University of Kansas School of Medicine - Jayhawker MD Yearbook (Kansas City, KS)

 - Class of 1947

Page 10 of 132

 

University of Kansas School of Medicine - Jayhawker MD Yearbook (Kansas City, KS) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 10 of 132
Page 10 of 132



University of Kansas School of Medicine - Jayhawker MD Yearbook (Kansas City, KS) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 9
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Page 10 text:

fn ZW ,. N LOGAN CLENDENING 1884-1945

Page 9 text:

70 Semcm mf '47 When you come to the end of the struggle for self and the world makes you king for a day, lust go to the mirror and look at yourself and see what that guy has to say. A lt isn't your father, your mother or wife whose judgement upon you must pass, The fellow whose verdict means most in your life is the guy who looks back from the glass. He's the fellow to please, never mind all the rest, for he's with you clear to the end, , And you'Ve passed your most difficult' and dangerous task if the guy in the glass is your friend. i Yes, you may be lack Horner and chisel a plum, and think you're a wonderful guy. But the guy in the glass says you're only a bum if you can't look him straight in the eye. You may fool most of the people in your pathway of life and get pats on the back as you pass, y But your final reward will loe heartaches and tears if you've cheated the guy in the glass. The courage We desire and prize is not the courage to die decently, but to live Manfully - Carlyle.



Page 11 text:

fcaqafn Q ' 000041-f94f5l DR. RALPH H. MAIOR The death of Logan Clendening on lanuary 31, 1945, removes one of the most colorful and picturesque figures from American medicine. No one who met or talked to him ever forgot him, and few who only saw him ever failed to remember him. A tall, handsome man, straight but ample of girth, he produced always the impression of vigor, health and good spirits. A born raconteur with histrionic ability that made him in his younger days an outstanding amateur actor, his stories and anecdotes, whether recounted at a dinner party, in a classroom, or at a medical meeting, were invariably hailed with gales of laughter. An equally good listener, he was keenly perceptive of humor and had the unusual gift of initiat- ing laughter, so that many speakers whose humor was not immediately effective were grateful to him for his infecti- ous appreciation. Clendening was at his best as a raconteur at the table and, as was said of MacDonald, Wherever he sat,.there was the head of the table. Logan Clendening waslborn in Kansas City , Missouri, on May 25, 1884, the son of Edwin McKaig Clendening, a prominent citizen, and his wife, Lide Logan. The Clen- denings were Scotch, and the original 'settler in America, a staunch lacobite, left Scotland after the downfall of lames Il. Logan Clendening related thatas a boy, his most vivid memory of his grandfather was on lune 10th of each year when the old gentelman, wearing a white rose in his buttonhole, walked up and down the street swinging his cane and vowing confusion to the Han- overian usurpers. Logan Clendening was educated in the public schools of Kansas City, Missouri, at the Uni- versity of Michigan, and at the University of Kansas where he obtained his M.D. in 1907. He then studied and travel- led abroad, visiting the principal medical centers in Eng- land, Scotland, and on the Continent. He began the practice of medicine in Kansas City and, in 1914, married Dorothy Hixon, a woman of unusual talent 'and ability, who encouraged his growing historical and cultural inter- ests. She was his constant companion on his numerous trips abroad and at home, for he early developed' a passion for visiting the shrines of medical heroes and viewing the scenes of their triumphs, a passion for visiting the shrines of medical heroes and viewing the scenes of their triumps, a passion which led him over all Europe, Northern Africa and over both North and South America. 1917, Clendening was commissioned major in the medical corps and served for two years as chief of the medical service at the base hospital of Fort Sam Houston. Returning to Kansas City, he was appointed instructor in Medicine at the University of Kansas and threw himself with great enthusiasm into the teaching of medical stu- dents, particularly physical diagnosis, a subject which fascinated him throughout his entire medical career. His WORKBOOK IN ELEMENTARY DIAGNOSIS, published first in 1938, is a brief outline of the course he taught for so many years. He was fond of quoting Osler to the effect that many correct diagnoses were based primarily on acute observation. "You recognize instantly what you have seen before," he would emphasize. "The process of reasoning is often only to defend your diagnosis before others who see less clearly. The Augenblicksdiagnose of Traube has nothing in common with snap diagnoses." It is difficult 3-to estimate at just what time the virus of collecting books and pursuing medical history entered his veins. His paper on "Centenary of the Stethoscope", published in the lournal of the Missouri State Medical Association in 1920, is apparently his first purely historical contribution and was inspired in great measure by his infatuation with physical diagnosis. 4 His first medical work, Modern Methods of Treatment, appeared in 1924. This work was not a dry-as-dust com- pilation of materiamedica, indications, contraindications and dosages, but was filled with interesting bits of medi- cal history, amusing anecdotes, and sound common sense. It was an eminently readable' medical text and interested the reader while it informed him. lt has passed through eight editions. ' 'This book fell into the hands of the well-known Henry Mencken, who read it with great interest. Mencken had long wantedisome doctor to write a medical book telling the American people just how their various organs were built and how they worked. Clendening seemed to be the man for the job. Mencken visited Clendening and explained the plan he and Alfred Knopf had in mind, but Clendening clemurred and protested his inability to write such a book. Later, with encouragement of his wife, he sketched an outline of such a book and wrote the first chapter. The other chapters, as he expressed it, rolled off his pen, and in 1927 The Human Body appeared. This work was arf instantaneous success, and more than half a million copies have been sold. " Clendening shortly afterwards was urged to write a daily column on health advice. After long deliberation, he accepted. It was a hard decision. He felt that any physician writing a daily column should not engage in private practice, and he dreaded the loss of a profession- al life which was at once exacting, interesting and ad- venturous. From the first his column was a great success and, at the time of his death, appeared in 383 daily news- papers with a combined circulation of 25 million. His column, interesting, informative, and sparkling with wit and anecdote, was filled with homely philososphy and common horse sense. Although Clendening withdrew from private practice, he did not withdraw from the practice of medicine. He worked harder in the dispensary than ever before. He initiated generation after generation of medical students into the mysteries of physical diagnosis, and no students ever slept or even dozed during his demonstrations of gastric lavage orl of abdominal paracentesis.

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