University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD)

 - Class of 1961

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 232 of the 1961 volume:

RCHIVES Tic -Tifr — » TERRAE MARIAE University of Maryland School of Medicine and MEDICUS- 1961 )chool of Nursing • Baltimore, Maryland he Medical Profe:33ion b the U)orld ' ;5 reatcat fraternity . lOhereoer a doctor may o irv ctoLlized 50cietL| , he 15 luelcomed bi) his fcliou) doctor I A5 diaea e Itself 13 no rc:5pccter of national or racial differenced 5o the doctors, in their humane eroice, do not respect thetn. hough methods of treating injury and disease may differ in different lands, the aim is euerL|u)here the same; the mitigation of human suffering , the sauin of humvan life . n that humane purpose is firmkj based the uast brotherhood of 3Doctor5 of Tiled icinc . J In Dedication .. . As Osier once said, " A hospital is not a hospital if it doesn ' t have medical students " . By the same token a medical school is not a medical school if it doesn ' t have a faculty. Obviously, the comparison is not complete; whereas the former statement must be interpreted figuratively, the latter one holds absolutely. As a child em- pirically reflects his parents, so also do we, the student body, hopefully reflect you, the faculty. Four years under your tutelage seem to have passed all too quickly — however, not without profit. Our medical initiation saw us begin almost completely ignorant of medicine and the things c losely about us now. Aggressive and forceful means were necessary to even begin to ply us into shape for recognition on a pro- fessional level. Brief as our contact has been, the necessity of that goes without saying. Use all of the meta- phors — avenues, vistas, horizons — you have led us to, opened up, and made us aware of many of them. Not only have you led us in positive directions but advised discriminately concerning pitfalls others had to dis- cover and negotiate for themselves. It has been said that the only thing that is constant is change itself. Both by inference and direct reference, you have pressed upon us that all important principle from the very beginning of our apprenticeship. In order that we even begin to measure up to this principle, you have had to point out to us the fallacy of a congealed mind and static thinking. More than to lay bare cert.iin facts before us, your function has been to bestow an attitude toward modern medicine. Your ideas are our concepts of medicine today. Ostensibly, students exhibit a desire to learn. Paradoxically, however, they are endowed with the protean quality of human inertia. " We are no different. Esthetic motivation by itself generally is not sufficient to over- come that inertia, but combined with a persistent driving force they act together in relentless fashion to propel and to give vector to an otherwise unknowing group. To build up a force to overcome the inertia required a prodigious amount of energy. But the manner in which the overcoming force was applied represents a superior finesse. We have all assembled and met for so short a while — these past four years. You have passed on something intangible yet something with which all of us will be able to make our mark if it is used judiciously. Granted, you have attempted to instill in us an attitude toward medicine, as should be the case in all medical schools, but just as important as the attitude is the stamp of Maryland which you have blended in. May our association be both mutually gratifying and advantageous. Therefore, it is not only an honor but a pleasure for the graduating class of 1961 to dedicate the current issue of TERRAE MARIAE MEDICUS to you, the faculty. In Memoriam . . . Maurice Charles Pincoffs, M. D. 1886-1960 Dr. Maurice C. Pincoffs, through his long and distinguished career in Medicine, brought honor to the School of Medicine, to the citizens of Maryland and to this Nation. Seldom is there an opportunity for a University to recognize one who was so dedicated and deserving. During the years 1922 to 1954, Doctor Pincoffs headed the Department of Medicine of the Medical School of this University at a time when the country was witnessing extensive scientific development and unprece- dented discoveries. As an inspiring teacher, he imparted a sense of responsibility, and meticulous attention for thoroughness to those many students and physicians who were privileged to study under him. Doctor Pin- coffs always practiced and taught the principles of comprehensive medicine, emphasizing the ecology of disease. It was his basic tenet to place the patient ' s problem foremost before all other considerations. During his long tenure, Doctor Pincoffs directed the curriculum within a busy department and in later years organized a new Department of Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation. He was the gifted author of many significant medical publications dealing with the natural history of disease and with the physiologic phenomena related to the adrenal gland and hypertension, functional and structural abnormalities of the heart, disorders of the nervous system and specific treatment of acute infectious diseases. Doctor Pincoffs made outstanding contributions during each of the Great World Wars. Awards for dis- tinguished service and indomitable courage were given him because of personal participation in the evacuation of wounded from the battlefields in France in 1917 and for the high morale which he maintained among sub- ordinates. During World War II, in spite of increasing years, he held posts of high responsibility in the Pacific Theater, initially as the Commanding Officer of the 42nd General Hospital, and later as Chief of Preventive Medicine for the Commanding General. Contributions to our Nation ' s health continued through his counsel- ing as a senior consultant to the Armed Forces and Public Health Service. Health problems in Maryland re- ceived his tireless attention. As a senior consultant to the Health Departments of Maryland and Baltimore, he contributed mature advice and assisted in community health matters with infinite care and vision. Doctor Pin- coffs, as Chairman of the Committee on Medical Care of the Maryland State Planning Commission, fostered a program which is a pioneer project of its kind in the United States. As a respected member of numerous medical societies, he was elected to the presidencies of the Maryland Medical and Chirurgical Faculty, the American Clinical and Climatological Association and the American College of Physicians, posts attained by few. Under his leadership as editor-in-chief beginning in 19. 3, the Annals of Internal Medicine became one of the leading medical periodicals in the world. The University will remember Maurice C. Pincoffs as one of Maryland ' s foremost medical teachers, practi- tioners, counselors and medical administrators whose mind and labors shaped and were shaped by an era of almost ceaseless medical progress. In Memoriam . . . Malcolm Lawrence Friedman 1935-1958 Malcolm ' s untimely passing in our sophomore year was the greatest loss suffered by this graduating class since our entry into medical school. It was also a loss to the medical profession which he so dearly loved. He was born the first of five children on Christmas Day in 1935. A graduate of the University of Mary- land in 1957, he matriculated with our class the fol- lowing September. Research was his first and fore- most love. It is ironic that his work involved the disease which was later to take his life — and the hopes and dreams of his family. By the middle of our fresh- man year he had established himself as one of the leaders of our class. His congeniality, sincerity, and ability impressed all who had the honor of knowing him. A year later Malcolm — friend, student, and son — graduated from life. His passing, and his life, will serve only to make us work all the harder and will be an inspiration to each of us. His passing is but a physical one, for in the hearts of all who knew him and in the hearts of his family, he will remain alive always. It is with great appreciation and with a deep sense of humility and honor, therefore, that we, his classmates and friends, offer this tribute to him. mm ]!]] 1 1 1 • = " " ADMINISTRATION J. Millard Tawes Governor, State of Maryland The State of Maryland is proud that its University again this year is turning out another group of young men and young women who are well-trained in the ancient and esteemed art of healing. In the words of a great English statesman, we know that " the health of a people is the foundation upon which all their happiness and all their powers as a State depend. " And therefore, we look upon you, as healers of the sick and succorers of the wounded, not only to enhance the future happiness of Americans but to add strength to our Nation. We have confidence that your training is good, because we know of the rich and proud history of the Medical School of the University of Maryland, which is the fifth oldest medical school in the United States and which established in 1815 the first facility in America devoted entirely to medical research. To each member of the Class of 1961, I send my personal and official congratulations and my best wishes for a successful and enjoyable career as members of the medical profession. 10 Wilson H. Elkins B.A, M.A., Litt.B., Ph.D. President, University of Maryland To the Senior Classes of the Schools of Medicine and Nursing: It is indeed a pleasure to extend warm greetings and good wishes to each member of the Senior Classes of Medicine and Nursing. We have watched with interest your progress toward your educational goal; we have been proud of your devotion to that duty; and we shall continue to have a personal concern in your careers after graduation. The University of Maryland is engaged in the development of human resources. To my mind, there is no greater achievement than this development of an individual ' s potentialities to the greatest degree of which each is capable and the offering of one ' s abilities and knowledge to society on behalf of human betterment. It is our hope that each of you will live successful lives; lives filled with the rewards and satisfactions of professional accomplishment. I am sure that the University ' s rich heritage of leadership will be enhanced in the years to come by your contributions to society ' s individual and collective welfare. 11 William S. Stone M.S., M.D., D.Sc. Director. Medical Education and Research and Dean Best Wishes to the Class of 1961: It has been a pleasure to participate in your medical education and to see you mature and develop into physicians. May the paths you tread as M.D. ' s continue to be challenging, exciting, and rewarding in the services you render to mankind. . 2Q6 12 Dietrich C. Smith B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Associate Dean, Admissions and Student Affairs Samuel T. R. Revell, Jr., M.D. Aisociate Dean Cnrnciilum Processor of Medicine 13 Pre -Clinical Davidge Hall Years Dressier Research Laboratory imlt ' r ik Rou ' 1: — M. Ashman, L. Dowler, J. Mueller, R. Protzel, C. Harrisjn, C. Collins, D. Culotta, J. Munzner, D. Deinlein, D. Nagel, S. Glass, F. Detorie, M. Pelczar, L, Gresser, L. Steinberg, A. Fleet. Roiv 2: — W. Cushard, C. Asplen, R, Biggs, L. Chong, G. Colon, W. Bruce, W. Byers. L. Becker, R. Luddy, M. Haendler, A. Gordon, M. Steffens, G. Spector, A. Schoen, M. Saiontz, S. Mucher, P. Hiley, M. Goldstein, M. Krugman. Row 3: — W. Dear, B. Baker, R. Sugarman, A. Schwartz, S. Lee, E. Jones, D. Lewers, S. Kirschenbauer, Freshman By application, matriculation, registration, placa- tion and physical examination, not to mention previ- ous intensification of cerebration topped by Baccha- nelian celebration in final culmination of hopefully great expectations did these neophytes of Aesculapius thus exert themselves, scarcely realizing the pitfalls and tortuosities of the road they had so eagerly chosen. Facultatively, a silent aspiration permeated the aca- demic confines — " I trust we ' ve acquired more than merely dilettantes and debutantes " . At last ensconced they became entranced by the icons of anatomy, too well-known to cite and too nu- merous to count. Absorbed in the learned compendia of their chosen aspiration, these neophytes ' garments, too become absorbed ( ?aromaticaliy ). How many wished to be anosmiac! No time existed for post- prandial lethargy. The time had come to act — how else mi " ht all become aware of such esoterics as " Great Anastomotic Veins of Trolard " ? Hopefully, many bridges were crossed before they hove into view. How else could one gird himself in defense against the formidable four-hour foray fanci- 18 ii •s . J L. Solomon, D. Lindenstruth, T. Porter, D. Wood, M. Kaufman, S. Wilson, B. Cohen, L. Doyle, W. Ware. Kou -i: — H. Bohman, G. Engelke. J. Doaks, D. Dayton, J. Weagly, S. Hendwerger, D. Nichols, M. Young, R. Kelly, H. Simpson, D. Lee, 1. Hartman, W. Schwartz. Lail Row: — S. Donohue, R. Myers, E. Francis, N. Pereyo, B. Hale, J. Lutz, J. Quinones, C. Reckson, M. Ashman, R. Gingell, E. McGinley. N. Michaelis, A. Yalam, M. Coplin, J. Conroy, J. Ratino, H. Standiford, E. Schmitter, R. Stoner, J. Tuerk, S. Seidman, B. Rosenbaum. Years fully touted as an exam but to burn brightly and briskly (and by the hour) the oil of sweat and toil? To be sure the oil was plentifully primed with am- phetamine, caffeine and nicotine (for synergistic ac- tion, of course ) . As the flame waned the body slept, but alas, the brain still strained. Then at last — Dreamsville. Up in the morning, down in the lab they worked like devils for their places in the sun. And those lucky old sons roamed around Bressler all day. All recall some topics of the day, e.g., innerva- tion of the brain, blood supply of the maw and ulti- mate of the middle ear. In a lighter vein — intermittent balls were called for all where news and booze prevented blues. The main topic of the evening (shop talk to be sure) be- came ingrained among the strains of cha-cha-cha punctuated freely with the tinkle of ice cubes. The time flew swiftly by. The first year, like the ball, ended quickly. And too, all were tired but happy with the time and effort invested and expended — and ready for the next. 19 V. E. KRAHL Professor W. j. H. NautA Professor H. G. J. M. KUVPLKS Associate Professor T. F. Leveque Associate Professor F. H. J. FiGGE Professor and Head E. A. Saunders Instructor K. F. Mech Assistant Professor H. E. LAiNOhNhhLDHK Assistant C. G. Crispens, Jr. Instructor 20 Once upon a time . Anatomy What more appropriate way to begin the study of medicine than to become exposed to the innards of Man! Probably no more vivid memories of our re- actions and experiences " at table " remain than those of the brachial plexus of the popliteal fossa. One of the more vivid we ' re still trying to remove from our clothes. Our lessons often came in the capsule form of an anatomical oration, the end of which was usu- ally prefaced with, " Give me five minutes more. " A four-hour exam could well have covered (and usually did ) what we learned in those last five minutes. Sometimes audio-visual aid was called on and gener- ally proved quite restful to all involved. Yes, those swivel chairs were mighty dangerous in the dark! Only one fractured pride resulted in the whole year. Though we ' re no Galens or Figges, we learned our lesson well. Extra brains were available to all. Instruction sheets even came with them. The Bard of Neurones certainly was lyrical about them, pointing out their many hidden corners and wondrous ways. To have romped the fields of Forel, plucked the olives, and viewed the pyramids with him are experiences we will not soon forget. 21 How much IS an ashtray anyway? Dreamsville U of M style 22 moreover . . . however And the thing-a-ma-bob comes through the whatcha-ma-call-it. . . . All together now ... in tune thi.s time 23 H R " V A. J. Emery. Jr. Assistant Professor E. J. Herbst Professor anil Acting Head A. V. Brown Instructor F. M. COUNCILL Junior Instructor 24 Looks like a Dali original Biochemistry Along the ancient shores of Chaulmoogra flowed the blood of the ages. And we upon the stately banks among the tubes stacked high gazed in wonderment. " Lo, wherein below " , say we, " lie the inmost secrets of this species sapiens " ? Behind our youthful eyes thought we, " To analyze that juice just from the sluice! " Sanguinously we went about our labors for days and days . . . then we knew a thing or two of Folin-Wu, Somogyi and all the rest. In vitro techniques were our forte. " Under glass " approach preceded in vivo studies. Ours was not to do or die but to reason why. Cycles here and cycles there. Round and round they went. And we in simple mimicry did too. To find the cycle clue, seek the pivot point, grab on, enjoy the ride. Embden, Meyerhof, Krebs and Henseleit did, so why not you, our mentors said. On flowed this mighty stream of life along its rocky way. The molecules and globules swelled and bobbed, more certain in their course than we in our relentless quest of knowledge. To those who ' ve tried their stride against this tide their dreams do seem to say, " This stream was rather — Styx? " 25 D. C. Smith Professor L. M. Karpeles Assistant Professor S. E. Greisman Assistant Professor J. K. Ml.KLIs Associate Professor W. D. Blake Head S. L. Fox Assistant Professor of Opthalmology and then the rravelint; salesman said . . Dog-gone Physiology In a more dynamic vein, we passed from the intri- cacies of the innards of Man to those of the innards of dogs and cats — although they were extinct rather than extant soon after we started on them. Finding Starhng ' s Law to be all or none was rather mundane. But a steel nerve? Really! Many were the facts we learned, both commonplace and esoteric — all to ulti- mately aid in explaining the whys and wherefores of our relentless search for the diagnosis. Part of the course revolved around the cor and its rhythmicity. To be recalled: it is heart-shaped and goes boom-boody-boom and is run by electricity (as shown by EKG). Furthermore, when it rumbles or snaps at you, that ' s pathos. Interestingly enough, we found that the brain is also run by electricity and that if one becomes too potential he may be seized. Every- body was eager to know all about hormones (espe- cially somebody else ' s). We found that just a little bit goes a long way and that there is such a thing as having too many. " Whereas the rolling stone gathered no moss, the smoking drum gathered the soot and we the facts. 27 Hoi,, I- — w. King, J. Prendergast, P. Kaminski, B. Rubenstein, S. Whyte, N. Brazauskas, S. Perkal, J. Gordon, M. Knopf, R. Goldman, J. Doerfer. Rou ' 2: — L. Rivosecchi, K. Magee, P. Insley, J. Mules, E. Lindstrom, E. Werner, M. Friedman, B. Adels, M. Coyne, R. Mer- chant, A. Smith, J. Petrakis, H. Padilia, G. Busch, R. Byers, F. Travisano, C. Roe, N. Hyman. Rou ' i: — H. Rodriguez, T. Inglesby, M. Early one September morn this class saw their second admission to this institution. Since their last admission the wind and sun and rest had revitalized them. Except for attrition and some previous weight loss they had regained numbers and their stature. Aside from a few nasty rumors concerning what lay ahead, they stood undaunted. Eyes were bright and ears so clear. The nose and head were held quite high. Throats were clear and necks quite supple. Chest expanded well revealing no adventitious sounds, save for an occasional sigh. Hearts beat strong and regularly. Its tones were clear. Sophomore The abdomen appeared so scaphoid. No borboryg- mus could be heard. Backs were straight. Extremities were rather limber. Peripheral pulses coursed relent- lessly. Not even a trace of edema could be found. Nail beds pinkly shone. Skin was tanned and dry. Sensorium and cranial nerves were all intact. Re- flexes worked bilaterally. Gait was arrogant. Co- ordination superb. Auguries so high a-flying in the sky Do seem to portend how they ' ll vie. Those most markedly prepared Will say they ' re not so scared. 28 St. lohn, P. Moore, P. Saneman, C. Gulp, W. Howard, M. Garrison, S. Minken, S. Cohen, H. Oster, A. Wolfe, M. Schwartz, R. Piat, A. Dawkins, R. Dinker, D. Braver, K. Stecher, A. Lamb, K. Stojanovich, W. Shervington. Rotr 4: — C. Lindgren, D. Bryan, R. Giangrandi, I . Hlder, M. Levin, R. Kennan, M. Joeres, L. Brauer, G. Wolski, S. Amitin, R. Beazley, R. Hess, C. Mock, R. Buffalino, C. Harvey. Class They ' ll perambulate and seem so bored. But watch the eyes and gauge the gait when they ' ve been scored. As time wore on the physical status changed markedly. Micro, Path and Pharmacology were be- ginning to show their influence. Towards the end in May ears were ringing and eyes were rheumy. Nose and head were stuffy and not so high. The throat was awfully dry exacerbated by the cigarette hack. The once supple neck writhed spasmodically with chronic torticollis. Chest then expanded leadenly and wheezes echoed musically. Palpitations of the cor associated with dropped beats were punctuated with infrequent precordial twinges. Reflexes were rather spastic. Sensoria seem markedly clouded. Such a state for ones so young! Stop, desist, delay. At least allay Our fears so fierce concerning this foray. Our minds are crammed so full and firm, They say, of facts about disease this term That, indeed, the strain upon our sanity Exceeds in great degree that upon our vanity. 29 A. G. Smith Associate Professor W. F. Myers Instructor C L. WissEMAN. Jr. Professor and Head O. R. Eylar, Jr. Assistant Professor M. J. Snyder Assistant Professor E. C. ROSENZWEIG Instructor ' Good Morning! " Watch it Claude, it bites! Just ' cause you can ' t see ' em doesn ' t mean they aren ' t there! Microbiology Of course, this was the course about which we had heard so much from our brothers-in-arms who had gone before. Psychologically, one might say we were overprepared — our association centers were honed sharp while our every Betz cell was in a state of constant tetany. Once we overcame the initial shock we began to meet a few people like that fellow Gram, and a few of his cohorts, too, including Giemsa, the Ziehl-Neelsen twins and some ex-wrestler by the name of Guarnieri. Then we launched full-tilt into the world of the microcosm. A well-known principle we picked up on this venture was this: just because you can ' t see ' em it doesn ' t mean they aren ' t there. Furthermore, we found that a strep was not something a danseuse did at the burlesque or that a staph was anything but a shillelagh. We also learned what an orgy was. We had these periodically. Some of us are still trying to find out if its worse to fall into a Dutch canal or crawl into a North Carolina cave (with regard to Leptospirae ) . Our sad lament on these ill-fated days echoed through the halls, " Is A really greater than B? " 31 " Jfc ' ' ■ mM J. A. Wagner Professor of Neuropathology Head, Division of Neuropathology C. B. Antonius Assistant Professor H. I. FiRMINGER Professor and Head L. KlEFER Assistant Professor R. B. SCHULTZ Associate Pr ofessor Ml H. DORFMAN Instructor Z. N. Naib Assistant Professor, Head of Division of Cytopathology ft H A W. B. King Assistant Professor of Forensic Pathology C. Wood Assistant Professor A. J. Noble, Jr. Instructor R. S. Fisher Professor of Forensic Pathology, Head of Division of Forensic Pathology c . i i E H. C. Freimuth Associate Professor of Forensic Pathology D. L. Reimann Associate Professor T. Weinberg Associate Professor 32 How did this fish get in here Open wide please Pathology Here our Greek held us in good stead for straight- way we knew we were dealing with the study of pathos — sickness to be sure. It wasn ' t long before we ascertained what was in those big gray jars and what went on in Room 16. Our rapport with patients couldn ' t have been at a higher peak. More impor- tantly we frequently opined about our rapport with department members. No doubt about it, it really waxed and waned. Our contact with this aspect of our medical educa- tion proved to be more than intimate. The line be- tween reality and the written word became rather indistinct. Indeed, at times the distinction between what we read and what we felt became quite nebu- lous. We must admit Dr. Karnes of Student Health was frequently called upon to draw that line in question. Many of us remember only too well the short but succinct visits of the Medical Examiners. The organs they brought held many an interesting answer — the difference between the subterfuge of an untimely demise and the demise secondary to Mother Nature. Their slides were also revealing — some of us are still weak from the viewing. A burning question remains — the significance of Dr. Firminger ' s tie-clip ax? Hm-m-m, our mortality ' rate iiuis rather high! 33 C. J. Carr Part-time Instructor E. B. Truitt, Jr. Associate Professor J. C. Krantz, Jr. Professor and Head R. M. BURGISON Associate Professor J. J. O ' Neill Associate Professor R. MUSSER Assistant Professor and this was my Easter bunny It might be easier with a blade. and I slept for 72 hours! Pharmacology What ' s in a pill? This and other questions came up during our pleasant sojourn. Were we amazed when we gleaned that such big molecules were put in such small pills! And when a big man would take that small pill! We finally figured out how a Carter ' s Little Liver pill knew where to go. Among our souvenirs of the course we might in- clude the following: quinine should always be mixed gingerly with gin before administration; morphine should be taken on the honeymoon; ouabaine should be taken for speedy relief of acute heart failure — if symptoms persist, contact your nearest physician. Undoubtedly there ' s no need to lecture on the quality of our lectures, either in content or especially in delivery. Guest speakers were hard pressed to even match our mentor, much less surpass him. A Thursday tea was usually in order and appro- priately at four. While cookies were daintily served with the orange pekoe, the meat of the course was served from the rostrum. Ours was the year the Paul Ehrlich Award of $100 was instituted for the best " Tea Party " speech. Our winner must have been independently flush for he was absent at its award. Did he ever get it? 35 C. L. Spurling Associate Professor M. S. Sacks Professor and Head ROUBEN JlJI Instructor in Medicine M. A. Andersch Associate Professor J. M. Masters instructor in Medicine I told you Kennedy would make it! r w VjjpH f$, , Which race was that? But Bence Jones isn ' t an electrolyte Clinical Pathology The rudiments of haematology, parasitology and scutology were laid bare before our very eyes. Win- trobe, Ham and Max were our constant companions. With a little assistance we soon became quite versed in how to diagnose tired blood and the more obvious causes of pruritus ani. How smart we thought we were when we diagnosed this case: A two-year-old, unmarried, colored male, non-veteran, Blue Cross positive, presented with a positive metabisulfite test. Sicklemia in a sickler born of a long line of sicklers. Protean protozoans, too, caught our eye. Just browsing through the names was like going over a South Sea travel folder. After a moment ' s thought, though, it became apparent how unromantic some far-away places could be and how far from good the " good ol ' days " could be — especially without try- parsamide or primaquin. Beware the cry of the Tsetse fly and the haunting strains of Loa Loa. .37 H. C. Bowie Associate O. C. Brantigan Professor W. W. Walker Associate Professor R. E. Martin Instructor H. E. Reifschneider Associate Ticklish fellow — isn ' t he? Table three ' s hood closed 45 seconds early! r Doctor, the esophagus doesn ' t go thru the foramen magnum Surgical Anatomy Back to the fossae and foramina for a few fine points we missed. There we were back in " gross " lab to refine all we had heretofore learned. Only this time each had a mere one-sixth of a cadaver rather than a one-fourth. Whereas we had become experts on either the left or the right side, we were to become upper or lower experts. We operated on our " patients " frequently, even without premedication. And not one anesthetic or post-op death did we cause. Some technique! Com- plicated chirurgical soirees, such as the plantar ap- proach to hypophysectomy for those with big " pits " and endarterectomy for a fecalith in the Circle of Willis for those with rectumular ophthalmitis, be- came standards in our repertoire. We ' ll all concede our confraternity in anatomy was most worthwhile, but still and all we ' ve observed that at the end of it there are at least two well defined disadvantages. Yes, that was the end of another year and we were again trying to rid ourselves of that formic essence. And, too, we again knew not about the foot. 39 Clinical University Hospital I I I e 111 I i ip ' _-_. I WW. « ■ ' :: ' iV:: ' -f ' ' - ' ' " r: r- I Years Greene Street IC 42 1 m ' : r : If r n ,V f -iK- ■iiF «»ip ; ' ,j„. ;,■ — p. Edgar, D. Child, J. Closson, D. Musgerd, L. Mliihiu, P, M astan, R. AkCormak, A. .s.u..ii, C, Baiiiiian, M. Koilnick, W. Sothoron, F. Felser, L. Breschi, J. Buchman, I. Hawkins, C. Fratto, J. Rupkt. R ju 2: — H. Dugan, A. Traum, A. Cohen, J. Bowerman, P. Kohlepp, R. Bokat, J. Pratt, M. Bradley, T. Cullis, W. Johnstone, E. Hunt, K. Malan. R. Klimes, M, Whorton, L. Ferber, A. Lachman, D. Paul, D. Lehman, V. Vilk. Row 3. ' — I. Anderson, C. Heinritz, H. Gendason, D. Weiss, H. Gaither, D. Cramton, M. Shefferman, T Patterson, G. Tempus fugit — and has. The street has been crossed. Boards are behind ( and ahead, too ) . Many ' s the harrowing experience left in the wake. How many times did doubts of the future loom large. To some they probably were ( and insurmountable ) . De- funct as a class per se, except perhaps on Saturday mornings, the small group setup took over. Indi- vidual personality stress and strain felt the impact of working together so closely. Night schedules were a dime a dozen. They were manipulated many times Junior in a week. Patient division proved another puzzle to be coped with and solved. Always somebody had an idea how to iron things out — his very own idea. Some even managed to work in three or four outside jobs at the same time. To figure out where to be at a certain time ( much less to actually get there ) one had to be a country lawyer to read the fine print or an experienced New York commuter on the run with his time table in hand. And then like a big leaguer wind up sliding into clinic and between rapid Bchmieler, J. Farinholt, B. Karpers, A. Franklin, K. Bonovich, L. Figelman, H. Semer, T. Moshang, P. PuUen, L. Love, G. Sophocleus, K. iTuttle, L. Lott, W. Law, B. Lindberg, R. Stephenson. Row 4: B. Goldstein, O. Steinwald, R. Bahr, L. Gallager, E. Luxenberg, J. Baker, R. Updike, S. Klatsky, E. Koenigsberg, P. MacMurray, P. Zikoski, D. Lanphear, F. Zampiello, W. Weglicki, V. Peterson, P. Ensor, D. Pstrushansky. Class breaths inquire of a patient ' s SOB or DOE. Some other new aspects of life came to the fore. Although orals were not entirely new they had a different twist. Still ringing in the ear were " Name ten causes of hypercalcemia " or " What percent of Procedures to be learned left little time to watch the course, there was no multiple choice to fall back on. Then came case presentations to the " visiting man " . Some had to do so without notes. And the last patient had seven previous admissions! Baptism by fire they called it. Time did fly, too. Journals to be read, reports to be made, patients to be seen and scut to be done. Procedures to be learned left little time to watch the clock. A year both formative and informative passed all too quickly and enjoyably. But it has led up to the fastest year of all, a year for most to become a senior and graduate for the third time. 45 T. E. Woodward Professor and Head E. F. Cotter Associate Professor W. C. Ebeling, III Assistant Professor and Head, Division Gastroenterology H. M. Robinson, Jr. Professor of Derma- tology and Head, Division Derma- tology -; C. Van Buskirk Professor of Neur- ology and Head, Division Neurology S. T. R. Revell, Jr. Professor and Head, Division Hyper- tension L. SCHHRLIS Associate Professor and Head, Division Cardiology 1 ' S. E. MULLER Assistant Professor K. V. Swisher, Jr. Assistant Professor Medicine I. Freeman Assistant Professor J. K. Mi;rlis Professor of Neurology and Head, Division Electroencephalo- graphy M. S. Sacks Professor and Head, Division Clinical Pathology W. S. Spicer Associate Professor and Head. Division Pulmonary Diseases W. K. Morgan Instructor R. T. Parker Associate Professor S. SCHERLIS Assistant Professor C. L. Spurling Associate Professor CM f ' m M p. B. Storey Associate Professor «J J. N. Snyder Instructor 46 F. R. McCrumb Associate Professor and Head, Division Infectious Diseases A. F. SCHUBART Assistant Professor and Head. Division Arthritis J. S. WISWELL Associate Professor F. J. BORGES Assistant Professor 1. WiLFSON, Jr. U. A. Andersch S. LiU T. N. Carey H. J. L. Marriott Associate Associate Professor Associate Professor Associ-ate Professor and Head, Division Physical Diagnosis E. T. LISANSKV J. R. Karns T. B. Connor G. Entwisle S. E. Greisman Associate Professor Associate Professor and Head Student Health Associate Professor and Head. Division Endoct ' jo nii] Assistant Professor Assistant Professo, C. E. Shaw Associate R. T. Singleton Assistant Professor V. Smith Professor L. F. Gonzalez I lis true tor B. HULFISH Instructor L. A. Kochman Associate C. E. Leach Assistant Professor L. A. M. Krause Professor W. F. Cox III Associate Robert MossrR Instructor 4ih S. J. Van LiLL III Associate Al This one pays 5 to 2 . . . ' Ya seen one, ya seen ' em all, Harry " Dig the curves on this one Medicinally speaking, our first exposure to real live patients came during our short course in Physical Diagnosis. After dispensing with a few basic prin- ciples, such as being able to tell whether a patient was well or sick, alive or otherwise, we began delving into more sophisticated areas. Encephalitides, hepa- titides, myocarditides, nephritides and plenty of cir- rhoses came within our yen and ken. Although we may not have been experts at this early date, we had learned a little bit about a lot of things. Within the hierarchy we may have viewed our position as less than stable, rather labile. Though we ranked very low on the scale, even so short a fall from it evoked our consternation. Hence, one might say we were spastic just a bit. We went " round and round " seeking, sifting, screening and stringing the proverbial pearls. As Ovid once said, " Semper paratus " ; we were not to be outdone and were (al- most ) always ready for the next stray question aimed at us. now let ' s see . . Within the hectic realm of WoodwardeysviUe lay a quiet little corner of the world, enveloped in aromas known to all, wherein we learned the subtleties of guaiac and clinitest. Of course, our studies ranged far and wide, from the serum porcelain titer to the routine O P. Nostalgia grips us as we recall how silently and swiftly we walked those halls — purpose in our every step. Are there really maltese crosses in this yellow fluid held within our vise-like grip? Our nine weeks on Junior Medicine seemed so very short. We had seen and done much. But really enough? All too soon orals were upon us, and only then did we realize how little we actually had done. ( Thank Heaven for the Merck Manual! ) The gaunt- let over for a time now, we evolved to the " acting intern " stage and the " private practice " of the medi- cal OPD. Humane as we were, the patients on the ward nevertheless still got " split down the middle " . They got worked up and we worn down. Consequently, to get a little sleep Nocte rounds served as useful devices. Grounded in TPC ( total patient care ) as we were, we still frequently encountered the true test of our Look, it moved " Sack time " What is this, u party? Chloro is a combination of three inedicaUy proven ingredients. principles each A.M. At an early hour, usually bright (and we not so), venipuncture rounds would begin. Then, how to maintain rapport with a sleeping patient? But the job got done — or we done in. Changing the pace from allegro to andante, some of us went from the ward to the OPD (others vice versa ) , Dr. Schubart ' s bailiwick. To each his own — booth, desk and " visiting man " . IVP, PSP, BSP, PPD and KUB, not to mention EKG and EEG and especially SPT (serum porcelain titer). Then with a flourish, a referral to Comprehensive Clinic. Thus, we stand prepared. Internship, ready or not, here we come. And, of course, in the words of the ancient Greek G. P., latros, we ' ll all remember, " Don ' t percuss ' til you see the whites of their eyes " . From the land of sky blue waters 50 You bet your sweet what? k . " A. Shapiro Assistant Processor H. M. Robinson, Jr. Professor and HeaJ BiTi H. M. Robinson, Sr. Professor Emeritus F, A. Ellis Associate Professor M. M. Cohen Associate f R. C. V. Robinson Associate Professor D, Bacharach Instructor W. Dvorink Instructor E. S. Blrlston Assistant Professor W. R. Bunuick Associate M. B. Hollander Assistant Professor S. N. Yaffe Instructor J. Raskin Associate F. Strahan Instructor Dermatology Though our contact has been evanescent the teach- ings have been effervescent. Certain things have been made rather apparent — a few saHent features of the venereal diseases; a flat papule is a raised macule; and there is no such thing as a scab. Frequently called Dept. " S " , it was nonetheless run by the three " R ' s " . Dey say I has " derupted " . ' ' Modern surgery is a far cry from the barbers of old and the traveling surgeons going from town to town doing in the populace. No longer is an opera- tion a race against the clock. It can be truly said that surgery is an art of long standing. Our introduction to the " cutting service " began benignly — a " clinic picnic. " Our practices thrived in some, and in other clinics they barely survived (the practices, that is ) . Visions of wens and gallbladders, gangrenous toes and hemorrhoids, too, made up the bulk of our dream centers for awhile. Various specialties dealt with special lesions and syndromes. Who doesn ' t recall the continuous bawl in orthopedics — " Low back pain ' s my C.C, suh? " After a few well placed queries (and X-rays) the G. H. Yeager Clinical Professor J. D. Young. Jr. Professor of Urology and Head. Division Urnlo, y C. R. Edwards Professor R. W. Buxton Professor and Head Surgery reply usually ended with a big supply of 50-55. And RTC PRN. Urology at times resembled speleology, especially in cystoscopy. Of course, we were always dilated to meet the patients — with strictures, to be sure. We sounded out many of our patients and solved their problems of the moment much to their relief. The French and Foley twins became our constant com- panions. Immediate satisfaction was their motto. Ask the man who has met them. Not all of us had the pleasure of a stay on neuro- surgery. Their patients frequently suffered from sudden alopecia. But as Bob Babinski used to say, " You ' ve got to get ahead in this game by keeping V R. A. Cowley J. G. Arnold, Jr. Associate Professor Professor and Head, and Head. Division Division Neuro- Thoracic Surgery logical Surgery K. F. Mech Associate A. F. Voshell Professor and Head. Division Orthopedic Surgery E. R. Shipley Associate A. R. Mansberger, Jr. Assistant Professor 52 C. L. Blanchard E. J. LiNBERG p. C. Phelan, Jr. Professor and Head, Assistant Professor Associate Division of Thoracic Surgery Otolaryngology W. H. MOSBERG, Jr. Associate in Neurological Surgery W. B. Rever, Jr. Associate G. H. Greenstein Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery E. P. Galleher R. M. S. Attar H. C. Hull R. C. Sheppard T. Flotte Instructor in Cunningham Instructor in Clinical Professor Associate Professor Urology Instructor Thoracic Surgery B. W. Armstrong E. H. Stewart, Jr. H. C Bowie R. Pierpont T. R. Adams R. M. N. Crosby Assistant Professor Associate Assistant Professor Assistant Assistant Professor Associate in Neurological Surgery (.. P. J. T. Gerlach W. D. Lynn C. A. D. J. Pessagno T. R. ORourk. Scarborough Assistant in Instructor Reifschneirer Clinical Professor Professor of Assistant Professor Otolaryngology Clinical Professor Otolaryngology 53 niT : nn and they say they ' re doctors? your trephines trimmed, your burrs buzzing and elevators up. " Naturally everyone read Through Nasal Passages with Gun and Camera. How else to learn about the ins and outs of ENT. We got the knack on how to pack the space of Kiesselbach. The deaf, the sore of throat and hoarse of cough bore their troubles to us, and with our trusty scopes we explored and cured. And there were those who heard the lusty call and There ' s only 84 cents in the kitty ■■p? " ' " V, Who wouldn ' t have a Babinski in this rig. ' spent their time in Chest. They stood and watched amongst the shivers and the crackHng valves. They also found that post-cardiectomy patients don ' t do well at all. Scrubsville was such a pleasure to us all! They ' re making brushes much stiffer this year — and soap stronger. We always wondered where that cream was that doctors and nurses used so much. But once in green we felt so clean and sterile. Meanwhile the wound gaped wide with sides so red, and in its bed the gallbladder bled. At once the surgeon said, " I Has it been that long since we ate? " Joe, the barber " : nlk " OSP say there — take a look. " And back it came so loud and clear, " You seen one — you seen ' em all. " On the ward, both night and day, the job was never really done. Both staffs kept us busy. We lubed the tubes and passed them deftly — and daftly at three A.M. Ectomies and otomies, plasties and orraphies are daily chores we ' ve come to know. We got the inside story. We ' ve groped and tried to increase our scope. At least we hope we ' ve done so slightly. One thing we ' ve certainly learned! Surgery is not just a " cutting service " . . . there ' s Pre and Post-op care too! The Boss! 56 and would you believe what he s.ud to me It ' s what ' s up front that counts. Cowley ' s still S. p. Bessman Associate Professor R. W. Baldwin Assistant Professor Director, Pediatric Seizure Clinic Per ounce of time and per dyne of energy invested on this service, pearl return rated rather high. Con- ference clinical experience ratios seemed to balance pretty well, and spasticity coefficients were mightly low. All was not always peaches and cream (or just a bowl of cherries ) but sour grapes on occasion. Each had t o develop his own approach to the antics of the kids. Grading murmurs between the screams and hearing rales among the wails was quite a feat. Many a tie was thrown by the wayside when sprayed by an S. S. Click Assistant Professor R. L. Clemmens Assistant Professor, Director Central Evalua- tion Clinic A. H. FiNKELSTEIN Professor G. S. Coffin Assistant Professor Pediatrics J. E. Bradley Professor and Head E. C. Layne Instructor G. E. Deane Instructor aliquot of a kiddies daily fluid output. Hence, we learned to keep our eye upon the stream and not the smile. Many, we opined, would state if they could — " Have we not a hole that isn ' t sacred? " Most were characteristically marked with their native products — tears, wax, mucous, saliva, sweat or meconium. Gradually our eye began to sharpen. Does he look sick? How dry or pale? Of course, he needs Wesson oil! The paler they looked the louder rang our motto in our ears — " Less than a quart (of milk) a day, 58 K. Glaser Assistant Professor R. M. N. Crosby Instructor M. K. GORTEN Assistant Professor T. A. Good Assistant Professor R. Hepner Professor A. Lyon, Jr. Instructor ▲X: S. H. Walker Instructor M. KAPPELMAN Instructor R. E. YIM Instructor K. H. Weaver Instructor f- G. J. Wells Assistant Professor S. S. SCHERLIS Assistant Professor L. SCHERLIS histructoi Mother. " Mongoloids, measles and just plain miseries reared their heads from day to day. We came, we saw and tried to conquer. One day we took a trip out Rosewood way. A concentrated dose of varied pathology met us at the snap of a finger. Out went the order — " Bring up the Sturge-Webers. " Then the clomp, clomp, clomp outside the door and in walked six — just like that. Our hearts went out. WBC (Well Baby Clinic) proved to be medicine by the numbers — take one and be served. Every day Ton ' s of fun! was family day. Two or three kiddies to be checked at once was routine. The main consideration was not to misconnect the wrong growth chart or vaccin- ate the wrong one. A kiddie is not a small adult. This we were told, and this fact was certainly confirmed. But, like an adult, he has a great love for needles except that he is louder in expressing his love. Most of all, our suspicions have been definitely confirmed — kids will be kids. Dr. Ray Wesson " I like my old fashions sweeter! A. L. Haskins Professor aud Head J. C. DUMLER Assistant Clinical Professor D. F. Kaltreider Professor E. B. MIDDLETON Assistant Professor R. S. MUNFORD Instructor I ' m ■»-• T ' f E. Hecker Assistant D. M. Solomon Assistant -. I. A. SlEGAL C. Martin G. A. Maxwell U. Villa Santa Clinical Professor Assistant Clinical Instructor Assistant 62 Para seven at age sixteen? I FH-LLQ Obstetrics - Gynecology Our tour of duty on this service served to show us how the storks did operate. For those who passed within our gates, their fates were usually predeter- mined while their mates paced the space outside. Down the hall would come the call, " Lady with a baby — not yet in arms hopefully. Then she ' d be greeted with an outstretched hand and treated with glee with an SSE. Not usually construed as constric- tors, things would get tighter after a BOA. Yes sir, while on the delivery suite we had the perineal peep or bird ' s eye view of the population boom. We learned while we earned our experience. The scheme of things was this: in our little room we ' d catch our forty winks. After only two the bell would ring. That ' s right, we ' d be needed on the consult, " Lab work, son. You know what ' s to be 63 done " . Thereupon we ' d soon embark upon manoeu- vers ( of some Belgian king named Leopold? ) . Status soon assessed, the patient ' s toil begun would relent- lessly progress. Then presently without duress they ' d press us, " Boy or girl? " We ' d scrubbed and prepped and helped the final step with or without forceps — another candidate for Babysville. Our days in the " pit " on Gynie passed fast. We saw an AB or two and found that PID was not always pulmonary inflammatory disease. Frequently we Aren ' t you forgetting something? " Douche pan hands! ' ■ .-V,VV ' ' BBP Up " ' ' No. It doesn ' t stand for British Overseas Airways and when was your LMP? realized we were stamping at disease and not stamp- ing it out. Maybe that ' s why we had tired feet half the time. Of course, the course would not have been com- plete had it not been replete with pelvimetry. And so we came to see that a svelte pelvis was more likely to develop CPD. We ' ll always confuse all those diagonals, tranverses, and A-Ps . . . and hope that the baby remembers which is " The plane of least dimen- sions " ! R. P. BOUDREAU Associate Professor J. A. LvoN Assistant Professor J. M. Dennis Professor and Head D. A. WOLFEL Assistant Professor F. G. Bloedorn Professor C. A. CUCCIA Associate Professor Bottoms up! Duh! There ' s a Ford in your future Tower to pilot, tower to pilot Radiology Lurking in the shadows some of us could always be found observing the delicate nuances of lucencies and opacities. Some things were obvious and others not so — who couldn ' t spot a " giant cell " tumor at ten paces? (Just ask Mr. Barnes). X-ray diagnosis can be very helpful. However, giving an opinion on a film requires a kind of legal consideration, for the eye oft-times gets wiped quicker than it can be blinked. The lights were out. The screen flashed green. Her fair, fat, fertile, female fortjish ways beguiled us. She ' d be proud to hang on the wall — this picture of her bladder — to prove to all its filled with gall and not a rock. Detection by inspection of a bolus going from the lip to the anus reveals, by maneuvers varied, crevices and pouches one ' d never know he had. Sleuthing through the G.I. tract reveals not all but often tells the story of the P.l. A crater here, a crop of polypi ripe for harvest or even a doughnut in the antrum may be the clue. Remember, the x-ray can help you find your " man " . 67 E. B. Brody Professor and Head R. R. MONRoi; Professor J. Raher liislruclor J. W. Reed Clinical Instructor B. Pope E. Levi A. Tan EGO Associate Professor Assistant Professor Instructor Med. Psychology Psychiatric Social Work E. T. LiSANSKY Assistant Clinical Professor I. Young Associate Professor Psychiatric Social V! ' ork W. H. SCOTT Assistant Professor Psychology S. Raines Instructor V. HUFFER Assistant Professor R. G. Grenell R. Brown M. ElCHLER W. W. Magruder L. S. KUBIE Professor of Neurology Medical Psychologist Instructor Assistant Clinical Lecturer in Psychiatry Professor 68 Nerve doctors? Mirror, mirror on the w jU . Psychiatry Among the newest of specialties, psychiatry proved to be a rather controversial cherub. We ' ve heard the knell that tells us the total patient picture is what counts. One is not just a gallbladder but a gall- bladder full of ideas, some adjusted and some not so. Overall we ' ve seen their point but not always gone along with the synthesis of ideas. Today we say we ' re " whole patient " men who realize it ' s fre- quently a matter of mind over matter. Psychesville has come to be closer to Baltimore than we thought. In this land of intrigue we ' ve tried to unravel the psychodynamics of some dynamic psychos. And at last we ' ve grasped the significance of the comprehension of apprehension and, therefore, what makes an anxious free-floater. Although we ' ve never found a good definition of neurosis and we ' ve found small difference between a manic and a maniac, we have acquired a bit of a knack in how to support an ego. Soon we gleaned from people we ' d seen: many bore so many problems that their problems had problems. Frequently, the problems were com- pounded by a hypertonic id or a flaccid super ego. And saddest of all we ' ve all been stalled with — ' And by that you mean . . . ? " Whatta ya mean, whatta ya mean, whatta ya mean? Madam this is a mental cathartic ix M. M. Henderson Instructor A. D. Richardson Assistant Professor T. M. Novak Assistant C. J. Fleischer Assistant Professor of Phys. Med. and Rehah. G. Entwisle Professor and Head P. F. Richardson Assistant Professor of Phys. Med. and Rehab. M. Tayback Associate Professor of Biostatistics H. Williams Professor of Hygiene and Public Health W. M. Wing Instructor Preventive Medicine R. D. Richards Professor and Head M. Kim Fellow M. R. Hagigh Instructor S. L. Fox Assistant Professor Take me to your leader Opthalmology Oh how they idolized the eyes! Pinpoint pupils and fundi fair. We ' ve seen a pair or two. On peering in the globus oculi, have the patient stare. And as he glares without despair, gaze within the haze. If through that glaze you ' ve not discerned the myope ' s hopes, at least you ' ve learned he ' s got a hocus focus. p. R. Hackett Professor M. Helrich Professor and Head P. Safar Baltimore City Hospital N. B. HOLLINGSWORTH Assistant Professor H ' IP F. COMPAGNONE Instructor T. HOSONO Instructor M. I. Gold Instructor anybody got a hairpin Anesthesiology It is better to have sat and passed gas in vain than not to have sat and never have passed gas. There are those of us who have trekked the halls and O.R. ' s of our Alma Mater and passed it; and those of us who have done so at Women ' s; and even at Mercy. Then, too, there are those of us who have gon .- on " Safari " into the wilds of Baltimore City Hospital to practice " jungle anesthesia " . One soul while on the stool even passed it on himself — inadvertently. He bears now the scar to prove it. ORGANIZATIONS Marsh (Chairman;, Moshang (Junior Representative). Honor Council The Honor Council has just completed its fourth year of service to the School of Medicine. The Class of ' 61 is the first class to have spent its four years under the Honor Code. The Honor Council is composed of an elected representative from each of the four classes and a chairman, the latter a member of the Senior Class who served as Honor Council representative during his junior year. The functions of the Honor Council are two in number: hearing alleged breaches of the Honor Code and interpretation of the provisions. The Council is not empowered to serve as a punitive body. It functions rather as a fact finding group, attempting to ascertain if in fact breaches of the Honor Code have been committed, hearing testimony of witnesses to the alleged offenses and examining pertinent evidence. Disciplinary action for offenses against the Honor Code may be instituted only by the Faculty, to whom the results of the Honor Council ' s investiga- tions are relayed. All proceedings of the Honor Council are con- ducted in secrecy and its findings are considered to be confidential in nature. 74 Waters, Kopilnick. Weglicki, Lindstrom, Bowerman ( President j, Dawkins, Cushard, Rupke, Inglesby. Student Council At monthly meetings the Student Council mem- bers sample the armchair atmosphere of the hospital board room. The odors of formaldehyde, ether and alcohol are placed aside as the business of the medical school is handled by the Council leaders and sub- committees. Topics large and small, varying from the disbursement of the Student Activities Fund to the procurement of table cloths for a school dance are considered regularly. The Council consists of thirteen representatives elected by their fellow students. Three members are present from each class of the Medical School and another member contributes as the president of the Student American Medical Association. As integral executors of the student government, these students direct and formulate educational, social, athletic, and loan fund policies on our campus. The councilmen are honored and privileged in serving their classmates and in having the excellent advise and earnest cooperation of Dean William S. Stone and Associate Dean Dietrich C. Smith. 75 Heyman, Berkow, Ifarraguerri, Acosta-Otero, Myerburg, Oster, Brouillette, Girod (President), Bessman (Faculty Advisor). Bachur, Dudney, Ortel, Goodman, Hofkin, Diacoyanis, Cerda. Alpha Omega Alpha " To be worthy to serve the suffering " The Alpha Omega Alpha is a non-secret, non- profit Honor Medical Society. Founded in 1902 at the College of Medicine of the University of Illinois, it is the only order of its kind in Medical Schools on this continent. Out Beta Chapter of Maryland was organized in 1949 and since that time it has been ably guided by prominent members of our faculty and house staff. The AOA program at Maryland has, for the past several years, included an annual lecture by an out- standing leader in the field of medicine and research. This year, we are proud to have presented Dr. Arthur Kornberg, I960 Nobel Prize Winner, as our guest speaker. In addition, a spring initiation banquet is usually held and original research papers of students are presented. Membership in the AOA is based entirely on scholarship, personal honesty and potential leader- ship, and its objective is to promote research and scholarship and to recognize high attainments in medical practice and related fields among the gradu- ates. 76 Sikoski, Marsh, Riter. Litrenta (President), Rupke, Sarles. Inter-Fraternity Council The Interfraternity Council, now in its fifth year, was formed to further the interests and improve the coordination and cooperation of the member groups. The Council is composed of two representatives from each of the three medical fraternities: Nu Sigma Nu, Phi Beta Pi and Phi Delta Epsilon. The IFC organizes the Freshmen Orientation Pro- gram, coordinates the rushing program, operates a used book and microscope store, and sponsors a yearly lectureship. The 1961 IFC Lectureship was presented by Dr. Howard B. Andervont, Chief of the Biological Laboratories of the National Cancer Insti- tute at the National Institutes of Health. The IFC is represented on the Student Activities Committee and although only advisory and co- ordinating in its capacity, represents a strong bond between the fraternities at the Medical School. 77 For the fifty-eighth consecutive year on the Mary- land campus, Nu Sig opened its doors to the Fresh- man chiss early in September with its annual " Meet the Anatomy Professors " evening. This was the beginning of a social year that was highlighted by the presentation to Dr. John Morris Reese of the third Annual Alumni Award for his outstanding contributions to the fraternity and the medical com- munity. The social year ended with a picnic at the farm of Dr. John Wagner. The Alumni Drive was more successful than ever this year. Each year there grows a deeper relation- ship between the active chapter and the alumni. Each year we hear from more of the alumni and hope to publish a directory in the near future. Nu Sig was the only fraternity on campus this year that maintained a house. We are always fighting to stay ahead with maintenance and this summer plans are being made to undertake major repairs on the house. Through social gatherings, business meetings and personal conversations we are gaining a richer, fuller and more meaningful medical education. As the seniors depart to the practice of medicine, we are assured that their membership has contributed to their complete maturity as a physician. A.ACOSTA C. eERNER J BROWEUL J CEROJ • " W " " PREEDER J.REEVES ( in J MARSH PRESIDENT R SCHII.LACI L WHITE LOCK bradlEv wjohnstone b karpers „ n p. o. E B U S C i 1 J c OY fME ;oYrME T DAWK in; T ELDER RP MERCHANT H PADlLLA 78 , W DUDNEY C QIROD C IFARRAQUIRR, j LIGHT T MC GEOY tt n H GAITHER VICE-PRESIDENT Sfty r7gj gjp J RVRINHOLT " 1 J RVRINHOLT TREASURER N BROUILLETTE C PRESSER ERITER R SARLES BBROUGHTON J r BAKER o - R MC CORMCK HSOTHORON tbRESLIN W EGlTU A HOFFMATM HARVEV M MAVRES TlNGLP y P INSLEY R, B KENNJAN G LElAIND ' -3V S. V =«3DR1GUEZ r BuFFALIi K STECHER E iNOSTRc S KEV AE. 0-:.v 79 ' sm Leventhal, Litrenta, Fueureram, Koenigsburg, Burgan. 80 The Phi Delta Epsilon fraternity was founded at the University of Cornell Medical College in New York City on October 19, 1901 This success was followed rapidly by the establishment of other chapters in middle west and Atlantic coastal cities. The chapters at the Johns Hopkins School of Medi- cine and the College of P hysicians and Surgeons merged into one chapter at the University of Mary- land. On December 28, 1918, Alpha Phi Sigma merged with the Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity. This made our fraternity one of the largest of the medical fraternities in existence, a position which has been maintained up to the present. . - 1 Phi Delta Epsilon Phi Delta Epsilon today functions on a nationwide scale consisting of 50 active chapters and 38 graduate clubs comprising over 14,500 members. Locally, the chapter fosters a diverse program through the sponsoring of medical and scientific seminars, scien- tific research programs, student endowment funds, social and cultural activities and many annual school projects. The Phi Delta Epsilon fraternity is an organiza- tion providing the student physician with a means whereby he may strengthen, enhance and equilibrate his entire professional and private life. 81 Stephenson, Edgar, Anderson, Heinritz, Bahr, Buchman, Lehman, De ' la-Pizza, Rupke. Breschi, Zampiello, Closson, Bonovich, Zikoski, Musg- jerd, Merring, Sophocleus, Vilk, Petrushansky. Phi Beta Pi Phi Beta Pi is now the second largest medical fraternity with a total of 39 chapters and a member- ship of 35,000. The National Directory of all members includes such illustrious names as Arey, Furstenburg, Larsen, Leake, Mayo, Whipple, Figge, Krantz, Krahl, Stewart, Fredenwald and Morris. The Zeta Chapter has played an active part in Medical School affairs for many years. In 1958-1959 there was a brief period of inactivity when the fraternity house was demolished to make way for the new library. In I960, Archon Gregory Delli-Pizzi reactivated the Zeta Chapter and plans were made for expansion and assumption of the role of leader- ship which the fraternity had enjoyed in the past. By 1961 the membership had reached 64 and included many of the campus leaders. Plans were carried out for the acquisition of a large, air-conditioned fra- ternity house. Activities were intensified and a series of lectures by prominent brothers was established. The fraternity owes a debt of gratitude to the other campus fraternities for their encouragement. We wish to express our thanks to them and look forward to another year of fraternity and cooperation in campus affairs. 82 Krahl, Entwisle, Dawkins, Ware, Farinholt, Joeres, Key, Rupke, Patterson, Weglicki, Acosta-Otero, Hayes, Bowerman, Turtle, Stephenson. Student American Medical Association The Student American Medical Association is a service organization whose purpose is to advance the profession of medicine and to contribute to the wel- fare and education of the medical student. On a national level SAMA publishes the New Physician, a journal edited especially for the medical stude nt, and annually sponsors student competition in the area of original research papers and scientific exhibits. The University of Maryland Chapter has a mem- bership of about 300 medical students. Our activities have expanded in the past few years to include the SAAIA Nt ' tfsletter. an Internship Evaluation File in the library, the annual Mock Trial, an orientation program for medical school applicants and an in- tensive Careers in Medicine program. This career program is conducted by medical students who visit high schools throughout the Baltimore area to pre- sent first-hand impressions of medical school and the profession of medicine. Interest aroused by these visits encouraged SAMA to sponsor its first Career Guidance Day this year. These local activities are organized by SAMA representatives who also represent the University of Maryland at regional and national medical student meetings. In addition, Maryland ' s SAMA Chapter received national recognition when Chapter presi- dent, William Weglicki, was elected Chairman of the National Standing Committee on Current Trends. 83 Women ' s SAM A In 1957 a group of student wives met and laid the foundation for the Maryland Chapter of the Women ' s Auxiliary to the Student American Medical Association. These wives had become aware of the necessity to develop an intellectual curiosity toward their husbands ' chosen profession. Every student wife is invited to become a member, thus the organization also permits a closer association among the wives. With these two objectives in mind, the monthly meetings are planned to include a wide range of topics. The Welcoming Tea for new wives inaugurated the activities for this year, followed by the annual Pediatrics Christmas Party, the Red Cross First Aid Course, and the Newsletter publications. A housing information service has been established for the bene- fit of interns and residents throughout the Baltimore hospitals. For the fourth consecutive year, the Aux- iliary will participate in the planning of the Dean ' s Day Tea. A charter member of the National Auxiliary, our chapter has played an active role at the annual conventions. The Womens SAMA has become firmly estab- lished as an integral part of the Medical School. Since approximately fifty percent of the student body is composed of married men, it is felt that the Auxiliary fulfills a real need and a useful purpose. 84 Weglicki, Litrenta, Bowerman, Girod. Dean Smith (Faculty Advisir; Inglesby. Robinson (Faculty Advisor). Berner, Stephenson. Mrs. Southall ( secretary ) . Vann, Light, Student Activities Committee The general assembly of the Medical School is the Student Activities Committee with Associate Dean, Dietrich C. Smith as its Faculty Advisor. This govern- ing body includes faculty members, representatives of student organizations and publications, student class presidents, the president of the Women ' s Aux- iliary to the Student American Medical Association, and a representative of the Medical School Alumni Association. The Committee was established in order to co- ordinate and arrange the activities of all student groups and to provide a closer union of the student body with the faculty. One important responsibility of its members during the few meetings that arc held each year is to assist in preparing the Student Activities Budget and to supervise Budget expendi- tures. These affairs are accomplished efficiently every year because of the interested and capable faculty participation and because of the industrious contri- butions of the president of the Women ' s Auxiliary of the Student American Medical Association and those of the student directors of the Student Council, the Honor Council, The Student American Medical Association, the individual classes, the Interfraternity Council, Alpha Omega Alpha, the Yearbook, the Student American Medical Association Newsletter, and the Orientation Committee. 85 86 ACTIVITIES ■ f! _S. at, ' JiSkfetui. JSBf. „.. . " - " ' • ' III iiOillTiiililllliiiliHilllilllmillimiilB ««-..fai«i...iliWiiTifiiii aiirii ' Mlr, ..... -.. . GRADUATES ' gje ' ' ANDREAS ABRAHAM ACOSTA-OTERO, b.s., m.d. Santnrce. Puerto Rico UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO Andy . . . quiet and capable . . . AOA in junior year . . . Nu Sig house manager and duet Puerto Rican Christmas carols . . . Chevrolet with Maryland plates in association with Puerto Rican license and traffic tickets . . . summers spent collecting " Don Q " and schistosomes at home . . . Rotating Internship and seniorita await return . . . plans now are for Surgical Residency. JAMES RICHARD APPLETON, a.b, m.d. West Point. New York UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Skipper . . . charter member of the class cyclists . . . summers spent as park policeman and Fellow in Ophthalmology . . . famous for his fourth degree tear in a PARA 10 . . . married Linda his childhood sweetheart . . . Rotating In- ternship at Albany Hospital . . . future plans include train- ing in " head and neck surgery " and return to his native New England. jCLAu . i - W ' C 94 NEIL RICHARD ARBEGAST, m.d. Bait! more. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Neil . . . noted for abiliry as a physical diagnostician . . . interested in the Pulmonary " Group " . . . Dean of the South Baltimore movement and proficient English teacher . . . summers in Anesthesiology at Women ' s Hospital . . . plans include a Mixed Internship at U.H. . . . future career in General Surgery. nio oju eju UAA NICHOLAS ROBERT BACHUR, SR., a.b., p j.d., m.d. Baltimore, Marylaml JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY Nick . . . late addition via Dr. Sam Bessman ' s lab . . . acquired Ph.D. during senior year of Med . . . class expert on Krebs or TCA cycle . . . browbeat freshmen with his knowledge . . . many interests including raising and training beagles for field ... a do-it-yourselfer . . . sailor . . . fisherman and hunter . . . AOA . . . married Joan, 1952 . . . Nick, Jr. and Suzanne . . . Internship at U.H. followed by more Biochemistry. f 95 GEORGE EUGENE BANDY, a.b., m.d, Findlay. Ohio BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY George . . . affable, well liked and conscientious . . . married Shirley Ann, 1955 . . . additions include Greg and Cynthia . . . summers at Edgewood and Fellow in Hypertension (tub team ) . . . formaldehyde free, over-the-cadaver book holder patent . . . Public Health Internship, Marine Hospital, Baltimore followed by Pediatrics or Internal Medicine. ( eor e £ S j JOSEPH CHANDLER BATTAILE, a.b., m.d. Memphis. Tennesiee CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY ' OF AMERICA Joe . . . the silent thinker from " behind the doors " . . . honor graduate from Catholic University . . . " Mr. Psychiatry " since freshman year . . . summer Fellowships also in chosen field . . . Rotating Internship at South Baltimore followed by return to University Hospital for Psychiatry Residency. - A ii ie A- ) % JOSEPH WILLIAM BERKOW, a.b., m.a., m.d. Bill 1 1 7 1 ore. Mciryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY ' Joe . . . serious, industrious but easy going . . . biochem a snap due to M.A. in Biochemistry . . . AOA in junior year and now Secretary-Treasurer . . . summers in Histochemistry at Sinai and " The John " . . . straight Surgery Internship followed by a Residency in Ophthalmology. iloawti . z ' iXw . Q: CARL FREDERICK BERNER, a.b., m.d. Ogden Dunes. Ind ' utnii CORNELL UNIVERSITY Carl . . . big " lineman " from Cornell . . . from land of Lake Michigan ' s Dunes . . . politician par excellence . . . class Vice President x 1, President x 2, Secretary of Nu Sig . . . married " Po " in ' 57 . . . recent addition baby Ann in ' 60 . . . summers as brew taster at " Boh " , Pathology Fellow and staff physician for Inland Steel . . . coming next . . . straight Surgical Internship, University Hospital, Seattle, Washington with possible future in Orthopedics. t ,HA 97 OSCAR HAROLD LEE BING, B.S., M.D., IFw Hempstead. New York WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY Oscar . . . quiet with many smarts . . . well known for his knowledge of the actions of catechol amines following two summers with Department of Endocrinology . . . member of Phi Delta Epsilon . . . straight Medicine at Boston City Hospital . . . future in Biochemistry. - JT? £, - 2). MYRON BARRY BLUM, A.B., m.d. Bidtitnore, MaryLind JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY Barry . . . corvette and country club . . . always a smile . . . suntan from long hours on tennis courts and golf links . . . occasional pasteboard encounter . . . Phi D.E. . . . summers as camp counselor. Medical O.P.D. and Pediatrics . . . frequent dates till collared . . . post graduation matri- mony . . . Internship at Sinai followed by Dermatology or Ophthamology. u TPi- . 98 ANTHONY RUSSELL BOCCUTL a.b., m.d. Tows on, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY Tony . . . class pseud ocynic . . . lectures on how bad it is . . . previous business experience . . . underlying enjoyment . . . reputation as best chef in class, particularly where spaghetti is concerned . . . " Don ' t you believe it? " . . . calculated sophistication . . . Phi Beta Pi . . . musketeer from So. Balto. Gen. . . . summer with Dr. Wisseman led to publication . . . married Betty Jo prior to Med. School . . . one thriving son . . . Internship at South Baltimore General followed by training in Surgical subspecialty. CLiaM tv, j. 3i --d THOMAS GRIMMETT BRESLIN, a.b., m.d. Wanvick. Rhode Island BROWN UNIVERSITY Tom . . . first love is a " fourteen international " with mast . . . seldom asked to prove age . . . docks boat in his living room for repairs . . . summers spent teaching sailing and in externship in Rhode Island . . . Rotating Internship at Rhode Island Hospital, Providence . . . future in Surgery. yjlyQ-yytdOO ' ■ ' Zj2, JJi. y 99 JOSEPH NELSON BROUILLETTE, b.a., d.d.s., m.d. Brattleboro, Vermont ST. MICHAELS COLLEGE J. Nelson . . . affable, scholarly and still a bachelor, in fact and spirit . . . AOA . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . originated " mushy brain syndrome " . . . financier due to evening and summer practice of dentistry . . . career of the week ... a real grinder . . . Rotating Internship at Henry Ford, Detroit . . . future undetermined. I. d -i ' JOHN NELSON BROWELL, JR., B.s., m.d. Wesl Hyatt SI tile. Maryland UNIVERSITi ' OF MARYLAND Jack . . . numerous intradermal identifications . . . ex-cook, USN . . . stale jokes . . . four years in transit from D.C. . . . Nu Sig . . . T.M.M. . . . married Ann on Bastille Day, 1956 . . . summers as extern at Prince George ' s Hospital . . . back to USN for Rotating Internship at Great Lakes Naval Hospital . . . possible G.P. Q y , ? 100 JAMES CARROLL BULGER, b.s., d.d.s., m.d. Water bury . Conn ecticut UNIVERSITi ' OF MARYLAND Jim . . . never xt a loss for words . . . SAMA representative for short time . . . anesthesiology at " City " prior to this matriculation . . . practice in evenings . . . longest matricu- lation in history of U. of Md frequent heated discussions . . . early bird . . . married Joan, 1956 . . . Elizabeth and Kathleen . . . Internship at Mercy with future in Pediatrics or OB-GYN. uo Ms, At.h. MILTON HERBERT BUSCHMAN, JR.. b.s., m.d. Bait more, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Milt . . . quiet and thoughtful . . . psychiatrically oriented since freshman year . . . resulting in numerous adeptly avoided barbs . . . physical culture at YMCA and elsewhere coupled with a bright red convertible plus bachelorhood . . . trips down rapids and skiing tours . . . numerous con- current externships . . . serving papers . . . summers in Psychiatry at Perry Point and Neurology at U.H future, following Rotating Internship at South Baltimore General is doubdess a Residency in Psychiatry. ;92y. i3 LUy j y} P?l 101 RONALD LOUIS CAIN, m.d. bnperidl. Pennsylvania UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA Bulldog . . . Virginia gentleman from Pennsylvania . . . raising and training cocker spaniels and fis h . . . horticulture . . . how to take it easy in a steel mill from experience . . . class embryology expert as freshman . . . also expert on x-ray of week thanks to Radiology technician ' s training . . . teaching Anatomy to student nurse " harem " at Sinai . . . coffee club . . . summer in OB-GYN and anosmia in E.N.T. . . . married Antje, 1956 . . . daughter Cecily Anne in 1961 . . . Rotating Internship at Latter Day Saints Hospital in Salt Lake . . . future undecided. JAMES JOHN CERDA, b.s., m.d. Brentwood. Maryland UNIVERSITi ' OF MARYLAND Jim . . . " Mr. Inside Scoop " ... a born musician, addicted to Mozart and the piano early . . . own compositions, too . . . commuted for " four " between the Mecca and Mariana . . . organization man . . . AOA, Nu Sig, class Treasurer, junior and senior year . . . summers spent catching flies and becoming a " gentleman " as ensign on USS " Champ " circum- cising and removing tattoos . . . extern at Prince George ' s General . . . married Mariana in 1957 . . . Jim, Junior, the " Tiger " in 1959 . . . Rotating Internship at Harrisburg General followed by Residency in Internal Medicine or General Practice. Q2 n€ . " 102 FRANCIS ALDEN CLARK, JR., m.d. Charleston, West Virginia WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY " Pat " (etiology unknown) . . . barefoot boy with cheek . . . class scribe . . . has appetite, needs CARE package . . . stays lean by running lean dog . . . official Thiotepa taster . . . Honor Council Rep. as senior . . . summers in Department of Microbiology 1959 and Sparrows Point Hospital, I960 . . . married Mary in 1954 . . . Rotating Internship at University, future undecided. hc . d.( i - ' - JOHN WARDEN CLARK, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland BROWN UNIVERSITY Warden . . . class connoisseur of fine arts, opera, the symphony and exponent of imported movies . . . T.V.? . . . admixture of medicine and the arts a la Dr. M. Lord . . . world traveler . . . psychiatrically oriented via Perry Point early . . . followed by renewed interest in Medicine . . . and Ellie . . . special tobacco from Feders for the " stove " . . . Internship at Mercy followed by Residency in Internal Medicine. VU LoJ ( }-0. 103 ANGELA WEBB CLARKE, b.s., m.d. Bill ti more, Maryland MORGAN STATE COLLEGE Angie . . . also " Toni " . . . " Weelll, I " , . . . the battle of females in medicine advanced one more step . . . unruffled . . . knowledge via the question . . , frequent Fellowships, including State Health Department, Fort Howard and Army Chemical Center . . . from A. Webb to A. Clarke last year . . . migration to West for Internship at Hospital of the Good Samaritan in Los Angeles followed by a Dermatology Residency. dufLtjM eLiyii KENNETH LEE CLONINGER, b.s., m.d. Newton. North Carolina DAVIDSON COLLEGE Ken . . . grits and gravy personified . . . Southern Gentleman specializing in hookworm infestation . . . distinctive ambul- atory motions . . . " Mornin yo ' all " and " crazy fools " . . . expert on all brands of bourbon and " shine " . . . transporta- tion via ticket laden Cadillac . . . expert woodsman from Yellowstone experience . . . Europe via Citroen . . . plans Internship at U.H. followed by a career in Surgery — in the South of course. ■yyc H oi ' Tnn 104 MAURICE MORTON DAVIDSON, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY Maurie . . . late joiner of our class due to year in Pathology between junior and senior year . . . always punctual . . . extra serious . . . known to blush on occasion . . . " hotrods " a V.W. . . . weekends camping in summer, skiing in winter . . . best collection of pictures of x-rays in class . . . frequently a class officer — Student Council and class Secretary . . . Phi D.E. . . . Neurology Fellowship and Neurological Research . . . married Phyllis in 1958 . . . Internship at Jackson Memorial in Miami — after that, undecided. 97 i GREGORY M. DELLI-PIZZI, B.S., m.d. New York, New York UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND " Pizza " . . . member of coffee club . . . four years com- muting from D.C. . . . supersales man for Wyeth . . . con- vinced that Equanil is the wonder drug . . . entertaining with baritone notes ... So. Bait. Gen. . . . chest diseases, particu- larly emphysema — including published papers . . . President, Phi Beta Pi as junior . . . married Ricky . . . Internship at South Baltimore then back to N.Y. for Residency in Internal Medicine. ,(SUa c ' - L7jiJ ' yy f ' ' 105 KARL WARNER DEVENPORT, b.s., m.d. Idaho Falls. Idaho UNIVERSITY OF UTAH Karl . . . fluent German from service in Germany . . . smarts from a textbook . . . spare time as a choir director . . . deter- mined frown always present . . . summers at Holy Cross Hospital in Salt Lake and later relaxing at Yellowstone . . . Rotating Internship at Huntington Hospital, Pasadena, Cali- fornia . . . future undecided. (i -V CLe DM Yil.l) JOHN NICHOLAS DIACOYANIS, b.s., m.d. Ballimore. Marylatid UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Johnny D ... in constant attendance at U.H. . . . the bane of all CPC ' s . . . " Hey gang, got any pearls " . . . " How ' s your what? " . . . avid reader, even South African Medical journal . . . AOA . . . has learned much from clinic population . . . Pathology Fellowships x 2 . . . extern at St. Joseph ' s in the A.R. . . . collects syndromes by proper name . . . black books X 4 . . . references on everything . . . Internship at U.H. followed by r.ny one of a number of careers. jj fS iSyOBCsCLMiit 106 WILLIAM HENRY DUDNEY, a.b., m.d. Delano, California UNIVERSITi ' OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA " Dud " . . . " Don ' t sweat it, man " . . . transcontinental com- muter from U.S.C. who disregarded Horace Greeley . . . collector of " fine " parking tickets . . . class prexy, sophomore year . . . Nu Sig . . . Psychiatric orientation via summer Fel- lowship . . . Med. Care Clinic one summer also . . . married Nita and is proud papa of Leslie . . . back to California — Sea- side Hospital, Longbeach for Internship — future undecided. U a . X . DANIEL JOSEPH FALL, a.b., m.d. Timoniioti. Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE Dan . . . " the voice " . . . numerous car pool and bus rides, even hitching for an education . . . deep affection for OB . . . home horticulture with azaleas . . . V.P., senior class . . . married Pat in I960 . . . son Stephen . . . future plans include Rotating Internship at Mercy followed by a Resi- dency in Medicine. . o . - oJlL M 107 BERNADINE CAROL FAW, A.B., m.d. Baltiniore. Maryland NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MARYLAND Bernie . . . another hen makes good . . . high heels make the difference . . . years as bloodletter for Hematology Department . . . early interest in Freudian doctrine . . . dis- tinctive ambulation . . . prejudice overcome . . . hours in Judy ' s office . . . Psychiatric summer Fellowships . . . Intern- ship at South Baltimore General followed by Psychiatry. " tZx cJ ' ROBERT ALLAN FINK, m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE Bob . . . the class answer to perpetual motion . . . early addiction to Neurology and Neurosurgery ... as shown by two Fellowships in Neurology and a summer on Neuro- surgery . . . class consultant on all and any Neurological problem . . . also authority on " cyclo " anesthesia . . . Phi D.E. and SAMA Newsletter . . . Mock Trial, I960 . . . plans mar- riage post graduation followed by Internship at U. of Illinois Hospital in Chicago . . . future in Surgery. ' 4ut QUa A . ' .Q- 108 WILLIAM RUDD FLEMING, JR., A.B., m.d. Chevy Chase, Maryland OBERLIN COLLEGE Bill . . . two wheeled, open air transportation in all kinds of weather . . . quiet, pleasant naivete coupled with solemn grin on a lanky frame . . . Honor Council rep. as a freshman . . . summer Fellowships at Perry Point, U.H. and St. Agnes . . . married Elaine in 1958 .. . one girl, one boy doing well . . . Internship at Mountainside Hospital in Montclair, N.J. followed by Pediatric Residency. 2? REDWELL KAY FORBES, A.B., m.d. Elizabeth City, North Carolina DUKE UNIVERSITY R.K. . . . temporarily transplanted Johnny Reb . . . dixieland, " Dixie, " and the classics . . . misspent youth evidenced by skill at " 8 ball " . . . ardent follower of Ness and " the Italian Hour " . . . Chevy with N.C. plates, " suh! " . . . courtship by long distance — with a southern belle . . . plans to avoid dermatological conditions . . . Secretary of junior class . . . Rotating Internship at Norfolk General followed by General Practice, in the South, of course. X A 4., J, 7 109 CARLOS EDUARDO GIROD, B.S., m.d. Ponce. Puerto Rico UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO Big Carlos . . . " the Hoss " . . . frequent weekend trips to D.C. . . . " What do you think about that? " . . . deep sea fishing . . joined Andy in two part harmony on Christmas carols in Spanish . . . and at baseball games ... " 8 ball " at Student Union . . . " the pit " . . . Nu Sig . . . President of AOA as senior ... U. of P.R. exp. agriculture in summers . . . back to P.R. following graduation for wedding bells and Internship at U. of P.R. Hospital followed by more training — Medical or Surgical. LEONARD WALTER GLASS, B.S., M.S., m.d. Biihitiiore. Aiivyland FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL COLLEGE Lenny . . . also " Reds " . . . " Hey, man " and " I feel a tired coming on " . . . president of sack-rats club . . . humorous narrative personified . . . long hours on Surgery and OB . . . donated Clinical Path smears of Infectious Mono. . . . pages of notes taken . . . externship at B.C.H. and a summer in Adult Evaluation Clinic and Medical Care Clinic . . . Internship at U.H. followed by Surgery. 4 . 110 JAY STANFORD GOODMAN, a.b., m.d. Baltimore. Maryland HAVERFORD COLLEGE Jay . . . academics and social grace . . . lover of the late, late, late show . . . T.V. guide also memorized . . . exponent of Goren . . . booster of Donnatal . . . also specializes on guitar . . . transport via Volvo . . . keeping up with a class- mate . . . studies on complement . . . AOA . . . Phi D.E. . . . married Sara Jane . . . Internship, straight Medicine at U.H. followed by any one of several specialties. RONALD LOUIS GUTBERLET, A.B., m.d. Bdlti ?iore. Maryland WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITy The " gut " . . . gears shifted in auto by turning corner . . . baseball with Richards, football fan . . . small home in Ruxton . . . exponent of Ford Motor Company . . . law next. ' ' . . . still a bachelor . . . summers in Psychopharmacology with Dr. Ayd . . . also Pediatric Allergy . . . Intern at Kings County in Brooklyn, then probably Pediatrics. f rnJj . SXtH J , Z? Ill SAMUEL HOWARD HENCK, a.b., m.d. Darlington. Maryland EASTERN NAZARENE COLLEGE Sam . . . better known to some as " Herk " . . . also occasionally called " the Ghost " . . . expert at the chess board . . . and behind the wheel . . . externed at U.H. and Women ' s . . . summers at Cytopath lab and Bethlehem Steel Hospital . . . from rural Md. with a love of the land and good home cooking . . . married Joyce and has two children, Wanda and Karl . . . Rotating Internship at Akron General, then undecided. J 7 . 7 W , , A ROBERT LAWRENCE HEYMANN, A.B., m.d. Bah hn ore. Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE Bob . . . year round flat-top ... a member of " the carpool " . . . " well, " . . . coupled with an unusual laugh . . . pointed remarks and a grin . . . politically inclined as Student Council representative and jr. V.P. . . . Nu Sig . . . AOA as jr. . . . externed at Bon Secours and neurophysiologic research at Army Chemical Center . . . Beverly Ann to wife in 1959 . . . will have to endure a year as Intern at Trippler Army Hospital in Hawaii but no further plans at present. dMd ' Lr ' .u M 112 GERALD ALAN HOFKIN, a.b., m.a., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY Jerry . . . combination of clinical and lab studies . . . bio- chemical and physiologic breakdown of pituitary extracts . . . " We know what it isn ' t " . . . brief case always close by — laundry? ... Phi D. E. and AOA . . . always ready for pizza . . . married Phyllis in 1959 . . . Internship at U.H., then Residency in Internal Medicine. RICHARD GARETH HOLZ, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE Dick . . . mother of group five . . . professional bloodletter . . . proponent of Medicine a la Shelly G . . . athletics with a trick knee . . . Baltimore sports fan with a passion for Weeb . . . hot dog salesman for Goetz . . . frequent discus- sions with Dr. Coffin . . . externed at both Bon Secours and St. Agnes . . . wife Kay, daughter Susan and new son Richard . . . Intern at St. Agnes followed by OB-GYN. £ . M y ? £). 113 JAMES LOUIS HOOPER, a.b., m.d. Baltimore. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Jim . . . alias " the Hoop " or Slim Jim , . . former paratrooper turned M.D. . . . famous Hooperisms are " you seen one, you ' ve seen ' em all " and " nerve doctors.- ' " . . . psychologically oriented. ' ' . . . special road map for short cuts . . . special study aids and hi-fi ... a ghost in attendance . . . super drug salesman for Schering . . . safe driving awards.- . . . special clinic experience at CMC . . . Bethlehem Steel Hospital . . . chess . . . married Martha . . . back to " home in the Army " for Internship at Madigan Army Hospital, Tacoma, Washington . . . future may lie in OB-GYN. d . Y P: CARLOS ENRIQUE IFARRAGUERRI, b.s., m.d. Manatl, Puerto Rico UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO " Little Carlos " . . . " Ifar " . . . puritic cutaneous eruption which spread to the house stalf . . . the " Beaux Artes " . . . vocalist with piano . . . " Hi " . . . often the scholastic pace setter . . . member and resident of Nu Sig . . . AOA . . . no marital fetters as yet . . . summers in Puerto Rico, one as a Neurology Fellow . . . back to Puerto Rico for Internship at the University followed by possible Residency in Pathology. 114 GERALD CONRAD KEMPTHORNE, b.s., m.s., m.d. Dodger lie. W scoi s ti UNIVERSITi ' OF WISCONSIN Jerry . . . from land of lakes and cheese . . . frequent visitor at several of Baltimore ' s better night spots . . . rapport with ladies, young and old . . . eyes frequently ablaze . . . ward- robe from Sach ' s Fifth . . . addiction to hi-fi and the T.V. in spare time, known to watch E. Ness and Company . . . SAMA representative X 2 . . . still a confirmed bachelor . . . summers spent as camp counselor in native Wisconsin . . . Internship at Cook County in Chicago with Surgery a strong possibility. J i c. ' :; 2 . A RONALD LEE KROME, B.s., m.d. Balrimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Ron . . . one of the gold-dust twins . . . " Hi, guys " ... an occasional member of class football . . . often seen in second floor lab at night . . . also class expert on Fiat autos . . . summers in Psychiatry and Preventive Medicine . . . reports for Dr. Entwisle . . . Phi D.E. . . . married Eva ... to Intern at Detroit Receiving followed by probable Resi- dency in Internal Medicine. JfWt : 115 ALFRED KRONTHAL, b.s., m.d. Bdltiiiiore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE " Al " . . . " the Hawk " . . . " just one thing " . . . student stock broker . . . small instruments, large thumbs . . . wheeling in a Corvette . . . " Who ' s a materialist? " . . . two year Student Council Representative, Treasurer second year . . . summers working? at Westinghouse . . . post graduate plans for matri- mony . . . Internship at Illinois R. and E. in Chicago, followed by Ophthomology. HARRY VERNON LANGLUTTIG, JR., a.b., m.d. Baltimore. Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY Harry . . . sportsman and " former " lacrosse expert . . . also gifted on numerous musical instruments for entertainment at 377 . . . special interest in pulmonary function . . . " spare " time spent in externship at S.B.G.H. . . . ardent sup- porter of SAMA . . . Historian of Phi Beta Pi in I960 . . . married Jacquie in I960 . . . plans include Internship at San Diego County General followed by a Residency in Internal Medicine, site unknown. " lu r ' f - 116 ' ii r? Wk - PHILIP WOODSON LANKFORD, b.s., m.d. York, Pennsylvania JUNIATA COLLEGE Phil . . . medicine liberally spiced with expert golf . . . one of the " big four " . . . occasional expert tennis . . . sustenance via real estate . . . owns half a city? . . . ammonia studies . . . only motorcyclist in class with a side car . . . occasional business meeting . . . frequent discussions with Harry and others . . . externship at Women ' s for three . . . wife Lois and children three . . . back to York for Internship, possibly followed by G.P., at least for awhile. ' i - .J ), MARC STEPHEN LEVENTHAL, a.b., m.d. Balthnore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITi ' Marc . . . otherwise known to many as the Gray Ghost . . . a member of " the Group " and the " big four " . . . soft spoken . . . Chevy convertible and numerous dates . . . sportsman — including billiards, tennis, golf and bowling . . . night lab work . . . summer " scrub nurse " at Sinai and Med. Care Clinic . . . V.P. of Phi D.E. ... set up housekeeping with wife Kay in late I960 . . . Internship at Akron General followed by either Pediatrics or Surgery. Mi V k ' 117 JOHN PAUL LIGHT, B.A., m.d. Cumberland. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA Jack . . . Otherwise " Pappy " or " Electric " . . . silent pipe smoker, mixture number what? . . . frequently an officer, formerly U.S.M.C, then class . . . freshman prexy, Student Council prexy, member of Professional School Senate . . . Nu Sig rush chairman . . . lover of good food and drink, par- ticularly shrimp and beer . . . his home a meeting place . . . married Marybelle in ' 53, daughter Joni and heir John, Jr. . . . remaining at U.H. to Intern, future uncertain — probably Radiology. Lj_(Hot r M. S- DAVID EDWARD LITRENTA, B.S., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland WASHINGTON COLLEGE Dave . . . busier than a one armed paper hanger with urticaria . . . numerous activities include obtaining funds for T.M.M. by hook and crook . . . prexy of both Phi D.E. and I.F.C., on Student Activities Committee . . . former employee of Gunther ' s has worked at U.H. and both Fort Howard and Walter Reed . . . also Dept. of Pharmacology Fellowship . . . drives " bus " for family of wife Shirley and five children . . . Intern at York Hospital then — not certain. fei fe x) 118 ROBERT ERNEST LUDICKE, b.s., m.d. Arbutus. Maryland MT. ST. MARY ' S COLLEGE Bob . . . president of the brown-baggers club . . . veep of the sack-rats ' club . . . quiet reservation with a crewcut . . . new pronunciation of old words . . . hieroglyphic type hand- writing . . . Nu Sig . . . former weakness for blondes as a bachelor . . . summers at Perry Point, Springfield and Bon Secours . . . captured wife Rochelle in June I960 . . . son Robert, Jr. . . . Internship at St. Agnes in Baltimore, fol- lowed by Residency in Medicine or OB-GYN. .j c- A y JEROME JOSEPH MAHONEY, B.s., m.d. Baltimore. Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE Jerry . . . another member of " the carpool " . . . now staunch advocate of self transport via the VW . . . golf with a passion . , . twenty winks at CPC . . . confirmed, strong bachelor . . . summers at Aberdeen and in Pediatrics . . . journey west to Intern at Seaside Memorial in Long Beach, Calif. . . . followed by possibly OB-GYN. 119 JOHN RANKIN MARSH, a.b., m.d. Westminster, Maryland WESTERN MARYLAND COLLEGE Jack . . . another commuter ex " Westminster . . . former " swabby " who spins a good sea story at the drop of an anchor . . . surgical experience in service helped . . . Honor Council x 3 including the Chair as senior . . . prexy of Nu Sig X 1 . . . always sticks to his guns . . . chromosome counting for Nat. Foundation . . . married Jane in ' 53 . . . son John, Jr. . . . Internship at U.H. followed by G.P. or Urology. . fA ?f . , Ug JAMES FRANKLIN McCARTER, m.d. Cambridge, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Jim . . . the class " worry wart " , . . never passed an exam until the grades came out . . . former swabby with numerous colorful stories . . . conversation a la the coffee houses . . . another of the VW crew . . . chief proponent of Eastern shore . . . summers at Eastern Shore Hospital, City Hospital and rounding for Schering . . . assist from wife Kay, Jay and Tim . . . Internship at U.H. followed by possible G.P. Residency. 4, Cf, ? = i.X ' .5 120 THOMAS JAMES McGEOY, JR., m.d. Bait !?? o re . Maryhv?d UNIVERSITi ' OF MARYLAND Tom . . . crewcut with a cigarette and a cup of coffee . . . " Don ' t sweat it, man " . . . minor social rebellion . . . chief of the evening crew at U.H. first, then Union Memorial . . . Mr. cool, calm and collected , . . Nu Sig . . . Psychiatry Fellowship . . . Internship at St. Albans Naval Hospital, L.I., N.Y., then, not certain as yet. jCC a J . 9V J 7n.7), ROGER LEE MEHL, A.B., m.d. Wentachee. Waihh?gtni? UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Roger . . . otherwise " machine " . . . study in a crowded room with earplugs . . . gigantic strides when walking . . . frequent cat-naps any and everywhere — compensation for midnight oil . . . trips, occasionally, back to the far West . . . passing interest in fish as commercial salmon fisherman . . . cardio- pulmonary research . . . U.H. scrub nurse . . . married Anne in ' 59 . . . Internship at St. Lukes in Chicago followed by Orthopedic or Plastic Surgery. Qo L %M ms- 111 GERALD A. MILLER, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Marylatid UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Jerry . . . slight of frame only . . . proof that blowing one ' s own horn is not necessary . . . reputation for never worrying . . . knowledge of nursing from practical experience at B.C.H. . . . Fellowships in Anesthesiology at U.H. for two summers . . . quiet contemplation ... to Philadelphia for Rotating Internship at Philadelphia General, future plans as yet unknown. . £J-M. 09iJ - ' CHARLES LOUIS MORREELS, JR., A.B., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY Charlie . . . " Chazz " . . . often heard to say " Dad " . . . big booster of seat belts for one and all . . . residence over all night laundry sometimes made study difficult . . . " paranoid pool " expert . . . summers as Surgical extern J.H.H., in Medical O.P.D. and Surgical Fellowship . . . married nurse Judy in 1958 ... to York, Pa. Hospital for Internship fol- lowed by a Residency in Medicine or a Surgical specialty. Cl.n ifirouuLLTr W.D 122 ROBERT JEROME MYERBURG, m.d. Bidtimnre, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSlTi ' Bob . . . has reputation of being class lady ' s man . . . more dates than any two of his contemporaries combined . . . constantly looking for new veins to tap for properidin studies . . . more investigation into arthritis . . . other investigations, Reno and Las Vegas?, during externship in California . . . chief antagonist of Andy A. while at 377 . . . AOA with reason . . . Medical Boards a snap? . . . straight Medicine Internship at U.H. followed by Internal Medicine. MICHAEL B. A. OLDSTONE, B.S., m.d. Pensacola. Florida UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Mike . . . otherwise Oldie and Birdie . . . one of the class highbrows ... a lover of fine things . . . sports car enthusiast, first M.G., then A.H. — boating . . . special work in Infectious Diseases x 1 year . . . President SAMA x 1, Editor SAMA Newsletter x 2 . . . Nu Sig . . . Surgical Fellowship in Boston, rickettsial studies . . . ardent bachelor ' til he met Elizabeth . . . married in June ' 60 . . . now proud papa . . . straight Medicine at U.H. followed by Internal Medicine with special interest in microbes. t ?a i 52«x, j2 f 123 RODNEY LINWOOD ORTEL, A.B, M.D. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA Rod . . . metabolism in partially suspended antimation . . . pipeline to the inside " scoop " . . . medical school combined with poker, pool, puzzles . . . trips to Goucher . . . tissue culture from rabbit skin . . . Medical OPD as summer fellow . . . married Melissa and honeymooned in Mexico . . . straight Medical Internship at U.H. . . . finds both Medi- cine and Surgery appealing. « 1. K.U. H-L . 7 WALTER F. OSTER, b.s., m.d. Baltimore. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Bucky . . . pharmacologist turned professional . . . every statement backed by two references . . . reputation for punc- tuality and attendance . . . lists of facts about little known syndromes . . . bridge, chess and V.W. ' s . . . largest pipe collection in the class, with one always at hand . . . AOA . . . summers at Read ' s as pill peddler and in Pathology . . . married Flo in ' 57 . . . Internship at U.H. followed by more training of some kind. ' cJ: 124 LEWIS A. OTTENRITTER, B.s, m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE Lew . . . long hours in the woods — prior to med. school, of course . . . distinctive gait . . . hours of dissertation upon field and stream . . . Walden holds its quiet charm . . . closest thing to a medical Hemingway . . . Schering Drug Company Rounds . . . " hooked " Janet in 1958, graduates with a new daughter present . . . rotation at Mercy fol- lowed by Pediatrics or Orthopedics. is:z ..Mi yff. LAWRENCE J. PAZOUREK, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE Larry ... to some, " Bull " . . . and " Shock " . . . belt buckle in close approximation to pubis most of time . . . ardent love of pasteboards — blackjack or bridge . . . occasionally chess . . . booming voice . . . raconteur . . . strange dis- coveries in dark alleys make headlines . . . Nu Sig . . . Braumeister, publication from work in Microbiology, studies in Otolaryngology . . . devoted bachelor and playboy ... to Mercy for Internship, then on to Pediatrics or OB-GYN. Ouurf - J. fCU f - 125 CLIFTON CONLYN PRESSER, B.S., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland CAPITAL UNIVERSITi ' Cliff . . . seen occasionally as only man in class with a long, white coat . . . near asphyxia due to nasal congestion . . . breakfast in bed? . . . infatuation with B.P. every thirty minutes and urinalysis as often as possible will, no doubt, lead to midwifery . . . Nu Sig . . . extern at B.C.H. x 2 . . . Fellowship in Allergy . . . married Ruth in ' 57 . . . to Women ' s for Internship followed by Residency in OB-CYTSf. KENNETH ED " WARD RASMUSSEN, a.b., b.d., m.d. Jetniore, Kansas STERLING COLLEGE Kenny . . . otherwise " Preacher " . . . med school via Africa . . . Medicine with a future in mind . . . " Dad " to the class . . . special work almost every Sunday on the circuit . . . Pharmacology assistant during one summer, another as camp Doctor with family . . . Marge and four — three boys and a girl ... to Presbyterian Hospital in Denver for Internship, then more training and back to Africa. f ' t.tn ' jt a. i. ' yn u.a t uLJ . . 126 PAUL ARLINGTON REEDER, JR., b.s., m.d. Barnes ville. Ohio OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY Paul . . . medical education followed false start in engi- neering . . . formerly in U.S.N. . . . politics a la Barry Gold- water . . . occasional game of poker or hour with rod and reel . . . Nu Sig . . . frequently summered in " Ivory Tower " in OB-GYN, Medical O.P.D. and a year on the medical wards ... a leaning toward academic medicine? . . . married another Goucher girl, Jane . . . Internship at Grady Memorial in Atlanta, then probably General Practice. . M - JOHN ALBERT REEVES, m.d. WeUernport, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND John . . . another man wht) can be found, on occasion, on the links . . . small talk unnecessary . . . the art of strikes and spares . . . chief antagonist of the goof off . . . Nu Sig . . . one summer in Public Health working in sanitation . . wife Maureen a school marm . . . Internship at U.H. pos- sibly followed by Ophthamology. CZZc .7 AiJ . Ml EARL FRANCIS RITER, JR., A.B., m.d. Clereland, Ohio YALE UNIVERSITY Earl . . . class master of historical allusions and caricature . . . any situation has humor . . . putting green in delivery suite . . . safe driving award? . . . early attachment to applied midwifery . . . Nu Sig . . . T.M.M. . . . " ivy league " outlook . . . long night hours in 2nd floor lab at U.H. . . . apple polishing won teacher wife Joan in ' 58 . . . summers as a hod jockey and one in Pediatrics . . . next year starts OB training as Intern at Women ' s followed by more of same. 2(a 3®av. - DAVID ROSEN, b.s., m.d. Far Rockatvay, New York CITY COLLEGE OF NEW YORK Dave . . . transplanted Yankee with southern charm . . . expert on Pickwickian syndrome . . . world traveler with conviction that N.Y. is the world capital . . . tropical fish and Siamese cats . . . psychosomatic medicine a la Dr. Lisansky . . . particular interest in Thespians since marriage to Ruth . . . travel in Europe and Israel . . . Class President xl 2 . . . neurophysiologic investigation xl summer . . . Internship at San Francisco Hospital followed by Psychiatric training. V s . 128 RICHARD MILFORD SARLES, B.S., m.d. Newark, New Jersey GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY Dick . . . " Snarles " to Dr. Bowie . . . " O.K. " . . . socially oriented expert host with fine wines, cheeses and paintings a la the old country . . . long ski trips . . . basketball with vigor . . . sailing crew . . . gourmet . . . Social Chairman of Nu Sig . . . have keg, will party . . . honeymoon trip to Europe with wife Lois . . . trips to Lowenbrau Brewery . . . externship in N.J. . . . plans include Pediatric Internship followed by Pediatric Residency at U.H. .cX c.. t{. tMAvM. , RICHARD FRANCIS SCHILLACI, A.B., m.d. Bcdtimore. Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY Dick . . . class leader in gassing, following training under Saphir at B.C.H. . . . also cardiology expert . . . large col- lection of purloined EKG ' s . . . frisby champ . . . part time fiddler . . . " highwayman " . . . chart care a la Dr. Connor . . . Neurology Fellowship . . . married nurse Pat, 1956 . . . daughter Vicki . . . Senior Navy Program has led to Intern- ship at St. Albans Naval Hospital, L.I., N.Y., future in Internal Medicine or Pediatrics. luAa -ZiAyrvcif S iJuIza yV.B. 129 MARVIN SMALL, B.S., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland COLGATE UNIVERSITY ' Marv . . . size belies the name . . . double bogies x 7 . . . highly questionable skill as angler despite numerous trips to Canada . . . that ' s a laugh? . . . frequent attempts at bufoonery . . . whole T.M.M. layout ... as tempers shorten . . . Phi D.E. . . . beautiful automobiles . . . married Suzanne in ' 57 . . . son Jonathan gives rise to swollen chest . . . research Fellowships in Anatomy, Hematology and En- docrinology . . . Rotating Intern at Henry Ford in Detroit followed by Internal Medicine with possible superspeciali- zation in Endocrinology. f?Zoav rrL Arrr jc SUi M O. THOMAS MICHAEL SONN, B.S., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE Tom . . . always soft spoken . . . high level neuronal function . . . foe of those who don ' t see the world around them . . . some sensitivity concerning the obvious . . . eloquent philosopher . . . precarious transportation . . . discriminating bachelor ... all " spare " time used to work . . . " Did you turn in a card this week? " . . . B.C.H. externship with room in Nurses ' Home . . . summers at Perry Point, Children ' s Hospital and B.C.H. . . . Internship at St. Agnes followed by Psychiatric Residency. iL • . ' ■ - 130 WAYNE BARRETT TATE, B.S., m.d. Ba ltimore. Maryland DUKE UNIVERSITY Wayne . . . " Tate " . . . class banty rooster . . . commuting by bus . . . avid historian, classical that is . . . attendance record at CPC ' s unmatched . . . achievement without effort . . . uses malapropism for nicknaming people . . . abiding dislike of Pediatric Clinic . . . summers at Bethlehem Steel and Women ' s and externship at Women ' s . . . Internship in U.S.A.F. Hospital, Lackland A.F.B., Texas, followed by Resi- dency in Internal Medicine. 66Mj - - - -. LARRY GORDON TILLEY, B.S., m.d. Bel Air Maryland ROANOKE COLLEGE Larry . . . class expert on LGV . . . some few refer to " the round man " . . . ever present pipe . . . the Bel Air kid . . . ardent Oriole rooter . . . occasional bout with duces wild five card draw . . . female chauffeur? . . . former Post Office clerk . . . Fellowships in Pediatrics and Pulmonary Diseases . . . married Edith in 1958 . . . P.H.S. Internship in Boston, Mass. followed by Pediatrics or G.P. Residency. ,JM M d 131 GEORGE EDWARD URBAN, JR., a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland DARTMOUTH COLLEGE " Pope " . . . numerous quotations from background in English lit . . . learned yankee reserve, resulting in cool, calm, collected attitude, at Dartmouth . . . bachelors degree in skiing, dancing and romancing . . . expert in Anatomy and " Colts " of all types . . . long " a-filly-ation " at Mercy . . . summers in Otolaryngology and assisting Dr. Ayd in phenothiazine study . . . Rotating Internship at University possibly followed by more E.N.T. ' L fJ, , NINA CRISMAN VANN, A.B., m.d. Olney. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF KENTU CKY Nina . . . " Where ' s Nina " . . . " Oh, Mah " . . . forever " im- morganized " by " cerebrate, my deah Miss Vann " . . . hen medic . . . short shorts rarely . . . record for Saturday A.M. attendance unmatched . . . femininity obvious . . . Editor, T.M.M. . . . V.P. of SAMA . . . Sec. of soph, class . . . Student Activities Committee ... St. Thomas ' Hospital, London, Eng. for a summer clinical clerkship . . . Neurology Fellowship at University Hospital . . . Rotating Internship at U.H. followed by specialization, area undetermined. jLta Ou a toyxJ VAyiL rr .P- 132 DENNIS ELWOOD VITALE, B.S., m.d. Salt Lake City, Utah UNIVERSITY OF UTAH Dennis . . . western import joined us at start of junior year . . . still occasionally on Rocky Mountain time . . . " well, well, well, " phenomenal gastric capacity in absence of thyrotoxicosis . . . travels via Renault . . . papers on Neuro- physiology published in Utah . . . income tax deduction, wife Karen, late December I960 . . . externships, summer, all over the great West . . . P.H.S. Internship followed by G.P. in Utah. Ty. £ U ., ni.-C). T W tf f W I BRANTLEY PAUL VITEK, a.b, m.d. Baltimore, Maryland WESTERN MARYLAND COLLEGE Brant . . . the " Kid " . . . leader of " the wild ones " . . . including all extras . . . coast to coast on the motor scooter . . . part time beatnik musician without beard . . . frequent trips to a houseboat in D.C. . . . early interest in Psychiatry later abandoned . . . " to trade or not to trade " for end table or surf board . . . confirmed bachelor till he met Eleanor . . . followed by marriage in December I960 . . . externships at U.M.H. and B.C.H. . . . summer in Washington State . . . special tailoring will enable him to suffer through a year of Army Internship at Tripler followed by another decision. ' J t2) I 133 ZACK JAMES WATERS, JR., a.b., m.d. Salisbury, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA Zack . . . chief proponent of active sports participation for one and all . . . ardent outdoors man . . . yankee with " stars and bars " . . . Student Council x three years . . . athletic director for 4 . . . squirrel tails . . . plantation and mint juleps . . . counselor at female summer camp . . . externship at Laurel General Hospital . . . gallantry won Alice in 1956 . . . son Mark, born I960 . . . back South for Rotating Intern- ship in Spartanburg, S.C. followed by G.P. Residency. o M a ; -- p . yr). . ANDREW WILLIAM WENDLING, b.s., M.S., m.d. New York. New York MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Andy . . , the pepsodent smile . . . have canoe, will travel . . . chem engine combined with medicine . . . but a car tied together with bailing wire and chewing gum . . . " hey you guys! " . . . bachelorhood without designs? . . . honors in Biochemistry . . . experiments in Surgery with shock, arti- ficial valves, heart and lungs . . . Rotating Internship at Jackson Memorial in Miami followed by some combination of engineering with Experimental Surgery. . cfi. 134 LELAND DAVID WHITELOCK, JR., B.S., m.d. Bethesda, Maryland UNIVERSITi ' OF MARYLAND Lee . . . frequently heard to say " well docky " . . . always quiet at the right times . . . developed special interest in Department of Microbiology in sophomore year . . . Nu Sig . . . acquired a southern accent, Vicki, in I960 . . . U.S. Veterans Administration x 2 summers, gerontology at B.C.H. . . . P.H.S. Internship at Marine Hospital in Balti- more followed by Residency in E.N.T. .. M M- 9 . A JOHN LOWRIE WINNACKER, a.b., m.d. Chevy Chase, Maryland WILLIAMS COLLEGE John . . . the prudential prince . . . one of " the wild ones " . . . better late than never . . . lost wagers but " you can depend on the kid " . . . exponent of surburbia with a pipe . . . collector of weird syndromes . . . won a Fulbright, Betsy, in competition . . . externships at B.C.H. with tennis on lawn, and U.M.H. . . . plans include Internship at George Washington Hospital in D.C. followed by Internal Medicine or G.P. Ij ol-U TurcuckuL TTbO. 135 HOWARD MILTON WISOTZKEY, A.B, M.D. Baltimore. Marylaud DARTMOUTH COLLEGE Howie . . . the Whizzer . . . " hello there " . . . heavy emphasis on brains since sophomore year . . . starting with CVA ' s . . . exponent of brain biopsy on O.P.D. basis . . . ardent follower of several types of " Colts " . . . married Carol, Aug. 1958 . . . followed precipitously by daughter Laura resulting in several people losing weight . . . Fellowship in Neuro- pathology X 2 . . . plans include straight Pathology Intern- ship at U.H. . . . followed by close association with Dr. John Wagner in Neuropathology. ' ' Z , ( te 42 . »«A. " 0 ARTHUR WOLPERT, b.s., M.S., ph.d., m.d. New York, New York COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY " Art " . . . collector of numerous degrees . . . exact knowledge of every drug in the PDR . . . Pharmacologist turned legiti- mate . . . only verbatum outline of Eastman in the class . . . syndrome mr.tching with the chief Resident in Medicine at Mercy ... an ever present briefcase . . . wife Yolanda, sons Robert and Darren constitute the home front . . . summers in rssearch in Pharmacology . . . Internship at the U.S. Public Health Service Hospital in San Francisco followed by clinical Pharmacology. ? ,-7). H.p, 136 ANTHONY JOHN YOUNG, a.b., m.d. Bed ti more. ALirylaiid LOYOLA COLLEGE Tony ... a voice like Ed Murrow . . . grapples in spare time . . . inquisitive mind . . . frequently asks the last question . . . long, long hours at St. Agnes as extern during year and during the summers . . . still a bachelor with many interests . . . Rotating Internship at St. Agnes followed by either G.P. or Internal Medicine. We ' ve drunk a toast to the few short years we ' ve spent together. Compared to a toast to the years ahead we ' ve taken only a sip. The flavor hngers lastingly tasteful. Our draught to the future, there- fore, must be a deep one drunk from the cup of daily experience. Heady as our mead might seem. it should be sampled lustily but with regard to individual capacity lest the lees and dregs within our tankard bite our tongue. Without further ado we raise our glasses high: may our wine flow sweet and clear. 137 Class Officers - Seniors C F. Berner President Aim D. J. Fall J. J. Cerda Vice-President Treasurer 4 F. A. Clark, Jr. J. F. McCartek J. R. Marsh Honor Council Secretary Honor Council Representative — 1 year Representative — 2 years A. KRONTHAL Student Council Representative 138 Senior Honors C. E. GlROD Faculty Gold Medal — Sum ma Cum Laude A. A. Acosta-Otero Magna Cum Laude J. N. Brouillette Magna Cum Laude J. N. DiACOYANIS Magna Cum Laude J. S. Goodman Magna Cum Laude R. J. Myhrburg Magna Cum Laude Z. Waters Student Government A u ard J. R. Marsh G-V Surgery Award R. K. Forbes Dermatology A ward 139 J. N. DiACOYANIS Medicine Auard J. J. Cerda Book Award OATH OF HIPPOCRATES 5wcar by Apollo tKc Physician , and itsculaplus and Health and All-HcaL t d all the gods and oddessc , that, according to my abllitY and judgement , L will Keep this Oath and this 5tipalatioa — to reckon him who taught melius Art equally dear to mc as my parents , to share my substance u)Lth him. and relieve his necessities if required; to look upon his offipring in the same footing a5 n v owt brothers , and to teach them this Art , if they toiaU to learn it , without fee or stipulation ; djc d thai by precept Lecture and every other mode of instruction , I luill impart a knowledge of t he Art to n y own sons and those of my teachers and to disciples bound by a stipulation i.ad oath according to the law of medicine , but to none others . ujill follow that system of regimen vuhich, according Qp[ T|| to mv ability and judgement, L consider for the ■ft B bencfLt of my patients and abstain from whatever HLS is deleterious and mischievous. I ujill give no deadly mcdiciae to anyone if asked, nor suggest any such counsel ; and in like manner I tuill not give to a vuoman a pessary to produce abortion . UJ ith purity and holiness I tuill pass m.y life and practise my Art . u?ill not cut persons labouring under the stone but aiill leaue this to be done by men tuho arc practitioner. of this Loork. Into whatever houses I enter, I tuill go into them for the benefit of the sick and u)ill abstain from every voluntary act of mischief Ciixd corruption, and further irotn the seduction of females and male3 , of freemen and slaves . Ihatevcr, in connexion uj ith my professional practise or inot in connexion with it, I sec or hear in the life of , jmci uHiLch ought not to be spoken of abroad, I anil •--.. t divulge, as reckoning that all such should be kept secret. v. ' r -v ' - continue to keep this C9ath unulolated, may h be . ranu A lo mc to enjoy lite and the prjictise of the art , rcspccicd by all men. in all times I 43nt should I trespass • ' Lnolatc this Oath, may the reverse be mi4 lot f . WmLJm JUNE WEEK k li-.v., %,.4 1 i r 1 T: iW •3 e J .._-ii v " . " -fi; ii;t .-,.-« r " 4« ■; _- , : . ( ' ' T ' »• - w Acknowledgments The yearbook staff wishes to express their appreci- ation and thanks to Robert Torrence for his fine work as photographer for our yearbook. Bob is a member of the Art Department for the Baltimore Campus of the University of Maryland. He has worked diligently with the members of our Staff and has played a vital part in making this book possible. To Bob we say " Thanks " for a job well done. We also would like to thank Mr. Austin, Hea d of the Art Department for his cooperation and advice in producing our book. When starting on a task, such as publishing a yearbook, one soon finds that it is not a one man job; but one which requires the skill and cooperation of a great many people in a great many different fields. We wish to take this opportunity to thank those who have extended us a helping hand — To Dean Smith, our Faculty advisor. To members of the Faculty of the School of Medicine who upon request were so kind as to send available photographs or have them taken. To Jim Conner of Garamond Press who was always willing and able to help us over the technical pitfalls. To all others who in any way helped us — whether it was advice, photographs, information or financial aid. Without this help our task could not have been accomplished and we wish to express our sincere appreciation. The Staff of ' 61 144 Terrae Mariae Medicus N. C. Vann Editor-iii-Chief J. N. Browell Copy Editor F. A. Clark Write-up Editor E. F. RiTER Co-Business Manager Mm J. J. Cerda Photography Editor D. E. LiTRENTA Co-Business Manager M. Small Lay-out Editor L. Smith Secretary J. Bresnan Se cretary 145 J.- ' 4i ■m .JT ' tt- . " V " " " . «||Wwtv M, SCHOOL OF NURSING Florence Meda Cipe, R. N., B. S., M. S., Ed. D. Professor of Nursitig Dean of the University of Maryland School of Nursing We dedicate this portion of the Terrae Marine Medic is with gratitude and appreciation to Florence Meda Gipe who has made us proud that we are gradu- ates of the University of Maryland School of Nursing, and friends of this eminent leader in the profession of nursing. 148 Mary K. Carl, R.N., B.S., Ph.D. Professor of Psychiatric Nursing Chairman of Graduate Curricula Virginia Conley, R.N., B.S., M.A. Associate Professor of Nursing Chairman of Undergraduate Curricula Advisor, Student Government Association Margaret Hayes, R.N., B.S., M.S. Associate Professor and Assistant to the Dean at College Park, Maryland Eissnor Slacum, R.N., B.S. Assistant Professor and Assistant to the Dean at Baltimore, Maryland 149 Nancy P. Anderson, R.N., B.S., M.S. Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Nursing Martha Baer, R.N., B.S., C.P.H.N. Assistant Professor of Public Health Nursing Chairman of Student Health anil Welfare Alice Beegan, R.N., B.S., M.A. Assistant Professor of Maternal anil Chilli Health Harriet Bond. R.N., B.S., M.S. Instructor of Psychiatric Nursing Jean Bruggeman, R.N., B.S. Assistant Instructor of Pediatric Nursing Advisor, Glee Club Mary Jane Carroll, R.N., B.S., M.S. Instructor of Psychiatric Nursing Ruth L. Dyson, B.S., M.S. Assistant Professor of Nutrition Anna L. De Haven, R.N., B.S., M.S. Instructor of Medical and Surgical Nursing 150 Mary Ann Coyne, R.N., B.S. Assistant hislructor of Medical anil Surgical Nursing Advisor, junior Class Mary E. Crotefend, R.N., A.B., M.S., C.P.H.N. Assistant Professor of Public Health Nursing Shirley Hale, R.N., B.S., M.S. Instructor of Psychiatric Nursing Carol M. Hosfeld, R.N., B.S., M.S. Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing Marguerite Hydorn, R.N., B.S., M.Ed. Associate Professor Maternal and Child Health Joyce Kaetzel, R.N., B.S., M.S. Instructor of Maternal and Child Health Advisor. Tcrrae Mariae Medicus Janis Kilmer, R.N., B.S., M.S. Instructor of Medical and Surgical Nursing Frances P. Koonz, R.N., B.S. Instructor of Tuberculosis Nursing 151 mk I ■ I ) Carl Miller, R,N., B.S., M.S. liistructur of Medical and Surgical Nursing Lillie Largey, R.N., B.S., M.S. Instructor of Medical and Surgical Nursing Patricia Orem, R.N., B.S., M.S. Instructor of Pediatric Nursing Francis T. Reed, R.N., B.S., M.Ed. Associate Professor of Pediatric Nursing Charlotte Seyffer, R.N., B.S., M.S. Ph.D. Professor of Nursing Service Administration Betty L.Shubkagel, R.N., B.S., M.N. Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing Advisor. Senior Class Kathryn Wohlsen, R.N., B.A., M.N., M.A. Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing Advisor, Student Nurses Council of Maryland Cecilia Zitkus, R.N., A.B., M.A. Associate Professor of Rehabilitative Nursing ki H V - wm r " J 1 152 ' fS The Junior Class t President Sylvia Swan Vice-President Herminia Nudo Secretary Barbara Edwards Treasurer Helen Ross Historian Clara Jane Callis Social Chairman Katharine Kilmer 153 ' If -5«»- ' » Allegra Abd El Malik Stefanie Herman Joyce Bowman Doris Chamberlain Joan Chambers Lois Davis Betty Jean Domeny Katie Emery Patricia Ferguson Nancy Freyman Joan Goldschmidt Donna Hall Laurie Hall Barbara Harvey Katherine Heltzel Patricia Henry Ruth Hepner Mary Jane Hickey Miriam Holland Pearl Holland Judith Jennings Norma Kempfer Susan Kimmel Harriet Kincaid ' V r, ' -I 154 Jane Kirby Caroline Lewis Janice Marks Annie McCaughey Joan Meredith Eleanor Ann Meyers Barbara Miller Kathryn Joyce Mullan Margaret Murry Jeb Palmer Carol Pearson Virginia Pearson Andrea Pryor Barbara RuUan Elizabeth Ann S;ymour Norma Smith Nancy Stevens Mary Todd Margaret Williams Gwendolyn Wise Kaye Wolf Elsie Wriaht Frances Zorn Sandra Zucker dmti 155 CLINICAL YEARS " eye level . . . away from label " Wait, my name isn ' t Vincent! " Hope I don ' t contaminate it again! Medical and Surgical Nursing Information, procedures, and knowledge enough to make one wonder how much can be absorbed in six months . . . the famed ten credit course . . . the trauma of giving medicines for the first time . . . traumatic, but terrific . . . three completes in one hour?!! . . . Have you been supervised? . . . How do you feel about this? ... 2 A.M. — lights, typewriters, libraries without books, — care studies due tomor- row . . . Yes-s-s-s, Miss !! . . . where " total nursing " is taught . . . permanent " bags " under the eyes . . . cerebral circulation ??? . . . anyone care to ' I know I should have taken Greek! ' " . . . and then I tripped over the IV tubing, carrying mouthwash in one hand and his meds in the other . . . ' " Ten completes with Nutrition at 10? try one minced-meat student nurse? . . . the backbone of all nursing . . . the bustle and hurry of the fourth floor . . . N.S.D.O. ' s on the ninth floor . . . rush, Rush, RUSH!!! . . . late to bed and early to rise . . . the nutrition care studies . . . care studies and more care studies ... a real rat race . . . Oh, but you must have a pulse . . . What is your problem today. Miss ?? . . . work. Work WORK!!! ... a fractured leg or a failing heart cannot be isolated from the individual to whom it belongs . . . typing is a pre-requisite for this course . . . empathy, our password . . . keen observa- tion and accurate recording a necessity . . . the obstacle course . . . optimum patient care, our goal . . . assistant charge duties . . . health teaching . . . narcotic counts with phenobarb, 6()mg., missing . . . the significance of little things . . . affectionately known as " med.-surg. " " Whew! It ' s about time! " " You expect me to breathe through that contraption! ' Double trouble! " Cot a match, nurse? " " Too Late, the seizure ' s over. ' " IV ' s have stopped, blood pressure 60 0! operating Room Of course I ' m awake, it ' s only 7 A.M. . . . the 10 minute scrub . . . the first time scrubbing alone . . . backache . . . Keep that field clean! ! . . . sponge count, " — but I only have 89!! " • • • someone, please push the panic button ... I lost three layers of skin . . . Hypoglycemia anyone? . . . oh, how your nose does itch after that period of sterility takes place . . . tension . . . requires sturdy legs and a back-brace . . . are your feet conducting — electricity that is? . . . could learn real live anatomy . . . watch out, don ' t get contaminated . . . pinned hemlines . . . but doctor, that was the last sterile suction tip . . . that " angel of mercy " look. ' I ' m down to the fasti " Where did that toe come from? " If at first you don ' t succeed . . . QUIT! Specialties " You can ' t remember your name? " ' I ' m being attacked from all sides! " i Tuberculosis Nursing Little white blobs behind masks . . . Who ' s who? ... I feel contaminated . . . cough, cough, cough . . . positive patch! . . . you can stand closer than that to her . . . but I don ' t feel sick . . . teaching diet and teaching how to protect self and others ... in which dark room is class being held today? . . . the mad dash through the early morning traffic . . . there ' s a spot on that X-ray? . . . complete bedrest means COMPLETE BEDREST! ! ... be prepared for Beacham . . . beware of the tubercle . . . X-ray reading is essential at City . . . dare not forget the segments of the lungs . . . any hemoptysis lately? . . . crowded conditions en- hance breeding of the bacillus . . . " treatment is the tool. " " This makes the fiftieth time today! " " That ' s a cavity, Dr. Beacham? " " A Little help can go a long way. ' ' I ' m ready to start againi " Rehabilitation Nursing Ever ride in a wheelchair? . . . but I don ' t want to go to P.T. . . . 230 pounds of hemiplegia and me in the shower!! ... Is walking that complicated? . . . encouraging each little accomplishment . . . she ' ll walk out of here yet . . . walking is easier than a wheel- chair — unless you ' re pushed . . . get plenty of rest, I want you all to be happy . . . lunch is free . . . the beautiful Montebelio Lake . . . emphasize strengths to minimize handicaps . . . learning the true meaning of understanding . . . the temptation of doing too much . . . purpose — to help the patient help himself. Obstetric Nursing The difference between deliveries: some are quite easy and fairly slow and others enter the hospital in the third stage . . . pant like a puppy dog . . . but I ' m 45 years old . . . looks like his " Pop " . . . push, Mother, push . . . our best course for personal informa- tion ... I started like that? — no wonder I ' m like this! ... if I ever see another perineum as long as I live ! ... all pregnant women — staff and patients — it must be contageous . . . consoling mothers in labor . . . feeding those little helpless newborns . . . comforting the father-to-be . . . arch your back like a pussy cat . . . yes, I know this is the premie nursery, When the apple is ripe, it will fall! Behind the green doors. " Compliments of University. " " My little corner of the world. ' but where is he? . . . brings out motherly instincts . . . beware of Para 12 ' s . . . nurses ' motto in prenatal clinic — baby coming, be prepared! . . . family cen- tered maternity care . . . careful don ' t shave the baby ' s head . . . seeing life begin . . . you wonder how you are ever going to bear normal children without com- plications . . . " when the apple is ripe, it will fall " . . . " now get the Lubritine for the doctor " . . . nutrition and diet taught continuously . . . cold cream, ice chips, and two wash cloths . . . thirty second preps . . . that first christening with a warm stream of urine . . . calculate the E.D.C. for an unknown L.P.M. . . . Doctor, are you sure circumcisions don ' t hurt? . . . the little room full of big mothers-to-be . . . learning the art of being non-judgemental ... ten tiny fingers and ten perfect toes . . . the wonderous miracle of birth. " Come on in, the water ' s fine! " This will put hair on your chest! " Pediatric Nursing " I want my mommy! " . . . new admissions and tear- ful goodbyes . . . feeding toddlers on 5 E . . . " but, I want to stay here! " . . . children watching our classes in the 5 C classroom . . . morning bath for student and patient . . . medicine stained uniforms . . . but it tastes like chocolate . . . " Nurse, my straw ' s bent " . . . coffee and confusion ... a necessity . . . such a lovely stool . . . the thoroughly gratifying feeling of satis- faction of coming home with purees and various other matter from head to toe . . . " Who says he ' s sick? " . . . just love those children . . . Leroy ' s fan club . . . if it isn ' t feeding, it ' s changing diapers . . . playtime . . . bicycle speedsters underfoot . . . how to regress in three easy lessons . . . tears and tempers . . . patience that passeth all understanding . . . reassuring anxious parents . . . sticky fingers . . . gummed chairs . . . lost teddy bears . . . the back-breaking, student nurse propelled merry-go-round . . . the well-worn path to the I.V. pole . . . the wide-eyed look of inno- cence ... we keep time by the Bromo-Seltzer clock . . . early morning roll call . . . oatmeal seems to jump from the bowls onto anyone near and into many little heads of hair . . . Miss Mildred and the play- room . . . the caravan of cribs to the rotunda ... a mummy wrap for security ' s sake . . . lollypop bribes . . . " My pajamas match your uniform " . . . discovering that a child is anything but a small adult . . . tender loving care needed endlessly. " Had to knock two nurses off to get this horse! " ' I know the soap floats, but I don ' t! ' ' Is he going to take my picture? ' . . r Page 81, 82, 83.. Psychiatric Nursing The first day at Spring Grove State Hospital . . . Meeting and talking with patients for the first time . . . " Really? " . . . " What makes you think that? " . . . they act as normal as I do?!!! . . . they ' re talking about me . . . " You don ' t care to live? " . . . " Got a match? ' . . . self-analysis anyone? . . . " How do you feel about that? " . . . " This is your thirty minutes " . . . most challenging to those who are able to give of themselves . . . focus on communication . . . seminar anyone? ... so few for so many . . . " and how was your anal phase? " . . . getting to know you . . . never a nasty word is heard ... " as a child you did what? " . . . hang on to your keys girls, so we don ' t get you con- fused with the patients . . . how to nurse without your hands . . . learning to keep your mouth shut and think before speaking ... a different kind of nursing . . . endless I.P.R. notes . . . learning to deal with anxiety — the patient ' s and your own . . . the art of listening . . . one single tool: yourself . . . unlocking doors and unraveling symbolism . . . personal and professional growth . . . offering your patients your- self . . . the most difficult task of all — to know oneself. ' But I want to go home. ' I understand. ' I ' d like ti) help. ' " Let- ' s walk together. ' V 4 r ■i «. ' UK ' - " You ' ll do it over and over and over until you get it right. " Public Health Nursing That first home visit . . . days of finding no one home . . . the fun of well baby clinics . . . snow flurries the second day out . . . seeing how others live . . . nurses with black bags . . . " Lady, are you a soldier? " . . . buses Q-hour . . . rats, hats, brats . . . learning a city in just a few weeks . . . you mean I passed Peele Street fourteen blocks back!! . . . Oh, no, — it ' s measles!!! . . . tired feet ... 8 to 4 specialing the community . . . the art of improvising . . . don ' t give up, there ' s always a back door . . . pounding the street of Baltimore on a mission of health. She ' s OUR nurse. ' Uh, Oh . . . Mommie — get me a diaperl " " She ' s on that liver binge again! " Service with a smile. ' Urine, weight, blood pressure; urine, weight, bloc . Out Patient Department " Thanks, doc, but I prefer to wear the cast. " ' Miss Tate, you think this is WHAT? ! ' ' .wa Kim ; if m OFF DUTY ) v ,. IT? (Sitting) D. Bc-t , Ciipy Editor; A. Zorn, Photography Editor; F. IVmcsdn, Eduor-in-chief; E. Jones, Advertising Editor; A. Lancaster, Layout Editor; (Staniiiiig) B. Fussell, Business Manager; M. Hense, Patrons and Subscriptions Co-editor; L. Wiles, Senior Write-up Editor; J. Ahah, Patrons and Subscriptions Co-editor. Terrae Mariae Medicus Our den of oroanizecl confusion. Only 999 cans to go. ' (Sitting) J. Rizer, Senior Class Rcprc-icntativc; J. Ahalt, First Vice-President, J Caucr, President; A. Seymour, Second Vice-President (Standing) S. Swan, Junior Class Representative; P. Tymeson, Student Senate Representative; E. Wright, Third Vice-President; S. Zucker, Treasurer; J. Callis, Secretary. Student Government Association Student Nurses Council (Sitting! A. Zorn, Senior Class Representative; P. Pritchett, State Vice-President; W. Jones, State Recording Secretary; S. Zucker, District Social Chairman; (Standing) N. Stevens, District Corresponding Secretary; R. Hepner, Junior Class Representative; J. Ahalt, State Nomi- nating Committee. (Sitting) J. Goldschmidt, L. Wiles, J. Kirby; (Standing) J. Callis, S. Zucker. D. Chamberlain, S. Swan, B. Edwards, D. Betz, J. Aha lt, N. Kempfer, J. Marks. Glee Club Flossie Flyer (Silting) C. Pickney, Feature Editor; P. Pritchett, Editor-in-Chief; J. Ahalt, Typist; S. Smith, News Editor; J. Carter, Business Manager; A. Zorn, Typist. (Not pictured) E. McKechnie, Art Editor; B. Chamberlin, Copy Editor. I :lv • , ' ..m J., A ,? r S. Smith, F. Vincent, P. Tymeson. I Not Pictured) D. Betz. Phi Kappa Phi Sigma Theta Tau tSittingI D. Betz, G. Boyer, F. Vincent, M. Ramsburg. (Standitig) B. Fussell, S. Smith, J. Hall, R. Schultz, J. Rizer, P. Tymeson. (Not pictured) M. Fry, L. Dyer. Homecoming Dance Homecoming on the Baltimore Campus . . . crown- ing of our Homecoming Queen . . . the hush of the crowd as the crowning draws near . . . congratulations and applause . . . " Ooh, look at those roses! " . . . the fall dance ... a social time for student nurses with their escorts . . . dancing ' til midnight . . . mood music for dancing unlimited . . . serving punch for your shift . . . our candidate for the University of Maryland Homecoming Queen . . . dancing in the new Baltimore Student Union . . . sprays of leaves to give a hint of autumn . . . informal, but a nice night to remember. Sylvia Swan receives bouquet from Mary Fry, last year ' s queen. Our Homecoming Candidates: P. Pritchetr, K. Kilmer, B. Eshelman, S. Swan, K. Wolf, B. Swartz. I Our inspirations. The Seniors " Orient " The Juniors Welcome Juniors to the Baltimore Campus . . . introduction to what the next year might hold . . . more fun for Seniors . . . " Are the instructors really like that??? " . . . Junior-Senior fun night . . . Senior orientation to decrease Junior anxiety . . . " She ' s exactly like that!!! " . . . uninhibited Seniors . . . relief of the trials of the Junior year through mimicry and pantomine . . . meeting Big and Little Sisters . . . sharing news from College Park . . . renewing ac- quaintances . . . being able to laugh at one ' s own mistakes of the previous year . . . instructor attendance forbidden . . . vivid memories of this hilarious evening . . . fellowship unlimited. Guess Who? Our mothers away from home. Dorm Life " My mail box is getting that malnourished l(X)k. " I: " Yikes, he ' s on time. ' " Cee . . . she ' s been out every night this week . . . and with someone else. " Oh, Hello Mrs. KJey! ! ' f V- . A 9 m w ' T ' " Let ' s try absorbing this by osmosis ' Did you say MAN on the floor? ! " Hey group, no more hot water! " H " OOh, just wait! ' ■ ' It SAYS, Have a coke ' ! Treatment for Med-Surg. syndrome. I Yakety, Yakety, Yak The touch of the master ' s hand. " I ' M buying? ! " Snowtime — worktime! There ' s devilment in those eyes. Care study, anyone? Wedding bliss in the planning. " Who cares if they fit, they ' te WHITE! ' Did someone hear that there ' s a quack around? " " Ha, now see if you can make six. " ■ Feeling mighty proud. Graduate Tea Finally getting to know them. " I shouldn ' t, but I can ' t resist a second. ' t WO ' vVT ' ' ' " fjt S Being a senior .... hard to take. " But, I can ' t breathe under water! " Senior Picnic Last one to the rind gets ducked! Sincere thanks for four vears of guidance Senior Awards University of Maryland Nurses ' Alumnae Association Award for the highest scholarship PiitriciaTymeson University of Maryland Nurses ' Alumnae Association Award for leadership in the professional student nursing organization P SSV PTttchett Elizabeth Collins Lee Award for second highest aver- age in scholarship Ferol P. Vincent Mrs. John L. Whitehurst Award for executive ability ]ane Rizer Flora Hoffman Tarun Memorial Award for leader- ship, loyalty and school spirit Janet Farinholt Joyce Simpson Landers Award for Public Health Nursing Patricia Ashburn Mrs. Charles A. Reifschneider Award for best profes- sional appearance and conduct Jane Ahalt Neuro-Surgical Nursing Prize for Neuro-surgical Nursing Marion Hense Elizabeth Aitkenhead Award for Operating Room Nursing Alice Zorn " Women ' s Auxiliary Board Award for professional nursing care to patients Catherine Orrell Our last time together. r-i ft -, GRADUATES MARY JANE AHALT College Park. Maryland " Janie " . . . " Panel anyone? " . . . Poise, her inherent virtue . . . Heard of Rog? . . . Girl of many talents . . . Delicate handwriting . . . Public Health, here she comes . . . Grace accompanies her every movement ... A sincerity that generates confidence . . . Patrons and Subscriptions Co-editor, Terrae Mariae Mediciis . . . Senior Class, Historian . . . Student Government Association, First Vice-President . . . Glee Club . . . Alpha Chi Omega. PATRICIA LEE ASHBURN O wings Mills. Maryland " Pat " . . . Creative, imaginative ... A good sport . . . Sleek as a filly . . . Never fails to arrive . . . Dry-witted . . . Bountifully lends any- thing she owns to one in need . . . Hobby — horses, horses, horses . . . Easy going . . . Handy with the paint and brush ... A willingness to help others . . . Orchestra . . . Fencing . . . College Park Dormitory Council. LINDA LOUISE ATKINS York, Pennsylvania " Lin " . . . UnruflSed, always just the same . . . Quiet in appearance with motive little known . , . Steady worker . . . Loves that stereo and FM . . . Faithful movie goer . . . Long, blond pony tail . . . Weekend Warrior to Pennsylvania . . . Remains undismayed in the face of obstacles . . . Warm smile accompanies a reserved manner . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Glee Club . . . Westminster Fellowship . . . Alpha Chi Omega. DOROTHY ALTA BETZ Baltimore. Maryland " Dottie " . . . Well-groomed . . . Tackles jobs with sincere determina- tion . . . How ' s the fudge? . . . Daily writer to Penn. State . . . Peaches and cream complexion . . . Freshness of a blossom . . . Free thinker, decisive, efficient and constant . . . Senior Class, Secretary . . . Copy Editor, Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . Glee Club . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Westminster Fellowship . . . Sigma Theta Tau . . . Phi Kappa Phi. LORNA McLELLAN BILLS Baltimore, Maryland " Lorna Doone " . . . Sweetness personified . . . Beautiful, big, brown eyes ... A conscientious worker . . . Ready for anything, ons might ask . . . Found her green pasture , . . Deep-rooted friendliness . . . Patience with a smile conquers anything . . . May wedding bells . . . Judicial Board . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . 4-H Club. GEORGIA ANNE MASSER BOYER Frederick. Maryland Christmas package bride . . . " Love and marriage " . . . " Have recipe book — will travel " . . . Warmth of feeling . . . Contagious laugh . . . Howard ' s other half . . . Depth of spirit . . . Sewing — an easy accomplishment for Georgia Anne ... A mature thinker . . . Beauty, blonde, and the blush . . . Judicial Board . . . I.ouis.i Parsons Nursing Club. JANET STEWART BURCHETT Rockville, Maryland " Jan " . . . Impulsive, yet likeable . . . " Love that Bob " . . . Neat as a pin — sharp as a tack . . . " Law abiding citizen " . . . Smart ensemble . . . Unpredictable gleam of mischief . . . Snappy conversationalist adept at expressing herself . . . Shuttle to City . . . Never a dull moment . . . She sparkles, she bubbles, she glows . . . Good common sense judiciously exercised. HECTOR JAMES CARDELLINO Blairsville, Pennsylvania " Hec " . . . Good-natured . . . Chief chauffeur of Edmondson Village crew . . . The only man in our lives . . . " His greatest sin — a happy grin " . . . " Proud papa " . . . Theory of Exercise model . . . Enjoys golf, bowling, and television ... A wonderful guy . . . " Jack of all trades " . . . Fun-loving . . . Big brother of the class of ' 61 ... Newman Club. BEVERLY HANNAH CHAMBERLIN Bethesda, Maryland " No, I haven ' t lost weight " " Bev " ... A fast writing South paw . . . Gas company ' s newest advocate ... Ed won out! . . . Loves to relax with a cup of coffee ... A wisp of a figure . . . She ' s up, with the second alarm ... " I have a thing about trains " . . . Ready for a good laugh and a good time . . . Loquacious nature sparkled with lively laughter . . . Our 3rd mother to be . . . Flossie Flyer. LAURA LYNN DYER Glen Echo Heights, Maryland " Lynn " . . . Woman of few words — all well chosen . . . Ready, willing, and able . . . Silent smile and subtle manner . . . Soft blond hair . . . Understanding and sympathetic . . . Teaching is right down her alley . . . Student Government Association, Secretary . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland . . . Glee Club . . . National Student Nurses Association . . . Sigma Theta Tau. BONNIE LEIGH ESHELMAN Sererna Park, Maryland " Bon " . . . Funloving and impetuous . . . Blue-eyed blonde . . . Good sport . . . Nimble with a thimble . . . Considerate . . . " Sleepy time gal " . . . Full of vim, vigor, and vitality . . . Happy-go-lucky person- ality . . . Supplied romping grounds for our class picnics . . . Geni- ality, an attribute . . . Senior Class, Social Chairman . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club. JANET CARTER FARINHOLT Baltirtiore, Maryland Always on the go ... Of tranquil temperament . . . Tall, brown-eyed beauty . . . Tomorrow I ' ll get organized . . . Charming, clever, and chic . . . Quality of humbleness . . . Doctor-Nurse team . . . Sympa- thetic listener . . . Sentimentalist . . . Student Government Associa- tion, Vice-President, President . . . Candidate for 1959 Homecoming Queen . . . Glee Club . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Flossie Flyer, Business Manager. ELIA MAE FILBEY Bahininre, Maryland " Filbey " . . . Neat . . . " Tee hee " . . . Dry humor personified . . . " What ' s Filbey ' s last name? " . . . Faculty for perceiving comedy . . . Light complexion silhouetted by striking black hair . , . Congenial, ' though always on the run ... A serene Miss, but always there for fun . . . Fashioning her own wardrobe, a specialty . . . Aqualiners . . . Carroll Dormitory Social Committee. MARY LOIS FRY Silver Spring. Maryland Saucy, with a glint of laughter in her eyes . . . Fashionable . . . Always a friendly smile . . . Then along came Bill . . . Knit one, purl two . . . Casual curls around her face . . . Ghost writer . . . Excitative and demonstrative . . . " Don ' t be late, I can ' t wait. " . . . Inter-professional School Senate . . . Nursing Homecoming Queen, 1959 . . . Delta Delta Delta . . . ' Women ' s Recreation Association . . . Sigma Theta Tau. BEVERLY LANE FUSSELL Upper Marlboro. Maryland " Bev " . . . Dimples-bilaterally . . . " I ' m so excited. " . . . Inquiring mind . . . Cleverness, all trimmed and neat . . . Manages to do a million things, the night before . . . Long brown locks . . . Emphatic gesticulator . . . High ideals . . . Dependable in every undertaking . . . Business Manager, Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . Alpha Chi Omega, Social Chairman . . . Sophomore Class, Secretary . . . Candidate for Pledge Queen . . . Sigma Theta Tau. HELEN ELIZABETH GATES Annapolis, Maryland " H " . . . Prim and proper air tinged with gaiety . . . Calesthentic enthusiast . . . Still learning bridge . . . Ray, Ray, — Who? Ray! . . . Excelling in social intelligence . . . Cute upturned nose . . . Warm smile , . . Wedding bells in the near future . . . Radiates a soft-spoken straightforwardness . . . Vice-President, St. Mary ' s Dormitory . . . Judicial Board Chairman, St. Mary ' s Dormitory. SHERRY K. GORDNER Dcuiville. Peinisyli ' di hi Loveable scatterbrain . . . Deep, dancing dimples . . . Bubble ' s " buddy " . . . Funloving and mischievous . . . Continued contributions to Dick ' s education . . . Can never remember those punch lines ... A laugh a minute . . . Beauty queen of the eighth floor . . . Playful disposition ... As unpredictable as P.R.N, duty . . . Hiking Club . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club. BARBARA ALLEN GRAY Ball ) ore. Maryland " Bobbie " . . . Captivating sense of humor . . . Monthly dormitory moves . . . Can really liven up conversation . . . An all around gal . . . Bubbling to the brim with personality . . . Double wedding in July . . . Prolific poster painter . . . Student Government Association, Calendar Committee, Chairman . . . Senior Class, Historian . . . Glee Club . . . Angel Flight. JANET RITCHIE HALL Rising Si n. Maryland Blushing again? ... It is a joy just to know her . . . Quiet efficiency . . . Smiles with sincerity . . . The apple of Jim ' s eye . . . Personality bubbles like seltzer water — and is twice as refreshing . . . Conscien- tiousness and perseverance — Janet ' s stepping stones to success . . . Wonderful cook and seamstress . . . Willing worker . . . Junior Class, Social Chairman . . . Glee Club . . . Sigma Theta Tau. SHARON BOSWORTH HARVEY Silver Spring. Maryland Balanced combination of housework and homework . . . Hubby, Claude — a medical student . . . Ready for anything you might ask . . . Epitome of organization . . . Amiable . . . " You didn ' t sell your tickets.- ' " . . . " They make a terrific, tall twosome " . . . Authority on crossword puzzles . . . Sincere interest in people . . . Quick to com- prehend . . . Our second mother-to-be . . . Delta Gamma, Treasurer . . . Diamond. MARION BARBARA HENSE Beltsville, Maryland Effervescent personality . . . Sparkling smile — winning ways . . . Optimistic — why not? . . . Never a harsh word ... A good sport around the clock, and every day the same . . . Considering Public Health . . . " Bridge, anyone? " ... A special knack for listening . . . Wealth of understanding . . . Bake Sale, Chairman . . . Subscriptions and Patrons Co-Editor, Terrae Mariae Medicus. EDWINA EILEEN JONES Falls Church, Virginia " Wendy " . . . Five foot-two, eyes of blue . . . Offers tea and sympathy to all she meets . . . Dignity and daintiness . . . Vivacious brunette with sparking eyes . . . Contagious conversationalist . . . Combine friendliness, humor, and petiteness; dress with fashion, and label — " Wendy " . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland, State Recording Secretary . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus, Advertising Editor. VIVIAN AVIS LANCASTER Rockpoint, Maryland " Avis " . . . The pink-cheeked countenance of a cherub . . . " Oh really! " . . . Mischievous and mirthful ... " 1 can ' t be bothered " . . . Lively little lass ... A wealth of empathy . . . Cute and captivating . . . Bustling bit of protoplasm . . . Our sensible country girl . . . Junior Class, Treasurer . . . Lay-out Editor, Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland . . . Newman Club. MARYAN LEWIS Edgeu ' ood, Maryland The ' Miss Etiquette " of Social Poise . . . Good natured . . . Gracious . . . Sincere in all her actions . . . Watch that wink . . . " You character " . . . Winning smile . . . Enthusiasm personified . . . Always has a parking place ... If it ' s neatness that counts, she will score ' 00% . . . Unmatched loyalty with special compassion for patients . . . Chic dresser . . . Newman Club, President. DOLORES FULTON MAGNESS Ballhnore, Maryland " Dee " . . . Came to us from the service . . . Serious minded . . . Calm exterior . . . Worn a path to the hospital . . . Prudence and industri- ousness will carry her far ... A member of the select group that graduated in January . . . Advocate of Public Health . . . Early riser . . . The keenly critical mind with a depth of understanding. EUGENIA CALVERT McKECHNIE BaltiDiore, Maryland " Genie " . . . Our " Navy " wife acquired her gold band at Christmas . . . Pert pixie with a bewitching smile . . . Soft, soothing voice with a wholehearted laugh . . . Sherry ' s Fan Club . . . Daintily feminine . . . Flair for fashion . . . " Georgia or bust " . . . Swimming is not her sport . . . Our first little mother-to-be . . . Flossie Flyer, Art Editor . . . Newman Club. ' N Ff HELEN JUTEN NOWACK Brookmont. Maryland Instant wedding . . . Germany bound . . . ... A wiz on ice . . . Diligent student efficient . . . Larry ' s " Special nurse " . . Parson ' s Hall . . . Talented and terrific . . and stable . . . Junior Class, Secretary . . Always ready with a smile . . Energetic, earnest, and . Best equipped room in . Quiet and quick . . . Able Maryland Marching Band " Wesley Foundation . . Gamma Sigma Sigma. Alpha Chi Omega . . . Tau Beta Sigma JOAN CAROLYN OLSON Colcain. Mcusachmetts " The littlest angel " of the January graduates . . . Vivacious . . . East coast traveler . . . Massachusetts Yankee . . . Possessor of a bewitching smile and sparkling eyes . . . Distinguished New England twang , . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland . . . National Student Nurses Association . . . Glee Club . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Canterbury Club. CATHERINE CHRISTINE ORRELL Baltiniore. Alcirykind " Cathy " . . . " And I whipped out of that room " . . . Chucked full o ' fun . . . Parson Hall ' s songbird . . . Her kindness is exceeded only by her good humor . . . Large vocabulary of wit . . . Red highlights in her wavy hair . . . " Alma Mater? " . . . Student Government Associa- tion, House Chairman . . . Judicial Board . . . Glee Club . . . Chapel Choir, Historian. HELEN HOFFMANN OVERTON University Park. Maryland " Betsy " . . . Capable, hard worker . . . Best " hula-hooper " around ... A wholesome and warm-hearted friend . . . Undercurrent of thoughtfulness . . . Contact lenses convert . . . Transfer from Duke University . . . April Fool ' s Day bride . . . Flair for art — particularly bulletin boards . . . Brown bagger . . . Chains of petite sneezes . . . Glee Club . . . Student Government Association, 3rd Vice-President . . . Senior Class, Vice-President. - rr: I DIANE OWENS Baltimore. Maryland " Owns " . . . The look of innocence in her brown eyes . . . Always around when " Bernie " buzzes . . . The embroidery member of the sewing circle . . , Contagious giggle . . . Record collector . . . Lovely, long hair . . . Quiet mannered young lady, but humor emerges when least expected . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Fencing Club . . .Glee Club. CAROLE ARNOLD PINCKNEY handover, Maryland Soft blonde hair and vivacious brown eyes . . . Cute and captivating . . . Daily driver from West Hyattsville to Baltimore . . . Casual con- versationalist . . . Avid gum fan . . . Married Gary last August . . . Laughter that pops forth intermittently . . . Spark of wit . . . The distinguished member of our class who learned about the Operating Room, first hand . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Flossie Flyer . . . Glee Club. PEGGY JANE PRITCHETT Bethesda, Maryland A gracious lady ... A real friend . . . Our Southern Belle ... A willing listener . . . Enjoys people . . . " Come in y ' all " . . . Quiet dignity and serene beauty . . . Charm is her essence . . . Expressive, brown eyes . . . True interested enthusiasm . . . Junior Class, Vice- President . . . Flossie Flyer, Editor . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club, Vice-President . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland, State Vice- President. MARTHA ANN RAMSBURG Frederick . Alary land " Maggie " . . . Gets along with all . . . Sometimes taken by mistake for being quiet . . . Tall tale teller . . . Flair for foolishness . . . Always ready for a good practical joke . . . Cool, calm, and collected . . . Systematic in her work . . . Behind the scenes helper ... A grin and a good work for everyone . . . " Dues? of course you ' ll pay " . . . Has a contagious laugh . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Senior Class, Treasurer . . . Sigma Theta Tau. NANCY LOU REMSBERG Middle own, Maryland Artist with a flair . . . " Huh " . . . Natural curls . . . Can she blush . . . " Wait for me. " . . . Can ' t miss her in those fire red P.J. ' s . . . Gets a lot accomplished in her quiet, efficient manner . . . Loves sports — especially horseback riding . . . " Sure, I ' ll go " . . . " Sled riding with Victor? — never again! " . . . Glee Club . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Aqualiners . . . Westminster Fellowship. JANE RIDGELY RIZER Ml. Savage. Maryland An indefinable likableness endears her to all . . . Sparkles with sweet- ness . . . Sugar and spice and everything nice . . . " God love her " . . . Conscientious leader and constant worker . . . McKiesty, her virtue . . . Full of pep and entertainment . . . Red, red blush . . . Junior and Senior Class, President . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland . . . Student Government Association, Executive Council . . . Sigma Theta Tau. RUTH BLUM SCHULTZ Baltimore, Maryland " Ruthie " ... In on the mischief making . . . Precise . . . Known for her nightly charges to the telephone . . . Can be heard three stories above or below . . . Giggles in high C . . . Prizes her stone of love Long, curly eyelashes . . . Tailored neatness ... A mind of her own . . . Speaks with authority . . . Sophomore Carnival Committee Chairman . . . Modern Dance Club . . . Hillel Foundation . . . Sigma Theta Tau. BETH ANN SCHWARTZ Lafayette Hills. Pennsylvania " Schwartzie " ... A pretty, perky, little package . . . Catchy as a tune ... " A ring on the finger is worth two on the phone " . . . Petite Has the hint of mischief in her big brown eyes . . . " Hampster time, Gang " . . . Cute giggle . . . Pint size package of personality tied up with a big smile ... St. Mary ' s Dormitory, Secretary . . . Women ' s Recreation Association . . . Freshman Counselor Association. STEPHANIE DAMPIER SMITH Silver Spring. Maryland " Steff " . . . " Well group ... ' ... Unique, calculating wit . . . Main- tains steadfast friendships . . . Organization plus . . . Sympathetic listener . . . Good natured . . . Weighty third finger of left hand Dependable . . . Flossie Flyer. News Editor . . . Student Government Association, Treasurer . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club, Treasurer . . . Alpha Chi Omega . . . Sigma Theta Tau ... Phi Kappa Phi. PATRICIA GORTNER SUBLETT Oakland, Maryland " Pat " ... A gracious lady possessed of much warmth and personal charm . . . Competent beautician . . . Between class snoozer . . . Smiles and dimples ... " I won ' t be here for dinner tonight " . . . Big blue eyes . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland . . . National Student Nurses Association . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Glee Club . . . Chapel Choir . . . 1960 Terrae Mariae Medicus. Lay-out Editor. I PATRICIA CAROLE TYMESON Cato !s I ■die . Maryland " Pat " . . . Irrepressible bursts of laughter . . . Perfectionist in per- petual motion . . . Creative imagination and originality . . . Success shall be hers . . .A true friend. . . Concentration plus . . . Just beats the clock . . . Organized confusion . . . Inter-professional School Senate . . . Flossie Flyer. Reporter . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus, Editor-in- Chief . . . Delta Gamma . . . Alpha Lambda Delta . . . Sigma Theta Tau . . . Phi Kappa Phi. FEROL PEALE VINCENT (.allege Park. MaryLind First gal to receive the golden circle on her third finger . . . Bill ' s nurse . . . Quietness with a glow . . . Always neat . , . Prompt and precise ... A sunny smile ... A wholesome, well-scrubbed look . . . Possible future in Psychiatry at Spring Grove . . . " Really ' . . . " Come on now, are you teasing.- ' " . . . Outstanding characteristics of capability and steadiness . . . Alpha Lambda Delta . . . Sigma Theta Tau . . . Phi Kappa Phi. LUCY JANE WILES Gle}2 Echo Heights. Maryland Our lovely blue-eyed blonde lassie . . . Where there ' s Lucy, there ' s laughter . . . " Chuckle " . . . Miss Enthusiasm plus . . . I ' ll just dash this letter off . . . Talented . . . Makes an out-of-tune piano sound lovely . . . What ' s wrong with my P.J. ' s? . . . ' Oh, I saw the best T.V. show! " ... A gal who is nice to all . . . Maryland Christian Fellowship, Secretary . . . Glee Club, President . . . Terrae Mariae Medicits. Senior Write-up Editor. ALICE EMMA M. ZORN Woodlawn, Maryland South of the border flavor . . . Naturally curly black hair . . . Known for making her morning mad dashes to Montebello and City . . . Short, sweet and spirited . . . Good things come in small packages ... A determination that will lead to success . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland, Senior Representative . . . Flossie Flyer, Typist . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Student Union Board, Secretary . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus. Photography Editor. 208 The Nightingale Pledge I solemnly pledge myself before God, and in the presence of this assembly, To pass my life in purity and to practice my profession faithfully. I will abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous, and w ill not take or know ingly administer any harmful drug. I will do all in my pow er to maintain and elevate the standard of my profession, and will hold in confidence all personal matters com- mitted to my keeping and all family affairs coming to my know ledge in the practice of my calling. With loyalty w ill I endeavor to aid the physician in his w ork, and devote myself to the w elfare of those committed to my care. 209 Our Sponsors ' hw yruj J Soi du . ' rfA« ' - £-?rUA, Hr7 iyi | s:tisfr :V! U y C . ' tJ t.t -«p y « w«- ' Th Si S-g- oio-» yp j y nf f kff hi.D. ' 30 iKy-t , u ■t i ' j ' . I H lur--., ■(4. -tL. i2 l 5. ' J--if- t .Q_ (_y iL i o. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob N. Holz H ' - " - t JeJcLt,j;, = . JL .. fiJ - o-f St. L| XX.Lu ' vru-i i--- - c:::zj A.CUJ Mrs. ftc) (Ml?. LXci ' Ly !J CU t , c -- J C5 H- hJ J U . ' C. DUDLEY LEE. M.D. 33DD CARLISLE AVE. BALTIMDRE 16. MD. T - i ' ' %uc (i - fPuM -. -i3tvj: :tu i )Hfr ;:fc,, " Nvvt -f VvVuft CoOfjevtM t j . f) .yfj7UAj.3A » ' ! J XCL Hnr. ' ;W - ■J " f f- - d ' rip f. Dexter L. Reimann, M.D. Cf d 9Zf z 3, J! J 7vn- -o l l:5 U-n.. Sudneu SewaJU. L H r-. - U) ' J. i-ry oJZiI - «. J:Jgl ,:., rW t C: - . DR. WILLIAM B. SMITH The Medical Center Rt. 2, Salisbury, Md. " cMxJi Harold M. Stein ,M.D. %• - , c zlA. (f Dr, and Mrs. Joseph B, Worknan rr)afUU f. t tujcd UiAJkU-...w. UW Our Patrons Mrs. Arthur M. Ahalt Albert L. Anderson, m.d. Mr. Mrs. Julius Bachur Dr. Mrs. George K. Baer Martha Baer Bruce Barnes, M.D. Bernard N. Bathon, m.d. ' 57 Dr. George Beck AHce E. Beegan Dr. Eugene S. Bereston John R. Bernardo, Sr., M.D, Mr. Mrs. Samuel W. Betz William D. Blake Dr. Mrs. Joseph S. Blum Dr. Mrs. Louis Blum George Bokat Eunice A. Broughton Mr. Mrs. Ernest S. Brown J. Lucien Brown Leo T. Brown, m.d. Terry Bryan William Ross Bundick, M.D. T. J. Burkart, m.d. Mary Jane Carroll F. A. Clark, M.D. Charles P. Clautice, M.D. Harold O. Closson Herman Cohen, M.D. Dr. George J. Coplin Dr. Joseph M. Cordi Dr. R. M. Cunningham Mr. Mrs. Louis H. Davidson Mrs. Maurice Davidson Mr. Mrs. Saul D. Davidson William J. G. Davis, M.D. Dr. Harry Deibel Dr. Mrs. Paul M. DiGiorgi A. E. Donohue Jacob L. Dreskin, m.d. ' 25 Dr. John C. Dumler Dr. Mrs. James E. Dunn II Edna Gerrish Dyar, m.d. Ruth L. Dyson Dr. Myron Eichler Francis A. Ellis, M.D. Dr. Mrs. Myer G. Etkind Remo Fabbri, M.D. L. W. Farinholt, Jr. The Feuerman Family Dr. Leon Freedom ' 21 Ernest Wm. Frey, m.d. A Friend Robert P. Fruchtbaum Dr. Mrs. Wilmer K. Gallager A. P. Gardner Harry E. Gerner, m.d. Dr. William D. Gentry, Jr. John E. Gessner, m.d. Albert J. Glass Dr. Samuel S. Glick Sue Carolyn Goldman D. U. Gould, M.D. Mary Ann Goyne Dr. Mrs. Wilson A. Heefner Mr. Mrs. William F. Hense Dr. Thomas F. Herbert Edward J. Herbst Mrs. Thomas Hickey Dr. Mrs. C. H. Hoffmann Mr. Mrs. Samuel Hofkin Mark Hollander, m.d. L. F. Honick, M.D. Charles B. Hooker, M.D. Dr. Richard Hornick Dr. W. L. Howard Irvin G. Hoyt, M.D. Virginia Huffer, M.D. B. Hulfish, M.D. Edward O. Hunt, Sr. Thomas E. Hunt, Jr., M.D. ' 54 Jesse R. Johnson, m.d. Dr. Clyde F. Karns Theodore Kardash, m.d. Mr. Mrs. Guy Kempthorn Mr. Mrs. Richard B. Kennan Dr. Mrs. Lauriston L Keown George S. M. Kieffer, m.d. Dr. Mrs. L. F. Klimes V. Ellis Knight, m.d. ' 50 M. F. Kocevar Mr. Mrs. Harry J. Kohlhepp, Sr. Fred Kyper, M.D. Dr. Mrs. David P. Largey A. L. Leonard Joni M. Light Louis H. Limauro, M.D. J.J.Luddy Jacob S. Ludwig, m.d. Wm. E. Martin, M.D, F. W. Mayer, M.D. Howard B. Mays, m.d. Mr. Mrs. Vernon McCarter George McCaughey John J. McGonigle, m.d. C. E. McWilliams, M.D. Medical Class of 1921 Meyer Mindel Robert V. Minervini, m.d. Charles A. Minnefur, M.D. Dr. Mrs. D. W. Mintzer William Morris Mitchell Dr. W. K. C. Morgan Theodore H. Morrison Dr. Mrs. Leonard J. Morse Mr. Mrs. Clarence G. Mueller S. Edwin Muller, M.D. Dr. L.J.MuUins R. S. Munford Allen R. Myers, M.D. Henry Nagel, m.d. Walter S. Niblett, m.d. Mrs. Mona Oldstone P. S. 1908 Thomas R. O ' Rourk Dr. William N. Palmer Salvadore D. Pentecost, M.D. Mr. Arch G. Perdew Dr. H. R. Peters J. P. Ponte, Jr., M.D., FACS Judge Mrs. J. Gilbert Prendergast Bruno Radauskas, M.D. Manfred J. Ratino John Maureen Reeves Mrs. Edward L. ReiUy ' 59 Mr. Mrs. Frank G. Remsberg Fred C. Sabin, M.D. ' 21 Harold Sager, M.D. Joseph Salan David Saloman, M.D. Mr. Mrs. Adolphe Solomon George Sawyer, M.D. Jordan M. Scher, M.D. Nathan Schnapu, m.d. William F. Schnitzker, M.D. Dr. Herman Seidel Senior Wives - Medical School Dr. Mrs. Albert B. Shackman Mr. Mrs. Milton Shenton, Sr. Solomon Sherman, M.D. Louis H. Shuman, M.D. Gabor Simor, m.d. Andrew G. Smith Dr. Mrs. Morton E. Smith Robert Lee Snelling Dr. Mrs. Henry H. Startzman, Jr. Patrick B. Storey, m.d. Dr. B. O. Thomas, Jr. Dr. Ramsey B. Thomas W. N. Thomas, Jr., M.D. Winfield N. Thompson Russell M. Tilley, Jr. Dr. Mrs. William H. Triplett Mrs. John Paul Troy Edward B. Truitt, Jr. F. Doyle Tyler Mr. Mrs. Arthur A. Tymeson Mr. Mrs. Victor J. Vilk Frederick J. Vollmer, M.D. Stuart H. Walker, M.D. Henry J. Walton Robert C. Waltz, M.D. Margaret H. Weagly Mrs. Mae McCarter Weber Mr. Mrs. William B. Weglicki, Sr. Mrs. Sylvia Weitzman Milton Wilder, M.D. Mr. Mrs. Ernest G. Wiles J. Frank Williams, Jr., m.d. John Z. Williams, M.D. Walter D. Wise, M.D. Charley Wisseman, Jr., M.D. George F. Wolf John C. Woodland Dr. Mrs. Theodore E. Woodward Dr. Lois A. Young Mr. Mrs. Herman Yalam Dr. Mrs. Frederick M. Zerzavy Joseph G. Zimring, m.d. Our Advertisers Complimenfs of THE W. B. CASSELL CO. 1027 S. HOWARD ST. Baliiwore, Maryland Compliments of THE ALCAZAR ZIZ HOPKINS NURSES UNIFORM CO. Founded 1932 MADE TO INDIVIDUAL MEASURE PERFECT FIT Official Maker of U. of Md. Graduate Nurses Uniforms 1822 E. Monument Street EAstern 7-4744 EAstern 7-3666 Compliments of KOONTZ CREAMERY Complimenfs of JIM ' S DRIVE-IN CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND Compliments of AMBASSADOR HOUSE RESTAURANT BEST WISHES TO THE CI ASS OF 1961 HUTZLER ' S Besf Wishes UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE 118 S. Eutaw St. Medical Books Stationery Surgical Instruments When good fellows gef fogefher — it ' s fhe COCKTAIL LOUNGE or MALLARD BAR of HOTEL EMERSON KEMP C. CATLING General Manager Wiih best wishes fo fhe Class of ' 67 GEORGE E. BOYNTON and CHARLES A. WUNDER MASSACHUSETTS MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. Besf wishes from THE MARYLAND ACADEMY OF GENERAL PRACTICE Compliments of HYNSON, WESTCOTT DUNNING, INC. Congratulations and Best Wishes PHARMACIES SINCE 18S3 ARUNDEL FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION PATAPSCO AVENUE AND FOURTH STREET BALTIMORE 25, MD. RESINOL OINTMENT Contains: Made in Baltimore 1 Resorcin, Oil of Cade, Prepared Calamine, I Zinc Oxide, Bismuth Subnitrate Boric Acid combined in a lanolin-petrolatum base to soothe and lubricate dry irritated skin. Famous for 60 years for its prompt, long-lasting relief for skin itching, burning and minor soreness. Prescribe freely. Prescribe, also, new RESINOL GREASELESS in tubes. Contains the same fine medications in a greaseless, washable, stainless base. Manufactured by RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY 517 W. Lombard St. — Opp. School of Medicine Tenae Mariae Med cus 1961 STAFF SCHOOLS OF MEDICINE NURSING UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Serving the medical profession for more than 40 years ■■ mil ( Si MURBAY BaUMCABTNBH Equipment and Supplies for the HOSPITAL PHYSICIAN LABORATORY SURGEON INDUSTRY NURSE Competent experienced surgical fitters in attendance Consultants on major types of Hospital Equipment urray.=cyJaumgartner SritOirAL IIV!iiTRI IE: T CO., I!VC. ESTABLISHED 1920 1421 MARYLAND AVENUE • BALTIMORE 1, MD. SARATOGA 7-V333 Best Wishes to the CLASS OF 1961 fro m WARREN INGALLS Estate Planning Life Insurance Tax Sheltered Annuities National Life Insurance Company Montpelier, Vermont 701 Maryland Trust Building Baltimore 2, Maryland Congratulations and Best Wishes from THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND NURSES ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION You are welcome to become a part of our membership Aeetings are at 8 P.M. the first Tuesday of every month except during the summer. Xne University oi JVlaryland Scnooi oi JNursin CLASS OF 1961 About Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . The text has been set in Linotype Garamond No. 3 with display heads in Monotype Garamond. The paper is L ntrn Gloss manufactured by the S. D. WARREN COMPANY of Boston. THE GARAMOND PRESS BALTIMORE • 196 1 The Editors and Staff wish to express their appreciation to Mr. James Conner for his help in producing the 1961 Terrae MARIAE Medicus.


Suggestions in the University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) collection:

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

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