University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD)

 - Class of 1958

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 212 of the 1958 volume:

■ " • c.T-.vJ;- y • •••» ... •• :?; TERRAE MARIAE MEDICUS ••. J.. » •• V •••• f ' • UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL NURSING Editor-in-chrej .... Business Manager Photography Editor Copy Editor Si ' uior Editor Elliott M. Berg Robert E. Cranley, Jr. .. Frank K.Kriz, jr. Daniel M. Levin Maurice Reeder =71 special Features Arthur Litofsky Niirsei ' Editor Anne Robin Maurice C. Pincoi-is, b.s., m.u. IN DEDICATION ' THE MAURICE C.PINCOFFS LECTURESHIP IN MEDICINE S7 JoamESMAMu. 11 W58 19S9 1%1 1962 19M 1965 »S 19b7 1968 • is 1971 1974 1977 1979 1980 To recite the life history of Dr. Pincoffs is to recite the history of medicine for the past fifty years. To hst his contributions to medi- cine is to recognize the remarkable advances of modern medical science. To recall his unceasing efforts on behalf of his beloved school and hospital is to hear the thanks of a devoted staff of disciples in a great modern institution. To honor his code of ethics and his devotion to humanity is to echo the Oath of Hippocrates a thousand times over. And to appreciate his visions of the years that lie ahead is to roll into one, the fondest dreams of all of us. We, the Class of 1958, feel proud to be " graduating " along with Dr. Maurice C. Pincoffs. His counsel and his inspiration will be missed by all. With one final " Thank You, " we wish a rewarding retirement to a true teacher and a loyal friend. Alice Messinger Band, b.a,, m.d. 1926—1957 In the constant struggle between life and death with which we come face to face each day, the loss of a particular friend often rep- resents a personal tragedy. And so it was with each of us with the death of Dr. Alice Band on June 9, 19 ' 57, at the age of thirty-one. An asset to the Department of Clinical Pathology and to the entire School of Medi- cine, she, more than anyone, personified the golden promise of the future to which all of us in medicine look so eagerly. As a tangible tribute to her memory, her many friends and colleagues have established the Alice Messinger Band Memorial Fund, to sponsor an annual lectureship here at the University by eminent authorities in the field of hematology and to enrich our library ' s col- lection of books in this subject. In no better way could her search for truth and knowledge be perpetuated. IN MEMORIAM In these times of selfish indulgence, to know and to count as one ' s friend, a true humani- tarian, is indeed a blessing. And truly, this is the feeling of all of us who have known Dr. Henry F. Ullrich, Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, who passed away on March 21, 1958, at the age of fifty-four. We who have been his teachers, his students, his co-workers, and his friends, shall remember and honor always his skill in the operating room as well as his benevolence at the bed- side. In his memory, his many friends have established the Henry F. Ullrich Educational Fund, the proceeds of which will go to the University, but, thus far, are undetermined as to their exact use. The life of Dr. Ullrich represented to us the kind of doctor each of us would like to be, and to his patients their idea of a doctor devoutly devoted to his profession. Henry Franz Ullrich, m.d., sc.d. 1903—1958 xr-v !» •%.. Administration Theodore R. McKeldin Governor. Stale of Aiaryliind To the Seniors, Schools of Medicine and Nursing: I am honored with the opportunity to greet you as you approach the close of your scholastic preparation for the years of work that lie ahead in tending to the needs of humanity, assisting in the curing of the ill, the easing of suffering and the progress of knowledge for a better, healthier world. Yours will be a life of unending study, for it is obvious even to the layman that the medical and related professions are on the verge of vast new discoveries that will be far more signifi- cant than the greatest rocket or spaceship that the human mind ever will devise. The faith that is vested in you and your manificent professions by your fellow citizens should be a great source of satisfaction to you and a real inspiration tor the tasks that await you. You have my best wishes for hapjiiness and jirogress in the remainder of this school year, in the years of your internships and in the future practice of your arts. Sincerely, z: } . x yt Governor Wilson H. Ei.kins, b.a., m.a., litt.b., ph.d. President, University nf Maryland To the Senior Classes of the Schools of Medicine and Nursing: I extend warm greetings and heartfelt good wishes to each member of the Senior Classes of Medicine and Nursing. The University of Maryland is proud to have played the final, formative role in developing your capabilities for a successful career. Soon, each of you will become an independent pro- fessional force for good in a world society that awaits the imprint you will make upon it. As you unfold the pattern of your personal and professional lives, you are our envoys among the people of the nation. We look forward to the honor which your achievement will bring to you and to your University. Sincerely, President William S. Stone, M.S., M.I)., D.SC. Director. Medical Education urid Research, and Dean Greetings and best wishes to the chiss of 1958: During the time you have been in Medical School you have iiad the opportunity to witness many changes. These have involved not only the Medical School, but medicine as a whole and the total Ikkls of science. The exploration of space and interplanetary travel are now definite possibilities. All these happenings are a challenge to all physicians to explore new frontiers of knowledge, as well as to slioulder the daily responsibilities of guarding and pre- se rving the health of mankind. Sincerely, Dean 10 Dietrich C. Smith, b.a., ma., ph.d. Associate Dean, Ad?ninions and Student Affairs Professor of Physiology Robert T. Parker, a.b., m.d. Associate Dean, Curriculum Assistant Professor of Medicine 11 ■y .id?%S» . I ► Scalpels Scopes Studies First rou: Henck, Friedman, Ortel, Urban, Waters, Sarles, Wisotzkey, Tilley, McCarter, Oster. Second row: Cerda, Mahoney, Roland, Faw, Hochman Whorton, Vann, Webb, Langeluttig, Leventhal, Litrenta, Krome. Third row: Bolger, Arbegast, Rasmussen, Riter, Heymann, Fall, Ottenritter, Ludicke, Small, Pazourek, Myerburg, Marsh, Mehl. Freshman Class OFFICERS John Light, PresiJem William Law, Vice President Richard Holz, Secretary Anthony Young, Treasurer William Fleming, Honor Council Representative Zack WatI ' KS, Tuo Year Student Council Represenlaliie Robert FIeyman, One Year Student Council Representative HISTORY This is the first admission for this 20-22 yr. old class born Sept. 12, 1957, admitted with a chief complaint of insomnia and delusions of grandeur. PRiiSHNT illness: Acute onset coincident with arrival of letter of acceptance. Quickening of the pulse and shortness of breath. Incontinence of bladder and bowels for a short time with no recur- rence. Gradual appearance of spots before eyes and inability to focus eyes without use of fine adjustment or oil immersion. Insidious onset of small nicks and cuts on ends of fin- gers and change of sense of smell of clothes and hands noticed by all observers. Self- medicated with alcohol 2 pints on weekends with no relief. Fading of suntan and acquisi- tion of sallow color to skin with beginnings of greenish tinge starting at angle of jaw. Functional anorexia manifested by loss of normal eating habits and onset of insatiable tiesire for shrimp salad, ham salad, cheese .md tomato sandwiches, cheeseburgers, ham- burgers and pizza. Somnolence during one o ' clock lecture not relieved by unbelievable coffee intake. Loss of rapid recall ability. 14 " iA ' W.--.li««!l First row: Goodman, Kronthal, Bing, Mciimu, H. iim, llntkiu. Busclmi.ui, Xiiuk. (il.is , MlCicov. liKiwcll .Sim. ,, row: Fink, Lankford, Shillaci, Brouillette, Gutherlet, Berkow, Appleton, Fleming, Hutzler, Light, Cain, Young. Third row: Sonn, Law, Holz, Morreels, Farrish, Headings, Forbes, Fuchs, Presser, Diacoyanis, Ensor. Inability to distinguish artery from vein or to find thoracic duct. Compulsive desire to learn only one half the human body. PAST history: Spoon-fed since birth with inability to retain feedings. Occasional injections of Vitamin F per rec- tum. Operations: Cortical stenostomy with no improvement. Dilation of rectal stricture. Illnesses: Paroxysmal epidemic spasticity spreading like wild-fire before mid-terms and finals and sensitized by sophomores. Depres- sive episodes relieved by weekends. Immu- nized against sleep, recreation, fresh air, sport clothes. Development: Talked at 2 mos., talked with sense at 4 mos. Stopped staring at 5 mos. Learned to use hands with dexter- ity at 6 mos. Walked without instructor at 7 mos. Smiled at 8 mos. Saw sunlight at 9 mos. Began to enjoy life at 10 mos. Said " at last I am a sophomore " at 1 yr. Habits: Likes to wear extremely dirty, smelly long white coat, plays with bones, breaks histology slides, gets along well with others in same boat, sleeps sitting up. Obsession to buy books and instruments. Environment: Lives with 100 similar animals, usually in same room. DIAGNOSIS: 1. Nervous reaction, manifested by extreme bewilderment and confusion. 2. Chronic passive congestion of cerebral cortex. 3. Atrophy of disuse of the muscles of self- expression. TREATMENT: 1. Burn smelly white coats. 2. Summer of pleasure. 3. Eye exercises — focusing on opposite sex. prognosis: Graduation — at best. referral: To Sophomore Class. 15 ANATOMY Frank H. J. Figge, a.b., ph.d. Professor of Anatomy and Head of the Department (nmfiletely cifitippal with technicolor, Todd AO. cind lc ' rcoplM))iic miiduI. " Two hundred fifty-six hours of gross anat- omy is simply not enough time. " No, you ' re wrong! That is not a freshman student talk- ing; those are the words of Dr. Frank Figge. Nevertheless, all students will agree that this is either about five hundred hours to little or else two hundred fifty-six hours too much. But no matter the time, we still managed to cram into our craniums (cranii) tiic seemingly infinite details of human hones, muscles, nerves, vessels, organs, and fascia. With the aid of Drs. Uhlcnhuth, Krahl, Mech, McCafTerty, and the rest of the staff, we maneuvered our way past the informal table quizzes ami the majt)r exams, which we imagined to be as awesome and frightening as any human ordeal possibly could be. Strange as it may seem, the department also finds rime to tlelve into and dissect other problems: — the dynamics of amniotic lluid; the development of the mammalian lung; tiic influence of obesity on the liver; porphyrin y 7 " This little piggy went to market, this little piggy stayed home ... " " This, gentlemen, is malnutrition " . metabolism; constitional diseases of mice; and other equally varied and unanswered questions. What can the student of tomorrow expect — more anatomy or less anatomy? Well, chances are he will get more, for " the future of medicine lies in bringing the basic sci- ences and clinical medicine closer together. " " And a biopsy was taken. " HISTOLOGY AND NEUROANATOMY WaLLH J. H. NAUTA, M.D,, PH.D. Professor of Anatomy " Here we see a fecalilh in the Circle of Willis. " A most stimulating and provocative part of our learning career was the microscopic dis- section of the human anatomy, including the nervous system structure. More concerned with the effort to teach dynamic concepts rather than static slide specimens, Drs. Nauta, Nice talk for a doctor! Mack, and staff use every learning aid avail- able towards this end. A senior ' s memories of these courses tends to become rather hazy, but as he thinks back. " I ' ll find the lost " cord " if it takes all year, ' certain images return — the unending slide boxes; the naps as the lights went out; the philosophical discussions; the formaldehyde fumes; and the upside-down backward movies. Unlike the senior student however, the de- partment is looking, not backwards, but ahead. An electron microscope has recently been purchased and is in the process of being installed. Investigations into the non-myeli- nated fiber tracts of the nervous system; neurosecretions of the hypothalamus; and the relationships of the rhinencephalon (wher- ever that is! ) to the hypothalamus are exam- ples of the behind-the-scenes actitivies of the department. " Gee! I shot Id hat e gone to barker college: ' BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY Emil G. Schmidt, b.s., m.s., ph.d. Professor of Biological Chemistry and Head of the Department. With a well-earned and well-recognized repu- tation for streamlined and efficient organiza- tion, this department can be proud of its role " And he thought that the eighth essential amino- acid was called gasoline. " in our medical training. Guided by the sure hand of Dr. Emil Schmidt, we were presented the mass of knowledge that has been accum- ulated in the fields of metabolism, endocri- nology, physical chemistry, and other related factors that make us " tick. " And as we look back, we can be nothing but appreciative of how useful this material has been, and, strange, to say, just how much of it we have managed to retain. But never let it be said that the depart- ment is content to rest on this reputation. Building and remodeling and planning are a part of the daily routine. Gone is the old weighing room; newly installed are a labora- tory for the handling of radioactive isotopes and a room for studies in metabolism. Activ- ities are to be expanded so as to include the now popular combined IVI.D.-Ph.D. program. Nor are the members of the " Bio " team neglecting their test tubes. Investigation is being conducted along many lines: — the ef- fects of the sex hormones on the secondary sex tissues; the manner in wliicli genetic in- formation is transmitted throughout the species; the role of amines in the synthesis of nucleic acids; the effect of antibit)tics on the metabolism of the intestinal flora; and similar problems, all of which will make the doctor of tomorrow a better doctor. " you listen closely, you ' ll hear Hong Kong. " " And the directions say even a baby can do this. " " What a funny way to make chicken soup! " i w Eilir 21 P H ' S I O L O G Y William R. Amiilrson, filiv, i ' h.d. Professor of Physiology ami Head of the Department Physiology, from the French word phys ' iolo- gia, is a combination of pbysis, nature, plus logos, discourse, that is, a discourse or study of nature. However, as exemplified by the Department of Physiology, it also has come to mean a combination of gentlemanly humanity and dignity, and a lesson in learn- ing without pressure. Drs. Amberson, Smith am! colleagues have always respected and acknowledged our maturity and our initia- " This is jine. but yon forf ot the muscle. " tive, and for this we can be nothing but grateful. If things seemed sort of quiet on the fourth floor of the Bressler Building for a while this past year, blame it on the fact that the " chief " was on sabbatical leave until January of this year, conducting research and writing a new college text book. The quiet was deceiving, however, for, in addition to continuing their teaching, the remainder of the staff was busy investigating the basic contractile mechanism in muscle and the physiological effects of simulated high altitudes, both projects sup- ported by N.I.H. grants. With the return of Dr. Amberson ' s force- ful leadership, the Department is looking eagerly to the future, bemoaning only the sad fact that the young scientist is not turning in sufficient numbers to the fascinating field of physiology. Smokers who knoiv now smoke the big " O. " " Hm! Maybe the batteries are decui. " ■ ■--—■-. .T . , . ..■! . ■ »•,■ ' ■ - ' 7-- • " . - --w •-»« ■ i -.- ::.«■-■ i. ' .ri Jlil H-- First row: Rosen, Simor, Stofberg, Cederblom, D. Young, Hooper, Figueroa, Fellner, Saville, La Mastra, Tritch, Lott. Second row: Brecher, Cheeks, Await, Berger, Silverstein, Stauffer, L. Young, Sigman, Ross, Honick, Standiford, Cooke, Sarni, C. P. Smith, Toulan. Third row: Devenport, Armstrong, Bennett, Henning, Clark, Meyer, Oldstone, Leaken, Hill, Ferciot. Sophomore Class OFFICERS David Rosen, President Paul DbVorr, Vice President Lois Young, Secretary Thomas Ferciot, Treasurer Francis Clark, Jr., Honor Council Representative HhrbhrT James, Tuo Year Student Council Representative Maurice Davidson, One Year Student Council Representative PHYSICAL EXAMINATION GENERAL APPEARANCE: This is a debili- tated, poorly nour- ished class in obvious mental distress. It is uncooperative and mentally asleep. Slurred, drunken speech. Cringes when approached by instructor. Temp. Oral 102, Rectal 95. Pulse I iO and Irregular. Respirations 1. SKIN: Sallow. Poor tissue turgor. Exfoliat- ing in sheets from lack of Vitamin D. head: Grayish, balding, disheveled hair. In need of shave. Unable to smile. Dif- fuse scars and hematomas over heatl from banging it against wall. EYES: Unable to see past nose. Internal strabismus with rotary nystagmus from writing in darkened classroom. React to darkness by closing. Conjunctivae red and inflamed from sleep loss. Tear constantly from formalin. Retina detached. Atrophic nerve head. ears: Unable to liear without microphone. External ears pined back. Canals scle- rosed. Drums white and .scarred. 24 Virst row: Zanker, BljiulIi. Alu .:.itos, DeVore, KesmoJd. j.diks, M. Smith, Robinson, Km,-, I.Lsk , Kmi .i.. i Second row: Stram, Myers, Glass, Yates, Heefner, Keyset, Anderson, Saunders, Lavy, Morton, Jenkins, Brenner, Nor- manly, Davidson. Third row: Saxberg, Huffington, Kurad, Crahan, Farley, Hermann, Wallace, Rogers, Messina, Vokzalc, Goldstein, Mills, Zalis. nose: Honed to fine edge from application to grindstone. Atrophy of mucosa. Lost sense of smell. MOUTH AND THROAT: Lips tremulous. Ton- gue tied. Throat horse and red from barking up wrong trees. NECK: Constant pain present. Stiff and im- mobile. Trachea choked off. chest: Depressed. Shoulders sagging from heavy load being carried. Multiple stab wounds present in back. lungs: Unable to breathe any but hot air. Deep sighing with thoughts of bet- ter days to come. No breath sounds heard. Percussion note of solid rock. heart: In throat most of time. Beating at times. Bleeding at other times. Constant low murmuring of mental aches and pains. abdomen: Hyperactive bowel. Large silver screw through navel. Weak kid- neys. Liver fried with onions. genitalia: Constricted. rectal: Broom handle protruding. extremities: Asleep. neurological: None to speak of. No muscle strength or tone. Staggering gait. Tremor of whole body at rest. Sensorium completely clouded. Nega- tive brain biopsy. Sensation dulled to any but the most painful stimuli. Microscopic exami- nation of serial sections of brain shows com- plete absence of neurones. impressions Functional spastic sophomore. 25 M I C: R O B I O L O G Y Charles L. Wisseman, Jr., B.A., M.S., M.D. Professor of Microbiology ami Head of the Department Put some salt on bis tail. " It is our purpose and the philosophy of this department to present subject material most useful to the practicing physician and, in these times, most vital to the national de- fense. " This statement represents the driving force behind one of the more dynamic groups in our university. Those who studied this course not too many years ago would hardly recognize it as taught today. True, the bugs and bacteria have remained the same, but emphasis has changed and will continue to change as more and better drugs are discovered and as new facts emerge from the laboratory and from the bed-side. " Bac-T " has doubled its floor space, particularly in the Bressler Building, in tile past 2 years; has expanded its research program ami facilities; has actively encour- ragcd student summer-fellowships; and has now reached a position in whicii it can take on graduate students. Behind tiie maze of animal cages and in- cubator rooms, a wealth of active research is p roceeding steadily forward — arthrojiod- borne viruses and their immunization sched- ules; basic studies in rickettsiae and tulare- mia; viral and rickettsial metabolism; aspects of bacterial cytology and mycology; physio- Darn it. Betty, why did yon look at the camera? " Who ivants to see a real close up of Sophia LorenP " " This is ivhy yon should wash your hands after- wards. " logical actions of microbial toxins and mecha- nisms of anaphylaxis and shock; and others, all supported by liberal public and private grants. Beginning July 1 of this year, the Depart- ment will be increased by the addition of Dr. Myer from the University of Kansas, who will devote much of his time to microbial metabolism. The future of the Department of Microbiology is typical of the golden future of medicine in general. PATHOLOGY HAKLAN 1. FERMINGER, A.B., M.l). Professor of Patholof;) and Hcai of the Dc-piirtnieiil With the coming of Dr. Firminger as head of the Department; Dr. Frost, as chief of the Division of Cytology; and Dr. Schultz, as assistant professor, the Department of Pathol- ogy typifies the new trend in our school, that is, the effort to bring in younger men with fresher ideas. One of the first changes made was to change to small group teaching with the liberal use of case presentations, so as to best correlate clinical and pathological processes. This has been extended to include surgical pathology conferences during the senior year. In spite of being among the busiest men in our institution, members of the department have still found time for investigative work. Dr. Wagner, in addition to continuing his " And the baby bear said, " Who has been eating my porridge? " work on cerebellar lesions, set up an exhibit at the AMA meeting in San Francisco on cerebrovascular accidents. In conjunction with the Department of Surgery, a study is being conducted on the evaluation of several chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of carcinomas of the breast, colon, and stomach. Future plans include the setting up of a laboratory for the study of biochemical and histochemical aspects of lesions, so that we may get correlation between clinical, patho- logical, and chemical processes. This is the stuff from which progress grows! " Oh! No wonder! Tli s r t ic rcmng slide. " " And lie ivas only a social drinker. " John A. Wagner, b.s., m.d. Professor of Neuropathology and Head, Division of Neuropathology ' Here ' s a good spot on l?is neck to tide! ' 29 PHARMACOLOGY John C. Krantz, Jr., b.s., m.s., ph.d. frojessor of Pharmacology and Heail of the Department One of the sharpest arrows in the quiver of our school for many years has been the de- partment headed by Dr. John C. Krantz, Jr. Combining dramatics, history, philosophy, and comedy with clinical truisms, laboratory observations, and good old common sense, the department attempted to impress us with the importance of the knowledge of the effect of drugs on the organism known as man. Recognized throughout the country for its " Doesn ' t be see that yet? " " Foiirscnre and seven years af o . . . " contributions in the field of anesthetics, the department is enthusiastic about a new line of investigation. Indoklon and Fluoromar, two well known agents which have recently come out of the Bressler laboratories, have essentially the same chemical structure; how- ever, one is a cerebral stimulant while the other is a depressant. It is hoped that with these compounds, so similar in structure and yet so different in action, all of the enzyme systems in the nervous system can be studied. Ever seeking new methods to add to its " armamentarium " for stimulating the stu- dent, the staff is planning to extend its " tea- parties " by inviting G.P. ' s to attend and relate their experiences and ask questions; " After all, 95 % of the students will be doing gen- eral practice. " A new edition of the popular textbook has recently been released and is another example of the vitality of the Depart- ment of Pharmacology. " Why do they bother to give iiic these dr igs? After 75 times I know how to convulse correctly. " " Who cares whether they ' re male or female? It only matters to .vmthcr monkey! ' CLINICAL PATHOLOGY Milton S. Sachs, b.s., m.d. Professor of Clinical Medicine ami Head, Division of Clinical Pathology Today ' s physician, it is said, has become a laboratory, rather than a bedside diagnos- tician. Certainly the more than 500,000 tests performed each year by Dr. Sachs ' depart- ment, in addition to the seemingly infinite- number carried out in the student labs, will attest to this statement. For this reason our study of clinical pathology is a most vital and rewarding experience. A large part of our career in clinical " A little dab ' II do ya. " " This next question will really ruin the curve! ' pathology is occupied with the study of the blood and its disorders, of which surely, there is no more mysterious or fascinating field in all of medicine. Appreciating this. Dr. Sachs and his staff are actively engaged in investi- gations into these areas. The most interesting of these is the study of erythropoeitin, a new humoral agent, which appears to maintain, in some way, the balance between red cell production and destruction. Other subjects of research include: — the use of new drugs in leukemias and lymphomata; the employment of radioactive isotopes in hematologic prob- lems; vitamin Bii; metabolism in leukemia; erythroblastosis due to ABO incombatibili- ties; and vascular hemophilia. Remember the answer we received when we inquired about the best book for the course? " There ' s really no satisfactory text available. " Well, before long there may be one available, since future plans of the de- partment include the preparing of a book on clinical laboratory diagnosis. " And reinetnber feces are a Physician ' s best friend. ' ' " Count the cells, add them up, multiply by years in med-school. divide by age. Result equals date of graduation. " SURGICAL ANATOMY Otto C. Brantigan, b.s., m.d. Professor of Clinical Surgery " This is where hemorrhoids come from. " The step from the cold inanimate anatomy of our freshman year to the delicate incisions, taps, and " centeses " of our clinical years is a giant one, indeed. To Dr. Brantigan and his staff has fallen the responsibility for assisting us in making this transition. And no one of us can say that it has been anything but a job well done. Nor do we take away from the course only vague memories of anatomy. Clear still are the lectures when the professor was finished five minutes before the students; the awe- some table quizzes; and the never-quite-right crayon marks. Again, one final echo of thanks to these bus ' but unsellish practitioners! ' Why don ' t I get any blood back? " " Of course it ' s easier when they can tell you if it hurts. " . - f W " cv-- •V V. f Patients Periodicals Prescriptions y y m First row: Russo, Morales, Mercer, Kirsh, Mainolfi, Mower, Holt, Hanauer, Asrael, Ances, Serpick, Durkan, Varner. Second and third rous: Sax, Roig, Koukoulas, Reda, Trotter, Schroeder, Halle, Gardner, Brown, Fletcher, Darr, Ruben- stein, Cadden, Economon, Coursey, Dawson, Felsenberg, Cole, Rybczwinski, Green. Junior Class OFFICERS William Falls, President Milton Cole, Vice President J. Patrick JarbOE, Secretary Georce Tro ' ITER, Treasurer Joseph Nataro, Honor Council Representative William Dunseath, Two Year Student Council Representative Jack Lewis, One Year Student Council Representative MENTAL STATUS GENERAL APPEARANCE Obsessively wears AND BEHAVIOR: white trousers and jackets, which are spattered with blood and urine and are ill-kempt but, nevertheless, white. Walks with a definite list to the right, caused by stethoscope, ophthalmoscope, sphymoman- ometer, hemocytometer, and small black loose-leaf note-book jam-packed into jacket pocket which is futileiy offset by week-old kincli in ieh pocket. Heels on blood-spat- tered white shoes are worn ilowii and shoe- laces, oftimes broken, are knotted again and again. Face has blank expression with star- ing, unblinking eyes, jaws open, tongue drooping and quickly acquires a learned, knowing expression when spoken to or ques- tioned. Arms are usually laden with waste- basket used to glean pearls as they are drop- ped. Huge black circles under eyes, and tremor of every muscle of body due to ex- treme fatigue and spasticity. Has profound knack of disappearing when needed the most. Has compulsion for doing white counts and differentials and cannot rest until at least 20 urinalyses per day are done. ACTIVITY: At times manicky, running from cafeteria to student lounge to car to home. But mostly depressed, speaking in a low slow voice, reluctant to acquire new patients. Sleeping in conferences, and being unable to sleep at night, does lab wiirk, or works up patients, or delivers babies, or just 38 First row: J. Lewis, Rhea, Jasion, Isaacs, Abramson, DeMarco, Ingham, Adler, Shields, Broccoli, Courts, Falls. Second and third rous: Kleinman, Irwin, D. Lewis, Wilhelmsen, Natale, Schocket, Ashburn, King, Feinberg, Cohen, Farley, Dunseath, James, Jones, McWilliams, Snyder, Pereyo, Jarboe, Lang, Stump, Just. reads. Becomes frozen as a catatonic when suddenly asked to present a case. Can listen to a heart intently for hours and hears noth- ing. Has an automatic type of obedience try- ing to mimic the deeds and words of superiors and an undying faith that their every word is gospel. STREAM OF TALK: Use of abbreviations ad nauseum: L.P., B.O.A., L.M.D., L.M.P., L.L.Q., WDWNWM, p.r.n., P.I.D., TBC, H.B.P., etc. Impresses self and others with medical talk. Speaks only medi- cine. ( Never heard of sputnik, Mickey Cohn, Wyatt Earp, Mickey Mantle, Brigitte Bar- dot.) Talks of rare cases, common cases, funny names, post mortems of exams, what the professor knows, what he doesn ' t know, how great I am. A ceaseless tirade of medical talk, talk, talk, and more talk until girl- friends, wives, lovers, friends, enemies, teachers, parents get tired of listening. MOOD: Spirits vary from depression — 80%, to elation — 10%, to alcohol — 100 proof. Mood varies directly with weather and inversely with amount of sleep. content: 99.9% is griping. Gripes about hospital food, amount of reading, lab work, getting pushed around, negative findings, positive STS, patch tests, parking space, late hours, little sleep, rounds, books to buy, getting called at 1 1 P.M., you name it; he will gripe about it. Has delusions of gran- deur. Wishes to be senior. Persecution complex. INTELLECTUAL FUNCTIONS: Memory of facts learned the night before impaired. Will confabulate white count results and physical findings. For- gets conveniently. At times cannot remember own name, date, or time. Is aware he is a medical student but at times forgets why he is and where he is going. But he eventually looks up to find himself a senior, and then all is well. Only one year to M.D. Begins to see the forest for the trees. impression: You figure it out. TREATMENT: T. L. C. prognosis: Bigger and better things. 39 MEDICINE Theodore E. Woodward, B.S., M.D., D.SC. Professor of Medicine and Head of the Department The methods for the teaching of medicine changed radically in 1952 when the student was taken out of the classroom and put into the hospital — the principle of small-group teaching. There are two keys to this method of instruction: adequate facilities and an in- terested faculty. In both of these, the Depart- ment of Medicine abounds. Our association with the medical depart- ment began with the physical diagnosis course in the sophomore year; Percussing each other; the awesome-looking stethotron; memorizing the ROS ( " But sir, do we have to put down all the negatives too? " ) — such were the experiences of an embryo internist. Then in the next year, we were turned loose " Sounds like Ravel ' s Bolero. ' trlDKGE ENTWISLE, B.S., M.D. Oul Patient Department Leonard Scherlis. b.a., m.d. Cardiology Henry J. L. Marriott, B.A., M.A., B.M., B.CH. Physical Diagnosis " Here ' s one named Dolly Aladison. " on the wards. That first case presentation; " who ' s up for the next patient? " ; when in doubt, call it a collagen disease — we were starting to get the hang of this medicine game. Finally, in our last year, our practice covered both the wards and the clinics. It seems that everyone has HCVD; " There ' s a split Ml, an early soft blowing diastolic mur- mur, and a protodiastolic gallop " ; " I ' ve never seen so many crocks in my life " — by now, we felt we kn ew twice as much as any visit- ing man that came around. " you never remember anything else, don ' t forget Ewart ' s sign! " pi» V I Charles Van Buskirk, b.a., m.s., ph.d.,m.d., m.s. Heurology " ! ' » brciikiiig in a new ban mer, my old one had a hlnivoiit. " " I can ' t understand it, I ' ve never missed one before. " The Department is not yet satisfied that its program is adequate or ideal. In the years to come, there will be greater stress placed upon the social aspects of medicine and upon rehabilitation. It would like to see a broader continuity of curriculum, so that a student could follow his patient through all of the specialties of medicine and really see his patient as a " whole " . But, it is quick to point out that, " The curriculum and research and plans are no better than the team, and the team is no better than the individual student. " " B ii Doctor. I can ' t breathe. ' " Oh. I think 200 cc. will be enough. " " And the heart pumps 2,571,240,65816 times in a life span. " " And this much cbloro always does the job. ' ' " I ' m not talking while the flavor lasts. " SURGERY ' RoiiiiKT W. Buxton, a.b., m.d., m.s. Professor of Surgery and HeaJ of the Department Under the leadership of Dr. Robert Buxton, the Surgical services have developed into a solid smooth-running organization, eager to teach and highly capable of doing so. There has been a fundamental change in the basic philosophy of the department, in that the division heads, in the majority, now work and instruct on a full-time basis. Since our first contact, we have been amazed at the complexities and the vastness of surgical problems; how wrong was our first impression of surgery involving simply cut- ting and sewing and bandaging. Fluid and electrolyte balance; pre - and - post - operative care; the prevention of infection and compli- cations — these are the things which make the good surgeon stand apart from the butcher and the blood-letter. Have scalpel, will cut. Edwin H. Stf.wart, Jr., m.d. Oiil Palieiit Department h " When ' s he going to let me look- ' " Cyrus L. Blanchard, B.A., M.D. Otolaryngology i HH " " ' 1 1 Bi -i ' [fl Jl Jl!i; H ' . V 1 al HBiF 1 i V r " I friend did it. " Our reminiscences of surgery are as long as the rolls of bandage we used up. Dr. Hull ' s helpful hints; the education in sociology on a Saturday night in the " pit " ; the feeling of " The children are normal, your tonsils are had. mother. " John D. Young, b.a., m.d. Urnlogy " So thill ' s what It looks like inside! ' " No. you can ' t go home until tomorrow. " And this irax constructed by U.S. Steel and Kaiser Alu?nivum. " George H. Yeager, b.s., m.d. Projessor of Clinical Surgery Allen I-. ' oshlll, u.a., m.u. Orthopedic Surgery " Knit one, pearl two. " " Let ' s hmry. Vm late for my scr h. " being treated like a " real doctor " at Mercy; the 7:30 scrubs for the vital job of holding retractors; our 12th floor home; the infiltrat- ing fluids at 3:30 in the morning; is it PID or appendicitis? " But I just changed the Foley 3 weeks ago! " Likewise, to recite all of the research proj- ects now under way would not be possible. We may cite as examples — differential renal studies using radioactive dye clearance meas- urements; work on a blood oxygenator dialy- sis device; the origin and eff ect of ammonia in shock; and the mechanism of wound- healing. While, as is obvious, much progress has already been made, the Department feels that it will fluorish most aboundantly when all of its teaching can be accommodated under one roof without having to make use of other institutions. . •, " V hy can ' t you hold onto three retractors? " James G. Arnold, Jr., b.a., m.d. Neurological Surgery " How can I tell with ?ny eyes closed- ' " PEDIATRICS J. Edmund Bradley, b.s., m.d. Professor of Pediatrics ami Head of the Deparlmciil " Pediatrics " is a word of Greek derivation and means " child cure. " However, as prac- ticed at our hospital, it has come to mean " child care " , since the department attempts to teach awareness of the precious role of the child in our society and the responsibility of the medical profession in safeguarding the " Gee! So yniing to have cirrhosis. 48 physical, emotional, and mental health of the child as well as to recognize and to treat the acute illness in the child. It is for this reason that we are taken through the intricacies of formula-calcula- tions and that we spend so much time in the clinic and in the accident room, for it is in these places that " care " is more essential than " cure " . And it is also for this reason that the Child Guidance Clinic, which studies the common emotional problems of children, is such an integral part of Dr. Bradley ' s de- partment. Even the numerous research proj- ects bear this theme out — the mechanisms of lead intoxication; the effectiveness of various experimental drugs in the control of seizures; and studies of the anemias of chronic infec- tion to name just a few. " Hey Doc! That thing ' s cold! " ' ' Oh ivell! My lab coat needs ivashinf anyway! ' 49 " Take a deep breath atid hold it. " To extend this concept to the future, the Department feels that there is the need for a complete center for child care to educate and train adequately those who will provide serv- ice and care for an ever-increasing child population. " No, my name is not Abie Cohen! " ' Where ' s the patient? OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Arthur L. Haskins, a.b., m.d. Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Head of the Department No department in our school has made more progress in the past several years nor has such elaborate plans for the future as does the OB-GYN service. Under the direction of Dr. Arthur L. Haskins, it has come to be one of the more instructive and practical specialties Belly High may call yon . . in our tour of duty. The early-morning deliveries; the middle- of-the-night blood pressures; the unending specimen bottles; the bloody room down in the pit; the " grab-an-abdomen " clinic; the madhouse at City — they were all hectic at the time, but as we look back on them, we can appreciate the professional satisfaction and confidence they gave us. Behind the closed doors on the sixth floor is arising a new enlarged modern delivery suite, with a remodeled admitting room, an increased number of labor beds and delivery rooms, and complete with a premature nur- sery and its own laboratory. But, as is true with progress, sometimes an old familiar friend has to be discarded; and these improve- ments will see the end of the old eighth-floor student and doctor sleeping quarters, which, for a part of our lives, served as a second home. Such is the penalty of progress! " Only 72 more to F.T.L.M.C. hy L.F. over C.E. from LOT. to L.O.A. to O.A. with LS. M.F.T. " Heh. heb. they ftnally let iiic Wiitch ii (hiircry! " 52 " Where did you say the cervix ivas, Doctor? " " Hemaglubin, one gram! I " PSYCHIATRY ' jACOb E. I ' INESINGEK, B.A., M.A., M.D. Professor of Psychiatry and Head of the Department From our tirst bewildering days as freshmen medical students until our final day as omni- potent seniors, no course is more controver- sial nor more thought-provoking than psy- chiatry. And no one is more aware of this nor happier about it than Dr. Finesinger himself. ' ' Only 6 1 J more hours " His purpose, and the purpose of his course, is not to memorize Freud nor even to accept the teachings of Freud, but, rather, to enable us to understand how we " feel about things " and, more important, to understand how our patients " feel about things " . The heated discussions on human behavior and the doctor-patient relationship; the strug- gle to master the elusive art of history-taking; the strain to practice minimal activity; the maze of locked doors at Spring Grove; the recreation periods in the Institute — certainly, these are not things that will help us to make diagnoses; but who can deny that they will aid us greatly in practicing the art of medi- cine?. No field of medicine is looking forward to a more fruitful future than is psychiatry, now that the barrier between biochemistry and mental disease has been shattered. And, we are certain. Dr. Finesinger and his staff will continue to be leaders in this investigation as well. k«Yi.lk» ' Ltl ik» ' ' ..»»n " .- ' .k» k»S Verbatnm interview? " So da patient sez ta me, she sez . . . " RADIOLOGY John M. Dennis, b.s., m.d. Pmfessor of Radiology and Head of the Dtpartmeiit The unsung-heroes in any hospital organiza- tion generally are those who handle the X-rays. We, however, are aware of their im- portance in our learning process and use this occasion to recognize Dr. John M. Dennis and the 2 divisions of the Department, the Division of Diagnosis and the Division of Radiation Therapy, headed by Dr. Bloedorn. " Next iveek, we ' re f oiiii; to have chocolate favored harinm. " 56 Beginning with a short course in radiologic anatomy during the first year gross anatomy course and continuing throughout our years as students, the Department is always willing to help us make heads-or-tails out of all those shadows, opacities, lines and clear areas. The radiologist, similar to the physician in other fields of medicine, also is looking for the refinements of technique and practice that are so essential for progress. The value of radiation therapy in the treatment of bladder cancer; the use of radical irradiation and sur- gery in the treatment of carcinoma of the esophagus; the significance of subdural air in infants; and the evaluation of nephrotomog- raphy as a diagnostic procedure. These illus- trate the type of work we hear so little about now which may prove to be so important in the years to come. You need only to recall all the banging and blasting that has been going on in the vicinity of the X-ray area to realize how the Department is planning for the future. Also, as of July 1 of this year, a full-time radiologist will have charge of the OPD X-ray unit. Dr. Lyon roars in the " Lyon ' s Den. " Prolonging life u ' ith cobalt 60. Fernando G. Bloedorn, m.d. Riuliotherapy 57 OPHTHALMOLOGY John C. Ozazkwski, b.s., m.d. Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology and Acting, Head of the Department " Your eyes — the only two you ' ll ever have — take care of them . . . " . This is not only a familiar cry on local radio stations, but could as well, represent the slogan of our Division of Ophthalmology. Following the lead of most top-ranking medical schools, Ophthalmology has been split off from ENT, and coincident with the expansion program now under way, the crea- tion of a distinct Department of Ophthal- mology is no longer just a vision but, rather, is close to becoming a fact. Flans have al- ready been drawn for physical facilities in the hospital, to be directed by a full-time pro- fessor, as yet unselected. ( May we nominate Dr. " Oz " ?) The ultimate goal is a separate operating room devoted to surgery of the eye, with its own team of trained nurses. After all these projects have been com- pleted, and after the setting-up of a residency training program, our school will then take its place among the leading institutions con- tributing its share to the study of o|ilulial- mo logy. " Made in U.S.A. by the American Optical Com- pany. " DERMATOLOGY ' .. . mit .Vi Harry M. Robinson, Jr., b.s., m.d. Professor of Dermatology and Head, Division of Dermatology Francis A. Ellis, b.a., m.d. Associate Professor of Dermatology None of us, as doctors, could ask for more than to be able to practice our chosen special- ties with the enjoyment and enthusiasm and satisfaction of the twelve members of this department, all of whom serve without re- muneration. The pleasure and pride they take in their daily chores are almost infectious as they try to make us realize the difference between a vesicle and a pustule or between pityriasis and psoriasis. This past year, Dr. Robinson ' s " boys " served as host to the American Board of Der- matology examinations, and it was the unani- mous opinion of all concerned that this was the most successful practical examination Need we say more. % ever held. At present, members of the division are investigating the potentialities of two new synthetic steroids; the possibilities of a new drug, oxypscralen, in vitiligo and psoriasis; the role of arsenic in malignancies; the use of low voltage X-rays in the treatment of skin disorders; new mycologic techniques; and various aspects of psychocutaneous medicine. In collaboration with the Department of Pathology, a new program in histopathology will be inaugurated. And one of the major projects for this year is the completion of a new text on dermatology by all of the mem- bers of the division to be offered to the stu- dents at cost. ( Oh, to be a sophomore again! ) " And if she wni ld bare listened to her mother . ANESTHESIOLOGY Martin Helrich, b.s.. m n. Professor of Anesthesiology ami Head of the Department It was inevitable that the anesthesiologist would come to be recognized as a most im- portant member of the operating team. With this recognition, there has been increased em- phasis on the techniques and intracacies of anesthetic procedures and physiology in our learning careers as well as a marked expansion ' ' If the patient ' s temperature goe below 32 degrees, gii ' e hint so?ne I.V. Prestone. " :__JLL a h of the hospital residency program. The recent and future advances in surgery, as typified by hypothermia and open-heart procedures, have been possible only because the " man squeez- ing the bag " has been so well-prepared. Mr. Wilson and Kernan Hospitals have provided special training in anesthesia for thoracic sur- gery and for pediatric orthopedic patients. The Department now boasts of its own fully-equipped chemistry laboratory on the seventh-floor of the Psychiatric Institute; a physiologic-monitoring unit to record simul- taneously in the O.R., arterial blood pressure, end-expiratory carbon dioxide, the EKG and the EEG; and a blanket-type heating and cooling unit. Efforts are being made to develop a pump- oxygenator for cardiac bypass during intra- cardiac surgery. Other studies include the EEG effect of hypothermia and the effect of ligation of the cerebral circulation during operations for cerebral aneurysms. Appreciating the need to progress, the De- partment hopes to increase its residency pro- gram in the near future to three years, the third year to be spent in full time research. PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION Maurice C. Pincoffs, b.s., m.d. Professor of Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation ami Head of the Department The newest of all departments in our school, this department under the forceful enthusi- asm of Dr. Pincoffs has already organized a program to impress upon us, whether we be freshmen medical students or members of the hospital house staff, the importance of pre- vention and rehabilitation. After assuring us of the necessity for the knowledge of medical statistics in the prevention of disease, the staff then aids us in the study of sanitation, dis- ease control programs, medical genetics, com- munity medicine, and the avenues available for the disposition of the chronically-ill patient. " Out of the study of epidemiology will come a better understanding of the real nature of our problems in medicine. " This is the philosophy behind the active research program being conducted by the department. By trying to establish the occurrence of coin- cident events through the examination of large, statistically-significant series, it may eventually be possible to explain such com- monly-known but poorly-understood facts as why bleeding from the digestive tract shows a seasonal cycle or why prematurity is more common in the Negro than in the white. The Department hopes to set up an Evalu- ation Clinic, in which all patients with handi- caps can be studied and aided by an entire battery of specialists — speech therapists, physical therapists, orthopedists, psychiatrists, and so forth. Looking even further into the future, the department foresees a Division of Industrial Medicine and an expansion of the Student Health Service, to cover, in addi- tion to medical and nursing students, dental, law, and pharmacy students. On July 1, 195H Dr. George Entwisle wil Head of the Department. become " Robin Hood Manley, your Cadillac is double parked. " 61 o ;.■ SAMA .i:» .; jJ . • • • ■ •■.■•■:v:4 • ■ ' •:.•?-. •.••■; ' :%■ • • •.■ •,:•■•• ( HONOR COUNCIL ' ' -j . " ; ■;■.■ : ; •4 " . .•.•■ .•;3 5? • •. " . STUDENT COUNCIL •-■• ' •.. ' •■• •■.•.•.• ' ••••■.•.-■ • . " :-ii} • ••• ...•• ... .. .. • ».? ' . ■ ' .•.•. ' -■•.•••.••.••.■. .■•.:•.•• •.•.-• ... ' itfc ' - .•.■■.:•••••■..•.■.•..;.;... •.. ' .. . .•.•..•..:• ;•• ..•s:i: ;.l. ••••••...•. . • •,. .: ' ■ ' ■ s J-V.- ' ■■WiJ- :.;oK,f AK ••••■■■ O- ' i: . • ' .. , Front rou : Daniel M. Levin, Senior Class; Joseph Nataro, Jr., Junior Class. Back row: Francis Clark, Sophomore Class; Gaylord Lee Clark, Jr., Chairman; William Fleming, Freshman Class. Honor Council The Honor Council has, as a guiding force and governing body for the Honor Code, just completed its f irst year under the newly instituted honor system. The Council mem- bers are student representatives from each of the four classes who were elected by their classmates. The Chairman of the Council is the senior student who represented the junior class the previous year. The main endeavor of the Council this past academic year has been to establish a firm foundation for the Honor System which is a new innovation in the 1 5 1 year history of the Medical School. This form of student government is not, however, an untested and untried plan, as it has Ixcn in existence in cnhcr Universities for many years, ;uid at the University of Virginia 115 years. It is thus a well tried and mature form of student con- duct; and the system iiere has every jirospect for success witii gradual growth, and incor- poration into the already existing fine tradi- tions of our Medical School. 64 First row: David Rosen, James B. Zimmerman, Jack Lewis, president; Zack Waters, secretary. Second row: Gaylord Lee Clark, Jr., Warren Armstrong, Robert Hayman, Herbert H. James, vice-president; John Light, Maurice Davidson. Not pictured: William Falls; William Dunseath, treasurer; James Taylor, and Richard Flynn. Student Council There are thirteen Student Council members consisting of representatives from each of the 4 classes and SAMA. Student Council functions include organ- izing and scheduling all social activities of the Medical School, planning and disbursing the student activities budget, enforcing student government, and acting as liaison between the students and faculty. Under the category of social activities, fall the four school dances. Each of these, along with the band must be scheduled one year or more in advance. One of these dances is now held at Turner Armory on a rent-free basis, and the money previously expended for rent is at present time turned into a student loan fund. The main expenditures of the $7,000 yearly budget include dances, bands, SAMA activities, publications, and a graduating senior banquet and pre-commencement cere- mony. In addition, the Student Council is repre- sented on a national level at the yearly SAMA convention, an Inter-school level through the Professional Senate, and on an Intra-school level through the Dean ' s Office, I.F.C., and Student Activities Committee. 65 p First rou: William Marshall, Howard Bronstein, Albert Heck, James Zimmerman, Sn k i.ii I icisurer; Joseph Mead, Howard Levin. Second rou;- Meredith Hale, William Hall, William Hicken, President; Raymond Donovan. ThirJ rou : Robert Johnson, Vice-president; Richard Keller. Not pktureil: Richard Flynn. Alpha Omega Alpha Alpha Omega Alpha was founded in 1902. Beta Chapter of Maryland was installed in I9I9. The aims of the society are to promote scholarship and research, to encourage a high standard of conduct and character among medical students and graduates, and to recog- nize high attainment in medical practice and the related fields. AOA is a non-secret, non- social, medical honor society. Undergradu- ate membership is based entirely on scholar- ship, personal honesty, and potciui.il leader- ship. Our program at Maryland has, for the past several years, included an annual lecture by one of the outstanding leaders in medicine. Other annual functions arc the spring and fall initiation banquets. In addition to faculty and house staff mem- bers. Beta Chapter of Maryland, Alpha Omega Alpli;i is made up of five members from the Junior class and thirteen from the graduating class. Faculty members. Dr. J. Edmund Bradley and Dr. Artliur Haskins, as co-counselors, li;i e ably guided the Chapter for the past year. 66 First row: J. Douglass Shepperd, president; Arthur Jones. Second row: Gerson Asrael, Robert RobI, Howard Bronstein, Robert Holt. Interfraternity Council The Interfraternity Council was formed in 1956 to promote better cooperation amongst the medical fraternal organizations at the University of Maryland. It is composed of elected representatives from the three mem- ber organizations. The Council has acted to coordinate the rushing program, Freshman Orientation, and social activities, and in addi- tion, it has taken the initiative to sponsor one of the finest lectures of the year. Since it is such a young organization, yet so active, it has one of the most promising futures of all the groups affiliated with the school. 67 Nu Sigma Nu The year 1958 is the 55th year of continuous service for the Beta Alpha Chapter of Nu Sigma Nu. This past season has been a busy one for the oldest fraternity on Maryland ' s campus. Our brother, friend, teacher, and The Grand Old Man of Maryland Medicine was honored by the whole school at the first annual Maurice C. Pincoffs Lectureship in December. Academically, the twenty-nine pledges combined studies on the human body with various projects designed to improve the anatomy of the house; the sophomores had a busy year winding up their pre-clinical train- ing, and they still had time for an exam every week; the juniors were caught up in the first stages of the practice of clinical medicine; and the select seniors were staggered by such questions as electives, internships, and na- tional boards. Socially, after pledge functions, the year began with costume aifairs — a Toga Party and a Wild West Party, followed by the Christmas Dinner and Dance. The Faculty Reception in February was the welcome for the freshman professors, alumni, and depart- ment heads. Then came the Initiates ' Party in March, and finally the Senior Spring For- mal in May finished the year — a year which was the last of an era for the seniors, and a year which holds new promise for all future physicians of Nu Sigma Nu — brothers all. WBariltU 01). JKoT hai w C .y rti ' fcsori " U.V " flTmsircnA H ' Ri r. " a nc? " K C -Mil V lC-n nc I V.i-.c »r ,- i C ' ?rc s 68 V % vV i«» V " ' ' rt-- U • -T ir. coU CouT cu " R ilAu-f on " IV ' !?uu?c. n T.l . " Ui " R. int Vi im _ " 1. cias ioi cil ' ' ipma ' )y ' . O ■■■■ ■F- ' " ' ' ' ' " ' ' lb.TB.V,o.-v ■R " Roux, ft Uhn-i ;hirvs.«n JR. 9ones 9 Wn fc.c- x E- suRE;R. P Dcvovc c ' l ., x crort W - f ( O C: T;onn.inl i, C-Ko cvs S Sciinllt " flUcctia-Okro c " cxILmIs. CSc ' -ncr P " SrouOlc ll« ! v,Vc ,unsk 1 ll =-ax ' bcTa, Tl cljittaci - " U . 6-ianMfsri UViWoccS _« yoixuo, 69 Fiiil row: Glass, Isaao, I ' iiilI.,iili , Kiil.Liist .iii, llernKh, ( apl.iii, Kl-hk, lliitkin, Goldstein, Brown, Trotter, Stofberg. Second rou : He ' efner, Honick, Kronthal, Myerberg, Brenner, Zalis, Zievc, Silberstein, Asrael, Small, Fink, Bronstein, Herman, Brecher, Ross. Phi Delta Epsilon OFFICERS Howard Bronstein, President Arthur Litofsky, Vice President Howard RubensteIN, Recording Secretary Nathan Stofberg, Corresponding Secretary GERSON Asrael, Treasurer William Bertuch, Historian Raymond Caplan, Marshall Phi D E from this vantage point looks back u]: on a most successful year, socially and scholastically, and takes great pride in launch- ing a devoted group of seniors to do battle in true Hippocratic style. These men, tested and true, came through trials carefully de- signed to test their mettle, such as the Apache Wine Dance, Shipwreck Party, barbecues be- neath the stars, the Conclave, guest lectures, and other parties and affairs thrown at the new Chapter House. Parties . . . Shoptalk . . . Come French . . . Thirty years of back exams . . . " Hospital? but there ' s a party going on " . . . Just fruit punch . . . Where were you during the bliz- zards? . . . The classic film . . . Bull . . . Beer . . . Bookworms. Into the future we send our Salks and Osiers, skilled from anatomy to anesthesiol- ogy, to make their fortunes in the world of the interne and resident. 70 Top run: Robert Damm, Robert Holt, Lewis Richmond. Bottom row: Jerome TiUes, Neil Goldberg, J. Douglass Shepperd, Harvey Friedlander. OFFICERS Robert Holt, President J. Douglass Shepperd, Vice-President Frank Hanauer, Treasurer Damon Mills, Secretary Xi chapter of Phi Lambda Kappa National Medical Fraternity has made great advances in the five years since its reactivation in 1953- The organization has grown in membership and scope of activity. Phi Lambda Kappa The group acquired a chapter house for the use of members and alumni. The addition of this prize enabled them to enlarge their social activities and add less formal affairs to their schedule. The summit of the social program was the annual formal dinner dance in May. Two scientific lectureships were presented to the school sponsored by Phi Lambda Kappa this year. This year ' s Interfraternity Council Presi- dent, and next year ' s Orientation Committee Chairman were chosen from Phi Lambda Kappa, so that the group looks forward to a brilliant future. 71 Michael B. A. OUIstone. PresiJent; Warren Armstrong, Vice-President; George I. Smith, Secretary-Treasurer. Student AM A SAMA, the Student American Medical Asso- ciation was founded in December, 1950, and is the national voice of 25,000 members. It has chapters in seventy-two of the eighty-two medical schools in the United States. During its early years, the Student American Medical Association was assisted in its operations by grants and subsidies from the organization which helped its formation — the American Medical Association. Now SAMA is an inde- pendent, autonomous organization which en- joys the cooperation of all associations and individuals concerned with tiie future of the medical profession, and last year operated on a budget of $118,000. Our national program includes publica- tion and distribution of " The New Physi- cian " , the official journal ot tiie Student American Medical Association; the SAMA Foundation, a trust funtl which is being or- ganized for the purpose of assisting hnan- cially needy medical students; the SAMA Life Insurance Program which provides up to $10,000 term insurance for only $50 an- nually; and last, but by far the most import- ant, The Association keeps a close watch on every area vital to the medical student in ortler to carry out improxements wlien and where they are needed. Locally, the program consists of an intern- ship evaluation file, assistance with the Fresh- man Orientation Program where the Presi- tleiit of SAMA addresses the Freshinan class, tile jHiblication of the " SAMA Newsletter " , and presentation of the Golden Apple Awards. Projects for the coming year are publication of a Student Directory, summer employment service, and a Research Award Day program. 72 Iiijl niu: buzaniii.- Ounscath, Ant|c (am, Mm ley ( heeks, Margo Shields, Joyce Farley. Second row: Florence Oster, Patricia DeMarco, Marybelle Light, Constance Zimmer- man, Arlie Parker, Joanne Swanson, Velma Lott. Although the Women ' s Auxiliary to the Stu- dent AMA is only a year old, it has had a full and busy season. The group, which includes as members, all medical students ' wives, was founded here at Maryland in June of 1957. The first function of the organized group was a welcome tea for the freshmen wives, fol- lowed by a tour of the hospital and school. Since then meetings have taken place each month, with the programs planned to better prepare the ladies for their role as doctors ' wives. Dr. John Savage, Dr. John C. Krantz, Jr., Dr. Patrick Phelan, Dr. Bertha Van Gel- deren, and Mrs. William S. Stone have spoken at the meetings on subjects ranging from " The History of Medicine " to " The Place of the Doctor ' s Wife in the Commun- ity " . At Christmas a party was held for medi- cal students ' children, and the group donated food and clothing to a needy family. The organization has sent representatives Women ' s Auxiliary of SAMA to the first Baltimore City Medical Society Auxiliary Meeting and to several meetings of the internes ' and residents ' wives. The Women ' s Auxiliary of SAMA poured tea at the Pre -commencement in 1957 and also at Convocation, and are managing the Tea for Deans ' Day. These activities have been noted in the " New Physician " . As the Auxiliary passes its first birthday, it looks forward with many plans and ideas for the future years. First roiv: Shirley McWilliams, Carolyn Lewis, Marlene Brager, Joan Goldberg. Second roir: Marie Huffington, Alice Waters, Betsy Felsenberg, Lynne Abramson, Jean- nette Kriz, Patricia Mead. 73 I m c. p. c. of the Year CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL CONFERENCE Adm. 9 20 54 Autopsy 1234 Died 6 6 68 This is the 35th University Hospital admis- sion for this 100 yr. old widowed albino female admitted witii a chief complaint of being a mimic. The history is rather poor since she is mentally detarded. PRKSF.NT iLLNi;ss: The patient was well until the age of 6 when she registered at the O.H. Clinic after being told at the Well-known Baby Clinic that she was fragrant. She was diagnosed as being anemicky and given iron pills. Post-mortem, she had a cough and Hame in her throat and was told she had ammonia. Her cough con- tinued for 30 yrs. and her condition devel- oped into chronical bronical trouble. She continued to have low blood despite receiv- ing iron and vitamins. At the hematology clinic she was diagnosed as having delicious anemia by Dr. Billy Rubin, but did not re- spond to treatment. At the age of 87 she be- gan to have S.O.B. on desertion after running up S llighfs of stairs, ankle edemer, and Aunt jemima [X-ctoris relieved by eating. She be- came more and more easily fatigued and be- gan to lose weight from 360 to 81 lbs. in a 74 period of 6 weeks. Her miseries brought her to the Accident Room and she was admitted to 3-G for further evaluation with a possible possessive-repulsive neurosis. PAST history: Wheezles as a child. Ro- mantic fever at the age of 2 and treated by injections of glamorous glob- ulin with no recurrence. High blood diag- nosed at age 14 by Dr. Arthur Ritis. No history of bad blood or needle treatments. At 24 yrs. vertical veins of her right leg were stripped by Dr. Anna Sarca and the patient was followed in the Bascular Clinic. At 20 yrs. a Sincerian section was performed at Mercy Hospital by Dr. Frank Breech. She had a fraction of the electrical process of her right arm at 60 yrs., and a severe burn of her chest which was skin drafted. At 9 yrs. she had an arrow removed from her back at the Fort Ticonderoga dispensary by Dr. Tim Pannum. At present she occasionally uses pepsodismal as a senative for a nervous stomach. SYSTEM review: Skin: Infantigo as a child. G.I.: Sharp pains in her neighbor following meals for past 20 yrs. Menstrual: Menarche at 5 yrs. Menopause every 20 days. Para 36 3 3 6. 3 absorptions at 3 mo., 4 mo., and 6 mo., and 2 miscarrots. Passes square clogs of blod from her pajama with each menstrual pyramid which lasts 15 days. Goes to Gyn. Clinic every 6 mos. to have tubers and obers checked. Lost her nature at 94 yrs. of age. Extrem. Very close veins of her left leg. FAMILY history: Husband 110 yrs. Liv- ing and well except that he goes to GU Clinic to have his bladder cauterized and his phosphate ' sahged. SOCIAL HISTORY: Non smoker. Drinks one fifth of whisky a day and 3 or 4 gallons of wine a week. PHYSICAL EXAMINATION: The patient is a severely emanci- pated albino in acute respiratory distress with no complaints. B.P. 210 40 0. T. 94 P. 160 R. 84. Diploma of eyes on looking to the left. Heart present. Chest negative. Ab- domen shows a well-heeled 6 ft. mid-line decision. Fireballs on utercles. Sharp pain in tendencies on leg motion. Deleted various veins in her legs. Extremities: 4. Few spotty nymph nodes in right posterior cervical triangle. LABORATORY FINDINGS: Hhb. 1.2 gm. WBC 600. Urine Negative. Sed. rate 100 (65 corr.) F.B.S. 530. Electric lights Normal. Retic. count 2%. Indices MCV 24, MCHC 20, MCH 16. Sickling Negative. Acid phosphatase 16.4 u. Chest X ray is available. Skull film shows possible enlargement of territory gland. ECG Comparable with coronary trombone. STS Positive. Spinal fluid CCF Positive. Col- loidal gold curve 44466543. Porcelain level 64 Lizanski units. CLINICAL COURSE: The patient was trans- fumed with 10 pints of whole blood. She was given cortistone 100 mg. P.I.D. and 3 gm. Bubbamycin daily. On her 4th hospital day an operation was per- formed and the incision was closed with chronic catgut sutures. The wound was dressed with sterile goze and easy tape. Following this, she began to bomick and was placed on IB fluids as 5 % Bluco and Water. A one minute monogram of her spine was performed and is available. She expired on her l4th post operative day. diagnosis: 1. Congenial heart disease 2. CNS Louis 3. Military tuberculosis 4. Aneurism of Abominable Aorta 5. Carcinoma of Circus — Stage II Autopsy performed by Dr. Al O ' Pecia 75 PHANTOM FATIGUE AND BUT IT ' S ONLY TWO MINUTES AFTER NINE! ' •DR. REED, DR. " I FORGOT MY MEAL TICKET. " i IRED BLOOD STRIKE AGAIN. 1 1 ALTER REED! " ■pH " jgL Hh |- », imi v % STUDYING IN OUR MODERN LIBRARY. Hlii iUaL—JI ■■1 j| " %r7 " . m. Jm-iM J " WHAT DO I DO NOW? " m: " No fair, three against one! " And d nnnd time iras bad by all. The Picnics " Watch your step, please. " Even medical stiidtiiti g i Mik. " I got my eleventh choice! ' ■t -,;. IT TAKES THREE TO TANGO. - mmm M I ■ 3 RING-AROUND-THE-ROSIE. ' t ■ ' ■. . vXf, u Ull iJ u BALTIMORE HECHT COMPANY DEPARTMENT STORE REDWOOD ST PAULS CEMETERY HECHT COMPANY GARAGE WESTERN HEALTH DISTRICT PARKING ( ) PHARMACY [rwRce stowed] to S£ added „y HOSPITAl 7, LOM BARD TO BE AOOCD J £i FUTURE EXPANSION DENTISTRY 9 E ?a His H 1 WAlNTCNAMCt, sTwucE.rrc (CNAMt W 10 -« STOHIES TO ec oocD UNION » DORMITOI FUTURE EXPANSION L CM M ON ST i 1 dM| Hi CENTRAL RECEIVING liill .-J S 1 - -L-. LAW E TTTl Ht lllllll ' nil I, J PRATT FUTURE EXPANSION 1 r FUTURE EXPANSION I I FUTURE 60 CO 150 iOO 1 — I 1 1 FEET PROPOSED TEN YEAR PLAf UNIVERSITY OF MARYLANI BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 1957-1967 Jit EET ILDING STREET FUTURE EXPANSION —1 ' ) _ tSlON TOKICS . O-l r u EET ' I5TINC PATIENT ILWNC n iinistrxtiOnI AOM- QLOO. |8L£C i ADa XI — BRESSLER LABORATORY MECHCAL ' mcuk: !. TECMNOLDGY TECMNOLOOY BLDC . I SCHOOL D Q r, o: =1 BC BASIC SCIENCES n u LiJ i- U Q. The Future El EET (PANSION ff The University of Maryland School of Medi- cine last year celebrated its sesquicentennial, one-hundred and fift) ' years as a leader in medical education and research. There were banquets and ceremonies and speakers all to recall the past and to remind us of our heri- tage. Famous men and famous firsts of our school were paraded once more before us. And as they were, that far-away look of remembrance was re-kindled in the dimming eyes of the " old grads " , while in the hearts of those of us who are just starting to travel the path of the healer, there could be heard the whispering of silent vows, as each of us dedicated himself to carry on this tradition and maybe, in his own little way, even to be able to add to it. Well, now the banners have been stored away, and the echoes of the orators have ceased to reverberate. The past has been made a part of the present for a while and has now returned to its rightful place behind us, The Ball wore Stiideui Union 84 to be remembered but not to predominate; it must give way to the present and, yes, to the future. Indeed, one wonders whether we should clieer more because we have seen the end of the first one-hundred and fifty years or because we have been given the privilege of starting under way the second one-hundred and fifty years. Since we have had presented to us the duty — and the privilege — of writing the first few pages in the next chapter of the history of our School, it is not too soon to begin thinking how they are going to read. Will they con- tinue to unroll the plot of previous chapters, with famous men and famous firsts, or will they read like oh-too-many-histories, much unimportant details, and too-little-action? Well, for a few short minutes, suppose we take a trip into the future to see, if we can, what we will have accomplished. Let ' s not go too far; 197.3 — fifteen years hence — would seem to be a good place to stop and 85 to look, to see what we have made of our School, and of our Hospital, and of ourselves. The area surrounding the corner of Lom- bard and Greene Streets looks completely changed from the time we last saw it back in 1958. From the crowded, cramped quarters that we had known, the University of Mary- land and its Hospital have grown to a true health and educational center in the heart of a rejuvenated downtown Baltimore, sprawl- ing from Baltimore Street to Pratt Street and from Paca Street to Fremont Avenue. There are so many new buildings and everything looks so different that we aren ' t sure just where to begin to look around. Anyway, let ' s start with the hospital itself. The first thing we notice about the hospital is that it has been increased in size by incor- porating into it what we remember as the old pharmacy and dental school buildings and in- creasing them up to twelve stories, to give a total of twelve hundred beds. This brings back to us the words of Dean Stone, who stated, in 1958 that this is the number of beds all in one area that is needed in order to teach medicine adequately. " These beds " , he told us, " should be both public, for prac- tice and for the study of advanced disease, and private, for the diagnosis and treatment of early disease. " Inside, too, things are different. There is air - conditioning throughout, and special ultra-violet lighting helps to sterilize the environment. Five high speed elevators in each building are constantly running. The hospital seems strangely quiet without the constant disturbance by the public address system; this is rather mystifying until we see that each member of the house staff carries around a small, hardly noticeable, receiving set by which he may be called in silence. Since we are not going to have time enough to look at every floor in the hospital, sup- pose we visit only the more obvious changes. Recalling all of the hammering and banging in the area of the second floor X-ray depart- ment when we were students, let ' s go there now. At an expense of a half-million dollars, the diagnostic X-ray area has been doubled in size and contains the latest in equipment — a biplane angiographic unit capable of making eight exposures per second in each of two planes; a body section unit to make body sections in both the upright and supine positions; a cineradiographic unit for making pictures of the fluoroscopic image; a new automatic processing unit, completely proc- essing a film in six minutes; and four new fluoroscopic-radiographic units. And up on the sixth floor is the new delivery suite with eleven public labor beds, a modern admitting room, student and doctor beds, and a labora- tory there on the same floor; four large deliv- ery rooms; and the premature nursery con- nected directly to the delivery suite. Four more operating rooms, one devoted to sur- gery of the eye have been added to the seventh floor. The top floor of the hospital no longer serves as quarters for the house staff but, instead, is occupied completely by neurosurgical patients and neurosurgical diagnostic and operating rooms. With the increased patient-load and with the new diag- nostic studies which have become available, the hospital laboratories are now running one million tests per year; this has necessi- tated moving the clinical labs into what used to be the pharmacy and dental schools, giving them four times more floor space than they had when they were located on the second floor of the hospital. Without going out of doors, we are able to go from the hospital across Redwood Street through a tunnel, and into the new Out- Patient Building. This Out-Patient Building is a huge structure, taking up the entire block. 86 On the main floor is a large, well-equipped, modern Emergency Room, for adults, a far- cry from the crowded, disorganized " pit " of our medical school days, complete with every- thing needed for the immediate care of the acutely-ill patient. There is also a complete X-ray division, with a full-time radiologist in charge. A unit of the building is set aside for X-ray therapy, for both hospital and ambulatory patients; it is equipped with X-ray machines, radioisotopes, a radioactive cobalt therapy unit, and a new contact ther- apy unit. Most of the building is occupied with spacious clinics, and many clinics can operate simultaneously, several times a week instead of once every week. One of the upper floors is devoted entirely to private offices, in which members of the Hospital staffs can see their private patients. This, we are told, was done in order to attract more good full-time doctors to the staff; with this arrangement, these men would be available for full-time teaching and research and still would be able to maintain a private practice. Finally, on the top floor, there are a group of beds plus physical-therapy facilities for the immediate care of rehabilitated patients. This is certainly quite a change from the Out-Patient Building that we knew. Across Greene Street from this OPD there is another newly-constructed building, housing a complete pediatric unit. On the spot that we used to know as Chick ' s, the Pediatric Out- Patient Clinic now stands and, adjacent to it, a complete emergency room for infants. On the same floor is a Child Guidance Clinic and a Central Evaluation and Guidance Clinic for the care of handicapped children. The upper floors accommodate one hundred and sixty beds, both private and public, for Typical dormitory room in the Student Union. 87 infants, children, and, to meet their particular needs, adolescents. Along with these beds are a number of companion rooms, where the mother or mother-substitute may stay with the child, when necessary, day and night. Furthermore, there is a recovery room set aside exclusively for pediatric surgical pa- tients. The uppermost floor of this Pediatric Building is restricted to pediatric laboratories devoted to pediatric research. And, by means of a tunnel running under the speeding traffic of Greene Street, the Building is accessible to the main Hospital, allowing for the safe interchange and flow of personnel, patients, visitors, and materials. Do you remember where our Law School friends used to hold their classes? Well, this building looks the same as when we last saw One of several delivery rooms now mider con- struction. it; however, it is no longer the Law School. The entire building has been converted into Administration offices, both for the Hospital and for the various Schools. Next to this, the Bressler Laboratory Building also has changed but little, except that it is now used exclusively for research, as we recall, it was originally intended by the Bressler Founda- tion. All of the lecture rooms and labora- tories for students have been transferred to other buildings. On the corner, the historic old Medical Building is still standing and has become some-what of a shrine, a sym- bol of the proud past of our school. Its hoary halls are filled now only occasionally for the presentation of visiting lecturers. Encircling the Medical Building, as they have always done, the old Gray Laboratories and Bio- chemistry Buildings have been converted into what has always been an acute neces- sity in our town and in our University, a school for the training of medical technolo- gists, to meet the ever-increasing demand for trained personnel for both the research and the clinical laboratory. Continuing on, we can see, across Lom- bard Street, that our medical Library is, no longer, a second-rate parking lot, but is, indeed one of the most modern and complete libraries in the country. And, adjacent to the Library and extending on down to Paca Street, is a new, massive Basic Sciences Build- ing. In here, under one roof, are all of the lecture rooms, laboratories, and other facil- ities for the teaching of the basic courses and disciplines of the pre-clinical years. We ' d like to stop and take a more thorough look, but there is much more to see, so tiiat there is little time for lingering. Occupying the corner long monopolized by the old Out-Patient Building is the Stu- dent Union anil Dormitory Building, about which we heard so much, even when we 88 were freshmen medical students. It is a five- story, million-dollar, K-shaped structure, and houses, on its bottom floors, a student sup- ply and book store, a game room, barber shop, beauty shop, post office, cafeteria, main lounge, fountain lounge, dance terrace, meet- ing rooms, television room, and various offices. The upper three floors contain rooms for two hundred out-of-town students plus modern spacious quarters for all members of the hospital house staff. Quickly now, let ' s see what the remainder of our " campus " looks like. We all remem- ber when the two-story Nursing and Phar- macy Schools were built back in 1958; well, they have each been increased up to five stories, and both are now complete, widely- respected institutions. Our Dental School confreres have found a new home adjacent to the Student Union and, to the south, a newer bigger School of Law has arisen. Since public health, preventive medicine, and medi- cal care have grown to be such a prominent part of present-day medicine, a building to house the Western Health District has been included in this development. A huge Cen- tral Receiving Warehouse facing Pratt Street furnishes supplies for all of the individual buildings. Also, because our undergraduate schools at College Park have become so crowded and unwieldy, there is talk at pres- ent of even further expansion, of building in the neighboring blocks new schools for the teaching of basic arts and sciences. And, finally, there are two large parking areas, where, we understand, the students may park their cars, free of charge. Let us now turn and see, if we may, some- thing of the Medical School curriculum of this same year — 1973. In spite of the trend in some medical schools to speed up the medi- cal education and in spite of the continued shortage of doctors, our School still has not been able to resolve the disparity between the anormous amount of knowledge which the medical student should be exposed to and the limited amount of time available for this exposure. The school year has been extended to thirty-six weeks but not beyond that, be- cause it is felt that, in order to learn best, breaks in the learning process are necessary. At the same time, there is much talk about increasing medical school training to five years, and many educators feel that this will soon become a fact. The classes at this time will be averaging one hundred and twenty students. The De- partment of Anatomy will show a " Proces- sion Film " to each incoming class, explaining in one or two days, by means of motion- pictures, just what they will be doing for The neiv Radiology wing, soon to be completed. 89 Part of the new Central Supply Roo?)t under con- struction. the entire year. The course in Anatomy has been increased so that it is even more thor- ough than during our schooldays; the empha- sis now, however, is on structure and func- tion rather than on the memorizing of minutiae. While we are on the subject of Anatomy, with the improvement in our standards of living, indigent bodies have be- come scarce, so that for several years, an active campaign has been conducted in edu- cating the public to will their bodies to medi- cal education and research. The teaching of the remainder of the basic science courses has continued essentially un- changed, except that there is a greater degree of correlation of scientific and clinical courses through the use of case presentations. Nor- mal jisychology has been added to the pre- clinical years; and the teaching of both psy- chology and psychiatry has been radically changed through a better knowledge of body chemistry. The trend of taking the student out of the classroom and putting him into the hospital has continued and has been extended; in fact, the senior student is now officially considered to be the intern, the University Hospital hav- ing no interns as such. Salaries of faculty members have been raised, finally, so that there is, at last, a large and interested and capable teaching staff. The student is urged to " get his hands into a problem, " and most of the students are carrying on a research project along with their regular studies. Students and teachers alike have come to realize the importance of stressing and of emphasizing the social aspects in the practice of medicine — the vital role of socio-economic and emotional factors in the conception and, therefore, the prevention of disease as well as their role in the response to treatment and in rehabilitation. Also, as back in our time, the problem of well-trained general prac- titioners versus super-specialization is still a subject of much debate and disagreement. In an effort to solve this dilemma, there is now more continuity and less categorizing of cur- riculum, so that the student studies particular patients rather than particular medical spe- cialties. This works by assigning each student to a family; the student then follows each member of the family through all of his medical problems, be it medical, surgical, psychiatric, or any other. In this way the student really sees each patient " as a whole " . Finally the medical student of 197.3 will have all of this training at the University Hospital; no longer is there the need, with a twelve hundred bed hospital, to travel to other insti- tutions for the proper experience. This has resulted in more efficient and inore uniform trainmij. 90 Having had a rather fleeting glance at the physical facilities and at the curricular changes of the future, most of our trip into the years ahead now lies behind us. Before returning once more to the cold reality of the present, let us take one final look at the year 1973 to see, if we may, what the problems of medicine will be, in general, in those not- too-distant years that are rushing up to meet us. The chief enigma of medicine still will be the control of new growths within the human organism; we will have made some progress, however, in this field. Research at this time is aimed predominantly at this prob- lem, as well as at a study of the degenerative processes. An overwhelming mass of knowl- edge has been accumulated concerning the diseases of degeneration, especially, arterio- sclerosis; and, although much advance has been made, it still continues as the number one killer in our country. The scourge of bacterial infections as a cause of human suf- fering has continued to decline, as the result of improved daily living and more potent therapeutic weapons. The isolation and iden- tification of viral agents has become a routine laboratory procedure, and specific drugs against them have become available. The field of atomic and radiation medicine has come to be a fully recognized and respected medical specialty; the effects of atomic irradi- ation upon human genetics are better, but not wholly, understood. With ever-expand- ing industrialization and the synthesis of more complex chemicals, the industrial physi- cian is assuming a more prominent role; the prevention of traumatic industrial accidents and the study of the long-range toxicity of the new chemicals are his special forte. And, finally, as seems to happen when there is more leisure and better living, people have more time to develop troubled minds, so that the family psychiatrist has come to be accepted and to take his place alongside the family general practitioner and the family pedia- trician. Having completed our brief dream tour into the future — and if even only one-half of this becomes reality, we will have done our share in writing the beginning of the next chapter in the history of our School. That ' s enough dreaming, predicting, or wishing — call it what you will; let ' s remem- ber our purpose and not get lost in star- gazing. Now that we know our task — and our task is nothing more than to continue to carry on a tradition which has grown for one hundred fifty years — and now that we know the sparkling possibilities and the golden opportunties that await us in the future, let us return to the present, for it is only in the present that we can begin the future. Perhaps it would have been more fitting to offer the following prayer before setting out on this trip into the future; but, nonetheless, we still feel it appropriate to at least close with the following: REALISTIC PRAYER FOR THE ATOMIC AGE " Unto us who have the pride and the presumption to release the most devastating forces of nature, O Lord, be merciful; " Protect us from cardiac contusion; " Preserve us from cerebral or coronary air embo- lism; " Guard us from the dreadful consequences of res- piratory tract hemorrhage; " Allow us not to suffer from pulmonary edema; " Save us from the trauma of distended hollow viscera; " Withhold from us the horrors of hemorrhages within the central nervous system; " Visit not these catastrophies upon us, and we promise to love Thee and keep Thy Command- ments, O Lord. " 91 te fft ixmm m mmmm iS £r T r c 1 I Lt :y ff ' f r jj u ' A rry f d ,:Jm i ryHyi( o rr r A . ' - -o«. f n !? rmr {( { Graduates yu ' Z-e.- H ♦ rJ rt H Q Jfe JOHN THOMAS ALEXANDER, m.d. Phoenix, Arizona BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY John . . . refined, well-mannered, likable . . . great personality even though perpetually sober . . . crossed the Continental Divide to enjoy Bal- timore ' s healthy climate . . . Cowboy suits in the East? . . . last summer treated scorpion and rattle- snake bites at Good Samaritan Hospital, Phoenix . . . buys and sells Volkswagens in his spare time . . . picks grapefruits from his backyard at Christ- mas time . . . only 13 wives . . . playing doctor for a year at White Memorial Hospital, Los Angeles . . . General Practice with emphasis on Plastic Sur- gery in Phoenix. ; st ,; sivear by Apollo the physician, by Aesculapius, Hygeia, and Panacea, JAMES KEYES ATON, JR., B.A., m.d. Saint Petersburg, Florida EMORY UNIVERSITi ' 1954 Jim . . . the great " Sun God " . . . calm and accomp- lished . . . " Stay loose, men " ' ... a true southern gentleman with disarming charm . . . Dixieland advocate . . . Phi Beta Pi veep . . . after hours sojourn in Bacteriology Lab led to acquisition of better half, Joan, in November 1956 . . . Baby Sun God born October 1957 . . , externship at St. Agnes with the clan was profitable and pleasant . . . Pfizer representative ' 57-58 . . . previous sum- mers spent grappling pianos in family music store . . . internship in South Carolina precedes a Gen- eral Practice in Florida. 94 WILLIAM GEORGE BARTLETT, B.S., m.d. .. Cumberland, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 " Wild Willy of the Woods " . . . loquacious, dig- nified, conservative . . . hillbilly from Maryland mountain country . . . fast turnover of patients on Ward 3B . . . Nu Sigma Nu historian and chair- man of the latter ' s notorious social affairs . . . God save the Queen! . . . SAMA president and veep . . . Student Council member . . . " I ' ll drink to that " . . . summers as apprentice intern at Memo- rial Hospital in Cumberland, Montgomery Co. Public Health, and St. Agnes . . . 1958-59 at Youngstown Hospital Association . . . future in Air Force and either surgery or pathology — he ' s a cuttin ' doctor. and I take to tvitness all the Gods and all the Goddesses, GEORGE ROBERT BAUMGARDNER B.S., M.D. Taney town, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 George . . . brilliant, interested, amiable, and myopic . . . always seen behind a cloud of smoke and the New England Journal . . . Huh! . . . be- lieves in complete work-ups, frequent blood cul- tures and daily progress notes . . . vacations spent in Taneytown and the Medical Out-Patient Clinic, and as a research fellow in Surgery at U.H. study- ing wound healing . . . Ward 3B doesn ' t sound very romantic but George met Selina there and they were wed on December 23, 1957 . . . Straight Medicine internship at U.H., and later Medicine and or research. 95 ELLIOTT MORTON BERG, B.S., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 " Giis " or Ell . . . friendly, cheerful, independent and cute . . . always smiling except during orals . . . authority on beautiful girls from exotic far- off lands . . . thought a mustache would antiquate his youthful profile, but the therapeutic trial proved a failure . . . spends spare time mimeographing maps, cleaning up after class picnics, and riding a famous donkey in the movies . . . Phi D. E. . . . editor-in-chief of Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . censor for the profession — " Nice talk for a doctor " . . . summers in Medical OPD and Phoenix . . . rotating internship at U.H. JUU jbtnoi. S u 2 , to keep according to my abil ity MAURICE JERROLD HERMAN, B.S., M.D. Baltimore, Maryland university of MARYLAND, SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 1953 " Maish " . . . sincere, carefree, sleepy, and pudgy . . . master at coining new words, pronunciations, and expressions . . . marriage counselor and lee turer to those in need . . . ex-playboy . . . exponen of Latin American and progressive dancing . . occasionally seen sneaking out of Slenderella . . AZO fraternity in Drug College . . . Phi D E . . pill pusher during summers and in spare time . . united in matrimony with Sharon on December 23, 1956 . . . expecting ' l.yle Carlton " around graduation time . . . Hoy Hon . . . OB-GYN after rotating internship at Mercy. Tm f % V ,y iS B . H mm .... 1 96 GERALD EDWARD BLOOM, m.d. Annapolis. Maryland CORNELL UNIVERSITY Jerry, alias " Dr. Gloom " (because it sounds like Bloom ) . . . brainy, brawny, and big . . . champion note-taker of the class, but how he reads the notes with that handwriting, we ' ll never know! . . . never lacks for shoes ... " I brought my lunch " . . . Alpha Epsilon Delta, honorary pre-med fraternity at Ithaca . . . Phi D E . . . hitched up to his college sweetheart, and well known N. Y. artist, Jo Ann, on June 2. , 1957 . . . summers as camp counselor and extern in " West Virginia . . . internship with Uncle Sam at William Beaumont Hospital, El Paso, Texas. . e io. cf. (3 - ' y ' t - and my judgment the following oath: STUART HARMON BRAGER, B.S., m.d. Bah more. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 1954 Stu . . . inquisitive, intelligent, colorful . . . can tell the nature of a tablet at arm ' s distance . . . always ready with the correct answer or a clever joke . . . top student at Pharmacy School . . . voted the student whose forehead was most likely to recede . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . summers selling drugs and treating patients in the Medical Clinic . . . chased Marlene until she caught him in Decem- ber, 1957 . . . since their marriage, they have been giving lessons on the cha-cha-cha . . . straight medicine for 12 months at U.H. precedes a career as Internist. 97 HOWARD DANIEL BRONSTEIN, B.s, M.D. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Howie . . . quiet sincerity and intelligence . . . do- it-yourself advocate . . . the car with dysarthria . . . pilot of carpool 2 . . . fortunate enough to be living within a seven-iron shot of the P.P. Golf Course . . . " You ' ll get a lot out of that lecture " . . . Phi Delta Epsilon president . . . won an Oscar for directing pledge class film . . . interest and service in student council and student activities committee . . . Chairman of freshman orientation . . . AOA . . . summers spent as extern at Rose- wood . . . future career in Internal Medicine fol- lows internship at Mt. Sinai in N. Y. 5M-o i JL Ba ryt twAZ , t -D. To consider dear to me as my parents him who taught me this art; GEORGE JAMES BURKE, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, SCHOOL OF pharmac;y 1954 " Pat " . . . tall, quiet, and capable in many ways . . . medical and pharmaceutical information at his fingertips ... a veteran pharmacist with summers under the shield and with Schering ... an entourage of fair ladies and a good medical mind bespeaks success ... no time for surgery . . . well known for his classical theory, " Know your nurses " . . . after many years on the Baltimore campus, an internship at Mercy Hospital and a General Prac- tice or Pediatric Residency are planned. y x og. li uyJoL M.D. 98 RAYMOND FRANK CAPLAN, B.S., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITi ' OF MARYLAND 1956 " Ray mee poo " . . . fast in wit and walk . . . our answer to perpetual motion . . . official schedule keeper . . . spontaneous combustion before exams . . . bearded elf in a sewer . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . summers spent as research fellow in Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery at U.H. in ' 55; Lederle Fellow in ' 57 . . . Grand Canadian tour in ' 55 . . . another of the P.S. 64 grads . . . Skaweeeze . . . copilot of carpool 2 . . . future shows a career in aca- demic Internal Medicine and Cardiology following internship at Sinai Hospital. C-C ( c nd to live in common with him GAYLORD LEE CLARK, JR., a.b., m.d. Stevetison. Maryland STANFORD UNIVERSlTi ' 1953 Gay . . . country gentleman at ease in any society . . . Southern hospitality at the steeplechase . . . duty in Caribbean with U.S.M.C. . . . yeoman work as organizer of Honor System and Chairman of Honor Committee . . . summers spent studying in Germany, U.H. Medical clinic, and as Polio fellow at Montebello . . . married Margery Sept. 1, 1956 . . . one addition in Gaylord III . . . active in school affairs — vice president of Jr. class, mem- ber of Student Council Student Activities Com- mittee . . . internship and career in Orthopedics in Baltimore lie ahead. gc 4U CM j -m 99 DAVID ARTHUR COPE, A.B, m.d. HAMBURG, PENNSYLVANIA LAFAYETTE COLLEGE 1954 Dave . . . blonde crewcut outdoor type . . . big man with pipe and stogie . . . following in dad ' s footsteps . . . wild plunges from a swivel chair in histology lectures . . . one of the original " Square " externs . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . springtime after- noons making rounds at Mt. Pleasant . . . rested up after rough freshman year by sleeping in Bressler lecture hall . . . summers spent in steel plant and shipyard ... ' 57 trip to the wilds of Canada for canoeing and fishing ... a busy future in General Practice after internship at Reading Hospital, Pa. - . c - P. and if necessary to share my goods with him; ROBERT EMMET CRANLEY, JR., B.S.. m.d. Bloomfield, New Jersey UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 " Cran " . . . crop of red hair to match his Irish background . . . " Pen pals " with Donovan . . . easily embroiled in basketball or softball game . . . never a follower of Carrie Nation . . . extern ex- perience at Woman ' s Hospital, Relay Sanitorium, Md. State Penetentiary and St. Agnes . . . caught by wife Kitty 10 ' 5 57 . . . last summer spent as Surgical Research fellow at U.H. . . . Nu Sigma Nu Secretary . . . Terrae Mariah Medicus Busi- ness Manager . . . U.H. internship and probable residency in Pathology lie ahead. dh: ( ' - - -M ' O 100 BRUCE NELSON CURTIS, a.b., M.D. Thatcher, Arizona BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 1953 Bruce . . . soft spoken, quiet mannered delegate from the wide open spaces ... " I was just rest- ing my eyes, men " . . . leisure time spent speaking Spanish, eating Mexican food and playing cowboy on his ranch . . . Stetson, boots, and embroidered shirts are the badge of distinction . . . several years touring country as naval aviation radioman . . . senior year saw the appearance of the midget car . . . summers spent as extern in Phoenix . . . Gen- eral Practice or Pediatrics in the Grand Canyon State are future plans following internship at Good Samaritan Hosp., Phoenix. __ . . .M to look upon his children as my own brothers. GILBERT BERNARD CUSHNER, M.D. Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY " Cush " . . . Coffee time, anyone? . . . likeable, live- ly, and learned . . . hornrimmed glasses and a quiet smile . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . wedding bells with Charlotte on June 25, 1957 . . . nearly bought a safety-belt after riding in Karpa ' s " hell on wheels " . . . another Jack Benny with his violent violin playing . . . summer ' 55 spent as Sanitarian 1st Class ( cleanup man ) at A P Bakery . . . ' 56, O.R. technician, Lutheran Hospital . . . summer ' 57, passing Levine tubes as gastroenterology fel- low at U.H. . . . internship at Sinai with plans for future as Internist. }QjJM - ' riA U- -o. ot C-uslv -Jtrv. n ' O 101 ROBERT LEE DAMM, b.s., m.d. Biiltimore, Aiaryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1954 Bob . . . man with n flare for details; i.e. phar- maceutical and female . . . extrovert with a sense of independence ... " I haven ' t bought the book yet, sir! " . . . Air Force service in Alaska showing movies to the Eskimos . . . Schering detail man for 2 summers . . . " hormones anyone " . . . Spring Grove externship in 1957-58 . . . perpetual pitch- playing pigeon . . . Freshman classic: " Did she have her hysterectomy before or after the baby was born? " . . . plans residency and practice in California after internship at D.C. General. " a v oCocJa-.- -- At. to teach them this art if they so desire RONALD LEE DIENER, B.S., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY ' OF MARYLAND 1956 Ronnie . . . determined, brilliant, and conscien- tious . . . learned anatomy from " Oswald " on the right side . . . featured in Phi Delta Epsilon film but was unable to get a head in movies . . . courted Lois in his old Plymouth and she finally said " I do " in December 1956 . . . summer jobs as operating room nurse at Lutheran Hospital and fellowship in Orthopedics at University . . . spare time spent playing pitch and Softball, and sleeping . . . next year ushers in rotating internship at Sinai and probable ftiture in Obstetrics and Gynecology. ( M Pxui . A ' .J. 102 RAYMOND JOSEPH DONOVAN, JR. B.S., M.D. Cliffside Park, New Jersey ST. PETER ' S COLLEGE 1954 Ray . . . tall, dark and easy-going . . . leaves orders to turn patient in 1248 q2h every day . . . liquids in P.M., diet as tolerated in A.M. . . . proponent of self-education . . . proud wearer of AOA key . . . Nu Sigma Nu ... an " institution man " since his arrival in Balto., having externed at St. Agnes, Springfield State Hospital, and the Maryland Peni- tentiary . . . detail man for Schering last summer . . . wedding bells with Sue in June ... a straight medicine internship at U.H., and residency in Internal Medicine comprise his future plans. tvithout fee or tvritten promise; JOANNE WINSLOW ECONOMON, B.s., M.D. Washington. D. C. GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITi ' 1954 Joie . . . aggressive, ambitious and female . . . metastasized from George Washington in the junior year . . . " 77 men and only one gal in town " . . . doesn ' t play pitch, poker, or ping-pong . . . Army brat and world traveler . . . since 1956 spends her spare time discussing medicine with husband, Straty, member of the class of ' 59 . . . summers doing research in Anatomy at G.W.U. and in Ophthalmology at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda . . . after internship at Mercy, she hopes to pursue the field of Ophthalmology. CLayT AJt. lO. CCo . r t t , ' - - • 103 RICHARD JAMES ERICKSON, B.S., m.d. Wood-Ridge. New Jersey MARYVILLE COLLEGE 1954 Dick . . . " Eric " Erickson ... a penny earned is a penny saved! . . . enticed Libby to leave Delta Airlines for the gay, carefree life of a medical stu- dent ' s wife . . . sincerity and conscientious endeavor mark the Rabbit for future success . . . externed at Franklin Square and U.H. as blood bank technician . . . summer of 1957 spent as fellow in Surgery at U.H. and Kernan ' s . . . refuses to take blood donors at Mt. Wilson — " It ' s not a learning process " . . . plans for internship in Buffalo, to be followed by General Practice in New England. " A " .-.VcrA. U ' to impart to my sons and the sons of the master who taught me avid . Phi STANLEY NORMAN FARB, m.d. Bull i more, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY Stan . . . thorough, exact and friendly . . fan of interesting academic bridge games . Delta Epsilon . . . enjoys show tunes while reading complimentary A.M. A. Journals . . . wife Mignon changed her last name in August 1955 . . . sum- mers as research fellow for National Heart Insti- tute and National Institutes of Health in Depart- ment of Anesthesiology . . . attends many parties to demonstrate his finesse at dancing . . . spending next year at Sinai Hospital with iiopes for a future in Surgery and a home-town practice. .- a-vi Oj % . JaJ %. . a . 104 ALFRED ANTHONY FILAR, JR., B.S., m.d. Balth)iore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1954 Al . . . alias " the spook " . . . unassuming, good- natured and competent . . . took one look at Sambo in anatomy Lab and almost went back to peddling lilies . . . would need I.V. fluids if prohibition were to return . . . expert on the polka ... in December of freshman year Theo became his per- manent dancing partner . . . son John born in 1956 . . . invaluable experience working in Bon Secours Accident Room . . . divided his summers between the Medical OPD and family florist shop ... in- ternship at Mercy introduces General Practice in Baltimore. CtfJO. £ JL.»-e- and the disciples xvho have enrolled themselves HAROLD LARRY FISHKIN, B.S., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Hal . . . witty, enthusiastic, easy to know and like . . . class treasurer in Freshman year . . . well known for his description of the forces of labor .. . . promoter of Sunday morning scrimmages starring the Phi D. E. Dyspneic eleven . . . sum- mers of ' 55 and ' 56 spent working with problem children in a N. Y. Boys Camp . . . invaded the Wild West last summer taking a Phoenix extern- ship . . . has worked as an X-ray technician at Lutheran Hospital and extern at Spring Grove . . . Child Psychiatry after an internship at the Brook- lyn Hospital seems most likely. M-OUiJil U. iaJJc , .11. 105 HARRY JOHN FITCH, B.S, m.d. Silver Spring. AUiryland UNIVERSITY ' OF MARYLAND 1951 Harry . . . best known for his refreshing candor and his flare for the controversial . . . tills the soil on his 144 acre colonial plantation at Charlottes- ville, Va. . , . externships at SBGH and Merc7 . . . ' 57 Public Health fellowship at Montebello . . . published an article on the technique of platelet counting while at Walter Reed in ' 56 . . . wooed and won Sally in ' 56 . . . recently acquired the first installment of their planned dozen . . . plans intern- ship and Medical residency at Mercy with future career as a country G.P. and gentleman farmer. • Q - rUt.o and have agreed to the rules of the profession, RICHARD ROWAN FLYNN, m.d. Salt Lake City, Utah UNIVERSITY OF UTAH Dick . . . one of three transcontinental imports from the " Land of Promise " . . . converted Sylvia to Mrs. Flynn August 11, 1954 ... two WDWN progeny, Shauna and Jeff . . . T.E.W. ' s golden- voiced lecturer . . . admired by all for his sin- cerity, devotedness and congeniality . . . Student Council representative . . . AOA . . . teetotaler Dick spent summers of ' 55 and ' 56 toiling at the house that Mr. Boh built . . . summer of ' 57 — fel- lowship in surgery at Mt. Wilson and Kernan ' s ... a bright future begins with internship at U. of California followed by a residency in Ortho- pedics. ■i . Bk ■ ' 106 HARVEY LEE FRIEDLANDER, B.S., m.d. Balt ' nuore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Harv . . . straight " A " man at College Park . . . dash pitch expert who always wins ... " I haven ' t seen a picture card in the last 10 hands " . . . Father-in-law helps with hard CPC ' s . . . married Vicki in 1954 . . . daughter Randi Jean is first $600 deduction . . . Phi Lambda Kappa . . . " That ' s red, I mean green, I mean red " . . . spent summers as resort waiter, scrub nurse and State Health Dept. trainee . . . will collect Army intern pay at Wm. Beaumont Hospital, El Paso, Texas . . . future plans include Surgery and a West Coast practice. OiA4My)( ' l i ' -t ' - M- btit to these alone, the precepts and the instruction. NEIL MORTON GOLDBERG, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Neil . . . tall, dark and humorous . . . " Nothing like a good cigar " . . . bitten by hi-fi bug , . . suc- cessful advocate of self-styled weight reducing plan . . . advocates long walks to stimulate coronary artery circulation . . . another who enjoys the stu- dent lounge card games . . . finally convinced Joan to become Mrs. G. in 1956 . . . Phi Lambda Kappa . . . lab technician and scrub nurse at Lutheran Hospital ... ' 57 summer extern at Spring Grove Hospital . . . future plans include Mercy Hospital internship and probable practice in Internal Medicine. %:!. yrj. - M , p 107 SHELDON GOLDGEIER, B.S., M.D. Balliwore. Aiaryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Shel . . . quiet, affable and unassuming . . . frus- trated golf pro . . . That ' s spelled G-o-l-d-g-e-i-e-r " . . . " Doc ' s " medical career began in high school while playing part of doctor in " Harvey " . . . Myra plans to help him study for state boards during their honeymoon . . . Vice-president of Freshman class . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . Oxygen therapist in 1955, promoted to Ob-Gyn researcher the next two summers . . . plans for future include intern- ship at Sinai and General Practice in Baltimore area. JUA ' vyL Jf Y -- - . I ivill prescribe regimen for the good of my patients BARRETT GOLDSTEIN, a.b., m.d. Rill ti more, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1954 Barry . . . affable and endowed with a liberal sense of humor . . . Monday morning brings tales of weekend misadventures rivaling those of Don Juan . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . summer researcher in Surgery at Sinai and in the mysteries of Cardiology and " hormonology " at U.H. . . . worked diligently as Junior Class secretary . . . future plans await the moulding of that " feminine touch " necessary for those devoted to the practice of Obstetrics and Gynecology . . . internship next year at Sinai Hospital. iSAMCt . UU4Jtuc - - 108 FRANK PHILIP GREENE, m.d. Silver Spring. Maryland GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY Answers to Frank, Phil, or " Herb " . . . the likable easy-going country philosopher with a ready opin- ion on anything from Fords to cigarette lighters . . . recommends private medicine to all his friends ... a willing fourth for bridge . . . plans to let wife Jeannie retire soon to concentrate on cultur- ing out little " Herbs " . . . goes fishing in the aquarium whenever things are slow . . . one sum- mer at the Maryland Drydock was enough . . . spent the next at Montebello Hosp. . . . Surgery looms in the future following U.H. internship. y fiAJi 5? mv. according to my ability and my judgment MEREDITH SAFFELL HALE, b.s., m.d. Reisterstoivn, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1954 Meredith . . . professional student and soldier with the build of a pro football tackle . . . chooses his friends and stands behind them . . . has a unique command of the English language garnered from his experiences with the Rangers in the Okefeno- kees . . . vice-president of sophomore class . . . AOA . . . wife Carol and children, Monica, Gilbert and Robert keep " dad " busy in his free moments . . . spent summers of ' 56 and ' 57 as extern at Rosewood . . . returned to the ranks of the military as a senior, with his sights set on an Army intern- ship in El Paso, Texas. m. 109 WILLIAM POPPLEIN HALL, III, B.s, m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNION COLLEGE 1954 Bill . . . lacrosse ' s loss is medicine ' s gain . . . likes warm weather and straight fairways . . . Nu Sigma Nu and AOA . . . one of the Mr. Boh Foursome . . . originator of McDonald ' s Duct . . . the lingual nerve ... an Indian Landing " yachtsman " . . . summers at National Brewery, Women ' s Hospital, Springfield State Hospital, and Maryland Peni- tentiary ... a Steve Allen admirer . . . springtime Saturdays spent in the Homewood Stadium . . . to sunny California for an internship at L.A. County Hosp. and then either Medicine or Surgery. ' t M .r Xf ' . and never do harm to anyone. JOHN SIMPSON HARSHEY, A.B., m.d. Jeannette, Pennsylvania CATAWBA COLLEGE 1954 Jack . . . pride and joy of Jeannette, Pa. . . . " I ' ll buy that " . . . owns the largest typewriter and private library in the class . . . married sweetheart Maryl August 1957 . . . brief interlude, then back to duty . . . devotes much time to BMR ' s ( build- ing model railroads) . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . lab technician in Army for years . . . recent summers spent at Women ' s Hospital, Mercy Hospital, State Health Dept., and Peninsula General Hosp. . . . looking forward to internship in Youngstown, Ohio, and then on to residency in Internal Medi- cine or Pathology. 110 ALBERT FRANK HECK, A.B., m.d. Balthnore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITi ' 1954 Al . . . scholarly and meticulous . . . the handwrit- ing ' s a pleasure to read . . . bitter memories of sur- gical orals and the lymphatic drainage of the rec- tum . . . expert on philately . . . " Coffee, anyone? " . . . AOA . . . wife Carole an R.N. at Union Memo- rial; may arrange for stork to arrive shortly after diploma . . . summers spent with Crown Cork and Seal, as lab tech and extern at St. Agnes Hospital and as neurology fellow at University . . . rotating internship at Mercy precedes a residency in Neur- ology and hometown practice. a£ . . - ' - To please no one tvill I prescribe a deadly drug WILLIAM JOSEPH HICKEN, A.B., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1954 Bill . . . " If in doubt, ask Hicken " was a useful motto . . . calm, confident and personable . . . avid follower of Goren . . . president of Maryland chap- ter of AOA . . . week-end nights at the ball park, flicks and bridge-table with Bob and Mo . . . summers spent in me dical OPD in 1956 and Dept. of Infectious Diseases in 1957 . . . departed from the bachelor ranks to marry Nancy in August, 1955 . . . daughter Lisa Anne born January 24, 1957; another $600 deduction due in the fall . . . a bright future includes the practice of Internal Medicine in Maryland following internship and residency at U.H. Ill ARTHUR CLARK HOLMES, m.d. Stnithfield, Pennsylvania WHEATON COLLEGE Clark ... a good sense of humor and friendly disposition manifested by a hardy laugh and ready smile . . . fair hair, ruddy complexion, feathered chapeau, poor-man ' s meershaum and V.W. indi- cate Deutschland tendencies . . . claims his orange " bug " was made by der elves in der Black Forest . . . senior class treasurer . . . married his favorite nurse, Jan, in 1956 after numerous trips to NYC . . . summer ' 56 at St. Agnes . . . summer ' 57 as a " cranium cracker " at U.H. . . . plans internship at Mercy, then back to University for residenc7 in Neurosurgery. Q. (%ydJ . t ' - nor give advice which tnay cause his death. ROBERT HARVEY JOHNSON, JR., a.b., m.d. Princess Anne, Maryland DUKE UNIVERSITY 1954 Bob ... a former Blue-Devil . . . amiable, well- educated, balding Shoreman . . . dedicated to the knife . . . trademark, " R.H. " , and a frequent com- panion of one well-versed in the subject . . . lives for a box-seat in section .t6 and dreams of Allie in the " pen " and Mickey with good legs . . . " Just rinse with Vermouth and add an olive " . . . usually saves money — to spend; hence, goes first class or not at all . . . AOA vice-president . . . South Bal- timore Gen. Hosp. and Homewood Terrace resi- dent . . . plans training for a semiacademic Sur- gical career at U.H. ILJl ' - u. M- 112 JAY NORMAN KARPA, A.B., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1955 Jay . . . sincerity and conscientiousness personified . . . interested in the whole patient . . . " But doctor, don ' t you want to hear the social history? " . . . did more than his share of 4 A.M. blood pressures . . . Phi Beta Kappa ... ' 54 ' 55 biochemical re- search at JHU ... ' 56 cancer research at Sloan Kettering ... ' 57 clinical clerk at Memorial Hos- pital in NYC . . . neoplastic tendencies with psy- chiatric overtones . . . internship at Sinai Hospital, followed by a surgical residency and a semiaca- demic practice in Surgery and Oncology. t y ' Vm ti Nor trill I give a woman a pessary to procure abortion. RICHARD HUBBARD KELLER, m.d. Ogden, Utah UNIVERSITY OF UTAH Dick . . . lanky, friendly, and easily embarrassed . . . Mr. Medicine Man . . . possesses enormous uh appetite for facts, uh figures, and uh food . . . uses his meal tickets to maximum advantage . . . chased by all women but hasn ' t been caught yet . . . Senior Class vice-president . . . Alpha Omega Alpha . . . last summer as medical extern in Utah . . . spare time spent skiing, exporting automobiles to other locals, and feeling grubby . . . internship at Salt Lake County Hospital and then a residency in Internal Medicine. Jl.Ji,., 1. -Ml 1 -0. 113 JAMES MICHAEL KELSH, A.B., m.d. Slaten Island. New York COLUMBIA UNIVERSlTi ' 1951 Big Jim ... the Staten Island kid . . . serious when necessary . . . can ' t understand how he gets out of Medical Clinic so early . . . conscientiousness and sincerity make his friendship most valuable . . . began medical school with Robbie and Alisa; will graduate with Michael and Brian among family supporters . . . considered one of the more for- tunate members of the class in regards to CPC ' s . . . past three summers in bacteriology research at Camp Dietrich . . . future plans encompass in- ternship at Letterman Army Hospital and a G.P. or Surgical residency. Volaa V, 6j j x . But I jvill preserve the purity of my life and my art. JAMES JUDE KELSO, b.s., m.d. Linthic im Heights. Maryhmd UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Jim . . . daily commuter from the shores of Anne Arundel County . . . behind the stern intellectual look lies a rare sense of humor . . . " Let ' s get down to the facts of the matter " . . . emerged as the local authority on " pseudotumor cerebri " at Medi- cal Grand Rotmds . . . married to Greta Joyce in ' 55 . . . an accomplished man on the dance floor . . . fought disease with the State Health Dept. during summer of ' 56 . . . spent .t months on Obstetrics at Peninsula General last summer . . . plans a rotating internship in Youngstown, Ohio, followed by residency in OB-GYN. QLnmi TY eAa M.a XT 114 FRANK KENNETH KRIZ, JR., B.S., m.d. Tou ' son. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Frank . . . society surgeon ... If you need data on the percentage of gall stones in males over 45, ask Kenny . . . " Do your arms and legs hurt? " . . . one of the sharp dressers in the class . . . the profile . . . married Jeanette in April ' 56, proud parents of Alicia Ann, January 16, 1957 . . . photography editor of TerrAE Mariae Medicus . . . " Somebody open a window; it ' s hot in here " . . . fellowship in Surgery at U.H. and Mt. Wilson in ' 56 an ' 57 . . . rotating internship at Beaumont Army Hospital in El Paso, followed by residency in Orthopedic Surgery. I tvill not cut for stone. DANIEL MELVIN LEVIN, B.S., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland university of MARYLAND, SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 1954 Danny . . . " saw the light " after studying phar- macy . . . pleasant combination of quiet dedica- tion to work and easy going disposition . . . one of the forces behind the introduction of the honor system . . . senior representative to Honor Council . . . copy editor of Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . prolific reader . . . spends spare time and summers in his alternate profession, filling prescriptions . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . still evading the clutches of matrimony . . . internship at University Hos- pital to be followed by an academic career in Internal Medicine. 115 HOWARD STANLEY LEVIN, B,A„ M.D. Baltimore, Maryland BOWDOIN COLLEGE 1954 " H " . . . Sam ... his first words must have brought laughter . . . started teasing nurses from his cradle . . . sophistication, enthusiasm, humility, sincerity and wit, all in one hairy package . . . one of Dr. Stewart ' s tieless ten . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . AOA . . . " hssss " . . . stood under a Homberg while taking wedding vows with Sue in Decem- ber 1957; a tour of the Virgin Islands followed . . . ran the first four-minute myelogram . . . sum- mers at Rosewood ... a rotating internship at Uni- versity Hospital in the immediate future. -liA ut J A ' O- even for the patients in ivhoin the disease is manifest ' , ARTHUR LITOFSKY, B.S., M.D. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSlTi ' OF MARYLAND 1954 Otts . . . " Ching how " . . . remarkable resemblance to Jerry Lewis or perhaps some oriental character . . . tall, good-natured and gregarious . . . " We have 30 of them out at Rosewood " . . . expert on con- genital anomalies and various pediatric abnormal- ities . . . tour of the Southland in 1957 . . . Phi Delta Epsilon ... to exchange vows with Serena immediately after graduation ... ' I can ' t work tonight, I have a date " . . . Seen Nick. ' ' . . . " We have to find a caterer " . . . internship at Sinai coming up . . . plans to specialize in Surgery and practice outside Baltimore. K 4 - v ;? 116 ROBERT CARPENTER MACON, B.S, m.d. California, Maryland GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITi ' 1954 Bob . . . perennial dieter . . . " Do you know how much weight I ' ve lost? " . . . affable and good natured . . . author of an anthology on Japan after 2 ' 2 years in Uncle Sam ' s employ . . . summers spent as milkman, lab technician at U.H., and cli- maxed by 3 months in Medical Care Clinic in 1957 . . . Phi Beta Pi ... a busy private practice in McAleer Court . . . married Ines in July, 1954 . . . brought forth Bobby and Carrie to date . . . intern- ship at Washington Medical Center with a pos- sible residency in Internal Medicine to follow. UJ Mcc ' I will leave this operation to be performed by practitioners (specialist in this art) , DONALD FREDERICK MANGER, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1954 Don . . . reserved, likable, quiet sausage packer . . . track star in college days at Hopkins . . . President of Christian Medical Society . . . bachelor with no foreseeable plans for improvement of marital status . . . 5:10 express to Edmondson . . . sum- mers spent in Medical OPD, climatology lab at Johns Hopkins, and Loch Raven Veterans Hos- pital . . . proud owner of Royal Blue Kaiser of ancient vintage, always parked within five miles of the hospital . . . plans call for internship at U.H. and General Practice in Maryland. yflLifK t U. , 7 n 117 WILLIAM JOHN MARSHALL, JR., B.S., M.D. Zanesiille, Ohio MUSKINGUM COLLEGE 1954 Bill . . . learned, friendly, charming . . . proud sub- scriber to two journals . . . " You mean you haven ' t read it yet — it ' s been out since yesterday " . . . Nu Sigma Nu and AOA . . . always in the know — " Have you heard the latest? " . . . Internal Medi- cine — " No one else is a Doctor " . . . summers spent as lab tech in industrial first aid, and in assisting physician in private practice in Ohio . . . " You ' re sick, sick, sick! " . . . hopes to practice medical sub-specialty and perhaps teach part-time someday . . . internship at Phila. General Hospital. Tj o Vvw.A-tt V. ' W.t). In every house where I tvill enter GERALD TIMOTHY McINERNEY, A.B., M.D. Niagara Falls, New York UNIVERSITY ' OF WEST VIRGINIA 1954 " Mac " . . . local representative of the " honeymoon town " . . . quiet ex-quarterback of University of West Virginia . . . outspoken views on Baltimore traiTic . . . converted to Dixie point of view . . . externship at Franklin Square, University, and Montcbello hospitals . . . spent last summer with Dept. of Endocrinology . . . expert on " very " basal metabolism . . . " If you can ' t cut it out, its psycho- somatic " . . . married Lorraine in September 1956 . . proud papa of Maureen in November 1957 . . . after internship in Buffalo, he plans a career in Surgery. 118 JOSEPH ANTHONY MEAD, JR., A.B,, m.d. BaUitiiore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1954 Joe . . . pipe-smoking, conscientious, " rabble rouser " . . . the taxpayers never get a break . . . " This medical school is costing me 90c per hour " . . . alumnus of Loyola, Continental Can and Balti- more County Health Department . . . sea-side resort dweller . . . AOA . . . married Pat in December, 1955 . . . little Joe in October, 1956; little ???, July, 1958 . . . populate the world! . . . authority on Nephrotic Syndrome . . . " There is no such thing as essential hypertension " . . . internship at Mercy, then General Practice in Maryland. , - CL. -yyu Tn. jx only for the good of my patients, JOHN JEROME MERENDINO, B.s, m.d. Silver Spring. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1954 John . . . " Pop " . . . the " Grey Ghost " from City Hospital . . . did some " time " at Jessup as an extern . . . the congenial philosopher . . . " But Dr. Robinson, my wheel chair broke down " . . . blood drawer at U.H. . . . whirlwind courtship with Phyllis leading to marriage in 195? . . . U.S. Army 1945-46 . . . proud owner of two convertibles, neither of which runs . . . phenomenal vocabulary . . . amateur psychiatrist . . . four years of chess competition with Mr. Mueller . . . plans call for internship at D.C. General and General Practice in southern Maryland. Jl vJV «r C1 JWW Ui 119 ERNEST EUGENE MOORE, A.B., M.D. Hinton, West Virginia WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 1954 Ernie . . . fun-loving son of the mountains ... a natural cunning for medicine and enviable per- sonality predict a great contribution to the healing art . . . " Paging Ernie " . . . ping-pong and social engagemen ts . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . " consultant " to Dr. Harry Robinson, Sr. . . . externships at Franklin Square and Women ' s Hospitals and Pub- lic Health fellowship . . . " Now listen here Orth, 1 am NOT hostilel " . . . Have gun, will travel . . . R. A. Cowley for President . . . plans for internship and residency training in So. Carolina . . . rule out Pediatrics or Dermatology. Owuaf f Vvvct -jyvi.I . keeping myself far from all intentional ill-doing and all seduction, ROBERT BERNARD MULVANEY, A.B., m.d. Newark, Netv Jersey SETON HALL UNIVERSITY 1954 " Max " . . . remains faithful to the Empire State . . . Dr. Krahl ' s favorite and whiz on the infra- temporal fossa . . . " Where ' s Max? We start a new service today. " . . . Nu Sigma Nu ... gift of gab . . . home town politico and landlord . . . sets pace for the latest styles in clothes . . . always figuring the angles with the " old man " ... a busy man with contacts in New York and Maryland hospitals . . . extern at City and Jessup ' s House of Correc- tion . . . versatility in Law suggests a career in Legal Medicine . . . internship and practice in New Jersey lie ahead. ;; w 6W G.p . ' - t-V . . 120 ROY WADE ORTEL, A.B., b.d., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland GETTYSBURG COLLEGE 1951, YALE DIVINITY ' SCHOOL 1954 Wade — devotion to the art of healing with ver- satility and training in ministry calls him to his future in medical missions where needed most . . . a refreshing sense of humor and ready retort to Orth ' s practical jokes . . . " Wade did it! " . . . secre- tary of Senior Class . . . hi-fi enthusiast and amateur TV personality . . . Haley ' s Comet . . . summer ex- ternships at St. Agnes and Loch Raven V.A. Hos- pitals . . . friend to all who Icnow him, especially spouse Jane . . . " Where are you parked today? " . . . internship at Graduate Hosp., Phila., looms ahead. tfcu (M , J. and especially from the pleasures of love tvith tvovien or xvith men, JOHN GOEDEKE ORTH, B.S., m.d. Balthnore. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1954 Jack . . . amiable, astute, and able . . . penman- ship too perfect for success as M.D. . . . unexcelled sense of humor . . . popularized " those " jokes ( " Enjoy the show, Mrs. Lincoln? " ) . . . pounded pavements pushing pills for Schering and Merrill Companies during summer . . . externship at Loch Raven V.A.H. . . . claims wife Mary as his encour- agement . . . little Jack, 1957, is without a doubt " the greatest " . . . R A. Cowley and Matt Dillon his ideals . . . music from outer space . . . golf? ... IV fluids and turn q2h . . . internship at Mercy and General Practice in Maryland. 121 AYLAND MIDGLEY OTTINGER, M.D. Magna, Utah UNIVERSITi ' OF UTAH " Bing " . . . thorough, conscientious, and always available with a ready smile and a helping hand . . . typical of the Utah boys and a credit to our class and to the profession . . . left the copper smelters to study medicine . . . externship at Holy Cross Hospital, Salt Lake City, during the summer of 1957 . . . " Is that right? " . . . Nick ' s right hand man in setting tri-malleolar fractures . . . blushes easily, works diligently, and stalks success . . . future plans include a residency in Medicine and private practice in the West. 04 y]flMnr: - be they free or slaves. CHARLES EDWIN PARKER, A.A., B.A., M.D. Roseville, California UNIVERSITi ' OF UTAH 195. Chuck . . . inherent sincerity and versatility to- gether with natural leadership led to continual contributions to our class progress . . . " My boat was late for Anatomy Class " . . . President of Freshman class and Student Council . . . hi-fi and " moon watcher " ... " I loved Biochemistry " . . . marrietl Arlie in 1956 — considers this his greatest accomplishment . . . summers spent cruising and doing research on Electronics in Medicine . . . future predicts an Army intcrnsliip in Tacoma, Washington, travel, and dedication to research. -tf fds £ 1 £ N. n 122 ANTONIO PEREZ-SANTIAGO, B.s., m.d. Ponce, Puerto Rico UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO 1956 Tony . . . quiet, conscientious Latin lover . . . realiz- ing lifetime ambition in achieving M.D. . . . studies to hi-fi . . . enjoys Friday night flicks . . . hemoglobin in a.m. . . . twelfth floor shivers . . . " Snow. ' what ' s thees! " . . . ambition: to present a CPC in Spanish to an all-English-speaking class . . . hopes to tour the world again after making his first million . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . vacations spent as a chemistry professor in Puerto Rico . . . plans to return to native land for internship and General Practice or Pediatrics. OLdbbvt - ' CiiSvp - Xa- « i« , M T - All that Tnay cowe to my knowledge MICHAEL DONALD POTASH, B.s., m.d. Silver Spring, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Mike . . . son-in-law of leading local criminal lawyer . . . " Oh man! " ... he showed Yul Brynner how to cut his hair . . . external strabismus from watching pretty nurses walk through the cafeteria . . . has an aversion toward redheads . . . four years of medical school combined with three years of Goucher have made life more exciting . . . exponent of Sigmund Frog . . . wed Vella in summer of ' 57 . . . summers spent as Dr. Schweitzer ' s emissary at Springfield . . . after a rotating internship at Sinai, a career in Psychiatry. n uJlaA cO- Po4o , M.O, 123 JAY THOMAS RAUH, M.D. Millers, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND " Pete " . . . the country-boy from northern Mary- land . . . self-confidence based on knowledge and common sense . . . who else can spell " axsident " like the Jay-bird? . . . lady ' s man . . . 2nd Lt. . . . nightmares of stat WBC ' s as lab tech in fresliman year . . . Sammye Lyn his bride of 1956 . . . David Joseph makes three ... a flare for the controversial . . . suits out of Esquire . . . summers spent as microbiology fellow in 1956 and extern in OB- GYN at Boiling AFB in 1957 . . . " fireballs on the uticus " . . . future suggests OB-GYN residency and long Air Force hitch after U. H. internship. in the exercise of my profession or outside of my profession MAURICE MERRICK REEDER, A.B., M.D. Balthnore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1954 Mo . . . well-liked, lanky, prolific ex-civilian . . . overpowering man with the gnip-gnop " paddle . . . Ti-RRAE Marial Medicus senior write-up editor . . . Phi Beta Pi social chairman . . . Bret Maverick of the 12th floor . . . wed to Elaine in freshman year . . . sons David and Danny born Nov. ' 55 and Dec. ' 57 . . . spent 5 summers on the Coke truck ... ' 57 clinical clerkship in Radiology and Pathology at Walter Reed . . . Internal Medicine — a challenge; Radiology — a profit . . . khaki ten- ure begins with rotating internship at Wm. Beau- mont Army Hospital in El Paso. P u. ; 6 .i). 124 LEWIS HILLIARD RICHMOND, B.S., M.D. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Lew . . . Maryland ' s gift to medicine and God ' s gift to women . . . hi-fi and ping-pong . . . Phi Lambda Kappa ... a stickler for little-known neurological diseases . . . discovered the refreshing warmth of Florida and June bride Madge, in a 1000 mile non-stop journey at Christmas . . . con- genial, sincere and light-hearted . . . lab tech at Sinai in 1956 . . . spent last summer in aviation medicine at Boiling A.F. Hospital . . . the future includes a military internship in San Antonio, Texas, with a possible Air Force career in the offing. £cuH ' d 9C C ' or in daily commerce tvith men ROBERT JOSEPH ROBL, B.S., M.D. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1954 Bob . . . ardent Navy man . . . " Why does every- body call us mister? " . . . frustrated railroad engi- neer . . . vast experience in the defense mecha- nisms of paranoia . . . " those CXXI nurses " . . . connoisseur of photography, dixie-land bands, long drives and Harley-burgers . . . prexy and driving force behind Nu Sigma Nu . . . summers at Ports- mouth Naval Hospital studying pathology, OB- GYN and tomato worms . . . bride-to-be Carmen patiently awaiting June . . . Naval internship at Portsmouth and OB-GYN career coming up. iZJU4-y -fZll njp 125 HAROLD ROLL, B.S., m.d. Biiltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 " Tootsie " . . . premature maturity and subtle man- ner ... a nonchalant individualist . . . with the U.S. Air Force during 1944-45 . . . " Write big " . . . relaxes with good music . . . tinkers with bifocals in spare time . . . junior OB sack-rat . . . loyal member of Phi Delta Epsilon . . . affectionate memories of Medical OPD during summer of ' 57 . . . deserted the bachelor life for Frances in ' 56 . . . daughter, Joyce Anne, in August 1957 . . . plans for the future include Neurology or Ophthal- mology following rotating internship at U.H. l . , - ■ 4 rt ' which ought not to be spread abroad JAMES DOUGLASS SHEPPERD, JR., A.B., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 1954 Doug . . . calm, congenial, unhurried . . . Inter- fraternity Council prexy. Phi Lambda veep . . . Sophomore class treasurer ... a well worn path to Goucher paid off in wife Jewell . . . " Anyone need a date " . . . Arthur Murray of the class of ' 58 . . . specialist in neurodermatitis . . . represents third generation of healers in the Shepperd clan . . . summer cab-driver and State Health Dept. trainee ... ' 57 clinical clerk in Cardiology at Walter Reed . . . future includes internship at D.C. General Hospital and a residency in Internal Medicine. .3a . .o M4.fi j%,l). 126 CHARLES ELIOT SILBERSTEIN, A.b, m.d. Ballimore, Alaryland WESTERN MARYLAND COLLEGE 1954 " Chick " . . . pleasant, ambitious, conscientious, and greying . . . exchanged his tennis racquet for a stethoscope . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . danced at his wedding with Barbara . . . the merger is ex- pected to pay its first dividend by graduation time . . . summers spent taking ultra-short boat trips, as counselor at a children ' s camp, scrub nurse at Lutheran Hospital, and as a fellow in G.U. . . . springtime Saturdays spent in Homewood Stadium . . . internship at Jefferson Medical College, Phila., followed by GYN or G.U. training. Ctd r e. fvC. u ill keep secret and xvili never reveal. GRANGER GIDEON SUTTON, JR., B.S., M.D. Washington, D. C. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 1954 Granger . . . the phantom . . . " I ' m sorry, but Dr. Sutton has checked out all the books on that sub- ject " . . . quiet manner hides a wealth of knowl- edge . . . ping-pong at 100 mph on 12 th floor . . . myopia from 2 a.m. sessions with Harrison, Freud, and Alpers . . . confirmed bachelor . . . summers spent at Fort Knox doing research in radiobiology and aeronautical engineering . . . shares a zest for the world of psychoanalysis and CVA ' s with Rich- mond . . . plans to enter psychiatry with emphasis on research following internship at Brooke Army Hospital, Texas. Ul RAYMOND ELMER SWANSON, B.A, M.S., M.D. Chicago. Illinois VALPARAISO UNIVERSITi ' 1951 WAYNE UNIVERSITY 1954 Ray . . . another of the balding medicos . . . " Who took my scrub suits? " . . . clinical pathology ex- pert from long experience in Navy and private hospitals . . . with the Fleet Marines in Korea dur- ing 1951-1952 . . . summers spent in U.H. lab, as a Lederle Research Fellow in Microbiology, and as a pathology fellow . . . married Joanne in 1950 . . . son Raymond Alan (Baby Geek) born just in time for sophomore finals . . . future plans after a rotating internship at Detroit Memorial Hospital include a residency in Pathology and practice in the Michigan area. If I keep this oath faithfully, JAMES EDGAR TAYLOR, JR., B.S., M.D. Liilheriille. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Jim . . . energetic and gregarious with a sincere interest in people . . . long hours before the podium as class president for the past three years . . . " Can we have a little quiet, please? " ... a walk through the corrid or with Jim is a social affair . . . record-breaking runs in the blue Plymouths . . . NSN . . . five years log time with the Navy as electronics instructor . . . Pathology fellow during summer of ' 57 . . . M.D. degree shared with wife Gloria and daugiuer Jennifer . . . Public Health internship to be followed by OB-GYN residency and practice in the Free State. 128 JEROME TILLES, B.S., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Jerry . . . " Portly " . . . expert on, and driver of, cars or remnants thereof . . . " whose deal? " . . . Md. Junior Chess Champ . . . gay and carefree, but always comes through smelling like a rose . . . brief undergrad stay . . . Phi Lambda Kappa . . . " Hello Bob, uh Lew, I mean Mike " . . . " seriously " . . . Latin and the classics . . . " This 31 year old white female woman " . . . " Where ' s the tumor? " . . . " How do you like that — a full house! " . . . sum- mers spent with tomato worms and at Spring Grove . . . probable Neurosurgical career after internship at Mercy. 3 -iwvi TI 4 P -O. may I enjoy my life and practice my art, JAMES HAROLD TVER, B.A, M.D. Bridgeport, Connecticut UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 1954 Jim . . . Connecticut Yankee . . . afflicted with con- genital alopecia . . . " kiss of death " . . . paging Dr. " Tyler " . . . Mighty Mouse has given him strong support through the last four years . . . suite-mate with Granger . . . summers at Grace New Haven Hospital, Yale, Baltimore City Hos- pital and the beach . . . discriminating patron of pubs and good music . . . future plans include in- ternship at St. Vincent ' s Hospital in N.Y.C., and a residency in Internal Medicine with emphasis on Cardiology. - ' ' z - - - 129 WILLIAM TODD WARD, B.S., m.d. Chevy Chase, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1956 Bill . . a perennial smile that ' s contagious . . . sports and skiing enthusiast . . . fond memories of SAMA convention in Philadelphia . . . Radiol- ogy and Cardiology at N.I.H. during summers . . . an " in " with the Psychiatry Department thanks to wife Valerie . . . relentlessly seeks knowledge and always seems to find it . . . honesty and humihty — his prime virtues , . . 1248 hornet ' s nest; the twelfth floor follies . . . soon to receive gifts on Fathers ' Day . . . future plans include internship at Colorado General Hospital and practice in the West. 2:0, r 2 , 7 1), respected by all men and in all times; ADRIAN SALTZMAN WEYN, A.B, m.d. Hagerstown, Maryland GETTYSBURG COLLEGE 1954 " Bud " . . . quiet, diplomatic, and red-headed . . . the little dermoid . . . Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Delta Epsilon . . . the invisible man . . . " Have you seen Bud? Does he still go to school here? " ... " I just can ' t decide " . . . couldn ' t get the nurse to call him " doctor " so he married her (Betty) . . . blonde, blue-eyed, Leslie calls him " Daddy " . . . fellowship in psychiatry at University Hospital 1957 . . . State Health Department in summer of ' 56 . . . spc-nding next fifty-two weeks at Mercy Hospital. cC rCLA S. (V-C , 7 . P. 130 RICHARD LOUIS WOLFE, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland WILLIAM AND MARY COLLEGE 1952 Dick . . . thorough, aggressive and possessed of great dexterity . . . well-known for his famous classification of hemangiomas and his rapport with various members of the house stafT . . . test pilot for Ford cars; mistakes city streets for Indianapolis speedway . . . spent several summers at Baltimore Dry Docks . . . summer ' 57 at Wilmer Institute lab studying hypersensitivity to streptococcal or- ganisms . . . future includes the acquisition of a TR-3 (if he can fit into it), internship at Johns Hopkins and a career in Opthalmology. Z but if 1 stverve from it or violate it, PHILIP DAVID ZIEVE, A.B., m.d. Baltimore. Maryland FRANKLIN MARSHALL COLLEGE 1954 Phil . . . disciple of Sigmund Frog . . . con noisseur of fine music, drama, white counts and vodka . . . will always be remembered by Dr. Uhlenhuth for his dissecting prowess . . . Phi D E and Phi Bsta Kappa . . . always arranged the night and week- end schedules . . . Dr. Figge ' s Zeevee . . . one of " the sediment " . . . wed to Elaine in August 1957 . . . summers spent as cab driver, member of fluid team at U.H., extern at Springfield, first aid man at Bethlehem Steel . . . straight internship at B.C.H. and residency in Internal Medicine in the offing. fXJL S . a. p .V 131 JAMES BENSON ZIMMERMAN, b.s., m.d. West AUxandria. Ohio UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 1934 Jim . . . competent, humorous and paternal . . . youngest looking of the class ' " old men " . . . " Lady, please don ' t call me " sonny " . I ' ve got four kids home " . . . pylorospasm before giving the first CPC . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . Student Council treas- urer . . . secretary-treasurer of AOA . . . married Connie while in pre-med . , . father of Andrew, Timothy, Mark and Matthew . , . summers spent as a medic at Bethlehem Steel and as a Neurology fellow at U.H. . . . rotating internship and a year of Medical residency in Dayton before General Practice in Ohio. pH . )k.w . M A may the reverse be my lot. Acknowledgments " When setting out to do a task, one finds that one cannot accomplish this task alone, but needs the help and cooperation of many. This I found to be especially true in planning the school yearbook, and so I would like to take this opportunity to thank the entire year- book staff for their never - ending aide. Among the " unsung Heroes " , I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the following: — To Guenter Sonntag of the Department of Art, who was responsible for photograph- ing 99-44 100% of the pictures, and who was always ready to put a 150 kilogram man in a 30 cubic centimeter test tube; To George Sakowich, Jr., of the Art De- partment, for designing our modern and con- troversial title page and dividers; To Miss K, our " private secretary " and typist, who never failed in reading a medical student ' s handwriting correctly; To Jim Connor, of Garamond Press, who stayed awake at night worrying if the book would be ready on time; To the Members of the Facult) ' , who al- ways gave their permission for photograph- ing anything we desired and who were prompt in giving us any information we needed; To all the members ot the Graduating Class and Medical Scht)ol who helped with the publication o this book; And to our patrons, sponsors, and adver- tisers who financed the annual. Thank you again. Sincerely, 132 Class Officers JAMES E. TAYLOR, JR. PRESIDENT RICHARD H. KELLER VICE-PRESIDENT R. WADE ORTEL SECRETARY A. CLARK HOLMES TREASURER RICHARD R. FLYNN STUDENT COUNCIL JAMES B. ZIMMERMAN STUDENT COUNCIL GAYLORD LEE CLARK, JR. HONOR COUNCIL DANIEL M. LEVIN HONOR COUNCIL ELLIOTT M. BERG EDITOR — Terras Mariae Medicus 133 ♦• r -ii i " i -: J ' ii ;• ••»• ' v;: v: ' ::•::v:K•. :;: ; :: V• Vv:•V :•y••:• :•v;• A • • ' • V ' 1 :.•.-: . . •.••• .•.••• .• . •. •;• •.■? ' -:; V ' SCHOOL OF NURSING ■ • V . , i ..f .••». -. •• . . . • ..m ;; --:- -■ ■■.■■■: ' • . V J y y-f. fp. " ' •■f :.l ,..... FLORENCE MEDA CHPE, k.n., h.s., M.S., i;i).D. r ' ROFESSOR OF NURSING Dean of the Uniiersity of Maryland School of Nursing 136 SCHOOL OF NURSING University of Maryland 620 WEST LOMBARD STREET BALTIMORE 1. MARYLAND OFFICE OF THE DEAN GRADUATES OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING - CLASS OF 1958 GREETINGS: Four years ago as high school graduates you entered the University of Maryland School of Nursing, an institution of higher education. Your main objective then was to become a professional nurse. Now that you have reached your goal through a combined program of general and professional education accompanied by persistent effort in your practical work at University Hopital, Health Department of Baltimore City, Montebello Rehabilitation Hospital and Spring Grove State Hospital for Mental Diseases, you may ask yourself - where do I go from here? During the long hours of difficult study and work application, wherein you helped people to live again, some of you probably have made plans for the future. These plans may be a home-maker, the rearing of families, further study in graduate education so that you may be prepared for nurse specialist, the field of teaching, supervision of nursing services, director of nursing services, dean of a school of nursing and in the important field of public health nursing. These and many more are direct challenges to you who have clearly demonstrated that you have the ability to serve mankind and are competent to represent the profession of nursing. To all of you, many opportunities will be open at sometime or another and since man ' s educational development is a continuous process a door or window will open here and there to which you will want to return; you will want to gain new knawledge, a deeper appreciation for art, music, literature, drama and religion. But, most of all, it is my sincere hope that you will want to nurse the sick and to teach people how to get well and stay well. Florence Meda Gipe Dean and Professor School of Nursing 137 A. Miriam Jamison, a.b., m.a. A si tant Dean of Women, Charge of Residence B. MAin ' K. (AKI., K.N., B.S., PH.D. Associate Professor of Nursing Chair man. Graduate Programs in Nursing C. Virginia Coni.hv, k.n., u.s., ma. Associate Professor of Nursing Chairman, Baccaulaureate Program D. MAK(jAKi:r 1.. Haius, k.n.. b.s., m.s. Associate Professor of Nursing 138 Nancy Anderson, r.n., b.s., m.s. histrucwr in Psychiatric Nursing Martha F. Baer, r.n., b.s., c. p.h.n. Instructor of Public Health Nursing r Alice E. Beegan, r.n., b.s., m.a. Instructor in Maternal and Child Health Barbara Falco, r.n. Assistant Instructor in Aledical and Surgical Nursing Lillie M. Baxter, r.n., b.s. Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing Rum L. i:) ' .soN, B.S., m.s. Assistant Professor of Nutrition W Arlyn Charl ton, r.n., b.s. Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing Theresa M. Fernandez, r.n., b.s., m.a. Associate Professor of Psychiatric Nursing 139 Ellen Foster, r.n., b.s., m.s. histriictor hi Piiliiitric Nursing Mary E. Grotefend, r.n., a.b., m.s., c.p.h.n. Assistant Professor of Public Health Nursing Georgia L. Helmick, R.N., B.S., M.S. Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing Carol M. Hosfhld, r.n., b.s., m.s. Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing Bettye Hughie, r.n., b.s., M.S. Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing Margaret E. Hvdorn, R.N., B.S., M.EI). Associate Professor of Maternal and Child Health Katiirvn M. Jex, r.n., b.s. Assistant Instructor in Maternal and Child Health Janis Kilmer, r.n., b.s. Assistant Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing Joanne Kreh, r.n., b.s. Assistant Instructor in Pediatric Nursing 140 Catherine E. Lindenberger, R.N. Assistant Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing Annie Laurie McElhenie, A.B., M.A. Assistant Professor of Sociology skjpr ' LORRANINE OLMEDO, R.N., B.S. Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing Julia Richardson, r.n., b.s., m.s. Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing R.N., B.S., A.B., M.A., PH.D. Professor of Pediatric Nursing Betty Shubkagel, r.n., b.s., m.n. Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing Eleanor Slacum, r.n., b.s. Assistant Professor and Assistant to the Dean Kathryn S. Wohlsen, r.n., b.s., m.n., m.a. Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing Dorothy Yorke, r.n., b.s. Assistant Instructor in Pediatric Nursing 141 a li lU :u ' iir.trr.- ' ' ' ' ' ' ' f4 _ -- m r Clinical Areas 9BC charge or 5B. ' Medical and Surgical Nursing What! Ten adfnhsions! Grand rounds with the chief. 144 Six long months of clinical calamity! . . . " Can you speak a little louder, please? " . . . Anastamose the bile duct! ! ! . . . " Categories and electric lights? " . . . Bull sessions — 4C and 3A . . . Plenty of time to RELAX! ! . . . only 3 cards a week and 25 " Care Studies " ! . . . 4G — tube feeding, NSDOs and trache- otomy care!! . . . " Supervised!! " . . . The O.R.!! . . . " But you ' ve already scrubbed on 3 D Cs — the craniotomy should be a cinch! " . . . " Just one more hematoma today — I ' ll quit the fluid team! " . . . " Stop! Don ' t light a match to see the oxygen gage! ! " . . . Nega- tive nitrogen balance — avitaminosis ... 7 a.m.: " I ' ll be right over! " ... 3 p.m. " Me? You mean I HAD special charts? " . . . " Two Seconals short? " . . . The " Passion Pit " — only a friend stabs a friend . . . " Dog-watch " and no sleep . . . Those 6 a.m. " Emergencies " . . . But is it right to put two in the same box?? . . . " She ' s been up all night typ- ing! " . . . ' With each PERSON ' S illness (we MUST) empathize; the Health Office judges and donates a prize . . . That ' s Med-Surg. Which tube gets the saline? Th Of iiirc J as bad as the disease. TLC personified. 145 Watch lu) Adding apple!!! So much to remember . . The making of a new culture. ll ' iiiHlli. 146 Now where are those Fallopian tubes? " Mr. Sandman. Blood pressures q 15 minutes. Specialties No, we don ' t treat animals here! Coming or going? If at first yon don ' t succeed Uvwi good!! Will the night ever end? Thrills and spills! 149 You ' re dohig fine, little mother. Can he talk jet? Obstetrical Nursing That maternal instinct. 150 This is where LIFE begins! . . . Prenatal Chnic: L.M.P.?? . . . screenings . . . " NO! You ' re normal!! . . . You gained! " . . . " Where ' s that elevator??!! . . . She can ' t BOA — all the rooms are full!! " . . . " What phase is the moon in? " ... 21 in one day! . . . contractions! contractions! contractions! . . . " Why doesn ' t someone fix that noisy clock? " . . . Bloody show? . . . just prepped! . . . " It ' s twins!! " . . . Father types — numb or frantic!! . . . Planned Parenthood — sh, sh, sh . . . Boy babies have no respect for sterile fields . . . " She ' s not Oriental — she ' s Rh negative! " . . . Mol-iron and multivita- mins . . . Telling a PARA 6 how to feed her baby . . . The slides in 6C class room . . . The blonde in the black veil . . . " Touch the cervix with something unsterile???!! . . . catheterizations and fundus checking . . . hibernation and gavage in " Premie " . . . That weighing routine and all the discharge in- structions . . . Happy farewells! . . . Good basis for marriage we all must agree . . . Fulfillment — through motherhood . . . That ' s our O.B. Finally made 5-4. If he ivere only mine. W hrj ' s going to uiii: Pediatric Nursing The children ' s hours . . . TLC to the tiny tots . . . Tour? . . . " I.V. poles are kept in here . . . oops!! . . . mop closet! " . . . " That ' s how YOU set up a croupette???? " . . . Fighting the Phisohex baths . . . " Hot- rodders " in wheel chairs ... so we changed to mobiles — mechanization! . . . " No TV until it is quiet! " . . . Play Program days — the ' Ruckus Room " . . . Teary mothers in masks and gowns . . . wiping noses and offer- ing comfort on visiting days . . . " But I put this uniform on clean this morning! " . . . " And the tiny wee bear took his medicine just like you ' re going to take yt)urs! " . . . That first intrabonular injection!!! . . . The " Bottle Brigade " on 5B . . . " Only ten more to feed and burp " . . . " This must be Teeling the Mashed Potatoes Day ' " ! . . . But I just fin- ished changing the beds! ... It certainly doesn ' t smell like modeling clay! " . . . Clinic days ... 105 degrees — still rising!! . . . buck- ets and buckets of ice — alcohol sponges . . . 5C conferences — " Not saline eye drops??!! " . . . Through three months of hugging and kiss- ing you ' ll find, you ' re trained — a real mother . . . But you ' re out of your mind . . . That ' s Peds. wonder what they want now? Don ' t throw it . . . it eat! 152 The girls in blue — more maternity!!! . . . " But the hat and coat doesn ' t fit " . . . " Are you prepared — boots, muffllers, knee-highs, earmuffs? . . . No snuggies? " . . . " Never put your bag on the floor " . . . " Newspapers? " ... " I just know they moved the house! " . . . " The father ' s name? " . . . Do you have a layette? . . . pertussis, varicella and Asian flu! ! . . . " Measles in 1 1 14? " . . . should have used the gamma globulin on ourselves " . . . " There really must be an epidemic of ' paint eaters ' " ... Baby Clinic days ... " I just ran out of vitamins! " . . . Onions for fever??? . . . " Scales wet again?!! " . . . Sanitary engineer- ing . . . " Get the DDT " . . . Back to school . . . 250 injections! ! . . . Ten years old — never attended school?? " . . . Chest Clinic — " Have you ever been a miner? " . . . " No snow? . . . How about bribing the weatherman? " . . . " What code number do you use for a ware- house? " . . . It ' s all in a day ' s work or so it would seem, but at the end of the day there just ain ' t no gleam!!! . . . Back to the ofiice with deflated purses to tell all our tales — true Pub- lic Health nurses. Another well-baby. Public Health Nursing B f thdt ' i ill the middle of the harbor! Mixed emotions. Psychiatric Nursing Where ' s Kinsey ' s Report? Occiipatinnal Therapy. 154 Orientation to mental?? . . . Couch time!! . . . Discovery of " the self " . . . " But I don ' t be- long here! " . . . " IPRs daily? " . . . " badmin- ton today? " . . . learning to knit . . . every nerve on edge . . . and when you think you ' ll break — " the Grove " . . . standing room only on the 8 . . . " Have the fare ready so you won ' t halt progress " . . . thumbing rides on Wade!! . . . " Gee, maybe it will snow again. " . . . " T he ' system ' is taking over! " . . . ' " Where did I put those keys?? " . . . " Must be getting old! " . . . Good food for a change! . . . " Shock?? " . . . " The whole thing ' s a shock! " . . . Psychosomatic aching persists! . . . Days and daze writing the project . . . flight of ideas . . . " When ' s the paper due? " . . . Men- tal gymnastics . . . Nursery School, the real thing! ... no two-way mirrors this time . . . Finally working with our peer group . . . real growing experience . . . Overt expressions of our repressed anxiety at the Dorm! . . . those cold, cold showers!! . . . Three months of introspection, our minds in a haze most advantageous in a great many ways . . . That ' s Psych. Deep concentration. Have you heard of Freud? 155 Freshman Class Bottom rou: B. Gray, B. Maier; J. Wiles, J. Gallette. SecoitJ rati: L. Miller, B. Eschelman, E. Jones, A. Zorn, C. ArnolcJ, M. Hayes, Advisor; C. Calvert, S. Gordner, A. McCardy, M. Holland. Thiril rou: M. Reillo, A. Masser, M. Rauisburg, P. Pritchett, E. Kallis, M. Dreesen, B. Rullan, B. Smith, J. Ahalt, D. Betz. Sophomore Class SealeJ: G. CornwcU, J. Hcrntz, D. Arnold, M. Hayes, advisor, J. Eitemiller, D. Owens, J. Booth. P. Hampton, D. Smart, J. Summers, J. Sweglar, J. Olson, J. Yeager. Stjihli)!: : Ci I ' .ivlor, 156 {- ' S iv - ; ' -. •■;: ... F. Huntley President C. HOSFELD Advisor E. DiETZ Vice-President Class of 1959 J. Weber Secretary . Hii.i:man Treasurer I). Haiinu;ari)ni;r Social Chairman 158 R. Brown M. L. Cornelius M. Lombardi S. MuUan S. Dahlin A. Ermer S. Niland S. O ' Neill M. Fedyshyn G. Feldman E. Paddock R. Peters S. Fouse R. Hamilton E. Reynolds J. Ringgold E. Hanson S. Howard M. Rohweddti M. Russell P. King E. Krongard E. Thompson 159 A moment spent in quiet thought Before we meet the challenge frought. With cries of fear and moments of pain To ease the suffering — our nursing aims. What is the goal, one looks with care And mixes love with courage rare, A soothing hand, a pleasant smile, Gives faith to sick — a task worthwhile. To hold a curly-headed babe, To watch a mother ' s worries fade, To answer a quest and say " I knew " — This is the goal we must pursue. WW m u ■4t ' Off- Duty p. £ •- " =• W f % .: Jr) W M Mrs. Alexander It ' s Nursing Service again. ' ] id Board Candidate? One hour per twenty-four hours . . . rowdy restfulness . . . the lineup at the telephone . . . but he ' s three minutes early . . . can I borrow your red scarf . . . first letter in a week — bill for room . . . ladies sewing circle will meet in room 444 . . . community sings in the shower . . . buzzer reville at 6 A.M. . . . dinner is served in the kitchen — baked beans again . . . birthday parties amidst wed- ding showers . . . penthouse on the eighth floor . . . Florida tan above Lombard Street . . . headquarters of the Snow Emergency Crew . . . meetings of every type — planned antl spontaneous . . . weekends at the Park . . . home cooking at home . . . fun is where you fmd it . . . bridge to pass the time . . . enduring friendships . . . consenual valida- tion . . . conscientious councelling . . . " Do you hear running in the halls? " . . . locked in at 1 A.M.! . . . " Please move your red tag. " . . . QUIET HOUR! ! . . . a time to learn the art of living, planning, receiving, hoping, 162 Can ' t get aivay from it. They sing too. Somebody out there likes vie. 163 Pt 03.131 JH L X 1 ll : HKBH iK r 1 B w ) niimbvr is 72 Fluting time. Rail up your sleeve . 164 No ... No. ' Empathy . . . ! Reference reading. 165 ' y ,. V- -J - ii 1 1 i f™ " Student Niines Council at work. Christmas serenade. Our basketball team. 166 Anne Ermer homecoming queen — 1957 Homecoming 1957 HOMECOMING QUEEN CANDIDATES: Anne Ermer, Becky Hamilton, Pat King, Jeanette Sowers, Sandy Reynolds, Georgia Kirtley. 167 Standing: C. Piper, A. Clancy. Secoiul roti : B. Laster, V. Conley, Advisor; A. Robin, Y. Jones. First rou : E. Cooper, D. Barlow, B. Marshall. A. Vermillion, E. Urban, A. Skoda. Terrae Mariae Medicus Editor Business Manager Advertising Manager Photography Editors Senior Write-ups Copy Editors Projects Chairman Sahscriplioiu Patrons Sponsors Faculty Advisor Junior Editors anne robin betsy laster yvonne jones ellen urban cynthia piper ann vermillion Alma clancy Elizabeth lee cooper ann skoda noi r ' - BARTOW jeanni:tth ambrosak BETTY MARSHALL miss VIRGINIA conley betti ' reynolds, shirley howard, mary lou cornelius, doris baumgartner 168 Projects coniviittee in action. Junior Editors at work. Suggestions are always welcome. 169 Student Government Association President First Vice-President Second Vice-President House Chairman Secretary Treasurer Social Chairman President Senior Class President junior Class Fac ilty Advisor SHIRLEY SIMMS WANTLAND ANNE SKODA BETTY REYNOLDS ELIZABETH LEE COOPER MARY LOU CORNELIUS SUE DAHLIN SANDY NILAND NANCY WESTERBURG FRANCES HUNTLEY MRS. KATHERINE WHOLSEN First rou: B. Reynolds, N. Westerburg, F. Huntley, E. Cooper. Secuiul row: A. SkoJa, M. L. Cornelius, Mrs. K. Wholsen, S. Simms, S. Dahlin. 170 Graduates, 1958 NANCY SMITH WESTERBURG B.S. IN NURSING President " Smitty " . . . personality personified . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Canterbury Club . . . Dining Hall Club Secretary . . . W.R.A. Represen- tative . . . Glee Club . . . Junior Class Treasurer . . . Student Nurses ' Council of Maryland . . . pure friendliness . . . natural humorist . . . Santa ' s little helper . . . " 265 " more days . . . December Bride . . . perseverance . . . stands up for her beliefs . . . short career — big family. BETSY SMITH LASTER B.S. IN NURSING Vice-President " Bets " . . . lots of fun and laughs . . . Aqualiners . . . Red and White Band . . . Business Manager of Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . Big Sister Chair- man . . . confident . . . Thurmont chicken farm . . . perseverance pays off . . . efficient wedding planner Jim ' s better half . . . FTL?C . . . " Lost another pound " . . . enough credits to graduate three times . . . vivacious . . . immediate plans — housewife and mother. MARY JEAN BRAY B.S. IN NURSING Secretary " Jean " . . . empathy plus . . . Alpha Delta Pi . . . Alpha Lambda Delta . . . Phi Kappa Phi . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Chairman of Student Government Association Nominating Committee . . . " Oh, no! " . . . real talent with a pen and brush . . . sincere and conscientious . . . always caught in a crossfire? — likes wrestling in cold showers . . . has a yen to follow boat whistles . . . future fore- sees General Duty and then Public Health Nursing. 172 VIVIAN ANN VERMILLION B.S. IN NURSING Treasurer " Ann " . . . sweet sincerity . . . Canterbury Club . . . Chapel Choir . . . University Theater . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland . . . Glee Club . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus — Senior Copy Editor ... a pretty warm smile and a friendly " Hi " . . . " It ' s just the dearest thing. " . . . wonderful to tell your troubles to . . . hard worker . . . bound for the OB wards. ANN L. SKODA B.S. IN NURSING Assistant Treasurer " Annie " . . . quiet sincerity . . . Alpha Delta Pi . . . Canterbury Club . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Glee Club . . . S.G.A. Vice-President . . . assistant treasurer . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland — Nominating Committee . . . friendly and dependable . . . willing worker with a finger in every pie . . . spaghetti dinners and pajama parties . . . Duchess doesn ' t bite — oh no! ... a yen to travel. ELLEN STAFFORD URBAN B.S. IN NURSING Social Chairman " Ellie " . . . effervescent personality . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma Social Chairman . . . A.W.S. representative . . . Newman Club . . . Glee Club . . . Social Chairman — Junior Year . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus — Photogra- phy Editor . . . Panhellenic Council Secretary . . . extra classes and symphonies . . . deep under- standing . . . our energetic pixie . . . " But the Gestapo says no! " . . . the future holds New Haven and Bob. 173 JEANNETTE AMBROZAK B.S. IN NURSING The quite thinker . . . Secretary of Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Secretary of Junior Class . . . Annie ' s counter part . . . always there to help . . . always the first to be called on alphabetically — but happy? to volunteer ... a loyal Baltimorean . . . Shubby was never done better . . . analyst extraordinaire . . . deserting Baltimore for career in New York — general duty or Public Health. DOROTHY A. BARLOW B.S. IN NURSING " Dottie " . . . drive and determination . . . Alpha Chi Omega . . . Sailing Club . . . Glee Club . . . Newman Club . . . Student Activities Committee . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus — Circulation Edi- tor . . . always seen heading for Bloomfield ... A penny a day while Roger ' s away . . . " Horrors, I ' m a pound overweight! " . . . sensitive ... a ready laugh . . . Roger dominates the future with Public Health and School Health Nursing. MILDRED F. BING B.S. IN NURSING " Bunny " . . . short and sweet . . . Hillel . . . Thrrae Mariae Medicus . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . May Day Committee . . . Intramural sports . . . " Oh! That is ridiculous. " . . . extra curricular activities include Mark . . . marriage seen in August . . . " What test? " ... " I don ' t tmder- stand. " . . . let mc see your age card . . . nice things come in small packages . . . Public liealih or pedi- atrics for the future. 174 ANNE G. BLAUVELT B.S. IN NURSING " Annie " . . . our glowing blond . . . Gamma Phi Beta Sorority . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Glee Club . . . quick to establish rapport . . . Hey! . . . runs a date bureau . . . eager and serious . . . " Well, Gee whiz! " . . . favorite— 9BC . . . marriage if right one is found . . . anticipates a roomy New York apartment . . . Public Health Nursing. ANN WILSON BOYCE B.S. IN NURSING " Willie " . . . friendship abounding . . . Newman Club . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Gamma Phi Beta — co-chairman homecoming activities . . . Vice-president Junior Class . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland — President . . . Membership and Career Committees . . . Maryland League for Nursing . . . June Wedding ' 57 . . . busy as a bee . . . ambitious . . . hard worker . . . expectant mother . . . Navy wife and Navy Juniors — off to a good start. PATRICIA A. BROWN B.S. IN NURSING " Pat " . . . sophisticate . . . Glee Club . . . Sailing Club . . . Homecoming Committee . . . May Day . . . Jud. Board . . . numerous activities for this gal . . . always good on a scavenger hunt . . . private room on the tenth floor . . . watch those skiis . . . who ' s the lucky guy now? . . . never too busy to be of help . . . " I ' ll go! " . . . " My filling fell out this morning! " . . . Europe soon — hopefully . . . Nursing in general ] 175 ROBIN L. CARTER B.S. IN NURSING The show must go on! . . . Gamma Sigma Sigma Service Sorority . . . University Theater . . . Glee Club . . . mathematically declined . . . Hi-Fi phobia . . . " What time does the health office open? " . . . Nova Scotia . . . Who but Robin could have had an experience like that? . . . conscientious worker ... a great pal . . . Psychiatric Nursing is her choice. ALMA D. CLANCY B.S. IN NURSING " Clanc " . . . " Great White Mother " . . . Senior Jud. Board . . . Student Nurses Council of Mary- land . . . Phi Kappa Phi . . . plant surgeon in her private green house . . . knows more about medi- cine than a doctor . . . the analyst . . . popcorn maker . . . the listening post . . . " Well, my son, Jerry. " . . . Have diploma — will travel! . . . really wants to be a philosopher. ELIZABETH L. COOPER B.S. IN NUKSING " Betty " . . . always foLmd working . . . Phi Kappa Phi . . . " D " Club . . . outstanding bandsman — 1956 . . . Gamma Gamma Sigma . . . Glee Club . . . Basketball . . . S.G.A. — fourth vcep . . . House- chairman . . . Orchestra . . . Terrah Mariae Mi-DlCUS . . . Wesley Foundation . , . Student Nurses Council of Maryland . . . " This is a brave new world. " . . . " Huxley ' s Triumph " . . . excellent student . . . serenades the 7th floor via trumpet . . . " Broken Arrow anyone.- ' " ... a friend to all . . . reservation bound with ilic U.S.P.H.S. 176 FRANCES B. DICKINSON B.S. IN NURSING " Fran " . . . loving generosity . . . Wesley Foun- dation . . . Aqualiners . . . Intervarsity Christian Fellowship — secretary-treasurer . . . Glee Club . . . a sincere interest in other people . . . always with a smile . . . Oh! those red roses . . . deep con- victions . . . tall . . . stately . . . can offer good advice . . . neatest room in the dorm . . . some area of psychiatric nursing for the future. BETTIE A. EUBANK B.S. IN NURSING " Bett " . . . " The Critic " . . . Louisa Parsons Nurs- ing Club . . . Kappa Delta Sorority . . . Fire Marshall . . . Red Cross Club . . . Circulation Staff of Diamondhack . . . " Want to buy a Christmas stocking? " . . . likes a good argument ... " I have to wash my hair tonight. " . . . avid Goren follower . . . altar bound with Scotty . . . future holds — Doctor ' s Assistant or a career in Elementary Edu- cation. PATRICIA J. EVANS B.S. IN NURSING " Patty " . . . refreshingly antagonistic . . . Kappa Delta Sorority . . . Intramurals . . . Basketball . . . Daydodger ... " I bid five no trump. " . . . " Who likes a dentist? " . . . hair cut famous . . . strong convictions . . . " And you anastomos. " . . . high calorie dieter . . . avid textbook reader . . . Obstetri- cal nursing instructor combined with marriage to a dentist — Paul. 177 PATRICIA DALE EVERY B.S. IN NURSING " Dale " . . . such pep . . . Gamma Phi Beta . . . Junior Class Historian . . . first T.V.-M.D. star . . . ' Oh, No! ! " . . . " Don ' t go to that restaurant, they have the worse china in Baltimore " . . . OOh, that party! . . . the sun lamps with friends . . . surgical or obstetrical ward is her aim . . . marriage and family is appealing. NORMA JEANNE FIERY B.S. IN NURSING " Jeanne " . . . sincerity and honesty . . . Louisa Par- sons Nursing Club . . . Glee Club — Junior Secre- tary — Senior President . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . volcano at rest . . . " Just a few more winks! " . . . down to earth . . . not a care . . . alto voice . . . her rooms a mouse trap . . . life with a medic . . . future holds marriage and pediatric nursing. EILEEN G. FISHBEIN B.S. IN NURSING Quietly mature . . . Phi Sigma Sigma . . . our tirst married . . . proved that nursing and marriage do mix ... as docs beauty and brains . . . biggest downfall — no time off with Bill . . . memories of those rides to Montebello in the " old faithful " . . . loves to cook . . . Maternal and Child Health Nursing spotlights the future. 178 ROSA R. GOLDSTEIN B.S. IN NURSING Pert charmer . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club ... Phi Sigma Sigma . . . Hillel . . . Larry — ' 57 . . . our little housewife . . . " Now mother how do you feel. ' ' " . . . vitamin tablets . . . " We can ' t have class, I ' ve got to bake a cake! " ... a gentle and under- standing nurse and friend . . . lullabys soon . . . major — marriage and motherhood. SANDRA J. GORDON B.S. IN NURSING " Sa nde " ... a cute little miss with plenty of get up and go . . . interests run to Aqualiners . . . Glee Club . . . Diamondback . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . coffee break ... a menagerie on the 4th floor . . . birds and fish . . . " You must be kidding! " . . . buzzer always ringing . . . looks for- ward to travel combined with Medical and Sur- gical Nursing. JOAN E. GOSNELL B.S. IN NURSING " Goz " . . . blond bombshell . . . Sigma Kappa Sorority . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Glee Club . . . " You ' ll need it for state boards. " . . . " Gotta match? " . . . " Pool anyone? " . . . here comes another laugh . . . December brought a diamond her way . . . Brook — lucky man . . . September will ring wedding bells . . . Pediatrics — her specialty. 179 JUNE BEVERLY GRAY B.S. IN NURSING " June " . . . trim figure . . . innocent eyes . . . spark- ling personality . . . always on the go when not napping . . . " What can I wear this week-end? " . . . what would she do without us ... a barrel of siblings . . . ' Got any new magazines? " . . . could survive on that Italian food forever . . . cold showers are fun, but the trouble they bring . . . future??? ANN M. GRIESSER B.S. IN NURSING " Ann " . . . pompous pony tail . . . Kappa Delta- House Manager . . . Circulation Staff of Diamond back . . . Sophomore Prom Decorations . . . Intra murals . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . " Bridge anyone? " . . . Hosfeld stand in . . . Mrs Edgar G. Cumar, Jr. on March 9 ... 9 to 5 . Saturdays and Sundays off . . . definite ideas . Public Health . . . School Nursing or doctor ' s assistant in the future. ELEANOR HARDY B.S. IN NURSING Alpha Xi Delta Louisa Parsons . . Sophomore Harmony Hall " Ele " . . . quiet and expressive . . — Corresponding Secretary . . Nursing Club . . . Angelflight Prom Decoration Committee . . . . Glee Club . . . Rossborough Club . . . ' " What makes you feel that way? " . . . the thinker . . . Voodoo posters — handy with the paints . . . bangs with a crew cut ... a Masters in Psychiatry is in store ill tlie fall. 180 JEANNEANE M. HOUPT B.S. IN NURSING Demure and reserved . . . lovely red hair ... an ardent bridge player . . . " How is Maryland Gen- eral? " . . . " I ' m specialing. " ... a soft voice . . . that favorite rocking chair . . . independent, but for Chuck . . . became a December Bride . . . looks forward to General Duty Nursing ... a family too . . . plenty of little redheads for Mr. and Mrs. NANCY SYNDER HUTCHINS B.S. IN NIIRSINC, " Nance " . . . pleasant disposition . . . Alpha Lambda Delta . . . country gal . . . diligent worker . . . friendly smile . . . never seen on weekends . . . Oh, those wedding vacations . . . " I ' d like to make a call to Poolesville " . . . building a boat . . . " Oh! It ' s rabbit! " . . . campfires and singing ... a future Public Health nurse and homemaker. YVONNE MADELINE JONES B.S. IN NURSING " Will " . . . girl everyone loves . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Homecoming Queen Candidate . . . Glee Club . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus — Editor Junior year; advertising editor Senior year . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland . . . " Oh my! " . . . worships her better half dream . . . laughter with tears . surrounded by many friends . . . Masters in Nursing Education. Psychiatrist ' s • • " Hey gang " . . . an Easter wedding 181 JOYCE F. KAETZEL B.S. IN NURSING Reserved . . . sincere . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Glee Club Vice-President Senior year ... a quiet but ready sense of humor . . . favors Monk Meyers ' meetings on Monday nights . . . good with books . . . private T.V. viewing in room 521 .. . Dear Gussy . . . prefers O.B. or Feds in the line of education for the future. SYLVIA A. KELLY B.S. IN NURSING Oh what energy! . . . Sigma Kappa Sorority . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland . . . Rossborough Club . . . " But Doc has class Friday night! ' . . . sleeps through anything . . . " party anyone? " . . . 4G phobia . . . call a spade a spade . . . new styles are a must . . . Mrs. Bennett in August . . . Psychiatry or Public Health after graduation. GEORGIANA KIRTLEY B.S. IN NURSING " Georgia " . . . cute and usually collected . . . Alpha Chi Omega . . . Aqualiners ... a very neat, femi- nine gal . . . 4A office . . . chief rider of Greyhound bus to College Park . . . Shorty is the lucky boy . . . Oh that alarm clock . . . am I late . . . beautiful handwriting . . . fun . . . Who needs breakfast.- ' . . . marriage and general duty nursing for the future. 182 HELEN EILEEN KLEIN B.S. IN NURSING Wesley Club . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Phi Kappa Phi National Honorary Society . . . homebody . . . " Where ' s Jerry? " . . . excels in nurs- ing techniques . . . 4G night duty — just loves it . . . Summertime and Meadow Brook ... a June bride ' 58 . . . future holds Mr. Kern for sure . . . perhaps teaching in Obstetrical or Pediatric nursing. RUTH J. LAMBERT B.S. IN NURSING Independent ideas ... Pi Beta Phi secretary . . . intramural volleyball and basketball . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Terrae Mariae Medi- CUS staff . . . expressive brown eyes . . . may be found working . . . Annapolis weekends . . . yummy meals in the kitchen . . . " But I can learn to cook " . . . likes law . . . " Close the door " . . . friendly and sweet ... a future with Joe and Psychiatric nursing. JOYCE LEEK B.S. IN NURSING Reserved . . . deep . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Tennis Club — but natch . . . decoration committee for Homecoming Dance . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . speak up girl . . . don ' t forget you ' re our tennis champ . . . hates tobacco . . . what . . . spends time on the Eastern Shore . . . gets an earful from Monk on Monday evenings . . . nursing in Maryland or D.C. for the future. 183 EVELYN MA ' LEMONOFF B.S. IN NURSING " Evie " . . . responsive . . . ready with a warm smile . . . Sigma Delta Tau . . . Phi Kappa Phi . . . Alpha Lambda Delta . . . Hillel ... a keen mind ... a subtle sense of humor . . . tactful . . . likes to draw, even in class . . . don ' t piddle around . . . lessons at the Y . . . Boy, can I swim . . . Medical and Surgical nursing is her choice. ANNA LEE LONG B.S. IN NURSING " Aunt Lee " . . . sparkling personality . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus staff Junior and Senior year . . . says what she thinks . . . striking and fashion- able . . . straight-forwardness sometimes get our gal more than she bargained for . . . Deep in the Heart of Texas . . . phone calls at 3 A.M. . . . " But Marv, I can ' t hear you " — We can!! . . . future homemaker and mother. SHIRLEY WACHTER McDANIEL B.S. IN NURSING " Shirl " . . . always smiling . . . Gamma Sigma Sigma Service Sorority . . . Lutheran Students Asso- ciation . . . Glee Club . . . doesn ' t believe in long engagements . . . little housewife . . . oh those mornings in Chcm lab . . . " Coffee and cigarettes anyone? " . . . knitting ;md notes . . . will she ever forget the O.R. — oops! . . . pleasant personality . . . neat, trim figure . . . posture plus . . . Mac . . . Public Health Nurse. 184 BETTY S. MARSHALL B.S. IN NURSING " Marsh " . . . behind the scenes worker . . . Alpha Gamma Delta . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Westminster Foundation . . . Freshman and Sophomore Prom committees . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . " Let ' s mark another day off " . . . College Park weekend commuter . . . Texas . . . world traveler . . . " four no trump " . . . mental poise . . . free thinker . . . capable nurse . . . future — obstetrics and marriage to Dale. CAROL T. MARTIN B.S. IN NURSING Personable . . . pretty . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club ... a true telephone fan . . . let ' s have a party . . . College Park, anyone . . . night blindness . . . swimming at the Y is her favorite subject . . . you can eat on a dollar a week ... V A Hospital nursing . . . Obstetrics combined with travel appeal to our Carol for the future. ELIZABETH A. MURCHAKE B.S. IN NURSING " Betty " . . . love that hairdo! . . . Newman Club . . . Dining Hall Club . . . former food pusher . . . quiet, sweet and friendly . . . " Why can ' t I put on weight? " . . . anyone have a good book to read . . . an ice skating fan . . . loves to knit . . . general duty nursing . . . travel looks good for the future. 185 BARBARA L. PALMER B.S. IN NURSING " Barb " . . . pleasing personality . . . Sophomore Orientation Chairman . . . Sophomore Judicial Board Representative . . . adores music . . . com- plete Belefonte collection . . . Senior class repre- sentative of the 5th floor . . . " May I borrow your car? " . . . Cheyenne! . . . television of her own . . . " Let ' s play bridge " . . . swimming at the Y . . . to be an inch taller . . . enjoys a good time . . . headed for Texas after graduation. JOAN LOUISE PELTIER B.S. IN NURSING " Joannie " . . . vivacious redhead . . . Newman Club . . . what ' s the attraction at College Park? . . . quiet determination . . . " It ' s madness " . . . dry wit . . . always good for fun and plenty of laughs . . . aversion to night duty and 9BC . . . tomboy at heart . . . could be she ' s partial to redheads . . . yet to come — Public Health, marriage, and lots of little Lyons. CYNTHIA ANN PIPER B.S. IN NURSING " Pipe " . . . everyone ' s sweetheart . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma . . . Alpha Lambda Delta . . . Student Council Representative . . . Terrae Mariae Medk.us . . . Photography co-editor . . . " Do I hear running in tiie iiall! " . . . Intellectual .southern belle . . . empathy abounding ... La Boheme again!! . . . simplifies our complex world by ignor- ing it . . . tall, attractive, and full of friendship . . . University Hospital a little longer. 186 SANDRA JULENE REYNOLDS B.S. IN NURSING " Sandy " . . . June in January . . . Aqualiners . . . Westminster Foundation . . . Homecoming Queen Candidate, 1957 . . . Glee Club . . . Terrae Mariah Medicus Staff . . . " Oh no " . . . vivacious . . . always ready for a good time . . . contagious laughter , . . genuine concern for others ... in- separable good humor . . . enviable figure . . . tell tale facial expressions . . . headed for surgical nursing in D.C. ANNE REITA ROBIN B.S. in nursing " Robeen " . . . heart of gold . . . Hillel Foundation . . . Chapel Choir . . . Dorm Academic Chairman . . . University Theater . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland — Veep . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus Editor-in-Chief . . . our chief correspondent . . . a real delegator . . . " Wait, I ' ve got to make a phone call " . . . always on the go . . . the " pit " . . . " Where ' s my new Post? " . . . clinical instructor in the future. JEANNETT ROWAN SOWERS B.S. IN NURSING " Jenny " . . . champagne personality . . . Executive Dorm Council . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Presi- dent . . . Wesley Foundation Secretary . . . Glee Club . . . Junior Class President . . . Homecoming Queen Candidate . . . her trip to Chicago will long be remembered ... a job well done . . . always on the go . . . friendliness and sympathy . . . good bedside manner . . . soon to be found on the third floor of University Hospital. 187 SALLY WADE TIEMAN B.S. IN NURSING " Sally " . . . vivacious blond . . . Aqualiners . . . has a passion for jewelry . . . good cook . . . com- bined marriage with her education . . . " Lucky Len ' . . . foreign car enthusiast . . . always ready for a gab session . . . " Want to hear a good joke? " . . . February graduate . . . home at present is . . . guess where? . . . sunny Florida. SHIRLEY SIMMS WANTLAND B.S. IN NURSING " Shirl " . . . serious . . . deep thinker . . . Alpha Lambda Delta . . . Aqualiners . . . Alpha Gamma Delta . . . S.G.A. president . . . Wesley Foundation . . . Glee Club . . . Phi Kappa Phi . . . progressive ideas " and all that jazz " . . . Stan the man . . . marriage in the Spring . . . eight years — it ' s about time . . . efficiency plus . . . " Gonna get some coflfee " . . . expects to be Med-Surg instructor anywhere U.S.A. I w IHIi 1 m ] i f ■■R,?i( ' »i,?3a .- :v ■-■. ,. •.- m BARBARA ANN WARD B.S. IN NURSING " Barbs " . . . sincere and friendly . . . Alpha Ciamma Delta . . . Wesley Foundation . . . Glee Club . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus staff . . . warm interest in people wins many friends . . . classic quips . . . " Who mel " . . . doesn ' t have to watch her diet . . . craving for cokes keeps S.Ci.A. out of the red . . . quietly efficient . . . future includes OB. in D.C. 188 PATRICIA A. WARREN B.S. IN NURSING " Pat " . . . Speaks her piece brilliantly . . . Alpha Chi Omega . . . A.W.S. intramural sports . . . University Theater Committee . . . Glee Club . . . " Just one hand? " . . . " But Butch has to study! " . . . master of many things . . . how long for a chignon? . . . motivation a necessity . . . amicable manner . . . eventual nursing career in Washing- ton — possible Public Health. CLARABELLE DECKER WENZEL B.S. IN NURSING " Honey " . . . sweet and lovely . . . Kappa Kappa Gamma . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Club . . . Homecoming Queen candidate ... " I have to hurry — Charlie is waiting for me " ... has become quite a sports fan . . . Lacrosse . . . lovely wedding and a beautiful home . . . even learned to cook . . . future includes all this and Charlie too. ELIZABETH CARR WHEATLEY B.S. IN NURSING " Betty " . . . latent warmheartedness . . . Red and White band . . . Aqualiners . . . Student Nurses Council of Maryland . . . Yearbook staff . . . real good sport . . . loves a good joke . . . ' How many late leaves do I have left? " . . . debatable as to long or short hair . . . April bride . . . enjoys real living . . . " Oh, that Public Health nursing! " . . . happy future in marriage and nursing in D.C. 189 Our Sponsors Mr. and Mrs, BLAINE H. ALEXANDER 1 f Z yC-- . .. , ( x ' - — . . . .n yyA i Jf- - ' po - d l -? r ' ,kW ' ' - ' ' ' ' K « - (A i i frr XrKXJ - f U Ofeol H, Uxl ' J ZH u.- - . Tyux : )jC 7 ' % . HjUtA4A(VA M thJ 7 . v7 2 Leiona icl (}. Ruck nc. A J { c t s -x cSa. McJl yyu4 . be rt e t Mn4 John hcC.V laLrrcri, tA.b- Ov XJ a J Our Patrons Daniel J. Abramson, M.D. — ' 38 Arlene and Barbara Ackerman Thurston R. Adams, M.D. — ' 34 Joan M. Arbegast, N — ' 57 Mr. and Mrs. Howard Argetsinger Bessie M. Arnurius, N — ' 20 Philibert Artigiani, M — ' 20 Martha F. Baer Beatrice Bamberger, M.D. — ' 3 1 Robert E. Bauer, M.D.— ' 46 Ahce Beagan C L. Beavan, M.D.— 08 Dr. Martin Becker, M — ' 33 Nathan Bercovitz, M.D. — ' 32 William J. Blomeier, Sr. Mrs. WiUiam J. Blomeier, Sr. Vincent Bonfiglio, M.D. — ' 21 Frances J. Borges, M.D. — ' 50 Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Bowden O. L. Brantigan, M.D. Warren D. Brill, M.D.— ' 2 1 Thomas J. Burkhart, M.D.— ' 53 Enoch Callaway, M.D. Mr. and Mrs. Max J. Caplan Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Gate Ariyn Charlton Mr. and Mrs. John Clancy Mrs. Raymond A. Clancy Mrs. Gaylord Lee Clark Charles P. Clautice, M.D.— ' 12 Mr. and Mrs. Harry C. Cohen and family Mr. and Mrs. Herman Cohen and Linda Herman Cohen, M.D. — ' 29 M. Marvin Cohen, M.D. — ' 46 Mrs. Lena O. Cooper Arthur A. Cope, M.D. — ' 25 Stuart P. Culpepper, M.D. — ' 52 Steve Curtis Eva F. Darley, N— ' 27 Walter T. Dixon, Sr. L. C. Dobihal, M.D.— ' 20 Mr. and Mrs. L. T. Dodson Alexander A. Doerner, M.O., F.A.C.P.— ' 35 Herman J. Dorf, M.D.— ' 2 1 George H. Dorsey, M — 15 Jacob L. Dreshin, M — ' 25 Ruth L. Dyson Dr. Daniel Ehrlich, M— ' 43 Louise K. Eichner, R.N. Charles F. Ermer Mr. and Mrs. John Evans Remo Fabbri, M.D.— ' 09 Gordon Fielder A. H. Finkelstein, M.D. Vincent des Fitzpatrick, Jr., M.D. — ' 45 Mr. and Mrs. John W. Flatley Leonard H. Flax, M.D.— ' 53 James Frcnkil, M.D. — ' 37 Joseph M. George, Jr., M.D. — ' 38 John E. Gessner, M.D.— ' 54 Mrs. Anna E. Goldberg Dr. and Mrs. Neil M. Goldberg, M— ' 58 John J. Haney, M.D.— ' 29 Eleanor Hardy, N — ' 58 Dr. David M. He 1 ford, M— ' 26 Mr. and Mrs. Frank Henderson Thomas F. Herbert, M.D.— ' 53 Mr. and Mrs. Frank Holmes Mr. and Mrs. Harry Honikberg Lorman L. Hooper, M.D. — ' 4l Dr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horiwitz Mrs. Orville C. Hurst Marguerite E. Hydorn Benjamin H. Issacs, M.D. — ' 36 Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Jex, N— ' 56 Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Kaetzel Theodore Kardash, M.D. — ' 42 Dr. Abraham Karger, M — ' 31 Abraham Katz Myron L. Kenler, M.D.— ' 33 Janis S. Kilmer, N — ' 57 Ellen M. Kingsbury Mr. and Mrs. John Kirby Thelma I. Kleckner, N — ' 47 John C. Krantz, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Raymond L. Klein Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Kleinman Mr. and Mrs. Martin Kleinman Fred T. Kyper, M.D.— ' 23 Byruth King Lenson-Lambros, M.D. — ' 27 Thomas H. Legg, M.D.— ' 07 Frank R. Lewis, M.D.— ' 29 Frank Liberti Everett Alexander Livingston, M.D. — ' 12 Dr. and Mrs. Edgar F. Long Ricky Lucas Mr. and Mrs. John T. Mclnerney Gerald J. Martin Carolyn Hackett Messick, N — ' 57 Thomas D. Michael, M.D. Joseph Millett Felix R. Morris, M.D.— ' 41 Frank K. Morris, M.D. — ' 27 Jerome D. Nataro, M.D. — ' 46 Lorraine Neal Henrietta Orf A. L. Ottinger John Robert Phillips, M.D. George N. Polls, M.D. — ' 55 Mr. and Mrs. C. Merrick Reeder Robert A. Riley, Jr., M.D.— ' 46 Dr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Rinehart, M — ' 43 John D. Rosin, M.D.— ' 42 Henry Rathkopf, M.D. — ' 38 Murray M. Reckson, M.D. — ' 32 Wallace H. Sadowksy, M.D.— ' 42 Nathan Schneper, M.D. — ' 49 Mr. and Mrs. John A. Scull Betty Shubkagel, N— ' 54 Dr. Melchijah Spragins Mr. and Mrs. Ross V. Smith Louis H. Tankin, M.D. — ' 40 Irving J. Taylor, M.D. — ' 43 Sue Terman, M.D. — ' 34 A. Frank Thompson, M.D. — ' 40 Samuel V. Tompakov, M.D. — ' 40 Arnold Tramer, M.D. James A. Vaughn, Jr., M.D. — ' 46 Mrs. J. Carroll Waldeck Mrs. John McC. Warren, N — ' 34 Alumnus, M — ' 23 Frances C. Wickham Aureha C. Willers Joseph W. Wilner, M.D.— ' 27 C. T. Whittington, M.D.— ' 27 Dr. and Mrs. Milton J. Wilder, M— ' 39 Mrs. Kathryn S. Wholsen Samuel B. Wolfe, M.D. ' 26 Allen C Wooden, M.D.— ' 44 Theodore E. Woodward, M.D.— ' 38 Stanley N. Yaffee, M.D.— ' 44 Frederick M. Zerzavy, M.D. C C. Zimmerman, M.D. — ' 25 E. HANLON MURPHY LIFE INSURANCE FOR PHYSICIANS 301 N. Charles St. Baltimore 1, Md. LE. 92446 VISIT US AT VALLEYBROOKE THE BERCS Compliments of THE W. B. CASSELL CO. 1027 S. HOWARD ST. Baltimore, Maryland ]hiikfMi,%U BELVEDERE DOWNTOWN EASTPOINT EDMONDSON Best Wishes To the Graduates of 1958 HUTZLER ' S BALTIMORE • TOWSON Serving the student ' s need BALTIMORE HARDWARE for Scissors and Toots KATHERiNE AAARTIN Greeting Cards — Gifts 601 W. Baltimore St. At Greene CONGRATULATIONS FROM MONTGOMERY WARDS SHPAK AUTO PARTS CO. 3323 Hollins Ferry Road BALTIMORE 27, MD. Circle 2-7600 GIFTS WITH UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SEALS Cuff Links, Buckles, Tiebars, Lighters, etc. - Officio! ■ U. of M. School of Phormocy Class Ring ot TROCKENBROT ' S Ce ebrofing 75 yrs. of Service to Marjrland Educational Institutions 310 N, PACA Customer Porking MUL 5 1052 UNIVERSITY RESTAURANT 5 S. Greene St. Sam Bob Lewis proprietors Open 24 hours a day PIRACCI CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. 2552 Woodbrook Avenue BALTIMORE 17, MARYLAND MAdison 3-2727 MEDICAL DENTAL COLLECTIONS, INCORPORATED MEDICAL DENTAL EXCHANGE 809 Cathedral Street Delinquent Col ectionj for the profess on Credit service for the doctor. Hospital and Patient. LEO BADART, President s, erving the Medical Profession for over a third of a century Equipment and Supplies for: Physicians ana Surgeons Hospitals • LaDoratories • Industrial Clinics Murray- jBaumgartner SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPANY, INC. 5 West Cliase Street • SAratoga 7-7333 Baltimore 1, Maryland. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND NURSES ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION Southern Hospitality when you make fhe Emerson a part of your party, a most enjoyable time is assured. EMERSON HOTEL WILLIAM E. STUBBS, JR. Vice-Pres. and General Manager Compliments of PHARMACIES SINCE 1883 EAstern 7-3666 EAstern 7-4744 NURSES UNIFORM COMPANY NURSES UNIFORMS SCHOOL UNIFORMS Made to Individual Measure — Perfect Fit 1822 E. MONUMENT ST. BALTIMORE 5, MD. RESIN OL OINTMENT Made in Baltimore i Resorcin, Oil of Cade, Prepared Calamine, Conloins: i Oxide, Bismuth Subnitrote Boric Acid (MrnliiTii ' il ill a laii(iliii.|M-lriil.iUirii Iki-i- In ihi||ii- ami lubricali ' dry irrilali ' d kin. Kanious for 60 year? for its prompt, imiji-laslinf ' n-lii-f for .-kin ilrliin};. biiriiiiii; anil minor sorrne s. Hri ' sirilii ' frcrlv. Prtscrllie. also, new RK.SINOL (;RE. .SELE. S in tubes. Contains the same fini- ninliealions in a preaseless, waslialilc. stainless l asi ' . Mtlilllldi Uiriil In RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY 517 W. Lombard St. — Opp. School of Medicine CONGRATULATIONS FROM KOONTZ CREAMERY " first wifh carriage frade " 5600 REISTERSTOWN ROAD BALTIMORE, MD. Complimenfs of JACK LEWIS, INC. Funeral Directors 2100 Eutaw Place LAfayette 3 6100 Compliments of CHARLES P. McCORMICK chairman. Board of Regenis RICHARDS SHOE REPAIRING WHILE-YOU-WAIT 1 N. Paca Street RICHMOND BROTHERS FRIENDLY JEWELERS 408 W. BALTIMORE ST. Phone: SA. 7-9249 Lafesi Sfyles Diamonds - Watches WATCH REPAIRING JEWELRY REPAIRING J. JENKINS SONS CO. INC. — OFFICIAL MANUFACTURERS — OF SCHOOL OF NURSING RINGS 2601 W. Lexington Street THE CLINIC mi All Styles Including a special Clinic Shoe with conductive soles to help eliminate static elec- tricity in the hospital oper- ating room. DALSHEIMER ' S 213 N. Liberty St. Dr. C. H. Webster Robert L. Webster special agents NEW YORK LIFE INS. CO. We Offer a Special Plan of Life Insurance Service To Members of ffie Medical Profession ADDRESS ALL INQUIRIES TO: 102 White Park Place Ithaca, N. Y. Compliments of A FRIEND Best Wishes from the STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF NURSING About Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . The text has been set in Linotype Garamond No. 3 tvith display heads in Monotype Garamond No. 248. The paper is Liistro Gloss manufactured by the s. D. warren company of Boston. THE GARAMOND PRESS BALTIMORE ' 1958 DR. GEORGE LENTZ says, " Tell Garamond to keep up the good ivork. "


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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

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University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

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