University of Massachusetts Boston - Beacon Yearbook (Boston, MA)

 - Class of 1981

Page 1 of 176

 

University of Massachusetts Boston - Beacon Yearbook (Boston, MA) online yearbook collection, 1981 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 176 of the 1981 volume:

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Morgan 1980 UMB Fall Even ts Table Of Contents Holzday Spzrlts Student Enterprzses Admlmstra tzon 8: Staff Ded1ca t1on 0rgan1zat1ons ...... ............. ...... ,.......,.,....,. The College of Arts and Sczenees .......,.,... ...,........ 9 5 97 Gz'aduat1ngSen1o1'sg .... . ...., . The College of Management and Professzonal Stud1es ...........,......................,,. G1'aduat111g Semors .... .,,.. . ................. , The College ofPubl1c and Comm um ty' Servlce ...................,.......,........., Graduatmg Semors ............ ...........,......,.... The Extended Day Program ............ .............. Sports C1'ed1 ts 98 125 127 129 130 140 141 143 144 146 147 149 155 163 166-168 Av rs.. mug i X ,,-gag .H .5 1-nllll'3's' 1m,,. c .. ,,x.4..f...--- ' "-Qs A . ..., ,,,,,.,-5,19 af: .WM-fL.g 3,-. '- win if lf, . ,Ayn X, xt ,f-'w f 1 ,rf-er' '- A A 1 -r1 . yn, N, '90 Q-fx. .f-,,.. f-AB in , 'viii ' - ,Iv 21 4, B LW! . . -- ,N wg W u u ff.??':,,.F'-f."r'1', , YUM M 1 3.61 FA f , 'Y 45" . n -1 .I -1 -v---v-r,, ,,.l. 'F""W"'f 'A'A f Ma-Mvmfw,wff :H ff ww','54J2' :U N :X -..,5., 1 "F 1 I - Z,.-Zd,,,:,y:fHL?W??gJM3 1I, -ig Z51+:wifv1HTf've? if , Z 5 x , ' f .4 X L., . Q M .f u J ff 3 l -1 I ' , ' 1 'if' ,,,f...- " I- f.,X,, X Q , Eg i ,sk ' Q . . ,..., fi . fa t ,,,,. L .W QS-'Q 52 1:5 " ,-4+ ,Y .Vx-'4 , , N, , ,,.4 Y .K . I... The Unive1'sity Massach usetts A Boston J . f i M 2 . v V 21,4 - WM . ,, fw, 'fvlqi .. ,Q lK 3 sf" 4.-'Wv:,'1? .f il, : 5, ' 1 -f"'?"""' Q 'inn-. uw firm Q 4 A ,,,.,. 4' The University of Massachu-, setts at Boston is the urban center of the stateis University system, which also includes campuses in Amherst and Worcester. Established in 1965. The University of Massachusetts at Boston today includes the original Downtown Center at Park Square and the Harbor Campus. The Downtown Cen- ter is almost exclusively devot- ed to the programs and services of -the College of Public and Community Services, While the Harbor Campus holds the Col- lege of Arts and Sciences, the College of Management and Professional Studies, and most of the .University's facilities and support -programs. Built in the early 1970's with specific attention to the princi- ples of barrier-free design, the Harbor Campus is accessible to all students, including the physically disabled. The University Library con- tains over 300.000' books and 3,000 periodicals including spe- cial collections for the Arts, Music and Sciences. At the top of the 10-story building is an Astronomical Observatory which is open to the University Community. ' The newest addition to the Harbor Campus is the Cather- ine Forbes Clark Memorial Sports Complex. The S9 mil- lion facility provides the Uni- versity's varsity Basketball and Hockey teams with compe- tition sized courts, and also fea- tures swimming facilities and individualized gyms for such purposes as handicapped ath- letics and dance. - Standing on the coastal edge of the Harbor Campus is the John F. Kennedy Library, a public institution for education and research. The Library was donated to the people of the United States by the Kennedy Library corporation and is part of the National Archives and Records Service. A Q 6 -:A-I 'fn Wm I Jai ' 5 .In Y, ,f '- ii l I. fp' V . fry, , -+4 5. M 1: bf, . 1 i . . , xx J' i .I W Q, adv ,,.4-,, QJYV- .- mb 'ui X W' xx. 1 K , D A - A ' ' .Av-' rf r 5 ' , '. 1 f. Yin. .iff V1.1 .2 :MV . Qi..-jibxjx .fr ,A ..,. .. L'55'fC7??.- -1 f:.g4v!",.--f -,,,ov"w' .-1' , I .w,,ri, V r ,-X kg-5 , .3f'fC.2'i1'-1, '-M, .fr - :MS .,' . 'ii-4-f' ' A - -,,."S1'f'1 .,4- K., 1 an KJ... ?u N: 1 Q I W gh.: --Q, xx. '59 Q WWW L, :ii " ' 'lil-if 3. ,,- ..- If if A-as W 'ws- ma .. .,.. - xx V A is if vw, X 'L 'mfr- Vi x JW L1 5 Sports Complex The Catherine Forbes Clark Memorial Sports Com- plex is the newest addition to the Harbor Campus and provides the University's varsity Basketball and Hockey teams with competition sized courts. The S9 million complex also features swimming facilities and individualized gyms for such purposes as handi- capped athletics and dance. The University's Board Of Trustees voted to name the complex in honor of Catherine Forbes Clark, a member of the board who passed away in 1977. Ms. Clark dedicated much of her time to community cares and improvements, and was an ardent support- er of the gymnasium for years. ...nl- H- E i 1fL.2'?F' ' -91,1 - N., A . , 4... Lf: : ., A. 1 - f. ----it I pr, . ,. 4... ., ""'l"'?"l""9' "" "' "" .nnslni-.-.nz si ww. 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QQ' ,,J I jf: 'Q A JZ' - -fm' ! w if it A j' r fzv j .51 ' ,., ' f . 1 Q' as -.N N - 1, S A L ,gg hymn- st wi. ,W ' s UA .A , . cv' ga' . . -.. if 4,4 5 w if "'fff4s"" NT. ,-Ju ,..' Q, ff" 'B' 'Pl' R ipaq -5- vwvmvxvii z . :Nl 1.4 Tis The Season of Celebration Holiday Spirits . P , il . M--. ht I ., . 4 v fi-Q3 i i Q" fixiliiiffi 1 51 V A i' . i fig ' ' S. Q. I " ' i vi V u X 1 1 v cl 5 r X Sl Q HAQN ' 0 , I i , fi WX, , Mb xx X A , v ox 1 ' ' -. - . 'I U., F N 5 ' uv eil V ' 2 x 1 I+ . V -7 1"- ' - f ' X r' Q yn N N 555. x E , vt 7 w ga '5 1-af . 5 :UQVI . lo al Ii l Christmas Crafts Bazaar Santa and members of Elves local 211 flew into the Harbor Campus in grand style for the sixth annual Christmas Crafts Bazaar. After problems with Magic Reindeer Wastes in the 020 lobby caused the cancellation of Wednesdays fes- tivities, the Bazaar brightened the lives and warmed the ,hearts of the UMass community on Thursday and Friday. Some people shopped for gifts offered by a Wide array of crafts people, others enjoyed the general merri- ment while feasting on Greek, Middleastern, and Chi- nese gastronomical delights. Santa proclaimed the Whole affair a success and promised that everyone using alternative heating would get coal in their stockings if they were good! Merry Christmas! 34 , Q .ffl 1 , , ,4? f nw Q wfivw- 9 WI! , rfb f, n I ,su Sf S, "S -X-.-tk Q55 2:8 PSON 4X8 Q. -A 1 .icy , , ,gi .CY 114: avg 5. . ' 3243 ' .vw v 5- v . ,xi-f ' 's "f,w,-fugiqvby AM- f"41"'-to L.. ,- Q' v. ,U .,,,,1,, inv?0lw ,, Wm www S: 2.-fx' . MW- 4 'f?,.'.1rXi " P - 338. .,,-, -,ZW 1, V- , "f'9 '-.Wil ,Q-Q agp , Q' . Ntifww -ia, . .Nt t - .34-. E T2 5.1. .Q f....,,...- . 'LL-'Jia' ','.5f'1!3,-",f -, ,. an - ,V -,. ,. A - -MP 'A 'ii ' " ,- N. ,V1, id' Ps .qi 1-,-!:,h,- .," Q ' 5- ,-4. Studen t En terprises fr "'1' flak " g. If l 'EK as 'L The Mass Media The Mass Media, UMassfBoston's only student newspaper, is more than the sixteen pages of newsprint which stu- dents could pick up once a week to keep abreast of campus news. The Mass Media is also the twenty or so students who work and learn together, not only for their own personal satisfaction, but for the benefit of the entire UMass!Boston community. The 1980-1981 staff began its work during the summer semester of 1980. De- spite the inexperience of the staff, the twenty-three students who comprised the summer staff produced more copy - one hundred pages of newsprint - than any previous summer staff had. Besides the six regular issues printed during the summer, the staff also prepared a thirty- two page newspaper which was available to students on the first day of classes for the fall semester. That special issue included the sixteen page The Mass Media Guide to UMass- fB0ston, in which on-campus services and programs were highlighted. The 11 -1 fag. 3 9 guide, which represented the first in- depth guide to UMassfBoston produced by students, included articles on gover- nance bodies, student-run programs, such as Earth Foods and the Harbor Art Gallery, and profiles on leading campus personalities. The staff produced its second supple- ment of the year in the last fall issue. That twenty-four page paper included Ersatz II, an eight page literary supple- ment filled with poetry, fiction, and art- work. For the Spring semester, the staff produced special supplements on the Boston music scene and the S.A.C. elec- tions. Besides those special offerings, The Mass Media featured an expanded com- mitment to news coverage. The institu- tion of a "beat" system, which saw stu- dents assigned to continuing coverage of campus governance bodies, resulted in the most complete governance the cam- pus has seen in years. The news depart- ment also expanded its coverage of lec- tures both on-campus and at the JFK sh -"' af if . B- 2 ,... , 3 I . s l . f x , Library in the hopes of increasing aware- ness of the multiple cultural and educa- tional opportunities available at UMass- fBoston. The Feature department, as well as presenting student-written movie, the- atre, and concert reviews, expanded into the area of faculty and student profiles. The Sports department continued its ex- haustive coverage of both intramural and varsity sports. But newspapers are not produced only by writers. An under-staffed, over- worked photography department contin- ued working side by side with both news and sports departments. And the Media expanded its production crew in hopes of assuring a neat, clean paper for its read- ers. Not to mention the typists, proofread- ers, copy-editors . . . the list goes on and on. Its probably enough to say that The Mass Media represented one of the har- dest working student organizations on campus on 1980-1981. rf -4 Ss OF I' Xi -'qv K f X 'su R 'JK J' y 0 'Q S is Y .: h V ,Y VM, ' sf 4 3 .Y Mgr- ri . .,.- A G M, . .ima 1 X The Mass Media staff1980-1981: CSittingJ, left to right: Stacie Tyler, George Abruzzese, Denise Delorey, Michael Desmond, Mary Platt, Peter Davoli, Diana Swallow, Francine La Terza, Sharon Singer-Nese. CStandingl, left to right: Debbie Clarke, Dan Lydon, 42 Leah Shriro, Eric Stanway, Torn Greene, Keith Lewis, Kathie Kelliher, Stephen Moniak, Cindy Quense, David Nathan, Carlene Hill. Z , ...,- ., 1-qwf, , . - f A 5 . . ,' ' 34751 4 f' ,' ,I 'M 1 ,S 1' , ,' A 5417: i rw VV 1 .K f f ,if 1 3 I -11 tif h , ' ' ' ,Z ' A 2 "f , 1 Q , ,"' A 1 V 'V AL S, e 2 0'C'.':n-2 B A " 2 T7 " Z " ,s ,Z xmaws V., 44, if .xmas 'il' 1 55 f M Stephen Moniak Editor-in-chief Carlene Hill News Editor Eric Stanway Lay-out Editor Kathie Kelliher Production Co- Editor From editing and organizing copy . . . . . . to keeping track of i all the pages . . . . . . to HSSOCI A ate feature editors doing the typesetting . . . . ,.e, ..,A . 4, , . ,-mgww., . . . It took a lot of people work ing together to produce The Mass Media. -..nissan-" - ., George Abruzzese News Report- Tom Greene News Reporter Michael Desmond Humour Col- Dan Lydon Staff Photographer GI umnist VISQ N Q-E A-Q45 i, Jig- 1,5 E fl ' . if 'f ' Q' l.:' 5 Wi 2 1 K if M -'Q ".'- fs' it J fl? f . 'I ii 7 'fd 4 jf """ 'Q if we i Anil X, E' 6 A V-VE ti Wa velength Magazin e Wavelength Magazine was started in the fall of 1979 by a group of students who felt there was a need for an alternative form of campus publication. Each issue of the magazine combines in-depth news arti- cles involving current issues of interest to students either as members of the UMassfBoston community or as citizens in general, and the artistic expressions of student artists, authors and poets. The magazine is published twice a semester with the combined efforts of its twenty member staff. in. fzw-,WN A ff f ""tgfw. Q GM HANJEAwn1H CARE , , , ,,., X M.. ,.,,,, . h CCL, Harbor Art Gallery Many students who attend UMassfBoston are highly talented in the fields of art, photography, and video Work. The Harbor Art Gallery is where these students can display their talents. Open year round, the Gallery is a student-run center funded by SAC and Cultural Events. The center has been open for over five years. 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Before you leave us for your own chosen endeav- ors, I would leave you with these few parting thoughts. First, each of you should feel proud. Proud to say that you have achieved a level of academic sophistication and accomplishment that few achieve. Proud, also, to know that you have been engaged in scholarly discourse with first-rate aca- demic leaders and that you have proven your abili- ties and have been judged qualified and competent to walk within the community of scholars who proudly say they are UfMass. graduates. Second, each of you should be thankful. Thank- ful because the people of the Commonwealth had both the vision and desire to provide this great institution to you for your educational develop- ment and advancement. Additionally, you should be thankful to your family, friends and classmates, To The Graduating Class of 1981: This is a time for congratulations and the recog- nition of achievement. You who graduate this year have worked in a dedicated way to reach this goal in your lives and careers. In universities today, it is only a relatively small percentage of those who begin their studies who complete their degrees. In doing so you have distinguished yourselves and have a right to be proud. It is also a time to pause and reflect on the fact that your education at the University of Massa- chusetts at Boston, if it has had a measure of success, has "raised your consciousness", to use the popular expression of our time, and has committed you to ideals and goals beyond yourself. Genuine learning and true knowledge always involve a hu- man dimension, they make their bearers aware of their obligation to the common good, to the public interest, and in doing so they dignify human ac- for without their support, encouragement and love your educational achievements would most likely not have come to fruition. Finally, and most importantly, you should feel anxious. Anxious to know that there is a whole complex world of opportunities and challenges awaiting your special insights and contributions. Each of you, moreover, should be anxious to apply the creative product of your education - knowledge - to the particular issues and problems that cap- ture your creative interest and fertile imagination. In closing, I want to wish each graduate in the Class of 1981 good luck and good fortune in what- ever field you choose to pursue. And remember always that we at UfMass. are proud of you, thankful to have worked with you, and we are anxious to see how each of you will leave your special mark on the world. Sincerely, Charles F. Desmond Vice Chancellor Student Affairs tion and justify human endeavor. The absense of these ideals is too painfully apparent in the world we live in, but that bleak picture is almost always the inheritance of those who graduate. It is renew- al and rededication that we celebrate in your graduation. Remember, then, that the priviledge of your learning carries with it an obligation, that you have received a gift and that you have inherited a responsibility. Cherishing that gift and meeting that responsibility are what matter. Sincerely, f?,zwlfI-W- Robert A. Greene Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost 1 1 12 if To The Class Of 1981: The completion of your course of studies at the University of Massachusetts at Boston is an event of great importance for you, your families and your teachers. You have worked hard for this achievement and your University is proud of you. For many of you, the path to your degree has not been smooth, straight, nor free of obstacles. Your background and situation place you far from the profile of the average college student. You are older, you come from families where you may be the first to attend college, you are working while learning - in fact, many of you are supporting families. All of this is as it should be, for you are the students for whom the University of Massachusetts at Boston was created. The mission of your campus has been, and remains, to provide low-cost, quality university- level education to people who, for whatever reason, choose to commute to college. It is a rigorous education designed for students who know what it is to work hard. It is an education which combines the offering of liberal studies with the opportunity for professional training, and, I would like to assure you, liberal and professional education are not antithetical. In our highly technological and organizational society, they should be complementary, with each informing the other. The student in the basic disciplines is not liberally educated for the world of today unless he or she possesses an understanding of the role of technology, its benefits, its costs, and the mode of thought of those who employ it. Conversely, students in professional fields can hardly function well if they do not have an understanding of the human and cultural milieu in which they will practice, be they engineers, physicians, or accountants. Finally, your education here at the Boston campus has provided you with an experience which will have value now and in the future. Regardless of your major interest, your trained intelligence now gives you the opportunity to provide leadership and make a contribution to the society in which you live. A You have worked hard, and you will continue to face difficult situations as you continue your education or start your career. I congratulate you on your achievements and wish you well in your future activities. Sincerely , ff! Zi D Vid C. K app resident if A Y M3 ,E ",. :A S A: V - 21. x xx: , if 1 i. :Q C . Z ,AA. , , ,A vw "' A 13' L M C, ,, 1 ,X 'klv"" Fo-ukkm abihgmi 0 1,3 A wwf' , pai MMV' WWA F,-A-I I ,"f---- Twelve years ago a small group of students at the Park Square Campus had a dream of developing an educational, informative and entertaining campus radio station for UMass- fBoston. Today, in 1981, that dream has resulted in not only WUMB Carrier Current, but in WUMB-FM 91.9 as well. One of the original founders of WUMB Ra- dio is Patricia tRicciol Monteith. WUMB Car- rier Current began operating in October of 1968. Pat was hired as General Manager in 1973, and retained the position when the sta- tion moved to its new 11 room complex at the Harbor Campus in January of 1974. A graduate of UMass!Boston with a degree in Mathematics, Pat went on to Emerson Col- lege and received her Masters degree in Mass Communications. Her commitment to educa- tional broadcasting inspired the application of an FM frequency for UMass in April of 1974. For the next six years Pat battled the red tape of obtaining an FM license for UMass Boston that would serve 15 South Shore Communities with a substantial amount of Community! Pub- lic Affairs programming. The dream paid off. On June 30, 1980, the Federal Communications Commission granted approval to begin con- struction of WUMB-FM, with broadcasting to begin in 1981. Through the years of being General Manager of WUMB, Pat's contributions to UMassfBos- ton only further portray dedication to educa- tion in the communications industry. Respon- sible for forty to fifty students per semester, Pat oversees the management of WUMB, while students are given the opportunity to hold management positions within the station, and learn first hand the creative and business world of radio broadcasting. Pat has taught a credited course in radio production at the Uni- versity, and directs three non-credited work- shops a year for interested students on campus. The station adds as many as thirty new staff members a year as a result. While work-study positions are available at the station, more than 7095 of the staff members at WUMB are volunteers, which confirms Pat's belief that given a challenge and the opportunity to learn results in higher productivity and a better edu- cation. The motivation that Pat inspires among the staff can be seen in the excellent programming formats, special events and ser- vices that WUMB provides to UMassfBoston. Aside from the management of WUMB, Pat's other contributions to UMass!Boston in- clude having helped to re-establish a Yearbook on campus after a seven year absense, and act- ing as Yearbook Advisor for the past four years, being Chairperson of the FM Policy Board, and she has served on other campus committees as well. Outside of the campus, Pat is an active mem- ber of, and serves on the policy boards of the National Association of Educational Broad- casters and the Intercollegiate Broadcasting System, and was one of the principal negotia- tors with the American Council of Education on copyright royalty payments for low power educational broadcast stations. In addition, she is also the founder and chairperson of the National Student Broadcasters Convention, which WUMB Radio has hosted for the past four years. Pat also serves as Chairperson of the Randolph, Massachusetts Cable Televsion Advisory Committee. Patricia Monteith is one of the most out- standing individuals within the UMass com- munity. She has brought national recognition to the campus, and educational radio broad- casting to hundreds of students over the years. She has given these students the chance to be creative, develop their talents, to learn respon- sibility and decision-making, all while provid- ing UMassfBoston with an informative and educational radio station. For outstanding dedication, commitment and contribution to the University of Massa- chusetts at Boston, the 1981 Yearbook is here- by dedicated to you, Patricia A. Monteith. S W 52,3312 ...Q-, , if 47 W-5.5 1, , fl is . ,, 5 1 s z I Q R N il X' "ln 5, ,ww it 8 AJMW' 3' . , , 7 'G o 5 ai 1 L M . . wiiv . '-GS my 1 1 M55 'fix yi. , ,iqyks-N 74' ex, f -'fm ,. 51,3-YA--' A iw -f.-x 1. 3? z . ,-V iii ga 12 Mg, 'Q Q '5 S .I air" I, ' QRAVXE' . , I :J 1. f .Mgr Q- .5 MP' 8 -'im L6w0" I ,X7 4 fi fi Q, Y 1. 'r N in un 'n ,IP I 1 ! ,1- i l 1 1 54 V W 1- . ,X fy,-., 15222651 ., Q if Z M .1- zl' 4' -f Q X , 4494 e 4 2 ' iffy. 951 -fy, Y Hf' 0 1 1 'WF' Deans, CAS, CMPS, CPCS Admissions Boston Urban Observatory Continuing Education Financial Management Graduate Studies Institute For Learning And Teaching Library Media Services Nantucket Program Prisons Program Registrar Summer School Survey Research University Counseling Center INFO Health Services Career Planning :Q Placement Athletics 8: Recreation Disabled Student Center Childcare Veteran's Affairs Pre-Freshman Program Student Activities Graduate Advising Campus Ministry Foreign Student Advising S.A. C. Qi Elected annually by the student body of the University of Massachusetts at Boston, the Uni- versity Student Activities Committee is a standing committee of the University Assembly. SAC itself breaks down into four subcommit- tees: Community Action, Cultural Events, Media and Publications, and Recognized Student Organi- zationsg each being responsible for coordinating and overseeing those activities which fall under its category of interest. SAC holds responsibility for approval of events and programs, and allocation of SATF monies to fund such activities. all 4. 'E , ,gg-::,g,. , - Lf 5 Q, in 2 ll " i I V .Y-I 'xy CR X .r U f Q Disabled Student Cen ter In 1971, Lillian Ross, a senior at UMassfBoston, be- came concerned about the lack of services for the phys- ically handicapped person who was trying to make it through college. Miss Ross, who is blind, started a small office for blind students in the Park Square Building on a work-study job. Since then the center has grown to serve students with other disabilities. The Disabled Student Center is now located at the Harbor Campus and offers a variety of services to approximately 100 students. The center, which is totally funded by the University, provides a broad spectrum of services which range from academic assistance and tutoring, to counseling and sup- port services. The center has helped to make UMass!Bos- ton one of the finest institutions in the country for disa- bled students. All of the University's programs and activi- ties are accessible to and useable by the physically disa- bled person. g x 'QQ- IGH RAS DI WLED li -1 9. . Organiza tions -A American Marketing Associa tion The UMB Collegiate Chapter of the American Marketing Association currently has about 30 members. When a student joins the AMA, he is actually joining three organiza- Arabic Student Union Marhaba! The Arabic tions: AMA National, the Boston Professional Chapter, and the Colle- giate Chapter. Each of these organizations has much to offer its mem- bers, including conven- tions and a guest speakerts bureau. This chapter is greatly indebted, in fact We owe our existence to, professor Gary Young. Professor Young's experience in AMA and ability to get things done proved in- valuable. Chapter Officers: President ...... Murray rVetstein Vice-President Bill Hay Secrtary Carol Surette Treasurer . John Neary ' Programs Director ..... Valerie Shiner iff' V' P ,,f 'era' if-11 iL Student Union's main goals are focused on intro- ducing Arabic customs and ideas to American So- ciety, and American cul- ture to Arabic students 4 , . l A ,Q who arrive in this country. Officers: President ............. Wasseem Kabbara Secretary Eri Pasalidis E Xa Visit ' .f 1 f as Asian American Society For the Asian American Society, this has been a year of c advancement. Our Annual Welcome Back Dinner-Party was held in mid-October. We hosted the 4th Annual Asian Col- lege Day at UMass Park Square, participated at INFOFEST, and threw a bewitching Halloween Disco at Narcissus. November was Asian Awareness Month. Asian student organizations on many campuses Csuch as Tufts, Harvard, and Brownl participated in this month-long cam- paign. At UMass we spon- sored three educational workshops for the UMass community, and co-spon- sored an Asian Cultural Coffeehouse with the Northeastern Chinese Student Club. All these social, cultur- al, educational, political, and recreational activities that we do are for the pur- pose of meeting the needs of Asian students on cam- pus. While We can not say that we have succeeded in this completely, we have made progress in bringing Asian students closer to- gether, and in playing an active role as students on campus and as Asian peo- ple in society. Biology club The biology ,club has been active since the be- ginning of life at UMass. Our members consist of students who are interest- ed in meeting others. with common interests such as Cughll the Bio exam, biol- ogy jokes, and career pos- sibilities or graduate stud- ies. We arrange field trips, have parties to get ac- quaintedfand "mobilized", and we host the Biology Department Poster ses- sion. Our goal is to turn 1-N-1-4'9 -'ki -1. everyone on to biology! Advisor ..... Dr. Hagar President ...... J oan ne Wynkoop Vice-President Stephen Roth Secretary .... Madeline Huber Treasurer Lea Gifford Chess Club The UMass Chess Club is composed of chess plays ers of all backgrounds and strengths. We have been an active RSO since 1972. The Club offers its mem- bers ahospitable environ- ment and opportunity to develop their analytical skills. In addition, mem- bers can engage in other games Qi.e., checkers, shogi, Ubughousevl if they so choose. T The Chess Club has also sponsored a chess team in the Metropolitan Chess League. The team tied for first in the 79-80 season. We also intend to sponsor a tournament in the 1980- 1981 school year. v4........-...- L......-.....-5 - yu. , sr., ga sl English Club The UMass!Boston English Club provides a meeting ground for stu- dents to discuss and share their ideas and exper- iences relative to the in- terests and problems of English majors. The club provides an opportunity for all students to increase their awareness and ap- preciation of the English language and its literature through social and intel- lectual activities spon- sored by the club. Services if ffirv s ' K if: if-1....-- - el.. T l include: A reference li- brary, holding discussion groups, writing work- shops, sponsoring films and poetry and fiction reading groups, offering graduate school and job opportunity information, and tutoring. 'i L ' , Q. fi Z 'N L W, , 'g v i -117 3 v : if T51 ,. N' Q r l L C E I 1 IJ, I I Z ,,., . g 4' LEE. ., ,. . ,... :ig Li? N ,yxitfjj N .S rv r rs., E 5,'.g,s . Y fb 7 'C' J if.. - ,, , is ,ww-9 sg isa fzgfia 1 1, ' S. fr if N Fpengh Club among members in which The French oiub pro- French is Spoken, and motes Comradeship sponsor and organize cul- E Hispanic Student Union The Hispanic Student Union is open to any member of the UMass community to provide counseling services to the large and growing Spanish 61' S A-so A 4' U QQ! - 1 3 X - .' - speaking population both on campus and in the sur- rounding university com- munities. The I-I.S.U. works as a homogeneus group, and includes stu- dents of all nationalities. Activities that the X 1 tural events of interest to its members, and the UMass community. 5 I ,r w ": E E 2 I-I.S.U. have sponsored this past year include films, theatre, dancing, and parties that portray the cultural and social ins terests of the Spanish community. ,gh 1 G. X 5 I I I ' gi ' 1 " E' 554 F -3. f is Q. - , 1: l K Lesbian And Gay Center The UMassfBoston Lesbian and Gay Center provides a rich variety of services to the University community. We provide peer counseling and sup- port for lesbians and gays, and advice for students with gay friends or rela- tives who would like to understand what their friends are experiencing more fully. - We also provide a safe, relaxing atmosphere for gays and lesbians on cam- pusg a place to come and talk with other gays, drink coffee and in general, un- wind from the academic rat-race. In addition, we have a wide range of information available to the gay and straight community at YL-F UMB. We have contacts for gay lawyers, health clinics, bookstores and re- ligious groups, among oth- ers. We also sponsor a va- riety of social events throughout the academic year. We heartily extend an invitation to the student body as a whole to come by and meet some of their fellow gay and lesbian stu- dents. Ph otography Club The Photography Club is a new RSO on campus with many goals for the year. A photo library has been started, and the club organizes contests, and participates in outside contests. A slide show pre- sentation is planned, as well as inviting guest speakers to our campus. And most importantly, club members teach each v-.S X. Fig others in the darkroom, and advise each other on the best buys in camera and darkroom supplies. Faculty member Melis- sa Shook is advisor to the club, an asset well appre- ciated by the club. v-.,,,wNV Portuguese Cultural Cen ter The Portuguese Cultur- al Center has been an ac- tive RSO since 1972. We currently have 38 mem- bers and hope that this number will grow in the future, as there are a great deal of Portuguese stu- dents entering colleges and institutions for higher education. wana --...-..,.....-M We are here mainly to provide services for stu- dents of Portuguese ex- traxtion, but anyone else is also welcome to our cen- ter. We provide tutorial services for students en- rolled or interested in Portuguese classes. We also provide background in Portuguese culture. Our center is also used as a place to socialize, practice our language and hold meetings. Every year we usually plan one or two festivals for all UMass students on campus. These festivals are planned to introduce the student body to the Portuguese culture Cous- toms, traditions, etc.J We usually provide folkloric dancers, music and food. ln the past, our festivals have been a success. We plan to continue providing our services to the UMass community. Puerto Rican Student . Union The Puerto Rican Stu- dent Union is a social and 'xi political organization cre- ated to serve as an advo- cate for the problems and issues affecting the His- panic community on cam- pus. It is the vanguard in helping the student strug- gle for a better education. Also, our goal is to serve as a linkage between UMass and the Hispanic community of the Boston area in an effort to pro- mote the recruitment of Hispanic students from the community. ge, Rock N ' R011 Club The Rock N' Roll Club sponsors social activities for the UMass community such as dances, concerts, and field trips to see local rock bands. Events that the club sponsored this fall included the f T drew a large crowd of !Party, Halloween Party music enthusiasts. ' , ,,,f' r 'Runnefs Club The Runner's Club is open to all members of the UMass community to or- -15- ganize and promote run- ning activities at UMass, This fall the Runnefs Club sponsored a benefit Road-Race to aid Cystic lu ai Y Fibrosis. The race was well attended, and a party was held after the race for all participants. t' al"fl'e1l"1iT4r'-71 .. s,,:,,.x.: .-.asm .- lf J if Sailing Club The Sailing Club now has approximately 150 members. Classes are held in Basic Sailing Xa Nomen- rine Spike Seamanship, Racing Tactics, Racing Rules and Navigation. The f Sailing Club pare ticipates in regattas with other schools such as Har' vard, Yale, BU, BC, MIT, , . . . clature, Seamanshxp, Ma- Malne Maritime, Mass il - ' ,. F 5 -V 'B : 'K 'Y -- ,235 , , ,, X 4 . , , ,. ' . 5 ,..s,?5, -' - K l ' 5 If:-fffi ff ig- .- 52 5M ' I A h 2 Zi Mi- , : p Sm'-:fl 2. ..e Xigkzam, , .... , ., ,,.., , - , Q X f A . e " r'i"Ng'1ef.:e:2S . r. .1 - .fs -ini' - ' 1 - 'gc . I L. - . 13'l"' WZ?-A' :-k'-"-tI'- '-X'iE,Q5r'- f I1 ff- ' 1 1 . K ' 'l - . - i it 3 , ,z ""' ' M agzf- 13-'TS'-.Qfi'-.--'3if'l" 3- .R-::.,gL,g,f,:g,5jgl,., f:U9' -d,.- 3 , f-nu: .A -as .1-af,-.-1f.:--rf-3 Qfif-1-sara-"n lllllille ' . .' ' -lass-. 1-use as '-:f:i:Z-esssiixgyff + "- . ' .., ..- . LI? ffzfgii'Fs:.giQ',Li1, "'i"""' ' ' .. ,. .r f . r , 1 'f A' s , 3-fs: X 'fffvryaq-A1,: wi . , , ., --.-Q: P, I 115 ' - - . f div -f'12::Z2- Liar- is '- .. ff a i ., - " A ' -X-"3-5? . 'f . . ,. , '. c'1':1'IfiQe3l "'f',iI1rfbYE'5"X i+"'5'F ' C 'A'-'flied-'i'. 1- FTS.:-:i ii-ici " z bcifei' 212-ff - 43 I3i-EIVJT3 '- - . 1.14 -231534, -I 'V "" 4 . M Sie ' ,ps - Spanish C1 Hb C The Spanish Club, has been active for two years and has a membership of 32. Generally, the club tries to offer the students on campus exposure to various iaspects of the Spanish culture, as well as an opportunity l for the s students to speak and i practice the language with H 7 each other. ' l fi Are , activities include l participating in the Christmas Bazaar, Info- festpand each spring the club attends the "La Price- mavera Festival? Parties, Maritime, and many oth- ers. ' Commodore l Rick Jakaus ViceaCommodore Mark . y e s Hamilton Rear, Commodore , ..,. . , Joseph Lally money-making functions, films, and selected speaks ers are some of our. other activities., , f President .l Cheryl Bowen Treasurer . LisafSama Secretary ..... Linda Cristello ...Sy ,?.c.., , ' N Jo' UMBIA The UMassfBoston In- ternational Students As- sociation lUMBIAl has been active since 1979. The purpose of this associ- ation is to inform the UMass population about the ethnic groups that ex- ist beyond the United States by projecting cus- toms, traditions and po- Urban Students Comm unity Club litical beliefs of different countries. Interest is greatly con- centrated on bringing for- eign students together in a friendly environment among people who share the same problems and needs, and helping new- comers overcome their difficulties in a new envi- ronment as best we cn. Officers: President Efthimios Emmanoulidis Vice-President . Wasseem Kabbara Secretary ..... Andreas Prantanos Secretary ..,.. Antonia Vasiliadis As UMass!Boston is a commuter campus, the Urban Students Commu- nity Club was formed to encourage student rela- tions in an informal non- academic atmosphere. The club offers a place to relax, meet new people, and have parties. Wom en 's Cen ter The Women's Center was founded when a group of Women felt the need for a designated space Where women could be certain of meeting other women to -6".'f.?:"' . Q1 foster a feeling of commu- nity, and to use as a base for political, cultural, and social action. The goal of the Wom- en's Center is to meet the needs of all women at the UMB campus. Many re- sources are offered by the center, which is staffed by both work-study students A i....a A T gl as and volunteers. All wom- en are Welcome to join, support and use the Wom- en's Center the way they think best. It is a resource and meeting place for all UMB women, but it can only serve those women who make their needs known and use this re- source. nik E Sftws f - S, I.. ,,.. . The Accounting 8 Finance Academy The Accounting Sr Finance Academy promotes the under' standing of the accounting Sa fi- nance iields. Through various activities such as films, guest speakers, field trips, and practi- cal experiments the Academy hopes to supplement a student's classroom theory. ' r ,T T Z College Republrcans The College Republicans hold rallies, circulate information, and try to further interest in college politics. They are the oldest and lar- gest student political organiza- tion in the U.S., and they active- ly work in the Republican par- ty's campaigns. iff Myra. ,ez gg , . , vii., f i Anthropology if ATAASO S . t ' y The Above The Average Age 0019 .V f r r ' Student Organization focuses on The Anthropology Society acts as a support group for stuj dents, and schedules lectures and films that relate to the field of anthropology. By joining stu- dents are able to meet with oth- er students and therefore, give feedback on issues of concern. . V . L, I ., 1 Debatmg Team The Debating Team was re- organized in Sept. 1980. The team's purpose is to help devel- op the speaking skills of its members through frequent de- bates. Subjects range from the virtues of an Oreo cookie to those of the U.S. nuclear arse- nal. ff" 'VW K. supporting the oider, returning student. We try, by pooling our knowledge and experience, to support other returning stu- dents and hopefully end some of the chaos that happens when you enter school after many years. German Club . Unsere Besten Gliickwiinsche Der Klasse 1981 Von Eurem Deutschen! The German Club provides a cheerful atmosphere for the meeting of new friends, and an insight into the cuture, traditions and civilization of Germany, and Central Europe in general. Network Network is a group of students from the Management Program whose goal is to seek better op- portunities for women in the management field through the interaction and, cooperation! of women. Psychology Club The Psychology Club spon- sors lectures, films, activities of t interest to the campus commu- nity, and facultyfstudent get-tow gethers. This year the Psych. Club is helping to organize and "Honors Group" for students with a B average or better in Psychology courses. Rifle 49 Pistol Club The Rifle 8a Pistol Club en- courages the organization of ri- fle 8a pistol shooting among stu' dents and faculty, with a 'view toward a better knowledge on the part of members in the safe handling and proper care of fire- arms, as well as improved mark- manship. mf I ', ff I Q 'f L ,V , ' K if ' ' , s so V , li . I , L , r . K fr .. f ff - The r Skill C3313 tpwmottes and ?UC9f13'?8BSl1Shefenjoymenttof all skiing activities by grouping, tg, for the inears est sua I snov2tf.'They Offer 0PlQ!0'1fl?l1HiliYgi9 learn to pgoftgsaiag Ta Terznis Association f t it to The Table Tennis Association is as new RSO which hopes to s tgiye students the opportunity to y play and enjoys "Ping Pong". iThe'eIub-ygifves all students a chance to learn from each other sanriximliroveitheirrskills. d UM ass p y Advocates for Presidential it Politics i l i g The Advocates started in 1979 to work on the Kennedy cam- paign, and taking trips to other states. fWe also sponsored Joe Kennedyon campus, and John Anderson. Our motto: "If you dorftll vote, don't complain? .......e, American Gospel Historical Society Armenian Club Art Club Fencing' Club Food Kr Nutrition Friends of Sparticist A Youth League Bi-Lingual Computer Ma tb Bi-Cultural Club Chemistry Club Draft Information Committe Against Group Racism Economics Soczety '30 H.E.A. T. H ellinic Students Association Hillel Jewish Students Islamic Iranian Student Society Italian Club In tervarsity ' Christian Fellowship Journalism Society Karate Club Latin American Human Rights Project Mass Pirg Music Club w- .,. Norlantic Reef Combers VJ- I W' S In - V .zu f 'QW Cc., ' u Q J, A A V .4 ' -x-A'l .'.','g,1l",' Sub- Urban Commuters UMB Flying Club' Welfare Advocates Womens Self- Defense Group Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental Society e Russian Club Science Fiction Sky Diving Club Parent Support Organization Physics Club Politics Society Pre-Law Society 1980 Campus Recap 1980 was a year of resignations, demonstrations and reorganiza tion! Vice-Chancellor of Student Af- fairs LeVester Tubbs resigned in February due to what he called "a lack of communication with Chan- cellor Corrigan". Assistant Vice- Chancellor Charles F. Desmond was then appointed interim Vice- Chancellor of Student Affairs. il Two-hundred and fifty students took over the foyer outside Chancellor Corrigan's office in March to protest Corrigan's non-renewal of the contract of Assistant Vice-Chancellor of Student Affairs Heinz Bondy, the resignation of LeVester Tubbs, and the negative tenure decisions against minority instructors Marcia Lloyd and James Cleveland. The week-long protest of the "disman- tling of the Student Affairs Office" turned into a rally that ended with the arrests of 29 students on charges of trespassing. X J. ff l'!N.. 3 IIKJLIWJW Ivux .r A ,.---""r SAC Director Robert Camerieri re- signed after being on the job for only five months. Point Press Director Nora Tringale also resigned after be- ing on the job for five months, but Tringale left because of "the ineffi- ciency of SAC operations and the bu- reaucratic systems at UMass". Acting Director of SAC is now Steven Ginns, former SAC business manager. Other resignations this past year include SAC representatives Susan Cantrill, Lynne Lopatin and Octavio Ramrez. In September, three-hundred members of the classified staff picketed and held a sick-out in op- position to the administrations new contract proposal to base lay- off decisions on "competency" re- quirements instead of strict senior- ity rules. In December, a faculty sick-out was held in protest of stalled contract negotiations. Two- hundred faculty, librarians and students participated in the two- day sick-out by not attending classes and picketing in front of the O20 building. -gf In November, students demonstrat- ed in the 020 lobby against military recruitment on campus. Reorganization: Only the Regents know for sure! IT . ,,, . L, . .114 i-i ' 1-A " J LP - 304 - 1 , , M ... V . 141 . M34 UL ' ' 1.1 "' . ..A.......4..., . . uf Q.. 5153" ri .,,',. , 1. .'TJ'."f 1 V4 'qf1f:i1':f'f5F ' K 5.4! J S 'X 1 f . Bells of freedom echoed throughout Massachusetts January 20, - in 4 4,4 gf ' V' A , 1981, announcing the release of 52 Americans held hostage in Iran for gt' .. ff 444 days. On Beacon Hill the elated House Speaker Thomas McGee 0' -, . 1 i "5 shimmied up the flagpole so he could raise Old Glory to its full height J A gf ." V for the first time in 14 months. ' X 2 - 1 X ..'f'w-ir1- +5.12-fc , tg, N Y yi 'f .-io f . 1 .F if 1 "sf',- t r ' .A 'F' 2- f' n ' 7 ' .In Washington the reigns of power passed from democrat if Jimmy Carter to republican Ronald Reagan. At 69, President N? 'Saw Reagan is the oldest man to ever have taken the oath of office. X QQ.. ,i, t my ri,A . ,.,, ,,if?'i W it ii s Q L, 'NL " ,ARI ii 44 4,7 Washington State's Mt. St. Helen blew her top on July 22, 1980, spewing lava and ash some 60,000 feet in the air. Mt. St. Helen had been active since March of 1980, and still trembles with harmonic tremors deep within the mountain. 92 .ki Ll'- In Lake Placid, New York, February 1980, the U.S. Olympic Hockey Team experienced what could be its prou- dest moment in sports history. Led by Captain Mike Eur- zione, local boys Dave Silk, Jack O'Ca1laghan and goalie Jim Craig were a dominant force in the capture of the gold medal, overcoming unbeatable odds in defeating the Soviet Union and Finland. LA u- The death of John Lennon shocked the world in December, 1980. People gathered world-wide to honor and mourn the loss of Lennon. In Boston, thousands gathered at the Boston Common, lit candles, and listened to the music by the man who was considered peace's spokesman. The Tall Ships once again graced the Boston Harbor, this time helping Bostonians celebrate its 350th birthday. Jubilee 350 climaxed in late summer after months of special events that portrayed the pride and heritage of Boston. is Bill Rogers was again the first man to cross the finish line in the 1980 Boston Marathon. However, Rosie Ruiz of New York City claimed that she crossed the finish line first. The result? Bostonians have been sponsoring the marathon too long to be taken in by the old "duck out of the race and catch a cab routine." ,4-an Jw Photographs courtesy of The Boston Herald American Q' E' t - What More Can I I du For p an Peace's spokesman, robbed of Oh, troubled boy of England's Shunned by father, you A mother who gave you en, pre you were a Youi, Ed the world with ta You, the walrus, the eggman, your lady. .The lady of the east, your kamiQfyyour haven 527 - .,.,xy at N Oh,.giygfthi'mkffback4awljWtsMtl1tat was not really it bejust likeY..Stapg.ngg2ygjg:'3j- 2 ,H TEA if V5 912 ' -Kathie ,ix The College Of Arts And Sciences About The College About The Students The College of Arts and Sciences CCAS3 is the largest academic unit of the University of Massachusetts at Boston. Twenty-two major departments and seventeen interdisciplinary concentrations are offered to the student body. A graduate program currently offers seven Master of Artsfor Science Programs. The College supports the general education programs of the other two Colleges of the Boston campus by direct faculty participation and by opening its own courses to all qualified students. The mission of the College is to provide its students with sound training and experience in the liberal arts and sciences, and through a variety of devices such as extended-day scheduling, satellite campus scheduling, tuto- rial services, and part-time degree programs, to make the education offered readily accessi- ble to the diverse, urban population served. The general goal of the College is to devel- op in its students the skills, interests and un- derstandings that will be a basis for life-long personal and professional growth. More than 350 faculty members serve an undergraduate population of 5253. The aver- age age ofthe CAS student is 24, with 64.295 of the students being under the age of twenty- five, and 35.896 of the students being twenty- five and older. 50.296 of the student popula- tion is male, and 49.895 are female. 87.421 of the students are single. According to student mailing addresses 35.395 of the students are from the Boston area, 45.396 from the Inner Suburbs, 18.395 from other areas of Massachusetts, 0.196 from other New England States, and 1.03 are from outside the New England area. Dean Mlchael P M Rlccards ff" 15338 P ,..--mv? To The Graduating Class of 1981. As Dean of the College I am pleased to extend my congratulations to the Class of 1981 - and to all the students at the University of Massachusetts at Boston This yearbook in future years will be an lmportant source of memories for many of you wishlng to recapture partlcular events 1n your college career It is my hope that the time you have spent at he University has provided you with a solid education and most importantly Wlth a love of learning and a recognition of the ethical and humane end that knowledge can bring. Again my personal regards to each of you and your families. Sincer ly yours f Q Michael P. Riccards Dean The Graduates Of The College Of Arts And Sciences S sees y as s ' ' Ti 4 ,"A is GEORGE ABRUZZESE Anthropology JOANNE M. AGO Biology MICHAEL N. ATWATER Biology STEPHEN ATWOOD Sociology JEANETTE BAILEY Political Science JUSTINA BALBUENA Sociology DESPRADEL BANKS Sociology INGRID A. BANKS Spanish VALENTINA N. ALALE Sociology GEORGE ALBRECHT Psychology PHILIP M. ANGELLIS Political Science LUZ M. ARREDONDO Biology DIANE BASTABLE Psychology ROSAMOND C BECKER Soclology SUZANNE E BECKER Engllsh RICHARD T BECKWITH Psychology LISA D BEDIG Spamsh CLARA M BENITEZ Spamsh BRIAN M BERKWITZ Computer Sclence JANE A. BERNARD Psychology MARILYN B. BERNSTEIN Psychology DEBORAH A. BIANCHI Psychology JEAN M. BIELECKI Psychology MARIANNE BIMBER Theatre Arts GAIL C. BLANCHARD Psychology DIANE M. BOGNI English KAREN E. BOODRO Anthropology HELEN R. BOUDREAU Psychology BERNADETTE BOURQUE Sociology JAMES WARREN BOWMAN Art SYLVIA C. BOYADJIAN Spanish CARL M. BOYD Economics ROSEANNE M. BOYLE English NATALIE A. BRADLEY Art JAMES MICHAEL BRADY History THERESA A. BRANAGAN Art ELEANER BRODERICK English JEANNE BRUNO Biology CARL V. BUCCILLI Sociology ELLEN M. BUCKLEY Psychology SUSAN M. BUCKLEY Political Science JANET ANN T. BURKE Psychology . ,.' . - 3:9 .1 "v-' 7 . Il, -f " ff! X 1 g X . ,,tvN V 'grfmf ,E Q I I . I - :f - - is L - x.-, .. ,A 1. '52, if iff 'ii . f' 4, ,, Y . A - fi If R45 A 'xi '-Sf-3-2' gy A -. . ,I sg., .- ...512',h'J 23.1 1:i..Jf.... GERALYN S. BURRELL Political Science LISA M. BURTON Political Science JANET L. BUZZELL Psychology MARGARET M. BYRNE Engifsh THOMAS P. BYRNE History STEPHEN G. CAIN English THOMAS H. CALLAHAN Sociology MONICA CAMPANA Economics COLETTA CAMPBELL Sociology JAMES L. CANADA EnglishfSociology BARBARA M. CANN Psychology!Sociology MARTIN J. CANNATA Sociology DAVID F. J. CAPONE Political Science BONNIE CAPUTO Sociology CATHERINE B. CARR English EVE REGAN CARR Political Science AMARILIS CARRASQUILLO Spanish JOSEPH M. CARRIERE Biology SANTINA G. CARTER Music OLGA CARVALHO Political Science YOLANDA CASERTA French CAROLYN A. CASSIDY Spanish DAWN M. CAUDLE Biology JOSEPH U. CAUTERUCCIO Economics GARY W. CAVANAGH English KATHLEEN M. CAWLEY Sociology M. RENEE N. CHANDLER Philosophy DIANE E. CHESTER- DEMICCO Music SUSAN E. CHINETTI Art MARK CIRONE Biology WT KL is 'Q-N. Q4 43 JOAN F. CLARK Theatre Arts KEVYN K. CLEGG Econom1cs DIANE E COFFEY Psychology JOSEPH A CONDON Economzcs BETH MARIE CONNOR Soc1ology ANTHONY CONTRADA Psychology KAREN A CORDERY Engllsh CYNTHIA A CORTEZ Psychology JOAN MARIE COVINO Blology LORRAINE CRAFT Psychology CLARENCE J CRAVEN Polztlcal Sc1ence LOUISE C CREER Psychology DEBORAH T CRESCITELLI Psychology MICHAEL CROWE Ar MARTHA F CROWLEY Psychology 1 f Nd' 1' -x.:4fI'1' fc 4 TERESA M CUFF Sociology CHUCK CULLEN Math DAVID E CUNNINGHAM Political Science THOMAS F CUNNINGHAM Sociology ANN M CURLEY Political Science MAUREEN ELAINE CURRAN Sociology RICHARD M CURRAN I' HEATHER M DALEY Sociology BRIAN H DEACY Sociology MARK J DESMOND History MICHAEL F DESMOND English MANUEL DESPRADEL Spanish DEANNA L DEVINGO Psychology LOUIS DEVITO JR. Biology JOEL DEVLIN Political Science JUAN M. DIAZ Art MICHAEL E. DILORETO Psychology ANN MARIE DINARDO Art ANNA MARIA DISCHINO Italian DONNA A. DISCIULLO Sociology NIGEL O. DOBEREINER English WILLIAM P. DOCKI-IAM Sociology ERNEST LUCKY DODSON Psychology VIRGINIA M. DOLAN English JANE DONALDSON English MICHAEL J. DONLAN Political Science NANCY M. DONOVAN English MAUREEN T. DORAN Biology MICHAEL D. DOTY Biology T. KOBINA DOUGHAN Music W nf. l"' 'C' I L 'f f f is F, 5 'GQ 2' f Q Y... GERALDINE A. DOWLING Sociology JAMES DOYLE Philosophy MICHAEL A. DUBAY Math ELIZABETH DUPONT Italian MIRANDE E. DUPUY Art JEAN DUVAL Sociology JAMES E. DWYER Political Science JIM EMERSON Psychology DEMETRIUS EMMANUEL Physics JOAN E. ERRICO Psychology RAFAEL ESPENDEZ Sociology RACHEL FANELLI Psychology DEBBIE FARMER Psychology EDNA M. FEIGNER Anthropology PATRICIA FERRIABOUGH English HJ-.'.."' rx GAIL M. FERULLO Psychology FRANCINE FIGELMAN English ANN D. FINLEY Sociology DAVID L. FINNEGAN Economics SUSAN B. FINNELL Sociology JOHN E. FISHER Biology LEO MICHAEL FITZGERALD Theatre Arts BEATRICE AL FLAMMIA Theatre Arts MARY ELLEN FOLEY Psychology PATRICK L. FOLEY History LAURA FONG Biology IRENE FONTANEZ Sociology GEORGE E. FRANGIADAKIS Economics ANNE PEVERE FRISOLI Psychology PETER A. GANDOLFO Biology X T7 is tr- MARLA J GARCIA Philosophy LORRAINE F GARRITY English DAVID W GEGEO Anthropology AFSANEH S GHALIBAF Economics JAY GILDEA Political Science BENEDETTO GIOVANNONE Economics MARY A GLEASON French CHARLENE A GLORIEUX English TADESSE GOBU Economics WAYNE D. GOMER Economics FRANCIS P. GONDOUIN Chemistry MARIANNE B. GOODWIN Sociology MICHAEL GORDON English JOHN A. GORHAM Biology FRANK X. GORMLEY JR. Psychology GREGORY J. GOUGIAN Computer Science ELIZABETH J. GOULD Psychology EDWARD S. GRAHAM Economics VICTOR J. GRASSO Computer Science ANN GRAVINA History THOMAS F. GREENE English IDA M. GROSSI Psychology JOANNE GRUSZECKI Psychology CHRIS GULICK Economics MAHMOUD S. HALEEM Chemistry PAUL F. HAMEL English ROBERT S. HAMILTON Biology DONNA J. HANDY English HELAINE C. HANNON Psychology LARRY HANSON Political Science STEPHEN P. I-IARRINGTON Biology DEBBIE HARTMAN English PATRICK D. HEGARTY JR Math JEFFREY C. HEMMERDINGER Biology INES HERNANDEZ Sociology JOHN H. HICKS Economics CARLENE HILL History GRACE O. HOOPER Psychology DIANNE A. HOPPE Sociology JANET E. HOSKIN Art MATTHEW J. HOURIHAN Political Science SAMUEL K. HUANG Biology CHRISTINE HURLEY Psych o1ogyfSociology MARIA HURSEY Anthropology JON R. HUTTON Art NANCY M IGNAZI English TOLEDO M ILEANA Spanish JOHN R IVERSON JR Theatre Arts MARVIN E JACKSON Ar RICHARD K JACOBS JR Political Sc1ence CYNTHIA A JANSHEGO Economics CLIFFORD I JOHNSON JR Economics ERIC ANTHONY JOHNSON Ar KEITH B. JOHNSON Biology LAURIE M. JOHNSTON Sociology JEROME R. JOY History PATRICIA JOYCE Sociology PAUL F. JOYCE Biology RICHARD J. JOYCE Sociology THERESE M. JOYCE Sociology ANTONI JURKIEWICZ Biology THEODORA KALFOPOULOS Psychology JACQUELINE R. KALISI-I Sociology GERALDINE K. KASMOUSKI English ELVIS W. KEIZER French ROBERT N. KELLEHER History KATI-IIE KELLIHER Art ELLEN KENDRICKEN Anthropology RICHARD A. KIMBALL Sociology THERESA KIMBERK Philosophy DIANE MARIE KIMBRELL Biology ROBERT E. KING English EDMUND L. KISIEL II Sociology KALLIRROE KOKINIDIS English STEPHANIE LADAS French PATRICK M. LAMPERT Computer Science JACQUELINE LANDY- DENIEFFE Anthropology BETH LANSING Psychology KATHI LAST Psychology LOIS C. LEAHY Spanish ROBERT J. LEE Economics KATHLEEN P. LEON Sociology BUTCH LEONARD History CONSTANCE A. LEONARD English JEREMIAH C. LEONARD Biology DIANA LETT Psychology PAULA LIETCHMAN English FRANK J. LILLY Art SHARON A. LINDSAY Art BARBARA LOMAX Psychology Q hx 1 S w-q W' wg? 'Cf' lx BEATRIZ LONDONO DE TORO Psychology ELLEN T. LOVETT Art!Sociology CAROLYN LOWERY Biology MARY JANE DALY LUCHETTI Anthropology GLORIA LYONS History CYNTHIA MACISAAC English MICHAEL MAHONEY Psychology BILL MAILMAN Biology STEVEN MAKAREWICZ Art ELIZABETH J. MALENFANT Anthropology PATRICIA M. MALLOY Psychology KEVIN F. MALONE Economics EWA M. MAMBER Biology LARRY MANCINI Music PAUL E. MANION Psychology JEAN M. MARCANTONIO Political Science DONNA MARGOLIS Biology MARK A. MARINELLA Economics DONALD MARTIN Sociology LOIS J. MARTIN Sociology BENITO MARTINEZ JR. Sociology DONALD W. MATHESON Art CAROLE A. MATTALIANO Philosophy DERMOT F. MCCARTHY Sociology TIMOTHY J. MCCARTHY Philosophy THOMAS F. MCDONOUGH Economics NICK MCGOWAN Theatre Arts ROBERT MCHUGH History BARBARA E. MCLAUGHLIN English ROBERT G. MCLAUGHLIN Economics -.fe "'llUlllF" xy LYNDA J. MCLEISH Art JOANNE M. MCNAMARA Psychology RUSSELL A. MCWATTERS Economics PAULO R. MEDEIROS Political Science NANCY E. MESSINA English ELLA M. MININCLERI English ALICE P. MITCHELL French BERINDA MOLDEN Biology STEPHEN MONIAK English PETER A. MORALES English JANE E. MORAN Sociology DANIELLA MORENCY French MELODY J. MORGAN Theatre Arts GRANT ERIC MORRIS Biology PAULA R. MORRIS English BRENDA MURPHY Sociology CLAUDIA JANE MURPHY English MARY FAITH MURPHY Sociology SANDRA M. MURPHY Art BARBARA MURRAY Sociology KEVIN MURRAY Political Science MICHELE MUSKA Art J OSEPHINE S. NAPOLITANA Biology DONNA M. NEAL English THOMAS MICHAEL NEARY Sociology BARBARA M. NEWMAN Psychology ROSEMARIE NIKAS Sociology BRUCE M. NOLAN Psychology JOSEPH P. NOLAN Sociology NOREEN NOLAN I' 7 NEILL J. NORCOTT Political Science JOHN C. NUGENT Psychology MARYJANE O'CONNELL Art SEATER-MARGARET O'HARA Spanish MICHAEL R. O'NEIL Economics JEANNE M. O'NEILL Psychology BONIFACE C. ONYEMENE Political Science GLORIA ORTIZ Art MARY JO OSKIN Sociology PALMER L. PAIGE JR. English RICHARD S. PALMER Math MARTA PARDEE-KING History ROBERT PASCIUTO History MARCIA E. PATALANO Art M. FATIMA M. PAULA Theatre Arts LOUIS M. PAVAO Art CLARE A. PEARSON Biology SUSAN V. PERRY Sociology NANCY J. PERUOCO English MARY E. PETERSON Theatre Arts SUSAN PIERCE Psychology CECILIA PITARO Sociology MICHAEL A. PONTE Psychology KENNETH A. POWERS English MARY C. PRESHO Sociology SUSAN PROPHET Economics CATHERINE A. PURDIE Art PETER RABINOVITZ Political Science SUZANNE REED English PEGGY REILLY Biology '1,, 'Y a if o,, 1 - Q.. I5 i .A JULIA A REYNOLDS H1story PARTHENIA RHODES Economzcs KAREN J RILEY Psychology MARIA C ROMBOLA Psychology DARLENE E RONCHETTI French IRENE J ROSENBERG Chemlstry LAURIE J ROSENSTEIN Socxology GRAHAM ROSS Phllosoph y MARY ELLEN RUANE B1o1ogy FELICITA RUIZ Spamsh JULIE A RUSSO Pohtlcal Sc1ence ANGELA G SACCO Psychology CORNEL D. SAMPSON Economics GLADYS SANON French KATHLEEN SANTA MARIA Sociology Q7 "CL""'l' ii'-K W l RICHARD J SANTO French ROSEMARIE SARAF Psychology BARBARA C SAULNIER Soclology DINEEN M SAUNDERS Psychology ANITA SAVIO Economlcs BEVERLY SCHAFFER Psychology STEVE SCHILLACI Psychology CLARE A SCHNEIDER Spamsh MICHAEL SCULLY P011 tIC3l Sclence CONCETTA SERIO Italian CAROL SHEARER Socmlogy FAYE SUSAN SHEINMAN Econom1cs GLENN SHELDON Engllsh BARRY L SHELTUN EHgl1Sh NANCY A SHIBLEY HISKOFY SHIRIN SHIRAZI Biology CAROL A. SILVA Psychology MAURA D. SILVERSTEIN Art VICKI J. SISKA English ANNMARIE SMITH Sociology BRUCE C. SMITH Biology DAVID M. SMITH Biology ELIZABETH P. SMITH Psychology KENNETH L SMITH B1ology MINNIE L SMITH Soclology JAMES V SPEARS Blology ELLEN SPENCER Psychology KAREN SPINALE Soclology K ELAINE SPINOS Blology DONNA L SPONGBERG Engllsh wr 1" ELEANOR E STAGLIOLA Soclology ERIC STANWAY Engllsh ROLAND F STEAD JR Anthropology CALEB P STEWART Ar SYLVIA S STODDART P0llt1C3l SCIQHCB SUSAN T STROJWAS Anthropology DIANE G SUDANOWICZ Economzcs KATHLEEN SUGRUE Psychology DUANE G SULLIVAN Soc1ology KEREIN SULLIVAN Psychology JOSEPH D SWEENEY Blology SONIA M. SWEET Psychology THERESA A. SWEET Psychology MARCIA H. TEICHMAN Art DAVID M. TESTA Psychology CHRISTOPHER JAMES THOMAS Art KATHRYN TOBIN French GODFRED E TONG Economics GLORIA E. TORRES Spanish MAXIMA R. TRACHTMAN Theatre Arts JOHN TREACY Math MAUREEN K. TRIPOLONE Biology LISA M TROY Theatre Arts ANTONIA VASILIADES English MARIA A VEJAR-BORISON Sociology ESTHER M VELEZ ROBERT F VENTURA Chemistry LAUREL C VINCENTIO Anthropology ROBERT T WALLEY Sociology JOHN WALSH English if 'f'-'r MARY R. WATERS Anthropology ROBERT S. WEBBER Economrcs CHERYLE L WEEKES Soc1ology DEBRA J WEGHORST RUSSIHH THOMAS F WELCH Theatre Arts PHYLLIS D WERLIN Anthropology SUSAN L WEST Engllsh NANCY C WILLARD POllt1C8l Sclence NILEITA M WILLIAMS Engllsh KEITH T WILLITS Chemlstry MARYA M WOLFMAN Englrsh DENNIS WOODRUFF Ar ANN L WYSOCKI Spanish WILLIAM YOUNG JR Soclology PHYLLIS Y YU Philosophy h ' Q, ,.. - ,I+ F: - k , r'-U V 2 4:2512 si' I 'F' 5 ff ' ,. . 'a:2eis5r:,I'I2 ,, .. .+ ,,- -. . "-E' . 'zgz - . ig 1 , vHh ,W L A, 3 , 4 Tv 4 1 ' y -, ,T 3 isafvi ww- J ...mm J y tw ,.,. .ff 1 , , it 2 arf ffl? L 3 if A T 752.3 1 U Q m , . 6 , 0 1. 4 .v,,-.,..-4- The College Of Management And Professional M Studies About The College About The Students Opening in 1975, the College of Manage- ment and Professional Studies CCMPSJ has grown to over 1,000 students primarily pursu- ing the Bachelor's Degree in Management. The Management Programs are designed for persons who wish to prepare for manageri- al careers in business, government, or other institutions, offering to each student a back- ground in functional management disciplines and in-depth knowledge in a particular area. They are designed to build confidence and competence for the pursuit of a career in man- agement. The Management Programs incorporate the most modern concepts of managerial training and provide students with a versatile preparation for work in a wide variety of cor- porations and institutions - public and pri- vate. The Management Programs maintain a high degree of realism and relevancy to real world practices through its faculty, curricu- lum, and the structure of its learning exper- ience. CMPS enrolls an academically talented student body that is broadly representative of the population of the Boston area. The stu- dents come from over fifty cities and towns in the greater Boston area, and represent com- munities and families of all income and edu- cational levels. Of the 1251 CMPS students, the average age is 25, with 61.795 under the age of twenty- five, and 38.393 twenty-five and older. 56.896 of the student body is male, and 43.293 are female. 83.195 are single. According to student mailing addresses 31.692 of the students are from the Boston area, 46.9913 from the Inner Suburbs, 20.792 from other areas of Massachusetts, 0.292 are from other New England states, and 0.692 are from outside of the New England area. Dean 7' Houston G Elam -i "mfr- To The Graduatmg Class of 1981 Congratulatlons You made it. As management students preparing for a life of decision- mak1ng lnterpersonal I'9l3t1011Sl'1lpS and d1ff1cult ChO1C8S you have successfully demonstrated your mtelligence determlnatlon and lngenuity We are Very proud of you and pleased for you True It was not always easy Sometimes you declded that you knew all there was to know I suspect that 1n those cases you learned 1n splte of yourself In other cases you were pess1m1st1c about your ab1l1ty and you demonstrated both to yourself as well as to us that you really could do It In the process you also learned that the facultr A P : - 'd dramatlcally to your professlonal development Well agaln you earned the degree and I surely want to congratulate you and w1sh you a good l1fe We at CMPS w1ll remember you Please do keep ln touch and let us know how you are dolng After all your success is our real award Cordlally Houston G. Elam, Dean The Graduates Of The College Of Management Kc Professmnal StUd18S LUCILLE M AARONS Management ANDREA ABDU STOKEY Management STELLA C AGOUCHA Management FRANK A AKINYEMI Management Management JOSEPH ALFIERI Management BRADLEY J ALLEN Management GLADYS D ANDONIAN Busmess KASPAR A ANDONIAN Management STEPHEN D BABCOCK Management JANE S BARNES Busmess ROBERT G BISHOP Management 0 o KENNETH G. ALBAN ma b-'AN f" -....f- GEOFFREY M BOEHM Management SEAN M BOYLE Marketmg MARK J BUCKLEY Marketmg JOHN M BUDRON COH1mUHIC3f1OHS THOMAS D CALLAHAN Management PATRICIA CANNON Accoun tmg JOHN J CARLISLE Management QUI PHU CHAU Management STEVEN P CIMMINO Human Resources WILLIAM S. COHEN Management KAREN M. COLATRELLA Management ROBERT A. COLOMBO JR Management EDWARD F. COMEAU Accounting JANICE D. CONLEY Management SUSAN J. COOK Management ,fab Na' , .3-.Y-,--v qv., ,cn 39" Iii.. ...V - , 4, I 'K Q. Sf W ANN M. COPPINGER Management JULIUS C.J. CORBETT Private Finance DAVID CRAWFORD Management JOSEPH J. CULLEN JR. Management ELAINE C CUMMINGS Health Management RICHARD CURTIN Management PETER F DAMICO Marketmg SUSAN DE GARAVILLA Management ELIZABETH DESIMONE Management WALTER GERALD DIAZ Management MARCO D DICIENZO Human Resources SIMON DICK Management KAREN L DICKINSON Management MARIE W DIGIORGIO Management MICHAEL DONAGHEY Management 7 I 45 o--- 2 V . 5 " ,, ' I A: 2 K V, , ,, . . .W ' ' ' rg. I 1 5. ll pf. 'ian 'A ' . 'STI' " rf' if ff , It ,lp IT' "t '-:VL Q - P' ' 'C' 1 rf ga, AE '::..'., I ,.1', YQL YYQ -.,, ,'-- Q ,'1:'A if .,,, . -I ,ji -A 'N .. 4 :QA . - Q 4. 4 Q. ...N ' fizilgyf' T1 " 8 . , ., jg . I AQ? I Ln, 1 ""'t Qs.,-. 'bmw' 'Q'---J' K.. 1' .amy CYNTHIA DONOHUE Management DIANE DRAGO Human Resources ROSEMARY T DUNN Management KEVIN DURGIN Operat1ons Management EFTHIMIOS EMMANOUILIDIS Management RICHARD W ESANCY Management JOSEPH C ESDRA Management LEE ANN EVANS Management PAUL E FITZGERALD Management PATRICIA C FLAHERTY Managem en t ROBERT FLANAGAN Management DEBRA M. FLATE Management KEVIN M. FOGG Management JOSEPH M. FOLEY Management DENISE A. GANNON Management CAROL HAMEL-WHITE Private Finance MELISSA J. HAMILTON Business Nlanagement MARK R HAROUTUNIAN Management RONALD P HAUGH Human Resources WILLIAM T HAY Marketing VICTORIA A HOLIAN Management D RANDOLPH HOWAT Management KA YIU HUNG Management STEPHANIE TALLEY Management ERIC W JOHANSEN Marketing LINDA J YLKKA CONCANNON Management RAWI GEORGE B KAHIL Economics ROBERT J KAHL Management NEIL E KATZ Management ROY A KNIVETON Management JANEY THOMAS N LAAKSO Management LARRY E LEPPO Management MICHAEL LINNANE Marketlng MARK J LINSKY Management MICHAEL J LUCIA Management BRIAN LYNCH Management ROBERT MACDONALD Human Resources DONALD J MACFARLANE V-H-f Marketmg JENNIFER C MAI-ILSTEDT 4' Management BARBARA J MAIDA Management EUGENE MATTIE Marketmg ROBERT MCALPINE Management EDMEA MCCARTY Management MICHAEL R MCCONNELL Management RONA E. MCCRENSKY Marketmg QM M- tb' Q:-"7 hx er, ls LEONARD J MCDERMOTT Management THOMAS M MCDERMOTT Management MARTIN C1 MCDONOUGH Management BARBARA MCKINLEY Management JOSEPH MCLAUGHLIN Management RICK MESSER Management RICHARD D MINCHILLO Management MICHAEL R MOORE Management JOAN C MORGAN Management MARTIN J MUISE Management PATRICIA MURPHY Management ANNE M MUSTO Management HANS CHRISTIAN NAETER Management NICK NAPOLITANO Management JOHN L NEARY Marketmg C1 in . gg, Q ,L-3, I . .X iw- -r-M-f"-' A 56 1 'TI R 1 9 . l iw, ' " fix 'kr 'wx f 5 ., I , -9 av ,tg 'A , Q.. 4 " ag"-F-sfx I A fm :N S as ,tim X , ' X QV v 1 xx ' . 3 . . Mal J '7 BARBARA A NELSON Management MICHAEL J O CALLAHAN Management MICHAEL O DETTE Management JOSEPH O LEARY Marketmg ROBERT A O MALLEY Fmance JOSEPH P O BRIEN JR Management KATHLEEN S O CONNOR Management MANUEL PAULA Marketmg MARILYNE L PELERINE Management GINA R PERACOHI Accountmg WILLIAM PERNICONI Health AdIHIH1Sf3t10D MICHELE A. PITTS Management ANNE M. POKASKI Private Finance WILLIAM F. REVENE Communications PAUL F. ROSSITER Management KEVIN J . RYAN Management THOMAS RYAN Management DOROTHY O. RYDER Accounting JOHN T SANTA Management MARY A SASSONE Management KAREN M SCHWIEGER Management CATHERINE SETTERLUND Management JUDITH A SHARLAND Management JOHN SHIBLEY Management NONA D SILVERMAN Management Marketmg KAREN R SOLIMINI Management HELENE C SOLOMOM Management MARY ANNE SPINELLO Marketmg LISA SPINOSA Operatmns Management RICHARD L. SNYDER WP' 'Af v...-V X...-f 9-5 CAROLYN J STANTON Management MICHELE A STENSON Management PETER A STERN Management REGINALD L STONE Comm unlcatlons JULIE A SWOFFORD Management FRED N TENAGILA JR Management DIANE P TROMBLY Management LISA TROY Management MURRAY D VETSTEIN Management PATRICIA A VITALE Human Resources STEPHEN J WALSH FIHHHCIHI Management ANTHONY F WHALEN Management WARREN S WHITE Management EDIE M WIEBE Management MARY Y. WONG Operations Management 40 'gif EDWARD F WOODSON JR Management SONA YACOBIAN Management AUGUSTINA YEBOAH Management MAVIS L YOUNG Human Resources JOHN E ZAMAGNI Management .X ig' THOMAS F ZOTTER Marketmg Management QW , ex . . g x I. OX r A l . O .W l NAOMI M. ZOTTOLI O g . O' , t R '. The College Of Public And Comm unity Service About The College About The Students The College of Public and Community Ser- vice, CPCS, is an innovative coliege ofi UMass!Boston, specially designed for urban adults seeking careers in public and commu- nity service. . g At CPCS, it is recognized that learning takes place not only in the classroom, but also at work and in a wide variety of experiences. Therefore, the CPCS student earns a B.A. degree based upon competence, rather than grades or credits. At CPCS, progress is made by demonstrat- ing what you know, what you can do, and what you have learned in areas which are relevant to public and community service. The students of CPCS are as unique as the college. CPCS actively recruits older, more experienced adults who have a clear commitment to Work in pubiic or community service. Out of the 737 CPCS students, 89.696 of the students are twenty-five or older, and 65.695 of the students are thirty years old or older. 26.9921 of the student popula- tion is male, and 73.195 are female. 64.292 are single. The average age of the CPCS student is 36. According to student mailing addresses 45.229 of the students are from the Boston area, 38.092 are from the Inner Suburbs, 16.796 are from other areas of Massachu- setts, and 0.12 are from outside the New England area. Since many of the CPCS students combine education with family responsibilities and full-time employment, they make use of the flexible program which accommo- dates their out-of-school commitments. Dean urray Frank 'O Dear Graduates It IS a terr1f1c pleasure for me on behalf of the faculty staff alumnl and students the ent1re CPCS communlty to greet you and congratulate you on the occaslon of your graduatlon Th1S has been a tough grlnd You have worked very hard You deserve to feel prlde and to sense xmportant accompllshments When CPCS was started e1ght years ago we accepted some respons1b1l1t1es and made some promlses whlch go beyond the typlcal college We promlsed to be connected and related to urban peoples nelghborhoods and problems And we prom1sed to Work at trymg to help some folks solve some of those problems We promlsed to be easy to get to for people who prevlously d1d not have access to h1gher educatlon We prom1sed to dellver a quallty educatlon that was relevant and approprlate for adult learners We promlsed to respect and glory 1n our dlfferences but at the same t1me we promlsed to remember that We are the same 1n more ways than we are dlfferent We contlnue to work at trylng to keep our promlses We ask of you, now that you are leavlng us as a student, but simultaneously Joinmg us as an Alumm, to help us keep those promlses Once again, on behalf of the College We greet you and congratulate you and your famllles We celebrate w1th you a Job well done. . Sincerely, few W4 Murray Frank, Dean College of Public 8 Community Service The Graduates Of The College Of Public Kz Comm unity Service THERESE A ALSTON Human Growth BRYAN ANTHONY Law ELAINE NICOTERA ARANGIO Elementary CHRISTINE E HARPER BAKER Law DIANNE P BARTALAMIA Law SANDRA CHENEY LYNCH Human Serwces ELLA ALBERTA COLEMAN Law ROSETTA L DANTIGNAC MARIAN DARLINGTON HOPE Commumty Plannmg ELIZABETH B DELANEY Human Servlces EVELENA DORMAN Management PHILIP DOW Comm umty Plannmg Human Services CAROLYN T. GRAHAM Human Growth BERNICE S. HARRIS Human Services CHARLES B. HARRIS Communications VERDELL HAYES Law SADIE JONES Human Services HENRIETTA KALNOSKA Human Services CELESTINE B LANEY MGMT Human Services GEORGE F LONGO JR Human Services MARION O MCINTIRE Human Services ROBERT F MCLAUGHLIN Housing EDITH R MONDANO Human Services ANNIE MOORE Human Services MICHAEL MORRILL Youth Work HOLLIE D MOULTRIE Management MARILYN H MUNSEY Human Services I 1 Mb' 'elf ir- Lf' 17" - CONNIE MURPHY Law MARGARET N NICHOLS Human Growth VICTORIA ORTIZ DE SMITH Human Growth THOMAS PENO Management VERNELL GILLIARD PRICE Human Serv1ces JOYCE REICHLIN Human Growth ROSAMUND SAMUELS Human Growth ELIZABETH SHEPPARD Human Servlces BARBARA A SOGOLOFF Human Serv1ces TIMOTHY R SULLIVAN Human Services JEANNE G SWAN Human Growth PEGGY VANVALKENBURGH Management M. CONNIE VILLEGAS Law EDWIN WILLIAMS Human Services The Extended Day Program 2 , . -1' ' 53' ' ' - " . .. ' 1 j xi Hfaf A , f - 'r 5' i . X e J e e ee e e e f e 1 ee ee ee , f va-hi. . X .Q vu f K 4 K 0 ,IJ uiwv 'C ' ef : e e 1 w 1 eeee l ee . efe ee 2 Q. -- e ,Q - , We e T , Q . i" f -efiffFi'.11,Qi.-.1 1 - ' .1 ' 'L' "" ' 1' ." , 4, ,L ' . ,, ,.," -"" 'ff x"",f'-- V . 1' . ,," 5' 2. ' -rf, ,e ,,x. ' Q f x " ' ' ' , Nng. e + Qi?" T e 4 ,e , e eg - . I 5 A,,, if lbnl IVNQ i ii, be n. , 'a I , , Q' 9 31' hu .: . Y , ' wg EH , 4 W- 'WY' 1 1 Q 1. , Q QA A , if Qizx :I in g i its ' 'Y , 15 . . K- w 'll ' x fs' ' I K 'L If 0, J gf' 'Q 5 'sf 5 'Ei 5-, 9 W wt? kve fw .K J. Q 1 'Q ,5 I Q is KR! 5 'xxg 'lurking' ' wx' 31: 53 4 :tw K 1" 5' I aww gy ,x.I1 -k-f , N, 'gs F' , 4 , ff 22 S X Q EY. Q - YH . Tfigwfl' wx s 4, f xt f 1 v ' -4 xagt , L ll I ' ,. 'Up ' f, , x 4 x . .- L wx, - 4 .f,. A . vkxfx , N 'if ' ' ' 'QQ f y w' y Q ,gp ,N if' JV ! ,xy Nh, ..., 'J-ex , -X Xe 6 Q N .lrgm 'SE' 'N X R I 'kv 'E 2. 1' 'N H Nab A x f,. N :S 'S m ' M' x 'G a if 0 S S' .4 ,Eli 45 A 'L N I, : 1 + 1 mx it 0 1 K gt ix ,-1 fr A Q.. . 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The Extended Day Program of the University of Massachusetts at Boston offers a wide variety of in- troductory, intermediate, and ad- vanced courses four nights a week for students who wish to 'studypto-A Wards a degree byltaking late after- noon and evening classes. f . ' Itis possible to obtain a B.Ag de- gree 'through full - or part-time study exclusively in the Extended Day Program, and since Extended "' J' ...- , s A '1' ' in il kflvif .1 P .. I 3 .w '- 5 gs i .-. -ag n I . - , a Day is not a division separate from the University's Colleges, Extended Day students.can register, for other UMass!Boston courses during dayi time hours, or plan a, program of .studyf'co'm,bining daytime and even- ing courses, A A . ' Coursesgin the Extended Day Program are taught largely by the University's 'regular faculty, are ,usually small and informal, and dif- fer ,neither in,fform nor substance , . ff ' I 'ff-ft""'.1' i I from- daytime courses. The Ex-- tended Day schedule makes everyg' effort- to accomodate degree-seeking? students, 'both full and part-time, as: fwell as special students taking onef or two courses without having been: admitted to a degree program. The Extended Day Program also: offers a Lecture Series during even- ing hours that entertains and in-A forms the UMass community. Extended Day began its programs 4 I 'I 4 if fl ur Ili 59 101 we lm M ffl St ii V, ,E .-. -. Q., Wm nof lectures in the fall of 1978 withia sseries entitled "Massachusetts Cul- ttural Heritage". Principle speakers tthat year included former State ESenator William Saltonstall and lformer Governor of the Common- wwealth and United States Ambassa- cdor to Italy John Volpe. Since then, ""Massachusetts Cultural Heritage" eexpanded to include talks by novel- isists George Higgins, Dan Wakefield, aand Robert B. Parker, poetry read- ing by Ruth Whitman, and folk mu- sic concerts by Louis Killen, Mi- chael Cooney, Alistair Anderson, Laduvane, and Battlefield Band. Extended Day also sponsored a pan- el discussion on New England Cookeryg panelists were Margaret and Franco Romagnoli, Robert Na- deau, Sheryl Julian, and Odette Bery. In all, "Massachusetts Cultur- al Heritage" has covered a diverse range of topics from Elma Lewis A -- , -. discussing Afro-American arts to Ken Harrelson talking about -the Red Sox to -John Finnegan speaking on the Boston Irish. ' Many people I at UMassfBoston have helped to make these lectures a success: Marty Col.lines, Al Divver, Lee Grove, George Good- win, .Constance Kelly, Norma Kroll, Margaret Nugent, V Shaun O'Con- nell, Ed Strickland, and Charlie Ti- tus. ' Q IM. hh- , , 'I h ,a,.,,..f,.' .a,.m..,.. EI. 41.41 X t A 1' I AAIBW , ,p-Pg? V' " Wag 1, - .,, r , . It an ll 4,3 hh L, if Photographs by James Scherer, Courtesy of the Publications Department of UMassfBos- ton. 151 UMB YOU noNE YoUR DEED U.M.B., U.M.B. salutory freshmen tlagellated seniors, you done your deed Two plus two years plus kin I 've killed off in threes, for late papers Eres tu. How now, your degree? How now liberal arts, to be plugged into the data-banked World? The sheepskin in hand, no less egg on my face the English ma jor's done: I through I done my deed. Glenn Sheldon AL f ,V ,, A .w H ' M nw "T" DP Q5 ,pn f . 5 'Pl' nl' 'ffx T' C' I' 44" 9 - - .,..- L-P 'Q v if 0 1 -, X . . .K ' N :KW qu 1 .4' Lg-'Ili Fall Sports Varsity Volleyball The UMass!Boston volleyball team started its second season in rocky fashion when it dropped four of its Hrst Eve matches, but the women pulled together in time to take 7 out of 10, ending 1980 with a winning record. Although their final mark was only 8-7, the women played a tough sched- ule which included a few upper divi- sion opponents. UMB Hnished the year with an 8-4 mark in their own division however. The season was highlighted bya to- tal massacre over longterm rival Re- gis, close games with Division II oppo- nents Wellesley and Tufts, and a thi ,x 4' thrilling victory over Endicott. The team had to battle back from behind throughout the Endicott match. The opposition eked out the Hrst game, 15- 12, then UMB knotted it with a 15-6 win in the second. Despite Co-captain Laura Delaneyis spiking heroics, Endicott took the third, 15-10. With their backs to the wall, the UMass players won the fourth, 15-10, and the squads went into the deciding game tied at 4-all. Endicott jumped out to a seemingly insurmountable nine point edge in the last game, but a five point rally by Pauline Ducharme at the service line got UMass back in. UMB finally cre- ated a 15-14 score for the overtime showdown, and came home the victor at 17-15, The 1980 season was also highlight- ed by Laura Delaney's "nuclear serve'2 which exploded on impact, Denise Furnariis incredible accuracy, Pauline Ducharmes scrambles and dives, senior co-captain Carol Sur- rette's inspiration and setting and Yoko Miyata 's famous roundhouse serve and strong net serve. Un Mn mf ,gywwaiw in ,BWNWW -if Varsity Soccer Ever since the first game of the year, when they shocked a respected and es- tablished Eastern Nazarene squad, 1-0 on Paul Kizelewicz'goal, the UMass Bea- cons were the biggest surprise on campus. Never having played a varsity sched- ule or a varsity team before, the Beacons had no idea of how they would fare in their year as NCAA competitors. But they kept winning enough games to Hn- ish the season at 7-5-1-, no small feat for a bunch of "rookies'i Along with a Winning overall mark, the Beacons were undefeated at home, and even more astoundingly, were undefeat- ed K1-12 in upper level play. Among the seasons highlights were a 2-O Whitewash of Merrimack College, and a season end- ing 7-2 trouncing of Emerson. 5 ,, lll-II Instrumental in the victories were captain Noel Cotterell, who amassed Eve shutouts in a season of only 13 games, Gus St. Silva, who led the team with 16 points and 10 goals and Roberto Noquera, who scored a hat trick in the final game of the year. Senior Nelson Azocar spear- headed the UMB defense and freshman Rich O'Conner, other- wise know as "Charlie Hustle 'Z ignited the offense. Peter D'A- mico did an outstanding job as sweeper this year, being cited by Division II opponent New Hampshire College in their a11- opponents team, no small feat, since NHC also played Plym- outh State, who finished the year th? in New England. Although UMB tied NHC 1-1 and beat their other upper divi- sion foe, Merrimack, their best game of the year was against Bridgewater State when they dominated the offense for the whole second half ,W . .154 . 'L , f ua-:fav , - ,X -, 4.,A'xwff- iv, was W al-iw esfi"'m g " ' . iff 0 ,V , 11 5 ' 'lil 2 1 mafia . e . az asa: LP ' X i xr R , ii' n .,. . ,PE J ,Q V E: . A '- . f 3 ' X w'iWn, v. 'li Iii' il a. ,F -' .fl 4 1 .K . ,,. i if 5 ,1 --'4P"W- e. -4 uw' 3 . ' Pmfrfj l v- u.,,M:' nfl". Injuries struck running back Joe Alffere, quarter- back Brian Stapleton, kicker Ken Scott and line- man Tom MCSh,8IIy, but they still hung on to first place in the Eastern Divi5 sion. A surprise challeng! er to the throne came from their own division howev-6 er, when the IHS pushed aside the Oilays, 20112 in the semis. The IHS and the Bay- fzoii were equally anxious to become this yearis Har- bor! Bowl champs, but it was the Bayzok' on the spectacular running of Al- Here, who picked up the post-season glory. F K v in w'1:, . nik-,g vw' , , f J S iw' ..- . 4 A . 1" A Qu 'Q Unrvcmty H Massachl1S9U5 mm - Boston -Whrcester '--fn,-.,,:,,,.f ... ..,,,,-W .L V ' I I ---1.-1.,...,M nag "'--....,., 'Q ,I-,, - 'r-favs! ' A . ,vw , xr li!!! 51. A 1, M....w--PM 'Q 1-1,--asv-H ' a 1 ha Harbor Light 1981 Editor Editor Assistants Sports Editor Photographers Copy Assistant Contributing Writers Contributing Photographers Special Contributors 1981 Yearbook Advisory Committee Design Sz Layout Endsheet Photo by Senior Portraits by General Manager Representative Portraits Secretary Printed by Represen ta tive R e presen ta tive Special Thanks To Very Special Thanks Melody Morgan Ellen Lovett Penny Morgan Keith Lewis Juan Diaz Karen Schwieger Melody Morgan Larry Hanson Thomas Callahan Roseanne Boyle Chris Clifford Steven Moniak James Scherer Susan Scalettar Peter Davoli John Cronin and the Boston Herald American Ellen Lovett Sharon Lindsay Liz O'Brien Kathi Kelliher Glenn Sheldon Nancy Kelly Jack Paster fYearbook Associatesl Henry Taylor QYearbook Associatesl The Mass Media Photo Staff Art Exhibitions on page 45 for the photos on pgs. 92-94. are by Kevin Wallace and United Press International Laura Montgomery Patricia A. Monteith fAdvisorJ Alec Johnson Christopher S. Clifford Duncan Nelson Doreen Goguen Melody Morgan Jack Paster CYearbook Associatesl Yearbook' Associates Ed Ralicki Al Thurston George Rosa Jackie Kurciviez Jostens!American Yearbook Company Robert L. Murphy Mary Howland Kathy Foley Ann O'Mal1ey Carole Cohen Jon Hutton Steven Korbet Carol Jessoe Dee Lawrence Donna Neal To Pat Monteith, Chris Clifford and The Presidents Office The Chancellor's Office The Provost's Office The Vice-Chancellor's Office for Student Affairs The SAC Office The Institute for Planning and Budgeting Office Bob Murphy for their dedication and patience in the production of Harbor Light 1981. for photo CMt. St. Helenj p. 92 5 9 I I I . ,hx w , n ' 1 'N X, 1 -' '. 1 W.. ' ' 4-" :..4':pf'i" 233'-g ,: . "" 'flu N "1'.'1'f,f,"' 5 -xl Q, .bl 1, . ' .cn- M A 1 ,Q ' -- 4 -Q. 1"f"I4 ' - , -'f+'.m2?m.1 . I ll wigg- pit" . 4 " u 'w , ,rv-y , ,, Ffa' 'Yi -' 47" V y?:'4f'-Q? " 5-1 My. . A' -N, '.. ' I 1::.::x2f: '3 " ,yl .., , . 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