University Liggett School - Rivista Yearbook (Grosse Pointe Woods, MI)

 - Class of 1943

Page 1 of 88

 

University Liggett School - Rivista Yearbook (Grosse Pointe Woods, MI) online yearbook collection, 1943 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 88 of the 1943 volume:

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Q ,, K M48 f . . , y RT a X v 6. an . , The Junior Class presents Rivisfd DEDICATION Liggelt dedicates this issue of Rifvisla to all the uniforms of the 'world that are helping to fwin this 'war ayainsl the Axis. s 4 55 X s X Wi W FQ ! -" K' if ZRXX Sv-s if-It 59 Sf Q iw 1 fi XX if xi 3, X ,pcm K Yuuox NW Working For Victory 7 A atharine Ogden To begin my message for the 1943 Rivista by saying that this is a history-making year is only to repeat what we all think and feel as we read the morning's headlines, as we listen over the radio to the voices of President Roosevelt, Prime Minister Churchill, Mme. Chiang Kai Shek, or even as we turn in coupon No. 17 for a pair of sturdy new shoes. It is exciting to be experiencing all this history, even though each day presents new problems, new decisions to be made, new responsibilities. Since one of the difficulties which we all face in 1943 is having less time for more jobs, some of our most important decisions have been what to do and what not to do- what is worthwhile and what we cannot afford in time and energy. This is a personal problem for each of us, and demands the quality of mind and character which college entrance committees call "maturity". In normal times a girl can develop this discrimin- ation slowly, but not in wartime! She has to plan her school day more carefully so she can do her research reading, or her laboratory preparation without extra mileage. She has to manage to have a week of lunch hours free when her turn comes to be on "D. P.". She knows she cannot manage both junior-Senior Play rehearsals and basketball practices after school, so she has to choose between them. Perhaps even more difficult are the decisions with regard to out-of-school demands. Most families are managing these days with less help than formerly and Liggett girls must do their share of "D. P." or "K. P." on the home front. Then there are the oppor- tunities for First Aid and Home Nursing classes which are so worthwhile- for every girl and woman in peace or war. Liggett School has warmly endorsed the junior AWVS and enthusiastically enlisted in its ranks and gives generously of precious Saturday time to this volunteer organization. When vacations come Detroit girls have an opportunity, even an obligation, to help with some of the many jobs clamoring for them because of the acute manpower shortage. This is a splendid chance to broaden one's horizon, know a different group of people, learn new techniques, or even gather ideas about what one really wants to make one's life profession. Several girls have attempted Saturday jobs during the school session, but most of them have decided, after a fair trial, that it is unwise. Health comes first, school obli- gations second, and then whatever we can do for the war effort. For never before in history has the education of the girls who are now in high school and college been so vital. The building ,of the post-War world must certainly be done by trained people. The boys who are fighting on the battlefields or on the seven seas have no chance to study Principles of Democracy or Economics. Even the boys who are still in school are concentrating on technical courses designed to make them the engineers, the chemist , the radio experts the War requires. It is the college graduate who has majored in history, in languages, in economics, in government or in social problems who will be drafted to help win the Peace. We cannot say this too often, nor feel it too strongly, and while there are often times when the routine of our school life seems dull, when we long for the "glamor" of more immediate service, we can comfort ourselves by knowing that it is the firm conviction of all experts that we are putting in the ground- work-just by being faithful in day by day school tasks and developing maturity-for an important post-war contribution to the history of the world. 6 1943 FACULTY HEADMISTRESS KATHARINE OGDEN, B.A., Vassar: Ph.D., University of Illinois Principal Emeritus JEANNETTE M. LIGGETT, Vassar: Associate Student of Classical Studies, Rome: a:1uLIfL,.o I Hon. M.A., Wayne University GRETCHEN K. BLACKBURN ---- - Physical Education EI lE, ormal College CLARE C. BOND ------ - History and English B.A., Univ sity of VVest Virginia H ' KATHARINE BROWN ------- - Music Surette School of Music: Longy School of Music ALMA B. COCKBURN ---------- Mathematics Toronto College .of Education: University of Toronto: Columbia University: B.A., Wayne University NAN COLE ' ---------- Fifth and Sixth Grades Diploma, National Education of Ireland: Queen's University, Belfast: Marlboro College, Dublin: Pupil of VVilliam Orpen, John Keating: Dublin School of Art ETTA JEAN CRAIG ------ - English B.A. and MA., University of Michigan NEVA CREIGHTON ----- - History and Civics HA., University of Michigan LOUISE PIERSON DAVIS - - Latin and Spanish B.A., VVayne University JULIA DAWSON ----------- Second Grade B.S., Detroit Teachers' College: Merrill-Palmer School: Wayne University GABRIELLE DELENS ----------- French Baccalaureat a la Sorbonne, Paris: Degre de Regente Litteraire, Universite St. Armand, Belgium GEORGIA LEE DUNCAN ------ Kindergarten and Nursery National College of Education, Evanston, Illinois: VVayne University ALICE JACOBS ----- - Advanced Kindergarten NVayne University 7 KATHRYN CANFIELD KELLY - - Assistant in Kindergarten BA., VVellesley JESSIE B. LANE ------------ Science Pratt Instituteg University of Michigang Columbia University MARIAN V. LOUD ---------- '- - Art Harvard Summer Schoolg Detroit School of Fine Arts: Wayne Universityg Pupil of Deborah Kallen, Eben Comins, Lawrence Grant, Eliot O'Hara, Moritz. Hey111a11 h 1 x - L ELAINE McDAVITT --------- Speech and English B.S., Northwestern Universityg M.A., Northwestern Universityg graduate work, University of Michigan HELEN E. MAY ------------- Art M.F.A., VVayne Universityg Detroit School of Designg International School of Arty Pupil of john Carroll, Hans Hoffman, Ernest Thurn GILBERTE NEYRAC --------- - French Officier d'Academie, HA., Sorhonne, Paris RUTH OSBORNE ----------- First Grade B.A., Northwestern Universityp Graduate Work Northwestern University and University of Te s, and Southern Methodist LAURAINE RICHARDSON ------ Mathematics and Typing B.A., University of Michigang Graduate VVork VVayne University RUTH TAYLOR --------- Third and Fourth Grade B.A.,' VVayne Universityg Columbia University Summer School JANE LEWIS WELSBY ------ - Latin B.A., Mount Holyokeg Boston University EVA MCKINLEY WEST ------ - English BA., NVellesleyg M,A., Columbia University Administrative CHRISTINE CHRISTIE BERTINE FAIR, R.N., OLIVE H. Loun ELIZABETH RIDDELI. PONGRACE LAURA M. PEACH f64AAAAf W1 ' WILLIAM J. SCOTT, M.D., Consulting Physician 8 w -1 sf' The Upper 7"-.3 Sdhool QT f -9 cl -I sd sf 2222 22 22 .'.7"X' - ii- '112 2 ' .,, Il L i --I 5'-"ia --?' I 'x .Ps-.,lhk L-'rh--bw--1 MQ Table of Contents Working for Victory-Miss Ogden - Senior Section junior Section Sophomore Section - Freshman Section - Lower School - Activities - Advertisements 10 Class M otf If uf X o: Tejas Fm "'v k ,. O N f 1 W n I X h h h , 1 A K 1 L l "l..,,A'1-,g'xJ .-71 'Wm Wwo-olsmw P h th h t 1 s renowned than W -Milton ELINOR BOYD Boyd has been as busy as a bee all during her high school career. Her high soprano voice has made her a member of the Double Quartet for three years. In the tenth grade she served on the Self-Government Board and was later elected to the Athletic Board. She had roles in "What Men Live By", "Merchant Gentleman", and "The Neighbors". Her enviable athletic skill wion for her membership on the varsity hockey and basketball teams for three years. Her humorous quips are enjoyed by all, and without her, school would be dull. VIRG INIA ADAMS First as the decrepit grandma in "The Neighbors" and then as the arrogant Malvolio in "Twelfth Night" Ginny won fame. If she would consider it, the "Metro" would have both a good actress and an excellent singer on its hand. She has been the backbone of the Double Quartet for the past three years. tVVe are hoping the Quartet doesn't develop a curvature of the spine without her.D The Rivixta board profited from her membership-as did her class. Ginny has both enthusiasm and spirit and has distributed them widely. WMM ,Dada ,ff-wffff BEVERLY CARR We are all envious of Bee's calm assur- ance and perfect poise. As a matter of fact her quiet mannerisms tend to calm down our riotous group. The Athletic Board say that they don't know how they got along Without her. Always prepared, she is eager to take on any responsibilities. She was seen as a Turkish dancer in the "Merchant Gen- tleman" in her junior year. That she has been with us but two years is our only regret. MARY CARPENTER The Symmathetea Board has in Car- penter-judging from her parts in "The Neighbors", "The Merchant Gentle- man", and as Maria in "Twelfth Night" -both an actress and a good worker to boast of. In the eleventh grade Mary was not only the president of the class but she was also chosen the May Queen Attendant. Her spirit has remained un- daunted in spite of the trials and tribu- lations of Muzzey's American History. Perhaps some day she'l1 make history herself with the help of her enthusiasm and her pretty brown eyes. B ETTY C RA PO "Pretty"-not sufficient. "Brainy"-an understatement. Through her ability and interest in the "drama" she became the able "pres" of the Symmathetea Board, has taken part in all Liggett's dramatic efforts tot which special men- tion should go to her for her interpre- tation of Milady in "Milady Dreams" and of the beautiful Olivia in "Twelfth Nightnl. Crapo began flashing those dark eyes as the May Queen's flower girl, and again when she was the tenth- grade attendant. She has given the best of the last thirteen and a half years to Liggett-and given it wholehearted- ly. This is proved by nionograms ga- lore plus her fervent friends. ELISE COSGROVE Cossie has been with us two years now, and, needless to say, is one of the most popular girls in the class. She has a gift for rounding up representa- tives from D.U.S., etc., to help swell the proceeds of prom and play treasur- ies. We wouldn't lose her for the world. Her coal black locks and dark laughing eyes are the envy of all, and we unanimously agree that she made a perfect Joseph in the Christmas pro- gram. 'DY-L Linus A I awe. we-W -av-H5 wsu 'ou.3r. Xi-94.95. X618 og 6""" 59' "'Q""' 9.0-treo ' -4-Qffys S..-AM,-www. L wa. WC-'JL N 'Q-J-Aix QI... RH EA COOK 'o 010- wo M0 lf Cook endorses it-it's as good as done. The Self-Government Board found this out in '41 and likewise the Rivista Board, which claimed "Cookie's" efforts in her junior and senior years. In the plays "The Neighbors", "The Merchant Gentleman" and especially as the swash buckling sea captain in "Twelfth Night" she displayed her prowess in the drama. Her higher nature came ont when she played Joseph in the Christmas Tableau. "Cookie" is one of the elements that have preserved the unity of the class by opposition, if any of us succeeds, shfiwill be among its first. me AL-.. CIA J- Q.L.,Su.1w.., Kun, -Q50-I-vss-ui'-' KAI + ..-s.:s..,,....a...,..L-av. 'W-1. lima 3951- i'uJL ovsdwsti s- 1,151 QQAQLW, CELIA CHRISTIANSEN She's literary, she's dramatic, she's athletic. Once a month the stain of printer's ink ,appears on the tips of Celia's fingers after Goplzrr goes to press. Again those same fingers wieid a needle and thread to create her cos- tumes for "The Merchant Gentleman", "Twelfth Night", and the Christmas Tableau. In basketball she handles the ball with the ease and grace that dazzles her opponents, and won her the title of captain of our basketball team. Yes, "Sea" has what it takes to make the proverbial all-around girl. 15 QL.- S LDKJ a flu ati! in lhu.. ANN DAVIS It is a known fact that our class could not long endure without Andy. Ver- satility personified, she is capable of carrying out any task that confronts her. For example, she demonstrated her executive ability as President of the Athletic Board, and as chairman of the junior dance committee. Her dra- matic ability showed up as Peter in "The Neighbors" and as a Turk in 'tThe Merchant Gentleman". Ann proved her athletic prowess as captain of the freshman and sophomore base- ball, basketball and hockey teams. These accomplishments plus her won- derful sense of humor account for the indispensability- of our Andy to the class of '43, BETH CRITTENDEN Assofiate Member Critt is one of those girls who has a zest for making herself part of every- thing she enters into. So it was when -she entered the class of '43, for she became its vice-president and took over the discipline of her classmates with a judicial air. However, it's far from Beth's nature to be somber. Her gay spirit is unfailing, her smile enlighten- ing, and her manner gurgling with fun. Our only regret about Critt is that she didn't come sooner. Q5 .Qouve 1 fi 0 S1500 QKCPT5 via T0 I-'gov' To ClCJL.!1fl.'f0f MARY ELLEN FRY Mary Ellen has lent her ability in the drama in the "Sandalwood Box," as a sheik-like Turk in the "Merchant Gen- tleman," and as a shepherd in the Christmas Tableau. No doubt she will always be one of "the" people wherever she goes, for her humor, gayety, her love for parties and fun have given the class some of its brighter moments. Time and time again she has turned out to be that proverbial friend in need. She is a friend indeed. Heine we leo-fe Pt 1' can we drift osftl SLQ3'lL1 wg Q Tctaae UxW0'Jxliq55 0 NANETTE FONT Associate Member We have all become very fond of the latest addition to our senior class. Nanette, our most beautiful member, is also one of the most popular. Her dark locks and smiling dark eyes are the envy of all. She is not only a tal- ented artist but also famous for her "boogie-woogie". She served on the prom committee and her valuable help and cooperative spirit have been truly appreciated by all. She has become, in short, a true Liggett member. L QQ, sebvol 50 noob E14 QA! mrxxovql UPN ,ILQ Nryfw-K UQ MJT Q dfyeomii. ,TYx,Qr-AJXH-Q."f MARY JO GOULD Probably the most diligent Latin, French, and geometry scholar in our class is Jo-Jo. Never at any time is she unable to respond to teacher's questions. She is always willing to lend a helping hand when she is most needed. No less famous is her love for music and her talent as a pianist. Long after we are old and gray, Jo-Io's time- ly jokes will live on. SUZANNE GENTHE For two years Sue has driven to school from Wyandotte despite gas rationing. The girls she has given "lifts" to are innumerable, for she is always willing to pack her car full. As a dancer in our production of "The Merchant Gentleman" she was superb. Her will- ingness to help and her sunny disposi- tion have endeared her to all. MARY HERBST Mary became a member of the class of '43 in the tenth grade, and it's a pity her class didn't have her prowess in sports before. She is one of those girls who are always around when you need them-when you're in a last minute rush. VVhenever she is called upon, Mary acts with willingness and with accuracy. NVhat more can you ask than a willing spirit, a ready smile, and the accomplished task? Mary has done it time and again. Hers is a challenge hard to defeat. LOIS HEARNE The Double Quartet's second soprano, a Scribbler, Riuirtalv business manager, Liggett's collector of debts for two years, the chairman of the junior dance and of the prom, and, the mightiest of all, the President of the school-that's little Hearne. All events-social, poli- tical, and economical-lead to Hearne. There is always a place in everything for such as Lois. She has a wide under- standing and a genuine consideration for everyone. Hers will be a name that will be long remembered. CYNTHIA LANGE Cyn deserves a lot of praise, for she has kept at the top of her class in spite of all her bad luck with colds. Her steadiness won her the job of business manager of Gophnr. She made her class proud of her as the Madonna in the Christmas Tableaug however, Cyn has proved that her beauty is not only skin deep, for she is one of the gals who made the class of '43 what it is through her good will and never-ending kind- IICSS. BETTY LAFER Betty-the girl with the golden voice, executive ability, and :1 dramatic trend. She has put all three to good use. The Double Quartet, the plays "Milady Dreams," "Merchant Gentleman," and "Twelfth Night", and the Self-Govern- ment Board have claimed her talents. She achieved the title of President of the Senior Class-and most justly. Her house has become a favorite ren- dezvous where all are welcomed, where the saddest of hearts are lifted to the gayest of spirits through Lafer's love of fun and never-ending hospitality. QXWOUJ pol W1 TZAL awe OLXYNOJLZJ as 022 V-Umm - Dlfdwou ' use twcswfhr qcvffzm TED OWN Atlslfvx HQ' Ho U3 O7 ma B Clams I C325 well as ,Sw can Baa Mmm JUDY McKEAN Judy has led her class to fame many a time. She became "editor" McKean of Gopher in her senior year. The Dou- ble Quartet, Scrihblers, and the plays "The Sandalwood Box", "The Neigh- bors", "The Merchant Gentleman", and "Twelfth Night" all have claimed her versatile talents. She has taken an active part in sports. VVe'll best re- member her as she delivered the Presi- dent's Proclamation with fiery gusto, and as our faithful song leader. Nor kept us gay through all our woes. TRL UW. l iQ-2 as can we forget that giggle of hers thatil :Z 2, um S 5 ull euro G20 Ye vomit amz Lf: o obmlm KQOL, XTX A MARION MacKENZIE Maime's gay wit and smiling counte- nance have endeared her to one and all. She is, as we well know, full of vim, vigor, and vitality. In her sopho- more year she portrayed Jean in the "Sandalwood Box" most vividly. In her junior year she was a perfect Turk in "The Merchant Gentleman". She has a charming personality and has added much to the senior class. 'Du 1- 3 . I 'Ha ' qcnufuvs JEAN SAYRE Bum '2 A bubbling laugh, ashmg eyes and a cheery smile on Monday morning al- ways bring jean to mind. She is 17st only for her wonderful wit but also for her love of fun. She has her ' us side, too, and has served her as well as editor of Rivirta. She also had parts in the productions of the "Sandalwood Box", "What Men Live By", and "The Merchant Gentleman". She will best be remembered playing the piano, singing, talking incessantly, and getting A's in Latin. 'RSX udq N00 LOIS PULFER 'D 'PJ OL Living up to the proud title of Vice- President of the Symmathetea Board, Lois has done more than her share in dramatic entertainment. Her triumph came when she took the lead as Viola in "Twelfth Night". She was the first May Queen's attendant in her class, and set a standard in her freshman year that has been difficult for other attendants to live up to. Perhaps Chau- cer had such as Pulfer in mind when he wrote, "She was like a torch-so bright that every one may take its light and yet it never shines the less." uw-CML. sidclmnd lib ' mf toviwdlua X JUNE WOOLLARD whose membership in the class has had great influence, was our original Class President and number one girl academ- ically. VVe count it a privilege to have had her with us, to know and love her, and we feel she will always belong in a very special way to the Class of 1943, even though she is now in England with her family. l Zin flllrmnriam There former member: of the Clay: of '43 are fondly remembered. ALICIA FORTI NBERRY le , 4 'R l if 2 2 2 E 5 E s 1 E ' POLLY Hess D L. 0 HIARNE E 32 4' 'ff ,V JMB f'Xs.1v.1 'So ELHAQG. 'PvLf:11. Vloclsou Qjwthxes QQ.-v.-qw-rn. 24 'BEC 6.11 N' ,, ig 2? " A 1 -1 mf, .,... .W-L. ,rf rw Y ts, fm W -vw 2- ,r , 'DILNDNS fgfifw 'A 5? 52355535 wb 6 v 'X mf -uw-Q Y' Sli! NANE+WC A 4-A ,J Cv. ,7 QQ sz? as W if W 'KNKEOQ M A K O mpc zs Svky Lmflk J NAMES Adams Boyd Carpenter Carr Christiansen Cook Cosgrove Crapo Crittenden Davis Font Fry Genthe Gould Hearne Herbst Lafer Lange MacKenzie McKean Pulfer .Sayre PRESENT The The The The The The The The The The The The The The The The The The The best conversationalist best athlete l'l10St most lT10SlC original class spirit individual best sense of humor best dressed smartest best figure 1'IlOSt versatile prettiest face most cooperative most gracious manner most most most most most talented efficient vivacious hospitable intellectual best sport Done most for the class The best actress The wittiest 26 FUTURE Head of Mrs. Boswell's seminary for girls Chief matron at the Detroit House of Correction Holding a six-month filibuster in the Senate A public speaker 1990-sitting'home waiting for Dick Third from the left at the Avenue Writing autobiography to appear in the Times nightly Applying for a parole Running the commuter's special to Ann Arbor Detroit's political boss Librarian at the Detroit public library Sweetheart of the army Street-car conductor Piano - hopeless-taking up the flute Striking for longer hours and harder exams at Vassar History instructor at Harvard Crashing the Metropolitan Suing for fourth divorce Duchess of Loudenburg Editor-in-Chief of the New York Herald Tribune Owner of Wright Kay's 1972-just learning the last bar of "Tangerine" Mine For the Taking t Henry Van Dyke once wrote: "They lay stretched out before us in the level sunlight, the sharp peaks out- lined against the sky, the vast ridges of forest sinking smoothly towards the valleys, the deep hollows gathering purple shadows in their bosoms, and the little foothills tanding out in rounded promontories of brighter green from the darker mass behihd them. . "They were all ours, from crested cliff to wooded base, the plumed sierras of lofty pines, the stately pillared forests of birch and beech, the tremulous thickets of silvery poplar, the bare peaks with their wide outlooks, and the cool vales resounding with the ceaseless song of little rivers-we knew and loved them all: they ministered peace and joy to usg they were all ours." I have had such a feeling, a feeling of owning the mountains-in fact the very moun- tains just mentioned. I have lived in them, climbed them, walked through their valleys, and breathed their clean mountain air. I first realized I owned them one summer's day as I neared the top of one of them. It seemed the nearer I got the stiffer the wind was. It swept the heat of the July day from my forehead and blew the tiredness from my muscles. It made me run, because I wanted to get on top and look back on what I had accomplished. The trail was steep, but I forgot about it in scrambling over the little rocks and in pulling myself over the big ones. When I arrived at the summit, I received a reward ten times the worth of my efforts. I loved the feel of the wind whipping through my hair-a wind so strong I had to lean against it to stand up-a wind that tore up my sleeves and made me shiver. I thrilled at the marvelous vista before me-row upon row of immutable mountains-each higher than the other until they parted the clouds. As I followed with my eyes these protean shapes casting their shadows on the mountain woodlands below, I took in the vast blue beyond them and the brilliant sun that seemed to have a certain calmness and smoothness in sending its steady beam to the greedy land. The whole scene. made me feel as if I would stop breathing. It seemed a if the sky would envelop me in its vastness and the moun- tains and the trees swallow me. I gazed at the opulent kingdom at my feet-a kingdom that tretched across the world and back. It was a world of adventure and romance. There were mountains to climb, paths through fairy-touched forests, icy-cold, refreshing moun- tain streams with their crystal clear pools that had been ground out of the rock through centuries of toil. There were rivers overflowing with thrilling rapids, swift currents, slow currents, water lilies sparkling in the sun, and an occasional unexpected plunge to their sandy depths. I have had these experiences. They are stamped indelibly in my memory. They are not to be forgotten, and when I think of them I live them again. I cherish them because of the glowing sensation I have when I realize by whom these wonders were created and given to me. I owned not only the mountains-I owned the world! It was mine for the taking. Ann Davila, '43. 27 To Dust Returneth Mike wasn't dead, but the rats weren't quite sure. One scampered across his chest. The spark of remaining life frightened it away. That odor-it seemed to come from something close to his face. Its source had been evading him until his cheek recognized the substance against which it was resting as a filth-matted boot-heel. Gradually, for his mind moved slowly, he realized that underneath him and at right angles to him, was a man's leg. Regaining his power of movement to a slight extent, and curious to find out whether or not his comrade was dead, Mike inched his, hand slowly up the leg. It progressed as far as the thigh, and there his fingers encoun- tered a sticky splinter of bone. Hoping to discover the amount of life in his new-found friend, Mike pulled. Pain ran screaming through Mike's body... So this is how things were! Here he was, lying half submerged in a muddy ditch, unable to turn his eyes or face from -the sight of mud. Worse yet, his leg-he couldn't tell which one-was off. Oh, to have a glimpse of a blue sky filled with white, drifting clouds! Was he dying, or was he dead already? No, he couldn't be dead, for that one twist of pain had been no dream. Numbness crept slyly upon him. He seemed not only to be detached from his leg, but from his whole body. Only his mind was functioning. Silvia. What was she doing now? If she were only here to rub his hands and face! He was alone. Was she? Could she be thinking of him as he thought of her? He wanted to pray that she be kept safe, but Mike knew'not where God was. He did know that God was not in this forsaken crater of mud, but in some beautiful place far away. Maybe Beauty had been devoured by Evil, so God was gone too. Time did not seem to be an element. How long had he lain here? How long did each thought take? Was it seconds, minutes, hours, days, or even longer? Was it only a fancy that he seemed to be looking up at life, instead of back upon it? Perhaps. He had seen the zero plane coming toward him and kept his finger on the machine- gun button. Suddenly Mike's eyes had filled with blood, and his plane had begun to dive involuntarily. He had landed on the tree tops of an entangled jungle forest, and was thrown from the plane to the ground. He had struggled to his feet and had time to stumble only a few yards, when he had met a raging, distorted man charging forward with bayonet out-thrust. First had come a thundering blast very close to him, and then- nothing. Now this broken, bleeding remnant of what had once walked upright proudly on the face of the earth. Darkness seemed to be falling. But how queer! Not as night would fall, but as a black wall moving toward him. As it approached, it brought serenity and peace. Mike realized then, that this was It. This was the time to which all men came, and of which no man should be afraid. He had time for one word-"Silvia". Mike was with her, and peace had come. The rat approached again, and sat on the chest of this shell of a man. Celia Chriftiansen, '43. 28 Did You Say Guestroom? "Idle the room might lie for days, for weeks, at a time, but it had a gleaming luxury of welcome, of invitation, for the stranger who would succeed the last stranger in the delightful procession." Robert Lynd voices this in "The Stranger's Room" as the child's point of view, but what of the long line of guests that stayed in that room? What did they think, and what was their opinion on the subject? More than likely they suffered in silence and never dared speak their peace. Guestrooms go to extremes. For the most part they will fit into two distinct cate- gories: they're musty or fresh, drab or forcibly colorful, too fussy and frilly or absolutely wan. Can't anyone find the perfect medium? The hosts could start with the bed for instance. I've met some pretty uncomfortable ones in my day. By way of explanation, the two most common types are the board and mountainous ones. The board feels exactly like a piece of timber, and for your head is a pillow that closely resembles a cement sack. "Saggy" is a word that goes with the mat- tress filled with valleys, mountain ranges, and precipices left by former occupants. After a long hard day of travel, you sink into bed only to find your weary back suspended over an abyss formed by a person of much more stocky build than yourself. But the bed isn't the only thing you have to worry about. Millions of other little details are present just for the purpose of making you fret and fume. As you enter the room for the first time, all looks calm and serene. Little do you know that the window is going to stick, and the radiator will emit terrifying grumbles and grunts all through the wee small hours of the morning. You stand looking about you, taking mental notes. In spite of the fact you simply abhor baby blue wallpaper specked with white and yellow daisies, and the pink curtains are just too, too ghastly, you grit your teeth and politely remark to your hostess, "What an interesting color scheme." As a malicious after-thought you quickly add, "I always think a room expresses the owner's personality a bit, don't you agree?" The fool-she fell for it! On she rambles in her own inimitable way. "Oh, my dear, I'm so glad you like it. I did it all myself without one little speck of help from anyone." That's exactly what you thought at first but you didn't dare put it into words for fear she'd take offense. Finally your well meaning hostess announces that you have just ten more minutes to get ready for dinner, and flounces out of the room-leaving you to your own resources. Your own resources is the word for it. It doesn't take long for you to realize that there's no hand lotion, no soap in the basin, no kleenex, no wastebasket, and, horror of all horrors no hot water. Even if you did have a chance to wash your hands you'd have to wave them in the air to dry them. All the towels in sight are about half the size of a cocktail napkin. Mentally you restrain yourself and hurry to change clothes. Wouldn't you know it! Your slip strap always gives way at a time like this. Well, that can be remedied very easily by a safety pin. Now all you have to do is find one. You tear through the bureau drawers. All that greets your frantic eye is the mending, some Christmas wrappings and ribbons, and the extra supply of sheets, not to mention a pair of rubbers and a rag doll. Not a ign of a safety pin anywhere. "A pin, a pin, my kingdom for a safety pin," you mutter as you tie a bulky knot in the offending member and dash down to dinner. A few hours later you again mount the stairs and enter the sacred portals. "The bed has been turned down, and the window is open," you exclaim with joy. Immediately the 29 skies clear, and for a time you are happy. That is, until you open the closet door. The musty smelling space is completely taken up by boxes and other people's clothing. Not a sign of an extra hanger greets your hopeful eye. Your best evening dress crumples and wilts over the back of a straight chair as you prepare to turn in for the night. A knock sounds at the door, and a much too familiar voice says, "May I come in?" By the time your hostess has half way completed this speech, she is in. Before you can say, "Of course," she's off again. 'Tm sure you won't want an extra blanket, dear: it's much too warm tonight. Sleep tight! Breakfast's at 6:30, goodnight," and with that she's out the door again. Whew! You sink down on the bed with exhaustion. You might have known itg it's one of those mountainous varieties, with a pillow that feels as soft as blotting paper. One glance will assure you that there's no reading lamp, and that all the magazines are at least two years old. Your last -means of escape have been cut off. You'll just have to lie there until morning with just one thin blanket and the temperature rapidly falling. As you fitfully toss from peak to valley, the most wonderful nightmares race across your brain. Most of them, queerly enough, dealing with ways and means to torture your host and hostess. Oh! At last I have it. Now I know why all the guests were strangers at Mr. Lynd's house-and why there was a procession of them-all strangers. They, too, weren't willing to take a second chance. By way of explanation: Any similarity to actual places or people is purely coincidental, and entirely unintentional. Betty Crapo, '43, 30 J un io r s Class Oilicers President -------- Frances NValker Vice-President - - Dolores Dossin Secretary - - - Betty Eaton Treasurer - - Alice Crabb Monograms L FIRST QUARTER SECOND QUARTER THIRD QUARTER Nancy Finn ,Ioan Lawson Nancy Reid Gloria Schlitters Frances Walker Margie Watkins Nancy Finn Joan Lawson Nancy Reid Eleanor Roberts Gloria Schlitters Mary Jo Tait Frances Walker Margie Watkins Class Victories: June, 1942-Tenth Grade Play, "Anne of Green November-Hockey Team School Champions January, 1943-Junior Dance February-Swimming Champion, Helen Grinnell March-School Basketball Champions March-Junior-Senior Play, "Twelfth Night" CLASS COLOR Green CLASS MASCOT lllrigeyll 31 Nancy Finn Nancy Reid Eleanor Roberts Gloria Schlitters Mary Jo Tait Frances Walker Margie Watkins , 1 -"Has Gables" A B .2 V N' bf- i K , 1' I S' ru ' H '- Ou. FMU beoixibail i+C1fW C1-1-L0 1111 NCT! Ftp! Cnpfbi D. Looe rb C5C!fb9l-Ufp irlkm ' Pbgbml Pm'-Ckni Last Row-Grace VVasun1, Alice Crabb, Frances VValker, Margaret Wlatkins. Fourth Row-Nancy Finn, Phyllis Littlebury, Gloria Otto, Eileen Denner, Mary Sue Bee, Marilyn Nash. Third Row-Joyce Krueger, Frances Hannan, Mary Brandon, Mary Crawford, Betty Eaton, Patsy O'Hair. Second Row-Eleanor Roberts, Bettie McClure, Dolores Dossin, Nancy Reid, Gloria Q Schlitters, Betty Roelnn, Helen Grinnell, Roberta Mackey. 3 0 if First ROW-,Ioan Lawson, Mary Jo Tait, Patricia Romaine, Jo Ann DeGree, Susan Anne 0 I 12 at Day- Q, f Zuaef .152 jf ' 0 O l Q ,146 'ff6""4,hd 43 Q' 1 Jufffaf Mage, .WM 0 O 0 N 'F A W 5 5124 4' gig? o 0 4 .', x 3 5' 3 ff fl M 32 f G of 3 Q 0 r "' 5' 11 ' ,Z 9 5 3 Sl ,E rg E Mollu- What kind of girls do I like or dislike? To answer this question, let's amble through the paths of an imaginary garden, comparing as we trudge along. Victory Garden C4 u im There in a far corner our observant eyes fall upon the shrinking violets. Our minds B MVGKVZWNZZJ Md.. Q X ' viii .. lr we. immediately drift back to those whose lack of school spirit and interest in activities cause them to thrive only in their own plot of ground. Not far from the violets we come upon the snapdragons. A vicious tongue clamping down on unsuspecting friends gives them a reputation we should all like to avoid. Next in line we stumble into the fragile orchid. Lovely to look at, but when called upon for extra-curricular activities, she wilts and quickly fades because of her impracti- cability. Towering head and shoulders above the others, we see the bold and gaudy tiger lilies. Maybe their characters we don't quite fully understand, but their appearance and forth- right colors cause us to cringe and wonder, "Would it be wise to seek farther?" As we wind our way onward, our spirits are promptly perked up by the sunny faces of the sunflowers. With these, along with the slim-stemmed daisy, we associate our friends whose effervescence and cheerfulness radiate to all dark corners of our hearts. As our gaze drifts skyward to the lofty pines, the sturdy pine cone, enduring all weathers, catches our eyes to remind us of our athletes and good sports, so well liked by all. Around the lofty pines dance merry little bachelor buttons. Their independence, faithfulness, and forever helpful ideas always lead them toward victory. Then in the very center of our imaginary circle, we rejoice in finding the combination of all qualities in the well-liked flowers in the American Beauty rose, bowing gracefully to the gentle winds. Our garden tour is ended. As you have probably guessed, it has wound through the twining halls and vine-covered walls of Liggett School. Troublesome weeds are forever sprouting among us, but with a little care and atten- tion these can be eradicated, and soon we can have a beautiful garden. . . Nancy Finn, '44. J . ,, ,. Just Absent-M'indedl'Maybe- " ' I have been forced to the conclusion that I am just not "the domestic type". Since the departure of Bernice for an extended tour of the Deep South and ultimately the welding department of Willow Run, I have become the second maid of our family. My mother can have first honors and welcome to them., Saturday morning has long been my time to catch up on Life, The New Yorker, and the adventures of my hero, The Spirit. However, I knew that this happy life was ruined forever when my mother said as she went out the door last Saturday, "Now, Roberta, if you will just dust and vacuum the living room, I think the house will look fairly respectable." I was just rescuing The Spirit from some particularly unscrupulous gang- sters and didn't bother with my usual weak and pitiful little protest. After all, I could finish that tiny bit of housework in fifteen minutes flat, and I didn't have to meet Joan downtown for two hours. One hour and two magazines later I remembered that this life of leisure was not for me and started at my dusting. The whole situation seemed pretty boring: so I turned on the'radio. Floating around to "Serenade in Blue" I was rudely interrupted by, "Boxes, boxes, boxes .... " Cursing Mr. Conn and all his clothes, I found that there was nothing else to listen to. It took me quite a long time to discover that, and my mind seems to have wandered in the process. Completely forgetting the situation in hand, I sat down Qi '80 Wg xii, Jx . J w,:,Qm'3,i Sow Y Q .45 'QNNAQ X 'O'0x.q'N ooxogo x 4 'QQ Q O fum +990 A 33 Xxigaow !D'0QXC9 Q0 i X X .9 Osdx 355 Oxsaox 'Y ccxf' ,O ,QT SWQXQOX oavx Q,-96, to furnish my own music. The "music" which I can furnish myself consists of a lovely one-finger interpretation of "Blue Moon", the top part of "Chopsticks", and the first page and a half of "The Blue Danube", so my repertoire was soon exhausted. About that time I decided on a little vacuum sweeping. Vacuum sweepers are wonderful things. Their din shuts out all other noises and makes it possible to do a great deal of heavy thinking. While I was planning my future, I remembered that my white skirt was filthy, and because there isn't a streak of laziness in me, I tore right to the phone and called the dry cleaner. It seemed a shame to be so comfortable in that chair just for one short callg so the logical thing was to call Carol and give her all the dope on the sorority meeting that she had missed. We were well along in our conversation when she asked how joan was. I assured her that joan was fine. In fact I was going to meet her in Kuhn's at one o'clock . . . . I gasped, hastily explained to Carol and, without further adieu, grabbed my hat and left. I returned, hours later, to find the vacuum sweeper still standing in the middle of the floor, and the dust cloth lying forlornly on the piano. Roberta Mackey, '44. Betty When I was sitting in front of the kitchen range, I thought about the homey and comfortable rooms where interviews were usually given. Betty was washing the dishes furiously and talking just as fast, while I was sitting on a hard, little stool, trying to remember the quaint phrases that she was using. She told me that she was bom in Kansas City, Kansas, solemnly informing me that she was a Southemer but not a "Deep South nigger". She coyly refused to tell me what year she was born, but she said she was a grandmother. While on the subject of relations, she told me that she had been married twice. "The first one," she said, "was a devil, but the next one was better- at least, he works part of the time." Then I asked her about the club she belongs to and what they do. "It's called the Hiawatha Art, Saving, and Charity Club, we meet once a week on Thursdays. First the meetin' is opened by the president and she leads us in our feme song and feme verse. Next the secretary gives her account, and then I gives the treasurer's report and the meetin' goes ong all the time, the secretary jots down notes in her book. We collects our savin' Cduesj before the meetin's closed. Then we embroiders for awhileg that's the art part of the club. Every Christmas we gives a few dollars to each of the old ladies of our parish and that's the charity part. The real purpose of our club is for a bunch of ladies to come and socialize together," she said all in one breath. She was soon telling me about her leadership in the choir. I asked her what church she belonged to. "It seems to be the Baptist Church at the moment," she replied. "I wasn't dunked in the river for my baptism," she offered, "but in the pool at the church." A vision of bemoustached Betty in a white robe with her fat black face popping through the neckline, bobbing around in a pool, would be a rare sight indeed, with the minister and his congregation surrounding him, ushoutin' and bein' happy," as Betty calls it. She told me with emphasis, her round face glistening from the steam of the hot dishwater, how playing cards was a sin and that she took the "scrament" once a month and that was the only time you could take wine without it "bein' a sin". Finishing the dishes soon after, she jovially bounced down the stairs, gathered her belongings, and bustled out of the door to catch her bus and on to home, leaving your reporter in a state of frenzied anxiety to reduce to writing the choice expressions of the king's English which she so nonchalantly left behind. fo Ann DeGree, '44. 34 United Against the background of a deep blue sky sat a little girl and a tiny dog. The dog had a tangled, curly coat of hair across his back. The little girl was rubbing him behind the ears, and he was enjoying it immensely. The little girl loved the blue sky and the green grass, dotted with sheep, contentedly grazing on the hillsides. It' made her heart sing, and she was completely happy. "We'll always stay here this way, and never go away," slie would say to her dog, and he would look at her with understanding eyes. But one day there were no more green hillsides, and the once happy sky was troubled and gray. Instead of sheep there were cannon, and men with sadness in their eyes and bitterness in their hearts. The little girl was taken away to a big and bustling city, far from the war zone, leaving the little dog, against her will, to forage for himself. The little girl who was once so gay was now silent and thoughtful, her merry eyes full of sorrow. She sold paper violets in the street to people who would buy them, but she had not forgotten her dog and the green hillsides. New Year's Eve found her still selling her violets in the cold. Her hands were numb, and salt tears ran down her face. She was crying for her old, carefree life and the things she had lost. She still dreamt of the happy days she loved. A man in the bustling crowd knocked the box of violets from her hands, and as she bent to pick them up, a large foot stepped on them and crushed them into the snow. The little girl went away crying, and the cold wind drove her into a corner in the door- way of an old church. As she sat huddled there, numbness crept around her body. She bent her head in weak defiance of the wind, and the numbness turned slowly to drowsi- ness. As she closed her eyes in sleep, a mall dog crawled feebly up to the step where she was sitting, his curly coat stiff with ice and his body almost frozen by the bitter wind. He was nearly dead with hunger and cold, but at last he had found his little girl. He crawled into the hollow in her anns, breathed a sigh of satisfaction of one who has at last reached his goal, and slept in peace. joyce Krueger, '44. 35 daiijogwgfx xg' " TNR 8 Vi was ,gf 'Q .vf af , fic . 0 +5 e :Sf 0 RKQQQ D uhm 9 wx 5 we -Q vnxqie go , X X KN-aw'Vof5f1""f-Q5 QM 2'eu'q? 1' Us E r 1 X QQGTQL PQQQ 0 1 .-- uj S ?U33 YQ 1 - +KYWCx ,Seq fm F T302-VN WN ow 625' udf ,iiffif 1? 0 Qhipiiv 9 .gm SK X' we ye Nye. x Q, can M 6x7N?q35 Eb' NJ 6593. of fi' W' Cgwv' Kvv ages- WWA 095.6 QK T Hbwdgd ww Xo..vo.dvxqsmT'1s qc RYNTQ 'mg Q.u.d'x1"ovu,wn und We dm Qs-cwxifavx Gvur' Nowawxess wxowoqev Q.-f1w"XXA1"W'X 'TQZT Ms 3 l A is Q. : ?CLXvv-. EY . 'Vice " :Po o w TP-wxk cffvvx 1 sho ei?uwm cg 5 . U Q A NW :J A51 'aL5"56x.S8neXCbf'-Teik: J ,. MSM:- 0 Wm mo Q4 ' H Qc WWXT he Jah, V:-Tq:mKxf?s Svnqx for chem. wyxlk fa-J Q t x05 .K 1 ROP' Q5 Qdvo' -go Q 15 AGP 'xv Gfxvjibww' Cjb 4 N ev . 'Be du in WAV E2-Qymq a. Kg- dgexfs GMM ink Q Sie- SHT SY-seg bhevi: Mxafdi Q, Q90 wig? ck QQ AQUOYX 5 , vsgfo ' 5 XQSQTVB 'U Wm?-5 X uwev 6 cyfvwg X wwd om. Fw:-YHQ 3 uit' -Nov :Po-gb Q Lgeey uyff 193. Ni 'Y V' 610 S 'A N x - Q 569' 0 'Mrs Qsx' Mg x-M1 '39 Pom if YKQN9 XR ffzxvex- Qkuqe- Up to the Topg Then Down with a Flop This year when Christmas rolled around, the ground was covered with snowg The family was all in doubt as to what to give me, so A pair of skiis was what I got to learn the art of skiing, And if some day you pass our house, this is what you'l1 be seeing: I bundle up from tip to toe, I'm muffled right to the eyesg While I'm in the throes of learning, I feel better in disguise. When I climb into my ski boots, it seems each weighs a ton, The dressing has me all worn out before the fun's begun. At last, I clamp the skiis on, 'I'm ready to take the hill, But much to my consternation all I get for myself is a spill. I lie there, laughing and twistingg my body is all awryg I can't pull myself together, but knowing I have to, I try. Finally again I am upright and go the rest of the way with no flopg Only to look up and wonder how I'll ever get back to the top. I work my way with the herring-boneg the going is awfully slowg Next time I'll practice my skiing where I'm sure they have a ski tow. My bones are all shattered and splinteredg I'm covered with black-and-blue marks Each time I fell I got madder and made many uncultured remarks. This all must have looked pretty silly to one who knows how it's done, But I think 'twill be worth the effort. With finesse it must be lots of fun. Suxie Day, '44, H E L' A, ,Q Jw' " . f I i s - ,1 ' " s l sg, 54- , V , 31... , , H - f.-, ,..,. ' : .. .- " , F ig 1: ' ' - QM A Zfwiil PoLm't of Interest? V..--v f-I .Y-v--.cY 38 Sophomores President - Vice-President Secretary - Treasurer - FIRST QUARTER Barbara Allen Cynthia Finn Nancy Sayre Joyce Skelton Class Olticers Monograms Joan Rockwell Virginia Hebb Joyce Coulton Ruth Duffield SECOND QUARTER THIRD QUARTER Barbara Allen Laird Beamer Cynthia Finn Nancy Sayre Joyce Skelton C1868 Victlitiei Dog Show Swimming Meet Song Contest - First Place Current Events Test - Jan Tarble, School Champion CLASS COLOR Yellow CLASS MASCOT Cha rlie-Horse 39 Laird Beamer Cynthia Finn Nancy Sayre S c Jan Tarble y K xg li ki E 'st Q. if a 5 5 E Si 2 5 3 A 1- 5 Q if 2: Q L fm VDT UD k?f.2-:A Tl? lag.. Wlffwgffak 1 1- N gk 'Q cglfffwlx A kg ,X FF Jw. 1.7113 ' r 'Lo S 1 M . KNCRSMEI 5 visor:-no ORESNJBW-2lClm,aot.oaJl,2,19 " Q 4 1, or htm ff'H-' X V X K L -'N gl, ' , 'wg ,A X 'W l mf? QE' 1 X . 4 gal, l 5 J N-'H Last Rowgoau Lambert, Ann C'aQi11e Erkfitz, P3.lllCl3YiqllOXlllS-6132 RfritlTfDuffYf:l . I Third Row-Barbara Allen, Joan Rockwell, Laird Beamer, Cynthia Finn, Joyce Skelton. . 7. . . 5 A. J ' Segond Row-jan Tarble, Betsy Baylls, Nxrgmua Helmlm, joyte Loulton. S x ., 'First Row-fNancywS3Xrg, Ann HCllClCYSOll, Sue Stamler, Mary Bell XVood, Martha V' ' ' 'wfonaliail A Also in Class-Ruth Brewster. Mag' 9250225 Sian," n U.:-5,5 '-Cf'-fx 1A'lL1fOf0fw2 DVB?-IVPHZ -- LWYN WGA 'rvvvbfaxvxq lflwoqs up O DU? f- Dui? JI dow? NY. hc ,Sud imma ugcdll bv 0 'Y-ofsvw mom min ,tim 5, xkrwqpotf Urcndrfz. XOC:xSxf-XGA C-of LJJCLTC5 VC, U will 'S ubcrol FLAYDLX' XFN Qmba pmG1,Q, 1 g,UQ,r-if LAQL4! Wg vocuai O Xu cl ' , :fight Qffzfrgfm Www ff aww do 1 AKA Sb X54 xt- lJQmvAUigXln:. A0631 -LQQA4 1,0 P3CnfH'jl l w..J4.SLt,1 fa-QA? dwg -bMr.vvYN,2jX -x.. It Took A Date To Learn After coming out of the water from a refreshing dip, I reclined on a flexible chair at one end of the club lawn. The air was cool, and I was extremely relaxed, until a young, blond boy about the age of sixteen approached and asked me if I was going to the dance that night. My reply was feeble, but I made it clear that I was not, knowing well that he was about to ask me. My hasty thoughts brought out an affirmative reply. I hadn't realized exactly what I had got myself into, until later he came strolling up, fully dressed in a tuxedo. He looked at me, still in my bathing suit, questioningly, and reassured me that there was still going to be a dance in an hour. I felt my face break into a blistering red. I took the hint and ran into the locker-room to dress. I didn't know how I could go out among that crowd of people and dance. Many times I had stood on the sidelines watching the other girls float across the dance floor, but this time I was the one who had to do the floating. It wasn't long before I was dressed and outsidelooking for my date. He was standing next to a bench but not daring to sit down for fear of creasing his suit. He made a polite bow and held out his ann for the purpose of e corting me. He did it so stiffly that I ducked to avoid being hit. When I came back up from my stooping position, I noticed his arm gracefully suspended in the air. Without much thought, I slipped my arm around his, and we started off towards the dance floor, he trying to be full of conversation, and I to be ladylike. We sat the first and second dances out at my request, and when the third came around, I couldn't think of any more excuses, so we set out for the waxed floor with the tremendous floodlight, which made the floor glisten. The music began slowly. I felt as if I were the only one on the floor, although we spent most of our time colliding with the people around us. If once I got out of step the only way I could get in again was to stop completely and start over. This was hard to do, for the good dancers kept moving around, and when we tried to stop, we were pushed so much that I really never did get in step with the music. I was relieved when the orchestra ceased. We walked over to an obscure comer and found two wooden folding chairs, which didn't ease my stiffness. We both tried to find a good topik: of conversation, but the events of the past had been related over and over, so we both sat staring into space. Finally the drums struck up a lively rhumba, and the request to sit out this dance was made by him this time. Q W Q t t d H Laird Beamer, '45. ' :erm sd qour norm :vonq ,km.SU:hoif5 how u-sounaufo ooml :ok wuz mt- one :zealots A-Sm Qs 'klnqwu mow ACN CDN-xlo.n:.s or cw buta- cvw- , lor co C5 gout. GMA out to Tfcu M-you new 'VW-104-vwx ue.: qv gow A Lonely Journey Today on West Hanley Street there are many prayers of thankfulness going up to God, and it is a very happy little family. Everything started three days ago when little Mary Kate's mother was taken to the hospital. Mary Kate, being only six years old, could not understand why. All her father had taken time to tell her was that her mother was in the hospital and would not be home for a little while. Mary Kate knew that only people who were sick or feeling bad were in hospitals, and it was awfully lonesome at home with her father gone from six o'clock in the morning' until late at night. Today, in particular, it was lonely for Mary Kateg so she sat on her small hard bed and cried for most of the morning before deciding to go to the hospital and find her mother if her mother wouldn't come to her. Pulling on her thin blue coat, she took some wilting daisies out of a brightly painted vase and proceeded down to the street. Crushing them tightly in her small clenched fist, she walked timidly along the side- walk. Cars whizzed past the small blue-clad figure walking through the slush and dirty snow. Hurrying past saloons where she could hear loud noises and swearing, she finally came to the corner and darted across the street between the rushing cars. Not knowing which way she was going she wandered aimlessly over endless sidwalks, miraculously remaining untouched by the heavy traffic. About dusk, her small legs weary from the unusual overfexertion, she crumpled miser- ably to the dirty sidewalk, crying pitifully. Too small and frightened to ask anybody for help, Mary Kate raised herself to her feet once again after resting for a few minutes to resume her search for her missing mother. Unnoticed by the tall policeman guiding traffic in the middle of the street, she stumbled down over the curb, her head downward and her small face streaked with tears. Far off she heard a shrill whistle, and the roar of motors, and then there was a complete blackness. Five minutes later that was the way they found her, lying in the street with her small fist still clutching the drooping flowers, and her dirty little face covered with tears of disappointment, but maybe fate was kind to little Mary Kate, for she was taken to the very hospital that she had been hopelessly searching for all day. When she opened her eyes again, twenty-four hours later, her mother and father were there, and someone else-someone she did not know-someone who was very small, very tiny-someone who cried and cried-a little baby brother. Yes, little Mary's dreams are answered. Everyone has returned home again, and never again will Mary Kate have to be lonely, for now there are two of them. Ioan Lambert, '45, Blue and Black The sea was blue, The sea is blue, The sky was blue, The sky is blue, A Catalina roared in the sky. But a body washed up in the waves. The sea was gray, Its suit is blue, The sky was gray, Its face is gray, A corvette went racing by., What mother grieves this loss? The sea was black, The armband is black, The sky was black, A sinister black, A periscope broke the waves- And it bears the Nazi cross. qlox-Egutaialdm some ou uuoq mm .M ,,c,,,,, aa. oo O?-PKSDQPQL 59'VK3' dh' 4 1 x HOV Q6 ww gg gbxiggfoirggn, whotlsalqi 35135 gmac. wo.-snncm www w.f.,,,,,, H, Freshmen Class Officers President ------- Cynthia Lovejoy Vice-President - - Nancy Purtell Secretary - - - Kitty Carey Treasurer - - Dawn Osius Monograms FIRST QUARTER SECOND QUARTER THIRD QUARTER Peggy Jackson Muriel Kupferberg Kitty Carey Cynthia Lovejoy Cynthia Lovejoy Cynthia Lovejoy Jean Marson Marjorie Maxon Marjorie Maxon Nancy Purtell Nancy Purtell Clan Victoria Initiation Week Thanksgiving Plays - - "Voices" and "The Venetian Mirror" " Song Contest s "Orphans of the Storm" - A review of the lost and found U 45" K9 Qty cLAss COLOR h N Q Red cuxss MAscoT 5 ou x Otis Jr. iTeddy Bear? 1 -- . Q I lb 4:3 ' " is. r 'CX 43 5. 'M Qwd SC.-h0G'i .XQQQL .nan it b L at LJ A NINTH GRADE Last Row-Margaret Jackson, Herminc Roby, Jean Faye Thomas, Marva Machris, Ann Ba.1dwin. ' - : Second ROW-Ahce Denner, Mary Lou Melcher, Glorla Engelhardt, Marjome Maxon. First Row-Cynthia Lovejoy, Nancy Purtell, Kitty Carey, Sue Bogel, jean Marson. ,x X ,se 1 -X U Also in Class-Muriel Kupf rberg, Dawn Osius. X f . fl, , f 1 1 V if JJ M 17 Q , fy ,lf 1 PM I. -, Io X , If , V U! I f rf M1211 ! Q A V A :lf X -W w W ,I ,Wy y y 710 f A W Y M Q o, xW ' w' 44 j! Qi wfx 'LAS y 4, fw 1 f ! The Fire The campfire smolders, the embers glow, The breeze whispers and breathes a slow Coolness. Then a spark Rises and finds its mark In a tree above, where it lies Subtly, quietly, and almost dies. It ignites the foliage, and into the sky Of twinkling stars a flame leaps high. Then another, and another, and another until The tree is a blazing torch! But still The rest of the forest lies under the spell Of a summer night. In a quiet dell The wild ones sleep as if in a swoon Unmindful of the impending doom Which hovers near. And still the flame creeps savagely ong The sky grows rosy, as if with dawn. A stifling heat hangs in the air Withering all which seems to dare To move. Each wild beast awakens in its den. It sniffs the smoky air. And then, Sensing the lurking danger, wakes Its mate and dashes for a nearby lake. But no place is safe, for all around The flames leap over the mossy ground. As each tree catches the blaze, it tries To fight it off, but finally dies, Engulfed in flames. And still the fire Rages on. 'Ti the funeral pyre Of nature's beauty. Then suddenly The fire is gone. And each black tree Smokes in silence. The wreckage lies Charred, lifeless in the sunrise Which can scarcely be seen through the smoky sky. The fresh breeze softly breathes a sigh In mourning for the trees. ' jean Marion, '46 45 The Baseball Game The day was one of those July specials, all sun, no breeze, and the man who sat in front of me seemed to be melting as the ball game progressed. Beside him sat a cool, unexcited girl who seemed to be slightly indifferent to her first ball game but able to annoy her escort with a flow of questions. "john," she cooed, "did the man get hit?" "No," he replied patiently. "Why do you ask?" "Well I heard someone say it was a strike, and I thought he meant he was hit, or does a strike mean they are all going to walk out?" "No, they won't walk out and he didn't get hit. He swung and missed," the kindly gentleman replied. "Swung at who, the man with the cage on his face ?" She queried. "No, at the ball, and that's a mask not a cage," he said with a slightly sour note in his voice. He's no bird!" "Well it says Cardinals on his suit," she retorted. "And you said they were getting goose eggs." "Yes, but watch the game now, and I'll explain it all later," he pleaded. "Why do they call that man a short-stop when he's so tall?" she questioned. CNo answer.D "Does the man called first base sing?" CA desperate sigh.J "Why are all the people standing up and yelling? I think they are rude." "Because it's a home run," he grunted. "Well if he's going home, why don't we?" she asked. He said very slowly," you finally have a great idea-let s Marjorie Maxon, '46. Ah, Summertime! Summer is a pleasant season. I usually start summer out with a bang-my report card: that little bundle of joy that is delivered to our door in the early summer. It takes a whole week of exhausting arguments to talk the family out of stuffing me into summer school, for math, of course. As my power of persuasion is at its peak, I try to get them to take a vacation up North. I must give pretty good speeches because it's not long before we're all breaking our backs carrying bulging bags out into tl1e car. Then we fight about who have to sit in the back, and have the luggage fall all over them. After finally getting organized we start out. We travel for endless hours. The sun is beating upon the car, the wind is ruining my hair, and the twin are playing some sort of a screwy game which is enough to drive a person buggy. Soon we arrive at an old landmark, "The Pause that Refreshesf' We joyously pile out for a much needed refreshment, but we aren't refreshed because the waitress puts too much syrup in the coke, and we soon are on our way. About a quarter of a mile ahead lies the end to which we have struggled all day-the cottage. On stepping out on the porch I encounter a little brown and green creature which squirms by. I can't stand snakes, so I just give it the right of the way. Up in my room unpacking, two bees want to discover what color powder I wear upon my nose. After a few seconds I discover it's better to let them look around-what a lump on my head! Dinner is pleasant with those juicy vegetables, and that bitter mineral water. Tired by a strenuous day we all retire early. Two mosquitos have mistaken themselves for Curtiss Navy dive bombers, and are maneuvering on my face. After they return to their base, I fall asleep and dream of peaceful days at Liggett. Summertime! Fooey!l! Kitty Carey, '46. 46 The Lower School wa., M353 !pZ'gJ3 'UW-12' KOMQQB 0 fUZ.ZAD6dIJ Jwmwawu cam? ioofqoejfo-law E l G H T H G R A D E Wiae'? 255 vi 6x Mzf::a,vf:d:,z5P if Third Ro Wilson, Carol Smith, J l, Betty oollol-oo, Bal-llal-a Blossom. 5 Seco d R Joy Steinbach, Kathryn Rockelmall, joan Stanton, Barbara Lawson. 5 Firs R W-Julie Marshall, Kathryn Jackson, Nancy Merritt, Isabel Baxter. 5 Also ln Class-Nancy Roollm. - ' do 'l gjl ff-7 ? X32 5 logs W M A jg Wilt lwf wloo y 190,922 i .Q Banff Jam? j'LlCQ,Rfv 15251 : 75 fi .. ..-e- 24222 335 it io 6 EVENTH GRADE Third ROW-hGSOfgf1 Tolle, Elizaheth Livingstone, Ann Xvhittingham. Second Row-Virginia Holbeck, Shirley Catherwood, Edna Skelton. J?5 First Row-Shirley Forsyth, Patricia Lovejoy, Grace Roehm. J Q, On Stone Ledge-Harriet Noble, Rosalind Woollard. -, W Also in Class-Karen Osborne, Julie Blossom,Nancy Preston. R5 , Qyl 3 Q9 ,if My X ..., X WN ' w ,ow wwf. Wwe it ,s Matlli' wul f QM! l I . v -- . .1 . U t C. J W 5 Fxiyag-15 M D M 1 , ,,.. fm X' 9- . ' ' -- 'xH'0,,. M99 150i , ,Pf tvmty 4 1 I ,V Q awww A 0 Wa, I, Lf' y, ' If M4 49 Q 5'U9'L Chin Up, My Son! Dedicated to every little boy all over the world whose' father has gone off to fight. May God watch over their daddies and bring them safely home. Somewhere amidst the turmoil and heartaches of a war-torn world, a large troop ship is ready to leave for some unknown destination. As the dark and sinister night sweeps over the decks of the giant ships in the harbor, a young man dressed in the uniform of the United States army sits with a young, curly-headed, freckled-faced boy on his lap. The boy, with tears in his longing eyes, is pleading: Boy: But, Daddy, we'll miss you, Mom and I. Do you have to go far away? Can't you stay with us? Soldier: No, son, you see, I have a job to do for my countryg so that little children like you may be free. But some day I'll come home to you-to you and your mom. Boy: Daddy, Daddy, what is this horrible thing that is taking you away from me- this - - - this war? Soldier: My boy, it is difficult to explain. It is a monstrous thing that comes on a freedom loving people like a ghastly dream. Countries fight for what they think is right, and many families are separated from the ones they love. Boy: Dad, please don't leave meg I know you have always told me to keep my chin up and be brave. But it's awful hard 'cause - - - 'cause I love you so awful much. Soldier: Son, do you see that flag-our flag-on top of that ship, unfurling its stars and stripes to the heavens above? It stands for what I love and what I'm going to fight for. It's a symbol of freedom, and, son, always respect it and love it as I do. Boy: I will always, Daddy. I kinda understand now why you must go, as you said, to help other children like myself be free. Pop, you always do what's right and-aw, gee-Pop, I'll miss you an awful much. Soldier: Son-my boy-I must go now, our ship is ready to leave. Take care of your mother and stand up straight. No tears nowg remember what I said. Boy: Yes, I'll remember, Daddy. I'll never forget never. Soldier: Good - - - Goodbye, my son. As the father boards the giant ship, the little boy's heart swells with pride and some- how he does manage to hold back his tears, as he says- Boy: Goodbye-Daddy, Goodbye. Nancy Roehm, Eighth Grade. NIGHT IN NEW MEXICO The twinking stars that seem so near But are really far away, The silvery moon that crosses the sky, Leaving it clear for the day. ' The distant mountains' outline dim Against the darkened sky, The wooded plains beneath the moon Where whitened bones now lie. The juniper and the pine trees green That dot the peaceful plain, The coyotes' howl from the distant hills While the moon is on the wane. The milky way across the sky As white as fresh fallen snow, The gentle wind that rustles the trees- It's night in New Mexico. Betty Osborne, Eighth Grade. 50 Here in this land, For years and still more, We've welcomed slave men, To our liberty shore. Pioneers came, From near and afar, To seek a new land Free from king or czar. Where, in the forest, Was sowed a great seed, Which would soon grow to serve, Every man's little need. AMERICA This was freedom of speech And freedom of press, Which no mighty tyrant Could ever suppress. Where worship is free To young and to old, For the meek and the mild, And the strong and bold. So our banner shall float, In the blue sky above, And shall stay there forever, For the land that we love. joy Steinbach, Eighth Grade. AN AMERICAN I am an American. Some of my forefathers were Americans as far back as the Pilgrims. Others came to this country later. When I was a child, my father's stories of the Civil War were still clear in his memory. He told me how his grandfather had fought with Washington at Valley Forge, in the Revolutionary War. i My own life was a quiet, serene one in our very prosperous country until my children were almost grown up. Then the terrible war known as World War I broke out. My two sons fought in France, but only one returned. I felt then, although the United States had won the war, that my own life was pretty empty. Things slowly got better and when my grandchildren were born, I found myself taking interest in them and the fast changing world in which they lived. I watched America come through the depression and enter into World War II. My grandsons again are going off to war as their fathers and grandfathers did to fight for the sort of life we all want and hope for. There is little an old woman can do to help, but I can knit and sew for the Red Cross: I can give up some of the luxuries that I'm used tog I can buy War Bonds and Stamps: and I hope to live to see the end of World War II, to see Hitler and Tojo defeated 3 and to see our country a better and safer place in which to live. Patty Lovejoy, Seventh Grade. 51 Journeys the Wide World 'Round by the Fours Up the Stairs in Pursuit of Knowledge Fives and Sixes Time Out for Juice and Conversation , by the First Grade Community Building by the Twos and Threes 4"l"""" fm. WONDERL-AND IN BED I had to stay in bedg I got my Fairy Book And there I slowly read:- Down where the flowers grow, Shining like silver lies a brook. Near to the brook, where lilies blow, The castle stands all stiff of stone 3 And there the princess lives alone. The mighty giant, bold and strong, Is going to keep her there ever so long. But who is this who comes from far? His armor shines like a star. Now that he is near The princess is full of fear: For the giant is coming, cruel and bold, And will fight the prince Who, he has been told Will carry away the princess fair, And leave the giant lying there. Crash! the giant falls to his.knees, Smash! he lies among the trees. Hand in hand the lovely pair Slowly come down the old stone stair, And they 'wander hand in hand Through a world of Wonderland. joan H arnefx, Fifth Grade AUTUMN The leaves are turning browng The flowers are bending down And curling in the sung Their life is done. All the trees in the wood Are in a dressy mood, And everything is a beautiful sight Though the frost makes you cold at night. Now Ha1lowe'en is coming near, And witches fill us all with' fear And Jack-o-lanterns are there too, And funny maskers saying, "Boo!" Patricia Texter, F ifth Grade. 55 CHRISTMAS TREES I love the Christmas trees so bright, They're such a lovely, lovely sight. I love the red-white candy sticks, They tempt me so on top the tree, I know that there is one for me. The presents all are gaily wrapped And heaped up high around the tree. There must be some for you and me. For mother there's a brand new dress, For grandma there's a new jacket, For brother Tim, a tennis racquet, And for papa a neat work-shop. I love the Christmas trees so bright, They're such a lovely, lovely sight. Parry Ward, Fourth Grade. A DAYLIGHT AIR RAID DRILL Today we had an air raid drill. It was the first daylight drill Detroit has had. In school we formed a line and went down to the recreation room. When the bell rang, we went back to our room. But the air raid was not over outside. Everybody stayed in his home, and everybody that was in his car had to pull over to the curb. After the air raid was over the cars went on, and the people came out of houses. Dorothy White, Fourth Grade. Poems the Third Grade Love THE BLUEBIRDS The bluebirds fly in the sky The bluebirds fly in the sky Darting o'er hills and lakes. Darting down to take a drink. The bluebirds fly in the sky The bluebirds fly in the sky In the morning when I awake. With their little breasts so pink. Sandy Forfyth, Third Grade. FLOWERS IN THE GARDEN WITCHES There are flowers in the garden Cats and sticks And not a single weed. Witches and brooms There's a special little flower Out of the fog I planted when a seed. A goblin looms. Eleanor fohruon, Third Grade. Sally Williamfl Thifd Grade 56 W6 QW 'aw Liqq SSH' Se I1 s- ACTiV1'nEs 0' o O Z OO mbuuxe SELF-GOVERNMENT BOA President .,......,.7,... Vice-President ,,....... Secretary ,..,,,..A,......,,,,., Senior Representative ,,e.. Junior Representative ......... Sophomore Representative ,...,,, Sophomore Representative ...... Freshman Representative ,,.,.... Freshman Representative ..,,. ------A- 58 RD Lois Hearne Betty Lafer Dolores Dossin June Woollard Frances Walker joan Rockwell Virginia Hebb Nancy Purtell Cynthia Lovejoy President .,.,........ Vice-President ...,.. Secretary ......... Treasurer ..,......,.., , ......., Recorder-of-Points .... -..- Sophomore Member Sophomore Member HLETIC BOA 59 WM Eiga Q ' , f v 'id Il V 1 JE 4 ml Ann Davis Elinor Boyd Mary Crawford Margie Watkins Beverly Carr Laird Beamer Jan Tarble ATHLETIC BOARD REPORT 42 Jo Ann DeGree Mary Jo Tait Helen Grinnell Margie Watkins School Champions Class Champions BADMINTON Sally Duffield 9th Grade Helen Posselius mth Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade PING PONG Helen Posselius 9th Grade 10th Grade Jo Ann DeGree 11th Grade June Woollard 12th Grade SHUFFLE BOARD Peggy Dolese 9th Grade Mary Friedrich mth Grade 11th Grade Ann Davis Betty Lafer 12th Grade BOWLING J an Tarble DUCK PINS Laird Beamer SWIMMING Elinor Boyd Nancy Reid Helen Grinnell June Woollard E Helen Grinnell HOCKEY CHAMPIONSHIP Class of '44 BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP Class of '44 HOCKEY VARSITY Judy McKean Alice Crabb Virginia Adams Rhea Cook Laird Beamer Margie Watkins Frances Walker Ann Davis llie Roberts Jan Tarble 60 SYMMATHETEA BOARD President .....,.. A,,....,......,. . Vice-President .,,.,. Betty Crapo Lois Pulfer Secretary ...,.... ......,,. S usie Day Treasurer .......A.w.7... .,- ....... Elly Roberts Senior Member ,,.....,.... .......,, M ary Carpenter Sophomore Member ...,.. ...,,... R uth Duffield Sophomore Member ...... ........ J oyce Skelton 61 f V f i T 2 s Y M M AT H ET E A vi moo!-:'x'l' SCHOOL . Pffltill 'TWUELFYH NXGHT' Y by ll WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE W l l N. l March ll, W43 if CAST Cnpccin , .,., ., Viola . .,..,. ., Dvke Ovriw . ,. Ynlnnu ,.,,. .,.., , .. ., .,.. ., .,.. ,.,,..RheaCwk his Puller Beuy Luiz: Bud: Mn.C'lurc cm, ,,,, ,., ,,,, ,.,...,.-,,. .,..,... ..,-..,.,.,,,.. .,...,., ....,.MuyBnmm Sir Tnby Bflrh .......... um .,.. ...... ..,.,.. .,.....,.... . ss' ,uw ,qwmn ....,...,. Frm, ilu Clean ...,...... .,.. . .... . , Dlivil lldoaliv ..... .,.... Juni: ,,., ..,.. Sfblllili ......,.,,. twin .,....,..,. ram anim Seton! Ollicn .,..,...., Prim ..,....,... L ...,. Indy Mcllnn Mary cuw-m Mnry 1oTail Ann Dnviu Bd-ly Cnpu . Virginh Adams Betly Rmllm , 5 ulln Ann Dly .. Elindl Boyd Jw- s-yr. llnbfru Mackey P France! Wnlker qu . ........,.... ,....,..,,...,..,.,..,.. . . ..,.... .,..,.. .........,..,..,. M I ry Cr-,hd Mnrilyn Null LORDS, LADHLS and U'l'H'Ell ATTENDANTS layoe Kmglr Beverly Can Elise Caqrvu Franca I-hmm Cdin Chrinimlw Nancy Finn 62 f, The scene of the play in lllyrin ,,.,- 'nm ,my wan be pf.-.ma an wo pm. wizh me inlenniuion. ,,- PRODUCTION Dimwf . ..,. .,.. .............. , , .... . ...,.,,............, .. Elnine McDaviu lnuidnul Muzi: . ., ....,.,. , Kaduvine Bmvm Dann . ...,.. . .,,., . ,.,.-- Sup Mnqm, ....,., , ......... . ,,.,- ., ...,.. . . ..,. ,, ..,. . Greu:henBlncl1bum Eleanor Ruben: Mlqllll Walkin: Helm Grinnell 1.051 Hume Scenery paimd by An Clmu -mf me --,mi-aw as MISS HELEN MAY ,,,- Svmmnruzru Bom Bmy Cnpo Elunor koberu buh Plllfet Slum Ann Day Muy Carpe-nur Rush Duield jayce Shaken Lf s YM M A TH E TEA pfufur T1-zz TKNTH GMD' in Sn NANNE or GREEN GAB'-E LIGGEI7' AvD1T0""'M june 3, 1942 044' 7' 4"Uf.. .. .....,....,.... lv , ,..,.,.,......... ..,,.,,... . ..................... ...., S u lm IJ. 010. .........,,,.,. ,,... ....,,.,,..,,......,...,....,.., ..,....,., .,.... ....., J . Q, q , DP "0" ""4"l1'lJf ,,,, AI 400 ..,...,.,.,,..,....,...,,..........,.....,, Ben-y Raehm 'rf ....,....,.... .......... A' 1 ',A"A"' """" """' 4""' ' ' ' """ M 'fllfbz Wnkina '-C 9 ...... .. ..,,,.... oh "U ......,..., .....,.,...,... ,.., ,. Muyjo 7.5, 0 ..........,......, M " 'W ..,.,......, .....,...,..... ....,,,., ..,.....,.,..., P . r of11.,y fl. 'Ill ,..,,. .....,. , , In ........ .. .,..,,.,, .,,..,, ..,,.. ....., . , M .fy gnndq, C4 01 50: .wb ..,.. ..,..,,..,..,,... .,...,..,,.., . . , ....,,.,.. jadnn Dqgfn. Iwi 'yr .,..,,., ..,..,.... v -------,-- ,,.... v ........,,......,. ,.,,.. . . .. Fune, Hlmuu "fool -V .,.,,.,,..,..,.,. 0 1 J' ""I"" , ,..,,.........,....,,... ..... ,,......,. F f .nm Wah, 'fn' I., .. ....,,.. H 'B' .................,....,..,....,......,...,., aqua, Ruben' """f'W1.b1 ..,,.,.. ., ' 0 Ay . .....,....,....., .,.,.....,....,,...., . Dunn, bmi, I- ,....,.,..,...... bm .,....,..... ...,..,.,.,..................,,.. P bylli: 1,fm,bu,,, CMJ ,............ . ....,...,..,..........,...,..,.........,.,,,..,,, Mu, C-,,,,,,M If .,..,...,.,.,.,..,...,,,.,,A ,ul .....,,,.,.........., , ,.,. ..,....... . . Helen Gfinqqf u ....,... .,..,,,.........,.,....,...A "iffy ...,....,....,, ,...,... .,,,.,,,,, ...,.- , . ...,.,,.,,...... .....,,.....,........,. lv .,.,,, RW Dim' ---. . .... ...,,,.,,, ,,.,,A. ,k4-..--- ',,v,A'--A---.-- El . M I Mmm!! 63 1 GOPHER -1942-1943 This has been a difficult but educational year for the Liggett Gopher. It has been difficult because of trouble in getting advertisements, and educational because all of us on the board have had to use more ingenuity in getting the traditional Liggett paper published. With such talented writers as Nancy Reid, Joan Lawson, Jean Matson, Ann Erkfitz, Celia Christiansen, and Pat O'Hair on the board, we feel we've given the school an enter- taining, newsy paper, and one that will be worthy of Gopher-'s files. Perhaps the hardest job of the year has been on the capable shoulders of Betty Roehm, our business manager. She has done an ,excellent job, considering the difficulties in ad- obtaining. There are two other people who are also certainly praiseworthy. They are Miss Craig and Mr. Stackpole. Miss Craig, our able faculty adviser, has again aided us greatly through the entire year, and without her there would be no Gopher. As for Mr. Stackpole, his patience and help in publishing the paper can never be expressed. Many a time he has performed miracles in getting the Gopher out on time. The Gopher more than ever before has tried this year to print on the editorial page the thoughts and opinions of Liggett girls. We have widened the scope of our news to "questions of the month", concerning world problems or problems of our country. In support of the war effort, we have written a host of articles and also put in little reminders to buy war stamps and bonds. We, of Gopher, in closing would like to express our gratitude to all who subscribed for Gopher this year and our hope that again next year 'Gopher may be able to bring you the news. fudy M CK ean, Editor -- 1942-1943. SELF-GOVERNMENT REPORT Upon glancing through the minutes of this year's meetings, one finds that most of the duties of the Self-Govemment Board this year have been quite routine. Considering the difficulties in transportation and the unusually severe weather, the number of tardy marks this year has not been very high. Moreover, we may well note here that also considering the number of new students we have at Liggett this year, who have had to adjust themselves, the number of disorder and locker marks has not been out of proportion. On the whole, in spite of the above difficulties, the student body have co-operated well with the Self-Govemment Board, for which we are certainly grateful. Refpectfully submitted, Lois H earne, Prexident. 64 A PAGE FROM SYMMATHETEA'S MINUTES The members of the Symmathetea Board were called to order today to discuss plans for "Twelfth Night", to be presented as the Junior-Senior play. Properties were assigned to Mary Carpenter, the new senior member. We regret to report that Joyce Skelton is unable to be with us on the "Twelfth Night" set because Palm Beach, Florida, has stolen her artistic ability from us. Betty Crapo is doing costumes besides her large role in the play. Ruthie Duffield has been a great asset in "odds and ends" jobs with both "Twelfth Night" and the ninth grade productions of "The Venetian Mirror" and "Voices". Of course, Ellie Roberts will always be our bright star in the lighting line. Lois Pulfer is both assisting her fellow members and actres es, and is doing a splendid job as the lead in "Twelfth Night". While reminiscing over the year's accomplishments so far, we talked of the time and effort spent on making this year's Christmas tableau the most beautiful and unforgetable ever, and also the fun we had painting the old scenery to look like new. Last year's Symmathetea banquet was very successful. The well-eamed dramatic award pin was presented to Nancy Fox for her portrayal of Nicole in "The Merchant Gentleman". Owing to the restrictions of this war year we shall be unable to give our annual spring banquet, although the honorary "Sym" pin will be given. We have recently learned that the Ibex Club is awarding its cup this year to the best single characterization instead of to the play. Summing up, we think this has been a successful year and fun for all. Refpectfully submitted, Susie Day, S ecretary. ATHLETIC BOARD REPORT If you were to look in on an Athletic Board meeting on Friday, you would probably see Laird and Jan perched on Knightie's cot beginning their homework. Maggie is madly trying to figure out where all our money has disappeared, while Ann, known to most of you as the president, asks what is being done about fixing up the recreation room. We have planned to make curtains and slip covers for the chair so that it will be available to the A. W. V. S. Somehow time passes and little is accomplished. As we reminisce over the past year, we first think of the party given on the playfield in early fall, with its hamburgers, the tomato soup, and those delicious cakes. As the months go by, we next think of the swimming meet, in january, held at the Women's City Club, where we all had such a good time. Looking into the future we begin to wonder if all the flowers are going to be blooming by Founders' Day. Our informal banquet last year, which I am sure none of you has forgotten, was a big success. The awards were all given out as usual with Kittie Marie MacKenzie receiv- ing the athletic pin for being the most all-around girl of her class. Respectfully submitted, Mary Crawford, Secretary. 65 B Q , W52?? g iiifwiig GOPHER BOARD is Bet R C ...V.77,..V.,.....w.77,.7,7,........,...., .,,77..V774..V.7,. 74....wV7A.. N joa S VX .,,,.....,,.....,,....,........., - ..,.,...,.,.......... . ..., ...,.. ....,............., , Celia Ch C M nager .,,...,,,,....,,....,,,,..........., Q .. .. .... Q. .,....,.,.,,..,A,.... Q ,... P O Report ....,......,,......,..,...,,.... ,...........A.....,.,.... . -.. . ...,. ,,..... .,,.......,,... ......,,, , A A f Gopherette Manager ,,....Y....... ..,...,............ ....... ...... .... 1 ..V... 5 .....-.,... - . ...V.... I e a M o .f - 25 do ' 32 w53'gf,, , sl Z232i2Eai222iE2s3 FEE, 162,011-E,5T, -rma. bw - ro som, mi. rp sn Lpun imsfa I, Mono .5t.fQza,6-ji mm ,mit 'E fr. 1i'5 C5 unffh txiifm IA- A -wr I C 1. if u 5:3 -' H ,d1"'.!ElA iffy . ' 1 ,.. QOT HA jOrU'5f.i .U O. kf.g:J ' - .. D Ji-I 'sm ' -3.1, ' J'A 'jx v , sm , -, , , - an A md' X152 QQ! ijregfafii "" I i A r ,C MRlvlfj'STAiBoA"RFig' y ki' 55' bw-Khin is 1 rf31.,.Wf raofmced rf? . HrJ+m4:1.Efp igiiffersi af'kj N Edimpin-chief ,.......A4,A .., ,...........,.A ,v... w...... ..............,.....,...,.. .......,. 1 ,.........,A,.A .... Mary Jo Tait A ' MA Business Manager . ,.......,,..,...........,...,,,..,......s,,..,.. .........,,. M ary Brandon A W Secretary ,.......,.... ....,,...,. J o Ann DeGree 0 M Q A t Editor ................ Phyllis Littlebury I N Liistant Art Editor ..,......... Pam Knowlson Yw Literary Editor ..,-. .......,, Roberta Mackey K u M s Q It l Junior Editor ,.... Frances Hannan o . JLl:5'2Fe R' 51 Qin Senior Editor .... Senior Editor ,.... Jean Sayre Rhea Cook Photographer ..................................,,. ,,..........,..............,,.,........,,...... .....,.,... H e len Grinnell So somore Editor ....,,...,,........................................ ......,...,.......,...... - .,,..,.... Nancy Sayre r .1 rn,-r.QifJ ggi 'W Lg , x ' Mm. so W3 My ra, 67 DOUBLE QUARTET Sopranos: Mary Brandon Nancy Reid Second Sopranos: Joyce Krueger Nancy Purtell JUNIOR A President ,......,...... Vice-President . ....... Treasurer ........ ,- Secretary ....... N ines Kitty Carey Margaret Jackson Mary Lou Melcher Nancy Purtell Tens Ruth Duffield Cynthia Finn Pamela Knowlson Joan Rockwell Jan Tarble Mary Bell Wood Twelves Virginia Adams Elinor Boyd Beverly Carr Elizabeth Crapo Ann Davis Mary Ellen Fry Mary Jo Gould Lois Hearne Betty Lafer Cynthia Lange Judy McKean Jean Sayre First Altos: Ruth Duffield Cynthia Lovejoy Second Altos: Jean Marson Joan Rockwell .W.V.S. Lois Heame , -,--- ,,...,..,,,. A nn Davis Elevens Mary Sue Bee Mary Brandon Alice Crabb Mary Crawford Susan Day Eileen Denner Dolores Dossin Nancy Finn Helen Grinnell Joyce Krueger Phyllis Littlebury Roberta Mackey Betty McClure Marilyn Nash Pat O'Hair Gloria Otto Nancy Reid Eleanor Roberts Betty Roehm Pat Romaine Mary Jo Tait Frances Walker Grace Wasum Margie Watkins Eleanor Roberts Margie Watkins List of Advertisers To the following advertisers we express our gratitude for their assistance in the publication of our year book: Craine Studios Dossin's Traub Bros. Jewelers Hawthorne House Hearne Brothers Moseley's, Inc. L. B. King Campbell-Ewald Company Arthur Pagelk KOPP,S Leona Hahnke Maxon Brothers Bendix Home App., Inc HEAR BRoTHER Engineers - Geographers Real Estate Atlases City Street Maps 69 e B DIX that WA in Tokyo Bay ...QW THE U. S. Submarine Nameless has sur- faced in the night.The crew is refreshed by a welcome breeze, though it blows on' the shore ofjapan. And as they lie awash-they do the wash, do it while they go about getting ship-shape for tomorrow. Yes, there's a Bendix Automatic Home Laundry aboard, as there is on many a Navy ship. It makes washing practically u'ark!e,tr-washes, rinses and damp-dries at the turn of a single dial. Every man in our plant takes pride in this sea-going Bendix. And in every other Bendix that is washing fighting clothes. You see, we're not making any more of them for the duration. Our plant has been converted l00lh'. to production of aircraft parts and army ordnance. So it's good to know that our pearetime product is on active duty, as well as the products we make for war. Not only Jeeing service, but giving service. The service that will bring washday ease and freedom to milliom more when peace permits production to be renewed. . . . BENDIX HOME APPLIANCES, INC., South Bend, Ind. The People who Pioneered and Perkcred the Automatic " Warher." AUTOMATIC HOME LAUNDRY BACK LATER BE Ill This advertisement does not imply endorsement - of our product by the Navy. Buy United States War Bonds and Stamps Cokes, Hotdogs, 7u'n, -I- A LT Raid Hr-ms Fo'rVLc'Co1'lf . bw , Susua Dui 'W the SMP shot U0i'n7ne'r 71 Varsiitef Hockeq Ram 9? wx: W 1, Rlvis-tai' OGC .? H T EWALD Prcsldsnt QM DETROIT I NEW YORK v WASHINGTON o CHICAGO o LOS ANGELES o SAN FRANCISCO 72 '7TlLSS 8'5th Happq BL1-'thdeui K11lqhTqf N91 Beautus Rlvlifu. BOOK Salt A Dgq SMU, mf-ymgr SI.DL'Y'l'l7TNi.1'l 'matt YOU ARE WELCOME T0 VISIT OUR CONSERVATORY The Freshest and Rarest Blooms for all Occasions W x W ., , 5 0 NIAGARA ,. L a 2 2 4 i f j'?ef?'.'Qi-- ARTHUR 1. PASEI. Q .r ,, 1- . n 104 ll Q ,. . K RADNOR if PARK Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich. 73 KERCHEVAL AVE. Grosse Pointe School of Music LEONA HAHNKE, Piano Artist Instructor-extensive study under Artur Schnabel, Winfried Wolf and Jose lturbi. Private instruction in Piano, Voice, Violin, Cello, Theory 17028 Kercheval TUxedo l- 1660 Leona Hahnke, Director CI , Since 1929 Opp A ,4-. Specializing in Grosse Pointe properties ,.. PHRRYTIRCICS MAXON BROTHERS Two Modun We are also interested in the listing of V Pharmacies houses for sale in the Indian Village. To Serve You 83 Kercheval Ave. - Grosse Pointe Farms Il the "lest" llock 15348 E. Warren Grosse Pointe Detroit Tuxedo 26000 ky JJ ,TV ,Wfm Jfyl' 5 ,gf fm UNITED TATE5 AVINGS BONDS ANDSTAMPS To you graduates-you who have al- ready earned a generous measure of success - we ofler our sincere congratu- lations. We hope that for many years you will again and again ehioy the photo- graphic portraits we were privileged to make for this book and that the training you have received will bring you new and gegtg successes to make the future truly happy for all of you. l11ZSlUIlIllS I d STROH BUILDING, DETROIT 28 ADAMS AVENUE, WEST 95 Also 525 Harrison Street, FLINT 76 Z. ero blcfthev Hockeq Game Gnd he said- u whantkoue we hen 9 Au out F01-Vietovqf GMO be of 0 P E ! 77 SCRAP IS VALUHBLE MAKE EVEKY PIECE CUUNTI Save.. :Q Ca-aT: cal, M3Ter'uaLS Dfink L. B. KingGLCo. Fine China . . Glass 1 Silver .... Lamps 4 O IF BIGGER cl BETTER HAWTHORNE D 0 0 of HOUSE For me Mmm QJKS NX , 0 f ff? 5 PUNCH and JUDY BUILDING wml mldinq L h D, R, 5' Closed Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday , I SUNDAY DINNER 12 to 8 FISHEL AL 05710117 Traub Brothers 8: Co. 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Suggestions in the University Liggett School - Rivista Yearbook (Grosse Pointe Woods, MI) collection:

University Liggett School - Rivista Yearbook (Grosse Pointe Woods, MI) online yearbook collection, 1949 Edition, Page 1

1949

University Liggett School - Rivista Yearbook (Grosse Pointe Woods, MI) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Page 1

1950

University Liggett School - Rivista Yearbook (Grosse Pointe Woods, MI) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

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University Liggett School - Rivista Yearbook (Grosse Pointe Woods, MI) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

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University Liggett School - Rivista Yearbook (Grosse Pointe Woods, MI) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

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University Liggett School - Rivista Yearbook (Grosse Pointe Woods, MI) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

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