University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA)

 - Class of 1945

Page 1 of 346

 

University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collection, 1945 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1945 Edition, University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1945 Edition, University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1945 Edition, University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1945 Edition, University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1945 Edition, University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1945 Edition, University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1945 Edition, University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1945 Edition, University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1945 Edition, University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1945 Edition, University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1945 Edition, University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1945 Edition, University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 346 of the 1945 volume:

, N A l L X 'L 1 xx X 1 x 1 X X 1 XQCQX Xxwxxx X X x xx X XXXX X XX X 4 W 5,1 z -A -- My M . .. WN u vf. 5 , gf 43, .i .- rs Q' . Q 5 331 s 'ik 3 - . 1 df 5: I? 'YQ Ei 5 33 fi TE- A l i 1 4 1 i 1 1 I - 1 1 1 . ' Y 4 , . 4 1 4 2 J 5 M E E M Q g l 3 5 i il 4 -5 1 . 'S - e . I WJJZQQ 4 v W 41 N .Q w1w3W'w ,A V Q - -., .nf Nr g 1 , I V , - MV "Ww.qi,,,:, Q fi S' f 7 4' Rum? im.: 24, 3'TTf5f" '55, K' AW " Y ,,-,1a:,,Cg7 Q fn, -if, f ' . N4 xxvx Y L Hi L WEEE Y E my A W I so " 4-5 4 Weak 'gy Q. 2 9 .- -.-:-:Pm +"P' -- -f V .. . , 5 4 lowa has met the challenge. llere at a great university' built for peace we are training to light. Yet, at the same time we have held fast to the precious shadows of yesterday. VVe hay e kept alive a syfmbol of what our men are lighting for . . . education, enterprise, freedom. The highlights are here, the lights of a today that is worthwhile and a shining tomorrow that we shall build. Shadows haunt the campus too . . . shadows of carefree college when laughter was light in the air 'ind Saturday s date the most vital problem. lowa, khaki and navy clad with heart full of hope, faces tomorrow. -'EM 'H1r'ir-M Wifi? QWMAW 27 MW . . .-. ' -.- -.-.-:-:-:-fifnzk-S-ze-'-' ., 4' . " - fs:-:P-. -4- .-.:.g.g.g:g:-:-.-.- - f - -:, S 3. 3, N Q . . , ..-..e-s zsziiils-2:1 ' " ' ' ' ,U A A ' -U Q: ' 1' ' " R This l'lAWKIiY1i is your story . . . in it lind your memories of the old and the new, the past and the present. YVe have traded in our saddles for Sam Brown now . . . our strollinfr O couples for straight lines of khaki . . . our amhling feet for rapid marching steps. VVe work in earnest . . . more serious, more sober, with a purpose. Keep the thought of the hospital tower piercing the darkness of night . . . the rihhon of walks from old capitol. Remember that Iowa stands with a new proudness. 'E .1 .,,m.s.w-we - V This is the Iowa campus, your campus, place of busiest activity. This is the campus where you worked and studied and played . . . where the sun-skimmed dome of Qld Capi- tol guards watchfully this place of your memories. East campus . . . Chemistry building, Schaehcer, East hall, the physics building . . . classes and libraries. VVest campus . . . University hospital, fraternities, stadium and field- house, University theater, the Art building. This IS your campus, caught in peace and quietude. The pillars of Old Capitol stand firm . . . Old Capitol for administration and congregation. Nlaczbride opens its doors wide to receive its eager students. ,, MM f fl s 4 1' J' 1 1 M 1 B! F, H 'Eifgx 5 . ,, .E ' f 5' ff 9 .. .... ,, b., . 3 H in 'EQ 5':l's4?"' . Y k f i 1 159, vt 'im WMM ww Aj 192111 211111 21 view ol' thu 11o111u of U1c1 Capitol sccu 1113111 Vvcst Cz1111p11s . . . 1101111 thu S11H.C1ONYCk1 1111114 110111 thc 11051311211 211111 1111 across thu bridge over thc 1111111 River to the stcps 1cz111i11g to k11oW1- cdgc. 101111 sz111' its 111611 111111111 pL11'poscf1111y across this bridge . . . 101111 saw its stu- 11c11ts 1111111 C1C1Cl'l111l1CL111' 111 w11111s 211111 snmv, 11U!'I'y1l1Q 1111014 211111 1401111 to Classes. 'Ast sm g-Q-If rf f I wal' 'X . an W V K . .. 7 A ,Wk K , M 'BP' ,,,3iw,wffz2 !'fW": t -is K: , ,V V g , Y ww m- , ,L?,Q3E .. ,f N iff , 4 . I 1 gf ,A ,h ar, 24 'i ' -'vain O 'hw a A , 2,5 NY! fm is Q1C""1J,!' ,Q X aw ,nf , .M v!' -H - , ,, W,. - .ew ,- 'MN' 'ef 4.,..,."'Kp,,,.9 s W ff' ' fi . fer' ' 4 ' mm wx, 'ii-K "" QQQQK 5134 ik - Amir in fa 9, vw .. . 4 A , ' ' A -Q' I, Lf ' -.Q . W fefwfkrz - am Q - m wwf ,,.-wr 'iw :sf?1Q??k :yi ,gg-QQM iv., 3' v K , '91, ' . 5' V A W . N ag if ' r swivnw, A .f i 'Wx sg A in X W sw W- 3' : -2 -I ,tlstwlt A C was-1 . 'X , , , .wa . M5 t ,L K, W 2 v 1q"f'a?' by -wg FS? wg., www Thu l.z1w 0111111111115 scrciic 1111 its hill, with spring cloutls :is 21 l1z1clitl1'1111. l'1l'lJlN its litiiglm, thc C111111111111s saw 1:11-ml sccncs. A h11111t- lim' 111111 stualuiits ill tht- 112151. thu Cc'11111111111s lmiist-tl 111t-tu11'r1lr1gists this yczxr. A-Xml, i11 111ilitz11'y' zittirc. the Cc,1111111c111s stuml p1'rj111nll1' 1111 its hill. lfirm and strong, the banks of thc Law Commons pool are mirroreal in the water. This, too, you will remember among' stcncs ol' your campus. : if Q 51 gwigp Q ii ., 1 it 'fa Mi' 4' A M w h ' M . N ,H gm .Q A .- ' A 'E S ' . - , ask H ,,-, b I F, y K E . ' ' - m fr 5 Q S wibiu if? V- A. A K, f 1 'I 'Sf ' -"- '- T1 ' - wa, H , K 1 K x- 'A i " wywrwsu M Y 1. The tower of the Univer- sity hospital remains Z1 famil- iar sight . . . in sunlight and under night shadows. The hroad clrive leads a winding way around the hospital. ln the hnekground, through the trees, is the medical lahora- tory, habitat of eager lneclical students. V ff, W 1LlQS,1 Q aii'55'7Y'ffL7if l23?f5"V5afETE"i 321521 AVL, f f Q 1 ' g',mr9YA'1"z A ' , . . , ,Z :W , V w ,. 1 'fi -ff A W 1 4 ,. 'L-4 ..gf'4'fw1 'fQ4?7'fe2W:r1s::W f , 'H , ,, L ,, L, A 2 if M M 1 4 , 7 . M , , was 1 f -- L, f , - i . H 5 -. , , A, ?' I' A' 24? . 7 " A Q, f ,, A, Q ,X ,L -lm 1,RiQ3,,,, ,X aj , X M M V, W ,. N ,,g WW ,T ., ,.,'u,,,.gs, ,f M. .2 , tg, x I .. v x, L ,Q 23,9 q . H ws S- "Art is lasting, life is brief" . . . over the lovely doorway of the Art building, these wordsg clouds float gracefully above the Iowa campusg and the Hydraul- ics building stands tall against the sky. ln this puzzled world, the motto on the Art building speaks the truth. Iflast Campus and the Physics building mm the siopu of the hill. In spring and in fail thc Cngiiiccring' SfUKiCllf9 with their instruments scatter rmvci' the broad slopcs of this Campus. M? Vg -K1 Q ,, :fat 4 ,ar 1, WH ag I fa ig, ,,1.,,, gk, 4, 'fi 9 A aw X f 'B 1 ,V ,grew 7. Aki., KT: Y fy ' J X 2 gf' x ff i A .,"' K 5 'Ffh 1 Q 'N ww' nf, , m1f1fw A, 1 lv , ,LQ 2 A Lg I 1 we ,fm ' nf x, 'ti E' A 2' I ' f Y v My , f , W af , f A if ffwlf 1? 'V " ar .ri fe' ' Amin ' ,fl 1' . ' -'ij , , I ar- it 4 t 4 .fl . N +V . , 'L' , , , .ikfhqfki 57f55,i'vVa5i6,pF V ef '. M 5, ' L -r 1 ,E 'M-' ,, , , , A, ' ft' 4 A 4:5,.i',, . ra " ' 'K , ' ' P 'P I2-ft A Ay ',Sg-tiny? f ,Q g?"fpi v " ., ' f , A Lx ' 4 Q ' ' - A . Y f, J 2 319 ff iv L 'ry P Nw 14 x., in fi! QQ: 1 Q 'nv if A i "ft QR' NA 1' ig' sf. A'-gin at .B A Q , 2 "' ,.. 1 fuff M M. V if w , -Aim? -. yi' . .1 . V V 4 . ,V Q sf' f Qu Ay M2 M if Af Q' ky as V. W J 4 ' Q ,ei 1..f,f ' ' V ggi' wi if . M ,ws G 412 qi 'fe ,, iv: V ' 5' V 4 'H YL 3' gr, ::1...s. 3 'wr g vs' xf ' j 1 ":.'1f L 'lt '?f,g 5"f 7 5 g,M, 'HJ A. -gg K fy, Aw,wMgy, gf f if-Af ,P , 'X' I V , x. ,S . 9' .Qi gf f f fff-1,,,f,,1 -g ' gifs, '4 R K gf! Q M 'Q w if 3 .. , A , ,gi av, 33 A , v , ' Q4 I 3 " . 6 -H MJ wi . :gh 3, fixa, . 'P A wk wma, .L N912 3. syg,g1A.fIw'N"" I ,.L,m,A-M, ,WWA L My .V W iw-WU Wf.. W '91 k -m,,,.,LgMh W 5 - ,, ,. , ,mf he , , A Azz - .,... , V Nfpk 'V G , , ' - 7 . iff Q? ' . ' p L 1 Y z M - - ' Wi1W.f,.A33y M- igfW...,, ' ,Q ,WZ Hffryw.--'wg 4 www X if . I 'X " :ffl ,.,, " " f ' S N . X 4 ?3,,,,2fE,gg15fffw ,jig Q ,M.Mq,.S V V 1 H A J K iijgigmmkf 55 I In f. ,Vw . L, .W I EL . , , , k 'MLW' E5 "fflw25+'swM1wb?w7,Q-'fjjgvwfwzfaiiw-54151, , I W V I ' - MA . , t "fi nk '5w4g X K M"-,f?vW39f2fz21'ff' ' 'X . V 1 ' 1 , 3 N9 M . f- ' ,V . . ,ff , . fb 5, ' I A' W QSM ' fl W4 A , ff ,ima I Y ' 22. M' ' MA 5 A . fm: N-Wm' N13 ,, 1 'g M - - vii L 1 2. ff, W A . - 1 - QzW, Q . WM wkgmwyw wi ,frwwqaw 955 , ' . Q ' ,J ' N NWg?+w,. V f 4' ' 1 , f ,rg . ,- ,ggi g w ffwsa W ,, - . ' K M im Mm, . fk ., V' wmk. , . V Vw -- 1 1 Y v in .5 , f. V fei, C -mam? J., a,f',aff,.w4ff, 1-:sfsiifgfsf l,siQ""L K ' 7' 'KW' s f -sq A gpg, .3 Kg 4, ww 3 ww ,nf gf if vw: S, S. AQ .,. ,iw M x Q hw. A 4 1? J w W. ,gm V H W ,W MQ A 'af A, 2, 45,3 -ww, if 4 .V , cgsfm .55.!g,,w ii1:i,2,.:4,-.gpm lr ,iff-A A H , f K Q , Q K ff V ww 573,31 79 ,S f 1. ,,,, , , ,Z , 4513 w q,5gf,s'K5 ,:2,5gw5fgf:.g:i,, vf:i425,g5?fz.,"..'WifHX,, fsfff:-a,:,,J pw, 1 ' 7 , . 4, ww- ,. R' . vv,-uf., ,.r.r'm1swm 'Gref'.fff'f.,1:4an , K' H4215 ' N:-kr N-':'Qwi1'g.iw,ae-,-..m,::f "ffll'w:Wf" fZff2,.:,i,fw .nf -A MQW, '1' .fiZx,x?z.22Ea1 kwin w11fl.1fV1.L.'23f-ww 55f'QQi?M4!"fenQ1 miigfsfs A2521 fkiwsi- yaifzi-'7 ,. wi' 5 ggi- w :e gym., , - :ww 41- L.,,,f, 'V Q, Ln-fl' -, ,, www 3152 , --1 . QM A lg-1 :Ph-r...72f Mm: f A ,Q :mms 'ii - V .L A , , ,,,'.M' " If - 4 ll-if ' P535-?li'iF"J' Llwflqsigl V?-4 ' w15L'f1:,,: Q,gfy,qf' 5: i wh' .img 55.411 Q 'V rw-i '. S1, uf .wi fy' ifvflf .i lliffff ' P CQJSFWW -.1 51 1 if +,' Q S" , .efgffm wgf wi 255 5 Xb ? Y fa 'f ,A y y : if 1 - Q ,, 5 ,iff y rss., :L L, M 43 'az in g : , ,- v.,,,Q.:., ' X H L 'aww' 'ap .. .W -- LT A-. K ' ' ' ..,, f e f.: ' ., 3 1 2. f f ""' " " H " ' ---- M-.. M-W-gmt D 'rw -- ---'---'-'-' ff ,131 -Wwmg. . , f-Wes, 'KLA' ' 'W' fi H Jia EW.,,,.,.7T""L 5,:f5 . -,Ziff fawbfm-"-f.A,.:::Q 4 HSTYNUIIE i' ..,.,... E 'A ' "" Q, K ,M ., .. .- ,,,. .. . W "1121 "'i" ..,. .. ' ,g f .i w- g5:g T'if f , , ,, , I f 6,47 35 ' MM., - ' gym -f , SQL. W e W. ' fpwa i?'..'?'f2'm m',f1.'v1'1Nw ,fx xy, ' .-ww jf'-" -517' , i3i2jkfQ.'12i'LE.,'Q f- ,- if, , 1 ,g:f5f1'f.. . " I 7- ,Niki Ia 'f if J' , ftfgfviii 'wggf-5,3551 k. 4 3 31: 'li' RL,f"f :"'z2s2.w Q2 1 - 'W?:1P'PT, 5Yffs1fs142i' S , " I ' M . ' -- , M g if -. , ,," .,"fk,1fXiA5Wg gg, 1 rf H- "".51i' "J f'W5:"'--' ,xwivif .fin XGA? -',1"f5 "IVE V : N5 Wi' 3-Six' 'likfffm -'iw -- :if "fill "" 1 gg. ..fi:Q1.y"l m -gg Mgzfxk , .N eilggyifi ff? I L ' ' u,xgg,y., K qu If ,M xyifigqgx M46 grrlitf. ,. K ' . vw, new - 7, -:'fg',..--zz'-ww V 5 wgf:q'g-QxLf,U f, L, ' . ,,.. A H ggi' W fi y K ,-,fggiws-viii' :,w,,k 1.11 W'P2fi" I 'fz f M - 1 .wks -' LW ,Ji , Y 1 in 47.9- f - 'N f-: sz - -f ' ,,,b,,w,,, .w Q. I . .. f ,. X .4 f. .- K - ' k,,7fzkff 1 iff ' - -53.31- ffi vga-ra ,.:Lg:5. X 1.lllil,5+Q The Union Bridge during Z1 peaceful moment . . . usuai scene of marching companies and hurrying students. This is your campus . . . nor will you soon forget your Hag as it waved from Old Capitol, in sunlight and shadow. Every- thing you think about Iowa, everything you dream about Iowa, you will say in two words . . . Old Capitol. EIHELE UF FHIE D5 . Down the sunny steps of Old Capitol come the girls of S. U. I .... happy and smiling, they are Iowa . . . Iowa in war- time, Iowa in peace . . . smiling into future highlights and shadows . . . highlights of friendships made through a year of gaining knowledge toward victory, a year of building a more secure design for happiness . . . hoping that War shadows will not return again. This I'l!WVKlEY1D is for these girls, iowa girls and boys, who make Iowa what it is . . . this IJAWVKIEYIE is for these girls and hoys, for their friends. Page 24 XXX X X X X 1 X X x XX GFX X XX xx X X XXX XXX X x xx XQXX X XX. x ,3 1 wr- ,f i 1 . 7, M X s I mf lj Q7 - ,am '- ,m 'Jr . 9' 'X-R: , . M. :Lx 1 W-nina., , ' 's 4 M s Nh' ,O I .ff iff 7 --FP . 4. 2 12 gm, ' :iv f W: H ff' . Y ,F '11 lam. ,1- A M 15 ,. dx. in '., fs , .41 . .Wu 1 ,FQ QQ A luv .. W' in gui, "', fs: - F171 ,fmrj , 1.1 1 12fJ:A,?n Ni. ,dy ' . w'1,xr.4', H, . Alvyf' -i4"'.w . - . --4' f n 1' EJ 1, W, -, '-FQ", 2.. . F VD., K .,, ar, .L - , x v, -. ' 4 f. 45211: N., 5 . rt.: 4 . r S. X, , 1,4 A V' J v, w , , P 1 1-gt' ' 4 13 RH I 3 I ,Ha A wi , iw ,Q . 5?-., I I wi ? mb .Q gat, .Y Qgdf ' ' , fihisfw, , , ' v in 4 Q mv'-ef' , ,f ,, , .-+L: , 55, rv W 4 ,V N- 45,4 .""':'fH ,"" Qu, 1 Qf"fia1'ni"-Vw , ,,- Hi!-g W" V f Y Ad: E, ,, B X' j 4 N .Mm K2 53" , P 'K ,'1,5 ' ' ,TW 1: l"Lf,"'5f V Q ,, 'gimmf' " ,, M4 V ,T 2,6 W, 5: affix F:'f,:j1v W Y 4 ilk :lEX?jiji.r25.Mf.f - N QL? gif- 45 4 ' ,Je if lwjiiyyi-'gi3Li.i?3 gi .--1 XX 1 2 . Y 3-'vii' 'V Ak , 1 i f . . ,ea31. A ,K p q f , E J ,QL ' .155 f X ' 5 S1 wigs' "1 fig - . HQ '1. fw1wq:,.,,b,1- WBVA, ,. E He 454-5564 , , .. . . its ww!i!,g.75V w f Y f K. ,L. Q ig- ' Q ' 1 " ' Y gh, H by . ' f 9' if?" I K 'Y . , , 4, 1 jp Q :M-ju, - . g Q 1 - X LW-' ifwfqa-iii 'gf 5 n 1 A ","iL!!je"'n-N1 Y. V 4 1. H r -, - - 'isw L3g.,:+!fiQ.sfN3i'.N W 3' -um" ,I ,.M..:L,Y-.t.!:vE.M..3 ,T 4? f .W , ' uf 6, 1-5:3 , ff M. M , 441 S' , Q , UH Q. 'VFW wg" " J Hi JK' ff' iggL5"w, - T 4. ' V-w-'w1.Lw." ,neg F fq - 2 4 , , H: K, A , Y gp-Kuff-'fi ,: ag N 0 , .bggp.,a44s . , s F9 ' "lf, an - - . 1- '- U, ' v Q, '.f4,L. 4?-ggn ,Aga 'QW-iff' ::...1 " A grim +1 .,,,, H. f ,wx KW,,,! , A , 1- -A-,,A.. ffl, CGNTENTS THROUGH THE YEAR ROYALTY PUBLICATIGNS FINE ARTS AND SPEECH GRGANIZATIGNS SGRORITIES FRATERNITIES DQRM LIFE SQ www 1 Q X, S Q ' vu, M. lv , . J Lffifii S fffgi ' 2 3 , ...fg -331 13123, 4 v N ' 32454 Ffa an ,i m M iff' , x. K3 Q , Nm. 2 ,., . ,::,., f"'a . ' :,:,i . b - -- .. 'ifw A 'z ' 5 ki s as f ' 'W A ,A , 215 x 7 -:1' A ,- ' Eggs 2 -P551 9 -- Lk gays M i 'fir i V ' 2 lm!! ,-V2 -Y' M -fa My -.f ., ?5if'?"'Q . ., FQ? -1 ' ,E-X K -5,5213 2 ' 5 Q . 1 "L WT54' Q A 1 V 4 - R 1 1 You wanted to thro h W t e nearest table at that alarm clock ringing in the middle of the night! You staggered into your clothes and off to the campus on a dead run, pausing only slightly to grab coffee at VVhet's and com- pare notes on last nigbt's big events. Itys daybreak . d you're ff ' 'in o to a big day. AND WE'RE OFF AS 'OLD CAP' LOOKS DOWN 737 if f . 'E WMM, .M . Through the years Old Capitol has seen all . . . has listened silently and watched benignly while plans were niarle anal dreams came true. And every Hawkeye takes with hini a picture of Old Capitol-her golden dome against a blue sky, with the Hag pmiitlly overhead . . . Old Capitol, on whose steps have stood lowals best, while fellow students cheered wildly and sang. "on forever- more!!! ENN .4 Q . 0 1 i 5 fr lf: Y . 'F' k 5 Q x -wg 3 if x.,, 'if ' Z . Qi, My 1 , we war-'4ww"' Ya , .1 , ,-ww' X L Y X, V Cx , ' Q, I my k:.?!X sf Q ggi swf? . 'ggi QQPQQEE . if xswsmze S ,W Ti ' ' wi . ...Q Y 'A J , , km., - X , ,Q .wwf X, . ., L,,,1 dwg, f Wm: . W n. f 'W 'M W1-SS'f,33' Q Ll f-.nv-ge-3-3,-qc , , , mwwgw ,,wwmvmmmwm2wv:mm:e.m Pauses for pleasure . . . that let-me-live-again Coke at VVhet,s . . . the cigarette that revived you from the dead . . . a good stretch and time to meet Pete between classes . . . time to relax and prevent rigor mortis from taking over completely . . . time for that bull session that Solved all the problems the world ever had or Could expect to have! PRECIOUS STOLEN SECONDS UNION HOSPITALITY No Lmou card, 110 ducs. no strikes. You walk in, not out. and it's highly orgzuiizcd for those spvcial hours when El gamv of bridge or a Coke on thc suiiporvh hits the spot. lfziybc you ambhr into the music room to calm shattered 1ic1'v9s or whip yourself into Z1 frvuzy clmsiug that Iitth' white piiigypong hull. Iveck-4-iid clauuiiig in the Rivvr room . . . losing yourself miles ziwziy vizi the lzitvst book ru rhv hhrzlry' . . . itis all lfuion hospitality! 1 A v 1 5, E ? u RQ if' '? av ,sv bf, Q? . 51534 , f? Q Wf f ,F fl 1 ' F312 Q av, . fy X, Alf , ,, J T . M ' 4 . at Em W if J i Si' X5 x an My 'E A jx .gg ,,.,,,,WX- A. V zrz, 'af A zae1,1i',.?i., . gafwazslgei. Q-Lfiw Q51 - Q21:911.M'w M F, a 3 E? Q 5 E, 5? H 5? 1 ! E i I L i 1 i 5 i W I K 1 1 y 1 , . v WITH VARIED VIGOR Swing into avtion on all fronts! lt's a hamburger midway down the hatch or a pushup halfway pushed. ltys not what you do but the way that you do it! ltls the re- sult of lowals super-special witamins and wigor . . . there you are, raring to go. Swing that hockey stick and ply that canoe paddle . . . if you sit back youyre sunk, and who has time not to do things anyway! t a xxx full ll i d awoke fifiiffef' W-:N RN ,. A 5 , .W 'A '5-in-Q IOWA'S SPECIAL COURSE No niajoi' is offc-rccl in this course, but it's one of the most popnlzn'...z1ncl no questions asked! ltls lowzfs spucinl 'lclaini to fauna" . . . fl1E1'ClS nothing like i'ivci'h:1iilii1ig on those spring ziftcrnoons . . . Canoe-ology for the niorc nthleticzxlly inclined . . . and it's all ours "till rhf- waters no more in their rivers shall rnnll' ilk My 1 2 I w bf ,uw Wi 3 , - flslinw JL www ww 4? 6 Q--ww .M Ag , if F 21" I I 1 if . 3? H 2 .iw 1 w 1 I SUN PORCH SESSIONS Religion to basketball and back again . . . as long as people can talk-they will! But what is Conversation without food . . . and what College student is ever with- out foodl S0 you eat and drink as you make with the words. Books rake :1 rest Cure while fists pound :ind voices rave . . . but why did we Come to College anyway! ,fffff VICTORY IN WAR VICTORY IN PEACE You were znnzizccl to find yourself at 21 lee- ture and actually enjoying itl lnforniation First rolled around weekly with its well known speakers. Then, too, you gave 21 push to that Victory that everyone is waiting for hy rolling bandages or being 21 hospital eo-aide once a week. Caine Saturdays . . . you turned on thc eharln at the lfnion tea dances . victories any or the evening USO party . . way you look at it! .ff-"W 3 'R ,M WN ,...---f-W' X 'N .N WW -1 QA if '55 W Mi? BOOKS FOR TONIGHT CLUB Tonight's the big night . . . so you take the mind out of cold storage, oil the typewriter and fill your pen. It's studying, the miracle of the age, and you're up to the eyebrows in formulas and techniques of the strait-laced type. All is peace and Concentration, for amazingly-you are studying! WE STUDY OR . . r You may beat your head on the wall a few times or throw a table at your best friend who disturbs you. You might even hang out a "Go Away, 1 Hate the VVorld" sign, or you might just talk and eat and lot the World relax around you for one night. 2 fig Qi R me Q as in M., Q 1 1 S E lx 3 3 Y: 5 W 3: fi 2 2 uv M' KW' A , fic 45.1 9' my 4' K EYif?95"'Q M 'twig sf Y 2 1 iii if i .J 5 L1 'S in is 1- 4 I1 Y Q14 f WK Y, 'Awww Q P K Rig I STRICTLY SATURDAY STUFF Footloose and fancy free . . . and that's for sure the way to be, Comes Sat- urday with its blessed freedom! You sleep Cif you can stand the shoelcj . . . you eat like mad. llaybe you even lose your sanity enough to make with the slacks and elbow grease. It's timeoff . . . and what wouldn't you do with a whole week of Saturdays! Hi WOMEN, WOMEN EVERYWHERE li tive of looking under the You didnlt quite get to t e 5 .,, bed nightly, and you didn't whistle at El single male. But who took the "he" out of eoedueation? Anyway you sur- vived, and it it meant Il lone cadet surrounded by ri bevy of beauties, HIC never complained. So you knitted and ' hat xvonien are such lovely wrote letters and tound out t people l 'N-s. it tt el hi 5 4 e if. .Q.:iL , Jw 'vw , wif! M .M A if-di? 1214, .3 Q, ' ' 3.1 " Y X ' ' '71 YN, IM ,,.f' iii? f- :if "Wiki P5-ii '5 F I V I The corn monument dicln't riyal the beau- ties of years past and the Highlanders were far from the husky he-men who once marched the gridiron . . . hut the mums were just as yellow, spirit was just as high, and "On Iowa" rang even more clearly this year. Boys all over the globe will someclay be coming back to a real Iowa Homecoming! l IT'S HELLO AGAIN X X se apr SMOOTH 'N SWEET Take down those programs from the wal I one of these nivhts . . . you,1l be back partyin like a smoothie. From 1: g hayrides to formals with dresses that made you look out- of-this-world, you had your Hing. And before you get any more gray hairs ther e'll be more of those shining hours . . . bigger and better parties will be around one of these days. , Q an , L., i wg Jgwis isfiefyefrxi N , ff",- A , ,L ,,,. I All, L mis. . ti? .Q Lx 653 'im K ' 'fn 4 f fy- . f N: 1 M xl? X is www - ,, S " " I gf Q, -A -W ny, . .SSJIX 11135 X K wa 'KA K E -fs. b, 7- T3 si . V , .. A . A M' Q A' . xx? Q f HW 1? gil' Ekimw.. Q , if 25 Qu-A... ' x '.', is X -s M..-fi , ,, mini: , f,:,ff,.f 5 , na ..,w'Qj9,Qgf,3 KW if is ii . 4 as 'gn H: W in 1 A -EAW K Q .. W , fx: ii.: Mi. ww. I ll "Nly darling," you began . . . and ink manufacturers made a fortune! Daily mail to the male and a fortune MAILS COMIN' THROUGH spent on stamps . . . specials and V-mails, too. Army, navy and marine morale soared, thanks to the lassies who picture-gazed and dreamed of the day When HE'd be back. So We "did right" and wrote . . . till arms ached to match hearts. But what's more wonderful than that all-important letter, as the heartlines went out for miles from the hearts in Iowa City. LOVEBUG WORKS OVERTIME Leap Year Came and the rice Hew thick and fast! Cupid made the campus his firing line and the "R'I1's.H wen many . . . not that zmyonr objected. EW' fl ' fi ima 9 1 vi E 6 M Q X :qv X .Q K 7 z 'F' B Z. Y, E J' 1' ww? wx I 0 6 21,5 ag, wx 1, ., , , 2' x :K S my i 'I ' 1. 3 3 N 1 SHUFF LE AND STOMP So the Central Part went into a huddlc and decided to plan some nights to make diaries sigh and memory books beam. Thar special Saturday Cach month was all-University party time. The lounge of the Union was thc- placc . . . when sweet 111 L1SiC meant dancing couples and who- wants-to-get-out-of-this-moodY y committee I SOPHISTICATION OR SWING SN A clcvcr backdrop, a catchy namc and an original program carrx' awax' to show the granclchildrc-n some day-all parts YO of thc l,'iiix'c1'sity pzirtics. In September wc got back into the 'ing with the "Kickoff," followed by thi- first formal, l'romcnaclc." Noveinbcr meant thc traclitional Homecoming clancc with stuclc-nts, faculty and alums all celebrating togcthcr ind the gfovcrnor as a soc-cial gm-st. fi -I, , M 2 ., 9 . ,, ii gif? 3 ni 1 :iw N. .VA W, A 5 jf-Q 1 146 4f5i?LE Q . MW, 'NAV X Q J i t X vii' ez ' F 9 , g .Jw- 'Z . 1 "fe -ix. -Q .., a lfa A 'fin - K z'.:':- L, w I an g . ,..s: ' 83 -W ,.., vy- ix t g, za Q. ,- x mf Law gs,,,'Qlsv,M3M:7 k ufifwfy' - 7, .. , A ' ' I 2 Wag SQH 5 .. V a-mia-iw 5 1 ma, ,wm.Mx.,., Mvnnmw . . vwfwwwmmy-. S2192 6 , 'X Z1 I 'ge 'SZ W if-v if 2 T5 W 'ki f r Wi ffsigww' iixssf V I i x 4 'Q i, 9 1 5- 5 wif- ' 5 'fi S if wfgug . Q, I. ? 5 4 G 1 K w , ? z i 1 1 HVVinterlude!' meant ieicles outside and Jack Frost busy at work behind the Count ll band. VVe glided at the HSil- ycr Skateu and then let down our hair at the patriotic "Swing Salute." Caine llarch and the gals took over for the PERK UP AND SWING OUT I 1 A.. ' oissn r if 2 "Leap Year Ganibolf' Then the Cen- tral Party' Committee heaved a Collective sigh of relief as the year was Climaxed with a gala formal, "Spring Debut," -1 , VA, and presentation of the Hawkeye court. vi w xgesggbv kk Q jgiita ::,,, ies W ex ,M Z W 3 AQ if s ws if awp .Y - X. fm 'M i -7111 ff M, - Ex Q. 'YY :.. F ' s- Q5 'U .- IIUHHIEPES MUST UUTSTANUING GIRLS SWEETHEAHT PARTY LIANICE BARDILI, SHIRLEY MCKIM AIARY JANE N EVILLE ESCUL PIA FLULIE LOUSE H.XRKNIZSS Kafvfw Knjvjvrz Ganzfzlrz b CARUL Ours Smvsox KIARY RIURCHISON Lpvf'.VffIl'ZL'I1 Ufrstlrzawz FRANCES PAGE, Queen Ufvstlazcn CAROL SNYDER DMM fyflllllllll 1 BETTY XVEAVER BIARILYN SNYDER Pi Hera Phi Ifllflflll Kflpjwzz Ganznm B.xRH.xRA BAKER 11111111 Chi Onzfya EEEA BALL W ELAIN E LOSSMAN, Queen Kajljm H 1111111 Them N. ' PATRICIA K1R1sY JANICE T-'WVU Currier Delta Delta Dfftzz RIA-XRJORY HALL Kajvjm dfjbhrz ywhffll FHESHM N EUUHT f?IZRI HOIfIfMANN IXVIIPPII Krzpfm Clllllllllll RAQH EI. UPDEGR AFF JANE X'vAN AL'sD.fxLl. Currirr Pi Brin Phi UF BEAUTY BIARY LOLTISE NELSON dljvha Chi Olllfgll RI.-XRIANNE BI.-XLLOY CIIIHIHIII Phi Hein JANET :XICr1i.-XVISPI Jfjwllzz Dalia Pi HAWEEYE EUUHT l':I.lZA-XISETH SHANLEY A-111711711 fllpllll Tl1l'ffl ELMNE LOSSMAN 1XrC1f7f7!l Alpha Theta CQLORIA Hrnx Chi Omrgn GER KI.-XRGIE ,ALLEN Dwfffz Dzffln Delln H WHEYE COURT ROSEMARY KRUSE Alpha Chi Omega BETTY SCHORI Currier -f ff FJ' Iowa lovely scenery . . . Iowa royalty and beauty. wi.. ,WW 1.1 fr n, 34. Q Zz J: 1 , Jr- A 3- he 3 I I Z w 1 vf'A he 5 .M 'lu 1 "W . ,M 1 f L. i Q 1 WK is 1 '! X X I B . Ti. ,BIG 1 gi, Q E l vnu ' M if nf, m W,M...u,.w,.,r,.f'--Q-v..ap.1Q-.., , '?'rW'9Thi ",L , ,, 1 ' ' f WMM hmm mmwwlv-num. ,, mi! .Wm-.vw E S 5 q y J.q.,,f:Q,,., xv' Wwg: - ' 4 This year's IEIAWKEYIZ shows the Univer- sity during Wartime . . . uniforms, war sched- ules and war activities played all-important roles on the campus. Those who look through this I'IANVKEYIi will see the univer- sity preparing its students for the higgest job they will ever face. ELAINE BRODY, Editor THE 1945 HAWHEYE EDITORIAL STAFF IIREDERIC .ACI-CERSON ROTC and ASTP HELEN JUDT . Fine Arts and Speech MARGARET BROVVNING . . Sororities CAROL XVELLM.-AN . . . Publications BEVERLY ZLOTKY . . . Dormitories MAURINE IIIOLLAND . Administration GLORIA WEIsER . . . . Juniors LOUISE I'IILl-'MAX .... Features IVIARY OSIIORNE . . XVOmen's Sports S'rI5AR'I' IVIILLER . . . Men's Sports MIRIAM LEVITT . Professional Schools JOHN HANNI . . . Meteorology Rep. TANNYE BLRNETT . . Photographer LOUISE JOHNSTON . Photographer SUE ON0 ..... Photographer DOROTIIY PEOERSON . Othce Manager BVSINESS STAFF ANITA HEA'l'TIE . Asst. Business Mgr. RUTH IVICCUTCHEON . Sales Manager BETTY XVEAYER . Contract Manager ELLEN ITXYIS . Junior Picture Manager PEGGY BANKS . . . Index Manager RAY E.-XSTMAN . . Meteorology Rep. PHYLLIS NEE .... Staff Secretary MARILYN CARPENTER Business Manager SALES STAFF Jeanne Franklin Mary' L. Nelson Flora Xxylllfillg VVilma Seemuth James Burnside Benna Bartells Frances Little Phoebe Hartz Loanna Schnoor Niildred Buoy Joan Brutus Shirley Austin Elaine Armstrong Jean Houser The editorial stall, headed hy lilainc Brody, and the husiness statl, managed by Nlarilyn Carpenter, worked to make this H.-AWKEYE a hook that portrays a cross-sec- tion of college life at the University of Iowa during the war year of 1944, Page B4 EDITORIAL STAFF Bark l'04w.' Stuart Nliller, Nlir- iam Levitt, jean Bowlsby, John Hanni Suomi rokwi Joan VVheeler, Maurine Holland, Helen Iudt, Gloria Weise1', BCverly Zlotky Front f01'w.' Mary Osborne, Car- ol VVellman, Anita Leopold, D o ro t ii y Pederson, Louise Hilfman, Margaret Browning PHOTOGRAPHERS Sue Ono, Louise Johnston, Tannye Burnett BUSINESS STAFF Bark rofw: Ellen Davis, Ray Eastman, Peggy Banks Front rohwf Anita Beattie, Phyl- lis Nee, Betty Yveaver SALES STAFF Bark l'04'bU.' Elaine Armstrong, Mildred Buoy, Frances Little, Jean Houser Serond ro-wi Benna Bartells, Jeanne Franklin, Shirley Aus- tin, Flora VVhiting Front row: Joan Brutus, Loanna Schnoor, Mary Louise Nelson, XVilrna Seemuth Page 85 Bark rofw: Nadine Ham- mer, Nancy Gilson, Eleanor Pownall, Mar- tha Richardson, joan Holt, Kathleen Patten, Margaret Browning, Peggy Hutchcroft. Fronl row: Mary Fors- lund, Marian Crews, Anne Byrne, Marcelyn lyiarvel, Yvonne Hoff- man. Nine topics. of conversation . . . nine issues of Friwol during Iowals eight-month school year. lowals humor magazine, edited by and for the students, is a campus institution, packed from cover to cover with the latest campus data. A picture of college life on the University campus during the wartime years of 1943 and '44, Friivol last year had short stories, jokes, campus fashions and features combining hill71O1A with more serious thought. Articles on music and movies, cartoons and poetry added spice and variety to the publica- tion. Qriginal covers by the Frieol photographers, campus gossip about lowa students and highlights on the university's instructors were special features of the Friwol. Under Editor Jennie Evans, the editorial staff of this yearls magazine let their imaginations take the lead to Write the type of nonsense that is the distinctive mark of any college humor magazine. Contributions of original poems and stories written by civilian students and army men on the campus added to the list of editorial features. lVIore serious were inter- views vvith outstanding people on the campus by the staffls regular Writers. Jeannette Chrysler, business manager, and lylary Forslund, advertising manager, directed the more technical side of the publication. The work of the business staff and the advertising staff was as essential as the Writing of the editorial staff in putting out the Frieol. Through increased sales of advertising, an all-important part of any publication, the business and advertising staffs worked with the editorial staff to publish Friwol, lowals magazine re- flecting campus views and campus life. Page 86 PHI UL EDITORIAL STAFF RUTH SIIAMEALGH ELEAXOR POWRALL KATHLEEN PATTEX PEGGY HUTCIICROFT MARILEE BORX . MARIAN CREVVS . MARJORIE BLAIR . . Art Editor . Asst. Art Editor . . . . . Editorial . Editorial . Editorial . . . Editorial . . Fashions Editor GERALDINE HOFFMANN Asst. Fash. Editor MARGARET BROWSING . Asst. Fash. Editor ELIZABETH CooK . . . VVomen's Editor PATRICIA IIIOBIN . . Home Front BUSINESS STAFF MARY FORSLUND . Advertising Manager ROBERT JENNER . GEORGE CAVALIER . ELAINE LossIvIAN . RUTH MCCUTEHEON PEGGY MARVEL . . MARTHA RICHARDSON AxxA BTRNE . . NADIXE HAMMER . .AXITA LEOPOLD. . Circulati MARIAN CREWS . joAx HOLT . RUTH KNIGHT . . Page 87 Advertising Advertising Advertising Advertising Advertising Advertising Advertising Advertising on Manager . . Copy . Copy . Copy JENNIE EVANS. Editor JEAXXETTE CHRYSLER Business Manager f MARIE NAU MA'rifiRE Advertising Maiiagei' DAILY IUWAN The Daily Iotwn played a vital role this year, as in the past, in educating lowa students. Through unbiased news selection it guided many through the seas of rumors and disbeliefs. A member of the Associated Press, the Iowan received vital news re- ports accurately and swiftly from all parts of the world. College columns and other local features added variety and interest to the paper. Intelligent editorials showing clear, effective thinking brought up questions concerning student affairs and world events. As a news medium, the Iowan combined ac- curate news coverage with intelligent analysis in one of the countryls outstanding college newspapers. Ably edited by the student staff, headed by James Zabel and Shirley lVlcKim, it provided enjoyment and information to its readers. Published every day except Nlonday, the paper offered to its subscribers a means of becoming well informed on current events, with up-to-date viewpoints on world condi- tions. The Iotraiz guided many in the search for facts in a war-torn world and served as a bulletin to keep students informed on campus affairs. JAMES ZHBEI., lst Semester SHIRLEY McKiM, Editor, 2nd Semester Page 88 FDITORIAI, STAFF DOR0'I'IIX' KLEIN Managiiig Iitl. BARR.-IRA REED . News Editor DORIS C'AMPI3EI.L Campus Editor ELLEx MORRISON . City Editor VIRGINIA HOAK . Society litlitm- RICHARD YOARAM Sports Editfwr BUSINESS STAFF lY1ARIE NAU lXf1A'l'IIRE . . Advertising NTHIIZIQCI' Louis LORIA . . CircIIlzItioIIMaIIzIger MARILYN CARPENTER . . Local Display MARY MQCLNE . . Assistant Local Display MARGARET lVIILI,ER . . Classified MaII:If.:eI' GLORIA VVEISER . . Campus Consxzltant PEGGY MARVEL Assistant Carnpus C0IIsIIlt:1IIt JEAN BowLsI3x' Assistant f'aIIIpIIs CoIIsIIlt:IIIt F Hr Page 89 FREDERICK POWNALL, Director MEMBERS OF BOARD VVILRUR L. SCHRAMM A. CRAIG BAIRD KIRK H. PORTER PAUL E. OLSON JACK MOYERS JEANNE FRANKLIN SARAH BAILEY DONALD OTTILIE CHARLES SWISHER FRED M. POWNALL Director LOIE M. R.-XXDALI. Secretary ST DET PUBLIC TIU 5 I E. The Board of Student Publications, Inc. was organized in 1924 for ownership and operation of all-university student publications. The corporation board is composed of five student and four faculty representatives. Student members are selected at annual campus- wide elections and the faculty members are appointed by the presi- dent of the University. Every spring the board selects editors and business managers of the student publications. All appointments for the all-university publications must be approved by the board. Frederick NI. Pownall is director of publications. S I a 71 ri i 7l fl : Charles Swisher, Jeanne Frank- lin, Craig Baird, Kirk Porter, Jack Moyer, Don Ottilie. Sfaivd: YVilbur Sehramm, Fredrick M. Pownall, Miss Loie Randall. Page 90 ...f-vm, TH!-l SIT Though the civilian enrollment of the engineering college has been depleted by selective service boards, the Iowa yllllfljill, monthly publication of the College of Engineering, has continued its circu- lation. The Transit is a means of exchanging ideas among students, faculty and other experts on problems and questions challenging the engineers of tomorrow. Credit goes to Edward Larsen, editor and general manager, and his competent stall, who have continued dur- ing Wartime to present the Transit as the same stimulating and inter- esting publication as in the past. STAFF EDWARD LARsEx Editor and General Mgr. CLAIR THOMAS . . Business Manager ROBERT SIJLEXTIC . Circulation Manager I. JOHN VVANSIK . . . Associate Editor I. John Walisik, Edward Larsen, Clair Thomas, Robert Sulentie Page 91 Publications Un The Hun N S 5 Qi Q-Q x , 0 I wr THE FAITHFVL SHEPHERDESS . . a pastoral fantasy A Change in the policies of the theater concerning ticket sales was brought about this year. The sale of season tickets to university stuclents was tliseontinuetl antl all university stutlents were perniitteal to attend all plays of the theater group without Charge, thus enabling many who oralinarily Could not take advantage ol' the line theatrical protluetions to tlo so. liven with the Changes in east continually neces- sary in View of the manpower situation, the University has been able to offer consistently line perforniances throughout the season. Costuniing and scenery effects reached new heights this season antl the acting throughout the year was superior. 'IXXVI-f1,F'1'H NIGHT . . . Shakespezlrff at Iowffs l'niVersity theater DRAMA AT ITS BEST The University Theater under the direction of Professor C. Nlabie has completed a highly successful season presenting five plays. The initial presentation was "Alice in XVonderland," Lewis Carroll's famous story adapted by Eva LeGallienne, with all its weird characters and unusual cos- tumes and scenery. No season would be complete without at least one of the classic plays of VVilliam Shakespeare. For its second offering of the season the University Theater produced the rollicking comedy, "Twelfth Night." "The Faithful Shepherdessn by John Fletcher was followed by the play Utlunior lVliss" based on the stories by Sally Benson and written for the stage by Chodorov and Fields, completely charming in its picture of adolescent life, and L'Papa Is Ally' by Patterson Greene portraying life in a Pennsylvania Dutch family. The hnal offering of the season was "lVlr. Pim Passes Byn by A. A. Milne. The experimental project was the powerful tragedy by Lillian Hellman dealing with life in a girls' school-"The Chil- dren's Hourf' The University Theater was privileged to have lVIr. B. Iden Payne, director of the Stratford lVIemorial Theater in England, as guest director this season. Nlr. Payne directed "Twelfth Nightn and 'fThe Faith- ful Shepherdessfl ALICE IN XVONDERLAND . . . a mirror of fun by Lewis Carroll ai w ff, Q' F 4413? Yami' V Q kay, 'ff 315 -mf QM 5 KX , 4, A .eff N, Eiga W fr S 2281 ' .,:,,,,.. is W gh W J, A 1. ., 44 'Nw S: ,z 'K 'W ge .., fr it 3 f i if Q 'W A f Q 5 tjk 54, 1 .' law My T552 ,gggxw iv 5 .,., .. H ,gi -K if - , , ,.,.- w Q ,L ifixslif' ' W'7-. H f . I 7 if ' ','g iff' ' '4 ' 'if K -PQ , '4 ' ' Q 15 4 U. ' 1 V ff' A W, mm,. Vmk., X ' M15 , 1 1Q.?lg,y3 :KH-as sw Q W I .. A ' - A K5 X Q ig 'i5x.'fQ:f'E- , A... Siiffiffillil, lm L A W 'K'k K X , V, My , gg- 4 ff .J ,,: 'inf I 'ik X 5: ' W -Q1 J, M' , 45 S is H ,gf 31 45. ' Je 1 . iikgfil X Q 'e 3352 ,fig x in ix X 9 4. . K -M M ' gif' ez -QM - W www- ra: A. , -Mfygf1.- Iswfi., ,U k ggg , 1,f-317' - f- A 4 ff , ,. - , , ffwssissiwf. Lk A - K ' - 5 A . 'wif-QW P .V , . KmKh-kk ff "" ' ...T . . 1 Zgbggzl 5 W W ll V ' ' 22 g T27 , P" 3g,Q.,,zi , ww ,, ,f ff S M 2 X nf ,ww af 'SPEAHI G FUR VIETUHY One feature of lowa's wartime student speaking program, continued from the previous year under the direction of Professor A. Craig Baird, has been the student HSpeaking for Victory", program. Students spoke before lowa City and other com- munity groups on such Vital subjects as financing the war, rationing, post-War international organi- zations and similar topics, and assisted with the student "Phoenix Fund" campaign. These speak- ers have also conducted weekly forums over YVSUI as members of the University Student Forum. The Speakers Bureau was this year under the direction of Eleanor Keagy and lVlarilyn Nesper. A. CRAIG BAIRD, Director Bark rofw: Raymond, Martin, Gray, Korneisal, Hardie, Neville, Hilfman, Gross, Howe. Front rofw: Kolarik, Stoekman, Birdsall, Abrams, Banks, Harmeier, Nesper. PHUA U CU Forensic participants during the year were organized as "Speaker Cadets". "Student Associatesll and "Student Direc- tors." The last mentioned group was composed of speakers pro- moted from the other categories and included: Ruth Reininga. Louise Hillman, Velma Nlartin, Tom VVuriu, Eleanor Keagy, Dick Baxter, Bruce llughes, Dorothy Kottemann, Sally Birdsall and Don lfcroyd. The lowa debate team composed ol' Tom VVuriu, Dick Baxter, Donald Ecroyd, Dorothy Kottemann and Bruce llughes participated in the Wvestern Conference tourna- ment at Evanston, lllinois, in Nlarch and tied for hrst place with Chicago and Indiana. ln debates with the University of Nlis- souri at Columbia, Nlissouri, and lowa City on the problem of "Voting for Eighteen Year Olds," Bruce Hughes, Tom VVuriu and Sally Hirdsall were lowa's representatives. Nlore than twenty students were active in intercollegiate debate during the season. Of this number, several were given special honors. Tom YYuriu, Donald licroyd and lfleanor Keagy were awarded the l.owden annual prize ol' S50 to the superior students in inter- collegiate activities. Dorothy Kottemann won the lrlancher Prize in the local Northern Uratorical League contest. and placed in the final intercollegiate contest in lowa City in April. Birdsall, Hilfman, XVnriu, Martin, Keagy, Ecroycl X' N, NNER UP SPEAHI E Intercollegiate debate and discussion, under the direction of Professor A. Craig Baird and Gordon Hostettler of the Speech Department, included a wide variety of programs in its yearls activities. Iowa, Northwestern and Nebraska were winners in the invitational intercollegiate forensic tournament and confer- ence held at S. U. I. on November 15-17. In December, Velma IVIartin, Eleanor Keagy, Louise I-Iilfman, Sally Birdsall and Ruth Reininga participated in the lvestern Conference VVomen's Dis- cussion contest at Northwestern. NIiss Reininga placed first in the women's speaking program, and the other Iowa contestants were rated among the highest ten per cent of the discussion groups. Eleanor Keagy, Velma hIartin and Louise Hilfman competed in the University of Nebraska speech tournament in February, a tournament which included representatives from 26 colleges and universities. Iowa also entered the extempore speak- ing-discussion contest under the auspices of the coordinator of Inter-American Affairs. Donald Ecroycl and Nlary ,lane Neville were selected by the national judges among the eight winners of the North Central region for the final contest at Evanston in IVIarch. Bark rofw: Birdsall, Marlas, Ecroyd, Keagy, Peterson, Collier, Hostettler Frou! rofw: Hilfman, Gray, Neville, Kottemann, Wuriu, Raymond, Martin R ilu SLIIVFIIIER XXIIIIXM Xeseri, "XYSL'l . . . the broadcasting station ol' tlie State Lvniver- sity of iowa" . . . these are tlie words which conie over the ether waves from the campus radio station located in the Radio building of the university. Recognized as one of the outstanding educational radio stations in the United States, VV5L'l is constantly giving valuable practical experience to budding announcers and technicians. XYith all the modern equipment ol' a big-time commercial station, YVSCI performs its function of training students as well as acting as the Voice of the university throughout the state and beyond. ln addition, the radio station is constantly attempting to do its part in the war effort by presenting government programs urging the pur- chase of bonds and entrance into the war effort of those not already called into services. XX HIIXVI Polziisiz, Muay ANN Iloweri. Bierce -Xnxxis W. S.U.I The Voice Ui The University Pm Lus VVxLr,Eu, GENEVIEVE SLEMMOXS RICHARD YOAKAM Throughout the day VVSUI brings to its listeners a variety of programs. ln addition to the War programs already men- tioned there is complete news coverage at Various intervals during the day. There are programs of education, classroom lecture broadcasts, speaking and drama, music, children's pro- grams, play-by-play presentation of football and basketball contests and interviews of notables and speakers visiting the University. The supervised student staff, although constantly changing, has been composed of the following people: staff an- nouncers, VVilliam Venell, Del Donahoog studio assistants, Phyllis VViller, Connie Nliddleton: sports announcer, Dick Yoakam, farm editor, Bruce Adams, and record librarian, lVlargaret l.abbitt. '- i Pm'LI.1s XVILLER, R.x1,P1i SCHVVEITZER ii E 2 5 2 I A bflenibers of the Art Department have been busy with war art in addition to their regular courses of study. The school aims to teach the student to recognize good work, understand the history of art and become familiar with the men who are producing our great art treasures and understand their tech- nique. Students produce all types of art such as life drawing and lithography. Several outstanding exhibitions were spon- sored as a function of the Art Department which had for its director Prof. Lester D. Longman. The oils and drawings of Philip Guston were presented in an exhibit before they were sent on to New York and St. Louis for showings in the spring. Humber Albrizio exhibited sculpture for several weeks this spring. 'VW ' Art, too, has its place in the war. Again this year the VVar Art VVork Shop donated its ser- vices and facilities to the army and navy con- tributing posters and art Work as its part in the war effort. Code cards for the Signal Corps of the United States Army were pre- pared in the studio and charts and lettering were done throughout the year for both branches of service. Posters for the Double- V program and other campus organizations were produced in this shop, as well as charts and posters for the hospital. The VVar Art lvork Shop has proved its merit in providing facilities for the presentation of war objec- tives on campus and will in all probability be maintained indefinitely. The work is under the direction of Nliss Alice Davis of the Art Department. WAR ART WUHESHUP CHARLES RXGHTER, Director UNIVERSITY IH-XD "Vile are proud to have been able to keep going this year in View of the shortages of men." This was the statement of Director Charles B. Righter, leader of the three uni- versity bands. The maintenance of the band has been possible through the increased use of women in the three organizationsg it is estimated that fifty per cent of the eighty members are women. For the Hrst time in the history of the University Bands, Women were used in the football band, although they had been members of the Concert and Var- sity bands previously. The band has had a full calendar playing at football and basket- ball games, presenting a fall concert and two spring concerts and a series of evening con- certs during Commencement week. Arnold L. Oehlsen is the assistant conductor. Page 104 IVEHSITY UHEHESTR Dr. Philip Grcclcy Clzipp has Complctul his twciity-liftll yczir as coniluctor ol' the Llni- Vursity QI'Cl1CSfl'2l. XYirh Arlrlison Alspzich us assistant conductor, thc orchcstra appcarccl in six Conccrts, one of which, thu lfzistcr pro- grzun, was zi joint pcrformzinfc with the Uni- versity Chorus, :is well as the wintcr Com- mcnccmcnt pcrliorinancc. This music group presents large clzlssicul Works sclrlom zit- temptcrl hy non-professional musicians and also Compositions by aclvancccl music stu- nlcnts. Thu war clcmanlls havc Quusecl 21 rapicl turnover, hut mcmhership in the group has remained at eighty members during the sca- son. The chamber group consisting of ap- proximately forty memhcrs was mziintainccl largely as 21 testing ground for stuclcnt Con- cluction and orchcstrating. PIIILLIP CL.xPP, Director Page 105 HERALD SPARK, Director UNIVERSITY EHUHUS Under the direction of Professor Herald l. Stark, the Lvniyersity Chorus, numbering a hundred voices, completed a highly success- ful season. The chorus was presented in four concerts during the year . . . in the fall and spring, and at the Christmas and Easter holi- days. A highlight ol' the Easter program was the introduction of a composition hy Kemhle Stout. a graduate student of the university. The work, "Nlisha Brevisf' was sung by the chorus with orchestral accompaniment. A group of ten yoices composed the mach-igal group and did special work, singing at the University yespers and on the radio. Officers of the chorus this year were Harry Hannon, librarian. and Kathryn Rose, accompanist. Page 105 CWWM BSYYEH Union Board. acting as the connecting lines between the student body and the Student Union, completed a Very successful year, despite a continual turnover of its membership due to graduation and calls to the service. lts activities were accomplished through the board as a Whole, operating through its six sub-committees. The tea dance committee conducted an open house and dance in the main lounge ol' the Union each Saturday, the Bridge committee conducted two tournaments, the games committee spon- sored a ping pong tournament and the house committee took charge ot the traditional Christmas decorations in the main lounge. Besides presenting two art exhibits, the art committee sponsored the weekly Sunday evening sing in the main lounge with Prof. Herald Stark leading. Bark row: Weber, Diggs, Venell, Kersten, Tierney. Sffofzd roew: Baldridge, Hardie, Lind, Evans, Clifford. F,-0111 for-wg Harper, Cody, Swisher, Kuenne, Larson. UNIUN BU an Page 108 MUHTAH BOARD Bark roiwi Simonsen, Grissel, Reininga, Baldridge, Slemmons, Rich. Front rome: Bm-stor, johnson, Iivans, Hensleigh, Uhme. ETIVITIES MA Y Page 109 "To provide for the cooperation between societies, to promote college lovaltv. to advance the spirit ol' service and fellowship among university women, to maintain a high standard ol scholarship, to recognize and en- courage leadership, to stimulate and develop a liner type of College woman" . . . this is the purpose of Nlortar Board, the national honorary organiza- tion for senior Women. lfaeh spring the active members of Nlortar Board submit a list of the eligible girls from various fields to the vote of junior women. Un the basis ol' service, scholarship and leadership, from live to twelve girls are selected and "tapped" during the VVomen's Recognition Day eereinonies. This year lxflortar Board assumed the duties ol' A. F. l., aided the Y. XY. C. A. bv entertaining the juvenile home Children at Christ- mas, supported the Double Y program, distributed Nlothefs Day letters and sponsored the lVomen's Recognition Day exercises. r x i ? i H 3 ZETA PHI ETA Bark roiw: Eckelmann, Grundy, Felton, Fritchen, Mereness. Suomi 7'04'bU.' Rowland, McCormick, Knapp, Alm. Flon! row: Baldridge, Nesper, Rich, Slemmons, Reynold. THE WUME SPE li Sigma chapter of the national professional womenls speech fraternity was established on the Iowa campus Nlay 18, 1936, as a professional aid and stimulus after graduation. lts rapid growth since has closely followed the development of speech arts in our American colleges and the progress of speech as a profession. The members are selected on the basis of schol- arship by those of the speech faculty. Although the membership of the organization is not limited, a balance is maintained among those engaged in radio, public address, theatrical and academic fields of speech. The organi- zation was led this year by Shirley Rich, president, Genevieve Slemmons, Vice-president, Virginia Alm, corresponding secretary, Jane Shipton, re- cording secretary, and lVIarilyn Nesper, treasurer. Page 110 UUESTIU SA SWEREU HERE Page 111 The newest organization on campus, Information First, sponsored by the University XVomen's Association, was established October 7, 1943. An outgrowth of the Xvar Discussion group of last year, it functions as a think- ing and planning body to bring outstancling speakers in Various lields to our campus. lts program has liour phases . . . the psychological, religious. and social phases of the war and peace: women's Vocational responsibilities and opportunities now and in the post-war worlcl: the historical, geographic, political and economic aspects of the war and peace: ancl an evaluation ancl interpretation and analysis of current news. Such speakers as Gardner Cowles, lVlrs. Rose Hilclebrancl, Bob Burlingame, Nlargaret Nleacle, ancl Henry Chamberlin have acldressecl the group. Bark row! XVheeler, Grundy, Randolph. Sammi rofw: Keagy, Newland. Front rofw: Fonteine, Herbst, Mikulasek. I FUHMATIU FIRST PARTY Ll E BWI G5 DUT ln the summer of 1942 the idea of a Central Party committee was con- ceived, and as a result, sixteen students were appointed the following Sep- tember to plan the all-university parties throughout the year at a minimum of expense. This year's committee was led by Dick Hainline, president, Jeanne Franklin, vice-president, and Nlargaret Browning, secretary-treas- urer. Dr. Earl Harper acted as advisor. Divided into five sub-com- mittees which in turn handled the individual parties, the committee produced such successful dances as the Vllinterlude, Silver Skate, Swing Salute, Home- coming Party and the Leap Year Gambol. Clever programs, corresponding backdrops and the music of Count lfleven and the Seahawks set the mood for many an exciting evening. Probably the most spectacular was the Spring Debut at which the Hawkeye Court was presented. Earl rofw: Cerny, Hainline, VVansik, Diggs. Srcond rofw: johnson, Hilfman, Alm, Randolph, Greetan, Buoy. front row: NVheeler, Franklin, Nesper, Browning, Harmeier, Scbenken. CE THAL P HTY EU MITTEE Page 112 J DIIII HY BOARD x 5 3 Herrald, Grissel, NIcCormick, Bardill THE WOMEN Pi LES Page 113 The Judiciary Board was organized this year to enforce undergraduate women's regulations. lleaded by Lois Grissel, vice-president of U. XV. A., the Committee Consists of a representative from town, a representative from Panhellenie and the vice-president of Currier hall. The Judiciary Board is related to U. XY. A. in that the viee-president of that organization is chair- man of the board. U. VV. A. has always had some general rules regulating university women, but it was not until its council formulated a definite set of rules last summer that regulations were laid down on a universal basis. The board eonvenes bi-monthly, and at one of these meetings it meets with the Chairmen of the various university housing units about town. The organiza- tion has already proved itself so necessary that undoubtedly it will become an integral part of university life. Pl LAMBDA THETA W UME 'S HU URAHY l EUUEATIU Honorary National Association For Xvomen ln Education FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION Nellie S. Aurncr Estella Nl. Boot Clara Nl. Daley Helen NI. Eddy Alma B. Hovey Ruth Aars Virginia Banks ljdith Barber Agnes Brady Zella Nlae Case .lean Christie Catherine Eckstein Helen Ford Jeanne Franklin lrene Groom Olive Gjerstad Nellie Hampton Helen lnlensleigh Fox Charlotte lunge Nlrs. lfrnest Horne Elta l.eysen Nlargaret Kuenne Edna Long Grace Long MEMBERS Nlaude M. NIcBroom Edna Patzig Anne Pierce Nlabel I. Snedaker Bday P. Youtz Nlrs. Dora Nlason limma Nlueller Helen Price Nlargaret Peterson Thelma Peterson listher Reinking Kathryn Richards Sarah Ann Rhue Pearl Ritter -Iulia Sparrow Nlargarct Schindhelm lelope lVlcCoWan Swift -Ieanne Beattie Tompkins Clara Wlallaee Ruth Vllillard Nlarjorie Vvilson Nlary YVilson Barbara Zeller Eda Zwinggi UQ' BETA GAMMA SIGMA EUMMEHEE AND SEHULAHSHIP Page 115 T Commerce National Scholarship Society FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION Vkvilliani Burney Homer Y. Cherrington VVilliani H. Cobb George R. Davies Nvalter l,. Daykin Charles S. Galiher ljlniei' XY. Hills Elsyin T. Jolliffe Karl E. Leib SEN Phyllis I.. Butters, 1943 I'll'2111CIS li. Dashner, 1944 Dayton G. Howe, 1943 Nlina NI. johnson, 1943 lla i'cn ld H. NIeCa1'ty Paul R. Olson Chester A. Phillips Katherine bl. Stone John H. Uthoff Sidney G. Xvinter C. XVoody Thompson Betty L. Nleachani IOR MEMBERS John NI. Klein, 1943 Nlilton A. Mme, 1944 Robert R. Rigler, 1943 EW ST DE TS FEEL AT HUME New friends, new Customs, innumerable activities and the varied routine ol' a new Campus life make the lirst few weeks of living confusing enough for the freshmen and transfer students. It is the responsibility then of the freshman and transfer orientation Councils to show its experience with the new girls, and men as well, in making adjustments as soon as possible. This year its members got under way with fall preparations vas earlv as the sum- mer of '43. At lirst friendly and personal letters were sent to the new- eomers. They in formed them of Campus activities which might he of inter- est, fostered informality and friendliness in the small groups which were organized, posted the girls on meetings, provided campus tours, and tried to acquaint the students with one another. lfvents followed bv informal teas at faculty homes, activities meetings, an etiquette and style show, and fi tea at the home of President and Nlrs. Haneher. Bark rofw: Evans, Simonsen, Hamilton. I Iron! roam: Alttilliseh, Ilensleigh, Grissel. Smith, Maloy, Baldridge UHIE TATIU Page 116 UNIVERSITY WUIVIE 'S ASS' I Karl' 7'0'ZXJ.' Fewel, Turner, Nlercer, Hensleigh, Timm. Third rofw: Campbell, Moon, Balster, Kurtz, Bnldridge, Patterson. Sfcolzfl rolw: Herhst, Jayne, Ohme, Bardill, Stamy, Judt. Fran! rofw: MacFwen, Reininga, Focht, Grissel, Schenken, Liepoltl. VIETUIIY FUR UNIVERSITY WUIVIE Page 117 Ifncler the tlirection ol? Ruth Reininga, the University YVUlNClI'S Associa- tion, the coortlinating botly for xvomenls activities on campus, has had a very successful year. lt has not only accomplishecl its purpose of fostering scholarship, activities antl better relations among campus organizations, but its main project as well, the Double V program . . . victory in war . . . victory in peace. The project has three phases: service, etlucation, and health. To promote the eclucational phase, U. IV. A. has sponsored Infor- mation First. By encouraging activity in hospital xvorli, Reel Cross surgical clressing, Information First committees, church service antl hostess Work, it has interestetl nine huntlretl girls in war services. The health phase was realized in a number of posters exhibited about campus emphasizing the "smart to be fit" idea. U. XV. A. also sponsorecl CODE FOR CO-EDS, Orientation, the all-university sing, student-faculty get-togethers, the Phoe- nix Fund and the activities recorcl system. TAU GAMMA Back rafw: Popovitch, Kessler. Front row: Meatle, Turner, Meade, Kruse, Kinkead, Popovitch. TUW GIRLS ANU FHIE USHIP ln 1939 Tau Gamma was founded on the Iowa campus as a local social organization for town women. The idea was so successful that the organi- zation became national in scope. lts purpose is to promote friendship and unity among the university women who do not live in dormitories. Activity of the group this year included the "PleeZ to lVIeetcha" meeting, a hayricle, a semi-formal dance, initiation, the Christmas langle, participation in the University Sing, and volunteer war work on everyone's part. Many' of its members have been active in campus affairs. Nlary Dumont Worked on station VVSUI and was one of the drum majors in the University band. Ann Popovich was publicity chairman for Tau Gamma and editor of The Nefwnmnal. Page 118 HUME EBU UMIES DHEA IZEU Since the time the Home Economics department was organized on the campus thirty years ago, the Home Economics club has played a prominent role in the department's activities. Anyone who has taken a home economics course may be a member of this club, which is not only a local but a state and national organization. Aiming to promote better relations between the faculty and students in the held, the club centered its activities this year about the tall faculty dinner, a tall picnic, a baked bean supper and a Val- entine tea. Every year the S. U. l. Home Economics club sends represent- atives to a national meeting. The girls sent this summer will go to Chicago to meet the national otlicers and other leaders in the held. Back row: Belko, Blazer, Mqsey, Donahoe, Christie, Smith. Fgurzh rgfwj Meis, Kelly, Burgess, VVaite, Balster, Stein, Huenger, jenkins. Third rgfw: Klahn, Culhane, Gray, Kurtz, Eckhardt, Porter, Thompson, Richter. S4-fond rgtwf Rayner, Hoover, Ruppert, Eckhart, Adair, Bevan, Schnoor, VVerbach. Front rofw: Street, Balster, Smith, VVoodruH, Zumsteg, Ewing. HUME ECU UMIES CLUB Page 119 FELLUWSHIP A D SEHVIEE Y. Nl. C. A. is composed ol' a group of young men, faculty members and alumni, united in a program ol Fellowship and service designed to help them prepare to lace life situations squarely, to make decisions wisely, and to meet opportunity and responsibility with equal courage, thus contributing to significant living on the campus and in society at large. This year the Y. Nl. C. A. organized boys' clubs in the junior and senior high schools ol lowa City, Worked in cooperation with the local community recreation center, conducted Sunday school classes, and entertained bedridden children. As a project the Y. Nl. C. A. converted their clubrooms in the lowa Union into a lounge and writing room for the service men and student body in general. Iiazlz mu: Higley, Cerny, Tipton, Kurtz, Scheider, Anderson, Dillinger, Ojemauu, Menefee, Saunders, Shipley. 110711 701-f'.' Coons, Maideii, Ruff, Ilalboth, Wooters, MacDonald. YMEA Page 120 YWE Bark rg:-w: Lowell, Haigler, Barngrover, Glnckler, Blair, Liepold, Bare. Serond rofw: Macliwen, Altiillisch, Nesper, Lansing, Osborne, Stamy, Smith, Hoper. I-'rgmf 1-gnu-5 Browning, Ilensleigh, Ohme, Macdfmnald, Chappell, Hardie, Kurtz. ED EATIU A D WELFARE Page 121 Young lVonien's Christian Association includes service and educational groups which are making direct and valuable contrihutions to the war effort and to the advancement of religious activities on the campus of the State University of Iowa. The "YH program, student planned and executed, in- cludes discussion groups on marriage, religion and current American proh- lems, service work in the University hospitals, with Girl Reserve groups and military personnel, morning chapel over station XVSUI, and other con- structive and purposeful activities, Through participation in the Y. VV. C. A. "our desire for a full and creative life through a growing knowledge of God is more completely realizedfl 1l EWMA EL B Bark roiw: Billiek, Reed, Culhane, VVhel:1n, O'C'onnor, Billick. I-'rolll row: Meis, Mnnnig, Barrett, Giles, Hurtxulo. HELIGIU S PURPUSES HEALIZEU For thirty-eight years the Newman Clulw has heen the Catholic organiza- tion for university students. This year, untler Larry Barret, last seniester's president, and -loe Phelan, the religious, educational. and social purposes have been realized. Aitling Joe Phelan in the clulfs undertakings were vice- presitlent Nlary hlotliste Nlonnig. secretary Donna Billielc, anal treasurer Leo Xlvalsh. Some of the events of note were the fall suppers, the spring and winter semi-fornials, the monthly mixer, Kanipus Kapers, and Retreat. At the winter semi-formal, Newman-Nocturne, Peggy Clillortl was elected queen. Page 122 FU Page 123 THE SIDE The opening of the Newman Club recreational center this spring was one of the most important events on the calendar for the members of that club. The student center is the remodeled Psi Omega fraternity house. Placed at their disposal, it consists of a chapel, a library, a recreational room, and meeting rooms. Father Schwinn, advisor for Catholic students, and Father Brugman, business manager ot the house, are now resident priests at the center. The idea is a new one and has proved thoroughly effective. The club has had various speakers from time to time and published their bi- monthly paper, the !Vf?iG,'7fl'6l1l6l1, compiled of university news for Catholic students. EWMA CLUB HUME AWAY FRU HU E The friendly and jovial atmosphere of the Wlesley Foundation makes it a real Hhome away from homef' You may walk in at any time, pick up a magazine or newspaper, sit down in an easy chair and enjoy yourself. The program this past year was highlighted with many well-versed and interest- ing speakers. Picnics, parties, sings around the fireplace, ping pong, and volley ball were a few of the activities that were especially enjoyed by the students and servicemen. The quiet and inspiring moments of Vespers, and the invigorating and lively discussions at the Sunday evening meeting and at 'LVVintellects', made an especially hne contribution to a War-minded campus. Bgfk rot-wg Dunnington, Custard, Brink, Montgomery. Third rofw: VVaterrnan, Moherg, Ladwig. Second ro-wr johnson, Maloy, Smith. Fronf rofw: Zones, Baldwin, Burns, Macomber, Paige. WESLEY PUUN TIU Page 124 Ii PP PHI Bark rofw: Anthony, johnson, Miller, Baldwin, Ladwig, Miller. Third rofw: VV:ltterson, Blackwood, Boyce, Petheram, Moeller, Sehowalter Serond roiw: Jacobson, VVager, Turner, Mo3'ers, Geiger, Dee. Front rofw: Peck, Mote, Jensen, Spence, MeGahey, Dackstader. PAITH 1 THE VIETUHY Page 125 L'EVery Nlethodist woman in the university today, a leader in the ehureh tomorrow." lYith this purpose in mind, Kappa Phi, the national Nletho- dist girls' eluh, was organized at Kansas University in 1916, and on the lowa University campus in 1917. Today there are twenty-live Chapters throughout the United States, Nleeting every other Nlonday evening, Kappa Phi built the theme of this year's program around "Faith in the Victory." But besides devotions, programs and business meetings, there were pledging parties in the fall, an open house for service men in Novem- her, the Christmas party which was the affair of the year, an initiation hrealcliast in January and a formal spring banquet in April. PHI SIGM IUTA Earle rome: deliinsky, llarcliman, Simonsen, Cnppedge, VVoodard. Front row: Lund, VVorton, Mendenhall, del Castillo. LA GUAGE STUDE TS HU UHEU The Delta chapter ol' Phi Sigma lota was founded on the University of lowa campus in 1926 as one of the thirty-six chapters making up this na- tional honorary society. A student may hecome a member of this organiza- tion hy gaining distinction in the general college course, particularly in romance languages, and by being elected to Phi Sigma lota. Nlemhership is of four classes: active, alumni, honorary, and associate. The purposes of this fraternity are the recognition of outstanding ability and attainment in Romance languages and literature, the stimulation of advanced work and individual research in this held, and the promotion of a sentiment of amity hetween our own nation and the nations using these languages. Page 125 ENGINEERS IVI EE THE GRADE Page 127 The Iowa Beta chapter of Tau Beta Pi, national honorary engineering fraternity, was founded in 1909. There are seventv-three such chapters in the United States. Iowa Beta is one of the most active of all "Tau Beten chapters. An attempt is made to encourage scholarship, and a prize is awarded annually to the highest ranking freshman engineering student. hfIemhers have written the script for, and are at present engaged in Hlming. with the aid of the Department of Visual Education, a vocational guid- ance movie on engineering to he shown to high school students. Social activities, however, are not neglected. lVIonthlv Sunday morning break- fasts have been a regular feature for several years, and last spring the local chapter took the initiative in organizing an all-honorarv dinner dance. Back 1'0'LU.' Phillips, Cole, Brink. Front rofw: Carns, Brenklander, Fisch, Cox, Bauer. TA BET PI WUME UP THE PRESS Theta Sigma Phi, honorary fraternity for women in journalism, has as its nienihers junior anal senior women who are majoring in journalism on the lowa ezunpus. During the year 'liheta Sig entertainecl XY. XV. Ylvayinaeli, enlitor of the Des Nloines Rvgixler am! ylflllllllfl Rollo Nvalter lirown, University lecturer: anfl lflse Roenl, Norwegian newspaper Woman. Nlartha Berry, president of the Iowa Wvomeirs Press Association, was pledged as an honorary meniher anal initiatenl late in Xpril. Theta Sigma Phi was led this year hy Dorothy Klein, president: lfllen lXfIOl'l'lSOl1, Viee-presielentg Shirley Nleliini, secretary: Terry Tester, treasurer, Doris Campbell, keeper ol' archives: anal Nlatleline Ritley, victory chairman. Aclvisors ol' the group are Helen Reich. assistant clireetor in the Ulliee of Student Affairs, and NI rs. lf. Nl. Pownell. Hoak, Buoy. Daniels, Nichols, Shroeder, Smith, Subotnik. Sffond roam Ono. Margolin, Cohen, Reed, VVeiser, Ericson, Cates. Fran! rom: Bark I'0f'LL'.' Third rofw: Mczrrisoll, Campbell, Klein, XVheelan, Tester. THET SIBM PHI Page 128 PHI EAIVIIVIA N U Bark rofw: Knutson, Grau, Swanson, johnson, Schnoebelen, Behounek, Sladelx Third rofw: Scott, Sehumacker, Daughton, Wlalmer, Denkmann, Towne Second roiw: Mansheld, Ita, Hartz, Snell, Monnig. Front rofw: Hermanson, Haigler, Bestor, Grant. EUIVIIVIEIIEE SIIIIUIIITY ACTIVE Page 129 A bid from Phi Gamma Nu, the national womenls professional commerce organization, is a coveted honor for majors in the department. Founded at Northwestern University in 1924, it spread rapidly throughout the coun- try and in 1928 the Delta chapter was established here. Its purpose is to encourage better scholarship and friendship among its twenty-four mem- bers. Phi Gamma Nus is an active organization. Every month it gives a dinner with the college faculty and invites distinguished people within the field of commerce to speak. Keeping pace with the times, it bought a War bond with the money it would otherwise have used for the COMMERCE MART. Also, Phi Gamma Nu had two members on the Commerce Board, cooperated with the Commerce Club in sponsoring many of the depart- mentls activities, and awarded the "Commerce Key", to the senior with the highest scholarship. CHI EPSILU Q Bark ro-ua' VVziterinzl1i, I.ZUIllJE1'f. Srrozm' rms: lxahnske, Dawson, Crawford, Meier, Rouse. F,-0,11 ygqg Van Dyke, Posey, Ashton, Buchwalter, Morgan, Larsen, Cox. CIVIL ENEINEEIII II PIIATEII ITY The Iowa Chapter of Chi ljpsilon, the nzitionzil honorary civil engineer- ing frziteriiity, was estziblishecl xfllly 4, 1940, to recognize the chzirzieteristies necessary to the successful engineer, and to develop these chzirzieteristics in the llI'1LlCI'gl'21LlUZltC engineer. The inemhers are selected on the lmsis of four requirements: seliolzirship, character, practicality, anal soeiahility. Due to the wartime emergency, the inajority ol' Chi Epsiloifs nicnibership has been ilepleteal. lfdward Larsen was the only niemher on campus at the begin- ning of the fall semester, hut with the return of the advanced R. U. T. C., Gerald Cox and Rohert Van Dyke increased the membership to three. Professor C. sl. Posey anal Assistant professor Neal Ashton were initiated into the Club as honorzirv nieinhers. Page 130 FELLUWSHIP H S RRURR PROGRAM lllestminster Fellowship, made up of the Presbyterian students on cam- pus, is a part of the Yvestminster Foundation and is represented on the Student Christian Council, It is student organized with four elected officers, a fellowship director and the minister making up the governing council. A broad program of activities has been developed for the members who attend church services, sing' in the choir, teach Sunday school and vacation Bible school, edit the I1"e.vln1i115Iw' Iforecuxl, conduct worship services, plan socials and visit hospital sick. Une of the more worthwhile things the fellowship has done this year has been to cooperate with local army officers and pastors in providing the maximum services of the church to the numerous army boys who have come to the church and the young peoplels services. Bark rofw: Ashley, Auchter, Hetfield, Hoper, Covert, Kooiker. Third rofw: Thomas, Hensleigh, Williams, Brinker, VVright, VVhite. Second rofw: Street, Snyder, Burney, Harris, jones, Collier. Front rofw: Covert, Taylor, Brinker, Hopkirk, Halboth, jones. WRSTMllXl5il'ljR liljLLUW5HlR Page 131 I TEEHATIU UF HELIEIUUS GHUUPS Being a comparatively new organization, established in 1940. the Student Christian Council is made up ol: representatives of the various Protestant student youth groups on campus, of the Protestant churches, the Y. VV. C. A. and the Y. NI. C. A. It sprang from a desire to integrate the various Protestant organizations, to promote the aims of and to participate in the work of the lwvorld Student Church Federation, and to sponsor the activities that are of mutual interest to those seeking Christian fellowship. A few of these activities have been monthly Sunday evening vespers during the sum- mer, the sponsoring of freshman religious orientation, a union meeting each semester of the various student church organizations, broadcasting during one week over station WSUl, the Easter breakfast and morning chapel. Back mfw: Montz, Brink. Sgggnd rgrw: Halhoth, Shoquist, Fleming, Burma, Barngrover, Lansing, Long, Studley, Ileise, jones, Slater. Front rome: Vorba, Ruff, Hensleigh, Kooiker, Shipley. IIHRISTIA EUUNIIIL Page 1 32 ART E TLD Back rofw: Stempel, Pfeiffer, Hoffman, Nelson, Fortun, Gordon, Beattie, Holt. Second rofw: Fishkin, Keyes, Layland, Luers, Dennis, Ohman, Carson. Front rofw: Goldfein, Ellison, Hunter, Chan, Lipman. THE ARTISTS GATHEH Page 133 The Beaux Arts Ball, this year built around the theme of a South Amer- ican lVIardi Gras, held its place as one of the most colorful affairs on the Universityls calendar. This ball, along with the University Film Society, formed the nucleus of this six-year-old organization. Because of the need for an organization through which art students could become better ac- quainted, an organization which would promote a keener appreciation of art itself, the Art Guild in its present form evolved. The Guild demon- strating the idea of civic improvement, completely remodeled an old studio into a semi-mid-Victorian and modern theme club room that housed many formal and informal gatherings of the year. Besides this, the Guild this year sponsored a vocational guidance lecture series that included talks by instructors and visiting notables such as lVIoholy Nag of Chicago. PA AIVIEIIIEAN CLUB CLUB Bark rome: Uolclhcrg, Crist, llzill, Sauvevfdrzi, Ems, Eychcne. Fl'01If roms: VVhorton, Rudnick, Garfield, Yzirela, Nlorrison. PIIU UTES UNDERSTANDING In orclcr that thcrc niay hc 11 hcttcr Pun Anicriczin unclcrstzintling among tht- stuclcnts on thc university campus, thc Pan Anicrican cluh has hccn cstuhlishctl. It is associated with thc National Pan Amcrican Icaguc in Nxiushington, D. C. Anyonc intcrcsted in intcr-Anicricun rclations is 11 xrcl- conic mcnihcr. As tht- stuclcnts hcconic zicquaintcnl, they lC21l'l1 of onc zin- othcr's culturcs, and prcjucliccs quickly tcncl to clisuppcnr. 'Iihc ycar's pro- grzun has inclutlccl talks hy stutlcnts, lccturcs by Various profcssors, morics, tlinncrs of I.z1tin spcciultics, :intl Latin-Anicriczin clzinccs. In acltlition to Pan American clay Icstivitics, thc cluh has institutctl 21 scrics of Saturday uftcrnoon hroziclcasts, "Pan Anicrica Prcscntsfl which has hccn Vcry suc- ccssful. Thc students nliscuss various topics over thc air, such as art, litcr- ziturc, music, Pun Aint-rican union, thc Good Neighbor policy, and future co-operation. Cnc of thc very cntcrprising organizations on thc campus this ycar, the Pun Anicriczln club has not only made a name for itself, but has hccn an invaluable uitl to thc many Latin university stutlents on the Campus. Page 134 CHENHSTSiHU Phi Lambda Lvpsilon was founded as an honorary chemical society at the University ot Illinois in Nlarch, 1899, by several members of the senior class majoring in chemistry. lts purpose, then as now, was to promote high scholarship and original investigation in all branches of pure and applied chemistry. The Lvpsilon chapter was founded at the State University of loyva in April, 1925. Since that time nearly 300 men have been initiated as active or associate members by the Epsilon Chapter. There are three classes ot members: active, associate, and honorary. Active membership includes junior and senior men majoring in chemistry, chemical engineering and related chemical fields and qualified men registered in the graduate school or affiliated with institutions of learning in some capacity other than that of registered student. Associate membership represents an honorary status within the chapter and is limited to faculty members and those who have noteworthy scientific papers. Honorary membership is limited to men of national and international reputation. Bark rom: Gloekler, Coleman, Berg, Mattill, Bartow. Second ro-w: lN1cCloskey, Hummel, Dornfeld, Heinrich, Routh. Front rofw: Bardolph, Callen, Steitz, VVaddell, Brink, Kehn. UHEU Page 135 PHI LFXNIHU UPSILU BUSINESS AND PLE SUIIE EUIVIBI EI1 Kappa Beta is the fellowship for university women of the Disciples of Christ. In February, 1911, Bethany Circle, the organization which later came to be known by the Greek letters Kappa Beta, was founded at the University of Illinois. In 1927 it became a national fraternity, and has since established nine active chapters in Kansas, Oklahoma, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Uhio, and lvcst Virginia. The ljpsilon chapter is the chapter here. Once every three weeks the Kappa Beta women gather for meetings that are both business and social in nature. Three of its more important activities during the year have been Founders Day, the formal February dinner, and national ol'licer's visit in April. Its members truly make up a representative cross-section of campus life. Some are active in Highlanders, University chorus and band, others, in Tau Gamma, Qrientation, orchestra, Home Economics club, Y. VV. C. A., Currier activities committees and the Nloun- taineers club. Bark rofw: Fleming, Pearson, Norman, VVylie. Second row: Hardy, Linkletter, Jenkins, Fleming. Front rofw: Herren, Carson, VVheeler. EAPPA BETA Page 135 SUEI L EUMMITTEE Perhaps one of the most important organizations on the campus in that it has jurisdiction over all the social groups on the campus, is the University Social committee. Composed of eleven faculty members and six students, it approves the institution of university social groups, selects the members of the Central Party committee, and makes and enforces the rules regulating social activity. Proud of being the Hrst faculty committee to include stu- dents, it selects its under-graduate members from the suggestions of various organizations. Three juniors are appointed each year in order that they may serve two years in this capacity. The student members now serving on the committee are l,ois Grissel, Reeves Hall, Jack lVloyers, Jean Hardie, Ann Nlercer and John Roalson. Faculty members of the committee are as follows: Dean Ewen NI. lVIacEvven, Director Earl E. Harper, Edwin B. Kurtz, Odis K. Patton, Kirk H. Porter, Harrison Thornton, Dr. Donald R. Mallett, Grace Cochran, Edna Patzig, Harry G. Barnes, and Helen Reich. SUPEHVISIU Ulf SUEI L ETIVITY Page 137 HILLEL PUUNUATIU new Barle row: Feinsilver, lVIintz, Levantin, Kelberg, Cohen, Fine. Second rofw: Pomerzmtz, Glaser, Lubman, Chanen, Roth, Levitt, Zlutky, Schoenfeld, VVliorton. 1110111 four' Rovner, Bordy, Klaperman, Nlarx, Grueskin. PHUEHAM FUR HILLEL EFFEETIVE ln order to promote better feeling among the various religious groups on the campus, and to satisfy the need of an organization for Jewish young people, the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation was established here in 1939. lts membership, however, has not been limited merely to students. lVIore than 150 service men have been made honorary members, and the Friday evening and Sunday morning services at the Hillel lounge are open to them. Under the excellent direction of Rabbi Klaperman of Queens College, Canada, Hillel has not only provided a good religious program, but an equally ellective social one. They sponsored a formal dance in the River room ol' the Union. and a Cabaret party at the Lounge. Every Sunday they hold open house in the Lounge, and from time to time, picnics in the City Park. Hillel also had a paper, Hillel lliglzliglzlsg this year Doris Cirueskin handled the editorship. Page 135 151311 Ax fi ,ff f i 'ff The Alpha Chi's have plenty of zest when it Comes to activities and all-arouncl lun. Alice Ann Nielson servetl as an erlieient presialent anal was active in Lf. XY. A. anal orientation . . . Florence lvalker Uhnie, who wore the liatlge ol' Nlortar Boaral. was lf'resialent of Y. XY. C. A. anal active in Lv. XY. A .... Phyllis Nissen, hesinles heing activities eclitor for Code for Co- enls, was on the Y. XY. C. A. Cahinet ancl a nieniher of the Liniversitv Scottish llighlantlers . . . theater-minaletl Nlar-iette lfrtichen had a part in the opening play, .Hire in lfmizlffrlazzfl . . . Dorothy l laigler, on Y. XV. C. A. Cabinet, was Yiee-presialent ot Phi Gamma Nu, national connnerce sorority. Wvanmla Siehels was active in U. XY. A., Y. YY. C. A. and Orehesis, national tlance sorority . . . loyal cheerleaders for the Oltl Cjolnl were Bernacline h'lacl4oroskv, lfllen Davis anal Bar- hara Baker . . . Nlarion Ferguson was presi- tlent of l'ireshnian Y. hlanv Alpha Chis were active in the lielcl ot journalism: Barbara Biel- quist was one ol' the Campus Consultants . . Peggy llutchcrolit contrihuteal to Frivol . . . lifllen Davis xvorketl on the Business Staff of ll.-XWIQIQYIZ . . . Prue lYheeler antl Babs Blantl helped out at the loffan olliee. Real Cross and U. S. U. work clainierl a good share of the time of the girls . . . some active in xvork at the Chilclren's Ilospiral while others xvorkenl as Xurses Ainles. Fi-fill roms: Notrlmnni, Oltman, Kioldapp, llyink, Maekorosky, Mcliinley, Yan Court, Omen. l"oizrlli rrm,:.'.' Dearclortf, Swain, Kruse, Bland, llutehcraft, l7e'nkman, Howe, Knutson, Towne. Third rofw: Ita, Nlyers, XVage, Tierney, Pingrey, llancock, Siehc-ls, Gunn, Nlellquist, YVlieeler. Sftillllxf rofw: Johnston, Bachmann, llorak, VVhisler, Eddy, Yieth, Davis, Ferguson, Baker, Voss. Fl'0lIl row: Fritchen, Nlinor, llaiston, Nielson, Guernsey, Olnne, Nissen, Armour, Haigler. Founded at DePauw University October 15, 1885 Sigma Chapter ACTIVE MEMBERS Class of 1943 D. Aita J. Haiston RI. Fritchcn F. Ohme Class ol 1944 Al. Armour V. Knutsen B. Bland IU. Swain D Haigler P. lVhisler Class oi 1945 B. Denkinann P. Nissen A. A. Nielson G. Notebooni D YVage Class of 1946 J. DeardorH B. KlCKin1ey J. ill. Horak B. lllellquist P. Hutehcroft R. lllinor R. Kruse XV. Siebels PLEDG-ES H. Bachmann '46 J. Johnston '47 B. Baker '44 B. Maekoroskgf '46 L. Boyer '46 E. llleyers '46 E. Ill. Davis '46 F. L. Nelson '46 R. Eddy 346 H. Oltman '46 M. Ferguson ,47 D. Owen '47 C. Ferris ,46 B. Pingrey '46 D Goldapp 446 B. Tierney '47 G Gunn '47 B. L. Towne '45 J Hancock '46 E. Van Court 445 V Howe '46 ll. Vieth '46 R. Hyink '47 A. Voss 347 L. lta 345 P. lvheeler ,47 Page 141 LPHA CHI UMEEA ACTIVE Class B. Bishop L. Hamilton lf. Keagy B. Baldwin '46 Boltz '47 ll. Cords '45 R. Dittbrcnner '47 K B. . Donovan '45 lfcllcr '46 Fisher '44 Gilman '47 Xl. L. Hipplc '45 B. G. A. LPHA BELT PI lfoundecl at Vfcslcyan University Nlay 15, 1851 Alpha Beta Clmptcr MEMBERS of 1944 N. NllCl2lSOl1 B. Scanlon ll. Taylor Class of 1945 J. llrnnson G. Harney P. Carson KI. Ncspcr F. Paco Class of 1946 KI. E. Bell B. Livingston B. Cole F. L. lwanker P. Griepcnburg ll. Xvalk B. lioudelka PLEDGES B. .A1'IHb1'USfCI' '47 ll. Hflllfl' '45 I. Jacobson '47 P. Lynch '47 C. llarkel '47 J. llcrllavish '46 E. llulnix '46 Bl. Pearson '46 J. Rankin '47 B. Thonizis '47 Page 142 The A. D. Pi's played an active part in eam- pus activities this year. President lfleanore Keagy, in addition to being president of lyoin- en's Panhellenie, was on the senior debate squad, radio ehairman for lnformation First, and active on station XVSUI. Eleanore was named student chairman of the ,lohnson County Tuberculosis drive . . . on the Y. YV. C. A. cabinet and a member of Zeta Phi Eta, national professional speech arts fraternity for women, was Nlarilyn Nesper, who was also on the Uni- versity Central Party Committee . . . serving on the Student Board of Governors at the Uni- versity Theater was Louise Hamilton. Bark rofw slanding: Haller, Hamilton, Cords, Fourllz rome: Third rofw: Snfolzd 1"0'LU.' Front rofw: VVol f, Brunson, Donavon Norma Nililason was a member of Phi Gamma Nu. national professional Commerce sorority, and a leader ol: transfer orientation . . . a member of Phi Gamma Nu, Pat Car- son served as president of Urehesis, national dance sorority '... sporting bright plaids and bagpipes as members of the University Scottish llighlanders were Nlidge Cords and Pearl Griepenburg . . . Nlay Rogers wore the insig- nia of Phi Beta Kappa . . . Evelyn Nlulnix contributed news to Frifol . . . Nlary Eliza- beth Bell and Beverly Holtz were members ol? the University Chorus . . . the Alpha Delt's also Contributed their time to war activities on the campus. Griepenburg, Taylor, Hipple. , Markel, Mulnix, Bill, Pace, Dittbrenner. Armbruster, Lynch, Pearson, Koudelka, Gilman, Feller, Manker, Boltz. MeTavish, Niklason, Cole, Baldwin, Jacobson, Thomas, Rankin, Livingston. Carson, Bishop, Nesper, Marson, Keagy, Scanlon, Harney. llistnrx' was pennecl this Year with 11 golclen Klum' ,l.uu was ai I"1'i-rw! lI'L'Sllll121ll healutx quill . . . untlei' the leziclership of president zintl servecl un the lltXXVK1iXl1 statt . . . linhhie llelen Collin, Signizi ehzxpteroljAlpl'1zi Xi Delta Cotter ennipletetl her thirtl year nl singing the zulaletl 22 pledges to its will at the entl ul' Rush hlues nn the lnwu ezunpus . . . again this year XYeel4 zintl wats well representeal in Y1ll'lHLlS wzii' she sung on "'l'he l'nix'ei'sity Plays lts l'zu't." activities on Czunpus . . . Xletritlee Newell :incl she heeznne 11 nieinhei' of the Kleteorolm- lelt in Xuvenihei' to join the XYXI-'S . . . gists' quintet. Nl'14JLlI' Wvintls zintl ai Chile." Both Katy llzirineiei' was husy on the Central Putty feta l'hi lftzi :intl Ueltu Sigma Rho eluinietl Cmnniittee . , , lireshnizin lslezi llnpe wus ,lane Shiptnn as ll ineinhei' . . . l'i2ll'lW21l'2l electetl tn the lhivetsity illhezitei' llmiiml ul Xlevik wwe ll Phi Ciznnniu Nu pin, :intl Put l Cim'ei'iim's. ,-Xlphzi Xi's were well reptesentetl lllllll letl 21 gmtip in lreshnizin orientzitinn. at lwmthull gnunes hy elieetlezialei' Klzlry lnuise lvnclei' the skillful guitlzinee ol' Llerrine Russ, Nelson, six girls weziring the pluitl nl' the Scot- :Xlphu Xi lleltzi Czipturetl Iirst plate in the un- tish llighlaintlers zintl two girls playing in the nuzil lloineenining haulge sale this year. huntl. ,Sixllf mae, Spzinn, Sehlnenivr, Nlelfzultlen, Nissen, llzirve-5, Burns, Rziyiwr, lluclsun, llzule, NlL'lllx. H-fill 2'U1L'.' llestmi, llfiusc, llnttmwt, liurm-y, I.ihz1l, Sheets, llupe, Sm-huxte, YV:1rnei'. I-'f,11f1l1 y-nqgg liuwniani, Stone, l7rwe1'i'cs, Greer, l.Ul't'll7, NX'ZlIllN'IQ, Sxlss, Knox. Tfiirii wma' Russ, Hiirterliclcl, XY1iltlrn't, Shipttui, Newell, Cutter, Rt-inley, lirnueht, NleN1ill. Spirfzzil rumzz: Hrriwn, l'lsslt'X, Nelson, C':n':ini, XVestvrstt, 1.1-miziul, Giles, Ucfrke, Uortl, llunnpsnn. I-'mail rum: lisiltlwin, Paul, Cutlin, ,-Xtuzlter, Nlfclfilf, litunry, Hiirimicr. lfoumlenl at l,,omlmrrl College April l7, lS93 Signux ACTIVE Class H. Collln J. Hudson li. L. lA'0Il2lI'll Class lialdwin li. Cotter Ll. Iissley B. Gm-kc Chapter MEMBERS of 1943 B. Alezlli bl. lVesteott of 1944 C. Harmeien ll. RICCYRB' L. lIeNall J. Russ sl. Giles J. Shipton Class of 1945 KI. Beatty P. Paul S. Bl'2lUCllI hl. Sheets H. Libal D. Stone Class of 1946 NI. Butterfield ll. Knox L. Carani R. Neirler E. Doerres BI. Pottorf M. Hade Remley M. Harvq PLEDGES M. Bowman '47 D. Brown '47 M. Burney '46 D. Burns '46 J. Cord '47 D. Greer '46 E. L. Heston '45 I. Hope A47 D. House A45 P. Lorenz A47 J. lAlCF21CldCl1 '45 lll. L. Nelson A47 Page 145 Nl. Newell ,45 E. Nissen '47 D. Rayner A47 KI. Sass A45 M. Sehloemer '47 C. A. Sehutte RJ. Spann A46 A47 llfl. Swaner A47 Al. Thompson '47 M. lValdorf A45 N. ll. Vlfanberg A47 Al. lvarner ,47 ALPHA Xl DELTA ljountlctl at tlic l,YniVcrsity ol Arkansas April 5, 1895 Psi llc-ta Chapter ACTIVE Class K. Kelly li. Sewick Class Y. Fowler fll. Hinos li. -lones Class KI. L. Higgs MEMBERS of 1944 Sloan of 1945 R. ll. Nlerrill D. Scott of 1946 Cl. Huenger PLEDGES H. Arnold '47 Billings 445 lf. Brown ,47 K. Eggers '45 N. Gentleman '47 yl. Horowitz 747 bl. Kcnnccly 347 R. lgllllfllsf '47 D. lJ?lCliCllllC1' 345 Lclantl 447 Ill. IX lansllclfl '46 Rl. E. Scales '47 G. Scllonc '47 KI. A. Sharpe y45 B. L. Shecley I46 R. ll. Steichcn '45 KI. Stout '44 V. Richter '44 l. Romanow '47 G. lVakt-field 346 G. lVciscr 145 CHI U Eli 4 Page 146 This year has been a memorable one for the Chi Omegas. The X and horseshoe girls dab a bit of powder and glance into the mirror where they see . . . Gloria Huenger, Harriet Arnold, and Nancy Gentleman as cheerleaders at all the university games . . . Nluriel Mans- lield and Rita Steichen singing in the Univer- sity Chorus, Jane Leland in the symphony or- chestra, and Susan Showers in the University Band . . . Betty Buckner as the Queen of Hearts in "Alice in VVonderland," Kathy gers and Eleanor Billings on the costume and lighting crew at the University Theater. Kathy had a role in "Junior Miss." Fifth row: Doris Scott was a member of the central planning committee at the U. YV. A. tea dances at the Union. Ruth Joan Nlerrill was a mem- ber of the Scottish Highlanders . . . Gloria Vlleiser specialized in journalism where she was a campus consultant and a member of Theta Sigma Phi . . . Shirley Sloan wasacontributor to Friwol and a member of the Home Ee club . . . Nlarjory Stout headed an orientation group . . . Kay Kelly, Rita Steichen, and Eli- nor Brown were active in Newman club . . . Gloria Vllakeheld belonged to Orchesis . . . Vivian Fowler, lVlary Lou Higgs, Beverly Jones and Harriet Arnold were members of Kappa Phi. Merrill, Buckner, Steiehen, Sharpe, Stout, Billings, Hutchinson. Fourfh rofw: Kennedy, Sloane, VVaketield, Lackender, Eggers, Arnold. Third rofw: Huenger, Gentleman, Horowitz, Showers, Weiser, Schone, Brown, Swanson. Second rofw: Scales, Sheely, Jones, Mansfield, Jones, Hines, Scott. Front rofw: Sewick, Fowler, Simpson, Kelly, Higgs. .. x1isI5FLsHi-"' 5'fPff'iT ' ' 'if' fiitfevi 'P . 1, 1 PM K ln step with the times, Tri Delta burst forth with an unrationecl harrage of honors this year. Aiming towartl the stars. they shot sky high, with two girls on Nlortar Hoartl . . . Pat Balclriclge, sorority presitlent, chairman of Transfer Orientation Council. ancl llnion Board memher . . . l.ois Cirissell, Vice- presiclent ol: Ll. XY. A., member ol' the Social Committee. anal chairman of the ,lucliciary Board. Yivacious Nlarilyn Carpenter reportecl claily for tluty at the l'l.vXWKEYl2 heaclquarters to carry out her work as husiness manager . . . petite lllinnie Alohnson served on Central Party committee ancl was attentlant to the New- man Cluh queen. fa lftlicient Lillian Castner commantletl Seals cluh . . . jean Stamp' captainetl the Red Cross volunteers and servetl with Nlary Osborne on the cahinet . . . Mary was also a mem- her of the l'l,XWIiEYIi stall . . . the clraniatic ability of Dorothea Ciruntly rated tops over lY5L'l antl placed her on the 'llheater Boartl of Ciiovernors . . . intlivitlualistic Ruth Sham- haugh, a guest etlitor of Nlatlemoiselle College lssue, servetl as 211't etlitor of l"ri1'ol . . . Klart' Ann Kurtz, Alunior-Senior presiclent of Y. YY. C. A.. clirectetl the co-aitles, ancl lftlna llerhst was chairman ol' lnliormation First. lhe lriple Dls answeretl the roll call in the llighlanclers, too. Sixtff rams: Allen, liahcoek, Noe, Grundy, 'I'urner, lohizis, Little, Marvel, Byrne, Beattie. lfzfllf roar: Stamy, Kurtz, Larson, Garms, Ross, Askew, Clinton, Polian, Frnest, Pinnell. l'l0lll'ff1 rrmg: Kaser, Castner, Trachsel, Anderson, Rohrs, Sl'l1llYll51lUj2,'h, llollantl, blohnston. 'llllirtl rms: Seemuth, VVhiting, llaitz, 'l'atinn, Pendry, Katschkfewsky, Leekzi. Nrtnlztl' rome: Schnug, Oshorne, Grissel, lfilkins, Haltlridge, Burnett, Austin. l'il'0llf mu: Rivers, Bean, Rinck, Johnson, Nic-tz, Gillespie, Dunn. L. Foumletl at Boston University Thanksgiving lfve. 1888 Phi Chapter ACTIVE MEMBERS Class ol 1944 LI. Anderson Xl. lf. Pinnell N. Askew ll. A. Rivers P. Balelridge ll. Sehnug P. ElChl101'll R. Sl1Z1I11l'72i1Igl1 L. Grissel J. Tobias K. Kaser P. Traehsel KI. A. Kurtz Class of 1945 B. Babcock T. Noe L. Castner V. Polian K. .Katsehlcowslcy Class of 1946 E. Garms D. Rohrs P. Gillespie KI. H. Seeinuth D. Grundy VV. Seernuth R. Haitz F. VVhiting D. Rinelc PLEDGES M. Allen '47 E. Larson '47 S. Austin '47 F. Little '45 D. Bean '47 P. Marvel '45 A. Beattie '46 N. Metz '47 T. Burnett '45 llf. Osborne '46 A. Byrne '47 lll. Pendry '47 B. Clinton '47 A. ROSS '47 A. Dunn '47 lf. Herbst '46 NI, Holland '45 L. Johnson '46 -T. Stamy '46 Tatum '45 NI. E. Turner '46 DELTA UELT TIELT Page 149 BELT AM l'lO1II1klCL1 at Lewis School ,111l1Ll211'1' 2, 18711 Tau Clmpter ACTIVE MEMBERS Class A. 51011115011 11. 1,:111gla1111 111. 11111112111 Class 111. 11a1'11g1'0Ve1' 51. Christie B. C0111f01't P. H:1111ilto11 17. Hunk E. K1o1'1'iso11 KI. Sicbke of 1943 111. Roberts G. S1e111m011s 31. 17. Z11Cl'C11C1' of 1944 L. Swz111s011 11. Tmvis P. T1'awx'c1' 111. A. Howell K. 1'etc1's011 A. 115111111 Class of 1945 111. 110171 11. Kcllcl1c1' C. 1111111 11. Porter ll. S111itl1 11. YV1'1l'C1Cl' PLEDGES K. Bz11'11g1'0ve1' '-16 31. F. Crowl 115 B. Doyle '15 111. 1'1Zl1'l'C11 1-17 P. Fl'2111l'l' '-15 G. Gray 1-15 K. 1121115011 l-17 D. 11c1'1'1cli 1-17 Y. Hoak 1-15 .-X. 1,L'l1Zl'I1 '-15 C. 1,4-11zc'11 '-16 A. Leopold '-16 13. 1X1arsl1:1l1 1-17 C. 1,CI1I11I1Ql'Ofl1 1. 501101-1'c1' 1-15 11. L. 51111111 1-17 Qu. Sllyalc-1' Y-15 -I. bOlll'l'S -11' 1 1. Stzullc '-17 Ql. Yam Alsrim- '-11 111. Yan 1111111410 -11 1Vl11'vl1'1' l-17 Page 150 The Delta Gamma's have gone patriotic this year with every girl in the house doing some kind of war work. Under the guidance of president Jeanne Christie, the D. Gfs ranked second in sorority scholarship. Dorothy Nliller, Charlene Horn and Nancy Prey wore the in- signia of Phi Beta Kappa . . . Genevieve Slemmons, besides being a member of hflortar Board, Was active on station YVSUI . . . a member of the Central Party Committee and Union Board sub-committee was Barbara Vvheeler, who was also on the council for ln- formation First . . . four girls represented Delta Gamma in Seals club. .Fifflz rofw: Prudence llamilton was a member of the lfreshman Orientation council . . . Lou Swan- son, active in orientation, was on U. VV. A. Council . . . Anita Leopold displayed her ad- ministrative ability as circulation manager of Friwol . . . Nlargaret Barngrover was a mem- ber of Y. XY. C. A. cabinet . . . working on the HAWKEYI2 was .loan Vllheeler . . . Carol Snyder was hailed as an attendant to the Aescu- lapian Queen . . . Virginia Hoalc lilled the job of society editor for the Daily Iowan during sec- ond semester . . . Nlary Fran Zuercher, Ellen lylorrison, Nlartha Mullaii and Virginia Hoak were members of Theta Sigma Phi. Van Alstine, Lenzen, Barngrover, VVheeler, Farrell, Hanson, Mullen, Verdin, Van 'VVinkle. Fourth rofw: Lenzen, Marshall, Herrick, Livingston, Smith, Slemmons, Staak, Leopold, Souers, Crowl. Third rofw: Hoak, Doyle, johnson, Barngrover, Snyder, Howell, Peterson, Miller, Siebke, Porter. Second r0f:,::.' Morrisoii, Gray, Fraher, Roberts, Travvver, Anderson, Laster, Hoak, Scheerer, Horn. From rofw: VVheeler, Smith, Travis, Swanson, Comfort, Stump, Christi, Langlantl, Kelleher, Hamilton. H, . F ' - :I-,f:,,'f,. ':'..,r-t"'::' - --m sn,-7 fy This year. with all the changes at S. lf. l.. the Gamma Phi Beta's, under the leadership of president Virginia llusman, have heen en- gaged in war work. including Red Cross. U. S. O. and hostessing at the Union tea dances for service men. The Scottish llighlanders. the University Chorus and hand claimed many girls from the chapter . . . Rose Day, a pledge. was the drum majorette for the University hand . . . ,lane Shanks was secretary-treasurer ol' Union Board and on the Commerce Board ol' Directors . . . lVIary Grace lfllison was elect- ed treasurer of the Art Guild and served on the war poster committee. lfififl Mew: x"l Donavieve Anderson and Pat Blazer were members ol Home Economics eluh . . . lVIil- dred Buoy, active on the Daily Iowan, was elected to Theta Sigma Phi. national honorary society for women in journalism . . . Nlillie was also a memher of the University Central Party committee. Nlany Gamma Phi's were active in U. XY. A., VV. R. A. and Y. YV. C. A. . . . Janice Liepold was secretary of U. VV. A. and puhlicity Chairman lor Y. VV. C. A.. be- sides being on a Union Board sub-committee . . . Bette .layne Uchsner. ,lean Ann Erickson aml Hope Ann lflea were on the PIAYVKEYE statl . . . Ruth Knight and Phyllis Hedges worked on Friwol. Chance, Hove, Brush, Day, llea, Lnehrie, Larmer, Lawton, lirichson, Lund. I-'guy-fl, fgqyg Blazer, Tuttle. Barnett, Ellison, Schlaeler, Metiller, Righter, Butler. T11 ird rom: 5 Supple, Carpenter, Kautz, Molis, Bowlin, Osehner, Knight, Liepold, Nfeliee. .Yffgml roi-reg Anderson, Hedges, Harover, YViller, Kent, Jensen, lWalloy, Hatton, Gregg. .Front row: Riley, Soenke, Shanks, Husmau, Crawford, Gloekler, Buoy, Casey, Dueharme. Founcled at Syracuse LvI11N'C1'S1tl' November 11, 187-1 R110 Chapter ACTIVE MEMBERS Class A. Q121Sl'j' l". f11oc1i16x' V. 111151112111 17. Kant Class X1. G. 131115011 D. Amlcrson H. 13:11'nCtt P. Blzzzcl' 11. Buoy V. DllL'11Hl'Il1C Class 130w1in 111. lirush S. 1gllt1C1' 111. L. Czlrpentcr 1. Gzittou P. Hedges PLEDGES A1. Chance 145 R. Day 1-16 1. Donahue '-17 .1. A. Erickson 1-17 11. C111-gg 1-17 V. Ha1'0vc1' 1-1-1 H. A. Hea '-16 Page .253 of 1944 I-i.Ri1Qy 1 A 1. Shzmks 11. Soeukc P. XVi11cr of 1945 111. Kautz B. 1,211'I11Cl' 11. Lund 111. A. :X1llC'11C1' 13. A1. OC1lSI1Cl' 11. Tuttle of 1946 1.1ep01L1 -1. HIQKCQ hl. 110115 11. Rightcr H. SC111?lC1ll'Cl' Q1. Supple 31. L. Hove 1-17 17. jcuseu '-16 R. Knight '-15 111. L. Lawton 1-17 13. Lochricf '-15 11. 112l11fJl' 1-16 GAMMA PHI BET 1'1IJU11L1CL1 at 1DC1,21LlXY L,v111VCI'S11fy Alz1nu:11'y 27, 1870 Beta C7ll11C1'UI1 C11aptu1' ACTIVE MEMBERS Class of 1943 Nr11:111d P. 1'f1tzc-1' Class lf. Berg F. liridffe 51. DfJXX'I11l1f1 K. Kirby 111. 1X'a1CCOl'Il11C1i Class A. 1Af11C1'f0Il J. Hardie K. 11opk11'k Class KI. 131'0w11111g P. Locber L. Ne11111a1111 111. 1,11IT161' P. 1Y111tef01'11 of 1944 1. R11111111g F. S1111o11sc11 11. SC1'1U'Zll'Z1i0Df P. Tressel P. Zumsteg of 1945 11. k1n5'11e 111. Knapp 31. 1QOXV1HI1L1 of 1946 -1. Sidney 1V111t6f01'd K1. 1V01'th111gto11 Graduate Student R. Randall PLEDGES B. 11611111 145 C. 1g1O0I11 143 J. Crockett '45 11. 171041111 '46 111. Frey 147 N. Gilson 147 KI. 112111 147 S. 1'1E1l'pC1' 147 11. Herrick 147 C. Jones '47 132. Lossmau '47 A. llosey '45 11. NC1SOI1 146 11. Noland 147 D. Pc1'k111s '45 C. 1J0I'tC1' '47 1'0W11a11 '47 11. R1C11a1'c1so11 146 If. Shanley '47 KI. Yau Hovsc-11 '46 A. VVZ'LtC1'Il1ZlIl '45 C. 111011111311 147 -1. 111115011 '47 A. -1051511 145 D. Ke11e11e1' '47 D. Kottemru111 147 E PP ALPH THET The Thetals have llown their kites high in the lield of campus activities and at the same time ranked third in sorority scholarship stand- ing. Fran Simonsen, a member of lVIortar Board and Freshman Orientation council, was elected to Phi Sigma Iota . . . .lean Hardie, one of six student members of University Social committee, was treasurer ol' Y. VV. C. A., secretary of Union Board and active in debate . . . secretary-treasurer of University Central Party committee and sophomore president of Y. VV. C. A. was lVIargaret Browning, who was also on Union Board sub-committee, HAWKEYE and Frivol staffs, and an orientation leader. Sixth rofw: Fifth rofw: ,lf 15, ,fi hflartha ane NlcCormick re resented Pan- . P hellenic on the judiciary Board and was initi- ated into Zeta Phi lita along with Nlargie Rowland and hflary Bob Knapp . . . Nlargie. on the University Theater Board of Governors, was awarded the Purple Nlask and captured the lead in "Alice in VVonderland" and a major part in "Twelfth Night" . . . Barbara .Iayne divided her time between U. XV. A. Council and the HY" Hospital Board . . . Pat Zum- steg was vice-president ol? Home Economicw club . . . active at VVSUI were Nlary Bob Knapp, Jeanne Ruhling, lVIartha ,lane lVlcCor- mick and Dorothy Kottemann . . . Marge Hall was a freshman beauty. VVhiteford, Gilson, Waterman, Loeber, Frey, Browning. Mosey, Richardson, Nelson, Bridge, Neumann, XVorthington, Kotteman, Hopkirk. Fourth rofw: Van Hoesen, Hardie, Downing, Sidney, Wilson, Tressel, Crockett, Bloom, Shanley. Third row: Hall, Jayne, Porter, Flodin, Perkins, Atherton, Pownall, Lossman, Herrick. Sgggnd rat-wg Pilmer, Jones, Bevan, Berg, Kelleher, VVellman, Harper, Joslyn, Ruhling, Knapp. F ron! row: Kirby, McCormick, Zumsteg, Anderson, Simonsen, Whiteford, Patzer, Schwarzkop. 'lllic girls ol' thc lwluc anal lwluc liavc coin- Active in thc Lvnivcrsity Tlicatcr. Sally Bircl- plctctl anotlicr succcssful ycar on tlic Iowa cain- sall hacl major parts in "Tl1c Faitliliul Slicp- pus unnlcr tlic lcaclcrsliip of Circtclicn Altlilliscli licrclcssu ancl 'vliwcllitli Night" . . . Sally anal anal Ann Nlcrcci '... Ruth Rcininga, who Ruth Rcininga took part in thc lvcstcrn Vvoni- worc tlic insignia ol Klortar lioartl, was prcsi- cnls llclwatc ancl Discussion confcrcncc, wlicrc tlcnt oli lv. YY. A. and a nicnilwcr of 'liranslicr Ruth ratccl lirst in alitcr clinncr spcaking . . . Uricntation council . . . a nicinlwcr of tlic lfni- 'llcrry Tcstcr was Daily loimn sports cclitor xcrsity Social connnittcc, Ann Nlcrccr was on tluring tlic lirst scnicstcr . . . Nlarui Blair. on Loxy..'X.L'OLlI1Cll21l1kl21l1Ol'lCllf2lfl0lllC21LlL'l '... Y. XY. C. .X. calwinct, was also on l"z'i1'ol . . . Nlarion Xlaclfwcn tliviclccl licr time lwctwccn Cicri llollinann was clioscn onc of tlic livc Y. XY. C. A. calwinct anal li. XY. A. council . . . lircslnnan licautics . . . l,ouisc llarkncss was a incnilwr ol tlic L.vl1lYCl'Sllf'CCl1U'21l Partycoin- an attcnnlant to tlic :Xcsculapian quccn . . . niittcc, -lanc Ranclolpli was cliairnian of the activc at station XYSLfl wcrc Ruth Rcininga, postcr connnittcc for lnlnorination lfirst. Coimic Klitlallcton. Ann rllravc anal Ann NI c rc c r. llnm-11, 1-Uqgg Hospcrs, Swzxllunl, Moore. Diclvolcl, Dorr, Norzncnt, Birnlsall., Tuluin, Inglis, Krupp, Donalioc, lltblflllllll, Mannon. Tlziril faqs: Gittins, Ilan, Oslwornc, Miller, Nlorri-on, Iforlws, lfootc, Shuttleworth, Kralvlwenhocft, Miclclleton, Blass, Sclnniclt. S,','g,11l1 rpm-5 Blair, Nlcrcer, Randolph, '1'rax'c, Rcininga, Garrctt, Snyder, Muclixxcn, Harkness, Shreves, Forbes. Frou! rms: Kuttler. l'l:1rk, llill. liucheinan, Alrlilliscli, Curtis, Ptcirfcr, Bartell. lfountletl at lNflonmouth College October 13, 1S70 B eta Zeta Chapter ACTIVE MEMBERS Class of 1943 G. Altfillisch J. Clark B. R. liartell D. Hill Class of 1944 111. Blair R. Reininga R. Curtis R. Swallurn S. lforbes A. Trave L. Harkness B. VViley L. Krupp Class of 1945 BI. Foote A. Rlercer H. Hospers BI. Snyder M. AIHCFXYCII T. Tester Class of 1946 D. Hays P. Norment J. H Krabbenhoeft C. Osborne Kuttler E. biannon C. Kliddleton N. Pfeiffer J. Randolph J. Schmidt P. lliller PLEDGES S. Birdsall '46 G. Hoffman '47 J. Blase '47 D. Inglis '45 B. Diebold '45 RI. Nloore '45 C. Donahoe '47 A. Rlorrison '47 111. Dori' '46 M. Forbes '46 M. Shuttleworth'47 BI. Shreves '46 KI. Garrett '46 P. Tobin '46 J. Gittens '47 EAPPA HAPPA GAMMA Page 157 ll. Kirby S. llereness A. Ayers S. Anderson '45 P. Bartlett '46 Bowlsby '45 ll. Crews '47 51. Daniels '45 111. Forslund '47 Nl. Glentzer ,47 P. Ham l47 X. Hammer '47 Y. Hollman 446 J. Holt 147 L. ISZICSOII '47 Pl BETA PHI Founded at Nlonmouth College April 28. 1867 Iowa Zeta Chapter ACTIVE MEMBERS Class of 1943 Y. XXYCZIVCI Class of 1944 B. Johnson S. Hailey Kelly J. Balster S. Schwertley ll. lialster KI. Stein J. lfvans S. Zoeekler R. Henry Class of 1945 E. Cook A. Rowe J. Houser P. Snapp K. lX'IeGladrey Class of 1946 Chrysler R. l1ICC1lfCl1C'0I1 H. Judt L. Remley B. Kimmel B. Strub S. Long B. 1Veayer PLEDGES G. Kelly l46 ll. Kirby 146 ll. Lodwiek 146 Rl. llandeville '47 K. Patten '46 K. Reeves '47 Sehenlcen '45 F. Sorensen ,46 -1. Yan Ausdall 147 G. 1Vallen l46 KI. lf. Vvest '47 Page 158 . CD The members of Pi Beta Phi have brought the Panhellenic scholarship cup to rest, winning it for the third consecutive time. Standing be- side it is the Stoolman Vase, a fraternity award to the second most outstanding Pi Phi chapter in the country. ln addition to editing Frifvol, president Jennie Evans, who wears the insignia of Nlortar Board, found time to serve on Union Board and the Freshman Orientation Council . . . lVlarge Kirby, in charge of U. JV. A. tea dances, was society editor of the Daily Iowan during the first semester and president of Theta Sigma Phi, honorary journalism fraternity. Sixth rolw: Fifth rofw: yay- s. Jackie Chrysler, business manager of Friifol, and Sarah Bailey, a member of the Student Board of Publications, added more journalistic talent , . . showing domestic tendencies, Ginny lVeaver belonged to Qmicron Nu, home eco- nomics honorary society, while Nlary Balster presided over the Home Economics club. Pledge Notes: Jane Van Ausdall was selected as a freshman beauty . . . Eileen Schenken, who held a position on the U. W. A. Council, Was a member of a Union Board sub-committee and the University Central Party committee . . . Jean Daniels was pledged to Theta Sigma Phi. McCutcheon, Wallen, Snapp, Chrysler, Bailey, Reeves, Forslund, Crews. Hoffman, Mandeville, Weaver, Ham, Daniels, Glentzer, Bartlett, Lodwick, Holt. Fourth rofw: Cook, Mereness, McKelvev, Sorensen, Henry, Bowlsbv, Houser, McGladrev, Balster. Third row: Long, Zoeckler, Kelly, Rerhley, Strub, Judt, -Schenkenf 1 Second ro-w: Schwertley, West, Hammer, Anderson, Van Ausdall, lsacson, Kirby, Kimmel. F rant ro-w: Balster, Kelly, Stein, Evans, Cruickshank, Johnson, Rowe, VVeaver. ,J -1 Q fe The torch of Sigma Delta Tau burned brightly this vear in service and activity. Pres- ident Elaine Brody edited the lol,-XWKIZYE and was an orientation leader. Other journalistic plums went to ,lo Ellen hflargolin and Betty Cohen, Theta Sigma Phi initiates . . . proud of their coveted Highlander plaids were -lov Deane Arkin, Betty Silverberg and Delores Rosenbloom . . . Louise Hilfman, feature editor for I"rii'ol and IIAWKIQYIZ. worked on the Central Party committee and Union Board sub-committee . . . linguist .Iudith XYorton was president of Phi Sigma lota, romance lan- guage fraternity, and treasurer of the Pan- American club. lfifllz row: l , Another gavel-wielder, Reva Bordy headed the Hillel Student foundation . . . Judith lvorton was secretary and Barbara Schoenfeld, treasurer, with Doris Grueskin, Beverly Zlotky, Sally Gross and Betty Silverberg on the council . . . Qrientation assistants were Sally Gross, Doris Grueskin and Louise Hillman . . . busy hours were spent rolling bandages and Working as co-aides . . . twice weekly desserts were given up in order to send cookies to boys in service. D. Tfs exhibited their patriotism at the Union tea dances and in lnformation First . . . gift packages were mailed overseas in the sorority's national Yvar Activities pro- gram. Kaplan, Roth, Rovner, Cohen, Handler, Davis, Kopel, Bordy. fourth romp: Snyder, Matras, Basuk, VVine, Posner, Turoek, YVohlner, Arkin, Levitt. Thzrd rofw: Fischman, Neuman, Scharff, Gross, Silverberg, Schoenfeld, Chanen, Fischman. Suomi rome: Hillman, Krnsne, Hankin, Gusman, Grueskin, Rosenbloom, Fishkin, Garber. Front rofw: VV0rton, Margolin, Cohen, Brody, Heindenrich, Borcly, lviishlove, Glassman. Founded at Cornell University Nlareh 25, 1917 . Pi Chapter ACTIVE MEMBERS Class of 1944 E. Brody J. llargolin P. Fishkin R. Neuman NI. Glassman J. VVorton Class of 1945 R. Bordy B. Krasne B. Cohen D. Rosenbloom Class of 1946 F. Chanen C. Seharff S. Gross B. Sehoenfeld D. Grueskin B. Silverberg L. Hilfman B. Zlotky R. 1VIish1ove PLEDGES J. Arkin '47 13. Kaplan '47 J. Basuk '47 C. Kopel '47 B. Bordy '47 114. Levitt '47 C. Cohen '47 D. Mat1'as '47 S. Davis '47 H. Posner '47 M. Fischman '47 H. Roth '47 J. Fischman '46 P. Rovner '47 P. Garber '46 M. Gusman '47 D. Handler '47 L. Hankin '47 Page 161 N. Snyder '47 A. Turock '46 B. VVine '47 C. VVohlner '47 SIGMA BELT TAU Foumletl at Virginia State Normal School October 15, 1898 Alpha Umieron Chapter ACTIVE MEMBERS Class of 1944 Howell 343 i l L E l ZETA TAU ALPH BI. Bolser sl. Koenig H. Carter Streeter V. Derry Class of 1945 P. Nee H. Tesehe D. Pederson QI. YVilson Class of 1946 G. Klalm C. l.zu1fe1'sweilei' PLEDGES V. Aller '47 -I. liezirsing '47 ll. Burdick '46 P. Klassieon '45 li. Paris '47 BI. Klelntosh '47 S. Gates 447 R. Reid '47 L. Hasselmzum 346 N. Stempel '47 B. Hill '47 P. XVooil '47 Ui Zeta Tau Alpha, under the leadership of president Jean Koenig, forged new links to their chain of activities. Zeta's were well repre- sented in Y. VV. C. A., Nurses Aides, U. S. O. and Red Cross. ln the field of art, Helen Kae Carter brought glory to Z. T. A. by having a stone figure on exhibit in the Art Building . . . Virginia Derry, Helen Kae Carter and Norma Stempl were active in the Art Guild. ln the athletic department, Jean Koenig was secretary of VV. R. A. and a member of the Basketball club . . . .lerry Klahn and Leona Hasselmann were in the Hockey club. Leona was also on the Student Christian council. ln the realm of newsprint were Phyllis Nee, Working on HAWKEYE, Dottie Pederson, ollice manager of l'lAXYKI2YE, and Norma Stempl, cartoonist for Fricol. .lean Koenig, along with her other activities, was an orientation leader, and Nlargaret Burdick and Nlargaret Bolser were Girl Scout leaders . . . active in Home liconomics club was Cecelia Lzuifersweiler, xvhile Margaret Bolser showed her talents in Sociology club. Nlusic was not lacking anion Z. T. A. girls . . . Nlargaret Burdick, ,lane Xlvilson and Rosemary Reid belonged to the llighlanders . . . Betty Lou Faris and Vi",- ginia Aller were members of the University band. Third r0:u:,' Nee, Hasselmann, Aller, McIntosh, Stempel, VVilson, Reid, Burdick. Second rn-w: Howell, Klahn, Tesche, Derry, Bolser, Pederson, Laufersweiler. I' 1 Front rofw: faris, Hill, Koenig, Huntington, Carter, VY ood, Massieon. Second rofw: Baldridge, Brody, Kelley, Altlillisch, Coffin. Front rofw: Noland, Hnsman, Keagy, Koenig, Evans. PANHELLENIC MEMBERS ALPHA CHI OMEGA FLORENCE OHME ALPHA DELTA PI ELEANORE KEAGX' ALPHA XI DELTA HELEN Corrix CHI OMEGA KAY KEI4LY DELTA DELTA DELTA PATRICIANXE BALDRIDGE DELTA GAMMA JEANNE CHRISTIE GAMMA PHI BETA VIRGINIA HUSMAN KAPPA ALPHA THETA JEANNE NOI,AND KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA GRETCHEN ALTFILLISCH PI BETA PHI .IENNIE EVANS SIGMA DELTA TAI? ELAINE BRODY ZETA TAU ALPHA IEAN KOENIC. Nlaintaining a high plane of sorority life, encouraging better scholarship and develop- ing the highest of social standards are the primary aims of VVomen's Panhellenic as- sociation . . . l'Panhellenic,,' a Greek Word meaning Hall Greeksf' signifies the real uni- fication of the twelve national social sororities on the Iowa campus . . . the Panhellenic council is the executive body, composed of sorority presidents, and headed this year by Eleanore Keagy as chairman, and Virginia Husman as secretary . . . each year Pan- hellenic sponsors a scholarship meeting to present the scholarship cup to the sorority with the highest scholastic ranking and to give recognition to other groups with honor- able mention . . . the Pledge Prom at the close of rush Week is Panhellenic's first social function and a formal dance in the spring ends the social activities of the year . . . all of these activities and meetings are under the guidance of Miss Helen Reich. WUME 'S PA HELLE llj EUU EIL Page 164 A MEMUHY 4,d'5 f 'fl R A.,2- , , 1-A mu? H QQ' fbiiffgn 1 1, NJ' if .. . F5 'naw gn, X A if 51 is 5 " . Il ' Q ATA, ?1'8f'w' 4 ff VF f' K, ,kt E . ima, 1 . -... Ben Q :I sul? N Page 165 vz,-,'G.: '- . ,. l, L..- gL,fV. -. -sn 2 4 - - ,. wth- P Q an -Q4 ' ' I xt, 1 NSW? 1' 'E ff M. "s -1. 1.. - '-Ing fi" ,,,,,.X..gx '-'Q .Qing "'f!,": gb' x, :Vp 5 , "if f if.1vgLf2g5 UF FHATEH ITIE5 I TEIIFIIATEII IIY EUU EIL ln a year of ups and downs and indeeision on the Iowa campus, the Interfraternity eouneil had a banner year. Led during the first semester by Reeves Hall, president: llvilliam Venell, vice- president. and Richard Saar, seeretary-treasurer. the council set up the Nile Kinniek Nlemorial award, a medallion in memory of the great All-American of '39 who was killed in the Pacific war theatre. It is to be given eaeh year to the boy seeming to best exemplify the standards of leadership, scholarship, and athletic ability. The an- nual lnterfraternity dance was a semi-formal Christmas party. Second semester officers were James Johnston, president: Richard Yoakam, yiee-president, and Fred Aekerson, seeretary-treasurer. Both semesters were spent in bringing closer together and mutually solving the problems of the few Greeks left on the Campus. Bark rofw: Smith, Falk, Yeuell, Stielmoth, lhorsou, XVeuger, Clave. Front rofw: Aekerson, Mallett, -Iohuston, Yoakam. Page 165 HAWKEYE ERATERNITY MEN WILL SET TI-IEIE COURSE . . . IOWA TI-IE GOAL ALPHA TAU OMEGA BETA T HETA P1 DEL'1'1X C111 DELTA T AU DEL'1'.A DELTA UIISILGN PIII DELTA TIIIETA P111 EPSILON P1 PIII GAMMA DELTA ' Page 157 PIII KAPPA PSI PIII KAPPA SIGMA PI KAIIIAA ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON SIGMA CHI SIGMA NU SIGMA PIII EPSILON TIIETA XI 11 IUWA U THE M HHH The 1945 HAWKEYE . . . a toast to the future of the State University of Iowa . . . to a greater uni- versity . . . a hope for the students of 1944 and the students who are to come. This is a chronicle of the HIGHLIGHTS of 1944 at S. U. I. and of the SHADOXVS of th e past. This is a story of you and of Iowa on the march. Page 168 J 'wi M S A fir 5 AQZM EUUP DUHMITUHY SS' . Something new! lVlighty proud were the cooperative dormitories of their new addition, Fairchild House. With the combined efforts ofthe three women's houses and Manse House, the men's dormitory, the Cooperative Dormitory Association accomplished great things. Life in the cooperative dormitories was organized under a smoothly working system established by the Dormitory Association council . . . bakers, homemakers, ingenious brains and college Joes cooperated in planning a recipe for fun and activity. The Turkey Trot for fun and frolic, added to intramurals, mixed well with War activities, scholarship and exchange dinners and picnics, garnished with the spring dinner dance when service key awards were given . . . the re- sults meant plenty of excitement. Each dormiotry is a self-governing unit under the guidance of a proctor. Since the system of cooperative dormi- tories is under the administration of the office of student affairs, the student proctor is chosen by the University. The Cooperative Dormitory Associa- tion council and the president, Nlargaret Ems, were elected by the houses. The other oilicers were Nlaynard Sandburg, vice president, George Hall, secretary, and Nlickey YValmer, treasurer. Lucile Ormiston as social chair- man Was responsible for the special social events that took place throughout the year. Since the winter of 1932 the Cooperative Dormitory Association has been active on the S. U. l. campus, and its success has increased year by year. Back rofw: Stacy, Martin, Studlay, Gaddis, VValmer, Reed, Ormiston. .Seated Hall, Sandberg, Ems. f bi w ? ELI TU PL CE Bark rom: Fourth rom' Third ro-w: Second rofw: Frnnl rofw: ln the mirror of activities of Clinton Place were reflected many successful events during the past year. First ligure appearing in the retlection was President ,lean Christie, under whose guidance the girls of Clinton Place had a busy year. Standing beside her were Nlarilee Born, secretary, and Nlarjorie Brown, treasurer. Completing the group of otlicers was Pegge Terral, social chairman. In the background were rellected informal open houses for servicemen and the Christmas formal which brought to a close the social activity of the lirst semester. Then appeared in the reflection a boy and girl 'ldancin' and romancin' 3' at the Sweetheart Swing, big Clinton Place party in honor of St. Valentine, and the spring formal on April Fool's Day. Shifting the mirror a little to the right brought into focus the campus activities ot these all-around girls. Representing the sports activities for the house was Betty Simon as president of the tennis club. Mistress of the balance sheets and income statements was Lee Grant, treasurer o li the honor- ary commerce sorority, Phi Gamma Nu. Nlarilyn Nlote completed a line year as president of Beta chapter of Kappa Phi, the national Nlethodist girls' organization. Because the group of girls living at Clinton Place was small, the girls were well acquainted with their housemates and cooperated to complete another successful year of activities and social events in this self-governing housing unit on the University of loxva campus. Rawson, Meehan, Sundin, Munro, Nlote, Schowalter. Engleman, Arrasmith, Block, Born, Timp, Garwood, Meyer, Leopold. Menelzios, Dillavou, Grant, Miner, VVaters, McKeen, Kreutz, Knight, O'Connor. Stutzman, Brown, Christie, Mansfield, Ladd, Simon, Snyder, Raymond, Knight. Rice, Smith, Riggle, Smith, Dehn, Roberts, Terrall. II RRIEH HALL "lVho has my shower cap now?" shouts one Currier girl to another. Therels never a dull moment through Currier's bustling halls . . . activity is the byword in the largest of University dormitories. Currier had an out- standing line-up in last seasonls heavy schedule . . . championship teams in intramurals, representatives on University committees, gay informal get- togethers down in the Nwrecku room, midnight spreads, dances that made a girl's heart turn to romance. Saturday nights and Sunday afternoons were reserved for servicemen who took part in campus social activities. Cadets filled Currier's lobbies, calling for their dates for the week-end whirl of movies and dances. Highlighting the year were the Pumpkin Prom and the coronation of the Currier Sweetheart at the Sweetheart Ball. Well worn tracks made by midnight descents to the soda fountain, "girl to girl" bull sessions after hours . . . the answer to any coed's dreams of college life. Under the guidance of lVIarjorie Bestor, hrst semester president, and Bernice Quintus, president during the second semester, Currier Hall had a busy year. Janice Bardill took over as Currier's vice president. Mary Jane Neville capably handled the secretary's position and Patricia Hoag was treasurer. Currier girls were kept in touch with the dormitoryls activ- ities by their unit representatives. The big-little sister program, which made girls better acquainted, alienated that lonely homesick feeling by encour- aging a warm spirit of friendliness among Currier girls. Bark rofw: Quintus, Michaelson, Jacobson, Sernstrom, Smith. Second rmw: Rieke, Hoag, Neville, Oliver, Gross, Smith, Franklin Subotmk Front rofw: Harmon, Thompson, Colby, Bardill, Moon, Schnoor Bestor -1 fi rs! 4 swf, .hm 'M' 1 Mi: egg: Mg is wr g Eglij I My i ,A ' J, .1 2 in X 4' ?'f?iLiZsf W, 4. 2. as 1. xlib Dorm life . . . happy, guy and serious . . . the girls of Iowa on their way. Page 175 X13 x U X xxx x x x Y X xxxiixx X x x xx Xxxxx X XX. X1xX. P ,,,,,,,v,,.M.W .WI .... Wm .,.-w.. I fi I I I ". ! . . A I I f I I I I J I I I II II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I A I I I I I I 0 0 I I ,K I , . . XI :Wi CONTENTS FOOTBALL BASKETBALL SPRING SPORTS WOMENS SPORTS own ,S or if Y.Q i f VARSITY SQUAD HARREIT ARNOLD DOD MOORE GLORIA HUENGER BETTE JO PHELAN BERNADINE IVIACKOROSKY DICK SHERMAN FRESHMAN SQUAD BARBARA BAKER BETTE KINKEAD BARBARA BENSON NIARY LOUISE NELSON ELLEN DAVIS BETTY SORENSEN Iowa Hghtsl And the Iowa Cheerleaders gave the team a bOOst toward victory by leading the cheering section at football and basketball games. A EHEER PUR IUWA Page 181 THLETIII BU PID UF EU THUL RALPH FENTos: CHARI,Es FOSTER FREDRIC HIGBEE RUDOLPI1 IQUEVER KARL LIEB BRUCE NIAHAN ROLLIN PERKINS FRANK PETERSON CHESTER PHILLIPS GEORGE STEWART The lowa Board of Control of Athletics con- sists of eleven men who are Well acquainted with the problems of collegiate sports. These men are appointed by the president of the university to oversee and control the athletic policies of the school. The board, headed by Karl l.eib, sets up the policies controlling lowa competition in Vllest- ern Conference activities including football, bas- ketball, baseball, track, wrestling, swimming, golf, tennis, gymnastics and cross-country. It also schedules the intramural events, handles ticket sales, approves the budget for the year and selects coaches. Under the Wise counselling of "Dad" Schroeder, athletic director, lowa's athletic facil- ities have been improved and its scope of varsity and intramural competition extended. Page 182 1 - mf ,www V, . , g,,ZEh?fgQg,,4, '35 X . . L if AMR., I Stepping into the shoes of Eddie Anderson, "Slip" Madi- gan has earned the admiration of all Iowa in his very cred- itable showing with his "grid kids" of 1943. In spite of the young and inexperienced material he worked with, he devel- oped a good Iowa team which showed surprising skill in its great defenses against the many styles of midwestern of- fenses. Born in Illinois, c'Slip" spent his own playing years at Notre Dame playing center. I-Ie came to Iowa from the Galloping Gaels of St. lwaryls college in Oakland, Califor- nia, where he had a record over nineteen seasons of 115 games won, 45 lost, and 19 tied for a percentage of .718. Popular with the boys, 4'Slip'l will he heartily welcomed hack as head coach for the 1944 season. Page 184 ME UP THE GHIDIHU Co-Captain Bill Barbour Co-captain Bob Dave Danner Harry Frey Bill Baughman ,lim Cozad Roger Stephens Howard Larson Paul Glasener Dale Thompson Henry Terrell Bill Gallagher Jim Hudson John Stewart Fred Eno MA JoR 1 Dick Martin Charles Burkett Joe Howard Tom Hughes Dan Sheehan Bill Sangster John Ford Harry Vllaugjh Joe Grothus Daryl Annis Bob Arzberger Bob Ireland Paul Zaehringer Stanley Nlohrbachei MINOR I Joe Nlesser Back row Devine, Frey, Hageleen, Sheehan, Cozad, Ford, Yanausch, Grothus Sullivan Sangster McCord Anderson, Nelson, Madigan. Szfcoml rofw Fischer, Barbour, Danner, Mohrbacher, Waugh, Gillespie, Annis, Terrell Hughes Stephens Gallagher Front rome Davis, Ribbeck, Glasener, Zaehringer, Murray, Gokbora, Liddy, Wallace Fhompson Phillips D we ' lf I I , ffm 1 ff as M t 4 'S 1 fi ' W r , Q f f , , if Q ,Q Q ,Q rf' ' S ,, we 'Y 4. 2 , l 5 me N ,I I ,tai 4 AV it tiff ff F 3 by Edward Patrick QSiipj in the hrst appearance of an iowa team coached Niadigan, the X943 TT 'keyes showed the exceiient edition of the ' an coaching and spirit that he had imparted to his team. The green Hawkeyes took on an experi- enced, expert team in the saiiors trom Great h oniv team in the Big Ten y Lakes. iowa was t e I l this season to have an entireiy civiiian team with no " " '. , , K ,vvthc i W . T stars in unitorm aiding then cause. Tlou ex ci Tdawks fought hard and heid the star-studded saiTor team in check except for iong runsg ah the scoring was done from outside the 45 yard stripe. The s unk and ahihty of the Hawks surprised and P ieased ah The iine, ied by Boh Liddy and Stan p . . ' ' ' fi weii. They stayed oh Niohrhachci, tunctioncc many powertui attacks hy the saiiors, and broke their otiense like veterans. The hackiieid piayed L weii, too, but more ohviousiy iacked the precision that comes with experience. Tn 'fact ah the Great Lakes touchdowns were made possibie by Q O O 1' kies h ' hackfieid men Biii Barbour was the tac y . Towa star of the afternoon hy virtue or his touch- pass from Giasener and down run. He took a sprinted 60 yards for the touchdown thriii. 'K --- '-H -'L- ' s'-- .n-mei.: 5.1-,,,.f-,,,,.fM..N,, Hawks Go Down Fighting os Soiiors Win' mi: .Seahawks Outciossp Ohio State in '28 to Bfliciory hi!-1ih1, '?f i...r.rg.4+..,,:.r' "vw www :-:.fs- s v o at s M- WN it az Bebliuwks Sikysis """"'y 'i fl ' "4.'t".:'L-"JF :1 .. a......-..,-... .i,,,,..w.a,.... ww-an A ' 1- 1 3, S1'LS-'iC?'.fX - Tf7.""""S'-X.. ' ., H -,,.,..,.,. ' V a .,. . .W-...N DUWI1gd ..,.,,,:51: in 'C Vyifadiy ,K klwikdifn f- mt.. , 'ill ,,,.,. mm ,K Ml, iw un 'tnllld www in ff '15 .1 Z' . ..,, -1' fx, - 5,21 lf , ,ftfff 1 . 'www Q2 , gi N.-w-1.1 . , g , , f fziiiff' .f S 2131- -gif? . P ?7i'if341fhW, s 'ff' i 5 -f x, . ' ae, an Wa . 1 ,V f.frs,,, i . ,,.. . , M.. ,,,,.. ffef- ' ' 77' 'sf 'ii ' it :JL ,."",:. 'WT--+"' Q--+2 we 125 V 95" ,,1f1,,', ' 5 Q, N 54 ,.,..,,,.- ' --.fa f ' naw ' if '11 i, ,S - ,,, A fi. 'iff 31.1 V Q --a Y-t , .- An:-uvlafu -' ' 'iff t , ' K 'ii iitlenauits 9,25 f2,E""-3, ,, ,V . L , , ,ry av. , 2515115 , Scania - --aw-jx ":..if.L , 1.41.-...v A . . ,....,.n,.,-1 ' .17 -"""' gi, , H g ' 1 1 f iw , 6- , 'if av- 1 e.:':':4 'V' Q ' i, f -A -- , ES59D'1-ribs" c nf.. . ,W - enum' W- .4-f,-1 f',j-"f'J',".'3-f7"n","9"' " wal-'1'?f'3 f TADDY Page 185 -44 ...gf my H 0 FFR' IAL NAVY PHOTOGRA? GREAT Xowrx Unces first downs ,..,,.,,...,, ,...,.A 5 13 V Net yards rushing ...,..,,. ...Y 4 2 272 Net yards forwards ...,..,.... ..,,. 1 34 173 Forwards attempted .,,.. ., 17 20 Q Forwards enmpkted ,..,,... 7 13 hxtercepted by ......,,...,..Y,...,,... A. 0 1 Yards Sntercepnon returns ,..,,. , O 4 Punts number ..,,...,.,,.,..,...,...,. . 9 9 Average yards ...., ...,. 3 S 32 Return wards ,. 31 75 Kickoffs number .,.. 3 3 m Average yards ..... ..., 4 6 47 Return yards . 23 19 V umhkfs ..,,...,... ,. 4 Z 13a11 10st ., 1 1 Penzdties ,,...,.. 5 1 ,l 1 ii 2vV I svv x mas rw ss rs BARBOUR CSLASENER GBE T L 111125 we! Net yards 96 forwards ......... 82 79 Forwards attempted ..,. 15 17 Forwards completed .,... ., .. 5 5 Intercepted by ........,....,........... .. 0 1 Yards interception returns .......... O 5 Punts number ............,..............,.... 6 8 Average yards .... 36 28 Return yards .... 24 18 Kickoffs number .,,, .. 3 1 Average yards ...... ..... 2 5 21 Return yards ..... , O 0 Fumbles .,.........,. . 8 2 Ball lost ..,, 4 2 Penalties ......,....,.. 6 5 K L,,,,. ifne L, I f if Yards lost .,,.... .. 31 35 I: M. 6235 FFVVF yards rushing .................... 88 WISCUNSIN VS. IOWA THOMPSON g and from w 1 Barbour Thet iHC1 on K Ong duve down th endnd m tm i avvks determmed to Wm Chargmg hard thcy drove Wrsco end z e sco cconds to go Barb d goal b The Hel T D Y Io grim HE ...AQIL hlik n the we, X wa's est hank of The Seahawks, eneamped o the campus, showed httie gratitude tor o hospitahty by heating down a iighting idawkeye eieren, 2510. However, the Hawks did not give up the victory as easiiy as it might seem. it was a rough and tough game ah the way , and the Ylaw . iooked good against the star-studded Seahawks. Severed grid stars were among, the Yre-Yiighters. former iowan Bus Niertes, who scored the tirst touchdown against the idawks, Niaznieki, Sinimy Smith, and Dick Kieppe . . . ah very good hah piayers. On the home side ot the iedger were Sim Yhidson and Bid Gaiiagher tor the iowa ot- tense, and the whoie iowa hne and Rodger Ste phens detensiveiy. The iowa hne heid oh severed scoring, thrusts by the Seahawks, hut their ahihty to keep putting in hrst dass reserves wore the iowans down. iowa threatened to score severai times, but the stnhhorn defense ot the Seahawks heid oh the attacks. The iowans himhied at sev- erai erueiai moments and sntiered as a restdt. idowever the Cid Goid banner was honored hr iight against a top team. the exeeiient 25-3 HHWIQS BBW to Sffahaw-kg ,Q-,nv if THE ??f7f3f:,-:.f,.,ff hawks Crush Xowo womvbwwl s ded: Cvucosus ug of Nozisfionks Cross u Voiwrnoikdi U0 0513i 5,5 null' Sravnr Page 190 QW V, 1 K , iikgzgmwf Zi wg? A fm gf 4. A 1-I Q P fi S' W fi ffmf u g 'ff 5 ' be Ly an-A givin. 1 ii JK SWE X F Q 9 .Jw 3 Y ,L ,Q h ,Q : L ,555 jf Qifgs Q5 g 3gfQ2 ,i, 'G N 2 w waxes 2 - -f L' ' A if 4 7 iff" fig fn Q w Q5 f W ffgfff Q im in 4520 Mf.f e'm H .P f , M K 5 , . , if igvfmgf wwf? gf Q1 " W 'W L 0 5 gr 1 ' A T is: 'iHunchy" Hoern- schemeyer, the Hoosier ace, intercepted an lowa pass and ran 35 yards to score. A few minutes later, Paul fSoapyj Glasener faked a pass and slipped through 27 g yards of lndiana territory for a touchdown The sco . re Was then 7x7, and that is the Way the game ended. But that is not the Whole story The lou ans' h' . if c ief jinx in the past had been fumbling: they had it lick cl he scoring Went like th' ' e . And pass defense, in which the l'TaWkeyes had also been Weak, was also greatly improved. The Whole story is one of good all-around team play. The ever-strong Iowa line kept the Hoosier backfield tied up, and al- lowed only short gains at best. They frequently broke through the line and dropped the Hoosier ball carrier for big losses. A glance at the statis- ticsXHoernschemeyer, the Hoosiers' spark plug. carried the ball 29 times Cover 50 per cent of all attempts by lndianaj and gained a total of 8 yards. The Hoosiers gained a total of 35 yards rushing, and lost 82 . . . a line tribute to the lowa line. Glasener and Stephens were the lead- ig ground gainers in the good Hawkeye backfield. ii THE u DANNER N page 193 N 4.-...,...' .L my ' N,-,..' N. ' f' p:.:,i Hawks m Yugoslavia t i firm- 3 Hiiifffiiffif t . Yldnuillfi Indiana 'W-,. M... 5... . 0. ow... W., X thu oheusxxu mutes of the Q, ix 'ue un Then came thu uX 'P xoa od YVhat happ he assauks of the Kd gc ad e h ous. had that OXVCI' three C. Y 1034 AN is lo Srwcsrm Penakres ....,...,, st ,,... Yards 10 Farr F HDUE . NW I-X iovm Prlrznurs First downs ...,............ .. 7 13 Net yards rushrng ......... . 'ZS 231 Net yards forwards .......... .. 72 46 Forwards attempted .... ...., 1 4 11 Forwards comp1eted ......,r... 4 4 lntercepted by .,...,,,...,,..,,,,..,,,., Z 2 Yards interception returns .,.,.. 23 26 Punts number ..........,,..........,...,...,. 7 4 Average yards .,.., 43 40 Return yards .. 9 47 Kickofts number ., ., 5 6 Average yards ,... 30 47 Return yards ..., . 87 9 Furnb1es ..,.,..,,...,,. . 5 2 131111 Xost ..... ., 1 9 10 55 90 5 . 6 , , . .. ,- f -- 14 mf W fs: ,gf f-,L,. f 5 an K ,. ,ub- K it kr . H .vii 5, -1, 1' M, 5, , , 5 w : ,f ,- .S f .-Q'-1'AA'-wlwl, ,sy ,gfg4fwf3mfii'w"mf'1w3AA-le: 1 n fs 5 H 1,-w:.fM:Lsa1f-F - , ,ga wa- 2,4 .. , , S A ' I AP-1 ,. Qi 1 ,, . ""- . AA S , in 2 if .. J - m-hh X 1 -, , -. , v--- 1 - ' - ' Q " , , '43 2' W W , z g " 1 ,, 1. 2 f W . A an ' A 1 ' ---' ,ww 3:k ,:LaiffL, 2- gg MT. ZjTf?3,'i f1,1j.5v,1 '1'ii'f3?mzki' Qi!" A' ,," 5'S1iz::':S:,-:s ' 1 1? ASK sv iw 'A 1 -- " A SS R ' . TQ, ' 4,-ik igfmwffvgz ,FAM-ls,iif"212fNfag'bsawyweffv fy , "" - ,,,k U s a ,,, ,, , mg A- L 5 :fix pw, L A' A 'Q J H- f- 'S H . - N: ' , f 1 R 'Q Wm Q wwfwif Awww p M51 Af A 5 ymvqfj.-a,55,wgf,asguzv Am, ,, ,,,ffLy,.ik,,,fgk,f,,,vg,gggQ,:,w gi, A-,fear Q, i f -I ,,2:APQ, ,7,:v1 Q - 15,5 .f f i ,va ' TWG.:g:gX,,f:,,'-,f"g., 3-451f'f:g,4g1.A ' , ,M , X, 5, , Q. ' ,. -wg, -M3 Aszv iw? Q,I',W5-54-iilJy: A A H3-5 7554 . L,'-Siu 'fffiw-""A'T5Lz.?'uEfv IAS, aw Z' 7,gQg?"'TA'f :N3,g,a., , nfl! gg:,li5ggi5L.,.m. , , A f if ML, fm, ,-,,,,.,x ,,,g ,-Www, ,,,',,w wg, was AM , ,ig :5,,5Qvy,f1g,M.f,WnA,awegif-,S A ' A Q fgu.f',A V , . - . rf wr fs 1,,,,?gfq,g,5?9,-5'w-w,1g,,q.,,,f,fg, lm,-31U,Ai l ff',zKi' eww vi pam- ff? ,gf-Awvwy.izf1.,,i5 ,, , , , 'Afiisw':j,,:Jf,. ,' K , ,M , W, ,, , A 1 , X ,wgiiif A .ff iii , 25155225 s M K . - A ' 4 iz fzg... ,V kfggruigi ..,, , H-gs My u,f,:'x'5gQg,g1?f.: ,u- zF' 974,-,',L,, ",,J'.WZ:i,xQ1,f7 iii? "77?E,,,j.g. zigkggfdfgiri f-55 -Jrepiv' sl' Thi. 3 fig. 1i',gjJ,jjg, 775f ,1,2ff .VA qv, w, ..xA,:, fig.: 'Q , Awg 5' V19 M 1 f , S A T A ' ' ,f 'i 11' Wi,-15ff'm 'A ' SA Ta ,-,vw we 'S-L - .. , ,z ffgf if A " 'L if M Q A11 -' ' ww ' ' 'A " J A A mf, W 2 rw- Q S .,,,,,,s, -,fb f ,Q M, W., awk- -A as , ' -, , , .. - ,, ,,., k,-, ,.,, L 1 - ',,1 M,-, , Q? vm we 'S' M , ,T S M ss 3 an 11, x,. , , Q Xa w Q X . lp . 4, Q , .S v V A,,, .A W., , , Q, ,. Q f . - f . , I If 1 " 'E I M. Mm KM' '-" NA-D---Hr-.1-.... W, ,,,m. 'N 4 'fu IA . "' "AW" 'AA W' iv -Q -w---gd-..-W -, ,,,.,,,,-,M i MNMWV MQW, -V Q4 'V' A' f ,Q li ' Us H W WWA, V ms: V N gg , , Y i . , .er Vim' as ak. 2 'fyw w"3k' QE, K , R? , 'Q J' 1 fm .,,. . . uf Q ' A - ,, , , x W, - Q A M igefih if A if '- . ' , - ..am:v,:,-'- A B , i f ' A ,, 9 f W, X Q V wi ...ww Z' , VL vi - ' . pf., A W -Lx, F fa, , ,A ,X as . wmwwf 1' ESP 1 'X Mvve D s, Ch :she a aghcz d a l cauymg and l lowa tou h si ez a field goal earller ln the game And thus were scoled low used t e T onl too in t play Woo ing, cell Cl Iowa Qfillzi' IOWAN lsr: Pal- , T3 Hits 'dh' Ven and mx hngers the Hawk passed to advantage lowa b played I9 it Niinnesota, , ' i consisting The Goiden Gophers o ot YN7ayne Qiledj Nviiiiams, haithaek, deteatet the idawkeyes 33fX4. The iowans were impotent on the ground, hut haunted the Oid Goid hanner through the air to score twice. Rodger Stephens threw a 54 yard pass to Dan 'Sheehan to set up the 'first score. Then he received a pass from Lar- son and ran 14 yards to score the second toueh- down. Biii Barbour did the kicking honors. Ap- parentiy Red Yviiiiams was the whoie Gopher squad. He had a iieid day, scoring twice in the hrst period. Then, to pass the giory around, he heaved one to his teiiow haithaek. Avery, tor a score. Perhaps teeiing a need tor exercise, he ran 60 yards through the iowa defense for his third taiiy. in the third period he scored again. But we must not disparage the etiorts ot the hard tighting iowans. They tried hard, hut they eouidn't stop the Gopher hacks. iowa was ahie to strike through the air hut was not ahie to get going " id, despite the usuai good piay hy the on the groui Hawk 33 -14 EUDhers Ground Hawkg E5 eye iine. DAILY 10W AN .--,-- ' F0fC95,5Pm i N011 .aff wruolalpw mul Ukraine 2ilnnd.Sr4 PxXPU!mK1l1 Howmzrx pdge 1 'viessera iovw rx 'Vhx N First downs ......,...,,..... Net yards rushing .......... 1 rwards ..,,.,,,.,. Net yards 0 Forwards attempted .,... compieted ....,,. Forwards hx 1 tercepted J' ............,.,.,..,...,., ' returns 0 n Yards interception Punts number ...,..,,......,..,,.. Average yards .,., Return yards ..... Ricketts number ...,, Average yards ..... Return yards ....,. F umbies .........,...... B aii P enaities .. Yards iost ,.,,. iost ..,... 9 91 96 ,. 17 5 0 -1 ..... D 33 16 352 77 6 2 2 5 4 36 0 17 5 33 5 25 0 . 1YNrHX N1 NNESUT Pr 35 2 1 1 5 1 1 4 50 IOWA NEBRASKA First downs ............... 15 5 Net yards rushing ...,..... ..... 3 47 53 Net yards forwards .......... ..... 3 0 95 Forwards attempted ...,,, .,.. 1 3 14 Forwards completed ..,.... . 2 5 Intercepted by ...........,............ 1 4 Yards interception returns ,... 15 22 Punts number .......,.....,................ 5 6 Average yards ,.... .. 31 29 Return yards ...., ..,., 3 O 20 Kickoffs number .,,.. .... 5 4 Average yards ...,,,, .,..... 2 0+ 46 Return yards ...t,. 16 15 Fumbles ...............,. 2 3 Ball lost ..... .. I 3 Penalties ..,..,,,..., ,,,,. 1 2 7 Yards lost ..,, ,.... 9 0 40 EBHASHA VS IOWA Wye knew th . ard-lighting, inexperienced Hawkeyes came through to win their final game! They beat Nebraska soundly, 33-13. It was a birthday present to Coach fSlipj Madigan. Bill Gallagher, Rodger Stephens, and Henry Terrall each got two touchdowns, just to A keep everything equal, Bill Barbour kicked the extra points. Fullback Bill Gallagher hit the line time and again in the best fullback tradition, smashing through and scoring nice gains. Besides spear-heading all the Iowan attacks, he scored two touchdowns. The Hawks were in good form, and would have beaten a better team than Nebraska. Too many times, earlier in the season, the Hawk- eyes were outclassed by lend-lease service stars. The Hawkeye squad, green and inexperienced, played a good brand of football throughout the season. They played like veteran grid stars, but were in reality beaten by stars. lowa came through! ey could do itl The h IOWAN ...":.:r.. 5 ' was iii Q Akzsizncizx page 201 Stalin-Churchill Conference Predicted 33-13 lnwf-1's Season Ends HaDDilY ,aww A bit of fringe, fur and Scottish Hing to accompany the smile of Highlander Edna Price. Good sports . . . on :my field, Eddie Anderson, "Sl1p', Nilldigfkll :md Com- mander Harmon. Harmony and team work in formation. f cElYi . V l-5. K E BASKETBALL Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa Iowa SCORES Nebraska . VVestern Illinois Monmouth Denver . Minnesota . Minriesota . Augustana Illinois Illinois Indiana Indiana Chicago . Ohio State Ohio State Purdue . Notre Dame . Northwestern . Northwestern . STARS SHUUT HIGH As the basketball season started, and the call went out for candidates for the 1944 team, it was rumored around Iowa City that "Pops" Irlarrison had some pretty good men out for the team. It was said that Jack Spencer was a good guard, and that Dick lves and Dave Danner were top-notch for- wards, but many pre-season tips are apt to be quite cold when the actual playing season comes around, so Iowa fans sat tight and hoped that "Pops' " boys would have a bet- ter season than the grid-kids had, after all. Gradually it became known that Coach Har- rison had a pretty "smooth" starting line-up with Danner and Ives at forward position, llerwig at center, and Spencer and Postels at the guard slots. The Hawkeyes were to make their debut in a pre-season game with Nebraska, and then they were to play three other games at home, before the first Big Ten tilt with Nfinnesota. Everyone was eager to see just how this 1944 team looked in action. The Hawks were impressive against the Nebraska squad. Ives and Dan- ner were a good pair, and they scored easily. The attack was snappy and smart, even though it was early in the year. Herwig was a good center and he had plenty of height and aggressiveness. Postels and Spencer were excellent guards, not only defensively, but also on the offense in handling' the ball as well as passing. Jack Spencer showed him- self to be a great ball player, and the clever- est ball handler on the team. All the points the team revealed that night, held true throughout the season and proved the rumors held at the beginning of the season true. l'Pops" I-Iarrison had a great team. Page 204 Before plunging into the stiff Big Ten com- petition, the lowa Hawkeyes played four pre- season games. The Hawks played the role of host and yanquisher to Nebraska, Vlvestern Illinois State Teachers, lVlonmouth College and Denver. They made resounding tri- umphs in all these contests, and cast a shad- ow of their coming prowess on the court. The star forwards, Dick Ives and Dave Danner, were revealed as scoring threats from any place on the floor. The squad looked good. The Hawkeyes breezed through the Hrst part of their season unde- feated, having beaten Nlinnesota, Illinois, Indiana and Chicago in conference play and also Augustana. They were tied for first place with the other undefeated squads until they ran into Ohio State, who already had two defeats on their record. Rated the toughest team in the Big Ten, the Buckeyes handed the Hawks two defeats which left the lowans in fourth place. Coming down to the wire in the race for the Conference pennant, the Hawks chalked up a thrilling victory over the I Purdue five, which was 5 leading the race until it met lowa. Tn the two- game series with North- western the Iowans took the Hrst game but were nosed out in the sec- ond game 41-42 which washed away TOwa's hopes for the championship. Considering everything the Hawks had one of their great- est seasons. They rolled up big scores, and broke old records. Dick Ives broke several individual scoring records, and his fellow forward, Dave Danner, was close behind him in the scoring honors, while Herwig and Postels both showed the Hght and aggressive- ness that makes good ball players. The oft- praised Jack Spencer was on his toes every minute and was the spark-plug of the team. Dee. Dee. Dee. .Tan- Ian. Izm- jan. jan. 21 Jan. 22 BASKETBALL SC HFDULE Nebraska, home VVestern Illinois, home b'Ionmouth, home Denver, home iX'Iinnesota, there llinnesota, there Augustana, home Illinois, home Illinois, home IRI jan Feb Feb Feb Feb Feb 1XIar. IXI:1r. 1. 28 29 s .J 11 12 18 26 3, 4, Indiana, there Indiana, there Chicago, home Ohio State, there Ohio State, there Purdue, home Notre Dame, there Northwestern, home Northwestern, home I B SHETB LL PL YEH5 SHUUT HIGH Ji3rH Iowa opened its Big Ten season in a two-game series with the Golden Gophers at Nlinnesota. In the lirst game, which was won in the last seconds o f play by Dave Danner, the Hawks did not appear to be up to their pre-season showing, but they played good basket- ball. Danner was high-scorer for the evening as well as the man who pulled the game out of the fire at the last minute, by scoring the basket that made the score 37-34 in favor of the Hawkeyes. The second game of the hflinnesota series, as well as the first, turned into a last half battle. The Hawks trailed at half time by the score of 19-14. All through the Hrst frame the Gophers outplayed the Hawks, but grim determination marked the Iowans as they came out after half-time, and proceeded to make it hot for the lads from Nlinnesota. They riddled the Gopher defense from all angles, breaking through to overcome the Nlinnesota lead, and rolled a final score of 37-29. The Iowa victory over Augustana, by the score of 56-30, was not as easily accomplished as the score might indicate. The team from Rock Island fought well and hard throughout the game, but the fast breaks and flashy play of the Iowans, led by high-scorer, Dick Ives, was too much for them. Augustana had height, and the Iowans were inclined to be sloppy in their play, but the Hawks still romped over their weak and inferior opponents. Spencer was the defensive star, Danner and Postels scored well. The Iowans overcame their next opponents, the fighting men from Illinois, in both games of a two-game series, played at the field house. The first game came to a thrilling last period close, and the Hawks edged out the Illini by the score 56-51. The Illini were a strong and scrappy team, but as in the first game the Iowans held a lead over them throughout the game. Danner and Ives passed the scoring honors between them: Danner scoring high in the hrst game and Ives in the second. Ives DANNER SPENCER Page 207 ivhen lowa took to the road again. they met the Hoosiers from lndiana. The Hawks again swept a two-game series, but almost dropped the first game in a real thriller. lndiana led at half time by three points. Qnce again the llawks came out a determined team, as the second frame got under way. The Hawks fought hard, but the Hoosiers led until the last two minutes of play when the score was tied up 39-39. lowa scored, lndiana scored. Danner scored again and lowa won, 43-42. After the thrilling climax to the game the night before, everyone was expecting fireworks, and they got them. But they were all lowa's, and the Hawks won coasting on the scoring of Dick Ives. lle set two records for the Big Ten statistics and helped put lowa out in front and keep them there to the tune of 52-40. The Hawk- eyes took an early lead and stayed out in front all the way. At sev- eral times the Hoosiers threatened, but the excellent play of guard -lack Spencer stayed off all attacks. lowa 103. Chicago 31. That score broke sixteen records! Dick lyes set a Big Ten high scoring mark with 43 points. His fellow forward, Dave Danner, was also well on his way to breaking the record with 32 points when he was taken out on fouls. "Shorty" Bill Anderson became the only man in the history of the Big Ten ever to score a basket after 100 points had been scored. The whole team was outstanding in team work, as well as passing and shooting. Wvhen the Hawks took to the road to play Uhio State, they were undefeated and leading the Big Ten Conference. VVhen they re- turned to lowa City, they had skidded into fourth place. The Buck- eyes had handed them a double-barrelled defeat with the series scores 63-49 and 56-42, despite the Hawks' determination to hold them. Posrnrs Hmzwic GRA FTON Page 208 Iowa heat the Boilermakers from Purdue in the last few seconds of a thrilling, rough hall game that ended as Iowa pulled into the lead, 46-43. The boys from Purdue rode into lowa City leading the Big Ten and Iowa fans were pulling hard for their team to win. The Hawkeyes took an early lead, but the Boilermakers tied the game up at half time. Kremer replaced Postels before the half and played very well. 1ves hroke the previous season's high-scoring mark and Spencer played his usual fine game at guard position. The "Fighting Irish" of Notre Dame, highly-touted in the ljast, hut apparently much under-rated in the mid-west, handed the Hawk- eyes a severe trouncing. The lrish held Ives to 8 points and kept the Hawks almost scoreless for the whole first half. Coming hack later, the Hawks partly overcame the 29-13 lead, but they were not able to overcome the superior ability of the Hashy Notre Dame team. The final score was 66-42. Danner and Postels were the high scorers for the Hawks. The Hawkeyes met Northwestern in the crucial series that wound up the 1944 basketball season. A sweep of both games would mean a tie with Ohio State for first place in the Big Ten Conference. The score was tied at half time and the lead changed hands several times as the period drew to a close. The Hawks came back in the second half and fought hard, keeping a slim lead, and finally overcoming the stubborn Vllildcat defense with the final score of 45--39, in favor of the Hawks. During the last game the XVildcats from Northwestern outplayed the Hawks all the way through the first half with the score at the half 16-22, in favor of Northwestern. During the second half the Wvildcats keep a good twelve-point lead over the Hawks. Then in the last five minutes things happened. The Hawks started hitting and the score see-sawed for the last few tense minutes. The Cham- pionship rode in the balance. The Hawks crept up, then dropped behind. and were nosed out, 41-42. Kknrvi ER Maoxussox VVA LTER Page 209 5 HAWHEYE5 SET HEEUHU FUR HEEUHD5 They Broke EB During Season THAEH A JU NIAJOR UI" Robert Bowles Harold Fiala Hubert Cline Richard Hoerner Leicester Farmer Kenneth Steinbeck P AHEAD MINOR 'AIU Richard McCarthy Carl Schnoor Robert VVorkman FRESHMAN NUMERALS John Caslavka John Christensen Ralph Doran Harry Marshall Warreri lwatthew Frank Powers Kenneth Finders Paul Francescon Robert Garrett Robert Huffman John 1IcDonnell Brockman Schumacher Ranson Smith Thomas Thorson Charles VVagner Rex VVhitworth The 1943 Hawkeye track squad was made up largely of freshmen, with few experienced upperclassmen to run in the important events of their meets. The large number of fresh- man trackmen indicated interest in track and field events and Coach Bresnahan expected a stronger squad for the next season until the armed forces took away most of the prospec- tive track team. Iiark rofw: Coach George Bresnahan, Charles YVag- ner, Ranson Smith, Ralph Doran, Frank Powers, Rex VVhitworth. Front ro1w.' Paul Francescon, john Caslavka, Brockman Schumacher, David Nlzllev, Thomas Thorson. ln an early indoor meet with VVisconsin and the Seahawks, Iowa's Farmer and Fiala looked good in the sprint and jump events. lowa sent a squad to the Big Ten lndoor Nleet, placing eighth, with Steinbeck tying for Hrst in the pole vault and Fiala placing in the high jump. Four Hawkeyes went to the Big Ten Qutdoor Meet but none placed. The team's spirit was excellent despite losses. Baci. rofw: Coach George Bresnahan, Leon Bland, Roger Kane, Rich a r cl Hoerner, H a ro l tl Fiala, Eugene Freels. Front rofw: Albert Slater, Kenneth Steinbeck CCap- tainj, Richard lVIcCarthv. Page 213 BASEBALLS T AT BAT jules Ahrendscn Clark Briscoe . Lyle lfbncr Toni Pa 1'111 er . lVilliznn Harbor . .lack Kcnney . Uon Kingsbury Klax Lzindes . Harold Lind fCap -lohn Quinn . H arry Rinlccnia . jack Sanders . Klux Smith . .Iohn Stewart . Roy Stills . Donald Thompson Sain Yziczrnti . . Pitcher First Base . Catcher Sccond Base . Catchcr . Pitcher . Pitcher Left Fit-ld Right Field Third Base Center Field Second Base . Pitcher Left Field . Pitcher Shortstop . Catcher waMii The Hawkeye baseball squad had winning ways in the abbreviated 1943 season, with a record of eight victories and four defeats in their twelve-game schedule. All four losses were in Big Ten competition-a hard blow to the good league record of the Hawks. ln the final standings Iowa was tied with Nlichi- gan for fifth place, with a percentage of .600. In Big Ten play Iowa defeated Northwestern twice and Chicago twice. The Hawks split two-game series with teams from Miehigaii and Yvisconsin. Nfinnesota was the toughest opponent that Iowa faced, handing the Hawks two defeats. A look at the records shows that the Towans outscored their oppo- nents, 73-37, and also outhit them, 99-85. Only three pitchers were available to Coach "Waddy" Davis and they saw plenty of ac- tion. Roy Stille had the most impressive rec- ord of the three, hurling 35 2X3 innings, winning three games and dropping one. He chalked up 35 strikeouts to his credit to give him a good all-around record. Jack Kenney hurled the largest number of innings, 47 1f3, with a record of three wins and three losses. Max Smith, the squad's relief hurler, pitched one full game and earned credit for two wins. The Hawks' leading hitters were Tom Farmer and Clark Briscoe. Captain Harold Lind led the team in runs batted in, with twelve credited to him. Thompson and Rin- kema did good jobs in the Held, although this department was somewhat weak all around. On April 24 the Hawks led the Big Ten con- ference with four wins and only one defeat. That afternoon they dropped a game to Yvis- consin and in the following week the tired Iowa pitchers dropped two games to the lVIinnesota team. These defeats spelled doom to the Hawks' chances for a pennant victory to climax the 1943 baseball season. Page 215 SWIMMIN TE The Iowa swimming team found the going tough during the 1944 season, winning one ol' three meets in which they competed and placing sixth in the Big Ten Conference meet. Coach Armbruster had little experienced ma- terial with which to work, depending largely on a few men. Bernard Vllalters and Hubert Norman were the 1944 lowa tank stars. Lee Nleis and Joe Gottsch also deserve mention for their line work. The tankmen tied their meet with Nleteorology students in Iowa City and lost to VVisconsin and Nlinnesota. "1 -Q , COACH Davin ARMBRUSTER xo- ,- " limi' roms: Coach D. A. Armhruster, Lyle Brown, Merle Homan, joe Gottsch, Charles Thomas. From' rome: Lee Meis, Paul Thompson, Hubert Norman, Bernard VV:il- ters, Robert Rigler. he . , af... Page QMS , DULPHI CL B Brink row: Thomas, Nfeix, Thompfon, G o t t s c h 1,,onmhnry. Front row: :Xu-rnlwrrster, Norman, Mille1', Gottseh, Rigler. Page 217 YVilIia1n Godden John Gottseh Joseph Gottsch MEMBICRS Hubert Norman Robert Rigler john Syvernd Lee lleis Charles Thomas VVillian1 lfiller Paul Thompson Bernard VValters ALUBINI HIPXXIBERS Dale Lounsbury Clarence lloore CRUSH EUUNTHY Coach Bresnahan trained a seven-man cross country squad for the 1943 season. From this scanty material he shaped a team that placed third in the Big Ten Conference meet at Chicago. The harriers participated in three meets, two of them with Iowa City service teams. In the Hrst meet, with the Nleteorologv squad, Coach Bresnahan's men came through to de- feat the soldiers by one point, Bob Bentz taking first place. The Hawks were outclassed, however, in their meet with the Pre-flight cadets, bowing to the men from across the river who were merely Hying low. In the Big Ten meet Al Slater was high man on the Iowa squad. Team Captain Rich- ard Lord deserved his title, running well all season. Lord and Robert Bentz were the stars of the Iowa team, with Albert Slater coming close behind to challenge them for top honors. Back rofw: Demetroulis, Vander Wilt, Murray, Coach Bresnahan. Front rofw: Capt. Lord, Maiden, Bentz, Slater. , Page 218 l l WUMENS HEIIRE TTU SS' Through its clubs, the YVomen's Recrea- tion Association offers a varied program of recreational activity for university women students. Everyone who participates in a XV. R. A. club activity is a member of the organization, one of the largest on the cam- pus. Presidents of the clubs, together with executive officers, constitute a board of di- rectors governing W. R. A. activities. Miss Nlargaret lVIordy is faculty advisor of the organization. Executive officers were Mary Beth Timm, presidentg Phyllis Peterson, first vice-presidentg lVIargaret Mott, second vice- presidentg Jean Koenig, secretary, and Ann Oliver, treasurer. The year's activities were highlighted by the sponsorship of a Weekly open house in the Women's gymnasium for all students on the campus, especially service men. The Saturday night programs fea- tured swimming, square dancing, roller skat- ing, table tennis and badminton. Tn tune with wartime activity on the campus, the VV. R. A. cooperated in the Double-V war serv- ice program and further aided the war effort by buying S3150 worth of bonds with money from the organization's treasury. Seals, honorary swimming organization, met weekly for instruction in life saving techniques and for practice in formation swimming under faculty advisor Nlarjorie Camp. Vvomen chosen through tryouts each semester were initiated into the club after passing all requirements. Seals president was Lilian Castner. Hick Hawks, square-dancing club open to all university students, met week- ly under the direction of Prof. Ella May Small and Albert Slater, president. The club's fifty members presented demonstra- tion square dances in costume for local or- ganizations in addition to sponsoring uni- versity square dances. Orchesis, an honor- ary organization for women interested in creative dance, was headed by Patricia Car- son. Clad in leotards, club members met weekly for instruction by Miss Janet Cum- ming. XVith Ann Casey as its president, the golf club was organized for the first time this year, playing weekly matches during the fall. Prof. Nliriam Taylor directed Hawkeye Hoofers in outdoor activities appropriate to the season--ice skating, skiing and hiking. The club was headed by Paula Raff. Bark rofw: Zyhell, Bonn, Slater, XVirds, Campbell, Castner, Metzgei, Sernstrom. Front rofw: Oliver, Peterson, Mott, Timm, Mordy, Koenig. 331 Ygzfzf - ' sn ' f:Qg9:,a , , V mf, gf ,Q , I ? " ,ww --,, ,M 4 "Lf Q , , Vw Wx A 'F' 'Q ,. A W Lm4ii?giP?gi I aww K Q 2 Mwlil The XVomen's Recreation Association this year offered a new program of fun and rec- reation for all students and servicemen on the campus, sponsoring a weekly open house at the women's gymnasium. During the first semester these Saturday night programs of- fered swimming as a special attractiong dur- ing the second semester roller skating was the main feature. livery week the program included tahle tennis, badminton, hridge and other games. Dorothy Bonn was the gen- eral chairman for the series of open house programs. with Lillian Castner in charge of swimming and Nlargaret Nlott directing roller skating. Open house also featured square dancing, led hy Alhert Slater. presi- dent of the Hick Hawks. Often the dances were performed in costume, with music hy old-time liddlers providing the proper at- mosphere. ln charge of refreshments for the open house evenings were Paula Ratt and Dorothy Wvirds. Ruth Shamhaugh and hlary lfllen Zyhell took care of checking' wraps. 'liihe memhers of the YY. R. A. hoard worked with the physical education department staff memhers in making the weekly house programs a success. UPE .HOUSE FUR HEEHE THl Page 222 Teams from Currier, Nvestlawn, cooper- ative dormitories and sorority houses partici- pated in intramural tournaments sponsored by the TV. R. A. A board of representa- tives chosen from each housing unit directed the competition, which included volley ball, basketball, swimming and bowling. VVartime limitations made mixed volley ball impossible this year. Yvinner of the volley ball tourna- ment was Currier first lloor, team H, fol- lowed by Alpha Chi Omega and Gamma Phi Beta. The competition lasted about six weeks, each team playing ten games. Top honors in the first semester swimming meet went to Gamma Phi Beta. Delta Delta Delta was in second place, with Zeta Tau Alpha third. Swimmers competed accord- ing to their ability in elementary, intermediate and advanced events. The Currier Annex team took first place in the basketball tourna- ment, with the Physiotherapy team taking second and Currier, second floor team, third. The intramural manager was Ann Casey and her assistant was Dorothy lVIetzger. Prof. Gladys Scott was faculty advisor of the tour- naments. in which nearly 500 women partici- pated. EU PETITIU EEE WUME 'S l TRAMUH LS Page 223 I WUME 'S PHYSIEAL EUUEATIU The lVomen's Physical Education department this year stressed all-around physical fitness through its instructional program. Enlarging its recreational program, the department made recreational facilities available to service men on week-ends. The members of the staff, working with students, spent much time planning and or- ganizing a weekly open house for men and women on the campus. Yvithin the department, women who majored in physical education or- ganized three teams captained by students for competition in team sports. Wleekly assembly programs kept physical education majors and statl members posted on news of the profession with panel discussions and speakers from the campus to review departmental problems and op- portunities in the three fields of recreation. physical therapy and teaching. One of the proj- ects of the major council, composed of repre- sentatives of each class and a representative elected from the department, was recruiting of needed teachers of physical education from high school graduates and university students who have not yet chosen a major. ELIZABETII H.XLSEH', Director linflc rofw: YVells, Bolle, llarris, Oliver, Timm, C' u l li a n e, Vllaters, Xvoodhouse, T e al l , Smith, Trawver, Spence, Casey. Tffird l'0fl.U.' Sheely, Ross, Patterson, Commack, Burnett, Roost, Bidwell, Castner, Peterson, VVirds, Schmidt. Sffond rofw: Short, Mc- Tavish, Scheerer, Gib- lin, Nletzger, lVIott, Ma- gill, Brown, Ralf, Bonn, Clark, Maffabee. 1"ronl rofw: Bird, Arnold, H u X f o r d, Jewett, Thompson, Scofield, Shively, Curtis, Me- Crea, Adair. X X X XX X 1 X 1 X X XQXXQX XXXXXXX 1 X X XX X X X XXX , XXX 1X 1 C 5 Lf 'Q . if 1 I f' ' X U ,fi 3 ' A' "1 W.. Q I J 4 I . . :HT ' WX.. I I 5 -. . v- 1 MQ ', ,,. :Gem Y 2 gm. 1 w . , , 1 ff :iffn 1,3 QE F 'Qi Wwixzrq, ' :wa ...Q if 1 6 , I 1T'-f5i3if55lZ?.i?9 all 'f -1 1 M DWI fl 5 'rfeiriffi:f'?Hf1,ff:4'1l1iqei A , ,:f215'ff" . K -?.f,M1gaf,4 M-1 ff aff ' 1fsf55lf..v,w9Q1"3if' 'ff' ff " ,J J J wa,-ljlaffxr' - 4 Q, 5 f jgxgfty'-, W ii CGNTENTS ADMINISTRATION SENIORS OF 1945 MEDICINE DENTISTRY NURSING PHARMACY RCTC AND ASTP PREMETEDRDLDGY NAVY zffZm4ws PHESIUE T ANEHEH President Hancher began his career at the Uni- versity of lowa not as the President but as a student from 1914 to 1918. He went to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar and received the Bachelor ol: Arts degree there in 1922. He again returned to the University of lowa to receive the degree of Juris Doctor. Constant association and knowledge of the University have qualilied him to meet the problems of this institution. President l lancher is vitally inter- ested in the problems of education and is serving on various postwar education committees. lle states: 'lPostwar problems will be difficult because education had not solved all ol: its problems before the war. Our most dillicult postwar problems will undoubt- etlly be our unsolved prewar problems. Uur greatest asset in the days ahead may not consist so much in our natural resources as in the character, ability, and stamina ol' our people. l trust that the L'niversity will serve a dual purpose by providing a liberal edu- cation which will make our graduates cultured, com- petent, and respected citizens and by providing grad- uate and professional education which will make them leaders in their respective lieldsf' president The president at work i i, -Bifiili i af A : E I f f :L an 4 ' v .,,.....-if ST TE BU HD UP EUUE TTU The Board ol' Education has had a bigger job than ever before in helping the University adjust itself to the army and navy educational program taking place on the campus. maintain the Universityls high standards. and plan for the future educational system here after the war. The hoard, consisting of nine memhers, is selected hy the governor with the approval of the senate to a term of oflice for six years. The memhers meet regularly four times a year, but special meetings are called for emergency measures. The duties of the board are to ap- point the president. professors, instructors and administrators and to manage and control the finances and property of the state schools: the State University in loyva City, the State College of Agriculture and Nlechanic Arts in Ames, the State Teachers College at Cedar Falls, the School for the Blind at Vinton and the School for the Deaf at Council Blufls. MICIXIBICRS OF THE BOARD HENRY C. SHU1. . . Sioux City XV. I-IAR1. HALL . . Mason City Rienfmn H. PLocx . Burlington Mas. l'TIR:XiXI C. HoeoHTox. JR. . Red Oak Ixov Loemsx . . Fairfield joux C. Ruin . . . Cedar Rapids Mas. CSEORGIE L. TQYSETH . Clarion XV. S. RIPE . . Ames lQEsTEa S. CSILLETTE . . Fostoria Page 232 PERCY BORDVVELL Acting Dean of Law LANV Acting Dean Percy Bordwell took over the job when Dean lVIason Ladd Know Lt. Col- onel and head of the legal department of the Surgeon General's oflice in Wfvashingtonj en- tered the army. Although the enrollment of the Law College has decreased since war be- gan, the College is still living up to its high standards of preparing students for the prac- tice of law and developing in those students an understanding of the relation of law to the other social sciences. The faculty and Dean Bordwell are working on plans for the col- lege after the war to meet the needs of its students. Plans for a four-year law course are being discussed because of the great de- velopment in recent years of administrative law and the need of meeting the new demands of business and government. The faculty is also working on building plans to complete the law campus that has been started on the west side of the river. Dean Bordwell has been at Towa University since 1910 and dur- ing Xvorld VVar 1 was a major in the Inspec- tor Generalls Department. He likes to relax at bridge, sports or reading. Page 233 llBEHAL.ARTS The College of Liberal Arts is the oldest college of the University. lt is the nucleus from which the other colleges grew and de- veloped. The College now consists of vari- ous departments together with the Schools of Fine Arts, Letters, Journalism, Religion and the Division of Physical Iiducation with their respective departments. The primary func- tion of the College of Liberal Arts is to pro- vide a liberal education, that is, to encourage the student in the fullest possible develop- ment of his capacities as a person and a mem- ber of society. The fundamental goal is the well-rounded development of the individual . . . intellectual, spiritual, physical, emo- tional and aesthetic. In addition to fulfilling the above function, the College of Liberal Arts in Wartime has accepted the responsibil- ity of teaching various army units: pre- meteorology B and C, A. S. T. P. basic, per- sonnel psychology, foreign area, language study and reserves: and pre-professional. Since 1941 the College has been administered by Dean Newburn. Previous to that time he was connected with the College of Education in various capacities since 1931. HARRY K. NEVVBURN Dean of Liberal Arts EUUEATIU lt is evident to all that the importance of education in a democracy has increased, not decreased, in this war. The College of Edu- cation has contributed to relieving the critical shortage of teachers by accelerating the reg- ular teacher education program, and by of- fering refresher and correspondence courses to qualify applicants for wartime emergency teachersl certificates. Faculty members have been engaged in various services to the U. S. Armed Forces Institute, including test con- struction and the preparation of instructional materials: in Inter-American problems in re- lation to educationg and in planning recon- struction of elementary and secondary schools after the War. Dean P. C. Packer is on leave of absence While serving in the Army as a major in the Education Branch of the Nlorale Services Division. Dr. Peterson, now Acting Dean, spent fourteen months of 1942 and 1943 as a Senior Specialist on School Facilities of the U. S. Office of Edu- cation. DR. E. T. PETERSON Acting Dean of Education CARL E. SEASHORE Dean pro tempore of Graduate College BH DU TESEHUUL The Graduate College is the capstone of all the university colleges in that it represents a cross section of all the other colleges at the graduate level. All faculties are represented in the Graduate College. This college was formally organized in 1900, and since then has had a phenomenal growth both in teach- ing and research facilities and in registration. ln normal times, the graduate students con- stitute about one-third of the total registra- tion in the university. ln the number of ad- vanced degrees conferred, lowa ranks near the top of American universities. Professor Carl Seashore became dean in 1908 and served for twenty-nine and a half years, the longest record of service of any graduate dean in any American university. lrle was followed by Professor George D. Stoddard for five years. Since then Professor Sea- shore has served as Dean pro tempore under war conditions. For more than twenty years Professor George XY. Stewart has served as acting dean at numerous intervals. Page 234 RUDOLPH A. KUEVER Dean of College of Pharmacy PHARMAEY The pharmacist, serving the physicians and the general public, is one of the public's most important servants. Today in wartime the pharmacist has taken a front line posi- tion in the nation's war effort. Dean Kuever reports that graduates from the College of Pharmacy are serving in every theatre of the war. The curriculum of the college has re- mained the same in the accelerated program with the exception of an Army and Navy first aid course which has been added to pre- pare the pharmacist better for public and military service. Opportunities in the future for pharmacy increase daily with the new discoveries in medicines, and these opportu- nities are open to women who are more and more Ending places in the profession of phar- macy. Dean Kuever, teaching a full sched- ule in addition to his duties as dean, is a sports enthusiast: he has served the longest of any of the present members on the Board in Control of Athletics, and he enjoys fishing and golfing whenever the weather permits. Page 235 EUIEI E Under the continuous program that the College of Nledicine is following, the stu- dents are actually spending more time in classes than they did previous to the war for the same amount of college credit. The cur- riculum and enrollment, of course, have re- mained the same although certain phases of medicine have been emphasized a little more in preparing the army and navy students for duty in War. The army and the navy now contract with the College of Nledicine to ac- cept a certain number of students for enroll- ment. The army has contracted for a mini- mum of fifty-five per cent of the total capac- ity of the school, and the navy has contracted for twenty-five per cent of the enrollment. This leaves the College with about twenty per cent of the enrollment for civilians and Women students. Dean lVlacEwen received his doctor's degree at the University of lowa and began teaching in the College of Nledi- cine. He was head of the Department of Anatomy before accepting the position of Dean of the College of lN'ledicine. EVVEN M. MACEWEN Dean of College of Medicirie EUMMEHEE Before the war there were four or live men to each woman student in the College of Commerce. Now there are four or five women to each man in the college. Although the faculty has also diminished in size, mem- bers have been participating in the instruc- tion of classes where the student personnel have been army students in the area study group and pre-meteorology. The College of Commerce emphasizes basic principles and facts with a view to preparation for business in general rather than specific lines of eco- nomic endeavor. The Bureau of Business Research, which is a part of the college, has continued to function during the War despite the reduction in staff members. The work of the Bureau is designed to be of service to the business enterprises of the State of Iowa and under its auspices the Iowa Business Digest is published, which gives the business men first- hand information with reference to business problems and practice. Dean Phillips, prin- cipal teaching has been in money and banking at Dartmouth and at the University of Iowa. He has been Dean of the College of Com- merce since 1921. CHESTER A. PHILLIPS Dean of College of Commerce FRANCIS M. DAWSON Dean of College of Engineering E GI EEHI G The College of Engineering is the chief hobby of Dean Dawson. The Army Special- ized Training Program now being carried on by the Engineering College has made the work of that college more difficult than in pre-war days. "Changes occur more fre- quently, there are more problems to solve, the program takes away time from research and investigation, but it is interesting and I enjoy it," comments Dean Dawson. Nlen of the A. S. T. P. are enrolled in the Chemical, Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineer- ing courses. Navy men under the VV. T. S. take aeronautics in the college. VVomen be- gan in February to take training in engineer- ing drawing under civil service. When time permits, the Dean relaxes at golf, skating and bridge. From childhood he has always known that he would be an engineer and a teacher. Born in Nova Scotia, he came to the United States in 1912 to take graduate work at Cornell University. During Ivorld Ivar I he spent four years in the Canadian Army Engineering Division and became a captain. After the war he came to the United States to live and to teach and has been at Iowa University since 1936. Page 235 C. VVOODY THOMPSON Director of Student Affairs SIIDE Ii IT'IHS The creation of the Uiqice of Student Af- fairs in IVIarch, 1942, represents a new trend among middle-western universities to con- centrate in one organization the non-instruc- tional phases of student life and living. The 0Hice of Student Affairs replaces the oflices of the Dean of Men, Dean of VVomen and Employment Bureau. It is concerned with the studentls Welfare and development from the time he evinces an interest in college until he departs, equipped to take his place in soci- ety. The more tangible services of part-time employment and other aid, and the securing of adequate living quarters are administered by two divisions, the Division of Student Placement and Division of Student Housing. The counsellor personnel which makes the oflice a success includes the following: Dr. C. lVoody Thompson, directorg Donald R. Nlallett, associate directorg Helen Reich, as- sistant directorg Helen Focht, assistant direc- tor, Adelaide L. Burge, senior counsellorg Robert E. Rienoxv, dean of men, retiredg Robert L. Ballantyne, manager of student placementg Imelda C. lVIurphy, manager of student housing, George Hall, counsellor to foreign students, and lVIargaret Lee Ems, counsellor to foreign students. Page 237 UE IISTHY Dental students put on navy and khaki uni- forms in the fall, and now they are continu- ing their education and professional training as navy or army students. The enrollment has remained about the same in the College of Dentistry as it was before the war, and practically no changes have been made in the curriculum. Born in northwest Iowa, Dean Bryan came to the State University of Iowa to study dentistry. Except for a year of practice after graduation, he has been teach- ing at the University. Dean Bryan takes special interest in the work he has done and is doing with the American Academy of Periodontology in their research and study on the diseases of the teeth and mouth. Dean Bryan is a past president of this organiza- tion. His private hobby, color and stereo- scope photography, has been put into the background until the War is over. ALVIN YVESLEY BRYAN Dean of College of Dentistry 1 , l IIHILU WELF IIE The lowa Child lllelfare Research Station was established for the scientific study of nor- mal children. As a department of graduate study it trains students for work in this field. Research is car1'ied on in the fields of child psychology, preschool education, physical growth, parent education and communication techniques. The station cooperates with va- rious departments in its research problemsq psychology, psychiatry, home economics, orthodontia, pediatrics, speech and journal- ism. Pamphlets, radio programs and parent education classes conducted throughout the state make the results of study available to the public. The research program on the de- velopment of personality in preschool chil- dren has recently been expanded by a series of studies under the direction of Dr. Sears. Projective play techniques are being devel- oped in this research. Previous to his ap- pointment as Director of the Child Xvelfare Department, Dr. Sears was a professor of Child Psychology at the State University of lowa. DR. ROBERT R. SEARS Director of Child XVelfare ROBERT E. NEFF Administrator of University Hospitals UNIVERSITY HUSPITALS NIL Robert IC. Neff, under whose admin- istration are the University Hospitals-Gem eral, Childrenls and Psychopathic-has been at the job since 1928 when he came from the Indiana University Hospitals, Indianapolis, to take over the newly completed buildings. These hospitals, governed by the State Board of Education, are intended primarily for the care of the indigent sick in the State of Iowa and for the clinical teaching facilities which they afford the College of Nledicine, the School of Nursing and allied professions. Iowa has been a leader among the states in the humanitarian care of its sick, and the statutes under which the hospital operates have been a model of legislation for other states. The hospital is complete in its facili- ties and equipment as demanded by its highly scientific staff in keeping abreast with the cle- velopments of? the modern medical science. The hospital operates a transportation sys- tcm, consisting of twenty ambulances. which transport patients to and from the hospital. Page 238 FREDERICK M. POVVNALL Director of Publications PUBLIEATIU 5 Wfhe University of Iowa as a whole is making a tremendous contribution to the war effort," says Director Frederick M. Pownall, Hand Publications has its part in all phases of this contribution. Everything done in the Held of publications today is influenced and colored by war-time activities." Aside from the Daily Iowan, the I'IANVKI3YE, the Cata- logue and the Companion to the Catalogue which form a major part of the output of publication material, there are the Summer Sessions Bulletins, the monthly News Bul- letin which is sent to 37,000 alumni and for- mer students all over the world, which in- cludes a list of alumni and former students now in service and which gives an honor roll of those who have died in the service of their country: and a Bulletin for the members of the Armed Forces which introduces and wel- comes them to the campus of the State Uni- versity of Iowa. Director Pownall worked on the staff of the Daily Iowan when he at- tended Iowa University, and later served on newspapers in Iowa and Illinois. Page 239 FI E ARTS Dr. Earl E. Harper came to the Univer- sity of Iowa in 1938 as Director of the School of Fine Arts and, likewise, of the Iowa Nlemorial Union. Previously he had been a member of the faculties of Boston University and I.asell Seminary in Massa- chusetts, and president of Evansville College, Indiana, and Simpson College, Iowa. The School of Fine Arts ollers academic and stu- dio courses on both the undergraduate and graduate levels with credit toward all de- grees. It prepares students for a profes- sional career in one of the line arts, or as laymen for appreciation and understanding of music, art or drama. Dr. Harper expects even greater enrollments in the departments of the school after the war, because the fine arts offer men a great service as instru- ments of necessary spiritual and aesthetic ex- perience, and more people than ever be- fore will seek to earn their living by the arts. Post-war plans for the School of Fine Arts include increases in the faculties, additions to the curricula and expansion of buildings and equipment. DR. EARL E. HARPER Director of School of Fine Arts SEHUUL UE LETTERS The School of Letters is a part of the College of liberal Arts and comprises the departments ot Classical Languages, Ro- mance Languages, German, and linglish. The aims and purposes of the School of Let- ters are many. The school encourages its students to relate their study of letters to the study of other arts and to philosophy, reli- gion, and history. The School offers a rigor- ous discipline in all the leading types of liter- ary activity-the study of language, the study of literary history, the study of literature as an art, the practice of literary criticism, and the practice of imaginative writing. By means of foreign language study the under- standing of European cultures is furthered in the School of Letters. A vital purpose ofthe school is the training of teachers who will be able to transmit the traditions of literature, and scholars capable of various creative ac- tivities of literary scholarship. Dr. Norman Foerster, who is Director of the School of Letters, has been at the University of Iowa as head of the School of Letters and as an English professor since 1930. NORMAN FOERSTER Director of School of Letters R. E. ELLSVVORTH Director of Libraries LIRRRRIES The twofold responsibilities of the library under war-time conditions are to continue to meet the ordinary library needs of students and faculty now at work in the University, and build the kind of library materials need- ed for post-war work. Collecting is ditlicult today because the tlow of scholarly records from all parts of the world is restricted and because the records of action groups now at work in this country are almost impossible to locate. The library is trying to collect letters and other records from soldiers so that civil- ians will have some basis for understanding the soldier's mind during the assimilation period. Plans for a new library are being developed. Since no one knows what a post- war university will be like, it is imperative that a type of library construction that will be flexible enough to be changed as needs change should be used. Director Ralph E. Ellsworthls particular interest lies in the study of the sociological function of the read- ing process as a means of communication. Page 240 ERNEST G. SCHROEDER Director of Physical Education PHYSHUU. EUUEATIU The Physical Education Department has been greatly handicapped the last two years by the lack of facilities and the lack of stu- dents. The Board in Control of Athletics decided that the sports program in the Uni- versity should be as extensive this year as was possible under the circumstances. That program has included football, basketball, baseball, swimming, wrestling and track. Unlike some of the Big Ten schools which have been able to use army or navy students training in their schools, Iowa University has had to rely entirely upon its civilian enroll- ment for participation in sports. The Phys- ical Education Department has been in close cooperation with the Army and Navy phys- ical litness programs. The Navy is sharing the field house with the University, and the Army has been utilizing many of the Univer- sity faculty in their physical training. Direc- tor Ernest G. Schroeder-known as "Dad" to all of the students--states that plans in the future are for a greater program of physical education and athletics. Page 241 UHSI G he School or lNursing, conducted in con- nection with the College of Mediciiie, pro- vides thorough instruction and experience in the art and practice of nursing. i It was or- ganized in 1898 as a two-year course, which was extended to three years in 1902. The University Hospitals serve as a practice field for the student nurse. The School of Nurs- ing now ollers two courses to the woman who chooses nursing for a career: a three- year course which leads to the Graduate Nurse certilicateg a five-year course com- bining Liberal Arts and the Nursing Curricu- lum which leads to a Bachelor of Science de- gree and the Graduate Nurse certificate. The newest program in the School of Nursing is the U. S. Cadet Nurse Corps which was es- tablished in July, 1943. The student who enlists in the Corps pledges to engage in es- sential nursing, either civilian or military, throughout the war. Niiss Lois B. Corder reports that all of the class entering in No- vember, 1943, enlisted in the cadet program. MISS LOIS B. CORDER Director of School of Nursing EXTE SIU Organized in 1913 to extend the knowl- edge of the departments and colleges of the University to the people of lowa, the lixten- sion Division has become an important factor in the enrichment of the adult life of the State and in the encouragement of achieve- ment in scholarship and fine arts for the youth of lowa. The Extension Division operates through several bureaus including correspondence study, educational research and service, visual instruction, conferences and institutes, high school, junior college, and community contests, club and informa- tion service, speakers, exhibits, parent educa- tion and radio broadcasting. The Bureau of Visual Instruction of the Extension Division is growing rapidly as a result of an increas- ing interest in visual aids as a tool in educa- tion. The Bureau is actively engaged in put- ting educational motion pictures, film strips, and slides to work in schools, factories, churches, and clubs. Bruce li. Nlahan, Di- rector of the Extension Division, is also Di- rector of the Alumni Service for the Univer- sity, and represents the National University Extension Association on the Federal Radio Education Committee. BRUCE E. MAHAN Director of Extension Division HOMER R. DILL Director of Museums MUSEUMS lfew people realize that the Nluseum of Natural llistory is playing a part in wartime as well as in peacetime. lts duties are caring for the bird, fish, ethnological and Roman, Pompeian and Nlinoan exhibits plus teaching museum methods. But the resources of the Nluseum have been adapted to the war effort: the arts and crafts taught in the laboratory of the museum have been found practical by army engineers in the production of relief maps, camouflage work and building dio- ramas: pre-dental and pre-medical students taking modelling courses find that making casts is of use in their professional training: the result of work done by museums all over the country during the past years is now be- ing used by ofiicers fighting on the scattered battlefields of the world. Director Homer R. Dill is the originator of the museum meth- ods taught at iowa University and for many years this was the only institution offering such a course. Dr. Dill's main interest aside from his laboratory work is the study and observance of song birds. Page 242 Page 243 i l DR. M. XVILLARD LAMPE Director of School of Religion HELIGIU The two distinctive features of the School of Religion are its interfaith character repre- senting the cooperation of Protestants, Cath- olics, and ulewsg and its integral relationship to a state university. Considering these two features, it is the only school of religion of its kind anywhere in the World. Dr. Lampe has been the administrative director of the school from the beginning seventeen years ago. The faculty consists of a Catholic priest, a Jewish rabbi, and Protestant minis- ters, who in addition to their religious train- ing possess the academic qualihcations re- quired of any university faculty member. These teachers carry responsibility also for those campus religious groups with which they are naturally identified. The School con- ducts YVSUI Chapel every morning except Sunday: carries on interfaith activities throughout the stateg serves as a clearing house for religious activities among the mili- tary units of the campus. Yearly enrollment varies from five to eight hundred students. Dr. Lampe also serves as the chairman ofthe University Board on Vespers under whose auspices outstanding speakers are brought to the campus for Vesper Services. SALUTE TU THE BH UU TES UF 1945. To you who have seen the highlights of an- other day and the shadows of the present . . . to you Who have gone through three years of hard work and have not forgotten howl to smile . . . to you who will very soon carry the tradi- tions of this university all over the nation . . . to you, juniors of 1944, graduates of '45, citi- zens of a brighter tomorrow . . . a salute! Page 244 ?f'?5 A?-.lv ,. si V i , g4 . i 'i'..2,-J.- 1. ww .-+,-m,-5A :5f'.,,, gf M WL ' 1 vw y ep E -f 'gvervy' ,ni-RJ ,pi DA, u vf v4',,-A w Q45vz,2Mi., 'E 'Y Jn," gg? -' .g,'3-."' - in ' 111 , f '. 1'.,,'5L'? bf , 45172, if, v , ur ig lakh? .' -2 Qs t ff xv t .L Q, V W, iw, 4-, I. , 1 tw wi I RQ , fm' QL- WZ, KL .P 3 T . g Mfh Q . I 'Z k bb-4 . ,Q I DH .gf 'wr' Q ,Was ci our first speaker will if lXfIorris Ackerman, Dentistry, Chi- cago . . . Frederic Ackerson, Lib- eral Arts, Des lfoines . . . Lowell Ahrendsen, Engineering, Oxford Junction . . . Arthur Allee, Com- merce, Lynnville. Nlarjorie E. Allen, Liberal Arts, Hopkinton . . . June Ames, Liberal Arts, lllarshalltown . . . Shirley Anderson, Liberal Arts, Ottumwa . . . Gladys Anthony, Commerce, Putnam, Ill. Elaine Armstrong, Commerce, Ha- Warden . . . Anita Atherton, Lib- eral Arts, Walllut, lll .... Anne Ayers, Liberal Arts, lowa City . . . Jane Baldwin, Liberal Arts, YVater- loo. Peggy Banks, Liberal Arts, New York, N. Y, . . . YVilliam Barbour, Liberal Arts, lllason City . . . Jan- ice liardill, Liberal Arts, Dubuque . . . Howard NV. Barnes, Fngineer- ing, Pittsburgh, Penn. Helen Barnett, Liberal Arts, Spring- field, Ill ,... Clarence Barrett, Dentistry, Bettendorf . . . Patricia Bartlett, Liberal Arts, Ottumwa . . . James Bastron, llledicine, Ottumwa. Rolley C. Bateman, Jr., Liberal Arts, Chicago . . . Mary Beatty, Liberal Arts, Atkins . . . Dorotha Jane Becker, Liberal Arts, Sheridan, VVyo. . . . Charles Beckman, Medicine, Iowa City. Kenneth Beebe, lVIedicine, Wever . . . Philip E. Bernatz, lyledicine, Decorah . . . Letta Berry, Liberal Arts, State Center . . . Mary E. Bickel, Liberal Arts, lWcGregor. Barbara M. Bidwill, Liberal Arts, Rochester, N. Y .... Donna Bil- lick, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . Donald Blair, Medicine, Dubuque . . . Joseph Blong, Dentistry, Iowa City. Warren Bogle, Nledicine, Tama . . Reva Bordy, Commerce, Omaha . . . Jean Bowlsby, Liberal Arts, VVater- loo . . . Louise Brannaman, Liberal Arts, Lisbon. Shirley Braucht, Liberal Arts, Joy, lll .... Bernadine Briggs, Liberal Arts, Council Bluffs . . . Elizabeth Brinker, Liberal Arts, Keokuk . . . Elaine Brody, Liberal Arts, Center- ville. l " ' ' Informally speaking it's quite hey-day l l 5 Eager for entertainment but In- formation Fi rst. Flora RI, Brown, lledicine, Anita . . . Lyle Brown, Engineering, Clin- ton . . . .lean Byrl Brunson, Com- merce, VVashington, D. C. . . . Joan Brutus, Commerce, Des lloines. Tannye Burnett, Liberal Arts, Tip- tonville, Tenn .... lllildred Buoy, Liberal Arts, Council Grove, Kan. . . . llildred Burger, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . Richard Buekwalter, Dentistry, Iowa City. Richard Burstein, Liberal Arts, Newark, N. J .... Don Buser, Dentistry, Sloan . . . Earl Caddock, NI e d i c i ne, VValnut . . . Doris Campbell, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rap- ids. ,lack ll. Campbell, Kledicine, Shel- don . . . Dorothy Carlson, Liberal Arts, Belle Plaine . . . Emmett C. Carlson, Engineering, Sioux City . . . Dortha Jean Carpenter. Liberal Arts, Goodell. Klarilyn Carpenter, Liberal Arts, Hamburg . . . Ruth Carpenter, Lib- eral Arts, Rochelle, lll .... lflaine Carson, Liberal Arts, Boone . . . Patricia Carson, Commerce, Rock Rapids. Doris Rlae Cedarstrom, Liberal Arts, Rockford, Ill .... Victor Chabal, Engineering, Iowa City . . . Joan Chance, Liberal Arts, Redfield . . . Gerald K. Chinn, Liberal Arts, Des lloines. Jo Ann Claiton, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . Barbara Coffman, Liberal Arts, South English . . . Betty Co- hen, Liberal Arts, Council Bluffs . . . Bette Colby, Liberal Arts, De- corah. Charles R. Comstock, Engineering, Logan . . . Elizabeth Cook, Liberal Arts, Glenwood . . . lIildred Cords, Liberal Arts, Rudd . . . Bar- bara Cotter, Liberal Arts, South Bend, Ind. Catherine Covert, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . Jacqueline Crockett, Lib- eral Arts, La Grange, Ill .... Ilfary Ellen Crowl, Liberal Arts, Ft. Dodge . . . Eileen Culhane, Liberal Arts, Des lXfI0ines. Jean Daniels, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rapid s . . . Charles Daugherty, Pharmacy, Floris . . . George De- VVitt, Engineering, VVest Burlington . . . Guy Kenneth Dice, Jr., Phar- macy, Tipton. On his way for knowledge. I another college spring. Navy Blue and Old Gold in pigskin competition. Clinton Diereks, Dentistry, Nfason City . . . Davicl Diggs, Dentistry, East Rloline, Ill .... Virginia Don- ahoe, Liberal Arts, Sioux Falls, S. D. . . . Kathleen Donavan, Liberal Arts, Omaha, Neb. .lean Doolittle, Liberal Arts, Daven- port . . . Betty Jeanne Doyle, Lib- eral Arts, Des ix'IOiIlCS . . . Donald Dysart, Liberal Arts, Tipton . . . Donald H. Ecroycl, Liberal Arts, Arkansas City, Kan. Elizabeth Edaburn, Liberal Arts, Creston . . . Robert Paul Eliason, Dentistry, Clinton . . . Betty Jean Ellcema, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . XVallace Ellerbroek, lledieine, Iowa Citv. Shirley Ellis, Liberal Arts, Waterloo . . . illary Grace Ellison, Liberal Arts, Alton . . . John Engel, Engi- neering, Bennett . . . Jean Fergu- son, Liberal Arts, Cedar Falls. Nlaxine Fisher, Liberal Arts, New- ton . . . Matthexx' Robert Fitzpat- rick, lliedicine, Klason City. . . Pauline Fishkin, Liberal Arts, llil- waukee, VVis .... Charlotte BI. Fleming, Commerce, Denison. -ia" Eunice Fleming, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . Louise Franks, Liberal Arts, Oak Park, Ill .... Harry B. Frey, Liberal Arts, Fairfield . . . Illarilyn Fronini, Liberal Arts, Kla- son City. Beatrice Frye, Liberal Arts, Inde- pendence . . . Klarie Gaddis, Lib- eral Arts, Ft. lfadison . . . Victor Gehling, Kledicine, Calniar . . . Barbara Gerke, Liberal Arts, INIar- shalltown. Irene Gianedakis, Liberal Arts, Ce- dar Rapids . . . George Gilligan, Engineering, Dubuque . . . Harriet Glaser, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . Iwary E. Godfrey, Illedicine, Iowa City Doris Grau, Commerce, Storm Lake . . . Gloria Gray, Liberal Arts, Des Moines . . . Judith Grayson, Lib- eral Arts, Yonkers, N. Y .... Richard Griffin, Nledicine, Sheldon. Sidney Gross, Liberal Arts, Cam- bridge, Blass .... Richard Hain- line, Dentistry, Rock Island, Ill .... Mary' Haller, Liberal Arts, Eagle Grove . . . l'Vayne Hardin, INIedi- cine, Des IN'I0ines. iron announcers, Terry Tes er and "Scoop" Riley. Press box attraction . . . grid I Lecture hall and eonferenee room . . . the Senate chamber. Phyllis Harmon, Commerce, North- wood . . . VVilliam Harness, llledi- eine, Newton . . . Fern Harris, Lib- eral Arts, Newton . . . lf. Virginia Hartman, Liberal Arts, Estheryille. Phoebe Hartz, Commerce. Shellield. Ill .... Harold R. Hatcher, Engi- neering, Iowa City . . . Lorraine Hawbeelcer, Liberal Arts, Storm Lake . . . LeRoy ll. Hayes, Phar- macy, lowa City. Roy Hayes, lledieine, llaqnolceta . . . Ballard Hayworth. lledieine, Sioux City . . . Kenneth lf. Heck. Dentistry, Cedar Rapids . . . David L. Heller, Dentistry. Stillwater. Okla. Qlohn Hennessey, Kledieine, Klissouri Valley . . . Helen Herrald. Liberal Arts, lvebster City . . . l'll1lIHZlI,0Xl Heston, Liberal Arts, Fairfield . . . Eileen Hines, Liberal Arts, lowa City. lllary Hipple, Liberal Arts, Daven- port . . . Virginia Hoalc, Liberal Arts, Des llloines . . . Elder Hoines, Pharmacy, Creseo . . . lllerle Ho- man, Engineering, Parkersburg. lllartha Hobson Hoover, Liberal Arts, lllount Ayer . . . Kathryn Hopkirk, Liberal Arts, lft. llladisori . . . llarjorie lilaine Horn, Liberal Arts, lflason City . . . Clarence R. Hosforcl, Dentistry, lllonticello. Rosemary Howe, Liberal Arts, Darl- ington, VVis .... janet Howell, Liberal Arts, Springfield, Ohio . . . Nlary Ann Howell, Liberal Arts, Grinnell . . . Robert Huber, llledi- eine, Charles City. Raymond Huffer, Liberal Arts, Shenandoah . . . Rosalie Cleo Hunt, Liberal Arts, Eagle Grove . .. Constance llgen, Liberal Arts, Free- port, Ill .... Robert H. Intress, lleclicine, Eldon. Alice ,lean lrish, Liberal Arts, For- est City . . . Robert lsham, Medi- cine, Iowa City . . . Lois Ita, Com- merce, Burlington . . . Virginia Jackson, Liberal Arts, lllarion. Jeanette Jacobson, Liberal Arts, Creston . . . VVillia1n Dean Jahnlce, Liberal Arts, Van Horne . . . Bar- bara Jayne, Liberal Arts, VVestern Spring, Ill .... Betty Jenkins, Lib- eral Arts, Newton. , .fu -:if- . Conversationally yours . . . a tete-a-tete with Tri Delt girls. Harmony in formation. Between halves it's tune time. Robert Jenner, Liberal Arts, Suther- land . . . Julie Jensen, Commerce, Eldora . . . 1Iauriee Johnson, Engi- neering, Clinton . . . VVenrlell John- son, lfedieine, Iowa City. James L. Johnston, Liberal Arts, Estherville . . . Beverly Jones, Lib- eral Arts, Iowa City . . . Herbert C. Jones, Liberal Arts, Independence . . . Lillian Josifelc, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rapids. Joan Kadavy, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rapids . . . Kathryn Katsehlcowslcy, Liberal Arts, Elkader . . . IVIarian Kautz, Liberal Arts, BIIISCEKIIIC . . . Donald Kehn, Engineering, 1Iaqno- keta. llarion F. Kelleher. Liberal Arts, Des Il'Ioines . . . Elizabeth Ken- nedy, 1IediCine, Oelwein . . . Dean Hubert Kerkman, Liberal Arts, Van Horne . . . llargaret Kerr, Liberal Arts, Iowa City. Jeanne Kimball, Liberal Arts, Irwin . . . flIildred Klahn, Liberal Arts, fllarshalltown . . . Dorothy Klein- ert, Liberal Arts, lVest Liberty . . . llary Bob Knapp, Liberal Arts, Ap- pleton, lVis. 1.-......, i e- -- - , Ruth Knight, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rapids . . . Katherine Kruse, Lib- eral Arts, Lisbon . . . Paul Kuhl, llledieine, llanning . . . llark A. Kuhn, Kledieine, Decorah. Rlary Ann Kurtz, Liberal Arts. Iowa City . . . llargaret Labbitt, Liberal Arts, Sioux City ..., A r- nold Landon, Dentistry, Iowa City . . . Harry Lange, Dentistry, Du- buque. Barbara Larmer, Liberal Arts, llflus- catine . . . John C. Latimer, Engi- neering, Red Oak . . . Ruth Lau- terbach, Liberal Arts, Sac City . . . Bette Lou Leaver, Liberal Arts Clayton, NIO. Rodney Leemkuil, Dentistry, Prim- ghar . . . Catherine Ann Lenzen 1 Liberal Arts, Cedar Rapids . . . Helen Libal, Commerce, Cedar Rap- ids . . . Betty Lou Little, Com- merce, Kingsley. Frances Little, Liberal Arts, Oma- ha, Neb .... Bonnie Loehrie, Lib- eral Arts, Osceola . . . Betty HI Long, Liberal Arts, Iowa Falls . . Donald Low, Liberal Arts, Sac City v 0 10' All tired out with prospects of a hike to the stadium and a you Rah! Rah! Admiring the time away over the new watch at the Chi Omega house. Dorothy Lowery, Liberal Arts, Fort Dodge . . . Bess Lubman, Liberal Arts, Sioux City . . . Dorothy Lud- wig, Nledieine, Des lloines . . . Barbara Lund, Liberal Arts. Peoria, Ill. Louise Nladdy, Liberal Arts, Great Bend, Kan .... Sydner Xlaiden, Liberal Arts, Couneil Bluffs . . . Harold hlammen, Liberal Arts. llanson . . . Pauline Klansfield. Commerce, Cherokee. -lo lfllen llargolin, Liberal Arts, Yanlcton, S. D .... Peggy Klaryel, Commerce, XVL-bster City . . . .lean llathers, Liberal Arts, Haskins . . . llarie Nau llathre, Liberal Arts, lflurlington. -lohn lIeCoy, Kledieine, Wvaterloo . . . Pauline iXleDowell, Commerce, Grinnell . . . Kathleen 1IeGladrey, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rapids . . . Klaryann illelielyy, Liberal Arts, Atchison, Kan. Richard illCLaughlin, Dentistry, Iowa City . . . Hilary Ellen NIC- Quern, Commerce, Blount Pleasant . . . Barbara lfeade, Liberal Arts, Nlason City . . . hlary hlargaret llleis, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rapids. lNIary Ann lIerCer, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . Donald Bates Riley- ers, Pharmacy, Arlington . . . Xlil- dred Tflichaelson, Commerce, Nevada . . . Catharine lVIiller, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rapids. llary Alice lNIiller, Liberal Arts, Omaha, Neb .... Norma Jean NIiller, Liberal Arts, Ayrshire . . . Rhodonda lliller, Liberal Arts, Os- kaloosa . . . Eleanor llitter, Lib- eral Arts, Cedar Rapids. Illatthew Joe KIolumby, Dentistry, VVest Union . . . lIary l'Iodest NIonnig, Commerce, Iowa City . . . Sadi Anka Nloon, Liberal Arts, La- moni . . . Robert L, lVIoore, Den- tistry, Ames. llary Jeanne lllorris, Liberal Arts, Le IXIars . . . Gwennyth lXIorti- more, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . Gail lN'Iosely, Liberal Arts, Anamosa . . . lVIarilyn llffote, Commerce, Sioux City. lNIeredith lXIoyers, Liberal Arts. Guthrie Center . . . lX'Iary Ann Iwueller, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rapids . . . Carroll Boyd lXIullin, Dentist- ry, Cromwell . . . IXIarilyn Nesper, Liberal Arts, Toledo, Ohio. I me, - 'Q'-. - 'H t Alpha Chi pranksters Cllf up for Halloween. Ial ented for the stage and Vncle Sam, another curtain call for the army show. Ruth Neuman, Liberal Arts, Brook- lyn, N. Y .... lWary -lane Neville, L i b e r al Arts, Emmetsburg . . . Charlene Nichols, Liberal Arts, Nichols . . . Nlarian Nichols, Lib- eral Arts, Iowa City. Josephine Nickless, lledicine, Des Xloines . . . Hubert Nickolisen, Dentistry, Rodney ...r A lice Ann Nielsen, Liberal Arts, Harlan . . . Phyllis Nissen, Liberal Arts, VVal- nut. Jean Nixon, Liberal Arts, Jefferson . . . llflarie Noe, Pharmacy, Amana . . . Terry Noe, Liberal Arts, Day- ton, Ohio . . . Gladys Noteboom, Liberal Arts, Orange City. Phyllis Nec, Liberal Arts. San Fran- cisco, Calif .... lllarvin R. Nove, Pharmacy, Fairfax . . . Carol Oh- rnan, Liberal Arts, New York, N. Y. . . . Arthur Rl. Olson. Dentistry, Humboldt. Sue Ono, Liberal Arts, Lupton, Colo. . . . Richard Scott Paflghani, Engi- neering, lowa City . . . llarion Palmquist, Liberal Arts, Omaha, Neb .... George Parks, Engineer- ing, Council Bluffs. Kathleen Patten, Liberal Arts, Tul- sa, Okla .... lylarion Lee Patter- son, Liberal Arts, Greenfield . . . Patricia Ann Paul, Liberal Arts, Sioux City . . . James Peter Pauly, lledicine, Dubuque. Elizabeth Peck, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . Dorothy Pederson, Lib- eral Arts, Clear Lake . . . Eliza- beth Jean Penningroth, Liberal Arts, Tipton . . . Dorothy Perkins, Lib- eral Arts, Keosauqua. VVayne Perrin, Dentistry, Iowa City . . . Kathleen Peterson, Lib- eral Arts, Red Oak . . . Phyllis Pe- terson, Liberal Arts, VVilliamsburg . . . Virjean Peterson, Commerce, Iowa City. Annette Pettis, Liberal Arts, VVap- ello . . . Shirley Pfasterer, Liberal Arts, Crete, Neb .... Virginia Po- lian, Liberal Arts, Omaha, Neb .... Helen Pollok, Liberal Arts, VVaynes- burg, Pa. Anna Popoyich, Liberal Arts, Oak- ville, Conn .... lllary L 0 u i s e Porter, Liberal Arts, Oskaloosa . . . Orlando Pottholl, Pharmacy, Carroll . . . hflargaret Proehl, Commerce, lowa City. 1 Their act is just beginning with new Costumes for the ariny's medical men. Hoot mon, it's pipe and drum time forthe Highlanders. Sarah P. Ronierantz, Liberal Arts, Des lloines . . . lllarie Ann Queensland, Commerce, Jewell . . . John Quinn, Liberal Arts, Daven- port . . . Lowell Quirk, liingineer- ing, Lawler. Kenneth Raak, Dentistry, Orange City .... A rthur Redding, Dentist- ry, Grundy Center . . . Kathleen Reed, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . Vern Reeder, Conunerce, Cedar Rap- ids. Elsie Reinschmidt, Liberal Arts, Tripp, S. D .... Ruth Roberts, Liberal Arts, llontieello . . . Blax- ine Roinig, Liberal Arts, Nfuseatine . . . llary Roost, Liberal Arts, Sioux City. Delores Rosenbloom, Liberal Arts, Kansas City, RIO .... Betty Ross, Liberal Arts, Olean, N. Y .... Klargaret Rowland, Liberal Arts, Dayton, Ohio . . . Thomas Rowley, lledieine, Iowa City. Ann Runyon, Coninieree, Strawberry Point . . . Rosaniond Ruppert, Lib- eral Arts, Iowa City . . . Lois Rutherford, Liberal Arts, Ft. Dodge . . . Nlartin Sahs, Nledieine, Salem, S. D. ylohn Sangster, Engineering, Grinnell . . . Klary Sass, Liberal Arts, Strea- tor, lll .... Richard Schenkelberg, Pharmacy, Halbur . . . lllarilyn Schrimper, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rap- ids. Chris Schrock, lledicine, lowa City . . . Louise Schroeder, Liberal Arts, VVebste,r City . . . Joseph Schupp, Liberal Arts, Burlington . . . Betty Scott, Commerce, Clinton. Doris Scott, Liberal Arts, Sterling, Ill .... Gerald VV. Seiffert, Engi- neering, Davenport . . . lVIary Alice Sharpe, Liberal Arts, E. Chicago, lnd .... Betty Lou Sheeley, Liberal Arts, llarshalltown, Jeanne Sheets, Liberal Arts, lowa City . . . Norma Louise Sheppard, Liberal Arts, Albert City . . . John Skogmo, Dentistry, Iowa City . . . Alfred Smith, Commerce, Stacyville. Doris Virginia Smith, Commerce, Corydon . . . Janet L. Smith, Com- merce, Corydon . . . Lloyd A. Smith, Kledicine, Iowa City. .. Xlargaret Smith, Liberal Arts, lnde- pendence. 'QV my R gg. , , . Programs, peanuts . . . and peo- ple. It's a great clay for football at old Iowa. Patricia Smith, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rapids . . . lVIary Louise Smith, Liberal Arts, Algona . . . Robert A. Smith, Dentistry, Troy, N. Y .... Sheila Smith, Liberal Arts, Harvey, Ill. , John Joseph Smyth, llledicine, Ft. Dodge . . . Phillis Snapp, Com- merce, Chicago, lll .... Virginia Snell, Commerce, Ida Grove . . . llarjorie Snyder, Liberal Arts, Council Bluffs. Jane Spencer, Liberal Arts. lowa City . . . Cornelia Springer, Liberal Arts, YVapello . . . Jeanne Stacy, Liberal Arts, Osage ..., A ndy Stefansky, Engineering, Gary, Ind. Rita Steichen, Liberal Arts, Dwight, lll .... Dorothy Stone, Liberal Arts, Hawarden . . . Claire Street, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . Lois Studley, Liberal Arts, Cumberland. Velda Stumpf, Liberal Arts, Eagle Grove . . . Betty Subotnik, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rapids . . . Janice Ta- tum, Liberal Arts, Nora Springs . . . Harold Taylor, Liberal Arts, Iowa City. . t, I 'wt liarjorie Tennes, Liberal Arts, Dav- enport . . . Luella Thorsland, Lib- eral Arts, Gruver . . . Donna B. Tjebben, Commerce, Creston . . . Betty Lou Towne, Commerce, Al- gona. Patricia Traehsel, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . Joe Trocino, Engineering, Oelwein . . . June Turner, Liberal Arts, New York, N. Y .... Robert E. Vanniee, Engineering, Vvest Lib- erty. Kathleen Vietorine, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rapids . . . Edward Vorba, Liberal Arts, Trayer .... A nn Ver- din, Liberal Arts, Iowa City . . . Joseph S. VVaddell, Engineering, Iowa City. Doris VVage, Liberal Arts, Cedar Rapids . . . IVIarjorie VValdorf, Lib- eral Arts, Peru, Ill .... Gordon VVarner, Engineering, Davenport . . . Anne VVaterman, Liberal Arts, Iowa City. Patricia VVatson, Liberal Arts, Coun- eil Bluffs . . . Juanita Weeksung, Liberal Arts, Muscatiiie . . . Helen lVeeks, Liberal Arts, Indianola . . . Gloria VVeiser, Liberal Arts, Burl- ington. Pillars and porch for an out door chat with the Thetus. Light snow Hurries, lighter at- tire and a snosvman in spring. John Stephen VVestly, iiledieine, llanly . . . Richard P. VVeyand, Engineering, Iowa City . . . Gloria Ivhale, Liberal Arts, Rockford, Ill. . . . Roberta VVheelan, Liberal Arts, VVasl1ington. John VVhinery, Dentistry, Iowa City . . . Harold VVhitacre, Liberal Arts, Burlington . . . James VVhitworth, lwedicine, Victor . . . Rex VVhit- worth, liedicine, Bramhall, Ifng- land. Carl VVieben, Commerce, Iowa City . . . Jeanne YVilson, Liberal Arts, Des Moiiies . . . Verdell VVirds, Liberal Arts, Iowa Falls . . . Bar- bara VVright, Liberal Arts, VVest Union. VVar1'en Zabloudil, Liberal Arts, Burlington . . . VVayn e Zeiger, Dentistry, VVebster City . . . Lula Zervas, Commerce, Cedar Rapids . . . Illaine Zimmerman, Liberal Arts, Brookline, IXIass. H'-"'i,,':ifs.ifl' ff 'f ' C4 . . r r w SSD ST DE T5 UF EUIEI MEMBERS Seniors Ray Hirleman jim Pauley Don Miller Roy Hayes Iuniors George Chambers Bill Kriedelbaugh Don Newland Karl Ness Sophomores Charles Cretzineyer Keith VValker Bill Hamilton Ralph Clave Bark rofw: Kridelhaugh, Ness, VValker, Cretzineyer, Hamilton, Chambers, Miller, Pauly, Newland, Clave. Front rom-.' Hayes, Foss, Grundahl, Bliss, Hirleman. MEDICINE E EU. DENTISTRY LPH HAPPA HAPPA ACTIVE MEMBERS Class of 1944 K. Beebe VV. Bogle NI. Hicks R. Allen L. Amick E. JV. Eubinger J. T. Elston R. Clave J. Duffy VV. Franey J. Gregg B . Haddad B. Barbour J. Crandall A. Divine J. Foster Back rww: Fourth row: Third ro-w .' Second rofw: Front row: VV. Johnson R. Olson R. Paul Class of 1945 D. Hesselschwerdt J. Huey J. Hyland H. Kardon J. Nloyers Class of 1946 R. Heilman E. Kopecky K. Krabbcnhoft K. lVlcGuire P. Nlannig D. Ottilie PLEDGES H. Freg J. Howe Johnson R. l.iddy Tj "e McGuire P att Fre L. Rceck C. Schvock J. S. lvestly NY. Nlullen, Jr. J. R. Singer J. Teigland VV. Vlvehrmacher Nl. Peterson H. Readings J. Thompson T . Tjossen F. Sloan T. Pratt R. Puckett P. Schloss A. Smith ossem, Olllll , , r , y. Peterson, Kopecky, Heilman, Ebinger, Foster, Puckett. Kardon, Krabbenhoft, Moyers, Allen, Barbour, Duffy, Huey, Monnig. Liddy, Crandall, Gregg, Hesselschwerdt, Franey, Clave, Mullen, Teigland, Ihompson Bogle, Reeck, Johnson, Singer, Hadded. PIII CHI L. A. Smith C. Bnllimfcx' Bates I H. Gclclick H. C. Gutenkauf H. N. Nelson R. NIitChcll E. Hanskc Bark rofw: Third ro-un' Front rofw: ACTIVE MEMBERS Class of 1944 Cotnam Class of 1945 R. Jongewaard J. Kooiker R. I'I. Kooikcr Class of 1946 I.. Larson K. Kool PLEDG-ES DI. .Iacobs I.. I.,ocs R. Smith Feldick, Jacobs, Kooiker, Kooikcr, WVasson. Smith, Hanske, Kool, Nelson, jongewaard. V . XV O R R XI K D Gehling Kridelbau Kruse NIattice NICCloske3 IVasson Kellow Dysart Sffond rofw: Loes, McCloskey, Mitchell, Dysart, Larsen, Kellow. Contnam, Gutenkauf, Kruse, Gehling, Muttice, Ballinger, Kridelbaugh. gh MEDICINE MEDICINE U SIGMA NU Class of 1944 IVI. Albers VV. Bliss Klein A. Callaghan Class of 1945 J. Bastron L. Cowan R. Huber C. Beckman R. Fitzpatrick R. Isham P. Bernatz VV. Harness T. Rowley E. Burke Hertzler Smyth lf. Caddock R. VVhitworth Class of 1946 IQ. Ahniann R. Conkling D. Newland VV. Baird D. Corton B. Vottler R. Kruse PLEDGES B. Allender L. Ellertson F. Nliller J. Anderson J. Eyre D. Moore C- BCYC VV. Gladstone D. Pfeiffer J. Christensen D. Goenne G. Rugtiv H. Cline J. Gottsch Slater T. Cole M. Hicklin E. Standley D. Crabbe R. Keefe J. Terry C. Cretrineyer McCrrane D. Tyler F. Darrow B. Merritt C. Woodbui'n Back rofw: Kruse, Corton, Bernatz, Moore, Woodburn, Hertzler. Fourth rofw: Cretzineyer, Huber, Merritt, Anderson, Isham, Burke, Smyth, Ellertson Third rofw: Rowley, Bastron, Fitzpatrick, Goenne, Rugtiv, Beye, Cole, Whitworth Second rofw: Conkling, Ahmann, Newland, Allender, Miller, Harness, Yotteler, Beckman Front rofw: Baird, Bliss, Klein, Albers, Callaghan, Caddock, Cowan. PHI IIHU C. Bennett J. Berg G. Beyer R. Daub WV. Brooker R. Campbell R. Gustofson F. Fuerste H Allen G. Fridell VV. Hamilton VV. Hoops R. Beckford -I. Devine H Jenkins G. Killinger SIGMA ACTIVE MEMBERS Class oi 1944 E. Hicks R. Hirleman N. Ingle M. Kuhn D. Pohl Class of 1945 D. Hagge L. Parker T. Quinn Class of 1946 gl. Hoyt VV. Jones lf. Schilling Nl. Schultz lv. Severson PLEDGES D. Kerkman C. Langner I. O'Dell D. Lopp I. Rinnel J. McGreevey G. Smiley T. Summers Troxell j. Rutledge ul. Thorsen Updegraff S. Mighell L. Smith L. Watters R. Vllorkman S. Vllittmer S. Shearer DI. Spencer D. VVilkins R. VVilley VVilley, jones, Smith. Gustafson, Ypdegraff. Fnurrlz forum' Evans, VVatters, Hamilton, Hoops, Fuerste, Fridell, Hagge, Severson, Allen. Third rofw: Schultz, Hicks, Parker, Quinn, Thomsen, Campbell, Hoyt, Brook .' Pohl, Rutledge, Mighell, Schilling, Summers, Kuhn, Daut. Front rofw.' Beyer, Myerly, Updegralff, Hirleman, Berg, Troxell, Plager, Bennett. Bark roms: Srfond rofw Cf. MEDICINE MEDICINE W. Hardin R. Harrington J. Coffey D. Cooper O. Fais C. Field K. Frankhouser L. Grams K. Buresh A. Bonnebrake VV. Church P. Cunnick D. Harrison Bark rofw: Fourth rofw: Third row: S nd rw' era ro . Front rofw: PHI BET PI Class of 1944 R. Hayes C. Knouf NIcCoy B. Hayworth P. Kuhl Class of 1945 J. Garland L. VVhite bl. Tudor I.. Hungerford R. Norton R. Vaubel D. Kerfoot VV. Page C. VVatson NI. NlcCloW G. Rahn Watson R. Nlyers R. Stolley Class 1946 NI. Hayden D. Hull T. Statler D. Howard H. Martin M. Van Pelt D. Carmichael E. Rizk PLEDGES R. Hodges C. Ness D. Soli F. johnson N. Qlson F. Tapia R. Johnson D. O'Toole F. R. Vernon R. Keller VV. Sands D. Walz H. Ladwig R. Seibel VV. VVisdom NI. Moon K. Schneider VVatson, VVatson, Kerfoot, Howard, Vaubel, INIcCoy. Hayes, Stolley, Tudor, Garland, Carmichael, McClow, Hull, Field. Paige Frankhauser Meyer Martin Rizk Hayworth Van Pelt Hayde Hardn C 0 r Rahn orris H efod Nor n Fa Kn iQ a 3 5 Y 1 Y 1 Y Y ' 7 F N ny 1 , o pe , , N , ung r r , I to , is, ou , wr ms. Kuhl, Fesenmeyer, labor, Young, Conley, Spellman, Baughman, Bartell. Whit mnmwmpu-Q, Future rloctors learn how to cure the Il2lfl0IlvS ills nv- 1 34:-,fm " gf...-41" 'Y 2 M" -gan VVe feel Eue today! is lf! up A M. MM W M Q e Q 3 wi .sv vis l 'P '5 . W 5, .. , aw as ,X K 1, wa? M air Bi an .K 5298715557 1 1. was Z gf Q ' H, Ii. -- '15 ' fry.-.oksvfw mi wmamw. ,wif l 3 PSI UMEG D. Busci' D. Diggs C. Diercks K. Heck R. BUcCllL'l' R. Clcwcll Nl. Durst l.. lxnlic U. Berg. '47 B. lirauumer. '47 XY. l31'zxuc1', '45 l.. l5I'21XI'NClCl', '45 l.. Carter. l-H5 C. Davis. '45 XV. Davis. '47 ACTIVE MEMBERS Class of 1944 C. lhlosliord R. lQecmkuil R. Nloorc Class of 1945 R. lfomla 5. ll2lllSL'l1 R. l.L-iglitfm Xl. Xlasrcrs PLEDGES R. liilcrs. '46 R. lfliusou. '45 R. lfxuus. '47 R. Cilcuu. '45 ll. Almics. '47 R. l.umlquist. '47 5 Rnmptmi, Bralucr. Dziuuport, llsvk, XXvhll1CI'j', Diercks, I.C6II1lxlll1l, Fifrlz roizv: Leighton, Davis, Slmgluzl. Buser, lflinson, Brammer, Bc-rg. Ifufl' rom' 170111711 rm rlllllfd fo-' Vmozzif 7'0Q'.L'.' Hrs! rom' 4-5 D:n'iS. Glenn. llauisru, Ruff, Nliller, Jones, lfvzuis, Luudquist. ll. Nickoliscn K. Rauk Wvhincry XY. fn-igcr Onlcll ll. Rull VI. Bcrg llhguci' Xl. hluulu, l-15 R. Nlillur. '-1-7 lj. Nclsc1l1.i-Hn lf. Puck. '45 D. Phillips. '45 lf. Rzuuptcm. '46 D. Schultze. '47 ,cf liraxmcicr. lxlllkllf, Diggs, Clcwcll, Prvk, Zciger, Phillips, Durst. Nlzistc-rs. KVagurr, Rank, llosforcl, Nelson, Carter. l'7UI'lKlIl, Schultze, Nlmmrc. 5 f'I'issiIlgCI', llmeu, Vllivk, You Burg, Nickoliseu, l'm'ker, Odell, lliglex ,-Xiiclwsmm. ' DENTISTRY Class of 1945 DENTISTRY BELT SIGMA BELT H2ll'l't'f lilong Ciresslin R. lflainlinc Armour Armstrong l'3raclrlCk Cahalan . Cole D 211'l3y . l'l arnc llarst . Buck, l46 . Curncs, '46 IJCxYZ11'lN2lll, Glasson, '4 Herzog, l46 lvancic, '46 Kruse, '46 Bar .lf rofw: Fifth rows: Fourth rmw: Third row: Sfmnd rofw: Ifirxt rome: ACTIVE MEMBERS Class of 1944 D. llellcr A. Rccltllng ll. Lange tl. Roc R. Xlclnughlin Xl. Olson XY, Pc r ri n lf. llixon lf. IIOHINZIINW gl. Kalb R. liruge r R. Kunz ll. Nlarshall U. Newman PLEDGES R. Nlark, '46 l,. Nleycrs, '46 '46 XV. Nliller, '45 XV. Ochs R. Ustlleuner P. Phair J. Roalson lf. Sawyer C. Slclehtcr KI. Smith D. Vlhltcher Al. Richard, '46 D. Shay, '46 James Stewart, '46 John Stewart, l46 6 R. Ophcim, 545 Phelan, '46 D. Rathhun, '46 G. Trihhcy, '46 l.. Xvalsh, '46 l.. Yanclerhan, '45 Sleichter, Hixon, NICl,.INlghllll, Gresslin, Armour, YVitt'her, C'ahalan, Marshall. Armstrong, Horne, Glasson, Kruse, Herzog, Ochs, Ostheimer, Hoffmann, Opheim, Roalson Dunn. Kruger, Mueller, Dejarman, Smith, Curnes, Phelan, Sawyer, Stewart, Darby, Phair. Heller, llaluline, Lange, Roe, Kunz, Cole, Buck, Rathlvun, Richards, Kalb. Redding, Bradrick, Ivancie, Stewart, Shay, Mark, Trilvlvy, Meis, Newman, Xxv1llFll. Herrick, Laude, Hyrrm, Barrett, Biebesheimer, Boclclicker, H s 1 X V 21 N3 ...., 'A"1w4 f -dm I I f 4 ,aw-A 'Wx-. A u If A ,fav ,Q-.4 'flfi ' L H M sp- ' V, , , Y 7 A A 'iw ' X J: .nil lk we ' w . x i' J .. , -9 L wa A - ' 15, " F - T , ,A. k 4 X '- A-L W, "Sag .ef , f, , 'Wa Y x ,V X , A A H ,435 k W Charlene Baltz, Postville . . . Ilfarjory ,im ji liiekel, Vinton . . . Frances Buehtel, Corydon . . . Norma Jean Carlson, Sisse- ton. S. D. Harriet Christensen, Council Bluffs . . . Janetta Coder, Newton . . . Ifinmie Lou 173' Davis, Iowa City . . . liable First, VVy- oniing. Frances Grossklaus, lluseatine . . Florence Fillenwarth, Charles City . . . Elizabeth Fulliam, lVIuseatine . . . Edith Gensieke, Cedar Rapids. UNIUH NURSES A between-meal snack in the ward . . . Beryl Older and diet :ride make patients hap- PY- Caroline Gilman, Chicago, Illinois . . . Janet Glasscock, Hawarden . . . Bernita Hangartner, Postville . . . Lois Hansen, Davenport. Carol Heckman, Knoxville, Tennessee . . . Nlary Jean Holst, Keystone . . . Stella Hove, Rake . . . Kathleen KIICIU- pel, Guttenberg. Susan Loetscher, Dubuque . . . Vir- ginia Lane, Rockford, Ill .... Patricia Leonard, Davenport . . . Nlary Leyda, Burlington. GIRLS WITH A WILL Seniors have a chance to re- lax in Vvestlawn parlors . . . Delores Skorheim and Mar- cia Eyler are off duty. GIRLS WITH PUHPUSE llarion llc-fferd, Poca- hontas . . . lllary lllur- ehison. Sidney . . . Doyne Nash, Cherokee . . . Alan- iee Nelson, Xvadona. Doris Owens, North lfnglish . . . T h e r e s a Phelps, DeNVitt ...A A ra- lnilda Platner, Daven- port . . . Lila Ann Pruess, Lone Tree. lflizabeth Rackaway, Davenport . . . J a net Roclclewig, Buffalo . . . Frances Rusk, Yillisea . . . Caroline Ruthen- bergf. lluscatine. llaureen Siegel, Kla- quoketa . . . Hallie Vol- link, Prilnghar . . . Em- ily Yoder, Iowa City . . . lllarjorie Youngstroni, Burlington. Page 282 STUDE T UHSES The Student Nurses organization is composed of all student nurses. Governing the organization is the Student Council which is formed by the group's ollicers and the three class presidents. This board, an integral part of the Student Nurses group, wisely guides the activities and business of the organization. This year, in keeping with the military trend on campus, the Student Nurses have held Cadet dances twice monthly in the Vvest- lawn recreation rooms. The usual Caps' Caprice, a formal allair, was again the party of the year. The U. S. Cadet Nurse Corps is playing a large part in nursing this year and has developed rapidly at lowa. lVlost members of the new classes are under the Corps nursing program. Senior nurses in the government Corps are preparing to go into military hospitals for the last six months of their training. OFFICERS CAROLYN Joxrasox . . . President JANE KNUPP . . lst Vice-President DOROTHY BARTHOLOMEW . 2nd Vice-Pres. SHIRLEY ELLIS .... Secretary VERA SVVAXSON .... Treasurer ELSIE BEARD Y. W. C. A. Representative ELEANOR Locicwoon . Athletic Chairman JEAN HOWLAND University Representative LORIAN BELL . . . Social Chairman MARCIA EYLER HAWKEYE Representative JANE VVEEKS . . Freshman President SUSAN LOETSCHER . Junior President RUTH SALBERG . . Senior President B Il r k rofw: Lockwood, Eyler, Howland, Loet- scher, Weeks. Frou! rofw: Beard, Knupp, Swanson, Jone- son, Ellis, Bell. Page 283 l 9 ,ff 'X r' 4' vi ' is A N qv 4 5 F . , W f y , ,I W if X ' ' ' afmi .5 ,gr Y 2, ,f 1 , gm! -.:,,g- . -,ij , .2 gimp 5532 'f 'I :fb Ruth Salbcrg and Dr. Poole examine new patient in surgical outelinic. Senior nurse, Amy Yeakel, prepares surgical pit in operating room for operation. Administering a bit of first aid. Ruth Saiberg pauses a moment with Nlzircizi Eyler in surgical ontclinie. Page 234 The nursery :mil Il bath for the young- est generation given by Amy Hvililer and Hallie Yollink. lfrs. Rex Harrington, registered nurse, supervises nurses' aides as they care for children in the metabolism ward, Zola llareussen, senior nurse, prepares a liypoclermie for zulministration. Page 285 SIGMA THET T U OFFICERS HELEN f3RAVES . President RIARJORIE CSOULD . Vice-President BETTY LoL' EVANS . Secretary BIARY SUE VVATSON Treasurer -IOELLA .ANTES . Archivist Giving recognition to outstanding nurses is Sigma Theta Tau, national honorary nursing society. Vliomen whose student nursing accomplishments merit honor are elected to this group. The stu- dent must maintain a high scholarship average throughout her undergraduate course, and she must show evidence of profes- sional interest, leadership and promise in the field of nursing. The society also confers honorary memberships on nurses for their worthy professional achievements. The purposes of Sigma Theta Tau are twofold: first, to promote high educational stand- ards, and secondly, to sponsor educational research. The organi- zation is active on several mid-western campuses, having been founded in 1922. Gamma Chapter, on the west side of the Iowa River, was established in 1929. It has one hundred thirty-seven members at present, many of whom are now in the armed forces. The local chapter, which is purely honorary, meets four times a year. Tn Qctober, a Founder's Day tea is held, at which time in- coming' student nurses become better acquainted with Sigma Theta Tau. A formal banquet is an annual event that honors new mem- bers who are initiated into the organization at that time. U TSTANDINS NURSES HEIIUS IZED Page 286 gf Q WH? ii-WJ 4 5 i E2 mx fa ,, m M ami fl- 1 211.225 ' ., -N .,.yg'7ew.:-u .Q M, , , J 1 x AEE ,k ,,, '1- ' '1"3?'?i - fi . , , U Li HHU CHI Rho Chi, the honorary pharmaceutical fra- ternity, was founded for the purpose of pro- moting the advancement of the pharmaceut- ical sciences, for the attainment of scholar- ship and to foster good fellowship. Its members are elected on a basis of scholar- ship and character. Starting at Nlichigan College of Pharmacy in 1908, the fraternity was later organized nationally in 1922. Delta Chapter on this campus was founded in 1923. Each year Rho Chi makes a cash award to the pharmacy freshman attaining the highest scholastic average. Officers of Rho Chi for this year were Ray Herrmann, president, James Swank, vice-president, and James VV. Jones, secretary-treasurer. Other members include Nlaynard Sandberg, Fred VV. Landon, ,lohn C. Purcell and Guy K. Dice. Faculty members are James IV. jones, Louis C. Zopf, Nathan F. Sorg, I'Iarry IV. Austin, and NIarjorie I.. lVIoburg. Hon- orary faculty members are Dean Rudolf A. Keuver and Dean Emeritus Ivilber Teeters. Although Rho Chi's activities have been lim- ited due to the war, it continues to honor worthy students in Pharmacy. H PPA EPSILU Honorary professional pharmaceutical so- rority for women, Kappa Epsilon has been active on the Iowa campus since 1921. Founded by delegates from Nhnnesota, Ne- braska, and Iowa University, the sorority now has thirteen active chapters. Its aims are to unite women employed in pharmaceut- ical pursuits for mutual encouragement and assistance, to assist in the advancement of pharmaceutical education, and to provide a bond of lasting loyalty, interest and friend- ship among students. INICINITCFS are selected on a basis of scholarship and character. Capably leading the activities of the soror- ity this year were Gloria B. Landon, presi- dent, Kathleen NIcIntire, secretary-treasurer, and Nlarie Noe, historian. In January the following women were pledged: lVIarybeth Irlartman, Helen Turnbull, lNIary Jane Van- dee Voort, Norma Ems, Susan Showers, Avonelle Rosheim and Veronica Ieska. Business meetings were held once a month. Social events included a Vvatermelon party which was the high-light of September, a party for new students in Pharmacy early in the fall, and a Christmas party. Page 283 SENIOR CLASS Iiaflc rout' SCh6IlkClbCI'Q, NI e 5' e r S, D3ll2fl1?Ftj', Potthoff, Txl'l0l'SOI1, Sand- herg. Fran! rrmc: Xxvllfd, Nioore, Burke, I.2lHdOI1, Jack- son. SENIOR DONALD V. XVARD . ID,-XRNYIN AIOURE . SFHOKI.-XS TIERNEY ,ILTNIOR CHARLES DAUGHFRTY . ELIIER HOINES . . . RICHARD SCHENIQEIRIERG JSI M,45W"15"-, CLASS I SOPHOKIORIQ CLASS . . President XVILLIAAI T. CLWIAIINGS . President . Xvifff-P1'CSidCI'lt DONALD CARLSON . . . AHCC-PI'CSidCIlf SeCI'GtaI'y-TI'easIII'e1' IQATHLEEN NICINTIRE SCCl'CfHlj'-'1il'621SLl1'C1' CLASS FRIQSHHIAN CLASS . . President HIAROLIJ BURKHALTER . . President . Vice-President RIARYBETH LIARTKIAN . . Vice-Presidem . SCCl'C't?ll'5'-rFI'C2lSllTCI' HELEN TLJRNBLTLL . SeC1'etaI'y-TI'easIIrel' SOPIIUMURF CLASS Burk rnfw: Severns, Carl mn. Sutter, Riggs. Frou! ra-un' -Ieska. NICIII tire, Rosheim. Phurmics nuiku up products for hos- pital use in IH2111llf2lCfLll'il1Q lub Dispcnsing department . . . proper umount . . . czwefully meusurud Rcstfaltli work for pharmacy students Products for dispensing at hospitals made by junior pharmics Page 290 Q 42 f NNN' ., V, W s.,-. "Q 'v ,md mmm, gffiwlffm 1 fff1!if:UMQ -f fffnfiw. f . . 1 '1- fb an saggy , . Q 7,,, Qi? 2? X 91 .L 9 Q , 1 , gg ,Iu ka , W5 .Q 4 52 gl S, J :fr 'L N 21' 5 "Wh s' Q ff , L, gg 5 Q T V55 .M 2 W, 5, : 4 ' sT' f3:,H' 47' 'S' N Pr My v-. NE :J fs , 2 B 33, ns ' .3 2 ,wmmwsg " Q, 2 K wr- Wfb ' R ,, fa 'frml Xing 71 3, H " 23 H ,,. i , ' ixm. uf- H , 'nf-f 1 ' ,. W 'iM-J 1 , 1, . ,, M H -,:g,,5-nf.-n vw ,MW . S, X -K-vgmiihf .ilufi : I f 1 . f E M.. .www Y . .V 'A--1 , ,H f , .umm 3 M 13 ,fi 3 X 1-45 tfall TfSgt O'Connor. roll Lt. VVehster. Back rofw: MfSgt Beecher, TfSgt Wes . , dl miw' Lt. Silverman, Capt. Nolan, Maj. Dixon, Capt. Car , Lt. Col. YVells, Col. Zech, Lt, Col. Sehauh. Rlid 0 ' . Front rofw: Maj. Culver, S. T. ion to- The University of l0wa's contribut ward the winning' of this war was greatly emphasized when the Army Specialized Training Program was established on the campus in lVlay of 1943. The 1500 army students were housed in twenty fraternity houses, with a military style of living re- placing fraternity life. They marched to the Union in formation morning, noon and night for mess in the Union cafeteria. The marching formations of soldiers along the sidewalks of the campus were a broad de- parture from the civilian life of pre-war Iowa. The free and easy college days of the army students were replaced by a con- ' ' lated study. The centrated program of iegu ' T. P. was to develop objective of the A. S. selec ' ' ' ecialists, for this is a specialized army. ted soldiers into sp Page 293 P. A D H.U.T.lI. HEAUUU APLTEHS HHADQUAR L . QA. S. T. P. and R. O. T. CJ COL. LUKE D. ZECH . . Commandant COL. DoUcsLAs XV. MCENERY lVledical Qllicer LT. Col.. l'l.-XROLD XV. Seimeis Commander, First Battalion Lr. Col.. EMICRY VVELLS Commander, Second Battalion NIAJ. EARL O. CULYIZR Director of R. O. T. C. NIAJ. GLENN R. DIXUN liixecutive 0HLicer CAPT. FR.xNc'Is A. TYOL.-KN Supply Orlicer C.-xifr. Ro1s13R'r P. CARRoLL Classification Gllicer lsr lyr. Gkoyizk . . . ental Oilicer ui J. SILWRMAN Adjutant lsr LT. XYILLI, S Wifissriik D Lt. Bernard VV. Aginsky, Capt. VVilliam H. C armichael, Lt. Col. Harold VV. Sehaub, Lt. Earl L. Milstead, Lt. Julian C. VVallazz FIRST BATTALIU The University of lowa's war effort was extended by the establishment of the Army Specialized Training Unit here on the Uni- versity campus Nlay 10, 1943. From that time daily progress Was made preparing ad- l' ' l utiona technicians for assignments with the armed forces. The First Battalion of the n Specialized Training Unit was com- posed of students of freshman and sopho- more college levels in the basic groups and all classifications of medical and dental stu- dents. All students in the A. S. T. P. were required to com A rm v plete a streamlined military program consisting of close order drill, ex- tended order drill, combat problems, lirst aid, rille marksmanship, mapping, security, military sanitation, marches and bivouacs, along with a program of academic courses. Courses under the Army Specialized Training Program were taught by means of classroom instruction, lectures, moving pic- tures, visual aids, practical demonstrations and applications. Later, advanced courses were given when students entered special- ized training in engineering, psychology, and area and language. Vvith this well bal- anced program of academic and physical ary training to their credit, the students completing the Army Specialized Training Program were well qualihed for assignments With the army in highly specialized and technical positions. They are vitally important in the military team that is being built to bring this war to a successful conclusion. education courses and of milit Page 294 lt Lt Col Emerv VVells, Lt. john D. Bradley, Lt. Irving L. Smith, Lt. John C. Luec 'e, . . - Lt. Herbert Garrett, Lt. Leslie I. VVright EEUU U BATTALIU, The Second Battalion of the Army Spe- cialized Training Unit at the State Univer- sity of lowa was comp he Area and Language, Personnel osed of advanced stu- dents in t Psychology and Engineering curricula. The training they received was equivalent to that received by junior and senior classes of col- lege level. Training in 9A Engineering was equivalent to that given post graduate stu- dents. After completion of one term at the University, some of these engineers were sent to an Utlicers' Candidate school for fur- ther training. Graduation from the O. C. S. gave them a commission in the army of the United States. Others of the engineers were h ' as non-comm1s- sent to units of t e army sioned specialists in their respective fields. Page 295 A. S. T. P. language students were given training in the area in which they might see service and were taught to speak some for- eign language other than the foreign lan- guage they already knew. The personnel psychology students were trained for selec- tion, classification and assignment of army of the results personnel and for evaluation of military training. The aim of the Army Specialized Training Program was to supply the army of the United States with men pos- he desirable combination of intelli- gence, aptitude, education and training in specialized fields. The lowa A. S. T. P. provided soldier-leaders capable of rapid and expeditious application of the ultimate in science and learning u fare demands from all branches of the sessing t 'hich modern war- service. CUM AN Thu two humhul mt-ii in Cmupany A ul' Thu uiigilit-1.'l'ii1g stutlcnts strugglcti to mn- IUXYZIQS .Xrniy Spucizilizt-tl Training unit wurc quur sinus anal cosincs. Z1 hit of lfiiglish, tht- one ol' thc two groups of husit unginccring square amd the compass in 21 course of stutltfnts iii the "army st'l1urJI" on thu hunks stuth' that prcpzireti thcm iiUl'2lkiYlll1CCLi uiigi- ot' tht: Iowa rivcr. Billcttcd in Phi Cizumuu l1LTL'l'il1gOl'fUl' work in othcr spccizilistsi fit-luis. Delta. Thctzx Xi, Ut-ltzi lfpsilon :mtl Phi Pliysitzil ctiucziticm :uid 21L'21tiClNiL'L'fJLll'SL'S to- Kappzl Sigma t1'z1tci'1iity houst-s. tht- mum in gcthcr with military training iuzulu them khaki wcrc 21 i.21lNiiilll' sight on tht- Iowa Cam- ruzithi to grzipplc with tht- prohlcms of the pus 215 tht-5' iiiziiwliutl trmu wcst Campus to airiuy in thu titiltl. XYhi1t- tht- men had little trust czuiipus for thcir clzisscs in the cnginccr- timu to tlzltc thc Iowa to-ctls with such a ing huihling and for muss in tht- lwnirm. First rigid sclicthilu zissignunl to thcm, thcy iiisistctl l.t. lfurl I.. Klilstczul, Infantry, wus tom- that whcn thuy went into zitticm, thcy would mamliiig ofhccr of COINPIIHY A of thc A. S. hzivc 21 tlzitc with hflr. Ilitlcr zuitl with the T. unit's First Bzittzilifm. Sun of llcawn. IIUMPA Y B Ullailing from Potsdam to l.os Angeles, lrom Baton Rouge to Cloquetf' the Com- pany B men of the A. S. T. unit had a yen for "takin, apartl' and a knack for Uputtin' together." They were on the lowa campus for nine months, studying basic engineering in preparation for putting their hands and minds to work for Uncle Sam in this global war. Yvith the Phi Delta Theta, Beta Theta Pi, Alpha Tau Omega and Sigma Nu frater- nity houses as barracks, the Company B en- gineers woke the Currier co-eds with their singing in the early mornings as they marched past Currier Hall on their way to mess at the Union. The Company B men had a special job to do at the University in preparation for the application of their knowledge gained through academic courses and military train- ing in active service with the army of the United States. These future soldier-leaders were combining education and training with their own intelligence and aptitude in the field of engineering. Capt. VVilliam H. Car- michael and First Lt. Leslie l. XYright were the otlicers of Company B, guiding the engi- neers as they lived and studied on the Iowa campus, under the regulations of a concen- trated plan of study. 1 ai A ,1 gs ii -.. 1, f -Tc EUMPA Y E Xvearing their white coats over their Glls, the students in Company C of the lowa A. S. T. unit were the "dents" and the "medics" of the "army school" at lowa L'niversity. Originally their plans for becoming dentists and physicians included administering to the needs of men, women and children in the towns and cities of the United States, Then they were called to serve the dental and medical needs of the nation's lighting men. As student dentists and physicians they entered the professional world hy way of the army. Second I,t. .lulian C. Wvallazv, was Company Cs commanding otlicer. The facilities of lowa's professional schools were at the disposal of these stu- dent dentists and physicians and they were granted University credit toward their pro- fessional degrees. Although they continued to live in their own peacetime fraternity houses most of the year rather than in GI harracks, they were governed under regula- tions similar to those of other Army Spe- cialized Training companies on the lowa cam- pus. Their courses included military train- ing in addition to academic courses to pre- pare them for active service with the United States army. EU PAYE llvhether the word is "Frehet,'l "Slobodan or 'LLiberta," it translates the same in ling- lish and in the hearts of men the world over. Company liils linguists, most of them al- ready masters of at least two languages, be- came proficient in still another foreign lan- guage during the months they studied at Iowa under the A. S. T. P. It was not un- usual to hear army students carrying on con- versations in foreign languages as they marched across the campus to classes. Ninety men were added to the unit at Iowa in Feb- ruary as area specialists, studying the political science, economics and geography of certain sections of Europe. Nlany of the Area and Language students at the University were natives of the lfuro- pean countries ahout which they studied. The Company li men lived in Kellogg Bar- racks and in the Sigma Alpha lipsilon, Delta Chi and Phi Epsilon Pi fraternity houses. First Lt. John C. Luecke was commanding olhcer of the company. During this world conflict and its aftermath, these students of Norwegian, Finnish, Arabic, Greek, Ger- man, Serbo-Croatian, Czech, ltalian and Rus- sian will be translating and interpreting the languages of the world into the language ol' freedom. EUMPA Y F In the IieId of personnel psychology stu- Some ot the men in Company If had Ph.D. dents have as their tooIs the minds and hack- degrees: some had heen college professors grounds ol' men. Students in the Advanced hetore their army training. Une psychoIo- i Personnel Psychology division of' the A. 5. gist had studied in Iflngland and I'aris. Ifrom T. IJ. at the University of Iowa were trained aII parts of the Lvnited States came the men I on this hasis to classify army personnel ac- who studied at Iowa L'nix'ersity. They Ietit cording to psychological analysis and to the campus earh' in 194-I and the ina-iority I evaluate the results of military training. of them are now overseas, doing their part 'Iiheir courses were designed to give them in Iighting this war. It is their task to main- the hest possible preparation to perform tain the working eihciency oli the Ifnited their duties with the army in the held in the States arniy, to protect its delicate psycho- work of classification and rehahilitation. Iogical hasis and to effect the rehabilitation Comnianding oihcer of Conipany If was Ifirst oi' those men who have served and sacrificed. I.t. Irving I. Smith. BUMP!-X Y I3 Equally adept at the drafting board as in the field, the laboratory or on the con- struction job, the men of Company G studied at the University of lowa under the A. S. T. P. to become the army's builders. Nlost of the Company G men had had some training in engineering before their army training. Under Hawkeye tutelage they added to their store of engineering knowledge until they were ready to serve the army in the field. Two of the men completed work toward eol- lege degrees, which they received, in absentia, from S. U. l. First Lt. john D. Bradley was commanding omeer of the Company. Some of the men had college degrees even before they studied under the A. S. T. P. Two members of the company held degrees in law, another engineer had been an ae- eountant in Civilian life: another had been the chief engineer on a rehabilitation project in Egypt and a consulting engineer in the construction of the Golden Gate bridge. There were several Nlexieans in the com- pany who spoke French, Spanish, Nlexiean and English. lvhen the men of Company G left for overseas duty, they boasted with pride that they were ready to do "an exca- vation job for bflr. Hitler's Collin." ...W ,,.. . -, sz. ,f.,,3.,,,,,,,,M.,,,,,,,m.y .-.ws we fm., f,-wmawsiiy--W:w -t.W--f.sff.wt-1 Q. ,.,. , ,.,M,.W ..wMTs..,W.,, -Ww.QW B SIE Pi.U.T.C. Two years of basic military training has been required of all physically lit men at the Lfniversity of lowa. After this basic course, the military-minded could apply for the ad- vanced two-year course. XYartiine limita- tions caused restrictions in lowa's military program, and the members of the basic R. U. T. C. unit may have been inferior in num- bers, but they were not inferior in quality. These underclassmen crammed into their minds all the knowledge they could absorb before entering the armed services of the Linited States. After ll weeks of intensive instruction in military courses. cadet platoon sergeants, cadet sergeants and cadet cor- porals were chosen, The responsibility placed upon these few students in the basic course was well justified. Basic R. O. T. C. students proved to be interested in the study of military tactics and capable of shouldering the responsibilities of army training. The interest in the R. O. T. C. was abnormally high at lowa because the members of the unit expected to make use of their military knowledge when they left school to serve with Uncle Samls lighting men in the field. Hats Off department: to Cadet Sergeant Richard K. Guthrie, lowa City. commanding the best squad: to Cadet Sergeant James Nl. Stewart, llvest Palm Beach, Fla., and Cadet Private Harry NI. Carroll. winners of the Chicago Tribmze medals. bflaj. lfarl O. Culver was director of R. O. T. C. at the University of lowa. First Lt. Kenneth K. Bennett and First l,t. llerbert Garrett were instructors of the basic R. U. T. C. unit. . DVA CED Pr.U.T.lI. ln April, 1943, the R. O. T. C. Ad- vanced Course students at the University were called to active duty with the United States army and were scattered among south- ern and Western army camps, where they completed infantry and engineer basic train- ing. There they gained knowledge concern- ing the swift construction of bridges and the laying of mine fields, plus the ability to carry out engineering projects under fire that is essential to a swift and well organized ad- vance or a strong defense. Some of the Ad- vanced Course students transferred to the air corps and others to tank destroyer officers' schools, although most of them remained with the Engineering Corps. Engineers play an important part in modern Warfare with their knowledge of engineering techniques and army tactics. After the former Advanced Course stu- dents had completed the basic training most of them were returned to the University in October, 1943. They were here to continue their military and academic training at the University while waiting vacancies in the Qllicers' Candidate schools. Additional col- lege courses which they completed at that time enabled several students to complete their degree requirements and to graduate. The experience and knowledge they gained at basic training centers developed them into competent instructors to assist in the military training given to other army units stationed here. First Lt. Herbert Garrett and Second Lt. Bernard VV. Aginsky were instructors of the men in the R. O. T. C. Advanced Course. HIGHLA UEH5 Doubting eyebrows were raised when Col. Zech decided to change the personnel of the Liniversity's traditional Scottish Highlanders from men to women because of the shortage of male students, but the response from the women was over- whelming. Shades ot Roh Roy, the women really went to town! They blew the pipes and beat the drums for one month's con- centrated practice, at the end of which they performed at the year's first football game. Their increase in membership of one- third over last year gave their 62 members undisputed title as the world's largest bagpipe band. Nlen established the High- landers as the University's "Black VVatch," because they wore the uniform of that famous Scottish regiment. The women car- ried on the Highlander tradition, but a more appropriate title for the Highlanders became "The Ladies from Hell." Organ- ized in 1937, the unit gained international reputation as the larg- est and most completely equipped bagpipe band in the United States. No lowa football game would be complete without the Highlanders with their brilliant uniforms and their bagpipe ver- sions of the University songs as well as Scottish airs. Pipe Major' VVilliam L. Adamson instructed and directed the Highlanders. Nfzljor flvdr- VV. Hllblwzlrd Lirutenzlnt Xvilliillll Potthaft R1-w...,,,K Lieutenant Frank I. Hzlvlivek Technician Fifth Grade Urnhrun Sergeant Cuvzlnaugh ff' ,ez, :ww K '-My Q a -X255 S' ..Q "i'Z 5 9?,Q K , Lg-135 .L 151 .ml ' f swff ff, Q: 5.513 1 , M., f ,Q .. 1 'Tis , ,. Staff Sergeant Skaggs, Staff Sergeant Edwards Sergeant lWatc-ra, Technical Sergeant johnson Sergeant Russell Stall Sergeant Smith, Staff Sergeant Christensen Staff Sergeant Adler, Technical Ser- geant lNIcGurn rpm!!! Mxweweewf Pfv. Tichenor qw A-we Bark rofw.' Reinmzm, Reed, Peterson, Fvanotlf, Stroud, illewkshury. Svrozzd row: Miller, Port, Bev- ington, Stone, Bowman, Von- Ilold, U'NeilI, Smith. Frou! 7'U1ZL'.' Best, Anderson, Peterson, Frvin, Musgrave, Lazarus, Goss. Platoon A-1, first on the recortl hooks of the pre-meteorology school, was one of the hnrtlcst working groups at the Commons. On thc athletic ficltl they rcfusctl to take 21 hack seat to any other group and were the win- ncrs of the Olympics, the most important phase of the year's inter-platoon competition. .lim Peterson swam sprints on the pre-meteorology swimming team :incl in the inter-platoon Olympics, in which the first platoon wulliecl away with all swimming honors, taking first place in all hut one cvcnt. An- other of the tlctachment's outstanding swimmers was Flight Lt. Ross L. Klillcr who won thc lowzi A. A. U. 221-yzircl free style swimming cham- pionship at Cctlar lfzills. Nlcmhcrs of the tlrill tczim wcrc: Wong Flight Sgt. lf. llziroltl Smith, l,eo R. Nlusgrzivc, anal .lim Peterson. Devon licvington was one of five checrlczulers anal 21 mcmhcr of the tumbling tczlm. whilc Alhcrt I.. Stone was one of the wing's top tcnnis players zmtl also ri ping-pong champion. FIRST PLATUU Bark rofw: VVarner, Skow, VVil- son, Lewandowski. Third' ro-w: Stine, Hanni, VVolFf, Tholls, Kreps, Johnson, Fei- gert. Szfrolzd row: Rowland, Kiwdle, Cox, Hayes, Rea, Perkins. 1-'irst rofw: Higbie, Easker, On- derdonk, YValIaee, Hyman, Beck. The second platoon has attained most of its fame on the athletic field and through extra-curricular activities. Nlembers claimed Championship titles in football, baseball, and drilling. These victories plus their record of linish- ing in either first, second, or third place in any inter-platoon competition gave the platoon first rank in the number oli points won in the inter-platoon meets. Representing the second on the wing basketball quintet xvere: James Hayes, Harry Lewandowski, and lidward W7allace. Harley Higbie was a member of the swimming team, while Robert Vvilson ran for the cross country team. Equally prominent was james Perkins who was high- est ranking math student in the detachment, having taken top honors in the block examinations. The second also supplied half ot the twelve drill team members and had several men in the dance and military bands, on the stall of the detachment's paper, and on the yearbook staff. On guard SEED D PLATUU Hafk rafwf Popovieh, Gyving Disher, Neal. Eskew, Faulds Gemmell. man, Nfiller. ris. From the ranks of the third platoon came both student wing commanders of the pre-meteorology detachment. who were Joseph G. Neal of llunting- ton, XY. Va., and George lf. Disher of VVinston-Salem, C., highest ol' the wing's student otlicers. Nlembers of the platoon who participated in athletic activities were Robert lfskew and John NI. Nliller who swam on the pre-meteorology swimming team. Serving as buglers and as members ol' the dance hand were Robert lf. Hayes of Shelbyville, Ind., and Raymond NI. lfastman ol' lies Nloines, lowa. lifastman also served on the 7'llIUlIit'l'- head stall. Platoon sergeant for the entire twelve months of the pre- meteorology course was David ll. Brunk of Nlanslield, Ohio. He and VValter llarris of Nlonrovia, Calill.. were members of the tumbling team and the cheerleading squad. ln the last ol' a series of inter-platoon compe- titions held during the year the third placed second in the Olympics held by the detachment. THIRD PLATUU All work . . . :md you know the IACSL u v Srrolzd r0ru.'.' Brnnk, Solvie, Su- sorney, Rickard, Nliller, Fast- Fronf rafwf Foote, Urooker, Dohne, Nlanther, Stokes, Har- Back rofw: Newport, Pence, Mackenzie, Kernodle, Jeffries, Schneider, XVooldridge. Second rofw: Lewis, Streissguth, Eibsen, Levy, Baughn, john- son. Front rorw: Zimmerman, Henry Matilt, Flattau, Oyer. VVith students and athletes outstanding in almost every phase of the pre- meteorology course, the fourth played an important part in the life at the Commons and helped make possible the successful records of the pre- meteorologists, both in the classroom and on the athletic field. Four men: Loren Jeffries of VVest Branch, lowag Carl Newport of Logansport, lnd.g Edmund Schneider of Corydon, Ind., and Karl Streissguth of lVlonroe, VVash., were members of the undefeated pre-meteorology basketball team, while Arville Woolritlge of Louisville, Ky., Was manager of the squad. Nlembers of the cross country team were Paul Qyer of Fort Xvayne, lnd., and Ernest Pence of South Bend, lnd. Oyer was also a member of the base- ball team and another position held by Pence was that of platoon sergeant. During their stay at the Commons, Earl Zimmerman of the fourth proved to be one of the most indispensable men at the Commons by the whole de- tachment. His job was the maintenance of the "coke" machine. Gentlemen at work PU HTH PLATUU FIFTH PLATUU Bark rofw: Dnnnington, John- son, Duncan, Knight. Second rofw: Miller, Pigg, Blytme, Horan, Hemstead. Fran! row: Kranth, Moses Mcliee, Slyby. The ranks of the fifth were depleted until only eleven of the original twenty-four members remained, but still the platoon Was one of the most active of the detachment. The fifth found its small size advantageous on the athletic field and proved to be one of the most persistent contenders for inter-platoon honors. Ernest Krauth was organizer and head of the tum- blers and cheerleaders who represented the detachment at football gamesg he was physical training gymnastics instructor and played for the pre- meteorology basketball team. Other outstanding members Were: Flight Lt. Howard Duncan, a member of the baseball teamg Bruce Dunnington, who swam on the pre-meteorology teamg Stephen C. Knight and George T. Pigg, who were both members of the military band. These and other active members of the Hfth who participated in the many different activities, proved their slogan "Little but Nlightyf' Victory for the fifth Bark 7'0'LL'.' Landes, MllCIl8l', Morris, Hannon. Tffirff rofwf Oyler, Steele, Ash- ley, VVallerstedt, I.emuns, Greenberg. .Yrrorzii row: Spencer, johnson, Bellamy, Boylan, Xvheatcraft, Cunningham. Fifif rofw: Goss, Free, Colley, lidwards, Lineberry. Under the leadership of Sgt. Charles Spencer of VVarren, Uhio, also a member of both the basketball and baseball teams, the sixth platoon became well known and well represented in the held of sports as well as other extra- curricular activities. Barton "Bucky" Greenburg, of Omaha, Nebr., swam breast stroke on the swimming team and was second only to Lt. Havlicek, coach of the team. VVilliam Edward of St. Louis, Mo., and Frank Free of IVIason City, Iowa, were both on the tumbling team. Edwards was also a cheerleader. NIembers of the Thzzmlerlzead stall from the sixth were Williain Boylan of Des IVIoines, Iowa, and Albert Gross of Nluscatine, Iowa. The sixth platoon was also well represented in the dance band and the military band. Roger IVIorris of VVooster, Ohio, Kenneth VVallerstedt of Des lVIoines, Iowa, and Richard Uhler of Frankfort, Ind., were mem- bers of both these organizations. SIXTH PL The army takes to the water. Back r0Q,L'.' Mclloiirnugh, Lind- hurg, Cottingham, liathgate, Frazier. Third rofw: Clonts, Shaefer, Hood, Soltesz, Kennedy, Nlil- ler, Hauser. Second rome: Ferguson, Novak, Noss, Trostel, Donovan, Kintz. Front 7'0'LU.' Nlontgomery, Cold St. Onge, Wlhite, Cook. v The seventh platoon was one of the largest platoons and ranked high hoth academically and athletieally in the wing. An outstanding member of the seventh was Alan Cook of Geneva, Ohio, who was editor of the bi- weekly 1l1I11lIlit'I'llt?dd. Others on his statt were: tlohn Nliller of South Charleston, XV. Va.: -loseph liintf of North Canton, Ohio: Rohert Novak of Cleveland, Ohio: and Franklin Nlontgomery of Tampa, Fla. Repre- senting the athletie ahility ol' the menihers in the seventh platoon were Robert Killian of Cetlar Rapids, lowa, who ran on the eross-country team: kYarren Limlhurg of Wiellshoro, lnal.: Billy Noss of Cleveland. Ohio, and Philip Froster of Nlarion, lntl., who were all memhers of the hasehall and haskethall teams. The seventh was letl hy platoon sergeant Charles Clonts. SEVENTH PL TUU W tszf ,V , Bark rofw: Borchardt, Scheig, Novak, Nolalider, Haverstoek Vllheeler, Thornberry, Steveni SOIL Sefond rofw: Leland, Slutzker, VVhanger, Cregar, Vrazd, VVickett. Front I'04'bC.' Kutchar, Stalnaker, Koppersmith, VVidlnk, Loy. Platoon sergeant Robert lVI. Stevenson of Kent, Ohio, was the competent sergeant of the eighth platoon throughout this year at the University. l'le also marched with the drill team as did James R. Whaixgei' of Huntington, VV. Va. Marvin R. Novak of Nlinneapolis, Nlinn., and Sanford Slutzker of Forain, Chio, were pitcher and catcher, respectively, on the detachment's baseball team. The eighth was well represented in the military band with members Willian1 L. Cregar of Brookfield, lll., George lrl. Leland of Glover, Vt., and George Vrazo of East Chicago, lnd. Participating on the tumbling team was Charles B. Haverstock of lVIinneapolis, lVlinn., who rep- resented the athletic ability of the eighth. Sheldon Kutcher of Toledo, Ohio, was a staff member of the bi-weekly Tlzzmdcrlzead. EIGHTH PL TDD ILIT HY BALL The biggest social event to occur for the ineteomlogists during their Stay at S. Lv. l. was the Nlilitary Ball which was held in the fall. Nlenibers of the detachment turned out en masse to attend their formal for which the entire luwa N'Iemoi'ial Lvniun was rented for the ocea- sion. llosts and hostesses of the ball were Nlaj. Clyde llub- bard, commanding Oflicer: Lt. lfrank Havlicek. adjutant, and Nlrs. Iilavlieek. H 0 n o 1' e d guests at the dance were the late Capt. lflanrahan and Nlrs. l'lanl'ahan: Cul. and bflts. Luke D. Zeehg Cnidr. and blrs. Fielder A. llonesg Capt. and Nlrs. Glenn R. Dixon: l,t. and bflrs. .'xI'lIl1ll1' Highland: Presi- dent and Nlrs. 'Virgil Nl. llaneher: Nlr. and lxflrs. l'l21l'I'y K. Newburng and NIV. and Mrs, Edwin N. Oberg. Nfusic for the dance was furnished by the detaehmenfs band, "The XXvC21fl1Cl'lHC11,U with vocalist Bobbie Cotter. The dance and programs were planned by a eoinniittee headed by Pvt. Nor- man S. Beck. Page 315 DRILL TEAM 9 yramn-- The pre-meteorology drill team, headed by Viling First Sgt. F. Harold Smith and VVing Cmdr. Gene Disher, was the result of an idea conceived by Disher and applied by Smith. The seventeen members of the outfit spent free evenings perfecting intricate maneuvers that were the result of grind- ing practice and split second timing. Appearances were made before the Triangle Club in the Union, at an Air Nledal presentation, and between halves of the Seahawk-Army football game. Qrganized and conducted under the capable direction of Albert Ham, formerly With Artie Shaw, the Vifeathermen became a Well known campus band, drawing at "Campus Capersll the biggest dance crowd the Union has held since Kay Kyser played there. Nfembers rehearsed entirely on their own time and played for the USG, the Nleteorologists' lVIilitary Ball, sev- eral sorority and fraternity functions, and made a broadcast over XVSUI. WEATHEHMA lk, 'Fur .M 35, 259' S -Q iv? In Vs '-464 OIENISI NKXX PIIOIWIHRAPIIF The Pre-Flight phase of Naval Aviation Training provides ea- clets military, physical, mental development for Naval flying. The Navy Vllings of Gold repre- sent months of Spartan prepara- tion, to make the Navy pilot thc toughest in the world toclay. Navy Pro-Flight School Maker of Worlds Touohost Combat Flyers The Navy's Prc-Flight School in Iowa City on the SUl Campus was commissioned April 15, 1942. Commantlcd by Capt. E. D. VVashhurn, Jr., USN, it has trained over 10,000 Avia- tion Cadcts, many of them now flying the Navy's great combat ships against the Axis. Abrams, Muriel ....... Ackerman, Morris 97 .............. 246 Ackerson, Frederic ,.... ........ 1 66, 246 Adair, Alice ..,............. ............. 2 24 Adair, Dorothy ................ .......... 1 19 Adams, Bruce ........... Aginsky, Lt. Bernard .......1O0 ..........294 Ahman, Edward ......,....... .......... 2 69 Ahrendsen, Lowell ..,.,. .......... 2 46 Albers, Millard ....... .......... 2 69 Alder, Beryl ...,..... .......... 2 80 Alder, Sgt. ......... . .....,.... 307 Allee, Arthur ....... .......... 2 46 Allen, Hoyt ........ ...,........,. 2 70 Allen, Margie ...... 80, 148 Allen, Marjorie ....... ............. 2 46 Allen, Robert ........... .......... 2 67 Allender, Robert ..... Aller, Virginia ,..,. Alm, Virginia .,.,.. Babcock, Beverly .,... Bachman, Betty Bailey, Sarah ....... Baird, A. Craig ...... Baird, VVilliam ,,,,..,..,.,.... Baker, Barbara .............., Baldridge, Patricianne 108, 109, 110, 116, Baldwin, Betty jean ...... Baldwin, Irene ,.., .,..,........,.,............ .... Baldwin, Jane ...... ........144, ..........269 ,......1110, 112 .....148 .....140 ,....159 90, 97 .....269 140 117, 14s 164 9 125 246 Q 'J 1 DEX 14575 X il ff A is for Artists, A motley crew. We carft understand The work that they do! A Alpha Chi Omega ,........140, Alpha Delta P1 ............. .......... 1 42, Alpha Kappa Kappa ........................ Alpha Xi Delta .,.............,.......... 144, Altfillisch, Gretchen..l16, 121, 156, Ames, June .......,.................................. Anderson, Donavieve ........................ Anderson, Douglas ...... ........ Anderson Dr. E. ...,.., ....... . Y Anderson, George ..... ........ Anderson, Jane ............ ........ Anderson, John ............... ........ Anderson, Dr. L. D. .,.... ....... . Anderson, M. H. ........ ........... . Anderson, Ruth ......... ............... 1 51 Anderson, Shirley ......... .......... 1 59, Anderson, VVilliam ...... ............... Annis, Daryl ,,............. ................... Anthony, Gladys ...... ......... 1 25, 9 Y iii 5.1 . 1.,,.X B is for basketball, Our boys are tough. Men they would be, If they were old enough. B Ballinger, Carter ....... ................. Balster, joan ........., 19, Balster, Mary ...... ........ 1 17, 119, Baltz, Charlene .................................. Banks, Peggy ........................ 85, 97, Barbour, William ...... 185, 187, 246, Bardill, Janice ...... 71, 113, 117, 173, Bardolph, Marilius .......................... Bare, Luella ...............,...................... Barnes, Howard VV. .... ............ . Barnett, Helen .....,.. ....,.....152. Arkin, joy Dean ..... Armbruster, Betty ....... Armbruster, David .... Armour, Jane .................. Armour, Thompson ........ Armstrong, Elaine ....... Armstrong, Lloyd .,..... Arnold, Harriet .......... Arrasmith, Ella Irene Art Gulld ........................ Arzberger, Robert ....... Ashley, Darrell ........ Ashton, Gladys ...... Ashton, Ned ...... Askew, Nancy ........ Atherton, Anita .......... Atwater, Marjorie ....... Auchter, Harry ......... Austin, Shirley ...... Ayers, Anne ...... Barngrover, Kathryn Barngrover, Margaret ...... Barrett, Clarence ,,..... ......... ...Q1f2'iE, .1f.QQfz2'3, ..Qf147, jffffiii, ...fIiEE, 121, 132, 122, 246, Bartell, Bette Rae .............................. Bartell, Robert ......... Bartlett, Patricia ...,.. Bartells, Benna ......... Bartow, Edward ..... Bastron, James .......... Basuk, Jeanne ............... Bateman, Rolley, jr. ..,.. . ffQfiE9, ........246, Page Bathgate, VVilliam .,... .,.,,,,, 3 14 Bauer, VVilliam ........... ....,... 1 27 Baughman, VVilliam ..... ..,,,,,, 1 92 Baughman, James ..... ......., 2 71 Baughn, Jack ,,,.......,.. ...........,,,,,,, 3 11 Bean, Dorothy Jo ..... ...............,..,,, 1 48 Beard, Elsie .,.........,.. ..,..,.........,........, 2 83 Beattie, Anita ...Y.. ......... 8 5, 133, 148 Beatty, Mary .... ..,....,..... 1 44, 247 Beck, Norman .......... ............... 3 09 Becker, Dorotha ......... ,................. 2 47 Backman, Charles ...... ...,..... 2 47, 269 Beebe, Kenneth ........ ............... 2 47 Beecher, Sgt. .......,....... ........... 2 93 Behounek, Virginia ....... ........ 1 29 Belko, Adeline ........... .,...... 1 19 Bell, Lorain ..................... ........ 2 83 Bellamy, Hayward ...,,., .,.,,.,. 3 13 Bennett, Chester ..,,,,,.. ,.,,.,.. 2 70 Bentz, Robert ,,,,,.. ,,,,,,,, 2 18 Berg, Clarence ..... ........ 1 35 Berg, John ..,.,........ ,....... 2 70 Berg, Marjorie .,,..... ........,,. 1 55 Berg, Obed ,............. ............... 2 76 Bernatz, Philip E. ..,,.. ..,,,,,,, 2 47, 269 Berry, Leeta ............ ..,.........,...,.,., 2 47 Best, Joseph .........,,. ,....,.,...,,,,,,,.....,, 3 08 Bestor, Marjorie ................ 109, 129, 173 Beta Gamma Sigma ....,,......,.,,.,,..,..., 115 Bevan, Betty ................ .......... 1 19, 155 Bevington, Devon ..... .,,,,....,. 3 08 Beye, Cyrus ,,..,....,.... ,,,,,... 2 69 Beyer, George .,..... .,,,,.,, 2 70 Bickel, Marjorie ,.,,.. ,,.,,,,,,,, 2 80 Bickel, Mary E. .,.,,.,,.,,,1,,, ,.,,,,,,,,,,,,, 2 47 Bidwell, Barbara ...... ,.............. . 224, 247 Biebesheimer, Dr. Jerome .,,,.,,,,,,,,,,, 277 Bill, Mary E. ,,..,..,,,.,,,.,,,,,..,.,, ,,,,,,,,,,,, 1 43 Billick, Donna .,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 122, 247 Billick, Ned ....,., ,,,.,,.,.,,1,,. 1 22 Caddock, Earl ......... ,,....... 2 48, 269 Cahalan, Gerald ......,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 2 77 Callaghan, Ambrose .,,,1 ,, ,,.,,,1-.,,,,, 269 Callen, Joseph .......,,.,,...,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 135 Camp, Marjorie ,,,......,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,. 221 Campbell, Doris ......,,.. 117, 128, 220, 248 Campbell, Jack M. ...,,,,,,,,,,,,,,1,,,,,,,,,,,, 248 Campbell, Richard ...,.. ,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, 2 7 0 Carani, Louise ,..,,,,, ,,,,,,,, 1 44 Carlson, Donald ...... ,,,,,,,, 2 88 Carlson, Dorothy ,,..,,,, ,,,,,,,- 2 48 Carlson, Emmett C, ....... ..,.,,.. 2 48 Carlson, Norma Jean ,.........,............. 280 Carmichael, David ........,,.,,.,.,,,,,,,,.... 271 Carmichael, Capt. William H. ........ 294 Carns, Charles L. ..,,,.....,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 127 Carpenter, Dortha Jean ,,.,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,, 248 Page 323 Billings, Eleanor 1...... ,... Bird, Doris .................,.,. Birdsall, Sally .,.,. ,...... Bishop, Betty ........ ..... Blackwood, Lois Blair, Donald ,.,...... Blair, Marjorie ...... Bland, Barbara .....,. Blase, Joan ............ Blazer, Patricia ...... Bliss, VVilliam ..... Block, Connie ...... Blong, Joseph ...,.. Bloom, Clara L. Blytme, Kenneth Boddicker, Dr. Vernon Bogie, Warren ............. Bolle, Elva .,...,.....,.,.,.. Bolser, Margaret ...... Boltz, Beverly ........, Bonn, Dorothy ........... Borchardt, Robert ...... Bordwell, Percy ..... Bordy, Betty ..,..... Bordy, Reva ....,. ........ 1 38, Born, Marilee .,.,., Bowlin, Jean ......., Bowlsby, Jean ......... Bowman, Lloyd ....1 Bowman, Maxine ...... Boyce, Alyce .....,..... Boylan, William ....,... Bradley, Lt. John ...... Bradrick, Harlan ...... Brammer, Bruce ........ QIf9'5," ...147 .97 92, 99 1 fffffff12i 7 156 .,.125 v 247 156 ...140 ............156 ....,,,119 .......266 1 v 152 269 ...172 .........247 ...155 .. ......... 312 ...,...,.277 247, 267 .........224 .....,...163 ............143 .......220 y 224 15 .,..,....160 160, 247 52 159, 247 .........125 ........,313 .........295 .........277 .......,,276 Brannaman, Louise ...... ,............... 2 47 Braucht, Shirley ......... ..,.,., 1 44, 247 Brauer, Walter .............. .......,..,, 2 76 Braxmeier, Luke .............,. ....,..,, 2 76 Brenklander, Lawrence ........,127 j ccigilr, 111' 1 Q9 l C is for Co-eds Whose intellectual vocab Consists of "Well, he said And other such blah. C Carpenter, Marilyn Carpenter, Ruth ..,....,. Carson, Dorothy ...., Carson, Elaine ,...,... Carson, Patricia ........ Carter, Helen Kae ........ Carter, Lewis ..,............. n 248 248 136 ..........133 1 .........145, 248 248 163 276 Carpenter, Mary Lu ....... Carroll, Capt. ...,.,....,.... . Caslavka, John ........, Casey, Anne ...,. Cass, Virginia ...... Castner, Lillian Cates, Yvonne ..,...... Cavanaugh, Sgt. Clayton, JoAnn ....... Clonts, Charles ....... 152 293 .........,152 220 1 213 224 152 224 128 306 249 314 Bresnahan, George ...... Bridge, Frances ,.,...,,.,.,...,...,,.... Briggs, Bernadine .............,,,..,., Brink, Richard ,,,,,...,,,, 124, 127, Brlnker, Janet .......................,,.,.. Brinker, Elizabeth ...................... Brody, Elaine ..,........... 34, 160, Brooker, Brown, Brown, Brown, Flora M. ..... . Dorothy Gene ,,,....,.,.., Elinor Joan Warren ..,,,.,,...,,.,..,,,.,. 213, 1521 157, 164, Brown, Luella ......1. ,.,.,..,.,,.., Brown, Lyle ............... ....... 2 16, Brown, Marjorie ......,.,..,..,..,.,.,.,,.,,.,.. Browning, Margaret 85, 86, 112, 121, Brunk, David ..,,,.....................,.....,,.. Brunson, Jean ...........,....,...,t,,,,,, 143, Brush, Mary ,,.,.., ,,,,,,,,,,, Brutus, Joan ..,........ ,..... 8 5, Bryan, Alvin W. ...... ........ 2 37, Buchtel, Frances ,,...... .......,...,, Buck, William ........,,.,. .,...., Buckner, Elizabeth .,........................ Buckwalter, Richard L. ........... . Buoy, Mildred ..... .85, 112, 128, Burdick, Margaret ...,......,.......... Burger, Mildred ...,.,,,.....,,,,.,,,,,,, Burgess, Beverly ........ Burke, Edmund ...... Burke, Francis ..,.,.,,.,,,,......,..,,.,. Burma, Betty 1 ..,.,....,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,, Burnett, Tannye .......... 85, 148, 130, 152, 224, Burney, Martha ..,....,...,....,....,..., 131, Burns, Dorothy Louise ....,.,.,,,.. Burstein, Richard ....,.,., ..,. Buser, Donald .......,.., ..,,,., Butler, Janet Sue ......... ..., Butterfield, Marjorie ,.,... .... 246 Byrne, Anne .................. .,,,,. 8 6, Cederstrom, Doris Mae ...... Central Party Committee ................ Cerny, Howard .......................... Chabal, V1ctor ............. Chambers, George ,....,, Chan, Irene ................ Chance, Joan ................ Chanen, Frieda ............... 112, 152, 138, Chappell, Martha Mae ...... ........... Chi Epsilon .,.,..,....,.......... Chi Omega ,................... Christian Council ...... Chinn, Gerald K. ..,... . Christensen, Harriet ....,. Christensen, Sgt. ...1...... . Christie, Jean ............ Christie, Jeanne ..,..,.. 146, 119, 218 155 247 135 131 247 247 270 144 147 248 224 248 172 155 310 248 152 248 277 280 277 147 248 248 163 248 119 269 288 132 248 144 144 248 276 152 144 148 249 112 120 249 266 133 249 160 121 130 147 132 249 280 307 172 151 Crissinger, Dr. D. L. 1 Chrysler, Jeannette ...... ......... S 7, 159 Clapnp, Phillip G. .,.... ............. 1 05 Clark, Carol ....,.. .......v........... 2 24 Clark, June ,..,.. ....................... 1 56 Clave, Ralph .,..... 166, 266 267 Clewell, Robert ...,,,, ,....,.....,.........,, 2 76 Clifford, Peggy ....... ......... 1 08 Clinton, Barbara ....,. ....,.... 1 48 Clinton Place .....,. ......,,. 1 72 Coder, Janetta ..... .,...,....... 2 80 Cofhn, Helen ............. .......... 1 44, 164 Coffman, Barbara ..................,,.......... 249 Cohen, Betty ............ ......... 1 28, 160, 249 Cohen, Cecille ..... ...........,,.,.....,.. 1 60 Cohen, Lorraine .,... ......... 1 38 Cody, Bob ........... ............. 1 08 Colby, Bette ..... ....... 1 73, 249 Colley, VVayne .......,.... .313 Cole, Betty ........,.. .,....... 1 43 Cole, John V. .,.... .....,.., 1 27 Cole, Theodore .... ......... 2 69 Cole, Robert .....,..... ......... 2 77 Coleman, George ...... .....,.., 1 35 Dackstader, Sybil .... ...................... 1 25 Daniels, Jean ....,..,., 128, 159, 249 Danner, Dave ...,..... 185, 193, 207 Darby, Dean ...........,.. ...................... 2 77 Daugherty, Charles .,.... ....... 2 49, 288 Daughton, Margaret ............ 129 Daut, Richard ..,,....,....... ......... 2 70 Davenport, Marshall ....,..., 276 Davis, Clint .,.,....,....... ............ 2 76 Davis, Ellen ............. ......... 8 5, 140 Davis, Emmie Lou ..,.,... ............ 2 80 Davis, 1. E. .........,.,... .,..... i ss, 214 Davis, Shirley ......... ....,.... 1 60 Davis, VVilliam .......,.. ............ 2 76 Dawson, Francis M. ....... 130, 236 Day, Rose .,,,,,.,..,,,,.,,.,, ............. 1 52 Deardorff, Jane ....... ......... 1 40 Dee, Doris ,......,,... ......,.. 1 25 Dehn, Alice ,,,................ ......,.. 1 72 DeJarman, James ..., ...,..,.. 2 77 deliinsky, MaryVonne ....., ,........ 1 26 Collier, Jean ....... ....... 9 9, 131 Comfort, Betty .. ....... ...151 Commack, Lois ....,........... ....... 2 24 Comstock, Charles R. .... ....... 2 49 Conkling, Russell ..... ....... 2 69 Conley, Francis ...,.. ....... 2 71 Contnam, John .,..., .......... 2 68 Cook, Alan ....,... .............. 3 14 Cook, Elizabeth ,,,,, ........ 1 59, 249 Coons, Louise ,,., ............. 1 20 Cooper, Dean ..... .....,, 2 71 Coppedge, Alma .... ....... 1 26 Cord, Joyce ............ .....,.... 1 44 Corder, Lois B. .... ......,....,. 2 41 Cords, Mildred ........ ......., 1 43, 249 Corton, Richard ....... ............. 2 69 Cotter, Barbara ....,......,... ........ 1 44, 249 Cottingham, Donald .,.... .............. 3 14 Covert, Catherine ,,,,..,. ........ 1 31, 249 Cowan, Lewis ........... ............. 2 69 Cox, Gerald B. ...... ........ 1 27 130 Cox, Robert ......... ............. 3 09 C ZX ClWl lj D is for Dance. Prerequisite: rhythm. Unfortunately some Just ain't got it in 'em. D DelCastillo, Lilia ..... ............. 1 26 Delta Delta Delta ...... ....... 1 48, 149 Delta Gamma ........... ....... 1 50, 151 Delta Sigma Delta .,,.,., ............. 2 77 Demetroulis, Nicholas .... ............. 2 18 Denkmann, Betty ,,,,,,,,, ........ 1 29, 140 Dennis, Miriam ....... ....,..... 1 33 Derry, Virginia .,.. ....... 1 63 Devine, Glenn ...... ....... 1 85 Dewitt, George .,....... ..,.... 2 49 Dice, Guy Kenneth ........ .......... 2 49 Diebold, Bonnie Mae ......, ............. 1 56 Diercks, Clinton ..,....................... 250, 276 Diggs, David ......,,.,.... 108, 112, 250, 276 Dill, Homer R. ..... . Dillavou, Betty .,.,., .......172 Dillinger, Dan .......,. ....... 1 20 Disher, George ......,..... ....... 3 10 Dittbrenner, Barbara ...... ....... 1 43 Dixon, Major .............. ....... 2 93 Doerres, Eileen ...... ....... 1 44 Dohne, Manuel ..,,.. .,,...,310 Cozad, James ........ .......,.185, 192 Crandall, Jack .,.......... .....,1....... 2 67 Crawford, L. C. ..,........... ,...... 1 30 Crawford, Mrs. Stella ..-.--.- --.-.....-- 1 52 Cregar, VVilliam .,........... .................. 3 15 Cretzineyer, Charles ...... ........ 2 66, 269 Crews, Marian ..,...........,... ....... 8 6, 159 Crist, Cha rles .,.....,...... Crockett, Jacqueline ,..... Crooker, Edward ........... .....,.....276 ........,155 1 249 Crowl, Mary Ellen ..................,. 151, 249 Cruickshank, Mrs. R. D. .........-........ 159 Culhane, Eileen .............,.... 119, 122, 249 Culhane, Mary ..... Culver, Major ......, Cumming, Janet .......... Cunningham, Fred ........,............ .......293 ,...,..221 Cu rn es, Ronald .......................,... Currier Hall .......,...... 173 Curtis, Lucille ....... ................... Curtis, Ruth F. .... . Custard, George ...... Dolphin Fraternity ..,,.. Donahoe, Clare ..,.,... Donahoe, Virginia ...... Donavon, Kathleen ...,... Donovan, Robert .,..... Doolittle, Jean ....... Doran, Ralph ....... Dornfeld, Clinton ..... Dorr, Mary Alice .,... Downing, Jean ............ 13 277 176 4, 175, ......,..224 156 ...,...124 ........119, Doyle, Bette Jeanne ....... ........ 1 51, Ducharme, Virginia ...., Duffy, James P. ..,.., . Duncan, Howard ,.,.. Dunn, Justin ....,.....,.. Dunn, Lois Ann . ....... Dunnington, Bruce ......,. Dunnington, Dr. Durst, Mark .....,.,.,,...,. Duvall, Ellen .....,. Dysart, Donald ,,....., L.L. .... . .......,250, Page 217 156 250 143 314 250 213 135 156 155 250 152 267 312 277 148 312 124 276 221 268 324 Easker, Charles .,...... Eastman, Ray ....... Ebinger, Ed .......... Eckhart, Corrine ...... Eckhardt, Betty ,....,.. Ecroyd, Donald ..,...... ..QQQfii5," 98, 99, Edaburn, Elizabeth ...... ...........,...... Eddy, Ruth .....,.......,... ..., Edwards, Sgt. .....,... . Edwards, William ..... Eggers, Kathryn ...... Eibsen, Richard ......,...,. Ekelmann, Dorothy ....., Fais, Oswill ........,., Falk, William .....,. Faris, Betty Lou ...... Farrell, Maureen .,..,.. Faulds, Dale ,.....,,.,., Feigert, Richard ...... Feldick, Harley ........ Feller, Bernadine ....... Felton, Aline ...,...,.... Fenton, Ralph ......, Ferguson, Jean , .,...... .. Ferguson, Marion . .......... Ferguson, Robert ..,,..,,.,,,,, Fesenmeyer, Richard Fewel, Marjorie .......,.. Field, Charles ..,....... Feinsilver, Sonia ......... Filkins, Lida ,,,,,,,A,,,,,,,,,,, Fillenwarth, Florence Fine, Evelyn .,.............. First, Mable ..... Page 325 ir News E is for Engineer, That bright, social lad Who studies four years Then works for his dad, E Eliason, Robert ........,..... ......... Eliason, Thomas ...... Elkema, Betty Jean Ellerbroek, Wallace Ellertson, Leonard .. Ellis, Shirley ..........,.,.,...,,,........... 250, Ellison, Mary Grace .......... 133, 152, Ellsworth, Ralph E. ...................,....,.. . Ems, Margaret ......,... .......... 1 34, Engel, John ............. Engleman, Nancy .... Eno, Fred ................. Erickson, Jean ............ . .....,... ......... Ein f -Camp ,Q 8 6 if F is for Freshmen, Naiue tots, all right! It's rumored they study On Saturday nite! F Fisch, Edwin J. .,...,. , Fischer, Howard ........ ......,.. Fischman, Joanne ,..... ....... . . Fischman, Mimi ..... Fisher, Maxine ....,.. Fishkin, Pauline .,....,......... 133, 160, Fitzpatrick, Matthew R. ..,....... 250, Flattau, VValter .,........................,....... Fleming, Charlotte .........,. Fleming, Eunice .,..... ....... 1 36, Fleming, Merle Flodin, Margo ....... Focht, Helen ,.....,..,. ,......132, Foerster, Norman .... Fonda, Robert ......... Foote, Leslie ........,.. 276 250 250 250 269 283 250 240 170 250 172 196 152 127 185 160 160 250 250 269 311 250 251 136 155 117 24-0 276 310 156 Foote, Mary ...,..,....,.. ......... Fonteine, Marilyn ,... ...,..... Forbes, Marilyn ..... Forbes, Shirley ....... Ford, John .,...,.,.... .,.....185, 111 156 156 196 Ericson, Rose ........,. .,.. Erivin, James ............... Ernest, Dorothy Lee .,.,.. Eskgw, Robert ......, 159 Essley, Joan .............,. Evanoff, Evan .............................,. Evans, Jennie 87, 108, 109, 116, Evans, Ray .......................,........... Evans, Robert ...,..................,,....... Ewing, Lorraine ....... ............. Eychene, Juliette .,...., ..,,.,.,...... Eyler, Marcia .,.., Forslund, hflary ,. Fortun, Ruth ....... Foss, Eugene .,..... Foster, Charles ...... Foster, John ..,...... Fowler, Vivian ...,.. A .....,.. 281, 5 Fraher, Patricia . ..,.. .. Francescon, Paul ,....... Franey, William ...........,..........,.. Frankhauser, Keith Franklin, Jeanne ...... 70, 85, 90, Franks, Louise ,,...... Frazier, Harold 112 Free, Frank ...,.....,.........,..........,.... 251 Frev, Harry ......,......... 185, 195, Fridell, Glen ...,,...................,........ Fritchen, Marjette ,.,.... ..,..... 1 10 Fromm, Marilyn ........ ...... Frve, Beatrice , .,.... , ,..... . Fu-erste, Frederick Fulliam, Elizabeth ..,,... Gaddis, Marie ............. .,,..,., 1 70, 251 Gallagher, William ....... ......., 1 85, 188 Gamma Phi Beta ....... .,,,,,,, 1 52, 153 Garhar, Pauline .,,,...,,, ,,,,,,,,,.,,, 1 60 Garfield, Charlotte .. ,,,,,,4,,, 134 Garland, John ........... ,,.,,.,,., 2 71 Garms, Ellen ............ ..,......, 1 48 Garrett, Lt. Herbert ..,,,. ,,,,1,,,,, 2 95 Garrett, Martha ....,..... ,,,,,,.,,, 1 S6 Garwood, Betty ,,.,.,, ,,,.,,,,,,,,v 1 72 Gatton, Imelda ..,...,,. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,, 1 S2 Gehling, Victor .,.,,,,. ,,,,,,,4 2 51, 263 Geiger, Wilma ..... ,,,.,,,,,,,,, 1 25 Gemmell, Ivan ..,...,, ,.,,,,,,,, 3 10 Gensicke, Edith .,,,,. ,,,,,,,,., 2 80 Gentleman, Nancy ..-,,, ,,,,,,,,,.,,, 1 47 Gerke, Barbara ,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,, 1 44, 251 Gianedakis, Irene ,,1,,,1, ,,.,,,,,,,,,, 2 S1 Giblin, Ruth ..1,.,.,,,,., .,,,,,.,,,,,,1v,, 2 24 Giles, Jacqueline ,,..., ,,,,.,1, 1 22, 144 Gillespie, Patricia ...... ..,....,,,,,, 1 48 Gillespie, Ray .,,,.,,,,, ,,,,,,,1,, 1 85 Gilligan, George ,,,,. .,,,.,,,,, 2 51 Gilman, Anne ..,,...,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,, 1 43 Gilman, Caroline 1,,..,., ,,,,,,,,,,,,, 2 81 Gilson, Nancy .....,.,,,, .,,,,,, 8 6, 155 Gittins, Jeanne ...,. ,,,.,,,,,, 1 56 Hadded, Benjamin .,,.,. ,,,,,,,,,, 2 67 Hade, Marilyn ......... ,,,.,.,,,, 1 44 Hageleen, Maurice ...... ...........,........ 1 85 Hagge, Donald ......... ........................ 2 70 Haigler, Dorothy .............. 121, 129, 140 Hainline, Richard ..,.,,,,.,,.,, 112, 251, 277 2- ,,, 1 Z 9 W lm lt 1 ix jig? G is for the Greek Who started it all. The old guy was certainly Right on the ball! ' G Glasener, Paul ........... .......... 1 85, 187 251 Glaser, Harriet ...... Glasscock, Janet ......... Glassman, Marilyn ...... Glasson, Gilbert ......... Glenn, Robert ......... .........13s, ........160 Glentzer, Marilyn ..... ...................... 1 59 Glockler, Frances ................ 121,135, Godfrey, Mary E. ..... ..........,.......... . Goenne, Richard ....... Gokbora, Ahmet .,,,. Gold, David ............... Goldapp, Dorothy ..,.. Goldberg, Marilyn ,,,,.... Goldfein, Rosemary ...... Gordon, Shirley ............ 152 251 .. .......... 269 ........185 14 ........14-0 ........134 ....,.,.133 ....,...133 Goss, Albert ........... ............... 3 13 Goss, Dale ........ .......,.....,.... 3 08 Gottsch, Joe ..... ......... 2 16, 217 Gottsch, John ............,,........................ 217 Grafton, James ..,..,.,..,.,,.,.......,..,,...,,. 208 Graham, Tech. Sth Grade .,.............. 306 Grams, LaVerne ................,..... ,....... 2 71 Grant, Lee .,.,...,....,,,,,.. .,....,....,,,. 1 29 Grant, V. Eulalie ..,.... .................. 1 72 Grau, Doris .........,.,.................... 129, 251 59 f - Ill H is for Health, And we offer to you A sweet, co-aid beauty- So run catch the flu! H Haiston, Joan .....,..,,.,. ........,,.......,.... 1 40 Haitz, Roberta ...................,................ 148 Halboth, Donald ...........,..,. 120, 131, 132 Hall, George ....,,..,. ............. 1 34, 170 Hall, Marjory .,.... .,.......... 7 6, 155 Haller, Mary .,,.,.. .....,.,.. 1 43, 251 Gray, Dorotha ....... ...................... 9 7, 99 Gray, Gloria ......... ......... 1 19, 151, 251 Grayson, Judith ....... .......,,.............. 2 51 Greenberg, Barton ....... .. ............. 313 Greer, Dorothy ......... ......... 1 44 Greetan, Nadine ....... .,....... 1 12 Gregg, Mary .......... ......... 1 52 Gregg, Jack ..,...,..... ......... 2 67 Gresslin, Robert ....... ....,.... 2 77 Grey, Mary Helen ....... ......,.. 1 55 Griepenburg, Pearl ............................ 143 Griflin, Richard .....,............................ 251 Grissel, Lois .......1 109, 113, 116, 117, 148 Gross, Carol E. ............................ 97, 173 Gross, Sally ...................,...................... 160 Gross, Sidney ............... ......... 2 S1 Grossklaus, Frances ......., .. .......... 280 Grothys, Joseph ....,...... ..........,......... 1 85 Grueskin, Doris ........ ......... 1 38, 160 Grundahl, Alvin ....,,..,., ,...,,,,.,,.,.1,,,,1 2 66 Grundy, Dorothea ............ 110, 111, 148 Guernsey, Mrs. Arthur .,......,....,,,,...., 140 Gunn, Geraldine ..,...,,...,..,,.,,...,,,.,,,,,, 140 Gusman, Marian .,,,...,.... ,....,,.. 1 60 Gustafson, Robert ,,.,...,.,...... .,...,,,, 2 70 Gutenkauf, Charles H. ...... .....,... 2 68 Gyving, Robert .,.,............ .....,-,, 3 10 Halsey, Elizabeth ...... Ham, Margaret ....... Hamilton, Louise ......... Hamilton, Prudence ....... Hamilton, William ...... Hammer, Nadine . ,... . ........221, 116, 266, .........86, Page 224 159 143 151 270 159 326 Hancher, Virgil M. ...... ........ 2 30, Hancock, Jean .............. .............. Handler, Donne ............. Hangartner, Bernita .... . Hankin, Lois . .............,. Hannr, John ............. ....... 8 5, Hannon, John ....... Hansen, Lois ......... ..........313 .....,....281 Hansen, Skuli ........... ................. Hanske, Edward ....... ........................ 2 68 Hanson, Kathleen .............................. 151 121, 155 Hardie, Jean ......,......... 97, 108, Hardiman, Milton ..............,.............,. 126 Hardin, Wayne ....... Hardy, Eleanore ....... 251, Harkness, Louise .......................... 72, Harmeier, Catherine ....,....... 97, 112, Harmon, Commander ...,.................... 202 Harmon, Phyllis ..........,,.. ......... 1 73, 252 Harness, William ....... .....,.. 2 52, Harney, Gloria ............... ................. Harper, Dr. Earl E. ...... ......... 1 08, Harper, Shirley ............... .............. Harrington, Mrs. Rex ..................,,.... Harris, Fern ..,................. ........ 1 31, Harris, Lucile ............., .,............ Harris, Walter ............. .......... Harrison, Lawrence ........... .............. Hartman, E. Virginia .,....................,. Hartz, Phoebe .,.............,.. ........ .129, Harvey, Mary Jane .....,. .............. 1 44 Hasselman, Leona ........ Hatcher, Harold R. ............... ....,.... . Hauser, George Frieberts ........ ..... . . Haverstock, Charles ..........,... Havlicek, Lt. Frank J. .... . Hawbecker, Lorraine ..... Hayden, Milford ........ Hayes, James .......,.. . ,........... ........ Hayes, LeRoy J. ....... ....................... . Hayes, Roy .......................... 252, 266, Hays, Doris .....................,,,.................. Hayworth, Ballard ..... ......,.,... 2 52, Hea, Hope .................... Heck, Kenneth E. ....... ........ 2 52, Heckman, Carol .............. .............. Hedges, Phyllis ................... .......... Heidenreich, Mrs. Viola ...... Heilman, Robert ........,........ Heinrich, Milton ............. Iabor, Rodman ......, . Ilgen, Constance ....... Information First ........ Inglis, Dorothy ..... Page 327 Herse, Catherine .......,. ................... Heller, Davis E. ....... .......... 2 52, Hempstead, Gus ........ ............... Hennessey, John ......... ............ Henry, Barbara ........ Henry, Richard ........................ Hensleigh, Helen Lee 109, 116, 117, 121, Herbst, Edna .............,.......... ...... 131, 111, Hermanson, Helen ................... ........... Herrald, Helen ........... ....... Herren, Dorothy .,.,..... Herrick, Dorothy .......... 113, Herrick, Margie ................ ........ Herrick, Dr. Percy W. ....... ....... . Hertzler, Jack ................... ........ Herwig, Lloyd , ...... .,........ ........ Herzog, Fred ......................... ........ Hesselschwerdt, Donald ..... ............ Heston, Emma Lou ..,.,..... ...... 1 44, Hetfield, Lois .............. ........ Hicks, Edgar ........... Higbee ,Fredric ..... Higbee, Harley ....... Higgs, Mary Lou ....... ............ Highlanders ..........,.. ............... Hlgley, Dr. L. B. ....... . ..,......,.... 120, Hilfman, Louise 85, 97, 93, 99, 112, Hill, Betty ............................................ Hill, Doris .......,........,........................... Hillel Foundation ...... Hines, Eileen ........... Hines, Mildred ........ ............ Hipple, Mary Lou ..,,. ....... 143, Hirleman, Hal ....... ............ Hirleman, Ray .,..... Hixon, Ernest ...... Hoag, Patricia ....... ................... Hoak, Florence ....... ...................... Hoak, Virginia ....,..1.......,.... 128, 151, Holfmann, Eugene ...,........,,................ Hoffman, Geraldine .............. 76, 133, Hoffman, Yvonne ..... ............ 8 6, Hoines, Elder .....,... ............... Hold, John Von ...,..., ............ Holland, Donna M. ..... ........ 8 5, Holst, Mary Jean ...... ...................... Holt, Joan ................ ....... 8 6, 133, fs wr, I ' X , I is for Ignorance, A half-witted creature. When you think he's extinct, He pops into the picture. I Home Economics Club Homan, Merle ................. ........ 2 16, 252 314 Hood, Harry .................... Hoops, William .................................. 270 Hoover, Martha Hobson ............ 119, 253 144 Hope, Islea .......................................... Hoper, Marian ............................ 121, 131 Hopkirk, Kathryn .............. 131, 155, 253 Horak, Jean Marier ............................ 140 Horan, James .. .......... .. Horn, Marjorie ........ Horne, Robert ........... Horowitz, Janet .......... 253 ........151, . ............ 277 ........,....147 Hosford, Clarence R. ..... ........ 2 53, 276 156 Hospers, Helen ............ Hostetler, Gordon ........ House, Doris Ruth ..,... Houser, Jean ............ Hove, Mary Lu ....... Hove, Stella ............. Howard, Dwayne ........ Howard, Joe ............. Howe, Virginia ......... Howe, Rosemary ...... Howell, Janet ........... 159 ..........281 ..........271 .................140 253 ............163, 253 Howell, Mary Ann ............ 100, 151, 253 Howland, Jean .................................... 283 Hoyt, John ............................................ 270 Hubbard, Major Clyde W. .............. 306 Huber, Robert ............................ 253, 269 Hudson, Jeanette ................................ 144 Hudson, James ..... Huenger, Gloria ...... Huey, John ........... Huffer, Raymond ..... Hughes, Thomas ...... Hummel, John ........... Hungerford, Louis ,..... Hull, David ............... Hunt, Rosalie Cleo ...... Hunter, Donald ....... Huntinton, Veva ....... Hurleman, Roy ..... Hurtado, Sara ........... Husman, Virginia ,...... Hutchcroft, Peggy ....... ........80, 119, 147 ........185, zoo ..........z71 ..........271 ..........253 ..........133 ..........163 ..........152,164 .......86, 140 Hutchinson, Dorothy ...... ...,.. L ...147 Huirford, Darlene ........ Hyrnk, Rhea ............. Hyman, Dean ....... Intress, Robert H. ..... ........ 2 53 Ishartj, Robert ....--- - Irish, Alice Jean ....... ........ 2 53 Ita, Lois .........---..-----.------- Isacson, Lenke ,......., ........ 1 59 Ivancie, Gerald ....... Ives, Richard ...... ..........224 ..........140 ..........309 ...............2ss, 269 129, 140, 253 ..........207 Jackson, Virginia Jackson, Wilton ....... Jacobs, Jess .,,,,....... Jacobson, Jean ......... fffffzss Jacobson, Jeanette ,....... ...... 1 25, 173, Jahnke, VV1ll1am ............,..,.,.....,........,. Jayne, Barbara ........ Jeffries, Loren ........ Jenkins, Betty ......,,.. Jenner, Robert ...... Jensen, Elaine ...,.... Jensen, Julie ..,.......... Jensen, Patricia ....... Jeska, Veronica ....... .........117, 155, 119, 136, 22, so Kfii Jis for Journalists Who worry and scurry, Could they possibly function Without so much worry? I Jewett, Lucy ......,... ....,.... Kadavy, Joan ..,..,.,.......... .......... Kalb, Anthony .,............,.,,. .,,.,,,,,, Kalinske, Prof. A. A .......,.. ...,,...,,,,, Kaplan, Beatrice .....,...... .....,,,,........ Kappa Alpha Theta ,,,,,.. ,.....,. 1 54, Kappa Beta .................... ,...,.....,.. Kappa Epsilon .................................... Kappa Kappa Gamma ,,,,,..,, ,,.,, 1 56, Kappa Phi ,,,,.............,.,....... ......,,,,,., 1 25 Kardon, Harold ..........,...,,,,.,..,,,,,,,,,,., Katschkovvsky, Kathryn ,,,...,....,.. 148, Kautz, Marian ...,.,.,,,,,.,,,.,,,,,,,,,,, 152, Kaser, Kay ...,..,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,.,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,, 148 Keagy, Eleanore .... 98, 99, 111, 143, 164 Kehn, Donald ...,,.,.,.,,..1..,,.,,,,,,,.,, 135, Johnson, Ann ............. ......,, 1 51 Johnson, ,Bruce ......,....... ........ 3 11 Johnson, Clarence , .,,........ ,....,.. 3 09 Johnson, Donna Jeanne ..,.... .....,., 1 59 Johnson, Edward ...,,......... .,......... 3 13 Johnson, James J ........,.. ,.............,... 2 54 Johnson, Lenore .......................... 124, 125 Johnson, May Baker .......... ............... 1 09 Johnson, Maurice .......... ........... 2 54 Johnson, Mina ........... ........ 1 29 Johnson, Sgt. ........ ........... 3 07 Johnson, Sidney ........, ....... I ..,....... 3 12 Johnson, Wendell ..,...,.,.,. ........, 2 54, 267 Johnson, VVinifred .,.....,..,,..,.,.,... 112 148 C C1 Q Z Ill ENN. "Ns. K is for K isses, Smooching and such. With few men on campus A miss misses it much. K Kelberg, Frances ..........., ............... 1 38 Kelleher, Dorothy Kelleher, Marion F ................... 151, 254 Kellow, Keith ................ .......,.,..... 2 68 Kelly, Gloria .....,.......... ,........ 1 19, 159 Kelly, Joan ..,.,..,..... ............,.. 1 59 Kelly, Katherine .,..,.. ........ 1 47 Kelly, Kay .................... ........ 1 64 Kennday, Elizabeth ...... ........ 2 54 Kennedy, Janice ......... ....,.,. 1 47 Kennedy, Thomas ........ .,...... 3 14 Kent, Pat .................,....... ..,...,. 1 52 Kerfoot, David ..........,........ ......,, 2 71 Kerkman Dean H bert .......... .,..,.,. 2 54 , u Kernodle, Norman Johnston, James ....... Johnston, June ...,,. Johnston, Loulse ......... ......... 8 5, Jones, Beverly ..,...... Jones, Cary .......... Jones, Dorothy ......... Jones, Herbert C ....... Jones, Laurene .,.... Jones, Wllllam .,....... Joneson, Carolyn ......... Jongewaard, Robert Josifek, Lillian ......... Joslyn, Alberta .,.,..... .... Judiciary Board ....... ....,.. Judt, Helen ......,...,,.. Kerr, Margaret ,,... Kersten, Herbert Kessler, Betty ,....... Keyes, Merrel .,...... Kimball, Jeanne ..... Kimmel, Barbara Kinkead, Betty ...... Kintz, Joseph ........ Kirby, Mary ...... Kirby, Kate ,..... Kirby, Patricia ...... Kiwdle, Charles ..... Klahn, Geraldine ,.,.,..147, 31, ..,....254, 85, 117, Klahn, Mildred .....................,.,,... 119, Klaperman, Rabbi Gilbert ..........,,.... Page 166 140 148 254 155 147 276 132 270 283 268 254 155 113 158 254 108 118 133 254 159 118 314 159 155 75 309 163 254 138 328 Klein, Dorothy .,.... Kle1n, Jack ............ Kleinert, Dorothy 128 269 254 250 268 143 254 172 172 255 312 271 144 283 140 Konavan, Kathleen ..........................,. Kooiker, John .....,...........,.... 131, 132, Koudelka, Betty ..,..... ....................... Knapp, lVIary Bob .............. 110, 155, Knight, Katherine ....... .................... Knight, Irene .........,.. ............. Knight, Ruth ........ ....... 1 52, Knight, Stephen .... .,........... Knouf, Clare ,.... .......... Knox, Margery .... ..,... Knupp, M. Jane ........ .,.....,............ Knutson, VeDonna ...................... 129, Koenig, jean .........1.. 163, 16-1, Labbitt, Margaret ....... Lackender, Darlene Ladd, Betty ...,............ Ladwig, Helen .... Lambert, Byron .... Lampe, VVillard .... Landers, William .. Landon, Landon, Arnold .... Gloria .... Lane, Virginia ,.,... . Lange, Harold ......... Langland, Mary .... Lansing, Bonita ....., ....,..124, .......255, ......121, Larmer, Barbara ..,.,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,, 1 52, Larsen, Edward ....,., ,.,,,,, 9 1, 108, Larsen, Lawrence ..,. ,,.,,,,,,,,,,, Larson, Ellen ......... ,,,,,, Laster, Joan ,.,,.,.,,,,,,, ,,,,,, Latimer, John C ....,,.., ,,.,,,,,,, Laude, Peter P ..,...,,,,,,.,,,, Laufersweiler, Cecilia ...... Lauterbach, Ruth ......... Lawton, Mary Anne ..,..... Layland, Betty .......,.. Lazarus, Melvin ...... ,. Leaver, Betty Lou ...... Page 329 220 255 147 172 125 130 243 313 255 288 281 277 151 132 255 130 268 148 151 255 277 163 255 152 133 308 255 Kolarik, Eleanor ..... Kool, Kenneth ,........ Kopecky, Edward ...,.. Kopel, Carol .........,......... Koppersmith, Harold ....... Ixorneisal, Dorothy ,,......... ........... lxottemann, Dorothy .,.................... 99 1 Krabbenhoeft, Jean Ann .................... Krahbenhoft, Kenneth ........ Kramer, Glen ................. Krasne, Beverly .......... Krauth, Ernest .,... Kreutz, Irene ....... Kreps, Kridelhaugh, William ..,..,.......... Clarence ..,. Kruger, Robert .,.,.,....., Krupp, Lois ........,..,...... G Q QC? .ML Y Q fi lllll 51? Leemkuil, Rodney ......... Leighton, Robert ..... Leeka, Leland, Lemun L L is for Love, A starry-eyed fate. Its embryo fruit Is known as a date. L Marilyn George ....... 266, ........255, .......148 ...........315 s, Vernard ............ ..............,.,. Lenzen, Catherine Ann ......,....... 151, Lenzen, Charys ....,....,....... .............. Leonard, Betty Lou .......... Leonard, Leopold, Anita ....,,.... Patricia ...... Leopold, Margaret ...... Levantin, Enid ,..,.. Levitt, Miriam .,..,... .,..,,,, 8 5, Levy, Louis ......,........... Lewandowski, Harry .... Lewis, Richard ............ Leyda, Mary ,,.... Libal, Helen .....,,.. ....,, Liddy, Robert .,......,. ,,,.,,.,. Lieh, Karl ......,... Liepold, Janice ........ ......... Lind, Edward .........., Lindburg, Warren ...... Lineberry, Dewey Linkletter, Ethel ....... Lipman, hiarjorie ...... Little, Betty Lou ....... .......s5, 138, 144, 186, 121, Kruse, Katherine ......... Kruse, Killian ........ Kruse, Otto ........... Kruse, Rosemary ............. Kruse, Rufus .,.................... Kucheman, Mrs. Mabel ..,, Kuempel, Kathleen ....... Kuenne, Margaret ..... Kuever, Rudolph ....... .,.......118, 1, ,.....,,.182, 255 277 268 140 269 156 281 108 235 271 270 Kuhl, Paul ,............. ......... 2 55, Kuhn, Mark A .......... ............ 255, Kunz, Ray .............,........................,...,. Kurtz, Mary Ann..117, 119 Kurtz, Dr. Edwin B ......... ,121, 148 Kutchar, Sheldon ..,.............. Kuttler, Helen ..... Little, Frances ....,................... 85, Livingston, Betty Jean ...... Livingston, Jayne ........,.. Lochrie, Bonnie .....,...... Lockwood, Eleanor .,..... Lodwick, Martha .,..... Loeber, Peggy ....... Loes, Louis ....... .... Loetscher, Susan ....... Long, Betty M .....,. Long, Shirley Lord, Richard .,..... Lorenz, Patricia ,..... Lossman, Elaine ........ Lounsbury, Dale .... Low, Donald ..... Lowell, Janet .,..... Lowery, Dorothy .... Loy, VVarren ,........ Lubman, Bess ............. Ludwig, Dorothy ....... Luecke, Lt. John Luers, Roberta ........... Lund, Barbara ,......... ...... Lundquist, Robert ..... Lynch, Pat ......,.... C .....,.. .........152, ,.,,.....281, .,.......132, ....75, 79, .........138, 126, 152, 148, 277 255 120 315 156 255 143 151 255 283 159 155 268 283 255 159 218 144 155 217 255 121 256 315 256 256 295 133 256 276 143 , I Meade, Rita ...v............. Marlas, Helen ...... ........ 9 9 Marshall, Diane .... ........ 1 51 Marshall, Harry ....... ........ 2 77 Marson, Vera .......... ............... 1 43 Martin, Hugh .... ................,. 2 71 Martin, Velma .......................... 97, 98, 99 Marvel, Marcelyn ................ 86, 148, 256 Martin, Lee .............. ...................... 1 70 Marx, Myra ............ ....,............. 1 38 Massieon, Paula ...... ........ 1 63 Masters, Maurice ..... ........ 2 76 Matera, Sgt. ............... ....,,..... 3 07 Mathers, Jean ................. ............... 2 56 Mathre, Marie Nau ....... ......., 8 8, 256 Matras, Doris ............. ........,.. 1 60 Mattice, Roger ........ ........ 2 68 Mattill, Henry ........ ........ 1 35 Maule, Marion E. ..... ........ 2 76 Mault, John .................. ........ 3 11 McCloskey, Chester ....... ........ 1 35 McCloskey, Robert ......... ........ 2 68 McClow, Marvin .,.,.....................,.,.... 271 McCord, Allen ....,.............................., 185 McCormick, Martha jane..110, 113, 155 McCoy, john ................................ 256, 271 McCray, Mary .............,.... ............... 1 44 McCrea, Mary Jane ...,.,.... ........... 2 24 McCutcheon, Ruth ...... ........... 1 59 MaCabee, June ................ ............... 2 24 MacDonald, Margaret ................ 120, 121 MacEwen, Ewen ................................ 235 MacEwen, Marion ......,....... 117, 121, 156 Mackenzig, Donald .....,...................... 311 Mackorsky, Bernadine .,.,.....,,,.......... 140 Maddy, Louise ...............,.................,.. 256 Madigan, E. P ..................... 184, 185, 202 Mahan, Bruce ........ ...,........ 1 82, 242 Magill, Dorothy ....... ....,.....,........ 2 24 Magnusson, Lloyd ........,...............,..... 209 Maiden, Snyder ........ ...,... 1 20, 218, 256 Maley, David .......... .,................... 2 13 Mallett, Donald ......... ......,,.......... 1 66 Malloy, Marianne .......... .,..... 7 8, 152 Maloy, Frances ................ ....,.... 1 16, 124 Mammen, Harold ................, ........... 2 56 Mandeville, Mary Lou ....... ........ 1 59 Manker, Fannie Louise ....... ,,.,.... 1 43 Mannon, Eugenia .,.......,..,.................,, 156 Mansfield, Muriel ..................,.....,..... 147 Mansfield, Pauline ........,..... 129, 172, 256 Manther, Leighton ..,,. ................,. 3 10 Mark, Robert ,,......,.,,. ,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,.,,,., 2 77 Markel, Mary C ..,,,,,,,..,....,.....,,,..,.,,,,.. 143 Margolin, -To Ellen .........,.... 128, 160, 256 McDonough, Sidney .,,,,.,.,,,.,,,...,...,,,, 314 NIcDowell, Pauline ,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,..,, 2 56 "ff-J I J ,L 4 Ei WI ' M is for Medios, When we're feeling nil, They thump us and poke us Until we are ill. M McFadden, Jean ..... McGahey, Esther ....... McGee, Donald .............. 159, McGladrey, . Kathleen ................ McGuire, Kirk ............. McGurn, Sgt. .............. . Mclntire, Kathleen ..... McIntosh, Mary ....... McKee, joan .................... McKeen, Dorothy .............. ........... McKelvey, Mary Anne .............. 159, McKim, Shirley ......,....................... 71 McKinley, Beverly .......................... McLaughlin, Richard ................ 256, McNall, Lola ....,............. .............. McQuern, Mary Ellen ...................... McTavish, Janet .................. 78, 143, Meade, Barbara ......... Meehan, Catherine ..... Mefferd, Marion ...... ...,,..118, Meier, E. Bruce ................,............... Meis, Lee .......................,...... 216, 217, Meis, Mary Margaret ...,.... 119, 122, Mellquist, Barbara ...........,.............. Mendenhall, Helen .,... ...........,...... Menefee, E. E ...,............ .................. Menelaos, Kathleen .......................... Mercer, Ann ....,.. ,.........,...... 1 17, 156, Mereness, Shirley ....,,...........,...... 110, Merrill, Ruth Joanne ...... Merritt, Floyd B. ........ . ,Messer, joe ............... Metz, Norma ......... .. Metzger, Dorothy ....... Meyer, Lorraine ....... Meyer, Robert ,.,... Meyers, Donald .......... Mezik, Barbara ....,,,.... Michaelson, Helen .,.,.... Mich aelson, Mildred .... Middleton. Constance .... 'sz M1 hell, Scott ............. Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller Miller Miuerl Miller, Miller Miller Milleri Miller Miuerf Miller, v Alaire ........... Bettv ................, Catharine .......... Daniel ..,...... Fletcher ,..,... Frank ..,........ john .......,,.,....... Mary Alice .......... Norma Jean .....,., Patty .........,,.... Richard ....... Robert ......,.. Rhodonda ....... Ross . ....... .. .......220, .257, ,.....,151, .......310, Miller, Stuart ................. Miller, William ................ Milstead, Lt. Earle L. ..... . Milulasek, Freda ........... Mintz, Shirley ...................... ..... Mishlove, Rita ......................... ..-.. Miner, Margaret Darlene ....... ..... Minor, Ruth .......................... ..... Mitchell, Richard ............ Mitter, Eleanor ......... Moberg, Dean ................. Moeller, Mary Aileen ...... Mohr, Dorothy ............... Mohrbacher, Stanley .................. 185, Molis, Jean ........................................ Molumby, Matthew Joe .....,.......,.... Monnig, Mary Modest ...... 122, 129, Monnig, Philip ..............................., Montgomery, Mrs. E. G ................. ,. Moon, Moore, Moore, Moore, Moore, Sadi Anka ................ 117, 173, Darwin .......,. ........... ............ Mary Jane ......... ........... Richard ............. ....... Robert L .,......................... 257, Montgomery, Franklin .................... Montz, Robert ......,....................... .... Mordy, Margaret ............ .,......zzo, Morgan, Mrs. Emma ........ ............ Morris, Mary Jeanne ,...... . ........ . Morris, Roger ..,.............. Morrison, Abigail ..... Nmiiii, Morrison, Ellen ............................ Mortar Board ..........,.......,..,.... .......... Mortimore, Gwennyth Mosely, Gail ...............,... Moses, Marlyn .................. Mosey, Ann ............ ...... Mote, Marilyn .................... Mott, Margaret., ....... Mottelson, Ann ...... fffQQffffii5Q 125, 172, Moyers, jack ..,...........,,. .......... 9 0, Moyers, Meredith ....,.... ........ 1 25, Mueller, Lawrence ...,... ,........... Mueller, Mary Ann ...,.... ......... 1 52, Mueller, William ...,.. ........ Mullen, Mullen, Mullin, Mulnix, Martha ...,.,....... Wylie .................. Carroll Boyd ......., Evelyn ............. Munro, Grace ........... Murchison, Mary ......,.. Murray, Don .... ..,... Murray, jack ,.....,....... Musgrave, Leo .......,....... Myerly, William N ........ Myers, Ellen .,,........,.... ...fffffffiif Page Nash, Doyne ........ ..........,........... 2 82 Neal, Joseph .....,,, ......................... 3 10 Nee, Phyllis ..,,....... .,........ 8 5, 163, 258 Neff, Robert E. ....... ...................... 2 38 Ness, Carl ............ .................. 2 66 Nelson, Herbert ............ ..............,... 2 68 Nelson, Marsena ................................ 155 Nelson, Mary Louise .............. 77, 85, 144 Nelson, Janice ................ .................. 2 82 Nelson, Nellie .,.,......... .......,....... 1 33 Nelson, Paul ................,,...................... 276 Nelson, Theodore .....,..,..................... 185 Nesper, M ..... 97, 110, 112, 121, 143, 257 Neumann, LeNore ...,.......................... 155 Neuman, Ruth ............................,. 160, 258 Neville, Mary Jane..71, 97, 99, 173, 258 Ochs, William .............. .......,.......... 2 77 O'Connor, Leonore .......... ......... 1 22, 172 O'Connor, Sgt. ........... ............... 2 93 Odell, John ..................,..............,.,...... 276 Ohman, Carol .............................. 133, 258 Ohme, Florence .......... 109, 117, 121, 140 Ojemann, Dr. Ralph ..,.......,............... 120 Oliver, Ann .................. 173, 220, 224, 258 Page 331 N Ju. 357' at 1 24111 ,Quai N is for Navy, JL .uu- 35. mx, Both gob and cadet Girls think they're wonderful, "Joes" say they're all wet. N Newbu rn, Harry K ......... Newell, MCffldCC ..,.... .................... Newland, Don ........... .......... 2 66, Newland, Jean ...... ................. Newman Club ............ ....... 1 22, Newman, Dwight ......... .........,... Newport, Carl ........,.... ................ Nichols, Charlene ............. ,...... 1 28, Nichols, Marian .................................. Nickolisen, 'Hubert Nickless, Josephine P ......,.......... 258, Niklason, Norma .......,.... Nielson, Alice Ann ..,...... Nissen, Eleanor ........... Nissen, Phyllis ............ Nixon, Joan ........ .....,,140, ........140, 35529 312 O is for Oral Surgery. The dents are good bums. After going to see them You chew with your gums. O Olson, Arthur M ....., ..., Oltman, Helen ............. Onderdonk, Harold O'Neill, Charles ....... Ono, Sue ...........,...... Opheim, Robert ....... Orientation ...,.........., Ormiston, Lucile ....,,, Osborne, Claudia ...., ...Qfsi'3," '12 5, " Noe, Marie ....... Noe, Terry ........ Nolan, Capt. .... . Noland, Jean ...... Nolander, John ...... Norman, Hubert .......... ......... 2 16, Norman, Ruth ........ Norment, Polly ...... Norris, Robert ........ Norton, Richard .... Noss, William ........... Noteboom, Gladys Novak, Marvin ......... Novak, Robert ........... Nove, Marvin R ...... .... Nu ,Sigma Nu ............ Osborne, Mary ....,................. .,,.'.ffii6Q"' 85, 121, Oschner, B. U .............,....,..................-- Osthemer, Richard Ottilie, Dan .......,........,.. Owen, Darlene ........ Owens, Doris ...... Oyer, Paul ...,............ Oyler, Richard ........ .......9o, 258 258 293 164 315 217 136 156 271 271 314 258 315 314 258 269 148 152 277 267 140 282 311 313 Peterson, Kathleen ......... ....... 1 51, Pohl, D011-Qld ----------- Pace, Ellen ................. ........ Padgham, Richard ...v.... ......... Page, Frances ............. ......... Paige, VVesley .......v........ .,...... Palmquist, Marion .......,... ......., Pan American Club ......... ......... Parker, Loran ................ ........ Parks, George .......,... ............... Patten, Kathleen ....... Patterson, Anita ...... Patterson, Marion ...... ......... Patzer, Patricia ..... Paul, Patricia ........ Pauly, james ......... Pearson, Mary .... Pearson, Nadine ...... Peck, Elizabeth ......... Peck, Ernest ...,....... Pederson, Dorothy .... Pence, Ernest .......... Pendry, Marilyn .... Penningroth, Elizabeth ....... ............ Perkins, Dorothy ...,....,....... ...... 1 55 Perkins, James ..,..... Perkins, Rollin ......., Perrin, Wayne ........ Peterson, Dean ...... Peterson, E. T. ....... , Peterson, Frank ....., f. 'E 1 ,-1' 1-f' x . if o If K6 ff f by Till, H , Xl it ll 'i P is for Professors. Their minds sometimes dither. We're partial to those Whose glances don't wither. P Peterson, james ........ ............. 3 08 259 Peterson, Peterson, Peterson, Peterson, Petheram ' 267 Maurice .,.. ..............,........ Owen ..,.. .......................... 9 9 259 Phyllis .................. 220, 224-, Virjean ,... ................,...... , Marjorie .................. .125 259 Petris, Annette ...... Pfasterer, Shirley ...,.. .............-.- ' 133 Pfeiffer, IN ancy ........ ....... , Phair, Wellman ..... ............. Phelan, joseph ....... ......... Phelps, Theresa ..... .....,... Ph ' i Beta Phi Chi Phi Gam P1 ....,.... ---.-.. ma Nu .......... ......... Phi Lambda Theta ....... ......... Phi Lambda Upsilon ...,..... ..........,,.. Phillips, Phillips, Phillips, Philli s Chester ......,...... ....... 1 82, Donald ...,..,. ............. H. Bruce ...... ......... ZUDCS ..,. P, J ----- Phi Sigma Iota .......... ......... Pilmer, Mary Beth ..,.... ............, Phi Rho Sigma . .......,. ................ Pi Beta Phi ..........,... ....,.. 1 58, Pigg, George ............... ............. Pingrev Betty ....,............ . ...... .. Pinnell, Mary Eleanor ........ ......... Plager, Vernon .,,...............,................. Qi Of P7323 ,J ,J 2 5, J s for Quaffing beer, wind and likker, Some grow quite thick, And others still thicker. Q Platner, Aramilda .....,. Polian, Virginia ......... ..........282 259 .......14-8, Pollock, Helen ............. .---------------- 2 59 ' 260 Pomerantz, Pauline .......... ....... 1 38, Poole, Harold ............... ....---..---- 2 35 259 Popovich, Anna ........, Popovich, George .,,....118, 10 Popovich, Helen ..... .,.......--.- 1 13 Port, Frank ............ ...-------------- 3 08 Porter, Carolyn .......... ........ 1 19, 155 Porter, Kirk ................. ...-----.---- 9 0 Porter, Mary Louise ......... ........ 1 51, 259 Porter, William ........... .....--...-,. 1 00 Posey, Chesley ......... ---------- 1 30 Posner, Harriet ............. ....... 1 60 Postels, Ned . ................... .....-.... 2 08 Porthast, Lt. VViIliam ..,....................... 306 Potthotf, Orlando .............. ....... 2 59, 233 Pottorf, Mary ............... ............. 1 44 Powers, Frank ...... .........---- 2 13 Pownall, Eleanor ....... ...... . ..36, 155 Pownall, Frederick ...... ......... 9 0, 239 Pratt, Thomas ......... ............. 2 67 Price, Edna ............... .......... 2 02 Proehl, Margaret ..... .259 Pruess, Lila Ann ....... ....... 2 82 Psi Omega .............. ....-...-. 2 76 Puckett, Robert .... .......... 2 67 Queensland, Marie Ann .,...... ........ 2 60 Quinn, Thomas ........... ......... 2 70 QU1I1fLIS, BCYIUCC -----, Quinn, John ......,. . ......... ........ 2 60 Qlllfky Lowell ---- - .....,173 Page 332 Raak, kenneth .............. Rackaway, Elizabeth Raff, Paula ............... Rahn, Gordon ...,....... Rampton, Robert .,... Randall, Lois .............. ...................... Randolph, Jane ................... Rankin, Jacqueline ,111, 112, Rathbun, Donald ....... ................... Rawson, Marlys ..... Raymond, Carol ....... Rayner, Diane .......... Rea, Russell ............... Redding, Arthur ........ Reeck, Leland .,....... Reed, Barbara ....... Reed, Kathleen ........, Reed, Roger ........ Reeder, Vern .,....,. Reeves, Catherine Reid, Rosemary ,,,. Reilly, Dolores ......, Reininga, Ruth ....,.,.... Reinman, Daniel ..,.. Reinschmidt, Elsie Remley, Joan .......,, Remley, Lucille ..... Saaveedra, Leonidas ....... Sahs, Martin .........,,....... Salberg, Ruth ,.,.,,.,.,.., Sandberg, Maynard .,.,... Page 333 ...QIfQ5i,"55," ,.....119, f' 1ffQQff2E6," ....,.12S, .........122, ""'i65l5112," .....,170, 276 282 224 271 276 90 156 143 277 172 172 144 309 277 267 170 260 308 260 159 163 251 156 308 260 144 159 134 260 285 288 WX 51, 1 K Q, . R is for Radio, And our hats we doff To such lovely voices. fWhile turning them offlj B Reynolds, Rosa Neil ..,.,... Rho Chl .. .................,...,. -------4-- Ribbeck, Robert ........ Rice, Elizabeth ...... Rich, Shirley ........, Richards, John .,.... ...1fQ96,"i65f' 110 289 185 172 110 Richter, Vlfgllllil ......... ................ 1 19 Richardson, Martha ...... ......... 3 6, 155 Richard, William ....... ...-.--,--,,- 3 10 Rieke, Helen ......,....... ......,-,- 1 73 Riggle, Shirley ...... ..---- 1 72 Riggs, Robert ..........., ...vv----- 2 33 Righter, Charles ........ ............. 1 04 Righter, Millicent .... ................ 1 52 Rigler, Robert .,........ ...Y-.. 2 16, 217 Riley, Eileen ................. ...,..,...... 1 52 Rinck, Ann .......................... .......... 1 43 Rivers, Margaret Ann ........ .......... 1 43 Rizk, Edward .......,........ .......... 2 71 Roalson, john ............... ....,..... 2 77 Roberts, Madalene ..... ...... 1 51 Roberts, Margaret ....... ..,..V 1 72 Roberts, Ruth ............ ....-.---. 2 60 Roddewig, Janet ...... ...,.,,.,. 2 32 Roe, Jack ................ ..-..----- 2 77 Rohrs, Dorothy ......,... ...... 1 48 51 -.1 AQQEFZ' iv 4-V fr lj 0 M33 A Kg S is for Serenades, Somewhat smaller this year. But the sentiment's the same Though the singing is queer. S Sangster, John .......... ..............,. Sangster, VVilliam ,,....... ....... 1 85, Sass, Mary ......,....,.......... ....,.. 1 44, Saunders, Dr. H. VV ......, .......... 261 195 261 120 Roming, Maxine ..... 224, Roost, Mary ....,................-- -------- Rosenbloom, Delores ....... ....... 1 60, Rosheim, Avonelle ...... Ross, Audrey ......,...... Ross, Betty .................. 224, Roth, Harriet ..................... ........ 1 33, Rouse, Hunter, Prof. ..... . Routh, I ..................... Rovner, Fay ............. Rovner, Phyllis ....... Rowe, Anne ............ ......... Rowland, Margaret ......... ....--.- 1 10, Rowland, Richard ...... ................. Rowley, Thomas ........ 260, 260 260 260 288 148 260 160 130 135 138 160 159 260 309 269 134 Rudnick, Norman .............................. Ru fl, Henry .......................... Rugtiv, George ....... 120, 132, Rnhling, Jean .............. ..............,..... Runyon, Ann .................... .........,....... Ruppert, Rosamond ......... ...... Rusk, Frances .............. Russ, Jerrine ............ Russell, Sgt. ....,....,......... . Ruthenberg, Caroline Rutherford, Lois ............ Rutledge, john ............ Sawyer, Frank ...... Scales, Mary ..,. Scanlon, Bette ...... Schartf, Carolyn ..... ,.119, 276 269 155 260 260 282 144 307 282 260 270 277 147 143 160 Schaub, Lt. Col. H ......... ........ 2 93, 294 Scheerer, Jane ............... ........ 1 51, 224 Scheig, Henry ............... ................. 3 15 Schenkelberg, Richard ................ 261, 288 Schenken, Eileen .................. 112, 117, 159 Schilling, Erwin ........... ................. 2 70 Schlachter, Harriet ....... ....,,. 1 52 Schloemer, Marjorie ..... ....... 1 44 Schmidt, Bettie ........ ....... 2 24 Schmidt, Jane .......... ....... 1 56 Schneider, Carol ........... ....... 1 20 Schneider, Edmund ....... ................. 3 11 Schnoebelen, Lovita .......................... 129 Schnoor, Loanna .................. 85, 119, 173 Schoenfeld, Barbara ......,........... 138, 160 Schowalter, Margaret ................ 125, 172 Schnug, Marian ............. .............. 1 48 Schone, Gloria ..... ....... 1 47 Schori, Betty ............ ....... 8 1 Schramm, Wilbur ...... ....... 9 0 Schrimper, Marilyn ....... ....... 2 61 Schrock, Chris ............ ....... 2 61 Schroeder, Ernest ........ ....... 2 41 Schroeder, Louise ...... ....... 2 61 Schultz, Marvin .... .,..... 2 70 Schultz, Donald ................. ....,.. 2 76 Schumacher, Brockman ...... ....... 2 13 Schumacker, Jean ......... ....... 1 29 Schupp, Joseph .,............. ....... 2 61 Schutte, Chloe Ann..e ......... .......... 1 44 Schwarzkop, Mary ....... ................. 1 55 Schweitzer, Ralph ......,. ....... 1 00, 101 Schwertley, Suzanna ..,.. .......... 1 59 Scofield, Nancy .......... .............. 2 24 Scott, Betty ............ ........ 1 29, 261 Scott, Doris ........ .............. 1 47 Scott, Gladys ......... ....... 2 21 Sears, Robert .,.........,.. .,,.... 2 38 Seashore, Carl E. ........ ......,.., 2 34 Seemuth, Wilma ....... ....... 8 5, 148 Seitfert, Gerald ...... .............. 2 61 Sernstrom, Lois .......... ........ 1 73, 220 Severns, Harold ...... .............. 2 88 Severson, Wayne ........ ....... 2 70 Sewick, Bonnie 7 .,,.... ....... 1 47 Shaefer, Glen .............. ....... 3 14 Shambaugh, Phyllis ..... .......... 1 48 Shanks, Jane .............. ,............. 1 52 Shanley, Elizabeth ....... ........., 7 9, 155 Sharpe, Mary Alice ........ ........ 1 47, 261 Shay, Dennis .............. ..................... 2 77 Sheely, Betty Lou ,..,............ 147, 224, 261 Sheehan, Daniel ...,.... ........ 1 85, 194 Sheets, Jeanne .......... ..,..... 1 44, 261 Sheppard, Norma ...... .............. 2 61 Shipley, David .......... ......,. 1 20, 132 Shipton, Jane ....... Shively, Mardis ...... Short, Patricia ....... Shoquist, Ruth ..... ..........144 .......224 224 132 Showers, Susan ....... Shreves, Mary .............. Shroeder, Louise ............... Shuttleworth, Margaret Sidney, Jacque ................. Siebels, VVanda ..... Siebke, I Marilyn .... . Siegel, Maureen ........ Sigma Delta Tau ....... Sigma Theta Tau .......... Silverberg, Betty ...... ............151 ..........160, Silverman, Lt. ...... ...... ........................ Simon, Betty .................. Simonsen, Frances. ..... 109, 116, 126, Simpson, Alleye ........................-......... Simpson, Carol ....... Singer, Rolland ..... Skaggs, Sgt. .... Skogmo, John ........ .......... 2 61, Skow, Ronald ............ ............ Skorheim, Delores ........ ................-.. Sladek, Beatrice ..... ......................--.. Slater, Albert ..,........ ....... 1 32, 218, Sleichter, Charles ....................,......... Slemmons, Genevieve..101, 109, 110, Sloane, Shirley .............................--A.-.- Slutzker, Sanford ...... -------- Slyby, Moses ......... ........ Small, Ella May ........ ........ Smith, Alfred ......... -------- Smith, Betty ...... .....-.. Smith, Cleo .......... ..--.--- Smith, Doris V ........ ........ Smith, Frederick ...... ....---- Smith, Irene Anna ........ ........ Smith, Lt. Irving ...... -------- Smith, Janet L. ....... -..--.. - Smith, Kenneth ..... ....v-.- Smith, Lloyd A ........ .-...... Smith, Lowell ..... .-.---.-.-.- Smith, Lula ........... ....-.--------- Smith, Margaret ....... .......... 1 23, Smith, Martha Lou ..,..... .,.......... Smith, Mary .................. ----.--- Smith, Mary Louise ............................ Smith, Max ..,....................................... Smith, Patricia ,........ ,....... 1 19, 151, Smith, Ranson ....... ........,...,......... Smith, Robert A ......... .-.---.- Smith, R. L .......... .......................... 2 68 Smith, Sgt. ...... ............................. 3 06 Smith, Sheila ...,............ 116, 121, 173, Smith, John Joseph ......,............. 262, Snapp, Phyllis .......,..... ......,... 1 59, Snell, Virginia .,...... ....,,.... 1 29, Snyder, Betty ..... ............... 1 62 Snyder, Carol ...,...... ........ 7 3, Snyder, Marjorie .....,.. ......... 1 31, Snyder, Marilyn ......... ........ 7 4, Snyder, Norma ....... Soenke, Marjorie ,..,.. ,...,.....,.160 .........152 Soltez, Alfred ............ ....... 3 10, Sorensen, Frances Souers, Janelle ......... Spann, Margaret ..... Spellman, George Spence, Martha ....... Spencer, Charles ..... Spencer, Jackson ..... Spencer, Janes ..... Spencer, Lois .... Springer ................. Stakk, Marianne ..... Stacy, Jeanne ......... Stalnaker ............ Stamy, Jean ............. Stark, Herald ....... Steele, Roger ....... Stefansky, Andy ....... 314 59 5 1 1 ......125 1 3 ..........207 ..........262 ..........224 ..........262 51 ...........170, 262 7, 121, 148 Steichen, Rita ......... ....... 1 47, 262 Stein, Margaret .......... ....--.. 1 19, 159 Steitz, Alfred ....... ------------- 1 35 Stempel, Norma ........ ....-.- 1 33, 163 Stephens, Roger ......... ....... 1 85, 190 Stevenson, Robert Stewart, George ...... A Stewart, James ..... Stewart, John ......... Stichnoth, John ..... ..........315 ..........182 ........199, 277 277 ....,.....166 Stine, Charles ........ ......-.-- 3 09 Stockman, Jean ....... ...... 9 7 Stokes, John ...... .--------- 3 10 Stolley, Robert ..... ---------- 2 71 Stone, Albert ...... ...-.-------- 3 03 Stone, Dorothy ....... .------ 1 44, 262 St. Onge, Louis ....,.... ...............v---- 3 14 Stout, Marjorie ......................------------ 147 Street, Claire ,,,,......, 9, 131, 262 Streissguth, Karl ..... ....-.---,---------- 3 11 Stroud, James ....... ---------- 3 03 Strub, Barbara ..... .......,....-----v--,--- 1 59 Studley, Lois ......................,, 132, 170, 262 Stump, Mrs. Maye ............------------------ 151 Stumpf, Velda ............ ---------- 2 62 Stutzman, Doris J ....... ---.....v---- 1 72 Subotnik, Betty .......... ....... 1 28, 262 Subotnik, Phyllis ..... ..---.,---.-- 1 73 Sulentic, Robert ....... ....--------- 9 1 Sullivan, Daniel ........ ....... 1 85, 200 Summers, Thomas .....,.,.. 270 Sundin, Bette ,...... .......--. 1 72 Supple, Jean ......... .......... 1 52 Susorney, Frank ..... .......... 3 10 Sutter, Raymond ..... .......... 2 83 Swain, Margaret ..... .......... 1 40 Swallum, Ruthann ...,...... 156 Swanson, Lorraine ...,.,.... 129 Swanson, Luella ..... .......... 1 51 Swanson, Marjory ..,....... 147 Swanson, Vera ..... .....,.,..... 2 83 Swisher, Charles ,....... .......... 9 0, 108 Page 334 l Y 1 X ll ff .fc y f XXZTITE 2,- T is for Tiffin, A place of the past. You'd go if you could, But you ain't got the gas. T Tatum, Janice .......... 75, 148, Thomas, Clair ............. ......... T jebben, Donna B .......... ........ 2 63 Tau Beta Pi ........., ,..................... T homas, Clifford ............ ....,.... T jossem, Theodore ....... 267 Tau Gamma ..,... .................. T hompson, C. VVoody ........ ............. T obias, Jean ............... ....... 1 48 Taylor, Harold ..... ........ T hompson, Dale ..,............ ....... 1 85, Tobin, Patricia ...,,. ,.................... 1 56 Taylor, Mildred ....... .....,.. T hompson, Ellen ......,.. ............. T owne, Betty Lou ............,. 129, 140, 263 Taylor, Miriam ..... ........ T hompson, Lucile ....... ...........,.... T rachsel, Patricia ....... ......., 1 48, 263 Taylor, Newell ...,, ..,..... T hompson, Marilyn ......... .....,. 1 4-4, Trave, Ann ............ .............. 1 56 Teall, Bette ...,....,. ........ T hompson, Paul ......... ....... 2 16, Travis, Maxine ......... .....,............ 1 51 Techenor, Pfc. .... ........ T homsen, john ............. ............. T rawver, Patricia. ...,,... 151, 224 Teigland, Joel ......, ...,.... T hompson, William ....,. .,....... T ressel, Patricia .,..... .............. 1 55 Tennes, Marjorie ....,.. .......,....... T horn, Dr. Erling .......... ......... T ribby, Gene .......... ......., 2 77 Terrall, Henry ..,.,.... ......... 1 85, Thornberry, Hugh ,.... ......... T rocina, Joseph ...... ........ 2 63 Terrall, Peggy ....... ,.......... T horsland, Loulla ................ Trostel, Philip ........... ..... , ,314 Tesche, Helen ......,.... ............,.. T horson, Mac ......... .,..... 1 66, Troxell, Millard ....... .................. 2 70 Tester, Terry ....,............,.,,......... 128, Thorson, Thomas ......, ......... T udor, John ........ ......................... 2 71 Tevvksbury, Richard ........ ,.............. T ierney, Bernadine ............................ Turner, June ........,............... 117, 118, 263 Theta Sigma Phi ....... . , ..,,.... Tierney, Thomas ........,......,................ Turner, Margaret .,............................ 125 Tholls, Wayne ....... ..,........ T imm, Mary Beth ,............. 117, 220, Turner, Mary Elizabeth ......... ........ 1 48 Thomas, Betty .,.,... ............... 'I 'imp, Kathleen ..,.... ....................... T urock, Ann .............,............ .....,.. 1 60 Thomas, Charles ....,.,.. ........ 2 16, 217 Tipton, William ..,.. ........, T urrle, Mariana ....... ........ 1 52 6' W2 M Q ' ,gs JA 0 -,f Union and Union, Their meanings are deep. I. A building for meetings. 2. An institution for keeps. U Updegraff, Edgar Rice ..,.,,. ..,..... 2 70 Updegraif, VVilliam Rice ...,... .......... 2 70 Union Board .......,.........,..,.....,.........-. 103 Updegraif, Rachel ........ ,,,,,,,, 7 7 University VVomen's Association ...... 117 Page 335 Van Alstine, Janet ..... Van Ausdall, jane ...... Van Delt, Meredith... .,.... ..77 J Van Dyke, Robert E .,...... ......... Vannice, Robert E ......... ,.,....., Varele, Jaime ............. ........, Vauhel, Rex ....,,,,A,, ,,,,,,,,, Waddell, Joseph .......... Wage, Doris ............. Wager, Gwen .........., VVagner, Charles ....... Wagner, john ....... VVaite, Katharine .... Vilakefield, Gloria ..., Waldorf, Marjorie ,,,,,,,,, ,,,, VValker, Keith .......... VVallace, Edward ........ Wallace, Kieth ........,.,...,-, Wallazz, Lt. julian C ..,....... VVallen, Georgianne . Wallerstedth Kenneth VValrner, Mickey .,,,,,,,,,,,, ,4,,,,, VValsh, Leo ,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Walter, Donald ........ VValters, Bernard .....,..,.,o A VVanberg, Nona jean ....,., 1 140, I L! e GJ. NLG, 1 S V E 2 , ,, . 1, K 4 1' l fi l TX s ,F x I T ' Q J ,b . I 5 IQ, W IS' 1 . ' 0 o L, Xl 1. e .49 ' , i Z' L . - ' . 5' Vg Y . i , I Y' ,lffi L it i iii I V is for Victory. We know its quite trite. 1 But a thing's worth repeating When the words are just right. V Venell, William .,.,..,.......,.,, 100, 108, Van Hoesen, Marjorie .........,.,............ Van VVinkle, Marjorie ,.,..,.....,............ Verdin, Ann ,..................... ....... 1 51, Victorine, Kathleen ..... ............. Vieth, Miriam .......... idea it ktafl EX Q iiivfijeigaiiiisgi, With little discretion, And plenty of gall. W Wansik, Irving ..,,....,,,,,, ,,.,,,,,, 9 1, VVard, Donald .,,,,,,, ,,.,....,,,,, VVarner, Gordon ,,,,,,,,r ,,,,,, VVarner, Marcella ......, ......, NVarner, Marshall ...,,,, ,...,.,.,. VVasson, VValter ,,,,,,, ,,,,,.,.,..,, Vilaterman, Ann .........,.. ,.,..,. 1 55, VVaterman, Earle L .,.,,,.,, ,...,.,,,..,, Waterman, lNIax ......... ...,,...,. VVaters, Irene ...,....,... ....,. VVatson, Charles .. ...,. .. Watson, John ..,..... .,,.... VVatson, Patricia ,,,,., ,,,,,,, VVaters, Irene ....,... ..,.... Vilatters, Lorraln ..... ..,,,,, VVatterson, Marilyn ,.,........,..,.. Vilaugh, Harry .,,t.. ,................... Weaver, Betty ......,...,............. 74, 85, Xveaver, Virginia ,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 166 155 151 263 263 140 112 288 263 144 309 268 263 130 124 172 271 271 263 224 270 125 185 159 159 Van Court, Evelyn ........,. ..,,.,,,..,... 1 40 Vollink, Hallie ..........,... ,.,.,.., 2 82, 286 Von Berg, John ........, Vorba, Edward ........,. Voss, Agneta ....,...... Votteler, Robert ....... Vrazd, George ..... ........132, 263 ..........269 15 108 293 263 263 263 155 295 224 166 WVeber, Paul ,.....,...,,, ,,,,,,, VVebster, Lt. ,.,.,,,,,,,,,,., ,..4,,,,,.,, ,,,.,, , NVecksung, Juanita A,,,.,,4,..,,,,,..,,4,,,,,,, VVeeks, Helen .,...,,,..,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,. VVeiSer, Gloria .............. 85 128, 147, YVellman, Carol ............................ 85, VVells, Lt. Col. Emery ,,..,,,,,,,,,,,, 293, VVells, Natalie ....,.,,.,,, ,..,,.,.,.,,,, VVenger, Vllilliam ,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,, Werhach, Frances r,,,,r ,,,,,,, Vllesley Foundation ......,, ,,,,,,, West, Mary Ellen ........ Wlestcott, jean .,,,..........,, ,,,,,., 119 124 159 144 293 VVestfall, Sgt. ........,....,,,,,,,. ,,,,,, , VVestly, john Stephen ......,.. ,,,,,,, VVestminster Fellowship XVevand, Richard P ...,,.,.,,,, ,,,,,,, VVhale, Gloria .....,.,.........,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, VVlxanger, I. Rlcha rd ......,....,,.,,,,,,,,,,,, Page 264 131 264 264 315 336' Vilhelltcraft, Neal ..... ..........,......... 3 13 VVick, Dr. J. H .......,., 276 VVohlner, Corrine ..... ........ 1 60 Wheelan, Roberta ........................ 128, 264 VVickett, Byron 315 Wolf, Margaret ....,. ....,... 1 43 VVheeler, Barbara ..,............. 111, 112, 151 XVicks, Jane ......,.,.... 283 VVoocl, Peggy ............, ........ 1 63 Vvheeler, Joan ............ ...,............ 8 5, 151 VVidlak, Arthur ,.,.... 315 VVOodard, Lillian ..... ...,,... 1 26 Wheeler, Prudence ..... .................... 1 40 Wieben, Carl ....... .,..,...,.. 2 64 VVoodburn, Chester ....... ......,. 2 69 Wheeler, Ruric ...,,.,.. .... ...... 3 1 5 Wilder, Amy ,,., .............. 2 86 Woodhouse, Margery ...... .,,.,,,. 2 24 VVhelan, Roberta ..... .........,... 1 22 YViller, Phyllis ....... ........ 1 01, 152 VVoodruf'f, Sybil .,........... ........ 1 19 VVhinery, John i.,....,.., ....... 2 64, 276 VVilley, Roger ........... ........... 2 70 VVooldridge, Arville ..................,....... 311 Whisler, Patricia .....,... .....,,.,.... 1 40 VVilliams, Erma , ..,... 131 VVooters, Richard ....................,.,,....., 120 VVhitacre, Harold .......... 264 VVilson, Jane ......... 163 VVorthington, Janice ,..,...................... 155 White, Betty .....,....... ....... 1 31 Wilson, Jean ....... 155 Worton, Judith .,..,.,..... 126, 134, 138, 160 White, Cody ..,.......... ...,.., 3 14 VVilson, Jeanne ....... 264 VVomen's Recreation VVhite, LaVere ..........,.,... ....,.,... 2 71 VVilson, Robert ............... .....,..... 3 09 Association ...,.. 220, 221, 222, 223, 224 VVhiteford, Geraldine ,,., ............. 1 55 XVilt, Robert Vander ..,,. .............. 2 18 XVright, Barbara ,,,,,,,,.,.....,...,,....,...,.. 264 Whiteford, Patricia ........ ......,.,........ 1 55 VVine, Bertha ....,......... ................. 1 60 XVright, Lt. Leslie I ............ ........ 2 95 Whiting, Flora .,....,....... ............. 8 5, 148 VVirdS, Dorothy ........ ........ 2 20, 224 VVright, Mary .,............ ..,..,., 1 31 VVhitworth, James ............................ 264 VVirds, Verdell ..... ............., 2 64 VVuriu, Thomas .........,., ..,,... 9 8, 99 VVhitworth, Rex ......,.,,........ 213, 264, 269 Witcher, Dale ....... . ..,.... 277 VVylie, Margaret , ,,,,., ....,,,. 1 36 QQ he Y is for Youth, A state of existence, Which everyone clings to With gamey persistence. Y Yanausch, Dean Andrew. .,.,...,,, 185 Yoder, Emily .... ,,..,... 2 82 Young Men's Christian ASs0ciation,,120 Yeakel, Amy ..,..,...,.,....,,., ............. 2 85 Young, George .,.,. ....... 2 71 Youngstrom, Marjorie ,..,..,,...,.,,,.,....., 282 Yoakam, Richard .,.,,,,,,, ....... 1 01, 166 Young VVomen's Christian Assoc ..... 121 Af' f 25 'X -KKK M Z is for Zero-hour. At war and at school, The same advice works- Just keep your head cool. Z Zabel, ,lflUl9S ---,,-,.-..... ........,. 8 8 Zervas, Lula .,,... .......,... 2 64 Zlotky, Beverly ........, ........ 8 5, 133 ZHbl011d1l, VVHTFCH ............, 264 Zeta Phi Eta ....,..,. ,.,.,,.,,.,,.. 1 10 Zoeckler, Sally ..,. H .....,,,.. 159 Zafhflngef, P3111 .,,.... ....... 1 85, 197 Zeta Tau Alpha .,..,... ,....... 1 62, 163 Zones, Sam .......,.,.... .............,. 1 24 Zefll, Col. .............. ................. 2 93 Zimmerman, Earl ...,,. ...,....... 3 11 Zumsteg, Patricia .,...... ......... 1 19, 155 Zelger, Vvayne ......,. ....... 2 64, 276 Zimmerman, Elaine .. ....... 264 Zybell, Mary Ellen ........ ............ 2 20 Page 337 I-XS YUU WERE Ugcuzga fo . . . Bill Norris for his advice and cooperation in compiling the 1945 HAWKEYE. ' The Pontiac Engraving Co. for their fine engraving. The Economy Advertising Co. for the printing and binding. The S. K. Srnith Co. for the cover. Max Christie for the photographs of the beauties. Marie Gacldis, Tannye Burnett, Sue Ono and Louise Johnston, for photographs. K Fred Kent, University photographer, for his many pictures. Phyllis Shambaugh for the alphabet cartoons and verses. My staff for the many hours they spent on the HAWKEYE THE EDITOR. V Q W wi .1 In ii rel 'fin-sv rv.. S2 . au., 4 va: .. M ...M ,..1,,.w AQ3fQQgQ4LanE':2.'1,:.9 fi- ",.f,Lf.,':2.4.. um,fiL5H..': .,,.zQ,',f3 Mnmubjg.,


Suggestions in the University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) collection:

University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Page 1

1936

University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collection, 1943 Edition, Page 1

1943

University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collection, 1944 Edition, Page 1

1944

University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 1

1946

University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

1947

University of Iowa - Hawkeye Yearbook (Iowa City, IA) online yearbook collection, 1948 Edition, Page 1

1948

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.