University of Houston - Houstonian Yearbook (Houston, TX)

 - Class of 1961

Page 1 of 404

 

University of Houston - Houstonian Yearbook (Houston, TX) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 404 of the 1961 volume:

- r "" """r'r'41 . E 1'---' rl-Jn -vv ----1---vw-Y , ....-....,..,:v--f-qw,-.,..':'-----w-7-7-f-A-4N-1-re-rv-1-4--71---vg-v-1-..-,.--mm.qqvqm-Mqgwfwvv-qmnvvumfwww-1.,..,-.-w-,m1-.-w-w-w---,-.-.-..,...........,.,. 1 1 . 'V , ,N , H 11, .' f 4' ' , , . - " 1 ' - -, V, .' 4. 1, -A ,Mm ,,. . ,Ugf-H,.,s,U-1-,.'.,r-, , , - -vxfv-N-:-:J -- ,A 1 nh - ' f- 1 1 . f- - - .,-,- .. f . . . -.-:.,K,,YfAf .. . v, , ,, ., . 4 1 . ' x. X , . A 4M 4 15-.e lm., n . 1 , . , . 9 ' ' l . ' A f 1961 A Changed Look For A Changing Universi'ry. The Official Yearbook of the EDITOR John T. Gehbauer UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON As?3'3lTl'2E,'?fl3's Kafhy Younger Sporfs Ediior , Mike Cook Houston, Texas' Adverfising Manager -Volume 27- Al Vela Color Phofography h Ted Jo nson-pages 8 84 9 John- T. Gehbauer-pages I74 8: l75 " J I in W'-"""i1-1 Administration and Facilities: Pages I0-39 Classes: Pages 40-I07 The cutline and the picture on page 1 give you an idea of what you will find in this 392 page edition of the Houstonian. A Changed Look For a Changing University-sums up the feelings of the 1961 Houstonian staff about the style to use in recording the 1960-61 school year. INTRODUCTION As you thumb through yearbooks, old or new, one thing comes to mind . . . "I am looking at a school yearbookf' All yearbooks have those little things that make them common to other yearbooks-page after page of nothing but individual class pictures . . . page after page of group pictures that look like "line-ups" . . . monotonous use of type . . . little or no thought of making it easier for the reader to find a particular per- son, group or activity . . . most contain no real information, just pictures and words that make the reader recall that, "This did occur.", but Why or where or what brought it about is never mentioned. X can D 0 sm? ., fc Organizations: Pages 206-297 Athletics: Pages 298343 College lite: Pages IO8-I73 Vanity Fair: Pages I74-205 But not your 1961 HOUSTONIAIN . , , Your class section is livened by abstract photographs that reflect various phases of life at the University. In the section devoted to organizations the groups are divided into smaller groups and photographed informally. A minimum of two type styles is used on any one page and as many as five styles and faces on some pages. Counting all of the styles and faces through- out the book, excluding those in the advertising section, the number will reach six. If you want to find someone or some- thing, use one of three indexes . . . the General Index on these two pages . . . the Student Index in the Advertising and Stu- dent Index Section . . . or the Organization Index found on the last page of this book. Information-you will find it. Chrono- logical accounts of student activities, the degrees held by various deans, the weight of football lettermen, a special account of the campaign for state support and much, much more. Within the covers of this book you will find the most read- able, comprehensive account available of the happenings of the 1960-61 school year as they concerned the University of Houston. Advertising 8: Student Index: Pages 346-392 GENERAL INDEX STATE SUPPORT -AA-AA.A..-.A....-.. ADMINISTRATION AND FACILITIES fjiiffjff CLASSES ................ A ..... A ........ A ...... AA.AA... ....... A .... .... Freshmen ..................... A ...... A ......... --...-...A..A.AA Sophomores A ...... - ..... -.A.-.A.A ..,.. -A Juniors ..... - .... A ..... A-A...-..A.....- Seniors A.-A.-AA..A. -AA....-A ...... -.A.....-...-. Senior's Activity List .... A..- .......... A.AA-..A....-.-- Graduates ..-...A..-A.AA...AA.-A-.A-.....A..-...........A Law Students .... - ...... A ...... AA.--.A-.....-.A.- .... A.-.A- COLLEGE LIFE ....... A..A.A-.A...--..-..A..-A..AAA Calendar A..A..A-.A.. .... AA .... A..AA.....A.A.... Cougar Capers .... A..--..---........---.. Songfest A.AA-.A...- .... AA.A--A..A.A.--....A Stage Presentations A.. ...... A. ....., A..A.AA- .... -..AA Commencement ...A .....,.. A ,......... ........ -...A..- VANITY FAIR .. .... --.....AA ...... A.-..A....-.A-.- Miss Houstonian ..A....AA.A..-...A..-..--.. Favorites .,,.,.....,. ..AA........A.- ....... --... ..... AA.. Beauties ....,.,..... A..AA.......A- ....... A.A ..... ...A.AA Best Dressed Coed -.-A-AA ...... A-.A.A..-.- ..... A.-- Homecoming Queen A ......................... A.....A-.-A ....... A Honorees -A...AA.-.A.- .... - .... -..A ....... A ........ . Outstanding Students ....... AA--.A.-- ..... A.-..A- ORGANIZATIONS ......... -...A...A-.--.--...A...A...-AAA- Architects A. ..... A.A ....... AA.A.A.AA..A Engineers .... AA.AA.A..A.-.A..- Creeks .... ................ .AA .A. Honor A .... A.. ...AA..AA...AA..A.A ............ .A...A..A.....-A..-.. Music A. ........ ..A..A.AA..A..A..A.A..A ..A... A-..A.A...-A-. Professional A...A.A..AAA....AAA ...... A... .... A .... A..A...- Advertising A ...... ..A-A-A-.A..- ..... ..-..A Drama ....... .... A .... ..... .A . AAA.. Education -..A...A..A.AA .............. ........... A. ...A.A.A.. Finance ...A ........ -.-AA .............................. -.-..... Journalism-Photography A.- .... A..-A-A .... ...A Law ......... A .... A..-.AAA...AA ....... A ..... AA...A.-... Marketing -....A-..-.A. ..... -..A-..-.-..- Medical .... A ...... -A ......... A...A---A...AA.A.-. Physical Education A.-..AA ........... -.A.A..-A..... Radio-TV .... -.A..--A-.-A..-..A.A-A.A ......... Speech A..--.A.AA.A.AA.-...A...A.A-A..AA .... -...-..... Technology .... AA...A ...... A.AA..A-.A..-AA...A....... Transportation ..-AA.A..A-.A .... ..-- ...... A.-. Writing A ....,..... A ......... .A.A..-A ........ ...A.A-A.- Publications ...,...... AAA...A...A.A.A.A.A ..... A...A ........ Cougar .............. A.A.A-..A.AA. ...... A.A .... A..A,A..AA,A. Houstonian .... A..-...A......A- .......... A..A.AAA.A...-. Harvest ...A..A..A...A.-.A...A-..AA....-A..A.AA.- Le Bayou .-A.-..-..A.A.A..AA..A-........... Religious ........ ...AAA...A.,- .......... A.A.A..-.-A...A....A..A Service A. .... A...A.A-- .... .AA .......... .A.A.-AAAA..-. Student Government ..............,...,..........,......,..,.............. ROTC ...................................... A ..,......... A ........................ SPORTS A..A ...... A-..A.A .... A.A.A.A.A-AA.A...A.A..AA Football .... A ..... A...A.A .... .A-.-A.A.....A.A...A..A.. Basketball - -... .-.- .. Track -A..A.....A.A-A....A.AA .... A .....,.. .A.AAAAA. .... AAA... Baseball ..A..-A.A...AA...- ............ -.A..A.AA...AAA...-.. Golf .... -A.A .............. ..-AA ................ A- ......... A .... AA.. Tennis A.--.A .... -...A....A.A-A.....A.........A..A. Intramurals A.-.A.A..---.AAA.. EDITOR'S COMMENT -AAA..AA.A..-A.-A.A-AAAA.A.A ADVERTISING AND STUDENT INDEX ORGANIZATIONS INDEX A...AAA.-.AAAAAAA.AAAA.A...-A 4 10 4-0 42 56 66 74 94- 100 104 108 110 137 144 148 168 174 176 178 184 192 193 194 196 206 208 208 215 244- 246 248 248 248 249 252 254- 254 256 258 260 262 262 264 264 266 267 267 270 273 273 274 278 286 292 298 300 312 322 336 328 334 340 344- 346 392 3 U. OF H. BIDS FDR STATE SUPPORT AERIAL VIEW of the center portion of the main campus, featuring the Ezekiel W. Cullen Building and reflection pool. State Aid . . . state aid . . . STATE AID! Two of the most popular Words on the University of Houston campus this year. These two words were on the tongues of practi- cally everyone . . . administrators, faculty, staff and students. Thoughts concerning the subject of state aid were inserted into almost every conversation. Never before had any one idea hit with such impact. Of course, never before had there been anything of such magnitude. For state aid means the growth of a great university . . . it offers the chance of higher education to many deserving people . . . and the big thing- it will relieve the students of a financial strain that has become greater and greater. 4 EDITOR'S NOTE The 1961 HOUSTONIAN, fully realizing the history that has been made, presents an account of the key events during the 134-day campaign to obtain Senate and House of Repre- sentatives approval of full state sup- port for the University of Houston. Keep in mind as you read, the months of preparation and years of study, by interested and dedicated per- sons, preceding the opening of the 57th Texas Legislature on January 10, 1961. - 134-DAY CAMPAIGN BEGINS January 10, 1961: Rep. James A. Tur- man 'of Gober is named Speaker of the House today. He is believed to be strongly in favor of our bill. January 16, 1961: First of a series of meetings of the Harris County delegation at which Senate and HXR bills, timing, probable areas of support and opposition are discussed in great detail. We are seek- ing a low HXR number. BILLS ARE NUMBERED .lanuary 23, 1961: Bill is introduced in the Senate at 11:05 a.m., by Senator Robert W. Baker, who had been immediately rec- ognized by Lt. Governor Ben Ramsey. The bill, SB 2, is referred to the State Affairs Committee. Delegation members in the House send word that Rep. Robert C. Eck- hardt has arranged to get the low number of HB 11 there. January 24, 1961: HB 11 is introduced in the House at 41:15 p.m. by Rep. Criss Cole. Co-signers include the entire Harris County HXR delegation and 34 other members from every area of the state. HB 11, is then referred to the House State Affairs Committee. DIF F ICULTIES FORESEEN February 1, 1961: There are increasing indications that most of our difficulties will be found in the Senate, where a hard core of resistance to any legislation involving major spending is developing. February 13, 1961: At a hearing before the State Affairs Committee of the Senate in the afternoon, the final vote is 10-7 in our favor. At one time during the after- noon, because of other meetings, hearings, etc., we have exactly three of our supporters present at the committee table. Closeness of vote is distressing although we are pleased to'get the bill out of committee. In the evening the State Affairs Com- mittee of HXR refers the bill to a subcom- mittee with a minimum of unfriendlyques- tioning. However, it is apparent that the committee will want an even more thorough study in spite of the months already spent on the problem. February 15, 1961: An intensive new program of contacting members of Senate and I-UR is begun by the delegation, with assistance from members over the state who are backing us. A decision is reached to push SB 2 first, possibly trying for a vote in mid-March. ,3- SENATE STATE AFFAIRS COMMITTEE Iistens os University of Houston Vice-President McEIhinney an- swers questions concerning the University's finonciol status, March 8, 1961 : We are approaching the necessary 2-1 margin needed to bring SB 2 up in theVSenate. TEST VOTE MEETS DEFEAT March 20, 1961.' We are advised to try a run in the Senate, in order to get an absolute measure of strength, as the op- position is gathering its forces and time is running out. March 23, 1961: On a test vote to bring MOTION PICTURES bring the campus to Austin for members of the House Stote Affairs Com- mittee. up SB 2, at 11:15 a.m., we are defeated 14--15 in the Senate. The vote is actually 16-13, but two of our supporters voted "no" when it becomes apparent that we do not have a chance of mustering the 2-1 margin necessary. Post-mortem decisions: This is a defeat, but it clarifies our position. We must now abandon the hope of obtaining support in 1961, and hope that somehow it will be possible to bring the University in the system as of 1963. April 1, 1961: An emergency meeting of community leaders is called in Houston to discuss a series of contacts with mem- bers of the Legislature, principally to im- prove our position in the Senate. CAMPUS IMPRESSES SUBCOMMITTEE April 8, 1961: HXR subcommittee holds a two-hour public hearing in the M. D. Anderson Library Auditorium. An un- biased firm supplies an evaluation of 334,000,000 on our campus and physical plant, which seems to favorably impress the subcommittee. April 12, 1961: We are again approach- ing a 2-1 majority in the Senate, with the adoption of the 1963 entrance date and other amendments. The HX R State Affairs Committee votes out HB 11 unanimously, on the basis of a highly favorable recom- mendation from the subcommittee which visited the campus. 11 DAYS OF FILIBUSTERS BEGIN April 17, 1961: Senator Baker is able to bring up SB 2 at 11:20 a.m. by the bar- est possible margin of 20-10. Opposing sen- ators then begin a determined filibuster. April 18, 1961: Filibuster continues in the Senate. Adjournment comes at 6 p.m. by agreement because obvious opposition can go past midnight and no Senate bills can be debated tomorrow or the next day. We are ready for a vote in the House and believe that we have between 85 and 90 votes there on HB 11. April 19, 1961: HB 11 is engrossed fpassed on to second readingl today at 2:20 p.m. with a vote of 84-311-. Rep. Cole tries immediately for the 2-1 margin needed for suspension and third passage, but fails 36-48. After analysis, the delegation goes to work at once on the approximately 15 ad- ditional votes they believe can be changed. 5 HOUSE PASSES BILL April 21, 1961: The HXR passes HB 11 by voice vote at 10:46 a.rn. with only scat- tered opposition. The bill goes to the Sen- ate, where it has little or no chance of com- ing out of committee. Concentration is con- tinued upon SB 2 and breaking the fili- buster. FILIBUSTERS CONTINUE April 24, 1961: Filibustering is resumed in the Senate, but adjournment comes at 6:30 p.m. April 25, 1961: The filibuster continues in the Senate until 11:30 p.m. Senate bills cannot be debated tomorrow or the next day, but we will attempt to keep the Senate in session Friday, when SB 2 will again be pending business. April 27, 1961: We are successful in bringing the Senate back into session to- morrow, by a vote of 144-13. FILIBUSTEB BROKEN April 28, 1961 : Finally, the filibuster is broken at 10:50 p.m., and SB 2 is en- grossed. The key vote was at 5:30 p.m., when Senator Jarrard Secrest of Temple agreed to break an 11-11 tie, making possi- ble a 12-10 vote to 'Lmove the previous question," and thereby limit debate. The opposition agreed to engrossment if we would not attempt final passage before ad- journment tonight. As We did not have the Votes for final passage, this was accepted. It was 11 days ago that the filibuster be- an. g May 8, 1961: Senator Baker attempts immediate setting of HB 11 by the State Affairs Committee of the Senate, but is overruled by the chairman, Senator Ward- low Lane of Center. We are examining all possibilities. Time until final adjournment is running very short. May 9, 1961: A difficult situation is arising in the HXR, as the members divide further and further on controversial bills. 6 Probing continues for an opening in the Senate. SENATE PASSES BILL May 12, 1961 : Senator Baker finds three opposing senators gone as the session be- gins at 10:30 a.m. Senator Louis Crump of San Saba agrees to vote with us and we win, 18-8, the right to bring SB 2 up at once for third reading and final passage. The really critical vote, however, is a 14-12 decision whereby Senator Baker is able again to move the previous question and forestall another filibuster. With the pre- vious question in effect, SB 2 is passed in just six minutes, at 10:4-1 a.m. FILIBUSTERS SLOW LEGISLATIVE ACTION A HOUSE SUBCOMMITTEE visits the campus and conducts a public hearing. Chancellor A. D. Bruce and subcommittee members W. H. Pieratt, H. G. Wells and S. F. Collins look over a scale model of the physical plant. Senator Baker goes personally to the floor of the House, announces passage and receives a great ovation. HOUSE COMMITTEE HOLDS BILL May 15, 1961 : It appears more and more that there will be a delay in having SB 2 voted out favorably by the State Affairs Committee of the HXR, which is necessary to get the measure to the floor for passage. It is decided to accept SB 2 exactly as is, because of the extreme danger in any fur- ther delays as adjournment rapidly ap- preaches. May 17, 1961: Still no action in the State Affairs Committee of the House, al- '1- STUDENTS EXPRESS their feelings through signs they intend to carry to Austin with the hope that legislators will recognize the sincerity of the University's request. though we understand the committee is for the bill. Members of our House delegation are beginning to work the floor intensive- ly again for final passage votes. SB 2 is heard at 11:45 p.m. after the Senate had voted redistricting bill. It is referred to the same subcommittee which visited the cam- pus, with instructions to report back Mon- day, May 22. H May 19, 1961: It is believed that there are over 100 favorable votes in the House, and possibly 115 in the event a 4-f5ths vote is needed to suspend the rules for final passage of SB 2 on the same day it is en- grossed. OPPOSlTION'S EFFORTS FAIL May 22, 1961 : SB 2 is reported out favor- ably by the State Affairs Committee of the House at 7:45 p.m. after last-ditch attempts by one or two opponents on the 21-man committee to amend the measure and there- by kill it. SB 2 PASSES HOUSE Tuesday, May 23, 1961: Rep. Cole brought up SB 2 at 1124116 a.m., and the bill is engrossed 111-29. He then moved for the 4f5ths margin required for final passage immediately. With the strongest possible support from Speaker Turman, this vote is won 117-26, fverification 117-231. At 12:29 p.m., SB 2 is passed 108-35 and sent to the governor for his signature. Thus ends almost two full years UH AND ITS STUDENTS WAIT AS BILLS ARE CONSIDERED of exacting planning and work, plus 134- extremely difficult days in the Legislature. In September of 1963 a new dawn will break over Texas as the Uni- versity of Houston takes its place as the 20th member in the Texas Sys- tem of Higher Education. . . . A NEW DAWN WILL BREAK SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE JAMES A. TURMAN is interviewed immediately offer the bill's finol poss- age. l 4 1 LT. GOVERNOR BEN RAMSEY expresses his views on the UniversiTy's success. 7 IN THE GOVERNOR'S OFFICE awaiting the signing of SB 2 are Representatives Gorrison, Grover, Cole, Eckhcirdt, Shipley, Floyd, Whitfield ond Miller June 17, 1961: Governor of the State of Texas Price Daniel signs SB 2, which brings the University of Houston into the state school system effective September, 1963. ,jx 1 i not fi i fs, ' 1 K ' ' ' 1 X- f , ' x " . i - fi ' :.f - "v -Hex f , V . xx ',,,.'v .J g li XY v f I 1' l I 'V Sl W sl N l., tn, X L X7 r rj ,l iv . Q in ll -, 5 i l iw s WJ i t D 1 I ' , J 4, pl, ,V l y' , tfffxl I' . in , . Y. ,Y fl, .k ,- l , -v LJ A gl., 4, F V Q ff Q Yl ncxtor Boker stands beside Governor Doniel. The For Their Successful Efforts in Bringing State Support to the University of Houston The 1961 HOUSTONIAN Pays Tribute to - Lt. Governor Ben Ramsey . . . Speaker of the House James A. Turman . . . the Administration . . . Faculty . . . Student Body . . . Alumni . . . Citizenry of Harris County . . . numerous Supporters throughout the state . . . and all News Media. A n d Harris County Delegation: Senator Robert W. Baker, Representatives Criss Cole fchairman of the HXR clelegationl, Robert C. Eckhardt, Paul Floyd, Don Garrison, W. H. Miller, Henry C. Grover, Don Shipley and J. Charles Whitfield, I iff 2, . -v . Hr . P, N 1 v FACILITIES A university can become great only through the com- bined efforts of its essential components . . . Its administration . . . its deans . . . its faculty . . . its alumni . . . its students . . . Because of their effective planning, our components . . . have aided the University's growth . . . gained prestige for the University among academic circles because of more stress on scholastic prac- tices . . . furthered the University's strides in cultural attain- ment . . . recognized and developed the great potentialities of our metropolitan University. Now as a grand finale in 1961, the UniVersity's com- ponents see their efforts rewarded with state support be- ginning in 1963. It has all been possible because of our stratagematic ad- ministration. Board of Governors SIXTY FORM BOARD BOARD OF GOVERNORS' OFFICERS: Col. W. B. Bates, chairman: Mrs. James P. Houstounn, secre- tary, Mrs. Ray L. Dudley, assistant secretaryp Lamar Fleming, Jr., vice-chairman. A legislative act of 194-5 provided for 15 regents, who along with 4-5 additional Houstonians form the University of Houston's Board of Governors. Since its formation in 1956, the Board, along with governing administrative practices, has worked to solve the Uni- versity's problem of operating deficits. The problem has continued to grow, primarily because of necessary raises in faculty salaries. In the period from 1957-1961 the Board raised the sum of 351,900,000, plus sizeable matching gifts to bridge the gap between income and outgo. A committee was established to seek permanent endowment funds. During 1960 and the major portion of 1961, the Board as a group, and as in- dividuals, gave their full-hearted support to help bring about a successful conclu- sion to the bid for full state support. W. Leland Anderson ar lsaac Arnold Col. W. B. Bates "' Warren S. Bellows, Sr. Ben C. Belt Mrs. John H. Blaffer Naurice G. Cummings Mrs. John de Menil Mrs. Ray L. Dudley' Dr. H. J. Ehlers J. A. Elkins, Jr. J. A. Ellcins, Sr. 4' I2 init T Robert L. Boggs W. Stewart Boyle 'l' Mrs. George A. Butler Marvin K. Collie Donald L. Connelly Roy Henry Cullen T. C. Evans A. J. Farfel S. P. Farish Wm. G. Farrington ll' .John C. Flanagan Charles Fleetwood "' Administration Lamar Fleming, Jr. 'l' Claud B. Hamill Earl C. Hanlramer Maurice Hirsch Harrison C. Hobart Sterling T. Hogan "' Mrs. Max Levine John F. Maher Mrs. Douglas B. Marshall A. G. McNeese, Jr. Leopold L. Meyer H. J. Mosser Charles A. Saunders Stanley W. Shipnes Curtis M. Smith Franlr C. Smith R. E. Smith Ross Stewart "' Regent 'H' Deceased May 22, l96l MEETING between the Executive Committee of the University of Houston Board ot Governors and various administrators. .mir .1 C! se? Palmer Hutcheson 'l' Russell L. Jolley John T. Jones, Jr. Mrs. R. C. Kuldell Alfred W. Lasher, Jr. F. M. Law "' TY, at l Travis E. Parish Charles A. Perlitz, Jr. Charles F. Reed, Jr. Corbin J. Robertson 'K James W. Rockwell Simon Salrowitz 'l' 5. John R. Suman Howard Tellepsen Milton R. Underwood "' Jack Valenti Mrs. Gus S. Wortham Andrew J. Wray Chancellor CHANCELLOR'S DREAM SPACIOUS YARDS surrounding the chancellor's home provide an ex- cellent place for outdoor relaxation away from the campus. flf?-'iT"'i"' ' - ' ' 1 "f'if'-'fl9??4g" sf..-ifif--et a! t fr Q W5 .f V . ., .4..,. . 1 ff l l iv" ff 1 -'l 1 .,L,g,,5 " ,5,i,f W - .wi-:Q .2 i i i Lx lat' MUSIC SERVES as a pastime for General and Mrs. Bruce who often spend leisure time at the piano recalling some of their favorite melodies. I4 GENERAL A. D. BRUCE BUILT GOODWILL FOR UNIVERSITY Another victory may be credited to an eminent tactician . . . the victory of gaining a place in the Texas System of Higher Education for the University of Houston. A. D. Bruce, Lt. General, USA Retired, came to the University of Houston on September 1, 1954, to assume the office of presi- dent. In December of 1956, he was elevated to the newly-created chancellor position. Previous to his arrival in Houston he served as the command- ant fpresidentj of the Armed Forces Staff College. General Bruce received a B.S. degree from Texas A8zM College in 1916 and an honorary LL.D. in 194-6. Entering the regular Army as a second lieutenant in June, 1917, he retired after 37 years of active service. His record in World Wars I and II is indicated by this nationis Distinguished Service Cross and decorations from the Army, Navy, Air Force and foreign governments. During World War II, he activated the Tank Destroyer Cen- ter at Fort Hood, Texas, and later commanded the 77th Infantry Division during some of the most crucial fighting in the South Pacific. His postwar duties included those of the first governor of Hokkaido, Japan, while his division occupied that island, and later in service in Korea. Since his return to his home state, Chancellor Bruce has served as a board director of the Southwest Research Institute, trustee of Scott and White Memorial Hospital and held numerous mem- berships in Houston clubs. Much of the wider academic and over-all acceptance expe- rienced by the University has been made possible through the chancelloris outstanding service and steadfast devotion. Truly a great leader . . . General A. D. Bruce. AN AMUSING STORY brings a laugh to General Bruce as he and his wife sit in the living room of the chancellor's home at 3612 Parkwood. ..-,- ,f i ' , N, 5 5-M. o "FZ OOO ' 4 fi w., 'N t wr . bv lf' fn dh 'E' 4 Vice Presidents UH NAMES NEW PRESIDENT TUESDAY, MAY 30, 1961-The govern ing board of the University of Houston ac- cepted the application of General A.D. Bruce for retirement as the chief executive, effective August 31, 1961. Announcing the retirement, Colonel W. B. Bates, chairman of the board, paid tribute to General Bruce for his "distin- guished service since assuming leadership of the University." He said that General Bruce would become chancellor emeritus. Simultaneously, Colonel Bates announced the appointment of Dr. Philip G. Hoffman as president and chief executive, effective September 1, 1961. He was the unanimous choice of a selection committee appointed to nominate a new president. DR. PHILIP G. HOFFMAN MADE CHIEF EXECUTIVE A TELEVISION NEWSREEL cameraman records the press conference state- ments concerning the change. '7' VIEWERS AT HOME saw and heard General Bruce commend Dr. Hoffman for his service to the University. VICE PRESIDENCY IS BIG JOB Dr. Philip G. Hoffman came to the University of Houston in 1957 as vice-president and dean of faculties. Prior to coming to Houston, Dr. Hoffman was Dean of General Extension Division of the Oregon State System of Higher Edu- cation, and later Dean of Faculties and professor of history at Portland State College, Portland, Oregon. Born in Kobe, Japan in 1915, while his parents were serving as missionaries, he came with them to the United States at the age of five to reside in Oregon. After receiving a bachelor's degree at Pacific Union College and master's at the University of Southern California, Dr. Hoff- man entered the navy at the beginning of World War H to serve as a naval intelligence officer. Following the war he returned to Ohio State University and he received his doctorate in history in 1948. Dr. Hoffman went to Oregon in 1953 following four years as assistant professor and associate professor at the University of Alabama. I6 X. I S. I n i n Dr. Philip G. Hoffman Administration I C. F. McElhinney V.P. IS BUSINESS MANAGER HIGH EXECUTIVE OFFICE HELD BY UH GRADUATE A native Houstonian, Dr. Patrick J. Nicholson has been vice- president in charge of University Development since 1957. Dr. Nicholson received his B.A. from Rice Institute in 1942, an I.A. in 1943 and an lVl.B.A. in 1946 from Harvard Uni- versity. The University of Houston conferred a Ph.D. upon him in 1959. He served with the U.S. Army Signal Intelligence Corps and is currently a captain assigned to the Office of Chief of Informa- tion, The Pentagon, as mobilization designee. Before coming to the University the vice-president served with public relations firms specializing in publications and com- munications. Since his arrival at the University of Houston, Dr. Nicholson has acted in the capacities of lecturer in management, executive director of development and assistant to the president, as well as vice-president. Dr. Nicholson heads the Student Publications Committee which governs the actions and policies of the student-published periodicals. Born in Truro, Nova Scotia, in 1907, C. F. lVlcElhinney grew up in Halifax. He came to the University of Houston during its first year, 1934. While teaching courses in education and psychology, he acted as assistant to Dr. W. W. Kemmerer, then director of research for the Houston Public School System. When Dr. Kemmerer came to the Univer- sity in 1939, Mr. lVIcElhinney succeeded him as director of research, a position he filled until 1945. Mr. Mclillhinney received his B.A. degree from Arcadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, in 1926 and his lVl.A. degree in education administration from Columbia University in 1929. After leaving Columbia he taught briefly at State Teachers College in Troy, Ala- bama, and Mississippi State College for Women. When the University was separated from the public school system's administration in 1945, McEll1inney became its business manager. In 1950 he was named vice-presi- dent and was acting president during 1953- 1954. Dr. Patrick J. Nicholson I7 Student Life Deans DEANS OFFER COUNSELING ro DEAN JAMES E. WILLIAMSON listens to a stuclent's problem. Men! Got a problem? Need a ques- tion answered? Want to form a new or- ganization? The place to go is the Dean of Men7s office. There you will meet a soft-spoken man. You will find him willing to listen and eager to help . . . you will meet the man we call "DL Will." Dean of Men James E. Williamsoii started his tenure of service with the Uni- versity in .Iuly of 1942. His educational background includes a B.S. degree from Stephen F. Austin State College in 1930g M.A. degree from Texas Technological College in 1936 and Ed.D. from Colorado State College in 1950. Since coming to the University Dean Williamson has held the positions of as- sociate professor of mathematics, profes- sor of education, acting director of loans and scholarships and director of student activities. Registrar REGISTRAR RETAINS ACADEMIC RECORDS On our campus there is one office con- cerned with how many and what courses you are taking, your current grades, scho- lastic standing and numerous other details. The office is that of Registrar. It has been said that at the time the man in charge took the position, he was the youngest registrar of a major institu- tion in the U. S. Ramon A. Vitulli, Registrar, joined the ranks of the University in January, 1945. He worked as assistant in admissions un- til 1948, when he was made director of admissions. In 1950 he was promoted to his present position of registrar. A graduate of the University of Hous- ton, Mr. Vitulli received his B.B.A. in 1948. RAMON A. VITULLI working at punch card filing drawer. I8 Administrationl UH STUDENTS Fall means Rush and an office that is just that, a rush, is the Dean of Women's . , office. l All sorority activities pass through this office, as do any items concerning the women on our campus. Dean of Women, Mrs. Bessie M. Ebaugh has been with the university since its founding. She received her B.A. from New- comb College, Tulane University in 1925 and M.A. from Columbia University in 1927. Since that time Mrs. Ebaugh has attended summer sessions of six addition- al universities. Previous professional experience in- cludes instructor in Latin at Newcomb College, Tulane Universityg chairman of . the division of languages and fine arts and H professor of English at the University of Q ,,,,,, A Houston. Q ivivi I DEAN BESSIE M. EBAUGH discusses Rush regulations with a member of Panhellenic. Student Life Assistant Deans THEY SUPPORT STUDENT ACTIVITIES A veteran faculty member, L. Standlee Mitchell joined the faculty in 1933 when the University was still a junior college. "Chief," the name by which he is best known, holds a B.A. from Abilene Christian College and M.A. from Colorado Col- lege of Education. Lillian C. Rowan Mrs. Lillian C. Rowan is a graduate of the University of Houston. Receiving ber BS. degree in 1952, she began work- ing for the University a year later as a staff writer for the Office of Information. L L. S. "Chief" Mitchell I9 Junior College TWO-YEAR PROGRAM MAY LEAD TO DEGREE In the spring of 1927 the Board of Edu- cation established the Houston Junior Col- lege. When the University of Houston was established in 1934, the Junior College was continued as a part of the University sys- tem. One of the largest junior colleges in the state, it offers a two-year educational pro- gram and confers degrees, diplomas and certificates after completion of required courses. DEAN-Dr. Charles F. Hiller assumed the position of Junior College dean in June of 1955. He has served as bursar, registrar, dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and vice-president in charge of development and public relations. Dr. Hiller holds a B.A. from Lehigh University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University. 1, ........ .Ev ,X it 'llll ,if H i gym cokltci ak 809908 Q? 9-Us 'Ao ic H4525 1961-62 . DEAN-Charles F. Hiller Architecture NAAB OK 'S COLLEGE Education for the professional practice of architecture is the objective of the College of Architecture. The college intends that by continued learning its students will become outstanding members and leaders in their profesion and community. Since 1950-51 it has been the policy of the College to integrate all phases of architectural instruction in four channels: design, construction, aesthetics and graphics. Students are instructed by persons active in the practice of the architectural profession. They work in classrooms and laboratories in the modern, air-conditioned architecture building. DEAN-Richard W. Lilliott, Jr. entered University of Houston service in 1941. Since that time he has carried many titles, from part-time instructor to his current title of dean. He received his B.A. from Rice University and his M.A. from Colorado University. Under Dean Lilliotlfs guidance the College of Architecture was fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board in May of 1961. 20 DEAN-Richard W. Lilliott, Jr Graduate School VARIOUS DEGREES ARE OFFERED TO GRADUATES Graduate work was iirst offered at the University in 1939. Since that time masters degrees have been added to include most of the undergraduate curriculum. The school offers doctorates in education, psychology, chemical engineering, chemistry, economics and biology. Professional degrees are gained with stress on basic aca- demic preparation upon admission and an increasing trend toward thesis and dissertation requirements. DEAN-Dr. R. Balfour Daniels took his position in Sep- tember of 1959. Dr. Daniels had been acting dean of the school and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Previous to receiving his doctorate from Yale University in 1934, he had received a LL.B. and an M.A. from that same school. He had also attended Princeton University where he gained a B.A. Along with his duties as dean, Dr. Daniels is also a profes- sor of English. Colleges DEAN-R. Balfour Daniels MANY AN EVENING is spent at the drawing table by architectural students creating better designs. 1 r v 1 ' as Y S f iq is ll 1 kiln'-I l . ffl .' F Ji 's f U.. H , W Y Arts and Sciences BROAD EDUCATIQN STRESSED DEAN-Dr. Alfred R. Neumann 'N efiz fszpgi ' + -, -gsw rss - s xi IW' L 1' .,.,-4 ,, 855: , - ,J . Offering a basis for a broad, liberal education, the College of Arts and Sciences is the largest of the University's ten colleges. In addition to basic liberal arts courses, the college offers pre-professional training for students planning to enter medi- cal, dental, legal, theological, teaching and other professions. Included in the special facilities available to students are language and science laboratories, KUHT-TV and KUHF-FM, the COUGAR fstudent newspaperj and HOUSTONIAN Cyear- bookj. Students may choose to participate in the concerts, oper- ettas and recitals of the music departmentg drama department productions or on the nationally-known debate team of the speech department. DEAN-Dr. Alfred R. Neumann was promoted from acting dean to dean of the college in September of 1959. Born in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, Dr. Neumann at- tended primary and secondary school in that city. He received his B.A. degree from Marshall College, lVl.A. from the Uni- versity of Kentucky, M.A. from Harvard and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. Dr. Neumann joined the University faculty in 1953 as an assistant professor of foreign languages. A specialist in Ger- man studies, he has lectured and written extensively on the interrelation of German music and literature. gd -rf 4 'NNY is 4 ,rr -ga - 53.2-5. , A R - "Y-'inf' 5 ff--V Q 13 - . -ggff-, 151 2- ..-' ' ' ' N3 ""- ez- Q," e 4' f if :?"'xZ..-'-K, "LEi'il'5 A., ,TJ Aggrisasg fn ai ' AIX' -"4 4,- 415 ,g. sb-.r-1-:S 2 ,4 ,-V Q--.. ,Qu - -.r ,4.5.,...,, f"g . - JN. -if - f :Tv El , -Q :ggi ' L-Lsx-'5344 fl Xflsi 4 FIRST ON CAMPUS, The Roy G. Cullen Building, houses mcmy of the English and language classrooms. TUBES AND PIPETTES form cz labyrinth in The chemistry lciborofory os experiments become more deicuilecl cmd exqcfing, LANGUAGES ore learned more ecxsily Through the help of the modern language laboratory. Monitoring one of The lessons is Dr. Josephine Sobrino. Q ii 4 .1 -s.1"l' , lf LQ- Business DATA PROCESSING is carried oui in The Compuiing and Dafa Pro- cessing Cenier in the Heyne Building. N MODERN labs and equipment promote faster, more efficient learning in a iypewriiing class. ,lg ' AEE 0 c1e.s.....+- ff- 5- l CLINICS in various phases of management are held regularly io aid area businesses. NEWEST on the campus, The Fred J. Heyne Building houses The most modern of classroom facilities. s 3 s7zL,, 351513 U :rs-.rm , s 3 225452295 wikis ., Colleges POPULARITY GROWS Striving to provide substantial professional preparation for a business career, the College of Business Administration is one of the largest at the University. A student seeking a Bachelor of Business Administration de- gree may choose to concentrate in any of the fourteen major fields of specialization. The college also offers Bachelor of Accountancy and Master of Business Administration degrees. A Doctor of Philosophy in Economics degree is offered by the department of economics and finance. Housed in the Fred I. Heyne Building, a new air-conditioned i 1 15? 1-. B.B.A. DEGREE'S lk, fe structure, the college's equipment list includes electric and manual typewriters, as well as adding, calculating, tabulating, dictating and transcribing machines. N DEAN-Dr. Eugene H. Hughes came to the University in 194.7 to assume the position of dean. Three degrees have been bestowed upon himg a BS. from the University of Denver, an M.A. from Western State College and an Ed.D. from New York University. Dr. Hughes formerly taught at New York University's School of Commerce. He is author of the college-level textbook, Introduction to M odern Business. DUPLICATING machines, common to many offices, are included i in 1-Cli- DEAN-Dr. Eugene H. Hughes the business machine operations courses. -Tv-N 5'-we Education EDUCA Tons TRAIN HERE Along with its primary purpose of training teachers for public and private schools, the College of Education offers con- sultant and extension services in off-campus classes, counselling services, in-service educational programs and school surveys, as - well as guest lecturers and discussion leaders. The College confers a Bachelor of Science degree in education upon students who have completed four years of academic work with a maj or in education. Additional work can result in a Master of Education or Doctor of Education degree. Persons following the prescribed programs within the College are eligible for a teacher's certificate, required of all Texas ele- mentary and secondary school teachers. Accredited by the Texas Education Agency and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the college is a member of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. DEAN - Dr. Arvin N. Donner was named to this position during 1950. Before coming to the University he served as a public school administrator for 20 years and has been a visiting university professor in colleges throughout several states. L ii iii Y From the University of Iowa Dr. Donner holds BS., M.A. and ,al ,, K' Ph.D. degrees. DEAN'Df'-AFVITI DOUUGI' He is a member of numerous committees and councils con- cerned with education and leadership. The educator's articles frequently appear in professional journals and he 'has co-authored many published works in the field of education. . 31- T55 ii?" ' 2- am-, an -Y .- -...nun gl 1 4, g Cs V .,...z 'fs SPECIAL CLASSES such os those that help the student increase his rote of reading comprehension are fought in specially-designed rooms. 26 N 5 7 I f I 4. I5 Qiliffif.. . ,- wg.-1f.,, ai! li -.....--an ll 50 -2 '51, S -5 -, .-f' yas ' e-. F-,, lg-'ii '. I, . E.,-f' -is . bg l ,m S 4, "-1 X: f 'r 'ak I. . 4. 1 4 ,J -5-f g .,. i. X , f-- ,e 1" gn 28 En ineering r. assi: - ' : 1 . Wgiflq: L ' 3 iqg " .. lf' -' A ,,.,...---a DEAN-Dr. F. M. Tiller CHALLENGE is MET Engineering is a creative profession which contributes to the improvement of our social and economic order through tech- nological advances and development. Training and preparation of engineers offers a continuing challenge to our educational program. The Cullen College of Engineering has accepted and met this challenge. Facilitating modern, air-conditioned classrooms along with specialized laboratories such as the Nuclear Calibration Facility and an experimental oil well, the college has experienced widespread acceptance. Houston, located in the center of a rapidly expanding industrial area, offers great possibilities for field trips and on-job training to the engineering student. DEAN-Dr. F. M. Tiller comes to the University with an impressive list of teaching and professional experience. His formal education includes a B.Ch.E. degree from the University of Louisville, where he was the first honor graduate in engineering in 1937, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Tiller is the author of numerous papers and holds offices and membership in many local and national engineering socie- ties. Law f " t as - " it :W 22 I PROXIMITY of college and business is exemplified in this picture of the Science Building, as the Houston skyline looms in the background. REVIEWING court cases takes many hours of the law students' time. - Colleges l Ai E , lt.lli ,2 - 1' 1 Xls-Q52 fri vlilq' P .- J n as I MILES of pipes thread their way through this section of the engineering laboratory to interconnect the hundreds of testing mechanisms. RADIOACTIVE material stored at the Nuclear Calibration Facility provides a standard for calibrating nuclear-radiation measuring devices. I at " jf . ig 'i , ff , ,IA--ill! :mr A 217-."" f 'elif' aff s...,,...1f'-4" STATE BAR EXAMINATION CLIMAXES YEARS' WORK Occupying a wing of the air-conditioned M. D. Anderson Memorial Library, the College of Law was organized in 1947. The law library has approximately 34,500 volumes, including substantially all of the reported decisions in the United States and England. The college's method of instruction is designed to enable graduates to practive law wherever the Anglo-American system of law prevails. Other objectives are: KD to train students in the fundamental techniques required in the practice and administration of the lawg f2J to impart an understanding and appreciation of the high nature of the professiong and f3J to equip students for intelligent participation in the affairs of their community, state and nation. Each year graduates of this college rank among the best when taking the state bar examination. DEAN-Newell H. Blakely entered University service as an assistant professor of law in 1949. He assumed the position of dean in 1957. Dean Blakely holds a B.A. from Ouachita College, a Ph.M. from the University of Wisconsin, an LL.B. from the University of Texas and an LLM. from the University of Michigan. i . l l I DEAN-Newell H. Blakely 29 Optometry COLLEGE IS UNIQUE L.. .rl H" fpli . XJ sf li is , , " W-' . "9 ,pf J .i ' J!" 1-' - fi 'f f ... tm 4 ,iq if - -' - S .r..,4'f'f ' . In i Y f M V7.3-Af ' " Je f i c . , iv ' -A' j Opened in 1952, the University of Hous- ton's College of Optometry is the only one of its kind in the Southwest. Major objectives of the college are to train students in the knowledge and skills used in the practice of Optometry and to provide an understanding of the basic facts in the field of visual science. A two-year pre-professional program is designed to include the general require- ments for a hachelor's degree, while the three-year professional program provides the theoretical and practical knowledge needed for general practice in optometry. DEAN-Dr. Charles R. Stewart has held this position since the college's opening. The holder of a B.S., an lVl.S. and a Ph.D. from Ohio State University, he is resigning to enter private practice as of I une, 1961. Pharmacy DEAN-Dr. Charles R. Stewart SPOTLESS laboratories, such as this for phytochemistry, along with the most modern equipment available furnish students incentive for the exacting care required in the profession 'J ' :,. ll "R-' ' " ' "' f " it " :ff 1 l"'i di l' - , 'YA 1: I . ' :ii l l J 'Q , 2 li y fi l ll Q i f l l J .2 gs l ll in cu l' i Colleges . -an LENSES in o refrocting instrument old in checking o potient's vision . . . loter lenses ollow o closer look ot other lenses to be used in eye-glasses to correct the potient's sub-normol vision. FACILITIES ARE NEW As authorized by the Board of Regents, the College of Phar- macy opened in September of 1947. Quarters in the recently constructed Fred J. Heyne Building include the Mading Pre- scription Laboratory, the Women's Auxiliary Pharmacognosy Laboratory, the new Pharmaceutical Chemistry Laboratory and the new Operative Pharmacy Laboratory. Limited enrollment in each of these laboratories assures personal instruction for stu- dents. Additional research facilities are available to advanced stu- dents and faculty in the Texas Wholesale Druggists Phyto- chemistry Laboratory, as well as in the Ralston Staff Research Laboratory. DEAN-Dr. Noel M. Ferguson, dean of the college since 1949, has been actively engaged in the pharmaceutical world since 1930, either in education or directly in the profession. He received his Ph.G. degree in 1930 and Ph.C. in 1932 from the St. Louis College of Pharmacy. Dr. Ferguson received a BS., a B.A., an lVl.S. and a Ph.D. from Washington University. Professional experience includes operating a drug store, consultant to the pharmaceutical industry and senior research chemist. DEAN-Dr. Noel M. Ferguson -I Q. 44 is 'Q-s.. 5 1 sP..3Q 1.52 3 iii L Q -M. W V ...J V . W, Q' A . 'W -..,,-I. 4 ", , Q N Q ix, , ,"""'-W, - LE- ' 1- 1 'Wh "H" m E!"-:fu :': if iii? "X in - "--.. I " 7' Q v :.: ,. Q . I i ,A..N . Q V :-:' I O + . G " N Q ' U . L I S 'T' ui 1' I M H2 5 ' , I' lg .Ii , 'TT' . 5 7 - - f W" I Q i' '95 ' Tl f A ' M. -' i 1 Q x '21 , - - A -. ' H K , ei., Il A xt ' if - IA 1, I A , "" . ' ' - ' 53 ' K - I L., x..1 AIX' HI :ESL . ii Rf' 3 T A, 'T' ' 1- '1- , 1. X 1 'L -'Su , sf' . -cf?" :-3 'I X fist " X23 'Y A W 'bm . "' 'f'-f--l- ' 1 -em :sf ' P 5 ' DIVISIONS SPLIT TECH PROGRAM The College of Technology, established in 19411, embraces two divisions: KD The Technical Institute Division which is con- cerned with the education and training of engineering technicians, the men who plan, build, test, operate and service the tech- nological equipment designed and de- veloped by the scientist and the engineer, and f2J The Industrial-Mechanical Divi- sion which is concerned with the training of skilled craftsmen, the persons trained to install, repair and operate machinery. DEAN-A. Ray Sims, with the Univer- sity since 1946, holds a B.A. from Hardin Simmons University and an M.S. from the University of Houston. An authority on technical institute edu- cation, Dean Sims was one of six technical education officials to visit the Soviet Union during May, 1961, under a Cultural Ex- change Agreement. MODERN AUTOMOBILES require modern testing fcculmes ond knowledge of their use as supplied nn the automotive mechanics dlvnslon Downtown School DEAN-James C. Taylor SCHOOL PROVIDES l SERVICE DOWNTOWN In May of 1958 the University's Downtown School moved in- to its new, air-conditioned building at 925 Caroline. Each semester the school serves some 1,600 academic students. Many of these students come from the professional and business world, studying only specialized courses. The majority of these courses are from the College of Business Administration, with the next largest portion being those of the College of Arts and Sciences. For the student interested in merchandising as a career, the school offers a unique combination of supervised job experience and academic training leading to a B.B.A. degree. DEAN-James C. Taylor received his LL.B. from Baylor University in 194-0 and an ML. from the University of Houston in 1954. In constant demand as a speaker for both local and national executive and sales clinics, Dean Taylor has been with the University since 1947 and is recognized as one of the outstanding leaders in civic work. MANY SECRETARIES attend special classes to learn more efficient methods of carrying out their office duties. - iss, , , , kiwi L N School -fF"'f1cj,. 'U' I 1 ,ENE . '1 +..""-it ,, 3: az: ,Y A : fevqv 'sn 1 T.vllts,9t. f.' .' 1. . l . . oe..:,11- l Y- he l'.,- 5,111 i '-- 'S,,,, ia , , 7, '77 ,- DOWNTOWN businessmen constantly use the facilities of the University of Houston's Downtown School. DURING CLASSES the halls are quiet and deserted, but between classes hundreds of students change rooms, leave and enter the building through these passageways. DOORS remain open for classes from 8:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m. Monday through Friday and classes are held the early part of Saturday. lat e L 'fi Z' "W ' 35 Library PROVIDING material to study and o quiet, relaxing otmosphere in which To study is the M. D. Ander son Memorial Library. Wi? yyleyy M is yyllu I A f'5' H. -P TF as a e ' tg, ' ' 55. Q? is fj ' W, 11,219 ,PSV f,,s, an "' Y f Jai Q dbg' 2 ' 'P' l I , .L . ,S .. . ?Q.i.2Qig" I Q, ' ' . - It fre' fs , -' 1' : es: N' I i . Placement Center NEVER ENDING TASK KEEPS STAFF BUSY In existence since 1946 the Placement Center is one of the largest and most efficent in the nation. With offices in the Recreation Building, the Center is operated Without charge and serves the entire student hody and alumni. Almost 1,000 companies call at the campus to interview gradu- ating seniors, and more than 10,000 job placements are made each year. It is the Center's aim to, not only place a person, but also to guide his career. E DIRECTOR-Miss Lou Russell came to the University in 1946 to organize the Placement Center. She received a B.A. from Baylor University and an lVl.Ed. from the University of Houston. She has also done graduate Work at the University of Chicago and the University of Texas. Much in demand as a lecturer, Miss Russell addresses civic and social clubs throughout the nation. 36 EW If rv ----K-S Ml- X N Director-Miss Lou Russell Directors 1- Director-Dr. Howard F. McGaw Counseling and Testing GUIDANCE IS VITAL Throughout the year, the Counseling and Testing Service of the University schedules a series of tests for all prospective freshmen. Designed to assemble pertinent data as to aptitudes, achievements and attitudes, these tests initially establish the student's major field of study. Along with the tests, interviews between the student and trained counselors help in further determining the field of study best suited for him. Facilities of the Service are available to any student or person connected with the University. DIRECTOR-Dr. Franklin L. Stovall serves as a professor of psychology, as well as director of the Center. With the Univer- sity since 1945, he received his B.A., M.Ed. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Texas. Before entering University service Dr. Stovall served as a teacher and administrator in Texas public schools, an instructor at the University of Texas and a consultant for research at the University of Puerto Rico. THOUSANDS OF VOLUMES MAKE BROWSING GOOD The University's library contains approximately 220,000 volumes, the majority of which are housed in the M. D. Ander- son Memorial Library Building. Completely air-conditioned, the building was constructed in l950. All books are located on open-stack shelves with reading facilities conveniently provided among the bookshelves. Sections of the library are devoted to the specialized Works of the various colleges. A portion of the main floor houses the Audio-Visual Center. DIRECTOR-Dr. Howard F. lVlcGaw came to the University in 1950 from a similar position with the New York City Board of Higher Education. Active in numerous librarious organizations he has had a large number of his own writings published. After his more than ten years as director of libraries Dr. lVlcGaW resigned in April, 1961. ,-T,,,Y, Y Y Y Ii , , ' 512:-f. pm... ltlzzg 'V was 934 fill Ig Z. I ls Director-Dr. Franklin L. Stovall 37 Religious, Medical, Athletics, Housing 7775 A :fill :If 1354. ' III?-E. I- - , , fr. ., 'ai ap" '-if' rw.- I Rev. George N. Thompson RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES-Serving as di- rector of religious activities, the Rev. Mr. George N. Thompson sponsors the Religious Groups Council. A proposed religious center fund is the group's chief interest. tt , I1 -fr g. i N ' ""' ' ' ' , ,,, . ..,.. ..i , . m y v , ,N As""" I . X 'ES sr ' 21 is , ff ,fx it I - KEEPING HIS STAFF INFORMED Dr. James Whitehurst discusses cz book with nurses Margie Gonce, Lucille McGhee and Helen Torforici. MEDICAL CENTER-Whether students need medication for a cold or a more seri- ous illness, they can visit the University's medical center for treatment. Services of the center, located in the Recreational Building, are free of charge. Serving his first year as director of the medical center, Dr. James Whitehurst su- pervises the center's activities as well as provides medical attention for UH students. Dr. Whitehurst, a 1942 Rice Institute graduate, is also the Athletic Department's physician. Alumni Association li DISTINCTION PLUS . . . the Alumni Association's new club waits for the arrival of its first guests. The insert shows the formal opening of the club as Bill Swanson, Bill Sherrill, George Valian, Johnny Goyen, Sher- wood Crane and Walter Rainey, Jr. act as a ribbon-cutting delegation. 38 Directors i. REVIEWING pages of sports activities are Ted Nance, publicity directory Margaret Standard, secretory and Harry Fouke, athletics director. ATHLETICS-As director of athletics, Harry Fouke not only directs intercollegiate athletic activities, but also the University's physical education program and intramural sports. A 1935 graduate of Rice Institute, Fouke received his Master's degree in 1939 from Columbia University before coming to the University in 1945 to serve as first director of athletics. OILIHC ,I 73, Bruce E. Gurd HOUSING-Supervising head residents and coordinating activ- ities of the University's four dormitories and Oberholtzer Hall, Bruce E. Curd serves as director of housing and is in charge of guest and convention facilities. Holding a B.A. degree from Davis and Elkins College and an lVl.A. from the University of Florida, Mr. Curd began UH service in 1953. ALUMNI ARE ASSETS An active, well-organized alumni group is one of the greatest assets a university can have. Keeping the graduate in touch with the University is the principal job of the Alumni Association. Through EXTRA, a magazine published monthly by the Association, the graduate can keep abreast of the happenings at his alma mater. Sponsoring the Football Banquet and Spring Sports Banquet, the Association vigorously supports all University athletic activ- ities. Homecoming, an annual event especially important to the alumni, finds the group actively planning and carrying out ideas. The association also presents awards to faculty members having 20 and 25 years of service with UH. This year the group establishes the University Club at Valian's and instigates a cultural activities program to bring nationally- known performers to entertain on campus. Governed by a 20-member board, headed this year by presi- dent Walter Rainey, Jr., the association's activities are executed by Executive Director Ted Hendricks and his staff in their second floor Ezekiel Cullen offices. Mr. Hendricks graduated from the University in 1955 with a B.B.A. degree and began working with the association in 1957. 1-of 'Ill' if Ili V VIEWING UH EXPANSION via a large map are Ted Hendricks, excecutive director, and Walter Rainey, Jr. Alumni Association president. 39 zgggauf , i R 11 .V ' ' 14:35 . M, v Elie BQ 4-. g .fi X 5 .., V , ,V - L,'M. Q2 x ,I Ln., WL. .isim 5 .K Q! ' -' ' Ns .'-?'v?i13EJ?2ffih5fEi13f.u A4 W , , ,f .- 5 kv f ,-sv: J 4, C595 .' 1 " 21 A' , 1? fniseikt . f ' X 7g,Ij.',ifQnfgiifiil'5 3 " M 4 , Jig,- f 'I ' - if A' X2 A "Ah A Y V Y ' , f- 4,-,I -'. , 1 ' .' ' . ' ' 15? 1, W - .1 -F", 1 1,vag:a r +5553-:fx L Alu' . L. 1355.1 ,. V YP'-' , 'wi ffgmgf 1 wfizfszw ,. - W 451. 2 A , A Y v 1. N -:.,:15ff,tEf'.ff+'2. 2-M..-fsaxlll'-ww,A - f ,wvf.U,ff1.-, u -A I 54g.,V.1,Q'g,Q".gf,,y3ggA3.5r if uf V-grab-+41,7gg,V.1-sg QW! ?'?C"11'p ' fp ' ' - W . . 3 . , A iw' M 4. -:-,:. ' igeii ,gif i .L pig, 172 N 1v5.iE?f':I'kQ,,A IVE: V My mf 2 ...L .. 'vguzn ew k., -X ,g, 2 si'L-'JZ--.j.ri z '-'wiv " f .-cvfiij a:'qia'V'f! Q .QB-'hzsicqli '1 " . .., . ,M ,- A., N., ,L 'U th ?'12f:iRf'9i"1i'!f' :IE 5' f 'lgilllfffsfr -.WP-Q If . 1 2. -.vf'fHw'fgHg.fff?',11 -1 . ......,.... P' if ,Qi-1r:,..'f5 4- 4 v- A'............- ' . ' ' " Qgagg, Z . ,KM l 1 -Rc f N I l , J , I 1, I H" at ... u 5 1, 5 'Ly' 1 - I gre- .Ana 7:-...T Q., ... ,., J ' 1,5 ' ,,- - - a ,V n 1' N5 4 I W- V -1' 1 ., , 4 ' 1. . 14511--' E1 bf: f'iJ3.1k,kQx Q. Y. A .. 1 f, X . 4 f- , - ., 'Q A X M' .i S . In -wg. i . ' px luxe. ' Q Nw .vs V 1 6 Y ..' I :ik H Q I .I 5, 'N ' A - in I " 1:1 .Q 'f-Sxsul 2-nz, w -,sq ...fur 9.-fu "iff I 45-"WM lffn 15 v7 S9 OJ 't 5 94. .- . s ,'.tQ,,'3r-.Ji ,gs N W I 1 , , x,,Q 'Nun X. .XA 'x f A . ik K - .. '-,aF'T"3' "' ' ' 45. 3' " 2 " Bidi .2-fA!.f ,,,'s 'xizlg , -L Y f qw, , 4 3 1 F. ,. The first day on campus is perhaps the most difficult . . . possibly the most exciting . . . surely the most confus- ing. ' A lowly soul, the freshman, and especially on his first day, should be confused, for he has climbed from the rank of freshman once before-in high school-to that top man on the totem pole position of senior, now he is back at the first level again. The year will pass and, if all goes well, he will change his name to-sophomore. Now there is an unusual guy. He has made friends, seen the workings of a large uni- versity, experienced the thrill of '6Big Red's" win and learned what it is to be on his own-yet he still lacks that polish that marks those with a college education. Once again, as still another year rolls around, a name change is in order, this time to--junior. Leadership abilities really start to be tested, for the junior is nearing the top and is expected to perform nearly as Well as the senior. Probably the transition from junior to senior is not nearly so great as was expected three years earlier. In fact, except for a feeling of nearing a climactic point in life and an inner feeling of self-satisfaction, the senior never really feels so much bigger, smarter or more important. The lack of these feelings is the proof that he has learned well what the four years of college have tried to teach. Not just the formulas, the miles, the grammatics, the methods, the histories, but the experiences that transpose the youthful freshman into the mature graduate. This is the real task of the university. 4I '0- sr II 41-A . . J aa' M 0 i - ' ALLEN, Michael Terry, P+. Worih ALSOBROOK, John O., Galena Parlc ANDERSON, Ann C., Housion ANDERSON, Francis Joseph, lvlunhall, ANGST, Lonnie W., l-lous'ron ARGIROPOULOS, Pafricia, Houslon ARGUE, John Willis, l-lousion ARNOLD, Jack George, San Anionio AYRES, Donald C. E., l-lousion AYRES, Eddie Ray, Pasadena BAKER, Diana Marie, Arlingion. Va. BAKER, Joe Wayne, Plainview BAIAMONTE, Rosemary, Housion BAIN, Yvonne Ellaine, l-lousion BALLARD, Pamela Jo, l-lousion BALLENGER, PauleH'e, l-lousion BARRETT, Kenne+h Horfon, l-lousion BARRON, Thomas Florian, I-lousion ALEO, BeH'ye Morgan, Houslon ALFORD, Juani'l'a Ann, P Freshmen Houslon rl: ,I 4 g M ': V J 1 W K 5 Q. ' V .. l' ,.. 1 54, 1,3 ,hx ' s' , My N" .M . . ffy--.-iff, 4-In L f F VE fl' g ril"'g?: 531' V 3'-U 'Q' TSW! ' mea' L'-155 if wijglfll C'-'M LT Q xi wifi ,e f 14, ,n "S Affgglzgi "?51?i"Q'3"Si:iWg,'?725?T?3f'?'5W1- l xl. ' X, , 'L H A ' A f -" ' , 1 -' 'T' ,- '1',f.g'S,.',,,,Q:LJ x ,.-1 '-5.-Y I , vu: 'A aff,- K 4 1' M, 11- LL 'J '53 .. . V-Q ff- 'I "'i""1 ':7f?i7' 1 3 1' ' 1 ' gf 47 ' A 7' F' 7 fl N f ' ' Y V '14 KV :g,,,,1sl . 9 5, , U 1 Y c 4 . 7 , . mf l w ' "" I I K 'CI ,Wi B 'W Rb. , X 5- ., ,fm Uh. am . if., im'-' 9,1 2.x 1 1 V , .. , w n Vs , -,J , ,ev Q 'fig if '54 . 4? -K . , 'f 1' 4 l i:. .1 "5" -4 .X ' K gf' ' , 7--1 vi in in in fr T willwlll"' lQ11,lw11,,,111,..ggg...ggg..."' Wgg..."'. W , ,,,,,, N, llulllullm Freshmen BUTERA, James Michael, l-louslon BUTTER, Roberl D., Jr., S+. Cloud. Fla. BYRD, William E., Jr., Bellaire CALVERT, Kaihy Ann, l-lousion CAMPBELL, Margarel' Ann, I-lousion CAMPBELL, Tex Thomas, l-louslon CAMPISE, Jim Pal, l-lousion CARLISLE, Jaclc H., l-louslon CARTE, Thomas l-larolcl, La Marque CASTRO, Francisco Jose, Lima, Peru CHEN, Norah, l-louslon CHIPPENDALE, Caro Ann, l-lousion CHOVANETZ, Billy J., l-lallerlsville CIZEK, Joe O., Pasadena CLARK, Roberl' Joseph, Jr., l-lous'ron COLEMAN, Thelma Jenne'H'e, l-louslon CONNOLLY, Pauline Sheila, l-louslon COOPER, Ruffin A., Jr., Pharr BU RNETT, Johnny Thomas, l-louslon BURNETT, Sarah Nllclcl, Houslon COWMAN, Hollis Lee, l-lousion COX, Barbara Jo, l-lousron COX, Roberl Wesley, l-lousion CRABTREE, Barbara Ruih, Angleion CRAIG, John Richard, Housion CRISWELL, William Andrew, l-lousion CROWDER, Julia Diane, Housion CUNNlNGHAM, Thomas Chelsea, l-louslon DANCY, Margarel' Anne, Housion DANNER, Andrew J., Galvesion DARLEY, Hearher Blair, l-lousion DAUGHERTY, Roann Pa+ricia, Housion DAVIS, Connie, Housion DE LA CRUZ, Raymond, l-lousion DELANEY, Kenneih Ray, l-lousion DEVILLE, Jimmy Paige, Bellaire DIAZ, Fred Eugene, Texas Ciiy DILLON. Pal' Harvey, Longview DINKLAGE, Mary Virginia, Houslon DODSON, Clyde Conrad, Houslon DOMINY, Cora Sue, Housion DONAGHE, Kaye Franklin, Houslon DOUTHITT, Cameron B., Galena Park DUFF, Roloerl' Williamson, Jr., Housion DUMAS, Joe Edd, Amarillo DUNCAN, Andrew S., l-lousion EASON, James B., Cleveland EATWELL, William Donald, l-lousion EHRMANN, Gisela Gerlinde, l-louslon ELMS, Richard Allen, San Anionio EMERY, William D., Williamsport Pa. EMMITTE, James Roy, Housion EVANS, Elizabefh Jo, Housion EVANS, Kenneih Wayne, Housion FARRER, Regina Margaret Anglelon FlTZPATRlCK, Charles Leonard, Lolila FLEMING, Elizabeih A., l-lousion FLETCHER, MaH'ie Elizalaeih, Housion FOGARTY, Charley Franklin, Buffalo FORD, Charles Fred, Bowie FORSTALL, Mary Ellen, l-lousion FORT, Marshall Bruce, l-lousion FRANK, William Frederick, Housion FRANKENY, Richard Francis, Brazoria FRANKINSON, Beverly Ann, l-lousion FRANS, Donna Lynne, Pasadena FREEMAN, Barbara Vadare, l-lousron FRIESZ, Jerry Daniel, l-lousion FULLER, Lamar L., Bellaire r X iv' .Y 4 lg-Q. J' ? 1 , 1. 1 ' I ,A 4 4 ii Q ,FEI ,pail FURLOW, Janie Marie, I-Iouslon GASTON, James P., I-Iousion GATES, Michael J., Housron GATES, Pa'I'ricia Ann, Eclna GEORGE, Beverly Judiih, I-Iousion GEORGE, Leonard Merle, San Anronio GIBBONS, Daniel Edward, I-Ious+on GIBBS, Barbara Jo, Pasadena GILBERT, Paul Lyle, I'Ious'ron GILBRETH, Vivian, I-Iouslon GLASS, Leo Murl, I-Iouslon GLICK, Bill Marvin, I-Iousron GOFF, Jewel Laverne, I-Iousron GREEN, Johnny Leo, Housion GREENE, James Boyd, I-Iousion GREENSTEIN, Donald Gavin, I-Iousron GREENWOOD, Michael Earl, Bellaire GREGORY, Marion C., Jr., I-Iousron GRIFFIN, William P., Jr., Liberiy GROSSFIELD, Anne Faifh, Por? Arihur GUIDRY, George Walion, Jr., Shreveporr, La GUMIENNY, Karel Pairick, Housion HARRIS, Carl Lee, I-lousion HARRIS, Carole Lynn, Houslon HARRISON, Clay, Houslon HART, Nancy Ann, Kerrville HARTMAN, Roberf Vergil, Hous+on HARTSFIELD, Roberl' Lee, Ill, La Marque HAVEMANN, Marilyn Joyce, Housfon HAZEN, Flerberl' Charles, Houslon HEATON, Danny Eugene, Housfon HENDERSON, George J., Houslon HENDRICKS, Alan Barclay, Shawnee-Mission, Kan. HIGGINBOTHAM, Pe-ggy, Houslon HOAGLAND, Arnold, Housfon HOBBS, Wal'l'er, L., Houslon HOOKS, Charles A., Galvesfon HORNER, Jack Mar+in, Columbia, Penn. HORWITZ, Mellon, Jay, Housfon HUGGINS, Calvin Prair, Jr., Housfon HUGHES, Linda Jo, Sfafforcl HURST, Jesse T., Jr., Missouri Ciry HUTZLER, Charles E., Chriesmam Freshmen ..-Y 2" Ur , 4.5- :ff ff 1, rv- , A X ' .-,x-ir, ., ' , A -' W , ELT., fr 1- Q 1 s 1 va lun ,J P1 A UL F , , th. .V 'L Q if-'11 L, h 2, , ff-. AS.-QQ.. F l.' 5: . , H-v , n Y ':.', ,- . "..-' ,-g4,,,,. ,- , . 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Q N W I I 1 1 X x 21172 A 'A ' 4' 1 wma LANGSTON, Claude McDonald, Jr., I-Iousion LARRABEE, John Dewey, I-Iousion LAY, Newman D., Jr., I-Iousion LAWRENCE, Sarah, Housion LEA, Donald R., Galena Park LEBLANC, William Andrew, I-Iousion LEE, Leonard Earl, Silsbee LEO, Donald C., Des Moines, Iowa LEPHIEW, Lois Glynnene, Fori Worih LEWIS, Jon C., I-Iousion LISCINSKI, Theodore John, Linden, N. J. LOBIT, Rober+ Neal, Dickinson LOCHER, Sharon Elaine, I-Iousion LOGGINS, Jane Lee, I-Iousion LORD, Richard Frank, Bellaire LOWREY, Lane, Housion LUPO, Frank Mario, Brooklyn, N. Y. LUTMAN, Sandra Carole, I-Iousion LYNGAAS, David Leslie, I-Iousion MACALUSO, Josephine Eliiabeih, I-Iousion MAHAN, Harper Norman, I-Iousfon MANNING, Edna McDuiiie, I-Iousfon MARBURGER, Jerry Lee, Housion MARTIN, Charles David, Texas Ciiy MARTIN, Dorofhy Leigh, Millers Creek, N. C. MARTINEZ, Felix Jacquez, Housfon MARTINEZ, Lionel Alberio, Killeen MATTHEWS, Judirh Ann, Housion Freshmen 341 MAZZU, Tommy G., Houslon MCAFEE, Dennis BurneH', Cuba, N. M. McGEE, Jimmy, Deer Park MclNTYRE, Robes-'I' L., l-lousion McLENNAN, Be'H'y, Houslon McNAY, Roberl' Harold, Houslon MEA, George Henry, Lindale MELLON, Rochelle R., Richmond MERRYMAN, Gary Don, Texas Cify MERSCHAT, Dian P., l-lopwoocl, Pa. MEYER, Billie J., Schulenburg MEYER, Clarence W., I-louslon MINTURN, Theo Marsh, l-louslon MORGAN, Barbara Jean, l-louslon MUDD, Be'Hy Jean, l-lousron MURCHISON, William Edwarcl, l-lousion MURRAY, Morris Lee, l-lousion NUSSER, John H., Befhel Park, Pa. OCHOA, Paul P., San Anlonio O'LEARY, William D., Munlmall, Pa. PACE, Carole Ann, Dallas PALMER, Nancy Ann, Housion PATTERSON, Lynn T., l-louslon PATTERSON, Sharon Lynn, Housion PAYNE, Claucle Eugene, Freshmen Housion PEABODY, Nan Carol, l-louslon PERRY, Virginia Louise, I-louslon PICKERING, Sondra Kafe, l-lousion PIKE, Carol Ann, Kerrville PRAYSE, Charles Lee, I-louslon RANTZ, Marcia, Bellaire REDIGER, John Thomas, Pecos REEVES, Shirley Jane, Dallas RIEDEL, Lincla Ann, Housfon RISNER, Gloria Fay, Galena Park ROBERTS, Larry Clinfon, I-lousion ROSS, Shirley Lee, l'lous'l'on ROSSl, Edward Joseph, Housion ROYALL, William Wayf, Newpori N sALEs, Nola v., Cleveland ' SANFORD, Donna Rae, l-lousion SCHOENFELD, Paula F., Houslon SCHREINER, Thomas D., l-lous'l'on SEPULVADO, Perlrins E., Housfon SH EROHMAN, Joseph Ross, Minneapolis, Minn. SICINSKI, Frances, A., Houslon SILER, Carol Jean, I-lousion SIMMONS, Brenda Jean, Rosenberg ews, Va SIMPSON, Joyce Randolph, Arlingion, Va. SINCLAIR, Julia, I-Iousion SMITH, Charles Lee, Jr., Housion SMITH, Frankie, Galena Park SMITH, James William, Porl' Arfhur SMITH, Phillis Audrey, Bayfown SPATAFORA, Sfeve VincenI', Monroe, La SPICER, Leonard Russell, San Anionio STALAROW, Devara Ann, Pasadena STEINER, Roberl' Paul, Piiisburgh, Pa. STERN, Sfeven Emanuel, Fulshear STONE, Jewel Ann, Housfon STONE, Linda Gay, Fori' Worih SUSTALA, Joyce Marie, Housion SUSTALA, Mary Helen, Houslon TAKARA, Kozo, Nakiiin-son, Okinawa TAMBORELLO, Josephine Elizabefh, Housion TAYLOR, Margarel' Ellen, Housion TAYLOR, Michael William, I-lousion TERRY, Carolyn Ann, Housion THAGARD, BeHy Jean, Housion THIERRY, Roberi' Kenray, Jr., Housfon THOMPSON, Joe Dolphins, Jr., Housion TOMLINSON, James Alexander, Housion TROUTMAN, Glenn CIe'I'us, Houslon TURNER, Flenoyd Conrad, Lewisville, Ark. TWILLEY, James Edward, Housion VALLES, Charles Edward, Housion VAN HOOK, John Aus+in, Independence: Mo. VAN NATTER, Charlie Henry, I-Iousion VESTAL, Marilyn Eve, Houslon VITANZA, George Vidor, Houslon WADE, Ronald Lee, Housion WALDEN, Shirley Tucker, Housion WALKER, Phillip Morris, Bayiown WALKER, Roger Lee, Housion WALLINGFORD, Delois Dee, Housion WASHBURN, Bruce EIswor+h, Sanfa Barbara, Calif WEINTRAUB, Mariin Rober'I', Phoenix, Ariz. WEISMAN, HarrieH Anne, Corpus Chrisii WHERLEY, Sharon K., Harlingen WHITEHEAD, Orville Clayfon, Coleman WILLETT, Barry Leigh, Housion WILLIAMS, Jimmie Lane, Housfon WILSON, Beverly Ann, Birmingham, Ala. WOMACK, Barbara Carol, Housion WOODS, Doro'l'hy Jo, Uvalde WRIGHT, Carolyn Jeanne, Housfon YEO, Joseph Emme, Housfon x Y , nfl? . Riga. , , .. x s . ex 5-FF .I , ,gd-. . , ' GW A my N W, , 'P . 1 , " 4 -rc, ' 5' 1 Qi ' A , , . Jia 1-' F Q XJ 1.--s . 5. '- LQ mam ' .ufv ' "gf vm .n- -.? sp f X K 1 ui ' E F M 22, x, 1, 'f , ,Pt ig- Q ..-I , J Fw! . f iv E. A I I, .u 1' fb E .Mig v ,Q 1 - ...,. K ff 1 R.. .. W I 5 .- ' '11 55? 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'. 1, A- 4 X2 m AHMADI, Reza, Tehran. lran ALLDRITTON, Dale Lee, l-lousron ANDERSON, Richard Wayne, Housion ASHER, Jerry Lee, l-lousron BAILEY, Raymond Gerald, Housion BANG, Efhelynn Dianne, Housron BARBER, Wanda Kay, Jackson. Miss. BARNES, George Phillip, l-lousron BAYER, Harrier, Housion BEELER, Frazier Greig, Housion BENAVIDES, Eva, Housion -BERGER, George Dixon, Housron BILANSKY, Harry D., Housion BINDER, Paul, Housion BOUDREAUX, Denise Ka+l1erine, New O BOWERSOX, Thomas H., Harlingen BRADLEY, Karen Faye, Housion BRITT, Barbara Ann, l-lousron rleans. La. Sophomores Sophomores BURGDORF, Richard Edward, I-louslon BUSCHARDT, B. E., Jr., I-Iousion BUTTS, Rulhl Nell, I-Iouslon BYERS, Bob Riley, I-Iouslon CAIN, Roy Earl, Houslon CAULKING, CharIo'H'e Marie, I-louslon CHAN, Aloysius Tak Foo, I-lonlc Kong CHEANEY, Phyllis Lynn, Houslon CHENEY, Gary D., I-louslon CHENG, Samuel Kam Foo, I-long Kong CHOW, James Hau, I-louslon CIOLKOSZ, James Slanley, I-Iouslon CLARK, Carolyn Marie, Houslon COLEY, Jerry Lee, Houslon COOPER, Carolyn Johnelle, I-Iouslon COX, Judi'l'h Laverne, Bay Ciiy CRITTENDEN, Velmonl' Sfevens, Jr., I-Ious+on CRUSE, Linda Alice, I-Iouslon CURRY, Larry Edward, Humble DANIELLS, Mary Kay, I-louslon DAVIS, Don Gayland, I-louslon DE LA REZA, Anlhony G., Cochabamba, Boliva DEAN, Michael Ray, Mineola DENMAN, Rose Caroline, I-Iousron DE VIDO, David, I-Iousion DODZUWEIT, Rosie Lee, I-louslon DOHERTY, Jerry Wayne, I-Iouslon DUNCAN, Morris Joseph, Jr., Housfon DUNLAP, Roberi' Lamar, Corpus Chrisli EASLEY, John G., San Angelo ENGEL, Jerry Lee, I-louslon ERDIL, Al'l'an, lzimir, Turkey ETTER, George, IV, Valley Mills FISK, Jesse All'on, Spring FLAHERTY, Roberl' Eugene, Houslon FLOURNOY, Lillie Mae, Lullcin FLOWERS, BeH'y Jann. Housron FOOTE, Pafricia Ann, I-louslon FOREMAN, Edgar L., Jackson, S. C. FRIEDMAN, Gerry, I-Iouslon FRITSCHE, Herberf Ahar'I', Jr., I-louslon FRITZ, Agnes Jacqueline, Bellaire FRY, Louis T., Galena Park FUNDERBURG, Gloria Gale, Pasadena GARCIA, Raymond Thomas, I-Iousion GARRETT, S'I'aneIy K., Bowie GAUTNEY, Donald Berl', I-louslon GENTRY, Gene Earl, I'lous+on GENTRY, Margarel' Ann, Houslon n , ' QQ 1 . .r" 'sl' Ea. , T... , , wif" '12 ' . Wy. W,... N I : . M, 5 Wa , S w A E A -wig .,aex 'f'4 AQJ' xi x. . Q. , 14 J.,-v :J qi r, , V A t an , . U ,:. . ,. 4 ,r" Q , X A H f S ' 1 Q .' 1-' ,. , fl Um 2 - 53115 Q- Q 3 1-.gim 'X - , 14 wwf Q., v x f- E9 : f l ' f A W if , A " .XQ'?"7-gf: , 'H' "-russia" ' Q " ' , 9' W , M ' f ,N ,fav ,ll I ,nl . V fr Q ' am- m M r 5 .-.-. Q- I Q . 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L 4 4. vm GIBSON, David Drew, I'Ious+on GIBSON, Dwane, I-lousion GILLILAND, Linda Frances, I-lousion GLAZENER, Kendall Bryanf, I-lousion GOLD, Elroy Benno, Fredericksburg GOLDEN, Jimmy Ray, I-Iouslon GOLDEN. Joe Allan, I-Ious'ron GOLDMAN, Jerald D., I-Iouslon GOODBREAD, James Edward, Grapelancl GRAYSON, Charles Vesler, I-Iouslon GREEN, Jerry Wayne, Tomloall GRIFFIN, Janice Sheppard, I-Ious'ron GRIM, Gerald Kenne'l'I1, I-Iousion GROVES, Edwin E., Houslon GUENZEL, Frederick Mar'I'in, I-Iousfon HADID, Jean, Crockell' HAISLER, William Arnold, Jr., Temple HARSCH, David Gerald, I-louslon HARVEY, Earl Clarence, Bayiown HATFIELD, Lillian, Housfon HAYES, Linda Janell, Houslon HENCKEL, Diana Elaine, Pasadena HENDRICKSON, Neal David, One HESTER, William Frank, Houslon HOOHSTEIN, Rachelle, Houslon HODELL. Belly Marie, Bellaire HOHMANN, Marie Chenowefh, Houslon HOPSON, Charles Lowry, ll, Channelview HOWARD, BeHy Ann, Houslon HOWARD, Gerry Rea, Housion HOWELL, Don Gene, Houslon HOWELL, Pa'H'i Kay, Houslon HUBER, Earl Ernesl, Hous+on HUDSON, Michael Dale, Houislon HUSTEDT. H. B., Houslon JACKSON, Ruby Nell, Crosby JENNINGS, Jualiih Marilyn, Houslon JOHNSON, Bruce Gordon, Houslon JONES, Tom E., Texas Cily JOSEPHSON, Johanna Carol, Houslon KENNEDY, Sam M., Houslon KERSHNER, Jack, Houslon KEYS, Gary Ellison, Housfon KIGHT, Michael John, Hous+on KING, Jaclc Lee, Houslon KING. Marvin Lee, Houslon KIRSCHKE, Ronald Allen, Housfon- Sophomores .. 'V , 1. V :U LII t VVV.,I I, U. ,an I I, rw V 4 uf-: :L .--1.2 ' -V, 1. , -1, Q, -Q W V .V V VMI., . IJ? I . ,.- I . 1, c. 11 .. V 1 A '21 ,- -. - ,.V 1 .UQ +5 VV, nf' 1. V T r .. f I ' . -,VVV :V f ' ' -V .fx E"fIV.IV,.T iii... ' ' ,gz 1? V I .9 ill, .U 12155. . 1- , . 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X . .., V5 "wt I V .I :I ,I I ' I, '22-3 '- "ag, LJ ,it - A Z, V HL S- V5 ' I 11' IIII an V- W I1-Q, I II ' F nh 'iff -.' I -. 'V V , . s ' , : I .' Q . . 7 .I . J ,A "" ' 1 Q-2-...I 1 - - U I Ing MI -L.. - I. V I I IL jI IVII,I3,III5 I I1j5?g?Vi3NWH :III ' 7 I , 1 III,I',I H W ' 3 . V' Qtr?" 'QHV51 H" V. "TF-' uri L9 e ' V I v I .5 IV I III I. I QI jIII.II.IIIII I.I V 1V3.I ,.. Ii V r - -1 L f -. V 'ff mf' 2 E VV . , ,J 'V V f ..I. . K.,.II3II,I V :I I MIIIIIII I . ,V III Q: TV IS: H ' fear. I Vw VI vw Q, ' 25? WE ' Nggf . V.. - I .W V - V ' 'V :im ,155 Cf y ' .. 1 1.3" f . li.. 11 . ' ll A 'V -V' -1152? V- A "AH 1 +A In V A 1' 1 - 'V 'TL' f Vf 1 ' ?5 ... M .II ,II AV- II.. ?-A K I II . I III gi: -JL I gh gi' 'gf "Vz4FW"?. wg '1 H' , ' ' EL'Qf,94 .f i f' J "9 VJ b . ..rf ' ' ' 4 39 Vf V V:- ,, 1 gg' "1f5.'I',,4:V . 4 QIQ . , ' I T' W .I I ,I I I V Q II I I I I, II I, I . H V H -, , fl' '- ff -7 f?f'H VA: -- TC I. I 9, .,. 'f 5 ij, I ' it ' A' . A 4' 1' V' .- me 2'- V2 -'lf' ' ' ,:-' .if A 5 Yi' ' ' , V , .77 .1-x. X 11 Q75 V ' .5 gg? k " 7' .413 . I 23,5 ' 'if-gil? liiiif -' E311 'Q V' - EX il 'A if .- V - 1 T7 -' 'fx . ,AI 59" I 'lag Q VV I I A Vx ' 'Q 4- 'fin !' ' w V - L-filth McMAHAN, Harry Kimball, Houslon MEGOW, Frederick Ronald, Houslon MEGOW, L. Donald, Houslon MElNSCHER, Fred Charles, Houslon MEISENHOLDER, Richard Eugene, Houslon MESIROFF, Jennie Pearl, Hous+on MEYER, Joseph Daniel. Sugar Land MINTER, Norma Jean, Houslon MITCHELL, John Michael, l-lousron MOEHR, Arlhur Roy, Cypress MONTALBANO, Phil Joseph, Houslon MOTLEY, Jerry S'l'anley, Houslon MOTLEY, Melvin Doyle, l-louslon MURPHY, Dan, Livingslon MURPHY, Norman Pal, Houslon NABONA, Sfanley Y., Houslon O'BRlEN, David Ebaugh, lll, Housron O'LEARY, John H., Lawlon, Olcla. ORTEGONQ Manuel, Jr., Hous+on O'WESNE, Jack Arlhur, Housfon PALMER, Raymond William, Pasadena PARRISH, Harry Allen, Housron PAYNE, Roberl' Vance, Cenler ' Sophomores PELHAM, Royce, Lake Jackson PEREIRA, Sheila C., I-louslon POTTER, Kay, l-lousion POTTER, Travis W., Grand Prairie PRINCE, Karolyn Lois, Housion PYLE, Margarel' Helen, Housfon RASH, Shelby Winifref, Jr., I-louslon REITZ, Jerry Eldon, Bellaire RESTIVO, Linda Jean, Bryan RIVERO, Rolando Carlos, Bolivia, S. A. ROBERTSON, Mary Carol, Housion ROBIN, Allan Maynarcl, Cosby ROE, Linn, l-lousion ROGERS, Losson Coolc, Hous+on ROSENBAUM, Marion Arfhur, Hous+ RUSK, Marfha Ellen, Housion RUSSI, John Michael, Housfon SADLER, Sieve Van. San Saba SAFIEH, William, Hous+on SAMUELSON, Jerry, Aus+in OH SCHULTZ, Richard W., Jr SCHWARZ, Roland Herml SEGEL, Jerry, Housion SHIELDS, James Earl, Mungall. Pa. SHUMATE, Billy George, Housron SMITH, Edward Arfhur, Housron SMITH, Gene A., Housron SMITH, Janelle, Housron SMITH, Pa'l'ricia Ann, Dayron SNELLINGS, Jasper Larry, Humble SPENCER, Jimmie Don, Houslon SPIEGELHAUER, Danny, Pasadena STRECKER, William, Jr., Housron . STRONG, Don A., Housion TIRADO, Charlie S., Bellaire THOMPSON, Meredifh Harry, Troy, N. Y. TOWNSEND, Roland Carringfon, Houslon TURNER, Virginia Lovina, Housron WEAVER, Neal Maverick, Housron WEINGART, Michael N., Skokie. III. WILKINSON, Beniamin Young, Munhall. Pa. WILLIAMS, Esfher Lee, Housron WOOD, Sharon Ames, Houslon WRIGHT, Edward Clarence, Housion YOUNG, Virginia Rohrer, Housion YOUNGWORTH, Benner Jacob, Housron ZEDLER, Zoe Ann, Houslon Sophomores JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS pause To 'talk between classes even if the weather is not perfect. They are: Valerie Daunoy, represenfative, Sally Day, Treasurer, Anne Sharpe, vice-president, Jocelyn Hayden, representative, Marlene Walker, secretary, and Norman Jones, president. ADAMS, Joseph Anfhony, Houslon ALANIS, Roy, Housron AL-ATTAR, Adil Hameecl, Baghdad, lraq ALLBRIGHT, Thomas Leon, Bayiown ALLEN, John Dave, Jr., l-lousion ARMER, Ronnie Kenf, l-lousion AURICH, Richard William, Housion AUSTIN, Gene Ray, Galvesian BAMMEL, Carol Ann, l-lousion BATSON, Kennefh, l-lousion BAUMGARTEN, Roger Lee, l-louslon BAYLOR, Roberi' Eugene, Housion BEAN, Floyd Raymon, Alvin BECK, Marilyn Jones, l-lousion BENHAM, Jimmy Doyle, Kenedy BIGGERS, Laura Ross, Housion BONNO, Joseph Paul, Housron BORK, John E., Harlingen BRICKEN, William Bryan, Beaumonl' BROOKS, Harry Louis, Jr., l-lousron BROOKS, Tensie Ann, l-lousron BROWER, Hudson, A., I-lousron ' BURDSAL, John Baldwin, Bellaire BURTON, William Clinfon, l-louslon BYARS, Jerry Adron, Aloilene CALVERT, Roberi' Don, l-lousron CAMPBELL, Billy Joe, l-lousron CANNON, Elizabefh Ann, Angleron CARBAJAL, Kenne+h Seeger, Houslon CHALMERS, Ray Delle, l-lousron CHIRIBOGA, Juan, Bellaire . CLARK, George Alexander, Jr., Galveslon CLINE, Ellen Thomasie, l-lous'l'on COFFMAN, Pafricia Lorene, l-lousron CONGER, Harry Edgar, l-lous+on CORPENING, Shirley M., l-louslon CRAWFORD, Waylen Thomas, Galvesron CRUZ, Richard Refugio, Jr., l-lousron CUNNINGHAM, Charles Lee, l-lousion DAILEY, Fred Harvil, Bellaire DANIELS, Allen B., lvloberly, Mo. DAY, Sally Elizabefh, l-lousron DEPTULA, Frank F., l-lousron DOOLEY, William E., Bedford, Va. Juniors 1' DUNCAN, Helen Berneice, Texas Cily DUNLAP, Roberl' J., I-Iouslon ECKENWILER, Michael Wya1'+, Houslon ESTRADA, Jessie Michael, Housion EVANS, Gerald, I-lousion FAIN, John H., I-lousion FILIPPONE, Marion Vincenf, Bellaire FOCKE, Roberl' Corcler, Jr., I-louslon FORD, Lee Mason, I-lousion FOSTER, Alberl' Ralph, Jr., Anglelon FRANKENY, Jerome Alberl, Brazoria GALLAGHER, Lydia Kay, Bellaire GANTER, Dorrance L., Galvesfon GARRETT, Joan Elaine, I-louslon GATES, Dave L., Jr., Dickinson GEHBAUER, John T., Brownsville GEISSELBRECHT, Elvin Ray, Temple GENSLER, Quen'l'in Gary, Houslon GIBSON, Jerry Bascom, Dallas GILES, Granl' Eugene, San Anlonio GILL, Bessie Eva, Housfon GODWIN, Phillip Eugene, Odessa GORSUCH, James Thomas, Houslon GREEN, Mariorie Hubbard, I-louslon GREENLEE, Bobby C., I-louslon HALL, Elhelyn L., I-louslon HANKS, Paul Ashfon, Sall Lake Cily, Ula HARRIS, Donna Rae, I-Iouslon HARRISON, Rebecca, Houslon HARTIN, James Ferrell, Pryor. Olcla. HATCHEZ, Odis McClendon, I-louslon HAVARD, Anna Belh, Pasadena HEATH, Edward Allen, Rio Grande Cily HELMCAMP, Hugo Charles, Sheridan HENDERSON, Maior Carl, I-lousion HILL, Glen Herberl, Rosenberg HILL, Lowell Winsfon, I-louslon HILLIN, Anne'H'e, Houslon HINKLE, Rulh Ellen, Houslon HOBART, George Joseph, I-louslon HOHMANN, Margarei' Ann, I-Iousron HORAN, James Rober'l', Houslon HOWARD, Russell Lee, Houslon HRNA, Daniel J., Deming. N. M. HUBER, Carroll Lainey, Troy HUGHES, Mary Virginia, I-louslon IVEY, Rulh Ann, Grapeland JAMES, William Verle, Freeporl JAY, Thomas Ryan, Houslon vi '-sl ar . 5: - fa Ai , -. ,M- WM.. vw! .Pd 43, f i , V me ..- ., jp, 5. g, . . -,. r. W I I 1. is, V A . . w .. ' ' ln I 1 h s -is 1 --1 4' ' 5.-Nj 'a .ia . ,,, 1, 1 ' " 1 A T I xr fb ' L HW in-4 i A M.. H .1 n ,fQfffLY 'ffT7 L' I ,fl 5 KN-Q I N s -, . 'nw J i . "' 1 1, .. , ' ' my P 1 M 1 ' , 3 :, L- Lvf if , , ,Q ?i!!,, J , F Q g EJ 1 A V Mg," az! , f . L, ' we .44 KL' Q S! QP-x. rl- Y , fi:-' , mg! QQ J K Si, H! l - - 'f f . X . N ' ' Y , 'A ' 1 , ,. 1 JV , - " x 'E 4 if ,gf ' H 1M5u.,,:L V f' y H .A ' vii'-f :Sgr ff I, ,, ' I X A w 35512 J . ' 1 i - 4 ' l frhug w Q i' f . , " ' Y ' 5- 'v ig- .4 1 - L- ' W' w ' 'if' .r V v , 1' 5 " V W- I 1 Y :- XX . . if-In , I J. ,. .. v., ,, .4 V. J 1,1 E?-T 3 1' 1 , I 3 I W Tv .. ,t .1 ' M11 X Q' Q-, - :ff il- 4,5 1 " A '31 N gf .4 -T4 35 I? 15.5, J. 'X ut qqrglk S5 1 " 1 ii i-1' -', :ggi wx tfifiyf-.141 lie' ' V-22. ' X 3.---Z., LL -1 I 1:5-i , il: .u:,,J.. l!. YY W 4, , 5 ' 7" - 5, 3 V- A., N I 'N L , -.Jw -' . - , Q--A A '- , , 'H-V 1 Eh! ix X Vi , . 'A ff ' L., 'fail '- f-g, .! ui ' ' fm. " 4 'A amxaj' 'wi Q1 " , ,wg wif? 'i ' ' 70 5, . , , mf 1 F E' W -.gy 'V f 'Q , v 'Q MARSHALL, Jack Hari, Mounl Pleasanl' MARSHALL, Melvin T., Houslonv MARTIN, Roberi' Sefln, Jr., Housion MCCONNELL, Pafricia, Houslon McCULLAR, Loyd F., Housion McKINNEY, Mary Lou, Pasadena MERDIAN, Joanne Frances, Houslon MINTER, James Calvin, Housion MORONKO, Roloerf EmmeH', -Houslon MORSE, James Roberl, Houslon MURPHY, Mary Shawn, Houslon NABER, Kenneih L., Housron- NECESSARY, Morgan Darrell, Pasadena NEWSOM, Bill, Longview NIEDERHOFER, Leona A., Bayfown NIVENS, Rolf Eugene, Houslon ODOM, Orville Neil, Housion ' PACHECO, Jesse M., Galvesron PAVLIK, Anfhony E., Houslon PAZ, RoI:ver'I'o Garcia, Brownsville PEAKE, Ar'I'I1iur Eugene, Houslon PETERSON, RoBer+ H., Douglas, ea. PHILIP, Sara Ann, Wicliiia, Kan. PLEDGER, Linda Joyce, Housfon LUCCHESI, Mario CI1arIe MANUEL, Jimmy L., Hou MARESH Mary Ann Eclr Juniors POTTER, Rae, I-lousion POUNDS, Thomas Wade, Housion PURPLE, Charles D., Jr., I-louslon RASH, Suzanne Emerson, Houslon REENAN, John D., Bossier Ciiy, La. REID, Ben A., I-Iousion REID, Elion Freeman, Housion REMBERT, Michael David, Housion RIGAMONTI, Helen M., Housion RUNDELL, Donald D., Housion RUSSELL, Donald Gail, Siaiiord SANSING, Bill, Amarillo SAVANAPREDI, Tana, Bangkok. Thailand SCHOPPE, Lela Mae, Housion SCHOTT, Augusi' Nelson, Humble SCHROEDER, Merle Ken+, Hillsboro, Kans. SCOTT, Pefer J., Groves SHAW, Jerry M., Tulsa, Olcla. SIMMONS, Gaylon, Howard, Jr., Orchard SMALL, Wayne Franlclin, Houslon SMILEY, Gayle, Housion SNYDER, Barron, H., Housion SODAGAR, Kirii' Amubhai, Bombay, India SORRELS, Roberl Wayne, Allcins. Ark. SOUTH, John Russell, I-Iousion STALLONES, SI'anIey Mason, Tomball STANDAFER, BeH'y Jean, Housion STEARNS, Neil Roberf, Houslon STEVENS, Harrie'H'e Marie, Houslon STICKSEL, Hugh A., Amarillo TALLEY, Eddie C., Pasadena TALLEY, Mar'I'ha G., Housion THOMAS, Dub. Longview THOMAS, Roberf Laverl, I-lousion TRUBE, Meredifh, Housion VALLES, Merrie Ann, Housion VISCUSI, Richard Louis, Housron WARNER, Jaclc Bruce, Housion WATERS, David L., Housion WATSON, William Eugene, Mounds, III. WEBB, Roland Morris, Housion WESTPHAL, Douglas Herlaer'I', Housion WETMORE, Davis Wya'H', Galvesron WHITTINGTON, Alfred Wilbeclc, Housion WIDERSTROM, W. O., Housion WILKINSON, Thomas Bradford, Houslon WILLIAMS, Clyde Nafhan, Housion WITT, James Roger, Housion ZUCKERO, George Nicholal, I-Iousfon if Y . Q' vi 4 ,., . .X Y . N . I I AI t. .. ,4,4 Q W W yr, 4 11" H, f n :Sd N' f5V l hy, Q ,ji XV X at xl I if SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS Take time out for a game of bridge between classes. Pictured are Bobbie Hainline, secretary, Cathy Young, vice-president, Susan Wood, treasurer, and Brenda Busch, representative. ABEL, Margarei' K., l-lousion: Business Educafion ACCOMANDO, Frank, Housionz Pharmacy ACCURSO, Pele Anfhony, Housfon: Accouniing ACREE, S. Eloise, I-lousiong English ADAMS, Jan McMullen, Housron: Radio-Television ALKSNE, Edwin Rudolph, I-lousfon: Ari ALLEN, Harry K., Jr., Housionq Biology ANDERSON, Bernice Burlre'H', l-lousionz Elemenrary Educaiion ARNAUD, Johnny, Housiong Mechanical Engineering ARRINGTON, Doris Banowsky, Bellaire: Ari Eclucaiion ARRINGTON, Jean Thomas, Freeport Elemeniary Educaiion ATKINSON, Roloerl' D., Housion: Archiieciure E AYLES Earl Mur he Dallas: I P YI Archiieciure BACON, James Rolancl, Pasadena: Managemen+ BAILEY, Elynclabeih, Housion: Elemeniary Educaiion BARFIELD, Marilyn Pryor, Housion: Biology ' BARFIELD, Sam C., Housion: Chemical Engineering BARTLETT, Alan Leigh, Housion: Chemical Engineering BATTAGLIA, Josephine Agnes, Housioni English ' BAUMER, Michael, Augsburg. Germany: Elecirical Engineering and Maihemaiics BENSON, Bei-fy Jeanne, Housfon: Home Economics Eduoaiion BERENT, Ruhi Rusiu, lsianbul, Turkey: Pefroleum Engineering BERGERON, John Thomas, Housfong lndusirial Engineering BIANCO, Daniel A., Housion: Mechanical Engineering BIGGERS, Glenda Hensley, Channelview: Home Economics BIUNDO, Bruce Vincenf, Independence, La.: Pharmacy Seniors BLAKE, Francis Eugene, Housronp Drafiing and Elecironics BLAYLOCK, Jerome Wayne, Gardena, Calif.: Maihemarics BLOMSTROM, David B., Housion: Accouniing BOELSEN, Charles Henry, Housrong Archirecrure BOLIN, Johanna E., l-lousiong Elemenrary Educalion BOLINGER, Ar'I'hur Marfin, Jr., Housrong Accounfing BOXX, Baxifer F., Houslonp Elecfronics BOYD, Jim Allen, Lampasasy Elecirical Engineering BOYKIN, M. Vaughn, Jr., Housiong Secondary Educalion BRIDIER, Shirley Ann, Bellaire: Business Educarion BRITTAIN, Charles Joseph, Housion: Managemeni' BROWN, Franklin Posielle, Jacksonville, Fla.: Heallrh, Safely, Physical Educaiion BROWN, Lee Augusf, Oniario, Ore.: Diesel Eleciric BROWN, Roberi' T., Housioni Psychology BUELL, Evelyn Jane+, Housion: Healih, Safely, Physical Educafion BUNDY, Pafricia Jo, l-lousronp Business Educafion BURGIN, Pafricia Jane, Hous'ron: Elemeniary Educaiion BURKE, Helen R. Chrisfie, Housfong Elemenfary Educarion BURKE, Susan Richfer, New Braunfels: Home Economics BURNS, Au+ry R., Housronq Chemisfry BURT, Billy Joe, Housiong Pre-Law CALELLY, Gale C., Housion: English CAMP, Dolrece Elizabefh, La Marque: Elemenlary Educafion CANSLER, Pafricia Ann, Pasadena: Secondary Educaiion CART, Blufford Joseph, Jr., Crowley, La.: Pharmacy CARY, Thomas Lee, Housion: Peiroleum Engineering -if. V 1,14 - - CHANDLER, Selma Allen, Housiong Elemeniary Educafion i y y CHEN, Howard Hsiao-Lian, Houslon: Transporiarion and ,fiat Q M , ' iig ig F Foreign Trade iiii 1 ,iklfgf-ff CHU, Wellesley, Housfong Pharmacy 3573" " CLARK, James Russell, West Accouniing ef, -fr a:,--- Ps ., v-Y. 931.-1 3.,-11.14-P: Mc. , L5 ,T 'eu 7 -I-J. R I - arf: '4's.,g'inzaig:-54734.22 an Q.. 'QW' L N 'Ia ,.,Q,1g we - , , T l L' :Iw- 1 2 !1il A' 'E uv 24 ff s T LC 9 'IX 5, ' wr- CLATWORTHY, Thomas Bernard, S+. Albans, W. Va.: Physics COBB, Jerry Wal'I'er, l-louslrony Economics COLE, Aubrey PruiH', Friendswood: Heallh, Safely. Physical Eclucaiion COLLINS, Charles Ray, l-lousfon: Biology CONTE, Thomas, Trenlon, N, J.: Heallh. Safely, Physical Eclucalion COOK, Eugene Augusfus, Houslong Accounfing COOPER, Alan Kenne+h, l-louslon: Transporfalion COTTON. Ernesi' Ray, Wes? Columbia: Pharmacy COX, Audrey Lee, Houma. La.: Elemenlary Educafion COX, Lucrecia C., l-lous+on: Business Aclminislrafion CRAWFORD, Sydalise Frecleman, Porl' Arfhur Ari' Eclucalion CRIM, Duane Melvin, Housloni Secondary Educalion CUCCHIARA, Charles J., Hammond, La.: Pharmacy CUNNINGHAM, Clarence H., Palacios: Agriculiural Economics CUNNINGHAM, Clifford Charles, I-louslon: lndusirial Eleclronics CUNNINGHAM, Roberi Hillary, Jr., Housion Eleclrical Engineering r DALAL, Nalinlcani' J., Bombay. India: Mechanical Engineering and lvlalhemalics DANIEL, Mar'l'ha D., Baylowng Elemen-iary Educaiion DAVID, Marie, Lake Charles, La.: Radio-Television DAVIS, James B., Housiong Pre-Law DAVIS, Roberf WyncIell, I-louslonz Secondary Educaiion DEHART, Shirley Jean, I-louslon: English DEMUTH, Henry, Houslon: Accounring DERBY, Donald R., I-lous+on: Geology DERRINGTON, Darrell B., I-lousl'on7 Mechanical Engineering DERRYBERRY, Donald R., Housfon: Eleclronics DIXON, Virgil L., Housfon: Radio-Television Seniors 1 DILLON, William Homer, Jr., l-lous+on7 Business Adminisrraiion DODSON, Lloyd G., Housion: Managemenr DOMINGUEZ, Consuelo Yolanda, Housfonq Elemeniary Eclucarion DOMINY, Nelna June, Housrong Journalism DUDLEY, Donna Kaye, Housion: English DUHON, Howard, Crowley. La.: lndusrrial Elecrronics DUNCAN, Linda Carol, l-lousron: English DUNN, William Lee, I-lousrong lndusirial Elecrronics EMMONS, Erma Loraine, I-lousionq Business Educarionl ENGELKING, Herberi' Arl'l1ur, Housronz Mechanical Engineering ERDIL, Nebahal, Izmir, Turkey: Ari' FARBER, Louis lrwin, l-'lousionq Elecfrical Engineering FERGUSON, Barbara Ann, l-lousronz Secrerarial Adminisiralion FISCHER, Paul J., Brenham: Psychology FLEMING, Roberi' Donald, Bellaire: Markeiing FLOYD, Virginia Lee, Housiong Psychology FLUKER, Edward Michael, Housion: Accounling FRANZ, Janeen Lee, Housron: Secrefarial Adminisirahon GADDIS, Franlc January, l-lousfong lndusfrial Engineering GAINES, Edwene, Housron: Journalism GARDNER, James William, l-lousl'on: Maihemaiics GEE, Jims, Housrong Civil Engineering GILES, Roberi' Darrell, Overiong Elecrrical Engineering GOULD, George Wesley, Jr.. Washingron, D. C.: Polifical Science GRAHAM, Maudie Marie, Sweenyg Biology GRAHAM, Olin L., Housrony Elecironics GRIERSON, Joseph B., Housion: Chemical Engineering GROESCHEL, Vernon Ernesf, Housloni Eleclronics GROSSBERG, Marc E., Housronz Polirical Science GURIN, Rachel Nellcin, Housron: Secondary Educafion 5 -U X .Lx '. -4 41 Wy ffl! I HW if Q. Vf W 1-. .A .45 .. ,A .ix sg? Q1 8I HALE, Samuel Edward. I-louslon: l-lealrh, Safely, Physical Educarion HAM, Charles Frederick, Galena Park: Psychology HARDIN, Eva L., l-lousfon: Secondary Educafion HARRIS, Ronald Emme'H', Bellaire: Pre-Law HARRISON, Paul Spencer, l-lousion: Transporrafion HAYWARD, Shirley Lucinda, Housfon: Home Economics HEDGE, George Andrew. Houslon: Draffing HELMS. James Frecl, Housron: Biology HILL, Jerry Harold, Bowie: Ari' HILLIN, Lincla Jean, Houslon: Secreiarial Aclminislrafion HIRSCH, Waller Carl, Jr., Housfon: Chemisfry HITCHCOCK, Hulon Joe, Jr.. l-lous'I'on: Air Condirioning and Refrigeraiion HOBBS, John Franlc, Abilene: Journalism HOELSCHER EllIoHE Houslron Accounhng HOFFPAUIR Eslle Henry Jr Porn' Arfhur Pharmacy HOLDER Joyce Lore'H'a Housfon Secrelarlal Admunlsfrahon HOLGIN Richard Palrlclc Houslon Managemenr HOLL Mary Jo Houslon Elemenlary Eclucafson HOLLEY Roberi' B Houslon Pharmacy HOOD Benlamm Harrlson Jr Houslon Elec+rncal Engnneerlng HORWITZ Arlene Gall Houslon Spanish HOUSWORTH Jack Lewis l-louslon Clvll Engineering HOWARD John Wallace l-louslon Home Bullcllng and Lvghl' Consfruchon HOWELL Avery Lowell Jr I-Ious+on Eleclrlcal Englneerlng HOYT Claudia Janan Housfon Secondary Educahon HUDGINS Nancy Lane Blacksrone Va Elemenfary Educahon HURST Ouafa Laverne Housfon Soczology INGALLS Phnllp Pasadena Secondary Educahon Seniors ' . I -I I . . A I I -I I I I v . . ' I I v l I I I 'I I . . . . . I I 'I I ' . I I I , . . . I I I I I I I I 'I I ' . I I ' I I I -. I I I . . . I I I ' IRWIN, David G., I-lousron: Managemenl' JACKSON, Calvin Rae, Housion: Psychology and Maihemarics JENNINGS, Roy Junior, Houslong Archilecrure JENNINGS, Shirley Lou, I-'lous+on: Marhemaiics JOHNSON, Merrel Travis, Spearman: Diesel Technology JOHNSON, Michael Tucker, Housfong Pharmacy JOHNSON, Pafricia Sue, Buffalo: Pharmacy JOHNSTON, Iris Kay, Housionp Business Adminisiraiion JOLLY, Orville L., Houslrom Poliiical Science JONES, Hugh Pafrick, Housiong Radio-Television KALLINA, Joe J., Jr., Garwood: Home Building and Lighi Consiruciion KELLEY, Edward Madison, Housiong Maihemaiics and Mechanical Engineering KELLEY, Donald William, Genoa: Elecrrical Engineering KENNEDY, Charles Gerald, I-lousion: Elecirical Engineering KIRKLAND, Kennefh Lesfer, I-lousion: Spanish KOHEN, Moshe Dov, Housionz Mechanical Engineering and Maihemaiics KOHLER, Shirley Jean, I-lousionq Elemenlrary Educa+ion KRUEGER, William W., Jr., l-lousron: Business Adminislrraiion LAINE, Dale Edward, Texas Ciiyg Malhemaiics LANDERS, William Rober'l's', Georgeiown, Pa.: Eleciric Technology LEFKOWITZ, Bennie Fred, I-lousion: Pharmacy LEHMANN, Edmund R., Housiong Accouniing LERMAN, Jerry Allen, Housion: I-lealfh, Safely, Physical Educaiion LEVINE, Irvin S., Housionq Elecirical Engineering LEWIS, Cleberi' Edward, Housionq lndusirial Elecironics LILLY, Janei' Carol, I-lousiong Elemeniary Educaiion LINN, Tosby Laile, Housiong Biology LOBACCARO, Frank S., Jr., Housiong Opiorneiry LOCK, Leonard Wesley, Housiong Mechanical Engineering and Maihemaiics LOHMAN, Barbara Jane, Housioni Home Economics 1 .al A,. la Q: . lu. if We 1 Ekf 1K us V :gag v I . 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F 4. ix gif U3f,J1'?Tw F-Qfff A 7 1 TQJJJIS 3.2. rf Tiff 11- , 1 ' 41 1 21 , 1 MCGOWAN, Darden Leonard, Jr., Housion: Archiieciure McKEE, Ronald Sfewari, l-lousiong Cnemislry MENDEZ, Julian R., l-lousion: Accouniing A MEYER, Travis Waller, Fayelrievillez Elecironics MILLER, Cafherine Penelope, l-lousion: Business Adminisiraiion MIZE, Roberf Clay'I'on, Alvin: Mallwemaiics MORGAN, John Richard, l-lousionq Physics MORGAN, Mona Ruih, Needvilleg Elemeniary Educaiion MURPHY, Roberi' John, l-lousionq Accouniing MUSGROVE, Freddy Gene, l-lousfon: Economics NABER, Marian Rielce, Houslonq Ari Eclucaiion NAIL, Wayne Howard, I-louslon: Elecironics NEEL, Ronald James, Housion: Elecirical Engineering NELKIN, Benard, Housfon: Ari' NICOLL, Mary L., Housionz Pre-Law and Poliiical Science Seniors NORDSTRAND, Carl H., Housion: Pelroleum Engineering O'BRIEN, Joseph Kenne+h, Housionp Polirical Science O'NEAL, Barbara Jean Gay, Housion: EIemenJrary Eclucaiion PALM, Lee Allen, Galena Park: Mechanical Engineering and Marhemaiics PARR, Benne'H' Ivy, Baldwin, La.: Business Aclminisiraiion PATTERSON, Roberl' Lee, Housion: Physics PERDUE, Jim Mac, Housiong Pre-Law PERRIRAZ, William Ernes'I', Housiong Agriculiural Economics PERRY, Don R., Housionq Psychology PETTY, Carol Ann, Housrong Hisiory PHILLIPS, Donald B., Housioni Accouniing PHILLIPS, Margarel' Lanelle, Housioni Elemenlary Educaiion PIPER, Joan JeaneH'e, Decarur, Ga.: Opromeiry POLLAK, Ka'l'hIeen Ann, Housiong Secrelarial Adminisiraiion PORTIS, William Bar'I'on, Jr., Housron: Pre-Law RAGSDALE, Thomas Glover, I-Iousionz Managemeni REINDL, Meyer Evans, Housion: Elecirical Engineering and Physics PEMMERT, Ora D., Bellvilleg Business Eclucaiion RICHARD, Arvie Lee, Galveslony Pharmacy ROGERS, Roberi' G., Housiong Poliiical Science ROSEN, Alan Davicl, Housiong Psychology ROSENBERG, Glenda Lerner, Galvesrong Speech and Secondary Educalion ROXBURGH, Charles Douglas, Housionr Perroleum Engineering RUSTIN, William Evere'H', Houslon: Incluslrial Elecironics SALINAS, Felipe G., Housloni Pharmacy SANDIFER, Alvin C., Pasadena: Business Aclminisirarion SCHOBER, Vic'I'or John, Housion: Hisiory SEWELL, Harvey Wilson, Housiong Psychology SEYMOUR, Tommie Lou, Houslon: Home Economics SHAFER, William Raymoncl, Housfon: Civil Engineering 1' ,,. J e fr -ig , ' 6 N M ,, 2 ,l i T, , 4. f Q 2 mmf V x 'mr' 4.1.1 V , f A X ' .J - V - L .Z E- QQ,--Qiff, -. nfl- fi - ' , " 2,2 , ,EQ-3 ' ' ww - , . , H+ what ,pw -, Q2--I, 1,-. -5 fe'-,Ga , ' 'mmf Y kflflwfiri ,:',"',,"4v, , CBJ'-iffs-' H , jflfgfk-x11 Q9 ,ia F , : gf::..v 5 u .-A . frm? 22:5 rJ 'ff'-76 u. if m H M , ,., 5:- I 1 , A 1 I - A Mg, if U sv, 'mx 5 I I w N nal" .',, 1: If , Q w ,L- 44.1 - 1 '.-1 , M, , vyq -lu ' ., . ,V W4-,. ,, - I ,A , C , ef- W, fu 1-, -,L -'J 555' 54' , -sy .-' ' k. . ,w . ,1 , , ,W Q'.a.- 'Q . . J .iz 'fl V D ,spfivw ve , wifi' E E '-53 '- .hw 5+-'-3 , H, -, -N 4 5 V In-W. I-H -.1 1.51, jpf: L-' ,I I iff? n l X Xv ' N SHALHUB, Emile Asad, Shweir, Lebanon. Civil Engineering and Maihemaiics SHANNON, James W., Pasadena: Diesel SHEPLER, Linda Brown, Bellaire: Home Economics SHINE, Wafhena Lynn, La Marque: Home Economics SHOWS, Gerald C., Housionq Mechanical Engineering SILVERMAN, David Vicfor, Housionp Accouniing SIMS, John Andrew, Jr., Housion: Managemem' SIMPSON, AII::er+ Dee, III, Housionq Economics SIRMAN, John M., Corrigan: Pharmacy SKINNER, Alonzo Jerry, Hous+on: Malhemaiics and Civil Engineering SLOUGH, DARREL GENE, Houslron: Accouniing SLOVER, Ira Naihan, Housron: Economics SMITH, Gene F., Galvesiong Business Adminisfrafion SMITH Joyce Marle Houslon Engllslw SMITH Paul GIles Jr Housfon Dlesel Elec'rrIc SMITH Ronald Lee I-louslon AIr Condlhonlng and Refngerahon SNOW Rosemary Housfon Spamsh SOUDBAKHSH M S Teheran Iran Mecl'IanIcal Engmeermg SPIELDENNER Gerald Louls Hous'I'on lnclusfrlal Engrneerlng STAIR Roberl' Yocum Housron Managernenl' STERNENBERG John Lewls Housfon BusIness AdmInIs+ra1'Ion STEWART George Ann McAles+er Okla Secrefarlal AdmInIs+ra+Ion STRADER ErIn Parker Housfon Elemenfary Educahon STRADER John Leslle Houslon Busmess AdmInISlFallOH SUCHMA James Howard Houslon CIVll Engmeerrng SWEENEY Ronald M LOHQVISW RadIo T6l6VlSlOn SZATHMARY Joseph Alex YarclvIlle N J ClVIl Engmeerlng TASKA Georgla Housfon Busmess AdmInIs+ra+Ion Seniors ' . I I I ' . I I -I I I I ' I I I I I I - 'I In I ' . I I I I I I ' . I I I I I I 'I . I I I . . I I I . I I I . I 'I ' I ' . I I I ' ll . . I I I . . . . TENENBAUM, Joyce Ray, Pharr: Speech Therapy TILLER, Ann Quiggins, Houslon: Spanish and Lalin American Sludies TODD, Palricia Ann, Houslong Secondary Educalion and Malhemalics TRAMMELL, Pa'I'sy Garre'H', I-louslonq Elemenlary Educalion TUFFLY, Thomas O'Brien, Houslon: Accounling TURK, Pafricia Marlin, Houslon: Elemenlary Educalion VAUGHAN, James Turner, Houslon: Pharmacy VAUGHAN, Jerry Lynn, Galveslon: Eleclric Technology VICKERS, Joe Wallcer, La Marque: Eleclronics WALKER, Larry Granville, Houslon: Marlceling WARD, Jellrs Oscar, Houslon: lnduslrial Engineering WARNER, Eleanor C., Houslong Elemenlary Educalion WARREN, Paul N., Houslon: Business Adminislralion WASHINGTON, Lesler Wayne, Houslonq Malhemalics and Engineering WATKINS, Bobby B., Houslon: Accounling WELCH, John E., Houslon: Managemenl' WELLS, S. Ralph. Houslon: Accounling WHATLEY, Hulon B., Cleveland: Heallh, Safely, Physical Educalion WHITE, Velma Floydene, Livingslonq Ari WHITLEY, Wanda Willhoife, I-louslon: Elemenlary Educalion WILLIAMS, Robbie Webb, Houslon: English WILSON, Ronald Edward, Hous+on: Physics WOOD, Susan L., Sugarland: Speech Therapy WOODSMALL, Donald Olis, Houslon: Managemenl WOOTEN, Leonard E., Houslong Managemenf YEARY, Harold Rulherford, II, Houslon: Biology YOUNG, Ca'l'hy V., Houslon: Journalism YOUNG, Kenne'l'h Wayne, Bellaire: Adverlising YOUNGER, Kalhryn Su, Sweeiwalerg Journalism ZIDELL, Harvey Rober'l', I-louslong Managemenl 4 '51 Rf gp A SENICR ACTIVITIES .A- ACCOMANDO, Frank: Pharmacy Phi Delia Chi ACCURSO, Pe'I'e A.: Accounfing Sociely of Accounlanfs: Fiesrla Assn.: Sfoclc and Siolon- Club ACREE, S. Eloise: English Della Zela: SEA ADAMS, Jan McMullan: Radio-TV Headline Hop Oueen: Rush Chairman, Zela Tau Alpha: Radio-TV Guild: Vanify Fair Beauly: Miss Adveriising: President Gamma Alpha Chi: Alpha Del+a Sigma Swee+hear+: Sigma Alpha Epsilon Sweelhearl: Besl' Dressed Coed: Cheerleader: Fiesia Assn. ALKSNE, Edwin, R.: Arr Phi Delia Kappa: SEA ARRINGTON, Doris B.: Ari' Ed. Kappa Pi: Zeia Tau Alpha ARRINGTON. Jean T.: Elem. Ed. SEA: CYC AYLES, Earl M.: Archileciure Treasurer. Wesley Foundarioin: ROTC Cadel' Officer -3- BACON, James R.: Managemen-1' SAM BAILEY, Elyndabefh: Elem. Ed. SEA: NEA: TSTA: Fiesia BATTAGLIA, Jo Agnes: English SEA: WSA: Newman Club: French Club: Corresponding Secre+ary. Delia Ze-'la BAUMER, Michael: Elec. Engr. AIEE: IRE: UHSEE: Phi Thefa Kappa: Tau Epsilon: Soccer Club BENSON, Bei-fy J.: I-l. Ec. Ed. Presidenl. Phi Upsilon Omicron: His- rorian, Cap and Gown: Bela Lambda: American Vocalional Assn.: Phi Thela Kappa: SEA BERENT, Ruhi R.: Pe1'. Engr. Vice-President Tau Kappa Epsilon: So- ciely of Peiroleum Engineers BERGERON, John Thomas: Ind. Engr. AIIE: Corresponding Secreiary. Alpha Pi Mu BIANCO, Daniel A.: Mech. Engr. ASME: Alpha Phi Omega: Newman Club BIGGERS, Glenda H.: Home Ec. Bela Lambda: SEA: BSU: Reporier. Texas Home Economics College Clubs BIUNDO, Bruce V.: Pharmacy President 'Phi Kappa Thela: IFC: House of Represenialivesi Sludeni Sena+e: Newman Club BLAKE, Francis E.: Eleclronics Vice-Preside-ni, Tau Alpha Pi: Dragan Socieiyi IRE BLAYLOCK, Jerome W.: Malrh Presiclenlqh Delia Sigma Phi: Warden. lFC: ROTC: Presideni. Scabbard and Blade: Pep Club: UHSE: Parliamen- larian. House of Represenfaiives: Fie-s'I'a BLOMSTROM, David B.: Accounling Treasurer, Socieiy of Accounlanls: BSU BOELSEN, Charles H.: Archifeclure U. of H. Archi1'ec'l'ure Socie'l'y BOLIN, Johanna: Elem. Ed. SEA BOXX, Baxier F.: Eleiclronics IRE Seniors BOYD, Jim Allen: Elec. Engr. Speaker, House of Represeniaiives: Secrelary, Tau Epsilon: UHSE: UHSEE: Omicron Delia Kappa: TISA BOYKlN, Moreau Vaughn: Sec. Ed. Officer, ROTC: Color Guard BRlDlER, Shirley Ann: Bus. Ed. Vice-President Delia Zela: House of Represeniaiives: Secreiary, Lulheran Sfudenir Assn. BROWN, Franklin P., Phys. Ed. Varsily Track BROWN, Lee A.: Diesel Elec. SAM: Diesel Club BROWN, Roberl' T.: Psychology Social Chairman, Psi Chi: Alpha Epsi- lon Pi BUELL, Evelyn Janel: Phys. Ed. Treasurer, Cap and Gown: Lanyard Club: SEA: Fiesia: S+. Thomas Mardi Gras Duchess BUNDY, Palricia: Bus. Ed. Phi Kappa Phi BURGIN, Pafricia J.: Elem. Ed. Band: Presideni, Sigma Alpha loia: Tau Beia Sigma: SEA BURKE, Helen C.: Elem. Ed. NEA: TSTA: TSEA: SNEA: TEPS: SEA BURKE, Susan Richfer: Home Ec. Riiual-Chairman, Delia Gamma: Sec- reiary, Bela Lambda: Librarian, Phi Upsilon Omicron: Cap and Gown .C- CALELLY, Gale: English SEA: Phi Kappa Phi: Phi Thela Kappa CAMP, Dolrece E.: Elem. Ed. Kappa Delia Pi: SEA CANSLER, Pafricia A.: Sec. Ed. BSU: Vice-President SEA: Alpha Delia Pi: Miss Fuiure Teacher CART, Blufford J.: Pharmacy American Pharmaceulical Associa- Jrion: Secreiary, Phi Delia Chi CARY, Thomas: Pei. Engr. AIME CHU, Wellesley: Pharmacy Secreiary, Kappa Epsilon: American Pharmaceuiical Associalion CLATWORTHY, Thomas B.: Physics Sigma Pi Sigma COLE, Prui'l"I': Phys. Ed. SEA: TSTA: NEA: SEA: Sphere Club CRAWFORD, Sydalise F.: Ari' Ed. Vice-President SEA CRIM, Duane Melvin: Sec. Ed. SEA: Siudenl Senaie: House of Rep- resenialives CUCCHIARA, Charles: Pharmacy Phi Kappa Theia: Newman Club: House of Represeniaiives: American Pharmaceuiical Associaiion CUNNINGHAM, Clarence: Agr. Eco. Treasurer, Siock and Siolon Club -D- DALAL, Nalinlcanf: Mech. Engr. lniernaiional Club: llE: ASME DANIEL, Marfha D.: Elem. Ed. Vice-Presidenl, Kappa Delia Pi: ACE SEA DAVID, Marie: Radio-TV Alpha Delia Pi: Gamma Alpha Chi Alpha Epsilon Rho: Vanilry Fair Favor iie: House of Represeniaiives: New- man Club: Broadcasiers Assn. DAVIS, James B.: Pre-Law Delia Theia Phi: U. of H. Bar Assn. DAVIS, Roberl W.: Sec. Ed. Sigma Alpha Chi DEHART, Shirley Jean: English SEA DERBY, Donald R.: Geology Vice-Presideni, Lambda Chi Alpha Cadei Company Commander, ROTC French Club: Poliiical Science Club Pick and Hammer Club DERRINGTON, Darrell: Mech. Engr. ASME DOMINGUEZ, Consuelo Y.: Elem. Ed. SEA DOMINY, N. June: Journalism Alpha Delia Pi: Theia Sigma Phi: Gamma Alpha Chi DUDLEY, Donna: English French Club: SEA DUHON, Howard: lnd. Elec. Chairman, IRE -E- EMMONS, Erma L.: Bus. Ed. Fufure Business Teachers 95 -F- FARBER, Louis I.: Elec. Engr. UHSEE: IRE FLUKER, Edward M.: Accouniing Phi Kappa Phi: Phi' Theia Kappa -Q- GADDIS, Frank J.: Ind. Engr. Secreiary, AIIE GAINES, Edwene: Journalism Ediior, The Cougar: Presideni, Theia Sigma Phi: Gamma Alpha Chi: Alpha Chi Omega GEE, Jims: Civil Engr. ASCE: UHSE: Epsilon Nu Gamma: House of Represeniaiives: Cadei' Capiain, ROTC: Scabbard and Blade: Cullen Rifle Drill Team GILES, Roberi' D.: Elec. Engr. UHSEE GOULD, George: Pol. Sci. Poliiical Science Club: Pan American Club GRAHAM, M. Marie: Biology Pre-Med Socieiy: Alpha Epsilon Delia GRIERSON, Joseph: Chem. Engr. Presideni, AlChE: Treasurer, Tau Ep- silon: Phi Kappa Phi: Omicron Delia Kappa 96 GROSSBERG, Marc E.: Pol. Sci. Phi Rho Pi: French Club: Vice-Presi- deni, Wri'rer's Club: House of Repre- seniaiives: Forensic Socieiy: Omici-on Delia Kappa: Poliiical Science Club: Young Democrais Club: Ass'i. Ediior, Harvesi' -H- HALE, Samuel E.: Phys. Ed. Sphere Club HARDIN, Eva L.: Sec. Ed. SEA: Phi Kappa Phi: Kappa Delia P HARRISON, Paul: Transporiaiion Delia Nu Alpha HELMS, James F.: Biology Chancellor, Pre-Med Socieiy: Scho- Iasiic Chairman, Sigma Alpha Epsilon: Pep Club: Gamma Delia: House of Represeniaiives HILL, Jerry H.: Ari Presideni. Kappa Pi: Secreiary. Kappa Kappa Psi: Band: U. of H. Archi+ec- 'rure Socieiy HIRSCH, Waller C.: Chemisiry Phi Theia Kappa HOBBS, John F.: Journalism Alpha Delia Sigma: Red Masque Players: Lambda Chi Alpha: ROTC HOFFPAUIR, Eslie H.: Pharmacy America n Pharmaceuiical Associaiion: Band HOLDER, Joyce L.: Sec. Adm. Phi Kappa Phi: Phi Theia Kappa HOLLEY, Roberi' B.: Pharmacy American Pharmaceuiical Associaiion HOOD, Benjamin H.: Elec. Engr. UHSE: UHSEE: AIEE: Vice-Presi- deni, Epsilon Nu Gamma: Secrefary, IRE: Tau Epsilon: House of Represen- iarives: Fiesia Assn. HORWITZ, Arlene Gail: Spanish Presideni, Sigma Delia Pi: Phi Kappa Phi: SEA HOUSWORTH, Jack L.: Civil Engr. President ASCE: UHSE HOWARD, John W.: Hom. Blg. Capiain, Scabbard and Blade: ROTC Bairlle Group Commander: House of Represeniaiives HOWELL, Avery L.: Elec. Engr. UHSE: Treasurer. UHSEE: AIEE: IRE: Treasurer, Epsilon Nu Gamma HOYT, Claudia Janan: Sec. Ed. SEA HUDGINS, Nancy L.: Elem. Ed. SEA: TSTA: NEA .J.. JACKSON, Calvin Rae: Maih. NEA: SEA: UHSE . -L- LANDERS, William: Elec. Tech. Diesel Club: Fies'l'a LERMAN, Jerry A., Phys. Ed. President Phi Epsilon Pi: Sphere Club: President Hillel Sociely: House of JENNINGS, Roy J.: Archileclure Represenfafgves Alpha Phi Omega: U. of H. Archilec- Jrure Assn. LEWIS, Cleberl' E.: Ind. Elec. JENNINGS, Shirley Lou: Malh. SEA: Gamma Delia: German Club ' Diesel Club LOCK, Leonard W.: Mech. Engr. JOHNSON, Pafricia S.: Pharmacy Q ASME. UHSE. Sfudem Senafe President Kappa Epsilon: House of Represenlafives: American Pharma- ceulical Associaiion' Secrefar Junior ' Y' LOHMAN, Barbara J.: Home Ec. Pharmacy Class SEA JOHNSTON' his K4 Bus' Adm' LOOPER, Waller B.: Mech. Engr. Disiribulive Ed. Club ASME JONES' Hugh p.: Rad:o,TV LOVELL, Donald D.: Accounling I Reporler. Alpha Epsilon Rho: Broad- Vice-Chairman. Tau Alpha Pi: Secre- +ary, lRE: House of Represenlalives: Sociely of Accounlanls: House of Seniors MCCORMACK, Paul: Accounling Sociely of Accounlanls: CYC MCDANIEL, Clinfon R.: Pharmacy Phi Della Chi MCGOWAN, D. Leonard: Archileclure U. of H. Archileclure Sociely McKEE, Ronald S.: Chernislry Omicron Della Kappa: Alpha Chi Sigma: Phi The+a Kappa: Forensic Sociely: Debaie Team: Bus. Mgr.. Slu- denl Direcfory MEYER, Travis W.: Eleclronics Treasurer, Luirheran Sfudenl Assn.: House of Represenralives: IRE MILLER, Cafherine P.: Bus. Adm. Omicron Chi Epsilon: Chaplain. Alpha Della Pi: Presbyierian Sludem' Assn. MORGAN, John Richard: Physics Della Sigma Phi cas+ers Assn.: Slalif Reporler, Cougar: Repfesenlailves MORGAN. Mona Rufhi Elem- Ed- -rencl' Club: Wesley Foundallon Vice-President FEA: Publicily Chair- . P' LUPAU, Clemeni' N.: Bus. Adm. man Kappa De la I SAM -K- MURPHY, Roberi' J.: Accounling Phi Kappa Thelra: Newman Club: So- ciely of Accounfanls KALLINA, Joe J.: Hom. Blg. -M- ROTC MUSGROVE, Freddy G.: Economics MAHON, James R.: Pre-Law and Eco. Omicron Chi Epsilon' KELLEY, Edward M.: Mech. Engr. U, of H, Bar Assn, ASME MAYHALL, CharloH'e: Music Ed. ..N- KIRKLAND, Kenneih L.: Spanish President MENC: U. of H. Concerl Choir: WSA: Vice-President Alpha Secrefary-Treasurer El Toro Espanol: phi NABER Marian Rieke. Ari, Ed Sigma Della Pi: CYC ' McCLARTY, John R.: Elec. Engr. KOHEN, Moshe D.: Mech. Engr. Kappa Pi: Chi Omega President UHSEE: Phi Kappa Phi: Tau NAIL' Wayne H.: Eledronics ASME: Hillel Sociely: lnlernafional E -I . O - D H K . G - Sfudenl Organizalion: Fiesla mlzsrlogfub micron e a appa' er IRE 97 NEEL, Ronald: Elec. Engr. AIEE NELKIN, Benard: Ari' Vice-President Kappa Pi: Hillel So- ciely NICOLL, Mary L.: Pre-Law and Pol. Sci. U. of H. Bar Assn.: French Club: ln- 'rernalional Relalions Club ...Q- O'BRlEN, Joseph K. Pol. Sci. Pre-Med Sociely: Poliiical Science Club? UHSME -p.. PALM, Lee Allen: Mech. Engr. Gamma Delia: ASME PATTERSON, Roberi' Lee: Physics Secrelary, Sigma Pi Sigma: Religious Groups Council: SEA: BSU: Phi Thera Kappa PERDUE, Jim Mac: Pre-Law Vice-President Omicron Della Kappa: lnlercollegiale Debale Squad: Sfudenl Senare: U. of H. Bar Assn.: House ol Represenfalives: Forensic Sociely: Presidenl Phi Rho Pi: Young Demo- crals Club PETTY, Carol Ann: Hislory Phi Kappa Phi: Phi Alpha Thela: CYC: House of Represenlafives: French Club: SEA PHILLIPS, M. Lanelle: Elem. Ed. SEA POLLAK, Kafhleen: Sec. Adm. Phi Thela Kappa: President Delfa Zela: Fiesfa: Secre+ary. Cap and Gown: Wesleyan Club -R- REINDL, Meyer E.: Elec. Engr, Treasurer, UHSEE: AIEE: Delia Chi ROGERS, Roberi' G.: Pol. Sci. President Lambda Chi Alpha: Secre- 'rary, IFC: Pholographer. Houslonian: Young Democrals Club: Polilical Sci- ence Club: House of Represenlalives: Fiesla: Camera Club ROSEN, Alan D.: Psychology President Pre-Med Sociely: Social Chairman, Psi Chi: Alpha Epsilon Pi ROSENBERG, Glenda L.: Sec. Ed. Hillel Sociely: Alpha Epsilon Phi ROXBURGH, Charles D.: Pet Engr. Vice-President Tau Epsilon: President AIME: Phi Kappa Phi: Phi Thefa Kap- pa: Omicron Della Kappa: UHSE -5- SALINAS, Felipe G.: Pharmacy American Pharmaceuiical Associarion SEYMOUR, Tommie Lou: Home Ec. HEA SHAFER, William R.: Civil Engr. ASCE SHALHUB, Emile A.: Civil Engr. and Mafh. ASCE: Wesley Foundalion SHEPLER, Linda Brown: Home Ec. Cap and Gown: Phi Kappa Phi: Vice- President Phi Upsilon Omicron: Schol- arship Chairman, Zela Tau Alpha? Bela Lambda: Hislorian. Phi Thela Kappa: Vice-President Sophomore Class Seniors SHINE, Wafhena L.: Home Ec. Secrelary, Phi Upsilon Omicron Treasurer, Bela Lambda SHOWS, Gerald C.: Mech. Engr. Secrelary, ASME: UHSE SIMS, John A.: Managemenl' SAM: Scabbard and Blade SIRMAN, John M.: Pharmacy Secrelary, Senior Pharmacy Class: Phi Delfa Chi: American Pharmaceulical Associalion: House ol Represenlaiives SKINNER, Alonzo J.: Civil Engr. ASCE: UHSE: House of Represenla- Hves: Scabbard and Blade SLOUGH, Darrel G.: Accounling Socieiy ol.Accoun'ran'l's: Vice-Presi- dent CYC SMITH, Joyce Marie: English Boosler Club: Fiesla SMITH, Ronald L.: Air Cond. ACTES SNOW, Rosemary: Spanish lnrerdisciplinary Club SEA Phi : : ,Nur El Toro Espanol 'j Sijmm Dgf 17 H' FA. Huff! Pb! 5 SOUDBAKHSH, M. S.: Mech. Engr. ASME SPIELDENNER, G. L.: Ind. Engr. Treasurer, AIIE: UHSE: Alphi Pi Mu: Epsilon Nu Gamma: Newman Club: IE Sludenl' Conference STAIR, Roberl' Y.: Managemenl Sigma lola Epsilon: SAM STEWART, George Ann: Sec. Adm. Omicron Chi Epsilon: AMA: SAM STRADER, Erin P.: Elem. Ed. President Alpha Della TSTA: TSEA: SNEA: SEA: Eiesla SUCHMA, James H.: Civil Engr. Secrelary. ASCE SWEENEY, Ronald M.: Radio-TV Broadcasiers Assn.: Radio Guild Pi: NEA: WATKINS, Bobby B.: Accounling Sociely of Accounianls WELCH, John E.: Managemenl SAM WILLIAMS, Robbie W.: English BSU: SEA WOOD, Susan L.: Speech Therapy SZATHMARY, Joseph A.: Civil -Engr. ASCE: Newman Club .T- TILLER, Ann Quiggins: Spanish Vice-President Cap and Gown: Phi Kappa Phi: Vice-President Phi Alpha Thela: President Sigma Della Pi TODD, Pafricia Ann: Sec. Ed. SEA TRAMMELL, Palsy G.: Elem. Ed. Della Kappa Gamma: SEA: Sloclc and Slolon Club: Eiesla Assn. .V- J VAUGHAN, Jerry L.: Elec. Tech. Phi Kappa Theia S e c r e 'l a r y. Siudenl Government SCONA: French Club: Treasurer, Senior Class: Secrelary, Zela Tau Alpha: TISA: WSA: President Dormi- lory Council: Ass't Secrelary, Pan- hellenic Council: NEA: SEA: House ol Represenlaiives WOODSMALL, Donald O.: Managemenl' Vice-President Pi Kappa Alpha: Presi- dent Sophomore Class WOOTEN, Leonard E.: Managemenl SA M .Y- YOUNG, Cafhy V.: Journalism Edilor, Cougar: Secrelary. Gamma Alpha Chi: Oulslanding Sludeni: Thela Sigma Phi: Exec. Board, Jour- nalism, Inc.: Phi Kappa Phi: Cap and Gown: Newman Club: Pep Club: Sweerheart Sigma Della Chi: Hous- lonian: Secrelary, Phi Thela Kappa: Kappa Tau Alpha: President Chi Omega A VICKERS' Joe W.: Eledmnics YOUNGER, Kalhryn Su: Journalism IRE .W- WALKER, Larry G.: Markeling Kappa Tau Alpha: Reporler, Thela Sigma Phi: President Gamma Alpha Chi: Tau Bela Sigma: Hislorian, Kap- pa Alpha Mu: PR Direclor, Broad- caslers Assn.: Assoc. Edilor. Houslon- ian: Cougar: Alpha Della Pi: Journa- lism, Inc. AMA: JCC -Z- WARD. J- Oscar: IHCI- EUQF- ZIDELL, Harvey R.: Managemenl' Vice-President AIIE: Eiesla Assn. Hillel Sociely: SAM: ROTC: Eiesla 99 GRADUATE CLASS PRESIDENT Anthony Kou- zounis pouses from his busy schedule To scan through cz reading ossignnienf. AULT, James Gilber'l', l-louslon: Business Adminislraiion BECNEL, Leo John, Franklin, La.: Oplomerry BEDDOE, Melvin Thomas, l-lousion: Biology BELL, Laura Elizabelh, l-lousron: Real Eslare BOLDGER, Lu'l'her Earl, Houslon: Psychology BRAVENEC, Beniamin Baron, l-louslong Accouniing BRIGGS, Roberl' William, l-louslon: Law and Poliiical Science BRULET, JeaneH'e l., Lake Charles, La.: Speech Therapy BYARS, Joe F., l-lousion: Secondary Educarion CHAN, Edward Yal'-Chung, l-long Kong Archileciure CHEN, Kay Kam, l-long Kong: Chemislry COLE, Anile S'l'ewarl', Housion: Secondary Educaiion CRUZAT, Inez J., l-lousion: English DANCER, Mary Calherine, Housloni English DUNN, Searcy Miller, Housron: Music Edu-ca+ion EDENS, Frank Newfen, Freeport Managemeni' ELLIOTT, James M.. Housion: Psychology FILIPPONE, John Marion, Bellaire: Pharmacy FONG, Juan, Panama Ciry, Panama: lnclusrrial Engineering FOSTER, Ralph E., l-louslon: Business GARNER, Gary N., Bayfown: Insurance GOODWIN, Ruby G., Bayiown: English HAO, Muhammad Nurul, Palcislan: Educarion HARTON, virgin E., EI camper Archireclure HERRERA, Heifor Moreira, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Mechanical Engineering HOLDER, Cecil Lee, Galena Park: Perroleum Engineering Graduates HOLLAND, Sanny Sue, Kilgore: Home Economics HOPFE, Erika Herra, Housion: Secondary Educaiion JAMES, Rebecca Lou, Housion: Secondary Educaiion KAHL, Luiz Fernando, Rio cle Janeiro. Brazil: Mechanical Engineering KISER, Lee J., Housion: Economics and Finance KROWSKI, Sianley Pefer, Maniioba, Can.: Geology KUO, Chiang-Hai, Taiwan, China: Chemical Engineering LEE, Roberi' Winnon, Housion: Managemeni LIGGETT, Harry F., Sedan, Kansas: Opiomeiry LIPSCOMB, Joel Nelson, Freepori: Pharmacy LLEWELLYN, Thomas Lee, I-lousion: l-lis+ory MANIAR, Dilip Sarabhai, Bombay, lndia: Chemical Engineering MARTINS, Nelson Henrique, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Mechanical Engineering MATTHEWS, Dan G., Jacksonville: Law McROY, James Jerome, Fayei-leville, Ark.: Psychology MENDOZA, Florencio Guillin, l-lousion: Economics MILLER, Mervin Deane, l-lousion: Biology MOREHEAD, Roberi Earl, Big Spring: Psychology NEWELL, Jimmie David, Meridian, Miss.: Opiomeiry RAO, Ramachandra M., Bangalore, India: Chemical Engineering ROSS, Norman S., l-lousiong Insurance SHAH, Pravin A., Bombay, lnclia: Managemeni SHAH, Umanglal G., Baroda, Guiarar: Business Aclminisiraiion STILES, Reggie Lois, Housion: Ari Educaiion THANGSUPHANICH, Thavisakdi, Bangkok, Thailand: Maihemaiics TONG, Pei-Ling, Taiwan, China: Poli'I'ical Science WALKER, Virginia Maria, La Porie: Music WEBBER, John Angus, Ruilancl, Mass.: Mechanical Engineering WINSTON, Joyce Roberison, Pasadena: Business Educaiion YEE, Yun Fon, Hong Kong: Civil Engineering M I Q J W4- i -'-' E N gf ,914 in g,M,fvgQf . " I Y J! ' -. ,, , ' gg Aff' L 1-fi' P- 4 "' A mr . -1 iii A 'f in 1 ' W 4 W 1 9 'nf L f1 5 vigil f if H , . FL , ., 4 f 2 . H M A ., ,,1. .- ,N if 1: 5 as ig KR Q '- 'fs 'H N ef jg' -A 4 s ff, V' we fi h V 5 45, 1 I W 03 ABRAHAM, Joseph Brian, Jr., El Paso ADAMS, Ronald Dean, l-louslon ANDRUS, Eunice Lanning, La Marque BAKER, Charles Allen, Hous'I'on BALDWIN, Douglas, Jr.. Genoa BINION, S'I'anley Bond, Abilene BOONE, James Carler, Jr., Houslon BRACKETT, William Quinn, Hillsboro BRUKNER, John Shields, Creighron, Pa. BURNS, Tommy Pairiclc, Ill, Housion CALVERT, lan Arbucltle, Housion CAMMACK, William Rex, Highlands CAMPBELL, John J., Ill, McAllen CUMMINGS, Charles Edward, Houslon CYPHERS, Phllip LaSalle, Pasadena DAVIS, James Burrell, Jacksonville DELANEY, George Jerorne, Pasadena DEYBARRONDO, Henri M., Houslon l l DOEHRING, Frederick A., Monirose, Ala DRAKE, Irving Richardson, Housion ENDLICH, Ben Alfred, El Paso EPPS, Raymond Riley, Houslron ESPER, Mi'l'cI1eII, EI Paso FAGIN, S'l'anIey Irwin, Housiron FRICK, Kennefh D., Fi. Wor'rI'1 GINTHER, 'Fergus Mahony, Hous+on HARRIS, Bruce Morgan, Housron HARRIS, 'Ronald EmmeH', Bellaire HARRISON, Kenneih Dale, Housion HAXTON, Manforci Ray, Texas Cify HEBERT, Joseph James, Beaumonr HENSLEY, Lynn CarIe'H', Iowa Park HINES, Roberi' Lewis, C-5aIves1'on HOGAN, Roberi' John, Housfon HOOKS, Bernard John, Jr., Cenfer HOPKINS, CIin'l'on E., Conroe HORNBUCKLE, William E., Housfon HUDSPETH, James Roy, EI Paso Law JERDEN, Ody Kenl, l-louslon JONES, Donald Lee, l-lousfon KAY, John Ross, l-lousion KEEN, Ralph Allen, l-lousfon KNOX, James Edward, Beaumonl LOOK, Morfon Barringion, l-louslon MAHON, James Rodericlc, l-lousron MAIDA, Joe Sam, l-lousfon MATTHEWS, Dan Gus, Jacksonville MAUZY, Lee Earl, Houslon McANALLY, Marcus Durwood, Houslon McCOY, James Clay+on, l-'lousfon MEADERS, Trenl' Sfuarf, Dallas MIRSKY, Joe, Houslon MIZE, Jerald David, l-louslon MOORE, Ardon Edward, Jr., Palesline MORSE, William D., Jr., l'lous'ron MOUNGER, Rex Childress, Housron NESTER, Charles A., San Anionio NUNN, Norman Russel, Commerce, Ga. PENA, Enrique Horacio, El Paso PERDUE, Jlm Mac, Housfon- PHELAN, Cleaius M., Levelland RAY, Raymond C. T., Housron SHOEMAKER, Leroy, Jr., Housron SMITH, Mary Lou Keen, Housron SNOOKS, Danny Joseph, Beaumonl' TRADER, Bobby James, San Anionio VAUGHAN, Richard William, Housion VRBA, Daniel Louis, Housion N WENCK, Jol1n Alfred, Jr., Housion WHITE, David, Manclwesrer, Ky. WHITE, Ted Gene, Housion- WOLDA, David Eugene, Housfon WOLFE, Louis Dewi'H', Jr., Housion WREN, Harry E., Housion Law if Q1 vga, ,-ur 2' ,a If .'5 X , .37 n' 3 , , QU' . Bu . li I Ugg L' t Y! ,A , V A I ? ' .saw . ..ga.............-, .. E 1" 2 1 ' if M r I , -Q4 I ..v, .J sb' 91", f " -A :fy-fr . v. .. . "r , gn. ' ,q f-v.-TS, J.: - .1 wus f nr jf ..-, ,if.-"LL " ' 4:2 P 4,-,,, :gm ,lfff-i?'1'Tj -. 1" .- ,- 51 .1 . 't . 1,4-.. . ',,,. -1- .mu 1'-F15 ':,f'--- ' fa 'QM ' ,' ' ' ' .Jr ,-,f-.f ' 'Z .mr-'fir " 1- g . Q 1-iL5,,i:,:?IQ? 2-WW E V. ' 1, ffjfilh -355,1 . iT,,4',,I11'j':' , ' Wi Q f . - L'-"'f?'we..,-J 141' 'jf t , -QU V 1 ,w -ww. Q A.. f. D .fi 3,-1 i rg, 'T' -, , vi 4 . A 1. . ' fa- ,.,. 4 . , 1 , . :, -.., '-" Fr . , .ze W 5' ' - . ' "4 f v'.-56? '3 g- - -- 4 ., f. ' -, i W"-H I, ,139 EC'i.4.,Y .ef , ,H xv., H umllt.-y' i Q' I 7:1 !,. - -V 9 . ,, ,xv , ' - V -ru. 1 .f '. 1--4, ,,,.' -' Eff -196 ' -"4--"'3"r'J 'ar wi 1. .f,-g'f!'5gj,,' QM.:-' J M. ' " W H V ,T ,"'F1r f' ' ' " 9, f M., I " ,.,,:,i'.. 'V ,. ,. ' A""s"f" x I ,' ., , V' , F 4 1' M !,537nf1,,,., X: K 1 "U-V ,EY Z a 77 , xg, .M .. .19 - gl f.1. E, . 'f '. , , - fl, ,Q A V1-1, ii, A H. 4 ,Qui x., fl I L I Jr' :I ' , ,, Sq... 1 "' f?5lQ13I'j 4, , ..':,1ag.'. 2-az, J, ' A ,rw-. Q. , . , . . , A lvl. . Wa '- 'qv , J "' ,v , '- f-q,. - 4 V ,- . vf:.nW!Z"--7 i . 1 .,,..':1 ,, 'T .Y -T,S,ainE:?4,.P iw V 1 we ,,.,gg,, ,. ' T J Qlffwffbi "' " -L5-ff, - V ,A xl 'Y W1 I ,L Lg: f. :' --lwfi 1-ffl'-ii'i:7'fw ,. -'.,:.'L-L.. --NJ,-sr ' Q1-.' ,LJ 4?f F- Z L41 I-' 'rw s'fl'-"LV-Q 1,-' Q ."vf.mIt'11 . , l"1f.3Q' ' -'1fnv4',1-TE? ,aww 1 .,-Y :f " - -j 7f ,f,.Mf-gf A , jf- f1ff.:!!,.,fA-?"'5'f. 'Sf , . .1 ' ' ' wf3i'3'-51':"h"f' ' - V 'W' .-gil,-:,,,-V,.viv.i v l N-- ., fnglqgrfrll K- ean. , . , itww 'A..4.j:'f' .A " ..,, What happens to a college studenlis time? He spends it . . . cheering the team on lo victory . . . meeting to discuss activities . . . making paper flowers for Homecoming floats . . . studying all night before an exam . . . going to the Dean of lVlen's or the Dean of Wiomeifs office while planning activities . . . attending classes at 7 olclock in the morning . . . hunting a vacant table in the Den . . . experimenting in the laboratories . . . dashing across campus in the rain . . . listening to broadcasts of out of town games . . . researching a term paper in the library . . . attending the numerous parties . . . waiting anxiously for the posting of grades . . . drinking a cup of coffee with a friend ...campaigning for the position of an organiza- tion officer . . . rehearsing for a musical ,or dramatic presenta- tion . . . going through fraternity or sorority Rush . . . fighting the traffic to or from the campus . . standing in line during registration . . . attending an all-school dance. These are all parts of . . . College Life. I09 -f - A - ,. v .1 1 '- 1 ' - - , ,, " 291. .. - . ' N' - 138 1! in I -sw' . wa .. :V ,. 'J LY' .,h.-...LeL4:. , .. vs.. ,,-,-. ,. , . L, . .--,... c..i.uY.4,4e.z.:v O 1 SCHOOL BEGINS AT COUGARLANDp ANOTHER YEAR WITH MEMORIES In the fall the University of Houston opened its doors to 11,448 students. Freshman Guidance Tests and registration kicked off a new school year that promised to give UH students long-lasting memo- ries of Homecoming, football, basketball and a spring dance. This was the year that sophomore Ed Bleier, UH guard, made his famous off-the-bench tackle during the Ole Miss game. The Chi Omega-Sigma Chi float was mysteriously burned before Homecoming. A new spring variety show was instituted, and Fiesta was discontinued. ORIENTATION introduces new students ro administrators and to the aims of their new olmo mater. And it came to pass one sunny September morn in 1960 that 3,313 recent high school graduates found themselves in a new role as college students . . . Following the Freshman Guidance Tests these first-year stu- dents are exposed to the mad rush that accompanies the begin- ning of school. They are exposed for the first time to the rigors of college lifeenamely that hectic three-ring circus commonly called registration. Endless lines confront the confused freshman as he begins the ordeal of registering. After waiting for hours in the first line, he is handed countless cards with empty blanks in which he is to put all kinds of information. Or, perhaps he is told that he has been in the wrong line and must begin at the back of another line. Dismal faces of all the freshmen look hopefully to upper- classmen for encouragement, but there is none to be found. They, too, are confused and are in need of encouragement- they have experienced the trials of registration during previous semesters. With determination the freshmen, as well as upperclassrnen, continue to stand in endless lines, filling out countless blank cards, and answering numerous questions. Then the students try to decipher class schedules and select courses. At long last registration is over, and students seek refuge in Cougar Den- over cups of coffee and a hand of bridge, only to find that Freshmen must report for Freshman Orientation. f-Q .viii ' HOUSTONIAN PICTURES are made during registration for the conveni- ence of those wishing a picture in the yearbook. Marie David stops to check her hair before having her picture made at a booth set up near the gymnasium. College Life i REGISTRATION ANXIETY builds up as students work their way to the front of a line and call tor the class section they desire. Meg Gibson waits as Phillis Smith checks the IBM cards. If the section is closed, it means a new schedule and again to the back of the line. fr f y a . 1 I J I ? 'I . , i-.14 i.:'..f-, nl' as 1 . if ,.-- . ,,, . 's wp' ,tail 4Z9.'.':' 7, -S '- ' --:-, A,., FILLING OUT CARDS becomes a tiresome iob, and it seems each registra- tion point means more of these multi-colored, questioning demons. SOFT WINDS and Hawaiian music greet rushees at a Zeta Tau Alpha rush party. Prospective pledges find thot the island's dress ond food is the theme of the party. SKITS TICKLE the interest of rushees at an Alpha Chi Omega party. Here members pantomime to the nutty chip- munks' song, "We 'Want Alvin." II2 y RUSH PROVIDES Eighty coeds look forward with eager- ness and a touch of anxiety to September 14-the beginning of sorority fall rush. The Week's activities begin on Wednes- day with Convocation, held in Cullen Auditorium. At this time sorority repre- sentatives explain rush. The rest of the Week is filled with parties, parties, and more parties. For rushees the week is fun, exciting, and a little exhausting. For sorority mem- bers it is most exhausting, but fun and ex- citing as well. Parties, skit practices, and decoration making go on all week, and no one gets much sleep. -wk I my FUN, WCJRK While sororities meet to discuss prospec- tive pledges. confused rushees discuss the sororities, trying to decide which are their favorites. Finally the morning comes when bid cards must be signed. Rushees indicate their top three choices, and then there is nothing to do except wait. That same evening, bids are given out in Cullen Auditorium while sorority mem- bers wait nearby for their new pledges. This is at time of laughter and tears, of ecstasy and heartache. This is rush and 40 girls embark on the new experience of pledging. Q. y i y College Life PIRACY on the high seos is the theme of this Phi Mu rush party-one members is to shcnghoi them. wcly to get sokomrv RUSH ENDS, FRATERNITIES BEGIN AROUND THE WORLD with Delta Zeta when you visit them at rush. Wearing costumes and little aerial balloons to carry out their Around the World theme, DZ's chatted informally with each rushee. OH GEE, l'M SCARED to open this envelope, but l guess l'd better. Wonder whaT's in it? Ha-ha, guess l'll find out if l open it. Uh-oh, the glue's stuck now. Good grief, envelope, open. Now then, let's see-Yiiiiiiiiii-l got itl IFC NAME TAGS are pinned on at the PiKA house during frat rush. Convocation on Sunday, September 18, marks the beginning of fall fraternity rush for the 11 groups on campus. Rushees attend informal parties at the various frat houses during the forthcoming week. Informal parties consist of frater- nity members meeting the rushees. Sorority members help with frat rush by serving as hostesses at the various socials. After four nights of open parties, Friday gatherings are by invitation only. Rushees receive bids on Saturday-and the 11 fraternities have 170 new pledges. 5 , I L. 'ffgq q - ..'c. K -.. VIII. V . w .k,'. 3' .1 ' fu! 1. 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' 1 T ' fm' V' 'u-U"' 'B if - .V uv '-Ji-WN, ' 'VH' V Vw +...w",.. vb, V'?'af'-MJ' '- ' ' Q 1 f - X ' 11.21, 1 !f.,-- ,Pg D 3. in .vw run- 0 A 3- 1 ,,,,,9Ng' Q g Q ,, f - -, . ,X I 9 ," I fy V ' , sy W? . f Q 'V - ' 11'-7 'Big 'f 1. ..-'Finn vial... ,G--,YY-fvkx gj-V7 l evtna' . , t'- - 7 ' 1 ,VA ,FTu.'Q,,,"xs 1" ' . ' yi 7 ',. ,' ' 'nf 1 , 'mx 4gff'Q",,,"-.4 ' f" -V -Q ww g V- , N1 ' , Q, - 1 . tq A jj 4 " ' ' 41 I 4 v i-1. Wk W4 . , ,fx W- V 9 -4,1 ,r-.D-Y wiv i F. Ur'-na' !L'V! V -L.-ii' 33, M? ,QA 91 ' '55 5, B L.: Civ ' '1.i1uQ"' av 'f . :Wx ,ir -41' 1 ral in i October BROTHERS FOUR . . . well, three of them anyway entertain at pep rally before A8rM game. One of the quartet is out nursing his throat. 3, STUDENT ELECTIONS and campaigns with all of their propaganda make the student even more aware that this is a national election year. II6 PRESlDENT'S BROTHER SPEAKS AT UH CAMPUS Edward M. Kennedy, brother of President John F. Kennedy, speaks to UH students at a coffee October 1 in Cullen Audi- torium. He discusses the role of young people in politics, while making a three-day tour of Texas. On October 7 the Brothers Four appear at the first pep rally of the season. UH Alumni Association sponsors the quartet which is scheduled for a Friday night engagement on campus. Shasta II makes her debut at the October 7 pep rally. The five-week-old lioness was obtained from an Albuquerque, New Mexico, zoo and is in training until Shasta retires. Shasta. now 14 years old, will continue her reign as mascot for several years. During halftime activities at the A8zM football game, the UH band stages a show revolving around the presidential elec- tion. One half of t.he members form a "Kennedy Band," play- ing "Happy Days Are Here Again." The other half represents the "Nixon Band" and plays "Lucky Day." i eff 4 f KENNEDY ELECTED PRESIDENT after long, hard battle. Ted Kennedy aids his brother by speaking and handshaking on campus. College Life NEW ORLEANS PQLICE SITE COUGAR MASCOT Texas, State Commission on Higher Education recommends on October 10 that UH be made a fully state-supported in- stitution. Student Governmentssponsored elections bring a mass of posters, banners and cam- paigners to the UH campus. Vote seekers find Cougar Den a haven for prospective supporters. After several days of cam- paigning, all the discarded handbills make the front of the Den look as though the litterbug has been extremely busy. UH students honor President Clanton Williams, who is leaving after five years, at the October 14 pep rally. The president leads students in his uCou-gah" yell dur- ing the rally, while wearing a cap given him by the cheerleaders. Also at the rally Student Government presents a portrait of the president to his family and one to M. D. Anderson Library. Oklahoma State University invades Cou- garland October 15 for a football game which sees the Big Red on top, 12-7. UH Drama Department presents chair- man David Larson's original play, c'Very Love," October 20-22. On October 22 the Cougars journey to Alabama for a game with the University of Alabama. On the return trip Shasta's trailer is involved in an automobile ac- cident near New Orleans. Shasta escapes injury, but the New Orleans police tow her trailer into 'town where she spends the night in front of the police station, caus- ing much commotion from passersby. General A. D. Bruce entertains student leaders at a garden reception on October 23. Journalists from the Houston area gather on campus October 28 for Journal- ism Assembly. In a one-sided game in which the third string played most of the second half, the Cougars trampled'North Texas State 41- 16 on October 29. SHASTA ll ioins a new group of friends. Dick Lassetter, Cougar Guard member, holds Shasta ll next to a picture of the older Shasta. There is a good future ahead if the newcomer is any- thing like her predecessor who travels, eats, sleeps and is treated like a queen by the Cougar Guard. JT' mfbl AUDITORIUM PEP RALLIES are a common sight during football season. At some rallies the players or coaches will give a few words of encouragement. At others, the band and the cheerleaders carry the entire session. Cheering, clapping and yelling, everyone leove's the rally ready for victory. i l ll7 i ,si 1 1 it i i NEXT ENTRANT, PLEASE, is the coll cis one of the Homecoming Queen entrants walks past those owciiting their time in front of the iudges. it iii' L if PLANNING SESSION between fraternity ond sorority crops up during discussion cis to the theme of their Homecoming float. Il8 I -aka' 'tm--..,,, HOMECOMING FEVER STRIKES COUGARLAND As the school year rolls onward, Cougar football goes into high gear. Excitement is in the air, and throughout the campus thoughts turn toward plans for Homecoming. Student organizations place their nominations for Homecom- ing Queen with the Student Government office, and a prelimi- nary judging is held in the M. D. Anderson Library Audi- torium. Five candidates are selected by a panel consisting of three University Alumni and two professional judges. The next few days are filled with campus campaigning. after which the entire- student body elects the girl who will be' announced as Homecoming Queen at the Homecoming Dance. Student leaders set up meetings to discuss plans for the big weekend, and their main topic of discussion is the float contest. Suggestions for a theme are taken from members of the campus organizations which are interested in participating. Revision of past Homecoming float rules is also discussed. This includes dividing float entries into small and large cate- gories, having house displays instead of floats, and awarding trophies if this alternate plan of house displays is passed. A downtown parade is considered, pending the entrance of a minimum of ten floats. As an added boost to the high spirit already spread through- out the campus, Mayor Lewis Cutrer issues a proclamation de- creeing October 30-November 5 as the officially recognized '4University of Houston" week in the city of Houston. PROCLAIMING UH WEEK Moyor Lewis Cutrer signs the document. On hand ot city holl is Alumni Association president Walter Rainey, Jr. 4 November BONFIRE KICKS OFF HOMECCMING The University of Houstonis fifteenth Homecoming reunion is drawing near. Again this year, as in all years since the first Homecoming game was celebrated in 1946. the weekendis events are kicked off with the traditional pep rally and bonfire on the Cougar campus. Student volunteers go without sleep to complete a stable framework, while Coeds lend a hand by bringing food, hot coffee and moral support. Finally- the huge struc- ture is finished, but it can't be left un- guarded. Already weary students keep watch over their creation until the time comes for the bonfire to burn. As day turns into night, students and cheerleaders gather around the unlit bon- fire. The Homecoming Queen candidates are introduced, then torches are thrown to start the fire, and the pep rally begins. The smoke and flames from the bonfire reach high up into the high, and the sounds of cheering Cougars echo far into tl1e night. At last the fire flickers and dies, but the Cougar spirit lives on. FEATURE ATTRACTION during Homecoming was the lighting of the bonfire. HIGHER AND HIGHER Climbs A.P.O. Dick Lus setter os he secures boards to serve os cm skeie ton for the bonfire. l20 U v College Life SOME STEEL BANDS and cz few pairs of pliers form the frame of the Chi Omega-Sigma Chi float for 1960 Homecoming. FLOA TS, THEME POSE PROBLEM What to do? What to do about a theme for Homecoming floats is the ques- tion of the day. Faculty advisors, student leaders and organization representatives meet to de- cide on a theme, but there is much dis- agreement among those at the meeting. Some students prefer having no specific theme. They favor instead each organiza- tion choosing whatever it wishes. Others suggest various themes, and the group fin- ally decides upon song and book titles as the 19-60 theme. .. f.. V , ., l i BUSILY WORKING with popier mache is Phi Mu Pat Coffman. Phi Mu worked with the Diesel Club to build this float. With a planned theme in mind, student organizations put their noses to the old grindstoine and get to work on their floats. Each group canvasses the area in search of any empty warehouse, barn, garage- anything that might be suitable for a stor- age and work area while their float is under construction. When the organization has begged, bor- rowed, bought for stolenl the necessary materials and equipment. the actual work begins. For about two weeks members spend every available moment working on dec- orations-usually fashioning' crepe paper or stuffing paper napkins into wire. Time becomes the major element, and all groups work feverishly to complete their floats before the judges ar- r1ve. flowers chicken DEMONSTRATING the technique of stuffing chicken wire is Delia Gamma Gerry Frieclman. Delta Sigma Phi's Clay Harrison, lefty Ellsworth Stewart and Lynn DeGeorge watch with interest. LAST-MINUTE DETAILS will improve a float's ap- pearance. That's why these members of the B.S.U. add lost-minute touches. I23 "Hl EXES," proclaims the prize-winning float of Zeta Tau Alpha and Phi Theta Kappa. -fi ,fd . Xi FLOAT JUDGING takes place in front of the Phi Mu-Diesel Club T. FLOATS FOOTBALL TOP All work is over now. No more sawing lumber cuttin chicken wire or making crepe paper flowers . . . competing floats are put on display by the reflection pool, where they are judged by alumni of the University of Cincinnati. The next morning they are moved with the help of a police escort to Rice Stadium. During the half-time ceremonies the winning floats are announced. Phi Kappa Theta and Zeta Tau Alpha take first place with their rendition of Memories. The float depicts an old-fashioned, crank victrola that plays recorded music. Second place goes to Home on the Range constructed by Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Alpha Chi Omega. However one unfortunate incident mars the float com- petition. About 2 a.m. on the day of the Homecoming game, the Chi Omega-Sigma Chi float mysterlously catches fire. Flames destroy all the float except its frame before campus police can extinguish the blaze. This marks the second time fire has threatened Homecoming. Pranksters set fire to the partially-constructed bonfire a week before lt is scheduled to blaze. However, the P01106 comes to the rescue and quench the flames before they cause real damage. Among the half-time activities is the presentation of the 1960 Homecoming ueen, Bobbie Hainline, along with her court. As the youp crosses the field, the Co-ugar Band honors the new queen with a special battalion formation, while the Scabbard and Blade Color Guard forms an arch- way with their sabers. Also during half-time, UH honors Mayor Lewis Cutrer who is observing his birthday. Students sing as the Cougar Band plays "Happy Birthday." The half-time ceremony, along with the football game 1 HOMECOMING ACTIVITIES On the dziy before the Homecoming game, the seven it H 2 at l Q display. Serving as iudges are University of Cincinnati alumni. itself, brings to a close another successful Homecoming weekend. Awards have been made, a new queen has been chosen, and the Cougars win another football game. S Ch' THIS STEAM BLOWING whale float by Delta TWO HARD-FIGHTING teams hold the interest A LAST LOOK at the Chi Omega- igma i of UH cheerleader Judy Motriss. float near the reflection pool before it caught Gamma and Delta Sigma Phi draws audience fire. applause. O -vu v 9 +L ,M , , E' l,,,,,I - - wk... A. , I I,--,1 .I ,,A I .-I I ' ,L I I 5-1 X ' 'Ni' "mx" "fm-1 Tl--yn Ea"-'N-'ffflj -4'l'3i:"3-J:-411 . ,l M7 W 1 Vw-W - - i' - , . ,,- Q- 4- 'I1,I,x-g J' ,I I ,I I -L - 'V Q K Q , ' ' . . ,' A M H- .9'iI5Q-?f'y'1I GW-15, 53-w,Iwg ' xiii 2112 I g'Pqi'3.s' ' - ' ' -va, II -'-zgag'f?Q, I-. If , :I I II .A V T KI Ji. .1 'frat' it Lg. 1 i 1 d....,,.,-.L ',I :il A 1 ' F Eu Q pi . -' 1 It 1 , 1 ,.. yy Q f ' tg: ' I- f, -,. TV- .I v '.,,. D b - Inj V ,'- "' an I-" gat. V- :Q I I Q ' fi K'1 - yi Q " Y' W . A if I ' ' L - , vin I U -E: fl, -: A x 4 .1:. 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Following the two-hour closed meeting, 31 organizational representatives send promotional material to I local radio ancl tv stations and letters to alumni in effort to continue l the university's traditional Fiesta. AFTER WINNING Saturday's Homecoming game, UH students decide Monday should be a holiday. Dean James Williamson arrives Monday morning to find entrances blocked . . . but there's no holiday. PRETTY Lynda Moore chats with two Vanity Fair iudges during the preliminary contest. VANITY FAIR JUDGING BEGINS s During a two-hour preliminary contest November 28, 118 campus beauties vie for positions in the semi-finals of Vanity Fair. Attired in apparel suitable for campus wear, each girl appears before a panel of five judges. The panel selects 62 girls who compete during the semi-final contest December 5. Each girl in the semi-finals talks informally with judges who seek poise, personality, grooming and overall appearance in making their selections on a point system. Judges for the contest are local professionals engaged in radio-tv, newspapers, photography, hair styling and personnel. AN INFORMAL DISCUSSION period finds contestant Juanita Alford sitting before the watchful eyes of Vanity Fair iudges. l26 ,i December College Life CHRISTMAS IS GETTING NEAR if r QUESTIONED by John Gehbauer, Houstonian editor, Carol McDaniel's answer is noted by iudges. VF JUDGING ENDS A big night in the lives of 26 girls is December 12 when they enter Vanity Fair finals. Wea1'ing formal attire, the pretty Coeds parade before judges and answer prepared ques- tions. This week's Cougar announces 10 girls as top Beauties and lists the other 16 as Favorites, keeping Miss Houstonian7s identi- ty secret until the Koobraey Ball. Later tvvo of the ten Beauties disqualify themselves. PICTURE TAKING TIME FOR Vanity Fair finalists . . . photographer Ted Johnson "shoots" the beauties backstage at the final iudging. K l Xi is f ' THE LONG LONG WAIT backstage means lots of conversation for final- ists who nervously await their turn before the judges and the lights. MISTLETOE means Christmas and other things for Sig Ep John Bork and AChiO Lynda Moore. Christmas holidays begin for university students December I9. 5 is l ,Iariuary f 71 gf, iv-5 N rx? f! i FINAL EXAM time rolls around . . . some study in the library . . . others d0n'f , , , oh well , , , NEW YEAR BRINGS NEW ACTIVITIES CAGERS INVADE KANSAS FOR NCAA PLAYp DEBATERS TRAVEL TO DALLAS T0 MEET S.M.U. After the Christmas holidays and New Year's Eve parties, UH students get back to the grind and study for finals which begin January 19. With 10,716 students enrolled UH be- gins the spring semester on February 6. Sororities and fraternities begin the new semester with Rush and new pledges. Cougar Den gets into the swing of things with a new decor. This is the month of Religious Emphasis Week, the naming of Best Dressed Coed and a big controversy over salaries for student government officers. March finds UH cagers beating Mar- quette 77-61 in the first game of the NCAA tourney and losing to Kansas in the quar- ter-finals. Students ban together to produce a new spring variety show called Cougar Capers. Many long rehearsals result in a vaude- ville-type show that runs March 16-18. Debaters Carmen Stallings and .lim l-H Perdue travel to Dallas to appear on the first televised series of collegiate debates. On "Young America Speaks" the pair wins TV FANS VIEW for the first time a series of collegiate debates. The UH team of Carmen Stallings S1500 for the university's scholarship and Jim Perdue appears before the cameras with The PVOQFOFTI m0def0T0f -l0Ck WYGTTI Cenfef- fund- l28 J . M' 5 3 fall' 1 ' x '-A Y '. K- 2- U1 if 5 ww Y Y 1 5' - v . 1 . ft . ,. i 4, S xqxx ra! aah "Pl"' i 'FPTE fTte'r"'-?i' M"'Tf'i'T il . T' Z , ' i r I - , , ,ir l 1, WI it if ' C i 5 M STUDENT GOVERNMENT RUNS OUT OF MONEY l I LADIES MAN contest winner Tommy Thomson receives an admiring glance from Judy Tussing as his thoughts are absorbed in a picture of the beauties who appear in the movie "Ladies' Man." YF' ' Q S 1 K 'Usa 1, If 'T T In POOLSIDE at the beautiful UH swimming pool is a favorite leisure-time spot for many students who like to tan and frolic. l30 April brings many activities to UH cam- pus and begins with Easter holidays and the All-American Golf Tournament. As the tourney begins at Pine Forest Country Club, Nancy Coffman, a junior, is named tournament queen. Students in the drama department pro- duce "HamletH for a three-day run in Cul- len Auditorium. Then the group moves to the fifth floor's radio-tv department Where students tape the play for television. Other activities include 'sororities join- ing forces at the annual Panhellenie Work- shop to study the future of sororities. Later in the month more than 100 stu- dents plan an automobile trip to Austin for the Senate hearings on state support. However, the trip is cancelled when sena- tors threaten a break in quorum if UH students attend. A blow strikes many organizations seek- ing money when student government an- nounces that it has run out of money and can pass no more monetary bills. Elections for next year's cheerleaders and student government officers mark the end of the month. l ELECTION TIME finds Joyce Simpson busily put- ting up posters. College Life MISS HOUSTONIAN'S name remains sealed in the envelope Houstonian Editor John Gehbauer holds. Awaiting the announcement are Sharon Sullivan, O. J. Joyce: Amelie Suberbielle, John Fisher, Lynda Moore, KOOBRAEY IS HIGHLIGHT Highlighting April's activities is Koobraey Ball sponsored by student government and the Houstonian. The two groups seek a spring activity to serve as an annual event to honor the Vanity Fair Beauties and Miss Houstonian. In order to select a name for the new dance, the Houstonian sponsors a name-the-dance contest with judges selecting Koo- braey. Everyone asks, "why?,'-it spells yearbook backwards. Plans for the event begin in late March and by the first Week of April, the campus is dotted with posters advertising the big event. , On April 21 more than 500 UH students attend the first annual Koobraey Ball in the Shamrock's Emerald Room. The semi-formal affair features the presentation of Lila ,leanfreau as Miss Houstonian, as well as the Vanity Fair Beauties and honorees from other universities. r X W - i i M ' Randall Dorsettp Bonnie McCool, Jack Horner, Molly Kasper, Buddy Barnes, Lila Jeanfreau, Tom Macaluso, Denise Boudreaux, Eddie Gore and Carol Akkerman, Don Mullins. PS if we -' SURPRISE? Lila Jeanfreau hears student body president Sam Goodner reveal her name as Miss Houstonian. Her escort Tom Macaluso takes it all calmly. HONOREES AND ESCORTS from other schools are introduced by Sam Goodner. They are: Mary Milbank, lRiceD, Charlie Giraud, Nancy Hughes lSt. Thomasl, Carl Hallo, Barbara Tom CS.M.U.l, Bill Van Osclel, Pat Dorn lSacred Heart Domini- can College? and Ron Hemkle. V '?T"'-:i"Ef-Y " ' ' ' ' i " i"'+y "'1f5IL - 2 TM.: 'T' 1 5 , ' 3 5 , ,- , '1 5 2 'sz ' 'la , 'yi iii? ' Yi ,?i 1 L ff, HM. ,- f 1 'tm 1 if iiiwgl 'li'..sf'sw if ii 1" i' it,riviera-i"i'g55i5s" i'w..'i... w'i,.ii i'sii""'l lei D 1 1-,L 'gm'- AT ATTENTION for final review are this year's R.O.T.C. companies as the reviewing officers pass. BOATS SAIL ON POOL p : l Freshman architecture students get the month started with I a bang by creating campus excitement with their sailboat regat- i I . ta. The event takes place at the reflection pool and features N many styles of sailing vessels. Teaching students how cement- ing materials can be molded into various shapes to hold various amounts of weight is the event's .purpose. One of Mayis most significant events is Awards Day spon- sored by Omicron Delta Kappa. This annual affair honors the ten Outstanding Students, announces next year's cheerleaders and student government officers, as Well as awards trophies to students contributing to campus service. Sororities and fraternities climax their Weeks of song prac- tice by participating in APO's annual Songfest. Delta Zeta and Sigma Phi Epsilon sing their way to first place. RED MASQUE PLAYERS present best actress and best actor awards to Jean King and Buzz Black for their outstanding performances. I32 AS YEAR ENDS Each year the Cougar awards a Spirit trophy to the or- ganization on campus contributing the most toward creating greater school spirit. This year's winner is Delta Zeta. A student government-sponsored hot dog party on the Ober- holtzer Hall rooftop draws acclaim from UH students as they take a breather before Dead Week begins. Student govei-nment's annual banquet- honors outstanding members when the event is held at the Ramada Inn May 13. ROTC holds its final review and commissioning ceremonies at the parade grounds to honor three Distinguished Military Graduates. General A. D. Bruce makes the opening address of the awards ceremonies on May 18. ' College Lifei, ,,.,-...I OUTSTANDING COED of the Year award from WSA goes to senior Susan Wood. Toni Rae Mensing, vice-president of the club, makes the presentation. 9-'A .J X .' JZ-ff 'S ' .-. 'V ilk ip: . f ':..l ROASTING WIENERS on the OB rooftop proves fun and good eating for students Clay' Moore, Brenda Busch, Caryl Carlson and Lyle Woodruff. X , WHO can manage without a tube of glue? This freshman architectural student finds it handy as he makes last-minute adiustments on his 55 "B." LINING UP for the race creates excitement at the reflection pool as architecture majors ready their sailboats for the long iourney they must make to the finish line on the other side. I33 1-11. 'D' DAY PROVIDES FUN Pie-throwing and a tug of war are only two of the hilarious events that mark Sigma Chi's fifth annual Derby Day that takes place at the reflection pool. The day's festivities end with the crowning of Miss Derby Day at a Sadie Hawkins dance held at the fraternity house. AN AWED GALLERY watches as Zeta Zoe Zecller's pie-throwing arm heads a custard straight tor the face ot some waiting Sigma Chi. A PIE IN THE EYE means a big mess during " ii' I ii': t ' li' Derby Day's traditional pie-throwing contest. u ,A 4. ,gg Y ti Y '1 L A-N ' 'Mi' L ..,- -: 4'..1" ,Qf Q,1 A :fa ' -. iq .iti I .. I "stall ' ' r elm' "f"r ' a A Y' si 09'--ixfii W ls ,. 'ii .J'W"" ' 4 t - S- ,- ' 65 that ,- if U - X12 'iff 7 -. .. 1 ,:e1'1.-my ,L I I I .24-rs-t'gsil1-.,e. 4.+frret ,fx-.7' ,A r...r - - -,It U . Q L Q V, -' lx IT SEEMS that messiness is iust a part of Derby ' ' -A ' Day . . . a dunlcing in a tub or the reflection pool . . . or a smushed pie in the face from the pie-th rowing contest, WHAT WOULD DERBY DAY be without the reflection pool's wetness? -if 1 'S l HOWLING in amusement students watch this sorority member race her Go-Kart around the pool. I34 Fd' l 'l.rl'a.: ,- i 'lj V ' il 1 Y It r ,I', wi. , I ggi, 4 MAY BRINGS PARnss, FINALS Along with May comes a week supposedly set aside for studying. However, for UH students this is probably one of the liveliest weeks of the year. Although finals are only a few days away . . . Everybody celebrates . . . It's party time . . . Deep suntans reflect Galveston outings. Most students start last-minute cramming when final ex- aminations begin on May 25 . . . some decide the effort is , futile and ditch their books for more interesting things. May 31-finals are over . . . Q J une 3-commencement is held . . . . . . the end of another year. Yes, the year has ended. For some it means summer school . . ,. for others the beginning of a new job . . . still others will travel . . . a few will just party. It has been a goodyear, excluding the exam that came on the morning after the big party. We have seen several firsts . . . Cougar Capers . . . NCAA basketball team . . . Koobraey Ball. We have seen several changes . . . a face lifted Cougar Den . . . a new university president . . . state support for the Uni- versity of Houston. We have seen the year as we have made it . . . sad . . W A l U I happy . . . disgusting . . . exciting. SlEgLi:E?ThLi:GCJsnecgl:,. important port of Derby Day ond viewers hnd WE HAVE SEEN 0 u i THE SCHOOL YEAR OF 1960-61. BLAZING TELEVISION LIGHTS flood the scene at commencement exercises careers for more than 1,000 UH seniors. us KUHT cameras televise the proceedings which bring cm end to college END OF ANOTHER ACADEMIC YEAR! DORMS ARE HOMES AWAY FROM HOME More than 650 students live in the university's three men's dorms-Bates, Settegast and Taub- ancl Law Hall, the Womenls dormitory. Located in the center of the dorm area, Ober- holtzer Hall, better known as OB, serves as an activity center for dorm residents. The spacious building houses the cafeteria, Snake Pit, mailboxes and ballroom. DORM LlFE'S really great-especially when there are hot-dog parties-agree John Ferguson, Linda Riggan, Des Grant and Sam Goodner. STRUMMING his guitar, Fred Stash brings forth Texas-style music. INFORMAL DANCES in OB Hall give dorm residents an opportunity to become better acquainted. I36 TO STUDY OR NOT TO STUDY-by candlelight-or forsake the books for a movie wonder Kay Gallagher and Beverly Ward during one of the electrical power failures that sometimes plague the dorms. WHY WASTE TIME reading an English book when magazines are so much easier on the pocketbook-and they're always in color, too! J ,iii L S All gr? N ' S X2 S HOW ,M IM iff f S s i i 1. Q 1. 5 MAR. 1631 ia cumin Abu. kuimcns 0 N0 MTWSTY BOOKS ' S ACCEPIED gc1,,,,gc.,,,, Dine 3:15, S is iiiiiii iiiiiii Q , ff , . , Tlcygy dll Qi!! 0120054 Y02'CW PRETTY Sondra Hicks displays one of The advertising posters. A NEW ALL STUDENT, SPRING SHOW l38 Bill Dooley, Director ABOUT THE DIRECTOR Most of the credit for Cougar Capers goes to its director Bill Dooley, who takes it upon himself to initiate the production. A junior drama major, Bill has extensive experience in theatre work. Besides performing in SHOW CALLS FOR An old idea dies . . . a new one is born. The traditional Frontier Fiesta, bringing national recognition to the University of Houston for so many years, no longer exists. But in its place is a new campus- wide variety show known as Cougar Capers. Under the direction of Bill Dooley, the show follows the general theme of "So This is Show Bizf, Over 60 students are in the cast of the production, giving their time and talent to produce a spring pro- gram equal to Fiesta. Designed to be a history of show busi- ness, Cougar Capers presents acts ranging from the soft-shoe routine of the 20's to the modern hip-swinging entertainment popular today. mi theatres throughout his home state of Virginia, he appears in many UH drama productions and directs several others. Bill serves as president of Alpha Psi Omega, Bed Masque Players and Tau Kappa Epsilon. IN CONFERENCE at the piano over a musical arrangement are music coordinator Don Elam, director Bill Dooley and choreographer Anne Sharpe. THESE TWO TIE THE SHOW' TOGETHER WITH APPEARANCES Versatile ANNE SHARPE is active in many phases of University life. In addition to holding the leading role in many UH drama productions, she is vice-president of the junior class. Popular with Houston audiences for past per- formances in Frontier Fiesta and Theatre Inc., as Well as a director and choreographer. LARRY BERTHELOT is an experienced dancer HOURS OF REHEARSAL i DIRECTOR Dooley mokes o suggestion to baritone Tyrone "Out to Lunch with Ross Bauer. Coroline Ross 41 "East Side-West Side" Newman Club "The Accordion Player" Beverly Wilson "Con-Con" Noel Joseph, Dione Croig, Joyce Simp- son, Beverly Word ond Annette Jones, ,JL Y lf . , X -fr' " fs. 'K ' - " 'H'-Wi' b ,' fa'f'f2:f - D' 'N ., . Vw Y , 4 . Y , .. , 5 -.4 , 1' "' 1, 'W 41 -www .Q--.g..:,.,,. . W -N. - . - f - H., , v-4.2 v 3 , E ,, , l '.,9 A XA ' ff A 1. . ,.,' ' Y , , . I ,wif 4 M Q 7-xv ' - 1 W' 1 ' 5 vw , - : - ,ga ' I Q 1 i - 2 '13 JT? , ii 9'- - l'... l ,Jahh X - - ,, ,, od , 4 i OTH E X vo. c i' K '.-.51 ,Mi if .sn N. I KX x l 'ix 11 ,. ,, xx.: -3 "2" ?J" f -Q .fff-i-Nw Rx ,- X 'AX N f . "- , S uf' x , -" J v N Liu , - ul! J . 9 4 c Z5 i ', 4 eg ' 4 - WW .H M v Q- 5 r 1' 1 Q- I , Q3 -- my W- 3 QR-M 4, - I ' -- A 1. S, K X N 1 4:5 lg -. OUT OF REHEARSALS CNTO CULl.EN STAGE "Carribbean Calypso" The EI Cubes .I . is K . , 1 Eff . . U T-7' -Q-l 7' we 'YL wg QlZlTF'u-e l 1 Card Girl Judy Johnson TOO MANY PHONES and not enough ears keep Theatrical agen? Buzz Black on The go. "Touch of Paris" Brenda Thomas I 1' "Barroom Ballads" Pat Moreno Hard-Hearted Hannah" Merrie Ann Valles "Steam Heat" Anne Sharpe ond Larry Berthelof SHOW CLOSES A - SUCCESS! r -' ,ff i ,UV Z il i by l?fl,'AT l r' . A ' .l ls X f 4 1 L.. -4- "Banio Man" Buddy Griffin SO THIS IS SHOW BIZ Direcied by: William E. Dooley ACT ONE Scene I: Typical College Sfudenrs The day affer gradualionz Anne Sharpe, Larry Berfheloi' Scene 2: Typical Office of a 'typical 'rheafrical aqeni: Buzz Black, Anne Sharpe, Larry Berihelol Scene 3: Typical Flashback fo a 'rypical vaudeville slage. CAST "Almosl' Gone wifh the Wind" , ..,,..... ,,., . Sigma Nu Ken Kefhan, Don Glinna, Jack Arnold, John Easley "Barroom Ballads" ., ..,...... . . Pai Morero "Perfecf Young Ladies" , , . ,,.,., ., , Sigma Alpha Epsilon Sam Epperson, Jim Helms, Denny Bowman, Randy Wands, Jerry Clapisaddle, Riffin Cooper, Busy Parris "The Greaf Financial Problem" ........ . Phi Kappa Thela Ed Kadlacek, Dick Kirlly, Tommy Thompson, Barr Truxillo, Charles Johnson Direcror: Bill McCurdy Piano: Jerry Lirelli "Banio Man" Buddy Griffin, Pele Scoif "Eas1' Side-Wes? Side" .. .,,,.,, ., .... , Newman Club Marsha Daigle, Sandra Hicks, Donna Gready, Charloffe Founfain, Wayne Bourguardey, Ray Mancaso, Billy La Mair, Gene Flalerry Card Girl ....... . ...,,., .. ,. ,................,.. Judv Johnson INTERMISSION There will be a I5 minute infermission between acfs. Refreshmenfs in 'the Music Lounge. ACT TWO Scene I: ' A Nighl al The Club "Show Biz." CAST "Can-Can" ...........,......,...... .... , , ..............,. ..,. A lpha Chi Omega Anneiie Jones, Noel Joseph, Diane Craiq, Joyce Simpson, Beverly Ward "Touch of Paris" , ,..... .,...... B renda Thomas, Beverly Wilson "A Lilile Roma" ......,... ,.........,.,.,.,..,,,.,..., ,...,..,.. . . Tyrone Bower "The Troubadour" ,. ,..,,..,.... ..,. .....,..... .......,.... T o m my Fonville "Af Sr. James' Infirmary" ...... Hank Beymer, Tonie Mensing "Hard-Hearled Hannah" ,...,........,..,,,..........,.....,, .. , Merri Valles "Caribbean Calypso" . . The El Cubes Lennie Wrighf, Max Krchnak, Dennis Davis "Ouf 'fo Lunch wirh Ross" ,, ,.,,..,,,.....,,,.... Carolyn Ross "Back From Lunch wilh Grossburgu .... ...... Mark Grossburg "Rock and Reel" .....,,................,,.....,............................. The Plaids Wallace Sisk, Joe Simmons, Bobby Eckhari "Jazz a la Johnson" ..,,..,,,..,.,.,,.,,..,.......,..,,,,.,......,.. Judy Johnson "Worsham wifh Romance" ,,..,....... . .,.,.., . . ,, Ron Worsham "Teach Us Tonighf" ...... ....... ..,......,...,. .,..,.,...,.. T h e MeloeDees Linda Pledger, Ann Rogers, Ann Brooks "Blues Inc." .,,, ..,. ......,... ,...,.. ..,..,,... . A m e lie Suberbille "If's Sfeam Hear" ...... .. ...... -Anne Sharpe, Larrv Berihelor Waiter: ........ I ..........,,, , .r,..,r.,.................,....... Mark Thomas Ciqarerfe Girl: .c,. , .......................... ..,. J udy Johnson TOMBOY AND THE CHAMP - When Siffnal Productions decides to film a movie in Katy, Texas, several University of Houston students and personnel become movie actors and actresses. The action of the film centers around a young girl who wins a calf in a calf scramble and raises it to be a champion. College Life 1- TOMBOY STAR Candy Moore with her pet Angus steer DRAMA major Ronnie Gural Icenterl portrays a hot rodder. LIVESTOCK SHOW scene shows: Richard Stiles, Clyde Webber, Bruce Moore, Victor Bond and L. S. Mitchell in the stands. CASTING DIRECTOR for the production is Fred Smith flettln sift N QL! DR. TOM C. BATTIN Irightl playing an M.D. is with Candy during a polio attack. I43 I I il 5 Y ' Q' F wg -,,- ',, h'j"r'V..,, . " - "C:-f-1 ' w .xx 1 K vu 4 1 ANNUAL H1 GREEK SONG FEST Alpha Phi Omega, men's service fraternity, sponsors the seventh annual Songfest to select the best fraternal singing organizations on campus. Sigma Phi Epsilon wins first place in the male division, with Sigma Nu and Sigma Chi taking second and third places. College Life JUBILANT Sig Eps Hank Beymer, song leader, and Leonard Lee, president, display their first-place trophy. Chi Omega Phi Mu Mlm' ' I l45 FIRST PLACE SORORITY Del+a Zefa SECOND PLACE SORORITY Ze'I'a Tau Alpha Sigma Alpha Epsilon DELTA ZETA songleocler Merrie Valles both laughs and cries as on APO member ushers her down the aisle to accept the first place sorority trophy. College Life Phi Kappa Thela PARASCLS, FORMALS, VOICES - WIN FOR DEL TA ZETA In a program filled with colorful costumes and unusual lighting effects, Delta Zeta Wins first place in the sorority division of Songfest. A panel of judges, consisting of authorities in the music field and university officials, name Zeta Tau Alpha to second place honors. Delfa Sigma Phi l I47 Stage Plays Slster Angelica ONE OF SEVERAL operettos performed on Cullen stage by The music department clrows lclrge ot- fendance. I' lb PLAYERS PRESENT INTERPRETATIONS On the stage of the Ezekiel W. Cullen Auditorium students from the drama and music departments often present their in- terpretations of dramatic and musical pro- ductions. While preparing for a production stu- dents regeive invaluable training in light- ing, handling properties, building sets and working with publicity people. A drama Awards Banquet in the spring honors the better actors and actresses with statues similar to those of the Academy Awards. Mr. Shaw Presents Devil's Disciple TENSE MOMENT with Anne Sharpe ond Bill Dooley on stage. I 1 College Life ...... Look Homeward Angel SLAP . . . from Jean King To Bill Dooley. ANNE FRANK iKay Wright? makes an enfry in her diary. ,zsiggal The Diary of Anne Frank FEAR strikes Mr. and Mrs. Frank Uean Hamlet? and James Smith? as they hide. I49 CLAUDIU5' GHOST is witnessed by Hamlet KPQT Horrisonl. HAMLET AND OPHELIA iAnn Lyonl folk of their plan To kill King Claudius. I50 Sl1alcespeare's HAMLET The College Life LEADING ROLES are played by iunior and sophomore students Carol Brower and Bill Conkwright. . -n"" DIRECTOR David Larson calls for a little more expression as he directs a play he has written. A VERY LOVE Magic Flute OPERETTAS are performed by members of the music department. In this scene are Merrie Ann Valles, Hoinds Laird, Ellen Murtaugh and Charlotte Mayhall. I5l NEW SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON sweetheari Lin Eckert is crowned by past sweetheart Judy Pifiman. QUEEN OF HEARTS BALL heads Sig Ep's social calendar. DERBY DAY ends with a party of the Sigma Chi house. I52 is DREAM GIRL and Duke of DZ are Arlene Newman and Sig Ep Charles Cuncliff. College Life GREEKS HA VE ACTIVE YEAR Parties make the world go 'ro1u1d, and greeks at the University of Houston keep a con- stant whirl of them. Fraternities announce new sweethearts . . . sororities honor their favorite frat men . . . or groups get together just for the fun of it. This, too, is a part of college life. 1, X "x X 'Fx X -, SWEETHEART of Alphcx Chi Omega, SAE George Stevenson, receives gift from president of the sorority, Lyndo Moore. fi-Q' ..'-' " OUTGOING DELTA SIG SWEETHEART Lindo Powell con- groduoies Lilo Jecinfreou, the troternity's new sweethecirt. cw J' eu., DELTA GAMMA MAN trophy is received by SAE Don McClure. Y , i A gf., L 2 .Ii A I MISS PLAYMATE of Sigma Nu is Chi Omega Bonnie ,Y Smith. EVERYONE IS INVITED to PiKA's fiesta pcirty. ' I53 - it ra Mm 15W P' , X 'gb , . xmas, x ,- H2-'QQ'-, F 1 ' 'gains Eff , FQ! 4 gf ,uw ff ff 4 - W ,, W 1 L uma -1. - ev W . n bd l Lfszummg i f Jw I 5556 'sifawwz Nw- I ,sf I ' L it JE 1 il 1 1 F I 1 1 I I dp, ,"ti"'A"""- wg "" ww ,ww1v.f,,- ww-www, ES' ww-. f 1 'L A Lx iw - ., ' C '11 1, 4 L I 1 M I - .......'. .um H ef: x- V-N., ,W.A.,,, - Ks k , ,, ,,,..3x...,.. UF 2 + m .Q wih"22'f1w:s'zz QW F 31.5,-szfffiwilifi? at ew: My - wn.-1-.fm-.--fm.,-,n-ff ,af-vw. '.mfw11-f-- .- W da. .,.e:,::1p..4, A.- ,f 1- :Q , ,... ... A .HY me. . . v ,....f,,-3!,,1V,1,5,,,,,,-,-. ,. J -E:-7. 1"".?' 741 ,ard College Life i. 5 S: l G l. i ROTC CADET COLONEL Judy Tussing teaches new ROTC sponsors Betty Curtis, Bonnie McCool, Valerie Daunoy and Bobbie Hainline the proper way to salute. ' I l 'Q Ia. vlll b 1 J it as lla 1 ri-in I COUGAR GUARD MEMBERS Stan Brown, Dick Lossetter and Preston Ivens make friends with members of the Victoria Junior College drill team during a Cougar football game. IT LOOKS LIKE student publications photographer Jim Gaston finds Yolando Kato an interesting camera subiect. I55 QPPOSITE SEX IS AL WA YS INTRIGUING INTERVIEWING Guy Gciboldon is Cougar Editor Ed- 1 wene Gaines. A portion of Mr. Goboldorfs life is the bosis of o wer movie 'released this yecir. LIFEGUARDS olwcxys seem to foscinclte girls ond this scene ot the university pool proves to be no different. MISS HEADLINE HOP Cathy Young clowns with Ed Kcidlecek CHRISTMAS SEALS ore ci proiect of WSA whose president, Doro Ristou, sees that student body president Scxm Goodner gets the first lopel ribbon during the campaign. ELECTION YEAR brings long-winded debates between the Young Democrats and Young Republicans on campus. WANDERERS THREE, singing trio, entertain UH students at the annual Homecoming dance in the Rice Hotel. College Life PHOTOGRAPHERS CLICK SHUTTERS ' yn ea L Nw ,f .I ,-M --5 vm' " Lf" ' I '.' " :- g 7 I 1-I 2 ips' H r- . :Q-4x 'iz " DELTA ZETA president Toni Rae Mensing holds the Cougar Spirit award her sorority wins for its outstanding contribu- tion to promoting campus spirit. COUGAR Guard members keep a close watch on Shasta, but an even closer watch on the action on the field. l v x 1? A, -- Y 5 .5451 K.. 'f'f vii: . : 1 , '5igq.:. Amr' Hi- :mr-W.. E K- --'Q 1 ,,Y .NM -- seg JRE? x R:- W,,','f. X, ' I V L Z . K,-N. 1 A ,. '11 M ,' ' r 1 ,-1 gf ' ,Ei V' ' "LQ '-.. "mf, J - , lg ' X . Z jf D . . 1,3 J I Q ,5:.r1-:gh 'L if , .. ' ,, - Q4 ,y 1, nl 3- - , , i nw .1' 1 Y . . . - Lflfggrr fb L' f f , , ' -,, a l u!99""'fH'f1',fLQyT1 .111-' v.!.'S' -If '-.'-'V 'HV " . , .'-Fi ' -Y 119.65 E: V T. 5 L Hqlblux-.:',.e.gg1- L -, -:gig :-My Q: x ' .mix J u H5 -- r,-'-"f..-.- ' V N ,t - . ' Wim" 1' , 'QKT 3:1- A , , -'bw ' , , -. 4- , . I Y 1 , ' . -f3-d,. 1. fs 5: 1, mb Q' f 'Q 1-'T' -- L "J t. ..,, . ,I Y .fi .W H.. ' 1 ff 1 's i,U:s.'e Ln - ,X . --J 3 ' - ,gr gl f .X , 1- .nsrfp ,:-' - 'Ke,,f .4- 5 ' 1 w...", 2 3 A 3 . '. f'i2f.9f"'.E :fr'.i'l T-ff, 'iq U -ff iii -'-W h ' iff, , , V ,Fl . rf-'-,swf -A A ng W Xi uf' 4 , gf. 71.5 1 I .-f 1' 1,- .2 W, ,3,3 . F 1 a ii' :gurl 4? ' 'Z' , cg . V . 1 1, ff! :mx . ., gi"a: . E A. -wt 4 4 Q ua,-ii!QQ- ' sw-'if 'lvl' . ,V '14,-Q-,id i': f- ' ,mx 4 'Ni ' I 5-J 'wil ,P ...gl 1 My A- PRESIDENT Clanton W. Williams gives his farewell address when UH honors him at the October 14 pep rally. ACTING cheerleader President Williams leads students in the Cougar yell, Alabama drawl- style . . . g , i 'a it el College Life if . I. Q.-N STUDENTS HOLD PEP RALLY FOR RETIRING PRESIDENT Presenting Clanton W. Williams, president of the university, with a portrait of himself, the student body honors the departing official at a pep rally October 14. A copy of Lhe portrait will be placed in the library. HCOUUUU ' ' ' During the pep rally President Williams leads stu- dents in the Cougar yell and gives a farewell talk be- fore taking a leave of absence. Students present Mrs. Williams with an orchid corsage. r 1 GAHS . . ." AN ORCHID for Mrs. Williams from student body secretary Susan Woods as the two Williams daughters watch. "GlT 'EM, BIG REDl" l59 I f fx! f 'H wfwf- f - ,-2,1 My fm: -, N, .J I .7 K 56, .Jef ' Lg. 'WW az: - sf.-x "" 7515: ' 5 f2??1.I:?"fN ,- ffxir' Q 4 uf .mv . if 5, Q. YJ xr I w-5 . KD., -N..,.gg,-A ' 1 7 if 3 . J ,- A 1 .R . -I W ae' mi" figs' 'fu " .ggzmw 11 'M' arena ? I I.. 1 QA! Vw nf ,li ...gig I 1 J LT 'Q 3 , lillkr- 1 W H , r ' ' 1 ff J avr' 13 :-' 4. . L... 1 .., . W- , 1' , :L R1 K 44.4 I . Z v , A i v2-S' ' -sf..-w -V A im. WL: 4' . 1.-I ,-, ' 1115? '- vpsa 4., Lui' bw- :ag '. 'J-1 -. .,!,,,5., . .-,,,.. ,k,?v,,gW,.. 4. Q, . ,, , Ziff - V. ' 'iff .g,1S1'P' ixjgvi ' S, at E 6 l JA T. 'id I ffkxf Y, 2 4f,. 0 gk. I" I , 'x x 'f f-fu ' X' -C3 , "'x ' :- 5 lu ii ' ' il' ll EM s i B sew tl in st ' , - wi WATCHING one of many athletic events is Cougar Guard member Stanley Brown. RAIN WATER on the campus grounds is one thing that almost every student sees. This year we are lucky that the rainfall is light gg s. we qfmf li ,w T -T . .1.i,, . I-.' J' ,, ,fy my , 'nj ir - I , ' - l. 31 ' --1 ish -.rf.'w1l,:1'El'? -1' ie ' - , ' fr ' l ',':,,. i ,,-: ' 4:- 'ti' - ::.-., .gc Mr, 1 L . . Rf?-1 -.. ,'J3'H.f'i-'jail Li - -M fr ' mv" -i "ew -- f ' , qi:-1 F5 ,.-in-4.w.i se-f,e.giE., 5'-:ng :V ,,,'.--,5 . Yr., 5 ' 1 f ' , e :glibc .c.C'f,.LL,f ijgfilfzr-5,.'i"Effg its ju" . -gg,-,lk 5:45 - ' . itf'f?.5,.i.L:?i :f"' 'dlwfititvl -if-in "lip, ' ' ' rg. , '- gjifigfglgi., ' 'rj n., 'h:- V--7.2 .ii:1,gv,,11 -' -mga: F1322 . ' l li l A -"7'3f' 11 "wi SLU - '- - ,mi Q . 1 ia, 1 ' Ha "l ' -- fl i ' Y . lP'3 5'll-l Tm ull" it 1 if ii H Q - L rr Bag- - T HF . W .xi i , li A ' 'X 7 P -.,.4 L ' 'Agajl' xl ' E' , l 3 is gi 1 M 1- T, . W, ::...,. ,,, Q, W, N gr , .T it T ci , ,M if i t i ll mlm W - nw ri iigggt i Q :.:.:. it :-.M M itll ri it lti l Z it Je ,, 52 W" CRATES AND POLES tower high into the air during the bonfire construction. 62 'CQ X, ,J Lulf ' -3.1 E na ,flint ,I -...VS-.1 1 ll xg iii S' ll' 53?-wlifiliff Q1 .Jli f , W N 5?f3ffwl.g:r 'fi , 55" l . sg il rl 1 cl-7 'FI 'ill ' A i i - r l fl -. . i i i College Life THINGS SEEN BY MANY TWIRLERS from many high schools line-up during the Band Night activities. SAM HOUSTON COLISEUM accommodates cx large number of Cougar basketball fans during five home games. BUT NOT ALWAYS GO FLY A KITE say architecture instructors-and mean it. Kite flying helps their students in understanding strong structural design. w 1 ' . 2 ' W Y ' . use :Q ' fi- 5 u ssiefxgxwf' ' . ,TQ ' W ii , lift? 1 , ff 1' it if i sms .V as nge! i ,ig-l. " ' ii' T? 'iii7ifig"' i V i i I Ml i ,, :il5l'i',5filfQf?:f.f , .5151 i 1-:ni N iwgffsfvfi - i -iw: my 2 2 :S -, :rf , i ' ss ii l :gm fb' H 5.5 ii ' A A. 'I FRQM A BOOK WHAT'S A BETTER WAY to enioy studying or picture-looking than sitting in a library cubicle with sock feet propped on a desk? CLEANING his rifle, Larry Conklin pre- pares his M-'I for the next inspection. C ollege Life .- PASTEBOARD sometimes takes weird shapes as architectural students learn the principles of design. It 'bf' XI' Vt. ,I .11 ,-:ijt ik, .4 .' I .f5,1lZ:jf1!: . :.,, e .Y:.g. 1,1 - :fri 14,-.,.,-1 K A ml 1:5531 'fr-Y v- -. are -ages. nazi INDIVIDUAL BOOTHS in the language lab provide students a better opportunity for learning. l65 93. .iam-' - ,. it Y ,L i 1 3, , 1 +1 ff, - 'Ll,z'3r '4-iq-Egmggi 4 axis, ge?" 'E-" X nf T 'she :-- 3 .la 1 xx-'I .: A - 5 A 4 A . ll, ,L ., wp 17' tk, ,ss W 'I .... 1---, -vt Hu -l fl al Q-an Q1 4, .. ,K :-uw' ,. . br.: 'L-2? , ...Ax I . ,H ,. 0- . . . ,1. ,M V -s .1 Yrs... I 541 P . 14 51:29 fglf, 9w.g"f:!,'f ' - '-I-f:.1'-'i,--...Q ,,vfn . -Q .-- , 1' f2.0..t..n-, ,-. --.,, lqnzo I au' 9 Q 1.lm1n 'U 's g'a ' . , Q fra'-'ps H' ' ' f g, . lfotzupzntqg " -g,' ' va,'.'-, ' .f 'o':"'o'0'xu. Q" , e 1 ' I 0, asv -' U 'Ona .'.os,m 1 u 4 'c"s n I , " -,Q Vi. '. 'T- I VARIETY or srunv v .J ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM is made on a cat during studies by senior psy- chology student Riley Worth. FUNDAMENTALS and techniques of photography are taught in photo iournalism courses using the latest equipment and a modern photo- laboratory. - College Lifei '11, 1 -,W l U Vx 'li Q 4?' COOKING IS EASY and fun if you have had experience in the kitchen such as Iris Carr is getting in the Home Management house. .r-4' PSYCHOSOMATIC induction of asthma on the guinea pig is at- tempted in the psychology department by Amy Talbot and Shirl Earl. I67 3 I68 Commencement HIGH ABOVE The scene a tv camera waits . . . AT THE SCENE rows and rows of chairs wait . . . SENIORS BID FAREWELL TO THEIR ALMA MATER Graduation . . . the end of years of study . . . the beginning of a new era in the lives of more than 1,000 members of the University of Houstonis 27th graduating class. Gathering in the Ezekiel Cullen Building on June 3, the seniors march with university officials past the reflection pool to the commencement area. In the ceremonies televised by the university's KUHT-TV, seniors hear Dr. William R. White, chancellor of Baylor Uni- versity, give the commencement address. Wvvmfw' WAITING graduates discuss future plans . . . I I College Life- A illlliiil? lllllllll ,,,,,.---' .--""" 'til' LAST-MINUTE decorations complete the scene . . . GRADUATION scene is set and waiting . . FACULTY members adiust their robes and prepare to lead the procession. ZERO HOUR strikes as university officials embark upon the first steps of the long walk from the Ezekiel W. Cullen Building to the commencement scene in front of the his- toric reflection pool. IYYYT -1 V' at-f L 4 i i TWO MINUTES until 7:00 p,m., the zero hour, finds cz scurry among block robes as the long lines begin forming. I69 -Q.: 'i"l 1 .-I .ir W gub- , a , U Mil IH,- M131 Q-as ,, iff W '1 'I ii nl-WS., .15 471 6 l 'i -s. , Nq: I 4 al. ' L r mi N E VVV- ,L V 'Q K 1- , . It I . Z r':',,.A 1, ' J 7' ,fi me , '00 , e P f f a 1 ' . 3 - 1 fp , ., . SJ R, l qi? Imp - U ' , -,, if ' , 'Y ""X'f'1h- I' ' 5' ,f , T. . ' S A lk, 1 ,pw 3 A U, I ev 19 A u QIAVAAA .qA , J? K sf- , ax' P Al in J- :wir " 4 hr . A l mi lu? 1- 'Q Q, xi. V . X is nn 'I 3' ' ' I' ' Q 2:2 1 - ' ' ' O ' K ' i' 'fav ,' " 4, Y' V- Q . Q5 , ,Yr .wr 1 l ,N W 4 . aa-4-F- . A: f , w A X 'Q H ' . ,F ' Q ' Y i , g,g,E1,gf3u.,1, ..-v , -agipmufanl-eang A 1 K 5.-' " ,"""'-JE! . X1 H ',. - :. " f :a,: 5- , ,'f.,,f,: as -' 'y-V - V1 ' wiv. , . 1 " , ""l":-- 1'- fn . .Y L1 , -gs ' ' ' ' ' ' W. -.- I I '- " if '.'.',., f f- ....-1f ., T., W. - -A 44. ha f' -1 , ,... ........-. u,...- , ' College Life NATION'S FIRST EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION STATION MAKES UH COMMENCEMENT UNUSUAL , , ATOP HIGH SCAFFOLDING one of three KUHT cameras watches action on stage. BEHIND the scenes at graduation Joe Cof- fer of KUHT keeps tabs on actnvntnes via CI monitor and serves as commentator for the television audience viewing at home. Ui' A 4, 5 ht v . 'r' r ,,. 1 , f , - OFFICIALS confer a doctoral hood on Graham Lantz. BUEIIHIIIII ffl? fifw'-ffawl'-fff 'N-1'M"'N' f .sf 5 , EN' College Life '- I DIPLOMAS make graduation completely official. X, ,Wf- TEARING down equip- b Th ment is a time-con- ijuzllncg illggriljafl, 'Stag' MORE GRADUATES gather to turn in robes. e . 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'1' ' -' ve Y .7462 1 ll ff' 'sf fi W ,,,,,,, if A , gi Q5 "'. 7 . f viz, WS ,.:,, 4, N ,, ,,-- .fi K T f 1 'aa 'Y ' ,.,, K ,...,, I ,. ,, ,. ,, ,f ni, A f A Q fp I76 f :fu fx ., 1 ' 1 NS- , - 1 "Eva gag, 2- , ,X - V Dandy gazr April 21, l96l, marlcs fhe dafe . . Koobraey Ball marlcs fhe occasion , . . Tense excifemenf fills fhe air in fhe Shamroclc's eleqanf Emerald Room as John Gehbauer, I-lousfonian Edifor. sfeps forward fo reveal fhe Universify of Housfon's fop Beaufy. Eighf formally-affired Vanify Fair Beaufies 'and fheir escorfs sfand before a crowd of more fhan 500 Ul-l sfudenfs. Anxiefy mounfs as fhe orchesfra of Ron Worsham hails fhe presenfafion wifh a frumpefed fanfare. Vivacious Lila Jeanfreau is presenfed as Miss l-lousfonian for l96I. Lila was chosen from I I8 coeds who vied for fhe fifle of fop Beaufy in a series of fhree preliminary confesfs held in fhe fall. The preffy junior was selecfed by a panel of iudges as +he personificafion of beaufy. poise and personalify. Judges also named 7 ofher Beaufies and I7 Vanify Fair Favorifes. ,ii , i -'--mr" ,ii . il' 1 l . K, JL' il Y Ezfz jean IQQGU as 1012 1:1226 . . . aoorzfes cgfztzfe Joyce Simpson Betty Conner yyfoobifgjoses Joyce Simpson's tiny checked suit is a tashion tavorite this season. Its boxy jacket and pleated skirt make the ensemble versatile, yet stylish. Pretty Joyce is an Alpha Chi Omega pledge. A treshman trom Arlington, Va.. she majors in psy- chology. Wgooefes SDOI2 Eafesf c31yQs Looking as though they just stepped from the fashion pages of Vogue or Harper's Bazaar, Houstonian Favorites bring you the latest daytime styles. Simplicity is the vogue expressed most often in all the models' daytime ensembles. This is the age of high hemlines and over- sized handbags. Right in style are the palest of pastels, the vividest of hues and the jettest of blacks. Local gardens and parks provide the setting for these beauties as they glimpse into the busy, swirling world of fashion model- ing. As our photographer begins shooting these pictures, pedes- trians stop and drivers slow their cars to watch the proceedings in amazement. We hope you, too, will follow these pages and enjoy the fashions as well as the modern format of our 1961 Vanity Fair section. Old-tashioned lacy ruttles com- bined with modern slim lines make Betty Conner's costume a designer's work ot art. Betty serves Chi Omega as his- torian and belongs to Student Gov- ernment and Women's Dorm Coun- cil. She is a Golf Queen tinalist and Miss Advertising Week. The pert treshman trorn Lutkin is a radio-tv maior. Sandra Hiclc's oversized purse is gaily decoraled +o symbolize The slyle of handbags 'rhis season. l-ler sleek blaclc dress and muliislrand while beads prove a fashion iavorile. A na+ive Houslonian, Sandra is a freshman secrelarial adminislraiion maior. 5-'AF' 441110: 4 Judy PiH'man Perieci for a garden parly or al- mos'r any occasion is Judy PiH'man's while shealh. Hs bulloned bodice and bow bellvadd a nol'e of feminin- ily. Judy, a junior from Midland. is a Chi Omega. She majors in polilical science and belongs io The Newman and Polilical Science clubs. Jus+ siepping from lhe designer's skelch board is Marfha Manly's simple slim-slcirlred dress. accenled by a Jrhree-quarler lenglh coal of malching plaid. Marlha is a senior physical educa- lion maior from l-louslon. Favorites Sandra Hicks Marfha Manly il I i Lillie Flournoy. a sophomore from Lulkin, models a navy suil accenled by a boal-neck collar, crop-+op iackel and a crush bell. Della Gamma claims Lillie as i'rs hislorian. ,Hu . M W TQ, Y if r,' Q 1 li Marie David Wilh The bulky look being popular 'rhis year, Marie David chooses a while wool dress wilh a blouson bod- ice and box pleals., An Alpha Del+a Pi from Lake Charles, La., Marie belongs Jro Gam- ma Al ha Chi, AI ha Epsilon Rho p P and Newman Club. Jane Buchanan's basic she'a+h's wardrobe adaplabilily 'rypilies Jro- day's fashions. A change in acces- sories . . . a new dress. Sophomore class vice presidenl and Chi Omega rush chairman. Jane is secrelary ol: Phi Thela Kappa and of AMA. - V" 1. - 'v-,. .. . 1 4 ?' 3 ,N li 'f.a-. -L , 1 F ., , E -' , 1 Lillie Flournoy Zeaufzes gaoor cgfkzzpk Jane Buchanan i 1 , .fri I s . -. uf.. - ,. Sally Day 112 es 112 gas 16125 Sally Day's beige silk coslume dress exemplifies' The heighlh of fashion. The shorl iaclcel fealures a deep collar and large bullons, while +he dress is a simple shealh. An educalion maior and nalive l-louslonian, Sally is a member of Chi Omegag The allraclive iunior represenrs UH a+ Rice Rondelel. She also serves as junior class Treas- urer. Zoe Zecller's shealh is 'rhe epilome of simplicily. A malching lealher lie bell adds a mark of dislinclion ro +he slim-skirred dress. Zoe serves as publicily chairman of Della Gamma. She is an educa- Jrion maior from I-louslon and is a sophomore. ,1 - 1, i L A Al A 1 I .v i"'v i Judy Morriss A spring day . . . Judy Morriss' shirlwaisr dress of classic sfyling . . . a perennial favorile. Judy is a cheerleader and serves as presidenl of Chi Omega. The pre'r+y iunior home economics ma- ior is from Houslon. Zoe Zecller Y 4- " , ' J .-. .11 - ' -7- V -2, ., .. V. .-4 - , .4 i ,, ,Q I 4 A Q 1 i Billie Schneider Billie Schneicler's lhree-piece ene semble is perlecl for lraveling or shopping. Tiny embroidered 'Flowers on lhe blouse add pelileness, while an envelope clulch compleles lhe oullil. Billie, a iunior from Bellville, serves as social chairman ol Della Gamma and as head maiorelle ol lhe Cougar band. Lanyard Club holds lhe al- lraclive physical educalion maior's membership and she is a Homecom- ing Queen linalisl. No maller whal lhe occasion, a suil is iusl righl. Carol McDaniel's lwo-piecer wilh ils lilled iaclcel is no exceplion. A malching lie and while collar provide an added louch ol inleresl. Carol, a l-louslon sophomore. ma- iors in Home Economics. She is a member ol Della Zela and Baplisl Sludenl Union. I82 "'3!5':' ., Diane Van Ealon Carol McDaniel QGFOQDS csef cgfaye jbr easozz is ogues Ready Tor almosT any occasion in This dark sheaTh is FavoriTe Diane Van EaTon. WhiTe organdy ruTTles and a wide collar add a spark OT originaliTy. Diane. a l-lousTon iunior, is secre- Tary oT Chi Omega and presidenT oT Phi BeTa. The music maior parTici- paTes in The Ul-l band. chorus and accordion ensemble. AnTha Adkins chooses a Tull, Tull skirTed dress oT pasTel coTTon as her TavoriTe dayTime cosTume. The sim- ple bodice receives a Touch oT spring Trom The rose-appligued neckline. Alpha Chi Omega claims AnTha's membership. The I9-year-old Tresh- man serves ThaT org.anizaTion as Treasurer. She is a home economics major Trom l-lousTon. Sherry English's boxy-iackeTed suiT oT knobby-weave silk porTrays The simpliciTy so popular in Tashions This year. 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Bobbie as presenfed ai' Jrhe annual Homecoming Dance and rengns a+ The foofloall game and half- Sally Day, Represenlalive +0 Rice Universily F I T FQ --,wff"" jEJ-F-f,f7:'--.SV . ff" ,.'fC:.f -., V , 5. fi :ix Y ,, -ff eifk gm SR S, w.?g,-'i1,-., , I94 1 :Sw .Z- 1 ff EEN 5 " ' : Mariha Manly, Represenlalive Lynda Moore, Represemalive Texas Weslern College Pan American College Susan Wood, Represenraiive Soulhern Merhodisl Universily A Sludeni Governmenl panel selec+s and sends six preH'y coeds +0 olher Texas col- leges. Junior Sally Day finds a lousy week-end a+ Rice Universily where she parlricipares in Rondelel acfivilies, including The Rondelei' Ball and Songiesi. Senior Lynda Moore spends 'rwo days in Edinburg for Pan American Days. She is a princess for La Carle Panamericana and fhe Pan American Day Ball. Marlha Manly is a princess in El Paso al Texas Weslern College's Sun Bowl game. Her weelc's aclivilies include Teas, Corona- l'ion Ball, luncheons, lours and a bullfighl. Soufhern Melhodisl Universi+y's Manada calls senior Susan Wood. As a princess Susan aHends ihe carnival. Mardi Gras Ball, chariol' races and a lea. Linda Lee represenls lhe universify a+ Texas AXcM where she aHends a 'lea and Jrhe annual A84M Coirlon Ball, Junior Billie Schneider is named Queen of Spring Fesrival ar Sfephen F. Ausrin Col- lege in Nacogdoches. She is selecied from 20 duchesses and a+'rends a formal ball, leas and a banquel. Eugene Cook Outstanding Students ACCOUNTANTS DAY IS BUSY A debater, a hard worker, a busy person . . . thatls Eugene Cook, student body vice-president. The senior accounting major serves as president of the Senate, Society of Accountants and Forensic Society. A second-year Outstanding Student, he is on the debate team and holds membership in Phi Kappa Phi, Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Kappa Delta, Phi Kappa Theta and Spirits. I97 -:ml-ii ' 7 Jw., -Jil ,.r' 44+ A , i ,nf ,. V. 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X .74 " ' 3 5. , .1 - 4 fn 1g '- -'1 ' , ,.', ' ,U-, 'lf-'3LQ1f2if'f J,i.f41'-"',- L-Iwi, ,nap ffl IH. v"4"'f. ' Q ' . V- -H , ff V. pu fi ' f' '5??Qmfwcff45fwYfF' Mir". 'ff 'N' - '. 1' ' f ,- . , . -11, - - x.gfw:eHff-L.,--fi-gzf ' 1 1 . r-S9 X -. M31 R r J2',.x,Q V' 4 'I , U ,f,.5Lf5Q,9fj,,g., ,,x.T,.y,. 1 fag". ,, ' E- '-21. Q.. ' 'SP' 14, fpA'pi1f"a"1-1.if-g' " ' , fx ,15,'A,1f , as-I 4' A. ., 'iff' 1 . , .. 1. .- A . f gnu-1 .f . - . ,. ',,z.xa., in .-: , ,. ! -R AJ--x I g3L.::, f , kJ L:-EN"- :L--- F 4.. 1, , ,. - X A rv, L. . L . 4 V C. ., -.- ,N 1 -1 I f , yn V ' ,X D1 -M KH., b N 4 xkx v 1 . Outstanding Students VV K K K K K K A K -'KK K-'f - ', ,, - ff-.-:r.iK7.-.sVs,--ri. ,, . 'fi f ig'-5-5"i 'f V. T? James Parkhurst 1 ::1,J- ..I 1 I, nd J , f-,lLiK,,TyKn1f.-:!, Y ,.,.:1.-2.1,-.a,:,l', 15. , Vg,5,,J,, ,1 ,k H, , x -' , -Az-iv, a,5e.fv7l , err- 'g43,,,:,-f:f2zi5r,'.,g 4... aj-I4,7fj.'1V.i-f'cG"f4f..-1- -1 '1!'z1,1A , qu., N-irq,--, ',,n u ...,.., . ,,.4 , -,. , ,fu V-.tru . -,,, -Vi: ,: .l,13l.rf Agia ELM, N, kg. fi- .-u., 4 gf.. .V -,, Vrfff-fl: M -- 11-faj,-ss-'J 'Am 'Jr " . ,J ....41..,V . ,,glF,r.5,,I-atm, L awp. . V N Vsez-,.'-wasllasff-i. 'V f",1'g'z 2,5 'L-.giul-.,-It .af - , 'Q , 1 -- . AV " ,.Ia1Q',1f l" "' H--1, iii' "ll, ,VV -Wi' , Ve , 1 A , Q' 'Liga 59251 - 'jtiiijr' ".- :fl-'L4',,s,'i . - 1 Ve ,, Y :Km ni - -+1 . - .. V .,Vr 11. .'r-3 -:gn 55:--,,,-j 4 3 - gffifiiiigi-,Ji Hg. ,I A V :lien :D-'-fd'-f 5113-I QT:-5 9'-1-. ,V,, ' "V-pp,-gg ,:1'.Qf.,.'m H1 .ax- .ijfggf bigger ' V A :.rHnEQI.2' . 'lf :-.,sVVf-.- 1?-"ff'W' 1' V 1 V X9 mn' 3 I ag!-V',.i,, gsm' VJ! :HZ-5 r:'.J.,.--,.Qy-flfkg ':5:55sg a..,aE sg .4 ,A . 'e L mit: '1.5VfW"'?'3i-' viHQ14WQ-ESR T155-if r ' '. "H-. 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V A , ,.1""54 .0r- 1 ., "QQ: H sw? 1r'.g'5's:L. l , , V.,Ji4,, ,,,.ix,,,..V.1 , rf V,.,:fi .Z .-'52, ' I Y ,.V.--feVial-gfauvf-ig-.u - V -41? 1 V252 :FPL Z are ': ' Y, X M 'C,5-Nj-'TEE - ' A 'wg ' ' :!,!,q-Y,V.irg I il l Fist - -A ., . V- :MSIFY ' . Y V A i iggiiw., , .N TRACK STAR WINS NEW HONOR Often seen hurrying across campus . . . James Parkhurst . . . no wonder . . . he holds many first-place track awards, plus an athletic scholarship. A junior electrical engineering major and president of Delta Sigma Phi, he maintains a B plus average. The track star spends part of his time as a member of UHSEE, Pep Club, IFC, Geiman Club and the Methodist Youth Foundation. v A , ' ,....-.-vv-rvv-n K zol Y Louis . X 202 Patronella '- - - E I Tp. ' ia A V 'lily' 1 E ' A X ' 9,36 . -A -A 1 pu I ' J 4 ri' 1 fs s . POLITICS ARE HIS MAJOR INTEREST An Outstanding Student for the second year, Louis Patronella performs the duties of president for Phi Kappa Delta and Omicron Delta Kappa and vice-president for Young Democrats. The senior political science major works hard as a member of the debate squad, Forensic Society and Political Science, Scoratic and French clubs . Susan Wood Outstanding Students SECRETARY IS ACTUALLY SPEECH THERAPIST Secretarial duties keep Susan Wood's time filled while she serves the student body and Zeta Tau Alpha as secretary. The senior speech therapy major is senior class treasurer, an honoree and a member of Women's Dorm Council, French Club and WSA. She participates in intramural sports and represents UH at SCONA. 45,5 1 T , ! Cathy Young NN,-Rx kg ESV.. as. L ,. swf Yrffsn .- we we-2 ' '--. 1: - Q 11-L POPULAR SENIOR KNOWN FOR RELIABILITY Serving as Cougar editor in the fall, energetic Cathy Young is also senior class vice-president. The busy senior journalism major wins Miss Headline Hop title and maintains membership in Cap and Gown, Phi Kappa Phi, Theta Sigma Phi and Newman Club. A repeat Outstanding Student, she leads Chi Omega as president. 204 S 1 gi! ,w v , , . 1 O . .W 4 li 'f 0 Q .-., .. .vw LR, A l o ,S . . ' l I P Q :sm I 'Z' -T - - --utru , . ' . 1 U T,1.,,,,,v, ,-: .--1:-1-LY .,,.,.,:,-ave.-.wrt-0.411-JJ .E . we k I .D 4' N . .1 . - V ' ' - ". 4- X ' U 1 . , . v X !"nl 5, 3 1 , . Q 1 , . if .. .,, .x -, - . -' - K .xv .' ,' 1 , K I-In 'JA v-U,,-5:5j:-..- ,,,. - - ' diy, '. , ... M51 .f. z' n ' .- i . 'I tw: :flux x .'v nfs' ' 1 'V ..,,. " , X .gk-.l -'LA gg. Qu .wi X. pn 1 3 'M.7,'. H 4 JB- F' . N -. v 1 . ' I Ah 4 .1 4' f,. 4 3' a'. A' P NV: K Wi' ,wk 6 , wr. - ,H X , x I , ,Ll .,. 'Q mv L . , ,xy - I : .ff .h . . x, 1 f?'f'? K- -.lr A f "F..' xi. 'R' -. .I -, fr. H A H . , 1 ' -, Y' 1 , . -- 1' , 'Q-,.-iw, 2 J-,L "Lu . , 2- ,LI '4,,r.-., .-11-n'., I dx- E -, .IAV an ,. . -N V J. '3 ' -. '-X ' Ln or-. ,uf- M N -S L, "fu, .'Y' J r ' , rv. -x . 4 Q, - 4. f,-:t YQ N Q , .-1.- ,J Qt. xr ,, l . 'fi',Qi"k. ,. L-5 Jigxx ff , l...0.4.,. .M A ,lf . mf," ug.. . 1 "KA B yy, tag.. 44 ,Wd , .,f , ..,:1, - g -A-avg , 1-.-Ns'-.xx '.:'f-- e' 'H' 'f--,f.e.y'- 5-if an R '. . x ' " ' ' , x - h,.fj.1',' A" ' x X - Y., I4 l PYP- 139 CRGANIZA TIONS M A i 'N QL my rw -ww 53.11.-bm Wag, -fag Mak. -'mem Laf.fm,, -W-wxm wk- MQ, L, .. W. 7 3054 3352? 'B M.,mu-w.- . , """"""' -W5 an WUwua.,,L Sig, ii 206 4 ' 3 L--"'i L,l.3E:'?'1aff'.i-i ' - -'F.:- X-fi?"G':'?'r ,Ana , ,. t, .,,, - -,M E '-I . ,-ir! '.. - . sam,-. - .,-,lc-., n.7 v,.3,g,- ,rv s wag: 1 J i s -Insist? f. -1. -1-.-5 , l 1.3: if-4.6 l.. -5554 -. 1- 7-w"Tf-.N.iH',u,g5--'-if . .. 1.3, . rs:,.-L-nf.wg.-.-Y?-:W--.4 " 'L f?'1-'LO-'i'F.i,"i'!-lf: i if 5. rig , "I F- f. 5'-'-TWA-"W wh N -1 'jg pf,-Q. Qytgga.-pm iiYp",.,5:41' ,su 11391,-.gr rs-1' 'w.:f-'tt-'qdi r "' ' i.'fl'11-if--'Jin 4 l' 1 l?i f2:'z.y,-VS t W vw" 1- cf l , ll x i' 1 'K 5 n wr wr gags- A ,, IL .qi In many Ways a person is always a student. Even be- fore and after his formal education, he is in .the process of learning. Much of this process involves the practical knowledge of dealing with others. The University, along with its for- mal training, offers an excellent opportunity to the stu- dent to learn more about dealing with others through stu- dent organizations. D These organizations are guided by faculty advisors, yet operated by student members. Each organization offers something particular to its members. The professional groups focus interests and ac- tivities on their major fields. Religious groups open their memberships to those who seek spiritual guidance and a relaxing atmosphere. Social activities and brotherhood are the aims of Greek and Independent social organizations. Service to others is the goal of the service groups. But no matter what the aim or objective of any one of these groups, the most important aspect is that of teaching its members to better understand the everyday task of deal- ing with their fellowmen. X Architectural Society SOCIETY AIDS DESIGNER AN INTRAMURAL TROPHY is held by treasurer J. Engel during c meeting of the Architectural Society. Members in back ore: C. Nelson, J. Sheffield, D. Gentry, C. Zimmerman, R. Lang, P. Mortensen, R. Johnson, A. Caporina, Society of Engineers ENJOYING A COFFEE BREAK are UHSE officers A. Germani, president, Prof. C. V. Kirkpatrick, sponsor, B. R. Hutson, vice-president, Prof. J. Hoff, sponsor and E. Rapp, sec.-treos. 208 J. Hancock, B. Koimn, K. Ercums, B. Bricken, R. Bigler, and R. Ploiscmce. Sitting in front are: J. Hagen, K. Carbaial, C. Madrid, C. Phillips and C. Knight. ALL ENGINEERS UNITED Organizing and co-ordinating the activities which will promote the growth and develop- ment of the Cullen College of Engineering and the engineering students are the objectives and aims of the University of Houston Society of Engineers. These aims are achieved by uniting all the engineering organizations. UHSE is composed of the following en- gineering organizations: ASCE, ASChE. AIME, UHSEE and ASME. Each of these ' groups sends two members to serve on the A UHSE Council. Each year the UHSE sponsors a group of meetings open to all engineering stu- dents. At these meetings men in all fields of business discuss the many applications of engineering. Quite active in campus activities, UHSE sponsors the 1960 Homecoming Queen, the UH Engineering Technical Paper Con- test and is a member of the UH Pep Club. Operating the Engineer's Coffee Bar is the local service project of UHSE. l l Architects Founded in 1954, the aim of the UH Architectural Society is to promote architectural education. The group achieves this by attending lecture series, taking field trips and participating in the International Traveling Exhibits, a special problems program. This year the society -undertakes the project of painting the architectural labs and also makes a field trip to New Orleans. i , A CIVIC CENTER i -'m OFFICERS VIEW MODEL of proposed buildings for the main cultural area of Houston. Checking the details of a fifth-year student's proiect are: R. Kendrick, president, R. Fyfield, vice-president, J. Engel, treasurer and R. Beech, secretary. r EXAMINING A FREE-FORM behind the architecture building are members B. Tiruxillo, E. Loi and C. Smith. Standing behind are: L. Pyle, D. Williams, J. Mashburn, J. Clapsaddle, R. Wade, D. Muller, J. Johnston, H. Metrik, J. Powers, J. Hieder and VR. Cox. Engineers x OPERATING OSCILLISCOPES is an everyday chore for UHSE members. Putting ci machine in adiustment are N. Cheshire, B. Medley and J. Boyd. EXAMINING RESULTS from c recent experiment are UHSE members G. Speildenner, F. Gentile, R. Hillegeist and G. Kinnebrew. 209 Civil En ineers CONDUCTING A LAB TEST ore ASCE officers J. Gee, rep., B. Fought, vice- dem, J. Binkleyl pqrliqmenfgriqn and J, Skinner, rep, presidentg J. Hedding, historian: P. K. Woo, secretory, J. Houseworth, presi- ASCE VIEWS FUTURE OF CIVIL ENGINEERS Acquainting civil engineering students with their profession is the American So- ciety of Civil Engineers' purpose. ASCE enables its members to have a cognizance of progress in civil engineering and gives them an opportunity to meet leaders who are responsible for this prog- ress. Numerous field trips supplement regular Class and laboratory Work- The Organization solL LAB EQUIPMENT amragues ASCE members P. Holland, D. clqyfon, B. Baker, J. suchma, J. annually travels to Vicksburg, Miss., to Bork, H. Comp, J. Gee, J. Skinner, D. Odell, A. Szcithmory ond T. Wood. INSPECTING SOIL SAMPLES ore: E. Street, D. Rundell, A. Szothmory, K. A. Sodogor, G. Keeler, B. Shibl, P. K. Woo, J. Anderson, J. Binkiey, A. Bonor, sponsor ond C. J. Tomborello. inspect the Waterways Experimental Sta- tion. Members attend semi-annual conventions of the Texas Society of Professional Engi- neers and participate in Cougar Christmas- land. They also hold a Christmas party for underprivileged children. A spring picnic and the Engineer's Ball round out their activities for the year. Teri 2l0 Engineers CLUB FILES WRIT Tau Epsilon is an organization for honor students in engineering. Founded on this campus in 1957, the society's purpose is to promote leadership and scholarship among englneermg students and alumni of the Universrty of Houston This year Tau Epsilon has submitted a petition to assoclate wlth Tau Beta P1 the nat1onal honorary englneermg society The groups executive committee 15 now con sidermg the petition Tau Epsilon Chemlcal En SPEAKERS AID AIMS In order to 1nst1ll a professlonal prlde in chemlstry, the American Institute of Chemical Engineering has practrcrng en glneers as guest speakers at its meetlngs films and frequent fleld trlps the group fosters mterest ln chenucal englneerlng An annual fall picnic and a spring ban quet are the groups top soc1al events of the year MEMBERS Front Row Shah Momar Copeland Herrera Shah Second Row Martin Small Barley Boston Townsend Hammer Shaver Back Row Hlllegerst Fonvllle Grady Bonneau Lamonte Boeger Gaffney Bar field Yepes COFFEE TIME tn the Engineering Lab brings together Chemical Engineer offlcers J B Gnerson president C Kmard vuce president J Ogden secretary and M Medley treasurer GATHERING nn front of the Engmeermg Bunldmg are Tau Epsllon members C Holder J McClarty and R Rxvera Standlng nn the muddle are M Brumer A Contreras B Simmons W Small and P F Woo On the back row are R Schwartz B Hood R Brooks A German: A Yepes J Hoff sponsor andJ Qurtter A MID DAY duscussron engrosses Tau Epsilon offucers J B Grnerson treas urer E Corley president J Boyd secretary and C Roxburg vice president SUM! IHUIIV I KXIV MIR 2 5 , . . . . . , . . ' . Q ' ' . , . , . ' , . . . . ' I ' I ' I ' 'I ' I ' I 1 - 1 ' 2 - 1 - 1 ' - l I s . . , . B - -amy o ' -1 f, ' -Q T ' - 1 , l , me V Q W c- f - Ib " A . . . . . - . H A Y P ' ' . Y Y ' Ln Supplementing meetings with technical T J - 'll- : I ' 1 1 ' I - F ' - . 1 1 1 1 1 1 - x 4 v 4: A : I 1 I I I I I 1 I ' Z I' A 'll I ' W Il' I ' lll I ' It I . D . . I . : I . y I . H . I ' I Electrical Engineers ENGINEERS FORM LINK INTENTLY WATCHING an electrical "gismo" are B. Hood, IRE secretary, B. Schwartz, vice-chain man, C. Johnston, AIEE secretary, R. Brooks, representative, F. Gentile, representative, J. McClarty, choirmang M. E. Reindl, treasurer and J. Boyd, representative. Serving as a joint student branch of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers and the Institute of Radio Engineers, the Society of Electrical Engineers forms a link between students and professionals. In order to provide this link, the group has industry speakers at its meetings and makes several field trips each year. In ad- dition SEE members attend functions of the local senior engineering societies. Members also enter papers in various contests sponsored by local senior organ- izations. Top social events are a barbecue and a spring banquet. Ben H. Hood, senior, is winner of a scholarship from the Schlumberger Founda- tion, while John R. lVIcCIarty, senior, re- ceives an honor from the Western Electric Foundation. Industrial Engineers TURN THIS WHEEL says H. C. Lambert as he demonstrates how to increase voltage to industrial engineers: J. Bergeron, L. White, J. Witt, P. Farley, E. Briggs, H. Potcinske and T. Turner. 2l2 Engineers WITH INDUSTRY GRAPHIC RESULTS of two tests are viewed as they come oft the Sanborn Model 150 by Societ of Electrical Engineer members I. Levine and C. Y Dufour. STUDYING CONTROLS of on oscilliscope are SEE members A. Howell J. Parkhurst, A. Meridian, R. Hieber, P. Chaput, J. Edge and L. Casey AIIE STRESSES INDUSTRY AIMS Providing further opportunity for its members to gain a knowledge of the theory and practice of industrial engineering is the purpose of the American Institute of Industrial Engineering. - In order that students might learn as much as possible about their field, the group also encourages fellowship with pro- fessional leaders in this area. In this way AIIE members can learn more about the progress of industrial engineering. At regular monthly meetings guest speak- ers give the group's members an insight into the practical side of the field. Each year the organization actively par- ticipates in the Industrial Engineering Con- ference. This yearAAIIE holds a Christmas and a spring party as its chief social functions. THESE CONTROLS and indicators on massive engineering equipment all have meaning for AIIE officers F. Gaddis, sergeant-at-arms: J. Ward, vice-president, J. Quitter, president, G. Spieldenner, treasurer, H. Underwood, secretary and E. Corley, ex-president. 2l3 Petroleum ,mud MEMBERS ARE TAUGH T ENGINEERING OPERATIONS The University of Houston Society of Petroleum Engineers is the student branch of the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers. SPE's purpose is to acquaint its members with engineering operations and innova- tions. The group accomplishes this goal through bi-monthly meetings and monthly field trips in connection with the petroleum industry. Members of the Society participate in annual conventions of SPE and AIME in Houston and their representatives also at- tend the International Petroleum Exposi- tion. A spring picnic is the societyis annual so- cial event. - A were - CHECKING OIL PRESSURE are officers Ramon Rivero, treasurer, Robert Tyree, secretary, Anthony Germani, vice-president, Joel Battle, industry sponsor and Charles Roxburgh, president. Panhellenifl STYLE SHOW AIDS Panhellenic, established in 1956 when all local sororities Went national, serves as a forum for the discussion of questions of interest to the college and fraternity world. l PANHELLENIC OFFICERS Linda Shira, corresponding secretary, Lynn Abercrombie, vice-president, EVERYBODY COME to the UH Panhellenic Bridal Valerie Daunoy, treasurer, Kay McKee, parliamenfarian and Sharon Moorhead, recording secretary, FGSIWIOU FOFUFTM SGYS Chl OYTISQU MOHY Kasper- listen to Nancy Coffman, president. ZI4 Engineers INSPECTING AN OIL RIG ere SPE members A. Owens, D. Frederick, C. Cary, M. Hubbard, R. Turner, T- Gerrfwni, C. V- Kirkpatrick, faculty Douthitt, D. Miller, E. Ayres, C. Haley, D, Lea, J. Smith, A. Contreras, T. SDOHSOF: E- LeB0vfQr1d F- Domino. Greeks sonomriss Panhellenicis purposes are to maintain a high level fraternity life and interfratern- ity relationship, and to cooperate with col- lege authorities in an effort to maintain high social and scholastic standards. Besides sponsoring pledge lines and a Rush tea, Panhellenic plans and organizes Rush itself. Other activities include usher- ing at commencement, hostessing at the Par- rf' ents and Friends Society and co-sponsoring Greek Help Week. The group also holds a style show which this year results in raising S5300 for the annual Panhellenic Scholar- ship. Outstanding members include Sharon Moorhead, Sigma Phi Epsilon Sweetheartg Lynn Abercrombie, Best Dressed Coedg X X, Valerie Daunoy, junior class representa- Ps. QL tive -and Molly Kasper, Vanity Fair Beauty. Q55-' A T PREPARING for a meeting are Sandra Schoenfield, Zeta Tau Alpha, Elizabeth Evans, Delta Zeta, Noel Joseph, Alpha Chi Omega, Sabra Hall, Alpha Chi Omega, Alice Cruse, Phi Mu, Theo Min- turn, Delta Gamma and Maurice McGlothlin, Zeta Tau Alpha. 2l5 lpha Chi Omega 'J' , -. if-J ' 1 - r- r- 1-1 -T '12 , gif L , me 2, is . 91454 Z- 1,i'."1'- - ah ,.:i, F1 ' A E' iid.. 1? r ew AA' t--I ' if W Q 31311, . .. qJ..,3.i:,s ei th All C ,,,, .ai az, tg Vs. C2955 1-F141 l 'ii J", M 'lah W: ' "J ,jj 'f.f4-sei, - PLEDGE TRAINER Anne Sharpe plans pledge activities for the next semester while pledges Cathy Williams, Carol Akkerman and Marguerite Frantz add their suggestions. 5 Est. 1 5 t 4' l L l I J ,: " ' -kg DUTIES OF ACl1iO PLEDGES include keeping the sorority's trophies clean. Aicling in the effort with their dustcloths are Diane Craig, Beverly Ward and Judy Hall. I 2l6 FRIENDS LAST FOREVER Alpha Chi Omega, founded in 1885 at DePauw University, is a social club bring- ing its members friendships that will be- come life long. At the same time it helps them grow as useful members of society. Belonging to the sorority is an experi- ence in self-governing group living. Giving its members guidance in adjusting to col- lege life is part of the group's purpose. Providing AChiO's an opportunity to develop leadership qualities, the sorority also encourages its members to develop their individual talents. Stressing the importance of intellectual advancements, Alpha Chi Omega guides its members in cultural development. It advocates service to the university and also to the community through various projects. Among the sororityis activities are Song- fest, Cougar Christmasland, Derby Day, Panhellenic Workshop and a Founder,s Day Banquet. AChiO wins second place in Home- coming float competition and takes first place in the Homecoming banner contest. Socially speaking, the top event is the Alpha Chi Allegro, which is held this year at the Houston Club. Outstanding members of Alpha Chi Omega are Lynda Moore, Vanity Fair Beauty, Miss Printing Week, Homecoming Queen finalist and Outstanding Studentg Edwene Gaines, Cougar editor and Out- standing Student and Antha Adkins, Fa- vorite. Also Anne Sharpe, junior class vice-p1'esi- dent, sweetheart of Tau Kappa Epsilon and secretary of Red Masque Playersg Carol Akkerman, sophomore class repre- sentative and Vanity Fair Beauty and Joyce Simpson, Vanity Fair Favorite. Other Winning honors are Nancy Coff- man, Panhellenic vice-president and Golf Queeng Cathy Williams, freshman class vice-president and Sabra Hall, Houston Press Club scholarship winner. Q 'x "Tn: . fn Q , . I, ',r.a15'.4 ' ' QM? .,j: hi Omega FOND MEMORIES are recalled by Chi Omegas as they look through their scrapbook. Reminiscing are Bonnie Smith, Phyllis Branard, Betty Curtis, Brenda Dietz and Verley Connolly. l l l'l - 71' .,, Q, ,aw 7.13 is-1 ,tm,:....-. . Nei, i X1 H, , 1' ' ,, -Q'-Also, 'W 'L .3 , ee 'ii' ' ee HR: i ' 'ya - 4 mga, V' 1 l, f ,s 3 P 4 'f ff-'funn WW ' ,ss1H'.'5q ' " " TNI 1 TROPHIES, TROPHIES everywhere, and the Chi O's have their share of them. Adrniring an adcli- tion to their collection are Bobbie Hainline, Judy Morriss, Ann Chenault, Betty Hodell, Janice John- stone, Pam Ballard, Judy Pittman, Sally Day, Molly Kasper and Judy Tussing. A SPRING AFTERNOON is best enioyed outside. Passing the time away are Jocelyn Hayden, Jane Buchanan, Barbara Gard and Valerie Daunoy. Greeks 5" BIG DECISIONS ARE IN THE MAKING around the Chi Omega sorority house. Here the officers of the group, Diane Van Eaton, pledge trainer, s Ai Lin Eckert, secretary, Sharon Wakefield, vice-president, Diane Doyen personnel and Sallie Stelfox, treasurer, consult with Cathy Young, president PSI ZETA GAINS NATIONAL FAME Founded in 1895 at the University of Arkansas, Chi Omega strives to promote high scholarship, a close bond of fellowship among its members and active participation in campus activities. Psi Zeta chapter is honored as the outstanding chapter in the nation at the recent Chi Omega national convention. The purposes of the sorority are carried out through chapter meetings, "owl hoots," coke parties, a spring formal, their Founders Day banquet and philanthropic activities. Outstanding members wearing the cardinal and straw include Bobbie Hainline, Homecoming Queen and Sigma Nu Sweetheartg Judy Tussing, Lt. Colonel of the ROTCQ Judy Morriss and Sharon Wakefield, cheerleaders, Molly Kasper, Vanity Fair Fa- voriteg Cathy Young, Cougar editor and Outstanding Student and Valerie Daunoy and Betty Curtis, ROTC sponsors. Ten Chi O's hold positions as class officers. PLEDGES LOOK INDUSTRIOUS at the Chi Omega house. Helping with the annual spring cleaning are Ellen Christian, Julia Sinclair, Nancy Rogers, Lou Thomas and Shari Dean. , Delta Gamma ENGROSSED IN CONVERSATION are DG's Sharon Sullivan, Billie Schneider and Zoe Zecller. The three are campus beauties-Sharon is a Vanity Fair Beauty, while Billie and Zoe are Favorites. , .. are DG' PROMOTE LEADERSHIP Delta Gamma traces its birthplace to Lewis School, Oxford, Mississippi. Founded in 1873, the sorority has among its aims the development of true and lasting friendships and the achievement of high scholastic goals. Delta Gamma members take part in many activities, including philanthropies such as sight conservation. her smile of approval. Leadership is another quality which the DG's believe in pro- moting and which is Well shown by the accomplishments of the group's members. Bringing honors to the group through campus activities are Sharon Sullivan, president of Panhellenic and charter member of Sparksg Billie Schneider, head twirler of the Cougar marching band and Bonnie lVIcCool, ROTC sponsor. Delta Gamma membership is not lacking in beauty. Vanity Fair Beauties include Sharon Sullivan and Bonnie lVlcCool. Billie Schneider, a Vanity Fair Favorite and Homecoming Queen final- ist, also represents the university at the Stephen F. Austin College Spring Festival, where she is chosen as its queen from among l it twenty representatives. Zoe Zedler is also a Vanity Fair Favorite. Sharon Moorhead reigns this year as sweetheart of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. Participating in all types of activities, the DG's enter Songfest competition, hold a retreat for members and give a Christmas party for blind nursery school children. Delta Gamma girls point with pride to their Spring Formal, the year's social highlight. DISPLAYING THE ANCHOR, the crest of Delta Gamma, Diane Miller, Theo Minturn and Rebecca Harrison. 220 z. SHAKING HANDS with the Delta Gamma sailor is pledge Paula Tacllock as Bonnie McCool gives are members l 9 Hr , 1' 3" -. 1. 'GT 43.2 Nw gi 'xg .?P-'kg ni' 17 i ,gg . 'x eu' 6, wg wf- , . Ei - ..,+.1 D A -4 ff. . 5-,, ., '4 E 'x v I E Z ' - - -7- -A,-,.,., x Z 442 .T-J... -..--...- v Ras,-3 2. JE? ' - - Q5 Fe ,r-ur ,E if '- f. 5 il, -wsu' 1-m15fff,1w!'..?l' . -. fu: wl4'fff " QF' x.-3- .armies L? 3? .-1' . gn. :mir - ':g5uw::- ' -.,.' ,affwgf-1-GH11' 2 ,af"':12nt. 's,w,n.Lqf-s- rg,-ff -3113, 1:11:11 'A' xv' wflfflffifff, 51- 51 E? , Jw wt.--24111, mf. 'lr -ssf..:ff.u,HfF--M11 fkgfjdilfzif , f - 5,-1. 4X5"552f,, ,- 1 , f H 1'-aa-'V Us WZ ,,., .,, , '-14.4-ff' , -,2WwQ,,.::q-- ,V'-- .,1 gg. ':5 ,- vw, k '-I-w-n W s. 501 sf a N? Jr A , , 4 w 4, ...-1,15 .v 1 , IE: V' Fw Q j Lg W -i kia: A Q 9' 'i Q? 4 4 'rf 4? gf-gg ., ' ' f" ' l ' 'Sit-, - 1 if 1-das Sf M X " S+ . 5 i . 5 ,iv , Aa-.. E L, s 5,4111 1 XA" f wr ' 7, ' my -W5 'A ' QS. 'f 4- x 4, 'vu ., ' , ' -- 1' ' ' 'v, Q--.,.,x,, , -Qu- A . md g .-V1 " l 3 K 1 . 12 1 A if N x A v.' 'H 3 .1 ,lg 4 F '-sn 1 fr , -,J . , 'V '.: i 't ,V . W, 5 F? Y gh 32" I .exif 1 x 5:1211-F" . - -5-' '5 " " 522 I X. A W- v , .filgQ:f" 'Pl ' 'HV- E m Greeks CAMPUS ACTIVITIES BRING MANY TROPHIES 1. i l i l l A SURPRISE PARTY lies in store for somebody. Pictured are Pam Thomas, Elaine Gray, Ann Walker, Kathy Berberian and Eloise Acree. First place in Songfest, winner of the Cougar Spirit Award, recipient of the DZ Pride of the Province trophy-these are among the outstanding accomplishments that highlight the year for Delta Zeta sorority. Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, in 1902, Delta Zeta is now the largest national sorority in number of chapters. Beginning the year by winning the Parents and Friends Trophy. DZ participates in intramurals and Derby Day, ex- changes serenades with campus fraternities, sells Christmas seals and gives a tea for DZ mothers and alumni. Delta Zeta sponsors the winning candidate, Anthony Kou- zounis, in the King Ugly contest held during Homecoming ac- tivities. Outstanding DZ's include Kathleen Pollak, senior class repre- sentative and Cap and Gown secretaryg Linda. Shira, vice-presi- dent of Phi Theta Kappag Llewelyn Scharlach, recipient of a 391000 scholarship for summer study in France: Toni Rae Men- sing, cheerleader and WSA vice-presidentg Arlene Newman, sweetheart of Alpha Phi Omega and Phi Sigma Kappa Moon- light Girl and Carol lVlcDaniel, Vanity Fair Favorite. Philanthropically speaking, Delta Zetas give food baskets to needy families at Thanksgiving, make Christmas toy baskets for orphans and present the Houston Speech and Hearing Center with a 35200 hearing aid and books for their library. wi , V www' .tt . " etgszsssisg wt' I . 's, . . .-f. "' Yi DELTA ZETA PRESIDENT Kathleen Pollak serves punch at the annual Kitty Taylor, pledge trainer, Toni Rae Mensing, treasurer, Arlene Newman, Rose Formal to other officers Shirley Bridier, corresponding secretary, rush captain, and Kathy Berberian, recording secretory. 223 Phi Mu CHAPTER REACHES ITS CBJECTIVES Scholarship, leadership, social grace . . . these are the ob- jectives of Phi Mu. The University of Houston chapter, activated on the Cougar campus in 1956, centers all of its activities around these three objectives, giving its members a balanced college life. IT'S MUSIC TIME as officers gather around the iukebox to pick tunes for a party. They are Pat Coffman, president: Margaret Pyle, treasurer, Kay McKee, vice-president and Peggy Sterling, secretary. Many members of Phi Mu have won special honors. Included on this list are Yolando Kato, secretary of Kappa Epsilon, Dora Ristau, treasurer of Panhellenic and president of the Women's Student Association and Betty Stanclafer, secretary of the Spanish Club. Each year the sorority presents awards to the active and pledge achieving the high- est scholarship average. This year's winner of the Collegiate Award, presented by the alumni group, is Susie Nettles, while Betty Standafer is the recipient of the pledge scholastic award. Outstanding member of the year is Pat Coffman. The pledge award goes to Carol Siler. Members of Phi Mu participate in cam- pus activities throughout the school year. Included among these are Homecoming, Cougar Christmaslancl, Songfest and Sigma Chi Derby Day. T Entertaining is not new to the Phi Mus. Their calendar is marked with open houses, teas, parties and dances, and the year is highlighted by the Enchantress Carnation Ball. Phi Mu philanthropic projects for the year include help for needy children. 224 Greeks CERTIFICATES are traditionally given at the end ot the year to Phi Mu members who will not be returning. Receiving theirs are Linda .lo Lee, Pat Coffman and Dora Ristau. -TL! qfii' MEMORIES RETURN as Dora Ristou, Jan Ewing, Linda Jo Lee, Linda Rogers and Brenda Thomas take a trip back to the past via the Phi Mu scrapbook. JN JU' PLOTTING against members seems to be the favorite pastime of pledges. It looks like Deanna Kincy, Carolyn Terry and Carol Siler are really up to something . . . a surprise party for mem- bers, maybe? A SCHOLARSHIP TROPHY is something to Show off. Performing this enioyable duty are Alice Cruse, Betty Standafer, Carol Marsh and Dorthea Koehler. 225 Zeta Tau Alpha PREPARING party invitations are officers Dorothy Phillips, treas,, Denise Boudreaux, vice-pres., Maurice McGlothlin, pres., Susan Wood, corres. sec.g .Iaquie Jouanet, rec. sec. and Patsy Ken- nedy, rush chairman. 'K ' rr Li, I I 1 . 72, I I e es M ' aggr- 5. .I -, mm V f L, I ,tif ef I I I V.,, II' .rlliwyfl I JI. .II I n I it III I I 2 i,,1 G, . K Z, is Y 'A 099- H PLEDGE LINE-UP finds members Jeana Clifton and Amelie Suberbielle giving instructions to pledges Irene Lieban, Phyllis Chectney and Marcia Marquer. TAKING TIME out from a busy schedule to relax at the sorority apartment are Zefas Linda Riedel, Beverly Wilson, Caryl Carlson, Linda Shepler and Lila Jeanfreau. ff! it tm.,- 226 Greeks zErA MEMBERS HOLD MANY riruss Participating in campus activities brings honors to Zeta Tau Alpha, as the group's Homecoming float takes first place and their singing wins runner-up honors in Songfest. Besides helping in the fight against cerebral palsy, the Zetas accept as their philanthropic project assisting the National Society for Crippled Children and Adults, Inc. Through the Zeta'.Tau Alpha Foundation, the group annual- ly awards scholarships to college students, both non-sorority and sorority members. ZTA's annual spring formal is their top social event. Other activities include a Christmas party, a Founder's Day Ban- quet and numerous informal gatherings. Four ZTA's are charter members of Sparks, with two girls serving as officers of the new organization. Lila ,Ieanfreau is vice-president, while Denise Boudreaux is treasurer. Lila is also Miss Houstonian and Delta Sigma Phi sweetheart, and Denise is a Vanity Fair Beauty. Other members of Zeta who have won individual honors are Caryl Carlson, Pi Kappa Alpha Dream Girl and Susan Wood, Student Body secretary, SCONA delegate from the University of Houston and Outstanding Student. Among other honor-winning members are Lynn Aber- crombie, Best Dressed Coedg Amelie Suberbielle, Vanity Fair Beauty and Brenda Busch, representative of the senior class. Q 1'ALf3q'I.. f Qi-1tu":!:i A SMALL PART of the Zeta Tau Alpha collection is admired by members Pat Busse, Nan Davis, Mary Lib liams, Mattie Fletcher and Linda Gilliland. STILL ANOTHER TROPHY is shown off by Lynn Abercrombie, Miss Inez Bryan, advisory Judy Wahlers, Mary Alice Gilley, Sandra Schoenfield and Ann Staples U1 l Q if lwmk gala, . V! . 9 aff! H I .af X ,J 1 njnng lm 1 ga.- 1 1 f an -' ua .4-zrwsn. -iwu.-arg "'- PA, F a W.,-. ,, .wg-fe-, 1 l v: PQ f. ' X 1 ss S 222 H" If 4 i i R E' 9 X f 9 5 , ,., I Q r Q , 4- .12-Q 'A :l:: 1' -,J .4 x 1 A dm A V- Hg-if ill 1 r- ' I, If I w- E.i:. I ti iii, I 1 Y! Q It N Eff' Y- H lr ' 'Ly ' I It as .-1-r -Qi n. ena- -11.-.. W: v I 8 Greeks DELTA CHI SCRAPBOOK holds many memories for members of the McCreight, Ron Pawlik, Harold Sorrell cmd Dick Larsen. fraternity. Taking a glance back into the past are Bill Dozier, Randy DELTA CHl'S PI RCMCTE DELTA CHI DARLING is DZ Jan Alford. Presenting the award are pledges Edwin Arnold and Rick Harral. FRIENDSHIP Founded at Cornell University in 1890, Delta Chi fraternity aims to promote friendship, develop character, advance justice and assist in the acquisition of a sound education. As a college fraternity with complete loyalty and allegiance to the college which nurtures it, Delta Chi supports in every possible way the institute of which it is a part. Activities of the University of Houston chapter of Delta Chi, established on the Cougar campus in February, 1956, include participation in intramural sports, a Founder's Day Banquet, the Sleepwalkers Ball, an open house for parents and friends, the annual pledge-active challenge day and Dog Day. Top Delta Chi social of the year is the White Carnation Formal, held each spring. John Perdue, a member of the Univer- sity of Houston chapter of Delta Chi, par- ticipates in many tournaments as a mem- ber of the UH debate team. 23I Delta Sigma Phi OFFICERS Ashley Hooper, sergeanf-ai-arms: Dick Finnegan, Treasurer and .lim Friou, secretary, gaiher around president Bill Buchanan. WE'RE READY FOR A PARTY, declare Larry Thieme, James Parkhursf, Jack Patterson, Dove Lay and Gil Willis. ll 'Qi lf ll l l l l A '-'1'1iA, N .NK S in F, l Q , A -Q. p ox "i, 'X Greeks ENJOYING a relaxing game of pool are Delta Sig members John Chapin, Walter Brauchle, Bill Allen and Ellsworth Stewart. .,x ,X N ACCENT is ON rNnivinuAL Maximum development of the individual is the aim of Delta Sigma Phi. The fraternity, founded at City College of New York in 1899, attempts to achieve high scholastic and social standards through an exclusive program of engineered leadership. Each year Delta Sig sponsors the presentation of the best sorority trophy, awarded on the basis of high sorority achievement. This year's recipient of the trophy, announced at the annual Homecoming Dance, is Chi Omega. Participation in campus activities is an important and very active phase of fraternity life for members of Delta Sigma Phi. Homecoming, Songfest, Greek Help Week and an open house for parents are all part of the Delta Sig Way of life. Outstanding members of the fraternity include Jerry Reck, cheerleaderg John S' Chapin, Press Club Scholarship winnerg ,M Wayne Dittloff, president of Gamma Delta, i 1 7 Ellsworth Stewart, treasurer of the Pre- J Med Pre-Dental Society and James Park- l hurst, member of the Cougar track team, recipient of the Dr. Charles Alexander l I scholarship, member of ODK and Outstand- ing Student. Top Delta Sig socials of the year include the fall Carnation Ball and spring Sailor Ball, in addition to many house parties. Philanthropy is not neglected as mem- bers of Delta Sig adopt a family at Christ- mastime. A QUIET TALK is enioyed by members .lack Pat- terson, Elmo Vestal, supervisor, Ben Britt, Rick Livesay and Charlie Gentry. lT'S WORK BEFORE play for Dennis MacAffee as he retreats to his room for a quiet session of studying. PRACTICING fraternity songs are pledges John Van Hook, Bob Darnell, Bob Bryan, Freddy Wal- ter, Ronny Grate, Wayne Paris and Art Decko. l ll l ,l l Phi Kappa Theta it ., iz! ll. .W V HONORS ARE MANY Phi Kappa Theta believes each brother should have a well-rounded education, and Alpha Mu chapter works hard at putting this idea into practice. For the past two con- secutive semesters, the fraternity has maintained the highest fraternity scholastic aver- age on campus. Participation in Homecoming and intramural sports brings the Phi Kaps first place in the Homecoming float competition, first in volleyball, and first in their league in football. Loyalty to God and college is the motto of Phi Kappa Theta. Its aim is to build a good hoy into a better man. Phi Kaps have achieved distinction in many different fields. Eugene Cook serves as vice-president of the student body and f P president of the senate, as well as being one of the top ten Outstanding Students. Others are Jack Charrin, Deputy Corps Commanderg Bruce Biundo, senator from the College of Phar- macy and Barlow Simmons, attorney general. PLEDGING PHI KAPPA THETA this spring are Joe Browne, Alex Szathmary, Frank Lupo, Emile Garidel and Ted Liscinski. A Y lT'S SERENADE TIME at the Phi Kap house as members of the fraternity ' gather around the piano for two or three choruses. The melody is provided by Pat Nitsch, Eugene Cook and Anthony Zinnante. Harmonizing in the background are Bart Truxillo, Ernie Braren, Joe Trapolino, Bill Byrne, Jimmy Carpenter, Pai Marrero and Charley Cucchiara. 234 'N 2-1! - f 'Q ,av an . V, H f 5 I 1 X any " , :wg K I D '-' Q ,Ov L r 4, wut. I , an J Y 14 4' X. ,' :gli C 1 N 1 f i ,RK 5 1 1 r .- af E . - A , s 'if t 4+ . Q ,... F, Ill' 1 ' 9 ,--cf z is ll, Y L1....1.f .-e x V 1 - ' R t 19' fail 1 . ir p"41l', ' f '. '73 ,Y 9 i , 1 N 15 19 KM I 4, I uX - --,F . .ri A .hrgm-,A 4.4, V OFFICERS AT WORK studying orT and literczfurez vice-presidenf, Al Robin, secretory, .lock McCuney treasurer, Glen Bruner and senfinel, Hank Allers. SING ALONG with Cl Phi Sig song produces close harmony from Harold Gunn, Jack McCune, Hunk Allers and Tom Reed. Greeks MOONLIGHT FCRMAL GROUP'S TOP EVENT Brotherhood, scholarship and the development of character are the three main goals of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. Founded in 1873 at the University of Massachusetts, the fraternity began its local chapter in 1956. A Their annual Moonlight Girl Formal is the group's hig- gest social event. This spring the dance is held at Ramada Inn, and Phi Sigs name Delta Zeta Arlene Newman Moonlight Girl. Other social events include a New Yearis Ballheld at the Phi Sig fraternity house and a Founder's Day Banquet on lVIarch 15. Members take part in the annual tug of war, the pledge-active football game, songfest and Homecoming activities. Outstanding members of the fraternity are Henry Milam, vice-president of Kappa Alpha Mug Al Robin, president of the Hillel Societyg Marty Scheeter, Winner of the pledge scholar- ship award and Hank Allers, a member of student government. PLEDGE PARTY REVELERS Gary Sitton, Mike Andre, Mike Schipper, How- ard Hayes and Woody Harrison enioy the entertainment at the Phi Sig THE PAUSE THAT REFRESHES draws the attention of Bob Leisure and Bill O'Feil. house-at least the actives said they had better enioy it, '1 v i i 1 i 237 igma Alpha Epsilon , I K .mo in M-1 W P-F 5 F sg- 'WT I ' 1 ,U I 12 X. Q ,.!, .. I E ' n A 15 'P' . - 4' ., ' : 'av' -' . ,xp li, 1: l V '- 2 +- L fx ' 2 1 Q 1 it Jifsdx-I N 7 E 1:31 ig, Ft' s F 1 , 1 4 mg, 'K I H K N, -19 4 " Q " gf l. 1'- ' , .. v - s , hui Q ,Q X 1 il :nk 'i f in fi? P ,I ,, ,. .. V X , l i l 1 mu My . J.. my i 5' ., iw, 5.2, , , ' i i . I' N i I , , 1 A y., N T X ,,..f Y I 1 . , 1 N . , . Q x l PLEDGES POSE at The Spring Formal. Front Row: Skip Montgomery, Paul Maitingly, Frank Moite, Bill Sansing. Back Row: Ken Hamilton, Denny Pederson, Mike Abby, Jon Kaylor. SWEETHEART of Sigma Alpha Epsilon is attractive Judy Pittman. SAE OFFICERS include Brian Belcher, correspondent, Don McClure, eminem' archon, Tommy Thomson, treasurer, Vicior Reed, warden, Denny Bowman, reporfer and Ross I-lookin, herald. M, ,gf , , i. , F f " nf '. , .. Y yn , i ,, r- rw , i 1? 5, f 1' 9 is ,,,r QS-s A you fry 5 5 ,uf ,f . l F l f 1 , 4 . 7 ,X .M E 1 fa s ,, i f ' I 1 ' . - i ' ' 1 . E f 1 ' ,' .' M V ' 'iz 'U 4 ,-,mi if 1 i 'A' , 1 ,J . w ii .' , gr- - l ' f 2- f i 5 If ., , QE I Q T, r F' , if , f if li 1 gym if l li iiiiii J fL.mS5l?l :sg :si an sm -5 . ' .qi . fs H , .H 1, f 238 as ,i-A -i ' ,szl f K -iriqzr, I E i 1 , , 'il " L' .1 '- r .1 - .Lg -5 1 ,I J,-L E 'X E x F , FI ' f V Els ii 25 ' L, l .-iii ,. ' ' W- - ffl ,ie : R 3 wo, Y -L Greeks SAE LEADS OTHERS IN MEMBERSHIP Sigma Alpha Epsilon has grown for over a century to become the largest national fraternity with a membership of more than one hundred thousand. SAE's objective is to create a better un- derstanding of one's place in society, his value to society and his responsibility in society. This objective is achieved through the development of self-discipline within l the individual. Certainly the fraternity affords the stu- dent an abundance of social activities and the lifetime fellowship of brothers in 143 chapters across the nation. Of most impor- tance, however, Sigma Alpha Epsilon is a man-making organization. Activities of SAE include Homecoming, Songfest, Cougar Christmasland, Creek Help Week and the annual Spring Formal. Outstanding members are Jim Helms, Pre-Med Society chancellorg Gary Phillips, All-American basketball starg J ack Becker, student body treasurer and vice-president of IFC and Bill Hensley, Phi Theta Kappa , Y i President and S'-1Preme Cmnt justice- PARTY TIME revolves around the bcir cnt the SAE house. Pictured ore members Jim Helms, Ross Hop- kin, Denny Bishop, Bill Dixon, Vic Mitchell, Ed Lewis, Som Epperson ond John Peyton. FRATERNITY TROPHIES and ci sweetheart picture make the perfect background for singing SAE's Har- old Pierctt, Jerry Clcpsctcldle, Bill Howell, Jock Costellunos, Richard Block, Bill Hensley, Norm Tuffli, Tommy Thomson and Vic Reed. 239 N ima 11 MEMBERS ATTAIN AIMS Sigma Nus aim is to create lasting bonds of friendship and brotherhood among college men, instilling in them the principle of honor. The fraternity, founded in 1869 by three ex-Confederate soldiers, was established on the UH campus in 1956. Intramurals, Songfest and Cougar Christmasland highlight the campus activities of the Sigma Nus. Top socials of the year include the fall Playboy Formal and the spring White Rose Formal, at which time the fraternity sweetheart is named. Sigma Nus membership roster includes many outstanding students who have Won special honors. Sam Goodner, who serves as president of the Student Body, is the recipient of the Outstanding Student Gov- ernment Member Award. Other outstanding members are Bill Lips- comb, president of the Interfraternity Coun- cilg Anthony Kouzounis, president of the graduate classg Norman I ones, president of the junior class and ,lack Gregory, presi- dent of the sophomore class. John Easley is a senator from the School of Technology, and Dan Lubbock serves as moderator of the Presbyterian Student Association. SOMETHING TO BE PROUD of are the many trophies the Sigma Nus have collected. Admiring part of the collection are Bern Allen, Sam Wood, Olle Lorehn and Bob Hammann. A SYMBOL OF BROTHERHOOD is proudly displayed in the Sigma Nu Crest. Looking at the crest are Norman Jones, Bill Brogdon, John McCaskill, Jack Arnold, Bob Mosby, Gary Cooper and Ron Stewart. 1 'li - u " 1 E ,S 240 Greeks GATHERING IN THE RECREATION ROOM ofthe fraternity house is a favorite pastime of all the SIGMA NU SWEETHEART, Bobbie Hainline, is members. Enioying this particular moment are Gary Cooper, Buddy Hood, Paul Schoenfielcl, and Ron presented at the White Rose Formal. Stewart. THERE'S ALWAYS TIME for a brief social session outside the fraternity house. Taking part in this one are Sam Goodner, Kenny Kethcm, Charles Knapp and George Roepke, sponsor. HIGHLIGHTS OF THE YEAR are captured in the Sigma Nu scrapbook. Recalling these moments are Dan Lubbock, Jack Gregory, Dale Kelly and A Bill Barrow. 24I igma Phi Epsilon 1 he .I-if ff W ey .Y T I OFFICERS John Greene, treasurer, Darrell Morris, historian- Herbert LaMair advisor- Maur Cor 1 1 1 Y P, vice-president, Bill Walters, secretary, Leonard Lee, president. CAMPUS ACTIVITIES BRING HONORS Sigma Phi Epsilon finds that participating in campus activ- ities can be very rewarding. Besides having a part in Greek Week, Cougar Christmasland and intramurals, the Sig Eps win honors by taking first place in the Greek Songfest corn- petition. Founded in 1901, the fraternity's primary objective is to take the prospective college man who is interested in the frater- nity and make of him a well-rounded individual. Philanthropies of Sigma Phi Epsilon include support of three boys, camps and the Texas Childrenis Hospital. Top Sig Ep social of the year is the Queen of Hearts Ball, at which time the fraternity sweetheart is announced. Outstanding members of the fraternity include Sonny Moore, charter member of Spirits, and John Bork, recipient of the Clifford B. Scott Memorial Scholarship Key. ff .v,r-. SIGMA PHI EPSlLON'S TROPHIES are highly cherished by members and pledges of the fraternity. Bob Pfister olusts off one of the collection for 242 John Bork and Clay Moore, while Ed Heath and Len George wait their turn forthe clustcloth. wgrg ii: 6 'V 'W I '1 l ffifa. tv' - "'x53Ei?:gg:::f:::: ' ' 1 W. K2 A l Mjrfl' f ... ., IIU Q V X., W.. ,, , Q I .wif V ? -. x 5. 'if' 'I Wf"7f?f 'flux F 'T if ,' 'H 4 A '54 We 3 ,Qu f' ' ' f J' qr jx ,vm 5 .I , ry 'Q R 4 'my-'b "" ,Y. , Omicron Delta KHPPE' THEY HQNOR MALE LEADERS I Omicron Delta Kappa, national leadership fraternity, recognizes junior and senior men who are outstanding leaders in campus activities and in scholarship. Each year ODK sponsors Awards Day, when it honors the Outstanding Freshman Male Student on campus. The group also strives to bring together faculty members and the student body through campus discussion groups. CHECKING the Dean's List are ODK officers Dr. Ban Henderson, sec.-treas.g Jim Perdue, vice- pres. and Louis Patronella, pres. BUSILY PLANNING the schedule for Awards Day are Omicron Delta Kappa members Ernie Robert, Finis Welch, Pat Clohessy, Al Lawrence, Marc Grossberg, Jerry Mize cmd John Becker. Phi Theta Kappa PTK PUBLISHES STUDENT INDEX E Members of Phi Theta Kappa, national honorary scholastic society, spend many hours at the start of the fall semester compiling the Student Directory. Proceeds from a campus-wide directory sale send three members to Sheridan, Wyo- ming, for the national PKT convention. Each semester the society takes in new pledges. The grade requirement for initia- tion is 3.2, while members must keep a 3.0 overall average. During November the 50-member group holds a reception to initiate its fall pledges. The yearis biggest event is the Spring Ban- quet, when spring pledges are initiated. In May Phi Theta Kappa undertakes a new project by sponsoring a campus- wide literary discussion. SPRING INITIATES include C. Urquhart, H. Layne, M. Horwitz, B. Berger, J. Yeo, J. Groves, M. Tadlock, L. Fuller, W. Jones, J. Hadid and V. Gilbreth. 244 H onoraryi AN ODK DISCUSSION can take place anywhere, even in the hall of the Ezekiel W. Cullen Building. Participating are Buddy Grierson, James McRoy, Dr. T. C. Sinclair, Eugene Cook, Edmond Corley, Anthony Germani, John McClarty, Charles Roxburgh, Jim Boyd, Sam Goodner and Barlow Simmons. MEMBERS are D. Barker, D. McGilvray, F. Putnam, R. Avery, L. Scott, O. Welch, J. Matthews, C. Krpec, M. Fletcher, H. Reinhardt and J. Pierce. 11 OFFICERS Front Row: J. Buchanan, nat'l. sec., R. Butts, hist., F. Bakenhus, treas., L. Shira, vice-pres., B. Hensley, pres. Second Row: J. Rosa, spon- sor, J. Josephson, delegate, B. Barnes, sec., R. Garcia, rep. Back Row: R. McMichael, D. Gates, N. Weaver. 245 Band Iii it ii r E!! 1 i HIGH-STEPPING maiorettes precede the Cougar marching band at all home games and many out- of-town games as well. Brenda Rayman, Glynnene LePhiew, Marilyn Holub, Marsha Daigle and Linda Raymond are directed by head twirler Billie Schneider. Chorus and Ofchestfa Music GROUP ARE Acnvf UNDER THE DIRECTION of Dr. Merrill Lewis, the UH Chorus performs in the Ezekiel Cullen Auditorium. Open to all students who wish to join, the chorus performs In addition, the chorus combines with the Houston Sym- at all University of Houston religious programs and presents phony Orchestra and Chorale this year in the presentation of two joint concerts with the orchestra each year. Belshazhafs Feast and also performs at various civic events. 246 W wr ' 1 ' ' 1' 12 . - ' 1 . ' f , 9 -. if , gg J v F11 gy '1 .V Q 1 3 " ' .. . M.: '75 A " 'G ax f "1-if!5"liY 1 L4 1? 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Nl lgk JJ. -' -Lp ,H - L Q ,qv k 1 'A ff fn x Ag 'Q LM 4 r I , gt' rx,-Exif" gi sq-. jig ,X If -.g - it -9 if 6. A465 , ' U ' . xf"Wm :lin '39-' 'id tt Ji' nb N' X Q QP ' :fi " , VA ix" X Fylfu ' 1 E MT A 3 ' ' I P JFK yy N 55' ff ' I M", '-,K Zin. Lp , V Li x Q4 F XfQ AY i, F f 4 X ' -1 ff ' 1,9 W, 49 Lff?iL'2j J V V xy.. U. -,. . T-is -. aug lima "-A. 1 if 1 .ff-X 'y ff I5 ',....'f l N' , - 'Q' .1 yffl' f . 1 W .4f' 1 - wsu'-J-A -,iilg 4 f - fx f,..,, .. Wg-ui. D Y- .Fi " . Alpha Delta Sigma Gamma A1Ph-H Chi GRouPs PROMOTE TRUTH uv BIG PLANS ore in store for Alpha Delta Sigma, men's advertising fraternity. Seated at the drawing board working on an advertising layout are Ron Rivenbark, treasurer, Tim Alban, president and Al Vela, vice-president. Other members making suggestions are Pat Coakley, R. J. Bucta, Vic Kopy- cinski, Ray Mensel, John Gehbauer, secretary, Billy I. Ross, sponsor and Robert Levitz. Red Masque Players THESPIANS PERFORM FOR FUN AND FAME An annual Awards Banquet highlights the year's activities of the Red Masque Players, a name which is synonymous with the dramatic art. At this banquet, awards are presented to those members voted best actor, best ac- tress, best director, best technical male, best technical female, best supporting actor and best supporting actress. All University of Houston students who are interested in any phase of drama are eligible for membership in the Red Masque Playersq Members participate in many campus ac- tivities. Bill Dooley, president of the or- ganization and a charter member of Spirits, this year directs Cougar Capers, the all- campus variety show. 248 ADS Alpha Delta Sigma's motto "Bridging the gap between advertising education and the advertising business" reflects the group's purpose. In order to bridge the gap, ADS mem- bers work on projects with alumni and ad- vertising agencies. The group also features outstanding men in the field at its regular meetings. One of the busiest groups on campus, the men's advertising fraternity co-sponsors Ad Week and a regional ADS-GAX meet- ing. Other projects include the Houston Advertising Forum and the installation of a new chapter at Texas A81M. Four members attend this year's national convention in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where Tim Alban is elected national vice- president, the highest student-held office. K Drama j USING A LADDER as their basic prop, William Dooley and Cora Nell Siorgren give fellow Red Masque Players an interpretative presentation. Reacting with varying degrees of interest and en- thusiasm are Sylvia Griffin, Roy O'Valle, Mary Osborne, Sam MorQOf'f Ron Gumlf CCII'0l BFOWGF, Jim Smith and Lou Thomas. Standing are June Line and fC1CUllY advisors David l-Gfson and Robert Lowery. ADVERTISING GAX To promote truth and service in adver- tising is the primary purpose of Gamma Alpha Chi. Founded at the University of Missouri in 1920, Gamma Alpha Chi is the only national advertising fraternity for women. Gamma Alpha Chi gives women students contact with workers in the advertising world and furnishes them with undergrad- uate experience in advertising. These objectives are achieved by initiat- mg honorary professional members, co sponsormg N3T1OHHl Advertising Week at tending national convention and partlclpa mg IH local events Membership 1n Gamma Alpha Chl IS op en to any woman student who IS studying advertlslng or a related fleld such as jour nahsm, radio tv, art marketing or business Kappa Delta P1 EDUCATORS GATHER as Dolrece Camp serves Clara S Carlton Joyce Mohr Dr Helen Bottrell Martha Danlel and Molly Goodman , ffffw 1 we 61251, f HV 5 I fssdtti ' thi is Professional fAdv.j 5- 3 ,uf . .. Y iQ fm' .b 1? ,,.l NATIONAL ADVERTISING WEEK calls for months of preparation by members of Gamma Alpha Chr Makmg decorations for the ADS GAX sponsored Advertnsmg Week Banquet are Joan Garrett treasurer Marne Davnd Rochelle Mellon Cathy Young and June Dommy Inspectmg the work are Nancy West Kathy Younger presldent Gayle Smrley vnce presuclent Bully I Ross sponsor Avns Ross and honorary professional members Isabel Vestal Alice Rogers Lou Letts and Vrrgmua Hurlbert flilclucattonl TEACHERS RECEIVE HONCRS Founded in 1911 Kappa Delta P1 15 a natlonal professional honor society for teachers and prospective teachers Its motto, Knowledge, Duty and Power symbolizes the ideals of the largest coeducatlonal honor society in the United States X 'v 11,523 xml? ,Q ,X fa fir F lf ,pl-. JA ISI "-3r:"'t, A l 1 uVtjwrNf Va 'x 5' r -'dit I' '5'gsT 'H-'53 I PVRQJ QW A ...i ,nf gr-f X- 8' 249 J c n I . I. l C - - . . , 9 ' I l I 1 1 ' ' ' ' ' ' t. , , ' : 1 - 2 - , 1 V V I . V . I . . V I . . V , . . n . 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'L's if "'l:Q3gl1l.f"'3 l X .. -Il 455 H- 1 ' fi-:Yi , Y , 1 1 f ,x. If It , , U5 qu f - V-. WM' s -I ir l N yx- A, I, Ie E+-3 x 4. M,-1 J I, , .- ,V if ' :J K . -'f ' 5 V. I qi- .1 Ni, XE A 1 -fi -Ag-,-, , xg, I 'N A :L 1 xiii f . M. W--'V' S if X 1 ff ' 1 fa ,- "T- " ff , . .051 L R lb-'nl 5 fr., V ,ng-5" N , fic - Er- x II E' 16 - " 1- A A i Y mf- -- --p- q -'Q 'F 0 0 v 1 1 , Q -ri . . .q.,..,.,-.- Tait HL 1 .115 x i uk gk 15 1 - Professional -11-2 5:-1 14-74 EDUCATION is the main topic of discussion for Student Education Associa- tion symposium members Ada Marcus, Bill Heaton, Ricia Fox, Howard Hayes, Ray Chalmers, James Collins, Carolyn Grisbee, Mary Briner and X Hillary Williams. INDUSTRlAL ARTS education students examine an electric bench saw. Pictured are Delbert Holmes, A. L. Chovanec, Prentiss Crowe, Earl Harlan, Bill James, Elroy Gold, Ernest Atsinger and Dennis Reidmiller. l PLEASURES of student teaching are enumerated by Bill Heaton for the , benefit of fellow education students. Front Row: Linda Kelly, Carolyn Langford, Barbara Daftin. Back Row: Bill Crockett, Deanna King, Dorothy Harriman, Arnold Elledge. Society of Accountants Through an active program of educa- tional activities, the University of Houston Society of Accountants attempts to ac- quaint its members With the work they will be doing in the business world. Accounting students who are members -of the society gain experience and knowl- edge transmitted by those who have al- ready practiced their trade. Guest speakers, including prominent certified public accountants, are provided for regular meetings of the Society of Ac- countants. Field trips to industries constitute an- other phase of the society's educational program. This year, in addition to visiting various accounting firms, members view a demonstration of a new complete data processing system. Omicron Chi Epsilon ACCOUNTING STUDENTS GAIN In addition, the group makes efforts to solicit scholarships in accounting for those members of the society who have shown outstanding ability and interest in the field. Outstanding members of the society in- clude Arthur Crutchfield, secretary of the Student Education Association and Eugene Cook, president of the Forensic Society. SOLVING ACCOUNTING problems is routine work for officers Robert Sims, vice-pres., Dr. Samuel Woolsey, sponsor, Eugene Cook, pres., David Blomstrom, treas. and Dr. Howard Daniels, sponsor. GROUP HONORS TOP ECONOMISTS MEMBERS AND OFFICERS of Omicron Chi Epsilon include Lee Kiser, secretary, Dr. Ervin Zingler, sponsor, Robert Brown, president and Willard Mertz, treasurer. Standing are members William Strevig, James Wright, Dr. John P. Owen, Dr. John N. Fry, Irwin Urbantke, Norman F. Byers, Donald Lanning, Marion Rotramel, Dr. Joel W. Sailors, Jerome M. Peschke, Byron Brown, Frank B. May, Dr. Bernard G. Brown and Dr. Henry C. Chen. 252 Omicron Chi Epsilon is a national hon- or society in economics. Its purpose is to confer recognition for outstanding work by economics students on both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Membership in the society is based upon election. The requirements are a 3.4 aver- age in economics courses with either a major or minor in economics. FIRST HONORARY member of Omicron Chi Ep- silon is Dr. James A. Byrd. Professional I F inance 2 USEFUL KNOWLEDGE I A FINANCIAL REPORT, of interest and importance to every student of accounting, is examined and discussed by Society of Accountants mem- bers Tommy McElhinney, Gary T. Barnett, Paul W. Mugnier cmd Paul LeRoy McCormack. Economics and F lnance I SPEAKERS AND TRIPS AID FINANCE GROUP P To stimulate interest and advanced study in the fields of economics and fi- nance at local, national and world levels is the purpose of the Economics and Fi- nance Association of the university. These objectives are achieved through providing speakers from all fields of ac- tivity, with particular emphasis on the areas of economics and finance. In addition, the Economics and Finance Association provides films and field trips relating to various aspects of general and special interest in the areas of economics and finance. Donut and coffee socials throughout the school year assist in helping members to become better acquainted. ACCOUNTING STUDENTS soon discover that college textbooks can be an invaluable source of information. Pictured are Bobby Kay, Steve Gor- don and Edward Rutledge. SPONSOR Dr. Henry C. Chen has the attention of all Economics and Finance Association mem- bers. Seatecl are William Strevig, Irwin Urbantke, Lee Kiser, president, Harvey Lieberman, treas- urer, Kent Adams, parliamentarian and Robert Brown. Standing are John Vanlngen, Donald Lan- ning, Marion Rotramel, Dr. Ervin Zingler, Byron Brown, Frank May, Willard Mertz and Carl John- ston. Through this program, the group hopes to afford a greater understanding of past and current events since such events may affect individual and collective activities. Outstanding members of the Economics and Finance Association include Lee Kiser, secretary of Omicron Chi Epsilon and Kent Adams, vice-president of Delta Nu Alpha. 253 Kappa lpha u KAM PICTURES CAMPUS EVENTS Almost every picture in the Cougar and the Houstonian is the work of a member of Kappa Alpha Mu, national coeducational photojournalism fraternity. KAM members also shoot pictures for groups on campus, thus providing these groups with a service while the photog- raphers receive practical training. This year the group establishes the Mrs. Rosella H. Werlin Outstanding Member Award, with President Mike Weingart re- ceiving the honor. KAM's aims are to promote scholarship, interest and ability among photojournalists and to bring student photographers and professionals together for a better under- standing of the photography field. J ALL EYES FOCUS on President Mike Weingart as he gives a few hints on photography. KAM members are lforegrouncli James Gaston, Ross Strader, sponsor, Kathy Younger, historian, Mildred Hicks, secretary, Millie Duelberg, Dana Donsky, Mike Cook and Larry Newman. Delta Theta Phi LAW GROUP STRESSES GRADES STUDY is the most important word in the vocabu- lary of Delta Theta Phi pledges Jim Mahon, Tom Burns, Morton Look, Teddy White, Norman Nunn, James Weir, Leroy Shoemaker and John Boswell. In 1953 the UH chapter of Delta Theta Phi, national professional law fraternity, was established. The fraternity is a charter senior member of the Professional Inter- fraternity Conference, was organized in 1928 to encourage high scholarship, profes- sional research, advancement of professional ethics and the promotion of a spirit of comity among professional fraternities. Delta Theta Phi's primary objectives are to encourage academic accomplishment among its members, to bring together men of common purpose who regard the prac- tice of law as an activity worthy of the highest human endeavor, to promote the continuing relationship between students and alumnus and to engage in social func- tions. Outstandjng members include Charles Nester, Robert Breaux, Charles Baker, Roy Rogers, Lou Carroll and Enrique Pena, who are all members of Order of the Barons, an honorary legal scholastic society. Social events of the year include a Christmas dance, a ranch party and a cock- tail party. Professional Uouj -. Theta i ma Phi g woMEN RAISE STANDARDS Promoting interest and upgrading stand- ards in journalism are purposes of Theta Sigma Phi, women's journalism fraternity. Members of Theta Sig attend the Ladies of the Press Breakfast where they honor Cathy Young as Outstanding Member. The group sponsors two talks on journalism during the Civil War to create community interest. At its annual Matrix Dinner Theta Sig honors a professional as Newswoman of the Year. The group also presents a local student as Texas High School Newswoman of the Year. Service projects for this organization in- clude sending medical magazines to China. Founded at the University of Missouri in 1909, Beta Epsilon chapter of Theta Sig has been on the UH campus since 1950. -W:-g-' DISCUSSING BUSINESS during a regular Theta Sigma Phi meeting are Sada Lou Stone, Gayle Smiley, pledge, Cathy Young, Bruce Underwood, sponsor, Meredith Trube, president, Kathy Younger, Carol Underwood and Jane Frederick, treasurer. Professional fliawl DIGNIFIED AND FORMAL are the officers of Delta Theta Phi. Included in the solemn gathering are J. Mullins, master of ritual, W. Brackett, bailiff, W. Morse, vice-dean, J. Gough, advisorp F. Ginther, deang E. Pena, tribune, C. Walker, advisor and J. Maida, exchequer. MANY HOURS are spent in the law library. Seated at a meeting are R. Keen, J. Davis, O. Jerden, C. Nester and J. Knox. Standing are P. Murphy, R. Rogers, P. Cyphers, E. 'Minor, C. Baker, B. Hooks, J. Kay, L. Fredrickson, R. Bradshaw, R. Breaux and R. Flesman. - Phi Delta Phi fLawl LAWYERS PROMOTE ETHICS BONING UP for a moot trial are Phi Delta Phi members Travis Johnson, Stan Binion, Ian Calvert, Irving Drake, Manford Haxton and Bob Hogan. l Phi Delta Phi, legal fraternity, promotes 1 scholarship and legal ethics, as well as fellowship between its members and prac- ticing lawyers. Another purpose of the group is to 'create a greater admiration of the legal profession in the public eye. PR V GOOD LUCK next year, beams John Brukner, out- going magister, as he gives a tirm handshake to the new magister, Richard Rorschach. Retailin Club SPONSOR Herman Garrett talks to members of the Retailing Club. First Row: S. Garrett, D. Beasley, D. Heaton, G. Meriman, C. Prouse, N. Anderson, T. Gillan. Second Row: L. Flournoy, R. Mosley, P. Ochoa, J. Kilgore, S. Wherley, L. Stone, V. Laney. ti ...su as tr Mn x iz. in l ce n t , s tt RETAILING STUDENTS GAIN PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE Members of the Downtown School's Retailing Club gain prac- tical experience in professional retailing and wholesaling through their Working arrangement with local businesses. ln this way the group's members learn self-reliance and more about service selling. 256 Promoting community and student interest in the field of re- tailing is this semi-professional organization's chief objective. Members of the group also advertise the Institute of Retailing at the Downtown School by talking with high school students and instructors. American Marketin Assn. AMA MAKES CONTACTS WITH PROFESSIONALS A professional organization composed of students interested in marketing, the Ameri- can Marketing Association gives its mem- bers an opportunity to hear outstanding speakers and to develop contacts with pro- fessionals in marketing. Dinner meetings with the local business- men's chapter of AMA creates an oppor- tunity for the student chapter to make con- tacts with professionals and to gain a better understanding of the field. Members of the group participate in the annual Student Marketing Day which en- ables them to observe local marketing op- erations in progress. Each year in May the group on campus holds a banquet. Although this is the Retailing Club's first year in existence, it has several achievements on its record. An advisory board composed of mem- bers of the group promotes student interest in higher education in ,retailing by serv- ing as counsel for high schools throughout the state. The local group stresses to high school students the importance of self- reliance and individuality, as well as prac- tical experience. Another way the club promotes retailing is through its displays at the Downtown School. Semi-annual meetings with local professionals give the group's members a better understanding of retailing and wholesaling. RETAILING CLUB president Tom Jones writes down ideas for possible talks to high school students. Giving suggestions are Bob Mclntyre, senatorf Larry Jones, representative and Tom Bowersox, vice-president. Professional fMk1:.j DISCUSSING A WELL-KNOWN book GFS AMA members Mickey Crawford, president: Jane Buchanan, secretaryp tbock row? William Koby, sponsor: Ronald Rivenback and Dr. John R. Young, sponsor. Professional fMkt.j :-f fi 'S 257 Pre-Medical PI-e'Dem1 THEY TRAIN FUTURE DOCTORS PROMINENT MEDICAL MEN frequently speak before members of the Joe Littleton, Robert Friedmann, Joe Avilla, Nancy Solito, Marie Graham, society. Pictured are Claude Draper, Fenella James, Carle Mayhew, Jim Scherer, Quentin Gensler and Jon Ryan. Optometric oeiet OFFICERS R. McDonald, treas., C. MccLaughlin, soc. chrm., C. Neese, vice-pres., R. Harworth, sgt.-at-arms, H. Liggett, sec., D. Browne, pres. 258 GROUP INFORMS PUBLIC OF SPECIAL EYE NEEDS Representing students in the College of Optometry, the Optometric Society serves as an educator that keeps the public informed regarding the care of the eyes. It does this through the total vision care program of the College of Optometry and a visual screening facility that is available to the public. In order that students in optometry might know what ad- vances the profession is making, the group provides educational speakers for its student body, both in optometry and also in related fields. In addition, the organization encourages and sponsors stu- dents who Wish to attend local, state and national professional conventions and assemblies. Social activities of the Optometric Society include a Christ- mas Dance and a spring picnic. The group also sponsors an athletic team which takes an active part in university intra- mural sports. Service projects include visual surveys for the university and for local public schools. For the convenience and pleasure of all optometry students, the society maintains a student lounge in the basement of the Science Building, home of the College of Optometry. Promoting efforts to increase greater knowledge and interest in medical science is the purpose of the Pre-Medical, Pre- Dental Society. Through demonstrations, visiting lecturers and discussions, the organization accomplishes its aim. By visiting the various medical and dental schools in this area, the society intro- duces its members to their operation. Another activity of the group is a scholarship fund which annually provides scholarships for pre-medical and pre-dental students. Although social events are of secondary nature to the group, it has a New Yearis Eve party, a spring beach party, several luncheons and an annual May Banquet at the Doctors' Club. fit-Q Professional I M edical LT LISTENING to president Alan Rosen's explana- tion are Harold Yeary, rec. sec., Melton Hor- witz, rep., Miki Davis, social chairman, Seymour Bauer, vice-pres., Ellsworth Stewart, treas. and Robert Engel, corres. sec. MEMBERS Shirley Amass, Neil Boll, Harriet Bayer, Desmond Grant, Marvin Brenner, Barry Madden, Edward Kopinitz and Christine Goodwin listen attentively to a lecture in biology class. CLASSMATES listen to R. Harwerth. First Row: D. Dickey, E. Libel, M. Treadwell, M. Weintraub, C. Cooper, R. Diefenbaugh. Second Row: M. Schroeder, C. Burgat, L. Burnstein, J. Blackburn, L. Stranch, J. Shaw, J. Young, C. Quebedeau. Third Row: S. Cox, F. Hartin, P. Darrow, R. Swift, H. Sticksel, H. Yocham, R. Peterson, C. Stephens, J. Tucker, C. Russell, M. Webb, B. Sansing, L. Godley. RECEIVING INSTRUCTIONS are, First Row: B. Flesch, E. Nossaman, A. Daily, L. Brenner, J. Vaughn. Second Row: O. Miracle, H. Codianne, D. Bradley, L. Love, A. Valdes, N. Reber, L. Becnel. Third Row: B. Russell, J. Parsons, B. Bau- Q scher, B. Baldwin, J. Shields, J. Piper, L. Lands- man. Fourth Row: M. Levy, S. Webb, O. Mur- ray, J. Newell, J. McAllister, A. Clevenger, G. Lipshy, T. Heard. . L Lan ard Club me WOM EN PROMOTE PHYSICAL EDUCATION Lanyard Club, an organization for Wom- en physical education majors, attempts to further the activities of the physical educa- tion department and also to offer oppor- tunities for experience to women physical education majors. As a minor function, the club attempts to stimulate intramural activities among campus organizations and better develop personal skills among the club's personnel. Outstanding Lanyard Club members in- clude Billie Schneider, Dian Doyen and Lynda Moore, finalists for Homecoming Queen, Martha Manly, UH Sun Bowl representative and Lynda Moore, Vanity Fair Beauty and Outstanding Student. LANYARD CLUB OFFICERS are Grace Everitt, treasurer, Linda, Hill, secretary, Mrs. Rosann Cox, sponsor, Lynda Moore, vice-president, Miss Elizabeth Closs, sponsor and Barbara Pring, president. arsity H Q 316' A A A , " s' V ' cg' ,Q"as,'i'1 awk tl Ii ii, Y 'Sf' an y ,wliil ,MM .N fri' V it 41,-'41 i 14' tr.-fl MWA iii fH':,' ' ' 5f'1,iH1f,56'i r - jfs?-54 'asa J, ,1 SITTING on a Cougarland bench watching all the girls ga by are Varsity "H" officers Don Mullins, president, Charlie Berry, vice-president and Bill Brown, social chairman. 260 V. ,, 1 I vt fi -.. - if - 'aria ' 'i l TRACKMAN Al Lawrence changes character as he exhibits a football to John Semian, Barrie Almond, Charlie Rieves and Richard Berry. Q0 rl" 0 ,M ' iq - . ' ' fir ., QS' in ., + fx ' I" AVNV .1 V, J x W K., .Q get -fam? 'XZ-1 JW V' .rf ' ,- -. f .1 li ily - ,' .H '35 .4 I Q! , .5 X144 1 'J 'ui '31 - ' mf 11-'4 'F L. 1 q-V - I -fs C 1, wg- s ' A .Qi z 1 ' If ..-W. H J ' B 1 , if-N Pnl . ,Ive , 4' 0. I 'qiiw' 15 J x 4 5 'H' Q., In " :gb ' i 1 1 ,H F S if 'Eff ,fn , W V. . I Ni! fag K. .ws 'lu :Nw Qi- K . ' F' 'if A F911 ' . 'fa .A, , , , . vf 1. - 1 W 'sa E .H fi 1- 141-1 ,Mi . 4,w , ur ' L 5 W wirfhqffv 1, Q,-iff! I 'Q 'A' 2151: 4 X -I ' . P ,. f-' N, itll. X Ipha Epsilon Rho DISCUSSING CAMERA Techniques are Michael Daspit, parliamentariany Dr. Patrick Welch, spon- sor, Pat Jones, reporter, Cathy Mobley, president and Charles Johnston, vice-president. i ,V READY WITH a stop watch and a studio clock, associate members George Collins, associate pro- fessor and art director, Beth Potter, office man- ,- ager, Dr. Tom C. Battin, professor and Jack Veres, KUI-IT staff, make sure the program is on time. Forensic UH DEBATERS TAKE A STAND . . . I I I.. 'I TAKING the negative side, Forensic members 7 Jerry Doherty and Marc Grossberg 'listen atten- TAKING TIME BETWEEN classes to stop by the Trophy cases to admire some of the trophies that 1-ively 10 the qffirmgfive 5ide'5 persuasive view- Forensic members have won are Jim Perdue, Norman Carnahan and Arthur Crutchfield. points, 262 ' Professional Iliad.-TVI .- GRADES ZOOM INTO ATTENTION Dedicated to promoting interest in the field of radio and television, Alpha Epsilon Rho encourages and recognizes outstanding college radio and television students who maintain a high scholastic average. Established in 1957, Alpha Phi chapter of AERho limits its membership to radio-tv majors of sophomore or above classifica- tion who have a B average in radio-tv courses and a C overall average. Alpha Epsilon Rho serves as host to the Texas Speech Association. In addition the group holds a spring picnic for the radio-tv department and a party each semester for new students in the department. This year AERho initiated a depart- mental Awards Banquet and began a schol- arship fund. PRO OR CON UNCAPPING A CAMERA for another KUHT telecast is Bill Newsom, as Tony Meliado, B. E. Buschardt, Kathy Younger, Brad Wilkinson, Herb Huls and Jimmy Dee Fore watch attentively. K S peech j "WS-nu-"iii-swung.,-. K ---'91ss1-- I i"u-me---. . .. . ---.,.-,-.e .q...,. --?--.. Y- Qi-ur .-.,,-W -- g .: lu- """'--ng-.....g.. . "Fl 'i:1i,,,!E-s!-!'- ll Hhtgilevmqgy. we--iw-gm - A GIVING SMILING approval of his teammate's debate, Russel Stanley listens while Shirley Ross practices for another important tournament. DEBATE PLANS are being discussed by officers Carmen Stallings, secretory-treasurer, Emerson Turner, vice-president, Jack Gravlee, debate coach and Eugene Cook, president. Public speaking is child's play to members of the Forensic Society, an organization of students interested in speech and competitive speech events. Debaters and fast talkers find a good outlet for their abilities in the Forensic Society. The purpose of the group is to foster the development of public speaking and debating skills. Members participate in debating, oratorial, public speaking, and extemporaneous speaking events throughout the nation. 263 Diesel Club DIESEL CLUB SEEKS JOBS Propeller Club and Delta Nu Alpha STOPPING FOR A MOMENT'S PAUSE during their trip aboard a Dr. J. E. Becht, J. Marquez, K. Adams, Dr. H. Chen, S. Ishiguro, Bayard. Members standing in back are E. Hendrix, F. Jinkins, J. Hurry, V. Engberg, C. Houston, T. Seman, A. Presley, T. McGinnis, In fulfilling its purpose of promoting job opportunities for diesel graduates, the Diesel Club publishes a brochure each semester listing qualifications of each graduating member. Sending the brochures to more than 500 prospective employers brings worthwhile results for the club's members. Meeting bi-weekly the club features speakers from professional groups. Field trips to local industries supplement class- room work and group meetings. During October and November Diesel Club members spend many hours building a Homecoming float with Phi Mu sorority. CHECKING the parts of a diesel .engine are Sid Dover, vice-president, O. O. Stotts, co-sponsor, H. K. Whittington, co-sponsor and Phillip Spitz, president. tanker are D. Hoelscher, R. Kirscke, W. McDaniel, J. Elliott and H. Brieger, W. Holmes, F. Bartle, W. C. Chou, B. Reid and E. Rutledge. Q Y.-.. 264 Eg:-43' ' A 4-. Professional I Tech. Q . X A CAR'S DIESEL ENGINE provides interesting educational material for Murrhee, O. O. Stotts, sponsor and Bill Goldman. Diesel Club members Richard Johnson, L. L. Fuller, Elroy Gold, Jimmy MERGER WORKS WELL FOR TRADE GROUPS This year Delta Nu Alpha and the Propellor Club merge to share activities and members. Advancing transportation and foreign trade is the new organization's purpose. The group strives to provide its members with activities to reveal the practical side of the field. Among these activities are frequent field trips to local shipyards, the Houston Ship Channel and Monterrey, Mexico. Educational films on transportation and guest speakers add to Delta Nu Alpha and Propellor Club meetings. The group's main social function is a Christmas Banquet. Members of local professional chapters assist the group by providing scholarships and serving as speakers. Through activities with members of the professional chapters, UH students become better acquainted with the business side of the field. I Trans. I X .1 ENGROSSED IN A BRIEFING SESSION are Kent Adams, vice-president, Earl Rutledge, president and Glenn Glash, treasurer. 265 Writing l CRITICIZE WRITINGS i Through membership in the Writer's Club, student authors have an opportunity to meet with others interested in creative writing, to read and criticize manuscripts ' and to participate in stimulating discus- sions in a social atmosphere. '. l. In promoting fellowship among writers, the Writeris Club works closely with the Harvest, the University of Houston student literary anthology. Each May members of the club assist in the sale of the Harvest, and Harvest editors are usually elected from within the membership of the club. Club activities include meetings where manuscripts are read and discussed. 4,5 MANY MEMBERS' works appear in the Harvest. Finding familiar names are officers Alyce LaRue, sec., Marc Grossberg, vice-pres., Nelda Younger, pres. and Leon Hirsch, treas. AGENDA for a meeting includes the discussion of various works. Liter- ning poet, George Garrett and Nelda Younger. ary critics include Light Bailey, Richard Wilbur, a Pulitzer Prize win- 1 -' 3' ' ii ' ' l 1- l - 'i " U ! Y 5 , 1 if - . i X . iii l uf w..:" ,, Z is ,H 266 Writer's Club 4 UH STUDENT AUTHORS i rummnnl Publications .. PAPER KEEPS UH INFORMED SPRING TERM BRINGS EDITORIAL CHANGES Wlth the begmnmn of the sprlng mester comes a new edltor and a new format for the Cougar gar artlcles rangmg from a survey on the food quallty ln the Oberholtzer Hall cafe ter1a to PUIJIICIILY and mformauon concern mg the Koobraey Ball ,lommg ln the LH flght for state ald the Cougar sends reporters to AUSt1H for firsthand mforrnatron Almost every lssue contams news concernmg the progress of our b1d for full state support Servmg as Couga1 sprmg edltor IS Ed wene Games An expenencecl Journahst, Edwene IS presldent of Theta Slgma Phl an Outstandmg Student a member of Gamma Alpha Chl and the Wrlter s Club Edwene Games, Sprmg Editor r . ' -1, 'TE' 2,- 11 ss1fs3?is :L I 2:14 ,,r1s,r1s,r 19t5.:'-Mizz" Q X . Whether you're looking for news about greeks, pohtxcs, fashrons or sports, you can fmd lt ln the Cougqr Publlshed each Thursday by students of the journahsm department, the newspaper g1VCS complete coverage of act1v1t1es on the Cougar cam us L1st1ng all of Cathy Youngs act1v1t1es would flll an entire ed1t1on of the Cougar The newspaper s energetrc fall ed1tor serves as presldent of Chl Omega, VICC presldent of the semor class and for the second consecutlve year IS named an Out standlng Student An enthus1ast1c supporter of all UH ac t1v1t1es, Cathy 1S on the Fronuer Flesta Student Faculty Comm1ttee and the Home commg Comm1ttee Through her edxtorrals, she attempts to 1nst1ll 111 tl1e student body her own st1ong scl1ool sp1r1t Cathy Young, Fall Edltor En- QUICK lm ml 910 ld ha iq. fkblltidhiibuvlb nm- n-4 nv., ll K l U IH 1. ! LII sq' X .559 IQIIIHIH R231 v-. X mr 267 ' . . . C l . f ,U , ' , ,111 1' "' ,H I , . . , . . . ,, 1. 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L h ,r I - - I ,fa if .3423 ' :J , ' ' ' N-:c 1 sz .I I. ll .7 7' pry' iff l I ' -A 5" l"l1w 11 'Z' ' " . - - 1 1 4, , 1 V71-f X at 1 , , I D M' V- - fam at 1' .Y . :.: . i If ig I if - I x P - - . . Y ,...- 1-L . .Q 73" ft A N' ,I Q, 45, I 1 . Q . . 2 xg!" 1225 gfijx? ' zxfg - r , ., ' yt. ' 15' 1 I I ' - f - ., 559. 1, ,. f A 2 , ' - ' - i .23 M, ' . n L -:ig NEWS, ADVERTISING DIVIDE STAFF sf si FALL SEMESTER Advertising Manager Jan Douglas Norris checks an ad to be placed in the Cougar. STAFF WORKS HARD Combining journalistic ability with par- ticipation in campus activities, members of the Cougar staff go out each week to gather all news that might be of interest to students and faculty of the university. Staff members are selected each semes- ter by the editor. i CONCENTRATION is essential tor the Cougar's assistant News Editor Carolyn Terry. 268 ll ll pnuu- g it lllll ll - t'G' BUSILY PHONING prospective clients is Tim Alban, spring Advertising Manager ot the Cougar. SPECIAL SECTIONS AID ADVERTISER Advertising is the backbone of all mass communications media. Without advertise- ments, media could not exist. This holds true for college newspapers such as the Cougar. Advertising managers spend hour after hour soliciting ads, writing copy and preparing dummies. Creativity is not lacking in Cougar advertising. Two issues of the paper contain special sections-a summer vacation travel guide for UH students and a pictorial preview of Cougar Capers. A TYPICAL MONDAY in the Cougar ottice finds statt m e m b e r s Bob Gammage, Johnny Heard and John Rainey hard at work. lg QE I: 5 'JW Ross Shader, Editorial Advisor As editorial advisor to both the Cougar and the Houstonian, Ross Strader Works closely with editors of the two publica- tions formats, themes and editorial con- tents. UH CORRESPONDENT WRITES ON POLITICS Capable Millie Duelberg, an experi- enced worker in student publications, serves the Cougar as managing editor dur- ing the fall semester and as news editor during the spring. In addition to writing an often-contro- versial political column for the Cougar, Millie is campus correspondent for the Houston Chronicle. WRITER EXCELS WITH A CAMERA Whether he's behind a camera or a typewriter, Mike Weingart is the epitome of a born newspaperman. His electrifying editorials and interesting feature articles classify, him as more than typical. Leading the Cougar as news editor in the fall and managing editor in the spring, Mike leaves no stone unturned in bring- ing complete news coverage to University of Houston students. ADMIRING their works of arf are Cougar staff photographers Larry Newman, James Gaston, Dano Donsky, Millie Duelberg, Mike Cook and Mike Weingarf. nhl'- . ' 2 -1: ..:: Y ' -:ii wa Publications -"F Q I 13 Millie Duellaerg, Managing Ecliior, iall-News Editor, spring l t i K l Rag, ixifrf Z' Milce Weingar'I', News Ecliior, fall-Managing Ediior. spring HOUSTONIAN STAFF RECORDS YEAR'S EVENTS It is shortly after midnight. Evening classes have long been over, students and faculty have gone home and a quiet hush has descended upon Cougarland. The entire campus is shrouded in dark- ness . . . with the exception of one office. Past the architecture building, past the engineering building, past the Cougar of- fice and around the corner . . . one of- fice is still flooded with light. This is the Houstonian office, and within its doors are the people who compose its staff. Often working into the early hours of the morning, Houstonian staff members are always searching for new ideas . . . new concepts in photography . . . new words for writing copy. Presenting to students and faculty the story of a complete year of college life at the University of Houston . . . a story that will live forever in pictures and Words . . . this is the objective of the 1961 Hous- tonian. John T. Gehbauer, Editor Successfully filling the responsible position of Houstonian editor, John Cehbauer not only brings a new format to the yearbook, he also formulates an idea soon to become a tradition at the University of Houston . . . the Koobraey Ball. As editor, John co-ordinates all phases of the Houstonian. An outstanding photog- rapher as well, he is the recipient of Sigma Delta Chiis, national journalism frater- nity, first place award for spot news coverage. YEARBOOK ACTIVITIES ARE VARIED Campuswide events such as Vanity Fair and Outstanding Students are sponsored by the Houstonian, and this year the year-book co-sponsors the Koobraey Ball with Student Government. GOOFING OFF again, Gayle and Kathy are caught in the oct by the Great White Editor. 270 Staff members take to the highways as the Houstonian covers the UH-Alabama game in Tuscaloosa and state support ac- tivities in Austin. Other traveling includes several trips to Dallas to check on yearbook production. Along with the work, members of the Houstonian staff always find time for fun. Just about any occasion is good enough reason to have a party. This may include making a deadline-missing a deadline, ing a quiz-flunking a quiz or any num- ber of other equally important reasons. YOGI BEAR helps editor Gehbauer celebrate his birthday. Decorations: courtesy of staff. wi gl Publications Kathy Younger, Associate Eclitor On the stage of Cullen Auditorium, driving around the city searching for likely spots to take pictures, behind a typewriter pounding out copy . . . these are a few places to try when look- ing for Houstonian Associate Editor Kathy Younger. Kathy serves the Houstonian as coordinator of Vanity Fair, exchange editor, photographer and Copywriter for the college life and organizations sections. ADVISOR RETIRES FROM POSITION After Serving as business advisor to student publications for the past Six year-S, Bill Ross is retiring to go into full time teaching. A graduate of the University of Missouri, Mr. Ross has had vast experience in both newspaper and advertising work. Bill Ross, Business Advisor tographer. COOK GOES WEST TO COVER TEXAS RELA YS Carrying his camera and a notebook, Houstonian Sports Editor Mike Cook can be found at any Cougar sports event. Although new to the yearbook field, Mike conscientiously covers all of the uni- i fs ' ' ' versity's athletic contests. In addition to his duties as sports editor, which include traveling to Austin for the Texas Relays, Mike serves as a staff pho- Mike Cook, Sports Editor i an . . I v ,,.....e-fn 'A "'A g f, 'E AE'7'..-.. . li, Gayle Smiley, Associate Editor A telephone is an instrument of necessity for Houstonian As- sociate Editor Gayle Smiley. In charge of the organization pages this spring, Gayle is responsible for telephoning each campus organization to schedule pictures. She must make as- signments to photographers and see that copy is written for each page. Gayle also serves as editor of the class section. t ffyf' l,l'Kigu.2'7i'f5f ' , I , 'X -Glen: -'Ll I I X - A ffaf I " 6' fi THEY STRIVE FOR THE UNUSUAL Flashing strobes and loaded cameras are familiar to Hous- tonian staff photographers, who roam both campus and city, day and night, in search of pictures that will add to the ef- fectiveness of the yearbook. Each picture expresses the individual creativity of the pho- tographer. From organization shots to feature pictures, Hous- tonian photographers attempt to catch the unusual. GETTING AWAY from it all, Jan Douglas Norris retreats to the darkroom to print pictures. 272 HE SELLS PRESTIGE Serving as advertising manager of the Houstonian opens the door to the world of business. In fact, the position carries with it the same duties as ad manager in any business. Practical experience in every phase of the profession is gained by the Houstonian advertising manager. After making the initial contact with a prospective client, through either a telephone call or a personal visit, the adver- tising manager must first sell the ad, then compile the copy and photographs and finally prepare a layout. WILL HE OR WON'T HE? Houstonian Advertising Manager Al Vela waits for a client to make a decision about placing an advertisement. READY FOR ACTION, Jim Gaston checks with Cathy Young, editorial assistant, on his assignment. "DID I HEAR you say that the photographer who covers your party will get tree drinks," asks Cameraman Mike Weingart with enthusiasm. Publications Harvest y I HARVEST WORK HELPS WRITERS As the student literary anthology of the University of Houston, the Harvest en- courages prospective writers through rec- ognition. Each year ,student contributions are judged by outstanding poets and writers Natlonally known for 1ts display of llterature and art the Harvest IS published 1n May be students of the Enfflish depart ment Harvest staff members are selected from members of the Writer s Club HARVEST STAFF Standing Marc Grossberg Lugl1tBanley Dave Gates Shenla OSullnvan assnstant edutors Seated Nelda Younger edntor Buzz Black assocuate edntor Noel Tolsky art editor Le Bayou lgluyou I bayo leb you LE BAYOU KNOWN IN MANY NATIONS ,f-" Le Bayou an internationally known llterary Journal of the University of Hous 1-57 4- ton contams hterary criticisms, prose and poetry wr1tten 1n French by well known personahtles Many of these personalltles have gained recogmtron as authors through their con trlbutlons to Le Bayou The Journal was founded and edited until hls death by Jules Vern professor if of French at the university ki i ,..-.....,. I-Lx X" BSR M LE BAYOU staff members Dr Elizabeth Brandon and Francoise Harrod prepare copy for the maga znne 2 D . - 1 l . . . . 1 . . ' 3 I 1 1 1 - 5 1 i 1 I 1 - 1 A-4 l ' ' ' ,l ' 1 A Z' . e u a- M ' 1...-1 ' -N - .f- f e-A 1 t - - - ,: lg 'KJH ' - 1-' 'N - t t . . I "l Egg' F A' 5' , I X-E . . 7 . . --' ,N P , 1' J 'w . . . - , - SVQLLSN- I ' ' . . . . . L -ji E 45 . 1' 1 5 V ' ' -' . If . . X X t , t , V Y , I ll V ' ' ' . l It It lt it ,fff f A , 11 . . 1 21 -" 9 Z ' - 1 1' you ' Z' ' Y 5-mg f f 1 9 I'5,x' ' V ,- ' :- A I ' ' . . l It iitxxw, in I. Y - . -i .'. I Z . l ' X " K 'I X - Y 1 el Z , 4 X1 Q' Y - ., " tg jx .zz eg-ge Q A '4 V" El tt N! H H Nr ' ' 1 - I if 1 -' . " 2 U -1 I Religious Council COUNCIL IS TIE FOR ALL FAITHS In order to make religion a vital part of the University of Houstonis activities, the Religious Groups Council unites the efforts of all campus religious organiza- tions. Composed of 13 member groups, the council spends many hours planning and carrying out five major programs through- out the year. The group holds fall lectures on religion, as well as Thanksgiving and Christmas programs. During the spring the group sponsors Religious Emphasis Week and an Easter program. Undertaking a new project this year, the council is publishing a brochure giving information concerning all religious gI'Ol.lpS OH CHIIIPUS. PRESlDENT'Ray Menzel presides over a Religious Groups Council meeting. Other officers are the Rev. Mr. George N. Thompson, Director of Religious Activities, Ann Brooks, secretary and the Rev. Mr. Milton Mayer, Lutheran Student Association advisor. Baptist Student mon Bsu PREPARES Fon Furuks Programs of the Baptist Student Union are directed primarily to Baptist students at the University of Houston. The or- ganization does not attempt to detract from a studentas church ties, but rather complements these ties and provides for the spiritual growth of the student dur- ing his college days. BSU's main activity, the holding of campus devotionals, seeks to provide this spiritual growth along with intellectual maturity and social contacts. Membership in BSU prepares today's college student for tomorrow's church leadership. Outstanding members of the Baptist Student Union include Warren Alexander, a summer missionary to California, and Ann Brooks, selected by the Home Mis- sion Board to work in Kansas. f BSU b O h f J K d Main philanthropies are aid to Latin A GUEST SPEAKER is o great interest to mem ers. n t e ront row are oyce enne y, . . Mary Virginia Hughes, Dorothy Martin, Lonnie McLeod, Alice Mack, Ann Stokes and Andy Jones. Afnerlcan. children and Student su Inner The second row consists ot Mervin Miller, Mack Thomas, Ann Rogers, Betty Barnes, Carolyn Clark missionaries. and Ann Brooks. On the back row are Arihiko Nachigcimi, Adil Al-Attar and Don Ridgeway. 274 Religious l PARTICIPATING in a discussion are Religious Groups Council members Mervin Miller, Robert Patterson, Wanda Barber, Judy Hall, Ethelynn Bang, Dan Hrna and Charles Schadel. i LEADING A RGC meeting is president Ray Men zel as members Darlene Sullivan, Roger Baum garten, Pascal Ghattas, Ellsworth Stewart, Elea nor Leopold and Tommy Mazer listen. .'-ga " ' me K-' ' .1-3-NQRQ JE BSU MEMBERS listen to the Rev. Mr. Harles Cone. On the front row are Darlene Sullivan and S. W. Patrick. Herb Edminster, Ollie Welch, Attar Reyad, Ryota Nemoto and Mike McMahon make up the second row. On the back row are Bonnie Sowell, Alice Mack, Ronnie Ribbink and Mariorie Hood. PRESIDENT Warren Alexander presides over a meeting of the BSU execu- tive council. Front Row: Betty Barnes, Carolyn Clark, Linda Harlow, Marion McKay. Second Row: Linda Pledger, Carole Lange, Ollie Welch, Ann Stokes, Bonnie Sowell. Back Row. The Rev. Mr. Harles Cone, ad- visor, Lonnie McLeod, Robert Patterson, George Collins, faculty advisor. 275 'ful Hillel LISTENING 'ro a guest speaker are members Avi Bobys, Marcia Rantz, Ruth Frank, Mike Weingart, Suzy Hersk and Marcia Lewis. READING an invitation to a regional meeting are Hillel officers Johanna Josephson, recording secretary, Bobbie Stein, corresponding secretaryg Harriet Bayer, corresponding secretary: David DeVido, vice-president, AI Robin, parliamentarian and Mike Johnson, treasurer. mi 1 276 EM PHASIS ON HERITAGE Religious, cultural and social activities guide the lives of members of the Hillel Society. Organized in 1948 for Jewish students on the Univegsity of Houston campus, the Hillel Society stresses an understanding and appreciation of the Jewish heritage and traditions. Hillel's bi-monthly meetings feature speakers who discuss problems concerning politics, religion and social culture. Among the group's. social activities are a Homecoming dance, the UH-Rice Univer- sity-sponsored Chanukah Ball and a sum- mer lnstallation -Banquet. Philanthropies include contributions to the university's library, the athletic depart- ment and the proposed Religious Center on campus and also active participation in the United Jewish Appeal Drive. In April a UH delegation travels to Texas A8zlVl for a meeting of all Hillel groups in Texas and Oklahoma. Religious LOOKING toward president Jack King are Linda Hughes, representative, Joan Fugman, secretary- treasurer, Carol Petty, vice-president and John Byars, representative. GATHERING for a devotional hour as Paul Mc- Cormack reads the lesson are Mona Wilbeck, Gary Haugland, LaGard May, Clyde Austin, sponsor and Dale Haines. CYC PROMOTES CHURCH Promoting fellowship among Church of Christ students on campus is the main purpose of the Christian Youth Club. Each Wednesday at noon, students who are interested in the Church of Christ gather for Christian fellowship and an hour of devotion in the Ezekiel Cullen building. Throughout the school year the group holds social functions such as picnics and get-acquainted parties. CYC is presented on the Religious Groups Council and actively participates in raising funds for the proposed Religious Center. Christian Youth Council Lutheran Student Assoc. FELLOWSHIP brings together C. Rice, B. Car- nelius, I. Roth, adviser, E. Steinfelt, R. Ueckert, M. K. Krueger, W. Brockely, A. Rice, E. Leopold and J. Teinert. Standing are R. Teinert, Poster M. E. Mayer, R. Lang, R. Baumgarten, president and G. Etter. rl , .,t STUDENTS RECEIVE COUNSEL Religious activities and counsel for students on college campuses throughout the na- tion is offered bythe Lutheran Student Association. The aim of the group is to promote fellowship whereby its members may express and deepen their Christian faith. At the University of Houston the Lutheran Student Association, under the leadership of Pastor Milton E. Mayer, achieves its aim through participation in weekly campus meetings, weekend Bible studies, Sunday Vesper services with the Rice University chapter and group retreats each semester. Q.. Wesley Foundation FELLOWSHIP IS WESLEY GOAL Providing students with spiritual and intellectual guidance, the Wesley' Founda- tion promotes Christian fellowship. As a unit of the Methodist Student Move- ment, the Wesley Foundation maintains a student center near campus. The center serves as a meeting place and has facilities for various recreational activities. Each week finds members of Wesley Foundation attending a noon worship, Wes- ley Fellowship and a luncheon. The groupis other activities include a Christmas party for children and small parties for members. Various Methodist mission projects serve as Wesley Foundationas philanthropies. Religious DURING WESLEY FELLOWSHIP the Rev. Mr. G. J. Avent, director, gives a devotional message to members on the front row S. Bou-Shibl, M. Dismukes, R. Dean and E. Shalhub. On the second row are D. Sanford, M. Miller, T. Schmidt, E. Schmehling and L. Wilbonks. E. Ayles, M. Misleh, A. Anouti and l. Singh are on the back row. Cou ar Guard WITH A MISCHIEVOUS gleam in her eyes, Shasta II finds herself right at home on the UH campus with Cougar Guard members Bennie House, Larry Edwards, Preston Ivens, captain, and Jerry Evans. CAT GETS GREAT CARE Caring for Shasta, University of Houston mascot, is the purpose of the Cougar Guard. Composed of volunteers from Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity, Guard mem- bers transport Shasta to all home football gairles, as well as to many out-of-town games. The group also takes her to pep rallies, registration, publicity functions and other uni- versity activities. Fifteen-year-old Shasta is the original UH mascot and lives at the Hermann Park Zoo. This year with the assistance of Student Government, the Guard purchased a new cage and traveling trailer for Shasta. Obtaining Shasta II from a zoo in Albu- querque, New Mexico, the Guard bottle feeds the cub, and members keep her in their homes for several months. Shasta II makes her debut at the October 7 pep rally to win the devotion of UH students with her playful ways and gleam- ing eyes. Meanwhile Shasta II is being trained and held in reserve until the time when Shasta becomes too old for service. Service Womenis Dorm Council CCUNCII. GCVERNS LAW HAI.I. Serving as the governing board of l,aw Hall. the WKllllEli,S Its activities include sponsoring a Christmas party for under- Dorm Council coordinates activities of the dorm 'and sponsors privileged 'children and an open house for friends and parents. social functions. .X LEADING A DISCUSSION in a Women's Dorm Council meeting is president SMILES ENVELOP the faces of members Mrs. Rubie Weaver, head residentp Linda Riggan as members Bette Billingsley, Carolyn Langford, Sue Fried- D6I'1iS6 BOUCIFGCIUXI ViCe'DFe5Ideni: Jlldle Cfclg, Demile CGYCIICIUO, -IUUS man, Brenda Busch and Beverly Cranford listen, Dominy, Marcia Barker and Tommie Holub. Service AFTER a long workout Shasta rests while Cougar NONCHALANT DESCRIBES SHASTA'S attitude as the Cougar Guard invades her privacy. Sitting in Guard recorder Stanley Brown and Jerry Arnold, the cat's cage in a playful mood are pledges Tom Bankston and Terry Harper, Standing behind the l962 captain, hold her leash. mass of white bars are pledges Gene Austin and Gordon Dotson. lpha Phi Omega RENDERING SERVICE IS PRIME PURPOSE Alpha Phi Omega, menls service frater- nity, has a definite program of activities in which the pledges and members direct their energies for the benefit of their fel- lowmen. APO's purpose is to assemble college men in the fellowship of the Scout Oath and Law, to develop friendship and to promote service to humanity. Being a service fraternity, Alpha Phi Omega crosses all lines of honorary, social and professional fraternities. Thus mem- bers of other campus organizations may also be active in this fraternity. There are two fundamental requirements for active membership in Alpha Phi Omega. First, that the student has had previous experience in the Boy Scouts, and second, that he prove an earnest desire to render service to others. Activities of Alpha Phi Omega, founded on the Cougar campus in 1947, include selling programs at football and basketball games, putting up the Christmas tree for Cougar Christmasland and ushering at Various university events. In addition, the fraternity sponsors the King Ugly contest during Homecoming and Greek Songfest in the spring. Top APO socials include the Founders' Day Banquet in December and the Spring Formal. Outstanding members of JAPO are John Ferguson, cheerleader, and Preston lvens., captain of the Cougar Guard. The fraternity is sponsored by Dr. James E. Williamson, Dean of Men. CHECKING the Roy Cullen Building bulletin board for meeting notices are pledges James Doss, Charles Shields, Sonny Johnson, John Ferguson, Burt Fairston, James McKaughan, Tony Kyser and "AC" Campbell. 280 GAVEL IN HAND, president Gerald Grim calls the meeting to order as members Roy Jennings, Thomas Reynolds, James Hempel, Stephen Allen, Preston Ivens and Jerry Arnold prepare to give their committee reports. A CONGRATULATORY LETTER concerning receipt oi a student government award for outstanding work on campus is read by Stanley Brown, Gordon Dotson, Jerry Evans, Jim Smith and Herb Hazen. FQ 'h::Px , 4, f-... I x Q '4":.w, ,, .-. 1-vis E Q H -QF' f I A' . - ' . -k q 'v' fiilifgji? If' ! 7 21 ' w'A.'ff'.', 'X 'R' . 5 yn I V Q .Q o N 5'r Eid' X2 gf ji sim YUURSEIF T-Sim w 7 ati' .5 . I a Cheafleadefs CHEERLEADERS cLowN 'l Arg . g , ., X , 35, -. l5el5'ff'rfi?f9 -ae X1 4r,' 2 q if n l--2-1,.'n" ', : .- -,gy ,K A 1.51,-. mi or 'P ll l he A .,. A y y gpg,-gg , I l QW- . llfffffef, ,5'q,jr35,iQfE3h in ,JLJMW-S W 5 5,3 lT'S UP INTO THE AlR for Jerry neck and Toni Rae Mensing Us they practice for The nexT game, CHEERLEADER PRACTICE finds Judy Morriss giving a big, rip-roaring, fearf 'em-apart Cougar yell. KELLY THE CLOWN befifs Dole who's playing like a hippefy hop over the megaphone. A DUNCE CAP FOR A CHEERLEADER? Perhaps . . . anyway, it means ca good joke for Three clowning 21 " wifi A cheerleaders Toni Rae, John and Judy. i i 282 l f 1?- 1:1 ' hi-32? In I l - . 7. 5 fi N540 XEPTOV A X it in 1. 'VH -"VJ ,' Q 1 qi f T' +1 . 1 . d 1 F ' 'JT' f-, :Q Ll-nfl gd ' ,.,, .. '11 f ff -ff? Q D rr 7-W2 :IQ in isa -' arf W' A H1111 K' 117 -'T ,J fly V . , .Qi A ny, -'Q r I v 1 --?"'5i" mal 'dim 1. 'xv' . 4 - Y' ' A U IQv.4u:.1 43, , K 5 A ., 13,16 H .. , . , fi' ,N 1 V ,P f :J ' I I' 5, ' . 4 ., K-fr f I. . 'fltvwgje is ,, W " ' 'gdb aff ,E J WH f' A ' p, V . , ' P 4145. fqm, ' " -W' . - V .gp A , - .,, an . 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V, 'lan .ml , .x- . .Y -1 " . 1 , J N miiifa' '::, xffj. Xxx: , .- I 'V iii! .,,v we , . Y:-45 V "CN W1 U B., if --' ,M f, - wi 5,1-1, 4 5 1 ' ' if L .-uf F P -we-ff 1' , . - - , . . wr . Qi- QF' A V avi ' 'A pf' y' 5 ' if f '- 522. ' si :.' Qiglg Q, . 1" X- w i, ' 'H ' .E - - " 1 + L , Jggjg, gif.. in 4, I3 I ' 193' ' - + nr 'N Q , V, T n"Yf' PM A m ' W1 QW T, ' ff" ur E " 34,2 V fa . T zss President GOODNER HEADS STUDENT BODY Sam Goodner, student body president, represents his fellow students to the ad- ministration, other universities, visiting businessmen and the public. Serving as head of the Executive Branch of the university's student govern- ment, Sam is responsible for all activities of the bicameral organization. Among the duties of the president, a junior physics maj or, are the coordination of the numerous student government ac- tivities and the organization of all com- mittees. Appointing the chief justice and three of his five associates in the Supreme Court is another duty for which Sam is re- sponsible. All monetary bills come to the president after they pass both the House of Repre- sentatives and the Senate. Sam can then sign his approval or exercise his power of veto. A two thirds majority vote of both houses can overrule his veto. 286 ii 1, STUDENT GOVERNMENT structure and organiza- tion is carefully explained to new members of the legislature by student body president Sam Goodner. AS PRESIDENT of the student body, Sam finds that ci great deal of his time is spent on the telephone, planning and organizing various Uni- versity of Houston student activities. Student Government VARIETY OF DUTIES ASSIGNED TO COOK ln case of t.he president's absence, the student government leadership is taken over by the vice-president, Eugene Cook. Also a member of the student government Executive Committee, Eugene serves as president of the Senate. Duties of the Senate leader include ap- pointing one of his members as a Supreme Court Justice and casting the deciding vote on equal division in the Senate and on joint vote of both houses. All campus elections come under Eu- gene's jurisdiction. He is in charge of the election board and also handles all elec- tion complaints. A senior accounting major, Eugene holds a varsity letter in debate. He serves as president of the Forensic Society, presi- dent of the Society of Accountants and also as a speaker before the State Legisla- tive Committee for State Aid. Vice-President Speaker of the House , 5 D i l l i DEVOTED to furthering the University of Houston, student body vice-president Eugene Cook spends endless hours and effort, including trips to Austin, in the fight for full state support. BOYD LEADS BUSY LIFE As speaker of the House of Representa- tives, Jim Boyd coordinates all the ac- tivities of various House committees. A member of the student government Executive Committee and the Student Election Board, the speaker of the House is elected from the student body of the University of Houston. Every other Monday night finds Jim, a senior electrical engineering major, presiding over the House meeting, held in the Roy Cullen building. Showing his leadership ability in other activities on campus, the speaker is secre- tary of Tau Epsilon, parliamentarian of Epsilon Nu Gamma and district chairman of the Texas Intercollegiate Student As- sociation. A recipient of the Houston Engineering and Scientific Society scholarship, Jim Boyd's name is frequently found on the Dean's Honor List. BETWEEN FIGURING OUT complex engineering problems and presiding over the House of Repre- sentatives, Speaker of the House Jim Boyd finds little time for relaxation in his busy schedule. 287 Secretar WOOD RECORDS SG ACTIVITIES Serving as secretary of the student body is Susan Wood, a senior speech therapy major. As secretary, it is Susan's duty to keep complete and accurate records of all stu- dent government activities. She is also responsible for retaining duplicate copies of minutes from the House of Representative and Senate meet- ings. In addition, Susan is in charge of all student government correspondence, as Well as keeping a committee file. An honor student, Susan is also treas- urer of the senior class, corresponding secretary of Zeta Tau Alpha and UH cor- respondent to the Texas Intercollegiate Student Association. A TYPICAL SCENE in the Student Government oftice finds secretory Susan Wood busily corrying out her duty of typing letters. Senate SENATORS APPROVE NEW ORGANIZATIONS One representative from each class and one representative from each college com- pose the student Senate, the upper house of the bicameral system of student gov- ernment. Among the powers of the student Sen- ate are the proration of the budget for student government and approval powers for new campus organization. Serving as president of the Senate is Eugene Cook, vice-president of the stu- dent body. Other Senate officers such as president pro tem, secretary and parlia- mentarian are chosen from within the ranks of the Senate itself. SENATE OFFICERS include Louis Potronello, president pro tem, Eugene Cook, president ond Kathy Toylor, secretary. 288 Treasurer BECKER DISBURSES STUDENT BODY FUNDS Keeping track of all student government expenditures is the duty of John Becker, treasurer of the student body. A senior accounting major, John is re- sponsible for drawing up a yearly budget and also submitting financial reports to the administration and the student body president. - All student government funds are dis- bursed through tlie treasurer, who must keep a close check on the validity of stu- dent government expenditures. A member of the student government executive committee, John also serves as treasurer of Scabbard and Blade and vice- president of IFC. He is also a member of Omicron Delta Kappa, national leader- ship fraternity. ALL EYES are on student senotor Drew Browne os he discusses ct new derson Duane Crum Jmm Perdue Jock Gregory Bruce Bnundo Normcxn orgc1nizotion's charter. Other senotors ore Mickey Crawford Jim Hen Jones Anthony Kouzoums John Easley ond Vnrgrl Horton House of RCPPCSCHWVCS House is omeuv Fon Mosr MEMBERS of the House gather for ci meeting. On the front row are Herb Underwood, Bill Hensley, Amelie Suberbielle, John Perdue and Walt Brochle. The second row includes James Gaston, Ron Rivenbark, Albert Contreras, Jim S. Gee and Jerry Skinner. On the back row are Ody Jerden, John Kiser, Reynold Hillegeist, Sonny Moore, Bill Lipscomb ancl Ben Hood. OFFICERS Carolyn Langford, clerk, Dan Hrna, parl., Marilyn Holub, sec., Jim Boyd, speaker and Carmen Stallings, speaker pro tem. UPMC Cm THEY INTERPRET A E LOOKING SOLEMN and stern, Supreme Court Justices prepare to render KNOWLEDGE OF THE LAW is an important requiremem for members ci decision concerning a student government regulation. Pictured are of the Supreme Court. Every corner of the law library seems familiar to Chief Justice Jim Knox, a UH law student. 290 . Student Government - LEGISLATION Representatives from each recognized organization on campus compose the stu- dent government House of Representatives. At bi-weekly Monday night meetings, the House processes bills and motions brought before them, including all bills for raising revenue. As the lower group in the student gov- ernment organization, the House is the point of origin for most of the legislation that is brought before student government. The House also holds sole power of im- peachment. All House officers, excluding the speak- er, are chosen from within its members. This includes speaker pro tem, secretary, clerk and parliamentarian. ' Any recognized campus organization may have representation in the House. If the organizationis membership exceeds 20, it is entitled to an additional repre- sentative. A REGULAR MEETING of the House of Representatives finds members busy deciding on bills and motions. A new bill seems to meet with the approval of these representatives. On the front row are Tommie Holub, Sue Friedman, Brenda Busch, Nancy Coffman and Wanda Kay,Barber. The second row consists of Ted Lafferty, John Paul Jones, Mike Weingart, Marc Grossberg, Helen Sue Reed and Carolyn Langford. On the back row are John Bonkston, Bob Baylor, Jack O. Wesne, Richard Bowman and Wallace Howard. SG REGULATIONS ' A Chief Justice and five other justices compose the student Supreme Court, in which is vested the judicial power of the -f student government of the University of Houston Duties of the Supreme Court include interpreting and clari- fying student government regulations, rendering advisory opin- ions and making decisions in all cases involving interpretation of the student statutes. i Justices Emerson Turner, James Williams, Clay Moore, Chief Justice Jim CHIEF PROSECUTOR for the student government is attorney general Knox, Jack Gregory and Bill Hensley. Barlow Simmons, whose duties include checking on organizational stand- ards. 291 Wards SG BANQUET BRINGS AWARDS Each spring at the annual Student Government Banquet, awards are presented to outstanding members of student government. OUTSTANDING SENATOR of the year is Virgil Horton, who receives his award from Eugene Cook, president of the Senate. These awards include Outstanding Member of the House of Representatives, Out- standing Member of the Senate, Outstanding Committee Member, Outstanding Student Government Member of the Year, and special awards to various campus organiza- tions for services to the student body. SPEAKER of the House Jim Boyd presents that HOMECOMING chairman Sonny Moore receives body's outstanding member award to Bill Lips- outstanding committee member award from Rich- comb. ard Haynes. cabbard and Blade A GLOBE SERVES as ci conversation piece for Lt. Col. A. E. Rice, 2nd Lt. John Becker, treasurer, Capt. John Howard, president, Mai. Frank Proctor and lst Sgt. Darrell Heinrich, sec. GENERAL PERSHING gets a good polishing Fritsche, Lonnie Angst, Loren Osborne, Floyd Jon Kaylor, Charles Cochran and Herbert Cull. LEADERSHIP IS HIGH Scabbard and Blade, a national military honor society, di- rects its service toward the university, the training corps and the nation. The organization's primary purpose is to raise the standard of military education. It also strives to unite the military department and to promote friendship among cadet from pledges Herbert Cleveland, Jerry Asher, . officers. - Student Government OUTSTANDING COMMITTEE MEMBER Award is presented to Tommie Holub by Richard Haynes,-past president of the student body. V... SPECIAL SERVICE AWARDS are presented by Eugene Cook to Gerald Grim of Alpha Phi Omega and Marilyn Holub of Gamma Sigma Sigma. DEAN OF MEN Dr. James E. Williamson presents Outstanding Member of the Year Award to Sam Goodner, president of the student body., Military SCABBARD AND BLADE MEMBERS are F. Gallamore, J. Sims, P. Gibbs, M. Johnson, J. Folloder, S. Dutton, J. ,O'Wesne, Capt. R. B. Rutledge, E. Because the group is an incentive for developing leadership, membership is limited to officers who possess qualities of lead- ership, patriotism, efficiency and honor. Each cadet is elected to membership and must be "an officer and a gentleman." The society fosters competition among corps' officers. Each morning members of Scabbard and Blade raise the Godkin, Hon. Cadet Capt. Sherry English, sponsor, E. LeBlanc, G. L. Williams, T. O. Weatherspoon, E. S. Luna, R. Goodwin and R. Alanis. flag in front of Ezekiel Cullen building in an impressive ceremony. Other activities of the group include a Christmas party, a spring formal and the Military Ball. Distinguished Military Graduates are Ronald Smith, John W. Howard and Darrell Heinrich. 293 1, I 1, -,Y , ---Q. ,, sf Mk x ' 1 YL . . -4-J u., fr. uszei f A x f" 5 ?!l.. , , Q A 7 Q N35 K, ,Q H, ,yf r 5 2 f QL L-1 .2 g Hx? 'Unvg i xx A ,- VJ X., in - f wx ' " Q 'X i Q A' I ni L 34: Q.. X " , gemrp-'A , -, Y T' ' 1 vi .T lk L ,Q 'za' '. q, 1 I v '1 1 fi? W' s x f I: M I ,. Y Q .. , 16 M? Q glw F z ,. I 5-E, v K, 'V EEN i jg' ?w5w:5!nlq3 A .. Q if X . ' , X M E I. 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'gif 2" ' Lx V!"Y"f" 'N ' gi me 5 ' w! 3- 53,5 ,. A Hlkzhy 2 w Wu. 'vim ff fi f' :gimme . , .5 4 rf f f-'- wg -2 ff, - " . 1 ' 'jf-"','I, .5-D., . '- gifjj' .,3?. , -- 7 P1 I "In :V 1 xi if ' I aff' ' pl, f, 5 E ' , gt V ,Q I 'if . .1 A - ' ' .mg -1 A 42. Q." - FLM . Wy g Ulf 'lflifizi nr- f .7 -' if. -rif,5!+f.5 5, aw nf, '- X:f.'fi11?:m' Fi MILITARY POSTS As members of the Army Reserve Officers Training Corps, students combine their regular academic activities with a military course of instruction. ROTC,s aim is to develop officers in sufficient quantity to provide a corps of well-educated, well-rounded leaders. Such leaders must be capable of adjusting to an Army organization that would have to expand with lightning speed in event of a national emergency. With this end in mind, the Army ROTC is designed to develop the qualities of leadership in college-trained men. , Until his graduation an ROTC student receives the training necessary to equip him for command responsibilities in the active Army or Army Reserve. The leadership training acquired in Army Officers' Training will closely correspond to the executive ability called for by employment personnel in civilian life. This training offers students an understanding of human be- havior, together with proven methods for motivating employees, indoctrination in the techniques of leadership and in the prac- tices and devices which tend to make a leader effective and last, it offers students an opportunity to apply the principles of leader- ship to everyday problems. COMPANY B First Row: Ristau, Arnim, Becker, Company CO, Boykin, Ayles. Second Row: Leonard, O'Keete, Fritsche, Barnette, Kottwitz, Gluck- man, Russi, Hillis, Boyd, Barrow, Sanchez, Luna. Third Row: Weatherspoon, Military .... COLORS HELD HIGH and boots gleaming, members of the ROTC Color Guard stand at attention during the annual Final Review. Angst, Hickman, Barnes, Averitte, Mattingly, Haisler, Allen, Gale, Harris, Godkin. Fourth Row: Kaylor, Valcliek, Hazen, Krpec, Osborne, Sherohman, Folloder, Kumin, Hewitt, Yaw. r. iaf- -l-Y' --A1-'-Y Y A l ' 'iq I i fx - A i 1 I 1 I l f 'O ' , ' ae-----1--f-vi--l'-j'- r------FN --D - ' -" 'r""" -""""""'li""" . L 11 I i ROTC NERVOUS COEDS face the firing squad, otherwise known as the entire membership of the ROTC, at the final selection of sponsors. SPONSORS AID IN PLANNING Assisting the military science department is the main duty of ROTC sponsors. Select- ed by the entire corps, the sponsors aid the cadet staff and the officers of Scabbard and Blade in planning and organizing the annual Military Ball. Summer and early fall are busy times for sponsors, as they perform public relations duties for the department by counseling and advising new students. They also serve the department by mailing out publications and other information concerning the Univer- sity of Houston military science program. Sponsors consist of an honorary cadet colonel and five honorary cadet captains. Each year the honorary cadet colonel is se- lected from the sponsors of the previous year. If if , ' SPONSORS include honorary cadet captains Valerie Daunoy, B. Co., Bobbie Hainline, Rifle Team, Sherry English, Scabbard and Blade, Bonnie McCool, Band Co. and Betty Curtis, A Co. FRESHMAN PLATOON First Row: Brown, Dotson, Bradford, Stilley, Bailey, Stash, Moor, Martinez, Platoon Sgt. Second Row: Nolan, Stroud, Pledger, Davis. Fourth Row: Green, Kennerly, Kern, Samo- Reichek, Newman, Whitehead, Scherer. Third Row: riga, Levine, Sinai, Howard, Cleveland. f i . i - i 4 I -ef E . . . , , ex, V - T 5 X 4 -,,, L-K? . .aw , :.,1 ,. MAA lq 1? 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V f V.V V V? A V V V V A V5?EffS12'E V KH S Vf- V. . V .V1,i',,,, V . V , - 'Vi " VA' Aj' -V ' lu-Mr' 1:-4t:?,:f: ' ' Q A 2 I 2- 5' IV neg! . L- V V '-'X I A, X V92 T, .59 ' , -- , 1 M fr, -:.V:.-grew! V z, qc.. - qv- X M V! . "AV V , -.g1,, rqpnygi..-Q I' VV, Q ,,, V 1 AV? - g.eV-, -" x v' V :V VV-?f':' V V11 -I 1.34 ,523 ,gg Q , VV' jam! VE - 525' -- 7',.V 3.5, V'-V' :bf F1 up ,, VV' -. .,,-'g-ge I Q"Ag,l,V ' .7 , V LVV V: 1"-'? 1 -LV , - .. - h 35 if Yi! V: if Jrwglfd' 3 .i 2'- V V l, X Y W U . ..- ,..- f'-V V- -. - V V , -'.V V N VA C W . -..-V VIAA- z A Yr , QA .-'Vq' ,V , :. ., if . 'V A ' ig, 'QA -5 gg ig .' -A " A FY? :HR N A! cl , gi :FRlf?f'i'f:'5 "Y . gg- .mg L V A- 1:--.VJ .. ,M V . . ., , 1 V -- .,. .A , V, R A MA W. .- Kean A N :A : I. . -V --44 -V 'r"V'fE?' ffm a.VmV,sfV L why .L 2: as Y V -,V ,M ., JLVV5 ,:A,V,7.VLV 3 V- 'VH fi p . bb q U Q V1 V , ::,wV- -,- ,Vl".T1A,, X , ' - Ty" - 37.7 Pinlef ." :7 -. ' -' 3 1M:EfV::.':-vV3.,efgjfe. V: 71' V J-, !V 'J f- , . --,V V- " ' g VV A f -V-4 ff 4 -if .4 "--V '- A F V N f rg af W ' ' , ' :u WLT" J U rl. . Za ,-1" RI if V ,. 4 " V mx 1 It , i' if ,F , .. i I N . -x ,,. A' Vg: 1 , f-1... X. g,., Iii! :X . -N . 1,1 9? 4'K I gd-ps 1 One of the highest honors a student can attain is an athletic letter. The letter signifies a Willingness to Work hard, to sacrifice and to cooperate with teammates. Much goes into the making of a modern day, college athlete. Months of practice, sore muscles, swet, drill, chalk-talks, encouragement from coaches, as well as the crowds that come to Watch him perform. Various sports keep a continuous program operating and many outstand- ing athletes participate in sports the year around. All of these-plus, like all college students, many hours of aca- demic work. The successful college athlete is no longer the hig, dumb guy who can do nothing right, unless he is engaged in physi- cal competition. He is the person who can divide his time between eating, sleeping, playing, studying and practicing to excel in academics and athletics. This is the successful college athlete . . . this is the ath- letic letterman. ,, A 'Q q 'ffi I t 1, H J -'S Q I .1 f 9 ,ll ,m-. ,L 'C'- A, 'IJQ ff, Playing their first season as independents, the Cougars not only managed a respectable 6-4 win-loss record, but also suc- ceeded in breaking four school records in the 1960 season. Combining the accurate passing of Don Sessions and the broken-field running of All-America Honorable Mention Kenny Bolin, the Big Red gridders never stopped driving for those "extra" needed yards that makes a winning team. It was this double threat of running and passing that made the Cougars top competition. While Bolin and Sessions broke records in passing and rush- ing, Larry Lindsey was busy punting and returning punts to set two records of his own, and add a powerful defensive punch. Vicious tackling and blocking highlighted the defensive ma- neuvers exhibited by the Cougars. More than once the Big Red linemen stopped paydirt drives with the goal posts at their backs. Probably the most outstanding feature of this year's team was the high spirit and "never dien attitude which the team irrevocably adopted. SEASON S RECORD University of Mississippi Mississippi State University Oregon State College Texas AS:M College Oklahoma State University University of Alabama North Texas State College University of Cincinnati Florida State University Tulsa University AND, TURNING THE CORNER, Bolin is off on another long run with D. Bradshaw H23 leading the way. -'vi .1- COUGARS RECORD BEST SEASON SINCE 1956 OLE MISS-A heavy aerial bombardment via the golden arm FIRST DOWN? Donut know . . . maybe . . . don'f think so . . . sure. , . might be . . . con"r look . . . first down? KEEPER by quarterback Lcurry Lindsey alter faking To fullback Charlie Rieves of Oregon. of Jake Gibbs killed all hopes of the Cougars upsetting the No. 2 team in the nation. Holding the University of Mississippi to one TD and 21 yards rushing in the first half wasn't quite enough to turn the tide in the Cougars' favor. First-half play saw the Big Red line dig in and stop all scoring threats that the Rebels could muster. But with 1:25 left in the second quarter, Gibbs fired a touchdown pass and it was all over for the Cougars. The second half saw Rice Stadium looking like Cape Canaveral as the Rebels unleashed pass after pass good for six TDS and a shutout for Ole Miss in its opening game. Depth and experience proved a vital factor in the game, as Ole Miss had the majority of its previous nationally-ranked team returning. CAUGHT BY COUGAR Buddy Hodges, OSC's Chuck Marshall lecms for on extra yard. Football TOUCHDOWN by UH fullback Charlie Rieves in the Big Red's l7-O romp over the Texczs Aggies. MISS STATE-Taking to the road for their next game, the Cougars took on Mis- sissippi State University and exhibited a powerful ground offense. Although the Big Red failed to score in the first half, they overcame a ten-point lead that State had established with a TD and field goal in the second quarter of play. Coming back strong in the second half, quarterback Lindsey sent backs Bolin, Rieves, Kuehne and Broussard crashing through the State line until the winning TD was scored. OREGON STATE - Not having played against a single-wing offense for two years caused the Cougars to fall short in their West Coast debut. Two quick TDS in the first quarter netted the Beavers a lead that the Cougars were never able to overcome. But through the efforts of press-box coaching, the Big Red was able to stop any more serious scoring threats. In a bruising, hard-fought battle, the Cougars lost the services of halfback Bolin in the last quarter, and of Co-Captain Kuehne for the rest of the season. TEXAS A8zlVI-A highlight of the grid- iron season came about in the Cougars' shutout against the Texas Aggies. It was the first time in the history of the series that either team had been left scoreless, and Cougar fans were delighted that A8zM was the victim. Although the Cougars launched a suc- cessful offense, both on the ground and in the air, this game was a big defensive win for the Cougars. The two Big Red scores came in the first and last quarters, with Mitchamore kicking a field goal between the touch- downs. A crowd of 40,000 witnessed the milestone in Rice Stadium. .r xH. -.Lx 303 PASS COMPLETION to Don fMoonl Mullins odds to eventuol record-setting total by quarterback Don Sessions. OSUaClutch defensive playing plus some good breaks helped the Cougars break a three-year jinx against a stubborn Okla- homa State University team. It was not until the second half that the Cougars found their way to paydirt. And it was not until the last quarter that the Big Red's TD pulled them away from the Cowboys. A thriller to the end, the game showed record-breaking punting by Lindsey, and a determined Cougar line that fought off OSU7s scoring threats until the closing seconds. ALABAMA-Outgaining the Crimson Tide yardage-wise did not prove effective enough for the Cougars in their next out- of-town game. 304 BEATEN COUGAR Gene Rifch is ci little too lote to breok up on Ole Miss pass to end Rolph Smith. Alabama took advantage of two Cougar mistakes in the first quarter, turned them into TDs, the11 settled down to a grueling defensive game for which they were na- tionally rated. Although the Cougars were playing a rugged defensive team, fumbles and pass interceptions were the cause of an inef- fective offense. NORTH TEXAS STATE--Trailing the Eagles after a quarter of play, the Cougars suddenly unleashed a devastating offense that resulted in the seasonis highest scor- ing game. Explosive as ever, Bolin started the Cou- gars on the road to victory with.runs of ten and 25 yards, giving the Cougars their first scores. Sessions then engineered three other TD drives before the third string came in to continue the slaughter. Capitalizing on Eagle miscues was the turning point of the game, as the Cougars turned two pass interceptions and a fumble into touchdowns. CINCY-A tough defensive unit came to the rescue of a slow-starring Cougar back- field, and the University of Cincinnati suf- fered last minute defeat. With the Bearcats dominating the ball in the first half, it took a staunch Cougar line to stop the Cincy scoring threats. Third period play followed the same pattern, and it was not until the clock showed six final minutes that the Cougars started their first TD drive. Seconds after UH had scored, the Big Red defense intercepted a pass, and the Cougars once again found paydirt. Quick pace and alertness in the closing minutes of the game resulted in victory for UH. BEHIND A SOLID WALL of UH linemen, pass quarterback Don Sessions tosses a quick sideline -.R u I I I4-0 win over the Bearcats. CINCINNATI DEFENDERS move in on senior end Errol Linden in the Cougars SIDELINE COLLISION as UH's Bolo Brezina C43l takes a spill with Reb Bob Crespino. U u W 4' I I-fz'n.m-"1" -- ""'Vf"1W , 0 .I is I il-Si ,l A- il.1',i,V Q60 ,. 9- X ' . le-'IE H ' 'L' Ni! v F .yi mv' es Q Q A' nw fn .Ay v, ,jf - . 1' ll l . 5 V 1 Q is 1, 1, . AH a, -r-l fb' . . s . 1 4 f in no 'WUNJ A A gm 7 x:'..w -i 1 so WA 'V .ii '51 'Clif in rig' i I fn Q9 ' ' "'a: i.u'A HQ! SI. O "ff " ii 'nv 5 gif, ' . I lun, .. ' HJ as 1' r "' X a.-in 'x Q I: IAIA :AN Q, Y ', ' If, ' Q V V xqufx, D 4 ,l ' ' . ' -'..??r' fail? A "PM , -Q 2 ' rpm ' . - ,Q-fx A 'Q S' Av 1-.5 rl, . 1- ' ? I X!! hi , A ly' SH- YE 1 1- ' ' pb -A Am J ? f ' 4, , . g i K . s. , . 1 M A I.. r. . U --,v- Y -va Q51 BARNETT, Bob End, IVL , 5-I I, l9O Fairy BASS, Dean End, IVL 6-3, I73 Kingsvilie BIRDWELL, Dan Center, 2Vl. 6-4. 225 Big Spring BLEIER, Ed Guard, IVL 6-i. 205 Texa rkana, Ark. BOLIN, Ken Halfback, ZVL 5-I I. I6O Houston BRADSHAW David Halfback, IVL 5-IO, I75 Houston Football l FLORIDA STATE-An alert defensive unit and the Seminoles' failure to make a two-point conversion saved the Cougars' last out-of-town game from being recorded as a loss. Following much the same pattern of play that prevailed in the Cincinnati game, it took the Cougars two periods of play before they could put together an effective TD drive. In a game where both teams had their share of backfield miscues, the steady pressure applied by the Big Red defensive unit told the difference in the score. The win gave the Cougars a chance to have the best season since 1956. TULSA-The Cougars ended their season the way they began it, victims of a deadly aerial attack. Although the Cougars' dream to score in the first quarter became a reality, Tulsa completed 18 of 27 aerials, 3 for TDs, and upset the favored Cougars. However, this was no easy task for the pass-minded Hurri- canes. Holding a slim one point lead at halftime, the Cougars battled Tulsa to the last second of the game. With very little time left, Houston made two serious scoring attempts ending 5 and 3 yards short of the coveted goal. Cougar fans sadly watched as the clock ticked off the last hope for a 7-3 season. PAIN AND PUNISHMENT as UH quarterback runs over o Cincinnati lineman. 307 PHOTO DAY for The Big Red cmd Jim Lougheod one of 500 pictures of The squad Taken prior To snaps end Buddy Hodges in pass catching pose, The opening of foil procfice. 308 BRANSON, Johnny Guard, ZVL 6-O, 2 IO Midland BREZINA, Bobby l-lalfbaclc, IVL 6-O, I95 Louise BROUSSARD, Larry Halfloack, IVL 6-2, ISO Pasadena BROWN, Bill Guard, 2VL 6-2, 2l5 Galvesion CAREW, Mike i-lalfloaclc, IVL 6-O, l75 Corpus Chrisii DEEN, Gerald Tackle, IVL 6-4, 220 San Beniio DORSETT, Randall End, 3VL 6-2, I95 Pasadena ELLIOTT, Richard Fullback, IVL 6-O, l9O Richmond FEAGIN, Wiley Tackle, 3VL 6-l, 225 Conroe GUSTAMENTE, Alberi' End, IVL 6-2, 2l5 Jourdanion HODGES, Buddy Encl, IVL 6-4, l95 Henderson HOOPER, Murdoch Tackle, 2VL 6-3, 220 Garrison HOWE, Benny End, IVL 6-0, l90 Fr. Worilw ISBELL, Joe Bob Guard, 2VL 6-I, 220 Orange KIRTLEY, Dick Guard, 2VL 5-IO, 200 Housion KUEHNE, Jim Fullbaclc, 3VL 6-0, l90 San Anionio LEECH, Bill ' Cenier, IVL 6-3, 200 Los Fresnos LINDEN, Errol End, 2VL 6-5, 250 New Orleans LINDSEY, Larry Quarierbaclc, 2VL 6-I, I85 Gilmer MARTIN, Conrad Tackle, IVL 6-2, 225 FI. Worilw MITCHAMORE, Eddie I-laliloaclc, 2VL 5-IO, I85 Houslon MULLINS, Don Hallbaclc, 3VL 6-I, l85 Slwrevepori. La. NORRIS. Jim Tackle, 2VL 6-3, 240- Mercedes PERKINS, Milfon End, IVL 6-3, l95 Basirop Football 5558 'C -xy ---Lb 309 TOUCHDOWN!. . . RICHARDSON, Billy Haliback, IVL 6-O, l7O l'lous+on RIEVES, Charlie Fullback, ZVL 5-l l, 200 Auguilla, Miss. RITCH, Gene Halfbaclc, IVL 5-I I, l75 Troup E5 Q, COACH McCUl.LEY POINTS OUT bockfield strategy to Head Coach Lohor during spring training session. SEMIAN, John SESSIONS, Don Cenler, 3VL QB, 2VL 6-2, 220 6-0, 195 Taylor, Pa. Springhill, La. WINDHAM. Jim WRIGHT, Red Guard, 3VL End, 2Vl. 6-l, 220 6-4, 2'lO Colorado Ciiy Mexia Football ., BANQUET ENDS sEAsoN The 1960 season was brought to a close by acknowledging the outstanding players at the 14th annual Football Banquet. In all, 37 players received letters, 7 of whom were seniors. By team vote two lettermen received further recognition-Jim Windham was chosen Best All-Around Lineman, While Ken Bolin was voted both Best All-Around Back and Most-Improved player. The numerous players who did not letter also deserve rec- ognition for they provided the team with depth and are the future lettermen. To these players, along with the lettermen, the coaching staff, the managers . . . "Thanks," COACHING STAFF LAHAR, Harold-Head Coach. 12 yrs. exp. Was captain and All-Big Seven guard at O. U. Also a member of Chicago Bears' Hall of Fame. A FLANAKIN, Tex-Defense Coach. 11 yrs. exp. Played end for Baylor. HILL, Lovette-Red-Shirt Coach. 29 yrs. exp. Was end at Centenary College. HILL, Swede-Freshman and Varsity backs Coach. 21 yrs. exp. Was tailback for SHSTC. MCCULLEY, Pete-Backfield Coach. 6 yrs. exp. All-Con- ference Back at Louisiana Tech. WATSON, Don-Defense Coach. 4- yrs. exp. 3 year half- hack letterman for A. M. ZUBEL, Andy-Line Coach. 11 yrs. exp. 3 letters at guard for West Virginia U. COACH LOVETTE HILL seems happy with what he sees on the practice field. COACH ZUBEL HELPS lineman Danny Birdwell to establish the correct defensive stance during spring practice. ' it Q.- DlSCUSSING INTER-SQUAD SCRIMMAGE are Coach Flanakin Cleftl and Coach Watson. AN ALERT EYE is kept by Coach Swede Hill for any mis-q's in the backfield. Q' as CCUGARS CAPTURE NCAA BID Combining a steady defense and an offense centering around fast breaks, the Cougars enjoyed a successful season that event- ually led to a bid for the national championship. Pitted against several nationally-rated teams, the Cougars battled rough competition and gained a birth in the NCAA tourney. Leading the Cougar five were co-captains Gary Phillips and Ted Luckenbill. Phillips achieved the distinction of being the University's first All-American eager, winning the honor two years in a row. In capturing this title, Phillips broke the school record for most points in a career with a 1,452 total. Another Cougar having his name written in the school's record book was Tommy Thompson. Accuracy was Thompson's speciality, as he set a mark for the best field goal percentage by hitting 105 of 205 baskets. The cagers worked hard together and each player contrib- uted his part to the team. They co-ordinated team efforts to set new school records for most points, most field goals, and best field goal percentage during the season. Through this team effort Big Red defeated Marquette in the Midwest NCAA playoff game, to advance further than any other Cougar team toward a National Championship. SEASON 'S RECORD UH OPP UH OPP 73 North Texas ..., ....... 5 3 75 St. LOI1i5'n' ...... -- ----------- ---- - ---- 6 7 61 Texas A8rM .,,,,,,. ....... 66 89 Texas ASM' ..................... ---M .-...-------- ----- - ----35 52 Sam Houston ,,,,,, .... .. ................... 5 5 75 Mialni, Fld. ........... .. ..---.--. - ------- - ---------------------------- 39 68 Lamar Tech ,-,,,,,, ..- .............. 64' 92 Loyola' ....... -.-..--- ..-..-..- ------- - .------------ - ----55 51 Oklahomai .,.,,,-,-,,-, , ,....., .,............ 5 5 of P3.CifiC'K' ....-..-...-.-..--------------- - --------------------------- 56 Oklahoma State' ..... -.- .-.----- - ------- 54 88 TUISH ---- ------------U ------ - ---------- - ----- - a------- ---- - ---73 78 Oklahoma City ..... ..................... ....... 6 5 86 North Texas' ------ ---- - --------------- - -- ------------------- --57 68 Wichita -,,-,,,,,. , .,,.,. - .......... ....... 7 1 107 Oklahoma City' ----.- .... ..- ....... - ....... - .... ..-----H73 85 TCU -,,,,,-,,w,,,,,, ,,-,--,,,, .............. ....... 7 2 7 4 Bradley ..................... ------. ..---- ---- --------------------- -V-90 86 0CU -,,.n..., , ,.,,,,,,,,-, , ,,,,,,,, --- ............... 82 62 St. Louis ..... --- ...... -s-...--------- -.--..--- M- ---- -----73 100 Larn-ar Tech' ----- ,M !,-------- .----,, ,.,.,.,,..- 7 3 80 Cincinnati' ..... .. .... - ....... - .......... ..- ..-- ---- ------------- 85 71 Cincinnati --,-,,,,-,,-,,,,,,.,......,............ ............--- 7 4' TU.15El" ..-.---- ----- ---- - ------ - --------- --------'--65 60 Bradley' .... - ------- - -------- - ---------- -- ------- 59 4' Homes Games NCAA PLAYOFFS UH OPP 77 Marquette .... -...--.---- ----- -----M ---------- ------61 64 Kansas State .... .. ...-.. --f --------------- - --------------------------- -75 67 Texas Tech -.-......---.----------------------------69 3I2 Basketball TRIUMPHANT COUGARS REJOICE offer upsetting Bradley, lead the woy os enthusiastic students curry co-captains Ted 60-59. .lock Thompson lleftl ond Don Schverok l3OJ happily Luckenbill and Gary Phillips from the court of victory. TED LUCKENBILL goes high to get his shot off before o St. Louis Billiken can interfere. 3I4 "HEY, TOM, let's get thot bull!" Gory Phillips C545 seems to soy os he instructs Tommy Thompson C403 who's hustling for ci loose bclll dur- ing cz game with Tulsa. UH OPENS CAGE SEASON Houston took to the road for the cage season,s first games, breaking even with a 2-2 circuit record. North Texas was first to bow to the victorious Cougars, 73-53. Next Big Red invaded College Station. However, the Aggie- Broussard jinx again held true, and Houston came away with a clouded 66-61 defeat. The Cougars dropped their second game in a row to a spirited Sam Houston State team, 55-52. In the final travel game of this series, the Cougars edged out Lamar Tech, 68-64. Leading scorer against Lamar was Gary Phillips, who broke the 20-point barrier for the first time this season. Big Red came home to battle with a pair of Oklahoma teams. In the first encounter OU eased by the Cougars 55-51, while Oklahoma State fell to Houston the next night, 56-544. BIG RED WINS TROPHY IN AC TOURNEY Next on the Cougars, agenda was the All-College tourna- ment. A strong Wichita team took UH by surprise and won the first round 71-68, sending the Cougars to consolation play. Houston did capture the runner-up trophy by defeating TCU, 85-72, and Oklahoma City, 86-82, in the remaining games. Returning home the Cougars broke 100 in trouncing Lamar Tech, 100-73. . COUGARS CHALLENGE TOP TEAMS Houston journeyed to Ohio to challenge highly rated Cincin- nati. Big Red played a spirited game and forced the Bearcats into an overtime, but was edged out 74-71. Basketball fever hit the campus with Houston's homecoming. But rugged competition lay ahead. Bradley, then number two team in the nation and undefeated since their game with UH last season, was t.he first of these foes. In a thrilling game Big Red came from behind to tie the Braves late in the game. With 33 seconds left in the game Jim Lemon broke the tie with a free throw to put the Cougars in front 60-59. With that score and amidst a crowd of cheering spectators, the game ended. victory against Bradley. Cougar Dick Molchany. CALM AND SERENE, Coach Guy Lewis encourages his team on to SHAKING HANDS basketball style with an Oklahoma St. defender is Basketball l PHILLIPS ELUDES Lamar Tech cager to retain control of the ball N...-qw... Q 'N' r , :Swv 4 4 , A ' nl b xx :yr .E h-5 -V . 42414 ., V-" V-if M5535 ac, J f 45 li. 'y1A 2 , f f Z H 4',:-- , i 'iif Z A f I Q 7i:VV bk:-Q' H -,af Q - f . fb ,, .-4. . , -Av -1 -3.1 N. .. if.. ,. 1 Basketball .T SIX ARMS IN A TANGLE as Cougar Don Schverak and a trio of Oklahoma State players struggle for a loose ball. COLLISION AT MID-COURT takes place between Jim Lemmon C327 and a St. Louis Billiken in the game UH won. Big Red racked up its second straight upset by defeating na- tionally-rated St. Louis. The victory marked the first time the Billikens had been out-gunned from the field, as the red-hot Cougars poured in 26 field goals, five more than St. Louis. High-point man for the Cougars was Ted Luckenbill, who hit a sizzling 28 points. Houston next hosted Texas A8ilVI. It was the last opportunity for the seniors to break a jinx that kept Houston winless against the Aggies for three years. Houston took advantage of the opportunity and beat the Farmers 89-85 in a hard fought game. From their well-earned victories the Cougars met defeat in Miami. The University of Miami, undefeated on their home court thus far this season, came out on top of a 89-78 score. FIVE STRAIGHT WINS Houston began a winning streak by tromping Loyola of Louisiana, 92-56, on the home court. The Cougars followed up the Win by a tremendous 101-66 Victory over the College of the Pacific. Gary Phillips hit a torrid 35 points, which was high for the season, in this home court victory. For their next encounter Big Red traveled to Tulsa. There the Cougars sunk 58? of attempted goals and walked over Tulsa 88-73. Big Red increased its win streak to four by defeating North Texas 86-57 on the home court. Ted Luckenbill grabbed in 19 rebounds, another season high, to lead the team to victory. The Cougars hit another season high, this time in the scoring department, as they trounced Oklahoma City 107-73. The win for Big Red completed a five game winning streak. 3l7 Q 'F x, Q. J., 5 , 72. 92 .IA PL f .ff 5 'n I ii ibn: X., EE! , C. 34 0 Q ll kj!! av L. will 5. Basketball ,. COUGARS CONCLUDE SUCCESSFUL SEASON At Peoria the Bradley Braves were ready to avenge their lost honor, and did so with a 90-74 victory over the Cougars. Dur- ing this game Houston collected 27 personal fouls which con- tributed greatly to the opponent's victory. UH next encountered a powerful St. Louis team. The Billikens, also seeking revenge, downed the Cougars, 73-62, in St. Louis. In a close game Houston again met the National Champions to be, Cincinnati. On the home court Cougar fans saw Big Red pull up even with the Bearcats late in the game. However, the 4'Champs7' edged into the lead once more and held off the Cougars to win, 85-80. Regular season play ended with Houston's triumph over Tulsa, 89-67. MOLCHANY CONNECTS for o goal cutter maneuvering through TuIso's defense. Thompson ADDING TWO more points to the Cougor's score is Jock ALL-AMERICAN Phillips cums his lump shot over the hecid of Q Cincinnati plciyer. NCAA PLAYOFFS After the successful season the Cougars were chosen as the 'NCAA Midwest Team-at-Large. Big Red then met Marquett in the Midwestern playoff game. In this game the Cougars took the lead early and kept it all the way to win 77-61. It was a rousing victory for the Cougars as they advanced further than any previous Cougar team to- ward the National Championship. The NCAA tourney in Kansas, however, did not prove profit- able for Houston. The first night of the playoffs saw Houston fall to the powerful Kansas State 75-64. In the final game the university's cage season, Texas Tech nosed out the Cougars 69-67. 'auf BISHOP, Denny Guard, 2L Sourh Bend. Ind. HARGER, LyIe Cenrer, IL Lubbock LEMMON, James Guard, 3L Wood River, III. LUCKENBILL, Ted Cenlrer, 3L Elkhart Ind. MOLCHANY, Richard Forward, 3L Johnsrown, Pa. PHILLIPS, Gary Guard, 3L Quincy, III. POLLAN, Bob Guard, IL Lawfon, Okla. SCHVERAK, Don Forward, I L Hous+on THOMPSON, Jack Guard, IL New York Ciry. N. Y THOMSON, Thomas Forwa rd, 2 L Glen Ellyn, III. THURMAN, Richard Forward, 2L Farmingfon, Mo. TUFFLI, Norman Guard, 2L Highland. III. Basketball 0 RENO LIFSCHUTZ Guard Bronx N Y FRESHMAN TEAM SEASON S RECORD Wharton Del Mal Vlctoua Tylel Lamar Tech LHITIHI Techy South Texas Hendelson School of the Ozaukq Bohvau Flat Rlver South Texae Del Mar' Henderson Tylel VICIOIIH Home ame Forfelt WINSTON BAKER DON FIRTH FOVWOVCI and Cenfer Freeport Forward and Guard Madison, Ind FH JOE THOMPSON Guard Houston JACK HORNER Guard Columbra, Pa , 7 .E UH . 77 ................ , ,,,,,...,,...... .,., , 58 79 - ,.,....,,-.,,-,.-,.,.At...,.,,........,.. 57 V, I I ffl 76 ' -' ..,.....,ot,.,vv,v.t.,to.ot,uu.....,..., 58 ,. F 69 - ...... . .... ........... 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"' 40' - A as -as L 4 ., ,,. ' ,L ser 1 -.fe'!-'5':. J ' f:k"f,,.,3:f 1 'i AL LAWRENCE BREAKS THE TAPE in East Lansing, Michigan, to set a new course record and win the NCAA Cross-Country Championship. The University's cross-country team then journeyed to Louis- ville for the AAU Meet on Thanksgiving Day. ln this meet, Lawrence ran each mile in the six-and-a-quarter mile run in a little over five minutes to win the endurance race with a 31:20.53 minute time. Teammates to place at this meet were: John Macy, 6th3 Barry Almond, 9thg Geoff Walker, 15th and Pat Clohessy, 18th. Al- though this marks the first time that Houston has won both meets, it was a repeat performance for Al Lawrence, who won these contests last year. TRODDING THROUGH THE WOODS is outstand- ing cross-country runner John Macy. 322 CROSS COUNTRY TEAM WINS NATIONAL HONORS The distance runners for the University of Houston brought home the National Championships from both the NCAA and AAU Cross-country meets. This marks only the third time in track history that one team has won both titles within a year. It was the thin Australian, Al Lawrence, who paced the torrid distances in both meets to net first places for Houston. First, at the NCAA Meet on November 21, at Michigan State Univer- sity, Lawrence toured' the four-mile course in the creditable time of 192282 minutes. Placing second was teammate John Macy, with a 19:44 clocking. Macy's second place made it a decisive victory for Houston. Other Cougars to place in the meet were: Barry Almond, 8thg Pat Clohessy. Ilthg and George Rankin, 50th. Cross-Country VARSITY cnoss-couNrRY TEAM DISPLAYS Buffy Almond. Sfunding: Pwf Clohessv, Couch TROPHIES. Kneeling: Al Lawrence, John Macy, John MOVES, George RUUWN- 'F' FRESHMAN CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM. Kneeling: Al Rodgers, Gregg Robinson, Woyf Roycull. Stand- ing: Roberf Cozens, Couch Morriss, Geoff Welker. ff - T " A Fri. .En is-W-'1 Xl .lk C AL LAWRENCE was the fourth member of the four mile relay team. Lawrence, a iunior, was slowed down this season with a sore Achilles tendon. JOHN MACY, PAT CLOHESSY, BARRY ALMOND receive trophy for first place in the four mile relay from Texas Relays' Queen, Nancy Ellen Thompson. UH RELAY TEAMS EXCEL The UH thinclads, already nationally known, added to their reputation by setting new meet marks across the nation. It was especially the relay teams that shined. ln almost every relay entered, they took one of the first three places. FOUR-MILE RELAY The four-mile relay team. composed of Al Lawrence, John Macy, Barry Almond and Pat Clohessy, set a new school record. Going into the West Coast Relays they were ranked second in the nation. and it was there the foursome ran the four miles in 16:57.6 to set the new mark. Members of this Versatile team did well in the open mile as well as the half mile, two mile, and three mile runs. In the mile this season Almond led the foursome with a 4:07.8 clocking followed by Clohessy l4:09.7l, Macy K4-:13.4l, and Lawrence f4:17.2l. Almond and Clohessy ran the 880 in 1252.8 and 1:55.8 respectively. Clohessy, Lawrence and Macy competed in the two mile run, and each covered the distance in less than nine minutes. Macy participated in the three mile 324 run with an excellent L3:54.9 clocking to hold the best time in the nation. MILE RELAY The foursome of Earl Harlan, Bob Waterman, Andy Anderson and Ollan Cassell recorded one of the nation's best times in the mile relay. The clocking of 3:10 was set in the Kansas Relays and was the third best in the nation. This team was spearheaded by speedy Ollan Cassell, who clocked a 47.4- in the 440 dash this season-one and two tenths off his all time best of 46.2. Cassell had times of 9.7 and 21.0 in the 100 and 220. Teammates Anderson and Harlan recorded 21.4 in the 220 while Waterman had a 53.8 in the 440 hurdles. 440 RELAY In the 440 relay the quartet of ,loc Dow, Jim Parkhurst, Andy Anderson, and Ollan Cassell recorded another top time in the nation. The relayers' best effort, 41.0, is within two seconds of the world record. Parkhurst participated in the broad jump, while Anderson hit a 9.7 in the open 100. Track .10 his sta rts, OLLAN CASSELL iogs around the track to loosen-up during practice. it ici 5 A BOB WATERMAN sails over hurdle. Waterman was o surprise as he improved his 440 time enough to become a member of the mile relay team. JIM PARKHURST checks spikes before practicing ANDY ANDERSON prepares to execute one of his swift starts. gm 6' if A j'1..,,, , f- - - .1 ' 11- -,. A -v, ..- . , A .5 '-- , ' . .ui-mi -1: r ' ' - ' . 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' I , V ,,, . X ,- 5 M, .54 jg--fa X3 , if ,Q .Mi ,sw Y A IA I! ii -ev awww - 1-. 1, 3 m 5 5, wk QL wg vi A? .., . A ,H U Ln, , mt, 2 jig, L ,- 1, . 3 uuiv K, Q L f 3 --.- L.. , if ,- , FQ Y M5125 V 'l'm I M-has I2 i it as 3 b W B H 1 sf . , I L M ' ' M! ,,.3, Q X -A an-'Bc AA . W W - - - -X 'R 4 ' '- A SH' - A-D 4 Huh' -.. If 355 vit' ' -is. 4, ,. A mb L -- , Sf' "- N .WN f Ig. -, JL Track . , . , , . , , , , he , Mm xl , , . 'sir Y i 1 .' 1:-J yi: :Q eww 'Wai' -- -2--3 ffmwu-sir' 5? ' K 'K - mzfvafrf, f -1 -i' 5-af, ' ' we l-- l I VARSITY TRACK TEAM. Kneeling: Jim Cowan, Earl Harlan, Don Brown, fington, Joe Dow, Ollan Cassell, Bob Waterman, David Hollingsworth, Al Lawrence, John Macy, Barry Almond, Pat Clohessy, Jim Parkhursf, Eu- lan Goldfoof, Coach John W. Morriss. gene Kalisek. Standing: John Reed lmanagerl, Stan Sfarrerf, Tony Whit- - - l r l i FRESHMAN TRACK TEAM. Kneeling: Andre Urbe, Al Rodgers, Wayt Royall, John Doyle, John Parks. Standing: John Reed fmanagerJ, Gregg Robbins, Landis Meyers, Bob Cozens, Geoff Walker, Curtis Hughes, Coach John W. Morriss. 1 1 r ,E I - V ag N ,.,-'aa , :: .--as .1 : I . ' 5 7: Y du m 1:-' . 1 ,,, .,.,,,i, ...M . E as 5 'jg ' Wm , ll 'lu "' 'rr H ' C '-"mFftw 2 ris f it 11 "' "v ,-rw" J L-13 i- - HJ" ' r isifgtg .af?f2- '111 , , , w,:"f-ew ,, , :SY ,E ' u Q ' 5 is .5 4 L4 fail- WT T Under the leadership of Coach Dave Willialns, the University of Houston golf team has again compiled an excellent record. Living up to expectations, they captured the team champion- ships in every tournament they entered with the exception of one, the National Collegiate Athletic Association Tournament. For the first time in five years the Cougars failed to capture a first in this big tournament. Three team members received due recognition when they were named to All-American teams. Homero Blancas and Richard Crawford were chosen for the first team, while Ron Weber re- ceived a third team berth. This year other great golfing representatives of the univer- sity have been: .loel Goldstrand, Babe Hiskey, Fred Marti, Rocky Thompson and Kermit Zarley. FLORIDA COLLEGIATE INVITATIONAL Shooting 1,126, ten under par, the Cougars win the team championship in this tournament held in Ocala, Florida. Frank Beard of the University of Florida edged Houston's Homero Blancas for the individual championship. Blancas finished second with a 278, Babe Hiskey fifth with a 282, Richard Crawford sixth with a 283, Rocky Thompson eighth with a 285 and Kermit Zarley sixteenth with a 289. Hiskey had the best round of the tournament, a 66 in the final round. ALL-AMERICA INTERCOLLEGIATE INVITATIONAL UH golfers played host to the nation's top teams in the Seventh Annual AAU Tourney. The foursome of Richard Craw- ford, Homero Blancas, Joel Coldstrand and Babe Hiskey repre- sented Houston in this tournament. They won the team medal championship after beating Texas A8zM in a sudden death playoff. The Cougars also walked off with the overall, team match and four-ball championships, while Blancas was winning the individual medal championship. SOUTHERN INTERCOLLEGIATE Ron Weber led Houston to victory in this tournament played at Athens, Georgia. The Cougars finished two strokes ahead of the University of Georgia. Individual champ Weber, seven strokes behind the leader going into the final day, shot a 67 and a 68 to finish with a 280. Dick Crawford was third with 282, Homero Blancas fourth with 283, Fred Marti thirteenth with 290 and Rocky Thompson eighteenth with 293. if 1..- ,,- , . - -'J - ,, ,-' -'W'- e-'-'F-'-M'-,"'---W ,. I 1 1 1".'.1-1 b- '. -- ' ' 'H' v-2' 555 f ef I A I ' ' Dfvli-1-',' FN-.,.:Ee- ' - ,Q-if . A . . . I' F-ff' iii' A ' Hr A . -I - ,I 1 , Q , ii E... II gf' H. 'I' V .-. E I COACH DAVE WILLIAMS has Iecl the University of Housion's golf teams io five con- secutive Nafional Championships. ' PRESSURE ON THE GREEN causes tenseness as golfer Richard Crawford prepares To Tap in a putt. Golf ....... Q, . -1 A, if w it 'P ..3' ,, . n' F' V FL 51 if p . 4-57 x '.-qw. r-fl-, 3.11 7g,,- ,,,. H0 nf"'.,, I n yi TQ! 'S Ts uma 1 ,-1--w,.,....-v-K , :fx " t ' 1 -.. ' in' P ' ' N-' - M' l'r'.",'fa ,. 1 Q ' fi QF, , an I . , - 4' , . 1.5. --5 352, f ' ' . ig' . fuk ..N, Q W .,.,,g if 8 .5 4 fy . A" Q- vy - ' , .1 I t " 5 . I ' VJ '. - 1 '21 r'L V .512 ,K gf 1, . r X U- + D' A, JE: . 1' cg,-..-4 - , ,.. V : iff' , f.,,i13 , 'wb' F+'4-N':'1- , "tj: 5 " ..' gf' -f gg, 5 15- . ' 'i--"--as Li? . ,rx SMR .41--i:LTSf'QJv -- , ff .1 ,EE A!9y,,..,. H12 YNJ!f gi 'fl E 1 O .v, ,..- 'z j 's.w5vwW'F9':.1 63,1-f "' "den i 3 " ,. wkxf. W 1' I.- :N QXQ ffff.-.ESV ' .K w- sv. gh ' '.....-,.-w n. Y. iv- gr:- . , ,s,.- .,,, ,. r .-gf ,- 5- .,-K. 4- 4- , Asia ,Q L: i 4 .Q , 'F ,rl . ' 'wi' . ,. -A kq..,..g A F ami- 'fli H - . XJR 4 N J 6 N x w ,R li 1' - Y-1 .I,Q1'L'l"1,- . V ,.. X. I 1 'Q ,Q '1if:S1N-11:3 . .A-"c?- 1' ' 92 5 1 5, 9: 1,33-::'1,::Qs x, A' Hsgikfll xxx- fm , - -. 1 . .V-' f- H1 .w uf -fu ,f9g"'.v"if -V ' A rf. ., mf, ,E ,.. X pan", Q .,. , A ra wa , 1 A li 4? 'R , H 3 -N! .x 1 R L ,L - , SMQQ ff, y' . " if , A -'-'elf 'S V- 1255 T151-r-Jfiiga, iris - ' , 7- 'vzlig ,.: ,-ffl Q x V , ,-35. '- l -nm, ' ' . 1-1v'v7w'.l,'j5E'wEQV4, jil-27v1,: iii gf Ll',5'fQ-f'w1wi'4iTE.i:Af:ffI 1 - fffgf ' .:.nf 11?f',ie:'i',eL,i1 gf:fZis wa nr: - " ' 1? '4' 'Q'-1, -f5i"f?. x ZF' 4 ' : V V My ef fi 1 , ZJALJV -ltd? c . J' f' if 14 - -U A P' ,f 1 f ., " ' xfvfizff - L . f QQLMU- 'hi ' W Q pi? . - 1, ' ' ' - v W . ' if -:5'.A" ' N 'ji' . ' 1 gg 4- Q , x . h x Y' ' 3 " A f W -. -4 , wg ' ' L" J ' YJ - Q - , . 2 , imf 7' YQ 1 EN 17. V V.: iii' S7 - x, f2"f.1i':. 1 ,Qt-.. , .Hb h ji C M 'I ,. fy" , ' 1' I . ,i Y v PLL -:V U A 5. N .1-.,. .,,, '- 4, ,R ,, , I ,n V ' ' , , A.. lffffgi 2 Qfvfif' ' 1 rf yy, '-Q 5 v 1 ' I Q I 1 i, If .Jr 1 I V. 5 x an JN, A ,.d .19 K .ft-N, A . FS. K W ffA N -0. ix i if A52 l,X.l' GOLDSTRAND IN A SPOT! But if could be worse-if the bclll were in The wafer Too. 332 TOURNEY CREATES VARIED SITUATIONS CRAWFORD CONNECTS to ease ball out of The sand ircnp and up onTo The green. wx g V ' 5, u -K Q 35 H we 'T'-ng V M we N - 1, ,. , V , is "H ' I , J., '. , , Q FOLLOWING THROUGH on his swing helps Babe Hiskey to cut strokes from his game. sul-gn-an W. , fx .x YQQQ WMM gm V9 K' 1 , A V 1 "1 ' w , .'- f . -f . . J n , X J v AQ f S Lu? , N ..,f'db5 ,af fi? Nl 5 .4 A IN R is TENNIS TEAM BREAKS EVEN SEASON'S RECORD OPP Texas ASIMR ......... .... ,. ....... .. ....... .. ..... .. .- ..... -..---1 Texas ASIM ....... - .................................. - ................ --..--.1 University of Corpus Christi' --.- ............. ................ - -6 East Texas State! ...,................... S ....,.... - .......... 5 T.C.U." .................................... ........ 0 South East State College' ......... ....,.......... 2 Mississippi State University' - ..... ..4- New Mexico State University' .,.. ......., 1 Texas Westernk .,..............,. ..... . .. .,,,........t, ...,. . ..0 Trinityx' .,,...i..,ii, ,, .i.. ,.., 4 ,.,.,.,,., ....,,,. 4 University of Texas' ,,..,.. 4 Lamar Tech ,...,.t ., .,.,.,, 6 L.S.U ......,..,t..,is... ,sA,,4 3 4 Home game VARSITY TEAM Kneeling: Aden Lopez Joe Kuykendall Stcmdnng AI Acrron, Coach John Hoff Ken DuBose KUYKENDALL Houston Won-65 Lost-7 In-Ls- ,- .' wifi H M if , A W NH 2 - Q , , Y "7?f'7?T'7?? H 1 9 f ,ff ' Vu' A ' 3 V E- ., ,jiif lkfxjg- ,jns ' , - ,H ,.l. A -u.,',-H -A 5 ' ' '1?4'i"'-?::i:Qw: EbTQiM v ' - 'N 'WPPVIP fd ,V -'-U.. ny. gf , -so 'vs-A ,, N 1,1 ,fl S A ., . ', 'S Q ' Hu qu A W I if .. '-,- 5. ' f 4 !,i::f1.I4Q-I, 13. -rl. 1 N ' 'A I 5,14 ,.-gif M ' --1. "F fx ' . '5:',.:"s::ar4 ,. , L.. ,. . . A lxj- . an .- Wuf. '-- fi.. Q, N A sw ,, -,, ,. , , g A+-- ifw"'Hf5aLf,ff's.2f-fs'V ' A 1 -hxcoffrii-ipigi' . 11 L ix ha '11 ' M W, X ' A Vw. w wx 'A :Q 'nv,,,m- m , A A- .N Vfifliil A A ' A fs H1 M f i Y ,W- Jrsh.. Tennis , ADAN Lopez 'fi , El Poso 'Qi 1. "1 Won-9g Lost-4 'I ' v"'i5T' 4'2" P -' s'f'4','.. ., Aff, V35 Swivy i V' 15: 'a KEN DUBOSE Corpus Chrisfi Won--55 Lost-8 l A , T! AL AARON I 1 -. q v 'T Tompo, Florida ' Q Won-5, Losf-8 A 45.17 'Q -.,...:, ,-w If FRESHMAN TEAM Lester Hewiff, Cliff Tyree. Bottom To Top: Ronnie Monshuugen, - if f. , A ,. cfzfzgg.-ff , : -Mrfks If ,Lf Q A A A-+4 'Lt ,mr r il ii. -V A f . d. 'srivgairftwiifeiffrf-fifrsee - - - ---msfffwwfs-' . , f l f. Q .A J iz A N Y H xref, 1 VQJJW, T, 'ig as fi 1 ' V ' ' ' . I' X- ,H it rg.. ga mi .W , H M f v ' T , ll' V ' ,rits it . it Wi. .i is ' 1 A it iii it . gg -i Q-1-v W , IJ jx, i, e ii' im, 1 .rig -f . '- W T l l READY FOR THE PITCH during practice are batter Virgil Fisher and catcher Clifton Jubelo. SEASONS RECGRD UH OPP 0 Minnesota' .... '---------------- 8 1 Minnesota' ..,........ ---------- - ---- - '----- 6 0 Oklahoma State' .... .. ......-- ------- 2 4 Oklahoma State' .... ............. ------- 7 3 Nebraska' ............. - .....---- --------f- ----'-- 5 6 Texas ASLM' .... ----- ----------- -10 6 Trinity' ........... ------- 1 1 1 Sam Houston ....... .-..--- ------- 6 8 Sam Houston , ...... .................------ ---4'-- 9 5 St. Mary's .......t. w -.-----.- - ---'---- --f---- 6 1 Sam Houston' .,... ------- 0 10 Texas Lutheran' .-.. ---- 0 6 Texas Lutheran ...... ..------------ - ----------- 5 4 Nicholls State' ..... --- --------------- 0 2 Nicholls State' ...,. ------- 3 i' Home game BUNKY CALDWELL Outtield' and Catcher Average-.3535 RBI-5 336 BAD LUCK PLAGUES UH BASEBALL TEAM With the return of nine lettermen the Cougars' outlook for a successful season in baseball was bright. A solid corps of pitchers composed of Bob Peters, All-American candidate, .lim Wilson and Tom Thomson was backed by a potentially great infield. This infield with Fred Green at first base, James Shirler at second base, Al Campo at shortstop, Bucky Watkins at third base and Pete Stonestreet catching was predicted to be the best Cougar quintet since 1953. An outfield led by Bunky Caldwell and supported by Ross Hoplcin, Eddie Mitchamore, Bobby Brezina, Virgil Fisher and Clifton Jubela promised to give this team strength. However, with the first games came even greater misfortune that was to plague the team throughout most of the season and dim the bright prospects. Two top players were badly injured- Pete Stonestreet and Bob Peters-and a losing streak began. Although the jinx lowered spirit, the players did not give up the battle. They kept fighting. Each game brought them a little closer to a win. The eleventh game finally saw the Cougars rewarded. By winning four out of the five remaining games, they showed that they were capable of everything they were predicted to have been. A pa ' 3 . l " hi it 5" i 1. ,iae X.. ' x ' ff :J w 4 iiil W :-- ' in xxx" Baseball T ' r A 5 .P rv 1 T rl ' 'L T ' if ' -A+ T Y. Vi' I BUCKY WATKINS JIM WILSON Third Bose and Second Bose Pifcher Average--.2325 RBI-6. Average-.1435 E.R.A.-3.04. ru H. H H fwfgsew .S r H 'ww E ,D T 'X nf- u,' ' "' PETE STONESTREET TOMMY THOMSON Catcher Pitcher Average-.1255 RBI-3. Average-.1827 E.R.A.-2.02 X 1 fqfffffffivff' ,wfzli m..E-f ,,,.,M.I-., -E1i3,,mM,-..,-...,,:.1qc,, , mc, V1 'N 5 I ,I I 4-4-'I , Ag . -,- ,. I Z' - I-,,-I I .aI -V COUGAR BASEBALLERS ,.f A0 EDDIE GORE Pitcher cmd Ouffielcl Average-.3535 RBI-If E.R.A.-6.28. -- 5 ' me u - 131' wissefrmyv I af vu Qgsigaww Q,-:,ww , - ji EI I I I' K: ' BOBBY BREZINA Ouffield Average-.2005 RBI-I . I I 338 JAMES SHIRLEY Second Bose Third Bczse and Ouffleld Average I9I RBI 5 ROSS HOPKIN Ouffield Average-.250 RBI-2. Baseball mmm amz-ff ,KH H, 37 fe SK 1 83 lf: L y 1 'R Am? STUDENTS DEMONSTRATE THEIR ATHLETIC ABILITY Each year various organizations and individuals on campus compete in intramural sports. Intramurals, sponsored by the men's and womenis athletic departments, give the entire school an opportunity to participate in sports. Besides being fun, intra- mural sports stress team work, competitive spirit and sportsman- ship. This year, as in the past, the competition was keen and the narrowest of margins often separated the winners from the losers. Listed below are those teams who edged out the others. MEN'S INTRAMURALS F irst-Sigma Nu Fraternity Second-Varsity H f Independentl Third-Phi Kappa Theta Fraternity WOMEN 'S INTRAMURALS F irst-Chi Omega Sorority Second-Delta Zeta Sorority Third-Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority OUTSTANDING INTRAMURAL PARTICIPANT AWARD-Given to Grace Everift lleftl by Miss Elizabeth Closs. BASKETBALL-Won by Chi Omega. Sitting: G. Phillips iCoc:chl, V. Connolly, B. Hoinline, M. Kasper. B. Dietz, J. Buchanan, B. Hodell, J. Pittman, V. Dciunoy, J. Morris. Standing: 340 I ntramura ls K, 1 f l ' nr 1 FOOTBALL-Sigma Nu won. Kneeling: P. Schoenfeld, J. Easley, B. Allen, Gregory, G. Cooper, B. Hood, E. Murphree. B. Brogdon, J. McCaskill. Standing: N. Jones, B. Hammann, D. Kelly, J. . Mp ,. . , . . . -. ,Av TENNIS DOUBLES-Varsify H members ' Thomas. l BADMINTON MIXED DOUBLES-Champs were Adan Lopez and Grace Everitf. who won are Bill Roland and Murphy "" "M" ""l ""' . .. A QW. ,. .-,. ARCHERY-First place won by sharpshoofer Carol Akkerman of Alpha Chi Omega. INTRAMURALS CONTINUE INTO SPRING SEMESTER ,l iiff f iis' . . -if ll J 1 J fin I, . . i. if i -I QT!-' A W . . in SWIMMING-Won by The Architectural Society. Piciured are: M. King, J. Hagan, D. Jenkins, B. Widdowson, D. Gentry. SWIMMING-First place won by Delta Gamma. Standing: B. Schneider, Z. Zedler, T. Tannery, J. Craig, M. Far- rer, B, Purifursf. Diving: S. Sullivan. Intramurals ...1 -:S TENNIS SINGLES-Won by Norman Jones of Sigma Nu. BASEBALL-Won by Sigma Chi. Standing: B. Grunden, C. Kubena, B. Barnes, M. Worley, B. Rau, J. Henderson, J. Chiaramonfe. Kneeling: A. Rogers, D. Easton, B, Goldman. -H..:4:-:L 2 Y .4 . ,- 5 -.a,:L:an.i:':n-L i ' ' '- . . 1 I . . . i ' . - .. . .rf -f . - .L . ... - ,. 4 4 V Luna l . l ' ' - H'---V -- f- L-.q..... - ' . : ..g,J, LA' 1, - - A K if' - ' .1 NT N ' H5155 T " V . ff V X. Y, ' X' l Lfvfi ng.. t ' V- ' .fn 1 " if l. ii. ,i Wi. ii . X E i . BADMINTON DOUBLES-Won by G. Everilf ond D. BASKETBALL, VOLLEYBALL, TRACK-Won by Varsity H members B. Brezino, G. Deen, B. Whifaker. Roland, B. Van Osdel, J. lsbell, D. Newby, W. Feaqan. na, , , X x' 2' WWA- ' aide? 5 fwf- ...W 1 fix fm mv: ,, W-M 1fWQ5,.z::aQ,54z4,,,,Nf:5 'mi' w 12 :qw i I 1 W , u , A A 4 . 1 .ff . q A M .KM ,mv . N. ,, 'fm huns H 7, M . 'N ,Q wp ag.: .ff My Q, ,MM W fn, a, , ,ff , My-ffQ " ' Q Y .,,,. yw ,ff fx Ui' ,., my 1.- M, ,, i gk: M m g vi' f :+ ..f ' 1 54:54. ' ,pw it ,liflm 'HA iii? -K 5' V V 'WW 7 f . A ,W ,, f km 'il - 4, M in A -Q.f. 5 . I -- . ifa, J, V, ,N A 3 W A ,, vrwigzrf - - . , Www, Lt A-wi"g Lfiwyf A .K J " ,, ,L , 1 A-:wg - 'ew " 355 fi , kg" 7 44-MQ, ,.,, W3 xx' Vx - N253 T. ei? ff? 3 , Vwaafw -fgif' V .,-Jr L 1 ' WS-K-' ,mn fv,j,- f ' " 2 fs . V f ,, iff: ' - S .ix- N : , vw 1 x. f' 'I 'll The picture on these two pages shows the office from which most of the production of this book has originated. That7s 'Yours Truly' there at the far end. It seems as if I have spent the greater portion of this year right there or within a few steps from there. But this is not true for a yearbook must reflect the activities of its university and to do this meant getting out of the office and into those activities. Between staying in and getting out, the editor talks, eats, sleeps and lives his yearbook. I say, '4His," because the editor feels the book is all his doing. but it is not ALL his. It is the final resultant of many efforts from . . . . . . Kathy-at whom I fussed for being slow, but it turns out that I am last to finish. . . . Gayle-the girl who wanted to know if she could help and ended up an associate editor. . . .Mike C.-willing to learn and eager to do a good job. . . .the photographers-Jim and Mike W., who put up with our criticisms. . . . Al-selling advertising to help pay for these 392 pages. . . . people like Eugene Cook, Ollie Lorehn, John Perdue. Lynda Moore, Carol Akkerman and Merideth Trube. . . . Ted-the guy who found time to do many special pictures for us even with his crowded schedule. . . . Cathy-with a problem of her own, the COUGAR. . . . Bill Daly, Fred Stash, and Virgil Zoth aiding with sports. . . . Dr. Nicholson and his office staff. . . . Mr. Farris Block and everyone in the Office of Informa- tion fsometimes referred to as my second homel. . . . the Office of the Registrar. . . . my instructors-who were understanding of my early morn- ing blank look. . . . Nancy-she knew the problems and was sympathetic to them. . ..Ted Nance and all of those people around the Athletic Department. . . . Various deans-especially Dr. Will, Mrs. Ebaugh- and c'Chief', Mitchell and their secretaries. . . . Bishop Photographers-responsible for making the class pictures. . . . Ted Hendricks and the Alumni Office. . . . Chief Baker and his staff-whose friendship meant much to us all. . . . the people at the Den and Woods with a good supply of coffee. . . . Goldie and Buddy, my aunt and uncle, whose apartment I turned into an office. . . .lVIr. Ross-with whom it was all right, if it was in the budget. . . . Mr. Strader-he didn't want to rush us, but did wish we would at least start. . . . Mrs. "V"-handling so many tasks they would fill this page. . . . Martin and J ack Hamilton of Taylor Publishing Company -their helpfulness and attitude is much appreciated. . . .my parents-understanding of why their son seldom wrote or traveled that road to Brownsville. Many other people, on and off the campus, helped in mak- mg... . . .this book, I hope, one of the best. . . . this year, I know, one of the most memorable and reward- ing. f4f f advertising week - adVeI'tiSi11g alpha gammq unive kCGpS uS rD11i1'1g-'-- me '75 ,mr 6 WI un,- 'ms 1 w mm I ' 2: . 'N STUDENT INDEX li lr g I , v i ADVERTISERS INDEX American Title Guaranty Company ............... Associated Publications ........,. - .......... ...... Atlas Bradford Company ,....... - .... - Avalon Drug Company .............. .. ....... Baash-Ross ,... - ..,....,,............... - Bess High Florist ............... .. Band oi the Southwest ..,........ Bill Williams - ..............,........ ---- ............ . Brown Oil Tool Company ............-.............. Cameron Iron Works, Inc. ...... - ........,.......... Cecil B. Lee Academy of Charm and Modeling Champion Paper 81 Fiber Company ......,,... Clampitt Paper Company ...... --- ............. -. Dee Brass, Inc. .................................. -- East End State Bank ............ Eddy Refining Company ............,............ -.. First City National Bank ........................... .... First Mortgage Company of Houston ....... Foley's .,.,......,......................,.. ---- ......... . Football Gaylord Page Sigs .....................,.. - ........... Stickle Company ,....... George Alan Company, Inc. ...., L Gulf Printing Company ............. - .... Hamilton Supply Corporation --- ....,. - Hamman Oil St Refining Company ....,,... Hammett's Auto Bake .....,.............. ..... Harrisbury Motor Parts .....,... W- ........ C. Harrison Equipment Company, Inc. .... Higbee 81 Mitchell t....,..,.........t. H ......... Houston Houston Houston Houston Houston Houston Hughes Humble Jesse H. Cigar Company ........................ Bank 81 Trust .................. - t..... H ..,. Coca-Cola Bottling Company ....,. First Federal ...,............ -A ........... . Lighting 81 Power Company .,.... National Bank ....,...,... - .... - .......... . Tool Company .........,. A ........... Oil Company .......,.. Jones Interests ...... King Center Drive-In ................ - ..... KTRH L. L. Ridgway Company .... MVP. ...... Langham, Langston, Burnett Kc Dyer ........ Michel .T. Halbouty ................,. ..-- ........ .. Ben Milam Hotel ,............................... Milwhite Mud Sales ........ - ...... - ......... Mission Manufacturing Company ........ Monarch Launders and Cleaners ..... National Bank of Commerce ...... --.- Oak Farms Dairy .................... --.. .r........ One's A Meal ,,,.,...,...,............. --- ........ Palmer-Houck Chemical Corp. -- ..... . Parker Brothers 81 Company, Inc. ..... . Peden Iron Sz Steel Company - ......... Prescription House ........,...,.............. Prince's Drive Inn ,,.. .,.. , . ..,.,.. Quintana ,....,. ........,. - .-.- Rapid Transit Lines ....... Rodney's ..,..,................. Sakowitz ........,.,................ Shaffer Tool Works .....,.,..,... .................. Shell Oil Company ................................. ....- Slater Food Service ......,.,,..,.,....................... South End Building Materials Company -- Southwestern Camera Company -..- ........... - Southwestern Savings 81 Loan Association T. J. Bettes Company ,............. - .................. Texas Ice Sz Fuel Company ........ - ................ Texas National Bank ,... .. ....,.,... . The Dow Chemical Company L- ........ .. The Maple Room ............................ - ....... The Superior Oil Company ..,.e LW... .......... The Texas Company ,..,........... .4 .....,..,. United Gas Company .-- .... , W. D. Haden Company .....,..,............. W. H. Curtin 81 Company ......... - ...... .... Wallace Duplicator Company -W ............... Warwick Hotel ........,...,.....,.. - ....... W--- ...,. -..- Wessendorff Nelms Company .,,,,,,.,..,,..,,,.,.,, Wilson Stationary 81 Printing Company Wyatt Industries, Inc. ................,................, - A-B Student Index A Andre, Michael Huni Jr. ..,. 237 Aaron. Alford ..,..,...,,. 334, 335 Andrus- Eunice ---------......... I04 Abby' Mike ,,,.,.4. ,,,A------,,.,A- 2 38 Andrus. James Jay L. .... 284 Abel, Margarei Kulhanek .... 74 AWQSJQ l-Ofmle -A"vA-A 43- 292. 295 Abercrombie, Lynn .,,. I92, 2I4, AVIOUTI- Adnan Haill -------- 278 227 Argiropoulos, Palricia .w..,,.. 43 Abraham, Joseph Brian Jr I04 AFQUG. John Willis .....,-..... 43 Accomando, Frank 4....,4. 74, 94 Arrner. Ronnie Kenr ....,,J..,J. 66 Accurso, Pele Anlhony 74, 94 Affifil-ICl. Johnny V.w............... 74 Acree, Sara Eloise 74, 94, 223 Amlm. Larry MiI+on -. V.,. 295 Anlha Ann .e,, l83, 2l7 Adams, James Keni ..,.,.., 253, 264. 265 Adams, Jan ......,.J.,..,,., . 74, 94 Adams, Joseph Anihony ,... 66 Adams, Ronald Dean ....,.,, I04 Adkins Arnold, Edwin Earl .....,,,.... 230 Arnold, Jack George .A,. 43, 228, 240 Arnold, Jerry Ray ,... 279, 280 Arringlon, Doris Ann B. 74, 94 Asher, Jerry 57. 250, 292, Ahmacli, Reza ,oA,.,.,...,, .. ,,... 57 330 Ainsworlh, Reagan .,,.,,.... Akkerman, Carol l90, 2l6, 342 Alanis, Roy . .e... . 66, 293, 294 Alailar, Adil Hameed 66, 274 Alban, James Timoihy 248, 268 Aleo, Beiiye Morgan . 43 Alexander, Warren .........,., 275 Alford, Juanila Ann ..,, 43, I26, 222, 23l Alksne, Edwin Rudolph 74. 94 Allbrighi, Thomas Leon ..,... 66 Allbrillon, Dale Lee ,,,....,..,, 57 Allen, Bem Price Jr. .... 240, 34I Arringron, Jean Thomas 74, 94 294 Allen, Bill .,.......,..v,,....... ..... 2 33 Allen H. Sieve .. . 280 Allen Harry Kinnard Jr. 74 Allen, Allen, John Dave Jr. ......,.,, . 66 Michael Terry ,, ,,,3,,, 43 Allers, Harry Diehl ...... ,.,.. 2 36 Almond, Clive Barrie 260, 327 323. 324. Alsheikh, Hazim Abdulla .. , 235 Alsobrook, John Oliver .,,. 43 Allemus, Eddie Merle .,...V.. 243 Amass, Shirley ...,.,,.,,,v.,.,s.,. 259 Anderson, Andy ........ 325, 326 Anderson, Ann Chrisiin 43, 222 Anderson, Bernice .....,..,,..,,,, 74 Anderson, Francis Joseph ,,o, 43 Anderson, Harlene .,,.. ,,.. . 22I Anderson, John O. Jr. .... 2I0 57 Anderson, Richard Wayne Aikinson, Roberl Douglas .. 75 Alsinger, Ernesi C. Jr. ........ 25I Aulr, James Gilberr ..,.. ..... I 00 Aurich, Richard William ,.,, 66 Ausiin, Gene Ray 66, 279, 28I Avery, Richard Warner .... 245 Avilla, Joe . ,,,,,,,......, 258 Ayles, Earl Murphey ,,,. 75, 94, 278, 295 Ayres, Donald Clarence E. 43 Ayres, Eddie Ray .,,A,,,, 43, 2l5 B Bacon, James Roland ,... 75, 94 Baiamonle, Rosemary .A,..... 43 Bailey, Elyndabeih ........ 75, 94 Bailey, LigIw+ ............ 266, 273 Bailey, Raymond ........ 57, 2ll Bain, Yvonne ,..,......,........,..., 43 Bakenhus, Frederick A. .... 245 Baker, Charles ,. ,.,,, IO4, 255 Baker, Diana ,,,..,,,A,,,,........... 43 Baker, Joe .. .,,,,.,.., ...........,,. 4 3 Baker, William Albin ......e. 2IO Baker, Winsion Leo . ....,..... 32l Baldwin, Bob Lee ...,....,... 259 Ballard, Pamela Jo .,,. 43, 2l8 Ballenger, Paulelle ............ 43 Bammel, Carol Ann ,....,...,.. 66 Bang, Eihelynn .....,...... 57, 275 Bankslon, John .. c.,...,.., 29l Banksron, Thomas A. ..... .,.. 2 79 Barber, Wanda Kay .... 57, 275, 29l Barlield, Marilyn Joan P. .,.e 75 Bariield, Samuel Charles 75, 2I I Barker, Diana Lou ..,,.,,,.,c, 245 Barker, Marcia Nan ,,,,,,,,,,,, 279 Barnes, Belly ..,....,.... 245, 275 Barnes, Chesler F. Jr. .e,..,.. 342 Barnes, George Phillip .....,., 57 Barnell, Gary Thomas .... 253 Barnell, Roberr Delane ,... 307 Barreil, Kennelh Horlon ..,. 43 Barron, Thomas Florian 43, 235 Barrow, William Ruffin ........ 44, 24l, 295 Barlholomew, Frank C. .....Y.. 44 Barrie, Thomas Frank ........ 264 Barrleii, Alan Leigh ,........... 75 307 228 Ballaglia, Josephine .,.. 75, 94 Bass, Barron Dean ............ Balson, Kennelh ........ 66, Bauer, Seymour ................ 259 Baumer, Michael .,,......... 75, 94 Baumgarien, Roger 66, 275,277 Bauscher, William .. ,.....,,, 259 Bayer, Harrier ..,. 57, 259, 276 Baylor, Roberl ....... .... 6 6. 29l .. 66 Bean, Floyd .......... ........... Beasley, Dixie ........................ 44 Beck, Marilyn ,Jones ............ 66 Becker, John ........ 228, 244, 289 292, 295 Beckerley, James Gwavas ,..v 44 IOO. 259 . IOO Becnel, Leo John ..,. Beddoe, Melvin Thomas Beeler, Frazier .,,,........c,...,,, 57 Belcher, Brian E. ................ 238 Bell, Laura ..,.......,..........,...... l00 Benavides, Eva .................... 57 Benderoil, Barlon Leigh Benham, Jimmy Doyle ........ 66 Benn, Charlolle Lee ............ 44 Benson. Bel-ly ................ 75. 94 Berberian, Kaiherine N. .... 223 Berenr, Ruhi Ruslu ,... 75, 94 Berger, Barry Siuarl' ........ 244 Berger, George Dixon .,...... 57 Berger, Roger Beniamin ........ 44 Bergeron, John Thomas .... 75, 94, 2l2 Berleih, Thomas Bagby ...... 44 Berry, Charles ...........,.....,.. 260 Berry, Richard ,..,...........,.... 260 Berihelor, Larry ......Y. I38, I42 Beymer, Frank M. III ............ l45 Bianco, Daniel A. ............ 75. 94 Biggers, Glenda Hensley 75, 94 Biggers. Laura Ross ............ 66 Bigler, Richard Edward 208, 284 Bilansky. Harry David ,....... Billingsley, Belle Sue .,..... Binder, Paul ..... ...........,...... Binion, Slanley Bond IO4, Binkley, James Arihur ........ Birdwell, Daniel Lee .... 307, Bishop, Dennis Frank 239, Bishop, John Leason ...,.. . Biundo, Bruce 75, 94, 235, Black, Allan Richard .,....,. Black, Buzz ......,. I32, I4I, 57 279 57 256 210 3I 1 320 28I 289 Black, Siephen Caldwell .... Blackburn, Carl Joseph ..,. Blake, Francis Eugene .... 76, 94 Blancas, I-lomero Jr. ...... . 330, 33l, 333 Blanchelle, William H. .,...,,. 44 Blaylock, Jerome Wayne 76, 94 Blazek, John Thomas Bleier, Edwin- Francis ....,... 307 Blomslrom, David B. 76, 94, 252 239 273 Black, Eddie ......... ,......,.., . . 243 243 259 Bloom, Noel Charles ............ 44 Bobys, Avi . ...................... 276 Bodden, Bari Bryce ,,.. 2I7, 285 Boeger, Johnny Louis ........ 2II Boelsen, Charles Henry '76, Boelson, Nancy .................... Boldger, Lulher Earl .,...... Bolin, Johanna ............ 76. Bo-lin, Kenneih Doyle 300, Bolinger, Arihur ................ Boll, Neil . ...,.................... . 95 44 IOO 95 307 76 259 Bolling, William Alvin .. ..,. . 44 Bond, Vicior Bernard ..,...,. I43 Bonneau, Roloeri Eugene ..,. 2I I Bonno, Joseph Paul ............ 67 Boone, James Carier Jr. .... I04 Shasta Goes to a Football Game 348 f yin Bank of the s 4 MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATIO We producea as Texas..'l, at X Pure as gold x - 1 k l HOMOGENIZU7 Xt X XX l X' X of quic -c eaners and floor -finish products l miami for industry. . .detergents, ug,---.lgggwax I .xoqblb u N Q -'EW 0 ik. 4 strippers. . .plastic floor f' ' ts. . . HQIHNIIIII mir. ,dvi Tv E steam-cleaning compo - .' gy gJ SX . . Nd w ,bp 'Q' Z concrete sealers. . . .lL?'1'-si. '9 'XI . 5 .,i'i7f"t'f" ? floor Sealers. . .plwrzoor Lib-'I For sea.- ln. 1 Q concrete cleaners. . .wax strip . 1 cleaning ' , , 0 compounds. . .floor waxers.. . . ' ts. . . 'li'-:QI A plastic floor finishes. . .floor mgete sealers. . . concrete cleanerl- 'N' .J-, . ...,,lrft Hi" X 1 we formulate for private labels 'dugg -"'-it ""' 'dihlllh A ml O L' ' ,241 chemical specialties fore QNQ J -'nome W" 'Ik X fri lily X use. . .using constant researr, Gulf , Coast need. . .constant rf " 'earch O ' I Ji- xx . l Q4l p . to full every Gulf Coast need. . . ff X lllXuRYlcE CREAH X Our phone number IS JAckson 2-l438. . . Richer creamer mstier X Our address is .352l West Dallas. . .Houston. . . ' .UM one Wm th f, I ' the multifarious manufacturer of chemical I q YH' e 'nest' l specialties for industrial and home use. . . l l Milk and Ice Cream PALMER-HOUCK CHEMICAL CORP. 1? . 641:14 I A T N wr X g f fs IT TAKES PEOPLE to convert pulpwood into paper. So thriving forests mean increasing job opportunities for young Texans. By practicing and encouraging forest conservation, Champion is helping to maintain these oppor- tun1t1es for the graduate of today - and tomorrow fix .. K L . 2 , V 2 x "' THE CHAMPION PAPER AND FIBRE COMPANY Manufacturers of pulp and paper from Texas forests V.. 350 to the CLASS of 1961 JESSE H JONES INTERESTS CONGRATULATIONS B-C Borcherr, Rebecca Jane .,.. 44 Bork, John Erik 67, l27, 2l0, 242 Bosion, Kirby Lee ..,............. 2l l Boswell, Cecil Wayne ........ 44 Boswell, John Howard ..., 254 Bou-Shibl Salim Khazem .... 278 Boudreaux, Denise K. .,...,.. 57, I87, 226, 279, 285 Bourguardez, Wayne H. ,... 243 Bowersox, Thomas 57, 243, 257 Bowman, Dennis .,......v.....a. 238 Bowman, Richard ..,,.,.......... 29l Boxx, Baxier .........,...... 76. 95 Boyd, Jim Allen ,,oc.... 76, 95, II9, l96, 209, 2l l. 2I2. 245, 287, 290, 292 Boykin, Moreau Vaughn 76, 95 Brackeir, William Quinn .,.. l04, 255 Bradford, Howard Pyle .,,,..,. 44 Bradley, John Bourland .... 259 Brochle, Wali .......,,,..,.....,. 290 Brogdon, William Grenn .... 44. 240, 34I Brooks, Harry Louis Jr. ,,....,. 67 Brooks, Richard Alan 2I I, 212 Brooks Brooks , Tensie Ann .... 67, 274 , William Jean .o...o,. 250 Broughion, Frances Gail .... 44 Broussard, Lawrence Ray .... 308 Brower, Carol Ann .... l5I, 248 Brower, Hudson .........,........., 67 Brown, BeHy Ann .,..,,,,,..,,,,, 44 Brown, Bill Byron .... 260, 308 Brown, Byron B. .... 252, 253 Brown, David Wayne ...,.... 44 Brown, Donald Earle ...,,... 327 Brown, Franklin Posielle 76, 95 Brown, Sianley ,. I55, I62, 279, 280 Brown, Lee Augusi' .,...,,. 76, 95 Brown, Roberi' Edward 252, 253 Buschardi, Bolling E. Jr. Busse, Parricia Diane ,...,,,. Buiera, James Michael ..,..... 45 Builer, Roberi Dean Jr. ,...,,,. 45 Bulls, Ruih Nell ...,.... 58, 245 Byars, Jerry Adron ,v,., Byars, Joe Frank .,....,..,....., Byars, John Wesiley Jr. Byers, Norman ..,................, Byers, Roberr Riley ...., Byrd, William Edwin Jr. Byrne, William Michael C Cain, Roy Earl .....,....... Calelly, Gale Clara P. .,A, 76, 95 Calveri, lan Arbuckle l04, 256 Calveri, Kaihy Ann ..,,,,,,..,, 45 Calverl, Roberi Don ............ 67 Cammack, William Rex ..,c l04 Bradley, Karen Faye ..,,, Bradshaw, David ,,...... 26l, 306. 57 301, 307 Bradshaw, Richard Allen ..,. 255 Branard, Phyllis .........Y.Y,L., -218 Branson, John 26l. 306, 308 Braren, Ernesi ,,..,....,.. 234. 294 Brauchle, Wal+er Roger 44, 233 Bravenec, Benjamin Baron I00- Bravenec, William Ray ,.,, 44 Breaux, Roberi' Simar ........ 255 Brenner, Larry .. ,c,,,L.,......... 259 Brenner, Marvin ......,......... 259 Brezina, Roberi Paul ..,., . 305. 308, 338 Bricken, William Bryan 67, 208 Bridier, Shirley Ann ,.,,,.,, 76, 95, 222 Brieger, Jimmy ...... ....--. 2 64 Briggs, Edgar Warren .,,,,A.. 2l I Briggs, Roberl' . ....,.. ........ l 00 Briner, Mary . ..... .. 25l Brinkley, Beiiy ,,..., , ,,.,,. 44 Brinkley, Mary Ann ,.,o..... 25l Bri+'r, Barbara ..,,,............,,... 57 Briir, Ben Nelson .,,,, .,.. 2 33 'BriHain, Charles. . 76 Brown, Roberr Talbol' o,,. 76, 95 Browne, 'Drew .......,.. 258, 289 Browne, Joseph James .,,... 234 Brukner, John Shields l04, 256 Brulei, Jeaneire lnez ,,,o.,.. l00 236 Brunge, Walier .. ,.,,,. 228 Bryant Dell Edward ........ 28I Buchanan, William C. ........ 232 Bruner, Glen .....c,...,......... Bucla, R. J. ,..,..,.., ....... . .. 248 Buell, Evelyn J. Isbell .... 76, 95 Bundy. Paiiy Jo Seiieri .... 76, 95 Burdelrle, William Dana .... 44 Burdsal, John Baldwin .,.,.,.. 67 Burgai, Charles ................ 259 58 Burgdorf, Richard .....,.......... Burgin, Pairicia Jane 76, 95 Burke, Helen R. Chrisiie 76, 95 Burke, Susan Dee Rich+er 76, 95 Burnelrlj Johnny Thomas .... 45 Burne'r'r, Sarah Chrisiy ..,...,. 45 Burns, Auiry R. . ..........,.,..--- 76 Burns, Tommy Pairick III .. . l04. 254- Burr, Billy Joe ..,....,. 76 Burron, William Clinion .... 67 Busch, Brenda . I33, I54. 279, 291 352 Camp, Dolrece E. ........ 76, 95, 249, 250 Camp, Howard Brady ,....,,. 2l0 Camp, Leland Benson ........ 228 Campbell, Billy Joe ........,... 67 Campbell, John J. lll .,....,. l04 Campbell, Margarei Ann .,.. 45 Campbell, Tex Thomas ........ 45 Campise, Jimmy Pairick ..., 45 Campo, Al Vinceni .. ....,..., 339 Cannon, Elizaberh .. ,......V..... 67 Cansler, Pairicia .. . 76, 95, 250 Caporina, Anihony Joseph 208 Carbaial, Kenneih Seeger .... 67, 208 Carew, Michael Anihony .. .308 Carlisle, Jack Helfrich .,...... 45 Carlson, Caryl Jean . I33, 226 Carnahan. Norman F. ........ 262 Carpenier, Jimmie Gene .. . 234 Carr, lris ,.... ..................... l 67 Carriker, Fred Keiner . .,..,. 243 Carr, Blufford J. .. . . . 76, 95 Carre, Thomas Harold ..... . 45 Cary, Thomas Lee 76, 95, 2l5 Casey, Lewis Odell . .......... 21 l Cassell, Ollan Conn ........ 325, 326, 327 3 Student Index Caslellanos, Leo John ........ 239 Casrleberry, Beverly ............ 22l Casiro, Francisco Jose P. .... 45 Caialano, Davenia ............ 279 Caulking, Charlorie M. ........ 58 Cervi, Dennis Paul ............ 235 Chalmers, Ray ..,......... 67, 25l Chan, Edward Y. C. ,.,......,,. l00 Chan, Tak Foo Aloysius ........ 58 Chandler, Selma Faye A. .. . 76 Chapin, John Thomas ........ 233 Chapui, Paul Theodore .... 213 Charrin, Jack Rene ............ 235 Cheaney, Phyllis Lynn 58, 226 Chen, Howard Hsiao Lian .... 76 l00 Chen Kay Kam ................ Chen, Norah ........................ 45 Chenauli, Ann ....................v 2l8 Cheney, Gary Douglas ........ 58 Cheng, Samuel Kam Foo .... 58 Cheshire, Ned Brownley .... 209 Chiaramonre, Joseph V. .... 343 Chippendale, Caro Ann .... 45 Chiriboga. Juan Alfredo .... 67 Chovanec, A. L. ................ 25l Chovaneiz, William James .... 45 Chow, James Hall ................ 58 Chrisiian, Ellen Marie ........ 2l9 Chu, Wellesley ............ 76, 95 Ciolkosz, James Sranley ....,.., 58 Cizek, Joe Oscar . ...... 45, 297 Clapsaddle, Jerry John 209, 239 Clark, Carolyn ........ 58, 222, 274-. 275 Clark, George A. ................ 67 Clark, James F. ................ 76 Clark, Roberi Joseph Jr. .... 45 Clarworihy, Thomas B. 78, 95 Cleveland, Floyd .... 292, 296 Clevenger, Alvah ............ 259 Cliiion, Jeana .................... 226 Cline, Ellen Thomasie ........ 67 Clohessy, Pafrick Andrew 244, 323, 324, 327 Clonrs, Carherine ..,............. 222 Coakley, Pairick S. Jr. ........ 248 Cobb, Jerry ........................ 78 Cochran, Charles 292, 294 Codianne, Harold Richard 259 'Y 1' ...a'f' ra., A IIQVAI' gf f f J WK if I rf filiaff ffl! Z iff fllffal ff J I f J ,f , - ,..,f-M' w w ...p. -1 M 1 1 ...m,jjf2ll" WQIWMQIF, 1i137fvf5Zv':'.fL,'f'LGWZV' n' W! MH'W'vm"f1'yIfFI " "iz f . jzliiwk-': J 1:5714 ..,f,I:N'Sl: ' , MW ..,qi.,..L .4 . f,!.f..4c.. I , 1, f "till "" w.w...f.:f-K: fg NM: ' "'l',.iw'1l f . ' Miz.. fi f . -':y,fw,gw 'EH 1 H " ' I " 1 awww' - I 43:5 . 'TQ' l V! lv" . Z2iiiS1?'rf1"?t 56:51 ri , 2 1311 If ' ami' '- .,, lla- . Z1 -. P -. P - gg S q-'nv - .gf Q f. ' .4 - -41.5 . este +4 ff , V ,, All " 03,1 Q. -"' W . . .W - .354 E .T. ff' ' . - ' . R . .ws f " "V . , HQL . ,,.. w11fF:ff ' . H' in ,r 1- f'3,wiy'. . 'M in in r' . W lf ""t5Z."?-IWW " .,:i AhSs'ifH"" "' M '11 1 :ffl 1155" C" Witte. .if J w ' ,wgf F ' 3. ,,:'Z.f.' 1.55 Hy, lg...'f,.. 1 Q. su. w B S , l 7: xg." i is ROOTED IN THE SOUWTHVVEST sr SERVING INDUSTRY: WORLDWIDE E V r , fi x. TI . QQ 1 . M 1 WWE 1. A -ffiif up ' h roxqwi' h A, Y Tisiiiiffze I ' ' .-...iffilfz M .,,, , sm... .. 3.3. :' azgfillirtigff' -Maw " Tfifiegirgiig wr Y,-1 , 'Milli1i'iP'i'1l!.'i1i.-4. ii - 1 " , L, .ir M5 LMDNJA ll -'vw.:i.':'i'.i.f' ,a1,i.,Mf -Y N U W:'....'.. fain ,..1fa:,.,,, Y ., Q, ' 'ivgi.f-fs WYATT METAL 8. BOILER WOR Fabrica chemical processing industries. PLASTICS and RUBBER DIVISION older of plastic, rubber and silicone parts industry and the nation's missile program. Custom rn for STEEL TANK CONSTRUCTION COMPANY b 'diary for the erection of tan s A su S1 k and pressure ' ' nce and repair. vessels, as well as in refinery mamtena tor of steel and alloy plate for KS DIVISION the oil refining and DRAINAGE PRODUCTS DIVISION Manufacturer of corrugated metal pipe culvert. WYATT cle MEXICO, S. A. de C. V. An affiliate with plant at Tlalnepantla and offi Mexico City. SALES OFFICES CORPUS CHRISTI o TULSA HOUSTON o DALLAS a CITY PHILADELPHIA o NEW YOR K o LOS ANGELES o MEXICO ...... ..... Q..-............................-.........-. OF WYATT'S FLOATING ROOFS LICENSEES FISHER TANK-COMPANY -PETRO-FOUGA DOMINION BRIDGE CO., LTD. Third and Booth Streets 111 Avenue Victor-Hugo P. O. Box 280 ' Paris C16ED France Montreal, Quebec, Canada Chester, Pennsylvama CSS in RADIO VOICE CF THE COUGARS - DEE BRASS FOUNDRY, INC. A-FOUNDRY Q CHSTIIIES Q ungiglklduzlbggltv BRASS. BRONZE, ALUMINUM CASTINGS 2408 EvereH S+. Phone CA 2-627I TEXAS ICE AND FUEL COMPANY Sized Ice Carvings in Ice 630I HARRISBURG WAInuI' 3-I6OI Congratulations and Best Wishes to the Class of ,61 WE WELCOME YOU TO THE FUTURE yll-Lp ouR 42.1 YEAR or Pnoensss OS --. ' Manufacturer of Quality Oil Field Tools and Equipment BAASH-ROSS DIVISION OF JOY MANUFACTURING COMPANY General Offices: Houston, Texas wg. -- .,.. N V fwwygg, .. . W if -Willie is V iiEFa'is,Qi . V Q " EEE 353 5257 Q - of .P W. L or 95 I ' f Ze fish?" ' 535 of J 4a:ela'a 15kr, meP5fif 1 ,wiki tif' 23512 P-19 - - M , ,gg:g,g ,'QQ..fiax 1, A le wq.gg,?gi:,,,,.-2 ,V . . This modern air-conditioned plant is the seat of Mission's research and develop- ment. Mission products are used around the world in oilfields, mines, refineries, and plants. This new plant, Mission's third in a quarter-century, is a reflection of the quality of Mission's products, the scope and completeness of its service. Pistons - Piston Rods - Gland Packings - Liners - Liner Packing ' Pump Valves and Seats - Slips - Swahs - Valves - Hammerdrils - Centrifugal Pumps - Duo-Ghek Valves - Conduit-Chek Valves - Blanking Plugs - Soluble Plug Injectors. Nfmin S Simons Yi l IZ MANUFACTURING CO I -- I - HOUSTON, TEXAS Doehring, Frederick A. Criswell, William Andrew .,., 46 C-E Student Index Coffman, Nancy ........ 2l4, 2I7, 285, 29l Coffman, Pafricia Lorene .... 67, I23, 224 Cole, Anifa Sfewarf .,...... I00 Cole, Pruifl' ,.,,.............,,7 78, 95 Coleman, Thelma Jenneffe 45 Coley, Jerry Lee ....,....,..,... 58 Collins, Charles Ray ......,..,A. 78 Conger, Harry Edgar ....w,A. 67 Conklin, Lawrence A. .... I64, 235,294 Conkrighf, William F. ........ l5I Conner, Beffy Lorraine .,., I78 Connolly, Pauline ,,,.,..e,.,,4,,, 45 Connolly, Verley Jo ..,, 218, 340 Contreras, Alberf .... 210, 215, 290 Cook, Alvin Michael .... 254, 269, 27l Cook, Eugene Augusfus ..,. 78, ll9, I97, 234, 245, 252, 263, Craig. John Richard .V.......,.. 46 Craig, Judifh .,c. 22I, 279, 342 Crammer, Roberl' .........,A. 243 Cranford, Beverly Jean .. ,... 279 Daniel, Marfha .... 79, 95, 249 Daniells, Mary Kay .,,,,,..Y,,.., , 58 Daniels, Allen Bruce .c.......... 67 Daniels, Lawrence Donald 284 Danner, Andrew Jackson .... 46 Darley, Heafher Blair c,,,..,, 46 Darnell, Roberf Lee .v,.....c,,, 233 284, 287, 288, 292, 293 Cooper, Alan Kennefh ,..,.... 78 Cooper, Carolyn Johnelle .,.. 58 Cooper, Charles .........,...... 259 Cooper, Garvin William 240, 34l Cooper, Ruffin Alcorn Jr ..,.. 45 Copeland, Donald Ray .,.. 2ll Corley, Edmond W. Ill 2I I, 2l3, 245 Cornelius, Barbara Lynn .... 277 Corp, Maury Henry .,,..i., 242 Corpening, Shirley M. .....,,, 67 CoHon, Ernesf Ray .,,......... 78 Cowan, James Lee ,,..... - .... 327 Cowman, Hollis Lee .....,...... 46 Cox, Audrey Lee ...,... ..... 7 8 Cox, Ba rba ra Jo ....... ..... 4 6 Cox, Judifh Laverne ,.....,...,, 58 Cox, Lucrecia Correa ..,..,.. 78 Cox, Roberf Allen .,.., ...,,. 2 09 Cox, Roberf Wesley .,............ 46 Cox, Samuel .,..............,... 259 Cozens, Roberi' Sfephens 323. 327 Crabfree, Barbara Rufh .... 46 Craig, Duane ..,.....,, .,,.s,...,,.. 2 I6 Crawford Michael .... 256, 289 Crawford, Richard Bussey 330, 33l, 332 Crawford, Sydalise F. .,,, 78, 95 Crawford, Waylen Thomas 67 Crenwelge, Offo Emil Jr. 243, 284 Cress, Glen .....,...,,.,,,,,..s..,. 294 Crim, Duane ......,, '78, 95, 288 Crisf, Lugene .....,,,c,,,.,.A., . 250 Criffenden, Velmonf S. Jr. .,.. 58 Crockeff, William E. Jr. . . 25l Crowder, Julia Diane .,,.,.,, 46 Crowe, Prenfiss Guy Jr. 250, 25l Cruse, Linda Alice .,,..... 58, 2I5, 225 Crufchfield, Arfhur W. ,. 250, 262 Cruz, Richard Refugio Jr. .,.. 67 Cruzaf, lnez Juanifa .,,.... . l0l Cucchiara, Charles J. . ,. 79, 95, 234 Cull, Herberf ............,....... 292 Cummings, Charles Edward I04, Cundiff, Charles Lee ........ l52 Cunningham, Charles L. Jr. 67 Cunningham, Clarence H. 79,95 Cunningham, Clifford C. ,..v 79 Roberf H. Jr. 79 Cunningham, Cunningham, Thomas C. ,... 46 Currey, Hal Sevier ............ 284 Curry, Larry Edward ...,..... ,. 58 Curfis, Belly 42, l55, 2I8,,,296 Cyphers, Phillip Lasalle l04,i255 D Daffin, Barbara Jo ......... .. 25l Daigle, Marsha .,., .....,...,, 2 46 Dailey, Fred Harvil .. .. .. 2 67 Daily, Aloe Jr. . ............ . 259 Dalal, Nalinkanl' J. ........ 79, 95 Dancer, Mary Cafherine . I00 Dancy, Margarel' Anne 46, 250. 26l 356 as ,i. I 15.1.4 an .. 1 ' Darrow, Paul ................,......, 259 262 Daspif, Joseph Michael .... Daugherfy, Roann P. ...... . 46 Daughefy, Michael Jewel 284 Daunoy, Valerie Andree ..,. 66, l55, 2I4, 2l8, 296, 340 Dillon, Pal' Harvey Jr. .....,.. 46 Dillon, William Homer Jr. .... 80 Dinklage. Mary Virginia ........ 46 Dismukes, Mary Marfha .,.. 278 Dixon, Virgil .. ,...,..,.., 79 Dixson, William ....,,,,.,,,,,., 239 Dodson, Clyde ,, .,,,,,,,,, ,, 46 Dodson, Lloyd Gene .....,..,,,. 79 Dodzuweif, Rosie Lee ,,,,., . 58 IO4 Doherfy, Jerry Wayne 58, 262 Dominguez, Consuelo .,.. 80, 95 Dominy, Cora Sue ........., .. 46 David, Marie .... 79, 95, Ill, l80, 248 Davis, Connie ..,V. .,...,,.,,,,,,, 4 6 Davis. Don Gayland ec.... ...... 5 8 Davis, Nan ...... ...,,,.,, ..,,,,,,, 2 2 7 Davis, James Burrell .... 79, 95, l04, 255 Davis, Miki .,...................... 259 Davis, Roberf Wyndell 79, 95 Day, Sally Elizabeih . ...... 66, 67. I8I, I94, 2l8 Dean, Michael Ray ..,......... 58 Dean, Shari .............,,......... 2l9 Decko, Arfhur Dennis ........ 233 Deen, Gerald Keifh . ..... 308 De Fillippo, Ken ,, ..,...,,..... 250 Degeorge Lynn ..... ,.,,,,.,,. I 23 Deharf, Shirley Jean .... 79, 95 Delacruz, Raymond .. .....,... 46 Delaney, George Jerome IO4 Delaney, Kennefh Ray ........ 46 Delareza, German Anfhony 58 Demuih, Henry ...., .............. 7 9 Denman, Rose Caroline ........ 58 Depfula, Frank Felix ............ 67 Derby, Donald Raymond 79, 95 Derringfon, Darrell B. 79, 95 Derryberry, Donald Royce 79, Devido, David .. ..,, .... 5 8, 276 Deville, Jimmy ........ ......... 4 6 Deybarrondo, Henri ............ l04 Diaz, Fred Eugene ...,..,...,. 46 Dickey, Donald ........... . 259 259 285 Diefenbaugh Richard ......,. Diefz, Brenda ........, 2l8, Dominy, June 80, 95, 249, 279 Donaghe, Kaye ,............ 46 Donsky, Dana ......,,..,. 254, 269 Dooley, William . .... 67, l38, l4-8, l49, 248, 284 Dorseff, Randall .. ., ., 26l, 308 Doss, James Cecil ............ 280 Dofson, Gordon ........ 279, 280 Doufhiff, Cameron ........ 46, 2 l 5 Dover, Sidney Max ...... ..... 2 64 Dow, Joe Lawrence .... 326, 327 Doyen, Diane ...... ..... I I9, 2l9 Doyle, John Joseph .... 42, 327 Dozier, William .. ......... .. 23l Drake, Irving ............ IO5. 255 Draper, Claude . ...,.,,,...,. 258 Dubose, Kennefh H. .... 334, 335 Dudley, Donna Kaye 80, 95 Duelberg, Mildred ..,. 254, 269 Duff, Roberl .. . .. ........... 46 Dufour, Charles R. ........-... ZI3 Duhon, Howard ..........,. 80, 96 Dumas, Joe ..... ................ 4 0 Duncan Andrew Sfewarf .... 46 Duncan Helen ..........,.......,. 68 Duncan, Linda ,,........,.......,. 80 Duncan, Morris Joseph Jr. 58 Dunlap, Roberf Jordan . .... 68 Dunlap, Roberf Lamar ...... . 58 Dunn, Searcy Lou Miller ... l0l Dunn, William Lee Jr. ,.....,. 80 Duffon, Sfafford 293, 294 E Earl, Shirl .....................,..,,.. I67 Easley, John 58, 289, 34l x X . Ng Xxx XIX i fff, f ff' f 1 ff? i xx if A' .' y f ,f flag is PIIEFAREIY FORf"TOMORROw X 'W-.M X 1 5 A ' , y , , E S i , ff 1' Ifff' f' We iii W Wi if ,f f'fff',ff'f" NX X X , . 1 1 ,H X XXX ts l X 5 ll! f X X! ,fifff W,,,,f mm N. , xx 3 v ,ff 1 A :XX X 1"- X V l f ff ,,,,w""" his Nix E ' X . sql was f 1 The years you have dedicated to education have fortified you with knowledge and understanding. You now stand ready to shoulder I your part in building a brighter f I I future for all, and in helping our nation fulfill the destiny that is a part of our great American heritage It is in your power to shape the future and secure the foundations of our free society. XL 'N-,. WN "-U-..,.,,,,m WW 'E Mr 2 A Z f QW I if 5733, iv ,441 4 ww f ,M 65: Ziff F 1- y fl? H f ' 2 ff' W? M 4 aff 4 f LI'I'I"lOgI'6pI'lef'S sun: c Punts P'I"'fe'S HARRISON EQUIPMENT oo., INC. Engravers I422 San Jacin'I'o S+. HousI'on, Texas PHONE CApi+oI 4-9I3I Dis'Iribu'I'ors 'For Producfs of STa'Iioners Office OuI'fiHers D. W. Onan 81 Sons, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn. Mimeographed ProcIuc+s WILSON STATIONERY AND PRINTING COMPANY I-IAMMAN OIL AND REFINING COMPANY HOUSTON. TEXAS Gasoline and Diesel EIec'I'ric Generafing PIan'I's Genera'I'ors ' Air-Cooled Engines Prairie at Fannin CA 7-8221 Food for the Cougars . . . SLATER is privileged 'I'o serve sI'udenI's and facuII'y a'I' The Uni- versiI'y of Housfon and af I28 oI'I1er leading coIIeges in America. While There is no cooking IiIce Mo+her's, SLATER sI'rives +o ma'I'ch Those delicious home meals boI'I1 in Iasfe and nu'I'ri+ion. 5 LATER? - FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT . . . PHILADELPHIA . ATLANTA NEW YORK . CHICAGO . BALTIMORE . LOS ANGELES D. HADEN Producers of Reef Oyster Shell Transit Mixed Concrete I Sand, Shell and Gravel SIX RETAIL PLANTS TO SERVE YOU IN HOUSTON Fry, Louis True A.w,,,,YY,,,.,....,, 58 E-G Student Index Eason. James Burl ....,,.,.. ,,,,, 46 Ealwell, William Donald ,.., 46 Eckenwiler, Michael W. ..,. 68 Eckerl, Linda ,,.,,.,, l52, 2l9, 285 Edens, Frank Newlon ......., lOl Edge J. T. ll.,,,,,,,,,,,, 2I3 Edminsler, l-lerberl .,,,,,,,.,A, 275 Edwards. Larry .ll,,,....4l.,l..,,, 278 Ehrmann, Gisela Gerlinde .,.. 46 Elem, Don Willis . A,,A,..,A.eA,, I38 Elledge, Arnold ,,,,,.,,,,,,,,.,A, 25I Ellioll, .James Marvin .,....,. lOl Ellioll, James Richard 306, 308 Ellioll, James Roberl ,,,..aeA 264 Elms, Richard Allen ....,,,,,,,, 46 Emery, William Duke .... 46, 28l Emmille, James Roy ,,,,l,,l,,,, 46 Emmons, Erma Loraine 80, 95 Endlich, Ben Allred .,,,..,. l05 Engel, Jerry Lee ,,,, 58, 208, 209 Engel, Roberl . ,,,.c,....,..cvV 259 Engelking, l-lerberl A. ..,.. 80 English, Sherry . l83, 293, 296 Epperson, Sam ,,....,.. ,,.,A. 2 39 Epps, Raymond Riley .,,,.,.. l05 Ercums, Karlis Jr. .,.....,,.,,.,,, 208 Erdil, Allan .. .. , ,.... ,,..,.,... . .. 58 Erdil, Nebahal Necibe ......,. 80 Esper. Milchell ....A.....,,.,,.,,,, lO5 Eslrada, Jessie Michael , ,,,, 68 Elleri George IV . 58, 277 Euresli, Joe Dell ..,.., ..,,,., . 28I Euwer, Sally ..,,....,,,,A,,,, ,,.,,, 2 2I Evans, Elizabelh Jo 46, 2l5, 222 Evans, Gerald ...,. ..,,,,,..,.,,. 6 8 Evans, Jerry ., ,,,, 278 Evans, Kennelh Wayne ...,..,. 46 Everill, Grace .. ...,, 260, 340, 34l, 343 Ewing, Janel Inez ., ,,,,. 225 F Fagin, Slanley Irwin . ...,.. l05 Fain, John l-luberl ....... ...,. 6 8 Fairslon, Burl ,,........ ...... 2 80 Farber, Louis lrwin ,......, 80, 96 Farley, Pal Jean ................ 2l2 Farrer, Margarel 46, 22l, 342 Faughl, Billy Dean ..........,. 2lO Feagin, Wiley .... 26l, 308, Ferguson, Barbara Ann 80, Ferguson, John Scoll ........ 280, Filippone, John Marion .... Filippone, Marion V. ......,.., . Finnegan, Richard .... 232, Firlh, Donald Roberl ........ Fischer, Paul John ... ....,,. Fisher, Virgil William 336, Fisk, Jesse Allon ........ 58, 343 222 I36, 28l lOl . 68 297 32l . 80 339 297 Filzpalrick, Charles L, ........ 46 Flaherly, Roberl Eugene .... 58 Fleming, Elizabelh Ann 46 , 222 Fleming, Roberl Donald .... 80 259 Flesch, Roberl ................ Flelcher, Mallie E. 46, 227, Florance, Slanley l-lunler Flournoy, Lille .,...... 58, 22l, 245 .235 l8O, 256 Flowers, Belly Jann .....,.,.... 58 Floyd, Virginia Lee .,............V. 80 Fluker, Edward Michael 80, 95 Focke, Roberl Corder .,.,..,. 68 Fogarly, Charley F. .......... 46 Folloder, Joseph ........ 293, 295 Fong, Juan ..,...... .. l0l Fonville, Thomas W. . .. l40, 2II Foole, Palricia Ann l-lull . . 58 Ford, Chares .,., ..,,. ....,...Y..,.. 46 Ford, Lee Mason .. .... . ..... . 68 Foreman, Edgar L. II s.,.....,... 58 Forslall, Mary Ellen ..........,. 46 Forl, Marshall Bruce ,..,........ 46 Fosler, Alberl Ralph Jr. ..,. 68 Fosler, Ralph .,.......,,......... l0l Fox, Ricia .. ,........................ 25l Fran k, Rulh Beverly ........ 276 Frank, William Frederick ..,. 46 Frankeny, Jerome Alberl .... 68 Frankeny, Richard F. ............ 46 Frankinson, Beverly Ann .... 46 Frans, Donna Lynne ............ 46 Franlz, Marguerile Mary ,... 2l6 Franz, Janeen Lee ................ 80 Fralolill, Joseph F. ......,.... . Frederick, Daryl Emile ..,...,. Frederick, Jane P. ........... . 243 2I5 255 Fredrickson, Lee E. ............ 255 Freeman, Barbara Vadare .... 46 Freilag, Ellis Joseph ..,..... 235 Frick, Kennelh ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, IOS Friedman, Geraldine ........ 58, l23, 250, 22l Friedman, Sue ........ 279, 29l Friedmann, Roberl Joseph 258 Friesz, Jerry Daniel .... 46, 294 Friou, James Samuel 228, 232 Frilsche, l-lerberl .. ...., 58, 292 Frilz, Agnes Jacqueline ...... . 58 222 222 Frye, Elva Kaye .. 46, Frye, Nelva Faye ,..,.... 46, Fugman, Joan Calherine .... 277 Fuller, Lamar Lindberg .... 244. Funderburg, Gloria ............ Furlow, Janie Marie ............ Fylield, Rodney Wallace .,., 209 G Gaddis, Frank January 80, 46. 265 58 48 96, 2 l 3 Gallney, Jerome George 2lI Gaines, Freeda Edwene ,c.. 80, 96, l56, l98. 207. 267. 285 250 Gailz, Diane ........ ........... Gallagher, Lydia Kay ........ 68, I36, 2l7 Gallamore, Fred .. ,. . 284, 293, 297 Gammage, Bob ...........aa... 268 Ganler, Dorrance Lynn .,,.,,. . 68 Garcia, Raymond Thomas 58, 245 Gard, Barbara Ann ........,... 2l8 Gardner, James William ..,. 80 234 297 IOI Garrell, Joan Elaine .... 68, 249 Garrell, 58 Gaslon, James P. ,....... 48, l 55. 254, 269. 272, 290. 273 Garidel, Emile Slephen .... Garison, Ira . .. ,,....., s..... . .. Garner, Gary .................... Slanley .. ........... .. Gales, Dave 68, 245, Gales, Michael Joseph ..,..... 48 Gales, Palricia Ann ............ 48 Gaulney, Donald Berl ....., .58 Gee, Jims ........ 80, 96, 2IO 290 Gehbauer, John ,,.,,... l27, l6l, 248, 270, 284 Geisselbrechl, Elvin Ray , 68 Geissen Richard ..,.,....... 294 Gensler, Quenlin .,...... 68, 253 Genlile, Fred J. .... 209, 2l2 Genlry, Don Eugene 208, 342 Genlry, Gene Earl .......... 58 Genlry, Margarel Ann ........ 58 George, Beverly Judilh ..... . 48 George, Leonard Merle 48, 242 Germani, Anlhony Bernard 208, 2l l, 2l4, 245, 284 Germani, Thomas Fred .... 2I5 Ghallas, Pascal M. .....,...... 275 Gibbons, Daniel Edward 48 Gibbs, Barbara Jo .... ........ 4 8 Gibbs, Pele .. .................. 293 Gibson, David Drew .,.......... 60 Gibson, Dwane ................. 60 Gibson, Jerry Bascom ..,.. 68 Gibson, Mary Ellen ........, .. Ill Gilberl, Paul Lyle ...... ........ 4 8 Gilbrelh, Vivian S. .. .. ., 48, 244 Giles, Granl Eugene . ....... 68 Giles, Roberl Darrell . 80, 96 Gill, Bessie Eva .................... 68 Gilley, Mary Alice .......... . 227 Gilliland, Linda Frances 60, 227 Ginlher, Fergus Mahony l05, 255 Glash, Glenn Lee ..... ..... . 265 Glass, Leo Murl .................... 43 Glazener, Kendall Bryanl .... 60 Glick, Bill Marvin .............. . 48 Godkin, Earl ............ 293, 295 . 68 , ,,,. 48 Gold, Elroy Benno 60, 25l, 255 60 Godwin, Phillip Eugene ..... Goll Jewel Laverne ........ Golden, Jimmy Ray ............ Golden, Joe Allan ......... .. 60 Goldlool, lan ...........a. ..... 3 27 Goldman, Jerald Douglas .... 60 Goldman, William Edwin 264, 343 Goldslrand, Joel l-larlow 330, 33l, 332 -4: , is F .X is ,, i . A 360 OPPORTUNITIES The advance designs of the Cameron pressure controls for drilling and production are the result of a research and development program which has continued for over 36 years. To be ready with the best equipment at the right time, we have combined first-hand field know-how with the finest in manufacturing technology. The challenge and opportunity of these activities are stimulating experiences and offer World-wide opportunities for alert engineers who are inter- ested in professional growth and individual advancement. IRON WORKS, INC. P. O. lox 1212-Houston, Texas 1 . f -Sin 4 V... 'iq Wir. I A ' HIIIF . 5 4 .' 1 .If I I ., ,, L' I K ' in, L 2 1-- , i ,Walsall 5 Hu x I xg X ' x I I5 I' I 4 b I ll I BE A SOUTHWESTERNER . . . nog ,W 1 9 'ex 4 , . EEINSUREDT 'I S1 2 5 qQ"I'7" Be a parrner in Ihe growing Soufh- wesI'. Build your Iuiure wiI'h an in- sured Soulhwesiern Savings Ac- counl. 42, annual earnings wi+h dividends paid and compounded quarlerly. SOUTHWESTERN SAVINGS Associafion 340I Main 5307 Richmond Rd. 4003 Wesfheimer 5306 Palms Cenier HOUSTON GOLF CENTER 77I0 So. Main Driving Range Wi'I'h Aufomafic Tees and Pro Shop 54 HOLES OF MINIATURE GOLF Large Grou s by Reservafions ITropI1ies FurnisEed for Large Groupsj -E' ni Q i sean'-'ss' I, Shogi' ii ip if-I ' '-If A EEE! 'E Q TTTLED UNDEI AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY I' HOUSTON COCA-COLA BOTTLIN6 CO. AMERICAN TITLE GUARANTY CO. HARRIS COUNTY ABSTRACT CO. Established I885 HOUSTON. TEXAS Best Wishes to the Class of 961 QUINTANA PETROLEUM CORPORATION Oil Producers F C N I B k B ld HOUSTON TEXAS 1- G-H Student Index.. Goodbread, James . ,........ 60 Goodman, Molly Doris .,...... Goodner, Samuel Warren l56, 24l, 245, 284, 286, Goodrich, Nancy Marie .,.A Goodwin, Chrisfine ,,.A, Goodwin, Roberf ,,,,,,,v77,,vv., Goodwin, Ruby Rose Gray Gordon, Sfeven ......,......... Gore, Edward 229, 234, Gorsuch, James Thomas Gould, George Wesley Jr. Grady, Charles Gerald ve.. Grafe, Ron .,..e.,,....A ..,A,..... Graham, Logan ...,.......,.... Graham, Marie 80, 95, Graham, Olin Leonard Granf, Desmond Thomas l36, 259, Gray, Elaine .,,...,...,, 223, Grayson, Charles Vesfer ..,Y Green, Freddie Ray .....,,..... Green, Jerry Wayne .,.,.... Green, Johnny Leo uA,, 48, Green Mar'orie Hubbard . 1 ..., Greene, James Boyd ,,,,.. 48 Greenlee, Bobby Callan .... Greensfein, Donald Gavin Greenwood, Michael ........ Gregory, Jack ,..,,,,. 56, 289. 29l. 249 I36. 293 217 259 293 IOI 253 338 68 80, 96 2l I 233 22l 253 80 W. 284 26l 60 339 60 242 68 68 48 48 241, 34l Gregory, Marion C. Jr. ,... 48 Grierson, Joseph . 80, 96, Griffin, Buddy .........,,.,.,,,,., 2I F, 245 l42 Griffin, Janice Sheppard ..,. 60 ' 248 Griffin, Sylvia L. ........,.... .. Griffin, William P. Jr. ........ 48 Grim, Gerald Kennefh .... 280. Grisbee, Carolyn ..,............. 60, 293 25l Groeschel, Vernon E. .......,.... 80 Grossberg, Marc Elias .... 80, 96, 244, 262, 266. 273, 29l Grossfield, Anne Faifh ........ 48 Groves, Edwin Earl ............ 60 Groves, John Howard .,,...,. 244 Grunden, Bruce Hoerner .... 343 Guenzel, Frederick M. ........ 60 Guidry, George Walfon Jr. 48 Gumienny, Karel Pafrick .... 48 Gunn, Harold Deland 229, 236 Gural, Ronald Andrew I43, 248 Gurin, Mariam R. Nelkin- .... 80 Gusfamenfe, Alberf A. .... 309 Gufherie, Don .........,.. ........ 2 8l H Hadid, Jean . ........A ,.,., 6 0, 24-4 Hagan, James Marfin .... 208, 342 Haines, Charles Dale ......., 277 Hainline, Bobbie. ,.., . II9, l22, l25, l54, l55, 2l8, 24l, 296, Haisler, William ........ 60, Hale, Samuel Edward .... 82, 96 Haley, Charles Sfanley .... 2l5 Hall, Efhelyn Lurline ............ 68 193, 340 295 Hall, Judufh ....,.,,. ...,., 2 is, 275 Hall, Sabra Sue 2l5, 2l7, 285 Ham, Charles Frederick .... 82 Hamilfon, Ken .................... 238 Hamleff, Shirley Jean ........ I49 Hammann, William R. Jr. 240, 34I 2II Hammer, Marvin Douglas Hancock, John Gaylon ........ 208 Hanks, Paul Ashfon ............ 68 Hag, Muhammad Nurul .... I0l Hardin, Eva L. .. ........ 82, 96 Harger, Lyle Edwin ........ 320 Harlan, Earl Whifney .. ..... 25l, 325, 327 Harlow, Linda . .............. 275 Harper, Terry Compfon 279, 28l Harral, Richard ................ 230 Harriman, Dorofhy .......... .. 25l Harris, Bruce Morgan ..,..... l05 Harris, I-larris, Carole Lynn ............ 49 Harris, Donna Rae Crump 68 Harris, Ronald Emmefl' 82, l05 Harrison, Clay ......,. 49, l23 Carl Lee ................ 48 364 Harrison, Kennefh Dale .... Harrison, Pafrick Morgan .... Harrison, Paul ............ 82, 96 Harrison, Rebecca ........ 68, 220 Harrison, Woodrow .v.......... 237 Harsch, David Gerald ........ 60 l05 I50 Hari, Nancy Ann ..............,. 49 Harfin, James Ferrell 68,259 Harfman, Roberf V. Jr. ........ 49 Harfon, Virgil .... l0l, 289, 292 Harfsfield, Roberl' L. III 49 Harvey, Earl Clarence Jr. 60 Harwerfh, Ronald .... 258, 259 Hafchez, Odis ...... . ............. 68 Haffield, Lillian .................... 60 Haughfon, Eugene Alfred 277 Havard, Anna B. Colwell .... 68 Havemann, Marilyn Joyce .... 49 256 Haxfon, Manford Ray l05, Hayden, Jocelyn Sonia 66, 2l8 Hayes, Howard 236, 237, 25l Hayes, Linda Janell ...,........ 6l Hayward, Lucinda ..... .. ...... 82 Hazen, Herberf Charles .... 49, 280, 295 Heard, Johnny ................ 268 Heard, Thomas ..... .... . 259 Heafh, Edward Allen 68, 228, 242 Heafon, Danny .. ......... ......... 4 9 Heafon, William Oirlo ........ 25l Heberf, Joseph James ,....... l05 2 I0 Hedding. Joseph Alberfus Hedge, George Andrew .... 82 Heinrich, Darrell ...... .. 292, 294 Helmcamp, Hugo Charles .... 68 Helms, James Fred 82, 96, 239 Hernpel, James Edward .... 280 Henckel, Diana Elaine ........ 6l Henderson, George J. Jr. 49 Henderson, James Harney Henderson, Maior C. Ill .... 68 Hendricks, Alan Barclay .... 49 Hendrickson, Ned David 6I, 243 Hensley, Lynn Carleff' ........ l05 Hensley, William Wendell 239. 245, 290, 29l Herrera, Carlos ................ 2l l ig Herrera, Heifor Moreira .... lOl Hersk, Suzy ........................ 276 Hesfer, William Frank ........ 6l Hicks, Mildred Phillips ........ 254 Hicks, Sandra Sue .... l37, I79 Hieber, Ronald Arfhur .... 2l3 Higginbofham, Peggy ........ 49 Hill, Glen- Herberf ............ 68 Hill, Jerry .................... 82, 96 Hill, Linda ...,..... .................. 2 60 Hill, Lowell Winsfon ............ 68 Hillegeisf, Reynold .... 209, 2l l. 290 Hillin, Anneffe .... ............. 6 8 Hillin, Linda Jean ............... 82 Hines, Roberl' Lewis ............ l05 Hinkle, Rufh Ellen ........ 68, 245 Hirsch, Leon ........................ 266 Hirsch, Walfer Carl Jr. 82, 96 Hiskey, Bryanf Gale ........ 332 Hifchcock, Hulon Joe Jr. .... 82 Hoagland, Arnold ................ 49 Hobarf, George Joseph .... 68 Hobbs, John Frank ..., 82, 96 Hobbs, Walfer Leonard .... 49 Hochsfein, Rachelle ............ 6l Hodell, Beffy Marie .... 6l, 2l8, 340 Hodges, Edward Earl ........ 302, 308, 309 Hoelscher, David ..... ...... 2 64 Hoelscher, Ellioff ................ 83 Hoffman. Jon Paul ............ 294 Hoffpauir, Eslie H. Jr. .... 83, 96 Hogan, Roberf John l05, 256 Hohmann, Margarei' Ann 68 Hohmann, Marie C. Kerr .... 6l Holder, Cecil Lee ........ lOl, 2l l Holder, Dorofhy L. ............ 250 Holder, Joyce Loreffa 83, 96 Holgin, Richard Pafrick ........ 83 Hall, Mary Jo .......... 83 Holland, Sanny Sue Smifh Holland, Willard Park Jr. Holley, Roberf ,Burgess 83, Hollingsworfh, Thomas D. Holmes, Delberf Hughie .... 25l 264 285 l02 2I0 96 327 Holmes, William Wafson Holf, William Randolph . A ,, ffm 'A A Alb 6 a M .74- '-" " --'-- ff ---'-- ,. .... WM A- ..... A A .,... , A -- S. B21-K-E-' WWW' - " wwgw ,-.-- z ff ' ----- -- - - -- M ,,.. . ..,.. :Aix 5-52? f 'fit jg, ' :1E5iL"':',, .... , -.-' A 4 ..,,4., ,.:.:? B . I COMPLETE BANKING FACILITIES FOR THE EST IN BANKING THE NATIONAL BANK OF COMMERCE MAIN TRAVIS AND CAPITOL OF HOUSTON MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION Nv- FOI' YOUI' CONV6NleNCe Twelve Loca+ions l02l CAPITOL 2l5 GULFGATE MALL TEXAS AND SAN JACINTO 2520 AMHERST H25 WALKER 4422 MAIN ZOI9 WEST GRAY 5603 ALMEDA 2252 WEST HOLCOMBE 2l28 PORTSMOUTH B-F HAMILTON SUPPLY CORPORATION I I u l 'AI 1 I . Division of Black Hardware Company O Sfeel . Pipe 2l0 Magnolia P.O. Box 425 5422 RICHMOND RD- ' Plumbing Phone onchara 2-9-:II 9047 NWN o Mill Supplies GALENA PARK I Wire Procluci TEXAS "ON E'S A ME AL" . screw Prodiicis O Sporiing Goods BROOKS SYSTEM SANDWICH SHOPS ' BU"4eff Hafdwafe I Abrasive Produds O Valves and FiH'ings I Elecfrical Appliances I I Ben Milam Manager, CHARLES PERRY Special welcome Io grads and undergrads a+ U. of H. Hospi+ali+y Headquar'rers . DANCES . MEETINGS . PARTIES 2 . WEEKEND . RECEPTIONS VACATIONS wawy i ,. Nw- . Accommodaiions for Parfies Up 'Io 300 '51 . Delicious Food . Superb Se,-vice Down'I'own HousI'on's Only Heafed 144 . Convenieni' Downfown Locafion SWImmIn9 Pool ' , Reasonable Ra-1-95 IFree 'Io All Ho'IeI Guesisl y A: f . Covered Parking Garage I Ty 1 . I00"'Z, Air Condiiioning, TV, Radio TEXAS AT CRAWFORD. HOUSTON Jablonsky, Edmund ..,. 284, H-K Student Index Holub, Marilyn ........ 2l7, 246, 26l, 290, 293 Holub, Tommie 279, 29l, 293 Hood, Beniamin ..,..... 83, 96, 2I I, 2l2, 290 Hood, Buddy ....,..,A.A. 24l, 34l Hood, Marjorie ..,.r... 250, 275 243 Hooker, Roy ,Wall .,.,.,.,,,., Hooks, Bernard John Jr. ,,., l05, 255 Hooks, Charles A. IV. ....,,.w 49 Hooper, Ashley Lionel ..., 232 Hooper, George Murdoch 309 Hoplie, Erika Herla .,...,,..... I02 Hopkin, John Ross .... 238, 338 Hopkins, Clinlon E. ..,..,,.V,, l05 Hopson, Charles Lowry ll .s 6l, 28l Horan, James Roberl' ........ 68 Hornbuckle, William E. .... l05 Horner, Jack Marlin .s.. 49, 32l Horwilz, Arlene Gail 83, 96, 244 259 Horwilz, Mellon Jay 49, House, William B. Jr. ...,.... 278 Houska, Susan C. Frilsch Housion, Carl Preslon Jr. Housworlh, Jack Lewis ..., 83, 96, 2I0 264 Hudson, Michael Dale ........ 6l l05 Hudspelh James Roy ...,... Huggins, Calvin Prair Jr. . Hughes, Curlis William ..,. 49 327 Hughes, Linda Jo ........ 49, 277 Hughes, Mary Virginia 68 274 Hull, Jerry Don .,,............, 285 Huls, Herberl Roland ..,. Hurry, William Floyd ..,..... 263 264 Hursl, Jesse Thomas Jr. ,... 49 Hursl, Quala Laverne S. . 83 Husledl, H. B. ....,,.............. 6l Hulson, Billy Ray ....,........... 208 Hulzler, Charles Elmo ....,.,. 49 I liams, Mary Elizabelh ....... 227 Ingalls, Philip Gardner .,,..... 83 Irwin, David .....,...,,............. 84 Isbell, Joe Bob 26l, 309, lsham, Sonia Kay ..,,.... I I5, 343 222 lshiguro, Sadao ,,...,,.,....,.. 264 Israel, Allen Herberl' ,,,,,,...,.. 50 lvens, Pres'l'on Rasin Ill ....., l54i l55, 278, 280 Ivey, Rulh Ann ., ..,............., 68 J 297 Johnson, John Jerry ............ 208 Johnson, Judilh Anne ........ l4l Johnson, Merrel Travis .... 84 Johnson, Michael ....,... 84, 228 276, 284, 293, 294 Johnson, Palricia Sue .... 84, 97 265 Johnson, Richard F. ....,...... . Johnson, Travis Camp .... 256 Johnson, Waller ........,.,.....,... 50 Johnslon, Carl .................... 253 Johnslon, Charles Milion ..,. 262 Johnslon, Charles Thomas 2l2 Johnslon, Iris ..........,..... 84, 97 Johnslon, John Henry 50, 209 Johnslone, Janice ........ 56, 2l8 Jolly, Orville Lee ,,.,...,........ 84 Jones Barbara Annelle ..., 2l7 Jones, David Norman 240, 289 Jones Donald Lee ..,...,,.,,. l06 Jones I-larry ....,..,,.,..... 50,257 Jones Hugh Palrick 84, 97, 262 Jones James Jerrold ..e.,... 50 Jones John Paul ,,..,... 50, 29l Jones Lavon Lyndell ,,s...,. 70 Jones Lei Lani .............f.. 250 Jones Norman .... 66, 34l 343 Jones, Palricia Anne .,,..,.. 50 Jones Ralph Andrew Jr ....... 274 Jones, Tom ........................f... 6l Howard, Beliy Ann .......,..,. 6 I ' 222 Howard, Gerrlan ....,........... Howard, Gerry Rea ,..,........ Howard, John Wallace ..,..... 96, 29l, 292, 294, Howard, Russell Lee ..,.,....... Howe, Beniamin Ellsworlh 6l 83. 296 68 309 Howell, Avery Lowell Jr. .... 83, 96, 2l3 I-lowell, Don Gene ................ 61 I-lowell, Pal'l'i Kay ............---. bl Howell, William Elwood .... 239 Hoyl. Claudia McFarland 83, 96 Hrna, Daniel ...,.... 68, 275, 290 Hubbard, Marlin Gould .... 2l5 Huber, Carroll Lainey ........ 68 Huber, Earl Ernesl' ............ Hudgins, Nancy B. Lane .,,. 6l 83, 97 Jackson, Calvin Rae ..., 84, 97 Jackson, Jerry Leon ..,.....,s.. 50 Jackson, Ruby Nell ,..,.....,,. 6l James, Fenella M. ............ 258 James, Rebecca Lou W. .... l02 25l 235 James, William Verle 68, Janca, Wellon Joseph .... Jay, Thomas Ryan ..........,. 68 Jeanlreau, Lila Laverne .... I77, I84, 226. Jennings, Judilh Marilyn .... 6I Jennings, Roy Junior .... 84, 97, 280 l53. 285 Jennings, Shirley Lou ..s. 84, 97 Jerden, Ody .,., IO6, 255, 290 Jersin, John Henry .......,.... 50 Jezek, James Edward ........ 285 Johanson, Carol Joy .,...,.. 222 Johnson, Bruce Gordon ........ 6l Johnson, Henriella Irene . .. 50 Jorden, Archie Lee Jr. ..,..,.. 50 Joseph, Noel Carol 50, 2l5, 2l7 Josephson, Johanna Carol 6l, 245, 276 Jouanel, Jacquie ...,..,......,.. 226 Joyce, O. J. ..,... ......... 2 28, 284 Joyner, James .....,........,..... 230 336 Jubela, Cliflon Mill'on ......,. Juneman, Julius John Jr. .... 70 K Kadlecek. Edward John l56, 235 Kaelin, Sandra Lee .,,...,..... 50 Kahl, Luiz Fernando D. ..... ., l02 327 Kalisek, Eugene James .... Kallina, Gerald Frank .,.,..., 294 Kallina. Joseph J. Jr. 84, 97 Kasper, Molly Ann . ,,..,, 50, I86 2l4, 2l8, 340 Kalo, Yolanda Maria .....,.. l55 Kay, John Ross ..,.. ,, I06, 255 Kaylor. Jon .... 238, 292, Keeler, Harold George .... Keen, Paul Herberl .... 50, 236 Keen, Ralph Allen ........ I06, 255 295 2I0 Keiih, Cora Anne ....,........... 50 Kelley, Donald W. ..............., 84 Kelley, Edward Madison 84, 97 Kelly, Linda L. .................... 25l Kelly, Phillip Dale ..s. 24l. 283. 34l Kendrick, Roberl' Miller .... 209 Kennedy, Charles Gerald ..., 84 Kennedy, Joyce Marie .... 70, 250, 274 Kennedy, Judy Ann .... 50, 250 Kennedy, Palsy .,...,..,....... 226 Kennedy. Sam .,.,.... ......... 6 I Kenl, Sieve Neil .,,.... ...,. 7 0 Kershner, Jack ...,....... ..... 6 I Keslenbaum, Miriam ............ 70 Keihan, Kennelh Wayne .... 24l Keys, Gary Ellison ............,... 6I Kighl, Michael John ...,. ....... 6 I Kilgore, Jimmie ...,................ 50 Kilpper, Roberl' William .... 70 Kinard, Cecil Lloyd ll ........ 2lI Kincy, Deanna Gray 225, 25l King, Jack Lee ...,..,,.... 6l, 277 King, Jean Frances .... I32, I49 King, Marvin Lee ,..,.... 6l, 342 Kinnelorew, Gerald Paul ..,. 209 Kinslow, William Freddie ..., 50 Kirkland, Kennelh L. Jr. 84, 97 Kirschke, Ronald Allen 6I, 263 Kirlley, Dick Palriclc ..., 235, 309 Kiser, John ....................-... Kiser, Lee ........ I02, 252, Killman, Elizabelh ............ 290 253 26l Klingsporn, Dorwin Wayne 70. 284 Klos, William Anlon ..........., 62 Knapp, Charles Cole ....... 24l Knosiman, John Wayne 70 Knox, James Edward ......,. 255, 290. Kobs, Barbara Gail ............ 222 225 IO6, 29l Koehler, Dorlhea M ........... .. Kohen, Moshe Dov .,,,.... 84, 97 368 HCJW MUCH Weehrr dofwg tech,-Nquecommendations are constantly changing, as bile' anrfiendini Weight es are improved. Ten years .ago we-were reC0m W7R, T S of 3,ooo to 5,000 pounds per inch of bit diameter on 3 he Suggested weights, today, on our greatly improved W7R. fange from 4,000 to 7,000 pounds. Looking to the future and future weight recommendations, we are experimenting with extreme weights. In a series of research laboratory tests, drilling with a 7k-inch W7R in granite, we applied weights up to 112,000 pounds-equivalent to 14,000 pounds per inch of bit diameter. Frankly, we thought the teeth would snap off. But that didn't hap- pen. lnstead, drilling rate and footage increased materially,compared with the performance of the bit with a weight of 70,000 pounds. This, of course, is controlled laboratory drillingmgrecommended in actual practice. But the results point to interesting possibilities, in view of our new advanced research program which anticipates increased drilling weights in the future. Q H U G H E S "'l'31!?EXIi1L!SElE I b ffm I ITEQIIQ '7':.-'5IJFTII:E':j . ,,... .4 , e . f , ,- ., . iw-'N - 'V I " f 1 I I I I nnu1llulllllllllllll . I ,V U, 'T ' vljfff ff 5351. -I ' "L ?.GI-.r'1"1:Lv?' iiiifi J r 5 r 1 fi 1 - ,. I. ..,-upA3351-gi.,-'.,.f5e. i '. " ' ' . .:f'Eg:w!55jg:fgJ13AI'LQ-iiqigtsige B a'x-,.-.,p,1:.,fI,.g:age L 4 ':,j,.,.fg: nn-a-..f,'.L. fi, , 'v--- rm. I -.me I THE SOUTH'S FINEST PRINTING PLANT Houston's largest Stores Devoted Exclusively to Men and Boys 2507 TIMES AT KELVIN 2335 POST OAK AT WFSTIPYEIMER . . . with modern letterpress and off- set equipment to produce quickly and economically every type of print- ing and binding, including catalogs, magazines, brochures, folders, books, broadsides, stationery and forms. V JAckson 9-4204 0" 'ow ' GULF PRINTING COMPANY ""' 01 otlqbzcf, 'Q' Io 'ad 4'-fo, fl.:-,,,' as-,HIFI "ol 6 '04, fgols I 22l0 WEST DALLAS W Freshman . . . or Senior... or Active Alumnus You'II never find better business friends than the folks at Houston Bank 8: Trust MAIN AT JEFFERSON I HOUSTON . . right on the way to Everywhere! 370 , muh W w FW: an ESS ' -'. V?3e.fg'9Q ' ' M -,xg M-WV . 9 - V ll C-HLHOUN ' ' iff. w If, I"'fa."f .5 . ,Q ,. ,,wx 4:1-f A l . i'1q,,,qh s Zf' 22 . - J--. I 'f ,np I I 156' 'A5' Q f.,. ff sv 4, :"' Vg, -I-I azx, f-1 I-I x 'fn' " git' if ' ,. .r 3 . .1 H, " ' ,.. I 41 :M sa, . M hi, fiydnfur A H . 1 A . p '- Ja'-. . Q31 . L Nix I f fr- ng ,-, , . 1,-,, 1 .V ' Q11 25' , 5.4141 ga will 5 1 ' J., 5.5 jf. ,g :gp J , fb. '51, f-:-,xiglfilyf 'R '- -'-- 'Q' , ,fn ,. - , -- - 1.15 4. ,Y ,R ,Wi ,. , . a. 'fl - MF' K-M Student Index Kohler, Shirley Jean .........A.. 84 Koimn, Bobby Lee .....,,,.... 208 Kolber, Howard Alan ..v. 50, 228 259 Kopinilz, Edward ,....,..,... Kopycinski, Viclor Peler ,.,. 248 Kouzounis, Anlhony .... l22, 289 Koy, Bobby .,,..Y,...Ye.... .,...... 2 53 Kozlek, Pamela Irene .,,..w,v.V., 50 Krowski, Slanley Peler ,.....A. IO2 Krpec, Charles George Jr. 245, 295 Krueger, Myra Kay ........v, . 277 Krueger, William W. Jr. .... 84 Krunlorad, Frankie J. ............ 50 Kubena, Clinlon Slandish 228, 342 Kubin, Leonard William ..,. 70 Kuehne, James Richard ...W 309 Kuehnle, Ronald Arlhur ,....,,. 62 Kumin, Boruch ........,.,,,i4,i,,, 294 Kuo, Chiang Hai ,,,..i..,.w..... IO2 Kuykendall, Kirk Joseph ,.,, 334 Kyser, Tony . ...... ....., . 280 L Lacamu, Leon Connor ,,,L,a,. 62 Lallerly, Theodore ............ 29l Lai, Eugene Joe ,.,v.....,...... 209 Laibl. Edward Vincenl ....2,2, 70 Laine, Dale Edward ......,...., 84 Laird, Hainds, Elliol . , 70, l5l Lake, Roberl .,w..,Y.,,....,... .V., . 70 Lamair, William Charles 50, 243 Lamonle, Charles J, Jr. 70, 2I l Landers, William Roberls 84, 97 Landreneau, Harold J. Jr. 50 Landry, Donald Paul ,. ....,.... 70 Landsman-, Lewis ................ 259 Lang, Richard Carl ,,.. 208, 277 Lange. Carolyn ...,................ 275 Langford, Carolyn Alice .... 70, 25l, 279, 290, 29I Langslon, Claude M. Jr. .,.. 5l Lanning, Donald Walker ..., 252, 253 Lanlz, Graham Frank .....,.. I7l Laro, Mary Ann .................... 70 Larpenleur, Jeanine M. .,.... 70 Larrabee, John Dewey ........ 5l Larsen, Dick . ...,... 23l Larue, Alyce ..,...,...........,. 266 Lasseller, Richard C. I20, I55 Lassiler, John Thweall' ........ 62 Lawrence, Allan ........ 244, 260, 322, 323, 324, 327 Lawrence, Charles Edward .... 70 Lawrence, Sarah .................... 5l Lay, Newman Davis Jr. 5l, 232 Layne, Hazel .................... 244 Lea, Donald Ray ..,.,... 5l, 2l5 Lealherwood, Polly Ann .... 62 LeBlanc, Earl Allon Jr. .... 293 LeBlanc, William Andrew ,.., 5l LeBoul, Edmond Ray ............ 2l5 Lednicky, Donald Gene ........ 62 62 Lee, Joyce Elaine ................ Lee, Leonard Earl 5l, l45, 222 Lee, Linda Jo ........ I95, 225 Lee, Roberl Winnon ........ l02 309 Leech, John William .....,.. Lelkowilz, Bennie Freddy .... 84 Lehmann, Edmund Richard .. 84 Leisure, Roberl' Lee .... 62, 237 Lemburg, Morris ................ 294 Lemmon, James Marcus .... 3l7, 320 Leo, Donald Clemenl ........ 5l Leopold, Eleanor 275, 277 Lephiew, Glynnene .... 5l, 246 Lerman, Jerry Allen .... 84, 97 Levine, Irvin Sydney .... 84, 2l3 Levilz, Roberl ...,............ 248 Levy, Marlin Morris ........ 259 Lewis, Cleberl Edward 84, 97 Lewis, Edwin Charles .... 70, 239 Lewis, Lewis Jon Clillord ............ 5l , Marcia Eileen 250, 276 Lichlenslein, Abraham A. .... 70 Lichlenslein, Jerrie R. I. .... 70 Lieloan, Irene ...... ..... ...-.---- 2 2 6 Lieberman, Harvey Harris 70. 253 Lievano, Rodrigo Joseph .... 70 Lilschulz, Warren Ira ........ 321 Liggell, Harry Floyd IO2, 258 Lilly, Janel Carol .........-.---.- 84 I 372 Lindberg, Jerry Dale ............ 62 309 Linden, Errol Joseph 305, Lindsey, Larry Jenson 302, 309 Line, June ........................ 248 Linn, Tosby Laile .,.............. 84 Lipscomb, Joel Nelson .... l02 Lipscomb, William ..., 228, 290, 292 Lipshy, George ..,............. 259 Liscinski, Theodore John 5l, 234 Lilllelon, Joe .................... 258 Llewellyn, Charles A. .......... 70 Llewellyn, Thomas Lee ........ l02 Lloyd, Charles Edward ........ 62 Lobaccaro, Frank S. Jr. .,...... 84 Lobil, Roberl Neal ............ 5l Locher, Sharon Elaine ........ 5I Lock, Leonard Wesley 84, 97 Lockler, Lynn Sherwin ........ 297 Loflis, Dennis Larry ............ 395 Loggins, Jane Lee ............ 5l Lohman, Barbara Jane .... 84, 97 Look, Morlon Barringlon IO6, 254 Looper, Waller Burl .... 86, 97 Lopez, Adan Lorenzo G. 334, - 335, 34l Lord, Richard Frank ..,......... 5l Lorehn, Olle Joseph .... 240, 284 Love, Louis Elvin .... 86, 259 Lovell, Donald Dale .,...... 86, 97 Lowery, Lane .....,.............. 5l Lubbock, Dan Gray Jr. ...... 24l Lucchesi, Mario Charles .... 7l Luckenbill, Theodore Ray I29. 3l3, 3l4, 3l6, 3I8, 320 Luna, Erneslo Sada .,.. 293, 295 Lupau, Clemenl Noland 86, 97 Lupo, Frank Mario. ....,. 5l, 234 Lulman, Sandra Carole ...... 5l Lyngaas, David Leslie ........ 5l M Macaluso, Josephine E. ...... 5I Mack, Alice ...........,.... 274. 275 MacLaughlin, Charles E. 86, Macy, John 322, 323, 324, Madden, Barry Eugene 62, Madrid, Carlos Anlonio 62, 258 327 259 208 Magnuson, Verner H. Jr. .... 243 Mahan, Harper Norman ...... 5l Mahon, James Roderick .,.. 86, 97, IO6. 254 Maida, Joe Sam .... I06, 255 Maniar, Dilip Sarabhai IO2, 2l I Manly, Marlha Lou ..,. I79, I94, 26l Manning, .Edna E. McDullie 5l Manuel, Jimmy .,.,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 7l Marlourger, Jerry Lee ........ 5l Marcus, Ada L. ................ 25l Maresh, Mary Ann Albina ,. . 7l Marquer, Marcia .,.. I54, 226 Marquez, John .,........,..... 264 Marrero, Palrick Cyril ........ 234 Marsh, Carol .................... 225 Marshall, Melvin Terrel ...,,... 7l Marlensenk Marlin Peler ..., 208 Marlin, Billy Ray ....,.,,,,,,.,,. 2ll Marlin, Charles ....,............... 5l Marlin, Conrad ...,. .. 26l, 309 Marlin, Dorolhy 5l, 250, 274 Marlin, Frances .......,., .,... 2 22 Marlin, Roberl Selh ..........., 7l Marlinez, Felix Jacquez .... 5l Marlins, Nelson Henrique IO2 Mashburn, Joseph Laing ..., 209 Massey, Delinn ..,....,............ 222 Malhias, William ................ 62 Malhison, Alvis Rene ........ Mallhews, Dan Gus .,.. I02, Mallhews, Judilh Ann ......,. Mallingly, Joseph .... 294, Mallingly, Paul .,......,..,.... Mauzy, Lee Earl ................ May, Cecil .....,...,,..,.......... May, Frank ,..,... ..... 2 52, May, Joann ........, .............. May, Lagard ........v..,., .. . Mayhall, Charlolle Jean .,.. 97, Mayhew, Carle C. ..... ..,. . Mazzu, Thomas Gene ....,.,. McAlee, Dennis Burnell .,., McAlIisler, Jerome ............ McAnally, Marcus Durwood McCarly, Vesla Lee Lloyd McCaskill, John Hardy 62. 62 IO6 5I 295 238 IO6 62 253 62 277 86. I5l 258 52 52 259 IO6 86 240 Tlwl flat . ,rvist-Fix - .i,4s'f'i:H H lg 1+ . Oil sought in out-of-the-way places . . . Taken from deep in the earth . . . Moved swiftly, silently, unseen . . . , . .,-.,,x..,,..f,t,.,:7.,,.., ..,5,..,,. . , ' 5 Q' . 4 . - I .- 13-.Lf---'fr , P41 . V ' 5 ' ' 'Y .1 , ' - -an , , ,,.. Y A, ' si . ' W - L -z 'V-e ',J fl ' , , ll, Y v , , .I ' , 1' 'I - 5 V ' , rr-1---N sw- .5 I "V ai- -f -ll f' L c I sp. it .a a. 53, 4 v In 1 LM 1.-L L, Lek'--s I iq, " 'Qi' li l'-w z D ...Lf , X-,gp I Lg A 'K . H f e - n-nl Leve I 'N ' WF- -1 1' fe' f-E e ' ' ""' -W. . 5 1 --:V '-n - f ' v Jz lf- v r i n L ,A J .: -4 1, ,lig f -1 ly b " I 'K .nl ,gy I ,- :I '1.:iI A ,gif 1334? I 1 ,Y 'N V' .T ', 'ir ' 5. lf i n-. .1 En Nfei l lfe-B, g. fu: H I , ' ' I .I ' Ffifivf 'f 'in fix wi f , ' ' L S . ' ' iii" " l A '11 'Fil-F H i- gf 1 , " - J' .v ' ,. ,f'1ggw"i,-,,, ::'1v-,Q in ,' 1 , ' .. f ' -- 5 1 "3 '-eV---- has -431 Is refined into versatile products . . . Of the finest quality science can achieve . . . For the needs of modern living. VCONSTANT,SCi91'1tiflC search for new oil reserves, improved products and more efficient distribution means better value in petroleum for you. HELL IL COMPAN Mx.: x l 8 I ,l,,"'0 PEDEN IRON 5 2 . , Standard 81 'Z ' xs Dupllcahng Machines STEEL co. WALLACE Serving Houston Over 7I Years l4I4 FANNIN STREET-HCUSTON 2, TEXAS Cong'-a-I-ulai-es Telephone Capitol 2-2273 lhe University on. lls Rapid Progress I of? '90 WHOLESALE HARDWARE WESSENDORFF NEI-MS QZTAEEL C: INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIES 81 CO- ' Qualily Tool Suppliers 700 N. San Jacinto CA 2-2I2I Fogsglgli-Irzligghvili-gclrzdllgilry You'll find all your favorite records now at FOLEY'S Whatever your tastes in music, you'll find iust the records you're looking for at Foley's . . . from Calypso to Cherubini, from Bop to Bach! Our complete selections include RCA Victor, Columbia. Capitol, Decca, London. and many other famous brands. . . both 33113 and 45 rpm. Come in anytime and browse . . . you're always welcome! F 0 L E Y 9 S Ninth Floor Record Shop W. F. ALBERT FELIX RESSMANN Phone FA3-5l48 THE PRESCRIPTION HOUSE INC. Six Graduare Pharmacisfs 'ro Serve You Free Mofor Delivery 8II Fannin Housfon 2, Texas HOUSTON NATIONAL BANK "Your Financial Friend" Since I876 Member FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION A Sincere Wish for Success to Each Member of the Class of I96I MICHEL T. HALBOUTY M-P Student Index McCaskill, William A. .... 34I McClain, Jimmy .,..,,.,.,,,,,,, 250 McClarly, John Reed .... 86, 97, 2I l, 2l2, 245 McClure, Don Ellis l53, 238 McConnell, Palricia ,,,A,ww- -.., 7 I McCool, Bonnie .,w.,... I55. I89, 220, 296 McCormack, Paul Leroy A..v 86, 97, 253, 277 McCoy, Carolyn Cummings 86 McCoy, James Claylon .... IO6 McCreighl, Randy .,.,,,,,.,,. 23I McCrummen, Ronny ..,.,,.. 294 McCullar, Loyd .,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,, 7 I McCune, John Slanley ,,., 236 McDaniel, Carol Renee l27, I82 McDaniel, Clinlon Ray 86, 97 McDaniel, William Lulher McDavid, George Eugene McDonald, Jo Ann .,,. 62, I6I 264 62 McDonald, Roy .,,,.......... . 258 McElhinney, Thomas H. .,,. 253 McGee, James Ralph . 52 McGilvray, David .,i,.,,,,,,, 245 McGlolhlin, Maurice D. ..,, 2l5. 226, 285 McGowan, Darden L. Jr. 87, 97 McGowen, Roberl Slevens 62 Mclnlyre, Roberl . ,.,,.....i.,,. 52 Mclnlyre, William E. Jr. ,,,. 257 McKaughin, James ..,......... 280 McKay, ' McKee. McKee, Ronald Slewarl 87, 97 Marion ..,.,.i,,,,.,L.. 275 Kay Ellen .,.. 2 I4, 224 McKee, Terrance Markham 62 McKinney, Mary L. Buzbee 7I McLean, Jim .,,.. .,V,...,,,,....... 2 50 McLennan, Belly L,...V.......... 52 McLeod, Alonzo A. i,.. 274, 275 McMahan, Harry Kimball .,,. 63 McMahon, Barney Michael 275 McMichael, Roberl ,,,,,,,,,,,, 245 McNay, Roberl Harold .... 52 McRoy, James Jerome IO2, 245 Mea, George Henry ........ 52 Meaders. Trenl Sluarl .,,. Medley, Morris S. Jr. 209, Megow, Frederick Ronald .... 63 IO6 2II Megow, Lawrence Donald .... 63 Meinscher, Fred ................ 63 -Meisenholder, Richard E. .... 63 Mellon, Rochelle R. .... 52, 249 Mendez, Julian Rodriguez ...... 87 Mendoza, Florencio G. .v.. IO2 Mensing. Toni Rae ........,... I I5. l33, I57, 222, 282 Menzel, Reynold Willy 248, 275 Merdian, Anlon W. Jr. ..,. 2I3 Merdian, Joanne Frances . .. 7I Moore, Clay Leon Jr. ...,.... I33, 228, 242, 284, 290, 29l, 292 Moore, Lynda Ellen .i...,Y. I I9, l26, l27, I53, l9l, I94. 200, 2I7, 260 Moore, Palricia May B. .,,. 222 Moore, William Bruce ........ I43 Moorhead, Sharon Ann ..,, 2I4, 243, 22l Morehead, Roberl Earl IO2 Morero, Pal ....,..,.i,,.,,.,,i. l4I Merryman, Gary Don ,,,..... 52 Merschal, Dian Palricia .... 52 Merlz, Willard ,....,,. 252, 253 Mesiroll, Jennie Pearl ........ 63 Melrik, Harry Paul ..,...,..... 209 Meyer. Billie .,....., ,.,.....,.,.... 5 2 Meyer, Clarence Wayne .,.. 52 Meyer, Joseph Daniel .....,., 63 Meyer, Travis Waller .... 87, 97 Meyers, Landis ................ 327 Miller, Calherine P. ........ 87, 97 Miller, David Lee ,........... 2l5 Miller, Linnea Joan .....,...... 222 Miller, Mervin ,Deane .... IO2, 274. 275 Miller, Olivia Diane ............ 220 Minor. Edward Truslow .,.. 255 Minler, James Calvin . ...... 7I Minler, Norma Jean While 63 Minlurn, Theo Marsh .,....., 52, 2l5, 220 Miracle, Oliver .. .........,.,. 259 Mirsky, Joe ........................ IO6 Misleh, Musa Jasir .....,....., 278 Milchamore, Eddie .... 309, 339 63 Milchell, John Michael ....... Milchell, Vic ......,..,.......,..,... 239 Mize, Jerald David .... IO6, 244 Mize, Roberl Claylon ,....... 87 Mobley, Calhy Jeanne .... 262. 285 Moehr, Arlhur Roy .,..,.....,. 63 Mohr. Joanna J. Loving .... 249 Molchany, Richard Andrew 315, 3l9, 320 Monlalbano, Philip J. .,...... 63 Monlg omery, Skip .............. 238 Moore, Ardon Edward Jr. IO6 376 Morgan, Barbara Eckardl 52 Morgan, John Richard .... 87,97 Mor an, Mona Rulh .... 87, 97 Q Morgan, Samuel Marshall Moronko, Roberl Emmell 248 . 7I Morris, Darrell Maurice .... 242 Morriss, Judy Ann .,,. l23, I8l, 2l8, 282. 285. 340 Morse, James Roberl ,. . Morse, William D. Jr. IO6, .7I 255 Mosby, Roloerl Scoll Jr. ., . 240 Mosl, Roberl . ...... ......, , 297 Molley, Jerry Slanley ,....... 63 Molley, Melvin Doyle ........ 63 Molle, Franklin .............. l07, 238 Mudd, Belly Jean . ..,... 52 Mugnier, Paul ..... ..., ......... 2 5 3 Muller, David Lamar ......,. 209 Mullins, Don Ray 260, 304, 309 Mullins, James Tommy .....,.. 255 Murchison, William E. ..... .. 52 Murphree, Emmell E. Jr. .... 34I Murphy, Dan ........................ 63 Murphy, Mary Shawn .......... 7I 63 Murphy, Norman Pal ......., Murphy, Paul Clarence ,... Murphy, Roberl John 87. Murray. Jerome Gordon ..,. 255 97 28l Murray, Morris Lee .,..,,.,.... 52 Murray, Owen ..... ....... ...... 2 5 9 Murrhee, James Jr. ............ 264 Murlaugh, Ellen Marie .. I5l Musgrave, Freddy Gene 87, 97 N Naber, Kennelh l-eonard .... 7l Naber, Marian Jean Rieke 87, 97 Nabona, Slanley .. .... .. .....,. 63 Nachigarni, Arihiko ............ 274 Nail, Wayne Howard .... 87, 97 Necessary, Morgan D. ........ 7l Neel, Ronald James .,...... 87, 97 Neese, Charles Lee ........ 258 Nelkin, Benard ............ 87, 97 Nelson, Claylon Lyonel ..,. 208 275 Nemolo, Ryola ......,.. ....... Nesler, Charles Alberl l07. 255 Newell, Jimmie David Jr. 102. 259 Newman, Arlene Marie I52. 222 Newman, Larry 254, 269, 296 Newsom, William Roy 7l, 263 ' 250 Nicoll, Mary L. Triolo 87, 98 Niederholer, Leona Alma Nielield, Terry Allen ........ Nicholas, Clyde ..........,,..., .7I 28I Nllsche, Pal .................... 234 Nivens, Roll Eugene ............ 71 Noles, William Joseph .... 28I Nordslrand, Carl Herber .... 88 Norris, James Aulhor ........ 309 Norris, Jan Douglas ..,. 268, 272 Nossaman, Elmer Lee .....,.. 259 294 Nunn, Norman Russell I07, 254 Nusser, John Hannillon .... 52 O Noxon, Scoll ................,... Obrien, David Ebaugh Ill 63 Obrien, Joseph Kennelh 88, 98 Ochoa, Paul ........................ 52 Odell, Harold Lloyd ............ 2 I0 Odom, Orville Neil ............ 7l ' ' ' 237 Ogden, Gerald David ,.... .. 2I I Oliel, William .................... Oleary, John ................ 63. 284 Oleary, William Dennis J. 52 Oneal, Barbara Jean- Gay 88 Orlegon, Manuel Jr. ..,......... 63 Osborn, Mary Marlha .... 248 Osborne. Loren ........ 292, O'Sullivan. Sheila ............ 295 273 228 248 294 O'T1el, Bill ........................ Ovalle, Roy ........................ Owesne, Jack .... 63, 29l. P Pace, Carole Ann ............. .. 52 For Discriminaiing Transien'I's and Residenfial Guesis THEOCTEYSAL DINING ROOM O R. T. CULLATHER xxx Manager WARWICK HOTEL AND APARTMENTS Housfon, Texas v ' ' 8490 Kafy Road, Posi Office Box I9236 COMPANY HOUSTON 24, TEXAS 7Il Main S'rree+ HCUSTON Housfon FA 3-8l23 Dickinson 7-685l E911 our 75th and greaieat year 0 Jeruice DIAMO ANN IVE RSARY 'I886 1961 Texas National Bank 0 F H O U S T O N MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION am ,-iw. 74 Swan" i ENGRAVING COMPANY CONGRATULATIONS on anolher educalional year com- pIe+ed! S+ar Engraving Company, for ihe pasi' 39 years, has been sewing schools 'Ihroughoul' 'lhe souih and soufhwesf. We are more 'Ihan appreciafive for lhe business you have favored us in ihe pas? and will sincerely aim fo coniinue fo offer you fhe finesl service in +he years +o come. CLASS RINGS DIPLOMAS ANNOUNCEMENTS Caps and Gowns, Yearbooks, Band Uniforms STAR ENGRAVING COMPANY HOUSTON, TEXAS "I-Ious+on's Own Finishing School" 'Fashion 'I'Pho+ographic "Television 'Make-up Personal A'r+en1'ion Wi'I'h Your Individual Problem Training Agency Ja 9-2535 Ja 2-0740 WZWQI y L Qcademieo c arm-:7 I207 Lovell' Blvd. and modefm-9 Hous+on 6, Texas One Source for Laboratory Supplies O Ins+rumen'l's O Apparalus O Glassware O Furnifure O Chemicals W. H. CURTIN 81 CO. HOUSTON O DALLAS NEW ORLEANS O JACKSONVILLE BUY THE BEST S BUY TEXACO I , , .o. MI nf- I ,... -asain-..,,, I4I5 HIGBEE 81 MITCHELL P. O. Box I726 HOUSTON I, TEXAS .- SUUT STERII IZH IIB. Q rf fi mpib "Headquar'I'ers for All Tl1a+'s New in Color" I4I6 MAIN CApi+ol 2-9906 LANGHAM, LANGSTON, -17 Dallas Ave. 0 FAirfax 3-2383 BURNETT 8, DYER Insurance Counselors I 3700 lvlonlrose Boulevarcl HOUSTON, TEXAS A Bank for Young People Who Are Going Places FIRST CITY NATIONAL BANK OF HOUSTON P-S Student Index Pacheco, Jesse Manuel .Ye...,. 7l Palm. Lee Allen ............ 88, 98 Palmer, Nancy Ann ............ 52 Palmer, Raymond William ,,,, 63 Paramore, Larry Y,.. 284, 297 Paris, Wayne e.,,.e.,........,... 233 Parkhursi, James Earl .,....A. 201, 2l3, 232, 325, 327 Parks, John .,,.,,.,,,,,,,4,,,,,,,,, 327 Parr, Ben neil ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,.,,,A4, 88 Parrish, Harry Allen ,,,..,,..,,, 63 Parsons, James Kirkland .... 259 Pairick, Seih William ........ 275 Paironella, Louis John .,,. 202, 288 24-4. Pallerson, Jack Jr, ,,4,w, ,,AA, 2 32 Pahkerson, Lynn . ,.,,,,,i,,,,,,,,, 52 Paiierson, Roberl 88, 98, 275 Pairierson, Sharon Lynn .,....,, 53 Pavlich, James ,,,i,i,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 230 Pavlik, Anihony Emil iAA.4,,,..,i 7I Pawlik, Ronald C. .Ao,.,o,.,,, 231 Payne, Claude Eugene ..v,..,, 53 Payne, Roberi ,,,,,,,,,,,,,A,,.,,, 63 Paz, Roberio Garcia ,.,,.,,.,.o, 7I Peabody, Nan Carol .....,..,. .. 53 Peake, Arihur Eugene V,,...., 7l Pederson, Roger Dennis ,,.. 238 Pedii, Doug ,.,,,,,,. ,. .......... 228 Pelham, Royce . ,, ,,,,,,7,,,,, , 64 Pena, Enrique Horacio IO7, 255 Penn, Edwin Eugene ..c.., . 243 Perdue, Jim Mac .. ,,.,. 88, 98, l07, l28, 244, 262 Perdue, John Roberi .,,,,... 228, 230, 290 Pereira, Sheila Cremilde 64 Perkins, Milion McKinnon 309 Perriraz, William Ernesi 88 Perry, Donald Ray , ,. ,,..,... .. 88 Perry, Oliver Weldon ........ 285 Perry, Virginia Louise ,,,,,,., 53 Peschke, Jerome M. ,,,,.,.. 252 Peierson, Roberi Henry 7l, 259 Peiiy, Carol Ann . 88, 98, 277 Peyion, John Charles .. 239 Piisler. Roberi Eugene 242 Phelan, Cleaius l07 Philip, Sara Ann . ,..,.. 7l Philips, Charles Henry .,.,.,,. 208 Phillips, Donald Drew .,..., ,..,. 8 8 Phillips, Doroihy ,,,,c,,,.,,..,., 226 Phillips, Gary A. ..,..,,,.,,u I29, 239, 3l3, 3l4, 3l5, 3l8. 319, 320, 340 Phillips, LaNelle .,,,,,,...,. 88, 98 Pickering, Sondra Kale ..,..... 53 Pieraii, William H. Jr. ..,. 239 Pierce, John Fesius ...,...... . 245 Pike, Carol Ann ,,,,, ..,......, 5 3 Piper, Joan ., ,.,,,.,,,.,.,, .6 88, 259 Panman, Judy . c...c 119, 152, I79, 2l8, 340 Plaisance, Roy Dahmer Jr. 208 Pledger, Linda Joyce ,,,, 7l, 275 Pledger, William ,.....,.,. 296 Pollak, Kalhleen Ann 88, 98, 222 Pollan, Bob Vern .,,,,, 320 Poriis, William B. Jr. .. ,... . 88 Polcinske, Hilmer Lee . 2l2 Poiier, Lorna Kay . 64 Poiier, Norma Rae .. .. 72 Poiier, Travis . .. A..,., ,... , 64 Pounds, Thomas . , 72, 294 Powell, Linda .. .. ...... ,,.. . l53 Powers, James Wallace 209 Presley, Adrian Eugene ,,.. 264 Prince Karolyn Lois .. ,,,,,,, . 64 Pring, Barbara , ,,..,, . . 260 Puriiursi, Bevery ....., . 22l, 342 Purple, Charles Dana Jr. . 72 Pulrnam, Frances Ann . . ., 245 Pyle, Joe Larry . ,... ,. , 209 Pyle, Margarei Helen 64, 224 O Quick, Karen Lee .. .,.. ., . 222 Quiiier, James Moses 2l I, 2I3 R Ragsdale, Thomas . ,.,.. . ...,, 88 Rainey, John ,,,.. ,,,,,,,,,,. . .. 268 Rankin, George John . 323 Ranlz, Marcia .,,,...,..,, 53, 276 Rao, Ramachandra M. R. IO2 Rapp, Edgar Arlhur Jr. .,.. 208 Rash, Shelby Winifred Jr. Rash, Suzanne Emerson ..,.,,,. 64 72 380 Rau, Raymond Frank ,....... 343 Ray, Raymond C. T. ........ l07 Raymond, Brenda Ann .... 246 Raymond, Linda Ann .... 246 Reavis, William Dean . ...,.. 285 Reber, Nelson Jay ......,..... 259 Reck, Jerry ........................ 282 Rediger, John Thomas ........ 53 Reed, Helen Sue ...,,........ .. 29l Reed, John Henry ........ 327 Reed, Thomas .. ..,.....,, . 236 Reed, Viclor Viiquinne 228, 238 Reenan, John Dallas .,.... ..... 7 2 Reeves, Shirley Jane .,.. 53, 222 Reid, Beniamin Arl'hur 72, 264 Reid, Elion ....,..,......... ...... 7 2 Reidmiller, Dennis .....,.. . 25l Reindl, Meyer Evans 88.98.211 Reinhardi, Harold .. ,.,...., 245 Reiiz, Jerry Eldon ............ 64 Remberf, Michael David ..,. 72, 228, 284 Remmeri, Ora Dell 88 Resiivo, Linda Jean ,.,. . . 64 Reyad, Alrlar . ,, . 275 Reynolds, Thomas Donald 280, 28l Rilobink, Ronald . ........... . 275 Rice, Allen Gene , ,,....,. . 277 Rice, Miriam Chrisiine . , 277 Richard, Arvie Lee . ... . . 88 Richardson, William ...,, . 3l0 Ridgeway, Don . .,,, ,,....,,. 2 74 Riedel, Linda Ann , ..... 53, 226 Rieves, Charles Ernesi ..,, 260. 302, 303, 3l0 Rigamonii, Helen Marie . ., 72 Riggan, Linda Joyce I36, 279 Risner, Gloria Fay .s..., 53 Risiau, Dora Lee l56, 225, 285 Risiau, William .. .........---- 294 Riich, Gene Paul 304, 306, 3l0 Rivenbark, Ron .. .'248, 257, 290 Rivero, Ramon T. .,,. 2l I, 2I4 Rivero, Rolando Carlos .. ...., 64 Robbins, Gregg . ...,..,,.. 327 Robert Ernesi . . .. .. , 244 Roberis, Larry Clinion . . , 53 Roberison, Mary Carol 64 ,ous l ., U 's 7 4, R 2983:-if L 'XWGUARD 4, if l x Ti X . uc una' ' -...nf O ,- - ... Q--fp'-' Robin, Allan Maynard ,,.. .. 64. 236. 276 323 Robinson, Gregory S. ..,.... . Rodgers, Alan Philip 323, 327 Rodgers, Linda Ann . ..,. . 274 Rodriguez, Charlie V. , .. ,. 285 Roe, Linn ......... .,............... 6 4 Rogers Linda ,,.,..,, ........ 2 25 Rogers, Losson Cook lll ........ 64 Rogers Nancy ,................... 2l9 Rogers Roberi George 88, 98 Rogers Roy Talberl' Jr. . . 255 Roland Billy , . ,,......,.. 34I, 343 Rorschach, Richard G. ., .. . 256 I one 4 slg, 9 Rosen, Alan David 88, 98, 259 Rosenbaum, Marion Arihur 64 Rosenberg, Glenda Lerner 88, 98 Ross, Norman . .. ......,.. IO2 Ross, Shirley Lee ..,... . 53, 263 Rossi, Edward .. .. 53 Roiramel, Marion , , 252, 253 Roxburgh, Charles D. 88. 98.211, 214, 245 Royall, William Wayl lll . 53. 323, 327 Rundell, Donald D.. . .72, 2l0 Rusk, Marrha Ellen . . ,,,.. 64 Russell, Charles ......... ,,,..,.,, 2 59 Russell, Donald Gail .. ......... 72 Russell, James Benjamin ,... 259 Russi, John M. .. 64, 294 Rusiin, William Evereii' .... 88 Ruiledge, Earl Read 264, 265 Ruiledge, Edward Eugene 253 Ryan, Jon .. .. ., 258 S Sadler, Siephen Van .... ,, 64 Safieh, William lssa 64 Sales, Nola V. .... . ........ 53 Salinas, Felipe Garcia ,... 88, 98 Samoriga, Eugene ...,...,,... 295 Samuelson, Jerry ,........ .,,.,. 6 4 Sandiier, Alvin Carlos .. ..... 88 Sanford, Donna Rae ......,..... 53 Sansing, William 72, 238, 259 Savanapredi, Tana .,,,.......... 72 Schadel, Charles ..,............. 275 i oi-F G iz c 4"-9 'lag ' Wind 1 marc' L, iii 2255 Q I A '5 ,if S 'S - 3 723' 5, ,Tl I--lllllll I 6-mai' Q -Q 3 'uni 551 Ti7"J' ikii 25' EKU. , . ,, ., 253111513352 THE MAPLE ROOM of the MEMORIAL PROFESSIONAL BUILDING Serving Better Food at Popular Prices AVAILABLE for PRIVATE PARTIES AND DINNERS For Reservations Call ................ FA 3-49I5 Jr ' Hula-Bake HOUSTON FIRST FEDERAL ,Ni HAS SERVED HOUSTON FOR Moy THAN 40 YEARS :MMM it does moke o difference where you save! Start a savings or lump-sum account now. Dividends start the day money is received. Accounts are insured up to 510,000 per person and up to 330,000 for two people. Save by mail . . . we pay postage both ways. Savings are profitable . . . and available. ,manor 4' 0 ' DIRECTORS: 7 . . -7 ' 3005 Harrisburg Blvd. CApLtoI 5-5454 5 INSURED L. H. QILXLREFETT DR. JOHN H. FOSTER PE? ' ' C. B. . L. M E ' ' 1 ""' 3 'W E oYcHE JR IFIOWARIE YEILLEESEN YEAR Houston s Largest Painters Q SlII,lll.xS - - 'E E TOWNES PAID of Automobiles and FIeet Equipment. la ww I I QUARTERLY www-EQHIEIQEQ-wtf ONE OF TEXAS' STRONGEST SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS Main Office -1114 Capitol Brunch - Westheimer of Pool Oak FAirfax 3-3341 "FIRST IN HOUSTON" FAirfax 3-3349 Stand Steadfast . in your ideal and Iook to the future with confidence. A "good" today and a "better" tomorrow is assured you. And Iook to natural gas for the finest in modern conveniences . . . reIy on this steadfast service to pIay an impor- tant part in your future business and in your home of tomorrow. f'Q5CE555L' -32525-1329 'flikfi'-1:51 :55fi'5-3 5.,.:.g.,44.-+:41g2f::5:Z I.fl-252275I551715525E'Z?U5IN"o?iSJZ'F-, -'C-?.9:-Z'Z-7-I-55:5I-435255723533 SERVING THE GULF SOUTH ,, KING CENTER M5696 wm nmvf IN THEATRE 'CZ Goh'-n moan :he-H AMNS M 0- 5- 17 dba ! Z is 6'Always 5 Top '6- Film I F are" M L4 55' if 32 ILT ,.. IIIIIII HOLMES ROAD df SOUTH HRK BLVD. FIRST MORTGAGE COMPANY OF HOUSTON 5IO Tafi' JAcIcson 9-393l ITAFT AT BUFFALO DRIVEI , - p HOUSTON HI-FI 3727 Wesfheimer MO 6-OI69 I fff CX! 9 .fi II nag? MWIWW HAMBURGERS SINCE 1929 Compli menis of ATLAS-BRADFORD C0 H TH OUSTON, TEX E Dow AS CHEMICAL COMPANY s..9,.e.e1,t! E D 6910 Fannin S ERIMS CO. treet HOUSTON 25, TEXAS f READY MIX xx WV CONCRETE CHARLES F. REED, Manager A' ' nf- 'T ' ' ' - Tags Q -'wwqg E' Q., 0 S 0 3--M' , 'va -- .4. , ffm, . ,..-, '- Y ' E 5 55 f35U,h,s 1' , , +5 .fn 'E 11 MM!-' E1 'ra 1:1 H "lx ' rr., ,,z" ggi: -, -5, 'Ham QT. ,Aj 'f ,ssanmg ,. 35, ",F',i-aw P32295 A' an X 115.21113 W X :YE 14 V fy , - V . ' gum ww, 'I EK - . Ea TT if , ' '91, g A A at if E in A 1:4 Q T M 4- ' ,zmrjfl-5 fi Qj ai 23521 ' E 'ff 3, " "H w 4L"M"'.z FL, ' L -.QTHM - ' - iff ,' ,arifilgf . -- -1 N 157475 Q A ,y 'Ti'-F121 '-" in :Rza 'L' f-53:-5 fjifz- ' , " , 'fi 55? ' f Rf E57':7,.i,:,-" 1 T All " "E W' f ALL. .445 I" T5 'E ' , rl -if?-7 ,QUTEY , V-11119 ng AML Hifi' W 383 S-T Student Index Schenlc, Hilde .,..,, ,,,, .,.,,. 2 I 7 253 237 Schmehling, Elhel Mae .,.. 278 278 Scherer, James ...,.,........., Schipper, Michael .,,,.,,v,,,. Schmidl, Thomas Mowery Schneider, Billie Janeen .... II9, l82, I95, 220, 246. 26l 332 Schneidler, Theodore ....,.,. 294 Scholaer, Viclor John .,,,,,,,,, , 88 Schoenleld, Paul Fredric . . , 24I. Schoenlield, Sandra A. . . 2I5, 227 53. 34I 285, Schoppe, Leia M. Garrell ..,. 72 Scholl, Augusl Nelson ......,. 72 Schreiner, Thomas Dale 53, 284 Schroeder, Merle ,....... 72, 259 Schullz, Richard W. Jr. ,,,,,... 65 Schveralc, Donald Earl. . 3l3, 3 I 7, 320 Schwarlz, Roberl E. .... 2I I, 2l2 Schwarz, Roland Herman .... 65 Scoll, Leslie Ann ................ 245 Scoll, Peler Jerome ............ 72 Segel, Jerry Pernell ......,..... 65 Seman, Theodore ..........,. 264 Semian, John Joseph 260, 3I0 Sepulveda, Perlcins ............ 53 Sessions, Donald Irvin ........ 305, 306, 3 IO Sewell, Harvey Wilson Jr. .... 88 Seymour, Tommie L. .... 88, 98 Shaclcell, Thomas Charles 228 Shaler, William Raymond 88, 98 Shah, Mahasulch Popallal 2II Shah, Mahendra Nagindas 2II Shah, Pravinchandra A. ...,.. IO2 Shah, Umanglal G. ..,......... IO2 Shalhub, Emile Asad .... 90, 98, 278 Shannon, James Winlred .... 90 Sharp, Mary ....,......... ..... 2 6I Sharpe, Anne Laurel I38, I42, I4-8, 2l6 Shaver, Oliver Roy ......... . 2II Shaw, Jerry Marlin .... 72, 259 Shellield, Jerome D. ........ 208 384 Shepler, Linda Brown .... 90, 98, 226 Sherohman, Joseph Ross .... 53 Shields, Charles ...,,. ......... 2 80 Shields, Jacqueline ..........o. 259 Shields, James Earl ..,, . ...,. 65 Shine, Walhena Lynn 90, 98 Shira, Linda Diane , ., 2I4, 222, 245, 285 Shirley, James Roland .... 338 Shoemalcer, Leroy Jr. I07, 254 Shows, Gerald Coy .... 90, 99 Shumale, Billy George .,.,.... 65 Sicinslci, Frances A. .....,.,.... 53 Siems, Donald Ray ............ 28I Siler, Carol Jean . ...... 53, 225 Silverman, David .....' ........... 9 0 Simmons, Barlow .... .... 2 II, 235, 245. 29I Simmons, Brenda Jean ......,, 53 Simmons, Gaylon H. Jr. .... 72 Simpson, Alberl Dee III ........ 90 Simpson, Joyce Randolph .... 54, I78, I30, 2l7 Sims, John Andrew Jr. 90, 293 S1ms, Roloerl .,........,.,.,,..., 252 Sinclair, Julia Harriel 54, 2I9 Singh, Inder . ,,,,.,,,,............ . 278 Sirman, John Myrlis 90, 99 Silrlon, Gary ..............,...., 237 Slogren, Cora N. ..... ,. ...... 248 Skinner, Jerry 90, 99, 2I0, 290 Slough, Darrel Gene ..,. 90, 99 Slover, Ira Nalhan .............,. Small, Wayne Eranlclin 72, Smiley, Gayle Barbara ........ 72, 249, 255, 270, 27I, 285 Smilh, Bonnie Lynn 56, I53, 2l8 Smilh, Charles Lee Jr. 54, 209 Edward Arlhur ........ 65 .90 2II Smilh, Smilh, Eranlcie Herman ........ 54 Smilh, Gene Alan ............,.,, 65 Smilh, Gene Fayelle ..,..... 90 Smilh, Helen Janelle ........ 65 Smilh, James Chrislopher I49, 248 Smilh, James William ........ 54 Smilh, John Morgan ........ 2I5 Smilh, Joyce Marie .. .,,.. 9I, 99 Smilh, Mary Lou Keen ....... Smilh, ' ' Smilh, Paul GIIGS Jr. .......... . Smilh, Phillis Audrey .... 54, Smilh, Ronald Lee ........ 9I Snellings, Jasper Larry ....,,. Snoolcs, Danny Joseph ........ Snow, Rosemary . ..,....... 9I Snyder, Barlon Haschlce .... Sodagar, Kiril Amubhai 72, 2IO SoI1lo, Nancy .,...............,.. Sorrell, William Harold 228 Sorrels, Roberl Wayne ....... Soudloalshsh, Mohammed S. Soulh, John Russell .............,. Sowell, Bonnie ...., .............. Spalalora, Sleve Vincenl IO7 Palr1c1a Ann ..........,. 65 .9l III .99 .65 IO7 , 99 72 258 23I . 72 9l. 99 . 72 275 . 54 Spencer, Jimmie Don .......... 65 .. 54 .. 65 Spieldenner, Gerald L. ....... . 99, 209. Spill, Phillip Adolph ,,....,,,,,, Spicer, Leonard Russell ., Spiegelhauer, Danny AI .. 91. 213 ,264 Slair, Roberl Yocum .... 9I, 99 Slalarow, Devara Ann ........ 54 Slallings, Carmen B. .,.. I28, 263, 290 Slallones, Slanley Mason .... 72 Slanclaler, Belly Jean 72, 225 Slanley, Russel Morlan .... 263 Slaples, Ann .................... 227 Slarrell, Slanley A. Jr. ..,. 327 Slash, Fred ........................ I36 Slearns, Roberl Neil ........ 72 Slein, Roberla Lynn .... 250, 276 Sleiner, Roloerl Paul ........ 54 Sleinleld, Eunice Lynn ......., 277 Slellox, Sallie .................... 2I9 Slephens, Charles ............ 259 Slephenson, Gail ............ 250 Slerling, Peggy Ann ........ 224 Slern, Sleven Emanuel ........ 54 Slernenloerg, John Lewis .,.. 9l Slevens, Harrielle Marie Slevenson, George H. Jr. Slewarl, Ellsworlh R. Jr. 233, 259. . 72 I53 I23. 275 Slewarl, George Ann ..,. 9I, 99 Slewarl, Ronald Roberl .. . 240 Sliclcsel, Hugh Alberl 72, 259 Sliles, Reggie Lois ............ IO2 Sliles, Richard .................... I43 Slolzes, Mary Ann .... 274, 275 Slone, Judy ,............... 54. 222 Slone, Linda ........ ............ 5 4 Slone, Sacla Lou ............. .. 255 Sloneslreel Charles R. , , 337 Slrader, Erin ................ 9I, 99 Slrader, John Leslie ...... ...... 9 I Slranch, Lawrence ....,,.,.. . 259 Slreclcer, William ,... 65, 297 Slreel, Earl Lesler ............ 2I0 Slrevig, William , ...... 252, 253 Slrong, Don Alan ............ 65 Suloerloielle, Amelie ...... . I88. 226, 290 Suchma, James Howard . . 9l, 99, 2lO Sullivan, Darlene .........,.,.,,, 275 Sullivan, Sharon I85, 220, 342 Suslala. Joyce Marie . ...... 54 Suslala, Mary Helen .,.......... 54 Sweeney, Ronald Murray 9l, 99 ' 259 Swrll, Ronald . ..... ........ . Szalhmary, Joseph Alex ..,. 91, 99. 2I0. 234 T Tadlocle, Millon M . 244 Tadloclc, Paula ...... , . 220 Talcara, Kozo ..... . ..... 54 Talbol, Amy ..........,,,.,.,,,,,.,, I67 Talley. Eddie Carl ..........,... 72 Talley, Marlha G. Burk ........ 72 Tamborello, Charles J. .... 2l0 Tamloorello, Josephine E. .... 54 Tannery, Terry Kalherine 22l, 342 TasI4a, Georgia ........... ..... 9 I Taulbee, George ..... .. .... 294 Taylor, Kalherine ...,....,,.... . 288 .Taylor, Killy . .,..................,. 222 Taylor, Margarel Ellen ..,..,.. 54 Taylor, Michael William ..,. 54 Teinerl. Jacguelin H. ..,..... 277 Tenenbaum, Joyce Ray ........ 92 1- X 11,9 9 O wg GLU 4 L-- L. L. RIDGWAY CO., INC. 6I5 Caroline SI. 3800 Greenbriar Bank of Ihe Sou'Ihwes'I' Arcade CA 8-23I I ARCHITECTURAL AND ENGINEERING SUPPLIES REPRODUCTION MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT COMPLETE MICROFILM SERVICE Savage Style CISIAIZN BIII Williams ResIauran'I and MoIeI Hlway 59 Richmond Texas BIII WlIIlams Coffee Shop 806 Clay 'Wa AI' I I 0 ' lu luldllli Try Our Many Orher Tasfe Tempfing Dinners and Befween Meal Snacks I Visir These Bill Williams Locafions Offen BIII Williams Chicken House, 65I5 Main . McGregor House, 5I00 Old Spanish Trail Complete loan Service Commercial Residential Industrial T. I. BETTES COMPANY The Bettes Building, 201 Main Street Financing Community Development WA. 3-4368 WA. 6-7728 HARRISBURG MOTOR PARTS Wholesale and Retail 7627 Harrisburg C. E. RAY HOUSTON IZ, TEXAS Congratulations, Class ot '6I It lt's Printing Paper Call Clampitl' CLAMPITT PAPER COMPANY 720 Bastrop St. FA 3-9322 PARKER Bkiiiiiiigfskeis. CO., INC. T Producers-Distributors Shell-Sand-Gravel-Cement Ready Mix Concrete-Asphalt-Coated Shell Sand Stabilized Shell Orders by Rail, Boat or Truclc HOUSTON I, TEXAS MAIN PLANT AND OFFICE 5303 Navigation Blvd ......................... WA-6-446l CONCRETE PLANTS SHELL PLANTS Industrial Road .................... GL-3-I937 3220 Fuqua ..............--..---... WA I H52 Holmes Road ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, OL-4-862I Hwy. 73 at Greens Bayou .... GL 3 243l Clay Road .,,,.,,,.,, .,,,... H O-2-3444 Diclcinson ................................... 72000 Deepwater ...... ....... G R-9-2729 HOUSTON CIGAR CO., INC. and MONARCH VENDORS TH E PERIOR OIL CO. Firsi' Ciiy Na'IionaI Bank Bldg. - HOUSTON, TEXAS HAV-A-TAMPA ancI TAMPA NUGGETS CA 7-6396 CHARTER New Air-Condii-ioned Dreamliner 'For Less Than You Think LAUNDERERS 81 CLEANERS Decidedly B'eHer RAPID TRANSIT LINES 28I5 S. Shepherd JA 2-5IOI RESSSISI SSRS ISSSSR SSSS EZRIE SSIILE RSRSSSSSSSSSSRSSSISRSISESIRISISISSSSSSSSIS 5025506 STATE BANK 4200 LEELAND AVENUE MEM E FEUERAL save svsrem-MEMBER FEUERAL nzposn' msu c o o ON 'T-Z .Student Index Terry, Carolyn Ann ....wY...VY, 54, 225, 268 Thagard, Beffy Jean .,.,,.,,,,,, 54 Thangsuphanich, T. ........,,,. IO2 Thieme, Larry ...A.,A,.aY,,,,,,,,, 232 Thierry, Roberf ..,.,.,. 54, 294 Thomas, Brenda .f ,..,. l4I, 225 Thomas, Lou ..., 56, 2I9, 248 Thomas, Dub . .....,,a,a,,w.,,,,,,., 72 Thomas, Murphy Lee eV,,. .. 34I Thomas, Pamela Kay ...,,... 223 Thomas, Roberf Laverl ........ 72 Thompson, Edward John ,,,, 235 Thompson, Joe Dolphus Jr. 54. 32l Thompson, John Joseph .,,, 3I3, 3l9, 320 Thompson, Meredifh H. Jr. 65 Thomson, Tommy .... I30, 228, 238, 284, 3l4, 3I8, 320, 337 Thurman, Richard .,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 320 Tiller, Ann . ,,,,,.,,,,,,, 92, 99 Tirado, Charlie .,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 65 Todd, Pafricia .. ,,,, , 92, 99 Tolsky, Noel .. ,,,,,, 273 Tomlinson, James .. ....... 54 Ton, Pei-ling ,,.,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, IO2 Townsend, Roland ,s,,,,,,,, ,,,,, 6 5 Trader, Bobby .,,,,,...... I07, I7O Trammel, Pafsy ,, ,,,,,, ., 92,' 99 Trapalino, Joe ..,,... ....,.... 2 34 Traylor, Jeff .,.......,. ,.,,,, 2 8I Troufman. Glenn .............,., 54 Trube, Meredifh ........ 72, 255 Truxillo, Barf .,...,,,,.,.,,.,,,,,,,,, 234 Tuffli, Norm ...,.,., 239, 3 I6, 320 Tuffly, Thomas .,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 92 Turk, Pafricia . .......,,...o,,ss,.s,,, 92 Turner, Emerson ..,.,... 29 I, 263 Turner, Flenoyd .....,.. 52, 384 Turner, Virginia ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 65 Tussing, Judy . . I30, I55, 218, 285 Twilley, James ..,......o,,,,,,,,,, 54 Tyree, Roberf ,,,.,,..... ...,, 2 I4 . U Underwood, Carol .,......,,,, 255 Underwood, Herb .....,...,.. 290 Urbanfke, Irwin ..,,. .. 252, 253 388 Urbe, Andre ,...... ,.,... V Valles, Charles .....,,......... 54. Valles, Merrie' Ann ........ 72, I47. I8I Van Eafon, Diane .....,.. I82, Van Hook, John ........ 54, Van lnyen, John- .............,, . Van Naffer, Charlie .......,.,,. 54 Van Osdel, Bill .,...........,.,,... 343 Vaughan, James .,.........,.....,, Vaughan, Jerry .........,.. 92, Vaughan, Richard .........,...... Vela, AI ,,...s .,.s. ,..,..,..,.. 2 4 8, Vesfal, Marilyn ....,.,..,,,,,.,,,,, 54- Vickers, Joe . ...,.,. ........ 9 2 Viscusi, Richard ...... ..... 7 2 Vifanya, George ,... ...., 5 4 Vrba, Daniel ....,,.....,......o..... I07 W Wade, Ronald ......... ...,...... Wahlers. Judy ..........,......... Walden, Shirley ........,......... 54 227 Wakefield, Sharon .... 2I9, 283 54 223 Walker. Ann .,.............. ........ Walker, Geoff .,,. 322, 326, Walker, Larry ,.....,u...,,... 92 Walker, Marlene ........ Walker, Phillip ......... .,...... Webber, John ..... ...... l O2 Weber, Ron . ......A,......,..,,. 333 Weingarf, Michael .,,u 65. 254. 269, 272, 276, 29l Weinfraub. Marfin .o..,.........,. 54 Weir, James . ,......,,..,.,.... 254 Weisman, Harriefl' ............ 54 Welch, Einis .,........,,.,.4...,.... 244 Welch, John ....V .....,,, 9 2, 99 Welch, Ollie ,,.,A, .......,... 2 75 Wells. Ralph ......A. .....V.. 9 2 Wenck, John ,,,.,A...,........,... IO7 Wesfphal, Douglas .....,.. 72, 284 Wefmore, Davis .,....,..,,,2,...... 72 Whafley, Hulon .........,...,.... 92 Wherley, Sharon ..,............... 54 Whife, Loyal Clyde Jr. .,,. 2I2 Whife, Ted Gene ,.,..,.. IO7, 254 Whife, Velma Eloydene ...Y 92 Whifehead, Orville C. 54, 296 Whifley, Wanda Willhoife 92 26I Whiffaker, Delores u.,,..,,.. .. Whilafaker, Donald Elgan ,,,i 343 Whiffingfon, Alfred W. 72 Wolda, David Eugene I07 Wolfe, Louis Dewiff Jr. .,,. I07 Womack, Barbara Carol .,,. 54 Woo, Pak Eaf ,L,..,...... 2l0, 2ll Wood, Samuel Ernesf Jr. 240, 283 Wood, Sharon A. Ferguson 65 Wood, Susan Lafrelle .,.... . 92, 99, I33, I59, l95, 203. 226, 285, 288 Wood, Terry Carrol ,....... 2I0 Woodruff, Lyle Alberf I33 Woods, Dorofhy .... ...... . . 52 Woodsmall, Donald Ofis 92, 99 Woofen, Leonard Ernesf 92, 99 Worley, Max Jerry ,,,..... 343 Walker, Roger Lee ................ 54 Wallin ford Delores 54 Whiffingfon, Anfhony B. 327 Widdowson, William C. .... 342 Widersfrom. Willie Oscar .... 72 Wilbanks, Lawrence C. .... 278 Wilbeck, Mona ................ 277 Wilkinson, Benjamin III ........ 65 Wilkinson, Thomas B. 72, 263 Willeff, Barry Leigh ............ 54 Williams, Cafhy Lynn 42, 2l6 Williams Williams Williams Williams Williams, Clyde Nafhan .... 72 David Edwin .... 209 Esfher Lee .......... 65 Hillary ................ 25I Jack M. ............ 28l Williams, Jimmie Lane ........ 54 Williams Robbie N. Webb 92. 99 Walferiii Freddy ...... ....... 2 33 Walfers. Bill ........................ 242 Ward, Beverly ...,.,...... I36, 2I6 Ward, Jelks, ..... ........ 9 2, 99 Warner, Eleanor . ........... 92 Warner, Jack ....... ........ 7 2 Warren, Paul ........ ......... 9 2 Washburn, Bruce ................ 52 Washingfon. Lesfer .............. 92 Waferman, Bob 325. 326, 327 Wafers, David ............ 72. 284 Wafkins, Bobby .......... Wafkins, Bucky .......... Wafson, William Weaver, Neal ............ Webb, Roland . .... . Webber, Clyde .. 92. 99 337 72 65, 284 72 I43 Willis, Gillian .......... ......... 2 32 Wilson, Beverly Ann .. . 54, I Wilson, Jimmie Jr. ........... . Windham, James Wayne Winsfon, Joyce Roberfson IO2 Wiff, James Roger .... 72, 2I2 39. 226 337 3l0 F-- X' gf , ' iff. ii. ...--eel-fr l . ., .1-' ' f i 1 . A .- ...abil 'f .A Kim-' Worsham, Ronald ..,., ..... 2 97 Worfh, Riley ........... ...... I 67 Wren, Harry .................. .... I O7 Wrighf, Carolyn Jeanne .... 54 Wrighf, Deanna Kay ........ I49 Wrighf, Edward Clarence .... 65 Wrighf, James Pai' ............ 252 Wrighf Presfon .. ..... 26I, 3I0 Y Yaw, Donald .............. ....... 2 95 Yeary, Harold R. II 92, 258 Yee, Yun Fon .......... .. ...... IO2 Yeo, Joseph Emme .... 54, 244 Yepes, Andres Guillermo 2ll Yocham, Harvey ........... ..... 2 59 Young, Cafherine V ....... 92, 99, I56, 204, 2 I9, 249. 255. 267, 285 Young, Kennefh Wayne .... 92 Young, Virginia Rohrer ........ 65 Younger, Kafhryn Su ........ 92. 99, 249, 254. 255. 263. 270, 27I, 285 Younger, Nelda Gay ........ 205, 266, 273 Youngworfh, Bennef Jacob 65 Z 1 Zedler, Zoe Ann .... 65. I35. l8l, 220, 342 Zidell, Harvey Roberf 92, 99 Zimmerman, Clefus Joseph 208 Zinnanfe, Anfhony R. .... 234 Zuckero, George Nicholal . .. 72 COUGAR: Tim Alban Marjorie Brown Ken Carr Hollis Cowman Millie Duelberg Jimmie Durden MaHie Flefcher Eclwene Gaines James Gunler Sabra Hall Gary Homburg Sidney Johnson Pai' Jones Be'H'y Knippa Mike Manrz Nancy Maxwell Harris Milam Henry Milam Jan D. Norris John Rainey Bill Salcowih: Al Seagel Carolyn Simon Sam Slarlc Bruce Washinglon Milce Weingarl Cafhy Young HOUSTONIAN: Mike Cool: John T. Gehbauer Gail Smiley Al Vela Kafhy Younger PHOTOGRAPH ERS: Dana Donslcy James Gasion Larry Newman ADVISORS: Billy I. Ross Ross Slrader SECRETARY-BOOKKEEPER: Mrs. Isa bel Ves'l'al It has been a pleasure to serve you ALUMNI ASSOCIATION University of Houston COUGAR ZI3 Ezekiel CuIIen Bldg. Ext. 25I HUUSTON OPP. 0 Uiiivsisiiy of Mississippi 42 14 Mississippi Stare Uiiivsisiiy I0 20 Oregon State University 29 17 Texas Asiivi College o ' 12 oiiisiisiiis sms Uiiivsisii, 7 Typewriters Sales, 0 Ullivelfsityi imiabama M Rerrl-als, 41 North Texas State College 16 and Repairs 14 University of Cincinnati 0 7 Fisi-ids State Uniiversitv 6 6I03 Kirby Drive JA 4-5588 16 University of Tulsa 26 "In The Village" Serving U. of H. Students MCGREGOR PARK NATIONAL BANK Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 5730 Calhoun Road OL 4-430I Serving the University of Houston VEND-A-DRINK COMPANY Mliefresh Between Classes" IZI6 Rosine JA 4-5455 Sept. Sept. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. Deo. BACKERIS 1961 SCHEDULE 23 - Texas AGM Coilege 30 -- Mississippi State University" 7 - Boston Collegex 14 - University of Mississippi 21 - University of Cincinnati 28 - University of Alalsamax 4 - Open 11 - University of Tulsa 18 - Oklahoma State University 25 - Florida State University? 2 - Oregon State Universityi: Denotes home gamesik Compliments of FIRST STATE BANK OF BELLAIRE 5I23 Bellaire BIvcI. MA 3-4463 Complete Mail Advertising Service for 37 Years PREMIER PRINTING AND LETTER SERVICE 2 I 20 McKinney CA 4-6 I 76 The Eyes of the Oil Industry SCHLUMBERGER 5000 Gulf Freeway WA 8-25II AVALON DRUG COMPANY QuoIity-Convenience-Courtesy PROMPT DELIVERY "Serving Southwest H oustoni' 25I8 Kirby Dr. JA 9-9I36 Alpha Chi Omega ....... Alpha Delia Sigma ..... Alpha Epsilon Rho .............,,,.,.,...,,., ,,.,,,,,. Alpha Phi Omega .,.,,,,,.,,,,.,,.,,,,,,,,,4A., ,,,,, 2 80, American lvlarlceling Associaiion .,,,,. .,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Archireclural Socieiy .......,............ ....... 2 O8 Band .,.,..V.,,...,.,....,..,.......,.,,,.,,,,..,. ,.,,.-. Baplisl' Siudenlr Union ....... Cheerleaders ..,.................. Chemical Engineers ...,..,,..,. Chi Omega .,,,.,,,,.,....,,..,.,...,.. Chrislian Youih Council ..... Chorus ..,.,4.A..,,......,,.........,.. Civil Engineers ............... Cougar Guard ......, Cougar, The ..o,.,.. Delia Chi .,Y......VV. Delia Gamma ...,.,.... Della Sigma Phi ,... Delia Thera Phi .,.,.. Delia Zara ,........,..,.........,......... ........ Diesel Club .........................,...,.A. ....... Economics 8: Finance Associalion .. .... .. Eleclrrical Engineers ....,..,,.....,....,... ...,.. Forensic Socieiy . ...............,..,. .... . Gamma Alpha Chi ...,.. l-larvesr, The ............... l-iillel .,,,,,., .A,,..,........,. l-louslonian, The ........ lndusirial Engineers .,......... lnleriraierniiy Council .,... Kappa Alpha Mu ......,.. Kappa Della Pi ...,..,.. Kappa Kappa Psi ...... Lanyard Club .,.................... Le Bayou ..,,....,.,,.................... Lurheran Srudeni Associairion Omicron Chi Epsilon ...,........ Omicron Del+a Kappa ........... Opromerric Socie+y .,..... ll n 'T Organizations Index Orchesira ,.u,.......,..,... Panhellenic Council .A... Phi Delia Phi ......... Phi Kappa Thera .... Phi Mu ....,......,........ Phi Sigma Kappa ......,,..,,.,....,,. Phi Theia Kappa ........,.,,,.,..,,-4. Pre-Medical, Pre-Denial Socieiy Propeller Club 84 Delia Nu Alpha Red Masque Players .,7,,,,,....,.,., Religious Council ..,.,.......,.,.....,. Reiailing Clulo ,.,... ROTC .........,............... 294 295 Scabbard 84 Blade ........ Sigma Alpha Epsilon ..... Sigma Nu ..,...........,...... Sigma Phi Epsilon ............, Sociery of Accounl'an'l's .,...,....... Socieiy of Engineers ...,..c,......... Sociery of Peiroleum Engineers Sparks .,..........Vs...s.s............A........ Spiriis ........,.,,....,.,...,......,.,.......,, Srudenl' Educarion Associarion . Siuclenl' Governmeni ..........,...,.. Awards ...,,.,....,..................... House of Represeniaiives Presideni .u...............,.,.,. Secrerary .v,a.s,,,..,..,..... Sena're ......,,......,...... Spealcer ol 'rhe l-louse Supreme Couri ...... Treasurer ,s..,,.,....,,.. Vice-Presidenl' .s,,,., Tau Epsilon ...,.,s,..,.. Theia Sigma Phi ............ Wesley Eoundaiion ..,,.....,. Women's Dorm Council .su..., WriJrer's Club ..................s. Varsiiy l-l ..............,........ Zela Tau Alpha .,.... i i 'W an 1 I. v.-.-,,.,., - '-W'--... , I -....V...--, IM ' " " '-I-fr-..I. ,I -H--V-QV.. V ' - . '-f-...-,F-V...I 'M-.vm --V-VV...-.V --ww-w,,....,,., """"":V1w- fm... "'-'-'rv-...v-y.. 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University of Houston - Houstonian Yearbook (Houston, TX) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

1955

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1959

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