sec.-4, L'Apache 3, 4, Hillel 2, 3, 4. 316 fi 452' V fs 'FQ A 2 5 HV, V yfawf, . mii- .zzgg afi11',., . f fs 3,1 - T1 :T?f.5i.5 . , ' Fi' A GREENHUT, ANDREW 1., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Drama, AFROTC 1, 2. GREGG, ALAN H., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Psychology, ZBT 2, 3, Dean's List 1. GRIMES, CECILE A., Brooklyn, N. Y., A.B. in Speech, Drama Guild 4, 1r. Counselor 3, 4, Angel Flight Adjutant-Recorder-4. GROSS,' PATRICIA 1., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Human Relations. GUADAGNO, 1ANET 1., South Miami, Fla., B.S. in Botany, AAA 1, AGM 3, 4, BBB 2, Dean's List 1, 2, 3. GUERARD, CAROLYN E., Morristown, N. I., A.B. in Speech, AI' 3, 4, Ski Club 3. GWAZDAC, IULIUS 1., St. Louis, Ill., B.S. in Geology, EH I, 2, 3, 4, Geology Club 4. HAGAN, ORVILLE M., Louisville, Ky., B.S. in Mathematics. HALL, HERMAN 1. IR., Greensboro, Ala., A.B. in English. HALL, KATHELINE G., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Sociology? Newman Club 4. HARMAN, ELIZABETH L., Geneva, N. Y., A.B. in Radio-TV Film, AAII 3, 4. HAYES, MARY A., Melbourne, Fla., A.B. in Art, AGM 4. HAYES, THOMAS N., Coral Gables, Fla., A.B. in Radio-TV, Radio-TV Guild 1, 2. HERMAN, IACK, Miami, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, AEA 2, 3, 4. HILL, ROBERT D., Reading, Pa., A.B. in Human Relations, ATU Sec.-2, 3, 4. HINDMAN, BERNARD W., Coral Gables, Fla., B.S. in Zoology, AXA 1, 2, 3, 4, ACN! Z, 3, 4, Sociology Club 2, German Club 4. HIRSCH, CHARLES 1., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, AEA 2, 3, 4, BBB 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 2. HODGE, BENNO B., Sopchoppy, Fla., B.S. in Geology, Cavaliers 4. HOLLERAN, ELEANOR M., Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, A.B. in History, Newman Club 4, All Campus 4. HOWE, LEROY T., Coral Gables, Fla., A.B. in Philosophy and History, DIPE 1, Sec.-2, V. Pres.-3, 4, OAK V. Pres.-3, 4, Iron Arrow 3, 4, AEE 3, 4, 111112 l, 2, 3, 4, AGM 3, 4, Wesley Foundation I, 2, V. Pres.-3, 4, IFC Pres.-Z, 3, SBG 2, Cabinet-3, Pres.-4, Outstanding Freshman Award, Dcan's List 1, 2, 3, 4, Who's Who 4. HOWERTON. ROBERT D., Wilmington, Ill., A.B. in Radio-TV, EAE 2, 3, 4. HOYT, SAMUEL F., Hialeah, Fla., A.B. in Sociology. HUDGINS, FREDERICK R., Tampa, Fla., A.B. in Psychology. HUGHES, HOWELL, Dallas, Texas, A.B. in Economics, Westminster Fellowship 2, 3, V. Pres.-4, Chorus 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 3. HUTCHISON, WILLIAM E., Miami Shores, Fla., A.B. in History, ATS2 2, V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4, Arnold Air Society 4, IFC 3, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. INGOLDBY, IOAN L., Fair Lawn, N. I., A.B. in Human Relations, FAX 3, V. Pres.-4, SAA 1, 2, 3, Arts and Sciences Treas.-4. INSELBURG, IOSEPH W., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, AEA 2, 3, 4, Pershing Rifles 2, Dean's List 3, 4. IANISCI-I, IACQUELYN M., Des Moines, Iowa, A.B. in English, KKI' 3, 4. IENNA, WILLIAM W. 1R., Coral Gables, Fla., A.B. in Government and Geography, EAE 1, 2, 3, 4, FST 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 2, 3, 4. IOHNSTON, ROY A., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, EAE I. KAMMAN, RUTH A., Milwaukee, Wise., B.S. in Nursing, Student Nurses Association 1, 2, 3, 4. KAPLAN, SEYMOUR, Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in History. 317 sit 1 5 lv ,V X X l G-K Arts and Sciences , f 35 'XY I xi s W3 9, 5 .E l . lt. 45 Arts ancl Sciences K-M KARP, PATRICIA L., Louisville, Ky., A.B. in Speech Therapy, AECI1' 1, 2, Pres.-3, 4, SAA Sec.-1, 2, SBG 1, 2, Cabinet-3, 4, Panhellenic Z, Treas.-3, 4, Homecoming 2, 3, 4, Resident Women's Council Sec.-1, 2, 3, 4, Ir. Counselor 2, 3, Who's Who 4. KATZKER, IACK E., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Human Relations, A1119 V. Pres.-2, 3, Pres.-4, AGPA Treas.-3, 4, German Club 1, 2, 3, 4, SBG Senator 4, Dcan's List 3. KESSLER, BARBARA L., Monroe, N. Y., B.S. in Biology: IAII 1, 2. KESSLEY, ALBERT S., Philadelphia, Pa., B.S. in Bi010gYE BBB 3, Pres.-4, Chemistry Club 2, 3, 4, German Club 2, 3, 4. KIRIAKIS, IOHN, Nixon, N. I., A.B. in Economics, Russian Club 1, Men's Residence Sec.-1. KIRIANOFF, T. G. D., Teheran, Iran, B.S. in Zoology, German Club 1. KLONSKY, RITA K., Miami'Bcach, Fla., A.B. in Philosophy, AAA 1, 2, Ibis 2, Hillel 1, 2. KOLCHNER, SANDRA I., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Art, Art Club 4. KON, ARNOLD B., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Iournalism, Cavaliers 1, 2, 3, AEH 1, Sociology Club 3, Drama Club 1, 2. KORNHISER, HARRY P., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, Track 1, 2. KROFINGER, FRANK P., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Gcologyg Geology Club 2, V. Pres.-3, 4. KUENZIG, FRANCIS I., Homestead Park, Pa., B.S. in Zoology. KYSER, GRACE S., Miami Springs, Fla., B.S. in Nursing. LAST, ALFRED, Syosset, N. Y., B.S. in Chemistry, Chemistry Club 3, Sword and Glove, 3, Hurricane 3, Hillel 3, Dean's List 2. LAST, PAULA D., Miami, Fla., A.B. in English. LAUCK, BARBARA A., York, Pa., A.B. in Spanish, ,AAA 1, Sec.-2, 3, 4: IIA41 Sec.-3, 4, 'AEE 4, NKT 4, Spanish Hon- orary 3, 4, YWCA 1, 2, WAA 1, 2, 3, 4, French Club 2, 3, 4, Panhellenic 3, Dean's List 2. LAYCOCK, ROY D., Muncie, Ind., A.B. in Sociology? EN 1, 2, 3, Pres.--4, CIJHE 1, SAA 1, 2, Pep Club 2, Dean's List 1. LEE, CHERIE A., Charles- ton, Mo., A.B. in Drama and Radio-TV Film. LEE, IANICE L., Brooklyn, N. Y., B.S. in Home Economics, Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, Sec.-4, Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4. LEFKOWITZ, LOUISE T., Miami Beach, Fla., M.S. in Psychiatric Nursing, EAT 1, 2, 3, Treas.-4. LEEGANT, ALAN R., New Rochelle, N. Y., A.B. in Government, A429 2, 3, 4, Fellowship of Religious Liberals 2, 3, 4, Public Affairs Club 3, 4, Hillel 1, 2. LEISCHEN PAULA M., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Home Economics, AXQ 3, V. Pres.-4, 3 Cavalcttes Sec.-2, Treas.-3, V. Pres.-4, Home Economics Club 2, Treas.-3, V. Pres.-4, Dreamgirl of GX 4. LE IEUNE, WILLIAM R., Chicago, Ill., A.B. in Commercial Art. LENNON, IOHN C. IR., White- ville, N. C., A.B. in History, HK!!! 3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4, BSU 4. LEWIS, MARGARET A., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Nursing. LEYVIS, PATRICIA A., Coral Gables, Fla., A.B. in Spanish, ZTA 3, 4, Dean's List 3, 4. LIPTON, HARRIET I., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in English, EAT 3, 4, Art Club 4, Hurricane 3, Philosophy Club 4, Dean's List 3. LOBO, RICHARD M., Tampa, Fla., A.B. in Radio-TV Film and Iournalism, Pershing RiHes 2, ROA 2, 3, 4, Army ROTC 2, 3, 4, Radio-TV Guild 3, 4. LOTT, IOHN R., Winter Park, Fla., A.B. in English, Dean's List 2, 3, 4. LOWDER, GEOFFREY M., Lima, Peru, B.S. in Geology, Geology Club 3, 4. LUNDQUIST, EDWARD B., Chicago, Ill., B.S. in Food Technology, EN 3, 4, Institute of Food Technologists 1, Football 2. MCCARTHY, MARGARET M., Miami, Fla., A.B. in History. MCCARTIN, WILLIAM IR., New Haven, Conn., B.S. in Chemistry, Chem- istry Club 2, 4. MCCUE, KEMPER W., Amarillo, Texas, B.S. in Physics. MCLAUGHLIN, ROBERT R., White Plains, N. Y., A'.B. in Iournalism, Tempo Managing Ed.-4, Ibis 4. MacDONALD, FRANK E., North Plain- field, N. I., B.S. in Geology, Newman Club 1, 2, German Club 1, Sea Devils 2, 3, 4. MacDONALD, ROBERT H., Hillsboro Beach, Fla., A.B. in Russian, Russian Club 1, 2, Pres.-3, 4, Dean's List l, Z. MACHEN- BERG, CAROL D., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Art: FAX Sec.-3, 4, Art Club 3, 4, Ibis 3, Parent Age 4, Dean's List 2. MacPHERSON, DAUN T., Bellefontaine, Ohio: A.B. in Sociology, Dean's List 2, Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4. MAISEL, MORTON, North Miami, Fla., A.B. in History. v 'S J' MATHIOS, IUDITI-I, Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Human Relations, Hur- ricane 2, Ir. Counselor 4, Dean's List 3. MEEHAN, VIRGINIA M., Chi- cago, Ill., A.B. in English, ASM 3, Sec.-4, Dean's List 2, 3. MEINDL, EUGENE F., Buffalo, N. Y., A.B. in Radio-TV Film, SMPTE 2, 3, 4. MERLIN, IOSEPH B., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Philosophy, IIA41 2, 3. MEYER, ANNE L., Coral Gables, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, AAA l, 2, IIME 3, 4: Dean's List l, Chemistry Club 2, 3, 4. MICHELSEN, NEIL F., Chicago, Ill., A.B. in Mathematics, AGM 4, Dean's List 4. MIELTY, EILA H., Clayton, N. Y., A.B. in French and English, WAA 2, Wesley Foundation 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 3. MILLEN, ALAN G., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., B.S. in Zoology, Army ROTC 3, 4. MALEK, LILLIAN, Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Drama, Drama Guild Sec.-3, 4. MANN, PHILIP H., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Psychology. MARIAS, BARBARA I., Miami Beach, Fla., B.S. in Psychology, AEfIJ 1, 2, 3, 4. MARKS, IOANNEg Miami Beach, Fla., B.S. in Home Economics, EAQ 3, 4, Home Economics Club l, 2, 3, Pres.-4. MARLEAUX, IVAN E., Las Vegas, Nev., A.B. in Sociology, Hillel 2, 3, Sociology Clubi2, 3, 4, Spanish Club 1, 2. MARSH, CHARLOTTE M., Winter Haven, Fla., B.S. in Medical Technology. MARSHALL, CLETA M., Winston Salem, N. C., A.B. in Iournalism, EK 1, Sec.-2, 3, 4, YWCA lg Hurricane 3. MARTIN, IAMES A., Uniontown, Pa., A.B. in Radio-TV Film, EN 3, 4, AEP 4, KABI 4: MOT V. Pres.-4. . Six 1" , H3 5 94 1. . A ' I V5 MILLER, MAREE A., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Biol0gY3 EACIP 3, 4, BBB 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 3. MORGAN, DANIEL F. IR., Port jefferson Station, N. Y., B.S. in' Mathematics and Physics, Dean's List 3. MORGAN, LOWELL T., Princeton, W. Va., A.B. in Sociology. MORRIS, ALYSE, Nashville, Tenn., A.B. in Psychology, AEG? 1, 2, 3, 4, Ir. Counselor 3. MOSES, ORRY R., Bayside, N. Y., B.S. in Chemistry. MOTZER, NEILAND E., Hamilton, Ohio, A.B. in Drama, A4179 l, 2, 3, 4. MULLER, CAROL M., New Gardens, N. Y., A.B. in History, ZTA 3, 4, FAX 3, Canterbury 3, 4, Liberty Forum 3, 4. MURPHY, LAWRENCE B., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Government, fIJIIE l, 2, 3, 4, ASM 3, 4, QA9 4, Newman Club l, 2, 4, French Club 2, 3, 4, Art Club 3, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4. Arls and Sciences N-P NAPOLI, FRANCEAN G., Coral Gables, Fla., A.B. in English, AGM 4, Dean's List 2, 3. NAYLOR, GARNET M., York, Pa., A.B. in Art. NEW, OSCAR T., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Sociology, Dean's List 3, Newsletter 4. NEWMAN, LAWRENCE E., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Zoology, QHE 1, V. Pres.-2, 3, 4, A9M 2, V. Pres.-3, 4, AEA 2, 3, 4, BBB 2, 3, 4, SBG Senator 3, AEE 3, 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4, 'Outstanding Pre-Medical Graduate. NOVITCH, HOWARD, North Bergen, N. I., B.S. in Biology, TACIP 2, 3, 4. OBER, FRED R., Coral Gables, Fla., A.B. in Philosophy, CIPEII Sec.-1, 2, V. Pres.-3, 4, L'Apache 2, V. Pres.-3, 4. O'CONNELL, IDA A., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Home Economics, X9 1, 2, Sec.-3, V. Pres.-4, PAX 2, 3, Newman Club 1. OLINGER, IOHN B., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Engineering, Society of Automotive Engineers 4. O'NEIL, PATRICK E., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Radio-TV. OSER, ANITA K., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Spanish, AAA 1, 2, 3, AQHA, Sec.-2, 3, Ger- man Club, V. Pres.-1, Sec.-2, 3, Dean's List 1. OWENS, IO-ELLEN, Homestead, Fla., B.S. in Home Economics. PALEVODA, WALTER, Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Iournalism, Hurricane 1. PALUCH, FRANCES H., Coral Gables, Fla., A.B. in Commercial Art, FAX 3, 4, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. PATCHEN, MARY-ANN, Phila- delphia, Pa., A.B. in French, French Club 3, 4. PATTI, IOAN, Coral Gables, Fla., A.B. in Commercial Art, FAX 3, 4, Hurricane 4, Ibis 4, Tempo 4, Honor Court 4. PELLETTIERI, LUIGI B., Wethersfield, Conn., A.B. in English, Symphony 1. PENLAND, IOYCE F., Bristol, Tenn., A.B. in Radio-TV, X9 1, 2, AEP 2, 3, 4. PEREZ, FRANCISCO., Guayaguil, Ecuador, B.S. in Iour- nalism, The Globetrotter, Editor-3, 4. PERRENOUD, DONALD K., Fair Lawn, N. J., A.B. in English, QKT 1, 2. PERROW, IOHN s., Roanoke, Va., A.B. in History. PERSE, EDWARD A., Milwaukee, Wisc., A.B. in History. PESSAK, IANET G., New York, N.Y., A.B. in Psychology, Psychology Club 2, Fellowship of Religious Liberals 3, Dean's List 4. PETECH, ROSITA, Miami, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, AAA 1, Sec.-2, 3, 4, ZAQ 2, 3, Sec.- 4, NKT 3, 4, AEA 2, 3, Pres.-4, BBB 3, 4, Dean's List 1, AEE 4. PETRY, IOAN M., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Nursing, Student Nurses Asso- ciation 1, Treas.-2, 3, Pres.-4. PHELPS, ARTHUR P., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Fine Arts, Hurricane, 1, 2, Parent Age, Art Ed.-3, 4. PI-HLLIPS, LYNDA L., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Commercial Art, IIBCID 4, FAX 3, 4, Chorus 2, 3, 4, Engineer- ing School Queen 3, Ibis Queen 4. PICTON, MARIANNE, Port Arthur, Texas, A.B. in English. POGREBIN, ROBERT, Ossining, N. Y., B.S. in Biology, TEQIJ 2, 3, 4, Pre-Dental Association 1. POTASH, LINDA S., Syracuse, N. Y., A.B. in Psychology. POTOTSKY, MYRNA B., Philadelphia, Pa., A.B. in American Civilization, Ski Club 1, Hillel 1, 3, 4. PRINCE, EDWARD J., Atlantic City, N. J., A.B. in Radio-TV, TACIP 2, 3, 4, Honor Court 2, 3, 4, Philosophy Club 1, 2, Who's Who 3, Homecoming 4. PRESTI, LOUIS I., Stanford, Conn., A.B. in Radio-TV Film, CIPAB 2, 3, 4. 320 3 .f- 32 ' 'gt 'YC , me Wg r , 5 31? 379525 ' yt iff:- QUIN, FRANK W., West Chester, Pa., A.B. in Economics. RARES, HELENE L., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Art, Cavalettes 2, 3, Sec.-4, Ski Club Z. READ, ROBERT W., Runnemede, N. I., B.S. in Botany, I'A, Treas.-1, Pres.-2, 3, Dean's List 4. REED, WILLIAM A., Wilmington, Del., B.S. in Psychology. REINLIEB, IOEL M., Belle Harbor, N.Y., A.B. in Iournalism, Tempo 3, Hurricane 2, 3, 4, Ibis 2, 3, Boxing 1, 2, Football 1, Intramural- Pub- licity 3, 4. REISS,'NANCY E., Farwell, Mich., A.B. in Radio-TV Film, AAA 3, 4, Radio-TV Guild 4, Wesley Foundation 3, V. Pres.-4, NSA District Sec.-3, AFROTC Princess 4, Angel Flight Deputy Command- er-4, SBG Hostess 4, Who's Who 4. REITMAN, ELI E., Atlantic City, N. I., A.B. in Psychology, QHE 1, 2, 3, 4, Chemistry Club 1, 2, German Club 1, 2, 3, Psychology Club 4, Dean's List 1, 4, NIIX 4. REMLEY, GLORIA L., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Nursing. RENN, WALTER F., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Zoology, BBB 4, Chemistry Club 3. RICE, HOWARD M., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Radio-TV, TE47 Sec.-1, V. Pres.-2, Pres.-3, 4, SBG Senator-Z, Lt. Governor-3. RICH, MARK, Miami, Fla., B.S. in Zoology, AEII I, 2, 3, 4, BBB 3, 4. Ronuss, LUISA B., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Biology. ROCCO, ROSALIND C., New York, N. Y., A.B. in Commercial Art, PAX 3, Treas.--4, ITA 1, 2, Ir. Counselor 1, 2, 3, 4, Associated Women Students Council 3, 4. ROSENBLATT, BERNARD S., Queens, N. Y., A.B. in Drama, AEE 3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, Battle Group Commander-4, Pershing Rifles 1, 2, Pres.-3, Scabbard and Blade 3, 4, Drama Guild, Pres.-2, 3, 4, ROA 1, 2, 3, 4, Ring Theatre 1, 2, 3, 4, OAK 4, Who's Who 4. ROSENBLUM, WILLIAM M., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Physics, Dean's List 3, 4, Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, Pres.-4. ROSENFELD, PAUL G., Miami, Fla., A.B. in History. ROSENSAFT, ANNE R., New York, N. Y., A.B. in Sociology, IAIT 1, Sec.-2, 3, V. Pres.-4, SPX 4, Hillel 1, 2, Sociology Club 4, Dean's List 3. ROSS, ,HERBERT I., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Sociology. ROTH, RICHARD D., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Geography, I'9T 3, Sec.-4. ROTHMAN, IOSEPH, New York, N. Y., B.S. in Chemistry, Psychology Club 3, 4, Chemistry Club 3, 4. RUFFOL0, HENRY P. IR., Iamaica, N. Y., B. S. in Chemistry, AXA 1, 2, Sec.-3, 4. RUSKIN, ANN G., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Com- mercial Art. SABATH, IRWIN A., New York, N. Y., B.S. in Geology, Geology Club 2, 3, 4. SALAZAR, GLORIA B., Havana, Cuba, B.S. in Mathematics. SAWYER, SUZANNE M., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Speech, Dean's List 3. SCHNEIDER, RICHARD L., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Geography, ABT 4, Dean's List 2, 3, 4. SCHNEIDERMAN, ALAN P., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in Iournalism, ZAX 2, 3, 4, Leadand Ink 1, 2, 3, 4, Hurricane 1. SEIDEL, HERBERT, Miami, Fla., A.B. in Psychology. SERAFIN, ALICIA M., Worcester, Mass., A.B. in Psychology, AAII 3, 4, FAX 2, 3, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Ir. Counselor 2, 3. SEITLIN, BARBARA I., Miami, Fla., A.B. in American Civilization, AEIIP 3, 4. SHAPIRO, MORTON, Brooklyn, N. Y., A.B. in English, Dean's List 1, 2, 3. SHAPO, MARSHALL S., Miami, Fla., A.B. in History, EAX 2, Pres.-3, 4, QK41 3, 4, OAK 3, 4, Iron Arrow 3, Chief-4, Hurricane 1, 2, Editor-3, SBG 4, NSA, Chairman-4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, AEE 3, 4, Who's Who 4. 321 P-S Arts and Sciences 5:1 5 S 'hs in .1 I Arts and Sciences S-T SHEA, CHARLES A., Bloomfield, Conn., A.B. in Iournalism, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4. SI-IENFELD, GARY, Ventnor, N. I., A.B. in Radio-TV Film, AEP 3, 4, Radio-TV Guild 1, 3, 4. SHERMAN, TAMARA F., Washington, D. C., A.B. in Commercial Art, PAX, V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4, Ir. Counselor 2. SIEGEL, HERBERT, Miami, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, Chemistry Club, Treas.-3, V. Pres. 4, Dean's List 4. SIEGEL, LEILA V., Great Neck, N. Y., A.B. in English, Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4, Ir. Counselor 2. SIEGEL, MARTIN, Miami, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, Chemistry Club, Sec.-3, V. Pres.-4, American Chemical Society 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 4. SIEGEL, PAUL, Miami Beach, Fla., B.S. in Physics, TACIP 1, 2, 3, 4, fIJHE 1, 2, Pres.--3, 4, AGM, V. Pres.-4, SBG, Senator-4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, AEE 4, OAK 4, Who's Who 4. SIEGLE, BARBARA L., Trenton, N. I., A.B. in Psychology, Lead and Ink 2, 3, 4, SBG 33, Senator-4, Ibis 1, Hurricane 2, 3, News Ed.-4, Tempo Editor-4, Sketchbook 2, Psychology Club 2, 3, 4, Sociology Club 2. SIGELBAUM, HARVEY C., Newark, N. I., A.B. in Philosophy, QEII 1, 2, 3, 4, Liberty Forum 1, 2, Senator 1, Dean's List 1. SKIDMORE, RICHARD A., Bryn Mawr, Pa., A.B. in Journalism, K2 3, 4, AAE 4, Philosophy Club 43 Management Society 4. SMITH, MARGARET R., Chicago, Ill., A.B. in Radio-TV, French Club 2, 3, 43 Ski Club 3, 4. SNYDER, ALVIN A., Atlantic City, N. I., A.B. in Radio-TV Film, Iron Arrow 3, 4, EAX, Treas.--3, V. Pres.-4, AEP, Pres.-3, KAM 3, 4, Who's Who 4. SPAULDING, ANN H., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Radio-TV, XO, Sec., Treas.- 2, 3, 4, Lead and Ink 2, 3, 4, AEP 3, 4, AEE 3, 4, Student Directory, Editor-4, Parent Age, News Ed.-2, Hurricane 2, 3, 4, SBG, Sec.--4, Florida Intercollegiate Press Association, Sec.-2, 3, 4, Sweetheart of MOT 4, NSA 4, Who's Who 4. STAHRE, RALPH B., Coral Gables, Fla., B.S. in Food Technology. STEARNS, ROBERT W., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Human Relations, EII 2, 3, 4. STEIN, LEE P., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Art, AEIIP 1, 2, Hillel 1, 2, Art Club 4, SBG 1, 2. STEINER, ROBERT B., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, ZAE 1, 2, 3, 4, M Club, Treas.-3, Sec.-4, Basketball 1, 2, 3. STEPHENSON, THOMAS R., West Palm Beach, Fla., B.S. in Zoology, KE 4, CIJOK 1, 2, 3, 4, CPPII 1, 2, 3, 4, AEA 4, Dean's List 1, 2. STEWART, CHARLES W., San Carlos, Cal., A.B. in Drama, TKE 2, 3, 4, Drama Guild 4. STIEGLITZ, ALBERT B., South Miami, Fla., A.B. in Government, AXA 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 2. STONE, GEORGE T., Coral Gables, Fla., B.S. in Geology, EAE 1, 2, 3, 4, Geology Club 1, 2, 3, Pres.-4, Dean's List 2, 3. STONE, MYRON I., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in French, French Club 1, 2, Hillel 1, German Club 1. STRAUSS, HARVEY E., Atlantic City, N. I., A.B. in Iournalism. STROUP, PHYLLIS A., Ravenna, Ohio, A.B. in Psych0l0gYS Cavalettes 2, 3, 4, Psychology Club, V. Pres.-3, French Club 1, 2, Sec.-3, 4, Ski Club 2, 3, 4, Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 4, Dean's List 3. SUBIN, PAULA L., Miami Beach, Fla., A.B. in History, AEII 4. SWAEBLY, FRANCES M., Norwalk, Ohio, A.B. in Iournalism, PAX 3, 4, Lead and Ink 2, 3, 4, Newman Club' 1, 2, 3, 4, NSA 2, 3, 4, Radio-TV Guild 1, 2, Tempo 1, 2, Hurricane 1, 2, 3. SWING, BERNICE H., Miami, Fla., A.B. in English. SYREK, EDWARD F., Washington, Pa., A.B. in Art, Dean's List 1, 2, 3. TALBOT, GEORGE W., Delray Beach, Fla., A.B. in Education, M Club 4, Basketball 3, 4. TARR, STEPHAN H., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry, Opera Guild 2, 3. TARRSON, CAROLE A., Chicago, Ill., A.B. in History. TIDWELL, ELEANOR L., Miami, Fla., A.B. in Mathematics. T-W Arts and Sciences TOMHAVE, SUE E.3 Cloquet, Minn.3 B.S. in Geography3 POT 3, 43 AAA 1, 2, 3, 4g AGM 2, 3, 43 Canterbury House 1, 2, 3, 43 1r. Counselor 2, 3, 43 Saddle and Spur Pres.-23 Fencing Club 13 Canterbury Award 2, 3g Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4g NKT 4. TOOMEY, PAUL R.3 Coral Gables, Fla.3 A.B. in Historyg EX 1, 2, Pres.-3, 43 QHE 1, 2, 3, 43 SBG Senator-3, Cabinet-43 Tempo 33 Liberty Forum 1, 2, 3, 43 Dean's List 1, 23 Iron Arrow 43 OAK 43 AEE 43 Who's Who 4. TOTAH, HENRY3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Mathematics. TOWLE, LYNN R.3 Burlington, Vt.3 A.B. in 1our- nalismg IAII 3, 43 Hurricane 33 Hillel 3, 4g Chorus 4. TREES, CLIFTON C.3 Coral Gables, Fla.3 M.A. in Economics. TRUPPMAN, BARBARA G.3 Minneapolis, Minn.3 A.B. in Sociology. TRUSHIN, BARBARA Y.3 Miami, Fla.3 A.B. in Speechg Debate 43 Dean's List 3. TUCKER, SHERRILL R.3 Rock Island, Ill.3 A.B. in Sociologyg AI' 3, Sec.-4. TURRELL, BARBARA E.3 Auburn, N. Y.3 B.S. in Nursingg AAA 3, 4. UCHIM, ABBE3 Brooklyn, N. Y.3 A.B. in Psychology3 1r. Counselor 2, 3. URBANEK, IOYCE M.3 Matinowoc, Wisc.3 A.B. in Hispanic-American Studies. VARELMANN, IOHN B.3 Cincinnati, Ohio3 A.B. Commercial Art3 Dean's List 4. VASCONEZ, LUIS 0.3 Ambato, Ecuadorg B.S. in Chemistry3 QI-IE 13 AEA 23 Globetrotter Circulation Manager 33 Dean's List 1, 2, 3. VENIS, GEORGE T.3 St. Augustine, Fla.3 B.S. in Chemistryg AEA 33 AKK 5. VITALE, ROBERT A.3 Denville, N. 1.3 A.B. in Spanish and Frenchg IIAfIH 3, 43 EA1'I 3, 43 French Club 1, 2, 3, 43 Spanish Club 3, 43 Cheerleader 23 Drama Guild 4. WARREN, ARNOLD3 Fall River, Mass.3 A.B. in English. WARREN, IACQUE M.3 Gettysburg, Pa.3 A.B. in Psychol0gY3 AAA 1, 2, 3, 4g Lead and Ink 1, 2, 3, Sec.-Treas.--43 KAM 2, Sec.-3, 43 GEII 2, 3, V. Pres.-43 Tempo 1, 23 Ibis 1, Assistant Ed.-2, Associate Ed.-3, Editor-43 Angel Flight Commander-43 AFROTC Queen 23 Who's Who 43 Publications Board 4. WASAI, RICHARD H.3 Haleiwa, Oahu, I-Iawaiig A.B in 1ournalism3 EAX. WASSERMAN, MARTHA3 Newark, N. 1.3 A.B. il Human Relations. WAUGH, LESLEY M.3 North Attleboro, Mass.3 A.B. in Drama3 Drama Guild SCC.-ZQ Ring Theatre 1, 2, 3, 4. WEBB, HARRY W.3 Hialeah, Fla.3 A.B. in Spanish. WEINER, ALAN 1.3 Fairfield, Conn.3 A.B. in Sociologyg Golf 4. WEINER, ROBERTA3 Miami, F1a.3 A.B. in Human Relations3 EAI 1, 2, V. Pres.--3, Pres.-43 Chorus 13 Opera Guild 2, 3, 4. WEINROTH, GEORGE 1.3 Elkton, Md.Q A.B. in Governmentg A1199 1, Sec.-2, 3, 43 CIJHE 1, 23 ROA 1, 2, 3, 43 Dean's List 1, 2. WEIR, IOHN3 Teaneck, N. 1.3 A.B. in Economics3 EX 2, 3, 43 L'Apache 2. WEISSMAN, IERROLD A.3 Great Falls, Mont.3 A.B. in Historyg A490 2, 3, V. Pres.-43 Debate 23 Ski Club 4. WEST, ORMAND 1. 1R.3 Manchester, Conn.3 A.B. in Radio-TV Film3 AEP 3, Pres.-43 Radio-TV Guild 1, 2, Pres.-3, 4g Iron Arrow 4. WEYAND, MARY 1.3 Miami, Fla.3 A.B. in Drama. WHITE, 1ACK H.3 West Palm Beach, Fla.3 B.S. in Chemistryg Chemistry Club 3, Pres.-4. WHITE, ROBERT 0.3 Wethersfield, Conn.3 B.S. in Geologyg EAE 1, 2, 3, 4g Geology Club 1, 2, 3. WILBER, ALBERT R. 1R.3 West Palm Beach, Fla.3 A.B. in Art. WILLIAMS, CLARENCE A.3 Homestead, Fla.3 B.S. in Mathernatics3 German Club 43 Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 43 Dean's List 1. SCALE MODEL is carefully measured before fhe lasf fouches are puf on fhe decorafing scheme. Arts and Sciences W-Z WILLIAMS, IOHN F., Coshocton, Ohio, B.S. in Economics, Ski Club 3, EAM 3, 4, Dcan's List 2. WILSON, FRED S., Chicago, Ill., A.B. in Radio-TV, EX 2, 3, 4, 5. WINOKUR, RONALD A., Philadelphia, Pa., B.S. in Psychology, TEKIP 2, Sec.-3, 4, Pep Club 2, SAA 2, 3, All Campus Party 4, Hillel Foundation 2. WITTICH, KENNETH C. IR., Coral Gables, Fla., A.B. in Psychology, AXA 2, 3, 4. WOODY, PENELOPE, P., Boston, Mass., B.S. in Nursing. WRIGHT, CARL I. IR., Miami, Fla., A.B. in History, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4, Scabbard and Blade V. Pres.-4, ROA 2, Treas.-3, V. Pres.--4. YVARS, REYNALDO, Tampa, Fla., B.S. in Chemistry. ZACCAGNINO, DON- ALD L., Stanford, Conn., B.S. in Zoology, EVD 1, 2, 3, 4, Italian Club lg German Club 2. ZARRAONANDIA, THOMAS, Miami, Fla., A.B. in Art History, Art Club, Dean's List I, 3, 4, ZARRAONANDIA, EMETERIO, Miami, Fla., B.S. in Mathematics. ZIEGLER, MARILYN, Detroit, Mich., A.B. in Philosophy, Philosophy Club Sec.-3, 4, Public Affairs Club Sec.-3, 4, Westminster Fellowship 3, Sec.-4, EAT 2, 3, Dean's List 3, 4. NKT 4. ZILLMAN, ROY S., Batavia, N. Y., A.B. in Government. i KNEELING ARTIST reflecfs careful fhoughf before adding a defail fo her canvas, hoping fhaf if will harmonize wifh fhe resf of her creafion. 324 Studies In Arts and Sciences Help Make the Whole Man HE WORLD has taken tremendous technological steps within recent years, harnessing the atom, re- peatedly cracking the sound barrier and, more startling, placing a shaky toe on the doorstep of outer space. But men of intelligence know that the achievements are hollow victories if they are no more than triumphs of technology. Men of intelligence know that without the freshness of imagination, the accomplishments are meaningless, unless they are intended to benefit man- kind, the accomplishments are worthless. So, as a type of insurance against technology-fon technology's-sake, men of intelligence still teach the arts. It is their hope to develop young men and young women into well-rounded persons, neither wholly scien- tific nor wholly artistic. Men of intelligence want their students to know not only "how" to do a thing but "why" they do it. And that is the reason for a college of arts and sciences. From a salt-spray covered oceanography laboratory on South Florida's Virginia Key to the Parkway Play- house in Burnsville, North Carolina, where drama stu- dents get summer-stock experience, the UM College of Arts and Sciences is an all-encompassing department. Students also have the opportunity of attending summer school in Oaxaca, Mexico, but the most work is done right on campus, where hundreds of courses are offered. American civilization, teaching the meanings and implications of democracy, journalism, teaching the methods and reasons for reporting accurately, human relations, teaching the problems of racial and cultural diversitiesg mathematics, teaching how man can solve his search for X-such courses are representative of the aims of men of intelligence. A SCIENTIST'S HANDS are important tools, tor no matter how expensive his instruments, they are no better than the hands that use them. Removing organs from rats and 'Fighting to avoid contamination are simple tasks in experienced hands. EARPHONES IN PLACE, LANGUAGE STUDENTS LISTEN TO TAPE RECORDED LESSONS AS THEY FOLLOW THE WRITTEN WORD IN THEIR TEXTBOOKS ,3 . , , , 5 ,,,,. ,,,.s.....,. .. NW' . 4 GROVER A. J. NOETZEL, Dean School of Business Administration AHIGH DEGREE of specialization is offered to the more than 2,000 students enrolled in the School of Business Administration. The School offers courses from pre-law to aviation administration. There are 32 separate accounting courses alone, helping to account for the fact that UM Business School graduates score five to 15 points above the national average of those who take the uniform 326 American Institute of Accountants' exams. Work simplification and time study comprise another phase of the School, the Time and Motion Study Lab. On-the-job training is arranged for a number of stu- dents through the cooperation of business firms. More time for faculty research has been provided by a recent load reduction, cutting teaching time from 15 to 12 hours per week. AAL, ROY S., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, AA2 4, Tri-Nu V. Pres.-2, 3, Dean's List 3. ABDENOUR, RICHARD G., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, A211 3, 4. ALBERT, 1ERRY B., Miami, Fla. B.B.A. in Management, EAM 3, 4. ALLEN, 1AMES H. 1R., Hollywood, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. ALLRED, REX W., Huntington, Ind., B.B.A. in Accounting, A211 3, 4. ALTER, PATRICIA U., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, KKI' 1, 2, 3, Sec.-4. ALTMAN, ALLAN H., Brooklyn, N. Y., B.B.A. in Market- ing, AAE 3, 4, Men's Residence 3, Adviser-4, Hurricane 4. ALVAREZ, CARLOS, Guayaquil, Ecuador, B.B.A. in Marketing, Propeller Club 4. AMIDON, HARRY I., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. ANANIA, RONALD 1., Geneva, N. Y., B.B.A. in Aviation Management, KA 1, 2, 3, 4. ANLLO, REYNALDO A., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Avia- tion Administration, EAE 3, 4, Arnold Air Society 3, Pres.-4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. ARCHER, ROBERT, New Haven, Conn., B.B.A. in Economics. ARMALY, IOSEPH W., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance, Newman Club 4. ARTON, CHARLES 1., Ridley Park, Pa., B.B.A. in Economics, Flying Club 4. ASTORE, ROBERT 1., Lodi, N. 1., B.B.A. in Manage- ment, A241 1, Sec.-2, V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4. BADER, CURTIS L., Omaha, Neb., B.B.A. in Marketing, EN 4. BAKALIK, ROBERT F., Youngston, Ohio, B.B.A. in Aviation Admin- istration, EAT 3, 4. BALSAM, BERNARD M., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. BARKETT, IOHN S., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, ATQ 1, 2, 3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. BARON, BETTE S., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance, Af1PE 1, 2, 3, 4, Hillel Foundation 1, Sec.-2, 3, 4, Liberty Forum 1, 2, Business School Sec.-2. BAUER, RAYMOND G., Spring Lake, N. 1., B.B.A. in Personnel Management, AXA 3, 4, Wesley Foundation 3, 4, ski Club 3, 4. BAYLEY, WILLIAM R., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, ZAE 1, 2, 3, 4, M Club 3, V. Pres.-4, Tennis 3, 4. BECK, CLAUDE S., Thomas- ton, Ga., B.B.A. in Accounting. BENNETT, ROBERT G., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, QA9 2, Treas.-3, 4, A211 3, Newman Club 2, 3, 4. BERKMAN, MARTIN G., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Industrial Manage- ment, Management Society 4. BERN, ARTHUR F., Chicago, Ill., B.B.A. in Latin American Trade, ZBT 3, 4, Pep Club 3, 4, IFC 3, 4, Pro- peller Club 3, 4, Ski Club 3, 4, Honor Court 4. BERRY 1ERROLD C., Boynton Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. BEVINGTON, RICHARD A., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. BINGHAM, WILLIAM G., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, Newman Club 3, Public Affairs Club 4. BISCHOFF, RONALD K., Toledo, Ohio, B.B.A. in Economics, 9X 1, 2, Cavaliers Sec.-2, V. Pres.-3, 4, Union Board of Governors 4. BLEAKLEY, ORTIN D. IH, St. Petersburg, Fla., B.B.A. in Management. BLOOM, MICHAEL N., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, TECIH 1, 2, 3, 4. 327 A-B Business Business B-C BOLEN, IAMES S., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Government, f1PA9 2, 3, Sec.-4, AKYI' 4, Union Board of Governors 3, 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4. BONNER, DAVID V. IR., Norfolk, Va., B.B.A. in Management, fIPMA 1, 2, 3, Treas.-4, AK11' 3, 4, Men's Residence Hall Association 2, Sec.-3, Treas.-4, SBG Cabinet 4, Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Symphony 1, 2, 3, 4, OAK 4. BOOZER, IOHN D., Canton, Ala., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, CIPA9 1, 2, 3, 4. BORINSKY, ARNOLD M., Deal, N. I., B.B.A. in Marketing, AE11 1, Sec.-2, V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4. BRADY, GREGORY D., New York, N. Y., B.B.A. in Management, Management Society 3, Sec.-4, Ski Club 3, 4, Newman Club 1. BREGMAN, BEATRICE M., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, Accounting Society 3, 4. BRINCKERHOFF, EDGAR F., Hamden, Conn., B.B.A. in Industrial Man- agement. BRING, GORDON G., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, 2AM 2, Sec.-3, Treas.-4. BROOKS, HAROLD I., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, ZBT 1, 2, 3, 4. BROSIUS, ALBERT I., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, Management Society 3, Pres.-4, Propeller Club 4, Spanish Club 4. BROWN, MARGARET E., Winamac, Ind., B.B.A. in Accounting. BROWN, MORTON P., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, AE11 1, Sec.-2, 3, 4, Scabbard and Blade 3, Treas.-4, Pershing Rifles 1, 2, ROA 1, 2, 3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. BUCHANAN, HOWARD T., Sauitse Marie, Mich., B.B.A. in Economics, A211 4, Dean's List 4. BUC1-IELT, ROBERT E., West Bend, Wisc., B.B.A. in Marketing, A211 2, 3, 4, Propeller Club 2, 3, 4. BURDETTE, MARTIN E., Gas City, Ind., B.B.A. in Management, Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, M Club 2, 3, 4, Iron Arrow 4. BURKE, ROBERT E., McMechen, W. Va., B.B.A. in Aviation Manage- ment, CIDH2 1, 2, Sec.-3, 4, A211 2, 3, 4, 2AT 2, Treas.-3, Treas.-4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3. BYRD, IAMES F., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, 11KA 2, Pres.-3, 4, Management Society 4. CALDERON, IACOB I., Rochester, N. Y., B.B.A. in Finance. CALO, PETER C., Stamford, Conn., B.B.A. in Marketing, A211 2, 3, 4, AA2 3, 4. CARTER, WILLIAM A., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, K2 1, 2, 3, Pres.-4, Accounting Society 4, Home- coming Committee 2, Election Board 2, 3. CASANOVA, IACQUES, Tegucigalpa, Honduras, B.B.A. in Economics. CASANOVA, IORGELINA S., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, ALFA 3, Sec.-4, Propeller Club 4. CASHMAN, RICHARD I., Ft. Wayne, Ind., B.B.A. in Marketing, 2X 2, 3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2, Westminster,Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Ski Club 1. CASTRILLO, EDGAR, Puerto Rico, B.B.A. in Accounting, American Marketing Association 3. CATLIN, IAMES H. IR., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, K2 1, 2, 3, 4. CERGIZAN, PETER ALAN, Dyer, Ind., B.B.A. in Marketing, 2N 1, 2, 3, 4, A211 4, Golf Team 3, 4, Propeller Club 4. CESARONI, IOAN T., Thunderbolt, Ga., B.B.A. in Finance. CHAPMAN, RICHARD H., Coving- ton, Ky., B.B.A. in Finance, IIKA Treas.-2, Sec.-3, 4, SBG V. Pres.-4, IFC V. Pres.-3, Who's Who 4. CHARLTON, KERRY B., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, 2X 1, 2, Sec:-3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2, Dean's List 3. CHARLTON, ROBERT E., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance. CHERPAK, GEORGE MICHAEL, Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. CHORBAIIAN, ROY, Bronx, N. Y., B.B.A. in Marketing, IIKA 1, 2, Treas.-3, Pres.-4. C-D Business CLARK, DONALD H. II, East Hartford, Conn., B.B.A. in Aviation Ad- ministration, Choir 1. CLARKE, RAMON A., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Mar- keting, Propeller Club 2, 3, 4. COHEN, SAUL H., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. COHEN, STANLEY R., Boston, Mass., B.B.A. in Account- ing. COKINOS, PETE C., Washington, D. C., B.B.A. in Marketing. COLLINS, MICHAEL H., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Aviation Administration, EAT 3, 4, Dcan's List 3. COLLINS, ROBERT L. IR., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, EAA 1. -COLOSI, RONALD I., Stamford, Conn., B.B.A. in Accounting, ZX 3, Treas.-4, Newman Club 1, 2, Cavaliers 2, 4' AFROTC 3, Lt. Governor 2. : CONE, WILLIAM G., Old Bennington, Vt., B.B.A. in Marketing, 'CPA9 3, 4. CONTI, ANTHONY G. IR., New Castle, Pa., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, EN 1, Z, 3, 4. COOPER, PHILIP I., Winona, Minn., B.B.A. in Management, Management Club 4, TA 2, 3, 4. CORRIGAN, IOHN PAUL, Panama, Canal Zone, B.B.A. in Marketing, Propeller Club. COVE, DOUGLAS, Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, Dean's List 3. COX, DAVID M., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, Arnold Air Society Treas.-4, AFROTC 3, 4. COYNE, IOHN S., Franklin Square, N. Y., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, Management Society 4, Newman Club 4. DAHMER, ROBERT W., VVoodbury, N. I., B.B.A. in Management, KE 2, Sec.-3, 4, L'Apache 3, 4. DAMIAND, EUGENE C., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. DAUSEY, GEORGE M. IR., New Rochelle, N. Y., B.B.A., AXA 2, 3, 4, Newman Club V. Pres.-3, 4, Ski Club 3, 4, Swimming 2, 3, Base- ball 2. DAVENPORT, TAYLOR D., Sanford, N. C., B.B.A. in Mar- keting, Dean's List 1, 2. DAVIS, CHARLES R., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Government, AEII 3, 4. DAVIS, IRVING R., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. DeBOLT, ROBERT C., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., B.B.A. in Ac- counting. DELGARDO, HECTOR M., Iuncos, Puerto Rico, B.B.A. in Man- agement, Propeller Club 1, International Club 3. DeLONG, WILLIAM M., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Management. DENEHY, ROBERT C., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. DERNIS, MARTIN M., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance. DEROSA, FRANK C., Mt. Kisco, N. Y., B.B.A., 9X 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, 4. DEVILLE, PHIL R., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management. DEYCAZA, ROGELIO R., Panama City, Panama, B.B.A. in Economics, Newman Club 2, 3, 4. DICKSTEIN, ROBERT A., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Industrial Management. DIMARE, IAMES S., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, Dean's List 3, 4. DIXON, WILLIAM H., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Government. Business D-G 1 5 S 2 1 2 DONNER, WILLIAM I., Hollywood, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, ZBT 1, 2, 3, 4. DONOVAN, THOMAS P., Muskegon, Mich., B.B.A. in Accounting, AXA 3, 4. DORESON, STEPHEN I., Brooklyn, N. Y., B.B.A. in Marketing, EAM 1, 2, 3, Pres.-4, Honor Court 4, IFC 3, 4, Dean's List 2, 4, Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4,1 Pep Club 1, 2, Homecoming 3, Liberty Forum 1, 2, 3. DUERR, IOHN BERNARD IR., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.B.A. in Marketing, A2211 Sec.-4, Newman Club 4. DUNCAN, RICHARD E., Greenhills, Ohio, M.B.A. in Marketing. DYE, IOHN W., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, IIKA 1, 2, 3, 4, SBG Senator-4. ECHOLS, EVELYN A., Corpus Christi, Texas, B.B.A. in Accounting, Ski Club 1, 2, 4, Ir. Counselor 2, 3, 4. EICHLER, DAVID G., Waldwick, N. I., B.B.A. in Accounting, AFROTC 1, 2, 3. ELDREDGE, ALFRED T. IR., Coral Gables, Fla. B.B.A. in Accounting, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. ELIEHS, DONALD A., Belle Glade, Fla. B.B.A. in Accounting, Southern Student Association 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4, Psychology Club 4. ENTEL, GERALD, Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Market- ing, Propeller Club 4. FABIAN, PERRY M., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. FAIRCHILD, GEORGE B. IR., Conshohocken, Pa., B.B.A. in Manage- ment, Propeller Club 3, Management Society 4. FELDMAN, ERNA I., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance. FIGLIOLA, ARNOLD R., Rochester, N. Y., B.B.A. in Government, AGPA 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4, Psychology Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Ski Club 3, 4, Sociology Club 3, 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, Who's Who 4. FIORICA, VINCENT I., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. FISCH, RAFAEL, Havana, Cuba, B.B.A. in Government, Lieutenant Deputy of Honor Court 2, 3, 4, SBG Cabinet 3, 4. FISCHER, ROBERT, Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. FISH, ROBERT N., Boothbay Harbor, Maine, B.B.A. in Management. FISHER, SHELDON M., Cleve- land, Ohio, B.B.A. in Accounting, ZBT 4, Dean's List 3. FLACHNER, IACK A., Linden, N. I., B.B.A. in Marketing, TE41 1, 2, 3, 4. FLEISCHMAN, ROBERT I., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Account- ing. FOGLIA, ANTHONY A. IR., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, 'IIIKT 2, 3, 4, Liberty Forum 2, 3, 4, Propeller Club 3, 4. FORBESS, THOMAS E., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Government. FRANKEL, DAVID E., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, TE-CID 1, 2, 3, 4, Honor Court 3. FRANKLIN, ROBERT A., New York, N. Y., B.B.A. in Marketing. FREEMAN, RACHAEL T., Homesdele, Pa., B.B.A. in Accounting. FROMME, ERIC H., Rochester, N. Y., B.B.A. in Marketing. GAGER, CAREM, Kearney, Neb., B.B.A. in Management. GANZ, CONRAD R., West Palm Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, Accounting Society 4, Dean's List 3, 4. GARCIA, FRED, Remsenberg, N. Y., B.B.A. in Management. GEORGE, CHRIS I., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance and Marketing, EGIPE 1, 2, 3, 4. 330 if of KS 1 GILL, IOHN, Santurce, Puerto Rico, B.B.A. in Accounting, Miami Accounting Association 3, 4, AFROTC 3, 4. GLASS, ALVIN, Lawrence, N. Y., B.B.A. in Marketing, QEII 1, 2, 3, 4, Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4. GLASSMAN, PHILLIP, Brookline, Mass., B.B.A. in Economics, QEII 2, 3, 4, L'Apache 3, 4. GLAZER, IOSEPI-I A., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, A211 1, 2, 3, 4. GNAT, ALBERT, Spring Valley, N. Y., B.B.A. in Finance, 'IIPHE 1, V.Pres.-2, Pres.-3, Pres.-4, Dean's List l, 3. GOING, DONALD I., Mineola, N. Y., B.B.A. in Marketing, K2 1, 2, 3, 4. GOLDSTEIN, MARILYN, Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. GOMEZ, MIGDALIA, San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico, B.B.A. in Management. GONZALEZ, EUGENIO IR., San Iuan, Puerto Rico, B.B.A. in Account- ing, Propeller Club 3, Accounting Club 3. GORDON, ALAN M., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. GORDEN, WILLIAM P., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, AEII 4. GOTTLIEB, BARON R., McKeesport, Pa., B.B.A. in Government, TE42 1, 2, 3, 4. GOTTLIEB, ROBERTA C., Huntington, Mich., B.B.A. in Marketing, ZTA 1, 2, V.Pres.--3, Pres.-4, PAX 3, 4, BSU 1, YWCA 1, 2, Ir. Counselor 1, 2, 3, Women's Residence Council 4. GRANDE, GEORGE F., Rome, N. Y., B.B.A. in Accounting. GRANING, THOMAS IR., Covina, Cal., B.B.A. in Management, K2 3, 4. GRAUBARD, ROBERTA L., Fair Lawn, N. I., B.B.A. in Marketing. GRAVES, STUART L., West LaFayette, Ind., B.B.A. in Accounting, EH 2, V. Pres.-3, 4, FIPHE 1, Dean's List 1. GRAY, WILLIAM H., Augusta, Ga., B.B.A. in Management. GRIEVE, HAYDEN G., Perry, N. Y., B.B.A. in Management, EN 3, 4, Men's Residence 2, 3, Pres.--4. GROSS, NORMAN H., Miami Beach,'Fla., B.B.A. in Government. GROSSMAN, ROBERT L., Westport, Conn., B.B.A. in Marketing, IIPEII 3, 4. GRUNO, CHARLES D., Highland Falls, N. Y., B.B.A. in Economics, OX 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4, AKAI' 4, ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. GUERRERA, ARTHUR VINCENT, Philadelphia, Pa., B.B.A. in Man- agement, AEII 3, 4, Dean's List 3. GUNN, DONALD ALEXANDER, Chicago, Ill., B.B.A. in Management, EX 2, 3, 4, Propeller Club 3, 4, Ski Club 2, 3, 4, SBG Senator-4. HAAS, WILLIAM C., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, QA6 1, 2, Sec.-3, Pres.-4, Arnold Air Society Sec.-3, 4, AKAI' 2, 3, 4, IFC V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4, Pep Club 2, 3, 4, Football 1, SBG 2, 3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4, lron Arrow 4, Who's Who 4. HADER, HEBERT I., Brooklyn, N. Y., B.B.A. in Finance. HAGEN, MAX, Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Administration: IIAQ 2, 3, 4, Predental Club Sec.-4, Dean's List 4. HAMMER, IAMES E., Rushford, Minn., B.B.A. in Aviation Administration, Lutheran Student Association 3, V. Pres.-4. HANSCHMAN, RONALD ARMIN, Dolton, Ill., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, TKE 1, 2, 3, 4. HARRIS, WALTER B., Shelby, N. C., B.B.A. in Aviation Administration. HECHT, MELVIN, Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, Hillel l, 2, 3, 4, Chess Club 2, 3. HEILIG, IOHN K. IR., York, Pa., B.B.A. in Management, EAE 1, Sec.-2, Sec.-3, Treas.-4, AIEXP 2, Treas.-3, 4, 'PMA 2, 3, 4, Union Board of Governors V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4, SBG Senator-3, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4, Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Who's Who 4. 331 G-H Business Business H-K HENCINSKI, EDWARD I., Chicago, Ill., B.B.A. in Marketing, GX Sec.-2, 3, Pres.-4. HENDERSHOT, ROBERT A. IR., Parkersburg, W. Va., B.B.A. in Business Management. HENNING, WILLIAM L., Sarasota, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, EN 3, Treas.-4, Scabbard and Blade 3, 4, ROA 3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. HEROPOULOS, TONY A., Can- ton, Ohio, B.B.A. in Management. HICKEY, IOHN I., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, Dean's List 2. HITTELMAN, SHELDON D., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, Pershing Rifles, 1, 2, 3, 4, ROA 1, 2, 3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. I-IOCHFELDER, ALLEN R., Chicago, Ill., B.B.A. in Accounting, 'IIHEII Sec.-3, V. Pres. 4. HOLLOD, RONALD E., Pelham Manor, N. Y., B.B.A. in Aviation, EAT 4, ATO 1, 2, 3, 4, Newman Club 3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4, Men's Residence 3, 4. HOOVER, WILLIAM G., Washington, D. C., B.B.A. in Aviation Admin- istration, AEII V. Pres.-4, Dean's List 2. HOWARD, RUSSELL G., Du Bois, Pa., B.B.A. in Aviation Management, KE 1, Guard-2, 3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. HUGHES, DONALD A. IR., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. HUGHES, IAMES F., Brooklyn, N. Y., B.B.A. in Management, Cavaliers 2, Treas.-3, V. Pres.-4, Newman Club 1, 2. HUGHES, IOHN A., Homestead, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, EN 1, 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 3. IACKSON, DEAN P., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, EAE 1, 2, 3, 4. JACOBS, BERNARD, jamaica, N. Y., B.B.A. in Marketing, AEI1 1, 2, 3, Pres.--4, SBG Senator-1. IACOBSKIND, BARNETI' B., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, TEQ 1, Sec.--2, 3, 4, Hurricane Cir- culation Manager 4, Honor Court 3, Pep Club 1, 2, 3, 4. IACOBSON, ARTHUR C., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, TAT 1, 2, 3, 4, AAE 1, 2, 3, Pres.-4, AKYI' 3, 4, EAX 3, 4, Lead and Ink 1, 2, 3, 4, Hurricane Circulation Mgr.-l, Advertising Mgr.-2, Tempo Circu- lation Mgr.-2, Advertising Mgr.-2, Business Mgr.-3, 4, Parent Age 2, Publications Board 3, 4, Iron Arrow 4, Who's Who 4. IAEGER, FRED- ERICK H. IR., Merion, Pa., B.B.A. in Marketing, QA9 2, 3, 4, M Club 3, 4. IANISCH, RICHARD B., Neenah, Wis., B.B.A. in Finance. IANSON, HUGH M., Tulsa, Okla., B.B.A. in Finance, ZBT 1, 2,'3,N 4, Psychology Club 4, Ski Club 1. IAROVICS, IOHN I., Cleveland, Ohio, B.B.A. in Accounting. JENKINS, BRUCE C. IR., Langdale, Ala., B.B.A. in Finance, AEH 3, Treas.-4. IOHNSON, DONALD N., Madison, N. I., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, EAE 1, 2, 3, Management Society 2, 3, Sea Devils 1, 2. KAISER, HARRY B., Milwaukee, Wisc., B.B.A. in Marketing, AEH 1, 2, 3, 4, Pep Club 1, 2, 3, 4. KAUFMAN, HERBERT M., Spring Valley, N. Y., B.B.A. in Marketing, AEII Sec.-2, 3, 4. KAUFMAN, LAURENCE, Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, APO 4, Propeller Club Sec.--3, 4, Management Society 4. KAUTH, ROBERT R., Detroit, Mich., B.B.A. in Finance, EN 1, 2, 3, 4, L'Apache 2, Pres.-3, 4. KERR, PHILIP, Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance, Engineer 1, Chief Photographer-2, 3, 4. KESSLER, MELVYN, Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Management and Economics. KING, DALE W., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, AFROTC 1, 2, Band 1, Symphony 2, 3, BSU I, 2, 3, 4. KITT, IEANNIE W., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Eco- nomics, Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4. KOIKOWSKI, STANLEY A., Lawrence Harbor, N. I., B.B.A. in Marketing, HKA 3, 4, Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Baseball 4, M Club. KOVACHEVICH, ELIZABETH A., St. Petersburg, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance, AAA 3, 4, QPSK 4, Newman Club 3, 4, SBG Cabinet-4, Associated Women Students V. Pres.-4, Dean's List 3, 4, AEE 4, Who's Who 4. KOZIOL, IOHN S., Amsterdam, N. Y., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, Manage- ment Society 3, 4, Cavaliers 2, 3, 4. KRAMER, FREDERICK, Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, AFROTC 1. KROHN, MARK S., Miami,-Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, EAM 1, 2, 3, 4. KUCENSKI, ERNEST, Scranton, Pa., B.B.A. in Economics, KE 1, 2, Treas.-3, 4, 'PHE 1, 2, 3, 4, AIKEI' 3, 4, Lutheran Student Association 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4, Dean's List 1. KUGEL, CURTIS L., Atlantic City, N. I., B.B.A. in Marketing, Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4.. KUPFERBURGER, IOHANN F., Iohannesburg, South Africa, B.B.A. in Marketing, Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4, M Club 1, 2, 3, 4. K'URITZ, MARVIN M., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. K-M Business 4 .L - f. . Q ff .1 -, f?J?+?Eil5iEa.i1. '..v: - 1- . . asf asf,,g1MW:'f .fwsgeifgiiweHi f ' fa .4 trftflffl, , , , 'f g :jk-fi:QQ ist- SQ.. 'ra ' H -4 .fd f Q-Y 'ggi :-3:1 fQj'2' k I- 1 1 My 154.55 Nga., gmgplf' .1-:-?5:,:'C: ,'.-4233 7 . X202 ' . Q KURTZ, JOSEPH M., Pottsville, Pa., B.B.A., Accounting Society 3, 4. KYLE, GEORGE B., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, EAE 1, 2, 3, 4. KYLE, IAMES W., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, GX 1, 2, 3, 4. LABUZAN, MARSHALL G. IR., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance, EAE 1, 2, 3, 4. LANG, ROBERT I., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. LAWRY, CLARE E., Latrobe, Pa., B.B.A. in Accounting, Accounting Society of Miami 3, 4, Dean's List 2. LEACY, MARILYNN R., Cape Elizabeth, Maine, B.B.A. in Management. LEACY, NANCY I., Cape Eliza- beth, Maine, B.B.A. in Business Education. LEE, WALDEMAR E., Miramar, Puerto Rico, B.B.A. in Economics, Base- ball 1. LEIPZIGER, NANFREDO, Rio De Ianeiro, Brazil, B.B.A. in Man- agement, M Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Swimming Team 1, 2, 3, 4. LEONARD, ARTHUR C., Salisbury, N. C., B.B.A. in Industrial Management. LICATA, ANTHONY T., Cliffside Park, N. I., B.B.A. in Industrial Management. LIM, CHIN YONG, Seoul, Korea, B.B.A. in Economics. LOCOCO, IOSEPH N., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, IIKA 1, IFC V. Pres.-2, 3, 4, Pep Club 1, 2, Liberty Forum 1, Student Action Association 2. LOMAS, CHARLES DOUGLAS, Westhampton Beach, N. Y., B.B.A. in Management, KA 1, 2, Management Society 4. LONG, LAWRENCE A., Barrington, R. I., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, A1159 1, Sec.-2, Treas.-3, Pres.-4, Flying Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Management Society 1, 2 3, 4, Propeller Club 1, 2, 3, 4. LOPEZ, GEORGE A., Caguas, Puerto Rico, B.B.A. in Marketing, Propeller Club 3. LOPINTO, IOHN A., New York, N. Y., B.B.A. in Marketing, EN 1, 2, 3, 4. LOTHARIUS, RICHARD D., Milwaukee, Wis., B.B.A. in Accounting, EX 1, 2, 3, 4, AEIT V. Pres.-2, 3, Dean's List 3. LUBER, ARTHUR H., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, Dean's List 1. LUECHAUER, DANIEL P., Hollywood, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, AEQ 3, 4, BSU 3, 4, Ski Club 4. LYNCH, RONALD G., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Government. McCAULEY, EDWARD I., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management and Finance, TKE 2, 3, V. Pres.-4, AEII 3, 4, Arnold Air Society 4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 2, 3. MCCRAY, LORENZO P., Merced, Calif., B.B.A. in Aircraft Management. McGOVERN, THOMAS 1., Brooklyn, N. Y., B.B.A. in Accounting. MCGRATH, THOMAS 1., Bronx, New York, B.B.A. in Marketing, New- man Club Treas.-2, Pres.-3. MCKENZIE, DONALD R., Port Huron, Mich., B.B.A. in Marketing, KE 4. MCKERIBAN, BETTY L., Holli- claysburg, Pa., B.B.A. in Marketing, Cavalcttes 2, 3. MCKETA, ROBERT F., Donora, Pa., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, QA9 3, 4, AKXI' 2, 3, Sec.-4, AFROTC 1, 2, Psychology Club 4, Management Society 3, 4. McMAHON, FLORENCE E., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, AAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Accounting Association of Miami 3, 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3. MADER, RICHARD W., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance. MALCOLM, KIRKWOOD G., Nassau, Bahamas, B.B.A. in Accounting. MALNATI, ADOLFO E., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, EH 2, 3, 4, Deanis List 1. MANDINA, PHILIP 1., Brooklyn, N. Y., B.B.A. in Government, TECIP l, Sec.-2, V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4, SAA 2, All Campus Party V. Pres.-4. MANSON, LAMBERT ARTHUR, Evans- ton, Ill., B.B.A. in Management, IIKA 1, 2, 3, 4, IFC 2, 3. MANTON, IEROME B., New York, N. Y., B.B.A. in Marketing, ZBT Treas.-3, 4, Honor Court 3, 4. MARCUS, MARVIN A., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, EAM 1, 2, Treasg-3, 4, Dean's List 4. MARLEAUX, IVAN E., Las Vegas, Nev., B.B.A. in Government. MARSHALL, IEROME R., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, IIPHE, Accounting Society 4, Dean's List 1. MEDER, IOHN 1., Wethersfield, Conn., B.B.A. in Industrial Manage- ment, EQJE 1, 2, 3, 4, Pep Club 1, Cavaliers 1. MENOR, IAMES A., Homestead, Fla., B.B.A. in Management. MILLER, FRANCIS H., Newport Beach, Cal., B.B.A. in Real Estate. MILLER, IOHN T., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Industrial Marketing, CIJKT 1, 2, 3, Sec.-4. MILLER, RICHARD U., St. Petersburg, Fla., B.B.A. in Personnel Management, AEII 2, 3, Sec.-4, Dcan's List 3. MILLER, ROBERT H., Findlay, Ohio, B.B.A. in Accounting, Account- ing Society 3, 4, Dean's List 1, 2. MINNIX, YVILLIAM R., Roanoke, Va., B.B.A. in Accounting. MINTEER, RUSSELL C., Claysville, Pa., B.B.A. in Finance, Dean's List 2, 3. MISHKIN, ISAAC, Harrisburg, Pa., B.B.A. in Accounting, Accounting Society 3, 4, Tempo 3. MONETTE, IOSEPH F., Flushing, N. Y., B.B.A. in Management, Pro- peller Club 4, EAM 4. MORAAN, LANORA L., Oklahoma City, Okla., B.B.A. in Business Education, YWCA Sec.-3, V. Pres.-4, Westminster 3, 4. MORGAN, PHTLLIP, Richmond, Va., B.B.A. in Marketing, TE? I, Sec.-2, 3, V. Pres.-4, Pershing Rifles 4, ROA 3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. MORGAN, WILLIAM R., Cape Girardeau, Mo., B.B.A. in Management. ' MOSKOS,1AMES 1R., Baltimore, Md., B.B.A. in Marketing, EN 2, 3, 4, AEII 2, 3, 4, AAE 3, 4. MOSS, STANTON R., Detroit, Mich., B.B.A. in Marketing, AEII I, 2, Pres.-3, 4, IFC 1, 2, Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4, SBG 3. MUFF, WILLIAM H.,ISebring, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, QMA 2, 3, Trcas.-4, 5, German Club 1, Band 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, AFROTC 1, 2. MULLEN, ROBERT A., Cincinnati, Ohio, B.B.A. in Government. 334. MULVIHILL, DONALD A., Staatsburg, N. Y., B.B.A. in Aviation Administration, EAT 3, V. Pres.-4. MURPHY, IAMES O., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, EAE 1, 2, 3, 4, AKXI' 4, Pep Club 2. MURPHY, WILLIAM C. IR., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, QA6 2, 3, 4, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. MURRAY, WILEY A,, Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. MYERS, RICHARD E., Harrisburg, Pa., B.B.A. in Management, IIKA 1, 2, 3, V. Pres.-4, L'Apache-2, 3, 4. NASH, MARTIN I., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, TAQ 1, Sec.-2, V. Pres.-3-4, fIPHE 1, 2, 3, 4, AKKII 3, 4, Dean's List 1, 4. NAYLOR, IRVIN S., Baltimore, Md., B.B.A. in Management, TKE 2, 3, Pres.-4, AEII 3, 4, Management Society 4, Arnold Air Society 3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 3, 4, Who's Who 4, OAK 4. NEWHOUSER, NEL- SON L., Bethesda, Md., ZX 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, 4, L'Apache 3, 4. NICHOLS, CHARLES R., Louisville, Ky., B.B.A. in Management, IIKCIP 1, 2, 3, 4. NICHOLSON, IRYVIN A., Warren, Pa., B.B.A. in Aviation Management. NICHOLSON, THOMAS E., Dover, Del., B.B.A. in Economics. NIELSEN, REIMER C., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Insur- ance Management, Cavaliers 1, 2, 3, 4. NIETO, ARTURO, Celaya, Guanaiuato, Mexico, B.B.A. in Marketing, ATO 2, 3, 4. NORMINGTON, HARRY C., Westfield, N. I., B.B.A. in Management, Sea Devils 4. NORTHUP, IAMES E., Atlanta, Ga., EX 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. OKMIN, MARSHALL A., Chicago, Ill., B.B.A. in Marketing, EAM 1, Z, Treas.-3, 4, Honor Court 2, 4, Track Team 2. O'MALLEY, THOMAS D. IR., North Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Govern- ment. OORLOG, IONATHAN W., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management. OSKING, NANCY B., Bell Glade, Fla. B.B.A. in Business Education, Sweetheart of 'TKT 4. PFLUEGER, CHARLES P., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management. PIPER, WILLIAM L. IR., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Industrial Manage- ment. PLUSO, THOMAS F., Syracuse, N. Y., B.B.A. in Economics, GX 2, 3, Treas.-4: Cavaliers 1, Treas.-2, 3, 4. POHL, SHERWIN, Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. POLLER, ROBERT H., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, TAG 2, 3, 4, AAE Treas.-4, Lead and Ink 3, 4, Hurricane Advertising Mgr.-2-3, Business Mgr.-4, Board of Publications 4, AEE 4. PORTER, IOHN R., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. POWER, RICHARD A., Kearny, N. I., B.B.A. in Management, Dean's,List 3. PREBIANCA, HENRY, Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, AKNI1 2, 3, 4. RACHLES, WILLIAM, Passaic, N. I., B.B.A. in Accounting. RADEL, RICHARD V., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, KA 4, Band 1, 4. RADELL, GEORGE M., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. RADTKE, MARY E., Wausau, Wis., B.B.A. in Accounting, Accounting Society 4. RAUCH, HERBERT I., Norfolk, Va., B.B.A. in Marketing, ITACID 1, 2, 3, 4, L'Apache 2, 3, 4. 335 M-R Business Business R-S RAUSCHENPLAT, ADOLFO L., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Government, Sigma VD 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 3, 4. REGISTER, ROBERT L., Dothan, Ala., AEII 3, Pres.-4, Propeller Club 3, Treas.-4. REIBEL, HARRIS A., Linden, N. I., B.B.A. in Accounting, AZII 3, 4, Hillel 3, 4, Ski Club 1, Dean's List 2. REIFF, CAROLYN A., Hollis, N. Y., B.B.A. in Business Education, FA 1, Treas.-2, Pres.-3, 4. REIN, WILLIAM F., Shaker Heights, Ohio, B.B.A. in Marketing, AE1'I 1, 2, 3, 4. REMEY, NELDON N., Stroudsburg, Pa., B.B.A. in Management, AEII. RETZLER, RICHARD M., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, TKE 2,.Sec.-3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. RIEGLER, RUSSELL C., Philadelphia, Pa., B.B.A. in Marketing, ATS! 1, 2, 3, 4, A1159 2, 3, 4, BSU 2, 3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. ROBERTS, RICHARD R., Kannapolis, N. C., B.B.A. in Insurance, ZAE 1, 2, Sec.-3, 4. ROBERTS, ROSS E. IR., El Cajon, Calif., B.B.A. in Ac- counting. ROBINSON, EDWARD A., Phoenix, Ariz., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, A211 3, 4. ROBINSON, RICHARD G., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Public Accounting, fIPHE 1, 2, 3, 4, AZII 3, 4, Accounting Society 3, 4, Dean's List 1. ROBINSON, CHARLES M. IR., Gainesville, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance. ROCHE, IOHN B., Lake MoHaWk, N. I., B.B.A., K2 1, 2, 3, 4, Newman Club 1, Pres.-2, 3, 4, Ski Club 3, 4, Football 1, 2, Boxing 2. ROEMER, DAVID F., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. ROHE, ROBERT L. IR., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, EAE 1, 2, 3, 4, AKXP, Sec.-2, 3, 45 M Club 3, 4, Tennis 3, 45 Management Society 3, 4. ROMAN, GERALD F., 'New Hartford, N. Y., B.B.A. in Accounting. ROSE, HARVEY M., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, ZBT 3, Accounting Society 3, 4. ROSEN, HARRY M., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, IIZAQ 4, Tennis 3, 4, M Club 4. ROSENBERG, STANLEY R., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, EAM 1, 2, 3, Sec.-4, Pep Club 3, Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4. ROSENTHAL, ALAN S., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. ROSEN- VOLD, WILLIAM E., Boynton Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in'Management, Man- agement Society 4. ROSS, ROBERT R., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Personnel Management. RUDD, CHARLES C., Fort Lauderdale, Fla., B.B.A. in Man- agement, KE 2, 3, V. Pres.-4, Arnold Air Society 3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, Wing Commander-4. RUDER, HERBERT, Weirton, W. Va., B.B.A. in Accounting, Philosophy Club 3, 4, Accounting Club 3, 4, Dean's List 3. RUSSELL, BRIAN I., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, ATU 1, 2, 3, 4. SACKS, GERSON L., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance, QKKIP 4, AKWP 4, Ski Club 3, 4, Hillel 2, 4, De2m's List 3, 4. SCARBOROUGI-I, RACHEL, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., B.B.A. in Economics, Band 4, Westminster 2. SCHAEFER, EUGENE E., Webster Grove, Mo., B.B.A. in Finance, EX 3, 4. SCHENENDORF, RICHARD, Rockville Centres, N. Y., B.B.A. in Marketing, 'IDEA 1, 2, 3, 4, Swimming Team 1, 2, 3, 4, Honor Court 2. SCHERER, RONALD E., Westwood, N. I., B.B.A. in Industrial,Management. SCHE'I'I'INO, BER- NARD R., Glenham, N. Y., B.B.A. in Aviation Administration, Cavaliers 2, 3, 4, EAT 3, Sec.-4. SCHINDER, BERNARD I., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, EAM 4. SCHOFIELD, IVILLIAM L., Chicago, Ill., B.B.A. in Marketing. SCHULTZ, THOMAS A., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, AX 2, Sec.--3, 4. SCHWARB, FREDERICK A., Fort Lauderdale, Fla., B.B.A. in Economics, CDMA 3, 4, Band 1, 2, 3, 4. SEFTON, DAVID, Altamonte Springs, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance. SEGAL, HARRY M., Margate, N. I., B.B.A. in Marketing, Dean's List 2, 3. SHAHIN, GEORGE F. IR., West Palm Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. SHECTER, ALAN, Baltimore, Md., B.B.A. in Marketing, IIPEII 1, Sec.-2, 3, Treas.-4, AA2, Sec.-Z, Hur- ricane 1, 2: SBG, Senator-3, Dean's List 4. SHEROUSE, LEWIS E., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, BSII 1, Sec.i 2, 3, 4, Arnold Air Society 3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 3. SHICK, LAWRENCE A., Wayland, Mass., B.B.A. in Marketing, AEII 1, 2, 3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4, ROA, Sec.-2, Pres.-3, 4. SHIMM, KENNETH L., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, TEQ 3, 4. SHOEN, RONALD B., Rock- ford, Ill., B.B.A. in Marketing, IIA41 1, 2, 3, 4, L'Apache 2, 3, 4. SHULAK, IERRY H., Toledo, Ohio, B.B.A. in Marketing, IIAKIP 1, 2, 3, 4, Golf Team 1, 2, 3, 4. SIDDALL, DALE G., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Man- agement, Ski Club 3, 4. SIEGMEISTER, LLOYD M., Union, N. I., B.B.A. in Management, EAM 1, 2, 3, 4. SIFFORD, LUTHER L. IR., Hamden, Conn., B.B.A. in Industrial Management. SILVERMAN, LESLIE, Oak Park, Ill., B.B.A. in Marketing, CIPEA 1, 2, Sec.-3, Pres.-4, Hillel 1, 2, President's Council 3, 4. SIMMONS, CHARLES A., Brooklyn, N. Y., B.B.A. in Accounting, 'PEA 2, 3, 4, Hillel 1. 2, 3, 4. SIMMONS, ROBERT F., Opa Locka, Fla., B.B.A. in Aviation Administration, EAT 3, Sec.-4, Sword and Glove 1, 2, 3, 4, Track 3, 4. SIMON, ALFRED E., Myrtle Beach, S. C., B.B.A. in Management. SKIP- PER, THOMAS A., Hialeah, Fla., B.B.A. in Aviation Administration, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. SLONE, FREDDIE R., Ashland, Ky., B.B.A. in Mar- keting, AEII 4. SMITH, GERALD D., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. SMITH, IAMES L., Pittsburg, Kan., B.B.A. in Marketing, KA l, 2, 3, 4. SMITH, IOSH M. IR., Pelham, Ga., B.B.A. in Aviation Management. SMITH, MORRIS L., New Richmond, Ind., B.B.A. in Marketing. SMITH, SAMUEL S., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, AEII 1, 2, 3, 4, Accounting Society 3, 4, Scabbard and Blade 3, 4, KIHHE 1, Z, IFC V. Pres.- 2, Pres.--3, 4, ROA, Sec.-3, Pres.-4, Liberty Forum, Treas.--2, V. Pres.- 3, 4, SEG Senator-1, 2: Business School Governor 3, Dean's List, 1, 2, 3, 4. SNOWBERGER, IOHN N., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. SNYDER, THOMAS E., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, TNI? 1, 2, Treas.-3, 4, AIEII' 3, 4, SBG Senator-3, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4, Pershing Rif1es 1, 2, 3, Pres.-4, ROA 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, 4. SOLOMON, IACK, Mount Vernon, N. Y., B.B.A. in Marketing, CIDEH 1, Sec.-2, V. Pres. 3, Pres.-4, Pep Club V. Pres.-2, Hillel Sec.-1, Honor Court 3, IFC Sec.--3, Treas.--4. SOMMER, WILLIAM L., Chicago, Ill., B.B.A. in Accounting, ECIPE V. Pres.--3, 4, IFC 3, 4, Golf Team 1, 2, 3, 4. SORACE. EDWARD I., Raritan, N. I., B.B.A. in Management. Business S-V SOWELL, HELEN M., Rock Hill, S. C., B.B.A., ZTA 2, 3, 4. STAN- LEY, MALCOLM C., Hartford, Conn., B.B.A. in Marketing, Dean's List 1, Newman Club 4. STEFFEY, DELFINA, Hopewell, Va., B.B.A. in Marketing, Newman Club 3, 4. STEIN, ROBERT M., Detroit, Mich., B.B.A. in Marketing, ZBT 1, 2, 3, V. Pres.-4, Pep Club 2, 3, AFROTC l, 2. STEINBAUGH, BYRON F. IR., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Management, AFROTC 1, 2, Army ROTC 3, Management Club 4, The Spokesman Editor-3, Scabbard and Blade Sec.-3. STEPHAN, COLETTE C., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, Psychology Club 3, 4, Cavalettes 2, Sec.-3, 4, Sweetheart of AEII 4. STERN, STUART G., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance, AEII I, 2. STEVENSON, RONALD L. IR., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Insurance. STORFER, ANDRE E.,'New York, N.Y., B.B.A. in Marketing. SWAN, IOHN A. IR., Worcester, Mass., B.B.A. in Management. SWARTZER, ALICE D., West Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. SWEET, CHARLES R., Worcester, Mass., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, Cavaliers 2, 3, 4. TABATCHNICK, IAY N., South Orange, N. I., B.B.A. in Marketing, AEII l, 2, 3, 4. TAICHER, LEE D., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Government. TEITELBAUM, GERALD, Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, QEII I, 2, 3, 4, Honor Court 4. TERNENT, IAMES A., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Economics, Sword and Glove 2, 3, Pres.-4. THOMAS, LOREE B., Chatham, N. I., B.B.A. in Industrial Manage- ment, TKE Treas.-2, 3, 4. THOMAS, WILLIAM I., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, QA9 1, 2, 3, 4, Management Society 3, 4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. THOMPSON, LYLE B., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance. THOMPSON, ORVILLE D., Des Plaines, Ill., B.B.A. in Personal Management, Management Society 4, Ski Club 4, Dean's List 2, 3, 4. TOWNS, IOHN D., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance, AK1If 2, 3. TOWNSEND, CHANDLER H., Miami Springs, Fla., B.B.A. in Man- agement. TRIGG, RANDELL Y., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, EN 1, 2, 3, 4. TURNER, WILLIAM H., III, Homestead, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, IIKA 1, 2, 3, 4. VALVO, ANTHONY A., Brooklyn, N. Y., B.B.A. in Management, TAG? 1, 2, 3, 4, AKII' 4, Homecoming 2, Tempo 2. VAMVAKS, ANTHONY T., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Industrial Management, ZX 2, 3, 4. VAN TASSELL, RAY C., North Tarrytown, N. Y., B.B.A. in Management. VIDAL, EDGARDO R., Villa Caparra, Puerto Rico, B.B.A. in Management. VINSON, GEORGE T. IR., New Haven, Conn., B.B.A. in Management. VOLKMAN, RICHARD, Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting. WALSH, RICHARD G., Hackensack, N. I., B.B.A. in Marketing, Tennis 2, 3, 4. WEBB, CALVIN I., Marion, N. C., B.B.A. in Marketing. 338 Q OUT OF PLACE in a darkened classroom, sunglasses reflecl 'Phe careful lasl'-minuie checking as sfudenl' prepares a Enal page in an assignmeni for bookkeeping class. WEBB, WILLIS M., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, AEII 2, Sec.- 3, V. Pres.-4. WERBLOW, IOEL I., Miami Beach, Fla., B.B.A. in Finance, Dean's List 3. WEST, WILLIAM A., Martinsville, Ohio, B.B.A. in Management. WHITE, IOHN B., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, 'PMA 2, 3, 4, Band 1, 2, 3, 4. WHITE, NORMAN B. IR., Duxbury, Mass., B.B.A. in Industrial Man- agement. WI-IITEHOUSE, CHARLES L., Louisville, Ky., B.B.A. in Marketing, TIKA l, 2, 3, 4. WILLIAMS, LEYSHON I., Pittsburgh, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, Propeller Club 4. WILLIAMS, ROGER K., Sanford, Maine, B.B.A. in Personal Management, TKE 1, 2, 3, 4. WIND, SARA, Baldwin, N. Y., B.B.A. in Marketing, DC8Il,S List 3. WINDENBURG, EARLE L., Coral Gables, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, Rifie and Pistol Club 1, 2, 3, 4. WOHL, IACKQ New York City, N. Y., B.B.A. in Accounting, QEA 1, 2, 3, 4. YOUNG, NORMAN L., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Economics, TACIP 1, Sec.-2, 3, 45 AAE 2, 3, V. Pres.-43 AKNI' 3, V. Pres.-4. ZAHER, IOSEPH E., Jacksonville, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing, AEII 2, 3, 4. ZANNIS, TOM N., Miami, Fla., B.B.A. in Accounting, IPAQ 2, 3, 4. ZINGLO, THOMAS V., Hollywood, Fla., B.B.A. in Marketing. V-Z Business 2:11if.wwa.m.,............., .. MAZE OF MACHINERY is a mechanical aid 'l'o business siudenfs, who work noi' only wi+h pencils and paper bui' wifh 'ihe fools of a modern age. DEEP CONCENTRATION is required of business sfudenfs, who help each o+her +o unders+and problems of mechanized accounfing. LEANING ON THE CHECKERBOARD-LIKE DESKTOPS, SEMINAR-TYPE STUDY helps 'I'o clarify s1'uden'l' prob- lems as ins'l'ruc1'or explains some 'Technical poinfs. iw wifi 'vel . 523 , X ga- 'mv -af Qi.. gm mm X 1 4' 5 ,SS X X ,fa , EMA 'S 4, W lair ,ga 3? R 5 ,E N Q if YM . QR , "' Q Y, G 5 X ' 1 School of Education EDUCATOR and author, William Lyon Phelps once said: "To my mind teaching is not merely a life work, a profession, an occupation, a struggle, it is a passion. I love to teach." Students of the School of Education share Phelps' love for teaching as they work toward their certifica- tion. Upon completion of the School's requirements, students receive that certification, which qualihes them 3412 JOHN R. BEERY, Dean to teach in public schools throughout the state. Teaching interests are divided into four fields of con- centration for those in the School: elementary, secon- dary, industrial and physical education. During their senior year, students spend a semester in one of Dade County's public schools, serving an internship under a master teacher. Course credits are also earned during the away-from-college training. ADAMS, MARILYN E.3 Miami, Fla. B.Ed. in Education3 X52 2, 3, 4. ADCOCK, SYBIL F.3 Hialeah, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Physical Educationg KAII 3, 43 QAII Treas.-43 PEM 33 WAA 33 Dean's List 3, 4. ADKINS, RAY3 Fort Lauderdale, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Physical Education: Debate Coun- cil I, 2, 3, 4. ALVAREZ, GEORGE A.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education3 FTA 4. AMATO, GEORGE I. IR.3 West Haven, Conn.3 B.Ed. in Art3 Education Art Club 3, 4. AMERISE, SALLY A.3 Coral Gables, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Ele- mentary Education3 X9 3, 43 Dean's List 3. ANDERSON, WARREN G.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Secondary Education3 French Club 43 HA? 4. BAKER, ROBERT C.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education3 ZH 4g FTA 2, 3, 4g Canterbury 2, 3, 4g Ski Club 43 Dean's List 3. BEHREN, LETA C.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education3 AECIP 1, 2, 3, 4: Pep Club 1, Sec.-23 Ir. Counselor 23 Cheerleader 2. BERG, CLAIRE L.3 Pittsburgh, Pa.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education. BERMAN, SANDRA3 Brooklyn, N. Y.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education3 11222 1, 2, Treas.-3, 43 Hillel Sec.-3, V. Pres.-4. BERNSTEIN, RUTH B.5 Gary, Ind.3 B.Ed. in Physical Education3 Sweetheart of TEH 4. BLOCK, HARRY I.3 Detroit, Mich.3 B.Ed. in Psychology3 ZBT 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, Pres.--43 Pep Club Pres.-2, 3g School of Education Gov- ernor 3, 43 SBG Cabinet 33 Ioint Education Council Pres.-3, 43 Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4g Who's Who 4. BLOCK, NORMAN A.3 Glens Falls, N. Y.3 B.Ed. in Physical Education3 IIEA 2, 3, 43 ACN! 43 FTA 43 Ski Club 3, 43 Pep Club 3, 4. BLOOM, IERALD E.3 Surfside, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Secondary Education3 QEII 2, 3, 43 Hillel 2, 3, 43 Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3. BLOOM, IOAN E.3 Milwaukee, Wisc.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Edu- cation. BOEHM, MALIGA M.3 Chicago, Ill.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education3 ZTA 2, 3, Sec.-43 FTA 3, 4g ACEI 4. BOICE, VIRGINIA 0.3 Hialeah, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education. BOSSAK, SANDRA H.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education3 AAA 1, 2, 33 KAII 3, 4g FTA 2, 3, 43 ACEI 2, 3, 4g Dean's List 1, 2, 3. BO'I'I', MARCIA L.3 Coral Gables, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education3 AAA 1, 2, 3, TfC2S.14Q FTA 3, 43 Homecoming Court 23 Dreamgirl of IIKA 23 Dean's List 2. BRODY, DORENE M.3 Miami Beach, Fla.: B.Ed. in Elementary Edu- cation3 AQE 1, 2, Treas.-3, V. Pres.-43 FTA 3, 43 ACEI 3, 43 Hillel 2, 3, 43 Hurricane 2: Tempo 2. BROWN, IOANN D.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education. BRUSCO, IOSEPH G.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Secondary Educationg TOE 4. CABLE, MARTHA T.3 Valdosta, Ga.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education. CAPPETTA, AUGUST A.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.Ed in Secondary Education. CARONE, MATTHEW D.3 Fort Lauderdale, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education3 Symphony 1, 2, 3, 43 Dean's List 3, 4. CASWELL, MIL- LARD H.3 Nashua, N. H.3 B. Ed. in Social Studies3 KE 1, 2, 3, 4. COE, ELIZABETH S.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education3 AEQ 3, 4. COOLIDGE, ROBERT B.3 Wollaston, Mass.: B.Ed. in Industrial Edu- cation: fIPA9 1, 2, 3, 4: Arnold Air Society 3, 43 AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 43 SBG Senator 2. DANIELS, IUDI B.3 Bemidji, Minn.3 B.Ed. in Ele- mentary Educationg KKI' 2, 3, 43 FTA 4. DANSKY, STANLEY3 Miami, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Secondary Education3 Dean's List 3, 4. DARNELL, SALLY A.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.Ed. in Elementary Education3 ZTA 1, 2, 3, 4g FTA 4, ACEI 4. 34-3 A-D Education 3 f :Q ' A. '33 t'r Nw J a' T2 Y 4 4 .1 K. Education D-H DELAIR, STELLA M., Butler, Pa., B.Ed. in Elementary Education. DEL RIO, THEODORE, Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Physical Education, Pedmen 3, 4, Dean's List 3. DEY, GEORGE G., Canton, Ohio, B.Ed. in Secondary Edu- cation. DIETERLE, HUGO L., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Industrial Education, EITT 3. DI TULLIO, FRANK IR., Cranford, N. I., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, QKT 2, Pres.-3, 4, IFC 3, Pres.-4, SBG Cabinet 3,' FTA 4. DORN, IOSEPH K. IR., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Art, Dean's List 3. DOSTER, RACHEL W., Coral Gables, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education. DUFF, PATIRICIA C., Westfield, N. I., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, ALFA 1, Treas.-2, Westminister Foundation 1, 2, Sec.-3, 4, FTA 1, 2, Ir. Counselor 3. ELDOT, HOWARD L., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education. FARRIS, MARIORIE F., New Kensington, Pa., B.Ed. in Elementary Edu- cation, KAII 3, 4, QKQ 3, 4, FTA 4, Dean's List 2, 3. FETTEN, IAMES F., South Orange, N. I., B.Ed. in Social Studies. FISHER, EVE P., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Secondary Education and Biology, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4, BBB 2, 3, 4, KAII 3, 4, EACIJ 2, 3. FISHER, MARSHALL B., Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Secondary Education. FLEMING, THELMA B., Fort Lauderdale, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education. FREEMAN, IUNE M., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Secondary Education, IAII 1, 2, 3, 4, 2AfIP 1, 2, 3, 4, Pep Club Sec.-1, 2, 3, 4, Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4, Student Zionist Organization Treas.-1, Sec.-2, 3, 4. GARFINKLE, GRACE, Roselle, N. I., B.Ed. in Physical Education, IAII 3, Pres.-4, QAII 3, 4, Iunior Counselor 3, 4, PEM 3, 4, WAA 3, 4, Newsletter Editor-4, Association of Women Stu- dents 4, Hillel 4, Panhellenic Council 4. GARLAND, HARRIET, Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Educa- tion, IAII 1, 2, Sec.-3. Treas.-4, FTA 1, 2, 3, ACEI 4, Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4, Pep Club 2, Panhellenic Council 3. GERITY, PATRICIA A., West Palm Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, ACEI 1, 2, 3, 4. GERSON, LOIS C., Elizabeth, N.I., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, Ir. Counselor 2, 3, FTA 2, 3, 4, Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4. GOLDIN, IUNE, Coconut Grove, Fla., B.Ed. in Secondary Education, FTA 4. GOLD- MAN, YETTA, Washington, D. C., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, ACEI 3, 4, FTA 3, 4. GOLDSTEIN, EVELYN Z., Boston, Mass., B.Ed. in Ele- mentary Education, AAA 1, 2, 3, 4, ZAKIP 2, Sec.-3, Pres.-4, KAII 3, 4, FTA 1, 2, 3, 4, ACEI 1, 2, 3, 4, Education Service Organization 1, 2, AEE 4, NKT 4, Dean's List 1, 3, 4. GOLIN, SUZANNE D., Wilmington, Del., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, EAQ 2, ACEI 2, 3, 4, FTA 2, 3, 4, Hillel 2, 3, Ir. Counselor 2, 3, Resident Women's Council 2, 3, Educational Service Organization 3. GONZALEZ, MIRTA M., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Business Education, ALFA 3, 4, Globetrotter 3, Latin-American Sub-Com- mission 3, International House Association 3. GONZALEZ, RAMON, Arecibo, Puerto Rico, B.Ed. in Physical Education, Dean's List 1. GRIFFIN, ROBERTA T., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Art Educa- tion, KAII 3, 4, Art Club 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4. GRIMES, THOMAS E., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Social Studies, ZAX 1, Sec.-2, 3, 4, Lead and Ink 1, 2, 3, 4, Ibis Sports Ed.-2. GROSS, ARLENE R., Huntington, N. Y., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, FTA 1, 2, 3, ACEI 1, 2, 3. GUNTHER- BERG, SALLY A., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education. HAMIL- TON, TERRY W., Fort Lauderdale, Fla., B.Ed. in Biology. HARIG, IANE P., Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Education. HARRIS, CAROL C.: Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, ACEI 4, Dean's List 4. X HARVEY, DANIEL R. IR., Westport, Conn., B.Ed. in Secondary Educa- tion, HAWKS, RONALD W., Park Ridge, Ill., B.Ed. in Industrial Arts, EIIT 3, 4, Dean's List 3. HEIDE, EVA E., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Spanish, ALFA Treas.-3, V. Pres.-4. HIERS, NAN H., Atlanta, 'Ga., B.Ed. in English, Dean's List 3, 4. HODGE, PATRICIA W., Temple, Texas, B.Ed. in Elementary Education, AZ 1, 2, 3, 4, FTA 4, ACEI 4. HOLLON, IOHN A, Tampa, Fla., B.Ed. in Secondary Education, EQE 1, 2, 3, Pres.-4. HOTCHKISS, BARBARA F., Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, FTA 3, 4: ACEI 3, 4. HOWELL, HARDIN O., North Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education. H-L Education lt .M if A at 13:1 Ng. ry i, It 5 A K as 1, lm ,vim,Y,,L..',,.4,2,fi,,:,HN,,,W,,.rA, fr H:f..:, f . it - an aw: wif 7 , .f . :cw , eff' on 'V w . : 33" 'f ' ' T1 'af-'at Viv, fr -, ,fifzi A jg . 1, fsjfw Li" fph .1 . - 2 - ., . 1 ..,., ii, in-5, ,:,5::kf , yigg, 5,-3.1, I 7 Dj.-f, .' , we .2 QT sf- fi 'QQ if prev- ,, f f fewif ,. te .:.:, :,L' --233. .EE -' ,iii A 2- q wjn gg :-' 52 4 ' tl wi f 3' . . . A '- v ., -11-'ar 'r .IW ,' '- '- -'I M 34 A fe? w'-2 ' H, . in f TAF. :5 1 , f 37 '23 ll HUBER, IOHN W., Clinton, Iowa, B.Ed. in Industrial Arts, EIIT 3, 4, Industrial Arts Club 2, Dean's List 2. HUMBURG, CAROLE I., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education: AAA 2, 3, 4, AAA 1, Pres.-2, KAIT 3, 4, FTA 3, 4: Sweetheart of EAE, Dean's List 1, NKT 4. HYLWA, NICHOLAS L. IR., Ansonia, Conn., B.Ed. in Physical Education, IIKA 1, 2, 3, PEM Club 1, 2, 3, 4. IRVIN, IOHN, Marion, Ohio, B.Ed. in Sec- ondary Education, FTA 4, Newman Club 4. IAPHE, ANITA S., Miami, Fla., B.Ed .in Elementary Education, AECIP 1, 2, 3, 4, KAII 3, Hurricane 1, 2, NVomen's Residence Council 1, 2, Dean's List 2, 3. IARLENSKI, ROBERT E., Hialeah, Fla., B.Ed. in Industrial Education. IENKINS, PEGGY W., Morehead, Ky., B.Ed. in Business Education. IOHNSON, ROSLYN A., Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in History, EK 1, Treas.-2, 3, V. Pres.--4, YWCA 2, 3, 4, FTA 3, 4, Cavalettes 3, 4, Fencing Club 1, KA Sweetheart 3. IONES, CHARLOTTE A., Dade City, Fla., B.Ed. in Math, AZ 2, 3, V. Pres.-4, KAIT 3, 4, AAA 1, 2, AEE 3, 4, NKT 4, FTA 1, Treas.-2, Pres.--3, 4: EACIP 1, 2, 3, 4, Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, Iunior Coun- selor 2, 3, 4, Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 2, Who's Who 4. KAUER, IOEN C., Corry, Pa., B.Ed. in Elementary Education. KENNEDY, WILLIAM V., Miami, Fla.: B.Ed. in Secondary Education: Newman Club 3. KERBEN, ALMA G., Camden, N. I., B.Ed. in Elementary Education: FTA 2, 3, 4, ACEI 2, Treas.-3, 4, EACIP 2, V. Pres.-3, 4. KING, EARL E., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Science, Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 4. KLEINER, DEENA M., Bridgeton, N. I.: B.Ed. in Elementary Education, AEE 3, 4, EACIP 2, 3, Sec.-4, ACE 2, V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4, FTA 2, 3, 4, Senator 4, Ioint Edu- cation Council 3, 4, Associated Women's Student Council 3. 4: Ir. Coun- sclor Coordinator 4. KLOO, GEORGE G. IR., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Social Studies. KLUSSMANN, MILDRED H., Coral Gables, Fla., B.Ed. in Ele- mentary Education, ZTA 1, 2, 3, Sec.-4, Pep Club 1, 2, Cavalettes 1, 2, 3, BSU 1, 2, 3, 4, Honor Court Deputy 4, SBG 3, 4, EQE Sweetheart Court 2. KLUSSMANN, ROBERT L., Bradford, Pa., B.Ed. in Secondary Education, EfIPE 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, 4, Propeller Club 4. KNICKREHM, BARBARA Bt, Elgin, Ill., B.Ed. in Elementary Education. KOEVAL, ROGER G., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Secondary Education, AEFIP 4. KOVEN, MARCIA G., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Secondary Education, EA? 1, V. Pres.-2, Pres.-3, 4, FTA 1, 2, 3, 4, DC2H,S List 3. KRAMER, IOAN R., West Palm Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, FTA 2, 3, 4, ACEI 2, 3, V. Pres.-4. LANDS- MAN, LEONARD H., New York, N. Y., B.Ed. in Physical Education, Pcclmcn 2. 3, 4. LANGE, BARBARA T., Coral Gables, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education: ZTA 2, 3, 4: ACEI 4, Pep Club 2. LASKOSKIE, IAMES W., Orchard, Texas: M.Ed. in Physical Education. Education L-P LIEBENSON, SEYMOUR H., New York, N. Y., B.Ed. in Social Studies. LIPMAN, MARIORIE G., Trenton, N. I., B.Ed. in Elementary Educa- tion, FTA 4. LUNDQUIST, BARBARA S., Columbus, Ohio, B.Ed. in Elementary Education, SBG 2, 3, Hurricane 2, Chorus 2. MCCALLUM, SHARON R., Wasau, Wis., B.Ed. in Elementary Education. MCCARREN, SALLY A., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Physical Education, ZTA 2, 3, 4, QAII 2, 3, 4, Pem Club l, 2, 3, 4, WAA 1, 2, 3. MCCOY, WILLIAM P., Canton, Ohio, B.Ed. in Social Studies, BAE 2, 3, 4. MCEWEN, MARION C., Coral Gables, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Edu- cation. MCGEE, ROBERT W., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Social Studies, PST 4. MACKI, MARVIN I., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Social Studies. MANSON, PHYLLIS, Morristown, N. I., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, KAII 3, 4, ACEI 3, 4, FTA 3, 4, Hillel 2, International Reading Association 3, 4, Dean's List 3. MARCUS, CHARLOTTE S., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Ele- mentary Education. MEMERING, WILLARD D., Hammond, Ind., B.Ed. in Secondary Education. MEYERS, ROSE E., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, EACIP 2, 3, 4, FTA 3, 4. MILLER, FRANCINE3 Great Neck, N. Y., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, FTA 3, 4, ACEI 3, 4, Hurricane 1. MONFORT, ROBERT W., East Lansing, Mich., B.Ed. in Speech and Science. MON- TELLO, IAMES V., Bloomfield, N. I., B.Ed. in Social Studies, ATO 1, 2, 3, 4, AFROTC 3, 4. MORTON, MYRNA I., Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Education, AfIPE 2, 3, 4, Pep Club 2, SBG 2, 3. NEUMAN, REGINA, Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, FTA 4. NEWCOMB, VESTER, Liberty, Miss., B.Ed. in Physical Education, M Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Iron Arrow 4, OAK 4. NEWMAN, CAROLE H., Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Business Education. NORWITCH, CHARLES M., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Physical Education, Pedmen 3. NOTKIN, ARNOLD E., Rochester, N. H., B.Ed. in Physical Education, Hillel 3, 4, Pedmen 3. O'CONNELL, FRANCIS W., Coral Gables, Fla., B.Ed. in Physical Education, ZX 1, 2, 3, 4, M Club 3, 4, Swimming Team 3, 4. O'KEEFE, WILLIAM A., Bayville, N. Y., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, FTA 3, 4, ACEI 3, 4. OLMSTEAD, SUZANNE, Coshocton, Ohio, B.Ed. in Elementary Edu- cation, AAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Canterbury 2, Pep Club 2, 4. OWENS,'VERNA B., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Science, AAA I, 2, KAII 3, Treas.-4, FTA 1, Dcan's List l. PAINTER, CECELIA B., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, Cavalettes 3, V. Pres.-4, French Club 4, Psychol- ogy Club 3, 4, FTA 1, 2, 3, 4, ACEI 3, 4, Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Ski Club 3, 4, Dean's List 2, 3. PARKER, IAMES A., Elizabethtown, Tenn., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, FTA 4, Dean's List 3. PATO, ELEANORE, Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, Stu- dent Education Association 2, 3, Pres.-4, ACEI 3, 4: Hurricane 2, 3, Ibis 2, 3. PERRY, LOWELL A., Brockton, Mass., B.Ed. in Social Stud- ies. PINTAVALLE, ADRIENNE A., Schenectady, N. Y., B.Ed. in Ele- mentary Education, ALFA 2, Pres.-3, 4, SBG Cabinet 4, Who's Who 4. POMERKO, WALTER, Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Physical Education. 34-6 PORTER, HAROLD M., Boston, Mass., B.Ed. in Secondary Education. QUAY, ALLEN A., Fort Lauderdale, Fla., B.Ed. in Industrial Arts: EIIT 3, 4, M Club 3, 4, Tennis 1, 2, 3, Captain-4, AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. REEBY, ELLIS A. IR., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Secondary Education, AKII 3, 4, FTA Sec.-1, QBK 1, 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3. REU- THER, DORIS R., Coral Gables, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, Canterbury 1, 2, 3, 4, Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. REUTHER, HARRY W. IR., Homestead, Fla., B.Ed. in Physical Edu- cation. REYNOLDS, WILLIAM R., San Iuan, Puerto Rico, B.Ed. in Secondary Education. RIMOLDI, PAUL, Coral Gables, Fla., B.Ed. in Industrial Education: Industrial Arts Club 1, 2, Sec.--3. RIORDAN, CATHERINE M., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, FTA 3, 4. RISO, CAROL N., Queens, N. Y., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, FTA 1, 2, 3, EA? 1. 2, Sketchbook 1, 2. ROGER, FRESE I., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Physical Education, Baseball 3, Dcan's List 3. ROSAMOFSKY, B. MARTIN, New York, N. Y.: B.Ed. in Social Studies, National Edu- cation Association 4. ROSE, LOIS C., Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, ACEI 3, 4, FTA 3, 4. ROSENBLUM, PHYLLIS I., Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, EAT 1, 2, 3, Pres.-4, Panhellenic Council 3, 4, Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4, ACEI 4. ROSMAN, MARILYN C., Surfside, Fla., B.Ed. in Ele- mentary Education, FTA 3, 4, Hillel 1, 2, Sigma VD 1, 2, 3. ROSS, MARYANN S., Denton, Md., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, FTA 3, 4, ACEI 3, 4. ROSS, MYRNA S., Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, AAA 1, FTA 2, ACEI 2, Dean's List 1, 2, 3. ROTH, PAULINE, Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, KAII 3, 4, Ir. Counselor 2, 3: FTA 1, 2, 3, 4: EMP 2: ACEI 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 2. ROYER, CHARLES H., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Secondary Education, Pcdmen Sec.-3. RUSSELL, DIANE G., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, AZ 1, 2, 3, 4: NKT 3, Treas.-4, fIPK1IP 3, 4, KAII 3, 4, AAA 1, 2, Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Sweetheart of 'PMA 2, Dean's List l, 3: Who's Who 4. SATZ, GLADYS M., I-Iibbing, Minn., B.Ed. in Spanish, AZ 3, 4: Ski Club 3. SCHACHNER, FRANK M., Durham, N. C., B.Ed in Physical Education. SCHOENFELD, NATHAN, Brooklyn, N. Y.: B.Ed. in History and English: Dean's List 2. SCHOLNICK, SANDRA R., Summit, N. I., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, ZACIP 3, 4, FTA 1, 2, 3, 4, ACEI 2, 3, Hillel 1. SCI-IWARTZMAN, MARILYN W., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, EAQ 3, ACEI 3, Dean's List 2. SHAVER, BERTHA A., Miami, Fla., B.Ed, in Elementary Education. SHELIENBERGER, MARILYN Z., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education: Band l, 2, 3, 4, FTA 1, 2. SMITH, CECELIA E., Mifflin- town, Pa.: B.Ed. in Elementary Education, AAII 3, 4, Ski Club 3. SMITH, IACQUELINE L., West Hollywood, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, EAC! 3, 4, FTA 4. SMITH, LEON B., Miami, Fla.: B.Ed. in Secondary Education. SMITH, NANCY P., Miami, Fla.: B.Ed. in Elementary Education. SPEISMAN, ANITA, Miami, Fla.: B.Ed. in Elementary Education, AAA 1, 2, AEE 3, 4: KAII 4: EA42 l, 2, 3, Treas.-4, FTA 1, 2, 3, 4, Hillel l, 2, 3, Dean's List 1, 3: Newsletter Editor-4, IIQII 3, 4, ACEI 3, 4, Ioint Education Council 3, 4. STAGE, GENE, Elwood, Ind., B.Ed. in Physical Education, Basketball l, 2, 3, 4, Iron Arrow 3, 4. 34-7 P-S Education Education S-Z STEIN, SARALEE, Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Secondary Education, AQE 1, Treas.-2, Pres.-3, 4, Panhellenic Council 3, Women's Resi- dence Council 1, Hurricane Exchange Ed.-1, SBG Cabinet 3. STERN, BARBARA I., Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, ACEI 3, 4, Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4, Ir. Counselor 4. STIMMEL, MARILYN M., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, ZTA 1, 2, 3, 4, FTA 3, 4, Pep Club 2. STONE, SANDRA G., Miami Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Sec- ondary Education, AAA 1, 2, KAII 3, 4, FTA 1, 2, Dean's List 1, 2, 3. SULLIVAN, MARY A., Palm Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Educa- tion, AI' 1, 2, 3, 4, Homecoming Princess 4. TANKLEFF, LILLIAN R., Hollywood, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, FTA 1, 2, 3, ZAQ 2, 3, 4. TEITELBAUM, ELEANOR, Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, FTA 3, 4, ACEI 3, 4, Hillel 2. THOMPSON, BARBARA S., East Hampton, N. Y., B.Ed. in Physical Education, fIPAfI2 3, 4, Pem Club 2, 3, 4, WAA 2, 3. TOPP, ROBERTA I., Miami, Beach, Fla., B.Ed. in Business Education, EAQ 2, 3, 4, Hillel 2, 3. TORAYA, MATEAS N., Miami, Fla. B.Ed. in Mathematics. TRIANA, EMILIO, Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Industrial Arts, TKE 1, 2, Pres.-3, 4, E1'IT 3, 4, Industrial Arts Club 2, 3, 4. UIBER- ALL, IOAN R., New Rochelle, N. Y., B.Ed. in Physical Education, fIPAI'I 2, 3, 4, Ir. Counselor 2, 3, 4, PEM 1, 2, 3, 4, WAA 1, 2, 3, 4. WAGNER, KAREN A., Fort Wayne, Ind., B.Ed. in Elementary Educa- tion, AI' 1, Treas.-2, V.Pres.-3, Pres.-4, Ir. Counselor 2, 3, Cheer- leader 2, Capt.-3, FTA 4, Who's Who 4. WAKES, PHYLLIS A., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, Q22 4. WASHINGTON, AGNES W., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education. WEEKS, EVE L., Coral Gables, Fla., M.Ed. in Counseling and Guidance, FTA 3, 4, 5, 'PX 4, 5. WEINGARTEN, DARLENE R., Hialeah, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education. WEISS, MARLYNE S., Newark N. I., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, NKT 3, V. Pres.-4, AEE 3, 4, AAA Treas.-1, 2, 'IIPKQ 3, 4, KAII 3, 4, EAQ 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, 4, FTA 1, 2, 3, 4, ACEI 2, 3, 4, SAA 2, All Campus 3, 4, SBG Senator-3, Lt. Governor-4, Ioint Edu- cation Council 3, 4, Publications Board Sec.-2, 3, Most Outstanding Sophomore Woman, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4, Who's Who 4. WERNER, MANFRED B., Baltimore, Md., B.Ed. in Physical Education, Pedmen 3, 4. WHEATLEY, RUSSELL W., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Social Studies. WOLFERT, PATRICIA I., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Physical Education, ZTA 1, Sec,-2, 3, 4, 1IPAI'I 1, Treas.-2, 3, 4, PEM Club 3, 4, WAA 3, 4, SBG Sec.-3, AFROTC Queen 3, Tempo Princess 2. WOLFSON, ELAINE B., Miami, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, KAII 3, 4, EAQ 1, 2, Sec.-3, V. Pres.-4, Hillel 1, 2, 3, FTA 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, 4, ACEI 3, 4, Dean's List 2, 3. WRIGHT, DELORES I., Coral Gables, Fla., B.Ed. in Elementary Education, EK 2, 3, Sec.-4, FTA 4. ZALEWSKI, MARYANN, Chicago, Ill., B.Ed. in Physical Education, QAII 2, 3, Pres.-4, WAA 1, V. Pres.-2. 348 iw? f all flies FWTQWSS ' . -. ,W , .A 's,..,-pa, -, f sf, 1 ' .,,,. A STERN EXPRESSION by the interning teacher tails to catch the eye ot an amused elementary student, who laughs at her own handwriting. Policy For Students In Education: Practical Experience-And Plenty EXPERIENCE is the best teacher for a future teacher, ac- cording to School of Education policy. For elementary education majors, a semester of internship is oitered at two special public elementary schools, operated in cooperation with the University. Applying their textbook knowledge to the practical work found in the classroom, UM students intern at the Merrick Demonstration School and Henry L. Wlest Laboratory School, which is a center for the testing of new teaching methods. Students majoring in secondary education establish their in- ternship at various Dade County junior and senior high schools. Students may also participate in a pre-internship program, which necessitates their returning to campus prior to registra- tion, allowing them time to acquaint themselves with the school at which they will teach. A very busy day is spent by students who both attend classes and teach them also. 34-9 Q l 2 i NOT THE BALL but 'Fair play is the thing that draws attention to a physical education teacher. CAREFUL STROKES are given to their paintings as tiny artists work to express their creative minds. i in 2 , . """""""' 'P' ' 'L 9' Y2?E5'YYV'j - School of Engineering HOUSED TWO MILES from main campus in the Spanish-type Anastasia Building are the keen, forward-looking students in the School of Engineering. Theirs is a special kind of education, for with the in- creasing interest in science, spurred by recent space accomplishments, they must be able to supply Amer- ica's technological needs. Theodore A. Wfeyher, a retired brigadier general, THEODORE A. WEYHER, Dean this year replaced John H. Clouse, dean emeritur. A modern engineering building is planned for the future. Courses in the school lead to the bachelor's degree in architectural, civil, mechanical, electrical, and indus- trial engineering and in engineering science. Labs in- clude work in fluid mechanics, electrical measurements, electronics, materials testing, metallography, and sani- tary engineering. ABEL, CARL, Miami, Fla., B.S. in Architectural Engineering, SBG Senator-4: Architectural and Civil Engineers 3, 4. ABRAMS, HOWARD M., New York, N. Y.: B.S. in Electrical Engineering, AEII 4, American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4: Institute of Radio Engineers 4. ANDERSON, DONALD R., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Civil Engineering. AOUN, RENE I., Valencia, Venezuela: B.S. in Civil Engineering, fIPIA Treas.-I, V. Pres.-2, Pres.-3, 471-IE I, 2, 3, 4, Dean's List I. BADIA, ERNEST N., Tampa, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4. BAIRD, CHARLES B., Deland, Fla., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, EAE 1, 2, Pres.-3, 4, Band 1, 2, 3, 4, SBG 3, Governor 4. BARCLAY, ROBERT I., New Rochelle, N. Y., B.S. in Industrial Engineering. BASS, HARRY H., New York, N. Y., B.S. in Electrical Engineering. BEHANNA, IOHN P., Highland Park, Ill., B.S. in Industrial Engi- neering, EAE I, 2, 3, 4, Society of Automotive Engineers 3, 4, Fellow- ship of Religious Liberals 4: Sea Devils 3, 4, Management Society 4. BETTS, IOHN IR., Hampton, Va., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. BLANK, SAMUEL A., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Institute of Radio Engineers 3, 4: AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. BORELL, THOMAS A., Philadelphia, Pa., B.S. in Industrial Engineering, A247 1, Pres.-2, 3. BOYLES, GORDON W., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Institute of Radio Engineers 3, 4, American Institute of Electrical Engi- neers 3, Sec.-4. BOZANIC, IOHN, Worcester, N. Y., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Institute of Radio Engineers 1, 2, 3, 4: American Institute of Electrical Engineers 3, 4, Engineers Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sigma VD l, Pres.-2, 3, 4, Pep Club 2, 3, President's Council 2, 3, 4. BRADIE, MITCHELL E., Miami Beach, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Insti- tute of Radio Engineers 4. BROWN, IERRY L., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Engineering Science, Institute of Radio Engineers l, 2, 3, Sec.-4, En- gineering Honor Society 3, Sec.-4, TIME 2, 3, 4, 'IIPIIE 1, 2, 3, 4, Miami Engineer 1, 2, 3, 4, A1159 l, 2, 3, Dean's List 1, 3. BROWN, IOSEPH M., Great Neck, N. Y., B.S. in Civil Engineering, Architectural and Civil Engineers 3, 4, Dean's List 2. BULA, IULIO A., Barranquilla, Colombia, B.S. in Industrial Engineering, Engineers Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Newman Club 1, Z, 3, 4. BURD, EDWARD M., Iackson, Mich., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Institute of Radio Engineers 3, 4. BURDINE, PAUL K., Louisville, Ky., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Institute of Radio Engineers 4, Dean's List I, 3. BUTTERWORTH, RONALD C., Raynham, Mass., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Society of Automotive Engineers Treas.-4. CANTER, EDWIN L. IR., Delray Beach, Fla.: B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Institute of Radio Engineers 3, 4, Dean's List 2, 3. CAPOWSKI, RICH- ARD W., Yonkers, N. Y., B.S. in Civil Engineering, Architectural and Civil Engineers 4, Engineering Congress 4: Ibis 3, 4: Miami Engineer 4. CARSON, DONALD F., Oneida, N. Y., B.S. in Civil Engineering, Architectural and Civil Engineers 3, 4. COCHRAN, BRUCE I., Tampa. Fla.: B.S. in Electrical Engineering TKE I, 2, 3, 4, American Institute of Electrical Engineers I, 2, Treas.- 3, V. Pres.-4, Institute of Radio Engineers 3, 4, Engineering Senior Class Sec.--4. CORRIGAN, IOHN E., Rochester, N. Y., B.S. in Mechan- ical Engineering, Society of Automotive Engineers Sec.-2, Treas.-3. CRANE, WILLIAM S., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Institute of Radio Engineers 4, American Institute of Electrical Engi- neers 4. CRISTY, ALFREDO I., Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, B.S. in Indus- trial Engineering. CROSBY, IAMES R., Chicago, Ill., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, EAE I: Dean's List 3. CUENCA, ROLANDO M., Havana, Cuba, B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, QK41 3, 4, Society of Automotive Engineers I, 2, 3, 4, Dean's List l. DAY, IAMES M., Detroit, Mich., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, American Institute of Electrical Engineers Treas.-3, 4, Illuminating Engineering Society 3, Institute of Radio Engineers 4. DESROSIERS, EUGENE A., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Engineering Honor Society 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3. 351 A-D Engineering H Engineering D-K i tr ' DRIVAS, GEORGE C., Saco, Maine, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, IIKCIP 4, IFC 4, American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4. DRUKMAN, MEL- VIN, Boston, Mass., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Institute of Radio Engi- neers 2, 3, 4, Engineers Club 2, 3, 4. DUPREE, IAMES N., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Institute of Radio Engineers 4, Engineering Honor Society 3, 4. DURRIEU, ARMAND E., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Mechan- ical Engineering, 411.59 2, 3, 4, Arnold Air Society 4. EBY, ROBERT E., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Society of Automotive Engi- neers 3, 4, Miami Engineer 2. FILER, ROBERT I., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Architectural Engineering, QHE 2, Treas.-3, Engineering Honor Society 4, Architectural and Civil Engineers 2, Sec.-3, 4, Dean's List 1, 3. FLETCHER, DONALD R., Cincinnati, Ohio, B.S. in Electrical Engineering. FOGARTY, WILLIAM I., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Civil Engineering, Architec- tural and Civil Engineers 4. FOLAND, ALVIN I., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, TAT 2, 3, 4, Institute of Radio Engineers Pres.-1, AEE 3, 4, 'PHE 3, 4: Engi- neering Honor Society 3, 4, Engineering Congress 3, Pershing Rifles 1, 2, Army ROTC 1, 2. 3, SBG Cabinet 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, OAK 4. FRAUN- FELDER, LEROY L., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. FRIDELL, IOHN R., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Ameri- can lnstitute of Electrical Engineers 3, 4, Dean's List 3. GOLDY, CHARLES S. IR., Miami, Fla.: B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Engineers Club 3, 4, Society of Automotive Engineers 3. GRAUBERT, IVAN H., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Industrial Engineering: TACID 1, 2, 3, 4, Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4: Pershing Rilies 1, 2. 3, ROA 1, 2, 3, 4, Institute of Industrial Engineers 4, SAA 1, 2. GROOMS, STEVEN E., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engi- neering, American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4, Institute of Radio Engineers 4. GRUBISHA, GEORGE, Goodrich, Mich., B.S. in Industrial Engineering. GWINN, IAMES T., Charleston, W. Va., B.S. in Electrical Engineering. HARUM, IAMES D., Coral Gables, Fla., B.S. in Architectural Engineering, EAE 1, 2, 3, 4. HOLTON, HAROLD B., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, EX 1, 2, 3, 4, Engineering Honor Society 3, 4, Institute of Radio Engineers 2, 3, 4, Engineering Senior Class Pres.-3, 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4, Iron Arrow 4. IENSON, THEODORE A., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, CPHE 1, 2, 3, 4, Institute of Radio Engineers 3, 4, American Institute of Electrical Engineers 3, 4, Dean's List 1. IOHNSEN, RALPH H., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Architectural Engineering, Swimming Team 1, 2, 3, 4, M Club 1, 2, 3, 4. IOHNSON, ARLEN R., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, GAG 2, 3, 4, Arnold Air Society 3, 4, Society of Automotive Engineers 2, Cross Country 3. IONES, WILLIAM C., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering. KALATA, IOSEPH A., Little Ferry, N. I., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Society of Automotive Engi- neers 3, 4. KANTERMAN, ARTHUR, New York, N. Y., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Engineering Honor Society 3, 4, Institute of Radio Engineers 3, 4, American Institute of Electrical Engineers 3, 4, Dean's List 1. KANTOR, RONALD R., Miami Beach, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Institute of Radio Engineers 3, 4, Engineering Congress 4, Miami Engineer Managing Ed.-3. Editor-4. KANZER, SHELDON I., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, TAQ 3, 4, Institute of Radio Engineers 3, 4, Society of Automotive Engineers 3, 4, Hurricane 4. KELLER, LOREN T., Fort Lauderdale, Fla., B.S. in Civil Engineering, Engineering Honor So- ciety Treas.-4: Architectural and Civil Engineers 4, Dean's List 1, 3. KENT, IOEL G., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Industrial Engineering, Institute of Radio Engineers 1, Pres.-2, 3, 4: Amateur Radio Society 1, Pres.-2, 3, 4. KERN, CRAIG S., Coral Gables, Fla., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, ATU 2, Treas.-3, 4, 5, Arnold Air Society 4, 5, Society of Automotive Engi- neers 2, 3, 4, 5. KESSLER, LAWRENCE, Utica, N.Y., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Engineering Honor Society 3, 4, Institute of Radio Engineers 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 3. KNAUER, FRANCIS A., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Elec- trical Engineering. KOSTAS, DEMETRIUS F., Haverhill, Mass., B.S. in Civil Engineering, Engineers Club 1, 2, Architectural and Civil Engineers 3, 4. KRIVANEC, EARLE V., Higganum, Conn., B.S. in Mechanical Engineer- ing, Engineering Honor Society 4: Society of Automotive Engineers 4. Dean's List I. LANE, WILLIAM L., Lucerne, Calif., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Honor Society 3. 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4. LANGDON, RICHARD M. IR., Agawam, Mass., B.S. in Electrical Engi- neering, Institute of Radio Engineers 1, 2, American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4. LA PORTE, CHARLES M., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering: American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4, Dean's List I. LICHTENBERG, WARREN I., Washington, D. C., B.S. in Industrial En- gineering, Architectural and Civil Engineers 2, 3, Institute. of Industrial Engineers 3, 4. LOWE, HOMER L., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Mechanical Engi- neering, Engineering Honor Society 3, 4, Mathematics Honor Society Treas.-4. MCCAVETT, LAWRENCE E., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4. McCLINTOCK, FRED H., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Society of Auto- motive Engineers 4. . . K-R Engineering "'i- "'- 3 i'l ?'i ' ?i?'l 1 MANDIS, ANGELO 1., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Insti- tute of Radio Engineers 3, 4, M Club 2, 3, 4, Baseball 2, 3, 4. MAROTTA, BASIL, Miami, Fla., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, TIME 3, 4, GHZ I, 2, 3, 4, Society of Automotive Engineers 2, V. Pres.-3, Pres.-4, Engineers Club 2, 3, 4, Denn's List 1, 3. MARTIN, IOI-IN D., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, American Institute of Electrical Engineers 3, Sec.--4, Institute of Radio Engineers 4. MENOYO, IOSE M., San Iuan, Puerto Rico, B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. MERLINO, CHARLES 1., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, AXA 1, 2, 3, 4, Society of Automotive Engi- neers 3, 4, Engineers Club 2, 3. MERSEREAU, ROBERT C., New York, N. Y., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Institute of Radio Engineers Treas.-4. MEYERSOHN, CHARLES, Miami, Fla., B.S. in Civil Engineering, Archi- tectural anti Civil Engineers 4. MONSOUR, ROBERT S., Providence, R. I., B.S. in Architectural Engineering, Newman Club 1, Suntanners 2. MONTGOMERY, DAVID 1R., Mount Pocono, Pa., B.S. in Architectural Engineering, fIPA9 Sec.-1, V. Pres.--2, Pres.-3, 4, Hurricane Flying Club 2, Dean's List 3. MUSSELWHITE, WILLIAM R., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Civil Engineering, Architectural and Civil Engineers 3, 4, Engineering Senior Class Treas.-4. MYERS, DONALD W., Willoughby, Ohio, B.S. in Architectural Engineering, Architectural and Civil Engineers 4. NEWCOMB, RALPH A., Weymouth, Mass., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, KE 1, 2, 3, 4, Institute of Radio Engineers 2, 3, 4, American Institute of Electrical Engineers 3, 4. NISSLEY, WALTER S., Lancaster, Pa., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Society of Automotive Engineers 3, 4, Engineers Club 3, 4. NOLA, FRANK 1., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4. O'CONNELL, DAVID F., Hialeah, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, American Institute of Electrical Engineers 3, 4. ORANGE, EDWARD N., Madisonville, Ky., B.S. in Civil Engineering, Architectural and Civil Engineers 1, 2, 3, 4, Engineers Club 1, 2, 3, 4. PATTERSON, DOUGLAS M., Batavia, N. Y., B.S. in Mechanical Engineer- ing, ZX 2, 3, 4, Society of Automotive Engineers 2, 3, 4, Dean's List 2. PLUNKETT, ALAN T., New Haven, Conn., B.S. in Industrial Engineering, Society of Automotive Engineers 2, 3, 4. POLLY, CHARLES, Linden, N. 1., B.S. in Civil Engineering, Architectural and Civil Engineers 3. POLYAN- SKY, IOHN, Bowie, Md., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Society of Automotive Engineers 3. 4. POPP, IOSEPH M., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Elec- trical Engineering: American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4, Dean's List 4. RECHTER, ROBERT I., Miami Beach, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Engineering Honor Society 3, Pres.-4, Institute of Radio Engineers 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, 4, Iron Arrow 3, 4, Engineering Congress 1, 2, Sec.-3, Who's Who 4, AEE 4, OAK 4. ROBERTSON, DONALD L., Miami, Fla., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Institute of Radio Engineers 2, 3, 4, Engineers Club 1, 2, 3, 4, American Institute of Radio Engineers 4. ROTH, CARL F., Chicago, Ill., B.S. in Civil Engineering, Architectural and Civil Engineers 3, V. Pres.--4. Engineering R-Z RUDICH, HARVEY3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Mechanical Engineering3 ITAQ 1, 2, Sec.-3, 43 'PHE 1, 2, 3, 43 Engineering Honor Society 3, 4g SBG Senator 43 Dean's List 13 Society of Automotive Engineers 2, 3, 43 Miami Engineer 3, 43 Suntanners 2, 33 Homecoming Committee 3, 43 Engineering Exposition Chairman 3. RUDOW, FRED G.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Electrical Engineering3 Institute of Radio Engineers 43 American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4. RYSAVY, THOMAS 1.3 Bayonne, N. 1.3 B.S. in Electrical Engineeringg Newman Club 3, 43 Dean's List 43 American Institute of Electrical Engineers 1, 2, 3, 43 Engineers Club 4. SANDERS, RICHARD C.3 Philadelphia, Pa.3 B.S. in Electrical Engineer- ingg Engineering Honor Society 43 Engineering Senior Class V. Pres.-43 Dean's List 2, 3. SCHERR, IOSEPH 1.3 Brooklyn, N. Y.3 B.S. in Electrical Engineering3 American Institute of Electrical Engineers 43 Institute of Radio Engi- neers 43 Society of Automotive Engineers 4. SCHICK, FREDERIC A.3 Yonkers, N. Y.3 B.S. in Architectural Engineering3 Architectural and Civil Engineers 3. SCHUBERT, IOSEPH W.3 Chicago, Ill.3 B.S. in Architectural Engineering3 Dean's List 3. SMITH, CARL E.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Electrical Engineering. SNYDER, GARY R.3 Fort Lauderdale, Fla.: B.S. in Electrical Engineer- ing3 IFC 43 Homecoming Committee 4. SOADY, ROBERT W.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Civil Engineering. SOFRANKO, MICHAEL F.3 Gary, Ind.3 B.S. in Architectural Engineeringg Architectural and Civil Engineers 3, 4g Engineering Honor Society 4. SOKOL, SAMUEL3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Electrical Engineering3 American Institute of Electrical Engineers, 1, 2, 3, V. Pres.-4. SOLTESZ, ATTILA3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Electrical Engineering3 Insti- tute of Radio Engineers 2, 3, 43 Dean's List I, 2, 3, 43 Ski Club 4g Fencing Club 2, 3. SORENSEN, ROBERT B.3 Fort Lauderdale, Fla.3 B.S. in Industrial Engineering3 Institute of Industrial Engineers Pres.-43 Industrial Engineering Society 2, 3, 43 Engineers Club 2, 3, 4. STANS, WILLIAM M.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Electrical Engineering3 Institute of Radio Engineers 43 Dean's List 4. STONE, HARVEY S.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Electrical Engineering3 TECP I, 2, 3, 43 KPHZ 1, 2, 3, 43 IIME 2, 3, 43 'PKCI1 3, 43 Engineering Honor Society 3, 43 Dean's List l, 2, 33 Institute of Radio Engineers V. Pres.-2, Pres.-33 Iron Arrow 43 AEE 4g OAK 4. SWAN, DONALD K.3 Pelham, N. Y.3 B.S. in Electrical Engineeringg American Institute of Electrical Engineers 43 Newman Club 4. TAYLOR, GARY H.3 Flint, Mich.3 B.S. in Engineering Science. THEODORIDES, ARISTOTLE D.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. TOR- NELL, GONZALO 1R.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Industrial Engineeringg Society of Automotive Engineers 1, V. Pres.-2, Pres-3, 4. TRISSEL, RICHARD P.3 Des Moines, Iowag B.S. in Electrical Engineer- ing3 Engineering Honor Society 3, V. Pres.-43 Institute of Radio Engi- neers 3, 4g Mathematics Honor Society 3, 43 Dean's List l, 2, 3. USLAN, GERALD M.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Electrical Engineeringg American Institute of Electrical Engineers 3, 4. VAN LOO, GORDON K.3 Grand Rapids, Mich.3-B.S. in Electrical Engineering3 Institute of Radio Engineers 1. VAN SHURA, CARL F.3 Chatleroi, Pa.3 B.S. in Electrical Engineering3 LIJKT 3, 43 American Institute of Electrical Engineers 4. VIEIRA, ALONSO3 Medellin, Colombiag B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. WEISBERG, SANFORD A.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Civil Engineering. WHIPPLE, RICHARD 0.3 Eric, Pa.3 B.S. in Architectural Engineering3 1'IKfIP 2, Sec.-33 Men's Residence Hall Association Sec.-2, Treas.-3, V. Pres.-43 Canterbury House 43 Chorus 3. WILLIS, CHARLES 1.3 Miami, Fla.3 B.S. in Civil Engineering3 Dean's List 3. ZARZAR, IACK P.3 Bethlehem, Iordang B.S. in Mechanical Engineeringg Engineering Honor Society 3, 4g Dean's List l, 23 ZAE 3. ZINN, CHARLES H.3 Drexel Hill, Pa.3 B.S. in Civil Engineering. 354 l inieewio ttjwfllf QKE-,g4Q55'fi'5i?ig if M it 31, ft W " f ' ,.k,V.M.,.gA 9.-:g d r y, 3 A motif-3 3 .if 1 g txt gy, W 4 5 ii ft 'Q Qt H t it I i 3? m3' Y." l'4ixi3' 1 3, Q ' ft 3. t i 431. . 3 X as. . 3 c 1 1 tg . 3 M if V . X littii 3 Yr 'Y iii rig I 1 s 933, ,, Q74 S . . 3 it 5 gf .Q 0 . ' iw. . H. .... 3 i. S, my 1.'w.yt 4,1 'W Jltsvgiiiifgiii 'K L Q 3 3 QW M ,Wes ..,. . ffl X if 1 if ENGINEERING CONGRESS: Fronf row: Ken Shipe, Alfred Shrader, Carolyn Baker, Bruce Baird, Mel Drukman, Jim Tifzel. Second row: Wayne Schunichi, George Grubisha, William Green, Robert Fisher, Dick Pieper, Joe Sugarman. Engineer Boys Get Last Laugh From Rocket-Firing Incident OMECOMING-HAPPY STUDENTS laughed in November when an engineering-school project, a 22-foot "rocket" named "Alumnic," barely cleared its 16- foot launching pad, falling clumsily onto the ground. Engineering students had the last laugh, however-though it took a couple months. They had the satisfaction of knowing that their "rocket," dud as it was, at least went higher than the first United States satellite-carrying Van- guard rocket. But all the engineers' time was not spent up in the air --or at least 16 feet of it. For the second year they elected senior class oliicers, who arranged a banquet for all gradu- ating engineering students. A quarterly magazine, the Miami Engineer, which is edited by Jerry Kravetz, published articles on engineering advances, while school events were publicized through a newsletter. An Engineering exposition open to the public, a big dance and other school projects were organized under the auspices of the Engineering Congress, which is headed by Bruce Baird. SENIOR OFFICERS: John Bozanic, John Fridell, Edwin Canier, Bill Musselwhiie, +reasurer, Harold Holton, president, MIAMI ENGINEER: Fronf row: Lawrence Dorfield, Ron Kanior, Leroy Blanchard, Jerry Kravetz, Bob Fisher, Jim Nissle, Ed Auerbach, Alfred Shrader. Second row: John Self, Dick Capowski, AI Rubin, Trip Segal. ,riff :li .ii Richard Sanders, vice presidenl, Bruce Cochran, secretary. . Lf? x A CIGARET, A CARTON OF MILK, A REVIEW OF TECHNICAL PROBLEMS WHILE ENGINEERING STUDENTS RELAX ON NORTH CAMPUS METAL SHAVINGS fly from lathe as stu- dent, eyeing nearby pIan,'turns part of tool. e s-num-gc: ma :mea ,:fa,fs Modern Machines, Labs Ease Study For HarcI-working Engineer Students ELL-EQUIPPED ENGINEERS, well-equipped laboratories- that is the story of the Engineering School. Laboratories provide the engineer-to-be with practical experience needed for his future work. In the dynamo laboratory is electrical equipment for the study of direct and alternating current machines. Devices used in industrial application and radio and telephone com- munications are available in the electronics laboratory. Light distri- bution is another phase of experimental Work. Experimental experience may be gained also in the fluid mechanics laboratory which is equipped for measuring flow in pipes and open channels. The study of metallography heat-treatment and Welding constitutes another form of practical treatment of knowledge learned. Engineering work is also done in surveying, woodworking, and in studying sanitary treatment processes. 356 FIERY TORCH welds a s'I'uden'I' proiecl' as engineer works in laboralory al' fhe Norih Campus' Anas'l'asia Building. CRACKING VOLTS of elecfriciiy race +l1rougl1 equip- menl' supervised and adiusled by cap-wearing engineer. WAVING HANDS relay a secrel' language +o engineering sfudenfs who iol' down informafion 'For homework. Surveying is no'l' confined fo one area, however: complex lofs are calcula'l'ed all over campus. 357 School of Music MUSIC STUDENTS had a special treat awaiting them at the start of the fall semester. Ready to provide for their listening to and reading of musical scores in air-conditioned comfort was the 350,000 circular Albert Pick Music Library. An important contribution to community cultural interests is made every year by the UM Symphony Orchestra, directed by Dean john Bitter. Internationally 358 JOHN BITTER, Dean recognized artists participate in the program. The colorful "Band of the Hour," supervised by Fred McCall, provides music and entertainment for UM football games and other special events. Courses offered by the school include composition, piano, voice and music education. Training in opera techniques is available through the School's affiliation with the Miami Opera Guild. BREES, ANTON D.5 Lake Wales, Fla.5 B.M. in Music Education5 KA 45 'IUMA 2, 3, 45 Arnold Air Society 3, 45 A4129 3, 45 AFROTC 1, 2, 3, 45 Newman Club 2, 3, 45 Men's Residence Hall Association 2, 3, Sec.-45 Band 1, 2, 3, 45 Iron Arrow 45 OAK 45 AEE 4. CIESLIK, KURT5 Berlin, Germany: B.M. in Music Education5 QPMA 3, 4, 5: French Club 15 Dean's List 2, 4. COLLINS, NEWTON 1.5 Fort Lauderdale, Fla.5 B.M. in Music Education5 CDMA 1, 2, 3, 4, 55 ROA 2, 35 Scabbard and Blade 35 MENC 4, 55 Band 1, 2, 3, 4, 55 Christian Science Association 1, 2, V. Pres.-3, Treas.-4, S. COSGRIFF, IOI-IN E.5 Hempstead, N. Y.: B.M. in Music Education5 QMA 1, 2, 3, V. Pres.-45 MENC 1, 25 Symphony 1, 2, 3, 45 Wesley Foundation 1, 2, 3, 45 School of Music Governor 4. FRIEDLAND, LOIS B.5 Coral Gables, Fla.5 B.M. in Music Education5 EAI 3, 4: French Club 2, 3. FRIEDMAN, CLAIRE E.5 Coral Gables, Fla.5 B.M. in Music Educationg EAI 1, 2, Treas.-3, V. Pres.-45 Band 1, 2, 3, 45 Dean's List 2, 3. GOGEL, PAUL K.5 Iohnstown, Pa.5 B.M. in Music Educationg QI-IE 1, 2, 3, 45 Band 3, 45 Dean's List 1, 2, 3. HARRIS, PAMELA5 Miami, Fla.5 B. M. in Piano5 EAI 2, Sec.-3, Editor-45 AAA 1, 25 IIJKQ 3, 45 Christian Science 1, 2, 3, 45 Dean's List 1, 2, 3. HERROLD, STEPHEN G.5 Em- porium, Pa.5 B.M. in Instrumental Music5 Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 45 Dean's List 2, 3. HUNT, IAMES W. IR.5 Norfolk, Va.: B.M. in Music Education5 EX 2, V. Pres.-3, 45 KIPMA 1, 2, 3, 45 ROA 2, 3, 45 Band 2, 3, 45 Army ROTC 1, 2, 3, 4. KASCHER, ROSEMARIE A.5 Youngstown, Ohio5 B.M. in Music Education5 NKT 3, Pres.-45 EAI 2, Editor-3, 45 Honor Court 45 Opera Guild 2, 35 Concert Chorus 1, 2, 3, 45 Student Religious Association Council 3, 45 Wesley Foundation 1, 2, Treas.-3, 45 Dean's List 1, 25 Collegiate Council of the United Nations 3, 45 AEE 45 Who's Who 4. LAIRD, IOAN K.5 Boca Raton, Fla.5 B.M. in Piano5 AAA 2, Sec. 3, 45 EAI 1, 2, 3, 4. MACALUSO, SAMUEL A. IR.5 Hartford, Conn.5 B.M. in Music Educationg Band 15 'PMA 1, 2, 3, 45 MENC 15 Newman Club 1, 2. MALOWITZ, ALLEN5 South Ozone Park, N. Y.5 B.M. in Music Education5 MICA 1, 2, 3. MCGARRY, ANNE 1.5 Flushing, N. Y.5 B.M. in Voiceg X9 1, 2, Pres.-3, 45 EAI 1, 2, Sec.--3, 45 AEE 3, Sec.-45 Dean's List 35 SBG Cabinet 3, 45 NKT 4. ROBERSON, PAULA L.5 Miami, Fla.5 B.M. in Music Education5 BSU 2, V. Pres.-3, 45 Opera Guild 2, 3, 45 Chorus 2, 3, 45 MENC 3, 4. RONCI, SALVATORE5 Daytona Beach, Fla.5 B.M. in Music Educationg QMA 3, 45 Dean's List 1. SEAY, BARBARA A.5 Fayetteville, VV. Va.5 B.M. in Music Education: AAII 2, 3, 4: EAI 3, 45 WAA 1, 2, Sec.-3, 45 Chorus 1, 2, 3, 45 Senator 3, 45 Cheerleader 1, 25 Opera Guild 1, 2, 3, 4. SHAPRO, BARBARA 1.5 Miami Beach, Fla.5 B.M. in Music Educationg AECP 1, 2, 3, Sec.-45 EAI 3, 45 Dcan's List 3. STATON, ROBERT G. IR.3 St. Petersburg, Fla.5 B.M. in Composition5 Conccrtante Chamber Orchestra Director-2, 3, 45 Symphony 1, 2, 3, 4: Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 45 Ring Theater 3, 4. SU'I'I'ON, MACK5 Miami, Fla.5 B.M. in Music Education. TORN, SHELDON M.5 Iaeksonville, Fla.5 B.M. in Voice5 Dean's List, 1, 2, 3, 4. YSAC, ALBERT5 Scottsbluff, Neb.5 B.M. in Pianog Dean's List, 1, 2, 3, 4. ZAPORA, WVILMA P.5 Nanticoke, Pa.: B.M. in Music Education5 EAI 3, 45 Symphony l, 2, 3, 45 Dean's List 2. 359 A-Z Music 'lbs CAUGHT IN THE LONG SHADOWS OF AN EARLY-MORNING SUN, STUDENTS RELAX WITH FRIENDS AND TALK MUSIC Surroundings Ease Education For Music Students LASSICAL MUSIC-usually pictured as something taken from dust-laden shelves-strikes a note of ultra-modernity at the University of Miami. It is not because of the music, of course, for that, as a rule, is venerable. Rather, it is the bold, clcn lines of a classroom building, the coolness of an air-condi- tioned library, the refreshing sight of a Hower-bordered walkway. The setting of the Music School was artis- 360 tically planned among the palm trees at the southern end of the Student Union Lake. These physical qualities of the UM School of Music are important to music students, Who, whether training for careers in voice, conducting, or even on the instru- mental side, find that their education is made easier and more enjoyable by their attractive and serene aca- demic environment. CIGARETTE SMOKE and I'I1e s'I'acca'Io 'lone of his percussion blend 'Io creaie a moody seH'ing for 'Ihe beaiing oui of flue blues. ANSWERS 'ro musical quesiions have been simplified for inquisifive siudenis by +I1e addiiion of a music library. GROUP INSTRUCTION IN PLAYING TECHNIQUES AND LONG HOURS OF PRACTICE ARE VERY ESSENTIAL TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF SKILL Welcome All Graduates - 7a memdmedcw in nam Kumar! 666454 Alumni Clubs ALABAMA BIRMINGHAM President: Mr. Maurice J. Farrell 617 Warwick Road, Hollywood CALIFORNIA Los ANGELES President: Mr. Elias Powell 3225 Butler Avenue SAN FRANCISCO President: Mr. Maurice Leinkram Monroe Residence Club 1870 Sacramento Street CONNECTICUT STRATFORD President: Mr. Harold E. ohnson r. I , I 99 Brightwood Avenue DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA WASHINGTON, D. C. President: Mr. John Saunders 422 N. Edgewood St., Arlington, Va. FLORIDA FORT LAUDERDALE President: Mr. Joel Miller 1215 S. W. First Avenue HOLLYWOOD President.' Mr. Marvin S. Black 1427 Adams Street JACKSONVILLE President.' Mr. Arman Reinke 135 13th Street Atlantic Beach KEY WEST President: Mr. Ralph G. Governa Mitchell's Havana Tours 917 Duval Street ORLANDO President: Mr. William G. Haynie San Juan Hotel TALLAHASSEE President: Mr. John Joseph Blair 1518 Atapha Nene SCHOOL OF EDUCATION President.' Mr. Leonard V. Wirkus 8105 S. W. 53rd Avenue South Miami 43, Florida SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING President: Edward F. Sheldon 7530 S. W. 36th St. Miami 55, Florida SCHOOL OF MUSIC President: Mrs. Catherine Tremblay 3018 S. W. 7th Avenue Miami 55, Florida TAMPA President: Mr. Edward K. Dick 5108 West Platt Street GEORGIA ATLANTA President: Mrs. Bette G. Bauer 2579 Bramble Road, N. E. ILLINOIS CHICAGO President: Mr. Jay S. Van Dyke 8541 Woodlawn Ave. KENTUCKY LOUISVILLE President: Mr. Joseph Fleischaker Will Sales Appliance Store 317 South Fourth Street LOUISIANA NEW ORLEANS President: Mr. Joseph S. Bonamo Standard Electric Company 719 South Pierce Street MASSACHUSETTS BOSTON President.' Mr. Saul J. Palder 60 Rockwood St. Jamaica Plain MICHIGAN DETROIT President: Mr. John F. Walsh 3707 Dukeshire Royal Oak MISSOURI ST. LOUIS President: Mr. Robert C. Greenberg Route 3, Box 224A Creve Cour NEW JERSEY NEWARK President: Mr. Herbert S. Smallzman 38 Grumman Avenue NEW YORK NEW YORK CITY President: Mr. Jacob "Jake" Horn 110 W. 42nd Street ROCHESTER President: Mr. Ronald F. DeBlase Norton Cadet Cleaners Corporation 420 Norton Street ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS GRADUATE SCHOOL President: Mrs. Janet M. Catvelli 7725 S. W. 35th Terrace Miami 44, Florida SCHOOL OF LAW President: Mr. Arthur C. Massey, Jr. 6270 S. W. 104th Street Miami, Florida SCHOOL OF MEDICINE President: Frank Wilson, M.D. 3710 Battersea Road Coconut Grove, Florida Secretory: Phil Kaplan 5920 S. W. 45th St. Miami, Florida NORTH CAROLINA WINSTON-SALEM President: Mr. James H. Gooch Junita Drive OHIO CINCINNATI President: Mr. Vincent M. Mercurio 4302 Floral Avenue CLEVELAND President: Mr. Edgar S. Spizel 3702 Winchell Road Shaker Heights, Ohio PENNSYLVANIA HARRISBURG President.' Mrs. Hope S. Jones Colonial Apartments Route 2 PHILADELPHIA President: Miss Caroline M. Hyde 3421 Berkeley Avenue Drexel Hill PITTSBURGH President: Mr. Gavin S. Millar 449 College Avenue Greensburg TEXAS HOUSTON Organizational Chairman: Mr. William H. Shilling, Jr. 6510 Rutgers VIRGINIA RICHMOND President: Rev. John J. Howard 205 Brunswick Avenue Blackstone CUBA I-IAVANA President: Mr. George Emilio Balbi Apartade 3327 Avenue Blanquita 304 PUERTO RICO President: Mr. Pedro J. Soler University of Puerto Rico College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts Meindez vigo 67 Mayaguez, Puerto Rico HOME ECONOMICS President: Mrs. Ann Lee Schreiber 2900 S. W. 63rd Avenue Miami, Florida SCHOOL OF NURSING President: Mrs. Dora' E. Blackrnon 3618 Rivera Court Coral Gables, Florida ALUMNI GRIDDERS President: Joseph A. Krutulis 5791 S. W. 51st Terrace South Miami, Florida ALUMNI AFFAIRS AND HIGH SCHOOL RELATIONS HARRY H. PROVIN Director CARL W. FIEN JACK R. BOHLEN RONALD B. STUCKER Coordinator of Alumni Affairs ' Coordinator of High Assistant Coordinator of Alumni Secretary School Relations ' High School Relations GENERAL ALUMNI BOARD OFFICERS 1957-1958 JUDGE RAY H. PEARSON, President WILLIAM C. HARTNETT, Second Vice-President MALLORY H. HORTON, First Vice-President MRS. BEATRICE SMITH ORR, Secretary Edward H. Baumgarten Patrick J. Cesarano Edward F. Dunn JEROME BLANK, Treasurer BOARD OF DIRECTORS Mrs. Helene Putnam Kichefski Susie L. Marbey - F. X. James O'Brien Frank W. Guilford, Jr. Caroline Banks Hunter, William H. Kerdyk Smart W. Patton M.D. Ralph Renick Jane Wood Reno Walter W. Sackett, M.D. Mrs. Ruth Linder Sutton Mary Gertrude Wensley Rev. Lloyd Whyte Someone Saved . . . So Someone Could Learn Parents usually save to give their children a college education. The diploma you earn represents a lesson in thrift that can, some day, provide for the education of your own youngsters. Savings accounts, of course, constitute but one of the many ways in which The First National Bank of Miami can serve your future business and personal financial needs. Establish your connection now with Miami's oldest and F1orida's largest bank, where complete banking and trust services are provided in one convenient, downtown location. K 1 Flagler at First MEMBER: FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 363 J CIPIIIN' 'IIIIS X ECJCJIK ISIN" 1999 i Cfllb 'fi' o o o and Won't it be your photograph that you and your grandchildren look for first? X! Q Y LZ X 7 That's a lot of looking ahead, but it illustrates the permanence... the interest...of a fine photograph. Fine photographs of you are our concern ...a photograph you will proudly give as a personal present...a photograph you will look back on happily years from now. We hope that when you Want a fine photograph taken again, you entrust it to us-your official school photographer. PhotoReflex...a unique method of faleing pictures from coast to coast x ' 1 PHOTOREFLEX STUDIO U f N 9 4th FLOOR U 'Z t N Q S Jlamhakw aafliblid' . W . Eg dwmmwe.5Q -V - .... f,,'j-,fl -f ,'-.lull .51 , fi L Compliments of Zzatic Qczfwlena INC. 5955 Ponce de Leon at Red Road Phone: MO 5-5423 Majors in the Complete College Wardrobe STAGG SHOP 80 Miracle Mile, C. G. 947 Lincoln Rd., M. B . ' QTIIIA! 451 v e DRIVE IN T 'n', il. X SHIRTS 7 10: . -..l 'Z' If ,Jiyaf,fZ:'j.,"fl I X , , .EEN ,,q3,:,I,l2 X s 1 5 if ?"f,j9fj'-Eg 2 . ' iii.-Q fm.. ,px 555 Q Ld! Q ,g S ,. nuff' fa X ,,. Y' 1' ifgz g. ,M , ,. I. X i i' 4 ' i 5 ?f'Y'5x V 'F , '52 Q ,74504 ,f j ,f',fN42b f Beauiifully Launclerecl . Limil' 3 Wi'I'l1 Each Sl.00 Dry Cleaning Wiihouf Dry Cleaning 2Oc I' 'I u I S . if 5 1 xi Bring Em ln fm- r . . Z ray.-x I' ln The Morning .f Inf ,v 'RX ef, X . .. -Wear Em - 1.5-. Q MQ, il A+ Ni+e- 4 .Z f fx 5 J ix NO EXTRA CHARGE X - Personalized Service HI 6-6752 3890 Bird Road at Ponce De Leon good Yoon! SHUHTYH Bar-B-II llamzh 'A' RIBS ..... 1.35 Served with Slaw, Bread and French Fries ik CHICKEN .... 1.50 Served with Slaw, Bread and French Fries f CORN-ONHCOB . .20 Big, Meaty Sandwichec f BEEF or PORK . .50 with French Fries BEER ON TAP C with food onlyj 2 MILES SOUTH OF UNIVERSITY ON DIXIE HI-WAY fam SWWY fzcdff i'!1,wE'cmZZie. WW ee a cle ode of pleas ng soph's9'ca!ed se ke s a cl yecr ouncl Fl 'd'ans FT. LAUDERDALE t I f Q y over c i I I , sun- e r n -r orll f l 1515 cas! las olas boulevard WN cm: Cables Mmm' Beach IX XX. X :X W X l Congratulations bud eq fd TEXTBOOKS - SUPPLIES, INC. 1132-1134 South Dixie Highway CORAL GABLES 4-6, FLORIDA Phone MO 5-7361 IN 1923, Col. Harry E. Parker, printer and publisher of Montpelier and Bradford, Ver- mont, ana' George E. Merrick, founder and builder of Coral Gables, put their heads to- gether and formed a print shop. It was one of the three first businesses in the then small suburb. It was called, cumbersomely enough, but entirely in keeping with those ebul- lient times, The Parker Art Printing Associa- tion. Its primary purpose was to produce some pretty flamboyant printed pieces fand some other milder and highly functionalj needed by Mr. Merrick and his associates to bring Coral Some Local gum! Gables from a grapefruit grove and truck farm to a front page, nation-wide name as a modern, all-planned city. Certainly this was accomplished. Parker's contribution was small but important. We went through the usual motions, did things the best they could be done under the circumstance, and got them when they were needed. Harking back to '23, Col. Parker, who had been a drummer boy in the Civil War, was at the ripe old age of 18 compelled, with his own band, to make a trip through the South. The South, in turn, I am sure, resented the heck out of him. Nevertheless, they turned out ffor there wasn't much else to do in those daysj and listened to his so-called music. Col. Parker brought a handful of his own New England printers, and abetted by a few locally recruited technicians famong whom, it must be confessed, was your correspondentj man- aged to get off the ground in late fall of 1923. It was an interesting time. A man with an arm like joe DiMaggio fand I am not sure he was born thenj could have pegged in any di- rection from our corner of Alcazar and Salzedo and hit nothing but scrub pine or palmetto. We did a modicum of justice to Coral Gables, both as a corporation and a city. In the interven- ing 35 years fand in South Florida that is prac- tically pre-Revolutionaryj we have ably served other noteworthy South Florida institutions, in- cluding the University of Miami, which was also the brain child of George Merrick. Of course the University was founded in 1926, the year of the big storm-which not only set the University back on its haunches, but also Coral Gables and the whole of South Florida. That really was a small thing. It was followed by six or seven years of the deep, deep depres- sion. The University suffered under it, even lit- Z' 74 , pfmzmgp History tle outfits like Parker suffered under it. But in South Florida, at least, we don't think individ- uals suffered under it too much. This was a nice area to live in during a de- pression. There was fruit of all categories, which could be had for the stealing. There was every- thing to be obtained from the sea, including such delectable and highly priced items as stone crabs, just for the asking. We didn't have to huddle up in snow-covered blankets selling ap- ples, as was the wont in Northern areas. We were blessed in an area where the lack of fuel didn't work a hardship. All we had to do was get enough to eat and save our dough for rent. Whatever: we were playing along with the U, at Parker's. And, by the Grace of God, still are. Both founding fathers have gone to their re- wards, but quite a few long-termers remain. Three were in the original crew, four have been around for more than 20 years, five for more than fifteen years, and the remainder are Johnny-Come-Latelies, some of whom have been here for less than 10. In any event those who have produced print- ing for a pioneer town are still striving fand valiantly, if you will accept a partisan's viewj to do service for an area which extends from Palm Beach to Key West. Many of the folk in- volved are interested in printing-a substantial number are interested in Parker ART PRINTING ASSOCIATION Since 1923 HI 3-4276, CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA HAM 'N EGGS in HE VILLAGE CORNER .IEWELERS HAND WROUGHT JEWELRY GIRALDA AT LeJEUN.E Unusual Design S. Dixie Open-16245 A.M- til P-M. Phone MO. 1-74-11 Coral Gables 46, Fla. Closed Sundays We Buy 8 Sell Used Textbooks All Year Round BOOK HORIZON 5815 Ponce de Leon QSouth End of University Baseball Fieldj PIIOIIB M0 1-9397 COMPLIMENTS W 0 nlt Y 0 u HAVE-A-TAMPA LINEN RENTAL SERVICE DRY CLEANING, LAUNDRY, WASHATERIA Zami laundry CZ. 6'0n the Campus" For an GU" store address . 214 Walsh "'i'Y""'e Smoke M" Store Address . Eaton Hall . if i l Vgggbv Q Lv. 2 8 ,- vIn4g,, xxx Eyes righl' . . . on a bright future in Florida! f i ser WJ... 1 lx- , ggwwd' ', -yew J X E Whether you're going on to higher learning or to a career . . . Florida offers every golden opportunity you seek! A l Florida colleges and universities are among the finest in the nation- and the same is true of Florida's rapidly expanding industry. ii So look no further your future IS bright if you keep your eyes rnght on Florida' FLORIDA POWER 8 LIGHT CUMPAIIY 2 ' 'U v x ' Iklltiixx 368 YF' is FOR FINE FOOD Open till1:00 P.M.-7DaysaWeek TYLER'S RESTAURANT Air Conditioned - - Ample Parking 1560 S. Dixie Hwy. KA1' Red Road! 1526 Ponce de Leon 1257 W. FI 1818 N. W. 36th Sf. 12395 Biscayne Blvd. RIDE HOME SAF ELY WITH SURE-FIRE . A University Favorite . :Wi W WE. Use Your Student Dlscount A TROPEX BATTERIES, INC. 2125 N. W. 17th Ave. can NE 5-5721 agler Sf. Covers for the 1958 IBIS by fmt.: 'KINCSPA ' i f KINGSPORT Plusss, INC. IIC. gy KINGSKRAFT Kingsport, Tenn. Compliments of fif' T.. ..... ,3,,., .gg ' r:2:rg2:1:2g1:2 - , . ,:1:1:g:1::: 1 cg: 1 2 V - r:1:'- --------: , : , ' --'1-'1-.. .. 5 "-":':g:g., 5 11' 55215 :,. ' ' '1 'A Compliments ieeweifwywie Of ' 3 .5255 .. , ...,.,...,,.. ., . A -A ....,.. 1 LUMBER YARDS, INC. CORAL CABLES NO. MIAMI BEACH MIAMI SHORES PERRINE ENGRAVINGS IN 1 9 5 8 I B I S BY College Annual Division ALABAMA ENGRAVING COMPANY BIRMINGHAM ' I -'A- 2 X '-1-f dm V- - 'I ' 'Q P L 'V TJ J if Since 'tl'lGAD3JVV'11 of the Century WE HAVE SPECIALIZED IN THE PRODUCTION OF OUTSTANDING COLLEGE AND HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOKS FOOTE SL DAVIES, INC. 1090 CAPITOL AVENUE, S. E. ' PHONE JACKSON 2-4600 ' P. O. BOX 5109 4 ATLANTA Adams, Palrlcla .....,..,,...,..... A Aal, Roy .........................,.,........ Abdenour, Richard ......,. 253 Abel, Carl ............,..... B4 Abel, Sluarl . .........'...........,... ., Abney, Carol .......................... Abraham, Maurice ............... Abrams, Herberl ..,....,............ Abrams, Howard .... 252, 257 Abramson, Margo ............... Accolla, Diane ...A...,........ 282 Acker, Fred ......................,....... Adams, Berl .......,...,... ,......... . Adams, Marilyn .............. I72 Adams, S a m .,.,........ 220 Adams, Dr. Thurslon 33, IOI, Adcock, Henry . .,................... . Adcock, Sybil ...,........ 2 .......... Adkins, Ray ...............,.,........... Adler, Richard ....................... Adrian, Edward .............. 204 Africano, Rosemarie ,.... Aiken, David ....,,..................... Akin, Mariorie .....,...... Alaimo, James Albano, Dave .......................... Albert, Eugene .....,.......... Alberl, Jerry .....,.. ..,........ Alberls, Ray .......,.... ........... Albred, Rex ..,.......,................... Aldrich, Caspe F .............. Alexander, Arl ........ ........... Allen Chrisllne ...............,..... Allen: James ............ Allen, Judy .........,.... General Index Baker, Melvin .,...... 2l6, 240 Baker, Roberl .....,.............,.... Balasauide, Dyhalma .......... Baldwin, Carole ,..... 55, IT6, Baldwin, Gail ...,....,............... Balek, Judi ..,....... ........,..,.... Balkan, Irwin .,........ ........ Balsam, Bernard ...... .....,.. Banville, Raymond .............. Barclay, Roberl .............. 264, Barish, George ...................... Barkell, John ...,.............. I99, Barnharl, Jim ...... ...........,.... Barnes, Bruce ...,..........,... 280, Barnes, Ernesl ...... .,........... .. Barnell, Banisler .,................ Baron, Belle ..,................. I78, Baron, Bob .............,,....... 2l2, Barone, Roberl 240, 242, 243, 244, Barreras, Esly ..............,,.......... Barrie, Caryl .......................... Barrie, Palricia .,...,.... ........ Barron, Barbara ..,,.... Bascella, Thomas ..,... ........ Basile, Joan ............ .,,...., Bass, Charlolle .,.... ........ Bass, Harry .........,.... ........ Baslors, Annis ........ .....,.. Baslos, Vanoni ........ ........ Bales, Nancy .......... .......,.... Bales, Phyllis ..,.,.........,.,......... Bauer, Raymond .............. 204, Baum, Ellen ....,..,.................... Baum, Roberl .......................... Baumgarlner, Jean .... I85, Bauske, Duane ..........,..........,.. Bayley, William ...,.......... 2l6, Baylis, Joan ,,........,, ............ Beach, Bill .....,,...,..... ........ Allen, Manhew ....., l5E""24i Allison, James ....., ,........ ..... Allred, Rex .............. Almazar, Werner .... ,. Alperl, Judilh ,, ...., Alphin, Roberl ............. Alsbury, John .....,........,.......... Aller, Palrlcia ............,.......,., Allman, Allen .....,.. 262 272 Alvarez, Carlos ...,......,..... 265 Beach, Ronald .....,.. Beal, Nancy ........ Bean, Blll .............. . ..,. Beane, Gordon ............ ....284 280 Beally, Elaine ....... - ,.... .. Beally, Roberl ............. Beauchamp, Bruce ..... Beck, Barbara .,.......... Benchenslein, Edrya .... Alvarez, George .......,........... Amalo, George' ...... Amdur, Neal ........ Amerise, Amidon, Sally ........ Henry ...... Amon, Henry ................,........... Amrhein, Duane .........,,......,... 202 Ananla, Ron .....,...... 200 Anderson Anderson: Anderson, Anderson And rson 9 I Anderson Anderson, Anderson Anderson: Anderson Donald V ....... , Douglas ..,,.... 252 , Gary .......... Arlhur .....,....,....... Donald .......... 256 Ed .......,.....,........... Joan ...................... Mary ....,,......,.,....... Roberl .... 233, 255 Warren ,....,. ........ Andrch, Ernesl .,.......,...... Andre, Jacques .... 238, Andress, Dorolhea ............... Andrews, Elaine .......,........ 45 Angelo, Joseph ...,...,...........,. Anglim, Thomas ......... Annlo, Reynaldo .... 2l6',m247, Aoun, Rene ..,.......................... Apfel, Roberl ,,... .......,..... 2 Il Appel, Norman ........... Applebaum, Myron ....,... 237 Appleby, Donald .....,,........... Applelon, Roberl ...... Apl, Lee ,....,,. , ..,................,....,,. Aranofl, Sandy .,,............. .,...... Archer. Roberl .........,.............. Argo, Donna ..., 84, I74, 246 Armalv, Joseph ......,....... Arnold, Kay ,.,.....,........,............ Aron, Allen ......,.,,........ Aronfeld. Norwin ...... Arlon, Charles .....,.. Asburv, Failh ....., Ash, Edward ........ Ash, Fred ......,....... Ashe, Crvslal ..,... . Asher, Edilh ......,. ..........,..,.. Ashworlh, Ann ,............ I80 Beck, Claude .......... ........ Becker, Faye ,...,... ..,......... Becker, Gilberl .........,.....,...... Becker, Vleve ...,..........,. 48, 9 5. Beckerman, Marion .......,,..... Beery, Dr. John ......,...,........... Bees, Brian ..,...,.....,.,.........,,. -,.. Behanna, John ........ 2l6, 267, Behney, Virginia .....,..,........... Behren, Lela. ...,,.........,.........,... Behrman, Michael ....,.,,,....... Beisw n er R erl eg , ob .............. Bekkenhuis, Alan ..... . ........ Belan, John ......,,.....,............,. 23l Belfore, Donald .............. Baller, Alender ....,........,.. ,,,., . Bellman, Marshall ....... Bellomio, Alhony .................. ' I88 Benamy, Rlla .,............... Bendell, Richard .....,..,..,.....,.. 295 Benn, Herberl 268, 271, Bennell, Lynn Ann ................ Bennell, Roberl ........,.......,.,, I38 Bennell, William .... I37, 240, 242, 243, 244, 245 Benlz, Dennis . ...,.............,..... .. Benlz, Leo ................................ Berein, Judilh ..............,,...,.... Berg, Claire ..................,....,,. Berger, Roberl ...,.,.......... 94 Berghoff, Dick .,.... I2B, l3l Bergman, Myran ..,...,..........,.. I68 Berkheimer, Chris .......... Berkman, Marlin ..,,......,, 262 Berman, Sandy , ............... 29l Berkson, Jill ...,......., ........,,., Berman, Aaron . .,... Berman, Sidney .,.... ............ Bern, Arlhur ..,..............,.......... ZI6 Bernard, Leonard ,.... I Bernard, Michael ....,..,,,.,.,.,,. Bernslein, Al ...........,.... .,...... Bernslein, Joyce ..................,. Bernslein, Mary ...,.................. 208 Bernslein, Rulh ,......,.... .... Bersch. Howard ........ ....,,.. Aslore, Roberl .....,,......... 236 Alwaler. Monly ...,.......... Auerbach. Ed ....,... Auslin, Charles ..........,... Auslin, William .,...............,.,.. Averbuck, Richa d I' Avidano, Alfred .,.,.......... 202 Axelrod, Arbie ........ .... Ayer-s, Gerald ........ B Bader, Curlis ...,... Bader, Sue ........ Badia, Ernesl ...... Badby. Joe ...... Bahl, Roy ...,.,,.., Bailey. Bob ......... Ballv. Tom ........ Baird, Alvin ........ Baird, Bruce ....... Baird. Charles , ...,.. . Bailcher, Daniel ...... , Bakalik. Roberl . ..,.,... . Baker, Marge ......... . Berry, Allan ......,. Berry, Bob .... ............ Berry, Edward ,...,... Berry. Jerrold ..........,... .,.., , .. Besvinick, Sidney .... .. . ..... .. Belourne, Vernon ......,. .....,,. Bells, John ............,...,. Bellsak, Jose ..........,................. d Bevinglon, Richar Biacaccrdi. Richard Blasco, Arlene , ......,..., , ,...... Biggs, Katy ......,.......,......... 25I Blgsbv, Bill .......,...... Bilachone, Viclor ..,,...,....,,.... ' ' ' 204 Blnard, William .............. Bingham. William ........264, Blsbee. Mary ..........,...,........... Bischoff. Donald .......... 280, Biller, -lohn ..,...,...... Black, Burlon ..... Black, Jacob ..... .......,,..., Black, Sandra .......,.......... I85, Black, Sonia ...............,,........... Black. Jarrell .......,. Blacker. Ellen .....,. Blair, Virginia ,...... 3 I 3 220 I 70 237 l88 2 I 2 I 68 IBB 35 I 276 276 I80 286 325 252 300 I94 202 325 I 90 276 202 3 I 3 256 3 l 3 289 202 236 l78 325 308 84 97 3 I 3 342 29l 35l I 94 343 208 3 I 3 272 3 I 3 291 228 234 3 I 3 28I 220 237 298 l68 325 3 I 3 233 276 I 78 343 276 I33 I77 I 94 325 343 l89 234 3 I3 234 274 204 276 276 I78 343 3 I3 254 2 I 2 325 208 253 3 l 3 35l 228 325 233 l90 279 276 220 292 325 I74 325 358 2I I 257 3 I 3 I94 250 I86 I90 259 343 3 I 3 246 222 I72 228 325 20l 35l 259 325 202 3 I 3 IU9 206 325 250 Blanchard, William .............. Blandebergs, Charles Blank, Sam ...... .....................,.. Blankmship, Guy ......,, Blanner, Kal ............... Blasko, Byron ........ . Bleakley, Orlin ,,...... Bledsoe, John ...,.... Bliss, Jacquelin ..... Blissell, Ronald ...... Blileh, Wilber ........ Bruce, Ellen ................,....,,,.... Brummel, Osake .....,............ Brunson, May . .,....,.... 32, 5l, Brusco, Joseph .....,.,........ 253 Buchan, Norman Buchanan, Howard Buchell, Roberl .............. 258 Buchi, Libby ........... Ceci-Kna bb, Anna ........ 282 Buckley, Richard ..,.. ......... Budd, Mike ......,,..... , ....,....... Budnick, Marlin .............. 270, Buell, Jon , .........,...... . ,.......... . Buhrman, Jack ....... ......,,.... Bula, Julio ........... ......,.. 2 '64, Bulawa, Frank ..,,.., .........,... Bulger, Harold ..... Bunn, Fred .,..,........ ......... Bunling, Charles ....... ......,,. Buonosan, Bob ........... . ........ . Burbank, Edgar ,.................... Burd, Edward ..................... ,... Burdelle, Marlin .... I28, l29 'l3l, Isa, 240, 245, 3I6: Cehean, Lynn . ..........,............ . Cergizan, Peler ..., 222, 274 Cesarini, Sandy ..................... Cesaroni, Joan .........,.....,....... Chaffee, Thomas ....... ........ Chaiser, Russell .......,.,....,...... Chaikowski, Jerry .......,......,.. Chamberlain, Eugene ......... Chamberlain, Susan .,.. l85 Chambers, Ben ,..................... . Chansen, Alfred ................... Chapel, Jackie ................ 284 Chapman, James ................. Chapman, Richard ..., 82, 84 226, 242, 244 Charllon, Kerry ..................... Charllon, Roberl .................. . Chase, Jackie ............. Chalfield, Joe ....... Chaves, Skip ............... Chazen, Slephen Chenowelh, Dean Cherpak, Chilcull, Kay .....,.... I84 206 Childers, Chippas Jim. ....,........... ' .. Chippas, Yvonne ..... Chivers, Nancy ..,.. ..... Chizek, John ...,................ Chorbaiian, Roy Chorney, 'Sandra Choros l, Linda ..........,.,. Choyce, Russ ..... Church George .......... I 94 302, , Lyd I5 .............. .2l2 .280 ill, Mary ...,................. Ciambolli, Vincenl ............... Cieslik, Kurl ..,..........,...... 259 Clark, Clark, Ann : .,........... I80 Connie ..... ,.... ....... 262, .l7l Blilslein, Marlin .................... Block, Fred ............,......,.......... Block, Harry .... 83, 234, Block, Norman ..........,............. Bloom, Jerald .................. l88 Bloom, Joan ................,........... Bloom, Michael ........ ..,.,,.. Blosser, James ..........,. Blossom, Roberl .................... Blumberg, Carole ................ Blume, David .............. ...... . . Bobal, Andrew ................... Bobrow, Harriel ............. Boehm, Marilu ................ Boggs, Dr. Ralph .....,.,......... . Boice, Virginia ...................... Boissonna.ull, John .,,.....,... , Bolash, Palricia . ................,... . Bolen, James ..........,......... IB6 Bololin, Lynn .......................... Bollon, Joe .........................,..., Bonamo, Anlhony ................ Bond, John .......,.............. 206 Bondreau, Roberl ,...... .,....... Bonner, David ...... 243,255 259, Bonomo, John ......................., Bookshesler, Dennis Boolh, Bill .,..,........,,...............,, Boozer, John ............,...,... 206 Boozer, Julia .... ., Borell, Thomas ........ Clark, Donald ....................... Clarke, Ramon ........,............ Clasen, Corinne ................... Cleveland, John ............ 2l8 Coales, George .,..............,.... Cochran, Bruce .... ,.257, 35l Coe, Elizabelh ....... - ............ Coffey, Jerry ............. ,.......... . Boren, Edie ........,..... Boren, Rhoda ...................,...... Borinsky, Arnold ............ I96 Borken, Gilberl ...................... Boro, Bruce ............,,,..,..... -... Borowsky, Daniel .................... Borysiawicz, Richard Boss, Sandy .,.,.,........................ Bossak, Sandra .....,..... ......... Bolnick, Arl ...,.... Boll, Marcia ........,.......,... Bo udrea, Roberl ...............,.... Bournier, Julian .............. 253 Bouse, Ann Marie .... I85, Bowen, Eugene ......... .... ,...., . . . Bowman, Shirley .......,...... 277, Boyd, Barbara ..,..........,...,...... Boyd, Paul ..........,..... Boyles, George ,.... Boyles, Gordon ...........,.. Bozanic, John ........,......... Brach, Ted ......,..,......,.........,..,,. Bracker, Arline .............. I78 Brackell, Palricia .......... Bradie, Milchel ...... Braham, Bob ...... ............ Branch, J. E. ....,.................,.. . Brandes, Sally ......, ......... I 94 Branlley, John .............,.,........ Brauslon, Bruce ...,......,.......,... Braxlon, Harold .................,., Breakslone, Barbara ...... I89 Brees, Anlon .... ..... 20I 243, 259: Bregman, Bealrice ........ Brenan, Mike ............,..., ,........ Brenan, Terry .......... Brennan, James .......... .,,,,.... Brenner, Jack .........,.............,.. Brenner, Marlin ..................,,.. Brellschnieder, 'Lane Bridgeford, Ed ..................,... Brinckerholf, Edgar ............,. Bring, Gordon ................ 2l8 Brishll, Bronne ...... ............ Brisker. Morlon ...... Brill, Roberl ............ ............ Brillon, Adelle .,,...................,. Broad, Norman ............., Brody, Clifford ,,...... ...........,.. Brody, Dorene .......,........ l68 Bromberg, Paula .................. Bronfm-an, Lewis ............ Bronner, Alan ................ Brooks, Harold .........,............ Brousus. Alberl ................ 264 Burdlne, Paul .........,...,..........., Burdsall, John ........,....... IO9, Burgel, Frank ...................,.... Burgsliner, Carson ..,..... ..... . .. Burke, Francis .,..........,........... Burke, Richard .......,................ Burke, Roberl .....,............ 258, Burke, William ..............., 287, Burman, Barry ....................... Burnes, James . ...................... Burns, James ..................,......, Burns, Leigh .......... 232, 233, 234, 240, 242, 243, 244, 247, Burns, Priscilla ............... - ...... Burrows, Earl 248, 249, 26l, 272, Burlon, Barry .,,..... .................. Burlon, Leland .... ..,,................ Bush, William ........................ Bushong, Calherine ............,. Buller, Tom ............,............,.... Bullerfield. Wilma .,............., Bullerworlh, Ronald 267, 339, Byrd, James ..........,. 2l2, 252 264, 3l6, Byslrom, Franklin .........,........ C Cabana, Margol .................. Cabell, Charlie .....,......,,.. 94, Cable, Marlha .........,,..... 33I 247 Cabrera, Carlos ,,..,....... , Cadamuro, William .... 302, Cahoee, Doug ........,....... 264, Cairo, Rinerio ................ 255, Calandra, Joseph .,.......,...,.... Calderon, Jacob .................... Caldwell, John .......,........ 23I, Caldwell, Ravona .......... 25l, Caleman, Granl .................... Callobre, Rene ..................,,. Calo, Peler ....,.,,...... 258, 262, Calvano, Barbara .................. Camero, Mario ......,...........,... Caminili, Lorraine ........ 278, Campbell, Barbara ...... ..I69, Cannalo, Sam .......,....,........... Canler, Edwin 252, 266, 346, Canlor, Jerome .................,... Capell, John ..........,......... l35 Capers, Kim ..,......,,................. Capowski, Richard .....,.......... Capo. Al ...................... 84, 85, Cappella, Augusl' .........,........ Capps, Gerald ........... ,.... . .84, Carey, Ted ............. Q. .,.......... . Carlos, Loude ......... ......... Carlson, John .......... ..,.. Carlson, Terryl ....................... Carmichael, Joan .................. Carpenler, Marcia .......... ,.,... Carpenler, Tom ....,,.,..,......,.... Carone, Mallhew .................. Carr, Carolyn I85, 274, 286, 302, Carr, Roberl .......... 206, 254 Carr, Sherman ....................... Carrera, Edward ..,................ Cohen, Cohen, Cohen, Cohen, Cohen, Cohen, Cohen, Cohen Arlene 95, I00, 279, 283 Arlhur ........ 2l8 Barbara ............. Barbara T. ....,,. . Celine .......,..,..... 291, 254 .I70 Charlene ............ 278 Dahlia ,.,.....,. ....... .276 Eugene . ....., ............ cohen, Lennie ..,.... Cohen, Lesler .,................ Cohen, Cohen, Cohen, Cohen, Cohen, Cohen, Cohen, Lewis . 52, 240, 242 243, Michael ...,................. Palricia .............. Richard ....,.,.. Roslyn ....... Saul . ,..... ......... Slanley .............. Cohen, William ...... l95, Cohn, Les ,...... .......................... Cohn, Miriam .......................... Cokino s, Pele .....,... Cole, Fred ..... Cole, William Coleman, Jane Coleman, Karl Colliflower, Nancy ............... Collin, Collins Collins Collins Collins Collins Collins Collins: Collins Collins Colon, Colon, Colosi, Colol, Colson Combs Cone, Tom .......,..,,..... , Jim ,.......... , John ......... ..... , Lloyd ................ , Michael ,......... . , Newlon .............. , Roberl ......... , William ...,........ Alba ............. ....... Carmen 84, 92, I04, 252, Ronald ....... ........ Raymond ............ , James . Carol .....,...,....... William Norma ............... Richard .............. 155 .317 225 254, 220, .204 .I77 Carrier, Carroll, Carroll, Ca rrow, Carson, Mel ............... ........ Andrew ....... ....,.,. Paul ..........,.. ........ Donald ......... , ...... . Bruce ......................... Brow, Browe Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Carl ........... ..,.,............, r, Hunler ....., 244, 286 , Barbara ...................... , Chad ....... ......... 2 33 , Dennis .,..... , Dorolhy ...... , Jerry .................... Joann ..,... Brown: Joseph . ,.,........... . Brown Brown Brown . Brown, Brown , Lloyd ..,... , Marcus ........ Miriam Morlon ........ I96, Marqarel ........,..,...... Brown, Nancy ....,.......,............ Brown, Peler ............. ,...... Brown, Ridoely ..... Brown, Sandra ........ Brown, William ,..,.,..,,........,... Browne, David ................ 220 Brown Bruba e, Hughes ............. ker, Barbara ................ 372 Carson, Donald . ...... .. Carler, Clyde ..,,.....,.. Carler, Sharon .....,,.,.........,.,,,, Carfer, William ...,.......... 202, Caruba, Alan .......... Casanova, Jacques ............... Casanova, Jorgelina Casey, Claude ............. Casey, James ............. Casey, Kalhleen ......... Cash, Sally .., ..........,.... . Cashan, Gloria ..............,,,...,,. Cashman. Richard .......... Casper, Roberl ...................,. Cassese, Thomas ....,,.........,... Caslrillo, Edgar .............. Caslro, Ada .........,...,......,,,..,. Casway, Malcolm ......,,........, Caswav, Millard ....,.. Calaldo. Grace ...... Callin, James .....,,., Ca rlisano, Orazio ..,..,..........., 84 284 220, zesf Conly, William ,.....,................ Connelly, John ....... ....,..,....... Connell, Joy ............ 274, 278, Connell, Tom J. ..,..............,,.. . Connell, Tom W. ............ ...... . Connolly, Virginia ................. Conli, Anlhony ........... ........ Conlreras. Ed .......,. ........ Conyers. Mary ........, ........ Cook, Don ............... ......... Cook, James ....,.......... ....,..,. Cook, Roberl H. ...,... ........ . Cook, Roberl L. ...,... ......, . Cooke. Charles .......,............... Coolidge. Roberl L. .... 247, Cooper, Philip ,.................... Cooper. Richard .... 2I5, 238, Cope. John ..,.................,........... Copeland, Philip .................... Copulos, Slella ........... ......... Coquel. James ....... .....,.. Corey. Wall' ........,.... .....,.. Cornell, William ....... ........ Corrado. John . ,.................. .... Correia, Donald ...................... Corrigan, John 268, 27I, 329, Freeman, Goldln, June ............... Feldman, Steve ............ Corso, Darlene ...... . ......,.. Cosgriff, John ........ 257, 264, Costantino, Nicholas ..,.. 1.66 Costello, John .,.....,.,...... Coughlin, Dan ...............,.. Courtright, John ..................,.. Cove, Douglas ........ ....... Covell, Paul .............. ,........ . .. Coward, Stuart ............,... 292, Cowles, Gary ........ .......,... Cox, Bob ..............,. ........ Cox, David ................ ....... Coyle, Ronald .......... .,..,.. Coyne, John ,, ....... ...... Crane, Edward .,,.............. .,.... Crane, William ................ 266, Crannell, Winslow ...... . ......... . Crawford, Pat .................. Crawford, James ....,......,. Crebassa, Leonard ............... Crespa, George ........,. ....... Crespo, Jorge ..................,...... Crippen, Bernard ..,................ Cristol, .lay , ............. ,... ....., 2 6 9, Cristy, Alfredo ...............,.,..... Cronanwett, James ............... Crosby James ,........... .,,..... Crow, Walter .......... ....... Crump, Kay ...,...,.......,.. .,..... Cruz-Munoz Luis ....,... ,.,.... Csiszar, Gabriel .,..,......,..,...... Cudlip, Craig ......,....,............. Cuenca, Rolando ....,.,..... 252, Culpepper, Virginia .,,....,..... Cundy, Donovan ,,,..,...........,. Cunningham, Donald ........,.. Cunio, John ............................. Cupp, David .......,..............., 94, Curci, Fran .... l09, ll2, Curry, Edna . ........................., .. Curry, Roberta ...............,...,... Curson, Elliott .................. 2I8 Cutler, Mary ........ ........... Cymrot, Joel ........ ....... Daglis, Faye ......,....... .....,..... Dahl, Ray ..........,....,..........,........ Dahmer, Robert ..,...,......, 202, Dahmer, Wayne ..................... Dais, Emily .........,..................... Dalton, Lols ....,................. Dalton, Richard .... 260, 27l, Damiand, Eugene ...,..,..... . ....... D'Amigo, Lawrence ........, D'Amore, Joseph ...,......,........ Dangle, Al .............................., Daniels, Judi .................... I85, Dannenberg, Robert .........,.... Dansky, Stanley ..............,...,... Danziger, Carole ...,... ...,.... Dardat, Ursula ...,.... ....,., Darnell, Sally .,...,...,..,... .....,.. Dauenbaugh, Don ................. Dausey, George ......,... ,,..... Davenport, Taylor ., ........... David, Alma .,,.,..,........ ,... . .. David, Ben ................ David, Sally ..,....... .... .... Davies, Doug .,...... ........ Davin, Eileen ........ ....,......, 258 Cupples, Leland .............. 29I, II3. 111, II9, 124, Elliston, Robert ..,...... Elmore, Phill .,....... Emerso P n, Rod ......... Emmons, Bob .,..,....,. Endlar, Engel, Engel, Engel, Richard ......... Barbara ...... , . .......... .. Phyllis .,..., ..,......, l 92 Ted . .... ,,..,..... . .. Enke, Dave ........,., Enke, Ralph ......,.. Entel, Gerald ,... ....... Epperly, Paul ............... Epps, Charlotte ,.,.,..., Fogarty, William ....... Fogel, Donald ...............,.......... Foglia, Tony ....,,..................,... Foland, Alvln ,........ .227 242 Folmar, P Footnick, 252 aul .,................. Ro ......... . ............. Forbess, Tom ....... Forbis, Bert ........, Foreman, Leon ....... Forno, Rosemarie .... F tgang, Joyce ....................,. Fggter, Martha .................. I73 Fox, Bobbi .............. ........ ..... Fox, Frances ......... Frank, Gary ....,.... Frank, To TTI .,..,... Frankel, David ............,. Frankel, Marcia .............. Frankie, Frankle, Charles .,...,.. ..... ......... Charles ............,....,.... Epstein, Lee .........., ......... Epstein, Leon .,,...... ........, Epstein, Louis ......... ......... Erdman, Bea ............... ....,..,. Erickson, George . .... Erickson, Roger ..,....,. ......... Erkkinen, Albert ....... ........, Erney, Clinton ,..,....... ......... Erskine, Kathleen ....... ..,...... Esformes, Joe ..,....,,,.....,,......... Eskenazi, George .................. Espinosa, Eve .................. 283, Essen, Richard ............ 84, 85, Epsteln, Stan ............,,.............. Evangelista, Vincent .,.....,.... Evans, gafbara ............... ., ...... . I Evans, ...........,........ ., .......... .. Evans, Evans, Evans, Evans, Eward, Bruce . ....,. , ,.,.., , Carol .,.,... ....... . .l90 Franklin, Robert ...................... Franzblau, Arlene ....,....... 292 Fraunfelder, Leroy ..........,....... Freal, Joseph .................... 26l Fredericks, Althea .,......,......... Fredias, Bertha l0l, 241, John ......... ............, Norman .....,. Ralph ......... Eyne, Charles .....,... Drummond, Terry ...,... ..,,...., Dlamond, Carol ...................... 283 Diamond, Charles .... I09, I99 245 Diamond, Goldie .................... 283 Dice, Dennis ...........,.................. 272 Dick, Barry ......,.......,................. 234 Dick, Jack ......,.........,. 84, 202 275 Dick, Stanley ..,,.,..,...,....... 25l 3l5 Dicken, Bruce .,......,......,.... 26l 3l5 Dickinson, Judith ........ ........,,.. I 77 Dickman, Richard .................. 278 Dickman, Wesley ............ ...,.... 2 I4 Dickstein, Robert ..................,. 329 Didier, Hank .........,....,.......,.... 262 DiDomenico, Carmine .,........ 3l5 Dieterle, Hugo ........,.,............. 344 Dietrich, Charles .....,..,... 284 3l5 Dietrich, Hannah .................,.. 289 DiMare, James ..,,.,..,.. ........ 3 29 Dine, Sydney ....................,..,.... I70 Dingfelder, James ........,..,...... 228 Dingwald, Walt ,...,... . ......... 308 Dirvin, Joanne ....... ......... I 77 DiSalvo, Sue ........... ......... 2 9l Disch, Merwin ......... .......,..... 2 80 Diskin, Bertram .......,................ 305 DiTulIio, Frank ...,....,....... I96, 344 Dixon, Jack .........................,.,.... 315 Dixon, Kenneth .,.,............ I99 248 Dixon, William ,...... ............. 3 29 Dolf, Steve .......,.,...,..,.. ..,...... 2 I6 Dolinger, David .,......, ....,.... I 96 Dominic, Anthony .................. 204 Donahoo, Wofford ................ 2l6 Donnadieu, Andy ........,..,..,... 245 Donner, William ...,..,...........,... 330 Donovan, Tom ...............,.. 204 330 Donovan, Walter ,................... 76I Doran, Dorothy .........,...,....,..... l92 Doreson, Stephen ..,. I95, 2l8 330 Dorfeld, Larry .......................... 263 Dorfman, Maxine .......,....,.....,. I70 Dorn, Alan .,............. ......... 2 I8 Dorn, Joseph ..,.... ......,.. 3 44 Dorner, Rita .....,... ......... 2 53 Doster, Rachel ......... ......... 3 44 Doyle, Jane ............. ,............ I 69 Drahmann, Joan .....,,........, 55 I86 Dratt, Pat ,... ,............ ............. 2 9 I Dreiling, John .,.....,..,....,..,,.... 268 Dressler, Abbott .................... 228 Drew, JoAnn .....,..,... 265, 283. 284 Driscoll, Susanna ,......,...... l93,l94 Drivas, George .........,........,.,... 352 Drogin. Jerry ....... .. ......,.. I96 Drott, Pat ................,,,,.............. l92 Drucker, Alden ......,.....,... 270, 305 Drucker, Norman .............,.,.... 27l Druckman, Kenneth ,,,..,.......,.. 3l5 Drukman, Melvin .....,. ....,.... 3 52 Druley, Tom .,.,..,....... ........ . I99 99 28l Du Barry, Joan ......,..,,..,......,... Duberson, Charles ,,................ Dubois, Lucille ........... ....,.... Duchon, Marlene ....... .....,... Davis, Davis Charlie ....,....,........ Emlly ......,.........,..... Davis: Gayle .... 25I Davis, Davis, Davis, Davis, Davis, Davis Davis, Davis, Georgeann Gregg ..,,.. Ilene ....... .. Irving ...,.... Mann ........ Patricia .... , 260, Phyllis ......,.,........... l93 Robert Graubert, Alan ,...,... 83, George, 204, 25l, 253, 280 Day, Fred ............................ 253 Day, James .............. 257, 266 Day, Raymond ........................ Dean, Charlotte ..., I73, 278 Dean, Lori ...,..............,....,....... DeArriba, Reymond ...,.. l95 De8olt, Robert ,.., ..,.......,,,...... Deeb, Sayed ............,,..,..,........ Deffert, Daniel .........,.......,...... DeHond, Robert .,........... DeicI1man,Herta ..,. I80, 286 Deiderich, Harry ..........,. Delair, Stella .,....................,... .. Del Castill, Sara ......... ......... Delgardo, Hector .,........,....... DeLisa William .. DeLong, William 'ffffffffffffisij 192 Delorey, Catherine ........ Del Loveman, Martha ............ DelRio, Theodore ..........,......... Denehy, Robert ..................,... Dernis, Martin ...,..... . .,..... . Derosa, Frank ......... ,........ Derrick, Dave ...,...,..... ......,.. Desauntes, Carol ....... ,........ Desautel, Bruce ,...,.... ,,....... DeSena, William ....... ......... Desrisuers, Eugene .......,........ Dessoy, Don .....,........... ......... De'Stefano, Henry .................. Deutsch, Larry .................. 2II, Deville, Phil ..............,...... ......... Dey, George ........... . ,.... Dev. wllllam ......,.,.. ......,.. DeYcaza, Rogelio ...,.....,......,... Dezen, Nancy .......,,......,...,...... Diamandis, Themistocles .,.... , 287 l09 Dudash, Barbara .,.......,......,.,.. Duf'f, Pat .....................,.............. Duttin, John ......................,,,,.,.. ' 92 l0l Duhalme, Pat ............ , Dunham, Bryce ....................... Dunkel, Sheldon ................. ,.... 278 Dunkel. Susan ..,.,.......,......, Dunn, Charles ..,...,,, ............. Dupree, James .,.......,...,,....... ' 247 Durrleu, Armand , ....,...,.... Duryea, William ....,,......,..,...,.. Drawdy. Robert ......... ....,.... Duerr, John ....... ,....,.... ......... Duke, Howard .........,,....,......,, Duncan, Richard Dunning. Dr. Wilhelmina .... Durnin, Douolas .........,............ Dusenberry, Tom ...,...,..,..,....,. 252 Dvce, Frank ......,,.,,,...,...... Dye, John ,.,, , ..............,..... 2l2, Dye, Ross , .,....,,...,.................... ,. I70 Dyer. Helen ...... 55, ll5, Dykes, Robert .......................,.. Dyson, Don .................,.............. Earlck, Louls ....... ........ Eastman, Mary ,.... .. ........... .. Eby, Robert ......... ....,............ 279 Echols, Evelyn .......,.......... Eck, Charles ., ....,.. ........... . . Eckerson, Don ...... .,....,.,. I89 Edelson, Judy ....... ........,. Eden, Ted ................ ..........,..,.... Eden, Tom . ............,,....,......,..,... . 244 Edgar, Henry .... 95, 2lI, A 254, 279, 284, 286 Edklns, Norman .,.................... Edlin, Abraham ..............,....... Edlin, Michael ....,.. ......... Edwards, Earl ............, ......,.. Edwards, Richard .............,.... Edwards, Robert ....,................. 254 Ehrlich, Sandra .......,........ Eichler, David ..........,............... Eichler, Dennis ..,..............,...... 257 Eicholtz, George ..:.254, Eighmie, Hugh ......................,. Eilender, Janet .,...............,...... Einhorn, Judv ..,....,...,........,....... Eisenman, Sheldon ...,......,..... Eldot, Howard ........... ......... Eldredge, Alfred ....,.. .......,. Elilehs. Donald ....... .. ..... .. Eller, Robert .,........,................. Ellington. Jess ...,.,.................. Elliott. Ron .............................. Ellis, .Malcolm .......... 84, 227, Ellison, James ..,... ,. ...,,........,... F Fabian Perry .........,. Fabric, Stuart ..... Fabry, Francis ...... ..... Freed, Owen ,.,......... ........ Freedman, Donald ................ Freedman, Howard ................ Freedman, Robert .................. Freeman, Elliott ..............,....... Freeman, Gary .,....................,. Freeman, June .................. I84 Larry ........................ Freeman, Rachel ....... Frehan, Pete ,.... ..,....,.... Frese, Roger ....,,..................,... Friberg, Harry .......,,............... Fribourg, J. Walter ...,.. 268 Fridell, John ..........., 257 Ffldllhe, Jane .........,...,...... Friedl, Dr. Berthold .....,.......... Friedl, Eva .,..,........................... Friedland, Allan ...................... Friedland, Lois ........ 260 264 Friedlander, Sandra ........... Fairchild, George ,................. Falconer, Hugh .,....... ......... Falk, Michael .,....... .... ...,.... Fallis, Howard ..........,,..,.......,... Farber, Don ................,...,. 258 Farkas, Gerald ., ..... ..,... .....,. Farnsworth, Sue ...........,.......... Farr, Harvey ..,....,.................... Farrel, Robert ......,. 202, 248 Fassett, John ....,..,,,........,, 268 Faze, Arnold ....................,...... Feinberg, Darlene ...........,.,.. Feingold, Winifred ..,............. Feit, Marian ...,...,......,..... 262 Feldman, Barbara ......,. Feldman, Erna ....,...... Feldman, Martin .......,.. Ferdinand, Bonnie .,.. 84, Ferguson, John ,...... ....... Fernandez, Anthony ...... Fernandez, Julio ............ Fernandez, Sergio .,...... Ferrell, Mallory.. .94, 96 Ferrell, Martha ......,....... Ferren, Frank .,................ Ferwerda, Marilyn .... 277, Fetten, James ......... ..... Feuer, Barbara ....... ,.... Feuer, Lols ..,......,.............,. Fields, Robert ...............,.. Flelo, Michael ..,............. Figliola, Arnold .....,,.....,. F1lardl,Tonl ....... , .,... Filer, Robert .................. Flllp, Beverly .............. .. Filippini, Angelo .......... Findlev, Art ...,...,..... Fine. Ronald .,.......,. Fineberg, Lois ..............., Fineman, Lewis . ...,....,..., .. Flnk, Charles .,......... Finocchio, Tony ..,.,...... Fiorica, Vincent .........,.. Fisch, Rafael ..,............... Fischer, Fischer , Larry ..,...............,, Fischer, Robert ....... Fish, Robert ,,...... . Fish, Saul ...... ..... . .. Fish, St Fisher, Fisher, Fisher, Fisher, Fisher, Fisher, Fisher Fred ...... .,.,...... H256' 255 ' 2664 'uiiili' I99 eve ............. ..,.,. - ......., ISI Eve .... L ........,........., Geraldine ...,...... Marshall ..... Martin ....,,.., Maxine ........ . Gerald ........, Sheldon ....... Fishman, Sam .....,... Fishman, Tobi .,.,..,,. Fishoper, Art ....... Fiske, Alan ...,.... Fitzgerald, Dan ..,..., Fitzpatrick, Lynn ...,... Flachner Jack ......... Flagg, Norman ....,.. Flam, Ronald .,.....,... Flannery, Gerald ...,,..... Friedlander, Nancy .............. 264 Friedman Friedman Friedman Friedman Friedman , Claire .... 260, , Joan ......................,. ZIS , Larry ....,. 52 242, 243 , Malcolm ..,.,..,........ ,Robert ,... 242, Friedman, Rochelle ................ l96 Friedman Friedman , Seymour ........ Stanley ....... Friedrich: Judlth ....,.. Friminski, Hank ......... Fromme, Eric ...,..... Fuentes, Raul ,.......... Fuetrelle, Austin ,...... Fuller, Joseph ........... ,. Fuschettl, Rlchard ............,..,.. Futrelle, Jean .......,.,... G Gabay, Edward .,..................,, Gager, Carem ..........,....,........ 278 Gagliane ll, Lee ................ Gaine, Brian .......,......,........,...., , Galbreath, Janet .,....,,.,.......... Gale, John ..............,......... 269 Galinis, Ernie ,.............. .....,.... . Galishoff, Donald .........,........ Gallander, Michael .............. Ganary, Gale ..,...,.........., I93 Gent, George ......... ..,.,....... Ganz, Conrad .......,. Garcia, Fred ....... Garcia, John . ........,. ........... . . Garden, Martin .,....,......,........., Gardener, Joe ......,.......,... Gardener, Tom ........,.....,,.,...... Garfinkle, Grace .,.. l82 I94 Garland, Harriet .................... Garlitz, Stanley ....... Garner, Wade ............. ....,.. Garty, Marian ..................,,...... Gasson James ..,.......,..., Geatz,'Phil .,..,. 109, 124'," Geiger, William ..,,......,........... Geller, Mauneen ....... ...,, I 69 Flannery, Jim .......................... Flair, Ronni ............ 278, Fleischer, Lols .....,....,...,. Fleischman, Robert ...... Fleischner, Kathleen ..., 28l Fleisher, Art ......................,.....,. Fleisher, Joel ........................,... Fleming, Edward ......,..... 249 Fleming, Neil ......... .,........... Fleming, Thelma ....,,.............. Fletcher, Donald .......,,... 257 Fliashnick, Jess ......, ,.... ........ Flink, Stanley ......... ....,.... Flofken, Pat ..,..,....... .........,... Focht, Tom ....... . ........... 96, 373 Gellert, Dellle ..,..,............ 275 I76 Gerber, Prudence ,...,... .. Kenneth ..,.............,... 29I Gerity, Pat ...,......,..,.. .,...,., Gernon, Gerson, George, George, George, Germer, Gershon, Gertler, Giacobo Gianni, Gibson, Gibson, Giebler, Gilbert, Gilbert, Gilbert, Gildrov. Susanne .......,...... Lo1s .,..,........ ., Chris ....,..,. Joanne .,... Tom .....,..... David ...,... Neil .......,..... John ......... ,...........,.... ne, Dominic , ......... .. Paula .....................,.... Gordon ....... Robert ......... Robert ,.....,.. Lyla ...,....... Lynn ,........ .. Ted ............... Clarence .................. Giles. Roy ....,................ Glll, Mary ..,............................... Gili, Miriam .......,....,............... Giliozzo, Frank ...... 227, 255, Gill, John ..... ,.............. ......,. 2 5 1, Gilman, Tom ....... ....,.,,......... 252 233 330 243 289 I09 95 330 266 300 282 279 3 I 6 I70 253 208 2 I 2 330 29I 28l 3 l 6 330 3 I 6 350 3 I 2 253 339 308 234 3 I 6 2 I 8 3 I 6 l09 344 227 330 284 347 3 I 6 27l 355 255 284 284 234 359 l88 l72 359 I78 240 27l 305 270 305 I82 32l 234 I89 268 330 2l 4 279 20l 2I 2 I79 237 330 282 290 29I I 74 308 29I 2 I 8 I96 283 30l 330 330 98 308 245 l09 265 344 344 264 30l I74 I99 245 30l 285 285 262 29I 344 246 344 330 29I 3 I 6 3 I6 228 208 245 l8l 272 3 I 6 2 I 2 I78 47 2 I 3 2l 2 30l 278 29I 29I 33I 268 Gilmore, John ......,......... Gilson, Gordon ............. Gilvie, Robert ...,...., Glnn, Eualle .....,,.......... Ginn, LeLand .,... .,......... Ginsburg, Richard ...... Giourgas, George ....,,.. Girhardt, Joan .....,..... Glass, Alvin .........,.. , Glass, Elliot ........ Glass, Jean ........... Glass, Pat .............,... Glasser, Robert ,... ........ Glassman, Phillip ..,...... Glazer, Janlce .............. Glazer, Joseph .............. Glenn, Judy ............. Glover, Joe ................, Gnat, Albert ..,............... Godard, Dr. James ..... Goff, Joel .............,.......... Gogel, Paul .....,..........,... Going, Donald ......,,.......... , Golden, Maxlne ...................... Goldberg Art .,...,.............. ...... Goldberg: Barry ..................,... Goldberg Goldberg: Edward..2l I, , Goldberg, Faye ..........,... 279, Goldberg, Jerome ................ l78 208 228 Barth .......,........ . ..... 228 244 29I 3 I 6 305 248 Goldberg, Myron ........ Goldenberg, aul ........ Goldenblank, Leon Goldfarb, Alan ......,...... Goldin, Belle .,..,...... Goldman, Goldman, Goldman, Goldman, Goldman, Goldstein Goldstein Goldstein Benton ....... ......... Ilene ,..... ......,......,.. 3l6 Merle ................ ,,.. I 86 Sidney ......,..... 269, 305 344 Yetta .....,..,..... , 278 , Evelyn ,... 24I, 242, 285, 292, Gail ...................... Marilyn .........,...... Goldstein: Melvyn ...,............ Goldstein, Nlna ......... ......... 278 344 , I78 Goldstein, Jacob .................... 234 331 228 29I 234 Goldstein, Paul ......, ,... ..... Goldstein, Roy ........... Goldvarg, Harvey ...,.... Golin, Suzanne .,......... Goloy, Charles .............. Goltzer, Robert ..,...,.,..... Gomez, Migdalia ......,. Gomez-Hernandez, Eduardo 3l6 Gong, Ed ,..... .....,. ,.... ...... Gonzalez, Eugenio ..,..... Gonzalez, Mirta .......,. Gonzalez, Ramon ....... Good, James ........... Goodkin, James .....,....,. Goodkind, Joel ....,..,..., Goodman, Judith ......... Goodman, Mary ...,...... Goodwin, George ,....... Gordon, Alan ,.....,...... ......... Gordon, Gordon Gordon Gordon: Gordon Gordon Gordon Gordon 33I Barry ..,...... ,........ 2 37 27l I89 , Dick .z ......... . Marcia .....,... ......... Murray ......,.....,......... Phoebe .............. 25l, 2 I 8 292 Rich a rd , ..,..........,..... 270 Steve ........... ,........ 2 27 ' I89 33 I Tobl ......,.. .,,...,...... Gordon, William .,......... Goscin, Dlane ..,.,........... Goshgarian, Armen Gotllieb, Phyllis ....,....... Gottlieb, Baron ,.,..,....,. Gottlieb, David ,...... ,.... Gottlieb, Roberta ....... 279 Gould, Robert ,...... ..,. ,..,. Gould, Ronald ................ Gourlay, William ....... Gowen, Gary .........,. Grad, Ted ..........,.. Granat, Pepi ........... Granat, Robert .....,. Granata, Rosie ,......,,..... Grand, Larry ....,..,....,...., Grande, George .......,.. Granlng, Tom .......... 202, Granstra, Frank ............ Grant, Roy ...,............,..... Gratz, Ruth ......,,.......,...... Graubard, Roberta ...... Graubert, Ivan ......,. 227, Graves, Stuart ,,....,....... .. Gravitte, Betty .,..........,. Gray, Gloria .........,,....... Gray, William .............. Greaves, Gary ,....... l09, Greeg, Alan .,...,..,........... Greeg, Peter ....... .,..... Green Sheila .....,. Green, Pat .,...,................ Greene, Bruce .,,.....,.... Greene, Linda ......... ,...... Greene, Nanita..55, I74 Greenbaum, Leonard .. Greenberg, Al ........,..... Greenblatt. Jay ......,...... Greene, William ......,... Greenhut, Andrew ...... Greenstein, Sidney ...... Grehl, Norm ..,.... ,........... Grieve, Havden..84, 222 Griffen, Robert ..........,.. Griffin, Alfred .....,......... Griffin, Roberta ........, Griffith, Wilson .........,.. Griffiths, Alfred ............ Grimes, Cecile..84, Grime 246, s, Tom ........,.......,..,........ Gr1naker, Arne .,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,A Gritze r, Francis. .......... , ...... Grooms, Steve ..............., 257 Grosholz, Anne ................ I94 Gross, Gross, Gross, Gross, Gross, Gross, Gross, Gross, Arlene ..,.,..,. ....,,,,,.,,, Edward ...,............ 260 Howard ..,.... ............ Noman .,....... Pat ............. Peter ....,,... Robert .,...,... Sharon ............. Grossman, Robert .....,...,..... Grove, Chester .......,... Grubisha, George Grumer, Howard ....... Grussmark Lin Gruno, Charles ,.,,..,........,....., 278 , da Gryaick, Robert Guadagno, Janet Guera rd, Carolyn ............ Guerrera, Art ...... Guido tti, Elsie .... Gulker, Mickey .... Gunn, Gunn, Gunn, Donald ......,....,...... James .......,,..,,.,,,,,,. Michael ...,..,............,..,. ....276, Hennings, Leroy ..............,.....,. 20l Herchen, Arthur ..,......,............ 29l Herman, Jack ........,,........ 250, 3l7 Herman, Linda ........................ I86 Hermanson, Charles ........,..... 202 Hero, George ..........,....... 268, 305 Heropoulos, Tony ...,................ 332 Herr, Charles .....................,...... 2l6 Herrero, Blas ....,,...,.... ....., 8 5 Herrold, Steve ...... .......,.. 3 59 Herron, Linda ,...,,.,.,.. ...... Hertzfield, Bernard ,...... .......,. Hertzfield, George .,.............. Herzberg, Denny ,... .............,.. Hess, Arthur ..,..,..,.,.....,,..,,,,,, ,,,. Hess, Jary ....,......,................ 2lI, Hester, red ...,.... ...........,.. Hickey, John ,,,,,,.,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,, Hicks, Pat ......,.....,..,,..,.,,,.,.,., ,,,. Hicks, Wilson ............ 33, lOl, Hidge, Ben ,... .,,.....,,,,...,,,,,,,,,,, , , Hiers, Nan ,...,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Higginbotham, Kathy .......... Hildlebrandt, Doug .............. Hill. Robert .................,.......... Hill, Susan ........,...., I69, 278, Hindman, Bernard ..,.,... l95, Hinegardner, Shirley .,,..,,..,,, Hinson, James ............,........... Jacobs, Bor1s .................. ,..... Jacobs, Joann ...........,............ Jacobskind, Barnett , ...,,,,.., .. Jacobson, An1ta ..,..,...,............ Jacobson, Art ........ 96, 97, l0l 240, 244, 254, 262, 266 Jaeger, Fred .................... 206 Jaffe, Danny ............................ Janik, Don ,,.,...,....,. ....,..,.,,....,,,,, Janisch, Jacquelyn ......., I85 Janisch, Richard .............,...... Janson, Hugh ............ .r..,..... Japhe, Anita .,.,...... ...... Jarecz, Nancy ......,. ...... Jarlenski, Robert ...... ..... Jarov1cs, John ....,.,. .,.... Knecht, Harold .....,........, . Gunterberg, Sally . ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Gurganious, Edgar ............... Gutke, Chuck .,....................... Guttentag, Richard ....,..,....... Gwazdac, Julius ,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, Gwinn, James ......,,, ..,,,,., H Haas, Gordon ..,...,....,............. Haas, William..l95, 206, 255, Habershaw, Frank ....,,........... Hackett, Paul ......,.,...,,....,,..... Hader, Herbert .....,... ........ Hagan, Orville .....,. . ...,... Hagen, Max .....,. ...........,. Haley, Michael ................ 2l3, Hall, Albert ..,...... ,...,....... Hall, Barbara .....,... ....,... Hall, Herman ........, ........ Hall, Katheline ,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,, Hallinan, Peter ............,... 284, Halpern, Steve ....... .......,.,.. Ham. Folmar ,,,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,, U Hamilton, Joe .......,.......... 22I Hamilton, Terry . ..,...... ............ Hammer, James ......,.. , ....,,. Hammock a Lee . M ry ,,......,... ,... ,.... Hammond, Anita ,,,,.,,,,,,, I73 Handelman, Janet Haner, Donald ....,.,,,...,..,,,,,,,, Hanken, Lynne ................,...... ' ' 25l Hanna, Patr1c1a ,,,, ,,,,,,,,, , Hannau, Michael .............,..... Hannon, John ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,, Hans barger, Betty ........,.,.,.... Hanschman, Ronald Hansen, George ...,.............,... Hanson, James ......,.....,,......... ' ' l73 Harding, Judith .............. 352 234 253 30 I 274 332 I77 22 I 234 I 86, 29l 29 I 292 345 I90 I90 277 268 246 84 30l Harding, William .....,..........,. Harelik, Brian .,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,, Har1g, Jane ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, Harkins, Joseph ......... ......... Harman, Betsy ,...... .............. . .. Harman, Elizabeth ............... Harnist, Pat ................. ........ Harre. Richard ........... ....,... Harreill. lrina .,...,.........,......... Harrington, Lenny .,.............. Harris, Carol ....,..,......, .....,... Harris, David ......... ......... Harris, John .................,..........., Harris, Mariorie .....,.....,.......... Harris, Marvin ........................ Harris, Pam ............., l0l, 259, Harris Walter .......,.............,.. Harrisbn, Edward , 215, 240, 244, Harrison, John .,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Harrison, Mike .........,.....,........ Harrington, Robert ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Hartach, Maxine ,,,..., . ,,.,.,. Hartley, Paul ............... .,...,... Hartung, Barbara .............,.... Harum, James . ,....... .. .,,.,, .. Harvey, Daniel .....,..,...,........... Harwood. Chris ..................... Hiribarne, Pedro ....,,.... Hirsch, Charles ...... 250, nirsclll, liawrence .......... 1rsc, egg ,..,...,.,,,,, Hirsch, 'Sandyy ................ Hirshhorn, Vivian ......, Hitchcock, Bob ............ Hittleman, Sheldon..248 Hoagland, Pete .,......,,..,......... nocll:felder,PAllen ........., 208 oc a ay, eggy ........ Hodapp,- George ...,.... Hodge, Benno ...,.......... Hodge, Pat .........,..,...... Hodgman, Parker ........ Hoffman, Peter .............. Hoffnagle, David .....,.. Hogg, David ..,.....,.......,,..,,.,., Holian, Carole ......,...,,,......,.... Holland, Mary ...,................... . Holleran, Eleanor .... 285, 29l Holleran, Tom ................. Hollman, Clinton ........,......... 272, 29l, Hollon, John , .....,.,.....,...,. Hollod, Ronald N250 193 275 205 2 1 a 305 286 301 332 159 254 280 345 131 109 3 1 7 284 3 1 7 192 215 301 , 317 2l 1 l70 21a 264 291 332 202 332 174 239 3 1 7 245 28l 228 3l 1 222 291 l8I 3 1 7 205 250 292,332 345 225, Holstrom, Davrd ....................,. 202 Holton, Harold 240, 255, 266, Holtz, Art .,..,.................,,.......... Homan, Ann ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Honig, Alan ..,..... .......... Hood, John ....... ,.... .,,...,...,,. Hoover, William ............ 250, Hopper, Carol ....... ,..,.,,.,,.., Hopps, Gary .,,,,1.,... ,..., ,..,, Horland, James ..........,.....,..... Horowitz, Judv ..,,............ Horowitz. Sybil . ..,....,.,,... . l82, Horton. Olive .................. 25l, Hotchkiss, Barbara .,.........,.... House, Hazel ...r.,,..,.. ,.,,,,2,,, House, Pat .......,....... .,... ,.....,, Howard, Jack ................., 27l, Howard, John ....,,,.......,.......,,.. Howard, Judith ..........,..... I74, Howard, Pat ..........,........,.,...... Howard, Robert ....,.,,.,,,..,,,,,,,, Howard, Russell .......,....,. 80. 82. 205. ss, Howe, LeRoy ,...,. 5l. 240. 242, 243, 244, Howell, Donald .....,............,... Howell, Hardin ...,..,...,.,,........ Howerton, Robert ...,,.... ...2l6, Howland. Willliam Jarrell, Walter ,,,,,, ,,,,,, Jarval, Tom .,....,.,... ...... Jasper, Larry .......... ,,.. . . Jay, Larry .,.........,.... ......... Jeffers, Jim ........ ...,.....,......., Jenkins, Bruce , .........,...,.., 258, Jenkins, Gayle .....,.. l20, l90, Jenkins, Peggy ......................,. Jenna, William ..,..,.....,,.,. 243, Jennings, Herschel ..............., Jennings, Roger ,,,,,,,,.,,.,,,,,,,,,, Jensen, Bob ,...,........ ,................ Jensen, Ove ...........,. ................ Jenson, Ted ............ 257, 266 Jerguson, Pat Jessop, Tom ............................. Johanan, Robert ...,,. Johnsen, Ralph ...... Johnson, Arlen .......... Johnson, Beverly . ,.... Johnson, Colton ........ Johnson, Donald ...... Johnson, John ,........... Johnson, Kendall ...... Johnson Johnson, Johnson , Lenard ...................... Ronald ..........,... Johnson: Roslyn Johnson Johnston, l I 193, 279, W1ll1am .......... Jones, Althea IBO, 24l, 242 Ray .....,,,.................... 269 Roy ..............,......,.. Jones, Charlotte .................., Jones, David .,........,...,......,..,,. Jones, Merritt ,....... Jones Robert ..,,..., Jones: T Om ........,. . ............. , Jones, Walter ..........,.., Jones, W1ll1am . ....,........ .. Josefson, Phylis .....................,.. Joseph, Ronald ........., ......... Judice, Sonia ................ ..,... Juerling, Elizabeth ,.,.., ..,... K Kabana, Margot ............ l90 Kahallss, M, .,,,,,, ,,,, , ,,,,,,,,,,,, , , Kahn, Dana Jo ...,.. .......... Kaiser, Alan ....,..... ........,..... Kaiser, Harry ...,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Kalata, Joseph ................ 267, Kaminetsky, Aviva Kamis, Daniel ...,.,...... Kamman, Ruth .............,.........,.. Kamp, Jackie ........,.. , .............. Kanterman, Arthur .,,., 266 Kantor, Kanzer, Kanzer, Kaplan, Kaplan, Kaplan, Kaplan, Kaplan, Kaplan Karel, Karp, C L Ronald ........................ Bob .,..,............,,. Sheldon ........... Daniel ...... .... David ..,,.. Karl ..,........... Marilyn ...... Ronald .......... Seymour .,..,. arry ...,.,......,...... . harles ...,...,..,...,,..,.,,,, ,, Karp. Ezra .........,.......,...,,,........ Karp, Patsy ...... l70, I94, 244 Karp, Susie ,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , , Kascher, Rosemarie Kasper, Kassner, Kassner, l 5I,24l,244, R1chard .............. Elizabeth .................. Robert ........ Kattel, Edward ....., .....,........ Katz, La ffx ..... ,.... . ..s..... . . Katz, Phyll1s ........ ....,..,.. John .............. 24, 2l6 Licata, Anthony .....,,.............. Haslett, Nancy 242, 250, 279 Hatch, Jerry ..,..........,............. Hatten, Louis ,,,. .,,,...,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Hauser, Edward ....... ..,..... Hawks, Ronald ....... ...,......., Hayes, Bill .......... ,,,...,... l 09, Hayes, Hayes, Hayes, Hayma Chason .,..........,... 227 Mary .. Thomas ......, .,....,.. n, lrene ..... .. Hazzon, Michael ....... .... Heard, Hecht. Hedric Heide, Heilig, M1lton ....,.... ......., Melvin .,..... ...... . .. h. Paul ......,............,....., Eva ..............,,,...,..,... ,.... 332 l0l 3l7 206 345 3I7 l0l Howlev. Walter ...,,... .......... 2 22 Hoyt, Sam ...........,..,, .......... 3 I7 Huber, John ........... .....,,... 3 45 Hudgins. Fred- .......... .......... 3 I7 Hudson, Sally .,.,..,.,........ ...... l 74 Huffnagle. David ...........,..,,.. l95 Hughes, Donald ................,.. 332 Hughes, Howell ,..,..,.. ..,.......,.. 3 I7 Hughes, James ............,,.. 280, 332 Hughes, John .,,..,... .............. 3 32 Huianen, Joan .,,, , ,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 290 Human, Ken .............,...,............ 2167 Humberg, Carole 174, 207, 241, Hunt, Bob ..,.........,,,.............,... 345 2l6 Hunt, Burton .. .......,........ ,...... , . 25l Hunt, James ..,. 220, 259, 264, 359 Hunter. Richard ...................... 206 Hurwitz, Shirley ,,,,,,,,.,,,,,..,,,,,, l70 Hutchings, Frances .........,.,.... l85 Hutchison, William I99, 247. 3l7 Hylwa, Nick .,,...,.,... I28, 2l3, 345 Hyman, Barry .,.,.........,.............. lngoldby, Joan ...,,.,,,,,,,,,, 262, lrv1n. John ...,.,..,...,.,.... ,......... Katz, Ronald ....,..... ...,........, Kalzker, Jack .,...........,.,., 292 Katzman, Marlene ......,........... Katzman, Sheila ..,...., .......... Kauter, Joan ..,..,.......... ...... Kaufman, Herbert ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Kaufman, Larry ...................... 274 Kauth. Robert ,..... .,.. 2 22, Kay, Ga1l ....,......................,......,. Kay. Joel ............,, .,................ Kaye, Elaine ......., Kaye, Llnda ,...,... ...... Kaylor, Ray. ,..,,,,., ,,,,, Kearms, Frank ...... ...... Kearne, Dave ......,,., ...... Keating, David .......... .......,.. 255. 286 Helbero, Neal ...............,.......... Helip, Donald ......,..,........,,....,. Helou, Victor .....,...,.... 94, 97 Hemp. Nancy .....,............,,...,.. Henqnskg, Edward ........ 233 Henc1nsk1. Marc1a ..,..,,....,.... Hendershot. Robert .,,.,... 267 Hendrix, Noble ..., ,32, l0l Hendry, John .....,...................,.. Henning, William .... 222, 232 3l7 lnselbura, Joseph .....,,..,....,... 3l7 ' 345 236 ltkoff, Jerome ........ J JECKOWITZ, David .........,,.... Jackson, Dean ........ 2l6, 274, Jackson, Ray ,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , 2Il 332 Jackson, Kendall .................... 206 225 332 Jacobs, Bernard .............. I96, Keegdz, William ...,......,........ Keeling, William .................. Keeti, Gloria ......,,,........... 29l Keith, D Keith, T onald .......................... ed .......,..,.....1..........,.... 256 Keller, Loren ..,......... 252, Kelloqq, Susan .........,,..... Kelly, Rosemary ..................... Kelly, Nathan ....,,......,..... I09 Kelsey, John .......,.........,........... Kempe. Carol ..,....................... 244 Kennedy, David .... 2243, 268, 27l, 289, 374- Kennedy, Jim ......,. .,............ Kennedy, John ....................... Kennedy, William .....,.,,... 29l Kent, Joel ...............,.,....,,.....,,,.. Kenzik, Barbara ............... Kerben, Alma ...,...... 278, Kern, Craig ...,........,. I99, Kerner Steve ..,............... Kerr, Ph1ll1p .,................,.... Kershman, Rosalie ..,.........,...., Kesser, Jack .... .......................... Kessley, Albert ,,,,,,.,.,,,,,,, 251 Kessler, Barbara ,,..,.,.,...,.... . ,,,, Kessler, Betty ..,,,,,,,,,...,.,,, Kessler, Larry ...,.. ..., 2 64, Kessler, Melvyn .,.. .................... Kettleman, Shirley .....,.. 25l Kilgard, Pat ..................,,........,. Killian, Rosalie ........,...,... 283 Kimbal Kimber, Carlton ...... Kimmelman, Jack ..,..... King, Dale .,..,............. King, Don .............,.. King, Earl ,....,...... King, Robert ........ . Kinieciak, Paul .......... Kiriakis, John .1.............. Kirianotf, Timothy ........ Kirkman, William .......,............ Kirkwood, Robert ............,..,.... Kirschner, Rita ...,.. .................. Kishner, lrwin .......... 26l, Kisker, Jerry ......,...,..,,,,..,...,....,, Kitt, Jeannie ..................,......... Kitzman, Ramon .,....,. Klain, Stan ........,............. Klateman, Sandy .......,.. Klatte. Richard ...,...... Klee, Ronald .......... ........,. Klein, Barbara ...... Klein, Martin ..,,....,..,.,,,.,,,,,,.,. Klein, Patty .....................,..,..... Kleiner, Deena 278, 279, 285, Kleinman, Larry ....,....,.........,.. Kleinman, Sharon .............,.... Kline, Mlchael .,...,........,. Klomaris, Anthony ....,... Klonsky, Rita ......,....... Kloo, George ......., ,..,... Klug, Claudia .,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Klussman, Millie ............ l90 Klussman, Robert ............,....... Klutch, Stan ........,.,................... Knabb, Jimmy ....,...............,.,. Knauer, Frank ...,,,,,.,..,,,,,, 257 288, Knickrehm, Barbara .....,........ Knight, Gerald ..,.......,....,........ Knight, Richard ...... 206, 243 Knipscher, Bill ........................ Knoch, Walter ....,......,,,..,..,..., Knott, Duncan ...... Knowles, Albert . ,,..... Kocia, Jacob ........ Koenig, Susan ......., .......,..,,.. Koeval, Roger . ,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,, 236 Kogan, Steve .,...,.., ,......,. 8 4 Kohler, Jean ........ .......,.. Kohn, Lynn ..,,.,........ .,..,,........ Koikowski, Stan .,.....,......,, 2l3, Kokos, Paul ........ , ,... ......,.... ,...... . Kolchner, Sandra .................... Kon. Arnold .......,.,..............,,.... Konig, Gloria .......,.......,.. 25l Kornafel, Mike ...........,..,......... Kosberg, Mimi . ..,............ l70 Kostas. Demetrius ..,..,.....,...... Kovachevick, Elizabeth I74, 244, Koven, Marcia .............,.. Kovich. Frances .,.. ,.l90, Kozacik. Gale ........................,. Kozic, Susan ........ ..,.........,..... Koziol, John ,,.. ........ .....,,....... Kraiger, Alan .................,,....... Kramer, Elliot ,,,,..,,,,,,,,,,,, 252 Kramer, Fred .......... . ........... .. Kramer, Joan ..........., ........,, Kramer, Leeanne ...... Kramer, Paul ....,,,. , ....,.,,. Kransner. Donald ......,.., Kreske, Richard ......,. Kritzik, Ruth ......,.......,. .,.,.,,,,, Krivanec, Earle ..,..,................. Krofinger. Frank ..........,........, Krohn, Mark ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 2l8 Kronhiser, Harry ..,......... Krosse. Nancy ....,,,..... Krug, William ..,..,.,..,..,,,,,,,,.,,,. Kruttschnitt, Louise .....,........,. Kucenski, Ernest .......,......., 202 Kueqel, Curtis ..............,, Kuehn. Andy .....,...... Kuenzig. Francis . .,................ . Kuhns, Ralph ...,...,........,..,..,...,. Kuhny, Elaine ...............,.. 276 Kuhnv, Ron ...,.,...,,......,,.,,,,, Kulick, Barbara ..,........,.,.. Kummerlen, Art ...................... Kuperberg, Bob ,.,................... 208 Kupferberg, Harvey ..,,,... Kuoferburqer, Johann Kurltz, MBFVIU ,.....,............. ..... Kurland, Norman ........ Kurtz, Joe ...,......,......... Kurtz, Ned ......,....,.. Kurtz, William ..... ,.... Kurtzman, Maxine .................. Kutner, Arno .,......................,.. Kuvin, Larry .... 242, 269, 306, Kvle, George .......................... Kyle. James ...,.....................,.... Kyser, Grace ...... I, 'Sandford ........... L Labuzan, Marshall .............,. Lachman, Carol ..................... Lacob, Dave ......................,...... Ladenheim, Helen .......... 252 Ladis, Alan .............,.........,..... Lailas, Nick ............................. Laird, Joan ........,...., I74, 260 Lake, Dor1s ............ . ................. . Lake, John ....,.......................... Lamont, Margaret 173, 275, 28l Lamothe, Colette ................. Lancaster, Leland ........ ......... Lance, Tom .................. ...... Landis, Dave .....,..,..... ..... Landsman, Barry .......... La ndsman, Leonard ...,..,..,,,. Landwehr, Joanne ........ Lane, Gordon ............ Lane, Ken ..............,. Lane, Robert .......... Lane, William .,........,, Laney, Rosemary .......... Lang, Robert ........,.................. Langdon, Richard .......... ...,. . . Lange, Barbara ................ l90 Langen, Joe ............................. Langford, George . .............. .. Lantz, Constantine .......... 27l Lapensohn, Lee .........,........... Lapkin, Robert .......... ...... . .. LaPorte, Charles ..................,.. Lark, Sarah ............................... Larson, Gary ..............,..... 233 Lashinsky, Gary ..................... Lashinsky, Philip ..................... Lasko, Norman ................ 208 Laskoskie, James ................... Lasky, Albert .............. .,........ Lasky, Burton ,..,,..... ....,..,.,... Lassman, lra ...... ................. Last, Alfred ....... ........... 2 70 Last, Paula ............................... Latch, Charles ..................... .. La uck, Barbara H 174, 241, 242, 254 La ud1s1o, Leonard ................. Lavelle, Vera . ,......... ........... . .... Law, Robert ............ Lawler, Leo ........................ Lawry, Clare ..,....,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Lawson. Gladys ...............,..,.. 2l8 Laycock, Roy .......... l95, Lazar, David .................... Lazcano, Ray ,,,,,,,,,, ,,,, , Leacy, Marilynn ........ Lea cy, Nancy .... ....,. ............. Leary, Wilson ............,............ Leav1tt, Carroll ................ I77 Lederman, Teddy ..,.............. Ledwell, Larry ....,....... Lee Lee Lee Lee Lee: , Cherle ............ , George .. ..,. .. , Janice ........,. Robert ........ Tom ......... ,... .... Waldemar ......,. Leegant, Alan ............ Lefkowitz, Louise ......,.,. Lehman, M1tchell ................. Lehmann, Walter ............ ,.,,. Lehrman, Barbara .......... 278 Leibv, Joan ............................. Leichman, Ken ................ l95 Leddig. Margaret .... ...,,...,,,,, Leidy. Robert ....................,.,,. Leipziger, Nanfredo ........... Leischen, Paula .............,., I92 LeJeune, Tom .,................ 203 Lemna, Judy ......,............. I77 Lemons. Roland ................ 2l3 Lenhart, Bruce ..... ......... Lennon, John .......,..... .......... Leoffler, Gloria ......... Leonard, Art .............. ...... Leonard, Lucia ,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,, LePlant, Dale ................ ..... Lesperance, Louis ................. Letchworth, George ............. Levack, Paul ..............,,. ..,,,, Leven, Lynn ................ ...... Levenson, Carol ......,.............. Levinson. Ed ....................,..,.., Levenstein. Leonard ............. Leverenz, Carole .............. I77 Levic k, Elsa ...................... l78 Levin, Merle .......... ............. Levin, Stan . ....... Levin s, Hal ............ Levison,lrma .... . .... . Levy, Levy, Levy, Lewis Arnold .......... Jerry .......,......,,.,,,..,.,,,,,,, Ronald ........................... , Carolyn .......... .... Lewis, Edgar ,.,,,.,, ,,,, 2 43 Lewis, Lewis Lewis Lewis: Ha rry .,......................... , John .............................. . Ken .........................,., Margaret ..................... Lewis, Pat .......................... l90 Lewis Leybd Ross .................,,,,,,,.,,,,,, urne. Sally ..................... Lichtenberg. Warren ..... ...... Liebenson. Seymour . ........... . Lieber, Toby .................... Lieberman, Barry .......... Lillien. Stuart .................. Lim. Chin Yong ........ Lindberg. Carole .......... Linn. David ................ Linnino. Charles ...... Lins, Judy ,... .... ,....... Lipcon, Mitchell .....,. Lipman, Justin ...... Lipman, Mariorie ....,.. Lipman, Peter ....................,..... Lippoldt, Kathy ....... - .....,.,..,. Lippitt, 'Sarah ....... Llpshlty, Jeanne ....... ........... Lipton, Harriet Liss, Betsy .......,.,.,,.,.,..,........ 98 Littman, Bernice, ,,.. . ..,.. . Litwin, Michael ...........,.. 237 Livedis, Phil .,......... ..... ,,..,. Lobo, Richard ......, Locher, Soma ....,,... ..,........ Locher, William ..............., 84 Lockhart, Sharon .,.........,........ Lococo, Jo-seph ........ 2l3, Loewenthal, Robert ....,,.. Logun, AI .........................,........ Lokau, Hilda ..,.......,.. Lomas, Charles .......,. ...,..,..., Long, Larry ...,........,.... , Lopez, George ............ ...,,.,..... Lopinto, John .,...,..,......... 222 Lopsonzski, Ronald ........ ,....... Lotharius, Richard .............,.. Lott, Charles ......... ,.... . .. Lott, John ..,.,.............. Loubriel, Jarnes ....... Perty, Loucks, Louise ,........ ,... Lowder, Geoffrey ....,., Lowe, Homer ............,............. Lowenstein, Regene ............., Lowenthal, Kay .........,.., Lubell, Myron .,......... ,.......,,. Luber, Art ,...,,...,.........,... . ........ Lucas, Frank ......,..........,.. 257, Lucas, Madeline .................... Lucht, James ............................ Ludovici, Phillip .............. 268, Ludwig, Robert ..,.... Luechauer Dan Luedke, Robert .,....... Lukowitz, Walt ............. Luna, Olga .........,...................... Lundquist, Barbara .,.....,....,,.. Lundquist, Edward ............,... Lunetta, Carmen ..,................. Luring, James .............. ,......,..,. Lustig, Jordan ...,.....,.............. Lutz, Ellie .................. 84 Lynch, Muriel ...........,.., Lynch, Pat ........,..,... .... Lynch, Ronald ..,.... Lyons, Gordon .,....... Lyons, Howard .....,... M: McCabe, Paul .......,. McCall, Pat ................... McCallum, 'Sharon ..... McCarley, Ed ............... M Carna Judie Munn, Re Bobbie ........... , ..,. c , .........,.......... McCarren, Sally ...... I90 265 283, McCarthy, Margaret ....,.,..... McCartin, William ......., 204, 280, McCary, Fran , .,.............,,,...... . McCauley, Ed ...... ....., . .23l McCavett, Larry ...,..,.,,..., 257 McClintock, Fred ,.,......,........ McClure, Alma ......,............. McConnon, Gerald ......,.,.....,. McCormack, Sally ,.........,..... McCormick, Roger ..........,..... McCormick., Veronica McCoy, William .....,...,,.,....... McCracken, E. M. ...... , McCray, Lorenzo ....... McCue, Kemper .....,..,.. McCure, Juanita ......... McDevitt, James .,.................. McDonald, Charles ...........,.... McEwen, Marion .,,.......... McGarry, Anne ...... I73 24l, 242 McGaw, Mike ...,.....,.,.,..... McGee, Robert ...................... McGinnis, Kay ..,...... McGovern, Tom ,... McGrath, Tom . ..,,.....,........... .. McGuire, Hazel ......... . .......... .. McGuire, Kathleen .....,.. 285 McGuirl, Peter ....,................... McKay, Gene ..........,...,........,.. McKenzie, Donald .,............., McKeriban, Betty ....,..,.......... McKerihan, Ellen ............. McKeta, Robert .... 207 McKim, Jean .... .....,......,........... McLaughlin, Bob ....,..,A...., 96 McLaughlin, Pat , .....,.......,.., .. McMahon, Florence .,..,.,....... McMahon, Robert ....... McMahon, Tom .,....,...,.....,..... McNamara, Carol .......,....,.., McNamera, Nedra .,..,... 253 McNeal, Dr. Archie ............,. McNeiIy, Tom ............. McNesby, Robert ..,.... McVicker, Richard .,...,......... . McWilIiam, Myrna ....,......,.... M Macaluso, Sam ...... 259, MacDonald, Frank ..,.........,..... MacDonald, Robert .............. 2I I 304 346 209 I74 I78 I 70 3 I 8 25 I l89 250 306 3 I 8 277 2 I 3 I69 l92 Lockwood, Sally ..........,...,....... 2lB, 33l 270, 306 302 28I 333 333 333 333 I09 333 207 3l8 284 I69 3l8 353 I70 I87 237 333 266 I73 2l7 27l 2I3 333 2l9 94 I 8l 346 3 I 8 256 204 306 246 254 276 333 20I 2I I 285 I77 346 247 276 346 3 I 8 3I9 I73 333 353 353 IBI 222 I93 I35 264 346 33 333 3I9 27l 25l 20l 346 359 306 346 276 334 334 IBI 29l 23I 276 334 334 I73 334 I69 3l9 29l 334 207 2I3 I8I 267 33 233 222 264 I69 359 3I9 3l9 MacDonnell, Richard ..,...,..... MacFarlan, Marilyn ..,........... Machenberg, Carol .............. Maclntyre, George Mack, Marvin .............., Macks, Errol ................. MacPherson, Daun ................ Maddlone Claire ,... Maddock,' Charles .jIl... Madeira, Val ..,.......,.... Mader, Richard ,.,,... Mager, Gerald ....,.... Magnes, Ronald ...,.,.,...... 270 Mahaney, Robert .................... Maheras, Katherine ....,........... Mahoney, Michael ...,.....,..... Maisel, Morton ....,,........,....... Maisel, Richard .............,,...... Malchus, Budd ...... 259 264 Malcolm, Kirkwood ................ Malek, Lillian ....,,......... Maliga, Marilu ............, Malnati, Adolfo ....,,... Maloney, James ......... Malowitz, Allen .,,.,.......... Mamches, Tamra ,........... Mamlet, Laurence ........... Mandell, Robert ..... ........., . ., Mandina, Philip ,. ..,... ..,. 2 28 Mandis, Angelo .245, Maniet, Yvonne ..........,,..,...... Mankowski, Ronald .,........... Mann, Philip ......,..,........ Manson, Lambert ..203, 2I3 Manson, Phyllis ................ Manton, Jerome ......... ..... Manton, Stephen ................... Marbey, Susie ........ 242 252 Marcadis, Isaac ...,......... Metzger, Allan .....,. Metzger, Jack ..,,..... .... ...... Metzler, Nancy ......,.....,..,...... Meyer, Anne ......., Meyers, Lamar .,.,,.... .... Meyers, Rose ...,....,......,., Meyersohn, Charles .,......... . Meyerson, Fred .,..........,..,..... l95 Micco, John ..,,..,............... Michaels, Richard ........ Michelsen, Neil' ..,,..,............... Michelson, Dr. Donald Midwood, Bart ...,..... Mieny, ears ..,..,....,...,,..,,.. Mildwoff, Norman ..,..... Miles, Millen, Ralph ..............,..........,. Alan ......,...,..,, ...26l Millen, Rod .. ..,...... 276, Miller, Carol ..,.....,......,........... Miner, Miller Miller Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller Dr. E. Morton 3I Francine ..............,, Francis ........ ..,. . ..,...... . . Herbert ,,...... ...... 2 90 Jo Ann ,...................... John .,......., ........ Larry ..... .. .,......, .. Maree .........., ....,.... . Mary .. ...... ...,... , . Mary Kay Rex ...,.. , ...,....,.,. .....,.... . Richard .... ,,......... 2 58 Robert ................ Roger Roslyn , Ruth .. Steven .... .,........ Valentine ......,,. Miramar., Judith Marcio, Marcus, Marcus, Marcus, Marcus, Roger ..........,...,..,..... Alan . ,,............. . Charlotte ...... Marvin . ..,....,... ,. Rona .. Marden, Jon .,....... ffffiiii' 2I8 Margolies, Al ,, ..,.... . Margolin, Martin ....... Marias, Barbara ...........,.,..,.... Marinello, Leonard Marker, Rita .,,......,..,....,., Marks, Hal ......,....,..... Marks, Joanne ......... Marks, Lila ,...,...,.... Marku, Marilyn ....... Marleaux, lvan ......... Marlin, Ro bert ..,.,.... Marmor, Henry .....,... "Milf Marotta, Basil .,,...,., ,,.,.... . Marsden. Bill .,.......,. Marsh, Charlotte ....,.... Marsh, Dr. Homer .... ......... . ., Marshall, Cleta .,,,,,..... Marshall, Edison ..,..... Marshal i, can ,..,.,,.. Marshall, Jerome ......... Martin, Brenda .........., Martin, Douglas .... Martin, Martin, Martin, Martin, Harry ........... James ..,,.., John .,........... Milton . ,.....,..... Martinez, Hubert ......... Mills, Dr. Altred ......,. .....,,..... Mills, Richard ...,...,.,....,,.. 268 Milstein, Joseph ......... .....,,, Minnix, William . Minteer, Russell .. .... A,.... . . Miranda, Carmen ...,... Mirilovich, Jon ......... Mirman, Selma ..,,... Mishkin, Isaac ,,........ ................ Mitchell, Kyle ......,,., , ...,.,,,.,..,. Mitchell, Richard .....,.... Mitchell, Theron ..,, II4 Molko, Ronald .... ................... Monahan, Curtis .................... Monette, Joseph ........ ...,.... Monfort, Robert ....,.. Monsour, Robert .......,, Mont, Jay .................,, ..,. . Montello, James .... ,....... I 99 Montgomery, David ..... Moon, John ..........,... .... Mooney, William ..,.... Moore, Reva ,.........,.. .......... Moore, William ..........,,.. 267 Moraan, Lanora ..,,.. Moran, Emmett ....... ....,... Morehead, Allen .,....... Morgan, Daniel ........,...,......... Morgan, John .........,.,. .207 Morgan, Lowell ...................... Morgan, Mireille ,....., ,........ Morgan, Phillip .............. 228 Morgan, William .............,.... Martinez, Hughes ....... Martinez, Millicent ........... .. Martins, Delano ...,....... Mascolo, John ................ 248, Mason, Kitty ,,,........., ........... Mason, Stuart ............... Materson, Barry ...,.,,............,.. Mathieson. Barbara Mathios, Judith .,,.....,..... 283, Matonis, Joan .............,. Matthews, Thomas .,,.. Mattox, Lorraine ......... Maxwell, Charles ....... Maxwell, John ....,........ Maxwell, Lucille ......... May, Bruce ..................... Mayer, Lawrence ......... Mayerson, Victor ......... Mayfair, Judy .,....,........ Maynard, Sidney ,... ,... . Mazursky, Rachel .,..... Mazza, Anthony .....,, Meder, John .,......,..,..... Meehan, Virginia ...... Meeker, Gerald ....... Meier, Johanna ....... Meiners, Ken ......... Meindl, Eugene ......, Melet, Marcia ..,...... Melinger, Milt .,....... Mello, Isabel ..,...,,...,.. Meltz. Arnold .,..........,,. Memering. Willard Menahn, June ..,,. ..,,....., Menor, James , .,.,...,. . Menoyo, Jose .....,......... Mercatoris. Robert ..... Merlin, Joseph ........ ..... Merlino, Charles .....,... Mermelstein, Marvin . ,........, . Merola, William .....,..,.........., Merrifi ld D n e . o .......... Merrill. Marv Ann ,.....,. Merriman, Terry .....,, .,,...,,.... Merritt, Joan ..,......, 244, 286 Merry, Dorothy .,..............., 247 Merryman, Carole ...,,...,. Mersereau, Robert ........., 266 Merten. Roman ........ .,............ Merzlak, Ronald ..,.,.......,...... Messer, Robert .........,.,.,., 237 Metler, Larry ....,.. ....... . Mcrgen Morie, Moritt, Morris, Morris, Morris, Morris, Morris, Morrison, Morrison, Morrison, Morrison, Morrison, roth, Christine Raymond ..,...... Edward ........... Alyse ...., .,.., ..,,.. Ed .,......., ..,.,....,.. Rosemary , .... . Tommie .. Wyn Bart ,. . Lewis .. .... Gertrude ., Harold ...,... Nancy .,.,..... Morrissey. Edward . . Morrow, Irene ., ,.,.,.,, ,. Morton, Jerry ........... Morton, Myrna .....,... Moscoe, Paul .,.,..... ..,.. Moses, Orry .......... Mosk, Yale ....... ..,....... . . Moskos, James .....,.. 22 Moss, Stanton, ..,... Moss, Winnie ...,..... Motzer, Neiland Maxon, George ..... Muff, William ...,.. Mull, Sha FOI1 .. .. ,, .... 'wiiid' 258, "f.'Qfffff2s5 Mullen, Robert .....,..............., Muller, Carol .......,.......... I96 Mulligan, Mulvihill. Mumm, S Gordon ..,,......,...,,,, Donald ...,.. andra .,.,.... Muncev, John . ......... .......... , Munier, Gerald ......,.. ,.., ......... Munnay becca . .............. 25l Patricia ..........,,..,,. Muravch' k. Ph llis ,.,. ........, ic y Murphy, Bill ..,.......,...... Murphy, Dennis ...... Murphv, James ..,,... Murphy, Lawrence .......... Murphv, Terrance .................. Murphy, William ..,,.,...... Murray, Mushlin Wiley ...,..... .......... Musselwhite, am 'I ,.......,. asa Mutschler, Robert .................. Myers, Donald .....,...,. .........,.. Myers, John ,................. ,,.. 2 59 Myers, Mary Ann Myers, Richard ..,............. 375 287 250 I93 3I9 285 346 353 2I8 203 237 3I9 29l 259 3l9 270 222 3I9 288 289 3I2 346 334 302 I78 334 I96 3l9 I69 283 249 334 334 235 283 I93 227 222 I78 280 306 302 334 334 27B I09 253 334 290 225 I I7 I 96 2 I 3 334 346 353 2 I 8 346 353 284 253 253 306 334 269 22 I 3 I 9 270 3 I 9 228 334 334 254 204 2 I 5 3 I 9 245 222 I 92 I77 207 289 289 270 I 88 249 30 276 346 228 3 I 9 280 334 334 47 3 I 9 289 334 I74 334 3 I 9 22I 335 I93 290 267 260 289 I 78 245 207 335 3 I 9 207 335 335 l89 355 2 I 3 353 264 I 74 335 Nace, Dennis .........,,..,.....,,...,... 260 Naftulin, Goldye .. .25I, Nagel, Paul .......... . ................. . Nalette, Robert ..........,,........,. Naness, Charles ....,................. Napoli, Francene ..252, 282, 320 227 257 335 Nash, Martin .......... , Naylor, Garnet ,....... .. ........,.. ' 23l Naylor, Irvin .,.....,.... 247, Nealon, Kay .....A.........,,.....,....... Needham, Frank ....... ,.....,........ N tt David ......,...... .,...,.. 9 . Neff, Mary ......... ...... Neilson, John .....,... ....,.. Neller, Roth ...,............,,........... Nelson, Ronald .........,...,......,... 254 Nelton, Sharon .,...... 93, Nemeroff, Michael ......,......,., Nesbit, John ,....,..... ,................ Neugebauer, Anton .,..r......... Neuman, Regina ....,.............,... 254 Neustein, Sylvia .... I82, Nevins, Myrna ....,..................,.. New, Oscar ..,.......................,... Newcomb, Patricia ..............., Newcomb, Ralph ..........., 203 Newcomb, Robert ......,.........,. Newcomb, Vester I20, l27, 240, 245 I I7, Newcomer, James ...,.......,...,.. Newhouse, Barbara .............. 274 N ewhouser, NeIson..22l, Newman, Carole ............,..,..,. Newman, Lawrence ......,....... Newman, Robert .....,... ...,,... Newman, Roger ...,,.. ,...... Nichill, Ken .............. ......,..... Nichols Dianne .,.., Nichols, Charles .... ........ 2 39, Nichols, Nelson ..,.... ............ Nichols, Phillips .....,,... .....,,. Nicholson, Irwin ....,.....,......,.... Nicholson, Thomas ................ Nielsen, Reimer .......,........ 280 Nieto Arturo ,............ ., , ,...,96 Nikoden, Shirley ..,........,........., Nissel, James .................,.......,.. Nissley, Walter ....,........,.. 267 Nobles, Mona .,....,,.. .,....,..... Nodoline, Frank ..,....... ..,..... Noetzel, Dr. Grover .....,..... Nola, Frank .......,......,,.. ..,..... Nolan, Gail .,......... ,, ...... .. Nolan, John ........... ........ Nordlie, Bob .......,.... ......., Norman, Elvin ...,.............,...,.... Normington, Harry ........,,,...,. Northup, Jimmy ....,....,.... 22I Norton, Judith ......,. .........,.. Norwitch, Charles ...,.. ......,. Notkin, Arnold ......,. ........ Noto, Edward ....,...., ........ Novesky, Joseph .......... ........ Ncvitch, Howard ,.... .... Novogrodsky, Gene .,.......,.... Nuckolls, Dianne ....,......., Nussbaum, Rene ....,,...... 0 Parisi, Parker Burton . ,,,... ..... . Parker: Fred ........... ,..,.. Parker Parker Parker , James ........,.. ...... , Josephine , .,......,,.... .. 20l Robert ......,.....,.,, Vincent .....,... ..,... Parramore, Clarence ..,........ Partington, Alfred .,..,.....,..,, Pascale, Ronald .....,.......... 233, 269 Paskay, Alexander .......... Pass, Judy .............,..............,,... Pass, Sondra ..,.......,.. ,.,.... Passonna, Fred ......... ....... Patcheit, David .......... ....... Patchen, Mary Ann ............... Paterna, Anthony ,... ......,........ 285 Pato, Eleanore ...... 278, , Patrick, Joseph .........,...... I95, Patterson, David ,,.,.....,........... Patterson, Dennis ...,.... ,.......... Patterson, Douglas ........,. 22I Patti, Joan .r...,............ 95, 97 Paulich, Judith ...,................... Pav, 'Jerry ...................,..,,......... Paynic, Noel ....,.,..........,..,....... Peacon, William , ................... Pearson, Dr. Jay ......,. 26, 27, Pector, Ronnie .,............,........ Pellegrini, Diane .................., Pellegrini, Jay ...,.,,,. ....... Pellettieri, Luigi ...... . ....,.... . Pelton, Donald ........r.............. Penland, Joyce ..,............. 250 Fennel, George ..,.................. Penney, Charles 240, 242, 243, Pennino, Agnes ......,................ Pennino, Anne .........,............... Perez, Armando .,...,.... ....... Perez, Francisco .,,................ Perlowitz, William ......t...... ,. Perrenoud, Donald ............... Perrow, John ........................,,. Perry, Gus ...,.......,.... 259, 264 Perry, Joan ....................,.......... Perry, Lowell ....,.,...,.........,...... Perry, Perse, Pat .,.,,........, ....... Ed wa rd ...... ....... Persico, Charles ...... .,....,,... Jeanette .....,...... .....,...,. Pescatore, Dominic ..,...,. 205 Pessak, Janet .....,...................., Petech, Rosita 24I, 242, 250, 25l, 292 Peters, Judith .............,,.......... Peterson, Diane .....,,.........,...... Peterson, Janyce .......,....., I93 Peterson, Melissa . .......,.....,.. .. Peterson, Roger .......... ,.., . ., Petry, Jean ............................... Pettengill, Howard , ..... ..,.... . . Petterson, Carl ...,........ ....... Petterson, Charles ....., ...,... Pettis, Andy ...,,...,..,,. .... . .. Pezzino, Tom ..........., ....... Pflueger, Charles ....,... ......, Pl1alp, Barbara .,...... ....... Phelps, Art ............ .,.,.., Phillips, Judy .,..,,...... ............... Phillips, Lynda 43, 44, 262, 280 Pickering, Ted ......................... Picton, Marianne ............,...... Pidone, Ann ...,.......,.... ....... Pierce, Joseph .,....,... . ..t... . Pike, Lynn ........t........... ............. Pillitteri, Francis .,,,..,..,.... .. Pintavalle, Adrienne 244 , 288 Ober, Fred ......,.......,....,.... 209 Oberg, Richard ..............,....... O'Connell, David .......,........... . O'Connell, Francis ..............,. O'Connell, Ida .......... ., ....., ,. O'Cook, Don ...,........,... ....,,.. Ocrlog, Jonathan ,... ..,......... , . O'Day, John .......,.....,................ O'Day, Pat ,. ....,.. ........ ,..... 2 5 I O'Dea, Maureen .,,,.. ....... Odell, Joan l68, I9I, 242, Ogborn, Clarence ,, ...,. .. O'Gorman. Ken ..,........... O'Keete, William ....., Okell, Jobyna ...,.,......., Okmin Marshall Oletzky, Sheldon ..,......... Olinger, John .,...,,,................. Olmstead, Suzanne ......,. Olson. Jane .... 265, 283, O'MalIey, Thomas ..., O'Melia, Larrv ................ O'Neil, Patrick ....... ,....... Ong, Sor Lian ........ ,......... 2 5I Opper, Melvin ..,..............,...... Orange, Edward ....,... Orland. John ,..,.......,.. .. ,,..,. .. O'Rourke, William .,....,......... Ort, William ....,.........., ........ Oser, Anita .................... ,....... Osking, Nancy ........ .. .,........,.. . Osterman, Howard ...,............ Otto, Jim ..........,........... .....,.. Overman, JoAnn ..,,..., , ....... Overpeck, Nancy ....,.. ....... Piper, Richard ....................r.. Piper, William ...,,,.............,,.. Pippinger, Davida ........ I93 Platt, Donald ...,..................... Platt, Martha ..........., ,............ Pleasanton, Louise ......,,....... Pleasanton, Roger . ........ 244 IO9 II7 Plevel, Joe ..........,.., Plummer, Mary Jane , I94 I85 Plummer, Richard ,. ..,......,... .. Plunkett, Alan ...........,,.., -263 233 280 Pluso, Tom ................ Podboy, Donald ...............,...,. Pogrebin, Robert ,.......,. ....... . . Pohl, Sherwin ...,...... Polan, Enid . ............,. , Pollack, Arthur ................,....., Pollack, Ellen ......................,.. Poller, Robert 227, 242, 244, 262 Polly, Charles ....................,.... Owens, Donald ........ ........ Owens, Jo Ellen . .,,.., .....,.... . Owens, Verna ., ........,..... 253, Owre, Dr. J. Riis .......... ......... P Pace, Richard ..,....,...............,.. Pacheco, Ferdie .......,......,....... Padewer. Joe ,,.,. .,., 2 62, 270, Paqett, William ..,.. ......,. . Painter, Cecilia ................ 279, Palevoda. Walter .... , ...,....... . Palm, Judith ..,.......... .....,,. Palmer, Paul .,... .....,, ......, Paluch, Frances ........... ,,..... Pancotti, George ......... ,..,... Polur, Sam .................. , .......... ,. Polyansky, John .............. 267 Pomerko, Walter ................... Pond, Karl ,....,... ....... ......, Poole. Bill ..............,..... ,...... Popofsky, Arnold ........ ....... Popp, Joe .............,,.,.....,........... Porias, Ina ........,.,...,.....,........,.. Porter, Fred 240, 242, 245, 254, 263, Porter, Harold ....................,.. Porter, John .........,,..,,......,..... Porter, Robert ........ ....... Potash, Linda ...... ....,.. Poticha, Bill ......... ....... Pototsky. Myrna ....... ....,.. Poulos, Connie .,,.., ,. ..... .. Povia, Charlotte ......... ....... Power, Jack .....,.......,. ....., Power, Richard .,.,...., ........,. Prebianca, Henry .. ........ ,255, l70, 265, 283, Presbrey, May .............,............ Preiser, Phyllis Prominski, Henry .....,...... David ---..--.- Press, Jack ,.......... ...,.......,...,. Presti, Louis ........ .......... 2 07 Price, David ....................., Price, Dick ,,....... .....,........... ,..... Price Ronald ..,.... Prgesiman, wiliianifllfffflfffff Prince, Ed ................... Prince, Paul ..,..,,..,. Pritchard, Pat ........................ Prittle, William ........,,...,.,..,.,. Riso, Carol ............................. Rizzo, Careen ........,,...,..., l92 Robenti, Robert ...,................. Roberson, Paula ......... Robert, Richard ....,.... Roberts, James ....... Roberts, Lynn ......... Roberts, Ross ......... Sacco, Jo Sack, Elle hn ......... .....,.,. n ............... ,,....... Sacks, Gerson .,........... ......,.. Sadacca, Sandra ......,,............ Sakal, Duane ...,.. Sakella, J ohn ....., .......... 2 47 Salazar, Gloria ..,.... .,,......,.,, Salomon, Salomon, Salsbury, Salzman Gaile ,,..,.. .....,... Sid ..A...,,... ..,...... Amiee ......... ...,..... Stahre, Ralph ...........,. Proulx, Virginia ......... . .........., . Provin, Harry ...,..,.. Pucci, Angela ....,,... Pullos Jophiana Puray,'willism .... If Purkey, Donald , ,......,...,..,.,,,. ., Purnell, Richard ............... Putt, Jack ........................... Pyles, Rex ...,,........... 259, Q uay, Allen ............. uin,lFrank ......,....... ulntllranl, Art ......,,. ......... Rabin, Leonard .............,......,,,. Ra bin, Louis ..,,,....,....,,,A.. I97, Ra binowitz, Barbara Rachles, William ..........,... ,,,... Radel, Richard ................ 20I, Radell, George ......,............... Rado, Barbara ....... Radtke, Mary ..................,.,...., Raepple, Eric ..,..............,.. 84, Raleigh, Roneen Ram, Rosemary Rankin, Bob .........,.., Rapee, Stuart ........, Rares, Helene ......... Rascati, Bob ......... Rasco, Ruth ..,................. Rashti, Jeanette .....,...... Ratner, Annette ............ Rauch Herbert . , ..... zls, Rauschenplat, Adolfo.. Ray, John ..............,...,...., Read, Robert ...............,.. Sa manich, Victorlliiil: Shank, LuAnn .....,..... ...,..... . ., Shannon, Patricia .................. Shapiro, John .......................... Shapiro, Leah ..............,... l60 Shapiro, Maureen ,,,....,,. l7l Shapiro, Shapo, Marshall ,,,... ..240, 244, 245, 252, 26I, 244 Shapro, Barbara ............., l70 Sharp, Shaver Linda ...,..,...............,...,. Bertha ......... ,.... .... Morton ...................... 242 Shaver: Ivan ......... ...., . Rechter, Bob 5I,240, 242, 243,244 Redlich, Martin ............ Reeby, Ellis ...............,.............,.. Reece, Roger 93, 240, 242 Reed, William ...,.................... Reese, Norman ........,,..,.,.....,.., Reese, Thomas ..,,,,....,.,,....,..,,, Reeves, Dick . ,....,....,...... Register, Robert .... 248, Reibel, Harris .................... Reich, Judah ....... ....... Reich, Jules .......,..... Reichert, Charles ....... Reichman, Tom .............. Reid, Bob .........,....,........... Reiff, Carol .... .......... 2 85, Reilly, Virginia .............,.. I90, Reiman, Cherry Loo ..........,. ' ' ' 227 Reimer, Irwin ................., Rein, Sue .....................,.............. Rein, Bin .. ,.,.....,.......... ,.... . .I87, Reinheimer, Marilyn ............,. Reinlieb, Joel ............,....,......,. Reiseman, Harvey I 242, 243, 270 Reiss, Howard .........,..........,.,.., Reiss, Nancy I74, 244, 246, Reitman, Eli ...,..........,.............,. Rekant, Ken .,.................. Relish, John ............, Remey, Neldon ,,,.,.. ,...,..,..,,, Robertson, Don ....... .,,.,.,....., Robins, Barbara .........,.....,...... Robins, Harvey ......... .....,, 2 70 Robins, Phil .,....... ............. Robinson, Dave ........................ Robinson, Ed .....,...,.,........ 258 Robinson Jalond ,...... ,...... I 74 Robinson, Richard ,..,,,,. 223 Robinton, Charles ................. Robles, Luisa ......................... Rocco, Rosalind .... 279, Rocco, Roy ...........,........,......... R kwood Bob ..........,..... oc , Roden, Joan ...........,.......... Rodrigez, Leonardo ............. Rohe, George ................,......... Roche, John ...,,..,.,....,.,............. Roe, Judy ............. ................ Roe George ...,.. ...,....., 2 I7 Raeln, Joe ..,.. ,.... ......,...,... 2 4 s Roemer, David ..............,. Rohe, Bob ...,............ 255, Rogers, Jack ...................2....... Rogell, Leslie ..,...,,.,..,,.,,....,.., Rogers, Judith .....,. Rogers, Lester ......... Rogow, Bruce ,........ Rohe, Bob .,................... Rohrer, Barbara ,..... Roias, Joseph .,....... Roman, Gerald ........ s ............... Rombro, Donald .,............,.... Ronca, Pat .......,.,,. ,,..,...,,., Ronci, Sal .,......................,. Rood, Shea .......,.....,.,...,.... Roque, Leonard ..,,......,........... Rosamofskyl, Martin ............., Rosboroug , Melanie ......,... Rosche, Altred ......,................ Rose, Al ........,...,.......,......... Rose, Harvey ...... ......... . 324 Rose, Joan ....,..,....................... Rose, Lois ...,...,,.......,..,,..... 335 Rosebaugh, Bob .....,........ Rosen, Bob ......,...,, .,.......... 2 55 Rosen, Carol .................... Rosen, Harry ...., : ...... 2 35, Rosenberg, David .................. Rosenberg, Robert ...,...... l95 Rosenberg, Stanley ....,,., 2l9 Rosenblatt, Bernard 242, 244, 249, Rosenblum, Phyllis ........,. Rosenblum, William 268, Rosenfeld, Paul ,..,.,,,. ....,., Rosensaft, Anne ........ ..... , Rosenstrauch, Shayna .,......... Rosenthal, Alan ..,..,.......,,, 324 Rosenthal, Cary ...,......,.......,... Rosenthal, James ............,,,,,... Rosenthal, Joan ....., 273, 278 Rosenvold, William 223, Rosman, Marilyn ..........,. Rosner, Helene ...........,....., 95 Samet, Ann .,,,,,,,,.,,, ,,,,,,,,. Sanchez, Jose ......,...... ..,,...., Sanders, Carole .,,,,..,,,,,..,.,,,, Sanders Re inald ,.........,......, Sanders: Richard ........,..... 255 Sanders, Thomas .,..,,,..,..,,,,,,,,,. Sandie, Bill .......,...... ID9, lll Sands, Roberta .,.............. l87 Sanguesa, David .,.................... Sansom, Samuel ,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, Sant, William ........, ,........ Santag, Eleanor ,....,,., .,.,. Santoriello, Frank ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Sarnoff, Diane ,,.,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, Sarver, Barry ,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, Sass, Fred .,........... ....,,... Satkoff, Stanley .,,,.., ,,,,,,,,, Satz Glad , ys .........,. .,...,....... Saunders, Diane ,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,l69, Saunders, William ...,......... Savage, Frank .......................... Sawtell, John ........,..,.,, .,...,... Sawyer, Suzanne ......... ......... Saxon, Carter .....,.,........,,.......,,. Scarboro Jan .. Scarborolsgh, Scarpinato, Dorothy .......,...... Schachner, Frank ,.,,,,,,..,,2,,,,,,, Schaefer, Eugene , ,,,,,,,,,,, 22l Schaffer, Gail ...,,.... ,,....,.,,.,, Schaffer, Jim ,.......... ,......,. Schaffner, Bob ..,..,. ., ..., .. Schecter, Allen ........................ Schell, Kenneth .......,.............,.. Schneider, Richard .... 252, Scherer, Ronald ......,............,.. Scherr, Joseph .,....,........... 264 Sherwood, William ,,,...,.,,..,.,. Schettino, Bernard ..,.,.. 280 Schick, Frederic ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Schinder, Bernard ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Schmerer, Henry ....... .,....,.. Schmidt, Larrie ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Schmidt, Wilhelm .................. Schneider, Camille .,,.....,....... Schneider, Joel ,...,,,,.,..,,,,..,,,, Schneider, Kenneth ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Schneider, Michael ...,............ Schneider, Neal ..,...,.,..,.....,..,, Schneiderman, Alan ....,,...... Schnurr, Susan ..,,.,,,,,,,,.,.,,,.,,,,,, Schocoff, Jack ,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, Schoenfeld, Joan . .................. , Schoenfeld, Nathan ..,........... Schoenling, Wilmalee ,,..... Schofield, William .........,..,.,. 8 292 Scholnick, Sandra .... 27 , Schoup, Charles ....,...,...,,.....,., Schubart, Franz ..,,.,...,,,,....,....,. Schubert, Joseph ....... .......,. Schubert, Charis ,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,.,,,,,, Schulgen, Barbara .,..,....... 44 Shaver, Paul ....... .,....... Shaver, Phillip ......... .,....... Shaw, Katherine ......... ......... Shea, Charles ......... ...........,. Shea, Jim ................................,, 208 Shecter, Alan ,,.,.,,,.......,.. Sheffield, Frances .................. Sheitelman, Lois ,... .............,..., Sheitelman, Philip .................. Shellenberger, Marilyn ...,.... Shenfeld, Gary .................,..,,., Shephard, John ...................... Sheppard, Margaret ........,.,,.. Sherman, Frances ,.,.,....,.,......,, Sherman, Tamara .................. Sherouse, Lewis ,,.........,., 247 Shew, Phill: ....,...... ...,,..,...,. Sherwood, Susan .................... Shick, Lawrence ...,,.....,..... I97 Shlmm, Kenneth ...................... Shipe, Kenneth ,....., ......... Shippy, Francis , ...,.... ,.... . Shively, James .,......... Shmerykowskyu ...,....... Shockett, Wllllam .........,........ Shoen, Ronald ............. ......... Shofner, Anne ......... ...,,.... Shores, Robert ..,.... . .2,..., . Short, Eugene .2....... ,,.....,. Shortle, Michael ....... .,....... Shouse, Joseph ....... ......... Shoyer, Stephen ...,..... .,....... Shriber, Sherman .....,. ......... Shroder, Alfred ,...... ..... Shubin, Sandy ...,..,.. ,........ Shulak, Jerry ........... ............. Shultz, George ...,.,,...,,.,.,.....,,. Shumway, Sandra .....,...... 25l Sicking, Richard ......,...........,.,. Siddall, Dale .,.,........, ,....., 2 76 Sieder, Richard .......,.........,.... Siegel, Gerry ......,........,,. l70 Siegel, Herbert ,,...,,,,,..,. 280 Siegel, Siegel, Siegel, 84, Siegel, Siegel, Siegel, Siegle, Leila ..........,.........,....... Martin ...........,.............. Paul 227, 242, 243, 244, 252 Philip ............................ Rhoda .,,.,.......,..,.,...,.... 2l5 Robert , .,.,.... .....,,,. Barbara .......... 84, 97, Remley, Gloria ........................ Rernmy, Fred , ............,...... IO9 Rengal, Gregory ..,.......... Renn, Walter ......,,..........., 25l Renuart, Cecile .............. I74 Renuart, Gerald .............. Retzler, Richard .............. Reuther, Doris .....,.., Reuther Harry ....... Reybold, Pat ............... ......... Reynolds, Mike ..........,........,.... Reynolds, William .............,... Rhoads, Bill .............................. Rhoads, Richard ..,.............,,..,, Ricci, Al .........,.................. 223 Rice, Howard .............,,... Rich, Mark ...,........,., Richard, Andy ............. ......... Richards, James .,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, Richardson, Ken ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Richardson, Nancy ..,,.....,..,..,.. Richman. Paul ,............ .....,... Richter. Don ............. Ricou, David ,.... .. Rider, Bonnie ........... Rrdlnqs, Carol ,,.,,,,.....,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Ridolf, Bill .....,........,,....,... 2l7, Riegler, Marlene ............ 265, Rieqler, Russell ...,.., Rietz, Margot ..,...... Riqdon, Vernon ....... Riker, James ....,.... Riley, Janet ,........ Riley, Tom ........... Rimoldi, Paul ........... Rinaldi, Leo .....,.,..,.,..,. ........, Ringblorn. Hilda ....... ...,..... Riordan, Cathy ....... ,...,........ Rischall, Carol ............,........... Risdin, Bunnie ....,............. 260, Ross, Ross, Ross, Ross, Ross, Ross, Ross, Ross, Ross, Ross, Rossi, Roth Barbara ....,,.......,, Benlamrn ,,..,........,,, I89 Herbert ......,........... 309 Joseph ..,..., Malcolm ......... .......,.... Maryann ....,.....,,...... 335 Myrna ......,. ........., 3 35 Robert ...... .......... 3 24 Ruth Ann ,..,........,.., 265 Sandy ............ 223, 242 Beverly ,,.. ...................... Carl .................,...... 34l ...280 Schultz, Harry ,...,.,...,..,,........... Schultz, T Schuster, Schuster, Schwarb, Schwartz, Schwartz, Schwartz, Schwartz, Schwartz, Schwartz, homas .....,... .......,. Carl ,......., Sandra ....... ......... Frederick .........,...,.. Burton ......... ......... Edward ....... ,.,. .... , Harold ,....,.....,,,,,., Hollis .,....,,. ......... Howard ..,.,............. Lawrence ...,............ Siegle, Martin .,,.,.................. Siegle, Ray ................ 266, 276 Siegle, Tony ........ ...................... Siegelbaum, Harvey ..,... 209 Siegmeister, 'Lloyd Slfford, Dan ...,..,,.............,.,...... Sif-ford, Luther ..,.... Sigany, Elaine .......,................ Sikore. Barbara ................ 260 Silberfein, 'Steve ..........,......... Silverberg, Marvin ....,........... Silverman, Barry .,......,.,,.. 209 Silverman, Leslie ...,.....,.. 2Il Simmons, Charles ............ 2Il Simmons, Robert .,.......... 247 Simon, Alfred ..,..,............ Simon, Gayle ..........,,..,...,. Simon, Saundra ....... Simons, Frank ............ Simpson, Charles .,...........,,,.... Simpson, Clifford ........,...,..,.. Simpson. Robert ...,..... ,........ Sindo, Carol Ann ......... .. Roth: Carole ,...... Roth, Pauline ..,... Roth Richard ...... Refill Ruth ..,..........,. Rothman, Joseph . Rouge, Linda .,...... Rouse, Nicholas 2I3, Rowand, Bonnie .,,.. Rover, Rubin, ....ffffff55s" .........,309 .........294 ,....,....264 252 Charles ......., ..... Robert ............... Rubinoff. Edward.. Rubins Ruch. Rudd, Ruder, tein, Ronald Paula ............. Charles.,I05, Herbert ....... Rudich, Harvey Rudow, Ruffolo. Henry ........ Rugendore, Alan . Rushing, John ......,........ Ruskin, Andrea ..,.. Ruskin. Rusnak, Alan .... 92, Russell Russell, Dianefil-Bl'--24'l Russell Russell Ruteck Brian ...20l ..229, 230 ...205 2o2,"24i' ...,,....324 84, 2 I 5, Fred .....,...,....... I94, 252 Ann ...,............... . Mary ....,,...,. ...2ll ...309 227, 25 I I 99 244 , Regena ..... . ...,,.........,,. , Russell, v, Sandra ..,.. Sue ..........,, Ruttenberg, Paul ......,,..264 Rysavy, Thomas' .....,,......... 342 Rysten, Felix ......,.... Sabath, Irwin ..,...... Sabel, Ronald .....,,.. Schwartz, Lynn ..,,..., ...,...,........ Schwartz Schwartz, Robert .............,,..... man. Marilyn Schwimm r ward e , Ho .............. Schwitalla, Alphonse Schy. Ken .................................. Scott, Eleanor ..,.,.....,............... Scott. Marv ..... ,,...... ....,,,....,..... Scott, Patricia ......,.....,..,..,,..,... Seav. Barbara .... 84, I69, 260, Sedlick, Jay ,,..,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,, Seemann, Bill , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , Seese, Marsha ......... Sefton, David ......... Segal, Harry ....,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,, Segal, Oscar ..,..............,,......... Seqall. Richard ........,............... Seqor, Joseph ...,...... 240, 242, Seherr, John ....,,,,,,,,,, ,, ,,,,,,,,,,, Seidel, Herbert ,.,,,,,,,.....,,,,.,.... Seidel, William ....,.,.. ......,.. Seidman, Arnold ...,.,. Seidman. Frank ........, Seitlin, Barbara .....,.., Selby. Bob ..... ........., Self, John .... Sells, Jackson . ......... . Seltzer, Daryl ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Semaschuk, Olga .................... Serafin, Alicia ...,..,, ,,,..,.... I 69, Sermoneta. Gianna ,,,...,. ........ Serns, David ............... Serodv. Stewart ....... Sesasch uk, Alga .,....,.. Sgutt, Vera .....,,..,,..,,,.,..,,,,...,..., Shadruff, Frederick ................ Shatirott, Martin ............ 2I I, Shaheen, Daniel ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Shahin, George ....... 376 Singer, Singer, Carol ..,. . ..,..,.. ......... Marvin . .......... ..,. . .. Sinkovetz. Adeline Skalski, Victor ........ Skidmore. Richard .......,.. 203 Skipper, Ken ................,........... Skippe Sklow, r, Thomas ,,.... . . Alvin ............, .,...,.. , Skop, Alan ..,.,....,. Skor. D lane ....,,..,.......,............... 253 Slack. John ........................ Slepin, Sliger, Slone, Small, Steve 85, 240, 242, 243, 284 l92 Rosemary ...,,......, Freddie .....,......,.,......... Richard ....... .....,.. Smiloas, Al ...... Smith, Smith, Smith. Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith. Smith, Smith Smith. Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith. Smith Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Carl ......... ..,...... Carol ..,.... .....,....,.. Cecelia .....,,.......,. I69 Dennis ....,,,.. ..,,......, 262 Dwight ....,,.. 223, George .................,...... Gerald ...,....................., 292 Jacqueline ...,,....... James D. ,,,,,,,,... ,,,, ,... James L. ......,..... 20l Jane .,........,.. .....,....... Josh ......... ....... 5 . La rr ,... .,...... Y Leon ...................... - 247 Margaret ........,.......,...., Morris ......,..,................ Nancv ...........,........ 285 Norma ...,., ,..,,,.... 2 Sl Philip .....,.,.., ..,,,..,.,. , . Richard ..,........,........... Samuel ......,........... 26l, Thomas ....... ............. l75 29I 2l I l70 276 32l 243 3 I 9 359 95 347 288 259 285 I93 322 28l 337 I90 I 86 208 347 322 237 I 72 262 322 337 207 I 69 337 337 267 285 263 29I I97 337 28l 248 269 2 I 3 22l I97 2 I 9 267 278 337 I09 I 90 95 337 2 I 7 I94 322 322 322 322 259 I87 274 322 . 280 28I I 97 274 337 I99 337 29I 264 2I I 303 306 337 337 337 337 29I I 89 2 I 7 267 267 225 I69 I69 209 I75 265 322 259 337 306 235 285 285 286 I94 337 I97 276 354 l85 347 2I 7 272 22l 337 347 233 337 I92 337 2l I 347 320 337 347 28l 307 I99 337 2l7 Snowberger, John .................. Snyder, Alvin 240, 244, 250, 263 Snyder, Barbara .......,....... ..... . . Snyder, Gary .................... 236 Snyder Philip ...........,.........,..,. Snyder: Thomas Sofranko, Michael ...,... Sokol, Samuel .......................... 227, 248, Soady, Robert ........................ ., ...252 Sokoloff, Nina ...,.......,.,..,......... 208 Solomon, Jack ...........,... Solomon, Lawrence ................ Solomon, Phyllis ...................... Solovey, David ........,,.... Soltesz, Attila ..........,.... Sommer, William .......... ,. Sontag, Elinor .....,... ..........,.. Sopher, John ............................ Sorenseln, Robert ...,..,,... Sorogglan, Jerry ...,.,........,,,,,, Southard, Thomas ,.....,....,........ Souza, John ,......,..,...,,.....,......,, Sowell, Helen ,........ ....,.,.. I 90 Spaide, Charles 2l, 248, 249, Spangler, Ronald ............. Spaniola, James .,.,,........,........ Spatz, Allen ...,............,... Spaulding, Ann 84, 242, 244, 25o, 254 Spelgelman, Max .................... Speisman, Anita 242, 278, zss Spencer, Arthur ...................... Spencer, Harold ...................... Spencer, Wayne ,.,..,.., Sperber, David ....... Spiers, Richard ....... Spinos, Mary ....... Spitz, Robert .........., Sprague, Donald .,,.... Springer, Arthur ,,,...... Staats, Riley ,... .......................... Staflin, Carolee .,...,................ Stage, Gene ............ 240, 245, Stagman, Charles ...,..,...,....... Stahl, Jerome .......................... Sorace, Edward ...................... ...263 Stalli ns, Bruce .. .,........, Stallman, Michael ....... Stalls, William ..,........ Stanl Stanl ey, Jerry ..,.......... ev, Malcolm ....... Stans, William ,,,.,.,.. Staples, Joan ..........,.... Stark Stark ey, Thomas ....................., stein, Nancy .................... Staton, Robert ...,...........,......,... Staub, Grace .,.. IOI, I76, 24I Stauffer, Joseph .....,.,.............. Staysa, Leda ........,.,......... Stearns, Robert ....... ............. Steele, Fran.. ,....................... .... Steffey, Delfrna ......,......... 29I Steig Stein, Stein Stein Stein Stein Stein er, Edward .............. , Robert ......,................... 245 , Robert ......,... 2l6, , Lee .....,............................ , Sara Lee ,.,. ,.,,...... ,.... ..... bach, Dr. Warren ........ Nancy ,....,,,,..,..,.,,..,, I79 Stein baugh, Byron .................. Steinberg, Diane ..,....,........,... Steinberg, Harris ..........,...,.,... Steinberg, Wanda .......... I79 Steiner, Robert ...........,............ Steinholt, Dr. Dan ...........,...... Steinhorn, .Mike ,..... ,......... ...... Stenson, Victor ................ IU9 Stephan, Colette ............ 279 Stephenson, Tom ..,, 203, 252 Stern, Barbara ........ 278 Stern, Bill ..,....,.,.........,......... Stern, Stern, Janice .........,........., Stuart ........... Stern. William ...........,.,....,....... Sternberq, Herbert ....,.,..,...,.. Steven, Bryrnes ......,.... Stevenson, Rae .......,.....,.....,..,. Stevenson. Ronald ,... . ............ . Stewa Stewa Stewa Stewa Stewa Stewa Stieql Stimmel. Marilyn .... Stoeh rt, Carol , ................. 25l rt, Charles ..,,....,..,.,...... rt, Earl ...,....................,,,. rt, Robert ................ rt, Terrv ......... ........ ,.... rt, Sandra ......... Stidsen, Steibel, itz, Albert .,,, 205, I90, r, Sonia ...,.,............ Stoley, Samuel .........,.....,......,, Stallman, Gerald ....... Stone Stone Stone 229 Stone Stone Stone , Bob .,,..,......... , George ........................ Ha rvey I 240, 242,243,252 , Myron .................,,......... , Sandra ......................... Susann ..,.,.... H en ry ......,...,,...,........ Myke .....,.................... 247 Storch, Perta ......,.... ........., , . Storfer, Andre Storm ont, Jghfinffffffffffffffffiit' Stoveken. Dina ..,,.........,....,..,,. Straff. Mickey ......,,........ Stragg, JoAnn .......... l9l Straus, Joyce ..,..........,.............. Strauss, Harvey ..,................... Strauss, Michael .,.,,,,,...,,,,,,,.,,, Streckfuss. Fred ............ Stroup, Phyllis ........ 279, Subm, Paula ..,..,,,,.,...,...,. 337 322 I93 354 207 337 354 354 354 284 337 I 97 I89 269 266 337 278 I 99 337 354 284 2 I 3 2l 7 338 349 203 205 307 322 269 347 20I 269 205 284 229 29I 203 225 203 253 I79 347 204 207 322 22l 227 266 28l 338 354 279 253 l7l 359 286 280 277 322 248 338 223 275 234 338 322 348 35 338 I 89 228 292 322 34 233 207 338 322 348 308 I79 338 307 229 l09 29I 338 286 322 207 207 l09 I68 207 l78 322 348 IBS 303 2 I 9 235 322 354 322 348 l87 29I 338 272 I90 I97 29I l7l 322 I97 264 322 322 Sugarman, Joseph . ....,. Sulli Andrew. ,...... .... Sullivan, Mary Sumpter, Robert .....,.............. Sunday, Kay ..,.....,...........,.,,...... Sunday, Virginia . .......,,. Sunergren, Charles .............. Sutton, Mack .,.,.......,................ Sutton, William ...A....,..............A Swaebly, Frances .........,.......... Swan, Don ........... YY...,,.. ...... 2 9 l, Swan, John ...,.........,.................. Swanson, Sharon ..,............,...... Swartier, Alice ...................,.... Sweet, Charles .......,....,....,........ Swift, Ernie .............. 207, 245, Swinehart, Russ ..,................... Swing, Bernice ..,................., Swords, Jack ..,...... Sylvia, Ralph ...,..... Syna, Sidney ............... Synder, Thomas ...,..... Syrek, Edward .,,.,.,........ Szymanski, Victor ........ , 'I' Tabatchnick, Jay ......,.. Taft, Ronalld ....,.......... ag art, ay ......... Taicier, Lee ........ Talbert, Ed ......... Talbot, Bill ..,,......... Talbot, George ......... Tallianoff, Susan ........... Tamarkln, Marlene ............. Tankleff, Lillian ....,....,... Taper, Michael ......,.. Taplin, Marty .......,. Tarlow, Irwin .,....... Tarpo Janis ....... Tarr, Stephan .,....... Tarrson, Carole ....... Tassi, Louis ...........,.,... Taylor, Beniamin ......... Taylor, Gary ,,...,. .......... Ta lor, Pat ..,............,. ....... ........ Tebeau, Dr. Charlton ............ Teisan, Joseph .......................... Teitelbaum, Eleanor ,..... ........ Teitelbaum, Gerald .............. Teltler, Alan . ..... .....,..... . , Tempest, John ,,.. ....... Ternent, James ......,., Thailing, Mary' ,.,,.... . Thalblum, Harvey ,, .............. .. Tharp, Dr. Charles ...,.... eodo des Arist I Th ri , ot e , ,.... .... Thibodeaux, Kathleen .... Thomas, Bruce ...,..............,....... Thomas, Loree .,..,.....,,.... 23I Thomas, Thomas ,.... .........,....... Thomas, William ............ 207 Thompson, Barbara ............,.,. Thompson, C. 5. ...,..,....Y.-.-.-. - Thompson, Jack ..,......,,.,... 27l Thompson, James .....,.,.........,,. Thompson, John ......,.....,. 268 Thompson, Lloyd .........,.......... Thompson, Lyle ....... ...,...,... Thompson, Mike .........., Thompson, Orville ..... ., Thomson, John ....,.., ....... Thorne, Terry ..,.,.,................... .. Thurlow, Thomas . .,..,............... , Tibor, Daisy ...................... 278 Tidwell, Eleanor ....,,................ Tiger, Anne .......................,...... Tighe, Russica .....,.... l93 265 Tisch, Howard ,.........,,.............. Titelfidle, Ange ...,.......,.......... A. C. E ........,..,,. A. C. E. I ............,..,.. A. I. E. E ..........,........... ALFA ...........,......,......,..... Alpha Chi Omega .,................ Alpha Delta Pi ............,.. Alpha Delta Sigma ............,..... Alpha Epsilon Delta ..... Alpha Epsilon Phi ..,...... Alpha Epsilon Pi ........... Alpha Epsilon Rho ....... Alpha Kappa Psi ........... Alpha Lambda Delta... Alpha Phi Omega .,...,............ Alpha Sigma Epsilon... Alpha Sigma Phi .........., Alpha Tau Omega ....... Angel Flight ................. Arnold Air Society .................. Associated Women Students Baptist Student Union ..........,. Bar and Gavel ............................ Beta Beta Beta ......,........ Beta Sigma Rho ........,.... Canterbury House ...,............ Titzel, James .................,., 2l6 Tolkin, Stanley ,,.... .. ...........,.... ., Tom si Joe as , ,............,...... Tomhave Suean ' 241, 252, 253, Toole, Rex ...,.............................. Toole, William ...............,........ Toomey, Paul 22l, 240, 242, Topp, Roberta .................,........ Toraya, Mateas ......... . ............ .. Torn, Sheldon , ........ .. Tornell, George .,..... Tornell, Gonzalo ....... Torres, Alvaro ....... Totah, Henry ............. Totoiu, George ......... ........... Tower, Evelyn .......................... Towle, Lynn . ..,.,................,. l82 Towns, John . .......,.,....,............ .. Townsend, Chandler ..,... 23I Traeger, Bert .......,........,.., Treat, Barbara ......,.....,............. Trees, Clifton ......... ............... Treloar, Hugh ...,...................... Triana, Emilio ...............,,... 23I Trigg, Randall .......................... Tripp, Norman ........................ Trissel, Richard ..,............. 252 Trivett, Victor .........,................ Troutman, Holmes .......... 268 Trupiano, Tony .......,................ Truppman, Barbara ......,,.....,., Trushin, Barbara .............,..,.... Tsiartsionis, George .............. Tuck, Jack .................................. Tucker, Jerrold ........................ Tucker, Sherrill .... ........,... I 76 Tulin, George ...,.,. ............... Turner, Ann ......... ....,... l 73 Turner, Ben ...........,. ........... Turner, Judith ....... ........... Turner, William .....,...,......,,.... Turrell, Barbara .......,.........,.,., Turrentine, Sheldon .. ...... 259 U Uchim, Abbe ,,,...............,. 2l8 Uchim, Dena .....,,.. ,.,... ..,...,. Uhlmann, Mary .....,,............... Uiberall, Joan 265, 279, Ulont, Alan ............................,. Ullman, Fred .................... 274 Ullman, Katie ....... ............... Ulrey, Lamar .... ,...... .,....... 2 0 3 Umphrey, Arthur .,....,..... 22l Umscheid, Clifford .......,........ Urbanek, Joyce ...........,............ Usilaner, Brian ......... Uslan, Gerald ....... V Valdyke, Gayle ................ I69 Valero, Allen .....,..........,....,...... Valibus, Marcia ...,..,, 53, 55, Valvo, Anthony ,,.. ..227, 255 Vamvaks, Anthony .................. Vanderzeyde, Raymond ..,..,., Van Dine, Paul ...,............ 287 Vangrow, Jack ........................ Van Loo, Gordon ..................,. Van Shura, Carl .........,.... 257 Van Tassell, Ray ...................,.. Varelmann, John ..,.,,.............. 09 Il2 II4 Varone,John .... l , Vasconez, Luis ....,..................... Vasiloff, Bill ..,........................... Veach, Susie ......, Organ Cavalettes .............,. Cavaliers ..... .... ....... .... Chemistry Club .,..... Chi Omega ...,............. Christian Science ....,.... Dean's Committee ......, Delta Delta Delta .....,.,. Delta Gamma ....,...... Delta Phi Epsilon ..,,,.... Delta Sigma Pi ........... Delta Theta Mu .....,..... Delta Theta Phi ......... Delta Zeta ..........................,....... Drama Guild ............................ Engineering Honor Society.. Engineering Congress French Club .............................. Gamma Alpha Chi ............,..... Gamma Dhelta .,.. Z ...,..............,., Gamma Sigma Sigma ...... ...... Gamma Theta Upsilon .......... German Club .................,.,.,.... Hillel ,,.,..,..,,,,,,,.......................... l. E. S ............ ,......,.... ....,. 1 ............ lnterfraternity Council ......,. Vecchio ni, Sal ......... . ......,,.. Venis, George Verrier, Judy ............. ........... Vidal, Edgardo ......... Vieira, Alonso ......,,,.. Villarroel, Jose Villiesse, John .......................... Vinson, George .,.......,. ,.........,,. Vitale, Robert ........,...... 254 Volkman, Richard ........ Volpe, Marie ............. . W Wagner, Elias ................ Wagner, Karen .....,., l76 Wagner, Natalie ......, .. Wahl, Stuart ,, ......... , ............., .. Waldman, Norman ..... Zll Waldman, Robert ..,..... Walker, Ruth Ellen ..... Walker, Sue .................... Walker, Tru bey .,.......,.... Walter, Dr. Walter , ....,.,..... . Wallace, Don .... IO9, II7, 203 Walley, Walsh, Walter, David ..... .......... . Richard ....,...... Sue- ...................... Walters, Neil ................. Walters, Sharon ....... .......,... Walton, James ............. Waltzer, Bernard ......... Walz, Martin .....,......, Wakes, Phyllis ..,............ Ward, Robert ............... Warner Warner Ward, T , Barbara .,.. 278, Peggy .,,.......,......... .... erry .,,..,.,.,......... .... 5 Warner: Sue ...........,...,..,........... Warren Warren Warren , Arnold ...................... I Jacque ...... 92, Dave ......................... l0I 244, 246, 247, 254, 263, Warter, Wasai, Stuart .,,.....................-. Richa rd ...... .......... 2 66 Washington, Agnes ...,,..,......., Wassenberg, Richard ............ Wasserman, Martha ....,,.....,.. Wasserman, Richard ..... Watt, Don ................................ Watts, Fred ..........................-... Watkins, Robert .......,.....,....... Waugh, Lesley ......,......... 28l Weaver, David Weaver, Ellen Weay, Frances Webb Webb, Webb, Webb, Webb, Webste Weeks, Calvin .....,. .............. Harry. .,.......... .......... . Ted ........,..........., William - ..,,..........,... Willis ....,....................... r, Charles ............ 20I Eve ..........,..................... jffff'"'fff.'fff.'i'iii'' Wehler, Mary Gay ............,,. Weicker, Ellen ........ l9l I94 Weigel, Penny ...,.........,............ Weinberger, 'Sanford .,... Weiner, Alan ..,........... , ............ . Weiner, David .............,.......... Weiner, Marvin ,........, Weiner, Roberta ............ 260, Weingarten, Darlene ............ Weinroth, George ..........,....,.. Weiner, Jack ,,.........., .,............... Weinstein, Cindy .................... Weinstein, Sue ..,...........,. l9l Weir, Angeline .....................,.. Weir, John ........................ 22l Weir, Robin ......,..,................... Weisbeg, 'Sanford ....,..... 256 izations Iota Alpha Pi ............, Iota Tau Alpha ......... Iron Arrow .....,......... ,. Junior Counselors ......, Kappa Kappa Kappa Kappa Kappa Kappa Alpha .,..........,.. Alpha Mu .....,... Beta Pi ..,....................... Delta Pi ............ ,.,......... Kappa Gamma .......... Sigma , ......................... Lambda Chi Alpha .,... L'Apache , .......,. , ......,.., .. Lawyer .,,...................... Lead and Ink ...,............... M Club ........... .. .........,.....,......... Management 'Society .......,.... M. E. N. C. ..,......,..Y......... ,-... . Men's Residence Council .... Newma n Club .......................... Nu Kappa Tau ..............,........... Omicron Delta Kappa .......... Panhellenic Council .,.,.......... PEM C lub .,..................,,........., Pep Club ......................... Pershing Rifles .,....... 377 Weiss, Ann ..,,..... ....... Weiss, Judy ....... .... ...,... Weiss, Lita ..........................,,.. Weiss, Marlyne ...,,... 5l, 24l 244, 253, 21s, 285, 292 240 Weissel, William .... 96, 243, 254, 263 307 292 Weissman, Jerrold ..,.... ,. Welch, Sondra ..................,..... Welsh, Steve ............. ....... Wendt, Charles ...,..... ,...... Wentz, Mary ......... ....... Wervblow, Joel ........... ....... Werblow, Lynne ........... ....... Werner, Manfred .................. Wersebe, John ....,................... Wesson, Maurice ......,.........., 250 West, Ormand ...... 240, West, William ....................Y... Westerkamp, Anna ................ Wetherington, Jerry ..........,... Weyend, Mary .............-. .-..--- Weyher, Theodore .......,........r. Wheatley, Russell ...,.............. Wheatman, Lawrence 250, 25l Whipple, Grace .....,........ I75 Whipple, Richard .......... 289, Whitcomb, Barbara ........... Whitcomb, Francis .............. Whitcomb, Robert ................ White, Catt. Hal ,,.,. ..,.......... White, Jac .... , ....,.............. 270 White, Jayne ........................... . White, John ..........., 2I5, 259 White, Norman' ..............,,.,.... White, Richard .......,........ 22l White, Robert ........... , ......,.... . Whitecotton, Joe ........,.,....... Whiteford, Barbara l9I, 265 Whitehead, Joan .................. Whitehouse, Charles ............ Whitt-enberg, Russell ............ Widrich, Warren .................... Wiemerslage, Roland ....,...,... Wiener, Sander .........,.............. Wiener, Wayne ............. ....... Wier, John ................. ....... Wigodsky, Susan ......... , ...,. . Wiita, Bruce ............. .....-- Wilber, Albert ..,,..... ,..--- - Wilkins, Phoebe .......,,.. ....... Willliams, Clarence .............. Williams, Deanna ........... : ......., Williams, Dr. H. Franklin .... Williams, John ....,......,............ Williams, Leyshon .................. Williams, Lovda ........r -...... Williams, Roger ...,......,.....,..... Williams, Wallace ................ 255 Williams, Warren..,.207, Willis, Charles ,..,. ................... Willis, Charles ....................... . Willis, Jeffrey .... ......,....... ........ 264 Willoughby, pale .... 259, Wilpon, Millie ........ .,...-..... . Wilson, Donald ...,...............,.. 22l Wilson, Fred .,.................. Wilson, James ........................ Wimer, Walter .....,................. Wind, Sara ...........,.........,........ Windenburg, Earle ......... Winfield, Bob ...............,,. Winner, Diane .,........................ Winokur, Ronald ..........,......... Wise, Rodney ,.....,. .................. 205 Wittich. Kenneth ............ Wohl, Jack ......,.... .................. Woideck, Christine .............. Woitesek, John ............. ....... Index Phi Alpha Delta ......... ..,.... Phi Delta Pi .......,......... . ..... . Phi Delta Theta ......... ....... Phi Epsilon Pi ............................ Phi Kappa Tau ........................ -- Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia .......... Phi Sigma Delta ......................., Phi Sigma Sigma ...................... Pi Kappa Alpha .......,. ....... Pi Delta Phi ............. ....... Pi Kappa Phi, .......... ....,. . Pi Lambda Phi ........... ....... Propeller Club ........, ..,.... Radio Engineers ....... ....,.. Radio-TV Guild ...,... ....... R. O. A ...... , ....................... Russian Club ..,......................... Scabbard and Blade .......,...... Sea Devils ...,....... J ...............,.... Sigma Alpha Epsilon .............. Sigma Alpha Iota .,................,. Sigma Alpha MU .....Y... -.---Y- Sigma Chi .......,.,....... ....,,. Sigma Delta Chi ......,.... ..... Sigma Delta Tau ........ I7l 285 I94 242 348 242 308 323 I 85 2 I 7 263 l73 339 l89 348 264 227 323 339 l69i 252 323 349 348 252 278 354 I9I 2l 3 2l 3 248 323 I85 339 339 303 323 259 283 I8l 339 23I I97 233 2l 5 235 274 l7I 223 323 I77 323 l8l 29 324 339 I92 339 280 274 256 354 252 288 292 233 324 2 I 7 207 339 339 207 28l 324 223 324 33'l I93 237 269 265 206 208 238 279 2 I 0 I 86 2 I 2 254 239 2 I 4 265 266 284 26l 284 249 285 2 I 6 260 2l 8 220 266 l88 Wolf, Malcolm ..................... Wolfert, Pat .... l9l, 265, 283 Wolfman, Stanley .............,... Wolfson, Barbara 253, 278, 285 Wolfson, Elaine .....,........Y....Y. Wolfson, Lynn .....,..............----- ' 270 Wolis, Kenneth ................ Wolkenberg-, Barbara Wolland, Diane ....,................ Wood, Sarah ..................-..-... Woodin, William .......... ..84 Woods, Bob , ...........,............,. .. Woodward, Sylvia ...,........... Woody, Penelope ............,.... Worsinger, Henry-, ...,.......... .. Worthington, Janice ..... Wortman, Victor .,.. 203 Wray, Robetfe ...........,...,....... Wright, Carl ....,,.............. 249 Wrestler, Carl .,................,.... Wrestler, Clifton ...,......v. 252 Wright, Carolyn ............. i Wright, Delores .... I93 Wright, Wilkinson . 83, 244 268 Wrinkler, Jan ......................... Wyatt, Janice ......................... Wynne, Faye .......,......... Wynne, William ......... Y Yarbrough, 8onnie..l09, I25 Yeager, Fred ........................... Yetts, Joe ................... rr.-- ..-..--.. Yoo, Ca pt, George .....,....... Young, Carol .....,................,,. Young, Norman 227, 255 262 Young, Robert ..............,......,. Young, Ross ............................. Ysac, Albert ............. Yvars, Reynaldo .....,,,. Z Zaccagnino, Donald .,..,...... Zaher, Frank ,...... ...... ,... .,........ Zaher, Joseph ..........,.... Zalewski, Maryann .........,..... Zamrs, Robert ............... Zane, Howard ....,............... ..... Zannls, Tom ...............,............. Zapora, Wilma .,...... 260, 264 Zarraonandia, Emeterio ..... Zarraonandia, Thomas Zarzar, Jack ............................. Zaspel, Anton ........,,..... ...... Zavitz, Mary ......,.. .......... Zech, Don ............,... ..... . ..259 Zemmel, Estelle .....,........ 278 Zenkel, Barbara ..................... Zervas, Patrick ................ 256 Zibelli, Carole ..,...... .......... Ziegler, Marilyn ........... Znllman, Roy ...... ............. ........ Zimmerman, Dianna ............. Zimmerman, Jewell .......,..... Zinglo, Thomas .,......... Zinn, Charles ........... Zisook, Laurie ......,.. Zmuda, Ken .,,....,..................... Zoccoli, Stephen .,..,.............. Zoeller, Edwin ............,. Zuckerman, Ellen ..........,. 25l Zuckerman, Harvey . ............ Zuckerman, Rosalie ............. Zuerra, Arthur .......,....... Zundell, Donald ,,....... Sigma Kappa ............. Sigma Nu ................... .... Sigma P,hi Epsilon ,,.....,. Ski Club ..................... S. A. E .....................,.... Student Education Association ...,..........,,...-.... . Student Nurses' Association Student Religious Association .,,.... .. ........ s. Tau Delta Phi ............. Tau Epsilon Phi ........, Tau Epsilon Rho .........,.., Tau Kappa Epsilon Theta Chl ,...................... Theta Sigma Phi ,.......... Union Board ................,........... Wesley Foundation .............,. Who's Who ................... Wig and Robe, ......... , Y. W. C. A ............., Zeta Beta Tau ...,..... Zeta Tau Alpha ......... This Book . . . And A Small White MG SMALL white MG, an editor's pride and joy, stands in a field of green which surrounds a busy be- hive for I bis staffers. This vehicle might well be the symbol of a year gone past, a year enfolded now in 378 pages of pic- tures and words and bounded by a cover of white, green and gold. The MG has done its share of la- bor in its own inimitable way: it has transported the pages to their place of departure-the airport-for that long trek to Atlanta, Ga., it has lent a helping hand in carting overdue pictures from the realms of the Photo Center, it has carried a food supply for weary staffers and taken them on relief trips, whether to a Gables movie, a bowling alley or on a day- long holiday jaunt. Standing alone, the little white MG calls to memory the many peo- ple who have made welcome and much appreciated contributions to the pages of this year's annual. One name appears as editor but it would be a gross misrepresentation to exclude the names of others whose combined efforts produced this vol- ume. In retrospect, we may recall the atmosphere of befuddlement which prevailed at the beginning when staf- fers joined forces, some for the first time, in this co-operative venture. F The Business Manager found the ledgers and journals difficult to ma- nipulate: the Photo Editor lost him- self in a maze of film, the Sports Edi- tor was confronted by a burning headache, of athletic character, an Associate Editor was faced with the chore of meeting, at least verbally and pictorially, a few hundred pro- spective graduates who now com- prise our senior section. Time progressed. Many harsh words were said. A whip was cracked. Academic responsibilities sometimes went neglected. Lights burned until all hours of the morning with aware- ness of approaching deadlines. With the headaches, disappoint- ments, threats, fears, and fatigue, both mental and physical, there came times of a different nature. These were the times when staffers chose to forsake their editorial obligations for an evening at a movie, or a TV dinner for the gang. From all of this heterologous ac- tivity, emerged the 1958 Ibis, part of an education accomplished. Yes, Pat Duhaime discovered how to deal with those troublesome ledg- ers and journals and even managed to get scholarship checks out on schedule. Alan Rusnak found his way out of the maze with pictures in hand, a job well done. 378 Roger Reece invented a remedy for headache ills when he came in right ahead of deadline. Carmen Colon did indeed become acquainted with the number and sta- tistics of graduating seniors. Then there were three assistant editors: Sharon Nelton, old faithful, who never among all the mounds of copy thought of over-running her vocabulary, Mike Thompson, who was there to measure the world with his astute calculations and slide rule and Helene Rosrier, who emerged victorious over the top of a mountain of index cards. Tempo Editor Barbara Siegle was also around to render moral support and material assistance in between her own deadlines. Giant-size bottles of aspirin are now empty and Mr. Hicks will soon be replenishing his supply for the preparation of 1959 Ibis. While reminiscing, we can not forget the photographers who kept the darkroom in operation from early morn until late at night. A special note of thanks should go to Dave Greenfield, Bob Rudoff, Ray Fisher and Flip Schulke. There are many others whose help has not gone unnoticed. Their names are too numerous to list here on this one page, but a hearty thanks goes out to all. If not for them, the plans and the dreams for 1958 would not have been realized. The year is over and the pages have returned bound together in a cover of white, gold and green. The book now lies before you. All that remains from the toils of many varying personalities are these 578 pages of pictures, words and memories. To those who now view our accomplishment, we hope that you will enjoy it. To those who will comprise the staff of Ibix 1959, the complaints, the praise or whatever else may be said, will be yours for your consideration as new plans are started and dreams for another year envisaged. And the small white MG will be "retired" -JMW T K rfw , I,!",. . -1 'Q i 1. 4, , . I F , . 4 f fi ' 5, .a


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