University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD)

 - Class of 1959

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 236 of the 1959 volume:

ARCHIVES Dlariae medicos mi 1 1 i 1 i MM N I l).-i JlM,L HALL — iliL Liiilcst building in the United States still in use loi uiLdical education. I his unique building seems appropriate to introduce our yearbook. The University of Maryland School of Medicine was the fifth medical college to be established in our country. Throughout the book we hope to pay tribute to the many events which have occurred or have originated within the walls of our institution and to acknowledge a few of the many medical personalities and accomplishments which have historical significance — for herein lies our heritage. ' ' -J ' Z TERRAE MARIAE MEDICUS UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND SCHOOL OF NURSING BALTIMORE. MARYLAND In Dedication Will i i I S. StONF, M.S.. M.I)., D.SC. There is a stir in the air down at Greene and Lombard. We refer not only to the construction of new buildings taking place, but also to the surge of progress in the spheres of medical education and research. We felt this as freshmen, for we were des- tined to become a part of it and proudly so. The one man most responsible for our having this privilege is our dean, William S. Stone. Doctor Stone came to the University of Maryland just four years ago, following a diversified, interesting and outstanding career in the United States Army. A few high- lights of his career include research in Tropical Diseases in the Panama Canal Zone, direction of the preventive medicine program in the Mediterranean Theatre during World War II, and administration of the U. S. Army Institute of Research at Walter Reed in Washington, D. C. His experience encompasses virtually every phase of medi- cine — clinical, pathological, educational, research and administrative. However, Doctor Stone is more than just a learned professional man. He is a true gentleman, a personification of dignity, honor and affability. It is in the spirit of knowing that our medical careers will necessarily reflect the high quality of training received here and the inspiration of men such as Doctor Stone, that we, the class of 1959, respectfully and appreciatively dedicate to him this yearbook. In Recognition As time goes on our medical school is continually changing the buildings, the students, and the faculty. Many of these changes we welcome, many we regret. The latter is true of two of the faculty changes which will take place next year. Dr. Amberson, who has served us faithfully for many years as Professor and Head of the Department of Physiol- ogy is leaving this position to devote his time to research. Dr. Parker, who is our Associate Dean in charge of curriculum is leaving this position to devote his full time to medi- cal practice. Robert T. Parker, a.b., m.d. William R. Amberson, ph.b.. ph.d. Both of these men have always had the welfare of the student foremost in his mind. They both have always been greatly interested in keeping our curricu- lum abreast of the times which is no little task. We of the senior class will always con- sider ourselves fortunate to have been students here while Dr. Amberson and Dr. Parker were associated with the fac- ulty. Wc wish to thank them both (or their constant aid to our education and to wish them success and Godspeed in their new tields of endea or. Those who stay behind them will miss their presence in future vears. Brigadier General William H. Triplett, m.d. The class of ' 59 wishes to express their indebtedness, appreciation and gratitude to Dr. Wilham H. Triplett, for his constant devotion and concern for the welfare of our institution. After graduating in 1911, Dr. Triplett showed an interest in military medicine, serving actively in the Maryland National Guard, and as a medical officer in World War I. After the war he became one of the senior officers in the 104th Medical Regiment. During World War II he assumed command of the 104th Medical Regiment with the rank of Colonel and served both in the United States and overseas. After retiring in 1944 he continued to be active in fraternal and civic affairs as well as devoting a large part of his time to the welfare of the School of Medicine and in particular the Medical Alumni Association. Dr. Triplett has worked diligently to build a strong professional and fraternal bond between the Alumni Association and the Faculty. He has been instrumental in organizing alumni gatherings at various meetings held throughout the United States, and has sought continually to foster a bet- ter understanding between alumni and students. The University of Maryland is indeed fortunate to have Dr. Triplett, a physician, soldier and friend, as one of the alumni of this institution. In Memoriam Emil G. Schmidt lsy5-195S Dr. Emil G. Schmidt graduated from the University of Wisconsin chemistry depart- ment with a B. S. degree in 1921 and received his Doctorate from the same institution three years later in biochemistry. After a short time with Commercial Solvents Corpo- ration in Indiana, he came to the University of Maryland Medical School as an Instruc- tor, concurrently serving as Chief Chemist of Mercy Hospital. He became Associate Professor of biochemistry in 1937 and Professor nine years later. In 1 948 he was appointed Head of the Department. Dr. Schmidt ' s research activities centered about the fields of blood and urine chemis- try, torulosis, antibiotics, and tlie effects of chemotherapy on the process of gastro- intestinal putrefaction. The Professor was a member of the American Chemical Society, American Society of Biological Chemists, the Society of Experimental Biology and Medicine of the Uni- versity of Maryland Biological Society, and numerous fraternities. We students who benefited from his teaching, acknowledge a great lo.ss to the Uni- versity in his death. -J-M--Y " ' " liPv " J c ■■■■1 glgMI V mk: SiS 1 ' MIW??-, |. M ' I sJ ' 3 1 S. ' f " I H ' OFFICE or 1 I Fi -tOHiSSICHS 1 r i — m ■_ . :; •-•--» k ADMINISTRATION BUILDING »t«i.«aif- ' !.43a :;e«M AK»» »- -- l | imr i fl»imii T -.H K 1 IMfl K ■i . .iflH Iff - ' ?n 1.,.. B HBl M SM ti " " " jK 1 r 1.. « j ■i n. i ■■ B 1 ' jJBMBBllll BBHjHi •.■BBl HH HBSf .;. Hpr . :,:: ' ■■ OFFICE OF Tr F i 1 • " • ' R £ G S iP K H H ... 1 ,, . 1. :ashier s V :_i:_ M ,J OFFICE __j ■; i:.. ...L J- rx ' -vi 1 1 CO ' I r " c i f " ? " = ._ L..- LI m • 11 - rW ■ - " . 1__ ■ " -rr 5H!r ' ( , 1 j 1 ' i ; ■■ - • ' ■:-■ ■■.■ ' 7 V . ' ,¥ J. Millard Tawes Governor. Stale of Maryland To the Graduates of the Schools of Medicine and Nursing: Congratulations to the graduates of 1 959! Ours is a great age of study and research and of successful discoveries in the allevia- tion and cure of human ills. Never were our medical men and women more devoted to the understanding and practicing of their professions. We already see the results in new attacks against old diseases, and the horizon is bright with new hopes — new faith in the skills and learning which God gives those who choose the life of devotion to the healing arts. This faith that is vested in you by your fellow citizens should be a source of great satisfaction and a real inspiration for the tasks that await you. Sincerely, , C,r l::pC- GOVERNOR Wilson H. Elkins, b.a., m.a., litt.b., ph.d. President, University of Maryland To the Seniors, Schools of Medicine and Nursing: If there is a greater achievement than the development of your own abilities to the maximum degree of which you are capable, then it certainly must be the offering of your skills and knowledge to society on behalf of human betterment. From early times such devotion has been the distinguishing characteristic of the physician; and, in the last century, of the nurse. Both groups have put service above self. The University of Maryland is happy to have afforded you the opportunity to attain your educational goal. We shall continue our interest in the progress of your career throughout the years to come. We hope that each of you will lead successful lives filled with the rewards and sat- isfactions of professional accomplishment. We are firm in our faith that you will add further honor to the University ' s already rich heritage of leadership. Sincerely, PRESIDENT William S. Stonl, m.s., m.d., d.sc. Director, Medical Ediicution ami Research, ami Dean Greetings to the Graduating Class of 1 959: During your undergraduate period in tlic Sciiool of Medicine, consistent progress has been made in improving the understanding of tiic needs of medical education by the University and the State. This has led to improved support for teaching in tiie basic science and clinical areas, as well as research essential to medical progress. It should be the obligation of every medical graduate to not only be an excellent physician ever conscious of the need to increase his knowledge and ability to care for the sick, but he should also be dedicated to maintain high standards of medical care by supporting, and influencing others to supp ' ort. impro ements in medical education. With all good wishes. Sincerely, te.OQ DI.AN 10 Dietrich C. Smith, b.a., m.a., ph.d. Associate Deem, Admissions and Student Affairs Professor of Physiology Robert T. Parker, a.b., m.d. A ssociate Dean, Cuniciiliim Assistant Professor of Medicine 11 12 ' W . -r k m y.} The Student Union I ' lie I.lhiciiy 16 Preclinical Years % III f»i J, N. m: IS ■ ! ' ' i Fro« roil . Schaulcle, Edgar, Barker. Cohen, I ' aiicrson. higclniaii. l )roton, McCormick. Klatsky. Satou, Weglicki. Kopilnic ' k, Barrick. Sccoiul row: Franklin, Harris, Zampiello, Linherg, Gaither, Traiim. Broughton, Feuerman, Love, Piillen, Tuttle, Steinwald, Updike, Bonovich, Sophocleiis. T iird rosw Hawkins, Heinritz, Anderson, klimes, Rupke. Lachman. Barr. Bokat, Lanphear, Closson, Buchman. Fratto, Bradley, Childs, Kilchenstein, Goldstein, Schmieler. Thi.s i.s the beginning for us. One hun- dred men and women assemble in the balmy Baltimore September. They want to become doctors, and they present them.selves to tho.se who have preceded them here — those already doctors who will teach them to become physicians. In four years the majority of this hundred will go away. In a certain sense they will have walked into, through, and out of the pages of this book; for, poor product though it is. this book and its other edi- tions will he the single record of their group, a rctlcction of the personality of the Medical School for one year. Becoming a doctor is like no other experience in the world, and we want to make the few pages of this hook a Ictlci to those most interested in us — our families and friends, who so often learn .so little from us of our part in this experi- ence. We want to show you some of what we do in our brief time here — the books we open, the instruments we begin to use. the sick people we meet, the tissues and diseases we study; and the places we pass through, the classrooms, the laboratories, the clinics, the wards, the operating rooms; and our seniors in medicine who teach, guide, mould, drive, enlighten, in- spire and aggravate us. We want to tell you, and remind ourselves, of the con- trasts, the new and the antiquated, the exciting and the dreary, the immaculate and the grimv, the instantaneous and the interminable, the diiinilicd and the liidi- 18 Freshman Class crous. With some snapshots and words from our own brief time here, and with some voices from the history of medicine, we want to put down a little of the per- sonal living experience that is our medi- cal education. CLASS OFFICERS Top row: Farinholt. SliidenI Council: Barrick. Suiclent Council: Bonovick, Honor Council: Weglicki, Senna: Tuttle, Suma. Bottom row: Johnstone, PresiJent: Kohl- hepp. Vice President: Sophocleus, Secretary: Bower- man, Treasurer. Front row: Felser, Gallager, Hunt. Klimes. Gendason, Zikoski, Luxenberg. Baker, Bowerman, MacMurray. Farin- holt. Second row: Breschi. Malan. Twardowicz. Ciillis. ShefFerman. Johnstone, Kohlhepp. Karper. Moshang. Third row: Crampton, Sothoron, Vilk, Burgan. Stephenson. Semer, Petrushansky. ANATOMY , , yi .j.y.. . , y.. r y. .i . j( - • WILLIAM CRUIKSHANK " The Anatomy of the Absorbing Vessels of the Human 1st Edition: (!. Nicol. London I7S6. William Cumberland Cruikshank ( I 745- 1 SOO ). of Edinburgh, the skill, like the lunus uives oil ' C ' 0_.. Body. " demons! r ited that 20 EDUARD UHLENHUTH, PH.D. In Recognition . . . For those of our readers who have ever been associated with our school. Dr. Uhlen- huth is no stranger. His presence in the anatomy lab and in the halls has been a fami- liar sight to the freshman students here for many years. None of us will ever forget his vivid lectures and his precise dissections. He is considered an international author- ity on the anatomy of the human pelvis. His achievements have been so numerous that it is impossible to list them here. One of his many interests over the years has been the anatomical library in Bressler building which he originated and to which he has con- tinuously contributed both from his collections of medical literature and from his own writings. It is from this collection that the old anatomy charts in this book are taken and we wish to thank him for giving us the privilege of utilizing them in our book. 21 Frank H. J. Ficge. a.b.. ph.d. Professor of Anciumiy tinil Head oj ihc Depiirtment " My Study of anatomy would never have succeeded had I when working at Medi- cine at Paris been wilHng that the viscera should he merely shown to me and to my fellow-students at one or another public dissection by wholly unskilled barbers, and that in the most superficial way. I had to put my own hand to the business. " Andreas Vesalius. There is just no other way to do it. Here at the dissecting table we try to un- ravel the beautiful structural and func- tional intricacies of this dead body. There is an atavistic trace of awe and shock in our first maneuvers. But " ... slicing and slivering the carcasses of bet- ter men and women than I ever was my- self or am like to be, " we begin to see the living bodies of our someday patients. " l ' hi is the sharicsi roiiic lo ilic dass picnic. " 22 ' And da head bone is connected to da neck bone. " " Since when do nerves have lumens? " Exposing tlie funny-bone. 23 NEUROANATOMY HISTOLOGY " Food for iluur ln. " " The first question in my mind is not " is it a case of epilepsy? ' , but, ' where is the lesion permitting occasional excessive discharge? ' " J. Hughlings Jackson. The parts of the human brain, how they fit and act together, the interlacing gray net of nerves, this delicate system that lets us act most human, and its places vulnerable to disease — all this we try to learn from kaleidoscopically beau- tiful drawings and the best of professors. " In the year 1 675 I discovered very small living creatures in rain water, which had stood but a few days in a new earthen pot glazed blue within . . . they had a tail near four times tlic length of the whole body, of the thickness, by my microscope, of a spider ' s web. " Anton van Leeuwenhoek. Through that wonderful piece of glass and black metal, the miscroscope. we struggle, fail to see, finally see for the first time and attempt to interpret the swirling red and blue cell patterns that make up the " very small living " tissue structures whose acti ity or disorganiza- tion we will later learn to recognize in the well or sick person. 24 ' Have you tried sleeping at iiigltt ' . ' " " Since when do artifacts have nuclei? " 25 BIOCHEMISTRY Edw RD John HhRBST. b.s.. m.s.. ph.d. Associate Professor unci, Acliiif; Heiut of the Depl. of Bioloi ' ical Chemistry. " The modern physician is learning some- thing about the chemical compounds that are normally secreted in the body and control the operation of its organs. The chemist now has his fingers on the spring that regulates our vital mechanism. " E. E. Slosson. Biochemistry is a particularly hopeful science today. Biochemists apparently feel nothing of the overwhelming sensa- tion that descends on the first-year medi- cal student as he fills notebooks with geometrical jungles of formulae that mo- mentarily cross the blackboard; or spends hours before the long, black benches, dis- tilling solutions in double-jointed glass apparatus, deciphering unknown powders and permanently coloring his fingertips and trousers. But the vagueries begin to fade before the fascination of studying the ultimate and inter - related functions of human life processes. " WoiiUI ( ii care to draw tin- Utritnila oj 26 ' Best moonshine in Marvland. " Fold in one cup sugar. " 27 PHYSIOLOGY WU 1 lAM R. AMBFRSON, PH.U., IMI.D. Professor of Pliy ioloi, ' }- and Head of the DeparlinenI " I began to think whether there might not be a motion, as it were, in a circle . . . the blood, forced by the action of the left ventricle into the arteries ... in the same manner as it is sent through the lungs, impelled by the right ventricle. " William Harvey. Most of us develop some feeling for this study. This is how the body works. This the way the parts we examine, or listen to, or test, or record electrically, perform in health. If we can project be- yond the frog muscle, the squid axons, the gadgets, the wires, the cats and dogs asleep, and if we can see in the life-trac- ings scribbled out on smoked paper drums the secret workings of human or- gans, then we have learned solid facts or data to use in understanding the experi- ments of Nature, the diseases. " Ccntlemcn! He ' s fione! " » •! r :■«. Vi .,-- Sit. ' - ■ »•• -•»■ -,.ts- , v •- .. Sr ■ " ».•;;« -. • " »«,. -r- . ' S-. Off. -..i «w . . - . f - Jl: Run I: Glass, Holkin. IJoccut, IJcrky, nclll-Pczzi, BIodmi. CiooJnian, Henck. Bing. Breslin. Ron- 2: Fleming. Faw. Holz, Acosta-Otcro. Fall, (iirod. Diacionos. Berkow, Bandy. Fink, C erda. R iw S: Dudney. Cloninger. Hcyniann. Cain. Giitherlel. Fiidickc, Lankford. Pa ourck, Forhes. Headings. Berner. By the end of his first year, the medical student may feel farther away than ever from medicine. He has worl ed and stud- ied harder probably than ever before in his life. He has sat through countless lec- tures, excellent and poor; seen hundreds of suspiciously similar lantern slides; watched beautifully executed and per- fectly forgettable scientific movies; fal- len asleep at the most embarrassing and crucial moments; amassed at least six notebooks, full of his own poor interpre- tations of good lectures; handled person- ally every ounce of a cadaver; peered at microscopic slides of brain and viscera; filtered and tested pints of secretions; and struggled, sailed or squeezed through ex- aminations. But he has never seen the Hospital or patients. And while he has learned a little, he has forgotten so much. He feels this way. But certain faculties have been awakened, certain problems brought tt) awareness, certain attitudes begun to form. And he has begun to be- come a docti)r. His second year takes him through more laboratory science, but there is a stronger clinical note. He slips a little deeper into this special life. 30 Sophomore Class CLASS OFFICERS Bottom row: Light. Two Year S. G. A. Rep.: Dudnev, President: Young, Treasurer: Berner. [ ' ice-President. Top row: Vann, Secretary: Marsh, Honor Council Rep.: Waters, One Year S. G. A. Rep. Row 1: Wharton, Krome, Merring. Tilley, Sarles, Schillaci. Waters, Vitek, Urban. Row 2: Oster, McGeoy, Wizoskey, Rassmussen. Riter. Reeder. Vann. Webb, Pressor, Reeves, Mahoney, Rosen. Row 3: Light, Sonn, McCarter. Young, Myerberg. Kempthorne, Murreels, Mehl. Calveriiim, Kronthal, Appleton. SURGICAL ANATOMY DUVERNEY-GAUTIER " Essui d ' Anatomic, en Tableaux hnprinies. qui representcnt au Naiurcl uni ' Ics Muscles dc la f ' ave, du Col, de la I ' ete, de la Laniiue da Larin.x. " Mist lilL ' -sizc colored copper plates. Ciaiilicr. Paris 1745. 32 " If under such circumstances one does not know the position of an important nerve or muscle, or of a large artery or vein, it can happen that he helps the man to death, or sometimes mutilates him, instead of saving him. " Galen. This body begins to look more like a person than a wa steland of unrelated parts. We handle him with a little more familiarity if not with more skill. The surgeons are there to remind us that what we learn or neglect here will follow us to the operating room. Otto C. Brantigan, b.s., m.d. Professor of Clinical Surgery " Sure wish I had the upper half. " 33 PHARMACOLOGY John C. Krant . Jr.. b.s., m.s.. ph.d. Professor of I ' lmrmcicolofiy tiiul Haul of llw DepiirlmeiU " Deer ' s flesh, as already stated, is a fel- sufuge. Periodical and recurrent fevers are cured, if we believe what the magi- cians tell us, by wearing the right eye of a wolf, salted, and attached as an amulet. " Pliny the Elder. Today ' s potions, powders, and amu- lets are concocted a little more rationally in the laboratory and the magicians are pharmacologists. Drugs are the time- honored symbol as well as the sword of the doctor. And here among our private practice of frogs, rats, rabbits, cats, worms, pigeons, monkeys, dogs and sometimes ourselves, we dispense our prescriptions for classic and current med- icines, to learn how they work in the liv- ing body. The faces of the patients will change, but the reactions remain pretty much the same, and it is to the credit of our instructors that this message is de- livered so well here. ' Somebody call a priest! ' ' Mv iKiiiif s Helena Ruhiiwicin! ' 34 " Kaopectate is a damn good blocking agent. 35 PATHOLOGY Harlan I. Fi rmingi r. ah., m.d. Professor of Pulholofiy iiiul HctuI of ihc Department " The semilunar valves of the aorta had lost their natural pliancy, th e previous stage to becoming bone, and in several spots there were evident ossifications. The aorta immediately beyond the semi- lunar valves had its cavity larger than usual, putting on the appearance of an incipient aneurism. " Autopsy on John Hunter, Everard Home. This is where the student first meets human disease, as it lies on the shiny steel autopsy table, or floats silently in museum jars, or stands in neat rows of microscopic slides. But his objective is to make these static specimens come to life, to see in the dead organs and glass slides " Beats the hell oitt of me! ' 4 )r-t •f : ' %y ■ ) I • V % f%J y a dynamic process — disease through hve tissues and grappling with all the barriers and defences this person could muster before he succumbed. This is his opportunity to see directly what be- fore long he will only hear or feel from a distance, the " battle " under the skin of his patients. ' Bottled in Bond. ' Us i JMI T M l: Klt iz 1 J mt " PT B T - ' T ' I if- BaHB 7 can ' t tell without the label! " Put another nickel in! " ■Al ' HlSfi[ 91 ■l M w 1 3b 1 I MICROBIOLOGY Charles L. WissEMAN, Jr., n ., i s . m.d. Professor of Microhiolony ami Hecul of the Department " To prove that tuberculosis is caused by the invasion of bacilli ... it was neces- sary to isolate the bacilli from the body. " R. Koch. The whole new world of microscopic life, their colors, characteristics, shape, motion, life cycles, the diseases that arise from the struggle between themselves and man — this is the medical science where possibly the greatest advances have been and continue to be made. So the student spends more laboratory hours hurrying through experiments, trying to find these microbes, to see how they act, how they look, how they can be detected, and how they can be killed. ' Rejects jroiii Canaveral. 38 ' What a hell of a way to reproduce! " " If at first you don ' t succeed, STOP!!! ' Thev all lool alike to ine. 39 CLINICAL PATHOLOGY ■ " The shape of the red cells was very ir- regular, but what especially attracted at- tention was the large number of thin, sickle - shaped and crescent - shaped forms. " J. B. Herrick. The clues of disease are scattered thrt)ughout the body, in the patient ' s blood, urine, stool, sputum, sweat and body fluids. We take these bits of evi- dence, test them, stain them, smear them out on glass slides, and try to add a little detective ability to our approach to medicine. Milton S. Sacks, b.s.. m.d. Professor of Clinical Medicine cmtl Hetul, Division of Clinical Pathology " Only 1 30 more to i o. " PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS " Taking a sheaf of paper, I rolled it into a very tight roll, one end of which I placed over the precordial region, while I put my ear over the other. I was both surprised and gratified at being able to hear the beating of the heart. " R. T. H. Laennec. The student, too. is surprised and gratified as he begins to hear the mur- murs and feel the shapes of disease. In his first actual contact with patients, he learns to use the special tools of the doc- tor, the stethoscope, the ophthalmo- scope; but he learns his most valuable in- struments are his eyes and hands. Henry J. L. Marriott. b. ., m.a., b.m., b.ch. Professor of Medicine and Head of the Deparlincnl of Pliysical Diagnosis Bedside instruction with Dr. Van Buskirk Clinical Years - mb r ( jr i-V ciif 7; Myers. Shiilliiuin, SaiiniJcrb. Slandiford, Lattimoie, Nomianly. Siiiilh, ' oung, loulan. Svphiis. Staufberg. Row 2: Martello. Stram. Passen. Myer. Silverslein. Young. Yates. Ross. LaMastra. Lesky. Smith. Triteh. Saville. Row 3: Laney. Odend ' hal. Wallaee, Rogers. Morton, Lavy. Messina. Leakan. .Sarney. Robinson, Zanker. White. Zaiis. Mills. It seems like another world to the third year medical student as he begins his cHnical years. These two years are spent entirely in the hospitals and clinics mak- ing the rounds of the various medical, surgical, and ancillary services. He is free of the .scheduled life of classes and labor- atories, but now he finds himself .so busy he wishes he could read more and study the laboratory techniques he must now put to actual use. His day becomes a regu- lar hospital work day of .seeing and exam- ining patients, doing laboratory work, studying x-ray films, changing dressings, trying to decide what is the matter with his patients and trying to help in making them well. Mixed feelings keynote every step. There is so much to learn; he ' s read so much, he ' s sure he knows nothing. There is nothing .so wonderful to the student as carefully and logically putting together a patient ' s story, physical findings, labor- atory results and x-rays and making a rational definitive diagnosis. Then, there is a side to student life consisting of drudgery, menialities, trivia, iilogic and weariness that are universally expressed in the pithy, undignifiably pointed word — scut. But by little steps he is becoming a doctor. He is living his way to it and wouldn ' t change for tiic world. 44 Junior Class CLASS OFFICERS Top row: Heefner, Honor Council Represenlutive: James, President Srnileni Council; Rogers, Student Council Representative. Bottom row: Normanly, Vice President: DeVore, President: Figiieroa, Secretary: Kurad, Treasin-er. Row I: Glass, Hensala, Figueroa, DeVore, Patlow, Cheeks. Berger. Row 2: Brenner. Goldstein. Brecher. Bertiich, Honick, Alevizatos, Await, Kurad, Heefner, James, Bennet. Row i: Hill, Hayden, Feola, Ferciot, Grossman, Fellner, King. Herman. Huffington, Henning. ' s :fe i aggjai.J J iffle iL . MEDICINE rnitiais bnichiotrphulinti fiui iiiiiuliiris inti-nta ilfxlfn ■• ' 1 .vs itYitrrens tlfxtcr ' uiviis vafiits dt ' xrrr V Villi] siilu tnrn .!f. nt ' rvits itfuYitiaia tit . -, niu$i iH ' ctonilis minor x . . ' ' «v Vfritr iurnnttiiis fw mo t. tfrxfri •.■. n-t-forolii tw ar x aifiitta u ' thiiri ii ■ tnufien ■ : r,i,-iiio,-e( ilitlu imstm X ' tn cava cnwiu t ' s - • " ftfextis ntrrosHS ■t ' ncnntiaens suiwrffc ' . •iiiffius vaiimlii ' Hi vagus sinister ' III cardiaci ncrvi vagi sinistri . . ' .lintfii ' ■■ ' m. sulnlavius X ; " ' ■ ' . thoracica interna x II ' ' t. penittntiacophreniea ,- ' " r. atnUiicm caudalis y " " , ■ ■ ' ' ■- ri;-urrentii sinistri ■ , ' ■ ' ' •■i ' ln vititrocranial. , ■■■ih ' wnis sinistri X rasa fterinir,liitco phrrnicH ilextm ramus phrcmcO ' nhiiominalis nerv. nhr.uj., .hxfn pars tiiiiphnigmat. , , plfnriw puriftalis ' ' ' J «. phrenims sinis rr ' + vasa itrricardiacO ' phreniat sinistra costac IVet I ' X iobiis tl(yi sociiutialis pulmonis sinistri nrrvtts p imiiais sinisfi ' r rniiri n iHnphmfinial . ' pulmonis sini tri iliaphinnma : rami ' initSirihris ntrni phrenici sinistri Fig. 23. si ' ws phrrniiwvstatis SOBOTTA-UHLENHUTH " Atlas of Descriptive Hiinuin Aiiainmy. " One of the most inipoitant stiiictiiii. ' s which cont ' umt tlic |ihysici;in is tlnit of tiic mediastinum. In order to deal with diseases of the mediastinum the stuilent must learn the anatomy of tiiis retiion as it is found at the dissecting table. The chart depicted above taken from the Sobotta-Uhlenhulh " Atlas of Descriptive Human Anatcmiy " is one of the vivid visual aids used by the student in this study. Throughout the students work in internal Medicine he must frequently refer to such pictures, drawings, and manuscripts taken from the classic works of meilicine. 46 Theodore E. Woodward, b.s.. m.d.. d.sc. Professor of Medicine and Heiid of llie Department " The senior student ' s private practice. " ' Lie still, there ' s something in your back. " " Freliniiiuiry for open lieari surgery. ' Now Lewis, one doesn ' t SEE Ewart ' s sign ' " Meleiui who? " ' Notice the varices in this ascaris. " But Grandma, what big eyes you have! " " A mi sometimes rounds go on . . . and on . . and ON! ' ' A T T down .1 pts. ... " " Life is short, and the Art long; the oc- casion fleeting; experience fallacious, and judgment difficult. The physician must not only be prepared to do what is right himself, but also to make the pa- tient, the attendants and externals co- operate. " Hippocrates. The months spent on Medicine are a fair sample of the spectrum of practice — the steady flow of chronic disease in the Clinic, the emergencies on the wards. The conferences, case presentations, and scrutiny of the attending physicians add spice; the interminable laboratory work and hectic nighttime admissions under- score the practical. It ' s a new feeling to begin to learn to decipher a sick person ' s complaints and physical findings, and to plan treatment and watch its outcome. It ' s good to be a member of the team, despite tiie classic definition of a medi- cal student — " he below whom the buck cannot be passed. " 50 DERMATOLOGY " And if the priest see that, behold, the scabs spreadeth in the skin, then the priest shall pronounce him unclean: it is a leprosy. " Book of Leviticus. This enthusiastic staff of excellent teachers provides such intensive instruc- tion and demonstration from the huge number of their clinic patients, that stu- dents are occasionally surprised when they find they have survived the cops- and-robbers pace to retain a fair amount of knowledge of this artful specialty. Harry M. Robinson. Jk., d.s. m.u. Professor of Dermatology and Head, Division of Dermatology " And what is the primary lesion? ' 51 RADIOLOGY " Anythiiii; in this winduw for $9. 5. JnllN M. Dl NNIS. B.S.. M.D. Piojcssor of Riulioldi. ' }- unci Head of llie DeptirlnienI ' What d ' xou mean l iill ilireeU " " Wluii lime does Peter Gunn come on ' . ' 52 PREVENTIVE MEDICINE ' The smallpox, so fatal and so general among us, is here rendered entirely harm- less by the invention of ingrafting, which is the term they give it. " Lady Montagu. Here is the vital newer approach to Medicine — keeping people well. Eye- opening visits with the Health Depart- ment to fly-trap restaurants, rickety rel- ics of houses, and home visits to Medical Care patients underscore the need and demonstrate the progress made. George Entwistle, b.s.. m.d. Professor and Head of Department of Preventive Medicine He said he wants to work, but 53 SURGERY ' A if JOSEPH PANCOAST " A Treatise on Operative Surgery. " Carey Hurt, I ' liiUulclphia. Pa. IK44. Presented to the Department of Gross Anatomy by James Henry Feaster (freshman medical student) January 1942. It was found by Mr. Feaster in the paper pile of a paper n)ill up north, and purchased for the price of a nickel or less. " Anybody got a hairpin? " 55 Robert W. Buxton, a.b., m.d.. m.s. Professor of Surgery and Head of Department " Moreover I have taken out innumer- able stones with my own hands, with va- rious colors found in the kidneys, in the lungs, in the liver ... " Matteo Colombo. Surgery has a personality all its own, due not only to the ritualistic .scrubbing, green gowns and drapery, the discipline of aseptic technique, and the drama of opening the body and meeting disease more directly than in any other branch of Medicine; but also in its routine and even drab aspects there is a blunt, inquisi- tive, straightforward attitude and an op- timistic realism that stamps its character. This is the atmosphere the student shares for a few months as he works in the clinics — taking out stitches, dressing burns and ulcers, passing catheters, peer- ing at tonsils, and removing plaster casts; " To cut or not to cut. that is the question. " in the hectic Accident Room — suturing scalps, lancing abscesses and confronting an endless line of major and minor emer- gencies; and on the wards preparing pa- tients for surgery and assisting in the op- erating room. What does he take away from the sur- geons? Some feeling for acting " with my own hands, " and a still deeper involve- ment in medical life. " and to think I just took a bath Saturday night ' " It only hurts when I laugh. Moulin Rouge ' Forceps ' " I can ' t see any hammer! " ANESTHESIOLOGY " As nitrous oxide in its extensive op- eration seems capable of destroying phy- sical pain, it may probably be used with advantage in surgical operations ... " Sir Humphrey Davy. If the patient can ' t breathe, nothing else much matters. Here is our brief op- portunity to learn to maintain that breath of life in the operating room and in emer- gency resuscitations. Martin Helrich. b.s., m.d. Professor and Head of Deparlment of Anesthesiology " You ' re getting sleepy . . . sleeepy . . . sleeeepy. OBSTETRICS n.M. J. M. BOURGERY " Traite Coniplct dc I ' Aiiatoniic dc rHomme Comprcnant la Medicine Operatoire. " I l lulilion: S Tomes. C. A. Dcluuiuiy. I ' aris IH32. 8 folios: These representing the period of the magnificent French colored lithographs; both illustrate the painstaking dissections of their time as well as the surgical procedures made possible by increased knowledge of anatomical detail. Presented to the Department of Anatomv bv Or. Joseph W. Scott, Miami. Florida, and alumnus of the Medical School, on June 30. 1952. 60 " But when she has brought forth the child, she no longer remembers the anguish for her joy that a man is born into the world. " St. John 16:21 Besides studying and following the treatment of the gynecologic diseases, the student takes part in delivering new lives as safely as possible. Not all of it is that wonderful — the Obstetrics clinic bulges with crowds of women for prenatal check-ups; for the third year students there is an abundance of watching, wait- ing and dawnlit urinalyses; and in fourth year City Hospitals is a mixed blessing of sound delivery experience and frenettic sleeplessness. But perhaps nothing gives the student the doctor ' s sense of responsi- bility and usefulness as performing a de- livery resulting in a healthy mother and child. Arthur L. Haskins, a.b., m.d. Professor and Head of llie Deparlineni of Obstetrics and Gynecology " File this under ' B " . " 61 If ' Two more BOA ' s and voii ' re out. " 7 hate to call him at this hour. " The pause that refreshes. " 62 ' Now you remember the pelvic jasici. . . " Doc. are von sure this is ENT clinic? ' PEDIATRICS ' IViBir « J. M. BOURGERY ' Trailc Complcl dc rAiuiloiiiic dc I ' lloiDiuf Coiupiciuiiit la Medicine Opcniloire. I SI l-Alition: V I Oiues. C. A. Delaiiiuiy. I ' liris (S ' .?2. A magnificent French colored lithograph of Pediatric anatomy. " Pediatrics made its greatest advance when it was realized that the child is not just a ' little man ' but presented peculiari- ties in structure . . . and physiology . . . peculiar to his age. " E. J. Stieglitz. In the Sick Baby and Well Baby Clin- ics, on the wards and in the nursery, at University Hospital and at Mercy Hos- pital, giving polio shots and vaccinations, treating measles or pneumonia, we have that opportunity to study and treat chil- dren as they present their special patterns of healthy growth or disease. Besides the student ' s interest in a unique branch of Medicine, this service is memorable for the children themselves and the universal affection they engender, whether they are at their agreeable, angelic best or their jaw clenching, skin barking, runny nosed worst. J. Edmund Bradley, b.s., m.d. Professor of Peclialrics and Head of the Department Tickle, Tickle . . . 65 ' Sounds like I ' m lihrilldliili;! ' Thev sav he biles! ' Either it ' s mumps or bubble gum! ' I ' m not talkini till I see niv hiwver. and add a touch of scotch PSYCHIATRY Ipolus rontu isl vrus rontolis superior fissiirti interhemisphiteru-n sulcus frontalis sufttrior sulcus frontalis superior gyrus frontalis mrdius sulcus frontalis inferior sulcu praecentrtilis , ' ru- centralis sulcus centralis sulcus temporalis superior sulcus postcrntni i • augu- ■■ ■l! Vkf ' B BH B jm V Bi • ' mTJ dl L ||| |A H - ' »_ l HfaHtHttAill H B H sulcus intcrfmrirtaiis lobului m titri oedpitales suprriore " ' " ' ' uuirRinalis 1 .sulcus ipolas ocripitulis) paheiooccipitulis sulci cincu i fissara inifrhrmisphaerica Fig. 160. SOBOTTA " Alias of Descriptive Human Anatomy. " These volumes were later translated from German to English by Dr. Hduard Uhlenhuth, Depart- ment of Anatomy, University of Maryland School of Medicine. 68 " How much might we do to bring back or restore the mind, if we but knew how to touch the instrument with a skillful hand! " Dorothea Lynde Dix. No penicillin cures among the gravely disturbed, the disoriented, or the anxious patients we meet in the Comprehensive Clinic, in the Psychiatric Institute or at the State hospitals. This is a rewarding, revealing four year struggle with our ignorances and prejudices in an attempt to understand a little of the diseases that attack the very humanity of the patient. THE UTE Jacob E. Finesinger. b.a.. m.a., m.d. Professor of Psychiatry ami Head of the Department ' It ' s Sigmiind, not Paul Freud! 69 Organizations Although Medical school training tends to make each man stand somewhat alone, the student, an inveterate social animal, remembers there are times to stand together. So he organizes councils, clubs, fraternities, committees and boards to administer some of his non-academic activities. Since student riots are not as popular a sport as previously, relations between the administrators of the School and the student body are handled by the Student Govern- ment, rather ably, too, although definitely unsung and practically unspoken. The steady hand of the Student Activities Committee is extended for all to bite, if anyone is displeased with their handling of the countless details of arranging the huge dances and other activities. Three Greek letter fraternities, Nu Sigma Nu, Phi Delta Epsilon and Phi Lambda Kappa provide us with social life on a less heroic but equally enjoya- ble scale, besides comradeship, occasional academic stimulus, and friendly ties with the alumni. Maryland ' s Beta Chapter of Alpha Omega Alpha, a national medical honor society, accents the academic aspects of Medical life. Contacts and continuity with fellow medical students on a national scale are coordinated by the Student Ameri- can Medical Association. Likewise, contact with their sister grass-widows is provided for the wives of students in the monthly meetings and fine social outings of the SAMA Auxiliary. 71 Student Activities Committee 72 Student Government Association 73 Alpha Omega Alpha 74 ; . f " Student American Medical Association Interfraternity Council 75 Honor Council Student Senate 76 Womens Sama June 1957 marked the founding of the Woman ' s Auxiliary to the Student Amer- ican Medical Association. Its objects are to better prepare members to be doctor ' s wives and to enable wives of the medical students to become better acquainted. During the school year a variety of activities attested to the vigor of the group. Among the highlights was the tea given to welcome wives of the incoming freshman class, the lecture by Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Jr. on Cosmetic Derma- tology, the panel discussion held at the home of Mrs. William S. Stone and the lecture given by Dr. Louis Krause. The association held a Christmas party for children in the pediatrics section of the University Hospital with refreshments. TV personalities and a Santa Claus who distributed gifts. Also a food basket was donated along with clothing and toys for a needy family. Candy and Christmas wrappings were sold to increase the funds of the treasury. It was the happy privilege of the group to manage the tea again this year for Dean ' s Day and a large and very suc- cessful Spring fashion show was held with the auxiliary and faculty wives participating. In completing this second full year of activity for the Woman ' s Auxiliary to SAMA a bright and active future is antic- ipated and manif ested in a steadily in- crease in membership. 77 Nu Sigma Nu VO C Ashhiirn Cole Coiirsev Diinseath Falls Green Irmliam ff ' if -iH if fT O ivIN Wilhelmsen DeVore Figueioa Kinu kiirad LaMastra Normanlv Cain ( anoll Diidncv Ciirod Ifarraguerri I.anHeliitlis Light 1959 marked tlic 56lh consecutive year of service for the Beta Alpha Chapter of Nu Sigma Nu. the oldest and largest fraternity on campus. Many memorable and unique events took place during the past tv e!ve months. We were happy to welcome the largest group of initiates in the fraternity ' s his- tory. Among the many social events of the year, the faculty receptitm. the Christmas party, the Spring formal and the freshman picnic and hull roast were outstanding. Jasion Odend ' hal ' TKT Jones President James Vice-President Dawson Secretary Morton Treasurer Lang Morales Pereyo Rhea Roig Rybczynski ■I M |pMgllMIIII IIM ■ IIWIg M Oldstone Rogers Seville Acosta Berner Broalette i ■ t i[ " ri ' ■ ir . Marsh Pazourick Presser Reeder Sarles Schallaci Young Dr. Charles Reid Edwards Beta Alpha ' 09, our brother, teacher, and friend re- ceived the first of our service awards, to be given annually to outstanding alum- nae. The overwhelming turnout for this event attested to the high esteem in which Dr. Edwards is held by his brothers. As seniors it is our hope that the same fraternal spirit that has pervaded and en- riched our lives during the past four years will continue in the future to make us — brothers all. Phi Delta Epsilon 80 Activities i n ± At Lunch On Duty ' Wish von were here " ' A marked bradxcardia ' ' Well, someone has to work over Christmas What a wav to make rounds. I think I ' ll study for a while. " " Two dollars on Pretty Boy in the fifth " The Picnic and this one is for OB. " " Hey buddy, you ' re missint; a lei;. " etc . . . ' You have to learn to budget your time. " Lucky guy " infiltrated AGAIN ' " Make some more coffee, Ma. " . m 3 i mm jhI ■u. ' A- ; Graduates THE OATH OF HIPPOCRATES I do solemnly swear ... by that which I hold most sacred . . . That I will be loyal to the profession of medicine . . . and just and generous to its members . . . That I will lead my life . . . and practice my art . . . in uprightness and honor . . . That into whatsoever house I shall enter . . . it shall be for the good of the sick . . . to the utmost of my power ... I holding myself aloof from wrong . from corruption . . . from the tempting of others to vice . . . That I will exercise my art . . . solely for the cure of my patients . . . and will give no drug . . . perform no operation . . . for a criminal purpose . . . even if solicited . . . far less suggest it . . . That whatsoever I shall see or hear . . . of the lives of men . . . which is not fitting to be spoken ... I will keep inviolably secret . . . these things I do promise . . , and in proportion as I am faithful to this my oath . . . may happiness and good repute be ever mine . . . the opposite if I shall be forsworn. DAVID L. ABRAMSON, b.s.. m.d. Baltimore. Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1955 " Dave " . . . quiet and unassuming . . . singing first tenor at disseeting table . . . Phi D. E. . . . summers spent as camp doctor in Georgia and Baltimore . . . married Lynn on June 17, 1956 . . . internship at Mercy Hosp. . . . future in dermatology. J - -Jlj ff U tyn c - f " O 1801 Jajncs Sniitli introduced WOLFE N. ADLER, a.b., mix Baltimore, Maryland FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL 1955 Wolfe . . . very fine sense of humor . . . summers strictly reserved for psychiatry, first at Spring Grove and then at Richards Children Center . . . married Faye on June 12, 1956 . . . daughter Rebecca ... Phi D. E., AOA . . . internship at Sinai . . . future in psychiatry. J ' T . :UA % 88 JSADORE G. ANCES, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Mumbles . . . " ' Speak up, Doctor, what ' s the course and relationships of the left vagus? " . . . Pepsi salesman, extern in OPD and in ' 58 at Beckley, West Virginia . . . Phi D. E. . . . rotating internship at Ohio State University Hospital. Si OY i: 9i. Aux yU.i . compulsory vaccination to Maryland WILLIAM L. ASHBURN, a.b., m.d. Bethesda, Maryland WESTERN MARYLAND COLLEGE 1955 Bill . . . thoroughly trained in the summers at NIH, first two years in National Cancer Institute ' s Leukemia Study, then in Cardiac Surgery Clinic of the Heart Institute . . . Nu Sig . . . secretary of Nu Sig . . . irrterested in Psychosomatic Medicine . . . Internship at Ohio State University Hospital. J JJJLa. £. dMuj nprcb. 89 GERSON ASRAEL. b.s., m.d. Baltimore, MaryUmd UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Gers . . . the best summer experience in tiie class . . . Scrub nurse at Sinai for three years, pediatric extern in Israel in ' 57 . . . toured Europe and Israel in ' 58 . . . Phi D. E. Treasurer and Vice President, Senior class Treasurer, AOA, Business Manager of TERRAE MA- RIAE MEDICUS. IPC . . . rotating internship at Illinois Research and Educational Hospitals Chica ' jo with an undecided future. P j2M tTrO Ua I ' O. 1807 Mob scene protesting dissection getve ANTHONY C. BROCCOLI, a.b., m.d. Providence, Rhode Island PROVIDENCE COLLEGE 1955 Broc . . . " I ' ve got the cards, where ' s the lifth? " ... a big man from the smallest state . . . ummer experience at Rhode Island Hospital makes him a mean man in the O.R. ... in " 5S graduated to the National level by working at NIH . . . married Bcrnicc in November, 195S . . . internship at U.S.P.H.S. Hospital on Staten Island, N. Y. . . . followed by military service and Ophthalmology or OB-GYN. 90 FRED D. BROWN, M.D. Miami, Florida UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 1955 Fred . . . one of the class brains in pediatrics . takes to those kiddies like Sudans III to fat . spent two summers at Mercy, one as a camp counselor (while externing) and last as a pedi- atric summer fellow at University . . . Phi D. E. . Married beautiful Barbara on June 15, 1958 . internship at St. Vincents in Jacksonville Florida to be followed by pediatric residency. y ' Ui O . C Vu.-. t) £ rise to University of Maryland Charter JOHN F. CADDEN, Jr., b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 J. C. ... a whiz with the kiddies . . . summers scrubbing at Johns Hopkins, a fellowship in psychiatry in " 57 and in ' 58 with the pediatric clinic and dermatology . . . has a special intern- ship rotating through the pediatric services of Mercy and University. f. C mMu J-.kp. 91 WILLIAM N. COHEN, m.d. Baltimore. Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1955 Bill . . . behind this quiet guy lies a host of orderly facts and applications of difficult tech- niques . . . Spent a bruising summer as camp counselor and life guard, then in the O.R. at Lutheran . . . Summer of " 58 as clinical clerk in Beckley. West Virginia . . . AOA. Phi D, E. . . . Internship at University Hospital in Ann Arbor then residency, probably in pediatrics. U X M C . M.o 1813 Books oj Joliri Crawford used to cstahlisli one of MILTON B. COLE, b.s., b.a., m.s., l.l.b.. m.d. Baltimore. Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY AMERICAN UNIVERSITY Milt . . . direct descendant of William Jennings Bryan . . . Nu Sig . . . Phi Beta Kappa . . . Vice-pres. junior year, honor council represen- tative senior year . . . summers of " 56 and " 57 in law practice and " 58 in Medical OPD . . . after internship at Providence Hospital in D, C. and Medical residency, general practice and Med- ico-leual consultant. JOHN W. COURSEY. b.s., m.d. Vidalia, Georgia UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1951 Jack . . . has been mistaken numerous times for Mc Williams (especially when absent) . . . Five years in the Army and then switched to the Air Force Senior Program . . . summers in OR at St. Agnes . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . Two year Rep. in student council . . . married Janice Jo in June of ' 57 . . . internship and residency (R o surg.) in USAF Hosp. Lackland AFB, Texas. iW-ti. GJ , C su, -l-C ; n42 the first Medical College Libraries in the United States DONALD E. COURTS, b.eng., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1955 Don ... a man whose summer jobs are the envy of the class ... in ' 56 and ' 57 in Naval Architecture with Beth. Steel and in " 58 freighted his way to Europe on a German ship . . . internship at Los Angeles General Hospital, followed by 2 years in Air Force . . . hopes for a rural general practice after 2 years of G.P. residency. ( f j; 93 JOSEPH L. DARR, a.b., m.d. Cumberland, Maryland LA SALLE COLLEGE 1955 Joe . . . " Have you heard this one? " ... if Joe hasn " t heard it it ' s not worth telling . . . " 56 in Cumberland as Brewery Worker (leave it to Joe ) and construction . . . then at Waiter Reed tor Thoracic Surgery . . . Senior Medical Student Program . . . Married Lois Marie on August 11. 1956 and now takes pride in Debbie Ann . . . Rotating internship at Madigan Army Hos- pital in Takoma. Wash, to be followed by surgical residency. 1820 Peter CJiatard performs earliest ROBERT J. DAWSON, b.s., m.d. Lonaioning, Maryland UNVERSlTYOr MARYLAND 1956 " Bulldog " . . . the country squire . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . first two summers spent at Pratt Indus- trial Clinic and last with Health Department . . . internship at Mercy . . . torn between Pediatrics and General Practice. ' £ ( . Lu y 7T 94 SALVATORE J. DEMARCO III, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1955 Skip ... a natural at surgery . . . loves those tours at Mercy . . . host to the class at the farm for summer picnics . . . one of the sport car bugs . . . " anybody want to trade a Renault for a Volks? " . . . farmed in ' 56 and " 57 and then a summer with the " moles " . . . married Pat on June 29, 1957 . . . will graduate with Salvatore (Jay) IV . . . intern at Mercy but beyond that undecided. J tJvtt n, Jj hia ica ' iiL M-O. experiments xvith ergot elurhig child birth WILLIAM J. R. DUNSEATH, b.s.. m.d. Audubon, New Jersey U. S. NAVAL ACADEMY 1945 Bill ... a man with a lot of Navy background, mine-sweepers, destroyers and Naval Aviation minesweepers, destroyers and Naval Aviation . . . calmest man in the " pit " on a busy Satur- day night after free beer at Chick ' s . . . Nu Sig, Student Council . . . summers in the Pocono Mts. as camp doctor and later as preceptor for G. P. in same area . . . Married Sue in August, 1946 . . . Sherry age 12 and Ross 7 . . . future undetermined after internship at Mercy. 95 JAMES PAUL DURKAN, b.a., m.d. Bciltiniore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1955 ■■Jim " . . . Mr. Magoo humor . . . AOA . . . fellow in OB-GYN . . . Summers spent in OB- GYN with the isotopes and as a farmer and carpenter . . . married Marion June " 58 . . . internship at Mercy. V fV - 0 rhbw f :p 1823 Dcvclopnunf oj hospital bedside WILLIAM F. FALLS, Jr.. b.s., m.d. College Park, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Bill . . . quiet and efficient . . . when you want something done look for Bill . . . ' 56 on the Railroad ... " 57 at Portsmouth Naval Hospital, " 58 in Hypertensive Division of University . . . Navy Reserve as Ensign . . . AOA, Nu Sigma Nu, President of class as Junior, student council Representative for Senior Class . . . internship at University and future plans undecided. aMU- X. 7 " .1 . . 96 FRANCIS E. FARLEY, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1952 Frank . . . amiable Frank . . . needs plenty of rest . . . AOA . . . summer " 56, " 57 and " 58 spent " in Bed " ... 2 years as 1st Lt. in USMCR in Japan and Korea . . . married Dorothy on May 30, " 55 . . . begat Pauline Sharon and Dorothy Marion . . . internship at Mercy . . . future undecided. --7 U-v C?. -7 . T fJ) training for medical students GILBERT N. FEINBERG, m.d. Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1955 Gil . . . big gun with the Phi D. E. " s as secretary and chairman of senior farewell committee . . . summers in Johns Hopkins Alumni Office, OPD here at University and then in " 58 as fellow at Memorial Hospital for Cancer and Allied Diseases in New York . . . will marry Janet on June 23, 1959 . . . rotating internship at Sinai and then as resident in orthopedic surgery. M t Jl .f - 97 STANLEY Z. FELSENBERG B.S. IN PHARM., M.D. Bell li more. Marylaiicl UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (PHARMACY) 1954 Stan . . . just name that drug and get flooded with the pharmacology . . . Big and friendly . . . summer of ' 56 renewing his knowledge in Pharmacy ... ' 57 as clinical clerk at Walter Reed ... " 58 in the Arthritis and Diabetic Clinics at University ... A second John in the Army Reserve . . . SAMA . . . Married Betsy on July 22, 1956 . . . Internship at Sinai, followed by internal medicine or OB-GYN in Florida. :,,|, A, ?Lrkr -o. 1824 Horatio Jameson performs first excision of CHARLES B. FLETCHER, a.b., m.d. Bethesdu, Maryland catholic university 1948 Charlie . . . the answer-man in microbiology on the basis of a tremendous background in the held ... Wz years doing virus research in Tokyo for US Army . . . later as a clinical clerk at Walter Reed and with Dr. Wisseman on Jap. B . . . married Jerry on September 8, 1956 . . . Carolyn Ann is the joy of his life . . . Internship at Providence Hospital in D. C. and then either G. P. or Pediatrics. - -«-J J - " V a5- SU. Wvt 98 GEORGE C. GALLAGHER, a.b., m.d. Tuscan, Arizona AMHERST COLLEGE 1955 Crom . . . the pleasant Irishman . . . summers in Cahfornia and at Georgetown doing research . . . " Will tutor " in English Lit or " How to get thru micro without using a scope " . . . refuses to give direct answer as to future plans . . . hence we suspect psychiatry! . . . internship at St. Elizabeth ' s Hospital, Washington, D. C. J the cervix of the uterus in America and Great Britian THEODORE D. GARDINER, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland DUKE UNIVERSITY 1952 Ted ... a prince of a man; quiet, unassuming, helpful ... 1 1 2 years aboard U.S.S. BALTI- MORE in Boston and Mediterranean, 1 year as Batallion Commander at Bainbridge . . . SAMA . . . summers at Mt. Wilson and Edge- wood where he worked in immunochemistry . . . internship in California Hosp., Los Angeles and then General Practice. M O-UL hJrii OJyckMi -j. O 99 JON B. GLAZIER, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Marykind UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Jon ... a grin and a good word for everybody . . . summer fellow in Microbiology . . . last summer as cardiopulmonary physiology fellow at Karolinske Hospital in Stockholm . . . intern- ship New England Center Hosp.. Boston . . . future undecided. .yj. m Ud. 1833 First medical cclhge in America KARL M. GREEN, b.s., m.d. Manchester, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Karl ... a man who picks his extra-medical work well . . . stamped out disease among the uranium miners during the summers and then followed up this field work with a three month stint in cardio-physiology . . . holds the money bags for Nu Sig . . . plans on a rotating intern- ship at University followed by practice in Car- roll County . . . married Sue on June 6, 1958. Z . u i,p. 100 CARLTON I. HALLE, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland WESTERN MARYLAND COLLEGE 1955 Carl ... a good variety of summer jobs . . . Gunther Brewing Company, Walter Reed and extern at Spring Field State Hospital . . . during the winter works as night physician at Spring Grove ... in medical service corps as 1st Lt. . . . rotating internship at University and then internal medicine residency. {LM-i, In.u 4(MM.t to make human dissection compulsory FRANKLIN A. HANAUER, a.b., m.d. Boston , Massachusetts HARVARD UNIVERSITY 1955 Frank . . . " And in the latest Ne w England Journal " . . . Merrill, Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and Hanauer . . . knocked himself out as counselor for two summers on Cape Cod . . . last summer as extern at BCH (Boston City Hospital, that is) ... Navy ' s Senior Medical Program as an Ensign . . . Money bags for Phi Lambda Kappa for two years . . . internship at Boston City Hosp. . . . internal medicine in New England. rorMi C 4tt f j9Mt, yii)J) 101 ROBERT S. HOLT, m.d. Hiintini;ton, West Virginia UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Bob ... he makes telling jokes a pleasure . . . behind the calm hides a real administrator . . . President of Phi Lambda Kappa in junior year . . . summers in Cabell Huntington Hospital . . . Senior Medical Student Program USAF . . . internship at Denver General Hosp.. Col- orado followed by military service and finally neurosurgery. , iJ l -TH ,9 1835 Nathan R. Smitli pioneers ROGER B. INGHAM, a.b., m.d. Memphis, Tennessee JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1955 Roger . . . he ' d rather see the Colts win one than get an advance copy to the National Boards . . . spent a summer with Green stamping out radiation among the uranium miners in Colo- rado . . . had a tour with Dr. McCrumb in Infectious Diseases and another summer with USPHS . . . internship at University followed by 2-3 years of medical residency and then private practice . . . Nu Sig. K i?. XJ — ' ■ ' 102 ROBERT C. IRWIN, a.b., m.d. Westharen, Maryland GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY 1953 Bob . . . wild times with members of the anatomy department . . . summers at NIH, as bacteriologist at Hunter Lab in D. C, and as a fellow with infectious diseases at University . . . spent 3 years as histopathology technician at Walter Reed . . . Married Marjean on August 17, 1957 . . . internship at University . . . future in pediatrics and infectious diseases. (j L.xS . u in thyroidectomy operation GILBERT H. ISAACS, b.s.. m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Gil . . . class consultant in just about everything . . . summers in OPD here at University and as summer employee State Health Department in Annapolis . . . Phi D. E. . . . internship at Boston City Hospital and then internal medicine. AjM 7{ UeL . 103 ROBERT T. JAMES, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Marykmd PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 1955 Bob ... a mean man with a guitar ... a bridge expert from way back . . . President AOA . . . had the ideal summer job as a ' " taster " for National Boh . . . finally spent a summer as a " fellow " at Montebello . . . married Pat on June 16, 1956 . . . internship at University Hosp. . . . plans on General Surgery. TJ W - I . n ,Kb. 1837 Edward CJiaisty po forms just successful JAMES p. JARBOE, B.s., m.d. Great Mills, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 " Pat " . . . quiet, unassuming, and philosophical . . . called Bob Dawson " Chuck " for four years . . . summers of ' 56 and " 57 spent as physical chemist at Beltsville and ' 58 at Rosewood . . . secretary of junior class . . . married Margaret on August 23, 1958 . . . internship at Mercy and then general practice. i ' ' .iiJ d.J) 104 ARTHUR R. JASION, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Otts . . . active in just about every field of medi- cine . . . externships at St. Agnes, Md. General and at Central Medical Center . . . first aid station at the " Point " . . . Polio Foundation summer fellowship . . . Nu Sig. as rush chairman and pledge master . . . keeps the class in trim with athletic programs . . . internship at Mercy and then orthopedic surgery . . . Married Carole Ann on April 12, ' 59. a jci ( .a ' ' emoval of the ovary in Baltimore ARTHUR F. JONES, b.s.. m.d. Oakland, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Hoppy . . . out of the hills of Western Maryland to warm the hearts of Baltimore maids ... a first class administrator . . . toughened up in ' 56 on a construction job and in the following summers with City Health and Montebello . . . Vice President of Nu Sigma Nu as a junior and President this year . . . Internship at University . . . interested in a rural or small town practice. (ll£ - 105 I JORGE O. JUST-VIERA, b.s., m.d. Hato Rey, Puerto Rico UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO 1956 Jorge . . . extrovert par excellence ... he shared Holt ' s loss when Rose Mary left . . . one of the mysteries of the century is what he did in the summer ... he denies serving with Castro . . . has a wide range of interests . . . internship at Pennsylvania Hosp., Phila., then a residency as vet to be determined. q LMu:m: 1837 Fi}sf school In America AUGUST D. KING, B.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Dan . . . Abou Adem has Danny in mind . . . was foiled in his attempt to elect private medi- cine . . . went right to the source and worked for Gunther ' s for two summers . . . summer of ' 5,s at St. Joe ' s . . . SAMA . . . married Netta on September 6, 1958 . . . internship at Mercy. 106 MARVIN M. KIRSH, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Marykmd JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1955 Marv ... a wild thirst for knowledge . . . attended every lecture ever given in past four years . . . summers as fellow in several fields (biochemistry research at Sinai and JHH, pathology and clinical clerk in OPD and at Memorial Center for Cancer and Allied Disease, New York) . . . Phi D. E. . . . internship at University Hosp. Ann Arbor, Mich., expects to end up in surgery. Ma . ' 7?7 ( ,mj2 . to give instniction in dentistry MARTIN S. KLEINMAN, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Mickey . . . artist par excellence . . . kept the anatomy class in stitches with his barbs . . . ' 56 as a waiter in the Catskills . . . ' 57 as a cab driver and honeymooner . . . " 58 as a fellow in ENT at University . . . President Phi D. E. and IPC . . . married Harriet on June 30, 1957 . . . interning at University Hospital, Columbus, Ohio . . . future undecided. O - ' S- (Aul fljp 107 PAUL G. KOUKOULAS. a.b.. m.d. Baltimore, Maryland Isle of Rhodes, Greece WESTERN MARYLAND COLLEGE 1955 Paul . . . ■ " anybody here excepl Koukoulas know the derivation of this Greek word? " . . . spent his first summer in med school in Spain, Italy and Greece ... " 57 in the Medical OPD . . . ' 58 at St. Agnes . . . Phi D. E. . . . SAMA . . . internship at St. Agnes . . . Future in medi- cine or pediatrics. ( L js UnA- , M, S 1853 Francis Donaldson, first in America WILLIAM KRAUT, a.b., m.d. Jersey City, New Jersey BROWN UNIVERSITY 1955 Bill . . . soft spoken gentleman ... in " 56 travelled the U. S. . . . then OPD and at Christ Hospital in " 57 . . . last summer at Huntendon Memorial Center . . . Phi D. E. . . . intern- ship at University followed by residency — field undecided. Vajn5J[U JVA-cft t VV .0, lUS RICHARD C. LANG, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Dick ... a class expert in ENT ... no doubt about knowing Dick, the man with the short red hair . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . SAMA . . . Photography Editor of this rag . . . hustled Pepsi for a summer, a summer with State Health on TB and a summer ' s " work " at Peninsula Gen- eral . . . internship in Denver General Hosp., Colorado, followed by two years of internal medicine and then General Practice. C. a _ to use microscope in the diagnosis of cancer DONALD R. LEWIS, b.s., m.d. Betterton, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 " Don " . . . first member of the Lewis gang . . . can do a delivery with eyes shut . . . summers spent at St. Agnes as obstetrician par excellence . . . married Dotty in 1958 and begat one son . . . internship at St. Agnes followed by general practice. ( M ( pC i 109 GEORGE N. LEWIS 111, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Mary kind LOYOLA COLLEGE 1955 George . . . deadly when it comes to drawing free nights off . . . summers at Walter Reed and with Dr. Frank Ayd. Jr. . . . SAM A and Nu Sig . . . married Carolyn on June 6, 1957 . . . in army student program as a 1st Lt. . . . intern- ship at Madigan Army Hospital in Taeoma, Washington and then medical residency. ' Z). 1855 Microscopy and experimental JACK C. LEWIS. B..S, M.D. Willards. Maryland UNIVKRSITY or MARYLAND 1955 Jack . . . never missed a class in four years . . . President of just everything. Freshman class, SAM A, Student Council (after serving for three years) . . . had two choice externships at St. Agnes and University . . . summer of " 58 in General Practice clerkship . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . married Cynthia on May 5, 1958 . . . rotating internship at University Hosp. followed by two years of General Practice residency and then hustle back to the Eastern Shore. -=- - (J .L_. ' Uv 1(1 ARTHUR LUBAN, b.a., m.d. Maplewood, New Jersey COLORADO UNIVERSITY Art . . . " Now as 1 told Shelly in no uncertain terms " . . . tickled the " 88 " in a summer resort on the Jersey coast in " 57 . . . " 58 in University ' s third floor . . . married Shirley in December of ' 57 . . . rotating internship at St. Joe ' s in Phila- delphia and then psychiatry. , iij£ TJ -J)- physiology made compulsory CHARLES J. MAILMAN, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland SORBONNE 1953 FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL 1954 Chuck . . . the class expert in chest diseases . . . had a real ball in Paris, never did get to the Eiffel Tower . . . Bardot still talks fondly of Chuckle . . . summers at BCH, Arizona and with the Doctors Robinson stamping out Monilia . . . trip to Las Vegas where the system didn " t work . . . Phi D. E. . . . Internship at Santa Barbara Cottage and General Hosp. fol- lowed by residency in Internal Medicine. C_ UjxjJLa I . fiLeuJL ny. Ill FERDINAND G. MAINOLFI. B.s.. m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1955 Ferd . . . ' " Now when you consider my Volks " . . . summers with Baltimore Biological Lab . . . as a cattle farmer and in " 58 as fellow in Micro- biology . . . married Ann Marie on December 22. 1956 . . . son Michael . . . yearbook . . . internship at Mercy then surgical residency. T ' .J u .. VUJ , ' ? 1., . 1866 First school in America to recognize ELMER S. McKAY, b.s., m.s., m.d. Erie, Pennsylvania GROVE CITY COLLEGE 1949 UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 1950 UNIVERSITY OF UTRECHT 1953 Elmer . . . saw the light after working in ocean- ography . . . an infantryman in WWII ... " 56 and " 57 with the State Health Department . . . toured Europe with Otto in " 5X. Phi Lambda Kappa president, IfC, Chairman of Orientation Program . . . married Doris in August, 1955 . . . internship at St. Lukc " s Hosp., Denver 3, Colo., followed by general practice in a small town. 112 DONALD R. McWILLIAMS, b.s., m.d. Cambridge, Marykmd UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Don or Mac . . . knows Sickle Cell disease better than Wintrobe ... if the book store doesn ' t have it check with Speedy . . . Vice-Pres of the class, vice-president of AOA, co-editor of the TERRAE MARIAE MEDICUS . . . SAMA . . . student activities and orientation committee ... an attendant at Eastern Shore State Hos- pital in " 56 and fellowship in ' 57 . . . toured the West in " 58 . . . married Shirley on June 16, 1956 . . . rotating internship at University, then general surgery or general practice. J - ' f ' Tlft Ji ' XA importance of medical specialties PHILIP W. MERCER, m.d. Arbutus, Marykmd WHEATON COLLEGE Phil . . . renowned cryoglobulin expert . . . summers with Pepsi, and U.S.P.H.S. in Beth- esda and at Marine Hospital in Baltimore . . . Married Mary Ellen on August 4, 1956 . . . daughter Cheryl Elizabeth . . . internship at Marine Hospital (U.S.P.H.S.) Balto. and then practice in Carroll County. (zy - y i 5 113 JOSE OSCAR MORALES, b.s., m.d. Rio I ' iedras, Puerto Rico UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO 1955 Choco . . . brainy ... a specialist in cha-cha . . . has contacts in every nursing home in the city . . . says little while absorbing the meat of a discussion . . . tour of Europe prior to medi- cal school with Roig . . . Student council rep, Nu Sigma Nu, Ensign in Naval reserve . . . summers with Navy and course in radioisotope techniques . . . internship at San Juan City Hospital and then nuclear medicine. C (Xc Wi 24 X-zo. 1867 First chair of OpJitliahiiology MORTON M. MOWER, b.a., m.d. Frederick, Maryland .JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1955 Mort ... a mean man with a stethoscope . . . can rattle olf any of 70 reasons for heart block . . . between school and an e.xternship at Women ' s, he conducts the orchestra for the Valley Players . . . fresh as a daisy for a 3 o ' clock call . . . class expert in Mayo repairs . . . Internship at University followed by residency and general practice in Baltimore. ; i C - V fce e _yi? ' 114 RALPH D. NATALE, b.a., m.d. Towson, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1955 Ralph . . . bridge, hi-fi, Volkswagens . . . sup- ported Yankees all through with Nataro . . . med-school basketball club . . . " 56- ' 58 summers in pediatric research . . . married Jane on April 19, 1952 . . . pride and joy are Toni, Vicki, and at last Ralph, Jr. . . . Internship at Mercy, then ENT. 4 - A f L £. and Otolaryngology estahlislied in America JOSEPH F. NATARO, b.s., m.d. South Orange. New Jersey UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Joe . . . " What d " ya mean? Those white coats fit perfectly! " . . . played bridge with Natale for 4 years (never won) . . . Volks club . . . ' 56, ' 57 as lab technician, ' 58 in Dermatology . . . Nu Sig, Vice-pres of Sophomore class, honor council chairman . . . internship Nassau Hosp., Lons Island . . . future undetermined. 9 1 !jfLd AiA 115 J. ROLLIN OTTO, a.b., m.d. Towsun, Maryland PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 1955 Pogo . . . iclined Southern gentleman, diplo- m;itic . . . loves those night calls ... a worthy opponent for PoH ' enbarger during the noon ses- sion of " hearts " . . . managed to turn the tables on Pof followed by much shouting and dire threats . . . toured Europe with McKay in ' 58 in attempt to stabilize French franc . . . Married Lucy on June 21, 1955 . . . Internship at Union Memorial and later internal medicine in Baltimore. C OJ?o-; p 1867 First Deparfffuiif in America specializing NICHOLAS A. PACE, b.s., m.d. Long Island City, New York NEW YORK UNIVERSITY DAVIS AND ELKINS COLLEGE Nick . . . always has the questions before they ' re asked . . . picks out the chalT of a subject and what ' s left is important . . . has every reference book in existence . . . spent four years trying to tell everybody he wasn ' t Otto . . . summer extern at Wildwood Hospital treating Erythema solare and at Springfield Hospital . . . rotating internship at St. Joe ' s, Phila., and then surgery or internal medicine. hU4.dat . 116 JOSE A. PEREYO, b.s., m.d. Rio Piedias, Puerto Rico UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO 1956 Pepie . . . after a session with Choco, a victim of acute, non-suppurative cha-chalitis . . . spends tlie summers teaching physics at the Univ. of Puerto Rico where female to male ratio is 4:1 . . . always glad to get back to Baltimore in the fall . . . Nu Sig . . . a real man about the dance floor . . . Internship at University, then internal medicine in sunny P. R. .©-4JL CL P m.a in Disease of Women and Children DAVID A. PERRAS, a.b., m.d. New Bedford, Massachusetts HARVARD UNIVERSITY Dave . . . good combination of brains and humor . . . summers at Army Chemical Center at Edgewood and last summer at Springfield State Hospital . . . married Pauline in August of 1957 . . . rotating general at Los Angeles County and then psychiatry. C _ . 117 LAWRENCE D. PINKNER, m.d. Cockeysville, Mary kind JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY Lurry . . . intelligent, smooth . . . knows the literature, a careful historian ... a bastion of Phi Delta Epsilon . . . never too busy or tired to discuss a patient or pass on a little information . . . enjoys " hearts " as well as any man . . . summer fellowship in private surgery and on the medical wards during " 58 . . . Married Sandra on June 24, 1957 which accounts for his special interest in anesthesiology . . . internship at Sinai plans on general surgery here in Baltimore. . ' --- iu H.J. 1880 Auatiuin Law ARTHUR LEE POFFENBARGER, a.b., m.d. Dunbar. West Virginia VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE 1955 Bill . . . brilliance hidden behind a drawl . . . puts his trust in a good history, physical, ade- quate lab tests, Robert E. Lee and getting the low man ... the day is never complete unless he can stick Pogo . . . vacations with West Vir- ginia Health Department and Memorial Hos- pital in Charleston one summer with Micro- biology . . . married Pat from southern Maryland on September 1. 1956, a dividend (John C. ) on September 28, 1957 . . . AOA . . . internship at Memorial Hospital in Charleston and then internal medicine residency. Cs V i 118 MARIO J. REDA, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1955 Motts . . . energetic and gregarious . . . always a willing subject during alopecia clinic . . . thinks Dr. Griesman is the greatest ... a class expert in pre-natal matters . . . sincerity makes his friendship a valuable thing . . . summers down at the " Point " . . . married Marion on June 11, 1953 and along came Mario, Jr. and Francis to brighten his life . . . internship at St. Aenes future in OB-GYN. OA %, S M 0. passed in Maryland WILLIAM E. RHEA, b.s., m.d. Charleston, West Virginia GEORGETOWN 1955 " " Bill " . . . " Have gut will travel " . . . Nu Sig . . . Summers spent at McMillan Hospital in W. Va., Walter Reed, and St. Agnes . . . married Rhoda December ' 58 . . . internship at Provi- dence (D. C. ) ... then who knows? cl o f. l. i? 119 HERBERT RIBNER, b.a., m.a., m.h.l., m.d. New York City YESHIVA 1938 Herb . . . thorough, conscientious . . . has to know " why? " . . . reads and remembers all he can lay his hands on . . . always willing to discuss your problems . . . Major in WWII and Korea . . . vacations with Path and Neuropath . . . Married Betty on February 7, 1943 . . . begat Hillel, Eytan and Dena . . . internship at Monte Fiore Hosp., N. Y. . . . future in Neuropathology. joMht -- i4- hJ . 1900 James Carroll collaborates xcitJi Walter RAYMON F. ROIG, Jr., b.s., m.d. Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO 1955 Moncho . . . goodwill Ambassador from Puerto Rico . . . summers as Good Humor man. fellow in Psychosomatic Medicine and then as ENT fellow . . . USAF Reserve as 2nd Lt. . . . Nu Sig, SAM A Rep as freshman, AOA (Scc- Treas) co-editor of TERRAE MARIAE MED- ICUS . . . married Aida on May 28. 1955 . . . children Aida and Carmen . . . straight medical at University and then residency in Medicine. 120 HOWARD J. RUBENSTEIN, a.b., m.d. Jersey City, New Jersey LAFAYETTE COLLEGE 1955 Howie . . . quiet and studious . . . spent four years with ringing ears 2 ' to pipe pounding by landlady ... in ' 56 fished his way around the U. S. and Canada ... ' 57 with Dr. Entwistle in OPD . . . ' 58 as summer fellow in Pulmonary Physiology . . . Secretary to Phi D. E. in ' 57- ' 58 . . . internship at University followed by residency in Medicine and then practice around metropolitan NYC. b UA fC. AUt Reed in problems in yeUmc fever research LEE G. RUSSO, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1955 Lee . . . neurologist par excellence . . . summers as Coke man in and around Baltimore, then as summer fellow in Neurology . . . AOA and write-up author of yearbook . . . married Mary Jane on June 6, 1958 . . . internship in Balti- more and then residency in Neurology. OLsu c lf. ) 121 CAROL E. RYBCZNSKl, a.b., m.d. Baltimor e, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1955 Ed . . . when Comroe ' s in trouble he calls on Ed . . . three summer ' s experience in pulmonary physiology at BCH and later with Dr. Spicer in Cardiopulmonary . . . Nu Sig . . . Rotating internship at Mercy Hosp. to be followed by practice in or around Baltimore. C CJ r MJi 1913-1915 Merger of Baltimore Medieal College and eollege of DANIEL S. SAX, a.b., m.d. Baltimore. Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1955 Danny . . . " but 1 like this picture " . . . everyones smiling friend . . . summers and during the year as research assistant in Psychiatry . . . special course at Baylor University in physiology . . . attended meetings and visited labs in Europe last summer . . . Phi D. E. . . . internship at Boston City Hospital and then research in the Nervous system and neurology. 122 STANLEY S. SCHOCKET, b.s., m.d. Baltimore , Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Stan . . . spent a delightful month in psychiatry pulling out his hair (?)... call him the great bald eagle and stand back . . . ' 56 as a detail man and two years in research in OB-GYN and then Endocrinology . . . Phi D. E. . . . has decided to spread his eastern " laming " out Iowa way as a resident in Ophthalmology . . . intern- ship at State Univ. of Iowa. Sh-J - UAiTrH . Physicians and Surgeons icith University of Maryland JOHN R. SCHROEDER, B.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1955 " John " . . . got a big bang out of the roll of drums and clash of cymbals . . . summers spent at Gunther Brewery, Paul Jones Distillery, and St. Agnes Hospital . . . internship at St. Agnes followed by general practice or general surgery in Baltimore. Jhi j UM ' MA 123 ARTHUR A. SERPICK. b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Otts . . . Downey cells take on a new meaning when you know Otts . . . has managed to stay single but this is thought to be only temporary . . . Phi D. E. and AOA . . . enjoys those summers in the OPD where he served as the right hand man of Dr. Entwistlc . . . future holds a straight medical internship at University followed bv career in Internal Medicine. CIaZLuu CL, JccfLul 7f),D. 1929 Dr. Maurice Pincoffs diagnosed case of EARL FRANCIS SHIELDS. Jr., b.s., m.d. Lorain, Ohio WITTENBERG COLLEGE 1955 " Earl " . . . " Why, Oh why did I ever leave Ohio! " . . . good reason to fear Februarys . . . summers spent on construction work, Med OPD and Polio fellowship . . . married Margo June ' 53 . . . begat Randy and Scott . . . internship at Akron General Hosp.. Ohio. £, f. sx;aj.,j.. ' •»• 124 STANLEY N. SNYDER, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Just call me Stan . . . one of the best read men in the class . . . one of the few men to meet his future wife at Springfield ... as a nurse . . . Phi D. E. . . . summers in polio, industrial medicine and chronic diseases . . . married Charlotte on July 10. 1958 . . . internship at Los Angeles County Hosp. . . . Internal medi- cine or pediatrics in California. jk :h,. yy pheochromocytoma foUoxved hy first surgical cure HARVEY M. SOLOMON, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC 1955 " Harv " . . . our future Krebs . . . research par excellence in past and in future . . . AOA . . . summers spent as a " Figglet " researcher ... no problem " Stump-s " Harv . . . internship at Univ. Hosp., Minneapolis, Minn. fWnyv Vn AaXovvo Vi 125 BEVERLY J. STUMP, b.a., m.d. Warren, Ohio HIRAM COLLEGE 1953 Bev . . . our favorite ■■non-niulc " medical stu- dent . . . summers in the OPD lab as technician and in " 58 as fellow with State Health Depart- ment working at Johns Hopkins School of Hy- giene and Public Health . . . Secretary of senior class . . . rotating internship at Rochester Gen- eral Hosp. followed by residency in pediatrics. " Ci A Q. :, Zry y??.2). 1930 Will lam R. Stvhcs hecvtnes inedical ROBERT J. THOMAS, a.b., m.d. Frederick , Maryland WASHINGTON AND LEE 1955 Bob ... a rabid Colt Fan . . . summers with C P Telephone Company ' s medical department and as extern with State Health Department . . . Nu Sig . . . Married Phyllis on June 21, 1958 . . . internship at Mercy followed by residency in Surgery. 2 i2 ( 4 ,« y .f- 126 MERVIN L. TRAIL, a.b., m.d. Cumberland, Marylund BRIDGEWATER COLLEGE 1955 " Squeaks " . . . someone bring some beer for Squeaks . . . ace ping-ponger of senior class . . . Nu Sig . . . summers of ' 56 and ' 57 as surgical extern at Md. General and ' 58 at Bethesda Naval Hospital . . . married Edythe in June, ' 58 . . . begat Shelby Jean on May 12 . . . Navy internship at Portsmouth, Va. . . . followed by pediatrics at UH. . ■? ♦«, c . . C - . , matyr to psittacine research GEORGE S. TROTTER, b.s., m.d. Jacksonville, Florida UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 1955 Red ... the class Beau Brummel . . . held down joint responsibility for Rosewood with Varner . . . FABULOUS summers . . . ' 56 as dealer in casino at Las Vegas, Fuller Brush Dealer in Baltimore and then as lab tech at Mercy . . . Phi D. E., Treas. of class as a junior, extern- ships at Mercy and Rosewood . . . will get married two days after graduation to Ann . . . internship at St. Vincent ' s Hosp., Jacksonville and then General Practice. - 9 , 127 ROBERT 1. VARNER. B.S., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Bob . . . " out at Rosewood we have three of these " ... a lab tech par excellence . . . spends his summers holding down the fort at Rosewood , . . one of the fortunate few with Army experi- ence . . . married Carolyn Virginia on March 21, 1953 . . . internship at University Hosp., Augusta . . . loves that Georgia where he ' ll be a G. P. t .J . ' CmJ -H, 1948 Basic hratmnit of Tick Fcvci HANS R. WILHELMSEN, d.d.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND DENTAL SCHOOL 1955 Hans . . . the class whip . . . practices dentistry all year round . . . summer of " 56 as chief dental surgeon at House of Correction, in " 57 in Department of Anesthesiology at University and in " 58 as a fellow at Montebello . . . Capt. in Army Reserve . . . class president as sopho- more and senior, vice-president as freshman, Nu Sig . . . married Judy on June 21, I95S . . . internship at Mercy anti then into plastic surgery. C « ?• i j lJAy » i l?S . A 128 ROBERT H. YOUNG, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland HARVARD COLLEGE 1955 Bob . . . after a year with Franticus, Bob was a little shaky . . . " 56 as A.R. extern at South Baltimore, " 57 as Lab. Tech. at Women ' s . . . " 58 in Department of Experimental Surgery at University ... US Army from ' 5 1 to " 54 as Sergeant First Class (Infantry) . . . Nu Sig . . . married Mary Louise on August 31, 1957 . . . Internship at USPHS Hosp., Balto., Md. fol- lowed by residency in Surgery. 5itefS(.% , m and Typhoid Fever developed And this is the parting of our group. Medical education is not merely hours spent in class, library and hospital. But it is a dynamic living experience that changes each man ' s life. This is the preparation and beginning of learning that we must continue all our lives in the care of man ' s sacred body. Eight hundred years ago, the physician Maimonides prayed to God for our vocation: " The Eternal Providence has appointed me to watch over the life and health of Thy creatures. May the love for my art actuate me at all times; may neither avarice nor miserliness, nor the thirst for glory, nor for a great reputation engage my mind; for the enemies of Truth and Philanthropy could easily deceive me and make me forget- ful of my lofty aim of doing good to Thy children . . . Grant energy unto both body and the soul, that I might e ' er unhindered ready be to mitigate the woes, sustain and help the rich and poor, the good and bad. enemy and friend. O let me e ' er behold in the afflicted and suffering only the human being. " 129 Senior Class Officers HANS Wll Hhl MM N PRESIDENT DONALD MtWll 1 lAMS VICE-PRESIDENT B L. J K f f •■ ' V 1 1 BEVERLY STUMP SECRETARY GERSON ASKALL TREASURER JOSEPH NALARO HONOR COUNCIE CHMRMAN MILLON COLL HONOR COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVE WILLL ' WI DUNSliAl H STUDENT GOVERNMENT Wn I L M LAI IS STUni N I (.() I KNMI NT Yearbook Staff DONALD McWILLIAMS CO-EDITOR RAMON ROIG CO-EDITOR GERSON ASRAEL BUSINESS MANAGER RICHARD LANG PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR FERDINAND MAINOLFI LAYOUT EDITOR LEE RUSSO WRITEUP EDITOR MARTIN KLEINMAN ART EDITOR RALPH NATALE LAYOUT JOSEPH NATARO WRITEUPS EARL SHIELDS SENIOR WRITEUPS ELMER McKAY SENIOR WRITEUPS Senior Week . . Class Night Alumni Banquet " | 3 " ll k. " M % ' !?%-il_ S ' JV .. .. . mkB , A . ' h ■ . Smf ■ sm ,p- ■ Kn »«- ' t «L i ' i y?. . . . Precommencement Commencement - - ' ■ ••y- • -i) " ' j r • w m : . . . Honors William F. Falls, Jr. Siimina Ci m Laiide Honors-Internal Medicine If WlLLL M N. COHhN Magna Cum Laude Harvey M. Solomon Magna Cum Laude James P. Durkan, Jr Magna Cum Laude JoRGL. O. JUST-VlERA Magna Cum Laude Honors-Arllirilis Robert H. Young, Jr. Honors — G. U. Surgery Ramon F. Roig Honors — Dermatology i xW. Acknowledgment The yearbook staff wishes to express their appreciation and thanks to Robert Torrence for his fine work as photog- rapher for our yearbook. Bob is a mem- ber of the Art Department for the BaUi- more Campus of the University of Maryland. He has worked diligently with the members of our staff and has played a vital part in making this book possible. To Bob we say " Thanks " for a job well done. We also would like to thank Mr. Austin. Head of the Art Department for his cooperation and advice in producing our book. RoBKRT Torrence When starting on a task, such as publishing a yearbook, one soon finds that this is not a one man job; but, a job which requires the skill and cooperation of a great many people in a great many different fields. We wish to take this opportunity to thank those who have extended us a helping hand — ■ To the Empire Studios for arranging for and taking our senior pictures in spite of the odd hours that we went to the studios. To Dr. Eduard Uhlenhuth who allowed us to use his cherished anatomy charts. To Gretchen Wood who obtained the anatomy charts for us from the manuscripts in the Anatomy Library. To Shirley McWilliams who did our endless typing. To Jim Connor of Garamond Press who was always willing and able to help us over the technical pitfalls. To Ted Brinkmann who loaned us his excellent photograph of the operating room. To all the others who in some way helped us — whether it was advice, pictures, in- formation, or financial aid. Without this help our task could not have been accomplished and again we say " thanks. " Sincerely The Staff for ' 59. 139 ' -.iz Z " % - - f " ' " " ' ' ■ ' :• V 1 . - mmM 1 - m ifllMii J T 3 l v 1 HIT JilM _ff r ' 7 i«T7r«»A-- - t will I I-.III:RSI IIAII,. Ihc now School of Nursiny luiikling. is a s iiihol ot llic groulli of ihc rni orsil on iIk- Baltimore campus, hour lloors proviJc facilities for teaching ant! administration, incliuliny class and conference rooms, a niirsiny lahorators, oliices for the Dean and ficulty memhers. and also a spacious lounge, recreation room, and kitchen. University Hospital towers behind, with ihc nurses ' dorniitor . I oinsa Parsons Hall, to the right. SCHOOL OF NURSING UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 143 Dedication of Whitehurst Hall The afternoon of January twentieth focused not only upon the manifold ac- complishments of a remarkable woman. Sara A. Whitehurst. but also rendered an inspiring tribute to Dean Florence M. Gipe. to the University of Maryland School of Nursing, to the profession of nursing, and to the values of higher edu- cation. Honored guests included Dr. Wil- son H. Elkins. President of the University of Maryland; the Honorable J. Millard Tawes. Governor of the State of Mary- land; Dr. Ruth B. Freeman. President of the National League for Nursing; Dr. Genevieve K. Bixler, Head of the Nursing Education Project of the Southern Re- gional Education Board; Mr. Charles P. McCormick. President, and Mr. B. Herbert Brown, Secretary, of the Board of Regents; Dr. Bertha S. Adkins, Under Secretary of the United States Depart- ment of Health, Education, and Welfare. Dr. Adkins delivers the address. SindciUs admire lite plaque to be placed in llie lobby. President Elkins and Governor Tawes are welcomed. Miss Frances Huntley unveils the portrait. " . . . Sinking thy praise forever, throughout the land. Sara A. Whitehurst, as the first and only woman member of the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland, has served our school, as she is serving women through- out the world, with honesty, keen judgement, and outstanding ability. Because of her interest in the growth and development of the nursing profession, many of our needs have been realized. As a forceful participant in organizations such as the World Health Organization and the Civil Defense Commission, founded to promote understanding and coopera- tion among all peoples, Mrs. Whitehurst has proven herself a discriminating analyst of problems and a woman undeterred, possessed with insight and social conscience. Graduate professional nurses throughout the state of Maryland have benefited for many years by her measures to raise economic and social standards for women. The Mrs. John L. Whitehurst annual award to the senior student manifesting the greatest degree of executive ability has provided a stimulus for leaders in nursing. In recognition of her dynamic leadership and cflcctive career in education, govern- ment and civic activities, the University of Maryland is proud to name its nursing school building for Sara Whitehurst. 146 Miss Feldmann interprets collegiate nursing to Dr. Adkins. Following the tour of Whitelmrsi Hall, refreshments are enjoyed by all. - :- f ■f:jj ' FLORFNCn MfDA GIPE, K.N., B.S., M.S., ED.D. l ' R01i:SSC)R OF NURSING DKAN ()l- I 111: IJNIVUKSITY OF MARYl AND SCHOOL OF ' NURSING With warm feelings and deepest gratitude, we dedicate our book to Florence M. Gipe, whose foresight and perseverence have made us prtnid to call ourselves graduates of the University of Maryland School of Nursing and friends of a devoted aiul eminent leader of tiie nursing profession. 148 SCHOOL OF NURSING University of Maryland 620 WEST LOMBARD STREET BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND OFFICE OF THE DEAN GRADUATES OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING - CLASS OF 1959 GREETINGS: " Great things are done when men and mountains meet ; This is not done by jostling in the street. " William Blake Gnomic Verses, I During the last four years you have had the opportunity to witness tremendous changes in the field of professional nursing. You have observed advances in psychiatric nursing, nursing needs in the modern hospital, present concepts in the care of patients with heart disease, the artificial kidney, the artificial heart-lung, develop- ments in the care of patients with long term illness, modern nursing care of the mother and newborn infant, and comprehensive care for the sick and the well child. Along with this highly specialized nursing care in the hospital, you have observed a wide expansion in the field of public health nursing. The University of Maryland, through the School of Nursing, has endeavored to prepare you to carry a major responsibility as a member of the medical care team. The faculty realize that more re- sponsibility immediately calls for more and better educational preparation since the professional nurse must asume first place in line following the medical doctor. You have met the challenge well; through study, practice, observation and experimentation. Given the opportunity, we believe, you will represent professional nursing to such a degree that you will bring honor to yourself and to your university. Florence M. Gipe Professor and Dean School of Nursing " ijja «_ 149 NANC ' i ' Anderson, R.N.. B.S.. M.S. Assisliiiit Professor of Psychiatric Niirsiiii; Martha Bai r. R.N., B.S.. r.P.H.N. Instnulor of Public Hccilih Nursing Alice Beegan, r.n.. b.s.. m.a. Instructor of Maternal and Child Health Nursina Maki C ari , K.N., B.N.. I ' M. I). Professor of Nursing Chairmun. CSraduate Programs in Nursing Advisor, Student Government Association Arlyn Charlton, R.N., B.S.. M.S. Instructor of Psychiatric Nursing VlRGINLV CONLIV. R.N., B.S.. M.A. Associate Professor of Nursing Chairman. Raccalaiireate Program in Nursing Advisor, Terrae Mari U ' Mediciis Rum I5VSON, B.S.. M.S. Assistant Professor of Nutrition PaIRKIA KvT RV. R.N.. B.S. Assistant Instructor of lcili( III and Siirgicid Nursing Marv CiROllH nd. R.N., A.B.. M.S.. CM ' . H.N. Assistant Professor of Puhlic Health Nursing Counselor. Sigma Theta Tail 150 Beazie Hayes, r.n., b.s., m.s. Instructor of Psycliicitric Nursing Margaret Hayes. R.N.. B.S.. M.S. Associate Professor of Nursing Assistant to Dean. College Park Division Carol Hosfeld. r.n.. b.s.. m.s. Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing Betty Hughie. r.n.. b.s., m.s. Instructor of Psychiatric Nursing Marguerite Hydorn, R.N.. B.S.. M.ED. Associate Professor of Materncd and Child Health Nursing Counselor, Sigma Tlieta Tau KaTHRYN JeX. R.N.. B.S. Assistant Instructor of Maternal and Child Health Nursing JaNIS KrLMER. R.N.. B.S. Assistant Instructor of Medical and Surgical Nursing Counselor. Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland Catherine Lindenberger. r.n. Assistant Instructor of Medical and Surgical Nursing Annie McElhenie. a.b., m.a. Assistant Professor of Sociology 151 Margarkt Murphy, R.N.. U.S.. M.S. Instructor of Maleriuil iiinl Chilli Health Niirsins Frances Reed, r.n., b.s.. m.ed. Assisluiit Professor of Peilicitric Nursing Julia Richardson, R.N., B.S., M.S. Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Nursing Betty Shubkagel, R.N., B.S., M.N. Instructor of Medical and Surgical Nursing Advisor, Senior Class Counselor. Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland H ' ■ - ■? y ® Eleanor Slacum. r.n., b.s. Assistant Professor Assistant to Dean Joan White, r.n.. b.s.. m.n. Instructor of Medical and Surgical Nursing Ad i ()r. Glee Club Kathryn Wohlsen, R.N., B.A., M.N., M.A. Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing Advisor, Junior Class DoROim YoRKl . R.N., B.s. Assistant Instructor of Pediatric Nursing Cecilia Ziikus, r.n., a.b.. m.a. Assistant Professor, Rcludulilative Nursing 152 Junior Class AT. i Carol Sanders President Dorothy Smart Vice Presidenl Phyllis Hampton Secretary Betty Hopkins Treasurer Patricia Purdum Social Chairman 153 Sandra Barnhiirt Elizabeth Bennett Bertha Bouma Dorothv Brewer Miriam Biizzcll Georgie C ' ornwell Kay Cummings Joan Eitemiller Barbara Frassa Elaine Garrett )£. Thehna Hammond Marietta Haupt Judith Hiiti Rhetta King Mary Lombardi 1 innca NcKon Sara Rafter Elaine Kucker Joan Summers Gwendolyn I aylor Suzanne I heis C arole Thoren Jane eager Jean Bniggemann Elaine (ohn Lynn Oyer Patricia Gortner Judith Heinlz Kulh kanow Iuiani Moses Joan Olson 15 Clinical Experience 155 Medical and Surgical Nursing One cannot isolate a fractured leg or a failing heart from the individual to whom it belongs . . . the famed ten credit course . . . affectionately known as med-surg . . . optimum patient care is our goal . . . empathy, our password ... we learn the fundamentals of all nursing . . . the sig- nificance of little things . . . use of the scientific method . . . keen observation and accurate charting . . . lectures in 4C classroom . . . twenty minute movie, twenty minute snooze . . . bedside demon- strations . . . understanding the impor- tance of fluid and electrolyte balance . . . preparing sippy diets . . . NSDO ' s . . . turn q 2h, passive exercises to all extrem- ities . . . health teaching . . . enrichment experience in neurosurgical and cardio- vascular nursing . . . senior seminars on disaster nursing . . . assistant charge duties . . . rtfteen minutes for lunch . . . " Doctor, do you think that special chart q ' 2h can be discontinued now that the patient is ready for discharge? " . . . miss- ing, one phenobarb, 60 mg. . . . " You mean my patient has TB? " ... all night care studies . . . typing is a prerequisite for this course . . . thirty page hour exams . . . " This week you owe twenty-four bibliography cards " . . . evaluation con- ferences ... we return to med-surg for our final days as student graduates . . . and most of all we remember — it was quite a traumatic experience. All the cnmiorls oi lu nie 5( An art and a .science. Delicious, nutritious " Just a little stick, honey. " Double trotihle. A lifesavini; procecitire. " Nineteen, twenty . A helping hand, cm encouraging voice. Protege of the fluid team. Specialties Crisis in the Ei)u ' ri;eiicy Room. Rehabilitation Nursing Emphasize strengths to minimize handi- caps . . . affiHation at Montebello State Hospital ... an hour ' s ride via BTC 19 ... a hitch up the hill . . . our purpose — to help the patient help himself . . . the temptation to do too much . . . perse- verance . . . the patient learns his first lesson — how to smile and say " I can. " . . . halting steps to self-sufficiency . . . not only the body, but the mind and the spirit need rehabilitating . . . satisfying hours in occupational and physical ther- apy . . . Barthel ' s index of progress . . . grand rounds . . . evaluation clinic . . . meticulous decubiti care . . . personal experience on the Stryker frame and in the wheelchair . . . monthly birthday cele- brations . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland Christmas party ... we learn the true meaning of understanding. The treatment is prevention. ' Oj course we know how to turn a Foster frame! " " Right there! " Operating Room The satisfaction of being an integral member of the surgical team . . . bright green dresses with adhesive taped hem- lines . . . Madonna caps for that angelic look . . . practice setups in 4C classroom . . . butterflies in our stomachs . . . circu- lating in circles . . . the interpretation of mask mumbling . . . tangled sutures . . . specimen in the wastecan . . . one lost sponge . . . " Sorry, doctor, you just threw the last sterile suction tip on the floor. " A place for everythini " . . . . size 5V2 gloves? . . . phisohex dermi- titis . . . those dirty cases . . . sharps and flats . . . mindreading, accuracy, and speed . . . inquisitive eyes peering down from the balcony . . . keeping watch in the recovery room . . . total exhaustion. The better to see. Four weeks of living like a mole . . . the midnight roundup ... a trusty flashlight . . . red light blinking on the telephone . . . emergency admission . . . stacks of paperwork . . . restocking at CSR . . . sterilize everything . . . patient rounds q hour . . . being an understanding listener to those who cannot sleep . . . " I ' m sorry to wake you, doctor, but ... " ... 6:50 A.M. — waiting for relief ... the count and morning rounds . . . sleepy-eyed at the breakfast table ... to bed at last ... on your door the warning, NIGHT NURSE SLEEPING . . . rude awaken- ing for 3 P.M. class . . . finally, back to the world of day people. You alone are responsible for the ward. The long night ' s vigil. Night Duty 163 Obstetric Nursing Family centered maternity care . . . pre- natal clinic daze ... the little room full of big mothers-to-be . . . " take off your panties and pass your water " . . . calcu- late the EDC from an unknown LMP . . . the art of being non-judgemental . . . advantages of breast-feeding . . . crunchy snacks of laundry starch ... ten pounds in a week? ... the challenge of teaching good nutrition . . . choosing a care study . . . the power of superstitions . . . new wives " tales for old . . . the bell rings at the door of the labor and delivery suite ... a thirty second prep, being care- ful not to shave the baby ' s head . . . " Don ' t bother scrubbing, doctor ... " ... a pit drip or C. section . . . but most often, patience and encouragement . . . timing contractions . . . " Take long, deep breaths " . . . cold cream, ice chips, and two wash cloths . . . relax . . . " Nurse, have you ever had a baby? " . . . the black- board scoreboard . . . express to the blue room . . . " Arch your back like a pussy cat " . . . " Push hard, mother, now! " . . . the ever wondrous birth miracle ... an angry wail ... a precious FTLMC . . . ten tiny fingers and ten perfect toes . . . rubber band cord ties . . . inky footprints for posterity . . . and off to the nursery . . . prophylactic penicillin, weighing-in. drying-oft " . . . squirming bundles of joy . . . rows of hungry mouths demanding attention . . . burp q half ounce . . . have dry diaper, will wet . . . postpartum . . . so many happy faces . . . itchy stitches . . . catheterizations by the gallon . . . Chuck- A-Bed caravan at feeding time ... de- lighted visitors, begowned and beguiled . . . " Looks just like his daddy, of course! " Tlui iii;h the lookiiii glass, his infant ' s debut. Step two of the bath cart ritual. The wee preemic — liundle wiili care. Rooming-in is fun! Double tliicknc.ss in front. Going home. Pediatric Nursing Tender love and care . . . and patience that passeth all understanding . . . three ounces in three hours . . . " Umm. those banana flakes are good! " . . . little pink bathtubs for little pink tots . . . soap- eaters and paint-eaters . . . stroller rides and phonograph music . . . " Please don ' t cry, baby! " . . . " You didn ' t have to bite me. " . . . WHOOPS!! . . . " Who said children are innocent? " . . . under the rotunda ' s big top, three performances daily ... the pregnant stillness of naptime , . . rubber nipples in a pan boiled dry ... a mummy wrap for security ' s sake . . . bicycle speedsters underfoot . . . the stickiness of spit-out medicines ... a party a week . . . tears and tempers . . . lessons in discipline, for children and self . . . checking growth and development in Well Baby Clinic . . . lollypop bribes . . . hundreds of handwashings . . . cubicle and gown technique . . . " My pajamas match your uniform. " . . . goodnight kisses and good morning hugs . . . hand- printed glass partitions . . . diapers folded to fit . . . baskets of bottles, buckets of ice, tanks of oxygen, gallons of alcohol, bags of soiled linen . . . the chaos of Sick Baby Clinic . . . the tense drama of an exchange transfusion . . . the struggle for life barely begun . . . reassuring anxious parents . . . the discovery that a child is anything but a small-scale adult. " Once upon a time ... " ' Carrots first, then your bottle. " % . f% J L i " Hey, that tickles! " Mary Lou ' s beautician service. " Down the hatch! " Mother surrogate. " y A HJm y n " never did think much oj dolls. " Here we come! " Life is just one merry-go-round. Psychiatric Nursing " It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye. " ' . . . Nursery School ... a two week observation of pure unadulterated behavior — interpersonal relationships in the raw . . . " Guess what, teacher " . . . early morning chapel . . . graham crack- ers and milk . . . the unnerving wisdom of a five-year-old . . . " These are normal children? " . . . Psychiatric Institute . . . one single tool, yourself . . . rising anxiety level . . . " What to do? " . . . role playing and role defining . . . acting out in the dorm . . . mastery of the self system ... we finally get to be authority figures . . . unexpected reactions . . . " Extension 550, Stat! " . . . " This hour is yours " . . . IPR notes . . . " Got a match? " . . . OT time, the elevator ' s waiting . . . profi- ciency badges in pool, basketball, ping- pong, and badminton . . . focus on com- munication . . . therapeutic intervention . . . Spring Grove State Hospital . . . the unforgettable first day . . . the upward climb through Old Main ' s grey stone stairwells ... a deep breath . . . Hall Six, so that ' s what ' s behind the green door ... so few for so many . . . pace, pace, pace . . . concentration . . . never break a promise . . . the art of listening . . . un- locking doors and unraveling symbolism . . . What is mental illness? . . . clinical conferences . . . cigarette breaks on Hall Nine . . . shrimp salad sandwiches and chocolate milkshakes . . . student - in- structor discussions in the office . . . per- sonal and professional growth . . . the most difficult task of all — to know one- self . . . " You must be very patient . . . First you will sit down at a little distance from me ... I shall look at you out of the corner of my eye, and you will say noth- ing. Words are the source of misunder- standings. But you will sit a little closer to me, every day . . . " . ' ys 9jiffpi j:. STATE • HOSPITAL 01 L 111 Aiuoine dc Sctiiil-Extipery. Tin ' Liltlc Prince. Harcoiiri. liraii ' ami Com- pany, New York. IV-fJ, pane 70. Il ' iil.. pane 67. 170 The long halls of hope. 171 The intensity of interaction. Recreatiunal therapy fur patient and nurse. Public Health Nursing Eight to four-thirty, specialing the com- munity . . . one well-developed sixth sense and two tireless feet ... a big black bag and a little black book . . . matching blue coats and caps with various sizes and shapes of students . . . mittens and ear- muffs, snuggles and boots, and somber kneehighs at 20 " ... the search for old newspapers . . . the art of improvising . . . hopelessly lost in the heart of Balti- more . . . " 1602 was right here before the harbor tunnel cut through! " . . . seek and you shall find, knock and it shall be opened unto you . . . don ' t give up, there ' s always a back door ... be prepared . . . ■ ' Is you a talkin ' or a doin ' nurse? " . . . you ' re a guest in the home . . . five pairs of wide eyes scrutinizing every move . . . flexible interviewing techniques . . . faith in one ' s own good judgement . . . the warmth of a cup of tea offered at a visit ' s close . . . only 4.2 health problems per family? . . . Monday morning court at Pine Street Station . . . rodent hunting with the sanitary engineer . . . Well Baby, Chest, and VD Clinics . . . nurse-teacher conferences at school . . . case finding, case holding, and follow-up . . . the sec- ret code of day sheets . . . phone calls, records, referrals, contacts, letters, ex- change slips ad infinitum . . . remember, you ' re not a social worker, policeman, employment agency, doctor, philanthro- pist, nutritionist, psychiatrist . . . insight into many cultures . . . the reward of a goal finally realized. ' You can ' t sit in the office all morning. " " Hello, Pine Street Station? " ' Now Mother, don ' t worry about her tluimh sucking. " 7 came to see ii ami flic hahv. Eight-thirty A M. bag inspection. Thorough handwashing for everyone ' s protection. Establishing rapport. The end of a rewarding day. A pleasant oice and a friendly smile . ' This is your last late leave . . . " Off Duty 1114 Is ready. ' T O Z 3 i L P C s 4 5 ■ " E c r s 5 ■ -i i . iilv I A 7 That Infernal machine! ' eres a ifiTSI Six no trump? " Yes, I ' d love to . Cleanliness is next to godliness. Knit-wits. ■•y Sixteen hums of p.r.ii. duty per weekend. There comes a time in every student ' s hfe . We Work . . . By the dawn ' s early light. Twentv-one at last! And . . . Happy days are here again. On with tlw dance. i ■ ' " Total exhaustion — and sweet dreams of June IVeek. " Here ' s to Ausust 15. 1959! ' C. Sanders, B. Frassa. S. Theis, F. Huntley, E. Krongard, M. Russell, M. Lombardi. Student Government Association President First Vice President Second Vice President Third Vice President House Chairman Secretary Treasurer President Senior Class President Junior Class FRANCES HUNTLEY EVA KRONGARD BARBARA FRASSA MARY LOMBARDI MARY RUSSELL SUZANNE THEIS GEORGIE CORNWELL SALLY FOUSE CAROL SANDERS 181 Welcome, Juniors! After two years of rather monotonous life at College Park, the junior students arrive, breathless with expectation. Since it has been proven that orientation to a new experience lowers one ' s anxiety level, the well-oriented seniors tradition- ally present " Skit Nite " as an unbiased indoctrination to the Baltimore campus and its inhabitants. Probably the evening is most entertaining to the uninhibited seniors, as they relive their junior year through pantomime and mimicry in out- landish costumes. At an afternoon tea. the students meet new friends and renew old acquaintances. A Big Sister program is also set up to guide the newcomers. It ' s a FTLMM with tail! Among those present at Skit Nite were: fseuled) Dr. Ramirez. Dr. Yim. Dr. Kuperman. Dr. .Seilew; islanding) Miss Shubkagel, Miss Hosfeld. Miss Mulligan. Miss Lloyd, Miss Baxter. Dr. Armstrong. Others attending were: tscaivd) Dr. Townshend. Mrs. klc . Miss Junior Student. Miss Gleason; (standing) Miss Senior Student. Narrator. Mrs. Holmes. The Dean, Miss Anderson. The puncli table always attracts a crowd. J. Smilh, M. L. Cornelius, C. Thoren, S. Fouse. E. Dietz, J. Hileman, E. Krongard. M. Russell. B. Reynolds. LIuisiinas curds for sale. Terrae Mariae Medicus Editor ELAINE DIETZ Business Manager sally fouse Photograpliy Editor june smith Copy Editor EVA krongard Senior Writeiips MARY LOU CORNELIUS Projects Chairman gretchen feldmann Subscriptions sue dahlin Junior Editor CAROLE THOREN Plots and plans. Homecoming 1958 Our autumn dance is climaxed by the selection of the Homecoming Queen, who represents the School of Nursing in the all-University competition at College Park. Miss Dorothy Smart OUR CANDIDATES SANDRA NILAND BETTY REYNOLDS JOAN SWEGLAR BECKY FLEMING DOTTY SMART THELMA HAMMOND The old faithfuls: H. Krongard. B. Reynolds. Dr. H. Ramirez. S. Niland. J. Hileman. M. Russell. Basketball Team Glee Club Caroliiii; ihroiii hoiit the hospital, we help to spread the Christmas spirit. -V 8 " t. f V Mcliv Lou Cornelius, our state President. Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland Phi Kappa Phi " The love of learning rules the world " is the motto of this national honorary society, whose members are the top scholars in every college in the university. E. Dietz, F. Huntley, E. Krongard, J. Smith. B. Reynolds. Faculty mcmhcrs o Sii-nui Theta Tan. Sigma Theta Tau The establishment of Pi chapter of the national honor society for nursing at the University of Maryland on June 2, 1959, was a milestone in our school ' s history. Nurses who have demonstrated qualities of good character, leadership, and a ca- pacity for professional growth were pin- ned at an initiation ceremony keynoted by the orchid and fuchsia colors of the society, whose motto is " Love, Courage, Honor " . The purposes of Sigma Theta Tau are to foster high professional stan- dards, to encourage creative work, to promote development of the individual, and to develop an abiding interest in the advancement of nursing. A student adds her name to the roll. Underf ' raduale charter members oj I ' i chapter. A fK 4m ' i W 1 W : 1 Z 1 ' " M F J . J ' i ff M June Week The beginning of the end of four years of collegiate nursing ... the faculty enter- tains graduating seniors and relatives at tea . . . uniform fittings for " whites " . . . the Junior-Senior Prom . . . Baccalaureate Service in the Chapel . . . picnic at Patapsco State Park . . . academic caps and gowns arrive . . . Sigma Theta Tau initiation and tea . . . a Flossie for paid- up class dues . . . cap-stringing dinner at picturesque Olney Inn ... a rainy pre- commencement convocation for the med- ical school . . . Alumnae Banquet and Dance, Emerson Hotel ... the return to College Park for graduation . . . sorrow and joy intermingled . . . the doctors rise and tip their caps to us . . . unsigned diplomas . . . NLN exams . . . teaching the freshmen . . . the long, hot summer . . . sunbathing on the roof . . . showers and weddings . . . hurried farewells . . . VACATION . . . new job . . . State Boards . . . the bright promise of the years ahead. ' One lump, please. " ' Hail, Alnni Maier . " Mmmin. f ood! — • I Honors " Congratulations, Doris. " The University of Maryland Nurses Alumnae Association Prize for highest average in scholar- ship: FRANCES HUNTLEY. The Elizabeth Collins Lee Award for sec- ond highest average in scholarship: ELAINE DIETZ. The Mrs. John L. Whitehurst Prize for execu- tive ability: MARY LOU CORNELIUS. The Flora Hoffman Tarun Memorial Prize for leadership, loyalty, and school spirit: JUNE SMITH. The Mrs. Charles A. Reifschneider Prize for the best professional appearance and conduct: ELEANOR HANSEN. The University of Maryland Nurses Alumnae Association Pin and Membership Prize for practical nursing and executive ability: SALLY FOUSE. The Neurosurgical Nursing Prize: BETTY REYNOLDS. The Elizabeth Aitkenhead Award for the best nursing care of surgical patients: DORIS BAUMGARDNER. The Elizabeth Aitkenhead Award for operating room nursing: SHIRLEY HOWARD and BECKY FLEMING. Seniors, this is your night . . Our Seventieth Year . Louisa Parsons 191 The Nightingale Cap No doubt at some time or other many persons have wondered why nurses wear caps. The size and shape of the cap. together with the fashion of wearing it, would certainly indicate that it was not meant to serve any utilitarian purpose. The answer lies in the deep shadows of the past, as no one has ever discovered the true origin of the tradi- tion. Probably the real reason that we wear a cap is that, in Florence Nightingale ' s day, it was the custom for every lady to wear a headcovering indoors. The cap of the University of Maryland School of Nursing carries with it a colorful history which every graduate of the school is proud to relate. Our school was founded in 1889 by Louisa Parsons, who was a student of Florence Nightingale at St. Thomas Hospital in London, England. An outstanding nurse, Miss Parsons was twice deco- rated by Queen Victoria for nursing service in the British campaigns. When Miss Parsons was preparing to come to this country. Miss Nightingale gave her a pattern of a cap and some point d ' esprit lace; and the privilege of bestowing it upon the nurses of the first school of nursing of which she was to become Superintendent of Nurses. By that fortunate circumstance, the University of Maryland School of Nursing inherited the Nightingale cap. During Miss Parsons ' administration this cap was worn by both students and gradu- ates. Each nurse made, laundered, and fluted her own cap. In 1900, Mrs. Kathryn Taylor became Superintendent of Nurses, and she, considering the long hours and ardu ous work the nurses were required to do. designed a simpler and less elaborate cap of organdy and ruching for the student nurses. For a while, several of the students helped finance their course in the School of Nursing by making these caps for fifteen cents each. This task was later transferred to the sewing room located in the old hos- pital, where these caps are made today. Although not wholly similar, the Nightingale cap was patterned after the cap of St. Thomas Hospital, and the point d ' esprit lace is still imported from England. There have been few changes made in the original design; however, varying hair styles have altered the fashion in which the cap is worn. A highlight of June Week is the " cap- stringing " dinner, at which each senior pulls and ties the string threaded through double rows of fluting so that her cap will fit perfectly. The day following graduation marks the debut of the " Flossie " , as the cap is affectionately called, upon the head of the proud new graduate, who has not yet shed her student stripes for a white uniform. The graduates of the University of Maryland School of Nursing respect and honor the tradition of their beautiful and unique, fluted point d ' esprit cap. 193 Fifty Years Ago . . . . . . Graduates, Class of 1908 194 I GRADUATES CLASS OF 1959 DORIS ANN BAUMGARDNER B.S. IN NURSING FRtDIRICK, MARYLAND Sower of mirth, dispeller of gloom . . . master impersonator who improves the original . . . versatile ... on with the dance . . . owner of most-battered bathing suit . . . animated gre- gariousncss . . . chains of petite sneezes . . . celebrated gastrocnemius . . . considerate, with a wealth of empathy . . . dearly loved by patients and co-workers . . . maintains steadfast friend- ships . . . University Band . . . Glee Club . . . basketball . . . Junior and Senior Class, Social Chairman . . . Tencie Mariae Medicus . . . Student Nurses " Council of Maryland. MARY PRICE BOYD B.S. IN NURSING Dtl.TA, PENNSYLVANIA Shyness becomes her . . . " Marley " . . . serious- minded . . . lovely dark eyes . . . favorite pastime is being " Cooped " " in . . . eagerly awaited long distance phone calls . . . Labrador retriever . . . cute and captivating . . . reader of many books . . . first little mother-to-be in the class of ' 58 . . . back into student stripes for three months of psych . . . weekend mother and wife . . . will graduate in time io celebrate son " s first birthday . . . has begun to rear children in the orchard . . . Canterbury Club . . . Delta Gamma, Parli- mcntarian . . . Glee Club. 196 MARY LOU CORNELIUS B.S. IN NURSING HYATTSVILLE. MARYLAND Poise, her inherent virtue . . . sagacious leader . . . orator . . . organization plus . . . manages to do a million things at once, all after midnight ... a room overflowing with file cabinets of plans and commitments . . . chuckles . . . faith- ful Wednesday evening concert-goer . . . that knowing look, the epitome of non-verbal com- munication . . . cross country migrant . . . secret conclaves with the faculty ... U. of Md. ' s big name in Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland, President . . . Canterbury Club . . . Independent Students Association . . . basketball . . . Student Government Association, Secretary . . . Glee Club, Secretary-Treasurer . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus. SUZANNE FAY DAHLIN B.S. IN NURSING SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND Deep - rooted friendliness ... a sympathetic listener . . . authority on crossword puzzles . . . speediest conversationalist alive . . . unpre- tentious . . . quietness with a glow . . . willing worker . . . hot dog peddler . . . abandoned tumbling feats after near-miss . . . card shark . . . care packages from Grandma in Iowa . . . sweet Sue . . . Delta Gamma . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Student Government Asso- ciation, Treasurer . . . Glee Club . . . Senior Class, Vice President . . . Terrae Mariae Medi- cus . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland. 197 SARA JANE RINGGOLD DHUE B.S. IN NURSING KIDCiFLN. MARYLAND Old-fashioned. Georgian style . . . doleful eyes . . . reserved . . . her knit one, purl two creates a strikino afghan . . . " Can 1 borrow this book? " ' . . . conservative nature typical of an Eastern Shoreman . . . the warmth of a fireplace and the company of a favorite book make a rainy afternoon well spent . . . enjoys the door to door life of the public health nurse . . . counting the days . . . the snafu of graduation in February and then a wedding . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Collegiate 4-H Club . . . Young Republicans Club . . . Student Nurses " Council of Maryland. ELAINE DOROTHY DIETZ B.S. IN NURSING BAI.TIMORI COLINrV, MARVI AND Creative imagination and originality . . . smiles with sincerity . . . the incurable procrastinator . . . thorough nursing care . . . that lived-in room, utter chaos . . . keen insight . . . the calm before the storm . . . blue-green and The Little Prince are favorites . . . life in the country . . . talented artist and author . . . discriminating taste . . . Tchaikovsky ' s ballets . . . warmth of feeling . . . high ideals . . . Alpha Lambda Delta . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club, Vice-Presi- dent . . . Lutheran Students Association . . . Academic Board . . . basketball . . . .lunior Class, Vice President . . . Phi Kappa Phi . . . Sigma Theta Tau . . . Student Nurses " Council of Maryland . . . I ' errae Mariae Mediciis, Editor. 198 ANNE CATHERINE ERMER B.S. IN NURSING BALTIMORE, MARYLAND Refreshing beauty and womanliness, her quali- ties . . . question mark eyebrows . . . irrepres- sible bursts of bubbling laughter . . . pattering feet to the coke machine . . . the hidden temper is usually restrained . . . protectress of animals ... a dirge for one dead guppy . . . appreciative sense of humor . . . ingenuous sophisticate . . . long range goal: to perfect piano rendition of " I ' ll Take Romance " . . . Charlie, my boy . . . Delta Gamma . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Gymkana . . . Homecoming Queen, 1958 . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland. ROMAINE BROWN EYLER B.S. IN NURSING MOUNT AIRY, MARYLAND Independence is her middle name . . . impulsive yet likable . . . frank and outspoken ... a con- tented and capable homemaker . . . our sensible country girl . . . thinks nothing of commuting one hundred miles daily for an education . . . generously provides hot rod taxi service to clinical areas . . . calm exterior belies fiery spirit beneath ... an incomparable individualist . . . nimble with a thimble ... a staunch advocate of natural childbirth ... a well groomed, beloved Shetland sheep dog . . . Canterbury Club . . . Gamma Sigma Sigma . . . Glee Club . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland. 199 MARJORIE JOAN FEDYSHYN B.S. IN NURSING NORTH HALEDON, NEW JERSEY Between laughter and tears ... a captivating naiveness . . . genuine ... a pla nt for every occasion . . . question-box . . . fifth floor ' s rock and roll expert . . . " Let ' s dance! " ... a new initiate to the diligent circle of argyle artists . . . unbelievably cute when provoked . . . timid at times . . . holds the blue ribbon for gullibility . . . good-natured . . . geniality, an attribute . . . wears the oft-questioned gold band, third finger, left hand . . . the muser . . . fashioning own wardrobe a specialty . . . Daydodgers . . . Gamma Sigma Sigma . . . Independent Students Association, Secretary - Treasurer . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland. GRETCHEN FELDMANN B.S. IN NURSING YORK. PENNSYLVANIA Her paths are peace; mankind, her neighbor . . . of tranquil temperament . . . earnest ... " 1 dreamt I sold Christmas cards ... " ... our buxom lass from Pennsylvania Deutschland . . . gentle tender loving care reflects her heart of gold . . . incurable romanticist . . . often puzzled . . . music hath charms . . . owner of a quiescent violin . . . prolific poster painter . . . scrapbook sentimentalist . . . Glee Club. President . . . Senior Class, Historian . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland, Program Chairman . Terrae Muriae Mcdkus . . . National Student Nurses ' Convention Representative. -V ' -. ) 200 REBECCA HAMILTON FLEMING B.S. IN NURSING OAKLAND. MARYLAND Saucy, with a glint of laughter in her eye . . . impish . . . always on the go . . . consumes 5000 calories a day without gaining an ounce . . . petite and stylish . . . says what she thinks, shows how she feels . . . flippant . . . one of the working wives . . . beautiful eyes fringed with thick sweeping lashes . . . mountaineer . . . " Anyone for bridge? " . . . self-assured . . . months and months of clinical experience in the O.R. . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . basketball . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland. SALLY ANN FOUSE B.S. IN NURSING BALTIMORE, MARYLAND Success shall be hers . . . dry, satiric humor, her trademark . . . wields the gavel of the class . . . efficiency expert . . . unique calendar numbers remaining senior days . . . siblings galore . . . adroit seamstress . . . wedding plans in full swing . . . practicing Chinese cookery . . . prudent penny pincher . . . outspoken and level- headed . . . determined go-getter . . . skillful rep artee . . . knit-wit . . . University Orchestra . . . D Club, Secretary . . . International Club . . . Senior Class, President . . . Glee Club . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland . . . National Student Nurses ' Convention Representative. 201 ELEANOR ELIZABETH HANSEN B.S. IN NURSING BALTIMORF. MXRYLAND Cleverness, all trimmed and neat . . . inquiring mind ... the first of the four " H ' s " . . . wee wisp of a waist . . . smart ensembles enhance her enviable slimness ... a pair of e.xpressive hands . . . loquacious n;iture sparked with lively laughter . . . " You know ..! " " ... gets to bed on time, regardless . . . " and all like that " . . . delicate handwriting . . . busily planning a fall wedding . . . never intends to pay a dentist ' s bill . . . keeps a spic and span room . . . Big Sister Program, Chairman . . . Student Nurses ' Coun- cil of Maryland. REBECCA JANE HILEMAN CANDIDATE FOR B.S. IN NURSING HELLAM. PENNSYLVANIA An indetinable likcableness endears her to all . . . funloving and impetuous . . . staunchly defends her convictions . . . craves adventure . . . unflagging caloric counter . . . matchless pronunciations and original jargon . . . indus- trious worker . . . " Come here once! " . . . the simple things in life . . . indoor and outdoor sports . . . " How does this look? " . . . bountifully lends anything she owns to one in need . . . graduation postphoncd by personal experience as a surgical patient . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club, Treasurer . . . Luthe ran Students Associa- tion . . . Glee Club . . . basketball . . . I cinie Muriac Mediciis . . . .lunior Class. Treasurer . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Marvland. 202 SHIRLEY ANN HOWARD B.S. IN NURSING ATLANTA, GEORGFA Her potential awaits discovery . . . the quiet one . . . unique, uncalculating wit . . . hilarious speech-maker . . . " damn dog died " . . . have class, will sleep — in the most unobtrusive manner imaginable . . . globe trotter . . . longest pony tail on campus . . . the trusting soul . . . changeable moods ... the pensive meditator . . . looks for the good in all things — wholly uncensorious . . . deep concern for people . . . Gymkana . . . Ski Club . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club, Secretary . . . Glee Club . . . Judicial Board . . . basketball . . . Student Nurses " Council of Maryland . . . Sigma Kappa. FRANCES HARRIS HUNTLEY B.S. IN NURSING BALTIMORE, MARYLAND A conscientious and warm approach to living . . . perfectionist in perpetual motion . . . that well known laugh . . . emphatic gesticulator . . . " A ' s " are a habit with this keen minded scholar . . . dependable in every undertaking . . . prompt and precise . . . finally learning to relax . . . modest ... an amusing story teller . . . " Couldn ' t help it; I had to! " . . . Alpha Lambda Delta, Secretary . . . Chapel Choir . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club, President . . . Glee Club . . . Junior Class, President . . . Sigma Theta Tau . . . Student Government Association, President . . . Phi Kappa Phi . . . Tenae Mariae Med- iciis . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland . . . National Student Nurses ' Convention Representative. 203 EVA ROSALIE KRONGARD B.S. IN NURSING BALTIMORE. MARYLAND Let not the search for wisdom end . . . free thinker . . . dry witted, serious manner ... a rare mixture of femininity, intelligence, and individualism . . . little Eva, five feet, one-half inch of pert congeniality . . . goal-oriented day dreamer . . . the men in her life . . . deserted bridge for the challenge of chess . . . intra- curricular nailfiling . . . feline fanatic . . . has time for fiction . . . Alpha Lambda Delta . . . Sigma Delta Tau . . . Hillel . . . Student Govern- ment Association, First Vice President . . . basketball . . . Phi Kappa Phi . . . Sigma Theta Tau . . . Glee Club . . . Terrae Marine Medkus . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland . . . Professional Student Senate Representative. PATRICIA KING KRUPINSKY B.S. IN NURSING BALIIMORL. MARYLAND Grace accompanies her every movement . . . demure femininity . . . radiates a soft-spoken straightforwardness . . . George ' s girl . . . gets in a quandary over quizzes . . . " May 1 borrow your notes tor the weekend? " . . . prefers brown bagged lunches to cafeteria fare . . . exemplary honesty . . . good-hearted . . . the patient ' s progress is a cause for rejoicing . . . the com- plaisant one ... a charming countenance wreathed with spun gold . . . wedded bliss . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club. 204 LUCILLE BERNARDINE LINDSAY B.S. IN NURSING WASHINGTON. D. C. A prim and proper air, tinged with unexpected gaiety . . . early to bed, early to rise . . . the other half of the February graduating class . . . who, what, how, why, when, where? . . . child- like wonder . . . dark eyes that twinkle ... a certain frothiness . . . listen carefully or you may miss a word . . . conducts an intensive whisper campaign during lectures . . . Newman Club . . . Independent Students Association . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Student Nurses " Council of Maryland. SUE ANNE MULLAN B.S. IN NURSING CUMBERLAND, MARYLAND Smiling Irish eyes, the windows of a warm heart . . . NSDO kid . . . jovial . . . amusingly n atural humorist . . . dimpled and freckled all-American girl . . . our youngest finally became legal . . . mischievous and mirthful . . . nothing could be finer than to be in Carolina . . . wears his ring around her neck . . . friend to all . . . " this is your life. Sue Mullan " . . . sometimes wistful ... a voice both soft and sweet . . . Newman Club . . . Alpha Omicron Pi . . . Glee Club . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland. 205 |p ||r SANDRA GAY NILAND B.S. IN NURSING BALriMORt, MARYLAND Sugar and spice and everything nice . . . peppy . . . closely cropped strawberry curls . . . minus a redhead ' s hot temper . . . worry wart . . . long-legged and lithe . . . always immaculately groomed . . . perplexed . . . notorious for return- ing purchases after a fifth floor showing . . . keeper of the coin . . . the age of innocence . . . Newman Club . . . Sailing Club . . . Alpha Omi- cron Pi . . . Glee Club . . . basketball, Captain . . . Student Government Association, Third Vice President . . . Student Nurses " Council of Maryland. ELLEN EMILY PADDOCK U.S. IN NURSING HAIH, NI.W YORK The pink checked countenance of a cherub . . . Dutchie . . . unlimited curiosity . . . ditlicult to understand . . . " Got a cigarette? " . . . jolly . . . playful disposition . . . the declarative one . . . ever insistent . . . chatterbox ... as unpre- dictable as p.r.n. duty . . . busy little bee . . . remains undismayed in the face of obstacles . . . University Band . . . D Club . . . University Theater . . . Glee Club . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland. 206 RITA MALIMIT PETERS CANDIDATE FOR B.S. IN NURSING BALTIMORE, MARYLAND She seeks the essence of things . . . fascinated by people . . . the inquirer . . . gifted musician ... a mind of her own . . . little minx with flashing black eyes ... an unusual prettiness . . . temperamental . . . plagued by deadlines . . . little Eva ' s inseparable companion ... a little bug of a car . . . our first Mrs. ... the promised " we three " delays her graduation . . . spent final semester shuttling between outside classes, the obstetrician, and her happy home . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club. MARY ELIZABETH REYNOLDS B.S. IN NURSING MITCHELLVILLE, MARYLAND Charm is her essence ... the happy wanderer . . . stands out in a crowd . . . excitative and demonstrative . . . maintains a year round tan . . . dates by the dozens ... the original party girl . . . casual hairdos . . . fashionable . . . adept at expressing herself ... an able student . . . excells as composer of own choreography . . . keyboard virtuoso . . . suave . . . Alpha Omicron Pi . . . Phi Kappa Phi . . . Glee Club . . . Sigma Theta Tau . . . Student Government Association, Second Vice President . . . Tenae Maiiae Mediciis . . . Student Nurses " Council of Maryland . . . basketball. 207 MARGERY ANN ROHWEDDER B.S. IN NURSING HALTIMORt. M RVIAND A willingness to help others . . . candid . . . good sport . . . borderline chain smoker . . . consump- tive cough ... a sunny smile . . . briskness . . . burns the candle at both ends . . . nothing surprises her . . . one who waits . . . moody . . . enjoys arguing ... a fever of unknown etiology . . . the infirmary, an extra curricular activity . . . exchanges service time with every- body in the class . . . easy-going . . . Alpha Delta Pi . . . Glee Club . . . basketball . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland. MARY LOUISE RUSSELL B.S. IN NURSING BMTlMORr. MNRYLAND True wisdom becomes a woman ... a quiet person, comfortable to be with . . . long, lanky, and lovable . . . the mother of us all . . . another Happy Birthday! . . . night owl . . . " now let me get organized " ... a mature thinker . . . came to us via several colleges . . . prefers a room of her own ... a clean, well-lighted place . . . the classics . . . owner of the one- horned giraffe and other assorted curiosities . . . Pi Beta Phi . . . Aqualiners . . . Newman ( Uib . . . basketball . . . Tenae Mariac Mediciis . . . Student Government Association, House Chairman . . . Professional Student Senate, Vice President . . . Student Nurses " Council of Maryland. 208 JUNE WEBER SMITH B.S. IN NURSING BALTIMORE. MARYLAND Good common sense, judiciously exercised . . . a person of responsibility . . . willowy figure ... a wholesome, well-scrubbed look ... a joy to know . . . the quality of integrity . . . the practical point of view . . . loves all shades of orange . . . characteristic laugh . . . quietly efficient ... a beautiful wedding day . . . but Webersmith sounds so distinguished! .... Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Delta Gamma . . . Junior and Senior Class, Secretary . . . Teirae Mciriae Medicus . . . Phi Kappa Phi . . . . . . Sigma Theta Tau . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland. ELIZABETH FRANCES THOMPSON B.S. IN NURSING ELLICOTT CITY, MARYLAND A tall and stately maiden, dark-crowned with ringlets . . . blushing again? . . . shyness with a come hither glance . . . thrives on weekends at home in the country . . . barefoot contessa in class ... a ten o ' clock scholar . . . moves at her own pace . . . mild mannered . . . home pressed uniforms without a wrinkle . . . sweaters topped by fancy lace collars . . . heaver of deep sighs . . . phobic . . . graceful, long fingered hands . . . isolationist . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland. 209 210 The Nightingale Pledge .solemnly pledge myself before God, euid in the presence of this assembly, To pass my life in purity and to practice my profession faithfully. I will abstain from whatever is deleterions and mischievous, and will not take or knowingly achwiister any harmful drug. I will do all in my power to maintain and elevate the standard of my profession, and xoill hold in confidence all personal ynatters committed to my keeping and all family affairs coming to my knozvledge in the practice of my calling. With loyalty ivill I endeavor to aid the physician in his xcork, and devote myself to the welfare of those committed to my care. 211 Our Sponsors n, ;4 ..--c . ) M, ft. 3r ' el« Al i yoC Oe ' iy « TaclAah. 7? - , . - . ' ' . _r;W ' 4?-:: ?- Z ' „ Or. U-feTTAC ' L ' vnrre 7 y t 7 c:f?i« r -» ? ;7 r-. V7? A Theodore Kardash, M.p, ( ' M i y A Iriv.v M . Ha -o j crwt e ' }£z ji.t V 9; ' o- y A- L njULcJ (. -n «c4XX i C 7»t£tv. p g y • ' ' ' £; Myf7;Y, t zf. 7(Cw J . flu .%1 t ' iUi jai " ■M PQ z « - 6 Mfl Our Patrons Dr. Thomas G. Abbott Daniel J. Abramson Charles B. Adams, Jr.. M.D. John T. Alexander. M.D. Marie A. Andersch Lawrence F. Await. Sr. Leonard Bachman, M.D. Dr. and Mrs. Henry A. Baer Martha Baer Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Barchet ' 55 and ' 56 G. C. Beard. M.D. Alice Beegan D. F. Bennett, M.D. Annie Bestebreurtje, M.D. Joseph G. Bird. M.D. John M. Bloxam, IH, M.D. Bernard Botsch, M.D. Mary H. Branan Selig L. Brauer. M.D. Henry A. Briele, M.D. Warren D. Brill. M.D. Thomas J. Burkart. M.D. Annie A. Buzzell Harry Clifton Byrd F.A.Clark, M.D. Charles P. Clautice, M.D. Dr. and Mrs. R. L. Clemmons Harold O. Closson Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Cohen Herman Cohen, M.D. Robert F. Cooney. M.D. E. I. Cornbrooks. Jr.. ' 35 Dr. Raymond M. Cunningham. ' 39 Raymond R. Curanzy. M.D. Dr. Irvin M. Cushner. M.D. Mr. and Mrs. John Dietz Anthony F. DiPaula. M.D. Garland C. Dodson. Jr. Herman J. Dorf. M.D. George E. Dorman. M.D. Jacob L. Drcskin Dr. and Mrs. Dunkleburger Edna G. Dyar Daniel Ehrlich. M.D. F.A.Ellis. M.D. Anne C. Ermer William G. Esmond, M.D., ' 5 1 L. Fairnholt. M.D. Mr. Harry Feldmann Dr. and Mrs. R. L. Feldmann Mr. and Mrs. T. Fredrick Feldmann Dr. and Mrs. Frederick P. Freguson Dr. Jack Fine A. H. Finkelstein. M.D. William N. Fitzpatrick. M.D. A Friend Julia C.Foley, R.N. .B.S. E. G. Fouse Samuel L. Fox, M.D. Dr. Edward L. Frey, Jr. Dr. Earnest William Frey George R. Funkhouser James J. Gerlach, M.D. Dr. and Mrs. George T. Gilmore Frank H. J. Figge. Ph.D. Samuel Glazier Dr. and Mrs. Samuel S. Glick An Alumnus Julius Henry Goodman. M.D. Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Gettlieb T. Graff Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert C. Halle Mr. and Mrs. George O. Hansen. Jr. Mabel J. Coley Harmeyer, R.N. Dr. Fredrick R. Haase Johns. Haught. M.D. Richard C. Hayden H.B. Hendler. M.D. ThomasF. Herbert. M.D. Mark Hollander. M.D. Carol M.Hosfeld Irvin G. Hoyt. M.D. Virginia Huffer, M.D. Harry C.Hall Mrs. George J. Huntley Mr. and Mrs. Aaron J. Isaacs M. Margaret Jameson Dr. and Mrs. Wm. H. Kammer, Jr. Dr. Theodore Kardash Lauriston L. Keawn, M.D. JanisS. Kilmer Barnwell R. King Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Klatsky Schuyler G. Kohl Walter Kohn, M.D. Lawrence Kolh, ' 08 Howard T. Knoblock Dr. and Mrs. Sander E. Lachman Herbert Lapindy Dr. Raymond Lauer Arnold F. Lavenstein. M.D. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Layton Benjamin B. Lee, M.D. T. H. Legg, M.D.. ' 07 Norman Levin, M.D. Dr. Joseph Lipskey W. Lyons, M.D. William W. Magruder Annie L. McElhenie C.E.McWilliams, M.D. Freda H. Micholitch Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Miller Joseph Millett Bernard Milloff, M.D. Charles A. Minnefor, M.D. Dr. and Mrs. D. W. Mintyer Frances Conneely Montgomery, R.N. Hilda E. Moore Pauline M. Mower Dr. S. Edwin MuUer Harry M. Murdock, M.D. John A. Myers. M.D. Joseph Nataro. M.D. Alfred S. Norton Sidney Noverstus, M.D. JamesS. O ' Hare. M.D. Dr. and Mrs. Stephen K. Padussis Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G. Paul Dr. Salvador D. Pentecost Louis A. Perras, M.D. Dr. H. R. Petters Dr. Ross Z. Pierpont Maurice C. PincofFs WilliamR. Post, M.D. A. H. Raneaster, M.D. JulianW. Reed, M.D. Dr. Ralph G. Reed Guy M. Reeser, Jr., M.D. Sheldon Reynolds C.Martin Rhode, M.D. Paul F. Richardson, M.D. Arthur M. Rinehart, M.D. Ida Marian Robinson Mr. and Mrs. Ramon Roig Marie H. Rosiah Joseph Rottenberg, M.D. Mrs. Morris Rubin Fredrick E. Sabin, M.D. Harold Sage, M.D. R. Louis Saparito, M.D. A Friend Nathian Schnaper Jacob Schmukler, M.D. Dr. Herman Seidel Mr. and Mrs. Jack Serpick Dr. William B. Settle Abraham Shapiro Nostalgia and gradtitude M. R. Shear, M.D., ' 37 Dr. Robert C. Sheppard Solomon Sherman, M.D. Virginia Truitt Sherr, M.D. Irving J. Spear, M.D. Marquerite K. Squier, ' 35 James J. Stovin Mr. and Mrs. Reed Stump George W. Suwall John Tansey Irving J. Taylor, M.D. Irving Terman Robert T. Thibadeau. M.D. Congratulations and Best Wishes Samuel V. Tompakov. M.D. Frances J. Stanley Trembath Ethel M. Troy Dr. Edward B.Truitt, Jr. Albert L. Trucker. M.D. Jose ' G. Valderas, M.D. Frederick J. Vollmer, M.D. A.C. Walrup, M.D. Robert C.Walfz. M.D. Daniel I. Welliver Joan E. White Frances C. Wickham Dr. and Mrs. Milton J. Wilder Dr. P. R. Wilson Charles L. Wisseman, Jr., M.D. Wives of Class of 1 962 Kathryn S. Wohlsen AllenC. Wooden, M .D. John C. Woodland Jack H.Woodrow. M.D. Dr. and Mrs. Theodore E. Woodward Mr. and Mrs. Adolph W. Yates Norma C. Yeager Robert E.Yim, M.D. Nancy K. Young Dr. and Mrs. Joseph G. Zimring Charles Zurawski. M.D. Best Wishes to the Gmdiuites of 1959 STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION SCHOOL OF NURSING Best Wishes to the CLASS OF 1959 from the MEDICAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SHS ' i ' I Serving the medical profession for over a third of a century Equipment and Supplies for the HOSPITAL PHYSICIAN LABORATORY SURGEON INDUSTRY NURSE Competent experienced surgical Jitters in attendance Consultants on major types of Hospital Equipment iirra y aiimgartner SITRGK AK lASTUI MEXT CO.. INC. ESTABUISHED 1920 1421 MA RYLAND AVENUE . BALTIMORE 1, MD. SARATOGA V- " 7333 THE SETON INSTITUTE Baltimore 15, Maryland Hospital for the MENTALLY ILL DAVID M. NICHOLS CO. Realtors Appraisers Homes — Farms — Waterfronts Commercial 15. W. Franklin Street Lexington 9-6855 Agents for Kent Island Estates — Bay City Horborview — Romancoke — On-The-Bay Congratulations Graduates from Class of 1960 School of Nursing Compliment-s of A FRIEND THE MEDICAL CENTER DRUG COMPANY Serving the student ' s need BALTIMORE HARDWARE for Scissors and Tools KATHERINE MARTIN Greeting Cards — Gifts 601 W. Baltimore St. At Greene RELIABLE NURSES REGISTRY Licensed Bonded in State of Md. RUBY E. BOND— Director Female and Male Nurses R.N. ' s — Licensed Practlcais Practicals Hospitals and Homes HO. 7-7666 2210 Aiken Street UNIVERSITY RESTAURANT 5 S. Greene St. Sam Bob Lewis proprietors Open 24 hours a day Baltimore Instrument Co., Inc. 716-718 W. Redwood Street Baltimore 1, Maryland Sartorious Balances C. Zeiss and E. Leitz Microscopes Compliments of THE W. B. CASSELL CO. 1027 S. HOWARD ST. 6o fimore, Maryland First With The " Carriage " Trade The H. E. Koontz Creamery, Inc. 5600 Reisterstown Rd., Baltimore 15, Md. Phone Liberty 2-4300 Best Wishes to the Graduates of 1959 HUTZLER ' S ELIZABETH COONEY PERSONNEL AGENCY Town Country Service • Practical Nurses. Maternity and Convalescent Care • Baby Sitters Companions, Day and Evening Appointments • Supervisors, Week-ends and Vacations 1 11 D ,j D Ho. 7-8435 1511 Pentridge Road _ „ i-,-,o Tu. 9-4772 J. E. HEALY, Co. Inc. Nine West Chose Street SURGICAL APPLIANCES EMERSON HOTEL is the center of everyfhing in Baltimore WILLIAM E. STUBBS, JR. V ce-Pres. and General Manager HOFFMAN Surgical Supply Co., Inc. featuring SUPPLIES and EQUIPMENT for Doctors — Hospitals Institutions and Industrial Clinics TUxedo 9-5555 503 W. Cold Spring Lane AMPLE PARKING ESTATE PLANNING Special Plans For Members of the Medical and Dental Professions C. H. WEBSTER, M.D. ROBERT L. WEBSTER Represenlatives, New York Life Insuronce Company White Parl Place, Cayuga Heights Ithaca, New York Phone 9278 E.T.C. Inc. GLOBUS CAFETERIA 407 W, Baltimore St. " Meet to Eat " HOME COOKING Catering MU. 5-9870 RESINOL OINTMENT Contains: Mode in Baltimore i Resorcin, Oil of C ade, Prepared Calamine, Zinc Oxide, Bismuth Subnitrate Boric Acid combined in a lanolin-petrolaluin base to soothe and lubricate dry irritated skin. Famous for 60 years for its proni|)t, long-lasting relief for skin itching, burning and minor soreness. Prescribe freely. Prescribe, also, new RESINOL GRE.ASELE. ' S in tubes. Contains the same fine medications in a greaseless, washable, stainless base. Manufarmrcd Iiy RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY 517 W. Lombard St. — Opp. School of Medicine EAstern 7-3666 EAstern 7-4744 Compliments of PHARMACIES SINCE 18S3 NURSES UNIFORM COMPANY NURSES UNIFORMS SCHOOL UNIFORMS Made to Individual Measure — Perfect Fit ZIS HOPKINS ROSEMARIE 1822 E. Baltimore St., Baltimore 5, Maryland Best Wishes UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE 118 S. Eutow St. Medical Books Stationery Surgical Instruments ' Compliments of the Chairman of the Board of Regents " J. JENKINS SONS CO. INC. — OFFICIAL MANUFACTURERS — OF SCHOOL OF NURSING RINGS 2601 W. Lexington Street Wifh the compliments of Hynson, Westcotf Dunning, Inc. Gifts wifh U. of M. Seals Buckles, CufF links. Tie bars. Bracelets, R. N. Jewelry Officio U. of Md. Rings TROCKENBROTS 310 N. Poca St. Mu. 5-1052 PI. 2-8387 The following pharmaceutical representatives extend their best wishes TOM WRIGHT ELI LILLY AND COMPANY 7818 Ballston Read Ruxton 4, Maryland Phone: Valley 3-7354 JOHN G. BRINGENBERG C. R. SQUIBB SON 66 Dungarrie Road Baltimore 28, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND NURSES ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OBSTETRICAL— GYNECOLOGICAL Ortho PHARMACEUTICALS AND BIOLOGICALS For the Medical Profession ORTHO PHARMACEUTICAL CORPORATION. RARITAN. NEW JERSEY S.K.F. Medical Color TV. . . an aid to postgraduate medical education If all the programs presented on S.K.F. Medical Color Television could be assembled in one book, you would have at your finger tips the collective experience, in almost every field of medicine, of many of the world ' s most eminent physicians. The continuing aim of S.K.F. Medical Color Television is to make available its facilities and technical skills to these physicians so that they can present to you, at medical meet- ings, the latest in medicine and surgery. Before the end of our next decade in this medium, we hope that you will appear not only in the audience . . . but also in front of our cameras. SMITH KLINE FRENCH LABORATORIES About Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . The text has been set in Linotype Times Roman witli display lieads in Monotype Times Roman. The paper is Lustro Gloss mcmujactured by tlie s. D. warren company () Boston. THE GARAMOND PRESS BALTIMORE • 1959 «5 ' -.f '


Suggestions in the University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) collection:

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

1956

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

1957

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

1958

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

1960

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

1961

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

1962

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