University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1923

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 436 of the 1923 volume:

PANDORA Tl?e Annual of tl?e University Georgia Published SepiortW ot 1923 GENERM- LUWtARt University of Georgia fcltfENS, GEORGIA 35 Ft, uX £ v 11 3k £E L To Koswkll Powell Stephens whose gentleness, scholarship, and integrity have made his life a worthy example for Georgia students of two decades the 1923 Pandora is dedicated. sm . -GENERAL LIBRARY University of Georgia ATHENS. GEORGIAForeword The Editorial Staff oj this volume do not claim it to he the best Pandora ever published. Bui they do affirm, that they, to the best of their ability, have made it a true history of the collegiate year 1922-1923 at the University, embodying, in so far as possible, every phase of student activity. With this thought in mind, they submit for your approval the 1923 Pandora.Divisions ADMINISTRATION THE CLASSES ORGANIZATIONS STUDENT ACTIVITIES FOR FI N 40981EDITOBHia-eHBEF ef-0 - AA iM) i rr sv- J C a cXl. ---—_ §§®felATTE E®BT@®§ . HaJUtvs faivfcs J J 0 , Q,4ax± r}4-£4 f , m nr©s§ (iWr- wsimi®s7 Tin: l.niKAin I.kConti. II M lTt km.i. Hall jBnW Al.HIClLTI.UM. El»l CATION 111' 11.1 I Nf.J M. "A or Hi Excellency Gov. Clifford V. Walker. Atlanta, Ex-Officio George F. Gober. Marietta, From the Stale at Large Henry I). McDaniel, Monroe, From the State at Large. William E. Simmons, Lawrenceville, From the Stale at Large James II. Nevin, Atlanta. From the State at Large Alexander A. 1-awrencc. Savannah, First Congressional District J. Robert Pottle, Mbauy, Second Congressional District I.. G. Council, mcricu . Third Congressional District Henry II. Goetchius. Gdumbus. Fourth Congressional District Clark Howell, Atlanta. Fifth Congressional District Loyd Cleveland, Griffin, Sixth Congressional District Joseph M. Ilrown, Marietta, Seventh Congressional District Marcus I . McWhorter, Athena, Eighth Congressional District Howard Thompson, Gainesville, Ninth Congressional District Bowdre Phinizy. Augusta, Tenth Congressional District John W. Bennett, Waycross. Eleventh Congressional District Dudley M. Hughes. Danville. Tuclflh Congressional District Hugh J. Kowe, Athens, Resident Trustee Harry Hodgson. Athens. Resident Trustee George Foster Pealwdy. Saratoga Springs, N. Y„ Idle Trustee IIy special act of the General Assembly Nathaniel E. Harris. Macon. Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the School of Technology. Ex-Officio Bichard B. Bussell. Winder. President of the Board of Directors of the Georgia Stale College for If'omen. Ex-Officio Peter W. Meldrim. Savannah. President of the Board of Commissioners ol the Industrial College for Colored Youths. Ex-Officio A. S. Hardy, Gainesville. President of the Board of Trustees of the North Georgia Agricultural College. Ex-Officio B. S. Miller, Gdumbu . Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Stale Normal School Ex-Officio James J. Conner. Cartersville, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the College of Agriculture. Ex-Officio Enoch H. Callaway. Augusta. President of the Board of Directors oj the Medical College Ex-Officio William E. Thomas. Valdosta, President of the Board of Trustees of the Georgia State ff'oman's College. Ex-Officio J. L. Lovvorn. Bowden. President of the Board of Trustees of llotcden Stale Normal College Ex-Officio Marvin M. Parks. Atlanta, State Superintendent of Schools. Ex-Officio Charles Murphcy Candler, Decatur, President of University of Georgiu Alumni Society. Ex-Officio Herbert D. McDaniel, Chairman Thomas W. Keed, Secretary and Treasurer! o'C o » O .CQ. :o 'Co -Co Co £:»(£ o' oxgD. ®lo .o? o 'Q: r?l I ncle Dave Barrow is without doubt the best loved man in the Stale. To all "Georgia’’ men he is a combination of all those qualities desired by right-thinking men, but acquired by so few. After being associated with Incle Dave for four years no student can but acquire some measure of gentleness and true virtue. tpA vCo'-Co'. 3 CoCq o' qc Gt gc wIGp o 0:FACULTY m V oT-C I. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS David Crenshaw Barrow, LL. D................................................................. Chancellor Charles Mercer Snclling, A. M.. Sc. D..............................President of Franklin College Andrew McNairn Soule. B. S. A., LL. I)., F. R. S. A.. Li.. I).. Sc. D......................... .............................. President of the College oj Agriculture und the Mechanic Arts. Thomas Walter Teed, A. M.. LL. B....................................... Secretary and Treasurer II. THE UNDERGRADUATE, GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS Charles Mercer Snclling. A. M.. Sc. D. ................................ Dean of the University Andrew McNaifn Soule. B. S. A., F. K. S. A., LL. D., Sc. D..Dean of the College of Agriculture Willis Henry Bocock. A. L, LL. !)................................ Dean of the Graduate School Thomas Jackson Woof ter, Ph. I).. LL I)............... Dean of the Peabody School of Education Sylvanus Morris. LL. B., LL. I)................................ Dean of the Lumpkin Laic School Robert Preston Brooks. Ph. I).................................. Dean of the School of Commerce James Philander Campbell. I). S. A........................................... Director of Extension Robert Cumming Wilson. Ph. G.................................Director of the School of Pharmacy .Mary Dorothy Lyndon. A. M. .......................................................... Dean of ITomen Mary Ethel Creswell, B. S. H. E.. ................................. Director of Home Economics III. THE AUXILIARY DIVISIONS Duncan Burnet .................................................... Librarian of the University Nell May Reese ....................................... Librarian of the College of Agriculture Dwight Warren Kyther. Colonel. Infantry. U. S. A............Commandant of the Reserve Officers' ............................................................................... Training Corps Joseph Spencer Stewart, Ped. D.......Director of the Summer School; Inspector of High Schools John Richard Fain. B. S., Sc. I)............................Supervisor of Rehabilitation Division •Daniel Hughes DuPrce. B. S.. M. I).....................................Surgeon to the University Hall 0. Reynolds, M. D............................................................. Resident Physician Ethel Codfrey............................... Superintendent of the Crawford ff . Long Infirmary OFFICERS OF INSTRI CTION THE FACULTY David Crenshaw Barrow, LL. D................................................................. Chancellor Charles Mercer Snelling, A. M., Sc. I).............................President of Franklin College Andrew McNairn Soule, B. S. A., F. R. S. A.. LL. D.. Sc. C.........President of the College of .......................................................Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts Emory Dewitt Alexander. B. S. A....................... Assistant Supervisor Rehabilitation Work Mrs. Emory Dewitt Alexander................................. Instructor in Rehabilitation Section Haync Coker Appleton .................................................. Farm Crops Specialist Thomas Lynn Asbury. B. S. A.............................. District Supervisor of County Agents DuPree Barrett. B. S. F.............................................Adjunct Professor of Forestry David Francis Barrow. Ph. D................................. Associate Professor of Mathematics Frederick William Bennett. B. S. ....................Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry A. Laura E. Blackshear...................................................................... Illustrator W illis Henry Bocock. A. M.. LL. D..........................................Mill edge Professor of Greek William Bradford. A. B.. M. D..................Assistant State Supervisor of Agricultural Clubs Mack F.lmer Brand. B. S. A.................................. Instructor in Agricultural Chemistry William Earle Broach. B. S. A.........................Field Agent in Agricultural Engineering George Marion Broadherst, B. S. C..................... Instructor in Stenography and Typewriting Charles Joseph Brockman. A. M., Ch. F.mg.................................... Instructor in Chemistry David William Brooks, B. S. A............................................... Instructor in Agronomy Robert Preston Brooks, Ph. D................................ Professor of Ranking and Finance (•Deceased, February 22, 1923JWaller Scolt Brown, B. S. A................. ..............District Supervisor of Country Agents Bruce Lamar Burch, Major. Cavalry, I . S. A.. .Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics Waller Clinton Burkhart. D. . M........................Associate Professor of Veterinary Medicine Thomas Dearborn Burleigh. B. $.. M. S...............................Associate Professor of Forestry Duncan Burnel ........................................................... Librarian of the University Susie Burson, B. S. H. E................................................. Teacher in Practice School James Philander Campbell. B. S. A........................................Director of Extension ll ork Kpsie Campbell ................................. Stale Supervisor of Vocational Home Economics James William Cantrell. A. B........................................Associate Professor oj' Physics (.conidas Myers Carter. B. S.................................. Professor of Agricultural Chemistry Parish Carter Chandler. B. S. A........Associate Professor of Vocational Education, in Charge of ................................................................................. Practice School Paul W. Chapman. B. S. A.............................Stale Supervisor of Vocational Agriculture Boss Kenfroe Childs. B. S. A.. M. S. A......Prvjessor of Agronomy, in Charge of Cotton Industry Wyatt Arnton Clegg. 13. S. A.......................Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering Andrew Jackson Cobb. A. B„ LL. B..................................................... Professor of Law Ellis Merton Coulter, Ph. D.........................................Associate Professor of History George Arthur Crabh. B. S. A............................Professor of Agronomy, in Charge of Soils Edith Vaughan Croswell, B. S. II. E.........................................Instructor in Home Economics Mary Ethel Cresswell, B. S. H. E............................................. Director of Home Economics George ivian Cunningham, B. S. A..........................Stale Supervisor of Agricultural Clubs Uriah Ilarrold Davenport, B. S.......................Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering Leslie Vincent Davis, B. S. A.................................Supervisor of Fertilizer Investigations Ellis Howard Dixon, A. B........................................................ Instructor in Physics Lois Pauline Dowdle, B. S. II. E...................................State Supervisor of Girls' Clubs John Eldredge Drewry, A. B............................................... Instructor in Journalism Austin Southwick Edwards, Ph. D...........................................Professor of Psychology Lula Edwards, B. S. H. E............................District Supervisor Home Demonstration If ork Julius Mitchell Elrod, B. S. A.................................. Associate'Professor of Agronomy John Estes Everett. B. S. A. ....................... Adjunct Professor of Agricultural Engineering George Alexander Fain, B. C. E............................ Professor of Agricultural Engineering .Nihon Cleveland Gay, B. S. A..................................... Slate Supervisor of Marketing Roye Panncbecker Gerfen, Captain, Cavalry, I . S. A.. .Assistant Professor of Military Science and ....................................................... ................................ Tactics John Kygress Giles, B. S. A................................. Assistant Director of Extension If'ork Eyiest Lee Criggs, Graduate of . M. I................. Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing Harold I.eon Harrington. B. S................................... Adjunct Professor of Horticulture Harlow Williamson Harvey, B. S. A............................ Specialist in Landscape Gardening Harold Milton Heckman. B. S. C. A. M.....................................Professor of Accounting Unvillc Laurentine liendrcn, Ph. D............................ Professor of Physics and Astronomy James Pittman Hill. A. B.................................................Instructor in Mathematics Thomas Scott Holland, A. B................................Adjunct Professor of Romance Languages William Davis Hooper. A. M........................................................... Professor of Latin Deforest Hungerford, B. S.. M. A........................Scientific Assistant in Farm Management George Alexander Hutchinson, Ph. D..............Professor of Philosophy and School Administration Milton Preston Jamagin, B. S. A., Sc. D.............................Professor of Animal Husbandry John Wilkinson Jenkins. A. M...................................Professor of Business Administration James Augustus Johnson, B. S. A...............................District Supervisor of County Agents James Guyton Johnson. A. M................................................ Professor of Economics Robert Wallace Jones, 1). . M.........................Associate Professor of Veterinary Medicine Rufus Lafayette Keener, B. S. A..................................Adjunct Professor of Horticulture Charles Edward Jellogg. B. S., M. S. A..................Assocaite Professor oj Animal Husbandry Joseph Krafka. Jr.. Pit. I)...................................................... Professor of Zoology Julian Gordon Liddell. B. S. A....................................‘Field Agent in Swine Industry Marion Wayne Lowry, B. S. A.. M. A...........................Associate Professor of Soil Chemistry Mrs. M. W. Lowry............................................. Instructor in Rehabilitation Section .............................;•••••,.......;....................................... an l Tactics Joseph Lustral. Bach, es Lett., Officer d'Academic, Lett. D.....Professor of Romance Utnguages Mary Dorothy Lyndon, A. M.......................................... Associate Professor of Education Leo Hartland Marlatt ........................................... Field Agent in Cheese Production Susan Matthews. B. S............................................... Food and Nutrition Specialist Julian Howell Miller, B. S. A..................................Associate Professor of Horticulture Mrs. Leila Ritchie Mi .e........................District Supervisor oj Home Demonstration IVork John Morris, A. M............................................. Professor of Germanic Languages Sylvanus Morris. LL. B., LL. 0....................................................... Professor of Late At ari ha McAlpine, A. B...................................Social and Physical Director of IVomen William Copes McCoy, B. $....................................... Field Agent in Poultry HusbandrySamuel Edwin Mel.endcm ............................. Charles Andrew McGarriglc. Captain, Quartermaster, I ............. Specialist in Stored Crain S. A................. Assistant Professor ..........0 Military Science and Tactics Rosa McGee. II. S. M. E..........................District Supervisor Home Demonstration Work Thomas Hubi crd McHutton, II. S.. Sc. D., , 1. Hort..................... Professor of Horticulture Hayden Mayo .McKay. II. S. A............................................Field Agent in Horticulture Pauline McKinley ............................................ Instructor in Rehabilitation Section John Hanson Thomas McPherson, Ph. L).....................Professor of History and Political Science Robert Ligon McWhorter. A. M.........................Associate Professor of English; Instructor in ........................................................................ Rehabilitation Work John Walter Nicholson. Captain Infantry, I . S. A.. .Assistant Professor of Military Science and ......................................................................................... Tactics James Cranbury Oliver. II. S. A..................................State Supervisor of County Agents Dolphin Henry Overton, II. S. A....................................Instructor in Poultry Husbandry Robert Emory Park, A. M„ Litl. D................................................ Professor of English William D. Paschall, 11. S....................................... Coordinator Rehabilitation Section William Oscar Payne, A. M....................................................... Professor of History Herman ictor Persells, D. Y. M.........................Associate Professor of Veterinary Medicine Samuel William Phillips. M. S.......................................Soil Specialist in State Survey Erna Elizabeth Proctor. II. S............................Associate Professor of Foods and Cookery Rosalie Virginia Rathbonc .......................... Associate Professor of Clothing and Textiles John Moore Reade. Ph. D................Professor of Botany and Director of Biological Laboratories Thomas Walter Reed. A. M.. LL B............................................................ Registrar William Walter Reitz, M. S...........................Associate Professor of Agricultural Education Waldo Silas Rice. B. S. A................................ Adjunct Professor of Animal Husbandry Albert G. G. Richardson, I). V. M...................................Professor of Veterinary Medicine Dwight Warren Ryther, Colonel Infantry. I. S. A.........Professor of Military Science and Tactics Shcadman Vincent Sanford. A. II., Lilt. I)...........Professor of English Languuge and Journalism George Paul Save, II. S. A.............................. Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry Alfred Witherspoon Scott. A. II.. Ph. D.............................Associate Professor of Chemistry Rhea C. Scott. II. S............................. Associate Professor of Institutional Management Julius Eugene Severin, I). V. M..................... Associate Professor of Veterinary Medicine Lafayette Miles Shelter, II. S.......................Associate Professor of Agricultural Education Frances Simpson. B. S. H. F..................................................... Nutrition Specialist Guy Ix renzo Smith, C. E......................................................... Drainage Engineer Mrs. Katie Lanier Smith.......................... District Supervisor of Home Demonstration Work Lewis Roy Smith. 11. S. F............................................ Adjunct Professor of Forestry Charles Mercer Snelling, A. M., Sc. I)..................................Professor of Mathematics Robert Murray Soule. II. S. A........................Associate Professor of Agricultural Chemistry Herman James Sicgcman, Ph. I)....................Associate Professor Physical Education for Men Roswell Powell Stephens. Ph. D..........................................Professor oi Mathematics Joseph Spencer Set wart, Ped. D............................... Professor of Secondary Education Charles .Morton Strahan, C. and M. E., Sc. I)......................Professor of Civil Engineering Charles William Summerour. B. S. A................................. Editor, College of Agriculture Paul Tabor, B. S. A., M. S. A..........Associate Professor of Agronomy, In Charge of Farm Crops Jantes Ralph Thaxton. A. 11....................................... Instructor in Romance Languages Wilburn C. Thoburn, M. S. ...................................................... Instructor in Physics Preston Carl I pshaw. Jr., 11. S. C..............Instructor in Economic Geography and Accounting Stephen Cummings Epson, LL II................................................... Professor of Law John Donald Wade. A. II................................................. Adjunct Professor of English Roosevelt Pruyn Walker. A. M....................................... Associate Professor of English Charles Manley Walton, First Lieut.. Infantry. I . S. A.. ..Assistant Professor of Military Science Frank Ward, B. S. A................................................................ Cotton Specialist Waller Preston Warren, A. 11.. LL 11............................................ Assistant Registrar Edison Collins Westbrook. II. S. A...................................... Farm Management Specialist John Taylor Wheeler. B. S. A...................................Professor of Agricultural Education Robert h red Whclcltel, II. S. A.............................District Supervisor of County Agents Henry Clay White, Ph. D.. Sc. D., D. C. L, LL. D...............Professor of Chemistry and Terrell ......................................................... Professor of Agricultural Chemistry Cecil Norton Wilder, 11. S. A., M. S. A..............Associate Professor of Agricultural Chemistry Robert Cumming Wilson, Ph. G................................................ Professor of Pharmacy James Bowdoin Wise, Jr., Captain. Cavalry, ti. S. A.................Assistant Professor of Military ............................................................................. Science and Tactics James Herbert Wood. B. S. A........................................ Professor of Poultry Husbandry Thomas Jackson W'oofler. Ph. D., LL D.......................Professor of Philosophy and Education Ralph Stewart Wooster. B. S...............................Adjunct Professor of Poultry Husbandry James Heyward Young, B. S.............................................Adjunct Professor of ChemistryThe Student Council WAS on March 3, 1919 that the plan for the present system of Student Government of the University was adopted by the student body. Created, as it was, to promote a brotherly feeling among the students, and for the promotion of a greater and cleaner “Georgia Spirit", we may say that the Council lias not shirked the great responsibility which was placed on it by this ever growing community of cultured and educated men. For four years the Student Body has been directed by a supreme organization, the Student Council of the University of Georgia. This council is composed of twelve Seniors elected annually, two from each department with one non-fraternity and one fraternity man, thus making the body thoroughly representative. From these men there are elected three officers without the slightest elemnt of politics: President, Vice-President, and Secretary-T rcasurer. The duties of the Student Council arc about the same as those imposed upon any other body of similar nature. From it come all of the rules and regulations governing the actions of the Student Body, which has the power to rescind any action of the Council by a two thirds vote of all the students. At the present time it may be safely said that tin Council has the respect of the entire student body, and that a stable and sane system of Student Government has come to remain in the life of the University of Georgia. For four years the strength of the Organization has grown until today it seems that the Georgia system is one of the best found in any Southern College. The prevailing sentiment since its creation has been to put able men on the council. In a conservative manner the men from year to year have gone forward with the work, each Council following in the foot-steps of the former and going just a bit ahead in its undertakings until today we believe that the time is not far-off when the Council is to mean the most in the life of the University.The Student Council Freeman Chcynne McClure Howard Mewbourne....... Ernest Algernon Lowe . .. ...............President ......... Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer Fred A. Tanner Luther C. Still Oiner C. Aderhold Charles S. Hodges Charles H. Newton Arthur F. Gannon Samuel L.. Yarnadoe Enoch II. Wilkerson William H. YoungGENERAL LWIARY UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA ATHENS. GEORGIAThe Student Government Association for Women Grace Allen ............................................................................ President Mary Simms ........................................................................ Vice-President F.mmie Nelson ........................................................... Secretary and Treasurer Gertrude Still Lizzie Mae Hancock Mary Ferguson Celia PerryC0 OO e.MSenior Class History I IK CLASS OF ‘23 stands today, joyfully yet sadly on the threshold of a new experience- young m«-n ami young women after four years of training, ready to climb the para| ct and do battle with the issues that make life. LIFK. and not mere existence. September, four years ago. when civilization was beginning to smile once more after the World War. our class came to the I Diversity. Some joyous and exuberant, fresh from their high school classes, others more mature, late of the khaki-clad ranks of a victorious army but all fired with that enthusiasm of thought that seizes upon the tiniest spark, and with that determination of purpose that fans the spark to a powerful blaze. Thus have we carried on the class of '23 from the Autumn of 1919 when as shaven headed freshmen we were first initiated at the fount of learning and tradition as provided l y our lma Mater, and by there drinking we have grown in experience, and widened our understanding, until now as we go out into life wc are confident, unafraid. Our cla s was installed in the I Diversity along with a new order of things, namely, coeducation, and taking our cue front the classmen altove us. we were at first balky of accepting it at par. However, after four year of association with each other, the male aggregation of our class, not only, no longer looks upon co-education with a hostile eye. but is prone to accept it as a natural and pleasing institution. Coming as we did. in the unsettled limes that made themselves manifest during the first days of peace following the Great War. we found the old Campus a restful city within itself, where men arc wont to gather in preparation for the long journey over the rugged slopes of Service. Our Sophomore year found us well-adjusted to the so-called “routine" of college life. However, our class lias never allowed routine to creep in. ami "work is play", has ever been its motto. Financial conditions, so poignantly fell in the Southland, sadly depleted our ranks, so that as Juniors, we missed many familiar faces. And loo, the many three? year men, of which the class of '22 boasted were drawn from our ranks. Today a - Seniors wc stand in retrospect; behind us a sleep pathway made dear by the many bubbling springs along the sides; Itcfore us, the drawn curtain of the future, from the other st lc of which the voice of Ambition calls clearly, "Forward". That our Class has produced leaders ranking with any other class, there is no doubt. Front our ranks the 1 Diversity presents the slate with men who have more titan held their ground as debaters, scholars, literary men and athletes. We are justly proud of them. In conclusion, may the class of ’23 ever remain true to the ideals installed by sitting at the feet of our beloved Alma Mater. —HISTORIAN.Senior Class Officers W. A. Lundy ................................................................ President A. F. Gannon........................................................... Vice-President E. V. Drew..................................................................Historian M. R. Bell......................................................................Poet C. J. Durham..................................................Secretary and TreasurerMAKN CO U MCI. I V A UN ICY. A. It. S. S. "Cornelia' • Athens. tJeorgin Chi Omega Pioneer: Chi Delta I'lii; Sponsor First Squadron Calvary. Cornelia came to the Cniversit.v two years ago from iiiiey Cobb and is a student of whom any institution wiuld he glad t« boast. She is alreadys ready to start some fun. but her lesson never suffer from it. She has not failed to take an active and prominent part in college activities and has made an enviable word in everything that she has done. Site has a sunny smile and a winning manner which make friends for her wherever she goes. She has a lovable nature and can lie deiiendrd on to do thoroughly anything that site undertakes. Cornelia, we can not predict what the future lias in store for yon. but we know that you will meet life squarely and will always be successful in everything you undertake. We are sorry that you are leaving, hut we know that you will he an alumna that (Scorgin will he proud to einlin. “Sincerity in word and deed is more precious than jewels.” I AM ICS THOMAS ADAIK. It. S. "Tom” Athens, (leorgia. Demostlieiiiau 2nd Lieut. M. T. C Cadet a Tom Adair is a product of which Athens can he truly proud. While he hasn’t set the woods a-fire with marks, he has set a standard for consistency that anyone would do well to emulate. For four years this young man lias come and gone on the campus, shaking to all hut making few MOqutiiutnnces. yet those acquaintances which he has made have been real friends. Ilis philosophy of life, found at the bottom of this ariele. is a good criterion of his character. Tom lias mint Impressed us by the ninny different girls he seems to rake out "flivveriilg. Kverytime you sec him he has a different member of the "aggravating sex' at his side. It is rumored that he has only to whistle, or make a noise like a chocolate milk and the ladies will gather round him like piccnniiies around a watermelon. That is rumor, however, and there will be minors and rumors, etc. We don’t know what Tom is planning to do when he gets out of college, hut we would lie willing to bet our first three mouths salary that whatever it is lie does it well. May good fortune follow you always, old man. "Do as you would he done by”GKACE AIXKN. .K. "Grace" Wintorville. Georgia. Pioneer; Chi Oniwa. • I’rwIilMil Women's Student Council. 28; Women's 1’aiJ-Ilrllcnic. 23; V. W. C. A. Cabinet, 22-'23; Chi Delta I’lii; l’yschology Prize Kssay. 22. Grace is a gift to ns from Wesleyan. She arrived in the embryonic stage and has develop'd into u great specimen. Her life history Inis lieoii very complex. displaying a heterogeneous jdieiiotype of an allelomorphic nature. Her customary habitat is the Co-ed Building. but she has often been found about I.eConte Hall, ami sometimes even at Minin's Weiner Stand. She seems to have inherited a tendency to overcome environment, and since her advent hero has boon rapidly scaling the fishes of success. It was site, who was largely responsible for the installment of the Chromosome Theory of Student Government for Women. She has also done U lot of g.nnl work among the churches of Athens. cs| oeinlly in keeping the |M t boiling for Foreign Missions. Itv her constant study and thought. Draco has not only started herself upon the road to fame, but her excellent example has boon tin inspiration to more than one girl or l oy to strive to reach a goal of the highest culture through the pursuit of Christian principles. . ". eilher to laugh nor to cry, but to understand." THUCSTOX LAPAYKTTK ANTHONY. A.It. "Mark" High Shoals, (ieorgia. Demostlienian; Kcoimmies Society. Track Team. '20. '21; Varsity Football Team. '111. '20, '21; Yire-Presideiit V. M. C. A.. '22. '23; I’resident Square and Campus Club; "G" Club; Gridiron Club. Friends. Hitmans. Countrymen, lend me your ears. What manner of man is this? He stands six feet two inches tall and weighs 200 itouuds. and is the mightiest of the mighty in physical ability. He was in active service in France for twelve months during the World War. and participated in all the major engagements of the Mighty-second division. There he won a medal proclaiming him the champion all-round athlete of his division. While Mark is idolized by all supporters of Georgia's athletics for devoting his entire energy to the glory of Georgia, even to the point of sacrifice, yet lie is known by bis closest friends not merely as an athlete but as an all-round good fellow. lie is always willing to aid a friend In need of help—Imt one need never go to him with his dirtv political schemes. "The world cares not who your ancestors were— II hat it uniats to know it, ‘if'ha are you?"JOHN WILLIAM HKNXKTT, JK.. A IL "Johnnie" Wnycross, Georgia. Drinostliriiiau; Sigma Chi. liconomlcsSwlrjy; la'r«kliin»ii Frcshmnii Impromptu Debate; Circulation Manager Red ami islacli; M. l.A.t aliinet; Assistant Athletic Manager .Mandolin Club. . "Johnnie" came to us ns the younger of two Dennetts and has mndo a re«s,nl of which he Justly proud. During In four years at Georgia lie has estahlislied himself as one of the Mien in college. lie has taken part in almost every activity of worth, ami has invariabiv ‘0111,. out a stronger man Imh-huso of the time thus spent. "Johnnie" savs that one of hi’s Ricatest assets, and by the way. ...... which always makes him succeed, is found in the fact that he is very fond of one of the fairer sex. Forgetting all of the genial traits of his porson-ality we would say that in this mail we find strength of character .a delightful personality, and °ne of tlie strongest touclu s of individuality that we have felt in many a day. “They never taste who always drink, They always talk who never think" JOSKPII KDGAK CHAPMAN. JK.. A ll. "Joe" Columbus. Ceorgia. Demostheiiiaii. l’lii Keta Kappa: Junior Cabinet; Captain Calvary Cadets; Senior Kouiid Table. In the fall of 1018 then came a certain young man. who was destined to gain much fame during his four years sojourn at Georgia. Joe has made an enviable record, which is clearly shown by the fact that he is a member of Junior Cabinet and Senior Round Table; he is in addition a worthy candidate for Phi P.etn Kappa. Like Alexander of old. Joe is always seeking new worlds to conquer; he therefore journeyed over to the Law Department this year ami succeeded in conquering the hitherto invincible Sylvanus. Ladies, it is useless to east bmgiug eyes at our Joseph, for lie is a profound woman hater. Dame Rumor says that Joe is going t«‘i--well, it is a family secret. Joe. may all of your ambitious become realities! “Perseverance conquers all things."FRANCKS M'CILK OHf.MBLKV. A.B.S.S. "Doc" » ltuthcr 6lrn. Virginia. Phi .Mu. l 'rr.slunaii llisloriiiu; Pioneer; (leorgla Naturalists; Basketball. 20; Cant. Basketball Team. ’21; Prize Horsemanship. ’22; Chi Delta I lti; Associate Kditor PANDORA; Rifle Team (Coed). ’22. ’22. "Doe.” tlie pioneer co-ed of Georgia, is taking with her Dumbest wishes from all students. She lias also won deserved honors, seholustic and athletic. Who but "Doc” Could possess a disposition so friendly, so funloving. and so wholeheartedly genuine? There is no pretense about her; she is sincere in every thought and action and is boyishly frank ait all times. Skill jn music, sports, studies and household arts, combine to make her an "all-round” girl. Incidentally. "Doe" has shown such a preference for the "Classic City" that she has decided to return next year. "U'hut one thinks of me matters little; what one knows of me matters much." KOBKKT .MAII IKK DA VAST, B.S. "Hob" Scabbard and Blade; Sine and Tangent; President Athletic Association; Captain .M. T. C. Cadets. Another Candler Hall ten hound ! __ At least, that is what "Bob” calls himself. He doesn’t stay late but he goes so often. "Bob’’ has been more than a "ladies man." however, since he came to college—he "rates" in the military department. It is rc)M»rted thu t"Bob" on the third trial induced hard-boiled Chastain to count off without calling tin- company to attention. lie not only "rates" in the military department but imssesses a wonderful knack of bootlicking the profs, especially in the physics department where he is mentioned both as a shark ami as a pet. "Bob" may be guilty of some of the above things, but nevertheless one of the most honest, clean, upright men that ever came to Georgia. lie is a hard worker, a clear thinker, and a noble gentleman. We predict that in whatever phase of life work he chooses to follow his influence will la felt. "Read 'em and laugh."JOHN WKY.MAN DAVIS. IIS. "lH'cyman" Athens, (Georgia. Rcmostlicniaii. Dice ('lul ; ('apt.-|ill Cadets; Captain Rifle Team ’23. Indies, look him over! We present for your approval Mr. Jolin Weynian Davis of Athens, (icorgia. Weynian lives in the ‘•Classic City" ami is proud of the fact that he docs. lie is our emit social worker. It is rumored that lie hasn't missed a Student Volunteer's Convention since that time in the dim and distant past when Dean Dudley wore pinafores. As usual, we feel that we must assert that Weynian is a "ladies man." To know him is to love him. or so tin co-eds say. and we suppose that they are the ones to judge. Rut they don't know our Weynian. t.ove. in his vocabulary, is a violently active verb, punctuated by many whisperings of sweet nothings into the shell-like ear of any fair damsel that crosses Ids path. Mr. Davis excels at 'most anything, hut his forte is straight shooting, being eaptain of the rifle team. He shoots the bull straight, he shoots the rifle straight, lie is a great aid to Cupid in guiding his darts straight, and he shoots the profs straight. In fact. Weynian is straight in everything. Here's to you, Weynian! “It's a waste oj energy to run in low gear." Al'STIN FORD DIO AN. A.R. "Austin" Caincsville. (ieorgia. I’lii Kappa; Kappa Alpha. Freshman Impromptu Debate; Freshman Debate; Sophomore Declamation; Sophomore Debate; Annual Impromptu Debate; Freshman Club; Spanish Club; 1 Alliance Francaise: IMii Kappa Council; I‘hi Kappa Key;Tlialians; Senior Round Table; (iridirnii Club. Three years ago Austin entered the Cnivcrsity, earning from the “Queen City of the Mountains." After a remarkable short time here, his ability was recognized. Although finishing in three years, lie has entered to a marked degree in almost every phase of college activity; in the class-room he is unexcelled; us u debater he is feared by all opponents; and on the stage lie is equalled by few amateurs. Within the walls of 1‘lii Kappa Austin will long be remembered for his fiery eloquence and wonderful orations. Some students excell in a few fields, but he Ims excelled in every field which In has entered. We have often wondered what is tin cause of such success, blit Austin has at last told us in his philosophy of life. We know that in whatever field Austin follows in life lie will suceecd. because lie is of the material of which success is made. "Positive anything is heller than negative nothing."KDfJAIC .MU-LINS IU NSTAN. B.S. "Senor" Porto Alegre, Brazil. Deniosthciiinn; A?. Club: L’Alliaiire Francnise: .Math Club; Sophomore As. Debate; Sophomore Debate Medal; Sophomore Declamation; Annual Impromptu Debate: Alternate Anniversaeian; Dehat luc Council; Pres. Demos! Iirniaii; . Deinostlieuinii Key: Chairman World Fellowship Committee: Treasurer V. |. C. A.: leader S. V. Hand: Keportorial Staff Ked and Black; I'res. Cosmopolitan Club; Vice l res. 4-Square Club: Senior Hound Table; (iridiron Club; Champion Debate; Phi Bela Kappa; Inter-Collegiate Debate. “Senor’’ blew in from somewhere hi tin wilds of Brazil three years ago with great determination to learn something about everything. After one year spent in rambling nbout however. he decided that science was better suited to his temperament and therefore selected the Physics Department ns his place of business, where he has steadily risen front blank wonder at the marvels of acceleration to an absolute understanding of the intricacies of nstron-oiny. During "Senor’s" stay with us lie has made nbout everything there is to make, as the above list of honors will testify. And the greatest thing he lias made has been friends; friends drawn to him and bound there by liis personal qualities of true manhood—that’s "Senor.” “Senor.’’ limy your success in your home country lx as meteoric as your career among ns. ‘7 i she attainment of the north while, the surest foundation on which to build is sincerity." FKANK .IKNMNttS KHWIN. A ll. “Frunk” lllalrsville. (Jeorgia. Demos! lien inn; Agricultural Club. Kcouomirs Society; Senior Hound Table; President Demos!Iieiiian; Inter-Collegiate Debate '22: Scabbard and Blade; First Lieut. M. T. C. Cadets; V. .M. C. A. Cabinet; Deiiiostlieiiian Key. Ladies look him over! This is the one and only Frank Krwin. born in the mountains of North (Jeorgia. but a citizen of the world at large. If you don’t like our Frank, you don’t know a good thing when you sis- it. and should Is compelled to do without the society of men of ids stamp. Frank doesn’t smoke, drink or chew, and is therefore wont to seek recreation in the presence of any member of the contrary sex. They say that his line is so thick that lie frequently suffocates them. But we don’t believe it is liis liue that makes the final score, for Frank Jennings is extremely adept at drawing room wrestling. Now don’t get the idea that our hero is forever placing an ear to the ground listening for the call of a damsel in distress, for lie is not . Oh. no! He takes time to make all the debates that lie wishes to make, and to accumulate all the honors that the law allows, besides making marks that are worthy of emulation by any student. Here’s to you Frank’ May you ever carry your load as lightly as you have since we’ve known you. “7V really lice is rare; most people. just exist."KDYVIN .MALLARD KVKKICTT, A.Il. "Ed" . Atlnnta. Georgia. Demostlicnian. •Iiiuior Cabinet; S. I. A. A Tennis Tournament: Kditor-iu-Chirf Georgia Cracker; 1 In Beta Kappa. "Kd" mav need On intrndiietion to many students of this Cniversity. for. although lie has mn«le many iuiiairtniit honors, lie has Wen sadly negligent in calling others’ attention to this tact. Let us. therefore, present Mr. Kverctt of Atlanta, whose most salient characteristic js, perhaps. his scholarship. His industrioiisucss is manifest from even a casual glance at his career here—in three years he has completed with excellent grades a four year course; he has ............ of Georgia's mainstys in tennis; and has serveil as Ivditor-iu-t'hicf of the Cracker for a half year. Tliis survey shows clearly that ‘T'dV time has been very fully taken up—furthermore this same survey evidences his great versatility and proves him an uncommon type in our I’niver-sity. lie differs in still other ways from the typical college boy—lie very frankly doesn’t regard friendship so indifferently as to number his friends by Ids aciiunintauces. WILLIAM COUNKLIl S FLK.M1NG. A.B. S.S. "Red" IMii Kappa; Sigma lpha Kpsilon "Fortnight Club" "I’m from old l Va.." said the Golden Tornado "breezing" his way towards Peabody Hall. Yes. “Red" went to Virginia where he acquired his great prestige, but after trying it for"a year he wisely decided to complete his education at Georgia. Ami so for the past two years lie has devoted himself with unceasing effort and unsurpassed interest to raising the standards of the School of Psychology, and making hard courses out of "crips." His efforts have not been in vain, for he has established a seholastie record which any of us would be proud to |m sstks. Not confining himself to the Cniversity. "Red" burst forth with all Ins radiance into the Athens social world, and he has continued to shine as one of its leading lights. We liojte that in tin years to come this beacon of honor, industry, and good will, will show the way for his friends and compatriots. “Logical consequence are the scarecrows of fools, and the beacons of ttise men." THANK II. TCI.I.Tit. Its. . “Tillie” Culloden. Georgia, rill Kappa; Sigma Chi. “Tillio" hails from tin plains of Culloden aixl prides himself on being one of the lucky graduates of the Georgia Military College. During his four-year stay with ns this man lias taken about every course offered on the third floor of the Academic Kuildiug. Fuller has a keen sense of humor and is truly one of the most intellectual men in his class. Tito, not one of the leading lights in college activities he jmssesses those elements of stability and culture which distinguish him from tin multitudes. Fuller is one of the few men that we know who has a real and genuine appreciation for real literature. When all is said wc believe that we have a man here who will grow old gracefully. SAKAI I NKM.E GILLAND. A.It. Kd. “AV r" Douglasville, Georgia. (hi Delta Phi; Pioneer Club Member of Y. Y. C. A. Cabinet ’22; Pres. J rcs. Y. V. C. A. •22-’23. Who was it a long time ago that said something like this: “Some people are born great; Others achieve greatness; while others have greatness thrust upon themV Whoever it was forgot to mention a fourth class—those who become great through a combination of these three. To this fourth class our Nolle belongs. The many honors that have boon hers during her two years at Georgia proclaim more successfully than eati mere words the love and respect which her fellow studnts have for her and wc predict that in her future Career she will continue to win first place in the hearts of her associates. Quiet and dignified is this sage of the Class of In all her college lifer she has proved to bo tile ideal “Georgia Co-ed" and wc believe that in the future no membr of this class will reflect more honor on our dear Alma Mater than Nolle. ‘To thine own self be true; Thou const not then be false to any man.”-lAMFS KKM.KK JIAICPKK. It. .1. “Doc” Columbus. Georgia, l’lij Kapp.t; Alpha Tan Omega. Varsity Football 'I'.t; Varsity Ituseball ’20. 21; "(•" Club; Iturcaii; • Ituecaneers: Gridiron Club; Itiftads; Chairman Square ami Campus Club 21; Freshman Club: Asst. Ilusliiess .Manager Glee Club ’22: Itusiiicss .Manager Glee Club 2S; Columbus Club; Pan Hellenic Council; l.'Aliance Franca iso; American I cgiun; Kilitor-in-Chief I ted ami lllack; President of Itonstcrs Club. "J )oeWhen this name is spoken then arises within us an emotion which words fall short i»f expressing-—an admiration which only those who know him host can feel. J luring the four years that In has Im o» with us his manly characteristics and "will-to-do" have won for him a place in every branch of college life. Since the first day that Georgia claimed him as her own. she has recognized this son as one who. by his influence, would lay a permanent stepping stone to her future sms-ess. Although his honors me numerous they fail to measure his success, for his most lasting work is manifested in those things which the printed page can not portray. Here is a loyal son. a true friend, and a man! "Doc." we predict for you a glorious future, and should Fortune smile U|h ii you as wo wish, your cup of life will lie filled to overflowing. “Behind a will is a might.” ZACIIAIilAII CLAICIi I1AVKS. .IK . A.It. “Zach” Klberton. Georgia. Phi Kappa; Alpha Tan Omega. Itnccancors; Pescado Club; Cavaliers; .Manager Athletic Team! Chairman Debating Council; Itusiness .Manager Pandora. V.ueh hails from where the golden apples grow. Four years ago Zaeh brought to the Cniversitv one of tin most pleasing personalities that a man could have enshrined in himself, (hi entering school Zncli set his goal, and today he lias reached it. but not without failure knocking him down a few times. The old determination and fight won for him. however, mid he has achieved much. As to honors Zneli has taken them through sheer determination. No one who knew him as a freshman would have predicted that he would one day occupy the exalted jHisition of Cliairnimi of the Debating Council. And furthermore, who would have connected him with athletics? Still the team says that he made a good manager. Now. as a scholar, he looks the part mid as such is good. in all your triumphs Zaeh. Old Man. you've made friends, and after you hit life's trail we see no reason why you can not achieve greater things. For with vour personality, determination. mnl ability to make friends, you have God's greatest gift to man. We look to you. Zach! 'Success don I konsist in never milkin’ blunders, but in never mukin the same one lioictCHAKI.KS (lOODKK Ii HKNKY. AIL "G" Augusta. Georgia. IMii Kappa; Sigma Alpha Kpsilon . Freshman lub; IHiladx; Junior Cabinet; Senior HoiiimI Table: Bert .Hirliacl Scholarship; J’lii Hein Kappa. Many veara ago. in the times when men valued Cod and placed less stress upon worldly matters, a star was seen in the heavens by thr« e wise men. Today a "star” of a different type has been seen—not by three men alone, hut by the entire I’uiversity faculty and all those Georgia students who have had the privilege and pleasure of knowing “Slim” Henry, lie is a man who may he aptly cnlh-d the ideal college student, hut one who is as far from the typical College student as the I'fist is from the West. As to the true nature of Goodrich's character it is hard to state: we shall say. however, that lie is morally upright, religiously inclined, and studious; the girls sa.v_ th.at he is ••indifferent." the boys that he is "ambitious." and the Co-eds that he is "charming." "If u little knowledge is u dangerous thing. Where is the man who knows enough to be out of danger?" FKKKMAX CIIRVXK MrG.l'IlK, A.li. “Senator” La Fayette. Georgia. Dcinnsthcnian; Ag. Club. Freshman Impromptu Debate; Annual Freshman Debate; Junior Oration; Annual Impromptu Debate: Aiiniversariaii Sneaker; Deiimsfhenian Key Couneil; Biftad Club; Junior Cabinet; Senior Hound Table; Gridiron; Sphinx; (Hoc Club: "Georgia Four" Quartet: Student Council President; Kditorial Staff of Hed and Black; Scrap Iron Quartette; Campus leader; Campus Club; Phi Beta Kappa. •’Senator" McClure, our only student legislator, came to enter himself as a student in this venerable institution three years ago. Since the eventful day when he was first a freshman. "Senator” has held the respect mid esteem of faculty mid students alike. "Senator" has distinguished himself in four of the main lines of student endeavor, in scholarship he Is among the leaders of his class; in debating his record is among the very best; in politics lie is In his element because of his natural leadership of men: and last, but bv no means least, in the social life of the I'Diversity lie occupies a very prominent position. With his inherent ability, and the I crsevernlice already demonstrated there Is no reason why "Senator" should not win success in whatever line he takes tip. "Patient and persevering work is the only sure key to success.”FKKDFKJCK OSCAK MrKKNZIR. A.It. "Mac” I’ll! Kappa; I’lii Delta Theta . Freshman Debate; Sophomore Declamation; Sophomore Debate; Sophomore J r-elaiiner’s Clip; Junior Oration; Junior Impromptu Debate; Junior Cabinet; Senior of tlie Koiiiul Table; Pres. Phi Kappa; Pres. Thalian Dramatic Club; Yice-Pres. Senate Club; Phi Kappa Key Circle; Debating Council The voice of Ilenrv (irnilv no longer echoes in the historic halls of Phi Kappa Literary Society. Robert Toombs, Alexander II. Stephens, and a host of other eminent Southern speakers have passed on. never again to charm the people with their eloquence and oratorical anility. It is not very often that the I'niversity prndmvs men of such caliber as those, who make up the list of our immortals. Hut every year we are producing, here on our campus, speakers who will sway the political sentiments and public opinion of our future state, lesser satellites of the greater stars that adorn our alumninl firmament. Forensic training is indispensable in making leaders of men. Some years ago, a shrine was creceted to Tlmliiis. Muse of the Dramatic Art. when the T’nf-vensity donned tin: buckskin and founded the Tlmlian Dramatic Club. Fred will long be remembered as an ardent follower and supreme exponent of these two worthy arts, os a inni who takes part in all worthwhile activities, and as a man who, having proved his ability to lead college men. will Ih called to leadership in afterlife. “One glance into a brilliant future. Then hitch your wagon to a star." OSCAK HOMAN MKTIIVIN. JR.. A.lt. "Oscar” Dexter. Cl corgi a. Demostlieninn. L’Alliaue Francaise; .Math Club; Cross Country Team ,2l-'22-,2:t. Oscar has the distinction of being one of the few of whom it may be said. “They never give up." lie blew in from Dexter and there seemed to 1m- ii place waiting for him. He has made a great many friends at Georgia, and has been rather an exception, in that he lias pot tried to tine them politically. Oscar has put in Ins spare time on the Track Team, making the Cross Country Team the last two years, lie has also done excellent work ns ii student ns well as in athletics and wc will no doubt hear great tilings from him in the years to come. NVe must admit, however, that Oscar is quite a ladies man. Luck to you Oscar, old man. We believe that the future has much in store for you. "The thorns tee encounter in life's path only make the roses sweeter.”JAM ICS MOOSKY. A It. “Jim” flnincsville. (Jenigiii. rill Kappa ; Kappa Sigma. Editor-ln-Cliief Georgia Crocker. Contrary to tin prevalent Focal custom. Jim lias lia l no advertising agency in college ex cept his high type of work, which. of itself, is proclamation enough. Forced from schotil by sickness during his second year, lie returned to fiuisli four years work in what amounts to three. At the same time lie has managed to contribute, while etfitor of the flUCKK F. enough time mid effort to be influential in that magazine’s materializing as a first-class college publication. While doing this lie has maintained a standard of scholarship that is among the best. Jim. to his own delight, has acquired the reputation of being .1 radical. Few persons, however. are so gifted with potential mental initiative as to warrant such a complimentary accusation. Jim. then, is to In- inferred, is a little different, and in this raw the departure from the mean is in the direction of superlative ability. I. FAI L MOICKIS. IS.fi. Athens, (icorgla. I hi Kappa; Phi Epsilon 1 1. I an-Ifcllrnir Council. (ieiitlcmrn. we present for your consideration another "local talent" Hiteclmen, Mr. I. I . Morris. Paul came to the Pniversity three years ago and during Ids sojourn lias made finite an enviable record for himself. Kver since he bus been in eollcge he has been a g od student. hut not n hook worm by any means. Wherever he goes lie is generally in a big hurry anil he i.siiiiII.v gets there. He is usually to be wen where least expected and is tin absolute authority ....verytbing evolved fwm Terrell Hull. Iteing of u seientlfie mind, lie lias made a very brilliant reiurd in chemistry. But chemistry Is not the only thing in which he is good; be weilds a tennis raelcet. and is indeed an Imposing speetnde in liis Buiek silan. alt ho. he thus not wear tortoise shell glns-es. Lately it has been noticed that lie is indulging in the theories of Killies us advocated hv Dr. Ilutehinson. This iiinkcs it hard for us to nredirt Ids future but sitin' he is going to follow the medical profession, we know that be will achieve honors in this field wherever he may Iwiag out his sign.CLAItKXCK MAItlOX I'Al'Mi, A.It "Clarence" Tifton. Georgia. lMii Kappa; Kappa Alpha. Alpha l hl Kpsllon; First Lieut. Infantry (nilrlx; Junior Orator ’22; Dehat ins • Council ‘22; (iiamplou Debate. '1‘he man above is probably not as well known on the campus as some others for he has been with us for only two years. Ills face is that of a worker—one who goes out for everything. His battles are won ami lost with good "race, he having long shire learned that it is not the outcome but the fight that counts. Among the personalities much missed at Georgia next year will | c his. for in his short time here he has made a goodly number of close friends, t'larencc intends, we understand, to pursue the study of law at Columbia or Harvard .and from the record that he has made at Georgia it may In safely predicted that his road to the pinnacle of success will be effectively cleared of all obstacles. "Knowledge is uorth nothing unless ice do the good we know." THOMAS lll ltDKM, I»HIXI7, K.S. "Toni" Augusta. Georgia. I’lii Kappa: Chi l .si. Senate Club; l’an-llellenic Council; Regimental Sgt. Major Cadets. .This worthy son of fair Augusta lias been burning with two devouring passions since the mystic veil that hides the wonders and beauties of science, learning, and art from the eager eye of the uninitiated was first dissolved for him by our Cnlversitv. The first of these aspirations—music—has often caused him to turn night into day. and sleepers wrathfuily out of bed in search of an old shoe at the chill quiet hour of four A. M. h.v the sonorous notes of his violin. 'Pom's second line of endeavor lias been mathematics. After a long and exhaustive study he has succeeded in proving false the age-old axiom—"A straight line is the shortest path between two points." lie brought to light this startling fact by discovering it is shorter to go from Athens to Augusta by way of Greenwood. S. C., than by the direct route. Tom 1ms made practical use of his discovery on many occasions. Seriously, we have much we would like to say about you. 'lom. much that could not be said of everyone. Throughout the years that we have known you we have found you a true friend aud a gentleman. We can depend on you. Wherever life may call you we know that then is one thing you will give— your best ! Success to von. Tom. and a finer success than prosperity. "Be serious, giving dignity due respect; confining pleasure to its proper time and place.'DANIKl, MARSHALL l,»U.OCK. A.It. "Polly" Monroe, (icorgin. I’lii Kappa; Sigma Alpha Kpsilon. Freshman C'lnlt; Lieutenant Infantry Cadets Senate. An old philosopher made the statement that a certain personage of the past was "not a man of inches, but every inch a man”: which commentary may be applied aptly to our friend and mutual acquaintance. Marshall Pollock. "Polly" is a student who confines his interests not to his books alone, but combines a hit of the practical, and a bit of the social, with his intellectual pursuits in order to attain that "Ptopia" which he jusly terms "a happy medium." "Polly" has often remarked to his friends that, even though a man compter the world, he is yet. if lie be unable to understand the psychology of a woman's heart, as ignorant of the practical affairs of life as is the most illiterate South Sea Islander. From this statement, my dear rentier, you may properly draw conclusions as to "Polly" ami his attainments with the “fair sex”—observing, attractive, fascinating, ami above all. persevering in his tactics. Marshall Pollock is a true and loyal friend—one who believes that in order to have friends one must be n friend. What greater compliment could be paid to any mnn? "If'hut's north doing at all is north doing well." PARIAN POWKLL. A.It.Kd. "Kv" Nashville. (Seorgia Chi Omega. V. V. C. A. Cabinet. ’23; Vice-President House Council, 23; President Zodiac Club. ’23. Now here is one win would not glitter as tinsel -whose dislike of flattery, whose lack of selfishness, whose love of moderation would prohibit the "trinket lustre" of worldly show. Yet genial, big-sou led. optimistic "Kv" lias not concealed that sterling worth of untarnished character within her. Friendly to all about her. kind, and considerate of others, she has left her impress upon the "co-ed" life of "Ole (Jcorgia." In the rush and whirl of a busy age such a calm spirit is a rarity: and in a commercial age such love of culture and literature just for the “sake of living" is a gift. So we predict for "Kv" a happy future growing out of her happy present and we might paint a picture of her laughing face in the home of a "future professor." About one who desires service rather than fame we had better say nothing else lest we thrust greatness upon her. "Then blow it east or blow it nest The wind that blows, that wind is best."KT11K1, lTKCKLL. A.H.Kd. "El heT . Lnvonin. Georgia. Y. W. C. A. Cabinet: .Math Club; I Alliance Francnise. If you an looking for » conscientious worker. Iu re sin Is! Although she has been with us only one venr slu- has made for herself a very creditable record scholastically. She possesses a very quiet. gentle, ami dignified reserve on first acquaintance, yet she is altogether alert and it requires no "syllogistic" device to prove that she is capable of reflective thought and reasoning. You find her always busy. imster-mnking being her chief pastime, yet slu is never too busy to help a fellow student, especially in .Math, this being her "long suit." Resides being a "math shark'1 she is a speed demon in getting up work. Such perseverity, together with sincerity and absolute dependability load to success in any line undertaken. "Not that you won or lost- but how you played the game." KI TH KAK. A.It.Kd. "Ruth" Augusn. Georgia. Zeta Tan Alpha. Y. Y. C. A. Cabinet. ’2 2: House Council. '21; Women’s Student Government, 21. ’22. "Tim' tangled and twisted the course of true love This ditty explains No tangle's so tangled it cannot improve If the lover lias brains." To use a familiar expression Ruth is a "knock-out!” We cannot help but believe that Georgia will suffer a great loss when Until leaves her sheltering wing. Although Hath seems partial to a very slight degree to the Sigma Chi's, she has always been the best of "buddies" with the brightest smile for everyone. While the words of her mouth and the meditations of her heart are not always generally known, they are always acceptable in our sight, mid we n.-e ready to give her the "hurrah" any day. ;kok ;k iiokaci; kiimsway. a.k.s.s. . “Montague" Jtoyston, (ieorgin. Deiiiostlienian; Sigma Nu. Among the vast tliniju «f freshmen who came to the I’niversity in UI1S. a certain young ln l was to be noticed lor his marked ability to get by” with tilings. The most casual observer Could readily detect that this man was destined to become one of the best "mixers” in the class. And they were not mistaken for “Montague" in his career at the I'niversity has known and made many more real friends than the average student. If. as Mr. Peabody put it. "I'diteration is numbered by the number of frictionless points of contact with the greatest number of persons." then we may truly say that "Montague” is an educated youth, lie is what may really be culled a "regular fellow.” Durng his stay at tlcorgia lie has applied himself diligently to his work, and his success attained hen is a fair index to what it will la when he gest out of school. "Montague.” may you always keep and develop that winning disposition, for i.f you do, the world will be yours. "There arc two sides to every street.” AXfiKLYX SASNKTT. A. It. S. S. "Anne” Atlanta. Georgia Zodiac. Chi Omega. Treasurer Zodiac Club. ’2!-'22; Secretary Y. YY. C. A. ’2l-’22; Y. Y. C. A. Cabinet '22.’2». Anne is so indifferent that she can keep a secret. Of course this does not sound reasonable, but who wants to be reasonable when a woman is concerned? After breaking in Y. IV. ( . A. Cabinet. House Coveruineut. Pioneer. Zodiac, and a few other organisations. Anne very calmly decided that the greatest achievement of them all was to look like she never heard them, hence the frivolous air. Don’t let it fool you—she knows enough to keep it u secret, which after all is a greater honor than a ring of Phi Heta Kappa keys. “The world is so full of a number of things, I’rn sure we should all be as happy as kings.”MAIJION DAVIS SICAHOKN. Jr.. A.It. “Uncle Hud" • Atlanta. Georgia. Demos! Iieniaii. Graduating from Hoys' High in 1010 Davis (In-idnl to try his collegiate fortune at tin T’uiversiry. For four years he has been a familiar figure on the campus. trotting In ami out of the library with huge piles of hooks, ami ever seeking someone to assist him to supimrt Pop I nlike most of us. he has succeeded in finding a place in which to while away die evenings, ami several times during the week he can be seen boarding a car ns if he were going ;o visit someone. We are set to wondering. Il« seems to have conceived a strange desire to wander about a bit. and we should not he surprised to encounter him some day among the South Sea Isles placidly smoking a Chesterfield and nbsorbcdly perusing his inevitable Saturday lOvciiiug Post, lie is not m foolish as to be satisfied with most conditions, nor does he succumb to all the rigors of current convention. “The worst of failures is the man who foils because he can't think fast enough” CAROLYN SIMS. A.H.S.S. “Bib” Ainericns. Georgia. Plii Mu. After three years at the Normal School, Hib eame to Georgia. full of "pep" i everything. Her few vears of confinement did nothing towards stunting her growth III the line of attractions I She has only to whistle and the whole anti entire Delta house is at her feet. Were I to enumerate her in am virtues I would be writing till doomsday, but such an epistle is not necessary, for she Ims radiated about her such a prism of sunshine ami personality that even "Goats" cannot resist the magnetism. We an proud of her and we are sure that some day. ages hence, someone will be saying. "Hib? Yep—Hib from Georgia 1 "Pleasure fills our youthful years, Drop study if it interferesMAKY KMZARKTH SIMS, AM S.S. "Mary" Amorims, (i corgi a I’lii Mu. Vice-President Women's Student Government; If the earth wore turning over, IM turn to Mary. If Salvation depended on me, l l depend on .Mary. If something must be done. And i must select the one WhoM (lot it well for fun. I’d xeleet .Mary. So "• C. A. Cabinet. " ho gives the world her best? Mary— " hose truth has stood the teat? "’by Mary's— M hose heart is ever bound In the friendships she lias found? M ho’s our very "best nll-nrotind"? IV hy Mary. {('eve joys and sorrows every day, ‘grin and bear it come u hat may." JOSKI'll I.eCONTK TALLKY, It. s "Red" Macon. Georgia. Second Lieutenant 0. It. (’.; Diogenesuiu Club. Talley decided in high school that he needed a little higher "prep training, so he spent one of his high school years at Mercer. Realizing at the end of the year its total inadequacy, he made n still worse mistake and spent two years at Georgia Tech. At last he found the error his way and came to the I'niversitv for the two first years of his college training. Talley -has been seriously hr.ndicnptiod since his arrival here on accouut of the fact that he spent his first year in our midst at the Y. M. ( A. He has overcome, however, all those almost iiiaurinoiitnhle obstacles, and has made Old College a "regular" inmate, lie is a man ot many accomplishments- a dreamer, who has not made dreams his master; a Ford mechanic who knows Chaucer and how to run a hog farm; and on top of it all he is red-headed. Can one imagine a more heterogeneous individual? They say he frequents as often as the matrons will |K rimt. a certain young ladies' institution down at Milledgeville. And we can sec his finish, llut no matter whether lie travels in double or single harness he will get there just the same. We’re for him.KDWIN THOMAS. A.It. "Doctor" Josup. (imirgiu. Dcmostheninit; l i Kappa |»|ii. rivshman Impromptu Debate; Junior Cabinet; Captain Cavalry Cadets; “Tlie Cliainpinn Alternate «,f the I’niverslfy' ; Scabbard and Itlade; Senior Bound rable: Mdrux I'rencli I'ri .e ’22; Associate Kditor Bandura; Student Instructor in the Department of Koniance Bnnguagex; 1‘lii Itela Kappa. Here is the ‘tMtumpion Alternate of tin- I’niversity !" In the short period of three years that it hastaken l-'dwin to attain his decree he has won more alternate's places than lias am-ether man in Ccnrgia's long history. Imbued with a certain degree of versatility lie has made an enviable record at the 1‘niverslty. lie has stood for three years among the very highest in scholarship, and besides has found time to participate in the varied branches of college life. His success at (Jeorgla might he attributed to his apparent motto. "No chcrchcz pas la femme." Jf success is for those who work, he lias already sue -ceded. I! departs from the I nlvcrsity leaving a record to In copied—a versatile worker and a friend worth having. “ have no pholosophy oj life. II'hat is it all about anyway?" KOBKBT IIIUTK TW1TTY. A ll. "hob" Bclliam. Ceorgia. I’lii Kappa; Alpha Tan Omega. Any of us who complain of getting such a short vacation might envy Boh. who returned to the I'liiversity last September after an extended vacation of about five years. I!«• was renliv hcre during the last summer school, hut that was only a fitting climax to his lung vacation. Yes. Bob attended the summer school despite the fact that he hates women in general, co-eds in particular, and is a paid-up member of the IMogenesinu flub. Bob says living in the city with all its bright lights and pool rooms never has appealed to him. And as soon as In gets his goatskin he will flee to tin- southern sands of l-'hirida. where lie experts to attain fame b.v crossing tlie hickory and grapefruit trees, thus obtaining an orange that won't split when one tries to suck it. I’erhans he inherits this trait of itcrsistcney iroiu Ills great ancestor lloliert Bruce. Buck to you. Hub. "You’ll never find anything unless you arc looking for something."SAMI Kl, LAMAKTINK VAKNKIMK. A B. “Sam" Savannah. Georgia, ritl Kappa; ( hi IMil. , Sudrut Council; JVIIran C'luli; Senate. Gentlemen, wo have liorr in this young Apollo of Savannah a peculiar combination. Not content with imsscsing tiio symmetry of form ami grace of a (irooian athlete, the eloquence of Demos then ok and sagacity of a Theophrastus, he has of late developed the political ability of Lloyd George and the generalship of Napolean. As a politician and organizer of vhe •'Democratic Party” of ”(»« orgia.” Sam was a knock-out -hut we will have to hand it to him in passing as being a mini who is willing to stand up for his convictions and who will champion any cause lie thinks is right, no matter what the odds are in regard to its success. Sam has ever been popular ns a ten-houud ami athlete, lie has mixed in all of the fraternity encounters, and they sny in Savannah that he is as much at home on the raging mailt as In is in a drawing room. If lie maintains the same consistency of pur|M»se and determination to do the light thing regardless of results, he will succeed, no matter where he goes. The best of Jack to .von. Sam ! KICKIN' VOGT, 1I.S. “E" Atlanta. Georgia. Demos! lie iilan. Junior Cabinet. jjero’s to siv feet of blonde-haired noiielialrtiice. Klkiu Vogt is an alumnus of Day’s High, where lie made his murk both as a student and us an athlete, being a short-stop on their baseball team and a star end in football. At the I'niverstiy lie lias made an excellent record in nil of Ins work, making Junior Cabinet, lie has done such exceptional work in tin ’ .oology department that In has been made an assistant. Vogt is quiet, good uatured, friendly, a man of the highest ideals, and n knockout with the Indies, though lie will not admit it. In suite of a disposition to rove there is without a doubt a great future before this young mail. His plan, al present, is to take up the study of medicine. Luck to yon, old man. We believe in you and expect to hear from von in the future. ‘7 takes clothes to make the woman, but all that is necessary to make a man is a derby.” I •IOSKPII I1KNKY Y. I-KKR. .III., It. S. "Henry" M'liirm1. (Jeorgin. . Hil Kappa; Sigma Alpha Kpsilon. Freshman Club; Scabbard and Blade; Lieuteuant Cavalry Cadets "Buttermilk. sweet milk, skim off the cream. Monroe. Monroe----------— — -----------------■” The crowu was tense with excitement ns our "friend to be." “Cloy" Walker of Walker l nrk. Jeorgin. led the .Monroe boys in a rousing cheer for Ins "prep" team. This was many years ago when he was a lover of all forms of activities which tended to show manhood and poweross; today, hardened bv four years of college WORK, he prefers Indoor sports and the parlor couch to any form of outdoor avocatin. Our friend "Walk"—we say our friend, for he divides all people into two classes, friends and enemies—is a man of many sterling ipialities. lie would make an excellent bill collector, a good Knglish student, a fair husband, and a superb "John Altlcn." .1. Henry often mutters to himself, "I may not be good looking, and I mny not be brilliant, but I lu i»e some day to make a success of life- didn’t Ceftsar and Cromwell make their lives immortal under similar handicaps?" "Charm wins the sight, but merit wins the soul.” MARY 01 1 VK WIIITKIIKAI). B.S. “Molly-0" Atlanta. (Jeorgin. Phi Mu. President of (iirls House Council ’23; Chairman of Publicity Committee Y. V. C. A. '22. Poise and grace, a true artistic sense, eleurness of thought and bigness of heart are com bined in "Mally-O." She is always ready for a frolic and yet is sometimes denied indulgence because the judgment that has obtained for her offices of responsibility, leads her to do unto others as she would have others do unto her. Who can think of "Molly-O" without bringing to miud the nuemernus little surprising, but pleasing, traits that make up her character. A distinct aversion for "hot dogs" is one of the most noticeable of these, but even this may be overcome with patience. Molly-O aspires to the professional world. Hcres to you. all success—yet we wonder, ran the world be so blind to charm ! "Ah, but a ‘man's reach should exceed his grasp. Or, what’s a heaven lor?”ALSA mcOWN W11 1.1 AMS. .JU.AU “A. ur A rgyle. Georgia. Dcmostltenian; Alpha Tan Omega. L Allhtiice Fruncaise; Freshman Club; Mandolin Club 22. The 1'nivorsity of (inirxiu euu bo rightly judged only by referring to the graduates who have passed from under her protecting cart . NVe can honestly say that we are glad to be judged by such a si a ml art 1 ns "A.ll." Having be‘ n in cliuu1 association with him for four years, we have come to love ami resjK ct him. not because of any publicity or small honor notoriety but because by his words and actions he has always shown himself to be a gentleman and proven liimself to be a true friend. Fully realizing bis purpose in coining to Georgia, his efforts have Wen directed to the aecmuplishment of that end. anti is needless to say that he has been successful. Now he would not many a fair lady could testify, or as you would vouch for yourself if you could listen to the give you the idea that A. 15.’ is a book-worm. No. indeed ! His is no one-sided nature as sweet music of his violin. In parting, our best wishes aecompuny you. nnd may your future success be as real and as satisfying as your life has been within these hallowed walls. "There can be no truly happy life devoid of work and friends." DAVID AVKKS CODLINGS. .lit.. A.M. "Dave" Atlanta. Georgia. Phi Kappa; Clil I’lii. Club; Football Team ’ l0-"20-’2l-'22; President of Y. M. C. A.; President of Senate Club; Senate Club: Secretary-Treasurer Pan-Hellenic Council;; Secretary-Treasurer of "Cl” Club; tine Club; Captain Tennis Team 21. The biographer for this man has a rather difficult task in view of the fact that everyone that has heard of "Georgia” during the past four years has heard of ■'Dave" Col lings. Like Achilles was famous for his heel. "Dave" is famous for his toe,—unlike Achilles, whose weakness was in tiie back part of his foot. "Dave’s" ability with his toe has made him famous. On the footbnll field he lias been a wondrous piece of hard-scrapping material. Many are the times when our hero's dependable toe has sent the pigskin hurtling from the shadow of “Georgia’ ” goal |lost far buek into the enemy’s territory. Truly his punting is a wonder to behold. Not only has "Dave" served his Alma Mater faithfully on the Gridiron, bat as a student.—well, A. M. after his name testifies to bis ability as a student. "Dave" Georgia will certainly miss you when the next scholastic year rolls around. "Strive and see if you can always be a gentleman."History of the Senior Law Class E TIME has come when wc are soon lo he numbered as one of those many illustrious classes which have passed out from these classic halls into the stern realities of a new life. Eventful has been our journey, crowded with trials and pleasures. But now that we approach the end we forget the rough places and the hard pulls, and re-member only the pleasant associations. It is with a feeling of sadness that we spend the few remaining days among familiar scenes and old friends, 3nd realize ihat soon we are to be thrust out into untried conditions among strangers. But we are made of firm stuff, and as we have withstood the storms and vicissitudes of college days, so will we withstand the difficulties in the future. It is a difficult task to write the history of the Law Class of ‘23. We have not a normal and commonplace record of the three years of uninterruptions and varied experiences. Most of us served our country in uniform. Some of our number have faced the Hun on the battle field, and some have sailed the submarine infested seas. Others, less fortunate, were kept on this side. Our ranks were increased by the return of those of us who were absent from their studies fop one and two years on account of the military service. We thank the class of '18 and 19 for giving us these men. “Well done, thy good and faithful”, can be fittingly applied to the entire class of ’23. However, as historian, who again for the third time writes the class history, I will deviate from my fixed policy of never indulging in personalities, to applaud the exceptionally good work of the following class leaders:—Harold Kassowitz, Enoch Wilkerson, John Wilcox, Howard Poole and Jimmy Hill. Yes, wc believe we arc an exceptionally good class. Our members rank high in the class rooms and on the athletic fields, in the debating halls and at the editors desk. In short we lay claim to diversity in our activities. We have among us some who have drunk deep of the classics; others who have delved into the mysteries of science; and some who have trained themselves for business and financial fields, but these things only represent a part of our preparation for the great study of the learned profession of law, which at last, we have at least, in part conquered. Nevertheless our work is not over, so wc will make our way in the world. Not all of us will become famous, but wc trust that some of the members of the class are not to l e denied the highest honors of achievement. We believe that the Class of 1923 will reflect honor on old Georgia and some day we hope our dear old Alma Mater will point to us with pride and say:— “These are my children with uhom I am well pleased."Senior Law Class Officers J. W. McWhirter T. H. Cooley •.. G. W. Chambers J. E. Wilcox ... ... President Vice-President , .. . Historian . .. . ChaplainISylvan us Morris, 1}. L. I.L.B. Dean oj Lumpkin Law SchoolCOUPON WORTH CII.YMDKKK. 1,1,1). "Pick" • Augusta, (icorgin. Sigma Delta Kappa; Phi Kappa; Henry V. (irmly Speaking (Mali; Judicial Order of Advocates; President of Henry Y. (irady Speaking Club; Class Historian Three iears; President of Judlelal Order of Advocates; American legion; Y. M. ('. A. Here we have Cordon Chambers, legal friend, conversationalist, hard worker, a good student, writer, soldier, leader, and a gentleman of the highest type. One can not mistake Ills husiaess-like figure as he strolls across the campus. He has hung closely to the Law Duildiiig. worked busily, talked fluently, and mastered eltoice intricacies of the Jaw. "Pick" deserves much praise because in the short space of three years he has risen from being a "target” of Dr. Morris to the very high and exalted position of his "right hand man." "Pick" has no marked peculiarity, except the ability to see far into the future of the realistic and idealistic world. He is not only a scholar, idealist ami hard worker, but is an exemplifying type of manhood that our Alma Mater is always proud to call her own. “ is easier to find fault, than to br faultless.” L.WYKKNTK DOFOLAS COOK. LL.lt. “Cookie” Atlanta, (ieorgia. Sigma Nil. . . Henry V. Crady Club; Phi Kappa; Freshman Club. From an errand boy in the office of the Secretary of State, his father. “Cookie" became a worthy applicant to the noble Justinian Order in the fall of 1010. Fiiassmning and unforgetful of little kindnesses, lie has unconsciously established in the minds of his co-laborers in legal lore his ipinlidos of dependability, honesty, and trustworthiness, as well as an ever present strain of real optimism which says. “Since others have been suceesfiil. what reason have I for failureV" Many are the times that the mighty “Sylvie" has challenged the legal strength of our “Cookie." but in each instance lie has been thrown back to his third line of defense, and such is the “jurisprudential” inake-up of our hero. In statue he wears the hoots of the mighty Stevens and we call expect from him. also, achievements worthy of the praise and admiration of the I.'uiversity and the Kinplrc State. "Give every man your ear, but feu thy voice.” JTHOMAS 11AYKS COOLLY. LL.lt. "Judge" Klhertnn, (Sporxin. , , , I’ll Kappa. •lolfcrsoiiiuu; Henry firmly; I’lii Delta I l»i; Couiisclers i'liili; ITesident of lleury (•rally; I resident of Jefferson inn; Yice I’resident of (lie Junior Law Class. Three years ago "Judge." bavin been reliably informed that a eertnin "Silvy" was the fountain head of h gnl knowledge. departed from Klberton with a longing fur precepts with which to secure unto his fellow citizens their rights and incidentally win for himself eminence and iiide)K»ndenee. Soffits it to say that lie has acquitted himself exi-ellently in the acquisition of said precepts. His greatest asset is a smile which never leaves his face unless some technicality of the law reduces his mark to US or UU. which it is seldom able to do. Companioned by his law book and inevitable smile lie looks without envy on all the world. He is the youngest captain in the I’nited States Army, lie has selected his partner from tin first year law class, and. Judge, we are assured that you will explore the most lofty peaks of your chosen profession. "Work, live I he truth, let your defeats be your stepping stones, then you are the master of success." CYIll’S WKXT FIKLDS. LL.B. uCy" Rome, (ieorgia. Dcnioslhenian; Sigma Delta Kappa. Judicial Order of Advocates; I'arliainentarian of Dcmostlienian; Henry Y. (irmly Speaking Club. "Cv" besides being a good all round fellow and student is a veritable sponge of information. Anything that pertains to the records of the world’s affairs or the legal works arc his specialties. lie has a faculty for legal absorption, and the three years that lie has spent here have develops! him verj fully on the jurisprudence of the I’lilted States and of (irent Britain. "( y is a good compniiioii and you would not find a better fellow if you were to search for years, lie is one of the most popular men in the Law School. Converse! If he has a fault it is neglecting to do something for a conversation. lie is a hard worker and has a determination to succeed, lie is ambitious to achieve the highest judicial |H»sition in the gift of the people, and if In shows the spirit as a graduate that In has exhibited here, he will sit with honor on the highest tllionc .»f confidence. “H'hen my dog and mother die, my friends are gone"I GKOKGR GKIFI’IN F1NCII. IX.H. "G Square" Atlanta. Georgia. Dcinosllieiiiaii; l i K |»|il Fill. •Junior Oration; Sigma Delta Kappa; Sophomore Declamation; l-'rrslunan Impromptu Dehate; See.-Treas. of Senior l.aw Class; N ice President Freshman Club; Ailv. lgr. Thai Ians; Square anil Compass Club; American legion; Demostlieuiau Key; •Jeffersonian; Henry V. Grady Speaking Cluh; Auniversaiian Speaker; .Jmlirial Order of Advocates; Captain Old College Football Team. ”He was the mddest ltonian of them all." And like the great Homan. 'Tie caine. lie waw. he conquered.” This is to inform the few who do not know the distinguished record of thii gentleman from Fulton County. Coming to us three years ago from the army, not a meek freshman, he has ascended to the ethereal heights of a noble scholar. His averages have been the dispair of competitors. "G-Square" is a smasher of “idols." a seorner of the sensual, always against the vulgar, he has stuck the gaffles of truth deep into the sides of wrong, and exposed crookedness whenever he found it. "G-Xquare" is a man to write about, requiring more span than the jealous editors will grant, but we will say that simple faith is his armor plate, honesty his shield, and truth his sword. Hunting words came from his tongue, scorching and branding every fraud. "Think less of your trouble and how you got into it, and more how to grj out of it." IIAKYKY DIXON GKIITTN. 1J,.H. "Griff" Haxley. Georgia. Deiiinstlicniaii; Pi Kappa Phi. Ilenry Y. Grady Speaking Society; Track Team; Counsellors; Senate Club; Glee Club; President of .Jeffersonian l.aw Society; J’esrado Club. While lie has made no unusual record during his five years at Georgia. Harvey is perhaps •me of the best all-round men in college. P.eing a good student. :i good boxer, a good singer, a good track man. a good imol shot, or in brief a good fellow in general, his activities have b» en many and he has done well in them all. Now unlike the majority of the class we do not predict for Harvey n brilliant future. He is one of the few among us who is not destined to Ih great, in all probability be will be a "jack leg" lawyer down in Haxley. Georgia, where the i cople have already started to calling him colonel. There lie will marry, settle down, raise a large family, prosper in a small way. and then die. Hut we’ll bet that he will always have the friendship and respect of his neighbors, ns he has done np hero. And what is gnatcr than that? "To make bad things good, and good things better."EKNKST JOHN HANK. I.LB. “t . jr Savannah. Georgia IMii Kappa; Sigma Nu. Thalia ns ’21 and '2i; Vice President of Tlialianx 2»; Kuslnesx Staff Georgia Cracker '21 and 22; Freshman Club. All hail tho boy from Savannah-. and among our host appears Earnest John Hanr. E. .T. came to the Cnivotsity in the fall of 11120. after having completed his prep career at (Ivor-gia Military Aeudeiny. His genial iKusonnlity ami ready smil. x have won for him many friends and wherever known he is genuinely liked. Though not exactly an A-l’lus student, he has delivered the goods. We f ol confident that if lie can convince a Jury as easily as he can obtain an affirmative answer from the fair »ex. his success Is assured. A lion In deliberation, a lamb In persona! dealings, as firm ns the mountain base, rs persistent us the ocean waves that come ceaselessly to the jagged cliffs, that's “K. .1." These and other descriptions; still you haven’t heard the half of it. flood luck to you K. .1. “Knowledge is better than weapons oj uar." KKNKST CLIFFORD HOGAN. LLU. “£. cr Stonewall. Georgia. Dcinoslhenhu Jeffersonian; Henry NV. Grady Club; Sigma Delta Kappa; Track Team 20.’22. 2:1; Judicial Order of Advocates; Georgia Cracker Staff 22-’2‘.l; Solicitor--General Jeffersonian .Moot Court. Deltoid the “Hx-Senator from the 'Old Ninth ” G. M. of Campbell County, lie won this appellation by his siuvexstul debates while in high school, and that same argumentative disposition lias remained with him throumit his college career. At all times he seeks to convince others that his viiws are correct, and he usually does It. for one genrallv concede he is right after hearing him argue any imint. His success in convincing other lies in the fact that he is always careful to choose the right side of a controversy. It is predicted that he will continue this practice as a lawyer and bennne the most formidable advocate of Campbell County' illustrious sous. Let the girls of Fayetteville. Ga., take notice of this fact. “Do as adversaries do in Inn strive mightilyt but eat and drink together as friends."hdwaud viii'Mi howakd. llb. “Uncle Him" Stephens, fSeonria. I’lii I si|»i :«: Kappa Sigma. Henry V. (irmly Speaking Society; Jeffersonian -Moot Court; President Junior Law Class; Counsellors; Freshman Club; G. .M. ('. Club. An iiispeetion of Veil's lionors shows that he has been thoroughly inbred with the importance of legal matters. This examination. continued still further, reveals in his philosophy of life mi even greater sat illation with law. These observation show Ned's likes are as they should be. lor after his graduation in .lime, his intention Is to prnetiee law—in Stephens, presumably. A write-up for this gentleman. “Ned." “I'tiele Dim". or "B. Y. as he is variedly known by his many friends, seems herdly ne ,cssni v—lie is too noteworthy a figure to In so summarily considered. Withal, it seems unfair to be eoinpellml to write the hnekno.ved expression "Mr. Howard is a perfect gentleman.” His demeanor proves his gcnt’cmnnlincss much lietter than we can e er hope to io l»y mere words. “A good judge decides fairly. preferring equity to strict lau'." HOY SBXTON JONHS. LL.lt. "Roy" Col I go Park. Georgia. Phi Kappa; Jeffersonian; Phi Delta Theta Thalian Club; Pelican Club; Phi Delta Phi; One Club; (dee Club; Senate Club; "Georgia Knur”: I-carter of I'nivcrsity Bulldog Orchestra; President of Glee Club; Vice-President Jeffersonian laiw Society. rime was. when young romantic lovers wmmrt and won their ladles by singing ‘neath their windows. It is a good thing that I toy didu t live in those days for methinks there would have been much need for laws against polygamy! Ilis indifference toward the fair sex has saved many a broken heart! Hoy is the exemplar of American youth. Itecklrss. genial, carefree and democratic, and yet with a spirit that never -ays die. In appearance a young god. with all the gifts a god can bestow, and yet wiili a great lovable nature that makes him just Hoy. lie doesn't take himself seriously. He doesn't take life seriously, lie lavishes his gifts freely. and offers Ills hand to all. An athlete, musician, speaker, and actor—and yet lie makes light of his own aecoinplishinuts. There is no ego in |{ov. Yet few jieopV know the real Koy. He has ideals and ambitious which he cherishes ami follows with unusual sincerity and perseverance. A host of staunch friends are expecting him to be a scintillating star in the legal world of the coming generation.||. ltO|,| KASSKWITZ. 1-1. 1C. Ceissy" I-'itZK« ri l«l. (iitirKia. • ‘I'i l lil K|isil»n. - ('omisrllors; Tlwl ns; l .in Hellenic riiunril; IVm;uI« ( lull. Kji.vm- ciif« » 4wl I !»« 1’iilvorsiiv admitlodly tin ln-st x nki'r fn'iii amniic the 1Viisli S« U«voIk of Iii - Srjin .’ I is«t«n naoj? • •«“ superficial honors which Kraviluio («• m« ti who distinguish ihw«« lvi K in f« r iisic «•»»• • l«»s. In Iiis attention |«» muiv profitable fidilx « f endeavor. I i «tu» st humbly i h % Ix’ t actor in c-ollejje. he eutph• '« «I Iiis talent to Imx-uuu not tin Piesideiit. but ltu Hu«4uoss Monogger of (In 'I'Juiliaiis. - it result. tin Tlinlitnis iMijuvnl tin most sunvssful year in their liixfory nii«f tin most profitable. Quito ensually 1m devoted a hit « f his otlu r vis tinu t«« (lie xliidy of I n w". with (l:ix iv.miII—as in nil of lit activities Kassy eatne out tin hig winner. I f,. will east ly top Iiis el-iss unless «» »«• iiiiihii tin ■‘students' in I.aw Sclesd slip by him by a fntlt of •» tfilth of a point. “Our u-fioie life is tike a play" (•ii. i;m:s aictiutc i.icwis. iam. "(0rnreyanr IkiWMin, Kappa. ■ 'in ivappa. •fcfrri soiiiiin; Henry V. fni(ly Club; Sphinx; (Sriilircnt; Senior Uuuml Table; (‘aunsrllum; Square and oip|K»sn Club; Cosmopolitan Club; General Set . V. M. C. A.; A'. |. ('. _ . Cahfnel. ’22. 2:1; Champion Debate. 22; IntereolleRiate Do-hnlo '22; Winner Orator’s .Medal. 22; Senior Impromptu Debate; 2:1 Anniversarlan; Cracker Staff; Captain Cadet Corps; Dili Kappa Key Cotmeil. ‘7 5rr f ir ont approve it too, - Condemn the wrong., and yet the it rang pursue,"WILLIAM IIOWAUI) MKWIHM'KNK, B. S. LL It. “Sailor” Elbcrton. Georgia. I’lii Kappa; Sigma Nu. . 1‘lii Della l hi; Vice-President Student Council: Pan-Hellenic Council; Senate Club; Glee Club 21. ’22. '22: Associate lied and Black; Editor-in-Cliief-Bleet Ked and Black; Square and Compass. “Sailor" came to the University two years apt as n graduate of the I'niversitv of Virginia. Prior to his school days ai Virginia the "Sailor" was a student for a spell at Mercer. School life ill these various institutions has Riven this man a broad viewpoint which is noticed by his associates in his every action. Ilis record here speaks for itself. Within a few weeks after his entrance in the Ciiivcrsity of Georgia his delightful personality had pierced practically every man on the campus. Immediately he begun to lake part in almost every student activity until today he is a man to be figured in every organization. When we say that the “Sailor" is a man. we mean a man in the full sense of the word. Ilis untiring energy together with his strength of character are sure to lend him to success. "Live and let live" JOHN WALTON .McWHIKTKK. LL B. "Mac" Koyston. Georgia. Deuiostliriilan; Kappa Siga Freslnnan Club; Pan-llellenie Council; Senate Club; President of Senior l«i v Class; Peseado Club; Henry W. Grady Speaking Club; Jeffersonian .Moot Court. “Mae”, our honored president, is truly a man born to honor wed. There is something about this steady, conscientious, hard-working individual which commands the love and respeet of his fellow creatures—such n man is “Mai-”, as we affectionately know him. Although, taking law. and hailing from Koyston. the two greatest handicaps that could he placed on a Freshman entering this grand old I’niversity. "Mac" has shown himself "fit to fight" and has surmounted these and other obstacles that have been thrown in his pathway until now he finds himself ready to fly away from the top rung of the ladder of collegiate legal attainment to make his way in Georgia’s Temples of .Justice. "Wisdom lias often sought me. Hut I scorned the love she brought me. My only books have been woman's looks. And folly is all she has taught me.■I HOW .MU) POOL, LL.lt. 7T Duculn, Georgia. Demosfhruian. Sigma Della Kappa (Legal); Jeffersonian; Henry V. Grmly Speaking Club; , Agricultural Club; Economics Society I1II0.2O; Impromptu Debate; Viee-Pres-iilent Deinostlienian; Judicial Order of Advocates; Secretary Debating Council; Proctor New College. The Danila. Georgia K. I'. I . carrier lias lust n good custom r, and a goud southern cotton picker has been milieu, but. s be it. the legal profession will profit thereby. "II" came to iis in the fail of ’I!) from the lecture platform, after having many times held the unlettered minds in gaping awe as words of wisdom trickled from his immortal lips. After completing one year of academic work lie heard the call for better lawyers and became a disciple of ••Sylvie." Itesides being a consistent student "H" has developed into a smooth politician. If we were to predict, we would mark his destinies unparalleled in noble achievements. A leader of men. a thorough and consistent worker, confident in his ability, we are compelled to predict for him a brilliant enreer in the practice of his chosen profession. "Truth is as strong as death; jealousy is us cruel us the grave.” J.VWKS It M.I'll ItOSSKIt. LL.lt. "Ted" 1mFayette, Georgia. Deniostliciiian Sigma Delta Kappa (la-gal); Ag. Club; Jeffersonian; Henry V. Grady Speaking Society; Freshman Club; Campus Club; Itasebull Team ’2:1; President of Jeffersonian; Vice-President of the Senior Law Class; Delia!ing Council; Vice-President Deinostlienian. To "Ted", Walker County can well . 011111111 her reputation, lie pledged his affiliations in the study of law for three years, and has bravely marched down the battle-alloy, under the fire of the l nlt ‘i'ies of "Sylvie ' ; surviving, but battle scarred. As a student, he has earned commendation. Consistent in study, loyal in interest, and able in prepatodnos ; lie is rewarded in scholarship, imiitlcnl achievement, literary and social prominence. For "Georgia", in athletics, ho lias pln c | the game like a true sportsman, if downed, never out. From the pn-ss. we contemplate consulting "Dosser on Injustice." In truth, we see "Ted", n man conscientious, painstaking, ami loyal to duty; and when our college days arc but memories, we look to see your ambition materialise, your name linked with eminence, and your life a monument. "If we are right we do not dread criticism from others.”I I.YSSKS VXSCO STWCII.I,. 1.1. It. "SlancUr ICustuHollec, ; .rgiu. . Dcinnstlicninii. Jeffersonian Debating Society; Henry XV. Hrady. Stanclll cn.nc silently nut f the mountains ami has remained silently with us. ehnrueter-i .ed by the simplicity and rugged honesty of North Hcurgiii's granite hills. In a straight-forward mnmicr. never varying a hair's breadth I nun his concept Ions of right. lie has fought his way very creditably through four years if college, ||, js „ strange mixture of obstinacy, determination. and perseverancea inai seemingly forever serious, yet with a keen sense of humor; good. but far from ecclesiastic. lie has created his own opportunities in life, and has used them well. Mis story is a book well begun ; may the remaining chapters follow in climaetle order! “ choose l.he course I think is right uml press forward regardless of what people say or think." ;koim;i : ii.xkdx tki-.xdwki.i.. i.l.il "Crepe" Atlanta. Ceorgia. I’ld Ivanna: Chi INI. Henry XV. (iracly S|K jiltiilK Club; 1 1 1 Delta I’lil; l an Hellenic ('ouiicil; Senate ('lull, "(’repe" after traveling all ever the country decided that Ceorgift was tile place of his choice, lie paid Heorgin a three-yiar visit, finding "Silvio” Morris his host. Did you enjoy your visit? Someone asked. lie replied. “Well—you can argue pm and eon.” Von wouldn't exactly call this young gentleman a woman hater for he is in a perfect love triangle, lie seems to be against the saying "Love triangles end up in wrecked angles." A grand prize lias been offered to the one who catches (Jeorge not telling iti new joke, strange to say his new jokes possess a peculiar ability for breaking up “bull sessions." (Jeorge is the kind of a man we all admire, lie possesses the ipinlities which constitutes ft real gentleman. His many friends are wondering if he intends to make money off other people s ••troubles." In whatever you undertake Hcorge we wish you success. We will miss you. luck to you "Crepe." “Smile and soon another smile, and soon there are miles and miles of smiles."(il.KNN CIIKATIIAM TVSON. LL.II. “Mir Darien. Crorgin. Phi Ka| | ;i; Lambda (’III Alpha. Jeffersonian; Henry Lrady Club. Kill is only half "(Jw'diw" for in eomes from Darien. if you know when that is. You'll lecoguiy.e it if you drive up so that tin telephone • !«■ won't obstruct your view. Mill is a veteran of the S. A. T. ( . days. and lie says Athens is a better place to live in than Karlen. You wouldn't believe it. but Mill is m love, and when June conies we're all hoping to have the pleasure of congratulating him twice—once for his "dip" and once for ‘‘Sid.’ With his disposition a liian could win any girl. He is a bit «pii t at times, but tin; “Flying Squadron" has nothing on him when he is "not quiet." "Judge.” your future is as bright as the sun. and we know you’li represent us in Washington before many moons. Keep up the good fight, and the best of hick I yon. “Things, ivilhout remedy should he nil haul regard; tehat's done is done.'' JOHN HKNICST WILCOX. LL.lt “Judge" Croenville. South Carolina. I'lii Kappa. Henry W. (Jrady Speaking Club; Jefferson .Moot Court; American Legion. Ladies and (•eutleinen. before you smiles the beaming countenance of one of the lenders of the Senior Law (’lass of the Lumpkin Law School. In 11117. when I’ucle Sam blew his trumpet. "Judge” wax one ot the four millions who answered it. and as a result, his legal islm ation was a trifle delayed. While a hit eccentric. Judge eai. always be counted on to "hold the knowledge of law", which gave rise to the saying, "when in doubt, ask Judge Wilcox !" Since the beginning of the year. "Judge" has had the benefit of an excellent guardian, in .Mc In iter. srlf-apiNiintcd. And under "Mac’s” able guidance we look for "Judge” to smile day occupy a seat on ti„. Supreme Court of these old I'nited States. .MeWhirter is strung on this ’.Me and 1 mi" stuff with the Judge. It being big me MeWhirter) mid little you (“Judge"). “It is heller lo be, thun In seem to be."KNOCII HOOD WILKKKSON, LD.lt. “Squire" Cutlibert. Georgia. Ueniastlieninii; I’lii Della I'lii (Inlenialional 1 egal). •Jeffersonian; llenry W. Grady Speaking Club; Student Council; Counsellor's Club; President of Hie •Jeffersonian Debating Society; President. Henry Grady Speaking Club. Fresh from the inferno of the Argoime. a battle scarred veteran of the famous "Jtainbow” Division, and haunted by his envious dreams of “ItiutscH” and “Taft". "Squire's” ambition was fired to study law. Ills first ideal materialized. when, robbing the ltible of all its love he won unto himself a helpmate. Determined, he mounted the task, visualizing a student's duty, lie utilized the opportunity, and meritoriously, has lie won. Once 7.”». and oh! hew disgraced! Never again below OS. Truth reveals the real man. He is an honor man in scholarship: n leader of men : a patient and untiring adventurer into the broad fields of knowledge; his is a high standard of character; devoted to truth, honesty, reliability; and a devout observin' of the preeept -"justice to nil.” Looking on Wilkerson today, our prophecies are fulfilled, as he climbs to his envious dreams, and from the summit his life ploughs a noble furrow in his country's fallow fields. "One who is certain without knowing achieves the maximum of uncertainly." yv cxr£Charles Morton Strahan, C. and M. E.. Sc.l). Dean of the School of Engineering WILLIAM FI.OYI) ABFItCKOMItlK. 1I.S.C.K. . “Ab" Douglnsvillc. (icorgia. Dcmosthenian. Engineering Society. Sine and Tangent; Scabbard and Made; President of Engineering Society Major M. T. ( . Cadets. Someone 1ms said "Doctors cun bury their mistakes, but an Kngincer's mistakes will bury liiin." Ab is ail Engineer who started "engineering" in Douglusvillc several years ago. He bus Imen here with us four .vents now. and lias convinced ns that we need have iio'fcur for bis safety in the game of life. Although'being "crowded" with visits to .Moore College he has been u leader in the .Military line. We can’t tell yon just what "Ab" is planning to do in the years to come, lint lie will probably be putting some of little Charlie’s tlicorv into practice. Well, folks, we could continue to write and tell you more of this gentleman’s good ipiulities. but those who know him are already aware of these, and those who don’t know him probably won’t read this, so we will just say in a few words, a better fellow can’t be found! Here’s to you and yours. Ab. limy yon live long and prosper. “IFhen you find yourself in the wrong, turn to the right." AARON IttSIl. It.S.lv.K. “A. Bush" Athens. Heorgia. •Ilinior Cabinet; Engineering Society; .Mathematics Club. 1st liMJt A. Hush entered the 1,’niverslty with tile keen desire to make an electrical engineer. With a i«w of continuing his course elsewhere, he has taken a large amount of work not required in his prrsi-riiHil conm . He Inis taken four years of two subjerts Physics and .Mathematics. Honors do not woiry him. but. if one can come to him in a perfectly fair manner, it finds a warm reception. If unfair means have to be employed, he doesn’t need them. In short, lie believes that fairness and frankness are very good attributes of any student. As an ardent radio "bug", his efforts were crowned with success when, on December 12. 1! 22. his station, -I Fit. was heard In England during tlu lYnns-Atlautic Tests. It is practically certain that this is just the beginning of a long series of wonderful achievements by him. ltnsli. you have your Alma Mater back of you ! "HI add my mite in making the world a better dace in which tv live."IIAKHV KAK1, KLDKHHiE. BSf.K. "Old Timer" Itinggold. Georgia. Dcinosthcniaii. Engineering Society; Square and Compass; "G" Club; Scabbard and Blade; Math Club; First lacut. 21; Captain 22; lJeut. Col. ’22; Baseball '20. '21. ’22. '22. ‘•Old Timer" originally hailed from the vicinity of Ringgold. Georgia, but. travel and experience have branded biin as a man of the world at large. After helping I’ncle Sam put the skids under the Kaiser. Kldridge came to Georgia and has proved himself to be the last word in versatility. lie is . good Engineer. a snappy military man and a ball player of no mean ability. Aside from those diversions “Old Timer" is vitally interested in one whom he calls til? "Duchess." On more occasions than one. “Old Timer’s" timely bingles have saved the Bulldogs from defeat and set the grandstand wild with joy. Throughout it all “Old Timer’s" head and neck have remained the same size, and been use of his talents, achievements ami personality lie is the idol of the red-blooded followers of the Red and Black. “Build for the future, but live in the present.” CHARLES HENRY NKWTON. Jr.. B.S.C.E. “Charlie” Athens, Georgia. Fiigineering Society. Sine and Tangent; Student Council. We all know this good-natured six footer and we all like him. Charlie is an Athens boy nnd proud of it. lie is a graduate of Athens High, where lie was President of the Senior Class of 1II11I. He is another of Professor Strahain’s engineers and a good one. too He is clean, pleasant, good Matured, of the highest ideals, and one of tile best nil-round fellows in college. e will have to admit, however, that Charlie is rather strong for the Indies. He intends to engineer west where we expect him to leave his stakes in things worth while. Here’s hoping you don’t get too far off. Charlie, for though your fame may travel hack, all the great things you could do would not take the place with your many friends Hint your sincere personality has had. Luck to you. Charlie, old man. “It's not tchnt you wish for, but what you work for.”•IAMKS vndfkson NKWTOX. B.SC.K. "Fig" Engineering Society. Sine mid Tangent. "Fis" got his nnn'Mrji' balled up and thinking Idmself n descendant «»f that illlustrious gentleman who invented gravitation and that he might have inherited some of the old gent's mathematical mind, docidist to study civil engineering. Regardless of who his forefathers might have been. Sir Isaac Newton, to the contrary notwithstanding. "Fig" showed his stuff when he made Sine and Tangent, the worthy desirntum of all engineers. The number of a man's friends is Mi proportion to the number of his nicknames. "Fig" answers "Uev O" to "Whitcy", "Fig". •'.I. A.". "Cottontop". and "Sir Isaac". All those bespeak his likable personality. If his opinion of anvoue is not the best, lie keeps his mouth shut about it. He rarely says what he thinks; usually only what he knows, but that's not why his tongue doesn't get "overhet." If "Sir Isaac makes as able an engineer as be is a good simrt. some day we'll be flivvering to Europe over concrete and dry dirt. "Fig" says- "Say it with figures, for figure never lie". Figuratively speaking, then "Fig", we hope that your future will be ns happy as your hair is white. Let your opinion of others be tempered with time and justice." Wild JAM llt(ill VOl’Mi, K.S.C.K. “Carrie" t'nrtersville. Georgia. Engineering Society; Kappa Alpha. Student Council; Sine and Tangent. Hugh is a limn whose ability as u student and as a man of affairs is never ipiestioned. lie hails from the small, but well-known town of t'nrtersville. which he condescend to admit is somewhat smaller than Atlanta. I'lensing and affectionate in his personality, he impresses his associate as a man distinctly worth while. Ijt would he difficult to find a man with a keener sense of duty, u more resolute determination. or a more sparkling intellect. During his vlirce-year sojourn at the Fnivcisity lie has accomplished much in every activity with which he has associated himself. We honor Hugh for hi ability, seek Ins sage council, and admire him for his sterling qualities of character. It would be nothing less than a reflection of our pveudo-prophcticnl ability should we predict anything less than a place of leadership in life's hectic struggle for him. Accept our best wishes for every success. "Let none falter uho thinks he is right" Andrew MacNaikx Soule, B. S. A., LL.I)., F. R. S. V. Sc.D. President of College of Agriculture and Mechanics Arts OMKR (’LVI)K AHKIUIOIJ), 15. S. A. "o. cr Lnvoiiin, ncoi|ii.i. • l cin»sthciiian; Agricultural ('lull. . l lia Zeln; (iridlron; Aglion; (leorgin Naturalist; Student Council; Kditordii Clliff (icnrgia Agriculturist; Vice-I'residcnt of Junior Class; Campus Club. Till M-airt and dime'll ini student mils I at von in his home, at least that is where his “Pit” hauls I.is guano from. It was a sad day in this young man's lift when he had to leave old "lliildv" and rhe plow b«‘hind to pursue his studies at the Agricultural College. " ). C." has for four years been one of the leading men in his class, having made u very high scholastic average, as well as taking an active part in the major college activities. Adcrhold has the record i»f not filling a single date at the “Co-Kd Pam" during his sojourn at the Cniversity. He con sidt rs this a commendable reeord. “O. ." performs all of his work in a conscientious manner believing that, “anything that is worth doing. Is worth doing well." »eiitlemeii. In is a real man. ami will make his influence for good tel: in any field of endeavor that In may choose. "A defensive life is like n defensive learn never a success." CLIFFORD WARD KAKKR. “Wyir Tifton. t; corgi a. Dcinosthrniaii; Agricultural Club. "Wyll” Raker is the pride of Candler Hull, the joy of the co-ed ltaru and the terror of New College. While others were wildly rushing and scrambling for meaningless college honors jitid marks, linker contented himself with making friends, doing a moderate amount of study jug. chasing co-eds occasionally, and attending his club meetings regularly iinker’s popularity has la-cn attributed to his intimate association with "Tub" McLendon. No doubt bis rotund colleague had something to do with his popularity hut his part input ion in Various college activities has Ihs h the potent factor in making him one of the most (Mtpular men n the e.impus linker's ambition has always been to shoot “Little Jack." lie has accomplished this extraordinary feat two or three times during his college career. This is a record to he proud of win n “l ittle Jack's" invulnerability is given due consideration. Maker, your profession expects much of you. "The (illuinmenl of success demands either genius or hard work s « JOHN LKK HOLTON. 1I.S.A. • l’arrott. Georgia. Agricultural Club. Alpha Zeta. In the fall of 11120 John einne to Georgia for a course in Agriculture. By dint of hard work and diligent application he has completed the full degree in three years. At the same time he has done sufficiently well in his class work to place him in the upper fifth of his class and into Alpha Zeta. He has not been exceptionally active in any line other than scholarship, although, lie has. at times, tried his luck in the social world. The results of his efforts along the lines of social endeavor would cause many a professed tcahouud to blush with shame. In fact. John has an unusual drag with the fair sex which many of his associates envy. However, coming down to brass tacks once more. John has made good at Georgia and by his worth of character lias made many friends. We can truthfully say that we believe that success will come to John. if. in the future lie continues the stride he has maintained during, his stay at Georgia. “Better not be at all than not be noble.” BOBKKT LKK BIGGS. “Bob” Bishop. Georgia. Bob served Glide Sam in the Veterinary Corps during the war. and while thus engaged he got bis incentive to study Veterinary Medicine. Instead of going back to the wilds of Oconee County, he came to the 1'iiiversftjr and joined that band, intent upon learning the science which deals with the prevention and alleviation of the sufferings of our domestic animals. Biggs joined the ranks of the '‘benedicts" a few years ago and since bis appearance in double harness he has developed into a dynamo of energy. Besides keeping up with his regular college work. Bob has built up a dairying business near Athens, of which he is justly proud. We do not know wliat line of work that Bob will follow, bid we do know that his everlasting grit, bis willingness t » work and bis determination to win will atrihute considerably toward bis success.DAVID PlCANK imi'CK. II.S.A. Athens. Georgia. AKrivtillur.il Club; Saddle anil Sirloin .Major Cavalry Cadet: I’iatol Team Stork Judging Team ‘22; President of Satlille and Sirloin Club ‘2’2. J’avid Frank is a native of the ('lassie City, immigrating originally from South Georgia. 11 is a hard worker and believes that asking plenty of |uestions goes a long way toward convincing the Profs that lie Is lnteresteil. lie Inis done much in the way of putting the Saddle and Sirloin Club oil the map. and the Kpwoi-ths into the Methodist Clmreli. lie is a Military man of eonsiderahh note, having risen to the rank of Major of the Cavalry I’nit. lie rides with all the dash of Tom Mix and handles troops in manner worthy of Napoleon. Itriieo has already 4 111 his wisdom teeth and is getting slightly bald, however, we prediet for him a long and eventful life as a County Agent. "lie sure yon ore right and then go ahead." syi nky gkigsisy ciiandlek. ds.a. “'Syd" Springfield. West Virginia. Demostlieiiiaii: Agricultural Club. Captain Cadet Corps: Saddle and Sirloin Club: Georgia Naturalists; Aglmn; Associate Editor Georgia Agriculturist; Alpha Zeta. This West Virginia hoy lias made a huge success of his stay at Georgiu. He knows the true value of things, and is not often led astray on matters of secondary importance. "Syd" is extremely versatile in his accomplishments, as he can shingle a house, handle a troop, confound the women, or make high marks with ease and felicity. At the same time lie makes sure to g r enough sleep and is careful not to overwork himself, since he believes that a mark aehievenu lit should be judged not by the effort he puts out but by the results he gets. We haven't room to tell you of all of Syd's manly finalities, hut we are willing io shout from the housetops that lie is every inch a man. Knowing him as we do. we feel sure that he will make his mark in the world sis he has done here. "Contentment is death to ambition.ru;.MiN ; m hkjnion chastain. h.s.a. “Chas" Tiger, (Jeorgia. Hcniostlicniaii; Agricultural Club. l iesidiiH «f Agricultural Club; Horticultural Club; Scrub I-ootl»:ill. •Til , world low a fighter." Tin mif win wn.tr those words either hud Chastain in tnilid or else hr hud visualized liis coming. His stalwart body, his undying steal. his hard fight in it. liis loyultv :iiid his stroinc character drnotr him ns u instil worthy of tin nntiir. "Chas" belong to that croup «»f nthlrtrs whose iinmrs never n pi wared in the headlines. but whom present...... Sanford Field had a great drill to do with tlir building of Ccorgin’x varsity "Winds. |t takes a man to play scrub football during his .liinior and Senior years, but "Clms" fills thr bill. Chastain stepped into thr inditiral limrliicht this year and thr Agricultural flub rewarded liis efforts by rlrrtinc him its President for the third term. Luck to you Chastain. If you continue to fijtht as you liave Iwen fighting. yours will he « rich rewartl. ult matters not what you are, but what other people think you are." I. I . COCIjTKIt. D.V..M. “Phreely" State at Large. Deinostlirni.iii: Ag. Club: Chaplain Diogcncsian Club. Cmvept; Fnlioiiored; ('listing. "IMireely" Coulter is somethin): entirely different. "Phreely" registered from the State at Large four years ago and look the noted "Crip" course of Veterinary Medicine. He has been erroneously railed "llolshevik" merely iH'eaiisi he asserts that lie does not believe in law and order. ll lias. Imwevr. been more correctly ••alleel "Co-ed I later." Ills political infliiem-e has Iwen felt on several occasions although, he never sought but one office for himself. He was elected llusincss Manager of the Georgia Agriculturist, which lie piloted through a critical period of its history. ('milter is one man who does not number Ills friends by his acquaintances .and is proud of the fact for he believes that one should liiiturnllv make some enemies if he is of a steady character, lie calls a spade a spade and gets away with It. His motto, selected by himself. Is a good index to his character. If In follows this motto he will succeed. "He who speaks without thinking is u jnol: he who thinks without speaking is a coward."KIJSIIA KKTKON DAVIS. li.S.A. "Ket" Clarksville. Ccm-gin. . Demostheiiian; Agricultural Club. Square and Compass Club; (ieorgi:i Naturalist; Vice-President of A Lieutenant Cadet Corps; Alpha Zola. Club; -uri lie came be saw. he conquered the stenographers ami Co-eds. "Ket" is an energetic y.niu fellow who knows the many wiles of the filthy medium of exchange in this noble laud of prohi I;.,', .... (»„. I v. w. He is a quiet, unosnining. and a very likable fellow who has memoi i . d every scientific word in Agriculture “1 ‘ , ,, s,JJJ‘,V.f.,J.' VlVJl .K''t is 'W ° "l)o irhat you know and you’ll always know what to do." NAPOl.ttON VANCB DAVIS. li.S.A. "Map" Ideal. tieoygia Demosiheiiian; Agricultural Club. President Deorgiu Poultry Scientists. "Nap" has been accused of breaking more school ma'ams' hearts during the past three summer schools than any other student. However, this is no serious charge situs he is speeial-ixitijr in | Mill try and chickens. Itut an accurate survey shows that Napoleon 5s a serious minded man and that he has made a notable record at the I'niversity. lie is one of the mnuv who gave three of the best years of his life to his country. This only served to create in him a greater desire for knowledge. In the fall of 1H1M in came to an ideal Institution from tie town of Ideal and has made an ideal student, having completed two years of high school work and a four year college course in less than four years We believe in you. “Nap." and feel assured that in the future you will Is as loyal to your country as you were to the principles of democracy. "To succeed you mast he willinft to pay the price of success, which is work and more work."JIKXICY WATSON DKKDKX, B.S.A. “Jane" , Kllijny. Heurgin. Demosllicnian; Agricultural Band: V. Al. A. Cabinet; Vice-President of Boron Club; Beil ami Bl«rl (|nar-lotfo;; Cosmopolitan Club. Mr. Derden mitrlit well bo called "Tin Mon Without A Country" since In romos from Killjoy, (ieorgin. Ilis college career bus boon o success in every way. Ho bus u»t “boot-licked" or "politicked" for anything. but lias entered into community-activities os o whole. Koch your of Henry's life hns boon rioh in girl—loro. Especially is this truo of his Junior your, wlion bis visits to Whitolmll woro vory frequent. Nonnnl School nuthoritios soy tlmt he bus si naturnl bout for flirting; it may bo truo. Ho anil "One" of the authorities mine very near to having serious trouble, but they never happened to oross onob others path. .Mr. Denleii |s self-sup|s»rting ami always optimistic about life. Ills pleasing personality makes him si-ores of friends and be is bound to make good at any undertaking. Some girl surely hns a great treat in store. “A majority is not necessarily always right " W11.1.MARTI I WINANS DUAKK. 15.S A. “Drake" Turin. Ceorgin. Dcmostlieninu; Agricultural Club. Alpha eta; Aghon: Senior Round Table; Horticultural Club; (irorgia Naturalists;: Sophomore Prize III2«-’2I. In all classes of endeavor there are always some few men who set the pace for the rest. Such a man is V. Druke. Having lost one year, be entered this class in 15 20. bringing terror to the hearts of the would-be honor seekers. For be is ji shark, gobbling up what other men must ponder over. In- makes hard things seem easy. We are glad that he does not let his work interfere with his i.utside activities. Ib has plenty of time to cultivate friendships, and is identified with imui.i imporVuut club . Drake is a good 111:111 to know mid bis keen brain is sure ;o bring him siK-ecs . I.uck to you old man. may you always average "lit)." “Inward happiness is a source of constant pleasure: hut all the pleasures of the world cannot make one happy."COLIWIIUS JOSKPII III KIIIM. D.V..M. "Joe” , Wuodvlllc. (icorgin. Demosthcnian: As Club. Secretary ami Treasurer of Senior Class. “Joe eaine In the I'uiverxity in (he fall of 'll), alone with that host of green rcvruits. Hr has hail ninny difficulties to overoome while here hut with that courage and determination for which he Is noted he has overcome all of these. At the mention of his name, to the minds .if those who have known him here, mines the thought of faithfulness and murage. "Joe" has siient the Inrge unit of his time in the study of Veterinary Medieiue of wliielt he has nmuired a most excellent knowledge. As sidelines lie lias acquainted himself somewhat with scvcial of the stringed instruments. “Joe" has also wielded a masterful hand with the ladies on many oeensions. Will; his knowledge of Veterinary Science, general adaptation to all surroundings and that big wholesome laugh at all times "Joe" could not fail in. matter where lie is nor what )ie Js doing. "Always make one believe yon know, else yon display your ignorance." KICASTI'S I .AM Alt KNCIAVI). It.S.A. "Great Hritain” ltlairsville. Ccnrgia. Drmostliriiiau; Agricultural Cliih. Allhiiru Intercollegiate Debate; Cotton Seliool Debate; Aglmii; President of the Agricultural Club; Saddle and Sirloin Club; Livestock Judging Team: Agrlcul-fural Debating Council; Square and Campus Club; Agricultural Club Key. "Kastus" got restive way up In bis mountain home, ltlairsville. and decided that he would collie away. He lias been in Athens for four years and lias distinguished himself in ninny ways. His is the cheeriest smiles on the campus. He debates with the power of Huxley, pulls lwliti-cnl strings with the deftness of Watson and adds his friends with a burroughs Machine. Knglnud learned in his days of teaching that grades aren't the only thing, so here he has devoted himself to many activities which have netted him several inditival offices and a vast front covered with phis ami medals. We are proud of his acquaintance and feel sure bis Colonial Possessions will he extensive ere lie is old. "Kulc Itrittauia." “Circumstances determine ones destiny ’lis true, but the person usually makes the circumstances." AKTIII K I''K.AM’IS GANNON. It.S.A. "Cannon" Savannah, ‘.corgi a. .. . , Agricultural Club; Sigma Alpha Kpsilou l;icsliiiiaii Cliil ; Horticultural Club; (jcorfiia Poultry Scientists; Yirr-Picsidcilt Sfiimr C lass; Student Council; Alpha Zola In Arthur wo have the connecting link between (hr student body and tin1 faculty, for hr , _ ‘ ‘y a student but also an instructor in Poultry Husbandry. Hr dors not limit his in- rirs s u, tin feathered fowls, hut hr is bosidrs a comioissrur of “chickens" in I hr broadest and most ehnriniiiK srnsr. Although hr is a "gceehee" hr lias nccoinplishrd much during bis four ywirs at the 1’niver-sity. and Rives promise to much mop in thr future. Jlr is a man of few words and many actions, u in believes that it is proper to think twice hrfore speaking oner; but when once aronsrd hr js as fluent' ns a Clay and as brilliant as a Welwter. In Savannah be goes under the nainr of Francis, at the ('imcrsity lie rocs by the name of Arthur among the Imvs. and “Artie" among the C« -Kds; but in his classroom he is heller known by Ins subservient pupils as J)r. Hannon or “Fess.” “Make up your min,I ax lo what you want to tlo -then ilo it." -IOIIN WYNN (.IM.Csni:. It.S.A. “John" Albany. tSiurpn. llcmostliMiian, Agricultural Club. Forestry Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '20; Aglion; President Georgia Naturalists; President of Horticultural Club; Itiftads; Tutor in Itotany; Alpha Zrta. .1 lin came to (Snirjin to study Agriculture, bailing from Albany, the city noted for Y. M. C. A trains and Wesleyan girls. Aside from doing everything in a scholastic way. hr has yet found time to plav much tennis ami read many books. Hr is a horticulturist, but because iir lias devoted unite a bit of (line to pecans does not mean that he is in any way •’nutty." This year hr rose to the rank of Professor, taking a position in the Itotany Department. lie really did four years" work in three, but having been out a term lie is graduating with his class , having dour considerable work on bis master's degree. VW lire in doubt as to whether Ju will go back to Albany and raise a family of seven boys or take a chair at Cornell. "They can beenuxe they think they can.HO.MKK JK I 'KICK SON I1AKDIN. K. S. A. ” Hawkey c” l y«s. (leorgiu. IMd Ivappa; Lambda C'lii Alpha. Horticultural Club; Agricultural Hub; Lieutenant K. 0. T. ( . N« v gentle reader. «!«« not K«'t excited, llnwk is not the "cake-eater" that he looks to be, so , „ not cxi»ect any wild tales such as are common to "Uuddie." The only wild tiling he ever « m was on a steamer going to Hostmi. He was immune to feminine charms until then. Since that summer he has Wen pa-sing all his courses, and receiving very thick letters daily. We hope that site will like the quiet life down mi the farm. "Hawk" has Wen with us four years, but lie does not raise as much noise around the house as most of the I toys. Still water runs deep, and with this in mind, and knowing Hawk’s perseverance and determination we look forward into the future to seeing him one of Georgia’s most successful farmers. His quiet way. ids steady character, ami his eagerness to learn will surely bring him success. It’s been a pleasure, "Hawk." to know you; may you always have good luck. "lie is truly wise who profits by the mistakes of others.” Wit Ad AM JOKL I1AKT. It. S. “liur Milton. Florida. Dcmostlienian; Agricultural Club. Cadet First l.leutenaut and Adjutant M. T. C Cadets; (ieorgia llortiridtiiral Club; Secretary of t.eorgla Naturalists; First Student Awarded Joe ltrown Commlly Scholarship; lnlia Zeta. Tins man lives up to his life’s philosophy. To pick "ltill" is like pleking one out of ten thousand, lie is justly te-med a student, a gentleman mid a man. (me who contends that si-leiiee is elegant. Says little, but does much, acting according to his insight which accounts for lus efforts Wing crowned with success, lie is very reserved in plncing himself foremost in anything. therefore, intimacy is required to appreciate his real value ami sterling character. It is a wise n.nn who knows liis business, but u wiser one who attends to it. "Kill" has Harare honor of '.wing in tie cat ago r of both. No finer type of real manhood ran be found. Kvery tree friend p. a glimpse of Cod".—Hart is n frieml to all. Success to vou "Kill" in whatever you muWtakc. "Ijiughtcr Libor and Love are the Cardinal Qualities." IALI.FN IIKNKV HASTY. It. S. A. "A. nr , Aloult Kcorgin. Dciiiostliriiiun; Agricultural ('lull. This bin hearted gentleman. a farmer by inheritance and an Agronomist by vocation. "ill probably some day startle tile worhl by crossing a cotton plant with a ran weed and producing a plant th.it will make cloth of the highest finality. "A. II." is primarily a student of Agriculture and has done well, lie is a genial, well-tempered man and will make some community a ginnl citizen. From his career here any of us might receive an inspiration, while he lias made few honors. in the broad sense of the word, he has made all honors. As a man he has worked his way through High School and College, coming out with a clean record and a head full of good common sense. He has a bright future and is a man that will let neither time nor effort stand between him and accomplishment. We trust that you will ever work for the high ideals you have set. "A. II. . and limy success ever smile upon you. "Let neither time nor effort stand between yon and accomplishment." (il.Vm.KS STl ART 1IOIM»US. -Jr.. I1.S.A. "Charlie" Cyreuc. (icorgin. I’lii Kappa; Alpha Tint Omega. Freshman ('lull; Secretary. Treasurer, Sophomore Class: Ag. (iuh; Class Basketball; Saddle and Sirloin Club; Lt. Cadet Corps; Itiftads; President Buccaneers; Baseball Squad ’20-21-22-23; Student Council; Head Cheer Leader; (iridiron Club. Who is that young fellow running around second base so lively? That is Charlie Hodges, and he is as happy as he looks to he. That is true. Charlie is known to be a lover of the game, and an enthusiastic fan in any sport in which his Alina Mater participates. For tin first three years Charlie ran around unite a hit. giving the dances a rash and entering eagerly into any college activity, but lately his friends have noticed that he has quieted down considerably. I toys there is a reason. Ask "l‘nsx" Whelchel what happened in summer school, and there you will find the answer. Charlie numbers Ids friends by his acquaintances, indeed it is said that he hasn't an enemy in the world, and all join in wishing him a long life filled with happiness. lienee ami success. "Let me live in a house by the side of the road and be a friend to man."JOHN WKSliKY l!() Y. KI . It.S.A. Kathleen, Georgia. Dnuostlieiiiun; Agricultural Club. Truck Team '21. ''22; Captain Track Team '22; “ »’ Club; (Gridiron Club; Pistol leam 21. 22; 2m) Lieutenant Cavalry 21; 1st Lieutenant Cavalry 21; Captain Cavalry '22; Stock Judging Team '22- rresldcnt Agricultural Club; Sergeant-at -Arms Agricultural Club, '23; b'lorida A . Debate. .Iidm is a good example of what continued effort will do when applied alone any line. He did not suddenly flash out as a great fellow, but gradually gained his high standing in college circles, llis most outstanding efforts have been on tin cinder path, where lie was just an ordinary mail to start with, but by continued training he has become nil outstanding figure. Everyone admires him for his never-ending courage, not only in track work, but in class work, and college activities us well. Besides. being a good student ami an athlete, lie is a successful politician. lie has put into practice some of the knowledge gained while here and thereby bettered bis financial standing. Thru all his work John carries a smile; this same smile and his ever-training to meet all problems will surely make him an exceptional citizen in the future. "II core steadily and with clear intention at thy design, knowing lull well the value of secrecy.” OSCAK LEON JOHNSON It.S.A. o. Lr 1 lir .lclmrst. Georgia. Agricultural Club; Square and Compass Club. ” •. L." came to us three years ago from Jeff Davis County and his record shows that he has lived up to his motto. Johnson, when a mere boy. conceived of one thought, that of improving the rural school of Georgia. The larger iMirthm of his life lias been devoted to Hint idea. In l: 20 he enrolled as a student at the College of Agriculture, selecting Agricultural Education as bis major subject. Within three years he has completed a four-year college course and at the same tune earned bis expenses, llis is a unique record, inasmuch as lie is the oldest stu-dent ill the I mversity. the first man from bis county to graduate from this institution, and one of the few who has bad no political aspirations nor envied those who made college honors. Oscar, you have confidence in your ability; you are willing to pay the price for success and being prepurtsl to render wortliv service to liuiuanity; we believe that voii will make the World better by having lived in it. Effort, energy, and enthusiasm is the price of success. Every day in every way I pat forth' greater effort, more energy nod enthusiasm." I1KNKY fJItOSS K10K1.IGHTKK. lt.S.A. "Kick" . (Ihunville. Georgia. Drinnslhciiinn; . j i icnllui :il Club. Glee Club; Track Team " , 22. "I.iltlp Kick", as tlx- above is known among the Co-Kds. Is a native of tin- "Mnrslics of Glciiuvillc . and a shining star of tin- Class of '111. (ilennville High. plus being a whole bunch of coiacts in his native heath. After thinking seriously over the possibilities of niaii-kiiul "Kick" eiee ie!e el that to be a Georgia alumnus would be one of the greatest achievements of his life . “Kick" entered with the t mgln-st and oldest Produtiaii class in the Cniverslty's history, and many were- the hardships wreaked on him by the vigilance committee while he was weaning hints' If from the hartnoni mis singing «»f Tatnali County's champion bullfrog. .ne-e "Kick" has been with us he has won tie reputation of being a man of splendid morals anil iiurcpreniehfu! e-ondiu-t. llis Jove for truth and Jiis infinite patience is the stairway by which he will mount to higher tilings. Stay in there ami fight 'em boy! We are for yon. " tiler every thing is said and done, lighten your belt and never run. but be a man." 1.1 ( It'S KOSSKK LANGI.KY. It. S. A. “Phi Mu" Lal’ayetie . Georgia. Deiuostlieniaii. Heron Club; g. Club. "1 1.1 .Mu” is truly n man of the will. As that is his cherished field lie will some day give to iiimi iiinnj of the hidden treasures lying tlierein. ami elevate the noble profession even hitcher than it is today. I terry School turned Ioo.m a green Freshman, but Georgia lias converted him into a finished pn elue t. We admire a man who will stand up for what he thinks is right and fight for it. Naturally. Langley is a more or less of a Indies man. hut does not let his admiration along that lim intorf-ri with his studies. 11» has n host of friends ami to know him better is to up-pice-i itc his friendship more. Langley Ik inict and modest, a go.nl student, and a good friend. lie has clone well ami we 1 1 i eve the future holds much worth while for him. We wish you the best of luck, old fellow. If hat counts in life is not so much what you are as ichut you arc becoming.”TIU KSTON LKVIIC. D.V M. “Shoal" Montezuma. Ccorgiu. Drniustheuiuu; Agricultural ('lull. Lcvic is one of tin- few survivors of tin S. A. T. campaign which was fought and won on HcHy Field in tin fall of 1J 1S. After tin smoke of tin battle cleared, l-evie went back to High School to absorb more knowledge In-fore entering uiioti his regular college i areer. The worst blot to he found on l.evie's word is the fact that lie roomed with Joe Durham for two years. Despite this handicap. I a vie is a regular fellow and can actually Converse without arguing. Lcvic is tin best horseshoe tosser in college. This is unite an honor when all the local talent is given consideration. He does not lay claim to being a devil with tin women, but tliis adds to. rather than detracts from. Ids virtues. Laying all foolishness aside. Levie is the kind of fellow whom we all admire. He is •juiet. thoughtful and friendly As he is one of the best students in the Veterinary Department, we prediet for him a great future in the practice of his profession. “The wore you see of others the less you settle to one." WAIiTKK Al ltKICV M NDY. K.S.A. “Lundy’ Macon, (icorgin. Deiuostlieulan; Ag. Club. Agliou; Ag. Debating Council; I'resldent of Senior Class; First Lieutenant Cadet Corps M. T. C.; Stock Judging Team 21; Cotton School Debate '22; Cross Country Team 21, ’22; Itiflc Team 21, '22. '22: (Jeorgia Naturalists; Horticultural Club; Campus Club; Florida Ag. Debate; Sec-Treasurer Dlogenesiaii Club. Since Lundy has been among us he has proved to be so retiring that few know him. us you would judge b.v the bunch of honors listed above. In fact, his is such a retiring nature fhut he is hardly known outside of Clarke County. However, he will get over his backwardness, we hope, and in a year or so settle down to grow pecans as a vocation and chickens as an avocation. Foolishness aside. Lundy lias proved to be so popular and so good a politician that his class elected him as its president. That shows how he is fixed when it comes to resourcefulness !(|„j initiative. It is useless to sa.v he attributes it all to being red-hcinled. Anyway we are cxpcctin-' him to push that old red hcau of his up near the top. "being as how" the old fight that wins js I here. "The ear that heareth the reproof of life abide!h among the wise.’’IIKKHKICT IIKN'ItY MADDOX. USA. “Sleepy" Hoschtoii. fieorgia. Driimstlieuiuo; Agricultural Club. (•corgia-Aiihiini Intercollegiate Debate; Cotton School Debate; Aglioit; .Mainloliii Club; Agricultural Debating Council; I 20 Freshman Football Team. It was tin ."»tb District A. M. that sent us this handsome. dreamy-eyed I siiccimeu in the full of T.t. In bis Freshman year he won lor himself that nickname "Sleepy", as well as the reputation of being a diligent student. In later years lie has distinguished himself In other realm of activity, salesmanship. inditin'. ami society. Never has he been known t » he tardy at lril more than five times a week. “Sh epy" is. as a member of the fair species expressed it. a “per-feet gciitleiiiuti." lie has nu unlimited amount of perseverance, and a disimsitioii which wins for him a host of friends wherever he goes. We predict for him unbounded success in whatever field of endeavor he may -liter. "Be Brief ' (JFOlUiK MACK .M11.1.Fit. I1S.A. "Goal” Wayeross. (Scorgia. Demostbcnlan; Sigma Chi. Nearly every one lias heard of "woman haters", especially since the Co-Kds were admitted to the Fniveisity. hut nevet has there been a man who deserved the name more than this young gentleman. In Wayeross he has absolutely nothing to do with them; in Athens, he has still less. His time is spent largely in taking notes on .Inriiigatfs hull, reading Captain Hilly’s literature. and other tilings equally ns profitable. As a nieinlier of the fieorgia Naturalists, we fn l safe in saying that he knows as much about nature, especially the swamps, as any man in the club, for he has devoted a large amount of his time to this. Moreover he has lived on the edge of the Okcfectiokee for tin past V wen I y-seven years. Why not give him the name of “Swamp 1.ixr.urd" instead of "final" for many of us feel that this inline would lie more appropriate. We feel, however, that no one can and does follow anything more honorable than the study of nature and that Ware County will do well to have this young man return there for his life's work. May success In yours “float", for your many frieuds will lie pulling for you in jour undertakings.M. 1 . .MOIILKV. IIKA. . nr Pallas. Ajrriniltur.il Club. Follow!iij; in lli« wake of tIn World War there hailed from tin metropolis ,,f Dallas. (icor-xui. this lad with a desire for creator knowledge. With a splendid prep school record "M. I)." -aim to the I niversify in the fall of 'lit. His policy is to seek no honor for honor’s sake, but to work and he patient and let honors come as a reward of merit. Since his arrival at » -ovgia Mobley has demonstrated his ability as a student by completing the requirements for his U.X.A. degree in three and one-half years. During the same period he has conducted a successful courtship, and on November nth. took unto himself a wife. Hlcssfd indeed is the woman who has that privilege, for M. D. makes a model husband. With the ability'to do. and a companion to encourage him. we predict for him a most successful career in ids chosen profession. I.nek to you. Mobley, we are for you. .lOSKPH WOKLKY MOON. U S . “Fuir Uowman. (• corgin Agricultural Club. I..•idles and (Seutleiuen, let me introduce you to a man who stayed at the I’niversity three y a is. never owed "Nick", never went into the pool room until two weeks before he left college, ami never cut a class. lie is one of the few, if not the only man. that ever entered the Fniverslty with no advanced credits and m-eived a H.N.A. degree in three years without attending a summer school. No harder worker and no keener student ever came to the old school than this )ad front Howmnn. lie came to college a few years later in life than the average student, mid came for the puriMisc of securing a degree in agriculture. To this cud lie applied himself unreservedly. Ihld he entered other fields of student activities he tio doubt would have been equally successful. No man ever left college with a truer litineh of friends than did Worley Moon. To know him is to like him. “Co ns jar ns you can, then see how fnr you can go." JA.MKS IMI I, MI'KI’IIKY. I S.A. “Shorty" ••billon. Ccorgin. ♦ Oeiiiosthriihin; Ag. Club: Surldlo and Sirloin Club; Diogcnesimi Club. September. four years ago w hen I hr 'hniieellor went down to o|h ii up the gate to tin Frcsh-iiihii Class who should he find but "Shorty Mnrpbey trying to scnle the wall, and shouting. "I.i-t me at .vour hard courses. I ll ruin 'em. And ruin em he did. There have been times according to his own confession, when "Shorty” was financially hanging on by the skin of his teeth. However, a little tiling like- beginning a School year with only five bucks in the till meant nothing m his young life. As to manipulating a Ford with a spray barrel up behind, well, right there "Shorty" has proved himself to Is a whole school of sharks. During til" past summer "Shorty" rated as one of the boll weevil experts sent out by the city of Athens. This should be proof-positive that he knows lus business. "Do not allow anything to stand in the nay of success that can be honorably removed." i;ik;. k aki.o nicsmitii. »s.. . “Steamboat" Statesboro, Coorgiil. Deinostlieiiian: Agricultural Club. "Steamboat" hailed fioni Statesboro, Ccorgin. ill 11 MS. and spent one year in diligent study. The following June he joined the I.ible agent's army and for til ns- months plodded the “Angels' Dust Trail." On account of tie economical depression which came that summer Xesmith was left with more llibles than lie had time to mid. The only profit that lie got was the experienev of sleeping under hay stacks and an iucrased vocabulary of slang. Therefore. rlo accepted a IMisition as a teacher ill ope of the ltiilloch County rural schools; Imt having such an Irresistible desire to become a "big bean". be found himself In the fall of 11)21 back again in the halls of learning. During lus second sojourn he Sms wen many friends and has utilized his time to good advantage. H» is one of the few; that is completing a four-year course in three years. Arlo Is a man if strong ciniv ictions and an cuunlly strong determination. We pmliet success for you. Nesmith. In whatever field of work yon enter we hid you Cod-speed. "All good has for its foundation clean principles, and in order to be clean in principles one. must be pure in thought."VOrX(i MAKION PATTHKSOX, It.S.A. . "Pat" Homer, Georgia. Driuoiilliciiian; Agricultural ('lull. Saddle and Sirloin Club; Vice-President of Agricultural Club; Georgia Naturalist. "l’ar". the mvsterv man. is without a doubt rim most roiisistant visitor of the ’o-Kd Darn of which the Senior Class ran boast. It is also known that he has given the Honorable Dean “Kichie” no small amount of trouble since his ai | earanee here. Although it has been two years since "Pat" got his Sophomore English off. he is still a good friend of “I►oh" Park and continues to frequent liis office. being on “ItnhV honorable-prootor-pay-| o|l. Notwithstanding the above short-comii gs “Pat" is one of the hardest and most mnsistnnt workers that has ever registered at the Agricultural College. He came here from the !Hh District A. M. School where he dis-tinguished himself as a worker and a man that has tile determination necessary to see a proposition through. We predict for "Pat" a great future. "It matters not if I won the game, but it matters how won it." WALTKH l„KK I’ TTKKSOX. It.S.A. "llig Pat” Niicooeliee. Georgia. Agricultural Club. President of Kivshman Class. l»l«-'20; President llilelic Association; Major Cadets. Infantry; Scabbard nml Itlade. Well. well, gentlemen, we come at last to a subject worthy of our discussion. "Dig Pat" entered the Puiversity the first fall after the war and 1ms attended classes given in this institution more or less regularly ever since, lie has been tnirlv siiceessful in satisfying the demands of the faculty as his presence in this volume of Pandora will testify. His main hobby, however, has been the .Military Department where he Inis risen from the lowly rank of a sergeant to the astounding heights of u majority. "P»ig Pat" is a sound fellow in every respect and ’tho he has never strived for the highest record in scholarship he has made a good average grade. However, lie has some- little weaknesses. The most evident of those is his irresistible desire to invest in ballooni stoek to the extreme annoyance of the balloon magnates. Another is his liking for members of the opposite sex where his downy pate makes him very popular. "Dig Pat" has ability and energy, and with those two characteristics he should make good. "The only way to have friends is to be one." ‘•IKI'TIIA I . SAN'DKHS, It S A. •7. rr Hartwell. fieorgia. • i)r'nMthr:ilan; Agricultural Ciuh (•eoryla NiituralisU: Saddle and Sirloin Club; Heron Club; Horticultural Club; Sec.-Treis Saddle and Sirloin Club. Than cnnie a time ir tin autumnal days of that eventful year when a stranger was aeon silently and morosely wending bis way thru tin- flotsam ami jetsam of raucous ynuib to the jiortflls of the inner shrine- tin- main nmm of the academic building. 'I'he purpose « f this wanderer was to l cconie affiliated without further ado with the grand hitch mogul of the powers that be. A lesson was to be barred. Innumerable yards of multi-cob.n d tape intist be unhooked, and the candidate measured for the o.hmi sesame. Breasting the outwash of that formidable occasion seems but the scam pet me of elfish iioodlnms in comparison to the hellish slings of outrageous fortune, as dosed out by the l« nigiiuut . iretakers of tin- official papyri. ltnt take heart, kind friend, and wish with me that "sealing night may conn and scarf up the tend ! eye of tin- pitiful day." The gentleman whose portrait is herewith attached has been with us three short years, but that has been sufficient time for him to insatiate himself into tin- hearts of bis fellow students. “The greatest happiness that ran come to any man is a conscious pursuit of a worthy purpose.” DOXAI.I) DKWFA SCAItltOKOCCill, ICS A.. .M.S.A “D. nr Marietta, (Seorgiu. Dcmostbenian; Agricultural Club. Alpha .e|a; Animus: Agricultural Quarterly Staff: Freshman Agriculture Scholarship duuior Agriculture Scholarship: National Fssay Contest Winner; College ivssay Contest Winner; I'ltelns-Stokc.s Fellow l!i 2-2:t. Donald Dewey claims .Marietta ns bis home town, but admits that lie doesn’t live right “slap up in town, only twelve mile out." By what means he was coerced into coming to (olleg« no one knows, bn; it seems that college life’or som other influence has broadened him considerably. as he now wear a No 7 tt-4 hat and shoes of corresponding magnitude. Beshlos getting his B.S.A.. and M.S.A. in four vonrs ami annexing most of the honors in sight lie has found time to do concentrated and extensive work in other lines. Quiet and modest, but self-reliant and thorough, he usually puts through anything that he attempts. ( nod luck to you old man and may you have the future yon deserve. “Mot the number of hours worked, but the quality of the finished product gauges a man's true worthKVItON I.KSTKK SOI TIIWKI.U II S.A. "B. LT , Keidsville. Georgia. .VKiinildir.il Club: Saddle anil Sirloin Club. I‘rr.si(lciil nf (in Saddle and Sirloin Club; Winner 1922 I.idle International (•rand Champion; Alpha Zola. From the land of tlu swamp mullet and the (Jeerher conies this enterprising young man. ami he has been in the midst of rhinos ever since he first favored ns with his nppenriinee in liM!). A eonsistant student, lie is one of the kinjl which in the mad rush for honors is contented in simply making friends. If any one lias any more friends than ‘‘It. I.." we would like to meet him. for although there are others with possibly more a«i|iiaintanees few of them have ns many true friends, mill none of tie-in could In- a better one. lie lias li« cn above tin average in bis studies, and bis extra tiim lias Im-cii well spent in outside activities. Whether lie runs a stock farm or teaches school, we e.nild predict for him nothin}: other than an iiiii|tinlifird success, for in him are emlsidied all the virtues of a gentleman and all the prereipiisilcs for a career of con-stmotive leadership. May you always succeed. "It. I..", to tlie same degree that you have while we have known you here. We could wish you nothing better. "Vhcrever you are, be considerate, truth jut and industrious." ADDISON KNOX SWIFT. K.S.A. “Speedy" Saint Marys. Georgia. Diogeucsiaii Club; I’escado Club. Heboid tie- blithe and trusting Mr. Swift, plucked from the sturdy yokelry of equatorial • '►iitJi Georgia. as gentle as the mild zephyrs that fanned his hair on his native heath, as xcrupu-h»iis as the day i long and friend of the brotherhood of mini. "Speedy" need feel no compunctious of conscience as lie folds his tent and carries the genius ,,f Ids agricultural hand to the scene of his future application. He has done liis work 'v,‘l! ; his personality has been a paragon for his companions to respect, and there is recorded no •••Malice wherein In scorned an op|tort unity to lend a helping hand. Oh! genial Addison, that your feeble ldographcr possessed the rich store of friendship von have founded on your brilliant character! Here was a man evolved for us; a wondrous philosophy—-character js fjrs, nttmiinient. We believe that this goldeu-haiml lad. a crusader oft-tinies to the shrimp of Fair Goddess ■“"••tune, will mould for himself an entirely desirable niche within the ranks of his stolid citizenry. "Life is u sporting proposition after all the more you play, the more you work."FKI-:i ANimBW TANNKK. U S A. "Coal" Iiabun iSnu, (ieoigla. . Dcinostlieninu; Agricultural (lull. (iridirun; Aglmii; Student Council: Georgia Naturalists; “(;•• ( lull; Varsity K«m»I-liall Team T . 20. :i 1. ’.TJ; Alpha eta. "(halt" or '(iii« t from th Hap". as lie is known t«» ewrv Georgia student, is a man ;hnt lias no insignificant nnrt in convincing the fairer sox that nil the stronger sex are deceivers, liars and heart-breakers. !ont‘ lim various things of which only rt frw- «rtn la- uc i!iou«d. °n returning from the “(Slip" he “Hulls” all the glass out of Candler's front door. drives his head into the cement sidewalk, visits the Co-ed Kara with unparalleled regularitv. and by some unknown means finds out the price of sugar in Gainesville. Hem gin. "Goat" has made a wonderful record sine coming here, lie lias represented Georgia nobly in many phases of college activities. especially on the gridiron, being one of the greatest defensive hack that the South lias ever produeeu. The "(inn" sliouid feel proud that this "Goat" got through, and should re-reive him hack with all liars lowered. “Temperance is the total abstinence from all things which are luirinjal, ami the moderate use mil) of those which are not' HOWARD OTIS THOMAS. IS.SA. “ifmr Homer. Heorgia. Deumsiheniau; Agricultural (’lull. (Georgia Naturalists; Square and Coir pass (‘lull, lad me introduce to you a man that has taken his "grub” at tin “Hennery" for four years end yet has never knmvu how it feels to he there for breakfast; has drilled four years and yet "cut" half the classes; has passed all his work and never "cracked" a lunik ; lias “Imotlieked" more professors than any other student in college; has been interested in politics the whole four years ami has never held but one office, namely. Treasurer of the Ag. Club; has been one of the large contributors to “NickWtnnd. and last, but by no means least, hits suffered the nguides of a disappointed "Mountain" Jove affair, lie is a 111111 that has stood the test ami has not been found wanting. “.Mutt" is a man of ability and a man that ean meet the world as he finds it. Then is 110 use to wish him good luck—that has always been his. "Always keep your best loot in jronl. and never worry."WALLACK WILLIAM THOMAS. H.8..V •ir . wr l.avonia, Georgia. . _ DeinoKtliciiiaii; Agricultural C'litl . Square am) Compass Club: Georgia Naturalists; Vire-rresidcnt Square and Compass Club; 2nd Lieut. Cadet Corps; Kifle Team. ■■ V." entered tin University four years ago to further his studies along agricultural lines which he started in High School. .Inst as he arrived on the campus the Sophs presented him with a haircut, and a few nights later lie gave them an exhibition dance in return, on Ids study table (at their request) His work and walks to the Ag. Hill have won for him the long looked for sheep skin. You never go to his room and find him Idle, and tills trait alone is enough to convince ns that ho will make good in the business world. Furthermore he will be an asset to any business with wliieli he is affiliated. W. WV we all hate to see you go. hut being equipped 08 you arc. we can rest assured that you will come out on ton. Here's to you, old man. hit cm us hard iu the future as you have in the past, and you’ll get by. "It is not how well you have done, but what you have done compared with what you might: have done that counts." GKOItGK AMOS Tt ItNKIt, 0 S.A. "C. A.” 1 tall Ground. Ga. Ih-most hen ian. Agricultural Club; Square and Compass Club. George drove a team of oxen from Itall Ground to college, and finding things different here, lie sold them for enough money to pay one year’s cxi»cnscs. This same ingenuity has been with him all through his college career; he has no trouble in making his way and keeping up with Ids studies at the same time. Unlike some others who have had much work to do. he has found ample time for social development and has put that time to good use. Without George the Kogiucering Hepnrtnicnt would he lost, and "l’rofniii" would not know who to depend upon. Sometimes, however, they do get tired of hunting for monkey wrenches down there and later finding them in George’s pockets, where he has been carrying them around to help ] eoi lc in fixing Fords ami lawn mowers. George has made a consistent fight: we can all profit by bis example of setting a goal ami working toward it. Good fortune he with you always! “With love and inflexible determination you will reach the goal."MAICIOX rb' ITM I SltY, It.S.A. “Pete” Thomson, (Georgia. Agricultural Club; Saddle ami Sirloin Club; Sophomore Class Fool ball Team. Motorcycle Pete! Jfoiv mnn.v members of tin v (iiifs a sex have thrilled at the mere whisper of tile name—bow many of Ills rivals have shudderingly sought the elongated timber when he east bis gauntlet into the ring. IVte ami his motorcycle are absolutely a double-dipped combination cross between a stick of dynamite and a roll of barb wire. Now fair reader don’t get the hallucination fixed too firmly that our Pete is forever blowing the gilded bubbles of plenum . Xo. he has found time in his four-year stay with us to play with his fellowmeu. study some, and “mditick' a great deal. Jn his play he has made friends; in his "politicking’’ he has successfully run more than one dark bay mare. And thru study lie has gained this place in the annual—no small thing to do when you outsider that Pete picked no "crips’ —It.S.A. after bis name is evidence of this. Fuck to you. Pete.' THOMAS Mtil'STCS WJIITKXKK. 0. S. A. Jlalton. Oeorcifl. Dcutoslheniau; Agricultural Club. dice Chib '22; Vice-President Hecuns Club; V. M. C. A. Cabinet; Red and Hlaclt (fund die. Whitfield Cutility suffered a great loss, while Clarke County enjoyed an invaluable gain, when the above young lad transferred his place of abode front the former to the latter place. Whitener. or "Handsome Turn.” as he was called, is by far the best looker in his class. His wonderful personality, combined with a bass voice that lias Iteeii unexcelled at the Cniversity of Ceorxiu for years, bus won for him lasting friendship In the hearts of the students and great Itopulnrity in Alliens. Tom has had three years experience teaching music, swimming, aud spooning. winch causal him to make the following statement: "The height of my ambition is to be Dean of Wotneu in some up-to-date female college.” He is a good student, of fine character and ability. Jle has not “bootlicked" anyone, but has stood on his own feet, lie is a man in the fullest sense of the word. So we say. "Duck to you Oid Hoy.” “He who lo ous the croud should not be jolloued far.”5 ? c Robert Preston Brooks, Pli.I). Dean of the School of CommerceI’M I, KFMI'FK ANDKKSOX, It. S. C. "P. K." , Waynesboro. (ieorgin. Kappa Alpha. Senate Club; Delta Sigma l i; Scabbard and Itlndc; "fi” Club; Scrub Football l». '21; Varsity Football ’22; Major Cavalry Cadets 21; Colonel Cadets ’22. •‘Halt! Who goes there? Cass Colonel Anderson." And so after four years of it "I . K." passes to struggle with the outside, lie onine to Ceorgia after fighting for I’ncle Sam in France; here he has been fighting on the football field and over numerous bridge and Vea-ta-bles. However. In1 has made an enviable record in his classes and has succeeded in capturing mini-t rolls scholastic honors. Those who are close to him love him greatly, wish for him all the success in the world, and believe firmly that be will attain it. Here's our best to you 1 K.” May you carry on as gallantly hereafter as you have heretofore. "Run not, for the world is round and not an endless plane.” .Ml1.1.Fit KAJFOItl) DFI.L. D.S.C. "Buck” Milledgovillo. (Jeorgia. I’lii Kappa; Sigma Alpha Fpsilon. Delta Sigma IN: Itiflads; Freshman Club; Senate Club; Drum Major; J an Hellenic Connell; Ser.-Treas. Senate Club '21. '22; l’oot of Senior Class. This man has been an asset to the University. As a student he has been an example. He has studied hard, and aside from his work he lias found time to mix with his fellow-students. We arc afraid in writing this epic that we will fail to bring out the many good points of "Duck". De-sides being a good student he has been unite a hand with the ladies. He is a man of true ability, practicing, not preaching his convictions; sincere and successful in the attainments of his purposes, and he could not be thought of otherwise than a true g« nth-man. True to Jus friends, and just to his adversaries, we foresee in him—not a demagogue of parties. but a Pilot of principle. He lias faithfully performed bis work, and as be g« x out of the portals of the I niver itv. he carries the l»est wishes of a host of friends.DANIEL I ADR BENNETT, B.S.C. "High pocket" Waycross. Georgia. Economics Society; Sigma (’hi. . Football, 20. -21; Basketball '20. 21 ((’aptain 21); Gridiron lub; Biftad Club; Senate Club; Alpha Kappa I'sl. The Fiiiversilv inherited fn»m G. .M. ?. in January 11120 tin's gentleman. athlete and scholar. "Iligluiooket" is a man of sterling character always standing for the highest ideal, and putting them into practice in his daily life. To those who know him this mill not be mud. His determination and spirit have been a great aid in swaying the victory for our grand old Georgia upon many occasions, both on the Gridiron and tlu» Basketball Court. Never shall we forget that Georgia-Auburn game in Columbus in 11121 and the part "Highpocket” played. , He is also handsome and can bo seen with the Indies when any social function is -n order It has been said that a woman's heart will not last in the sunshine of his smile any longer than the proverbial snowball in IT "Higlipoeket" lias mad» the Cniversity a good m in. and in leaving takes with him the best wishes of his mauy friends for a prosperous future. “When the One Crent Scorer comes to write against your name He writes not whether you've won or lost, but how you played the game.” KBBKICT ALEXANDER BOWEN. B.S.C. "Pete" Doles, Georgia. Deniost lien inn; Economics Society. Winner “Cracker" Short Story Contest ’22: Editor-In-Chief Pandora 1923; Grid-lion Club; High Priest Diogencsian Club; Campus Club. After a heated discussion at Clmtenu-Thierry with the forces of Kaiser Bill, in which lie received a few souvenirs of German lend. "Pete" decided he would tackle the hard-boiled professors of the I'niversitns Georgine. He therefore entered the Commerce Department in 11 Jill, and has since become involved in many heated discussions with the cohorts of "Pistol'' Jenkins. “Pete" has never been pictured by his closest friends as a calculating business man. nor ns a wizard oi finance, and from all indications his ambitions do not run in that line. Any man who can write his poetry and short stories, and write them with apparently no effort, ought certainly to do so later in life. "Pete" has a whole host of friends, who predict for him a brilliant career. .Way his victories be many and his wound stripes few in the battle of life. We wish him the best of luck. 'Don't waste words!CI.AKKNCB KL.MO W«)CKI. TO. II.S.C. "Mun-o'-tt’nr" Hrunswick. (ivory in. Deinosllifiihiu; Pi Ktipp.t Till. • Senate Cluh; .Ailvrrlijilnj; .Maimer "(jfnri;la Cr.-irkcr" '21. ’22. 231; b'resbni.in Club; I'aii'llrllrn;r Council 21. ’22. '2S; hVoiiimuVs Society. lino we have. ladies and gentlemen. a limn of no menu iddlit.v- Mr. Kioto Hrockingtou. who is familiarly known l»v many nan o , among which arc "Itroek". ‘Itenu-Hniinniel" am "Man-o'-Wai". The Inst nainnl is his favorite. Imwovor. and i very appropriate. Mo is out »nly representative fr »m the frog ponds and marshes of (Slytm. but they are well represented—for '.Muii-’o Var‘' Is some worker and a fast one. lie ha made kihhI fit his work, both in school and out. especially the last. And .is Ids honors indicate lie ha taken a prominent part in student activities. Me is without doubt the most desperate lover In college therefore a jrood one. If von don't believe it look at lis philosophy of life or ask him. lie a duiits it ill though "his mule" Inis been reared several times. Hut all in al! Crock is a gmol man and sure to succeed in any business be may have. “ i V with its many problems ran be solved easier with the consolation that whoever lives true life loves true love.” .101 IN I'KANKI.IN lf( KT. II.S.C. "Ilurt’’ Point IVIer. (ieorgin. lie most lien inn. Kcoiioinin Society; Spanish Club; Secretary KroiioiniYs Society. Hurt started In's schooling at Point Peter and finished at Athens High. Point IVter was unheard of until In came into our midst, but during Ids stay here he has b vn trying to explain to us where it is. lie emmet understand why it is not oil the map. He says that they have two stores tiler and an- contemplating building one more. Hurt made the famous Old College foot-bull team which lost only one same during the entire season. We are sure he would have made tli« 'nn«itj If | .e had only gone out. lie is a charter member of the “Woman llnters Club", but nevertheless you can see him going down to the Co-op every morning to get that letter from the "only girl." Hurt lias made an enviable record during Ids stay at the Chi versify ami hits also made many .....I... If vmi know him you can but like him. We are sure you will make a sue- -e s. I.nek to you “Hurt " "Let your conscience he the guiding light of your life" J(.'KOItCK .1. CI.AKK. B.S.C. “Padre” WayCross. (h-orgta. Demos', lien inn; Sigma (hi. ItUM-hall ’20. ’21. '22. '22; Casket ball 21. ‘22; President "(»” Club; President Panllellenir Council; Alpha Kappa INI; Itiltads; Senate Club; Gridiron; Sphinx; Captain of Uasohall Tram 22; All-Southern llasehall '22. (imrge is truly one of the strongest nn,n in Ills class. Carrying tin limit iu his x-linlastic work this man graduates with about nil of the honor that the »| ! institution run thrust upon him. He is one man that excels iu almost every phase of college life. llrsiileK his raptnincy »f the Itasehali team he is also president of the Pnn-Ilelleuie Council—two honors much coveted in college circles. W e are safe wnen wi« say that this man has hosts of friends on and off the campus. Jlis congenial disposition and his fidelity to principle have functioned In his everv action and are duilv loading him to success. CI.AItKNCK IIKNKV COIIKN. It.S.C. “Fat” Augusta. Ceorgia. I’hi Kappa; Tan l-'nsilon Phi. I‘resident I’ni Kappa; Captain Infantry Cadets; Senior Impromptu Debate. ‘22; Senior Impromptu Debate. ‘2:5; Pan-Hellenic Couueil; Kratcrnity Basketball, ’ll. ‘22. '28 training at 'th .U adnav' of" r'IS!! .1 ' "msmueiitly remived bis early military hroad-eiisled ov the’ cimiul thTli '"■ rumnr. on.; cadet in the l{. O. T • 'in- a-v s! .• 1 re ei ed the distinction of being the lies! dressed he made in his uniform! In vi,i .!’IVr Vi "?,s a,,.lw "f ,l"' and nifty appearance was so great as to im-ri him •..! handicap Ins knowledge of military tactic Wlun it mines to”"! t iX!" ,1 HK •h" UM i»«-lliK.i.......................ffimr of the It. O. T. '. would make the old nn)iti it s ,l,V • His understanding of the art l? I tributed to bis abilitv as | XV, JI ,‘ ,v.v. His success in this field can Is- at- in store for him. nmlonr last il,,,,, ! ' s:,ll.l,,l‘ S4' vi,Vs 'v" n‘" s,iM • '• .ast toast to you Tat is that your life may he n h.ag and happy ................•IKKOMK not CHKIM V DAVIS. It S.C. "Tootie” • At lions, (iwii'jjia. Kcouomics Society: Lamlidu Clii Alpha. “Tootie’s" clothes don't l«» him justice. Ills ability as a im»u| shark, and to pick wiuuiiig football loams wnnl.liiot suggest such conservative apparel. Ma bo that is his strategic method iu capturing fish, Conservative. sincere. and strictly a gentleman at all times, ho has made many friends. Those who do not know him well say that ho will outer the wholesale grocery business, but those who are well acquainted with "Tootie" sec him as a successful stock broker in some largo city. Hi deliberation and forethought are uimiiunlled. "Tootie" has not allowed education to interfere with his pleasures, and though he lives in Athens, he has never missed a football trip to Columbus or Atlanta. Here we find him the best of sports. Jerome, may you always continue to be serious in your duties of life and joyful in your pleasures. Our best wishes are behind you. worthy son f (ion-gin! KIHiAit WILMS DKKW. B. S. C. “Sidney" Preston, (ieorgin. Denuistheuian. Kconomics Society; Alpha Kappa Psi; Campus Club; .Manager Athletic Team ’22. ’2:5; I'resident Kconomics Society; Business .Manager Pandora; Freshman Club. it takes a 1‘oiisiderable amount of determination for a man who has trod the cobble stones of many French villages and listened to the growls of the war hounds of the ICntentc to put aside his feelings of restlessness and settle within these sequestered halls to make himself a broader man mid a better citizenry. Hut the qualities which enable Drew to survive the hardships of u "dough boy's" life have brought him triumphantly through the successive stages of college activity and to the uitiinnte goal. Commencement Possessing that Inestimable asset of a olea -ing personality, lie lias won the esteem of his fellows, and by diligently applying himself to his work he has demanded the respect of his instructors. Armed with the lessons of lCxperience and endowed with the gift of our Alma Mater, you now enter upon the final adventure with the best wishes of the class of ’23 ringing in your ears. “Hard work and the ability to stick has a reward well worth while."IIAKK WILTON KVEKKTT. H.S.C. “Harry" A then , Georgia. Dciuosthpiiinn. , Elected Sophomore I’resicleiil. 1020; Economics Society. Harry is another one of the Everett ln»ys t-» finish at Georgia They say that when he registered ior the Iasi Inn of his collegiate career. T. W. lteed heaved a two-ton sigh of relief and took an extra-sized whack of "(Tunax" oy way of eclehratioii. Von see before you the likeness of a man who in 11)111 discarded the blue of his kinsman's navy, and a few days later donned vhe •live drab of tin military department. He wax no sooner registered than he plunged ambitiously into politics emerging the following spring with tin crown of Sophomore President resting jauntily on his brow. But alas! the call of a sawmill camp wa too much for Harry, and lie failed to show up the following fall. However, sawinilling could not hold him down, and he came back, after being out one year, and joined the Co-op. Here's luek to you. Harry. “Bite of) more than you can chetc, and chew it, Plan more than you can do, and do it." THOMAS RI'SSKLI, EVERETT. B.S.C. T. R." Athens, Georgia. Deinostlienian; Beta Theta Pi. , Student Instructor; Assistant Manager Denmark Hall; Student Assistant Librarian; Economics Society. "T. It.' once made a great mistake, which ho has since rectified he went to Tech two years. However, after two years of study at the worthy school of Technology lie invented a motor that will do everything biit answer the phone and mind the baby. We therefore contend that his time was not ill-spent. With his motor about perfected and a sufficient knowledge of engineering he came to "Georgia" to get bis degree in Commerce, and he has well succeeded, as the heavy type at the the top of this page indicates. During the past year "T. It." fell before the darts of .Dan C’npid—fell so hard that lie proceeded to purchase a marriage license and exclaim fervently “I will!" lie is the type Hint makes an ideal husband, home-loving and hard-working. .He and Mrs. Everett are to be congratulated on finding each other. Everett’s one great sin has been his close association with "Pistol" .Tonkins and the "Beanery”. and he has performed this particular operation of graft with exceeding dexterity. May things always come your way Bussell as they have since you came here. “Keep on stirring, the good will rise to the top; don't get excited."P1KKCB Kl'CjKNK (iCNDY. B.S.C. “Square" l.incoliitoii. Georgia. Demos! lie iiian. h'rniiomlcs Society; Champion Debate. ’I!»22; Treasurer Dcmostlicniaii; Secretary Krononiies Society; Delegate to National Student Volunteer Convent ion; Secretary of V M. ’. Smile, work and think, an in truth tile philosophy of this young fellow's life. That vivacious. irresistible smile and cheerful lis|Mtsition distinguishes him from tile ordinary. Though frail in body “Square" has a spirit undaunted and has ovi -come difficulties which would discourage most of us. Withstanding a serious physical handicap he has made a record at the I'nivorsity worthy of emulation. Me completed the four-year course for his U.S.C. degree and one year law in three years. At the same time lie has taken a leading part in the activities of the camtnis. All in all he is a true friend, a genial companion a full f|edg ‘d optimist, and an all-round fine fellow. We preiliet for him a great future in his chosen profession of law. "Smile, work, and think, in order that your life may pave a tray to nobler destinies NATIIANIKL J. HAKItKN. It S.C. "Mat" Itluffdale. Texas. Demosthenian. Kconomirs Society; Spanish Club; Cairpus Club; Klceled President of Demostlir-iiian; President of Square and Coiroass Club; Student Coimeil; Kconomirs-Agricultural Club Debate. Attention! Our friend. Nat. with his soldierly hearing came all the way from Itluffdale. Texas, to get an education. Perhaps lie did this because his big brother. (Jeorge. told him Vliut Georgia would start him off in the way that lie should go. "Nat" is a demon among the ladies; long hair, bobbed hair, blonde, and brunette are his favorites, lie would quictlv walk out of Candler Hall almost every night about N o'clock to give tin fair ones a treat, and would return long after Ins roommate had gone to dreamland. Excusing this one great fault. "Nat" is a good worker and lias made a good record, and is lik« d by everyone on the campus. His line of bull and. common sense made bis professors think that lie studied 11 • completed his course at the end of the Summer School in ppjo went Columbia Pniversity to study Jaw. and we understand In lias kept up tile standard of Georgia men by milking good. Fools may have ambitions, but it is l,-ft „ „ixe men determination for the fulfillment thereof."JOHN A I.TON HOSOH. II. S. (’. "Alton" »nincsville. (iwirjiii. I'hi Kappa; Kappa Alpha Krc.shman Impromptu Debate; I’rc simian Debate; l-'reshiiiuu Club; Sophomore Declamation; Krniinitties Society; lliftari Club; n iiilit ly Club; Thai Ians; I’hi Kappa Council; Associate Kditnr Keel anil Itlack; I'lii Kappa Key Connell; Scab-bare! and Hlade; Captain Cavalry Cadets; Junior Cabinet: Spanish Club; Alpha Kappa I’si; Student Assistant in Keonomies; Senior Impromptu Debate; Champion Debate: Oriel iron Club; Iteta Oaiimta Sicilia; Sphinx. No more adispinte tribute can be paid this stalwart son f the "Queen City of the Mouii tains" tlmn this: " lty their works ye shall know them.” Fhitcring the stately isirtals of Old (ii-oixin In 11120. Alton begun bi career of siic -c.-m as an orator by participating ill vwo victorious debates against I eniostbciiinn. Then branching out in other college activities, he made for himself a name long to lie rcmcinlicml and ever to he envied. In fact, there are few honors which were open to him that lie did not obtain. Not only lias Alton reached the pinnacle -if success along literary, scholastic, and military lines, but lie lias gathered unto himself life-long •‘riends. Judging from bis philosophy of life. We see for Alton suc-cess in the present, transcended by eon-tiinicd success in the hereafter. "Life is everlasting to be continued hereafter." SAMI Kl. AI.I'ltKD IDKI.SON. IIS.C. "Sani" Doerun. (Seorgiu. I'hi Kappa; I'hi Kpsilnn I’i. Kreshinaii Club; Kcimuniies Society; I'au-llcllcuic Council; (Jeorfin Cracker Staff. An altogether placid and confident young mini lias ambled hither and yon these past three years, fiasliing a smile here, a comeiitionnl slap on the back there, and dispensing sunshine everywhere. So effectually has lie amiably mixed with his fellows that we are honored to present Sam Idclsoti. possessed of all the candour of a jurist, all the charm of a l.ochinvnr. If it be true that half the advantages of I’liiversity training lie in the pleasantry and mutual helpfulness of the environment afforded, then we may say that our good-natured contemporary has shorn lucidly in the first half. lie has been a collegiate atmosphere himself. Not to have known IIi« airy Samuel were truly to argue yourself unknown within this all too brief span we are now closing. A goodly jiorrion of Idleson's time lm« been sjieiit in the company of the fair sex. within whose ranks the young man is reputed to create in negligible devastation. Studious lie lias been at times, and playful too. so thill bis collegiate career has knotted itself into a hopeless tangle of girl, Imoks. and ribaldry.mCNJA.MIN FltANKLIN JOKI.. Jr.. It.S.C. "Ben" Atlanta. GcmKia. • I'lli Kappa; l lii Kpsilon ]'|. ." V Htreo years have liccumc intimately acquainted with Hen know him ns a friend anti advisor. be it n matter pertniuiiiK to the heart, the poeketbook or otherwise. During Hen s ('Diversity career he has constantly argued with himself as to whether he should rely on hts face as a fortune in the movies, or merely utilize it as a marriage application blank. We are certain that with it he can work wonders. Foolishness aside. Ken came to this retreat of the mind n-wcary just three short years ago. and as Time has steadily and speedily plucked the leaves from the calendar, lie has swiftly and surely brushed aside the debris between him and the covet is I piece of ram's hide, so that today, he stands ready to seize this proclamation from under the very eyes of a watchful faculty. What other evidence of ability could the world require? Hs| ecially when the fact is considered that our hero has paused long enough between classes and "hull sessions" to throw monkey wrenches into the blood circulating apparatus of some million or two members of the prevaricating sex. We like you Hen; kt op the good work going. "The greatest happiness that conies to any person is in the conscious pursuit oj a worthy cause." KOIIKItT M) VKI,I, LANK. It.S. “Smooch” Itlakely. Georgia. IMii Kappa; Lambda Chi Alpha Ivfoiiomics Society; Student Assistant; Delta Sigma 1 1. "Smooch" lives six miles from Itlakely. and we can understand how he reached there walked t.f course. Hut the mystery is how he reached Athens. After he arrived hen , however, he made g«w»d. How a man with such nicknames as "Smooch" and "Souse" is capable of making "A’s’ is food for more thought. Week-ends find him at Costa’s and the Georgiani slinging chocolate milks and a mean shuffle. Although Lane is ipiiet and lets you do all the talking, he »s one of the best known and liked boys in the School of Commerce, lie knows more about accounting than Kestcr himself, and if you need a C. I . A. next year, call Lane. Then is no doubt that Lane will make good—everything he does has his whole interest, is exact, and Is done rigm. Tlie lag businesses are looking for you "Souse", go at 'em. We'll endorse you. "Bel your speech be better than silence, nr be silent." KAKNIJST AIA.KKNON LfNVK. It. S. C. "Rastas” fun . (Jeorgin. DcinostJiciiinn; Sigma ’l»i. Frouomics Soritly; (iridiron; Alpha Phi; Senate; Secretary and Treasurer «»f Student Council; Financial Manager Athletic Association; Kditor-iu-CJiief of the I ted and It lack; Cliairman of the V. M. C. A. Publicity Committee. This •‘Kent." tin pride of Parr’s Station, has been as important in I’niversify circles as hr was in his home town lie began bis career in the fall «»f lllll when “Freshman and Sophomore" ‘•lashes were ns frepn-nt ns the "bull sessions’ of Candler (lull, an dalmost at once tin name of "Hast us” began to circulate among the upper classmen of that day as it does among the ’o-Kds of t«Mla.v. At one time Itastns was a Sports scribe for the Augusta mid Savannah papers. The various Athletic teams of Oeorgid were given their share of publicity in these papers so well that be was elected to die ltr ! and Itlick staff where he reached the top last fall, and we fee1 safe in saying that liis work in this capacity was always above criticism. Ilis acts, and bis ambitions, have been such that brand him as a Christian, and iis n gentleman, and one whose opinion is always sought regarding the more complicated matters relative to student life. As (Georgia Military College feels proud of her miii liecauae of his record here, so shall the I’niversity fee] proud of his muni in life. "Make your stride a steady one." CIIFSTFK FI.I.IAII McKAK. It S.C. "Oscar" .Mount Vernon. Ceorgin. Demos (lie iiiau. Pressing Club. Here he is. the one and only "Oscar from Alt. Vernon". and like the original dweller therein of a Mt. Vernon, he has never told a lie. Oscar likes the I’iiiversit.v; in fact, he likes it so well that he hasn’t missed a Summer School since Tnnynrd Itrnueh ran by the postoffiee. They have conic and gone .g-md students, bad students, and Slimmer School students, Imt Oscar goes tin lorever. His days arc s|H»nt hatlessly wandering the easy by-ways—ever ready to pause nnd toss "K1 loro", ever ready to lend n dune or borrow a dollar, oveg ready to come to the succor of a maiden in distress. Ask the Summer School women ! As a student. Oscar hasn't set the woods a-fire. but as a work of art. created solely for the Normal School nftrnnHUicrs In lias been a howling success. We predict n great future for yon in the movies, ( s nr. "Love, honor nnd be gay."JAMKS AlGl STl'S MOItftAN. Jr.. It. S. C. "Jim" '.iI(I»kIii. (Snirp'i, Pressing Club. If yon have never met a haii|»y g«» lucky chap who laughs t tin hcsl as well us flu worst. t« |i for a moment and make yourself acqum'iited wffli ••Jim.'' If you should try t«» size him uj from tin list of honors you might think In had "just bwii" at tin liiivcrsity and that's till. Hut this is not trio as his record in politics and class work shows for Itself. “Jim" merely wished to be conspicuous by not having a list of honors by his name as he might have bad. Hr comes to us from the plains of South (Jeorgin and In three years has captured that which it takes most of the fellows to get in four years. 'V' understand from all reports that 31 organ is not satisfied with his education received hen , extensive as it is. mid intends to journey forth to some higher School of Accounting and some day write across the frosted-glass window of hi s office, where all may read "James A. Morgan. . I . A.” “Visualization is a necessary precedent to Materialization.” MOSFS (ilST.MTS MTKItAV. Jr.. tt.S.C. “Gus” Macon. (Georgia. Alpha Tail Omega, rill Kappa; Kcoimmics Society. I ted and I Slack Staff Junior Cabinet; President of Junior Class; ( Alliance Fraucaise; Scabbard and lilade; Senior Hound Tabic; Alpha Kappa INI; Student Assistant In the School of Commerce; President of Ivroiiomirs Society; Captain Company "l»"; (iridiroM Cluh; I tela Cauimu Sigma. Customs. better known to the initiated as "(ins”. Is universally liked because his very union- seems iucapabl" of offending any one. Ilis smile is one that never wears off and he keeps bis troubles to liiiioelf. »«is bus niitu.v sterling qualities Which will he an Inspiration to all those with whom lie is associated. Ilis honors are many and are well deserved, lie lias taken part in every tiling that tile Cniversity offered him. lie reaolnsl his zenith when In was made Student Assistant in the I(epiirtimnit of Commerce. He has succeeded and the I'nivorsity is proud of this idoildc-Iniiroil Iwy. Some day w» will i dii» to him with great pride and say. "lie was my classmate , because be is a mini, true bine and a yard wide. "Honesty, hard work, and faith in Cod will surely be rewarded by success.” THOMAS HOWARD KIVKRS. B.S.C. "Skinny’ I.ouisville, Georiiin. Dcmostlieiiinii; Economies Society. Manager Fool ball Team "22; Assistant Manager 21; Della Sigma |»|; Senate Club Candler llall Football Team. We present foi your approval the "Sheik" of I'amllor llall. better known as "Skinny.” He hails from the little town of Grange, altlm lie has fnlloWiM his usual eustoin if prevaricating, and has given Iauusville the honor of being the nlnee of his a la ale. "Skinny" has been with us four years, ami while he has not gained the distinction of being an A-plus'mnu. he is endowed with tar art of making friends, wliieh is by far more valuable than a mere A-plus. "Skinny” lias but one weakness; he loves the ladies, the long ones, the short ones, the lean ones, the fat ones. Show him a lady and lie is lost. As a member of the Candler llall football team. "Skinny” established a world ni-ortl as a substitute. "Skinny”, you of the sunny smile and pleasant dis-|Misition. may good fortune smile tiimiii you always. And we feel sure that it will if that smile p always as hard to rub off a it has been sinee we've known you. "Success is yours, if you have faith, ami work." JOHN FREDERICK SdlWALII. CSC. "Petty" Savannah. Georgia. I’lii Kappa; lambda (’hi .Alpha. Track Team ’!»; Captain Cadet Corps; Seabbard and Glade; Fan-llelleiiir Connell. Freshman Club; Keonomies Society. Here lie is. Indies, you enn’l find a hands.. man if you look through seven states. Lord Chesterfield was not more ladished. nor Menu Hriimiitel more gracious than our "I’etey”. witness, tile ladies fall for him. If he were not the sensible fellow that lie is we would predict that next year would find him in the studios at Hollywood. Cut I’ete is not going into the movies, no. instead he tells us that he is going into the insurance line, having received the first principle from t.ephart. During his four years with us he has proved to he a true friend and a sterling gentleman. Yours is the spirit that never says die. I'etc. Give the world your host and sueeess is yours, for you have the determination and ability to achieve it.LI'TIIKK ( I YDK STILL, B.S.C. “Stotsy" Confers. (Jcorgin. Dcmosllieiiian; Kronomirs Society. Ireshm.in Impromptu Drlmti; Sophomore Debate; •Junior Cabinet; Junior Orator; Alternate Intercollegiate Debate ’22; Senior Hound Table; President De-mostlieuian Society; Demosthriiian Key; Campus Club; Student Council; Impromptu Debate; (iridium Club; Champion Debate.; Delta Simula I'i. Luther is the original "Bolshevik" of the military department. During an illustrious career ot four years, in which lie has attended drill some thirteen odd times and shaved even less, lie lias acquired recognition as a second Crassus. Hut despite his long hoard and evil eye. “Stotsy” lias a record of which lie may indeed he proud, lie has taken part in more debates than most of us have heard; he was selected for-hut just look at his list of honors, ladies and gentlemen .and I need say no more. These and other things show “StotsyV popularity as a man and general recognition as an excellent student. Here's to you, Luther, boy: who wants to 1m a Napoleon, anyway! "A mini's friends are his most valuable ussets." ALLIA J I'Ll AN STKICKLAND. Jr.. B.S.C. "Sirick" Phi Kappa; Sigma Alpha Kpsilon. Beta (Jammu Sigma; Della Sigma Pi; Senate Club; Band '21. '22. lie was the uoldest Homan of them all. Me came, he saw. he eomniered. This to inform those who do not know of the brilliant record of this young mail. “Strick" came to as from V. L. and Knior.v. After having “prepped" at the above institutions, he decided to east In's lot with us. Kew men can boast of the brilliant record ’’Strick" has made during his brief sojourn here. lie has labored, and labored hard as his honors above will show. it is the d«light of the weaker sex to have him among them at a dance, bridge or tea. and it is rumored that lie lias played havoc with many a fair young damsel's heart. Julian, your personality mid kind disposition make us love you ; continue your good work mid all will he well. Accept our best wishes for a suei-essfnl career. "II ark it ell done makes pleasure more fan."ALLFN DAVll) SI MMKKS. .Ir . I!S.(’. "Sliekum" , Citnym. (icorgia. Drinnstheiilaii. Kcuiiomics Society; t Alliance Fran raise; Lieutenant K. O. T. C.; Freshman Club; American Leflon. “A. ! ." hails from Convers. Rockdale County. icorgia. 11 isn't on the map. but it's .here. This fair young gentleman has been at the Fnlversity for four years and has mastered all the "bosh" sis he ••alls it. that “Puny" brooks has to offer. The only thing that "A. 1 ." regret about his college career is that he waited until his Senior year to imisli Physics, but why Worry about such trivial matters, just so you absorb this important subject before you leave college is sufficient. We must n«.t neglect to tell you that there are two streets on which he wished to make good, viz: Wall Street and Hill Strict, being a master in the financial world, lie certainly lias the ability and «|tinlifictuions to make good on Wall Street, and from what we hear circulating among the fair sex he also has the qualities to win on Ilill Street. “Do your best. If hat more can be expected KOItFKT LKK TI'KMAN. b. S. C. “Lee" Atlanta, tieorgia. Phi Kappa; Lambda Chi Alpha. Senate; Pan-Hellenic Council; Freshman Club. Leo’s easy grace has made itself felt during the three years he has been with us. Kver balanced. well poised, and assured, bis artistic cue strokes are delightful to beludd. He lias always been nil asset to the social life of the I'niversity. where bis composure lias been advantageous to him. lie i very charming to his friends. , , ,, Lee has seen fit to finish his course in three years thereby depriving us of his well-known "line." Siii'h a pcrsonnlitv could hnrillv fail to impress an outside world as it has impressed us. His sojourn with us will remain as a ragralit long enduring memory, when lie is departed. "Know thou thine eggs.1.01 is sr.MNKIt WINN. H.S.C. “Her Statesboro. Demostlionian; Della Tail Della. Sicilia Tail; Kcoiuunicx Society; Della Sigma l i; Can-IIcllenie Council; Associate Kditor Pandora; {Jlee Club ’2:i. This na haired eteran of a thousand parlor engagements eaitic to us in the fall of HMD. and since then has done remarkably well along all lines, socially as well as scholastically. Despite the fuel'that he is as handsome as Apollo ever dared to be. and was cut out to be a ladies’ man. "Ked" is a red-blooded woman hater, despises the women, and although many have tried to woo him he has always managed to give them the slip with his favorite phrase. "(let thee behind me Satan.” lends Sumner halls from Statesboro and we know that the home town hasn’t been tlie same since the municipality farmed "lied” out for four years at the I'niversity. “Ked" is well trained in home economics and i conceded by every one to be an authority on this subject. He also "knows his material” in auditing and accounting, and during his Junior and Senior years has served as official account ant for tin Athens Kailway mid I-’leetrie Company. "Ked . we predict for you an uminnlified success in the future. '’lie not discouraged in performing any task which yon know you can do— the Gods nil assemble to help those who help themselves JOHN IIOIJ.INDSWOUTII VANDINKK. IJ.S.C. "I'andy” Koine, (icorgin. Deinosllicninit. . (economies Cluh: American I .eg ion: I Test ideal Koine Club: Alpha Ivanna I’m; varsity Font ha 11 ’l! . ’20. ’21. ’22; Cluh; Drldiron Club; Secretary hrouomies . Society. “Vainly” bails from that section of the state where they take u kid at the age ■ »t live and throw him against the ceiling to trv his mettle. If he digs in and sticks, they pronounce him “fit to fight", if not. well, he is just' out of luck. "Vandy" must have dug in mightily .for lie 5s about the biggest little package of dynamic vitality and determination that ever wore the habiliments of a Hcorgin pig-skin warrior. "Vandy" has not only made good on the gridiron, but «hat same old pluck and "nevoi-suy-die" spirit that made of him a gnat football player lias carried him through college in three and one-lmlf years, leaving a commendable hunch of marks behind. He also left behind a certain young lady but that is another story, and we feel certain vlmt Athens will see hit..any times before lie gets his final papers lien . Here’s to von. "Vandy"! .May you ever fight .is hard a you have during the past lour years. "Don’t waste time talking; action’s the thing that counts."•1. M. WILLIAMSON. B.S.C. "Tony" Atlanta. (Jeorgiu. . I’lil Kappa: ('lit J'si. "Tony” was originally a simple country boy. blit alas, who now would even "suspicion" the aroma of hayseed about tin person of this curly-headed, "lie-vampire.' This boys chief trouble ill life is trying to make days into night, in order that he may have more time to sleep. Iwenty hours per day is nothing for this champion stuinhcrer. However, when he can manage to Stay awake long enough to grace ns with his presence, he is indeed a wonder to behold. His lips are like rubies, but wo have sufficient reason to believe that most of his beautv comes from the drug store. Ills rare collection of cosmetics would make an ordinary female artist blush with shame. Two ears ago "Tony" went to 1-2 urn pc to study no less a question than Foreign Trade Conditions. On that trip Paine Fortune placed his future better half in his pathway and since that lime when he is not in Athens Ids address is Sheridan Knud. Chicago. Illinois. Yes. we have all met her and wish “Tony" all the luck in the world, trusting all the while that his life in double harness will not be besot with vicissitudes and too many little troubles. niAKLKS KITKKT YOfXCHI.Odl), It. s. C. "Buddie" Augusta, (icorgin. Pcmostlicniaii; Sigma Chi. Alpha Kappa I’sl: Senate Club; Financial .Manager Athletic Teams 1022. "Huddle" resigned his position as president of the Ccorgin Florida Railroad and came over to Athens for a little vacation, choosing the School of Commerce for his playground. Now that lie is a Senior lie has again resumed his work and has taken over the managership of the Commercial Bank. In this field he is doing remarkably well and is fust taking onto himself a number of friends that need a little financing, it is easy to predict the future for a man like this for we feel safe when we say that he will succeed ut almost anything that he undertakes. So long us we jive we shall never forget the man that has sold more tickets to football -ames in one year than all the other managers have been able to sell during their entire career. Vheu football games ar forgotten we shall never forget the cross-eyed man with the genial personality.Senior Pharmacy Class History LTHOUGH our sojourn at the I nivcrsily has been comparatively short we have spent much lime toward the realization of our ambition, the art of compounding. However well, we have succeeded lime alone shall tell. Our class originally consisted of fifteen students ,each aspiring to learn the secrets of the science. We assembled from far and near, from as far as Mesopotamia, and as near as Klberton, Ca. Six of the fifteen are now left. With the aid of an excellent faculty we have succeeded in overcoming some of the most difficult problems that will confront us in the practice of our profession. Especially to the Professor of Pharmacy do we feel appreciative as we look backward over the time we have spent in the University. We will always remember him as our best friend. For two years we have met in Terrell Hall in the pursuit of knowledge. Various fortunes have been ours, from being “shot"' to the last man in the classroom, to explosions in the laboratory. Arguments have arisen, but have been settled between us, and we feel that we hove gained knowledge of the profession by them. As we pass out of the dear old Halls we realize that we have come to the parting of the ways. Each for himself goes out, but we have one common desire, to reflect credit on “Georgia" . We have gained the fundamentals, we now aspire to bigger and better things. Always will we treasure in our memories our days at “Georgia”, our friendships, the faculty members we have been so closely associated with, and most sacred of all, our Alma Mater.Senior Pharmacy Class Officers J. 1). Mellon........ R. L. Neville ........ Miss Eunice You mans H. B. MiskofT........ .............. President ......... Vice-President .............. Historian Secretary and Treasurer Robert C« mminc: Wilson, Ph.C. Director of the Srhool of PharmacyMardine. Mesopotamia. Turkey. • Deiiinslliriiinil. (’resilient Cosmopolitan Club; V. M. (’. A. Cabinet; Secretary and Treasurer Senior Pharmacy Class; Student Volunteer Hand. It on under tbe Turkish Crescent in Mesopotamia—that land of little light and few opportunities- iiaiinn took advantage of the meager facilities for education offered by American Missionaries until the war with its horrors of Turkish massacre closed the school and put a premium on the life of every Christian. K »r five years. Hanna roamed the Mcsoimtamian plains, a rump-trailer to the fighting armies. On the entrance of American relief workers after the armistiee 11ulitm was enrolled as i; worker and by his untiring energy and ability to learn, rose from tile position of office hoy to 1m chief interpreter and assistant to the I’ost Surgeon. Coming to America in the spring uf 1!»21 by bis own energy and his own efforts, he enrolled in the IMuirinacy Department of the Cniversily, and. working under perhaps as great a handicap as any student, lie lias made his way to graduation. As busy as he has necessarily been, he lias found time to devote bis energies ardently to V. M. ’. A. and Church work. The future success of Ilniina Miskoff is written, whether he seek it in the country « f bis birth or in the country of liis adoption. “Labor, Cheerfulness, anil Charily are the Ideals from which life is fitted for happiness." JAM ICS DAVID MKLTOX. IMi.fS "Pete" (SrecilWood. S. . Demostlieiiian. President Senior IMuirinacy Class ’23. M e now present for your approval. (Sentlentmi. the leader of the l’lmrmaey Class, and very deserving is in-.if that distinction. "Pete". a native of the Palmetto State, lauded in the "Classic ( 1 t.v III September 1!»J1 to In-come one of us. • s" good points to draw from with which to write a pleasing description that il is difficult to choose, First of all lie is a fine fellow, happy, amiable, and with a smile that 'Y°ar "D- I ' s. a good student, and is very popular with those members of the faculty with whom lie emuex n contact. Hesides liis ambition to exceed in the art of Pharmacy, he intends to go deeper m the pursuit of a H.S and then into medicine. i.nek to yon "Pete." and may tin best be yours! "He silent or say something belter than silence."IU ITS LKSTK.lt NKYII.LK. Hit;. I.eck" SIiiIihIhiih, (ieorgia. Dcmosthriiian. Vice-President Senior Pharmacy Class '2:t; Aloha Omega (Pre-Med.) Behold. ye wlm will! Tliis shining article is none other than Mr. Unfits Lester Carbun-cious Ainslitioiix Neville of Statesboro ami the Pharmacy Department. In two years Neville lias eoiiipletoil the requirene-uts for_ his diploma in pharmacy, plus the stiff pre-medical course. Why shouldn't he he Dr. Wilson's pet? With all that behind him he has a perfect right to walk "kind of" leaning back and wear all overgrown hat band. Hut Lexter does nothing of the kind, on the contrary, he is one of the liesf “mixers" that ever graced these famous haunts of democratic men. With him " twas ever thus". If Lester never summers on the sunny allures of fair Sicily, if lie never autumns amid the grandiloquent beauties of the Adiroudacks. if he never winters where the xephyr-like breezes of the ocean kiss the perpetual green of the palm, if he novor springs among the la .v pleasures of southern France, he will still have seen life. For Mr. Neville once attended summer school at the I’niversity of (ieorgia. And looking back on that summer school he can say truthfully. "I have had experience", lister contemplates attending a medical college next year where we confidently expect him to make good, l.uck to you. Lester. FKANCIS AKDA STOVALL. Ph.G. “Stovy” Klbcrton. Georgia. Demostheiilan. Vice-President •luniur riiarmacy Class '22; Historian Senior Pharmacy Class ’2:t; Kresluuau Club. ■vii High School with a grand flush. Stovy entered the Ciiiversilv II trio to the cause since that time. Never brilliant, hut always coii-ring his stay with us. Stovy has many hobbies of which Chemistrv ast two years he lias amused himself delving into the ‘Theory of In passing let ns not forget to say that he has received his share .if pink envelopes •rs of the fair sex. Stovy started out with Science, but "Doc" Wilson finally "got on verted him into a pill roller of the highest order. Over in Terrell Hall, lie mar be Finishing his home towi three years ago and has been sistent. lie has done well during is the chief one. For the last Ionization.” from inemla : him", and 11................................ .. , seen at most anytime overcoming-the general art of "compounding." In conclusion: with his good nntiired smile and pleasing way. Stovy has made himself well liked by (hose that know him. "Always true to the best that is in him" he has the good wishes of '2.'». “Always be true to the best that is in you."KI NK IC BKU, YOlMANS, I’ll 0. “Eunk” Swains boro. (icorgia. Historian Class 1920-21. Well, tin hest way v« c«n speli h« r mime is P-—B—A— C ii ! That's just the best we euu sji.v of anyone. And when we apply that name to one it lias a world of meaning. Buniee was with us in ’20 ’21 and we feared we had lost her. as she failed to show up for the next session. Bnough to say, however, that she eouldu't stay away long—so she returned to finish this year. Can you imagine sueh a demure little lady coneoeting some detailed prescription in a drug store? Car better is she suited t.» the job of coneoetiug dainty dishes in some nice little kitehen. ami it is rumored that sh is rather good at prescriptions for "heart trouble." At any rate we wish her the jolliest of luck, wherever she be. whether it be meting out drugs or food supplies- here’s to you Buniee. and may yours be the best ever. "Our ideals are our better selves."OMAII YAt GIIN KAIM'OCK. It. S. H. K. 'OMc" Wont l’niin liench, Florida. Mil Mu. (’Ill Della I’lil; Yice-I'resldent llomeoon Club; Girls' Klfle Tram '22. '22; I’mi-dent of Women's I’au-Ilellenir. A jolly disposition, that allows no dull moments, a sweetness f manner, tlmt captivates at once, and a quiet generosity that is felt hut not seen, make •'O-Me" the companionable yrirl tlmt she is. Small thoughtful acts that rarely occur to others, with friends for her quite frequently. As a sideline she likes tunny people and many things; not the least of these things being "movies". Looks, and dill pickles. It will seem strange indeed to imgninc the ol campus, streets and "hot dog" stands without "O-Me." Here's to you Oiuali! May you always reeeivc as much joy and sunshine front life as you give! _ ... , "Take time to smile—it uon t be wasted." K.MMIK NKI.SOX. II.S.ll.K. "Em" f'artorsvillc. Georgia. Alpha Mu; Secretary Y. Y. C. A.. ’22-’2:$; Assistant Kditor of Agriculturist. '22-'2;{ Secretary-Treasurer of Student Government Association for Women ’22-’23. Was ever a girl more ready for fun and frolic than KmmieV She is uever too busy to play a prank or to do a favor. The uncxpoopsl alwnvs springs from her lips and fills her audience with laughter, hut her fun is wholesome and wins for her many friends. Fannie was somewhat of a bacteriology shark and made a justle for "i'S" in spite of Iter popularity with the opposite sex. Her sunny disposition and viuniug personality have Iteen a source of inspiration to students and faculty and she will be missed on the campus next year. We can’t think pf nothing but success for her in any liu of future activity that she may choose. The slncercst wishes of her classmates arc hers. "lie true to your word, your work, and your friend.". LILLIAN SIIKIIKK. It.S ll.K. Athens. (Icorgia. Homccou; T2 til-cat was I lie loss «»i "(J.X.I.” when Lillian abandoned that school and mine to ns two years ago. but well why should we grumbh—we're the winners! Lillian followed her natural good judgment and continued her course in "hoine-ee". for which, as rumor has it. she’ll have adequate use—perhaps, real soon. To many, she may give the impression of being somewhat aloof and indifferent, but when it comes to a smile she’s right tlu-re with the goods. And when you know her. surely you'll love her. A generous nature, an ever-readiness to lend a helping hand, ami a sympathetic spirit, combine to make her attractive to the extreme. Here’s to you Lillian; may you never tire of delicious concoctions which have so often satisfied our appetites! "0 let the solid ground not jail beneath my feet. Hejore my life has found what some have found so street." AI)KA LOIS STILLMAN. It.S.II.K. “Littleun” Atlanta. (Jorgia. llonircon; Chi Omega. President of Ilomecon u±'2-f'2:i: Alpha Mu; Treasurer V. W. ’. A. Some people saunter thru life, some run and others dash madly. Lois belongs to the last mentioned categorv. A few people have been known to go into hysterics for fear Lois would not get to class on' time: street cur conductors always halt an extra minute at the Co-Kd Kuril Stop, and the pedestrians who ar - wise step aside when ’’friend Lois” ambles by. Hut why quibble over how a person does a thing- the imint is. she gets there just the same. “ff'hat is to be. will be, and what, is, is right."MTV ANN WOOD. 1LS.H.K. “Lu-lil’’ Cave Springs. (Jwrgin. V. V. C. A. Cabinet; It S. II. E. Sonli. Representative Student Government Association for Women 21; V. W. C. A. Cabinet; It. S. II. E. .Innioranii Senior Kepre-sentative Student Government Ass’ll ’22. 2:t; Sec. Zodiacs; Sec. lloniecon Club ‘22; House Council; Vlcc-Pres. Zodiac Club ’Si. No truer pioneer lias gone out from our emit institution than Lucv. Seizing the opisirtu-liity to make her life more useful to her fellowmun she came to "Georgia" in September. 1010. and lias been nn enthusiastic participant in the affairs contributing to the progress of co-educa-tion. in her steadiness of purisise and untiring devotion to the task before her she lias proven that the training which makes women happiest in themselves also makes them most serviceable to others. Her popularity has conic largely from her good nature and her willingness to do anyone a favor. She will certainly put any vocational High School on the map. or Home Demonstration work, in any county, in tile papers, because slut can cook good enough to make any inau "praise God from whom all blessings flow." ANNIE S. WOOTEN .1 LS.lI E. "Annie S." Atlanta. Georgia. lii Omega. Alpha Mu; lloinecott; Y.W.C.A. Two years ago N. I. C. sent us this original structure of dynamic determination. That is to say.'among the many things fo which Annie is noted, determination easily takes the lead. And. it may truthfully he said Annie’s gallantry of spirit is forever a source of wondrous admiration to her friends; likewise, a thing that any mortal would do well to emulate. She has a way of doing big things in ait easy, graceful way as if she were nceustomed to doing them every dav in the year. And work! Her capacity for work is as unlimited as Professor Sanford's line of jokes at a mass meeting. t We might say in passing that Annie is verily in love. Yes. in love! Xow.lior feeble biographer is into a "mess’., so we will hastily add that the objeet of Miss Wooten's affections is no other than Professor —or- or well. Professor Rosalie Halhboue. Fortunate indeed is Miss Jtathboiie! We don't know what "Annie S." contemplates doing when she gets her “dip", but we'll wager whatever it is. is done right. Junior Class History OME THREE years ago three hundred and twenty-seven young men and women enrolled as freshmen at tin- I Diversity of Georgia. Of that number, there remains today less than half—one hundred and twenty-one. to Ite exact to uphold the honor of the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Twenty Four, and the fair name of our Grand Old Institution. The most noteworthy event which has taken place since we first signed our names to the Registrar's hooks was the successful completion of Georgia's Million Dollar Drive. We count it a privilege to have done our hit in that which means so much for the future of Old Georgia. .Never was there a class like that of Nineteen and Twenty-Four! Among our present class are four G-men in football, two in basketball, and four in baseball. And a glance at “the Iwoks" will show that our class has maintained a high scholastic average during our three years. It is, however, in the Literary line that the Class of ’21 has done itself proud, in the scholastic year of 1920-21 every man who made Freshman Impromptu or Freshman Debate was a member of this famous class. Likewise, in the year following, of the twelve Sophomore Declaimed chosen, one hundred per cent were members of the present Junior Class. Still more remarkable- the present year saw every Junior Orator a wearer of the numerals '24. We ask )on, gentle reader, has this achievement ever been equaled by any other class? Hut enough of this idle chatter of the past! It seems foolish to speak of history when the Moving Finger has hut commenced to scratch our record. The Past has gone forever. It is to the Future that we look. One short year from now we will be called on to step forth into the world and shoulder the responsibilities of life. Soon, ail too soon, must we turn the Iasi page of the introduction and enter the first chapter of life. And yi't, much as we hate to think of leaving the shelter of our Alma Muter, the Class of '24 looks forward with no little eagerness to the time when we may face the problems single-handed. the dangers unaided, and the temptations uncounselled. We realize that much depends on us: that the future of the State and the University will, in a measure, rest in our hands; and wc pray that when the Great Historian enters the last word concerning us, there he not a single Idol to mar the page which is now so clean and bright. —HISTORIAN.Junior Class Officers L. B. Musgrove .. J. II. Freeman ... Millard Beeves .. . C. U. Youngblood Ken ley Kytlier . .. ...............President ......... Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer ............... Chaplain .............. HistorianJunior Class Roll Abercrombie, Vonnie, Arts.................Hiram Adams. James Marion. Science...........Augusta Anderson, Charles Roberts, Arts...........Macon Anderson, John Lee. Agriculture.. .Winter vilJc Armstrong, James Robert, Agri..........Woodville Beall, Joseph Spriggs, Agriculture.....Atlanta Bells. 1-ouis Necse, Jr., Com............Athens Bleckley, Barnett, Agriculture..........Clayton Bondurant. Elizabeth Moss. Education. .Athens Bridges, Walter, Agriculture.............Dawson Bush, Rose, Arts.........................Athens Butt, Hubert I-afayelte, Com...........Blairsville Callaway. Matilda. Home Econ............Claxton Cannadv, S. Annie. Education...........Fruitland Carmichael. Mary Frances, Educu........Comer Cartlcdge. Samuel Antoine, Arts........Athens Chance. Claude, Arts...................Graymont Chappell, Joel, Agriculture .... Americus (.'hick, Hoyt Nelson. Agriculture......Monroe Clccklcy, Hervey Milton, Science.......Augusta Collier, Clifford Warlhen, Agri........Meansville Conger, Mary Elizabeth, Education......Athens Cook. Hugh Yandell, Agriculture.. .Cooksville Cook. Robert Erie, Commerce. Cot ton wood, Ala. Cooper. Walter Gerald, Jr., Arts.......Atlanta Cox, Lemuel Emon, Agri...............Blue Ridge Dailey, Leonard Parker, Agriculture... .Homer Daniel, Sallic Fannie, Arts........Daniclsvillc D'Antignac, Auvergne. Civ. Eng..........Griffin l)ay. Theodore Roosevelt, Agri..........Douglas Death, Harry Lee. Commerce.............Covington Drexel. Adolph Edward. Vet. Med........Tiflon Dunaway. Jewel Luther, Agri................Rome Edwards. William an Buren. Agri......Griffin Exley. Slade Heyward, Per. Med.............Clyo Fant, Handy Bruce........................Athens Farrar, Clifford Eugene, Arts............Dawson Fesperman. George Thomas. Com..........Waycross Fickling, William Lloyd, Com............Atlanta Floyd, Dugma Ix ak. Agri...................Rome Fourchcr, Kenneth Rushton, Med.........Augusta Freeman, John Hilton, Commerce.........Forsyth Fulghum, William Lainar, Arts..........Augusta Gorfain, OredeJ Mark, Agriculture.. .Savannah Graham. Whaley, Arts Irreg................MeRac Grant. John William, Jr., ............. Atlanta Griffin. Mack Hall. Arts................Douglas Hall. Esper Everette, Agriculture......Bowman Hanahan. La Bruce Mortimer, Com.. Dothan, Ala. Harbin, Robert Marwcll, Arts...............Rome Hargrett. Felix, Civ. Eng................Tifton llarkey, Robert Franklin, Civ. Eng. ........................... Bradentown, Fla. Herndon, Elisha Merriman, Set’ ..Social Circle Heslop. Roland Coffyn. J’lism .Christobal. Pmna. Izlar. William Henry, Science............Waycross Jarrell, Joseph Gilman, Civ. Eng...........Athens Johnston. Jefferson Brooks, Com.........Cannon Johnston. William Bibson, Agri-... .Thoinaston Johnstone, Amos Charlisle, Arts Irreg.. .Athens Jones, Henry Alton. Arts.............Sale City Jones, Joseph Mabbett. Arts............Cario Jones, Lila, Home Economics...........Parrott Kelly, James Bartlett. Agri..........Cordele Kling, Joseph Williams, Science.......Atlanta Lanier, Eleazer. Jr.. Civ. Eng..........Summit I inier. William McKinley, Civ. Eng...Summit Lowoni. Charles Julian. Corn.........Carrolton Miller, Charles Oliver. Science..........Macon Miller. George William. Agriculture. .Waycross Miller. James Zenus. Agriculture. .Toomsl oro Minor, William Arthur, Jr., Agri.....Stone Ml. Murphey, George Walter. Agriculture. .Wadlcy Musgrove, l-ois Blonnie, Com.........Homerville McCommons. Luther Cloud, Com.. .Crecnslwro McGchcc, John Howard, Jr., Arts... .Talbolton McLendon, Waller Floy, Vet. Med... .Bluffton McRaincy. Neal Duncan, Agri............Elmodcl Newton. Joseph Barnwell, Agri........Woodbine Orr, Donald Fraser. Arts................Athens Patterson, Harold Telford, Science......Athens Paulk. Clarence Marion, Arts........... Tifton Payne, Elizabeth Fleming. Home E.con..Athens Pierce, Frances Dowdle, Science.........Parrott Power. Pat, Commerce................Carrollton Quillian, Amy. Education............... Athens Reed, Clarence Moses, Agri..........Lincolnton Reeves, Millard Arnold, Commerce... .Zehulon Richardson. Samuel Lumpkin, Agri........Rayle Robinson, Walter Leonard, Civ. E...College Pk. Rockwell, William Spencer, Agri......Savannah Ryther, Fcnley, Civ. Eng................Athens Sanders, Jeptha P. Agriculture.......Hartwell Sanders. Marion Dwight, Agri...........Decatur Seay. James Lester, Science.............Liclog Shaw. Ralph Benj.. Civ. Eng..........Woodville Shirley, Stonewall Jackson. Vet. Med.... Plains Sibcrt, John Winton. Jr.. Civ. Eng...Augusta Spann, Carl McKinley, Commerce..........Dalton Stephenson, John Willie. Agriculture. .Atlanta Stith, Gertrude Ernestine, Arts........Yidalia Taliaferro. William Granberry, Agri..Savannah Tate, William, Arts..................Fairmount Townsend, George Allen, Agriculture.....Kite Trawick. Anderson Jackson. Vet. Med.. .Linton Treanor, Kenneth. Agriculture........Ridgeville Vieitas, Raul. Agriculture- • Rio dejaneiro Brazil Walker. John Tracy, Agriculture......Shellman Walton, George Britain, Science......Hamilton Ware. Crawford Arncll. Agri..........Hogansville Watson, Otho Odell, Medicine............Dublin Whitner. John Selby, Commerce...........Atlanta Yoemans, Manning Stevens, Agri..........Dawson Young. Nellie Carbutt, Arts.............Athens Youngblood, Claude Ralph. Com........AugustaHistory of Junior Law Class HE FALL of 1921 saw the beginning of a mighty force, a mutely array ;»i first, but soon, under the guiding influence of loyalty and supreme good fellowship, the law class of 1924 became welded and united a one, suffering the same hardships and enjoying the same liberties and advantages. Of course, as in all gatherings and congregations, there were some not so fortunate as others. These men went out of the circle of endeavors, better for having ! ccu in it. and leaving those behind l ctter and broader as a result of their connection. Great men have we had among our number, men prominent not only in the University, not only in the State, but men known nationally. The illustrious "Bum" Day was at one time an admited and respected member; others like Pew. Mulvihili and Boney have left an influence not to he forgotten; these men are leaders. They have left behind in the hearts of the rest the ambition to do something; to become leaders of men is the example set by our predecessors. Some have left to take up other vocations we wish them success and feel sure that the memory of our class will linger in their hearts as one of the most worthwhile periods of their lives. We have men represented in all branches of University activities. In our class arc members of all honorary and social clubs and men who have fought for the glory of old Georgia oil all of the athletic fields. Can we but admire these men? Olliers have been honored as speakers, writers, orators, and students, and in ways too numerous to mention have the members of our class been recognized for their ability and genius. Politics has ever been a magic word to mankind; honest politics, impossible; clean IKdilics almost unheard of; yet, who is not satisfied with the officers of the past two years W illiam Fulcher of W'aynesboro was the most prominent man and the logical leader of our class. At the latter part of the year another man made himself known and due to his work for the school and his irresistible personality. William C. Munday, Jr. of Atlanta was elected to fill the chair as President. In th«- future —who knows what it holds for us? For some, greatness; for others, who knows?Junior Law Class Officers W. C. Munday, Jr, J. E. Foy ....... J. J. Bennett .... T. G. Glenn..... ...............Preside nl ......... Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer ...............HistorianJunior Law Class Alexander, Adam Leopold ........ Allen, William DeLacy .......... Benneu. Joseph Johnston. Jr. .. Bird. Francis MaKo ............. Breed. Herbert Hay ............. Browder, David Chandler ........ Brown, William Angus ........... Cohen, Samuel Alfred ........... Davis, Henry Woody ............. Dean, Hcrliert Henry, Jr........ Dyar, Thomas Carlyle ........... Fletcher, John Hamilton ........ Freeman. Davis, Jr.............. Frier, Alvah Hansel ............ Fulcher, William Marcus ........ Gcarreld. Frank L............... Glenn, Thomas Little. Jr........ Cordon, James Francis .......... Grayson. Spence Monroe ......... Harvey. William Thomas ......... lleiman, Lou ..................... Hester, Joseph Cohen ........... Higdon. Archelaus William .... Higdon, Cornelius Wilburn .... Higdon, Madison Vespucius .... Joseglove, isadorc Aaron ....... Lewis, Emanuel ................... Mulvihill, Alexander Richard . Munday, William Chenault, Jr. Mcl.aws. Philip Livingston .... Nelson, Carlton Krather ........ Padgett. Charles Leonard ....... Pearson, Claude Wilkins ........ Post. Daniel Muse .............. Kamsey, Burton Hugh ............ Holier! s. John Hulherford ..... Tift, Richard Ashe ............. Tyson. Glenn Cheatham .......... Walton. Thomas Berrien. Jr. ... West. Ernest Prescott .......... Wisdom, William Arnold ......... Wright, Arnold ................. ........ Savannah .......... Smyrna ......... Atlanta .......... Bowden ......... LaG range ........... Cordele ..... Dewey Rose ........ Savannah ......... Camilla ...... Gainesville .......... Athens .......... Tifton .......... Savannah .......... Denton ..... Waynesboro .......... Newnan ...........Athens ........... Atlanta ........ Savannah .......... Columbus ..........Atlanta .......... Savannah ........ Savannah ........ Savannah ........ Savannah High Springs, Fla. ........ Savannah .......... Athens ......... Atlanta .......... Savannah .......... Dublin ,.......... Atlanta .......... Augusta .......... Newnan ....... Statesboro .... Donalsouville .......... Albany ........... Darien ...... Washington ..... Wrightsville .......... Chipley .......... NewnanJunior Pharmacy Class History E, THE Pharmacists to be in the dim and distant future, came here on a bright September morn, after having discovered that a beaker was not a little pitcher minus a handle, settled down to show an astonished world what a class of such brilliant scholars thirsting after Pharmaceutal knowledge could accomplish. Since that eventful September morning we have come through many trials and hardships and learned quite a number of things concerning various and sundry topics. We have struggled through a maze of unending I.abs. Labs! Labs!! We have delved into the mysterious complexities of divers strange concoctions, compounds, and druggy substances. We have compounded equally strange concoctions and are ever willing to demonstrate their effectiveness upon anyone who is inclined to have doubts about the matter. With all of our knowledge however, the Seniors tell us even yet that there is more and still more to be learned, and what is more discouraging, certain persons declare that they are going to make a fortune by establishing Undertaker’s Parlors next door to our drug store. Be that as it may, we have the distinction of being the most popular class in the University—with the Dean at least, for he never fails to send us written invitations every time the books come out, cordially urging that we call on him at our earliest convenience. Although we arc few in number it is quality rather than quantity that counts for most after all, for if a man can roll a belter pill than his neighbor the world will beat a pathway to his door. And, my friends, when you sec that pathway you may know that it leads to the door of the Pharmacy Class of ’24.Junior Pharmacy Class Kelly, c. w........... Herrin, Harold .M. . Robinson, J. B........ Miller, Gloria........ Brown. I). K. Crisp, J. A. Enloe. Y. I . ............... President .......... Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer ............... Historian Gro», Charles H. Harlow. John K. Johnson. H. L. Wil'iams. F. Y.“S o Wr-XSophomore Class History NOTHER year has rolled by and with it another Sophomore Class has come and gone—gone, save in the deep recesses. Now, in a spirit of reminiscence we will draw aside for a moment the curtain of time and review the events of the past year, our sophomore year. In the last days of September 1922 we arrived in Athens with justifiable pride that we were at last sophomores. And as sophomores we thought as sophomores, thoughts that boded ill to the incoming horde of freshmen. For the first few days scissors and paddles were very much in vogue, and that our work was done, and done well, numerous freshmen will testify. Graveyard parties reigned supreme in the freshman's social realm. It required only a few weeks of these disciplinary methods to give the strangers in our midst their proper start on their college career. Our duty in this respect was done. We had acquitted ourselves nobly. Now for the sterner things of our year’s work. And that we have diligently applied ourselves to our classroom tasks can be substantiated by a perusal of the scholastic records of the class. To every line of activity at the I niversity the Sophomore class has contributed and contributed generously. Some of the most prominent defenders of the Red and Black are numbered among the class of ’25. We are especially proud of the literary achievement of our class, having made a record in this respect that coming classes will do well to emulate. Although our class is violently opposed to co-education we cannot overlook or hide the fact that we gave to the University its first woman speaker. As a class our college journey is half over. Behind us lies the rough and unknown pathway of the Junior and Senior years. The future is in our hands. Just what it will be depends on our individual efforts and how we apply ourselves. Let us remember our past record and resolve to fight a good fight and to give our all in the days that arc before us. We cannot belter sum up our year’s work than to tell of a tribute paid us by Uncle Dave on our Sophomore year. He said that as a result of the very moderate hazing at the University this year the present Freshman Class had been given a better chance to study than any preceding class. Surely to merit such a statement from Uncle Dave is sufficient cause for pride in our work as Sophomores. Sophomore Class Officers P. E. Jones..................................................... President C. E. McArthur............................................. Vicc-PresUlcnt A. S. Bradley .....................................Secretary and Treasurer I). W. Ryther......................................................... Poet G. C. Dean ..................................................... Historian Sophomore Abney. Horace Isham Civ- Eng............Athens Adams, Tommie Martin. Ere. Med........Elbcrton Alnut, Thomas I anier. Commerce.. .Savannah Ashford. William Henry. Jr., Com......Athens Hailey, Mary Ethel. Home Econ...........Athens Baker. Charles Huber. Com.........Danielsville Baltzell. George Franklin Jr., Arts... .Newnan Barrett. Dorothy. Education.............Athens Barrow. Augusta Arnold. Arts............Athens Beer. Edwin, Civ. Eng...................Athens Belcher. Leo William. Com...........Bainbridgc Bidding, Morris Coodson. Science......Augusta Blackwell, Ernest Griffith. Agriculture. .Athens Blount. John William, Commerce... .Savannah Boley, Evelyn, Education................Athens Bond, Augustus Guerard, Com...... .Savannah Bonner. James Calvin. Journalism______Carrolton Boone. William Lester. Vet. Med.......Baxley Bowen, Nellie May, Commerce............Quitman Bowers. Folly Ruth. Home Econ...........Athens Bradley, Alden Shirley, Arts......Swainsboro Broome, William Herbert, Agriculture. .Macon Brown, Claud Vinson. Education____Union City Brown, Millcdge Hartsficld. Com...Ft. Valley Brown, Raiford Franklin. Science......Athens Buchanan, Joe D„ Commerce..............Jackson Bush, Esther, Arts......................Athens Butler, Jacob Johnson. Agriculture....Athens Bulner, Robert Roy. Science... Powder Springs Butt, Sylvan Edwin, Ere. Med..........Blairsville Caldwell, John Moss, Jr. Medicine... .Augusta Calhoun, James Villard, Commerce------Atlanta Calloway, Hamilton St. Clair, Arts....Athens Campbell, James David. Science........Atlanta Carswell, Porter Wilkins. Arts... .Waynesboro Caruthcrs, Robert Sample, Com.........Statesboro Chandler, Isaac Vibian, Agri..........Commerce Cloud. David Lowe, Jr.. Science.,. .Greensboro Coppingcr, David Wade, Vet. Med.......Atlanta Courie, Simson Nabhen, Arts...........Greenville Craig, Henry Roosevelt. Medicine......Augusta Cromarlic. James Alex. Commerce.......Vidalia Crouch. Charles Franklin, Commerce... .Ocilla Curtis, Charles Arthur. Civ. Eng..........Neal Davis, Alexander. Commerce..............Athens Davis, Alfred Lee, Science................Rome Davis, Marguerite. Education......Commerce Davis. Winifred Jordan, Home Econ-----Athens Day. John Milton, Agriculture.........Douglas Deale, W. RoscofT, Journalism.....Statesboro Dean, George Colquitt. Com........College Park Dickey, Ernest Gibson, Com.. .Baltimore, Md. Doar, Frank McBeth, Commerce..........Augusta Dolvin, Ralph Leonard, Agriculture... .Siloam Dornblatt, Amelia Boley, Journalism... Athens Dowdle. Frank Thomas, Agriculture... .Athens Dowdy, Annabel....................... Commerce Drexel, Frederick Charles, Agri-.. Tifton Class Roll Ebcrhardt, Homer Christian, Sci.......Maysville Edwards, Myrtle. Arts................Fairmount Ellis, Rutherford Lipscomb. Arts......Atlanta Erwin, Marie, Science..............Blairsville Estes, George Presley. Jr.. Ere. M... .Gainsville Everett. Samuel Thomas, Jr.. Com......Pelham Evitt, Troy England. Arts.........Rocky Face Farr, Jesse Russell. Vet. Med...........Athens Fears, I eila May. Commerce.............Athens Ferguson. Mary Olivia. Arts............Augusta Fitts. John Berlin. Ere. Medical.... Danielsville Fletcher. James Monroe. Com...........Columbus Foote, Waller Ogilby. Science..........Atlanta Forrest. Luke Astell, Agricidture.......Leslie Franklin. W illiam Jesse. Sci. Irreg..Zebulon F'redcrick. Sinclair A., Com......Marshalsvitle Gaertncr, Nelle J.. Ere. Med.. .Oglethorpe Uni. Gaerlncr, Herman Julius, Jr.. Journalism. .0. U. Gallagher. Elbert William. Com....Montezuma Cardiner. Lisle Sears ................ Augusta Garritt, Mahlon Cooper. Com.......Logansville Gay, Owen Edwards. Agriculture........Garfield George. Emerson Holland, Jr.. Science Irreg. .................................. Madison Gibbs. Helen. Education...........Social Circle Green, Calvin Davis, Agriculture......Moultrie Green. Lewis Crouch, Agriculture.. .Ft. Valley Green. Thomas Fitzgerald, Arts..........Athens Groover. Frank Clayton. Com. Irreg.. .Quitman Gurley, James Brown, Jr., Edu.....Logansville Hagood, Lowery Tavlor, Agri.. .Oakdale. Tenn. Hailey. Ethel Elizabeth. Arts...........Athens Hall. F'ric Edward, Commerce.........1-aGrangc Hamilton. Newell Martin, Com... .Thomasvillc Hammond, Emily Cummings, Ere. M.. .Augusta Handcock, James Harold, Civ. Eng......Athens Hancock, Lizzie May, Home Econ........Lizella Harley, James Balckshead, Com.........Waycross Head. Herbert andolali, Jr., Com....Athens Heath, William Pratt, Jr., Arts........Atlanta Hill. Wclbom Buchanan, Arts.............Newnan Hodges. Charles Stuart. Agri......:_____Albany Hodgson. Fldward Reginald. Com........Athens Hodgson. Harry Lowe, Commerce.........Athens Hollis, William McKinley. Agri........Reynolds Howell, Albert. Jr.. Arts..............Atlanta Hubert. Henry Olin, Jr., Arts...........Harlem Hughes. Lee Henry, Commerce...........Oakwood Husbands, Ben Howard, Com.............Waycross Jackson. John William, Agri............Griffin Jankower, Edward Maurice, Com. Irreg..Athens Jarrell. Hampton McNecly, Arts........Athens Joel, Lyons Barnett. Commerce..........Atlanta Johnson. Green Flourncy, Jr., Arts, Irreg. ............................... Monticello Johnson, Henry Bradley, Arts...........Augusta Johnson. James Rufus. Commerce........Dalton Jones. Harris, Commerce.................AthensJours. Pratl Elmer, Pre. Medical________Columbus Jones, Robert Bruce. Arts..................Macon Kelley. Raphael Emerson, Agriculture.. .Avera knight. William Taylor, Commerce.. .Quitman Lamar. Lucius. Arts.......................Dawson Lane. Byrl Benjamin. Pre. Med.. .Donalsonville Langford. Calvin Howard. Agri.......Daniclsville Langston, Shelby Preston. Com.............Monroe Lawton. Edward Pcrcival. Com............Savannah Lowe, NN illiam Cloud. Arts........Retina Vista Lucas. Jonathan. Journalism.............Savannah Lufhurrow, Stephen Brown. Jr.. Agri... .Oliver Lund. Naxficld. Commerce..................Athens Maddox, John Bernard. Arts...............Conyers Maddox, Sarah Evelyn, Home Econ.. .Cullodcn Mann. Oscar Samuel, Commerce............Koyston Martin, Charles Holmes. Jr.. Com--------Cainsvillc Massey. Edward Grady, Pre. I led........Valdosta Merritt, Thomas Edward. Agri-..............Macon Middlehrooks, Harry LaFayette, Sri... Eatonton Middleton. Robert Merriwethcr, Agriculture ........................ Merriwethcr. S. C. Mitchell. Frank Elijah. Agriculture... .Athens Moody, Clarence Ahna, Pet. Med..........Blakely Modeller, Joseph Brown. Civ. Eng.. .Columbus Mote. John Hulon. Science.............Monticello Murray. Willie Slater. Pre. Med.........Augusta Myerson. Irvin Philip Journalism........Athens McArthur, Charlie Eugene, Pre. Med...Cordele McCarthy. John Brown. Commerce..........Dalton McCrary. William Laurence, Com..........Augusta McElveen, Jesse Wyman, Agn..............Areola McIntosh. John Hawkins. Jr.. Com........Boston McKinnon. George Itemur. Com..............Boston McLendon. Clarence Durwood, Agri.. ..Sasser McLendon. Lucius Blaketnore, Agri.......Sasser McNecr, May Yongc, Journalism. .Tampa. Fla. McRae, William Harrington. Commerce Irreg .................................. Valdosta McWilliams Henry Trammell. Com..........Griffin Nelson, Lucuis Henry. Agri................Dublin Octjen, Leroy Henry. Medicine...........Augusta Orr. Frederick William, Agri..............Athens Owens, Auburn Caubelle, Arts.............Augusta Pantone, Clifford. Commerce.............Savannah Parker, John Leslie, Civ. Eng............Whigham Parr, Bessie, Home Econ..................Atlanta Parrish, William Brantley. Agri.........Brooklet Peeples, Alice Winn. Arts.................Athens Pendergrast. John Heidt, Arts...........Reynolds Philpot. William K.. Medicine............Augusta Phinazce. James Harrison. Agri...........Griffin Piltard. Maxwell Hurt. Commerce. .Winterville Powell. Cuthbert Ennis. Pre. Med.. .Swainsboro Powers, Henry Waller, Agriculture.......Rome Randall. Foy Clifford. Pet. Med...........Athens Rauziu, lhcrt. Commerce................Savannah Reid. John Whitfield. Agriculture.......Roswell Richards, Paul Wtllelon. Civ. Eng.......Athens Richardson. Roberts James. Agri...........Athens Roberts. Lucien Emerson, Arts.............Dallas Rothschild. Herbert Bernard. Sci........Columbus Rutherford. Clara Bell, Arts............Roberta Rylher. Dwight Warren. Jr., Com.........Athens Sale, Fred Link, Pre. Medical............Buford Sanders. Earl Irvin. Agriculture.....Knoxville Sanford, Homer Reynolds, Com.............Athens Schncll. William Irving, Com...........Columbus Scoggins. Roy Thomas. Commerce..........Athens Scoggins, Paul Thurman, Corn.............Athens Sears. Edgar Louis, Forestry...........Columbus Sewell, Walter Edwin, Arts...............Newnan Sheffield, Harold Craton. Journalism Irreg. .................................. Atlanta Shelley. Austin Malachi. Commerce.......Pavo Shores, Hcrschel Henry, Agri...............Rome Slater. Frank Joseph. Science..........Savannah Slaughter, Carnctt Fain, Com.............Athens Smaha. Tofcy George. Science............Griffin Smalley. Robert Harris, Agri.........Lincolnton Smith, Herman Burton, Pet. Med..........Alliens Snelling. David Barrow, Arts.............Athens Southern, William Hoke. Agri.........Dunwoody Stanfort. Reace I.ogan. Pre. Sled....Ml. Vernon Stewart. Frederick Hahr. Journalism... Athens Stokes. Morris Layton. Commerce.........Atlanta Strahan, .Mary, Arts.....................Athens Strange, James L. Pre. Medical.......Oak Park Sullivan. Herman Perry, Journalism. Waynesboro Summers, Herbert Andrew, Com.........Conyers Talmadgc. Marian Cracc, Home Econ.. .Athens Tanner, John Wesley, Com..............Carrollon Tarragano, Sarah, Home Econ.............Atlanta Tatum. Jefferson Wright. Arts........Ft. Gaines Tatum, Webb. Agriculture.............Kensington Taylor. Nicholas James, Pel. Med... Hazlchurst Taylor. William Walter. Forestry....Arab. Ala. Thomason, James David. Com...........Columbus Tillman. Thomas McKey, Com...........Valdosta Tinker, John Minton. Forestry............Athens Tucker, Genevieve, Home Econ.............Athens Turk. Clovis, Agriculture..............Commerce Turner, Dewitt Campbell. Com.........Largo, Fla. Turner. Jim Chandler, Home Econ.... Elbcrton Tyler, Thomas Leon, Com..................Albany N ason. Sue Reid, Arts..................Madison Neale, William Horace, Com...........NValkinsvillc NVatson. Henry Latimer. Jr., Com.....Columbus Watson, Josh Lanier. Civ. Eng........Statesboro Weems. Sarah Parks. Home Econ...........Athens NVestbrook, Jessie Lovic, Pre. Med...........Ha NVcyman. Sam Mavrick, Com...............Atlanta Wheeler, Richard A., Com...............Savannah Whitaker. Rosemary Stevens, Journalism ................................ Elbcrton Whitehead. Carl Thco, Medicine.. .Gainesville Whitehead, Thomas Hillyer, Medicine. .Athens Wielurs. Charles Frederick, Jr., Com..Savannah NVier. Annie Laurie. Home Econ...........Athens Williams. Horace Jackson, Journalism. Unadilla Wood, Samuel NVasden. Agri.........Sandcrsville Woody, Oscar. Agriculture..............Acworth Youmans. Comer Roger, Pre. Med...........Lexsy Young, Frank Marion, Agriculture... LafayetteMSIFirst Year Law Class Allen, LeRoy ............... Rozarth, Frank Albert ...... Brooks, Cussic ............. Brown. Lawrence Wright ,. Carroll, David Edgar ....... Carter. Robert Lee Pittman Cooley. James Grady ........ Cox, Lamar Patterson ....... Dugger, George Frederick . Epting. Wallace Houseal .. Fitts. Sheldon ............. Florence. Robert Spurgeon Foy. John Ellison. Jr....... Glass. James Francis ....... Goethe, Edward Kcmcys ... Go wen. Charles Latimer .. Griffith. Rupert Baun ______ Gurr. Edward McLain ........ Hatcher. Albon Lee ......... Helmly, Israel Clinton ----- Holliday. William D......... House. Edith Elizabeth ... Jelks, Freeman Napier------- Johnson. Martin Latimer .. Jones. James Morgan ........ Kauffman, Guy .............. Kirkland. Deppish, Jr....... Mabry, Harvey Melvin .... Marshall, Alexis Abraham Milledge, DcBlois .......... Milledgc. Stanley .......... Miller, Oscar Francis Mock, Theodore Richard .. McCiffen. Thomas Jackson McPherson, Hoyt Hamilton Nathan, Abraham Aaron ... Odom. John Duncan .......... O'Neal, Marvin Richards . Ossinsky, Louis ............ Perkins. James Williams .. Perry. Terrell Rainey, Jr. .. Powell, Clarence Lee ....... Ramsey. Lynton Francis ... Randall. Loren Chester______ Robinson, Lee LaFayetle .. Saffold. Robert Earle ______ Sage. Ira Yale. Jr.......... Smith. Judson Butts ........ Sullivan. Leo Anthony ______ Veal, Lawrence.............. Wilson. Frank Lyndall .... Wright, Robert Allman .... ........... Qmtman ........... Darien ........... Athens ............ Athens .......... Decatur ......... Commerce ......... EJberton .......... Camilla Elizabethton, Tenn. ......... Savannah ............ Athens .......... Augusta ......... Savannah ......... Savannah ... Vamville, S. C. ....... Brunswick ......... Buchanan ............ Macon ...... Wrightsvillc ......... Savannah ........ Jefferson ........... Winder ..... Hawkinsville ............ Athens ........... Sardis .. St. Charles, Va. ......... Savannah ........... Athens .......... Atlanta ........... Athens ............ Athens ......... Columbus ...... Montgomery ....... Brunswick .......... Atlanta ............ Jesup ......... Columbus ......... Savannah . Jacksonville. Fla. . ...v..... Athens ........ Sylvester .......... Augusta ......... Norcross ........... Athens .......... Quitman .......... Vidalia .......... Atlanta ........ Brunswick ......... Savannah .......... Conyers .......... Atlanta ............. Rome1 'Why We Stroll Out Milledce'freshman class history the largest class of freshmen that has ever assembled at the university of gcorgia was the class of '26. it was indeed a grand sight to behold the bald heads of the lower classmen when they first entered upon the duties of a college student, the freshman class of '26 started the year right when they stopped the sophomores on college avenue the second night before freshman night, and held more than their own in the annual “fist affair” between the first and second year men. our venerable chancellor gave the freshmen a royal welcome when he delivered a short talk the first chapel morning, and declared that he was a freshman and would always be one since lie entered the university of gcorgia as a sophomore. never before has a freshman class entered the university of georgia with such a bright outlook for the future as the class of 26. the members of this class have, with marked success, distinguished themselves in every phase of college activity, on the gridiron and on the basketball court as well as on the baseball field the freshmen have achieved much fame and distinction. according to various reports given out by chancellor barrow, the scholastic standing of the class of 1926 was unusually high for a freshman class. there has been a very wholesome increase during the last four years in the number of undergraduate women students at the university, according to a statement given out by miss mary lyndon, dean of women, about 10 per cent of the freshman class this year are of the fair sex. in the literary societies and other fields of oratory freshmen of 26 have achieved much success. the year 1926 was distinguished from past years in the history of georgia because it was the first year that the freshmen had a representative team in athletics. the freshmen of 1926 have drunk deep in the fountain of georgia history and have themselves become true and staunch supporters of the red and black. all hail to the class of 26! -historian.freshman class officers george w. heriot, jr. j. h. wright......... george s. cargill, jr. m. s. cook ......... cooper powers j. v. webb.......... b. c. colson......... f. h. ball.......... ............ president ....... vice-president . . secretary-treasurer ............ historian . .. . parliamentarian ..............chaplain .......cheer leader assistant cheer leaderfreshman ahcrnathy, john danicl, commerce..........hlakely acrec, well alien, pre. med.............Sylvester adkins. lena grace, home economics.......Vienna alien, robert lafayclte, jr.. com........flovilla anderson, julian tIleus, commerce... .Statesboro anderson, robert edward.' science........augusta bailey, lucius asbley, pre. med.. .ellcnlon, s. c. bailey, mary dean, arts.............Social circle baker, peggy, home economics..............royston barlield, robert e. jr., arts............valdosta bargeron, cverett. pre. med...........wayneslioro bargeron. yewjy cugene, jr., arts.. .Washington harksdalr, mary clizabelli, arts.....Springfield bartlctt. baywood Summerville, arts......atliens hartley, henry allon, arts................chipley barton, joe terrell, arts irreg...........Iiowman bass, wesley edward, commerce.. ..milledgeville licacb, henry fair, commerce............brunswick beaebam. william dunsler, jr., commerce, .alliens healo, charles bernard. forestry.........savannah bceland. dan sully, arts.................rcynolds bennett. malcolm ross. commerce..........atlanta benson. bertha margaret, home ccon.. .marietta beusse. benrietta. home econ.............alhens bickcrstaff, charles alien, arts..........alliens bishop, george norman, agriculture.......at hens bishop, joseph cider, civ. eng.............alhens blount, robert ashton, commerce______wayneshoro Ijolcy, bertram Sidney, arts.............at hens holton. wayland eugene, commerce.........parrott boone. william joseph. agriculture..........perry brady. riebard douglas. science...........atlanta brawner, james newton, science............atlanta breen. harry david, jr.. commerce........waycross bridges, anna deane. home economics.. .9argent brown, arlliur davidsou. commerce........sbaron brown, benjamin barlow, jr., commerce, .griffin brown, lewis pearce. civ. eng.............atliens brown, hugli herbert. journalism.........nasbville brumby, robert inongin. commerce... .marietta bryan, jame iiorthcn, science.............luxomni bidder, waiter raymond, agri.. .Indianapolis, ind. hurks, david halsey. agriculture..........griffin burroughs, john herbert. pre. med.............ila butler, robert jeff. commerce........watkinsville byne, james miller, jr.. pre. med.... wayneshoro caldwell. howell. commerce................atlanta callaway. lois howell, home econ.....sunnyside Callaway, william garuell, agriculture.. .atliens Campbell, davis Stanley, civ. eng.........atliens cargill. george slade, jr.. arts.........savannah cauthen, frank merriman. com. ireg.roanokc. ala. chulker, bill liowurd, pre. med..........mitchell chambers, andy homer, agriculture........buford rhambliss. james rollin. jr.. commerce... plains chandler, eddie gilbert, pre. med............hull chandler, james bethel, pre. med.............hull chesnut. william grier. commerce.........atlanta class roll clarke. Christian hudgins, jr.. com.....atlanta clarkc, george miller, agriculture......augusta close, t ho mas mcelmurray, commerce, .savannah coebran. jolni robert. jr., com..........savannah colquit, carlton black, education------thomaston colson. james byron, arts.............kingsland comer, franccs clizabetb, home econ.....atliens conley, don bryan, commerce.............atliens cook. j. carter, jr.. commerce..........atlanta cook, lueycle, home econ................atliens cook, meyer sussman. journalism......fitzgcrald cook, oscar thonias. arts................Iwston cotton, charlcs heflin. arts..........west point cranford, robert bewitt, arts..............sasser crovat, joe g.. pre. medical..........thomasville cumbus. george warren, jr.. electric eng..atliens curry, elizabeth. home econ...............atliens d’antignac. munroe de mere. com. irreg...Criffin davenport, adeline « lainc, education, .fitzgerald davidsou. joseph qucnlin, arts.........ft. valley davis, ilouglas lafayclte, vet. med... .Clarksville dcadwyler, thurston albert, pre. med......atliens dean, jessc jocl. commerce.................athens dobbs, james protbrox. commerce irreg. .atliens dolvin, james humilton, commerce..........siloam dornblatt. alliert julius ................ athens doughty, melville, pre. med. augusta drewry. judson liarrell. journalism.......griffin dunson, albert goss. commerce............lagrange dupis, setli elroy. jr.. journalism....warrenton earnest, david lewis, jr.. science........atliens caton, james loyd. forestry.........viola, tenn. edwards, charles beach, commerce... .savannah elyca. george develle. commerce...........atlanta ezcll. lee crawford. agriculture.......billsl»oro fain, clarence samuel. arts..............ringgold fanning, james choice, arts...............thomson fciler. edwin jacob. arts................savannah flanagan. thonias carlton. commerce.......athens forbes, james lauritz, commerce..........valdosta ford, carrie, arts irreg................ atliens foster, william albert, jr.. pre. med......dallas franklin, gordon. arts...................ptilaski franklin, sarah. home econ................atlanta frazer. james powell, architecture.........macoii frcderick. Iiarold loyd. civ. eng.........vidalia fullilove, henry marshall, jr.. pre. med...athens gant, john maxwell, commerce.. .pensacola. fla. garner, milliard hither, agriculture.....dunlin gatewood. hal hawkins. commerce______americus gladin. chandler balkooni............... mcintyre glenn, henry robertson, commerce........athens glover, carr sullivan, jr., commerce_____americus grant, bishop franklin, forestry... walhalla. s. c. gray, john william, jr.. agri.....beaufort, s. c. gray, thomas Stephens, jr., ..............augusta grayson. james roy. pre. med...............athens green, john clifton. jr.. com.....anderson, s. c.green, john william, commerce. .anderson. s. c. griffin, jones llewcllyn. urn........jcffersonville griffitli, jim frank, pre. medical.......buchaiian gri s. ernest lcc. jr.. civ. eng.............alliens griner. adlai ! .. agriculture.........marshal ville guylon. jnoses, jr.. science.........marianna. fla. hall, frank herndon. commerce...............lagrange hurahon. frank eonlcy. commerce__________hlairsville liardin. david harry, prc. med................dallon hardniun. william henry, agriculture, .commerce hargrctl. lester. arts........................tiflun liarris. john william, science...............alliens harris. william hrook, agriculture.......newnun hart, Clifford. pre. medical................savannah liarvey. harris graham, prc. med...............jakin halfield, georgo raiford. vet. med... .montieello hay, james willis. commerce...................dallas haves, john akin, civ. eng....................sasscr head, huh rnfus. agriculture................clermonl head, james crillenden, commerce.............alliens henslev. ernesl alherl. pre. med.............augusta heriot. george Washington. jr.. pre. med.....sav. hiers. jack sidney. prc. medical.................way cross hiphiower, edward august us. com..............spuria liilton. Ice holmes, commerce...............sylvania liilclicock. frederick eoleman. pre. med.. .dallas [lodges, claylon ralph. pre. med..........hrinson holland. george preston. science..........augusta holliday. henry, science.....................alliens Iioojrt, charles herty. arts...............alliens hopkins. james russell. civ. eng..........atlicns hoscli. john harrison. jr.. commerce, .gainesvillc hu'dgins. dorolhy lender, arts..................mine huff, charles wilmer. commerce...........carrolion huggins. mary sue, home ccnn.................atlicns huggins. william carl, agriculture............oliver jester, ethel corin. home econ...............atlanta johnson. george marvin. jr.. com_________hartow. fla. johnson. liollis m., arts irreg..............alliens johnson. john wesley. commerce................dallon jolinston. joseph Icon, vet. med..............sasscr jones, mara ella. arts...........,.......smithvillc jones, ralph kelly, civ. eng..................oxford jones. richard mordecai, jr.. arts, .gadsden. ala. kamensky, fee. journalism................atlanta kennedy. james ailaway. civ. eng.......hacoitlon kenny. lawrence, commerce....................alliens kent. frederick hever. commerce..........savannah kenl. ray s„ commerce..................waverlv hall kilpatrick, andrew jones, jr.. com.......augusta kilpalrick, charles meeord. prc. med... .augusta kilpatrick. martin edward. science...........athcris kim .ey, margaret. home ccon.................alliens lamarlinc. octavio. agri. irreg......acary. brazil langley, archie, commerce................lafayette laramore, julius hennclt. jr., arts.......lagrange Saxarus, max. jr.. commerce....................macon leach, john I., journalism...................jackson levie. marshall craigg. com...............niontezuma levy, dorothy ida arts.......................augusta levy, hyman sydncy.«r s.....................savannah lewis, edward lloyd. pre. med...........greenslmro lewis, frank mccall. commerce..............quitman lipscomh, edwin sinilli. fire, med......cuniming little, fiances elizabeih. arts.............sparta lilllo. rohert nallian. pre. med..........Cornelia little, william jacoh. agriculture...........macon lochridge. Imherl thomas, com...........atlanta magill. eli ahetli earroll. arts...........athens mugruder. george milton. jr.. prc. med..grovetnn mahoney, joseph alozsius, com...........duhlin mallory. roswell. science irreg...........athens niarion, olive, home econ..................atlanta marks, thomas donald. pre. med... .Summerville marshall, willoughhy earl. jr.. science..reynolds marlin, frank hcamon. commerce... .stateslioro mell, Carlton newton, science...............athens merrell. rohert a., commerce............Carrollton miller, bills cranford. commerce.......hmnwood minter. richard gideon. civ. eng..........iiampton moon. Christine, education..................Iiiram inoore. william Icon, agriculture.............gray moran, dorothy josettc, arts...............atlanta morcoek. john cooper, jr.. agriculture, .savannah morris, rohert dupree, commerce...............nunc morion, james while, jr.. agriculture______athens morion, louise hinton, arts irreg...........athens mulherin, philip authmiy. arts.............augusta munro. henry smith, agriculture............alliens iticcullough, ernest I., com. irreg........atlanta mekemie. william johnson. jr., com------eoleman niekenzie, tliatcher pierpont. pre. mcd..rcidsville mckoy. lierhert alexander. agriculture..newnan mcmanus, esthcr, home econ.................atlanta mcmillan, neal james. agriculture...........athens mcneill, james kinard. science.............augusta merae. rohert henry, agriculture... .ml. vernon mcree, jerry jones, commerce.............kinderlou ncel. william mayson. commerce.............decatur nelson, thomas iiianeliiit. jr., civ. eng... .alhany nixon. guinn liuxlcy, jr.. commerce... .augusta nolan, bur well atkinson. pre. med........marietta unite, cltarley wayne. forestry........hlairsville nunnlly. Iiugii pendleton. arts............atlanta odom, alvin lee. vet. medicine...............Ivons oliver. warringlon maxwell, jr.. arts.. .valdosta orr, douglns milton. arts..................atlicns oshorne. louise bacon, science..............alhany owens, gula waiter, arts....................alhany owens, Iiuhert bond, agriculture.............canon padgett, david mauriee. commerce--------glennville palmisano, leonard antlmny. science........athens pnris, lierman. commerce..............sandersville park katherinc. com. irreg..................athens parker. alien brooks, pre. medical.........milieu parker. rosa julia. home econ...............milieu patton, normal) hawking, arts.................hull pearce. lierhert embry. commerce--------Columbus peoples, andrew, arts irreg........hlufftou, s. c. perry, celia, arts............................sale city perry, john kolb. vet. medicine.........kingsland pittman. dill, medicine.............gaffney. s. c.plaster. emma elizabeth. journalism-------atlanla I or er. roberl linton. arts...............alliens powers, cooper. journalism...............quitman powers, jolm. pre. medical..............lagrange prisani, myrom Isaac, commerce.............albanv quick, edward whitesidc, com. irreg.. .columbus rackley. ernest william, agriculture. .way net boro raiford, william savage, commerce.........alliens randolpb. george buford, science..........dalloii ralclifTe, dean jolmstnn. arts irreg......atlanla ruuziu. julius leonard. arts.............suvamiali richardson, arlliur embry, science........lagrange liebardson. Clifford nolan. arts irreg....atlanla roberts. henry hansel, science..............macon robeils. joseph duke, education.........eedartown roberts. roberl glenn. commerce. . lawrenccville robinson, william e«lward, jr., com., milledgeville rosenherg. irvin. commerce................Columbus russell, thoma shefiall. jr., commerce.savannah russell. waller brown, journalism...........winder sailer, james josey, arts...................barlow sanders. mac belle, arts.................knoxville sallof. jolm. commerce....................columbus schwa lb. otto william, pre. med.......savannah SCoII, william thumas. jr.. re , med......griffin scroggs, george bell, commerce.........gainesville searcy. william everard hamillon II.. .commerce ...................................... griffin segresl. roberl taylor. commerce..........lagrange sellers, morgan dykes, pre. med...........americus shall nek. Iiorace dew in. arts..........lafayeilc sbippey. edwin francis, agri... wewabilchka, fla. sijnonitz. sail), commerce irreg...........augusla slappey. ilieo. aullon, pre. med............albany slater, waller bill. elec, eng.............alapaha sledge, lamar cobb. civ. eng...............alliens smith, alien nicliols. civ. eng.........hlackshear smith, herschel eugene, arts................barlow smith, jolm flclchcr. ugriculture______kensinglon smith, jolm slierman. ugriculture... bowersville smith, roland frank, arts...................boston smith, samnel bosworth. com..chaltanooga. lenn. Smith, waller hyron. jr.. com..........barnesville smith, warren dickson. com.......covington. lean. snider, duncan incleren, com..............columbus spcnce. hiram warner. arts.................Camilla Stanley, jugh smiley, arts.................alliens stantoii. valentive ligare, com...........waycross starling, diaries houston, civ. eng.......decalur staham. jolm claude. pre. med.............lecsburg sleincr, pinckncy alslon, agri.............augusla Stephens, louis. agriculture................mystic storey, nell marie, home econ..............alliens strangeward. Charles william, agri.....Sylvester Strickland, lierbi rt albert, com. irreg..jesup Strickland, lobert wilson. pre. med....lagrange sullivan, diaries walker, pre■ med.....zcbulon lalmadge. coke wells, commerce...........alliens latum, julius glenn, commerce.........kensinglon taylor. dudiev billon, journalism..........tiger taylor. jack Iwrney. com. irreg.......davislioro taylor. marie lillian. education........sylvunia lliomas. ezekiel fred, vet. med...........martin tliomas. roliert. jr.. commerce......thomasville thomason, Clinton lee. commerce........Sylvester tliompson. ralpli sandward, com■ irreg.. .atlanla tippin. jolm n.. civ. eng...................rome tracy, annicc franees, home econ..........athens Ireunor. honoria sapela. arts irreg...ridgeville tuck, clarence alon .o. agri.............cordcle tupper. samnel yoer. III. arts...........atlanla turner, clofford lurman. agri...........elberton turner, diaries incited, pre. med.....Carrollton turner, geoigc edward, journalism... .savannah van valkcnburg. chusc. science...........decatur waits. a!ex vclmer. pre. med.........adgatevillc wall, william henry, pre. med..........ullaville wammock. Iioke. commerce................so perl on ward, alma viola, education........sugar valley watson. jerome lliomas. commerce..........dallas waxdbaum. edgar artltur, urts..............macon webb, james vernon, agriculture........ariinglon welllmrn. william betliune. arts.........atlanla wesley. harry leslie. commerce...........atlanla wesley. jolm marvin. commerce... .lumber city wbeaton. monor lewis, commerce...........griffin white, jolm franklin, com. irreg........savannah whildiill, Howard ernest. pre. med..........hull whiteliurst. zollicoffer. jr.. civ. eng..augusla whitney, moragne alexander. elec. eng., .augusla wight, wondell byron. commerce...........Cairo william diaries henry, com. irreg......utlauta williams, george lowdncs, com...........columbus williams, james frank, com.............quitman williams, ralph watson. com. irreg......atlanla wilson. roliert kemp, pre. med.......thomasville wimhish. oliier cook, architecture........athens windhain, lliomas ftederick. com., i... .reynolds winslow. tliomas edward. com.............decatur woollen, angus goss. science irreg........athens w right, donald. per. medical...........commerce wright, ivy wilson. journalism_____gallatin, tenn. w right, jolm harrison. agriculture...nacoochec wyclie. murray cllis, journalism........lagrange young, william cogdcll, pre. med.........augusla£ra.lmutu’S EAE ATA A® X $ K£ XT H K ATO AKA KA EX IN E1ES §©R® RETIES TE XBPan-Hellenic Council SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON MILLER BEI L WILLIAM FULCHER CHI PHI D. A. COLLINCS JOHN CRANT PHI DELTA THETA ED GURR C. R. ANDERSON KAPPA ALPHA SPENCE GRAYSON HERBERT DEAN APHA TAl OMEGA J. K. HARPER JOHN McGEHEE SIGMA CHI CEORGE CLARK F. iM. BIRD SIGMA NU HOWARD MEWBOURNE W. G. JOHNSON DELTA TAl DELTA W. 0. WISDOM L. S. WINN CHI PS1 GEORGE TREADWELL TOM PHINIZY KAPPA SIGMA JOE BENNETT JOHN McWHIRTER PI KAPPA PHI C. E. BROCKINCTON W. V. EDWARDS LAMBDA CHI ALPHA LEE TURMAN CHARLES WIEHRS PHI EPSILON PHI I. P. MORRIS E. M. JANKOWER TAU EPSILON PHI I. P. MYERSON G. KAUFFMANwSi ma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity Foi’NDM) at the 1'niversity of Alabama 1856 Bet Chapter Established 1.866 Colors: Koval Purple and Old GnUl. . G. Fleming . F. Gannon C. G. Henry SK MORS I). l. Pollock . J. Strickland. Jr. J. M. Walker. Jr. JIM OKS W. l. Fulcher. Jr. S. P. I ngsioii L L Itoliinson. Jr. W. T. Harvey G. F. Baltzell P. V. Carswell W. P. Heath Harris Jones SOPHOMORES J. J. McKee 0. F. Miller D. II. Snelliilg T. M. Tillman FRESHMEN Everett Kargeron K. A. Illount I.. H. Hilton F. H. Kent W. M. Oliver. Jr. W. K. Kohinson. Jr. W. E. Hass W. II. Kussell I). VI. Snider G. V. Strangcward Koberl Thomas. Jr. S. V. Tupper, 3rd Hugh Stanley GRADUATES T. R. Perry PLEDGES C. S. (Hoveru.Chi Phi Fraternity Founded at Princeton I NivEKsm 1JJ21 Eta Chapter Established IIS67 Colors: Scarlet and HI tie CKADI ATE Dave Coiling, Ji. SEMOKS S. I- Yuniedoo .1. s. Wliilner Jl NIORS Colquitt Carter V. I.. Fielding John W. Grain. S. L Kirhardson A. L. Alexander liulherford Ellis SOPHOMORES T. F. Green W. 0. Foote S. l. Wevtmin w. ». mu H. H. Sanford J. 1). Campbell J. It. Cochran J. V. Culhouu M. H. Brown F. M. Duar A. Howell E. L. McCullough K. II. George FRESHMEN J. W. Morton K. 1). Ilradv H. P. Nunnally W. B. Well horn B. Nolan P. A. Vu'herin M. Brumhv C. W. Talrradge W. H. WellsKappa Alpha Fraternity Founded at Washington and Lee 1865 Gamma Chapter Established 1868 C.OLORS: Crimson and Cold P. K. Anderson SENIORS J. A. Hoscli A. F. Dean C M. Paulk J. H. Dean VV. H. Young Jl MORS F. Hargretl •S. M. Grayson H. L Watson W. H. Ashford SOPHOMORES J. A. Mahoney J. M. Fletcher W. L McCrary M. Guyton W. II. lcRae H. B. Johnson M. 1.. W loaton T. M. Close FRESHMEN F. l. Lewis C. B. Edwards C. N. Mell J. C. Green W. C. Powers J. W. Green W. K. H. Searc L. Hargrelt L. C. Sledge C. H. Hooper J. 1). Smith J. H. Hosch J. B. Smith I . M. Jones J. L. Williams M. K. Kilpatrick J. F. Williams W. C. Beerhem1Pin Delta Theta Fraternity Founded at Miami I niyersity 1848 Georgia Alpha Ciixpter Established 1.571 Colors: Hue ami While POST-CKADl ATES E. M. Curr SENIORS Roy Sexton June Frederick Oscar McKcnwc Jl MORS Charles Robert Anderson Clifford Eugene Farrar Frank Loft is Cearreld Arnold Wright Freeman Napier Jelks Joseph M. Jones Francis Dawdle Pierce SOPHOMORES Ellwrl William Callaher Lewis C. Creen Frank Clayton Groover Eugene Flournoy Johnson Robert Bruce Jones Lucius Lamar. Jr. Claude William ljowe Harry La Fayette Middlebrooks (joren Cluster Randall FRESHMEN James Miller Byne David E. Carroll James Hampton Dolvin Wcndel lbert G. Dunson John Maxwell Gant Hersehel Eugene Smith II. Wight Malcolm R. Bennett PLEDGES Arthur I). BrownAlpha Ta u Omega Fraternity l'or DKD at Virginia Military Institi tk 1365 Alpha Bkta Charter Establish ei 1378 Colors: Sky Him’ and Ohl Gold SENIORS Harper, J. K. Hayes. X. C.. Jr. Hodges, C. S. Murray. M. C„ Jr. Twitiy, R. II. Watson, K. K. Williams. A. H. Drewry. II. II. Jl MOHS Buchanan. J. I). McCelifc. J. II.. Jr. Miller. C. 0. Reeves, W. A. Tift. R. . Walton. T. H.. Jr. SOPHOMORES Brown R. E. Fletcher. J. H.. Jr. Marlin. (.’. II. Pi»ndi rgra L J. II. Shearer, C. N. Stokes. M. L. Tyler, T. L I bulges. C. R. FRESHMEN Beeland. I). S. Caul hen. K. M. Drewry. J. II. Campbell. I). S. Depute. S. F... Jr. Hightower. K. A. Owens. C. W. Scott. W. T. Segrest. R. T. Spence. H. W. Wesley. H. L. Quick. E. W.Sigma Chi Fraternity I'oundki) at Miami I Mvmssm IJ565 Dklta Chai tkb Kstaiii.isiiki) I{‘72 Co i.OUS: HI tic anil Cob! Bennett. I). 1 . SENIORS Ijowc. E. A. Bennett. J. W. Miller, G. M. Bird, J. M. Youngblood. C. Clark. C. J. Fuller, F. II. Bleckley. B. Jl MORS Fowler. J. H. d'Antignae, A.. Jr. Johnstone. A. Fesperman. C. J. Pantone, C. Fills. S. Walson. J. L Sheffield, 11. C. SOPHOMORES Sale. F. L Clark, C. Williams. II. W. FRESHMEN McPherson. If. Brawner. J. N. Baifnrd. W. S. d’Anlignac. M. Stanton, V. 1.. Whailev. B. Sigma Nu Fraternity I'OI NDKI) AT IIU;IN1A MlI.ITAin INSTITUTE l ClIAPTKIt ESTABLISHED loo I C01.OKS: Hlad;. U'hiic and Old Cold. I. I). Wade C. M. Snclling FAC i m •I). J. P. L. I). Cook K. J. Haar SEN I OHS W. H C. H L. l. Hanahan K. C. Heslop W. II. War Jl MORS J. B. W. C M. S. D. L. Cloud 11. J. Gaertner J. B. Harley A. L. Hatcher J. C. Hosier SOPHOMORES li. II. H. M W. C C. E. J. D. S. W. Woods J. I). Abernathy II. Brown FRESHMEN II. L W. K 1869 1. DuPree Hill . lewi ourne Ridgway Johnston Johnston Yeomans Husbands . Jarrell . .Monday, Jr. McArthur Thomason Johnson . Marshall, Jr. Deceased. February 22, 1923.LDelta Tau Delta Fraternity Founded at Bethany College 1859 Beta Delta Chapter Estadlisiied l« ’ 2 SENIORS Winn. L. S. Jl MOBS Tanner, J. VV. Riihinson. 1.. Hyliter. F. Tale. William M usgrove. L. I . Wisdom. W. 1). Adams, J. l. SOPHOMOKES Blount, J. W„ Jr. Odum. J. 1). Phil|Mj|. W. K. Fulghutn. W. L. Powell, Ennis Alnuti. T. L FRESHMEN O'Neal. Marvin Turner. (I. E. Milledge. He Blois Allen. It. 1... Jr. Mil ledge. Stanley BickerstufT. . Parker. A. H. Glenn. T. L Davidson. J. Q. lleimlv, 1. C.. Jr. Ryther, D. W.. Jr. Mcrrel. H. Caldwell. J. M.. Jr. Glenn. II. It. Windham. T. F. PLEDGES Jolmson, C. M. Uohinson. James i GKi Psi Fraternity Foi nded at Union Collkce 1841 Alpha Alpha Delta Chapter Established 1890 Colors: Royal Purple and Old Gold T. B. Phinizy SENIORS J. M. Williamson G. H. Treadwell II. M. Cleckley, 111 JUNIORS T. H. Whitehead R. M. Harbin H. S. C. Callaway SOPHOMORES J. I . Fraser FRESHMEN E. L. Griggs Jr. J. K. Hopkins C. 1. Kilpatrick N. A. Whitney A. J. Kilpatrick, Jr. T. K. Mallory C. H. NixonKappa Sigma Fraternity Founded at I niveksity of iucinia 1869 Beta Lambda Chapter Established 1901 Colors: Scarlet, Emerald and While Howard, 1C. Y. SENIORS Mooney, J. K. McWhirler. J. Y. JLNIOKS Bennett. .1. J. Ilullcr. J. J. Caruthers, K. S. Dickey. E. 0. Hancock. J. H. Mulvihill. A. It. SOPHOMORES McCariv. J. B. Oeijen. I.. II. Sullivan. C. S. Wilson. F. L llufr. C. W. Fullilovc. H. M. Morris It. D. Neel. W. M. FRESHMEN Starling, C. H. Winslow, T. K. White. J. K. Moore, C. Beach. Henry Holiday. Henry PLEDGES Magnifier. G. M.. Jr. Taylor, K. J.. Jr. Van alkcnhurg. Chase k 4.Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity Founded at the College ok Charleston 1904 Georgia Lambda Chapter Established 1915 COLORS: Gold and While C. E. Brock'nton SENIORS H. D. Griffin Edwin Thomas Joe S. Beall JUNIORS Louis N. Betts William . Edwards L. A. Bailey Lawrence N. Bennett T. P. Crawford SOPHOMORES James C. Head Henry T. McWilliams J. 11. Phinazee H. D. Breen W. A. Foster J. W. Cray FRESHMEN C. P. Holland J. W. McCaughey H. W. Sanford 0. C. Wimbislt PLEDGES E. S. LipscombLambda Chi Alpha Fraternity Founded at Boston University 1909 t: Chapter Established 1915 Colors: I’nr tlc, Crvr.ii ami Cold 1 . M. Almond J. 1). Davis 11. J. Hardin SENIORS 15. L. Kane J. K. Sellwalb IS. L. Turman C. C. Tyson N. M. Hamilton R. F. Harkey E. l. Herndon J. M. Jones JUNIORS C. L. Padgett W. S. Rockwell J. W. Sibcrt W. C. Taliuferro H. Abney L. R. Allen L. W. Belcher C. L. Gowen C. 0. Hart SOPHOMORES W. T. Kni"lit T. J. MeCiffin F. J. Slater R. A. Wheeler C. F. Wielirs S. . Wilson FRESHMEN K. E. Barfield F. A. Bozarili I). Kirkland E. K. Coctlie T. S. CrayPhi Epsilon Pi Fraternity Founded at City College of New York 1902 Mu Chapter Established 1915 Colors: Purple and Old Cold SENIORS Ren F. Joel, Jr. Sam A. Idclson H. Kassewitz I. P. Morris SOPHOMORES L R. Joel H. R. Rothschild Ike A. Joseglove Edwin Beer E. M. Jankower FRESHMEN Retram Boley Max A. La arus Irwin Rosenberg E. A. WaxelbaumTau Epsilon Phi Fraternity FoilNDKl) AT COLUMBIA I MVF.RSITY OCTOBER 1909 l ClIAPTKK Established 1919 CoijOUS: Utvender and While SENIORS c. Cohen Jl MORS 11. M. Dornhlalt I.. Hcinian G. . Kauffman i. P. Myemm (). S. Maim SOPHOMORES S. Simnwil FRESHMEN E. J. Feiler M. Piisanl J. Sailof HONORARY V. C. MichaelPhi Mu Sorority Founded at Wesleyan Collkce. Macon, Ga., 1852 Alpha Alpha Chapter Established 1921 COLORS: Pink and While Flower: Enchantress Carnation. Omah Badcock Lucile Chumbley SENIORS Carolyn Sims Mary Sims Mary Olive Whitehead Annabel Dowdy JUNIORS Gertrude Stith Rosemary Whitaker Winnifred Davis -Marie Erwin Emilv Hammond SOPHOMORES Mac McNeer Clara Belle Rutherford Mary Strahan Melville Doughty FRESHMEN Elizabeth C. Magill Pegg Baker Henrietta Beusse Louise Osbume Marie Storey Marguerite Davis PLEDGES Sarah Maddox Sue Reid Yason Mary Sue Huggins Marion Talinadge♦ Chi Omega Founded at the University ok Arkansas IB 15 Ml Beta Chapter Established 1922 Colors: Cardinal and Straw GRADUATES Nolle I pshaw Marguerite Beale SENIORS Cornelia Abney Grace Allen Olga Reeves Boiioinly Annie Woolen Evelyn Powell Angelyn Sasnett Lois Stillman Jl MOILS Kli abelli Rinuluvant Amy Quillian Nellie Mae Bowen SOPHOMORE . Doroth Harrell Polly Ruth Powers Mary Ferguson Edith House Helen Gibbs Bessie Parr Alice Winn Peeples Jim Chandler Turner Sarah Weems Annie l-aurie NVier FRESHMEN Frances Comer Dorothy Hudgins Olive Marion PLEDGES Deane Bridges Lueile Cook Lois Calloway Margaret Kimsey Kli abelb CurryDelta Sigma Pi Fraternity (Professional—Commercial) Bell, M. R. Shearer, C. N. Jones, Harris Kick ling, W. L. Rivers, T. H. Anderson, P. K. Fesperman, George Fitts, Sheldon Heckman, H. M. Pantone, Cliff Powers, Pat Strickland, A. J. Wei hers, C. F. Williamson, J. M. Gurr, E. M. Tillman, T. M. Sanford, H. R. Calhoun, J. V. Langston, Shelby P, Stokes, M. L. McCartv, J. B. Dickey, F. G. Caruliters, R. S. Blount, J. W. Broadhursl. G. M. Still, L. C. Lane, K. L. Butts, H. L. Lovvorn, Julian Buchanan, J. D.Alpha Kappa Psi Fraternity i Professional Commercial) Dr. R. P. Brooks Alnutt, T. L. Bennett. 1). P. Clark, G. J. Cook. R. E. Dean. G. C. Drew. E. W. Fieeman, J. !l. Hanahan, L. M. Harken. iV J. Hosch, J. A. Johnston, J. B. Harley, J. B. Lowe, E. A. l iwton, E. I Marshal), A. A. Murray, M. G. Musgrovc, L. B. McCrary, W. L. I pshaw, P. C. . Thomason. J. I). Vandiver, J. H. Whitncr. J. H. Youngblood. C. U When the Pandora decided to put on a beauty contest the thought was to take it out of petty politics and make the selections on a basis of pure merit. In order to do this all pictures, several scores in number, were sent to Charles Dana Gibson, who kindly consented to judge them for us. Mr. Gibson made his selection by the “one tivo three” method, and the winners appear in this section just as he picked them. They are: Miss Mary Louise Collings Wesleyan College, Macon, Georgia Miss Florre Jo Everett Shorter College, Rome, Georgia Miss Harriett Peade State Normal School, Athens, Georgia Miss Mildred Warner LaGrange College, LaGrange, Georgia Miss Sarah Watkins LaGrange College, LaGrange, Georgia '. Miss Mary Lynn Brogden Shorter College, Rome, Georgiai 1 :M 11 n f iiVjKIt , • « , V •III ; l • WAV i.rfKn • f. .. : . . I • ■ [Hi ; , !! « m •» .■. fc;M3 I i »- •i... 4»?r i ;i:5 i IkDemostlienian Presidents h. c. Still ... E. M. Dunslan F. J. Erwin .. . First Term Second Term Third TermPin Kappa Presidents F. 0. McKenzie............................... C. H. Cohen.................................. A. F. Dean................................... . First Term Second Term Third Term Y IAgricultural Club Presidents J. W. Howard K. L. Fngland F. D. Chastain . First Term Second Term . 'Third TermEconomic Society Presidents M. G. Murray................................................. First Term E. W. Drew ................................................. Second Term J. A. Morgan, Jr..............................................Third TermThe Jeffersonian Moot Court Rosser, J. U. .. Griffin, II. D. .. Wilkcrson, E. H Cooley, T. H. . First Term Second Term Third Term Fourth TermThe Debating Council Hayes, Z. C............................................................... President Pool. Howard.................................................Secretary and Treasurer D EMOSTH ENIA PHI KAPPA . Dunstan, E. M. Pool, Howard Kosscr. J. K. Hayes, Z. C. McKenzie, F. 0. Paulk, C. M.Anmversarians DEMOSTHEMAiN “Americanism" ....................................... G. G. Finch Introduced by E. M. Dunstan PHI KAPPA “Graphite and Diamond Dust” ..........................C. A. Lewis Introduced by W. C. Carterlie.sol veil: Inter-Collegiate Debate Georgia vs Vanderbilt SUBJKCT That the I nited States .should adopt a policy of cancellation of the allied tear debts, or a proportional part of them, under agreement with the allies that a reciprocal policy would be adopted by them. C W. Anderson V. F. Dean Georgia defended the AffirmativeInter-Collegiate Debate Georgia vs Alabama Subject Resolved: That the United States should adopt a policy of cancellation oj the allied tear debt, or a proportional part of them, under agreement nilh the allies that a reciprocal policy be adopted by them. Oilquill Carter E. M. Duncan Georgia defended the NegativeInter-Collegiate Debate Georgia vs Virginia Subject Resolved: Thai tin excess profits tux should lie made u port of our Federal fiscal system. F. C. McClure J- A. Hom.Ii Crorjjia deft'iulctl llie Negative. IAgricultural Inter-Collegiate Debate Georgia vs Florida Subject Resolved: That the government should accept Henry ForiCs proposal to operate the Muscle Shoals project. W. A. Lundy J. W. Howard Georgia dejended the NegativeAgricultural Inter-Collegiate Debate Georgia u.s An burn Subject Resolvetl: That the I tiled Slates should cancel her allied tear debts. Negative J. 11. Cha(Tin II. H. Maddox hChampion Debate Subject Resolved: That the manufacture anil sale of all light nines anil beers should be legalized in the ( nited Stales. PHI KAPPA DEMOSTHENIAN (A f)innative 1 (Negative » J. A. Ho ch I_ N. IJcus C. M. Paulk E. M. DuiisianChampion Inter-Departmental Debate Agricultural Club vs Economics Society Subject Resolved: That the State oj Georgia should adopt an income tax to supplement the existing jorm of tax. AGKICULTl UAL CLI I) (Affirmative) ECONOMICS SOCIETY (Negative) S. J. Shirley F. M. (iorfain E. W. Drew L C. StillRegular Junior and Senior Impromptu Debate Subject Resolved: That the I ailed Stoles pursued a wise policy in withdrawing from European affairs after the tear. DEMOSTHENIAN PHI KAPPA {Affirmative) »Negative) W. I). Allen C. K. Nelson II. Pool W. C. Gioper L. N. Hells E. . 1. Dunslan C. A. I wis F. N. Jelks A. F. Dean J. A. Hoseli C« I(|uiit Caricr C. H. CohenCotton School Debate Subject Resolved: That the number of counties in Ccorgia should be reduced to not more thun three-fourths of the present number. Affirmative Fred M. Corfain William C. Taliaferro Negative James H. Chaffin Hubert H. MaddoxJunior Orators L. N. Beits W. C. Cooper. Jr. F. M. Jelks Win. Tate W. C. Carter C. U. Anderson Sophomore Declaimers 15. I,. P. Carter J. II. Harley II. C. Eberltartli I). L. Cloud Esther Hush Rutherford L Ellis . W. Hill E. W. Gallagher Tom Green Edward I.awloii ( Sophomore Debate Subject Resolved: Thai l he Ron us Rill recently passed by Congress and vetoed by the President should be re-ennacted and made into a late. PKMOSTHKMAN PHI KAPPA i Affirmative (Mega live) H. C. Klierluirdi Edward Lawion C. L. Cowan Rutherford L Ellis A. L Davis T. C. SmahaSoph omore Agricultural Debate Subject Resolved: That the United States should adopt a rural credit system modeled after that of the Kenyon-McFadden Rill. Affirmative J. W. Jackson Clovis Turk Mega live I, V. Chandler J. C. BonnerFreshman Regular Debate Subject Resolved: Thai Inter-Collegiate Athletics As Note Practiced Is for The Rest Interest of Education In The United States. DEMOSTHENIAN PHI KAPPA • A fjir motive) (Negative) H. D. Shanuck M. C. Levie Y. E. Bargcron J. H. Ho ch Albert Dornb'ati Bertram S. BoleyFresbman Agricultural Debate SniJKCT Resolved: That unionized labor in its present state is detrimental to the agricultural interests of I nited States. A fjirrnative J. R. Chambliss A. H. Chaml crs Negative J. H. Wrlielu II. 15. OwenFreshman Impromptu Debate Slbjkct Resolved: Thai immigration should he further restricted in t'te United States. DEMOSTHKMAN (Affirmative) PHI KAPPA i Negative) 'I'. I). Duadwylrr M. C. 1-evic M. ri'Anfignnc T. S. Cra J. H. Wright Lesltr Hargreii J. II. Hosvli, Jr. Marvin O'Neal F. II. Koni K. J. Fieler ic in AltCU'J rjtu' -V OCT' igji urn 11 iT!TTTimimnii uiimiiinTrn irniifin Pjnmiii KT nhi n Kill I k a r i ii ditt i ir inn ill L I- I I K Allll JAI ijlIm i mkkH latumuimmiiijiimiiiJiimiiuiiniiimiiinnininiiinnflB] J. -k.. yvxoT Tr Phi Beta Kappa Prof. J. H. T. McPherson ......................................................... ‘resident Prof. W. 0. Payne ................................................................. Secretary Prof. K. P. Stevens ............................................................... Treasurer CHARTER MEMBERS Dr. J. H. T. McPherson Dr. R. P. Stevens FOUNDATION MEMBERS D. C. Barrow W. H. Bocock L. L. Hendren W. D. Hooper R. E. Park J. Lustra! C. M. Snelling H. C. White T. J. Wooftcr J. Morris ACTIVE MEMBERS Chapman, J. E. Dunstan, E. M. Everett, E. M. Thomas, Edwin Henry, C. G. McClure, F. C. Stevens, A. H.ALPHA ZETADr. A. M. Soule........................... Honorary Member FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Dr. T. H. McHatton Prof. Geo. A. Crabb Prof. V. 0. Collins Alpha Zeta Aderhold. 0. C. Holton. J. L. Chandler. S. G. Davis. K. K. Drcxcl, A. E. Drake. W. W. Dunaway. J. L. ACTIVE MEMBERS Gannon. A. F. Gillespie. J. W. Hart. W. J. MoKainey, M. A. McRainey, X. I). Minor, W. A. Scarborough, I). D. Trawick, . J.Cl o 0 Mill I 0 1 IAJ1AJ UC Vd4M. A. Mcltainey ..................................................................... P P E. H. Dixon ......................................................................... P I- F. C. McClure ................................................................. I . S. B. G. J. Clark ....................................................................... K. S. C. A. Lewis....................................................................... J. J. Benncll ...................................................................... ? ? ? J. A. Hosch ...................................................................... ? ? ? HONORARY Chancellor D. C. Barrow Dr. NV. H. Bocock Dr. K. P. Brooks Prof. W. I). Hooper Dr. R. E. Park Dr. S. . Sanford Dean C. M. Snellinji Dr. A. M. Soule Coach H. J. Slcgeman Prof. C. M. Sirahan Dr. H. C. While «J Kinvimivin { J mjuiuiuu i 7. OW IV X PGridiron Club Roll S. V. Sanford W. 0. Payne H. J. Stegeman Bill While Larry Conover I). W. Rvther J. W. Nicholson Sylvanus Morris Julius Taimadge H. A. Nix R. P. Walker R. P. Brooks Jas. K. Harper M. A. McRainey 0. C. Adcrhold E. M. Gurr G. C. Clark F. . F.. Watson P. C. L'pshaw T. L. Anthony J. W. Howard A. F. Dean J. K. Mooney C. R. Youngblood J. H. Freeman D. P. Bcrnetl C. S. Hodges E. A. Lowe C. A. I ewis . F. C. McClure M. G. Murray J. A. Hosch F. A. Tanner K. M. Dunstan J. H. Vandiver R. A. Bowen L. C. StillChapman, Dean, A. I Drake, W. Dunstan, 1 Erwin. F. Henry, C. Lewis, C. i Murray, .N Senior Round Table (Sigma Ii’silonI j. i:. McClure. F. C. F. McKenzie. F. 0. . W. Still, L. C. Z. M. Thomas, Edwin J. Prof. W. 0. Payne G. Prof. R. E. Park . Prof. J. I). Wade 1. C. Mr. T. W. ReedJunior Cabinet Anderson. C. R. Carter, V. C. Carl ledge, S. A. Cooper, W. G. Everetl, E. M. Kant, H. B. Freeman, J. II. Griffin, M. H. lloscli, J. A. Marshall, A. A. McGehee, J. H. Tale, Win. Prof. R. E. Park Scabbard and Blade Co. L 2nd Rug. Rvlher, Fenley Murray, M. C. Freeman, J. H. Merritt, T. E. . .......... Captain . First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . .. First Sergeant ACTIVE Abercrombie, W. F. Anderson, C. R. Anderson, P. K. Bennett, L. R. Erwin. F. J. Schwa lb. J. F. Freeman, J. II. Merrill. T. E. Murray, M. G. Patterson. V. L Ryther, Fenley Hoscb, J. A. ASSOCIATE Thomas, Edwin HONORARY Burch, Major, 13. L. McCarrigle, Capt. C. A. Nicholson, Capt. J. W. Ryther. Col. 0. V.w cpfcE AF D AND EbLADE HC HarryAghon Society derhuld. 0. C. Chaffin J. 11. Chandler. S. G. Drake. W. W. England. E. L. Gillespie. J. V. HONORARY l)r. T. II. McHallnu Lundy. W. A. Maddox, H. H. McKainey, M. A. McKaincy. N. I). Scarborough. I). D. Taimor, F. A. Prof. L. M. CarterCampus Club F. C. McClure R M. A. McRaincy J W. A. Lundy V 0. C. Aderhold V E. W. Drew J . A. Bowen . II. Freeman . G. Cooper 7. I). Allen . R. Rosser N. J. HarbenC WE 4 rftuSP' G Cool - OALtt '« « •’Georgia Naturalists OFFICERS John W. Gillespie..............................................President V. H. Hart.............................................GeneraI Secretary Fred A. Tanner................................................ Treasurer Dr. J. M. Rcade ..................................... Permanent Secretary HONORARY MEMBERS Dr. J. M. Rcade Dr. T. H. McHatton Dr. Joseph Krafka ACTIVE MEMBERS Aderhold. 0. C. Beall. J. S. Chance. Claude Chandler. S. G. Collier. C. W. Dailey. L. P. Davis. E. K. Drake. W. W. Dunaway. J. L Gillespie, J. W. Violas, R. Hart. W. J. Lundy. W. A. McRainey, M. A. McRainey, N. D. Patterson. Y. M. Sanders, J. P. Tanner. F. A. Thomas, W. W. Thomas, H. 0. Ware. C. A.Tbalian Dramatic Club Rose Bush Bessie Parr Rosemary Whitaker Marie Erwin Katherine Park Dorothy Moran Marguerite Beale Annie Laurie Wier Sara Maddox F. 0. McKenzie Freeman Jelks J. Jones Pierce, Dowdle Charlie Anderson Austin Dean Alton Hosch John Hosch Mosc Guyton Thomas Clase E. J. Haar Brooks Johnston Harold Kasscwitz G. G. Finch Colquitt Carter A. A. Marshall Roy Jones rvGlee and Instrumental Club lloy Jones ....................................................................... Leader Jas. K. Harper ................................................................. Business Manager Harvey Mabry....................................................Leader. Instrumental Club John I aimer ...................................... Assistant Lender, Instrumental Club Brooks, Johnson............................................ Assistant Leader, Glee Club J-loytl Hclcliug............................................ Assistant Business Manager Joe Bennett ....................................................... Advertising Manager personnel GLEE CLI IJ L Allen K. Bird I). (Darrell C. Farrar J. Frazier W. Fulcher K. Gurr F. Hargretl L llar»rclt J. Williams INSTRUMENTAL CLUB C. Anderson J. Bennett C. (.’arter G. Kesprrinan J. Hancock J. Harley FACl LTV MEMBERS W. Harvey C. Mel I U. Morrell W. Melbourne II. ShelTield M. Stokes B. Whatley M. Wheaton L. Winn L. Hilton I). Kirkland II. Maddox P. Mtilherrin M. Sellars J. Taylor Prof. Alfred Scott Prof. John I). WadeThe Senate BromMH. R. Sanford Joe Buchanan 'l M. Tillman The Cavaliers Roll Call ............... President ........ Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer A. L. Alexander W. Johnson R. S. Currul Iters T. Knight W. C. Carter E. 1 . Lawton r. |. Doar C. Lowe C. Farrar C. H. Murks L. C. Creen 1L Merrill C. Groover W. C. Monday Z. C. 1laves W. II. McRae W. Heath D. Fierce J. II. Haiicnek J. Phiniz.ee A. Howell L. L. Robinson J. 15. Harley M. Reeves 15. Husbands 0. 15. Snellin J. k. Harper T. Walton E. K. WatsonThu Pioneer Cli'hHomecon Grace Allen Lena G. Adkins Peggy Baker Henrietta Beusse Bertha Benson Deane Bridges Ethel Bailey Evelyn Bo ley Frances Comer Elizabeth Curry Lucile Cook Lois Calloway Winnifred Davis Sarah Franklin. Mary Sue Huggins Lizzie May Hancock Flossie Hairston Ethel Jester Lila Jones Margaret Kimsey Sarah Maddox Olive Marion Esther McManus Martha McAlpine Elizabeth Payne Rosa Parker Bessie Parr Willie Raulerson Marie Storey Lillian Shchee Lois Stillman Angelyn Sasnett Annice Tracey Genevieve Tucker Jim Chandler Turner Emmie Nelson Sarah Tarragano Annie Wooten Sarah Weems Lucy Wood Mary Olive Whitehead Ovie BanksDavid A. Col lings Spence M. Grayson Frank L. Gear re Id Arnold Wright Ed. M. Curr Richard A. Tift Samuel L. Richardson Roy S. Jones James D. Campbell William M. Fulcher Joseph A. Mahoney John W. Grant, Jr. Ike C. JoscloveIson Inn of the Legal Fraternity of Phi Delta Phi FOUNDED AT THB I NIVEBSITY OK MICHIGAN, 1H69. FRATER IN FACULTATE Stephen C. Ip son MEMBERS Roy Sexton Jones James I’. Hill. Jr. Ceorgc Treadwell William Howard Mewbourne Enoch Hood Wilkerson Thomas II. Cooley William M. Fulcher Established 1922. Joseph Rennet I Frank Loftis Gearrald Freeman Napier Jelks Francis M. Bird Adam L Alexander William T. Harvey Joseph C. Hester William Henry WellscwFtnur OHQr OALLt i Pelican Club xv Butler, “Jake” Carswell, P. W. Geek Icy, Hervey Cochran. Jack Foote, V. 0. Williams, “Porky Callaher, “Kb” Harvey, “Happy” McRce, J. J. Stokes, M. L. Wheaton, MinorBiftads OFFICERS Jas. K. Harper M. R. Bell Roll Geo. Clark John Gillespie C. S. Hodges I). I Bennett Sheldon Fitts F. C. McClure C. Pantone J. Watson W. C. Munday J. A. Hosch Idoyd l ickling L. L. Robinson F. Hargrett Frank Wilson Brown Whatley Fred Sale Delacey Allen C. G. Henry Colquitt Carter Jake Butler L. Lamar Joe Bennett$S$gsi 0 H G Z3 , ii W ■iS IGeorgia Horticultural Club Roll J. W. Gillespie .......................................President C. W. Collier ........................................ Secretary FAC I LTV MEMBERS C. B. Sweel (I. L Harrington J. H. Miller R. L. Keener Dr. T. H. McHattrn G. H. Firor H. M. McKay H. W. Harvey ACTIVE MEMBERS 0. C. Aderhold H. J. Hardin A. 1. Almand W. J. Hart F. 1). Chastain J. W. Howard C. W. Collier W. A. Lundy L. P. Dailey J. P. Sanders N. V. Davis W. H. Southern W. W. Drake V. C. Taliaferro J. L. Dunaway K. Treanor A. F. Cannon C. A. Ware J. W. Gillespie D. W. Whitmire C I). Green M. S. YeomansTop run : Cornelia hney. Omah Badcock, l.ucile Cluimbley. Bottom row: .Nolle Young, iNelle Cillnnd. Grace Allen.Squake and Compass ClubCosmopolitan Club Founded October 6. 1920. ‘’Within the Foir Seas- All Brethren". HONORARY MEMBERS D. C. Harrow, Chancellor Dr. A. M. Soule Mr. C. W. Crook Mr. C. A. Rowland I resident Secretary Treasurer First Term J. B. MiskolT J. L. Co58 K. M. Dunstan OFFICERS Second Term J. H. MiskolT C. S. Chu R. Violas ROLE OF MEMBERS Third Term C. C. Hsu W. C. Thohurn Sallic Fannie Daniels C. S. Chu (C» S. N. Courie tSt Sallie Fannie Daniels A) H. W. Derden IA» F.. M. Dunstan (B) J. L. Goss (A) C. C. Hsu (C) A, B. C. E. F. M. S. America. Brazil 0. Lamartine B Mile. Laplere I Ft C. A. Lewis (At J. B. MiskolT (Ml 11. B. Milvaine (El W. C. Thohurn t A t R. Viet as (B» China. England, France. M«-so| otamia. Syria. Alpha Omega T. M. Adams W. S. Murray H. 11. Craig K. L. Neville J. M. Caldwell L. K. Octgen J. B. Chandler J. 1.. Strange 11. C. Harvey E. Vogt C. . Waites C. U. Hodges P. B. E. Jones B. Lane R. R. Wilson ft. N. Little I). P. Wright C. M. Macgrudcr C. R. Youmans T. 1). Marks J. E. Powers N. 1). McKainey C. M. Turner Roster Disabled Veterans of tbc World War Joe Brown Connally Post No. 2. Paul T. Connolly.............. Commander Paul I.. Watson .............. Treasurer Eilwin J. Rosser...Senior Free Commander Alvin I.. Odum ................ Adjutant William I.. Austin.Junior Cice Commander James W. Weaver ............... Chaplain II. E. Bridges......... Sergeant-ai-Arms Frank K. Mitchell,.. Rehab Committeeman Aaron. B. A. Allen. T. W. Alexander, Koncrt D. Almand, Albert I. Anderson. Ilohart W. Attaway. M. H. Autrey, David P. Boone, William I.. Burriss, Clayton . Bishop. J. C. Bowers, Jesse M. Berrong, Sylvester M. Brooks, John C. Burton. Harry S. Broome. William H. Boring. Luther W. Brown. William II. Brown, Thomas W. Bowen. W. M. Bryant. C. II. Bedenhaugh. Carl Bailey. Keuben I". Cain. Charles S. Car|t r. Charles E. Cook. I). II. Craft. Clarke II. Coppinger. David W. Crews, Charles W. Chambers, Cordon W. Culpepper, Amos A. Cannon. Robert I). Corley. Robert M. Chitwood. Otie 0. Chaffin, James II. Cortez. T. E. Davis. A. L. Darley, J. F. Duckworth, J. T. Davis. A. F. Devinney. J. I). Dietz. Ernest C. Davidson. Frank K. Duflcy, David Daniels, James W. Dunnahoo, Lee II. Dunbar, Daniel E. Durham, W. L Fades, R. II. Edge, Alfred Edwards. Fred Evans, B. M. Escoe, Percy M. Emory. Waller Ellis. Joe P. Fallow. William B. Finley, Joseph W. Field. Alonzo Finch, George G. Floyd. Dugina L. Farr, Jesss R. Farrell. II. II. Fuller. Walter A. Flood. Edward J. Forrest, Luke A. Griner, John M. Grant, Bishop F. Garland. Ehad Criswell. M. C. Gunn. William M. Gunther, Henry F. Goodson. S. A. Greenway. C. J.Gibbs. J. E. Gaddy, Jesse M. Griner. A. B. Ha good, Lowry T. Halloway. John E. Holbrook. James S. Hendrix, Carl V. Hart sell. Kay E. Haskins, W. M. Huckahy. E. W. Hawkins, Vane 0. Hawkins, E. L Hilliard. Milton II. Huili, Layd 0. Hendrix, Benjamin C. Hall. Koilin J. Hatfield. George K. Hamby, G. C. Holder, Helton T. Hubbard, Howard J. Hackcll. R. N. Ivestcr, Joseph L. Jackson. Otis Jennings. Sam Jordan, John J. James. W. T. Johnson, A. L. Jones, C. J. Kuydendall. K. C. Kamensky, Fee Kennedy. John 1.. Klein. Frank W. Kilchress, M. K. Lamb. J. J. Igtncaster. J. A. Lucas, Jonathan Lavender, Robert E. Miley, Mark A. Mask. Robert R. Mason. Charley Mansfield. William S. Mulling, George T. Miles. Frank C. Moody. Clarence A. Mabrv, E. L Miles, L W. Minhinneti, Frank McGill, William Morton. Mike Middleton, Robert M. Miller. Warren J. Nelson. Amos E. Owen. Ira A. Oliver. James 1. Potter. J. L. Pearson. Harney K. Pope. John C. Price, George L Petty, Reynold E. Patterson. John R. Pitts, William Pollock. Judson Patterson, Carey H. Pope, William R. Parks, Edgar D. Pritchard. E. C. Quinn. Morgan M. Reeves. Clement R. Rodepeayl. D. C. Ratcliff. II. 0. Robertson. R. C. Randall. Foy C. Robey. Obe Reeves, Robert L. Rowe. William M. Riggs. Ralph F.. Robinson. George V. Reid. John W. Ragland. Andrew C. Rowell, D. R. Roach. A. W. Smith. Reed M. Short, William G. Smith, 0. I). Scarborough, Lee R. Smith, John H. Singletary. Paul Stinson. John A. Stokes. Stanton E. Scott. E. W. Smith. Junior W. Scarcey. Frank J. Seytnous. C. J. Smith. Herman IJ. Sharp. P. A. Tuck. Hugh E. Thomason. Francis M. Thompson, Leroy Tolhert. Charley V. Thomas, John E. Taylor. William W. Thompson, I). I). Tinker. J. M. Taylor, Mullis P. Taylor. George W. Treadwell. George II. Taylor. William A. Issery, William J. Walker, Marion E. Whitfield. Joseph II. Wood. William G. Westbrook, G. G. Williams. Offic A. Willey, Julius T. Wright, C. R. Weathers. Tom Webb. Jeptha Waller. W. E. Welsh. Asa R. Winstead. Paul L. Whitehead. L F. Youngblood. Jesse C.Saddle and Sirloin Club Promoters ok Little International Livestock Show and ok Interest in Good Animals officers First Term Second Term 13. F. Bruce...........................President......................B. L. Southwell L. H. Heath ....................... Vice-President A. J. Trawick A. J. Trawick..................Secretary and Treasurer...............J. P. Sanders CLUB ROLL Anderson, J. L. Bruce, I). F. Chandler, S. G. Chaffin, J. H. Coulter, I. P. Dunaway, J. L. Durham. C. J. England. E. L. ExJey, S. H. Gay, 0. E. Gardner, S. H. Hasty, A. H. Howard, J. YV. Hollis, YV. M. Hodges, C. S. Jackson. J. V. Kelley, R. E. Langley, L. R. Lundy, YY;. A. Murphev, J. I . Orr. F. YV. Patterson, V. M. Powell, E. C. Sanders, J. P. Shirley, S. J. Southwell. B. L. Southern, V. A. 'latum, YV. Tanner, F. A. 'Thomas, H. 0. Trawick, A. J. Usry, M. P. Walker. J. T.PRESIDENTS STOCK Jl DOING TEAM K. L. England J. W. Howard S. J. Shirley . First Term Second Term I). F, IJruce D. I'. Bruce .. B. L. Southwellr i The Diogenesian Club Motto: Treat 'em Rough. Flowkk: liras knuckles or paving Slone {Founded at the I niversity of Greece 43 II. (.. hy the famous Greek IT'rrsller, Diogenes. Charter gf anted Fuzzy H uzzy Chapter, University of Georgia. Athens, Go., hy University of Mexico 1023.) WHY IT IS In the early days of man’s freedom, before I lie cumin}” of prohibition and co-cdticaliou, the male human was wont to rule the roost, dispensing only those tilings to woman that his superior intellect counseled as good for her. Then with the passing of time man found that woman was smoking his favorite brand, and vamping his pet Ixmtlegger. She even objected to a single standard of |K)litics. To combat these evils the Diognesian Club was formed. Every members carries a lantern, or some other form of lighting apparatus, and a club the lantern to aid in finding an honest woman, the club to show others the error of their ways. The organization is a direct outgrowth of an ideal that was suppressed in Adam when he was forced to relinquish his dignity and skin his shins while climbing a rough-barked apple tree in order to satisfy the vanity of Mrs. Adam. Its ideal is for a man to l»e a MAN. and not a supine creature swayed by the winds of circumstance. "Ilig Pat" Patterson “Slots)'" Still ..... “Red" Lundy......... "Phreely" Coulter . “Pete" Rowon ....... OFFICERS .......................................... I resident ...................................... Vice-President ..............................Secretary and Treasurer ............................................ Chaplain .......................................... High Priest MEMBERS "Mickey" Freeman "Shorty" Murphry Ralph Youngblood “Whiicy" Newton Jim Morgan llob Twitty LeConte Talley "Pete" I sry "Speed” Swift . D. Summers Allen Hasty Herbert Summei' "Old-Timer" KldredgeThe Forestry Club OFFICERS E. 3- Rosser .................................................................. President W. W. Taylor ............................................................. Vice-President R. I). Alexander .............................................................. Secretary J. M. Tinker................................................................... Treasurer MEMBERS IN FACl ETATK Tims. I). Burleigh DuPre Barren Lewie R. Smith ACTIVE MEMBERS Beale, C. B. Grant. B. F. Point, C. 0. Bickers, B. K. Hraper, W. J. Quinn. 0. E. Brown, R. F. Hooper, J. 11. Rietz. P. R. Byrd. Z. 11. Ivester. J. L. Rowan. K. V. Cannon. G. E. Johnson. C. W. Sears, E. L Carlton. W. H. Jones. O. C. Sellers. C. I). Corn. T. J. Magill, J. W. Speer. A. L. Davis. A. L Martin. H. B. Strange, H. K. Doherty, C. P. .VlcDaris, E. I). Teasley. E. A. Dougan, F. W. Mears, Sydney Thomason. F. M. Earnest. C. C. Monighan. F. J. Warner. James Eaton, J. L. Morton. Mike Watts. C. H. Ertel, L. D. Nuite, C. W. Williams, C. J. Flood, E. J. Ogden. W. F. Williams. 0. A. Gaskins. J. 11. Ogletree. II. I). Winstead. P. L. Gaston, N. R. Peters. J. M. Tiner. R. F. . . C -aJ( v% UJL . k ni Jk' 4l (A XsMO' fb-vAj 4$jU'7+ C 6 Ll) vXx vj . fif z 2y P V sM€r u • Ly jUyv yi .a. j Cl CtMz tfLlu + 0. J €.• 'ty( n% 1 tyjl—.o Athletic Association Presidents Davant, Robert M. .. Patterson, Walter L. .. First Term Second TermClark, George. I resident Gurr, E. M. Williams. "Porkv” Power, “Pal” Pantone. C'.iiT Sale. Fred Thomason, J. L). Watson, "Josh” Allen, DeLucy Kldredge, H. K. Howard. W. McGiffen. T. J. Cleckley, Hervey Richardson. Boh Welchell. Hugh Tanner, F. A. Anthony, T. L. Vandiver. J. H. Coiling . Dave Boncy, Sam Post, Dan Thompson, Sanford Richardson. S. Anderson. I . K. Taylor, N. J. Joscglove, Ike Bennett. J. J. Randall, L. C. Fletcher, John Butler. Jake Mulvehill. R. Bennett, Paige Fitts, Sheldon tPah;k"re©T AkUCoaches Conover and Steceman1 “PUSS” WHELCHEL, Captain Captain Whelchd, guard. played through a greater part of the season with an injured shoulder, but he always gave his best on the firing line, as well as in practice. "Puss" is a good student of football, quickly diagnosing the opponents plays, and is an unusually hard man to gain ground over. He has played his last game for his Alma Mater and will be greatly missed when the roll is called next fall. Gip-tain "Puss" led his team in a most admirable manner, instilling into his men the importance of fair play and his wonderful fighting spirit. He was All-Southern. "DAVE" COLLI N'CS. End and Quarter Hack Collings, belli r known at the University as "Hospital Dave", has played his four years on the Georgia team, and proved to be very dependable on both offense and defense. “Dave” did most of the punting for the team his first three years, and averaged far above other punters in the leading colleges of the South. He played one of the flank positions in most of the important games this last year and handled that position in a very skillful manner. "Dare-devil’s" specialty, was to send the oval well down the field into the hostile territory from behind his own goal line. • SAM HONEY, Center Sam played the early season games at end. being stationed at this in the Chicago game, where he participated in active service. He was shifted to center after this game where he played the remainder of the season. Boney is an accurate passer and is a good defensive man against running plays and forward passes. Sam was a three letter man at the University, being a consistent performer in ail three major sports. Unfortunately, Sant left school at the close of the football season, after giving splendid service for two years. "DICK" Ml L Kill LI., Quarter "Dick's" first appearance in an important game was against Tennessee, where he showed rare ability in running the team and throwing forward passes accurately. His best work was against Auburn, directing the plays well and sending between the uprights a perfect drop kick from the twenty yard line. Hail MulvehilJ remained in school he would have made a valuable backfield man next year, hut it is said that he has gone to Georgetown. This was "Dick's" first letter as he played on the Freshman team his first year. L. -JOE ir.'.’NI-'.T T. Ta 7.7 • Captain Elect l'» nnett lias played left tackle on the team for thro- years and won his spurs his Freshman year. Joe is known among his teammates as “Varsity”, a title he well deserves. “Varsity" was ilic best tackle in the South last year, lie always handles his position skillfully and blocked many punts and pas es. lie plays a hard '•ons’stent game and is especially good in defensive play. "Varsity" was unanimous!) chosen to lead the 1923 eleven. If his men will follow him in his determination and fighting . p.nt the season will l . a grand success, lie was All Soitllurn. JIM TAY1.0H. Tackle Jim made his letter in 1920. hut hud to withdraw from school and was not here for the 1921 season. On his return to the Gridiron this year, lie stepped into regular tackle position where hi has performed consistently in all the important games of the season. Jim is not a censational player, hut he is aggressive, a hard worker, and can be depended upon to do more than his share of the work on both olTcnse ami defense, lie is always in good physical condition and should be one of the outstanding tackles in the South next year. Jim, we are g.ad that you have two more years on the team. J. 11. VAND1YEK. Guard “Vandy" has played guard during his four years on the team and has done it wonderfully well. He is not a sensational player, but is reliable; yea, more so than many sensational performers, because he takes no unnecessary chances he plays safe. "Vandy’s" performance is always admirable. Although not having won All-Southern, he is as valuable to the team as any man so honored. It. S. THOMPSON, llulflunk "Smack" has been with us two years and has made us a valuable man. He possesses the same old fighting spirit that his brother. Charlie, in the days of yore possessed. “Smack” has played ! oth haekfield and end positions and has done both admirably, lie is a better defensive man than offensive, although lie is no slouch in advancing the oval. Hi two remaining years should bring out the best that is in this stalwart blond. « L C. KANDALL. Halfback This fleet-footed young man i lianl to Mop if allowed lo get past the line of scrimmage, lie has been one of Georgia’s most consistnnt ground gainers during his I wo years on the leant. His best work this year was against Mercer and Chicago; in llic latter game lie was injured which prevented his showing his old time form again during the season. Next year. "Tcany” should he one of the most INiwerful and most finished football players in the South. All Southern is your’s Randall if oii will hut reach out and grasp it. J. (I. FLETCHER, Halfback "llig" John, as most of us know him. is a natiiral-imrn athlete. He is the fasteil two hundred pound man in the South and when carrying the hall it usually takes three or four men to slop him. He possesses the greatest ability in -tiff arming which is imperative for a good offensive man in college football. John has been with us only two yean, hut is one of the most valuable men we have. His work against Auburn. Vanderbilt, Virginia, and Alabama was especially outstanding. He made C ni|)ositc-AII-Soutlurn this season, an honor he rightly deserves. F. A. TANNER, Fullback • During his four years here. “Coal" Inn been the main stay of the Ceargia hickficld. It is regretted that he was not allowed to carry the hall more his first two years on the team. "Coal’ has always been noted for his great defensive work, but this year lie developed into a wonderful offensive man. It was in the last Auburn game that he showed his greatest ah.'lity to advance the pigskin going through the opponents line time after time for substantial gains. As an interference man. “Coal’’ has not an equal in the South. In the Chicago game his defense was outstanding-work that cannot be surpassed. "DAN" POST. Halfback "Little Dan,” as he was known liy all his teammates, hails from Ncwnan. Although, weighing 145 pounds, lie has played an important role in all (he big games of the season. Post is an unusually strong man on defense, especially in breaking up passes, and is also dependable when called upon to advance the ball. It is regretted by Georgia sup|Mirters that "Dan” decided to discontinue bis work at the I niver-sity to enter u|n»ii the real battle of life.HERVEY CLECKLEY. Sub-Halfback Clccklcy may properly be called “Charlie Paddock” of ilie University. Ho made a wonderful record on ihe cinder path last season, being a runner of the hundred and two hundred and twenty yard dashes, as well as a member of our famous relay team. Hut that it not the only spoil in which Hervey participates. He showed ability this year to advance the pigskin making during the season some very nice runs. With this years experience and his marvelous speed Cleckley should be a regular halfback next year. SPENCE GRAYSON, Sub-Guard Grayson played in practically all of the October games, but failed to get in enough November games to warrant a letter. This is the first year that he has played in the line, but nevertheless his work was commendable. Of the two guard positions left open by the graduation of Whelchel and Vandiver, Grayson stands a good chance of landing one of them. With this man’s superb pair of legs he can get almost any opposing linesman out of his position. T. R. DAY. Sub-Guard “Roose" is a brother of the famous “Hum" Day. the greatest center that ever donned a Georgia uniform. “Roose" has labored under the greatest handicap that can face an athlete-—an injured knee, but nevertheless, in every game in which he has played his work was commendable. We are “pulling" for you. “Roose," and wish to see you on the varsity next year. NEWTON, Sub-Guard “Puss” played in several of the early games this year and before he leaves the University should win a regular birth provided he develops a little more speed that is enough to run interference properly. “Puss" is one of the hardest fighters on the sipiad and if Coach White could always be around and say, “Cct in there and fight ’em “Puss”, no man could play opposite him for an entire game.SAM RICHARDSON, End This year was Richardson’s second year of college football. He played a good defensive game at his position at left end, where his nose was badly smashed in the Virginia game, but “Rich” would not allow this to stop him. He is a hard conscientious worker and will make a good man on the flanks next season. Sam enjoys giving his best at all times, in practice as well as in the actual game. •IKK" JOSGI.OVE. Guard “Ike” won his spurs in the Furman game, where he played a very hard aggressive game, showing that he had the fighting spirit that it takes to win. His work in the Vanderbilt and Alabama games was good and of a high order. With more experience this man will be hard to keep off the regulars. He is a worker and has the determination and spirit that will make a valuable man in the future. This is "Ike's” first letter. He is well deserving of the honor of wearing the coveted “C.” “BILLY” PHILPOT, Sub-Quarter . This man weighs only 145 pounds, but is hard through and through, never complaining of injuries and always being ready and willing to give his best in the scrimmages against the varsity. "Billy" calls signals well, and is a good side-stepper, and showed himself to be built from regular football material. He performed nicely in some of the early season games, and with a little more cx|tcrience should be a valuable man. He did not get in sufficient games to make his letter. "SHAD" FRYER, Sub-Center “Shad" played most of the early season games at center and played them well. He absorbed much punishment in the Chicago game and will, no doubt remember the signal that sent John Thomas and Zorn in his direction and the neighboring vicinity, but “Shad" played all of the game, giving his best every minute of the play. "Shad” weighs around 200 pounds, having an ideal build for a football man, and will be hard to keep off the regulars next year. He did not make a letter this year, but should get his reward in another season. ►"J. I).’’ Thomason, Sub-End Thomason is a Sophomore and hails from Columbus, where he was an outstanding performer at the High School in both baseball and toot ball. "J. I).” played all of the Furman game at end. proving himself to be a good defensive man, and excellent on sending the pigskin down the field on the kick-off. He also «hows promise of developing into a good back-field man. “J. D." did not make bis letter, but should give all comers keen competition for a regular place next fall. He is a lirst class star on the baseball diamond and will play an important part in athletics in the future at the I niversity. P. K." ANOKKSON. End “P. K." came to the I niversity in 1919 and made bis letter his first year. He has been a faithful hard working athlete since that time. He made bis second letter this year by doing splendid work in the Vanderbilt and Alabama games. "P. K.' deserves much credit for bis four years on the gridiron, not because of bis spectacular playing, but because be has given bis best to Ceorgia. His best work is on the defense and he is a punter of considerable ability. JAKE IU TI.F.H. Sub-Fullback Jake played an end during the early season games, where lie performed well, especially on the defensive, lie absorbed much punishment along with several other Bulldog players in the Chicago game and will, no doubt, remember the game a long time. Butler got in several games at fullback, displayed the football ability and fight that will make bint a valuable backfieKI man for next year. He will be mighty bard to keep off the regulars when the work starts again, and should make bis letter easily, but. Captain Joe says all positions will be bard to make next year. The Football Season By E. E. IF'atson 1EWED through prism sliol with the numerical talcs of four defeats, the 1922 Georgia football schedule might be termed unsuccessful. But just as surely as athletics has a nobler aim than the mere winning of games, just as certainly may the rejuvenated fighting Georgia Bulldogs of 1922 be held in the light of glory when the cxasting nature, of perhaps, the most exhausting schedule in the history of Southern football, is considered. When the mighty Auburn Tigers, completely outfought out-scored during the first half, completed a long forward pass that paved the way to an immediate touchdown, a “Ccorgia” team was defeated by a Southern foe for the first time since (November of 1919. The Bulldogs had been defeated by their most ancient and honorable of enemies, the “big game' of the year had been lost, but there was ample glory for both teams, for eighteen thousand people had seen a team that was widely acclaimed the superior, forced to struggle savagely as the game died away to a laboriously earned Tiger victory. There is little to write of the record of the 1922 team. As is just, the doleful figures of those four defeats by Chicago, Auburn, Ya-dcrbilt and Alabama will be effaced from the popular memory e’er another harvest moon comes to bathe old Sanford field with a flood of golden and mellowed light. And there will remain for posterity the record of how the intrepid Athenians fought. Not how they won, but how they fought. The sordid figures may be hastily summoned and summarily and mercifully dispensed with. Newberry was swamped in the opening game, scoring two touchdowns in losing, 82-13. One of the touchdowns however, was portentous in that it followed from an effective enemy use of the forward pass, a weapon of attack that the Bull dogs were never to be able to completely master. That aerial touchdown was not generally regarded a menace at the lime of victory, however, and thousands of jubilant Georgia supporters sang praises of what was happily supposes to be the first real Georgia scoring machine developed in some time. And why not? Here was a team that though considerable distempered by the loss of those three supermen of the line. Day, Pew, and 0. Reynolds, seemed freshened here with the injunction of exuberant and powerful, though embryonic material; welded into a defense of iron-like rigidity under the hands of Slegeman and Conover. Those who trusted in the remarkably efficient Slegeman School of Football Defense knew that few yards would ever be gained through any Georgia line the wily Chicagoan might develop. And this surmisal was well founded, for only in one game did the 1922 Georgia team ever waver before the line attack of the opponent. But we must wearily serve some more figures. Alumni and student enthusiasm waxed tremendous as the Mercer team came to Athens only to take the most thorough clawing the Bulldogs had ever given it. 41-0 was the score, and though the style of play the Baptist offered never allowed their forward line to unitedly stand against Georgia line rushes, nothing could be seen in the Georgia machine, but an irresistible attack that was to devour enemy territory in hugh gobs, withal, to perhaps hold the Red and Black goal line inviolate against the cleat of every host.Just what happened at Chicago the interested know. As Captain Welchel and his males toiled with might and main on the grassy plats of Sanford Meadow prior to the Western invasion, ceaselessly, hut not per-functorvly drilling under countless formulae, the waiting world of Georgia supporters saw in the bristling defense and the rapidly gathering power of the Athens squad a team that meant to be felt when it struck against the ramparts of the outstanding Chicago Maroon grid men. The contingent that accompanied the team to Chicago say that, but for a few' bits of misfortune, of which either team might have been the victim, the 20-0 margin of defeat might have been halved. . Those who slaved behind gleaned that a most promising Georgia forward defense. composed largely of supple, ambitious, new material had been gouged, battered, and crushed into extensive retirement from football in gloriously fighting before the potent thrusts and far-famed mass attack of the Maroons. You who urdcrsland and revel in the “Georgia Spirit” will sense that it w?as not an overwhelming defeat after all. Furman, I niversity of Tennessee, and Oglethorpe were next encountered in successive games. The Carolinians doggedly contested every inch of Georgia advance, and to them went the honor of holding the invaders to a 7-0 victory. Tennessee flashed surprising form and strength in succumbing to the Red and Black, 7-3, a game made memorable by the feat of the Vol quarterback in booting a 42-yard drop-kick from a difficult angle. Oglethorpe was vanquished, 26-6, scoring the first touchdown they had ever been able to consummate against Georgia. There followed what will probably stand as the severest test a Dixie team ever faced, when the Bulldogs were forcer to engage in succscssion Auburn, Virginia, Vanderbilt, and Alabama. The history of that series in the history of any loss of prestige our football system may have suffered. MulvehilFs drop-kick gave us our only points of the game with Auburn. John Fletcher, swift as a falling meteor, husky and nimble, accounted for the lone touchdown that gave Georgia a 6-6 tie with the colorful eleven from Virginia. Virginia had fervently hoped to win, in fact, in view of recent achievements against Washington and Lee, Princeton, and others, the Dominion fondly indulged the hope of atoning for their 21-0 defeat by Georgia in 1921. Then swooped the cohorts of Vanderbilt, gleaming in Black and Gold, upon the Bulldog fold. When the jagged shadows of that November day bad crept over Sanford Field, the Commodores had scored 12 points by artful use of the locally lamented forward pass. McGugin and company had won despite the valiant defensive effort of Captain “Puss”, Joe Bennett, Jim Taylor, Holly Vandiver, and the not altogether futile charges of John Fletcher, Fred Tanner, Dan Post, Dick Mulvihill, and the rest of the fiercely scrapping crew of Georgians. ictory emerged from the air that day, the Tennesseean’s first coming as the direct result of 45-yard pass, and the next following from another aerial attack. That the Georgia line stood supreme in defeat is evidenced in the fact that Vanderbilt was unable to gain over a score of yards on line plays. The closing game of the season saw the most decided shock of all befall the Red and Black. Though it was known that the Georgia team was in badly crippled condition, it was little thought that Alabama would crush through to victory. The Crimson won by 10-6, though Fletcher had put the Bulldogs into an early lead by seizing an Alabama fumble behind his own goal line to race the length of the field in Montgomery for a touchdown.The Alabamians fought as though inspired, furiously crashing time after time into the blood-besmeared Georgia line, which was worn down and backed under its own goal posts as the Tuscaloosans scored their First touchdown against Georgia since 1920. There were heroes born of the memorable 1922 Georgia football campaign. There were the stolid “Puss' Whelchel, brilliant Joe Bennett, and talented John Fletcher to make the composite All-Southern team. Captain Whelchel, closing his fourth year as a guard, was hindered in early season by a recalcitrant shoulder. Delirious, battered into semi-consciousness in his efforts to share in stemming the Vanderbilt tide, the flaxen-haired giant, it is said, did not know until after the game that Georgia lost to Vandy. Bennett, a figure of splendour, possessed the rare quality of drawing spectators’ admiring attention to his work in the line. His spectacular and effective work, albeit his great athletic temperament earned for him a handsome reward. He is to be Captain of the 1924 team. Fletcher was named All-Southern fullback, he being one of the few “Georgia” men ever to make the mythical aggregation while in the Sophomore year. Great dependence is placed in him as the leader of next year’s attack. Nor can the laurel wreath escape the noble brow of Fred “Goat” Tanner, certainly the greatest defensive back the Red and Black ever boasted, and perhaps the best in Dixie grid annals. This modest son of the mountains carved for himself a recess in the Georgia Hall of Grid Fame that time cannot efface, even when the nature of his work was not ordinarily spectacular. Let it be said for him that he made of secondary defense a colorful art. Little Holly Vandiver finished his grid career just as he had conducted it at all times, efficiently, faultlessly, a lower of strength at guard. It is said that wedding bells are soon to chime for the Rome boy. He carries the best wishes and congratulations of all who admired him. a veritable legion. The season saw developed a wizardous drop-kicker, passer, and broken field runner in Dick Mulvehill. Dan Post, halfback, was rapidly approaching the ranks of stardom, too. “Teany” Randall, another back, sustained injuries in early season and had small opportunity to display the form that heralded him a real “find” in 21. Dave Collings, the old reliable, rounded out his four years as a varsity back in a bright red cloak of glory. He was used at several positions and proved himself the dependable performer at end, and quarterback. Sam Boney, versatile linesman, failed to return to school after Christmas and brought gloom to those who saw him a bulwark for Kid Woodruff’s 1923 aggregation. Jim 'Faylor, the Douglas Typhoon, will return next fall as running mate for Captain Joe at tackle. No doubt has ever existed that Jim is a finished performer, and his aggressiveness and alertness last fall sustained the “rep.” Of the new men who ascended to the varsity in the strenous campaign. Shad Fryer, Ike Joselovc, Jake Butler, Paul Anderson, and Spence Grayson played best, and all but one arc to return as bits of the nucleus for next season. That schedule artist, Dr. S. V. Sanford, has laid another hard road for Georgia gridmen to travel. Yale, Auburn, Center, Alabama, Virginia. Tennessee, Vanderbilt, Mercer, Furman, and Newberry are to be met in 1923.1922 Football Schedule September 23 Georgia 82 vs. Newberry 13 September 30 Georgia 41 vs. Mercer 0 October 7 » Georgia 0 vs. Chicago 20 October 14 . . At Greenville, S. C. Georgia 7 vs. Furman 0 October 21 • Georgia 7 vs. Tennessee 3 October 27 Georgia 26 vs. Oglethorpe 6 November 4 Georgia 3 vs. Auburn 7 November 11 Georgia 6 vs. Virginia 6 November 18 Georgia 0 vs. Vanderbilt 12 November 25 Georgia 6 vs. Alabama 10 At Montgomery, Ala.1922 Football SquaiWKHS3MJGeorgia vs Aciu'rxCO' co 4 First row, reading left to right: Bennett, Williams, Coach Stegeman. Second row: Clark. Captain Gurr, Watson. Third row: Butler. Richardson.The Basketball Season OACH STEGEMAN was confronted by a mosl difficult pro| osition when he sought to turn out a basketball team during the 1923 season which would compare favorably with Bulldog quintets of the past. Three of his 1922 regulars— Eddie Rawson, Sam Boney and Paige Bennett, were not back in the fold; only two regulars from last year resumed the harness, Ed Gurr and Joe Bennett, but coaches, taking these two letter men from last year as a nucleus to build around, developed a strong machine which made a very formidable record. Ed Gurr, who had been playing reserve forward for several years was shifted to center, playing at the pivot position all season. And there Ed played a wonderful brand of basketball, his playing being phenomenal at times. He not only secured more than his share of the tip-offs on opponents centers, but he also shot more than his share of points. He was arsenic personified in dribbling the ball down the floor and making good shots under the basket, and he was without u peer in shooting foul goals, shooting seventeen straight without a miss in the Tennessee and Kentucky games. Gurr captained the team, being chosen leader shortly after the season had opened. He was the third captain to be elected. At the close of the ’22 season Eddie Rawson was honored by his teammates by being named their leader. But Eddie failed to return to school and Sam Boney was elected early this season. Sam, however, withdrew from school during the Christmas holidays, and Ed was then chosen. Ed made the boys a great leader, and on several occasions led them to victories when defeat was staring them in the face. The boys, in appreciation of Ed’s efforts as captain, reelected him for next year at the close of the season. George Clark and Joe Bennett, the only two regulars from last year to return this season played guard all year. Both played splendid basketball throughout the season and were always in there fighting with the tenacity of the vicious Bulldogs they represented. Jake Butler and Porky Williams, reserves from the 1922 season, held down the forward positions and both performed splendidly. Butler excelled as floorman while Williams proved to be most uncanny in locating the basket from all angles. He was also a splendid floorman. Josh Watson and Bob Richardson were the only other members of the squad to win their coveted “GY It was Josh’s first year out for the cage team, but he performed so well in the early season scrimmages that he won a place and from the start and distinguished himself in several games during the season. He played forward. Richardson was a reserve guard from last year, but did not then make his letter. This season, however. Bob went out for the team fired with a new determination to make good. The score card says he did. On their schedule the Georgian’s played thirteen games, winning eight and losing five. The boys downed Wofford twice, Clcmson once, Furman once. Auburn once, Mercer once, Kentucky once, and the Atlanta Athletic Club once. They lost to Auburn, Mercer. Tennessee, Vandy, and the A. A. C. Their victories over Auburn, Mercer, Kentucky and the A. A. C. were the most brilliant. It was Georgia’s first win over the Atlanta clubl ers in several years. They won the Auburn game after they had apparently hopelessly lost it. With eight minutes to go and trailing the Tigers by ten points they rallied and won out, 33 to 29. The Bulldogs downed the Baptists in their second meeting, 29 to 28 in one of the hardest fought games of the southern season, and they scored the victory over Mercer after Josh Cody’s men had hopelessly outclassed them and sent them down in a 31 to 11 defeat in the first game. By beating Kentucky, 23 to 19, in Lexington the Bulldogs avenged the dusting the Wildcats game the Georgia team in 1921 in the finals of the Southern Collegiate Tournament in Atlanta. The feature of the Bulldogs play in the Southern Tournament in Atlanta was their meeting with Georgia Teeh in the third round, the Jackets emerging victorious by some few points. The game drew an immense crowd of wild and wooly fans, and the best of spirit between the rival schools prevailed. The Georgians won the fight to meet the Techsters by heating Tennessee in the first round and drawing a bye in the second round. Tech went to the third round by virtue of drawing a bye in the first round and downing Centre College in the second. —W. C M.Prof. S. V. Sanford Coach Bill White Captain Geo. ClarkPat Power Catcher J. D. Thomason First Base DeLacy Allen Short Stop JOSH WATSON Second BaseIt % a 'iQfc- If) JJ r W gg w JL • Hy - - Cuff Pantone Pitcher Fred Sale PitcherPop” Ramsey Right Field “Old-Timer” Eldreoce Left-Field McRae Right-FieldGeorgia s 1923 Baseball Schedule March 24 .. March 26 . March 28 . March 29 . March 31 .. March 31 .. April 2 . April 4 . April 5 . April 6 . April 7 . April 10 . Aphil 14 . April 18 . April 19 . April 20 . April 21 . April 27 . April 28 .. April 30 . May 1 . May 2 . May 4 . May 5 . May 7 . May 8 . May 11 . May 12 . May 14 . May IS . May 18 . May 19 . 1923—Schedule- 1923 Al Camp Benning..................Georgia 4 vs. Camp Benning 3 .At Camp Benning.................Georgia 2 vs. Camp Benning 3 At Athens, Ga....................Georgia 12 vs. Dalhonega 4 At Athens, Ca............Georgia 1 vs. University of Penn. 3 At Macon, Ga...........................Georgia 9 vs. Vale 0 At Macon, Ga...........................Georgia 7 vs. Yale 2 .At Athens, Ga.....................Georgia 4 vs. Maryland 3 .At Athens, Ga......................Ceorgia 4 vs. Dartmouth 4 .At Athens. Ga......................Ceorgia 3 vs. Dartmouth 4 At Clemson, S. C...................Ceorgia 6 vs. Clemson 2 .At Clemson, S. C..................Ceorgia 1 vs. Clemson 2 At Athens, Ga.........................Georgia 1 vs. Trinity 2 .At Athens, Ga.....................Georgia 5 vs. Michigan 6 At Starkville, Miss............Ceorgia 5 vs. Miss. A. M. 1 At Starkville, Miss..............Ceorgia 1 vs. Miss. A. M. 2 At Tuscaloosa, Ala.................Georgia 3 vs. Alabama 1 At Montgomery, Ala.................Ceorgia 2 vs. Alabama 5 .At Athens, Ga...................Ceorgia 6 vs. Vanderbilt 3 At Athens, Ga......................Georgia vs. Vanderbilt .At Athens, Ga.....................................Georgia vs. Virginia At Athens, Ga......................................Georgia vs. Virginia .At Athens, Ga.................Georgia vs. North Carolina .At Auburn, Ala.......................... Georgia vs. Auburn .At Auburn, Ala...........................Georgia vs. Auburn .At Athens, Ga.....................................Georgia vs. Oglethorpe .At Athens, Ga.....................................Ceorgia vs. Oglethorpe .At Athens, Ga.......................... Georgia vs. Auburn .At Athens, Ga...........................Georgia vs. Auburn ,At Athens, Ga.......................... Georgia vs. Mercer .At Athens, Ga.......................... Georgia vs. Mercer .At Macon, Ga............................ Georgia vs. Mercer At Macon. Ga............................. Georgia vs. MercerBaseball T COULD hardly be said by the exacting that the baseball season has opened with a rush, and at this early date of the season, when the “Pandora” goes to press, it would be foolish to make any predictions as to its outcome. However, a glance at the score-card shows that Georgia has more than split fifty-fifty with the hefty schedule evolved by that famous schedule artist, Professor Sanford. With the above in mind we will let the score-card deal out the sordid figures, while we tell you of that baseball team of Georgia's. Or, if you please, while we make a few personal remarks to the team, or about the team. George “Padre” Clark is, this year, whipping the horsehide around for the last season on Sanford Field. Captain of the team, with a batting average that reads like a millionaire’s bank account, and that recognition which comes of being named ALL SOI THERN, George will leave school in a cloud of glory; glory, both for his athletic prowess and for his numerous other contributions to his Alma Mater. • “Old-Timer" Eldredge is another senior who is prancing around the left garden for the last season. “Old-Timer” leaves a host of admiring friends and a gap that will be hard to fill. With one more year for Pantone, two for Sale and three for Chambers and Mundav, the pitching staff next year should he a machine respected and admired by the best. We predict that the inner garden will continue to be held down to perfection by that efficient quartette, Thomason, Watson, Allen, Middlebrooks. Of these four Thomason is All Southern. With Pat Power pegging second and “Pop" Ramsey harvesting them in the right field and slamming out doubles, any team should look forward with interest to a set-to with Coach Bill White’s aggregation.T Kk The 1923 Track Team Sittinc Left to Right F. N. Jelks. “Red" I.viit, J. M. Jones. Harvey Mabry. John Howard. Captain, John Fletcher, Hcrvey Cleckley. Harvey Griffin. Tom McCiffin. Standing Left to Richt Z. C. Hayes. Manager. J. R. Johnson, H. C. Kicklightcr. W. H. Veale. Bill Tate. V. A. Lundy. K. C. Hogan, C. M. Spann, “Ruddy" Lllis, H. J. Stegeman, Coach.  JHCfok if CCitr er 5Cf Coo mTKe University Y. M. C- A. HE Y. M. C. A. aims at a threefold development of the men who are brought into contact with it. It’s purpose is to help keep men physically fit, morally straight, and mentally awake. Those students who have availed themselves of the many opportunities offered by the “Y”, both for amusement and edification are already aware of the unique position the Y. M. C. A. occupies in the life of the University, and of the incalculable service it renders to every man who will only accept it’s proffered opportunities. Under the capable leadership of the student officers, and without the services of a full-time General Secretary, the “Y” has made much progress in the right direction. The “Y” Building has come to be the real center of social life on the campus. Many students have enjoyed the magazines and newspapers in the reading room. . Everyone of the Vesper Services and Saturday Night Parties have been thoroughly enjoyable affairs. The former have brought to the campus many of the leaders of Athens civic life, and also several members of the faculty. The latter have been eagerly looked forward to, and proven to be extremely popular with the students generally. Deserving of especial mention is the service rendered in bringing to the University, Dr. Frank Morgan, and Rev. Edward Nason McKinley. Dr. Morgan’s biblc-study class, and “Brother Mark’s” series of lectures on the campus both accomplished a great deal of good. We might mention many others who have been of great service to us during the year. The Y. M. C. A. is steadily looking forward to better things. The organization will surely be able to accomplish greater things next year, because of the added support that is being gained as time passes. The men on the campus have come to regard it as almost invaluable, and will be right behind it next year.Officers of Y. W. C. A Nelle Gil land .......................................................... President Annie Wooten ....................................................... Vice-President Emmie Nelson ............................................................ Secretary Lois Stillman ........................................................... Treasurer Gertrude Stith ..................................... Under-graduates Representative Grace Allen Evelyn Powell Angel yn Sasnett Nellie Mae Bowen Ethel Purcell Mary Sims Sallie Fannie Daniel Genevieve Tucker Nell Upshaw Edith Houseer - i: BED AND bLACk 3C 1 Editorial Staff, First Term E. A. Lowe ......................................................................... Editor-in-chief Alton Hosch ............................................................... First Associate T. K. Perry .................................................... Second Associate Editorial Staff, Second Term J. K. Harper ........................................... Editor-in-chief W. C. Munriay.......................................................First Associate W. C. Cooper ........................................... Second Associate Business Staff Dave Wisdom ............................................................ liusiness Manager J. H. McGehee ....................................................... Assistant business Manuger 1if : Clje ant) plack First Edition of Red and Black Appeared 1893 Editorial Staff J. K. Mooney.................. Flilwin Everett ........... T. E. Merritt ............ C. R. Anderson ........ J. W. Kling.......... J. P. Myerson _____ Nelle Upshaw ... Lester Hargrett ----- Editor-in-chief, First Term Editor-In-Chief, Second Term ......... Associate Editor •......... Associate Editor .....Associate Editor — Associate Editor .. Associate Editor Associate Editor H. C. Sheffield Brown Whatley Art Staff .......... Art Editor Assistant Art Editor E. E. Watson W. G. Johnston . E. C. Hogan......... S. A. Idclson ........... Business Staff ...........................Business Manager ..................... Assistant Business Manager ................................. Circulation Manager ........................... Assistant Circulation ManagerIThe Georgia Agriculturist 0. C. Aderhold ................ S. G. Chandler............. Miss Emmie Nelson A. E. Drexel...... N. D. McRainey 0. E. Cay........ I. P. Coulter......... W. W. Drake................ G. W. Murphey................. ................ Editor-in-Chief ..........Associate Editor ..... Associate Editor . Associate Editor Local Editor . Exchange Editor . .. . Business Manager Assistant Business Manager . .. . Assistant Business ManagerA Statistical Study of Certain Aspects of Student Life at the University of Georgia (This data was gathered by the class in statistics from a random pick of 592 students out of about 1200.) Per centage who dance ..............................................................95:62 Percentage who attend dances ......................................................95:52 Percentage who use tobacco .........................................................95:52 Percentage averse to hazing.........................................................95:30 Percentage who arc church members ....................................................95:82 Percentage who attend church ......................................................95:86 ATTENDANCE AT MOVIES Number of movies per month Number of students who attend % of students who attend 0 19 3 1 37 6 2 54 9 3 30 5 4 120 21 5 44 8 5 61 11 7 14 2 • 8 89 15 9 1 0 10 45 8 11 0 12 21 4 13 0 14 0 15 20 4 More than 15 25 4 MONTHLY EXPEiNDITt RES AND MEANS OK SUPPORT Total monthly expenditures in dollars All students Self-Supporting students Partially self supporting Supported by others No. 1 % No. fr No. 95- No. 95 25-34 94 18 30 34 31 31 30 9 35 44 87 17 18 20 23 21 16 14 45-54 100 19 17 19 19 18 64 0 55-64 81 15 7 3 13 12 61 19 65-74 68 13 6 7 12 11 50 15 75-84 59 11 7 8 6 46 14 85-9-1 8 2 r - 8 1 3 95 and above 25 5 4 » 1 1 20 6 ru ir IT'} 9 m-mmTl0 PeAceColonkl Dwl.ht W. Rytiifh 1‘rojcssor cf Military Science and Tactics and Commandant of CadetsV The Military Staff Major 1$. L Hurch .......... Cavalry Captain J. W. Nicholson ... Infantry Captain C. A. McCarripIc ... Q. M. C. Captain R. P. Gerfcn .......... Cavalry Captain J. B. Wise ......... Cavalry First Lieutenant C. M. Walton ... InfantryRegimental Headquarters Paul K. Anderson . Miss Louise Morton John W. Sibert ----- Krastus L. England James S. Jones ----- Frederick L Russell Otl p 0. Watson ... ...... Colonel ..... Sponsor Sergeant Major Supply Sergeant Supply Sergeant Color Sergeant Color SergeantRegimental Headquarters Harry E. Eldrcdgc ................................ Lieutenant Miss Lillian Scot! ......................................... Colonel SponsorRegimental Adjutants Lawrence K. Bennett ...................................................................... Adjutant Clarence 11. Cohen ........................................................... Intelligence Officer .Miss Elizabeth Phillips .................................................................. SponsorRegimental Adjutants John F. Scliwablt ................................ Joseph K. Chapman ................................ Miss Hetlv 1-ove.................................. Personnel Adjutant ---- Supply Officer ............Sponsor »First Battalion Officers Walter L. Patterson.....................................................Major Charles R. Anderson................................First Lieutenant and Adjutant Robert E. Cook.....................Second Lieutenant and Communication Officer Miss Dorothy Thompson.................................................SponsorDaniel F. Bruce.................................................Major and Squadron Commander Joseph C. Jarrell......................................First Lieutenant and Squadron Adjutant William Tate.......................................... First Lieutenant and Intelligence Officer Miss Cornelia Abney .................................................................. Sponsor Second Battalion Officers kMotor Transport Battalion Officers William F. AI ercroml»ie Will J. Hart .............. James T. Adair............ Miss l.ila Cox ............ .......................................Major ............First Lieutenant ami Adjutant Second Lieutenant and Intelligence Officer ................................... SponsorCompany A Officers Fenley Ky titer ...... Henry G. Kicklightcr Louis N. Hells....... William K. Kul shum Miss Alice Howland .......... Captain . First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . .. First Sergeant ......"... Sponsor II. Clerk ley W. II. Hill SKKGKA.NTS M. Nachman C. 15. Youngblood COKHOIl AI.S II. 1. Abney 0. K. Gay c. II. linker II. F. Middlehn.uk: c. F. Crouch T. I TylerCompany "A Roll Kyther. F.. (.'apt. kicklighler. H. C., 1st Lt. Betts, L. N'.. 2nd Lt. Fulghum. W. L.. 1st Sgt. Clccklcy, H., Sgt. Hi!!. W. B.. Sgt. Naclunan, M., Sgt. Youngblood. C. K.. Sgt. Abney, H. I., CpL Baker. C. H.. Cpl. Crouch. C. F.. Cpl. Cay, 0. E.. Cpl. Miad(chronics. H. F., Cpl. Tyler, T. L.. Cpl. Anderson, J. T. Bargcron, Eugene Bartlett. H. S. Burroughs. J. H. Clark. M. Cloud. I). I.. Craig. H. R. Dolvin. J. II. Foster, W. A. Card. C. T. Carner. L. Harden, I). H. Hardman, W. H. Hitchcock, F. C. Hodgson, K. C. Huggins, W. C. Kilpatrick. C. .M. (.angston, S. P. Levy. H. S. Magruder. C. M. Marks. T. i). Miller. B. C. Morcock. J. C. .Moore. W. L. McKoy, H. A. Neel. W. M. Owens. H. B. KatclifTc. 1). J. Phinazee, J. II. Powers, H. W. Salter. J. J. Sanders, E. I. Schwalb. 0. W. Shaiiuck, H. I). Smith. H. E. Starling, C. H. Steiner. P. A. Taylor. N. J. Topper. S. V. Turner. N. Watson, H. J. Williams. C. I.. Wilson. R. K. Wehh. James V. Williams. Balpli W. Van Valkenhurg. Chase Burks, I). H. Cotton, H.Company B Officers Moses G. Murray ........................................................................ Captain Charles O. Miller ............................................................. First Lieutenant Clarence M. Paulk ............................................................. First Lieutenant Samuel A. Cartledgc .......................................................... Second Lieutenant Handy B. Fant ................................................................. First Sergeant Miss Clara Bell Rutherford ............................................................. Sponsor SERGEANTS J. L. Strange G. F. Slaughter CORPORA1.S H. B. Johnson J. H. Mote C. E. McArthur W. E. Sewell L. E. Roberts Company B Roll Murray. M. G., C-apt. Miller. C. 0.. 1st Lt. Paulk, C. M., 1st Lt. Cartledge. S. A.. 2nd Lt. Fant, II. B., 1st Sgt. Lund. M.. Sgt. Slaughter. G. K.. Sgi. Strange. J. L.. Sgt. Johnson. II. B.. Cpl. McArthur. C. E.. Cpl. Mote, J. II.. Cpl. Koberls, L. E.. Cpl. Sewell. W. E.. Cpl. Alnutt, T. L Calhoun. J. Y. Fitts. J. B. Baltzell. C. F. Bartley. H. A. Bceland. I). S. Bennett. M. IL Bolton. W. E. Brown, A. I). Brown, C. V. Eberhardt. H. C. Fanning. J .C. Flanagan, T. Forbes, J. L. Gatewood, H. H. Callahcr, F.. W. Grant. J. W. Griffin. J. L. Hall. F. H. Heath. W. P. McCullough. E. L. Hay. J. W. Ilosch, J. 11. Jones. K. K. Kennedy. J. A. Kent. R. S. J-anglcy, A. Lazarus. M. I.each. J. F. Martin, F. B. Morris. U. I). McKinnie, W. J. Nelson. T. M. Owens. G. W. Patton. N. H. Pearce. H. E. Hightower. E. A. Robinson. W. E. Rosenberg, I. Russell. T. S. Sanford, H. W. Searcy, W. E. H., Ill Smith, A. N. Spence, H. W. Wesley, J. M. Whitney, M. H.Company "C Officers Thomas K. Merrill Iris P. Coulter ... Ed Y. Howard ... William A. Minor William L. Lanier Miss Mae McNeer ......... Captain . First Lieutenant . First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant ... First Sergeant .......... Sponsor C. K. Johnson SERGEANTS D. W. Ryllicr. Jr. CORPORALS A. L Davis L S. Gardener J. Iv. Johnson I. . I .amar C W. Lowe J. L. Wcslhrook r Merrill. T. K.. Capl. Howard, E. V.. 1st Lt. Coulter. I. P.. 1st Lt. Minor. W. A.. 2n l Ll. Lanier. W. M.. 1st Sgl. Johnson. 0. F.. Sgl. Ryther. I). W.. Sgl. Davis, A. I„. CpI. Gardner. L. S., Cpl. Johnson. J. K., Cpl. Lunar, L„ Cpl. Lowe. C. W.. Cpl. Bishop. J. E. Barton. J. T. Bass. W. E. Beacham, W. D. Brown, L. P. Bync. J. 1. Caldwell. J. M. Campbell. D. Caruihcrs. B. S. Cauthen, F. M. Close. T. M. Colson. J. B. Cook. C. J. d'Aniignac. M. Dunson. A. G. Dupuis, S. F,. F.lyca. G. D. Glover, C. S. Kviu. T. E. Garrett. M. C. Harris. J. . Harvey. H. G-Hayes. J. A. Hiers. J. S. Hooper. C. H. Husbands, B. H. Johnson. G. M. Johnson. J. V. Levie. M. C. Mallory. R. Marshall. V. E. Richardson, C. N. Bussell. W. B. Segrest. B. T. Slappey. . T. Slatham. J. C. Talmadge, C. Thomas, It. Tippin, J. N. Turner. C. F.. Waite. A. V. Wall. W. H. Wooten. A. G. Wyche, M. E. Bargeron. Everett Gray. J. W. Adams, J. M. Kilpatrick. M. E. Johnston. A. C.On Pa it ad kTroop A Officers Niton Ilosch ............................................ Joseph Walker, Jr........................................ Joseph S. Beall ......................................... Charles F. Wiehrs ....................................... Miss Sara Shaw .......................................... SKRGKANTS William C. Taliaferro Bernard M. Dornhlatt L C. Still ........ Cuplai i . first Lieutenant Secon-l Lieutenant ... first Sergeant .......... Sponsor J. H. Hancock J. P. Murphcy CORPORALS J. W. mount V. H. McRae I.co BelcherTroop A Roll • J. A. Hosch. Capt. J. H. Walker. First Lieut. J. S. Beall, Second Lieut. C. R. Wichrs. First Sgt. J. W. Sibcrt. Master Sgt. t Attached) J. L. Watson. Staff Sgt. (Attacked) IL M. Dornl.latt, Sgt. W. C. Taliaferro. Sgt. W. C. Carter, Sgt. J. I». Murphy, Sgt. J. II. Hancock. Sgt. J. W. Blount. CpI. W. II. McRae. CpI. L. W. Belcher l. C. Belt!ing M. II. Brown S. A. Frederick II. K. Noinmack F. Thomas K. J. Ficler J. M. Cant C. It. Claddin J. F. Griffin C. O. Hart C. W. Herriot T. P. McKenzie N. Bishop H. S. Calloway J. A. Crowinartie I). Wright J. H. Wright P. .N. Little C. C. Moore J. W. Morton H. McRae H. L). Nunnally J. K. Perry J. Clark J. C. Crcvatt I). Davis J. Q. Davidson L. C. Sledge II. K. Whitehall E. W. Rack ley A. E. Richardson W. T. Scott S. Simowilz V. K. Slater L Stephens1 Troop B Officers John H. Freeman ... Charles A. Lewis ... Clifford W. Collier .. Ralph R. Shaw ........ James A. Morgan------- Miss Elizabeth Harris .......... Captain Attached Captain . First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant ... First Sergeant .......... Sponsor SERGEANTS Harold T. Patterson C. J. Durham Fred M. Gorfain W. L McCrary S. H. Exley CORPORALS C. II. Curtis R. B. Jones L. C. GreenCompany ' B Roll J. H. Freeman. Capt. C. W. Collier. First Lieutenant R. II. Shaw. Second Lieutenant. J. G. Jarrell. First Lieutenant. F. M. Gorfain. Sgt. II. T. Patterson, Sgt. S. H. Exlcy. Sgt. C. J. Durham, Sgt. W. L. McCrary. Sgt. C. II. Curtis. CpI. L. C. Green. CpI. E. Beer R. F. Brown J. M. Day F. M. Dear W. 0. Foote C. R. Hodges J. W. Jackson G. S. Cargill J. P. Chambliss J. J. Dean J. L. Drcwry R. L. Ernest T. S. Cray H. Holliday R. E. Kelly L. B. McLendon F. W. Orr L. II. Oeljen W. K. Philpot W. H. Ashford R. J. Richardson L. Kenny F. H. Kent F. M. Lewis J. A. Mahoney C. H. Mcll P. G. M inter H. S. Stanley R. T. Scoggins T. II. Whitehead S. W. Wood R. L. Allen H. F. Beach II. I). Breen K. M. Brumby G. 11. Nixon D. M. Orr R. L Porter M. I.. Prisant G. II. Randolph G. B. Scroggs I). M. SniderTroop C Officers Sydney C. Chandler ...................................... John W. Davis ........................................... Charles I.. Padgett ..................................... Janies A. Newton ........................................ Miss Marie Krwin ........................................ SKIIGK ANTS Francis Stovall John W. Stephenson C. K. Powell .......... Captain . first Lieutenant Second Lieutenant ... First Sergeant .......... Sponsor P. W. Carswell H. M. Jarrell COUPONALS F. J. Slati-r J. I). Thomason S. G. Chandler ....................... Caplain Wm. Tale First Lieutenant J. F. Chapman ............. Captain Attached) C. W. Padgett ................. Second Lieutenant J. W. Davis .................. First Lieutenant F. A. Stovall ....................... Sergeant J. W. Stephenson. Sgt. C. 11. BickerstafT P. W. Carswell, Sgt. R. D. Brady .1. B. Mos'cllar, Sgt. 0. T. Cook H. M. Jarrell. Sgl. W. II. Smith 0. 0. Watson. .Master Sgt. J. C. Bonner t Attached.) J. J. Butler J. C. Bonner. CpI. It. Deal J. D. Thomason, CpI. B. II. Lane C. K. Powell. CpI. F.. D. I awton F. J. Slater. Cpl. P. N. Richards II. L. Frederick P T. Scoggins J. C. Green C. N. Shearer C. C. Dean D. 15. Snelling J. B. Harley E. M. Jankower H. C. Hubert R. M. Jones F. C. Groover P. A. Mulherin J. W. Green A. B. Parker J. R. Greyson •S. M. Weyman R. L Griggs 1. M. Adams G. P. Holland C. B. Ilealr L. B. Musgrove J. Power N. Nash .1. SatlnfT II. . Nolan II. R. Head C. W. Nuitc W. II. WrightU 19 2 2 Cikls Rifle TeamMotor Transport Co. No. 1 Off icers Neul D. McRaincy ............................................................... Captain Waller A. I.umly ...................................................... First Lieutenant Wallace . I Immas .................................................. Second Lieutenant Frc«l A. tanner ....................................................... First Sergeant Miss Mary Sims...................................................................Spon.wt SERGEANTS A. E. Drcxel . W. Rridjes CORPORALS J- 7- Mi»er W. S. Rockwell « r Roll of Motor Transport Co. No. 1 McKainey. N. I).. Capt. Lundy. W. A., 1st Lt. Thomas W. NY.. 2nd Lt. Tanner F. A., 1st Sgt. Drcxel, K. A.. Sgt. Bridge . V. Sgt. .Miller. J. Z... CpI. Rockwell. W. S.. CpI. Chandler. I. V. Drexel. F. C. Dolvin. R. L. Caertner. II. J. Haralson, F. C. Head. H. V. Knight. V. 1'. Langford. C. H. .Maddox. J. IL Merrell. R. A. McKIveen. J. V. Nelson, L. IL Rauzin. A. Sanford. H. R. Scars. K. L. Seay. J. L. Sheffield. H. C. Small a. T. G. Smalley. R. II. Smith. J. F. Summers. II. . Treanor, E. K. Turk. C. Young. F. M.Motor Transport Company No. 2 Officers Robert M. Davant .............................. Frank J. Erwin ................................ Elisha K. Davis ............................... Howard 0. Thomas .............................. .Miss Martha McAlpinc ......................... SERGEANTS Felix Hargrett .......... Captain . First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant ... First Sergeant .......... Sponsor L. F. Dailey CORPORALS G. W. MurpheyRoll of Motor Transport Co. No. 2 Davaiit, Ii. M.. Capt. Krwin. K. J., 1st l.t. Davis, K. K., 2nd Ll. Thomas, H. 0.. 1st Sgt. Hargrett, Keliz, Sgt. Southwell, B. L.. Sgt. Dailey. L. P„ CpI. Murphey. C. W„ CpI. Chastain, F. I). Kngland. K. L. Jones. J. M. Johnston. V. C. Maddox. H. II. Patterson. V. M. Seaborn, M. D. Trawick, A. J. (This company is composed entirely of 2nd Advanced Students).HThe Band Roll Abernathy. J. 1). Lipscomb, E. S. Barfield. R. E. McGiffin, T. J. Blount, R. A. McKinnon. G. K. Brawner, J. M. Mabry. H. Brown, H. 11. Merrill. R. A. Chandler, J. B. McKee, J. J. Colquitt. C. B. Oliver. A. M. Dornhlatl. A. J. I’endcrgrast, J. II. Drewry, 11. H. Power . W. E. Eaton. J. L Raiford, W. S. Glenn, IT. R. Robinson, J. W. Hinton. L. 11. Strangward, C. W, Johnston, J. L Tanner. J. W. Johnson. 11. L. Taylor, J. B. Jones, 1 E. Tillman. T. M. Turner. 1). C. Williams. J. E. Whitehead, . Windham. T. Miss Eli .abkth Coi:.ncil Sponsorr BfA Night Blooming Seance E HAD gathered or foregathered, as Billy Sunday and King Lardner would so aptly put it—to write the prophecy for the class of ’23. There was -or were—just five of us in midst of the others, thereby creating the most “midstest” crowd ever collected in Skinny River’s Sanctorium. Kaslus Lowe acted as chairman, V. V. Drake drew the exalted Sergeanl-at-Armship, Doc Harper and I drew up chairs in preparation for the seance that was going to practically strip the future of the Seniors bare of those obnoxious weeds of mystery with which it was seemingly wrapped. “Before we delve into the depths of the mystic unknown”, began Rastus, “where we arc likely to encounter scads of frisky spirits, I made the motion, second it, and declare it carried that we first have baptistical communion with some earthly spirits.” “At your service sir”, politely spoke Skinny, bowing in his internationally famous Chestcrfieldian manrer. i o sooner spoken than action took place; the resourceful Ski: nv produced from his beautiful mahogany wall cabinet a long green glass receptable, with a slender neck, the latter being stopped with a corn cob. On the side of the flask was inscribed in flaring gold letters this entrancing legend: “100' c Simon-Pure North Georgia Joy Juice. Nectar of the corn, sowed, ‘stilled and sold in the mountains of North Georgia.” “Purchased, primed, and proven in the sacred domains of Candler Hall”, pronounced skinny, withdrawing the stopper. Then in order to prove his utter unselfishness he tip-tilted the bottle toward the chandelier, and a gurgling sound was heard, gurgling and whispering like a far oft brook rushing joyfully onward over cool stones between mossy banks and shaded hedges. • The rest of us were mightily impressed by the artistic manner in which the j redoubtable Skinny manipulated the liquid inspiration; nevertheless, we exercised enough will-power to withhold until we had observed its effect. After five minutes, as Skinny was still alive, someone quoted the Governor of North Carolina when he made his great oration to the Governor of South Carolina, a d we all partook. Each little drink had the disposition of an Italian immigrant—it beckoned for another one to come on over. Soon the poor flask which had held enough inspiration to wri e a Russian novel lay empty, deserted, forgotten, kicked into a corner where it cringed in awful desolation. Then, Slap! Bang! The room went ’round and ’round. The washstand chased the wall cabinet into a corner and kicked it unmercifully, while pink monkeys ranged themselves along the ceiling and pelted one another with stars. Just then the deserted bottle shook itself, turned into a green snake, climbd the wall and hung down from the chandelier and began licking me in the face. At the same time the monkeys all directed their fire toward me, and 1 went under. The rext thing I knew we were seated around a red hot table, with the flask in the middle of the table, while a little black forked imp with a greasy smile was seated on top of the bottle and revelling in a pitcher of ice cream with frozen cherries. “Who are you?” we chimed in chorus. “I am the spirit of an honest bootlegger. This is 1933, and I am going to tell you what the class of 23 is doing”, answered the little imp, inserting a thumbnail in a cherry then allowing the juice to trickle slowly down his throat.“Whal arc wc doing here?" cried die listeners in unison. “Not so fast, gentlemen", answered die black one, “know you not that, today, altruism is considered die monkey’s adenoids? For such selfishness I must talk with Satan and Company regarding an extra carload of coal. Thoroughly shamed at our display of self-interest wc prepared to listen while the creation of soot and outer darkness rambled on. “W. F. Abercrombie. Weyman Davis and J. T. Adair own a string of igloos at the North Pole. They recently ejected Maelerlink and Ibsen, two pearl divers, for ron-payment of rent. “T. House Coolev and Squire Wilkerson are practicing inter-national law in the Shetland Islands. Their livelihood is gained by fishing whoever they can. “Phreely Coulter is Commander-in-chief of a Bolshevik army advancing on Bogart. “Old-timer Eldredge and A. Bush are traveling salesmen for a prosperous bootlegging establishment. Old-timer reports that the children cry for it. “Si«l Chandler and 0. C. Aderhold arc joint owners of a Sunday School Bulletin, published in Pekin, China. They also breed the famous Wampus Cat, whose fur is so highly prized in Hawaii. “Buck Bell’s office is always crowded with customers. He takes the three gold balls down when he closes up the shop. “The entire Pharmacy Class are rolling hoops at the court of the queen of Patagonia. They rank ns court jesters. “E. M. Dunstan now wears a number of collar, and is stable-boy to the sacred ox of the city of Stamboul. “Bob Davant and Davis Seaborn arc office boys in the printing establishment of Edwin Everett who is now owner-publisher of Jode l Jewels. . “Shorty Murphey and Gross Kicklighter arc joint owners of a weiner factory. Kick is also the exalted city poundmaster. “Pools Murray and R. L. l.ane arc bookkeepers in Schenectady. Their real business is binding books, but they keep most all that are sent them. “Mull and Wallace Thomas have at last succeeded in politics. They are official rain-makers for the state of Arizona. “Sleepy” Maddox has named his oldest son “Rastus England" Maddox, Raslus reciprocated by naming his daughter “Sleepy". “Coat" Miller is called the “Father of Podunk Center". Little Podunk is a lively lad. Goat puts little Podunk to sleep by singing “Tit Willow” which has nothing to do with the flowers that bloom in the Spring Tra-La. “George Clark has just busted a ladies heart so badly that she consoled herself by marrying another man. “Finch anil Rosser are practicing the Law of Gravity in Dcmosthenian Hall.” “Zach Hayes is still trying to enveigle Nick into buying a Pandora. “Edwin Thomas and Senator McClure are teaching Romance languages in a gypsy camp. Thomas has the edge on Mac in judging boss-flesh. “Paige Bennett and Nemo Vandiver are alternating at chasing Professor Sanford’s famous mystic football. “John W. Bennett is professor of manicuring at Vassar. He gains his livelihood by passing the collection plate at church. “Mark Anthony is conscientiously selling Lydia E. Pinkham's egclablc Compound. Mark Guarantees it as a cure for lameness.“Alton Ilosch and Austin Dean arc bally-hoo men for tlic Do Drop In Animal Show at Atlantic City. “ClilT Baker is a traveling troubadour, traveling from co-ed barn to co-ed barn singing, “Oh Where is my Wandering Co-ed. “Since his latest escapade at the ladies garage, Arthur Cannon confines his attention to the high flying fowls. “Stotsie’ Still still slumbers at the side of “Sleepy” Summers. “Boy Jones has given up ‘sasiety’ and is now affiliated with a tribe of Taos people. “Durden ar.d Whilener are traveling minstrels, their pet monkey is the chief attraction. “C. Elmo Brockinglon has at last convinced someone of the truthfulness of his ‘fifteen times' story. “D. D. Scarborough is now the official photographer for Mac Scnnett’s Bathing Beauty Publicity Bureau. “Big Pat and Pete I sry are still carrying on the good work of the Diogenesian Club. Big Pat has twenty-three notches on his club. “Burt says business is good at Point Peter, wherever that is. “T. R. and Harry Everett have bought out the Ford Motors Corporation and transformed it into an lngersoll watch manufactory. “Judge Wilcox is the proud owner of a cane so equipped that when the judge presses a button said cane remarks, ’good evening’. “Sam Varr.edoe is an instructor in Geechce Language at the University of Yapp. “Dave Collings is a football coach at the I niversity of Czecho slovakia. “Jim Morgan, Bob Twitty, and Chester McRae are jointly prosecuting Lundy and.Hart in the Supreme Court of the L. S. for selling them left handed canes. “Lillian Shehee is known as a good hostess in the little town near Savannah where she abides. “Lois Stillman has at last succeeded in taking her time. “Omah Badcock is the ofTicial sampler for Heintz’ fifty-seven varieties. “Kasscwitz and Fred McKenzie have gone on the stage. They create thunder in storm scenes. “Graveyard Lewis is now a great philanthropist. He recently donated fifty billion dollars to erect a night-party proof barb wire fence around all cemetaries in the country. “A. J. Strickland has entered the slock exchange. He exchanges guinea pigs for white rabbits. “John McWhirter recently drew a royal flush. Dr. says that he will recover. “Speedy Swifth was there when John drew the flush. “Sailor i cwbourne has completed his attendance at all schools in the I . S., and will register this fall at the University of Mexico for a course in bull fighting. “P. K. Anderson holds a corporalship in the horse marines. “E. W. Drew is still ‘o(T the women’, despite the fact that he was last seen at the co-ed barn. “Red Winn is still doing nothing. “C. H. Cohen is a political boss in the 7th ward in his home town. “L. R. Langley is a paid up member of the Chi Nu sororiety. “ . W. Davis has inaugurated a summer school for the year round in South Florida.“A. H. Hasly is leaching Agronomy and Physical Culture to the natives of the Hymalaya Mountains. “Frank Fuller and Lee Turman arc the joint owners of a pool room. They fu:nish free towels to the bathers in their pool. “Charlie Hodges is singing ‘Hope Springs Eternal In The Human Breast. “D. F. Bruce has at last succeeded in murdering a professor by asking questions. “Sid Chandler and John Gillespie are running a nut farm in the ZLZl Islands. They sell their nuts in Pekin. “Goat Tanner is running interference with a guano distributor ahead of a cotton planter. “John Howard is farming. He wears shock absorbers on his front teeth and his mules all have padded feel. John ain’t taking no chances. “Hard-boiled Chastain is butler at the ladies club, Tiger, Ga. “Jim Mooney is a owner-editor of Photoplay. “Red Fleming has made extended use of his knowledge of psychology by securing for himself a janitorship in the post office in Union Point. “Doc Chumbley, Grace Allen and the Sims sisters arc teaching aesthetic dancing. They are splendid artists thanks to their excellent teacher the erstwhile Miss ‘L. I)’. “C. R. Youngblood is a duly registered Senior at the University of Georgia.” “Ruth Rac is practicing chiropody in Macon, N. C. “The remainder of the class are doing exactly what their biographers predicted.” “And—and”, but before the little imp could finish I awoke with a start to •find ice water running down my collar. There we were in Skinny’h room, the monkeys all gone and every thing in place, that is, as much in place as could be expected in Candler Hall. Rastus, Skinny, and Drake all swear that we talked with the little forked tailed imp. and that he told us the very things I have here jotted down. Senator McClure and Doc Harper are inclined to believe that the imp was purple colored with red spots, but the majority rules. FINIS_ PASSING thc GRAFT or THt1TRAGEDY of a BUSINESS MANAGER BY ANNA LUMNUS - WITH A FEW B0W5 TO LlFET VfHAT — Yoo ARE SURPRISED THAT OUR BILL IS £4,300 OVER THE ESTIMATE? Dio you think that for the £g.ooo AGREED UPON WE COULD PUBLISH THE. „ SORT OF ANNUAL YOUR SCHOOL 0EMAN0S ? ' What of the changes you demanded in February? And putting in those. six extra pages in March ?------ Certainly £543 was not exhorbitant FOR THAT.' "In June you unreasonably INSISTED THAT WE RUSH THE WORK ON THE BOOK AND GET IT PUBLISHED BY COMMENCEMENT. WE PUT ON A NIGHT SHIFT. MORE EXTRA EXPENSE." “Were we responsible for the TYPESETTERS STRIKE? WE WANTED TO WAIT TIL. IT WAS SETTLEO BUT YOU HAD US GET NEW MEN. £ 1300 IS MOT EXCESSIVE FOR SUCH A WHIM.' 'In the face of such modest CHARGES 1 AM SURPRISED AT YOUR. ATTlTUOE'. AFTER THE SELF SACRIFICING WORK WE HAVE DONE ON — BUT WAIT, 1 FIND AN ERROR'." There has been an omission • — There is no charge here for rebinding THE BOOKS TO KEEP THEM FROM FALLING APART J THAT WILL MAKE IT £ 12,000 ALL TOLD. 1 THANK YOU." ( J-D Co n i "f Take It From Me TH AT lliere isn’t a bolshevik in the present Senior Class. THAT in Athens the Eighteenth Amendment is incorporated in the Ten Commandments. THAT several men have refused Sphinx. TH AT “Phreely” Coulter hasn't any political influence. TH AT Chester McRae studies hard all the time. THAT Cy Fields refuses to argue with his laundry lady. THAT Jimmie Cromartie is an athlete. THAT co-eds didn’t hoollick in order to raise marks and thereby be taken into sororities. THAT Ed Curr doesn’t believe that he is handsome. THAT Earle Watson is a hard worker. THAT Prunella Walker never changes his mind. THAT “Brigham'’ Young is at times half-way sociable. THAT every body is sorry that “Goo Goo'' Egerton left. THAT A-Plus Dixon fills “Goo Goo’s'' place to perfection. THAT “Big Mac” is out of politics. THAT altruism is the spirit of the student body and grafters arc an extinct species. THAT the Co-op is run for the benefit of the students. TH AT “Puny” Brooks can see two sides to a question. THAT the library always has the book you need on hand. THAT the Georgia Cracker is the most popular publication read in Macon. THAT someone was able to tell a literary number of the Cracker from a humorous one. THAT Columbus isn’t a darn good town. THAT the alumni never bull into University affairs. THAT all this is straight goods.The Collegiate Log SEPTEMBER 6: Football men begin «» show up for practice. I sual amount of pre-season dope inflicted on the public. 7: Mark Anthony shows up with broken arm. 8: Charlie Padgett still out for football. Anyway Charlie gels his Itoard free. 9: Nick and “Cue-Room Pop” register joyful anticipation. 10: A vanguard of politicians appear in town. "Big" Mac never did leave. 11: Carl Nelson shows up and begins running for President of Demosihenian. 12: Football practice liegins in earnest. 13: Drew. “Skinny" Rivers, and forty-nine other would-be football managers show up. 14: Colonel Rvther feels slighted, nobody "politicks" for commander-in-chief of cadets. 15: The Physics Department rattles the mailed fist. A-pius Dixon appears in town. 16: A little scattered hair cutting takes place. The gutless brigade from Sparta is not in scIumiI. 17: Drew calls up Coach Stegemau and asks if Managers will be given letters. 18: Drew asks Dr. Sanford if managers will Ik- given letters. loiter on: (same day) Drew is assured by Little McCraney that he got his letter managering 19: 9:00 a. in. Registrar's hooks open. 11 a. in. Nellie May Bowen tries to vamp Willie llpshaw into allowing her to register junior in order that she might be eligible for Senior Round Table. 20: College formerly opens. Faculty shows up as | cr usual armed with caps, gowns and dignity. 21: A snipping is heard on Gdlege Avenue. One egg intimates that the Sophs aro cutting hair. 22: Nick practically ruins a freshman by kissing it and cooing. 'Mye Babee." 23: Freshman Salter lakes the sophs seriously and goes to church lmrcfooted. 24: Politicking starts in dead earnest. The freshmen attend classes. 25: Politicking still going on. 26: Still more politics. 2?: Politics adjourned long enough for the annual fresh-soph scrap. Charlie McArthur is heard murmuring as lie comes up for air after Heriol's swing, "I told Pa that mule’d kick! ’ 28: Many sophs nursing paddle arms. Charlie McArthur proudly exhibits sprained wrist. 29: 0. politics, where art thou! 30: The football team unlimbcrs against Mercer, 40-0. Lucy Cobb stars. OCTOBER 1: Bob Harkcy attends church and thinks the minister is too personal in bis remarks. 2: Number of siudes seen weeping together on llerty Field because of “JakcyV absence. "Phrecly" Coulter leads the weepfesl. 3: Drew and "Skinny” Rivers l»cgin derby graft. Verily Barnum didn’t miss. 4: Coach Stegcman decided to lake "Puss" Whclchel and Joe Bennett on the Chicago trip. 5: "Skinny" Rivers lays bet on Yanks, bluffs freshman into covering bet. Score: Giants more, Yanks, less. 6: Mr. "Timer" Kldrcdge gives dope on world series. 7: Ditto. If we had made twenty-two points we would have won from Chicago. 8: Sunday. 9: The team returns from Chicago. 10: Frank Erwin hollers “Squads Right!” on drill field, thinks it's an error and corrects it by yelling "Squads Wrong!" Buck Bell fails to gain at G -ed Barn. II: LeConte Talley makes very interesting sjjeech to New College Freshmen on the becomingness of his new derby. 12: General Paul B. Malone in speech at Octagon settles the much mooted question of “Who won the war?” 13: Friday the 13th.14: Georgia 7. Furman 0. 15: Sunday again. Several new derbies seen waiting for the Methodist church to turn out. Pete Usry sports new overcoat. 16: Ye Pandora staff grafts a publisher for a feed at the Georgian. 17: Zach Hayes announces for President of Phi Kappa. 18: The sophs pull a Pudley and Darks raid on Old College, in re. freshman dales. 19: Syd Chandler visits Co ed Barn. 20: Syd Chandler visits Co-ed Barn. Ad infinitum. 21: Georgia and Tennessee exhibit game fraught with thrills. John Fletcher stars. Georgia wins 7-3. 22: Seniors airing their derbies on Prince Avenue arc mistaken for advance agents of the soon-to-come circus. 23: Great Clark County Fair opens with carnival as principle attraction. 24: Dr. Waters of Tech addressed the Economics Society. 25: Circus in town. "Big" Patterson doesn’t buy a single balloon. 26: “Old Timer" Eldrcdge inflicts much first class football dope on all he meets. 27: Georgia wins again from Oglethorpe. 28: Everybody gone to see Notre Dame romp on Tech. 29: Co-ed cl al steps out in hideously long skirls. "Graveyard" Lewis throws away his glasses. 30: Big rush for tickets to Georgia-Auburn game. "Mountain Goat" Chastain joins I.emon Club. NOVEMBER 1: Co-eds sell tickets to send band to Columbus. Everybody but Dean Dudley claims he can toot a horu. 2: On to Columbus! Give 'em Hell Georgia! Hoboes ride everything but Epp’s airplane. 3: On to Columbus! 4: University of Ceorgia moved temporarily to Columbus. Auburn wins game. George wins money. 5: Studcs drift in from Columbus looking morning-afteringly. That Columbus booze is H-K-L-L. 6: Hoboes drift in cussing the country’s freight service. 7: Cap’t Slick Leacock resigns from the faculty. It is alleged he had trouble with Chancellor Short. 8: "Kastus” England and "Pete" Usry begin politicking Ag. Club members. 9: Hart and Lundy dodge income tax collector and divide spoils as per senior canes. 10: "Ole Dominion’s" football team arrives in "Klassick Silty". 11: Armistice Day. Big Game. Georgia 6 Virginia 6. Big Speeches. Big Dance. Big Celebration. Bed Stephenson buys automobile from roulette wheel proceeds. 12: Jimmie Morgan wearing his derby and loitering at the Georgian is mistaken for prosperous bootlegger by six traveling men. 13: Beanery serves corn beef hash. 14: Beanery serves corn beef hash. 15: Freshman Scroggs goes to the graveyard because he can't forget hula hula dancers who came with the late Clarke County Fair. 16: Home-coming festivities begin with Pan-Hellenic dance at Moss Auditorium. Fraternities giving house parlies are. Phi Delta Theta, Kappa Sigma. Dc!t3 Tau Delta, S. A. E.. A. T. 0., Chi Phi and K. A. 17: A bunch of alumni arrive in town and parade campus. About 99%9c of them are teaching school in the sticks. 18: Home-coming Day. 11:40 a. m. Classes suspended. 2:00 p. m. Alumni feed at Beanery. 3:00 p. m. Gcorgia-Vanderbilt game. Georgia-Clemson Cross-country. 9:00 p. m. ”G" Club dance. 19: Fighting Fields loses to Flailing Finch in 3rd round. Dr. Reynolds runs nine stitches for a touchdown on Cy’s snoot. 20: Freshman reports that John Morris smiled during a German Class. Freshman goes to graveyard for general untruthfulness. 21: Mr. Malone of the Retail Credit Company. Atlanta, speaks to Economics Society. 22: A meetings of the Board of Deacons is held in “Little Mac’s" room in Old College.23: New College holds secret practice for the forthcoming game with Candler Hall. 24: Candler liall announces a house party in celebration of the game with New College. Co-eds invited. 25: Gcorg.a loses to 'Bama. John Fletcher stars with ninety-six yard run for touchdown. Joe Bennett elected captain of ’21 team. 26: Hart and i.undy palm off left-handed cane on “Oscar” McKae. "Oscar" is to see the Dean about it. 27: Candler Hall by virtue of its 0-0 win over New College challenges Old College for a game of football. The President of the Pcscado Club accepts. 28: Dr. Edwards announces that there will be no classes Thanksgiving. A co-ed in the class is heard to mutter. "Aw, Hell". 29: A-plus Dixon steps out in new suit. 30: Turkey tas'.es had. Tech beats Auburn that's why. DECEMBER 1: Bob Harkey and Frank Erwin dine at the Beanery. “Skinny" Rivers and Drew dine there also. 2: Pete Stephens cuts a class. 3: Dunstan begins watching the bubbles on the political slop bucket. The Sigma Chi's have a new hat. 4: Macon starts a howl because the "Georgia Cracker" alludes to it as a "Hick Town." 5: The powers that be at the Beanery spring a fake formation of left-over bull, which even "Sleepy” Maddox is unable to solve. 6: Harris Drewry continues practice on his saxophone much to the delight (?) of Old College. 7: “Brigham" Young unthinkingly speaks to a student on Campus. 8: Colonel Rvther's army hold first “sho nuff" dress parade. 9: Candler Hail outswims Old College on wet field thereby claiming inter-dormitory championship. 10: Announcement is made that there will only he fourteen seniors and one fraternity in 1923 Pandora. 11: The sun rises in spite of the fact that the Pandora is dead. 12: Drew elected President of F.conoinics Society. 13: C. A. Lewis resigns as head of Y. M. C. A., charging himself with general unfaithfulness. 14: "Senator" McClure and "Skinny" Rivers write pitiful letters to Santa Claus. 15: Exams show that any fool can ask questions that a wise man can’t answer. 16: Exam passes without a single egg inquiring, “Shall we write the questions?” 17: Sunday, that’s all. 18: Sherman forgot exams when he was mentioning hcll-likc commodities. 19: Sylvanus’ proteges finish exams and go home. Hurrah! Peace reigns along the Potomac. “Senator" McClure shoots pool. 20: Home. JANUARY 2: Everybody that wants to save three bones puts in appearance. 3: Classes for the second term begin. Why did we drink that stuff on the train last night! 4: San Boney is conspicuous by his absence. The basketball team feels it. 5: The "Klassick Silty" puts traffic cops on duty. Hard Charlie establishes a record -lie hasn't shot anyone this year. 6: Zeta Chi rally. 7: Still is re-initiated into the Pescado Club. 8: Billiard tournament begins. 9: Billiard tournament still goes on. 10: More billiards. 11: Dr. Sould wises up chape! audience on conditions in South America. 12: Red and Black announces that "Red" Winn has become affiliated with Pandora. 13: Georgia downs Wofford. 14: EGGS ARF. SERVED FOR BREAKFAST AT MRS. DENMARK’S BOARDING HALL. 15: Nothing doing. 16: Ed Curr wins Billiard Tournament. 17: Rnstus Ixiwe attends class.18: John Fletcher, Charlie Wciltrs and "Big" Mac’? little brother unlimber their ankles at East Lake. 19: Lee’s birthday. Hon. T. S. Mell orates at chapel. 20: Weather warm enough for the bones to “shake, rattle and roll" on the abbutments of Candler Hall. 21: Charlie Hodges returns from his cross-country- run. 22: Pescado Club reorganized. NVisdon and Hodges initiated. 23: Little Mac and John McWhirtcr conies (hat they believe in Santa Claus. 24: Campus wrap| ed in snow. Farmer's short course opens on Ag. Hill. Covernor-elect Walker speaks on the tax situation. J. J. Brown informs us all that “Hardwick polities has adjourned." 25: In a snowball battle between the Candler Hellions and the New Collegians, New College wins when F.berhardt joins in the fracas. 26: "Speed" Swift pays his back dues to the Pescado Club. “Little Mac” has heart failure. Little Mac is treasurer. 27: Ceorgia romps on Auburn. F'reshmcn take Gordon into camp. Cooley elected president of the Henry W. Grady Public Speaking Society. 28: Pandora row settled. Cobb Torrance stars. 29: “Fish” Ware violently ejected from Pescado Club. Keason. non-payment of dues. 30: Drew comes out in new suit. More Pandora graft, b'gosh. 31: "Phreely" Coulter makes impassioned appeal to ye common people at G. 0. P. meeting in chapel. FEBRUARY 1: Glee and Mandolin Club hold final tryout. 2: Sweet young thing remarks to "Count" Russell. “Ye Gods, ain't you gone yet?" Georgia loses to andy. 3: Lady Luck smiles. Georgia Beats Kentucky. 4: A-plus Dixon visits Palm Garden. 5: Politics warming up, six studes seen smoking cigars. 6: Jim Morgan elected President of Economies Society over Thomas H. Rivers—41-24. That's why the cigars. 7: Two seniors go to chapel. The fourth year co-eds arc all there. What are we coming to? 8: Dean Dudley takes out Finch's private telephone. 9: Georgia shoulders the light end of the score after setto with Auburn. Johnny Craves predicts practice game for A. A. C. with Georgia. 10: Like many of his worthy confederates, our Johnny goes wrong. Georgia shakes A. A. C. down 44-10. 11: Speed Swift is called by John McWhirtcr. but not on the telephone. 12: Finch has long private session with. Dean Dudley anent; “The Economics of a Private Telephone.” 13: Exam schedule posted. "Pistol" Jenkins explains the "whichness of why" it is posted so early. 14: Mcllatton regales his desciples again with his classic "Alfalfa Joke." 15: Pictures begin coming in for Pandora’s beauty section. 16: Georgia loses to Mercer. Herbert Summers loses argument with freight conductor. 17: Georgia l»eats Mercer. Two cops and Georgia’s team save referee from being star guest at lynching party. Beautiful spirit. 18: The team returns from Macon. 19: Baseball practice begins. 20: F’reshmcn dust Athens Hi. 21: Hudson Maxim visits Athens. 22: Hudson Maxim reviews cadets. Georgia loses to A. A. C. 23: Bob Harkcy announces that he is off for South merica and purchases Imots suitable for the walk. 24: "Shorty" Kolw-rts breaks up Moot Court in l.aw School. "Sleepy" Ball .cll breaks up dance at Georgian. 25: Sunday. 26: Bob Park announces that room rent must l»e paid. Members of Pescado Club register sadness. 27: Georgia mops up with Tennessee in Basketball Tournament. Game with Tech probable. 28: Tech beats Center, thereby becoming eligible to play Georgia. Sylvanus Morris shoots pool. He also shoots the remainder of the class.MARCH 1: The Goddess of Despair does indeed frown oil Georgia. We lose to Tech in whirlwind fracas, witnessed by everybody from Athens but the courthouse canary. 2: Headline in Bogart Times: “Many Tramps ('tainting to be Georgia Students pass through Bogart Returning From Atlanta." 3: Atlanta sport writers pick mythical "All Southern Basketball Team." They ought to pick a bunch of all southern managers in order to give Zacli Hayes a chance. 4: Pandora's “Wlio’a Who" ballotting puls E. E. Watson down as the "Hardest Boner". 5: The Dean posts a roll of the senior class as having excess absences. Everybody feels natural. 6: Bob Park issues ultimatum regarding dormitory room rent. Great rush to pay up -Not. 7: Diogencsian Club makes its appearance. Many woman haters develop. 8: The Old College Drunken Quartette gives its regular Thursday night Shotgun Serenade. 9: Baseball practice livens up. Thomason gels a "homer" against scrubs. 10: Robin Hood shows at Colonial. Freshmen attend Elite. 11: Still attends drill. Major Burch faints. 12: Betts and Nelson announce as candidates for Dcmosthenian president. ‘Rav! 13: The Pandora gi to press. And thus endetli our I.OG. POSTPRESS NOTICE: Owing to default of McArthur. Cliff Baker wins at Co-ed barn.1As it Should Be HE GREAT KING, Al Moral), sal upon his throne and yawned. His favorite dancer was sojourning in Athens, from whence came rumors that she was receiving a grand rush at Little Commencement. Verily, lime hung heavy upon the hands of the great ruler. Finally, clapping his hands the king called his counsellor Ab Harem and spake thuslv, “Ab Harem, what day dost tomorrow?” “Oh King”, spake Ab Harem, “tomorrow is the First of April, and a great day of rejoicing. All your loyal subjects will be gathered together at the Bull Slinger’s Feast, where they will feast throughout the morning and watch the mighty artists al their work in the afternoon." “The knowledge pleases your master”, spake the king, “but what is the prime event?” “Oh King”, answered Ab Harem, “The prime event is the great chariot race, the greatest of all time.” “Will it please the public?” “The public be pleased, my Lord.” “Ben Home”, cried the king, calling the court hootlieker, “give me the choicest details of the morrow’s race.” “The chariots, which are most fit for the occasion, have been procured, my lord”, answered Ben Home. “Many of our most learned men would fain be drivers, but the vote of the populace has elected four who stand above the multitude. The great poe’. Al Go: again and his famous colleage Al HcMallon, both artists in their line, drive the first chariot. Al Gonagain holds the reins by virtue of his ability in constructing zeroes, while Al HcMatton urge forward the noble steeds. They take the inside track, and drive the car called “Pour-it-Out." “The other chariot takes the outer course as a handicap, for it is rumored abroad, my Lord, that its drivers are professionals at the art. Their vehicle bears the strange and unknown name “Anglo-Saxon”. Its driver, one Al Fansord, is an athlete, the best in all the land. The one who urges on the beasts is famed for adeptness with the lash; for he, oh I ord, is the far-famed Al Hob Darks, who so often holds the whiphand among his fcllowmen.” “Hold, fool”, cried the king, “thou art truly worthless. Thou standcst up here before me and try to make rylhin with thy speech. Where is my o e best bet, the “Knight of the Bath Robe?” “Mv Lord, his bow tic sets not straight with his collar. He was clamored by the people, but he does not race tomorrow.” "Where is the favorite of my harem, fool?" "She belongs to the union, my Lord." "What about AI l sy—?" "It is not the psychological moment, my Lord." "What became of the other applicants?" "We fed them to the lions, my Lord." Thou hast sinned, fool. Knowest thou not that of such stuff is the Beanery Bull constructed."I Hate - An Ode to Laziness HATE the feel of icy floors, when clock bells chime out eight. I hate the hike to beanery—I mostly get there late. I hate the bacon and the grits, and the hard brown biscuits cold. 1 hate the smell of the slushy stuff—the cals, they swap for gold. ' I hate to climb back to my room and find it disarrayed, with things all scattered on the floor, like a million kids there played. I hate to bend and pick them up; I wouldn't, had 1 pelf. 1 don't mind seeing work go on—I hale to toil myself. I hate the sight of the classroom crowd, and the sound of foreign verbs, while prof, gives names of parallels to buy with hard earned herbs. 1 hate to spend my borrowed jack for a measley book or two, when Prof, could tell of Riding Hood or the talc of Kalamazoo. I hate to hear the chapel bell say, “Change class, climb the stairs!" A crowd waits there as dumb as the last, plus co eds with their airs. I hale to hear some calf-eyed guy, that boot-licks for a pass, and raves anon an hour or so on forin-a-lion of glass. 1 hate to sec the dark come on, when 1 must seek a light, and bone at length on things long dead, 'till 'way up in the night. Why ain’t they let me seek mv cot, and dream of forests green? Where profs, in overalls chop wood— an ultra-pleasant scene. At last the book slips from my hand and unfolds on the floor. I sit and contemplate the clock, and swear I'll bone no more. I hale to hear the busy clock, it hurts my weary head. I wish that time would slow its gait; I hate to go to bed. —R. A. 13.Advice on General Etiquette For the Youth Contemplating Coming to Georgia YOU can’t spend more of the old man’s jack in college than you can at home, stay at home. If they try to make you study political science, don't do it, let the other students teach you the science of politics. If you are not a “frat” man make it a point to knock the “frats”, or if you belong to a fraternity don't pass up an opportunity to show off your superiority. Either one is a sure-fire popularity maker. Always feign surprise and indignation when anyone expresses ignorance of the exact location of your two by four home town. Tell the first sophomore that approaches you to go “plumb" to Hell. Don't speak to the old men, they might think think you too familiar. Words are cheap, so, don't fail to tell how good you were in high school. Always be blase, don’t let a little thing like a football game excite you—people are liable to think you are from the country. Be sure to root for Tech at all times. Don't let ’em josh you into wearing a red cap. The things are not becoming, and besides, they are only a local style. If you don’t do as well as your old man thinks you should, blame it on the University.We Nominate for Our Own Little Hall of Fame: ROUDEST CORPORAL. P. K. Anderson. “Old Timer” Eldredge ruled out for politicking. Henceforth P. K. is ineligible owing to S. I. A. A. ruling. Biggest Liar, easily goes to Ted Rosser over Roscoff Deale. Deale’s stories have a tinge of professionalism. Biggest Bootlicker, won by “Red” Fleming on faculty vote. Biggest Bootlickeress, Nellie Mae Bowen carries the field with a majority of twenty-five hundred. Ugliest Freshman, Abe Nathan wins by a nose, closely followed by Gross and Bass. Most Conceited, Charlie McArthur beat Freeman Jclks by one vote. The Handsomest Man, Judge Wilcox wins, but Cy Fields hollers for a recount. Biggest Sport, Lee Turman wins when he offers to match Buck Bell for the place. Bell objects. Most Desperate Lover, Charlie Hodges wins amid protests from “Hot-Lips'' Walker's friends. Biggest Countryman, A-plus Dixon el al the Physics Department. Best Musician, Fess Dottery wins, but Skinny River lends close competition with his comb-blowing. Most brilliant, Sleepy Baltzell wins, although handicapped by it being his first year. Most Popular Professor, John D. Wade. The hardest Boner, E. E. Watson, Jr., wins; exchange of votes by Mabry and McGiflfen provides only competition. Best Athlete, Joe Bennett and Father Clarke tie. Strongest Man, Eberhardt and Fields; Eberhardt has the edge on Fields since the Ficlds-Finch episode of last fall. Biggest Bull Artist, Bill Taliaferro wins; Montague Ridgeway furnishes competition. Biggest Runt, Skinny Rivers wins, due to bootlicking. Biggest Fish, C. A. Lewis pins five dollars to his ballot and wins in a walk. Proudest Shavetail, Charlie Padgett wins when he has his spurs initialed. Biggest Politician, Austin Dean wins on his merit. Biggest Grafter, we know, but we ain’t gonna tell. Most Popular Song, “T. H. W. T.” closely followed by “Dan, Dan”.Biggest Nuisance, Military and Chapel lie. Hardest boy, Charlie McArthur was until worsted by Heriot. Most Bashful, C. K. Nelson forges ahead when he tries to borrow a dollar from “Sylvie". Biggest Sissie, Jim Taylor. Biggest Freak, Gross wins, but students of evolution say that he is easily accounted for. Best Lawyer, “Big" McRainey. Worst Knocker, John Wade; Thalian Club votes solidly for Jim Mooney. Biggest Joke, Bill Munday wins over the honor system when he and Rosser pool votes. Biggest tightwad. Red Stephenson wins when caught sleeping a la Adam to keep from wearing out pajamas. Most obscure man, Bill Munday wins when caught hiding in the lobby of the Georgian Hotel. Most Popular College, Old College; made so by the Pescado Club. Biggest Bone-head, Student Body; since everybody votes for himself. Best Cue Artist, Ed Gurr. Biggest Loafer, Edwin Everett. Most Popular Co-ed, Sarah and Sarah Company. Biggest Grouch, G-squarc Finch, indisputably. Biggest Burden on University, Irvin P. Mycrson; explanation demanded by the Co-op. Luckiest man, Kassewitz; politicked to success by his fellow members of the Pescado Club. Biggest Co-ed Chaser. Charlie McArthur wins over a varied field through a varied field through a majority given by co-ed votes. Biggest Bolshevik, Phreely Coulter unanimous choice. Best Writer, T. W. Reed wins by dent of his excellent chirography. Best Orator, Lee Turman wins through successful politicking by Cue Room Pop. Laziest Man, Dave Collings. Craziest Freshman, Terrell Rambumptious Perry, of the Lumpkin Law Fish Market. Biggest Crook, every man voted for his roommate, except C. K. Nelson, who voted for himself.The Frenzied Limburger By T. E. Merritt (With no apologies to Plumb's ‘ Types and Breeds oj Farm Animals '.) ISTORY OP' BREED:—The origin of the Frenzied Limburger is wrapped in obscurity like that of all the rest of them. Il is claimed by some that the progenitor of the race was the Detecto odorono, or Musk Ox, but the present breeders of the breed insist that this is not true. Prof. Hopeless Bonehead of the University of Siberia reports that he read an article in the Semi-Independent wherein it was stated that a couple of workmen while digging a hole in which to bury a dead mule came across a funny looking bone imbedded in the earth. Prof. Bonehead wrote an illustrious essay in which he proved that this was a bone from the Industrio Mollicum, also showing that this was in all probability the ancestor of the Frenzied Limburger; but it has since been proven that the bone was buried by a dog. In a bar room of some small town in Europe there hangs a picture of a cow and a calf. Authorities have studied the painting many years and agree that the calf must belong to the cow. Importations of the Frenzied Limburger to America were first made from Manchuria in 1492. At that time it was necessary to bring them across the continents of Asia and Europe as the Pacific Ocean had not been discovered. They were led in single file from Manchuria to Lisbon and were just in time to catch the Santa Maria for America. These first importations were lost track of and it was not until later on in the nineteenth century that any records were kept of the pioneer cows. In 1862 a certain Mr. Bone-arrow of Cowslop, Indiana, ordered three cows and a bull from a place in Switzerland. They were put on the boat and sent to him just as he said; hut when the ill fated ship reached mid-ocean the cattle became so tired of their menu that they organized themselves into a union and with one accord jumped overboard. Seven years later, a cow and a bull were seen swimming toward the shore near Boston, Mass. They landed on Plymouth Rock, having swum half way across the Atlantic Ocean, and became the head of the breed in America. Characteristics of the Frenzied Limburger:—There arc certain characteristics which enable the expert eye to distinguish this breed fromany other. The body is neither too long nor too short. The back feet are enormous but at the same time are not too large, giving the idea of firm foundation. The bones of the leg arc strong enough to be used (or building purposes. The twist is very twisted. Climbing up on the rump we find it so steep we are in danger of sliding off. The tail slicks straight up in the air, and this is a quality of which the breeders are very proud as they claim it enables one to delect the presence of the herd at much greater distances than when the tail drops down, as in most breeds. Walking along the back of the cow we find it decidedly swaying and dangerous. The withers are withered up. Climbing over the head we jump down and take a look at the forequarters. Although the joints are like the gnarls on oak trees and the hair is as coarse as that in a horse's tail, still this breed can not be said to be lacking in quality. Color of the Frenzied Limburgcr:—The predominating color of this breed is black or white. Sometimes one color is spotted on lop of the other. The most common of all colors ordinarily encountered is red while the one most frequently seen is brown or dun. The favorite with most breeders is grey. Purple at the tip of the tail or on the feet is a disqualifying factor. Orange or brilliant yellow is considered taboo. Purpose of the Frenzied Limburger:—The Frenzied Limburger is what is called a dual-purpose cow. As to milk production it has broken all records, while the same cows when sold for meat broke all records for meat production. In the usual farm herd, however, the heavy meat producers are not good for milk and the heavy milk producers are not good for meat. Some Important Families of Frenzied Limburgers:—The most important and well known of all the Families of Limburgers is that descended from MacHatton’s Queen Lollipop, who was sired by MacHatton’s Bull, 1922. In this family are such noted animals as: MacHatton’s Short Course, MacHatton’s Zero, MacHatton’s Alfalfa Joke, and MacHatton’s Orchard. The Sad Sookey Family is another great family of Limburgers. Sad Sookey was sired by Kellog’s Post Toasties. Most of these animals have a cowlick on the back of their poll, but that factor does not hinder their flow of milk. Some of the most noted dams of this family are Beavcrdam, Damit, Dammitell, and Blankitty Blank. Blankitty Blank is out of Old Huzzy. Another famous family is the Johnny Can, from drone of the Classroom, 123456789. This was sired by a famous bull named Professor Cone Again. The descendants from this cow are Big Bull, All Bull, and Bull Artist, a line of pure bulls.Whether You Like It (A drummer in one act. Soft Music.) Scene:- Physic Class-room. Time:- Eastern time hourly b Western Union. (A force acting in an upward direction is applied to a curtain, there being only the weight of the curtain acting downward:- note the physicists lingo: the curtain rises. A group of students with the appearance of martyr- arc scaled facing a black!) ard and sundry instrument of torture. Professor A-dix Plussion stands before the board armed with a roll-book and a hugh hunk of flunking au'hority. As the curtain clears. A-dix. with a dramatic gesture, whirls and turns the board, showing a test left by the prof, that preceded him with another section.) Freshman Dabh. “Damn!” Freshman Cuhh. "Damn!" General Chorus. "Oh Damn!” tA-dix pretends not to hear.) Student Metis.—"Freshman don’t do that." Fr lunan Gabb. -finjurcdly) "Do what?" Student Me'.ts.—Swear with a nasal accent." P. A.—d.(Meaning Prof. A-dix) "Here now. we've just got five minutes to finish this test and hand it in. (Thirty seconds later) "Time up. Sign your name on the back. Now Mr. Melts can you tell us what an oximeter is?" Mr. Melts. "Fesser I think it is an instrument for finding the specific gravity of the line of bull thrown out by summer school damsels." P. A. -d. (Harshly) "There’ll be no foolishness in this class." (Business of making a circle • opposite Belts’ name.) "Now Miss Powers can you tell Mr. Betts what a hexagamutetcr is?" Miss Powers. "It’s a hexa —it's a hexagam. it’s a Hcgamma. (brightly) it’s a hcxagammeteler." P. A. -d. (with wrist movement of constructing a ten) “Might! Did you get that Mr. Betts?" Student B. "But you didn’t ask me that question." P. A. -d. (with a wise smile) “Same question, different words." "Now Mr. Hubert you're a good man." Fatty Hubert.- (agreeing readily) "Yes Sir." P. A. d. "Mr. Hubert will you explain the law of Volstead to the class?" F. H.- "Yes Sir, K is to Q as Y is to X. therefore P equals W." P. A.—d.—"Right! Mr. Hubert evidently studies." (Issues Fatty a ten.) "Now Mr. Blount will you give us the ninety-three things that makes the Tower of Pisa lean?” Freshman Blount.—“1 know a lady that took something that made her lean, but 1 forgot what it was right now." (Wave of laughter begins, but subsides at a stern look from P. A.—d.) P. A.—d. '"Mr. Blount you ain’t right about that." (absent mindedly gives Blount a tcnJ "Now Mr. Freeman if you stood two inches in front of a mirror, how would you find the exit cl location in the rear of the mirror of your reflection?" Student Freeman. "I'd take a set of Vernier Calipers and go around behind the mirror and measure it." P. A.—d.- (rushes hack and forth behind his desk, tearing his hair, frothing at the mouth and leaping high into the atmosphere.) "Wrong! Wrong!! Absolutely wrong!!! 1 tell you, you can’t pass this course unless you study at least’ seven hours for each lesson." (With this three Freshman leap from the window breaking their necks, and the remainder of the class scoots madly from the room.) CURTAINlifpj kittle Joke. N°ooo.oou With All Due Apoloq'tes CTosepb ffcCrrcqor- The lodi+$,for Thomas 0Denn iS-K Hood HtcG.urylc O'lJad i q$ loved by fht ladies tor be ny so qood. Predicted a hanging; hz acted so bad. I uf Th om QSj of Collect acts j u$t as he should ; e 5 koden of Vespers, a power tor acod treats all ot 'em rouqh Hz's loved by the laditS tor th + rave-rran staff.Acknowledgements THIS, the thirty-sixth volume of the Pandora, goes to press we wish to thank those whose co-operation has made the hook possible. To Professor II. E. Park we arc indebted, both for literary contributions and for many valuable suggestions. Dr. Park has expressed at all limes an active interest in Pandora, and a willingness to do more than the staflf felt justified in imposing upon him. We are thankful to Chester W. Slack for the colored inserts in this volume. We are especially grateful to Mr. and Mrs. Fred J. Ball who have displayed a more than personal interest in our efforts. The week before this book went to press Mr. Ball was in his studio night and day working on Pandora material. We arc indebted to H. C. Sheffield for the border. To Brown Whatley we arc indebted for the design and make-up of the beauty section. It is to be regretted that because of circumstances, not explainable here, Mr. Whatley hasn’t many representative drawings in this annual. The Editor-in-Chief wishes to thank the remainder of the staff for their whole-hearted co-operation in gathering material. The personal jokes in this book are aimed at those whom we believe to be our best friends. No suggestion of malice is expressed or intended. We trust that they will be taken in a spirit of fun. We take this occasion to thank Jacobs and Company, our publishers for accepting “rush orders” and treating them as such. In conclusion, let us state that it is our sincere hope that our efforts on this, the thirty-sixth volume of Pandora, meet the approval of faculty and student body alike. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF.FINIS "TR.r- „ Dr KINGS Hl ? £ giacovtV VFNE BAD »IlV3,J T501V AND -TH B JKPBfttAKfR| COME AND SEE ovn f KANT$£ KUT RAZORS bob wins. DTUNK KONTEnUD M1DK" Meu). Co Sour nose kno us LlSE AUNT.... _JEMIMMA S S RuSHAVMGr AM CREAM , CRUNCH-COMPOUND CATH OTICS CATCH - -CEASLESS CONTAGEOUS CONSPICIOUS COLDS ANSELS PMflR. o»V ADSFRED SALE HURLS PERFECT GAME VIRGINIA UNABLE TO GET A MAN TO FIRST IN MONDAY’S G ME Bulldocs Defeat Old Rivals 4 to 0; Greatest Exhibition of Box Work Ever Seen in Athens WATSON IS STAR Air-Tight Defense Saves no Hit Game For Sale, Ramsey Has Perfect Day. Frederick Link Sale, Georgia's young right-hander who hails from Atlanta, broke into the hall oj immortal fame here Monday afternoon when he pitched a perfect game against the University of Virginia, Georgia winning easily, 4 to 0. Fred let the Old Dominion boys down without nary a hit and, of course, nary a run, and he did not permit a man to gel on first base. Only twenty-seven men faced him and of these he caused eight to retire to the bench after taking three healthy, hut unsuccessful swings at his benders. He did not walk a batsman. Fred’s feat marked the first time since the memory of man runneth not to the contrary that a Georgia pilener has chunked a perfect game. Several times in recent years Red and Black tossers have heaved no-hit games, but none of them go by without letting one or more men reach first base. Mr. Sale, who is just twenty years old, had everything in the world a pitchercould want in turning in his remarkable game. He had a fast ball which cut up something awfully and his curve ball had a most outlandish break on it. And with these he mixed in a brilliant change of pace which was as bafTling as it was deceptive and puzzling. Fine Support Fred was accorded masterful support by his teammates, not an error being committed by them. On two occasions Josh Watson, Georgia’s candidate for the allsouthern second base position this year, 6aved his no-hitter for him. In the fifth inning, McCoy, second man to face Fred, hit a hot grounder between first and second which looked good for a base knock, but not so; Josh, with the speed of a marathon runner, let out for the agate and after a great spirt scooped it up with his gloved hand retiring McCoy at first. Parish, first man to face Sale in the ninth, hit one through the box and Watson was again the man of the minute. He ran far out of his position, picked up the ball with his bare hand and with a phenominal throw got his man at first on a close play. Sale had three balls on three batters during the game, but on only one man did he have the count three balls and no strikes. The gentleman we have reference to was Mr. Foster, first man to face our hero in the eighth. He looked over three bad ones then watched Fred throw over a strike and lined the next pitched nail out to George Clarke in deep center. Ramsey Leads Attack "Pop” Ramsey, Georgia’s right gardener, led the Bulldogs’ stick attack, polling out two singles and a triple. Old-Timer Eldredgc and J. D. Thomason secured doubles. Josh Watson and DeLacey Allen were Georgia’s fielding stars. These .two guardians of second base performed like big league stars, accepting eleven chances between them in fine style. Shortstop Dielrick was Virginia’s bright star on the defensive. He handled seven chances without a bobble, many of these being very difficult. Dielrick showed Georgia fans the most powerful arm any visiting shortstop has exhibited here here this season. The Red and Blackcrs have reached their stride and from now on they will he mighty hard to stop. They arc fielding their positions perfectly. Not a hobble has been charged up agianst them in their last two contests and they are hitting with men on bases. As for the pitching they are getting, take Sale's brilliant performance Monday as an example. The Box Score GEORGIA— A.B. R. H. P.O. A. E. Clarke, cf .4 0 2 1 0 0 Watson, 2b .3 1 1 1 6 0 Eldrcdge, If. ... .4 1 1 1 0 0 Thomason, lb. . .4 0 1 14 0 0 Ramsey, rf .3 2 3 1 0 0 Allen, ss .4 0 0 1 4 0 Middlchiooks, 3b 2 0 1 0 2 0 Powers, c .3 0 1 8 0 0 Sale, p .3 0 0 0 2 0 Totals 30 4 10 27 14 0 VIRGINIA— A.B. R. H. P.O. A. E. Hubbard, 2b. . . . .3 0 0 1 2 0 Dcitrick, ss .3 0 0 4 3 0 Bronaugh, lb. .. .3 0 0 9 1 0 foster, If .3 0 0 1 0 0 McCoy, cf .3 0 0 3 0 0 Holland, rf. ... .3 0 0 0 0 0 Parrish, c .3 0 0 4 4 0 Deal, 3I .2 0 0 2 1 0 Maphis, c .1 0 0 0 0 0 bee, p xKinley .0 0 0 0 0 0 .1 0 0 0 0 0 xxBoman .1 0 0 0 0 0 xxxFIourney ... .1 0 0 0 0 0 Totals........27 0 0 24 11 1 xKinley hit for Maphis in sixth. xxHit for Deal in the ninth. xxxHit for Lee in the ninth. Score by innings: R. Virginia ...............000 000 000—0 Georgia ................012 001 OOx—4 Summary—Two-base hits, Eldrcdge, Thomason. Three-base hit, Ramsey. Struck out, by Sale 8, by Maphis 3, by Lee 1. Base on halls, off Lee 1. Hit by pitched ball, Middlcbrooks by Maphis. Double play, Bronaugh to Dietrick. Empire, Rucker.Photographs In This Annual Made By FRED J. BALL Photographer ATHENS, : : GEORGIAFIREPROOF MODERN THE GEORGIAN “ATHENS DISTINGUISHED HOTEL” ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 250 GUESTS CUISINE UNEXCELLED — When in Athens meet your friends and refresh yourself at the Georgia Palm Garden —The most beautiful and ufi-to-date SODA PARLOR in the South. The Georgia Hotel Barber Shop Hilley Jones Company (Incorporated) Southern Mutual Building ATHENS, GA. COLUMBUS, GA. MONROE, GA. ANDERSON, S. C. GREENVILLE, S. C.fHanhuttun daft Georgia Boys Welcome at All T imes WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION D. T. BROWN. Prop. College Avenue ATHENS :: :: GEORGIA THE EXPERIENCED HOUSEWIFE KNOWS all the different cuts of meat and eannnt be deceived. Our cuts are all choice, even though all cannot he “first" cuts. First class meat is often found in “second" and even “third" cuts. You will make no mistake ordering your meats from this shop. PIEDMONT MARKET Davison-Nicholson Co. —Ladies Suits, Coats, Capes, Dresses, Millinery, Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery- House Furnishings. Davison - Nicholson Co. ATHENS :: :: GEORGIA We extend to the Class of ’23 our hearty appreciation for your patronage while attending College in Athens, and our best wishes go with you as you depart from among us. BRAD-O'S '•CHICK” OWEN LEE BRAOBERRY Class '16 Class 18 Enjoy HOME-COOKED FOODS DELICIOUSLY PREPARED at THE CLOVER LEAF TEA ROOM “Georgia Boys" 123 West Clayton Street Athens, Ga.ICE CREAM SODA CIGARETTES CIGARS COSTA’S The Finest Soda and Ice Cream Fount in Georgia Manufacturers and Wholesalers of COSTA’S DELICIOUS ICE CREAM ' Just a Little Bit Better Jobbers of Confectionery and Fountain Supplies In Determining Which Bank shall have your patronage you cannot attach too much importance to SERVICE. If you desire a Service which is accurate, prompt and helpful at all times, you will find the highest satisfaction in becoming a depositor in THIS INSTITUTION : : The Georgia National Bank ATHENS. GA.The Universal Desire Almost everybody you know wants money. It is tbe universal desire. Most of tbe common, every day happiness of this life depends upon having money. It is not everything but it is something. Open a Savings Account. HAVE MONEY OF YOUR OWN. 4% Paid on Savings Deposits The National Bank of Athens Athens, Ga. “THE PINES’ —Y- W. C. A. Cafetaria If you want service, courtesy and good home cooking try us for one month. You members of the Class of ’23 when you visit Athens don’t forget “THE PINES" College Avenue and Clayton Sts.—Over American State Bank. The King-Hodgson Company FANCY GROCERIES Athens, GeorgiaMade to Measure by KAHN TAILORING CO. These clothes, with their pure woolens, their authentic styling and their superb tailoring are the best on the style fairway. They give ordinary clothes a big handicap—yet their price is as low as a professional s score. Come in and let us take your measure for really satisfactory sports clothes. SAM B, WINGFIELD OFFICE FURNITURE —When you equip your new office, let us figure on your needs. We equip your office throughout. Desks, Chairs, Safes, Filing Cabinets, T yfiewriters, and all kinds of Supplies and Printing. THE MCGREGOR COMPANY ATHENS, GA.Barrett Company (Incorporated) COTTON FACTORS NORTH GEORGIA COTTON A SPECIALTY C. H. PHINIZY. Manager Athens, Ga. Michael Brothers ATHENS, GEORGIA Founded 1882 The Store Good Goods Made Popular Johnson’s Billiard Parlor Soda Water, Cigars, Cigarettes, Candy, Billiards “Just Opposite Campus”—PHONE 509 ATHENS, GEORGIAThe Big Point The fine opinion we have of Griffon Clothes is so wide-spread in this country, that we can t truly point to any originality in our selection of these famed suits for this store. However, it is satisfying to know that a whole nation of thoughtful men agree with our ideas. w e ve selected well in the matter of Griffon suits. Not so much because of exhilirating styles and studied tailoring and long-lived woolens go into their making. But because these qualities are included at prices plainly within reason. Spring models for 1923 vividly bring out our point. Charles Stern Co. “The College Men’s Store” Established 1867 - --- ATHENS, GA.ANCIENT GREEKS Were Never Bald The Tests Have Provod Stabac a Hair Grower and Beautifier Quickly nroraous the Growth of New. Healthy. Lustrous Hair. Easy ;o Comb and Dress as Desired. The Delicate Perfume and Well-Groo-ied Appearance Produces a Feeling of Distinction and Contentment Delightful after Shampooing. At Drun Stores or by Mall Prepaid 30 Days Sire 50c. A. M. EDWARDS, Inc. U. S. Distributor ATLANTA :: : :: GEORGIA Eureka Fire Hose Defit., NEW YORK. N. Y. Eureka — Paragon — Red Cros3 AMERICAN La FRANCE FIRE ENGINE CO.. (Incorporated) ELMIRA. N. Y. Motor Apparatus for Fire Department Service P. 0. HERBERT, Southern Manager Atlanta. Georgia Candies Soda Fount Fancy Fruit BOSTON CANOY KITCHEN ANDREW CHELEVES, Prop. 115 College Avenue Cigars Cigarettes Compliments of CANDLER. THOMSON anJHIRSCH(’Ol) ATLANTA, SA. Compliments of Southern School Book Depository (INCORPORATED) 108-110 West Peachtree Street Atlanta, Georgia Dealers in Wholesale SCHOOL BOOKS, STATIONERY and SCHOOL SUPPLIES Drummer—"Are there any feet In town larger than yours? ’ "Only one pair. Bill Jones has to pull his trousers off over his head." —The Log-Nick DeakidesANNOUNCING Guaranteed (’LEANS AND POLISHES EVERYTHING IN THE HOUSE, NEW METHOD OP RENEWING OLD FURNITURE. EXCELLENT FOR POLISHING. BRINGS OUT ORIGINAL LUSTRE. MAKING IT GLISTEN LIKE NEW. A GLOSSY FINISH CAN BE OBTAINED IN A FEW MINUTES. Dampen a piece of soft cloth with Diana, allowing: it to stand on the surface four minutes after rubbing:, then rub off with a dry soft cloth leaving a lasting lustre. Diana, a rich and glossy polish found on the highest grade of • furniture, mahogany, cherry, walnut or oak, and automobiles. Diana automobile polish will eliminate the purchase of a new car by giving to that old one the appearance of a new. No grease, no sticking, and all dust removed in a sanitary way. Let Diana renew your home. Prepared by Nick Deakides Diana Furniture Polisli JB a f r narW. l.arKy to ft finest. Furniture PTdnos Automobiles Woodwork etc. Superior results. Let DinnA renew your home! Guaranteed no dust will notgrease or injure ihemod delicotc Furniture Prepa ''«’ ! only by Nick. Deakides. Athens. Ga.US.A ATHENS GEORGIA .v.s.y.v.1.1. K1RSCHBAUM CLOTHES I Diversity styles tin slraifilircr body lines, the widei button spacing, the longer wider lapels that discrimi Dating Georgia men prefer—you'll find such in oui new showing of Kirsclibaum Clothes. CHAS. STERN CO. Clayton S,„ Athens % • xvx- xvv.v.y.v. % w.v. v. y. v. .w %v.v.v.v. Suits Young Men Like New greys, tans, blues, mixtures, invisible stripes the colors that young men like most this Spring — Sport suits; full chested trim waisted sacks. Lots of value to them without getting beyond young men’s means. H. J. REID CO. “The Shop of Quality.”Hardauiay-Cargill Co. Columbus, Ga. CANNERS OF Ingleside 100% Pure Georgia Cane Syrup At All Grocers : JUDGING FROM ADVERTISEMENTS Professor: Can any one tell me the secrrt of Napoleon’s success? Student: I suppose he took a correspondence .course in something or other.—Life. Ale: ,Sp old Johnny Walker is bootlegging his way through college? Yale: Yeah, sort of a spiritual education SPRINGER HOTEL SPRINGER THEATRE Springer Billiard Parlor Columbus, Ga. 10th STREET and 1st AVENUE HARD NAMES There are all kinds of hard names which cheap wits may call you if you save your money. But hard words break no bones. Bet-ter be abused for saving and be comfortable than be despised for spending and be miserable. Open a savings account. Columbus Savings Bank and Trust Company COLUMBUS, GA. Capital and Surplus, $435,000.00 After Your Doctor Has Failed— Visit the RIALTO and GRAND THEATRES "Both- i i the Heart of • . COLUMBUS" She: “How dare you address me, sir. I don’t know you from Adams.” He: “You ought to. I’m dressed differently.” —Pelican.“Mother, I learned that our Sunday-school teacher doesn't take baths.” “Why Johnny! What do you mean?” “She said that she never did anything in private that she wouldn’t do in public.”—Gargoyle. An Automobile stage was speeding along a narrow winding road over Montara Mountain. A tourist did not like the look of the many gulches and after rounding a sharp turn his nervousness overcame him and he turned to the driver. “Say," he asked, “have we got any more turns like that?” “Well,” answered the driver, as he gave it more gas, “wc have one more up here a bit where the radiator will rub the spart tire.” —Judge. WELCOME Georgia Students and Alumni. ALWAYS MAKE OUR STORE YOUR HEADQUARTERS WHILE IN COLUMBUS Foley Cargill, Inc. CHAS. B- FOLEY J. DONALO CARGILL FINE FOOTWEAR 1130 Broad Street :: Telephone 241 COLUMBUS. GEORGIA POIGNANT "What you need is a tonic to sharpen your appetite,” said the Doctor. "By the way, what is your occupation?” ”1 am a sword swallower in a circus sideshow." replied the caller. -Cincinutti Enquirer. Third National Bank Columbus, Georgia Capital and Surplus $1,000,000.00 DEPOSITS ........... $2,400,000.00 Total Resources Over ............... $3,500,000.00 “The Bank With a Surplus” W. c. BRAOLEY.......................President TOOMS HOWARD ................. Vice-President J. J. PEASE .................. Vice-President J. E. FLOWERS.........................Cashier JAS. A- LEWIS.......................Assistant Cashier H. P. MULLIN........................Assistant Cashier TELFAIR STOCKTON ..................... President ROBERT GAMBLE ........................ Vice-Pr:s. C. W. DIXON...............Secretary and Treas. Office: 219 Twelfth 3t. Phone 132 COLUMBUS BRICK TILE COMPANY Manufacturers and Distributors High Grade Clay Products Face Brick, Building Brick, Fire Proofing, Partition Tile Drain Tile Dennison Interlocking Tile “I'm cutting quite a figure,” said the chorus girl as she sat on the broken glass.—Gaboon. Polly—“The papers say there has been a great robbery in the Capitol.” Politician—“Official or unofficial?” —Georgia Cracker. University of Georgia 4 4 SENIOR - ALUMNI RIN( ■'i » y The above cut shows the design of the official “Senior - Alumni Ring,” adopted by the classes of 1923.1924-1923-1926, and to be worn by nil future University of Georgia graduates. On each side of the shank is shown the “Fighting Hull Dog”, Georgia’s mascot, and the wearer’s graduation date in raised gold. Mounted on an Onyx Stone is the University seal in gold. Bordering the stone, in raised letters, is “University of Georgia— 1783.’’ The initials and degrees are engraved inside of the ring. The wearer of this ring should feel highly honored, in that, no one except a Senior in good standing, or an alumnus, is permit ted to wear one. A Georgia student, as well as those from other colleges will be able to recognize a “Georgia Man” by this distinctive ring, and to strike up an ac- quaintance wherever they may meet. The Wearer himself enjoys it be-cause its constant presence reminds him of “Old Georgia.” This exclusive design is registered in the T S. Patent Office, and can only be manufactured by the Official Jewelers, llerff-.Iones Co., Indianapo. lis, Ind., who require an order from the secretary of the Senior Class or alumni secretary before filling an order. This permits no one except those who legitimately deserve it to wear this ring, and thus makes it an “Hon onary Emblem. ” Graduates of any year may secure their ring with graduation date on the shank at any time. The first, or Master Ring, is the property of the University, presented by the student body, and is to be used as a Barometer to judge the quality of all futtire rings. “Every University of Georgia Graduate Wears a “Senior-Alumni Ring.” j S iiJiiiiiniiMiniinniniuuiuirininnnunninninunnittnNmnminimuntm: miiiiii £ HAVE furnished a complete service to the management of "THE PANDORA" 1923. All extra art work, the engraving, printing and binding of this done in our plant. This has been made possible by specializing on this class of work. This year we are doing work on something like 35 Annuals. We are prepared to furnish a complete line of stock inserts, borders, panels, instruction books and many other necessities to an annual staff. We will have a more complete line of samples also. We sincerelv hope that the management of "THE PANDORA" is satisfied with the product of our efforts and that the incoming staff will confer with us before committing themselves on next year s contracts. Don t fail to let us know when you can see our representative. JACOBS COMPANY COLLEGE ANNUAL SPECIALISTS Clinton, S. C. iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iimiinmninmniiiiiiinm iiiiiiiiniiiiinniniinnmii»imniiniiiniinininnniiiiiiinHmminmminiiiiiniiColumbus, Georgia HOME OF THE GEORGIA - AUBURN CLASSIC Host Annually to Thousands of Georgia Men AND HAS MANY OTHER THINGS SHE IS PROUD OF. ONE OF THE GREATEST OF THESE IS THAT YOUNG MEN OF THE TYPE FOUND AT OLD GEORGIA ARE COMING TO US TO GROW AND PROSPER WITH COLUMBUS, HELPING TO BUILD GREATER COLUMBUS. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO LEARN WHY THESE MEN JUST OUT OF COLLEGE START BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL LIFE IN COLUMBUS, WRITE— Cbamber ol Commerce MEET ME AT THE "Q ROOM College Avenue 18 Carom and Pocket Billiard Tables SODA AND SMOKES. SERVICE—EQUIPMENT—Environment the Best. YOUR PATRONAGE APPRECIATED. VALUE OF ECONOMICS Zene--Lend me four bits, will ya? Ben—Only got forty cents in change. Zen©—Well, gimme that, and you can owe me the other dime. —Purple Parrot. “She confided t ome that many had tried to kiss her and none had succeeded. But lately, she said, she had become rather curious to know what it is LLkc.,, •‘Weren’t you surprised at that?” ‘‘Well, it gave me quite a start.” —Princeton Tiger.I I THE LAWYER’S LIBRARY THE FOUNDATION OF EVERY LAWYER’S LIBRARY SHOULD BE THE LOCAL BOOKS OF THE STATE IN WHICH HE INTENDS TO PRACTICE. GEORGIA LAWYERS WILL FIND THE FOLLOWING BOOKS OF FIRST IMPORTANCE: Georgia Supreme Court Reports. Georgia Appeals Reports Van Epps-Akin-Stevens-Index Digest of the Georgia Reports and Georgia Appeals Reports Park’s Annotated Georgia Code Local Text Books. WRITE FOR PRICES AND TERMS THE HARRISON COMPANY Law Book Publishers ATLANTA, GEORGIA Compliments of SPALDING. MacDOUG ALD SIBLEY Attorneys-at-Law JACK J. SPALOINC HUGHES SPALDING u«nitL MacuOUGALG JOHN A. SIBLEY Atlanta, Georgia Compliments of LITTLE, POWELL, SMITH GOLDSTEIN Attorncys-at-Law JOHN D. LITTLE ARTHUR POWELL MARION SMITH M. F. GOLOSTEIN ATLANTA, GA. She (referring to the rain): “Oh, dear, it’s beginning to come down!” He (absent-mindedly): “Would a safety-pin help?” —Voo Doo.Burglar (to fiancee)—Marry me, honey? 1 have money in.the bank. His Fi—What bank? Burglar -Oh, just any one you pick out. —Lyre. She (indignantly)—I'd like to see you kiss me again! “All right." said the Cave Man Kid as he prepared to renew the combat, "keep your eyes open this time.”—Panther. It was in the little, but overcrowded classroom of an East Eud New York public school. The teacher looked out upon a group of eager faces as she put the question: "And now, children, can any of you tell me what is a stoic?” Only one hand went up. “Does only Abie Clutz know what a stoic is?" Silence. "Well. Abie, tell your classmates what is a stoic." “Please, teacher,” said Abie triumphantly, "a stoic is a boid what brings in th’ babies."— Judge. OF COLUMBUS for MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS The Leading Drug Store in Columbus Wkeat Drug Company 1116 BROAD ST. The Leading Florists in Columbus WHEAT SHELNUTT (INCORPORATED) 1116 BROAD ST. OFFICERS T. E. BIANCHARO...President T. S- FLEMING.Vic«-Pr«sldent W. R. LOTTRELL......Caihier J. T. ANTHONY..Asst. Cashier H. G. HIGGINS.Asst. Cashier W. M. HOWARD.Asst. Cashier 4th National Bank of Columbus, Ga. 4% Interest on Savings Strength—Courtesy Service “Just one more kiss, Hon!” “No! “ She pushed him away. ‘The street car goes by the house here at 12 o’clock, and its 11 already.”—Malteaser.Style and Quality The two foremost requisites of our Young Men's Suits. OUR FURNISHINGS ARE IN KEEPING WITH THE SUITS—THE VERY LATEST THAT FASHION DECREES. Hoffhn Greentree THE STORE THAT SERVICE BUILT COLUMBUS, GA. PARENTAL VOICE Father “You ought to go to work now; you have reached your majorily.” Crad.—“Yes; bui mine isn't a working majority."—Widow. COMPETITION "Are you trying to make a fool of me?" he cried. “I never interfere with nature," replied the girl with the painted cheeks and pencilled eyebrows. fudge. THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK of Columbus COLUMBUS, GEORGIA Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits. .$ 436,137.69 Total Assets 1,962,131 51 Oldest National Bank in Columbus Accounts of Individuals, Firms and Corporations Solicited HOME SAVINGS BANK of Columbus COLUMBUS, ' GEORGIA Surplus and Undivided Profits. .$ 100,000.00 Total Assets.... 1,377,325.35 THE SURE ROAD to SUCCESS IS THROUGH SAVING Interest paid on Deposits at four per cent., compounded Semi-Annually. Deposits Invited 1859 — — — — 1923 THE GEORGIA HOME INSURANCE CO. of Columbus, Ga. Cash Capital.......$200,000 00 Assets ........... 730,216.00 Surplus to Policy Holders..... 342,826 00 IN PLACINC YOUR INSURANCE PATRONIZE A GEORGIA INSTITUTION Rhodes Browne.......President Dana Blackmar, V-Pres. and Sec. A. P. Bugg..........Treasurer George Klump........Asst. Sec. DIRECTORS Dana Blackmar, Rhodes Browne, L. H. Chappel, H. H Swift. Julius Friedlaender, H. L. Williams, R. E. Dismukes. Co-Edgar—“What have you in view for the summer?” Co-Edna—‘‘Just wait until you see my new bathing suit.” —Georgia Cracker.I TEMPTING FRUIT FLAVORS One Reason Why -“THERE’S NONE SO GOOD" For centuries. ever since the Juice of the tropical Cola nut was first used for its refreshing qualities. efforts have been made to perfect a cola drink that would surpass all others. Such a drink must of necessity be refreshing and contain enough fruit flavors to give it variety of appeals to satisfy the tastes of the multitudes. CHERO-COLA does that. The luscious flavors of seven tropical fruits are blended with the Juice of the Cola nut. giving it a fruit-punch flavor that Is satisfying and delightful. U Doesn't that make a combination for you that’s hard to beat? It hasn't been surpassed since CHERO-COLA ma le Its debut. DRINK Chero-Cola THEBE'S NOME SO GOOD mm wHotel —THE WAVERLY—= Cafe In the Heart of the Business District Thirteenth Street, Near Broad CHAS. E. WALTON, Proprietor COLUMBUS, GA. HOTEL TERMINAL Oj I osite Union Station CHAS. E. and J. A. WALTON, Proprietors The University Commencement means for many the severing of college ties preparatory to the forming of new ties in the world of business. A connection with a strong, progressive bank is of first importance in any well-formed plan of business success. Merchants Mechanics Bank COLUMBUS, GA. Established 1871 “At Your Service’' Cavalry Captain (to Freshman): "Now Smith, how would you use your saber if your opponent feinted?” Smith: “I'd tickle him with the point to sec if he was fooling."—Georgia Cracker. Botany Prof.: “What animals come from plants and what plants produce them?” Fresh: ‘Teddy-bears come from underwear plants.”—'Ee’Au. THE POLITICIAN l.'nder the shelt’ring archway The Politician stands; From morn till night, unceasingly. He’s always shaking hands. A beaming smile adorns his face. And love his voice denotes. For fellow-studes. 'cause that is how He gets so many votes. - The Dirge. Young Thing: You don’t care for sports at all, do you? Eminent Literary Man: Yes indeed—I can play as well as think, you know. Young Tthing: Really! Eut you don’t let either interfere with your work. —LIFE.When the Zero Hour Comes You have spent several years preparing for the Battle of Life. You are now ready to “go over the top.“ In the Battle of Commerce you will want your store, office or bank to compare favorably with others. Our expert designers are at your service. Catalogues upon request. We build all kinds of store, bank or office furniture. NATIONAL SHOW CASE COMP ANY COLUMBUS, GEORGIA “THE SOUTH’S LARGEST FIXTURE MANUFACTURERS” She told me that she adored the legendary literature of Iceland, that she was fascinated by the sages of Scandinavia and the countless anecdotes with which they were interwoven, so 1 proceeded to launch forth on a voluminous discourse upon the history of those peoples. When I had finished. I turned to her. “Tell me.” I queried. “What are your actual impressions of the Norse races?" "Why.” she replied. ‘‘I think they were cute." —Smart Set. “He—“I've decided to kiss you.” She "Oh, George, can nothing move you from your decision?" He—"Nothing." She—"But. George, 1 must have time to think: just one minute. George—grant that." He—"No.” She—“Please. George, give me a second." — Jay. Miss—"How did you get all those wrinkles?" Mrs.—"From worrying." Miss—“What did you worry about?” Mrs.—“About getting wrinkles." —Georgia Cracker. Daniel might have gotten away good in a lion’s den. but I’ll venture a 1922 model co ed could have gotten a meal out of him.—Notre Dame Juggler. ❖ When in Columbus You Will Find THE CRICKET “A Good Place to Dine” Yours truly, GORDON FLOURNOY §• » $ GUARANTY TRUST CORPORATION CAPITAL $500,000.00 SURPLUS $500,000 00 ATHENS, GEORGIA Loans, Real Estate and Insurance GOLD SAVING CERTIFICATES AMERICAN STATE BANK College Avenue and Washington St. Branch Office: Broad St. Solicits Your Banhing Business SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT Member Federal Reserve System OFFICERS: John J. Wilkins, Pres.: W. C. Jordan. Vice-President: Howell C. Erwin, Vice-President; G. It. Davis. Cashier; Lewis 1. Jordan. Assistant Cashier. THE ATHENS SAVINGS BANK Capital, Surplus and Profits $400,000.00 M. Stern, President M. G. Michael, Vice-Pres. G. A. Mell, Cashier B. F. Tuck, Asst. Cashier The Athens Railway and Electric Company’s Motto is “SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC” The Electrically Equipped Home is the Happy, Contented Home IF IT’S ELECTRICAL WE HAVE IT. The Athens Railway and Electric Company ATHENS. GEORGIA • A PUBLIC SERVICE CORPORATION'’Press of Jacobs and Company Clinton, S. C.


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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

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