University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD)

 - Class of 1957

Page 1 of 236

 

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1957 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1957 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1957 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1957 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1957 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1957 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1957 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1957 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1957 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1957 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1957 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1957 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 236 of the 1957 volume:

V ! Si $ A U i C e N T E N N I AL 57 E l» I T I N I ■. ' i ' ft ' f V, - ' -■I i i miM ' ' MxW " I iill - ' l« -feV vt ' , ' liBRirnikUlii ' iflt ' i m: t.hru. ' lbM) H fid ' ifi aailr.iB ' iiT.K. ' itUiJu: . iftmitiirilbii3rMbirAirJ rluJ ' M ' ll kV l fHLS|i:H ' ' iii, ' ;v)- .t;H iM.r ' ifl i ' ,«ki ]:Ull JtTJ i, ,, i, f } ' Af Mi| or. (■ I «.v ( • i» im r 1 1 . .Itmlf .Jmi iiA- m, oii AN Act ' f Act of r , ' ' embly ,i„, " appears to this r , ' ■ ' " ' at many benefice General As- ' r fo the Staf. r ° " Voiild accrn. i- ' -ts of the U - ' ' ' " ' ' " . but o " ° ° " - Medic. vr .. ' ™ ' = " f " T, r. " = ' ' i«l CUV or - ' ' ' " ' .A»„ .. . " ' ° ' - " 0E „,■ f 1,, J ( I T V if ■ ' ' ' 9 ' ' ' i % ' i ' K ' M ' . ' :i ' r , ■ " » ' ■? TERRAE MARIAE The annual joint publication of the students of the School of Medicine MEDICUS-19 7 and the College of Nursing, Universify of Maryland - Baltimore Staff James P. Laster George A. Lentz. Jr. Carl Jelenko. Ill Arthur D. Ericsson Nevins W. Todd Frederick W. Pllgce. IV Stlart J. Abrahams Selina G. Balco. Vincent J. Fiocco. Donald T. Lansinger Mary Wu Kenneth Brooks Studios; Walter Garden and GUNTHER SONNTAG, ArT DEPARTMENT,- RiCHARD K. B. Ho: John Codington. M.D.: Roman Nagorka. Our warmest appreciation is expressed to MiSS DoROTHY Fritz and the MEDICAL School Art Department for their help in compiling this book. Editor-in-Chiej Business Manager Layout Editor Photography Editor Historical Editor Copy Editor Circulation Editor Contributors Nursing Editor Pictures by: TABLE OF CONTENTS The Past 8 The Present 33 Preclinical Years 35 Clinical Years 57 Organizations 85 Our Spare Time 95 The Future 105 Graduates 109 Intcrneships 144 Couuegk of i hsinc 148 ! ■; 7957 marks the T50th anniversary of the founding of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Wilson H. Elkins, b.s., m.a., litt. n., d. i ' hil. President, University of Maryland William S. Stone, m.s.. m.d.. d. soc. Dean, School of Medicine We Honor Our Past . . . I The chandelier in Anatomical Hall has dispelled the darkness for generations of medical students. iBSt THE PAST IN 1796 Baltimore had just become an incorporated city. With 25,000 people this small tidewater metropolis was already assuming a prominent place in the develop- ment of the new nation. Seated at a strate- gic convergence of the principal roads of the province, its fine harbor was alive with ships from many ports. Growth was every- where as new streets pushed into the rolling open country to the west and into the forest toward the north. Born as a city of trade, Baltimore was booming into the Gateway of the West. As hogsheads of tobacco rolled across the wharves, tanned sailors brushed shoulders with bustling merchants and pros- perous farmers. DAY IDGE This was the Baltimore that greeted Dr. John Beale Davidge as he stepped ashore on his return from England. Born in An- John B. Davidge, M.D. napolis, he had been educated at Edinburgh and Glasgow and now at the age of 28 in- tended to start private practice in Baltimore. It was still a half century before Pasteur and Lister but Baltimore had already estab- lished a medical precedent. A new vaccine for smallpox had been received in Ba ltimore by Mr. William Taylor from his brother in London. The fame of Jenner had spread to the New World and Dr. James Smith was able to convince the Maryland Legislature that the state should utilize the serum. This was done, marking the first occasion on which serum was distributed free by state authorities. Despite this advance, the status of the medical profession at this time was weak. Quackery was rampant and require- ments to practice medicine were few. To protect themselves, the local physicians as early as 1785 had organized to provide a plan for a state medical organization, but its success had been short-lived. Four years later, however, a Medical Society of Balti- more became a realization. Lectures in anatomy, surgery and obstetrics were of- fered to the members in the winter of 1789 to 1790. Because of the success of these lec- tures, a " Medical School " was organized with a faculty composed of prominent local medical men. However, after a few months interest died and the lectures stopped. Despite this failure, the idea of medical education persisted and in 1797 another course of lectures was offered. Once again lack of interest ended them. In 1799, a charter for the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland was adopted by the State General Assembly. Dr. Davidge was one of the leading organizers together with Dr. Nathaniel Potter. In 1802, Dr. Davidge began a private course of lectures on anat- omy, surgery, midwifery, and physiology which were given ammally for several years and appear to have been well attended. At 10 this time, the medical and chirurgical fac- uhy numbered 240, of whom only 37 pos- sessed the degree of Doctor of Medicine. The subject of medical education was fre- quently discussed but little was done ac- tively. Meanwhile, Dr. Davidge in 1806 had erected an anatomical theater at his own expense and upon his own property. For the purpose of demonstrating anatomy, a body had been obtained. The discovery that dissection was taking place within the build- ing led to the gathering of a howling mob outside the building. As their numbers grew and the crowd became more inflamed, they smashed into the building, stole the cadaver and thoroughly demolished the whole struc- ture. ESTABLISHMENT OF A SCHOOL This outburst of violence frightened the physicians of the city and urged them final- ly into action for the purpose of obtaining legal protection. They unanimously re- solved to apply to the legislature for a char- ter for a medical college. Such a charter was prepared with haste by Dr. John Shaw and submitted to the legislature. After an amendment to unite the school with St. Mary ' s College was rejected, " The Medical College Bill " was passed by the legislature in its original form on December 18, 1807. This same act created a Board of Regents for the college consisting of the Board of Medical Examiners of Maryland. The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of the state were considered the patrons of the col- lege. All expenses were to be borne by the faculty and Board of Regents. The faculty consisted of John Davidge and James Cocke, joint Professors of Anatomy, Sur- gery and Physiology; George Brown, Pro- fessor of Materia Medica; John Shaw, Pro- fessor of Chemistry; and William Donald- son, Professor of Institutes of Medicine. Dr. Brown soon resigned to assume the pres- idency of the Board of Regents and Na- thaniel Potter was named to fill his place. Dr. Davidge was elected dean of the medi- cal faculty. Seven students began the study of medi- cine in the first class, wi th lectures given in the homes of the faculty. In the Spring of 1808 the faculty secured an abandoned schoolhouse on Fayette Street and used this to teach anatomy and chemistry. In spite of the delapidated state of this building. Dr. Shaw maintained an excellent laboratory and worked diligently with his students. During the course of his chemistry demon- strations, he would plunge his arms repeat- edly into tubs of cold water and this prac- tice was believed the cause of the pleurisy he developed in the early winter months of 1809. Pulmonary consumption rapidly fol- Nathaniel Potter, m.d. 11 lowed and he died shortly after. During the second session, beginning in the Fall of 1808, the students increased to ten and the following year, to eighteen. In April of 1810, the College of Medicine of Maryland graduated five young men with the degree Doctor of Medicine. THE FIRST BUILDING A SUITABLE building for the college had been frequently discussed during these early years. No available structure seemed to suit the purpose adequately, so it was decided to provide a new building which would be both an outstanding piece of archi- tecture and a permanent home for the college. Early in the formation of the college, a lot on the corner of Greene and Lombard Streets had been purchased at " a merely nominal amount " from Colonel John Eager Howard. The contract with Col. Howard was signed by several of the professors, who made themselves individually responsible. Howard insisted that no stipulated time be established for termination of the debt which was eventually paid to him in full. Funds for the building, however, would be a little harder to come by, for the faculty at this time consisted of young men with little in the way of money. A common means of raising funds for any enterprise was by public lottery so it was decided that this would be appropriate. The first act audiorizing a lottery was passed by the legislature in January, 1808, and it provided a scheme for raising $40,- 000. Returns were slow until Dr. Cooke assumed charge and he is generally held responsible for die financial success. With the needed money at hand, R. Carey Long was commissioned as architect and the cornerstone was laid by Col. Howard in April, 1811. Like most prominent architec- ture of the time, the building was designed to imitate a classic: the Pantheon in Rome. At the time of construction, it was conceded to be the finest structure for medical educa- ion in the New World. Commanding an excellent view of the Patapsco and the Ches- apeake, it stood alone in the Western Pre- cinct overlooking the old Washington Road. For years it was a landmark to travellers from the capital. By November of 1812, the incomplete building was already being used for lectures. THE UNIVERSITY IS BORN Meanwhile, the expense of educating young doctors was proving a heavy burden to the men who were responsible for teach- ing them. In other quarters, the dream of a state university, comprising many schools, had long existed. In 1784, a state university had actually been created by act of legisla- ture, comprising Washington College on the eastern shore and St. John ' s College of An- napolis. Doomed by a top heavy organiza- tion, its endowments were withdrawn by the state in 1806 and the University Act re- pealed. Now spurred by the need for a firmer foundation, an act to create the University of Maryland was presented by the president 12 and professors of the Medical College widi the approval of the Board of Regents and was passed in December, 1812. The word- ing of the bill is unique: " Be it enacted by the General Assembly of Mary- land, That the college for the promotion of medical knowledge, by the name of the College of Medicine of Maryland, by and for the same is hereby authorized to constitute, appoint and annex to itself the other three colleges or facul- ties, viz: The Faculty of Divinity, The Faculty of Law and The Faculty of the Arts and Sci- ences; and that the four faculties or colleges, thus united, shall be and they are hereby, con- stituted in University by the name and under the title of the University of Maryland. " Thus occurred the only known instance of a university being founded upon a medi- cal school which was already functioning. The original Board of Regents now ceased to exist and a new Board of Regents, com- posed of the Provost and the four faculties, assumed leadership. In January, 1813, the medical college an- nexed the other three faculties. Named as fust provost was Archbishop John Carroll, cousin of Charles Carroll of Carrollton. He declined the position and Robert Smith, former U. S. Secretary of State, took office. Although the other schools did not flour- ish during the 19th century, the medical school continued to expand. A library was begun in 1813 with the purchase of the books of Dr. John Crawford for five hun- dred dollars. Crawford had come to Balti- more at the same time as Davidge, had been a close friend of Benjamin Rush and had developed an extensive practice. His theory of the " contagium animatum " (that certain diseases were caused by microscopic organ- isms), published in 1800 had been de- nounced by leading medical figures of the day. The war with England touched Baltimore at this time and the faculty of the new school tended the wounded at the Battles of North Point and Fort McHenry. THE HOSPITAL A LACK of patients for the teaching of clini- cal medicine was soon appreciated, so to The first Baltimore Infirmary built in 1823. 13 satisfy this need the faculty initiated the construction of the Baltimore Infirmary. By means of their own funds, the professors, in 1823, obtained a lot on the southwest corner of Lombard and Greene Streets and had erected a small rectangular hospital. Built to house 50 patients, the Infirmary was divided into four wards, one of which was devoted entirely to diseases of the eye. Attached to the main building was the oper- ating theater, seating several hundred stu- dents. Nursing duties were undertaken by an order of Catliolic nuns, tlie Sisters of Charity. Under the control of the professors, the Infirmary provided ample teaching cases. Three physicians and four surgeons com- prised the staff and with its immediate prox- imity to the school, it " gave tlie institution advantages not possessed by any other American school of the day. " These facilities were soon overtaxed how- ever, and in 1833, an addition of four more wards was made, raising hospital capacity to 90. YEARS OF CONFLICT Meanwhile, the medical school had en- tered upon a period of strife and instability. By an act of the legislature passed in 1826, the Board of Regents was abolished and a board of 21 trustees established, with the governor ex officio president. This move was said to have been instigated by certain faculty members who were jealous of Dr. Davidge and of his popularity with the stu- dents. Whatever the cause of the act, the result was 13 years of ferment. The faculty and the students bitterly opposed the gov- ernment of the trustees. Duels were fought and ill feeling simmered. The feud reach its climax early in 1837. Professor Potter discovered that liie janitor of the school had been conducting a gam- bling den behind Anatomical Hall, with the sale of whiskey to the students between classes. The janitor then threatened the life of the professor, who protested to the Board of Trustees. No action was taken, the jani- tor continued his activities, and Dr. Potter acquired a pistol for his own protection. The faculty was enraged at this attitude of the trustees and when, shortly thereafter, a new faculty member was appointed against the wishes of the faculty, the break- ing point was reached. At a meeting in the Infirmary on May 2, the old Board of Regents and certain of the faculty voted themselves independent and decided to hold classes in a local hotel. Most of the students attended these classes; the rest either transferred to other schools or left school entirely. A new faculty ap- pointed by the trustees held classes before an almost empty Chemical Hall. For two years this situation existed, flar- ing at intervals into violence such as the incident in which several of the old Faculty, with the aid of a number of the students, ob- tained keys to the University, expelled the janitor, and occupied the grounds for two days. In 1839, the Court of Appeals ruled that the act of the state legislature establishing the Board of Trustees was unconstitutional and tlie government of the university was restored to the Board of Regents. The old faculty was re-installed. THE FACULTY Shortly after the opening of the lectures in the new Me dical School building, Drs. Davidge and Cocke turned the professorship of surgery over to Dr. William Gibson, then 24. Nine years later, in 1821, Dr. Gibson became head of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania, and in his place appeared one of the colorful figures that marked these 14 early years. Dr. Granville Sharp Pattison was a Scot, small in stature and sandy- haired, with an aggressive stride and con- fident air. He had been associated with the distinguished anatomist Allen Burns of the Andersonian Institute in Glasgow. He brought with him a large collection of ana- tomical specimens prepared by Burns. This collection was purchased by the university for $8,000 to begin the Anatomical Mu- seum. In 1820, Pattison had applied for the chair of surgery at the University of Penn- sylvania. His appointment was bitterly op- posed by one Nathaniel Chapman of Phila- delphia and he was not awarded the posi- tion. Pattison drafted a fiery letter to Chap- man which was ignored, so Pattison sought out Dr. Patrick Macauley to serve as his second. He challenged Chapman to a duel which the latter declined. In 1821 Chap- man published and distributed a paper en- titled, " Official Transcript of Proceedings in Case of Divorce of Andrew Ure, M.D. vs Catherine Ure for Adultery with Gran- ville Sharp Pattison. " Several years later, Pattison met Chapman and his brother-in- law, Gen. Thomas Cadwalader on the street in Philadelphia and publicly insulted Chap- man. Cadwalader challenged Pattison and a duel was arranged for the following week. In the quiet Delaware countryside, Patti- son ' s shot shattered the General ' s pistol arm, himself suffering only a hiatus in his coat tail. Following this Pattison resigned his position and left Baltimore. Following Pattison ' s abrupt departure, Nathan Ryno Smith became Professor of Surgery and the dominant figure in the faculty. Appointed in 1826, he was already a well known figure in American medical educa- tion. The son of Nathan Smith, founder of Dartmouth and Yale medical schools, he Nathan Ryno Smith, m.d. himself was a leader in the reestablishment of the University of Vermont Medical School and in the organization of Jefferson Medical College. Destined to head surgery for 42 years, the department flourished under his stern eye. In 1843, Professor Potter died and in the next three years the Chair of Medicine was filled three times. Finally in 1846, Dr. Wil- liam Power was appointed at the age of 33. As a student in Paris, he had observed the methods of percussion and the use of the stethescope there. These observations he brought to Baltimore and was the first to teach them in the city. Pulmonary tuberculosis, a disease fatal to so many of the early professors of the school, brought about Dr. Power ' s death in 1852. The vacancy was filled by Dr. Samuel Chew, noted as a polished speaker and clas- sical scholar. 15 Samuel Chew, M.D. In 1848, anatomical dissection, previous- ly an elective, was made compulsory. Gas light was introduced into the dissecting rooms, in order that the students might spend their evenings dissecting without in- terrupting their daily schedule of lectures. This was the first time in America that prac- tical anatomy was made a requirement for graduation. At about this same time, a chair in Path- ological Anatomy was established. This marked the beginning of the separation of the teaching of pathology from that of the clinical branches. This was the era when the Baltimore Clip- per was sweeping the seas and the city was experiencing a phenomenal growth as the riches of the world poured thru its port. The infirmary was soon jammed to capacity and the overcrowded conditions made expansion mandatory. In 1852 the Infirmary was extended to the corner of Greene Street by the addition of a rectangular wing. Private cubicles and a large amphitheater with skylight were in- cluded in the new structure. Tlie expansion established the hospital as the largest in the city with a capacity of 150 patients. Early in 1861, Professor William A. Hammond of the Department of Anatomy and Physiology provided microscopes in the Anatomical Museum. Since the museum possessed " one of the largest microscopic collections in the country " , introduction of tliese microscopes unveiled a wealth of his- tological material for the students. For the first time in the United States, histology was introduced into the curriculum. WAR The outbreak of hostilities in the Civil War found the School of Medicine at a peak. At this time it had no peers to the south and only a few to the Jiorth. Recog- nized as the leading medical institution of South, most of the student body was drawn from southern states. Enrollment declined sharply as tlie students hurried home to join tlie Conferederate armies. Military Surgery and Hygiene was established in the curricu- lum as Baltimore huddled under Northern cannon on nearby Federal Hill. Professor Hammond was appointed Sur- geon General of the Union Army in 1862, and founded the Army Medical Museum and Medical Library at Washington. In 1863 Dr. Richard McSherry assumed the chair of Practice of Medicine upon the dcatli of Dr. Chew. Dr. Chew ' s son. Dr. Samuel C. Chew, became Professor of Materia Medica. A PERIOD OF DEVELOPMENT Following the war there was an influx of physicians to Baltimore from the South. 16 During this period many physicians began to earn prominence in diversified fields of medicine and the art of specialization had begun. In 1866 the chair of Physiology, Hygiene and General Pathology was created with Professor Frank Donaldson as head. Con- currently, the first clinics were held in dis- eases of children and on venereal disease. The formation of these clinics marks the foundation of the Out-Patient Department. One year later, the organization of the chair of Diseases of Women and Children was regarded as the first recognition in the country of this field as a distinct branch of medicine. Dr. William T. Howard, who later became president of the American Gynecological Association was appointed as first professor. The following year saw a clinic in diseases of the eye instituted. It was in the same year, 1868, that the state legislature approved a bill to provide $2500 per year for the medical education of a certain number of students to be drawn from the state senatorial districts. A Gen- eral Dispensary was founded in 1869 to treat the public on an out-patient basis and a new wealth of clinical material had been tapped. In 1870, to accommodate the increase in the student body, a " Students Building " was constructed adjoining the Infirmary and housing 24 young men. Further developments occurred in 1873. At tliis time, the dispensary made public its policy of attending " poor women " in their homes. A trained dentist was provided in the clinic to instruct students in the art of " drawing teeth " . The Department of Dis- eases of the Eye and Ear was created with Dr. Julian J. Chisholm as professor. Dr. Chisholm had treated the first wounded at Ft. Sumter and was noted for his Manual of Military Surgery. Since the city had condemned the use of some wooden sheds which had been erected at the rear of the Infirmary for the treatment of excess patients, it was decided to apply The Greene Street addition erected in 1875. f ' -:-- ' tm 17 for funds for a new hospital. The legisla- ture quickly provided $30,000 and in 1875, the Greene Street Wing of the Infirmary was opened. This was a long, slender, rectangu- lar wing, tliree stories high and 26 feet wide with high, narrow windows. The hospital capacity was almost doubled and during this year there were 1,200 in-patients and 15,000 out-patients. With the new building, it was possible to establish a Lying-in De- partment, and with the transfer of patients from St. Andrew ' s Home for Children, the Department for the Diseases of Children was created. Upon the completion of this wing, the faculty decided that the original Lombard Street Wing needed overhauling. This was accomplished and the name University Hos- pital appears for the first time in a photo- graph dated 1880. This same year the Sis- ters of Charity relinquished their nursing duties and were replaced by the Sisters of Mercy. In 1881 Dr. Louis M. Tiffany suc- ceeded Dr. Christopher Johnson as head of Surgery. Dr. Tiffany had been educated at Cambridge, England and during his regime at the university, developments in anesthe- sia made possible modern elective surgery. He performed the first nephrolithotomy in the United States and was noted for his ex- perimental surgery on the Gasserian gang- lion in facial paralysis. During tlie early ' 80s, the school curricu- lum was increased to 5V2 months and in 1886, on the death of Dr. McSherry, Dr. S. C. Chew became head of the Practice of Medicine. It was at this time that Balti- more was shocked by details of " The Burk- ing Case . It was well known by students that the Department of Anatomy offered $15 for any cadaver. The financial fortunes of one of the students and of Uncle Perry the jani- tor, were at tlieir lowest ebb. It appeared to them the most effective fund-raising cam- paign would be to expedite the demise of 80 year old Emily Brown of Pig Alley. This was accomplished and Emily was transported by wheelbarrow to the Anatomy laboratory where the fee was paid. Some- how the police learned the details of the transactions and while Uncle Perry escaped, the student was captured, tried and hung. 1889 became a landmark in Baltimore with the opening of the Johns Hopkins Hos- pital. The outstanding men of the Mary- land University faculty were called upon to act as consulting physicians, augmenting the newly imported staff. Drs. Chew, Howard, and Tiffany extended their activities to in- clude the new hospital. It was a period of change, and when in 1893, Johns Hopkins opened its Medical School, bold new ideas in medical education flashed like lightning on the horizon. Maryland men were added to the faculty of the new school and a friendly rivalry ensued which has endured to this day. Many innovations created by the Hopkins were subsequently adopted at the University, as indeed, they were by medical colleges throughout the world. Admission requirements were made more exacting; a compulsory 3 year course was instituted, and scholastic levels were raised. In 1889, the Sisters of Mercy withdrew, and that same year Miss Louisa Parsons, a stu- dent of Florence Nightingale, founded the University of Maryland School of Nursing. The group of old and new buildings at Lombard and Greene Streets underwent ex- tensive remodelling in 1896, and in 1897 opened the doors as " new " University Hos- pital. The new hospital embodied the latest in medical architecture. Capacity was 190 beds with wide, uncrowded wards and an operating amphitheater considered a model at the time. Meanwhile, University men were active 18 The University buildings in 1890. New University Hospital — 1897. rir.c£mfi " i " ? ■ = ' " ■-- ' ' ' sT ' t- ' ■ ' jm WEKfnmimmns sfm i iMm 19 in fields all over the world. James Carroll was serving under Walter Reed on the Army ' s Yellow Fever Commission in Cuba; in Panama in 1906, Samuel T. Darling was publishing accounts of a new and unknown disease — histoplasmosis. W. T. Council- man was Dr. Welch ' s first assistant at the Hopkins and was later to be Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School. ONE HUNDRED YEARS In 1907, the University marked the centen- nial anniversary of its founding. A four day celebration was honored by the pres- ence of distinguished medical men from all parts of the country and the principal ad- dress recounted the progress of the school thru the century, during which it had pro- duced 6,000 physicians. With this backward glance, the university then moved on to another period of change. In 1912 Dr. Arthur M. Shipley was named Professor of Surgery and was to hold this post for 34 years. In 1913 Dr. Gordon Wil- son became head of the Chair of Medicine and attained national prominence in the field of diseases of the chest. It was in 1913 also, that the University School of Medicine was consolidated with the Baltimore Medical College. In 1915 the University merged with the College of Phy- sicians and Surgeons. The latter had been founded in 1872 and had, in its turn, ab- sorbed the Washington University of Medi- cine in 1877. Washington had been the first rival of the University of Maryland in Bal- timore, having been created in 1827 by a University graduate during the regents- trustees battle. The faculty of the Baltimore Medical College and that of the College of Physi- Anatomy Laboratory 20 Operating Room, University Hospital — 1898. Centennial Celebration, 1907. 21 Gordon Wilson, m.d. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. cians and Surgeons joined with the Univer- sity facuhy and in 1916 Dr. J. M. H. Row- land of the B. M. C. was named Dean of the School of Medicine and Professor of Obstetrics. When a declaration of war announced America ' s entry into the First World War, the faculty of the medical school and hos- pital flocked to the colors. The 42nd Gen- eral Hospital, commanded by Col. A. C. Harrison, was formed with a nucleus of University-trained physicians. In Spring of 1918, the 42nd departed for France, there to set up a complete base hospital for the A. E. F. In France, they remained until long after the Armistice, returning home in the Spring of 1919. The war created changes on the medical school scene. Women were admitted to the school for the first time in 1918 and uni- forms dotted the campus as students joined the Army Reserve. Absence of the younger faculty members, especially in the hospital, created problems. Several older men were called out of retirement to aid in teaching the undiminished flow of students. But the war ended before an acute short- age made itself painfully felt and the de- mobilized veterans returned to the school with new ideas. The construction of a mod- ern well-equipped hospital was one such idea. Meanwhile, changes in the structure of the University were taking place. Though nominally an integral part of the Univer- sity, the School of Medicine enjoyed a high degree of autonomy, almost in fact, com- plete independence. Budgets were separate and state financial support for the medical school and hospital was a token. Now per- manent and close union was in the making. The Maryland Agricultural College had been chartered in 1856 and had struggled fitfully thru the 19th century. Becoming 22 Ward Scene — University Hospital, 1915. a wholly state institution in 1914, it was named the State College of Agriculture of Maryland and united with the School of Liberal Arts, School of Domestic Arts and the Graduate School Divisions. This incor- poration of the schools on July 1, 1920 created tlie modern University of Maryland and gathered control of the physically separated members of the University into one pair of hands. University Buildings, 1916. 23 Dr. Shipley discusses patient care. THE NEW HOSPITAL Early then in the 1920s, the budget of the University as submitted to the legislature allotted funds for a new hospital to be built in Baltimore. The legislature approved the huge financial request but the governor vetoed it. This was to be the pattern for almost a decade before the new hospital would be built. By the year 1932, the need for new pa- tient accommodations became critical. The University Hospital, located on the same site as the old Baltimore Infirmary of 1823, had a capacity of 250 beds. There were 25 obstetrical beds and an " outside obstetrical clinic " was conducted. In that year there were 406 hospital deliveries and 1303 de- liveries at home. The Out-Patient Depart- ment was organized in tlie basement of the hospital and facilities were cramped. The medical student ' s four years of train- ing consisted mainly of lectures. Twenty- six hours per week for ten weeks were spent on the wards as clinical clerks in the fourth year and each senior student was required to do at least twelve home deliveries. Fees were $350 per year for residents of the state and $500 for non-residents. The curricu- lum was organized under eleven depart- ments: Anatomy, Physiology, Bacteriology and Immunology, Pharmacology and Ma- teria Medica, Pathology, Medicine, Sur- gery, Obstetrics, Gynecology, Opthalmol- ogy and Otology. A number of notable names appeared in the faculty list: Dr. John C. Krantz headed Pharmacology; Dr. Hugh Spencer was Professor of Pathology, a post he would hold with distinction for 35 years. Dr. Carl L. Davis was Professor of Anatomy. In 1932 Dr. Gordon Wilson (lied and was succeeded by Dr. Maurice C. Pincoffs. Five years earlier Dr. Pincoffs had gained national renown when, togetlier with Dr. Shipley, he had participated in the first successful preoperative diagnosis and removal of a pheochromocytoma. 24 Construction of new University Hospital, 1933. 000 was available, a bequest from Dr. Frank C. Bressler, for the construction of a medical research building. The Bressler Research Building was first opened in the summer of 1939 and its six stories were put to immediate use. That same summer, Dr. Rowland retired and Dr. H. Boyd Wylie, Professor of Biological Chemistry, was named acting dean. THE ROAD TO AUSTRALIA The clouds of war were again rolling over Europe and preparations were begun in America in the event of involvement. In May of 1940 the School of Medicine was invited by the War Department to form a provisional group to function as the nucleus of an army hospital. The members of the unit were to be commissioned in the Medical Finally, it was in this year that money was granted by the state for the erection of a new hospital. Work began in June of 1933 on the southwest comer of Redwood Greene Streets and the first patient was admitted in November, 1934. The 400 bed capacity, ten story building cost $1.2 mil- lion. At the same time, a campaign was ini- tiated among the alumni to raise $170,000 to re-equip and convert the old hospital building into an out-patient clinic. The new hospital wrought many changes in the routine of the students. Ward work was increased and less time was spent in formal lectures. For the first time, hospital births exceeded home deliveries. Facilities for up-to-date surgery and radiology were provided and for the first time students were able to take advantage of a large number of out-patients. Research at the university, hitherto on a small scale, received great impetus by the announcement in June of 1937 that $500,- Col. Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 25 Corps Reserve and to enter active duty to- gether at the time of mobilization. A meet- ing of the faculty in Chemical Hall accepted the invitation and a committee was ap- pointed to select personnel. In October 1940, the Surgeon General authorized the formation of a hospital unit to care for 1,000 patients. This was desig- nated the 42nd General Hospital, retaining the same number as the base hospital which had represented the university in the first World War. By January 1941, a cadre had been formed and personnel commissioned in sur- gical, medical and dental services. Recruit- ing of nurses began in December, 1941, and ninety were finally selected, ten still mem- bers of the senior class, who " graduated in mid-Pacific in June " . The unit was activated in the Spring of 1942 and Dr. Pincoffs was named com- mander, with the rank of lieutenant colonel. The group was split into two 500 bed hos- pitals, the offspring being designated the 42nd General Hospital in Australia in World War II. 26 Frank C. Bressler Research Building 27 Davidge Hall 28 H. Boyd Wylie, m.d. Edward Uhlenhuth, PH.D. 142nd General Hospital under the com- mand of Dr. Monte Edwards. In late May of 1942, the 42nd sailed for Australia where they were to remain for the duration of the war. Dr. Pincoffs was promoted to colonel and later to brigadier general and made chief of professional services for the southwest Pacific area. The 42nd came under the command of Col. George Yeager with Lt. Col. Henry Ullrich succeeding him as chief surgeon. Back in Baltimore, the school was under- going radical changes. By the Fall of 1942, army and navy student programs were in force and almost all students were in uni- forms. The government assumed all ex- penses of tuition, books, and instruments and the students were paid $75 per month. Enrollment at first was maintained at pre- war levels with the same requirements for matriculation, but as the war progressed, students were accepted after only fifteen months of college. The medical curriculum was accelerated, with the school year com- prising eleven months and total course com- pleted in a little over two years. Gradua- tions were held several times a year. In 1943, Gen. Robert Patterson, former dean of University of Oklahoma School of Medi- cine was appointed dean of the medical school. The military influence was manifested on Saturdays, when the army students would form ranks on the sidewalk at Lombard and Greene Streets. Their commandant, a colonel, would then march them to Carroll Park for close order drill. The students lived at home or in lodgings of their own choice but were forbidden to enter establishments designated by the military as " off limits " . The faculty of the medical school had been greatly diminished, especially in the clinical subjects. The undermanned hos- pital staff worked at a killing pace, with 29 students serving as internes and junior resi- dents performing major surgical proce- dures. With the end of the war, conditions re- verted slowly to normal. Gen. Patterson resigned and Dr. Wylie was again named acting dean, a position he was to hold until 1948, at which time he was confirmed in office as the 28th dean of the medical school. In 1947, state aid to the school and hos- pital was increased from 15% to 50%. Post-war planning envisioned a major growth in the physical plant. To accompany this growth, sweeping changes in curricu- lum and faculty were to follow. In 1948, Dr. Eduard Uhlenhuth became Professor of Anatomy. The same year. Dr. Shipley retired as head of surgery. In 1949 Dr. J. Edmund Bradley was named Profes- sor of Pediatrics and Dr. Jacob E. Fine- singer, Professor of Psychiatry. These divi- sions for the first time became entities dis- tinct from the Department of Medicine. 1949 saw the institution of the " block sys- Conslruction of the Psychiatric Institute, 1951. 30 tern " into the curriculum of the clinical years. Under this plan, third and fourth year students devoted their time almost ex- clusively to ward and clinic work. A mini- mum of formal lectures was scheduled. Out- side obstetrical service ceased completely. Construction began in 1950 on a Psychi- atric Institute with a capacity of 150 beds. The first patient was accepted in June, 1953. By 1954, a large number of the faculty, who had served the university fruitfully for many years reached the age of retirement. As they stepped down from their positions, promising young men were plucked from all parts of the nation to replace them. Dr. William Stone, Commandant of the Army Medical Graduate School was named Direc- tor of Medical Education and Research. A year later, he succeeded Dr. Wylie as Dean of the School of Medicine. Dr. Theodore E. Woodward became Pro- fessor of Medicine when Dr. Pincoffs was chosen to head the Department of Preven- tive Medicine and Rehabilitation. Dr. Woodward had earlier earned world-wide repute for his work in infectious diseases and was considered an expert on the Rick- ettsiae. Within the next few years, many familiar and revered names passed from the scene: Douglass, Hundley, Robinson, Sr., Hachtel, Spencer, Uhlenhuth, Toulson, Kilby and others. Men of high caliber were carefully picked to head the departments and divi- sions: Dr. Frank Figge — Anatomy; Dr. Robert Helrich — Anesthesiology; Dr. Leon- ard Scherlis — Cardiology; Dr. H. M. Rob- inson, Jr. — Dermatology; Dr. Charles Van- Buskirk — Neurology; Dr. Charles Wisse- man — Microbiology; Dr. Walle Nauta — Neuroanatomy; Dr. Arthur Haskins — Ob- stetrics Gynecology; Dr. John Dennis — Radiology; Dr. Robert Buxton — Surgery; Dr. John Young — Urological Surgery; Dr. R. A. Cowley — Thoracic Surgery. Landmarks also began to disappear and the roar of steam shovels filled the air as new buildings were begun. Excavations ap- peared for a nursing school, a new library and a new pharmacy school. These were shortly to be followed by a students ' build- ing. Research was stimulated as grants swelled in three years from $400,000 to $1.5 million, with every department par- ticipating in some phase of investigation. Students were encouraged to undertake their own research. A new era for the stu- dents had begun as the school year was lengthened. Students, during their clinical years fanned out to a dozen hospitals across the city to supplement their training. New methods of teaching and learning were in- augurated at a fantastic rate. As so again the university finds itself in a period of ferment and change, and an- other milestone is reached. One hundred and fifty years of medical education lie behind; ahead, the threshold of the Golden Age of Medicine. In a world ceaselessly in turmoil, the old values still apply. The dream of Davidge in those raw, early years has culminated not merely in a more effici- ent machine, but in the intangibles of the healing art that no book can contain. The ideals of hundreds of men over the years have blended into a rich tradition. For truly, time is unimportant except for what can be learned and accomplished. Anniver- saries too, are insignificant unless they serve to focus attention on some grand attainment of the human spirit. The seeds of the past blossom into the fruit of the future and from the struggles and strivings of men now gone, we gatlier inspiration for our own lives. For what we are and will be, we honor our past. 31 Tradition and progress blend in ] y-yy:- : THE PRESENT ■;:.-aV ' •. -, v ti .. ' -N- t., ' «. ' u , ' ■ ' , ■ ' .;t JSE- it M M i •If,: " i »r- s I (.Dnuociilniri fxciiuscs l ci:.ui llic stIiDol year a.s Dean Shine dildrcs.ses Goirnini li Keliliii. I ' lfstileiit Elkins, mill ilii ' students. The foundations of the practice of medicine are laid in the PRE-CLINICAL YEARS FIRST YEAR CLASS: Lt-jl in ripht: Bollnm Kuw: Kurad, Trilrh. ' I dumj;. 1). L.. Saundt-rs. Meyer. Secontl How: Kin;:. Oldsldiic. Bi ' nnrlt. Wood. Normanly. (irrp Miian. .StaulTer. Standiford. Anderson. Third Rotv: Latimer. Cedar- Mom, Wallace, Hayden, Coldstein. Honick. Heefner. LaMaslra. Hreilier. First Year Class FRESHMAN OFFICERS: . ■ la right: Hiiiiam Hon: James. VickPuksidknt. Roson. I ' liKsmKM. Serunti How: Devore. .Sn DK.NT Oil Nfii.. duH " . I). L.. Skcuktmi . Kerciol. Thk si ni:u. l)a idsoti. Stuiknt (!oi mil. s n . ' ■lia.ifiAWt.W FIRST YEAR CLASS: Left to right: Bottom Row: Datlow, Saxberg, Second Roiv: Smith, C P.. Armstrong, Clark. Robinson, Passen, Yates, Martello, Brenner, Ross, Farley, Kesmotlel, Dunn, Lavy, Fellner. i Davidson, Zanker, Stramski, Await, Feola. Morton, DeVore. Third Row: Nicodemus, I MORE FIRST YEAR CLASS: Left to right: Bottom Row: Stofberg, Fiqueroa. Davenport. Smith. G. L. Myers, Berger. Second Row: Keyser, Shulman. Cheeks, Young, Ferciot, Lesky, Berturh, Reed, Smith. M. E., Mills, Third Row: Hill, Lott. Leaken. Sarni. Huffington. James, Salan, Sigman, Tate, Silverstein, Laney. Fourth Row: Aleviza- tos. Volcjak. Messina. Rapoport. I ANATOMY Anat. lUl. Gross AiuUiimy. Fir-t yi ' ar. Fir l - ' iiii ' tfr. 2.S6 lidurs. This course gives the stuileni an opixirlunily to (levetof) a ha.sic con- cept of the morphology oj the human body. It is closely interwoven with the study oj neuroanatomy, histology and embryology, and some time is devoted to roentgen anatomy. The entire human body is dis- sected. That first stoniacli-w reiiching look at the cadaver . . . our own Ijox of Ijoiies . . . quizzes . . . the all-pervading scent that clings . . . the Gordian knot of the brachial plexus ... an aid to remembering the hones of the wrist . . . lost in the space of Retzius . . . study, study, studv . . . " the laboratory will be open Saturday after- noon for those who wish to dissect " . . . also nights and Sundays and Clnistnias vacation . . . the constant state of spasm . . . tlie nightmare of the final exam. Fm K II. J. Fu.i.i;. .b.. I ' H.u. I ' rolessor and Hrad ol Anatomy Dr. Mech finds the Lost Cord Dr. Vhlenhuth demonstrates HISTOLOGY AND NEUROANATOMY MlCROANAT. 101. Microanatomy. First yiar. First semester. 114 hours. This course presents an integrated study of the histology and embry- ology of the human body . . . Special emphasis is placed on the dynamic and junctional aspects of the subject. Neuroanat. 101. Neuroanatomy. First year. F ' irst semester. 96 hours. The study oj the detailed anatomy oj the central nervous system is coordinated with stnuturc and junction oj the entire nervous system. The dissection oj the hiiinan brain and examinuliun oj stained micro- scopic sections oj the hrain stem arc reqiiirrd. Looking iof mitotic figures . the slitie liox that never seems to empty . . . 3-D movies were in vogue . . progress reports . . . that microscope hunch . . . the prac tical exams and the 60 second i)uzzer . . . probing pe ri|)heral pathways of pain . . . can this he the interior coUiculus? . . . sections of the spinal cord . . . " put you brain back in the crock before leaving. " M.i.K .). H. Naita, m.u.. I ' H.i). I ' rojessor oj Anatomy First glimpse Gray white matter BIOCHEMISTRY BlocilKM. 101. principles of Biochemistry. Kirsl year. .S ' corul semes- ter. 208 hours. The phenomena of living matter and its chief ingredients, secre- tions and excretions are discussed in lectures and conferences and examined experimentally. Training is given in bioi hemical methods of investigation. New five-svllable words . . . round and round on the Krehs cycle ... 24 hour urine specimen trans- ported via streetcar . . . the structure of the amino acids . . . the boiling flasks . . . the missed endpoints . . . the loose stopcock . . . oluminous notes and writer ' s cramp . . . the ilirty j lassware . . . the acid holes in the pants . . . breakage fees . . . the marking system tliat leaves no doubt. Emil G. Schmidt, b.s., m.s.. imi.d. Professor of Biological (Chemistry Moonshiners But the book says Salnion-pinkr To the jourth place 43 PHYSIOLOGY Pii ' iMUL. 101. Principlf- of Piiysiology. First year. SecoiiiJ semester. 225 hours. The lectures cover the major fields of physiology, including the jollow- ing areas: central and peripheral nervous systems, neuro-muscular, ap- paratus, heart and circulation, respiration, kidney and body fluids, gas- trointestinal tract, endocrines and reproduction. The laboratory includes experiments with jrog and turtle heart and nerve-muscle preparations, mammalian operative work, and observations on the human subject. The axon of the giant s(|uid . . . hours spent in the (lark . . . taking our first l)h)0(l pressure ... lie down and rest for an hour . . . smoking tlie drums . . . the EKG . . . the visual fields ... a procession to the Student Health Office following the audiometer tests . . . turtles and frogs, cats and dogs ... a department full of scholars and gentlemen. V H.LI M K. nilJisllS. I ' ll. I!.. I ' ll.l) Professor and Head of l h siology ■ t-swuia MW i ' : ' r-. ■ !. r -3 - ' -I DiKTRicH C. Smith, b.a.. m.a.. ph.d. Pro lessor oj Physiology and Associate Dean Dr. Ferguson makes a point. Under the eye of the master Second Tear Class L. to R.. Bottom Row: Irwin. Falls. Coursey. Ashburn. Adler. 2nd Row: James. Morales, Mainolfi. Mower. CaH- tlen. Courts. Feinherg. Ahramson. Young, -ird Row: Jasion. Odend ' hal. DeMarco. .Sclioeket. Stump. Hatem. Darr, Syphus, ShiekU. Kraiil. llh Row: Fletcher. Alices, Rhea. Holt. Poffenhartier. Re.la. King. Cohen. Olto. Jarboc, Thomas. 46 L. to R.. Bottom Row: Kleinman. Trotter. Hanauer. Denseatli. Mercer. Felsenberg. Broccoli. ' 2nd Row: Russo. Serpick. Varner. Rihner. Pinkner. Sax. Trail. Lewis. G. N.. Pereyo. Koukoulas. Ingham, -irrf Row: Halle. Pace. Luban. Rybczynski. Jones. Green. Just. Gardiner. Glazier, Snyder. Washington. 4lh Row: Asrael, Isaacs, Cole, Daw- son, Rubenstein. Brown. Wilhelmson. 0 " Rourk. Kirsh, McWilliams, Economon, Lang. SOPHOMORE OFFICERS: Front Row: Joseph Nalaro. Jack Lewis. Hans Wilhelmson. President. Back Row: Williaiii Falls. John Coursey. Robert Young. 47 MICROBIOLOGY MlCKOBioL. 101. Mfilical .Mi i(il]ii)iut: ami Inmiuiiolu year. First semesler. 180 hours. conil This course is intended to supply basic information necessary to understand infectious diseases, public health and diseases of immunologic origin. Bacterial, fungal, virus and riclictlsial agents are studied in both lecture and laboratory. The first veiiipiinctiire ... 32 weeks of colored fingers ... a joke to start the class . . . oliooolate agar sounds pretty good . . . the warm room . . . eggs that never hatch . . . the hewildering world of liyphae, mycelia and hlastospores . . . skin tests and vaccinations . . . guinea pigs . . . hack to the microscope . . . are they motile or not? . . . get those cheesy Ininks. (jIARLES L. WiSSKMAN. Jr.. B.A.. M.S.. M.D. I ' roiessor and Head of Microbiology i«P ! Don ' t touch it — ive might all get it. The Guinea pigs get the point PHARMACOLOGY Phakmacoi.. 101. (ienpral Pharmacology. Second year. 21f) lii ur». This course iiirhides those phases ol jihoriniuolo y necessary jor an intelligent use oj drugs in the treatment oj disease. The instruction includes materia medico, pharmacy, prescription writing, toxicology, Josology, pharmacodynamics and experimental therapeutics. The labora- tory exerci.ses parallel the course of lectures. Words to live 1)V . . . itiany lost their laste for tea . . . the ait ol eloquence . . . the dangjer of drug addiction . . the mice and rahhits are a little the worse for wear . . it looks so easy in the hook — why doesn ' t it worky . . anesthesia . . . the purple foxglove . . . mechanisms of action ... a colorful department . . . another arrow the quiver . . . Rx: G-R-O-W. John C. Kk mv. Ju.. it.s.. i.s.. rn.u. Professor and Ueitd ol l h(irmai ology 50 T " " A tense moment In the field of observation . . . m A PATHOLOGY Path. 101. General Patliology. Second year. Second semester. 208 hours. Path. 103. Autopsies. Third year. Path. 104. Clinical Pathologic Conferences. Third ami Fourth years. 36 hours. This course includes the study oj the basic principles uj pathology. Laboratory instruction is based on the study of prepared slides and fresh and preserved gross materiul. Small groups oj students are required to attend autopsies conducted in the University Hospital. The sketch book . . . the Kodochrome slides . . . lecture notes are usually incomplete . . . Saturday morning detective story ... the contents of room 16 are a jolt at first . . . nutmeg liver, with coffee-and- cream spots . . . diseases f)egin to emerge from the world of books . . . more long hours over a hot micro- scope. JllMN A. WaGNEH. B.S.. M.I). Professor and Acting Head oj I ' uthology .- . . f- hi ' :..»» Dr. Cunningham picks a .■ pefiinen Surprise CLINICAL PATHOLOGY Meu. 101. Basic Clinical Fatliolngy. Second year. 128 hours. The course is designed lo train the student in iieriormanre and interpretation of laboratory procedures used in clinical diagnosis. During the first semester, basic techniques of hematology are taught. In the second semester, tests used in the diagnosis of renal, hepatic, gastric, pancreatic and meta- bolic diseases are considered. Finger sticks and ear punches . . . the art of pulling a smear . . . most everybody has some kind of worm . . . can ' t tell a mono from a lymph wiliiout a program . . . color, specific gravity and transparency . . . anemia made easy . . . the Imih- in-conscience at 3 A.M. Milton S. .S cks. b.s.. m.d. Pro lessor of C.linicnl Medicine SURGICAL ANATOMY Anat. 103. Clinical Anatomy. Second year. Second semes- ter. 96 hours. The course is designed to bridge the gap between basic anatomy and clinical or applied anatomy. Students per- form a detailed anatomical dissection with emphasis upon clinical application. The cadaver is an old friend . . . eat a sand- wich with one hand, dissect with the other . . . crayon marks show you how to do it . . . lec- ture drawings are works of art . . . " Let ' s say you ' re the head surgeon " . . . fuiuiy how much you can forget in a year. OlTO C BkANTIUAN, B.S., M.D. Professor of Clinical Anatomy Two years of iniensive study are preparafion for the CLINICAL YEARS msj 3t J. Third Tear Clciss I., til R.. Bottom Row: Polasli. Snllon. Alexander. Swanson. Maeon. Bron lein, Levin. I). M.. Zimmerman. Slu ' ijpard. ' lid Row: Raul). ()ltin(;er. Manger, Diener, Erirksnn. Herman. Marshall. Bloom. Kriz. Winslow. Taylor. 3r(l Row: Tilles, Moore. Kitcli. Harshey. Ward. Merendino. I.ilofsky. Hartletl. Clark. 4th Koiv: Rielimonil. MnKaney. Levin, H. S.. Karpa. Sillierslein. Wolte. Zieve. 58 iH I ' ' - ' 4 ' m i % M L. to R., Bottom Row: Baumgarclner. Goklgeier, Ortli. Caplan. Filar. Perez. 2nd Row: Hall. Hale, Greene, Gold- stein, Berg, Parker, Goldberg, Damm, Heek. 3rd Row: Uonovan, Keller, Kelch, Flynn, Gee, Burke, Bachur, Cur- tis, Searles. JUNIOR OFFICERS: L. R., front: G. Clark. J ' ice President. J. Taylor. President. Rear: J. Zimmerman, Student Council. H. Bronstein, Treasurer, B. Goldstein, Secretary, C. Parker. Student Council. ' 59 MEDICINE Meii. 102. Clinical Clerk lii|) in Medicine. Third year. Students are responsible, under supervision, for the history, physi- cal examination, laboratory examinations and progress notes of assigned cases on the medical wards of University Hospital. Med. 104. .Advanced Clinical Clerk hip in Medicine. Fourtli year. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards of University. Merry. Loch Raven and Fort Howard I eteruns Administration Hospitals jar 4 weeks. An additional 4 week period is spent in the Medical Outpatient Department. Liil)-DUP! . . . that first patient ... " I can ' t re- nieniher a tiling " ... 58 years old WD WN WF . . . the 4 A.M. admission . . . the clinic — can this he what practice is like? . . . the most common cause of hematemesis is . . . call me Doctor . . . scut work. TnKonDRE E. W OllDW ARD. U.S.. M.D. Proiessor and Head of Medicine Medical Clinic — The Students ' Private Practice ■ fc •■4-i ' ! Cardiac Catheterization Interference Again Practicing Neurology Starts in the Classroom J pi S. T, K. Revell, m.d. — Hypertension Hemoglobin, White Count and Differential — Stat! George Enlwisle. m.d. — Medical (Jinic H. .1. L. Marriott, m.d. — Physical Diagnosis " SURGERY Sl ' RG. 101. Principles of Surper). Third year. 48 hours. A discussion of fundamental surgical problems. Sim,. 103. Outpatient C lerkship in Surgery. Third year. .Sfudents are assigned tu imtients in the Surgical Clinics, One-third of this quarter is spent at Mercy Hospital. SiRC. 104. Clinical Clerkship in Surgery. Fourth year. One month is spent on the general surgical wards at liii- versity Hospital. .4n additional month is devoted to either Orthopedic. Vrologic, .Neurosurgical. Thoracic or E T services. 1 m Early iiKuning lectures five straight ulcers to dress . . . i)urns. cvsts and stitclies in the clinic . . .that first electrifying night in the accident rouni . . . the infiltrating fluid at 4 A.M. . . . any haboon in the zoo could stand here and iiold this retractor . . . contaniinated again! ... a cutlin " doctor. KdllKliT . lil T()N. A.I).; M.S.; M.D. Professor and Head of Surgery Changing the dressings Checking the result Precision TI " ' fj j 1--. Ainolil. M.i). — . eiirosurgery Tij ht squeeze Recovery room Alli-ii Voshi-11. M.I).- Orlhdiieilii Siirpery R. A. Cowley, m.d. — Thoracic Surgery John D. Young. M.D.- Urolo ir Surgery Accident Room PEDIATRICS Peu. 101. Iiipalifiit Clerkship. Third year. Students are assigned jor four weeks to the pediatric wards of the University and Merry Hos[)itnls. They are responsible jor patient care. Ped. 102. Oiitpalient Department. Fourth year. Students are assigned as clinical clerks lor a period oj lour weeks in the Pediatric Outpatient Department oj the University Hospital. Senior students are also responsible lor physical examination of all neonates. . that first trail- figuring formulas sometimes We lose our hearts to the kids matic heel-stick . , takes advanced calculus . . . But tliey ' re so little! . . . don ' t mention a needle . . . the Cough Clinic . . . sore throats, diarrhea and vitamin pills . . . Mother, you ' ve got to give this hahy orange juice . . . 130 pulse uitli a urade i svstolic murmur. .1. KdMI mi BlUDl.K ' V. B.S.. M.I). Professor and Head of Pediatrics f A bird in a gilded cage Newborn Examination Got il on the first try Enp.rossed OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Ob-Gyn. 101. Clinical Clerkship. Third year. Students participate in (liagnoslic studies, delivery and pelvic surgical procedures ui allocated hospital- ized patients. Ob-Gyn. 102. Advanced Clinical Clerkship. Fourth year. Students attend Baltimore City Hospitals for two iveeks and are responsible for deliveries, prepartum and postpartum care. For an additional two weeks the students are assigned to the University Hospital Out- patient Department. Para 6 in the accident room, 9 cms . . . a urine at this hour of the morning! . . . constant state of foggy fatigue . . . the first delivery is a momentous occasion . . . Leopold ' s maneuvers are impressive but ... 2 A.M. blood pressures . . . after City, you ' re never the same . . . watch that weight . . . push down, little mother . . . It ' s a boy! Arthur L. Haskins, a.b., m.d. Professor and Head of Obstetrics and Gynecology 1 Last-Minute Chech Lunch Time By the Barrelful Oncology C.liiiic PSYCHIATRY I ' sv. 101. Introduction to Psychiatry. First year. 80 hours. A urLsidenition oi human relations ax applied lo the practice j medi- cine. PsY. 102. Psychopathol(){;y. .Second year. 48 hour-. Methods oj examining patients and ileveloping ami alilizing the doctor- patient relationship. PsY. 103. Psychiatric Clinical (:ierk lii|). Tliinl i-ar. 80 hours. Students are assigned for two weeks as dinicul clerks at Hiiring Grove or Springfield State Hospitals. PsY. 104. Advanced Clinical Clerkship. Fourth year. 110 hours. A clinical clerkship on the wards at Ihtiiersity Hospital tor one month. How do you feel al)Out that . . . THINK! . . . Sciatic compression ad iiifinitiiin . . . the id and the ego . . . tlie enormity of the problem dawns . . . the wards at Spring Grove . . . hook reviews . . . hadminton and haskethall at night. Jacob E. Finkmni.lk. .i:.. . n.. m.d. Professor and Head oj Psychiatry Somebody must have a thought Conference The latest word DERMATOLOGY Med. 107. Introilmlion lo Dermatology. Third year. Sludfnls are given assigned readings on the more common skin erup- tions. Med. 108. Practical Exercises in Dermatology. Fourth yiar. Groups of students are given indiiidiiiil inslrurtinn in the diagnosis and treatment of cutaneous lesions. A dynamic outfit . . . now, everybody under the Woods light . . . primary lesions . . . wash the hands ... a macu- lo-papulo-vesico-pustule . . . These quizzes dont count . . . How many looked at both feet? . . . Mechanized dandruff . . . oatmeal baths with a dash of rhubarb. ' 9 M H iiin M. RiiiiiN-oN. ,|k.. b. .. m.d. I ' roiessiir and Head oi Dermatology Three heads are belter than one Now you may not believe this, but- V ( : The earlobe tells the story ANESTHESIOLOGY Anes. 101. Inticiihution lo Anollie -iiilo!; Fourth year. 35 hours. Each senior student sficrtfls a week In the operating rooms oi University Hospital ailniinistering anesthesia and observing. Informal group meetings are held to emphasize factors affecting anesthetii management of patients observed. Passing the gas . . . coffee becomes a staple of diet . . . D and C ' s always after dark . . . the bewildering array of chrome . . . behind the green curtain . . . the most iinpoitant man on the team. M HTIN HkLFUHH. B.S.. M .U. I ' rojessor and Head of Anesthesiology Six hands would help One too many RADIOLOGY R [). 101. Radiologic Anatomy. First year. First semester. 12 hours. Rad. 102. Radiologic Physiology. First year. Second semester. 3 hours. Rad. 103. Pathologic Correlation. Second year. 4 hours. Rab. 104. Radiologic Orientation 1. Third year. 28 hours. A series oj lectures demonstrations tu sliidenls iil Baltimore City Hospitals. Mercy Hospital and University Hospital. Rao. 105. Radiologic Orientation 11. Fourth year. 30 liours. Students are assigned to the Department oj Radiology for one eek. the needle in the haystack . . . that " . . the flickering fluoroscope . . In the dark my gallijladder shoulders begin to sag under the lead apron world of machines. tl le J()H M. t)ENMS. B.S.. M.U. I ' rotessor and Head oj Radiology Noiv, the problem is The Cobalt 60 Practice makes perfect OPHTHALMOLOGY Ol ' HTHAL. 101. Inlrochiclion In Oplithalmology. Tliinl year. 20 hour . The uiKiUiiny iiiul plnsialo y » the eye are reviewed. If eel, I section work, ileinuiistratin the use oj the Ophthalmoscope is car- ried on during the entire session at the Baltimore Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital. Ophthai.. 102. OplillialiM(ilof;y Clinic. Fourtli year. Watrli tlie eyeballs go by . . . relax, listen and learn . . . tlie joy of finally seeing a disc . . . use your ophthalniosfope with either hand . . . low pressure exam. John C. Ozazkvvski. b.s.. m.d. Head of Ophthalmology PREVENTIVE MEDICINE REHABILITATION Prkv. Med. 101. Biostatistics. Fir t year. Second semester. 1.5 hour . Prev. Med. 102. Epidemiology. Second year. 18 hours. Prev. Med. 103. Applied Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation I. Third year. 38 hours. Each student is assigned a patient ol the Mediral (.are Clinic whom he follows by visits to the home. Pkev. Med. 104. Applied Preventive Medicine and Rehabililalion II. Fourth year. 16 hours. Conferences on Home Survey reports and visits to Montebello State Hospital for observation of chronically ill and disabled patients. Sigma and significant differences . . . crabcake and ham salad illness rates . . . into the home . . . the family doctor . . . Montebello ... the great physician, himself. Mai„:rice C. Pincoffs. b.s., m.d. Professor and Head of Preventive Medicine and Rehabilitation A common goal gives rise fo many ' - }i: ORGANIZATIONS ' A- % . ' y. Student Council Student governing body for the Medical School I.. Id R.: James Zimmerman. William Barllett. Gaylord Clark. Maurice Davidson. Jack Lewis. Charles Parker. John bulkelcy, John Hammann. Paul Oexore. David Rosen, James Taylor. 86 Alpha Omega Alpha National Medical Honor Society " Worthy to Serve the Suffering " Seated — . lo r.: Plugge. Rairigh. Abrahams. Dr. Haskins. Dr. Bradley, Cameron. Lansinger, Rappoport. Hickman, Bouzoukis. Standing: Henderson, Randall. Schwartz, Bulkeley. Lentz. Todd. 1) 1 WA ■ Jr I ' " i 87 Ronald Cameron, NU SIGMA Nil President James Bouzohkis, Howaud Siegel, PHI LAMDA KAPPA ' PHI DELTA EPsILON Interfiaternity Council Organized 1955 to improve the cooperation between jraternities. KlUNKLIN ScllWAUT ., JoSEPll DeAN. PHI LAMBDA KAPPA NU SIGMA Nt ' Phi Lambda Kappa Xi Chapter Reactivated 1953 L. to R., Seated.: H. Wilner, J. Tilles, J. Bouzoukis. President: W. Poland, D. Sheppard. Standing: L. Richmond, D. Miles, M. Cohen, D. Rosen, R. Holt, R. Brown. - " f ' ' ' 89 Nu Sigma Nu Beta Alpha Chapter Founded 1882, Organized at Maryland 1904 D i . p pi O ' ArtandtUaA C.J.AlUa J.L.Beeby D.L.Bucy J.T. E ' jl.KeUy Vf . _r l _ h.K.Batt ' L.EngnoIk KJ.A.Garcia DT I.W.Gautnier A.r.Hamm W. l?ever K.f Spcnce N.W.Todd.Jr L.M.Zull p o .Hen lerSCa W.H.Holdefer Jr ?.A. Julian B.W.RairioK KR.Can.eroa n President Inr -- ' r - ' f 1 u l? . „ii% -!, ' » «li arm Mm i Bartl4t D A Cope RjDonovaa R.ECnnUvJr ' J.O.Ieai .J.- I ! W,P. HaU,nr J.S.Harshty R.B.J.Mulva ft ii. jL.Dirr- R J, Dawson WFFallsJr- K Grte " B Insh gharri J.E.Taylor Jr ?.L Wolfe jWCoursey Nu F W.Fljgge,!! Tr«a.s«ircr K.M Gree ? e ' P R.C.Lano B. J J cMunuS F. Odend " ho.l,Jr RJThoino.S 90 I 19 5 7 Phi Delta Epsibji Delta Epsilon Chapter Founded 1904; Chartered at Maryland 1906 L. to R., Bottom Row: A. Gerber, G. Asrael, E. Berg, A. Litofsky, W. Adler. 2nd Row: H. Levin, A. Serpick, G. Cushncr, A. Meyers, M. Kleiman, M. Davidson. 3rd Roiv: B. Stoffberg, I. Anus, R. Schulman, H. Bronstein, C. Silverstein, R. Deiner, P. Zieve, M. Smith, M. Rapaport. 92 L. to R. Bottom Row: C. Halle: B. Goldstein; R. Caplan: S. Passen: H. Rulienstein. 2nd Row: P. Meyer; L. Pink- ner; N. Robinson; J. Ross; W. Bertuck; H. Brecker. 3rd Row: J. Herman; W. Heefner; N. Fellner; A. Brenner; W. Silverstein; S. Felsenberg; R. Lavy; E. Zaiis. K STOP Howard S. Siecel, President Fraternity House Group Di Liis iion 93 And in our f-:,n I ,.;- ' i-:m SPARE TIME I-? IM 1 k : We visit patients We study We lunch in the student lounge ' Y Wf r r " ' ' 1 - ( We either . . . Or We keep in shape . . . body and mind We have hobbies and lie relax 10(1 f ' ' ' , ; Ws- % f -f ♦. ■ H». « If w ' y fy a M4 J { - J We do research— Dick Ho wins Shering Award for his original paper on the Collagen diseases We £0 to dances And we also 102 .c T x ;- ■■ _J All in all. it ' s a wonderful life ' A ■ ' ,1 r m ' -- x%V . ■ - :) 103 ■-f With anticipation, we look to THE FUTURE ' -I- ' - . ' An « ,)? ' r - ».- - ; ipL ' t I T I r rm t I ioia ion mi fc . .A 1 — ™.-h: -; — f- -- T iini.flDa iajiD mm itWWr. aMKfc.i Vett; Library Building — noH ' under conslruclion New Buildings Student Union Building when completed iii 1! i S( IkiiiI tij riiarmacy Building — now under construction Provide Better Facilities m riHB fim wir More than buildings alone, fhe future rests with the - ' Xil GRADU ATES •■«-, . I STUART JOEL ABRAHAMS, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland WESTERN MARYLAND COLLEGE 1953 Stu . . . noted for his photogenic auto in a fanious flick a few years back . . . Phi Delta Epsilon. Veep and Sec ' y . . . AOA in the Junior Year ... a really great guy . . . vacations spent as a camp doctor and a medi- cine man at University . . . personal qualities of steadi- ness and sincerity . . . toured the Mid-West in Septem- ber ' 56 . . . differential diagnosis includes OB-GYN. 2 -L xjCa rrt.a j fj EMIL EMANUEL AFTANDILIAN, m.d. Teheran. Iran UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Emil . . . trichomania immaculata . . . camels, harems, caravans, and other dreamy ecstatic pleasures from the land of Sinbad . . . loyal resident of Nu Sig for the duration of the campaign . . . played " Doc " at summer camp ... a memorable externshi]) at Peninsula Gen- eral out on " the Shore " . . . the neat little ambassador from Iran . . . on to Radiology or Internal Medicine and then a honieland |)ractice. vf.J . r CHARLES JAMES ALLEN, a.b., m.d. Patersoii. New Jersey JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1953 Bud . . . clinics should have poker tables and " Bud " on tap ... all sports are high on the list of interests . . . Nu Sigma Nu, Social Chairman in the Junior Year . . . " These men can ' t gas me that easv " . . . the best bartender the house on . ' t. Paul Street ever had . . . deserted the cloisters of Lnllieraii to marry Janice Sep- tember 1955 ... an externsliip at PtJH in ' 56 . . . er slal ball jjredicts a future in Medicine or Peiliatrics. V-Z . 110 MARVIN SHIELD ARONS, b.s., d.m.d., m.d. Ansonia. Connecticut YALE UNIVERSITY 1952 N.B. HARVARD DENTAL SCHOOL 1955 Marv ... a welcome stranger from the Ivy Halls to the Terrapin Flats in the Junior Year ... a fabulous loose- leaf with all the answers . . . the neat and quiet type . . . made the Grand Tour in 1954 . . . has spent the past two vacations as an extern at the Griffin Hospital in Derby, Conn. . . . wed to Cyvia in June 1956 . . . at present is planning for a career in Plastic Surgery. SELINA GLORIA BALCO, b.s., m.d. Mt. Rainier. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1953 ' " Beanie " . . a pretty, perky little package; so sweet she teaches sweetness . . . our local globetrotter . . . has mastered the art of being nice to everybody . . . Scribe for the Frosh Year . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . summer of ' 54 as Sec ' y at VA CO DM S . . . summer ' 55 around the world in 90 days . . . some laughter . . . summer of ' 56 as extern at HUP in Philly . . . would be Internist; maybe Cardiologist. If M.D. BERNARD NEIL BATHON, b.s., Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1953 Neil ... St. Dynamo — the Apostle of Greene Street . . . the senses keen on the metaphysic ... a thinker s delight . . . Phi Beta Pi, Social Chairman in the Sophomore Year . . . Newman Club ... a real hustler ... the Lab of Maryland General and the O.R. at Agnes gave way to the outdoor life for the past two summers . . . " If I could only talk faster " . . . exchanged vows with Joan in August ' 56 . . . looking forward to a New England General Practice. 111 JAMES LEONARD BEEBY. b.s.. m.d. Frederick, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 19.S3 Jim . . . " Doctor. I have a question in the audience " ... an ardent Nu Sig fan . . . married to Bettie in ' 48 . . . clinically oriented for years now . . . Naval corpnian and Medical Research Tech from 1946-49 . . . deserted the milk truck of ' 54 for the Navy again in ' 55 and ' 56 at Portsmouth. Va. ... a real interest in the physician ' s life . . . once more up anchor for internship and OB-GYN residency. y P y P- RONALD RICHARD BERGER. m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Ronnie ... all activity done with an air of supreme confidence and experience . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . wife June and daughter Susan Leslie with another addition on the way . . . tall and red-headed . . . sum- mers spent at Mercy then Lutheran with the most recent as a National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis Fellow in Pulilic Health and Preventive Medicine . . . has the right answer at the right time . . . possible army intern- ship paves way for General Practice. PAUL BORMEL. b.s.. m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1953 Paul ... a pointed practitioner of the precision habit . . . Phi Delta Epsilon ... the art of raising a thorough- bred mustache . . . Clinical Pathology and the Medical OPD in " 55 set the pace for a lnis sununer in " 56 as a NFIP Fellow in I ' liMir lli ' iillii ;iihI I ' rcvcnlixc Mcli- cine, research in Lcplospirosis. Medical (.are (..linic, and the Health Dcjit. Iiiiinculation Clinics . . . will gladly vohmtccr iiifonnatinn to those uhn seek it . . . L. S. Arm) an l liilcriiiil Mciliriiic in llir future. 212 JAMES KOSTAS BOUZOUKIS, a.b.. m.d. Nashua, New Hampshire HARVARD COLLEGE 1952 Jim ... a notable rapport with the patients of Hellenic ancestry . . . constant calorie battle . . . Charter Mem- ber of Phi Lambda Kappa, Treas., VP and President . . . IFC and AOA . . . jovial personality and welcome presence . . . from drug store counters to VA surgical clerkship to summer internship in Medicine at Univer- sity . . . one of the Levophed Boys . . . eloped with Delores in ' 56 ... let him off at Internal Medicine. - li.- M. HERBERT EDWIN BROOKS, a.b., m.d. Chevy Chase, Maryland WABASH COLLEGE 1951 Herb . . . silent smile and subtle manner . . . two years at Wayne University in Physiology and research in blood clotting . . . Phi Beta Pi, Sec ' y . . . union with Cal brought forth Donald Frederick and Catherine Jean . . . Scrub Nurse at SBGH, extern at Agnes and Spring Grove Hosps., and clinical clerk at Portsmouth USNH have kept papa busy at summertime . . . cur- rently wearing the Navy Blue . . . hopes for General Practice in the North. DONALD LOUIS BUCY, b.s.. m.d. Chevy Chase, Maryland GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY 1953 Don . . . the gentleman from Georgetown . . . casual- ness imperfecta . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . two year Rep. to the Student Council in the Frosh Year ... a connoisseur of the finer femmes . . . from the ditches of ' 54 to the Lutheran O.R. in " 55 to the Eastern Shore and PGH in " 56 . . . another broad smile ... a prac- titioner of the art of gracious living . . . rotating intern- ship begets Military Service begets a General Practice. 113 JOHN THOMAS BULKELEY. b.s., m.d. Selbyville, Delaware SALISBURY STATE TEACHERS ' COLLEGE 1951 Jack . . . Mr. Chairman, our candidate from the Eastern Shore . . . our beloved Class Prexy for the past three terms ... a special interest in Diets . . . one of the Nu Sig Boys . . . AOA . . . with the Leathernecks 1945-46 . . . courted and won Barbara Hudson . . . vox populi served the Class well in many a dark hour . . . rotund and jolly . . . gave up Campbell Soups to work medical wonders at Peninsula General for the past two summers . . . Internal Medicine or General Practice. MARY CECELIA BURCHELL. a.b.. m.d. Bradford, Massach iisetts BARNARD COLLEGE 1951 Burch . . . saucy little lassie ... a real bundle of energy . . . boating and niountaiii climbing . . . Camp coun- sellor in 19.54 . . . Sam . . . O.R. at Lutheran during the sunnner of ' 55 . . . stayed on at Lutheran as X-ray tccli. and then for A.R. dul . . . medical externship . . . sailing . . . ho])es to inteiii in California then stay on for residenc) and practice. 1 _ I k .( r HARVEY RUDOLPH BUTT, JR., m.d. AniHipolis. Maryland UMVEKSITY OF MARYLAND Harv ... the sage of his flock . . . quiet ami dapper . . . several years of experience nut to sea witli the Navy and Merchant Marine have left fond memories of foreign places and friendly people . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . the cordial host at the annual oyster roast . . . Medical Director at Cap Cod Sailing Camp last summer . . . more sea duty leads to a General Practice here or abroad. 114 ANTHONY JAMES CALCIANO, b.s., m.d. Bristol, Connecticut UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 1954 Tony . . . status quo spasticus . . . has the longest card in Davidge Hall history . . . proud wearer of a Phi Beta Kappa key from the University of Vermont . . . notes translated on request . . . always relaxed and calm . . . vacations efficiently spent in the Bristol and Waterbury. Conn., hospitals . . . considering Internal Medicine in the Nutmeg State. 1 Ca v-v S - » V . K.D. RONALD ROSS CAMERON, a.b.. m.d. Hagerstown, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1953 Rod . . . latent qualities of leadership became manifest in the Senior Year . . . hi-fi addict . . . chief liaison with the Block . . . has served Nu Sig well as Rush Chairman, Veep and Prexy . . . looks forward to those Miami sojourns . . . Junior Class VP . . . AOA, Pres. . . . IFC, Scientific Chairman ; President . . . exchanged rings with Marge in ' 52 . . . Fellow with State Health in ' 55; started a Naval engagement at Portsmouth in ' 56 ... a future in Blue and Internal Medicine. ROBERT ANTHONY CARLIN. m.d. Rahway, New Jersey UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Bob . . . tall. dark, and smooth . . . " Ach! " . . . mourned the passing of Chick ' s with many others . . . a colorful log on the Maine to Baltimore cruise (see Butt for the details) . . . thinks of the OPD with real affection ... a friendly manner . . . summers spent in rest and the clinics . . . expects to practice with Dad before taking up the uniformed life. 115 MARVIN COHEN, b.s.. m.d. Baltimore. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Marv . . . quiet and quick; able and stable . . . Charter Member of Phi Lambda Kappa . . . married Flo in June " 53 ... a real photobug . . . the truck and taxi of byegone years gave way to a camping trip through- out the U.S.A. this past summer ... an addiction for the Goren pastime ... on to the West Coast for OB-GYN. JOHN VINCENT CONWAY, b.s., m.d. Wilmington, Delaware UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE 1952 John . . . graduate study in protein chemistry ... a special talent at blood letting . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . John and June 6-4-55; daughter Deborah Lynn born 6-11-56 . . . grand prize winner during the earlier days at Chick ' s . . . L ' niversity externship . . . spent the last two summers in the employ of Lhicle Miltie . . . Surgi- cal intern at I H . . . General Surgery follows training at Mars land General. rr -Kr-z r JOSEPH OLIVER DEAN. JR.. b.s.. m.d. Bethesda, Maryland liNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Joe . . . determined, resolute, steadfast and unswerving; there i s no course but the straight one . . . Nu Sigma Nu. Sec ' y then VP . . . IFC durinj; the Junior Year . . . last two summers spent in Clinical Patliiilogy at NIH . . . «(■(! til Jii(l in " 54: combined cITorts to produce Joe. 111. No cinlier " 56 . . . now on reserve connnission with L SPHS . . . Internal Mf-dicine or Lrology follows a West Coast internship. ( jL £).a , ©. 116 MILTON LORING ENGNOTH Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Buz . . . former track star from " The Park " . . . lives in no fear of alopecia . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . swimming, fishing, and aqua skiing for extra curricular activities . . . got paid for pumping ethyl in ' 54 and ' 55 . . . summer intern at Montebello State Hospital in ' 56 . . . ex lifeguard ... an intership at University Hospital is in the making. ARTHUR DALE ERICSSON, b.s., m.d. Miami, Florida UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI 1953 Art ... a candid camera on the Senior Class . . . enthusiasm and cheerfulness make any job easier . . . another hi-fi addict ... a standing date with the Balti- more Symphony . . . the eyes have it . . . earlier vaca- tions spent back home in the Sunshine State . . . summer of ' 56 at Bon Secours introduced senior extern- ship there . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . residency in Neurology or Surgery lead to a career in Neuro- surgerv. MARVIN ALLEN FELDSTEIN, m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE Marv . . . " Did you ever see him when he wasn ' t laugh- ing? " . . . quick to move and quick to make friends . . . hobbies include sailing, swimming, and reading . . . Grand Tour of the Continent in ' 53 . . . has spent his summers at the brewery, cab driving; as a sales- man and a Lab Tech ... a seasoned X-ray man at UH . . . crew cut, sport shirt, and moccasins ... to Montreal for internship and then Internal Medicine. fC ' €e . W 117 VINCENT JAMES FIOCCO, b.a., m.d. New York, New York COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 1954 Vince . . . how are you fixed for blades wide smile betrays 32 beautiful pearls . gait . . . master locksmith of the 8}5 keys . tant date with Mardi on May 25th . sale of drugs in " 54 . . a really a jaunty an impor- promoted the Med-Surg externship at St. Joseph ' s Hosp. in Stamford, Conn, in " 55 and " 56 . . . externship at Mercy . . . internship in THE city at St. Vincent ' s before answering reveille. MARY LOUISE STANG FURTH. b.s.. m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1953 Wheeze ... the charming young lady from Catonsville . . . always ready and willing to lend a helping hand . . . worked with Dad the dentist in ' 54 and externed at St. Agnes in ' 55 . . . closed out the Junior Class social season as the hostess with the mostest . . . acquired hubby Werner in June " 56 . . . plans to intern in Balti- more and then do research in Endocrinology. OyUcA- p, j!X» y yCu X »P. SEBASTIAN JOHN GALLO, a.b., m.d. Harljord. Connecticut JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1953 Subby ... a real individual thinker . . . delighted laugh . . . quietly and in a friendly fashion he moves through the daily routine ... a Connecticut Yankee . . " 54 and " 50 spent on the wards at McCook Memoria in Hartford . . . ' 55 at X-ray tech. at University . . A.R. duty at Franklin Square . . . private practice fol lows a rotating intcrnsliip at the Hartford Hospital id i-J ei I -- J). 118 NICOLAS ANTONIO GARCIA, III, a.b., m.d. Santurce, Puerto Rico JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1953 Nick ... all that sugar cane . . . Nu Sigma Nu ... a Latin gentleman . . . Vive El Pancho ... in 1954 a wonderful summer on the Caribbean Isle . . . hard work never hurt anyone . . . ' 55 at Maryland General . . . Nick and Kathy in July ' 5.5 . . . Portsmouth, Va., in 1956 began a Naval career that ' s still afloat . . . plans after internship not yet decided. ' ef X ' jF i DONALD WILLIAM GAUTHIER, a.b., m.d. Manchester, Neiv Hampshire ST. anselm ' s college 1953 Don . . . hearty laughter and perpetual risus . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . Custodian in the Senior Year . . . New- man Club . . . tied the knot with Cecile August 1955; tied the cord of Colette in June 1956 . . . alias Boy Scout " Doc " . . . spent the summer in ' 56 with the U. S. Navy and stayed on for the Senior Cruise . . . Naval internship then OB-GYN or General Practice back home in the White Mountains. ALLEN SIDNEY GERBER, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND 1955 Al . . . a personal appreciation for the humorous side of things . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . one of the Gold Dust Twins . . . relaxes with good music . . . Social Security Admin, in ' 55; Clinical Center — NIH at Bethesda in ' 56 . . . now on Reserve Commission with the U. S. Public Health Service . . . cherishes most his individualism . . . the recent years have had a trimming effect . . . hopes for Internal Medicine and travel abroad. Cities J. A , - - 119 VERNE EPHRAIM GILBERT, a.b.. m.d. Los Angeles, California UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 1953 Verne . . . memorable days at the " house " with the other five . . . intellectual interests . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . summer of ' 55 spent on the Coast in a Psychiatric Externship at Langley Porter Clinic — San Francisco . . . X-ray Tech. at University during the current season . . . Clinica l Clerkship at Springfield State Hosp. in ' 56 . . . much spare time spent perusing the present literature — medical and otherwise . . . Academic Medicine or Psychiatry in the years ahead. LORETTA ANN KIRZ GILMORE. b.s.. m.d. Takorna Park, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1950 Loretta . . . that beautiful hair and slim, trim figure . . . research minded ... an enthusiastic and conscientious investigator . . . married to Jimmy in July 1950 . . . summers spent uith the National Institutes of Health at Bethesda ... at present an Ensign in the I ' . S. Public Health Service Reserves ... a quiet charm ... a rotat- ing internship in the Nation ' s Capital paves the way for a Pediatric resideiicv. t o-uiJV - : . -M -V i ELDON BENORR HAMBLIN. b.s.. D. Phoenix. Arizona UNIVKRSITY OF UTAH 195. ' ? I ' .ldiin ... a slow talker with crackcr-liarrcl humor . . . uilh uife ' i ' heone he ' s sired the llxc lilllc Harnbliiis . . . Phi Beta Pi. Editor and Treas. . . . 1956 with the Histopatliolog) Lai) at St. JosP|)h ' s ... as a PhM 8 c uilh Ihe U. S. Navy he foii,i;hl ihc -Hallli- of San Diego " for i ' j yrs. . . . Good lluiiidr man . . . llic old home town awaits this General Prarlitiont r to lie. . 5 w -, 4 120 JOHN HENRY HAMMANN. b.s., m.d. Baltimore. Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1953 Moose . . . the genuine manners and ways of the true gentleman . . . Phi Beta Pi. Sec ' y . . . Newman Club . . . he ' s served his class well as Treasurer in the 2nd and 3rd years . . . and as Student Council Rep. during the 4th yr. . . . Scrub Nurse at the Hopkins. Lab. Tech. at St. Joe ' s, and 1st aid duty at the Lord Baltimore Press Co. have made for busy summers . . . Surgery or General Practice in the ofiing. ANTHONY FRANCIS HAMMOND. JR.. b.s., m.d. Irvinglon, Neiv Jersey SETON HALL UNIVERSITY 19.53 Tony . . . jovial, jolly, jocund, and Jersey . . . drawing to an inside straight is a sucker ' s game ... El Gordito . . . Nu Sigma Nu and St. Agnes externship in the bachelor years . . . the sack hath its charms . . . Schering pill-pusher during the summers of ' 55 and ' 56 . . . wed to Joan in June 1956 . . . internship and residency lead to a Garden State practice. PAUL KATSUTO HANASHIRO, b.a., m.d. Kekaha, Kauai, Hawaii INDIANA UNIVERSITY 1953 Paul ... a good harmonizer in those Anatomy quartets ... an ardent fan of the Big Ten with a special interest in those Hoosier lads . . . externship at Mercy . . . still admits to a single status . . . summers in the Windy City, the lab at Mercy, the O.R. at St. Joe ' s and as Clinical Clerk at Walter Reed . . . sights are set on Internal Medicine. ( - n- ( • s i- Q 121 CHARLES MORGAN HENDERSON, b.s., m.d. Lathrop, Missouri UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Chuck . . . Would you? . . . interests include tropical fish, vacuum cleaners, and trephines . . . You would! . . . Frosh Class Veep ... a Teegernsee romance in Bavaria led to charming spouse Barbree . . . Nu Sig and AOA . . . externship at Jessup . . . summers spent at St. Agnes O.R., Medical OPD. and at UH as an intern on Neurosurgery . . . Maryland Clinic ... a long lease at Universit for internship and Neuro- surgery residency. HAROLD JACK HETTLEMAN, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1953 Hal . . . tall, dark, and taciturn ... a gentleman with moderate tastes . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . vacation times spent filling orders for the pause that refreshes . . . ac(]uired lovely wife Elayne in June 19.S3 with the first installment this March ... a general rotating internship ushers in a Baltimore practice. ROBERT OTHELLO HICKMAN, a.b., m.d. Logan, Utah UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 1951 Bob ... a real high-brow . . . rol)ust and frictulK . . . truly good things come in little packages . . . served as a Private with the Air Corps for a year that included duty in Texas and (Colorado . . . wife Lucy with the children Jon and Jeatnie . . . research in Steroid Metabolism at I nivcrsity of I ' tah . . . straijiht intern- ship and a residency in Pediatrics at I ' tali and Salt Lake General Hosp. lead to a practice in the land of liri ' -hani oung. : { J d? ■ AyiyUn . yf .d. 122 RICHARD KOON BOW HO, b.a., m.s., m.d. Honoiiilu. Haivaii UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII 1951 AND 1953 Dick . . . big bonanza winner on TV this past summer . . . looking forward to the trip to the Eternal City . . . Phi Beta Pi . . . U. S. Army Transport Service 1945-47 . . . son Stephen from wife Anita . . . summers as research biochemist, Medical OPD and Microbiology Fellowship, and summer intern in Pediatrics . . . First Prize — Sobering Awards for 1956 ... a career ahead in Pediatrics. WILFRED FERBER HOLDEFER, JR., b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1952 Willie . . . solid on them skins, man . . . the weevil is quite a storyteller in his own soft tones . . . The Bear . . . friend of P. D. White and the Solid Gold Stetho- scope . . . Nu Sig, Rush Chairman . . . O.R. at SBGH and Lab at Woman ' s . . . frequently seen leaving school dances early with friends . . . wed to Helen in April 1956 with junior on the way . . . past summer as Cardiology Fellow at UH . . . rotating internship. CARL JELENKO, III, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1953 Carl . . . confidence fortified with intense interest in the subject at hand . . . always eager to help . . . imitations, card tricks, funny stories, juggling, etc. for any occa- sion . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . Terrae Mariae . . . still admits to the bachelor ranks . . . psychiatric extern at Seton Institute in ' 54 . . . held a similar status at Spring Grove State Hosp. in ' 55 and ' 56 . . . immedi- ate plans include a mixed internship and surgical resi- dency; ultimate goal, pediatric surgery. 123 NORMAN PAUL JONES, m.d. Washington. D. C. GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY Norm . . . Will Rogers at his best . . . more cracker- ijarrel humor . . . the voice of the common man . . . 1943-45 spent with Uncle Sam in the Air Corps . . . Newman Club, President . . . strove to maintain anonymity in vain . . . wife Clare and daughters three: Mary, Paula, and Barbara . . . this gruff exterior con- ceals a heart of gold . . . the future is yet undecided. ■?7f -y -jtXX 77p ' EDWIN LOUIS KAHAN, b.s.. m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1953 I ncle Lou ... a Lilliputian by birth . . . do-it-yourself is the only way . . . possessed of much drive and determination . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . married Carolyn in June 1951; daughter Ellen Gail has a sibling on the way . . . Humpty Dumpty Ice Cream and Coke and the Diamond Cab during the summer months ... a specialized General Practice somewhere in the Free State. Q:p. c dt ' i-u -y V 1 WILLIAM FRANK KENNEDY. JK.. u.s.. m.ij. Lewiston. Maine RATES COLLEGE 1952 13111 . . . red hair, a saltv mariiicr and an accent reminiscent of his home Pine Tree State . . . I ' lii Kclu Pi . . . a year of graduate work in Ph siological Clicni- istry at the Univcrsit) of Minnesota . . . the sununcr of ' .54 as a Lab Tech. at Mt. Sinai Hosp. in Minneapolis . . . Mercy externship began wav back in the sununcr of ' 5.5 . . . definitely thinks a relaxed attitude is Ikmc to sta . . . future sights set on Internal Medicine in Minnesota. OJ. - ! - C ■ Xl 124 LEONARD LOUIS KOGAN, m.d. Baltimore, Maryland DARTMOUTH COLLEGE Lenny . . . thorough and exact in all undertakings . . . Phi Delta Epsilon ... it takes 2V weeks to make a Neurologist . . . good posture and characteristic gait . . . one of the Monumental City ' s eligible bachelors . . . 1955 saw the culmination of three summers with a private medical laboratory . . . Neurology Fellowship in ' 56 . . . wine, woman, song; and oh yes, Cardiology. JZii y -- M cy x_ " Tx.. , HERBERT LEE KRONTHAL, b.s., m.d. Baltimore. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Herb . . . swift and sure; always ready to lend a hand . . . Phi Delta Epsilon ... a first-hand specialist in Brucellosis . . . exchanged vows with Joyce in June 1956 . . . Maryland State Health Dept. and a Fellowship with the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis at Montebello during vacation time ... a two year intern- ship is the last link to General Practice. DONALD TYSON LANSINGER, m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE Don . . . frequently seen haunting Student Health Service . . . " got to have my beer " . . . Frosh Class Treasurer . . . AOA, Vice President . . . wore an Ensign ' s stripe for three years . . . Rosewood Training School in 1954 gave way to more Navy Blue in ' 55 and ' 56 . . . married Helen in November ' 53 . . . Naval engagement now under way to continue for the remainder of the internship and surgical residency campaign. 125 DAVID POOLE LARGEY, b.a.. m.d. Glenolden, Pennsylvania WASHINGTON LEE 1950 Dave . . . the booming voice and laughter ... in Penn- sylvania they call it charm ... he speaks with anthoritv . . . " my feet hurt " . . . spent summers keeping Scott Tissues on production and stamping out disease in the Diamond State . . . two years with the USAF in the wilds of northern Ma ine . . . connoisseur of fine food and drink . . . Internal Medicine follows internship in the City of Brotherly Love. JAMES PRESTON LASTER. b.s.. m.d. Dundalk, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1948 Jim . . . much warmth and personal charm ... a sinceritv that generates confidence . . . possesses the only harem west of the Casbah . . . sailing on the " Dyspnea " ... 2 yrs. research with LISPHS . . . Infantry Sgt. in Korea . . . Terrae Marl E Medicus — Editor in Chief ... a memorable summer as an intern on Medicine at I niversit) with a special interest in P. Iiilarensis . . . innnediate plans include an internship in Malliinore. O ' TPZl ' iP. J :? -mj . K »« JOSEPH CHORPENING LAUGHLIN. m.d. Clarkslniifi. II I ' st I iiiiiiiia WEST VIK(;iNL IMVEKSITYV Joe . (Ic ()lce of the good life . niddu.- i eiKU includes skiing, sailing, and tennis . . . " Ini serious guys " ... a real rapport with Hemingway and Wolfe ... 2 yrs. Rep. to the Student Council, Treasurer . . . college sweetheart. Mary Liz. became his bride in ' 5.5; Frances Ann in .56 . . . I)es . . . past summer as Cardiology Fellow at I II . . . decisive, enicieiit and constant . . . Canadian trip led to an internship at the l{.,Nal Vic. M.Ci Surgery ' : 3cr=»jk . UjUuj»K.l ' y lA.t:: . 126 GEORGE ALVIN LENTZ, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1953 George . . . tough but oh so-o-o gentle with the kiddies . . . get your charts up to date, guys . . . " Creep " . . . the broad grin . . . popularized the Queen ' s English . . . PhiBP, Archon . . . six colorful years researching paint . . . Frosh Class Historian ; Senior Class Veep . . . AOA . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . Business Manager . . . most recent vacation as Pediatric extern at University . . . internship introduces General Practice or Pediatrics. , ' V p. SIDNEY ISAAC LERNER, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland university of MARYLAND 1953 Sid . . . the calming influence . . . let ' s put it this way . . . the kidney ... a true artiste at penmanship . . . completely unhurried . . . spends spare time interpret- ing prescriptions . . . " in other words " . . . drugs, drugs, and more drugs . . . sailing and tennis for relax- ation . . . chased Monica till she finally cauiiht him in December ' 56 . . . there ' s a future in Internal Medicine. RICHARD LEONARD LEVIN, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1953 Dick ... a real whiz kid; sharp as a tack . . . Shubey Dubey amid all that Ivy-tailored sartorial splendor . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . authoritative but rolls well with the punch . . . friend of " the Birds " . . . nimble wit . . . another graduate pill dispenser who ' s made it pay . . . Mercy Hosp. Public Relations Expert . . . married to Suzanne in 1955 . . . internship and residency in Surgery at Mercy Hospital. -a£ ' 2 r !f t 127 PETER PAl ' L LYNCH, m.d. Springfield, Massachusetts MOUNT ST. Mary ' s college Pete . . . rusty crewcut and Irish eyes are smiling . . . BB and Rocko . . . the Grove and the Loop . . . Agnes is less expensive than Hertz . . . the bachelor years at the " country club " . . . there he met and wooed his beautiful bride. Bettie . . . externship at Mercy Hospital back home during the past summer . . . flying through the Senior year with 2nd " Louie ' s " bars . . . Air Force internship paves the way for General Practice in the Bay State. FRANCIS JOHN MACEK. JR..b.s.. m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1953 Frank ... a big man with the cigar . . . views the world through a pair of Simpson ' s . . . genuine smile and an affable laugh . . . Mach ... a long term interest in the baby business . . . Phi Beta Pi . . . post card salesman in " 54 . . . O.R. at St. Agnes gave way to OG-GYN externship . . . married sweetheart, Marlene. in September ' 55 . . . internship and OB-GYN residency at St. Agnes. FRED HENRY MEHLHOP. n.s.. m.d. New York, New York JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1953 Mel . . . (]uotes may be used to advantage . . . another thinker in our midst . . . congenial host who is well accpiainled uith the Bartender ' s Guide . . . summers .spent in filling orders for the partakers of the li ]uid repast ... a commuter ' s romance was halted in Decem- ber " 56 when Bctte said. " I do " . . . internship at Mercy Hospital. Iriclc Sam. and a General I ' raclice are included in tlir iiiiiiicili;ilr |)laris. 128 FREDERICK MOOMAU, a.b., m.d. Petersburg, West Virginia WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 1953 Fred . . . one of the trio from the Mountain State . . . speaks in tones both soft and slow . . . takes more than an alarm to break the sack habit . . . Electronics Tech. 1 c with the U. S. Navy 1946-50 . . . after train- ing at Great Lakes, he saw duty from a destroyer for a year . . . Mediterranean cruise ... a tour of the West in ' 54 . . . married Jennie Lee after heavy courtin ' in ' 55 . . . General Practice after local training. PAUL ALOYSIUS MULLAN, b.s., m.d. Morristowii, New Jersey SETON HALL UNIVERSITY 1952 Moon . . . the guy everybody likes . . . started out across the street . . . Nu Sigma Nu, out to Ann Arbor for the 75th Anniv. Conclave ... an early call to lead- ership as Frosh Class Prexy set the stage for Student Council President in the Junior Year . . . Professional School Senate ... a 3 yr. externship at St. Agnes had its pleasant moments . . . Schering pill-pusher in ' 56 . . . Newman Club . . . possessed of much savoir-faire . . . plans include General Practice. HERBERT HARVEY NASDOR, m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE Herb ... a real crop of flaming red hair . . . always alert and attentive . . . able and willing to lend a hand . . . Charter Member of the revived Phi Lambda Kappa, Prexy . . . National Representative to Phi Lambda Kappa . . . gave up the idle life of 1955 to be a camp ■ ' Doc " in 1956 ... a wonderful Bermuda honeymoon with wife Ruthie in " 54 . . . internship at LIniversity Hospital and then a General Practice. fA ■Tf j ma 129 THEODORE THADDEUS NIZNIK. JR..b.s.. m.d. Baltimore. Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE I ' J.lH Niz . . . (]iii(_k to establish rapport witli patients . . . efficiency plus ... a special talent on the organ . . . Newman Club . . . industrial medicine at Bethlehem Steel . . . externship at Bon Secours . . . nuptials in June 19.55 with fiancee. Dorothy . . . the stork is on the horizon . . . local internship with a General Practice here in the Monumental City. ■ cT- ■4} . Ji FRANCISCO ENRIQUE OLIVERAS-ARMSTRONG, B.S., M.D. Hato Rey, Puerto Rico UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO 1955 Quique . . . sefior-doctor es muy simpatico . . . quiet, friendly and perserverent with a fetish for perfection . . . his Caribbean homeland is the only place to live . . . last two summers spent as a clinical cl°rk at the Liga Puertorriquena Contra el Cancer . . . wed to Madie in July 1956 ... an internship at the University Hospital or at Baylor is the extent of plans to date. CHARLES ROGER OPPEGARD, b.s.. m.d. Washington, D. C. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Chuck . . . honi soit (]ui nial y pense . . . experienced and able . . . charitable and reserved with a good sense of humor . . . junior Class Veep . . . purveyor for Murray-naumgartner . . . Christian Medical Society . . . the milkman caint-th in 19.54-5. ' ) ... a psychiatric externship at Sprinfield State Hospital in " 56 intro- duced him to his charming bride, Juanita . . . Christian Evangelism overseas after residency traini.ig in the States. 130 FREDERICK WILLIAM PLUGGE, IV, a.b., m.d. Chevy Chase, D. C. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 1953 Fritz ... a bachelor flat is a fading luxury . . . cos- mopolitan tastes and interests ... a chapeau for any occasion . . . tennis and a new interest in skiing . . . Nu Sig. Soc. Chair, and Treas. . . . ADA . . . TMM . . . Class Secy 2nd and 3rd yrs. ; Treas. 4th yr. . . . MGH Lab and Agnes O.R. . . . Orange Bowl in ' 56 . . . summer intern in Medicine at UH . . . memorable Canadian and Mid- West sojourn; New England and Williamsburg jaunts . . . Maryland Clinic . . . intern- ship at the Royal Vic, McGill; then Surgery back in the States. WARREN SAUL POLAND, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Warren . . . politics is everybody ' s business ... a loyal Stevenson supporter ... a specialist at repartee . . . Phi Lambda Kappa, Sec ' y and Veep — Nat ' l Best Sec ' y Award . . . IFC . . . facies neonatorum but well-oiled cerebral synapses . . . married Janice in June ' 54; proud father of Hylla born Sept. ' 55 . . . camp coun- selor and City Hall . . . Schulemaster 4 yrs. . . . extern- ship at Springfield in ' 56 . . . anticipates career in Psychiatry or Medicine. JOSE GEORGINO QUInONES-SEGARRA. b.s., m.d. Lares, Puerto Rico UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO 1953 Joe . . . another record at Davidge Hall . . . slim and trim; calm and collected ... " I never get a chance to do much reading " . . . congenial with everyone . . . Christian Medical Society . . . Arecubo City Hosp. back home in ' 54 . . . X-ray tech. at UH and surgical extern- ship at Church Home in ' 55 . . . Fellow in Preventive Medicine — UH and externship at St. Agnes in ' 56 . . . Internal Medicine follows a rotation at LIniversity. 131 DONALD WILSON RAIRIGH, m.d. Baltimore. Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UMVERSITY Don . . . the Forward Look in Medicine . . . " the Chief, man " . . . looks forward to those nights off with allow- ance behind the green door . . . " Baby Boy " . . . another one who enjoys the Miami sojourn . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . AOA . . . Cokes of the past provided the energy for a summer at NIH in " 56 . . . beautiful Bobbette in July lUo4; Mark and Dawn comprise the family so far . . . duty for the U. S. before Internal Medicine. JOHN JOSEPH RALEIGH, b.s.. m.d. Kings Park, L. I.. New York ROANOKE COLLEGE 19.52 Jack . . . the Squire of West Baltimore Street . . . (juiet of manner with a ready smile and laughter . . . two years with the USN and the Marine Corps as a Phm 3 c . . . 10.54 with the Hospital for Joint Disease — NYC ... a Long Island vacation in ' 55 and ' 56 ... to open an olllce for General Practice following internshiji. LOLIS LKKOY RANDALL, n.s., m.d. Balliniore, Maryland MORGAN STATE COLLEGE 1953 Lou . . . per aspera ad astra . . . hard worker and con- scientious ... a master at convivialit . . . Frosh Class Rep. to the Student Council . . . AOA . . . wed to Marie lionise in February 1954 with new arriyal Linda Marie . . . technician for the American .Sugar Befinery in .54 . . . exlernship at Sinai Hos|)ilai dm ing 55 and 5() . . . prospects include ()H-G N aflci iiilcrrisliip. e - u ,iL 1.32 WILLIAM JOSEPH RAPPOPORT, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1953 Bill . . . outstanding personality and intellect . . . PhiDE . . . just between us girls he ' s chaaarming . . . niedicus studentius in perpetua with a personal interest in fluid poles . . . AOA — Sec ' y and Treas. . . . harbors a good thought for one and all . . . married patient wife Nessie in 1952; she ' s still hopeful . . . Medical OPD and OB-GYN Fellowship during the summer months ... a future Baltimore Internist. RICHARD CHARNEY REBA, m.d. Milwaukee, Wisconsin LOYOLA COLLEGE Dick . . . that ' s R-E-B-A, sir . . . always on the go. but seldom there on time ... a real hustler on the wards; capable and calm . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . Shipyards and taxis ... 1st aid in industrial plant . . . said " I do " with high school sweetheart, Arlene. in ' 54: lovely daughter, Lori Anne . . . Med. OPD and summer intern in Medicine at UH . . . took the senior march with the U. S. Army . . . Medicine or one of its sub-specialties after tenure of duty. MARION CHARLES RESTIVO, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE 1953 Mario . . . lux et Veritas . . . friendly efficiency bespeaks much personal charm . . . more interest in blue blades than in blue bloods . . . Phi Beta Pi . . . Newman Club . . . clinical clerkship with the Medical OPD in ' 55 . . . Fellow in Radiology during the summer of ' 56 . . . after internship a residency in Radiology. $2 dZ 2. i 133 GEORGE WRIGHT REVER. b.s.. m.d. Ballimore. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1950 George . . . makes a virtue of equanimity . . . words are carefully chosen and softly spoken . . . another holdout in that shrinking stag line . . . Nu Sigma Nu ... as Sgt. and Medical Aidman with a tank battalion he saw duty in Louisiana. Texas. California and Korea in 195()-.S2 . . . salesman for Home Insulation Co. . . . ' 55 and ' 56 with the Baltimore County Health I)c|il. . . . blueprints for the future not vet completed. LYNN BENNION ROBINSON, b.s., m.d. Ogden, Utah UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 1953 Lynn . . . friendly smile and quiet manner . . . the out- doors is the place to be ... a fetish for thoroughness . . . serious attention to the business at hand . . . con- struction worker . . . Utah State Health Dept. and private hospitals during the summer months . . . mar- ried Joanne Stuart in August ' 55; son, Steven, born December 7. 1956 . . . Internal Medicine or Pediatrics in the West. MORTON SCHMLKLER. a.b.. m.d. Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVKRSITY 1953 Mort . . . research minded with a special interest in the ()rogress of medical science through experimentation . . . always collected and concise . . . Phi Delta Epsilon . . . with Rethleheni Steel in " 55 . . . Research Fellow at UH in Pediatrics in ' 56 . . . very high on the intelli- gence quotient . . . local internship is the extent of j)Ians to date. 134 LEE IRWIN SCHOCKET, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Lee . . . hobbies include chess and a hi-fi set . . . one of the gold dust twins ... set a record in Anatomy . . . a Charter Member of Phi Lambda Kappa ... a real wit with a fabulous sense of humor ... an authority on the use and abuse of Levophed ... a memorable summer recently spent as an Intern on Medicine at University Hospital ... he just looks sleepy . . . intern- ship and Internal Medicine in Baltimore. y7 _ O e Xs -CV «-X T ? mr m 1 B , ) 1 n it y m m I FRANKLIN DAVID SCHWARTZ, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Frank . . . much social grace and charm . . . " Hey there, Harry " . . . intellect ... a special interest in keeping physically fit . . . Charter Member of Phi Lambda Kappa — Pres. in Junior Year . . . AOA and IFC . . . Spring Grove State Hosp. in summers of ' 54 and ' 55 . . . Summer Intern in Medicine at UH in ' 56 . . . Internal Medicine and Cardiology in the future. rT-c niisC vO .S .MJ), MORTON WALTER SHAPIRO, b.s., m.d. Washington, D. C. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1954 Mort ... a pleasant partner on the wards . . . quick incisive manner ... a Charter Member of Phi Lambda Kappa . . . quick on the quips . . . U. S. Geological Survey . . . summer of ' 55 and ' 56 saw him part of the team at Spring Grove Hosp. . . . wife Bernice keeps watch on 9 A-D . . . the big smile ... to prep locally for Internal Medicine and Urology. T n UJ, jt rUj), 135 GEORGE PATRICK SHAW, b.s., m.d. Manislique, Michigan ALMA COLLEGE 1953 Pat ... a million laughs and a million jokes . . . the big broad grin for one and all . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . swim- ming instructor in Detroit during the summers of ' .54 and ' .56 . . . OPD Fellowship in Gastro-enterology in ' 55 . . . wed to wife Sandy in June 1954 . . . General Practice or OB-GYN to follow tour of duty with the NAVY. c 2u y— ' fi WALTER MORGAN SHAW, b.a., m.d. Moundsville, West Virginia LAFAYETTE COLLEGE 1951 Walt . . . the tall, silent, easygoing type . . . the irre- versible bachelor that may be reversed soon ... 1st aid with an industrial plant in Ohio in ' 54 . . . taxied Chevie. ' i south to Florida and Alabama in 55 . . . externship at Spring Grove State Hospital and a Fel- lowship in Cardio-Pulmonary Physiology at University during 1956 . . . " The Hobster ' " ... a General Practice to follow 2-3 years training in General Suraerv. LEROY SHEAR, h.a.. m.d. Hallimore. Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS IMVKKSITY 1953 Lee . . . conscicnlidus and clliriciit . . . llie Lyric and the good music of the Baltimore Symphony are ideal for relaxation . . . i ' hi Delta Epsilon . . . taxicab driver . . . hitdi-hiked to the West Coast and back in " 54 . . . inarricd to Sheila August 1955 with honeymoon in JM-rrnuda . . . suniniiT intern on Medicine at University . . . rneniorable trip to Deiner and the Grand Canyon in ' 5() ... a pai;ik(rl naincil Aiiigale . . . Iiitirnal Medicine. 136 HOWARD SHELDON SIEGEL, b.a., m.d. Cleveland Heights, Ohio WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY 1953 Howie . . . the sophisticated gentleman from Cleve- land ' s " 400 " . . . repartee as a polished art . . . don ' t let him pull your Legge . . . PhiDE, President . . . SAMA and IFC . . . Student Activities Committee . . . three summers spent in Clinical and Experimental Cardiology at Western Reserve . . . Chairman, 1956 Freshman Orientation Week . . . enjoys an excellent fare and writing . . . looking forward to Cardiology or Ophthalmology in the Sunshine State. WILLIAM ARTHUR SIMMONS, a.b., m.d. Weirton, West Virginia WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 1953 Bill ... the life of the country squire . . . good man- ners and music ... a gourmet ' s delight . . . relaxes best with the foreign flicks . . . employed at Weirton Steel Co. in summers past . . . OB-GYN and Pediatrics at Portsmouth U. S. Naval Hospital in 1956 . . . SAMA . . . Ensign in the USN Reserves . . . soujourn to Ocean City and a month of luxury at Virginia Beach . . . prac- tice limited to OB-GYN in Ohio. KENNETH FRANKLIN SPENCE, JR., b.s., m.d. Hagerslown, Maryland WASHINGTON LEE UNIVERSITY 19.53 Ken . . . friendly persuasion ... a real attraction for the arts . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . deserted the bachelor barracks in August 19.53 to marry his Memphis belle, Phyllis; son. Ken, 111. now completes the home . . . Maryland State Public Health Service in ' 55 . . . clini- cal clerkship at the l ' . S. Naval Hospital in Portsmouth, Va., during the summer of 1956 . . . currently as Ensign in the Naval Reserve . . . more time in Blue then a private practice in Orthopedics. 137 quick to toiistruc- MAITLAND G. SPENCER. JR.. b.s., m.d. Provo, Utah BRICHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 1952 Maitland . . . the country store humorist smile closely followed by hearty laughter tion and farm labor in ' .S4 . . . wife Earlene Foote and sons Steven and David Earl . . . 5,5 in the Research Labs at the University of Utah Department of Pedi- atrics . . . ' 56 an externship at Holy Cross Hospital . . . hopes to settle in central Utah and do General Practice after internship and Surgical residency. MAX JAY SPENCER, b.s., m.d. Boise, Idaho UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 19.52 Max . . . has cultivated a most successful good neigh- bor policy ... a prince among men . . . airplanes and hi-fi hold a special interest . . . Phi Beta Pi ... 5 years in Naval aviation as Lieutenant in Air Groups 1 and 4 aboard the U.S.S. Tarawa with the 7th Fleet. Task Force 77 . . . spouse Grace Constance and children Charlene, Michael, and Christopher . . . ' .54 and ' 55 spent hard at work . . . ' 56 visited Boise and the in-laws in Montreal . . . plans eventually to practice in the West. LANDON CLARKE STOUT, JR., m.d. Silver Spriiifi. Maryland IINIVERSITY OF MARYLAND Clarke . . . drranis of the Old West . . . adds color to any group . . . slow talking and sure . . . " roll your own. pardncr " . . . married to Martha in May 19.54 . . . daughter Lvnn and son Clinton . . . l)ecame a cab ihi er. udder, and carpenter during vacation times ... a fabulous firearms collection . . . " cant stand these sewing circle phonies " . . . longs for the wide open spaces and Internal Medicine. 138 JAMES GRANT STRINGHAM, b.s., m.d. Salt Lake City, Utah UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 1952 Grant . . . another one who has no fear of alopecia . . . " Utah is the only place to live " . . . the congenial hahit . . . quiet mannered . . . summers spent peace- fully out in the land of Brigham Young . . . automobile exploits were a feature of the freshman year . . . wed to " Teddy " in October 1954 . . . longing to practice Medicine in Salt Lake City. NEVINS WOODCOCK TODD. JR., m.d. Salisbury, Maryland SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Nev . . . the little corporal . . . noted for his interpre- tation of the modern dance . . . " I ' ve got so many deals going I ' ve forgotten what ' s trumps " . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . Class Historian for the past 3 yrs. . . . AOA ... a really swell guy . . . BCH in 1954 . . . UH and SBGH in ' 55 . . . Peninsula General on the Sho ' and Ports- mouth Naval Hosp. in ' 56 . . . distributor for Kloman ' s . . . externship at South Balto. . . . The Maryland Clinic . . . Surgery after internship and residency at UH. o ' T Jl. i MICHAEL SARON TRUPP, a.b., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland WESTERN MARYLAND COLLEGE 1953 Mike . . . " That ' s Trupp as in troupe " ' . . . urbane and well dressed . . . He ' s tried his hand at prose . . . summers spent in externships at University and Spring Grove State Hospitals during ' 55 and ' 56 respectively . . . warm smile accompanies a reserved manner . . . tall, slim, fast talker and walker . . . career ahead in Psychiatry. U cAa. y X fP . Y 139 HARVEY IRA WILNER, b.s., m.d. Bronx, i ' ew York UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 1954 Wee Willie . . . " Have you heard the latest Harv story? " ... a good-natured, fun loving lad with a high threshold for any exteroception . . . Phi Lambda Kappa . . . Cape Cod in ' 54 . . . makes a virtue of naivete . . . externship at Harlem Hospital in New York during ' 55 and ' 56 . . . his West Baltimore domain provided many exciting moments . . . the future is as yet uncertain. U v.-. 1 M JU M.i). RAY AUSTIN WILSON, a.b.. m.d. York, Pennsylvania JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 1953 Ray . . . fantastic capacity for never remembering a name . . . outstanding characteristics of capability and steadiness . . . pipe fitter and ambulance driver back home during ' 54 and ' 55 ... an ex-gridiron regular at Homewood . . . absolutely impervious to the effects of Scotch ... a cool man in the teeth of crisis . . . wed to Margaret in June last . . . played doctor at Camp Airy in ' 56 . . . internship at York Hosp. and General Prac- ticr in the Ki ' stone State. VIRGINIA ELIZABETH YOUNG, a.b., m.d. Ballirnore, Maryland VASSAK COLI.KCE 1953 Giniiy ... a gracious lady possessed of much uannth and personal charm ... a passion for llic kiddies . . . Class Secy in the Senior Year . . . AOA . . . tlicv never call her Maggie . . . true interested enthusiasm . . . 1954 Polio Foundation Fellowship with the Well Baby Clinic at UH . . . research in Microbiology in " 55 . . . the Blood Bank at SB(JH paved the way for a Pediatric externship . . . 19.56 Neurology Fellowship at I ' ni- vorsity . . . straight internship and residency in i ' cdiatrics eomin " up. 1) iAf f-1 k.X 110 LEONARD MICHAEL ZULLO, b.s., m.d. Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 1955 Lennie . . . it ' s a tough job holding up the rest of the alphabet . . . another quiet lad . . . Nu Sigma Nu . . . didn ' t guess; said Goetze ' s during the summers of ' 54 and ' 55 . . . stays in shape by pressing weights . . . detailed for Merrill Drugs in 1956 . . . the little rock . . . Internship in Baltimore, Military Service, and a home town General Practice are the extent of plans to date. Class Officers George Lentz. Vice-Hresidenl t Fredekick Ph g(.e. Treasurer John Bilkeley, President Virginia (n i,. Secretary Nevins Todd, Historian 141 Interneships ABRAHAMS. STI RT J. AFTANUILAN, K.MIL K. ALLEN, CHARLES J. ARONS, MARVIN S. BALCO, SKLINA G. HATHON, BERNARD N. BEEBY, JAMES L. I niitrsity flosinttiL Baltituore Cleveland Clinic, Ohio University llitsiiilid. Baltimore Duke University Hospital, .C. University Hospital. Baltimore W aterliury Hospital. Conn. U. S. Naval Hospital. Mass. BERCER, RONALU R. Union Memorial Hospital. Baltimore BORMEL, I ' Al L University Hospital. Baltimore BOrZOlKIs. JAMES K. University Hosjiital. Baltimore BROOKS, HERBERT E. U. S. Naval Hospital. I irginia BI CY, DONALD L. Jersey City Medical Center, N.J. BILKELEY, JOH i T. University Hospital, Baltimore BURCHELL, MARY C. Snn Francisco Hospital, Calif. BI TT, HAR EY R., JR. Monmouth Memorial Hospital. N.J. CALCLANO, ANTHONY J. Boston University Hospital, Mass. CAMERON, RONALD R. U. S. Naval Hospital, Mass. CARLIN, ROBERT A. Monaioalh Memorial Hospital. N.J. COHEN, M RVIN .Sinai Hospital. Baltimore CONWAY, JOHN V. Maryland Ceneral Hospital. Baltimore DEAN, JOSEE ' H O. U.S. Public Health Service, Seattle, Wash. ENCNOTH, MILTON L. University Hospital. Baltimore ERICSSON. RIMI K I). University oj Michigan Hospital. Mich. FELDSTEIN, MARVIN A. Ho ttl I ictoria Hospital. Montreal FIOCCO. VINCENT J. St. Vincent ' s Hospital. N .Y . Fl RTH. MARY LOl ISE Deferred HLI.Il. SEBASTIAN J. Hartford Hospital. (.oni . (.ARCIA. NICHOLAS .. Ill ( .,S. Naval Hospital. N .Y . tAI THIEH. DONALD W. Mercy Hospital, Baltimore CERBER, ALLEN S. University Hospital. Baltimore GILBERT, VERNE E. University of Chicapo (Clinic, III. GILMORE. LORETTA A. K. D.C. General Hospital. If ash.. D.C. H M1)L1N, ELUON B. St. Joseph ' s Hospital. Arizona HAMMANN, JOHN H., JR. U.S. Public Health Service. Baltimore HAMMOND, ANTHONY F., JR. Men y Hosjiital. Baltimore II N SHIRO. P l L K. Presbyterian Hospital. III. HENDERSON, CHARLES M. University Hospital. Baltimore HETTLEMAN, HAROLD J. Sinai Hospital. Baltimore HICKMAN. ROBERT O. Salt Lake County General Hospital. Utah HI). RICIURD K. B. University Hospital. Baltimore HOLDEFER. WILFRED F. Utiiversity Hospital. Baltimore JELENKO, CARL III Sinai Hospital, Baltimore JONES, NORMAN P. Mercy Hospital, Baltimore K HAN. EDWIN L. Mercy Hospital, Baltimore KENNEDY. WILLIAM E.. JR. University of Minnesota Hospital. Minn. KOGAN, LEONARD L. New England Medical (Center, Mass. KRONTHAL. HERBERT L. University Hospital. Baltimore LANSINGER. DONALD T. U.S. Naval Ho.ipital, 111. LXRGKV. DWID I ' . Lanhenau Hospital, Pa, LASTER. JAMES I ' . University Hospital, Baltimore lAI (.Hl.IN, JOSEPH C. Hoval Victoria Hospital. Montreal I.ENTZ, GEORGE A.. JR. Universit Hospital, lialtimore I.ERNER. SIDNEY I Universit Hospital. Baltimore l.EMN. I1[(1I RI I.. Mercy Hospital. Baltimore L1NCII, PETER r. Brooke Medical Center. USAt ' , Texas M CEK. FRANCIS J.. JR. St. Afines Hospital, lialtimore MKIII.IIOP. EHKD II. Merc) Hospital. Baltimore MDllM l . FREDERICK Garfield Memorial Hospital, tl ash., D.C. 142 MILLAN , PAUL A. Jersey City Medical Center, N.J. NASDOR, HERBERT Vniversity Hospital, Baltimore NIZNIK, THEODORE T., JR. Bon Secours Hospital. Baltimore OLIVERAS-ARMSTRONG, FRAMCISCO E. Baylor University Hospital, Texas OPPECARD. CHARLES R. Ohio State University Hospital, Ohio PLUCCE, FREDERICK W., IV Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal POLAND, WARREN S. Sinai Hospital, Baltimore QUINONES-SEGARRA, JOSE C. Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore RAIRICH, DONALD W. U.S. Public Health Service, Baltimore RALEIGH, JOHN J. Mercy Hospital, Baltimore RANDALL, LOlIS L. University Hospital, Baltimore RAPPOPORT, WILLIAM J. Sinai Hospital, Baltimore REBA, RICHARD C. U.S. Army Hospital, Hawaii RESTIVO, MARION C. University Hospital, Baltimore REVER, GEORGE W. Mercy Hospital, Baltimore ROBINSON, LYNN B. University of Oregon Hospital. Ore. SCHMUKLER, MORTON University Hospital, Baltimore SCHOCKET, LEE I. University Hospital, Baltimore SCHWARTZ FRANKLIN D. SH PIRO, MORTON W. SHASV, GEORGE P. SHAW, WALTER M. SHEAR, LEROY SIECEL, HOWARD S. University Hospital, Baltimore Sinai Hospital, Baltimore Harper Hospital, Mich. Roanoke Memorial Hospital, Va. University Hospital, Baltimore University Hospital. Baltimore SIMMONS, WILLIAM A. Akron General Hospital, Ohio SPENCE, KENNETH F., JR. U.S. Naval Hospital, Maryland SPENCER, MAITLAND C. Veterans Administration Hospital, Utah SPENCER, MAX J. St. Luke ' s Hospital, Colo. STOUT, LANDON C, JR. University oj Oklahoma Hospital, Okla. STRINGHAM, JAMES C. (T. H. Groves Hospital, Utah TODD, NEVTNS W., JR. University Hospital, Baltimore TRUPP, MICHAEL S. Bellevue Hospital, N.Y. WILNER, HARVEY I Kings County Hospital, N.Y. WILSON, RAY A. York Hospital, Pa. YOUNG, VIRGINIA E. Boston University Hospital. Mass. ZULLO, LEONARD M. Franklin Square Hospital, Baltimore Statistics The class of 1957 began the study of medicine on Sept. 17, 1953 with 104 stu- dents, including 5 girls. They listed 22 states and 3 foreign countries as home. Undergraduate training had been received at 37 different universities and colleges. All branches of the armed forces were represented by 14 veterans. 16 members of the class were married. One student joined the class at the be- ginning of the third year. June, 1957 saw the graduation of 94 new physicians, many of whom had chosen their particular field of practice. Internal medicine was the preference of 27; general practice, 25; surgery, 12; ob-gyn, 7; pediatrics, 4; psy- chiatry and radiology, each 2; and re- search, 1; 14 were undecided. Now mar- ried were 53 students with a total of 29 children. Upon graduation, the class dispersed to 51 hospitals in 20 states, the District of Columbia, Hawaii and Canada. 11 men entered the armed forces and government service. Hail and Farewell! 143 A Valedictory To THE Class of 2007: we wish you well! At this moment, fifty years seems like a very long time, as it will to you when you look forward to the what is it, hicen- tennial? Yet we figure there will he thirty of us left around to see you graduate. Dickens described the medical student as " an idle fellow, much given to gaming and drinking. " Well, most of us have a few little inclinations along these and similar lines but we ' ve come a long way since that was the most accurate description of us. We ' ve worked hard over the books but we ' ve had a lot of laughs too, and all in all, it ' s been a rich and happy four years. This is the secret, you know. If medicine isn ' t fun, you shouldn ' t he in it. But we wonder about you. What will you be like? Oh, we can tell you a lot about yourself, as compared to us. Your clothes will look different and you ' ll no doubt smile as you look back thru these old pictures of bygone days and styles. You ' ll probably be bigger and heallhier men physically than we are. Your looks v ill be different and you ' ll ix ' taking a lot of courses we can ' t even imagine now. Most exhilirating of all to us is the fact that you ' ll have at your fingertips tools and techniques and drugs to tame our big- gest killers of todas. You will have the answers to a great many unknowns that puzzle us. (That will be tough in one respect — more studying for you.) Rut these are things for which ()ii can lake no credit. They will all have been given to you by us, even as we have been given our knowledge l)y those i)efore us. It ' s exciting to spe culate about the lutiir ' . We have many dreanis we hope om will know as realities. We like to think you ' ll be worthy of them. Perhaps you ' ll even have a little patience (though if you ' re like us. it ' ll be precious little) with the ancient codgers who will enjoy reminiscing about their days in medical school, when cancer and tuberculosis and coronary thrombosis were such dreaded words. It ' s also interesting for us to wonder what type of person your average student will be. You know, it ' s hard to put into words just what makes a man want to study and practice medicine. To help other people? Well yes, that ' s a part of it but it ' s not the most important part. And it ' s true, we have our share of those who are in it for the money and tlie social prestige and be- cause doting parents pushed them. But for most of us, there ' s a challenge and any man worth his salt likes a challenge. The test is to pit our wits and skill and courage against humanity ' s oldest foe. The op- ponent — death — whether the form be disease, degeneration, deformity or depriva- tion. And though we ' re fairly sure that ultimately He must win. it won ' t be i)e- cause we didn ' t try our best to beat him. By God. that ' s a game that takes a Man to play! And l)y God, Who gave us this calling, we hope we have the integrity to measure up. We hope you do too. Does all this sound a little too romantic for you? Well, i)erha|)s it is. Bui let it stand. Everyone ' s entitled to get a little loniantic once in a while. Anyway, you have our blessing, for what it ' s worth. We look forward to helping you celebrate your graduation dav. Meanwhile, it ' s going to lie a MiighlN interoting fifty years. We wouldn ' t nii s it for the world. 144 . .l ' -«, ' ■ .:--.t . SCHOOL OF NURSING Maryland Florence Meda Gipe, r.n.. b.s.. m.s., ed.d. professor of mrsing Dcnn (ij lite I ' niversily nj Mnrylaiul Srhaol oj iirsin!2 Unil,- ! ' = " °° ' - O NURSING " ' ve«-.,ty of Maryland THE DEAN " ° WEST LOMBARD STREET BALTIMORr- , street ' " ORE I, MARYLAND GREETINGS: CLASS OF 1957 Four years At? A careful evalunt- u ° ' " Pl " e, nursing. «.»„,.. ,„;„■;»; .T. ' " - • " " • " • " ■ " • " . ' " :, ' " ' ■, " " J ' iorence Meda Gipe Dean and Professor School of Nursing ' ' Mtitnoti 1773 inriiran. ml oiifm viauM a ioi„e7 I nii k lor T " " " J lo ' ■». •yttem. ° • " " u.r r U for I ' ;, " " " ' J n«c ■P ' - " ..ut ur .o .k " ' • " ow ih-r " • oear Ta (.,1° ' " " » L main object ■ ' ' J«« or tuo ' " loi. »• ' for?, . ' " ' ' . ' .toi:; " ; •?° ' «-f " " ■? ••rrloi oJV ° " « ' •ai(- ' O tOB.rInf , ' " OOUML, .l " ' ' cruoi • ii 6.V, ' oi;;; ' °» for ?„?,;„ ' ■; % " ' " oSi " r; O ' ver oo o«Ty ' • ' ! ••op-ri ?ii " P " ' n ' . i«nhB book, " " " i • ' " Mr. po»87 " " " " ■jj ' net u( „ " ■ ' " ■■ VDnote ° Mill dunu t.. ' ■ " ' • D. ' aa Hiiii ' OjcooiMn, ,J Aootdsr d«, will K, • froo] r YESTERDAY. . . nherent ;n ffie i sfory of the School of Nursing is a spirit of progress exemplifying service fo the individual, the profession, and the community. Louisa Parsons December, ISHO, marked the founding of the second organized school of nursing in Maryland. In the beginning it was incorporated with the medical school and hospital and was called the University of Maryland Faculty of Physic Train- ing School for Nurses. Two years prior. Louisa Parsons, a protege of Florence Nightingale and a graduate of St. Thomas Hospital in London, came to America. The services of Louisa Par- sons were sought by the Lhiiversity of Maryland in December 1889, and so it was that she became its first Superintendent of Nurses when the training school was inaugurated; the program was two years in length. Miss Parsons ' exact birthplace is not known, but it is believed to have been somewhere in Devon, England. She dedicated her life to the alleviation of suffering, and chose to take the rougher road which meant hardship, exposure, and responsibility. Five service medals were awarded to this great humanitarian, the first being for service in Lord Wolseley ' s Egyptian Expedition in 1882. The others included the Egyptian Service Medal with its coveted " Suakin 188.5 " bar, the Royal Red Cross awarded by Queen Victoria in 1883, the service award of the Spanish-American War. and the Queen ' s medal of the South African Boer War. worn by so manv British soldiers and nursing sisters in France a short twenty years later. Miss Parsons died on November 2. 1916 at the Great Lea Farm near Reading. England. We find in a letter written by Sir William Osier the words: " I had never before seen a military funeral given to a nurse. I am sorry clippings are forbidden, but I am sending a notice to the Johns Hopkins Hospital Nurses ' Journal. She was a fine character and I can never forget the devoted service she gave us in those early years in Baltimore . . . . " Of Florence Nightingale and her famous pro- totype, Longfellow ' s lines might have been written : " As ij a door in heaven should be Opened and then closed suddenly. The vision came and went The light shone and was spent. A Lady with a Lamp shall stand in the great history of the land, A noble type oj good. Heroic womanhood, ' It was to Miss Parsons that Florence Nightin- gale gave her design for the cap. The Florence Nightingale cap is proudly displayed by the graduates of St. Thomas Hospital in London and the University of Maryland School of Nursing. The unique Point d ' Esprit lace incorporated in the Nightingale cap is imported from London; it is subsequently fashioned into the final product here in the L ' nited States. In 1902, thirteen years after the founding of the LIniversity of Maryland School of Nursing, the two year program was extended to three years. The school was growing and seeing its graduates going out into the community, found- ing schools of nursing in Maryland and other states. With the outbreak of World War I in 1914 graduates participated with the Medical Units of the University of Maryland on foreign soils, ministering to the sick and wounded. In 1920 the School of Nursing became a separate unit of the University, but still remained as a hospital unit in administration. The trend of nursing in 1926 saw the inaugu- ration of a combined five year arts and science and nursing program. A student received the Bachelor of Science degree and a diploma of Graduate in Nursing after completing two years of academic work in the College of Arts and Sciences and three years in the hospital unit, the School of Nursing. Again graduates were called to foreign soils with the outbreak of World War II in 1941 and the aggression of North Korea in June. 1950. Serving with the Medical Units of the Lhiiversity of Maryland, the graduates of the school con- tinued to minister to the sick and wounded. Educational trends in nursing called for a new four year program to replace the existing five year one. The four year program was publicly announced by the President of the LIniversity on May 26. 1952. Dr. Florence Meda Gipe was appointed Dean, and academic status was given to members of the faculty. A graduate program in nursing became a Department of the Graduate School in 1955. The School of Nursing is a part of the State University, which is also a Land Grant College, and receives funds for operation from the Uni- versity. The University of Maryland is a mem- ber of the Association of American Colleges and is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Our appreciation is expressed to Dr. Florence M. Gipe for the use of her doctoral thesis in the collection of some of the material incorporated above. " 1- •H m IK J. n ■} , ty r a - c ryt ' ' •in r ■ - u UrrA uri - - ' f ' ' ' it ' Htffi II A 1 ' t l-C C ( f ty-f d- ' n II, ' I, f-f ' n a C( ' L f -f -i - Ca m % 4J tat J! ' -K , if 7i f Surgical Ward with Louisa Parsons Second from Left. 154 Children ' s Ward G. Maternity Nursery 155 in www ' « Sun Parlor Private R( Ward B 156 Porch Dining Room 157 Tl ■i i V .Vfl ■ii - ;«; TODAY Miriam Jamison, a.b., m.a. Assistant Dean of Women, Charge of Residence MaR k. CaKL. R.N., B.S., PH.D. Associate Professor of Nursing Chairman, Graduate Programs in Nursing VllU.IMV CnM.i: . R.N.. U.S.. M. . Ass(i{ Idir I ' riijrssor of Nursing Chairnidii. HaiiiiuUiurralr I ' roiirum MaRI.AKKT I,. llx ' ll.S. H.N.. U.S.. M.S. Associdir I ' riift ' ssor of Nursing 160 Peggy A. Dashiell, b.s. Assistant Instructor in Child Growth and Development Ruth L. Dyson, b.s., m.s. Assistant Professor of Nutrition Georgia L. Helmick, r.n., b.s. Instructor of Psychiatric Nursing Martha F. Baer, r.n., b.s., c.p.h.n. Instructor of Public Health Nursing Dorothy A. Drew, r.n., b.s., m.a. Instructor of Psychiatric Nursing Mary E. Grotefend, r.n., a.b., m.s., c.p.h.n. Assistant Professor of Public Health Nursing Carol M. Hosfeld, r.n., b.s., m.s. Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing Marcella Z. Davis, r.n., b.s., m.a. Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Nursing Theresa M. Fernandez, R.N., E.S., M.A. Associate Professor of Psychiatric Nursing Marguerite E. Hydorn, R.N., B.S., M.ED. Associate Professor of Maternal and Child Health 161 I.oitmiNE T. Lysack. K.N.. B.S. Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing ,|l].l II. IxKllMiDSON, R.N.. B.S. Instructor oj Hsychialric Nursing Ml HlhL ( " .. VaNCK, H.N. Assistant Clinical Instructor. Mcflii ' il nnil Suriiiciil iirsing . l H(, i Kr . . ()i .N(,, [I.N. Assistant (.linical Instructor, Mriliiui nnil Suffiical Nursing K. ' VTHRYN M. PyLE, R.N., B.S. Assistant Instructor, Maternal and Child Health Gladys Sellew, r.n., a.b., b.s., m.a., ph.d. Professor of Nursing of Children Jiuv M. Williams, r.n. Assistant Clinical Instructor of Pedifitrii nrsing Frances T. Kkid. ii.n.. b.s., m.ed. Assistant Professor of Pediatric Nursing Eleanor L. Slachm, r.n., b.s. Assistant Professor of Nursing Kathryn S. Wohlsen, R.N., B.A., M.N., M.A. Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing CecKLI 1. iTKI ' S, R.N., A.B., M.A. Assistant Professor. Rehabilitative Nursing 162 CLINICAL AREAS Commonly known as Med-Surg . . . basic training for student nurses ... " 6 am, al- ready? " . . . 3 C classroom . . . " To wit, per se, as such " . . . library time . . . calls from X-Ray and operating room . . 3-11 on a Saturday night . . . emergencies to the O. R. . . . " An extra bed in the hall?! " . . . admissions from the Accident Room . . . The Rose Room (all completes) . . . that dazed feeling when everything happens at once on the ward . . . Charge duties . . . " Care to special the 4th floor tonight? " . . . TPR ' s. enemas, irrigations, admissions, discharges, and lliose endless medicines and treatments . . . " It ' ll be good experience " . . . intake and ()ul|)ul . . . the first injection -oops! . . . care studies . . . " But I haven ' t been supervised yet! " . . . Doctor ' s rounds and subse(|uent orders at 2:45 pm . . . calls lo CSn . . . valor above and l)cyoiui the call of dul . . . TLC an important factor ... a new das with ever changing problems . . . All liail lo the graduate luirse! 164 On call to the O.R. Another incident slip Medicine and Surgery Those deep knee bends . This Is Your Life r ' i All rlea, Ajlcr this, you . . Ydii neicr oulfirow your need jor niitrilion For the third time. 1 . . 2 . . 3 Mmitebello One month in Rehab . . . pad those decii- biti . . . from ])ed to wheelchair in six easy (?) lessons . . . snow, rain, and wind — just another hill to go . . . Barthel Index and Dr. F. P. Mahoney . . . first, second, or third floor? . . . Paraplegic Club . . . let ' s thumlj it this morning . . . Tuesday and Thursday rounds . . . Whirlpool bath — any- one for a swim? ... do we have time for a speech lesson? . . . down to P.T. for a lesson in crutch walking ... we got it up, but now how do we get the lift down? . . . the focus on Physical Medicine. Flip! What ivill they think oj next! Learning to write a ain " Jiisl a little stiik . Specialties Five itiiniile srriih . . Halsted 168 Straws, milk, and napkins All together now . . . But it ' s only a splinter 169 Another three hour wait . . . Rooininji in Apathy uith Empathy Ohstet TICS OB . . . Prenatal Clinic and the OPD . . . " No starches! " . . . " Another ten ponnds, in a week? " . . . Classroom instruction for expectant mothers . . . the anxious moments during the question period . . . " Why don ' t you ask your doctor? " . . . Pork liver, Starlac, no salt! . . . The excitement of the Delivery Room . . . " But I can ' t tell when she ' s having a contraction! " . . . " She won ' t B.O.A., will she? " . . . The everchanging data on the blackboard . . . stretchers to the delivery room . . . " Pant like a puppy! " . . . " Why. it ' s a FTLM! " . . . Inked foot- prints . . . Admission to the nursery . . . squirming bundles . . . hungry cries . . . rooming in . . . the all day expeditions with the loaded bath cart . . . Questioning mothers . . . " But he sleeps all the time; why doesn ' t he cry like the others? " . . . " Are you sure he ' s all right on his stomach? " . . . Doting fathers . . . 6BD . . . " Another catheterization?! " . . . The Discharge Speech . . . another discharge ... an animate bundle, two proud parents, a bottle of formula and the Chuck-a-bed . . . Another admission. Through the looking glass He ' s gained a whole ounce A new citizen 0] ' Ti ' .j5« 1 W atcli that (hip Bui nurse • ; ( () nil Pedia tries The initial grand tour . . . utility room, linen closet, laundry chute {always locked) . . . luingry cries from 5B . . . anxious parents on 5C . . . the inimitaljle sounds from 5D . . . angry wails from the Treat- ment Room . . . " Only five drops a minute, now! " ... 8 am meds at 11 am . . . " Only fifteen more babies to feed and I ' m finished until 10 pm! " . . . " Set up a Croupette, who me? " . . . mashed toes from runaway oxygen tanks . . . the caravan of cribs to the rotunda . . . the most rambunctious in cribs labeled, " Strict Bed Rest! " . . . " It has a chocolate flavor, you ' ll love it " . . . Or- ganized chaos in the playroom . . . new admissions and tearful goodbyes . . . " But Mommy will come back real soon! " . . . The sunny smiles after a cascade of tears . . . " Can I help you. Nurse? " . . . " Can I grow up to be a nurse like you? " . . . Hurry, hurry, hurry ... an exhausted track star at the end of eight hours. Oops! Just a little bit more . . . Thai mean old doctor! m :1 Recon s. records, records . . . Hello, I ' m from the ... " The Streetwalkers Public Health And the rains came, and the snows fell . . . onward ever onward . . . " you can ' t ]nit that on your day sheet! " . . . " Good morning, I ' m from the . . . — SLAM! . . . the girls in blue . . . forgot the caps, hut never those " longies " . . . " it ' s only 4:28 " ... " A rash you say? Well, it could lie — and then again??? " . . . i)rn hospital ... a holiday on a holiday, glory l)e! . . . ■ " preemie clinic — again? " take number 22. then numlicr 6. then number 4 — then walk three miles east . . . " Now about lead poisoning " . . . rats!! literally! . . . " When did vou have your last chest X-ray? " . . . knock on an (h)()i- . . . |)renatai isils . . . nurse-teacher cnnferences . . . " Can we make it back lor bnich? " tl lose little black bags . . . " How do you wash your diapers? " . . . flashlights recommended . . . " HLxkI pressure? On ' rc sup|)oscd lo lake a bh)od pressure? " . . . " Must get all our visits done lodav — supervision tomorrow! " . . . case finding, case holding and follow u|i . . . service III ihi ' indix idiiai. ihc laniils. r I ' dinniiniiU . . . " I his won ' t hurl, honey A cordial welcome . another referral A typical home visit Clinical conference On the path to recovery ' Tell me, why did you hid that? " 176 Psychiatry Psych ... an introduction via nursery school . . . two, three, or four year old, anyone? . . . wonder why he ' s always throwing blocks at me? . . . key assignments ... an orientation to the wards . . . ad- justing to a new atmosphere, a new situation ... the initial feeling of, " What shall I do now? Can ' t circle the solarium again — guess I ' ll have to talk to a patient " . . . occupational therapy . . . crocheted rugs blossoming everywhere . . . role playing . . . How did you feel? . . . clinical conferences . . . those valuable discussions . . . How would you handle the situation? . . . the focus on interpersonal relationships . . . there must be a reason . . . recreational therapy . . . who hits the punching bag the hardest? . . . fast and furious basketball games, milder badminton matches . . . rum- my at 8 am, checkers and ping-pong . . . profitable walks outdoors . . . activity with a purpose . . . the satisfied feeling of seeing improvement . . . understanding of human behavior . . . professional and personal growth during three short months ... a valuable experience. What are your goals? Occupational therapy The scope of Psychiatry 177 ;:V i. J. Sowers President E. Urban Social Chairman CLASS OF C. HoSFELD Class Advisor 1958 A. Wilson Vice-President D. EVKRY Historian J. Ambrozak Secretary N. Smith Treasurer 179 D. Barlow M. Bing R. Blauvelt J. Bray E. Fishbein S. Gordon P. Brown E. Carr R. Carter A. Clancy E. Cooper C. Decker K. l)i.k.n (.ii B. Euliank S. Kelly G. Kirtley ' E. Kl R. Laniliirl If ' .O d J. Leek Jl E. Lemonoff A. Robin R. Rottenberg B. Marshall (.. Martin S. Simms A. Skoila J. McCormick E. Murchake B. Smitli N. Snyder B. Palmer J. Peltier R. Stopak A. Vermillion C. Piper M. Price S. Wachter B. Ward S. Reynolds J. Ringold P. Warren Y. Williamson 181 cJ ? ' U U i ' « »r 1 ' ' , s JOI %. Tempus fugit, this is clear Two years of college, two years here. Juniors now; seniors next year Preparing now for our nursing career. Pediatrics — sounds of children at play Obstetrics — more babies born every day Med-Surg — hope to give; fears to allay, A professional nurse, we learn to portray. Fifty-six girls, our working team Sharing a mutual goal and dream Anticipating when we all will beam Wearing our Flossies with highest esteem. :Ai ' - ' i im OFF DUTY Terrae Mariac Medicus L. to R., Buck Row: J. Wliitc J. Smith. R. } ' ayne, J. Schiller. .1. Judkins. S. Goldsmith. From Row: l. Pfterson, M. Wu. M. Stevens. P. Thayer. STAFF: Editor Business Manager Advertising Manager Photography Editor Senior Write-ups IJterarY Editor I ' ro ' jccis C.liainiKin I ' diully Editor Subscriptions Layout Editor I ' dtroiis mil Sjionsors Eaculty Advisor juuiiii Editors Mary Wu Stell.4 Goldsmith Mary Stevens Barbara Peterson Jams Scihler JoA White Janet Jidkins Joyce Smith l!i I II r m; Pai ' Til m:u ll i!i: K Ki.im;i)inst Dr. M. K. Carl Yvonne Willi vmson and Annk Kohin 186 One of our many prujcct i Junior Editors — i . W illiamson and A. Robin Yearbook in the planning stage 187 f?f 1st Vice-President N NXY KlllK President iKK-Nt Abraham ' Jii,l I II r-l ' resident li KBAKA DUVALL rd I iee-l ' resldent Ki TM Pav e Treasurer Jams Scm li;i! Serretary Joan Arbkuast Ith I i( e-l ' resiileni Betty Cooper Student Government Association Faculty Adviser — Miss Virginia Conley .V (.s ' .s Janiisot] meets with Council members Spring nominations . . . Seven novice poli- ticians . . . Brains l)riinming with entluisi- asni . . . " See you in (iordon Wilson Hall at 6:30! " . . . Call to oidcr . . . A tnomcnl for soletniiit willi Peter Marshall . . . Re- ports . . . dvvindlinji dollars . . . Old biisi- ness? . . . A hundred ilollar ad for the yearbook? . In case ( f fire, " No, not the .■levator! " . . New liiisiness . . . so ■iai calcnilars . . . revision of hy-laws . A caution to H- ladylike . . . " Is Ih ■re any discussion? " . . Mcetinj; adjourned. 188 Vice-President Barbara Klinedinst President Margaret Bkaubikn Secretary Sue Harmon Treasurer Janet Judkins Social Chairman Doris Powell Class Officers Injonnal Class Meetings in the Kitchen Miss Martha Baer — Faculty Adviser Homecoming 1956 Glittering lights . . . sparkling eyes . . . Welcome to the alumni of our old Alma Mater . . . party manners and muffled sighs . . . " Do you really think she ' ll be Queen? " . . . courtesy calls to isolated chaperons . . . hustle and bustle of last minute preparations . . . " Now where in the world is that photographer! " . . . the excited candidates for Queen . . . that end- less march down the aisle . . . the final announcement and burst of applause . . . the band plays louder . . . " Is it really me?! " . . . the dancing continues . . . and . . . Goodnight Sweetheart ' till 1957. Margaret Bradburn Hoinecomins. Queen — 1956 HOMECOMING QUEEN CANDIDATES: Lejl to right: Elli.- lirl.aii. Anna Lee Morris, Yvoiiir- VilliaiM on. IVggy Hraill)iirii. Charlnttc niivall. Hdiirv l)e-ckrr. Wednesday evening rehearsals with Mr. Haslup Glee Club L. to R.. Front row: B. Clow, B. Palmer. D. Powell, B. Ward, J. White, N. Smith, M. .Stephens, J. Judkins. A. •Skoda, S. Gordon. S. Hipp. A. Blauvelt. C. Gulp. A. Ponieroy, D. Barlow. 2n(l row: M. Stevens, B. Smith. M. Price, B. Peterson, E. Urhan, J. Fiery, sec, B. Klineilinst, v.pres., E. Hardy, J. Sowers. J. Kaelzel, F. Dickenson, P. Thayer, B. Cooper, P. McGuire. 3rd row: J. Kreli. pres.. P. Bradlmrn. S. Simms. P. Brown. R. Carter, A. Robin, E. Adams, D. Smith, J. Gosnell. J. McGormick. P. Warren. Y. Williamson, N. Kirk. J. Arbegast. ia« il « . ( s7 (I iiiiriulf. please Bel 1171(1 the Scenes Only luo Idle leavps lejt Mrs. Alexander " Fourth for liridge? " . . . organized gripe sessions . . . springtime brings tennis in the halls, sunnner brings swimming in tlie hath- tuiis, winter l)rings basketball with trash cans, fall recreation anyone? )rings Indian leg wrestling- . " doirt slam that elevator door! " . . . " what were her exams like last year? " . . . the late late show on T.V. . . . " somebody answer that phone! " . . . linzzer at 6 AM— 6:10 AM— but I don ' t work this morning . . . " Lineup " — Jud board meets tonight . . . (juiet. night nurse sleeping ( good luck on this one ) . . . sun- bathing on the roof-splat! " locked myself out of the room again " ... I AM. panic! . . . case studies due. llic claller of type- writers . . . the shower line on ibc night of a dance . . . sogg clollics in wash basins . . . " hat are we doing tomorrow? " . . . the patter of feet and rustle of aprons at 7 AM, 3 PM, and 1 1 I ' M. .... grades are in . . . maillinic a big c ciil . . . " u got 1(1 I lean llii room " ... oiilv more days lill (Iracbialion . . . c pc(lilion to " am " s " . . . Iii)lida in ihc dorm- oh well . . . ■ " biit iii rlox ' t is loo big?! " . . . pri alc eye ... if oii caul figlil cm. join cm! . . . 192 THE CRUCIBLE ijIT»«, " ' JfAUS. } JAN. II aJopM l Read while voii ride . Try another channel Marlon and firoiip RC 343— E 55 193 .- ' l ... ' tJt sites in the donn. I II find her . . . " Shoir ine the way lo go home . . . Don ' t you dare! Mail! 194 Tennis, anyone? Just one more hand . . Typical 195 Subject to change ' ' Five minutes and I ' m tired already " And . . . Hypoclwndricsis Tuesday evenings and Monk fl H BI H J ▼ " Bp IK - H v B H ■ P ' 1 Hi FoaVe ! ;o cents over Ptomaine Tavern Y Y Y A Merry Christmas to all . . . ; . :0r I t.V. . TOMORROW • LIMIVERaTV- ri •MAPYLA! X Future School of Nursino; The new tlircc sloi ItuiKlinj; adjacL-iil to llic liuildiii will ((nitain ;Hlnniii liali i ' the existing nurses ' residence is expected offices, classrooms. coMlcrciuc rooms, anti to Itc completed in midsummer of 1957. a recrealiniial lounge. 200 ■-: ' :t.- ' : GRADUATES, 1957 i ' %- IRENE RITA ABRAHAM B.S. IN NURSING " Rick " . . . premature iiiaturit . . . Sigma Delta Tau . . . SGA President . . . Sluilenl Handbook Editor . . . Representative to Professional Schools Student Senate . . . capable leader . . . gift of gab . . . Oh. those fascinatin ' glasses . . . hvjjersensitivitv reactions . . . " Yeh, Yeh. Yeh ' ' . . . remarkable memory for wit . . . " Now realh. " . . . jovial . . . interesting biograplu . . . chief pleasures are mail from New York and long distance phone calls . . . dynamic personality. JOAN MEYER ARBEGAST B.S. IN NURSING " Joanie " . . . gay sense of humor . . . Alpha Chi Omega . . . Louisia Parsons Nursing Club . . . Glee Club . . . SGA Secretary . . . eflirient . . . outdoor type . . . loves swimming, horseback riding, sports . . . always has a pleasant " Hi " . . . " Thar stands the glass " at Ocean City . . . livens u|) a party with her ukelele stvle . . . sweet . . . sextet singer. LAURA LOllSE BLAIA KIT B.S. IN NURSING " Louise " . . . grand person Id kimu . . . Gannna Phi Beta . . . very conscientious on the job . . . became " Mrs. Pete " on September 7. ' ) ' i6 . . . night duty hone moon . . . inanied life is great! . . . enjoyed working in the newborn nursery . . . " Hey. Khris! " . . . friendly . . . ga . . . " Must clean house on Wednesday ' . . . aversion to the 3-11 shift. 202 ARTA LEE BOWEN B.S. IN NURSING " Arta " . . . conscientious . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing Clul) . . . known for her good luck with working hours . . . ready to settle down and get married . . . Wed- nesday night dates . . . " Joe! " " . . . given a job she gets it done . . . tired of cafeteria pork . . . likes to play the piano. MARGARET MAE BRADBURN B.S. IN NURSING " Peggy " . . . personality plus . . . Glee Club . . . Terrae Marine Medicus project co-chairman . . . Senior Class President . . . Homecoming Queen . . . red roses and a crown at the Alcazar . . . " Hot dog, anyone? " . . . follow-up on pediatric case study in Ocean City . . . charm . . . wit . . . " Oh. how I hate to get up in the morning! " . . . strums the uke . . . fond of bowling, tennis, bridge, and pizza . . . annoyed by doctors ' illegible orders. BEVERLY ETTA CLOW B.S. IN NURSING " Bev " . . slinger . down . . giggles Glee Club . . . dining hall hash You can ' t win them all! " . . . never runs ttle curly-head . . . can really put over " Basin Street Blues ' " . . . siblings galore . . . " Oh! " . . . smile for everyone . . . vivacious . . . steady and reliable. 203 CHARLOTTE ELEANOR GULP B.S. IN NURSING " Charlotte " . . . sincerely sweet . . . Aqualiners . . . Junior Class historian . . . Glee Club . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus STAFF . . . excellent nurse . . . loads of fun . . . psychiatry intrigues her . . . enjoys swimming and reading in her spare time . . . " Things work out for the best " . . . beautiful eyes and a pretty warm smile . . . " How are you today? " ... an understanding and interested listener. KHRISTA McKENZIE DINGES B.S. IN NURSING " Khris " . . . wonderful to tell vour troubles to . . . Gamma Phi Beta House President . . . Newman Club . . . Louisa Parsons Club Secretary and Treasurer . . . Religious Life Committee . . . Junior Class Secretary . . . runs a beautiful salon on the seventh lloor . . . liappih married . . . sincere smile . . . " " Excuse me. I wasn ' t listening " . . . gets that certain " glow " when the conversation shifts to weddings or babies . . . " " is the mail in vet? " . . . needle and thread wizardry . . . " Oh. Johiinv anvplacc but 4G. BARBARA LOIS 1JL ALL B.S. IN NURSING " Duv " ... Is she as lough as she sounds? . . . Alpha Delta Pi . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing ( lui) . . . SCIA Social Chairman . . . active on cummitlecs too numer- ous to mention . . . " Oli lairi. llic slimes loose again . . . loves a good myster . . . go to her for the latest magazines . . . amusing cynicism . . . ukclcle and bridge widow . . . " Let ' s go to Ocean City! " . . . bound to have at least one rcdliciid . . . always ready to |)arlv . . . hi-fi enthusiast. 204 CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH DUVALL B.S. IN NURSING " Scarlett " . . . real good sport . . . quiet dignity and serene beauty . . . excellent sense of humor . . . " I ' ve lost another five pounds! " . . . loyalty and persever- ance . . . poker-faced pinochle player . . . sincerity and honesty . . . " All the way to Bainbridge. for pizza? " . . . Interested in the West. VALDA BERZINS EMERSON B.S. IN NURSING ' " Val " . . . willing to work for a successful future . . . helped to keep the lines moving in the Dining Hall . . . voted the Delt a Delta scholarship in 1954 . . . Phi Kappa Phi honorary . . . native Latvian ... " I was just resting my eyes ' . . . very happily married to a considerate and amicable Don ... a competent nurse in every way . . . " But I ' m specialing " . . . cordial couple . . . knitting needles click . . . top quality personality . . . " Hey. come hear my new record! " . . . tranquil . . . likes dancing and sports. STELLA SUE GOLDSMITH B.S. IN NURSING " Stell " . . . friendly . . . business manager o Terrae Mariae Medicus . . . Homecoming Queen Committee Chairman . . . dislikes working PRN hospital, 4G, and until 11 PM on Friday — who doesn ' t! . . . will always lend a helping hand . . . experienced night duty nurse . . . hard worker. 205 kAKMELA GRABECKI B.S. IN NURSING " Fluce " . . . sympatlu ' tic nuise . . . Newman Cluh . . . Terrae Maiiae Medicus STAFF . . . polka prize winner . . . hobbies and interest include knitting, boating, crabbing, baking, and photography . . . loyal friend . . . " Ainoiie for pinochle? " ' . . . pleasant disposition . . . on the boardwalk . . . piano accompaniment for musical moments. EDNA CAROLYN HACKETT B.S. IN NURSING ' " Caroh n " ' . . . a weakness for powder blue . . . always neat . . . lovely wardrobe ... a pal to everyone . . . gay . . . " Pinochle, anyone? " . . . Eastern Shore en- thusiast . . . sincere . . . dry wit . . . " Hacky " . . . adores ice cream. SI E HARMON B.S. I NURSING " Sue " . . . congenial . . . Alpha Gannna Delta . . . Louisa Parsons Club Vice-President . . . Westminster Fellowshij) . . . Ihiiiiiiiin ll:ill (piaitct . . . " Mr. .Sandman " . . . Tcrnir Marine Mciliru.s sT vv . . . Senior Class Secretar . . . " Movies. an one? ' . . . jo ial . . . avid reader . . . " IJilge! " . . . sincerely nice . . . " itty bitty bu(l(K ' " . . . nmsic lover . . . pet peeves? — pedi- atrics and I ' RN . . . horsewoman . . . has a yen to travel. 206 SALLIE MABEL HIPP B.S. IN NURSING " Hip " . . . We ' ll never forget her 21st birthday! . . . Wesley Foundation . . . Red and White Band . . . Glee Club . . . Terrae Marine Medirus STAFF . . . nursing runs in her family . . . " Bill Bailey " . . . " Night Train " . . . can she dance! . . . Dr. Reese, remember me? . . . FTLFC delivered at UH in May, 1935 . . . " What makes you say that? " . . . professional polish as a seamstress . . . real enthusiasm for helping others . . . " No joke " . . . ukelele entertainer . . . happy and gay. JANET ADELINE JUDKINS B.S. IN NURSING " Jan " . . . redhead . . . Glee Club . . . Senior Treasurer . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus project CO-CHAIRMAN . . . heard saying, " I ' m crazy about night duty " hot dogs for sale . . . peeved by doctors who fail to flag orders . . . diligent worker . . . plays a " wild " ukelele with her musical partner. Peg . . . off-duty hours spent bowling, dancing, playing tennis or at the movies. JANIS SCHULER KILMER B.S. IN NURSING " Jan ' . . . charming and industrious . . . Delta Gam- ma . . . Diamondback reporter . . . Alpha Lambda Delta . . . Junior Class Treasurer . . . SGA Elections Chairman . . . SGA Treasurer . . . Phi Kappa Phi honorary . . . steady always but shocking at times . . . amiable . . . talented . . . especially fond of sail- ing, reading, music, and an ATO . . . excells in sewing . . . intelligent . . . Greshs party partner. 207 NANCY LEE kIRK B.S. IN NURSING ' " kiikic " . . . Tialiii;il liLiinorist . . . Alpha Gaiiiiiia Delia . . . Westniiiistcr Fellnwship . . . L(juisa Parsons Club i ' resident . . . Student Council — Junior Class representative . . . Glee Club . . . Trrrac Mariae Medicus STAFF . . . SGA representative to National Student Nurses Association Con ention in Chicago . . . " house mama " . . . backbone of SGA . . . " frab " . . . Canadian sunset . . . her poor uke . . . wishes every- one closed elevator floors . . . earnest interest in frequent bus rides to College Park ial. BARBARA MARY KLINEDINST B.S. IN NURSING " Barb " . . . sincere and talented . . . Secretar of Red and White Rand . . . Lutheran Student Association Secretary ... I of M Orchestra Secretary . . . Junior Class Vice-President . . . Glee Club Vice-President . . . Senior Class Vice-President . . . successful in all she atteini)ts . . . " Bills! " . . . rosy cheeks . . . " " Klinestein and the fat rats " , " round hounds ' , etc. . . . known for nursing abilit . . . organ, violin, piano iind glocken- spiel . . . lives in a musical whirl. JOANNE CARROLL KRLH U.S. IN NLKSING " Jo " . . . beautiful so|)rano voice . . . Aijualincrs . . . Louisa I ' arsons ( luli . . . Glee Club president . . . sunnnerliinc liaiMclcoii . . . " C ' niere once! ' " . . . re- tiring . . . would like to get along without bio-sta- tistics . . . compassionate . . . congenial . . . lisls licr favorites as swinnning. nni ic. tennis. I ' cdialiio and weekends off. 208 SONDRA JEAN LEE B.S. IN NURSING " Sandy " . . . Dream Girl of Pi Kappa Alpha . . . Aqualiners . . . Glee Club . . . dry sense of humor . . . " Where ' s Dig? " . . . champagne 21st birthday . . . the " bug " almost got lost in the rain at Ocean City . . . " Oh, no, really? ! " . . . can be found on the roof May through December . . . likes swimming, too ... " I don ' t know why you ' re so happy " . . . loves to snooze . . . " Why it ' s blue, Buzz! " ANNE MORROW OWINGS B.S. IN NURSING " Anne " . . . feminine charm . . . Alpha Oraicron Pi . . . Junior Class President . . . Homecoming Queen, 19.56 . . . strikingly attractive . . . " O.K., let ' s have a gripe session ' . . . administrative ability . . . six years — six majors . . . perennial college girl . . . capable nurse ... " I can ' t find a thing in this room! " . . . Pediatrics — loathsome! . . . Oh, that Elvis! . . . suave and sophisticated . . . favorite pastimes — cutting up or sacking out . . . faculty for perceiving comedy . . . retains her wit and composure in any situation . . . independent . . . National Student Nurses Association. " Ruth " . . Shore farm Chi Omega curly locks so calm? . . EDNA RUTH PAYNE B.S. IN NURSING . country gal . . . raised on an Eastern . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus staff . . . Alpha , . . " I ' m tired — must get some sleep " . . . . . at last a cardinal . . . How do you stay , Ocean City beauty . . . " Bridge, anyone? " , . . Which rates first . . . " Babe " Ruth or baseball? 2;ay spirit . . . AM care assigned by " big sis " . 209 BARBARA ANNE PETERSON B.S. IN NURSING " Pete " . . . ambitidus and competent . . . Alpha Oniic- ron Pi . . . I ni eisity Theater . . . Student Activities Committee . . . Block and Bridle Club . . . Westmin- ster Fellowship . . . Louisa Parsons Club Social Chair- man . . . " Dad s Day planning committee . . . Red Cross Club . . . Sweetheart of Alpha Gamma Rho . . . Glee Club . . . Terrae Mariae Mi dicus photography EDITOR . . . " Good Grief! " . . . headed for a Master ' s program . . . intelligent . . . myriad of activities . . . unconventional . . . no date shortage! . . . bound for the upper bracket . . . hates to get up early! . . . stylish. DO RIS MAE POWELL B.S. IN NURSING " Doris " . . . unsung hero in class activities . . . Aqua- liner ' s secretary . . . Glee Club . . . Basketball Team . . . Senior Class Social Chairman . . . dynamic interest in all things . . . photographed beach scene at Ocean City . . . excels in sports . . . crazy bout swimming and basketball . . . country girl at heart . . . temporarily slowed down by head and toe injuries . . . willingness to give of herself . . . irked by the " Private Eye " . . . wishes for some of her roommate s luck with hours . . . stands up for what she thinks. ROBERTA MARYLAND SETTLE B.S. IN NURSING " Bertie " . . . knows how to be happy • . • Louisa Par- sons Club . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus ART stakk . . . Publicity Chairman for Alumni Homecoming Dance . . . her heart is in Missouri . . . down to earth . . . " Bertie, your mother ' s calling " . . . ver talented with brush and paints . . . exceptional bedside imrsing ability . . . " Buddy ' s " . . . always ready for fun . . . can ' t resist a mysterv . . . loves to dance . . party pals from Psychiatry . . " I nmst not procrastinate ' . . . sketches accompany class notes. 210 JOYCE LIPPINCOTT SMITH B.S. IN NURSING " Joycie " . . . quietness sparked by an unpredictable gleam of mischief ... Pi Beta Phi ... a connoisseur of the best in music and literature ... if she could only understand Russian! . . . has found happiness and security with Wendell ... a gracious hostess for unexpected overnight guests . . . patience that passeth all understanding . . . " Got any new magazines? " . . . maturity . . . transfer from Syracuse . . . high goals and standards. n 71 1 i 1 . ' % j J t : ■■ Mm 1 f ■1 DOROTHY STEIN B.S. IN NURSING " Dottie " ... an individualist with charm . . . Bertie ' s model . . . " 4G — but it ' s good experience " ... a whirl of activity . . . has a flair for fashion . . . started an art colony on Louisa Parsons third floor . . . always ready for fun . . . striking . . . feminine. MARGARET ANNE STEPHENS B.S. IN NURSING " Margie " . . . efficiency plus . . . " Army brat " ' . . . Newman Club . . . always on the go . . . " Bridge, any-- one? " . . . loves to party . . . sophisticated . . . will do a favor for anyone . . . greetings with a smile . . . " Dolls, anyone? " . . . sympathetic . . . capable nurse. 211 MARY EMMA STEVENS B.S. IN NURSING " Stevie " . . . independent ideas ... Pi Beta Phi . . . Terrapin Honors Editor . . . Chapel Choir . . . Har- mony Hall . . . Glee Club . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus ADVERTISING EDITOR . . . Homecoming Queen Chairman . . . subtle wit . . . ' This is a little off the subject, but — " . . . shower songstress . . . frequently philo- sophizes . . .personality plus . . . " Come on, gang " . . . excellent manager . . . hep on music and football . . . ' ' He ' s such a schweetie! " ' . . . cheery individualist. EARLENE JONES STEVENSON B.S. IN NURSING " Diggie " . . . mind of her own . . . Aqualiners . . . Glee Club . . . Sand) " s partner in crime . . 82nd Street mob . . . " Listen, kids " . . . watches jets go by , . . originator of Dr. Spicer ' s socks . . . doesn ' t believe in long engagements . . . beach party hostess . . . " Mom. set another place " . . . clever humor . . . efficient. PATRICIA THAYER B.S. IN NUR.SINC " Pat " . . . Terrae Marine Medicus STAFF . . . heaiitijiil eyes with a merry twinkle . . . showed a flair for iiiiidriii (huiic . . . parlrici ' for ln(li;ui leg wrestling . . . ftijovs musical eiitcrlaimncnt . . . pla ful . . . loves to tra el . . . iKilcd for l)askclb;ill skill . . . Glee Club . . . ris fan . . . clllciciil . . . rciiaiilc nurse . . . reserved . can uaik and walk and «alk . . . mature thinker sympatlictic. SJjorl: 212 MAXINE RAY WACHTER B.S. IN NURSING " Max " . . . greetings with a smile . . . Rec Hall gang ... " I could say something, but I won ' t " . . . sincere and sweet . . . fond memories from Psychiatry . . . haunted by Pediatric nightmares . . . wee one . . . everybody ' s pal . . . " They can ' t do that to us! — or can they? " JOAN ELEANOR WHITE B.S. IN NURSING " Joanie " . . . sincere and naive . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus STAFF . . . Glee Club member . . . Basketball Team . . . served on many refreshment committees . . . " You got your hair cut! " . . . likes to paint, knit and play the piano . . . excels in Indian leg wrestling . . . " I ' m depressed! " . . . bashful . . . actively participates in swimming, ice skating, and skiing . . . sports fan . . . seeking a sense of gratification in nursing . . . annoyed by gripes and conceit . . . " For Pete ' s sake! " . . . striving to give pleasure to others . . . earnest. MARY SIU MEl WU B.S. IN NURSING " Mare " ... a combination of admirable qualities . . . Pi Beta Phi . . . Diamond . . . Junior Class Social Chairman . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus EDITOR-IN-CHIEF . . . Phi Kappa Phi honorary . . . " It ' s the principle of the thing " . . . outstanding capability . . . wears beau- tiful clothes well . . . " Coke! " . . . headed for a Master ' s program . . . friendly . . . pleasant disposition . . . came to us via Buenos Aires, Argentina and Bucknell University . . . often found sewing, knitting, or read- ing . . . conscientious ... a pleasure to know. 213 Our Sponsors ?W 6Lfd» t C i; ,l -«fc 214 „ p 7 ;:« W 2— ' ;t ( - Z u du - ! - 215 ulaJify % yfcS a C -ft - V » U..x i TTV v-rrw. ' T ' Vt - 5 21 f. Maurice C. PLncoffs, M.D. (Z cX.r, ' --- J . - ' 24. si ( - ' %.zry 2 y 217 Mr Mrs Mevins W. Todl ' 7i? : 7fe , - : 218 Our Patrons Dr. Mrs. Samuel J. Abrams, M— ' 54 Benjamin A. Addison, M.D. — ' 52 Alice L. Ahmuty, N — ' 54 William A. Anderson, M.D.— ' 56 Anonymous Bessie M. Arnurius, N — ' 20 Eugenio E. Benitez, M.D. — ' 55 Martha F. Baer Dr. Henry F. Bongardt Harry C. Bowie, M.D.— ' 36 Warren D. Brill, M.D.— ' 44 Mr. Mrs. John L. Burkert Dr. Edgar M. Bush, Hampstead, Md. ' 96 Dr. Joseph E. Bush ' 36 U.H. 36-28 Theodore R. Carski, M.D.— ' 56 Dr. Charles Clautice ' 12 Dr. Raymond Clemmens Richard G. Coblentz, M.D.; F.A.C.S. Howard D. Cohn, M.D. Mrs. L. 0. Cooper Nancy Jane Corum, N — ' 56 Everard F. Cox, M.D. Charlotte E. Culp, N— ' 57 Mr. Mrs. George E. Culp Lucille D. Dahms John Oliver Davies, M.D.— ' 98 Dr. George Davis, M — ' 36 Elva Dean, N— ' 13 Anna Lee DeHaven, N — ' 46 Dr. Mrs. Donald H. Dembo Joseph DeNolfi Dr. Nestor deVenecia Dr. Paul Di Giorgi Harold C. Dix, M.D. Mr. Mrs. Louis W. Duvall Ruth Dyson Dr. C. Reid Edwards ' 13 Louis K. Eichner, R.N. William P. Englehart, M.D. Dr. William Esmond, M— ' 51 James Estes, M.D. — ' 56 Marvin Feldstein Dr. Frederick P. Ferguson Dr. Mrs. Frank H. J. Figge A. H. Finkelstein, M.D.— ' 29 Leonard H. Flax, M.D.— ' 53 Michael J. Foley, M.D.— ' 52 Dr. Samuel L. Fox Dr. E. W. Frey ' 12 Joseph C. Funiari, M.D.— ' 42 Nick Girardin Dr. Mrs. A. E. Goldstein, ' 12 Mr. Mrs. Adam B. Grabecki Dr. Mrs. Wm. R. Greco R. A. Grubb, M.D.— ' 52 James Gunther Dr. T. E. Haddad Dr. John R. Hantruis, M— ' 48 Mr. Mrs. R. L. Hardy Margaret L. Hayes Leonard Hays, M.D.— ' 13 Dr. Mrs. Thomas F. Herbert, ' 53 Mr. Mrs. David E. Hettle man Dr. Richard P. Ho., Honolulu Hawaii, ' 57 Mark Hollander, M.D.— ' 31 Miss Carol M. Hosfeld, N— ' 50 Best Wishes Graduates of 1957 Harry C. Hull, M.D.— ' 32 219 Mrs. OrvilleC. Hurst J. E. Hu.ster Benj. H. Isaacs, M.D.— ' 36 Mr. Mrs. Raymond W. Kaetzel Dr. Theodore Kardash, ' 42 Dr. C. F. Kanis, ' 27 Dr. Joseph I. Kemler, M— ' 11 Marie Kirhy Paul E. Klinedinst Family Dr. Mrs. Paul W. Knowles, M— ' 56 Walter Kohn, M.D.— ' 31 Kenneth Krulevitz, M.D. - ' 41 Leonard T. Kurland, M.D.— ' 45 Dr. Fred T. Kyper, ' 23 Jane E. Laib, R.N. Mrs. Ehhin P. Laster Mrs. Vehua Lentz Byiiith K. Lenson-Lambros, M.D. — ' 27 Frank R. Lewis, M.D.— ' 30 Dorothy C. Lochte, Mercy Hosp. Lorraine Lysack, N — ' 51 Ronald E. Mendlesohn, M.D.— ' 53 Robert S. McCeney, M.D.— ' 28 Edmund Middleton, M.D.— ' 49 Zach R. Morgan, M.D.— ' 18 Frank Kailcr Morris, M.D.— ' 27 Dr. L. Louis Mould S. Edwin Muller, M.D. Mr. Mrs. Albert Nasdor Mrs. Myrtle Novey Dr. Aiilonio Olrnedo lIciiiiclLi Oil Dr. Robert I). I ' arker L.Mii a Parsons, Nursing Club, ' 59 ' 60 Mrs. Ethel Peddicord Dr. Henry Perry Mai-vin S. Piatt, M.D.— ' 56 Mrs. Nellie C. Price Miss Maxiiie Pyle, N— ' 56 Mr. Mrs. Joseph T. Restivo Artluir M. Rhinehart Anthony A. Richardson Nathan Schnaper, M.D.— ' 49 William F. Schnitzker, M.D.— ' 47 Mr. John Scull Mrs. John Scull Maurice E. Shamer. M.D. Mrs. George H. Smith. N— " 53 Ross V. Smith, Thurmont, Md. D. E. Staker Dr. Edwin H. Stewart, Jr., ' 43 Dr. John F. Strahan, ' 49 Kyle Swisher, Jr., M.D.— " 48 Ber nard O. Thomas, Jr., M.D.— ' 38 Howard L. Tolson, M.D. AmoM Tiamer, M.D.— ' 49 Mrs. John Paul Troy Albert L. Tucker, M.D.— " 56 Virginia H. Truitt, M.D.— ' 56 Isadore Tuerk, M.D.— ' 34 Jose G. Valderas, M.D.— " 47 Jane H. Watson Dr. Mrs. J .im M. Warren, M— ' 35 N— ' 34 Zack J. W aters, M.D.— " 29 Mrs. lia cl M. W -lls, N— ' 36 H. Lawrence Wh.-eler, M.D.— ' 17 Dr. VIr . Thcddore K. Woodward Margaret Ann Young. N — 56 220 Best Wishes from the STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION Mulberry 5-7222 Compliments of FRANKLIN UNIFORM CO. SOUTHS LARGEST UNIFORM CO. BALTIMORE — WASHINGTON — RICHMOND — NORFOLK 235 PARK AVE. BALTIMORE, MD. BERNARD I. FRENKIL CHARGE ACCOUNTS WELCOME FONTI ' S BARBER SHOP SAL 531 W. BALTIMORE ST. AL ' S RESTAURANT 10 S. Greene Sf. ' o good place io eat ' Best Wishes UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE 118 S. EUTAW ST. Medical Books Sfationery Surgical Instruments Compliments of THE W. B. CASSELL CO. 1027 S. HOWARD ST. Baltimore, Maryland Ortho OBSTETRICAL — GYNECOLOGICAL PHARMACEUTICAL AND BIOLOGICALS FOR THE MEDICAL PROFESSION ORTHO PHARMACEUTICAL CORPORATION RARITAN, NEW JERSEY THE mm SHOE All Styles Including a special Clinic Shoe with conductive soles to help eliminate static elec- tricity in the hospital oper- ating room. DALSHEIMER ' S 213 N. Liberty St. With the Compliments of a Friend HYNSON, WESTCOn DUNNING Incorporated CHARLES CHASE STREETS BALTIMORE 1, MD. Complimenis of EMERSON DRUG COMPANY MAKERS OF BROMO-SELTZER Famous for Relief of Headache and Upset Stomach PHARMACIES SINCE 1883 Dr. C. H. Webster Robert L. Webster Special Agents NEW YORK LIFE INS. CO. We offer a special plan of Life Insurance to the Medical Profession Address all inquiries to.- DR. C. H. WEBSTER 102 White Park Place Ithaca, New York s, erving the Medical Profession for over a third of a century Equipment and Supplies for: Pkysicians and Surgeons Hospitals • Latoratories • Industrial Clinics jMurray-jBaumgartner SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPANY, INC. 5 West Ckase Street • SAratoga 7-7333 Baltimore 1, Maryland ;rn UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND NURSING RINGS 2601 W. LEXINGTON ST. BALTIMORE 23, MARYLAND EDMONDSON 6-6188 CONGRATULATIONS FROM KOONTZ CREAMERY " first with carriage trade " 5600 REISTERSTOWN ROAD BALTIMORE, MD. RESINOL OINTMENT Contains: Made in Baltimore Resorcin, Oil of Cade, Prepared Calamine, Zinc Oxide, Bismuth Subnitrate Boric Acid oiiil)ini ' (i in a lanolin|)i ' lnilaluiii liasr to soothe and luhricalc (I17 irritated skin. Kainoiis for 60 years for its prompl, long-lastin;; relii ' f for skin itrliinp. Imrning and minor soreness. I ' ri ' seril)! ' freely. IVeserilie, also, new KKSINOL (;RKA,SELE.S.S in tubes. Contains the same fine meilieations in a greaseless, wasliahji ' . slaiidi-ss hasi-. Maiiiilni tiiml hv RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY 517 W. Lombard St. — Opp. School of Medicine Besi Wishes To Class of 1957 HOLLAND FURNACE CO. (BALTIMORE BRANCH) Compliments oi THEODORE KLUPT AND COMPANY 329 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland Congrafu of ons To Class of ' 57 • DOWNTOWN • EDMONDSON • BELVEDERE Serving the student ' s need BALTIMORE HARDWARE for Scissors ond Too s KATHERINE MARTIN Greeting Cards — Gifts 601 W. Baltimore SI. At Greene Men ' s Suits - tailored clothes fay Ladies ' Suits MELNICOVE are better 526-28 W, BALTIMORE STREET at Greene Street A Stone ' s Tfirow from U. of M. Compliments of THE KRAMER COMPANY Makers nf the PILOT BLOUSE NURSES UNIFORM COMPANY Nurses ' Uniforms Made to Industrial Measure PERFECT FIT SCHOOL UNIFORM — PROFESSIONAL APPAREL Official Maker of U. of Md. Graduate Nurse Uniforms 1822 E. MONUMENT ST. ■ 5 EASTERN 7-4744 finest FUNERAL SERVICE SINCE 1898 lllm Cook St. Paul and Preston Sts. Wm. Cook-Blight, Inc. 6009 Harford Rd. i( Where Southern Mospitality Js aKeality ' ' HOT ELi % THE MEYER HOTEL IN BALTIMORE O. G. CLEMENTS, bAana er 400 AIR-CONDITIONED ROOMS MEDICAL DENTAL COLLECTIONS, INCORPORATED MEDICAL DENTAL EXCHANGE 809 Cathedral Street Delinquent Colleciions for the profession Credit service for the doctor. Hospital and Patient. • « LEO BADART, President in Baltimore it ' s SCHLEISNER MAIN STORE, HOWARD AT SARATOGA SUBURBAN— WEST, PIKESVILLE COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND CONGRATULATIONS TO GRADUATES OF 1957 HUTZLER ' S BALTIMORE • TOWSON RICHARD ' S SHOE REPAIR Shoe-repairing while-you-wait 510 W. Baltimore St. GIFTS WITH UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SEALS Cuff Links, Buckles, Tiebars, Lighters, etc. Officio) ■ U of M. School of Pharmacy C oss Ring of TROCKENBROT ' S Ce ebrofing 75 yrs of Service fo Maryland Educationat Insfifufions 310 N. PACA Customer Porking MLIL 5 1052 UNIVERSITY RESTAURANT 5 S. Greene St. Sam Bob Lewis proprietors Open 24 hours a day About Tcrrac Mariac Mcdicns . . . The text has been set in Linotype Rodoni Book with display heads in Hulmer. The paper for the general text is Liistro gloss manufactured by the s. D. warren company and the paper used for the lithographed historical section is Ticonderoga Text. THE GAKAMOND PRESS BALTIMORE • 1957 GEORGE LENTZ says. ' ' Fine schools demand the finest in pultlications. " ■■■ " I •■ ' ■.«$ ' ?; PL. IX • ' . ■=- ' ■■ ■ » .■ ' ' .


Suggestions in the University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) collection:

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

1955

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

1956

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

1958

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

1960

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.