University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD)

 - Class of 1964

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 166 of the 1964 volume:

19 6 4 TERRAE MAKIAE MEDICUS UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE Dedication T he relationship of intellectu- ally eminent men to the con- temporary medical student society is a vital element of a rigorous medical education. In some fortunate epochs such as we in the class of 1964 find ourselves at the present time, there appears an individual whose intellectual accomplishments, moral con- stitution, and dynamic personality es- tablish him as an outstanding example of perfection and harmony. Dr. John C. Krantz, Jr., is such a man. His understand- ing approach to our medical education and his analysis of pharmacology in its practical as well as in its experimental applications has crystallized in us the concept of proper theraputic endeavor. But above all we must gratefully acknowledge him for reviving and bringing to light in us that vague and yet paramount entity, a state of mind, which determines a good physician. 5 In Memoriam John Fitzgerald Kennedy 1917-1963 He was a man of profound dignity and earnest, whose brilliance will illuminate our social and political philosophy for generations to come. No one of us in the class of 1964, who lived through the tragic events of November 22, 1963, when John Fitzgerald Kennedy, our beloved President of the United States died from an assassin’s bullet, will forget this grotesque and unbelievable injustice. The Honorable J. Millard Tawes Governor of the State of Maryland 8 William S. Stone, M.S., M.D., D. Sc. Director, Medical Education and Research Dean Dietrich C. Smith, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Associate Dean, Admissions and Student Affairs Registrar 9 frn -- M The new Mercy Hospital D avidge Hall University of Maryland Hospital Men’s Dormitory ... at night John Eager Howard Hall . . . basic sciences building 13 The Baltimore Student Union The Baltimore City Hospitals 14 Freshman Class Elizabeth Ann Abel Joseph Ackman Stephen Morris Adalman George Kenneth Adams Joel Barry Alperstein Enrique F. Aveleyra William John Banfield Michael W. Benenson John Albert Bigbee Sandra Lee Blondin William Frank Bloom Barry Alan Blum Guillermo Juan Gonzalez Bobonis William Leon Boddie Mary Susan Bollinger Donald Stanleigh Bright Barrett Lewis Burka John Chalmers Butchart Colvin Cecil Carter Edward Ralph Cohen Omar D Crothers III Hans J. Crump-Wiesner Charles Ernest DeFelice Francis Dalton Drake Harold Atkinson Dunsford 16 Frances Mary Dyro Perry Alan Eagle Gordon Homer Earles Thomas Howard Emory Harris Joseph Feldman Larry Brian Feldman Ira Lincoln Fetterhoff Henry Feuer Eric Michael Fine Robert Orville France Martin Irwin Freed Edwin Cockey Fulton John illiam Gareis Joseph Samuel Gimbel .Mien Stanley Glushakow Joel Henry Goffman David Malcolm Hadden James Lawrence Hamby Robert illiam Hertzog Frederick H. Hobelman Arthur Michael Hoffman Stephen LeRoy Hooper Arthur Lee Hughes John Stephen Ignatowski Beverly Estelle Jackson 17 Jean Marlene Jackson Philip Dickson Jones Charles Edward Jordan Michael Aron Kaliner Elizabeth Earle Kandel Stanley Allan Kaplan Eugene Francis Kester James Gerard Konrad Elihu Mark Kraemer Frank Albert Kulik George Anthony Lapes Gary Marc Lattin Michael Morgan Lee Stuart Harvey Lessans Jack Ruben Lichtenstein Gary Scott Litle Robert James McCaffrey John Milton Mclntrye Richard Henry Mack Sheldon Leonard Markowitz Phillip Edward Middleton I_,ouis Winaker Miller Alan Harvey Mitnick Bert Frederick Morton Boyd Douglas Myers 18 Fred Ritchie Nelson Janet Hull Norman Thomas Hyatt Norwood Donald Edward Novicki Thomas Joseph O’Donnell Lawrence Stuart Oliver Edward Benjamin Ostroff Arnold Zorel Paritzky Howard Leon Pelovitz Bruce William Pfeffer Gerald Michael Pohost Carol Jean Posner Allan Sanford Pristoop Merrill C Raikes III Ralph Daniel Reymond John Francis Rogers Howard Roy Rosen John Albert Routenberg John Russell Rowell, Jr. Marvin Coleman Sachs Lucy Pearl Samler Jeffrey Allan Samuels Peter Frank Sansone Lee Howard Schilling Larry Dean Schmardebeck 19 Myron Lee Seligman John Calvert Sewell Michael Louis Sherman Howard Paul Sherr Harold Frederick Shuster Zellman David Skloven John James Smith III David Michael Snyder Robert Alan Sofferman Joseph Ira Stapen John Robert Stephens Kenneth Bernard Stern Steven Rogers Strawn Michael David Sussman Stuart Ronald Tattar Lawrence M. Tierney Frank John Zorick Donald Bruce Vogel Stephen Clark Wardlaw Larry Joseph Warner Charles Edward Wendt Alan Michael Wexler Gary N. Wilner Alan Frederick Wolf Ronald William Yakaitis 20 Anatomy Vernon E. Krahl, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.; Profes- sor of Anatomy. Karl Frederich Mech, B.S., M.D.; As- Charles G. Crispens, Jr., B.S., M.S., Theodore F. Leveque, B.A., M.S., Ph.D.; sociate Professor. Ph.D.; Assistant Professor. Associate Professor. 21 Fundamental to the understanding of the multitudinous complexities of the human body, he they physiologic or pathologic, is the necessity for the acquisi- tion of basic relationships in order that they may he applied to dynamic situations by the 1 clinician. To the anatomist, this is a subject of boundless intricacies, a complex ol organ systems and their interconnec- tions with one another, comprising that wondrous composite which we call man. To the freshman medical student, it is an illogical maze of various tissues, wherein the oidy correlation between that viewed in the laboratory and that depicted in the textbooks is a slight resemblance of color. But to the clinician, anatomy represents a set of useful concepts which are immedi- ately recalled to mind whether he be ex- amining the fractured arm of a screaming child, testing the visual fields of a youth with a bitemporal hemianopsia, or at- tempting to determine the site of a foreign shadow on a chest film. Indeed the knowl- edge acquired from the tedious hours spent in the dissection laboratories and at the microscopes were the humble products of conception which would, at the end of a four years’ term, be delivered as a newly graduated class of clinicians. 22 “Yes, my little bonehead you’re lovely.” — G. Heyer, Envious Casca. “Abandon hope, all ye who enter here.” — Dante, Inferno “Some folks look up and others look down.” Scottish Proverbs “Do you think to pull the bag over my head so easily?” — Max- well Anderson, Elizabeth the Queen. “Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.” — Shakespeare, Hamlet. Biochemistry Arthur -J. Emery, Jr., B.S., Ph.D.; Associate Professor. The emergence of scientific inquiry as a pervasive social force in our time has re- kindled serious interest in the broader and more humanistic values of Biochemistry. Awareness is growing that Biochemistry and Biochemical thinking are no longer the exclusive domain of professional scientists. Discoveries and experiments, which a generation or two ago were con- fined to the laboratory, have become press- ing issues of medical and social signifi- cance, and responsible decisions by the physician have become increasingly de- pendent upon the understanding of this science. If our biochemical education is to convey this sense of relevance to man’s problems, it must not confine itself to just the results of scientific inquiry, but must devote itself as well to the applica- tion of its discoveries and scientific think- ing to the total well-being of the patient. Here at the University of Maryland we have received the benefit of both of these phases in our education. We have studied the value of experimentation and scientific methodology, while at the same time we have learned the techniques of applying our findings to patient care. Elijah Adams, M.D.; Professor of Biochemistry and Head of the Department. Ann Virginia Brown, A.B., Instructor 25 “Dip your fingers in the hot gravy and let your moist tongue lick them as it darts in and out.” — Ephemeris. “Now go write it before them in a table and note it in a book.” — Isaiah. “Many a drop of good broth is made in an old pot.” — C. H. Spurgeon 27 Physiology William Dewey Blake, A.B., M.D.: Professor of Physiology and Head of the Department It is of paramount importance that we realize that the ostensible point of dif- ference which distinguishes the modern world of medicine from that practiced in the earlier centuries is the rise of physi- ology as a pervasive dominant force in our thinking. We are today enraptured by this science to such an extent that it is prac- tically unthinkable to approach the sick patient without a clear comprehension of the basic normal and pathological physi- ology. Without this primary foundation we are destined to remain merely confused with isolated facts unbound by a unifying theory. In the light of the clincial years, Starling’s Law of the heart, Bernouille’s equation for laminar flow, LaPlace’s ten- sion and pressure relationships, and myriads of other physiologic laws and con- cepts began to assume a more prominent part of our thinking. It became apparent to us that it was necessary not only to as- similate these concepts, but to apply them to the pertinent clinical situation. 28 “ ‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;” — Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking Glass. “I may not know anything about my own machinery, but I know how to stick a ramrod into the other fellow’s.” — George Bernard Shaw, Heartbreak House. 29 “I first gave it a dose of eastor-oil, and then I christened it.” — Sydney Smith. Lady Holland ' s Memoir. “Her gentle limbs did she undress, And lay down in her loveliness.” — Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Ancient Mariner. Sophomore Class Leslie Abramowitz James Edward Arnold Richard Henry Bard Robert Bruce Baron Jay Martin Barrash Arnold Saul Blaustein William Robert Bosley Walter M. Braunohler Sheldon Irving Brotman Philip Panos Brous Mark Jeffrey Brown Wilfred J. Brownlow, Jr. Michael P. Buchness Harold Arthur Burnham Herman Lee Carter, Jr. James Walker Carty, Jr. Dana Harry Clarke Charles Henry Classen Arthur Cohen Ora Richard Cohen Hammond Chas Collins David Michael Cook Francis H. Cost, Jr. Robert Platt Costleigh Henry Spera Crist 31 Jane Frances Cushing Albert Lee Daw Gerard D. Dobrzycki Philip Bryan Dvoskin Michael Anthony Ellis Pudge Nelson Ellwood William David Ertag Stuart Lee Fine Richard Leroy Flax Gary Allan Fleming Dwight Norbert Fortier Joseph Martin France George E. Gallahorn Bruce Wayne Gattis Saul Bruce Gerber Richard Salvatore Glass Marshall C. Goldberg Donald E. Golladay Augustin Karl Gombart Dennis Harvey Gordon Stephen Frank Gordon Jose R. Culpeper Gracia John Gary Green Louis E. Grenzer Dean Harp Griffin 32 Stephen Barry Hameroff Michael Joe Haney Irvin Rivers Hanson William O. Harrison James Marbury Hawkins Thomas Michael Hill Elizabeth Claire Hosick John Joseph Houston Larry Travis Ingle George Medard Hrieko Franklin Leroy Johnson Harry Louden Kiracofe Raymond Edgar Knowles, Jr. Ronald Howard Koenig Diane Lenore Kornblau Kenneth Ralph Koskinen Joel Arnold Krakow Lloyd Irvin Kramer Robert E. Leibowitz Elmer Charles Long, Jr. Stephen Machiz John Hatch Mann Joseph Baer Marcus William James Marek William Terry Mason 33 Carl Anthony Mattsson David Stanley McHold Albert Truman Miller Allan Jerome Monfried Stanley Irving Music John Jay Oldroyd Barry Edwin Lee Ominsky Carl Joseph Orfuss Carolyn Joan Pass Gary David Plotnick Samuel Eanet Press Charles Downey Price James Artnur Quinlan, Jr. Dudley Raine Nina Cole Rawlings Richard Henry Reed Rivera Ernesto Rivera Hans Jeurgen Schwarz R. A. Padro Segarra Alfred Anthony Seritella Richard David Shuger Donald Joel Siple Kurt Porter Sligar Irvin Mu rray Sopher James Wilson Spence 34 John Edward Steers David Jerome Steinbauer Jack Irwin Stern Jeffrey Stephen Stier Robert Alfonse Stramski Richard Malcolm Susel Beresford Mark Swan Henry Leonard Trattler Stephan John Wittmann Robert Runyan Young Stuart Howard Yuspa Andrew Anthony Zalewski James Gregory Zimmerly Sandra Lee Zucker 35 Microbiology In so far as natural law succeeds in being impersonal, it necessarily achieves this end at the odious price of destroying the individual unity of man. This is the in- herent and consequently inescapable dilemma of all human existence. It has been only within the past hundred years that man has been able to apply his sci- entific ingenuity in a consistent and uni- form manner in order to preserve his mental and physical integrity from the devastating ravages of infectious diseases. It is an irrefutable testimony to the physicians of the the past and present that we have acquired the voluminous knowledge of microbiological problems. We, as future physicians, have become part of a tradition and have acquired a heritage and an obligation from our predecessors in attempting, scientifically, to eradicate the primordia of communi- cable disease. We have willingly ac- cepted the problems of the past to be our problems, and in the tradition of the great physicians of the past and present we have devoted our future to furthering man’s struggle in the conquest and elucidation of infectious disease. Charles Louis Wisseman, Jr., B.A., M.S., M.D.; Professor of Microbiology and Head of the Department. Andrew George Smith, B.S., M.S., William Fredric Myers, B.A., M.A., Edward Charles Rosenzweig, A.B., Ph.D.; Associate Professor Ph.D.; Assistant Professor M.S., Ph.D.; Assistant Professor 36 “Yea, slimy things do crawl with legs.” — Samuel Taylor Cole- ridge, Rime of the Ancient Mariner. 37 “They lard their lean books with the fat of other’s work.” — Robert Burton, Anatomy of Melancholy. “The fairest spot to me, On land or on the sea. Is the charming little cupboard where the jam-pots grow.” — Laura Elizabeth Richards, Master Jack’s Song. “Lets talk of graves, of worms, of epitaphs.” — Shakes- peare, Richard 11 Pathology It is indeed fitting that our course in Pathology be the culmination of the studies of the pre-clinical years, for this subject represents the harmonious fusion of all those basic sciences which have preceded it. Only- in pursuing the study of pathologic phenomena, is it possible to begin to conceive of the ordered complex intricacies of an aberrancy in the functionings of a system. For, in order to assess the genesis and pro- gress of an abnormal state, it is first mandatory that the clinician be able to conceive of the anatomical architecture of the altered organism. He must then determine the character and degree of departure from the physiologic norm, and often be capable of offering an explanation for these disturbances in the light of recent pathologic deviations. Harlan I. Firminger, A.B., M.D.: Professor of Pathology ' and Head tf the Department Robert B. Schultz, A.B., M.D., Ph.D.; Associate Professor John A. Vagner, B.S., M.D.; Professor of Neuropathology and Head, Division of Neuropathology Russell S. Fisher: B.S., M.D.; Professor of Forensic Pathology ' and Head, Divis- ion of Forensic Pathology Howard Dorfman, B.A., M.D.; Instructor Walter B. King, A.B., M.D.: Assistant Professor of Forensic Pathology Henry C. Freimuth, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.: Mitchell Rosenholtz, M.D.: Assistant Associate Professor of Forensic Path- Professor ology 39 “My mangled youth lies dead beneath the heap.” — Francis Thompson, The Hounds of Heaven. “We can not know how much we learn From those who never will return, Until a flash of unforseen Remembrance falls on what has been.” — E. A. Robinson, Flammonde. 40 “The very hair on my head stands up for dread.” — Sophocles, Oedipus Coloneus. “Who knows but life be that which men call death, and death what men call life.” — Euripides, Phrixus. “Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are.” Anthelme Brillot-Savarin, Physiologie du Gout. 41 “Care to our coffin adds a nail, no doubt, and every grin so “I counted two-and-twenty stenches, all well defined, and merry draws one out. several stinks.” — Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Cologne. —Peter Pindar, Expostulatory Odes. 42 Otto C. Brantigan, B.S., M.D.: Professor of Clinical Anatomy Clinical Anatomy The conceptualization and assimilation of the theoretical and abstract into a solid practical idea forms the educational philosophy for the art of medi- cine. This situation reaches its ideal form when an accomplished practicing physician masters the theory behind his success and has the ability to transmit the concept and knowledge to the student. Such a unique arrangement exists in the teaching of Clinical Anatomy at Maryland. Each department member is accom- plished in his respective field of medicine. Each views anatomy from the elincial perspective. Each has the ability of transforming the lifelessness of preserved muscle groups, vascular formations and nervous structures into vital, dynamic, applicable clinical entities. Ideally this is the aim of all medical education. William allace alker. B.S.. M.D.: As- sociate Professor Robert E. Martin. M.D.; Instructor Ross Z. Pierpont. B.S.. M.D.; Associate Harry C. Bowie. B.S.. M.D.: Associate 43 i “It ain’t no skin off my neck.” — A. R. Hillard “This was the most unkindest cut of all.” — Shakespeare, Julius “After the meat comes the mustard.” — Cervantes, Don Quixote. Caesar. 44 Phar macolo gy When therapy was bound to bias and unwaranted speculation, pharmacologic experimentation did much to transform its primitive nature. In the welter of conflicting information one of the few unifying forces became scientific truth- fulness. This was the process of basing one’s beliefs upon observations and in- ferences as impersonal, and as much divested of local and temperamental bias, as was possible for human beings. To have insisted upon the introduction of this virtue into therapeutics and to have invented a powerful method by which it could be rendered fruitful were the chief results of Pharmacology. Through out close association with the pharmacology department we have gained a new insight into therapeutics. A drug did not merely represent a stagnant chemical compound, but it became a dynamic complex of vast experimental evidence, and we as future physicians learned the elaborate and exhaustive procedures of aquiring and judging pharmacologic evidence. John Christian Krantz, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D.; Professor of Pharmacology and Head of the Department Raymond Merritt Burgison, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.; Associate Professor John Joseph O’Neill, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.; Associate Professor Helmut Freimund Cascorbi, M.D., Ph.D.; Research Assistant Pro- fessor Edward Byrd Truitt, Jr., B.S., Ph.D., Professor Ruth Musser, B.A., M.S.; Assistant Professor 45 . “He was a little bright creature, with a rather large head.” — Charles Dickens. “The woods are full of them.” — Alexander Wilson, American Ornithology. 46 “I smell a rat.” — Ben Jonson, Tale of a Tub. “When doctors differ, the patient dies.” — Confucius. 47 Clinical Pathology As we envisage a rationale for the study of the ill, we must conclude the pos- sibility of a systematic and integrated study ofAPathology and clinical medicine. Thus with the advancement of our intel- lectual approach to the analysis and treat- ment of the sick, we come to rely upon the three pillars which uphold our foundation in medicine — the patient’s history, the physical examination, and the laboratory data. All of these are indispensible to the formation of a stable physician. Each value must be viewed in the whole context of the pathophysiology of the patient. Each figure must be carefully weighed and rechecked, and a satisfactory explanation must be derived for that figure’s existence. We have not only learned the method- ology of acquiring laboratory values, but we have also gained an intellectual approach for the integration of these laboratory data into an explainable hy- pothesis for an abnormal physiologic state. Moreover, we have received some insight in the testing of our hypotheses and the titration of our observations against our therapeutic endeavor. But perhaps the most vital lesson that we have learned from this course is that a great volume of patients continuously violate the Marie Amelia Andersch, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.; Associate Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine Milton S. Sacks, B.S., M.D.; Professor of Clinical Medicine and Head, Division of Clinical Pathology dogmatic standards of our medical in- experience, and it is only when we remem- ber to utilize our three cornerstones of knowledge in a systematic way, we may, no matter how improbable the situation, come to a successful conclusion. Ruben Jiji, M.D.; Assistant Pro- fessor 48 “Self sacrifice enables us to sacrifice other people without blushing.” — George Bernard Shaw “Beware the Jabberwock, my son!” — Lewis Carroll ‘Thereby hangs a tale.” — Shakespeare, Othello “Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! Spout, rain!” — Shakespeare. King Lear. 50 Junior Class 52 Jeffry D. Aaronson Zalman S. Agus Verner Albertsen John H. Axley, Jr. Brian J. Baldwin Donald G. Benfield Stanley L. Blum Bruce A. Brian Charles S. Brown Harry J. Brown Jeffrey L. Brown Wm. Gregory Bruce William H. Choate Larry Chong Thomas C. Cimonetti Brenda Cley Chester C. Collins, Jr. Michael N. Coplin Arthur R. Dick Patrick F. Dougherty, Jr. Jean B. DuBuy John C. Dumler, Jr. Gary L. Ehrlich George E. Engelke Paul H. Fesche Louis L. Fine Stanley Friedler Allen A. Frey David J. Gillis Ronald Goldner Stan Goldsmith William M. Gould Timothy K. Gray Boyd J. Hale Robert L. Handwerger Charles S. Harrison Frederick S. Herold Stephen M. Highstein Terren M. Himelfarb John C. Hisley Edward S. Hoffman Robert R. Holthaus Susan L. Howard Barbara L. Johnson Calvin E. Jones, Jr. Allen H. Judman Paul A. Kandler Galen H. Kistler Wilhelm C. Koethe Earl K. Landau Susan T. Legat William E Legat Allan S. Land Sanford L. Levin Frank R. Lewis, Jr. Jay S. Margolis John W. Maun John G. Mueller Louis O. Olsen Janne R. Olson Michael E . Pelczar George Peters Jeffrey E. Poiley Michael J. Reilly Donald C. Roane E. Ann Robinson Alfred B. Rosenstein Henry A. Saiontz Sigmund L. Sattenspiel Allan E. Schoen Martin S. Schwartz Hannah J. Segal Earl S. Shope Wm Edson Signor G. Clarence Sjolund, Jr. Larry A. Snyder M. Peter Stasiowski John M. Steffy Harry C. Stein Louis E. Steinberg Fred N. Sugar Hollis R. Sunderland Harry D. Tabor Elliot S. Tokar Phillip P. Toskes Richard W. Virgilio Joseph S. Weinstock Philip J. Whelan Robert N. Whitlock Victoria P. Whitelock Wm. Carey Winnner Thomas W. Wingfield Medicine Theodore E. Woodward, B.S., M.D., D,Sc.; Professor of Medi- cine and Head of the Department Richard B. Hornick, A.B., T. Nelson Carey, M.D.; M.D.; Assistant Professor Professor Vernon Smith, M.D.; Chief of Medicine, Mercy Hospital Milton S. Sacks, B.S., M.D.; Professor of Clinical Medi- cine and Head, Division of Clinical Pathology Albert Antlitz, M.D.; As- Harry M. Robinson, Jr., sistant Professor, and Head, B.S., M.D.; Professor of Division of Cardiology at Dermatology and Head, The Mercy Hospital Division of Dermatology Edward F. Cotter, M.D.; Samuel T. R. Revell, Jr., Associate Professor; As- B.S., M.D.; Professor; Head, sociate in Neurology; Chief Division of Hypertension of Medical Education at The Maryland General Hospital George Entwisle, B.S., Mark B. Hollander, A.B., M.D.; Assistant Professor M.D.; Assistant Professor in Dermatology. 53 Louis A. M. Krause, M.D.; Professor Raymond C. Vail Robin- son, B.S., M.D., M.S.; Associate Professor of Dermatology and As- sistant Chief of Dermatol- ogy Clinic I f 54 Francis Joseph Borges, James R. Karns, B.S., Kyle Y. Swisher, Jr., B.S.. M.D.; Assistant M.D.; Associate Pro- M.D.; Assistant Pro- Professor; Assistant Head fessor; Head, Student fessor of Hypertensive Clinic Health Service Irving Freeman, B.S., M.D.; Associate Pro- fessor Ephraim Theodore Lis- ansky, B.A., M.D.; As- sociate Professor Thomas B. Connor, A.B., Fred R. Me Crumb, Jr. Yu-Chen Lee, B.S., M.D.; M.D.; Associate Profes- M.D.; Associate Profes- Instructor sor; Head, Division of sor; Head, Division Endocrinology and Me- of Infectious Diseases tabolism William S. Spicer, Leonard Scherlis, A.B., William Carl Ebeling, Jr., M.D.; Associate M.D.; Associate Profes- III, B.S., M.D.; As- Professor and Head, sor and Head, Division of sistant Professor Division of Pulmonary of Cardiology Diseases Patrick B. Storey, M.D.; Associate Professor Robert S. Mosser, B.S., M.D.; Assistant Pro- fessor The conception of life and its har- monious existence within the framework of nature as well as the infinite deviations from this omnipresent order is the raison d’etre of Medicine. Medicine, therefore, occupies an intermediate position, as a fundamental entity, between theology, philosophy and science. Like theology, it contains speculations on matters as to which definite knowledge has so far been unascertainable; like philosophy, it ap- peals to human reason rather than to authority, whether that of tradition or speculation; and, like science, it attempts to reduce the various complexities of the organism, physical and emotional, to simple universal principles. It is for this purpose that we have been taught. It is to this goal that we have be- come dedicated. At the University Hos- pital we have learned to regard Medicine within the sphere of the totality of human existence — not devoid of or usurped from personality, not based on remarkable observations on isolated facts, but rather as both cause and effect of various natural phenomena in which different systems flourish or perish. “You come back, wavering shapes, out of the past ... In which you first appeared to clouded eyes.” — Goethe, Faust. “Come up into the hills, O my young love.” — Thomas Wolfe 56 “Out of one darkness . . . These travellers have come, to be taken into an- other.”— Thomas Wolfe A vine bears three grapes, the first of pleasure, the second of runkenness, and the third of repentance.” — Anacharsis “We must discern the skin from the shirt.” — Samson Lennard Robert William Buxton, A.B., M.S., M.D.; Professor of Surgery and Head of the Department The concatenation of the world of intellect to the world of the senses is made possible in the field of Surgery. The intel- lect, as composed of the factors of reason- ing and understanding, and the five senses are condensed in the surgeon in such a manner as to enable him to perceive a pathological phenomenon and to ma- nipulate the internal environment of the individual patient to a successful con- clusion. In this dynamic field sound judgment, dexterity, and extensive knowl- edge go hand in hand. It is a field where the determined hand of the surgeon, and the diagnostic art of medicine fuse in the formation of a complete physician. To us Surgery was a field full of sur- prises— some happy, and some sad. It was here where the word “hope” meant more than just a comment, and a green shirt was not merely a uniform. It was here where we as junior students proudly James Givens Arnold, Jr., John David Young, Jr., B.A., M.D.; Professor of B.A., M.D.; Professor of Neurological Surgery and Urology and Head, Divi- Head. sion of Urology Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., Arlie R. Mansberger, Jr., M.D.; Professor of Or- M.D.; Associate Professor thopedic Surgery and of Surgery Head, Division of Or- thopedic Surgery placed the first matress suture, and it was also in surgery that we were initially exposed to the “pit.” Although confused by the volume of work at the beginning, the students began to realize with time that they had passed the test of respon- sibility which had crystallized in them a concept of self-confidence. ) l $ C. Thomas Flotte, B.S., M.D.; Assistant Professor Edwin Harvey Stewart, Jr., M.D.; Associate Ross Z. Pierpont, B.S., M.D.; Assistant Eugene Joseph Linberg, A.B., M.D.; Associate Professor of Thoracic Surgery James J. Gerlach, A.B., M.D.; As- sistant in Otolaryngology Earl Potter Galleher, A.B., M.D.; Instructor in Urology George Herbert Greenstein, A.B., M.D.; Assistant in Orthopedic Sur- gery William Dawson Lynn, B.A., M.D.; Instructor C. Parke Scarborough, B.S., M.D.; Clinical Associate Professor of Plastic Surgery Daniel James Pessagno, B.A., M.D.; Professor of Clinical Surgery Harry Clay Bowie, B.S., M.D.; As- sistant Professor of Surgery Thurston R. Adams, M.D.; Assist- ant Professor of Surgery Robert M. N. Crosby, M.D.; As- sociate in Neurological Surgery Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Pro- fessor of Surgery “Keep a good table and look after the ladies.” — Napoleon I ‘When you get back home your own mother won’t recognize you.” —Aristophanes 61 I i 62 “Give me a slice of good English sirloin; cut and come again. — Garrick, The Irish Widow. “So prime, so swell, so nutty, and so knowing.” — Lord Bryon ‘All the king’s horses and all ' the king’s men couldn’t put Hump- tey together again — Mother Goose. ‘As blind as a bat at noon.” — John Clarke He’s such a quack, I’ll bet he’s web footed. —A. M. Stein “You touch the right string of my inclination.” — Sir Richard Baker, Letters to Balsac. Pediatrics It is manifest that the ordeal of death which is so tragic a catastrophe for each individual living creature is never so near to the organism as at the moment of birth. Nature’s endowment of her new creation with the gifts of multiplicity and com- plexity must be guaranteed by the com- petent pediatrician. We have only to re- mind ourselves of the drastic upheaval in the neonatal physiology to realize the magnificent and yet sometimes devastating experience of Pediatrics. Indeed tire pediatrician has the responsibility for the welfare of an organism through the entire spectrum of its formative years; from the initial neonatal examination to the post- puberty problems, from the assessment of a proper diet to the the diagnosis of metabolic disease, from the evaluation of the psychic interplay between parents and children to the analysis of proper growth and development; the pediatrician scans tire entire field of medicine with a deliber- ate mind and a confident hand. Kurt Glaser, M.D., M.Sc.; Associate Pro- fessor Murray Kappelman, B.S., M.D.; Assistant V. Ray Hepner, B.S., M.D.; Professor Professor J. Edmund Bradley, B.S., M.D.; Professor of Pediatrics and Head of the Department 65 Stuart H. Walker, A.B., M.D.; Assistant Pro- fessor Ruth W. Baldwin, B.S., M.D.; Assistant Professor of Pediatrics Martin K. Gorten, B.A., M.D.; Assistant Pro- fessor Samuel P. Bessman, M.D.; Research Pro- fessor of Pediatrics 66 “Thus in the beginning the world was so made that signs come before certain events.” — Marcus Tullius Cicero “Tell that to the Marines . . . the sailors won’t believe it.” — Sir Walter Scott, Redgauntlet. 67 “I have gout, and asthma, and seven other maladies, but am otherwise very well.” — Sydney Smith, Lady Holland’s Memoir. “So ends the bloody business of the day.” — Homer, The Odyssey. “Let’s choose executors and talk of wills.” — Shakespeare, King Richard II. “We will now discuss in a little more detail the struggle for existence.” — Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species. “It is not a fish, it is a man.” — Martial, Epigrams. “I’ll speak in a monstrous little voice.” Shakespeare, A Mid- summer Night’s Dream. 70 Obstetrics and Gynecology The regularity and uniformity of the Obstetrical phenomenon and the irregular- ity and diversity of Gynecological situa- tions have presented to the future physi- cian a dramatic contrast existing within one specialty. Perhaps no experience shared by us, the students, in our medical curriculum has been as impressionable and as gratifying as the first delivery of a new life into the world or the diagnosis of fetal motility in a gravid female. On the other hand the experience acquired from the gynecological pathology has given the student a systematized approach to the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Arthur L. Haskins, B.A., M.D.; Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Head of the Department. D. Frank Kaltreider, B.A., M.D.; Edmund B. Middleton, M.D.; Professor of Obstetrics and Gyn- Assistant Professor, ecology; Chief of the Depart- ment at Baltimore City Hospitals. John C. Dumler, Sr., B.S., Richard Savage Munford, M.D.; Assistant Clinical Pro- B.A., M.D.; Assistant Pro- fessor. essor. Erica F. Moszkowski, B.S., Umberto Villa Santa, M.D.; M.D.; Instructor. Assistant Professor. George A. Maxwell, B.A., Isadore A. Siegal, A.B., M.D.; Instructor. M.D.; Clinical Professor. 71 “I am listening for the voices Which I heard in days of old.” -Lady Maxwell, The Lonely Harp. 72 “Well, General, we have not had many dead cavalrymen lving about latelv.”— Joseph Hooker, C.S.A. “Come in the evening, or come in the morning, Come when you’re looked for, or come without warning.” — Thomas Osborne Davis, The Welcome. 73 “Let down the curtain, the farce is done.” — Francois Rabelais “She’s no chicken; she’s on the wrong side of thirty, if she be a day.” —Jonathan Swift, Polite Conversation. “Will all great Xeptune’s ocean wash this blood clean from my hand?” — Shakespeare, Macbeth. “But see, his face is full of blood. His eyeballs further out than when he lived, Staring full ghastly like a strangled man.” — Shakespeare, Henry VI. 75 John Murray Dennis, B.S., M.D.; Professor of Radiology and Head.of the Department. James A. Lyon, Jr., A.B., M.D.; Assistant Professor. Radiology In the pursuit of our inquiry into the dynamics of disease we must give testi- mony to the vitality of Radiology as an in- dispensable adjunct to diagnosis and therapy. With impersonal objectivity we attempt to interpret a point in time of a dynamic pathophysiological situation and test this hypothesis against our prej- udiced impressions which were based on the patient’s history and physical examina- tion. It is with such investigations that we may acknowledge with unmistakable re- flectivity the effectiveness of our intel- lectual and systematized approach to the ill. With the evolution of the sophistica- tion in radiology all phases of medicine have profited immeasurably. Who would have thought, fifty years ago, that the or- gans of the body hidden behind an im- permeable screen could be visualized, that coronary flow could be seen in an active live patient, or that the minute lymphatic circulation could be visualized and studied. At Maryland we have acquired the heritage to this sophisticated tradition and have learned to apply it within the universal context of the totality of disease. Fernando Germano Bloedorn, M.D.; Pro- fessor of Radiology and Head, Division of Radiation Therapy. 76 “We also try poisons and other medicines upon. them. ’’ — Francis Bacon “I love fool’s experiments. I am always making them.” — Charles Darwin “Where the light is brightest — the shadows are darkest.” — Goethe HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BALTIMORE Preventive Medicine Our faith in Preventive Medicine is an absolute on which our destiny hangs. If we have this faith, it will give us an inward freedom which is veritably Life itself; if we do not have it, our beliefs and practice of medicine will condemn us to an inward enslavement to the daily routines of alleviating the end processes of pathologic phenomena. Prevention, in the ideal sense of the word, is the ability to help man live, and help him to live life in a more abundant spiritual and physical sense prior to the onset of the various pathologic entities. To achieve this goal we must go beyond our routine histories and physicals. We must attack the antecedents of disease and eradicate them wherever they to begin to forge ahead. But above all we must have an understanding heart. George Entwisle, B.S., M.D.; Professor of Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Head of the Department Maureen M. Henderson, M.B., Aubrey D. Richardson, B.S., B.S., D.P.H.; Assistant Pro- M.D.; Assistant Professor fessor Paul F. Richardson, M.D.; Assistant Professor and Head, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Matthew Tayback, A.B., M.A., Sc.D.; Associate Professor of Biostatistics Theresa M. Novak, R.N., B.S.N.E.; Assistant Clara J. Fleischer, M.S., M.D.: Assistant Professor 78 “We have but two sorts of people in this house and under the whip; that’s fools and madmen.” — Middleton, Changeling. “To get at the mistress, begin with a tip to the maid.” — Terrence. Psychiatry Charles Stewart, M.D., Assistant Professor Eugene B. Brody, A.B., M.A., M.D.; Professor of Psychiatry and Head of the Department; Director, The Psychiatric Institute. Gerald D. Klee, M.D.; Associate Professor Imogene Young, B.A., M.S.W.; Associate Professor of Psychiatric Social Work. Francis T. Rafferty, Jr., B.S., M.S., M.D.; Associate Professor; Director, Child Psychiatry. 80 “The time has come the Walrus said To talk of many things: Of shoes and ships-and sealing wax-of cabbages and kings.” -Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking Glass. “There’s no business like show business.” — Contemporary American song. From the study of gamma-hydroxy- butyric acid and serotonin metabolism to the evaluation of a Rorschach and TAT test, from the evaulation of cerebral blood flow and brain oxygen consumption to the study of family dynamics and child care, the modern psychiatric researcher ap- proaches his task with a broader and more encompasing background. We as students have become aquainted with the vast and complex patterns of hu- man behavior. We have attempted to deal with and understand various psychiatric problems. We have seen how a personality responds to the psychic impact of another personality: on one hand rekindling a light of creativity and on the other hand creating submission and death. But above all, we stopped for a moment, thought, and gained some insight into ourselves. 81 Ophthalmology Richard D. Richards, A.B., M.Sc., M.D.; Professor and Head of the Department We should be aware that the distorting effect of our illusions on our mental picture of good medical practice has placed us on a path which may approach the danger of narrow mindedness. No physician, no matter how specialized or brilliant in his field, can devoid himself from the rest of medicine and exist independently within his specialty. The study of the eye has brought to us vividly this dual objective of medicine in general. Traditionally the physician has been concerned with the preservation and care of man’s visual sense. However, rapid advances in Ophthalmology have accen- tuated its mutually inclusive bipartite composition, the study of the eye and the evaluation of generalized pathology. Samuel L. Fox, B.S., M.D.; Associate Professor “There’s more here-, sir, than meets the eye.”— John Galsworthy 83 Anesthesiology Martin Helrich, B.S., M.D.; Professor and Head of the Depart- ment of Anesthesiology Perhaps no discovery made in modern medicine and surgery has proven more beneficial to the human race than the in- troduction of anesthesia for the alleviation of the fearful pains of disease. For the first time, it became possible to liberate the human soul from the malignant fears which emanated from the inexorable courses of pathologic phenomena. This new impetus marked the beginning of the greatest ad- vances made in modern surgery. Today whether we attempt to treat tic douloureux, remove a gangrenous piece of colon or deliver a complicated pregnancy, we can assure the patient that his painful misery will be diminished to a greater extent through the judicious and effective use of anesthesia. 84 STUDENT AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA-MEDICAL HONOR SOCIETY HONOR COUNCIL CHRISTIAN MEDICAL SOCIETY STUDENT COUNCIL 88 PHI DELTA EPSILON The Phi Delta Epsilon Regional Conclave PHI BETA PI The Phi Beta Pi Cocktail Party NU SIGMA NU I The Nu Sigma Nu Pledge Class 92 Eric Schmitter and Edward McGinley face off at a group picnic. Larry Becker at the campus bookstore. 93 Joel Mindel throws one of his famous “stag” parties. 94 The senior class picnic. 95 Cartoons ; •• desire for Knowledge, to serve humcmrhj, " t ? concjuer the pestilence that placjues mankind ’ and besides, it Keeps the arrmj off ijour bacK. by Al Schwartz 97 Dr. Don Barrick, Bill Cushard, and Bob Gingell at midnight coffee break. Don Deinlein WASAMA bake sale, 98 THE OATH OF HIPPOCRATES I do solemnly swear . . . by that which I hold most sacred . . . That I will be loyal to the profession of medicine . . . and just and generous to its members . . . That I will lead my life . . . and practice my art ... in up- rightness and honor . . . That into whatso- ever house I shall enter ... it shall be for the good of the sick ... to the utmost of my power ... I hold myself aloof from wrong . . . from corruption . . . from the tempting of others to vice . . . That I will exercise my art . . . solely for the cure of my patients . . . and will give no drug . . . perform no operation . . . for a criminal purpose . . . even if solicited . . . far less suggest it .. . That what- soever I shall see or hear ... of the lives of men . . . what is not fitting to be spoken . . . I will keep inviolably secret . . . These things I do promise . . . and in proportion as I am faithful to this my oath . . . may happiness and good repute ever be mine . . . the opposite if I shall be forsworn. os O pP Izj M SIGMUND ALLEN AMITIN South Baltimore General Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Sig, who lives in the Monumental City, is a graduate of the University of Maryland at College Park. His plans for the future have not yet crystal- lized at the present time. He will be taking a rotating internship. OyyyiJ _. 4 ,1). MICHAEL NATHAN ASHMAN Jewish Hospital Brooklyn, New York A graduate of Johns Hopkins University, Mike was born in Baltimore, Maryland. During the medical school years, he has engaged in bio- chemical research and has had both medical and surgical externships at Sinai Hospital. In the Junior and Senior years, Mike also worked as a clinical research fellow in the Department of Anesthesi- ology at University Hospital. 100 PHILIP MILLER ASHMAN Harrisburg Hospital Harrisburg , Pennsylvania Miller, a graduate of Hobart College in New York, makes his home in Baltimore. During his medical training, he has worked for a brewing company and has been involved in surgical re- search at Sinai Hospital. Miller has also served a surgical externship at Sinai, but his future is not completely decided. CHARLES HENRY ASPLEN University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Chuck is from Baltimore and was graduated from the University of Maryland at College Park. A member and President of Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society, he has served as Secretary of SAMA and as Vice-President of the Class for three years. Chuck is a recipient of the McCormick Scholarship and has spent much time as a fellow in the Division of Hypetensive and Renal Diseases. 101 LYNN BRADLEY BAKER University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Brad, a native of Easton, Maryland, received his undergraduate and pre-medical training at Franklin and Marshall College. During the summer months, he has worked at Baltimore City Hospitals in Preventive Medicine and Obstetrics and at the Vanderbilt University Hospital in Obstetrics. Vice- President of SAMA in his Senior year, Brad looks to a future of Ob-Gyn. X. Q cuLtuy aa. D. LARRY BECKER Sinai Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A graduate of Johns Hopkins University, Larry makes his home in Baltimore. In medical school, he was elected to the Presidency of the Freshman class and has held summer fellowships in the Division of Pulmonary Diseases. Larry will follow his internship with a residency and practice in Orthopedic Surgery. 102 MONA STEFFENS BELINIC Mercy Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Mona is a resident of Baltimore and was grad- uated from the University of Maryland at College Park. She has served externships at St. Agnes, South Baltimore General, and Mercy Hospitals. Mona was Class Secretary during our Freshman year and plans to specialize in Pediatric Endocri- nology or Cardiology. 9 THOMAS PAUL BIGBEE South Baltimore General Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Tom, a graduate of the University of Maryland at College Park, is a native of Maryland. For two years, he has worked as a fellow in the Division of Infectious Diseases; he has also served as an extern at South Baltimore General Hospital. A member of Nu Sigma Nu Fraternity, Tom plans to enter general practice after a medical residency. 103 RICHARD DOUGLAS BIGGS, JR. University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Vice-president of Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society, and winner of the Magna Cum Laude Certificate, Dick is a graduate of Princeton Uni- versity. He has lent his talents to the Terrae Mariae Medicus as its very capable Editor of the Senior Section. He plans to enter the field of Internal Medicine. HENRY HUBERT BOHLMAN University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A native of Arnold, Maryland, Hank was grad- uated from Washington and Lee University. Here at Maryland, he has served as class officer on more than one occasion; Hank was Vice-President of the Freshman class and President of the Sophomore class, the latter position making him a member of the Student Council. He has spent summers in the Cardiopulmonary Laboratory at University Hospital and as an Orthopedic assistant. Hank is a member of the Phi Beta Pi fraternity. uy Af 104 RIMA LOIS BRAUER Montefiore Hospital New York City, New York Having worked as a psychiatric fellow during the summers, Rima plans a residency and a future in Psychiatry. She is a graduate of Goucher College and lists Baltimore as her home city. In addition to work in her field of choice, Rima has spent time at Sinai Hospital in Enzymology. WILLIAM SEAL BYERS Mercy Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Bill, whose home town is Hagerstown, Maryland, is a 1960 graduate of Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. A member of SAMA, he has served the Class in the capacity of Athletic Chairman and has been active in intramural sports. Summer externships at Washington County and at St. Agnes Hospitals have occupied some of his extracurricular time. After completion of his post- graduate training, Bill plans t o specialize in In- ternal Medicine. 105 BARRY MARVIN COHEN Sinai Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A graduate of Duke University, Barry lists his home town as Clear Spring, Maryland. A co-editor of Terrae Mariae Medicus, he has also served our class as Honor Council representative in the Freshman and Senior years. Barry has held ex- ternships in Pathology and Medicine at Sinai Hospital and a clinical clerkship at St. Agnes Hospital. In future years, Barry will engage in the practice of Internal Medicine. MIRIAM LEAH COHEN Union Memorial Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Miriam, a resident of Baltimore, completed her pre-medical training at the University of Maryland at College Park. In medical school, she has spent summers in Psychiatry and in Neuropathology at University Hospital. Having served an externship in Medicine at Maryland General Hospital, Mir- iam’s plans for the future are not decided. Her field will be either Cardiology or Dermatology. 106 GUSTAVO ALBERTO COLON Public Health Service Intern Gus was born in Ponce, Puerto Rico, and com- pleted his undergraduate training at Johns Hopkins University. At Maryland, he has served four years as Honor Council member and was Chairman of that committee in his Senior year. With fellow- ships in Surgery and Internal Medicine behind him, Gus will embark upon a career in either Surgery or Ob-Gyn. JOHN JOSEPH CONROY Church Home and Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Jack is a native of Baltimore, Maryland. He re- ceived his pre-medical undergraduate schooling at Loyola College in Baltimore. While in medical school, he has held externships at Church Home and Hospital and at St. Agnes Hospital. After residency, Jack plans a practice in General Surgery. HO 107 DOMINIC ANTHONY CULOTTA University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A native Italian, Dominic now makes his home in Baltimore where he was graduated from Loyola College. As a medical student, he has worked as an extern at St. Agnes, Church Home, and Mary- land General hospitals. Dominic’s future lies in either Internal Medicine or one of the surgical sub-specialties. SbrO y a. . pPPp. £ WILLIAM GREEN CUSHARD, JR. Charity Hospital New Orleans, Louisiana A graduate of the University of Maryland at Col- lege Park, Bill is a resident of Kensington, Mary- land. He has spent summers in Pathology and Medicine at the Washington Hospital Center and has held a fellowship in Endocrinology at University Hospital. He served our Freshman class as a Student Council representative. No doubt the future will find Bill engaged in the practice of Internal Medicine. lx) • 108 DAVID AMSBRY DAYTON George F. Geisinger Hospital Danville, Pennsylvania Dave, a graduate of Bucknell University, hails from New Castle, Pennsylvania. While in medical school at Maryland, Dave has held a fellowship in Pediatric Research at University Hospital and clinical externships at St. Agnes Hospital. WILLIAM ALLAN DEAR, JR. St. Agnes Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Bill, a resident of Baltimore, attended the Uni- versity of Maryland at College Park. During the medical school years, he externed at St. Agnes Hospital, served on the Interfraternity Council, and was Archon of Phi Beta Pi Fraternity. Bill’s field will be Plastic Surgery. vO vAAjlL-. . -• Ql . 0 ■ ■ • 109 THOMAS WADE deBECK University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Tom, a “native-son” of Boyds, Maryland, was graduated from the University of Virginia in 1960. He has worked on summer fellowships in Psy- chiatry and Pathology and has been an extern at South Baltimore General Hospital. DONALD ANTHONY DEINLEIN Mercy Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Don lives in Baltimore and is a graduate of Loyola College. He has spent summers in Gastroenter- ology at Mercy Hospital and as a medical extern at St. Agnes Hospital. Don has contributed greatly to many campus athletic activities. £ r O 4‘ no FRANK MARIANO DETORIE St. Agnes Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Frank, of Baltimore, was graduated from Loyola College. He has externed at St. Agnes Hospital and is a member of SAMA. He has done a fine job on the Committee for the Promotion of Medical School to College Students. Frank plans on a future in General Surgery. • ' V. SALVATORE ROBERT DONOHUE Mercy Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Sam, out of Loyola College, lives in Baltimore. He is, without doubt, the funniest man in the class. A member of Phi Beta Pi Fraternity and of SAMA, he has also held a fellowship in Gastro- enterology at Mercy Hospital. Sam has not yet decided about the future. ROBERT LAWRENCE DOYLE Mercy Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Larry Doyle was raised in Baltimore and was graduated from Loyola College in 1959. He has had the honor of membership in Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Soeiety and has spent his summers at Mercy Hospital. Larry is destined to become a surgeon. of. . i! EARLIE HILL FRANCIS, JR. South Baltimore General Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Earlie attended Howard University before enter- ing medical school. He has spent summers in the Departments of Physiology and Pathology. A mem- ber of Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity, he has externed at South Baltimore General Hospital. In the future, Earlie will be found as a General Practitioner. 112 ROBERT LORING GINGELL University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Bob is from Silver Spring, Maryland, and he graduated from American University in Washing- ton, D.C. He has done research at the Naval Hos- pital in Bethesda, Maryland, is a member of Phi Beta Pi Fraternity, and was a fellow in the Car- diopulmonary Section at University Hospital. Bob regards Surgery as a distinct possibility ' for the future. SIMON DAVID GLASS Letterman Army Hospital San Francisco, California Dave is a graduate of the University 7 of Mary- land. Originally from Baltimore, he has traveled extensively to many parts of the world. An extern at St. Agnes Hospital, Dave’s plans for the future are not yet decided. WD 113 MARVIN NORMAN GOLDSTEIN University of Chicago Clinics Chicago, Illinois Marv hails from Baltimore but migrated west- ward to Western Maryland College where he grad- uated Summa Cum Laude in 1960. He has been a most active member of the Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity and was President of that organization in his Senior year. Marv is particularly .interested in Neurology. -thO i ALBERT MORTON GORDON University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A graduate of the University of Maryland is Al Gordon. Al is a member of Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity and has served as Pledgemaster of that organization. He has been a pediatric extern at Sinai Hospital and plans a career in Pediatrics. 114 LEE EDWIN GRESSER Sinai Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Lee is from Baltimore. He was graduated from the University of Maryland at College Park. A recipient of the Street and Hitchcock Scholarships, he has spent summers as a research fellow in Preventive Medicine and has held externships in Surgery and Gynecology at Sinai and Women’s Hospitals. Lee is undecided about the future. STUART HANDWERGER Bronx Municipal Hospital Center New York, New York Stuart, a native of Baltimore, completed training at Johns Hopkins University before entering medical school. He is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha and has done research in allergy at Johns Hopkins. Stu plans to enter academic Pediatrics. - 0 . 1 15 If I I i I IRA FRANK HARTMAN II University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Frank, from Buckhannon, West Virginia, was graduated from West Virginia Wesleyan College. He is a member of SAMA and of the Phi Beta Pi Fraternity. Frank has worked as an extern at Mary- land General Hospital. - ■ . - L- y wmammammmsk i — i ROBERT GUNNELL HAZARD Providence Hospital Washington, D.C. Bob is a graduate of the University of Maryland at College Park, and he is a resident of Bethesda, Maryland. While in medical school, he spent some spare time as an extern at the Washington Hospital. After his hospital training, Bob’s specialty will be Internal Medicine. 1 16 PAUL CULVERWELL HILEY Public Health Service Intern Paul, a native of Baltimore and a graduate of Wheaton College, has spent two summers at the Argonne National Laboratory, Division of Medi- cine. During the third summer, he held a fellow- ship in the Department of Medicine at University Hospital. Paul was SAMA representative during his Junior and Senior years and has been Secretary and President of the Christian Medical Society. LP ys M D- EUCLID HOWARD JONES Public Health Service Intern Euclid was born in Emmitsburg, Maryland and completed his pre-medical training at Bridgewater College in Bridgewater, Virginia. Having served an externship at St. Agnes Hospital, Euclid plans to enter Dermatology through the United States Public Health Service. 117 ROSALIND PERLOW KAPLAN Washington Hospital Washington, D.C. Roz is a native of New York City and received he r undergraduate training at Queens College. She has completed two years of medical schooling at Albert Einstein Medical School before coming to Maryland in her Junior year. Roz has held fellow- ships in Biophysics at the Sloan-Kettering Institute and in Cancer Research at Baltimore City Hospitals. I i % LEEDS EDWARD KATZEN Mercy Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Jack lists Baltimore as his birthplace and the University of Maryland as the source of his under- graduate education. He has served as an extern at Women’s and Mercy Hospitals. A member of Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity, Jack has held fellow- ships in Pathology and ENT at University Hospital. 118 MATTHEW LEWIS KAUFMAN Harrisburg Hospital Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Matt is a native of New York City and a graduate of the University of Michigan. He has worked as a fellow in the Department of Pharmacology at the Cornell University Medical School and as a fellow in Pathology at the Medical Examiner’s Office in Baltimore. A member of Phi Beta Pi Fraternity, Matt has performed duties as an extern at St. Agnes Hospital. RICHARD JOHN KELLY St. Agnes Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Born in Chevy Chase, Maryland, Dick received his undergraduate training at College Park. A mem- ber of Phi Beta Pi Fraternity, he has served for two years as an extern at St. Agnes Hospital. Dick has been a member of the Student Council each of our four years. w. a. 119 t i t MICHAEL WILLARD KILCHENSTEIN Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A native of Baltimore and a graduate of Loyola College, Mike has done two years of graduate train- ing in Biochemistry. From 1959 to 1962, he held a research fellowship in Pediatrics, and he has served externships at South Baltimore General and Women’s Hospitals. Mike plans a career in aca- demic and research medicine in the field of Gyn- ecological Endocrinology. ! i STANLEY JOHN KIRCHENBAUER South Baltimore General Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Stan, a resident of Baltimore, completed his undergraduate training at the University of Miami. While in medical school, he has served as an extern at the South Baltimore General Hospital and has worked for the Department of Preventive Medicine at University Hospital. In his Senior year, Stan was elected to membership in Alpha Omega Alpha. Stan has directed his interests toward Ob-Gyn. 120 MARK EVANS KRUGMAN Mount Sinai Hospital New York, New York A member of Alpha Omega Alpha Honorary Society, Mark is from New York City and is a graduate of Union College. He has served as co- editor of the 1964 Terrae Mariae Medicus and is a member of Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity. Mark has served an externship at St. Agnes Hos- pital and has worked during the summers at a camp. He plans to enter the field of otolaryngology. ' ytyjc. K n d. CHARLES DUDLEY LEE, JR. Passavant Memorial Hospital Chicago, Illinois A graduate of Morgan State College, Dudley was born in Baltimore, Maryland, He is a member of the Phi Beta Pi Fraternity ' and has spent summers as a clincial clerk at the Naval Hospital in Philadel- phia. Dudley plans for a future in Neurological Surgery. 121 DONALD THEODORE LEWERS University Hospital Baltimore, Mary land A member of Alpha Omega Alpha, Ted came to medical school after completion of undergraduate training at the University of Maryland at College Park. A native of Salisbury, Maryland, Ted has served the Class as SAMA representative and Vice- President; during the summer months, he has worked as fellow in both Surgery and Medicine. Ted plans a career in Internal Medicine. ! ! DANIEL VINCENT LINDENSTRUTH University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Dan, a graduate of Georgetown University in Washington, is from Aberdeen, Maryland. During his Senior year in medical school, he was elected a member of Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society. Dan, whose future lies in Internal Medicine, has spent his summers working at the Perry Point Veterans Hospital. Lud 122 RUTH ELIZABETH LUDDY University Hospital Baltimore , Maryland Our Class Secretary for three years, Ruth com- pleted her pre-medical undergraduate education at Notre Dame of Maryland in her native Baltimore. During the medical school years, Ruth has spent summers in Pathology at University Hospital and as a medical extern at Maryland General Hospital. A member of Alpha Omega Alpha and Secretary of that organization in her Senior year, Ruth plans a future in Pediatrics or Medicine. JOHN HOWARD LUTZ Church Home and Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A future Internist, Howard is a native of Balti- more and a graduate of Johns Hopkins University. His summers have been spent in Medicine and General Pathology. Howard also has held research positions in Pediatrics and in Endocrine Pathology. 123 k i i EDGAR VICTOR McGINLEY South Baltimore General Hospital Baltimore , Maryland A graduate of Bucknell University, Ed is orig- inally from Ocean Grove, New Jersey. Having served externships at both Church Home and South Baltimore General Hospitals, Ed’s future is directed toward either General Surgery or Internal Medicine. h.0. i i I MILTON S. MICHAELIS San Francisco Hospital San Francisco, California Hailing from Silver Spring, Maryland, Milt is a graduate of George Washington University in Washington. During the summer vacations from medical school, he has spent time at research projects at N.I.H. Milt is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha; having worked as a surgical extern at Mercy Hospital, Milt’s future lies in Surgery, probably on the West Coast. 124 ELLEN ANN DAGON MILLAN Union Memorial Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A resident of Baltimore, Ann took her under- graduate and pre-medical training at George Wash- ington University in Washington, D.C. With fellow- ships in Psychiatry, Neurology, and Anesthesiology behind her, Ann’s future field will probably be Anesthesiology. f lk- n fXr, o O xLLa-r 7) Q JOEL SIDNEY MINDEL University Hospital Ann Arbor, Michigan A native of Pikes ville, Joel was graduated from Swarthmore College. In addition to spending his summers in Pediatrics at Mercy Hospital and tour- ing Europe, Joel also was engaged in biochemical research at the Sinai Hospital, and reported on his work at the latter at the 1964 AOA research seminar. Joel plans a career in one of the Surgery specialties. 125 SAMUEL MUHER Sinai Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Sam is a native of Baltimore and was graduated from the University of Maryland at College Park. During each of the summers while in medical school, Sam has worked as a fellow in the Depart- ment of Preventive Medicine. An officer of Phi Delta Epsilon and co-editor of the . fraternity’s publication, Sam expects a future in Ob-Gyn or General Practice. I 5 ( | J I | JO ANN MUNZNER Jessie, from Reisterstown, Maryland, is a grad- uate of Notre Dame College of Maryland. She has worked as a summer fellow in Rheumatoid Arthritis and in Psychiatry. Jessie plans a rotating intern- ship followed by a General Practice residency. ‘Tflmwsji; %Z-? 126 RAPHAEL CHARLES MYERS, JR. St. Agnes Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Having completed his undergraduate training at North Carolina State College and the University of Virginia, Ray returned to his native Baltimore to medical school. He has spent time in research at the Baltimore Biologic Laboratories and as a lab extern at St. Agnes Hospital. After his residency in Ob-Gyn, Ray expects to practice in Maryland or Virginia. " JACOB DAVID NAGEL Mercy Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Dave, who makes his home in Baltimore, is a graduate of Loyola College. During the past four years, he has spent summers working for the Balti- more County Health Department and has had a fellowship in Otolaryngology at University Hos- pital. Dave is a member of the Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity and he plans a future in either Otolaryn- gology or Gastroenterology. 127 DAVID MONROE NICHOLS, JR. Mercy Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A future surgeon, Dave comes from Baltimore and is a graduate of Washington and Lee Uni- versity. As President of the Junior class, he was a representative to the Student Council in 1962- 1963. Dave has spent several summers as a camp counselor and has been active in -intramural athletics. v ■zr-fi.j .jy4 Jrts I NEVILLE PEREYO TORRELLAS University Hospital San Juan, Puerto Rico A graduate of the University of Puerto Rico, Neville makes his home in Humacao, Puerto Rico. He has spent two summers as a fellow in Arthritis in Puerto Rico. His future is not yet decided, but Neville will spend time in the Armed Services after his internship. f x uyo I IJ) 128 ALBERT BERNARD PLEET University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A member of Alpha Omega Alpha, Bernie was bom in Baltimore, Maryland and is a graduate of the University of Maryland at College Park. He was a Senior representative to the Student Council and a member of Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity. For two summers while in medical school, Bernie has worked as a fellow in the Division of Neuropathology. THOMAS JENKS PORTER Public Health Service Intern Planning for a future in General Practice, Tom came to Maryland after completing his under- graduate training at San Diego State College in his native California. While in medical school, Tom has served externships at South Baltimore General and University Hospitals; his summers have been spent at N.I.H. 129 RICHARD MARVIN PROTZEL University of Wisconsin A resident of New Jersey, Dick is a graduate of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. While at Maryland, he has held a fellowship in Ob-Gyn at University Hospital and an externship at the Newark Beth Israel Hospital. Dick’s plans for the future have not yet been announced. JOSE DULCIDIO QUINONES Public Health Service Intern Jose hails from Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico and was graduated from the University of Puerto Rico. Having spent summer fellowships in Infectious Diseases and Otolaryngology, Jose plans for further training in Internal Medicine. 130 JOHN MANFRED RATINO South Baltimore General Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A native of Takoma Park, Maryland and a grad- uate of the University of Maryland, John has served as representative to the Student Council. He was a member of the Student Activities Com- mittee and Treasurer of Phi Beta Pi Fraternity. John has spent some vacation time at the National Institute of Mental Health and will practice in either Surgery or Pediatrics. CHARLES EVANS RECKSON University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Born in Miami Beach, Florida, Chuck received his undergraduate training at College Park. Elected to membership in Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society, he has spent summers working in both Radiology and Pathology. Chuck is a member of the Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity and plans to enter the field of Internal Medicine. QJc. ex MAX 131 JEROME PAUL REICHMISTER Sinai Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Jerry is a native of Baltimore and was graduated from Johns Hopkins University. He has worked as an extern at Sinai Hospital and has had fellow- ships at Baltimore City Hospitals and at University Hospital. A member and Vice-President of Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity, Jerry anticipates a future in either Orthopedic Surgery or Internal Medicine. ,, 1 CSVOTyUZ. EDGAR LEE ROBBINS Mercy Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Lee completed his pre-medical training at Dart- mouth College in New Hampshire. While in medi- cal school, Lee has worked with the Medical Care Clinic at University, with the Baltimore County Health Department, and at Sinai Hospital as an extern. Lee is a member of the Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity. X A, OiO, 132 BARRY NORMAN ROSENBAUM University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Barry is a resident of Baltimore and was grad- uated from the University of Maryland at College Park. While in medical school, he has spent his summers in Experimental Surgery, Psychiatry, and Preventive Medicine. Barry has also served as an extern at Mercy Hospital. A member of the Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity, Barry’s future is not yet decided. EDWARD JEROME RULEY University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Our Treasurer in the Sophomore and Junior years, Jerry is from Baltimore and is a graduate of The Citadel. He has worked as an extern in Cytopathology at John Hopkins Hospital and has engaged in research with the Division of Pul- monary Diseases at University Hospital. Jerry plans to enter either Internal Medicine or Pe- diatrics. 133 MARVIN FREDERICK SAIONTZ Sinai Hospital Baltimore, Maryland The President of our Senior class, Marv is a resident of Baltimore and a graduate of University of Maryland. He is a member of the Student Activities Committee and of the Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity; his summers have been spent in Pharmacy and as an extern. Marv is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha Society. i ERIC DEAN SCHMITTER San Francisco Hospital San Francisco, California Eric, whose pre-medical training was accom- plished at Earlham College and the University of Maryland, comes from Kensington, Maryland. He has engaged in research in Neuro-surgery at NIH over several summers and has had externships at Maryland General, Women’s, and Union Memorial Hospitals. His future is not fully decided, but Eric will probably direct his interests toward Gen- eral Surgery. 134 ALLEN DAVID SCHWARTZ Grace-New Haven Hospital New Haven, Connecticut Al, a graduate of Johns Hopkins University, hails from Baltimore. As Vice-President of Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity, he was a member of the In- terfraternity Council. Elected to Alpha Omega Alpha Honorary Society, Al was on the staff of Terrae Mariae Medicus. A career in academic Pediatrics lies in the future. 0 . -Ctc )?). p. WILLIAM ERDMAN SCHWARTZ Mercy Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Bill’s home town is Havre de Grace, Maryland, and he is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University. Externships at Women’s, Union Memorial, and St. Agnes Hospitals and summer work at Perry Point VA Hospital occupied some of his extra- curricular time. Bill plans a future in either Radi- ology or Pediatrics. 135 SIDNEY BERNARD SEIDMAN Sinai Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A graduate of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Sid is a native of Baltimore. He is a member of Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity. Sid has served a summer fellowship in Preventive Medi- cine and an externship at Sinai Hospital. i I 5 i i I PERRY SHIPLEY SHELTON Mercy Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Perry is a native of Cumberland, Maryland and a graduate of University of Maryland at College Park. He has served externships at Bethesda and Pensacola Naval Hospitals and at Mercy Hospital. A member of Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity, Perry looks to a future in Pediatrics. 136 RICHARD GERALD SHUGARMAN Sinai Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Dick, listing his home as Baltimore, received his A.B. from Johns Hopkins University in 1960. He has held an Ob-Gyn externship at Sinai Hos- pital and has spent fellowship time in the Alcoholic Clinic. Having had three summers in Ophthalm- ological Research at the Wilmer Clinic, Dick ex- pects to enter academic Ophthalmology. y?? ' O ' . LAWRENCE FRANKLIN SOLOMON Sinai Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Larry is a resident of Baltimore and was grad- uated from the University of Maryland at College Park. He is a member of Phi Delta Epsilon Fra- ternity and has served externships at Sinai and Mercy Hospitals. Larry has also worked as a fellow in the Department of Preventive Medicine and plans a future in Internal Medicine. 137 GERSHON J. SPECTOR Beth Israel Hospital Boston, Massachusetts Jerry, a native of Baltimore, received his under- graduate training at Johns Hopkins University. While in medical school, he has worked as a fellow in Biochemistry at University Hospital and in Surgery at the Hadassah Hospital in Israel. The copy editor of TERRAE Mariae MEDICUS, Jerry is a member of Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity and Alpha Omega Alpha Honorary Society. J ' .ifZk 7,%.jX I « j i HAROLD CLARK STANDIFORD University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Harold, who notes his home city as Aberdeen, Maryland, is a graduate of Johns Hopkins Univer- sity. He is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha and was a Student Council representative during the Senior year. Harold has performed summer work at the Perry Point Veterans Hospital and plans for future accomplishments in Intermal Medicine. 133 ROBERT ELMER STONER University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A native of Baltimore, Bob was graduated from Rutgers University in New Jersey. The recipient of the Anatomy Award in our Freshman year, Bob has spent two summers working in Endocrinology. Bob was Treasurer of the Senior class and expects a future in Medicine. (fUMJ (f rfQ JONATHAN DAVID TUERK University Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Jon is a resident of Baltimore, and he received his undergraduate pre-medical training at Dart- mouth College. During his four years in medical school, he has worked as a fellow in both Neu- roanatomy and in the Arthritis Laboratory. Jon is a member of Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity. 139 JOHN KIRKWOOD WEAGLY South Baltimore General Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A graduate of Western Maryland College, John is originally from Laurel, Maryland. A future pediatrician, John has served an externship at South Baltimore General Hospital and is a member of Nu Sigma Nu Fraternity. jjdvu 1 a t A ' D. WALTER DOUGLAS WEIR South Baltimore General Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A native of Silver Spring, Maryland, Doug fin- ished his pre-medical training at St. John’s Col- lege in Annapolis. He has spent time as a research fellow in Cardiology at City Hospitals and in Urology at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Doug has also held externships at Women’s and South Baltimore General Hospitals. SHERWOOD EWELL WILSON South Baltimore General Hospital Baltimore, Maryland A future psychiatrist, Sherwood hails from Mardela Springs, Maryland, and is a graduate of Columbia University. He has held two summer fellowships at University’s Psychiatric Institute and has served a summer externship at South Baltimore General Hospital. A member of Phi Beta Pi Fraternity, Sherwood is Business Manager of our Terrae Mariae Medicus. j 140 DONALD MICHAEL WOOD South Baltimore General Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Originally from North East, Maryland, Don now lives in Baltimore. He was graduated from the University of Notre Dame. A member of Phi Beta Pi Fraternity, Don headed the group of South Baltimore General Hospital externs. In the future, Don will be found in General Practice. Hi. ( M ' k. ARNOLD ROBERT YALAM Jackson Memorial Hospital Miami, Florida Arnie makes his home in New York City but received his undergraduate pre-medical training at Johns Hopkins University. He has held extern- ships at Beth-El Hospital in New York and at Women’s Hospital in Baltimore. Arnie’s future includes a practice in Internal Medicine. MARSTON ALEXIS YOUNG St. Agnes Hospital Baltimore, Maryland Marston, a graduate of Johns Hopkins Univer- sity, makes his home in Catonsville, Maryland. He spent time as a laboratory technician at Spring Grove and University Hospitals and has served summer clerkships in Medicine and Pediatrics. Marston plans for a future in General Practice. 141 Senior Class Officers Marvin Saiontz President Charles Asplen Vice-President Jerry Ruley Treasurer Ruth Luddy Secretary 142 Senior Honors CUM LAUDE Milton Siegfried Michaelis CUM LAUDE Harold Clark Standiford UROLOGY CUM LAUDE Charles Evans Reckson SUMMA CUM LAUDE EXCELLENCE IN MEDICAL STUDIES Charles Henry Asplen MEDICAL BOOK AWARD Stuart Handwerger SURGERY AWARD Jonathan David Tuerk MEDICAL BOOK AWARD Ruth Elizabeth Luddy DERMATOLOGY CUM LAUDE Marvin Frederick Saiontz MEDICAL BOOK AWARD Robert Stoner 143 Yearbook Staff Barry Cohen Co-E ditor-in-C hief Sherwood Wilson Business Manager Mark Krugman Co-Editor-in-Chief Gershon Spector Copy Editor 144 Richard Biggs Senior Section Editor Marvin Goldstein Photography Editor m .JHur L I p k The Hippocratic Oath . . . . The Processional leaves Davidge Hall VRYLi 1 .O . ME 146 Dean William S. Stone addresses the graduates _ Dr. Paul J. Sanazaro, Educational Director of the Association of America Medical Colleges, delivering the Precommence- ment Address. The wives of the graduates receiving the “Mrs. M.D.” awards. 148 Jhe SAINT AGNES HOSPITAL congratulates The Graduating Class of the University of Maryland School of Medicine “ancf gladly teach” — Chaucer John H. Tuohy, M.D. Director of Medical Education I I i i i i WISHING i THE CLASS OF 1964 EVERY SUCCESS. MERCY HOSPITAL 150 »; ® r _ -- zzi-iL ihgia tjggg f T Mr ' rr-tmmr. Jhe Jutun SOUTH BALTIMORE GENERAL HOSPITAL 151 — j Harold Wo Blondin v Y — A yyvt,. r}h r. lE MjdtAS 152 • QlLti %XlA . Mv, Mr ' s, Re t vjr f, bosXcr i Y ia ajJ S.l’ ru j?, Aa- Asrx.s. £ M+ ia d -C f rc 153 Vi fa ' Ok duj Jbu JkJle fo fyuM J!f ' % M T fypt ' P a . ' hj 0. jf ci ri ' Samuel T.R. Revell, Jr. ,M.D« Kp. At. S;J a e. — !_ 4 XT- y S Gle n Sl i«pley H Jj lJ w QtJL.Hl ' ' Smj£- Wyfem, H n„,r k9u[yikj 154 Mr. Mrs. George A. Strawn Student Union Barber SiAp 0 ry3 cA»a zy. Di- ' ttyf U ' - Qttyk £ (jttnbu vJ George H. leager, M. D. .© e v£_ 3, Ljo jrv . Mi.9U»ftaz bL yy j J t . PATRONS Mr. Mrs. Morris L. Abramowitz Mr. Mrs. Harry M. Ashman J. Tlyer Baker, M.D. Dorothy K. Benjes Robert Bokat, M.D. Dr. Mrs. E. D. Bryan Dr. Mrs. Herman G. du Buy Dr. Mrs. Williams Cushard John C. Dumler, M.D. Mr. Mrs. Virgil Ellwood Hilda C. Fliegel, M.D. Mr. Mrs. Frank Freed Albert J. Glass, M.D. Mark B. Hollander, M.D. Dr. Mrs. Richard Hornick Virginia Huffer, M.D. Mr. Mrs. James W. Konrad Dr. Mrs. Richard L. London Dr. Mrs. Arlie R. Mansberger, Jr, Richard S. Munford, M.D. Mr. Mrs. Wm. H. Myers Henry Nagel, M.D. Phi Delta Epsilon San Francisco Intern Resident Club Mr. Mrs. Samuel M. Poiley Mrs. Mortice Protzel Mrs. Genevieve S. Rogers Mr. Mrs. Aaron Rosestein Patricia B. Storey, M.D. L. M. Tierney, M.D. Stanley Zorick Mr. Mrs. E Sterling Johnson 155 CAMPUS BOOKSTORE BALTIMORE UNION Best wish to the graduates 621 W. LOMBARD Books Supplies Miscellaneous items Lab Coats Any in-print book special ordered small service charge HUTZLER’S The Medical Alumni Asociation of the University of Maryland extends a warm welcome to the Class of 1964. The name of each graduate will automatically be registered on the membership roster of th Associa- tion, the current year’s dues remitted and the BULLE- TIN subscription paid from Association funds. It is im- perative that the Secretary be kept informed at all times of any change in address. Please feel free to make use of the Association’s service. 156 Sincerely, Gibson J. Wells, M.D. President Q] lurray=03aumgartnet SI K4.K AI. I STB1.ME T ( O.. IXC. Sen ing the medical profession for more than tO rears 1421 MARYLAND AVENUE • BALTIMORE, MD. 21201 Saratoga 7-7333 Specialists in iScjuipmeiif atiS S H ff ,c S | or HOSPITAL PHYSICIAN LABORATORY SURGEON INDUSTRY NURSING HOME also: RETAIL SICK ROOM SUPPLIES Murray Baumoartrer .. J Parking Facilities Available Competent experienced surgical fitters in attendance Consultants on major Hospital Equipment, Sales and Service Rleans 5-5440 R. W. Ellicott Medical Bookseller Open Noon To Nine 704 N. BROADWAY Baltimore 5, Maryland HOFFMAN SURGICAL SUPPLY CO., INC. Featuring SUPPLIES EQUIPMENT For DOCTORS - HOSPITALS INSTITUTIONS PHYSICAL THERAPISTS TUxedo 9-5555 4324 YORK RD. AMPLE PARKING TOADS VINO- Phone: PLaza 2-1772 Polynesian-Oriental Restaurant Lounge Catering Service Eutaw at Lombard Baltimore 1, Md. Martone Cleaners Inc. One Hour Martinizing 6. S. Howard Street PL. 2-9664 Best Wishes c : | Compliments Of UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE 1 18 S. Eutaw St. MEDICAL BOOKS — STATIONERY SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS — COATS AMBASSADOR HOUSE SPECTOR ' S SANDWICH SHOP 507 W. Lombard St. Best Corned Beef Sandwich In Town Vi block from the Hospital LExngton 9-5763-4 PHOTOCENTER PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES Amateur and Professional 23 N. Howard Street Baltimore 1, Md. Compliments Of Fonti ' s OK Barber Shop chamber provided he has common sense Oh the ground -floor”- -Oliver Wendell holmes NC UDEL PHOTOGRAPHERS TO BALTIMORE SINCE 1910 PORTRAITS IN DIRECT COLOR , TOO 1018 N. Charles Street LE. 9-3740 Parking in rear 159


Suggestions in the University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) collection:

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1967 Edition, Page 1

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