University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD)

 - Class of 1956

Page 1 of 192

 

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1956 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1956 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1956 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1956 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1956 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1956 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1956 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1956 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1956 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1956 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1956 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1956 Edition, University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 192 of the 1956 volume:

■i y; . f:ir. :S;J»- .-.- ' •» , TERRA MARIAE 1956 ■- ' J I LL T I III I II II H II rr rr rr rr II II II II WITH MOWLEDGE STREIVGTH DUTY PRESIDENT WILSON H. ELKINS B.A.. M.A.. Litt.B.. D.Phil. On April 30, 1954, Dr. Wilson Tl. Elkins was named President of the University of Maryland succeeding Dr. H. C. Byrd. He ollicially became the fourth University President on January 20, 19.55. Dr. Elkins comes froni Texas Western College, El Paso, Texas, where he served as President since 1949. Graduating from the University of Texas in 1932 with his hacliclor and niastcr degrees. Dr. Elkins pursued his studies under a Rhodes scholarship at Oxford University and received his diiclorate in 1936. Dr. Elkins is one of those rare nn ' ii wlio is alilc to coniliinc holh studies and sports la kclliall and track. li BfMa Kai)pa. He has always been a strong proponent for the hcttcrnienl of students anil is stri ing to place the University of Maryland among the great schools in the nation. successfully, having received 8 athletic letters in college for footha He was, at the same time, elected to P DEA WILLIAM S. STONE M.S., M,D., D.Soc. When Dr. William S. Stone was named Dean of the School of Medicine on July 1, 1955, he succeeded Dr. H. Boyd Wylie. He came from Walter Reed Army Medical Center where, as a Colonel, he served as Commandant of Army Medical Graduate School. He held this posi- tion until April 3, 1954 when he was named as Director of Medical Education and Research at the University. Dr. Stone is well known through the field of medicine. He won acclaim in 1943 when an important invasion of Italy was endangered by the spread of typhus fever. With the aid of many teams, he organized control measures with a then new drug, DDT. More recently he instituted measures for the elimination of Bang ' s disease in cattle, a serious disease in humans if contracted. In accepting the office of Dean, Dr. Stone emphasized that he had no intention of giving up his previous job at school. With the cooperation of the Departments, he intends to con- tinue the expansion of reasearch and encourage more students to take an active part. HUGH RAYMOND SPENCER. M.D. Professor oj Pathology and Head of the Department DEDICATID Dr. Hugh R. Spencer has officially announced his retirement as Professor of Pathology, effective July 1, 1956. Born in 1888 in Baltimore City, he grew up in the country, where he acquired the love of fishing and hunting. He graduated from the Baltimore Medical School in 1910 and was added to the University of Maryland Staff somewhat later when the two schools merged. After studying physiology for one year. Dr. Spencer redirected his interests to Pathology. He studied tliis subject at Johns Hopkins for two years and, later, during World War I, served in the United States Army for thirteen months as a Pathologist. After this war, he returned to become Professor of Pathology at University of Maryland in 1921. In addition to his academic duties. Dr. Spencer is also a member of the Admission Com- mittee who interviews each student before he is officially accepted into medical school. With his keen insight and judgment, Dr. Spencer is able to evaluate a man ' s capabilities and personality without his being aware of the observation. The Clinicians, as well as the students, will remember him also for his amazing ability to uncover bafiling cases for Saturday morning C.P.C. ' s. Many times has he demonstrated a dry wit as he reads the " Pathological Diagnosis. " We, the Senior Class of 1956, proudly dedicate our yearbook to Dr. Hugh Raymond Spencer and wish him continued successes and good health in the many years ahead. G. Edward Reahl, Jr. Editor in Chief " Marshall Franklin Associate Editor and Cartoonist Betty Irene Ivens Associate Editor Robert L. Wright Photography Editor John E. Adams Business Manager CONTRIBUTORS Richard Belgrad James Castellano Robert Headley Virgil Hooper Patrick Laughlin Wilbur Pickett Edwin Whiteford Harry Wilson Joann Wright Albert Trucker Irvin Pollack Richard Belgrad James Stovin TERRA MARIAE MEDICUS WISHES TO THANK MR. AFFLECK AND MR. GARDEN OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL ART DEPARTMENT AND DR. E. KLOHR FOR THEIR COOPERATION IN HELPING TO PHOTOGRAPH PART OF THIS BOOK. The opinions expressed by the Cartoonist in this annual are his own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Staff in general. ILLUSTRATOR PHOTOGRAPHY ' tcon4 ' After four years of classes, clinics, wards and labs, the once remote feeling of " walking alone " becomes imminent. The sense of responsibility which is care- fully nurtured through these years will now be tested and remain forever a part of the Doctor. No longer are formal quizes, given by the instructor, the meas- ure of success. His actions now must stand before the most critical judge of all . . . the patient and his family! GEORGE ALAN ABESHOUSE; A.B., M.D. February 15, 1932 Baltimore, Maryland Phi Delta Epsilon: SAMA, Vice President, 1954-5. YALE UNIVERSITY, 1948: Dean ' s List. BALTLMORE CITY COLLEGE, 1948: Graduated with Honors. " Horg " . . . Mt. Vesuvius at Pompey . . , baseball, foot- ball, golf, history of medicine . . . wed Sarah on August 10, 1953 and expecting a baby soon . . . Bermuda honey- moon, summers in New England and Florida . . , Md. General and UH ... to follow Father into Urology in Baltimore. JOHN EDWARD ADAMS; B.S., M.D. May 11. 1930 Cumberland, Maryland Baltimore. Maryland TERRA MARIAE MEDICUS: Business Manager. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND: 1954, BALTIMORE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE: 1948. " John " . . . confidence and ability in earnest . , . soft music and flashbulbs . . . Lee in June, 1953, in Silver Spring . . . Fresh Air Camp summer physician, 1955 . . . General Practice, Carroll County. ROBERT THOMAS ADKINS; B.S.. M.D. February 19, 1930 Salisbury. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF PHARMACY: 19,52; Andrew I L DuMez Medal; Rho Chi. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. WICOMICO HIGH SCHOOL: 1947. " Bob " . . . Double barreled elTuiency . . . Baseball, foot- ball, fishing, and pholngrajihy . . . ' Wed Nancy, June. 1951 . . . Cathy May. 1955 . . . Pharmacist extraordinaire . . . Peninsula General, 1955 . . . General Practice in Salis- bury, Maryland. 10 DANIEL G. ANDERSON; B.S,, M.D. May 29, 1931 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania SAMA Journal, April, 1955. MUSKINGUM COLLEGE: 1952; Cum Laude; AED, President; Alban Club. PERRY HIGH SCHOOL: 1948; High Honor Graduate; National Honor Society. Dan . . . Take things as they fall . . . Record collections, historical novels and beachcoinbing . . . Most inactive Ensign in Naval Reserve . . . New York and Greenville, SC . . . Waiter in Ocean City 1954-55 . . . Peninsula Gen- eral, 1955 . . . Pediatrics. ' 1 I HENRY ALLEN BAER; B.A., M.D. August 10, 1931 Westchester, Pennsylvania Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY: 1952. KENWOOD HIGH SCHOOL: 1948. Hank . . . soft spoken sincerity and friendly smile . . . football and fisticuffs . . . married Carolyn on September 10, 1955 . ,. . Internal Medicine in these United States. y STEPHEN BARCHET, M.D. October 25, 1932 Annapolis, Maryland Nu Sigma Nu — Secretary. BROWN UNIVERSITY: Sigma Chi. CORONADO HIGH SCHOOL, California, 1949: French Medal, Math Scholarship to Redlands University. " Steve " ... on the move . . . Tennis . . . Ensign, Naval Medical Corps . . ,. Crocodiles of Panama, 1936-7; Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 . . . Woman ' s Hospital, Baltimore, 1954-56; Bryce Hospital, Alabama, 1955 . . . Obstetrics-Gyn, Phillipine Islands. XT II RICHARD BELGRAD; B.S.. M.D. August 22. 1932 Baltimore, Mar)land AOA, President; Phi Delta Epsilon. LOYOLA COLLEGE: 1954: Four year half scholarship. BALTIMORE CITY COLLEGE: 1949; National Honor Society, Quill anil Scroll. " Dick " . .. . intelligence with a smile . . . sports, music and snapshots . . . Grand Canyon, " You a Ranger, stranger? " ' . . . Poconos. Florida. California . . . water- front Counselor in Maryland and Pennsylvania . . . Future may hold Internal Medicine. fe v ,1 1 Z ' FRANK ROCCO BELLOMO; B.S., M.D. March 9, 1920 Casamassima, Italy Roselle, Union, New Jersey LOYOLA COLLEGE: 1952; Biologv Gold Medal. ABRAHAM CLARK HIGH SCHOOL: 1938; National Honor Socie ' y. Frank . . . Conscientious . . . Baseball, football and Clas- sical music . . . Married Mary, February. 1946 . . . Sea- bees in the Pacific Theater . . . Muhlenberg. Plainfield and Union Memorial Externships . . . General Practice, New Jersey. JERALD HORNE BENNION; B.S., M.D. April 28, 1928 Salt Lake City, Utah UNIVERSITY OF UTAH: 19.52. EAST IHGH SCHOOL: 1946; Senior Class President. " Jerry " . . . Man with a cause . . . Travel and sports . . . Connie, July l.S 19.5.5 . . . Mission to Australia and Canada for Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints . . . Practice in the Western United States. 12 STANLEY MORRIS BIALEK; B.S., M.D. June 22, 1930 Washington, D. C. GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY: 1952, Phi Eta Si-ma THEODORE ROOSEVELT: 1948, Track Team, Captain. " ' " Stan " . . . sensible silence . . . Foreign sports cars and sailing . . .yUe Phyl, August 31, 1952 . . . University OPD . . . " Larrie and me " . . . Internal Medicine or Cardiology, Washington, D. C. MORRIS LARRIE BLUE; B.S., M.D. May 10, 1930 Baltimore, Maryland Phi Delta Epsilon. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 1952; Gamma Beta— Vice Presi- dent. Baltimore City College, 1948. " Larry " ... a body that thinks ... a " 33 " fan . . . wed Barbara in Baltimore, 1954 . . . Sugar Bowl in ' 52 . . . " Stan and me " . . . Mercy and University Hospitals . . . Internal Medicine. HENRY FRANCIS BONGARDT, Jr.; B.A., M.D. November 1, 1930 Baltimore, Maryland Phi Beta Pi. LOYOLA COLLEGE, 1952. LOYOLA HIGH SCHOOL, 1948. " Hank " . . . where man masters memory . . . married Edith in April. 1955 . . . son of an Industrial Surgeon . . . bricklaying during all available free time . . . spe- cialty and locality not yet decided. 13 ERNEST OWEN BROWN: B.S., M.D. August 9. 1927 Baltimore, .Maryland Severna Park. Maryland MORGAN STATE COLLEGE, 1952: Cum Lauile; Biology Award; Beta Kappa Chi Honorary. WILEY H. BATES HIGH, Annapolis. 1945: Clieniistr - and Science Awards; Senior class Vice-President. " Ernie " . . . Earnest endeavor silently speaks its own praises . . . movies, theatre, baker ' s hat. and hasehall bat . . . laborer, orderly, technician . . . Provident and Sinai Hospitals . . . It ' s almost yesterday . . . General Surgery. RICHARD ALVIN BURINGHAM; B.A.. M.D. September 24, 1929 Los Angeles. California AOA. UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, 1951. GEORGE WASHINGTON, Los Angeles, 1947: Knights Honorary; Yearbook, Editor. " Dick " . . . soft voice and strong mind . . . Eating holds a special fascination . . . wife, Colleen. September 8, 19.16: daughter. Ellen. June 3. 1953; son, Mark. January 9. 19. " )6 . . . lab technician, Sinai . . . Internal Medicine in California. JAMES ABRAHAM BURWELL; A.B.. M.D. September 11, 1931 Uniontown, Pennsylvania UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH: 19.52; Cnm Laude; Phi (ianinia Drila. -MERCERSIiURG ACADEMY: 1949; Cum Laude. " Burr " . . . " Live fast, die young and have a good look- ing c()r])so " . . . bridge, photography . . . Boris KarlofI " House of Horror " aimoiinci ' mcnts on WMBS in L nion- town ... a ( ' liiiical Pallmld " ;!-! In be. 14 ROBERT JAMES BYRNE; B.S., M.D. May 22, 1924 Baltimore, Maryland Thurmont, Maryland Nu Sigma Nu; Sophomore class Vice President; Freshman class Student Council Representative. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 1954. FREDERICK HIGH SCHOOL, 194L " Bob " . . . amiable with energy spent in silence . . . handy man around the house, ask Alice whom he married on August 27. 1954 ... US Army, 1946-8. Pacific, Ecuador, Japan ... St. Agnes Hospital . . . headed for practice in New England. THEODORE ROBERT CARSKI; A.B., M.D. June 22, 1930 Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY: 1952. TOWSON HIGH SCHOOL: 1948. " Ted " . . . How loose can you get? . . . U.S. Power Squadron Navigation Contests . . . Trudy, July 10, 1954 . . . Little Ted. September 11, 1955 . . . Research at Balti- more Biological Institute and NIH . . . Research in Vir- ology and Biochemistry. JAMES CASTELLANO, Jr.; B.S., M.D. April 22, 1927 New York, New York Staten Island, New York AOA; Nu Sigma Nu; Student Council, 2 years. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 1953. PORT RICHMOND HIGH, 1944. " Jim " . . . Join me in a smile . . . hot rods and hypnosis . . . USAF, Staff Sergeant, 4V2 years . . . auto mechanic and wrecker of new cars ... St. Agnes and Relay Hill Hospitals . . . OB-Gyn. JAMES McAllister chase, jr.: b.s., m.d. October 1, 1931 Wilmington, Delaware Nu Sigma Nu. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 1954: Tlieta Chi. HENRY C. CONRAD HIGFI. 1949: Honor Society; Soph Siiiior class President; Student Council, Vice President: 3 letter man. ■ " Jim " . . . Mv day begins at sundown . . . has widely traveled the Eastern Seaboard . . . DuPont worker for ■ " too many years " . . . Peninsula General ... no definite plans for future. { £kl WILLIAM COLEMAN COHEN: B.A.. M.D. December 19, 1930 Baltimore, Maryland Phi Delta Epsilon; Honor System Committee. JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY. 19.S2: Cum Laude. BALTIMORE CITY COLLEGE. 1949: Honor Graduate. " Big Bill " ... a combination of mind and matter . . . pipes, sinoking, and hiking . . . wed Doris on .August 15. 1954 . . . son. Ira Jeffrey born in February 1056 . . . Miami honeymoon . . . fellowships and vaterfront . . . U.H. accident room ... " I ha e a question ' . . . Internal Medicine in Baltimore. WILLIAM R. COHEN; B.S., M.D. June 15, 1931 Baltimore, Maryland Phi Delta Epsilon. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 19.53. liAI.TIMORK CITY COLLEGE, 1919. ■ " Litlli! Will... too many other people haye Jaguars . . . . . . slcc|) and T . viewing the " Flicks ' . . . Rolicrta and Wenily-Ellen make u|) the family . . . Fleetway cabs and Seton Institute . . . " Just a minute, now! " . . . General Surgery in New England. 16 THOMAS HERBERT COLLAWN; B.S., M.D. April 17. 1932 Williamson, West Virginia Woodlawn, Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF iMARYLAND: 1954; Phi Eta Sigma, Vice- Presidenl: Lambda Clii Alpha: Scholarship Award. CATONSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL: 1949. " Tom " . . . Yesterday went so fast . . . animal trainer, equestrian, aquaman and mystery enthusiast . . . Ensign in Naval Reserve . . . Peninsula General. 195.5. with fre- quent jaunts to Ocean City . . . General Practice in Mary- land or Pennsylvania. DAVID LEE DAVIDSON; B.A.. M.D. May 31. 1930 Baltimore, Maryland CORNELL UNIVERSITY, 1952: Student Government, Pi Lambda Phi. BALTIMORE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, 1948. " Dave " . . . sailing, reading . . . Europe and Middle East, 1954 by hike and sleeping bag . . . Hi Fi and radio haiu . . . Spring Grove 1955, as e.xtern . . . specialty and site of practice undecided. JAMES THOMAS DORSEY; B.A.. M.D. January 28. 1930 Cumberland, Maryland Sophomore Class President. WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, 1952: Chi Psi. LASALLE HIGH SCHOOL, 1948. " Jim " ... It sure is fun to be happy . . . photography, reading, and trips to Nantucket . . . Dorothy and Rye, N.Y., June. 1955 . . . Montebello State Hospital, 1955 . . . " One more of them, and ' . . . General Practice. a JOHN DEM DOWNING. Jr.: B.S.. M.D. September 2,S. 1930 Baltimore, Maryland Catonsville, Maryland UNIVERSITY OV MARYLAND. 19.S2. CATONSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL. 1948. " John " . . . silence is golden . . . carpentry, boating, and tennis . . . 2nd Lt. USAFR . . . water skiing in Florida, 1954-5 . . . Bact. lab technician . . . General Practice in these United States. LUDWIG JOSEPH EGLESEDER, M.D. May 12, 1928 St. Michaels, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND: Phi Delta Theta. ST. MICHAELS HIGH SCHOOL: 1945. ' " Luddy " . . . " Semper Fidelus " . . . Commanding per- sonality . . . Married Ruth in 19.54 . . . USMC sponsored tour of the world . . . " Egle like a bird, Seder like a tree " . . . General Practitioner in St. Michaels, Maryland. JAMES TILFORD ESTES, M.D. March 24, 1928 Jellico, Tennessee Williamsburg. Kentucky UNIVKHSITY OF MARYLAND. CU.MIiEKI.ANI) JUNIOR COLLEGE. Kt-ntuokv: 19. ' 0. MONTGOMERY lil.AlK HIGH SCHOOL: 1946; Slud.nl Council — Presideiil; lilair Kiy for .Atlilclirs. " Jim " . . . cooperative, willing and probing thinker . . . angler and " round ball " devotee . . . Rosemary and Chyerl Jean . . . ISX. 1916-48 . . . mechanic for 5 years . . . Peninsula (Jeneral Hospital. 1955 . . . General Prac- tice or Surgery. 18 RICHARD GILBERT FARMER, M.D. September 29. 1931 Kokomo, Indiana A.O.A. INDIANA UNIVERSITY: Sigma Chi. KOKO-MO HIGH SCHOOL: 19-19, Honor graduate. " Moose " . . . meticulous and exacting with a flair for being " gassed " . . . music and hardwood court . . . Cali- fornia and Florida . . . laborer in Kokomo for 4 years . . . Franklin Square and Methodist Hospital . . . " Good googamooga " . . . Internal Medicine. RICHARD ALLEN FINEGOLD; B.S., M.D. April 12, 1932 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Phi Delta Epsilon. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH: 1953. Phi Beta Kappa. TAYLOR ALLDERICE HIGH SCHOOL: 1949. " Dick " . . . Clothes make the man . . . Even tempered with casual remarks of low pH . . . Fishing and new Cor- vette . . . Franklin Square in Senior year . . . " Stay loose " . . . Urology in Pittsburgh. GIRAUD VERNON FOSTER; B.S., M.D. January 13. 1928 New York, New York Centreville, Maryland TRINITY COLLEGE: 1952; Pi Kappa Alpha, President; Chem- istry Cluh. President. ST. PAUL ' S SCHOOL; Concord. N.H.: 1946. " Giraud " . . . ophisthotonus for the masses . . . soft spoken and conscientious . . . folklore and tropical fish . . . Carolyn and Douglas . . . USMC. 2 years . . . widely traveled . . . more lunch time for bridge . . . Pediatrics or Medicine. 19 JORGE ALFONSO FRANCO; B.S.. M.D. February 22. 9 ' ' Ponce, Puerto Rico UN ' IVF.RSITY OK I ' lFHTO RICO: 1954; Magna Cum Laude. PO.NCE SE.NIOK HIGH SCHOOL: 1954; Salutatorian. " Jorge " ... A cosmopolitan Latin ... An accomplished linguist uilh an air for swimming . . . Europe and le Louvre. New York and Earllia Kitt . . . Sore feet with the post office iti ' 5. ' ? . . . L ' .H. Lab technician . . . Internal Medicine. MiP MARSHALL FRANKLIN: B.S.. M.D. November 5, 1929 Baltimore, Maryland Stiulent Council; TERRA MARIAE MEDICUS: Associate Editor; Plii Delta Epsilon, Vice-President; Professional School Senate. FRANKLIN MARSHALL COLLEGE: 1952, Pi Lambda Plii, Vice-President; Student I nion Board. FOREST PARK HIGH SCHOOL: 1948, Boys Leaders Club, President; Student Court. ' " Marsh " . . . Energy to burn . . . Suiitle comments in a styptic air . . . Collects records and cufflinks . . . Forever itinerant . . . General Store salesman for 9 years at Edge- mere. Md. . . . Externed Baylor U.. 19.1.5 . . . Industrial Clinics Accident Room, 19. . ' 5-,56 . . . Internist. EDWARD DAVID FROHLICH; B.A.. M.D. September 10, 1931 New York, New York Chevy Chase, Maryland Phi Delia Epsilon. WASIIIN(;T0N JEFFERSON college; 19.52; Kera; Cuni Lauile; AKA. i( i-Pre ident ; German Honorary; Chi E.M; Phi Si ima. THOMAS A. ROIiFIMS HIGH SCHOOL: Berlin, Germany, 1948; Sjlulatorian. " Ed " . . . An eternal Fountain . . . Slamj) and ])li il coffector . . . The Berlin Airlift. Ilolhirid. Sweden. Den- mark. Bcrniiida . . . Ainciican ln liunirnt ( ' orM|)any and Department of State . . . l.II.. MIL (laidiolouv Fellow- ship. L.ll OH-GYN in Washington, 1). C. 20 r " 7 LFRED WILLIAM GRIGOLEIT; A.B.. M.D. December 10, 1927 Baltimore, Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY: 1952. BALTIMORE CITY COLLEGE: 1946. " Grig " . . . the unbiased, bashing truth . . . mechanical work, beer, women and cool, cool water . . . USCG- Pharmacist mate . . . Germany and Puerto Rico . . . Bethlehem Steel as furnace mechanic and later, assistant physician . . . jokes for one occasion only . . . Surgery in Army. .. JOSIAS HENRY HAWKINS; A.B., M.D. June 30, 1925 Washington, D. C. Forest Heights, Maryland SAMA. GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY: 1952; DTD. OXON HILL HIGH SCHOOL: 1943. " Harry " ' . . . genial, stable and objective approach . . . Gifted ' linksman . . . Wed Edith, 1949 . . . Pacific and Far Eastern tour courtesy of USN . . . Detail Man for Wyeth Inc. for 31-2 years . . . " Oh, I don ' t know " . . . General Practitioner. ROBERT NELSON HEADLEY; B.S., M.D. June 29. 1932 Boyd, Maryland Rockville, Maryland Junior and Senior Class President; Phi Beta Pi; Student Govern- ment. A.O.A. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 1954. RICHARD MONTGOMERY HIGH SCHOOL, 1949: Sophomore Class President; National Honor Society, chapter vice president; Student Council. " Darts " . . . level headed with an abundance of common sense . . . sports, particularly hunting . . . married Willie December 23. 19.5.5 . . . vacationed in New England and Canada last five summers . . . externed St. Joseph Hosp. and Walter Reed . . . heading South as G.P. J . I» - Sp fc New York, New York Phi Kappa Sigma; Inter- NIEL CARLTON HENDERSON; B.S., M.D. September 17. 1931 Pelham, New York UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 1954: fraternilv ccniniil. PELHA.Sl MEMORIAL HIGH. 1949. " Niel " . . . confident and capable in any task . . . Yankees and sailing . . . Elizabeth. 19.5.5. with a family addition on the way . . . N.Y. life insurance salesman. 7 years . . . " There ' s always an easier way. " . . . IVdiatrics in New York. 4: WEBB SELLMAN HERSPERGER; A.B.. M.D. October 16. 1930 Frederick, Maryland Poolesville, Maryland Flu Beta Pi. JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY: 1952. POOLESVILLE HIGH SCHOOL: 1 948; Student Council— Pres- ident. " Webl) " ... a real likable guy . . . woodwork and Sugar- loaf Mountain visits . . . truck and auto driver along Eastern Seaboard . . . Chestnut Lodge. U.H. and Fred- erick Memorial . . . " Well. sir. it looks to me like " . . . Plastic Surgery or General Practice. LEE HOFFMAN; B.A.. M.D. June 21, 1929 Baltimore. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MAKM.AND. 19.52: University Theatre. BALTIMORE CITY COLLEGE. 1947. " Lee " . . . Thought is the boon of existence . . . science, classical music, art, |)olilics. cycling . . . nationwide trav- eler via the tluiinb ( x|)ress: Canada . . . cabinet ntaker. summer stock. cam|) coun. elor . . . Spring Grove research, U.H. . . . Medicine or Psychiatrist. 22 VIRGIL ROY HOOPER: A.B., M.D. February 8, 1931 Weirton, West Virginia AOA; Senior Class Secretary-Treasurer. WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 1952: Kappa Sigma; Alpha Epsilon Delta. FOLLANSBEE HIGH SCHOOL, 1949: Salutatorian; President of Junior Senior Classes. " Virge " . . . Livin ' can sure be a lot of fun . . . sports, dancing, painting, woodwork, and theatre . . . steel mill and restaurant work . . . Ohio Valley and Lutheran Hos- pitals ... " I tell you, Buddy, I ' m shot! " . . . General Practice in the Mid-west. RALPH TURNER HUMMEL, M.D. October 5, 1928 McKeesport, Pennsylvania Frostburg, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. GRANTSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL, 1946. " Doc " . . . My footsteps follow new hewn pathways . . . something about a Banjo . . . Betty, 1953 . . . USN, 3 years; California, Alaska . . . industrial and dock work, plastering . . . Spring Grove, Gundry Sanatarium . . . Psychiatry. GIL BERT EARL HURWITZ; B.S., M.D. June 23, 1932 Baltimore, Maryland Junior Class, secretary-treasurer. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 1953. BALTIMORE CITY COLLEGE, 1949: Honor Society; Letter Writing Contest, winner. " Gilbo " . . . personable smile and ready wit . . . reading, music, and any sport you can name . . . summer baseball with the Walbrook boys . . . " Buy an encyclopedia, Ma ' in? " . . . U.H., Spring Grove, and Franklin Square . . . " How ya doin ' , oF Buddy? " 23 BETTY IRENE I YENS: B.S.. M.D. April 17. 1931 Chestertown, Maryland Yearbook, Assistant Editor. WASHINGTON COLLEGE, 1952: Magna cum laude; Literary Annual. Editor. CHESTERTOWN HIGH, 1948: Valedictorian. " Irene " . . . good things come in small packages . . . reading, theatre, people . . . Europe in 1954 . . . There ' s a certain sparkle in " them " ' eyes . . . ' ' Oh, No-o-o-o!! " . . . Scatter, kids, she ' s a Pediatrician. € DANIEL FULPER JOHNSTON; A.B., M.D. July 28. 1931 Easton, JMaryland Dundalk. Maryland PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, 1952: Cum Laude. SPARROWS POINT HIGH SCHOOL, 1948. " Dan " . . . " Who doesn ' t have his eyes open? ' . . . foot- ball . . . dear Pam on August 21. 19.54 ... the Midwest and Grand Canyon . . . dairy bacteriology . . . future as yet unsettled. ALBERT VICTOR KANNER; A.B., M.D. February 11, 1931 Baltimore, Maryland JOHN ' S HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, 19.52. FOREST PARK HIGH SCHOOL, 1918. " Al " , . . It ' s host to stay loose when you ' re panicked . . . f. ' olf. iiridge. chess, and casino with Ka|)lan . . . Delores in .August, 1054 . . . Spring Crove, 1954. Roanoke Memorial. 1955 . . . " Get serious " ' . . . future as yet undecided. 24 ROBERT MARTIN KAPLAN: B.A., M.D. February 11. 1930 Hazleton, Penns)lvania Baltimore, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. 1952: Pi Lamlj.la Phi. BALTIMORE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 1948: Valcdiclorian. " Bob " ... A silent man who stores his thoughts . . . hip boots, rod reel, and a cool stream . . . wed Shirley on July 11. 1954 . . . European honeymoon, 1954 . . . Springfield State Hospital . . . " Why ask me? " ... a family in the future. SHEPPARD GORDON KELLAM; B.S., M.D. January 10. 1931 Baltimore, Maryland Cape Charles. Virginia LOYOLA COLLEGE. 1952: Mendel Club. President. BALTIMORE CITY COLLEGE. 1949: National Honor Society, Chapter Vice President; Loyola Scholarship. " Shep " . . . Let your thoughts be known, and above all — Criticize! . . . Music and good wine . . . the high seas . . . deck hand, taxi driver, life guard . . . University Hospital, Psychiatry, Clinical Pathology, Neurology . . . " Gosh " . . . Psychiatry. t ' ' J. EDWARD KELLY, Jr.: B.S., M.D. July 5, 1930 Syracuse, New York Nu Sigma Nn. NOTRE DAME UNIVERSITY, 1932. SYRACUSE, 1948: CBA. " Ted " . . . Life is what you make it . . . all sports and rooting for Notre Dame . . . engineering and surveying, construction . . . Fellow in Gastroenterology. Mercy Hos- pital, Jessup Prison Physician . . . Internal Medicine. 25 i " CHARLES HERSCHEL KING; B.S., M.D. December 13, 1931 Delaware County, Pennsylvania Baltimore, Maryland A.O.A. IIM ERSITY OF MARYLAND. 10.i2: Al|ilia Plii Om.-ga. TOWSON STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE, 1951: Aliilia I ' lii 0]iief;a. WOODROW WILSON HIGH SCHOOL. 1919. " Hersch " . . . well, let ' s set it done . . . photography, reading, sleeping, and fishing . . . the Eastern Seaboard . . . First Aid attendant . . . Church Home Hosp.. 1955 . . . General Practice. KENNETH MUNSON KLATT, M.D. May 25, 1932 Macomb. Illinois Touson. Maryland LNlVERSrrV OF DELAWARE: 4 l.-ltcr man; Varsity Club. TOWSON HIGH SCHOOL, 1949: 3 letler man; Siml.iit Govern- ment. ' " Ken " . . . Gotta keep active . . . athletics, travel, nature, photography, and bull sessions . . . Westerner in heart . . . brewery, truck driver, industrial plant work . . . Baltimore City Hospital . . . possible Pediatrician. m PALL WILLIAM KNOWLES; B.S.. M.D. December II. 1926 Salt Lake City, Utah I ' lii Beta I ' i; Weaver Fellowsliip in Histology. UNIVERSITY OF UTAH. 1951. CYPRUS HIGH SCHOOL, 1914. " Paul " . . . e er onwaid . . . reading: model building; skeletal work . . . Orra Marie in March of " 49 . . . I SN. 1944-7, Pacific Tlualre . . . Las Vegas honeymoon and Niagara Falls second honey moon. West Coast . . . Medical Examiners Olllce LH . . . possible Surgery in the Rockies. 26 ELMER CURTIS ROLLER, Jr.; B.S., M.D. July 27, 1929 Baltimore. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, 1951: Rho Chi Honorary: Phi Deha Chi. KENWOOD HIGH SCHOOL, 1946: Gold " K " ; Student Council, Treasurer. " Curt " ... A tall student with an active sense of humor . . . theatre and music . , . Colorado and Wyoming, 1955 . . . Pharmacist in the off hours . . . General Practice in New England. BERNARD KRAMER; A.B., M.D. January 2, 1929 Baltimore, Maryland Phi Delta Epsilon. JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, 1951 BALTIMORE CITY COLLEGE, 1947. " Bernie " . . . Sincerity has its own rewards . . . Immuno- chemical research, U of M, 1951 ; Chemistry of Nerve Gasses, Army Chemical Center. 1952; Cancer research, JHU Sinai, 1955 . . . Internal Medicine, Baltimore. ■flH«:»ra» -wfflaflsn8M H. COLEMAN KRAMER; B.S., M.D. April 4, 1928 Baltimore, Maryland Phi Delta Epsilon. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 1952. BALTIMORE CITY COLLEGE, 1941. " Cole " . . . sincerity at its peak . . . wed Eleanor June 23, 1951; Karen Sue March 22, 1952; Jeffrey David July 27, 1955 . . . USN, 1946-8 . . . painter, lab. technician, representative for Schering Corp. . . . G.P. or Int. Med. in Fla. 27 Detroit, Michigan SCHELDON KRESS; B.S.. M.D February 2. 1931 Washington. D. C. Plii Delta Ep ilon. LMVF.RSITY OF MARYLAND, 1952. ROOSi:VELT HIGH SCHOOL, 1948. " Schel " . . . the " collagen " king . . . photography; clas- sical music . . . wed Rose in June. 1955 . . . Miami honey- moon; Atlantic Citv and Xew York . . . Christmas trees and meat carving . . . Royal Order of Cardiologists I Hearts at the card table I . . . BCH and Walter Reed . . . Internal Medicine in D. C. LOUIS JAMES LANCASTER; B.S., M.D. Baltimore. Maryland A.O.A. VIRGLNLV POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 1952: Alpha Zeia: Alpha Phi Omega; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Sigma; Omicron Delta Kappa. TANEYTOWN HIGH SCHOOL. " Lou " ... a quiet, but discerning, eve . . . with a camera in the outdoors . . . will take a fishing rod too . . . Margie in June of " 55 . . . USN, 1942-6, Carribean and Atlantic . . . Pacific Northwest . . . Forestry Service . . . .Shelton Clinic in Washington State . . . General Practice or In- ternal Medicine in the Northwest L .S. JOSEPH G. LANZI; B.S., M.D. June 17, ig. ' ?! Baltimore, Maryland LOYOLA COLLEGE, 19.x5: Z.H.O. TOWSON CATHOLIC, 1949: President Junior Class. Valcdir- torian, Capl. I ' oothall S(|uacl. " ■jdc " . , . free flowing with an eye for detail . . . pinochle and westerns . . . wed Patricia. May 26, 1956 . . . Ken- tucky and N.J. . . . loter for cokes, groceries, and news pa] ers . . . Mercy and Franklin S(]. . . . G.P. in Md. 28 CARL PATRICK LAUGHLIN; A.B.. M.D. September 28, 1931 Parkersburg, West Virginia Clarksburg. West Virginia AOA, Secretary-treasurer. WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 1953: Sophomore Class Presi- dent; Sigma Nu: Pre-med Honorarw ST. MARYS HIGH SCHOOL, 1949: Student Council; National Honor Society; 3 letter man. " Pat " ' . . . urbane and well dressed . . . frustrated tennis and golf participant . . . wife Carol from home state . . . Mid-West travels . . . State roads and Camp counselor . . . l Id. General and Franklin Square . . . Internal Medicine. MATHEW HUNG MUN LEE; A.B., M.D. July 28, 19.31 Honolulu, Hawaii Wahiawa. Hawaii JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, 1953: Student Council, Secre- tary-Treasurer. SCHOFIELD HIGH SCHOOL, 1949: Student Council President, Editor of newspaper. Senior Scholarship Award, Valedictorian. " Matt " ' . . . quiet and capable . . . photography, stamps, fishing . . . L ' .S. traveler . . . postal clerk, camp counselor, dormitory director . . . Mercy Hosp. . . . fellow in Infect. Dis.; Polio Foundation grant . . . G.P. in Hawaii. I WILLIAM ARDEN LEMMERT; B.S., M.D. August 4, 1930 Frostburg, Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 1952. BEALL HIGH SCHOOL, 1948: Valedictorian. " Bill " ' . . . There ' s always tomorrow . . . preoccupations of bridge and sleeping . . . quite athletic while awake . . . permanent bridge partner in June . . . New Orleans and Sugar Bowl. " .52 . . . Camp Cliffside Doctor ... St. Agnes Hospital . . . " Deal ' em fast, we still got time for another hand! " ' 29 JOHN BRECKENRIDGE LITTLETON; B.S., M.D. October 10, 1929 Staunton, Virginia Greenbelt, Maryland Phi Beta Pi. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 1952: Cum Laiule. DUKE UNIVERSITY. GREENBELT HIGH SCHOOL. 1917: . ' Student Government; National Honor Soeitly; Quill Scroll; 3 letter man. " Rose " . . . consistently comes through smiling like one . . . competitive sports with a passion . . . Virginia in April. 1954. and daughter. Barbara . . . mesomorphic life guard . . . Hawaii . . . can ' t stand " other loud mouths " . . . General Practice in Maryland. WILLIAM THOMAS LLOYD: B.S.. M.D. January 19. 1931 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Baltimore. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 1952: Cum Laude. (;eorgetown prep, 1952. " Tom " ... at bridge or at the track, a capable hand . . . There ' s always next year ' s Orange Bowl game . . . Mary Lou from Passaic. New Jersey in August, 1954 . . . future plans still in the cards. • T THOMAS A. LOVE, M.D. July 18, 1930 Baltimore, Maryland Monkton. Maryland UN1 KKSIIY OF MARYLAND. SPARKS HIGH .SCHOOL. 1949: Student Counrd. Ir(a urer; Treasurer. Junior and Senior classes; Editor, newspapir; 5 lettir man. " Tom " . . . set our out) pace . . . Ann. July 5. 1954: Richar.i. Feb. 1.1 19.56 . . . farm and cit by truck and railroad . . . Fraiikliti Sq. atid I iiion Mem. . . . from a Dynasty of Doctors . . . General Practice in Balto. Count). 30 GERALD NORTON MAGGID; B.A., M.D. April 12, 1930 Baltimore, Maryland Phi Delta Epsilon. JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, 1952: Phi Sigma Della-Presi- FOREST PARK HIGH SCHOOL; 1948: Chief Justice of Student Court; Boys Leader ' s Club — Vice President, Varsity Tennis — Cap- tain. " Jerry " . . . quiet and serious . . . swimming and tennis at " the club " . . . wed Marcia August 1955 . . . remem- bers 1948 for Mexico and bull fights . . . " Crazy " . . . Cardiology or endocrinology for the future. ROBERT JOSEPH MAHON; B.S., M.D. October 20, 1928 Sparrows Point, Maryland A.O.A. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND : 1954; All American Lacrosse, 2nd team. SPARROWS POINT HIGH SCHOOL: 1945; Junior and Senior Class Vice-President; Student Council; Varsity Lacrosse team captain. ' Bob " . . . Noted for lucid and Rabelaisian personality descriptions . . . Ann, Bobby and Kevin . . . USN. Medi- terranean theater in 1946-48 . . . Worked at Bethlehem Steel Corporation . . . Internal Medicine or General Practice. k t SAMUEL JAMES MANGUS; B.S., M.D. July 13, 1929 Baltimore, Maryland WASHINGTON COLLEGE: 1952; Phi Sigma Kappa: Alpha Omega Nu. SPARROWS POINT HIGH SCHOOL. " Jim " . . . quiet, conscientious and sincere . in his work . . . Ruth and Bonnie Dru . . picnics . . . Far East and Asia with U.S.A. motive fireman to package goods , and general practice. takes pride . parties and . . from loco- Army internsh ip 31 HERBERT MILES MARTON; A.B., M.D. September 8. 1930 New York, New York Phi Delta Epsilon. BROWN UNIVERSITY, 1952. HORACE MANN, 1948. " Herb " . . . intelligence with an air for frivolity . . . ■ " Women! " . . . Europe and gay Paris. 1950 ... a Giant fan from a family of Physicians . . . Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York . . . Internal Medicine in the city of New York. O fi J £ JOSEPH SHEFFER McLAUGHLIN; B.S., M.D. June 26, 1930 Baltimore, Maryland Phi Beta Pi— President. A.O.A. LOYOLA COLLEGE, 19.54. BALTLMORE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, 1949. " Joe " ' . . . good natured. ambitious and tenacious worker . . . sports, frat. and fast dance music . . . wed Irene August 1955 . . . Medical bulwark at Franklin Sq., Mercy and U.H. . . . Surgery (what else?) and maybe teaching. ROBERT GABRIEL MUTH; M.D. August 30, 1931 Baltimore, Maryland Alpha Omega Al|ilia, Phi Beta Pi. LOYOLA COLLEGE: Three letter man. L010LA HIGH SCHOOL, 1949: Caj)!., swimming team. " Bob " ... of industry and determination . . . Eastern Catholic and Maryland .scholastic swimming champion- shi|)s . . . Mason Di.xoii and South Atlantic swinmiing chaini)i()iiships . . . afianccd to Patricia Hubert . . . USN . . . r.H. fellow in Cardiology . . . Lederle and NIH research fellowships. 32 s- - ■. ll ■ f ■ v - ' 1 RICHARD IRA MYERS; A.A., B.S., M.D. December 19, 1919 Quarryville, Pennsylvania Junior Class Vice-President, A.O.A. GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY: 1952. QUARRYVILLE HIGH SCHOOL: 1937 " Dick " . . . conscientious, hard working and punctual . . . enjoys home life and wife ' s cooking . . . married Bejay, 1949 . . . South Pacific with USA, 1940-46 . . . X-ray technician, Walter Reed Hospital, 4 years . . . Army career as Radiologist or Internist. JOHN FRANCES NOWELL; B.S., M.D. December 1, 1928 Annapolis, Maryland Honor System Committee — Chairman UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 1954; Cum Lautle. ANNAPOLIS HIGH SCHOOL, 1945. " John " . . . neat and dignified with a quick easy sense of humor . . . holds distance record for commuting . . . music lover and pianist . . . married Virginia Carolyn April 10, 1954 . . . diverse employment background . . . psychiatry is the ultimate goal. CLARK LAMONT OSTEEN; B.S., M.D. April 19, 1932 Commerce, Georgia Beltsville, Maryland Nu Sigma Nu; 2 year Student Council Representative. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 1954: Plii Kai.pa Gamma. GREENBELT HIGH SCHOOL, 1948: National Honor Society, chapter President; Science and Biology Clubs. President. " Lamont " . . . quiet, friendly, with a driving determina- tion . . . pistol and rifle shooting . . . Ann and Chris . . . Europe, 1948-9. and that Follies Bergere . . . Construction and the Department of Agriculture . . . Lab technician at U.H. . . . General Practice in Maryland. d 33 DAVID ALA OLRSLER: B.A.. M.D. November 25, 1929 Baltimore, Maiylaiul Fres-hman Class Vice-Presiilent. JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY: 1952. BALTIMORE CITY COLLEGE: 1948; National Honor Socit-ly. Cliapter Vice-President, German Medal. 1 vear seholarsliip to J.H.U. " Dave " . . . leisurely attitude with a genius fur establish- ing rapport with instructors ... Hi H anil wmxlworking . . . Spent summer at BCH with Public Heahh Ser ite . . . " Schwein " . . . Internal .Medicine in . lar land or Virginia. WILLIAM MARTIN PALMER. M.D. March 9, 1932 Cedar City. Utah .Senior Class Vice-President. .4.0.. . UNIVERSITY OF UTAH: Alplia Epsilon Delta. SACRA.MENTO HIGH SCHOOL, CALIF.: 1949; California Scholarship Federation. " Martv " . . . easy going, jovial and sincere . . . Wed Nina in June. 19.55 . . . Worked in Physiology at Naval Diving School . . . " How ya ' doing " . . . Going to Far, Far West as a General Practitioner. Fr 1 WILBUR CRAFTS PICKFTT. .Ir.: U.S.. M.D. January 3, 1930 W ashiiigton. D. C. Chevy Chase. .Mar lan(l Student Council, President; .National winner SAM A Rlui- Shii-ld Essay Contest, 19.). ' ); Freshman Class Pn idenl; Phi liila Pi, Historian. WASHINGTON LEE UNIVERSITY. 19.S2: Phi Gamma D.lia. President; Alpha Delta Kp-ilmi. HETHESDA CIIEN ' i (:il K UK. 11 (:il()OL, 1918: .Nhool Monofiram; (.)uill and Scroll. " Bill " . . . Mohammad and tiie mountain . . . arranging the Softball schedule and pushing tlie lionnr s stem . . . married Nancy. 1953 . . . ra . lnfe(tious Disease Lab. Clinical Pathology and Psychiatry externships at I II . . . Walt T Reed. 1955 . . . possible General Practice in the South. 34 MARVIN STANLEY PLATT; B.S., M.D. November 29. 1930 Baltimore, Maryland Phi Delia Epsilon. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND: 1954. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, SCHOOL OF PHARMACY: 1951; AZO. BALTIMORE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE: 1947. " Marv " . . . energetic, tireless and good business sense . . . work and play in proper place . . . Florida, Canada, Chicago . . . Camp Louise ' s physician. 195.5 . . . Pediatric Fellowship U.H. . . . Practicing pharmacist . . . " Now " . . . Pediatrics. RICHARD LEON PLUMB; B.S., M.D. October 16, 1931 Kaluga, Russia Washington, D. C. Phi Delta Epsilon, Treasurer and Corresponding Secretary. RANDOLPH MACON COLLEGE: 1952. ANACOSTA HIGH SCHOOL: 1948. " Dick " . . . always ready with a helping hand . . . Sports enthusiast, especially of RMC . . . Texas — greatest gift from the gods . . . Grand Canyon, 1955 . . . Externed in Dallas for 3 summers . . . Surgery in Texas. IRVIN PAUL POLLACK; A.B., M.D. February 17, 1931 Baltimore, Maryland Phi Delta Epsilon, President; Interfraternity Council, Chairman; Intercollegiate Schering Award. JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, 1952: Wilson Democratic Club. ' ice President. BALTIMORE CITY COLLEGE, 1949: Wilbur E. Smith Award; Honor Society. ' " Irv " . . . personable and good natured . . . collects old medical texts . . . traveled the Midwest and Western US by tent and sleeping bag . . . Baylor University Hospital, 1955 . . . Pediatrics or OB-Gyn. 35 HELLMl TH RAAB November 22. 1927 Vienna, Austria Baltimore. Maryland FLORID. SOUTHERN COLLEGE. TOWSO.N HIGH SCHOOL: Class Treasurer two years. ••Hank " . . . peaceful . . . don ' t fence me in . . . New York Yankees and sniniming . . . study in Psychiatry at Vienna . . B.C.H. exlernslii]) in anesthesiology in third year . . . O.B.-Gyn in Baltimore. G. EDWARD REAHL. Jr.: B.S., M.D. May 28, 1931 Baltimore, Maryland TERRA NL RA1E MEDICLS: Editor; I ' lii Beta Pi, Treasurer. LOYOLA COLLEGE: 1954: Tan Kappa Alpha. CALVERT HALL: 1918: Yearbook Eililor; National lio " s Wlio. " Ed " . . . Let a smile he your uiid)rella . . . Read a little, shuffle the cards, and win that hallgame . . . Ocean City, Miami Beach. St. Louis . . . Mercy. University, and St. Agnes . . . ' " Oh. no. don ' t tell me that! " ' . . . Medicine or Surgery in Baltimore. HAROLD IRVIN RODMAN; B.A.. M.D. April 11, 1931 Baltimore, Maryland ScherinR Award Contest; Honorable Mention. JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY: 1952, Phi l,and)da Upsilon; Phi Si(:nia Didta: l)e|iartnierital honors. BALTIMORE POLYTECHNIC: 1949, Honor Society. ' •Hesch ' . . . easy going . . . Always ready for a " pearl " . . . furniture making and reading . . . Jane and Kim . . . Medirinc ,il Waller Heed, summer. 19. " ). " ) . . . Nova Scotia. Miami Beai h, (Quebec . . . " That ' s right " . . . Internist in Balliinore. 36 HARRY PAUL ROSS: B.S. , M.D. April 23, 1925 Emmitsburg, Pennsylvania Nu Sigma Nu, President Vice President. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 1954: Plii Eta Sigma; Secretary -Men ' s LeaEue. 1947-9. EMMITSBURG HIGH, 1942. " Harry " . . . " go getter " who does a job well . . . always ready for a party . . . US Army, 3 years . . . Xocho- millcho, Mexico . . . UH Blood Bank mainstay, 3 years . . . Pfizer representative, 1955-6 . . . future Internist. CHARLES ANDREW SANISLOW. Jr.; B.S., M.D. November 11, 1930 Rahway, New Jersey Phi Beta Pi. A.O.A. RUTGERS UNIVERSITY, 1952: Biochem-Bact. Award; Biology Honor Society. RAHWAY HIGH, 1948: Senior Class President. " Charlie . . . personable, hard worker who knows his goals . . . fishing and photography . . . lakes, streams and fish of New England . . . Hematology fellowship and Blood Bank exteriiship at U.H. . . . Surgery in New England. GERALD DAVID SCHUSTER; B.S., M.D. May 24, 1931 Baltimore, Maryland Phi Delta Epsilon. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, SCHOOL OF PHARMACY: 1952; Rho Chi. Phi Alpha. BALTIMORE CITY COLLEGE: 1948. " Jerry " . . . Enthusiastic approach and inquisitiveness personified . . . avid disciple of Goren and art of relaxing . . . Helen and Sharon Lee . . . practicing Pharmacist for 3 years . . . Kernan ' s Hospital, Summer, 1955 . . . Ortho- pedics in Maryland. 37 ROY 0. SHAUB. JM.D. February 5, 1929 Ogden, Utah Phi Beta Pi; Linlhicum Scholarship; Dr. Horace Hetrick Scholar- ship. UNIVERSITY OF UT. H. WEBER COLLEGE: Sigma Delta Pi, President; Most popular man on campus. OGDEN HIGH SCHOOL: 1946. " Roy " . . . casual and relaxed . . . skiing and hunting . . . USA in Far East for 18 months . . . Externed at Franklin Square and U.H. . . . railroad switchman for 4 years in Ogden . . . General Practice in the Golden West. WILLIAM ALLEN SINTON, Jr.; B.S., M.D. Xo ember 9, 1930 Baltimore, Maryland Read Scholarship. WILLIAM MARY. 1952: Kappa Alpha Order. BALTLMORE CITY COLLEGE, 1948: Honor Society. ' " Bill ' ' . . . quiet, but a dry sense of humor . . . canoeing and swimming . . . married Margie, May 28, 19.55 . . . helped administer first aid at Bethlehem Steel. 1955 . . . ' " Bridge, anyone? " . . . Pediatrics or may follow Father as G.P. JAMES WILLIAM SKAGGS, Jr.; A.B., M.D. April 2, 1931 Nitro, West Virginia SAMA Journal. April 19.S.S. WE.ST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY: 1952; SIGMA NU. NITKO HIGH SCHOOL: 1948: Salutatorian; Thespians— Presi- dent. Siudcnl Council; National Honor Soc iety, Music Trophy; Student Hand Conductor. " Jim " . . . spastic serenity . . . class rhronologist . . . concert, jazz, opera and ballet . . . Great Smokey Moun- tains and water skiing . . . O.R. at McMillan Hospital. 1955 . . . " Did ou hear the latest alumt Nilro " . . . Obstetrics or General Practice. 38 PAUL VERNON SLATER: A.B., M.D. December L5, 1930 iMoundsville, West Virginia EST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, 1952: Beta Theta Pi; Varsity Football. MOUNDSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL, 1948. ' " Bear " . . . amiable with an air of informality . . . enjoys " gassing ' a certain classmate before exams . . . extra- curricular medical training at Md. General and Franklin Square , . . ' " Yesssssss " . . . General Surgery. f? GEORGE THOMAS SMITH; B.S., M.D. October 19. 1930 Evansville. Indiana Terra Alta, Preston, West Virginia Nu Sigma Nu. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND: 1953; Sigma Plii Sigma. TERRA ALTA HIGH SCHOOL: 1949; Valedictorian, Student Council, President. " George " . . . Personable and conscientious . . . Dad is M.D Woman ' s Hospital. West Virginia Medical Center, Cardiology Fellowship at L .H. . . . McGill intern- ship . . . Here comes a future Cardiologist. GEORGE ALEXANDER SOWELL; B.S., M.D. April 20, 1930 Leonardtown, Maryland Phi Beta Pi. THE CITADEL: 1952. CHARLOTTE HALL: 19-18. " George " . . . quiet and amiable . . . met fiance Mayme at Franklin Square Hospital . . . X-ray technician at Uni- versity Hospital . . . Internship and possible practice in South Carolina or Colorado. Fj w- ■W ' • 39 JAMES JOSEPH STOVIN; B.A., M.D. February 21. 1931 New York, New York Phi Delta Epsilon. President. YALE UNIVERSITY, 1952. COLL ' MBLV GR.V.MMER SCHOOL, 1948. ' ■Jim ' ' . . . cosmopolitan, student, philosopher, and an- tagonist . . . both Mom and Dad sport MD " s ... Go any- where, voung man . . . Morocco, Europe, Canada . . . Xray technician at Sinai and U.H Future Radiologist. « 1 V ROBERT GEORGE STUCK; B.S.. M.D, July 31, 1930 Wolcott. New York WASHINGTON COLLEGE, 1952: Cum Lamle; Lambda Chi Alpha. LEAVENWORTH CENTRAL, 1948: 3 letter man. " Bob " . . . natural extrovert persuing an easy manner . . . golf and bridge . . . works in Family hospital every summer . . ,. ' " How about that! " " . . . General Practice or Surgery in Wolcott. HOWARD E. STURGEON; B.A., M.D. November 2.5. 1927 Suffolk, Virginia IMNLHSriY OK VIRGINIA: 1950; Pi Kappa Alpha. SLll ' ULK. HIGH SCHOOL: 191.5. " Fish " . . . Easy going, poised and composed . . . jazz and golf ,. . . Ann and Brooks . . . one year on Guam through the courtesy of I ncle Sam . . . Bob Stuck and me . . . possible General practitioner. 40 EVELYN ANNA RAUBA TRAINIS; M.D. June 9, 1931 Baltimore, Maryland GOUCHER COLLEGE, 1952: Honor Graduate; Cliemislr - Club award; Essay award; Chemistry Club, President. WESTERN HIGH SCHOOL, 1948: Honor Graduate; Goucher Scholarship. " Evy " . . . the eyes of a child see the world as a shining object and reflect its light ... 14 MD ' s in the family . , . music, summer stock, swimming and domestics . . . sudden interest in Spain and Neurosurgery with Pedro . . . Carribean Cruise . . . Woman ' s Hospital. ALBERT LEROY TRUCKER Jr.; A.B., M.D. August 5, 1924 Benton Harbor, Michigan Baltimore. Maryland JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY: 1951. GLEN BURNIE HIGH SCHOOL: 1941. " Al " . . . warm personality and diversity of interests . . . sailing, skating, skiing, philosophy . . . Anne in 19.52 and " Little Anne " ' in 1953 . . . European theatre in the In- fantry . . . Italy, Germany, Switzerland. VIRGINIA HARRINGTON TRUITT; B.S., M.D. March 19, 1931 Washington, D. C. Kent Island, Maryland SAMA — Secretary — Treasurer; Sophomore Class Secretary. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND: 1952; Mortar Board— Presi- dent; Pi Delta Epsilon; Kappa Kappa Gamma. HYATTSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL: 1948. ' " Ginny " . . . cooperative, friendly, sincere ... a sailing enthusiast . . . Southwest Europe — Capri and gay Paris, 1949 . . . Eastern Memorial and St. Agnes . . . Public Health in Caroline County . . . " Now. friend " . . . Prac- tice in Baltimore. 41 y a EDWIN WARFIELD WHITEFORD. Jr.: B,S.. AI.D. June 13. 1931 W liiteford. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND: Sigma Clii: S.abliard Blad.-. SLATE RIDGE HIGH, 1948: VaMictoriaii: Cla s M- n-laiy. 4 years. " Wardv ' . . . with warmth and friend. liip . . . framing, photography, skating, and good music . . . 2nd I.t. in USAFR . . . Da li)na Beach and the South — broi c but happv ,. . . Wliitefurd Frozen Food plant . . . General Practice in Maryland. JOHN ZIGLER WILLIAMS: R.S.. MD. Washington. D. C. April 27, 1927 Hagerstown. Maryland UNIVERSITY OF . L RYLAND. la ' .l. HAGERSTOWN HIGH SCHOOL. 1947. " John " . . . thoughlful and logical electronics. Hi Fi. and pliolograpiu . . . Washington (bounty Hospital Lxternships . . . headed for General Practice in Western Maryland. ajiproach to life . . . ... I S . electrician HARRY DAVIS WILSOX. Jr.: B.A.. M.l). Baltimore. Mar)land n ' a?un ' i ; .V.O..V. — ice April 8, 1930 S.A.M. A.— Chapter President, National President; Nu Sigma Nn. ANHIERST COLLEGE. 19.J2: Clii Plii. liALTIMORE CITY COLLEGE, 1948: S " H.IX " . . . energetic, astute, friendly and hadminton are his rackets . . . counseling in N.H. . relaxing in c I ' liiihind . . . " How often is ' not infre- nior Class President. . . . tennis, squash iuentl .,., Practice and tcachin the .Northwest. 42 ROBERT LEE WRIGHT: B.S., M.D. March 27, 1931 Toronto. Jefferson, Ohio Nu Sigma Nu. TERRA MARIAE MEDICUS, Photography Editor. KENT STATE UNIVERSITY: 1952. TORONTO HIGH SCHOOL: 1948; Junior Class rri ' siatnt. " Bob " ' ... A man who stands on his own two feet . . . Saihng and snapshots . . ,. Married Jo on June 20, 1953 . . . West Coast, 1955 . . . Chemist with Goodyear Research ... St. Agnes and Uni ersity externship . . . General Practice in Ohio. SENIOR OFFICERS ROBERT HEADLEY President MARTIN PALMER Vice President VIRGIL HOOPER Secretary-Treasurer MARSHALL FRANKLIN Student Council, 1 year 43 JAMES CASTELLANO Student Council, 2 years Upon cnloriiig Modical School, the slu- deiil is faced with many seemingly unsur- monntable obstacles. Anatomy, Histology, and Biochemistry — to name a few — pre- sent many uneasy hours. These soon melt, however, when the patient contact is first made and reasons for his training become more evident. These arc the years when lectures and books predomi- nate. But each man realizes that every hour brings him closer to his ultimate goal, the care of patients. FRESHMAN CLASS We like to think that the Class of 1959 is an iimisual one. At the present time there are 95 members in the Freshman Class. It is a well rounded class. The members represent no one age group, but range from the younger and greener college graduates to the older and wiser veterans. There are men who have already completed professional training, and men who are doing it for the first time. Of the 95 students, two are girls. These two young ladies are to be congratulated for standing up so courageously on the frequent occasions when we men lost sight of the fact that they are not ' just med students. ' We are also unique in the fact that we are the first freshman class to go through the completely revised curriculum. Correlative and oral examinations replaced the older methods. Everyone will agree that the first four months were a harrowing experience and nothing would have been accomplished without the help of a most understanding staff. We also had our share of gaiety too. Class parties were held after exam periods at a nearby fraternity house. Each one would successfully rid himself of all emotions and these affairs showed the class spirit at its fullest. We learned many thousands of facts, and a great many concepts in this unforgetable year. Most important of all, we gained some small insight into what it means to be a doctor. l.ejt to richt: Row I: Fortune Odeiul ' hal, Arthur Jasion, Mervin Trail, Stanley Scliockef. Arthur Serpirk. Jack Lewis, Donald Lewis, Thonis K. 0 " Rourk, Jr.. Nicholas I ' ace. Row 2: William Falls. Joseph Nataro, Donald R. McWillianis. Ferdinand G. Mainolfi. Lee Russo, Donald Courts, James Durkin, William Rhea, Ralph Natale. Row 3: Isadore Ances, Bernard J. McManus, Paul Koukoulas, Robert Varner, Robert Young, Milton Cole, Straty Economon, William O ' Malley, Salvatore DeMarco, Charles Fletcher, Robert Daw- son, Daniel Kin;:. Richanl Lang. Trotter, Fred Ihelmson, Walter ; Ramon Ross, Asreal, Robert FRESHMAIV CLASS OFFICERS Left to right: Front Row; Richard Lang, Secretary . . . John Coursey, Student Council, 2 yr. Back Row; Hans Wilhelnison — Vice President, Donald Lewis — Treasurer, Jose Morales — Student Council, 1 yr., Jack Lewis — President. 47 Frank H. J. Figge. Pli.D Professor oj Anatomy AMTDMY Gross Anatomy has traditionally been the medical school ' s greeting to the freshman stu- dent . . . and so it was to us. We acquired cadavers, dissecting kits, and a box of bones. Although we missed Dr. Uhlenhuth and his famous " Was ist your name? " we enjoyed the varied talents of Dr. Vernon Krahl, asso- ciate Professor of Anatomy, and his associ- ates. Dr. Karl Meek, Dr. Robert McCafferty, and Dr. Gladys Wadsworth. We committed to memory much of the sub- ject matter with the of some classical mnem- onics which cannot be conmiitted to print here, but one of Avhich was " viva Maryland! " for the brachial plexus. We can also joyously recall a fascia splitting safari into the depths of the pelvis. " Now, Sobotta says. A tense monirnt. When things were dull there were diverting little table quiz- zes. Completely relaxed and con- fident we approached the mid- term and final examinations. On lithotomy day tlie feminine members of the class were offi- cially initiated into the fraternity of medicine. Even our best friends could tell that even though we had left the lab behind, the scent lingered on. We discovered that anomalies to the rule are the rule, and that fascia can serve as a fine fac- simile of a nerve in time of need. Those of us lucky enough to come up with the more emaci- ated cadavers could laugh as our other classmates struggled. Dr. McCaferty demonstrates skeletal structure. c ♦ V ' v « " You see, it IS here, " says Dr. Kralil. «M - Dr. Holbrook supervises perineal incisions. .«l ? alle Nauta, PhD, Professor of Neuroanatomy. HISTOLOGY IVEUROAMTOMY Under Dr. Frank H. J. Figge we acquired concepts of the primary organizer theory and otlier basic prin- ciples of Histology and Embryology. Tliese were re- ceived in our daily progress notes as were the drawings of slides. An ardent advocate of audiovisual aids Dr. Figge showed numerous films. These were valuable, for with- out them we could have never gotten our much needed sleep. During the course there were well timed practicals including a grand finale panorama which featured fifteen well chosen slides . . . one of which, a dorsal root ganglion, became an ovary for the few short minutes it was viewed. We were exposed to the art of being brief in our answers, especially to such questions as " Discuss your concept of the human body " in twenty words or less. Histology is now taught l)y Dr. Mack since Dr. Figge has moved to the head in tlie Anatomy department. In Neuroanatomy, which is now under llie direction of Dr. Walle Nauta, we disected the brain and memo- rized the spinal cord at various levels only to find that it is one of tlie most difficult subjects to retain. Despite comments to the contrary. Neuroanatomy and its asso- ciated clinical subjects will forever remain a mystery to most members of the class. You must know the normal, first. Tahle conference. Peep Show. Egad, a fecalith! Dr. Mack describes the finer points, ADOTOXSIH 1 ■ " rrTrasasr ri m " r. I EMIL G. SCHMIDT Professor of Biological Chemistry Measure exactly BIDCHEMISTHY To enter the Emljden-Myerhoff scheme or the Krebs cycle? . . . that was th e question. Brandishing test tube we titrated and boiled, strained and filtered, but our reactions were not always according to the book. We were introduced to the fine art of the " finger stick " — and many white coats have the marks of those first attempts at blood sugar determination. BUN, NPN, — all seemed so far fetched at the time, but later became an important part of hospital procedure. It has become increasingly more apparent just how important these tests are. Under the direction of Dr. Eniil Sclimidt and his asso- ciates, Dr. Herbst and Dr. VanderLinde, we were led through the fields of metajjolism, endocrinology, physical chemistry, and many otlier facets that continue to be useful now. We were also given the annual lecture by Dr. Summerson on electrophoresis of blood, a field which is coming to the fore with each passing year. In retrospect, this department was one of the finest in our preclinical years . . . lioth for content and presentation. Here ' s a funny one, muses Dr. Vanderlinile, tlic aullior of the te?t. Made it the first time! Crystal gazing. But the answer was here! Needs a little more Scotch! ■ % ' WILLIAM RUTHRAUFF AMBERSON Ph.D., Professor of Physiology PHYSIOLOGY Our association with the department of Physiology will be rememhered not only for the high calibre of the instruc- tion, but for the unique treatment of students with humanity and dignity. Dr. Amberson, Professor of Physiology, introduced us to the axon of the Giant Squid in the Neurophysiology section as well as keeping us informed on the activities at Woodshold Biological Station where he spends his summers. Dr. Dietrich Smith lectured on endocrinology and Dr. Ferguson ' s lucid lectures on the kidneys and heart were espe- cially appreciated. The laboratory work covered a wide range from mam- malian experiments to artificial respiration. BMR ' s to map- ping peripheral fields of vision. We usually smoked ourselves more than our kymograph drums and spent many a frus- trating hour trying to canulate the carotid artery. However, the visualization of the living organism in action for the first time was well worth the effort spent. An experiment under way. This is the basal state? Get the stimulator ready. t Ml DIETRICH CONRAD SMITH, Ph.D. Professor of Physiology and Associate Dean Now here is how to put the patient into the circuit. Instruction at the table. -r ' 55 - - ILL ... Left to right: Seated: Goldberg, Taylor, Parker, Damni, Holmes, D. Levin, Kelsh, Manger, Rohl. Standing, front: Swanson, Sheppard, Bachur, Flynn, H. Levin, Karpa, Fislikin, Orth, Mead, Delli-Pizzi, Tilles. Standing, back: Reeder, Friedlander, Mul- vanez, Cope, Bloom, Rauh, Ortel, Keller, Kriz, Ottinger, Mclnerney, Merindino. SDPHOMDHE CLASS CASE HISTORY OF THE SOPHOMORE CLASS. Chief complaint: Emotional Stenosis. Present Illness: Pressure atrophy of the cortex . . . gradual assumption of new attitude . . . advisors at last! BMR recommendations to sleepy students . . . spasmatic bouts of: " Can ' t find that macula " ... ice cream boxes . . . RAVOCAINE! . . . pursuit of the manic pigeon . . . " Schmutzdecke " ' . . . various and sundry organisms . . . flying mice . . . cannulations of capillaries . . ,. our first " real " patients. And then there was, " I can ' t draw this very well, but you know what I mean ' . . . Gubernaculum ... it don ' t come through, gentleman! Get out slide 2, 34.5, 4. ' 8 and describe what you see . . ,. medical students . . . disease, real and unreal . . . Sure! they ' re watching you from behind thai window. Best Seller: " Dora and the Rat-man " . . . chronic blood loss . . . science or finance . . . " You have a connnent to make, BOY! . . . " Where is your tie? ' the military touch? Junior " rock and roll " garb . . . short white coats . . . stethoscope first plateau Past History: Acute idolization . . . condition has now cleared . . . William ' s Syndrome Operations: Total resection of interior of wallet . . . anatomical tatoos . . . now removed. Allergy: Two hour lectures . . . manifestation: steatopygia Diagnosis: " Sophisticated Fools. " dirty white coats . . . stateboards . . . the 56 SDPHDMDRE CLASS OFFICERS Left to right: Standing; Sheppard, Searles, Parker, Taylor. Kneel- ing; Hale, Flynn. Left to right: Seated: Robl, Bronstein, Goldstein, Filar, Caplan, Cranley, Weyn, Perez-Sanliago, Marshall. Standing, 1st: Curtis, Hecht, Wolfe, Potash, Maron, Zimmerman, Diener, Berg, Brager, Baumgardner, Bartlett, Cushner, Searles. Standing, back: Tyer, Hale, Zieve, Mailman, Ward, Farb, Kelso, Hichen, Donovan, Aton, Harshey, Erichson, Clark, Burke, Berman. Not Present: Alex- ander, Day, Fitch, Gee, Greene, Hall, Johnson, Litofsky, McDonald, Moore, Silberstein, Sutton. i CHARLES WISSMAN, Ph.D. Professor oj Microbiology Most fingers are gram negative. MICHOBIDLOGY Under the astute direction of Dr. Frank Haclitel and his staff, we were introduced to the microscopic world of bacteria. It was during this part of our sophomore year that many of us developed ulcers, colitis, and anxiety neuroses from the frequent impossible quizes. At the end of the day there were many gram stained and not-too-actively motile embryobacteriologists with eyes weak from frying to decide whether or not the cuhure tuije contained acid or tlie gas forming organism. Our final week included what probably stands as the world ' s shortest, most intensive, course in mycology. Although feeling like candidates for a Ph.D. in " Bug- ology, " we all weathered the storm and can now appre- ciate most of tlie maze of knowledge. We were well drilled in the basic transmission of disease . . . Fingers, Flies, and Fomites . . . and learned about incubation periods, immunization, and allergy. Many of us became very unfondly adherent to the cul- ture media placed before us, ])ut finally we were able to " plate out " anything that Howed. Dr. Steers administering aid. 58 Like many other departments. Bacteriology has under- gone a change. It is now titled Microbiology and headed by Dr. Charles Wisseman, Jr., a graduate of Southwest- ern Medical School in 1946. He has been particularly active in the field of Rickettsial diseases and has written many papers on the subject. Before leaving we would like to offer our thanks to Dr. Hachtel with a farewell wish for his continued health and happiness. Staff observes student ' s technique. Preparing the inoculum. 59 PATHOLOGY HUGH RAYMOND SPENCER, M.D. Projessor of Pathology Witli a groundwork of normal histology and physiology we Legan tlie study of the changes brought about by disease. During our sophomore year we received a series of lectures and laboratory periods dealing witli microscopic pathology. Inflammation and repair of tissue were stressed as basic to the understanding of pathologic changes. Although we needed " speed-o-graph " to cope with some of the lectures, and the required drawings in the lab proved that we were no Rem- brandts, it was basic and valuable instruction which we were soon to appreciate when facing clinical problems. As juniors we studied gross pathology utilizing specimens from the departments museum. We learned Nieman-Pick ' s Disease, Hemochromatosis, flea bitten kidneys, and . . . " When in doubt, call it Cloudy Swelling! " Correlations were made between microscopic pictures and clinical syndromes. We were required to attend a number of autopsies and write clinical pathologic discussions of these cases. The final prac- tical exam was especially memorable. Dr. Hugh Spencer, Professor of Pathology, is noted for his selection of cases for the departmental CPCs given on Satur- day mornings. Many a clinician has bitten the dust or risen to the heights during these most enjoyable periods. Among the instructors in the dejjartment were Dr. Dexter Reinian, Jr., Dr. John Wagner, Dr. Turner, and Dr. Wright. THIMK! . . Dr. Goldstein in G-U Pathology. The writing rush! A Session with the slides. CPC li M 61 Hi " " m i 11 u • i by PMHM ICDLDGY ' ■ - gfaa i JOHN CHRISTIAN KRANTZ, Jr. M.S., Ph.D. Professor of Pharmacology. The theatre ' s loss was medicine ' s gain in the person of Dr. John C. Krantz, Jr.. Profes, or of Pharmacology and well known pnhlic speaker. His careful! v delivered lecture series, including Metchnikoff ' s conversation with Louis and William Withering ' s investigation of the purple fo.xglove, have earned the title of the " Hour of Charm. " We hrushed up our rusty Latin and practiced Avriting prescriptions . . . struggled con erting grains to mgm. " How many drops in a dram? " Having been admon- ished to learn the mechanisms of action oidv to discover in our fust quiz that dosages were important too. hi the laboratory we performed a variety of experi- ments demonstrating the actions of conmionly used drugs. Also during eacli laboratory period four of us faced by four jjrofessors tried to juggle teacups and questions sinuiltaneously in the institution of the " Tea Party. " We received lectures and laboratory assistance from Dr. Cave, Dr. Burgeson, and other members of the department.. We turned actors for an afternoon during the filming of a short feature concerned with narcotic addiction and produced liy Dr. Krantz. Besides its teaching duties, the department is engaged in an active research program. Searching for the " .Magna Therapia Stprilizans! " ' t iiii Dig that crazy cat! » THE HELD OF 0BS£RV riON CHANCL F»ORS (My M Mil© WHICH IS WBWflO Preparing for the experiment. The tea party ! ! 63 MILTON S. SACKS. M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine The lecture period. The specimens you receive today CLIMC IL PATHOLOGY Enough initials to Lewilder a New Dealer much less a poor sophomore — we met them all from RBC to BUN via MCV and AG. We admired Endamacha coli and taenia saginata, searched for elusive Filaria bancrofti and Schis- tosama, performed tests on every secretion and excretion of man. Beside the laboratory work we received a series of lucid lectures lay Dr. Milton Sachs on the anemias and leukemias. Dr. Marie Andersch introduced us to the biochemical tests that were to jjecome a part of every working day in the next few years. In the laboratory Dr. Band and Miss Hcllen were always ready to help us. Orientation time. OTTO CHARLES BRANTIGAN, M.D. Professor of Thoracic Surgery, Clinical Surgery, and Surgical Anatomy. You read and I ' ll dissect. SURGICAL AMTDMY Pencils ready . . . GO!! ... as Dr. Otto Branigan and his competent staff present a full scale Surgical Anatomy course in just a few minutes less than it takes the racing student to finish it. Find the bony landmark, check peripheral pulse; paint your partner red or hlue, whichever one you choose to do. . . . Review the body structure, do a spinal tap; try an appendectomy, keep the body wrapped! But at long last we had done it . . . reviewed every stitch of gross anatomy and made all the incisions in the book. We were tired and bushed — you can bet on that, but there wasn ' t a man among us who didn ' t agree . . . we certainly learned a lot! Instruction at the table. y ,s w ThcBfiimonHi -x|.l il« of llir " Mon ill While " :i li-iil l -«l ill llio iiiovics, llicaUTs, Irlc i- ' ioii, iiikI novels ;ire «|iii ' k- Iv Hiseovereil I " be a shiini by ihc new eliiiiral sliideiil. Hoiiliiie becomes an integral pari of his life. Histories and physicals, lab work and requisitions serve to temper the once raw enthusiasm and give him a more sober outlook at his future in Medicine. JUIVIDH CLASS MENTAL STATUS— CLASS OF 1957 1. Appearance and Behavior: Sell-clressed in short white jacket with gray flannels — ambulatory with a somewhat perplexed look on face — often noticed sleeping while sitting down. Attitude: Reacts well to situations, extremely friendly toward nurses. Behavior: Up at odd hours throughout the night — moves about constantly. Occasionally noted pulling hair while staring through microscope. 2. Stream of Talk: Coherent and accelerated with occasional punning. Responds to questions with some hesitancy and misgiving, depending on question. 3. Emotional Reaction: Extremely variable, ranging from extreme elation at Saturday noon to gross depression jMondav morning with tremors noticed at times. 4. Thought Content: Examii)h(ji)ia is evident, accompanied by doubts, anxiety and extreme mental anguish. There is a compulsion to wash hands quite frequently while at work and there is a tendency to indulge in alcohol at leisure. Voices are heard shouting, " Domination is the only way " and odd round gray structures containing glittering particles are seen by the patient in 3C lab. There are no thoughts of grandeur of feelings of unreality although there is a feeling that the brain is dead at times. Time passes unusually rapid and there is the feeling that 1957 may not be too far away after all. 5. Sensoriuni and Perception: Occasional confusion as to day and date. Recognition of nurses extremely acute. Consciousness is apparently normal although there are frequent bouts of drowsiness from 8:00 to 9:00 a.m. Comprehension is average — once attention is obtained. 6. Mental Grasp and Capacity: Remote events such as dance and holiday dates are easily remembered. There is a marked loss of recall in the field of anatomy. Ability to compare facts and ideas is excellent. There is a phenomenal ability to differentiate between married and single females, 85 and 75, and alcohol and water. IMPRESSION: Normal Junior Medical Student. First row, left to right: Hanashiro, Rt-vcr, Lerner, Stringliam. Raliegh, Macpk, Poland, Zullo. Hickman. Second row. leit to right: Wilner, Oliveras, Stang, Lynch, Moomau, . ' Spencer, M. J., Mullan, Spencer, M. G.. Shaw, C. P., Nastlor, Nisnik, Shapiro. Quinones, Levin, Spence. Third row, left to right: Laster, Wilson, Lentz, Robinson, Kenneily, Melhop, Todd, Restivo, Rairiegh, Plugge, Berger, Shear, Laughlin, Trupp, Simmons, Ojipegard, Largey, Young, HoUlefer, Schwartz. r First row, left to right: Kronlhal. Gauthier, Kahn, Cohen. Beeby, Aflandilian, Berger. Second row: Jelenko. Boiizoukis. Bormel. Dean, Butt. Garcia, Hamblin, Bulkeley, Balco, Arons. Third row, left to right: Kogan, Calciano, Ericcson, Hammond, Lansinger, Conway, Jones, Ho, Gerber, Fiocco, Engnoth, Gilniore, Brooks, Bucy, Cameron, Hettleman, Holdefer, Henderson, Raliegh. % u : - JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS Second row, left to right: Plugge — Secretary, Bulkeley — President, Oppegard — Vice President, Todd — Historian. First row, left to right: Laugblin — Student Government Representative, Mullan — Student Government Representative. 69 MEDICmE 9 THEODORE E. WOODWARD, M.D. Professor of Medicine m Dick Plumb and Irv Pollack discuss therapy while Harry Ross prepares for next patient. Headed by Dr. Theodore E. Woodward and upheld by a staff of devoted physicians, the Depart- ment of Medicine offers one of the finest opportunities for learning in the entire clinical curriculum. As a Junior one lives the life of a clinical clerk; the seniors are acting interns. As students of the suljject of Internal Medicine, ward work and didactic teaching methods are combined to shape a living picture of moving pathology as seen I)y the eye, touched by the hand, and heard by the ear. The first exposure to a living, breathing human patient is often as shaking to the novice as his first introduction to a colder and less livid counterpart during the early days of his freshman year. The clinical clerk is a brave man, for he is armed only with material written in texts and pro- tected merely by the shallow (lc|)tli of his newly laundered white coat. He is a picture of insecurity, a statue with too tiianv lhimii)s, as, armed with stethoscope and sphig, he approaches his first patient. The delicate balance between })artial solenmity and expectant spasm in which the student of Medicine normallv exists is sometimes converted into a fibrillating nightmare. A short j)hrase spon- taneously delivered from his overseeing staff reminds him that he has been requested to deliver a " Case presentation. " The senior, now an accuiiiplislicd clinician, bungles witli a polished air as he administers to his charges. The end result is the growth of a steady flying binl from what was previously a fledgling sparrow . . . and who will leave these halls to become a fledgling again in his attempt to someday attain the agility of an eagle. _- Paul Slater in OPD lab. Dr. Lisansky and Dr. Woodward review a case. Just like a mosquito bite. " Mr. Sebastian Wutaheluvanaymthisiz . . . Jr CHARLES VAN BUSKIRK, M.D. Professor oj Neurology. A good D-P rolalion liip. Ginny Truitt adjusting irrigation belli r ' C7-. JOHN M. DENNIS, M.D. Projessor of Roentgenology. HADIDLOGY Indispensible to every branch of medicine, the Xray has become one of our most valued diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In almost every service a weekly xray conference is held corrolating clinical findings with radiologic change. Ward instruction is also aimed in the same direction. The department of Radiology at the Uni- versity of Maryland is headed by Dr. John M. Dennis who is ably assisted by Dr. Charles Davidson, Dr. Robert Boudreau, and Dr. Harvey Startzman. An active radiotherapy division is headed by Dr. Bloedorn. During our two months at BCH in our junior year lectures on basic xray technique and reading are given with a supplement of fluoroscopy and its dynamics. In our senior year a week of i ntensive teaching in all phases is given covering all phases of the subject. These are presented at University Hospital. IMB «-i Wi A HlBV H K_A 3 L. 1 W% w ' s illli ■ . ' 1 J k 1, Dr. Boudreau moniters a film session. Take a deeper breath, please. JACOB ELLIS FINESINGER, M.D. Professor of Psychiatry. PSYCHIATRY The class of 1956 was the first to receive the full impact of the growing psychiatric orientation at Maryland. Headed by Dr. Jacob Finesinger and staff, it proved to be a course that was completely different. Featuring group discussion and case presentation, it was frequently accepted or rejected with frank emotion. Surrounded with the traditional memo- rization of medical school, here was a department that chal- lenged us to think and test for ourselves — to see our patients not only as animated anatomy and biochemical reactions, but as people with thoughts and emotions deeply influencing physiologic functions. Constant emphasis was placed on this viewpoint, not merely for those interested in Psychiatry, but for each to utilize daily, be his interest General Practice or Neuro- surgery. Teaching us to deal with the " whole patient " was the aim. But above all were to understand and have respect for the patient ' s feelings. During the first two years stress was placed on establish- ing a good Doctor-Patient relationship and good interview technique. In our junior and senior years visits to Sheppard Pratt, Spring Grove, Springfield, and the Psychiatric Institute at University Hospital introduced us to the management of the psychotic and severely neurotic patient. We saw demon- strations of insulin and electroshock therapy. Also we had the opportunity of working in the new Comprehensive Medicine Clinic. The concept ot tlie " Whole Patient. ' Learning in small groups. The Rohrshock test. f- DERMATOLOGY HARRY M. ROBINSON, JR., M.U. Frofessor of Dermatology. Inspection under the ' ood " s Light. Without question tlie department of Derma- tology is one of the more colorful aspects of our medical education. Headed by Dr. Harry Robin- son. Jr. and including Dr. R. C. V. Robinson, Dr. Bundick. Dr. Ellis, Dr. Hollander, and Dr. Zeligman, it represents a department of varied opinion and presentation. The stress on morphologic diagnosis caused many of us to go about muttering at most in- appropriate times, " Few to mimerous. discrete to confluent, well defined to ill defined, pink to red. macular to papular distributed on the face, neck, trunk, and extremities. " During our senior year our interest was spurred by a series of daily quizes. Anyway we can now tell Tinea capitis from Pityriasis Rosea ... if there ' s a Wood ' s light handy. The department also presented a series of lectures on the yenereal diseases. At the students ' request. Dr. Robinson, Jr. gaye a seminar on treatment of the more common skin disorders — something which has been grossly lacking in past years. Now each time we pass the detergent counter in the grocery store, we bow our heads in soleum thanksgiying for the new breath they have given our dermatologists. Herb Marton observes derraatograpiiia. This skin condition is characterized by . . " These are classic examples of A rose by any other name. And, by all means, DON ' T talk to the patient. 77 PEDIATRICS J. EDMUND BRADLEY, M.D. Professor oj Pediatrics. The Department of Pediatrics has a long reputation for being academically well organized. The juniors as well as the seniors have access to the teaching cases. We would tear ourselves away from the chil- dren ' s TV and pick our way through the scattered toys to meet our new patients. Our friendships usually ended abruptly when we did our routine heel-stick. Daily seminars were also held by the members of the house staff. P 1 . : Ted Carski working up a patient in Clinic. ii., ir.-« 78 As Seniors we worked in the Pediatric OPD vali- antly treating the cold, the common cold, the very common cold interspersed with a few cases of diar- rhea. We used vitamins and nose-drops in amazing quantities. With ten babies crying in unison we had a perfect symphonic background for our auscultatory efforts. We assisted in the Well-Baby Clinic juggling ounces of milk with tablespoons of carbohydrate and learned to give the DPT shots and vaccinations. Visits to the seizure, cardiac, and child guidance clinics were included in the program. We also spent some time in the newborn nursery becoming ac- quainted with the new arrivals. Dr. J. Edmund Bradley, as head of the department, has done much to develop the service to its present calibre. We remembered with fondness also Dr. Kay McGrady, Dr. Raymond Clemmens, Dr. A. H. Finkel- stein, Dr. Samuel Bessman, and the entire staff of residents. All were very helpful during our associa- tion with the department. Carl Jelenko presents. Frank Bellomo checks another. PAUL RAYMOND HACKETT, M.D. Associate Professor of Anesthesiology. AMESTHESIDLDGY Acting Department Head, Dr. Paul Hackett, capably undertook the running of the Depart- ment of Anesthesia early in 1946, replacing Dr. Robert Dodd. As Junior students we had a course of lectures in the subject at BCH, and as Seniors spent a week as " anesthetic aids " in the operating rooms. The necessity of the patent airway and how to attain and maintain it were reviewed and fully discussed. When to use local, when to use general? Keep them light, keep them deep? Squeeze the bag, let it go! pass the tube, pull it out! Check respi- ration, pulse, blood pressure, and eye signs. How do you know where the patient is? You never know just how difficult it is to fol- low an unconscious patient! Brealhing for the patient. Explaining the " gas " machine. SURGERY .:itt ' ROBERT W. BUXTON, M.D. Professor of Surgery Our association with the surgical department has been a close and instructive one over the last three years. We were first exposed to the elementary principles by Dr. Thurston Adams in our sophomore year. Perhaps the most important fundamental we learned — aside from the care and recognition of infection and vascular disorders — was punctuality. In our junior year came the memorable lecture series by Dr. Harry Hull, perhaps the best organ- ized series of instruction in our short medical Harry, Ed, Marsh and Bob inspect a setup in traction. Calm Ix-dirc llic storm. ■ ' ' dl MONTE EDWARDS, M.D. Professor of Proctology. THURSTON R. ADAMS, M.D. Assistant Professor of Surgery. career. Each lecture was prefaced by an " eye opener " which added a certain amount of stimulus to the early hour. At Baltimore City Hospital we were exposed to a series of lectures and ward rounds for eight long weeks. It was also in this year that many of us did our first bit of surgery on Mr. Kaynyn Dogge — a rather important patient to whom we owe the greatest respect for the part he played in our medical education. Our night duty in the Accident Room was an educational experience in more fields than medi- cine, especially on Saturday nights. Our Senior year marked the beginning of a new regime at UH with a new department head, the very competent and intelligent Dr. Robert W. Buxton, from University of Michigan. Although thoroughly familiar with the field of Thoracic Surgery he is mainly concerned with the teaching and practice of General Surgery and the basic principles associated with it. Through his efforts the art of diagnostics became as important as the operative procedures performed. Dr. Harry C. Hull, Professor of Clinical Surgery, makes Rounds with Senior students. This is recovery . . . ? 83 Dr. Shepard iiijtructing Junior Class group in Surgery Clinic. Hirsch King and Al Kanner before Chiefs Rounds. ■ ' Let ' s make the classical Y-shaped incision. " ' But, men, you just can ' t cut out the brain. " 11 [ - OBSTETRICS and GYNECDLDGY ' m The liistory of the growth and development of the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at University Hospital has been progressive and dra- matic. This year marked an important milestone — the consolidation of both departments into one under the professorship of Dr. Arthur Haskins who succeeded Dr. Louis H. Douglas, Professor of Obstetrics, and Dr. Mason Hundley, Professor of Gnyecology. He previously received his training at St. Louis Maternity and Barnes Hospitals and was Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecol- ogy at Washington University School of Medicine. Our Gynecologic careers began when we were Sophomores with a series of lectures by Dr. Diehl and Dr. Hundley which continued into the junior year. As Seniors we spent two weeks on the GYN Al Trucker studies pelvimetry. I f-«r ARTHUR L. HASKINS, M.D. Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Pilot to control tower. service working in the clinics, wards, and in the OR under the supervision of Dr. Haskins, Dr. Diehl. Dr. Cornbrooks, Dr. Gardner, and staff. Perhaps one of the most valualde experiences was our visit to the Oncology Clinic where we became aware of the importance of biopsy and smear. Dr. Reese ' s Obstetrics lectures also began in our sophomore year. These were a pleasant and educa- tional iiUroduction to a ' " fruitful " ' field. In our junior year we received didactic lectures, manikin clinics, and a first experience with the night vigil. Then to the senior year and memories of BCH ... as if we could ever forget! New patient . . . pant like a puppy . . . two hours of sleep a night (?) ... fingertip . . . RUSH! ... no sleep ... pit drip . . . BOA! ( K. Dr. Brinkley sliows how a cord is tie d. It won ' t be Ion " now. Intermission. 86 f-l - " Eating watermelon seeds, honey? ' Bill Pickett in pre-natal check. nid mUm ii n iiiiiwi •MmnJ- ' - ' ' ' ' " ' ' ' " ' ' ' ' " ' Marsh Franklin demonstrates Leopold ' s maneuvers. w jsaaaia SlSS ti PCFC mmm Tote Board. 87 The conviviality and harmonious per- formance of a job are but another facet in developing a well rounded personality ill the future physician. Serving on com- mittees, approaching the faculty, and the general handling of student affairs keeps the interested student busy during many of his free hours. Fraternities, too, play a largo part, by not only sponsoring enierlainnient, but also guest lecturers and seminars. ROD CAMERON Nu Sigma Nu FRANK SCHWARTZ Phi Lambda Kappa WARREN POLAND Plii Lambda Kappa IRVIN POLLACK Pbi Delta Epsilon, Chairman JOE DEAN Nu Sigma Nu GEORGE LENTZ Phi Beta Pi HOWARD SIEGAL I ' hi Deha Eiisilon JIM ATON Phi Beta Pi In the Spring of 1955 it became apparent lo llie fialcinilics of the Medical School that each would hencfil jircatly from closer coopcralioii and exilianjic ol ideas with each other. It was in this spirit tliat representatives from Phi Deha Kjjsiion. I ' hi iJeta I ' i. Plii i.and)da Kappa, and Nu Sigma Nu met and planted the organizational seed of the liilcifiatcniilv ( onncil. During the Spring and Summer of 1955 |)laiis were made lor tiie I ' ollowing school year with paitiridar emphasis on a coordinated Freshman rushing |)rogram. At the opening of school the IFC was represented at the Freshman Orientalidii I ' rogram. In its earlier meetings, imder the chairmanship ol lr in Pollack, tlie Conslilution of the new organization was acci ' j)tcd hy tlie mcmiicr fialernitics. ( ' oordination in tiic |danning of social and scientific events was successfully accomplished, and the hrst year ol the Inter- Fraternity Council was culminated by the Annual IFC I.cclmcship. 90 ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA Seated l-r: H. Wilson, V.-Pres., Arthur Haskins, M.D., faculty advisor, R. Belgracl, President, P. Laughlin, Secretary-Treasurer. Standing l-r: R. Cameron, J. Castellano, R. Muth, W. Rappaport, R. Burningham, R. Myers, D. Lansinger. " Worthy to serve the sufFering " — this is the pledge of Alpha Omega Alpha, Honor Medical Society. Beta of Maryland is one of seventy two chapters active in medical colleges of the United States and Canada. This is a non-secret society, membership to which is based on scholarship, moral qualification and future promise in medicine. Founded in 1902 during a revolutionary era in medical education, the organization has supported and encouraged improvement in medical teaching through the years. Installed at the University of Maryland in 1949, AOA is a progressive, growing society with an active student and faculty membership. Its aim has been to foster in the minds of graduates as well as underclass- men, the ideals of scholarship, moral integrity, professional aptitude and leadership, encourage an interest in research and clinical investigation, and enhance relations between students and faculty. This year, under the able guidance of Dr. J. Edmund Bradley and Dr. Arthur Haskins, the group ' s program has included two banquet meetings, two lectureships and a student scientific symposium. In order to emphasize the importance of the medical profession as an integral part of American society, AOA has chosen its speakers, from not only physicians, but also from non-medical personalities. Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of the University of Maryland addressed the group on " What kind of College Education for the Premedical Student, " and Mr. Frank Branch Riley, well-known author and lecturer spoke on " A Lawyer looks at the Doctor. " The student research paper selected for presentation at the scientific symposium in Gordon Wilson Hall v;ere by Charles Sanislow, Nicholas R. Bachur and Raymond E. Swanson. Richard Belgrad, Harry D. Wilson, Jr., and C. Patrick Laughlin served as President, vice-President and Secretary-Treasurer, respectively during 1955-56. 91 U SIGMA M The year 1956 represented tlie 53rd con- secutive year for the oldest and largest fra- ternity on campus, the Beta Alpha chapter of Nu Sigma Nil. Starting off the first week, Nu Sigs extended their welcome to tlie freshmen, our new " frates in altes altissima, " with a series of stag smokers followed by a mixer We wel- comed the faculty freshmen at the annual Reception for New Faculty Members and Department Heads, which is an established tradition with Nu Sigs. The first semester of the year swept the 23 pledges into the rigors of " all " anatomy, and the sophomores into petri dishes and smoked drums. Buoyed up from this luidertow of new knowledge, the now clinical Juniors and Seniors invited Dr. Woodward and Dr. Meek, to give informal talks illustrating the prac- tical aspects of medicine and surgery. M i M S Barcnet J rt Burwell K J. O Q J C -,1cllaiiqJr J | ' ' » Ctia.lC,Jr ; ! (VAi.tii Ir, rt i vMl,5a R L Wn.lit J OBeanJr- Jk ' H.P.Kosl Kr«iW Rli Cameron Vhrr-, O -O f . ca r f B V. (Ta rh.ir- A r Hammond CM Heniitrtoi. v. " ,ll«. i.f...Jr I ' AMuUilii L I t.. .1. „t ]) V, K i, i-WK.v.r 1,1 .,T y O Oi pi c j. " " J.iJono ai. w.r Hill, 111 J J lUrjh.) J I .M Don. lJ K.b.i Mulvumy K J l iJbl J i . Uvlor Our memorable costume parties. Wild West in October and Nite Club in November, and the open houses after the nied-School dances were fitting preludes to the climax of the Winter Season — The Christmas Dinner and Dance. Fresh studies for a fresh year lasted only until final exams were over, and we let ofl: steam with a blast — consolation and celebra- tion. Surely no one could forget the Pledges ' Party with the shipwreftijlecorations and the - ' 1 ' " Spastic Time " par Academically in sponsored a series history of various such teachers and b Hull, and Dr. Krause shman days, semester N2N lectures on the of medicine by Dr. Savage, Dr. A Founders ' Day Ban- quet and formal dance honoring the Alumni is our traditional approach to modern medical history. St. Patrick and the world ' s hobos were like- wise honored, but at more light-hearted gath- ering. The Senior Party and the Spring Formal rounded out this academic and social program designed to aid in molding physi- cians as well as citizens who are truly — brothers all. X ' U ■ JE ' , i.:?. ••- fpim Howard Siegel Vice-President ir Howard Bronstein Corresponding Secretary Ir vin P. Pollack President OFFICERS, PHI DELTA EPSILON Richard L. Plumb Treasurer Celebrating its Golden Anniversary at our School of Medicine, Delta Epsilon Chapter is proud of its vital role in the activities on the Baltimore campus. The chapter received its local charter in 1906 and this year celebrates its 50th anniversary as the largest medical fraternity at the Uni ersity of Maryland with a membership of more than eighty medical students. The fraternity is honored by the leadership of its members in the Interfraternity Council, the A.O.A., the Committee on Student Affairs, the Student Council, and on the Terrae Mariae Medicus. Among the achievements are fine series of scientific meetings presented this year. Who will forget Doctors Lisansky, Finesinger, Hall,=aiid Krause presenting their views on ' " Should the Patient Be Told? " . Then, too, there vas Dr. t.coijard Scherlis discussing new advances in cardiology. The annual Lectureship was given bjt L );i Ansel Keys of the University of Minne- sota on " The Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease ' . ' ' i To brighten the spirits of the boys there W(ij( ilii |ioiise parties, the smoker at the Variety Club, Carnival night, the delerious New es(4 S | Jjarty, the Conclave dinner-dance at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington and the fin =w5st — the " Golden Senior Farewell " at the Emerson Hotel. One of the outstanding accomplishments of the year was the initiation of tiie " Graduate- Prater Program. " In years to come each frater will have a Phi Delta Epsilon Graduate Club member as an advisor with whom he can establish a personal relationship and from whose practical experience he can benefit. From its founding in 1904 by eight enthusiastic men at Cornell University, Phi Delta Epsilon has expanded year after year until now it is a national organization with a membership of over 10,000 physicians and students and with chapters and graduate clubs at every major medical school throuirhout the United States and Canada. The Uance Dr. Lisansky and Dr. Fine- singer at frat seminar. After the ball is over! ;v; George Richard Belgrad M. Larrie Blue William R. Abeshouse Cohen Marshall Edward Frohlich Bernard Kramer Franklin H. Coleman Scheldon Kress Gerald Maggid Marvin Piatt Gerald Schuster James Stovin Ronald Berger Kramer Harold Hettleman Carljelenko Sidney Lerner Elliott Berg Maurice Berman Gerald Bloom Raymond Caplan Gilbert Cushner Sheldon Barry Goldstein Daniel Levin Harold Roll Adrian Weyn David Abramson Goldgeier O •o ■• Wolfe Adler Gerson Asrael Fred Brown William N. Cohen Ronald Diener Gilbert Feinberg Stanley Felsenberg Jon Glazier Carl Ha lle Marvin Kirsh William Kraut Charles Mailman Lawrence Pinkner Daniel Sax Arthur Serpick Stanley Schocket Stanley Snyder Walter Weinstein Howard Rubenstein PHI BETA PI A proud member of one of the largest and strongest national medical fraternities, the Zeta chapter of Phi Beta Pi also claims local heritage. Established on the campus in 1901. and active here ever since, except during a brief period in World War II, Phi Beta Pi has consistently been prominent in academic, athletic, and social affairs. The fraternity ' s membership includes many faculty i nbers representing a wide range of the various academic departments. The latter, along with several guest sp eafsha e repeatedly treated the group to excellent seminars. Student membership in Phi Beta Pi includes an abundance df campus leaders — Class Presidents. Student Council Presidents, and other class officers. AOA members, Kewnian Club leaders and the TERRA MARIAE MEDICUS Editor. §: ' ' % Phi Beta Pi ' s prominent location at 519 W. l.omhant Street, just across the street from medical school, makes the fraternity easiiv accessible for between class and liini li hour relaxation. The fraternity ' s pine-panelled bar, its piano, phonograph and television set are subjected to frequent use over the weekends. In addition to the usual smokers, parties, seminars and guest speakers, this year ' s activities again included our annual party at Dr. Kardash ' s shore. The Phi Bate ' s lament the graduation of an outstanding senior class, but with a strong force still left, anticipate another active and promising year of social and academic leadership. H. Bongardt R. Headley R. Muth M. Pahiier W. Hersperger J. Littleton J. McLaughlin George Lentz President G. Sowell G.E. Reahl C. Sanislow R. Shaub ;._ i PHI LAMBDA KAPPA Xi chapter of the Phi Lambda Kappa National Medical Fraternity has grown rapidly since its reactivation in 1953. The active programs and goals set by this relatively small group has made its place in the Medical School. This year ' s successes have been academic civicj d. social. With highlights such as lectures of interest to the profession and the layman and a beach party, rocome a smooth functioning organization. Continued help to freshmen with study guides and panel d sc )t ' eminent members of the medical profession have been an integral part of the activities at the house. M able parties — " stag and drag " — enlivened our less academic moments. The summit of our social pra gW the annual formal dinner-dance at the Saxony. We have been able to participate in the newly formed Interfraternity council at school and our national organization by sending well qualified representatives. We were honored by having a national officer selected from our chapter. By wonderful cooperation with the alumni club of this city, we have expanded our outlook to include a new fraternity house and a more extensive program. J. Bouzoukis Franklin Scliwartz President N. Goldberg R. Colfeklt 1 J r H. Nasder W. Poland o X L. Richman M. Shapiro J D. Sheppard G. TiUes C A «s J. Caitellano J. Laughlin • ' " - mih H. Wilson J. Bulkeley R. Flynn P. MuUan President R. Headley J. Taylor ii M. Franklin J. Coursey I- J. Lev J. Morales STUDENT COUNCIL The Student Council as liaison between the student and faculty has diversified functions directed toward the formulation and direction to policies and activities of the student hody as a whole. In accordance with the new By-laws of the organization adopted during this school year, the membership of the Council consists of the President and two rej)resentatives from each class and a representative of the SAMA. The Council meets at regular intervals to consider the many matters that come under its sphere, including the Student Activities Fund, school dances, interclass sports program, student lounge, class elections and other details concerned with all phases of student life and curriculum. This year the Council acted to broaden the scope of its activities not only on a medical school level but also on the University and national levels. The Professional School Senate composed of representatives of the Student Councils of all five Baltimore schools was organized. The charter of this organization pr( ides for coordinated action on matters of mutual concern to all schools and will grant this organization representation in the Student Senate of the University at College Park. Contact on a national basis was made by sending delegates from the Council to the SAMA convention, where problems common to all schools were discussed. The most important respcmsibility of the Student Council is concerned with the advancement of the medical curriculum. The Council coordinates and supervises tli( |)resenlation of the student evaluation of the present curriculum to the faculty and a(lministrati e olficers. The Student Councii-FacuU) Dinner formerly held in the spring of each year was replaced this year by open class meetings at which the class oflicers and representatives |)resented data regarding class evaluation of courses as gathered by a survey of individual members of each class. The department heads were then able to comment on departmental jjolicy. jjlans for the improvement and discuss the feasibility of putting into practice suggestions made by the students through their representa- tives as well as any direct questions from class members present. The sjiirit of cooperation and mutual under- standing demonstrated in these give and take meetings is t pical of the fine Sludenl-I-acult) relationships for which our school has long been noted. 98 William Bartlett, Vice-President: Virginia Truitt, Secretary -Treasurer; Harry Wilson, President; Ramon Roig-Calderon, Freshmen Representative. S. A. M. A. The year 1955-1956 has been a significant one for the Maryland Chapter of the Student American Medical Association. The year was ushered in in the spring of 1955 at the annual SAMA Convention in Chicago where the University of Maryland was most fortunate in having its name on the national SAMA scene by the election of Harry Wilson, Class of 1956, to the office of National Treasurer, by the awarding to Wilbur Pickett, Class of 1956, first prize in the National Blue Shield Essay Contest, and by the well-received showing to the assembled delegates of Dr. John Krantz ' s fine movie, " Drug Addiction — A Medical Hazard. " These events were accompanied by stimulation of interest in the local chapter where a Freshman membership drive resulted in almost ninety per cent membership. Increased Freshman and Sophomore participation in SAMA has been evident throughout the year. Our series of medical films was primarily chosen for these classes. The annual Internship Questionnaires, sent to the Class of 1954, were returned thoughtfully answered and were of some benefit in enlightening this year ' s Seniors. The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland and the school administration were contacted in regard to the possibility of establishing a preceptorship program. Student opinion as revealed by a school-wide poll was overwhelmingly in favor of such a program and more progress in this direction is expected. The SAMA Newsletter for the dissemination of pertinent news and views was inaugurated in February. Its potential for expansion and elaboration is great and it should continue to be a useful medium for the School of Medicine. Beginnings have been initiated for the establish- ment of a student book exchange. In the revised Bylaws of the Student Council the President of SAMA has become a member of that body. The President is also a member of the newly formed Student Activities Committee composed of faculty and students and acting as a coordinating team. At the 1956 SAMA Convention the University of Maryland will be fortunate in having five SAMA members present, thereby assuring an ever-increasing Maryland interest in the Student American Medical Association. Standing: Donald Manger, David Denisch, Dr. Burdelle iNcwton, Jose Quinones. Isl Row: Donald Courts, Clark Holmes, Charles Oppegard. CHRISTIAIV MEDICAL SOCIETY " But that you may know that the Son of man has authority on earth to forgive sins " — He then said to the paralytic — " Rise, take up your bed and go home. " As quoted from the gospel of St. Matthew, the Lord Jesus Christ had hoth purpose and power, as well as compassion in His ministry on earth. Christians throughout the years have sought to accrue these characteristics by getting to know this same God through understanding of Scripture, in prayer, by knowledge in general, and the exchange of ideas. Because of this desire many Christians with similar purpose in the medical profession have organized as the Christian Medical Society. Since its formal beginning in Chicago in 1946 autonomous groups have been initiated in some fifty medical schools with numerous active graduate chapters. Here at Maryland a group has met regularly for the past eleven years. CMS is non-seclarian uitli llic iiiiitv of its mend)crshi|) mainlaincd in ihcir i)e]icf in the Iriinic Cod. Wlio has manifest Himself in His creation and in His revealed Word. In our study and our contact with the broad scope of the patient ' s need, we arc liecoming more aware of the congrnity of what medicine has to offer and the Christ, Who said " I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly. " 100 I SWEAR BY APOLLO THE PHYSICIAN, BY AESCULAPIUS, HYGEIA, AND PANACEA. AND I TAKE TO WITNESS ALL THE GODS AND ALL THE GOD- DESSES, TO KEEP ACCORDING TO MY ABILITY AND MY JUDGMENT THE FOLLOWING OATH: TO CONSIDER DEAR TO ME AS MY PARENTS HIM WHO TAUGHT ME THIS ART; TO LIVE IN COMMON WITH HIM AND IF NECESSARY TO SHARE MY GOODS WITH HIM; TO LOOK UPON HIS CHILDREN AS MY OWN BROTHERS, TO TEACH THEM THIS ART IF THEY SO DESIRE WITHOUT FEE OR WRITTEN PROMISE; TO IMPART TO MY SONS AND THE SONS OF THE MASTER WHO TAUGHT ME AND THE DISCIPLES WHO HAVE ENROLLED THEMSELVES AND HAVE AGREED TO THE RULES OF THE PROFESSION, BUT TO THESE ALONE. THE PRECEPTS AND THE INSTRUCTION. I WILL PRESCRIBE REGIMEN FOR THE GOOD OF MY PATIENTS ACCORDING TO MY ABILITY AND MY JUDGMENT AND NEVER DO HARM TO ANYONE. TO PLEASE NO ONE WILL I PRESCRIBE A DEADLY DRUG NOR GIVE ADVICE WHICH MAY CAUSE HIS DEATH. NOR WILL I GIVE A WOMAN A PESSARY TO PROCURE ABORTION. BUT I WILL PRESERVE THE PURITY OF MY LIFE AND MY ART. I WILL NOT CUT FOR STONE, EVEN FOR THE PATIENTS IN WHOM THE DISEASE IS MANIFEST; I WILL LEAVE THIS OPERATION TO BE PERFORMED BY PRACTITIONERS (SPECIALIST IN THIS ART). IN EVERY HOUSE V HERE I WILL ENTER ONLY FOR THE GOOD OF MY PATIENTS, KEEPING MYSELF FAR FROM ALL INTEN- TIONAL ILL-DOING AND ALL SEDUCTION. AND ESPECALLY FROM THE PLEASURES OF LOVE WITH WOMEN OR WITH MEN, BE THEY FREE OR SLAVES. ALL THAT MAY COME TO MY KNOWLEDGE IN THE EXERCISE OF MY PROFESSION OR OUTSIDE OF MY PROFESSION OH IN DAILY COMMERCE WITH MEN. WHICH OUGHT NOT TO BE SPREAD ABROAD, I WILL KEEP SECRET AND WILL NEVER REVEAL. IF I KEEP THIS OATH FAITHFULLY, MAY I ENJOY MY LIFE AND PRACTICE MY ART, RESPECTED BY ALL MEN AND IN ALL TIMES; BUT IF I SWERVE FROM IT OR VIOLATE IT, MAY THE REVERSE BE MY LOT. Ill iiuMlirnI school, as in every profes- sion and oeeuiialion, all is iiol work. Seliool ilances, elass pienies or a good eani game in ihe loiing are all pari of Ihe ineil sliulenl ' s life. These are ihe limes lo forgel books, journals, histories ami phisieals and just relax — lo ( ' njoy the golden hours, ihal soon, will be no n i NEWS POLITICS ; vmvi% LIBRARY 1 ii ' ii , ' ' ig| .r STUDENT LOUNGE Jb . »m V p T, " ' ■r.t " J .« - T-. M •? - t - ' .% , . V ,- I 9 iC--: : ' ■» vv.: r niTJ. m M 1 mm I Jf t-A . ' 3 w -Ji. 5 Kl ' ' p 1 1 1 V 1 J I 109 «l V- ♦1 kam£hi :t Bill Pickett takes first money of $500 in National SAMA-Blue Shield Contest from Dr. Warren Furey, Judging Chairman. Irv Pollack receiving congratulations from Dean Wylie for winning Grand prizes of 8600 in the 1953 Schering Award Contest. " Miss Conway, " good luck! Ill UMVERSITY TT MARYLAND FLORENCE M. GIPE, R.N., Ed.D. Dean Dean of the School of Nursing of the University of Maryland GRADUATING CLASS SCHOOL OF NURSING 1956 GREETINGS: Just a few years ago, instilled with a high nursing objective and an eagerness to do good for the peoples of the world, you entered the School of Nursing of the University of Maryland. Today, through study, work and perseverance, you are giving evidence that you have achieved your goal. Never in the annals of history is there recorded such a demand as present for luirses who have been prepared to lake their place on a national and international health team, and to help lessen the alllictions of mankind through hiniian understanding. You have been prepared for the field of professional inn sing when new health patterns have evolved: when the function of nursing is also to teach the individual how to help care for himself; when medical science, tluoiigh drug thcrajiN. higher scientific methods of surgery, is demanding an extended nursing knowledge. As you ( iiiliaik upon your career have no fears. The faculty of the School of Nursing has no fears for yon. They feel confident that you, given the opportunity, will stand the test of validity and reliability. Sincerely, Florence M. Gipe Dean FACULTY VIRGINIA CONLEY, R.N., B.S., M.A. Assistant Professor and Assistant to the Dean Baltimore Division Endowed with wisdom and understanding . . . keen sense of judgment . . . foresight and mental poise ... a qualified individual in all nursing spheres . . . dignified appearance . . . problem-solving a speciality ... a shining example to the University, a true University of Maryland graduate nurse . . . studies for Doctorate at University of Pennsylvania during summers — Philadelphia ' s summer resident . . . local home in Guilford . . . music apprecia- tion lays in the realm of symphonies . . . Surely, Miss Conley shall be remembered for her helping hand and her willing guidance in all our undertakings. MARGARET HAYES, R.N., B.S., M.S. Assistant Professor and Advisor of Student Affairs College Park Division As gentle as a summer breeze . . . the image of under- standing . . . restored hope and humor while flooded with problems of freshmen and sophomore nursing students . . . the connecting link between College Park and Balti- more campuses . . . pursued nursing education in Illinois . . . Bachelor of Science degree from Vanderbilt . . . Master of Science degree from Catholic University . . . stressed Medieval nursing to present day methods . . . instilled nursing standards and principles ... a special glint of personality ... a knowing smile ... a willing listener . . . truly a friend. KATHRYN WOHLSEN, R.N., A.B., M.A. Assistant Professor, Community Nursing and Assistant to the Dean The spark of new ideas . . . the gleaming fire of insight . . . " the teacher, the inspiration " ' . . . over-all co-ordi- nator and counselor . . . her guidance unequaled . . . shares a true belief in indi iduals . . . proclamates praise where due . . . acquired education at Western Reserve University, Columbia Lniversitv. and University of Flor- ence . . . armed service experience in North Africa, Italy, and state side . . . genuine sincerity in all undertakings . . . quaint home over-looks Roland Lake . . . lovable miniature schnauzer named Marck . . . public servant . . . currently pursuing her Doctorate in Education at George Washington University . . . the asset of Mrs. Wohlsen ' s glowing warmth shall be remembered forever. FACULTY N ancy P. Anderson Instructor oj Psychiatric Nursing Martha F. Baer Instructor oj Community Nursing Mary K. Carl Associate Professor of Nursing and Chairman, Graduate Program f Tlicrca Fcrnanclt-z Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Nursing Katherine R. Fitzgeralil Instructor of Maternal and Newh am Nursing m f i K 1 m i ■• c l v T Nancy A. Gocke Instructor of Pediatric Nursing tLi j MargUfril " ' Ilyilorn Assistant Professor of Maternal and Newborn Nursing Margaret Paulonis Instructor of Nursing Francis Rccil Assistant Professor of Pediatric Nursing 116 FACULTY Peggy Dashiell Assistant Instructor oj Growth and Development Mary Grotefend Assistant Professor of Nursing sr " Eleanor Slacum Instructor of Nursing Dorothy A. Drew Instructor of Psychiatric Nursing 1 Carol Hosfeld Instructor of Nursing Marcella Z. Davis Instructor of Psychiatric Nursing f Ruth Dyson Assistant Professor of Nutrition Elsie Ho Assistant Professor of Mental Health I Cecelia M. Zitkus Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing 117 ZJo Uki Ulse lAJe Jjedi rJLlj-e id inaeea dath, icaie u nedS Aave when flu lere is urae, i lrae is blinu save when there is hnowteciae, snowtedae is vain Save when there is work, l Uorh is entptu Save when there is love. l Uhen love bechons follow, Jhouah the wau be hard and steep. When uou worh with love i ou bind uourself to uourseij-, ant id to one another, and to KJod. Lyur profession, fursina, is love made visible. m i CLASS 1956 THE FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE PLEDGE I solemnly pledge myself before God and in the presence of this assembly to pass my life in purity and to practice my profession faithfully. I will abstain from whatever is deleterious arid mischievous, and will not take or knowingly administer any harmful drug. I will do all in my power to elevate the stand ard of my profession, and I will hold in confidence all personal matters committed to my keeping, and all family affairs coming to my knowledge in the practice of my calling. With loy- alty will I endeavor to aid the physician in his work, and to devote myself to the welfare of those committed to my care. :: ' « SARAH MAY BARNES B. S. in Nursing Quiet and sedatenes cloak an underlying mischievous nature ... a ready, sympathetic listener . . . willowy, five feet, six inches . . . irridescent blue-green eyes . . . traded her long remembered ' ■ching yon " for pert boyish cut ... a naturalized Baitimorean originally from Connecti- cut .. . conservative bridge player . . . room filled with goodies . . . four cokes a day are a ritual . . . attends meals with Patty between snacks . . . Secretary of Student Government Association . . . Diamondback reporter . . . yearbook staff member . . . surpassing ability with the yarn doesn ' t stop with argyles ... she steadily knits sweaters and stoles . . . Room 744, " A Clean Well-Lighted Place " ' . . . exam nights are spent observing a flick, yet Sarah maintains notable scholarship . . . considers a Masters Degree in Psychiatric Nursing in preparation for an instructor ' s role. LILLIE MAY BAXTER B. S. in Nursing " Lil " ... a dark haired mighty mite of five feet one inch . . . changeable gray-green eyes . . . famous for dissertations on life . . . philoso]jhy . . . " Nothing is impossible " ' . . . alwa s a thoughtful listener . . . versa- tilitv a virtue . . . tireless working co-pilot of the year- book . . . possesses a raucous laugh and endless wit . . . perpetually in motion . . . optimistic zest for living . . . " speak up " . . . basketball team member . . . hails from " Woorshington " . . . deri es inspiration from the sea . . . frequents the theater . . . Alpha Xi Delta social sorority alumna . . . incessanth going on a diet . . . explorer . . . reflections from f sychiatry. Pediatrics, and 4D . . . future plans. Westward IIo. PATRICIA LEELA BEAN B. S. in Nursing A tiny five foot three and one half inch ball of energy . . . has a million things to do . . . her long flowing tresses resist all scissors . . . brown eyes that snap when she gives forth . . . has weakness for shoes and formals . . . nursing major . . . bacteriology minor . . . notorious practical joker . . . her future sounds exciting . . . per- haps, overseas nursing or imrsiiig in a Western college . . . whoopee, a rebel from Front Royal. Virginia, heads West to rope a staff position in Obstetrics or Operating Room ... six no trump bridge bidder . . . basketball guard . . . member of Diamondback and yearbook com- mittees ... in between snacks Pat goes to meals . . . original jargon . . . inseparable companicjn is Sarah. 120 BARBARA ANN BIEHL B. S. in Nursing One of Frederick, Maryland ' s prides . . . " Barb " . . . bubbles . . . bangles . . . and beads . . . genuine smile and a contagious laugh . . . never lost her love for the College Park Campus . . . Glee Club . . . Louisa Parson ' s Club . . . Lutheran Student Association . . . Sunday School teaching fills spare moments . . . Canasta cohort . . . understanding, sensibility, and sincerity characterize her . . . willing hand and lending ear to classmates . . . " Who is ready for a snack? .... I am starved. " . . . pizza parties a preference . . . one girl in sixty who sips water during coffee break . . . headed for the Obstetrical or Medical fields of nursing;. SHIRLEY JANE BRAMBLE " Janie " comes to us as a Trailway ' s traveler from the Eastern Shore . . . " ) ou all " ... a capable leader in Glee Club activities . . . solo rendition of popular ditties are her specialty ... a dead-shot forward on University ' s basketball team . . . the barber of the nurses ' residence . . . known as a Charleston instructor and excels in ball- room dancing . . . tall, trim and always well groomed . . . peaches and cream complexion . . . convulsive laugh accompanies magnificent sense of humor . . . tax collector of senior class . . . " Girls, would you like to put a down payment on your class dues? ' " . . . apt with a needle on her own creations . . . plans to enter a specialized field of nursing after advanced professional training. MARY HELEN BRANAN A vibrant personality touched with subtle humor . . . born comedienne . . . turns up at unpredictable places and hours . . . flashlight, record players, and disturbing the peace . . . would rather sit up all night and chat than sleep, then spend the next day in bed . . . dark tresses crown her oval face . . . sweeping " pony tail " ... a long legged lassie with an undefineable gait . . . Mary, an asset to every party . . . mellow moods ... " A Thousand and One Nights " . . . " Wait until 1 tell you what hap- pened! ' . . . tales of entertainment . . . enjoys life to the fullest ... a friend enriched with sincerity . . . " the rain- coat " . . . fascinated by Medicine and Surgery, especially the former . . . future bent around general duty nursing. 121 CHAROLOTTE LOUISE BROWN " Dick " . . . the color of light blue . . . softness and neat- ness . . . charm . . . the color of light blue . . . music at a distance . . . the utmost discretion . . . valid . . . sparkling personality . . . softness . . . the room with the big light . . . scrubbing in . . . masters in suture serving . . . calmness . . . plans for a one-way trip across country to California this autumn . . . always one of the gayest, yet maintains poise . . . knitting artistry . . . Blue Ridge Summit . . . sunny high lights on copper brown curls . . . letter composer . . . committee meetings . . . yearbook essential with ruler and graph paper tucked in her hand . . . editor of Terra Mariae Medicus lay-out committee . . . the color of light blue . . . softness . . . " Dick. " V JUNE LABOR CONWAY Fresher than springtime ... a personality that buds and bubbles . . . golden blonde with dark misty eyes . . . china clear complexion . . . will celebrate a June anni- versarv . . . chirped in the Glee Club and Quartet . . . old fashion harmony . . . John and June . . . finally confessed that she drew those mysterious " guess who " portraits passed around the class . . . ardent attendant at Medical School and Nu Sigma Nu affairs . . . yearbook photog- raphy and write-up committees . . . formerly nested in Cumberland, Maryland . . . enjoys all phases of home- making and nursing . . . pitch-in painting parties ... a natural hostess ... an instructor ' s position in Medicine and Surgery has tempted our classmate . . . June will be rustling as a doctor ' s wife, mother, and school girl work- ing for her degree in Nursing Education. CAROLINE ESTHER COOPER B. S. in Nursing Strawberry blonde hair highlights amber eyes . . . tall, poised, statuesque " Cooj) " . . . distinctively clad . . . surmounts diflicuities realistically . . . sincerely esteemed . . . typical coed of " Old Line " . . . Ilillel Organization . . . earbook committee . . . basketball forward . . . Louisa Parsons Nursing ( " lub . . . Ilnmcconiing Ouccn candidate . . . Sigma Delta Tau alumna . . . dining out and frequent phone calls are extracurricular activities for Carole . . . this gregarious Washingtonian maintains steadfast friendships . . . thrives on basking and bathing each summer at Atlantic City . . . future gratification in Psychiatric or Ol)stetrical nursing. 122 NANCY JANE CORAM A dark, devastating damsel with come hither blue eyes . . . flashing, mysterious smile . . . ' " Silky " ... a turf fan and capable horsewoman . . . her accent leaves no doubt ... a confirmed Confederate from West Virginia . . . " that walk " . . . aesthetic interests in music, writing and painting . . . utilizes artistic skills with charcoal and paint brush for posters and dance decorations . . . praiseworthy literary enterprizes concocted on a minutes notice . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus photography committee member . . . " knack for naughtiness " . . . would gladly stay scrubbed twenty-four hours a day in the Operating Room . . . never allows a late leave to remain unused . . . lends a willing shoulder to cry on . . . the future may find Nancv " soaring in the stratosphere. " a competent and charming airline hostess. PATRICIA CATHERINE DAVIDSON The hunter of many and assorted lost objects in other people ' s rooms ... a Baltimore lass with accent to vali- date it . . . never at a loss for conversation . . . her bright disposition has made her a recipient of many practical jokes . . . friends and patients cannot resist her con- tagious cheerful glow . . . steady member of the " roof set " . . . pattering feet to the coke machine . . . special duty in the fourth floor television room . . . thrives on dashing to home sweet home . . . timely typist for the vearbook ... a bubbling five feet three and one-half inch brunette with green feline eyes . . . chose her future nursing field while on a tour of duty in the delivery suite. FRANCES HARRIETT DENNIS A heart as large as a California redwood . . . " Denny " . . . deeply rooted with sincerity and simplicity . . . pointed sayings . . . custodian of the seventh floor phone . . . one time resident of the hidden bedroom behind the elevator shaft . . . homefires now burn in Tacoma Park . . . domestic arts . . . knitting, sewing, and cooking each performed for husband. Charles . . . lent to the class her cooking skill as head chef on " hot-dog nights " . . . cross country migrant . . . matriculant of various schools . . . class of 195? . . . unique uniform fit . . . warm person- ality . . . inate " motherliness " explains love for Pediatrics . . . future envisionment through enthusiastic green eyes to build a home in Annapolis for a happy family of eight. 123 SARAH ANN DOWNS B. S. in Nursing Presents an unusual evenness ... a tall five feet six inches with a short trim hair cut . . . those green eyes . . . capahle ward organizer . . . recipient of many goodies baked by Grandma . . . member of Westminster Fellow- ship . . . hope-chest a treasure chest . . . small town gal who hates the big city and Gre h()und buses . . . Eastern shore inhabitant . . . Chesapeake City, her home . . . well oriented in domestic life . . . spare time occupations are sewing, knitting, and cooking . . . subtle humor . . . utters unpredictable comments which perfectly fit a situation . . . notably neat . . . Medicine and Surgery are her pro- fessional choice . . . Wilmington, Delaware, is Sarah ' s practicing choice. JOYCE SHORB FLETCHER B. S. in Nursing A tune from the piano and strong hearty laugh character- ize Joyce . . . friendliness and helpfulness asset her pleasant disposition . . . songstress in the Glee Club and typist for the yearbook . . . serious minded . . . clear fresh complexion crowned by soft brown hair . . . the tense momentum of the Operating Room and the timeless marvel of Obstetrics have captivated Joyce ' s interest while in training . . . an ardent participant in religious acti ities . . . Lutheran Student Association at College Park and Sunday School instructor . . . Louisa Parsons Club . . . flying stitches from knitting needles occupy this senior ' s spare time ... a recent migrant to Mount Vernon. Virginia . . . future ])lans are definite . . . teacher of nursing arts. JEAN ANITA FRIEZE B. S. in Nursing Sixty seven inches of innocence from Frederick . . . " My, what big eyes you have, Jeanie " ' . . . hears no evil . . . sees no evil . . . speaks no evil . . . friend to all . . . the type of girl a mother would like her son to bring home . . . Snow White . . . genuinely sweet and demure . . . usually moves at a tortoise pace . . . naps and nods in early classes . . . clever at the sewing machine . . . bounds and rebounds on the basketball court as veteran guard . . . member of dance committees and Diamondback . . . nothing is too much trouble for this classmate . . . delight- ful sense of humor . . . wealth of human understanding ... a position in Obstetrics or Medical-Surgical Nursing in a small hospital are Jeannie ' s plans for tomorrow. 124 JOANN MARGARET GESELL B. S. in Nursing A true Baltimore Oriole . . . " Hey Bird " . . . worked industriously as ad editor of the yearbook . . . never missed a meeting of the Lutheran Students ' Association while at College Park . . . traveler U.S.A. and Canada . . . plans to tour Europe after graduation . . . valiant spectator of the nurse ' s basketball games . . . demonstra- tive . . . delights in classical music and the theater . . . " This is a benign bridge hand " . . . coke fiend . . . con- scientious correspondent . . . round face bursts with enthusiasm . . . unbelievable concentration powers while enveloped by one of her many books . . . perhaps after ' graduation " Jo " will be found working in Medicine and Surgery in some distant land. MARY M. GORMLEY Floats by on a pink cloud . . . dark, closely cropped natural curls and wide innocent hazel eyes . . . prize faux pas . . . confuser of pelvic trays for gastric washing sets and the unconscious donning of bobby socks when duty bound . . . takes self-directed jokes well . . . spinning classical pops keeps her phonograph well worn . . . religiously endowed . . . member of Bible Study and secretary of the Baptist Student Union of Maryland . . . religious chairman of Nursing School . . . photography committee of yearbook . . . Glee Club yodeler . . . mania for a return trip to Maine . . . " Monies " two fishy room- mates are Revel and Bolero . . . hails from beach country in Anne Arundel County . . . prefers Pediatrics and Psychiatry. MIRIAM CHARLOTTE GRAF Laughing blue eyes and a cap of curly brown hair . . . always ready with a smile . . . musical inclinations . . . harmonizing vocally or on the keys . . . spins the platter for classical music . . . wealth of nursing favorites . . . Medicine, Surgerv, and Obstetrics top the list . . .the blending of deep ' religious understanding with inspired nursing care create a capability and competence admired by all . . . participant in Intervarsity Christian Fellowship and Bible study . . . Glee Club . . . feature committee of yearbook . . . warm summer days are reminiscent of picnics and bicycling expeditions two of " Mir ' s " favorite past-time activities . . . general duty nursing and studying for a degree in Nursing education are this classmate ' s vie for the future. 125 LILLIAN MAE GREENFIELD An insomniac who will never waste a spare moment sleeping . . . when one thinks of " LiL " P.R.N, night duty, night classes, and general " night-owl " are brought to mind . . . productiveness and creativeness are her essen- tials . . . ability to take mental notes and complete exami- nations in record time with record scores was most per- plexing to classmates . . . the welcome mat is continually spread before her threshold on ' " Seventh Heaven " . . . crammed private duty nursing into an already full schedule . . . incessantly on a hunt for a parking place . . . represents a warehouse of ambition stored in a five feet five inch frame . . . wit and wisdom lie behind those blue eyes ... a deep curiosity in Medicine and people heads our gal toward Medical School upon graduation. EMILY WATTS GRIFFITH Typifies the " All American Girl " ... a blue-eyed blonde with that fresh well-groomed look ... an even smile discloses gleeming white teeth ... a recent Navy bride . . . knitting and letter writing coincides with thoughts of " Just My Bill ' . . . reading interest harbors on his- torical novels . . . former class president and basketball veteran . . . candidate for Homecoming Queen . . . Florida yields significant connotations . . . " Lola ' s twin " . . . born Virginian now claiming Dickerson. Maryland as home " Night dutv? Dont mention it! ' fifth floor residency reminiscent of pow wows, record plavers. and understandings . . . dut in the Accident Room and Delixerv Suite head " Em ' s " specialty list . . . the future will find this classmate contently practicing nursing and wifery. JUNE COLE HARDESTY Inspiration to her freshman classmates as our first bride . . . life outside of the nursing realm is spun around husband Don . . . June is number nineteen from a happy family of twenty-three children . . . owns a grab-bag of hilarious jokes and stories to suit every occasion . . . food hunter who jireys on cheese and crackers . . . dark- haired minx of five feet one and one half inches . . . (lash . . . quick and efficient ward organizer . . . Glee Club songbird . . . word wrestler on crossword puzzles . . . danct; decorator . . . rushes home to Amiapolis during o(f-dut hours . . . her future will be s|)cnt entwining marriage and motherhood with gcn ' ral duty nursing, perhaps in Obstetrics. y ' " 126 EVELYN FUSS HECKMAN B. S. in Nursing One of our newlyweds . . . former farm gal from Union Bridge who now makes frequent trips to Yellow Springs, Ohio, via nebulous routes . . . celebrates first wedding anniversary in August . . . musically inclined ... a Jenny Lind . . . reliable sense of judgment has led to leadership in Glee Club and Student Government Association . . . chairman of house conmiittee . . . azure eves and creamy white complexion lend an angelic air to Evie ' s oval face . . . understanding, sereness. and sincerity characterize her . . . animated speech and gestures . . . another avid bridge fourth ... an exceptional student with high scholarship and insight . . . clever cook and superb seam- stress . . . will busily blend housekeeping with nursing upon graduation. STEPHANIE MAHOLAGE HODSHON One of our happily married classmates . . . " Stevie " . . . frank, straight forward and always honest . . . possesses an amazing adaptability of the ivories . . . discovered the fascination of Obstetrics while racing about the delivery suite . . . favorite pastime is planning future with her husband Ernie . . . commutes by way of Belinda, a fascinating machine of questionable vintage . . . loves shopping sprees to equip her future home . . . frequently dashes off to Washington, D. C. . . . creative with colors . . . artistic ability with oils transforms cerebral impres- sions on canvas . . . expressive brown eyes and golden tinted hair excels in swimming revolve around family life. aspirations PATRICIA MICHAEL HUSTER A plump five feet ten and one half inches . . . " Pat " . . . combines genius for good home-cooking with housekeep- ing and nursing studies . . . zeal for insurance agents relates to husband Jack . . . apartment is hub of well attended parties . . . ready means of transportation with two car family . . . mania for Greek comedy and tragedy masks in any form . . . " Anyone for chewing gum or cigarettes? " . . . artistic cosmetic talent well used in freshman year Minstrel Show . . . absorptive power for all jokes . . . outstanding ability to make the best of any situation . . . found Delivery Room intriguing . . . great- est ambition: a home of her own and six children. 127 CAROLYN LOUISE INGRICK B. S. in Nursing Reminiscent of autumn . . . rusty hair accentuated by clear blue eves and glowing cheeks . . . harmonizing . . . quiet but unpredictable . . . noted for ])rankish escapades . . . co-operative and responsible committee member . . . Glee Club . . . projects and tvping committees for the yearbook . . . Thursday night hot dog saleswoman and consumer . . . resides in the Nation ' s Capital . . . main housekeeper of Room 531 . . . known as the " Germ " . . . the infirmary is an extra curricular activity . . . called ' inky ' " by those who know her well . . . enjoys curling U[) with a good book . . . desires to pursue a future in Pediatric Researth or Obstetrics at the National Institute of Health in Bethesda. Mars land. -MARY ROSANN JIRECEK The golden blond hair . . . black velvet . . . the oval green e es with ha el flecks . . . tall . . . slender . . . the carriage that demands respect . . . the business like air . . . honest and frankness . . . knitting . . . reading . . . sewing . . . separately or all three at once . . . ability to enjoy life In tiie fullest . . . music created b the old masters or tiic ■ " rra icst ' " of dixieland jazz . . . abstract art . . . immaculate dresser . . . helping the sickest or helping 111 bring new life . . . favors Psvchiatrv and Obstetrics . . . ])lans to get her degree in Nursing Educa- tion . . . poetr with a lill . . . in aluable to the Yearbook as business manager . . . Rosann. in aluable period. PATRICIA LEIGH KENEALY Pixie hair-cut accents twingling green eyes . . . dazzling jiersonality ... a reservoir of artistic abilities . . . origi- nality brightens itmumerable social acli ities . . . cartoon capers . . . Art Edilnr uf IVrra Mariac Medicus . . . enviable wardrobe enlianicd by deft hand . . . produces a succession of knlllrd novelties . . . niriiculous wards and boudoir are a result of her managiinenl . . . ])roclaims the ileli ery room as her most fascinaling training experi- ence . . . " PujJsie " . . . warm and lo al)li! . . . sociable social chairman . . . jaunts lo " Little Itah " ' for s|)aglictti and pizza ... an A.M. sleeps head . . . oplimi lic and ambitious . . . Washington ' s birthda) re(iuires s])ecial celebration . . . sadly admitting th ; impossibility of nursing on 12 AI), she plans to fnrllicr her education and receive her degree in imrsing. 128 1 31 m V i »fc , .y K ' !■ " f 1 -fie mmm BETTY KATHERINE KRABILL B. S. in Nursing Saucy smile ... ice pink glasses magnify " Beautiful, Beautiful Brown Eyes ' ' ... a minute five feet one and one-half inches packed full of vim and vitality . . . head chief on scholarship totem pole . . . squaw from Poco- moke City on Maryland ' s Eastern Shore . . . subtle humor accompanies ready laugh . . . willful worker . . . patron editor of yearbook . . . senior representative of the Student Go ernnient Association . . . recent initiate of Phi Kappa Phi honorary . . . Westminister Fellowship at College Park . . . vicariously lives while engrossed in reading the epics of the South . . . bargainwise shopper . . . whip stitching succumbs in fashionable creations . . . nursing education or .Medicine and Surgery fields for the future. MARY ELOIS LANCASTER B. S. in Nursing Our little countr ' girl with a Dixie drawl . . . hails from the southern tip of Maryland . . . Rock Point . . . appears wide eyed and innocent . . . those dark dancing coquette eyes are a perfect blend for her natural jet curls . . . wisp of a waist ... a confirmed coffee drinker and vegetable hater . . . prefers goat ' s milk . . . her bubbling laughter enlightens everyone . . . homespun . . . sews, swims and rides in her spare time . . . earnestness and inquisitiveness solve many baffling problems . . . remembered for long tales of life back on the farm . . . religious emphasis . . . member of Legion of Mary Club . . . entranced by the care of the newborn baby and its mother . . . plans to " Join the Navy and See the World. " BARBARA M. LAPE B. S. in Nursing Wow! that New Jersey accent . . . activities galore . . . high stepping majorette for the University of Maryland . . . Alpha Lambda Delta Honorary Sorority . . . class officer two years . . . Women ' s League Representative . . . Phi Kappa Phi Honorary . . . Louisa Parsons Club . . . talented seamstress and argyle manufacturer . . . mixes and matches well . . . pert five feet three inch brownette . . . model ankles . . . scholarship sets a high curve . . . commutes to College Park on weekends . . . fondness for rusty hair and " sonny days " . . . infectious laugh . . . unappeased appetite accompanies fraud diet . . . dancing and bridge rate high with " Barb " . . . plans to possibly specialize in Pediatrics before and after marriage. 129 JOAN ELIZABETH MATHEWS B. S. in Nursing Resident of the Hudson Riviera . . . Park Avenue, New York . . . theme song " Anchors Away " . . . fashion creator and seamstress . . . social chairman of junior class . . . Alpha Delta Pi alumna . . . dance and yearbook committee member . . . I niversity Theater productions participant . . . five feet three inches of vim. vigor, and vibrance . . . expressive brown eyes . . . dark lustrous pageboy . . . " Toast of the Town " . . . queen candidate . . . chatterbox . . . winsome, outgoing smile . . . nursing influenced by religious inspiration . . . argyle artist . . . weekend homestead is Annapolis . . . after circumventing the world " Mitzi " will start her homegrown football team. LOLA LUCILLE McCLEAF Breezes in like a new year . . . breathless and bubbling . . . notorious for distubing the peace on the fifth floor of the dormitory ... an unconscious comic . . . " Emily ' s twin " . . . " the many splendored one ' " . . . thick curling lashes curtain big blue eyes . . . her slender five feet six inches ar ' se to natural curh blonde fluff . . . accents on the serenity of the mountains . . . hometown. Blue R idge Summit. Pennsylvania . . . infirmary duty was a nursing speciality ... a phobia for photography led to member- ship on the yearbook photography committee . . . appro- priate theme song. " Oh. How I Hate to Get Lp In the Morning. " . . . the future sounds exciting, around the world as an airline stewardess after training in a model- inj; school. DOROTHY HELEN McCLURE " Let ' s all go to IVnn- Ivania for some peaches and apples " . . . this sounds like our Dotty . . . native Towsonite . . . hails as Home Economics major at College Park to Nursing on Baltimore campus . . . notorious laugh . . . vivacious . . . enthusiastic bonny lass . . . clear blue eyes set off her fair skin . . . golden hair matches golden voice . . . Co-dettes Quartet . . . Glee Club . . . church soloist . . . famous Na h takes starved nurses out for good old fashioned home cooking . . . perseverance and reliability relate to being chosen vice president of senior class . . . dance committee member . . . social chairman of Student Government Association in junior year and senior class representative . . . professional interests center in Pedia- trics and Surgery . . . plans lo further education in college and travel. 130 T - HELEN MILDRED McFADDEN B. S. in Nursing Has a million relatives and friends . . . overpowers the Post Office with the numerous letters and parcels she sends . . . radiant brown eyes and a personality which bubbles . . . " that reminds me of a joke " ... a " Yankee Doodle " from Fawn Grove, Pennsylvania . . . engaged interest in veterinary medicine ... a lark at College Park and on the Baltimore campus . . . Chapel Choir and Glee Club cherub . . . Louisa Parsons Club . . . Chairman of the Student Government Association Rules Committee . . . seconds on meat, potatoes and gravy . . . thirds when pizza pie is offered . . . can always spare a minute to listen . . . future roads lead to Obstetrical Nursing in Athens, Georgia. KATHERINE GENEVIEVE McFARLAND B. S. in Nursing Naturally curly brown locks and big, big brown eyes . . . the words " Im hungry " are a trademark . . . class- mates are envious of Kitty ' s capricious appetite which never mars her slim figure . . . sincere and unaffected ... a genuine person . . . possesses a frankness and independence all her own . . . always has an answer . . . success story of a farm gal who has worked her way through college and nursing school ... a four year resi- dent of 620 West Lombard Street . . . craves Obstetrics and Public Health . . . specialing a speciality . . . Glee Club . . . future plans revolve around rural nursing in hometown of Hancock, Maryland. Native Washingtonian . coiffu generates in mambo BETTY JEAN MERRYMAN calls Greenbelt her home . . . mystic blue eyes . , . five feet four inches ascends to curly Betty ' s intense passion for anything Latin and chacha interpretations ... a return trip to Puerto Rico forever beckons . . . self taught Spanish scholar . . . able desire for self-reliance and individuality justify her excitement and gratification while nursing in the Accident Room . , . earnest supporter of feature committee. Glee Club, and write-up committee . . . clever cliche . . . commendable depictions . . . collects empty bottles as souvenirs . . . pizza and chianti . , . lavender socks . . . plans the pursuit of knowledge through travel and college. 131 SOMA MARLENE MULES B. S. in Nursing Warm angel glow . . . keynotes on the keyboard . . . Peabody protege . . " the blue of her eyes and the gold of her hair are a blend " . . . fastidiously feminine . . . five feet five inches arranged in the vogue of fashion . . . silk and satin fluff . . . the carnivorous one . . . " Two servings of meat, please! " ' . . . literary dexterity . . . write-up com- mittee for the yearbook . . . Diamondback reporter , . . basketball guard for University . . . warm sunny days are spent on the green . . . serving on the tennis courts or quarry swimming . . . ' " Hal is everyone " . . . the ultima- tion of mood music terminates in a mock ballet with roommate Sal . . . teaching is Marlenes choice for the future. JOSEPHINE EVELYN NOCKE B. S. in Nursing Expressive hazel eyes reflect the sincerity within . . . the personification of friendliness . . - so calm and gentle . . . burns the midnight oil seven days a week . . . tardily and breathlessly arrives at every destination . . , can make one coke last longer than an one else . . . refuses tasty chocolate morsels . . . enjoyed food immensely at Mount Wilson . . . traveling ambition — ' ' Go est. Young Lady ' . . . indulges in deep conversation and pizza . . . reli- giouslv inspired . . . member of Newman Club at College Park . . . fondly speaks of homestead. ' " Brookside, " Elkton, Marvland . . , extremely conscious of patients ' needs . . . Obstetrical and Medical Nursing ha e caught Jo ' s fancy. ANNIE MARIE NORFOLK B. S. in Nursing Contimudls huiniiiiiig a tune on or off key . . . Baltimore colt . . . lengthy five feet nine inches . . . naturally curly brown crop . . . iridescent blue green eyes . . . sure shot Annie ... " A Blossom Fell " ' ,. . . sees her dentist more than twice a )ear . . . nifty knitting . . . breaks all speed records . . . enthusiastic committee member and s|jorts fan . . . poetic |)cnmanship . . . speaks witii a rii li basso resonance . . . ' ' comede-Ann " . . . the operating room which this gal heads will be sterile . . . systematic and smiling . . . her nursing capacity and patient contact is adniiralilc and cnvijiilc . . . niclious with age. P 132 JEANNE GOE OREM B. S. in Nursing Jeanne with the deep blue eyes and short brown hair . . . one hundred and fifteen pounds packed into a slim five feet five frame ... a recent bride . . . met her husband on a blind date . . . " he was the tall one ' ' . . . the quiet manner masks peristaltic enthusiasm . . . known for plan- ning . . . foresight and original ideas . . . here is one lass who can put a nickle into a coke machine and get back not only a coke but a quarter change . . . fantastic luck . . . fluctuant appetite . . . when out to dinner she is starved . . . when diimer is free, not hungry . . . enjoys entertaining . . . alumna of Alpha Gamma Delta . . . plans to work in Public Health or in a Medical Surgical area in addition to navigating over the United States with husband Joe. FREDA BEATRICE PARKER A quiet manner and a shy smile . . . the girl with the " baby voice " . . . soft hazel eyes ... a neat well groomed five feet seven inches ... an active Girl Scout counsellor . . . musical appreciation . . . enthusiastic Glee Club member . . . spare time pianist . . . possessor of high ideals with religious influence ,. . . Methodist Youth Fellowship . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus photography staff . . . diligent seamstress . . . hails from Frederick, Mary- land . . . awarded a nursing scholarship . . , conscientious in all undertakings . . . independence, an asset . . . Freda spent her most enjoyable hours in the field of Pediatrics . . . certainly her life long ambition to work with children will be satisfied in the role of a school nurse. BARBARA LOUISE PICKETT Woodhue . . . the lore of the out-of-doors . . . roaming amid the rolling hills of Howard County . . . hunting and wild life observation . . . Barbara, with the gentle brown eyes and satinwood hair, dark and shining . . , endowed with faith, hope, and love ... an inspired wife and nurse . . . leader of Bible study meetings in the dormitory and Sunday morning matins in the hospital . . . combines piano or organ accompaniment with hymn singing . . . quietness . . . calmness . . . Obstetrics and Public Health held in esteem . . . pride in keeping house for Earl, a research assistant at Johns Hopkins University . . . future emphasis on missionary work and raising a family. 133 KATHRYN MAXINE PYLE B. S. in Nursing Trim size seven . . . accepts leadership . , . activities boundless . . . vice president of freshman class . . . presi- dent of junior class . . . Glee Club . , . R.O.T.C. sponsor . . . Terrae Mariae Medicus write up committee . . . Delta Delta Delta alumna . . . naive . ,. . idealistic . . . enthu- siastic fourth for bridge . . . low sales resistance especially when a bargain is sighted . . . hazel eyes reveal a sincere faith in people . . . asset of empathy endears her to patients and friends . . . declares independence . . . mitigator . . . fancy for hats and horses . . . homestead in Edgewood, Maryland ... an architect has designed her future . . . predilection for Obstetrical or Public Health Nursing . . . seeks a nursing challenge which requires ingenuity and imagination. s LOU ANN RESH Tiny as an atom and just as explosive ... a literal dynamo of perpetual energy generating in all activities . . . skillful " long-shot " expert on the basketball court . . . member of yearbook and dance committees ... a " night-owl " who loves to chat ,. . . daytime sleepyhead . . . spelling specialist . . . " scik " . . . eyes with glints of green and hair with hints of gold ... a petite five feet three inches . . ,. continuously ready for a sortee ' into " Little Italy " or Druid Hill Park . . . homestead in Hamp- stead . . . obstinately obstetric-conscious . . . general nursing duty and proving her hypothesis that families are cheaper by the half a dozen will be a lifetime career for Lou Ann. JOAN MARIE RICE Reserved, with a smile that s|)eaks . . . an inspiration to those who turn to her . . . the responsible position of Student Government jiresident was duK awarded to " Joanie " who has guided niir meetings, dances, confer- ences, and activities galore with true leadership and intelligence . . . " Girls, don " t forget the meeting tonight! " . . . short and sweet . . . agile,. . . feather-cut natural curls wisp around clear curnplcxioned countenance . . . indis- pensable to the Glee Club and Quartet . . . collector of records ranging from the classics to pop hits . . , roman- ticism . . . long walks in the snow . . . hails from Cumber- land. Maryland . . . enjo ed all phases of nursing . . . plans for future education after graduation. 134 JOAN MARGUERITE ROOT A busy, bustling, blue eyed blonde . . . fair skinned sun bather . . . " the profile " . . . famous for impersonations of records and individuals . . . her Tarzan yell occa- sionally rings loud and clear in the dormitory halls . . . delights in delicatessen delectables . . . night duty a night- mare ... a good night ' s sleep means a fourteen hour stretch to " Joanie " . . . tickles the ivories . . . enjoys music in all forms from Bach to Berlin . . . hails from the hills of West Virginia . . . snowy peaks connote favorite winter pastime, skiing . . . the drama of birth captivated our classmate ' s heart and professional interest while circulating in delivery. DORIS JEAN RUTHERFORD A tiny sprite with the velocity of a hummingbird, t his describes " Doree while on duty . . . refreshing . . . soft spoken . . . takes pride in responsibility . . . vice-president of the senior class . . . member of the Student Govern- ment nominating committee as a junior . . . freshman class treasurer ... a native of Altoona, Pennsylvania with an intense dislike for Baltimore winters . . . advo- cates music for relaxation . ,. . reading rendezvous . . . poised pen spells out constant correspondent . . . weekend commuter to Annapolis ... a green-eyed nymph with an irresistable elfin smile ... a slight five feet two inches . . . sparetime " specialing " ' ... an all-around nursing enthusiast who has enjoyed every phase of training. PATRICIA RUTH SHANAHAN Religious enrichment . . . responsibility and repose . . . inspired leadership in Bible study meetings . . . vice- president of Student Government Association and House Committee chairman for two years . . . secretarial editor of Terra Mariae Medicus ... an Eastern short lass from Chesapeake City . . . surprising sense of humor . . . smiling gray-green eyes . . . lustrious long locks of mahogany hue . . . cooking enthusiast whose partiality leans toward chocolate cake . . . broad scope of conversa- tional topics extend from archiology to baseball . . . reading spectrum from science fiction to biography . . . thrives on long walks in newly fallen snow . . . sensitive . . . human interest lends incite into meeting the needs of others . . . this quality will asset Pat ' s future in Psychi- atric or Medical Nursing. 135 ELEANOR FRANCES SHEARER A whiff of English lavender . . . quietness . . . reserve . . . fashionably slender " El " uith the polished chestnut hair . . . classical cravings satisfied through literature and noted browsing in museums and art galleries . . . conceits . . . rare gift for putting into writing those things which others can only feel . . . extends wardrobe advice upon request . . . bedside |)antry stacked with goodies from home . . . Cundierland Country girl . . . efficiency per- sonified on surgical wards . . . tactfulncss and maturity combine to make a s nipathetic listener and understand- ing friend . . . long walks invariably end as window- shopping lours . . . post graduate gleenings in aseptic technique in addition to future education toward a degree will be followed by that " urge to travel. " NANCY ANN SHROP A tiny brown haired, brown eyed elf . . . " Nan " . . . decided after two years at College Park that nursing was the career for her and embarked on her new-found pro- fession . . . known for stories of " When I was in the Gymkana " ' and for demonstrations of gymnastic ability and agility . . . quietness with poise . . . calls Ellicott City her home . . . clever miss with knitting needles or sewing machine . . . neat . . . stilish . . . delights in reading and singing . . . " Oh my! " , . . always busy with one project or another . . . co-editor of Terra Mariae . . . Glee Club ... an efficient, understanding nurse . . . the miracle of new life interested Nancy most . . . being a top notch nurse is her design for the future. JOYCE VIRGINIA SIMPSON B. S. in Nursing Deep dimples enhance round face . . . pug nose faintly freckled . . bright countenance . . . c impact five feet two and one-half inches . . . uni(juc brief hairdo . . . envisag- ing . . . surpassing ambition in schohistic achievement . . . A " s are a habit with this classmate . . . prompt and precise . . . VAee VAuh particijiant . . . secretary-treasurer of junior class . . . fore er there will exist a fondness for Frederick, Maryland . . . anirnl w in(low-shoii|ier and Navy rooter . . . pizza enthusiast . . . semi-classical or classical music are Joyce ' s listening ])refercn(e . . . plans to pursue nursing career in the fields of Obstetrics or Public Health . . . aspires matrimony and a haj)py home. 136 NANCY RUTH SKADDING B. S. in Nursing Willful worker with boundless capability wicked paint brush for the art committee slnigs a . veteran basketball guard and Glee Club songster . . . Student Government Association treasurer . . . chairman of Terra Mariae Medicus project connnittee . . . photogenic . . . genuine smile . . . lavish, long lashes shade doleful brown eyes . . . calorie conscious . . . " Saccharine anyone? " . . . the arrow points to Phi Beta Phi social sorority . . . passion for purple . . . equine fervor . . . Thursday nights connote hot dogs, rolls and mustard . . . with foresight into Obstetrical Nursing, Nancy will plan her future in Florida . . . surely her accomplishments throughout life will be performed with constancy. KATHERINE STONER B. S. in Nursing Bunny . . ,. an appropo nickname for this lively gal who is always hopping . . . proud of North Jersey heritage .... thrives on pizza and Mom ' s brownies . . . bright doe eyes . . . tall, tailored five feet seven inches . . . explores new and different places . . . Europe after gradu- ation . . . leisure activities plus . . . bounding around the basketball court as player and manager . . . photography editor of the yearbook . . . member of R.O.T.C. Angel Flight and Alpha Xi Delta social sorority . . . Aqualiner . . . room 740 hub of seventh floor life . . . unorthodox bridge contender . . . hiker . . ,. future aspiration to be crowned with a Flossie and to deliver twins single-handed. SALLY JOANNE STROTT B. S. in Nursing Big Brown eyes, smooth complexion intertwine golden glints, golden tones . . . mirror reflects model figure despite carnivorous cravings . . . the scavenger . . . strictly tailored . . . that characteristic walk . . . Gamma Phi Beta alumna . . . Terra Mariae Medicus write-up editor . . . queen candidate . . . Diamondback , . . realistic approach re-enforces independence . . . Lady luck . . . cum si, cum se . . . creative beauty exemplifies classic apprecia- tion . . . the delight of modern dance terminates in mock ballet with roommate, Marlene , . . exploring escapades . . . Indian leg wrestling . . . forever amid festivities . . . loves people and puppies . . . fashion a la mode . . . Florida yields memorable moments . . . nursing education and Europe shall add the future . . . possesses the for- tunes, sincerity and faith. 137 JOAN BRENTLINGER SWEZEY A " Delaware doll " ' . . . known to exhibit creative capers and imitations at class parties . . . ' " Sweze " . . . eyes contain a golden glint ... a visiting nurse to Annapolis . . . excels in administrative work . ,. . eminent to class- mates for abilitv to make connnittee work an honor . . . president of freshman class . . . University ' s representa- tive to Student Nurse Council of Marjland . . . Student Government Association worker . , . colored slides of European tour witii commentary added a bright spot to S]iringfield . . . " " Oh! that laugh " . . . theme song " Navy Blue and Ciold " ... an cx-coed of Delaware University who seeks higher education after graduation. HELEN HERGERT TESHER Panoramic brunette . . . dark, bewitching, and bewildered beauty . . . unnecessarily caloric conscious as her wee waist emphasizes . . . headed manv " icebox raider brigades " . . . thick fluttering lasiies veil mistv Idue eyes . . . first sun-worshi|)per on the roof each spring . . . bronzed diviiis board artist . . . previous baton twirler . as predictable as the wind . . . " Rut wh ? ill celebrate a mid-summer anniversary . . . engrossed by dancing, dentistry, and house-keeping for husband, Fred . . . scrapbook sentimentalist . . . understandable crave for Chinese dishes . . . obsession fur ()i sletrics . . . Penn- svlvanias loss will be Florida ' s gain . . . plans for a sunny future in Holh wood, Florida, as an anesthetist in Dental Surgery. CAROLS RUTH THOMAS A light haired laughing " Baltimore belle " . . . hazel eyes laugh and twinkle when she talks . . . known for her original pronunciation of " big words " ... a breathing, walking, and alwavs talking dynaTuo on the wards . . . will long be rcmendjcred as being able to do the greatest amount of work in the shorlot span of time . . . habit of arguing with authoritative persons . . . seldom in a situation she cannot conquer . . . contrasting extra- curricular interests . . . embroidei ini; baby clothes and stock car racing . . . Glee Club warbler . . . perpetual action keeps Carol at a slim one hundred and eighteen pounds . . . requests the three t " eleven shift on 11) or 6BD as her professional choice. 138 Y JUDY MAE WILLIAMS " Oh what those five feet can do! " . . . our senior class president who is eternally kept busy planning, organizing and posting notices . . . always manages to reserve time for a midnight gab fest . . . Judy completes the lyrics with the proper qualifications . . . " Five feet two, eyes of blue " ... an effervescent personality is evident in her " perennial smile ' . . ,. the lime-light reflects talent on taps . . . Glee Club cherub . . . Bible study member ... a native of Kentucky with a notable Southern drawl claims Indianapolis, Indiana, as her new home . . . discovered nursing on surgical wards to be especially gratifying . . . Springfield affiliation sparked an interest in Psychiatry . . . future . . . revelations in general duty nursing. SHIRLEY SILVIA WOLF Possessor of flippant, blue eyes that twinkle and a clear, fresh complexion . . . adopted daughter of Baltimore . . . homestead " good old Pennsylvania, " and that home cook- ing . . . enthusiasm plus lies in thoracic surgery particu- larly in the operating room and recovery suite . . . " Commissurotomy, swell I ' ll special it! " . . . diligent subscription editor of Terrae Maria Medicus . . . senior class scribe . . . may be caught regularly recording the number of days left before graduation . . . possibly owes rent on the eleventh floor . . . night duty ad infinitum . . . whirling blades on ice . . . long moonlit walks . . . name a book and " our Shirl " has read it . . . forever kids about her own " ski-slide " nose . . . found lurking on the dance committees using her talents to enrich the social occasion. MARGARET ANN YOUNG Glowing hazel eyes and a smile that goes a long, long way . . . finds intrigue in student activities . . . vice presi- dent and social chairman of the Student Government Association . . . utilized musical talents while singing in the Glee Club and LIniversity Quartet . . . classical music for her listening pleasure . . . one may find " Margie " engaged in a fast game of basketball or conducting a Bible study group . . . yearbook feature editor ... a farm girl who loves to get away from the big city . . . sewing as a hobby stems from past days as a 4H Club member . . . avid sports enthusiast . . . possessor of a wide range of nursing interests . . . Pediatrics, Obstetrics, and the Operating Room rated high while in training. 139 Tf •l D. Rullierford V. President J. Williams President S. Wolf Secretary J. Bramble Treasurer A. Norfolk Social Chairman P. Kenealy Social Chairman T. Fernandez Advisor CLASS MEETING o n 140 STAFF EDITORS Art — P. Kenealy Projects — N. Skadding Literary — M. Young Patrons— B. Krabill Subscriptions — S. Wolf Co-Editor — N. Slirop Advisor — K. Fitzgerald Co-Editor — L. Baxter Business — R. Jirecek Write-up — S. Strott Photography — B. Stoner Advertising — J. Gesell Layout — C. Brown Typing — P. Shanahan (not present) 141 CLASS C. Duvall B. Klinedinst Vice President A. Owings President J. Arbegast J. Judkins I. Abraham N.Kirk S.G.A. Elsie Ho Advisor D. Stein " Actually As Such " . . . Biochemistry in July . . . lab coats . . . one day weekends . . . capping . . . memories of College Park . . . myocardial infarction . . . " whooping doses " . . . 5B . . . " Christmas or New ears? " . . . Junior-Senior Prom. J. White M.Wu p. Shanahan 1st V.P. w N. Skaclding Treasurer J. Swpzry Sen. Class Rep. E. Griffith 2nd V.l ' . M. Young 3rd V.P. E. Hecknian 4th V.F. Hub of student life . . . notorious podium in Gordon Wilson Hall . . . reputed for activities q. month and p.r.n. . . . Baltimore Campus Homecom- ing Queen reigned in October . . . notable accom- plishment, new house rules, at last . . . you mean sixteen overnights in one month? . . . Time: 1:01 a.m., " Mrs. A. please let me in " ... all delinquents invited to " court session " . . . sorry no lawyers allowed . . . " Any volunteers for chairman? " . . . the Christmas movie. Arizona? . . . delegates elected to national convention . . . destination Chicago . . . latest pursuit . . . renovating handbook . . . flash, parliamentarians needed . . . " Want to rent a booth for our bazaar? " . . . nominations for next year ' s officers . . .S.G.A. rolls on. K. Fitzgerald Advisor J.Rice 1 ' resident S. Barnes Secretary N. Kirk Jr. Class Rep. B. Kraljill Sen. Class Rep MEDICIIVE-SURGERY OBSTETRICS PEDIATRICS PURLIC HEALTH PSYEHIATRY DPERATIIVG RDDM MEDICmE SURGERY Security within Principle source of practical expe- rience ... a day begins with inexije- rienced novices ... a continuous hustle of 7-3 shift with a.m. care, numerous pills and injections . . . securing oxygen tents . . . calling for I.V. fluids . . . ordering special diets ... an admission from the accident room ... a patient to surgery . . . doctors ' rounds ... a discharge with an appointment to O.P.D. . . . check- ing narcotics . . . The notorious " relief " shift with endless medica- tions and treatments . . . tube feed- ings . . . p.r.n. dressings . . . irriga- tions . . . TPR ' s . . . enemas and bed|)ans . . . the recjuests of the medical students . . . Iiack rubs and sleeping pills . . . The i|iii(l iinstery of darkened halls on night duty . . . midnight census and diet reports . . . intake-output . . . cleaning and steri- lizing . . . endless charting . . . N.S.D.O. . . . artificial res[)irati(iii . . . administering T.L.C. . . . uatcr )iil It- er .. . specimens to hih . , . (piiet yawns of 7 a.m. re])nii ... a new day appears with conhdciil. c()iiii)eteiit nurses. A new day appears His needs . . . spiritual, emotional, physical The niainlenance of life 146 Nutrition, a milestone to health Medicines, T.P.R. ' s, and smiles Aiding the physician in his work A helping hand 147 DBSTETRICS reality ... to the Tul: for a " little needle ' future . . . fifteen niinil Down the back si father " . . admissioii hour watch after circua content . . . twelve hoiJ pans . ,. . time for disc| irge instructions A vt-ry special delivery • patient . , . mei ' Mother, prepare ooni and a hurried prep . . . fast anticipation — the cry . . . mother checks for two hours . . . rs clutching that bundle of joy . are in the liab " s " " first home ' " . . . bahi( ision . . . teaching all phases of baby care of careful observation of the bus)- clinic now past . . . specimens, r layette " . . . Delivery Suite . . . E.D.C., a to the Delivery Room . . . just lean on nie )our son . . . recorded foot prints for the thevre always wrinkled and red at first. d bottles lined up for feeding . . . six a relaxed, new mother . .. . proud and credeing and eai andiulation . . . pitchers, pads, and the sum total: a new mot le miracle of life itself. Tile prriioiis pat-kagc riic preniiiT Iriu ing 148 Facing the world T.L.C. — A Mother ' s first lesson 149 " Relax, bend your head forward, honey. " ' Are you sure it will taste good, nuVse? " " She always lakes her medicine so well. ' Welcome to the fifth floor . . . Pediatrics . . . sorry we ' re too busy to stop . . . must change a diaper . . . set up a croupette ... do at least ten feedings in the next half hour ... all the noon medications . . . com- presses for a burned child . . . the fluids running at two drops per minute . . . maybe the play nurse will turn on the T.V. or get you some gingerale . . . don ' t sit too close to the staff elevator . . . the nurse from the formula room will be delivering the bottles to the " Premie " Nursery with its isolettes . . . quietness . . . changing diapers . . . giving vitamins . . . the heat lamp . . . the clinic . . . drawing bloods . . . the treat- ment room . . . the tears . . . and frightened looks . . . the parents . . . case studies . . . endless papers and ward rounds . . . giving injections . . . " strapping " . . . " what did you eat? ' ' . . . it ' s bedtime . . . three T. and A. admissions at ten-thirty . . . nurse, kiss me good night . . . this is the fifth floor . . . Pediatrics . . . sorry we ' re too busy to stop. M;ikiiig hours fly with con -lriulivc play therapy. PEDIATRICS Christmas made merry on the fifth floor Next ... 16 dilute oz. 2 with premie nipples Premature nursey: Gavage . . . Isolate . . . mist " Do you know where the main hospital is? PUBLIC HEALTH Health service in every direction Teaching — a primary objective A case finding " Mama " Baer offers suggestions Rail), snow, sleet, measles ... all that equipment in one little bag? . . . " But I know that street is here some place " . . . route books . . . door to door visits and referral slijjs ,. . . now take fifteen P.A.S. before every meal and strep, twice a week ... up three flights, hack a dark hall and knock on any door . . . maternal hygiene . . . urinalysis, the basic seven, and blood jiressure . . . " eleven children — is that all ' . ' ' " ' . . . ' ell-Baby Clinics . . . appointment books . . . the new series of polio shots . . . making a date to instruct a new mother in the act of bathing the newest addition . . . " open your moulli for the nice doctor and say " ah " . . . teaching jjlans for a new day . . . those " eight hour " day sheets . . . records, records, and more records . . . four-thirty public health — a family service. 152 . % ,, , . " Symposium — the classic condition Role playing — experience brings understanding PSYCHIATRY . . . the mastery of oneself . . . Springfield . . . three months stay away from " home " ... a very new and awesome unit . . . our new team leader — the psychiatrist . . . new faces and volumes of new terminology . . . mornings utilized helping the patient adjust . . . afternoons passed quickly learning therapies and their applications . . . evenings spent " pondering " . . ,. E.C.T., insulin, O.T., R.T. and their net result . . . glimpses of Phipps, Seton and Rosewood . . . Neuroanatomy and its unforgettable nissl bodies . . . lessons in personality development starring ourselves . » . examples and samples of a " classic condition " . . . staff conferences and sym- posiums . . . the result a better understanding for patient and team . . . home — a great deal wiser in our understanding and ability to help others. Psychiatric Institute ... a warm welcome with the " community coffee jar " ,. . . nursery school and the dilemma of choosing one child among the masses . . . the significant keys to unlock the mysteries of human behavior . . . " anxiety producing moments " . . . " how do you feel about this? " . . . the art of becoming a listener . . ,. up to R.T. . . . down to O.T. . . . confer- ences and group meetings . . . classes, I.P.R. studies, projects . . . role playing and feeling the emotions of both patient and nurse . . . therapeutic activities to understand oneself , . . impressions of Spring Grove and the resulting desire to revolutionize . . . profes- sional and personal growth . . . now the door closes, but we have the keys to open it once again. Springfield — for guidance An understanding toward therapy DPEMTIIVG RDDM " Scalpel, sponge, clamp! ' Scrubbing . . . first step toward asepsis A scrub nurse ' s layette Tcaimvork in iiKiliciii 154 BASKETBALL Forwards— Resli out smarts guard to snare two L. to R. Kneeling: V. Bean, B. Stoner, Coach R. Bajkowska, P. Thayer, L. Resli. Standing: N. Skadding. .M. Mules, J. White, J. Bramble, J. Friese, L. Baxter, M. Young. " Captains ready? ' . . . Time in on llie whistle . . . fourteen fearless " fighters ' . . . fifth floor Psych gym . . . Tuesday night practice parlor . . . Win over St. Joe . . . breathless two minute overtime . . . Bramble ' s height a great asset . . . Vying rivals meet . . . net out of reach . . . loss proves heart- breaking . . . skeleton crew faces " champs " . . . feature . . . Resh ' s lay-up shots . . . team spirit darkened . . . Holiday feature . . . " practice " with house staff . . . " dirty " stars . . . Merciless defeat . . . fourth straight loss . . . height of squad insult . . . Snoustonn . . . postponement stimulating . . . faint win o er M.G.H. changes tide . . . team still anxious . . . generous win over Provident . . . " Carolina " car gives moral support . . . Mutt ' s and Jeff ' s battle . . . spectator count now encouraging . . . Baxter plays dual role . . . Season climax . . . thrilling victory over Bon Secours . . . Powell ' s power cleverly distributed . . . flashing photog- ra|)her ]iresent . . . ictory celebralinn ;it Bonnie ' s . . . hats off to a contented team. Rhuniba anvorie; ' Guards — CfcI that loss-up! Bonnie ' s — Pizza to ciltbrate succcsj-ful season Ihiddlr- I . r- win llii fi.imi ' ! GLEE ELUB GLEE CLUB, L. to R: Director, C. Haslup, N. Skadtling, D. McClure. B. Clow, E. Heckman. J. Juilkins, C. Ingrick, J. Conway, M. Bradburn, J. Kreh, J. Arbegast, B. Peterson, J. Bramble, P. Thayer, K. McFarland, B. Klinedinst, M. Pyle, J. Rice, M. Young, J. Williams, S. Hipp. Practice makes perfect Blue and white nightingales . . . instruineiited and directed by Bird Charles HaslMp . f - flock of thirty songsters . . . nest in dormitory living jfooi|i . . . apply the larynx Monday evenings . . . warbled a . M edical School Convocation . . . purred at Alumni diimer jBjrolled at Practical Nurses ' Gradu- ation . . . twittercc %t (!Br " Ra al Aacademy Hospital . . . carrolled at Dr. Krant ' s L btAaoP- hospital Christmas party and throughout hospital dui HHI ays . . . chirped at Trinity Church social . . . became j kong-birds at Maryland Peni- tentiary . . . hen-partied at simleiit nurse reunion . . . har- monized at U. of Md. SAE invitation . . . vocalized at Marine and Doctors ' Hospitals . . . chirped at Silver Tea . . . feathers at rest ... at ease per roost. Judy taps to " Basin Street " Carols for IJr. Krantz ' s guests University Chordeltes 157 Bible study . . . sharing and expressing Centennial — Sesquicentrnnial finds school of nursing well represented. n CAMPI LIFE F -jp Decking the Halls Ligluening hearts with magic of music " Sure we believe in Santa " Staff Christmas Party " A Merry Christmas to all " 159 DANCING m THE DMK And the dance lingers on " Kings and queens of Ilcarl " gather at The Cadoa Preparing " old faitlitiil " for a welcome dance Chordettes featured in Psi Omega Minstrel Music by the Men of Note 34 - 24 ■ 34 ? OUR IVIED WALLS Presenting . . . T.V. ■ S.N. Mrs. Alexander . . . sound judgment, kindness, and friendship are hers. " The gentleman takes a nurse " Six no ? ... no ! Mrs. Gleason relays a message Mrs. Clye counts her sheep .1 YDU WERE THERE... September destination — College Park . . . immediately absorbed in the excitement and chatter . . . new faces . . . feeling of inde- pendence and determination . . . small closets, bunk beds . . . spacious green mall, scattered buildings . . . tears in Mom ' s and Dad ' s eyes . . . unpacking and pressing . . . rushing . . . tours and tired feet . . . " Why do all those football players sit on the wall? " . . . registra- tion . . . general chaos . . . " Grand Central Station, " long lines, train tickets, mailbox numbers, Saturday classes — ish . . . Freshman Mixer, terrace dance. Sophomore Carnival, the Proms, Louie Prima, Ralph Flannigan, block dances. Dixieland bands. Powder Puff Bowl, Turtle Derby, Intrafraternity Sing, Harmony Hall . . . memories were made of these . . . and classes . . . zoology, slimy ameoba, emaciated cats, labs . . . History of Nursing . . . Dalton ' s law, " But Dr. Rollinson, why does a molecule split? " . . . Nutrition 110, white rats . . . Psych in the Gulch . . . theme after theme . . . nurses need Parlia- mentary Law?? . . . coifee break at the Rec Hall after 8 A.M. classes . . . " Meet you at Albrecht ' s after your 10:00 " . . . the dining hall . . . swordfish and boiled rice . . . week- ends . . . G.l.G.l.F. ' s . . . Zal ' s . . . cowboy and pajama parties . . . traditional Tau Tramp, Minstrel Show . . . numbers to re- member— 823, 4400. 2400 . . . Saturday nights end with Little Tavern Deathballs . . . football . . . Pep and noise rallies . . . " To the boulevard! " . . . Big Red . . . mums, blankets, noisemakers, " rolls " of streamers, the TKE bell . . . Homecoming and old grads . . . floats and house decorations . . . queens . . . exams . . . the files . . . panic . . . basketball in Ritchie Coliseum . . . Rossborough Inn, the wishing well, the tunnel . . . dedication of the Chapel . . . Spring . . . convertibles . . . Green- belt and Rock Creek . . . tennis anyone? . . . ROTC . . ,. May Day . . . couples sitting under the trees . . . pinnings and seranades . . . Chapel bells tolling " Maryland, My Maryland " every hour on the hour . . . joyous sounds darkened only by dark, pendulous, overhang- ing exams — climax of our two years at College Park ... Onward to University Hospital ... we join the 36 who relate their Freshman days . . . nursing arts . . . bedpans, bed baths, lab coats . . . " use your thigh muscles " . . . Micro- biology — or Variety Show . . ,. contamination ad infinatum . . . anatomy and physiology . . . Gray lab and " Missy " . . . good old bor- borygmus . . . bones and muscles ,. . . " on old Olympian ' s towering top " . . . English . . . chemistry . . . acids, bases, salts . . . " Do it • ; 1 ...AND HERE, TDD! It Mm 3 ' UiW F?: over " . . . nutrition . . . " wake up, girls " . . . polysaccharides and vitamins , . . psychology . . . rationalization and knitting . . . paranoid tendencies . . . sociology and theatrics . . . 36 plus 26 equals ' 56 grads . . , first aid . . . splints, bandages, shorts . . . dosage and solutions . . . find x . . . that first injection . . . borborygmus . . . circulatory nursing and " fibrillations " . . . dermatology and vener- ology . . . the French ( ? ) disease . . . contact dermatitis . . . pharmacology and therapeutics . . . the effects of alcohol . . . dogs, rabbits, mice . . . exams . . borborgmus . . . History of Nursing . . . milk and cookies . ,. . foods and cookery . . . baking in the summer ' s heat . . . the soft rattle of charge keys . . . 4D relief . ,. . notes on the elevators . . . checked curtains at Peabody ' s . . . Chipparelli ' s and pizza . . . the affects of alcohol . . . psychiatry . . . Oedipus who? . ,. . the four B ' s . . . sym- posiums . . . fresh air and good food . . . weekends off . . . the " Pit " . ,. . web belts, paraldehyde and I.V. ' s . . . Phisohex, T.A.T., suture sets on Saturday nights . . , diet kitchen . . . assembly line ... a straw on every tray . . . low sodium, 1200 calorie diets . . . the rats ,. . . Seniors at last . . . night duty forever and ever . . . lost flashlights . . . sudden noises . . . days without sleep . . . black bands . . . parties and showers at 11 P.M. . . . more late leaves . . . basketball . . . glee club . , . T.M.M. . . . weeks of relief . . . Pediatrics . . . wash what- ever you can hold of . ,. . Da-avy Crockett caps . . . needles and tears . . . that hopper on five with the long flush . . . the " premies " wee beasties . . . formula room . „ . masks, gowns, gloves, slippery nipples . . . " O.B. " . . . for every woman a cure . . , push, pant, help the good doctor . . . religious incantations with cervical dilation . . . diapers and formulas . . . labor and A.S.A.? ,. . . 3-H enemas . . . Public Health . . . more fresh air . . . 13 weeks . . ,. photostat . . . service hours . . . " How do you like Public Health, dearie? " . . . bus strike . . . tired feet . . . the B. and B. party . ,. . Hedgie ' s uke . . . meetings, meet- ings, meetings . . . dances in the cafeteria . . . Bridge anyone? . . . the " Dog " committee invades the hospital . . . begging pleas book editors . ,. . Dental and Med dani parties in 444 . . . fittings for our whites gym class or body mechanics . . . force, work, distance . . . solicitors rounds . „ . 5tli floor culture sessions . . . plans for unforgettable June Week . ., . Junior-Senior prom . . . our days are numbered . .. . many " indefinite ' ' plans for the future-, . . . Baccalaureate . . . Alumni Banquet . . . Senior breakfast . . . Yearbook signatures,. ,. . the " big moment " ends as quickly as if began . . . individual goals achieved only to be reset a ste higher ... P PROGRESS . . . SCHOOL OF NURSING AND RESIDENCE BUILDING With professional growth goes physical expansion. Our new building of classrooms, offices, rcsidfiices. and recre- ational facilities will help broaden our student life socially and educationally. 166 .oue Dur Sponsors: Dor Gratitode for yoor Assistance and Encooraqement Nci ncyj nn Jar son t- , -.t--c_ C . S x ' 2 cr— , J r Qj( i? - f. 7 - y- 0,.flL.a.(CN .. ' c C.fvV . oJwol J JJ JT). Q u . uJ- ' 168 V.. . ...... ir ,y i (Zi f . i-- ' V ' o. . 2 . 4 ' ?:wU. yA r jtA . . 169 4 t ' d X ' ' «- - 06 - 2V tJtV fc 1 f : 77-. fi,% a WrJe KOMy . ,2L e , ' ' y). -O - t ' - 170 Dur Patrons: Dur appreciatian far your support Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Adams Dr. and Mrs. Thurston R. Adams— M- ' 34 Dr. and Mrs. L. L. Ashburn Ruth W. Baldwin, M.D.— M- ' 43 William B. Barnes Isabel J. Barron Mr. and Mrs. Norman Baxter Mr. and Mrs. Roland Bean Mr. and Mrs. Louis Becker Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Belgrad Dr. Eugene S. Bereston — M- ' 37 Dr. Samuel P. Bessman Mr. and Mrs. Glenn E. Biehl Fannie and Albert Blue Louis V. Blum, M.D.— M- " 34 Mr. and Mrs. Marcus C. Bramble Mary Anna Brislin — N- ' 51 Dorothy A. Carr Mr. and Mrs. Nelson L. Cohen— M- ' 56 Mr. and Mrs. Clifton D. Conaway Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Conklin Mrs. Harry Cooper Mr. and Mrs. Louis Cooper Mr. and Mrs. Michael Cooper Dr. Joseph M. Cordi Dr. Edward F. Cotter Evelyn L. Courtney Dr. Richard J. Cross— M- ' 46 Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Cunningham — M- ' 39 Mr. and Mrs. Herman Cutler Eva F. Darley Peggy Ann Dashiell Sue T. Dawson Mary R. Dayball Mr. and Mrs. Arnin Debstreit John DeCarlo, M.D. Anna Lee DeHaven — N- " 46 Dr. John B. De Hoff Dr. Everett S. Diggs— M- ' 37 Div. Public Health Nursing Ruth Dyson Carl E. Ericsson Mr. Belmont Farley Dr. and Mrs. Frederick P. Ferguson Edward G. Field, M.D. Dr. A. H. Finkelstein Dr. Russell S. Fisher Mr. and Mrs. William H. Fletcher Miss Fralinger Virginia Lee Franklin — N- ' 54 A Friend A Friend A Friend Dr. Perry Futterman — M- ' 44 Mr. and Mrs. William N. Galloway Mr. and Mrs. Nelson W. Gebb Caroline and Samuel Gelblum Mrs. Charles E. Gesell Joann M. Gesell— N- ' 56 Mr. and Mrs. V. T. Gesell Nancy Gocke, R.N.— N- ' 55 Burton and Maxine Goldstein Dr. Caridad Gonzalez Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Grigg Mrs. Gerald Halway Mr. and Mrs. Donald P. Hardesty Mr. and Mrs. Clair E. Hart A. S. Haskins, M.D. Mr. and Mrs. William Hauser Dorothy K. Herbert— N- ' 24 George Anna Hinely — N- ' 55 Mr. and Mrs. Grover W. Herndon Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hilgenberg Elsie Ho Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Hodges Mark Hollander, M.D.— M- ' 31 Dr. and Mrs. Clewell Howell— M- ' 24 Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hughes Lois C. Hundertmark — N- ' 38 Simone C. Hurst Miss Marguerite Hydorn Benj. H. Isaacs, M.D.— M- ' 36 Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Ivens, Jr. M. W. Jacobson, M.D.— M- ' 32 Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Jirecek Dr. Wm. H. Kammer, Jr.— M- " 39 Walter E. Karfgin, M.D.— M- ' 36 Dr. C. F. Karns— M- ' 27 Mr. and Mrs. Milton Kessler Dr. Leon A. Kochman— M- ' 33 Mr. and Mrs. Verlin C. Krabill Joanne C. Kreh— N- ' 57 Mr. and Mrs. Frank K. Kriz Fred T. Kyper, M.D.— M- ' 23 Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Lantz Audrey A. Layman — N- ' 55 Philip F. Lerner, M.D.— M- ' 31 Herbert R. Lewis M. Rosalee Lewis, R. N. Dorothy Lochte Mr. and Mrs. Victor M. McAlister Mr. and Mrs. Bruce McCleaf Mr. and Mrs. Fred McFadden 171 George G. Merrill, M.D. Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Michel Lolali Marshall .Miliin Donald W. Minlzer, M.D.— M- ' 44 Gladys A. Mintzer— N " 45 Dr. Frank K. Morris— M- ' 23 J. Hurt Morrison, M.D. S. Edwin Muller, M.D.— M- ' 37 Harry M. Murdock, M.D. C. Lorraine Ncal — N- ' 41 Mr. and Mrs. Murray C. Nelson Mrs. Herbert L. Norfolk— N- ' 56 Louis A. Nowell Henrietta Orf Ellen M. O ' Shea Mr. and Mrs. Preston A. Pairo, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Preston . Pairo, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. William Paul -Margaret Paulonis Dr. H. R. Peters Frederick W. Plugge— M- ' 57 Milton Phimb .Mrs. B. B. Powell Anna E. Pratt, R.N.— N- ' 23 Mr. and Mrs. Sam Preis Michael J. Raleigh Dr. and Mrs. George D. Resh .Mr. and Mrs. Paul Rhodes -Mr. and Mrs. Lewis M. Rice Mrs. Mcrlcnc M. Richardson— N- ' 54 Raymond C. V. Robinson, ALD.- M- " 40 Margaret L. Royal Maxine M. Russell— N- ' .51 Mr. and .Mrs. Geo. Rutherford Maria T. Sagardia — N- ' 43 Miss Abby Schiff— N- ' . S Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Schmidt, Jr. Nathan Schnaper, M.D. S. LaRue Schwallenberg .Mr. and .Mrs. Albert Schwartz Mr. and Mrs. Francis C. Shearer Albert J. Shechuh, M.D.— M- ' 31 .Mr. and Mrs. Theodore R. Shrop Betty Shuhkagel— N- ' 54 -Mr. and .Mrs. Sam Silberg .Mr. and Mrs. Homer R. Simpson Mr. George R. Skadding Ruth A. Snyder, R.N. Dr. John T. Slang Martin F. Slant Dr. and .Mr?. Henry . ' tartztnan — M- ' .50 Mr. and Mrs. John A. Stoner Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Stoner Flora n. Street— N- ' 38 Mr. and Mrs. J. Charles Strott Mary F. Seltzer Mr. and Mrs. Frank R. Swezey Dr. and Mrs. J. M. Thayer, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. Thomas— N- ' 56 William E. Thompson Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Thornton F. X. Paul Tinker, M.D. Ethel M. Troy Edward B. Truitt. Jr., Ph.D. Dr. Henry F. Ullrich— M- ' 29 Dr. Raymond E. Vanderlinde John Irvin Varner Dr. Frederick J. Vollmer— M- " 38 Mr. and Mrs. Samuel S. Watts — N- Sf W. Earl Weeks, M.D.— M- " 40 Mrs. Sadie Webb Mr. and Mrs. Philip Weinstein Helen L Wheatley Dr. John I. White Milton J. Wilder, M.D.— M- ' 39 Katherine ' illiams — N- ' 45 0. W. Williams Annette Wills— N- ' 48 Dr. and Mrs. Gibson J. Wells— M N- ' 36 Dr. Walter D. Wise Mrs. Kathryn S. Wohlsen Mr. and Mrs. Leo E. Yorde Mr. and Mrs. John D. Young Mr. and Mrs. William Zimmerman Mrs. Bessie M. Arnurius — N- ' 20 Rita Bajkowska Mrs. Marie Branan Mr. and Mrs. John L. Davidson Patricia M. Davis— N- ' 55 Mrs. Anna Jericek Mr. and Mrs. S. S. Lancaster, Jr. M. Rosalee Lewis, R.N. Louise K. Eichner, R.N. Jane Eisenhauer, R.N. N- ' 55 Mrs. John F. Flanigan — N- ' 49 Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert T. Friese Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Goe Eleanor AL Harrison — N- ' 49 Thclma I. Kleckner, R.N.— N- ' 47 Laura Philbrick, R.N. Marion C. Waldie Edith E. Miller 172 CoinplimCNfs STUMNT GOVERNMENT fiSSOCIftTION u. Of roD. SCHOOL op NURSINQr 173 May Your Burning Hopes And Ideals Of Today Light The Roads Of Tomorrow Best Wishes Class Of 1955 University Of Maryland College Of Nursing 174 DAVID M. NICHOLS CO. REALTORS Homes — Farms — Waterfronts 15 W. FRANKLIN STREET Lexington 9-6855 Agents for Kent Island Estates, Harborview Romancoke-On-The-Bay CONGRATULATIONS Class of ' 56 J. JENKINS SONS CO.. INC. 2601 W. Lexington St.— ED. 6-6188 Manufacturers of University of Maryland SCHOOLS OF MEDICINE and NURSING RINGS — CREST JEWELRY Compliments of EMERSON DRUG COMPANY MAKERS OF BROMO-SELTZER Fomous for Relief of Headache and Upsef Stomach BALTIMORE INSTRUMENT COMPANY MAKERS OF PRECISION INSTRUMENTS Design, Manufacture and Repair Surgical, Scientific and Laboratory Instruments of All Types New and Used Microscopes Sold and Repaired SA ratoga 7-5035 716 W. Redwood St. Baltimore. Md. DANKMEYER ' S PROSTHETIC CENTER Certified Prosthesis Mfg. 2029 E. North Ave. AMPLE PARKING BRoadway 6-7772 175 Best of All . . we are always improving! NURSES UNIFORM COMPANY Nurses ' Uniforms Made to Individual Measure PERFECT FIT SCHOOL UNIFORMS— PROFESSIONAL APPAREL (Officio Maker of U. of Md. Graduate Nurse Uniformsi 1822 E. Monument St.— 5 EAstern 7-4744 The O. K. Barber Shop 531 West Baltimore Street 1 AMOCO AMERICAN OIL COMPANY Comp imenfs of THE W. B. CASSELL CO. 1027 S. HOWARD ST. BALTIMORE. MARYLAND The Nurses ' Friend Clinic Shoes give you young styling and complete comfort. DALSHEIMER ' S 213 N. Liberty St. Compliment of A FRIEND 176 Ci) igniluliitio)is To The Class of ' 56 • Downtown • Edmondson • Belvedere Compliments of THE COOPER EQUIPMENT COMPANY 1114 Ninth Street, N.W. Washington 1, D. C. BONOLIS SHOE REPAIR Shoe Repairing ]Vhile-You-U ' ait 510 VV. BALTIMORE STREET M te MAY com, i i€i nft Compliments of THEODORE KLUPT AND COMPANY 329 West Boltimore Street Baltimore, Maryland " Should Auld Acquaintance ... " Whenever you or your friends come back to Baltimore on business, pleasure or for Class Re- unions, be sine to remember the Lord Baltimore Hotel. This great hotel has been downtown headquarters for Terp Old Grads for years. Mainly (we ' e been told) , because there ' s a lot of sheer comfort in its room appointments, good food in its restaiuants and fine service through- cut. The LORD BALTIMORE HOTEL B. LTIMORE AT HANOVER STS. Baltimore, Md. Compliments of the NURSES ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 177 s, ervzng the Medical Profession for over a third of a century Equipment and Supplies for: Pnysicians and Surgeons Hospitals • Laboratories • Industrial Clinics AIurray-jBaumgartner SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPANY, INC 5 West Ckase Street • SAratoga 7-7333 Baltiinore 1, Maryland |m: Com f)Iiiiie»ts of CARL ' S RESTAURANT 51!) V. I.OMHARD STREET PHARMACIES SINCE 1883 REALTORS W. BURTON GUY CO. MORTGAC.E LOANS Willi tlir Cdinpluncnts tif a Frirtid Hynson, Wescotf Dunning, Incorporated c:hari.k,s ;iik1 chase streets 1 AI riMORI 1 . Ml). 178 (( li)here Southern J4o3pUalUy, sJj a J ealUy. HOTEL m The Meyer Hotel in Baltimore O. G. Clements, Manager 400 Air-Conditioned Rooms Dr. C. H. Webster Robert L. Webster Special Agents NEW YORK LIFE INS. CO. We offer a special plan of Life Insurance to the Medical Profession Address nil inquiries to: DR. C. H. WEBSTER 102 White Park Place Ithaca, New York UNIVERSITY RESTAURANT 5 S. Greene Street Sam and Bol) Lewis, Proprietors Open 24 Hours a Day BEST WISHES FROM UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE 519 W. Lombard Street Medical Books Stationery Surgical Instruments Serving the Student ' s Needs BALTIMORE HARDWARE for scissors and tools KATHERINE MARTIN greeting cards — gifts 601 W. Baltimore Street at Greene 179 L. E. GOLDSBOROUGH, INC. Insurance for Ex ' ery Need Including Physicians Malpractice Policies 2434 Maryland Ave. Baltimore 18, Md. HOpkins 7-5 ' .) 10- 11 C.oinplunents of A. J. BUCK AND SON 1515 East North Avenue Baltimore 13, Maryland CONGRATULATIONS to the GRADUATES OF 1956 HUTZLER ' S Kloman Instrument Co., Inc. 907 Cathedral Street Baltimore, Md. Surgical Supplies Physicia ns ' Office E iuipinent Medical Supplies SA ratoga 7-3060 Fnjoy Bardens Ice Cream ML ' Iberry 5-7222 Bernard L. I-rctikil Franklin Uniform Co. Soulli ' s Largest i ' niforui House Baltiimne Wa hint ton — Ridiiiioiul 235 Park Avenue Baltimore 1, Md. Coinf)luitc] ts of SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO. 1400 E. North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 5700 Ritchie Highway, Brooklyn Park RESI NOL 01 NTMENT Made in Baltimore _ i Rc:orcin, Oil of Code, Prepored Colamine, Zinc Oxide, Bismuth Subnitrotc Boric Acid (nlill)inc(l ill ,1 l.illiillll {» ' llnl;il Mill Ii.im ' Ki mpiHIic and luhricaic (li iiiiuilcil skin, lamoiis lor (ill years for i(s |ji iin|)l. long jasiing relief lor skin iliJiing. Iiiirning and minor soreness, i ' rescribe fiecly. 1 ' rescril.e, also, rmr RK.SINOI. (.Rl- ASI ' 1 1 SS in Inhts. Conlains ihe same fine medi(alioiis in a nieasejess, washalde, stainless base. Mfirtuftir Inittl li RESINOL CHEMICAL COMPANY Com f)lnni ' nls of The Shady Nook Nursing and Convalescent Home 1002 N. Rolling Rood Catonsville 28, Md. MRS. .SOIMIIA .Nin.E.S. R.N. 180 S- IN MEMORY OF A YOUTH WHO GAVE HIS LIFE TO HELP PERPETUATE THE IDEALS THAT HAVE MADE AMERICA GREAT. Donated by The Ensign C. Markland Kelly Jr. Foundation, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland. 181 Scuiike in oxygen company COMPRESSED CAS MANUFACTURER ANliSTHETIC THERAPEUTIC GASES and EQUIPMENT RESUSCITATION EQUIPMENT RENTAL and REPAIR SERVICE 2900 Kenilworth Aye. — Bladensburg, Md. UN ' ion ■1-2. ' M5 More tlian 50 hrandi uunchouse lonilious tlirotiphoiit the rast. The ARUNDEL CORPORATION Baltimore 2, Md. Dredging — Engitircring Constrnrtion SAND GRAVEL STONE COMMERCIAL SLA(; MUTH BROTHERS COMPANY 23 25 S. CHARLES STREET Baltimore 3, Md. Wholesale Druggists PL a a 2-0480 liAI.riMORES OLDEST SERVICE WHOLESALER " Ortho OBSTETRICAL - GYNECOLOGICAL PHARMACEUTICALS AND BIOLOGICALS lOR IHE MEDICAL PROFESSION ORTHO PHARMACEUTICAL CORPORATION, RARITAN, NEW JERSEY 182 H. G. ROEBUCK SON Incorporated 2140 AISQUITH STREET • BALTIMORE 18, MARYLAND Sf CX ft4A %e Producers of Your Yearbook 183 Internships Abeshouse, George A Siiiai Hospital, Baltimore Adams, John E Union Memorial Hospital Adkins, Robert T Mercy Hospital, Inc. Anderson. Daniel G Uni ersity Hospital Baer, Henrv A University of Virginia Hospital Barchet, Stephen Naval Hospitals Belgrad, Richard Uni ersity Hospital Bellomo, Frank R The Mountain Ide Hospital Bennion, Jerald H W. H. Groves L. D. Sts. Bialek, Stanley M D. C. General Hospital Blue. Morris L Sinai Hospital. Baltimore Bongardt, Henry F., Jr iMercy Hospital, Inc. Brown, Ernest Cambridge City Hospital Burningham, Richard A Naval Hospitals Burvvell, James A White Cross Hospitals Byrne, Robert J Greenwich Hospital Carski, Theodore R University Hospital Castellano, James, Jr St. Agnes, Baltimore Chase, James M., Jr The Delaware Hospital Cohen, William Sinai Hospital, Baltimore Cohen, William C University Hospital Collawn, Thomas H Allentown Hospital Davidson, David L Baltimore City Hospital Dorsey, James T Allentown Hospital Downing, John D., Jr Tampa Municipal Hospital Eglseder, Ludwig J Mound Park Hospital Estes, James T University Hospital Farmer. Richard G Milwaukee County Hospital Finegold, Richard A Montefiore Hospital Foster, Giraud V University Hospital Franco. Jorge A Bellevue Hospital, N. Y. Franklin, Marshall B Duke Hospital Frohlich, Edward D D. C. General Hospital Grigoleit, Alfred W Winchester M. M. Hospital Hawkins. J. Henry, Jr Med. Coll. of Virginia Headley, Robert N Univ. of Virginia Hospital Henderson, Neil C Methodist Hospital Hersperger, Webb S Geo. F. Geisincr Mem. Hoffman, Lee Buffalo General Hospital Hooper, Virgil R University of Michigan Hummel, Ralph T Wayne County Gen. Hospital Hurwitz, Gilbert E University Hospital Ivens, Betty I University Hospital Johnston, Daniel F Los Angeles County Hospital Kanner, Albert V University of Wisconsin Kaplan. Robert M Boston City Hospital Kellam. Shcppard G Bellevue 4th Med. N.Y.U. Kelly, John E., Jr University Hospital King, Charles H University of Michigan Klatt, Kenneth M L niversity of Wisconsin Knowles, Paul W University Hospital Koller. E. Curtis Union Memorial Hospital Kramer, Bernard Sinai Hospital, Baltimore Kramer, Harold C University Hospital Kress, Scheldon D. C. General Hospital Lancaster, Louis J Virginia Mas. N. Hospital Lanzi. Joseph G Mercy Hospital, Inc. Laughlin, Carl P University Hospital, Cleveland Lee, Mathew H University Hospital Lemmert, William A St. Agnes, Baltimore Littleton. John B University Hospital Lloyd. William T Mercy Hospital, Inc. Love, Thomas A Mercy Hospital, Inc. Maggld, Gerald N Sinai Hospital, Baltimore Mahon, Robert J Mercy Hospital, Inc. Mangus, Samuel J Army Med. Ser. Hospitals Marton, Herbert M Bronx Municipal Hospital McLaughlin, Joseph S University Hospital Muth, Robert G Naval Hospitals Myers, Richard I Public Health Service Nowell, John F Naval Hospitals Osteen, Clark L St. Agnes, Baltimore Oursler, David A Univ. of Virginia Hospital Palmer, William M Highland Alameda County Pickett, Wilbur C, Jr Duke Hospital Piatt, Marvin S University Hospital Plumb, Richard L Parkland Hospital Pollack, Irvin P Sinai Hospital, Baltimore Reahl. G. Edward, Jr Mercy Hospital, Inc. Rodman. Harold I Baltimore City Hospitals Ross, Harry P Union Memorial, Baltimore Sanislow, Charles A University of Michigan Schuster, (k ' rald D Sinai Hospital. Baltimore Shaub, Roy University of Michigan Sinton, William A., Jr Union Memorial Hospital Skaggs, James W.. Jr I nion Memorial Hospital Slater, Paul V Milwaukee County Hospital Sowell, George A Roper Hospital Stovin, James J Lenox Hill Hospital Stuck, Robert G Union Memorial Hospital Sturgeon, Howard E Norfolk General Hospital Trainis, Evelyn A Deferred Trucker, Albert 1... Jr Ihiiv. of Calif. Hospital Truitt, Virginia II Allentown Hospital Whiteford. Edwin W U. S. Air Force Williams. John 7, Harri lun ' g Hospital Wilson, Harry D.. Jr Union Memorial Hosi)ital Wright, Robert L Akron General Hospital 184


Suggestions in the University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) collection:

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

1955

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

1957

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

1958

University of Maryland School of Medicine - Terrae Mariae Medicus (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.