University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1928

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1928 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 364 of the 1928 volume:

PANDORA . 1928 Abraham Baldwin. "Father 0} the University 0 Georgia." nas chiefly responsible for the granting of the charter to the University. January 12. t?$f. This action by the legislature gives Georgia the distinction of being the oldest chartered state university in America.u X f-s l°v Copyright 1928 1 Thos. J. Hamilton, Jr.. Editor B. B. McAfkr. J. W. Driav, W. H. Young. Jr., Managers Although the I niversily inn chartered in igff. it was not until if01 that instruction was begun Josiah Meigs, a close friend of Abraham Baldwin, and previously a member of the Yale faculty, became the first president. Until Old College, the first permanent building, was erected, classes urre held under a large oak on the campus. Ir Published by ihe Senior Class of the Athens, Georgia University of Georgia Volume XL1 Degrees u ere firsI conferred by the University in the summer of 1S04 The stage for this first commencement teas erected in the open air, the north side of Old College being in Ihe immediate background. The numerous spectators uere sealed under a brush arbor in front of the stage. GENERAL LIBRARY University of - iAthens. Georgia •J‘Dedicated to "Professor John cMorris Sound scholar and skillful teacher in his chosen field of Germanic languages. Many a student has profited from contact with his powerful and independent personality, and has caught from him glimpses of the satisfaction to be had from the pursuit of learning. He is one of the rare instances in which the thorough intellectual cultivation and charm that characterize the classical tradition are found associated with a refreshing open-mindedness louards the changing standards of our modern complex civilization. Professor Morris is a liberal in the truest and best sense of the term. The Golden Age in Georgia's history ikm the forties, when her great professors made the institution a center of cultural life and influence. Outstanding among the distinguished men on the faculty vert the brothers John and Joseph I.eConte, u ho were both celebrated scientists. •!foreword Every annual endeawrs to present a complete and accurate account of the college year. The iQ2$ Historical Pandora essays in addition to depict the salient episodes in the history of the University of Georgia The period before the Civil War was the hey-day of the two literary societies at the University. There were no other organizations or activities, and competition between the Demosthenian and Phi Kappa societies u m keen. The tu societies were accustomed to march in joint procession to the Chapel for the annual Champion Debate.Order of 'iBooks University Classes Fraternities Athletics Co-eds Activities Military Features The University u as closed during the Civil War, and was not reopened until January 12. 1866. The return of the former students, some clad in uorn Confederate uniforms, to the campus which still bore signs of devastation by Federal troops, is one of the dramatic incidents in the University's history.Qraduatioru May all that's best of youth and age be yours. Until the lime when day and night are one, May all be yours within the magic doors, The gold-spilled treasures sparkling in the sun. May hard white highways lie beneath your feel, And young trees line the way with flags of green, While your eyes mark the flight of swallows fleet That vanish in the azure world unseen. May yours be gleaming lakes and sunlit seas And coves where flashing gulls find summer rest, And yours be pathways curving through the trees That fling dark arms against the crimson west. Old books be yours to glimmer in the light The flick'ring fire throws out in ruddy glow. And deep arm-chairs and lied-back curtains bright And purple shadows on the opaque snow. May young love find you, calling like a bird Across the silent stretch of throbbing youth. May romance find you like a song just heard, And beauty may it bring along with truth. And when the sparkling wine of life is gone. And death's soft footfall sounds upon the floor. May children's voices echo through the dawn To lead you, smiling, through the open door. S. Y. TuppiiR, Jr., '26.University 1 he speech of Albert II. Cox. a member of the Junior class, created a sensation at the 1S67 commencement. The young orator violently attacked the military government to which Georgia was being subjected, and the Federal authorities ordered that the University ht' closed The order was. however, rescinded shortly after, enabling the institution to open as usual in the fall of tSbg. i Portal la Strange Adfenlurcs sMtipS pup tyy fo poqy—3ufppnfi iiiutpo y i K 1. Dfmoslhfnian—Training Ground for Statesmen and Future Home of the Co-o[ ChaftI—Fluted Columns Plashed with Mellon.' SunlightI A'av College Walk—the Bel! a Martyr to Georgia Glee fulness Over a Great I'ictoryLibrary —Cariyle Would Call it the Entire UniversityTerrell Hull—There H e May Study the . llorn While Phi Kiif’f'a's llall Xestles Beside Hknkv Ci.av White 1848-1927 '"P HIr. passing of Henry Clav White, for fifty-five years a member of the faculty f the Univer-1 sitv of Georgia. removed the last link connecting the days of the reestablishment of the University after the Civil War with those of the present. Dr. White, after being graduated from the University of Virginia, came to Georgia in 1872. and had been continuously engaged in teaching chemistry at the University until a few days Itcfore his death in Athens. November 31. 1927. Generous recognition of Dr. While's talents had come to him during his long life, filled with years and honors. His scientific associates recognized the value of his researches in chemistry and great universities over the country honored themselves and him by conferring degrees uj on him. In our own state lie served for a number of years as State Chemist, and l ecamc President of the Association of Official Chemists of America. As President of the College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts he held firmly to his conviction that education, not mere training, is the object of a college, and that instruction in technical subjects solely is not the pur|H se of an institution of higher learning. It was during his association with the College of Agriculture that he rendered his most invaluable service to the University, the appropriations from the federal government under the Morrill land grant act. for a numlier of years the chief support of the institution. being made (and later increased) chiefly through his unsparing labors. When official duties were laid aside. Dr. White was in truth the embodiment of the phrase, “a gentleman and a scholar." During the life of his charming wife their home was a center of culture and refinement. The many students who catre under his tutelage he knew, and remcm-liercd: his circle of friends and acquaintances was probably the most numerous in the state. They have lost a gentleman whose courtliness of manner and charm of personality seemed an anachronism in these rushing days. The University, and the State, mourn the death of a staunch friend, a powerful advocate, a devoted servant.‘iBoard of trustees of the University of Qeorgia Richard B. Russell, Chairman Thomas W. Reed, Secretary and Treasurer Governor I.. G. Hardman . George F.. Maddox . . . . . . Atlanta Howell C. Hr win . . George Foster Peabody . . Athens Sanders McDaniel . . . . . Atlanta Saratoga Springs. N. Y. William D. Anderson . . . Macon Samuel H. Sibley . Marietta James B. Nevix . Atlanta Harry Hodgson .... Alexander A. Lawrence . Savannah Frank I). Foley . . Columbus Isaac J. Hoimayer . . . . . Albany Marion Smith .... L. G. Council . Americus Nathaniel E. Harris . Macon E. T. Moon . I .aC range Richard B. Russell . . . Winder Clark Howell, Jr . Atlanta A. Pratt Adams . . . . . Savannah H. Lloyd Cleveland . . . . Griffin Albert S. Hardy . . . Gainesville Joseph M. Brown .... Marietta Brick S. Miller . . . . . Columbus Marcus 1 . McWhorter . . Athens James J. Conner . Cartersvillc Egdert R. Bartlett . . . . Gainesville Enoch H. Calloway . . Augusta William II. Fleming . Augusta William K. Thomas . . . Valdosta John W. Bennett . . Waycross Prick Edwards . . . . . Buchanan William W. Larsen . Dublin Robert C. Ellis .... . . Tifton Hucii J. Rowe M. L. Duggan .... . Atlanta Qeoiyia States Colleges of Agricultures James J. Conner. President Tiiomas V. Reed, Secretary and Treasurer Andrew M. Soule, Assistant Secretary H. Lloyd Cleveland................Griffin Lucius L. McMuli.an . . . Hartwell James E. Hays............Montezuma A. S. Chamui.ee...................Bartow T. W. Bennett . ’. . . . Waycross John A. Gaston.................Greenville Lamartine G. Hardman . . . Atlanta Frank T. Kidd....................Hartwell Eugene R. Talmadgr .... Atlanta M. I.. Duggan.....................Atlanta F. M. Cates...................Wayncsl oro ------ James J. Conner .... Cartersvillc Deceased. ‘‘oar SlatternL'.WIO C. II ARROW Chancellor Emeritus 44 r TXCLE DAN E" BARROW, for nineteen years Chancellor of the University of Georgia, was born Octol cr 12. 1852. in Oglcthorjjc county. Having grown up amid the trying Re-construction days in Georgia, he became a member of one of the first classes to enter the University after its reojiening following the Civil War. and received the bachelor of science degree in 1874. His election as chancellor in 1906 came as a natural recognition of those qualities which had been responsible for his steady advancement since he liccanic adjunct professor of mathematics in 1878. In June, 1925. the Board of Trustees of the University regretfully accepted his resignation. made l ccausc of advancing age. and elected him Chancellor Emeritus. The years of his administration of the University, numbering nearly two decades, were marked by no blare of trumpets. A quiet man. Chancellor Barrow conducted the affairs of this institution smoothly and efficiently. That achievement to which lie looks back with particular pride is the acquisition of land for the University, a course of action dictated by a far-sighted policy the wisdom of which has been justified by the years. In the time to come it will l c realized even more fully that the consolidation and expansion of land-holdings which lie fostered put all in readiness for the great university wh:ch is now in process of growth. The College of Arts and Sciences. Franklin College, which had almost alone constituted the University of Georgia, was complemented during his regime by the addition of other schools which served to make Georgia a real university. The Medical College at Augusta became an integral part of the University. The State College of Agriculture, the Graduate School, the Schools of Education, of Commerce, and of Journalism, were added. Reflecting the expansion in the concept of the institution, the enrollment increased during this time from four hundred students to sixteen hundred. • The simple l cauty of Chancellor Barrow’s life, one of unaffected piety and abiding trust, lias influenced for many years the lives of Georgia students, and of all others with whom he comes in contact. It is the ho| c of all who know him that lie may lie spared for many more years of good works. rage Ttrt t»Ciiaki.es M. Sxf.i.lisg Chancellor 'X'HIC purpose of the University as recorded u| on its Seal is: “To teach and to enquire into the nature of things." The institution’s first duty and highest obligation is to fit young men and women for citizenship in a live and growing commonwealth: to train them so that they may contribute their just share to the well being of the state. '1 he development of Georgia’s untold resources, human and material, can come only through education and educated men and women. Leadership must rest with the young jtcoplc trained and cquipj cd in the colleges to study the problems, whether economic, social, or spiritual, that every day press more urgently for solution. As the servant of the people whose money supports it and to whom it belongs the University’s activities must not be restricted to its campus. Through its extension agencies already in operation and others to l c set up as the opjtortunity arises, it must carry its service to every section and community in the state. Xo institution can claim to be a university that does not foster and encourage productive scholarship. Even with the limited resources at our command crcativcncss must continue more and more to express itself in the life of the University. Only as the institution conserves the things of the spirit, widens the Ixnmdarics of knowledge. aids in uncovering the secrets of nature and in adapting nature's resources to the benefi- cent use of mankind will it justify itself as a university. The end and aim of education and the goal of economic progress is the development of a social order congenial to science and art. literature and religion, and in which they all shall flourish. The duty of the University is to bring the | cop!c of Georgia to a sympathetic understanding of its mission and purjjose. • Citas. M. Sneli.inc. Chancellor University of Georgia. t'O'Jc TrerHlyonefyranl{lirL- College C'RANKLIN COLLEGE, now incorporated in the organization as the College of Arts and Sciences, was the original foundation upon which has been reared the University of Georgia. Chartered in 1785, the first institution to l c supported by a state, it was named for Benjamin Franklin, the great American commoner. The institution had a varied career, several times being on the ] oint of extinction; but after these early hardships and reverses, during the first half of the nineteenth century it not only became the dominant force in education in Georgia, but was universally recognized as the peer, and in some respects the superior, of any American institution—its library and “philosophical apparatus’’ being especially noted. It faculty comprised some of the most brilliant men who have been produced in the South; and its graduates include many of those whose names arc historic. After the disruption of the South by the War Between the States and the period of demoralization which followed it. it was many years before Franklin College, now become a part of the larger institution, recovered its prestige. It offers only the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees, but many of its courses enter into the more socialized curricula, so that students in all departments arc brought into contact with its leaching. There scans to be a general reaction in favor of the cultural courses, and it is confidently anticipated that Franklin College will at least maintain its importance in the University organization. S. V. Sanfokd. President of Franklin College. rage TteriUytteo'Dearie of (fJYien np HE office of Dean of Men was created at the beginning of this session. It was made neces- sary l»y the constantly increasing enrollment of students, which necessitated additional administrative duties, and the advisability of placing some one at the head of the student body to supervise its interests and activities. The Dean of Men is an administrative officer elected by the Board of Trustees and is concerned with the supervision, under the Chancellor and the Dean, of student life, interests, and activities. His duties are to assist the Chancellor and the Dean in all matters affecting the relations l)Ctwcen the students and others with whom they may come in contact. The Dean of Men is a mcml er of the faculty committees on absences, athletics, discipline, dormitories, freshmen, student business activities, student social activities, student publications, and is general chairman of the Student Employment Committee. He is also general chairman of the Committee on Student l.ifc, Interests, and Activities, which consists of the chairmen of all faculty committees that have any connection with student life, interests, and activities. He also acts as intermediary between the authorities and the student body in all questions affecting the latter. The office of Dean of Men, or Dean of Student Affairs, is now installed in the large majority of colleges and universities throughout the country. S. G. Back man. Dean of Men. Pave Tutnly three rDearu of Womeru AS a result of a resolution of the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia, passed Sep-tcmlier 21, 1918, admitting “all white female students of proper age and qualifications," the office of Dean of Women was created. Miss Mary D. Lyndon was chosen to fill this position, and in September, 1919, she assumed her duties. To her fell the difficult task of championing a new and unwelcome cause, for at that time co-education was looked upon with disfavor by both faculty and students. It was Miss Lyndon’s responsibility to form policies, to set standards and to create ideals by which young women were to live. At the dose of five years of loyal and efficient service, her life was cut short. The steady increase in the numl cr of women students and the scholastic standing which they have maintained would justify the statement that the foundations for their coming were well laid. In June, 1920, eleven women received undergraduate degrees, the first ever given for work in residence. June, 1928, will probably sec the University confer them upon more than seventy-five of the women now registered. With the greater enrollment of students, the duties of the Dean of Women have become more complex. She is held responsible for the social life and conduct of the young women at the University, although the student council enforces the actual rules of student government. Kxccpt for a few hours of teaching and several courses in the Correspondence School, the work of this office is largely executive. The Dean has direct supervision over Freshman and Sophomore house, she holds frequent conferences with all chaperons, and serves as adviser to any woman in the University who has need of her counsel. Anne Wali.is Brumby, Dean of Women. States Collegeof (Agriculture '"p HE Georgia State College of Agriculture was reorganized in June, 1907. under the terms of the Conner Bill, which was passed l y the general assembly of the state in the summer of 1906. The institution has dcvclo| ed its initial staff of three individuals to the point where the resident corps of workers locate ! upon the campus at Athens now numbers one hundred and fifty-two. The building, equipment, and plant have been developed to the point where their replacement value would approximate $2,000,000. Last year, 940 students received collegiate instruction upon its campus exclusive of the men, women, boys, and girls who attended the various s] ccial and short courses. Instruction is now provided through the medium of fourteen highly socialized collegiate divisions. The College has an excellent technical library and forty efficiently equipped and modern scientific and field lalxiratories. It also made direct contact last year through the agency of its Extension Division with more than 323,000 citizens of the state. A new research division employing some fourteen specialists has recently been organized. The courses in forestry, agronomy, animal husbandry. | ouHry husbandry, veterinary medicine, home economics, and physical education have also been greatly enlarged and strengthened. Provision has also been made for instruction in fine and applied arts, weaving, and jwttcry making. A new division of child welfare, the first of its kind in the South, is now being organized and will be supported during the next five years through the medium of an appropriation received from one of the great eastern foundations. A new degree course in landscape gardening has also been authorized by the trustees. A gymnasium, to cost above $100,000. is now in process of construction. It will provide adequate accommodations for the physical training of five hundred women. Andrew M. Soule, President of the State College of Agriculture.rPeabody School of Education T N 1903 the department of metaphysics and ethics of the University was changed to philosophy and education. A movement l cguu in 1905 led up to a gift of $40,000 in 1910 from the old Peabody Hoard of Trustees to be used for a sj ccial building for a school of education. George Pcalxxly hall, thus made possible, was erected and occupied in 1911-12, the department of philosophy and education expanding to Ijccome the Pcalxidv .School of Education. Its origin explains that it is more than a school of education. It includes the older classic department of philosophy and has developed the modern departments of psychology and sociology as well as education. The s|)ccial degree of the School of Education is the bachelor of arts in education. This has the same entrance requirements and freshman courses, and in many respects the same general courses, as the general bachelor of arts degree. Its students arc eligible for Phi Heta Kappa and arc accepted for graduate standing in our great universities. The School of Education has this year enrolled in its classes 645 students not including freshmen. In extension classes it has twice that number. It is striving to make its contribution to a progressive University and a greater Georgia. T. J. Wooktf.r, Dean of the Peabody School of Education. School of (Commerce np UK School of Commerce of the University of Georgia was established in 1913. The objcc-live of the school is to provide a type of education which will do for the prospective business man what the School of Medicine and the I.aw School do for those who choose those fields as their life work. The ultimate aim is to prepare the students for executive positions. The University authorities came to realize that, with the huge increase in enrollment that has characterized the twentieth century, large numbers of youths were seeking collegiate training who had no intention of entering any of the learned professions. The majority of college students become business men and the demand was strong that college curricula l c extended so as to include subjects of a vocational nature. At the same time the l c!icf has been kept firmly in mind that not all the time of the student should be spent on technical or vocational subjects, but that, on the contrary. ample room should be provided for subjects of a cultural character. In the University of Georgia School of Commerce only about one-half of the total number of required hours is given to business subjects, courses in Knglish. mathematics, physical science, modern languages anti history occupying an important | osition in the course prescribed. R. P. B KOOKS, Dean of the School of Commerce.Vfenry CW. Qrady School of Journalism JOURNALISTIC instruction in the University of Georgia is designed to provide the student with professional training in the technique of newspaper work, and a broad educational and cultural background necessary to the practice of journalism. Courses leading to the degree of Ixichclor of arts in journalism include not only those covering various phases of journalistic work, but basic courses in English, history. | olitical science, languages, literature, mathematics, economics, and other subjects the contents of which will be helpful to the practicing journalist. The department of journalism was authorized by the board of trustees in 1915, and was changed to the Henry V. Grady School of Journalism in 1921. The School is named for a distinguished .Southern journalist and statesman who was an alumnus of the University of Georgia. In the purely journalistic courses offered in the Grady School, an effort is made to combine theory with practice. Lectures and standard text-book study are supplemented with practical assignments designed to reproduce in a measure the conditions that will confront the graduate when he enters the newspaper or magazine office. The School of Journalism is housed in the new Commerce-Journalism building. It occupies the ground floor and half of the main floor, the remainder of the structure being devoted to the School of Commerce. In the Journalism part of the building an effort is made to reproduce the atmosphere of the modem newspaper office. In addition to ample class room space, there is a large city room which is to 1 equipped with typewriters, a copy desk, and other furniture necessary to an editorial laboratory. A University Press on the main floor will crvc as a reading room, and will offer to the students periodicals and !xx ks in their field. A morgue houses reference material and clippings. There is space for printing equipment which the school may install later. S. V. Sanford, Head of the Henry IP. Grady School of Journalism. rage Turnty tightQraduate School '"p HE Board of Trustees established the Graduate School in 1910 on ilic recommendation of Chancellor Barrow with the i lcn of still further and more systematically taking advantage of the scholarship of the Faculty for the benefit of advanced students, promoting research, providing the atmosphere of devotion to pure science and learning without which undergraduate study can not l e constantly fertilized, and laying the foundation for a greater university ready for upward as well as lateral expansion. In 1910 there were four students pursuing graduate courses. The Bulletin of the Graduate School of March. 192S, contains the names of one hundred and ninety-nine. Working under the burden of a very large undergraduate teaching load the members of the Faculty have shown a high patriotism and devotion worthy of all recognition. And there arc signs of such recognition on the horizon. With the augmented equipment which may reasonably be expected the University will become still more effectively the center of the higher development of the spiritual, intellectual, and material resources of a great state. W. H. Bocock, Dean of the Graduate School. I'ayt Tirtnly uhteLumpl{in Law School a T the regular meeting of the Trustees of the University in 1859, the l oard determined to reorganize the University, and in the plan that was then adopted it was determined to establish a law school "in which facilities for the best legal education would be afforded." In pursuance of this plan,-on August 4. 859, on motion of Governor Hcrschcl V. Johnson, Joseph Henry Lumpkin (the first Chief Justice of Georgia), William Hope Hull, and Thomas R. R. Cobb were elected professors, and the law school opened in the autumn of that year. The law department of the University was conducted under the name of the Lumpkin Law School, and the graduates were awarded their diplomas by the trustees at the regular commencement. In August, 1S67. Benjamin IL Hill and William L. Mitchell were elected by the Board of Trustees to the two vacancies in the law department, and from that time forward the I-aw School has been conducted under the name of the law department of the University. The enrollment of the school has increased 250% since 1925, and the enrollment for the present school year is 223, eighty more students than were enrolled in the year preceding. During that time the curriculum has been extended, the library has been built up. If the law school is run u| on its present lines and accommodations arc furnished, it would be reasonable to estimate that it will have some 275 students next September. George F. Goiier, President of the Lumpkin Law School. Pa-je TfttrlySchool of Tharmacy rvN the recommendation of Chancellor Walter B. Hill, the School of Pharmacy was authorized by the Board of Trustees of the University in June, 1903. Doctor Samuel C. Benedict, at that time a practicing physician in Athens, was elected Dean of the School, and served in that capacity for a number of years. Courses in pharmacy and materia mcdica were first offered in September of that year. At that time it was a difficult matter to influence young men to spend any time in preliminary educational training or to go to college for training which could be acquired under the prevailing apprenticeship system. The enrollment of the school has been small and will continue to be until other schools and the state boards recognize the value of proper educational standards. Originally, and for a number of years, a two-year course was offered, on completion of which the graduate received the certificate or degree, graduate in pharmacy. But beginning in 1926, the two-year course was discontinued and a minimum four-year course was inaugurated on completion of which the graduate receives the degree, bachelor of science in pharmacy. At the time our minimum four-year curriculum was adopted, there were only two other institutions in America with similar standards. There arc now only four others, but a number have announced a minimum four-year curriculum to begin in September, 1930. R. G. Wilson, Dean of the School of Pharmacy. Page Thirl ontSummer School THE University of Georgia Summer School was created by an act of the legislature and began operation in the summer of 1903. under the administration of Chancellor Walter B. Hill, so it has l ecn serving the state for over a quarter of a century. At first it gave no courses recognized by the University for college credit. Today all the courses arc recognized for college credit. For the last few years it has combined the facilities of all three of the Athens institutions. the University with its arts and science departments; the State College of Agriculture with its large variety of courses relating to farming, home economics, physical training, and fine arts: and the Georgia State Teachers’ College, specializing in | cdagogical subjects and methods. All these combine their staffs and physical facilities under a single administrative head. One of the marked features of the summer school is the music department, which draws professional teachers of piano, organ, voice, and violin from all parts of the south. A week of grand ojicra with New York stars is also given each summer. Four complete grand operas will l c presented this summer. Institutes of | olitics and of music arc held, and also training courses for members of parent-teachers associations and for school superintendents. The success of the summer school is attested by the rapid growth in attendance despite the springing up of many competing summer schools. In 1918. 1.012 students were enrolled. Last year there were 2.433. hi the former year there were sixtv-fivc teachers offering 109 courses; in 1927, 112 teachers, of whom thirty-sx were from different institutions, offered 27S courses. In addition to the teachers enrolled, a rapidly growing numl cr of university students spend their summers in Athens seeking- by summer work to shorten the time necessary for graduation. JoSRi’ti M. Stewart, Director of the Summer School. Pa ie IhlrlyttceUniversity R. 0. Ro. Q. ADRP ARTMEXT of Military Science was a l ic l as a requirement to the course of instruction at the University of Georgia in 1871. A competent professor was designated as commandant of cadets and the course of instruction consisted of three drills a week. In 1905 on | ctition of the University a regular army officer was detailed commandant of cadets. The instruction still consisted of drill three times a week. This system continued through 1916. In 1918-1919. there was maintained a Students' Army Training Corps for students under twenty-one years of age. During this period from 1871 to 1919 the federal aid received was in the form of endowments and appropriations primarily for the advancement of agriculture and mechanical arts, and the necessary equipment and arms for instruction in military tactics. In 1920 the department of military science and tactics was converted to a Reserve Officers’ Training Corps unit under the provisions of the National Defcn c Act of 1916. The course is four years, first two years compulsory at the University, the la t two arc elective for those students selected as desirable for further training. The student receives no emoluments in the first two years but receives a commutation of uniform and rations in the last two years from the federal government that amounts to approximately three hundred and seventy dollars. The War Department maintains at the University six officers, three non-commissioned officers. and fifteen privates, giving instruction in subjects | crtaining to the science and art of cavalry and infantry tactics and strategy. There are enrolled 530 freshmen and sophomores and 130 juniors and seniors. A. T. Colley, Major, Cavalry, V. S. A., Professor of Military Science ami Tactics. Thirty threeOfficials of the University Thomas V. Reed............ Harold E. Reynolds . . . Duncan Burnet . . . Thomas S. Gray, Jk. E. A. Lowe . . ...........................Registrar ......................Physician ................Librarian . . ihonni Secretary Publicity Director Gray Lowe Hyrnet Rf.f.i Reynolds Page Thirty-fourSenior Qlass Officers SENIOR ACADEMIC Hoke S. Wofford...............................................President Roiiekt L. Patterson . . Vice-President W. Alton Ward............................Secretary and Treasurer Lamar X. Smith . Thomas B. McRitciiie Seaborn E. Watts . SENIOR LAW ....................President Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer McRitciiie Smith Wofford Patterson Watts Ward 1‘aoc Thirty-fit faculty of theis University DAVID CRENSHAW RARROW. I.L.D. Chancellor Emeritus CHARLES MERCER SNKLLIXG. A.M., Sc.D. Chancellor STEADMAN VINCENT SANFORD. A.B., Litt.D. President of Franklin College ANDREW McNAIRN SOCLE. B.S.A., F.R.S.A., LLD.. Sc.D. President of the College of Igriculture and the Mechanic Arts EMORY DEWITT ALEXANDER. B.S.A.. M.S.A Farm Crops Specialist. and in charge of Agricultural Correspondence Courses CHARLES R. ANDERSON. A.B Instructor in English THOMAS LYNN ASRURY. B.S.A. District Supervisor of County Agents MARION H. AYERS. B.S. Instructor in Physical Education STANLEY CEORGE BACKMAN Captain. Infantry. U. S. A., Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics. Dean of Men DrPRE BARRETT. B.S.K. Field Agent in Forestry DAVID FRANCIS BARROW. Ph.D. Professor of Mathematics FREDERICK WILLIAM BENNETT. B.S.A. Associate Professor Animal Husbandry A. LAURA E. BLACKSHEAR Illustrator WILLIS HENRY BOCOCK. AM.. LL.D. Millcdge Professor of Ancient Languages GEORGE HUGH BOYD. A.R.. M.S.. Sc D. Professor of Zoology WILLIAM BRADFORD. A.B.. M.D. Assistant Stale Supervisor of Agriculture Clubs MACK ELMER BRAND. B.S.A. Adjunct Professor Agricultural Chemistry DAVID H. BRIGGS. A.B.. A.M. Associate Professor of Philosophy WILLIAM EARLF. BROACH. B.S.A. Field Agent in Agricultural Engineering GEORGE MARION BROADHURST. B.S.C. Adjunct Professor of Secretarial Studies CHARLES JOSEPH BROCKMAN. AM.. Cli.Enff. Associate Professor of Chemistry ROBERT PRESTON BROOKS. PhD. Professor of Economics and Finance WALTER SCOTT BROWN. B.S.A. District Supervisor of County Agents ANNE WALLIS BRUMBY. A.B.. A.M. Associate Professor of Education. Dean of II'omen WALTER CLINTON BURKHART. D.V.M. Associate Professor of I ’elerinory Medicine THOMAS DEARBORN BURLEIGH, B.S.. M.S. Professor of Forestry DUNCAN BURNET Librarian of the University SUSIE BURSON. B.S.H.E. Assistant Superv isor I'ocational Home Economics MATILDA CALLAWAY, B.S.H.E. Adjunct Professor of Home Economics F NEWELL CAMPBELL. B.S.C.. A.B.A. Adjunct Professor Finance and Accounting JAMES PHILANDER CAMPBELL. B.S.A. Director of Extension II'ork EPS IE CAMPBELL. B.S. State Supervisor of I’ocational Home Economics HOWARD A. CARTER. B.S., M.E. Instructor in Physics LEONIDAS MYERS CARTER. B.S. Professor of Agricultural Chemistry O. R. CAUSEY. B.S. Instructor in Zoology CLAUD CHANCE. A.B. Associate Professor of Uomance Languages PAUL W. CHAPMAN. B.S.A. Stale Director of I'ocational Agriculture ROSS RENFROE CHILDS. It.S.A.. M.S.A. Professor of Agriculture, in charge of Cotton Industry WALTER PAGE CLARKE. B.S. Field Agent in Poultry Husbandry WYATT ARNTON CLEGG. B.S.A. Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering THOMAS M. CLOSE. A.B. Instructor in Komance Languages A. T. COLLEY. Major, Cavalry, U.S.A. Professor of Military Science and Tadics LURLINE COLLIER. B.S.H.E. Clothing Specialist WILLIAM OLIX COLLINS. B.S A. Associate Professor of Soil Chemistry WALTER GROVER CORNETT. LL.B. Professor of l.atv ELLIS MERTON COULTER. PhD. Professor of History GEORGE ARTHUR CRABB. B.S.A. Professor of Agronomy, in charge of Soils EDITH VAUGHAN CRESWELL. B.S.H.E, Associate Professor of Home Economics MARY ETHEL CRESWELL. B.S.H.E. Director of Home Economics GEORGE VIVIAN CUNNINGHAM. B.S.A. State Supervisor of Agricultural Clubs URIAH HARROI.D DAVENPORT. B.S. Professor of Electrical Engineering LESLIE VINCENT DAVIS. B.S.A. Supervisor of Fertiliser Investigations ELLIS HOWARD DIXON. A.B.. A.M. Associate Professor of PhysicsWILLIE VIE DOWDY. B.S.H.E. Home Improvement Specialist JOHN ELDRIDGE DREWRY. A.B.. B.J.. A.M. Associate Professor of Journalism MARION DERRELLE DuBOSE. A.M. Professor of German AUSTIN SOUTHWICK EDWARDS, PhD. Professor of Psychology LULA EDWARDS. B.S.H.E District Supervisor Home Demonstration ll'ork EDWIN MALLARD EVERETT. AM. Instructor in English JOHN RICHARD FAIN, B.S.. Sc.D. Professor of Agronomy M RY FERGUSON. A ll.. A.M. Instructor in Romance Languages GEORGE HENRY FIROR, B.S.A. Field el gent in Horticulture JOHN WILLIAM FIROR. B.S.A. State Agent in Marketing FRANK WILLIAMS FITCH. B.S.A. Field Agent in Dairy Husbandry GLENN LOREN FULLER. B.S. Soil Specuilist in State Survey JOHN KYRGESS GILES. B.S.A. Assistant Director of Extension THOMAS S. GRAY. JR.. B.S.C. Alumni Secretary GEORGE F. GOBKR. A.M., LUD. Professor of Law J. E. GREEN. A.B.. M.A. Associate Professor of Education ERNEST LEE GRIGGS. Graduate of V. M. I. Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing EDITH HANSON. B.S.H.E. Adjunct Professor of Home Economies HARLOW WILLI MSON HARVEY. B.S.A. Specialist in Landscape Gardening E. S. HEATH. A.B.. M.A. Associate Professor of Hotany HAROLD MILTON HECKMAN. B.S.C. A.M. Professor of Accounting LINVII.l.F. LAUREXTINE HENDREN. PhD. Professor of Physics and Astronomy GILBERT HENRY. A.B.. MS. Instructor in Physics POPE R. HILL. B.S.A.. M.S. Instructor in Mathematics THOMAS SCOTT HOLLAND. A ll. Associate Professor of Romance Languages WILLIAM DAVIS HOOPER. A.M. Professor of Latin C. G. HUFF. Sc.D Associate Professor of .oology GEORGE ALEXANDER HUTCHINSON. PhD. Professor of Sociology NANNIE ELLA IVEY. B.S.H.E. Assistant Manager College Cafeteria MILTON PRESTON JARNAGIX. B.S.A.. Sc.D. Professor of Animal Husbandry JOHN WILKINSON JENKINS. A.M. Professor of Business Administration D. D. JETER. A.B. Instructor in English JAMES AUGUSTUS JOHNSON. B.S.A. District Supervisor of County Agents ROBERT WALLACE JONES. D.V.M. Associate Professor of I’elerinary Medicine RUFUS LAFAYETTE KEENER. B.S.A. Associate Professor of Horticulture CHARLES EDWARD KELLOGG. B.S. Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry GAINES B. LANG. A.B. Instructor in Physics KATHERINE LANIER. B.S.H.E. District Supervisor Home Demonstration Agents JULIAN GORDON LIDDELL. B.S.A. Field Agent in Swine Industry E. A. LOWE. A.B. University Publicity Director MARION WAYNE LOWRY. B.S.A.. M.S.A. Associate Professor of Soil Chemistry MARY ELLA LUNDAY, A.B.. A.M. Physical Director for ll’omen SAMUEL PATTERSON I.YLE, B.S.. M S Professor of Agricultural Engineering LEO HARTLAND MARLATT Field Agent in Cheese Production SUSAN MATHEWS, B.S. Food and Nutrition Specialist JAMES D. MELTON. A.B. Instructor in Chemistry JULIAN HOWELL MILLER. B.S.A. Associate Professor of Botany FRANK ELIJAH MITCHELL. B.S.A. Field Agent in Poultry Husbandry WILLIAM ARTHUR MINOR. B.S.A. Form Management Specialist LEILA RITCHIE MIZE. B.S.H.E Slate Agent Home Demonstration ll'ork MAYOR DENNIS MOBLEY. B.S.A. Associate Professor of Agricultural Education JOHN MORRIS. A.M. Professor of Germanic Languages SYLVANUS MORRIS. LL.IL. LL.D. Professor of Low JENNIE BELLE MYERS Social Director MARTHA McALPINE. A.B. Child Study Specialist M. O. McCORD Associate Professor of Educational Extension ROSA McGEE. B.S.H.E. District Super-visor Home Demonstration ll'ork THOMAS HUBBARD McHATTON. B.S.. Sc.D.. M.Hort. Professor of Horticulture HADEN MAYO McKAY, B.S.A.. M.S.A. Field Agent in Horticulture WALTER FLOY McLENDON. D.V.M. Adjunct Professor of I ’eterinary Medicine JOHN HANSON THOMAS McPHF.RSON, Ph D. Professor of History and Politieal Science ROBERT LIGON McWHORTER. A M. Professor of English Poyt 7 htrty-ierenROBERT L1GON McWHORTER. A.B.. LI..B. Professor of Law CATHERINE NEWTON'. B.S.H.E., M S. Associate Professor of Foods and Nutrition IRA C. NICHOLAS, Captain. Infantry, U.S.A. Assistant Professor of Military Science ami Tactics JONAS GRAXBURY OLIVER. B.S.A. Slate Supervisor of County Agents WILLIAM GLADSTONE OWENS. B.S.A. Field Agent in Swine Husbandry ROBERT EMORY PARK. A M.. I.itt.D. Professor of English WILLIAM OSCAR PAYNE. AM. Professor of History S. C. PELHAM Associate Professor of Educational Extension HERMAN VICTOR PERSE1.I.S. D.V.M. Associate Professor of Veterinary Medicine MERRITT BI.OODWORTH POI ND. A.B.. A.M. Adjunct Professor of History F. W. POWELL. A.B. Instructor in English EDWIN DAVIS Pl’SEY. A.M.. I.L.D. Professor of Educational Administration and Secondary Education JOHN MOORE READS. Ph.D. Professor of Polony and Director of Biological laboratories THOMAS WALTER REED. A.M., LI..B. Registrar WILLIAM WALTER REITZ. M S. Associate Professor of Agricultural Education WALDO SILAS RICE. B.S.A. Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry ALBERT G. G. RICHARDSON. D.V.M. Professor of Veterinary Medicine ROBERT JAMES RICHARDSON. B.S.A. Field .-Igent in Poultry lluslmudry STEADM AN VINCENT SANFORD. A.B . Lilt D. Professor of English Language and Journalism LESTER E. SAWYER. B.S.F. Associate Professor of Forestry HOWARD T. SCOGGINS. A.B.. M S. Instructor in Chemistry ALFRED WITHERSPOON SCOTT. A.B. Pli.D. Professor of Chemistry RHEA CLARKE SCOTT. B S. Associate Professor of Institutional Management JULIUS EUGENE SEVERIN'. D.V.M. Associate Professor of Veterinary Medicine LAFAYETTE MILES SHEFFER. B S. State Supervisor of Vocational Education LOUIS IRVING SKINNER. B.S.A. District Supervisor of County Agents LAWRENCE G. SMITH. 1st Lieut.. Cavalry. U. S. A. Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tadics ROBERT MURRAY SOULE. B.S.A. Editor, College of Agriculture EDWARD PORTER SOULE Manager Radio Station, College of Agriculture HERMAN JAMES STEGEMAX. I’ll B. Associate Professor Physical Education for Men ROSWELL POWELL STEPHEN'S. PhD. Professor of Mathematics JOSEPH SPENCER STEWART. Pcd.D. Professor of Secondary Education CHARLES MORTON STRAIIAN. C.. and M.E., Sc.D. Professor of Civil Engineering •CHARLES M. STRONG. A M. Associate Professor of Economics PAUL TABOR. B.S.A.. M.S.A. Associate Professor of Agronomy, in charge of Farm Crops WILLIAM TATI-; A.B. Instructor in English JAMES RALPH THAXTON. A.B. Associate Professor of Romance Languages SAMP B. TOLAR. A.B. Ed. Instructor in Physics KENNETH TREANOR. B.S.A. Farm Management Specialist RICHARD B. TRIMBLE. Captain. Cavalry. I S.A. Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tadics LUCILLE TURNER. B.S.H.E. District Supervisor of Home Demonstration Agents STEPHEN CUMMINS UPSON. I.L.B. Professor of Lcrw ROOSEVELT PRl'YN WALKER. A M. Professor of English FRANK CRAWLEY WARD. B.S.A. Pure Seed Specialist J. C. WARDLAW Director Educational Extension WALTER PRESTON WARREN. A.B.. LI..B. Assistant Registrar A. H. WEBSTER Associate Professor Educational Extension EDISON COLLINS WESTBROOK. B.S.A. Colton and Tobacco Specialist JOHN TAYLOR WHEELER. B.S.A.. M.S. Professor of Agricultural Education •HENRY CLAY WHITE. Ph.D.. Sc.D.. D.CL. I.L.D. Professor of Chemistry and Terrell Professor of Agricultural Chemistry FREDERIC WALDO WHITNEY. Major. Cavalry, U. S. A. Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tadics CECIL NORTON WILDER. B.S.A.. M.S.A Associate Professor of Agricultural Chemistry JAMES HUNTER WILSON. B.S.A. Associate Professor of Agricultural Education ROBERT CUM MING WILSON. Ph.G. Professor of Pharmacy JAMES HERBERT WOOD. B.S.A. Professor of Poultry Husbandry THOMAS JACKSON WOOFTER. PhD.. LCD. Professor of Philosophy and Education TUTORS D. H. HARDIN. Mathematics J. C. AKIN. Mathematics G. E. FLORENCE; Mathematics H. S. STANLEY. Mathematics L. R. BRASWELL. Pharmacy (•Died during 1927-28 session.) Page Thirty-eight(glasses The Morrill land grant fund furnished for a number of years, beginning with 1S7 2. the principal source of income for the Uniier-sily. The establishment of a military unit at that time was the chief means by which the University qualified for the Morrill grant, and ra therefore of great material benefit to the institution.Seniors GENERAL LIBRARY University of George Athens. GeorgiaMcHatton Aiiei. Macon, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) .■tlf'lia Camino Rho; Demoslhenian Agricultural Chib: Saddle and Sirloin Club. "Let me life by the side of the road and be a friend lo men." Georgia Maf. Adams Dublin, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.K. Degree) Pioneer Club Homccon Chib: Music Club. "Solitude is as needful to the imagination as society is n-Jiolesomc for the character.'' James Devof. Adekhold Lavonia. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Dcmosthenian Alpha Kappa Psi: Economics Society: 4-H Club; Scabbard ami Blade; First Lieutenant, Infantry; V. M. C. A. Cabinet. "U: and Vs." Perky Clegg Ali.en Americus, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Pi Kappa Phi: Phi Kappa Senate Club; Vice-President. Athletic Association; Freshman Club. "The elevator lo success is not running— take the stairs." Julius Amis Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Ed. Degree) Chi Omega; Pioneer Club "For love. and beauty, and delight. There is no death nor change." Lena Grace Atkins Cordcle. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.K. Degree) Pioneer Club Women's Athletic Association: Junior, Senior Hockey Teams; Homccon Club: 4-H Club. "A thing of beauty is a joy forever." Dorothy Louise Balk Augusta. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Chi Omega; Pioneer Club Phi Beta Kappa: Phi Kappa Phi: President, Student League of Women Voters; Girls' Glee Club; Zodiac. ‘7 count life just a stuff to try the soul’s strength on." Joseph McMiu.uk Barnes Wayeross. Georgia (Candidate for LLB. Degree) Sigma Chi; Oemoslhenian Gridiron; President, Blue Key Council: Pan-Hellenic Council: Phi Delta Phi: Recent Decision Editor, Georgia Law Review: Manager. Basket-ball; “G" Club; Delta Sigma Pi; Economics Society; Business Manager. Glee Chib; Senate Club; Freshman Club; Junior-Senior Impromptu Debate: Junior Oraliou: Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Judge, Jeffersonian Moot Court. "If the elevator to suceess is not running, take the stairs." P-me Fortv-tico Roy Jackson Bond Daniclsville. Georgia (Candidate tor A.B. Fd. Degree) Demosthenian Bohemian Club. "Xol for self but for others Kdwin Sanford Boyett Blakely. Georgia (Candidate for Degree) Sigma Xu; Phi Kappa Pan-Hellenic Council: Cavalier Club. "Knowledge comes but wisdom lingers." Robert Thornton Bkadberky Athens. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Plii Kappa Alpha Kappa Psi: Economics Society: Scahl»ard and Blade: Lieutenant. Cavalry. "To strive, to seek, to hud. and not to yield." Mrs. Margaret McDonald Brand Athens. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) P.ta L'psilon Gamma: Pioneer Club Phi Kappa Phi: Alpha Mu: Homecon Club. "He who keeps close to duty finds pleasure dwells near." Donald LeRoy Bran yon Danielsvillc. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian Phi Kappa Phi: Gridiron: Alpha Zeta: Aghon Club: Freshman Track Team; Captain, Cross Country Team: Track, ‘. 8: Sophomore Agricultural Debate: Cotton School Debate: Agricultural Intercollegiate Delate: Agricultural Club - Homecon Debate: Agricultural Club Key Council: V. M. C. A. Cabinet: 4-H Club. '•Simplicity. sincerity and sen-ice." Henry Herman Braselton Braselton. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian Delta Sigma Pi: Economics Society. "Lore finds the way." Robert Samuel Brice Decatur, Georgia (Candidate for B.S. Degree) Kappa Sigma; Phi Kappa "G" Club; Track Team: Scahlxard and Blade: Kappa Beta Phi: Senate Club; Secretary-Treasurer, Freshman Club: Secretary-Treasurer, Spiked Shoe Club. "ir iat I will, I can; what can, I will." Walter Miller Brick Decatur, Georgia (Candidate for B.S. Degree) Kappa Sigma: Phi Kappa President. Senate Club: Scabbard and Blade: Kappa Beta Phi: Freshman Club. "Laugh and the world laughs with yon; Prown and the world laughs at you." Page Forty tourLillie Brooks Athens, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.II.L. Degree) Pioneer Club Iiomccon Chib; Bohemian Club. "Time wasted is existence; used, is life." James William Bruce Danville, Virginia (Candidate for B.S.C.E. Degree) Demosthenian Phi Kappa Phi: President. Engineering Society: Sine and Tangent: Senior Round Table: Junior Cabinet: Scabbard and Blade: Captain, infantry. "Be true." Anita Louisa Burke Washington. Georgia (Candidate for A.II. Degree) Phi Mu; Pioneer Club Girls’ Glee Club: Blackfriar Dramatic Club: Bo-hemian Club; Music Club. "Caesnr's dead, Cicero's dead, and I'm not feeling well myself.'' James Calhoun Burns Greenwood. South Carolina (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Chi Tau; Demosthenian Sigma l elta Kappa; Six Foot Club. "There's nothing worth the wear of winning. But laughter and the lore of friends." George Towns Burpee Athens, Georgia (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Freshman Football Team; Andrew J. Cobb Forensic Club. "Life itself will be the ultimate teacher." George Linton Canih.ek Lincolnton. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.E.E. Degree) Demosthenian Cross-G untry Team: Rifle Team: Engineering Society: Sine and Tangent. "Today decides tomorrow.” Warren Asa Candler Lincolnton. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.E.K. Degree) Demosthenian "Prom no efforts expect no returns." Lucile Carsweij. Athens, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Pioneer Club Jlomecon Club: Bohemian Club. "I'irfue is like a rich stone, best plain set.” I'aye Forly-fteAnnie I.ank Cartledce Athens, Georgia (Candidate ior A.B. Degree) Pioneer Club Phi Beta Kappa: Phi Kappa Phi: Chi Delta Phi; Zodiac: Inner Circle, Pioneer Club; Women’s Athletic Association: Captain. Freshman Basketball ; Freshman Prize. "Seek not happiness, but give it; Peign no righteousness, but live it." Ciiaki.es Mf.tiiam Cate Athens, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Tan Kappa Theta: Phi Kappa Glee Club: Thaliun Dramatic Club; Economics Society: Six Foot Club. "Life is a song of meaningless words but beautiful melody.” Fussei.l Makiox Ciialkek Fitzgerald. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Ed. Degree) Demosthenian Junior-Senior Impromptu Debate: Junior Cabinet; Glee Club; Georgia Four: Music Club. "It matters not Itow long we live, but how.” Roy F.stbs Cheatham Jefferson, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Demosthenian "Strive to make each experience a stepping stone to something greater." Margaret Brown Christian Tifton. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Alpha Gamma Delta; Pioneer Club Girls' Glee Club. "Truth and sincerity rest equal in friendships." Frances Victoria Clary Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Ed. Degree) Pioneer Club Bohemian Club. "Without love and laughter life is nothing." Troy Benton Conn Adel. Georgia (Candidate for D.V.M. Degree) Demosthenian Alpha Zeta: Aghon Society; Glee Club; Georgia Four; Vice-President, V. M. C. A. " Testcrday was yesterday—today is today. Tomorrow will be today when it comes— act now." Merrell Hulsey Collier Atlanta. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Kappa Cavalier Club; Freshman Club. "In wisdom there is strength." rage Forty iLtGeorge Douglas Collins, Jk. Flint, Georgia (Candidate (or B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian Alpha Zcta: Saddle and Sirloin Club. "Xot that you won or lost, but henv you flayed the came." McWhorter Stephens Cooley Maysvillc. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian Phi Kappa Phi: Beta Gamma Sigma; Alpha Kappa Psi: Bert Michael Scholarship; Vice-President, Economics Society; Quirinal Club; Sansculottes. "Ift that only hopes is hopeless." Julia Clairf. Cook Monroe, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Alpha Gamma Delta: I’ioneer Club Chi Delta Phi; Zodiac: Women's Athletic Association; Girls' Glee Club: Music Club: Bohemian Club; Assistant Librarian, Memorial Hall; Freshman Hockey Team. "Always laughing, never sad: Sometimes naughty, but never bad." Theodore Dudlev Cook Atlanta, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Sigma Chi; Demosthenian Varsity Basket-ball; "G” Club: Senate Club; Pelican Club: Bulldog Club; Freshman Club. "Incipio non ineifis.” Francis Ellis Cooper Lawrcncevillo. Georgia (Candidate for B. S. C. Degree) Demosthenian Economics Society. "Sympathy is the golden hey that unlocks the hearts of others." Bertram James Cornett Hickncll. Indiana (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian Alpha Kappa Psi: Economics Society; Cracker Staff. "Xcver say die." Aliiekt I.kkoy Crittenden, Jr. Shcliinan. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian Phi Kappa Phi: Alpha Zcta; Gridiron; Freshman Alpha Zeta Medal: Sophomore Alpha Zcta Medal; Agricultural Club. "Xo pleasure under the sun equals that of work well done." Thomas Alexander Crouch Ocilla, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C.E. Degree) Demosthenian Engineering Society; Sine and Tangent. "Zest only at the proper lime." Vogt Forly icvenMary Peepj.es Clhiiedgf. Guyton, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Ed. Degree) Alpha Cainma Delta: Pioneer Club. Phi Kappa Phi; Women’s Pan-Hellenic Council. "Act ‘.cell your part; there all the honor lies." Joseph Koihnson Camming Cordcle, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Demosthenian Phi Beta Kappa: Phi Kappa Phi: Demosthenian Key Council; Vice-President. Demosthenian: Junior Oration: Sophomore Debate: Freshman Debate: Freshman Impromptu Debate: Freshman Prize: Boxing Team: International Relations Club; First Lieutenant. Cavalry. "A horse is valuable only when well broke-how different with man." Jefferson Dewey Davis Bowcrsvillc. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian Agricultural Club: Saddle and Sirloin Club. "It's not what yon are: it's wlial other people think of you." Alma Lee Day Douglas. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Pioneer Club Homccon Club. "Conversation is the best of life." Marjorie Grover Denmark Fitzgerald, (icorgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Chi Omega: Pioneer Club Vice-President. Thnlian Dramatic Club. "l ennuie naijuit un jour de Vunifonnite." Emmett Oliver Doims, Jr. Bartlesville, (icorgia (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Demosthenian The set of the soul determines the goal.' Kelson Barrett Doims Carrollton. Georgia (Candidate for B.S. Degree) Demosthenian "Life's no tragedy, keep smiling." John Thomas Dolvjn Siloam, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian Delta Sigma Pi: Economics Society. " Knourledge planted in youth giveth shade in old age." root Forty-ehihlRobert Newton Dobson, Jr. McRae, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Delta Tau Delta: Phi Kaffa Pan-Hellenic Council: Cavalier Club. "AYper say die, say git.” Laura Doughty Dork Augusta. Georgia (Candidate for A.15. Degree) Phi Mu: Pioneer Club Women's Athletic Association: Basket-ball Team; Hockey Team; Captain. Volley Ball Team: Captain. Baseball Team; Women's 'G” Club; Thalian Dramatic Club. "Why worry! Things will hatfen anyway." Robert Cari.ton Downs Watkinsvillc. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian Economics Society. "Build for eharaeter, not for fame." Jesse Wai.tkr Drew Preston. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Deuwsthenian Gridiron; Business Manager, 1928 Panikwa; Freshman Baseball Team: Captain, Lacrosse Team: Glee Club: President. Athletic Association: Campus Chib; Scabbard and Blade; Economics Society. "He yourself at all limes and you will be ha tty." Irene Townsend Dudley Tampa, Florida (Candidate for A.B. Degree) .■Htha Camma Delta: Pioneer Club Girls' Glee Chib: Bohemian Club; Music Club. ''Character is higher than intelleet." Elizabeth Allebne Kits Jefferson. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.K. Degree) Kappa Delta; Pioneer Club President. Women's Pan-Hellenic Council: President, V. W. C. A.; Secretary, Homccon Club: Home Economics Editor. Georgia Agriculturist: Black-friar Dramatic Club; Chi Delta Phi; Baseball Team. "Judge thou me by what am." Maktiia Mozeli.e Epps Athens, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Pioneer Club Women's Athletic Association; Freshman Hockey Team; Secretary. Economics Society. "To be, not to seem." Benjamin Scott Eppes Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. IX-grce) Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Swimming Team; Monkey Drill Team; Captain. Cavalry. "Doing rightly fear nobody." Pane forty-nineRoy Edwin Estes Chattanooga. Tennessee (Candidate for LI..B. Decree) Kappa Si uta; Phi Kappa Gridiron: Varsity Football Team: All-Southern Coast Football Team: Baseball Team: Vice-President. Pan-Hellenic Council: Senate Club; One Club: "G” Club; Freshman Club. "Happy am; from core I'm free." Frances Evans Columbus. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Phi Mu: Pioneer Club Girls' Glee Club. "Do enough to avoid overdoing." Guy Washington Findley Duluth. Georgia (Candidate for A.B.Ed. Degree) Demostheniau "Youth a blunder, manhood j struggle, and old age u regret." John Wiielciikl Finger Gainesville. Georgia (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Sigma Xu; Demostheniau Glee and Instrumental Club: Bulldog Orchestra. "He profits most who serves best." Frances Forbes Athens. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.P.F.. Degree) Phi Mu: Pioneer Club Inner Circle. Pioneer Club; Vice-President. Women's Student Council: Vice-President. Girls’ Glee Club: Pan-Hellenic Council: Blnckfriar Dramatic Club; Bohemian Club; Music Club; Hockey Team. "There's nothing neither good nor bad, but thinking makes it so." Nora Palmer Fortson Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Phi Mu; Pioneer Club Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi: Junior Staff, Cracker: Vice-President. Blackfriar Dramatic Club; Chi Delta Phi; Girls’ Glee Club: Zodiac; Bohemian Club. "Don't worry, it’s never too late." Winifred Amanda Fowi.er Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Pioneer Club Phi Beta Kappa; Women’s Athletic Association: Inner Circle. Pioneer Club; Treasurer. Zodiac; Secretary. Pioneer Club: Girls’ Glee Club: Freshman Hockey Team; Captain, Sophomore Basket-ball Team. "When you play, play hard; when you work, don't play at all." Lorimkr Bassett Freeman l.aGrangc, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demostheniau Beta Gamma Sigma. ‘7 am the heir of all the ages in the foremost tiles of time." Va-je FiftyWilliam Ryan Frier, Jr. Douglas, Georgia (Candidate for A.B.J. Degree) Delta Tau Della; Phi Kappa Gridiron: F.ditor. Red and Black; Sigma Delta Clii: Pan-Hellenic Council; Student Advisory Board; Senate Club; Freshman Club. "And when at last the tight is won, God kee( me still unsatisfied." Mack Carter Frost Jefferson, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. I'd. Degree) Demosthenian "Be not overcome with evil, but overcome evil with Rood." Arthur Fare Fit .ton’ Elbcrton. Georgia (Candidate for B.S. Degree) Demosthenian "Time will tell.” James Auurky Garrard Washington, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Alpha CowiMto Rho: Demosthenian Phi Kappa Phi; Alpha Zeta: Agricultural Club; Rille Team; Fourth Corps Area Infantry Ride Team; Instructor, Rifle Marksmanship, National Matches, Camp Perry, Ohio: Infantry Battalion Adjutant: Work in Soils Extension Department. "Whatever is worth doing at all is worth doing welt." Arthur Matiienvson Gignilliat Pineora, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Demosthenian Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; Gridiron; Senior Round Table: Junior Cabinet; News Editor. Red and Black; Sigma Delta Chi; Junior Oration; Junior-Senior Impromptu; Freshman Debate: President. V. M. C A.; Vice-Chairman. State Council of V. M. C. A.; Lieutenant-Colonel, Infantry: Scabbard and Blade; President. Demosthenian: Demosthenian Key Council; International Relations Club; Varsity 1-acrossc. "In this blind pursuit of mirages. "donnes-ntoi un litre ct une antic.'" Fstiier Godbee Manassas. Georgia (Candidate for B. S. H. E. Degree) Pioneer Club Homccon Club: Vice-President, 4-11 Club. "Unto thine own self be true." Minnie Goijjing Columbus. Mississippi (Candidate for M.A. Degree) Phi Mu; Pioneer Club "Laugh and the world laughs with you." Robert Hall Gracey Atlanta. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Pi Kappa Phi; Phi Kappa Delta Sigma Pi: Economies Society: Freshman Club: Cavalier Club: Biftad Club. "Forget the past, but so live in the present that the future will take care of itself.” I’oge Fifty-oneDavid Greenfield Atlanta. icorgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Phi Epsilon Pi: Phi Kappa Gridiron: Plii Kappa Key Council: Junior-Senior Impromptu: Junior Oration: Varsity Football S iuad. ".-I crook- in the hand is worth two in the nose." Allen Park Grimes Athens, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. IJcgrce) Tou Kappa Theta; Phi Kappa Alpha Kappa Psi: Monkey Drill Team; First Lieutenant, Cavalry. "Work- well done makes pleasure more fun." Walter Ticker Hall Atlanta. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. IXgrcc) Sigma Chi; Demostlienian Bohemian Club: Freshmen Club. “Live and let live." Thomas Jefferson Hamilton, Jr. Augusta. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Phi Delta Theta; Phi Kappa Rhodes Scholar-elect from Georgia: Phi Beta Kappa: Editor-in-Chief. 1928 Pandora: Sphinx (resigned): Gridiron: Senior Round Table: Junior Cabinet: Vice-President. Phi Kappa: Debating Council: Junior-Senior impromptu, '26. ‘27: Anni-versarian; Park Medal, Junior Oration: Freshman Impromptu; President, Quill Club (Sigma Delta Clu): Managing Editor, Red and Black: Senior Staff. Cracker; Associate Editor, Alumni Record: Secretary. Blue Key Society: Cavalier Club. "The little white prayers of Elspelh Pry Plant up the arches into the sky. .1 little black bird on the belfry high Pecks at them as they go by.” I-olise Keene Hammond Augusta, (Icorgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Phi Mu; Pioneer Club President. Women’s Student Council: Vice-President. Women’s Athletic Association: Inner Circle, Pioneer Club: Women’s "G" Club: Hockey Team: Basket-ball Team: Volley Ball Team; Baseball Team: Captain. Senior Basket-Kail Team. "Climb though the rocks be rugged.” James Framitox Hanaiiax Augusta. Georgia (Candidate for B.S. Degree) Tau Kappa Theta: Phi Kappa Circulation Manager. Cracker: Freshman Club. ’’Priendships lie at every hand if one but seeks them out.” William Dearing Harden, II Augusta, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Chi Psi: Phi Kappa Colonel. Cavalry: Leader. Best Cavalry Platoon: Scabbard and Biadc: Monkey Drill Team: Polo Team: Freshman Track Team: Cavalier Club. "Truth is our most precious possession—therefore let us conserve it." Max Meveriiardt Hakdie Gordon. (Icorgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demostlienian: Agricultural Key Council. "Mon's life is short, but full of how lie lives it." Page rifty-tieo Benjamin Hili. Hardy, Jr. Bartlesville, Georgia (Candidate for A.B.J. and A.M. Degrees) Sigma Alpha Epsilon ; Phi Kappa l’hi Beta k»ri«: I’M Kap| Phi: Kdilor-inC ief. Red and Black: Editor-iii-Chief. Georgia Cracker; Business Manager, Georgia Cracker: Sphinx (resigned); Gridiron; President, Sigma Delta Chi; President, I’hi Kap|-a; President, Bine Key Council; l'rc i lent. Cavalier Cl«l : Prc»iitcnt. Senior Konml Table: Junior Cabinet: Sigma Delta Chi Scholarship Award. “■ • . he jested with all cose, and told free tales, and look the word and played upon it.” Georgf. Thomas Harris Wrens, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Kappa Alpha Kappa Psi; Vanity Lacrosse: first Lieutenant. Infantry. "It's all in knowing how." Thomas Jewell Harkold Atlanta. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian I’hi Kappa I’hi: Alpha Zcia; President, Agricultural Club: Secretary -Treasurer. Saddle and Sirloin Club; Agricultural Club Debating Council: Agricultural Club Key Council: Cotton School Debate. ‘27•‘iS: Agricultural Club—Homccon Club Debate; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. “Never argue with a wasp, he always carries his point.” Isaac Kline Hay Covington, Georgia (Candidate for LI..B. Degree) Demosthenian Sphinx; Gridiron; Blue Key Council; Campus Club; Intercollegiate Debate: Ainiivcrsarian: Demosthenian Key Council: President. Demosthenian: Andrew J. Cobb forensic Club: Sigma Delta Kappa; Staff. Georgia Ijiw Review; Champion Debate: Junior Oration: Junior-Senior Impromptu Debate; Sophomore Declamation. ‘‘When the heart dares to speak no preparation is needed.' Richard Willis Heard Savannah. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Phi Kappa Reporter. Red and Black; Circulation Staff, Cracker; freshman Club. “The tragedy beneath the world’s surface can only be borne by laughter.” John Horace Henderson Adairsvillc. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian Agricultural Club. “Character is the corner stone of all success.” Joseph Kohn Hkyman Atlanta, Georgia (Candidate for A.II. Degree) Phi Epsilon Pi; Demosthenian Phi Beta Kapi«a; Phi Kappa Phi: Valedictorian; Gridiron: Senior Round Table; Junior Cabinet; Debating Council; Demosthenian Key Council; Champion Debate, "if-'29; Intercollegiate Debate: Junior first ion; Junior-Senior Impromptu Debate; Sophomore Declamation: Thatian Dramatic Club; Cavalier Club: Crow Country Team: Track Team. “Heard melodies are rweet, but those unheard are stweler.'' Sarah Hkyman Savannah. Georgia j(. (Candidate for A.B. Degree) “i'ou may be as orthodox as the Devil and as wicked.” Pa-jc n tp threeIvy May Hixson Augusta. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Pioneer Club I l»i Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi: President. Women’s Athletic Association: Vice-President. Y. W. C. A.: President, Zodiac: Inner Circle, Pioneer Club: Secretary-Treasurer, Students' League of Women Voters; Representative, Soule Mall House Council: Dolphin Club; Manager. Baseball: Volley Ball Team: Hockey Team: Basket-ball Team. "All that we send into the lives of others, eomes baek into our own.” Onie Elizabeth Hixson Augusta. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.F. Degree) Pioneer Club Treasurer. Homccon Club: Women's Athletic Association: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Vice-President. Soule Hall House Council: Inner Circle. Pioneer Club: Vice-President. Bohemian Club: Hockey Team. "II'here there's a will there's a way." James Franklin Hollingsworth Athens. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Kappa Alpha Kappa Psi: President. Economics Society: Secretary-Treasurer. Athletic Association: Managing Editor, Red and Black: Business Manager. Georgia Business Review; Junior Stall. Cracker. “Life eonsists not in holding a good hand, but in playing a poor hand well.” Ernest Dexter Holmes Ranger. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian Agricultural Club. "Seek intelligently and you shall find." Sidney Smith Horton Rome. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian Gridiron: Scabbard and Blade; Lieutenant, Infantry. Vice-Campus Leader: Campus Club. "Climb to the highest water tank." John Edward Hughes Atlanta, Georgia (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Demosthenian Sigma Delta Kappa; Andrew J. Cobb Forensic Club. "The strength of your life is determined by the strength of your ’.All." Hugh Alexander I nulls Clarkcsvillc. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Alpha Gamma Kho: Demosthenian President. Agricultural Club: Agricultural Club Key Council; Cotton School Debate: Freshman Debate: Sophomore Debate: Assistant Business Manager. Georgia Agriculturist: Solicitor-General. Dc-mnsthenian; A. S.A. E.: Saddle and Sirloin Club: 4-11 Club. "Work and win." Emmett Harris Jackson Granite Hill. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Alpha Gamma Kho; Demosthenian Agricultural Club: Stock Judging Team; A. and M. Club: Student Instructor, Fertilizer Demonstration Tests: Student Assistant. Soils Department. "The man who blushes is not quite a brute." I'aye Fifty-fourJohn RonF.krjENNF.TTE Goldsboro. North Carolina (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Demosthenian "Hat, drink, and be merry: for tomorrow you may die." Rouf.rt Jay Jkrnigan Mayfield, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian winner Never quits and a quitter never wins." John Caki.ton Jester, Jk. Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Chi I'si; Phi Kafka Champion Debate; Junior-Senior Impromptu Debate: Lightweight Boxing Champion. University of Georgia: Boxing Team: Swimming Team: Captain, Cavalry. "I am the master of my fate. I am the eaftain of my soul." Jake Brandt Joel Athens, Georgia (Candidate for I.L.B. Degree) Phi Kaffa Andrew J. Cobb Forensic Club: Solicitor, Moot Court. “.• few understanding friends, that know me and love me fust the same." David Weems Johnson Dalton, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian •‘G” Club: Varsity Track- Team: Fredmun Track Team: Lacrosse Team: Sophomore Declamation: First Lieutenant, Infantry. "lie who is accomfonied by noble thoughts is never alone." William Thomson Johnson Commerce. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Sigma Chi; Demosthenian “G” Club: Manager, Track Team: Manager, Freshman Basket-ball Team: Secretary. Demosthenian: Freshman Debate: Freshman impromptu Debate: Economics S« ciety: Spike Shoe Club: Senate Club: Frcshntan Club. "Make every failure a steffing stone to success." Young Joseph Johnson, Jr. Commerce. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Sigma Chi; Demosthenian "G” Club: Manager, Lacrosse Team: Pan-Hellenic Council: Alpha Kappa Psi; Economics Society: Freshman Delate: Senate Chib; Freshman Chib. "Listen to others; think for yourself.” Otis Crittenden Joiner Edison, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian Delta Sigma Pi. "Kerf thy tools ready and God will find tliee work." Page Fifty-fireMary Adeline Keener Rabun Gap. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.l . Degree) Pioneer Club Homccon Club; Music Club: V. W. C. A. "Your actions speak so loudly I can not hear what you say." Thomas Clarence Kendrick, Jr. Columbus. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Sigma A'w; Phi Kappa Gridiron; Scabbard and blade: Secretary-Treasurer. Senate Club: First Lieutenant. Infantry. "Forever bear without abuse the grand old name of ‘gentlemany’ Elizabeth Ellis Kennedy Clarkesvillc, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.Ii. Degree) Pioneer Club President, V. W. C. A.: Inner Circle, Pioneer Club; Vice-Prcsi lcnt. Homccon Club: Secretary. Soule Hall House Council; Women's Student Council; Girls' Glee Club. "True happiness comes in making others happy." Emma Keys Rome, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.Ii. Degree) Alpha Gamma Della; Pioneer Club Phi Kappa Phi: Alpha Mu: Zodiac Club: llomc-con Club: Women's Athletic Association; Women's Pan-Hellenic Council: Hockey Team; Basket-ball Team. "It is better to have the true Io:-e of one than the Haltering love of many." Otis Glenn Lancaster Comer, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. lid. Degree) Demosthenian "To strive, to seek, to find and not to yield." Herman Joseph Lesser Rome, Georgia (Candidate for I$.S. Degree) Tau lipsilon Phi; Phi Kappa Pan-Hellenic Council: Senate Club: Freshman Club; Student Assistant, Chemistry Department. "It'hy pretendt lie what you are." WlNSOR I.ETTON Atlanta. Georgia (Candidate for A.B.S.S. Degree) Sigma Chi; Demosthenian Senate Club; Monkey Drill Squad. "People who live in glass houses should be careful of their ’visitors." John Robertson' Lewis Monroe. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Phi Delta Theta; Phi Kappa Senate Club. "It’s great to have a smile that smiles." Pa-jc Fiftg tlrI Keith Bush Lewis Xahunta, Georgia (Candidate for R.S. Degree) Sixina Chi: Phi Kappa Financial Manager. Athletic Association: "G" Club: Secretary-Treasurer Senate Club; Glee Club; Scabbard and Blade; First Lieutenant, Infantry. "Il'isdom sils on the curbstone—sits and smites." Hilda Lind Savannah, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.P.K. Degree) Sigma Delta Tan: Pioneer Club Phi Kappa Phi: Inner Circle. Pioneer Club: Zodiac: President. Soule Hall House Council; President. Women's Athletic Association; Secretary. Women's Pan-Hc!lcuic Council: Manager. Basketball Team: Manager. Swimming Team: Manager. Track Team: Woman's "G” Club: Student Instructor, Physical Fducation: Hockey Team; Tennis Team; Baseball Team; Volley Bali Team. "A merry heart doeth good tike a medicine; a little laughter cures many a seeming ill." Malcolm Maury I-ockhakt, Jk. Decatur. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Chi Psi: Phi Kappa Assistant Leader, Glee Chib: Georgia Four; Business Manager. Blackfriar Dramatic Club: Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Freshman Tennis Team; Cavalier Club. "Iisse quam videri.” Augustus Shaw I.ovless Atlanta. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Gridiron; Business Manager. Cracker; Pan-Hellenic Council; Alpha Kappa Psi: Secretary-Treasurer. Cavalier Club: One Club: Pelican Club; Freshman Club. "Age quod agis" Wilhelmixa Yvonne Macken Sparta. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Chi Omega; Pioneer Club Homccon Club; Girls' Glee Club. "He fair; play square." Gordon Isaac Maddox Winder. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian Aghon Club: Business Manager. Georgia Agriculturist; Vice-Campus Leader; Instrumental Club; Lieutenant, Infantry. “-Vo one can climb out beyond the limitations of his own character.” Sim Newton Manning Alpharetta. Georgia (Candidate for A.B.J. Degree) Demosthenian "Think! Think! Think!” Ida Marguerite Mariiut Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Ed. Degree) Pioneer Club "It is the wise head that makes the still tongue.” Papt Fifty-sevenIrvin Samuel Makkf.i. Atlanta. Georgia (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Alpha Epsilon Pi: Demoslhenian Pi Phi Pi. "A fool utlereth his whole mind, but a wise man kcepelh his." Zola Zetella Marshall Atlanta, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Ed. Degree) Pioneer Club "Laugh; look up; lift up." Lewis Cato Makkel Atlanta, Georgia (Candidate for I.L.B. Degree) Alpha lipsilon Pi; Demoslhenian Andrew J. Cobh Forensic Club: Pi Phi Pi. "And the loud laugh bespoke the 'vacant mind." Carter Esmond Martin Bainbridge. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Lambda Chi Alpha; Demostheniau Senate Club. "Live and learn." Zenas Alonzo Massey Columbus, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Lambda Gamma Delta; Demostheniau Aghon Society: Junior Livestock Judging Team: Senior Livestock Judging Team; Agricultural Club: Saddle and Sirloin Club: 4-H Club; Engineering Society. "Smile and the world smiles with you." Andrew Jackson Matiiews Cuthbert, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Demostheniau Phi Beta Kappa; Gridiron: Associate Editor, Iconoclast: Associate Editor, 1928 Pandora ; Sigma Delta Gii; Junior Cabinet; President, Sophomore Class. to form a brotherhood with weeping willow trees." James Crawford Mathews Cuthbert, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demostheniau President, Sophomore Class: Glee Club. "If you must unsheath your su'ord—lhen throve the scabbard away.” Samuel Micklkrrrry Merritt Aincricus, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Pi Kappa Phi; Phi Kap a Delta Sigma Pi: Economics Society; Freshman Football: Freshman Club. "Sincerity is not measured in years but in service." ■irjre Ftltyctyht Sam Miller Valdosta, Georgia (Candidate for A.H. Degree) Demosthenian Phi Beta Kappa: Phi Kappa Phi. "Hard work loads lo success." I-OL'IS Hambrenger Mitciiei.l Columbus. Georgia (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Kappa Alpha: Phi Kappa Glee Club: Boxing Team; Bulldog Orchestra: Six Pool Club; Senate Club. "All great wen are dying— feel ill myself." William Alexander Mitchell Gainesville. Georgia (Candidate for LL..B. Degree) Sigma Alpha lipsilon: Phi Kappa Cavalier Club. "If ignorance is bliss, 'lis folly lo be wise." Henry Moore Buchanan, Georgia (Candidate for B.S. I degree) Demosthenian Square and Compass Club; Lieutenant. Cavalry. "lie 10 more than whal you are." Katherine Robertson Moore Augusta. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Phi Mu; Pioneer Club Vice-President. Pioneer Club: Inner Circle. Pioneer Club: Secretary. Women’s Pan-Hellenic Council: Zodiac; Girls’ Glee Club: Secretary-Treasurer. Dol- tdiin Club: Freshman I loekey Team: Freshman Bas-:et-ball Team. "liverything is in being able to say, 7 have done my best.”’ Charles Morris Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Sigma Alpha lipsilon: Phi Kappa Glee Club; Leader, Bulldog Orchestra; Delta Sigma Pi: Six Foot Club: Cavalier Club. "1‘ery few things waiter and nothing matters very much." James Hoyden Moss West Point. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian Lieutenant, Infantry. "Il'ise is he who knotes nothing of women." Merle Dorothy Moss Cornelia, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Pioneer Club "Know what you want and then go after it." I'ar e ynty ntne■ Addie Inez Munoay Atlanta. (icorgia (Candidate for B.S.H.K. Degree) Kappa Della; Pioneer Club President. Women's Pan-Hellenic Council; Executive Council. Women's Athletic Association; Treasurer. Pioneer Club; Inner Circle. Pioneer Club; Secretary, S'. W. C. A.: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Baseball Team: Hockey Team. "It mailers not whether you won or lost but how you played the name." Broaih's Hi rton McAkre Aragon. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian Gridiron; Business Manager, 1928 Pandora; Presi-dent. Economics Society: Delta Sigma Pi: Blue Key Council; Scabbard and Blade; Campus Club; First Lieutenant. Infantry. "Knowledge comes, but wisdom Hagers, and I Hager on the shore, And the individual withers, and the ‘world is more and more." Rena Ionk McCormick Cartcrsville. Georgia (Candidate ior B S.ll.lv. Degree) Pioneer Club "I believe in being rather than seeming." Or.t.ie McDaniel Bartow, Georgia (Candidate ior A.B.Ed. Degree) Alpha Comma Delta: Pioneer Club "Let Patience have her perfect work." Alex Jackson McDonald, Jr. Fitzgerald, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Sigma Delta Kappa: Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; President. Baptist Student Union. ‘7 am the master of my fate. I am the captain of ray soul." Gordon Harvey McGee Knoxville. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian Agricultural Club. "Too much sincerity maketh not a multitude of friends.” Arthur Park McGinty Atlanta. Georgia (Candidate for B.S. Degree) Sigma Alpha Hpsilon; Phi Kappa Phi Beta Kappa: Phi Kappa Phi; Senior Round Table; Cavalier Club; President. International Relations Club; Secretary, Phi Kappa; Track Team; Freshman Club. "Came the dawn." Virginia McGowan Cartersville. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Phi Mu; Pioneer Club Homocott Club: Representative, Soule Hall House Council. "Life is what you make it." rage Slxtv I Gavin Demetrius McKav Athens, Georgia (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Chi Sixmo Chi (Boston University); Demoslhenian Sigma Delta Kappa; Pi Phi Pi; Andrew J. Cobb Forensic Clnb. “They :irong Opportunity who say she knocks but onee Frank Alonzo McMi llan Atlanta. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Chi Psi; Phi Kappa President. Thalian Dramatic Club: President. Bohemian Club; Reporter. Red and Black: Dramatic Editor, Cracker: Champion Debate: Junior-Senior Impromptu Debate: Sophomore Debate; Sophomore Declamation: Freshman Debate: Freshman Impromptu Debate: Phi Kappa Key Council: Alternate. Phi Kappa Anniversarian: Senior Round Table: International Relations Club; Music Club: Senate Club; Six Foot Club; Freshman Lacrosse Team. "Picu et won droit." Thomas Berry McRitchie, Jr. Xewnan. Georgia (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Kappa Alpha: Phi Kappa Thalian Dramatic Club; Alpha Kappa Psi; Phi Delta Phi: Vice-President. Senior Law Class; Senate Club: "X” Club. “Trust your friends but eut the eards.” Robert Earl McTigue Nashville, Tennessee (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Alpha Ton Owega: Phi Kappa Gridiron: Varsity Football Team: "G'‘ Club: Pan-Hellenic Council: Vice-President, Sophomore Class: Delta Sigma Pi: Economics Society: Freshman Baseball; One Club: Senate Club; Pelican Club: Freshman Club. “Be no more than what you are." Oscar Marvin McWiiikter Athens. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Phi Kappa Alpha Kappa Psi: Economics Society. “Xol tonight. Josephine." Earl Barron McWhorter I-aFayctte. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demoslhenian Agricultural Club: R.S.C.E. “Better with a few that are right, than many who are wrong." Thomas Acton Nash Washington. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Sigma Alpha lipsilon: Phi Kappa Sphinx: End. All-American Footliall Team: Varsity Football Team: Varsity Baseball Team: “G" Club; Bulldog Club: Six Foot Club. "Be prepared." Georgia Hendkkk Neal College Park, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C.E. Degree) Demoslhenian Engineering Society; Sine and Tangent; Scabbard and Blade; Lieutenant, Infantry. “Put not your faith in princes.” Page Slrty oncRussbi.l Frederick Newcomb Newport. New Hampshire (Candidate for B.S.F. Degree) Pemosthenian President, Foresty Club; Assistant Editor, Cypress Knee. "Have a good time while you can." Alfred Benjamin Newton Lyons. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C.E. Degree) Pemosthenian Gridiron: Glee Club; Scabbard and Blade: Engineering Society: Monkey Drill Squad; Rifle Team: Captain, Cavalry. "War is liell. and so is astronomy.'' Francis Conns Nixon Augusta. Georgia (Candidate for B.S. Degree) Chi Psi; Phi Kappa Instrumental Club. "To tliine cr.cn self he true." Sarah Mildred Noell Comer. Georgia (Candidate for A.B.j. Degree) Pioneer Club Phi Kappa Phi: Scribes Club: Inner Circle, Pioneer Club: Girls’ Glee Club: Sophomore Declamation: Student League of Women Voters. "Il'hen in doubt, beep on talking.’’ Virginia Jane Norton Cornelia. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Pioneer Club Vice-President, Women's Athletic Association: Vice-President, Homccon Club; Women’s "G" Club; Captain, Junior Basket-ball Team; Hockey Team; Bascl nli Team; 4-H Club: Girls' Glee Club. "IPork, love and enjoy life." Charles Bowie Nrnnai.lv Atlanta. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Chi Phi; Phi Kappa Treasurer. Pan-Hellenic Council: Sccrciary-Trcas-mcr. Southern Golf Association: Golf Team: Pelican Club; One Club; Cavalier Club; Freshman Club. "Out of my way. prophets." Thomas Dozier Oglesby Flberton, (leorgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian Phi Kappa Phi; Beta Gamma Sigma; Delta Sigma Pi; Freshman Impromptu Debate. "All things are given to Industry." Joseph McDonald Oliver Savannah, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Intercollegiate Debate; Thalian Dramatic Club: Vice-President, International Relations Club; Phi Delta Phi: Biftads Club; Cavalier Club; "X" Club. "These are my jewels—Trust and Faith." fa e Sixty fico I William Wiley Oliver Valdosta, Georgia (Candidate (or A.B. Degree) Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Kappa Captain. Golf Team; Cavalier Club: Pelican Club. "In truth thrrr is happiness." Mary Louise Orr Calhoun. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Pioneer Club "Life is '.chat you make it." Andrew Jackson Osteen Pembroke. (ieorgia (Candidate for D.V.M. Degree) Demosthenian Agricultural Club. "II'hat can not deny. I will own.” Oswald Lamont Osteen Pembroke, (ieorgia (Candidate for D.V.M. Degree) Demosthenian Agricultural Club. "Oh. to he sclf-halaneed for contingenees!" Walter Ennis Parker Waycross. (ieorgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Chi Psi; Phi Kappa Vice-President. Economics Society; Alpha Kappa Psi; Instrumental Club; Thalian Dramatic Club: Six Foot Club. '7 live my life today, tomorrow may never come." Zepii Eugenia Pate Unadilla, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Chi Omega; Pioneer Club "As a man thinketh in his heart, so is lie." l.ATRELLE PATRICK Jefferson, (ieorgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Pioneer Club Treasurer. Homecon Club; Secretary, Soule Hall House Council: V. W. C. A. Cabinet: Girls' Glee Club; Women's Athletic Association: 4-H Club; Hockey Team; Baseball Team. "A laugh is worth a thousand groans in any market." Robert Lee Patterson, Jr. Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Phi Beta Kappa: Sphinx; Vice-President, Senior Class: President, Phi Kappa: Intercollegiate Debate: Champion Debate; Junior Oration; Junior-Senior Impromptu Debate: Phi Kappa Key Circle; Debating Council: Phi Kappa Council: Sophonvorc Debate: Senior Round Table; President. Junior Cabinet; Editor "G" Book; Vice-President. V. M. C. A.; Business Manager. Thalian Dramatic Club: President. International Relations Club; Scabbard and Blade: Major. Cavalry: Cavalier Club: One of Four Candidates for Rhodes Scholarship. "Dene fix if cjui bene latuit." Page Si tV thrte William Wayne Pearce Cairo, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian Vice-President. A.S.A.F..; Agricultural Club; Saddle and Sirloin Club; 4-H Club. "Be yourself." John Thomas Persall, Jr. Cordclc, Georgia (Candidate for B.S. Degree) Demosthenian ‘‘I may break in a storm but ne'er will sway in u breath." Golden Aurelius Pirkle Buford. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. EtL Degree) Demosthenian Demosthenian Key Council; Intercollegiate Debate : Sophomore Debate: Sophomore Declamation: Freshman Impromptu Debate; Delegate to Student Conference, Indianapolis; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet: Square and Compass Club. “Fill each fleeting day. with dream and work and flay.” Jewell Pitts Bowman. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Pioneer Club Vice-President, Homecon Club; Soule Hall House Council; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet: 4-H Club. ".Vot too serious, not too gay, but a rare good fellow when it comes to flay." Edwin Aldine Pound, IT Athens, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C.E. Degree) Kappa Alpha: Phi Kappa Gridiron; President. Engineering Society; Sine and Tangent; Junior Cabinet; Senior Round Table: Captain. Cavalry. "The way to have friends is to be one." Charles McDowell Preston, Jr. Macon. Georgia (Candidate for B.S. Degree) Tau Kappa Theta; Phi Kappa Circulation Manager, Cracker; Exchange Editor, Cracker; Freshman Club. "Avoid falsity and do as your true self directs." John Gatewood Pryor Smithvillc, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Pi Kappa Phi; Demosthenian President. Junior Class: Student Advisory Board; Cavalier Club; Freshman Club. "The greatest pleasure that I find is to maintain a quiet mind." Joseph Hicks Pyron Reynolds, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Ed. Degree) Demosthenian Music Club. "Defeat is only for him who accepts it." rage Stxty-tourGcy Austin Racf. Amsterdam. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Demosthenian Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi: Student Assistant. Romance Languages Department: Swimming Team: Scabbard and Blade: Major. Infantry. "Then let us not in hurry waste our lives." Theodore M. Raise Fitzgerald. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian "I hardly think so." Virginia Ray Atlanta, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Ed. Degree) Kappa Delta; Pioneer Club Phi Kappa Phi; Y. W. C. A.; Zodiac. "The one who always wins is the one who thinks he can.” Henry Yancey Reeves Sunnysidc, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Sigma Xu; Phi Kappa Gridiron: Manager. Varsity Baseball Team; "G” Club; Vice-President, Cavalier Club; Freshman Basket-ball Team. "Rexvard is the fruit of endeavor." Daniel Jackson Renfroe Quitman,'Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian Phi Kappa Phi; Beta Gamma Sigma; Gridiron; Editor. Cracker; President, Alpha Kappa Psi; Secretary-Treasurer, Music Club; Economics Society; Scabbard and Blade; International Relations Club; Prize Poem, Cracker. "Appreciate art, especially a good joke." Mrs. Eli.en Pratt Rhodes Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B.S.S. Degree) Pioneer Club Phi Kappa Phi. "Genius is one-tenth inspiration and nine-tenths perspiration." Thomas Evans Ritciiie Cornelia, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Sigma Chi; Demosthenian Phi Kappa Phi; Alpha Zeta: Editor, Georgia Agriculturist; Reporter, Red and Black: Vice-President, Demosthenian; Sophomore Declamation; Agricultural Club; Freshman Agricultural Debate; Sophomore Agricultural Debate: Agricultural Club Key Council: Saddle and Sirloin Club; 4-H Club; Second Lieutenant, Cavalry. "Make success a habit." John Reed Roberts, Jr. Buford, Georgia (Candidate for A. B. Degree) Vice-President, International Relations Club; Sigma Delta Kappa; Senior Round Table; Junior Cabinet. "Marry ambition, son, and spend your honeymoon among the stars." Page Sixty tireGeokge Henderson Robinson College Park. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C.E. Degree) Delta Tan Delta; Phi Kappa Phi Kappa Phi: Secretary-Treasurer, Athletic Association : Engineering Society: Sine and Tangent; Senate Club. "Mow oz'cr and make a place for me at the top." Margaret Rogers Pittsburg. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Pioneer Club Homecon Editor. Georgia Agriculturist: Y. V. C. A. Cabinet: Women's Athletic Association: Captain. Junior Basket-ball Team: Hockey Team. '"Love doing, and not the credit you get for it." Roselle Rosenthal Augusta, Georgia (Candidate for A.B.J. Degree) Sigma Delta Tau: Pioneer Club Phi Kappa Phi: President, Chi Delta Phi: Reporter, Red and Black; Women's Pan-Hellenic Council : Girls' Glee Club. "The dreamer lh-es forever; the toiler dies in a day." Alice Ai.df.n Rowland Athens. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Ed. Degree) Chi Omega; Pioneer Club Women’s Athletic Association; Treasurer. Chi Delta Phi; President, Music Club; Michael’s Tennis Cup: Blackfriar Dramatic Club: Girls’ Glee Club: Hockey Team; Captain, Rifle Team. "If 7.o brings sunshine into his life, has sunshine in his own." Thomas Franklin St. John Athens. Georgia (Candidate for A.B.J. Degree) Demosthcnian Phi Kappa Phi: Gridiron: Editor. Red and Black: Associate Editor. 1928 Pandora: Senior Staff. Cracker: Sigma Delta Chi: Campus Club: Freshman Debate; Vice-President. Demosthcnian; Thalian Dramatic Club; Scabbard and Blade; Major. Cavalry. "Give me large, enduring laughter." Will a Sanborn Americus, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Pioneer Club Inner Circle, Pioneer Club; Girls' Glee Club. "Keep on goindon’t slay still—some won’t like you, but others will." Mary Agnes Sanders Musclla. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Pioneer Club Phi Kappa Phi; Alpha Mu: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Homecon Club. "So little done, so much to do." Ephraim Sciiarkman Midvillc. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Tau Bpsilon Phi; Phi Kappa Freshman Club. "Knotvlcdgc comes to those who earn it." I’agc Sixty sirHorace DeWitte Shattuck LaFayettc, Georgia (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Demoslhenian Sphinx: Gridiron; "G" Club: Blue Key Council: Associate Editor. Red and Black: President. De-mosthenian; Demosthcnian Key Council: Debating Council; Junior Oration : Sophomore Declamation : Sophomore Debate: Freshman Debate: Andrew J. Cobb Forensic Club: Football Squad: Track Team: Vice-President. Spike Shoe Club; President. V. M. C. A.: F.ditor, "G“ Book: Business Manager. Faculty-Student Directory; Junior Cabinet: Scabbard and Blade: Winner, Company Prize Drill: Captain, Infantry; Campus Club; Freshman Basket-ball; Bif-tads. “i'iclOry is fine but wisdom is acquired through defeat." Herbert Samuel Siiearouse Guyton. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Ed. Degree) Demoslhenian "To live, that the world may be better because 1 have lived." Evelyn Hilton Sherman Blakely, Georgia (Candidate for A.B.J. Degree) Chi Omega; Pioneer Club President. Scribes Club: Assistant Society Editor. Red and Black. ‘ To love too much has been the only art used." Ivey Mervix Shiver, Jr. Sylvester, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Pi Kappa Phi; Phi Kappa Sphinx: “G” Club: Captain. Varsity Football Team; Captain. Varsity Baseball Team; Student Advisory Board: Bulldog Club; Senate Club; Regimental Adjutant. Infantry. "One life to live, let that be nothing less Ilian your best." Bernard Ai.vin Sr mow it Augusta. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Alpha Epsilon Pi; Phi Kappa Beta Gamma Sigma: Phi Kappa Phi; Economics Society: Freshman Club; Freshman Lacrosse. Addison Wingfield Simpson, Jr. Washington. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Aghon Club: Stock Judging Team; Dairy Judging Team; Winner. Little International Saddle and Sirloin Honor Key. "A little bull goes a long way." James Luther Smai.ley Lincolnton. Georgia (Candidate for D.V.M. Degree) Demoslhenian Agricultural Club: toth A. and M. Club. "Play your best cards in the game of life." Mary Rosi.yn Smalley Thomson. Georgia (Candidate for A.B.F.d. Degree) Pioneer Club Women’s Athletic Association: Hockey Team: Girls’ Glee Club. "In all things be simple, modest and sweet." t’aoe Slrt-j termWayne Alonzo Smalley Lincoln ton, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree Demosthenian Agricultural Club; R.S.C.E. Bernice Eley Smith Athens, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.K. Degree) Pioneer Club True life lies in laughter, love and work." Charles Rufus Smith Monticcllo, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Chi Tan; Demosthenian Boxing Team; Saddle and Sirloin Club; Bohemian Club; l'reshman Agricultural Debate; Freshman Club; Lieutenant, Cavalry. "Trouble never troubles me." Frances Elizabeth Smith Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Ed. Degree) Pioneer Club "everything is possible until it is dispensed." Henry Eugene Smith Columbus, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Pi Kappa Phi; Demosthenian Varsity Football; “G” Club; Pan-Hellenic Council; Senate Club; Bulldog Club; Biftad Club; Freshman Club. "Give the best to the world and the world will give the best back to you." Lamar Nesbitt Smith Clayton. Georgia (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Sigma Chi; Demosthenian Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Delta Kappa; President, Senior Law Class; Business Manager. Georgia Law-Review: Senior Round Table; Andrew J. Cobb Forensic Club. "Know what you pretend to know." Louise Smith Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B.Ed. Degree) Pioneer Club Tbalian Dramatic Club. "Many are cold but few are frozen." Robert Wilson Smith Gainesville, Georgia (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Pi Kappa Alpha; Demosthenian Phi Kappa Phi; Gridiron; Sigma Delta Kappa; President, Demosthenian; Champion Debate; Square and Compass Club; Andrew J. Cobb Forensic Club. "But what he treasures most when travelling ends, is love and faith and those few smiling friends." Page Sixty-tightJohn Frank Sparrow Hawkinsville, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian Agricultural Club; President, A.S.A.E.; Lacrosse Team; Ride Team: 4-H Club: Scabbard and Blade. “Never trouble trouble until trouble troubles you." Pf.rcv Marvin Spiers Lincolnton. Georgia (Candidate for D.V.M. Degree) Dcmosthenian Phi Kappa Phi: Alpha Zcta; Agricultural Club. “Hold your eyes on the goal: never mind the passing moment.'’ John Frank Sprocll, Jr. Lindalc, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian Alpha Zcta: Aglion Society; President, 4-H Club; Agricultural Club: V. M. C. A. Cabinet. '"Litre today, tomorroiV never comes." Hallman Lckk Stancil Tate. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Demosthenian Phi Beta Kappa: Phi Kappa Phi: Sphinx: Gridiron : Campus Leader: Blue Key Council: Varsity Lacrosse Team: President. V. M. C. A.: Square and Compass Club: Leader. Instrumental Club: Leader, Bulldog Orchestra: Captain, Scabbard and Blade; Captain, Rand. "Let’s hit up a tune." Jennie Claire Steed Augusta. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Ed. Degree) Kappa Delta: Pioneer Club Phi Kappa Phi; President. Pioneer Club: Inner Circle, Pioneer Club: V. V. C. A.: Bohemian Chib. "Act well your part, there all the honor lies." Virgil Shellnvtt Steele Eastman, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian Varsity Baseball Team; First Lieutenant. Infantry. "If you can't get along, go ’long." Franz Hahr Stewart Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Chi Psi; Phi Kappa Varsity Football Team: Pan-Hellenic Council: Freshman Impromptu Debate; Blackfrairs Dramatic Club: Cavalier Club: Six Foot Club: Freshman Club. "Love thy neighbor as thyself." Clara Mayiielle Stith Yidalia, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Pioneer Club President, Pioneer Club: President, Music Club; Zodiac Club: Girls' Glee Chib. "Better to make one rejoice with glee than plant a desert with a colony." Pooe Sixty-nineGeorge Henry Clement Stone Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. lid. Degree) Demosthenian Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Lacrosse Team. "Be frank to yourself anil to your fellow men." Howard Kulmax Story Ellabellc, Georgia (Candidate for B.S. Degree) Demosthenian Monkey Drill Squad; First Lieutenant. Cavalry. ‘‘Lend every man thine ear, but fete thy voice.” Lonnie James Strickland Waycross. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Decree) Demosthenian Aglton Society; Treasurer. Agricultural Club: A. S. A. E.: Saddle and Sirloin Club; 4-H Club; Scabbard and Blade; Freshman Agricultural Club Debate; Sophomore Agricultural Club Debate; Cotton School Debate; Agricultural Debating Council. "Use your head and be yourself." Wilburn I.esca Strickland Buchanan, Georgia (Candidate tor B.S.C. Degree) Demosthenian Lacrosse Team; Polo Team; Scabbard and Blade; F.conomics Society; Captain. Cavalry. "To be cautious is to serve a fall.” Charles Dwight Tabor Danielsville, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demosthenian Agricultural Club; Saddle and Sirloin. "Contentment is death to ambition.” Harry Erwin Talmadge Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Kappa Alpha; Plii Kappa Gridiron; Secretary. Pan-Hellenic Council; Vice-President. Biftad Club; Vice-President. Y. M. C. A.; Secretary-Treasurer. Pelican Club; International Relations Club; Thalian Dramatic Club; First Lieutenant. Scabbard and Blade; Cavalier Club; Freshman Club; Major, Cavalry. "Big things seem small after they have been acquired." Thomas Roumai.dus Talmadge, Jr. Forsyth, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Phi Delta Theta; Phi Kappa Blue Key Council: First Assistant. Phi Kappa; Alternate, Junior-Senior Impromptu Debate; Freshman Impromptu Debate: Thalian Dramatic Club; Circulation Staff. Cracker; Scabbard and Blade; Economics Society; Cavalier Club: Freshman Club; Captain. Infantry. "Compare, then remedy.” Malcolm Connor Tarver, Jr. Dalton, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Tau Kappa Theta; Demosthenian "Perseverance.” Page SeventyMaky Kathleen Taylor Union Point. Georgia (Candidate (or A.B. Ed. Degree) Pioneer Club "Be prepared." Edmund Earl Terf.au Guyton, Georgia (Candidate (or B.S. Degree) Demoslhenian Student Assistant. Chemistry Department. "Be reliable." Goss Thomas Martin, Georgia (Candidate (or B.S.A. Degree) Demoslhenian Agricultural Club. “There is never anything lost by fighting for a good cause." Maurice Clay Thomas Macon. Georgia (Candidate (or LL.B. Degree- Lambda Chi Alpha; Demoslhenian IMii Kappa Phi; Gridiron; Sigma Delta Kappa: Bulldog Orchestra; Staff. Georgia Law Review; Andrew J. Cobb Forensic Club. "Patience—that quality twhich conquers all." Friar Matthews Thompson, Jr. Griffin. Georgia (Candidate (or B.S.A. Degree) Lambda Chi Alpha: Demoslhenian Aghon Society; Business Manager. Red and Black: Associate Editor. Georgia Agriculturist; Agricultural Club; Glee Club; Cavalier Club. "IVhy worry, things are bound to happen." Jack Thurmond Athens. Georgia (Candidate (or B.S.F. Degree) Demoslhenian Alpha Xi Sigma; President, Forestry Club; Business Manager, Cypress Knee. "It ‘won’t be long notv." Marie Ussf.ry Tibretts Athens, Georgia (Candidate (or A.B. Ed. Degree) Alpha Comma Delta; Pioneer Club Women’s Athletic Association: Thalian Dramatic Club; Inner Circle. Pioneer Club; Freshman Tennis Championship; Secretary, Girls’ Glee Club; Bohemian Club. "If time lets slop one little perfect hour, take it—for it may never come again." James Fleming Touchstone Griffin, Georgia (Candidate (or B.S.A. Degree) Kappa Sigma; Phi Kappa Agricultural Club; Polo Team; Freshman Club. "livery action is measured by the depth of sentiment from which it proceeds. Pace Seventy oneDaniel Curtis Tully Savannah, Georgia (Candidate for H.S. Degree) Delta Tan Delta; Phi Kappa Sphinx; Gridiron; President. Glee Club: Varsity Baseball; Cavalier Club; Six Foot Club; Bulldog Club. "The evil that men do lives after them." Comer Lester Vandiver Helen, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Deiitosthenian Economics Society; Captain, Cavalry. "Keep on trying—struggle is the father of victory." Earl Morgan Varner Indian Springs. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Demostheuian Gridiron; President, Athletic Association; Aghon Society; President. Saddle and Sirloin Club; Agricultural Club; Secretary-Treasurer. Sophomore Class; Campus Club; Captain. Lacrosse Team. "It matters not what you do— It's only in the point of vine.” Ruth Wages Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Ed. Degree) Pioneer Club "Keep conscience clean, then never fear." John Wesley Waller Culverton, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Lambda Chi Alpha; Demostheuian Varsity Baseball; Freshman Football; "G" Club; Bulldog Club; Captain, Infantry. "A ready smile lifts a world of sorrow." George Walter Ward Lumpkin, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demostheuian Economics Society. "Do unto others as you would have others do unto you." William Alton Ward Powder Springs, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demostheuian Phi Kappa Phi; Gridiron: Secretary, Senior Class: Delta Sigma Pi: President. Economics Society; Campus Club; Treasurer, Freshman Class; Freshman Club. "Be it pleasant or olhemnse. I'll take it as it comes." Ed Milton Watkins Lexington, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Demostheuian "Professors and classes are my only objections to a college education." Pa je Secoity ticoJudson Durward Watson Statesboro. Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Sigma Chi: Demoslhcnian Associate Editor, 1028 Pandora; Senior Staff. Cracker; "G" Club: Manager. Boxing Team: Manager, Freshman Football Team: Senate Club: Pelican Club: Freshman Club. "If thou regrettest thy youth, why Uvet" Seahorse Ernest Watts Atlanta, Georgia (Candidate for Degree) Phi Kappa Secretary-Treasurer, Senior Law Class. "Be loyal to your ideals." Mary Estelle Wells Hapeville, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Pioneer Club Phi Kappa Phi: Alpha Mu: Women’s Athletic Association: President. Homccon Club: V. W. C. A. Cabinet: Junior Representative, Women's Student Council. "els we therefore have opportunity, let us do good to all men." Geokof. Douglas White Athens, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Kappa Alpha Kappa Psi: Economics Society: Senate Club: Six Foot Club: Freshman Basket-ball Team: Freshman Baseball Team. "Nothing is good or bad; only thinking makes it so." Hiram Jones Whitehead Comer, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Degree) Kappa Sigma; Phi Kappa "Let there be light." Katisue Whitehead Atlanta, Georgia (Candidate for B.S. Degree) Pioneer Club Phi Beta Kappa: Inner Circle. Pioneer Club: Historian, Pioneer Club; Women’s Student Council; Vice-President, Student League of Women Voters: Zodiac Club: Student Assistant, Zoology Department. "Silence is the only successful substitute for brains.” Francis Lamar Wilcox Valdosta, Georgia (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Kappa Pan-Hellenic Council. "Blessed are the pure in heart.” James Booth Williams Monroe. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C.E. Degree) Beta Kappa (Auburn University); Demoslhcnian President, Square and Compass Club; Engineering Society. "Build for character, not for fame." I’oge Seventy threeThomas Augustus Witcher Athens, Georgia (Candidate for A.B. Decree) Chi I’hi; Phi Kappa Golf Team: Six Foot Club; Bohemian Club; Dumb Owls: Freshman Club. " n’y a pas dc justice ici has.” Hoke Smith Wofford Atlanta. Georgia (Candidate for B.S.A. Degree) Dcmosthenian Sphinx; Gridiron; Blue Key Council; "G” Club; President, Senior Class: President, Agricultural Club; President, Dcmosthenian: President. Aghon Society; Head Cheer Leader; Thalian Dramatic Club; Campus Club; Scabbard and Blade: Intercollegiate Debate: Junior-Senior Impromptu Debate; Junior Oration; Sophomore Debate; Freshman Impromptu Debate: Dcmosthenian Key Council; Freshman Agricultural Club Debate; Sophomore Agricultural Club Debate; Agricultural Club Debating Council: Agricultural Club Key Council; Captain. Infantry. "The bull is mightier thou the bullet." Mart Elizabeth Wood Athens, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Pioneer Club Phi Kappa Phi; Alpha Mu. "Muse not that I thus proceed; for what will, 1 will, and there’s an end." May Emma Wood Cave Springs, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Pioneer Club Women's Athletic Association: Homccon Club; 4-H Club: Hockey Team; Baseball Team. "If we always face the sunshine, the shadows 'will fall behind." Muriel Wood LaGrange, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.H.E. Degree) Pioneer Club Women’s Athletic Association; Homccon Club; Music Club. "To be alive, to think, to yearn, to strive." James Christopher Wright Commerce, Georgia (Candidate for B.S. Degree) Phi Kappa Lieutenant-Colonel, Cavalry; Student Instructor, Chemistry. "Happiness lies in the pursuit of one’s own true interests." Wallace Douglas Wright Savannah, Georgia (Candidate for B.S.C. Degree) Phi Delta Theta; Phi Kappa Economics Society: Lieutenant. Cavalry. "Be yourself at all times.” William Hall Young, Jr. Columbus, Georgia (Candidate for LL.B. Degree) Sigma Alpha lipsilon; Phi Kappa Sphinx: Gridiron: Bine Key Council; President, Pan-Hellenic Council; Business Manager, 1928 Pandora ; Editor. Georgia Law Review; Phi Delta Phi; "G" Club; Manager, Varsity Football Team; Cavalier Club. "The best way to rid oneself of temptation is to yield to it." rage Seventh-fourLolver (glassesLolver (glasses A Abercrombie, James Merritt, Sophomore • Cullodcn Abram. Lewis E.. Sophomore............Fitzgerald Abramson, Lillian Goldstein. Freshman . . Athens Abramson. Samuel. Sophomore...............Athens Adair, Ellen. Speeial.....................Athens Adair. Raymond Ernest. Sophomore .... Dallas Adams. Arthur Blant, Sophomore ■ ■ Bowcrsvillc Adams, Clayton A., Jr.. Sophomore ■ ■ • Glcinvood Adams, O. L.. Jr.. Junior................Royslon Adams, Rabun X.. Freshman.................Bowman Adcox. X’eil 'ictor. First Year Law- • • • Albany Adams, Reba, Junior....................Jefferson Aderiiold. Hugh R., First Year Law- • F.a-t Point Adkins. John Story, Sophomore...........Stephens Agnew, Robert Thurman, Freshman .... Trion Acoos. Bernard. Freshman.................Thomson Aiken, James Edward. Sophomore ■ - - Statesboro Alexander. Mrs. (.eland R.. Junior .... Athens Alford. Angus Linder, Freshman..........Hartwell Allgood, Clyde. Freshman..................Athens Allcood, Florence. Freshman.............Marietta Almand, David Julian. First Year Lav.', Conyers Alston, Margaret. Sophomore..............Atlanta Anderson, Christine Cook, Junior . . Ogden. X. C. Anderson. Esther. Freshman...............Decatur Anderson. Franklin X'.. Sophomore • ■ ■ Covington Anderson, Fannie Leonora. Junior . . Hawkinsville Anderson. Kankakee, Sophomore .... Rockmart Andrews. Rebecca Elizabeth. Junior . . . Augusta Ansley. David Henry, Second Year Law - Decatur Anslev, William B., Second Year Law ■ ■ Decatur Arline, Thomas Jefferson, Jr.. Freshman - - Cairo Armistead, Mildred Coder. Freshman - . Crawford Armstrong. Adah Elizabeth. Junior ■ ■ Woodvillc Armstrong, George C., Sophomore...........Athens Armstrong, Henrietta, Freshman .... Savannah Armstrong, Thomas J„ Sophomore - - - Columbus Arnold, Eugenia. Freshman.................Athens Arnold. Edwin Turner. Freshman - - - Philomath Arnold, Thomas D.. Freshman..............Atlanta Arrendale, H. Special....................Colbert Akvin, Mary Elizabeth. Sophomore - . . LaFayctte Askew, Benjamin Hand, III, Freshman ■ Arlington Aspinwall. Harry A.. Sophomore...........Atlanta Aspinwall. J. D., Freshman.............Patterson Atwood. Wm. Swinton. Freshman .... Ridgeville Aultman, Rufus Edwin, Freshman . . . Sylvester B Backer. Sidney, Freshman..................Macon Bacon, Alta Mae, Freshman............Hinesville Bacon, Mercedes, Freshman................Albany Baggett, Boyd Quillian, Junior .... Bethlehem Baggs. G. B., Freshman..................Camilla Bailey. Elizabeth, Freshman...........Jefferson Baird, Wm. Joe, Junior..................Augusta Baker, George Wallace. Freshman............Gore Baker. James Neal. Freshman................Pavo Baker. James P.. Sophomore.................Gore Baker, Thelma Margaret, Freshman - - - Ben Hill Baldwin. Eugene Baker. Sophomore .... Dublin Bancroft, Matilda, Junior................Athens Barnard. Grace. Freshman.................Athens Barnard, M. Elsie, Sophomore ■ Xacoochce Institute Barnes. John Lecon, Sophomore .... Ft. Gaines Barnett, K. H., Junior................Jefferson Barron, Alfred Lee, First Year Lazo .... Rome Barron. Frank M., Sophomore.............X’cwnan Barron. Oliver Burns, Freshman............White Barrow, Craig. Jr.. Junior.............Savannah Barrow. Susan Frances. Sophomore .... Athens Bart. Caspar Ernest. Junior............Savannah Basham, Clyde M.. Sophomore..............Athens Bates. Hucii F.. Freshman..............Waycross Battle, Miriam, Junior..................Atlanta Batts, Ramoh Cecil, Sophomore............Ocilla Baxley, H. B., Sophomore..............Hcphzibah Bazemore, James Malcolm. Sophomore - - Augusta Beale, Clyde K., Junior................Savannah Beale, O. W. H., Sophomore.............Savannah Beamer, James Philip. Freshman..........Calhoun Beasley, Alexander Stephens, Junior - Dewy Rose Beasley, Eddie Eugene, Freshman .... Stapleton Beers, W. T.. Jr., Freshman..............Ncwnan Belplower, Alton Preston, Junior . . . Sycamore Belesario, Gladys, Freshman - Daytona Beach. Fla. Bell. Charles E., Freshman ........ Athens Bell. Martha Gertrude, Sophomore .... Athens Bennett, Chester Norton, Junior .... Waycross Bennett, Herbert, Freshman..........Gainesville Bennett, I. J., Junior.................Waycross Bennett, Nathan R.. Jr.. Freshman • . Washington Benson, Oscar Lynn. Sophomore .... Marietta Berg, Ethel, Freshman................Fitzgerald Berlowe, Max, Sophomore.............New York Berronc. Mrs. M C, Irregular..........Hiawasscc Berry, Wm. McDowell, Sophomore .... Sparta Bethel, Josephine, Sophomore..........Thomaston Betts, Jerry Glenn. Sophomore...........Ashburn Betts. Mary Allen, Freshman..............Athens Betts. Victoria E.. Junior...............Athens Beusse, Thomas Clarence, Sophomore ■ . . Athens Bickers, Marjorie Dozier, Sophomore ■ . Savannah Bickerstafp, Margaret L.. Junior.........Athens Bickley, Thomas Z.. Sophomore - ■ ■ - Woodland Bircii more, Harrison A.. First Year luxw. Athens Biro, A. J.. Jr., First Year Lazo........Metier Birdsev. Herbert Ford, Sophomore..........Macon Bishop, Edwin Hines, Sophomore .... Ashburn Bishop, Major H kold. Freshman.........Atlanta Bissell, Harry H.. Jr., Freshman • ■ Camp Renning Bivins, James McAlpin, First Year Lazo. Moultrie Block. David Gould, Junior..............Atlanta Block, William H., First Year Late. . . Valdosta Blackshear, A. Laura E., Irregular .... Athens Blackshf.ar, J. H., Second Year Law . . Gainesville Poye Srrcnty ti»Lolver (glasses Blalock. John Loyd. Junior...........Adairsville Blanchard. Meli. F.. Freshman...........Crawford Butch, Henry Smits. Junior............Statesboro Blount, George. Freshman.................Yidalia Blount. J. J.. Jr.. Second J’ear Law • • Hawkiusvillc Blum, Irving Philip, First Year Law • • • - Athens Blumenthal, Saul M., Sophomore • • • Savannah Boggs, Claude E.. Junior...............Jefferson Boggs. Glenn Ernest. Junior .... Lawrcnccvillc Boland, Joseph Horsley, Junior...........Atlanta Bolton. Joseph Herbert. Freshman .... Atlanta Bolton. Lee Boykin, Junior................Athens Bond, Claude, Jk., Freshman...............Toccoa Bond, DeWitt Tai.madge. Freshman . . Daniclsvillc Booth. John Xevil, Sophomore...........Lexington Booth, Sarah Sue, Junior..................Athens Booth, W. Howard. Freshman.............Lexington Bostxvick, John. Jr.. Sophomore.........Bostwick Bottom, Jordan Vaughn, Junior............Atlanta Bowden. Josie Frank. Sophomore............Athens Bowers. John Harvey. Freshman.............Athens Boyd, Ellis F.. Sophomore................Tignall Boyett, Edwin Sanford, Second Year l.aw ■ Blakely Bradherry, Laura Louise. Sophomore . . . Athens Bradley, Gi.enn Walter, First Year Law - ■ Athens Bradley, John Green, Freshman.............Walden Brand. Mary Caroline, Junior..............Athens Brannon, Mary Claire, Sophomore.............Pavo Brantley, G. I).. Sophomore ■ . Washington, D. C. Braswell, L. R.. Freshman..............Covington Bray, Claud Alvin. Junior...............Woodbury Bray, Merle, Sophomore..................Savannah Briant, Alton Franklin. Freshman ■ • Winterville Brice, Charles Dixon. Sophomore ■ • ■ Brunswick Bridges, Geo. Harold, Freshman...........Sargent Brinson, Ida, Junior................Wrightsvillc Brinson, M. F... Jr, Second Year Late- • Waycross Briscoe, Cora Frances. Freshman...........Monroe Briscoe, Helen, Freshman..................Monroe Broach, James Marion, Freshman............Putney Broach, Thomas Rudolph, First Year Law • Putney Brook, Harold E„ Sophomore............Greensboro Brooke, James O.. Freshman..............Columbus Brooks, Josephine Reid. Sophomore .... Athens Brown. Alice, Junior...................McDonough Brown, Harley Derrei.l, Junior.........Stillmorc Brown, Joseph Emerson, Junior............Atlanta Brown, John Mitchell. Freshman............Dalton Brown, Kendrick M., Freshman..............Sharon Brown, Max, Freshman......................Martin Brown, Noel Guy, Sophomore..........Daniclsvillc Brown, Randall G.. Sophomore............Garfield Brown. Thomas H., Freshman...............Royston Bruce, Mary Elizabeth, Junior . . . Young Harris Brumbalow, Dewey C. Sophomore .... Madison Bryan, Benjamin L., Sophomore . . . Greensboro Bryan, James Lewis. Freshman .... Greensboro Bryan. Robert G., Sophomore............Philomath Bryant, Charles James. Freshman...........Jasper Bryant, Vernon H.. Sophomore.............Sargent Bryant. Fred L.. Junior..............Winterville Bryson. C. J., First Year Law.......... Atlanta Bryson, Frank, First Year Law, Jacksonville, Fla. Buchan, Lizzie, Junior..............Sandcrsvillc Buchanan, Martha F., Freshman • • Hawkiusvillc Buchanan. Frank, Freshman...............Americas Buchanan, John A.. Junior................Atlanta Buchanan, James H.. First Year Law . ■ - Jackson Buckman, John Hamilton. Sophomore • - Athens Felker Lewis. President, Second Year Law Class Buffington, J. E., Second Year Law • ■ Union City Buie, Paul Douclas. Sophomore .... Nashville Bullard, C. W., Freshman...................Camilla Bullard. Helen, Freshman....................Dalton Bullock. H. H., Freshman...................Atlanta Bumgarner, James A.. Freshman . . . Daniclsvillc Burch, Walter Graham. Freshman ■ • Fayetteville Burger. Agnes Sims. Junior.....Watkinsvillc Burgess, Henry Claude, Junior...............Athens Burkhart. W. C, Irregular...................Athens Burns, John Milton. Freshman................Athens Burroughs, Lucile, Sophomore....................Ha Burton, Thomas Cuthuert, Sophomore ■ ■ • Canon Burton, Wynn T.. Junior....................Atlanta Bush. Laurier Sheffield. Sophomore • • • Camilla Bush. Morris, Sophomore.....................Athens Butler, Heywood D., Jr., First Year Law ■ ■ Atlanta Byers. Preston, Freshman..........Estill. S. C. Byrd, Edward Duke. First Year Law . . . Lakeland Byrd, Fov Andrew, First Year Law.............Macon Byrd, Oscar I.ee, Freshman.......Ringgold C Caldwell. Andrew J., Second Year Law- Marietta Calhoun, Jenellf. Teresa, Freshman . Washington Calhoux, Murray A., Jr., Sophomore • • Columbus Callaway, Hubert Moses, Junior .... Philomath Callaway, Mrs. Lf.ssie Hunt. Junior . Garkesvillc Cameron. Henry C. III. Freshman .... Albany Camp. Walter Ernest, First Year Jxtw.......Tate Campbell, Donald Charles, Sophomore . • Athens Campbell. Frances Elizabeth, Sophomore - Athens Campbell. Marcy H.. Freshman.............Athens Candler, John Slaughter. II. Junior. . .Atlanta Cantrell, AGNES Ann. Junior.............Calhoun Capps. William Monteith. Junior..........Athens Carithers. James Arthur, Freshman . . . Athens Carlisle, Della Elizabeth. Junior .... Decatur Carlisle, E. F., Jr., Sophomore.........Griffin Carlton, Annif. F., Special..............Athens Carlton, John Thomas, Freshman .... Decatur Carmichael, Sarah Lucile, Freshman . ■ Monroe Carr. Ewell Sanford, Junior.........Cave Spring Carr, Frank S., Freshman........Donalsonviilc Carr, Robert L., First Year Law..........Athens Carrikkr, Wm. Calvin. Freshman . . • Barnesville Carroll, Wm. B.. Sophomore.............Columbus Carson, James Mason, Freshman............Tifton Carswell, H. M.. Junior..................Athens reje Srrenty ieccnLolvcr (glasses ST Axwiew Kixgery, President, First Year Law Class Carswell, Kathleen J., Junior .... Jeffersonville Carter, Allman, Junior...........Bowdon Junction Carter, Robert Lboxidus, Freshman .... Athens Carter. V. Clifton. Freshman..........Gainesville Cartleuce. Alice Mae, Junior...............Augusta Causey. C. B., Junior..............Alberta. Can. Cavendek, Henry Thistle. Freshman. .Millwood Cawley, Louis Vernon, Junior...............Augusta Chafin', Glenn C., Jjtnior.................Lindalc Chafi.n, W. V., Sophomore..................Norwood Chaille. Wm. J., Second Year Lazo . . Hawkinsvillc Champion, Frances, Sophomore .... Sandersville Chandler, James, Freshman...................Athens Chapman, Mrs. Elizabeth, Irregular. . . Athens Chapman, Laurah V., Sophomore..............Atlanta Chastain, Frank Loyd, Sophomore . • • Lakemont Chastaln, Walter Ralph, Junior . . . .Lakemont Cheney, Mary Frances, Freshman .... Marietta Chesnutt, Thomas Williams, Special• • • Tifton Christian, Allene, Freshman .... Lawrencevillc Christian, Margaret Brown, Junior .... Tifton Clark. Roy, Junior..................Flowery Branch Clark, William F., First Year J.azv. . Gainesville Clarke, Frances Louise, Sophomore . . . Augusta Clarke, Peter F., Jr., First Year Lazo. . . Atlanta Clarke, Wiley E.. Jr.. Freshman .... Savannah Claussen, George F., Jr., Freshman .... Augusta Clement, Blanton, Junior.............Buena Vista Clements, Claudius A.. Freshman • • • La Fayette Clemmons, Robert Slaton, First Year Lazu • Rome Cloud, Joel, Jr., Sophomore..............Lexington Conu, Mrs. Carlisle, Irregular..............Athens Cobb, Lorry Alton, Sophomore..................Adel Coffee, Charles Grady, Sophomore ■ ■ • Eastman Cohen, Herbert, Sophomore...................Athens Coile, Mary Ida, Sophomore.............Wintcrvillc Coker, Warren Harvey, Freshman..............Athens Cole, Charles Martin, Freshman • • Opelika, Ala. Coleman, Claudine, Freshman.................Athens Coleman, Jno. S., First Year Laxo. Chappell, S. C. Collier, Miles Arnold, Freshman............Colbert Collins, Joe M., Second Year Lazo . . . Cartersvillc Collins. Julian Walden, Freshman.............Flint Collins, Walker Augustus. Sophomore • Savannah Collins, W. Burt, Second Year Lazo • • • • Rome Collins, W. H., Sophomore..................Cordelc Colvin. Combs N., Junior............Locust Grove Colvin, Henry M.. Sophomore .... Locust Grove Colvin, Jackson Earl, Freshman...............Jesup Concdon, Fred Voorhees, Sophomore • • . Atlanta Connally, Lindsay Allen, Junior........Atlanta Connally, Ralph Collins, Junior . . . Manchester Cot’NCELL, J. Edwin. Jr., Freshman.......Cairo Connerat, Robert Vincent, Freshman . . . Atlanta Constancy. Frank A., Freshman..........Atlanta Conway, Katherine T., Junior . Washington, D. C. Cook, Albert B.. Freshman...............Monroe Cook, James Lawson, Junior..............Athens Cook, Vergil Wright, First Year I tw ■ . . Atlanta Cooley, John Rogers, Junior..........Maysvillc Cordray, Thomas Franklin, Fresh man . Savannah Cormany, Clifford E.. Sophomore...........Rome Cornett, W. G. Sophomore................Athens Courson, Prentiss, Junior.............Savannah Courts, Malon Clay, Junior.............Atlanta Cowan, James, Junior...................Atlanta Cowart, W. Madison, Sophomore...........Hahira Cox, Hallie Anne. Sophomore.............Athens Cox, Marvin Hill, Freshman..........Waynesboro Cox. Sidney G. Jr., Junior..........Waynesboro Cox, William Crozier, Freshman.........Coleman Crabb, Anna, Sophomore..................Athens Crawford, John A., Freshman.............Dalton Crawford, Thurston C, First Year Lazo . Columbus Crawley, G. D„ Jr., Junior.............Hampton Crisfield, George Fenwick. Sophomore ■ Savannah Crittenden, Thomas J., Freshman. . . . Shellman Crook, Claude Harris, Freshman..........Athens Cross, Howell C, Freshman..............Douglas Crouch, L. C, Sophomore.................Ocilla Crvmes, Myrtle, Junior..................Athens Culbertson, Eva, Freshman..........Wintcrvillc Culbretii, Albert Williford, Freshman ■ ■ Edison Culpepper, Wesley Lef., Sophomore ■ • . Savannah Cum mINC. John Freeman, Second Year Lazo • Rome Curran, Jack, First Year I.azo.........Atlanta Curry, Dupert Charles, Freshman .... Athens D Dale, William Jackson, Freshman .... Athens Daniel, Lucian Lamar, Sophomore ■ • . Moultrie Daniel, Mary Elizabeth, Freshman . ■ ■ Ludowici Daniels, A. Elizabeth, Junior .... Hawkinsvilte D'Antignac, Thomas B., Sophomore • • - Augusta Darling, Samuel Taylor, Freshman . . . Leesburg Dasher, John Robert, Jr., Sophomore ■ • Valdosta Dasher, Zeno Vance, Second Year Lazo ■ ■ Marlow Davenport, Maxwell H., First Year Lazo . Norcross Davey, Lillian, Sophomore................Thomson David, Mildred Paulette, Sophomore • • . Atlanta David, William Paul, Freshman............Atlanta Davidson, J. F., Sophomore...............Atlanta Davidovitch, John, Freshman.............Columbus Davis, Charles Edward, Sophomore • • • Amcricus Davis, Edward, Jr., Freshman...........Kingsland Davis, Frederick B„ Sophomore............Atlanta Davis, Ken non. Sophomore...............Buckhcad Davis, Merry Nell, Junior...........Wrightsville Davis, Roy, Freshman......................Buford Davis, Troy A., Junior....................Athens Davis, Thomas Orme, Sophomore............Clayton Davis, W. G., Sophomore.............Cartersvillc Dawson, O. P., Sophomore..............Blackwells Day, Roy Baker, Freshman ■ Dawson Springs, Ky. Deal, Lucy Mae, Sophomore.............Statesboro Dean, Robert Arthur, Junior...............Martin Dekle, Cecil Kekmit, Freshman..........Stillmore Dellincer, Chesley M., Junior............Calhoun Page Seventy-eightLolver (glasses - - -g- V iVAV T v • kV Dent, Sue Tarpley. Sophomore ■ • • Lockhart, S. C. Derrick, Clifton Jennings, Junior. ■ - Oglethorpe Derrick, Pauline, Junior..................Clayton Dews, Lila, Junior........................Decatur Dickens, Marion Bailey, Freshman...........Ocilla Dickerson, Henry Hoke. Freshman .... Elberton Dickerson, Ola Mildred, Sophomore ■ ■ . Elberton Dickerson, Walter Cary, Freshman • • Homcrvillc Dickson. Henry Samuel, Freshman . . Carncsville Dillard, Stephen Horace. Freshman . . Davisboro Dismukes. Arthur F., Freshman .... Columbus Dixon, William Leon, Sophomore.............. vcra Dobbs, Hal Bleckley. Sophomore • • • Barncsvillc Donns, O. R. Jr.. Freshman.................Athens Dodd, Claire Alpen, Junior..................Menlo Dodd, Richard K„ Sophomore................Atlanta Dorm iky, Wst. Eugene, Sophomore ■ . • Fitzgerald Dover, Theopiiilus Walter, Freshman . . . Klljjay Downer, C E., Sophomore..................Richland Downing. Jane, Freshman...................Atlanta Downs, R. C. Senior..................Watkiusville Doyle, Robert Oder, Second Year Law • • Royston Drake, Alice, Junior.....................Fairburn Drake, Frank Maccuder. Freshman ■ Summerville Drew, Roy F„ Junior.......................Preston Driver, Edmond Bradley, Freshman . . . Columbus Dudley, Frank, Sophomore...................Athens Duke, Lewis Jenkins, Freshman .... Fowlstown Dunaway, Janes Rufus. Sophomore • . . - Harlem Dunaway. Nolee May, Sophomore..............Athens Duncan, Amos O.. Junior. . . . Bowdon Junction Duncan, Ira J., Freshman .... Bowdon Junction Duxston, Linton Reese, Junior............Commerce Dunwody, Donald, Second Year Lazo ■ • • Atlanta Durden, Evelyn, Junior................Hogansvillc Dyer, Byron. Sophomore.................Carrollton Dykes, Nellie, Junior.....................Cochran E Earnest, Charles B., Junior . . . Bowdon Junction Earnest, Martha Jane. Freshman..............Athens Earnest. Robert Lee. Freshman ■ Bowdon Junction Easterlin, A. E.. Freshman................Americus Easterling, Allen Wade, Sophomore • • Glcnnvillc Eberiiardt, Ruth, Junior.................Maysvillc Fberhardt. Robert Toombs, Jr., Freshman • . Comer Edmondson, Hubert Ray, Sophomore • ■ Gainesville Edmondson. Royce, Junior...............Gainesville Edrincton, Edward, First Year Laze .... Athens Edwards, Jules G., Jr.. Junior.............Atlanta Edwards, Lila Elizabeth, Freshman .... Dublin Edwards, Nellie Patrick. Junior.............Athens Edwards, Tom Pickett. Sophomore .... Dawson Edwards, W. L., Sophomore...................Athens Eitel, Marie, Junior............South Haven, Mich. Elder. Ethel Dodd. Junior.............Watkinsville Ellis, Robert B., Freshman..............Alpharetta Ellison, Geokce William, Freshman . . . Augusta English, D. L., Sophomore • Davidson River, N. C. Epting, Eugene Albert, First Year Lazo . ■ Athens Erbelding, Mary, Sophomore.................Augusta Estes, William J., Jr., Sophomore...........Senoia Estroff, Maxwell Joseph, Freshman . . Louisville Etheridge, Eddie Blanche. Freshman .... Milner Eubanks. Nathan Bryan, Junior, Nashville, Tenn. Evans, Martha, Sophomore....................Athens Eve, Arthur E„ Jr., Freshman . . . Asheville, N. C. Evins, Samuel N., Jr., Junior..............Atlanta J. R. Cooley Vice-President, Junior Class Ewing, William B.. Second Year Lazo Lawrcnccvillc Exley, Katherine Virginia, Sophomore ■ Savannah Eyler, Arm and T„ Junior...............Savannah Ezell, James Ridley, Freshman.........Hillsboro F Falligant, Robert F... Second Year Lazo Thunderbolt Farantos, George C., First Year Lazo .... Athens Farmer. Boyd William. Freshman...........Martin Farrell, William E.. Sophomore..........Atlanta Fawcett, Anne, Freshman................Savannah Feacin, Robert Douglas, Jr., Sophomore . . Macon Fears, Robert Francis, Freshman.........Madison Fennell, Mrs. Edna R.. Irregular .... Hincsville Fetzer. G. VV., Jr., Second Year Lazo. ■ ■ Marlow Fet er. L. W., Freshman..................Marlow Fincher. Sarah, Freshman............Cave Spring Fincer, John W., Second Year Lazo. - Gainesville Fisher. Harry Carver. First Year Lazo• - Atlanta Fitts, Pryor Walker, Sophomore..........Atlanta Fleetwood. Roscoe George, Sophomore ■ Thomasvillc Fleming, Tiios. E.. Sophomore............Albany Flesh man, Ward S.. Freshman.............Sautce Fletcher. Richard Van, Junior...........Jackson Flournoy, Thomas M., Second Year I.aw, Columbus Flowers, Julian Carlton, Junior........Valdosta Fi.oyd. Berry, Jr., Sophomore.............Canon Floyd. John F.. First Year Lazo.........Cochran Folk. Wylly, Sophomore.................Waycross Folsom, Martha Jane, Junior...............McRae Ford, Earl, Freshman..................Sylvester Fordham, J. B., Jr.. Junior..............Dublin Forshey, Ada Claire, Sophomore, Vicksburg. Miss. Fort, Theo.. Sophomore..............Wrightsvillc Forman, George Pinkston, Jk., Junior . . Greenville Fortson, Janet T.. Junior................Athens Fortson, Margaret, Sophomore.............Athens Foy, Ethel, Sophomore....................Butler Franklin, Joe Neai.. Junior ....... Columbus Franklin, Russel D., Freshman...........Eastman Franklin, Robert E., Freshman...........Pulaski Franklin, Virgil Eugene, Sophomore • • Graymont Frankum. Robert Oscar, Sophomore .... Martin Fredericks, A. B.. Jr., Freshman ■ • Brooklyn. N. Y. Free, Carl Branson, Sophomore • ■ • Clarkcsville Free, Pearl Elizabeth, Sophomore • • Clarkcsville Freeman. R. B.. Junior................ Atlanta Fricks, J. L.. Second Year Lazo ■ ■ . Rising Fawn Frisbie, Theodore, Sophomore..............Athens Page Seventy ntneLolver (glasses Kei.lv McCutchf.n, Vice-President, Second Year Law Class Frye, Porter, Freshman.............Clarkcsville Fulghum, James Franklin, Junior .... Augusta Fulghum. Ralph Morris. Junior..........Mitchell Fuller. Rorert Henry. Sophomore . . • Crantville Fuller, Walter Sydney, Sophomore .... Shiloh Funkenstein, Dan Hertz. Sophomore - - • Macon Fukkhouser, William L., Sophomore • • • Atlanta Futch, Thomas A., Jr., Sophomore • . Thomasville G Garrett. Martha. Freshman..............Savannah Gabriei,. Erwin T., Sophomore..........Savannah Gaines, Bessie Sue T.. Junior...........Jasper Gallis. Anthony, Freshman .... Andalusia. Ala. Galloway. John Franklin, Sophomore ■ • Athens Galloway. Martha. Sophomore • • • Waverly Hall Gans, Nathan A., Sophomore.............Macon Gardner, Doris W.. Freshman...........Townsend Gardner. Samuel Newton. Junior .... Ft. Gaines Garland. John W.. Freshman...........Bamesville Garrard, Francis DeLeon. Sophomore • Washington Garrard, Frank L'., Jr., Freshman .... Columbus Gary, I-oxen. Jr., Sophomore.........Georgetown Gary. Robert Eucene. Sophomore ■ ■ • Georgetown Gay, James M., Sophomore...............Matthews Gay, Linton Eugene, Sophomore .... Matthews Gay, Otis Franklin, Freshman.............Athens Gerdine, Thomas F.. Sophomore. Sacramento. Cal. Gholston, Mary, Junior...................Athens Gignilliat. Helen H.. Freshman..........Pincora Gilleland, Clement Eugene. Junior .... Athens Gilmer. Julia Kathryn, Junior........Gillsvillc Ginn. Shelton Ogden, Sophomore .... Royston Gleaton, Edwin Shaw. I:reshman .... Arlington Glenn. Henry Robertson, First Year Law ■ Athens Goldman. Sidney, Sophomore...............Athens Gordon, Ida, Sophomore............Florence. Ah. Gordon, James Augustus, Freshman .... Athens Gorman, Harry Waring, Sophomore .... Atlanta Gokovitz, Sam, Freshman................Savannah Gortatowsky. Henry K., Freshman .... Albany Goss. Robert E., Freshman..........Locust Grove Gracey, Robert Hall, Senior.............Atlanta Graham. Thomas J.. Sophomore ■ - • Washington Gray, Claude Nelson, Freshman . ■ . Locust Grove Grayson, Leon H.. Second Year Law • • Savannah Green, John Linton. Second Year Law ■ - Athens Green, Lucilk Linton, Junior.............Athens Green, Rf.mbf.rt A., Junior...........Flltcrton Greene, Mrs. Ruth Abernathy, Irregular . Athens Green, William Louis, Junior..............Athens Gresham, Frances, Junior................Bostwick Gresham, Lena. Sophomore..............Waynesboro Gkifpin, Ralph Lafayette, Sophomore ■ . • Rome Griffith. Mildred. Freshman...............Athens Griffith, Joseph Edwin, Sophomore . . . Buchanan Gxicgs, Harold Porter, Freshman.........Marietta Groover. Sarah Wynelle, Freshman .... Toccoa Grosbkkg. Lawrence. Sophomore • • Ansonia, Conn. Gunn, Margaret Lovelace. Junior .... Augusta Gwyn, Charles R., Jr., Freshman..........Zcbulon H Hackel. Sarah Adel. Sophomore............Vidalia Hafer, Harris H.. Freshman............Ft. Valley HagEV, Edward H., Sophomore .... Chicago. Ill- Hailey, Hugh E., Freshman...............Hartwell Hale. John P.. Jr.. Freshman...........Maysville Haley, Nick, Sophomore..................Elberton Haley. S. E.. Second Year Law. Charleston, S. C. Hall, C. C., First Year l.aw...........Nashville Hall, Edward Tilden, Freshman.............Dublin Haley, Sanford Eugene, Second Year Law, Athens Hall, Adolph Kenneth, Sophomore .... Hahira Hamby, Ralph Edwin, Sophomore .... Clayton Hamilton, Guy Crawford, Jr., Junior ■ ■ • Dalton Hamilton, R. E., Sophomore................Dalton Hamilton, Sarah Caroline. Freshman ■ • • Dalton Hancock, A. C, Jr.. Sophomore.............Athens Hancock. H. N., Junior.................Jefferson Hancock, Robert Dudley, Freshman ■ ■ • Savannah Hancock, Sarah Pendergrass, Junior . • . Athens Hanson, Wesley Turnelu Jr-. Freshman ■ Smyrna Haralson, Frank C., First Year Law ■ • Blairsville Harrer, G. W. Dillard, Junior...........Commerce Harden. Beulah Mae, Sophomore .... Douglas Hardin. James Lee, Junior................Appling Hardman, I.. G., Jr.. Sophomore .... Commerce Hardy, Charles Lambdin. Sophomore . Gainesville Hardy, James G.. Freshman................Atlanta Harmon, Edna, Sophomore..................Atlanta Harper, Hubert. Junior...................Ambrose Harper, Sage, Freshman......................Wray Harrell. Osmah F... Sophomore............Pearson Harrington, Era. Freshman.................Dexter Harris, Dupont Guerry. Sophomore • . • Valdosta Harris, Frank Hardicree. First Year I jaw ■ Winder Harris, James J., Junior..................Athens Harris, R. D., Jr., Freshman..............Bowman Harrison. James Clarence, Jr.. Freshman . Augusta Harrison. Ruth. Freshman....................Kite Hart, Dan R.. Freshman................Statesboro Hart, F.dwin Rice, Sophomore.............Colbert Hart, Mary Adams, Junior..................Athens Harvey, Cora Lee, Sophomore...........Glennville Harvey, Elizabeth Hamilton, Sophomore ■ Athens Harvey, H. W., Jr., Freshman..............Athens Haskin, David. Second Year l.aw............Macon Hawkins, Joe Kelly. Sophomore • • • Summerville Hayes, Hoke Smith, Freshman .... Eastanollec Hayes, James Thomas, Sophomore .... Athens Haycood, Oscar Williford. First Year J.ate • Athens Hays, Bessie. Irregular.............Guthrie. Ky. Hays, B. C, Freshman....................Colquitt Hays, James E„ Jr., First Year Lav ■ • Montezuma Head. Helen Ernestine, Freshman . . ■ ■ Athens Head. Sidney A„ Freshman...............Jefferson foot fttffhlnLolver (glasses »$£ A ■ Heacarty, Edward M., Jr.. Sophomore ■ . Waycro s Hearn, Frank Cartkr, Sophomore .... Franklin Hearse, Jcanita. Sophomore ■ Williamson, W. Va. Heffernan. Henry j.. First Year Law • • Augusta Hences. Anna Lillian, Sophomore ■ • • Savannah Henry, Lucy Goodrich. Junior.............Augusta Henry, William Conley. Freshman .... Athens Henson, Noemi S.. Sophomore .... Cartcrsville Herndon. Pete. Sophomore...................Canon Hester, John F., Sophomore................Monroe Higdon, Sam Parrott, Freshman..............Cairo Hill, Annie Laurie. Junior................Athens Hill, Benjamin Harvey, Junior............Atlanta Hill. Hoke Smith, Junior...................Canon Hill, John Bunn, Junior.................Columbus Hilsman, Thomas Brumby. Sophomore ■ . Albany Hines. Thomas M., First Year Law ■ ■ Millcdgcville Hirscii, Samuel D.. Freshman............Savannah Hiscock, William David, Freshman...........Dixie HiX, Herman D.. Freshman............Danielsville Hodges, Gerald T.. Freshman...........Loganvillc Hodges, Marie, Second Year Law .... Loganvillc Hodgson, Fred Grady, Freshman............Atlanta Hodgson, John McCullough. Junior. . . .Athens Hoemayer, Stephen Popper. Freshman . . . Albany Holbrook, Dorothy Anna, Junior...........Ashland Holbrook, Ruby, Junior................Camesville Holliday, H. C.. Special .................Athens Hollis, M. D., Freshman..........Ft. Monroe. Va. Hollis, R. F., Sophomore................Amcricus Holt. Daniel Vercil. Jk„ Freshman .... Albany Hood, Dorothy, Freshman.................Columbus Mood. Samuel, Freshman..................Commerce Hooks. Robert G., Junior................Amcricus Hope, Charles Anderson. Freshman - - Gainesville Hopkins, Lindsay, Freshman...............Atlanta Horton, Dan Webster, Jr., Junior . Durham, X. C. Horton, Oze F., Jr., Junior..............Atlanta Hosch, Willie Hill. Special...........Louisville Houston, Joe Lofton. First Year Lazo . . Sylvester Howard, Marion L.. Junior................Augusta Howell, Claude S.. Freshman.........Suffolk. Va. Howell, Luther. Sophomore..............Sale City Howell, William W.. Junior................Athens Hoynes, Thomas Maxwell. Sophomore ■ Savannah Hoynes, William Bent, Freshman . ■ . Savannah Hubbard. Buell, Jr., Freshman.............Xewuau Hubert, J. H.. Jr.. Sophomore.............Athens Hudson, Benjamin Beeland. Freshman ■ Columbus Hudson, Elizabeth. Sophomore............Vidalia Hudson. Russell Jackson, Sophomore . . Ashburn Huff. Emmett O., Junior..................Atlanta Huggins. Caroline A.. Sophomore...........Athens Huggins, Tryon Kenimer. Junior............Athens Hughes, Claude D.. First Year Laze ■ Tallulah Falls Hughes, Claude W., Freshman..............Oakwood Huches, Ralph E.. Sophomore..............Thomson Hughes, Velma, Sophomore................Pembroke Hughs, Marvin Pierce, Freshman .... X'ewnan Huculey, Mary Cleo. Sophomore............Musclln Hulbert, Marie Jones, Freshman...........Augusta Hunt, Stephen Fortson, Junior.............Athens Hurst, Cecil Pace. Freshman..............X'ewnan Hurt. Joel III, Sophomore................Atlanta Hl'SHINSKY, Sam, Freshman..............Arlington Huston, Mack D., First Year Lazo .... Columbus Hutchinson, Homer B., Freshman .... Rochelle Hutcheson, Lf.e, Freshman..............Jonesboro Hyde, Frances Elizabeth, Sophomore • ■ ■ Atlanta J. S. Tumlix, Vice-President, Sophomore Class I Ingram, Herbert R.. Sophomore...........Coleman Iverson. Robert L., Freshman.............Athens Izlar, Durham W.. Second Year Lazo . • Waycrosj J Jackson, Dorothy Isabelle. Freshman ■ • • Athens Jackson. Elmer Horace, Sophomore ■ • • Donovan Jackson, Earl Hoi.com b. First Year Law ■ . Athens Jackson, Edward W., Freshman ■ Schenectady. X". V. Jackson. Evelyn, Freshman...................... Jackson. Joseph Marion. Sophomore • ■ • Decatur Jacobs, I.oyd Louie, Freshman.........X'ewnan Jacobson. Roy Hildreth. Second Year Lazo ■ Atlanta Jardine. Dan Arthur. Freshman.........Douglas Jarmalowsky. Julian, Sophomore • • • . Eatonton Jarnigan, Milton Preston III, Junior. ■ .Athens Jarrett, Lucile R.. Sophomore..........'Center Javetz, Emanuel. Sophomore............Savannah Jenkins. Albert F., Second Year Lazo • Danielsville Jennette, John R., Second Year Lazo ■ . . Athens Jennings, Rufus B.. Second Year Lazo • • Dawson Jernican, Robert J., Junior...........Mayfield Jessup. William Lee. Freshman.........Eastman Johnson, Bernard Coleman. Freshman • . . Athens Johnson, C. M., Sophomore.................Dalton Johnson, Duskin J.. Jr.. Freshman ■ ■ • Gainesville Johnson, Herbert Foster, Jr. Junior . . . Valdosta Johnson, Joseph A.. Second Year Lazo . ■ . Albany Johnson, Leonard F.. Freshman . . . Watkinsvillc Johnson, Zachary Morris. Freshman .... Alma Johnson, Percy Stokf.lv, Jr.. Sophomore ■ • Athens Johnson, William W., Sophomore • • Washington Johnston, Cov Kelley. Second Year Lazo ■ ■ Gibson iOHNSTON. E. C.. Freshman.................Walden oiner, Foster E.. Sophomore..............Albany 0INF.R, George Jefferson, Jr , Freshman . . Camilla Jolley, Joseph P.. Freshman................Comer Jones. Ban non. Sophomore..................Athens Jones. Marvin Joseph, Sophomore.............Macon Jones. NOBLE W., Sophomore..............Savannah Jones, R. W., Special.................Wintcrvillc Jones, William Curtis. Junior..............Brooks Jones, Wilburn D., Freshman...............Adrian Jones, Wilbur Sparks. Sophomore............Mcitcr Joselove. J. F., Freshman.........Williston, Fla. rant Ktyhttf-ouc Lolver (glasses Frank Harris, Vice-President, First Year Law Class K Kaplan, Sam, Hirst Year Loti'...........Uvalda Keen, George L.. Jr., Second Year Lena . ■ ■ Macon Keene. Ralph Marion, Sophomore • ■ • Columbus Keener, Mary A.. Senior.............Rabun Gap Kelley, Emory S.. Sophomore...........Palmetto Kellogc. Forest Edwin, Freshman .... Chamblec Kelly, Lillian Claire, Junior..........Augusta Kelley, Kendrick King, Sophomore .... Atlanta Kelley, Weodington H., Freshman .... Palmetto Kemp, Wilson, Second Year Law..........Atlanta Kendrick. Sam M„ Sophomore............Columbus Keener, Cecil Ernest, Junior............Dalton Kicklighter, J. H„ Sophomore........Glcnnvillc Kilpatrick, Anne, Freshman..............Athens King, Howard L., Sophomore..............Athens Kinc. William Anson, Sophomore • • . Ft. Gaines Kincery, Andrew Jackson, First Year Low, Summit Kingman, Katherine, Freshman ... Ft. Henning Kitchens, Mrs. Julia Porter, Junior. . .Danville Kline. William A., Jr., Second Year Law, Columbus Knowlton, Lillian Drane. Sophomore ■ Amcricus Kopple, Albert M„ First Year Law .... Atlanta Koknecay, William B„ First Year Law . ■ Atlanta L Lacey, Marjorie Elizabeth . . . Union Park, Fla. Freshman Lamar, Mary, Junior........................Athens Lam back, Sam Palmer, Sophomore .... Augusta Lambert, James Gardner. Sophomore • Thomasvillc I.AMIIKE, Ella R„ Irregular................Athens Lanford, Leroy Carruth. Junior.............Tucker Langford, George R„ Sophomore • • . Danielsville Lankford, Georce McCauley, Freshman ■ . Lyons Lasseter. Bill, Freshman...............Fitzgerald Lattay, James Boyd, Junior...............Crawford Lautzeniiisex. Glenn Bruce, Junior- . . .Atlanta Lawrence. Alexander Atkinson, Junior ■ Savannah Lazarus. Margaret I.ila, Sophomore • • Brunswick Lea, Petf.r Lowry, First Year Low..........Athens Leavy, C. H„ Jr., Second Year Low • . Brunswick Ledos, Milton S„ Sophomore................Atlanta Leckie, James Norman, Sophomore. . . . Moniac Lee, Bertie Mae. Sophomore.............Statesboro Lee, J. Harry, Freshman..................Waycross Lee, Pinkney Hair. Sophomore ■ . Williston, S. C. Lee, Robert Earl, Junior..........Williston, S. C. I-egwen, William A., Junior..............Augusta Leonard, F.mory S., Freshman............Waycross Lesser, Frank S., Sophomore.................Rome Lester, Frank Wood, Sophomore ■ . . .Montezuma Lester, Jewell, Junior......................Rome Lester, Martha Ruprecht, Junior .... Augusta Levington, Herbert, Freshman............Savannah Levkoff. Sanford Abram, Freshman . . . Augusta Levy, Hyman Sidney, Second Year Law, Savannah Levy. Samuel H., Sophomore .... Ansonia, Conn. Lewis, Hal Graham, Freshman .... Greensboro Lewis, Elize W„ Junior...................Calhoun Lewis, Walton Felker, Second Year Ijxw, Monroe Lightfoot. Dozier Millard. Freshman . . . Athens I.issner, John J., Jr„ First Year Low, Brunswick Little. Fannie Jo, Sophomore.............Cordelc Little, William Douclas. Junior...........Sparta Logan, Alfred Escoe, Irregular...........Lavonia Lokev, Hugh M„ Jr., Junior...............Atlanta Lokey, Thomas Hamilton, Freshman - • - Atlanta Looney, Helen Victoria, Freshman . . Wintcrvilie Lott. Oscar, Jr., Freshman..............Waycross Lott, Thomas Purse, Freshman............Waycross Loveless, Oliver Frederick. Freshman, Thomasvillc Lowry, Georgia Crews. Irregular...........Athens Luckey, Juanita, Junior..................Augusta Lumpkin. Frank Grieve, First Year Low, Columbus Lundy, Walter Hillyer. Junior..........Sylvester Lunsford, W. F., Freshman...........Watkinsvillc Lyles, Claud Parker, Freshman . • . Marshallville M Maddox, John W., Freshman..................Rome Mafkett, Herbert Sidney, Freshman ■ ■ ■ Atlanta Macid. I-ouis Borris, Jr., Sophomore, Tallulah Lodge Magrudf.r. Richard S., First Year Law . . . Athens Magill, Jack, Freshman.................Hartwell Mallard, John Clyde. Freshman .... Statesboro Mallard, Leo, Junior.................Stateshoro Mallory. R. B., Jr.. First Year J.aw.......Clyo Malone, Rosser Adams, Jr,, First Year Law, Albany Manley, William Fletcher, Freshman . Madison Mann. Ethelyn Livingston, Sophomore ■ Decatur Manning, Mary W.. Freshman.............Marietta Manning, Mildred, Freshman...........Fitzgerald Marbury, James Hoyt, Sophomore .... Newman March BANK. Delia Modane, Freshman, Gainesville Markey, John Minta, Freshman .... Waycross Martin, Edward Chandler. Freshman . . Moultrie Martin, George Harold. Sophomore ■ • • Norwood Martin, Gerald W.. Freshman . . • Brooklyn, N. Y. Martin, Harold H., Freshman............Commerce Martin, Joe Bernard, Second Year Law, Hartwell Martin, William Horace, Sophomore, Granite Hill Mathews, Andrew Jackson, Senior . . . Cuthbcrt Mathews, Susan, Irregular..............Cuthbcrt Matthews, Arthur I... Jr., Freshman • Fayetteville Matthews. Daniel Herman, Sophomore, Talbotton Mattox, James C. Sophomore.............Elbcrton Maxwell, Ben Rf.ese. Freshman.............Rydal Maxwell, James E., Freshman...........Lexington Maynard, Marvin Junius, Freshman . . . Athens Meadows, John Crawford. Sophomore • • • Vidolia Meakin, Sophie Lou, Freshman............Atlanta Means, Muriel Rebecca. Sophomore .... Athens Means, W. H.. Sophomore.................Zchulon Medlin, John Jeptha, Jk., Sophomore - • • Monroe Meeks, Alton Piiinizy, Junior...........Nicholls racie Etohtv-tK Lolver 0asses Meeks, Daniel Gilbert. Sophomore.........Ocilla Mem.. Patrick Hues, Freshman.............Athens Meltzer. Louis L.. Freshman................... Mentzek, M. Richard, Sophomore..........Atlanta Mercer, James A.. Freshman.............Tcnnillc Mercier, Leo, Sophomore.....................11a Metiivin, Thomas J., First Year Lazo . Georgetown Metz, Junius Davis. First Year Laze • • • Atlanta Meyers, Marcuerite Helen, Sophomore, Columbus Michael, James William, Freshman .... Athens Middleton. Osgood Dilworth, Freshman, Atkinson Mikell, Robert Felton, Sophomore . . . Statesboro Milhollin, J. H.. Second Year Lazo .... Broxton Miller, Dorothy, Sophomore.............Savannah Miller, John Lamar, Freshman..........Iron City Miller. James Steele, Sophomore. . . . Waycross Miller. Walter II.. Second Year Lazo ■ Bainbridgc Millican, Merle. Sophomore...............Athens Milton, James Ramon, Sophomore . . . Matthews Miner, I.. W., Junior...............Gainesville Minkovitz. Isaac, Sophomore............Sylvania Miscallv. Mildred. Sophomore...........Savannah Mitchell, Joe Dale. Sophomore..........Waycross Mitchell, John Hubert, Freshman .... Lavonia Mitchell, Lathrop, Junior...........Thomasvillc Mitchell, Ora F.. Junior.................Dalton Mitchell, Roscoe William, Second Yr. Laze. Albany Mize, Benjamin Franklin, Irregular. Winterville Mobley, Albert B., Jr., Sophomore .... Atlanta Moncriek, Millard Snow, Freshman .... Albany Montfort, Eugene Earl, Jr., First Year Lazo, Athens Montgomery, Claud Howard, Freshman, Commerce Mooney, William Cotter. Freshman . . . Neuman Moore, A. C., Jr., Junior........Powder Springs Moore. Donald La Verne. Freshman .... Athens Moore, Jonathan Threatt, Jr.. Freshman. Jackson Morgan, Charles A., Jr., Freshman ■ . • Columbus Morgan. Mary, Junior....................Lavonia Morris, Brad, Sophomore..............Maysvillc Morris, Gladys, Junior..................Uvalda Morris, Hoi.lis Earl, Second Year Lazo ■ ■ Atlanta Morris, Sarah McCurdy, Junior...........Athens Morton, J. C.. Freshman................Waycross Morton. John Harris, First Year Lazo .... Gray Morton, Martha Louise, Junior............Athens Morton, William Robert, Sophomore • • . Athens Moss. Sead J., Jr., Sophomore...........Atlanta Mundy, William W., Jr„ Sophomore . . Ccdartown Murdock, James F„ Sophomore ■ • Stone Mountain Murphy, Richard William, Freshman • Savannah Murray, Oscar Beryl, Freshman.........Rossvillc Myers, Henry Tift, Junior................Tilton Myers, Sadie McCoy, Freshman.............Athens McArthur, Henry Duncan, Freshman, McGregor McClatchey. Homer R., Sophomore ■ ■ • Columbus McClellan. Daniel W„ First Year Law • Waycross McClung, Jim Hill. Freshman..............Dawson McCollum, Elliott P.. Sophomore • ■ Thomasvillc McCommon, James E.. First Year Lazo • ■ Thomson McCommon, Rollin M,, Sophomore ■ ■ Greensboro McCord, Frank. Freshman...............Covington McCord, James R., Freshman............Covington McCoy. W. Sumter, Freshman ■ • • Abbeville. S. C. McCrary. II. W„ Second Year Iaszo . Bickncll, Jnd. McCrary, Stewart L.f Freshman...........Royston McCutchen, Frank Kelly, Second Yr. Lazo, Dalton McDaniei., J. R.. Sophomore..............Dexter McDonald, James J., Freshman...........Cuthbcrt McDonald, Joe Norman, Sophomore ■ Hazlehurst Harold Rasnake. Vice-President, Freshman Class McDonald. William Francis...........Gainesville McDorman, Eliza Cobb. Junior.............Athens McDoUGALD, W. E., Jr.. Junior........Statesboro McDuffie, Gertrude. Freshman .... Camcsville McGaughey. Cliff H., Freshman...........Atlanta McGee, Mary D., Junior..................Roberta McGee, R. M., Junior....................Raymond McGregor, Joan, Freshman.................Athens McKenney. Henry Reid, Freshman . . . Woodbury McKinley, Howard Lindsay, Junior, Wheatland, Ind McLauchlin, Charles F.. Sophomore • • Columbus McLeroy, Hugh Finley, Junior.............Athens McMillan, Mary Ellen, Sophomore . Clarkcsvillc McMillkn, Wallace Lee. Freshman . . . Pittsburg McNamara. James, Sophomore...............Albany McPhaul, Margaret E., Irregular, Belle Vernon. Pa. McRea, Mary 1 orcas, Freshman . . . Ml. Vernon McTigue. Jof.. Freshman..............Nashville, Tcnn. McWhirter, Lucy Elizadeth. Freshman . . Athens McWhirter, Oscar Marvin, Senior .... Athens N Nance, Ruby Mae. Sophomore............Dun woody Nance, Robert F.. Sophomore.............Atlanta Napier, Joseph Hamilton. Jr.. Sophomore, Macon Nathan, Irving S., Sophomore............Ashburn Neal, James C, Junior...................Thomson Nesbitt, Arthur, Junior.........Fairvicw, X. C. Nessmith, Gordon, Junior.............Statesboro Newton, Albert Sidney, Freshman..........Millcn Nichols, Gfx rce Durward, Sophomore • • • Jesup Nicholson, John Pettktt. Sophomore ■ • Marietta Nightingale, Michael, Sophomore..........Athens Nix. Joseph D„ Freshman................Commerce Nix, Lois Sue. Junior..................Rockmart Nixon, Gwinn Huxley, Second Yr. Lazo. Augusta Nixon, William Fred, First Year Lazo - ■ Newnan Norris, Sarah Emily. Junior.............Augusta Norton, Betty Stoddard, Sophomore ■ ■ • Cornelia Norton, Fred Andrew. Sophomore ■ • Lithia Springs Nunn, Patrick Claiborne, Freshman • • Davisboro O O’Berry. Robert Charles. Sophomore ■ ■ Waycross Odum, Sam. Freshman....................Waycross Odum, Frances, Freshman...............Covington Odum, Walton Vernon, Sophomore • • • Waycross Oglesby, Mabel Argvlp., Freshman.........Athens Pa'je ft-jhtt three4 Loluer 0asses iSllSiPiiPr Oglesby, Moselle Cars UK ix. Junior.......Athens Oglesby, Rebecca Wright, Sophomore . . . Athens O’Kelley, George. Sophomore..........Wintervillc Oliver, George M„ Junior................Americas Oliver, John Cantev, Sophomore .... Valdosta Oliver. Joseph McDonald, First Yr. Law, Savannah Oliver. Perry Staton. Junior.........Gainesville O'Neill. James Howard, Freshman • ■ Union Point Okr, Evelyn, Junior......................Calhoun Okr. James Darby. Freshman..............Tennille Okr, Mary Louise, Jut.ior................Calhoun Okr. Winifred, Sophomore..................Athens Oksini. Felice M., Junior...............Savannah Osborne. David Francis. Freshman . ■ Watkinsville Owen, Henry Pierce. Freshman .... McDonough Oxford, James Clay. Junior................Concord P Padrick. Elizabeth Idelle. Junior........Tifton Pace. Weyman O., Sophomore...............Monroe Palmer, Henry G.. Sophomore • • Cheyenne, Wyo. Palmer. Millard H., Jr.. Junior . Cheyenne. Wyo. Palmour. James E.. Jr.. First Year Law ■ Gainesville Pariiam. Stith Anderson. Sophomore, College Park Paris, Thomas Hanie, Sophomore • • • Gainesville Park, Hugh Alonzo. Jr.. Freshman■ . .Tennille Park. Mary Holt. Freshman................Athens Parker. Carl Oliver. Junior..............I Livonia Parker. Hugh. Junior....................Lavonia Parker, Rudolph, Sophomore...............Milieu Parker, Wilmer Alfred. Freshman .... Milieu Parks. Jack J., Freshman.................Xcwnan Parks, William Hutchinson, Sophomore, Xcwnan Parr, Jack E., Freshman..................Athens Paschal. Paul Holmes. First Year Ltrw • ■ Monroe Patrick, James Harden. Jr., Sophomore, Montezuma Patrick. LaTrelle. Junior.............Jefferson Patz. Madelyn. Freshman................Elberton Payne, Calvin Lee. Freshman.........Daniel'villc Payne. Rufus Floyd. Freshman . Copperhill, Tenn. Peacler. Willie K.. Freshman.........Homerville Pearl, RoSIXa, Junior...................Augusta Peeler, Julian C.. First Year Law . . . Woodland Peevv, Orion J.. Sophomore.........Fayetteville Pennington, Andrew Floyd. Sophomore, Matthews Pennington. Winnie Lou, Freshman .... Dexter Penny, Mrs. Margaret K.. Junior..........Athens Persons. Robert Ogden. First Year Law, Forsyth Petty, Harry S., Junior...................Dawson PiitLURicK, Hazel. Sophomore...............Baldwin Phillips, Jewett Allen, Freshman............Athens Phillips, James Middleton, Sophomore, Savannah Phillips, Keelv X., Sophomore...............Athens Phillips, Mary Whit, Freshman...............Monroe Phillips, Thelma Lee, Sophomore ■ - Social Circle Phillips, Zelia. Junior..................Cedartown PiiiNiZY, Frank Hamilton, Sophomore • ■ Augusta Pilgrim, George E., Sophomore..........Gainesville Pikki.e. Bei.den E.. Sophomore..............Buford Pittman. Clarence, Freshman...............Commerce Pit.xer, Joneil B.. Irregular...............Athens Polhill, Rutherford B.. Freshman..............Rome Pom’erance. Joseph Bernard, Suphomore. Augusta Poktmax. Harry Jacob. Sophomore • ■ • Savannah Potter, James Theodore, Junior . . . • Cloudland Powell, Alver B., Sophomore...........Wrightsville Powell, Hattie. Freshman ................Sylvester Powell, Thomas Roy, Junior.............Union Point Powers, Laura, Special......................Athens Preston, Prince H., Jr., Sophomore • ■ Statesboro Prickktt, Leila. Freshman...................Athens Prickett, Reba, Irregular...................Athens Prindle, Harlow R.. Junior................Amcricus Pritchard, Charles R.. Junior................Macon Pritchard. George Barnard. Junior ■ ■ • Savannah Pkoutor, Agnes Kimberly, Junior.............Athens Proctor, Elizabeth, Junior .... Warm Springs Prosser, Julian B., Freshman. .... Sandersvillc Purvis, Mattox L., Sophomore.................Mcndes R Rabun. William Franklin. Freshman - • • Vidalia Raisty. Mrs. Jewell, Sophomore...........Athens Randolph, Dorothy Louise, Junior .... Jefferson Randolph, Joseph Donald. Junior .... Jefferson Rasnake, James Hamilton. Freshman • . . Atlanta Rauschenberg. Gerhardt Henry, Freshman. Dalton Rawls, Ben Hill, First Year Law • . Wright sville Rayle. Mrs. May Smith. Irregular.........Athens Read, Lucia, Junior ,....................Athens Redman, John Arhur, First Year Law. .Jackson Redmond, Dwight W., Sophomore...........Cochran Reed, Buford B.. Sophomore............Lincoln ton Reeder. Tiios. H., Jr.. Freshman........Atlanta Reese. Xei.le M„ Irregular...............Athens Reiiberg, John Melvin. Freshman...........Cairo Reid. Bertam S., Sophomore..............Cordcle Rf.id, Frances E.. Freshman ■ • ■ Lcaksvillc, N. C. Reid. John Elmer, Junior................Chiplcy Rf.id. Robert Lee. Freshman . . . Bowdon Junction Reinhardt, Ida A„ Irregular..............Athens Renfroe. Riley, Junior..................Quitman Rice, Catherine. Sophomore.............Commerce Rice. Georgia T.. Sophomore............Commerce Rich, William G.. Freshman...........Bainbridgc Richards. Albert Glenn, Jr., Junior .... Athens Richardson, Tom V.. Freshman...........Hartwell Richter. Rudolph Cooper, Sophomore ■ ■ Savannah Ridgway. Lat, Sophomore...................Canon Rincel, Hubert Arthur. Junior...........Atlanta Rivers, Georce Emory, Sophomore...........Avcra Rivers, William Fay, Freshman.........Stapleton Roberts, Mary F., Junior................Douglas Robertson, Edward IL, Junior.............Guyton Robinson. Henry Grady, Freshman . • Spring Place Robinson, James Marion, First Year J.aw . Elberton Robison, Alice Louise. Junior.............Monroe t’QU Lfjhly fourLolver 0asscs J v S3«mu2 ss r Roden, Rocer, Freshman...................Athens RocerS. Jack, First Year Law...............Rome Rogers. Martha Worth, Sophomore • • • • Atlanta Rogers, V. IX, Jr., Freshman.........Pittsburg Rose, John Graham, Freshman..............Athens Rosenthal, Maxwell, Junior.............Savannah Ross. Alexander M., Ill, Freshman. ■ Chicago. 111. Rothstein, Bennie, First Year Laze. .Gainesville Roux, Hoxack Remshart, Freshman - ■ - Savannah Rowe, M. A,, Sophomore....................Comer Rowland, Ivrnest Cleve, Freshman. • • • Pittsburg Russell. Fielding Dillard. Sophomore. • • Winder Rvals, James Harris, Freshman. .... Savannah Ryals, Mrs. Walter Lewis, Irregular . . • Athens S Sakkold, Thos. P., Freshman............Savannah Sailors, Edith Carolyn, Freshman........Athens Sailors, Ruth, Sophomore ................Athens Sala. Weldon Lee, Second Year I.aw • • • Atlanta Sams, Frank, Junior......................Dalton Sams, Walter Aucustus, Jr.. Sophomore • Athens Samuels, Irving Lewis. Junior...........Atlanta Samuels, Jeannette, Freshman...........Thomson Sanford, Sanford W„ Freshman...........Augusta Sawyer, Samuel Theodore, Jr.. Freshman ■ Denton Scarborough, Eber Leila, Freshman .... Athens Scarborough, John Clemons, Sophomore. Savannah Schaad. Elizabeth Joan, Sophomore . • • Augusta Schilling, Charles Frederick, Freshman. Marietta Schmidt, Henry Louis, Jr., Freshman ■ . Augusta Scheussler, Wesley, Freshman ■ • • Roanoke. Ala. Scoggins, Clifford. Freshman.............Athens Scott, Mrs. Aggie Dean, Speeial..........Athens Scott, Thomas J,. Second Year Law • • • Valdosta Searcy, Floyd H„ Freshman.................Cairo Segars, R. P.. Junior....................Athens Sells, Wm. Mattison, Junior.............Augusta Selman, Joseph Rodert, Freshman. .... Atlanta Sewell Ciiesley Hoke, Freshman .... Lavonia Shackelford, Powers W., Freshman ■ . . Greenville Siiarpe, William V., III. Sophomore • • Waycross Sharpley, John Gartner, Freshman. . . Savannah Shattuck, V. J., Jr., Junior.........LaFaycttc Shearouse, F. H., Second Year Lerw • • Springfield Shedd, Alton, Sophomore...................jesup Shensky, Meyer E„ Second Year Law • Savannah Shepard, Karl, Sophomore.................Docrun Shepard, Wm. Raymond, Junior.............Docrun Shepherd, Edward P., Freshman .... Columbus Shepherd, Ida Lucile, Sophomore .... Rebecca Shepherd, LaL’na E., Sophomore ■ • • Social Circle Sheppard, James Clarence, Senior..........Avcra Sherman, Marion Hilton, Junior. .... Blakely Sherrod, Robert I... Junior.........Thomasville Shirley, Ronr. Edward Lee, Junior........Plains Shivers. Carolyn A., Junior.............Augusta Shull, Rout. Eugene, Freshman.........Lexington Sibley, Gf.orce Royal, Jr., Freshman . . . Augusta Simpson. Emily. Junior...................Athens Sims, Mary Ella, Junior................Commerce Sims, Thomas Bryant, Second Year Lazo. Douglas Sims, Vivian Lee. Freshman..............Colbert Singleton, R. Claude, Junior.........Alpharetta Skinner, Egan Greer, Jr., Freshman . ■ . Atlanta Skinner, Franklin M., Sophomore • • Waynesboro Slate. Samuel Jordan, Jr., Sophomore. • Columbus Slaughter, Nell, Freshman.................Athens W. L. Jessup, Secretary-T rcasurcr. Freshman Class Slayton, H. H., Jr„ Sophomore.Daytona Beach. Fla. Sloan, McArthur. Sophomore . • • • Hawkinsvillc Smith. A. I.., Sophomore.............Barnesvillc Smith. Bernice E„ Junior..................Athens Smith. Conril B., Junior.................Atlanta Smith. Curtis Jr., Sophomore. .... Augusta Smith, Ernest M., Freshman.............McDonough Smith, H. Grace. Junior..................Atlanta Smith, Hoke, Sophomore...................Sargent Smith. Helen. Sophomore .................Warthcn Smith, Henry Cliffoxd, Freshman. ■ - • Columbus Smith, Hal M., Freshman....................McRae Smith, James Henry, Jr., First Year Laze. Griffin Smith, Leo, Sophomore Pearson Smith, Fred Loyd, Freshman...............Thomson Smith, Louise A., Freshman................Athens Smith, Otis F... Jr., Sophomore........Gramville Smith, Palmer M., Freshman................Athens Smith, Robt. Thomas, Sophomore...........Tignali Smith, Shelby. Jr., Sophomore............Atlanta Smith, Victor Olvin, Sophomore...........Thomson Smith, Warren R., Sophomore ■ . • • .Barnesvillc Southwell, M. C.. Freshman............Reidsvillc Spano, Frank, Sophomore.................Columbus Sparks, Stella, Special .... Charlottesville, Va. Spencer. S. M„ First Year Laze .... Eutaw, Ala. Spetii, Dorothy C.. Freshman.............Augusta Spiers, James Franklin, Freshman. • . . Brooklet Spiers, Rassif. E., Freshman..........Lincolnton Spivey, Dennis D., Sophomore............ Monroe Stanley, Burwell P„ Freshman..............Athens Starr, !. M„ Jr.. Freshman..............Lithonia Steed, Mrs. Rudye T., Junior.............Statham Stein, Jean. Freshman.........Jacksonville. Fla. Stelling, Howard Cree, Freshman .... Augusta Stephens, Earnest L., Freshman............Dublin Stephens, Harriet, Junior..............Brunswick Stephens, James F„ Freshman .... Cartcrsville Stephenson, Mei.l Manlf.y. Jr., Sophomore, Athens Stevens. Wither Jennings, Freshman . . . Athens Steves. Wilbert Luther, Junior...........Atlanta Stewart, Gregory Edward. Junior .... Fitzgerald Stewart, Mary Frances. Junior ............Athens Stewart, W. S.. Freshman..............Ochlochncc Still. Ruby Lillian, Freshman.............Monroe Stinson, Earl John, Sophomore.............Athens Stocks. Joe T., Freshman................Leesburg Stokely. Ernestine. Freshman............Crawford Stukely. Eunice Farr, Junior............Crawford Stone, Makcaret Gould, Sophomore .... Atlanta Pa-jc Eighty teeLolver (glasses Story, Earl Pasciial. Freshman..........Appling Strain, Hen Bradford. Freshman...........Dalton Strain. Julius K.. Junior..................Rome Stratford, W. G.. Jr.. Sophomore .... Columbus Strickland, Fisher. Freshman............Rovston Strickland, Thomas R, Sophomore............Rome Strickland, Weyma.n. Junior ............Chiplcy Strong, Frances K.. Junior...............Ncwnan Strother. Francis Coleman. Freshman ■ • ■ Perry Stuckey. William Sylvester. Sophomore, Eastman Sti rtevant, Lillian M„ Freshman • . • Savannah Sumerfokd. W. T., Sophomore..........Rcidsvillc Surface. T. J.. First i’ear Law . Christ iausburg, Va. Sutherland, Carl Thomas. Junior. . . Adairsville Swan, R. P. Wren, Sophomore............Matthews Swanson, William R., First Year Law • Fairborn T Tador. Rutii. Junior.................Wayneslwro Talmaoce, Sam McNeill. Freshman .... Athens Taneniiaum, Max Manuel, Junior. . . .Augusta Tarver. Francis L., Freshman.............Guyton Tassopoulos, Spero. Sophomore..........Savannah Tate, Fairsii Carter, Freshman .... Fairmount Tate. Philip May. Junior..............Fairmount Tatum, George Wilbur. Freshman ... Ft. Gaines Taylor. John D.. -Jr.. First Year Law. Summerville Tenkniiaum. Michael, Sophomore • • . Savannah Terry, Guyton Odis. Sophomore. ..... Albany Tiiarpe, W. D.. Jr.. Freshman........Ft. Valley Thomas. Ernest Walburn, Freshman • . - Athens Thomas. Hunter W„ Freshman..............Atlanta Thomas. Jewell. Junior..................Statham Thomas, John W„ Freshman...............Tennillc Thomason. C. G.. Sophomore...............Athens Thomason, Owen W., Second Year Law ■ Columbus Thompson, Delmar, Freshman.............Tennillc Thompson. L. E., Second Year lutzo . ■ Millcdgcviltc Thompson, Rose. Sophomore ..... White Plains Thompson, Ruby, Freshman.................Athens Thompson, Richard A., Freshman. . .Ccdartown Thompson, William G.. Freshman .... Savannah Thornton, James 1)., Jr.. Junior.........Athens Thornton, James Francis. Sophomore ■ ■ • Athens Thornton. VESTER K.. Freshman ■ . . Watkinsville THkELKELD. Harry H.. Jr.. Freshman . . . Albany Thurmond. Albert Kenneth. Junior. . . . Atlanta Tiuuetts. Carl L'ssery. Freshman.........Athens Ticknor. Wm. E.. Freshman..............AIIkjiiv Tietze, Richard G.. Freshman • • Brooklyn. X. Y. Tillman, John. Freshman.................Quitman Tirus. Robert L , Freshman...........Fort Valley Todd, Fi.sif. Estelle. Freshman.....Wintcrvillc Todd, Peyton H.. Jr.. First Year Law . . . Atlanta Tollerson, Ernest D.. Sophomore. .... Franklin Tomberlin. Thelma, Freshman............Shingler Tracy. William S.. Freshman...........Sylvester Travis, William Livingston. Sophomore. Savannah Tumlin. John Sigman. Sophomore • • College Park Turner. Thomas Leslie. Sophomore • • • 1-aGrangc Turner. Wilmer W., Freshman .... McDonough Tvus, William Haynes. Sophomore • . . - Griffin U Upchurch, Charles Burnard, Freshman . . Athens Upson. Marie, Junior.....................Athens Upson, Stephen, I... Junior..............Athens Usher, Wiley R . Freshman...........Springfield V Van De Grift. Edward R„ Sophomore ■ • • Macon Varner. Sarah O.. Sophomore • • Powder Springs Vaughan, Albert T., Freshman . . Greenville. S. C. Vaughan, John R.. Sophomore.........Vienna Vauciian, Walter A.. Junior............Carrollton Ventulbtt. Tom Walker, Jr.. Sophomore • Albany VerNooy, Montine. Junior............Athens Vinson. Thomas M.. Jr.. Sophomore ■ ■ ■ Valdosta Voigiit. George Frank, Sophomore • • ■ Blackshcar W Wadley. W. M.. Freshman..................Waycross Wages, Albert Morgan. Sophomore .... Athens Walden, Spencer C. Jr.. Second Year Law, Albany Walker, Billington Sanders, Sophomore. Macon Walker, Josephine, Freshman ...............Athens Walker. Warren. Junior....................Augusta Wall. Margaret. Freshman.................Richland Wallace. Wm. Gordon. Sophomore . • . Chamblce Walter. Leonard. Freshman • • • Stonewall. Miss Walters. Allen Jackson, Freshman . Eastonollec Walters, Helen E., Sophomore..............Augusta Walters. Julian, Sophomore................Atlanta Walton. I.eon Monroe. Freshman............Atlanta Warneli.. Harold B.. Freshman .... Pembroke Wardlaw. Ralph W., Sophomore • • • New York Warning, William, Freshman . . . Homewood. III. Warren. James Ben. Freshman................Athens Wartmom. Albert, Freshman...............Roopvillc Watson. Maurice B.. Sophomore..............Athens Wattekson. Mrs. Bob, Special...............Athens Waugh, Arm in Chas.. Freshman.............Atlanta Waugh, Richard Gordon, First Year f.aw. All»any Weatherford. I.. E., Sophomore.............Athens Weatherly, Kingsley, Freshman.............Atlanta Weave . Leila Mae. Sophomore .... Ccdartown Weaver. Maxwell D.. Junior ■ .... - Savannah Webb. Joe. Second Year Law...............Elbcrton Wef.ms. Elisha J.. Sophomore...............Luclla Weems. Julian T.. Jr.. Freshman ■ • . McDonough Wehunt. Winnie Lf.e. Freshman . ■ Wintcrvillc Weinstein, Abe, Freshman.................. Macon Weinstein, Julius, Second Year Law. . .Macon WeitZ. Frank. Freshman...................Savannah Weitz. Minnie, Sophomore.................Savannah Wellborn. Samuel M.. Jr.. Sophomore . Columbus Wells. S. F.. Junior................... Hapeville West, Charles C, Freshman...................Macon West. Jesse K.. Sophomore.................Ashhurn Westbrook. Dorothy. Freshman .... Columbus Westbrook. J. C.. Freshman.........Scbriitg. Fla. Westbrook, J. R.. Sophomore...................Ila Whatley. Jno. C.. First Year Law. . . .Augusta Whatley. Victoria. Junior...............Montezuma Whklchel, I.ynn W.t Sophomore.............Douglas Whitaker. Sara. Junior.....................Harlem White. Edmondson Ware. First Year l.aw, Athens White. Henrietta, Freshman...............Cliiplcv White. John H.. First Year Law. . . .Alabama White. Millepge. Sophomore..............Sylvester Whitehead. Sarah, Junior..................Atlanta Whitley, Martin, Sophomore.............Fitzgerald Whittle. Emory. Freshman...................Dexter Wiggins, Ralph Lionellf., Second Year Law. Avcra Wightman. J. D.. First Year Law. . .Jacksonville Wilder. Buford Sanders. Freshman .... Musclla WilENSKV. Gertrude D.. Sophomore . . . Savannah Page EightyLolver (passes Wiley, Mrs. Annie V.f Irregular . • • Blackshcar Wilev. Edwin DeWitt, Junior. ..... - Sparta Wilkins, Helen M., Junior.................Kenwood Wilkins. S. B.. Jr., Freshman..............Athens Wilkinson, James C. Second )’ear I.a to, Xewnan Williams. Duchess, Junior .................Athens Williams, Herbert Maxwell. Sof horn ore. Atlanta Williams, James A.. Jr., Freshman ■ ■ Wintcrville Williams, Jas. D., Freshman............Stockton Williams. Mary Frances, Freshman ■ . . Atlanta William, Mildred, Sfecial..................Athens Williams, Ruth, Junior.......................Hull Williams, Mrs, Ruth Scott. Junior .... Athens Williams, R E.. Freshman.................Stockton Williams, Shelby Frances, Sophomore • ■ Atlanta Willis, Clarence Hill. First Year Law, Barncsvillc Wills. Wm. Rali'h. Sophomore...............Athens Wilson, Berry. Sophomore .... Owensboro, Ky. Wilson, Hal M., Freshman............. . Savannah Wilson, Ralph S.. Sophomore..............Dublin Wingfield, Joe Alexander. Freshman ■ . . Athens Wingfield, Rout. S., Sophomore...........Athens Winston. A. Penn. Jr„ Freshman.............Athens Wise. Elizabeth F.. Junior.................Sumter Witcher, Rotrr. Hale, Sophomore ..... Carlton Withers, Wm. Banks. First Year Law. ■ Moultrie Wolfe, David M„ Sophomore.................Augusta Wolff, Bernard P., Sophomore..............Atlanta Womack, Charles H.. Junior..............- DcSoto Wommack, Jerry L.. Sophomore.............Tcnnille Wood. Wm. F.dgar. Junior................Covington Woodall, Johnston C, Sophomore • . . Columbus Woods, Ferris Whitney, Jr.. Freshman. . Atlanta Woodward, M. S., Jr., Freshman .... Bartlesville Woody, John C., Freshman.............Daniclsvillc Wooldridge, James M„ Sophomore .... Midland Wright. John Goode, First Year Law. . Philomath Y You MANS. K. A.. Sophomore............Lvons. Young, Melba, Freshman..............Valdosta Young, Robt. James, Sophomore..........Macon Young, Willis E., Sophomore...........Winder Z Zant. Aj. Edwin, Sophomore..........Valdosta Zkesman. Bennie, Freshman..............Milan ©the) Qlass Officers Harold Grigcs..........President Freshman Class Robert Young...........President Soplioinore Class Hoyt Williams . Secretary-Treasurer Junior Class Rov Jacobson, Sccy-Treas. Second Year Law Class Page KightgievenThe first Creek letter fraternity at the I nnersity was established a few days before the reopening, of the institution after the Civil War three men who before the war had been members of Sigma Alpha Epsilon at the Georgia Military Institute formed Georgia liela chapter of S. A. December 31. iS6y.Qeorgia paternities Before the Civil War there were no Greek letter fraternities at the University. I he two literary societies, Dcmosthenian and Phi Kappa, contained all the activities with which Georgia students busied themselves. Entering with great vigor into the debates of the two societies, the students divided into two competing, and occasionally hostile, camps. This continued the situation during the entire early history of the University. With the reopening of the University, and, indeed, a few days before it, a fraternity first came upon the Georgia campus. As the page which introduces the fraternity section shows, three members of Sigma Alpha Epsilon at Georgia Military Institute formed after the war Georgia Beta chapter of S. A. E., the first fraternity at the University. The date of founding was December 31, 1865, twelve days before the reopening of the University. The first chapter actually founded, however, was Chi Phi, which was chartered in 1867 by the Virginia chapter. The late Dr. Henry Clay White, for many years professor of chemistry at the University, was secretary of the Virginia chapter of Chi Phi and issued the charter to the Georgia chapter. Kappa Alpha was established in 1868, and Phi Delta Theta in 1871. It was in the early seventies that fraternities at Georgia encountered the opposition which they always seem to have attracted at one stage or another of their existence. The board of trustees passed a rule forbidding any student to join any secret organization “with the exception of Demosthcnian and Phi Kappa societies,” and required every student to swear before registering that he was not a member of a fraternity. This rule continued in effect for several years, and was only repealed because of the active fight made in behalf of the fraternities by Dr. Patrick I). Mcll, who refused to accept the chancellorship until the regulation was repealed. The rule was repealed in 1878, and since that time fraternities have been unmolested by University authorities. Sixteen national Greek letter fraternities are represented at the University, and one local, Tau Kappa Theta, which is petitioning Beta Theta Pi. Of these, fourteen are members of the Pan-Hellenic council, the official governing body of the Georgia chapters. The admission of women students to the University in 1918 naturally paved the way for the founding of fraternities for women students. Phi Mu established a chapter at Georgia in 1921, and was followed by Chi Omega in 1922, Alpha Gamma Delta in 1923, and Kappa Delta in 1924. These four, along with Sigma Delta Tau, a fraternity with limited membership which is not represented in the Pandora, make up the Women’s Pan-Hellenic Council. The statistics given for the fraternities were compiled from the 1926 edition of Baird’s Manual. There is probably as little ill-feeling at Georgia between members of fraternities and other students as at any other institution in the country. The unfortunate characteristics of fraternities at certain other institutions—snobbishness, banding in cliques against students not members of fraternities—are not prominent at the University. Friendships are not at all restricted to one fraternity house, and in many cases fraternity men and nonfraternity men are intimate friends. It seems reasonable to believe that this desirable state of affairs will continue, and certainly as long as it does there can be no serious thought of interference with fraternities at the University. ' tye Xinrty oneSigma cAlpha Spsiloru Sigma Alpha Epsilon was founded March 9, 1856, at the University of Alabama, University, Alabama. Georgia Beta chapter was established at the U niversity of Georgia in 1866. The colors arc Royal Purple and Old Gold. Number of active chapters is ninety-nine. Number of chapter houses owned, eighty-two. Total membership, 32,226. fraternity publication, The Record. Top row: Palmour, Hardy, Sidling, Napier, Garland, Clemmons. V. Mitchell, Collier, Hines. Second row: Cox, Maddox. L. Mitchell, Myers, Crisfield, Jones, Hodgson, H. l-okcy. Third rote: Burton, Lawrence, Vcntulctt, Claussen, Fcagin, Walker, Nash, Skinner, W. Oliver. liottoin rote: McGinty, Upson, Smith, Walker, Hopkins, Garrard, Young, Wellborn, Barrow, Lumpkin. rage Sineig-ttcoSigma cAlpha Spsiloru David H. Ansley, Junior Law..............Decatur Craig Barrow, Jk.. Junior...............Savannah Georcf. D. Brantley, Sophomore, Washington. D. C. Wynn T. Burton, Jr., Junior..............Atlanta George F. Claussen, Freshman.............Augusta R. Slaton Clemmons. Freshman Law . . . . Rome Merrill H. Collier, Senior...............Atlanta Marvin H. Cox, Freshman...............Waynesboro Sidney C. Cox, Junior.................Waynesboro George F. Crisfield. Sophomore..........Savannah John R. Dasher, Sophomore...............Valdosta Frank C. Dudley, Junior...................Athens R. Douglas Feagin, Sophomore ..............Macon John W. Garland, Jk.. Freshman . . . Barncsvillc Francis U. Garrard. Freshman............Columbus Ben H. Hardy, Jr., Senior............Barncsvillc Thomas B. Hilsman, Sophomore..............Albany McCombs Hines, Freshman I.aw ■ ■ . Millcdgcvillc Fred C. Hodgson, Freshman................Atlanta Robert G Hooks, Junior..................Amcricus Lindsay Hoi-kins, Freshman...............Atlanta J. L. Houston. Junior Law..............Sylvester Milton I . Jarnacin, HI. Junior...........Athens Joseph A. Johnson, Freshman I.aw .... Albany Ban non P. Jones. Junior..................Athens Noble W. Jones. Sophomore...............Savannah Alexander A. Lawrence, Junior...........Savannah Hugh M. Lokcv, Junior....................Atlanta T. Hamilton Lokey, Freshman..............Atlanta Frank G. Lumpkin, Sophomore..............Columbus H. R. McClatchev, Sophomore............Columbus A. Park McGinty, Senior.................Atlanta Chas. F. McLaughlin, Sophomore • . . Columbus John W. Maddox, Freshman.....................Rome James II. Makbuky, Sophomore...............Ncwnan I. athrop Mitchell, Junior..........Thomasvillc Wm. A. Mitchell, Senior Law...........Gainesville Chas. A. Morgan, Freshman................Columbus Henry T. Myers, Junior.....................Tifton J. Hamilton Napier. Sophomore..............Macon Thomas A. Nash, Senior.................Washington John C. Oliver, Sophomore................Valdosta Wm. V. Oliver. Senior...................Valdosta J. Hr nest Palmour, Junior Ijsw .... Gainesville James M. Roherts, Senior...................Monroe Fielding D. Russell, Junior . ....... Winder Franklin M. Skinner. Sophomore . . Waynesboro Palmer M. Smith, Freshman...........Tampa. Fla. Shelby Smith. Jr.. Sophomore..............Atlanta H. Cree Stilling, Sophomore........... • Augusta Stephen C. Upson, Junior...................Athens Thomas W. Ventulett, Jr.. Sophomore ■ - Albany B. Sanders Walker, Sophomore..............Macon Warren W'alker, Junior....................Augusta Samuel M. Wellborn, Sophomore .... Columbus Bernard P. Wolff, Sophomore...............Atlanta Wm. H. Young, Jr., Senior................Columbus Pane Slnctt -thrfeChi Thi Chi Phi was founded December 24, 1S24, at Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey. Eta chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1867. The colors are Scarlet and Blue. Number of active chapters is twenty-nine. Number of chapter houses owned, twenty-nine. Value of chapter houses owned, $960,000. Total membership, 9,513. Fraternity publication, the Chi Phi Chakett. Tof row: Ansley, Boland, Green. Carroll. Tahnadgc. Hurt. Brown. Courts. Middle row•' Fears. Arnold. NVitchcr. Schilling, Evins, Black. liottom row: Hill. Nunnally. Hailey, Hanson, Magid. Dunwody, Gcrdinc. Connerat. Page Vlnety-fourChi Thi William B. Ansley, Junior Low ■ Hugh E. Hailey, Freshman . . . . Thomas D. Arnold, Freshman ■ ■ ..... Atlanta W. Turnell Hanson, Freshman. • David G. Black, Junior B. Harvey Hill, Junior Joseph H. Boland. Junior. . . . William W. Howell, Junior. . . . Joseph E. Brown, Junior .... Joel Hurt, HI, Sophomore ■ ■ • - William B. Carroll. Sophomore . . . . Columbus Louis B. Macid, Sophomore ... . Tallulah Park R. V. Conner at. Freshman • • • Atlanta W. Fletcher Manly, Freshman. . Malon C. Courts. Junior .... Patrick H. Mkll, Freshman . . . . .... Athens Thurston C. Crawkord, Freshman Law, Columbus William R. Morton, Sophomore ■ ■ ■ - Wintcrvillc Donald Dunwody, Junior Law • ■ Charles B. Nunn ally. Senior . . Samuel N. Evins, Junior. . . . Atlanta Charles F. Schilling, Freshman . • - • • Marietta R. Francis Fears, Freshman . . . Samuel M. Tai.madce, Freshman . Thomas F. Gerdine, Sophomore, Sacramento, Cal. T. Augustus Witcher, Senior ■ . . John L. Green, Junior I.aw • • • Page Xintty flveKappa cAlpha Kappa Alpha was founded December 21, 1865, at Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Virginia. Gamma chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1868. The colors are Crimson and Old Gold. Number of active chapters is sixty. Number of chapter houses owned, twenty-six. Value of chapter houses owned, $500,000. Total membership, 16,752. Fraternity publication, The Kappa Alpha Journal. Tot rote: Hill Parks. Candler. Jack Parks, Talmadgc. Howell, Patterson. Oscar Lott. Purse Lott. Wad-ley, Bivins, Thomas. Middle row■ Franklin. Pound, Hayes. Smith, Lankford. Sharpe, Nixon. Simpson. Carson, Wilson, Grayson. Bottom row: Withers. Clarke. Davis, Medlin, Mallory, Strickland, Loyless, Hodgson Oliver, Mitchell. McRitchie. Po'je SiHctg sUK appa cZAlpha James M. Bivins, Freshman Law.........Moultrie John S. Candler, II. Junior............Atlanta James M. Carson, Freshman...............Tifton Wiley Clarke, Freshman................Savannah Frederick B. Davis, Sophomore.........Atlanta Harry C. Fisiier, Freshman Law.......Atlanta Joseph N. Franklin. Junior...........Columbus Leon H. Grayson, Junior.........•• • • Savannah Hunter Harris, Jr.. Sophomore...........Athens James T. Hayes, Sophomore...............Athens John MeC. Hodgson, Junior...............Athens Claude S. Howell, Freshman ..... Suffolk. Va. Martin E. Kilpatrick.‘Senior Law- ■ . .Athens Howard L. Kinc, Sophomore...............Athens George M. Lankford, Sophomore...........Lyons V«. W. Larsen, Jr., Senior Law.........Dublin Oscar Lott, Jr., Freshman............Way cross Thomas P. I.ott, Freshman............Way cross Augustus S. Loyless, Senior............Atlanta R. B. Mallory, Jr., Freshman Law..........Clyo John J. Medlin, Jr., Sophomore..........Monroe Louts H. Mitchell, Senior I.aw........Columbus Thomas B. McRitchie, Jr.. Senior Law. Newnau W. Frederick Nixon, Freshman Law - - . Xewnan Joseph M. Oliver. Senior..............Savannah Jack J. Parks, Freshman.................Newnau William H. Parks. Sophomore.............Newnau Robert L. Patterson, Jr.. Senior........Athens Edwin A. Pound, 11, Senior..............Athens William W. Sharpe, III, Junior.......Waycross Addison W. Simpson, Jr.. Senior . . . .Washington James H. Smith. Freshman Laxo..........Griffin Thomas E. Strickland, Sophomore...........Rome Harry F.. Talmadge, Senior..............Athens Hunter W. Thomas, Freshman.............Atlanta Wm. M. Wadley, Freshman...............Waycross Clarence H. Willis, Jr., Freshman Law, Barnesvillc James C. Wilkinson, Junior Law..........Xewnan Berry H. Wilson, Sophomore - ■ . Owensboro, Ky. Wm. B. Withers, Freshman I.aw..........Moultrie h'lntty net ■uThi "Delta heta Phi Delta Theta was founded December 26, 1848, at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. Georgia Alpha chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1871. The colors arc Blue and White. Number of active chapters is ninety-six. Number of chapter houses owned, eighty-three. Value of chapter houses owned, $3,000,000. Total membership, 32,090. Fraternity publication, The Scroll. Top row-' Harris, Talmadgc, Smith. Weems, Day, Brown, Montgomery, J. Lewis, Berry, McArthur. .Middle row: Askew, Polhill, Strother, Bush, Fletcher, F. Lewis, Woodward, Hardman, Rose, Lcgwcn, Westbrook. Hollow row: Easterlin, Hays, Hardy, Sanford, Crittenden, Hood, Wright, Mobley, Woodward, Hamilton. Page SinfigeightT5hi HDelta c(dheta Ben H. Askew, 111. Freshman...........Arlington Wiixiam M. Berry, Sophomore..............Sparta Herbert F. Birdsey, Sophomore.............Macon Kendrick M. Brown, Freshman..............Sharon Laukier S. Busil, Sophomore.............Camilla Thomas J. Crittenden, Freshman .... Shclltnan Hoy B. Day, Freshman .... Dawson Springs, Ky. Richard F. Dodd, Sophomore..............Atlanta Aubry E. Easterlin, Freshman. .... Amcricns R. Van Fletcher, Junior...............Jackson Nicholas E. Haley, Sophomore...........Elherton S. Eugene Haley, Freshman I.aw, Charleston, S. C. Thomas J. Hamilton, Jr., Senior.........Augusta Lamartine G. Hardman, Jr„ Sophomore, Commerce Charles L. Hardy, Sophomore.........Gainesville Frank H. Harris, Freshman Law............Winder James E. Hays, Freshman Law • • • . Montezuma John F. Hester, Sophomore................Monroe Sam C. Hood. Freshman..................Commerce William A. Legwen. Junior...............Augusta John R. Lewis, Senior.....................Monroe W. Felker Lewis, Junior Law...............Monroe Junius D. Metz. Freshman Law..........Decatur Albert B. Mobley, Sophomore...........Atlanta Claude H. Montgomery, Freshman ■ . . Commerce Henry D. McArthur, Freshman .... McGregor James H. Patrick, Sophomore............Montezuma Rutherford B. Poliiill, Freshman . - Hawkinsville J. Graham Rose, Junior Law. • • • Florence, S. C. Sanford W. Sankord, Freshman.............Augusta A. Lamar Smith, Sophomore............Barncsvillc Ernest M. Smith, Freshman.....McDonough Dennis D. Spivey, Sophomore............Monroe F. Coleman Strother, Freshman ...... Perry William R. Swanson, Freshman Law. • Fairburn Thomas R. Talmadce, Jr., Senior .... Forsyth WM. H. Tyus, Sophomore...................Griffin Julian T. Weems, Freshman..............McDonough J. C01.EV Westbrook, Freshman .... Scbring. Fla. Monroe S. Woodward, Freshman. . . - Barnesville I'aoe Xinctv-nlncSigma Chi Sigma Chi was founded June 28, 1855, at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. The Delta chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1872. The colors are Blue and Old Gold. Number of active chapters is eighty-seven. Number of chapter houses owned, seventy-two. Value of chapter houses owned, $2,215,000. Total membership, 24,185. Fraternity publication, The Magazine of Sigma Chi. Top rot?: Barnes. Watson. Fubanks, Davidson, Waugh, Benson. McClellan, Hall, W. T. Johnson. Middle row' L. N. Smith, Lctton. d'Antignac, W. V. Odum. A. W. Odum. Bates, McDonald, Ritchie, D. Cook, Harris. Bottom rot?: Florence, Walden, Y. J. Johnson, Morris. C. H. Smith. Randolph Aiken, tautzenliiser, l.ittlc. Collier. Page Onr HundredSigma Qh.i James F. Aiken . Junior..............Statesboro J. Me.Miller Barnes, Senior Lax........Waycross Hugh F. Bates. Freshman Law............Waycross Wilbert J. Bauchs , Senior.............Savannah Oscar L. Benson. Sophomore.............Marietta Jake Carlton, Freshman..................Decatur M. Arnold Collier. Freshman.............Colbert James I.. Cook. Junior...................Athens T. Dudley Cook. Senior..................Atlanta W. Vircil Cook, Freshman................Atlanta Thomas B. d’Anticnac, Sophomore ■ • • Augusta John F. Davidson, Sophomore.............Atlanta William F. Farrell. Sophomore...........Atlanta George F. Florence, Graduate.............Athens Walter T. Hall, Senior..................Atlanta James J. Harris, Junior..................Athens Donald V, Holt, Freshman.................Albany Lee Hutcheson. Freshman...............Jonesboro Roy H. Jacobson. Junior Lau.............Atlanta William T. Johnson. Senior.............Commerce V. Joseph Johnson. Senior..............Commerce Georce L. Keen. Junior Lo.v.............Atlanta W.w. B. Koknegay. Freshman I.aw. Georgetown. S. C. Glenn B. Lautzenhiser. Junior..........Atlanta J. Harry Lee. Sophomore ........ Waycross Winsor B. Letton, Senior...............Atlanta Keith B. Lewis. Senior................Nalninta Jos. D. Mitchell, Sophomore...........Waycross Hollis E. Morris. Junior Law...........Atlanta Daniel W. McClellan. Sophomore ■ • ■ Waycross James J. McDonald. Freshman...........Cutbbert W. F. McDoucald, Junior.............Statesboro A. W. Odum. Sophomore.................Waycross Walter V. Odum. Freshman..............Waycross J. Donald Randolph, Senior...........Jefferson Conril B. Smith. Junior...............Allanla Curtis F. Smith, Sophomore............Augusta Lamar X. Smith. Senior Law...........Clayton James B. Thornton. Junior.............Athens Spencer C. Walden, Junior Law...........Albany J. Dukward Watson. Senior...........Statesboro Armin Wauch. Freshman..................Atlanta Herbert M. Williams, Sophomore • • • • Atlanta Poor One Hundred and OnecZAlpha c au Omega "'" ■— ■» Alpha Tau Omega was founded September ■ i, iS65, at Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Virginia. Georgia Alpha Beta chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1878. The colors are Sky Blue and Old Gold. Number of active chapters is eighty-seven. Number of chapter houses owned, sixty-seven. Value of chapter houses owned, $1,900,000. Total membership, 22,105. Fraternity publication, The Palm. Top rotc- Hollingsworth. E. White, G. White, Ezell. Byers. H. Palnijr, Loveless, Lcavy, Connell. Middle rtn» : Moore, McCollum, R. McTiguc, J. McTigue, Carlisle, Dillard, M. Palmer, Futch, Buchanan, Arlinc. Bottom rote: Sherrod, Tharpe, Robinson, Kelley, Cumming, Fleetwood, Glcaton, Adcox, Gwyn. I'a'je One Hundred and Ttco6 tAlpha au Omega X. Victor Adcox. Freshman Laic.............Albany Thomas J. Arline. Freshman..................Cairo Frank Bryson, Freshman Late. Jacksonville. Fla. James H. Buchanan. Freshman Late. - - Jackson J. Preston Byers. Freshman...........Fstill, S. C. Ernest F. Carlisle. Sophomore.............Griffin J. Edwin Connell. Freshman..................Cairo J. Freeman Cumming. Junior Late..............Rome Stephen H. Dillard, Freshman .... Davisboro James R. Ezei.i.. Freshman..............Hillsboro Roscok G. Fleetwood. Sophomore . . . Thomasvillc T. Allen Futcii, Sophomore.........Thomasvillc Edwin S. Gleaton, S’opltomore.........Arlington Chas. R. Gwyn. Freshman................Zcbulon James F. Hollingsworth, Senior..........Athens Joseph M. Jackson, Freshman Law- . - . Decatur C. Howard Leavy, Junior J.at ..........Brunswick Oliver F. Loveless. Freshman.........Thomasvillc J. Tiireatt Moore, Freshman..............Jackson Elliott P. McCollum. Sophomore • . • Thomasvillc Joseph McTicue. Freshman .... Nashville, Tcnn. Robert E. McTicue. Senior . - - . Nashville, Tenn. Henry G. Palmer, Sophomore • . Cheyenne, Wyo. Millard H. Palmer, Junior. . . . Cheyenne, Wyo. Chas. W. Parrott, Senior................Amcricus Rouert O. Persons, Junior Late...........Forsyth Harry S. Petty, Junior....................Dawson James M. Robinson, Freshman Law • • . . Elberton Robert I.. Sherrod, Junior...........Thomasvillc W. I). Tiiarpe. Freshman.............Fort Valley Thomas L. Turner. Sophomore.............LaGrangc E. W. White. Freshman Late................Athens G. D. White, Senior...................... Athens Page One Hundred and ThieeSigma V (u Sigma Nu was founded January i, 1869, at Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Virginia. Nu chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1881. The colors are Gold, Black, and White. Number of active chapters is ninety-two. Number of chapter houses owned, seventy-four. Value of chapter houses owned, $2,1 78,000. Total membership, 21,730. Fraternity publication, The Delta. Top row: Easterling, Flournoy, Oliver. Weems, Peagler. Ginn. Woodall. Driver, Izlar, Shepherd. Middle rote: S. Kendrick. Buie, Iiafer, Slate, Barron. Hall, Franklin, Kingery. Jessup, Boyett, Brinson. Holloiu row: Threlkeld. Bird, Bruce. Bisscll. Martin, Huston, T. C. Kendrick, Kemp, Dobbs, Kline. Page One Hundred and FourAlfred L. Barron, Freshman Low..............Rome A. J. Bird, Freshman Lou•.................Metier Harry H. Bissell, Freshman........Columbus Claude Bond. Freshman.....................Toccoa Edwin S. Boyett. Senior Law..............Blakely Mose E. Brinson, Junior Law.......Waycross Charles D. Bruce, Sophomore.......Brunswick Paul D. Buie. Sophomore...........Nashville O. R. Dodds, Jr................................ E. Bradley Driver, Freshman.......Columbus Wade A. Easterling, Sophomore .... Gtcnvillc Thomas M. Flournoy, Freshman Law • Columbus Robert E. Franklin,"Freshman.............Pulaski Shelton O. Ginn, Sophomore...............Royston Harris H. Hafer, Freshman............Fort Valley Edward T. Hall, Freshman..................Dublin Frank C- Haralson, Junior........Blairsvillc Mack D. Huston, Freshman Law ■ ■ • - Columbus Wright D. Izlar, Junior Law.............Waycross Wm. L. Jessup, Freshman..................Eastman Wilson Kemp, Junior Law..................Atlanta Sam M. Kendrick, Sophomore..............Columbus Thomas C. Kendrick, Senior..............Columbus Andrew J. Kincery, Freshman Law...........Summit William A. Kline, Junior Lav.'..........Columbus Edward C. Martin, Freshman..............Moultrie George M. Oliver, Junior................Amcricus W. Kenneth Peagler, Sophomore . . . Homcrvillc Henry Y. Reeves, Senior................Sunnyside E. Porterfield Shepherd, Freshman. • . Columbus Samuel J. Slate, Junior.................Columbus Owen W. Thomason, Junior Law . . . .Columbus Haxrv H. Tiirfxkei.d. Freshman J.aw ■ . - Albany Elisiiua J. Weems, Sophomore..............Luella Vaot One Hundred and FireDelta c(5au 'Delta Delta Tau Delta was founded in 1859 at Bethany College, Bethany, West Virginia. Beta Delta chapter was established at the University of Georgia in I 882. The colors are Purple, Gold, and White. Number of active chapters, seventy-four. Number of chapter houses owned fifty-nine. Value of chapter houses owned, $2,000,000. Total membership, 21,350. Fraternity publication, the Rainbow. Tor row: Tumlin, P. Tate, Anderson, Parker, Baird. Sells. Cormany. Middle ro'.o: P. M. Tate. Cloud, Dopson, Maxwell. Weaver. T. M. Hoyncs, B. iloyncs. llotlon 1 rote: Fulghum, Glenn, Means. Tully. Robinson, Thompson, Frier. I’auc One IhtNtlrol and Six'Delta cfoau Delta Franklin X. Anderson, Sophomore ■ • • Covington W. Job Baird. Junior...................Augusta Joel Cloud, Jk.. Sophomore...........Lexington Clifford E. Cormanv. Sophomore............Rome Titov A. Davis, Sophomore...............Athens W. Carv Dickerson, Freshman.........Homcrvillc R. N. Dodson, Senior.....................McRae W. Ryan Frier. Jr.. Senior.............Dougla James F. FulgHLM, Junior...............Augusta Henry R. Glenn, Junior Law..............Athens Lot'is L. Holt, Junior Law........Sandcrsville Tom M. Hovnes, Sophomore..............Savannah W. Bent Hovnes. Freshman..............Savannah James E. Maxwell, Freshman...........1-cxington Howard Means, Sophomore.................Zcbulon Rudolph K. Parker, Sophomore.............Miilcn Wilmer A. Parker, Freshman...............Miilcn George H. Robinson. Senior........College Park Wm. M. Sells, Junior....................Augusta F. Carter Tate. Freshman..............Fairmount Philip M. Tate, Junior................Fairmount Leonard E. Thompson, Junior .... Millcdgcville James F. Thornton, Sophomore.............Athens Daniel C. Tully, Senior................Savannah John S. Tumlin. Sophomore. . . - College Park Maxwell D. Weaver. Junior...............Savannah Page Ore Hundred ond SerenChi Tsi Chi Psi was founded May 20, 1841, at Union College, Schenectady, New York. Alpha Delta chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1890. The colors are Purple and Gold. Number of active chapters is twenty-four. Number of lodges owned, twenty-one. Value of lodges owned, $1,157,500. Total membership, 7,868. Fraternity publication, The Purple and Gold. Top row: Phinizy, Latnback, Lester. Capps, Hcffcrnan, Parker, Nixon. Dolloiu row■' Jester, Sibley, I-ockhart, McMullan, Travis, Stewart, Horton, Harden. Va jc One Hundred and EightChi Tsi Chas. A. Aspinwall, Senior...............Atlanta Thomas C. Beusse, Sophomore...............Athens John J. Blount, Junior..............Hawkinsvillc V. Monteith Capps, Junior................Athens V. Jack Chaille, Junior Law .... Miami, Fla. C. Harris Crook, Freshman.................Athens Edward H. Hacev. Sophomore .... Chicago, III. Nathaniel Hancock, Junior.........Jefferson J. Leroy Hankinson, Senior.........Augusta William D. Harden, II., Senior.....Augusta James C. Harrison, Freshman........Augusta Henry J. Heffernan, Freshman Law . . Augusta Oze E. Horton. Junior....................Atlanta J. Carlton Jester, Jr., Senior............Athens Samuel P. Lam back, Sophomore.......Augusta Frank W. Lester, Sophomore.......Montezuma Malcolm M. Lockhart. Jr., Senior. . . .Decatur Frank A. McMullan, Senior.............Atlanta Francis C. Nixon, Senior..............Augusta W. Ennis Parker, Senior................Athens Frank H. Phinizy. Sophomore...........Augusta Alexander M. Ross. Freshman .... Chicago, III. WEI.DON L. Sala, Junior I.aw..........Atlanta Walter A. Sams, Sophomore..............Athens George R. Sibley, Freshman..........Augusta Franz H. Stewart, Senior............Athens W. Livingston Travis, Sophomore. ■ ■ • Savannah A. Penn Winston, Freshman..............Athens Page One Hundred and .VineKappa Sigma Kappa Sigma was founded December io, 1869, at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, irginia. Beta I.ambda chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1901. The colors are Scarlet, White, and Emerald Green. Number of active chapters is one hundred and two. Number of chapter houses owned, eighty. Value of chapter houses owned, $2,123,000. Total membership, 26,722. Fraternity publication, The Caduceus. Top row-' Taylor, Horton. R. Broach. Schcusslcr, Whitehead, McCutchen, Schmidt, Martin, J. M. Broach. Middle Row: Block. Coleman. W. Brice, Harbcr. R. Brice, Funkhouser, Warning, Tillman. Bottom row: Clarke, Cameron, Alford, Turner, Buchanan. Hays. Bradley, Estes, Touchstone. I'age One ttumtred anit TenK appa Sigma A. Kinder Alford, Freshman........Hartwell Richard X. Block, Senior Lav.............Atlanta Glenn W. Bradley, Junior.............Tampa. Fla. Roar. S. Brice, Senior...................Decatur Walter M. Brice. Senior..................Decatur J. Marion Broacii, Freshman...............Albany T. Rudolph Broacii. Freshman Lav- ■ ■ -Albany John A. Buchanan, Junior.................Atlanta Henry C. Cameron, Freshman................Albany Peter K. Clarke. Sophomore...............Atlanta John Coleman. Sophomore • ■ • • Xcwbcrry, S. C. Joe M. Collins, Junior..........Carter»vil!c Roy E. Estes, Senior Lav • • • Chattanooga. Tenn. Wm. L. Funkhouser. Sophomore.............Atlanta G. W. Dillard Harder, Junior......Commerce Broughton C. Hays, Freshman.............Colquitt Dan W. Horton, Junior............Durliam. X. C. Harold H. Martin, Freshman.............Commerce Roscoe W. Mitchell. Second J 'ear Lav ■ ■ Albany F. Kelly McCutciien, Second 1 'ear Lav- • Dalton Jack Rogers, First Year Lav................Rome Henry I.. Schmidt. Freshman.............Augusta WESLEY SciieuSSLEK, Freshman • • • Roanoke. Ala. Thomas J. Scott. Junior................Valdosta Mell M. Stephenson, Junior...............Athens John D. Taylor. Junior..............Summerville John Tillman. Freshman..................Quitman J. Fleminc Touchstone, Senior...........Griffin William W. Turner, Freshman .... McDonough William Warning, Freshman .... Chicago. III. Hiram J. White head. Senior................Comer Page One Hundred and ElnenTi Kappa Thi Pi Kappa Phi was founded December io, 1904, at the College of Charleston, Charleston, South Carolina. Lambda chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1915. The colors are Gold and White. Number of active chapters is thirty. Number of chapter houses owned, thirteen. Value of chapter houses owned, $209,000. Total membership, 3,051. Fraternity publication, The Star and Lamp. Tof row: Gracey, Miller, Allen. Lee, Merritt, Collins, Mikell, Buchanan. Second row: Stewart, Rich, Lundy, Griffin, Byrd, Preston. E. Smith, Shiver, Nichols. Third reno: King, Ingram. Armstrong, Pryor. Moss. MatTett. T. Smith, Peeler, Connally. Bottom row: Richter, Burton, McC-auhey, Gray. Davis. Bowers, Tracey, Colvin. l'aye One Hundred anil TicelveTi Kappa rPhi Perry C. Allex, Senior................Amcricus George C. Armstrong, Sophomore..........Athens John H. Bowers, Freshman................Athens V. H. Bryant, Junior.................I.aCrangc Frank Buchanan, Freshman..............Amcricus H. A. Bullock, Freshman................Atlanta Thomas C. Burton, Sophomore.............Canaan Foy A. Byrd, Sophomore...................Macon Walker B. Collins, Junior.................Rome J. Fakl Colvin, J:reshman................Jesup Ralph C. Connally, Junior..............Atlanta Chas. E. Davis, Sophomore.............Amcricus Jules G. Edwards, Junior...............Atlanta Robert H. Gracey, Senior...............Atlanta Claude N. Gray, Freshman.........Locust Grove Ralph L. Griffin, Sophomore...............Rome Herbert R. Ingram, Sophomore...........Coleman D. Joseph Johnson, Freshman. .... Gainesville William A. King, Sophomore..........Fort Gaines Robert E. Lee. Junior.............Williston, S. C. Walter H. Lundy, Junior..................Sylvester Herbert S. Maffett, Freshman...............Atlanta Samuel M. Merritt, Senior.................Amcricus Robert F. Mikell. Sophomore ■ ■ . . Dcl-and. Fla. Walter H. Miller. Junior................Bainbridge Seab J. Moss, Sophomore....................Tignall Clifford H. McGauhey. Freshman .... Atlanta George D. Nichols. Sophomore.................Jesup Julian C. Pf.ei.er. Sophomore.............Woodland Prince H. Preston. Sophomore. .... Statesville J. Gate wood Pryor, Senior..............Smithvillc Wm. G. Rich.............................Bainbridge Rudolph C. Richter, Sophomore .... Savannah I. M. Shiver, Senior.....................Sylvester H. Eugene Smith, Senior...................Columbus Warren R. Smith, Freshman..............Barnesvillc W. S. Stewart, Freshman................Thomasville Wm. S. Tracey, Freshman..................Sylvester Patic One Hundred and ThirteenLambda Qhi cAlpha Lambda Chi Alpha was founded November 2, 1909, at Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. Xu chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1915. The colors are Purple, Green, and Gold. Number of active chapters is seventy-three. Number of chapter houses owned, forty-three. Value of chapter houses owned, $1,048,000. Total membership, 9,000. Fraternity publication, The Purple, Green and Gold. Top rote: Martin. Falligant. Thomas, Wiggins. Coffee. Stuckey, Hall, Walton, Johnson. Middle row: Dickens. Thompson, Gardner. Stephens, Waller, O’Xcill. Upchurch. Wingfield, Black, Phillips. Bottom row: Meadows, Harris, Thurmond. Wilson. H. E. Smith. H. M. Smith. Eyler, Baldwin, Wilcox. Prindle. Pane One Hundred and FourteenLambda Qhi LAlpha Eugene B. Baldwin, Sophomore...............Dublin Charles G. Coffee, Sophomore..............Eastman Marion B. Dickens, Freshman................Ocilla Armand T. Eyler, Junior..................Savannah Korext E. Fallicant, Junior..............Savannah Sam X. Gardner, Senior...........Ft. Gaines, Fla. Adolph K. Hall, Junior...............Miami, Fla. Geokce T. Harris, Senior....................Wrens Herbert F. Johnson. Junior...............Valdosta Carter E. Martin, Senior...............Bainbridge John C. Meadows, Sophomore................Vidalia Leonard W. Miner, Junior..............Gainesville James H. O'Neill, Freshman............Union Point Harlow R. Prindle, Junior............Miami, Fla. Henry C. Smith. Freshman..............Columbus II. M. Smith. Freshman...................McRae K. L. Stephens, Freshman...............Dublin William S. Stuckey, Sophomore..........Kastman Maurice C. Thomas, Senior................Macon Friar M. Thompson, Senior..............Griffin A. Kenneth Thurmond, Junior............Atlanta C. Bernard Upchurch, Freshman...........Athens Jack W. Waller, Senior...............Culverton Leon M. Walton, Freshman...............Atlanta Ralph L. Wiggins, Senior.................Wrens Hal M. Wilson, Junior.................Savannah Joe A. Wincfield, Freshman..............Athens rage One Hundred ami FifteenThi Spsiloru Ti Phi Fpsilon Pi was founded November 23, 1904, at the College of the City of New York. Mu chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1915. The colors are Purple and Gold. Number of active chapters, twenty-three. Number of chapter houses owned, ten. Value of chapter houses owned, $345,000. Total membership, 2,164. Fraternity publication, The Phi Kpsilon Pi Quarterly. Top row: Greenfield. Holey. Lissncr, Samuels, Gans. Dot lorn row: R ingel, Josclovc, Gortatowsky, Funkcnstcin. Cohen, Hey man. Page One Hundred and SixteenThi Epsilon Ti Joel O. Boley, Senior...........................Athens Herbert Cohen, Sophomore........................Athens Daniel H. Funkenstein. Sophomore .... Macon Nathan A. Cans, Sophomore........................Macon Henkv K. Gortatowsky. Freshman .... Albany David Greenfield, Senior.......................Atlanta Joseph K. Heyman, Senior.......................Atlanta Julian F. Joselove. Freshman • • • Williston, 1-la. Jack J. Lissner, Sophomore...................Brunswick Herbert A. Rincel. Junior . . . Georgetown, S. C. Irvinc Samuels, Junior..................Atlanta Page One Hundred and (Seventeen au SpsilonThi Tau Epsilon Phi was founded October 19, 1910, at Columbia University, New York City. Nu chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1919. The colors are Lavender and White. Number of active chapters is twenty-four. Number of chapter houses owned, five. Value of chapter houses owned, $172,000. Total membership, 1,620. Fraternity publication, The Plume. Top row: Jarntalovvsky, H. lesser. Scharfmati. Tar.cnbaum. Holt out row: Ponicrance, F. Lcs s, Rothslcin. Kopplc, Conslangv. I'oue One Hundred and EighteenRjau SpsilonfPKi i-i, . — — i'p $ Frank A. Constancv. Freshman..........Atlanta Jt'MAN A. Jarm alowskv, Sophomore ■ • • Eatonton A. M. Kopple, Sophomore...............Atlanta Frank S. Lesser, Sophomore...............Home Herman J. Lesser, Senior.................Rome Joseph B. Pomerance, Sophomore. .... Augusta Bennie Rotiistein, Sophomore......Gainesville Epiiraim Scharfman, Senior...........Midvillc Man M. Tanenbaum. Junior..............Augusta Pane One llnmlreil ami Xlnetten 9au Kappa Roheta The Tau Kappa Theta fraternity was founded in 1924 at the University of Georgia. Alpha chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1924. The colors are Black and Blue. Total membership, 100. Top rote: Coimally. Walters, McCoy. Hamilton, Strain. Morris, Cate. Middle rote: Ellison. Preston. Bolton, Hale, Tarver, Huggins, Grimes. Bottom roxc: Hanahnn, Wages. Cornett, Rauschenberg, Chandler, Curry. Gorman. •«! • Our ItuuiUnl and TwentyRoau Kappa 'ijheta L. Boykin Bolton. Junior..................Athens Charles M. Cate, Senior...................Athens James Chandler, Freshman..................Athens L. Allen Connali.y. Junior...............Atlanta Walter G. Cornett, Sophomore..............Athens Rupert Curry, Freshman....................Athens Georce W. Ellison. Freshman..............Augusta George Fetzer, Freshman Law..............Marlow Harry W. Gorman, Sophomore...............Atlanta Allen 1 . Grimes. Senior..................Athens John R. Hale, Freshman.................Maysville C. C. Hall, Freshman l.ow......Ft. Myers, Fla. Guy C. Hamilton, Junior...................Dalton James F. Hanahan, Senior.................Augusta Tryon K. Huggins. Junior................Athens Z. M. Johnson, Freshman..................Alina Brad Morris, Sophomore...............Maysville Sumter W. McCoy. Freshman . . . Abbeville. S. C. J. X. McDonald, Junior..............Hazlehurst Henry P. Owen. Freshman..............McDonough C. McDowell Preston, Senior..............Macon Gerhardt H. Rauschenberg. Freshman ■ . Dalton Benjamin B. Strain, Freshman............Dalton Weyman Strickland. Junior..............Chiplcy Malcolm C. Tarver, Senior...............Dalton A. Morgan Wages, Sophomore..............Athens Julian S. Walters. Sophomore...........Atlanta Ed Wiley, Junior........................Sparta l’"!JC One Hundred and TiccntifonecZAlpha Spsiloru Ti r fifCiry,.-Tvr‘-y - T Alpha Epsilon Pi was founded in 1913 at New York University, New York City. Omicron chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1926. The colors are Blue and Gold. The number of active chapters is thirteen. Total membership, 650. Fraternity publication, The School. Top ro'.v: JavcU, Siniowitz, J. Weinstein, A. Weinstein. AgooS, Backer, Haskins. Middle rove: Rosenthal, L. Markcl. Blumcnthal, Bcrtowc. Bennett. Portntan, Weitz, Minkovitz. Bottom rote: Natlian, Tencnbaum, Block, Husbinsky, Goldman, Gorovitz, Jlstroff. Pape One Hundred and Tiecntu twocZAlpha SpsilonTi Bernard A COOS, Freshman.................Thomson Sidney Backer, Freshman....................Macon Jos Erl! J. Bennett, Junior.............Waycross Mac L. Beriowe, Junior Laxo ■ ■ New York, X. Y. Lester H. Block. Senior .... New York, N. Y. Saul M. Blumentiial, Sophomore . • • Savannah Max J. Estroee, Freshman.............1-ouisvillc Sidney Goldman, Sophomore................Allien Samuel Gokovitz, Freshman...............Savannah Dave Haskin. Junior Lazo...................Macon Samuel P. Husiiinsky, Freshman .... Arlington Emanuel Javetz. Sophomore...............Savannah Hyman S. Levy, Junior...................Savannah Irvin S. Markel, Senior Lazo .... Richmond, Va. Lewis C. Markel, Senior Lazo • • • Richmond. Va. Ikf. Minkovitz, Sophomore.............Sylvania Irving S. Nathan, Sophomore............Ashburn Harry J. Portman, Sophomore...........Savannah Leonard J. Rarhan, Senior.............Savannah Maxwell Rosenthal, Junior.............Savannah Bernard A. Simowitz. Senior............ ugusia Michael Tf.nenbaum. Sophomore ..... Atlanta Abraham Weinstein, Freshman..............Macon Julius Weinstein, Junior.................Macon Frank Weitz, Freshman.................Savannah Page One Hundred and Ticenty threecAlpha Qamma Rho Alpha Gamma Rho was founded April 4, 190$. by the unions of societies at Ohio State University and at the University of Illinois. Alpha Eta chapter was established at the Georgia State College of Agriculture in 1927. The colors are Dark Green and Gold. Number of active chapters is thirty-one. Number of chapter houses owned, eight. Value of chapter houses owned, $300,000. Total membership, 3,284. Fraternity publication, The Sickle and Sheaf. Top row: Inglis. Congdon, Slayton, A. L. Earnest. Richardson, Ford, Carter, Bishop. Middle row: Leckie. Vaughan, Dunjon, Boggs. Lewis, C. B. Earnest. Orr, Scarborough. Bottom row; Garrard, Jackson. Bell, Abel, Wooldridge. Mallard. Davis. Lanford. rayc One Hundred ami Ticentyfourc5Alpha Qamma Rho McHatton Abf.l, Senior......................Macon Joseph C. Bell. Senior.....................Athens M. Harold Bishop, Freshman................Atlanta Claude R. Boggs, Junior.................Jefferson V. Clifton Carter. Freshman..........Gainesville Frederick V. Congdon. Sophomore...........Atlanta Jeff I). Davis, Senior...................Hartwell Linton R. Dlnson. Junior.................Commerce Charles Earnest, Junior................Carrollton Robert L. Earnest, Freshman............Carrollton Earl G. Ford, Fresh mg .................Sylvester James A. Garrard, Senior...............Washington Hugh A. I.nclis, Senior.................. Earl H. Jackson, Senior............Granite Hill Leroy C. Lanford, Junior................Tucker James X. Leckie. Sophomore..............Moniac Elzie W. Lewis, Junior.................Calhoun Leo Mallard, Junior.................Statesboro James S. Mookf., Graduate..........Gulf, X. C. G. S. Xewton, Freshman.................Milieu James D. Orr, Sophomore...............Tennille Thomas V. Richardson, Freshman .... Hartwell John C. Scarborough, Soph • more . • • .Savannah H. H. Slayton, Sophomore ■ • Daytona Beach, Fla. John R. Vaughan. Sophomore..............Vienna James M. Wooldridge, Sophomore .... Midland Vmgt One llnntlrtd and TucntyftreThi eTlfCu Phi Mu was founded March 4, 1852, at Wesleyan College, Macon, Georgia. Alpha Alpha chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1921. The colors are Rose and White. Number of active chapters is forty-eight. Number of chapter houses owned, nine. Value of chapter houses owned, $212,000. Total membership, 6,014. Fraternity publication, The Aglaia. To(' Orr, Ebcrhardt. McGowan, Moore, Rrooks. Bickerjtaff, Hart. Whitehead, Golding. Middle row: Calhoun, Gabbett, Forbes. Dorr, Forshey, Evans, Green. Fawcett, Upson. Hulbert. Bottom row: Arnold. Myers, Burke, Hammond, Hill, X. Fortson, Bacon, M. Fortson, J. Fortson. Page One Hundred and Twenty ! Thi (fMu Eugenia Arnold, Freshman.................Athens Mercedes Bacon, Freshman.............Hincsville 1 Sue Fan Barrow, Sophomore...............Athens •Marjorie D. Bickers, Sophomore .... Savannah ■ Margaret L. Bicker staff. Junior.......Athens M. Caroline Brand. Junior................Athens Merlf. Brat, Sophomore.................Savannah ‘Josephine R. Brooks, Sophomore...........Athens Anita L. Burke, Senior...............Washington Genelle T. Calhoun. Freshman ■ . . Washington Laura D. Dork, Senior...................Augusta •Martha T. Earnest. Freshman.............Athens Ruby W. Eberiiardt. Senior...............Winder Frances Evans. Senior................Columbus Virginia Exley. Sophomore.............Savannah Annie Fawcett, Freshman..............Savannah Frances Forbes, Senior..................Athens Ada Forsiicy, Sophomore........Vicksburg, Miss. Janet T. Fortson. Junior.................Athens Margaret Fortson, Sophomore..............Athens Nora P. Fortson, Senior.................Athens Martha Gabbett, Freshman..............Savannah Minnie Golding, Graduate................Athens Lucile L. Green, Junior.................Athens Lena Gresham, Sophomore.............Waynesboro Louise K. Hammond, Senior..............Augusta Mary A. Hart, Sophomore..............Athens Annie L. Hill, Junior.................Athens Marie J. Hulbekt, Freshman............Augusta Dorothy Miller, Sophomore...........Savannah Katherine R. Moore, Senior.............Augusta Anne Morris, Graduate...................Athens £apie M. Myers. Freshman................Athens Virginia McGowan, Senior..........Cartersville Winifred Orr. Sophomore.................Athens Mary H. Park, Freshman..................Athens Louise Robinson, Junior.................Monroe Marie Upson, Sophomore..................Athens Kathryn Williams, Senior.............Ellaville One Hundred and Tuenty-ierenChi Omega Chi Omega was founded April 5, 1895, at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas. Mu Beta chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1922. The colors are Cardinal and Straw. Number of active chapters is seventy-six. Number of chapter houses owned, twenty-nine. Value of chapter houses owned, $814,000. Total membership, 11,015. Fraternity publication, The Eleusis. Top row: Folsom, Balk, Rowland. Sherman. Denmark, King, Meaders, Macken, Crabb. Middle row: Kingman, C. Rice, G. Rice. Amis, Hancock. Morton. Buchanan. Bethel. Bottom row: Pate, Westbrook, Brannon, Code, Jester, Rogers, Hall, Morris, VerNooy. Pane One lluiulrcd anil Tiecntn elohtChi Omega Julius Amis. Senior.......................Athens D. Louise Balk, Senior.................Augusta Josephine Bethel, Sophomore............Thomaston Mary C. Brannon, Sophomore..................Pavo Helen Briscoe, Freshman...................Monroe M. Frances Buchanan, Freshman • • Hawkinsville Mary I. Coile, Sophomore.............Wintervillc Anna E. Crabb, Sophomore..................Athens Marjorie C. Denmark, Senior...........Fitzgerald •Martha J. Folsom, Junior...................McRae E. Madeline Green. Senior..............Augusta Elizabeth Hall, Junior....................Athens 'Sarah P. Hancock, Sophomore...............Athens Elsie Jester, Graduate....................Athens Anne Kilpatrick, Freshman.................Athens Norman King, Graduate.................Cuthbcrt Katherine Kingman, Freshman .... Ft. Rcnning Wilhelmina Mackrn, Senior...............Sparta Jeanettf. Meaders, Senior...............Toccoa •Sara M. Morris, Junior.................Athens M. Louise Morton. Junior................Athens ZErn E. Pate. Senior..................Unadilla •Catherine Rick, Junior...............Commerce l Georgia T. Rice, Sophomore...........Commerce •Martha W. Rogers, Sophomore...........Atlanta Alice A. Rowland, Senior................Athens Evelyn H. Sherman, Senior..............Blakely Harriet E. Stephens, Junior..........Brunswick •Montine VerN'ooy, Junior...............Athens I'oyc Ou c 11 unit nil ami TKCHtynlnc 5 lpha Qamma ‘Delta Alpha Gamma Delta was founded May 30, 1904, at Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York. Gamma Alpha chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1923. The colors arc Red, Buff, and Green. Number of active chapters is thirty-seven. Number of chapter houses owned, seventeen. Value of chapter houses owned, $530,000. Total membership, 4,410. Fraternity publication, The Alpha Gamma Delta Quarterly. Top row: Eunice Stokcly, Cook. Earnestine Stokcly, Arntistcad. Wall. Tibbetts, Young. Middle rote- Carmichael, Deal, Mabel Oglesby, David. Keys. Rebecca Oglesby, McDaniel. Cubbcdgc. Bottom rozv: Christian. Hamilton, Dent, Shepherd. Carlisle. Downing, Chapman. Toge One Hundred and ThirtycZAlpha Qamma ‘Delta Mildred G. Armistead, Frcslnuan .... Crawford Alice Brown. Junior...................McDonough Della E. Carlisle. Junior...............Decatur Saraii L. Carmichael, Freshman...........Monroe Lovhaii V. Chapman, Sophomore .... Atlanta Margaret B. Christian, Junior............Tifton Julia C. Cook, Senior....................Monroe Mary P. CuBBEDGE, Senior.................Guyton Mildred P. David, Sophomore.............Atlanta l-L'CV M. Deal, Sophomore............Statesboro Sue T. Dent. Sophomore...........Lockhart, S. C. Jane Downing, Freshman..................Atlanta Irene T. Dudley, Senior.............Tampa, Fla. Sarah C. Hamilton. Freshman...............Dalton Emma O. Keys. Senior........................Rome Ollie McDaniel, Senior....................Bartow Mabel A. Oglesby, Freshman................Athens Mozellr C. Oglesby, Junior................Athens Rebecca W. Oglesby, Junior................Athens LaUna F.. Shepherd. Junior.........Social Circle Ernestine F. Stokely. Freshman .... Crawford Eunice F. Stokely. Junior...............Crawford Marie U. Tibbetts, Senior.................Athens Margaret Wall, Freshman.................Richland Melba Young. Freshman...................Valdosta Pa je One Hundred and Thirty-oneKappa '"Delta sE3i Kappa Delta was founded October 23, 1897, at the Virginia State Normal School, Farmville, Virginia. Sigma Phi chapter was established at the University of Georgia in 1924. The colors are Olive Green and Pearl White. Number of active chapters is fifty-eight. Number of chapter houses owned, sixteen. Value of chapter houses owned, $251,900. 9 Total membership, 6,758. Fraternity publication, The Angelos. Top rote: Meakin, Baltic. Slaughter, Epps. Darden. Randolph. Stone. Qscney, Dews. Middle rote: Cox. Kelly. Armstrong. Head, Means. Erbclding. Cartlcdgc, Steed, Manning. Hot lorn rote: Dykes. Lester, Ray, M nnday, Hyde. McMillan, Bailey, Henson. Smith. 1‘ii'jt- One llnu‘lreil amt Thirly-tieoKappa ‘Delta »TP- P Elizabeth Armstrong, Junior.............Woodville Elizabeth BaileV, Freshman..............Jefferson Miriam Battle. Junior.....................Atlanta Alice M. Cart ledge, Junior...............Augusta M. Frances Cheney, Freshman..............Marietta Hallie A. Cox, Sophomore...................Athens Evelyn Darden. Junior.................Hogansville Lila De YS, Junior........................Decatur Nellie Dykes, Junior......................Cochran AllEENF. Epps. Senior...................Jefferson Mary Kkdeldinc, Senior....................Augusta Ernestine Head, Freshman...................Athens Anna L. Hences, Sophomore................Savannah Noemi S. Henson, Sophomore...........Cartersville Frances K. Hyde, Sophomore..............Atlanta Lillian C. Kei.lv. Junior...............Augusta Martha R. Lestf.r, Junior...............Augusta Mary V. Manning, Freshman.............Marietta Sophie L. Mkakin, Freshman..............Atlanta Rebecca Means. Sophomore.................Athens Adoie Ml’NDAY. Senior...................Atlanta Mary E. McMillan. Sophomore .... Clarkesville Dorothy Randolph, Sophomore...........Jefferson Virginia Ray. Senior....................Atlanta Nell Slaughter, Freshman.................Athens Helen Smith, Sophomore..................Warthen Jennie C. Steed. Senior.................Augusta Margaret G. Stone. Sophomore .... Tampa, Fla. l‘W f Our Hundred and Thirly-lhrercAthletics The field on which the Athens Y. M. C. A. is now situated was in 1867 the scene 0 the first athletic contest between a Georgia team and an outside organization. The Georgia baseball team defeated an amateur team from Atlanta six to four. Organized athletics, however, first came into existence in 1892. 1 IS n«’ r% cy- %S MMETT tullyS 5Tt C GENE SMITH WALLER ROBERT BWCE CREB STELU G A J0W BK0M UAX q Jy Ay BHLY YGUNC JMf»00Ks gieun own J0E COLLINS WOVilC MAlON COUR75 _tSUE DAIL'S ’5i 'MO ?fVv VRANK OUDlE'f 8A8E FLORENCE mic«£yfrain ■WtOOOW GtNE HM-E" JIMMY HARRIS BOB HILL eOBBV HOOKS BOV JACOBSON HORACE SHtfEUCK W»S lBOEBSlW JIM ROBERTS HENM REEVE5 HEnry Palmer WTl OR r°M WASH HEROIS M'CRARY "°“b w. bobby hooks , 5 Mo )S BOV JACOBSON BEAR MORRIS H.F. JOHNSON ,PETE KENNER v Y BOB MAYHEW JOM JOHNSON Ml «m, lE “ SHAKY KAIN BOBMCTIOUE Ckin chick ; £k ll'C 4merican £ndTOM MASH cAll'cAmerican 8ndQeorgia tAthletics Athletics at the University of Georgia are in charge of the University Athletic Association, of which Chancellor Charles M. Snclling is chairman. The active administration of athletic affairs is in the hands of Dr. S. V. Sanford, dean of the University and faculty chairman of athletics. Robert L. McWhorter, assistant to the faculty chairman; Charles E. Martin, financial assistant, and Herman J. Stegcman. a-.sociate professor of physical education, arc executives assisting Dr. Sanford in conducting Georgia athletics. In addition to intra mural activities, the University athletic authorities offer intercollegiate competition in four major sports, six minor ones, ami three freshman sports. The major sports arc football, basket-ball, track, and baseball. Designated as minor sports because of less general participation in them arc boxing, lacrosse, swimming. cro'S country, tennis, and golf. The University R. O. T. C. Ii3s under its supervision rifle and monkey-drill teams which are not under the direct control of the athletic association. Freshman teams arc football, basket-ball, and baseball. The coaching staff of the University for the past year was as follows; H. J. Stegcman. director of athletics, coach of basket-ball and track; George C. Woodruff, coach of football; William P. White, coach of baseball and freshman football; Harry t Mchre and James A. Crowley, assistant football coaches; . G. Smith, boxing and monkey-drill team: I. C. Nicholas, lacrosse and rifle team: W. M. Tate, cross-country; E. M. Everett, tennis: C. W. Jones, swimming: Martin E. Kilpatrick. fre'hman football; Johnny Broadnax, freshman basket-ball and baseball. Harry J. Mchre. line coach of football, was announced as next year's head football coach at the banquet following the end of the season. Coach Kid Woodruff, who had served five years at a personal sacrifice, had announced at the beginning of the season that business affairs would prevent him from continuing as football coach. Captain "Chick" Shiver, All-American end, was chosen as end coach, and Gene Smith. All-Southern guard, as freshman football coach, for 1928. COACHING STAFF Top rote: Nicholas, Woodruff. Everett. Mchre. Tate. Hollom rote- Jones. White, Crowley, Smith, Broadnax. S. V. Sanford Faculty Chairman of AI hi dies I'oyc One Hundred and FortyQeorgia tAthletics All freshmen not taking military are required to take a course in physical education three afternoons a week as a part of the general physical training program of the athletic authorities. An effort is being made to extend the intramural athletic activities by organizing dormitory and fraternity leagues in basket-ball and baseball. This attempt has been handicapped by the lack of funds and necessary equipment. but during the past year military leagues in basket-ball, and fraternity competition in basket-ball, track and baseball, was organized and conducted. The year as a whole has been a moderately successful one in Georgia athletics. The great Georgia football team boasted in Captain •‘Chick'’ Shiver and Tom N’ash, the greatest pair of ends in the country, and with them leading the attack lost in the defeat by Georgia Tech a clear-cut claim to the national championship. The basket-ball and track teams had only moderately successful seasons. The baseball team, patterning after the football team lost the final game of the season to Georgia Tech when victory would have meant the conference championship. The lacrosse and golf teams won the conference championships, and John Oliver won the conference golf title. Malon Courts did not defend successfully his conference tennis singles championship, but won the title in the Georgia State meet. The boxing team had a rather unsuccessful season, but at the conference tournament Bobby Hooks won the light-heavyweight championship, and Carlton Jester went to the finals in the featherweight class. Hooks later won out in the Olympic regional trials, held in Mobile, but lost in the final try-out in Boston. H. J. Stegkman The recent letting of the contract for a great athletic Director of Athletics stadium means that at last it will he possible for epic contests to take place in Athens, and that the great Tcch-Gcorgia contests will be divided evenly between Athens and Atlanta. The erection of the stadium will mean that the athletic plant of tltc University will be one of the finest in the south, and that Georgia teams will have a site worthy of their efforts. CHEER LEADERS Franklin Klinf. Wofford Kenner I’oge One Hundred and Forty one‘Wearers of the (fMinor Q Drew Varner Lewis UNIVERSITY ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION Jesse W. Drew...................................President First Term Earl M. Varner..........................President Second Term Keith Lewis.........................Financial Manager CROSS COUNTRY Robert Young, Noble Jones, W. K. Becton, George Crisficld. C. A. Adams, Donald Branvan. BOXING Robert Hooks, Gene Haley, L. II. Mitchell, M. Shensky, James Fulghum, Earnest Palmour, lames Patrick, Joseph Cumming, Carlton Jester. ilson Kemp, William Carroll. TENNIS Malon Courts, Bill Lcgwcn. Joe Boland. Hamilton Napier. SWIMMING Robert Hooks, James Harris, Glenn Richards, John Hodgson, Conril Smith, Tom Hoynes. LACROSSE C. H. Bishop, John Candler, L. C. Crouch. J. W. Drew. I.. 1C. Gay, J. M. Gay. A. M. Gig-nilliat, G. 'I'. Harris, C. M. Johnson. Ralph Keene, E. O. Parker. T. R. Powell, J. E. Sparrow, H. L. Stancil, W. I.. Strickland, E. M. Varner, L. W. W'hclchel Band—Inrpirer ok Victories $ One IlmmthrH « J t'"r,V t,e°footballfootball (By Alex Lawrence) The bright victories of Octo! er and November have been far too much obscured by the fatal December affair. It is idle to minimize the defeat by Georgia Tech. It is useless to gainsay the extent of its damage. Where a single afternoon witnesses the conflagration of a national and a sectional championship, no other thing can l e said than that it was catastrophic. But all too much has the bitterness of the defeat of the Third l ccn permitted to clouden the memories of the splendid victories of two preceding months. Inexorable destiny may snatch away at the Anal moment every hoped-for laurel, every crowning wreath, but memories are beyond any earthly power to remove. The glories of the )ctobcr and November achievements lie beyond the reach of sullying Deccmljcr defeats. Bitter though the whole may l c. the part is sweet. Thus a Waterloo may erase all the accomplishments, all the aims of a magnificent career, but the splendor of the previous Maren-gos, the Austcrlitzes. the Jcnas, the Fricdlands can never fade from memory's view. In 1927 for the first time a Southern eleven won the unanimous recognition of the American football world. Years before, powerful Tornado teams had caught the nation's passing eye. Two seasons back, beyond the far Rockies, Alabama had won a wholesome "Western respect. But until 1927 the cynical Fa t remained unturned. Small wonder, too, that for two months Georgia basked in football’s sj otlight. Early in the season, on the sod of Yale s historic Bowl, one of the mightiest elevens that the East had raised up in a decade was beaten down, 14-10. From the first of October through the twenty-fourth of November the nation witnessed of all football careers one of the most brilliant. Week after week opponents fell before Georgia's splendid attack. irginia was crushed. 32-0. Yale was l caten. Furman went down, 32-0. Auburn was smothered 33-3. Tulane was smashed. 31-0. Florida crumpled 2S-0. Clcmson was routed. 32-0. Mercer defeated. 26-7. Alabama thrashed. 20-6. The team that Woodruff had been five years in the building amassed during these nine games 38 touchdowns and 248 points. Its opponents crossed its goal line but thrice and rolled up 26 jioints. Exciting were those days! Seldom has a team produced as many stars. The raciest assortment of backs in the country embellished the backfield. Fleet and powerful, the great Hcrtis McCrary emerged as one of the season’s finest fullbacks. Thirteen touch downs he scored during the course of the fall, and his name appeared among numerous comjxjsite selections. A firm forward wall was flanked by perhaps the two most skilled and rugged ends that a single team has ever possessed. Captain Coach "Kip" Woophlff The Squao rage One Hundred and Forty fourfootball Shiver or Tom Nash, one or the other, appeared on every authentic All-American team that was published during the year. They were a factor in the successes of the team of too enormous mould to lx succinctly set down here. Thus was the season of 1927. Magnificent, disappointing, successful, unsuccessful, wonderful, catastrophic, as it may he regarded. Hurtling during the course of two months toward a grand destiny, all things sought for were snatched greedily away in the first week of the third. Bright memories of a wondrous march toward a fatal destiny arc all that remain. But a thousand defeats can never obscure its brilliance. VIRGINIA Beneath the glare of a burning Junc-day sun Georgia routed the proud Cavaliers of Virginia, 32-0. on Octol cr first. It was a brilliant prelude to a brilliant season. After two early threats that carried well into the Blue’s goal territory. Georgia finally crossed the Cavalier goal in the late moments of the first period. Fullback McCrary broke through for 16 yards to Virginia's 15-vard mark. On the next play the same player took a short pass from halfback Estes ten yards in front of the Cavalier’s goal In the following quarter after a 32-yard run by halfback Dudley, McCrary smashed four yards through center’ for Georgia’s second touchdown. In the third quarter,, half back Sloan of Virginia attempted a forward pass. The ball sailed into the arms of fullback Rothstcin near the Cavalier’s 35-yard zone, and there was a clear path in front of him to Virginia's goal line. Late in the same period Georgia l egan a steady advance goalward. ( n the first play of the fourth quarter McCrary ploughed through center across the goal. When quarterback Johnson place-kicked the goal tiic score was 25-0. Midway in the final period halfback Hushion of Virginia fumbled on Georgia’s 36-vard line. McCrary scooped it up and raced 64 yards across the goal for Georgia’s fifth touchdown and his fourth. Captain “Chick" Shiver and rumbled across. YALE Under a gray northern sky that hung heavily aliove the historic Yale Bowl Georgia won a magnificent 14-10 victory over Old Eli on the following Saturday. Georgia’s dashing first-half onset. Shiver’s marvelous punting, brilliant end play by Shiver and Nash, together with a ballant last period stand, were the factors that overcame a rugged Eli defense and an attack built about the brilliant Bruce Caldwell. Virginia Game Payc One Hundred and Forty-flee Early in the battle, following a Yale fumble, Georgia opened a blinding attack. From the Yale 38-yard mark McCrary ploughed ten yards. A few minutes later, the ball was twelve yards before the Blue goal. On fourth down a pass from quarterback Johnson whistled through the autumn air into the arms of halfback Estes, who whisked across the Eli goal for the first Georgia touchdown. In the waning moments of the same period Yale drew up even. A long pass moved the Blue eleven deep into Georgia territory. From the 30-yard mark Caldwell passed to left-end Scott, who was standing near the goal line. Coxc kicked the goal. Near the middle of the second period a pass carried Yale up to Georgia's 24-yard line, from which Coxc kicked a field goal and Yale went into the van 10-7. Shortlived, though, was the lead. Immediately after the kickoff a pass from Hooks to Dudley found the latter with a clear field before him. A twinkle of feet down half the field's length and Georgia was on Yale's 7-yard mark. McCrary drove into center twice, and on a third attempt went over the line. The extra point made the score, Georgia 14, Yale to. The third quarter passed uneventfully, a lull before the gathering storm. The final | criod found Georgia, weary but determined, facing a team employing all its brilliant art and desperate effort to score, and strengthened by the return of its great halfback. With Caldwell running in the wildest fashion, three times during those trying minutes, the Blue battered its way to the gates of Georgia’s goal. Once the onset was checked by an intercepted pass, once by a fumble, and once by a determined brace on the one-yard line. Then as the remaining play passed from minutes to seconds, Caldwell rifled a pass to Scott across the goal, but it was across the end-zone, and the ball was given to Georgia. A moment later, of all its victories, Georgia had won perhaps the most memorable. FURMAN Blocking and running and passing in magnificent fashion the Bulldogs trampled Furman on Sanford Field, on the fifteenth. 32-0. Flashes of red darted out of and around the scrimmage line and danced in quick time across the Purple goal. Right and left Furman tacklers were tumbled to the sward by Georgia blockers. Passes whistled and sang a gay refrain through the biting autumn air. Furman’s defense, predicated on a system designed to combat the recognized strength of Georgia’s passing attack and the impetuosity of fullback McCrary’s plunges, was completely baffled by the Bulldogs. While occasional thrusts into the line and a pass, here and there, kept the Purple defense guessing. Georgia concentrated on the flanks, with halfbacks Hooks and Dudley, MeTigue and Estes cutting the tackles and rounding the ends with zest and abandon. Early in the game, after a forward pass had carried the ball to the Purple's 15-yard line, and a first down moved it 10 yards further on, halfback Hooks crashed through left tackle for the first touchdown of the afternoon. Hows’, of Yai.e, Gets Dudley, Who Has Paved the Way for Georgia's Second Touchdown I’ngc One llumlrctl ami Forly-»ixIn the same period halfback McTigtic capered 37 yards afield to the Pvtrplc goal. Johnson place-kicked the goal. In the late moments of the succeeding period halfback Dudley charged safely through tackle into a field ahead that expert blockers were fast making clear, through that field 5 yards to the goal line. From midfield in the third period halfback Kstes frisked out in the open to the left, eluded the Purple’s secondary men, and roamed 52 yards before he was brought groundward two yards from the goal. MeTigue whisked across the goal line. In the final period Hooks scored the final touchdown, following the customary aerial and artillery attack. AUBURN On the twenty-second Georgia crushed Auburn in the stadium at Columbus. 33-3. The story of the second period contains the record of almost the entirety of Georgia’s offensive operations for the afternoon. Not before had. never after during the season did the Bulldogs score four touchdowns in a single period. The familiar touchdown burthern that the passes have whistled in other games was heard once more. Georgia’s attack was at its best. The Plainsmen had scored early in the first period when flankman Ingram lx oted a placement kick over the bars from Georgia's 20-yard line. Then at the owning of the second quarter halfbacks Hooks and Dudley and quarterback Johnson were hastened into action. Simultaneously the Bulldogs’ attack began to boom and bang. From Auburn's 7-yard line Hooks, behind a mighty wave of interference, crossed the goal for the first touchdown. A minute later Georgia had another touchdown. Dudley returned the succeeding kick-off 40 yards to the Plainsmen's 47-yard strijie. A moment after he ran 21 yards further on. and from that point broke free around left end. sidestepped the safety man, and whisked across the goal 26 yards away. Several minutes later Hooks passed far afield to the massive Nash, who was standing ten yards out from the Tiger goal. Decoys had lured the secondary defense into other corners, and Nash had almost a clear path to the goal for Georgia’s third touchdown. I-atcr on in the | eriod. the big Red team swung into the gay strains of the touchdown chorus for the fourth time. The ball lay on Georgia's 32-yard line. Dudley, apparently begun on an end run. tossed a lateral pass to McCrary and the big fullback went 68 yards to the Auburn goal line. In the fourth period third-string fullback Coxc bucked over the Auburn goal line after a pass to the same player had carried the ball to the one-foot mark. TULANE Far westward near the banks of the broad Mississippi, Georgia battered down Tulane 31-0, the following week in gay and cosmo] olitan New Orleans. Yale Goes Ovek for a Score 1‘apr Oh, II u ml ml mill f'urlfi-xtrinTom Nash End Bobby Hooks Halfback Joe Boland Center Hkrius McCrary Fullback Paoe One Hundred and Forty et-jhtFurman—Coach Laval's Men Make a Gain T hem selves backficld accomplished only the wearing down of the Floridians, the appearance of the Hooks-Dudlcy-Mc-Crary-Johnson quartet at the beginning of the second quarter was a signal. From the 47-yard belt Captain Shiver, running from punt formation, dashed 15 yards. Hooks assailed left end for n more. McCrary in two plunges made a first down on Florida's 27-yard stripe. On the dead run, McCrary took a whizzing pass from Johnson, and was across the goal a moment later. In the third period, the Bulldogs again stormed down upon the Florida goal. From the one-foot mark. McCrary smashed over center for a touchdown. Shortly after the second touchdown, following a driving invasion of Florida territory that carried to the 7-yard mark. Johnson shot a pass across the goal, on third down, which McCrary pulled in. It was his third score, and Georgia was ahead 21-0 now. In the early minutes of the next quarter, halted thrice near the 20-yard line. Hooks fired a pass goalward. On full run, halfback Dudley took the ball over his shoulder, and galloped over for the fourth score. So ended the Florida engagement. In six triumphant claslies Georgia had amassed 26 touchdowns while opponents had crossed her goal but once. A brilliant meteor was flashing across the nation's football skies. CLEMSON The merry march was under way again the following Saturday with a sweeping 32-0 triumph over Clcmson on Sanford Field. Sparkling runs by halfback MeTigue and quarterback Johnson and splintering assaults on the Tiger line by fullback McCrary carried Georgia to four touchdowns in the opening half. The final half, with reserves in the Woodruff line-up a large part of the time, produced only one more score, but meanwhile the stalwart play of the Leroy La n ford Center Gene Smith Guard Roy Jacobson Guard Gene Haley Guard G. L.utzenhiser Tackle Furman—Bon MrTtcuE Starts Off for the Races I'ayc One Hundred and Forti nlxrTulank—It's Estes and Perfect Interference Bear Morris Tackle Crf.k Stellinc Tackle Theodore Frisbie Tackle Henry Palmer Had Bulldogs’ skilled forward wall had kept the Tigers from crossing, if not away from, the Black and Red goal. I.ikc a bolt out of blue heavens cante the first of Georgia's five touchdowns. Behind devastating interference MeTigue skipped through left end, out into the open expanses to his left, on across the distant goal. 71 yards away. Three plays after the succeeding kick-off. Johnson gathered in a pass from Estes near Clcmson's 40-yard stripe, pranced down the field with great skill and crossed the goal on an amazing run. Before the next period was over Georgia added another pair of touchdowns. The Tigers’ wavering defense was blasted and broken by McCrary's rushes. He scored both touchdowns. and on two other occasions was out in the open, but in both instances was brought down by halfback Eskcw. The third quarter opened with third string backs manoevering behind a second string forward wall. But near the close of the period, with Clemson hammering away goal ward on Georgia’s 9-yard line, the varsity streamed out on the field, and as the quarter ended the Tiger advance was abruptly checked. Hardly, however, was the fourth period tinder way than the Tigers were snapping at the Bulldog goal again. A blocked punt on fourth down left the visitors 5 yards from the goal. On first down halfback McMillan plunged 4 yards goalward. But at that point three succeeding thrusts into the powerful Georgia forward wall were barren, and the opportunity was gone forever. Later, with McCrary leading the way, the Bulldogs ploughed down the gridiron 86 yards across the far Tiger goal for their fifth and final score, just before game’s-end. H. F. Johnson Quarterback Auburn—Estes bout to Rifle One 1‘ii'jc One Hundred and Fifty Ci.f.mso.v—Dudley Punches Off Tackle and They Can't MF.RCF.R On the nineteenth Georgia won a drab 26-7 victory over Mercer in Athens. The important Alabama game was less than a week away: in the stands prying eyes of scouts were eager for a sight of the varsity, and these considerations kept the first team blanketed on the sidelines as long as it was expedient. And so reserves faced Mercer during most of tlic afternoon, and during their stay assumed a 13-7 lead. But in the late moments of the third period when the Bear was growling angrily before the Bulldog goal, red-shirted first stringers poured out from the bench onto the field. Passes began to shoot, backs began to dance about the ends, and McCrary started sundering wide the weary Mercer line. Two touchdowns were scored, another lost by ,a fumble one yard from the Bear's goal, and another lay but a few yards away at gameVend. Halfback Smith of Mercer shone with dazzling lustre throughout the afternoon. To add to his remarkable defensive play-after the Bulldog second stringers had just scored their second touchdown, and on the ensuing kick-off Smith gathered it in, and took a course straight down the center of the gridiron, cut to the left and fled deer-like down the sidelines, across the goal 95 yards away. ALABAMA With the giant Nash at the dazzling zenith of a brilliant season and with halfback Estes passing, running, and kicking in the most spirited fashion. Georgia reached top form in beating Alabama 20-6 at Birmingham on Thanksgiving Day. Midway in the first period the white-shirted Georgians launched their first onslaught. The ball lay on the Bulldogs' 43-yard mark where Hicks of Alabama had fumbled. Estes romped nine yards around left end, Johnny Broadnax Quarterback Roy Estes Halfback Bor McTigue Halfback Bennie Rotiistein Fullback Jim Rouerts Manager Mercer—McTigue Starts on a Lonc Run Around Left End With Hill and Broadnax Runninc Perfect Interference Pa'jc One Hundred and Fifty-one mmmm € «• red Nixon Tackle Sidney Cox Fullback Glenn Bradley End Harvey Hill 11 a!{back Buster Cook Halfback Tech—Nash Catches an Over-the-Line Pass With the Ball as Heavy as Mud Can Make It and a few moment later lined a pa to Nash which advanced the ball to Alabama's 49-yard mark. On the third play Kate shot a pass, swift and accurate, to the right, whither Nash had cut diagonally through Alabama's secondary from left end. It was a touchdown pas and Johnson kicked the goal. Early in the second period Kates crossed the Crimson goal line after a nine-yard jaunt, hut the ball was called back, and it was not until lloland intercepted a Tide pass which be lugged to his opponents' j6-yard xonc that Georgia was in scoring position again. From that point McCrary broke off left tackle like an arrow from a long bow, and the ball was ten yards out in front of the Crimson goal. Three plays later Estes slipped across the line, and when Johnson place-kicked the goal the score was 14-0. Shortly after hc opening of the second half, from Georgia's 46-yard belt, the third touchdown offensive got under way. An eleven-yard smash by McCrary, a fifteen-yard penalty, and a pass to Nash from Estes brought the ball to the threshhold of Alabama's goal line. Three attempts lost a yard. On the fourth pby Johnson looped a pass across the goal which fell safely in the arms of Nash who was waiting for it. Alabama's score in the fourth period was scored on the forty-yard dash by halfback Hrasfield, as wild a run, as mad a sprint, as the season saw. It came about when, on an attempted pass, no Tide receiver being free, Urasfield sought the more favorable opportunities of the open spaces to the right. Hying as a gust of the west wind, the runner raced down the sidelines across the goal line forty yards away. A few minutes later whistle announced Georgias finest victory of the the final season. TECH The grand destiny toward which the course of Georgia ever seemed to wend _ its way. was not achieved ten days after Thanksgiving against Tech. Amid a sombre setting of dark gray clouds, chill mists, and below a gridiron bathed in the mud and slush of three days' rain. jR.000 spectators looked on in wonder while Tech scored two touchdowns to Georgia's none. The Crowd that Stormed Atlanta the Morning of December 3. This Was at the Seaboard Station Vayf One lluniirol anil t'lftytlCOA LA HAM A 1 HEY MAKE A Short GaIN OVER GEORGIA'S I.F.FT TACKLE Th« mythical national championship in whose pursuit during two past month Georgia had cut down one after another, Vir-I'urman. Auburn, lulnnc, Florida. C'lcmt.011. Mercer, and Alalami faded dream like into the du k of the gray lie cember afternoon. Faded too. the Conference title. All that remained were the bright memories of the glorious victories of October and November. T.°. ' ?? ha tbc defeat of the Third been set. The muddy field, a team gore stale, or the superiority of Tech, have each had their asseverators as the cause of Georgia's fall. The Frank Stewart Guard David Greenfield Guard Jackets had come along slowly, and in the gloam-.ng of the season were just attaining their fastest | ace. Moreover, for Georgia, with all in the balance, victory meant so much, but defeat so much more, while for Tech, with little at stake, defeat meant no more than the chagrin of losing to a rival. As a conic- fuence. Coach Alexander was able to throw into action on the hird a team that mentally and physically had reached the top. Georgia, on the other hand, had reached bottom. The likeness of tlie learn that had won the bright victories of October and Novcmlicr to the team that took the field in December was the likeness of tropic and pole. Flashing resemblances to the conqueror of October and November were seen now and then in its December shadow-. The Hulldog registered nine first downs against Tech's four, completed five passe to one. and from scrimmage outgained their opponents ija yards to 60 yard . Hut only on a single occasion were Georgia's nine first down able to advance tbc ball into striking distance of the enemy's goal, ar.d at that point the running attack unfortunately collapsed. Tech, on the other side, with its four first downs was also in the vicinage of Georgia's goal line hut once, hut that single opportunity resulted in a touchdown, while the one pass that the Jackets were able to complete ended with the receiver across the goal. Tech scored in the second period when quarterback Durant look a screened t« » on Georgia's Jo-yard pass and romped aero the line. Ilatlhack Thomason in the third period ciicled eleven yards around the end for the other touchdown. The final whistle caught Georgia floundering in the midfield slime, and to this undramatic end had come a most dramatic season. Alabama—And Dudley Gets Four Through Center Hollis Morris Center Buck Weaver Guard Joe Martin End .i-dred and FiltV-thrcetyreshman football The 1927 freshman football team had a season which was highly unfortunate. Five games were played and four of these were lost to opponents. Only one victory was won, that being the encounter with the Auburn Rats. Several men of outstanding ability were included in the Bullpup squad, but the team as a whole was never able to become the smooth-working machine which it should have been. The season opened with a game against the Clemson freshmen which was played on Sanford field in the midst of a hard rainstorm. The encounter ended in a 7-6 victory for Clemson, after an agonizing sixty minutes in which Georgians and Carolinians slipped, slid, and stumbled in the mud and ankle-deep water. In the game with the Mercer freshmen a second contest between evenly matched teams was fought. The lines swayed up and down the fields, locked in a bitter struggle throughout most of the game, but at one stage the Mercer frosh were able to push a lone touchdown over the goal line and humble their Red and Black enemies. The game with the Auburn freshmen proved to be a star of encouragement for the weary Georgians. Auburn was defeated, 25-0, although the two teams were far more closely matched than the score showed. The game with the Alabama freshmen in Rome marked another defeat. Georgia was able to score 13 points but was unable to compete with the Alabamians, who ran up 27. The final game with the l ech freshmen was lost 40-0. Chief among the first-note players were Bennett at center, Rasnakc and Jones at guards. Carter and Thornton at tackles, McTigue and Maffett at ends, Waugh and Dickens in the backfield. Numerals were also awarded to Upchurch at center, Johnson and Highcs at guard. Griggs and Winston at tackle, Kelly and Hollis at end, Morgan and Dixon at quarter. Sanford at half and Bishop and Day at full. Pa'Jt Oat Hundred anti Pi fly font‘zBasket-'jBall (By Boit Sherrod) The 192$ issue of Georgia basket-ball teams won 13 out of its 23 games. The quintet was eliminated in the second round of the conference tournament in Atlanta by the University of Kentucky. 31-16; the Red and Black quint had won its ltrst round game front Y. M. I. by a 37 to 26 count. The Bulldogs began before Christmas with a victory over the Southern Bell Telephone Company's outfit, 50 to 17. Captain Florence was the outstanding individual for the evening. The second pre-season game found the tables reversed, the Bulldogs being defeated by the Gulf Refining company’s powerful five, another Atlanta team, 30 to 16. The Gulf aggregation turned out to be one of the best cage teams of its kind in the South, winning the city commercial championship of Atlanta and downing several reputable foes. Herman"J Stcge man During the Christmas holidays the Bulldogs took an . easy game from the Augusta Y. M. C. A. by a runaway score of 69 to 20. This game brought to the front the find of the season in the person of Henry Palmer, Cheyenne. Wyoming, sophomore flash. Palmer scored 18 points to be high point men for the Red and Black. The college season opened on January 4 when the Furman Hurricane five came to Athens to engage the Georgians. Coach Stegeman's men doubled the score on the South Carolinians, downing them. 46 to 23. Palmer and Florence were the satellites of the evening. After this start the Georgians won five straight conference games before being stopped by Pone One Hundred and Fifty tit‘Basketball the North Carolina Tarheels. Included in the five victories were two over Florida, two over Tulanc. and one over the Tech Yellow Jackets. The Tech game, which was played on the Tech gym court in Atlanta, was, in its intcnsencss, typical of all Tech-Gcorgia games. The Bulldogs, after trailing at the half, came back to win one of the hardest fought affairs of the season. 33 to 30. Palmer and Keen furnished the fireworks for Georgia. Then began a three-game road trip which brought two defeats and one win for the Athenians. They lost their first conference engagement when the Tarheels won a six-point victory. Duke University won an extra period match the next night, 49 to 44. while the Bulldogs staged a comeback on Saturday evening to l eat the X. C. Staters. 38 to 31. The Bulldogs came back to Athens with another Tech game facing them. This was probably the closest game of the season, both from the standi oint of the score and from the intense fury with which it was played. Tech finally won, 36 to 35, aftec the lead had been tossed alxmt from one to the other for the concluding moments of the fray. The next two games were also conference engagements, the Georgians winning from South Carolina and losing to the mighty Auburn Tiger, which was practically conceded first place in the tournament to come but was nosed out by one point in the finals by an aggressive Ole Miss five. 'Hie Tigers took the Bulldog number, 28 to 25, in their lair on the Plains. Atlanta Athletic club, with the incomparable Stephens shooting 20 points from all parts of Captain "Babe" Florence, Boneard foye One lluudrtd ami t'lftjr Jcrcn'Basketball “Slim" Drew, Center John Davidson, Guard Jimmie Harris, Forward George Keen, Forward the Woodruff hall court, won from Coach Stcgc-man's men in the next game, 35 to 29. They repeated a few days later in Atlanta with a 3S-2S win over the Bulldogs. In the interim a 13-point victory over Clcmson was consoling to the injured Bulldog. The University of Mississippi five, which later won the conference title, split a series with the Bulldogs following these games. More interest was taken in this series than in any other of the season except the Tech games, probably due to the striking personality and style of play of the Ole Miss men. (Georgia was probably at its top form of the season in defeating the Mississip pians in the second game, 37 to 33. The last and deciding 'l ech game, played in the Atlanta auditorium, found hundreds of Athenians listening in over the radio while many others saw the game. The crowds witnessed the drawing jxnver of all Tech-Georgia games, no matter the sport or why. After 40 minutes of terrific fighting Tech won,4 28 to 26. This ended the season except for the tournament. Georgia fans were hopeful, remembering the 1927 tourney in which Georgia, after having a mediocre season, lost in the finals to Vanderbilt by a single field goal. The Bulldogs’ start in the 1928 tournament was one of a brilliant nature but the team hit a slump the second night against a Kentucky team which was in fine form. The Blue Grass team won from the Bulldogs by a greater margin than any other college team during the season. All other losses were by very small margin, averaging only three or four points. Captain Ba! c Florence ended his career as a Georgia basketeer in fine fettle, leading his team in scoring and playing a remarkable floor game. George Keen, All-Southern forward in 1927. also played his last game for the Red and Black. His work for the year was excellent but hardly on a par with the previous season, when he was probably the outstanding forward in the southern college ranks. Dudley Cook, the other letter-man who graduates, was awarded the coveted “G” after four years of steady and consistently improving work. Roy- Drew was the backlxme of the team at center, being best noted for his jumping and I'afjc One IIumlred and Fifty ci-jht Basket all defensive play. Captain-elect Lautzenhiscr played at guard during the latter part of the season and proved a remarkable defense man. Joe Martin, rangy six-footer, covered a great deal of territory as running guard and should improve steadily in the next two years. Jimmy Harris made his second letter at the utility forward position. Henry Palmer was the only Freshman from the 1927 team to win a place on the varsity. An uncanny knack for finding the basket from any position was Palmer’s chief virtue during the past season. Letters were awarded to: Florence, Keen. Drew, Lautzenhiser, Cook, Harris, Palmer, Martin, and Manager Collins. The season's record: Georgia 50 Georgia 16 — Georgia 69 — Georgia 46 — Georgia 37 — Georgia 40 — Georgia 42 — Georgia 28 — Georgia 33 — Cieorgia 29 — Georgia 44 — Georgia 38 — Georgia 35 — Georgia 36 — (ieorgia 25 — Georgia 29 — (ieorgia 38 — (ieorgia 28 — Georgia 37 — Georgia 37 — Georgia 26 — Georgia 37 — Georgia 16 — Southern Bell 17 Gulf Refining Co. 30 Augusta V. 20 Furman 23 Florida 35 Florida 30 Tulane 32 Tulane 18 'l ech 30 North Carolina 35 Duke 49 N. C. State 31 Tech 36 S. C. 32 Auburn 28 A. A. C. 35 Clemson 25 A. A. C. 38 Ole Miss 44 Ole Miss 33 Tech 28 V. M. I. 26 Kentucky 31 Dudley Cook, Poniard Glenn Laulseu-hiser. Guard Henry Palmer, Guard Joe Collins, Manager Page One Hundred and Fifty-ninetyreshman asket- Ball W ith the exception of the final game with Tech freshmen, which was, of course, one of the big things of the season, the Bullpup basket-ball squad won every game played. Ten games were on the schedule of the baby basketmen. High school and prep school teams furnished most of the opposition. Brasclton High was the first opponent to be encountered, and this game was followed by contests with Arnoldsville, Winder, Grayson and Riverside. These games furnished the Georgians with a string of victories. The Clemson freshmen were met and defeated, and the Tech freshmen were overcome in the first game played with them. Only in the last game of the season, the second battle with Tech, was the season’s record broken. Numerals were awarded to Sanford, Gorovitz, McGaughey, Maffct, Reeder, Waugh, Frye, Owen, and Hollis. Sanford and McGaughey at forward, Reeder and Waugh at guard, and Frye at center starred throughout the season. A number of the Bullpup cage-men give indication of being good varsity men during the next three years. Peyton Todd was the frosh manager. Voijt One Hundred and SixtyThe 1927 Georgia track team did not have a brilliant season, although there were some outstanding stars on the squad. The Bulldogs won their first meet of the season when they defeated Clemson, 65 to 47. Each team won seven first places hut Georgia's many seconds counted heavily in the meet. Bee ton won the two-mile for the Bulldogs, while Shattuck took first place in both the high and low hurdles. McCrary won the hundred-yard dash and the shot-put, while Georgia's other two first places came on Orr's winning the 440-yard dash and Huffs capture of the discus throw. Among the runners-up against Clemson were Yonce in the mile, Mayhew in the too. Hill in the 440, Kenner in the pole vault, Orr in the half-mile. Turner in the high jump, and Shattuck in the discus throw. The next meet brought the Bulldogs their first defeat of the season, the North Carolina Tarheels winning from them by a rather large margin. Eight first places, five seconds and five thirds were captured by the Tarheels. McCrary, star football player, was the high man for Georgia, winning both the too and 220-yard dashes and placing second in the shot-put. Becton won the two-mile and Turner took first in the high jump and pole vault, fritz Orr came in ahead of the field in the 440-vard dash. Shattuck took two second places, Yonce one, Curran one. Hill one, and Kenner tied for two. Third places were won by Shattuck and Huff. The Tech Yellow Jackets administered a crushing defeat to Coach Stegeman's men in the Couch Herman J. Slegcman Page One Hundred and SUIg tKO Uracil final dual meet of the season. The score was no less than 92 to 34. The Georgia Freshmen partly alleviated the defeat l)y winning from the Tech underclassmen. 9 to 5. by the English scoring system which counts only first places. The Bulldogs won only two first places, these being the 220-yard dash by McCrary and the two-mile run by Becton. Second places were won by McCrary in the 100 Orr in the 440, Shattuck in the low hurdles. Third places were distributed among the Georgia team as follows: Yoncc in the mile, Orr in the half mile. Shattuck in the high hurdles, and Kenner in the javelin throw. The Tech relays, which were held early in the 1927 season, yielded a first place to the Georgia relay team but the team’s activities stopped there. Bill Tate, veteran Georgia star and now coach of the cross-country team, set a new record in the special two-mile race. Tate ran independently. The Southern conference meet, which was held at Louisiana State University, was another catastrophe for the Georgia team. H R. Breton, Two-Mile Spiked Shoe Qlub The Georgia chapter of the Spiked Shoe chib, a national organization of track men. was installed in the spring of 1927. Fifteen mcmlicrs of the track team were taken in at that time but a majority of them graduated. So members of the cross-country team were taken in at that time became the harriers won the conference championship and were awarded major letters, even though cross-country is normally a minor sport. There are about forty chapter' of Spiked Shoe Gib in the national organization, which was founded at Columbia. H. J. Stegeman HONORARY MEMBERS William Tate MEMBERS Kankakee Anderson Wendell R. Becton A. J. Bird Robert Brice V. Wright Cook John Greek Olin Hcff Robert J. Jfjjnigan Noble Jones Cecil Kenner Robert Yol-nc Herpis McCrary Kelly McCutchen Horace D. Shattlck Fred Nixon Carl Slthf.ri.and I'agt One llun.br,I onrf SUtir thrfeA. J. Bird Pole vault Buster Cook 4)0, hurdles Bob Jernigau 440, half mile Buck Anderson Javelin, hurdles Uracil Pete Kenner Pole vault, high jump Kelly SfcCutchen Broad jump Herd is McCrary 100, SSO-yard dashes With the 1928 season just closed by the conference meet at Birmingham, one outstanding performance is recorded by the Georgia aggregation—that by Buck Anderson, who broke the conference record in a javelin throw of 193 feet. 8J4 inches. Eleven conference records were broken in this meet by various southern college track stars, the most notable being that of Hamm of Georgia Tech, who jumped 25 feet, 6j4 inches, within a few inches of the world’s record. Kenner, of Georgia, tied for second place in the pole vault in this meet, including some 20 colleges. The results of the 1928 season are about the same as of the year before, a mediocre team with some outstanding performers. The sophomore element of the 1928 team is predominant. Anderson, Cook, Young, Nixon, Jones all having come up from last year's remarkable Freshman team. With two more years before them, Georgia can safely anticipate better results on the cinder path and in the field events. Wendell R. Becton is captain and an outstanding performer on the 1928 team. His event is the two-mile, in which he has captured many points this year. Herdis McCrary, who made such a fine showing as a sophomore, has been handicapped all season by throat and tonsil troubles and operations and has never been able to get back to par. His running in the short dashes has been all the more remarkable in that he weighs 195 pounds. Buster Cook, renowned prep athlete, made his debut on the track squad this year by being high point man of the team. He runs the 440-vard. Cook is the man who as a Freshman captured over 30 jxjints for his fraternity in the annual Pan-Hellenic meet. The weights were handled by Olin Huff, veteran of two years; Fred Nixon, a sophomore, and Buck Anderson. Nixon specializes in the shot-put while Huff throws the discus. Although Anderson's main event is the javelin, he also puts the shot. In the jumps. Robert Brice and Kelly Mc-Cutchcn do the broad jump, while Carl Sutherland. John Sproull, and Pete Kenner are high jumpers. McCutchcn has l een handicapped by a broken ankle which was sustained in 1927 I'ayc One Jlunrhfil anil Strip-four'forack Fred Xixoti Shot tut, discus and which has troubled him since. A bright outlook is ahead of him next year. Kenner and A. J. Bird have vaulted excellently for the Bed and Black this year, the former l e-ing an understudy of Captain Hoyt Turner of last year, and the latter a Sophomore. The hurdles arc handled bv Buster Cook in the low and Buck Anderson in the high. Robert Young was one of the most outstanding men on the 1928 team, running in the mile and half mile. He won his event several times during the season. Other members of the team were: N'ohle Jones (milcr). Robert Jernigan (half miler), and Joe Buffington (440-yard dash). In the first meet of the season Georgia vanquished Clcmson, 75 to 50. Cook was high point man. The Bulldogs were at their top form when they tied the noted Auburn team, 63-63. in the second dual meet of the season. Following this moral victory, the Bulldogs placed second in a triangular meet between Georgia, Auburn, and Florida. The meet was won by Auburn by a safe margin while the Bulldogs were far ahead of the Gators. The Red and Black did not enter the state meet. Tech defeated them decisively in a dual meet, 80 to 46. Kenner tied for first place in the pole vault at the Tech relays in Atlanta early in the season and Young won third in the special two-mile race. At the Olympic games tryouts held in Atlanta the first part of June, Bill Tate, old Georgia star who is now instructor in F.nglish and coach of the cross country team, and Robert Young, stellar distance man, were nominated to go to the final tryouts at Boston later on in the summer. Both are premier distance and steeplechase men and have excellent chances of representing this nation at the (Mympic games. Herd is McCrary was elected track captain for J929 after season had closed. Georgia track men in general have a bright 1929 season to look forward to, with only a few stars leaving this year. The following were awarded letters for 192S: Captain Bccton. Young. McCrary, Kenner, Sutherland, IIufT. Jones, Nixon, Bird, Cook, Anderson, Jernigan, and Manager Skinner. liob Young Half mile, mile Robert Brice Broad jump Joe Buffington 440, half mile Olin Huff Discus Marks Mile Frank Skinner Manager rar c One Hundred and SUty-fireCross Country ___Xm The story of the present year's cross-country team is one of victory over a big handicap, and of a struggle against a jinx which had pursued the runners through the previous season. ] or during the fall of 1926 every dual meet was lost, and low scores were made in the A. A. and Conference races. After that season of hard luck four of the l cst men on the squad were lost by graduation, so that at the start of the present season only two veterans reported for service. The two men who formed the nucleus for the team were Captain Becton of the track team and Captain Branvon of the cross-country squad. The rest of the squad reporting to Coach Bill Tate were sophomores. But it was an excellent aggregation, for most of the new men had taken part in the Freshman Intramural run and had made outstanding records. With this bunch a team was formed which swept its opiwncnts lxrforc it in the dual meets. It won all of them, and placed second in the Birmingham A. A. U. run, as well as third in the Conference race. It was a team which compared favorably with any of those of former years. And prospects for next year arc excellent, for nearly every man on the team will return. Indications | oint to another cup. which can l c added to the six now held by the Georgians. Among the sophomores who ran on the present team were Robert Young, who won first place in every dual meet and proved himself a crack athlete; Jones. Crisficld. Adams, Boyd, and Hudson. The freshman runners lost to the fast Tech High school squad, but several of the yearlings have since l ccomc interested in the sport and show promise. Sam Talmadge is to be especially mentioned. He won first place in the intramural run. and showed himself to be a man of much ability. Williams, Duke. Hollis. Upchurch, Baker, Higdon. Connerat, and Woody have also shown themselves to be good men. The freshman run with CIcmson resulted in a victory for the Carolinians. This was the only collegiate match engaged in by the first year men. Vage 0 c IlHudrfd and SUtg ti»baseball1927 baseball (By Bou Sherrod) Winning 19 games and losing 11. the 1927 edition of Georgia baseball teams had a fairly successful season—a season packed with a far greater amount of thrills than the average routine of games for a college baseball nine. Coach Hill White's men finished with a conference record of 14 won and eight lost. With op| oncnts outside of the Southern conference they were credited with five wins and three losses. Of the total. 19 games were played out of town while the remaining 14 weere fought out on Sanford field. Coach White issued the first call, for pitchers and catchers. on February 15. The battcrymcn were followed two weeks later by the other contenders for the team.Prospects were fair in the beginning. Six letter men had been lost from the 1926 lot in the stellar | ersons of Captain Xolen Richardson, shortstop: George Morton, catcher; Tom Nelson. pitcher; Johnny Satlof, second baseman; and Scrappy Moore, centcrficldcr. However, preliminary practice brought out several good performers to replace those lost. The remarkably big shoes n°?i'r ° en Richardson at shortstop were filled exceedingly l{l1 11 lnlc well by Glenn Chafin, diminutive Sophomore. Pat Keating showed promise "as Captain "Sheet” Johnson's understudy behind the bat while Rov Jacobson took his place with the slugging outfielders, Shivers and Flowers. “Mickey” Train's ability afield won for him a place at second base. The Georgians l egan the season with a pair of victories over Ohio State on Sanford field. The Northerners were unable to cope with the Athenians in pitching or batting. The Bulldogs won the first game 7 to 2 an dthc second 4 to 2. Following this beginning the Red and Black nine went on an eight-game road trip which lasted throughout the spring holidays. Four won and four lost was the record made by the team on this jaunt, covering three states. The team won its first pair of games from Clemson. 10 to 7 and 10 to 8, in two of the heaviest slugfests of the year. The Georgians collected 27 hits in these two games. Auburn, next on the Pane One II u ml rat amt Slztyci'jht1927 »Baseball list, was responsible for the first Georgia defeats, winning both games, the first 7 to 6. and the second 6 to 2. “Chick” Shiver. Georgia leftficldcr, hit two long home runs in the first game and was consequently walked three times in the second affair. The third pair of games was split with the University of Alabama. The Crimson team defeated Emmett Tully, 5 to 4. in the initial fray despite his remarkable pitching. “Lefty" Stewart kept the 'Banta hits well scattered in the second game and the Bulldogs won. 7 to 3. In each game the losers outhit the winners. The fourth two-game series was split with Vanderbilt in Nashville. Six errors were partly responsible for the Georgians' defeat in the first game, "Shakyv Kain being downed before his home-town crowd. Jack Waller's pitching and heavy hitting won the second for thc Bulldogs, y to 1. Scoring 14 runs in each game and totalling 2 S hits, the heavy bats of Coach White's men proved too much for the -Mercer Bears in the next two-game scries and the results were: Georgia 14, Mercer 4; Georgia 14, Mercer 12. In the third and fourth home games of the season the Bulldogs were again doubly victorious, this time defeating Kentucky, 15 to 6, and 7 to 6. Kain and Waller were the winning twirlers. Foreign teams won the next three out of four games from the Bulldogs. The University of Michigan's Wolverines won both games, the first 5 to 3. and the second 4 to 1. The Michigan pitchers proved very effective and base clouts came few and far between for the Bulldogs. Seven errors in the first game and five in the se.-ond were largely responsible for the Georgia losses. Michigan scored three runs in the last inning to win the first encounter. Tully and Stewart were the losing pitchers. In their next game the Bulldogs were shut out for the first and only time of the year. Besten. of Notre Dante, was the victorious pitcher. Although "Shaky” Kain fanned ten batters, the Captain "Chicle" Shiver, Ccntcrhcld Poire One It undent and Sixty-nine1927 baseball “Leftyr Sletean, Pilch Jack Waller, Pilch "I.cfly" Mur.lock, Pitch Bill Parks. Pilch Pal Keating, Calcli Harry Gorman. Catch B ciiuic Pot Its l cin, First Base Kush Freeman, Second Base South Benders hunched their hits to make them count. The next day brought revenge tor the home team when Emmett Tully held the Notre Dame men at his mercy. Georgia won, 4 to 2. Sensational catches by A renowitch and Shiver featured the last game. The Bulldogs again began their two-at-a-time campaign in the next series, defeating Clemson S to 4 and 9 to o. The second game was awarded to the Georgians when an unruly Clemson prayer refused to leave the field at the umpire's order. Earlier in the game Kain had scored from first when the pitcher threw wild to catch him napping. “Lefty” Stewart won the first game with his superb pitching. Then began the Tech scries. The first game, played in Atlanta, was a wierd affair, the Bulldogs scoring four runs in the last inning to nose out the Tcchsters. Georgia got 14 hits while Tech collected 15 off Tully. who managed to stay the whole route. Tech used three pitchers. In the second game. Kain turned in the l est pitching performance of the year, letting down the Yellow Jackets with one solitary hit. The Bulldogs won by an S-i score. Captain Johnson was spiked when Parham scored the Tech run and had to be taken from the game. North Carolina, next on the list, divided a two-game scries with the Bulldogs, winning the first 4 to 1, and losing the second by the same score. Stewart won his game while Kain lost the first. The second Tech series, played in Athens, furnished thrills to hundreds of visitors to Spring Dances. W ith the Yellow Jackets leading by three runs, some determined Bulldogs came to bat in the last half of the ninth to tie the score. But it was to no avail, for the Tech batters scored exactly five runs in the tenth inning to win. to to 5. Although they hit "Shakyv Kain. the Tech jinx, rather freely in the second game the Bulldogs also hit freely and won a slugging match, to to 8. The desperate Tech nine scored four runs in the ninth inning and that second battle. as well as hitting a home run., a triple, a double, and a single. This game made it three out of four for Georgia over the Yellow Jackets. Since the resumption of athletic relations in 1925. the Bulldogs have beaten the Tcchsters eight out of 12 games, winning two four-game series and splitting the other. The Bulldogs won the two-game scries and lost another to end the season. Maryland bowed to the Red and Black. 5 to 1 and 8 to 5, while the Cavaliers of Virginia won the two final games of the year,, 6 to 3 and 9 to 6. Stewart and Tully won from the former while Kain and Waller fell lxiforc the Virginians. Fane One Hundred m I Seventyig27 baseball H. F. Johnson led the 1927 team in batting, the sophomore third baseman hitting close to .400. He was followed by “Sheet" Johnson and "Chick” Shiver. “Lefty” Stewart, diminutive twirlcr, led the pitchers by winning six games and losing only once. At the close of the season. Coach White awarded 14 letters to members of the team for their services. “Chick” Shiver was elected to captain the 1928 team. There receiving letters were: Pitchers: "Shaky" Kain, Jack Waller, “Lefty” Stewart, and Emmett Tally. Catchers: Captain "Skeet” Johnson, Pat Keating. First Baseman: Tom Nash. Second Baseman: “Mickey" Frain. Third Baseman: H. F. Johnson. Shortstop: Glenn Chafin. Outfielders: “Chick” Shiver, Billy Arcnowitch, “Buck” Flowers, Roy Jacobson. "Brick” Davenport, Second Base Glenn Chafin, Shortstop If. F. Johnson. Third Base Roy Jacobson. Left Field SEASON'S RESULTS Georgia 7 — ()hio State 2 Georgia 4 — Ohio State 2 Georgia to — Clcmson 7 Georgia 10 — CIcmson 8 C icorgia 6 — Auburn 7 Georgia 2 — Auburn 6 Georgia 4 — Alabama 5 Georgia 7 — Alabama 3 (icorgia 2 — Vanderbilt 8 Georgia 9 — Vanderbilt 1 Georgia 14 — Mercer 4 Georgia 14 — Mercer 12 Georgia 5 — Kentucky 6 Georgia 7 — Kentucky 6 Georgia 3 — Michigan 4 Georgia 1 — Michigan 5 Georgia 0 — Notre Dame 4 Georgia 4 — Notre Dame 2 Georgia s — Clcmson 4 Georgia 9 — Clcmson O (forfeit) Georgia 10 — Tech 9 Georgia 8 — Tech i Georgia 1 — North Carolina 4 Georgia 4 — North Carolina 1 Georgia 5 — Tech 10 Georgia 10 — Tech 8 (icorgia 5 — Maryland J Georgia 8 — Maryland 5 (Icorgia 3 — Virginia 6 Georgia 6 — irginia 9 Tom Xash. Right Field Vergil Steele. Outfield Pete Herndon. Outfield Henry Reeves. Manager Page One Hundred amt Seventy onetyreshman Baseball 1928 Seven games were won and five lost during the spring season of the Georgia Freshman baseball team. The season opened with a series with Monroe A. and M., which the Aggies took, two out of three. The first encounter was lost, 4-2, but the Georgia nine came back in the second game and defeated its opponents by an unusually big score, driving in twelve runs while Monroe made one. The final game, and the series was lost when Monroe won the last game 11-8. Fort McPherson was defeated by the narrow margin of 12-11 at Atlanta. The Boys’ High team of the same city was met and overwhelmed 12-6. The first scries with the l ech freshmen in Athens was an even break between the rival freshmen crews. Georgia took the first game 5-3, while the Techstcrs returned next day and won 7-5. Three games with Riverside were next on the schedule, and two of these were Georgia victories. Georgia won the first two by scores of 3-! and 6-5, but the cadets were able to take the third 6-5. The season’s later games were with the Tech freshmen in Atlanta. One of these was taken by Tech, while the Red and Black freshmen won the second, 4-3, and broke even with the baby Jackets. A number of the men on the team have shown themselves to have expertness in playing the game. Among the regular players were l ate and Bishop behind the plate; I rye, Adcrholdt, and.Rowland in the pitcher’s box, Owens and Fuller at first, Holt and Hancock at second, Day and Rogers at third, McGaughey at short, and Sanford, Bird, Murray, and Ellis in the outfield. The team fought hard to be on a plane with the freshman nine of the previous season, which proved to be one of the best in the Southeast. A number of stars were on this team, including Lefty Murdock, Lee and Haley as pitchers; Gorman and Riddle as catchers; Rothstein and Wolfe at first; Maxwell and Butler at second; Griffin and Davidson at third; Fisher and Clark at short, and Davenport in the outfield. Murdock has become one of the varsity’s leading pitchers, a siren of destruction for apposing batters. Rothstein has won a place at first on the varsity and has shown himself to be a top-notch in fielder. pa'je 0ne w "l ,r d a"J ScetM 1 4 0foxing ZTT L'' V3-: Although the Georgia boxing team did not have a brilliant season, winning only one of the five matches in which it engaged, two of its members achieved outstanding success, and one has shown himself the peer of college light heavies throughout the nation. After the close of the season the Bulldog ringmen entered the Southern Intercollegiate Conference tournament at Lexington, Virginia. Carlton Jester, Athens, a senior, fought his way through to the finals before being eliminated. Bobby Hooks, a junior from Americus, defeated every man he encountered and won the tournament, along with the light heavyweight championship of the Southern Conference. After leaving Virginia, Hooks entered the ring at Mobile, Alabama, to try for a place on America’s Olympic boxing team. Here he won the Southeastern division championship, and began preparations to enter the final contest for a place on the team. However, he was defeated in the first pairings at Boston. The Red and Black squad lost to V. M. 1.6-1, Hooks winning the only match for the Georgians. The match with North Carolina was lost 5-2. Hooks and Jester won the only matches for Georgia. The Duke and first Clemson contests were also lost, but the Bulldogs' two crack boxers, Hooks and Jester, again came through with flying colors. In the final match of the season the Red and Black was raised for the first time over an op| osing team. Georgia defeated Clemson, winning five matches, and losing only one. At this time Hooks and Jester again won decisions. Kemp at bantamweight, Cumming in the lightweight class, and Frisbie as heavyweight representatives, all won their matches. Shensky obtained a draw with his man. Although Haley handled the heavyweight work before the last match, Frisbee, who entered the Clemson contest, made a good showing and proved himself to be a formidable hitter. The team was coached again this year by Lieutenant Iutwrcnce G. Smith. The present team is composed of the following letter men: Heavyweight, Haley; light-heavy, Hooks; welterweight, Pahnour and Mitchell; middleweight, Fulghum and Shensky; lightweight, Patrick and Cumming; featherweight, Jester; bantamweight, Carroll and Kemp. Durward Watson managed the pugilists. Payt Onr Hundred and SrrcntV f”ut Lacrosse SasSSIliPi The Georgia lacrosse team, in its third season, related with the southern diampionship title won in 1927. Tech, with the only other Southern lacrosse twelve, was defeated in both games played. The first game, played in Atlanta, was won by the Bulldogs after a bitter uphill fight, 7 to 5, and when the Techsters came to Athens they again fell under the speed and accuracy of Coach Nicholas’ men, ti to 7. Captain Ira C. Nicholas, as coach of a new sport, naturally faced many difficulties in training a team to combat those of years’ experience, but by sheer hard work succeeded to a high degree. The 1927 varsity brought the championship to the Georgia campus for the first time. The first game was played in the fall of 1926 between the half of the Tech-Vanderbilt football game in Atlanta. The abbreviated affair was won by the Bulldogs, 4 to o. Next in the second season of the sport at Georgia came the Syracuse University team, touring the South in the interest of lacrosse. Syracuse, former world’s champions, defeated the new Georgia team, 11 to 2. In an extra period match Tech was defeated by the Red and Black twelve, 9 to 8. On the Fort Bcnning trip, the Athenians broke even, defeating the Soldiers, 7 to 3, and losing, 5 to 2. Two of Georgia’s best players were lost for the season in the Fort Bcnning fray on account of injuries sustained. Tech then evened the three-game series with Georgia by winning the second game, 8 to 4. The 1927 Southern championship was at stake in the next game and the Georgians finally came through with a 7 to 4 victory over the Yellow Jackets. Freshmen were very strong in 1927, winning two games from the Tech rats, 8 to 1, and 20 to O. The latter score is a world’s record. Among those who contributed to the success of the current season were: Captain Jesse Drew, Candler, Strickland. Crouch. Gignilliat, Varner, Keene, G. Harris, Bishop, Whclchcl, Sparrow. Stancil. Parker, L. E. Gay, J. M. Gay, C. M. Johnson, and Powell. Joe Johnson was manager. pooe One Uundrtd and Seventy-fivetennis T. Tennis, like several other sports. has lat orc l under immense handicaps at the University. There is no adequate court in Athens where the game can Ik; played and all big Georgia matches must be played out of town. And yet, Georgia players continue to show up exceedingly well each year. The possibilities under favorable conditions arc great indeed. Malon Courts, junior at Georgia, is without a doubt the outstanding tennis player in Southern collegiate circles today, although he did not retain his Southern conference singles crown this year. in the conference tournament at New Orleans early in May, 1928. Courts was defeated in the semi-finals but only after lie was dead on his feet, having played all day. Hamilton Napier, sophomore member of the team, reached the quarter-finals. The 1928 season began with a 3-2 victory over Vanderbilt, but was followed by two defeats at the hands of Tech and Vanderbilt. At the state meet Courts won the singles championship and Boland and J.egwcn tied for the doubles, the play-off to come later in the spring. Malon Courts, Joe Boland, Bill I.egwen. and Hamilton Napier did most of the playing this season. Sanders Walker and Ralph Griffin participated in one or more matches. A short review of the 1927 season shows that Georgia produced the most successful team in many years’. Courts' winning of the conference title was the high light of the year, but other events are well worth mentioning. Kels Boland and Billy Armstrong won the state doubles crown. The 1927 team won every dual meet it participated in. defeating Vanderbilt. South Carolina, Clemson, V. M. C. A., Tech, Emory, Mercer, and Macon Racquet club. And all these victories came in spite of poor facilities! The 19-7 letter men were Malon Court'. Kel Boland, Billy Armstrong. Bill I.egwen, Joe Boland, and Bill Dcas. Pont One Hundred and Scient? rtfSwimming Swimming was first established as a sport at the University in 1926 but went out of existence the following year. During the 1927-28 session the sjxjrt was reintroduced on a smaller scale, only three meets being participated in. However, all three meets were won and second place was won at the state meet in Atlanta. Clemson was defeated in the South Carolina city and was again vanquished in Athens some few weeks later. The Savannah V. M. C. A. lost to the Bulldogs on May 19 in Athens. To C. YY. Jones, athletic director of the Athens Y. M. C. A. goes most of the credit for Georgia's swimming reorganization and success. Mr. Jones, recognized as one of the foremost swimming coaches in the South, consented to coach the Georgia team and with the help of a few who were interested in the project, did a creditable job. John Hodgson, Jimmie Harris. Bobby Hooks. Glenn Richards, Tom Hoynes, Cotiril Smith, Guy Race, Scott F.pjjes, and I .eon Grayson, were members of the swimming team which, though a bit obscure, was a credit to the institution. Despite the fact that the athletic association has a pool in Memorial Hall, all practices were held in the Y. M. C. A. pool. It is hoped that in succeeding years the Memorial Hall will be utilized, so that more students will be able to participate in swimming. Page Onr IhindreH a» l £ccenlv ct r«t Qolf The current golf season ended in a blaze of glory for Georgia when John Oliver, sophomore member of the team, won the Southern Conference championship on May 12, 192S, at the Belle Meade course in Nashville, Tenn. He defeated Dave Black, a team-mate, in the finals, 5-3. But this was not all—three out of four of the conference tournament semi-finalists were members of the Georgia team, Dave Black and Harvey Hill, as well as the younger Oliver. Never before had such a showing been made by one team. The Bulldog crew captured team championship and also medalist honors, John Oliver being low medalist. Black had entered the finals by defeating Leslie Williams of Sewanee in a gruelling 20-hole match on the morning of the final round while Oliver won from the other Georgian, Harvey Hill. The 1927-28 season was an eminently successful one for the Red and Black crew, only one match being lost during the entire season. The team was captained by Billy Oliver, while the membership was made up of John Oliver, Charlie Nunnally. Harvey Hill, Dave Black, Warren Walker, and Gus Witcher. The first five were awarded major letters at the close of the season in recognition of their winning the conference championship. Murray Soule managed the team. Following arc the results of the season: Georgia . . . . . . 7 — Alabama . . 6 Georgia . . . . . . 15 — Alabama .,, . . . 1 Georgia . . . 7 — Tech '. . . . 10 Georgia . . • . . 10 — Florida . . . 8 ' Georgia . . . 16 — North Carolina . . 2 Georgia • • • , . . 11 — North Carolina . . 6 Georgia . . • . . 15 — Duke . . • • 3 Georgia . . • . 13 — Sewanee . . • • 5 Georgia • . • . . . 12 — Vanderbilt . . . . 6 p"ae One Hundred and Serenli elt htfWomens AthleticsARCHERY Cupid and Robin Hood, and all that sort of thing HOCKEY TEAM Have at yoi knave ADVISORY COUNCIL Strictly Athletic Business, that’s u l‘»i7C One ffun,tred and Kiyht.v« TENNIS Forty or more love RIFLE TEAT The camera man seems to be the target for most eyes DOLPHIN CLUB No one save life guards need apply WOMEN’S G CLUB We got our G sweaters by strictly athletic activity Page One Hundred and Elghty-onc ZAdvisory (Council The work of the Women’s Athletic Association of the University has grown by leaps and bounds within the past few years, and with its growth the duties of the advisory council of the association, which is the governing body, have correspondingly increased. The officers of the association are: Ivy Hixson, President. Virginia Norton, Vice-President. Elizabeth Daniel, Secretary. Martha Evans, Treasurer. Addic Munday, Chairman Committee on Membership. These officers, together with the general managers of the different sports, constitute the advisory council. The council looks after all business matters of the association and endeavors to arouse and maintain by means of an intramural program interest in women's athletics at the University. Major sports offered to women students arc: hockey, basket-ball, swimming, tennis, and baseball. Minor sports are rifle marksmanship, archery, horseback riding, and hiking. Class teams compete in all major sports, while competition in the minor sports is by individuals. eWearers of the.s Q The Women’s thletic Association as a member of the Athletic Conference of American College Women uses an approved point system by which points are given for participation in both major and minor sports. A woman student is permitted to go out for only one major sport a term, and this, in addition to certain other regulations, makes necessary about three years of participation in order to make the 1,000 points which entitle a student to a letter. A W. A. A. pin is given to students making 450 points. Wearers of the G arc: Laura Dorr, Leonora Anderson, Hilda Lind, Virginia Norton, Louise Hammond, and Ivy Hixson. hockey Hockey takes the place for women of the University that football holds for men. The principal sport played by women students, it attracts more attention than any other class contest. The junior class team won out in the class tournament, played in the fall, over the sophomore team, runners-up, and the freshmen and senior teams, which finished in the order given. The playing of the game has improved steadily, and this year adherence to a definite set of training rules, as well as proficiency in the game itself, was necessary to make the class teams. cArchery Archery is the latest sport for women offered by officials of the University. It has been organized as a minor sport by the association, and regular classes have been offered during the fall and spring months. A number of the women students have become excellent marksmen in the ancient pastime. A class tournament in archery was held last spring for the first time. Ribbons were awarded to Cora Lee Harvey, Fannie Joe Little, and Helen Walters. Another intcrclass tournament was scheduled for this spring. 1‘aijc One Hundred and Kluhtytieehorseback Riding During the winter term classes in horseback riding arc held twice a week with Major F. W. Whitney, executive officer of the University R. O. T. C., as instructor. These classes have always been well attended by women students, and a number of creditable riders have been developed. Women riders competed for the first time in the fall of 1927 in the annual R. O. T. C. horse show, held in Athens. The three ribbons in the Ladies' Saddle class were won by Katherine Kingman, Winifred Orr, and Anna Crabb. Miss Kingman is a member of the Chevaliers Agilcs, which performed at the Augusta horse show, and won several places in the jumping events. tennis Interest in tennis is gradually increasing, although players arc handicapped by the very poor facilities offered on the University campus. The Michael cup tournament held in the fall was entered by doubles teams from different sorority houses and dormitories. Alice Rowland and Elsie Jester, representing Chi Omega, formed a team which defeated Emily Simpson and Evelyn Berry, an Athens team. An inter-class tournament was scheduled for the spring, and prospects seemed very promising, as each class has splendid material. Numerals were to be awarded the winners complying with regulations determined by the athletic association. Rifles c fCarksmanship A rifle team was coached in the fall by Captain I. C. Nicholas, of the University R. O. T. C. Practice began in November, and over thirty co-eds tried out for the team. Under the direction of Captain Nicholas and two student assistants, the members of the team arc taught all the different firing positions. Most of the shooting, however, is done from the prone position. They also practiced pistol marksmanship on the outdoor range. Alice Rowland, captain of the team, held first place for average high score. Della Carlisle was second, and Rebecca Oglesby and Anna Crabb tied for third place. Two matches were held with Nebraska and Maryland, the results of each team being telegraphed to the opponent. Nebraska defeated Georgia 4S3 to 480, and Maryland 4S8 to 483. HDolphiru Qlub The Dolphin club is the swimming club of Georgia co-eds. Membership in the organization is open to those who have passed the senior Red Cross life saving test. Classes arc held by the club in beginners and advanced swimming, and also in Red Cross life saving exercises. Members of the club arc: Evelyn Berry, Alice Cartledge, Martha Evans, Ivy Hixson, Katherine Kingman, Martha Lester, Hilda Lind, Katherine Moore, and Emily Simpson. Page One Hundred and Hlght y-ihrec -Co-eds The centennial commencement of iqoi awakened the interest of the people of Georgia in their state university. It was at this time that Mr. George Foster Peabody (shown in the painting standing at the right of Chancellor Hill), first became interested in the institution in which he has since munificently aided.Hlaid of Mens, ere we part. Give, 0. Give me back my heart Elfyb thaf old Beauty Judge, Johv HELDjr ha f vaU'l a,ia'Miss Josephine Brooks Athens, GeorgiaMiss Sadie Myers Athens, Georgia Miss Juanita Luckey Augusta, GeorgiaMiss Wii.hel.wina Macken Sparta, GeorgiaThe reorganization in 1Q07 oj the College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts into the Slate College of Agriculture marked the extension of the University sactivities to the economic betterment of the entire commonwealth. Scientific farming in Georgia has received its chief impetus from the efforts of the institution which began its work at that time.C?an-C3idlcnic (Council The Pan-Hellenic Council is composed of two representatives from each of the national Grcek-lctter fraternities which has been elected to the council. A chapter of a national fraternity must have been established three years at the University before becoming eligible for election to the council. All University dances arc sponsored by the Pan-Hellenic Council. OFFICERS Wili.iam H. Young, Jr................... Roy E. Estes........................ Harry E. Talmadge .... Charles B. Nunnai.i.y . . . ................President . Vice-President . . Secretary . Treasurer Sigma Alpha Epsilon Wm. H. Young, Jr. Craig Barrow, Jr. Chi Phi Donald Dunwooy Charles B. Nunnally Kappa Alpha Augustus S. Loyless Harry E. Talmadge Phi Delta Theta W. Eelker Lewis R. Van Fletcher Sigma Chi J. Mc.Miller Barnes Y. Joseph Johnson MEMBERS Alpha Tati Omega Rouf.rt E. McTigue James Buchanan Sigma Xu William A. Ki.ink Edwin S. Boyett Delta Tan Delta W. Ryan Frier Robert Dodson Chi Psi Franz Stewart Jack Chaillk Kappa Sigma Roy Estes E. Kelly McCutciien Pi Kappa Phi H. Eugene Smith W. B. Collins Lambda Chi Alpha Francis L. Wilcox Arm and T. Eyler Phi Epsilon Pi David Greenfieu) Herbert W. Ringle Tau Epsilon Phi Frank S. Lesser Herman J. Lesser Our f Hdml itnrl SlHtly clt htcWomen’s rPan'C{Kellenic (Council The Women's Pan-Hellenic Council is organized upon the same principles as the men’s, except that it has nothing to do with the dances. OFFICERS Addie Muxday President Katharine Moore . Secretary-Treasurer Phi Mu Frances Foruks Katharine Moore Alpha Gamma Delta Mildred David Mary Cubbedge MEMBERS Chi Omega Sara Morris Jeannette Meaders Kappa Delta Addie Monday Martha Fester Sigma Delta Tau Roselle Rosenthal Rosina Pearl Top row: Meaders, Cubbedge, Forbes. Moore. Rosenthal. Bottom rose: Lester, Monday. Morris, David. Pearl. f'O'jr Our Itnnilrut owl Xlurtp niueStudent Qovemment tAssociationfor cWomemJ The Student Government Association for Women is concerned with making and enforcing the University regulations concerning women students, particularly with regard to their social activities. OFFICERS Louise Hammond . . Frances Forbes Janet Fortson . .. Lucy G. Henry ................President . . Vice-President . . Secretary . Treasurer Halije A. Cox Frances Forbes Janet T. Fortson MEMBERS Louise K. Hammond Lucy G. Henry Mary W. Manning Katisue Whitehead Top roue Henry. Forbes, Hammond. Manning. Bottom roue Fortson. Cox. Whitehead. Pttyc Ttco Hundred rReligiousF y. Q. c2L Cabinet OFFICERS Arthur M. Gignii.liat....................................President Robert L. Patterson...................................First Pice-President Troy B. Cobb.....................Second Vice-President John L. Barnes.........................Secretary R. B. Jennings...............Treasurer MEMBERS B. K. Anderson Oscar L. Benson Claude E. Boggs Donald L. Bran yon John S. Candler, II Harry Carswell B. Scott Kites Pryor W. Fitts Berry Floyd, Jr. John L. Green Lamartine G. Hardman, Jr. Robert Thomas J. Harrold D. Guerry Harris Malcolm M. Lockhart William A. Legwen Harold H. Martin Alex J. McDonald, Jk. Jack E. Parr E. L. Secrest John F. Seroull, Jr. I-I. Luke Stanch. Harry E. Talmadge Ongfield Tot row: Hoggs. Sproull, Eppes, Sccrcst. McDonald, Wingfield. Cobb. Hranyon. Second row: Patterson, Floyd. Carswell. Lockhart, Jennings. Benson, Harrold. Bottom row: Gignilliat, Stancil, Legwen. Anderson. Hardman. Green. Harris. Talmadge. I’atje Tico Hundred and Tiroeshmaru y. (£Nl. Q. cA. Cabinet OFF Jack E. Park .... J. Herbert Bolton . Jake T. Carlton . Wilbur S. Jones Herbert Bennett J. Herbert Bolton Jake T. Carlton Albert B. Cook Harold I. Griggs Charles A. Hope -------------“ OCRS ........................President ..............Vice-President .................Secretary .............Treasurer MKMBERS Wilbur S. Jones Harold H. Martin-Jack K. Parr Jack J. Parks J. Hamilton Rasnake J. W. Thomas E. L. Secrest To( row: Parks, Secrest, Parr, Hope, Bolton. Bottom row: Carlton, Bennett, Martin. Rasnake, Jones, Thomas. foot Tko Hundred oniI Thrtry. cls). Q. ZA. Cabinet OFFICERS Elizabeth Kennedy . Ivy Hixson .... Allbf.ne Epps . Elizabeth Wise . President . Pice-President . Secretary Treasurer MEMBERS Alleene Epps Coka I.ee Harvey Ivy M. Hixson Mary C. Huguley Elizabeth 1C. Kennedy Addie Monday Mary E. McMiixan Jewel Pitts Margaret Rogers Helen Smith F. Katherine Strong Agnes Sanders Margaret G. Stone S. Ometta Varner Mary 1C. Wells Elizabeth F. Wise Top row-' Varner, Stone, Sanders, Wells, Hu git ley. Kennedy, Monday. Bottom rote: Hixson, Harvey, Smith, Rogers, Epps, Pilts, McMillan. Page 7Vo JtunJrol oml FourScholasticThi 'Beta Kappa Tin- University of Georgia chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, national honorary scholastic fraternity, was installed in 1913. Elections are held annually at the beginning of the third term. 1 lie initiation is not held, however, until commencement. J. H. T. MacPhersox R. P. Stephens . W. O. Payne OFFICERS . . . President . Treasurer Secretary STUDENT MEMBERS Dorothy L. Balk Annie L. Cartledge Joseph R. Cumminc Nora Fortson Winifred Fowler Arthur M. Gignilliat Thomas J. Hamilton, Jr. Benjamin 11. Hardy, Jr. Joseph K. Heymax Ivy M. Hixson A. Jack Mathews Sam Miller A. Park McGintv Robert I Patterson Guy A. Race H. Luke Stanch. Katisue Whitehead Top row-' Patterson, Dimming. Ralk, Fortson, Cartledge, Hixson. Second row: Fowler, Hardy, Standi, Hey man, Mathews. Donum rote' Whitehead, Miller, Race, GiRnilliat, McGinty, Hamilton. P09t Tko l HH.lrct ami HU‘Thi Kappa Thi T Phi Kappa Phi. national honorary scholastic fraternity for students in the professional schools, as well as in the colleges of arts and sciences, holds two initiations annually—one in the fall term, and the second at the loginning of the third term. OFFICERS Andrew M. Soule........................... Ben Hardy.............................. Milton P. Jarnigan............... E. M. Coulter................... . . President . Vice-President . Secretary Treasurer Charles A. Asmnwall Louise Balk Mrs. Margaret M. Brand Donald L. Branyon James V. Bruce Annie L. Cartledce McW horter S. Cooley A. LeRoy Crittenden Mary Cubbedgb JosEm R. Cum Ming Rubye Eberhardt Nora Fortson J. A. CiARRARI) Arthur M. Gignilliat Benjamin H. Hardy, Jr. STUDENT MEMBERS T. J. Harroi.d Ivy Hixson Joseph K. Hkyman Emma Keys Lucy Lampkin Hilda Lind A. Park McGinty Sam Miller Sarah Nokll T. Dozier Oglesby Winifred Orr Virginia Ray Jack Renfroe Mrs. Alex Rhodes Guy A. Racf. T. Evans Ritchie G. H. Robinson Rosf.llf. Rosenthal Agnes Sanders A. Bernard Simowitz Lamar N. Smith R. W. Smith, Jr. P. M. Spiers H. Luke Stanch. Jennie C. Steed Thomas F. St. John Maurice C. Thomas W. A. Ward Mary E. Wells Mary E. Wixjd Tor 'ow: Giguilliat, Cooley, Liml. Steed. N'ocll, St. John. Race, Wells, Brand, Rhodes. Secoiut rate: L. Smith. Cartlcdgc, Hardy. Eberhardt, Branyon, Oglesby, Bruce, Crittenden, Keys, Cum ming. Third rate: Ward, Kcnfroc. Heyman. McGinty. Ray. Stancil. Thomas. Miller. Spiers, Fortson. Bottom roto: Pearl, Garrard, Hixson. Simowitz, Wood. Sanders, Balk. R. W. Smith, Orr, Robinson. 1'orjt 7' o Hundred and SrreuSenior ‘Ttgund ables -'V.vs - - : C. __ r-T1 The Senior Round Table is a chapter of Sigma Upsilon, national honorary literary fraternity. The purpose of its formation was the encouragement of literary activity among members of the student body. Although high grades are the chief consideration for election to the Round Table, college activities are of importance. James Bruce Donald Dckwody Arthur M. Gignii.liat Thomas J. Hamilton, Jr. Ben H. Hardy, Jr. Joseph K. Heyman A. Park McGinty Prank A. McMplun Robert L. Patterson E. Ai.dine Pound John R. Roberts, II. Lamar N. Smith Top row: Brucc. McGinty. Hamilton, Cignilliat, Dunwody, Hardy. Bottom row: Patterson, Pound. Roberts, Heyman. Smith, McMullan. Pape Ttro Hundred and f.vjht•c Chi Delta Thi T Chi Delta Phi is a national honorary scholastic fraternity for women students. Its chief object is the encouragement of intellectual interests in its members, who are chosen because of their scholarship. An Nik Lane Cartledce Julia C. Cook Alleeke Ei’rs Nora P. Fortson Roselle Rosenthal Alice A. Rowland Top rovf: Cook. Cartlcdftc. Bottom r nv: Rosenthal, Fortson. Rpps. Pt'jc Ttco llumirtd omt .VineJunior Cabinet- The Junior Cabinet is an organization for members of the Junior Class which corresponds to the Senior Round Table. Proficiency in studies is the chief qualification, but as in the case of the Round Table, athletics, debating, work on college publications, and other activities are also considered. Craig Barrow, Jr. Joseph H. Boland John S. Candler, II Fussell M. Chalker Guv C. Hamilton B. Harvey Hill Alex A. Lawrence, Jr. William A. Lecwen W. Douglas Little A. J. Mathews Maxwell Rosenthal Stephen L. Upson Tof rote: Candler, Chalker, Mathews, Lcgwen, Rosenthal, Barrow. Bottom row: L'pson. Hill, Boland, Little, Hamilton. Lawrence. « • Tiro ItuiHlrrd and TrnZodiac The Zodiac Club is an organization for women students of the Junior class which is quite similar to the Junior Cabinet, club for men students. 'Hie qualifications arc much the same. Rebecca F. Andrews A. Elizabeth Armstrong Agnes S. Burgher Martha J. Fot-SOM Lucy G. Henry . Katisue Juanita Luckey M. Louise Morton Rosin a Pearl Eunice F. Stokei.y F. Katherine Strong miitehead Top rote- Andrews. Pearl, Henry. Whitehead. Bottom ro?iMorton, Folsom, Luckey, Armstrong, Strong. Page r “ t:,CCfnrPublicationsTandora Tiios. J. Hamilton, Jr.............................................Editor-in-Cluef Jesse V. Drew.............................................Business Manager Broadus B. McAfee......................................Business Manager William H. Young, Jr.............................Business Manager A. Jackson Mathews.............................Associate Editor Thomas F. St. John.........................Associate Editor J. Durward Watson .... Associate Editor H. M. Heckman .... Faculty Advisor The 1928 Historical Pandora is the forty-first volume of the University of Georgia yearbook, the first volume of which was published in 1888. Founded originally by the social fraternities at the University and published as their record of the college year, the Pandora in 1901 became the annual of the entire student body. The present book cuts away sharply from those which have preceded it both in theme, format and general arrangement, and the editor has therefore felt justified in entitling it the 192S Historical Pandora. It seems highly appropriate that after the first forty volumes there should come such innovations, changes, improvements that they, without exaggeration, may be said to have changed in far-reaching ways the entire make-up of the Pandora. instead of the former method of selection by the caucus of the Republican party, the system of selection by a committee was begun with the 1928 Pandora staff. 'This committee, composed of Mr. H. M. Heckman, faculty advisor of the Pandora; a representative from the Pan-Hellenic council; a representative from the non-fraternity men; and two persons chosen by these three, began with the staff of this Pandora—as this is written, it has just selected the staff of the 1929 Pandora. The theme of The 1928 Historical Pandora, illustrating salient episodes in the history of the University, is a prime reason for the title chosen. We have essayed to depict the epoch-making events in the history of our Alma Mater as it has developed through the years. The fourteen paintings which form the decorations for the opening and division pages of tnc Pandora have been presented to the University and will be hung, along with adequate explanatory notes, in the lobby of Memorial Hall. The size of the annual, the typographical features, the lay-out of the different sections—all these have been changed wherever to change them has seemed to promise a more original, a more attractive, a more desirable year-book. The page size of the 1928 Pandora is nine by twelve inches as compared with seven bv nine inches, the size of preceding Pandoras, and. indeed, of all Mathews Hamilton St.John Watson I’a-jt Ttro Hundred and CourtrenTandora other Southern annuals. This additional space has encouraged a balancing of facing pages and an arrangement of activities according to a coherent plan of grouping which is more difficult with the smaller size page. The activities pertaining to the school of commerce, for example, have been grouped in a single section; those of the college of agriculture, and of all the others, in fact, have been grouped with the motivating idea of permitting a person not at all familiar with activities at the University to find with facility a particular organization. Brief notes explaining the nature of the organization or activity have also been furnished with the general aim of increased usefulness to all readers. Two major innovations have to do with the senior section. We return this year to the practice of earlier Pandoras and of leading annuals at present in abolishing the formal write-up which in former years has l een carried for each senior. The separate section for seniors in the law school has been done away with, so that the 264 seniors in the section, the largest number ever appearing in a Pandora, arc in one alphabetical order. Only co-eds appear in the beauty section this year whereas none had ever appeared in it before. Twenty-eight photographs were submitted to John Held. Jr., the noted illustrator, and from them he has chosen six for the section. Mr. Held's woodcut, “Maid of Athens, Ere We Part ' which is reproduced at the beginning of the section, we consider the feature of the l»ook. The roll of the student l ody of the University is not given by classes, as heretofore, but in one alphabetical order, together with the class and home address. The fraternity rolls arc also given alphabetically, always with the purpose of making easier access to the information which an annual contains. The chapter houses, the fraternity crest and the fraternity badge arc reproduced this year along with the usual panel of members. The fraternity section contains only social fraternities. the professional and honorary fraternities having been placed where they belong, in the sections dealing with the activities of the schools of whose activities they are a part. For the University the deans of the different schools have furnished messages sketching the histories of their schools and the objects of the courses which they offer. We have reproduced with his message a photograph of each dean at his desk. The athletic section, always one of the most important sections of an annual, we have endeavored to make worthy oi the splendid teams which have represented the University during the past year. Especially have we attempted to make the football section an adequate record of the great team which last fall came within a game of winning the national championship. Georgia's two All-American ends. Captain Chick Shiver and Tom Nash, perhaps the greatest pair of flank-men the country has produced, arc drawn in charcoal to introduce the athletic section. We consider it only a deserved tribute to two men whose efforts have won nation-wide fame. Drew McAfee Young Heckman Page Ttea Ilundrid and FifteenT ed and fflack FIRST HALF YEAR Ihomas F. St. John .... Editor-in-Chief Guv C. Hamilton .... Managing Editor , EDITORIAL STAFF Rkn Hardy.....................................................First Associate Editor John S. Candler, II....................................Second Associate Editor Prentiss Courson......................................Third Associate Editor R. E. Hamilton...........................................,Ynos Editor Robert L. Sherrod.....................................Sports Editor Wyllv Folk.........................................Feature Editor I.athrop Mitchell..............................Staff Manager Nathan Gans.............................Staff Manager BUSINESS DEPARTMENT Friar M. Thompson, Jr................................................Business Manager Carl T. Sutherland....................................Assistant Business Manager Billy McClellan........................................Circulation Manager Joe K. Hawkins...........................................First Assistant Edgar R. Blount.......................................Second Assistant L. L Gay.........................................Third Assistant SECOND HALF YEAR Ben Hardy, Jr................Editor-in-Chief R. E. Hamilton . . . . Managing Editor EDITORIAL STAFF John S. Candler, II...........................................First Associate Editor Prentiss Courson.......................................Second Associate Editor Gene Baldwin..........................................Third Associate Editor Latiikop Mitcheli..............................................Xezos Editor J. H. Napier, Jr......................................Sports Editor Nathan Cans.........................................Sports Editor Josephine Brooks..............................Society Editor Evelyn Sherman...................Assistant Society Editor Charles Hardy..........................Staff Manager R. C. Batts........................Staff Manager BUSINESS DEPARTMENT Friar M. Thompson, Jr................................................Business Manager Carl T. Sutherland....................................Assistant Business Manager Joe K. Hawkins.......................................Circulation Manager L. E. Gay......................................... . . First Assistant NELSON Gray.......................................Second Assistant Oscar Lott.......................................Third Assistant REPORTOKIAL STAFF Mary Claire Brannon, Sadie Myers, Roselle Rosenthal, Xoemi Henson, James Hollingsworth, Tom Hamilton, Rene Stuart, Percy Johnson, J. T. Carlton. William Parrel, Sam Hirsch, R. E. Falugant, Bill Tyus, Marvin Cox. Top row-' Thompson, Brooks. St. John. Sherrod. Second row: R. E. Hamilton, Hardy, Folk. G. Hamilton. I’aije Tiro It u ml in I iml SixteenQeorgia Cracker I E3 FIRST HALF YEAR Ben Hardy......................................Editor-in-Chief A. S. Loyi.ess.............................Business Manager T. A. Witcher................................Art Editor SECOND HALF YEAR Jack Rentkof..........................................Editor-in-chief A. S. Loylkss...................................Business Manager George Oliver......................................Art Editor Frank McMullak..................................Theaters Ben Hardy.........................Advertising Manager Gwynn Nixon K. E. Falugant Steve Upson John B. Hill Wesley Culpepper Wynn Burton Nora Fortson Noemi Henson I. S. Makkel Dave Wolfe SENIOR STAFF Thomas St. John Wvlly Folk Tom Hamilton Conrh. Smith Guy Hamilton J A M ES HoLLI NGSWORT H JUNIOR STAFF James Carson Anne Morris Percy S. Johnson C. M. Preston, Jr. . Guy C. Hamilton B. B. Strain Charles Hardy CIRCULATION DKPARTMF.NT G. H. Rauschenberc C. C. West Manager BUSINESS DEPARTMENT Billy Glenn Sanders Walker Top row: Hardy. Rcnfroc, Si. John, Loylcsj. Holtoni row: Witcher, Oliver, Hamilton, Folk. I'age Ttco Hundred and SeventeenSigma Delta (Shi The Georgia chapter of Sigma Delta Chi. national professional journalistic fraternity, was installed in January, 192S, and is therefore the most recent addition to the organizations at the University. Only those students intending to make journalism their profession arc eligible for membership. S. V. Sanford FACULTY MEMBERS J. E. Drewry MEMBERS Wynn T. Burton Eugene B. Baldwin John S. Candlf.r. II Prentiss Coukson W. Ryan Frier Arthur M. Gignilliat Nathan A. Gans Guy C. Hamilton, Jr. Thomas J. Hamilton, Jr. R. E. Hamilton Ben H. Hardy, Jr. Charles L. Hardy Lathroi Mitchell A. J. Mathews Thomas St. John Roiiert L. Sherrod Carl T. Sutherland Top row: Gans. Candler, T. Hamilton, G. Hamilton, St. John. R. E. Hamilton. Middle row-' Courson, Baldwin. Drewry, C. Hardy, Mitchell. Sherrod. Hottom row: Burton, Sutherland. Gignilliat. B. Hardy, Mathews, Frier. I'ayr Tiro lluiulrftl it ml HiijhhrilLiterary SocietiesHDemostheniaru Officers •e Presidents Arthur M. Gigniluat.......................................First Term Hoke S. Wofford..........................................Second Term R. W. Smith...............................................Third Term Secretaries P. S. Fitts...............................................First Term Emanuel Javetz...........................................Second Term Weyman Strickland....................................... Third Term Gigniluat Wofford Smith 1’aye Tito HnndmI and TwentyThi Kappa Officers Presidents Robert L. Patterson..........................................First Term Ren Hardy...................................................Second Term John S. Candler, II..........................................Third Term Secretaries Park McGikty.................................................First Term Sanders Walker..............................................Second Term Fred Davis...................................................Third Term Patterson Hardy Candler ’aye Tico Hundred and Twenty-oneHDemostheniaru Kgy (Circles The Demosthenian Key Circle is composed of all members of the society who have won a speaking key. In order to win a key, it is necessary to represent the society in four speaking events. An intercollegiate debate is counted as two speaking events and the presidency of the society as one. Members of the circle are: Joseph R. Cu.m minc Rohert L. Fali.igant Autiiur M. Gignii.i.iat Isaac K. Hay Joseph K. Heyman EMANUEL JAVETZ Rufus R. Jennings Irving S. Nathan Golden A. Pirki.e Horace D. Shattuck Franklin H. Siiearouse Hoke S. Wofford Top row: Wofford. Javctz, Shattuck, Hay. Jennings. Bottom rote; Falligant. Nathan. Pirklc, Gignilliat, Heyman. I'Mr Two llun.tr,,t a 'l Twenty.(ieoThi Kappa Key Circles The Phi Kappa Key Circle is compose l of all members of the society who have won a speaking key. In order to win a key it is necessary to represent the society in four speaking events. An intercollegiate debate is counted as two speaking events and the presidency of the society as one. Members of the circle are: John S. Candler, II David S. Greenfield Thomas J. Hamilton, Jr. 1). Guerry Harris Andrew J. Kixgrry Prank A. McMui.lan Robert L. Patterson B. Sanders Walker Top row: Greenfield. Candler, McMullan, Hamilton. Bottom row: Patterson, Kingery, Walker, Harris. Page Tieo Hundred and Tircntythret1Debating Council The Debating Council, composed of three representatives from each of the two societies, is in charge of speaking activities at the University. It chooses the subjects and dates for both intercollegiate and society debates and generally acts in a supervisory capacity. OFFICERS Isaac K. Hay..............................................President Joseph K. Heyman.............................Vice-President J. Ernest Palmour, Jr. . . . Secretary and Treasurer DEMOSTHENIAX Arthur M. Gigxilliat Issac K. Hay Joseph K. Heyman PHI KAPPA Thomas J. Hamilton, Jr. J. Ernest Palmour, Jr. Robert L. Patterson FACULTY MEMBERS Robert E. Park William Tate To[ row: Patterson, Palmour, Tate, Heyman. Bottom rote: Hamilton, Park, Hay. Gignilliat. Tieo Hundred and Twenty-fourIntercollegiates ‘Debate 1927 Subject: "Resolved, That military training should be abolished from the American schools and colleges A ffir motive (Won from University of Alabama) Hersuel Parham Robert L. Patterson Negative (Lost to University of South Carolina) Golden A. Pikki.e Isaac K. Hay Patterson Hay PlRKLE Page Ttco llmirimt tin l Wrnfy- J«eIntercollegiate Debate 1928 Subject: “Resolved, That the democratic party should nominate Al Smith of Nciv York for the presidency." Affirmative (Won from South Carolina) John S. Candler, II Rufus B. Jennings Negative (Ix st to South Carolina) Isaac K. Hay Joseph M. Oliver Oliver Hay Candler Jp.nnincs Page Tico Hundred and Ticcnty-tl Intercollegiate "Debate -'.T,T 1928 Affirmative (Lost to the University of Florida) Robert E. Fallicant Rufus B. Jennings Joseph K. Mf.yman Subject: “Resolved, That the United States should cease to protect by armed forces all capital invested abroad except after formal declaration of tear.'’ Fallicant Jennincs Heyman Page 3Vo Ilumlnit 1 ml Tirrttlv-tttcency nnbersariaris The anniversary exercises of the founding of Demosthenian and Phi Kappa societies arc held annually in the chapel, April 21. The speaker for each of the societies is chosen by judges on the basis of papers submitted. DEMOSTHEMAN Robert E. Falligant—"Justice Delayed Is Justice Denied.’' Introduced by Caki. T. Sltjierland PHI KAPPA John S. Candler, II -“Phi Kappa's Contribution to the Hall of Fame.” Introduced by Thomas J. Hamilton, Jr. Fallicaxt Candler Page Tiro IlindrrJ uifrf Twenty -right( hampion Uebatex The Champion Debate is held annually between the two societies, ordinarily in the winter term. Subject: Resolved, That the United States should cease to protect by armed forces all capital invested abroad exec ft after formal declaration of war. Affirmative (Dcmosthenian) Robert E. Kaluga nt Rufus B. Jennings Joseph K. Hevman Negative (Phi Kappa) John S. Candler, II J. Carlton Jester, Jr. Frank A. McMullan ( Decision rendered in favor of the affirmative.) Top rotv: Candler, Jester. Bottom rozo; Jennings, Failigant, McMullan. Herman. Po'je Ttco Hundred and Tictntu xlnc Junior 0ration Six Juniors selected in a preliminary trv-out compete annually for a medal offered by Dr. R. E. Park, head of the English Department of the University, for the best oration written and delivered by a member of the Junior class. The medal this year was won by Glenn Richards. Jr., of Athens. The six who delivered orations were: Gi.knn Richards, Jr. J. Earnest Pai.mer, Jr. Joseph R. Cummixg I .eon IT. Grayson Rufus B. Jennings Care T. Sutherland Pai.mour Grayson Jennings Com minc . Togr Tiro lluudrtd and ThirtyJunior-Senior Impromptu Subject: "Resolved, That students should be given college credit for all activities, whether physical, mental or social, when these activities arc duly authorized by the college." Affirmative (Phi Kappa) John S- Candler, Ii David Greenfield J. Carlton Jester, Jk. Thomas J. Hamilton, Jr. Frank A. McMillan Robert L. Patterson Negative (Demostlicnian) Fussei.l M. Ciialkbr Arthur M. Gicnilliat Joseph K. Heyman Rufus Jennings Carl T. Sutherland Hoke S. Wofford (Decision rendered in favor of the negative.) Top rote: Wofford, Chalkcr. Hamilton, Guuiler, Sutherland. Jennings. Bottom rote: Jester, Patterson. McMullan, Greenfield. Gignilliat, Heyman. I'auf. TKO Ilundrtil ond Thirty-on,Sophomores ‘Debate Subject: "Resolved, that no student at the University of Georgia should be pledged to any social fraternity until he has been officially recognized as a Sophomore Affirmative (Phi Kappa) Guerry Harris Livingston Travis Sanders Walker Negative (Dcmosthcnian) Kankakee Anderson Emanuel Javetz Irving S. Nathan (Decision rendered in favor of the affirmative.) Top row: Javetz. Harris. Bottom row: Anderson, Nathan, Walker, Travis. Paye 7Vo Hundred and ThirtytKOSophomore Reclamation J en Sophomores selected in a preliminary try-out compete for a medal offered by the Hoard of Trustees for the l est Sophomore dcclaimer. The medal was won this year by Emanuel Javetz. Kankakee Anderson H. R. Edmondson T. P. Edwards Pryor Fitts Guerry Harris J. E. Hays Emanuel Javetz Irving S. Nathan V. Livingstone Travis Sanders Walker To? row: Anderson. Edmondson. Heffernan, Hays. Bottom rout: Javetz. Nathan, Travis. Walker, Harris. I'agc Tieo Hundred and Thlrlv it rctreshman_ Uebate Si'DjECT: “Resolved, That no Freshman shall take part in any athletic contest off the University campus Affirmative (Phi Kappa) Frank Constancy Marvin Cox Kingsley Weatherly (Decision rendered in Negative (I )emosthenian) Sydney Hacker Herbert Bolton Charles Hope of the affirmative.) Constancy Cox Hope 1‘orjf. Ttco Hundred and Thirty-tourtyreshmaru. Impromptu ‘Debates •T' pMK Subject: "Resolved, That the Prohibition Amendment should be repealed. A ffirmotive ( Demosthenian ) Joseph H. Boi.ton Jack E. Parr Samuel T. Sawyer Abf. Weinstein Charles Hope (Decision rendered in Negative (Phi Kappa) Era n k Const a ncy Henry H epeer n a n William Jessup James Maxwell Kingsley Weatherly favor of the negative.) Top row: Sawyer, Weinstein, Maxwell, Holton. Bottom row? Parr, Jessup, Constangy, Heffernan, Hope. faffc Tko IIumlrol ,md Thtrtv-flrcrPioneer Inner Circle The Pioneer Club is the organization to which all women students of the University automatically belong. The Inner Circle of the Pioneer is the governing board. OFFICERS Maykelle Stitji................. Katiikkine K. Mookk .... Mary Claire Brannon Addie Monday............. Katisue Whitehead . . . . . President . Vice-President . . Secretary 7'reasurcr II istorian MEMBERS Mary Ci.aire Brannon Willie Mae Cook Annie Lane Cakti.edce I.ii.a Pews Frances Fokiies Winifred Fowler Louse K. Hammond Ivy M. Hixson-On ie K. Hixson Elizabeth E Kennedy Hilda Lind Katherine R. Moore Addie Mhnday Sarah M. Xoell Rosin a Pearl ilia San horn Eunice F. Stokely Jennie Ci.aire Steed Maybelle Stith Katisue Whitehead Tof row' Fowler, O. Hixson, Lind. Orr. Hammond. Tibbcts, Hill. Middle rote-' Nocll. Pearl. Cartlcdge. Stith. Whitehead, I. Hixson. Brannon. lloltom rote: Sanborn. Moore, Forbes. Steed. Kenne ly. Monday, Dews. Pag Two Hundred and Thirty! Membership in ilic Sphinx Club is generally considered the highest honor o| cn to a University undergraduate. The club, which was organized in 1897. ordinarily initiates from eight to eleven members a year. The initiations arc always held during a week-end. Those not members of the club are not allowed to know anything of the nature of the organization, but the students most prominent in college activities are generally selected for membership. 1. A. H. Patterson 49. Harold Kktron 97- Claud Derrick 2. V. I). Hoopkk 50. Jack Bower 98. W. C. Henson .L L. Cotiiran S'- Framptox Ellis 99- J. B. Harris (’». Glenn 52. Frank Anderson 100. Y. B. Smith 5. C. R. Andrews 53- R. P. Brooks 101. D. H. Rf.dfearn 6. F.. E. Pomeroy 54- L. P. Goodrich 10. . Jerome Michael . A. P. Adams 55- 1. S. Hopkins, Jr. 103. D. L. Rogers 8. V. S. Rlun 56. J. J. Killorin 104. F. V. Carter. Jr. fl- C. W. Davis 57 M. H. Blacksiiear 105. J. F. Lucas IC). M. D. Dl Bose 58. Veri.YN Moore 106. H. G. Bailey 11. R. I . Jones 5fl- T. W. Connai.lv 107. E. M. Brown 12. A. J. McBride (tO. WlNSHII NUNNALLY 108. H. A. Nix IJ. R. J. Travis 61. T. T. Turnbull 109. O. W. Franklin 14. T. W. Rucker 6 2. W. W. Patterson no. K. T. Miller 15- M. M. Thurman 63- Arthur Sullivan 111. H. I.. Lanham )6l John Banks 64. Charlie Cox 114. H. B. Blacksiiear 17. R. L. Denmark 65. Rodney Hill t»3- W. Falk. Jr. 18. J. E. Hall 66 Harold Telford IM- A. R. MacDoNELl 19. R. M. Charlton 67. A. L Hardy IIS- H. C. Hatcher JO. Harry Hull 68. J. K. D. Young 116. P. I.. Bartlett ji. H. C. Johnson (9. W. ’. Marsiiburn 117. E. L. Pennington 22. J. B. Ridley 70. H. M. Scott 118. F.. W. Moise - t. W. R. Ritchie “1. John Brown 119 G. C- Woodruff J4- J. 1.. Fkwin 74- George Mains 1 JO. I-. V. Heath Jj. Piiinizy Calhoun 73- Dan Y. Sage 141. Millard Rfavis 2(1. F. K. McCutciien 74- 1. C. Levy 144. R. B. Frontman 47- Ijincstrket Hull 75. Lansing B. Lee 143- A. K. Maddox j8. H. J. Lamar 7 . I- Raoul 144- J. A. SlRLEY it). W. M. Hardy 77 J. J. Ragan 145- Cliff Bkaxxf.x .to. N. I . Park 78. R. S. Parker 126. L. 1). Brown 31. W. J. Hammond 79 Geo. P. Wiiitner 127. G. T. North ex 3-i. L C. Rucker 80. W. L. Ekwix 148. W. A. Mann 33 Sterling Blacksiiear 81. Harrison Jones 149. H. 1). Meyer 34- M. M. Dickinson 8j. C. D. Caiianiss 130. B. H. Walton 35- Andrew Calhoun 83. W. G. Brantley 131. D. R. Peacock 36. C. D. Dorsey 84. P. R. Weltmer 134. V. F. Durden 37- M. S. Richardson 85 A. H. Carmichael 133- C. E. Martin 38. B. S. Walker 86. R. Kyle Smith 134- E. B. Dunlap .tfl- Sandy Beaver 87- W. Brown • 35- R. I.. McWhorter 40. G. W. Lcgwf.n 88. J. K. McDonald i.t6- R. H. Freeman 41. F. M. Ridley 8fl- C. X. Feidlson 137- S. Cowan 44. Randolph Jacques fl3. Frank Martin 1.38. Kow. Morganstern 43 Rali-ii Meldrin fli. H. I„ J. Williams 139- Jas. M. Lynch 44 Marion Smith 04. R. H. Jones 140. H. Levy Rogers 45- Wallace Miller 93- S. 0. Smith I4« Bentley 11. Chappell 46. Minor Boyd 94- M. S. Hodgson 144. Ira Funkenstein 47- W. J. Turner 95 H. P. Dr. La Perriere 143- Frank Carter 48. J. F. Baxter 96. F. C. .Newton 144- T. Rucker Ginn I'niiC Tito Hundred and Thlrlf-iSphi inx 145- Aaron IS. Herxd W. P. Zaciikv 223. W. C. Carter, Jr. 146. Russell H. Patterson « s. Irvine Piiinizy 224. William Tate 147. Victor Victor |«L R. 1). O'Callagiian 225. C. F. WlF.lIRS 148. H. Hoyt Wclchel 187. Ciias. M. Candler. Jr. 226. John Fletcher 149. Louis A. Pi.vkussoiin 188. W. M. Dallas 227. J. D. Thomason 150. Clark Howell. Jr. 189. C. H. Satterfield 228. John Hoscii. Jr. 151. D. K. McKaxiy 190. F. II. Harold 229. T. F. Green. Jr. 152. David H. Paddock 191. W. I). Miller 230. W. 15. Sf.weli. 53- John Henderson 192. Artiicr Pew 231. Lester Hakckett 154. Edward J. Hardin 103- R. 15. L. Spence, Jk. 232. C. 1- Gowen 155- Geo. S. Whitehead 194- C. W. Slack 233. M. 15. KlLI'ATRICKt 15ft. Jas. B. Conyers 195- J. R. Slater 2.VI- J. D. Allen 15". C. W. Jacobson 196. K. W. Higiismith 235. H. D. S11 ATT L'C k t 158. II. I.. Hodgson 197- A. M. Day 236. George Morton 159. R. H. Wesley .98. C. M. Straiian, Jk. 237. G. H. Xixoxt (Resigned) 160. G. L. Harrison 199. H. H. Manclm 2.58. A. A. Marshall 161. C. M. Tanner 200. W. H. Stephens 239. C. X. Mell 162. W. H. Qiwrterman 201. P. B. Ford 240. 15. P. Rogers 163- Robert Cali-a way. Jr. 202. Nathan Joi.les 241. W. T. Forbes, Jr. 164. Joel IS. Mallktt 3. Owen Reynolds 242. G. S. Johnson 165. Thomas A. Thrash 204. J. P. Carson 243. Rollin J. Chambliss 166. Max L. Segall 235- W. D. Dcrdex 244. Ernest Camp. Jr. 167. W. Holman Sorrells 206. W. B. O.DY 245. Allen W. Post 168. W. O. White 207. M. A. McRainey 246. . . S. Clay. HI 169. J. P. Stewart 208. W. F. Daniel 247. Kei.s Boland 170. N. L. Gii.us. Jr. 209. F.. H. Dixon 248. Ivey Shiver. Jr.I 171. Rope Sims, Jr. 210. F. C. McClure 249. William Young, Jk.i 172. J. H. Carmichael 21 1. L. H. Hill 250. Isaac K. HavJ 173. Howard McCall 212. G. J. Clark 251. George 15. Florence, JrA 174. Irwink M. Levy 413. C. A. Lewis 252. Thomas A. XasiH 175. Hinton Longino 214. J. J. Pennett. Jr. 253. Thomas J. Hamilton, Jk.? 176. R. W. Coe RTS 21 5. Alton Hoscii (Resigned) 177. L. H. llPPETT 2l6. C. G. Henry 254. Benjamin H. Hardv, Jr.? 178. O. R. Ellaks 217. J. K. Harper Resigned) 179- R- H. West 218. H. H. Maddox 255. Hali.man L. Stanch. 180. R. L. Foreman. Jr. 219. J. I.. Watson 256. Daniel C. Telly 181. J. M. Hatciier 220. C. R. Anderson 257. Robert 1.. Patterson, Jr. 182. Dewey Knight 221. E. M. Gi-rr 258. Hoke S. Wopford 183. Lewis Seaborn A—II. Brown 222. H. M. Cleckley, III L—J. T. Dorsey W-A. M. Soule B— C». Bctler M —F. R. Mitchell X—W. H. Bocock C—0. S. Siiu.ey X —H. Dodd V—S. '. Sanford I)—'). K. Dougherty 15—W. H. Harris F—H. Bacon G—W. 1 . Hall II—F. K. Boland I—H. G. Colvin J—W. S. Cotiikan K— V. Sl'AIN O-C. H. Black P— W. R. Ticiinor Q—G. T. Jackson R—Ciiax. W. B. Hiu. S—Chan. C. M. Sxelling T—Chan. D. C. Barrow U—R. 15. Park V—H. C. White (Deceased) ' .—C. M. Straiian A A—H. J. Stegeman BB—Sylvanus Morris CC—G. F. Peabody l)D— !5. A. Lowf. KK— T. J. Wooftek FF—Thus. W. Reed GG—Harry Meiire •Member of the faculty of the University, t Member of the student-body of the University. I'nin Tiro l niulml ami Thlrty-KlnrQridiron Mcml crship in the Gridiron Club is rated next to the Sphinx as one of the highest honors an undergraduate can win at the University. As with the Sphinx, nothing is known of the nature of the Gridiron. MemlxT of the Gridiron always refer to it as "the lx st club in school.” Klcc-tions arc held once each term, juniors being elected at the third term meeting. honorary and faculty mf.mbfrs CHARLES R. Anderson S. G. Back.man D. C. Bakkow Morgan Blake R. P. Brooks Ci.acde Chance T. M. Close Tims. S. Gray Harold Hirsch E. A. I-owe Harry J. Meiire Sylvan cs Morris N T. H. McHatton H. Ahit Nix R. E. Park Y. O. Payne S. V. Sanford H. J. Stegeman Jll.IfS TaL.MADGE William Tate J. Ralph Tiiaxton j. D. Wade R. P. Walker W. P. White Tof row: Chance. Stegeman, Barrow, McHatton, Brooks. Park. Close. Hollow row: Walker. Thaxtou, Gray, Lowe. Anderson. Backman. Tate. Pn-W Tko H un.hr,I o„d fortyQridiron fg MEMBERS .1. M. Barnes I)onali» Branyon I. KKOV CRITTENDEN Jesse W. Drew Roy Ivstes J. W. Fanning George F.. Florence W. Ryan Frier. Jr. Arthur M. Gignii.i.iat David Greenfield Thomas J. Hamilton. Jr. Ben H. Hardy. Jr. Isaac K. Hay Joseph K. Heyman S. Smith Horton Thomas C Kendrick M. E. Kilpatrick Andrew J. Kincery William A. Kline, Jr. AUGUSTUS S. l.OYI.ESS A. Jack Mathews J. R. Morris Broadus B. McAfee Koiif.rt E. McTigue A. B. Newton Gwynn H. Nixon Roiiert I.. Patterson F.. A. Pound Jack Rf.nkroe Henry Reeves Horace D. Siiattuck R. W. Smith II. Li ke Stanch. Tiiomas I'. St. John Harry F.. Talmadcf. Maurice C. Thomas Dan Tully E. M. Varner Alton W. Ward Hokf. S. Wofford William H. Young, Jr. To[ row: Barnes. Siiattuck. Greenfield. Young. Hay. Hardy. Newton, Renfroe. Second rote: l.oylc s. Smith. Si. John. Kline. Pound. Kites. Varner. Ward. Florence. Third row: McAfee. Heyman, Mathews. Talmadge. Kendrick, Stancil. Patterson. MeTigue. Giguilliat. Tourih row: Drew, Wofford. Nixon, Tltomas. Tully. Branyon. Kingcry. Horton. Hamilton. rage Tiro Hundred and yorly oneSenate Club GF.XFRAL SOCIAI. CLUB FOR UPPKR-C1.ASSMKX OI-TICKRS W'ai.tkk M. Bkice.......................................President Davii» Greknkieijd............................ 'iec-President Thomas C. Kendrick, Jr. . . . Secretary and Treasurer MKMBKRS N'. VICTOR AI ICON Pbrrv C. Allen J. McMillkr Barnf.s William J. Baird Alfred I.. Barron A. J. Bird, Jr. Foy A. Byrd Richard X. Block Robert S. Brice Paul D. Buie T. Rudolph Broach John A. Buchanan James H. Buchanan E. F. Carlisle. Jr. Joseph M. Collins W. Burt Collins Petek F. Clarke. Jr. Hi.mkr B. Ckim T. Ouhley Cook Troy A. Davis Richard E. Dodd Walter C. Dickerson Roy E. Estes William F.. Farrell Harry C. Fisher W. Ryan Frier William L. Funkhouser David H. Funkenstf.in James F. Fulchum Ralph L. Griffin J. Thomas Hayes ICOVVARD H. Hacey James E. Hays Henry J. Heffeknan Daniel W. Horton. Jr. John McC. Hodgson W. Dillard Harder S. Eugene Half.v D. Wright Izlak Julian Jarmolowskv W. Thompson Johnson V. J. Johnson. Jr. George L. Keen. Jr. Wilson Kemp Samuel M. Kendrick Glenn B. Lautzexiiiskk C. Howard I.f.avy. Jr. WiNSOK LKTTOX W. Felker Lewis. Herman J. Lesser Roiiert E. Lee William A. Leg wen W. Hillyer Lundy Carter E. Martin Koscoe W. Mitchell Joseph D. Mitciiei.i. Sead J. Moss. Jr. Ai.iiekt B. Moiilky. Jr. F. Kelley McCutciien Thomas B. McRitciiik Robert E. McTigue Frank A. McMullan Rudolph Parker James M. Robinson J. Donald Randolph Jack Rogers Walter A. Sams. Jr. Irving L. Samuels Samuel J. Slate. Jr. A. U Smith Curtis E. Smith. Jk. Coxril B. Smith Lamar X. Smith H. Eugene Smith Mf.i.i. M. Stephenson William S. Stuckey Thomas F. Strickland I. M. Shiver Philip M. Tate Harry H. Thkei.dkeld, Jk. Leonard E. Thompson Spencer C. Walden, Jr. J. Dukward Watson Maxwell D. Weaver George D. White James C. Wilkinson •« ■ Tiro ItuH'lrol a d t'orly-hroCavalier Club (iFXF.RAI. SOCIAL CLUB FOR UPPFR-CLASSMF.X OFF1CKRS Ben H. Hakdy, Jr.......................................................President Hknrv V. Reeves.......................................Vice-President A. S. Loyi.ess.......................Secretary and Treasurer FkAN KLIN X. A X DEN SON William B. Ansley William Mi l). Berry Craig Barrow. Jk. Herbert F. Bikdsey Jambs M. Bivins Kowin S. Boyett Henry S. Blitcii George B. Brantley Joseph !•'. Brown M. E. Brinson Charles D. Bryce Wynn T. Burton I„ L. Bysii William B. Carroi.l W. Montietii Capps Joel Cloud. Jr. R. Slaton Clemmons Merrill H. Collier Herbert Cohen James I.. Cook Sidney C. Cox. Jr. Malon C. Coyrts J. R. Dasher, Jr. Charles R. Davis Fred B. Davis A. Wade Easterling R. Doyglas Feagix, Jr. T. M. Flournoy Josei’h X. Franklin MEMBERS Robert II. Gracev Leon H. Grayson Lamartine G. Hardman, Jr. Joseph K. Hevman James K. Hays John F. Hester Thomas B. Hii.sman W. Dillard Harder Oze E. Horton Thomas J. Hamilton, Jk. James J. Harris J. Carlton Jester. Jr. Bannon Jones M. E. Kilpatrick William A. Kline Samuel F. Lamh.uk Alex. A. Lawrence. Jr. Jack J. Lissner. Jr. Hugh M. I.okky, Jr. Loyis B. Magid. Jr. J. Hoyt Manbury John J. Mepi.in. Jr. Latiirop Mitchell William A. Mitchell W. Edward McDoygald Homer McClatciiey A. Park McGinty Charles McLaughlin W. Fred Xixon Charles D. Xunnai.lv John C. Oliver Joseph McD. Oliver Wm. W. Oliver Robert L. Patterson William H. Parks J. Ernest Palmour. Jr. Frank H. Phixizy A. Pound J. G. Pryor J. C. Peeler Herbert A. Rixgei. James McM. Roberts Bennie Rotiistein William M. Sells Weldox I- Sala Frank H. Stewart Robert L. Sherrod Franklin M. Skinner Thomas J. Srorr Thomas R. Tai.m.mr.e » Harry K. Talmaikje William L. Travis John S. Tumijn Stephen L. Upson B. Sanders Walker Warren Walker Samuel M. Wellborn William B. Withers Bernard P. Wolff William A. Young l’«W Ttrn llnitiiifil anti y»rtu thrfeTelican Club The Pelican Club, an exclusive social organization for Sophomores, is composed of two members from each of seven Grcek-lctter fraternities, and one member from another. Members arc initiated in the spring. Sigma Alpha llpsilon Sanders Walker Douglas Feagin Chi Phi Thomas M. Gerdine Joel Hurt Kappa Alpha Berry Wilson Fred Nixon Phi Della Thcla Laurier Bush Herbert Birdsey Sigma Chi Willie Farrei.l Max Williams sllpha 'Tan Omega James M. Rop.inson F. Ir. Carlisle. Jr. Chi Psi Walter Sams Kappa Sigma William L. Funkiiouser Dan Horton Vage 7Vo Hundred and Forty-Jour(U3iftads Qlub The Rif tads Club i an organization for Sophomores corresponding to the (iruliron. an honorary society for Seniors. Men who arc outstanding in athletics, scholarship, debating and the like, arc initiated at the end of their Sophomore year. Hanky E. Talmadge . William A. Legwf.n Mai.on Courts OFFICERS .................President . . . Pice-President Secretary- Treasurer Kankakee Anderson Ckaig Bakkow. Ik. A. J. Bird Joe Boland John S. Candler, II Bii.i.ie Carroll Buster Cook Malon Courts George Ckisfield John Davidson Frank Dudley Douglas Eeagin Harry Fisiiek Tom Grkdine MEMBERS Koiiert Gracev David Greenfield Rali-ii Griffin Eugene Haley Ren Hardy Guerry Harris Jimmie Harris Harvey Hill Roiiiiy Hooks Xoiile Jones Buster Kiluatrick Andrew J. Kingery William A. Kline William A. Legwen Ef.i.kek Lewis Jack Lissner John Mf.di.in Hollis Morris Charlie McLaughlin Hamilton Xaimer Iob Oliver I’rincf. Preston Rennie Kotiistein II. D. Shattuck H. E. Smith J. H. Smith Harry TalmadGE Tom Strickland Sanders Walker Vaye Tkc I!imlrrJ f ort »,,Square and Compass The Square and Compass Club is composed of undergraduates who arc meml crs of the Masonic order. J. B. Williams . • • C. T. St'THERI.AND . B. Q. Baggett . V. A. Capps OFFICERS . . . . President . Vice-President . Secretary Treasurer J. I.. Anderson K. M. Anderson S. G. Backman A. J. Caldwbli. Claide Ciianck J. S. Cochran V. (I. Davis G. V. Fetch r Luke A. Forrest O. G. I.A.NCA'TF.R MEMBERS Rout. M. Middleton Harry Moore I. C. Nicholas Gasper Palmasi.no R. W. Smith H. 1.. Stanch. V. Strickland F. I.. Tarver A. C. Ward Top row: Ward. Lancaster, Davis. Fetzer. Strickland. Tarver. Middle row: Basuctt. Capps Palmasino. Smith. Williams. Stancil. Hollow row: Suthcrlnml, Backman, Chance, Nicholas. Moore, 1’irklc. Hundred mar T and Forty Campus Club The Campus Club is made up of leading members of the campus party, which is composed of students not members of social fraternities. The motto of the club is the mystic phrase. “Nunc Pro Tune.” OFFICERS II. Luke Stanch...................................Campus Leader Hoke S. Wokkokd................President of the Senior Class MEMBERS Jesse V. Drew A. Jack Mathews Broadus B. McAeee Alton S. Ward Thomas F. St. John Horace D. Siiatti-ck Earl M. Varner Isaac K. Hay Top row: Wofford. Drew, Ward, Stancil, Varner. Hotiom row: Shnttnch, McAfee, St. John. Hay. Mathews. foot 7Vo ?lnmlrrd and Poily ittencZAlpha Omega — r -ir =r Alpha Omega is an organization for students taking the pre-medical course at the University. C. A. Adams 1C. T. Arnold I.. R. Braswell R. G. Brown R. B. Ei.li$ Robert O. Fkankum I. oren Gary. Jr. R. E. Gary J. E. Griffith Sac.e Harder Osmah E. Harkei.i. R. D. Harris L. L Jacobs A. I.. Matthews. Jr. L. E. Mf.i.tzer O. B. Murray R. F. Payne Frank Sams J. G. SlI ARPI.EY F. C. Stinson R. V. Wiiki.ciif.i. David M. Wolfe Top row: L. Gary. Wolfe, Harrell. Franknni. I’avnc. Middle row: 1.. Smith. Harlxtr. Jacol . R. Gary. Griffith, Stinson. Hottoni row: Brown. Adams, Sams, Mcltzer, F.llis, ro'ie Tiro Uundrol 0)1 i 'orty-dyli footlightsQlees and Instrumental 0ub The Glee and Instrumental Club, which, aside from intercollegiate athletics, docs more to present the University to the people of Georgia than any other college activity, made its seventeenth annual tour during the spring holidays, and finished the season with a performance in Athens Friday night of Little Commencement. The other cities in which performances were presented were: Sandcrsvillc, Hartwell. Gainesville. Winder, Atlanta. Newnan. Columbus, Albany, Tallahassee. Fla., Thomasvillc. Valdosta. Waveross, Savannah, Vidalia and Augusta. OFFICERS Dan Tuli.y...........................................................President J. Mac Miller Barnes....................................Business Manager Arm and T. F.yi.er...........................Leader of Glee Club H. Luke Stanch. . . . Leader of Instrumental Club E. A. Lowe..........................Faculty Advisor E. M. Coulter .... Faculty Advisor C.LKK CLUB First Tenon— Bill Shar; . Waycro : Dave Black. Atlanta; Fuwl Clutkcr. Eittgerahl: Malcolm l.ockhart. Decatur. Second Tenors—John Mcdlin. Monroe: Harlow I'rindle, Miami; Rxltard Tietx, Brooklyn. N. Y.: "Knute" WIIID, llarncaville. Baritones—Armand Eylcr. Savannah; Prince Preston. States, l-oro; Lory Cobb. Adel; Eugene Gillcland. Athena; Ralph Wardian-, Athens. B« r -Tmy Cobh. Adel; Charter Cate. Athena; llartridgc Shearoti»e. Springfield. INSTRUMENTAL CLUB Mandolins—Ennia Parker, Waycrota; _ Gordon _ Maildox. Monroe: I'rank Spa no, Columbus; l-rancia Nixon. An- guata: Friar Thompaon, Griffin; Monticth Cappa. Athena. Guitars —Luke Slancil. Tate: Buck Weaver. Savannah. Banio—"Squeaky" Mitehell. Columbtu. I'iolin —llenry Cameron, Albany. Harp—Jeave V. Drew, I’reaton. BULLDOG ORCHESTRA Director—Luke Staucil, Tate Piano—John l-'inger. Galncavillc. Bon to—"Squeaky" Mitchell. Columbtu. Saxophones—Cltarlea Morria, Athena; Steve Upson, Athena; Jack IXaie, Athena. Drums—"Blue" Wataon, Athena. Boss—John Upcharch. Athena. Trumpets—“Judge" llornbuckle. Jackaonville. FJa.; Hugh Bulloch, Atlanta. Trombone—Luke Slancil. Tate. INTERLOCUTOR Andrew J. Kingery, Summit. COMEDIANS Dan Tully. Savannah; Harry Talmadge, Athena; Ralph Wig-gina. Wren ; A. II. Newton, Lyona. ACCOMPANISTS Arina ml Eylcr, John Finger. P»t C Tiro Hundred on J c(5haliaru Dramatic 0ub T The Thalian Club is recognized as the oldest college dramatic club in the United States. It ordinarily presents three plays a year, the last coming at commencement. In the contest sponsored by the Athens Little Theater League, the Thalian cast won first place, and Frank McMullan was awarded the prize for the best individual j crformancc. Frank A. McMullan . Marjorie Denmark . Robert L. Patter SON- OFFICERS .................P resident . Vice-President Business Manager Eugenia Arnold Miriam Battle Herbert F. Birdsey John J. Blount, Jr. M. Caroline Brand Josephine Brooks Joseph E. Brown Mary Claire Brannon John S. Candler, II Della E. Carlisle James M Carson Charles M. Cate Frederick B. Davis Marjorie Denmark Laura D. Dork Ruby V. Fueriiardt R. Van Fletcher H. R. Glenn David Greenfield S. ADEI.E HaCKEL Lamartine G Hardman, Jr. MEMBERS Charles L. Hardy D. Guerry Harris Mary A. Hart James E. Hays, Jr. Naomi S. Henson Joseph K. Heyman Rufus B. Jennings Andrew J. Kingery Lillian C. Kelly Martha R. Lester Jack J. Lisnf.r, Jr. T. Purse Lott M. Rebecca Means John J. Medi.in Junius D. Metz Lathrop Mitchell C. M. Montgomery Frank A. McMullan Thomas B. McRitciiie Rebecca Oglesby Joseph M. Oliver W. Ennis Parker Jack E. Park James H. Patrick Robert L. Patterson R. B Poliiill Martiia V. Rogers William W. Sharpe, III Franklin II. Siiearouse Marion Sherman Louise Smith Thomas F. Strickland Thomas F. St. John Harry F.. Talmadce Thomas R. Talmadce F. Coleman Strother Marie Tibbetts Stephen L. Upson C. H. Willis A. Penn Winston William B. Withers Hoke S. Wofford rou« Ttro Hundred an l Fl Iv one'Blackfriars ’Dramatic Club The Blackfriars Dramatic Club was organized in 1926 to offer a means of expression for the dramatic talent of the University not included in the older organization. It is presenting three plays a year. OFFICERS Robert 1£. Fallicant............... Nora I . Fortson................. Ki th Irion Wai.kf.k James F. Fui.ciilm Malcolm M. Lockhart Roosevelt P. Walker ....................P resilient . Vice-President . . . . Secretary Treasurer Stage Manager . Director MIC.MBI- Anita L. Birke Frank A. Constancy C. Harris Crook Ai.i.eene F.pps Armani) T. Kyi.er Robert K. Fallicant Francks Forbes Nora P. Fortson Janet Fortson Margaret Fortson James F. Fi-lgiicm Lena Gresham Edward 11. Hackv (lev C. Hamilton. Jr. Ralph W. William Jess it Percy S. Johnson Frank V. I.ester Herbert Levincton Malcolm M. Lockhart Dorothy Miller Leonard Miner Winifred Ork Roger Roden Alexander M. Ross, III Alice A- Rowland Frank H. Stewart F-. Lacey Stephens W. Livingston Travis ’ardlaw I’aye 7Vo Hundred end '(fry-lira(:2 radesmerueta Qamma Sigma rrr Beta Gamma Sigma is a national honorary society for students of commerce. Two elections arc held annually—a Junior is usually chosen at the second election. One honorary member is elected annually from the leading business men of the state. MEMBERS C. A. Asm n wall Dr. R. P. Brooks Prof. F. X. Campiiei.l M. S. Cooley L. B. Freeman Prof. J. Y. Jenkins T. D. Oglesiiy Jack Renfroe Maxwell Rosenthal Top rote; Cooley, Jenkins, Heckman. Brooks. Bottom row: Renfroe. Simowitz. Oglesby, Koscntlial. Freeman. roue Two lluHitrtrl on t fifty-fourEconomics Society Officers The Economics Society is a general organization for students in the School of Commerce. Bkoadl s B. McAfee . lA.MES I', i lOl.UNCSWORTIt Alton S. Ward .... I residents . First Term Second Term Third Term Thomas R. Talmadce . L. Ali.f.n Conn ally . Ioiin B. Hill Secretaries . . First Term . Second Term Third Term McAfee Hollincsworth Ward rant Two Hundred and Fifty fit cZAlpha Kappa Tsi r-TT rrrr Alpha Kappa Psi is a national professional fraternity for students of commerce. MEMBERS I. 1). Aderiiold J. Edward Aiken Robert '1 . Bkadiikkky Dr. R. P. Brooks M. S. Cooley L. Allen Coxnai.i.v Thomas d’Antignac Hubert R. Edmondson Roscoe Fleetwood Eugene Gh.i.ei.and Allen P. Crimes Y. Joski’ii Johnson. Jr. Y. Douci.as Kittle Cus I.OYLESS James F. Hollingsworth Daniel W. McClellan Oscar M. McWiiirtkr Walton V. Odum W. Ennis Parker Milliard Palmer George Pilgrim Jack Rknkroe Virgil S. Steele George R- Siluey Karl Shephard George D. White Top row: Connally, Steele. Renfroe, Adcrhold. Hollingsworth. While, Parker, Bradberry. McClellan. Stiddlr row: Gilleland, MeWhirter, d'Antignac, Palmer. Grimes. 0 lum, Holton. Dr. Brooks. Bottom row: Cooley. Prof. Jenkins. Edmondson. Sibley. Fleetwood. Aiken. Kittle. Keyless. Johnson. Pa' r Tiro Unnitrtd 0» t Fifty-'Delta Sigma Ti Delta Sigma Pi is a national professional fraternity for students of commerce. MEMBERS J. M. Abercrombie James M. Buchanan Oscar L. Benson Henry H. Brasei.ton E. !•'. Cari.isle. Ik. John R. Dasher J. T. Dolvin Robert H. Gkacy Prof. H. M. Heckman V. Alton Ward John B. Hill Prof. L. B. Raisty Otis C. Joiner Robert E. McTigue Samuel M. Merritt Broadus B. McAfee T. Dozier Oglesby I. Lake Wommack Charles H. Wommack Top row: Joiner, Ward, Heckman, Graccy. Oglesby, Benson. Middle rose: Dolvin, McTigue. Merritt. Buchanan. Braselton. H, liom row: Jones. Abercrombie, Carlisle. McAfee, Raistv, Hill. I'a'jt TVo IInmiIicJ iwil ritly irrrnfarmerscAlpha eta Alpha Zeta is a national lionorarv society for students of agriculture. It corresponds to Phi Beta Kappa for students of the arts and sciences. The Georgia chapter was established in 19M- Wendell R. Bectox C. A. Bray Ivan E. Carson Troy B. Cobb George D. Collins A. Leroy Crittenden A. O. Duncan James A. Garrard Thomas J. Uarroi.d P. M. Spiers T. Evans Ritchie John E. Sproul Top row: Col)l , Recton, Garrard, Duncan, Spiers. Hollow row: Collins, Hranyan, Harrold, Criitcndcn. Sproul. •«' • Tiro llumlrt'l «m 1 FiftySAghoru Society The Aglton Society is an organization com| o cd »f outstanding Seniors enrolled in the College of Agriculture. Membership is based upon qualities of leadership and promise for the future. MEMBERS IX L. Brannon Troy K. Couii Ciiksi.by M. Df.i.i.ixokk Rai.ph M. Fuxjiu m 1.EKOY I.ANFORD Gordon Maddox Hoke S. Wofford Zen as A. Massey Addison W. Simpson, Jr. John F. Sprofi. I-ON NIK ). StKICKI.AND Friar M. Thompson Fare M. Varner Top rote: lirauyon, Thompson, Simpson, Varner, Dellinger. Lanford. Hot tom row: Massey. Cobh. Wofford. Maddox, Sprout, Strickland. I'ni c Ttco Hundred and Sirin-onecAgricultural Club m »■ ■ vf • • wSf_ 1 ji-n3S The Agricultural Club is a general organization composed of ail students enrolled in the College of Agriculture. Hoke S. Wokkoko H. A. Incus . T. J. Harrold . . President .................................hirst Term .............................Second Term .................................Third Term Secretary and Treasurer Hugh A. Incus............................. V. Ralph Chastain......................... C. N. Bennett............................... First Term Second Term Third Term WoFKOKU Incus H MKOI.D I’u'jr Tiro llnndml ami Kitty-tiro1 £Agricultural Key Council Places on tlic council arc awarded to those winning places on four Agricultural Club de- lates. Hokk S. Wofford i). I.. Branvox T. I'.vans Ritciiif. R. M. Fi’lciu'M I. . J. Stkicki.and Thomas J. Harroi.d II. A. Incus c5Agricultural ‘Debating Council The Agricultural Debating Council i' in charge of the debates sponsored by the Agricultural Club. Hoke S- Wofford Thomas J. Hakkold I.. J. Stkicki.and Tof row: Hrauyon, Inglis. Hollow row: Kitcliic, Strickland, WofTord, Ilnrrold. 1‘ayr Tiro llmulrc1 and Sifty lhrccJ (grth (Carolina Intercollegiate ‘Debate Subject: "Resolved. That the United States should cease to protect, by armed forces, property invested in foreign lands, except after formal declaration of war." .■I(firmotive (flcorgia) Thomas J. Harrold 1). L. Bkaxvox (Won by (icorgia) Cottoru School Debate SUBJECT: "Resolved. That the United States government should set up a national farm relief plan, co-operatively controlling the production and marketing of all agricultural products." Affirmative Negative K. M. Fui-ciium IX L. Brasvox M. A. 1 nous Thomas J. Harroi.d (Won by Affirmative) SJfomecon Debate SUBJECT: “Resolved. That the United States Congress should enact uniform marriage and divorce laws." Affirmative (Agricultural Club) I.. V. Cawley Thomas J. IIakkoi.d D. 1.. Bran vox (Won by Negative (Homccon Club) F.mily Simpson Em ma Keys Maudank March hanks Homccon) row: Branyon. l-'ulullmn. Hollow row: Harrold. Inglis, Cawley. Keys. Tiro IliHtlrfil anil SUlw ourc5Agricultural Sophomore Uebate Subject: "Resolved, That cotton production in the Southeast eon not meet the competition of cotton production in the Southteest." Affirmative Negative K. I). Toi.i.Kkson Harold Martin J. P. Nicholson J. R. McDanif.i. (Won l»y AOirmntivc) tAgricultural freshman ‘Debate Subject: "Resolved. That Georgia Should Have . In Open Stock Law." Affirmative Hen Maxwell I S. Carr Negative C. J. Bryant H. T. ( avkni)f.k (Won by Negative) Top row: Marlin, Nicholson. McDaniel. Tollcf'On. Bottom rose: Carr. Bryant, Maxwell. Cavcnilcr. foot Tiro IlmiJrril ««• nitlo flirQeorgia cAgriculturisp-- The Georgia Agriculturist i a monthly publication of the students oi the College of Agriculture. T. Evas Ritchie..............................................Editor An-Chief Gordon I. Maddox.....................................Business Manager EDITORIAL STAR Rai.pii M. IVlgiu m.....................................Associate Editor Ali.ek.ne Epps...............................Home Economics Editor (I. H. Martin..................................Assistant Editor BUSINESS STAFF Margaret Rogers...................................Associate Business Manager High A. Incus..............................Associate Business Manager J. I . Baker...............................Circulation Manager DKIW RTM KNTAI. RKPR I-SENT AT IVES C . N. Bennett.......................................Agricultural Engineering Gordon Nessmitii..............................Agricultural Education I.eo Mallard..................................Animal Husbandry D. L. Bran yon.................................Horticulture L. V. C'awi.ev.......................Horticulture Troy Core .... I’eterinarx Medicine Ken Tiii'kmond .... forestry McH. Abel . . . Poultry Top rote: I-'«ilKl»itn. Rogers. MaiMox, Bogg . Hotlom rote: Ingli , Ritchie. Martin. rayr Ttro 1 moli rtf nml SUIy-tlrc lpha qMu Alpha Mu is an honorary society for students of home economics. MEMBERS A. Elizabeth Armstkoxc Mrs. Margaret McD. Brand Emma Kkys Mary E. Wood Agnes Sanders Katherine M. Stroxc Mary E. Wells I lx.vxi Worm Wki.i.s Sanders Kkys race TKO Hundred and SUIptermVfomecon Club The llomccon Club is a general organization composed of all students studying home economics. OFFICERS Mary E. Wei.ls...................................................President Virginia Norton.......................................Vice-President Latkki.i.k Patrick....................................Treasurer Mary C'. Hi gpley.............................Secretary Ki.I aiietii F. Wise . . Corresponding Secretary Top rote: Patrick. Norton, Wells. Hot tom rote: Me Lana ban, Wise, llugnlcv. t’a'jc 7Vo llmutrtrl unit Si ly etyhtSaddles and Sirloin0ub The Saddle and Sirloin Club is a general organization composed of tudent: of Animal Husbandry. First Term Second Term K. M. Varner .... ... President..........................R. M. Fui.ciium V. R. Siikpakd.......................J'ice-President.............................M. M. Hakdie R. M. Fulghum..........................Secretary-Treasurer.......................Leo Mallard MKMBKRS Shields B. Adair R. II. Barnett Joski'ii C. Bku. Chester N'. Bennett Xatiian R. Bennett Claude 1C Boggs James Bumgarner F.wf.li. S. Carr Frank S. Carr Ivan K. ( arson C. B. Causey Louis '. Cawley A. H. Chambers T. V. Chestnut Troy B. Conn George 1). Collins Fred V. Congdon W'm. N. Stewart Kdward J. Davis Jefferson 1). Davis O. F. Dawson Ciiesley M. Dellinger C. K. Downer A.mon (). Duncan Wm . J. ICSTES J. B. Fori hi a m Ralph M. Fulghum Wm. L. Green M. M. Hakdie Thomas I. Hakkoi.d John H. Henderson Hugh A. Incus James N. I.eckie Flzik W. Lewis John C. Mallard Leo Mallard Zen us A. Massey Cordon H. McGee John R. Nicholson Carl A. Nix Stitii A. Fakiiam Carl ( . Parker Wm. W. Pierce T. I •a-a.ns Ritchie Alton Siiedd Wm. R. Shepard Addison W. Simpson James L. Smalley Lonnie J. Strickland C. D. Tabor Hr nest D. Tollerson Eari. M. Varner Walter A. Vaughn I'clchum Varner Pa-tt Two II mhihtil an 1 Hutu-nineJ Qeorgia Live-Stock Judging 'Seflnu A. (). Duncan R. M. Fui.ciium Leo Mai.i.ard V. R. SllKPAKD The live-stock judging leant front the State College of Agriculture won second place at the Southeastern Fair. Tennessee capturing rtr t place. The team took third place at the national dairy show, and won a permanent trophy as high team in judging Guernsey cattle. Maixard Fuijt.iicm Diwcax SlIEI'AKII I’aijv Two II nit •hr,I ,ih,I SternlySngineersUniversity of Qeorgia Student Chapter of the c‘American Society of Civil Engineers The Engineering Society i a general organization for students of civil engineering. OFFICERS J. V. Bruce . . J. I). RANDOLPH T. A. Crouch W. T. Beers WlLLIAM BeKKV M. F. Blanchard Jambs V. Bruce John A. Buchanan Georc.e I.. Candler Warren A. Candler MEMBERS W. Monteitii Capes Rov Clark Blanton Clement Thomas A. Crouch J. I’. Davidson Robert A. Dean Georc.e V. Ellison . . President I 'icc-President Secretary George I . Forman Allison B. Fredricks Erwin T. Gabriel Christopher C. Hall Y. Turnki.l Hanson James J. Harris (Jerald 'I'. Hodges Bruce Rakdom-ii Tout Two II undrr t „nd Stivnlg lteos •f ) University of Qeorgia Student Chapter of the UAmericaru Society of C il Engineers M. 1). Holms Tryon K. Huggins Ho.MEK B. 11UTCIIINSON Hannon Jones Cecil E. Khnnkk V.m. Lassktkr William 1. f.g wen Much 1’. McLeroy Wallace I.. Mc.Mii.lkn Howard I-. McKinley CieraLD W. Martin James C. Mattox Marvin J. Maynard James W. Michael James S. Miller Donald L. Moore George II. Neal A. H. .Vewton Felice M. Orsini II. G. Palmer Hugh Parker Jack E. Parr James H. Patrick Edwin A. Pound George B. Pritchard Joseph I). Randolph I.at Ridgeway George H. Robinson I . Ci.eve Rowland Roiiert E. L. Siiirlky Roiiert E. Siiull Shki.hy Smith Hurwell P. Stanley W. ». Stratford Thomas E. Strickland J. Fisher Strickland Spero 'I'assapoci.os Carl U. Tiimietts Charles B. Upchurch K E. Weatherford Martin Whitley Edwin I). Wiley J. Booth Williams R. E. Williams Joe A. Wingfield Sin and ®angenp The Sine and Tange,« is an honorary society into which leading students of civil engineer ing are initiated in tlic middle « f tlicir junior year. Gkokok II. Routxsox . Wll.I.IAM A. Leg w ex . RoitKkT K. I.. SlIIkl.KV OITKT.KS ....................President . Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer MKMBKKS James V. Bhi'cf. ( iKOkCK !.. Candler Thomas A. Crouch Tryox K. Huggins Cecil I7.. Kenner Wii.i.iam A. I.egwen Hit.ii I.. McKini.kv CiEORGE H. XkaI. i. Auhxe Pound Joseph I). Raxhoi i ii George H. Robinson Robert F.. L. Siiiklkv Top rote; N’cal. Bruce. I-cgwen. Shirley. Hoggin . Candler. Hnlloni row: Pound. Randolph. Kenner, Crouch. McKinley. Rohinson. •aye Tfo lli,nj,rj HfKfntp fourLalvyersThi 'Delta Thi The international legal fraternity of Phi Della Phi is a professional organization for students in the law school. MLMBKRS David M. Ansi.ky William Ansi.ky J. Mc.Mili.er Barnes Riciiakd X. Block T. Rithm.pii Broach Roiiert Slaton Clemmons Donald Dcnwody John L. Green Andrew J. Kincery William A. Ki.ink Martin !•'. Kilpatrick William W. Larsen W. Fki.ker I.ewis Kelley McCYtciien Thomas B. McRitciiie Joseph M. Oliver J. Ernest Pai.mocr Sam cel Spencer Spencer C. Walden William II. Vocnc. Jr. I'iil f Tiro lluiulml and Scrrnly-tlrSigma ‘Delta Kappa Sigma Delta Kappa legal fraternity is a professional organization for students in the law school. Gavin I). McKay . I.a.mak N. Smith Roiikrt V. Smith . |ou n I !. Broadnax OKHCKRS ....................Chancellor . . . I "icc-Chancellor Secretary and Treasurer . . . Chaplain MEMBERS joSEI'll H. Bi.acksiiear John E. Broadnax James C. Burns Rupert E. 1'am.igant Gf.okck W. Ketzer. Ik. R. A. Ham. Isaac K. Hay E. J. Hugiirs R. B. Jennings Coy K. Johnston Alex J. McDonald. Jk. G. I). McKay I . H. Paschal John R. Ruperts I H. Sheakousk I.a.mak X. Smith Koiikkt V. Smith William S. Stuckey Maurice C. Thomas Joseph W'kiiii Top row: Thomas, R. V. Smith, Hughes. Hay, Falligant. Jennings. McDonald. Hollt'ni row' Stuckey. Roberts. McKay. Burns, Black shear. I- Smith, Paschal. l ift lluMtliiil tntil Strmill -'"'IdMilitary Members of (he class of iqi7 received Iheir diplomas with academic towns worn over olive-drab uniforms, symbols of (heir enlistment for service in the World War. - they had volunteered cn masse before the completion of the gear's work, they received their degrees by special action of the Board of Trustees. -Officers of Instruction FOR run UNIVERSITY or GEORGIA DETACHMENT OP THE RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS. Major A. T. Cou.ey, Cavalry. U. S. A. Professor of MHilary Science and Tadics. Major F. Y. Whitney, Cavalry, U. S. A. Executive. Captain R. G. Trim hue, Cavalry, C. S. A. Captain 1. C. Nicholas, Infantry, U. S. A. Captain S. G. Hackman, Infantry, U. S. A. First Lieutenant I.. G. Smith, Cavalry, U. S. A. Backman Whitney Colley Trim hi.e Nicholas Smith Pogt Tico Ilun-lrcl anil Ebjhti oneScabbard and Bladc The Scablwrd and Blade is a national fraternity for men taking advanced military training in Reserve Officers Training Corps situated in the colleges and universities of the United States. It combines the purjtoscs of patriotic, professional, and social organizations. James I). Adf.kiioi.d James V. Brhce Robert T. Braduf.kry John S. Candi.er, 11 C. Jennis ;s Derrick Jesse W. Drew Aktit I k M. Gignii.liat John 1). Hii.i. William I). Harden. II. Charles C. Harman S. Smith Horton Thomas C. Kendrick. Jr. Keith B. Lewis Bkoadus B. McAfee Ai.iiert B. Newton CiEorc.e H. Neal Robert L. Patterson George B. Pritchard (il’v A. Race Jack Renkroe 'J‘. Evans Ritchie Horace 1). Sit attic K I.orine J. Strickland Wii.itURN L. Strickland John F. Sparrow H. Li ke Stanch. Virgil S. Steele Thomas F. St. John Harry F. Tai.madge Thomas R. Talmadge. Jr. Gordon S. Walden Hoke S. Wofford Major Artiicr T. Coi.i.ky Captain Ira C. Nicholas Liectf.nant Lawrence C». Smith Major Frederick W. Whitney Tof row: Derrick, Drew. Stalled. Harman, V. L. Strickland, McAfee, Candler, Gignilliat, Harden, Smith. Middle rote: Sparrow, Kendrick, Wofford, Hackman, Brncc, J. I). Adcrhold, Neal. Newton, T. Talmadge. Hollow rote: M Tahna lge, HradLerry. Pritchard, Nicholas, Colley. St. John, Whitney. Hill. I.. J. Strick- land, Ren f roc. '•«! Tie© IlmndrrJ ami t'.iuhty lirvoDdonkey ‘Drill The Georgia monkey lrill team j crformcd only once tins year—at the Augusta horse Show. There they were warmly praised for their various tricks of riding and acrobatic ma-noeuvers. A special horse show team, composed of Lieutenant Smith. Miss Katherine Kingman, and Jimmy Harris, entered the Augusta show and won no less than n places, three of them firsts. "C hevaliers Agile-." i- the name given to a new society comj oscd of members of the monkey drill team and the horse show team. A special emblem is being designed to he worn by the 21 mcmltcrs. The monkey drill team was this year coni| oscd of the following: John Hodgson Fred Hodgson C. C. Harman Mkli. Stf.i-1if.nson Windsor Letton K. C. Armstrong Rd Aiken Leo Mai.lard AlI.KN (iRIMKS T. K. Huggins J. N. Leckie C. J. Derrick R. A. Dean Livincston Travis Frank Stewart H. K. Story Bili.v Funkiiousek M. R. Brinson The monkey drillers were coached by Lieutenant Lawrence G. Smith. Half of the monkey drill team acts as riders of the horses while the remaining nine arc designated as stunt men. I’ayr 7 Ht. llwm.hrj a A Kightf thrrrRifles earru Although the University of Georgia rifle team worked hard during the past season and made scores which were dangerously close to those of its o| poncntst it did not win any of the 14 matches in which it took part. Plans for the organization of a long-range rifle squad to hold matches during the present season arc being considered by authorities. If such a team is organized. the Georgia riflemen will shoot against North Georgia A. and M.. Clcntson. and other colleges having long-range squads. Coach Nicholas slates that prospects for next year's team arc excellent. The rifle range has been enlarged and put in first class shajie. the sport is rapidly becoming more jiopular with students. and the handicaps under which the present squad worked are being removed. One of the most serious obstacles to the team has been the inability of the old men to practice regularly. As a result most of the shooting fell to the rifles of the newcomers. T. S. Miller, who entered the University from Wofford College, led the team as high point scorer this year, with Captain Neal as runner-up. Matches were held with Alabama, Maryland. Texas A. and M., University of Dayton. Iowa. University of Utah. University of Missouri. Nebraska, Massachusetts A. and M., West Virginia. New Mexico Military Institute, Syracuse, Cornell, and Norwich. The squad is composed of G. H. Neal, T. S. Miller, J. K. I-nnicr. B. Floyd. J. F. Bolton. W. G. Wallace. H. R. Aderhold, C. I-. Hardy, J. R. McDonald, II. M. Colvin. L. Smith, and F. A. Morton. The range, which has gradually l ccn put into good sbaj c. is in the Octagon, and practices arc held there under the direction of Captain I. C. Nicholas. Competitions with rival teams take place by corrcsjxnulcncc. each rifle squad firing on its own range. Scores arc then compared, and the team having the highest rating is the winner. A contest for the Hcarst marksmanship trophy takes place each year, and is participated in by colleges having rifle teams. I‘ai e Tten Hundred and Highly.[our Cavalry l egimental headquarters V. I). I Iakdkn, II......... J. C. Wricict................ E. A. Pound, II............. E. D. Wiley.............. B. Q. Baggett............. G. W. Ellison .... .............................Colonel .................Lieutenant Colonel . Captain and Adjutant . Second Lieutenant, Supply Officer ..............Sergeant Major ..............Color Sergeant Miss Josephine Brooks.......................Regimental Sponsor Miss Mekdal Dowdy .... Regimental Maid of Honor Hardin Miss Brooks Wright Miss Dowdy I'n-jr Tim Jlnmlrfil « Klvhty flM tyirsp— Squadron headquarters Thomas F. St. John John Hodgson . Oze K. Horton . Major . Adjutant Sergeant Major Miss Wylly Foi.k...........................Squadron Sponsor The First Squadron includes Troop A. Troop B, and Troop C. Sr. John Miss Folk Tiro llnniht'l anil Hi-ihfij ixSecond Squadron Headquarters Robert L. Patterson...................................................Major V. V. Pearce.................................................Adjutant Harvey L. Butch.......................................Supply Officer Miss Kvcenia Arxoi.i ..........................Squadron Sponsor The Second Squadron includes Troop I) and Troop R. P.VTTEKSON lil.lTCII Miss Arnoi.ii I'ayc Tin llumtrfrl uml Myhla trrthird Squadron headquarters ---• av'c ' ' • x XvS(LT'r . rp Harry E. Talmadce.............................................■] aJor Y. H. Daniel.............................................Adjutant Miss Mary Hart..............................Squadron Sponsor The Third Squadron includes Troop F and Troop G. Talmadce Miss Hart l-ayc Two llumlml ami Et-jhtv-Chjhtroop cA Jester Story Bradurmrv Sponsor Carlton J. Jester. Jr..........................................Captain H. K. Story.........................................First Lieutenant R. T. Bkadbkrry...............................Second Lieutenant M. M. Steimif.nson...........................First Sergeant Miss Ei.mina Cham hers.......................Sponsor SERGEANTS V. R. Chastain H. Parker W. A. Vaughn TR )OP ROLE Sophomores Bicker y, T. Z. Blumenthal, S. M. Boyd, E. F. Brown, Nt. G. Brice, C. I). Campbell. D. C. Carroll, V. B. Cobb, L. A. Cohen, H. Con goon, F. V. Cor many, C. E. Criskiei.d. F. Davis, J. F. Davis, V. G. Edmondson, H. R. Fitts, P. W. Franklin. R. O. (iABRIEL, F.. T. Goldman. S. Hester, J. F. lIl RT. J. Jarmolowsky, J. Javetz, E. Jones. W. Keene. R. M. Mattox, J. C. Minkovitz, I. Morton, VV. R. McLaughlin, C. F. O'Bkrry. R. C. Ork. J. D. Parham, S. A. Pilgrim, C. E. Portman, H. J. Richter. R. C. Sheppard, C. Slayton. II. H. Smith, Hoke Smith, Leo Tennenbaum, M. Terry. G. O. Travis, W. L. Wages, A. M. Westbrook. J. R. F'reslimen Bond, C. Bumgarner, J. A. Deki.e. K. Speering. H. Wadley, W. M. I’tii e Tico lluuilrf,! amt y.hjhtv ninet roop 3B Hppes Grimes Sponsor B. Scott Rites .... A. P. Grimes .... C. R. Smith . . . H. M. Cam.away . Miss Frances Crane . Captain . I:irst Lieutenant Second Lieutenant First Sergeant . Sponsor SERGEANTS A. Carter G. P. Forman C. B. Earnest T. H. Yentulettk TROOP ROLL Sophomores Adkins, J. S. Armstrong. (I. C. Baldwin. E. B. Brown, R. (I. Buchanan, J. A. Buckman, J. H. Clement. B. Cornett, V. (I. CULPEPPER. W. L. Davis. K. P. Downer. C. L. Estes, W. J. Fuller. w! S. Funkiiouser, Y. I.. Herndon, P. Herbert, I. H. King. W.P. Kicki.igiitek. J. Lamiiert. J. C . Langford, G. M. I.Kitos. M. S. Merciek. L. Miller, J. S. Milton. J. R. Morris, B. McCollum. E. P. O’Kelley, G. Parks, Y. H. Phiixips, K. M. Piiini .y, F. H. Randolph, J. D. Sams. W. A. Scarborough. |. C. Stratford, Y. G. Strickland. T. E. Vaughn. J. R. Voigiit, G. F. Weems, V.. J. WlIKI.CIIEL. I.. W Wilson. R. S. Freshmen Beamek. J. I . Broach, j. M. Collins, J. W. Duke, L. .1. Hope. C. A. l'age Tiro llundwl and XtuflV 5roop C Prrs.mj. Stkickland Sponsor Persall Stkickland Sponsor W. I.. Stkickland......................................... . . Captain J. T. Persali...........................................I:irst Lieutenant V. IX Wkiciit.................................Second Lieutenant L. Mallakd...................................First Lieutenant Miss Kmma Keys.....................................Sponsor SKRC.KAXTS M. I . Jarnican M. Rosenthal J. X. McDonald C. II. Womack TROOP ROLL Sophomores A coos, B. S. Anderson. K. Benson, (X L. Baxley. A. B. Chastain. I-'. L. Ci.acsskn, G. I'. Feaoin, R. I). ( iKKIW NK, T. I'. Henry. W. C. Lesser. 1:. S. LeTTON. V. Matiikws. H. IX Medlin. J. J. McClatchey, H. R. Nance. R. F. Xl’NN. P. C. Paris, T. Phillips, J. M. Pom era ncr, J. B. Sanford. S. ‘. Schmidt. H. Smith. S. Stanley. B. P. Sapfold, T. P. Tietz. R. G. Walker. B. S. Freshmen Carr. F. S. Ezell, .1. R. Gwyn, C. R. I.ECKIE. X. I.ICHTFOOT, IX M. Lott. O. Montgomery. C. H Owen. II. P. Ski.man, J. R. Ti iiiietts, C. X. Walter, L. 1). Waccii. A. C. Winston, A. P. I'ayr Tiro 1 mM nitil Xln IjVMrc Droop T) Vandiver Cum M INC C. W. Vandiver........................ J. R. Cum ming...................... J. J. Harris...................... R. Kdmondson..................... Miss Katmerinf. Kingman SKRC.FAXTS L. B. Boi.ton H. 1). Brown Sponsor .................Captain . First Lieutenant . Second Lieutenant . hirst Scry can I . . . Sponsor II. C. Steu.ing TROOP ROLI. Freshmen Adams. R. N. Agnrw, R. T. Arnold, T. I). Aultman, R. I' Baker. N. J. Barron. O. B. Bates, H. F. Beasley, K. F. Bennett, H. V Bishop, M. IL BOWERS, J. II. Bradley. J. H. Brown, K. M. Brown. M. V. Burch, W. G. Burns. J. M. Byers. J. P. C ameron, II. C, Carlton. J. T. Carter. Y. C. Carson. J. M. Cavender. H. T. Chandler. J. C. Clement, C. A. Coker. II. Y. Conner at, R. r. Curry, R. C. Davidovitch, J. Day, R. B. Dickinson. II. H. Dover. T. Y. Drake. F. M. Dyer. B. Fry, P. Hudson, B. B. Hughes, M. P. Martin, IL IL Moncriek, M. S. McCord. IL S. Scoggins, C. I'nge Tiro llumtnJ anil Xtnrty tico roop 8 Newton Touchstone Sponsor B. Newton.................. J. F. 'I Ol?Ciistone .... T. K. IIfecins .... (i. B. I-AITZENIIISER . Miss Dokutiiy Brown . ................Captain First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . First Sergeant . Sponsor Cox, M. H. Earnest, M. L. Ei.i.is, R. B. Eve. A. E. Hale, J. P. Higdon. S. P. Hoynbs. W. B. Hi rst, C. P. J A COBS, L. SERGEANTS TROOP ROLL C. O. Parker Strain. B. B. J. L. Cook Johnson. E. C. Johnson. Z. M. Middleton, O. E. Miller, J. L. Moore, J. 'I . Mcrimiy, R. W. O'Neil. J. H. Pavnf.. R. I:. Phillies. J. A. Rabi-n. T. Rauschenberg. R. Reid. R. L. Rivers. W. F. Robinson. H. G. Sciiii.lino. C. I'. Shackleford. W. P. SllARI'LKV, L G. Smith. II. 'C. Smith, I'. L. Stocks. J. Tarver. F. L. Tate. F. C. Thomason. R. A Titos, R. V. Warnei.l. IL B. West. J. K. Wilder. B. S. Williams, J. A. I'o'jr Tiro Uundroi anil Xincty-t irre'foroop H kmax Ritciiie Sponsor Chaki.es C. Harman......................... O. M. McWiiirter.......................... T. E. Ritchie........................... S. F. Hunt........................... Miss Dorothy Mii.i.er.............. ...............Captain l:irsl Lieutenant Second Lieutenant First Scry cant . Sponsor SERGEANTS J. B. Forimiam J. I.. Hardin BELL. C. F. TROOP ROI.E V. Strickland G. C. Hamilton Carlisle. E. E. Franklin. R. 1C Fredericks, A. B. Fuller, R. H. Gallis. A. Garland. J. V. Gay. (). F. Gortatowsky. H. K. Maker. H. II. Head. S. A. Hodgson, F. G. Hokmeykr. L. P. Hollis. M. 1). Holt. D. V. Howell, ('. S. Hutchinson. H. B. Hush insky. S. Iverson. R. I.. Jackson. K. Y. joilNSON, B. C. Jolly, J. P. JoSKLOVE. J. F. Kellogg, I . E. Kelley. Y. I .am hack, S. F. Lassiter. B. Lott. T. Maddox, J. Mallard, C. Martin. G. Maynard, M. L. Michael, J. W. Morgan, C. A. McKenney, H. R McMillan, W. I.. Newton. A. S. •rif 7 in, HtmirrA niul iaitj -f■ roop Q Derrick Dean" C. J. Dkkkick......................... R. A. Dean .......................... H. T. McLeroy...................... O. D. Dawson .................... Miss Elizabeth Rai e........... SERGEANTS C. X. Bennett V. M. Bekky Sponsor ...................Captain . First Lieutenant . Second Lieutenant . First Sergeant . Sponsor C. B. Causey TROOP ROLL Sophomores Bryant, V. H. Freshmen Bennett, C. X. Berry, W. M. Cmf.stnutt. T. V. GrKSIIKKG, L. Hikscii. S. D. Hiscock. V. G. Johnson, D. I. Levkoff. S. A. Levy, S. H. Mercer, J. A. McClvng. J. H. McCord, J. B. McGauchey, C. Xix. J. Park. H. A. Parks, J. J. Pitman, C. W. Purvis. M. !.. Reeder. T. 11. Roden. II. Ross. A. M. Rowland. E. C. Shull. R. E. Smith. E. M. Smith, O. E. Smith. P. M. Spiers, J. R. Southwell. M. C. Story. K. P. Strother, I '. C. Turner, W. V. Usher. V. R. Walters, A. J. Weems. J. T. Weinstein, A. Weitz. I '. West. C. C. Wilkins. S. B. Wingfield, J. A. Woodward, M. S. Paue Tku llmulrtil and .Yiiu j 1r»Infantry 'Tfegimental headquarters GlC.VILI.IAT W'allek Gkacev Sponsor Ai'tiii'k M. (iir.Niu.iAT.....................................Lieutenant-Colonel G. A. Hack..............................................................Major J. M. Brooks........................................Captain. Supply Officer J. V. Wai.i.kk.......................................Captain. Adjutant H. S. Wokkoki)............................Captain. Plans and Training R. II. Gkacev..................First Lieutenant. Intelligence Officer John S. Caxdi.kr, II . . . . First Lieutenant, Machine (inns Mi$s Ri th 1 Iii.i..........................Regimental Sponsor I'ti'jr Tiro llumhnl and S'indy-titCompany cA Talmadc.e McAfee Sponsor 1 mom as R. Taluadce...........................................Captain Commanding Jack Renekoe.................................................................Captain V. S. Steele ... ..................................First Lieulenont H. B. McAfee..............................................First Lieutenant K. B. Lewis .... Seeond Lieutenant O. C. Joiner.......................................Seeond Lieutenant J. D. Adkkholi................................Seeond Lieutenant Miss Nett a Rcsseli...............................Sponsor R. G. Hooks G. W. Jones R. M. McCommons SEIKiKAXTS Sophomores Adams, A. I?. Adams, C. A. Beale, (). V. H. Booth, J. N. Bki'miialow, D. C. Coffee, C. G. Cowart. V. M. Crowii, I.. Gary, I„ Hai.i., A. K. Hardman. L. G. Hawkins. J. K. oiinson. W. N. .ester, F. V. Murdock. J. F. Norton. F. A. Page, W. O. Thompson. !). Tou.erson, M D. Wellborn, S. M. Fresh mot Alford, I.. A. R. I . Hollis COMPANY ROLL Anderson, F. N. Arnold. K. T. Beer .. W. T. BIjOL'NT. G. Bond. 1). Booth, V. H. Bkiant, A. F. Bridges, G. H. Brown, J. M. Brown, T. H. Bryan, J. L. Bryant. C. J. M. A. Rowe G. I.. Chakin I . Cocrson Clark, W. F. Collier, M. A. Crittenden. T. J. Crook, C. H. CCLURF.TII. A. W. David. V. I . Dickinson, M. B. Dickson, H. S. Hayes. H. S. McCoy, W. S. Reid. B. S. Rasnake, J. H. Sen L'ESSLER. W. Sf.wei.l. H. C. Stewart, W. S. Thomas. J. V. Thornton, V. F. Tillman, J. Weatherly, W. K. Williams. J. I). Williams, R. K. Zees man, I!. I'OilC Tko llunilrrtl anil .YImi-Ir fcnCompany '53 Bruce Garrard Neal Johnson Sponsor James V. Bruce.................. James A. Garrard .... G. H. Ne.nl.................. I). W. Johnson............ 0. 1). Collins............ C. R. Kenner .... Miss Marv Dean Bailey . Captain Commanding ..............Captain . First Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Sergeant . Sponsor SKRC.EANTS C. T. SCTIIERI.ANI) J. V. Bottom J. Sophomores Basham, C M. Bishop, E. II. Bkvan, B. L. Bryant, R. G. Buie, P. D. d'Anticnac. T. Edwards, T. P. Hdwarhs, V. L. Fleetwood, R. G. Fkishik, T. L. Blalock J. N. Franklin Ginn, S. O. Hardy. C. L. Jackson, C. H. Johnson, P. S. Kino, H. I.. Meadows, J. C. Meeks, D. G. Mkntzkr. M. R. Mitchei.i., H. Mc .Vamara, J. Thomason, C. G. Young, V. F. J. K. Strain COM I’A XV ROLL Freshmen Aderiiold. H. R. Akline, T. J. Blanchard, M. F. Bolton. II. J. Buchanan, F. Carr it iieks. J. A. Cox. W. C. Crawford. J. A. Dillard, S. H. Estrhff. W. J. Farmer, B. V. Fears, R. F. Ford. K. Franklin. R. D. Cord an, G. A. Gorikivit h, S. Griggs, H. P. Hailey. II. F. Hall, F. T. Hardy, J. G. llix. H. D. Howell. 1.. L. Jessup. W. I. Jones, W. D. Lewis, H. Mapfett, II. S. Manley, W. F. Market, J. M. Martin, C. E. Maxwell. B. R. Murray, O. B. McDonald. J. J. McTigue, J. O. Prosser. J. B. Stephens, F. L. Smith, II. M. I'nite Too ll»H lre4 ant Xinety fi'jhlCompany C Pritchard Kendrick Strickland Sponsor G.B. Pritchard............................................................Captain Kendrick..................................................Pirst Lieutenant Strickland................................................Pirst Lieutenant ( . I. Maimiox..........................................Second Lieutenant ' ? «. IIVKk..................................Second Lieutenant G. T. Harris.............................Second Lieutenant J. R. Moss.................................Second Lieutenant J. I Sparrow . ..................Second Lieutenant G. H. Stone.........................Second Lieutenant W. A. Legwen.........................First Sergeant Miss Alice Rowland.................Sponsor skrokants A. O. Dr.man w. b. Jones S. X. Bins l„ B. Macid C. K. Smith C. R. Pritchard COMPANY ROLL Sophomores Gallawav. J. G. Incram. H. R. Nathan, I. S. Tick nor, W. F.. Abercrombie, J. M. Garrard. F. I). Johnson. C. M. Nichols, G. D. Ti mlin. J. S. Abram, 1.. K. Gay, J. M. Jones, M. J. Nicholson. J. P. Walters, J. S. Adair, R. K. Gay, L. E. Jones, W. S. Oliver, J. C. White, M. Anderson, K. Graham, T. J. Kendrick, S. M. Palmer. H. G. Williams. H. M. Barnes, J. I.. Haley, X. A. I.ancford. G R. Pennington, A. F. Wills, W. R. Birdsey, H. F. Hancock. A. C. Martin, G. H. Reed, B. B. Wolfe, B. P. Chafin'. W. F. Harris. I). G. Martin. W. H. Smith, A. L. Wooldridge,). M. Dasher. J. R. Hayes. J. T. Mitchell. J. D. Smith. W. R. Freshmen Points. H. B. Hi won. R. J. Moss. S. J. Spivey. D. D. Bacgs G B Floyd, B. IUgi.es, R. E. McDaniel, J. R. Swan. R. P. Bi llaril C W. E A STERLING, A. E. Page Tteo Hundred and Xinely niner F he 33and Stanch. Drew Sponsor H. Luke Stanch. .1. W. Drew . . . Miss l.ois McClain '1'. F. Cokdrav R. E. Hamby ..................................Captain .......................First Lieutenant ............................ Sponsor SERGEANTS 1.. C. I.ANTOKI) E. H. Roukrtson MEM HERS OF THE BAND Sophomores Ba .emore. J. M. Bush. I.. S. Rush. M. Colvin. H. M. Davis, C. 1C Dok.minv. V. 1C Farrell, W. IC Fetzer. L. W. Futch. T. A. Gorman, 11. '. Hamilton, R. E, Harris, R. D. Hovnes. T. M. Patrick. J. H. Sl'ANO. IC Vinson. T. M. Wallace, V. G. Watson. M. B. Fresh men Askew, B. II. Betts, J. Ci. Byrd. O. L. Carter. R. I.. Cole. C. M. Colvin, J. E. Gray, C. M. Harter. S. Hoi kin's, I,. Loveless, O. F. Moore. D. L. Pol hill. R. R. Rich, W. G. Sawyer. S. T. Searcy. 1C H. SlIETARI). E. P. TALMADGE. S. M. Til ARTE. W. D. Thomas. E. W. Tracy. W. S. Utchurch, C. B. WoRTIIAN, A. G. Westbrook. .1. C. ‘Hire Three llunttirO.... Thf 'Micalion in 1024 of Memorial Hall, a beautiful tribute to the I nnersity of Georgia men who lost their tires in the World V "• expressed the awakening of the alumni to the needs of their Alma Mater. The recently completed Commerce-Journalism Building ts another structure erected through their contributions to the War Memorial Fund.Qeorgiana • i I—Moore College. Come here oral Irani to ( r a surveyor. , t—Memorial Hull. Look like a ' glorified inkierll. Who'll open the I lid t S—•posterior ran of Aendrmle building nnrl Chapel. The cloud arc pood to look al. I—This i Harrow Hall. One of lho c Ayricullmal College things. S Conner Hall. The main plant of the gentleman-farmer factory of Crorgla. c I.ura Hall, home of "Teddy" Walker, "lied" Sidling, and other . I t,id here i I'hl Kappa' hall, which ha politician’ paradise upstair , quarter or halve for the brio red (ienrgia Co-Op downstair . Oowah! X Sophomore llou e. Well, this I one of the Co-cd fail . 'J -Candler Hall. formerly yiren orer In rough arrks, now the abode of Hr. Park's prize pen of freshmen, and Hake Wofford. Page Three Hundred and Three ; «uVufy 1 hr repp building. education, (;»grhol- I o.W. 'rriologp, or irhat hare pouf t—I nd A' if Slrod Vor tell hot II not that leap —laatm, I of crtrncr-tlone « r ir C' WMrr(rVour«g(lim MMifljr, I v»T. Iltlicvr It nr Hal, 6u Af building trim flnhhed irllhin I len month aflrr the corncr-Honc teat Jrjlrf. AY lleinle licet-I Man for explanation. ■ t—Crated .rt.emblr fit r iil of the Academic building for another of tho»e damn initiation . Sole Itebeeca, Walter, and llnllir ri'jht out in front of ererptuxip. $—Com merer-Jaurnnli m building ox It looted in June, »! :. Cantidtr It beautp note. - 11 u in n i going inl« the Chapel, June, I9Z7. flnnah for | (Seargla! «'•—I.eConle Hall. Abode nf 1 range nmelt» and right 1111 tlranger. :—The big Canadian I all dre ed up to inert thr returning farmer». Thl I June. I i7. A Soule llall. If %re didn't tnaie It iron Id mate thr prnl dent of thr Agricultural College tore, trr'd rail it the co-ed » ' !eo,.,la'. Hlg Three: Willi II. II.tort, dean of the tlraduatr School and proft or of Oreek; John ilorrl . profe •or of Herman; and It. I Brook , d.an of the School ol Commerce. Cage Thrrr Hundred and four) ■ ) I ■ 1—-I "'I thi ix I lif era ted Ih'il Iff Hi to I hr Southern driiot to turn Ihr rctumtnp hrror. from S'ric 11 mrit. Thin trim In l rlotirr, alxo. i Scabbard ami lltailr, Man. IM7. Three arr Ihr aoirtl bon If ho If rat In on Ihr ftr-t Inlllaltnu. If hart t,r„ of them hohl Ihr rank of eaptnin. or hlalur. S -Alumni lunch ran, alxo Junr, pear of oar l.artl, 19!".. Sure if or a poor rural. I—Senior Hound Table. Man. MX. Iion't ark ux If hat thin club i yood for except to purthnxe •pore in the I'amlura. o I form Mehre and Wallace Waile fit on the beach and look ihixyx over. Wade, didn't km.tr then if hat llniepta ir. x got an la do In Itlriaiupham. nor did Helm kante ir i jf Tech uni t otnij to do in titan la. hut they both xrem to hare forexern, induin') from their irprcxxionx. r, (iehryta xtudcntx celebrate the victory or. r iulr. October, 19!T. hfreiubcr S didn't xetin xo threatenin')—I hen. ?- t'arnedoe. Dole, and Mr Mat Ian, found' r of the lloltrmian clnl. tax! piar. han't euiharrtUu any of them fin axkinf) what hr ran paint, if any. If—The Alpha Kappa Si’x rot In me l.rnirt, tart p. nr. The Itahl.lltx xtnrl deexxinp up early, you xr,. 9—Junior Cabinet, May, !» . Xotr the int,llip. nt. nuroHcrrned look on llielr tiailimj facet. i Pape Three Hundred and Tire J'tiftr Thrrt llniulrrtl nml Sif I ' i jiivffy crude. but rent ember, tht i jult a photograph. The ‘nudum refute In he re. pon ibte for the elegant placard , or Ihtir in• mi-riptinn either. I—frank Hell ullun, hi cup. .1 Hitt Hue Who Ha Hone Illy Thing In a Ht’J M'njr. Sole tht dual prrxonaHty. .« He tea a Ton tinppa Theta when hi pictnri tea made. Oat a Chi t'hi irhrn their liantl Ira mudr. } Hi Kingman make hor ic ml dirt, CCeH if he hn a cup to drink out of. i The monkey-drill team, or Carp de Cher, ul I pile. UV aren't going to matt that oO-cion crack about ino t of the hor r haring their fret on the ground. (5 llill Hellichnrl and Itehrna Umn at omc Lind of thing left epriny. I,rf hope nobody touched 11 cigarette to llill' hula costume. Thin really ought to hare been In la t gear'll random, but don’t mind that, please. 7 The I'andora photographer calrhrt the track captain with hi brrtrhe down. 1 I'age Three Hundred and Setrn i - Chi I’lii 'irou i. tf irr were to t'U the !• their retina iroutil In hurt. fart. .t Show in, that not onto Homer, tint time rren neiol men of the |irr ml, mm tin innch'es to siren. }—■Captain .Xieholn . Inn l.aillcs' Itl te 7. .V Amt here In the low nrhoot nt eloss to fiie hire token. Sot irr the inhllli i nt, net ex fiii mmIomm ii lion oil I hr [arm, liteluillnn t the rritoieuril jndi c himself. r.— We'll h t non iteetilr about thrue. lint ore n port o[ the eorolrn ulofl. 7 Kline mill A listen join m; with the t’hI I’hi'n. Tlnil shows then are 'joint to hr townees. $ l.omlnlo t'hi i)in up. The miiiiii on the t'hi I’hi'n. 9- The .1 ui itMln Coni eon, pan-ion iinkM llnrrn Mehre who that S m nhe set on liin hi irk unit he tellM her to nee hln illtornen. I Ih III! 'Inn III till. We'll Ilo it oniiwon. Siih tin mrli nehtiln ixpn unions on their fares, rspe violin lli'l'lleiirteil. Amt one o[ the freshmen who broke hit till ilile In time In In the iiieture. Cun saint ions, huihln . Toije I he, e ItunilrC'l ami Kiijht Robert lit ice That is this one. Harry Tultnudge Krappy Alpha's contribution to bigger ami badder dec clubs. II’alter llricc I wouldn’t politic—but come in and I'll buy a dope. Luke Slancil "I wish there didn't have to be politics in anything." 6. Muck Humes This is that one. Red 'umer Another celebrity on the campus ticket for gridiron. Page Three llumtretl ami MaeHen Hardy That damn Red and Black. Jutland Eyler I'm a sin jeer—look at my lone hair. Tom Talmadgc Must he thinking of the heroine of the "Forsyth Soga." Fcllccr Lewis The laziest man in college. Hilly Young Who lost $300 last week-end. Gns Loyless That's a "Cracker-jack” suit you've got on. Gus. 1‘ii‘ir There llumlrfil amt TenT. C. Kendrick A good guy—until fit got rich on the Semite dub. Hoke IK off or d My bunds itch for the plow-handles. Roy Estes "Who's that Indy I seen yon with in Los Angelest" "That wasn't no lady, that teas a movie actress." V ' Tom Hamilton It'll be published by Aucjust. Chick Shi ver He's not this goofy on the athletic field—he's just on his way to class. Donald Dutncody An Atlanta Chi I hi— sober up.i ragt Thr e Ihimlrnt unit Elect" ✓ Jlton itrei Gel your senior ring— need the money. Turn Si. John Le grand Si. Jean. "I didn't tcanl the Cracker anyway." Allen Grimes Company, alien—shunt Arthur Giynillini "Holy, holy, holy" Lord God Almighty! Boh Mi Tit tie Be nonchalant—light a Home Run. Babe Florence He made a G, then Sigma Chi. t’eujr Three Hundred and 'Ittih Friar Thompson Thinking of those Red md Mack profits. Dan Tally lx a Sphinx he's a damn good end man. Tamar Smith lie remembers he’s married. Ryan Frier Big hearted, the fntur, owner of a chain of Gear gia weeklies. Jim mie 11 oUinejsxvorlh I Wanna Office, Esq. Tom Sash An All-American what? Po-jc Three )lnn lrctl un.l ThhUrnKelly McCutchcn The One Club's cherub. Hob Pa Her sou Hr tens griped like this when he thought Sphinx and Phi Meta Kappa had given hint the go-by. Red Round What's in it for Kappa Alpha Hroadns McAfee It teas Christmas bells for some, but it teas wedding bells for Bobbie and me. Hill Kline Down with the G. O. P. Joe Hey man Georgia's star alternator. •I Three Hundred and FourteenPark McGinty G I wish Stcg would give me that letter. Jack Mathews "A tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.” Gene Smith Good Guard! Mac McCrary This is Mac McCrary —oh my God, yes. Rufus Jennings Angel Eddie's side-hick. Jack Renfroe Oh Gawd. The Cracker he has put out. t'nye There Hundred and t'lftern T. •;. Ritchie am monarch of all I survey — and a senior pledge to Sigma Chi. Steve I'pson II ail Iy bitten by the political bee. •Kwh McMulltw Inttrloeutorf .1 nniver-sarinnf Gridiron f Phi Beta Kappaf So. thank you. I don't care (or any. Ike Hoy He has a great future —behind him. Iloh Sherrod Blue Key's studious habits saved him from a fate xeorse than death— editing the Pandora. Henry Reeves Hold 'em up. Henry— don’t embarrass us. Pane 7 hire llun‘hrit oml SUIre  Bobby Hooks Bring on J'nnney.' Hollis Morris One of that large body of athletes attending the lent’ school. Joe Brown The tear-time governor. Billy Oliver "How about a four-somef" Pogr Three I In ml red amt Seventeen Harvey Hill Coop's golfing gnickers. Dave Black Also ran—as a wet.(Jlenii ’ La illzcnhiscr Basket-hall captain in one year on the team— but then he's a Sigma Chi. Pete Kenner "After the elections, mother." Craig Barrow A good hoy. hut he's just another S. A. E. Joe Boland Ike, Eel's little brother. Herbert Ringel Von know I like to play football—yes I do. Spencer Walden Georgia's Beau Brum-me I. ■ I'age Three Hundred and Eighteen Mulon Conns "Dizzy" listens for that dirty one. Charlie A initially Kara Avis, a likable Chi Phi. Hear Morris A not her athletic late-yer. Jesse Drew A good boy—eventually, why not note Gene Haley Note sleep the brave. Bill I.eg wen " tVhen I teas in Mew Orleans .... " rage Three Hundred and XlnelrenGuy Hamilton Cheer up, you won’t live always. Boh Falligant “Why isn’t Ratliffe here to push me?” Prentiss C our son Hi, seriousness. Jimmie Harris Yes, I'm a good basket-ball player—sure I am. tV y nit Bur ten A young ineffectual. Frank Dudley A t least I can learn football signals. root Three ItuniJreJ ami Ttcentl)Slim Drew Hold ’em, Slim. Joe Franklin IF hat a cheer leader— by the grace of God and the G. O. F. F. . Shea rouse I have the ear-marks of a campus leader. Carl Sutherland Honest Carl Sutherland. Lathrop Mitchell Look out, Doc, here comes Marie. Hip Palm our An Earnest Christian lad. Pan' Three llunrlml onrl Ticmly-onrJohn Candler Marshall hath slain his thousands, but Candler his tens of thousands— with the jmvbone of an ass. Dong Little The Sweetheart of Sigma Chi. Andrew Kingery "Hut, sirs, when I was in the legislature—" Slim Mathews "I ain’t killed a man to-day.” H. F. Johnson So the Lambda Chis finally got an athlete. Dutch Lawrence Keep that gripe on life. I’ayc Three Hundred and Ticenty-tteoThe Concellaurcatc To caption this properly toon Id result in the editor going to jail. that Proprietor of the Law School. Shake thing, Pnge Three IhnttUrtl amt Tirenty-three Vow. fellows, let's stop this drinking. The Dean of Virtue. Don't be so boisterous, please. Onward and Upward! Page Three Hundred ami Twenty-four The biggest freshman of them all. Let's first educate the School of Education. Page Three Hundred aiul TtcmlgflreH'alder, ll'a-ller, open the window. Here comes Dr. Soule. Commandant of the local West Point. els a low person—a darned good football p layer rntje Three Uun-lrxl nnrt Twenty gUFOR THOSE WHO LOVE FINE THINGS UNUSUAL CANDIESTom’s Toasted Peanuts As Fresh as a Flapperforeword These write-ups of the fraternities at Georgia are prompted by no spirit of antagonism to any fraternity or fraternities. They contain the grain of truth which is necessary to any attempt at humor, but not enough, we hope, to bring serious injury to the chapters concerned. An attempt has been made to avoid personalities, save in a semi-complimentary way, and to concentrate attention upon the organizations as a whole. May we ask that as each person reads these pages, he will resolutely note that no matter how bad (or truthfully!) his own fraternity has been treated, those d—d Greeks which arc his particular enemies have been treated even worse! And that way lies tolerance and friendship. S. £ "Have you a little S. A. E. in your home? ’ "Hell, no, and 1 don't want any." Sigma Alpha Ep-saloon was indicted on the University late (it's a pity it couldn't have been delayed indefinitely) in 1865. when the South was too whipped down over the effects of the war to resist the army greater than the Union and Confederate foiccs combined. Try as it might, since then, neither University authorities nor the students who join rating fraternities have been able to get rid of the Beta Boys. As long as there were only four fraternities represented at Georgia, the S. A. E.’s were a member of the Big Four. Certainly. In numbers there is strength. Now. however, with other fraternities represented at Georgia, the S. A. E.'s rate as they do out West, where to ask a college man if he is an S. A. E. means a fight or an apology. Ask Ham Napier how he found the S. A. E.'s rated at Tulane! S. A. E. used to lioast the champion plain, fancy, assorted, and long-distance vodka-vanquishers at Jawjaw. but of late they have spurned the vine (except Jim Roberts) while in hot pursuit of scholarship and activities. The K. A.'s have given them a few minor office , for activities, ami they actually rate eleventh in scholarship when there are no fewer than eighteen fraternities represented here. By convenient bargains with the K. A.’s ami other campus men. they managed to get three men in the Sphinx, until this year an exclusive honorary society at the University. In the general squabb'c over the attempt to elect the entire student body to mcmliership, one member resigned. The other two stayed in. So much for fraternal solidarity. Such harmony is nothing unusual with the S. A. E.'s. They have all the loyalty to their fellow members possessed by the proverbial snakc-in-tlie-grass. When good S. A. E.'s get together, one of them has to say. “He’s not an S. A. E..“ before they express their candid opinion of the person in any except cuss words. But when they take in such a large percentage of the student body, you really can’t expect a hundred or two hundred boy to get along with each other, now can you? Their chapter meetings, for instance. Where the brothers have to he introduced to each other, and even then some people get in by mistake. It reminds one of the story about the worthy ae student who went to the K. A. house and told them he had decided lie wanted to ioin a fraternity. They told him the enrolling office of the army were down the street on Pulaski. and sent him on his way. The S. A. E.'s were glad to get him. as they had only ninety-nine then attd wanted to complete the century. Their house would be moderately acceptable to a farmer not in need of too good a barn—it was vacated by the A. T. O.'s 20 years ago as it was falling down. But they don't care, as long a the charred keg may be worshipped out in the shack, and indoor sports of all kinds are on tap. Yes, let's whoop it up for S. A. H.—Join the army—and see the world as an S. A. E. Chi Phi After the S. A. E.'s the Chi Phis came second —they have been second, or worse, ever since, no matter who was first. We admit it's hard to say anything about the Chi Phis—they do so little. They vainly try to be the aristocrats of University of Georgia fraternities—and still we haven't said anything about them! The secret of Chi Phi success—if any—is to pick the tlowcr of Atlanta youth when they arc still tender buds, then bring 'em to Georgia and pickle ’em in alcohol. Also, by some manner of seance they manage to tell when a babe is still in his cradle that he will be a great athlete when he comes to collitch. They put pledge buttons on tlicir swaddling clothes, and consequently have a great collection of gentlemen athletes—there ain’t no such animal. The Chi Phis are noted for abstinence from politicking in student activities, but they have never been known to turn down anything offered them without effort on their part. The Chi Phis are just enough of everything to l e nothing, despite their efforts to laugh it off. Too sotty to be good Y. M. C. A. boys, too dumb to lie dilettantes, too snooty to ! e good mixers, there is nothing left for ihem to be but Chi Phis. What other students think of the Chi Phis may be judged by the old but admirable, most contemptuous, cut of all: “We don’t want him— give him to the Chi Phis." And now arc presented to our view that noble order of Southern gentlemen, the Georgia chapter of Kappa Alpha, affectionately known about the campus as Krappy Alpha and by other equally endearing terms. They have to be noticed here, as elsewhere, for they possess the obnoxious ability of attracting publicity on all occasions. The K. A.’s arc the political degenerates of the University, working on the successful principle: "Let not thy right hand know who thy left hand Vaar Three UunJreJ anJ Ticenly HlncThe University of Georgia ANNOUNCES September 17, Opening Date for 1928-1929 Session Erected at a cost of $215,000, the gift of Alumni and Friends of the University II. Franklin College. (The College of Arts). V. Chartered 1785. offering the Degree o: Bachelor of Arts, and including: 1. General Courses in the Liberal Arts. 2. Special Courses. VI. The Georgia Stale College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. Offering the Degree of Bachelor of Science, and including the following: 1. General Science 2. Civil Engineering. 3 Electrical Engineering. 4. Pre-Medical. 5- Full Agricultural Course. Forest Engineering. 6. VII. 7- Veterinary Medical. 8. Course in Home Economics. 9 Course in Physical Education. 10. Winter Course in Agriculture. VIII. it. Experiment Station (at Experiment). 14. Farmers’ Institute and Extension Service. IX. III. IV. The School of F.ducation. Offering the Degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education. The School of Commerce. Offering the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Commerce. The Henry II'. Grady School of Journalism. Offering the Degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism. The Graduate School. Offering the following degrees: t. Master of Arts. 2. Master of Science. 3. Master of Science in Agriculture. 4. Master of Science in Forestry. 5. Master of Science in Economics. 6. Civil Engineering. 7. Master of Sciences in Home Economics. The I.umfkin Law School. Offering the Degree of Bachelor of Laws. A three years' course. The School of Pharmacy. Offering the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy. A four years’ course. The I nirersity Summer School. Six and nine weeks’ sessions, embracing work at the University, the College of Agriculture and the Georgia State Teacliers’ College. Elementary, High School, College Credit and Graduate Courses dc-signed especially for teachers and college students. Copies of the general catalogue of the University and special bulletins of the several departments will be sent upon request by T. W. REED, Registrar. I'OUC Three It unit re,I amt Thirtydocth.” They team up with the campus men and get what they can out of them, then fawn on their tcllow Greeks for other political plums Too bad they Itad to concede the campus four places in the Thalian club this year in order to retain a voice in the G. O. P. councils. But who couldn't win with a system like the K. A.'s use? They put at the helm of their political machine a dear brother who has been in school not less than six years and who by means of experience knows how to get by with highhanded hell-raising. At least, it’s worked fine under the guidance of 1-eck Marshal and Buster Kilpatrick. The latter and Horatius Shattuck have done everything this year but pledge each other campus and K. A. respectively (but not respectfully), but both have such a wide streak of each in them that they couldn’t be much worse. And now at the eleventh hour it develops that the Januses of University politics stoop even lower. With the Thetas throwing them overboard the good ship ’Thalian,” the K. A.'s make a last stand as desperate as Custer's, nominating a Phi Mu for president in order to com more votes and still keep their fingers in the dramatic pic. We didn’t think they had the Hart! Like a true family of brothers, the K. A.’s fight amongst themselves and call each other all sorts of crooked so-and-so’s to outsiders, but when there's votin' to be done with a fellow Kappa Alpha on the grafting end of the election all the K. A.'s are right there to add validity to the old adage about "Honesty among—" but we'll have to get Lester llargrett back in school to finish it out. So here’s to the Georgia K. A.'s (Southern— to distinguish them frpm the K. A. Northern, which really rates up N’awth. When more treacherous campus politicians are foisted on the college, their mail will be addressed to the K. A. House. Phi ‘Delta 'Theta The term “Big Four" was coined by the dear old Phi Delta Thetas when they finally realized that they could not crash the gate on the ’’Big Three.” They go around shouting that their lodge is one of the five best in the country, but although they may be hell in the west and the middle-west, they aren’t so hot at Georgia. Their juniors and seniors are nothing to wire home about, except for pull to get them back in college, but their sophomores arc worse and their freshmen arc terrible. They surely may look into the future, confident that if they are lucky they will still rate better than the Lambda Cliis. Maybe. The fraternity proudly leasts that it has upon its rolls the name of no more and (how could it l c) no less a person and personage than Lamartine Griffith Hardman, Jr., the son of our present distinguished governor. At last the Thetas have managed to beat the S. A. E.'s to a politician's son! Marble-shooting, poker playing, and crap shooting arc the principal occupations of Georgia Alpha’' Blue and White boys. From the tenacity with which they hold to their hitching post one would think that they feel a personal need for a refuge and a safe anchoring place. Their fraternity paper stated last year that their house is “generally considered the best chapter house owned by a fraternity at Georgia.” Aside from the fact that the porches arc rotting down, their mortgage is certainly the most ponderous of any chapter at Georgia. In college activities, after four years they finally got a man in the Sphinx only to have hint resign. It looks like the fates arc against them, a' it hardly seems likely that they will have another man who can pass up enough work to stay in college four years, much less do anything. And as in Fclkcr Lewis ami Flunky Swanson, to mention only two of the more outstanding loafers, they have the laziest men in college, they might have depended on getting offices in the Thalians if the K. A.’s hadn't roped them as they do everybody else. When Phi Delta Theta came to Georgia, practically its only excuse for competition with real fraternities was its high scholastic standing. Its marks are tumbling fast—it now ranks only twelfth out of eighteen—and possibly some day they'll start chosing co-eds and be a leading fraternity. But until then the boys will have a good time, depend on that. Sigma Chi Mack Barnes was Sigma Chi's first opportunity for the Sphinx since the days of "Country'’ Man-gum, and poor old Mack, though lie stayed around five years hoping that maybe Buster would put him in, has had to be content with the Gridiron, lie did make $500 on the Glee club, remember. Sigma Chi is composed of athletes, would-be athletes, boys who couldn't make anything else except Tan Kappa Theta, and boys who hadn’t been able to make anything at all until Sigma Chi got big-hearted and even with them, the statement still stands. Any man to whom Coach Stegeman will issue a basket-ball uniform is also issued a Sigma Chi pledge button, by special arrangement with Mack Barnes, who was basket-ball manager last year. George Keen got l ent for basket-ball captain, and so there was nothing left to do but pledge Bai c Florence, who beat him. Which was done. On the football team they may be heard shouting that they have the two captains for next year, I-autzenlveiser and Jacobson, and Lautzenheiser also captain of basket-ball. Jacobson is reported to have said that lie guessed he was a member of that lodge. Sigma Chi. isn’t it? but that it didn't worry him. It is needless to say anything about basket-ball and its captains. As no natural Sigma Chi could ever be anything but a rough-neck athlete, they arc forced to adopt the practice of taking any prominent man on the campus who is still of the campus, and brandishing a pledge button. Some of them, like Ritchie, grab for it. A lot of them say they would rather l c nons than Sigma Cliis. Those who refuse the bids naturally find good company in the large number of Sigma Chi athletes who won't affiliate with the chapter, like Pryor Fjtts. lA. t. 0. Let's All Turn Over for the A. T. O.’s, the lodge composed of commerce students, law students. and other morons. Perhaps it is fraternal loyalty to the business college which one of their members (he joined when the chapter rated better than last) heads; perhaps it is because the School of Jewish F.nginccring and Judge Gober’s School for Feeble-minded boys are the only ones easy enough for them to pass—at any rate. Bob Sherrod is about the only man in the chapter who doesn't take one of those two, and Bob is dunking journalism! Alpha Beta stands not only for the lodge number but also for the elementary principles of knowledge, manners, and morals which they have not yet learned. Their convivial little parties in the shack, and the tca-danccs which they used to give Saturday afternoons, have been enough to 1‘oi f Three llunrlrcd anil Thirty-oneThe University Rich m Tradition Joseph Costa Company point with pride to the confidence the university, alumni, and friends of this great institution have in the past bestowed upon us by their patronage. We look to the future with hopes of rendering a greater service made possible by the good faith placed in us by those who have passed on into life's highways. fl THE JOSEPH COSTA COMPANY Manufacturers of COSTA'S DELICIOUS ICE CREAM am Jobbers of Confectioneries and Fountain Supplies COSTA'S LUNCHEONETTE You will enjoy our wholesome borne cooked food Our service and quality can not he equaled r O S T A ' S $ DELICATESSEN £ ‘Dispensers of “Good Things to Eat COSTA'S Soda Cigars Candies Flowers COSTA’S JUST A LITTLE BIT BETTER ’"••Ve Three Itmutrnl au.l Thirly lHOmake good girls weep, and sometimes those not so good. Of course, if the girls come to a tea-dance, they stay down-stairs. Of course. And if they want to do a little light drinking, that's all. Of course. In finances as in scholarship the A. T. O.’s arc highly insolvent. They haven't payed their meat bill in months, and, to sliow how people pick on them, a man sued them the other day for a bill not six months overdue. Fawncy. Maylic one of the reasons their food bills arc so high is that their sheiks, like Jimmie Hollingsworth, Booby Persons, and Charlie Parrot just will have town girls take Sunday dinner with them. And they specialize on professors' daughters—but who said anything about them being dumb? Sigma SS(u It's hard to find any justification or explanation for the Sigma Xu’s, except that but for them a lot of Columbus lx ys wouldn't be able to wear fraternity pins. T. C. Kendrick, Henry Reeves, and Bill Kline are about the only excuses for the chapter's existence, and they have to support a terrible crowd. The Sigma X’u’s arc supposed to keep up the traditional enmity with the A. T. O.'s since an expelled founder of A. T. O. was their founder. The A. T. O.'s won’t take them seriously, though, and the best the Sigma Mu’s can do is to try and organize the democratic fraternities so they can get some kind of office. But they get it in the neck just the same, as the recent cheer-leader election showed. And so they have to take it all out on their sweet-tempered neighbor, who drove out the Sigina Chi's last year. 4Delta Tan Delta The closest the Deltas come to rating is the fact that they are living in the house the Thetas used twenty years ago and gave up because it was too dirty. In a way, and it would l c a funny way. you might say that the Deltas arc a leading fraternity. There’s Tully. president of the Glee club, Sphinx, Gridiron. And Frier, former editor of the Red and Black, and Gridiron essayist. And Buck Weaver is on the football squad. And G. H. Robinson is a Phi Kappa Phi, showing that they are scholars as well as gentlemen. But unfortunately, that's all for them till the re-birth of their fraternity. They arc largely composed of Savannah boys whom even the K. A.'s wouldn’t take, and naturally of very high standing. Yes. Bill Tate’s brothers are Deltas, but you couldn't expect him to be disloyal to Dear Delta, now could you? Chi Psi An index to the standing of the Chi Psi's here may be gleaned from the historical fact that the local chapter was installed by none other than "Whisperin’ John” Holder, highly esteemed high-monkdamonk of the state highway department. Naturally, therefore, they arc against road or other bonds, and think of the excuse beginning, "We got stuck in the mud.” But this fraternity is not so successful as its fraternal progenitor, although it appears to get its hand on whatever money it needs. The chapter boasts—yes. boasts is the right word—one of the best looking houses in the college—if that means anything. You've simply got to hand it to the boys on this score—in fact, it was handed to them by the alumni. In this purple-plashed palace the Chipsis have cnsconscd themselves as the social lions—or lines —of the college community. They do say that more than one fair damsel's pulse has been known to palpitate provokingty when, at the weekly sandwich-and-iced-tea get-togethers at the lawdge, she has danced about to the tunc of the chapter’s frog-throated Awfulphonic and heard Chipsis (there just not being any way to escape the persistent fellows) "whiskey" sweet nothings in her cars. Although the Chipsis may be the world to their mothers, and their own girls, and occasional real sassicty debs, they are a bunch of bult-oncy to the masculine contingent of the college, even though the dear boys did take on their manly shoulders the responsibility for a fine guzzling match at the country club during the open drinking season. For plain downright unpopularity, they can’t be beat, although many try. Is it necessary to name them? Look at the chapter roll. Politically, the Chipsis are a frost. They arc not only the most promising (not used as applied to the K. A.'s) but also the most promised politicians on the scampus. They arc promised more to get less than anybody we know, despite the far-reaching and close-fisted schemings of Me-. i id urn. And if you want to make 'em mad. just state to the majority of the chapter that Damyankec is one word! Taken all in all. Chi Psi is one of the ranking—in fact, the rankest—sorority at Georgia. ( McMultan disgusted !) I appa Sigma This, ladies and gentlemen, is the drinking bulge out on Milledge. They didn’t have but two freshmen pledged at the beginning of the year who drank. Boy. what a whale of a difference just a few months make! The Kappa Sigs were founded at the University of Virginia and they now have more chapters than any fraternity on earth. But if the rest of their chapters are like the Georgia one (and most arc worse, we arc unreliably informed), somebody at Virginia made a terrible mistake. Of course, most Kappa Si s made mistakes when they joined, although it is true that very few could have nude anything else. They arc like the Chi Phis in that they take very little interest in college activities. They arc unlike the Chi Phis in that they have no men of ability, anyway. Roy Estes is the only man in the chapter who has amounted to anything, even in athletics, and he couldn't stand his dear fraternity brothers but moved into the Holman with Biily Young. Then there is Dick Block, who was driven first to drink, and then to marriage. And the two Brices, one of whom broad-jumps—the other heads the Senate. Yes. sir. gentlemen, scholars, and good judges of drinking whiskey! And don't forget the fire, boys and girls. They really got hot that night. And. well, one of them left a suit to burn while he carried his charred keg to safety. Pi I appa Phi Pi Kappa Phi is rivalled only by Sigma Chi in its fierce determination to have athletes, big men in college, upon its roll. Cultured Apollos wltom even the Statesboro boys wouldn’t have arc gladlv signed. As for the remainder of the chapter, the less said the more charitable to them. 1 hev arc the boys who have simply come off to college, and stay because there’s no law against it. But really, fellows, there ought to be. Thru- llumlrcd ami Thlrlf thicrSANDWICHES _IMI B H R R 5 Opposite? Arch Curb Service? I'wjr Three llnfi'lretl anti Thirty-fontJ atnda Chi ±Alpha It seem fortunate enough that the Lambdas should be member of the G. O. P. party, along with the Deltas, for without the few political plums that the K. A.’s and the campus leave them, they never would Ik able to get anybody. As it is. half the freshmen they get break their pledges before it i too late, and others, like Tom Cray, get out when they have realized their mistake. Yes, I.amUla Chi Alpha is a leading fraternity —it got Maurice Thomas in the Gridiron on the campus ticket. H. F. Johnson and Jack Waller are the Lambda athletes; Friar Thompson is the financial genius, and Bob Falligant the political one until he was stabbed in the back by his own fraternity mates. Heave ho, for the Lambda Chis! Phi Cpsilon Pi The Phi Eps, for the benefit of those who don't know and want to. is an organization rather predominantly Yiddish, organized so that the kosher boys might have their pin ami grip just like everybody cl c It is a chapter of virgins, but that's liecause they don’t know any better. And from the way some of the dear brother' have been hitting the bottle in recent months, it seems that they will be all right all tight all right before much more time goes by. The Phi Ep take their meals at Mrs. Cohen's, appropriately enough, which is back of the K. A. house. They will own up to that, if you force them to. But if you mention, "You all take your meals where John Candler rooms.” you’ve got a fight on your hands. That’s one thing they resent. The Old Testament is the basis for their ritual; Phi Epsilon PI i' the name of their fraternity, and the looks of some of the members carry out the impression. Membership is limited, strictly, and they do have only 12 members. They leave the Fpsiloons—Tau and Alpha, to take the kykes, upon whom they look with great contempt. As for them, they'll probably be bond-salesmen, not pawn-shop proprietors. Tau epsilon Phi The Tau Eps have robltcd the pawn-shop and the clothing store, all for the alleged purpose of establishing a fraternity. They were founded somewhere near N'cw York and have since invaded Georgia. They have a tremendously hard time getting any members, for the ones they want the Phi Eps can always take away from them, and the Alpha Eps arc always ready to take anybody at all. And so their membership is strictly limited, so limited that only the desperate expedient of moving out where the fraternities are, even at the cost of taking over the old Sigma Cow house, was made necessary. So far no noticeable improvement has followed, but you never can tell . . . Maybe the shades of Mack Barnes and other good Sigma Chi' will yet enable them to Make Progress. Tau F appa 'Theta Tau Kappa Theta was founded in 1924 by some God-fearing campus boys who wished to taste the joys of Fraternity Life, about which they had heard so much. The result was that an organization with Strong Moral Principles and Examples got going, helped out by the best-looking chapter house in Athens, even if it was rented and meagcrly furnished by the month. The supply of Outstanding Men (even including some Gridironers!) soon gave out—what was worse, those who had been foolish enough to come in regretted it speedily, and many resigned the benefits of being enshrined as Charter Members of the Great Fraternity. Thereupon the fraternity was forced to depend upon the gleanings of other fraternities. The fact tliat they were not member of the Pan-Hellenic council, which had made it possible for them to have girls stay in their house while real fraternities were sending theirs to hotels, made it also possible for them to rush freshmen while the other fraternities, in name at lea't, were shunning them like the plague. This made the Lambda's complain that the Thetas (Tau Kaps, please) were abusing rushing privilege. So serious did it become that they actually pledged several men who were destined for fraternities. Many of these afterwards broke their pledges: all wanted to. At least one Tati Kappa Theta pledge broke it and was immediately pledged Chi Phi. The Tau Kappa Thetas hail lx ppcd them, you sec. Although they have some fairly good boys, for the most part there is little reason for them continuing. They arc still hoping and praying, as this Pandora clatters merrily to press, that a national will get big-hearted and give them a charter. The Betas aren't so good over at Tech, and there is little chance of that fraternity wishing to be further disgraced by another weak Southern chapter. The Tan Kaps tried to get Jimmie Hollingsworth to sign up with them, as his father is a Beta, but Jimmie thought even the A. T. O.’s were better than a local, and so he wears a Maltese (cat) cross rather than the skull and cross bones which form the fearsome Tau Kappa Theta badge. iAlpha epsilon Pi The Alpha Eps were known last year as Mosc Karesh's lodge. Mose isn’t back in school this year, and so there is little chance of identifying them with anything, which is perhaps fortunate for the thing. In B. Simowitz and M. Rosenthal they have two Beta Bamma Sigmas: in E. Javetz. a peerless orator: in the rest of the chapter a bunch of law students, several from the grand old University of Virginia itself. zAlpha Cja nma c7 ho The farmer Ixiys had founder's banquet some time ago, just as if they were a fraternity. It’s a pity they haven’t foundered since then. Alpha Gamma Rho. a social fraternity for students of agriculture, that’s them. Some kind friend must have told them that ag students, though they are good boys and all like that, arc hardly the boys for the regular fraternities, bad though they are. There is a bucolic air about them, a homesickness for the plow handles, which doesn’t go well in a sophisticated chapter house. And so the boys got themselves fixed up with a pin ami everything. Don’t make the mistake of thinking the Alpha Gamma Rho’s are established at the University of Georgia. Baird Manual (the Greek Bible) states that their chapter is established at the Georgia State Agricultural College. That ought to settle that. They had the big butter and ag men who i Poijc Thrrt II uivlrcj nml Tltlrtp flrcW. G. TILLER Plumbing and Heating Contractor REPAIR WORK GUARANTEED 119 N. LUMPKIN STREET TELEPHONE 1716 ATHENS, GEORGIA 1908 Georgia Law Books 1928 WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR GEORGIA LAW BOOKS AND CAN SUPPLY COMPLETE SETS OF Georgia Supreme Court Reports Georgia Appeals Reports Park’s Annotated Georgia Code Van Epps-Akin-Stevens-Gillen’s Index Georgia Digest Local Practice Rooks (SATISFACTORY TERMS CAN RE ARRANGED) THE LAWYER’S LIBRARY THE FOUNDATION OF EVERY LAWYER’S LIBRARY SHOULD BE THE LOCAL BOOKS OF THE STATE IN WHICH HE INTENDS TO PRACTICE AND YOU WILL FIND THE ABOVE BOOKS OF FIRST IMPORTANCE. YOUR CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED THE HARRISON COMPANY PUBLISHERS OF LAW BOOKS 151 Spring Street, N. W. ATLANTA, GEORGIA SERVING THE LAWYERS OF THE SOUTH FOR TWENTY YEARS '«« • Thrrr Jhin.lrol anil Thirl f nUpresident of their Grange conic all the way down to Georgia to try to get them in the Pan-Hellenic Council. They even threatened Billy Young with withdrawing the charter if the Georgia farmers weren't allowed to have to have two free passes a night to the dances. Billy refused to lie f right -eticd even at this, and thus far the chapter is still exiting. They have a phonograph, a bridge table, and everything around their chapter house (the S. A. E. annex last year) and maybe in a few years they will get the hay-seeds out of their hair and he as uo-account as the rest of the Greeks. But the fact that they are Georgia hillsmen naturally prejudices them against all foreign nationalities or organizations. Phi CfrCu With co-education came the inevitable accompanying curse—sororities, or women's fraternities, in which we have—paradoxically—feminine brothers, masculine sisters, or—aw, hell, what's the use? Alpha Alpha chapter of Phi Mu, which originated in Georgia as did Coca-Cola and the Ku Klitx. was the first woman's fraternity to add its insult to the injury of co-education. The chapter name is not pronounced like “Alfalfa,” despite the appropriateness of the moniker. Phi Mu held first place until another woman's fraternity was established at Georgia. Since then Phi Mu claims it holds first place. Phi Mu. if we must speak boostingly, has been growing by leaps and bounds—it refuses to look before it leaps or to stay in bounds when it does lx und. When you look at the house they roost in, you would think that the "Phi Mils arc love-birds; when you see one of them head the Thalian club, you would think they had turned G. O. P. and sold out to the K. A.’s: when you hear them fight among themselves, you would think they are cats and doss: when you hear them talk about the Chi Omegas, you would think they are just cats. Socially, the Phi Mus are right there—meaning in their rooms r at the picture show when any event of importance comes off. However, the popularity of a small but determined minority of the chapter, as attested by A. T. O. tea dances, has done much to discredit the truth of that glorious old ballad l eginning “We Are the Phi Mus.” which had bid fair to rival “Sweet Ada-line” as the national anthem of the gasoline-gargling boys. The jolly old Phi Mus, more power to ’em— after you get ’em in the electric chair. Chi Omega The Chi O-Muggers. God Bless ’Em. How the Phi Mil’s love ’em. God Bless ’Em Both. I.a$t year it might have been accurately stated that while the Phi Mus were nice girls, always at home when dancing, etc., was to be done, the jolly Chi Omegas were right with the boys in seeing to it that a good time was had by all. The conditions have changed slightly since then, for two or three of the dear Phi Mu's just insist these days on having good times more strenu-ously than the Chi Omega’s ordinarily do. All the Muggers remain teasers pretty consistently, however, parties with Chi Psi's excepted, and gold-diggers without exception. That Chi Psi party, now. Strangely enough, the national officer?. of the fraternity heard about the convivial gatiiering. where the Muggers were the Women, the Chi Psis furnished the Wine (corn), and as for Songs, oh my Dear! Shocking. And do you know, they do say .... Yep, here’s to the Chi Omega’s. Teasing, tantalizing. trying (to one’s pocket-l ook)....... They came to the University the year after the Phi Mus. Since that time they’ve been trying desperately to get one single girl that the Phi Mu’s hid. They did get one, so they say. two years ago. but it seems that her Phi Mu bid was lost, or something. Just as the Phi Mil’s were l csidc themselx’es when they got a pledge from Sophie Newcomb, along came a Chi Omega pledge from the same jolly Tulane Terminal, and made them all square. Or all round, girls. Ha, ha, tha a good one on you. So here’s mud in the eyes of the Chi Omega's .... who live out on Prince past the Theta house . . . . who try in vain and like hell to make the Thetas walk home with them .... or even buy them an ice-cream sandwich .... wlio tried equally in vain to get the Lautzen-hiscr-Rose Louise Smith in order that they might assemble all the gold-digging talent in the University community .... who are. sans peur et sans reprochc. professional teasers in the most expensive sense of the word. zAlpha Cjamma T)elta The Alpha Gams ought to be handled lightly, for they have been so close to getting their charter jerked in the last year or so that there is still hope. This year they have really got a house to and for themselves, the first since the Moons did not return and they had to give up the establishment on Barber street. That was in the days of Rebecca Butler and Frances Walton, remember? But now .... since they have been able to have another meeting place than at Irene Dudley’s. they have just been having a great time, and so has everybody else, including the A. T. O.'s for whom they gave a special (kind of) dance. They really are out for a big time, these girls arc. Miss Brumby will tell yon that some of them arc her favorites—if only they won't come back to Georgia! Why they should insist on training themselves to be cooks is more than we can understand. But here they are, take ’em or leave ’em, at the church door. K appa T)elta The Kappa Delta’s have finally become a real sorority—they have a chapter house and everything, no longer just a room at the Georgian— or was it the Holman? Well, anyway, there they are, safely installed on Millcdgc, able to take care of any of the Phi Mu-Chi Omega leavings. They are just a real activities sorority. The sisters are Girls That Do Things—they arc just the last word in the Pioneer club, the Student Government, and the various other alleged co-ed activities. In the main business of co-eds—snagging dates, the Kappa Deltas arc not so successful. Lillian Kelly and Martha Lc-tcr do right well, but the others usually go to the movies by themselves. And as for getting into town from their country home .... They usually have to cut through nigger-town, or hop one of the Georgia Power company’s electric limousines. There hardly seems much to say about these Y. M. C. A. girls, except that they really are one of the Big Four in Georgia sororities, anil that their membership is not markedly inferior to the students at the State Normal. I’Kjr Thrrr motre t »• Thirl frr»THE BON AIR-VANDERBILT WINTER TOURIST HOTEL AUGUSTA :: GEORGIA A SOUTHERN RENDEZVOUS FOR OUTDOOR ENJOYMENT GOLF TENNIS RIDING SHOOTING THE WINTER HOME AM) PLAYGROUND OF SOME OF THE OUT. STANDING MEN IN AMERICAN BUSINESS, FINANCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL LIFE. WRITE FOR RESERVATIONS Keeping Pace With Augusta's Progress and Development Y OOKING forward, and anticipating the needs of a greater Augusta, this company has extended its gas mains and improved its service to the highest degree of efficiency. The Gas Light Company of Augusta rant Three Ihit'lrcd anj Thirl weightI Soule v. Sanford Dialogue on Telephone Sanford: Hollow Andy. How arc you? Soule: Feeling line. God's Great Out-of- Doors is smiling. Sanford: Shurc. Reminds me of the traveling man who— Soule: There, there. I’m president of a great institution. I haven't time for stories. Sanford: Certainly, certainly. Now about that Vanderbilt game. I was talking only yesterday. Soule: Make it snappy! I heard a hen cackle. May he's he’s laid! Sanford: Of course, of course. Now if the weather's fine, we oughta get Tech outa there. Soule: Say, what the hell do you want? Sanford: O yes, shurc. shure. As 1 was saying .......... Soule: Hurry up!That damn lien’s laid an egg. I’ve got to go! Sanford: You’re perfectly right. I agree with you implicitly. Shure, shurc. Soule: Say, what did you call me for, anyway ? Sanford: Nice day, isn’t it? Soule: Of course. It always is. Sanford: Eli, Andy—er—I— Soule: No! No! Positively no! Sanford: Of course, you’re perfectly right. Soule: No! You can't have your stadium where God li3S chosen to let His trees grow! Sanford: You’re right.—perfectly right. 1 was saving only yesterday that you were right— hey-eh-heh. Soule: But I said positively no! Sanford: Yeth, yeth, thas right. But listen to this .......... Soule: As an executive of the higl est order I will not, absolutely. Sanford: Shurc. shurc. But listen to this: Soule: I listen to nobody. Your stadium will muss up our scenery. Sanford: Of course, of course. 1 was telling George today that it is going to be a beautiful structure. Soule: The hell you say! Sanford: Yessir. a temple devoted to the eleventh muse—hey-eh-heh! Thas a good one! Soule: I will have nothing to do with it. I'm president. That land belongs to me—and mine— do you hear? Sanford: Of course, of course. Shure, shurc. Soule: And by the way. Do you have anything to do with that journalism department still . . .? Sanford: Yeth, yeth,—distantly, of course. Soule: Well. I just wrote the Chancellor a letter. One of your students wrote an article about my college, and my name wasn’t mentioned in the whole damn thing! Sanford: Of course, of course. You're perfectly right. Soule: I won’t have that. I’m too big a man. Sanford: Of course, of course. You're per-fcctly right. Now. about that stadium........... Soule: Say, whaddavuh think 1 am? A fool? Sanford: Of course, of course. You're perfectly right—shurc—shurc. Soule: The stadium can not be built so close to the main seat of the University. That settles it. Sanford. Sanford: Shurc, shure—hey-eh-heh. Soule: Over here is where art flourishes. Where Georgia youth is made better. I see to that. Sanford: Of course, of course. Shurc. shurc. Now. let’s see. Have you heard this one? Soule: Hell yes! (Continued laughingly) root Thrtt I fond red aud rhlrlt ulHCFRUITS : CANDIES : EATS DRINKS : SMOKES Pete PetropoFs Place Athens’ Quick Luncii Counter The Handiest Place in Town for “Georgia” Men COLLEGE AVK. and BROAD ST. “Just Opposite Campus” Third National Bank COLUMBUS, CJA. Capital : Surplus and Undivided Profits $1,129,352.45 Columbus Bank Trust Company COLUMBUS, GA. Resources More Than 4 MILLION 4 Banks in Columbus Whether your mission to Atlanta is business or social, you will be sure of a pleasant visit if you stay at the Bilt-more. Every modern appointment, of course — with a “quietness” and restfulness that please and a type of gracious service which has always appealed to our guests. A Bowman Biltmore Institution where the comfort of the guest is the first thought. Rates from $3.50 wATLARTA B1LTRIORE THE SOUTH’S SUPREME HOTEL Page Three Jluiulrctl amt FortySanford: Of course, of course. You’re perfectly .......... Soule: And furthermore, you haven’t got a team worth a hoot. Your athletes arc dumb and have no culture. My students get it. Hob Park tells me that Ag. Students arc the most cultured. Sanford: Huh, don't they study Agri-culture? Thas a good one. Soule: And furthermore, you talk too much— and don't ay anything. 1 am a matt of few words. I am. No! You simply can’t have your stadium. You............. Sanford: Of course, of course. You’re perfectly right. I was around the capitol.......... Soule: Say, how's that? Sanford: Oh. I talked to some legislators the other day. Soule: How about that appropriation I've got hanging fire? Sanford: Hcy-chlich. You’re perfectly right— shurc—shurc. Soule: What about it. Now, please— Sanford: Of course, you're right—perfectly right. Soule: Conte on. now. Tell me. What did they say. Please! Pretty please! Sanford: Of course, shurc, shurc. They said they’d like to sec Georgia play Tech in Athens. Soule: Ha! Well, they won't see that game so close to my seat of culture! How about that appropriation? ABOUT THK COMMERCE-JOURXALISM BUILDING. ••__But I can ottlv at present suggest decorat- ing its frieze with pendant purses; and making its pillars broad at the base, for the sticking of bills. And in the innermost chambers of it there might lie a state of Britannia of the Market, who may have, perhaps advisably, a partridge for her crest, typical at once of her courage in fighting for noble ideas: and of her interest in game: and round its neck the inscription in golden letters. “Perdrix fovit quae not peperit." Then, for her spear, she might have a weaver’s beam: and on her shield, instead of her Cross, the Milanese lioar. semi-fleeced with the town of Genesaret proper, in the field and the legend. "In the best market." and her corslet, of leather, folded over her heart in the shape of a purse, with thirty slits in it for a piece of money to go in at, one each day of the month. And 1 doubt not but that people would conic to see your exchange, and its goddess, with applause.” I. For the benefit of students of the School of Commerce, the inscription, which is in Latin, a language somewhat in use a few centuries a'-reads. "The partridge fosters what she brought not forth." "Traffic,” from "The Crown of II ild Olive.” By John Rcskin. Sanford: Of course, of course. You’re perfectly right. I was telling Hugh Rowe and Dick Russel only yesterday that you arc right. Soule: Yes ? Sanford: Hcy-ch-heh, they thought you were, too. Soule: How about that appropriation? Sanford: O yes, your appropriation. Let’s see. 1 might get them to speak a word about it. Soule: Fine! Fine! That vindicates my position entirely. Sanford: Shurc, shurc. You're perfectly right. Soule: I’ll have my board of directors fix up the papers immediately. Sanford: Shurc, shore, and I’ll have mine, too. Soule: Shurc about that appropriation? Sanford: Shurc, shure. Soule: You’re a great man, Sanford! Sanford: Of course, of course, you're perfectly right. I was telling Dudley......... Soule: Everything's settled then. Think of the big-hearted publicity! Bigger and belter University! Body and mind! Sanford: Of course, of course, you're perfectly right. Now about that Vanderbilt game. Soule: That hen's cackling again! Two eggs in one day! This is a great State! Finis. The Chancellor al Georgia, Who likes to be discreet; .lias. alas, for Georgia, He has no winding sheet. Mg. College's king at Georgia, With Intellect so dim; .lias, alas, for Georgia, .Vo tombstone's over him. The women's dean al Georgia, Who thinks the co-eds love her; Mias, alas, for Georgia, There's no grass grcr.es above her. The dean of men al Georgia. 11 ha’s rather dumb and daft: Mias. alas, for Georgia. He has no efitaph. The Dumb Mthletes at Georgia, On field and gridiron met; Mias, alas, for Georgia, They have no grades as yet. 1‘aijr Three lluu.tn 1 unit furl r onrMuscogee Bank and Trust Company Columbus, Ga. Solicits the Business of Young Men Entering the Business World YOI’ WILL BE CORDIALLY RECEIVED. COMPLIMENTS OF— THE LAW FIRM —OF— Randolph, Parker Fortson ATLANTA e'HERE are more than one hundred V J manufacturing plants in Columbus. We supply power to all but TWO of them—ami these are partly operated by |K wer from our lines. Columbus probably is the most completely electrified industrial city in the South. Only exceptional jwwer service to manufacturers would bring about this condition. : : : : COLUMBUS ELECTRIC POWER CO. COLUMBUS, GEORGIA Vnder Executive Management STO X E W E BST E R, I SC. -----------------------------1 “GIFTS THAT LAST” NAT. KAISER CO. Incorporated JEWELERS 3 PKACMTKKE ST. ATLANTA, GKOItGIA Wr. . . . . . COMPLIMENTS RALSTON HOTEL COLUMBUS, GEORGIA J. F. SOMERS. Proprietor 1859 : 1928 THE GEORGIA HOME INSURANCE CO. OF COLUMBUS, GA. In Placing Your Fire, Tornado and Windstorm Insurance Patronize a Georgia Institution. Rhodes Browne ..............President Dana BInckmar....Vice-Prcs. and Secretary A. P. Bugg..................Treasurer George Klump ........Assistant Secretary 1)1 HECTORS Dana Black mar Rhodes Browne L. II. Chapj ell II. If. Swift Julius Friedlaendcr II. L. Williams R. E. Disnmkes l’'1'jc Thrrc IhtKJrfl a H Forty-1 koCalendar September 14: Freshman Week; Cap’ll Blackman holding forth in fine shape. September 15: Hoke Wofford, Candler Hall house mother arrives; Freshman politicians groomed for elections. September 16: Gignilliat admits that Y. M C. A. is the world’s greatest organization. Freshmen arc herded in; dividends declared. September 17: Squeaky Mitchell arrives, sees Judge Gober, and decides to replenish cellar for year's stay. Two co-eds found reading Burke’s Peerage. September 18: Tau Kappa Theta, having the ground-tloor, pledges practically everybody with high-pressure salesmanship. September 19: Lambda Chi Alpha tries' to get everybody else; Bob Falligant seen at Holman hotel and doesn’t know he’s there. September 20: John Hill of Columbus, the eminent football genius and most popular Columbus prodigy is now here. Cracker and Red and Black editors go into hiding. September 21: Official opening of 127th session at Chapel; Freshman Harry Talmadge fishes in pledges for dear K. A., Weatherly attends under the inlluencc. September 22: Guy Race, young French instructor, speaks to a common student who bears up under the strain, knowing that it won’t happen again. September .23: Madeline Green enters Costa's unescorted: Martha Lester faints. Will mother never come? September 24: F.d Everett declares something or other is a fine thing. Editor says Y. M. C. A. "G” book will be off the press despite rumors that it won't. Septemlicr 25: The Dean of Men attempt;, to explain new absence rules. Marjorie Denmark goes in for physical culture. Psychology lulwnrds opens his mouth; class is astonished. September 26: Sunday: Boredom visits Old Col lege: fir-t lady visits Old College this season; Dean of Men horrified but comes up smiling. Septemlicr 26: Blue Monday: Bill Harden and his crony, J. C. Wright, start the military department work right. Chapter meetings assume dignified atmosphere for benefit of pledges. September 27: Luke Stancil, campus leader, goes to the picture show; Phi Beta Kappa stock drops one point. September 28: Duke Looev Metzer. of the Cherokee Apartments, decides to write his name on several checks which unfortunately are on the wrong bank. The Red and Black staff starts work; Guy Hamilton fails to make 9S: it will not do. Alpha Gamma Delta's formal tea dance is well attended despite the Home Economics lab. Demosthenian and Phi Kappa well-attended. September 29: Billy Young, the financier, prepares for Homecoming: Alpha Gams decide to give another tea dance; it won’t be long now. September 30: Pledges are announced: as usual the S. A. E.'s lead: McMullan disgusted. Blackfriars Dramatic Club discusses plans as usual. October 1: Virginia is defeated: the Greater Georgia Football champions start their march to glory. The dance ends promptly at twelve. Octolier 2: Sunday: The bird cage taste. Some hoys unwittingly serenade, using the now famous “We arc the Phi Mu’s.” Morgan of the Year Blake fails to show up to reform wayward Y lioys. October 3: Work is begun on the telephone exchange; Cap'n is now busily engaged, thank Gawd. October 4: Campus comes back as McAfee is elected president of Economics society; Hollingsworth is finally elected something. Chi Omega gets back m running with a dinner party to their pledges (female). Kappa Delta gives dance and various things. October 5: Hop-offs on non-stop (lights to New Haven begin. Alumni Record appears, by heck. October 6: Fortnightly club meets: the elect attend only. What Price Glory is shown; Milt Jarnagin learns to cuss right. K. A.'s hold seance with Stancil. October 7: The Thalians catch the usual fish, plus four campus men, including Hoke Wof-foerd. McMullan disgusted. October 8: Georgia Bulldog cats duck soup from Yale Bowl; Athens goes wild. Gignil-liat will be a lieutenant colonel loo. October 9: Sunday: Tis odd that God should choose the Jews. October 9: Behold the conquering heroes come: Athens welcomes team home with brass band and all like that. Blackfriars manage to get eighteen new members. McMullan disgusted. TItalian fish in ten more of these co-eds. October to: The board of trustees meets: Andy Soule smirks as Ag College gets fine arts department. Erastus Lowe is appointed the White House Spokesman; another good man gone wrong. October 11: Woman enters Demosthenian hall with no scandal attached; freshmen impromptu debaters selected. October 12: At last the Cracker appears; there is no doubt about it, now. October 13: The New Building will be opened next week: John Drewry simpers. October 14: Jimmie Burns has date with Lillian Kelly who promises him to tel), that story the next time sure. October 15: On this day Jack Renfroc wrote a poem but he won't go back there anymore. October 16: Sunday: Shorty Pritchard seen without his uniform. Kay Kingman ousts Alice Rowland as the daughter of the regiment. Octol er 17: Georgia beat Furman last Saturday. John Hill will address the International Relations Club on his favorite subject at their next meeting. Perhaps the Co-op will lie moved to Demosthenian next century if Pete Stephens docs not change his mind. Octoltcr 18: Quill Club agrees to join Sigma Delta Chi: Ben Hardy gets a free trip west and a new coat. October 19: Dr. Sanford states to Freshman Y Club that the Bible is a great book : his praise is unstinted. Bob Patterson presides at Phi Kappa; McMullan disgusted. October 20: Dean of Men figures there arc 10.-009 cigarettes smoked every term; his office is at last justified. Oetol er 21: Johnny Blount goes to the Lawdge in a fog: McMullan disgusted. October 22: Georgia beats Auburn as usual; Columbus liquor fails to prove fatal so Georgia boys return home, sadder hut wiser. October 23: The insidc-of-the-motorman’s-glovc-tastc. We won’t do it again. October 24: Bill Tate looks for Eddie Guest’s I’d'ic Thro- IIvwired nail Forty-threeGEORGIA RAILROAD BANK AUGUSTA, GEORGIA A GROWING INSTITUTION IN A PROSPEROUS GROWING COMMUNITY We want to be more than just a bank. We aspire to be your friend, confidant and counselor, to assist you and all worthy enterprises. We strive to render an increasing helpful service to our customers. THE AUGUSTA CHRONICLE AUGUSTA, GEORGIA “The South's Oldest Newspaper'’ Noted for Its Progressiveness —Strong Editorials —News Accuracy —And Dependability Read and preferred by people who appreciate a good live newspaper of the better type. MICHAEL’S ATHENS, GEORGIA Founded 1882 THE PARTRIDGE INN AUGUSTA, CA. The Hotel for Comfort 100 Rooms with Bath FINEST GOLF IN SOUTH THE STORE Noted for its excellent cuisine GOOD GOODS Write for Booklet MADE POPULAR M. W. PARTRIDGE, Prop. I'ant Thrrr II» ml ml ami Furlvtourand Service's poems; alas, Sue Fan goes without literary entertainment. October 25: Doe Coulter speaks to the Quill Club on something or other. The Pandora photographer will 1 in Athens for the first and Ia t time next week positively. Frances Holden is entertained: Chi Omegas get free food. October 26: John Held, Jr., will judge the best-looking co-ed for the Pandora, if any. October 27: Ag. College to have power plant, in fact, anything the Ag College wants, the Ag. College can have. We don t care anyhow." October 28: Co-ed is elected to represent the freshmen on the Women's Student Council: Glory to God in the highest and on earth peace, good will toward men. October 20: Georgia tromps over Tulanc as usual. I'hc headlines say that Georgia has a great team. Phi Kappa and Demostheniau pick Junior and Senior Impromptu debating teams. McMullan makes a place. October .to: Bndweiscr is better nor Bevo and the bottles are bigger, but you never can tell anyway. October 31: Cap'n Charlie Hannan is absent from drill. Various things seen happening along the bridle path but nobody ever knew for sure. Novemlier 1 : The University goes on the air. “We must sell the University and the idea of a bigger and better University to the peepul of the State." Cap’n Packman arranges musical program: Lucy Cobb well-represented. Fd. 2: Fverett uses technique on the Zodiac club, that learned bunch of co-eds. Nothing happens. November 2: Duke Mct cr buys ticket to Georgia-Tech Game, thinks liettcr of it. and dreams of Texas plains in Ohio. November 3: Just one month before the game. Many students arc entered for the horse show. Demosthenian wins impromptu debate: McMullan disgusted. November 4: Harry Talmadgc to nlay easy na- tural part in the "Old Soak.” The Bohemian Ball may happen tomorrow night. O, yes. last Saturday, the Alpha Gams did it again, a costume dance in spile of everything. Red awl Black writes up Thalins refusing to explain Steve Upson. November Georgia routs Florida after a scare: the hand does not accompany the team south. The Bohemian Ball did happen. November 6: It can never happen again: but I thought it was good stuff. November 7: Cracker Poets plan anthology: Renfroe out of place but interested anyway. November 8: Scabbard and Blade hard up: Candler. Race. Derrick, and that well-liked Strickland of Buchanan make the organization. Just you wait! November 9: Glee Club is greatest thing in the world, says Dan Tully. and he ought to know. Phi Kappa decides A1 Smith is the best man for president (of the United States, of course.) November 10: Hollis Morris. Dan Tullv. and others put their heads together. The Bulldog Club is formed with even Chick Shiver licing used for bait. November 11: Armistice Day: T. W. Reed speaks, as usual. A dance was held this night. Three Phi Mu's absent in line of duty. The Red and Black wants to know how the Y. M. C. A. gets that way. November 12: Bulldogs crush CIcmson as usual. The sports boys begin calling the football team very great. Great mystery afoot: "What happened at the Georgian—and how!" November 13: TIjc Y. M. C. A. Student and Faculty directory will be free from errors according to a combined statement from Big Buck Anderson and Angel liddic Seercst. All of which docs not improve the taste in one's mouth. November 14: Just another day. November 15: The Dean of Men docs not choose to answer questions regarding his date at the Kapna Delta house. November 16: Shiver. Hay, Young, and Florence make the Sphinx: Nurse, will the night ever end? The Y. M. C. A., God bless ’em, plans a new sort of service for Thanksgiving. November 17: Secret throws a monkey wrenc1' in the Chancellor’s plans for a bigger and better Georgia by bidding on the leasing of the lower floor of Demostheniau hall. Novemlier 18: The Freshman Club is written up by the Red and Black; nobody likes it but the freshmen who don't know any liettcr. November 19: Georgia mashes Mercer—but Phoney Smith wins house and lot by making a touchdown. The Sphinx initiation comes off in spite of frequent trips to Dick Nash's. November 20: These week-ends! Sunday is an awful day, you make so many good resolutions then. November 21: Sigma Chi’s start pre-basketball rushing season. Novemlier 22: Dean Ratliffc returns to tell his clear friend Boh Falligant to keep out of mischief. Novemlier 23: Although the water is cold, the A. T. O.'s decide to have a swimming party despite what the Chi Omega house director has to say about it. November 24: On this day Georgia beat Alabama but the Tide mussed Georgia up terribly. The band goes to Birmingham, although Jesse Drew doesn't rcinemiier that far back. November 25: There were classes held on this day. Joe Heyman, Park MeGinty. and three other people attended all day long: Yes. the other three made Phi Beta Kappa too. November 26: Saturday, and the anti-climax feeling, followed by November 27: Sunday, and the hangover is still hanging over. November 28: Y. M. C. A. Student and Faculty directory appears: Angel F.ddic and Buck Anderson say it was the printer’s fault. Novemlier 29: Bill Harden grooms Jimmie Wright for the Horse-Show, thus throwing the other two horses, W. L. Strickland, Buchanan. and Finley McLeroy out of the running. Novemlier 30: Tickets for the Ga.-Tcch melee go at a premium Just you wait, though. December 1: It rains? Yes. it rains. December 2: It never rains but it pours. Dcccmlier 3: The least said the licttcr. December 4: Now we can talk about other things: why the co-eds flock to the English department, for instance. Dcccmlier 5: Dr. Sanford declares that it rained hard last week. Dccemlwr 6: Kid Woodruff reiterates his resignation. December 7: Perhaps there will he a stadium: Andy Soule rises on his ear, hut that's all right. December 8: Billy Young makes hurried trip to Atlanta. Vij r Thrfr lluiulntl ami forly-flrcJos. 0. McGehee John I). Odom Howard Bus Line, Inc. THURSTON C. CRAWFORD. President Parlor Cars : Mack Buses : Packard Cars Compliments of the Law Firm t f Operating Columbus-Fort Bknninc CARS FOR RENT AND ON CALL McGehee and Odom Also. Buses and Cars for Cross Country Trips COLUMBUS. GEORGIA Columbus PHONE—City. 410 POST. 224 BROAD AND TENTH STREET Springer Hotel and Theatre Candler Candler ATTORNEYS AT LAW Suite 1430 Candler Building Headquarters ATLANTA, GA. Georgia Bulldogs John S. Candler Asa W. Candler, ’05 Columbus . :: Georgia John L. York Jxo. D. Little Marion Smith COMPLIMENTS Artiii k C. Powell M. F. Goldstein Harold Hirsch, ’01 COMPLIMENTS OF THE LAW FIRM DRUGS SODA —of— WHEAT’S LITTLE, POWELL, 1116 Broad Street Columbus, Georgia SMITH GOLDSTEIN FLOWERS CANDY ATLANTA I’afit Thrrt llumirol on. I forty sUDecember to: The Horse Show conics off including Jimmie Wright. December 11: John E. Drewry will attend the meeting of some association or other: you might have known it. December 12: The Dean of Men is surprised in —well, we won’t say any more. December 13: O. yes, the exams begin and everything's going fine. December 14: Jim Robcrt forgets all about an exam but that’s all right, too. December 15: The Dean of Women takes stock; better watch out. now. December 16: Everylxxly better watch out, sho' nuff, because the Dean of Men means business. and that’s not all he means either. December 17: On this day Ed Everett did not wear a different tic. December 18: Pete Kenner buys a cigar; lookout, you politicians. December 19: Co-eds watch the mail for—Well, Christmas will be here soon. DeccmlK-r 20: And after that, the dark; but the Phi Mil's never knew for sure. December 2t : Pretty soon it will all be over and then we may sleep; Jack Frost writes his column as usual but nobody notices it. December 22: Polly Mac held his exam as usual and as usual they ride the pony. December 23: Merry Christmas in spite of the Vice Chancellor. January 3: Johnny Blount, the big Chi Psi, states he does not choose to run; no, lie won’t lie back. January 4: Dr. Drewry was elected vice-presi dent of that association; the N'EW building WILL open FEBRUARY 1, no doubt. January 5: School started, but they are still reg istcring. January 6: The other faculty members tell what they did during the holidays. January 7; The Y. boys come back from Detroit enlightened, enlarged, and Angel Eddie’s halo is sent in for reburnishing. January 8: New Phi Kappa Phi members arc announced; sorry, Fusscl, but you'll get it next time. January 9: Junior Cadets' uniforms must undergo changes; Johnnie Hodgson looks daggers. January to: Bob Falligant hurriedly resigns from the post of society editor of the Red ami Black. January it; Hell hath no fury like a woman corneil; ask the S. A. E.’s, they ought to know. McMullau disgusted as usual. January 12: On this day Jack Rcnfroc was elected editor of the Cracker; hi' address is R. F. D. No. 2. Quitman, Ga. January 13: Unlucky thirteenth, Friday: jinx visits Red and Black. January 14: Jake Joel holds law school spellbound as he speaks at length on the cloak and suit fraternity. January 1?: Rcnfroc decides that the Cracker is a funny thing: it won’t be long now. January tfi: At last Sigma Delta Chi. that damn journalism fraternity is installed. January 17: Blackfriars thumb combined noses at Thalians: McMullan disgusted. January 18: Andy Kittgery starts politicking the Gridiron for one of his boys; it works. January iq: Registration mounts to 1664; Dean of Men states that increased enrollment makes his iob nccesary. January 20: New plan will cut out Spring holidays: will the night ever end? January 21: R. O. T. C. l oys will face inspec- tors next week; how can they face anything? January 22: O yes. Judge Green, another mem-Ikt of the Pru-Dental committee spoke here on Lee’s birthday: nobody took him scrioii-however. January 23: Farmers’ week begins; Governor Hardman makes a speech in spite of his evident bad grammar. January 24: Sigma Delta Chi, that damn jourual-ism fraternity, goes down in favor of a publication board; Honest Carl Sutherland eminently disgusted. January 25: Many trips made to Dick Nash's: Tech Week-End nears. January 26: Nobdoy knows it yet, but four fish bit on this day: H. D. Shattuck ought to declare dividends this day; lie doesn't; but did he ever do anything Imnest ? January 27: The Sphinx did start taking in just anybody, after all. January 28: Here they are: Stancil. Nash, Hardy and Hamilton. One of those big week-ends. January 29: Coulter, Tate, Anderson and Everett groom themselves for debate on ••Women:’' they study matter at first hand. January 30: Thalians decide at much length to enter Little Theatre Tournament: meeting well-attended in spite of the fact that no officers are to be elected; McMullan disgusted. January 31: Military basketball tournament rival- frat baseball games as free-for-alls: in spite of being president of the Y. M. C. A., Gtgnilliat feels important. January 32: Commerce student accuses Heinie of cribbing on C. P. A. exam. February 1 : Women win moral victory as vanity ease is tom from Bill Tate's pockets. February 2: I-ast Sunday there was a forum held: Mister Sccrest is in his glory (?). February 3: St. Mathews Day celebration docs not come off except in a nominal way. February 4: Banner-Herald staff goes on the war path: Jimmie Burns goes into hiding and fits. February 5: Ye Georgia boxing team goes up to V. M. I. for a tea-partv and comes out losing only six bouts out of seven. February 6: Red and Black says that the Thal-■ n cb'b is to present "A Game of Chess." Doc Mitchell asks if the game is played with golf clubs. McMullan disgusted. February 0: Spring football practice begins; Judge Gober's school for boys furnishes majority of candidates, as usual. February 7: Elmer Crim graduates from law school after many, many years. Rumors to the effect that the presidency of I. R. C. did the trick. Tomorrow is Bob Sherrod's birthday—and no stock laid in. February 7: Soul-savers man out plans for big whoop-em-up intellcclualizcd revival at Religious Welfare Conference in April. February 8: Andy Kingery bashfully accepts in terlocutorship of Glee Club: his performance inspires inventor of “mechanical man." McMullan disgusted. February 9: Pandora sends letter to co-eds requesting pictures for beauty section: photographs so flattering as to be unrecognizable received in reply. February 10: Red and Black makes weekly announcement that Commerce-Journalism building will l c ready immediately. February 11: Saturday, meaning Palace, is jammed tight in the afternoon; student body also tight that night. (Rhyme unintentional.) I'atir Thrrr llumlrtil 'inti rort‘t crrn“QTT ROOM Not An Ordinary Billiard Hall —But— A Strictly High-Class “College Mans" RECREATION CENTER Eighteen Carom and Pocket Billiard Tables SODAS SMOKES “Qrr ROOM COLLEGE AVENUE “Georgia MEN'S Meeting Place” — ■ - MONTAG BROTHERS, INC. COMBINE POPULAR PRICES —WITH— UNEXCELLED QUALITY ATLANTA New York Los Angeles GEORGIA CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION TEXT BOOKS —AND— STUDENTS’ SUPPLIES Fountain Pens Collece Jewelry Toilet Articles Memory Books Athletic Supplies FULL LINE GEORGIA BANNERS, PENNANTS AND PILLOW TOPS PIEDMONT WIENERS FELLOWS— VISIT OUR COLLEGE DEPARTMENT {The Snappiest in the South) Hofflin Greentree Columbus :: Georcia I'not Three Hundred and yorty-eiyhtFebruary is: Sunday; up be-noontimcs, arriving at dinner just in time; suddenly realize didn't want anything to cat anyway: back to bed. February 13: Prexy Cox of Emory delivers Georgia Day address: highly inspirational; moral: It grates to be a Georgian. February 14: Alpha Gamma Rho imitates real fraternity by pitching founders’ banquet at the Holman; guests wonder why A. G. K. doesn’t founder again. February 15: Andrew J. Cobb Forensic Debating Club formed by law students (?). But Cobb was a real lawyer! February 16: John E. Drewry pompously imposes himself on Mercer Press Institute, posing as Henry V. Grady School of Journalism. February 17: Blackfriars present so-called play; audience attempts to cash rain checks. February 18: Tech defeats Georgia as usual in Atlanta in final basketball game. Curfew shall not ring tonight! February 18: A T. O.’s give impromptu tea dance; enjoyed by all. but by some more than by others; most of girls remain downstairs. February 19: Another blue Sunday with a dark brown taste. February 20: Gridiron initiates nine outstanding seniors, three of whom students not rooming with had heard about previously. Four of the meml ers of Democratic fraternities; hold your majority, campus! McMullan disgusted. February 21: Anniversarian exercises: Candler and Falligant spout, ponderous platitudes for audience of eleven. McMullan disgusted. February 22: Phi Kappa definitely settles question of government ownership of railroads by voting negatively; Department of Commerce informed of decision by wire: Hoover fails to reply. February 23: Dr. Sylvie Morris holds “Trial of Christ" again in chapel for benefit of Y. M. C. A. and other eamcst-seekcrs-aftcr-truth. February 24: Athlete already a fraternity man enters school: Sigma Chis gnash teeth and rend clothing. February 25: Mrs. Hudson short-changes the co-op a nicklc and suffers stroke of apoplexy. February 2 5: Another Sunday—O. my head! February 27: Publications board plan submitted to Blue Key. as matter for co-operation of students and faculty: enthusiasm bountiful; also, co-operation; also usual inaction and inefficiency. February 28: Fire razes the roof of Kappa Sig house: clothing burned but jugs saved; everybody happy. February 29: Leap year day! Co-eds active. “Doe'' Mitchell Hies to safety, closely pursued by Marie Upson. March 1: Chi Psis and Chi Omegas get party-fied; Chi Psis tell; Chi Omegas griped, of course: swear off—and at—Chi Psis. March 2: Marie Upson gives bridge party; “Doe" Mitchell there, per force. March 3: Saturday. Mehre's, Costa's, and the Palace enjoy big business. (Also Dick Nash). March 4: Sunday. Why say it? March 5: Classes held for first time in new-building ; the Red and Black was right all along; the building did open next week. Heckman and Drewry simulate peacocks. March 6: Pat Mell and Caroline Brand elope: Sara Hancock an accomplice: everybody knows it five minutes after she returns; coeds thril-l-led. March 7: Demosthenian decides Georgia should have student government; reactionaries smile up sleeves. Shaplcy lecture on astronomy a fine thing. March 8: John Hill starts drive for Cracker editorship, campus leader, football letter, editorship of Pandora and a few other minor offices. March 9: Red and Black announces varsity baseball team is ineligible: report denied; they arc all eligible, of course. Of course. March to: Art exhibit closes, great interest having been manifested by all three people who saw it; it grates to be a Georgian. Burglar enters Theta house: retires tearfully after giving the boys money for next day’s meals. March 11: Sunday; afraid 1 won’t live, then afraid I will. March 12: Miss Norman King pitches birthday dance, but won’t tell how old she is. March 13: Rene Stuart goes news-gathering: visits out-of-the-way places, where he is told he is in the way; gets hot copy, none of it fit to print. March 14: K. A.’s and S. A. E.’s elect John Candler president of Phi Kappa—as if literary societies arc not already degraded enough. McMullan disgusted. March 15: New York Giants beat Georgia Bulldog.., the former being called a professional team. March 16: Rene Stuart reviews Cracker; says he found a good joke in it, but docs not tell which one he thought good. March 17: Spring football practice ends; what of it? March t8: Sunday: the day of rest—and test. March 19: Looie Newton hears Red and Black is conducting straw vote with Smith's nante on it: Christian Index boils over. March 20: That lull before the storm. March 21-24: Storm breaks; exams held. This life is just one exam thing after another. March 25: Sunday: the after-effects of exams is responsible this time. March 26: A1 Smith club formed: members send him enthusiastic telegram—also plea for campaign funds. March 27: Meeting of Georgia kamp of the Ku Klux Klan is called; Shattuck, Hay. and Sutherland match for graft offices. March 28: Freshmen herded together for weekly meetings of Phi Kappa and Demosthenian. March 29: Another straw vote held by Red and Black; Senator George also ran. at request of administration. March 30: Baseball game: Georgia continues drive for runner-up position in Conference rating—as usual. March 31 : Or has March 31 days? Anyway, it's Saturday, another ball game, and another Saturday night in Athens. April 1: The chancellor's birthday: all the little boys and girls dance with glee. April 2: Skeet Johnson returns to Athens and Dr. Stewart’s office; McCrary holds firm, however, and Skeet goes back. April 3: The Pandora this year will be out before the middle of May: perhaps. Gus Witcher docs not have a date this day, being out of town and sorts. April 4: Old College begins to get ready for what used to be called Little Commencement, but Kappa Sigma gets there first and buys out the good stuff. Al-Smith-for-Presidcnt Club logins to coagulate. I'dfie Thrrv Jin mired mid forty HintThirst is something more than wanting a drink - It means you need one And when you thirst and want a drink you want full enjoyment. On this foundation. Coca. Cola, a drink of natural flavors, hat proved more Eopular than any beverage cfore it or siace. The Coc»-CoU Co., AtUot . G». 2million a day IT HAD TO BE GOOD TO GET WHERE IT IS HOTEL RICHMOND Augusta, Ga. 200 ROOMS Modern Fireproof Centrally Located AUGUSTA’S LEADING COMMERCIAL HOTEL European Plan Cafeteria and Main Dining Room Good Food at Popular Prices Super-Power and Super-Advantages GEORGIA is making wonderful industrial advances. New mills, for the manufacture of various fabrics, household utensils. |w ttcr_v, etcetera, arc moving into the State daily. IDEAL climate, suited for year-round work, together with the best supply of labor in the world, arc largely and very pro|ierly credited for this condition. BUT for the manufacturer, the Guilder, the producer, the dairyman, the potent factor that brings him to this section is the fact that he can get POWER. AUGUSTA, in the heart of a fertile farming district: in direct touch by water with the sea; in close proximity to an unlimited supply of hard and soft wood, with vast kaolin dejiosits to the immediate north and south, with tourist and commercial hotels of the first class, with all adjuncts necessary to our advanced civilization, such as churches, parks, schools and theatres, is the center from which radiates cop|»er wires carrying the product of Sl’PER-POWER to every city, town and hamlet within a hundred miles. POWER is the agent, the mighty item, that will make this the busiest and happiest section of the Union. POWER alone has built up states and sections. Augusta has POWER, unlimited power, to l»e delivered at a reasonable rate to the user who would be free of lal or troubles, shut-downs due to strikes, Hoods or droughts. LAND is cheap in the Augusta district. I and values are constantly advancing. The entire community is healthful. The citizens of the Augusta section are intelligent and progressive. Manufacturing interests of every sort are invited to study the opportunities offered by Augusta. Augusta-Aiken Railway Electric Corporation (■aye Three llurnheil and FiftyApril 5: Charles Miriam Cate is seen lurking around the dean's office, looking for the absence committee. That Glee Club trip is going to be a success after all. Torchlight parade of Smith Gtib; it does coagulate, egged on by the Koo-Klux. April 6: There will be no more kindergarten for 5 days, including Sunday; be good boys and girls and the Easter rabbit will bring that nice Dean of Men something. April 7: Harry Talmadgc. off on the Glee Club Tour, wires home for more funds; we told you about those girls, Harry. April 8: Divers reports show divers’ standings: what do you make of that? April 9: Several bums, including H. 0. Shat-tuck. hold very interesting meeting in the I-aw School. Only man who ever wanted to go in the Kappa Delta house appears and is taken for a burglar. April to: It was a mistake, that wasn't no burglar—that was a Gii Psi looking for a late date at the Phi Mu house. April 11: Swimming team takes first bath of the season; Guy Race finds nair of socks he thought he had lost last Christmas. April 12: Yes. the Pandora will probably be out soon; buy your advance copy now. Jack Mathews sends telegram to Orlando. April 13: Hugh Rowe goes witch-hunting on this day: prominent faculty member plays nice doggie. April 14: Martha Lester visits English department again; she can't understand what in the world has come over him. April 15: Marjorie Denmark decides to go back to Fitzgerald; changes her mind again, sighs, and goes back to her knitting. April 16: Red Pound decides to take that little girl along after all. April 17: T. Evans Ritchie, that brand new Sigma Chi. wears his pin on this day. Evelyn Sherman has date. April 18: Get ready boys, this week-end is gonna be a hell raiser: homebrew distillers work over time in Old College. April 19: Jimmie Burns, cruising in his old man's Hudson, is mistaken for the Dean of Men, is fired at several times. Swimming party at Lake Kirota breaks up as dawn and soberness appear. First day of little Commencement passes (out). April 20: "Lady” and gentlemen appear suddenly at hotel without: Henry Myers looks for liis pants. April 21 : The morning after the night before. Brenau girls start resting up for next time. April 22: Monday—the morning after the morning after the night before. April 23: "The ! est-bchavcd spring dances we've had yet,” says Dean of Men. Now you tell one unless you want to be popular with the boys too. April 24: The Social Life committee begins to put its fingers in the pic: and just when Sigma Delta Chi. that damn journalism fraternity, wanted to have a dance. April 25: Erastus Lowe. White House spokesman. becomes more and more a Philistine. April 26: Memorial Day. we forget what for: Polly Mac spent a nickel on this day. April 27: Billy Mackcn bootlicks a seventy-five front Ed Everett who just can't refuse the ladies anything. . . April 28: Billy Hooper (notice the association Geraldine!) declines a Latin verb, a ride home, and an invitation to go sit on a tack. April 29: Nothing much on this day: Soule pats Brooks on back. Brooks disgusted. April 30: John Held's selection for beauty section becomes known. Co-eds who aren't put ask what and why the Held. . . . May t: Gwynn Nixon elected editor of The Cracker by editorial board, which hopes to rc'torc magazine to place it held before South Georgia politicians hopped it as a soft job: plots of aspiring editors nipped in bud. Contract let for building of stadium and work begins on it immediately, as usual. Still nothing said about new dormitories, but nobody cares. May 2: Thalians ratify new constitution making club politic-proof after K. A.’s and Thetas pull fall-on-each-other's-ncck stunt. McMullan disgusted. May 3: High Mogul Soule provides Georgia raised dinner for his Phi Kappa Phi boys and girls, presiding with all the elegance and finesse of one of his prize Durocs assaulting a well-filled trough. May 4: Co-eds begin baseball practice: bats active. Georgia debaters convince South Carolina S| eakers in chapel that A1 Smith should lie nominated: police guard speakers from Horace Shattuck. Ike Hay, "Honest Carl" Sutherland, and other campus pillowcase-prowlers. May 5: Workmen begin remodeling old offices of Romance language department preparatory to "Angel Eddie" Secrest being located there. Rumor hath it that ghost of late lamented head of department disturbs workmen at their task. May 6: Sunday: ?• ? XZ:!! May 7: Large red letters proclaim to early ris- ers midnight establishment of Backman Military Institute, on the historic site of University of Georgia: much hurried scrubbing in evidence. May 8: President of sophomore class elected: Luke Stancil advises class to keep politics out of everything. (Ha! Ha!) May 9: Rufus Jennings elected president of De-mosthenian. thereby assuming proportions but not dimensions of a Big Man in College. May 10: "Red" Arnold has date with fraternity man. May 11 : Campus and K. A.’s start making up gridiron tickets. May 12: McGregor’s printing establishment hums down. Red and Black staff dances with glee. May 13: Hardy repents and announces that the Red and Black will l c printed anyway. May 14: Powerful politicking among the Aloha Kappa Psis for office. Allen Conn ally’s Tau Kappa Theta caucus shows its results. Campus, K. A.’s win great victories in Gridiron elections. May 13: Women's Athletic Association sponsors plavday. bringing together girls from six different towns around Athens. 0. how the girls did play. Andrew McNairn suspected as the driving force. May 16: Sylvanus Morris addresses Demosthen-ian. Hay and Shattuck expected to get their LL.B.'s. May 17: Somebody asks the impertinent question, "When is the Pandora coming out?” Heckman reminds Hamilton that he is editor of the book. May 18: Drewry is frustrated in attempt to get the Red and Black under his control. Georgia beats Tech. May 19: Red and Black comes out with belated editorial on faculty assumption of student government. The name of the Dean of Men Pnot Thrtc 1l 4r 4 amd nfly oxtBuy Drugs at Jacobs’ SEND MAIL ORDERS TO JACOBS’ PHARMACY COMPANY ATLANTA, GEORGIA HOFMEISTER SHOE SHOP High Class Shoe Repairing At Low Cost “Georgia’s” Favorite For Y EARS HOFMEISTER SHOE SHOP BROAD STREET ATHENS : GEORGIA KIRVEN’S Columbus’ Complete Department Store I’O'JC Three lfnmtre'1 ami Flfty-tiCOis carefully omitted. We S. A. E.'s ought to hang together. Stands fall as Tech beats Georgia. Injuries unprintable. May 20: Glenn Richards conics from behind and scores a knockout over Honest Carl Sutherland in junior oration. Other orators don't give a damn. May 21: Chi Omegas stay sober as they give shower for Mary Ferguson in honor of her long defered marriage to Claude Chance. The couple announce that they intend to tour Europe and learn to speak French as the French do it. May 22: Pandora staff stays indoors to avoid an- swering questions as to when the book will appear. The editor and Bob Sherrod go to Atlanta. Somebody asks the question, “Why did Sherrod go?" We don’t want to hurt Bob’s feelings, so the question is left unanswered. May 23: Work is begun on the 1928 Pandora. It seems as though editor has awakened. Rest of staff have not. Work begins some time in 1920 Pandora. May 24: Hamilton and Sherrod'still in Atlanta. Are joined by Hardy. Ratliffc and Camo drop in to '•talk-' over old times. Pandora expense account furnishes refreshments. May 25: Hamilton and Hardy awake up at four o'clock in the afternoon and gravely decide to return to Athens. Who wants to have a Pandora anyway? Sherrod stays in the big town to finish "it'’ up. Georgia beats Tech; to win championship if victorious tomorrow. May 26: Tech beats Georgia and Auburn wins championship on percentage by half-game, big Georgia drunk in Atlanta. May 27: Somebody puts in a good word for the Dean of Men. May 28: He takes it back. May 29: Work starts on feature section of the Pandora. Sherrod returns from Atlanta with expense account of $57.25. Heckman explodes. May 30: Memorial Day. Pandora staff celebrates holiday. May 31 : "Songs of Nothing Certain’’ appear. Renfroe disgusted. June t: The first of June. Beginning of a new month. June 2: Seniors begin looking in cracks and crevices for those credits. Athletes and Ryan Frier pray for Dr. Sanford’s return. Jqnc 3: Delegates arc sent to Atlanta and Dr. Sanford appears in Athens. Frier orders invitations for commencement. June 4: Exams begin. A few start studying. Seniors who pass stay sober, unc 5: St. John writes faculty ra z section, unc 6: Hamilton remembers lie is responsible for ra z. section and tones it down. June 7: Heckman throws dog fit when shown his own write-up and suppresses entire razz section. Pandora staff goes to Atlanta for final vodka vanquishing. June 8: We catch up on calendar. June 9-' We don’t know anything about tomorrow. Stand by please for a few days until the damn thing comes off the press. wr JA(ojv I?i Our TOay Napoleon crossing the Alps had nothing on Georgia students crossing the river. The Dean of Men refused to believe that pajama parties (and more) were pulled off in local hotels during dance week-ends. Unreasonable people reading in the library disturbed those who wanted to talk, notably co-eds with dates. Co-eds' skirts were lengthened, by order of the Dean of Women, acting (as usual) for the Women's Student Council. The V. M. C. A. bulletin board was next to we Crackers, by Heck. Trade was diverted from Costa’s to Mehre's— deciding the point that there must be something in football after all. Georgia still lacked tennis courts—among other conveniences. The cavalrymen took their dates to ride in the Cavalry Barn. Atlanta sub-debs raised the status of co-education at Georgia. Backman put a firm large foot down on dances, with the edict that chaperones must outnumber guests 5 to 1. Old College was still noted for beer and women —they made the beer and unmaid the women. Water was fine, whiskey better. Bootleggers from Winder and Gainesville still did a hot trade in liquors—plain and fancy. John Drewry made his annual attempt to get control of the Red and Black. The Cracker and the Red and Black got too hot for McGregor's; so it burned down. Publication was suspended (as usual). The Commerce-Journalism building was completed, all hut the rest of it. Georgia lost championship in both football and baseliall to the Tech friends. An anthology of campus verse was published, with little or no students' work in it. Work on the stadium was started to the extent of cutting down a tree or two. Georgia had two All-American ends in school— not necessarily loose ends. Crowds in front of the Commerce-Journalism building rivalled the crowds in front of Academic building. The Chance- Ferguson tradition became a fact. (License on display—certificate framed.) Co-eds were forbidden to ride in anything— including airplanes—on pain of automatic expulsion. Co-ed was shipped for kissing a boy. Boy still alive—and kicking. Heckman ran Backman a close second for the position of most misunderstood man on faculty. King Andy gave the Chancellor a piece of his mind—and found to his surprise that lie hadn't any left. For reasons of health, suppers after dances were strictly forbidden. For the health of all concerned and a lot unconcerned (young ladies especially) house parties were abolished. The Pandora came out late—eventually, why not now? Page Three Hundred and Fillv-thrrcCLAUSSEN’S Bread : Cakes Since 1841 : South’s Favorite - |pr CHARLIE JAMES LAUNDRY Dry Cleaning and Pressing PHONE 746 Compliments of SLADE and SWIFT ATTORNEYS —and— COUNSELLORS AT LAW L. C. Slade H. H. Swift Columbus, Georgia '« «• Thrrr llmuireri anil f ifty-fourLUNCHES SOFT DRINKS Founded 184S WILLCOX-LUMPKIN COMPANY BILLIARDS INSURANCE 1149 Broad Street THE REX YORK’S RECREATION Columbus :: Georgia “Everything Insurable" 117 North Pryor Street ATLANTA Frank (J. Lumpkin, I re . J. D. Box, Secy. ( I XCOKl'OKATKI) ISO2 ) A Clean Place for Clean Fellows COLLEGE MEN WELCOME Robert L. York, Proprietor TRUST COMPANY OF COLUMBUS 6% ON REAL ESTATE SAVINGS LOANS ‘The Company That Co-operates” HOLMAN HOTEL (The Pride of Athens) NEWEST FINEST LARGEST HOTEL Co mplimenls— •OKXO C. E. IPestbrook Department Store HEADQUARTERS FOR UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA ALUMNI Columbus ox»o L. W. Nelson, Mgr. •a-ie Thrtr ll Hdr 4 and t'i tff fl1'147 Broad St. Telephone 509 P. S. JOHNSON CAROM AND POCKET BILLIARDS CIGARS : TOBACCO SODA FOUNT ATHENS :: GEORGIA The cover for this annual was created by The DAVID J. MOLLOY CO. 2857 N. Western Avenue Chicago, Illinois M COMPLIMENTS OF THE NATIONAL EXCHANGE BANK OF AUGUSTA A NATIONAL BANK WITH A SAVINGS DEPARTMENT UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY LAW DEPARTMENT University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. Summer School begins June 25. 1928. First and second year work will be given. It appears that there will be a large attendance. The 1928 session begins the 3rd Wednesday in September. LARGEST LAW SCHOOL IN THE STATE Page Three Iluntire‘1 nn I Fifty tlrGEORGIA FAIRY TALES FAMOUS SAYINGS IN FACULTATAF. or ONCE UPON A TIME IN 192S- Co-cds didn't go to ride. Law students were students. Georgia played football on a muddy field. The Sphinx limited membership to outstanding men. The Campus elected frat men to tltc Gridiron. The Dean of Men was popular. King Andy failed to run the University. Co-eds began to rate. The co-op failed to make a profit. The Cracker and the Red and Black were edited. The School of Journalism had a "faculty.” Georgia stopped giving athletic scholarships. The Chancellor and the Dean agreed on something. Dean Dudley talked to Captain Backman. Chapel exercises began to be enjoyed. The Pandora came out on time. Georgia was a real University. —LIKE HELL. OWED TO MR. EVERETT (Because of the requests of his many admirers that I write them a "poem” to give to him.) Thoit muchly ravished prey of unquietness. Receptacle of chatter and fast time, English instructor, who const thus express A flowery talc more stveetly than our rhyme; 11'ha I numerous co-eds haunt about thy shape. Waylay thee, with the wiles of Leap Year old. In office or the halls of library! What co-eds here arc these! Il'hat maidens bold! What mad pursuit! Il'hat struggle to escape! What gifts and pictures! What wild ecstasy! Heard compliments are Siveet, but those unheard Are sweeter: Therefore, ye co-eds, rave on! Xot to the beloved's car, but more the 1word Ripe to your poor friends ravings of your own. Root men, beneath their adoration, const not leave Their presence; never can they be erased, Poor teacher, never, never canst escape Though winning near the goal—yet I believe Perhaps tlion dost delight to contemplate Forever wilt they love, and thou be chasedA The Eminent Chancellor: (When interviewed in all seriousness on co-ed regulations) “I have often said that the biggest trouble with woman is that she wants to be a man." Andrew M. Soule: (Anent academic freedom) "You can bet that all my faculty members attend church regularly. If they didn't, I'd fire them." Rolicrt E. Park, Head of the English Department : "The purpose of all art is moral. We must all make this world a little better for having lived in it.” Dean J. T. Dudley, office boy: "Don’t come to sec me about your absences! Go sec Godal-mighty! He's the dean and the chancellor and everything else around here.” Dr. S. V. Sanford: "You know now I understand why they've got a naval unit at Tech. They wanted us to swim December 3. Cap'11. S. G. Backman, dean of men (writing in the Pandora) : "The office of Dean of Men was created due to the increased enrollment this year." Official figures on enrollment: 1926-27, 1781 ; 1927-28, 1641. Rev. E. I.. Secrcst, general secretary of the University Y. M. C. A.: "The University pays me a salary just like the other professors.” Robert McWhorter of the Law Faculty: "Perhaps you were sick on that day. Go tell Dr. Reynolds you were anyway.” ■nggar COGITATIONS OF A CO-ED "ft is not good for man to be alone—" So runs the maxim staid. But. modified by the chaperone, At least, alone with a maid!” "Man can not live by bread alone—” At least. I've heard it always has been so. "Man can not live by bread alone,” But oh, what wonders he can bring to pass with dough! tWe arc requested by the author to call attention to the pun. rage Three Hundred and Ftjty-MtvenCOMPLIMENTS UNION SAVINGS BANK AUGUSTA, GA. Wm. Sciiweickrt R. -M. Kh.ky T. S. Gray President Assistant Cashier Vice-Pres. and Cashier ARNETT’S STUDIO ATHENS 255Vi North Lumpkin CANDY Portraits Kodak Finishing KITCHEN Commercial Fork Athens, Ga. Pete Chiliers Athens Rent-A-Car Company Compliments of Farr and Hogan AUGUSTA, GA. Phone 1926 ATHENS, GA. Pxgc Three Hundred and Flfty-rl(,htC. T. GOETCHIUS BRO. Drugs—Soda—Kodaks—Candy 702 BROAD ST. PHONE 6.9 AUGUSTA, GA. L. SYLVESTER SONS ESTABLISHED OVER HALF A CENTURY Quality Clothiers “Georgia” men, make our store your Augusta headquarters on every visit to Augusta and this part of the State 816 BROAD STREET AUGUSTA, GA. Compliments of GEORGIA-CAROLINA BRICK CO. AUGUSTA, GA. Vo'jr Three lluNdred and Filin-nineIn Closing I have many people to thank for their kindness in assisting with various sections of this Pandora. Mr. Earl Sanders and Mr. Clayton Webb, of Foote Davies Co., have been very patient, very helpful, in dealing with a haphazard editor who seemed unable to get material in on time. The engraver and the photographer have also assisted materially in the la t desperate effort to get this book printed before it was entirely too late. The paintings for the opening and main-division pages were executed by Mr. B. J. I-ore, art director of the Southwestern Engraving Company, of Fort Worth, Texas. If, as I believe, they arc a highly artistic embellishment to this volume. I have Mr. Lore to thank, most sincerely, for his co-operation despite the distance which separates him from the campus on which the events lie has depicted took place. If, as I hope, these paintings form a valuable contribution to the history of the University of Georgia, it is largely due to the fact that members of the faculty have given unstinted assistance with respect to them. Foremost among these is the late Dr. Henry Clay White, who had an intimate knowledge of the University's history from its reopening after the Civil War to the present time, and contributed from his rich store the information for most of the paintings. Others who aided greatly arc: Dr. F.. M. Coulter. Dr. John Morris, Dr. R. P. Brooks, Dr. W. D. Hooper, Mr. T. W. Reed, Mr. Duncan Burnet, Judge Blanton Fortson. Dr. Brooks wrote the dedication to Dr. Morris, a splendid tribute worthy of its subject. Both Dr. Brooks and Dr. Morris were good enough to correct a few of the errors appearing in the explanatory matter of the opening and division pages, in the sketch of Chancellor Barrow, and in the In Memoriam page to Dr. White. John Held, Jr., the noted illustrator, kindly selected from the twenty-eight photographs submitted the six co-eds appearing in the beauty section, and also donated to an impoverished yearbook his inimitable drawing. “Maid of Athens, Ere We Part," which we reproduce at the licgin-ning of the section. Mr. Hcrliert Dougherty, of Southwestern Engraving Company, made the sub-division drawing- and all the l orders. including the “phantom" for the Senior section. Miss Jean Flanigcn drew the charcoal sketches of campus buildings which close the different books. Two of them appear on the end-sheets. Sam Tupper, Jr., ’26, allowed us to use his poem, “Graduation," in the opening pages of the volume. In addition to the work performed by regular members of the staff. Bob Sherrod has done yeoman service in all the numberless tasks incident to publishing the Pandora. He wrote the copy for basket-ball, baseball, track, and most of the minor sports, and has aided in reading proof, taking snap-shots, getting material in. and in other ways. "Dutch" Lawrence is responsible for the football write-up, which is a masterpiece of its kind—one of the best pieces of sports writing which has ever appeared in a Pandora. Among other members of the 1929 Pandora staff, Guy Hamilton and Craig Barrow have been of great assistance. Gus Witcher executed the faculty caricatures. John Taylor loaned us the camera with which to take the snap-shots. Ben Hardy, my room-mate, has borne up well under the strain of constant association with the Pandora and it harassments. Perhaps lie had heard too much about it when he wrote a part of the feature section—which part, he prefers not to l»c known. At any rate, his contributions may lie recognized by the magic, of his phrases. Mr. H. M. Heckman, faculty advisor of the Pandora, has shown a great spirit of magnanimity and help which heaps coals' of fire (figuratively) upon my head. And as for the rest, it is useless to rejieat the old plaint of Pandora editors that 110 one understands how hard they have to work, and how little material reward they receive. The Pandora is an incubus, a demon which never allows undisturbed freedom from worship at its shrine. Paraph rasing Cardinal W'olsey. "Had I but served my professors with half the zeal I served this Pandora, they would not in mine age have left me naked to my exams.” Tom Hamilton, Jr., Editor ip 8 Pandora. I’l'Jt Thrrt llumlrt'l uml Sixty


Suggestions in the University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) collection:

University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1932 Edition, Page 1

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