University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1922

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 502 of the 1922 volume:

PANDORA CENERAL library University of Georgia ATHENS, GECWG1AO v V- . . 1 LAV pm | ||||||i|!||||||| p mm PROFESSOR JOSEPH LUSTRAT Officier d Academie M I » mmuiii O PROF. J. LUSTRAT, who. during his long and fruitful activity in our University, has, by his zeal and devotion to the highest ideals of scholarship, maintained the standard of instruction in his department upon a level with the best in any of our sister institutions, whose many admirable personal qualities have gained for him the affection and cordial esteem of his students and colleagues, who has caused twenty-five generations of university students to appreciate and love the French language and its literature, France and her ideals, this volume is respectfully dedicated. GENERAL U1RARY University of Georgia ATHENS, GEQKtfA STAFF M.A.McRAlNEY EPfiTOR’IN'CHBEF EoE.WATSON JR. JoE.BENMARK ASSOCIATE EDITORS HW.HQ5CH H£.SHEFFHEILD CJHLWIUIAMS asst. ART EIMTOR3 J.BoWJiLSON JJF.BRANNEN JR. BUSINESS MANAGERS S.CHOWEIL MEDICAL ESCTOR ELWBIAPFORP J.HLSHERMAN ASSOCIATE MEDICAL EDITORS olR BATTLE MEMCAIL BUSINESS MANAGER ;v.y vraraigs HABOS.D C.f BRANNCN 4G9S«FOREWORD HE BOARD of Editors do not pretend that this volume of Pandora is all that it should be, but they do herewith affirm that to the best of their ability they have made it embody every phase of student activity in the University. This breadth of subject, if nothing else, the editors feel, will of itself give the book a wider appeal perhaps than it has sometimes had when it was more of a Senior Class-book than a cross-section record of the entire body of student interests. Goodbye, Old Buildings IIK mellow, witrm haze of a Septemlwr sun wrapped in tarnished gold the ivy-covered aeademic building, the high eolunin chapel, the ancient dormitories, and the structures »f later days, sym-lailizing in quiet tranquility a benediction of peace and love. Hut we walked through the great seal of the entrance arch into tlie arms of n Spartan mother. A mad Pied Piper stalked the fields of Picardy and Flanders, luring a host of millions into the slaughter of war. We came to find our Mina Mater, outwardly peaceful and smiling, but inwardly militant and broken with grief. Her older sons had answered the call, and already many of them lay on their broken blood-stained shields. Duty, with silver bugles, sounded from across the seas and we, the youngest of her sons, came to receive the challenge and follow in the paths of others. Pence came suddenly, while she instructed us in the arts of war. She put away our arms and furled the Hags we were to have raised in battle while she t H»k us upon her knee and hade us learn of peace. Four years ago we eagerly ol eycd her, and now........... At the dusking dawn, while the wind blows fitfully through the trees, making the new leaves stir and sing, a minstrelsy of music heard only in the hidden depths of the heart, a sound like the soft drawing of a master's bow across the taut silver strings of an ancient violin, we walk the old accustomed paths, knowing that today we leave them, perhaps, forcvci We arrive where tile massive columns of the old chapel tower in the bine light like the portals of a pearl gate leading into a legendary past. Our hand goes up. our hat conies off, and we stand lxiwed while the new light flares up in the east and the old light burns in our heart like incense before a cherished altar. Goodbye, old buildings! Today the jiomp and ceremony within your walls will lie as the blare of silver bugles in our ears again .... the herald of tla’ King of I.ife calling ns into' the field of battle. We shall see the paths of life lending like silver threads of light across the hills until they are lost to sight lieyond the horizon’s rim. Beyond that rim we cannot know what lies. Jov and sorrow, success and defeat-—'these are the common heritage of all that travel the trails. We shall not falter, we shall not linger long, we shall not shed one tenr-for we are brave— brave enough, at least, to cliokc back the sob we feel rising into our thront on saying Farewell, and inarch resolutely through the great seal of the entrance arch into the paths that challenge us and call to ns.' Goodbye, old buildings- we are gone} Hut shall we lose you forever? Someone speaks, “We do not hear it in onr ears, but we sense it in our hearts”. It is the voice of the Alma Mater: “No. you cannot lose them, for as you entered into them, so did they enter into you. and they will remain a part of you forever”. We brace up onr shoulders .... we are smiling as we go. Goodbye, old buildings! We feel no sorrow. Oi.ivkr S. Morton .Acadkmic 15I’ll PINT. I'XIVKWUTY ClIAHKI.I'xivkhsity Library Pkahody Ham.Law Buii.mxr. Ac.ricui.tuhai. Education Buii.dixo♦ Nkw Cou.tokVktkkixaky COI.I.KCKDr.NMARK Hai.lExginkerixg Bvii.mxo Agricui.tur.u. AXIM.U. IIl'SHAXURV DUIMMXGMOORK. Coi.t.KC.K Campus Wai.kCrawford W. l oxc Infirmary Vll.IIKX»‘OKI CIIII.OHKN' HOSI'ITAI.IIOSI'ITAI. ok Mkiiicai. C'omkok Sckxk on Mkiiicai. Ciii.i.kgs CamitsThe War Memorial Fund X Novemlier 11, 1921. nn organization created by the Alumni Society for the purpose concluded a campaign to raise a million dollars for the University. The committee succeeded not only in reaching their objective, hut secured $180,000 in excess of the million. As this was the most important effort of the sort ever undertaken by the University or the alumni, it is fitting that Pandora should express the gratitude of the student body to the alumni and to put into permanent form the record of this great achievement. The idea of campaigning for a million dollars was horn in the minds of Prof. It. E. Park and Prof. H. A. Inghram. These two members of the Faculty were instrumental in calling a meeting in Athens on Memorial Day. 1920, at which the whole matter was discussed and a temporary committee formed to devise plans. Mr. Harry Hodgson, '98. was made chairman of this committee and Prof. H. A. Inghram. 17, was made secretary. When the Alumni Society met in June, this committee laid before the Society plans for an organization. The Society authorized the campaign and created a General Campaign Committee, of which Mr. Harry Hodgson was made chairman and Prof. It. P. Brooks secretary. At the first meeting of the General Campaign Committee it was deemed advisable to create an Executive Committee within the larger laxly. 'Phis Executive Committee was chosen from those members of the Committee who reside in Athens Harry Hodgson, Chancellor I). C. Harrow. C. 1). Flanigcn. It. P. Stephens and It. P. Brooks. C The intensive drive extended from October II to November II. 1921. In that short space of time alumni and friends of the University pledged alxmt $1,128,000. The largest gift received was that of the General Education Board. $100,000. An anonymous friend of the University, living in New York, gave $80,000. which was later raised to $00,000. An effort was made to have the alumni average the sum of $815. More than 1.000 gave that amount. The total number of subscriptions was •1.840. The alumni subscribed $088,000; non-alumni. $4 49,000. The most noteworthy feature of the campaign was the large number of small subscriptions. Outside of the two above mentioned, the largest individual subscription was $15,000. The students in the University at the time of the drive subscribed most generously to the Fund, as did the Faculty of the University. In concluding this brief sketch of the War Memorial Fund. Pandora desires to pay special tribute to Harry Hodgson. ’98. whose organizing ability and unsparing effort largely account for the success of the campaign. During a period of unparalleled business depression, when his own business demanded every moment of his time, he most generously devoted the larger part of bis thought and effort tor eighteen months to this unselfish work. Important as was Mr. Hodgsons service to the cause, his efforts could not have been crowned with success without the aid of Chancellor Barrow, who was always wise in counsel and whose tremendous popularity with the alumni and students was a factor of great moment. Nor could the movement have succeeded without the loval support of hundreds of alumni scattered all over the State and in other States, who gave freely of their time and money to the cause.Georgia Daughters of the American Revolution Scholarship Fund LI.l'STRATIVIS of the groat purpose of their splendid organization was the gracious not of the Georgia Daughters of the American Kevolution in presenting to the I’niversity of Georgia n fund of live thousand dollars, the income of which is to l e loaned to worthy young men to aid them in securing an education. The bravery, fortitude and sacrificial spirit of Revolutionary ancestors, passed on from generation to generation, sprang into full flower and fruitage when our gallant (toys were summoned to the colors of the great World War and Iwueath the starry Hag of the Republic went forth to light the battles for the lilierty of mankind. The blood that hallows the rugged slopes of the Argonne adds a hue, fadeless and immortal, to the poppies of Flanders Field, was of the same strain as that which embalmed in the hearts of men the sufferings of Valley Forge, and through its sacrificial libation on lilierty’s altar made possible the great government under which we live. To this active and effective organisation of noble and beloved Georgia women the t'ni-versity of Georgia deems it not only genuine pleasure hut also a proud privilege to express its thanks in behalf of those Georgia Ikivs who throughout all the years to come are to be recipients of this generous assistance and its grateful appreciation of the thoughtfulness and loving spirit that guided them to the decision to thus honor the memories of our gallant sons, who. with the unswerving fidelity to duty and with valor unsurpassed, illustrated u|M n the sanguine fields of battle the dauntless bravery of Georgia manhood, and wove around the khaki uniform of the American soldier fadeless glory of immortality.tv or , K A j if VyA V fy 'Vtv. r ‘ - •5J,yn Al 1 ■ V V S'- T I , X U G V I tfSTg Board of Trustees His F.xckm.kncv. Govkrxor Tiiomas W. Hardwick, Atlanta, Kx-OlHeio. Gkorc.k K. Gorki. Marietta, from the State at I irge. Hknmy D. McDaxiki., Monroe, from the State at l.nrp . Wii.i.iam K. Simmons, Lawreneeville, from the State at Large. .1 amks It. Nkvin. Atlanta, from tl»e State at l.arjir. Aiv.x. A. Lawhkxck, Savannah. First Congressional District. ,1. Kohk.ht Potti.k, AI tinny, Seeomt Congressional District. I,. Ci. Cot?xon.. Amerietis, Third Congressional District. Hknhy U. Goktciih’ . Cotnmtms, Fourth Congressional District. Ci.ark Howki.i., tlnnta. Fifth Congressional District, i.ovu Ci.kyki.axd. Griffin, Sixth Congressional District. Joskkii M. It row x, Marietta, Seventh Congressional Ditrict. Marcos 1 McWhortkr, Athens, F.ighth Congressional District. Howard Thompson. Gainesville. Ninth Congressional District. Uuwdrk iiixir.Y. Augusta. Tenth Congressional District. •Ioiix W. Hkxxktt, Wnveross Kleventli Congressional District. Dodi.ky M. Hoc.iu.s. Danville, Twelfth Congressional Distriet. Hoe.ii .1. it owe.. At tie ns, Resident Trustee. Harry Hodohox, Athens, Resident Trustee. Gkorc.k Fostv.r Pkamody. New York, Life Truster, hv Special Art of the General Assembly. Natiiaxiki. K. Harris. Macon. Chairman of tlie Board of Trustees of tlir School of Technology, F.x-Offieio. Richard B. Rosski.i., Winder, President of the Board of Directors of the Georgia Normal and Industrial College, Kx-OlUeio. Pktv.r V. Mkmhhm. Savnnnaii. I resident of ttu Board of Commissioners of the Industrial College for Colored Youths, F.x-Otticio. A. S. Hardy. Gainesville, President of the Board of Trustees of the North Georgia Agricult- ural College, F.x-Offieio. B. S. Mii.i.kk. Columbus, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the State Normal School, Kx- Officlo. •L mk Coxnkr. Cartersville, Clmirnian of the Board of Trustees of the College f Agriculture, Kx-Ollicio. Kxocii H. Cam.away. Augusta, President of the Board of Directors of the Medical ( ollcgc, K -Officio. u .... Wiu.iam K. Thomas. Valdosta. President of the Board of Truster of me tmniiii Georgia Normal College, Kx-OlUeio. . -T. L. l.ovvoHN. President of the Board of Trustees of Bowden College. 'x Ciuur Mvrpiiy Casducr. Decatur, President of the CDiversity of (»corgi-‘ . 1111,1,1 ° M a Kx-Offieio. Marion L. Brittaix. Atlanta, State Superintendent of Schools. Hkxry 1). McDaxiki.. Chairman. Thomas V. Hr.r.u. Secretary and Treasurer.   itniiiiiitimniiinimiiiniiiiiHimmnuiiimiiiiinimmHuiriniiuTmnniiimmViiinntimniirmimiiiimn'ii iiiimiuunHiiiiiitiitiiiiiinVi I.i 1111! 11111111111111111111111!M(111!1111111i[111111f11111111111111(i(11111111[111111111111!(II11H111111'UIJIrI(1111!I In IIonoh ok Dr. Henry Clay White, Ph.D., F.C.S., D.Sc., LL.D. Professor of Chemistry, i'nivcrsity of (iconjia 1872 1922 UK Paxdoka, on behalf of the student body, esteems it a high privilege and honor to join with the entire alumni in commemorating the jubilee year of Dr. Henry Clay White, whose full half century of continuous and distinguished service to the University in the Chair of Chemistry will be complete at the coming Commencement. Dr. White came to Athens in 1872, when the A. M. College was established as the scientific department of the University. His life work has thus been intimately and effectively concerned in those changes and advances which have marked the rising importance of scientific knowledge, and under which Franklin College the seat of classical learning established by the State in 1801, has been added to and developed into the many-sided organization which the University now represents. In addition to his professional duties. Dr. White, as President of the A. M. College (1890-1907) was called upon to protect and advance this scientific department of the University before State and national legislatures during a period of very serious growing pains and dangerous uncertainties. He brought to this task rare abilities and devoted energies. His untiring effort and wise initiative did much to preserve and prepare our Alma Mater for her enlarging and ever more important influence upon the youth of the State. Dr. White has borne a no less sympathetic and gracious part in the social and intellectual life of the Faculty and students. The charm and cultured influences of his hospitable home are treasured bv hundreds of the alumni among their choicest memories of college days. For many years Dr. White has been a national figure in the world of science and letters. He worthily bears the highest awards and honors from many Universities and learned societies. It is with admiration and warm personal wishes that the Paxdoha congratulates Dr. White upon the completion of so long and so valuable service to the University and to the State. It congratulates also the University upon an occasion, rare in the annals of any institution, where, to such unusual length of service there is added such marked distinction of culture and scholarship, of achievement in her behalf, of personal influence and social sympathy which enriches and will continue always to enrich the ideals and traditions of this time honored seat of learning.----- V iriiiTr'«rliA--Mt. m r .-gSASi G 11 r r" mg faculty AT;i _ w PC m m P'S ®Y3 I. ADM INISTK ATI VK OFFICERS David Chknsiiaw Ban how. I.I..D...................................................Chancellor Chahi.ks Mkhckr S.vki.mno. A.M., Sc.D.........................President of Franklin College Axmkw MacNaimx Soci.k. B.S.A.. I.L.I).. F.U.S.A., Sc.D................................... President of llu- College of A grind!lire mu! the Mechanic Irts Thomas Waltkm Kkkd. A.M.............................................Secretary and Treasurer II. Till-: CNDKIIGUADl'ATK, (IKADl’ATK AND PHOFKSSIONAI. SCHOOLS Chakm» MKKCKK Snki i.inx. A.M.. ScD.................................Dean of the Fniversitg AXMKW MacNaux Socmc. H.S.A.. F.K.S.A.. I.I..D.. Sol).. Dean of the College of A grim I In re W11.1.IS Hkxrv liiKiK'ii. A.M., I.I..D.........................Dean of the Graduate School Thomas Jackson W ooitkii, I’Ii.D., I.I..D...................Dean of the School of hid neat ion SVI.vancs Mokhis. B.l... 1.I..D..........................Dean of the Lumpkin La«• School Hokknt Pkkstox Bhooks. l»h.D................................Dean of the School of Commerce Jamks Phu.aSiikm Camhkki.1.. B.S.A.....................................Director of Extension IIohkrt Ci’.mmino W H.sox. Pli.(J........................Director of (he School of Pharmacy Maky Dorothy I.yxihix. A..M.................................................Dean of Women Maiiy Ki.ixaiiktii Chkswki.i.. B.S.Il.K........................Director of Home Economics III. Till- A I’X 11.1 All V DIVISIONS Dcxcax BlfKXKT..................................................Librarian of the Fniversitg Dwiout Warmkn Uvthkn. Colonel. Infsntry. C. S. A........................................... Commandant of the lleserve Of peers’ Training Corps JoSKMI Sl’KXSKR StKWART. IY(I.D...................................................... Superintend! at of the Summer School; nspeclor of High Schools Daxiki. IIcoiiks DcPrkk, B.S., M.l)..............................Surgeon to the 'Fniversitg 11 a . (). Bkyxoids. M.l)................................................Resident Physician IvriiKi. (Joi)CKKV.......................Superintendent of the Crawford IT. Long Inprmary Till-: INSTKCCTIONAI. COUPS David Chknsiiaw Bamhow, I.I..D....................................................Chancellor Chahi-ks Mknckn Sxki.i.ino. A.M.. Sc.D........................President of Franklin College xdkkw MacNaimx Son k. B.S.A.. F.U.S.A.. I.L.D.. Sc.D...................................’. President of the College of Agriculture anil the Mechanic Arts B.S.A.........................Associate Professor of Agronomy .................Issociatc Professor of Institutional Economics ................................Associate Professor of Hot any .................Adjunct Professor of .Agricultural Engineering ................Associate Professor of Mathematics ..........Issociatc Professor of Dairy Husbandry K.mohv DkWitt Ai.kxaxdkr. Mks. Kditii May Andkkws .... K. Kcokxk Bakkkm. I’Ii.I)......... DcPrkk Bamnktt, B.S.F.............. David Francis Bamhow, Ph.i). . . . Fhkdkiiick Wuxi am Bknnktt. B.S.A. Wii.i.is Hkxky Bocock. A.M., J.|,.|). . Milledgc Professor of Creek 1 ilU li.ro i1yt |l[ • —G-”' ■  G ' - v» - i:'VA 4 nwfiyn«8i;H! I list ructor in Chemist rg Wyatt Akton Ci.egg, B.S.A................ Andrew Jackson Coiui, A.B., B.L. . . Wll.I.IAM Ous Coi.I.INS, B.S.A. . . . I'aw, Tkiian Connolly, D.V.M. . . Walter Grover Comnutt. LL.IL . . Ki.i.is Merton Cori.iTK, Plt.I)........... George AhtiU'h Ckahh. B.S.A. . . . Maky Klieahktii Ckeswei.l, B.S.H.F.. Ciiari.hs Brockman, A.M., Ch.ICnjr.............................. Bkcck 1 .amah Bi'rch, Major, Cavalry, I'. S. A.................. Assistant t'rofessor nf Military Science and Tactic alter Cl. IN ton Bcrkiiart, I). ..M..........Associate Professor of I' eterinnry Medicine Thomas Dearborn Bcki.kic.ii, B.S.F., M.S.F....................tssoeiate Professor of Forestry Dcncan Bcrnkt......................................................Librarian of the I'nicersi ty J. NN . Cantkki.i., A.B.........................................I r roc in I e Professor of Physics I.konioas Mykks Carter. B.S........................................Professor of Soil Chemistry FRANCIS Cartkk ( HANDLER, B.S.A..................Associate Prof error of Vocational Education Boss Ben prop. C II i I.IW, B.S.A., M.G.A. . Prof error of A yronotny, in Charye of Cotton Industry . . . Associate Professor of Ayricuttural Engineering . Lecturer on Constitutional Laic and LeyaI Procedure ................Associate Professor of Soil Chemistry ..........Associate Professor of Peterinary Medicine ....................................Professor of Laic . Associate Professor of History and Political Science ..........Professor of Agronomy, in Charge of Soils ........................Director of Home Eocnomics Jci.iax Wai.j.ao: Cl'Nninoiiam, Captain, Cavalry, C. S. A.................................... Assistant Professor Military Science and Tactics I Ria11 1 Iakroi.I) Davenport, B.S...............Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering John Ki.dridgk Dkewry, A.B...........................................Instructor in Journalism Acstin Soctiiwick Howards. Pli.J)....................................Professor of Psychology Frank Nichoi.as F. ;kmton, Jr., A.M., K.K........................tssoeiate Professor of Physics Julius Mitciiki.i. IjI.koo, B.S.A..........................Associate Professor of Agronomy George Alexander Fain, B.C.K...........................Professor of .Agricultural Engineering John Hichakd Fain, B.S., S 1 ........................................Professor of Agronomy Kknkst Lee Griggs. Graduate of V. M. I. . . . Professor of Ciril Engineering and Draicing Harold I.»:on Hakhinc.ton, B.S.............................Adjunct Professor of Horticulture Coknklics Jacoh Hkatwoi.k. A..M............................................Professor of Education 71. M. Heckman........................................................Professor of Accounting 1.INVII.I.K LackeNtixk Hkndkkn, PIi.D......................Professor of Physics and Astronomy James Pittman Hii.i., A.B.........................................Instructor in Mathematics Thomas Scott Holland, A.B............................tdjunct Professor of Homance Languages William Davis Hooper. A..M..................................................Professor of Latin George Alexander Hctchinsox. PIi.D. . Professor of Philosophy and Sr hind Administration Howell Artiicr Ixgiikam. B.S.C...................... . Professor of Accounting Charles Wki.m Jacohsox, Captain. Cavalry, f. S. A............................................ Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics Milton Preston J am n agin. B.S. A.. Sc.D..................t rof essor of Animal Husbandry John Wilkinson Jenkins. A.M...........................................Professor of Economies Beers Lafayette Keener. B.S.A..............................Adjunct Professor of Horticulture Charles Fdwakii Kellogg, B.S., M.S.A................tssoeiate Professor of .Animal nsbandry Joseph Khapka, Jr., PIi.D..................................................Professor of Zoi'dogy Marion Wayne Lowiiv. B.S.A.. M.A.......................tssoeiate Professor of Soil Chemistry Joseph Lcstrat, Bad), es Lett..............................Professor of Homance Languages Mary Dorothy Lyndon, A.M...................................Associate Professor of Education Jci.ian Howeli. Miller. B.S.A..............................Associate Professor of Horticulture John Morris. A.M...........................................Professor of Germanic Language: Syi.vancs Morris B.L., I.L.D...............................................t'rofessor of Laic Martha McAi.pine, A.B................................Social and Physical Director of Women Charles Andrew McGakrigi.k. Captain, Quartermaster, I’. S. A................................. Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics G Ai.hkkt Doitiikt MdiiiKw, H.S...................................Adjunct Professor of Forestry Thomas HciimanIi McHattox, H.S., Sc.I).. M.IIort.....................Professor of Horticulture John Hanson Thomas McPherson. I'li.l)...............Professor of History and Politico I Science Kokkiit I.icon McM iiortkr, A.M......................Ixxocinte Professor of Latin an l Greek John Wai.tkh Nkmioison, Captain. Infantry, I . S. A.......................................... Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics Uohkkt Emory Pamk. A.M„ Lilt.I)............................................Professor of English Wll.MAM Oscak PaYNk, A.M...................................................Professor of History Hkkman Victor Perski.i-s, D.V.M........................................Hog Cholera Specialist Kuna Ki.ixaiikth Proctor, H.S........................Associate Professor of Foods and Cookery Hakaki. Wii.i.iam It a i irk ., A.M................Associate Professor of Romance Languages ItosAMK Virginia Hatiihonk. H.S.................Assoiiate Professor of ('lathing and Textiles John Moohk Kkadk, i'll.I). . . . Professor of Hotany ami Director of lliological Laboratories Thomas Wai.tkr Hkkii. A.M............................................................Registrar Waiie Hampton Hick. H.S.A............................Adjunct Professor of Poultry IIushandry Waiiki Sii.as Hick. H.S.A............................Adjunct Professor of .Animal Husbandry Al.HKKT (I. (I. Kichakiisox. D.V.M............................Professor of Veterinary Medicine Dwight Warrkn Hytiikh. Colonel, Infantry. I'.S.A., Professor of Military Science ami Tactics Stkaiiman Vixcknt Sankokd. A.H., I.itt.D. . . Professor of English Language and Journalism Jci.irs Eugene Skvkrin, D.V.M.......................Associate Professor of Veterinary .Medicine I.aFavkttk Mm.es Siikkkkk. H.S..................tssociate Professor of Agricultural Education .1 aaiks I.ongstrkkt Sihi.ky, H.S..........................Extension Professor of Social Work ChaRi.es Merckk Snkm.ino, A.M., Sc.I)...............................Professor of Mathematics Kohkrt Murray Soci.k, H.S.A.....................Adjunct Professor of Agricultural Chemistry Hkkman Jamks Stkokmax, I'li.H.....................Instructor in Physical Education for Men Hoswki.i. I'owki.i. Stkpiikns, I'li.D...............................Professor of Mathematics AUGUSTUS Haktskiki.I) Stkvkns, A.H..................................Instructor in Mathematics Joseph Spencer STEWART. Pcd. I)...............................Professor of Secondary Education Chaiii.ks Morton Straiian, C. and M.K., Sc.I).....................Professor of Ciril Engineering Horace Strinokki.i.ow, Captain. Infantry. V. S. A............................................ .Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics Ciiahi-KS ii.i.iam Soaimkrocr. H.S.A.......................Associate Professor of Agronomy i.i'rkii Mki.ha Thornton, H.S.A................................Editor, College tf Agriculture Preston Cami. I’pshaw, H.S.C........................................Instructor in Commerce Stkpiikns Cummins I'woa'. I.I..H............................................Professor of Imxc John I). Waiik, A.H.......................................................Instructor in English Kooskvki.t Pruyn Wai.kkk. A.M.................................Associate Professor of English Wai.kkk I'rkston Warrkn, A.H., H.l.........................................Assistant Registrar John TaYi.or Wiikki.kR. H.S................................Professor of Agricultural Education llKNRY Cl.AY WlllTK, I'h.Dn D.C.I... I.1..D............................’..................... Professor of Chemistry and Terrell Professor of Agricultural Chemistry Ckoii. Norton Wii.hkr, H.S.A.. M.S.A............Associate Professor of Agricultural Chemistry Hohkht Ci’MAiiNO Wiison, I'b.Ci........................................Professor of Pharmacy Jamks Hkkrkrt Wimiii, H.S.A...................................Professor of Poultry Husbandry Thomas Jackson Wooitkr, Ph.D., 1.1..I)...............Professor of Philosophy and Education W1111am Archer Worshaai, Jr.. H.S., A.M....................Professor of Agricultural Chemistry Jaaiks Heyward Young, H.S.......................................Adjunct Professor in Chemistry THE MEDICAL INSTIt ICTIONAl. COUPS David Crknshw Harrow, A.H.. C. and M.E., LI..I).....................................Chancellor Wii.ijaai IIknry Doughty, Jr., A.H., M.D., F.A.C.S........................................Dean Thoaias Ui'SSKI.i. Wright. M.D., F.A.C.S...................................Professor of Surgery Wim.iaai IIknry DoI’OIITY, Jh., A.H., M.D., F.A.C.S........................Professor of Surgery. Instructor in Chemistry Charms Brockmax, A.M., Cli.Rnjr............................. Hhcck I .a mam llt’RCii. Major, Cavalry, I . S. A........... Assistant Professor of Military Science ami Tactic Wai.TKR C I.IXTox Hcrkhart, DA .M...............-Ifractalf Professor uf Veterinary Medicine Thom ax Dkarhohn Hmucmn, H.S.F., M.S.F........................I social , Professor of Forestry Dl’XCAX Hi’RSET....................................................Librarian of the t'nicersil y •I "• Caxtrell. A.B...........................................Ittociale Prof ft tor of Phytics Lkoniiia Myers ( artkr. B.S........................................Professor of Soil Cheniittry FRANCIS ( artkr ( handler, II.S.A..............Associate Profettor of I'oralional Eilucalion Hoxx Kkxiiok C hi i.im. H.S.A., M.d.A. . Profettor of Ayr on omy, in Charge of Cotton Imlnttry Wyatt Artox Clegg, H.S.A....................rlssaciale Profettor of Ayricuttwral Fnyineeriuy AXDREW Jackson Cohn, A.11., H.L. . . . Lecturer on Contlitntionat lane and LeyaI Procedure William Oux Com,I NX. H.S.A.............................Ittociale Profettor of Soil Chemitlry PaiX Tkhax Conn on. Y, l).V.M....................Ittociale Profettor of Veterinary Medicine Wai.tkm (Jrovkk Comxktt, I.I..H..............................................Profettor of lane Kl MR MKRTOX Coi'i.tkr, IMi.I)............Ittociale Profettor of History and Ptditical Science (•kokgk Author ( Rahh, H.S.A.....................Profettor of Ayronomy. in Charye of Soilt Mary Ki.ixahktii ( rkswki.i., H.S.11.1'.........................Director of Home Eornomics •Ici.ian Wallace Ccnningiiam, Captain, Cavalry, C. S. A...................................... Attitlanl Profettor Military Science and Tactic I RiAii Hamhoi.o |)avkn» ort. H.S................Ittociale Profettor of Electrical ICnyineeriny John Humidor Drkwry, A.H.............................................Instructor in Journalism AlSTlX Socthwick Kdwarim. IMi.I).....................................Profettor of Ptycholoyy Frank Nicholas Hgkrtox, .?r,( A.M., K.E........................Ittociale Profettor of Physic J 1 1.1 ex Mitchell Ki.rod, H.S.A...........................Ittociale Professor of Agronomy Ckorge Alexander Fain. H.C.F............................Professor of Ayricultural ICnyineeriny John Richard Fain, H.S., Sc.I)........................................Professor of A yronomy Ernest I.KE Grioos, Graduate of V. M. I. . . . Professor of C it'll ICnyineeriny and Draiciuy Makoi.ii I .EON Harrington, H.S.............................Adjunct Professor of Horticulture Cornki.h s Jacoh Hkatwoi.K, A..M.............................................Professor of Education Tl. M. Heckman.......................................................professor of .tecountiny I.INVII.IK I.ACRESTIXK HkndREN. l’ll.I)....................Professor of Physics and Astronomy James 1’ittman Hill., A.H..........................................Instructor in Mathematics Thomas Scott Holland. A.H..........................Itljnncl Professor of Itomance Language William Davis Hooper, A.M...................................................Professor of Latin George Alexander Hitchinmin. IMi.I). . Professor of Philosophy and School Administration Howell Arthcr Inghram, H.S.C................... .....................Professor nf Accounting Charms Wells Jacorson, Captain. Cavalry, V. S. A............................................. Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tadics Milton Frkston Jarxaoin. H.S.A.. Sc.l)......................Professor of Animal Husbandry John Wii.kinxon Jenkins, A.M..........................................Professor of Economics Rcics Lafayette Keener. H.S.A...............................Idjunct Professor nf Horticulture Charles Howard Kki.migg, H.S., M.S.A...............Ittociale Profettor nf Animal IIutbnntlry Joseph Kmafka, Jr., IMi.I)...................................................Profettor of .oology Marion Wayne (a Wry, H.S.A., M.A........................Associate Professor of Soil Chemistry Joseph Lcstrat, Hach. i s Lett..............................Professor of Homance l.anguayes Mary Dorothy Lyndon, A.M....................................ittociale Professor of Education J ci.i an Howell Miller, H.S.A.............................Associate Professor of Horticulture John Morris, A.M............................................Professor of Germanic Language: SVI.VAXes Morris H.L„ LI..I)................................................Professor of Laic Martha McAlpine, A.H................................Social and Physical Director of Women Charles Andrew McGarhiglk. Captain, Qiiartrrinastrr, l S. A................................. Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics i 4 h;'-- -i ( 1 11j f, | i 1' . v- V At.HURT DorTlIKT Mc( RKW, B.S Thomas 11 i'hrahii McIIatton, B.S., Sc.D., G ................Adjunct I r of tutor of Forestry i»rt..................Professor of Horticulture . . Professor of History nutl Political Science Kohkkt I-loos- McWhorter, A.M........................Associate Professor of Latin and Greek .Ioiin Walter Niciiolxox, Captain, Infantry, I . S. A.......................................... Assistant Professor of Military Science anil Tactics K««MT Emory Park. A.M.. Litt.D.............................................Professor of Enylish ii.Mam ()sc. m Payxk, A.M. . ...........................................Professor of History Hermax Vhtoh I’krsei.lk, D.V.M..........................................Hoy ( holm, Specialist I'.mn’a Ei.ixahkth Proctor, B.S......................Associate Professor of Foods and Cookery Ka»AKI. II.I.IAM K amiri: , A.M...................Associate Professor of llonianre Lonyuayes K sauk iroinia ItATIIRONK. B.S................Istofiule Professor of Clolliim anti Textiles Jolts Moukk Ukaiik, I'll.I). . . . Professor of Hottiny and Director of llioloyictil Laboratories Thomas Wai.ty.h Keen. A.M..................................................... . . . Heyislrar Wai»»: Hamilton Hick. B.S.A..........................Adjunct Professor of Poultry Husbandry Waldo Sil.as Kick. B.S.A.............................Adjunct Professor of Animal Husbandry Ai.bkht («. C». Kiciiamimcon, |). .M........................Professttr of Veterinary Medicine Dwioiit W arrkn Hytiikb. Colonel, Infantry, I'.S.A., Professttr of Military Science anti Tactics Steadman Vixckxt Saxkorii, A.ll. Litt.D. Jr Mrs Kit.kxk Skvkrix, D.V.M. . . . LaFayktte Muxs Shkitkr. B.S............. Jamks I.oxortmkkt Sihi.ky, B.S......... Charms Mkrckr Sxki.i.ixo, A.M., Sc.D. Kohkkt Mcrray Socle, B.S.A............ IIkrmax Jamks Stkgemax, Ph.B. . . . Koswki.i. Powki.i. Stephens. IMi.I)........... Arr.rsTrs IIartskiki.d Stkvexs, A.B............ JoSKFII SfKXCKR STEWART, Pcil.D................ CHARI.KS Morton Straiian. C. anil M.K.. Sc.D. IIorack Strinokki.low, Captain, Infantry. I . S. Professor of Enylish Lanyuaye and Journalism . . .Associate Professor of Veterinary Medicine Associate Professttr of Ayricullural Education ..........Extension Professor of Social Work ...................Professor of Mathematics . Adjunct Professor of Ayricultural Chemistry . . . Instructor in Physical Etlucalitm for Men ...................Professor of Mathematics ...................Instructor in Mathematics ..........Professor of Secondary Education ..............Professor of Civil Enyineeriny A........................................... Assistant Professor of Military Science anti Tadics Chahi.ks Wii.i.iam Sr.MMKRorR. B.S.A........................Associate Professttr of Ayronomy Amrki) Mki.ka Thornton. B.S.A.................................Editor. Colleye of Ayriculture Prkstox Caki. t’pshaw, B.S.C.......................................Instructor in Commerce Stkpiiknr Cr.MMi.Ns I’pson, I.I..B...........................................Professor of Laic John I). Waiik, A.B.....................................................Instructor in Enylish Hooskyki.t I'ki’yn Wai.kkh. A.M................................Associate Professor of Enylish Wai.KKR Prkstox WarkkX, A.B., B.I........................................Assistant lleyistrar John Taylor Wiikki.kr. B.S...............................Professor of A yricull ural Education Henry Clay White. IMi.I)., D.C.t... I.I..D.................................................. Professor of Chemistry and Terrell I’rofessnr of .A yricull ural Chemist ry Ckcii. Norton Wii.dkr. B.S.A., M.S.A............Associate Professttr of Ayricullural Chemistry Koiikrt CrMMINO Wiijwin, Ph.Ci........................................Professor of Pharmacy Jamks Hkrhkrt Wood. B.S.A...................................Professor of Poultry Husbandry Thomas Jackson Wmoitkr, IMi.I)., I.I..1)..............Professor of Philttsophy and Education Wii.i.iam Akciikn Worsham. Jr.. B.S., A.M................Professor of A yricultural Chemistry Jamks Hkywakd YorNO, B.S......................................Adjunct Professor in Chemistry vStr THE MEDICAI. INSTHICTIONAL COUPS David Chknsiiw Barrow, A.B., C. anil M.K., I.I..I)...........................Chancellor Wii.i.iam Henry Docoiity, Jr., A.B., M.D., F.A.C.S.................................Dean Thomas Ucsski.i. Wright. M.D., F.A.C.S.............................Professor of Suryery Wii.i.iam Hknry DormiTV. Jr.. A.B., M.D., F.A.C.S..................Professor of Suryery jSjf  V C ! | W j ’’j.uy •» James Mkkiwkathk.r llru., M.I).......................................................... Professor of Ophfhalnrdoyy, Otoloyy, Larynyoloyy and Itliinioloyy Tiiomas Davies (ou ias, A.M., -M.I).................................Professor of Medicine Theodore Ki'iiknk Okrtki., .M.I)., F.A.C.S....................Professor of Ophthalmoloyy Ecoenk Komixii Mcrimiev, M.I)......................................Professor of Medicine Wii.mam Henry Goodrich, A. 15., M.I)., F.A.C.S.......................Professor of Surgery Noki. McHenry Moohk. M.S., M.I)....................................Professor of Pediatric C it ari.es 11.1.1 a ms C'kask, M.I)., F.A.C.S.................. Professor of Sun ery W11.i.iam Crissy Kki.i.ooo, A.15.. M.I).. F.A.C.S................Professor of Larynyoloyy Henry Midiii.ktox Miciiei., M.I)., F.A.C.S................Professor of Orthopedic Snryery Wii.i.iam Richardson IIoistox, A.M.. M.I)...........................Professor of Medicine I Iron Nelson Paoe. M.I)..................... Richard Vandkrmohst Lam ah. M.I)............. Caki.tox Howard Maryott, Fh.l).............. Wii.i.iam Sai.axt. H.S., M.I).............. Kohk.rt Alexander I 1erri.no, M.I).......... Gkohok Ai.hkrt Tkayi.oh. I5.Sc., M.I)., F.A.C.S. Wii.i.iam Anthony Mri.iiK.Rix. A.M.. M.I). . IK 4 .......................Projector of Anatomy ■ Professor of Patholoyy and lioctcrioloi y ......................ltrofe or of Chemist ry Professor of Physioloyy and Pharmacoloyy ........Professor of 1‘revenlix'e Medicine ............tssociate Professor of Snryery ...............Associate Professor Pediatric Peri.EY Pierce CoMKV. M.I).....................................tssociate Professor of Medicine Axiikkw .Iones Km.I'ATRICK, M.I)...............................Associate Professor of Obstetric C. C. Ai’IM.kwiiitk. M.I)............................tssociate Professor of Prex'entire Medicine Moses Soi.OMOX Levy. M.I)......................................Assistant Professor of Medicine (irv Tai.maikik Bernarii. M.I)., F.A.C.S........................Ixsistanl Professor of Suryrry JosKrn A kkrmax, A.15., M.I)...................................Issistant Professor of Obstetric Uojimit Lewis l{ IIOOKS. A.15., M.I).. F.A.C.S.................Assistant Professor of Snryery Wii.i.iam Wiiati.ky Battev. M.I)...........................................Assistant in Snryery Georok TCHNEH Horxk. M.I).....................................Issistant Professor of (iynecoloyy Chahi.es Ivk.msox Bryans. M.I).....................................Associate in Ophthalmology Asiicry I In.I.. M.I)......................................Associate in Cenitn-P rinary Snryery Wii.i.iam Johnston Cranston. M.I)..........................................Associate in Medicine YIuoil Frkston SydenstrICKKR. A.15., M.I)..................................tssociate in Medicine Samcei. Liciistk.nstei n. M.I)..........................................tssociate in Pacteriotoyy Amciiihai.d I5i.acksiik.ar. A.15.. 15.1........................Lecturer on Porensic Medicine IIiNton Jamks Baker, M.I)......................................Associate Professor of Pediatrics George Lombard Kki.i.Y, A. 15.............................................Instructor in Anatomy Wii.i.iam Canfield Fmk.rson, 15.S.........................................Instructor in Chemistry Sami'ki. Joski'H Lewis. M.I).......................................Instructor in Dermatolnyy Wii.i.iam Henry Roberts, M.I).............................Instructor in Ccnito-Prinary Snryery I.vkrari) Ansi.k.y N iia’ox. A. 15., M.I)................................Instructor in Oynecoloyy I.YSANOKK Fai.mk.r Hoi.mks. M.I)...................................Instructor in Itnentyennloyy Koikht Wrioiit IIorsKAi., A.15.. M.I).....................................Instructor in Medicine Nathaniki. Ki.kitman, I5.S., A.M.....................Instructor in Physioloyy and Pharmacoloyy Koiikmt Neixox Hoyt. S.I5., C.IMI...........................Instructor in Prex'entive Medicine N. M. Ai.vis. K.N.........................................................Instructor in . ursiny Loris Warren Faroo. M.I).............................Issistant in Patholoyy and Photoyrapher Kino Wai.ker Milligan. Pli.G., M.I).........................Iteyistrar. Out-Patient Department IIknry Wii.i.iam Shaw. M.I)................................................Issistant in Surycry I.HKNT AmiNXO Davioson. M.I)..............................................Issistant in Medicine Andrew Arorsrrs Wai.dkx, M.I)..............................................Issistant ill Medicine ()avii Marion Silver, M.I).............................Issistant in Oynecoloyy and Obstetrics Francis Xavier Mcmikrix. M.I)..............................................Issistant in Pediatrics Peter I5crcm Wrioiit. M.I)................................................Instructor in Snryery John Coskkry Wrioiit. M.I)................................................Instructor in 1 ynecoloyy F.DOAK K. PCND. A.15., M.I)...............................................Instructor in Medicine i f--Jr; • ' ,■  Senior Class History the Class of ’22 will l c starting on the threshold of a new era— g men and women, fired with ambition and strengthened with new ige—ready to step forward into the dawn of real life and fight its c resourcefully. Four years ago in the autumn of 1918, the old campus was full of new faces. Our country was in the midst of the world’s greatest war, and on these new faces there was a grim, serious look of determination. Wc came that autumn to answer the call to arms. Our Alina Mater was to instruct us in the arts of warfare, and looked forward to following the older brothers across the seas into the battles. Thus our career at Georgia has liecn of dual nature. We came to learn war, and when the Armistice was signed we remained to gather the pearls of wisdom and peace. The short service of the famous S. A. T. C. of 1918, in which all of us over the age of 18 were enlisted as regulars of Uncle Sam’s army will never be forgotten. There were two kinds of fright cast like a pal] over our camp -the Sophomores and the hard-boiled army officer, whose commanding voices we feared far more than the former. At length came November the eleventh, and wc were mustered out of service to gather with the home folks for Christinas dinner. Returning to the college halls after the great war was over, wc turned our attention from learning the tactics of destroying mankind to those of aiding and uplifting humanity, ft was now that we entered upon our real college career, the grand climax of which is at hand. Our Sophomore year found us again adjusting ourselves to a new era—-this year. 1919, will ever remain as the historical milepost of our Alma Mater's career, for it was then that first members of the fair sex were permitted to trod the sacred paths and ground of this institution as members of the student body. Against coeducation. we first rebelled, sullenly. However, after three years that have gone with women ever increasing in number among the ranks of the student body, wc have come quite accustomed to their presence and have lost our bashfulncss, submitting silently, as man will always do to wishes and wiles of the female. But youth will have its triumph and fortune, frowning however scornfully, will smile betimes. Our Junior year saw emancipation from the tyranny of the drill-master. Ours was the first class to Ik- excused from drill in the Junior year. It is needless to say what joy this glad news brought us. Suffice it to be said that the warm blankets of a soft bed are far more enticing on a cold wintry morn than the monotonous round of “squad rights” executed amid chilling winds with a cold, heavy rifle on your shoulder. The ( lass of 1922 has produced leaders from the beginning, and though wc must not boast the best, we can justly place them at the top, alongside the production of other classes. From our ranks have gone forth, and arc going forth into life, some of the best athletes, debaters, scholars and literary men that Georgia has produced. It is quite a distinction that our class can boast of the greatest number of three-year men than any other class that has preceded us. In conclusion, may the Class of ’22 ever aspire to those lofty ideals and remain true to the golden traditions for which our Alma Mater stands.Senior Class Officers M. A. McKainby..............................................1‘rfx'nlent I). M. Hastings........................................ 'ice-l,re ulent •I. T. Kihhy. .Ik................................tircrflarxi-Trrtixurer I). Di'kgkn...............................................Ilhlorian 0. S. Morton......................................................I’oel A. B. Cri.HKKiHON..............................................Chaplain k ’ 1 A '■ ' Vr aWII.LIAM BUY AN ALMON. B.S.C. “At." Hoopville, Georgia Deniosthcniim; Economies Society I Alliance FrHiiCHi.se; Square and Compass Club; President Economic Society; First Lieutenant M. T. 20. 21: Captain M. T. C., 21. 22. Do you remember the commercial looking guy with the ilerhtca and army shoes, soliciting trade on the campus last fall? Well, sir! This Is none other than he. Almon came here from Bordeaux with the other fellows to help thwart the Kaiser's plans. Msten. I'll toll you about "Bryan," fellows, lie's from Heard t'ounty. "Deep Heard." so "Fish" Ware says. Although you don't see so much of Mr. Almon In a Teahoundish sort of way. he's a Devil with the women. He Is a three-year man and a hard boner. He keeps a light in his Candler Hall window long after less studious boys are in bed. He Is a eommercial student. He used to affirm that he was going west when he finished. Whenever he goes, he'll make good. Gentlemen, he's a man. "7 o he honest as this world ijors, is to he one man picked oat of ten thousand” IIEKHF.KT GLENN BAILEY, D.V.M. “Baii.kv" Cold). Georgia Agricultural Club. "Halley” Is one of the Veterinary Medicine sharks, and we add right here that we cun hardly refer to him without using his “Veterinary" nickname. and that we only refrain because of the fact that "orders are orders." and we believe In obeying them ut limes. "Bailey" Is an excellent student, ipilet and good-natured In his bearing, with a smile for everybody, especially the Co-eds. Also he seems to he snperendowed with that greatest of all gifts, good common "horse" sense. This Is no pun upon his knowledge of the equine species. lie jtossesses a good store of general Information and consequently forms a valuable asset to all stag parties and Is often the central figure In campus "hull" sessions. We expert you to push yourself to the forefront out in the world of hard knocks. "Bailey.” because of those sterling ipmlilles of genuine worth whleh have placed you In the front ranks of our class. “.I horse is valuable only irhrn broke—hoir different xcith a man.''MKKWIX CI.1FFOH1) HAII.KV. B.S.C.K. “Kid,” “Dammit” Colili, Georgia Demos thru inn; Engineering Society Sine ;m«l Tangent; Cracker Staff, 21. '22. "Kl«!" Malloy, better known to bln friends as "M. ..■• came to us four years ago from the Third District A. and M. School of Amerleus. Not being old enough to Join that memorahlo "gang" of S. A. T. boys. lu decided to become a disciple of "l.lttte" Charlie. Though quiet and unassuming, he Is a man of great possibilities, and, outside of several visits to the Dean, the military officials and Ids professor's offices. "M. (V has enjoyed a very successful and progressive college career, lie has derived great pleasure and spent most of Ills pastime In constant visits to St. .Mary's and to "Caspers.'' One of his noblest characteristics and greatests assets is his loyalty to his friends. Indeed, a truer friend hath no man. We understand he is going to India, or South America, u] on graduation, to practice Ids profession. Our best wishes go with him for wonderful success and happiness in life. '■ nee you thouyht of the yood that could liner been lone hail you not put off e tor tiny till to-nlorrolr.', iwrr, TNKonoHK dakiiktt. a.h.s.s. «], Tn Commerce, Georgia Demostlieninn Sophomore Declamation "I . T.” Is one of those steady, quiet, unassuming fellows who can be depended upon on all occasions. He doesn’t shout his abilities or acclaim his friendships on the street corners, but he can always l.e counted on as a lined worker, a producer of the goods, and a loyal friend, lie came to Georg'a five years ago from Commerce High, not a stranger, for Commerce Is our next door neighbor and 1ms sent us many good men. Although his college course was Interrupted by two years' absence, he accomplished the hard task of finishing in three years. We understand that he Is going to tench, and also take up the study of law. The best of luck go you. "I . T.." In your preceptorial and forensic undertakings. Remember, too, that you are gifted with that pleasing personality that girls cannot withstand. We know Cupid lifts great things in store for you. And when the question of a college arises. "P. T.." you will not forget your Alma .Milter to whom you have been so loyal. "Experience is a yreot I' nirereit y xcllich off ere o variety of courere.” G X 4 FRANCIS MARO BIRD. A.II. “Ilimii" Bowtloti, Georgia Dcmosllicniiin; Sigmn Chi Senate: Alternate Junior Orator; Glee Chib; Spanish Chib. When "Uuster" came lo tlu University four years ago. he looked like a small chap to lie on -tering college. I'.ut the old saying Roes that gold Is tied up in the smallest packages. "Buster" always holds a strong hand with the weaker sex ami If he run decide which one. we arc afraid that he will enter a broader Held than a college course. "Fluster” waited until this year to go out for the (ilee Club, hut made It with ease. When he went he said that he wanted Caruso to lie out of his way before he tried out his nrt as a singer. "Poster" Is a very likeable fellow and has made many friends since entering college. He stays to Ibc end on anything that he attempts to do. and we know that this will he one of his characteristics when he gets out Into the world for himself. I,uck to you. "Buster.” "Jfo.y our lire hr untainted b;t thin a frirolou anil ruh ar. hut t ire eujoifiuent in iclial it noblest and best." JOE1. CONYF.RS BENNETT, B.S.A. “0on vims' Atlanta, Georgia Drinostheninn; Kappa Sigma Freshman Club; .Mandolin Club, 21. ‘22; l an-llcllenie Council. 21; 22; Senate. One of Atlanta’s social leaders, and he has represented her well, lie Is not only a good leader and a good student, hut also a good fellow. "Conyers” Is the type of man that everybody likes, lie came to us with a silent smile and an ambition. and In leaves us as a man upon whose shoulders any responsibility could rest, and a man of whom our state shall some day he proud. While with us he has made many friends, both male and female. We hate to see you leave. "Conyers," because you have won a place in our hearts that will be hard for another to till. “Conyers" has featured the social festivities. He can he seen al most any afternoon practicing some new step to show the visitors for the next big week-end. May you live long and happily and never grow too old to enjoy the return to a Georgia Commencement. “Some take all but hare none." EOTr Tt SAMl’KL MKAN'S BONKY, B.S.C. “Km Bonk” Columbia, South Carolina l hi Kappa; Sigmn Alpha Kpsilon Freshman Basketball Team; Freshman Baseball Team, ‘21; Varsity Football Team, ‘22; “(I" Chib; Senate Club; One Club; Varsity Basketball Team; Varsiety Baseball Team. 22; Gridiron Club; Delta Sigma Pi. Honey, a native of the ralnietto state, came to us from the Citadel, and after completing two years' work, be is claimed by Georgia as one of her sons. His popularity is due to his many qualities.—his unassuming manners, ready smile, his quick wit. all contributing. As an all-round athlete there are few men who excel Sam. As to his football ability, he Is a fast man. a vicious tackier, a heady player, where true worth Is recognized by all. On the basketball court, he is a fast dribbler, ami a quirk thinker, who knows every phase of the game. Honey, never seeking glory, has achieved it—his distinction lying In his unique success. for he has lived clean, made a multitude of friends and is always ready to serve one. These qualities of genuine success, so forcibly demon-started in school, assure him of a brilliant future. “U’lwt't irorth floiny nt nil is irorlh tlniny icfill.’’ JKSSE BitKNAKI) BOOKHAKDT, B.S.A. “Jack” Powder Springs. Georgia Agricultural Club. Second Lieutenant M. 'I . C. •T. B. Is probably the youngest member of the class, but It has been said that, "Out of the mouths of babies comcth forth wisdom.” and we find it that way with him. He has wisdom far beyond his years. Since coming among us. "Jack" has made many fast friends. The highest hope one can make for his future Is that he may be as successful hereafter in the making of friends, as he has been In the past. He has become a Vamp in his stay at Georgia, und bids fair to be a regular "Devil" when he gets back to J’owder Springs. It Is said that he specialized in Ag. Engineering so that he could lay off the streets of his home town on the contour system. His knowledge of Engineering should lit him to lie a good road foreman back in Cobb County. Jesse, you have endeared yourself to the hearts of the students. We are sorry to see you leave. Good luck to you. ‘• ’x noI irho you are. but rrhnl you do, Unit countx." G MACK K, '»KH nIt. .VI), BAA. '•1 I'lVJK I (1 lisvill?, (;,virKi„ Drinoxthrninil; . Krir„lt„rnl Club Saddle nml Sirloin »». . of Saddle him I Sirloi! ci„i ‘ J ,a c,a; rr™™ur rr Club. n ( ,Ml ; ..ml Com,ms in™ J'.n’ "thT Pnlx r ‘!ClilUr r‘«»- ou H .eVr;.xiyc fy standing as „ IcholLr is ,V ib A 1? "7 f'M'KHi, no Ik lieKinnliiK to iret n Ht r J,- i-,.,! .however. as (s Indicated by his nmnorotis « -cursions out unionR Hit- fo-eds behove that r..m!I.ff'i v v,r ,",re 'v‘»ul l rob him entirely ,.f the it put at Ion which he has luillt up. Hut then ;« hbln»«r“n co,[V«rV°.l,,°r "f 1 - ° lo‘ him have his tuin. .'Jack Is scheduled to become a professor. and If he docs, wo believe that ho will make h success In his life work. ”A nn'TcIrtlf r i'jt better than irenfmm of tear.'’ JOHN rilANKI.IN Bit ANN KN. Jll.. B.S.A. "Jolt x" .Sijrnui Chi; Dcinostliciiiiui; Ajrriciiltiirnl Cltib. Secretary ami President of A rfe'iltuml Club; Associate 'l-Ulltor Agricultural Quarterly: Clmir-niait A rietdtural Debntin : Council: Stock Judjf-intj Team; Sophomore Dccla:iiii r; Cotton ■Selustl Debate: Intrrrollejriate Debate. "JO. i?l; Business Manager PaNIM»ka; Afflion Club; Gridiron Club. Half Pass no further until you have read of the noble exploits of this knlffltt from the pla • Tn"r I." hi, unl.i-.lloU. •n-l.l .hi- vt i i'i'Ii'K ■In'1 nn,li 'h' j ° «, XT aS ho lift, hei omc “"O ' ni«,cerl.il olo- swayed the icrent success of bis rolled ,lieuce! John and otherwise, and w ;!?edlc.n for hbn even greater successes In after m„ hnrr ,» f‘.lhl «' bore to knoxc.” : k f) . I V •'IS G B THOMAS JACKSON BRIGHTURI.I.. B.S.C. “Tom-Mrtxcvs, Georgia I’lii Kappa; Chi Phi Economics Society, Junior Cabinet, Bneenneers; Senior Hound Table; Alpha Kappa Psi; Student Assistant, Beta Gamma Sigma. "Tom" entered the University in the winter of 1911 . Since then he has been among us almost continually, except for time spent In short excursions hack to the "home tires" at Maxeys. Because of his many "Imll-fellow-wcll-mct" qualities, Tom has made numerous friends In divers University c'reles. As to his love affairs, well, they have been rather Ifm'ted. (Limited to Georgia). Besides these convivial tendencies. "Tom" has applied a good deal of his time to his work and his suceess In Academic circles is evidenced by the long 1‘st of scholastic honors which are his. These successes and the fact that he has always stood for what Is r'ght and worth while in college life prediet a brilliant future for him. The best wishes of his many sincere friends go with him now ns we say "Bon voyage, ‘Tom’." “S iftik only ichrn i on knmc irhrreof you speak." ■ BENJAMIN JAMES BROACH. B-S. “Bennie” Cnrlton, Georgia Dciunsthcnian; Sigma Chi "Ben" finished here in the short (Into of three years. He Is one of the most conscientious workers in the University. If "Ben" tells you that lie Is going to do anything you can count on it to the limit. "Ben" first started out In Washington arul Lee University. But he soon found out his mistake and came to Georgia. "Ben" Is rather timid when It comes to telling you where he lives, he may and will tell you he gets his mall from one town and lives In the other. But if all of the representatives of Point Peter are like "Ben.” then we are satisfied that the town Is all right. "Ben" went out for track this year and the hopes of the captain and coach rose very much. They thought that they had anotlter Paddock. He always makes a hit with the Indies and that Is about his only fault. "Ben" will make good, wo know. Here's to you. “Lift it Ion thorl In hr comi lrtr, Ihrrrfnrr. makfl yood your days of youth.’’ Sfe m 1  GEORGE MARION BROADHl'RST. B.S.C. “Ciiaxcki.i.o ’ ' .1 tvsii|), Georgia Dcnmstliciiian; Economics Society Delta Sicilia l i; President, Economics Society. ••Chancellor" Is one of the old stand-bys of the Commerce Department, who t»y zealous application to Ids studies and his profession has developed Into an excellent business man. He has won and is still winning "his spurs” in bis own line of endeavor and bits equally well won a warm place In the hearts of those who know him. And ton. we will add here that he has seemingly won more than a warm {dace In the hearts of some of the Co-eds. one in particular: but we do not marvel at this at all. for how could it be otherwise when one possesses such a captivating smile and such a winning personality? "Chancellor" hits an excellent habit of paddling his own cuno«- and leaving the other man to paddle his. and as long as this Is his practical philosophy of life, we can augur for him only happiness, peace and success. ■• you icool to eell more tjoatl.t, leant more rea-90HM xchy jieo tlc rhoultt hut I lie lit." MARION JACK BRODNAX. B.S.C. “Rroai“ Carrollton, Georgia I’lii Kappa; Delta Tail Della Buccaneers; Scabbard and Elude; Captain and Personnel Adjutant; General Staff, It. 0. T. C.: I’an-Ilcllcnic Council; Economics Club; Truck Team; Itiflc Team. He followed his older brother to school one day tbill’s why lie's come to Georgia. Seriously, be came In the autumn of I9IS l enlist under the colors of the S. A. T. C. Twice he fought by our side In the battles of Ducas Hill, hut we could not keep him there for they knighted him with the shevrons of a sergeant and from that day to this he's walked an easy road. Pair and tall, a typo of the true Anglo-Saxon, lie towers over the heads of most of us and Is renowned for his aml-nldeness with the Indies. Some say he desperately loves a maiden, hut wo are skeptical on that iK lnt. However, tills we know he receives an average of six and two-flfths special deliveries per diem. Does that sound like love? Marlon has many times more friends than he Is Inches tall. He Is quite a few Inches tall. All of these friends wish for him the success and happiness which his earnestness and Industry deserves. "To know him Is to love him." ‘‘Defeat i only far thnee i rltO acre ft! it."  1!; £fa§l iiMii'iiJiHinr th ii?rr DAVID WII.l.IAM BHOOKS, B.S.A. ‘Ml MM IB Itovston, Georgia Demo.sthenian; Agricultural Club Alpha Zi-tit; Forestry Club basketball IV««n; Sophomore anil Junior Championship Basketball Teams; Horticultural Society; Georgia Naturalists; Secretary of the Agricultural Club. Young men! Will you kindly ccage firing n nm-ment while I tell you of •Jimmie Brooks, the notorious pedagogue from Koyston? lie onto Wl Georgia In I lie fall of IS and became a member of the famous lighting endel corps. -Jimmie a mea of college In Ills freahman year was tlmt It was a place of rest and not of study. Although he made fair grades that year they were low enough to cause him trouble trying to raise them during his second and third sessions. lie finished his degree requirements last summer and has spent his fourth vear leaching ami taking some graduate work, lie has been tin excellent student ami should he go Into the teaching profession, his experience here would Insure him success. However, wo think he will go hack to Koyston and oj en a grocery, for which work he Is admirably fitted. So long. "Jimmie.” luck to you! '• Work not for yourself but ultrays strive on-xmril that you may be able to pull another up." 01 11.FOB I) McOHFP. CANNON, B.S. “lU,noi.i itM Dalton, Georgia Demosthcnian; Kappa Sigma Buccaneer; Band. 19, 20, 21; L Alliance Franca isc. "Kudolph Va sell no” Cannon. Ill, halls from tho mountains of far North Georgia, where Ihev use possums for watch dogs nn«l owls for chickens, since entering the University some three vears ago Guilford has divided his lime Into three equal parts books, a motor cycle, ami a girl. Ho has been fairly successful In the first two lines of ac-UHtlcs. hut the result of the third is yet to be £o‘ur J ° n gentleman of poise and grace. Is i. . . an u have no doubt that he will bring k'be Ir’wn hi ani ‘■ujture to the sturdy yeomanrv of the township of Dalton. We wit also, that he will of "oi,r"’ am',nK ,hc Good luck to you. Guilford. May vou live long love well, and battle Father Time Into a ripe SIS fellor” t0° t0° i,ny bmt n j°n ifood f jaMTI G IIOMKH CKHAI.I) CAKKKKKK. A.H. •Max ." Commerce, Georgia l lii Ka| j)a; Sigma Alpha Kpsilon Freshman Club; Vice-President Math Club; Spanish C'lnt ; Senate Club. 1 »1 1 you ever meet a happy-go-lucky chap that Just winks his eye. and laughs at the worst as well as the host? Well, that's ".Inzz" all over. Ymt can search the seven seas for a man with such a winning chuckle and not lind him. You've simply got to feel at home around him. No one who ever met •'.laz ." t’arreker will ever lorgot him. Those who know him love him. and those who are fortunate enough to he among his friends hear witness that he wove his way into their lives and became permanently n part of their patterns. "Jazz” Is one of the men whom everybody likes without knowing just why. We have decided that It Is no single ‘luallty. hnt the entire wealth of his lovable and striking ixTsonallty that draws us to him. "Jazz" is more than square with all men. and we will carry to our graves the cherished memory of his friendship. "Life hax ilx hill. , its vallei x, i(x n ). , it. tloxcnx. I'm taking it ax it come , rrxrrrini kick. for mif- xelfr mUC.GS CAKSON. JK.t ll.S.C. “Kit’ Tifton, Georgia Keonomies Society; Kappa Alpha Senate Club; Tlialiniis; Delta Sigma I'i. What manner of man is this, who turnetli troubles aside and coiitinueth along his way. as merrily as ever before? Gentlemen, he Is the embodiment of speed as that quality applies to the clmler path and affairs of the heart, over two years ago when ur subject llrst whizzed into Athens the girls emitted piercing screams and jumped from pillar to post in high glee. "Here." they said. "Is our ideal." Bring forth the royal diadem, sister designers. and he shall have even Sunday night closed dates. My word, the tad hath a gullible np| ear-anee. what? Briggs fooled them, and today picks nonchalantly his favored from the ranks of the "frails.” Our hero is a speculative sort of chap, and stands right jealously behind his conviction with the oltl green. The last time this man picked a loser in an athletic event, college weeklies were carrying liquor adds. If. within ten years the party tinder consideration does not control the destinies of an entire mm in unity by a mere wave of the hand, then we will cut our shoes Into small fragments, oat them, and digest them thoroughly. .Success, you know, will seek out a man of his Ingenuity ami magnetic personality. '• 'Tie ic’ixr to think irhat if on x ieak, ratlin• than at all time. x icak rchat if on think.”r 4 O’NKAI. WASHINGTON CHANDI.KK. H.S.C. “Wasiiinoton” Bishop, Georgia Phi Kappa; I'i Kappa 1 1 1 Freshman Club; S »pb uuorc Debate; Thalian ; Della S gum I’i; Cliaiiipioii Debate. "Washington" entered tin University three years ago, being one of the boys able to accomplish "4 in 3.” During his sojourn with us he has made quite a re«ord for himself as a student ami also as an all round college man. lie is possessed of a genial, pleasing personality which has won for him many friends. " ). V." is said to be a member of the famous woman haters club, but we notice he Is always first to meet the postman and get the little pink missive. II.- has been an active student in the Commerce Department, having taken a very active part in getting a chapter of Delta Sigma I’i established at the University. At present he con-lines his ups and downs to IXmgherty Street. Ilow-•evor. we predict that some day lie will ride the ups ami downs of Wall Street. Host wishes. ••(). W.” We know you will make your up exceed your downs, and that you will do your Alma Mater honor. •■To Krill In do is half I lit- deed." VIUGII. CAKI.lSI.rc CHILDS. II.S.A. ••v. c." Macon. Georgia Demostlicninn; Agricultural Club Alpha Zeta; Aghon Club; Student Council; grieiiltiirnl Sophomore Scholarship. "V. came to Georgia in 1910 from the City of .Macon, lie sja-nt one year in diligent study and then left college to answer the call of his country. After two years' service overseas ho returned to the University In 101!» to complete bis education. Since then he has shown by conscientious, faithful, ami untiring effort that his ambition runs high in the Agricultural world. During his sojourn he has had a wide and varied career. Having learned the fun lamentals of stenography in high school. h -has made quite extensive use of It In college. In fact, he has made quite an impression u| on Dr. Pain as to his ability as an economist. Hut Farm Management is not the only tiling in which "V. C." Is interested, lie Is quite a Indies’ man. He bids fair to graduate cum laude. Here’s to you. "V. ." for you have all tin attributes of a true gentleman, an excellent scholar, and an admirable companion. " l nmcledi e ami rirlne art embncnienls ( renter limn nobleness nnd riches.'' nr GfcNEKAC UNIVERSITY Of-' GEORGIA tiiffilAG CHRISTOPHER THORNWKLI. CONYERS B.S.A. "Skip Cartersvillc, Georgia Demosthenian; Kappa Sigma Freshman Club; Track Team, ’19; Football Squad, Tf). ’20; Tlialiaiis; President Thalia ns, ’21, ’22; Mandolin Club, 1 1; Glee Club, '20, ’21, 22; Assistant Leader Glee Club. ‘22; "The Georgia Four’’; Lieutenant Cavalry, 21; Captain Cavalry, Members of the Conyers family have been at the University for the past century, hut few. If any, have left the enviable record that "C. T.” has. "C. T.” Is in every sense of the word a young collegian. He Is known far anil wide, not only for his singing ability but as a ladles' man. “C. T.” knows more girls and has more dates than any other fellow in school, but this doesn't keep him from being rather studious. You can readily sec from the honors which "O. T." has. that he has made for himself a name long to be remembered. ” . T." grew tired of (Seorgia and decided to try George Washington for a year, but he grew still more tired of George Washington during his sojourn there, and the following September found him again mingling with his many friends back on the campus. To know him Is to like him. May success be yours. Christopher Thorn well! “The hum Hint hath no music in his soul is fit for treason, strntei y urul spoils" HAROLD MORRIS COOK, A.B. "I’hoctok” Blythe, Georgia Demosthenian F.conomics Society; Agricultural Club; V. M. C. A. Cabinet; Spanish Club; L’Allinnce Fran- on isc. Harold, besides being a good all round student. Is a veritable sponge of history. Anything that pertains to the records of world affairs or the works of men Is his special Held. He has a faculty for historical absorption, and the three years that he has spent here have developed him remarkably In the knowledge of the history of the United States and of Kurope. A good companion! You could not llnd a better were you to search for days. Converse! If he has a fault, it Is that he neglects his work for conversation. He is a worker, with no regard for Harold Cook, but with a determination to master. He Is ambitious to acquire a doctorate and teach history to the youth of America; and If he shows the spirit as a graduate that he has exhibited here, he will succeed In a big way. “Life is a cotnetli to those trho think; a tragedy to those irho feel." Gl'Y HA HU IS COO I K It. B.S.C.K. "Gi'y" Columbus, Georgia Kngiurering Club Student CoiilH'il; S lie and Tangent "Guy" Is one of the original Columbus Guards of the class of ’22. He lias not played such an Important part m the political broil ns some of his fellow-townsmen, but nevertheless, In his quiet way he has made himself felt in his department In the Student Body. He has been a faithful follower of "Little Charlie " and from all reports should brim; honor to his profession. He ranks well up In his class and has been honored with membership in the Sine and Tangent, the honorary club among the engineers. His real standing with his associates wax clearly established last spring when they asked him to be their representative on the Student Council. This trust he has faithfully fulfilled to the satisfaction of all parties concerned. Ve know that it will rend his heart to part with "Little” Hailey, so we offer the suggestion that they go into business together. We believe that Guy will rolled cerdit on his Alma Mater, and we believe that be will succeed. “ W jtixlirr l»t tlonr in tvrry inxtanrfi.'’ Kl.ISHA CAKSON COX. B.S.C. "Shorty’ Athens, Georgia Dcmostlieninn; Keonomic Society Krcshniun Club; Class Basketball Champions, "20. 21; Major in the Cadet Corps; Scabbard and Blade. "Shorty” Is our military genius, having risen to the rank of Major, which position he holds down remarkably well. He says one doesn’t have to be a "great big" man to have some knowledge of military matters for after all. "wasn’t Naiwleon of small stature"? Many are the times that we have heard his voice ring out on the drill field. "Where is my d—d Adjutant?” And we knew lie meant business, meant for every man in his battalion to lie always where he was supposed to be. "Shorty's” entire disposition may well be summed up In his philosophy of life. "Listen much, hut talk- little," which, together with his other admirable qualities, makes him a great favorite among the students. Me Is not a mere “babbler" of Idle words, but when he talks he speaks volumes, showing that his Is a rare instunce of a man’s choosing a philosophy which applies to himself. “Linttn much, hut talk little.” JOHN THOMAS COX. .IK., B.S.A. MJ. T.” Macon, Georgia Dcinostlicnian; Agricultural Club Saddle and Sirloin; Georgia Naturalist; Square and Compass; Student Volunteer Band; Cosmo-politau Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; American Legion; Freshman Club; President Saddle and Sirloin Club; Vice-President Y," 20; Secretary-Treasurer Student Volunteer Baiui; Secretary -Treasurer Cosmopolitan Club; Stock Judging Team,'21; Hereford Medal at Southeastern Pair, 21. ".I. T." hulls from ttie ( lty of Macon. After lie had been graduated from [.aider High School he yearned for higher education, and consequently entered the Vnlverslly. He entered as an humbh-Freshman and has risen to the rank of a dignified Senior. ".I. T." has taken an active part In tin-work of the Y. M. . A. and Is a leading member of the Student Volunteer Band. The latter organization has led him to take several Important conference trips over the state, particularly to J. N. I. C. ".I. T." Is a hard worker and makes progress In any line he undertakes. Ills greatest happiness Is working for the welfare of others. Luck to you. ".I. T." May you And happiness In a life full of good deeds. “To be ini beet self for (be general ijood; to find happiness throui h sacrifice—in; life's philos-ofill it." AKTHt'K BKNMAMIN (TI.BKItTSON. ILS. “CfH Litlionia, Georgia Deniostlleuian. Junior Oration; Impromptu Debate; Champion Debate; I.‘Alliance Franeaise; Spanish Club; V. M. C. A. Cabinet; Student Instructor in Psychology; Chaplain Senior Class; Intercollegiate Debate; Dcinostlicnian Key. This auburn lopped young gentleman came to the Cnlversliy three years ago with a trunk and a determination to carry away a store of knowledge from the Alina Mater of Little Alex and Henry Grady. The ups and downs and the outs and Ins that he laid In his push to make his way here make the Struggle seem like a dull of the sons of the Four Hundred. “Cub" has almost literally lifted himself by Ills bool straps. Not until Ids last year In college has he had the time to show what he could do In the life of the Cnlversliy. Debating and public speaking may not he his forts, hut he has made his mark in both by passing the early morning hours In penetrative study and arduous practice. Whether It he law or the teaching profession. he will be satisfied with the host. “The xcorld is calling for real sjiorls -.1 nsirer with action."y WILLIAM FRANK DAN I LI., A. B. “Doc” Thomnston, Georgia I’lii Kappa; Chi I’si Freshman Chib. '19; Buccaneer; Associate Art Kriitur, Cracker. ’21; Lditor Humorous Issues of the Cracker, 22; Gridiron Club; Pan-Hellenic Council. '22; Sphinx. "Doe" Daniel comes in for Ills share of (lie discussion at this lime. We want to say right here that the subject is really worth discussing. Frank has been here for four years. Being of a retiring nature he was not known very welt during Ills freshman and sophomore years. However, when the Georgia Cracker tlrst made its appearance lie did some excellent work in this notable publication which pushed him to the front among his fellow students. Frank Is a modest fellow, preferring to tlo Ids best and allow the other fellow to tell the world about it. He never has taken any part In the activities of college life outside of the regular line of duty. He is really appreciated by those that know him best because of his sterling qualities of manliness. Wherever his future life may be spent, we know that the section In which lie settles will lie the better for bis being there. Good luck, Frank! “Work is a retard; for tno.it evils." FRANCIS CLKMKNTS DART. A.B. “Ct'E Bam.” Douglas, Georgia Phi Kappa; Delta Thu Delta Member Freshman Club. ’19; Sophomore Debater. '20; Soplnnnore Declaimer, ’20; McihIkt .Junior Cabinet; Member I.'Alliance Frnnealsr; Buccaneer. Now. fellows, we have with us today a man of many titles and more ncomplishmcnls. (’all him "Cue Ball,” "Pops” or what you may, he came to Georgia in the Irresponsible hours of youth, and. having grown up with the country, he now hies himself back to the wlregrass plains of Douglas, where he must eventually develop into a Judicial luminary. He will argue anything provided lie can ilnd someone to argue with him. He Is a good cook, a line housekeeper, a gifted orator, a close student, a woman hater, and a prince of a fellow. Indies, it will pay you to become acquainted with Hie smiling gentleman —lie'll make you a mighty line wife. Wherever he displays the smile, he wins a friend. And "Pop" always smiles. When he frowns all you have to say Is. "S'matter. ‘Pop'? We're for you. ‘Pop.’ You're made of regular stuff and you're going to arrive big.” ‘‘Xatnre ever yields reward to him icho seeks, ami loves her best.” mw '-?s -: ’[ y yin vs. ? 5x0)-- • - - vo -. y_p =S2 yfa ROBF.KT LKB DASF1KK. B.S.C. “Hob' Valdosta, Georgia I’lii Kappa; Sigma Alpha Epsilon Freshman Club; Economics Society; Hand, ’20, '21; Buccaneer Club; Assistant Manager Glee Club, '21; Business Manager Glee ami Mandolin Club, '22. One of the outstanding incidents of a trip soutli on the "Florida Special" is to see the night capped heads of sunn- of the best Valdostan families peering out ms the "ears" go rushing through tile birthplace of Kobort l.ee ! asher. I Hiring Ids sojourn at the University. "Hob" lias proved himself u true friend and a loyal student. Never making a fuss or pushing himself forward he lias gone steadily on. doing Ids duties and taking Ids honors as they came. Ills regal personality has won 1dm many stanch friends and admirers. We all cling to that ende of friendship that regards a friend as a brother, and this nature Is exemplified in "Bob.” Ills ability to grasp the situation and probe unerringly to the heart of things, coupled with Ids steady purpose and his capacity for work, answers Ids success In whatever lie may enter, and It is success tlmt he merits. ‘•117Kit I ospired to be nntl ten nut, comfortt me." AIAW BETHEL DAVIS, D.V.M. “LlTTI.lt Ql'ACg’’ Donalsonvillc, Georgia Dcmosthcn'an; Agricultural Club Square and Compass Club; Veterinary Club; Killc Team. 'If), 20. Four years ago tills swamp mullet from the southwestern corner of tills state came to Georgia along with others from adjoining counties. Davis lias been a quiet sort of fellow since becoming a student at this Institution. He lias not asked for any politieal honors, and In the Veterinary College they do not recognl .e such an animal as scholarship. Exposing himself to such a difficult course ns that of Veterinary Medicine, he has naturally Imd to betake himself more to his studies than would have been tlie case had he been taking a different line of work. Hut In spile of all the boning "l.lttle Quack" is quite well known. Especially Is this true over In New College since the occupants of this venerable edifice were much angered at their being made a target when "Little Quack" takes Ids weekly Sunday afternoon target practice. We believe that Davis will make a good Veterinarian and will do much to help put the State of Georgia on the map as the producer of live-11 n JAKIIKTT I.A FAYETTE DAVIS. .IK.. H.S.C. “Fatk” I'lii Kappa; Alpha Thu Omcgn Secretary-Treasurer Tim Sigma. 20; President Senate Club, ’2 2; Manager Athletic Team, '2 2; Member of the (]’’ Club; Delta Sigma Pi. In September. 1919. a quiet spoken youth Jumped off of a Central of Georgia freight train and made a bee-line for Mr. Tom Held's registration booth. Strangely enough, the boy "quiet-spoke" himself Into becoming a student of our University of Georg la, and now we find him quiet speaking Ids way away from here with a college degree. Oh. Lord Hull, what vagaries are committed In thy name! In his career of quiet-speaking we have found him identified in every phase of college activity. His social proclivities have gained for him the presidency of that social hand, the Senate, and his success at quiet-speaking out in tin great social Held, or parlors, has made him the uncrowned king of any number of feminine hearts. In defiance of any attempt to brain us for using such a harried term, we are knighting him with the classification "a induce of a fellow." Just as long as true ability Is recognized, ami figures continue not to lie. our man Davis will go along the road of success. The best of luck to a straightforward man’s man! "It ix easier o be icise or others thou ourselves.” “Uski.f.ss” Statcslmro. Georgia Dcmosthcnian; Phi Beta Kappa Freshman Debater; Sophomore Debater; Senior Itound Table; Member Student Council; Captain and Regimental Intelligence Officer Cadet Corps; President Deniosthenian; Associate Editor Paxis r a ; Dcmosthcnian Key. Here we are considering the record of "Useless" as some of his more intimate friends speak of him behind his buck. Denmark is a Jack of all trades, and. to hear out this assertion, we need only point out Ids record In the various college activities. He lias excelled in scholarship, debating. military activities, and last, but not -least, in politics. It is probably in the last mentioned phase that he has had the most narrow escapes, winning one election by the margin of one vote while the second resulted In a Me which was broken in Ids favor. Denmark has .played the game fair and square, and his record In Mils In-sltuntlon stands without blemish. We slate without hesitancy that, as an alumnus, he will reflect credit upon Ids Alma Mater, because he has the qualities which make for success. "J.et me lire in a house by the s'ule of the road oml be a friend to man.''znr xmrzxxr t Kl.I.IS IIOWAHI) DIXON, A.B. “A +’ 1 1)1 Kappa Wrens, Georgia Freslmian Impromptu Debate; Freshman Debate; Sophomore Declamation; Impromptu Debate; Hamilton McWhorter Prize; Senior Itoninl Table; Debating C'ouneil; Phi Kappa Council; President Phi Kappa; Winner Rssnv on "Great Seal of Georgia”; Phi Beta Kappa; Intercollegiate Debate. Bills Dixon, excellent student, writer of winning essays, debater, and a believer In simple honesty. The reinstation this young gentleman has made during his three years In the University Is one that a man may well aspire to acquire. How has la done It? By unaffected hard work, with a search for his limitations and Isis faults. Mu had is good prop record behind him. but past per-f or ma sices played no great imrt in his work here. He hiss labored and labored hard. He has been a sincere follower of absolute truth to the beat that she t’realor breathed into his soul. He is a hussian being with a realization that men are books, ns well as pages hound iss cloth or In leather. And he will snake good whether his work Is known beyond his own door or his name a household word oss five continents. ".7m miner of common en e is xvorth a pound of honk Irttrninti." HKNKY DO It MAN "Pi»:ks ont” Americas. Georgia Dcmnsthchinn President, V. M. A.; Vice-President, Demos-thenian; Spanish Club; Cosmopolitan Club; Fortnightly Club; Kditor-in-Cbicf, Hed and Black; Gridiron. Who Is it that doesn't like llenry? He is a hard worker, a good student, writer, soldier, leader, lover, and a gentleman of the very highest typo. He has a splendid personality. Is a good mixer, a fine fellow, ansi a trite friend. He served his eonntry In Prance frotn ISIS-1919. and then came hack to the University. Mere he has not only worked his way through college hut he has fltslshed his course In three years. He has taken a lending part In the religious and social activities both on the campus and In the city. Power to you. Henry. The world steeds such men as you. May your life be a blessing to humanity. “. mon ron do o lot of (tood if he does not core Xi'ho i rte the credit for it; zcork ond he patient.'’ f G DKSSIK BHOWN DUltDRX. B.S.A. “Smith” Grnyinont, Georgia Dr most lirniun; Delta Tau Delta Agricultural Clul . "Smith" arrived at Georgia In eventful 191S. along with a host of his fellows, hud no Illusions us to duty--down-rlghl landlubbers from every jungle of the State Ills was Kmunuel—they sought enlistment in the saltiest branch of the S. Navy, the S. A. T. Naval unit. He has not yet seen the sett. An ex-salt seldom makes a Rood land lublier. hut ••Smith.” after four years of devoted worship at the feet of his goddess, the modern science of Agriculture, goes Imck to the soil of Kmanuel to work his miracles in material form. And, brother. If he succeeds in his efforts to make two things grow where one grew before, his college life will not have been in vailn. "Dcssle" Is an adept In the art of cultivation—few men have cultivated more friends In college than he. for he numbers them by his acquaintances. Another angle of Ills cultivating tendencies explains his hobby—the cultivation of the ladles. "True happiness consists, not in a in till il title of frit-mix, bul in the irnrth and choice.'’ HOW IK VINSON DL'KDKN, B.S.A. “K. V.” (iraymonl. Georgia Dcmostlicninn; Agricultural Club; Delta Tail Delta Again, gentlemen, we have the name Durden: and with it the pursuit of agriculture and the geography of Oiaymont Is synonomously associated. Vet. "It. V.” differs from the rest of the Oray-montians In that lie's the llrst woman hater ever known to have hailed from their town. Ah. hut there'n lies a story and a tragedy—for Dan Cupid mixed his fickle arrows and did ”lt. V." a downright dirty trick. Too much In love to take his college career seriously the (Irst two years, the change into an anti-feminist could not work miracles either. For how can a man study when his heart is tilled with unrequited love? Hut in spite of Kate’s hard buffeting . "R. V." has forged ahead and made a record which bears testimony that Cupid can put a man down but never out. He is the only man at Georgia who has lived on every street and every campus during his stay. an l as he has numbered his habitations, so has lie multiplied Ids already large circles of friends. Luck to you. "It. V."—the art of agriculture never awaited u more promising evangel of newer and more prosperous seasons. “Mat I never speak except I hare something In sni irnrth while listening to.”tv A . WILMKK COLKMAN IH'KDF.N, H.S.A. “Goat" Graymont, Georgia Dcmosthcnian; Delta Tati Delta Agricultural Club; Freshman Club; Buccaneer. A would-Ik- agriculturist- -a man who has Ix-en training himself for four years to the end that he may don the overalls and chew the regulation straw of a farmer? Kike Mill Nye, he has. Somehow we can’t visualize him doing either of the above stunts. No. "Cleat." we'd picture you far better as a hanker or business man. Now, ladies, we wish to introduce a Mr. Farmer Man. who doesn’t drive a Fordson or chew Climax. He's a champion ladies man—look him over'. In love each week and out the next we’re wondering who the next victim will he. Few farmers can sip the social tea without making a noise like a grain harvester, hut. thank God. here's one who’s up to Hoyle. "Goat" is a peach of a good fellow, a hard student, in spile of his longing proclivities, ami has a veritable multitude of friends who wish him well In the future. There are few men who are as well known over the stale as "Goat" Durden. We think we'd capitalize this asset—now that the women vote—and enter politics, old shipmate! "Anti I Ira rued about xcomen from lirr.'" WALT Kit DAWSON Dl'KDKN, A. IL “ClH’HHY” Grnymont, Georgia Demos!hettian; Delta Thu Delta Freshman Club: Winner of Freshman Debate Medal; Winner of Sophomore Debate Medal; Sopltoinore Dcelalmer; Winner Junior Orator's Medal; Member of Student's Loan Fund Hoard. 'JO. '21; Intercollegiate Debater; Senate; Junior Cabinet; Senior Hound Table; Tlialiaus; Fan-1 lel-leuie ('ouneil; Secretary and President of Dc-mosthenian; L'AIHanee Fraucaisc; Spanish Club; Historian of Senior Class; Demostbeninn Key; Gridiron Chib; Sphinx; Phi Beta Kappa. Heboid the man! and then we would have you glance casually at the handsome list of honors be lias topped. Those help to hear out all rumors that lie Is a student among students and that his four years In College have been profitably spent. "Chubby" is following in the footsteps of a brother who left Just such an env'able record as lie is leaving, and we are inclined to believe that the scholarly brother has been out-distanced by his younger "Hud." Tile Fniversitv Is proud of you. "Chubby." and it should be. for you have acquitted yourself well In almost every branch of its activity. “llVre » not for xcomrn. trr men mi a lit lirt lifer oil .” 1 KO •T fa v J THOV HOWARDS, B.S.A. Champion. Georgia Dcmnsthrniaii; Agricultural Club Georgia Naturalist; Square and Compass; Alpha ' .eta; Junior Orator, 21; Cotton School Debate, '22; Vice-President Deinosthenian; First l.iculen-ant Cadet Corps, 21, ‘22; Scabbard and Blade; Agism. This ruddy faced gentleman. a student and an orator by nature; "Beau Brumme!" and ardent lover by adaptation, received his tirst breath of "Georgia" atmosphere In 1917. lie came Into our community from the 5th District A. M. School determined to IInd a better way of tilling the soil and to develop his natural ability as an orator. After four years of diligent application, his success has been so marked that we would unhesitatingly support him for the leglsature! However, we doubt If he would care to remain long in politics, for after he has successfully terminated his conquest at the Co-ed .Barn, we expect him to settle down and make some Xorth Georgia plantation a mighty good owner. His record Is an enviable one and I know we will hear from him In the future. "lie trim Hr fit ire ix a yaatl preacher." (.HOUCK IIKBSK KVANS. BAA. “C HICK Savannah, Georgia liti Kappa; Mplm Tau Omega. Assistant Manager Athletic Teams, 20, 21: Manager Athletic Teams. 21, 22. Back In 1918 before co-education became an established institution. George Iteene Evans blew into the Seaboard depot ready to undergo all the trials and tribulations that accompany a freshman's career at our dear I’nlverslty. A likely looking lad. was this Evans person. And until this day. as he grabs his degree, lie has retained the likely countenance. But withal he Is a confirmed mysoglnlst. George has fostered, at different times, as many hobbles as we have toes and blistered linger tips. One time cartoonist extraordinary. again a track man of short lived, though decided success, and lastly abl-de-camp to l.lonal Ktrongfort. the marvelous physique. In the man's face Is honor and loftiness of Ideals portrayed In a vividness that defies all description of tongue or pen. The world had best prepare to receive A genius, for determination to succeed In the vast outside Is here lacking not. George, we'll back any horse you ride. “ mailerx not if I icon the yame, tml il mol-terr t real hi hatr I ‘.con il. ’  DOC GKOHGK K.U’LKNKIt, ll.S.A. "I)oc” Itoyston, Georgia Agricultiirnl Club; S |ii»rc mul Compass Club; Secretary-Treasurer ami Vice-President of Agricultural Club. At Iasi we come to ilio financial genius of the University. "Doe” is an energetic young ?» fellow who knows the many wiles of the filthy medium of exchange in this noble la ml of prohibition and I. W. He has l oen very successful because the word ••fall'' was cut out of his vocabulary many moons ago. "Doc” deserves a lot of credit for his record since entering college; it is one that inspires admiration. He had the earmarks of a successful politician hut "Doc" would not let pleasure come before business and ns a result he did not enter the slimy iioliticnl arena. He 1ms budded out as something of a monsoon on the social slop bucket, however, and there are those of us who believe that this Is the real reason why he stayed out of politics because lie could not spare the time from his social campaigns. There Is little use to predict success for "Doc” because he has success by tin- handle and a down hill pull. "•Hull’ lout will if rriiin. mul erer he ran-cralnl.” KAI.PII LAMAR KITTS. IIS. “Haiti.i no" Atlanta. Georgia Demosthcuinn; Sigma Chi Scabbard and lUndc; ThnliatiS; Declamation Cup; Track Team. 30. '21; Captain Track Team. 22; Lieutenant Colonel Cadet Corps; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '21; Viee-President, '22; "(»" Club; Cosmopolitan Club; Leader Student Hand, 22; L'Alliance Prancaisc; Gridiron Club. Fills earned the sonorous soubriquet that has attached Itself to him In the University. Awkward and with no natural tendency toward the track, he has made an enviable record on the path through sheer determination and hard work. A multitude of duties devolving ujkmi him. he emerges from four years In college with a testimonial of faithful discharge of academic requirements. He Is a worker with a clear vision of the things worth while In life, lie Is planning to follow Ids father in the study of medicine, and then hie to the. mission field and a life of service. Orator, soldier, friend, and a gentleman on and off the track -that Is Ralph Fitts. "('are more for the terrier i ou tmr than fttr the dollar. you reap.” it JG Vr, njSC U 2r'Y. FRANK IIAItOI.I) FROST, IJ.S.C. “Jack” Clicntcr, West Virginia Demos tlx Iran; Economics Society Football Squad, s2 ; Basketball, ' 21; Baseball, '■Jl, ' 22; “O" Club; (I rid iron Club; Alpha Kappa Psl. Tlds Is one "Jack” Frost that we are always glad to meet. Ho came to (5eorg a In the spring of '20. and has been with us since that time. "Jack" drove up unheralded, without an advance notice of his greatness. Consequently, since he has shown the goods he Is truly appreciated by the entire student hotly. He has worked and worked hard for the glory of his Alma Mater and to him credit Is due for many of her victories on the diamond. "Jack" bus had no press agent to give him the publicity which his deeds really merit but he has made a name for himself In the memories of his fellow students which will live a good many years. He Is a quiet fellow and has not even a touch of conceit about his person. Everybody likes him and this is saying enough for any man. As you go out to fight the battles of life. "Jack." you have the best wishes of us all. "Jfy aim to help the xcorltl, on a trhole, loxcards a letter xcay of thinkiny and liriny ’ FRANCIS MARION GREEN, IJ.S.C. “Heim Ohpkn,” “F. M.” Augusta, Georgia Demostheninn; Economics Society Math Club; I,'Alliance Francaise; Jeffersonian; Lieutenant, ' 20. ‘ 21. Here Is a man who can pull the wool over the eves of the smartest I’rof. In fact, he Is reported to have quite a hootllck with Professor Jenkins of the Commerce l epartment. Judging from outward appearance he looks a great deal like an ordinary person, but take a look at his grades In some nine or ten subjects which he carries In one year and you see that If not extraordinary, certainly he Is not mediocre. How he accomplishes so much with so little work Is a source of wonder to his classmates. but If one should happen to go to his room in the wee hours of morning one would discover his secret, for he "hones” while others sleep. Frank enjoys college life and seems never to have a worry, nor need he worry about Ills future, for h's sterling work in his classes has marked him a man of rare ability. Dealers in high finance, here is a good partner for you. "lie brief, and to the paint, far Irerily is the sface of life." rv- t - - f ;  4 I.ITIIKK ALFKKI) GKIFF1N, BAA. “Grikk” Gibson, Georgia Demnsthrnian; Agricultural Club Alpha ' -eta; Twenty-Five Dollar Prize Given by Virginiu-Oarolinn Chemical Company for Kssny on “The Profitable Cse of Fertilizers with Staple Crops, ’ 1! . '20; Interclass Basketball Team. ’21. ••Griff" Is one of the quietest and most seclusive of all the members of the senior class, lie has never entered Into those college activities which tend to make one well-known. Put '•Griff" has been a hard worker and stands today as true a Georgia man as breathes. He has one of the best scholastic records of the senior class in Agriculture and as a proper and Just rewurd was made a member of Alpha eta. It Is a pleasure to know such men as ••Griff." because they are constant quantities and you can depend that they speak seldom but truthfully. We understand that he will teach for a while after completing his work here, and we know that wherever lie goes Georgia will have an alumnus that she will he proud to acknowledge ns her own. "l)o jclml you think is riyht reyordlexx nf what otherx think, anti you xcill irin the respect of them nil.” HI GH BKN.TAMIN Gl’KJ.KY, BAG. “Jim" I.ognnville. Georgia Deinoslhenian; Kconomies Society Although taking Commerce and hailing from 1-ognnvllle. the two greatest handicaps which could be placed on a Freshman entering this grand old Pnlverslty. ".lim" has shown himself "Fit to Fight,” and has surmounted these and other obstacles that have been thrown In his pathway and now finds himself ready to Ily away from the top rung of the ladder of collegiate attainment to make his way In the world of business. To those "gentle readers’" who do not understand the slgnl-tleance of the above used term of "I-oganville." I might add that this Is a microscopic town situated somewhere In the wilderness between Athens and Atlanta and famed far and wide for Its proximity to Rosebud, the old home town of "Professor” t’pshaw. Hugh’s friendly attitude and genial disposition have won for him countless friends and admirers, among whom any man In college would be proud to find his name. The business world holds a great future for this young genius of commerce, and when he does get started, look out. Wall Street. "Couraye is one of the y rent ext assurances of o xurcexxful life.” rrkdwaki) McLain gukk, USA'. “Kn’’ Macon, Georgia Phi Kappa; l»|ii Delta Theta Senate Club; The One Club; Varsity Itasket-ball. 21, 22; Delta Sigma 1 1; "I!" Club; Gridiron Club. K. Mel ain CJurr is the cognomen of the Apollo-like memher of the genus homo whose classic features are here repr sluced. With his name parte l in the middle, you failed to recognize the renowned • Btl." Since "Hil" Is known where e’er In- goes, one might think that he Is "sorta” eosnu»|K htan. hut since we have the dope. It Is only fair that we explain. His check comes from Macon and he propped at I .aider High. Our friend "Kd" is quite an athlete, and besides playing a good hand at bridge, he was for two years on the varsity basketball team, playing a forward. Humor says that basketball Is not the only thing he is forward In. and although he Is not exactly a woman-killer, all he doesn't kill, lie cripples. "I-M is a hard worker, shown by his graduation in three years. The best wishes of scores of friends go out with him in the struggle of life. •■ tin nil Ihnl may become a nnm: trim tine more i none.” JOSKPH HARRY HAI.PKRT, A.B. Moultrie, Georgia Phi Kappa; Phi Epsilon Pi Junior Cabinet. Harry llalhert. Sociology (lend, conversationalist, connoisseur of poetry! Harry has succeeded in running the gamut of the four year course in three, and during Ids stay In the I’nlverslty has established for himself a reputation for doing tilings in a clear cut fashion. One cannot mistake the diminutive yet business-like tlgure as It strolls hurriedly across the campus. He has clung close to I’eabody Hall, worked busily, talked fluently, and garnered choice bits of sentimental verse. His studies In Sociology have left him in a contemplative mood, and were lie not looking toward the medical profession for a career of service, lie might spend his time In exhorting the youth f (Jeorgla to prepare themselves for nobler lives. Harry has no marked peculiarities, except the ability to see far into the future of the realistic and idealistic world. He is an excellent student, an Idealist, a hard worker, exemplifying a type of manhood that our Alma Mater Is always proud to call her own. “’lie reork and U? ftrire In accoMplirli on end.”  G n ■ tn MARION I.OTIIROP HAXAHAN, IKS. Dotlinn, Alabama I’lii Kappa; Sigma Nil Sophomore Football Tram, 20. LrSn This young man is not a Georgia Cracker, hut hails from I lie State of Alabama. He entered the sacred products of the I’nlverslty three years ago. He has worked hard and as a result has succeeded In finishing the general science course In that time. "I»efty" Is a ijulel fellow and one that will not attract undue notice. Hut at the same time he Is a hard worker and slicks to Ids task until it Is creditably done. He 1ms not shirked the harder courses In order that Ids scholastic record may reach a dizzy height, but. on the other hand, has seemed to seek those courses, which, while difficult, would do him the greatest good. Hanalmn is conservative In his daily life, and wo have no doubt but that his is the wiser path. If the past Is any sort of a guide to the future, we have no fear for our friend and classmate. "Lefty” Hanalmn. " 'or 'chnl you heliere to he right, fight to the rrrg mil.'’ ARCIIIK DKNNIS HARKINS, R.S.A. “IIawkkvk" Wit Hut Ha. South Carolina Agricultural Club; Dnuosthenian Saddle and Sirloin Club; Stock Judging Team, ‘21. 22; Vice-President Saddle and Sirloin Club, "22. During the fall of '20, this splinter of humanity made his first appearance on the campus of this Institution. He Immediately became a disciple of the notorious Milton and longed to become as apt a student of the "hull' as his professor. Whether he lias attained this standard of perfeetlon Is difficult to decide, hut It may he said with all truthfulness that he has made great strides In the right direction. "Hawkeye" Is a good fellow, liked by nil that know him. He Is of a Jolly turn and always takes a Joke as well as he hands one out. That “Hawkeye” takes an interest In the work of his department Is evidenced by the fact that he made the Stock Judging team last fall and the part he plays in the Saddle and Sirloin Club. lie has made us a good student ami we believe that his future work will reflect credit upon Ills Alina Mater. “Gel trhnl r oti leant, irhal jyou can’t gel don'I xcan I.” 'mm r . i LUTHKR MARION HARMAN. B.S.A. “Luke” Carrollton, Georgia Agricultural Club; Saddle and Sirloin Club. Alpha ' .eta; Scabbard and Blade; Vice-President Junior Class, ‘20, 21; Secretary Saddle and Sirloin Club; First Lieutenant and djutunt Cadet Corps, 21, 22. Another one of the ( atroll County boys Is up for our consideration. And well may Carroll be proud of her son' "l.uke" has made a Kood all-round record while at the Cnlverslty. He has excelled In scholarship and military activities more, perhaps, than In any other lines. In scholarship Ills record placed him as a member of Alpha Zola. while his excellence In the Military Department caused his election to the Scabbard and Blade. He has been a Rood fellow and has made many friends. Another department In which "l.uke" excelled is that of fooling the women. At this kind of work he is an adept. However, we understand that he has not yet attached himself to any Kiri's apron strings, ■'l.uke” should make n name in after life If he keeps up the stride he has sot for himself In college. Shoot, ''l.uke." or (five up the gun! “To t r or not to hr.” RALPH WALDO HARRIS. B.S.A. “Rust” Wrens, Georgia Dcniostbcniiiii; Agricultural Club Business Manager Agricultural Quarterly; Agricultural Quarterly Staff, 20, 21. "Hunt" entered the Cnlverslty four years ago and from the first night until the last night of graduation he could In found in the apartments of Candler Hall. It seems as If "Runt" has become a fixture over In Candler Hall, and that they could hardly do without him when the "hull sessions" start on the steps of that sacred and honored building. "Hunt" Is a man of few words hut when ho speaks he has said something. He has a dis|K sjtion that everybody likes and numbers his friends by those who know him. The only thing that can be said against "Hunt" Is that It has been rumored that lie has nsuned with "Skinny" Rivers. But la has quieted this by emphatically denying the charge and offering a handsome reward for its Instigator. "Runt" Is not the largest man in the class physically, hut he makes up for that in the qualities that go to make up a practical student. J.uck to you. "Runt." We know that you will do well. “Firft, hr tore of yourrrlf, thru let nothiny (Ht-courayr you from your purpotr.”' y) DON A I,I) MADISON HASTINGS. B.S.A. "Dux' Demiiir, Georgia Deinostlieiiiiin; Sigma Clii Agrieuliunil Club; Georgia Naturalists; Georgia Horticnlturiil Club; Vice-President Student Coimeil; Assistant Manager Varsity Foot bn II, '20; Manager Varsity Football, 21; Championship Class Basketball Team. ’20. '21; Freshman Club; Bueeaneers; Agbon Club; Senior Hound Table; Alpha ' .eta. "Don" tins made an envlnt le record since entering the t'niversliy. That ho can he classed us one of those natural sharks 1h shown hy the list of honors under his name. Ho Is an industrious and conscientious worker, who always puts his whole heart in everything that he attempts to do. "Don" had tin- good fortune of making tin trip with tho football team to Harvard as manager last year. There Is no doubt as to his future, and we know when he goes back to Atlanta to help his father in the seed business, he will make an even greater success than he lias made In college. Georgia will be proud to list you us an alumnus and we know that you will ndd honor to her name. BOYD DAVID IIKXDKKSOX, A.B. Adairsvillc, Gcorg’n Demos! lien inii Here he is. the greatest of globe trotters since the crafty Odysseus, who "wandered far and wide and saw the towns of many men." And lie says ids rambling luts only begun and that ere many moons have come and gone, lie will have seen tiie towns of many more men. Be that as It may. "B. I).." we know from experience that you’re a good "pal of tile road" and number your friends by your acquaintances. so luck to you now and ever afterwards. But despite "B. D.’s” appreciation of "variety In scenery" be lias tarried long enough to get a College education and also has cultivated a great habit of reading, with the result that lie now stands on familiar terms with the world's greatest authors. So go after It. and, if you don't lind it in one place, do as you have In the past, seek it In another. Just remember that the best wishes of your great host of friends go with you in all your undertakings. J.et us hear from you. • neither hare nor desire anything." "In xchat yon think; in what you say; in what yon do; he a M A.V, my son."HI GH WILLIAM HOSCII. B.S.C.B. "U IONOV” Gainesville, Georgia Phi Kappa: Kappa Alpha Knginecring Society; Scabbard and Blade; Sine and Tangent; Cadet Major; Business Malinger Bed and Black; rt Kditor Panhoka. '21, 22; Student Council; Gridiron Club. "Be yourself: tin- path of simplicity Is the best way." Sago vvonls coming from sage Ups. ami typified in Mr. Ilosch's living. If you want to "nx" a political deal, or attempt to trade a sorry horse, don’t go to Hugh. A lion In deliberation, a lamb in personal dealings, as linn as the mountain base, as persistent ns the oconn waves that come ceaselessly to the jagged cliffs. These and other descriptions, and you haven’t got him half told. The exhibit hails from Gainesville, where all good Georgia men come from. and. bv heavens, where they all go back sooner or later, there to become the bulwark of the mountain city, urn-man Is a connoisseur among the fair sex. and can by a spoken word overcome all their whims ami funcies. This ability can be attributed to the proximity of his home to Itrenau. where he Is known as the fairest among the fair, the Apollo LKW1S HAMILTON Mil.I., .IB.. A.B.. 1U. “ Ki.at" Nctvimn, Georgia Phi Kappa; Chi Phi "G Club: Track Team, '20. '21. '22; Freshman Debater; Impromptu Debater; Tnu Sigma; Debating Council: Phi Kappa Council; Intercollegiate Debate; Phi Kappa Kcv. "Flat," gentlemen. Is his erstwhile nickname. Whether this refers to his head or his feet, nnlxxly deems to know. Possibly It is because he halls from one of the flat spots around Atlanta, known as Newnan. hut more probably it is from tin- flat sound Ills feet make as lie dashes around in the wake of some young person In skirts. L. II. Is a well-rounded man. lairing is sojourn of three short years he has distinguished himself in several lines. He has made two degrees. A.B. and B.J.. as a mark of his scholastic ability. In the line of oratory he has achieved success, both In winning speaking honors and In lending his ability to the direction of Phi Kappa as a member of the Debating Council. To top this record, he is the proud wearer of the "G." "Flat" numbers his friends by scores. We feel that he Is going to carry It's college success Into the battle of life. May his efforts soon he crowned with their Just reward. "ICcc i on kickini until lltc heu rue conic aron ml.”F.DMUNI) WOODRUFF HURT. A.B. "Sim p" Atlnnta, Georgia I’lii Kh))] »; Chi I’hi University of Georgia's Glee and Mandolin (’lull, '21; Buccaneer. "Simp” came l ihe University three years ago from Atlanta, a fact which he has done Ills host to live down during Ills stay In Athens. "Simp" can sit and hull for hours at a time, and according to the results obtained In various parts of the State Ids line must be pleasing. He made the Glee t.luh in '21. and while under the direction of one of Athens' most noted amateur dancers, ♦leveloped Into the best favorite of the "Harem" that has has been seen In Athens. Among his other attainments while at Georgia, "Ed" made the "Who’s Who" of the I'nlveislty as lading the most practical man in sehool. "Simp" has one of the biggest hearts that a student ever had. There never Is a lime that he cannot help a friend. I.tick to you in your life's work, and here's hoping that you go to the very top of whatever profession you choose. " mil tick of Iitilr tut 1 drxirr lo rrxt WARE HUTCHESON, A.B. Jonesboro. Georgia Dcinosllicnian; Sigma Clii ' (»" Club; Varsity Baseball, 20, '21. 22; Gridiron Cbili; Freshman Club; I’nti-llellenie Council; Spanish Club; Buccaneers. "Gravey Hutch" entered In the fall of 'IS when Captain Tliweat was "Kaiser" of the campus. He was such a ipilet sort of fellow that only a few students knew him when be made the baseball team In the spring of '2o. Since that time he has been in the limelight, more or less, and now everybody knows him. "Hutch" was not a rcgulur on his prep school nine but since coming here he has worked hard. and. as a result, has developed Into one of the best inflclders we have. He dislikes too much publicity and praise, but he is worthy of a great deal of It. “Hutch” has made Georgia a good student. By Ills athletic prowess he has already brought her honor. In the years to come he will win the buttles of life If lie continues lighting them as he has fought during his four years at Georgia. “Ilr ronrlroiijt, hurt- xrlf-confiilntcr mill caxt the 'iilr’ Innujurt of ‘bull.’ ’’A K 1 1)01.1 11 .101’. INMAN. B.S.C. “Uiuy" .1 acksoilvHle, Florida I’hi Kappa; Sigma Alpha Fpsilon Buccaneer Clul ; Baxehall Scpintl, ’19, 20, 21; Assistant F N thnll Manager, 20, '21; Athlctic M imager. '21. 22; "(I’’ C’lul . iioundless energy and enthusiasm for all campus activities, and thorough scholarship in all courses which he has taken up. have characterized the resident of this genial representative of "Old" Florida in our midst. A goodly amount of the sunshine of Florida went Into the personal equipment of "Uudy." Ills infectious smile and winsome ways have won for him a place In the hearts of till who know him. and they are many. Although "IJudy" has never had the opportunity of representing the University on a varsity team, those of us who have seen him on the athletic Held believe that this is due not so much to lack of ability as to hard luck. Ills capacity for making friends can scarcely be rivaled by any one in the class, and In the years to come he will surely derive much satisfaction and pleasure In knowing that his personality has won for him so many people to hold him dear. "It is nut the tcinuinif, hut lioir you that counts in the i nnie nf !,ife.'’ COl.r.M BUS A NT. rs JOHNSON, B.S.A. "Fhknciiv" Bnrwick. Georgia Agricultural Club Now, gentlemen, with your Indulgence, we will endeavor t«» do justice to a man who can out parleyvotis even the famous J. Lustra!. Where did he learn it? Over across the pond doing Ids hit to put tlie war on lee. After experiencing army life. "Frenchy" decided that he could possibly live through at least one college year. He therefore entered the University and found himself rooming in Candler llall. "Frenchy" completed the Candler Mall and Freshman courses all in one year, which Is some task In itself, and then spurted up to make the next three laps in two.- which In has done. He has made Oeorgia an excellent student and has the unique record of being the only man who could night watch all night ami attend class all day. It Is generally thought that lie will endeavor t » pass on to the coming generation of towheads some of the Information he has gathered together In the last three years. If so. we predict that he will make them an excellent teacher. •• {exults to hr ohtuined ore more dependent upon met hods of procedure thou upon efforts exerted in doimj."grrxrrrir rr xt A DKSSIK FOIU) JOHNSON. B.S.C. " ! »:«" Higgs ton, Georgia Deuinstlirniun; Economics Society Freshman Club; Spaiihh Club; Math ('lull. "Dess" came to the I’lilvonilty three years ago with a large store of pep and determination. Ilia word as a Freshman was In keeping with fair scholarship, hut In ills second year lie le-gan to show Ids real worth, t'arlyle and Arnold fell before his onslaught and the Economics Department held no terrors for him. He read a goodly number of the classics, thought a great deal, and came back to summer school determined to carry away the testimonial of the faculty in three years. Besides driving through the summer academic work, he dally recreated Ids weary spirit by comforting homesick school marms. No accurate record of Ills activities on the campus Is available, but no one ever has disputed Ids claim of supremacy In pursuit of the "campus course." He Is a worker with the vision of the possibilities thot lie before the college man. He lias done things here: he ran succeed anywhere. May the best of luck bo yours. "Dess.” •‘Tht mini icho serrrx hix neiyhlmr can mil but lead a broad lift.'' THOMAS (SILKS KBI.LY, A.B.S.S. “Boozy" Monroe, Georgia Phi Kappa; Sigma Alpha Epsilon Freshman Club; Vice-President Buccaneer Cluli; Student Council; One Club. Why do they call him "Boozy”? Nobody knows why anyone would wish such a name on such a good fellow, and especially in this day and time, where it flows not at all. But then let us admit that lie has been done a great injustice. "Boozy" Is one who deserves the appellation. "A gentleman and a scholar." Although unassuming and reserved, his social graces, his sterling qualities of character and his due personality have won for him the affection and honor of the entire student body. Books have never bothered him. but he Is conscientious and uses bis time to an advantage. alt bough be will take an hour off every now and then and Join "Morpheus" in a slumber party. With all the pride of a true southerner, lie Is typical of the south In generosity, hospitality, and true gentlemanly traits. We wish him the happiness and success that he deserves. ‘•yolhiny except life itself is so interestiny as life as il is imayinedJ’G I o'? I [ CLINTON COLEMAN KEMP, B.S.A. “Cl.l NTOX Powder Springs, Georgia Dcnmstlieiiiun; Agricultural Club Saddle and Sirloin; Stock Judging Team, ‘20. “Clinton" is it »)Ik man with it big heart. He always greets you with a broad hand and a broader snule. The fact that "C. C." hulls from I’owder Spr.ngs, Is the only thing we have against him. After repeatedly being lured on by some of Ills associates, he Joined the ranks of the llook-Agents and tried to do missionary work in the Virginia mountains. While In the Old Dominion It is rumored that "Clinton” so captivated the heart of one of the beautiful girls of that State, that he has slave been kept busy reading telegrams and special delivery letters. It seems that he Is a regular vamp because lie has maintained complete sway over the heart of a certain Co-ed, while two of his classmutes tried all the wiles in their power to win her hand. Hut above all. Kemp is a loyal Georgia man. Luck to you. you have our best wishes. “The Hull m mit hlier than the Hullet.” JOSEPH TOLLESON Kilt BY, JIL, A .11. “Toi.i.y” Ncwnan, Georgia Phi Kappa; Kappa Alpha Buccaneer; Secretary-Treasurer Senior Class. .1. T.. Jr., alias "Tolly," "liablilt." etc. During Ills four years In our midst he has been a good student, in fact, he stands among the first four hundred In scholarship. The "Babbit." like most of the species, likes to browse on the given and under the tutelage of "Pop" has become fairly adept In the subject of "Q's." Though a southerner by birth and inclination, for the past two seasons "Tolly’s” thoughts during the school months have wandered North of the Mason-Dixon Une. Vacation time finds his habitat In Newnan and Atlanta. We understand that he Is commercially inclined, and expects to go to Columbia next year. Whatever his aim may he he has the best wishes of Ills many friends. if one with such a youthful face and Innocent smile, we would say he has yet lots of time In which to propound such thoughts, but looks are often deceiving, and he may he a regular "Devil" in his own home town. “The sure ! iray to hit a woman's heart Is to take aim kneeling." xx;.fj Lw Tr r i G 9 JelfiCny --• .. - iNTimiiuiniinmi ' 7. y A . V 1 t - VM'-y WILLIAM LAWTON LAMB, B.S.C. Swainsboro. Georgia Domosthenian Kconomics Society. A keen observer Is ibis young fellow who came to us some four years ago. from Swalnslioro. He has developed some admirable tendencies since he landed, and every fellow who knows Uml) Is fond of that genuine good disposition that Is so peculiarly his own. If any one has ever been offended by this fellow it Is not known. His sense of humor Is a stimulus, and Unit) litis tilled himself over the hard places in his career at the rniverslty and smiled at the worst of things. There is no heating around the hush with tills fellow. When there Is danger of Intensifying a weakness. Lamb believes in removing the danger wither than waiting for the result and then making an application for the removal of the Injury. His career has been modestly carried out here, however. Lamb lias been on the alert gathering manna for the future, and we expect to hear tmidi of him in the business world. Hoy. good luck! "hunk for yon mid your , mid let the other fel-lotc do the mime.” LON NIK RICH A HI) LAN ILK, B.S.A. "I.OXXIK ’ .Metter, Georgia Dcinost hcninti Agricultural Club; Georgia Naturalist; Cotton School Debate; Captain M. T. C.; President of Agricultural Club. "Ix nnle" started In the rniverslty hack in IlMfi. hut had to take a vacation in order that he might cross the Atlantic and quiet a certain chap named William, who was. about that time, kicking up a good deal of disturbance. Since returning from the Army, he has debated a little, and taken one or two flings into politics. Iteeause he Is a horn loader of men. he was made u Captain In the M. T. C. However, the outstanding feature of "Lonnie'' Is his uncanny ability to vamp all the girls he meets, and keep his own heart intact all the while. Hut we fear that some letters that he has been getting from a certain South Georgia town will spell defeat, and lliut before many moons have istssed he will have launched his hark on the troubled seas of matrimony. "Lonnie." luck to yon. and may all your troubles he little ones. "Which is the ; renter, ‘a Senior irho ha never hem a Freeh man or o Freehmon xchn never expert to he a Senior.' "FRANK A I.SION MARTIN, B.S.A. “Si. :Krvv Huinlirid f, (iror 'in Deinostlienitin; Agricultural ('lull. Well. Koiitlemen. if any. here is tin- man who stands up under tin- name of Frank Alston, and we'll say that the name has as sound a restiitK place as any we know. Frank has made this I'nlverslty a K"od .student and furthermore, we know that he will make her a better alumnus. This younK man has never "put out" for the various medals offered for scholarship, nor has he Kono out after tin political sea Ip of some of his fellow students, hut he has always proved ready to help his friends In any way possible, and for this one characteristic lie has made many true friends. One of the worst things we can say about Frank is that lie Is frank. In fact, we do not know of anyone whose tonjjue ami brain co-operate so well. If a thought comes to Frank's mind, a moment later It comes off his tonKUc. Frank Is easily soothed to sleep tswect. restful sleep) by the monotonous monotone of a mosshneked professor. and as a consequence the title of "Sleepy" has Ittcu wished off on him. We do not call him "Sleepy" belnpr on too familiar terms with him for that, but at nn.v rate we believe that he was a wood baby. Frank Is strictly business, and should develop into one of the moneyed arsltocrac.v. “For mi frit-nth I xdll t o the limit.” JAMES I.KW1S MERRITT. H.S.A. “Jimmik” Americas, Georgia Agricultural Club; Demoslltetiiatt Phi Kappa l’lii Student Council: Pan-Hellenic Council; Slock Judging Team, '20; Senate Clul ; American l.cgion. "J. Lewis" hailed from the small Hamlet of Americas four years a«o with the intention of making a real "farmer" of himself. Should lie be as successful In climbing the ladder of success In life as he has been In climbinK Ak. hill, he will surely do well. During "Jimmie's" sojourn with us he has made a grrat record for himself as a student, lie Is a hard working: scout, possessed of a modest, friendly disposition, which has won for him many friends. In the Held of cattle judging, this man of precision, has no peer. It Is rumored of late, that he is es| eclally Kood on "calves." If lie Is as Kood In Judging the ladles as In Judg-InK stock, we predict for him a happy home. Above all. he is a well rounded student and could do well In any walk of life. JudKC well, old boy. and success Is yours. "Il iit router to fintl fault than to hr faultlfut.” -o 'V yV| _S , [fL .ft wm 'G ) le - "Vw-'£ KtlfTmSW l y 1 IIA HOLD M RHCKIt MOB BIS, B.S. A. li K “Zkek” Bowdon, Georgia Agricultural Club. Dcmusthcninn; Saddle and Sirloin Club; Georgia Naturalist; Glee Club, ’22; Scrap Iron Quartet. 21, ’22; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 20, 21; Class Prophet. This you ns: man came u us only three years ago from county of Carroll. He lives up this name marvelously well, for his line voice has thrilled more than one Athens nuihlcn. Judging from the number of letters he gets now since his Glee Club trip we believe that there are sills in other parts of the state affected in the same manner. ,-Zeek" has sained a notorious reputation this sprins far his ability to tell sood jokes. It has even been suggested that a College of Jokes be Instituted In the 1‘nlverslt.v. with "Zook" as I ean: also that lie be mndo head of the 1 1-vlslon of Co-operation, since his connection with the Co-op during his stay here has eminently fitted him for the position. With these two ijuali-tles. Joviality and co-operation, we can see nothing for "Zeek" hut sunshine and the pot of gold at the foot of the rainbow. “Don’t look for udder field until you Imre masterful lhn e about you.” OLIVKK SA.MCKL MOHTON. A.It. “Sam” Lumpkin. Georgia Phi Kappa; Delta Tau Delta. Sophomore Debater; Sophomore Dechiimer; Junior Cabinet; Senior Bound Tit hie; Athletic Kditnr, llctl and Black; Kditor-iu-Chief, Literary Cracker; President, Phi Kappa; Phi Kappa Key; Member Publicity Bureau; Junior Orator; Debating Council; Second Lieutenant Co. B, K. O. T. C. When It devolves upon us to speak a word concerning this boy, wo fall hack apace, and are confounded. Sablood! The fellow. It is said, is a veritable night hawk, and lays Ills magnetic plans after midnight. Ills nocturnal rumblings have been productive of countless honors, as a glance at his coterie of distinctions wilt prove. Some wag hns said, however, that Sam Is one of those Bacchanalian adherents who care not for the length of the road, hut are greatly disturbed at times about the width of it. The women have not escaped his charms, either. In requital of his affection, they have concocted for him various terms of endearment, which we. for the sake of harmony in the family, will not divulge. Summing up. we find these puillticatlons: A master of the literary pen. the shaker of a mean oratorical tongue, and a prince of a fellow. “He 1C ho knoics much ha mam rare ."  [m tt Hr JIM CAHSWKLL M l’H PI IKY. N.S.C.K. “Jim” Hcpli .ihali, Georgia Knginrering Society; Lambda Chi Alplm; Sine and Tangent; Scabbard and Blade; American legion; Cadet First Lieutenant, ’21; Cadet Captain, 22i “Jim” came to us four years ago from the quiet town of Hephzlbalt and each year that he has been with us he has bound himself closer to our hearts. To know him Is to love him and to be a friend of his Is an honor worth striving for. "Jim" does not Indulge In Idle talk, but when he speaks his words abound In wisdom. This gentleman Is the primary cause of the electric company’s wealth— as he Is a burner of the midnight oil. Dame Humor has it that somebody Is waiting down in ileph .lbah for him besides his little brother, and we are Inclined to believe her In that respect. If "Jim” works ns hard In the future as he has while in the University, his success Is a certainty. The very best luck to you for the future. "Jim." '‘Give all thine ear lint none thy tonyue for silence is n rare yew." WII.BL'H THOMAS Ml'It BAY, B.S.C. “Wu.mV’ Albany, Georgia Phi Kappa; Alpha Tan Omega Kconomics Society; Student Council; President of Freshman Club. Looking back to the year 1917. it will be remembered that this boy wonder came to the classic city to help further the social world of the University. During this year. Wilbur lead the Freshman Club through one of the best years In the history of the organization. After finishing the horrors of the S. A. T. he decided to explore the golden west. Fully realizing his mistake, he returned to our folds. From this time on, he has worked with all the complicated affairs of the Commerce Department. With only three years to his credit, we would say that his record is one that many envy, having been among the leaders In all of his class work. To this we may add in a summary way. that our friend is one we shall never forget, one that we shall always remember as n clean tighter and a gentleman In the true sense of the word. Success Is yours, accept It. “Let ns re yard our mistakes, not as stmnhliny blocks but as steppiny stones to yreater success."  r v'» Vi£ v_ Hmiua llllswhYff n ■ S- 3H cl ff " , 'i O, K G ss » 1S5®4g tIir PiBSfflKWli :.: .citxrart-Uux Ifrnntf ffnrrTr JOHN WILLIAM McCKANKY, B.S.C.M.A. “MaXAOKH Columbus, Georgia Dcmostlienian. Phclps-Stnkes Fellow; President Spanish Club; .Manager Basketball Team, 20, 21; .Manager Baseball, 21; Member “(1 ’ Club; Campus Club; President Columbus Club. Now we eome to the young man who bus managed more athlctie teams for Georgia than any other student In her history. This activity of "ISIIIV lias earned him the title of ''Manager.” lie has been a faithful servant In this capacity and holds the sincere appreciation of those in charge of athletics. Hut this Is not the only lino in which “Manager" lias excelled, for he holds the I’helps-Stokes Fellowship, and then there Is polities. in which he has lieen more successful In politicking for the other fellow. However. “Manager's" own ambitions fell down because of the failure of certain friends to stand by him. In all the different phases of college life In which "Mack" has participated lie has played the game square. If he wins he Is a gracious victor, and If lie loses he takes loss like a man. With tills quality alone, success should reward his efforts. " icon hi rut her hr right I linn President.'’ DONALD WALLACE MoKAHI.AND, B.S.C. "Mac” Dalton, Georgia Demosthenian; Economic Society; Spanish Club "Mac" halls from the fair mountains of Northwest Georgia. lie entered the University four years ago. with tHe spirit to make good, and this spirit has predominated in his life through these four years. He has fought a good, clean battle all the way through. There has not been a harder and more conscientious worker here than "Mac" has been. Neither bus a man pulled more for "Old" Georgia. When that old team went out to fight, no matter in what line of athletics, to him It was all for Georgia, and "Mac" could always he heard above all others, whether the team was leading by a safe margin, or whether she was in the hole, he always yelled encouragement. That spirit of never snv quit ruled with him. "Mac" has done much and said little; on through life he will take the Ideal that "Actions s|K ak louder than words." "Mac." we all know that you will make Ole Georgia proud of you. "Strife In moke on honest Hr in; ond help others ot nil times.’' BE 3C =J| b • .y? 11; §1 m 1 •v.-. I itirfxi:. ? i •s V-T-7S , ,'yt, « ' u ’»’ 'JrZ a mKmE mw I’ACI. McGKK, U.S.C. “Spanish ’ Dcmosthcniaii; Kconomics Society President Spanish Club; Cosmopolitan Club; 1 .‘Alliance Kruneaise. Languages ure Paul's forte. but he Is an admirable student In other ways. During the four years In- bus taken to finish his course In commerce. he has done each subject as If it were the only one required of him. Spanish and French are at his heck and call, and any medium of communication that he attempts to master Is almost equally as docile under his power of imagination. Aside from his good record as a student. Paul Is a good thinker, a pure thinker, the possessor of a spirit without guile or malice. Ills disposition Is toward the ideal, and he lives the principles that he maintains to he holy. His environment has served to draw from the depths of his soul the best that Is In him. and he leaves the I Diversity with his faee set toward n noble end. Ills comrades are for him; they believe In him! they feel that he will succeed. “Let’ lire more ami ijnit rxistintj.” THOMAS I.EVBHKTT Mc.Ml U.lN, H.S.A. “Mac" Hartwell, Georgia Phi Kappa; Alpha Tuu Omega Halt!—Stop!- -Look! Listen! This Is a man from Hart County. The county where men fall down In the snow and freeze because of being overloaded with Joy-oil. Hut we can truthfully say that never would "Mac” Ret In such a condition as that. “Mac" served his apprenticeship out In noble service for his country as a member of the Saturday Afternoon Tea Club. After that time he wended his way over on the brow of the Ag. Hill to offer himself for the advancement of scientific agriculture. Ho Is now ready to put Into practice the facts he has garnered, or to pass the information on to a younger generation. In his four years at Georgia. "Mac" has made many friends because of his Jolly, carefree nature. He is a good sport and will play you fair In all things. The acquaintance with such men as “.Mac" Is what makes life worth living. As you leave us. old man. you have our best wishes for your success. •‘Think then you are Unlay irhnl yesterday yon xerre Tomorrow you shall not he less.’'s MALCOLM ANGUS Melt A INKY, R.S.A. “Mack” FJtnodcl, Gcurgin Dcmostlipnian; Agricultural Club Saddle and Sirloin; Frcslmmn, Sopls.more and •,unlMr Scholarships in Agriculture; Junior Cabinet; Aghon; Senior Hound Table; Georgia Naturalists; Gridiron Club; Campus Club; Alpha eta; gricultural Quarterly Staff. '20, '21; Editor-in-Chief. Agricultural Quarterly.’22; Kditor-In-Chief. Candor a, ‘22; President Student Council, ’22; President Senior Class. 22; President Georgia Naturalists. '22; Stock Judging Team. 20; Sphinx. Ignites and gentlemen, here he is. "Mack” Is. without a doubt, the hlggcxt man In College, physically and otherwise. Ehnodel can well be proud of her son. and they can well turn out the town when he goes home, for "Mack" has come here to ennuuer and now there are no new worlds to conuuer. In his studies, he Is one of the most brilliant men In College. In polities he is the idol of his friends ami the fear of the rival factions. And in his literary work, this book will speak for Itself. "Mack’ married before he entered here, and there Is u "Little Mack." who will he a political leader here about 1042. Luck to you. "Mack." you ought to make baker County a good (military. ,,'Solh ntj h certain.” NOH.MAN DUNNING NICKKRSON, B.S.A.K. “Nick" Athens, Georgia Phi Kappa; Sigma Alpha F.pislon Scabbard and Blade; Engineering Society; Promotion Committee Y,” '18, ’lf , 20; Cabinet, 20. '21, ’22; First Lieutenant Cadet Corps, ’20. '21 ; Captain and Regimental Adjutant, 21, ‘22; Freshman Club; Mathematics Club; Cosmopolitan Club; Rifle Team. v21. 22. "Nick" Is a man with driving power and to spare. He goes after things ami he usually gets them. Ills record In the University 1ms been creditable, liut he has left the Impression with those that now him Lest, that lie has not let himself out as lie Is sure to do when he begins structural ex-r»cutlo»i Like a good debater or a good pitcher, lie has not let the difficulties that he bas met so far have the force of all the power he command He Is a llrm believer in believing In the thing thntyou are doing and doing them with al A mnn of coot! Judgment. excellent tastes, n friend rfiSrt. a»i a»ove .11, » .emlcnmn-tlml Is “I)o ay you bare been ‘done’ by.'CHRISTOPHER C. PEARCE. JR., U.S.C. "C" Columbia, South Carolina Phi Kappa; Sigma Alpha Epsilon Scnntc Club; Freshman Basketball ami Baseball, '21; Varsity Football, 21; "G" Club; One Club; Alpha Kappa Psi; Varsity Baseball, ‘22. If there are many more men In the 1'nlverslty more widely known and inure agreeably known, we miss an official guess. Hailing from the renowned old state mentioned above. ”C." as he is better known, directed his tlrsl efforts towards a higher education to "The Citadel.” After two years of cadetship at "The Citadel.' he decided to return to his native state, as he Is one of Georgia's own sons. Ids birth-place being W’lgham. ■'C' has proved an excellent quarterback and there never was a time when he was called on, and the times were many, that he couldn’t fill the bill, lie was extremely cool, and picked the weak spots with rare precision. "C” was a real quarterback. He possesses the type of manhood that our Alma Mater Is always willing to call her own. A true friend, a genial com pa non. ever willing to leave his path to please another. You can mark him as a man. "H’liiil thould a man do bat be merry.'’ ERNEST MORGAN NIX. B.S.A. “Nix” Commerce, Georgia Dcmosthcninn; Agricultural Club; Sigma Chi Saddle and Sirloin Club; Tan Sigma; Cotton School Debate; Intercollegiate Debate, '21; Stock Judging Team, '20, 21; Agricultural Debating Council; Aghon; V. M. ( . A. Cabinet, '20. '21; Champion Debate, '22; Intercollegiate Debate, 22. "Nix" Is one of the old guard which entered in the fall of the S. A. T. (’. and Flu Epidemic. He served ills sentence out In that noble organization, aixl came back to Georgia to get an education. "Nix" has been a -consistent, hard worker. He never has tried to cop first honor, but Just the same, he bus done creditable work in his classes. In other lines he has done even better and holds one of the best debating records any xtudent ever, made in the College of Agriculture. His entire record shows "Nix" to have been one of the l est men we have had with us in many a day. The feeling which his fellow-students have for him is only the best, for he is liked by all. "Nix" may teach or farm, but at either he will succeed. Luck to you. Ernest. "The deed I intend if yrenl, bat what, as yet I know not." "Think only of your irork until your funk is min jilrti-tl.” ABNKH THADDP.I’S PKKSONS, B.S. "Thaw" Yidcsville, Georgia Dciuosthrihan; Spanish dull A'. M. ( . A. Cabinet; I .’Alliance Francai.se; Historian, Sophomore (’lass; Sophomore Declaimer; .Math Club; Georgia Naturalists; (’osmopolitan C'lul ; Alternate Intercollegiate Debate. brilliant! No. Consistent! Yes; :tn l a worker if truth ami rlKhteousness. A worker and a gentleman under adverse or In favorable surroundings -that is Abner Tluuhlcus Tersons. A spendld roc-ord In prep school, where he made friends by the score, and a bulldog determination have enabled him. financially unaided, to finish In twenty-seven months instead of the thirty-six. the rocky course leading to his degree. Usefulness In whatever sphere be Is thrown and the Ideals of the great are his natural characteristics. Ilfs thoughts run eas'ly along the lines of the works of the literary masters. Of “Thud” It Is conservative to say that lie will make good in whatever field lie chooses to labor, lie has earned the respect and the admiration of his comrades, and they are with him strong in his work. Tower to you. "Tlmd.” ".tlxcuyu hr trur tn I hr brut that is in yon." TKKItKI. HA INKY PKKHY..IK., A.B. "Com moookk” Sylvester, Georgia Phi Kappa; Sigma Alpha Kpsilnn Sophomore Declaimer; Bed and Black Staff, 21, 22; Buccaneer Club. •'Commodore” came tripping in from MeChail Institute (which in plain Kngllsh means Sylvester High). It is a great transition, coming from the little town of Sylvester, basking sleepily under a South Georgia sun. to promenading up and down M(Hedge Avenue. In front of l.u y Cobb, but that Is what our hero has acomplished. Although bis middle name has some degree of dampness about it. he nevertheless spreads sunshine wherever he goes. Not content with having rmni ed away with the necessary sixty-nine hours in a short throe years. Perry has decided that lie has not yet displayed his ability In full, and next year any one who wishes to lend tin- Sophomore I-aw class will have some first class proposition. Terry has a happy smile ami a glad hand for his friends, and those who know him are those who like him. With such assets lie is certain to achieve success.•4 KOBKKT CAKTKK PITTMAN, A.B. “Kbd-1 .a Fayette, Georgia Deinosthcniaii; AgricuHnral Club Freshman Impromptu Debate; Freshman Debate; Glee C'liili, '20; Junior Cabinet; Sophomore Debate: Senior Hound Table; Annual Impromptu Debate; Debating Couneil; Scjuare and Compass Club; Campus Club; Cheer Lender; Demosthe-nian Key. 1 Mlianee Franeaise; Spanish Club; Vice-President Demostlieniun; Secretary-Treasurer Athletie Association: Intercollegiate Debate. Tills sorrel lopped prodigy hails from the northwestern extremity of this noble state. While he registers from !.a Payette. we personally think that probably what he means Is that It Is from this village that he hauls his guano, "lied" slipped up on us three years ago and Immediately set about making a little history for himself. He never "put out" for the A-plus marks, hut he passed his work creditably and found sufficient time to engage in other college activities. He has made speaking honors galore and has successfully dabbled in politics, "lied" thinks that he can sing and he evidently had the Glee t'lub lender fooled, for he made that Club with the terrible handleap of being a freshman. The campus doin' has It that "lied” will spend his life, after he has taken law at some other Institution. In the defense of the worthy bootlegger. Go to it. old man, but we feel for that bootlegger. “To moke till men Ml friend . irilhin the line of reriprnril» .” KOBKKT IfKADDKS' POWKKS, B.S.C. “Bob" Koine, Georgia Plii Kappa; Keonomic Society Beta Gamma Sigma; President Keonomic Society; Student Instructor; Alpha Kappa Psi. "He was the noblest Unman of them all." and like the great lioinan. "he came; he saw; he conjured." This is to inform you few who do not know the dlsllngushed record of this gentleman from Floyd. Coming to us three years ago. a meek freshman, he has during this short lime ascended to the ethereal heights of a noted scholar. "Hoi." Is a hard worker, having spent much time In toiling over various and sundry tlnunciul records of the War Memor nl Fund. We understand from all reports that Powers is not sntislied with the education received here, extensive as It Is. and intends to Journey birth to Columbia to augment his present knowledge there. A man devoted to Ills study, sincere in his purpose, we predict for him no less achievement than his ambition demands. Thus It will be that before long one can read on the frosted-glass door of some office. "Robert _JI. Powers. ( . I . A." “Labor, lohi liter and lore ore the mraunreit from width the cii of life i.« filled." o g ' msum r vr 5 v . . •jLfjtpSC HlmtTll • - i hi n ] 11 ■ _ 1111 JOHN FRANKLIN RFID, ILS.A. "Shorty Rkii " Bmvtlnn Junction. Georgia Dcmostbcriiiui; Agricultural Club rif ■il I First Lieutenant Cadet Corps; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Viee-Presidenl Agricultural Club; Scabbard and Blade. (Jwtlnif to the gentleman from Itowdon Junction. "Kmnk" came to the Fnlversltv and entered the S. A. T. c in 1S18: he has since that time displayed his Military ability In the K. O. T. C. in which‘he Is now a lirsl lieutenant. Frank has not failed to do his share In the propagation of Campus traditions, having domiciled ut Candler Hall, l.ticas Hall and Old Col lege. He has been closely associated with the Y. M. C. A. and the "Hennery": also he has been an active member of both the Demosthcnlnn and the Agricultural Clubs, from which he will receive diplomas. During his college career, he has been Intimately connected with the State Normal, and has gone on reeord as having no objection to Co-education at Georgia so long as he Is so fortunate as to llnd a playmate for his favorite sport--tennis. His pleasing personality, seriousness of purpose, genera! ah'llty and fearlessness of work will assure hfs ultimate success. Say It with five. Good luck to you. “I try to ‘I'lt IXK’ irith crrrybotly.’' I.KI.ANI) CHADWICK KKNV, B.S.A. “Kid Hkw" Fores!, Mississippi Agricultural Club; Saddle and Sirloin Club; Second Lieutenant, Cadet Corps. The tlrst time we saw Row, we wondered If that smile was natural or simply the result of a futile attempt to fathom the depths of a civilization that possessed such unknown articles as electric lights and other things not found In Forest. Mississippi. Hew has made a good record In his work, especially In the Anirnul Husbandry Division. It is rumored that Iceland Intends to cross the horse and kangaroo so that the "buggy horses" of Mississippi will llnd It easier to Jump the ditches along the road. "Inland’s" biggest virtue Is that lie Is always willing to help a friend. His genial personality lias made friends out of all his acquaintances. We hope that he will stay In Georgia, bat if his native state calls him back, we trust that he will find someone that will he true to him and will settle down and help make the world a better place to live In. “It does nut nu to xcorry—thing are bound to htti ] en anyway." IIKNKY AI.I.EN KOMNSON, H.S.C.E. "Hexm" Augusta, Georgia Demosthoninn Engineering Society; Mathematics Society '•Henry, having come Jo us from the Richmond Military Academy, receives a degree from tlto most difficult course In college after only three years here. This Is quite an honor, for anyone exiK sed to “Kittle Charlie's" courses does well to master them in four years, ltut "Henry" has also divided his activities with Dr. Stephens by taking the "Higher Math." He Is quite a mathematics shark and can solve any "thirteenth” degree equation known. He has met all the math re-qultvments for the M.S. Degree. "Henry" Is quite a busy man but nevertheless he always finds time to slip off to Augusta for the week ends. There certainly must tie some attraction down there for him. for he has spent only three week ends in Athens since first coming here. We have been worried for fear he would get "tied up" there and not get hack, for he is rather strong for the fair sex. "Henry" has not yet fully decided what he will do next year, hut he Is seriously considering an "invitation” to attend a school up north, and continue along the mathematical line, Kuck to you. "Henry.” success is sure to come your way. ONVKN REYNOLDS, 1U.; B.S.C. “P" Doimldsonvillc, Georgia Dcinoslhcninn Football 'IVam; Track Team; Sphinx; Gridiron Club; "G" Club; Captain Football, '‘21; Alpha Kappa Fsi. Kittle light can he Imd on the past history of this modern D'Artagnan except that he llrst saw the light of day somewhere in the wilds of what is now known as Seminole County, propped at Tlfton Ag.. and allowed Mr. Tom Held to add another name to the celebrated Held mental roster in lf'1.%; then after quitting his hooks for two years to fly the Hag of his country from the tail spin of a seagoing hawk plane, he at last came to earth with his helmet on. Craving excitement of a mild sort, he straightway trotted onto the gridiron Held and finally lead his team in the tight. An athlete, a scholar, a soldier, yet a peace-loving man. a forceful, earnest, likeable chap—he is D'Artagnan still -he turns from past adventures to enter the quiet, yet still exciting lane of letters. As captain of his team he fought for all that was manly and fair, never failing to play up and piny the game. They are waiting for you somewhere. Owen, to lead again. 'M lift' xcorth living is certainly one well worth moulding with the utmost care.” ‘‘May right be the guiding light of my life.”0 •'"0 G ft V, Oil A HI.IK ASUKRRY ROYSTON, B.S.C. “Cholme” Royston, Georgia Doinostlieninn After securing all Hie knowledge which the fair Metropolis of Royston. Oa., ha l to offer, this young hul rambled over to the University four years ago, in quest of greater learning. He was quite able to show the Freshmen a good time during Ills sophomore year. As a vamp. Charlie has made a wonderful success, so far as a certain young lady is concerned. At almost any time he may be seen wending his way down College Avenue towards this young lady’s residence. "Cliollle" was so fascinated with drilling that lie has stuck to it for four years. For lack of anything better to do. he entered the Commercial Department and has fared rather well under the guidance of the far fumed "Pistol.” "Chollle” takes things as they come and never worries about tomorrow. However, he is a typical Jolly good fellow and numbers Ills friends by scores. "CholUe" hasn’t yet decided what he is going to do In the future, but we all feel sure that he will bring honor to his Alma .Mater and make a brilliant success In after life. ••Il’orAr hard and sucre xcill he yours.” m jy j MALI.ON .IKROME SHEFFIELD. A.R. “Shef" Atlanta, Georgia Demo.stlicniiin; Sigma Chi Senate; Thaliiins; Secretary-Treasurer Freshman Club. Mi); Glee ami .Mandolin' Club. ’18. Mi), 20. 21. 22; President, 21; Leader Glee Club, 22; Assistant Leader Mandolin Club,'20. Ladles, this is .Mr. Sheffield! However, it might l.e more titling to introduce him to the gentlemen, for. If he Is unknown to either sex. It is the male. During Mallon's four-year sojourn at the University he lias accomplished much In every activity with which he has associated himself. He has been the shining light of the dee and Mandolin Club since his first appearance, holding every Im-lHirtaut office in It. It Is not our Idea, however, to leave the impression that the musical line is the only one In which he has starred. For besides the long line of friends he has made since entering college, he has attained many student honors. and has shown great nplliudc In the classrooms. If he tackles the world as hard as he did college—look out. world! “Aim high and shoot straiylit. You can't miss trhen you’re yot dead aim."HANSOM HAKKIS SKEEN. A.B. “Pkihco” Decatur, Georgia Phi Kappa; Clii Phi Freshman Club; Buccaneer Club; Junior Cabinet; Mandolin Club, 21; Student Council; Phi Beta Kappa. Uanxoin lias been a student at the University for three years, and when wo say student we mean it In the true dictionary sense of the word, ami not In tlie college slang idea, lie has been a hard and conscientious worker and his work has been crowned with success. Aside from scholastic honors. Hansom has gathered no little fame as a musician. For two years he was a member of the Mandolin Club. and. joined with other dark haired brutes, he toured the Stale on a heart -break.ng expedition. He Is always a prominent member of the band until after It makes it's annual trip to Columbus. In spite of studies and music, ltansom has found time to make scores of friends, and Ills natural capacity for leadership lias placed him at the top of everything lie undertook. May your success in life increase with your years, old hoy. '•lie yourself above all I hint ." CHARLES MOUSE SLACK. IVS. “SlJtCK Gainesville. Georgia Deinostbenian Spanish Club; 1 Alliance Francaise; Freshman Impromptu Debate; Sophomore Declamation: Junior Oration; Junior Cabinet; Senior Hound Table; President of Math Club; Campus Club; Champion Debate; Phi Beta Kappa: Tennis Champion. It was in the fall of MS that tills youthful scion of the Slack family entered "Georgia. ' Since that time he has been more or less devoted to duty and lias collected many college honors. Slack is a speaker of ability, but his record In ills class work shows that his chief Interest lies in his studies. As a Sophomore, lie tried, to the limit of his ability, to Impress the Freshmen with their utter lack of understanding. Ills favorite pastime was concerned with the unpadded punts and the oaken hoard. There are many men In college who remember Slack's night raids with fear and trembling. He has made Georgia an excellent student. We do not know Ills plans for the future, hut we have no fear but that be will continue his present stride, no matter what he undertakes. "Mi life irill rarre lie Otcn Philosophy ami mat other men profit by my mistakes.” '( VJ y '■ |- -- - V ■iZivil if _- = SS •l°"N ItOHKKT SLAUGHtkh. b a “J. It It'll W»verly Hall. Georgia l c.nosthon!an; Agricultural Club t 1' ” with thJ'othw SmbSR. "V ,£? f n of IS b:ul hardly stopped on Vi, ' of this class. He eel veil a bid to ‘ zl.t.?Ch ® h‘‘ rc- sundod to accept | » , T ?UKl almost per clays and tho »Ve bo Je K,€}1°rr f( r few ?tTi.om™, SSn lUrt’Vaj'sa is,1 jb.,!" , ,sr1',?,K!:rrh„ui;.i,ry K ,,yK.,f t,,CrV 18 i4,,arKe female membership, from his recent activity, we believe that he is to teach. If ho doc , his training here will Insure him success. • matter little whether I win. hut it matter •treatl i how fit ht.” EMMETT NOHMAN SMITH. B.S.C. “Nokm r." Grecnslsmi, Georgia Phi Kappa; Alplm Tau Omega Economics Society; Buccaneers; Manager Elect Track Team. ’19; Frcslimnn Club. any troubles lhc 'are ',s intermittently for Kmmett has !»•«« 'Vnurse hc look n furlough rive years. During his ou . mu. j|C also in engage in tho wrap |nrn of Louslana. but he east his lot " V • v'Virdlngly gave us the Pr v J f ra.no back. mhlm aonie day and my He of expecting t€» point to nun, stands ace high was a classmate of mine that ere long with the fair sex, «•» .h . sweet voico of a hi will ! • ®rV°"_.Vrl “"TrGly everyone who knows certain young jgL Tra Y. man after mine him can best sa . own heart. --:- «• - — _ . . ■ — . g, . — -J on II 1,v" t---== g-’ . .-==• ki i. rett itself hrc»' e a }' ••" =— e =- r JM "For too mnch rest w v , FKKDKIUCK HL'IlKAN SMITH, H.S.A. "F. B. Bowcrsvillc, Georgia Dnnosthcniiin; Agricultural Cl«il» Square and Compass Ulnli; President of Heeons Club; Class Poet; Alpha ' •eta. "Hlg Smith” has a peculiar way of winning friends and kipping them. Not only lias ho proved himself a desirable fellow to have around, hut he lias proved himself to be a man in every respect. His life here will be an inspiration to others when they llnd that he is one of the few who Unished the lt.S.A. course in three years and at the same time worked his way through. When he Is gone It will be said of him. "He fought a good light, kept the faith and finished his course.” "To be a man is the height of human endeavor:” is the motto of his life, lie has made an excellent record at the University of Georgia, of which any one should be proud. "To reach tlic heiyht of human endeavor i.» to hr a man." JOSEPH I.kCONTK SMITH. .B. “Cornt' Macon, Georgia Phi Kappa; Sigma Nu "Count” began his college career at Mercer, he being of such active proclivities that it was thought best to keep him In an environment perhaps more sheltered than he would llnd at tire University— es|K clally as his family was living In Macon and could keep an eye on him. Our hero decided that beginning with his Junior year he would follow his original plan and risk himself as a student at Georgia. Anybody observing him can recognize that the present ”.J. 1.. (V, whatever Ills scholastic origin. Is a mighty good man. lie Is systematic, industrious. persistent In good works; above all. he is fair-minded, and he has a ready sympathy for all sorts of | eoplo. of whom he does not necessarily demand that they see life from Just his angle. According to schedule. "Count's" next stop will be at Harvard, where lie is to study law. lie will do well there, as he will do nt any other place nt which there Is a premium set on real worth. "To (fire the world my heel and every man hie due.”CHAULKS DANIEL STEWART, B.S.A. “SrNSlIINK” Shinglcr, Georgia Demostheninn; Agricultural Club Cosmopolitan Club; Aglion Society; S |unrc and Compass Club; Horticultural Club; Cotton School Debate, 1018; Y. 1. C. A. Cabinet, 10, 20; Secretory of Y. M. C. A.. 21, ’22; Baritone in the Bed ami Black Quartet; Agricultural Quarterly Staff, 10. All of us like "Sunshine.” lie lias a very pleasing anil attractive personality. Always very popular lie lx a luinl worker and a really One fellow. He Is noted far and wide as a singer. Georgia Is going to he proud of this man. The list of honors after his name is an Index to his good record. Me has taken an active part In the religious and social activities on the campus and In the city. He has tilled a big place In the University life. We are sure that he will till a much bigger place In the life he Is about to enter. We are counting on you. "Sunshine.'' May your life he happy and a benetlt to humanity. “Help yourself rise by hr I piny others rise." JAMES PAYNE SPICER, B.S.C.E. "Jim mu:” Savannah, Georgia Engineering Society; Kappa Alpha Ereshinun Club; Sine and Tangent; Glee Club, 20, 21; "G” Club; Varsity Football, 21; Senate; Captain Scrub Football Team, ‘20; One Club; Gridiron Club; Vice-President Pan-Hellenic Council, 21; Student Council. 21; Cadet Lieutenant. During football season "Jimmie” divides his time between "Little Charlie” and Sanford Field. In fact, he likes both so well that he came back to us for an extra year Just to delve deeper Into the mysteries of Ijin a and the three Moment Equation: Ht the same time shifting his dogs with remarkable celerity on the gridiron. One would not expect to meet a social lion in such a practiced being as an engineer, but here we have the unusual combination of Uidies Delight in a Porch Swing and "Spike" Spicer looking through a Wye-Level. "Jimmie” Is one of the most likeable fellows in college. Those who know him arc his friends. As the possessor of a good nature and ability, we ennnot but predict for him a big success. “Stand by your friends -riyht or icrony.'A G JAMKS It-WSOH STOKKS, It. S. Cyrone, Georgia 1’lti Kappa; Phi Delta Tlwtn Cadet Captain and Kcgimental Adjutant; Member Scabbard and Blade; President Spanish Club; Senior Hound Table; Phi Beta Kappa. From the marshlands and frogpunds of South Georgia, out of the sticks and hayseeds of the h.-tek woods, step h man who la leaving Ida footprints on the sand of "Georgia's" history, and who gives promise of scratching still deeper in the mould of the Intellectual world ere he has shuffled off this mortal coll. Such a diversified character, with so many striking and admirable qualities speaks for itself much more eloqently than all tin eulogies penned by band could do. But let It suffice to say that James cun drape his habit over his manly form much more becomingly than Beau Itrummel. can grace the Senior Bound Table as well as King Arthur’s most chivalrous knight, and can get as much out of his Itooks as the best of students. A keener sense of duty, a more resolute determination, a more sparkling intellect, or si larger heart seldom dwells In house of clay. " {ml happiness comas only thronyh the conscious pursuit of o icorthy purpose WILLIAM LACY TAIT. B.S.A. “S. s n-S k r. r.TKK” Agricultural Club; Dcmosthrimm Alpha eta; Saddle ami Sirln'n Club; Georgia Naturalists; President Saddle and Sirloin Club. "Utcy” entered the University In the fall of ’19. He claims Brunswick as his home, a little sealant village In the original "Sandskeeter” country. He was green as the ’’.Marshes of Glynn" In summer, with Just enough salt from the sea breeze to save him from l elng verdant. Never was there a more consistent worker. Aside from doing four years In three, he mixed with the hoys enough to he known as a hail-fellow-well-met. and a man of genuine worth. ■’Lacy" has Ignored the ladles while here. We have a sneaky feeling that It is on account of his abhorrence of having someone sit on his lap and rumple his hair. He rarely goes nearer profanity than an emphatic "Gosh-DIng-It.” Ills ready wit and quiet dignity demand the respect he deserves. You must meet this fellow at your earliest convenience. May tin best be yours. "Lacy.’’ wherever you go. "h'noxc iit host one thin; ire , knmc much about many thinys; a irell rounded man is xcell met.”f S) KNOCK JAMKS VANN “Vann” Boston, Georgia Economies Society; lambda t'lii Alpha Vice-President, Economics Society. At first kIhiico one would think “Vann” A child of the metropolis' Boston. but you must guess again. This Itoston Is ft hamlet within the hord-ers of our own state, and “Vnnn” Is one of Its most worthy sons. "Vnnn” hits worked hard every one of the three years that he has been In our midst and If lined work and consclentlousness have anything to do with success. Enoch's achieve-meats will surimss the wildest dream of ambition. It would not la amiss to add right here that "Vann” Is another letter hound, he receives more letters In one week than the rest of us receive In six mouths, and all of his letters hear the same postmark und arc addressed In a feminine hand. Enoch has never been known to utter more tlmn ten words in a single day. which is due. however, to something that we have mentioned la-fore. Best of luck to you. Enoch. '• aluwthtn not hope. for il is »rritten ihnt ike meek rhall inker'll the earth.’' I’HESTON CAUL UPSHAW,. 1 IL, B.S.C. “Wh.iie” I ognnviilc, Georgia Demosthenian; Economics Society Student Council; Student Instructor in Ko»-nouiirs; Secretary Student Council; Spanish Club; Senior Hound Table; Beta Gamma Sigma; Asst. Manager Denmark Dining Hall; Gridiron Club; Vice-President Economics Society; Alpha Kappa INS. “Willie” believes that "Variety Is the spice of life." He hails from the city of Rosebud. the famous suburb of l apinvitle. When Co-eds first entered the University, he was an exponent of the doctrine of "Total Exclusion." but from causes unknown, lie has boon converted, sprinkled and bnpll .ed In the faltli that "woman hath charms to soothe the savage breast." Ho now dresses so eons pic non sly that one female student has said. ‘The Prince of Wales is with us." Seriously. "Willie" Is a leader In the School of Commerce. For four years he lias displayed his ability and rapacity for work, und his readiness for action places him among tin minority whose nulck mentality creates thoughts which crowd the tongue for expression. He never leaves a task Incomplete, hut thoroughly cleans the slate before lie leaves It. We predict that lie will he nothing less than a giant In the world of business und finance. " irill Irl thr careers of nohler men he the philo -ojihft of my life.”e a G JAMKS MII.I.Kit WALK Kit, Jit., B.S. “Millkh Walken" Augusta, Georgia Phi Kappa; Chi Phi Spanish Club; L'Allinnee Francaisv; Buccaneer Club; Phi Beta Kappa. And all the maidens shouted, "’Tin he. 'tls. our Ideal at last.” Gentle reader, scan these few lines with care. The physiogonomy here ixirtr ycd, of the one and only Miller, can he seen often. In life, roaming around his native haunts In the Queen City of Augusta, Ga. The Academy of Klclunond County sent him out. one of Its proudest products, and turned him loose without warning on our unsuspecting Cnlversity. During his three years stay here he has made his B.S. degree. and a brilliant record, to say nothing of many truo friends. Though of a somewhat quiet nature, to him an argument on any and all subjects Is more welcome than the llowers in May. This young man has a keen and clear mind, with which he can make whatever tasks he chooses to apply it to come out just the way he wishes. He Is a true gentleman and a loyal friend. May the best of luck attend you. Miller, and success meet you in whatever path of life you choose. "Hr, ulnnr. in cnurai roHx xcho nrrer dcxintir .” KAlU.K KKASTI’S WATSON. A.B. "Siikik” Atlanta, Georgia Phi Kappa; Alpha Tan Omega Gridiron Club; Fortnightly Club; Kditor-in-Chicf of Bed and Black, '22; Bed and Black Staff, '21, '22; President of Phi Kappa, 22; Associate Kditor of Paxinika, '22; Buccaneer Oluh; Junior Orator; Impromptu Debater; Phi Kappa Key; Bulldog Serihes. This busy man Is none other than the l-'ditor-ln-Chief of our weekly publication. The Bod and Black. He It Is who supplied said pni er with enough copy to make of It a five column affair, the pride of the Cnlversity and the envy of College weeklies In general. Carle Is somewhat of an orator and debater, and bolds the honor of being "big borer" down In I'lil Kappa. Sinec teasing the ••Bulldog" is his hobby, much of Ills time Is spent enacting scenes suitable for publication in this notorious column. He tickles the tyix -wrlter for more thnn one metropolitan newspaper, an activity attested to by the fact that one wall of Ills den is paiiered with such clippings. With his determination. Karle Is hound to achieve success In the world of Journalism. “I’erscrernnce and re It'S 11 In do are thr cardinal qualilirt.”r. ) KOKIN MADISON WHKATON. H.S.C. “Sox” Griffin, Georgia I’hi Kappa; Kappa Alpha Fnn-Hcllcnic Council; Scrub Knscball Team; Senate; Freshman Club; Alpha Kappa I si. "Son" Is anntlier three year man. who during this comparatively short time has made more friends than most of us make In four. He Is a good student, and an athlete of no mean ability. He has scrubbed at baseball for the last two years and has la-en a mainstay on that team. "Son” used to be found turning his steps towards Lucy Cobh but now he has forsaken that institution and confines his reflections to the vicinity of the Capital C ty. It Is rumored that "Son” had planned a pleasant trip to the city for Thanksgiving I ay. but for reasons unknown, he remained here for the (Vinson game. He pleads ignorance of such plans, so we discount the rumor at once. "Son” expects to enter the commercial world upon receiving the obi dip and unless he revolutionizes Ids lumber business, lie may turn banker. Cower to you. "Son.” “Mtitf each of ax strive to Imre thin world a little heller I linn lie found it CIIAKLKS FRANK W’HITNKR, JR., R.S. 44Uxci.it Kim” Atlanta. Georgia Fill Kappa; Clll I’hi Senate Club; Sigtnn Tan. Charley dropped In three years ago upon our t'nlverslty with a motley crew that hailed from Atlanta. He Is no longer among the rabble, for since arriving he bus risen high among his fellow students. Though ipilet ami reserved. Charles has a certain attribute about him which makes all say. "To know him is to love him." It can be Justly said, that his actions speak louder than his words, and his actions are always of the most commendable sort. Would that there were more like you. Charley! This young man Is a student of the first magnitude, and a hard worker in general. Although not an athlete, he shines In the famous Indoor sports, pool and billiards. It would not be fair to omit that C. Frank has brought Joy to the henrts of many fair maidens, particularly to some of our Athens belles. Wo wish you success. Charley, though our wishes are really unnecessary, for you will attain whatever you strive for In this world. ■• ’(f iYfwfM ami ririlittf are the hunt capitals rrer inrenteil in huninen .”|— ,!]..fe: m % .) (5 •wW AVi? •2a | JOHN HENSON WK1K. H.S.C.K. “Jack” Ninety-Six, South Carolina Engineering Society; KappA Sigma Track Team, '!! , 20; Sine and Tangent; Freshman Club. After conquering "Ninety Six." ".lack’ came to Georgia, an»l before bis hair would heed the touch of a comb, he hail firmly established himself with the ways of the "Classic City." During his four years of college life, ".lack" has made worlds of friends. It Is quite the delight of the fair ones to have this fashion plate among the party at a dance, bridge or tea. Away from the ladles. "Jack" takes his recreation In tennis, golf and billiards, being quite a shark along these lines. Thus far he has remained true to the callings of a bachelor, but sooner or later his shining black hair will bow before his queen—such Is the rumor. But we do not stop here because "Jack" Is quite a student and has made an excellent record in the Engineering Department. Good luck to you. "Jack." It has been a pleasure to know you. and may success be yours In all life's undertakings. "J ore that (lore not entile i.i never fair.” m.ONNIK HI GH WILLIAMS, B.S.A. "Bum. Hbxky” Sylvester, Georgia Demosthcnian; Agricultural Club Saddle and Sirloin Club; Campus Club; Treasurer Agricultural Club, 22. "B(ull) ll(enrv)" drove up from the plains of South Georgia. He was a a hit lardy, because ho had to harvest all the crop and put all his sugarcane into Jugs before his Da would let him enter the "Bull Shooting" Association. Be not hasty In passing Judgment u| on the participant of Old College's affairs (none excluded), but look again at him. Vos. he was an archlight, not among the "Normalltes" nor any other part of the College Curriculum, but among the "Hens" who migrate here In the summer. He says very little, he talks very much; he works very little, he plays very much; yet he Is never broke. There are many things "B. II." docs not know how to do. but he does know how to wear out his pants and shoe soles, and how to hold a straight face under any and all circumstances. He can not do other than succeed for he Is dependable. “ You con fool me one time ami it won’t he my fault, hut if a eerond time, it trill he." 5 G Aa . 01.IN STEW A NT WILLIS, A.B. “Pco” Meigs, Georgia Demosthcninn; Sigma Nu Here, gentlemen. Is the specimen that paxseth all understanding. Mr. Willis came very near keeping the I’andora out of the press since the whole staff had to go adjective hunting to trump up a wordy likeness. The one reliable phrase that did not fall us was this one: "He Is a darn good fellow.” When that Is said about a man. the ensuing encomiums are as but liquid on the well known swan's back. We look again. We con- elude that IMogenex and Ids famed lantern wuuUl have earned great solace by playing around in 'Tug's" territory, which lx Just a long way to say that lie lx the embodiment of honesty and straightforwardness. The trait of frankness lx present when we hear one of •Tug’s" cohorts say that he would make a good umpire, because he calls "cm like he sees 'em.” We dare say that his discretion and ability will carry him to higher heights than that, though. (Set In that game of Life and tight. 'Tug." and we'll stake the Pandora prollts that you win out. •'Mark ye well the pa I Incay af life; ye travel it bat once" WILLIAM CONDON WINC.ATE. U.S A. “Bn,I.” Arlington, Georgia Dcmostlimum; Agricultural Club Student Assistant in Agricultural Engineering. Well, young gentlemen, we will now consider one of the famous characters of recent history at this institution, "Bill" Wingate Is probably one of the oldest men in point of service in the present Senior class. He made his debut here. If It may la-called such, in the fall of ‘1J. At that time he managed to stay for one whole college year. Then the call of the clodhopper came creeping Into Ids youthful lib and ho served two years on the farm. The fall of 'IS found him at Georgia for Ids second year. The following summer ••Hill" decided to do Ids hit toward making the world safe for the Democrats. As a result he was not able to return to Georgia until the fall of '20. and he has been here since that time getting off his degree work. This task was completed last summer so this year has found "Bill" taking some graduate work and teaching a class of Itehabs. Wingate Is steady and reliable and has In him the qualities which make for success. Luck to you. "Bill." "It in not iriee hi hr xciter than is nereemry." G :i‘ :r'. JASI’ftK GCY V001)H(K)K, BAA. “Woody” Woodbury, Georgia Dcinostliciiiaii; Agricultural Club Cosmopolitan Club; Horticultural Club; Georgia Naturalists; V. M. C. A. Cabinet. "Woody" Is u man of many words, very fast of speech. Ho has made a great record here in many ways. He lias taken an active part in the religious activities of the Campus and churches, mostly of the latter. He has hut three years and Summer Schools to his credit, hut during these three years he has been very active In the above named organizations. He may not know how to tel! Jokes, hut he knows how to spray trees and eat all kinds of fruit. He may he studious in Horticultural lines, hut lie is "arsenic" among the fairer sex. espeelally the summer selmol lassies. Though often laboring under the most trying circumstances, he has never given up. Kven the surgeon’s knife was not too sharp to cause this persistent character to lose courage. We look for great things from you. “Woody." “if I m)i useful, honest, ami hare a flood character, tchat does it matter if I am not rich?" I IKK lUCKT KMKKSON WOODIU'ftF, BAA. “Woody" Winder, Georgia Dcinostlicninn; Agricultural Club President Agricultural Club; President Horticultural Club; Saddle and Sirloin Club; Georgia Naturalists; Agliou; Intercollegiate Debate, 20; Cotton School Debate; Agricultural Debating Couneil; Champion Debater Intercollegiate Debate; Agricultural Quarterly Staff, ’17. If the Kaiser had not been overly ambitious "Woody" would have graduated with the class of ’20. Although delayed two years by his tour abroad, he returned to (Georgia and resumed his interrupted task with added zeal. "Woody" has excelled In debating, dabbled In polities somewhat and Is a leafier in Mac’s Horticultural Department. His rotund llgure betrays the fact that lie Is a regular patron of "Nicks.” where he Indulges excessively in ICsklmo Pies. Although he Is very bashful when around the young ladles, yet lie was sometimes seen walking over to the “Ag" college with a certain Co-ed. "Woody" lias contemplated either entering politics or growing peach trees. We predict for him success In which ever he chooses, for "Dull" ami ability are a great combination, and "Woody” has both of these finalities. “Hull and ability is a yreat combination, but if you can hare only one—leare off ability.’’ £ - BN EDWARD STEPHENS WRIGHT. B.S. “Ed' Atlanta, Georgia l'hi Kappa; Alpha Tan Omega Edward Stephens Wright, Atlanta lad. unaffected. even tempered, of admirable disposition: "Ed.” like the groat. has not been as much appreciated by people In general as he has been by those who have worked with him Intimately. Few students in the University know that he has in his make-up a mind that penetrates the outer covering and grasps the kernel of things, for he has not made himself in the least obtrusive. Me has gone about his work In a manner that bespeaks the true gentleman a man of sincerity, of honesty, and of whole-hearted good will toward the man at his elbow. "Ed" Is going to assist "Mother" Nature In her rare for the bodies of men and if he is as successful as a physician and surgeon as he has been in his pursuit of the atom, the protozoa, anti the vertebrates, he will make the spirits of Jenner and Osier, and a host of others famous in Science sit up and take notice. A good student and a better friend Is “Ed” Wright. “ Possexx xelf-ronfidrnrr mnl work to tome dr finite t onl." GEORGE WASHINGTON WRIGHT, JR., B.S. “SlIOHTV" Augusta, Georgia l'lii Kappa; Chi l si Senate Club; Pan-Hcllcnic Council. 21. 22; Freshman Club, 1)1. According to collegiate traditions, this attenuated fellow Is called "Shorty" not because he Is short, but because he Is long -so long that he ought to appear in installments. Me is from Augusta t(»«.) and his respect for a person Is In direct proportion to the number of people that person knows from his native hamlet. People, according to "Shorty." are divided into three classes: (ai those who live on the Mill: (b) those who know people who live on the Hill, and (c) barbarians. Aside from brushing his teeth, his favorite s|s rt Is to jumble a long list of chemical reactions together and watch the Ch’s and Pit's do funny things. Hut no matter how interested he becomes, he always keeps his weather eye on the mail box. and it Is estimated that if the special deliveries he gets were placed end on end. they would form a line nearly as long as his legs. "Shorty" is a good fellow, liked by all who know hint, and he has our slncerest best wishes. “Work is the first prerequisite of xiicrexx." G BKl'NICK ADAMS. A.B.S.S. “Mis Adam ” A Hit its, Georgia 'He t oo l, street maid. If I who trill bt clever; l)it ntihlf thintjf; tin not dream them all day Inmj. And lit ax make life and death, anti I lint rant forever, One t rand sweet sunt .'’ Heuulce 1ms been with us but one year and her gentleness of manner and sweet temper have won for her h right warm place in our hearts. He u nice Is the very embodiment ami spirit of the above lines of KliiKsley. In fact when interviewed as to her philosophy of life, what should she give but. ‘■(let something out of life worthy of Imparting to others." To the person who thinks deep and says little there Is bound to come the getting of something worthy of passing on to others. W ith it also comes the deep understanding and appreciation that few of us possess. Iteunice has reflected credit upon both Lucy Cobb Institute and the State Normal, which she attended previous to entering the University, by the splendid record that she has made in Iter work this year. '•(let somethin t oat of life worthy of imjiartintj to others." IU I II ALSTON BATHS. B.S.Kd. "KiTtr Dallas, Texas Pioneer Club; Pi Bela Phi Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, "22; Captain Basketball Traill, '20; Delta Psi Kappa; Girls UiHc Team. Ituth was a pioneer at Georgia. And sure she did not therein miss her calling. For does she not possess the requisites of a pioneer? Pressing toward the goal, true to Iter mark, possessing an insatiate love for the old camp along the newly blazed trail -such a wayfarer proved Ituth. when after the tirst year of co-education at Georgia, she came wandering back, hundreds of miles across Texas winds to finish her education at her Alma Mater. Her loyalty and truth spoke forth In Iter basketball goals, or In the many evidences of a good shot found In the middle of a bull’s-eye during the rifle practice, and best of all In her sincere attitude toward all her friends. W'c wonder If. after she shall have entered her profession, we should be far wrong In still creating pictures of her which seem to us now so characteristic—Ituth full of life and enthusiasm, hitting the gypsy trail In much the same manner as she headed the hikes of our University Y. V. C. A. "Thinif seem sweeter when we possess them not»Irl'-' -J VJ C MAIMU’KIUTK MOOHK KKAI.K. A.B.S.S. “M akgahkt" Savannah, Georgia 0lii Omega Bert Michael Prlxe. 22; President V. U C. A.. ’’£2; Pioneer Club, 21, '22; Treasurer 7. Kliac Club, 21; 'I ha I in n Club. 21, 22; Chi Delta Phi. Marguerite, of whom nothing more need be said than. "To know her Is to love her." came to Georgia two years ago. n graduate of the State Normal. She entered the I’nlverslty filled with many lofty ambitions, which she. triumphing over every obstacle hut remaining withal, the same lovable character, has realized during her two years f study hero. Attached to her name are some of the highest honors possible for a student to attain, but greater than all of these is her true friendship and love for every one which are expressed even in the smallest acts of her every day life. Marguerite, your ideals are high, may they always remain so in the after years when you shall look back upon your Alma Mater as tin inspiration of many of them. ’’ Irani ichal I leant when I want it, ami I know 5chat I iranl rii ht well.” Ill’BV MAH IE BKI.I., A.B.S.S. “Hf»v” Waleska, Georgia Pioneer Club; Zodiac Club Vice-President Zodiac Club. Here Is a lady who should have Inhabited the old sphere some centuries ago. Not that she is a old fashioned girlie—she Isn’t—but because she Is such a student and a lover of the writers of ye olden days that to hoar her talk you would think she knew them all personally—why she never puts "Miss" before the names of the Neuscs -yet she is the essence of refinement and culture. Iiul»y Marie has been one- of the most zealous members of the Zodiac Club—If you want to hear about It and Sts activities Just ask her. In all things Just ns In this, she puts her whole heart and soul. To have her behind a thing means its going thru: In other words, she’s dependable, a truly enviable thing to have said about one: if you can think of anything better she truly merits'll! “.Vo to hr influenced by Innmni frail tier hut to lank elrailily toward an ideal." a AI.ICK KI.K.MKNTINK CHANDI.KK, A.R.S.S. “Ki.k.m ' Athens, Georgia When Alive was a student nt Lucy Cobb she was voted tin bent looking girl in school, ami since that time her looks haven’t changed for the worse. She was also one of the best students In her class, and edited that powerful literary organ. Nods and Hecks, the Lucy Cobb annual, her senior year. After receiving Miss Millie’s blessing. Alice tried Cunsfan llall for a time, hut she decided that Athens was the place for her and came buck to be it Co-ed. Her work at the Cnlversity hits been a credit to iter former institution: iter marks are always above the average. Furthermore, despite the keenest competition. Alive holds the record of having come In late to more classes than any other "town girl" Co-ed. In other words. Alice Is all right. She dances or attends classes or entertains with a cheerfulness and earnestness that commands everybody's friendship. There Is Just one person you would like better than Alice, ami that's iter mother.. “Krauti if truth, truth beauty—that if nil you knmc on rnrth, unit all ye need to know ' .MANY K 1C HANDS COLVIN . A.11. “Dick" Atlanta. Georgia Pioneer Club; Phi Mu President Pioneer Club, '22; Malinger Girls’ Basketball Team. 21; Basketball Team, "20. S21; MciiiIht Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, '20, '21; Junior A.B. Ucpreseiitative Student Council, 20, '21; Vice-President Pioneer Club. 21; Chi Della Phi. "Hick." as she Is called by her many friends on the Campus, is an all-round girl. Her talents extend from the Itille Cange to the Isnv School. Kntering the I’nlvcndty as a Sophomore with the llrst of the Co-eds. she took an outstanding place among them. She has entered all phases of college life, and In each hits stood out prominently. She has the honor of being the llrst woman to enter the I.umpkln Law School and the first one to register in Franklin College for an A.B, degree. She has a personality which makes and holds many friends. She Is n goixl student, a strong leader and n splendid girl. Though we are not prophets, we know that she will be successful In anything she undertakes. We say this because we know her. “Inter irel life thru itf flower 'A ■ . r" IN A ELBIN COOI’EK, A.B.S.S. “I na" Athens, Gcorgiti Don't got It Into your head that there will over he n day when Miss Cooper can be called “old”! Possessing the keenest sense of humor and just bubbling over with fun and wit. she will always he young and an entertaining eotnpanlon. Her characteristics and descriptions of people and incidents are as clever and si Mints neously witty as any Mark Twain can offer. Maybe It is a little dirricult to let little hoys wash their faces in Spanish, hut she can make so many timely remarks about It that those sitting near her get convulsed with laughter. There Is one thing that she has made up her mind to do and it will he the host hot that she will do It -that Is to pass up French without learning Pro. l.ustrafs French Verb Hook by heart. Under this eloak of wit Is a sterling character, kind, sympathetic, and hearing nobly her share of the world's responsibilities. Miss Cooper Is a genuine and delightful woman. “Just try to hold font to the highe t ideal that float aero f nig vision in moment of exalt at ion ’ ALLEK ELIZABETH DOILSEV. B.S.H.E. Eliza'' Athens, (icurgin Homccon Club; Chi Omega •hminr Representative Student (iovcriiment s-social ion, ’21; President lloniecon Club, "22; Alpha Mu. Hi! What’s the thrill today? Anybody who knew Elizabeth and heard from Just around the corner the above words would know they were addressed to her. Of all the people we ever knew, she has the most thrills—this year she has thrilled over tin Homccon lub as Us President, thrilled over Oh I Omega and thrilled over Alpha Mu. and thrilled over -oh! well she wouldn't want his name mentioned Just now! Eli ihclh is always "tea-hounding” yet she always has those lessons up, even tho the most brilliant social event of the season took place the night before. Next year she will certainly bo missed off the Campus. Her ever ready smile and word of cheer has been a source of Inspiration to teachers and students alike. We hate to bid you farewell, may you have much success In the adventures of l|f« . and we know whatever you do. wherever you go. you will reflect ercdlt on your beloved Alma Mater—Old Georgia. “The les I syrak, the more meditate.'’ I IQh:; ,A • . 'V w,« u r G fr =n NNA BELLE DRAKE, H.S.H.E. “Hannah" At liens, Georgia Vlplia Mu; Honiecoii Club; V. ('. A.: Froi-dent T- Club. Heboid! Tin- Solomon of tin Home Economic Kiris In I lie chemical worhl she Is a real wonder ■Alpha amino Heta phenol propionic acids. etc., etc., hold no terror for her. .Mailame Curie. you had hotter look out if you don't want to come down from your coveted pedestal—not only docs Anna Hello stand first In her classes hut also In the Hist ranks In the hearts of those who know her lu'st. She Is «iuiel and unassumtnK In her manner, yet possessor of it personality with an undercurrent that once you are enKulfed within Us flow you are held wIlllnKly. Indeed she makes a wonderful pal. Anna Hello, we arc dreamlnu biK dreams for you and out in the big field of life we have visions of them conihiK Into realization—there's no reason why you shouldn't reach the top. "Hitch your waK n to a star.” and while you pull we are pushing. lion voyage: "dire to the xcvrhl the best i ou hare, an inlinl-fnl of the returns." KATHLEEN DRAKE. A.B.Etl. “Cat" Alliens, Georgia I’ionecr Club; V. W. C. A.; Spanish Club; I.‘Alliance Frnncai.se. Although It la sometimes said that intellectuality and coldness go hand In hand; we who know Kathleen realize that Is not the case with her. In the two short years that she has been with us she has made her Impress on the Intellectual life of the University und her gracious word and cheerful smile have lent much to the brightening of our lives. Here Is the artistic nature Interested In the beautiful myths of long ago and in Cupid particularly. although that Cupid Is just as real as Is an Instructor of our own campus who frequently makes his apiwarnnce at the door of the psychological laboratory and other convenient places when she Is about. Yet. In spite of this Impractical phase of her nature, she has the force of character to bring about the desired end. and the real worth that makes us feel glad that we know her and that she Is one of our number. "Keen the heoriest harden t rmc Vujhter trhen home irith a smile.’’ . rs K , ' VOP"’ -} 3l' fv , "V1 «r v A snntnniH' hIMI ;i IfifoA a , I;! iSflli irnTTW LI LA BLANCHE EDWARDS, I3.S.I1.E. “Mi« Lila” Oxford, Georgia President of Ciirls’ Student Council; Vice-President ilomccon; V. W. C. A. Cabinet, '21 and 22; Alplm Mu; House Council, 22; Girls’ Glee Club; Chi Delta Phi. The Slate Normal School has furnished us with another of those priceless Jewels who this time is none other than Lula Edwards. She needs no write-up to tell of her two years record at the University of Georgia. for do not the honors that her fellow students have bestowed upon her bespeak the confidence and esteem that she has won while here? She has been faithful and diligent In all that she has undertaken. As President of the Student Council, she has shown love for the Kiris and a sympathetic understanding of their problems as University women. Lula says that if you can not lie a moss gatherer, do not be a stone thrower, and she lives up to this. too. for she speaks only Kood of others. “None knew her but to love her. none named her but to praise." “If you can’t be o moss-ijntherer, don't be a stone thrower." NANCY CURE, R.S.II.E. "Naxck” Dawson, Georgia ilomccon Alpha Mu; Associate Editor of Agricultural Quarterly. Nancy came to us from the State Normal School with an enviable record and she has been leading her classmates a rather rapid race in trying to keep apace with her during the two years that site has been at Georgia. In fact Madam Gossip would have it that Nancy is somewhat a shark when it comes to chemistry and a few other sclentltlc courses, and If certain popular week-end past times among some of the Co-eds be termed scientific. Pin sure that Nancy ranks A plus. A casual glance at this quiet, unassuming classmate would indicate that she is Just an ordinary co-ed. but closer acquaintance reveals to one that the mechanism of Nancy's general makeup is very extraordinary. Jn fact it is so unusual that there are no few guesses as to her future career. Whatever line of future activity may he her choice there can lie no doubt of a wonderful success for her. She has the l»est and simerest wishes of her classmates. “If I xcere loved os I desire to be. this world iron hi be a jmradise to me.”WKKN KI.I' .AHKTII HOI.DKN, A.I1.S.S. "Qdiexik” Alliens, (Sntrgin Alpha Delta Pi Behold and i »n«ler well. "Queen «if the Co-eds"! This charming young lady with the smiling brown ••yes and equally brown bobbed hnlr made her advent among us about a year ago, but even In (hat short time has dearly evinced her right to the aforesaid title. Queen Is very reticent In regard to her love affairs and consequently little Is known of them. However, she has been known to make several trips to Virginia lately—to Kandolplt-Ma-••on. of course ? . Among the many charming qualities of this lady's personality are her absolute sincerity and whole-hearledncss. qualities rarely met with In the modern American girl. Tho not ul all desirous of academic honors. "Queen" has made for herself a very creditable name In scholastic circles. This fact, together with the many energetic characteristics of her nature, points to a large measure of success In whatever path of life site may choose to take— it path paved all the way with the best wishes of her many slneero friends. "The xerret of xuccexx »jr conxtnnci to mr toxe.” MARY III'NT Kit MARTIN, A.R.S.S. "Mahv" Athens, Georgia Chi Omega Vice-1’resident of Pioneer Club, s£i; Member Zodiac ('lull. Mary Is an Athens girl and one of the representatives of the State Normal School. She has done her two years work at the I'nlverslty In high style nnd lists shown a special proclivity for pulling down "inns” (n Zoo- -an achievement very few people can l oa»xt of. A more conscientious student. whether in classroom or lit outside activities. has not at tended the Cnlverslty. When yon want anything done. If you ask Mary, she will ho right there with the goods. Mary possesses nn unusual soft and pleasing voice and with her quiet and gentle ways has won her place In the esteem and affection of all. She Is a good s| oi t and always ready to enter In and have a g«xal time. We are not In a position to say what Mary's plans for the future are. but we feel mighty sure that they will be carried out and In a way that will be of greatest serv'ee. Mary, may you always have the host of good fortune, is our wish. "Stirre.ix Iremix on the heelx of erertf riijht effort.”G Wll.M.A .11'ANITA MITCHKI.I.. B.S.II.K. “Bill" Calhoun, Gror ia President of Zodiac Club; Vice-President of V. V. C. A.; Vice-President of House Council of Woman's Building;; V. W. C. A. Cabinet, ’21; Secretary of Zodiac Club, 21; Treasurer of House Council. 21; Homeeon Club; "T” Square Club; Georgia Naturalists, 20; (Wee Club, 21. She's no; much to look at. "much" referring to quantity, not quality, but looking long and hard you perceive that here Is a little hunch of nerves that mean all pep and go. In the course of a week she uses enough energy to run a good sized loco-inot|vo a long way. hut we'll wager |f well used. She likes a Rood time hut she is not frivolous: witness her very serious pursuit of the Art and Science of Home Kconotnles. Her training here is in the right direction, and some day we expect to see published from her pen some hook as to "The Care and Keeping of the .Methodist Parsonage." Well, here's Joy and happiness. Hilly. "So lire thnl irhen you tlir the untlertaker will hr sorry.” ANNI-: HCTII MOOKK. B.S.C. “Axnik Kctii” Decatur, Georg'a Phi Mu Thalian; Pioneer Club; Zodiac Club; V. W. C. A. Cabinet. A vivacious stnlle for old And young alike, a gentle disposition, a magnetic ability for attracting the elusive first letter of the alphabet, and a friendly willingness to help every one with whom she comes In contact, must distinguish Anne Uuth from the ordinary girl. It Is a distinct surprise to the stranger to hear Anne Uuth talk learnedly about stocks and l onds. Insurance and Wall Street transactions, until lie realizes her unlimited knowledge of such subjects, apparently so foreign to her loving nature. She will make a |H?rfeet secretary for some rich business man. Truly marvelous Is this winsome young lady's pro|H»nslty for bootlicking the teachers, even In the physics department. as was demonstrated by the acquisition of a tiny compass for her watch strap. The campus will miss Anne Uuth's cheerful greeting and cord I At manner next year, hut she will long he remembered here as one of the brightest and most attractive co-eds that ever entered the old iron arch way. "I 'a rift if if Hie f iirr of lifr—the epirer the better.'  MARION BAL’DKY MOO 11K, A.B.S.S. Savannah, Georgia Tlialians Where did she 1ml! from, this hunch of good natured sunshine that we call .Marion? She always greets the fellow students with one of those enticing, contagious smiles that comes no matter what happens. Is there any wonder that she has sy many admirers among the opposite sex? This smile is not the only admirable quality that Marlon IK ssesses that many are envious of. for who has ever seen the fair Marion with her nose In a book any later than twelve I . M.. and yet who outranks her In classes? She has made a very line record for herself while at Georgia. There Is nothing that site undertakes that she cannot accomplish. Loved by those who know her best, liked by others who know her less, but admired by all. Is the best way of expressing the popularity and esteem that Marlon has won during her two years stay at Georgia. It was Itamlolph-Macon's loss and our gain when she came to us in her Junior year. '•Whence it thif learnint ? Hath thy toil o'er hook continued the midnii hl oil!' IDA KI.I .ABKTll POIND, A. II. till. Athens, Georgia IMii Mu Secretary and Treasurer of Women's Student Government Council, ‘22; Secretary of Pioneer Cltili, '22; Chi Delta Phi. XolMidv has to he asked to say good things aiKHil Ida I'otiud. tile good tilings must be said because a person would have to be deaf, dumb and blind not to recognize that she Is eminently worth while. Those who know her admire her because she stands for the liesi and highest in womanhood. She is true. Just and dependable. She has the strongest convictions and opinions and yet she is big enough to "get the oilier fellow's viewpoint." Tills old world would certainly be a more comfortable and pleasant place if there were more daughters. students and citizens like Ida Pound. She has a most enviable record for scholarship, being one of the two to record the highest grades in the senior class of "I'l. She is an alumna that even a school as renowned as the University of Georgia will l»e proud to claim. “ « »inett comet with fulfillment of dnti .” -SI •Vcj § Vj-.; c' G d iSL FRANCKS HAKKK SIMPSON, H.S.I1.K. “Franc 13” Decatur, Georgia Houieeon; Alpha Mu V. C. A. Cabinet, '21; Vice-President of Student Government Association of Women, '22; President House Council, '22. Sh!! Sli-h-h!! You probably think a tornado Is bursting In your door. to find thut It Is only Frances, our House Council President, who believes in doing everything on the strict q. t., but who incidentally makes more noise than the objects of her "shoos." (N. It. Said objects are not chickens, for such an incident as the above often takes place around mid-night in the "Co-ed barn.”) To see Frances walk across the campus Is to know that she Is full of "pep"' and enthusiasm and that whatever that bundle of energy gets behind in life. It is bound to make rapid progress forward. Frances comes to us from Agnes Scott, where she left an enviable record and her two years' course at Georgia has been attended by high marks from her "Profs” and respect from her fellow students. Her sunny nature has won for her a warm place In the hearts of University students of both sexes. " Moil fill i in thr chief virtue:'' MARY FI.1ZAIlKTIl WHITK, II.S.1I.K. "Wiling'' Camion, Georgia Y. W. C. A. Cabinet: House Council; Girls' Glee Club; Ilomccoii Club; Zodiac Club; Georgia Naturalists’ Club, 21; “T" Square Club; Vice-President ”T’ Square Club; State Prize Kssnv- -"The Great Seal of Georgia”; Chi Delta Phi, Who Is Mary? Why Mary Is our essayist and she hasn't won as many prizes yet as she's going to in the future. Her enviable college career Is only half of what you think. Yes, she's studious, makes good grades and all of that, hut she's an ••xpert along other lines as well. Ask her if she ever uses tier mind for purposes such as will trap us foolish ones with a catchy problem. As for thoughtfulness! She always thinks of things like smuggling you a piece of toast on a cold morning when your alarm accidently didn't go off on time or bringing your mail if she happens to he passing by. All In all, Mary Is made of line stuff and whatever she determines to do "it Is to he.” so knowing that she will determine to do only the finest, our corolary is—Georgia will some day be even more boastful of being Mary's Alma Mater." " f in the fiulirtil holiliui out. Hint tnnkr.r the xcinner win.’’ mu rV V-'i 11 ttj 111111111111111 Is t, " 5vvC ■ • v,j fa %S) •V;nr season now, the ash tree stirring red Like maiden’s blush, before the kiss of Spring: Four seasons now the cardinal returns to sing, And green grass creeps beside the lane we tread Which soon we leave for pilgrimage and so, Four seasons usher Spring—and then, a day firings dune who sounds a silver call away To tasks beyond these paths, but ere ice go— IVe plant this tree—Cod give if sun and rain! That it may spring to lofty limb and bear Good fruit, and shelter give, and shade-- this prayer Fulfill for those who follow us amain. JVe plant a tree—ourselves a symbol thing 'That, too, must spread and span —and years must greet Fruition time. That fruit of ours be sweet, God give us, too, the sunshine and the rain! 1-4 Senior Law Class History HIS year’s Senior Law Class entered tlie University in September. ns the largest class in the history of the Law School; and we come to graduate the second class under the three-year curriculum, and still the largest class in history “whereof the memory of man runneth not to the contrary." But as we quaff from the cup of recollections the reminiscences of the past, there comes the echo: "Law. in its most general comprehensive sense, signifies essentially a rule of action”. This was the first siege gun fired in the battles staged around the Four Hills of Blnckstone. We emerged from the fatal encounter, crippled, disorganized, and several of our number realizing that they had answered through mistake the call of Justinian. Again we sallied forth about the ramparts of Common Law Pleading and fought our hardest battles at the .Mount called Equity. At the dawn of our Senior year there were still others who aspired to the call of other pursuits. Now. as we view our class as a whole, we find it diversified in activities. taking an active part in every phase of college life. Among our number are several graduates, the "tallest songbird" in college, and the "littlcst college man" in the world, undiscovered regions included. The whole class believes that the three-vear course has offered the opportunity for more efficient research work; and that, under the excellent tutelage of Dr. Morris, Judge Cornett. Col. Upson and Judge Andrew J. Cobh, whose inspiration and example and profundity in the law we are the first to share since his return to the Faculty, we are all better fitted to meet and overcome obstacles in the legal world and to give Georgia a gift of citizenship by reason thereof. —IIlSTOIIIAN'. nmnniiiiimmniinnmrmnnnnmnntuiimnninu  G yjM KOBF.KT I.ANIKK ANDKItSON, JK.. A.It., L.L.U. "I.onxik' Macon. Georgia I I»i Kappa; Jcffcrsoniaii; I’ll! Dcltn Theta .Mandolin Club; President Glee and Mandolin Club, s22; President Pan Hellenic Council; Football Manager, ’19; Vice-Presi lent Senior Class. ‘20; Senate Club; Senior Hound Table; Gridiron Club; Phi Delta Phi. Uidles and gentlemen, clear the stage for one "l.onnle" Anderson, the central city's favorite. There are only two men in college who have ever seen his hair much shorter than at present, and one of them walked the lowers of a freshman with him. We must take notice that "Isinnle" hasn't spent six years in the t'nlverslty for nothing. During this time he has won two degrees and well does he deserve them. He has been quite an exponent on the Glee and Mandolin Club and entertained thousands of Georgia's Citizens with the charm of Ills box. •Tamnle.' we have been honored liy your association and fellowship. Your kind disposition and earnestness of purpose make us love you. Continue In your good works and all will be well. Accept our wishes for a great career. ’‘Aehierement if the croicn of effort ami the diadem « thought.” U.I.F.N JOHNSON ARNOLD. LL.ll. “II.XI-" Monroe, Georgia Phi Kappa; Jeffersonian; Sigma Alpha F.psilon Freshman Club; Buccaneers; G. M. ('. Club; Phi Delta Phi. Great Joy tempered with some slight consternation reigned in the metro| olls of Monroe on September :t. 1899. A. D. There was Joy for the populace knew that a great barrister had been given to the world. "Ilap” Is more or less a landmark around the I'nlverslty. this being Ids fifth year. This June lie will return to Monroe, with his IX.11. tueked under Ids arm. there to hang out tils shingle In the practice of his chosen profession. "Ilap' is rather iju'et, which at first gave us the Impression of hashfulness. hut we soon found our mistake, and that he Is an example of the saying that. "Still water runs deep." Hut coming down to fuels. "Hap" Is one of the most likeable men In Ids class, always ready to do any thing he can for you—be makes one of the best friends Imaginable. "Ilap" enters everytidng with an enthusiasm that Is I round to earr.v hint far. ". life well lout if better than a death well iron." KKl’BKN ALVIN imASWKI.U Bk. 7. .i»:" Danila. Georgia Demostlicuiaii; Jeffersonian; Agricultural Club; Henry VV. (Irmly Speaking ('lull. Company, halt: I'age tin Junior Senator from Ccurgiu. for wo now have wlili ns a most ardent exponent of his doctrine . Do you erave an nrgn-mem. well, (luestion the integrity of this, his political hero, and he will hear with you at any time, any place and at any length, you choose the wea|M ns. After giving the "tSermun hoys” n thorough thrashing. his attitude toward the next war is "then ain't going to he none." Slm-e we have known him he has keen an industrious and hard working student and one of Ceorgia's host. Kvery Inch sincere in Ills beliefs, lie allows no statement to ico unchallenged. ho hrooks no opposition front whatever source and however dire may lathe consequence . Inasmuch as he expects every man to do his duty, he never refuses a helping hand to any one. True to his friends. Just towards his adversaries, we forsce In him a demagogue of parties hut an untiring statesman and an idol of clients. "(•ft the trinci ial thinifx of life, and do tint dirt re xx front thexe for uniiojtortanl thine x." BINA1I B. BOW KBS. LL.B. “Bi’SK" Canon, Georgia Demos! lieu in it; Jeffersonian With Bunk's exit the Colonial Theatre and Georgian Hotel loses their best patron. A more profound student and disciple of S'vanus. the I’ni-verslty can never honsi. It is rumored that he once attended a Saturday class, hut the same has never appeared to In- of record, lie Is reputed to have once taken voice at Luey'Oohh. hut this also does not appear to he on record. However, he Is one of the foremost "tenors" of the Uw Department choir, and Just where lie acquired this rare "tenor" is as uncertain as his age. A past master in the art of speculation and known "at one fell swoop of tick or tape" to have cured himself of a chronic disease, hy the simple process of elimination. We know not his plans for the future, hut his thorough mastery of the Blackslonian principles should rentier him able to procure for himself a place In the "limelight' in h's future endeavors. " ant afraid of nothing on earth, or abort• the earth, or under the earth, hot to do ter on fl.” A Bi G ; J Jig fRnjrllM JOSEPH ANDHKW BHOWN, M..B. "Brvr»: '' At lions, Georgia DemoiMlieniau; Jeffersonian; Henry Grady Speaking ’lul». The distinguished looking gentleman herewith has the honor of calling Athena his home. 11«• Is one of the many sons who have sought to attain the higher realms of the professional world thru the Instrumentality of the Lumpkin latw School. Though "Busier" has never stayed on the campus he has made it his adopted home on many occasions—he may frequently l.e found In Old College Hall of Fame, engaged In an animated conversation with the ‘immortal Triumvirate” the Inhabitants thereof "Messrs. Haves. Braswell and Few." But aside from this one digression from the trodden paths of duty. "Buster" Is rarely ever seen unless busily occupied in the analysis of some complicated legal problem. His friends are numbered by his acquaintances, and what more can he asked! With his cheerful aid alert mind. "Busier" will never lack clients and no Jury will he able to resist his earnest appeal. Hood luck. "Buster." and may Dame Fortune accompany you down the jwithways of life. "The pnlli of duty I .iholl endeoror to trarel, fearing no frit oml trending no consequences.'' NKPIIEW HINT. Cl.AllK, "Nkw” Savannah, Georgia Phi Kappa; Sigma Alpha Epsilon Buccaneer Club; Pan-Hellenic Council, '20. 21. 22; Vice-President. '22; Jeffersonian; One Club; Phi Delta Phi. After deserting the sunny south to prep at Igtwreneevllle. and thence via V. M. I. for two years. Nevy returned to Ids native state to study law. Nevy is a many-sided man: he is a master in tile art of making friends, a faithful student, one of our most brilliant socIr! butterflies, and is looked ii| on as being one of the most popular men In the lidverslty. After doffing the cap and gown with Ills L!,.B. to encourage him. Nevy expects to descend the ladder of preferment In Savannah. We have confidence that If he can convince a Jury as easily ns he can obtain an affirmative answer from the fair sex. the future generations will abide by Judge Clark’s decisions. In conclusion, he it said that Nevy numbers as his friends ull who know him. To a man who can make friends so easily and hold them so endearingly, we predict a happy life. "The grenteft error. ore commit ted and the mart judgment i slnnm in the choice of ittdi-cidnal. .” « [J M r—1— |H rpJyH f 1 t •' ■»— •• - - - —  1 V i rVviWv v G MITCHK1 L SETH DKKLK. “Deek” Metier, Georgia Demostlieninn; Sigma Chi Cadet Lieutenant “20; Cadet Captain, 21; Cadet Colonel, 2 2; American Legion; Club; Biftads; Jeffersonian; Counsellors Club; Buccaneers; Baseball Team, 20, 21. 22; Gridiron Club; President Jeffersonian. Battalions, attention! Beat! Behold In the foreground, gentlemen. W clllng-ton’s only equal. Stonewall Jackson's only rival, our friend, classmate, and Cadet Colonel. Mitchell Seth Dekle. "Dceole" halls from the wilds of Southern Georgia. where Atlantic’s balmy breezes are said to rustle the Jungles around the metropolis of Metier. Seth has acquired a happy faculty of guessing, has polished It into a line art; and we are Informed (reliably) that this accounts largely for his record In law. "Be true to your conviction ." Seth likes to play ball, and had it not been that "Sllvey" coaxed him to devote himself mere assiduously to the legal pursuit, otherwise. Tyrus ami Kutlt. but more especially the big moundsmen. would be trembling for their tottering fame. He Is a good student as bis list of honors demonstrate, also conscientious and consistent, and we predict for him. upon bis return to the regions of Southeast Georgia, friends, success and wealth. “Let junlire be done tho’ the heaven fall.'’ WALTER HUGH DONOHUE, LL.B. “Mike” Savannah, Georgia Counsellors; .1 effersonian. Yes. he Is from Savannah, and a more Jovial Irishman there never was. Ills fame as a dlspeller of gloom has spread far and wide and he Is panacea for all Ills. "Mike” is another member of the renowned biw School quartet and is said to have amassed quite a fortune Ik chuso of his dexterity In emitting harmonious discords. 'TIs said of "Mike" that though he has been In Athens for the past three years, his heart has been In Savannah. If this is true, we can account for the "pep" that he has displayed, for it is for such ns that men perform their noblest deeds. "Mike." we will carry with us always the memory of your quaint "Howdle." and your spirit of optimism will spur us onward to greater deeds. We have had the pleasure and privilege of hearing "Mike" argue cases In Moot Court, and If the earnestness of knowledge which characterizes his work, there is incorporated into his work In the future his success ns a criminal lawyer seems assured. “Work- a com pan ion in all of our xtruyyle SA.MIKI. WAKHKN KKW. 1.1..11. “Ski.iwm" Apalachee. Georgia Drninstlieiiiuii Agricultural Club; Henry V. Grady Club; Jeffersonian. "Scliloiw" halls from the I.room ami wige fields around Apalachee, and they even say that he fol-lowed a pair of plows hack of a train into Athens. We know him mainly for his "partnership” with Kraswcll and Haynes: and we are told; lie Is the co-principal In many unfathomable maneuvers staged in the law library. In spite of the handicap of his environment aforesaid partnership), he has emerged with delhiuonc.v. in two courts: first, he positively and emphatically states that he Is constitutionally opposed to wearing a derby ami carrying n cane. tWImt a metamorphosis! I ist Sunday, seen with a cane, and a Jane.I Second, that h Is desperately ami jmsslonately in love. Allegation vehemently denied, hut circumstantially proved. He came to us victim of "eo-edu-phobia; ' Imt now he leaves afflicted with “co-edu-manla." hi fact, he has not missed a single performance at the Colonial during Ills sojourn here. Hut "Seldom" has made the University a good student and will return to give Georgia a higher gift of citizenship. May the satisfaction purchased by thy resolves he the crowning reward of a life well spent. “!u Ih'iitt lifx sublime that pierce flic nii fiI like slars, ami ii'ith their inilil persistence nrpe wan’s search In raster issues." JOHN DBWKY GODPKKY, 1.I..B. I.ukv Sandersville, Georgia Dciiiu.stlirnian; Jeffersonian "Jack" is entitled to much praise, because hi the short space of two years lie has risen from the humble iMjsItinn of being the "target” of Dr. Morris, to a very high and exalted location, that of his "rlghthand man." Aside from this merliorlus accomplishment, he shares first honor with Col. Gray in the contest for 1’romlcr dispenser of Jokes In the University. "Jack" may be truthfully called the Heau Mrnnnnel of the Law School, and with his "dolby” and flaring 1k w ties, ho cuts a wide swath among the fair sex of Athens and adjoining towns, lie Is also a singer of note, and Ills warbling may lie heard dally by all who enter the law building. "Jack” Is a student who is not content with mere preparation of his classroom work, hut may he found nightly laboriously delving Into the reports, assisting a certain local attorney in tbe preparation of his briefs and other documents. This Interest continued will Ik amply re-' "rVT Jflf: i-T'' V ."r- G J? KDWAUD JA.MKS GOODWIN, LI..1L ”Gooi y" Savannah, Georgia Dcmonstlicnian; Jeffersonian I.;«Ues anil gentlemen, we have with us today a disciple of Plshnu. the Great. whose chief oecupa-tion Is poumlinK out "Ja• : ." either on the piano in the rear of Kress' famous emporium, or upon the floor. decrepit waste basket In the Senior classroom. Hut truthfully. •‘Goody” Is a musician of llrst water, anil his services are always In great demand. When a freshman, he was noted for his many eccentricities, chief of which was his Indulgence in the habit of carrying lead pipes concealed in the folds of his umbrella. “Goody's" bettor Judgment prevailed here and these were east aside for the more serious thoughts of life. 'T's said that he has a way all his own with the ■allies, and of this we are quite certain. Hut laying •ill Jokes aside. "Goody” is a conscientious worker, anil one who stands high in the esteem of the entire student body. To know him Is to like him. and this combined with Ids legal lore, causes us to predict for him a brilliant future. “}fake book III tool . bill be nut it xerrant to thrill." IIKKBF.UT (I.INTON Git AY, “Akciiik” Augusta, Georgia Flii Kappa: Lambda Old Alpha Jeffersonian; Counsellors Club; Henry Grady Club; Fan-1 Icllcnic Council; Charter .Member of Connelv Fust Disabled Veterans of the World War. This young fellow is another of Augusta’s own. The I'nlversity has been immensely benefited because of his sojourn within Its circle. Ills example as a student has been a marvelous Inspiration to his fellows and his accomplishments in every way are highly gratifying to his professors. They would mourn for the day of bis parting If It were not for the bigger game In life to be played after college days have faded Into one of the memories of the past. Herbert, a glad hand goes with you and the highest hopes for a great success at the bar shall ever be present in the hearts of your classmates. Let us hear from you. for we are expecting the best and are satisfied that nothing short of happiness awaits you. Adieu! Adieu! “Jewel hare point)t that icon ml un; fortune hue feller I hoi fling—Heller the Jr emu of a beggar than the Hi content of a king’'  5 1 WKSl.KY THOMAS HAKC.RKTT. JR. “Wm” 1 i fton, Georgia IMii Kappa; .Jeffersonian; Kappa Alpha l- reshinan Club; First Sergeant S. A. T (' • Senate; “One" Club; ( .lee Chib. ’in. ’20; Varsity Baseball, 19; Scrub Football. 19. '20; “O" Club-Fan-Hellenie Council; |»hi Delta Phi. It was back In 11 17, many years before the xol- ee'iVU|€|ib 11 ‘ of or » »esinen hail conctlxed tin Idea of n four-power Pacific pact unt‘;,yJook,,,K l eclmcn of Georgia man-hooil familiarly known as “Wes.” entered the University. And during the five years that he has been here, he has made his presence known. In every phase of eollcjcc activities, he has ranked Hfi a lender. On the diamond. cr ld. and even In the ballroom, he has been a favorite. “Wes" has been tuklnu law at the University. Whether or not this means that he Is to become u lawyer Is yet to be determined. Rut regardless of what phase of life's activities be may enter, we lielleve that he will be a favorite there also. Rest wishes, old man! "Hat, drink ami he merry.” .11 1.IAN IIART1UDGE, I.I..B. -Jimax" Savannah, Georgia •ffersoninn: Chi Phi; Buccaneers; Phi Delta Phi. Kind render, turn not this page In hwlc. |K n the beaming countenance of the InlmMabe Lilian, and then barn of the man. He r_'is ,=‘s ,ree years' mtmy Hi itnVnvmn .. hH fln.- record. Afl r K _ 0J tlie law »n his ntl»n are to t»eo«»«io « r»» ' |M,r tlie prohibition utlve heath, aud » '", ‘‘ , ” out of Savannsh ,,,,r«meM« to ™ ‘ ability In the ito Jail. He has sii n|M| the best wishes tudy of hisko.nI luck will always f his friends for success ano c with him. “fat th other fellozc irorry. : JJONES HAYKS, I.L.B. “Uki v Kastanollrc, Georgia Dciunn.sthenian: Agricultural Club; Grady (Mill); Jeffersonian. Mere he Is. fellows, the inan who mistook a spell of chronic laziness for a call to practice law. No man ever math a happier exit from the tutelage of the learned "Doctor." and so great Is the Dr.’s affection for him. and vice versa, that lie has by a special request taken a number of his courses twice. As a consequence he has captured the coveted degree of DL.lt. He has been called upon to discuss the various phases of the law with a frequency approximating three million times, and it Is said that he once announced ready. Aside from his diligent activities in the laiw Department he Is frequently seen engaged in "tossing the Taurus" around old College’s hack yard. Hut this is simply a display of Bed’s outstanding characteristic, an unbounded love for the sjK rt of the toreador. He Is Indeed a true friend, sincere. amiable, and exemplary. His college career has been marked by a grim determination which will count much for success. “1 no man that knows more Ilian myself, Iml pity them (hat know less” IUC1IA HI) I.EH HICKEY. 1.I..IL "Hick" Atlanta, Georgia Phi Kappa; Jeffersonian; Sigma Alpha Epsilon Senate Club; One Club; President Jeffersonian; Phi Delta Phi. The class of twenty-one lost a man. that twenty-two was glad to get. when Hick changed his course from Academic to l aw. Hard working, conscientious, ever willing to do his part. Richard has Indeed passed his years successfully in the I’nlverslty. His genial personality, ready smile and quick wit, have won for him many friends, and wherever known he Is genuinely liked. Along with his work he has distinguished himself and the I’nlverslty as an eminent golfer of premier caliber. He has placed well In several Southern and National Championships, and In 1921 won the amateur title of Atlanta. Ills ability as a lawyer Is one that Is sure to attain the height of success. and make for him a record that will be admired by all who follow the profession. It will he mighty hard to tell you good-bye. old man. because you have been a friend good and true, but we are sure that you will show the same In your future life, that you have shown at Georgia. “When in ilouht. keep on talkinif.”MILTON LKK HOI.COMBK, LL.B. “Hoi.com he" Atlanta, Georgia Kappa Sigma I him of beauty it t joy forever!' The accompanying physiognomy represents one of the most moilest and retiring gentlemen that ever matriculated at the I’niversity. In his three years stay nmnng us. "Along the eool sequestrated vale of life He kept the even tenor of his ways." .Mr. Holcombe believes Hint success comes not alone to the noisy hut likewise to the quiet. It Is rumored hy those who know him Iiest that he yearns to change his present happy mode of existence and Join the benedicts of the silent majority. This rumor, however, we do not vouch for. I'pon leaving these sacred precincts, our friend will take up the practice of law. Where he will take it we are not Informed. He may In course of time achieve the distinction of a Justice of the peace and hold the unlettered minds in gaping awe as words of wisdom trickle from his Immortal lips. Best wishes. “Silrnre it t oliim.” HAKYKY JOHN KKNNKDY. LL.fi. “II. J." Bartlesville, Georgia I’ll Kappa; Chi l’lii President Junior Law Class; Commander University Post American Legion; Krcslimnn Impromptu Debate; Buccaneers; Pin Delta Phi. From the little village of Bartlesville. In and behold "it Daniel Is come to Judgment." From the poppy-covered fields of France lie returned to the Held of carnage of the Lumpkin Law School. A young man of sterling qualities, and n real gentleman. he has made his path through the 1'nlversity notable In many losjiects. Ills list of honors shows that Ills activities have covered divers lines. They range from the social activities of the Buccaneers and oratorical successes, to being leader of the Junior class and of the local American Legion Dost, to say nothing of being a shining light In the Barristers Club. Ills nature has made a friend for him of all who know him. His scholastic record is one of the best In his department, and we feel sure that highest success will crown his efforts. May the best of luck be with you. Harvey, always. ’"Stii something if you Imre to take it back."LINTON C.U. I)Y LAN IKK. LL.ll. "Sidney” Dcmnsfheninu Henry W. Grady Public Speaking Club. "Sidney" came to iis from Kmory. where he was h student in nrts. but on reaching: Georgia he had decided that Just one more g s»d lawyer was needed, and working with that in view has succeeded wonderfully well. He is n consistent student ami we believe one who possesses more "stickahilitv" per cubic centimeter than any other man in college, and with this essential requirement for success the future can have in store for him only the choicest of nature's riches. "Sidney" plays the violin well and we have also heard it said that he plays equally well u|H n the heart-strings of the opposite sex. And who could dispute it. ufter having mice gazed upon his radiant countenance? Our class Appreciates you. "Sidney." and we feel quite sure that witldn a few veara the old home town will l.e appreciating you fully as much hut calling you their own ".Judge" Under. "To in mi tut e at hern in In eonfegn i onr xceak-nenn brinin'; i nu alone are the nrlor in the i rrnt lira inn irhieh xcill be cam ileleil at life’n exit." ALKKRT THEODORE LEVIK, I.L.H. "T »:n” Montezuma. Georgia Demostheninn; Agricultural Club President DcnwsUionian; President Henry Grady Club; President Debating Council; Impromptu. '21; Solicitor-General Jeffersonian Moot Court; Secretary and Treasurer of Senior Law Class; Gridiron Club; Counsellors’ Club; Campus Club; Class Football; Class Basketball; Dr-mot Italian Key; Class Orator; President Athletic Association; Second Lieutenant in Army. The limiting of the desires of the rigid kind of ambition are two of tile Issues in the life of the successful. "Ted" has Instilled Hot It in his makeup: Self-denial, that he may serve others, and ambition of noble purpose. Ills record as a disciple of the law borders on the brilliant and with a better spirit than polonlus he has bound the hearts of bis comrades to him. He has the vision the ability and the motives that dominated the genuinely great of the Kmpire State and fortunate will be the men and the women, the hoys and the girls with whom he labors. He knows nothing of ostentation hut is charged with the spirit of a man. "Mai there be no moan in; at the B.-lli xchen I fint ant la nea." JA.MKS PBTKK McDOWHI.L. U..B. -Mac' Griffin, Georgin Phi Kappa; Jeffersonian Senate; Pan-Hellenic Council, 21; Secretary and Treasurer Pan-Hellenic Council, '22; Student Council, '22; 'I'au Sigma; Phi Delta Phi. NVe, who In the past three years have become more Intimately ae iualnte l with the gentleman of the accompanying likeness, take pleasure In Introducing him as u friend. If you have never been to Griffin, but have met "Mac.” you'll naturally believe It must he a good place. Provided that college life be a fair Index to ultimate success; then "Mac" has the scales already balanced in his favor. By glueing at his list of honors reminds us that he’s been a leader In everything attempted. He does things well, and has a way of gaining the confidence and respect of his fellows—a way of doing what he sets out to do. Does this seem extraordinary? No, not when you are referred to his philosophy of life, quoted below. Now can you understand why those who know him best have bound him to themselves with hoops of steel, and wish him many happy returns for a life well s| cnt! "HV tcho lire for ourtelre acroniplieh nothing." TIIKO JACKSON McGKK. I.I..B. “Mac” Butler, Georgia Dcmoxthenian; Agricultural Club; Jeffersonian Grady Public Speaking Club; President Gradv Public Speaking Club; Solicitor-General Mini! Court; Counsellors. All hall the original "tenant In possession of the I.umpkln Ijiw School...r. .1." Is a man of varied business experiences, having been employed In various offices, from that of a railroad up to that of his excellency the Governor of the State of Georgia. Coming to Athens three years ago. lie took Ids alside In Candler Hall with his established companion. Thomas. Then he was transferred to the law building, where he has been In "custodla legls" of the forgotten legal case. A man of very pleasing personality, a friend to all and esteemed highly by all who know him. "Mac'' (tossed the bar early In his career as a student and has since been conspicuous as a promising attorney in several legal controversies. A leader of men, a thorough and consistent worker, confident In his ability, we are compelled to predict for him a brilliant career before tlie bar of this state. 'l noir thin: In name undertaking you will succeed, and in owe foil. Know III! and he a won in each.'’?• EDWIN AHIEI. McWIIOKTKK. A.H., l.l.B. “Bu ck Hkai " Savannah, Georgia Demostbcnian; Jeffersonian Sophomore Declamation; Junior Cabinet; Junior Oration; Champion Debate; Senior Hound Table; V. M. C. A. Cabinet; Counsellors Club; President Senior I .aw Class; Impromptu Debate; Dcnio-tbeniHii Key. Hall to “Block Head.” the man without a doubt! This lad Contes to us from Savannah, lie entered the I'nlvorslty in the fall of MG and the six years spent here have well settled upon his record not a less fitting than the one with which we tercet him. Every day of his coll cue life he has been a blooming success. He has won almost every honor iwsslble to he had: has gained admiration of the faculty: respect of the student hotly, and last hut not least, "they" are thinking of hulldlnK a little nest. The good wishes of every member of your class go with you. "Block:" may your good works brink you many happy returns. We hope to hear from you In the future, for we are expecting great things of you. '•So lire in the Present that the Paul will hare no ret rets. the Future no front." ANDIIKW JOSEPH BVAN, I.I..B. "Vacation Jok" Savnnnnb, Georgia Dcmoslltcniaii; Jeffersonian The number of trips that "Vacation Joe" makes each year to the Free State of Chatham Is equivalent to the number of miles between here and there. The reason for these sudden and uproarious departures has never been discovered officially, hut 'tis said to be In response to the beckoning of some fair queen. His high average In class work stands as a tribute to the diligence with which he has applied himself while with us. Ills supply of Jokes is everlasting, and Ills dally greeting. "Say, hoys, have you heard this one," will always he remembered. It has been reported that "Vacation Joe" Js planning to desert the profession of law and follow the dollar over some other route. Wc hope this will not come to pass, for the bar will lose a very reliable man. Stay with us. old man. for we are sure that with your knowledge and personality you will become an invaluable asset to the Empire State of the South. "Smile nhrai s. One tall tear in the rujt of tear, the !riuk it make mitre hitter."JOHN WAI.TKH SHKPPAKI). A.H., I.I.. II. “Siiki ” JAM ICS C'liAl.MKKS SHI'.LOK, I.L.H. “Jakk" Atlanta. Georgia Dciuostlicniun Student Council; Football, ’!! , ’20, 21; Gridiron (’Ini); Inter CImss Basketball; President Jef-fersoniun Law Society; Vice-President Sophomore l.iiw ('lass; Jeffersonian; Impromptu Debater; Henry Grady Society; Phi Delta Phi. Here tie in. gentlemen. commonly known as "Jake." but to a secluded set as ".Jay-ko." He is another one of our Atlanta boys , but very different In nature as pertains to the opposite sex. A more violent denunciator of women was never created. Jake has been unions the most faithful of athletes, even to the expense of his roommates In appropriating their tied for dumb-bells and pillows for punoh-baK«. Aside from this lie has been one of tlie outstanding UKUres during tits three years career at ttie I'nlverslty. A rare comldiiation of good athlete, excellent student and a prince of a fellow, lie Is a quick thinker, a conscientious worker and exerts an honest effort In all of Ids undertakings. In the not far distant future, we predict that the bar of Georgia will feel his strength as a lawyer. ".Vo nnin ran rinr ta true t real nee a imlrs hr hr lairrauI af tin opinion of othrrt." Daisy, Georgia Phi Kappa; Henry V. Grady Society; Jeffersonian; Woodrow Wilson Foundation; Square am) Compass. Phi Kappa Annivcrsariaii. '22: Counsellors; Debating Council, ‘IS; Lieutenant Cadet Corps, 'lb; Impromptu Debater, 'IS, 21; Historian, Phi Kappa Centennial, '20; V. M. C. A. Cabinet, 18, 'Ifl. 20. 21, '22; Secretary Jewett Williams Post. American Legion; Cbniiipioii Debater, '22. At this |a lnt. gentlemen, we take great pleasure In presenting for your approval one John Walter Shepiiard. To one who has been around this institution for only a comparatively short time It seems that John has been here ever since the time when the "memory of man runneth not to the contrary.” During these seven years' stay among the halls of learning he has absorbed everything In two courses, and then, like Alexander, wept for more to conquer. He has gone about his work with a systematic and business like attitude and his quiet and unassuming personality has won for him friends by the scores. We are expecting big things of you. John. Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Who knows? Remember we are for you. and here’s luck. Go after them. hoy. and don't forget to take the kodak along. “Hr brief anti to the point: for hr irho con account for hie icortht and arte, in the owner of a prirrlr 'inn."WILLIAM GI.KNN THOMAS. LL.B. .? t'lHJE ' Jcstip, Georgia Demosthenian; Agricultural Club; Jeffersonian; Henry W. Grmly Speaking Society. Counsellors Club; President Jeffersonian Moot Court; President Henry W. Grndv Sneaking Society. "Judge” dime to us three years ago from the wi regress regions of South Georgia, anil in a short time he had endeared himself to us all. (hiring tills period he has risen from an occupant of Candler 11 nil to the lucrative position of "tenant In-common" of the Lumpkin Uw School. What better evidence Is needed of his business sagacity? "Judge" Is a baseball player of note, and though he has won many games, for some unknown reason he would never sign a contract, but at present It Is rumored that he Is planning to sign a life contract—nuff sed! A more - .eaious and conscientious worker Is hard to he found, and Ills every effort has carried with it a certain sincerity of purpose. Judging by the past he will go forth into his life's work "strong In will, to strive, to seek, to find. and not to yield." " ijrw'f the time that ire e ientl in collfi e hut the atlranlat r xce hike of o nr o ijiort unilir .'' IIAKVKV HKXKY TTSIXGKK. B.S.C.. LI..11. “Tv" Carrollton. Georgia Deiuostbcninii Beta Giiiiiiiim Signm; Cottnselb r; Glee and Mandolin Club. 17. ‘is. 19. 20; President Ivco-iioinies Society, 20; Vice-President Senior Class, Cheer Lender, 19. 20; Sophomore Declaimer; Spanish Club; Agricultural Club; Floor Walker Denmark Dining Hall: Vice-President De- most hrnian; Kconomics Society, and Henry "• Grndv Society; President Athletic . MocIntlon. -Tv" or "Honest Harvey." ns he Is known from the days of old. has been at the I nlversltj six vears. Since the admission of woman Into the sacred halls he has l»een converted froim a con firmed hater to an ardent lover of l,,e r"'r fn'; I rw- M eomnlet log Ids commercial course n in .eml?-d ?r enter the business world, but hearing BJrlrz. t jtsl Vo pwUct we would mark Ids destiny unparalleled oicm reject „ee,In ) tcorrnhout that of other : yon It hove it. nxc J. PltANK THOl’TMAN. L1..R. “Ciiiki " Port Valiev, Georgia Plii Kappa; Jeffersonian; Phi Della Theta; Pan-Hellenic Council; Buccaneers; Phi Delta Phi. Again the circle of Georgia’s distinguished and loyal alumni finds a worthy addition to Its ranks, said addition hailing from the Peach Kingdom of Port Valley. Indeed, Prank, so reserved in nature and dignified In hearing, can well he called a "peach product," for he Is as cherry and pleasant as the fairest blossoms, aial as seasoned and wholesome jis the mat ores t | icach that Georgia can boast. His serious mlndedness. his grave way of assuming responsibilities, and Ids dominant qualities of leadership have won for him the name of "Chief." In the pursuit of his professional career. Prank bids to make h level-headed counsellor and an able prosecutor. With Ids Intensely practical nature, he can draw up an excellent brief, with his dignity he should favorably Impress a Jury, and with Ids smooth How of eloquence and interesting way of telling things should convince the most obstinate of judges. Yet "Chief" loves his Jest and Is a regular fellow. A host of friends wish him the best of luck. “.I gooil judge decides fairly, preferring equity In strict lairS' MII.LKK (WKSWKI.I. NVA I.TON’, UL1L “Bpi.i.iikaij-' Augusta. Georgia Phi Kappa; Jeffersonian; Lambda Chi Alpha; Counsellors' Club; Pan-1lellcnic Council. This guy. Walton, comes to us from Augusta, and it may be added that he brings all the go sl graces of that little village with him. He only spent three years in the University, having entered the I .aw School in the fall of '19. All problems of a Blaekstonlan nature have found and enveloped this lad. but only to be subdued and overcome after a matter of time. They all look the same to him. The workings of a master ndnd and untiring effort have not fallen short of the requirements to meet the standard of excellence set out in his course. He lias acquitted himself In a splendid manner. It would he all hut fair to let this gentleman pass without making a final how to the fair sex of our good city. By his usual winning way. they have "Hopped" unt'l he has a string of admirers eredltahle to any man. and June -1st will find hearts not so light, nor spirits so gay. for. alas. Miller has gone away. ineasli chance is a gaud one only death is certain.” .JOHN BRYAN WILSON. “J. Stitt’' I-ogmivitlc, Georgia Demnsthenian; Agricultural Clul Grill iron Club; Counsellors’ Club; Debating Council; Campus Leader; President Sophomore Law Class; .Jeffersonian; Henry W. Grady Speaking Society; Hell and Black Staff; Business Manager Pandora. 22; Glee Club, ’ll). ’20, ’21. 22; Scrap Iron Four, ’20. 21; Georgia Four, 22; Campus Club; Floor Walker Denmark Hall, ’22; Proctor Old College. ’22. We have before us now "J. Stitt.” the elongated gentleman from Loganvllle. During his college career "Stitt" has not attained the "rep” of being a hookworm, but lias striven for the higher tilings in life. He not only leaves a scholastic record that many of us would envy, but has been the outstanding figure In campus leadership and graft. He is not a social artist, but few people have more ability as a mixer and friend-maker. There are three things we have against ".Stilt." Ills opposition to co-education, ills close association with "Pistol Jenkins,” and the oilier we dare not tell, hut even with these serious drawbacks. "Stitt” should develop into one of Georgia's leading legal lights. ‘■ e hug achicretl success, chose life has hern on ingjtiration anti whose memory a benediction."fl - I Here’s to the Class of ’22 Here’s to the ('lass of 1'went y-’I'wo, Wlnt hails from Georgia ('.; If’e’re for Georgia thru ami thru. Always will what e’er ice do. It'e'll fight for thee and true shall he, If’e'll not forget the Georgia Hah! Hah! liaise the eup to the best old erew. To the ('lass of Twenty-Two. C. T. Coxvkiis. -2Senior Pharmacy Class History HOUGH otir time at the University has Ihjcii comparatively short the same cannot be said of the time wc have spent attempting to gain a thorough knowledge of the science and delving into the arts of compounding. Twenty-two ambitious students entered our class, coming from far and near—from as far as Holland and as near as Washington, Georgia. And of the twentv-two six of us are left. It seems a good example of the biological law of the survival of the fittest. Put our survival has been largely due to the untiring efforts of an expert Faculty and especially of our professor in pharmacy, under whose guidance we have labored through some of the most difficult problems that may confront us in our profession. And we appreciate fully the opportunity which wc have had—-of In-ing under such a man as he and in such a school as the University of Georgia. Day after day we have met within the halls of the well known Terrell Hall, bv some known as “Terrible Hall", but to us it will always be remembered as a place where much valuable time was spent and a place where much useful information was gained, l.ike all classes, wc have our "ups and downs"—almost every kind, from explosions in the laboratory, due to some careless member, to being "shot" to the last man in the class room. And. too. wc have had arguments and "heated" discussions l»etween the members of the class, but. as we must learn from experience, we profit by it all and hope to gain our purpose in the end. And now as wc leave, each to his respective place, we feel grateful to the Faculty and to the University for the lessons wc have learned here, both scholastic and practical. W'e go out with a different view upon life and better fitted to overcome difficulties as we meet them. And each of us, in our individual way. aspires to bigger and greater things, so if our work does no credit to us wc will do credit to our work. And with our training here as a foundation we go out, each of us. in our individual way. aspiring to bigger and greater things, keeping ever in our minds the words of our beloved Chancellor. "If our work does not credit to us wc will do credit to our work”.rifigjfTfirira ai L M - G ItlSSKU. KDWIN HI. A NT MAUD, Pli.G. "Our Wakiioksk-' !.enh, (icorgin Deinosthcniiin Observe. Indio and gentlemen, this Innky lad from Ix ah. Georgia. It may ho pretty hard to llnd his homo town on the map. hut your first Inipres-sion upon gazing at him for a moment Is. that if "Blanch" Is u specimen of what they grow there, tlie town must he all right. Staunch and loyal to the G. ». I’, party. In takes meticulous care to stuy eligible In Demoxihenlan Society so that he may vote for his man when campus politics are on the boom. lie Is a shining light in Old College's basketball team, which, during the season, practices nightly around ten-thirty or eleven, the players clad In anything from.lt. V. IVs down. Hlunchard has demonstrated most convincingly that a mini can become adapted to any profession, for this natural born "rail splitter” has turned out to he a genius hx compounder of drugs. He has the distinction of shooting ! r. Wilson for a round hundred, something never before accomplished in the pharmacy department. I ulftll your highest ambition. "Blanch.” Marry, settle down and be happy. “If fame comes after death. am in no harry for it." ANDUKW Bl.OKMICK, Pli.G. “Bii.i.” Deventer. Holland President Cosmopolitan Club; Secretary Pharmacy Class; Janitor Beanery. Clad. Indeed, are we to have as classmate and friend this honest-faced young globe trotter who. dur.ng his two years at the University has had one ever present problem, and that: how to curb his restlessness long enough to get a degree: hut this lie has done, and In good fashion, too. After having been educated In Amsterdam for a life at sea. he was an officer In Hie Dutch Merchant Marine, and for two years roamed the seven seas: then, thirsting for more knowledge, he came to the University of Georgia. What he has done here Is nothing short of miraculous. Mastering the Kngllsli language with ease, he launched Into his work with a vigor and drive that characterizes his every action and has led Ills class In scholarship. Now that you have become so (Irmly fixed In our Affections. "BUI.” we hate to see you go: nevertheless the Golden West has Its charms and will claim you for Its own. Hut say. how about a little jaunt out to Honolulu and Shanghai before we settle down? You're on! "Obstacle are not only inevitable bat they are an indispensable part of the training for honorable success.’’ r. '• - A A A n ' -■■■-■ '.I I'Tii jmOLl m vX Ci. Mr THOMAS VIRGIL COLKMAN, IMi.G. “Doc" Macon, Georgia Dciuostlicninn Coleman, or better known as "Doc" by his friends, receives his monthly check from the metropolis of .Macon. Georgia. '•Doc" has a personality that Is to be envied. He Is stern, straightforward and honest with himself and others. "Doc" bids fair to become the foremost soda Jerker of the South. All hail to the future Ice cream king! Chocolate soda, please! "Doc1 Is well read and a good authority on literature. He spends about three hours each night reading suspicious little pink and blue letters. What wondrous knowledge they must contain! Newton’s three laws of motion have no effect on him when he Is thus engaged. "Doc" Is a lover of the diamond and It Is said that he twirls the old pill with the ease and grace of a Mulshed hall player. Well. "Doc." the best of friends must part ami may old friends ne’er be forgotten. Here's hoping that you make the | erltous Journey of life without mishap. True friendship Is broken only by death. “ IIV hare the force within u lu overcome our trial , troubles and temptation .” IIBNUY HARRIS DRKWRY. IMi.G. Griffin, Georgia I'hi Kappa; Alpha Tati Omega Lieutenant Cadet Corps, ’21, ’22. Argue with me and we shall be friends, agree with me and we cannot agree. During the four years that "Cleu" has been in our midst, he has argued to himself as to whether M.D. should carry him thru life, or whether the art of drugs would he most beneficial. Leaving with "Doc" Wilson’s IMi.G., he has not yet decided, hut do tell him which you think the host, for lie is sure to tnke the other. However, be this as it may. our tall boy from Griffin, has made good in all that lie has attempted. It Is quite natural for Harris to have any number of questions asked him during a day from those who do not grasp the difficult problems of Physics and Chemistry. In conclusion, we can truthfully say that he Is always willing to lend a helping hand. lie will be remembered for time Immemorial as one with a true feeling for his fellow man. "So long a it interfere not with on personal welfare, far he it from me to interfere.’’THOMAS JL-DSON SASSKR, Ph.G. “T. J.” Savannah, Georgia Demosthenian Sophomore Doclaimer; Thulinns; Glee Club; President Senior Pharmacy Class. Wo now have for our "once over” the loader of the Pharmacy class and very deserving Is he of that distinction. "T. J." Is one of those students with whom "Silence Is Golden." but withal he is well known and hns a host of friends. He Is a hard worker and lets no obstacles hinder the materializing of his purposes. In our mind the greatest tribute that can be paid to a man Is that he realizes there is more beyond to do and Is willing to help do It. Such a man is “T. J." He does not intend to stop at tlie completion of his course here and rest upon his laurels, but Is going to plunge into the realm of Medicine and further equip himself for a life of service. If you succeed In your profession. "T. J.." as you have succeeded as a student, your cup of reward will be tilled to overflowing. “Look upward. Pre forward. There is much to be done. J clp do it.” JOSI'.PII I.KOPOLD GROSS, Pli.G. "S.mokk” Hirmingliam, Alabama Phi Kappa Gross halls from the "Magic City" of Itlrmlng-ham, Alabama. He has liven with us part of two years, having attended part of the time at Auburn. but lie has been with us long enough for his classmates to learn to like him. ns he Is a tine chap, having high ambitions of becoming a "pill-roller." lie has an Idiosyncrasy of boiling water in a measuring cylinder. In addition to the fact that he likes the physics department, the next of Importance is his love for the ladies. He Is very IMipular with the fair sex. "Smoke.” as he is known by many of his friends. Is a past artist at the jiopular pastime of "bull slinging.” anti lie should receive his degree for proficiency at same. When seen on the campus he Is headed toward Terrell Hall at breakneck speed, carrying under his arm a load of knowledge. Gross, In parting, we bid you adieu with best wishes for a prosperous Journey on the Sea of l.lfc. man pour dr ups of which he know little, into a body of which he know less."fV fky JAMKS ANDHKU', B.S.. M.I). “Jim my" Macon, Georgia Chi 'Acta Chi; Kn] |)a Sigma Look hlin over, girls, for it may be your last chance to hoc him as he really Is. If you don't like the way that huh- mustache is parted, you may correspond with the secretary at Vlnevllle Avenue, in the city of Macon, hut of course, we couldn't guarantee a personal reply. Jimmie- -the I toy Wonder -came to us from Macon. ?a. He attended prep school at I inler High School, then spent one year in Alabama Polytechnic Institute, hut not being astisfled out of the state, lie came back to finish his Pro. Med. at Mercer University. After spending three years there and receiving his B.S. Degree, he came to Augusta. Jimmie Is the smallest person in the class in statue, but this does not mean that he is below the average mentally, fur he Is one of the best students In the class, and we predict that in will do great things In tlie profession he has chosen as his life work. ‘•('ontitfenci it a jewel ’ WII.UAM JACOB BAUGK, B.S., M.I). “Ct'i'in" Newnan. Georgia Memlwr of Student Council from Senior Class. If you don't see why we call him Cupid, you should see him ns we had the privilege of seeing him In Ids surgeon's cap and gown ready to do violence to Willie Stiff. Then perhaps the resemblance to tin- immortal Dan would he more apparent. Cupid Is one of the Mercer l oys. having llnished three years at that institution before he decided to take up medicine, and came to Georgia for that purpose. His prep school work was done In his home town at the Newnan High School. He has always been a busy man In college since joining the "Immortal thirteen" In 131S. and as member of the Students' Council from the senior class, he has proved his judicial ability. We expect that there will be far fewer crazy foks In the world by 1340 If Cupid takes Psychiatry as we have heard It whispered he possibly will do. "Virtue alone if the unerring tir n of a noble ton I." mm UI.YSSHS SIMPSON HOW BN. H.S., M.I). “ L'sKijaa” Mettcr. Georgia Dciuonstiiminn; Chi .eta Chi Fleeted Vice-President Athletic Association, ’IS; Secretary Demontheninn Society, ’IS; Mcm-lier Students' Council Medical Department University of Georgia from Junior Class, 21, and Senior Class, 22. "Useless's" nickname was adopted, as Professor l.ustral would say, "for the sake of euphony alone." In short. It Is the condensation of one of his given names, which name was brought Into prominence some sixty years ago by one we will take It for granted you remember. I to wen "pre-incdded” at Georgia after having "high-schooled" at Metier. l.ater he showed his appreciation of quality ami "medlclned" at Georgia, too. "I'seless" has not lived up to his nickname at all. for ho has proved anything hut useless during Ills course of medical study. Having got wise to the wiles of tlie dapper shortly after taking up the study of Ills life-work, he lias devoted little attention to the fair sex since, much to the sorrow of said sex. 11«- lias been active In student affairs and lias a fine record In every way. "The clock upbraid tnr with the iconic of time." IB UKFSF WATKINS BHADFOHI), B.S., M. D. “BN. n” Carlton, Georgia Alpha Kappa Kappa Skull ami Hones Club; F.ditor Medical Section of Pandora. "Hind" is an all round good fellow and will do anything in the world he can for you: that is why he was chosen as the most popular student In the Medical College. After graduating at the Georgia Military College and then taking Ills Pre-Medical work at tin University. he came to the Medical College fully prepared to take up the study of medicine. There Is no doubt that after he graduates and goes back to the large city of Carlton to minister to all the ills and discomforts of humanity that he will make a big success and In the years to come we will ail he proud of the fact that we were In college with him. were associated with him so closely. 'Tin the mind lliol make the bod rich." irxrirn CI.Alrl K McKINI.KV IH KIM'.K. B.S.. M.D. "Brae” Athens, Georgia Nil Omicron Nil Secretary an l Treasurer »f Senior Class. "Burn" Is a sure enough Georgia man. He halls from the Classic City, where he attended high school within earshot of the old chapel hell. Having made his farewell to Athens High, he contracted to have his dally routine punctuated by that Ih 11, and listened patiently during two years for Its welcome peals to end various ami sundry fifty-minute periods, known so well to all Georgia men. Two years in Franklin College and two In the Medical Department gave him his B.S.Mcd. degree. Now. after having played tin- game with unwavering determination an l marked ability, he has his efforts crowned with the coveted prize, the degree of Doctor of Medicine. "Burp” has had a set objective and lias hewed to the line, lie has worked and if It's college record Is any augur of his future as a physician, then let competitors beware. He Is quiet. serious and dignified, studious, bright and retentive. He has been a good student and will make a good doctor. "ffauor lir.r in ho it ex I toil." "Km” Appling, Georgia "Kid” rates with Bowen In being one of the "long hoys" of our class. We wonder if long caudal appendages aren't quite an advantage, though. In fording the Harper Street creek and doing the crane stunt down through "Frog Hollow." That reminds us that "Kid" Is acknowledged as the king of that district, in spite of Ids mild dis|K sition, which would preclude at first tlie possibility of there being any monarchlal instincts In him. But of course we refer to his rating with Hie fair sex. and none can deny him his honor In this particular. "Kid" spent his prep school days at Isx-ust Grove Institute and followed this with his prettied work at Mercer. Ills work In Medicine has always been up to the scratch and we expect good things of hint when lie goes back to Appling to practice. ‘•lie xilent anti tuft -tilenct Merer hrlr n x you." jjl c s? v- G r - L s wk » « v i- m swr Ira A c 1 STACY CI.AIBOl ItNK HOWKI.I.. B.S., M.D. “Stacy-' Augusta, Georgia Alpha Kappa Kappa Skull and Bones Club; Secretary of Junior Class; Kditor Medical Section Pandora. Stacy lx one of the few of our classmates to go through college without a nickname. Although a number of them have been given him they were soon discarded as entirely unsuitable and we know him as Just Stacy. Although Stacy stands well enough with the fair sex to have been voted our most popular man with the ladles, he does not let them Interfere with his work and so far has been able to avoid all plt-falls. As Kditor of the Medical Section of the Pandora, he has proved that wo could not have picked a more capable man. for with that as with everything else he goes Into, he has put his very best Into it. Stacy, like the other Augusta men who propped at Georgia. is a hard working student, and together with a very active ami alert mind, and that wonderful llow of language of his. he Is sure to make a success wherever he goes. “.In hone it! mail‘n icon! in an i ooil an liin bond." 1 1.01 P.It JACOBS M ANSON. B.S.. M.D. M| J.” Covena. Georgia Alpha Kappa Kappa "I’. J." began his career In the town of Covena, (la. After taking Ids prep school at Ocilla High School, he began his college work at Presbyterian College of South Carolina. Graduating from this institution during the stress of the world war he demonstrated his loyally by enlisting ns one of I'ncle Sam’s "Gobs.” After a creditable service In the navy, he entered the Medical Department of the fidverslty In the fall of 1918. He has always done his work well, has been active In all branches of student life, and sports the best trimmed little blonde mustache In school. He completed a year as physical! at the county home, and If we are to judge by the reports of Ids charges at that Institution, he bids fair to be one of the best dispersers of ndserv In this part of the country. “The only way to hare a friend in to he one.” TTr-? v Augusta, Georgia Delta Tail Delta; Chi ' .eta Chi "Hen" may live In South Carolina, hut he has lived so clove to Georgia all his life that he has become a Georgia man from his heart. After tlnlshlng at Richmond Academy at Augusta. he continued his pre-mod work at Georgia. Completing his requirements in IflIS he returned to Augusta and entered the Medical Department in the fall of the same year. After weathering the tempestous assaults of the S. A. T. C. and escaping the culling of the "Grim Keaper." he has now come to he a real M. D. Henry hasn't decided Just what kind of a doctor he will he. hut he Is certain of one thing at least, that he Is through with the "stork job" for life. He has always been well liked by his fellow students and members of the faculty, and has always stood alx ve the average In Ills classes. Wc are certain that his personality will make him an hon-ored and respected physician In whatever community he decides to practice. "Mraxnrt' your mind' liciyht by the ha dote it rast ." RAFAEL FELIX MORALES. IMI.C., M.l). •Fn.ix" Panama City, Panama Soeiedad Cervantes, KxPresidcnt; Honorum, ll». Kafael has no nickname, unless It Is Felix. Felix means happy. Rafnet Is usually that way. Bver since lie cablegrammed his exiiected arrival from the Gulf of Mexico until the present the pronunciation of Ills surname has a large interrogation point. It Is distinctly not "Moreralls." Rafael obtained Ids bachelor's degree with honors at the Inslltuto Xaclonal de Panama, spent a year at the University of Pennsylvania, then entered the Medical Department of the University of Alabama at Mobile. After two successful years there, he came to Georgia and soon proved himself to he "all there.” He made quite a name for himself during Ids Junior year as a collector of Internal revenue, officiating as long-green-holdor at all the college dances. And it was a sly Jaz .er that got by without having Ids leg pulled. Rafael Is considered by his mentors as one of the best men In Ids class, and It Is with an easy con-sc ence that one may predict for him a brilliant future In his native land. "On ic i th the doner, rt joy be uncon fined.” 1 U  j££J| THOMAS CHARLES NASH, B.S.M., M.I). “Cits' ' Philomath, Georgia i lii Kappa; Clii ' .eta Chi President of Student Hotly; President of Student Council; President of Junior Class. “Cut .” received his preparatory training at Georgia Military College. While there he was known and respected l»y all. as gentleman, pood student and athlete. He entered the 1’nlveralty In 1HH. received his academic and pre-medlcnl training. ami while at the University he retained the honors which he had received at prep school. It was there that he received the name of "Shun" by which he was known for several years. Since entering the Medical College. "Shop" changed the name to “Cut ." and Is known by all as "Cut .” Nash. "Cut .” has added a number of friends to his long list. All students and inen love and respect him. We understand that he Is going hack to Philomath to cure the Incurable. Luck to you. “Cuts.” “ am not in the roll of common men ' FRANK McKKMIE ROGERS, M.I). “F. M” Coleman, Georgia Alpha Kappa Kappa One of our smallest In stature—hut brains—that is a different matter. We challenge you to find his equal. And he is as good looking as he is brainy. If you don’t believe It Just take a look at the accompanying likeness and we are sure that you will agree with us that we have told no falsehood. A friend in need Is a friend Indeed. This can well he said of Frank, for you will always find him a true friend. Frank halls from Coleman. Georgia. After attending prep school at Locust Grove Institute, then Bmory University, he decided that he was too small to do the ordinary tolls of life, so picked the profession which his father has followed. Since making this decision and coming to Augusta. he lms shown that he Is capable of expending untold energy. It Is said that Frank is going to return to Coleman and distribute pills to the lucky cues who call him. ' om nick of time anti desire to rest ' FRANK GKIFPP.TH SMITH, M.D. “Smittie” Monroe. Georgia Demostbrniun; Chi ' .eta Chi Vice-President of Sophomore Class; Viee-Presi-dent Senior Class. "Smlttle" li ) Ills propping at Mount Carmel Academy and after that secured Ills premedical training In the Classic City. Ills next step was to enter the Medical Department and get down to hard work. "Smlttle” is such a man as would have pleased Caesar; unlike Cassius, he has not a lean and hungry look: and Instead of staying awake at night, lie has kept the fair sex awake in their suspense as to who would receive the favors of the favored one. "Smlttle" has been a favorite with the unfair sex ns well ns with those they admire, to-wit; the ladles. And he has been a good hoy. notwithstanding the fact that twice he has been the Vloe-I'resident of his class. The author of this biography has never even seen him play Afriean golf. It Is said he smokes, sometimes In bed. That shows you how luxuriously inelined he Is. Hvon at that, as a young physician. Just "watch his smoke.” “Xolhiuif is inure useful Ilian silence. IIHKHKKT STEED A I.DEN, H.S. Med. "Koeii" Decatur, Georgia Deino.stlienian; Chi l si Mandolin Club, 'll). s20; Skull and Bones Club; T'rcslnimn Club. There he Is. hoys, the "Decatur Demon.” Herbert has well lived up to this name from Ills as-soelatIon with the fair sex thruout the state. Ills well-applied nickname of "Koch” was the result of correspondence with about fifty hospitals in New York for bacteriological work In the summer. The real athlete of the Medical Department Is none other than the above gentleman. He makes the “Y" his nlasle from f lo !) I’. M. dally. Always true to the honor system. "Koch" is a good student, a good fellow and rather playful at times, his hobby ladng lo skip rope In the dissecting hall. Within another two years the writer predicts that one of the greatest "surgeons" In captivity will graduate from a medical college In the ! er-son of our own "Decatur Koch." So here's luck to you In the future. ".Ihcut s lenre them sit him when you sail i outl bye.”  L ZlMkikm WILLIAM DOl'GLAS ANDKKSOX. B.S.Mcd. “Bau»v” Athens, Georgia 1 1)1 Kappa; Chi ‘ .eta Chi Skull and Hones Club. The Classic City boasts of having the only tree that owns Itself, the only double-barrelled cannon. ;tn l last but not least, the only man who as a Freshman, beat the Sophs to the "Trimming game.” (For details see Athens "Banner” of Sept. 23d. 11 17.) Kaldy Is gifted with the peculiar faculty of making friends, and having once made them, they slick to him. and lie to them. On Saturdays and Sundays be usually specializes along these lines, but more particularly with the fair sex. to whom he admits their Influence over him. Hut during the week he Is a regular hound for work and at all hours of the night the neighbors can sec his light burning ns he "sits and ponders" over many of the yet unsolved mysteries of bis chosen profession. "Doug's" scholastic record Is among the very best. He is a conscientious, hard working student and Is possessed with unusual brilliancy. We leave It to him to unveil many of the mysteries of Medicine. “I nerrr knew .to youni a hmli , to ohl a head.” THOMAS GIBSON BROOKS. B.S.Meti. “Tom” Agricola. Georgia Ucmoslheninn; Lambda Chi Alpha; Chi ' .eta Chi. Skull and Hones Club; Freshman Club; Social Committee of Student Body. Mr. Chairman, before voting upon the motion, allow a word of explanation In behalf of the most handsome man In college. "Tom" has been on trial for four years, and bis first and Inst Impression was most favorable. He has a way of his own with the Indies. His proficiency at ballroom wrestling Is enviable Indeed. "Tom" has always been a dynamic factor in creating and maintaining spirit and good fellowship. Ills work and play are so Interrelated to each other that the greatest benefit Is derived from both. Ho possesses the type of manhood that our Alma Mater Is always proud to call her own. We shall remember you. "Tom," as a scholar, ns a gentleman, and may your many attainments find expression In your chosen field of endeavor. ‘•Those irhn ore pleased themselves must always he pleased.", {Tk -■AY1 p V T ■ ' I ' r- V4o FIJI.IX KF.KTKI. BROWN, B.S.Mctl. “IJkbt’’ Sharon. Georgia I’lii Kappa; I’lti Delta Theta; Chi ' .eta Chi Some good men have conic from Die old red hills of Georgia; men whom one likes; men who look one straight In the eye; men who are square In their dealing with their assoelates; such a type of man is Hurt. Socially, Bert Is a high stepper, for he strictly adheres to the rule "that when business Interferes with pleasure-why, business must he delayed." It is said that Bert’s strict adherence to his rule will repay him. for the ladles all like him. Seriously. Bert Is a Rood worker, an intelligent student, and ambitious to accomplish great things. If there be anything in heredity, we predict that Bert's ambition to become a good physician will be realized, for his father and grandfather are physicians. Here's to you. Bert. May you ever he successful. ••Sinifintf and danrini alone will Hot advance one in thr world." I.AUKIR I .ESTER I 07. IKK, B.S.Mctl. “Sl-ATS” Hillman. Georgia Dnnosthenian; Chi ' .eta Chi Skull and Hones Club. Hillman, Georgia, was unheard of until "Slats" came into our midst, hut from that time on we have heard nothing else. We are still In doubt as to the exact location of Ills native lminlel, hut some of the boys from Sharon state that It Is a suburb of their mciro|«olls. However, we would appreciate some Information as to the location of the above mentioned Sharon. Georgia. But we so approve of the first sample from this part of the commonwealth that we would do well to have the county agents work this trade anil get us some more of like character. "I.egs" has succeeded both in his work ns a student, and Ills unprecedented ability of making friends, for his friends are numlK-rod by his acquaintances, and he makes more each day. In addition to his ability to put out good work In record time, he is about as happy all the time as mere mortal man gets to be. and we aptly designate him "hall fellow, well met." We predict for him all the success that his profession holds for the best, which Is the respect of his co-workers, the love of his patients— and a few sheckles on the side! "In friendship I was early tan a hi to beliere.  .—_ ,'i+’ G «a WALDO KMKHSON FIX)YD, B.S.Med. "Gi's” Stnteslmro. Georgia DcmostlicntHii; Sigma Chi: Alpha Kappa Kappa; Freshman Club; Skull and Bones Club. Ivmerson is n young I’on .l, having ;i monopoly on anything pertaining to ilnancoa. Waldo x efficiency as a Money Collector is so great that he ran the present treasurer of the Kreslunan class a close rare before they could convince the first year men that lie was ineligible for that office. Me has also acquired In his studies -having gained a much coveted citation from the ••Immortal Dick”-along with the respect and admiration of his classmates. a name for being a good all-round student. "CIus" is very impulsive and this trait makes him all the more likeable. "Fie rushes In where olIters would fear to venture." This is especially true In his numerous affaires de coenr. As a result of one such "rushing" it Is whispered that the climax Is drawing near—and In Augusta, too much to the sorrow of many feminine hearts in Statesboro and other parts of the state. Luck to you. Waldo, and may the best be yours. " you hare no pull,— imrk!'’ J I’Ll US DO. K JOHNSON. B.S.Mr:!. “■I »• i. : ’ Aiken, South Carolina Dcmosthrninn; Chi ' .eta Chi Solo Cornet in Band; Y. M. C. A. Orchestra; Member Student Council Medical College, 22; Member Skull and Bones Club. ".lule" has so many vantage points from which one could write a pleasing description of him that It Is difficult to choose. Probably all his outstanding virtues should be commented upon. First of all. he Is a fine fellow , happy, amiable, smiles quickly and easily and wears a brand that won't come off. Next, be Is a good student and popular with the faculty and boys. He is quite an artist with a pen. plays the piano and saxophone. is an expert photographer, and please don’t omit this—lie would rather speed In an automobile or soar In an aeroplane than to eat. He lias held creditably Important positions In the student organization. One of bis pet ambitions Is to cover the twenty odd miles between Augusta and Aiken in fifteen minutes flat. It is not true that "Julc" used to play checkers with a certain famous professor during school hours. ‘•Our mu attain h iyh terete hi fry ini —rren if it taken an aeroplane.” 1! ;. A G CIIAIU.KS BBATTY KBNXKY, B.S.Med. “ K K X ’ Athens, Georgia Demostlicnian; Alpha Kappa Kappa Beatty left the Classic City In 1920 to continue his stmiles In the Medical Department of his Alma Mater, where he soon acquired the name of "curly-headed Adonis" and not l y accident, for seeing Is believing. "Ken" has been called "cute" and "darling" by every girl who has met him, but owing to his quiet nature, he has always been unsusceptible to Cupid's darts. However, his fall Is predestined since the amourous descent normally occurs at least once in every man's life. Ills many friends expect quite a crash when the time doth come. He Is best known by his consistent work— resulting In Ids being recognized as one of the best men in the class and bids fair of achieving a wonderful success In his chosen profession. We're for you, Ken. ••Il’oiiirii are Women and Medicine is Medicine anil never the 'twain shall meet.'' KMMKTTB HOWARD .MARTIN, B.S.Mcd. "Ivmmkttk" Hilton, Georgia Deniosthcnian; Kappa I’si Campus Clttli; Business Manager Red ami Black, 20; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '20; Secretary Student Body; Medical College. The subject of this discussion Is Kmmctte K. Martin, who halls from the metropolis of Hilton. Georgia. Years ago Kmmette resolved to quit clodhopping and develop Into a notable person along a line which would be of benefit to humanity as well as himself. He Is nearing success and In two years from this date will be a full flcged M.D. Kmmctte Is a good, upright sort of man. He can be depended on to always be square and to play the game as becomes a man. He will be found on the right side of most questions, and especially Is this true when it comes to questions of a moral nature. Kmmctte Is a good mixer and merrymaker and this side of his nature Is never so well brought out as when he Is In company of persons of the opjmslie sex. We believe that success will reward his efforts, l.uck to you. Kmmctte. “Would not ire shatter it to hit ,—and then remold it to the heart's desire• 4 »oi G ?-i I.F.l.DON WAII.S MARTIN, D.S.Metl. “I,. W." Adairsville, Georgia Phi Kappa Campus Cluh; Truck Team, T9; Sophomore Basketball Team, ’20. “Ye crags and peaks: I am with you once aKaln.” From the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains, some moons ago. there came to the University u boy whom we all know by the nickname of "L. NY." It is said that the bracing. Invigorating air of the high places breeds strong men of charaeter and body. "1,. NY." has fully maintained this reputation. W'e know him as a manly fellow, straight in his dealings with his colleagues, honest in purpose. a hard worker In ills studies. Always ho has stood well in his classes. He was a member of the I’hi Kappa Literary Society. in the way of athletics. Martin has accomplished worth while things, for he was a member of the Varsity Track Team and the Sophomore Basketball Team. "L. NY.’s" ambit ion is to be a surgeon, and we predict that he will carve, with his knife, the way to Fame and Fortune. “.Wrer ire n », jre ktiozc what 7fit can do onlg after ire have tried." ROBF.RT CARRY McGAIIKR, B.S.Med. ••Mac" Dcaring, Georgia Demos!Iirninn; lpha Kappa Kappa Freshman Impromptu Dehater; Campus Club. There is something about the quiet, steady, conscientious. bard working individual which commands and demands the love and respect of his fellow creatures—such a man we affectionately know as ".Mac." "Mac" comes from the high level country of McDuffie County, and as we have watched him and known him. we think that he reflects in his quiet steady straightforward manner, the atmosphere of his boyhood home. In his school work, Mac has ever been rated ns a good man. He can always be counted upon to be constant In his work, diligent in the pursuit of his studies, and - .ealous In his desire to accomplish his goal of success. As an impromptu debater in the Hemosthenlan Literary Society, Mac acquired some degree of fame. It is said that he aspires to be a surgeon. If this be true, we predict for him a success in his chosen profession, and worth while to benefit humanity. "The race is neither to the ncift, nor the battle to the strong, but time and chance come to all”.IONKS m-Hl.AH OM I'll ANT. B.S.Metl. “Cocoa N-it" Wrens, Georgia Demostl Ionian Oliphant took Ills high school work lit his home town of Wrens and afterwards studied two years at Georgia to get Itls itre-medlcul credits. He entered tlte Medleal ] e| artmeui In 1920 and Immediately got down to serious study, to which he has been Wedded ever since. When given the nickname of "(.ocoanut" he took it good naturedly, just as lie does all other kidding that comes Ills way, returning it in kind. And while he lias not yet completed his much anticipated l.ook on "How to Speak and Write Knglfsh Correctly," this failure can he attributed to engagements he has had with Willie SUIT, a well known colored hoy tlutt has tile liahlt of getting all cut up. and to' other engagements equally engrossing. If not entertaining. You must not judge from Jones' | mpadour that he Is a ladies' man. for as yet lie has seemed to shun the fair sex, hut of course he may he taking It out In seeming only. Jones is an allround good man. "lie ilalh Indeeil, jrhoxc some spark that art like wit: W A I.LACK 1.AM A It POOLE. B.S.Metl. “Wai.i.y" Atlanta, Georgia Dcniostlicniaii; Alpha Kappa Kappa Skull ami Bone' Cluh; Krcslunan Club. Wally, another Atlanta hoy. originally of Alabama I "and proud of It. sir"), is rat e in that he can combine the big 4 In uti agreeable ratio, viz.. Wine. Women. Waynesboro and Work. His escapades with the fair sex have been numerous, so much so that the "more he sees of the others Unless he settles to one." One might think that many of liudyard’s most cynical proverbs were inspired by Wallace -nevertheless, we are coti-tident that all his cynicisms will be forgotten when he meets tlie real girl, if he has not already, and the Indications are to the contrary at the present. Wally, however. Is a friend to all. and a hard worker. Wherever he may go lie will carry his share of Georgia spirit. Au revolr. Wallace L. " •’or a K-omou is only a Iranian, bill a yootl ciyar i a smoke.” m aOllllpil v Uv ira. m §» '■ m ALHKKT IIKXKY I’OWKI.U BS.Med. Ai ’ Augusta, Georgia DeiiKistlienian; Alpha Kappa Kappa Skull and Hones Club; Freshman Club. "Al" is another l ov from A. U. C. who has certainly lived up to ilie ideals of that famous Institution which is known to be one of the best prop schools In the South. liver since ”P. A." has been in college ho has been a thorough and conscientious student, but not the bookworm type, since he is always ready to go out "amongst them." and does iulte often, but not enough to keep phone calls from chasing him during the day. Some sage lias written, "Men are of two kinds—the kind women run after and the kind women run from.” Al is of tiie former type. Characterlstle of Albert is his pipe, which is quite famous. If such an In-animated object as a pipe can be called famous. It all happened on a mixed camp last summer. Said pipe being smoked as an antidote for moon light intoxication by all tlie girls. Needless to say. it Is one of his priceless possessions now. 'Cess to you. A I. “ ix fortune, not xcisflom, I hoi rules twin' life” THOMAS POHTBIt UKVN.I.K. B.S.Med. "Kkvii.i.k" .lesup, Georgia Dciuostlicninn; Kappa PsI Campus Chib. They say that Uevllle is not much In a crowd— hut when lie is in the Okcefeenokoe swamp- -oil! Just give him a gun. a box of shells, his old pipe mid worlds of tobacco, and dump liim off ill the wild swamp, anil to him then, the "world is a Paradise now." Before Uevllle was sixteen years of age. lie had. according to the newspaper reports, proved liini-self to be a chip off the old block, for he had killed and haggi-d three black bears. However, those of us who have been permitted to know Uevllle more intimately know that lie lias "other ideas in his head" besides those of hunting, lie Is studying Medicine, and we know that his calm, steady, even disposition, bis excellent brain, his conscientious spirit will all unite to the benefit of many a poor old frame which lias been racked In pain and distress. Porter, here's to you—we like you. •‘(lire ever; man thy ear, hut few thy voire.” irrxrmrxcgl DAVID STKINIIRRC. H.S.Med. "Davk’’ Augusta, Georgia I’lii Kappa; Tan Kpsilnn P!ii Freshman Club; Skull and Hones Club. From Augusta several moons ago there came lo the I'nlverslty one whom we all have learned to know as a most likeable boy—he answers to tho nickname of "Dave." Dave's friendship Is not limited to the mule sex. for a Krcnt amount of his time is alloted to the ladles and It Is said that they like his winning smile, so much so that he Is regarded as a dangerous rival. In class work. Dave has always stood well and he can he counted upon to be constant, eager, diligent, and zealous in the pursuit of knowledge. The Held Is never too crowded for a good man. anil even in the Medical profession the best reach the top. Dave Is studying medicine and we predict for him a brilliant future. Luck to you. "Dave." We are counting upon you. "Could I litre less, I should he happier time." HKNMA.MIN AKTHl'R WILKINSON, H.S.Med. “I’kwkk ' Quitman. Georgia Dcmosthcnian; Chi ' .eta Chi McjiiIkt Student Council; Skull and Hones Chili; Square and Compass. "IVwee" halls from Quitman. Georgia, and admits it himself. He entered Into our midst during the term of Nineteen and readily gained the enviable position of leader of the class, ns well as a host of friends. He is a man worthy of anyone’s friendship and respect, being strictly honest and upright in every dealing, ns well as one who lives a life alwive reproach, a gentleman In the true sense. "Wlik's” one ldg fault and besetting sin is Ills admiration for the fair sex. and he will stray from the path of duty now and then and neglect his work for a few hours pleasure with one of his many admirers. Tit's Is a case of a man made for a profession, for "Wilk” will HU every requirement of a physician, as he Is serious and conscientious. and ivossesses the necessary qualities which lead to success In any field. The medical profession needs good men. and we predict a rapid ami brilliant future for "Wilk" in his chosen field, and expect to see him at the top In a short while after beginning his life work. "To trork for the pleasure there is in resting”.A PI ’KINO BOON I! WINGFIKLI). B.S.Mctl. P. b: Athens, Georgia Lambda C'lii Alpha; Chi Y.vln Chi Skull and Boiic . "P. U." halls from the Classic City where ho received his preparation for medical college from the first grade thru the high school arid then three years In the University as a pre-mod student. Like tin well known Cassius, this nohle son of Georgia’s northland has a "lean and hungry look." hut this Is as far as the comparison may go. Wingfield is a good all round scout doing equally well in his mental endeavor as In his flirtation with the fairer sex. lie has numerous female admirers and quite a number of male associates, who. more or less, think quite a bit of him. Mis excellent standing In the .Medical College earned him membership In the Skull ami Bones which In Itself Is quite an attainment as far as college honors go. There Is little use to predict hig things for this mental monstrosity, for every one believes he will succeed In Ids chosen duty. However, considering his past record, we believe that we are safe to say that lie will have a large and lucrative female practice. Luck to you. IVrrlno.' "If your lip keep from flip . of (he r fire (hint bnrare, of idiom you peak. to idiom you apeak, anti lioir and irhen outI idle re." U, A j -- 4 V . iffi® G Third Year Medical Class OI-TICKHS •Iacom Poi'K Khkriiariit.............................................. ’resident John- C. McCai.i.................................................Vice. ’rcsideut Ik (). .McI.kmork.........................................Secretary mid Treasurer ST I I) K NT CO I’ NC11. « K 1»K KS K NT. VI’ IV KS .Iamks Fitwskh ai.i» Matti.k .Iamks C. Mktts (Note: Nairn's arc from Ifft to right, according t'» rows.) Na.mk: .11?max I). 1’ankkr .... Jacoh Pock Kiikkiiakiit. . •Iamks Fitwskrai.ii Batti.i:, John C. -McCai.i............. Ira (). McI.kmork . • loll X II. SlIKKMAX Aktiiiii A. Morrison Kahxkst W. Vkai. . Ihvixk Piiixixy . . Iamks C. MKrrs . . Stanmno I’nirrrsitif of f rort iu . I'n ire rail if uf f eorifia . I'nicersitif of f rori iu . I'nirersit if of (Iron in . I' nirer.tit i of (ieort iu . Clemsiiii SlTTINO Prk-Mkiiicai. Work At Kksidkno: ('nicersitif of !eortjin..................I.mlowici. t’nicersitif uf f• earijin.................. thriis. I’Hirers! if of (Seortfin................Columbus. Mercer....................................Ogccchec. Iligg'toii. Augusta. Savannah. Millcdgoville. Augusta. Gaines, S. (’.Second Year Medical Class OFFICERS I Jammy II. McGee..........................................................I’reridfht Jons M. Gorman'.......................................................I'ice-Cretulrnt Waldo E. FloVI)................................................Secretary ami Treasurer STUDENT COl’NCI I, REI’llESENTATIVES Walter B. Jameson Benjamin A. Wilkinson (Note: Names are from left to right, according to rows.) S»:at»:i Wallace I,. Pooi.k . . Loo ax S. Owens . . . William A. Bostick William J. Ilorsox . . James 1). McGlammerv I.eldon W. Marti:; . . William II. Groves . . Jones B. Oiiciiant . . Edward J. Wiiei.an . . I .A l‘M IE I,. Do .IEH . . . David Stei n her ; . . . . Lloyd K. Booos . . . . William I). Anderson . Perixo B. Winohei.d . Marry II. McGee . . . Thomas (». Brooks . . J riles (». Johnson . . Felix B. Brown .... Patrick H. Smith . . . Ykri.in I . Bryant . . Ai rert 11. Powell . . . Hernman T. Kenneiiy . IIerhert C. Ork .... Koreht McGahi.i: . . . Harry I., (’iieves . . . Thowa.s P. Hevii.ie . . Ivmmeite E. Martin . . Benjamin A. Wilkinson IIereert S. Ai.iikn . . . . W'ai.tkr B. Jameson . . . Waldo K. Fiji yd...... John M. Gorman . . . . Pre-Medical Work At Residence . I'hirerrity of Georgia.................. tlantn. . Mercer..................................Macon. . I'uhiverrity of Florida.................Camilla. . I'itlrereity of Georgia.................Covington. . Mercer..................................Stapleton. . I 'hirerrity of Georgia.................Adairsvillr. . I'hirerrity of Georgia..................l.incolnton. . I'hirerrity of Georgia..................Wren . Second How, Standing . (’hirerrity of Georgia................Savannah. . I'hirerrity of Georgia................Hillman. . ('hirerrity of Georgia................ ugustii. . Cletnrom ...............................l.ilwrty. S. C. . I 'hirerrity of Georgia................. t liens. . f hirerrity of Georgia..................At liens. . Tulaiir.................................Savannah. . ('hirerrity of Georgia................Agricola. . I "hirerrity of Georgia..................Augusta. . ('hirerrity of Georgia................Sharon. . Mercer..................................GlennvUle. . Mercer..................................Bartow. . ('hirerrity of Georgia..................Nugii'ta. Toe Row. Standi no . ('hirerrity of Georgia................Collins. . ('hirerrity of Georgia................Klowerv Branch. . (’hirerrity of Georgia................lira ring. . Mercer..................................Macon. . ('hirerrity of Georgia................Icsop. . ('hirerrity of Genryia................Hilton. . Chirerrity of Georgia................Quit man. . ('hirerrity of Georgia................Decatur. . Oglethorpe ('Hirerrity..................Coltiinhll'. . ('hirerrity of Georgia................Statesboro. . ('hirerrity of Georgia................Savannah. ‘'w ’ Y' V i tf AV | First Year Medical Class 11 aiih v M. Kaxdei.............................................................President Tenney II. Kohertc..........................................................V ire-Prreidenl Jamxs 11. Wiutox..................................................Secretary and Treasurer SITDKN'T COl'NCIl. It KPIt KSFNT TIVKS Wai.tek .1. MfM I'RIIA Y Names are from left to right, according to rows.) Bottom How Name George W. Brown, Jr. Wai.tkr .1. McMcrhay I Iron C. Wai.kkr . . Jose i'll It. (Jay . . . Tiiomas K. Morgan . Karie I . Warren . . F.i.i.is M. Bono . . . Cl.ahkk I . Savage . . Wii.iii'm (I. Mri.i.is . . James It. Wii.sox . . Wii.i.i am F. Dory NS . I.OKEE FUlRENCE . . . Tenney II. Hohkrts . Andrew W. Fowi.ek . John I). I.amox, Jr. 11 roiles It. Jen kins . Frank C. Storey . . George II. Ridgeway . John I). Wii.ky . . . . ItOGER P. Vor.MANS . . George W. Richardson John J. Hood. Jk. . . . Itii'iiard B. Weeks . . Itacy ||. Smith . . . . Wii.i.i am C. F.merson . Coiden It. Battey . . . Ji'sto I.. Mrsox . . . . Wll.MA.M J. IlCHDASH-...' Not in Pictche Percy I). Weeks....................Oylelhorye I'nirrmily Haroi.d ('. Trimhii. . . .•........Oylelhorye Fnirertity I’re-Me Die a i. Work At . I'nivemily of Florida . .lulmrn............... . 'nirrmily of Croryia . . Fnirersi!y of Croryia . . Oylclhorpe Fnirertity . . I' nice mil y of Croryia . . Emory..................... . ’nirrmily of A'orlli Carolina Second Bow . Fnirrrsily of Croryia . I 'nirrmily of Croryia . Emory and llrnry . . I 'nir entity of Croryia . Mercer.............. . I'nierrsity of Croryia . Fnirrmily of Croryia . Mercer . Mercer Tor Itow . rnirrmily of Croryia . David ton........... . I’nirrmily of Croryia . . I’nirrmily of Croryia . . I’nirrmily of Croryia . . I’niremity of Croryia . Fnirrmily of Croryia .John II. SI el non Fairer . Ceoryrlmcn . Mount Vernon I’olleye . . I 'nicerf ity of Croryia . itovstoii. Sparta. Swainslioro. Savannah. Danila. Harlem. Harrison. Augusta. ugustn. J mmadiaz. Augusta. Milieu. Fast Point. ,, ,., ___ r ... 3. (V: '■ . .--I ('( (+ """ !! !" A .. .. o 4 j A m-GP1 fy - w « -A f Junior Class History NI.Y three years ago the present Junior Class enrolled in the University three hundred and eighty-two strong, which was at that time the largest Freshman Class in the history of the I'nivcrsity. This year there remains only one hundred and four of that number. Where arc the others? Some of them have probably gone to other colleges and universities, hut most of them. I fear, have dropped out of college forever. Two memorable events accompanied our Freshman year. One was the return of football to the University. As all of ns know, Georgia did not have a football team during the World War. Practically every member of the team volunteered in some branch of the service, some of whom paid the supreme sacrifice. Kven the coach volunteered and served throughout the war as a Captain in the Army (82nd Division.). During the fall of 19. the Armistice having been signed, the University officials decided to re-enter the football world. At the first call for practice, in September, a promising bunch of “green material" reported. Only four men on the squad had played any college football and they had not played a great deal. But Coach Cunningham, with these four men as a nucleus, developed a team which was considered one of the greatest in the South. The other noteworthy event was the advent of co-education to the University. 'Phis new condition caused much discontent among the upper classmen, who yearned for the days of vore. K very where were heard such remarks as, “Women will ruin the University, might as well turn it into a girls' school”; "Give back to us our dear old University”, etc. But. notwithstanding those (lire prophecies, the grand old University is prosjH-ring as never before. The Class of '28 has been a class of no little consequence. It has furnished thirteen letter men to the football team, four to the baseball team, two to the basketball team, and five to the track team. Aside from its athletic achievements, it’s members have attained many of the highest scholastic honors in college. Realizing now. that as a class, the greatest burden of the University falls upon us. wc shall endeavor to be loyal at all times and to all matters which we deem wortliv. And after we have gone out from its walls wc shall still uphold the honor of the institution, because we realize that then, even more than now. the upholding of its honor will rest upon us. Historian. Junior Class Roll m 3C3 Abkrcromrik. W. I .............Douglasville Adair. J. T..........................Athens Aiikrhoij), O. C...................ILivonia Ai.i.kx, (5. C..................Winterville Axdkrsox, I . K.....................Quitman Axtiioxy, T. I.................High Shoals Bakcock, (). . W. 1 111111 Beach, Fla. Bakkr, C. V.........................Tlfton Baknktt, .1. W.......................Sharon Bkardkx, C. S...................Huckliead 11km.. M. It.................Millcilgevillc Bknnktt, I). 1 .................Way cross Bknnktt. .1. V., Jr..............Waycross Bum; , It. 1.........................Athens Bowkx, R. A...........................Doles Brandon, Si-sax M............Gainesville Brockinatun, C. K..............Brunswick Bruck, I . F. . Athens Bi’rt, J. F....................Point Peter Bran. A..............................Athens Ciiaxiii.kr, S. G................Washington CIIADMAN, J. 1C....................Columbus Chastain, F. D........................Tiger Chumiii.kv, Frano:s I.renk . . . . Toecoa Cuakk, G. J........................Wnveross Coi.lky, J. W....................Grnntvillc Coi'i.tkr, I. P....................Columbus Dantas, C. B.........................Brazil Da VAN t, It. M......................Butler Daviiwon, Nora......................Atlanta Davis, I?. K....................Clarksville Davis, J. I).........................Athens Davis, J. W Dkriikn , H. W Acworth Dhakk, W. W Drew, K. W Durham, C. J Ki.dhiiku:, II. K. . . . Athens Ei.ns, E. L .... Gainesville ICnoi.and, E. L .... Blairsvillc Fi.kmino, W. C .... Augusta Gannon, A. F Savannah Gii.i.and. Sarah Nki.i.k . . . . Douglasvllle McRae (IfNMV, P. E .... Lincolnton . Bluffdale, Texas Hardin, II. J Dyas IIardkr, J. K Havks, .. C.. Jr. • Elbcrton Hknrv, C. G Augusta Jakrki.i., Iris B LaG range Johnson, Norma Dvai. Kicki.iohtkk. H. G. • Glcnnville Lank. It. I Blakeley Lanui.ky, L. It .... La Fayette Lkvik, .... Montezumacv ' . ■ , X A • KZlT . a ts A rv W'k• . •- . A. - 'y.vV; .V, —nE ator Gl -x-'' ; ■' ''• Jl3 'r jt ■'•■'i- • p5lLa£j mw;A- - raw SS, ' Lott, Viroinia Low . K. A. . l.UIRI'RKOW . . l.cxoy, A. . Maddox. II. H. Mkaiior, V. K. . Columbus . . . Carrs . . . Oliver . . Mnenn . . Tallin) . Covington .Mktiivi.v, (). ....................Dexter Muck, Mrs. Lkii.a ..............Coinnieree Mori.ky, M. I).............IWlrr Springs Mooxr.r, J. ..................(Jainesville Morris, I. I .......................Mlirns M urpiiry, J. P..................'Acliulon Murray, M. 5.......................Mliany Myrick, Tiicija K vn: .... Milledgeville McCm’rk. F. C.............. McKkxxik. F. 0............. Mc.Miii.ax. C. A........... McHai:, C. P........................Mcllnc McWhomtkr, T............... Nkwmax, llrniA Siikiukn . Nkwtox, C. H.» Jr.......... Nkwto.v, J. A.............. Pattkrsox, W. I,........... Sasxktt. Axoki.yx ScAKKORorr.ii, I). 1). Skakohx, M. 1)., 1k. Smkiikk. 1 ii.max . Siiki.i., S. 1’......................Palmetto Si.ack, .Iksaik Mii.iikm) Smith, C. H............ Soi’TII WKI.I., It. I . . . Stii.i., L. C Stii.i.max, Al KA I .OIS Stokks, T. K........... Stkicki.axii. A. J.. .Ik. Scmmhks. A. I).. -Ik. , Swiit, A. K., .Ik. . . Piiixixy, rr. m............. Poi.i.ock, D. M............. Hak, Hitii.................. Kawso.v, C. K.........................Athens Hkavks, Oic.a Mab.....................Athens . 1 ii Fayette Montezuma Taxxkr. F. A . . itahun Ciap . . Monroe Tiiomas, K Thomas, II. 0 . . . . I Joiner . . Athens Thomas. W. W , . . . I avonin . Dahlonega TcR.vr.R, (». A . Mall (Iround . . Athens 1 SKY, M . l.nCirange Yaxdiybr. J. 11 . . Santee Vogt. W. S. K Wai.kkh, .1. I!., Jr. . . . .... Monroe WlllT»:ilBAD. Makv Oi.ivk . . . McDonough Wiiitkxbr, T. A . . Augusta Wii.i.iams. A. B„ .Ik. . . . .... Argvle . . .Monroe Wll.I.IAMSOX, .1. M .... Atlanta Wix.x. I S H ItlVKRf, T. H............... ItOGKHS, Jn.lA Ki.ixarktii ItrssKi.i., F. L.. .Ik. . . . lAMiisvillc . Athens . Athinta Wood, I .rev Annk.............Cave Spring Wootf.x, A xsii: Sakkom) . . . Washington Vorxo, i' i i .ahktii B............Cednrtown Yoexo, W. I!.............. Yocnobi.ood, C ii as. Hcit.kt . Cartersvillr . . Augusta —, -A. A Z- fj OiYViS I?'- - ' 'M A Sf—TlHistory of Junior Law Class. II. give me space.” 1 sighed. Hut they gave it not. and tile glorious doings of the great men. who for two years have added life to the L’university of Georgia, must he shortened and condensed into the ignoble space allotted to the historian. Nevertheless. "A caudle cannot he hid under a bushel”, so with the light that radiates from the Class of it’s glories are known; want of space cannot condense. Modesty prevents any lengthy discussion as to our social prestige. Being advocates of "justice”, we are forced to make the revered statement that our position in the social world strikingly resembles that of the hub in its relation to the mechanism of the wheel. It has been voted unanimously by the class that never before in the history of the University has such a magnificent body of young men Ik'cu collected in one class, who are in personal appearances so handsome, in influence so weighty, in brain and intellectual force so far above the average- but here again space and modesty prevents my telling all. Fame, you have heard, has been lost. This is not true. It has Ik-cii won. and won by men who keep it. Look at every phase of college life and there you will see men who wear the insignia ‘‘•J.’}" in class work, oratory, literary lines, athletics, ami social and other organizations evervwhere are found men. and each a noble freeman, both strong and young and —bright. UlSTOlUAN. v O’Y t jjS l P — «- S-. — — — § § I f F r 3 c_ - •V ft t o Q n s S x s i § 2 • s ? 2 j x " - r. 5 R L Ci P P | z ‘J. M cr. C“. = W V" £ M . rv 'f ! tJunior Pharmacy Class History. tin opening day of classes, September th. 1921, we made our first appearance as Class of Pharmacy, and as we made our but in the mysteries of Pharmacy an air of confidence seemed to reign supreme, but ah! does not time show many things? Kvcn that there is much to lx learned. So now as the year draws near its end and we l egin to think just what our first year of Pharmacy has been, we can see that though our battle has not been an easy one. and at times it seemed ns if we were not accomplishing much, yet we find that eight of us still survive and are gradually (very gradually) approaching the Senior year ami the coveted Ph.G. Though we are small in number as compared with other departments of the University, we have endeavored to cope with them in all college activities and Ik a real part of the University. As to our success in our undertakings. time and its record will Ixr our judge. Then hail to the Pharmacy Class of 1928. and may her reward be in proportion to labor expended. Histohiax.Daniki., B..............................Moultrie  i N I $ mmmz ASophomore Class History 1TII the mitur.nl progression of time we are able to set down the failures and achievements of one more Sophomore Class. We- the Class of ’24 —in September felt for the first time a weight of responsibility on our shoulders. Recognizing the importance of our )K sition we have earnestly endeavored to give the upperclassmen something to talk and think about, that their minds might not grow dull from introspection, and the Freshmen something to do in order that their limbs grow not old and decrepit. The greatest pride of the Sophomore Class is in its small studio behind the age-old chapel. In this studio the Freshmen are instructed, not in the art of making music by “picking the strings", but in the newer and more exclusive of "pulling the string". Mere, between the hours of six and twelve on any Saturday night a weary passer-by may hear tin sweet notes of a string instrument as they Hoot out triumphantly upon the air. carrying glad tidings to all of "Athens Town". We mav also boast as lieiug the first class that ever had the Chancellor to honor a "Graveyard Party" with his presence. This class also holds the record for Presidents, having had five in her short career of two years. To be convinced of our business success one has only to step in our halx-rdasherv on Clayton street. The fashionable beaux who assemble here in Septemlx-r. coming from all parts of the State, have declared the gorgeous color of our enforced headgear the most attractive and becoming that they have ever seen. But there is a channel that runs deeper. A visitor, turning the leaves of the old dusty books in the Faculty Room will be convinced that the scholarship average of the class is unusually high. In the literary, social, and athletic life our class has played a prominent part. Many of our numlicr. through their untiring efforts, have seen ml seats in the “Halls of Fame” of the I’nivcrsity. ■—Historian .00000200000201000102100000040903110706030605110102020002010201000001010000 Sophomore Class Officers.Av. iia wr ti' ti mm 1 'fAir r -«» prf— _ngx:: m:ii-L ' J 4 ,-Q ' iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii Sophomore Class Roll sV ili Amnkv, Mary Coknkiia . t liens Ai.kxandkr, T. W. . . . Denitur l.MAXO, K. I... Jr. . . . . . . Social Circle Amikrson, 0. It Macon Aniikrson. .1. 1 . . . . NVintervillc Amikrson. O. B. ... . . . . Oehloclmec Armstrong. .1. It. . . . .... Woodviltc Baird. A. C Bakiuk. GkNKYikvk . . theiis Barnkv. (). It Bkai.i.. .1. S Bktts. !.. N Bi.anciiahii, 11. II. . . . Bi.axkknship, V. K. . . .... Stonewall Bl.KCKI.KY, B Clayton BOI.TON. .1. I Boniickant, NV. M. . . thrns Bowiikn, NV. ()., .Ik. . . . Roswell Bridoks, NV. . . ’. . . . Sasser Bright. A. J Brooks. 1 BrcllANAN. J. 1) Tackson Birkk. B. It Bctnkk. It. It . Powder Springs Brrr. II. 1, Canti KIIOK, S. A. . . . Chaffin. .1. 11 Ciianck. (‘ Ciian m kk, NV. S Chaitki.i., .1 Chick. H. N Ci.kcki.kv, H. M.......................Vugusta Coi.kman. M. M.........................Lyons Coi.i.ikk. C. W...................Mcansvillc Cook. H. E.................Cottonwood, A In. Cooi'KK, ,?. W........................Annuchcc Coockh. W. (»., .Ih..................Atlanta Cox. 1„ K......................Blue Ridge Chandaix, I). S................Port Valiev Coi minus. H. O........................I.eln Daii.kv, I,. P........................Homer Daxiki., Sai.i.ik Kanxik .... Daiiielsville o’Antionac. Awkrgnk. Ill.............Griftin Davis. Nr. V...........................Ideal Day, T. R............................Dougins Dkauwvi.kn, I). I....................Carlton Dkan. A. F.......................Gainesville Dkatii. H. I......................Covington Donaldson, I)........................Summit Dornki.att. B. M...................... thens BTii PTTi t jLjr sSEsfc -■ ■ Dcnaw.w, .1. 1 Rome Dcnstan, E. M Atlanta Eowaros. NV. V Grittin Erwin, F. .1.. .Ih .... Blairsville Kvkrktt, 11. NV Kvkrktt. E. M Ntlanta Kxirv, S. 11 Fast. 11. B Fkspkrman. G. T. . . . .... NVavcross Ficki.ing. NV. I Fitts, Shki.inin .... . . Hamburg, Ala. ForciiKK. K. It Fowi.kr, .1. II Fkkdkmick. F. .1.. ,1k. . . . . . Marsliallville Fkkkmkn. .1. II Forsvtli Fry. B. C . . . Clurkesvillc Fi’wnni, NV. 1 Nugiistii Gorfain. F. M Grkkn, 1 Griffin. M. II Douglas Gcki.ky. J. B., .Ih. . . . .... l iganvillc Hairston, Fi-ossik A. . . 1 1AMCTON, H. 'I’ II AN AH AN. I.. M. . . . . . . Dothan. Ala. Hancock, l.ir.r.u: Mak . .... Lixelln Harmin, It. M.. Jr. . . . Rome Hariik.man. .1. C Hardman, H. E .... Crawford Hardman, NV. NV .... Crawford Hardy, A. S.. .Ir. . . . . . . . Gainesville Hargrktt, F Harkky, It. F . Bradentown. Fin. Harrison, T. C Martin Harti.ky. H. V . . . Fort Valiev Hkrndon, E. M. ... . . . Social Circle Hksi.oi , R. C Panama Moih’.k . C. S Hoscii. Ai.ton .... . . . . Gainesville Her '. J. B IIcffakf.r. B. E Rome 1 dkison, S. A lxi.AR, NV. II .... NVavcross Johnson, 0.1, Graham j p rat 1 Sjs |l ■: , . V ? n G i% 'X7a XK | ._________ Johnston, J. 1$. ... Canton Johnston. J. II. . Woodstock Johnstone, Wji. G. . . Tliontaston Jones, II. A.................. . . Sale City Jones, J. M...........................Sardis Jonks, Jos. M..........................Cairo Kki.i.ky, V. H.....................Columbus King, II. C..........................Cordele Km no, J. W..........................Atlanta Lancast :k, II. 11...............Gainesville Langford, G. T.......................Kovston Langston, S. i'.......................Monroe La n IKK, 15..........................Summit Lanier, J. It.......................Graymont I.anikr, W. M. .......................Summit Lovvokn, J........................Carrollton Mahsiiai.i., A. A....................Atlanta Martin, C. T.........................Ashland Massey, 15. J.......................Valdosta Mays, L. B............................Albany Mkrmmt, T. 15..........................Macon Miciiaki., 15. I.......W. Carrollton, Ohio Mii.es, W. G..........................Dalton Milker, C. 0...........................Macon Mii.i.er, CL NN'...................NVaycross Mm.i.kk, J. Z......................Toomsboro Minor, NV. A.. Jr............Stone Mountain Mitchell, L. II.....................Columbus Mohi.ey, J. NV.................Millcdgcville Morgan, J. A., Jr...................Valdosta Morris, J. Z........................Mt. Zion Mcrphky, G. NV......................NN'ndlcy Mcsgkovk, L. B....................Momervillc McArthur, C. T.......................Cordelc McCollum, NV. NV......................Nelson McCommons. L. C., Jh..............Greensboro McDaniei., J. G......................Kastman McDonaid, O. L.......................Decatur McGriiek. J. H., Jr................Tnlbotton McRae, C. E..............................Mt. Vernon McRainky, N. D.......................Elmodel McNVii.i.ia.ms, II. T................Griffin Nachman, M...........................Augusta Nkijon, Emmie...................Cnrtersvillc Nesmith, 15. A........................Portal Nf.wton, J. B......................NVoodbinc O’Dell, Jas. NV.........................Lula Ohh, D. F.............................Athens Ostkrman, F. J...........................St. George Owens, 1)............................Atlanta Pantone, C..........................Americas Parker, J. I........................Wliigham Pahrisii, G. NV.....................Brooklet Patterson, II. T......................Athens Peterson, J. C........................Niley Pkt :rson, M.........................Tifton Peyton, Lula Mae...............Mt. Airy Pierce, F. I .......................Parrott Pittman, .1. G., Jit.........Gaffney, S. C. Powell, Evelyn....................Nashville Power, P.........................Carrollton Heed, C. M.......................IJncolnton Beeves. M. A........................Zebulon Reynolds, J. T.................Donaldsville Richardson, S. 1......................Rayle Romkhts, II. S.....................Columbus Rorinson, NV. I.............College Park Rockwell, NV. S....................Savannah Royal, G. I.......................Crossland Rytiikr, Fkni.ky.....................Athens Sanderrs, J. P.....................Hartwell Sanders, M. I)......................Atlanta Seay, J. L..........................I.ielog Shaw, R. B......................Cnion Point Shiri-ey. S. J.......................Plains Sikkrt, J. NV., Jr..................Augusta Sims, Carolyn......................Americas Sims, Many Ki.ixahktii.............Americas Snead, Mary 15.......................Athens Spann, C. M..........................Dalton Stephenson, J. NV...................Atlanta Stith, Gkmtrcdk 15..................Vidalia Taliaferro, NV. G..................Savannah Tate, NV..............................Macon Thomas, L. A.. Jr.....................Macon Thornton, C. J.. Jr.................Ntlnntn Trawick, A. J.....................I.inton Turman. R. I.....................Atlanta A’aknadok, S. L....................Savannah A'ikitas, R..........................Brazil Walker. J. T.............................. NVai.ton, G. B.....................Hamilton NVai.ton, J. M.......................Dublin NValton, R. J.. Jr.................Harlem NVatson, M. !.., Jr..............Columbus NVatson, J. I).....................Dallas NVatson, J. I.................StatcslK ro NVatson, J. NV.......................Dallas NVatson, 0.0.........................Dublin NVheki.kr, R. A., Jr...............Savannah NViiitakkr, C. I)....................Harlem Wiiitmirr, Durand NV..................Talmo NVhitner, J. S...................Atlanta NViley. G. F....................Eastonollce NVii.uams, J. O.................Ccdartowu Williams, L. E...................Atlanta Wright, R. A...........................Rome Yokmans, M. S........................Dawson Young, Nellie Gakrutt................Athens m G Sophomore Law History WING reached the first mile-post of n three-year journey wc. the ineml»crs of the first year Law (’lass, beg your indulgence while we recite to you our humble history. We are well aware of the fact that our history lies ahead of us rather than in tin-past. that is it mostly a sort of prophecy we write that will acquaint you with ourselves and our desires before we resume the journey that leads to the gateway from which we pass to argue your ease in the court of life. Realizing the hardships and trials which would beset us. but fired with the determination and .cal to surmount them, we came like all simple pilgrims a year ago to take up the journey to the Mecca of our desire, reaching which we shall worship at the feet of our chosen mistress. Law. This we have learned Law is a jealous mistress. Rigid routine and faithful constancy is required of those who find favor in her sight. There can In- no shirking, for many Shylocks are to come to justice and. like Daniel, wc must come to judgment. It may not l»c given to us that wc interpret our mistress' desires in the wisdom of a Solomon, but it is given to all men to be brave enough to uphold the Justice and Kquity. if they will. Wc have learned further- -the golden traditions of our great democracy lean down through the years to whisper to us a challenge for the future. We may not hear the message plainly now. hut we are willing to learn. Full realization of the responsibilities that shall rest upon our shoulders can only Ik- attained by tracking tip the long, winding road that lends through toil and privation, amid days of sun and cloud, and nights of stars and darkness, which we have yet to climb after reaching the goal of our Alma Mater. But we have wise counsel to assist us. Our professors we have found ready and willing to give the helping hand where we labored in tin-dark. It may be that we shall conquer and win our goal. M ith these words we take leave of you. for you have yet to hear of us again before we reach that high gate looming ahead from which we shall file out into life and again beg indulgence until we have proven our merit through the championing of your rightful claims and the defense of your revered institutions. —HlSTOltlAN . f A- 'j V iii v 1 , 1 HriurTr JaiM « | —! -A »| la»1 ■»» " , Sophomore Law Class Roll mm Adkhiioid, .1. 1). . . Jurki.ovk. I. A High Springs, Fla. Aijjcx. W. 1). . . . Inglesidc KaI’KPMAX, (i. A. . . . . St. Charles, Va. Marry, II. M Brunswick Uknnktt. .1. .1.. .Ik. . Manx. T. V Breed. 11. It., .Ik. . LaGrange Monk, C. F Moultrie Browder. 1). C. . . . Mi'i.viim.i., It . . . Pittsburg, Pn. Brown, V. A. . . . Mi ndy, W. C.. .Ik. . . Atlanta Carter. 11. A MiCi.ki.i.and, I.. F.. .Ik. ('oil K X, S McGimx, T. .f„ Jm. . I)avii . II. W. . . . Camilla McI.aws. I . 1 Savannah Dean, 11. 11.. .Ik. . Gainesville 1 eax, T N'kwman, T. F. . . . Atlanta Dohbs. J. M., .Ik. . . Padgett, C. 1 Dvak. T. C Athens Pkarmox, C. W. . . . Augusta Howard . 1). 1 . . . Dawson Post, D. M Newnan Ki.ROD, 11. C Canon Ramsey. B. H SlateslKiro Fl.KTCIIKK, .1. 11. . . Tifton ItORKRTS, J. It Foster. 11 Fov. .1. 1-:.. .Ik. . . SlIRKVK, M. 0 Krie, Pn. Freeman, I).. .Ik. . . Savannah SlIl'PTKINK, J. T. . . . Savannah Frier. A. 11 I'l'U’llER, W. M . . Waynesboro Thomas, M. I (lEAHHEI.I), F. 1.. . . Newnan Tut. It. A (il.ENX, T. 1 'I ii.i.ett. W. I . . Dneherd, Tenn. Heim ax, 1 Todd. H. W Hester. J. C Wai.ton, I-. 11., .Ik. . . .... Washington IIiGDOX. A. W. . . . West, F.. P Hicdox. C. W. . . . Wisdom, W. I) Higdon. M. c. . . . Wright. A Newnan Hrnt, W. II. . . . Cnihliert ■ 1 freshman class history H K journey from the clipped heads and red caps to derbys and canes was enthusiastically begun by three hundred and fifty perfectly fresh young men and women, entering the t’niversity as members of the Class of ’25. The young men’s introduction to college life was made lively and nnforgetahle by the Sophomores, who thought it best to prune their flowing locks that the knowledge to which they might perchance l e exposed might the more easily be absorbed. Hut such is the history of every Freshman class which enters the names of its members on the books of Obi Georgia’s registrar, and ere long one and all had imhilicd that spirit of loyalty to his Alma Mater, which no one of her sons can fail to receive and absorb into his mind and character after he has remained here for a while. The Class of ’28 is distinguished as being the last Freshman class to furnish first-year men to Georgia’s varsity teams, for next year the men who make up these teams must come from the ranks of upper classmen. And as the last Freshman class to have this privilege the Class of 2.j has furnished several athletic stars to the football, baseball and track teams. Wc also have the distinction of l»eing the Freshman class which helped to put over the Million-Dollar Drive, which will mean so much for a greater Georgia in the future. Now that our Freshman days are over and we have packed up our Freshman caps, expecting to return next fall and assume the responsibilities of all-wise Sophomores, we realize that the history of the freshman is made. —Historian.freshman class officers frank crouch..............................................president c. o. lovern.........................................vice-president w. ni. Iiollis.......................................... secretary j. w. jnckson.............................................treasurer s. cdwards................................................historian I. c. roherts..................................................poet c. h. colquitt.............................................Chaplain MiHiuiiinni miuin umiMitu mi 1t 1 Hi ahiicy, Ii. i............................atliens alford. a. ii.. jr.....................Iiurtwell alien, w. s..............................zcbidon allison. (I. in.........................cull mil iilnntt, t. I...........................savannah ami-, j. |»..............................alliens asbury, blanche....................ermvfordville ashford, w. Ii.. jr......................alliens bailey, 1. a......................cllcnton, s. c. baker, e. b........................ilanielsville baldwin, e. s.. jr........................dublin burr, b.. jr............................sylvania beer, e..................................atliens belcher, I............................bainbridge bennelt. a. r............................alliens I ten nett, I. r..........................jcssup blinint. j. v„ jr.....................savannali ImiikI, a. g...........................savannali homier, j. c..........................Carrollton hooue. v. I..............................baxlev booth, irma clare........................atliens lumen, nellie inae......................qnitinan bowers, polly ruth.......................atliens bradfifld, irma.........................lagrangc bradlev. a. s....................... swainstniro braiian, w. n.............................macoii braselton. j. I........................braselton breineii, lielen.........................atlanta bright well, i. b....................uiontieello brown, r. f..............................atliens bullock, ninnita.........................atliens burney. r. g...........................colunilms biiriuu, (I. m...........................augnsta bush, estber.............................atliens bush, rose...............................atliens butler, j. j.............................atliens byril, d. i...........................Statesboro eallioiin, f. f...........................perry, fla. calhoun, j. v...........................i.tlanta callawav, b. s............................Athens Campbell, j. cl..........................atlanta carnes. o. to............................atlanta carswell, p. w.......................wnvncslioro carter, j. t........................jasper, fla. carter, r. I. p.........................commerce carter, w. c.............................atlanta carntlicrs, r. s.................... j.tatrsboro chance, f. I..........................Waynesboro chandler, i. v...........................atliens chestnut, w. g...........................atlanta cloud. 1. I..........................greensboro coggins. a. b.....................niilicdgcvillc cokpiitt. e. I)........................thomnston converse, g. k..........................vnhtosta eiMik, b. v...........................cooksvillc courie, s. n........................ grcenvillc eranford, Ii..............................sasscr eromartie, j. a..........................vidalia croneh, e. f..............................oeilla eroxton, j. s.......................bueiia vista culbertson. 1. «■.......................litbonia curtis, c. a................................neat d a vis, a...............................atliens davis, a. I.................................mine dnvis, f. I.............................tennillc day, j. m................................douglas deal, r...............................stateslmro dickey, e. g....................bnltimore, nut. dodd, f. p..............................hoschton dolvin, r. I.............................si loam dornhlatt. amelia holey..................atliens dowdle, f. t.............................atliens drexel, f. e..............................lifton diincan. g. s............................royslon (lunstnn, a. e............................brazil duvall, r. r.............................atlanta dyal. b. f.................................white oak eberhardt. b. e........................maysvillc edmondson, j. b., jr....................lagrangc • 1 wards, s...........................Imchnnan elder, j. I.........................wntkinsville ellis, r. I..............................atlanta elrod, a. t............................jefferson erw||», marie........................blnirsvillr everett, j. p...........................roekmart everett, s. t.. jr.......................pelbnin evitt. t. ii.........................rocky face fainbrougli. e...........................atliens fergusoii, inarv olivia..................augnsta fitts, b. j.........................danielsville fleteher, j. in.........................columbus foote, w. o., jr.........................atlanta foster, k. w.............................atliens frnnkliii. w. j., jr....................zebu Ion zHzi fraxcr, j. p...............................mncon fudge, f. e............................Arlington flitch, d. j...........................nnicricus gaertner, h. j., jr. . . Oglethorpe university gallaher, c. w......................montcznmn gardiner, I. s........................nugustu garrett, in. e.....................lognnville garrett, w. s.. jr.....................spnrtn gay, o. c....................................gar field gelders, s. w.........................fitzgcrnld geurge. j..............................Ice pO] c gill, j. a............................immehester gins' , j. in......................tnnipa, flu. gleaton, c. p..........................arlington gowen, c. I............................hrunswick gregg. h. a......................florenee. s. c. green, 1. e.................................fort valley griffin, r. e..........................bn x ley- groover. f. c.........................(piitinaii gunliy. v. c..............................wrens hadley, w. c................. . . . thoinasvillc hailey. etliel clixnhcth.................atiieus hall. e. c..............................lagrange ham, f. e............................gainesville hamilton, n. m......................thoinasvillc haneock, j. h.............................athens barley, j. 1»...........................waveross hart. e. o..............................savannah harvey, m. m...............................jakin hateher. a. I.......................wrightsvillc haves, j. a...............................sasscr head. It. v., jr..........................athens head. j. e................................athens lieydt, r. h...................hloomficld, n. j. hill. w. I)..............................newnaii IhkIsoii, e...............................athens hodsou, h.................................athens hollis w. hi............................reynolds holt, 1. j.........................sandersville howell. n., jr..........................ntlanta IiiiIntI. Ii. o„ jr......................harlein huff. e. w............................earrollton hughes, I. h.............................onkwood hushaiids. h. It........................waveross iliman. h. t.............................Atlanta irby, f. I ......................new port, ark. jnekson. j. w............................griffin janies. a. s............................reynolds jankower, e. in.......................athens Jarrell, Ii. hi...........................athens joel. I. I ..............................atlanta 'WUL-Ufia Mi:.’ t 'cj » V johnson, g. f......................inonticello Johnson. Ii. h..........................orchard johnson, j. r...........................dalton jones, h., jr.................................at liens jones, p. e.............................Columbus jones, r. 1 .............................tiiacon kcllcy. r. c...............................avera kent. r. s...............................wavcrly hall kitchens, I...............................gibson knight, w. t............................(piitman lalaam, cniilv uuillins...................athens lamar, 1.. jr.........................daw son lane. h. h..................................Iron city lane. j. d...............................laTiier langford, e. h......................danielsvillc legg, j. p..............................valdosta lewis, j. d...............................pelham lewis, t. h.............................eallioun little, w. j...............................mncon long, j. w....................holdcnvillc. okla. loudcrniilk, j. h....................gainesville lovern, e. o.............................newnaii loving, w. I........................college park lowe. e. w.................................tmena vista hind, m...................................Hthens mnddox. j. h............................eolivers inanii, o. ..............................royston inn reus, h. e.........................eominerce martin, c. h.........................gainesville inavne, e.................................athens rniddlehrooks, h. I.....................catonton initehell, I. d.........................lagrange nioore, j. h..............................sparta mosteller. j. h., jr...................woodstock mote, j. h...........................inonticello inulkey, in. f.........................lafayette mulvihill. r.....................pittshurg. pa. niurrny. w. in..............................fort valley murray, w. s.............................angusta mcartlmr, e. e...........................cordcle me artliur, w. r...........................ailev me early, j. h............................dalton me curry, w. h......................willacoochce me donnhl, m..............................pelham ineelveen. j. w...........................areola me intosh, j. It., jr....................Iioston rne kinnon, g. r........................Ixiston me lendon, e. h.........................sasscr me lendon. I. h.........................sasscr me ncer, may........................tampa, fla. me rae. w. h............................valdosta me rce, j. j...........................kindcrlon  1-4 . —'-i - - nelson, I. h.............................dtihlin odom. j. d.............................coliimbus odom, w. Ii...........................cohimlttis oetjen, I. Ii...........................aiignstu orr, f. w.....................................at hens ossinsky, I...................Jacksonville, flu. palmisano, 1. a..........................utliens park, katlierinc.........................alliens parr, maliel clizubcth...................utliens parrisb, w. b...........................brooklet peacock, r. 1..........................perry, fla. peeples, aliec winn......................utliens pendergrast, j. b.......................reynolds perkins. j. w........................nasliville, tenn. pbilpot. w. k.......................... migusta phinuzcc. j. Ii..........................griltin pierce, j. w...........................coliimbus piper, c. g...................Jacksonville, fla. pittard, in. Ii......................wintervillc pound, e. c...........................atlanta powell, c. e.......................swainslsiro pritclictt. t. j.........................diihlin tpiillian, aiiiy.........................utliens moduli, I. c.............................utliens rauzin, a...............................savannah reeves, t. f..........................tliomastnn riebards, p. n...........................utliens riebardson, r. j.........................utliens ricks, i. j.............................reynolds rojH-rts. ). .............................dallas rolxrtson, p. f..........................augustu ropers, j. h..........................grittiii ropers, r, t......................dunielsville ro|MT. Ii. I............................villunow rotbscbild. b. b.......................cobuubiis rocker, j. v........................ellierton rvllier, d. v., jr.....................utliens sale. f. I...............................atlanta sunders, c. i..........................knoxville sanford, b. r............................utliens schncll, w. i...........................Columbus M-oppins. p. t...........................utliens scoppins, r. t...........................utliens sears c. I...............................parrott Sewell, w. e..............................newnan shearer, e. ii..........................lapranpc slieHield. Ii. e.........................atlanta She I ley, a. hi............................pavo siniovitx, s............................aiipusta silos, e. p.............................valdosta slater, f. j............................savannah slauphtcr, p. f..........................utliens slaupbter, j. I.........................Columbus sinulia, t. p............................priflin smaller. r. b.........................lincolnton smith, b. j............................sarpent smith, f............................statcslmro smith, I. o...........................valdosta smith, s. b........................round oak snellinp, 1. b........................utliens Stanford, r. 1.....................nit. vernon Stephens, d. w........................lapranpc Stephens, f. d.........................atlanta stevens, w. o......................sale city stewart, j. ii..........................athens stokes, m. I...........................atlanta stranpc, j. 1..............................oak park struppa. r. w........................coliimbus siillivan, c. w.......................zebu Ion snllivaii, h. p....................wuyneslioro summers, h. a..........................conyers tahnadpc, c. h., jr.....................athens tanner, j. w........................Carrollton tarranpo, surah........................atlanta tatum, j. w........................fort paines tatum. w............................kenninpton tuylor, j. b........................dnvislairo thomason. j. d........................Columbus tilliiian, t. in......................valdosta tuylor. n. j.......................ha .lelmrst trapnell, p............................met ter treanor, k..........................ridpeville trowbridpe, k. s.......................aupusta lurk, c...............................commerce turner, d. c......................largo, fla. turner, j. 1.........................cedartown turner, w. r.........................coliimbus Ivler, t. 1.............................albanv veale, v. h......................watkiusville walker, cIihs. a...................Carrollton walker, f. b., jr.......................barney ware, c. u.........................hopansvillc weeks, f. t. . . . wedding, r. s. . . Westbrook, j. I. . weyman. s. in. . . wbeaton. in. 1. . wbittaker, r. s. . whitehead, c. t. whitehead, julietl whitehead, t. b. wielirs, c. f.. jr. . williams, c. h. . . williams, o. s. . williams, r. w. . . wilson, battic bin wood, s. w. . . . ...............wrens fort lauderdaic, fla. ..................ila , . . atlanta . . . griffin . . clticrton . painesvlllc . . . athens . . . athens . .savannah . . . atlanta . blackshear . . atlanta . commerce sandersvillc r Pan-Hellenic Council Representatives selected by their respective fraternities OFFICKRS It. I.. Andkkson . I'lii Delta Theta..................President S. K. Ci.akk . . . Si ma Alpha Kpsilou . . . Vice-Prfsidfnt ■I. I . McDowki.i. . Alpha Tam Omega, Secretary ami Treasurer mum miiiiiniiwiij imiiiiHHimiin wnuumnwin iHiwi Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity Foun lr l at the University of Alul Hiu;t 1H.W Beta Chapter Kstahli-shcd 18 »ii Colon: rtoyii Purple and Old Oohl SF.MOHS Jl'NIORS M It. Bell B. W. Daniels W. C. Firmixo A. F. Gannon C. G. Henry I). M. 1 011. KK . J. Strickland .1. II. Walker SOPHOMOItKS T. W. Aikxandkr ti. K. CoNVKRCK U M Fiiciirr I). .1. Furrii S. I . Langston It. A. Wright M. t). Siirkyk A. M. Snki.ijnu H. W. Tooo .1. I„ TraxEB I. . L. Robinson FKKSI1.MKN It. W. Carswell F. K. IIamm II. L. HolMiKSON Harris Junks J. J. McRra W. It. Tcbxbr I- F. Peart. I). II. SXELI.IXO T. M. Tillmax M () Mnxa II. C. Turner POST Git XDCATK II. M. Ticiiexor It. L. illCKKY It. J. Inmax T. G. Kelley N. I). Nickerson C. C. Pr.ARCE T. It. Perry A. J. Arxold S. M. Boxey II. G. Carreker N. K. Ciark It. I.. Dashrh Chi Phi Fraternity Founded ;it Frineeton l llivorsitv 1S21 Ktu Cluipter Established lhG7 Colons: Srnrlet null Blue SKNIOKS T. .1. Briuiitwki.i I). A. Coi.i.ixs J. IIahtmiim'.k I.. II. Him. K. V. 1 Ii’rt II. J. Kknnkiiv H. II. Skkkn J. M. Wai.kkr .1I’NIOItS (J. S. Hart SOIMIO.MOKKS K. I.. Ai.manii W. I.. Fickmnc. 1). OWKXS S. L. lilCHAKMOX S. I.. Vakxkook J. S. WIHTXRK FIlF.SHM F.N A. (5. G. Bond .1. ’. Cai.ikhw .1. I). CamI‘HKI.1. W. C. Cart»:r J. It. Cochran K. M. Doar I.. It. Ei.iis V. (). Footk T. F. Greks V. B. Hii.i. A. Howell, III II. .1. I XMAS II. It. Saxford C. A. Tai.maok S. M. Wkv.max SOHIO.MOKr.SA i ■s f 1 Mr ig Jan 4apl J rsJ — V. x. « % % 2 '• = £ ; £ ■ ■ - ' 05030603060705030305100505050911070507040708060202000102010002000001000201 lUiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuniimiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniMiiiiiiiinniiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinnSOIMIOMOIt ICS .UNIOKS •H|- XH«)|M. ;) •i: inv(| SMOISMH no ) i io inn jiiIjit, luh'ii,7 :vhoioj 0G«! IM,IS!I‘1M1SM J-'l'In'l.) «I|»C1 ItKl i"1!11.) I1-' | ' | mil .‘l isj iqo IIfi . HHIIIHIIIIIIIIl ■ ■ b ' '■ Kappa Sigma Fraternity Founded at I’nlverslty of Virginia lSfi!) Beta I.amhda Chapter Kstadilished BUM Coi.oMs: Snirltl. Hintrolil anti WhUr SKNIOHS •I. (’. IIkXNETT (’. T. CoNYKKS (I. M. Can vox K. Y. Howard .FoNKS .1. J. Dkxxktt A. N. Ai.komi) .1. .1. Biti.kr It. S. CaNNI’TIIKKH A. Cakt»:k K. (I. Dickky .UNIONS SOIMIOMORRS KR KSIIMKN C. V. Sri i iva.v V. B. Co»v M. I.. I loi.COM HK .1. B. W’lKR •I. K. Mooxky .1. W. McW IIOKTKN .1. II. Rooms .1. II. Hancock A. R. Mri.viuiLi. .1. B. McCarty I.. F. McCi.ki I.ANO (). II. Oktwkx Sg||ip £S£ ■ • Z31 • ’'VM T J vO- vlninnnniimmnimnuninnnm ......Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity Pounded at Ito.ston I'nlversitv 1909 Nil Chapter Ivdnblished 1915 Colons: I’tir ile. Crt-en and Cold SP.NIOltS II. C. (’.KAY .1. C. Mmi'iiKV M. C. Wai.ton K. .1. Vann J. I). Davis II. J. IIahihx .Il'NIOKS C . C. Tyson It. 1.. I.ani: C. K. RawsonTau Epsilon Phi Fraternity Komulrd nt Columbia Cnivcrsity 1909 Mu Chapter Established 1919 Cm ohs: Luvtnibr uu ! IV hi If SKXIOItS I). StkIMIKHC. JCN10IIS C. H. CoiiKX SOI'l IOMOK KS II. DoK.NHI.ATT I. I . Mvr.HsoN FltKSlIMKX O. Manx I„ IIkiman (». Kauptmax S. SiMowm HONOR A It VAlpha Kappa Kappa Fraternity Founded at Dartmouth College 18S9 Alpha Gamma Chapter Kstnhlished 1 ! 0| Colors: Emerald Green anti White Flower: White Carnation FOURTH YKAR CLASS Rkksk Watkins Bradkoro I’lymkr Jacobs Manson Stacy Clairocrnk I low km, Frank McKk.mik Rogers THIRD VFAR CLASS Jacob Fork Khkriiarot John Chari k McCall Jamks Clayton IIowei.i. Ira Oglktiiori k McI.kmomk F.rnkst Whitney Vkai. SI’.COND VFAR CLASS 1 ,M»YI K KN N BUY BoGGS W A 1.00 F..MKKSON FlOYO Ciiaki.ks Rkattv Kknnky Rohkht Carky McGahee Wai.i.ack I.amah Fooi.k Aihkht IIknky Powki.i Fowaro Jamks Whki.an I.KWIS 11. Wric.iit FIRST YKAR CLASS John C». Hiniu Kari.e Loy Warren Gkorc.k Riimsway Hrc.ii Carers Wai.kkk John Davioson Wii.ky FRATF.RS IN FACULTATK Joseph Akkrman, A.B.. M.D. Hinton J. Baker. M.D. Jamks Harvey Rkti.kk. M.D. William J. Cranston. M.D. Albert A. Davioson. M.D. Ashcry Hi'i.i., M.D. Anorkw J. Kilpatrick, M.D. Riciiarii Vanokriiorst Lamar, M.D. Sam cel Joseph Lewis, M.D. Kino Walker Milligan. FIi.G.. M.D. Frank X. Mci.iierin, M.D. Kik-.ar R. I’cno. A.B.. M.D. Henry W. Shaw. M.D. Thomas R. Wrioiit. M.D.. F.A.C.S. Anorkw A. Wai.iikn, M.D. I.ysanokh I . Holmes, M.D. Carlyle S. Lentz Sam cel Lichtenstein, M.D. Kappa Psi Fraternity KomuUxI at New Haven, Conn.. May JtOtli. Ih7!) tiainina-Kappa Chapter K-tahlished in Colons: Srarlet ami dray I- LOW I1H .liftl Cnrua ion SKCOND YKAH Cl .ASS M KMUKUS 11. l» Curves V It. Jameson .1. M. Com max E. K. Martin w 11. limiVKS 1.. S. Owes w .1. II I RON T. P. Revii ir. FIRST YEAR Cl. SS K. M. l)oxd F. C. Story II It. .Ikskink II C. Trimble T. E. Mom;an J. R. WlLROX P. C. Savage | » 1). Weeks  ■ tniTrnnm i i fifflii nfrli njirnTfirmniJi:, f T-n 4 = ? ; - ii .r — £ " ■ . c : x . x £ ; : : 5 xuC fX - ?-oj TOT3 im 11 mm miiininmnm minimum — i . •li t  )%+%((%+!""!" !"" ""! "! !!" 3The Student Council of the Medical Department MKMI'KKS Front lime (Left to Itiglit) Mktts, Howkn. Nash, Haiti k liork lime (l.eft to Kiplit) Uiciiakoson. Hanck. McMikkay. Wilkinson, .Iamkson  The Student Government Association of Women OKFICKKS Miss l.n.A Kimwinw.................................................I’retulenl Miss I'nascks Simpson ......................................I’irt-l’retiilfHf Miss Ida I’orxu.........................................Sfrr larti-Trfii»urer M KM IIKHS Miss 1 01.1.y Itrrn Bowkks Miss (ikhtmtiik Stitii Miss Hitii Kak Miss I .rev Woodmmntmimiiniiniiinnimnnnmnm:iimiimimimi -tr Y A T j The History of the Demosthenian Literary Society HI ' Demosthenian I.itcrnrv Society lias a record of one hundred twenty years' service to the State, the Southland, ami to the Nation that tin- imagination of men of the present generation can scarcely compass. Her history since the year I SOI has heen closely linked with the literary and economic development of the men whose lives came in contact with her molding influence, and few organizations have filled so well the purpose for which the ten charter meinliers endowed with their loyalty the foundation of the society. The meetings of the society were held in a class-room until the year I 821. when the present building was erected at a cost of four thousand dollars. In the meantime serious differences of opinion had arisen among its members, and in 1820 one group of tin- rival factious formed the Phi Kappa. Since that time the history of the two societies have Ik-cii closely identified, each with the other, often marked clashes, open warfare, armistices and treaties that were charged with traditions of some of the men P who have left a deep impression upon the life of tin- Nation. The constitution of the society, cmliodying the purpose of the attainment of proficiency in extemporaneous speaking, has gradually evolved into a document which directs toward the pursuit of Truth and Science: and it is in accordance with the guiding principle that the ready and the stumbling in speech of the present generation are endeavoring to learn the means of simple, eloquent expression. Some of the men who have proved worthy in places of honor and trust, and who caught in the Demosthenian the gleam of their possibilities were V. S. Rutherford. Benjamin Harvey Hill. Sam Spencer. Bob Toombs. Pope Barrow. .1. II. Alexander. Phil Cook. Hugh Dorsey. William .1. Harris. Chancellor Barrow. Doctor Sylvaiius Morris and Professor Charles M. Strnhan are monuments in which the Demosthenian has played her part in the erecting to the service of their fcllowincn. The love that the sons of the society have for her spirit and her usefulness is every year attested by the visits of some of the humblest and some of the most famous men whose voices have revcrln-rated within herDemosthenian Presidents The History of the Phi Kappa Literary Society XK Hl'NDRKI) AND TWO years ago tlu- Clariosophic Phi Kappa Literary Society was founded at the t’iiiversitv. Old Phi Kappa Mall, having withstood the agencies of destruction for eighty-five years, stands forth today one of the ancient landmarks on the campus. In style it is hut the court architecture of the early thirties. Its massive pillars of hrick. covered with concrete, are almost of the Doric order. Rectangular in shape, Phi Kappa Hall majestically faces Dcmosthenian on tlu opposite side of the campus at the end of an avenue of oaks. The old building stands Colloss.nl near the loftiest campus peak, festooned with many a tradition, rich in glory and embellished with the fame of many a hero. From the earliest records we have: "On Saturday. February 12. 1820. the Philokosmean Society met for the first time, consisting of William It. Crablic. Homer V. Howard. Stony Simmons, and John G. Rutherford, the latter of whom was absent. For three years the society met in the old Chapel garret, and in the year 1822 moved into a wooden building, which was used for eleven years. In 1821 the present structure was erected at a cost of five thousand dollars, and the society finished paying for it in 1839. Phi Kappa was originally a fraternity, for the early members labored in profound secrecy in all their performances, and in the annual reports the term "brother" was used exclusively, as well as the term "this fraternal organization." The Great Seal of Phi Kappa has been designed and ordered affixed to the Constitution. ( erlificates of Award of the Key. Diplomas. Records and Documents. A committee has liecn ap|K»inted to revise the Constitution. which has not been changed since 1910. The Court of Ap| eals (Phi Kappa Council), once renowned in the history of the society for its extensive jurisdiction, is again playing an important part in the settlement of mooted questions. The Phi Kappa Key in Oratory, struck on January 20. 1828, for many years having fallen into disuse, has been revised and is now awarded to those who qualify for the same, and those making it are also awarded the Certificate of Award, which admits them to the Phi Kappa Key Circle. We arc glad to say that eight of such keys will Ik awarded this vear. 1 The History of the Agricultural Club X 190G work was begun upon a new building at the University of Georgia. This stately building was soon completed and lias stood for one and one-half decades overlooking the surrounding country from its commanding position, bearing the inscription. "GEORGIA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE”. Erom the halls of this building have gone forth men who have done much good in the State. It was early recognized that to develop leaders in agricultural thought it was necessary to establish a club to give agricultural students an opportunity to discuss together these existing problems peculiar to their calling. Accordingly on January 15. 1907. there was established at the Agricultural College an organization which stands primarily for education and progress. This organization was christened "THE GEORGIA AGRICULT URAL CLUH”. During the past fifteen years this club has been the means of drawing the agricultural students closer together, giving them greater interest and pride in the Agricultural Department and furnishing them a medium of expression. In 1907 the Club began publication of an agricultural paper known as the "Agricultural Annual". It later became what is known as "The Georgia Agricultural Quarterly". During the past year it has taken another step forward and has now become a monthly publication. In 1909 recognition was first given the students of the Agricultural College by the Paxiioha. The Presidents of the Agricultural Club and Hoard of Directors of the Quarterly Ix-ing published in the College Annual. At the beginning of the collegiate year of 1911-12 the Club was put on an equal basis with the other literary societies of the University. Due to increasing recognition of the value of oratory in the training of agricultural leaders a new and broader schedule of dcliatcs was arranged in 1921. Interest sprang up anew, and thus far activities along this line have been successful. In the few years of its existence the Club has sent forth many men who have made their influence felt in developing a greater agriculture in the State. “The fanner was the first man. And all nobility rests on the jmssession and use of land.” Emerson. - Histohian. • r t =[l®- ■ ■ SBr G History of the Economics Society m Y .InHilary of 1919 the enrollment of the School of Commerce had passed the 100 mark, and it was an established fact that commercial education had come to stay and would henceforth hold an important place in the curricula of all tirstclass institutions. Realising this, and with the aim of fostering a closer feeling of friendship and co-operation among the students in the school, and also to afford closer study of actual business problems as they should be presented by prominent business and professional men. Dr. Howard 1). Do .ier and Prof. H. A. Inghram put on foot a movement that resulted in the establishment of the Economics Society. 'file first meeting, held in Dr. Stephens’ class room .January 27, was attended by an unusually large and enthusiastic group of men. A permanent organization was effected, and a Constitution was drawn up. Weyman 1. Dooley was elected first President, and Chancellor Harrow was invited to speak at the first meeting. Messrs. Hugh Gordon and Harry Hodgson also addressed the Society at meetings held that spring. During Mr. Harvey Tisinger's administration in the fall of I ill 9 the Society succeeded in becoming recognized by the Trustees as a Departmental Club, and was allowed to collect fees at registration as the literary societies do. its financial stability being thus insured. During this year the attendance records were improved and eligibility pins (tearing the letters "K. S.” were awarded to those memltcrs who had been eligible to vote for two years. During the 1920-21 term a numlter of spirited debates were held and Mr. Max Michael and others gave some instructive and interesting lectures. In the present school year meetings have been addressed by Messrs, .loci Hunter, of Atlanta; Harold R. Flintoff. of New York; Hon. Harry Hodgson and Prof. II. M. Heckman, of Athens; Harold Hirsch. of Atlanta, and Dean Edward H. .Johnson, of the School of Commerce. Emory University, while Messrs. V. R. Baker and C. Murphy Candler have also promised dates for the third term. A debate has been arranged with the Agricultural Club. This meeting of two closely allied branches of the University promises to awaken a new interest in commercial-agricultural subjects. Added enthusiasm has been shown this year in the meetings and the attendance has been good, so we feel justified in predicting that the Economies Society will play an important role in future University activities . "ii—II !• aajpqitig (I. M. Hko.MIII I NST II. II. I’oWKNS W. B. A I.MON Economics Society Presidents Cl. M. Bnoaihicrst.........................Fir el Term It. II. I’owkrs.................................Second ’Term W. B. A i.mon....................................Third Term  'i T. J. McCSnc A. T. I.r.rnc G. Thomas Henry W. Grady Public Speaking Society Presidents Tiiko .F. McGkk.............................................First Term A. T. I.kvik................................................Semml Term NV. G. Thomas...............................................Third Term mDebating Council Agricultural Debating Council iiiiiimuimiiii.'iiimiimimiii » cr. .- s 5: + X T X 5 ■5 V ■ e 3 — 'S y; ■ • 3 w C ” V K n 3T 7 . M "•» -- J5 05 J ■“ • y £ — x ! . V, ►— • •T -3 •- £ 3 t" 5 05 7: % d V ■n • ■ 5 2 . % M m c 3 | O 3 R. ('. I'lTTMAX C. A. I.KWIS Inter-Collegiate Debate St-MJKCT: lletnh'cd, That the proposed Con tilutionul .1 mendnienl yiriny the Federal (lovernmenl poxcer to tor local hand anil other inet rumen talitie ehould he adopted. AFFIRM ATIVK 0. A. I.KWIS ft. C. PlTT.MAX To Debate Virginia Ifl IPS Q-0 K. H. Dixox A. B. CviJncmox Inter-Collegiate Debate Sl'UtiTi Urtoh'ed, Thai the jirexenl laze limitiin ini migration to three ja r rent, annually of the number of alien rnjieterimj from a yiven rountry in the ceneu of HUH elioulil he continued. XKliATl V K K. II. Dinox A. B. CiM.NKR'nwix 1 0 Di-hatr Vanderbilt r i 4- V. - U 4— 03 (V Q v 4— C3 bD a; l. k s _= a-. h 2AUtl KX VS. (Jl’.OKCIA Si’hjkct: Itrunlvnl, That thr Fanner of thr South xhonld adopt a ni iitem of ('o-oprrntire Mark tiny of Cotton. NEGATIVE Agricultural Inter-Collegiate Debate K. I.. Exoi.ani II. II. Maoimix II. II. M ADIKIX J E. L. Enoi.ani» X'{ .11 (1111111111111 it mil in hi ii in iiiiiniiiii n K. M. Nix Agricultural Inter-Collegiate Debate GEORGIA VS. PI.OH IDA Si'hjkit: Urtolretl, Thai Covernment Control ami (hcnerxhip of liailroaib wonh! rrxull lo the hex! interext of the American Farmer. AFFIRMATIVE E. M. Nix II. K. W(KiDRirn II. K. WooimfKF  Champion Debate 2 -5 •r s t J ; . V. . I z Z ? i i - -s ? V w £ •? = O 5« O T. J do: stEvC,? a A Cotton School Debate Sl'UKCT: lierotved, That (! overt) men I Control and ( hear rehip of Railroad e would retult to the beet in ferret of the American Former. (Affirmative) .. K. Laxikr W. A. 1 .UNDY ( Xnjaliee) Thov Edwards JO. I.. Knolaxd Negative won W. A. I.UN DY I.. R. I.AXIKM T. Kuwarim K. I B NO I. AM)I.BVIK Nki.son Morton Mf WllOHTKK (Vl.HKHTSON McKknxik McO.I’RK I.. Watson Dixon Pittman I.. SII KI’I’AKO C'OIIKN Impromptu Debate Sl'lJCCT: That the peace of the icorlil xcill he more effect iinllu prreervtil hit the plan of (lien ran I men I conference than hi that of the Leap ne of X at ion . PHI KAPPA (. If fir motive ) C. II. CoilKX E. II. Dixox K. (). McKknzik O. S. Morton .1. W. Sll KlTAKI) E. E. Watson DKMOSTH KNIAN ( Xeija tire ) A. It. ClM.HKRTSOX ('. K. Nkijm n H. C. Pittman F. C. McCi.crk K. A. McWiioktkr A. T. I.kvik Negatin' wonA. 1 lowii E. M. Di'XtrAX i-9 C. I.. Paikiktt w. c;. Cimipkn A. Dkan I.. Hirrrs Sophomore Debate Si-hjko': Iteeolred, That the principle of the open shop is for the be,vt interests of the people of the I'niled States. Pill KAPPA DEMOSTIIE (Affirmative) (Negative) A cstix Dkan I.. N. Hktts Ai.tox Hoseii W. ( . Coofkh C. IPadgktt E. M. Di’nstax .1. H. CiiAmx NV. C». Tai.ikkkko M. Doxmx F. M. (iuimx(Si D Agricultural Freshman Debate I. ClIANIII.KH .1. ('. Hoxni:r Sl'KJKlT: lirtolvrtl. That (hr I'nlrrnl Foria Loan .let ulionhl hr anirnilril a.i to a ran I imtiriilnal loanx up la (jlSo MiO ichn'r (hr proper e-rnrilp in furniuhril. (.1 ffinnativr) 11. V. Cook ( Tt'RK (.V nja(irr) I. V. ClIANOl.KR •I. C. Honnkh SrFreshman Impromptu Debate Sl'HJKCT: Hr olved, That Ihr dixpotrs brlicecn capital anti lalnir xlionld In xubtnilInl to a Federal Hoard of Arbitration, ichoxe decision xhonld hr final. I’ll! KAPPA DK.MOSTI 1KN1A N (Affirmative) (.Yci ative) W C. Cantkr 11. C. ]a RKRii. Kirr W. B. Him. ('. B. Column- T. (». Smaiia C. 1.. Go WAV .1. U. Pkndkhokast H. ('. SlIKITIKI.I) K. S. BAll WIN H. 1.. P. Caktkh Bknnktt Nix Hkanxkx Cox Kkm p McRainky I 1 All KINS Stock Judging Team STOCK JIDGING TEAM. 20 I . H. Bknnktt J. F. Bkannkn, Jm. C. C. Kkmp J. T. Cox A. I). Harkins I.. Mkkritt M. A. McRainky K. M. Nix (Altcrnntc) STOCK .ICDOING TEAM, 21 V. A. I.VXIIY E. M. Nix iL___ wnc'- ''IJCL'J P rrt rjetu Wkamkks or tiik Dkmostiikxiax Kky  0202020100010200010102000102000000010202010100000306100310061010080803  A suns r z fiOSCtl  Senior Round Table (Sipna I’psilon) IWCU.TY MKMIIKKS I). C. Harrow Dm. It. R. Park W. o. r.WN i: .1. 1). W alk T. Hkki ACTIVK MKMHKItS T. ,1. HkIC.IITWKI.I M. A. Melt ain ,1. R. Dknmakk 0. S. Morton K. 11. Dixon H. C. Pittman D. Dl-rdkn J. R. Stokks I). M. Hastings C. M. Si..u k' I’. C. I'miiawi M lin i ni   mmnimuiiiH The Aghon Society 31Jif) .A Georgia Naturalists M. A. .McKainkv...........................................1‘ri-xiilenl H. K. Wooiiriij'i".................................Cturru! Sfcrrlori I). M. 11 asti nos..........................................Trrnxurrr Du. .1 as. M. Ukmik.............................I rrnnnienl Srcrrlary HONORARY MK.MBKRS Dr. ,1. M. Rkadk Dm. T. II. McIIatton Dm. K. K. Rakkkk Dm. .Foskhii Khakka. .Fk. Klttil'I.AIt MKMHKRS (). (’. Ai»:kiioi.i M. A. McKaixky S. (i. OHANM.KR II. M. Morris Thoy Kowakim A. T. Pkaksoxs V. (jii.i.ttsm: W. I . Tait V. .F. Mary F. A. Tanner D. M. Hastings II. (). Thomas I.. It. 1 .anikk -F. (I. WooimriT A. Lundy II. K. NVooihuwAr v-:: ■ ivV.r ,.dUy Thalian Dramatic Club  Glee and Mandolin Club OFFICERS OF THK CIX’B !.anIKK Aniikrson.................................................... 'resident Mai.ijOX Smkkk»:i.i ...........................................Leader ( lee Club John Si.auo.iuy.k.......................................Leader Instrumental Club Kohknt I.. Dashkh...............................................Hurines Mannyer Doc 1Iampbr........................................Assistant tlusiness Manager J,oyi I'lOKl.lNG....................................................Advertising Manager PERSONNEL GLEE CLUB 1.. Ai.msn B. Johnston T. .1. Sasskh B. Biro Jkhky Jonks M. Shki’kikiji .1. Boykin H. Jonks M. WllBATOX S. C’aktij!ix;k M. MKWHOntXB T. A. Whitbxbk C. T. CONYBRS II. Morris C. NVll.UA.MS C. Farrar C. T. MiArthi r Frank NVii.aon J. Fra .ikr F. C. .McCm rk J. B. WtIJMIX Orikkin M cCOM.l’M INSTIU’M KNTAL CI.UB ( Aniikrson JoKI. J. T. SlU'ITRINK L. Aniikrson M. Mayhhy John Si-ait.iitbr C. Bknnktt !.. N. Mitciiki.i. J. Tannkr A. Brown L. C. Handai.i. NV. Twinby B. Davison II. Rowl.lNSON T. Wai.ton Fbss Dottkry M. O. SlIHKVK NV. NVii.i.iams -Homecon Society Elizabeth Dohsky 1‘renidrnt I.YI.A Edwards I.COY Wool) I.ixxik Mak Hancock OMAII It AIICOCK Katik Myrick Irma Booth Km M IK NKI-SON I’OI.I.Y Itl'TII BoWKRS Mrs. Him da Newman Si'san Brandon Katherine Bank Helen Bremen Mamkl I’akr Ei.ixabetii Dohsky Sara Keid Anna Belle Dkakk Hi 1. II AN SlIEIIEK I.ci.a Howards Frances Simpson Bkcna Wank Krkkman Iaiis Stillman Jewell Gkonok Sara Tarragons Nancy Gcrr Mary White I1').ossik Hairston Mary Oi.ive Whitehead 1.17.7.1 k Mae Hancock •I cijette Whitehead Nancy Haddock I.ccy Wood Bertha B. l.CKK Annie Wootkn Wii.ma Mitchell Kmii.y I.aBorn FACri.TY MEMBERS Mrs. Kdith Andrews Miss KniK Campbell Miss Mary K. Ckesswell Miss Martha McAlpine Miss Irma I’lOCnw Miss Rosalie Rath noneiiiimumi; trhjKl sS1.xiiij J .................................. pun tijnjijjjtf......................... injpi jjtl-jji ..................................... impi j,i.......................................... SWAMAAO KHM.L .1.SMM J-x.ili u ' ' ! q "I tivuxvji •) ”| A' 'INV] { •ti T qn|3 UBUii|S3jjPhi Delta Phi v . T. Uahuhkit J. Ha UVRIIKIK w . M. Fl-I t’ll KM J. II. Kknnkuy It. S. Junks It. L. Hh'kky It. It. Andkhsun J. J. Bknnktt J. II. Trkauwki.i. v . II . Mkwhui'rnk F. I.. (iKHKAt.U J. 1 . Him. 1). Khkkman J. | MoDvwkm. 1 . I.. Me'Laws L. F. McCi.KI.I.ANI) S. L. (iRAYSUN A. J. Arnui.u It. V. Daniki. J. K. Troutman N. K. C'l.AK K J. ( . Siiki.uk .1. Junks inmiHHnmiimiiiiinmmtmi5555555555555555O555E55555555 Georgia Horticultural Society1McCm'mk CimmopiiKii DantasT. J. McCkk V. II. Kki.i.ky .1. K. Haki km •Ixo. I.. Si.ait.mtkk. Jh. I.. MlTCllKI.i. Ki.Mr.ic Jonks Hakhv Ti’kxkk Ost'AH Mil.IKK All initials are ti| | t r rlnssiiien. Columbus Club •I. V. McCkaxkv........................................................I’mtirintl Cirv II. ("OOI’KH...................................................r«,c'- ’rMWf« J. K. (" ii a cm a x..................................Srrrrliirij uml Trraxurrr Ja.mks I’ikkck I.oris I’kask John Odom Wjl.I.IAM SfMXKI.I. Ja.mks David Thomason Koiikkt Bi’mxky IIkniikht Kotiu'iiii.iw Ja.mks Pi.ktciikk Those s)H ll( l out art Freshmen.Federation of “The Alliance Fran-caise”—Groupe l’Athens UK groupe d’Athens of the Federation del'A Ilia nee Francnisc, although not an exclusive activity of the University, is so closely connected with it that it should have a place in this publication. More than two hundred students of the University are of the Alliance; its honorary president is our Udoved Chancellor 1). C . Harrow, and its president since its organization. I’rof. .). I.ustrat. head of the Department of Modern Languages. During the year 15)21-22 the groupe d'Athens. besides many lectures in Knglish or in French from American scholars, had the great advantage of being addressed by French speakers of international reputation, such as Messieurs Kmil Villemon. Arnild Von C»ennepj es. and Bernard Fay. The groupe counts more than three hundred meml ers. and its influence in the literary life of the city of Athens, tin University, and the State Normal School, and even the High School, is strongly felt. Long live the Alliance Francaise!'N Vi •. o -«i.abat mk )m£fflmm7 a p 4 I E The 1921 Football Season By CATTAIN OWKN HkYNOI.DS. |HKN Georgia finished her 15)20 football .schedule and returned to her (|uarters to take inventory of tlmt season's results, she found that she had not lost a single game. This was something to he proud of, for Georgia had played the leading teams of the South, and in several cases the odds were against her, yet she came through the victor. In the spring the eoaehes limbered up the punters; the forward passing brigade did passing work; line men were coached on how to got out of the line with the most skill and speed in running interference; ends were instructed on how to get down under punts, and some time was devoted to signal drill along the latter part of the spring training season. When college opened in September everything was in full swing on the football rield for a successful season. Mercer was the first game on Georgia's schedule. Mercer had l cen underrated by us. and it took hard work to get our scoring machine in action. Not until the second half did Georgia score, blit before the final whistle blew, the score stood 28 to 0 in Georgia's favor. Furman came next, with the odds slightly in favor of Georgia. The year before Georgia had barely nosed out a victory over Furman, and as Furman had practically the same team, a hard battle was looked for. The Purple Hurricane was the first to score, then Georgia took on new life and pushed over four touchdowns, winning—27 to 7. These two games did much to develop the new material and make ready for Harvard on the 15th of October. Georgia's back field looked the best in years. It was the backfield that had given Georgia trouble since resuming athletics following the war. It had been strengthened considerably not by the addition of new men so much as by developing the material on hand and introducing new plays. The report had been spread that teams playing for the first time in the Harvard Stadium would get stage-fright. Hut when Georgia's team lined up for the kickoff in the Stadium they did so with the same deliberate confidence and coolness that would have been shown against any other close rival. Of course, the tension was exceedingly high this is true in every great contest where teams are evenly matched. Georgia found herself playing an uphill game after the first three minutes. A blocked punt by Brown and Fitts of Harvard gave the Crimson squad a seven point lead. With her back to the wall. Georgia fought for clear life. Harvard scored three more points during the next quarter when P faff man kicked a drop-kick from a verv difficult angle. At the end of the first half the score stood Harvard 10. Georgia 0. But when the last quarter began Georgia executed a beautiful forward pass which netted seven points. Georgia came back strong at the beginning of the second half and threatened Harvard's goal several times. It was a wonderful game, played clean and hard by both teams. Georgia certainly deserves a lot of praise for her wonderful showing against Harvard. Several Eastern papers came out with the statement that Harvard was lucky to win. Certainly it was a close call for John Harvard, and I'm sure he was glad when the final whistle blew. Georgia’s second string men took care of Oglethorpe in fine style. However. BE K y UJ ■ o'i Kj ’ • m HI Ol S' TTflil _ .luring the last few moments of piny. Coach Stegeman sent in his scoring machine. The game was "salted away"- the score being 1 f to 0 in Georgia's favor. After Oglethorpe came Auburn, the Bulldogs’ age-old rival. Auburn loomed up like a mountain. She boasted of having the best team in years. This frightened the Bulldogs very much, for Georgia realized she could not afford to lose to Auburn, on the ground that the remainder of the season would be marred and many would sav "it was merely luck with Georgia that Harvard failed to give her the heating of her life". Georgia got busy. Her team had not rounded out into form since the Harvard fracas. There were injuries that would keep two of Georgia's stars out of the game; there was danger of over-eonfidenee. and everything seemed to be out of tune. But the Bulldogs won, 7 to 0. lienee placing another feather in her cap. The old Dominion had tied Georgia for two consecutive years. Both teams determined it would not be a third consecutive tie. This being the "Home Coming" game for Georgia Alumni made the Bulldogs more anxious to win than ever. It was this game that set a record-breaking attendance for Sanford Field. Never before had the Cni versify drawn so many of her alumni back to witness a contest as were here on this day. However, it was a glorious day one befitting the occasion, and even though the Virginians weren't able to hold Georgia's hard hitting and driving team, they did justice to their institution bv fighting to the last moment. Georgia managed to push over three touchdowns and won. 21 to 0. Football followers throughout the South were surprised when they heard that Vanderbilt tied Georgia, 7 to 7. The dope favored Georgia, and the Bulldogs were confident of winning, but the high tension had l cen kept up too long, and of course they dropped back just enough to cause a tic with Vanderbilt who. by no means, had the same caliber team that Georgia had. It was on an oil-side kick that she tied the score in the last moments of play. In 1910 Alabama heat Georgia by two drop-kicks; in 1920 Georgia beat Alabama on blocked punts, but this year Georgia won from Alabama because she bad the 1 letter team. There was a downpour of rain from beginning to the end of the game, which was in Alabama's favor, for it made Georgia relv solely on line plunging. Alabama fought desperately, but to no avail, for Georgia easily won. 22 to 0. The reserves were again called upon Thanksgiving Day to win from Clemson. The following Saturday the Bulldogs were to meet Dartmouth, in Atlanta, and in order that it won 1 1 not take too much strength away from the varsity, or for fear of some costly injury. Coach Stegemaii let his reserves hear the brunt of the game and they easily won. 28 to 0. Probably the greatest game played in the South this year was played between Dartmouth and Georgia. Both teams were evenly matched, and due to the fact that it was an interseetional game, it drew one of the largest crowds that ever attended a contest in Atlanta. It was a miracle that Dartmouth won the game from Georgia. I.ess than ten seconds before the first half was over they completed a 50-yard pass, which netted the seven points that won the game for them. Georgia came back in the second half and continually threatened Dartmouth's goal, but never could get the right amount of punch to put the ball across. Even though Georgia was beaten, she felt she had been defeated by a worthy team, for there is nothing a Georgia man can say that is too good for the Dartmouth sportsmanship.— It is superb. Mention must he made of the men who were the bulwarks of Georgia’s team.S' G who were always there with the goods, playing a hard, clean game all the time. Me n of this type are an asset to college athletics, for it is clean sportsmanship they arc interested in. One naturally thinks of I’cw, Day. Whelchel. the captain-elect for the coming year, and J. Bennett, as the outstanding figures on the Georgia team. Pew was the grand old man of the Georgia team. He was an ex-captain, having served as captain in 191!). and All-Southern for three years. Pew was the most consistent player in the line, lie was a hard, fierce tackier and a splendid interference man. There is no center in the South that can he compared to Day. Camp's All American choice for that position in 1918. He is aggressive, quick to size tip plays and. above all. his passing is perfect. One cannot conceive of a man the size of Whelchel breaking through the line continually and blocking punts. How he does it. no one knows, hut if there is any record on breaking up punts, surely Whelchel has it. Whelchel plays football with ease, for he is a natural player. He can always be depended upon to open up a hole for a gain. Joe Bennett was the star of the Harvard game—not only the Harvard game, but he starred in nearly every game on Georgia's schedule. Bennett is tall and rangy and is a sure tackier with a keen sense of diagnosing plays. Hut men like Anthony. Vandiver, and P. Bennett cannot lie overlooked. Anthony, without a doubt, will be the greatest guard in the South next year. Vandiver has always played a jam-up game. He is not a star, but one of those men who fight from the beginning to the end without slackening his pace. P. Bennett is the opposite type of "Vainly". He gives his all and takes miraculous chances from the l cginning. He is fast on getting down the field under punts, and his long reach makes it easy for him to pull down high passes. Paige’s understudy. Sam Richardson, got in the majority of the games this year and showed his ability as an end. He will, no doubt, fill the vacancy at left end next year. Bouev did much in subbing for Day. He plays almost the same style of ball that “Bum" plays. He passes accurately and is a splendid tackier. Williams showed great promise at tackle. In the baekfield Georgia had a horde of material. They were: Hartley. .1. Reynolds. (' 1 lings. Tanner. Randall, Thompson. Fletcher. Spicer. Pearce and Clark. It was the fleetfooted Hartley that led in points scored. However. J. Reynolds and Randall ran him a dose second for that honor. With Callings or Fletcher at full, this would be a combination hard to beat. Hartley and Reynolds arc above par when it comes to executing forward passes. Randall is a wonderful end runner. He has both ability and form. No one but an end knows how to appreciate Col-lings' punting. He gets them off with distance and height. Tanner was Georgia's best defensive man. Spicer proved to lie the best safety man. And “Smack" Thompson well, he knew bow to keep the “pep” up. Pearce and Clark were always ready to do their duty when called upon by the coach. The men making letters were: Vandiver. Tanner. Randall. Murray. Spicer. Day. Codings. Fletcher. P. Bennett. .1. Bennett. Honey. Whelchel. Anthony. Pew. Richardson. Thompson. O. Reynolds. J. Reynolds. Pearce. Hartley and Williams. Men I’ve slightly mentioned may prove to Ik- Georgia's stars next year. Who knows? But a limited amount of space bars me from giving each member of’ Georgia’s team his legitimate amount of publicity. We hope the Bulldogs will have even a greater year in 1922 than they had in 1921. Glory to Old Georgia!Cv f j- n .a PAICK IlKNNETT 0RTS fJIHSON OK ( Hl’RX. l'XlOK HRNNRTT AMI MARK ANTHONY STOH HI'KKR OK DARTMOUTH. KI.KTOIKR I1ITTIM. TIIK WKAK SII K OK FURMANS I.INR.IJ CAPTAIN OWKN UKYNOI.DS, Hmd l|» re we have. men, the original T. N. T. flank man, who fon rlit Mmi bled these four years for the good old Iteil and Black. Captain in 1 5)22, and All-Sontliern in 10. 20, and 21. speaks for "P's” grid prowess. Boy. may you nit down advancing foes in life as you have thrown consternation in the ranks of opposing gridmen! (’APTAIX-KI.KCT “PI SS" WIIKI.CIIKI„ dmard There was not a whimper when this blonde giant was named to the mythical All-Southern Kleven last pall. But there were so many grunts when his titantie form was blocking them off in the line. A footballer's piece is spoken when it is said that he played his position well. But “Puss went that several lietter. He's about two-elevenths of a football team. Walter Camp, the omniscient, saw it that wav, and Whelchel was one of the two Southern men to make the Grid sage's third All-American. "Bl’M” DAY, ('enter '•Bum ' Day, All-American! He was the only mythical choice to show his wares on a Southern gridiron last Full. Men. Iielieve us when we say that "Bum'' was the- most feared man in the Bulldog camp last season. They all hacked up when the mighty center took his pivot place. He can analyze plays, and in the Hast they say that he is physically foot ha I Ilea I ly perfect. His battle-cry. “C.et s (Jo, Georgia!" has spurred the team on to greater things when it seemed that the crisis was near for the Bulldog cause. Day served as Captain of the team in 15)20. He had another year to play if he so desired, hut has cast his lot with the business world, and Georgia has lost one of the best gridmen she has ever had. AItTIK PF.W, Tackle Artie Pew will always rank as one of the grand old men of Southern football. For four seasons lie was the bulwark on the right side of the famous Bulldog Stonewall line. There was never a more ardent student of the game, and he has never liecn known to become excited under tire. His remarkable sang-froid ami inexluiiistable knowledge of the game always cropped up ami saved his team, many and many times. For several seasons the All-Southern teams would have liecn incomplete without him. Added to the glamour of his physical achievements is the great name of being a clean gentleman and a sportsman that he has built for himself..MARK ANTHONY, ( uanl |e=3 = This limn carries tin- true double threat. He scares ail uprising linesman to death, and the odds are two to one that lie will allot it Iwat him to death if lie :cts within range of the nohle Roman's flnil-like arms. Mark is a good football player when the hand of experience gets its never-failing processes to work. Watch Anthony this season aikI Ik ready to fall into the ranks of the "I told von soV next Novemlier. I’AKili BKNNKTT, Kml If Raige had never played but one hall game in his life or even to reduce his career to one play, lie should have gained much fame from the pictures of his violent and smashing diving tackle of an Auburn I lack; it was a most remarkable play. Rut his career thus far shows that he has cared for right end for two seasons in ship shape. With two more left he will, very probably, lieforc lie has served Ins time, Ik known as one of the Smith’s gen text ends. Raige’s end play and deadly tackling made the folks sit up and take notice when the Bulldogs were entertaining John Harvard, which was reallv some entertainment. I JOK HKNNKTT, Tackh Joe made his spurs in his Freshman year. When you take into consideration that very few Freshmen make the varsity in their Tat" term this alone is a feat that proclaims all of the gridnian's virtues in one of fell swope. Any man who can la»x this Harvard tackle like our man Joe did at Cambridge last Fall carries football ability .stored away in Ills frame. Joe’s going to Ik a tower of strength in the Bulldog line next year, or a good guess has gone the way of the discard. SA.M BONKY, Sub Center Sum came here from Citadel and left lieliind him there an enviable record in football, basketball and I he National Pastime. It will 1m rememlwred that Sam was tlu life of the Citadel line when the Charleston hunch stacked up against the Red and Black here in the Fall of 1920. In the Oglethorpe and Clemson games Sam certainly strutted his stuff, breaking through often and nailing (he occasions. If there is a new ii runner on numerous man who is primed to IhkiJs, this is the bov.  DAVK COM .INS. fullback I'lwy call him “Hospital Dave", hut lie possesses that rcmarkahlc tendency of lying in the infirmary until Friday la-fore the game, then of striding out on the field to play a whale of a game of find hall. Dave's feat in going into the Harvard game with the oval on the Georgia two-yard line. Georgia on the offensive, and things looking blue as indigo for Un-Bulldog cause -then hlam! -off sailed his punt and the day was saved. He is a remarkable punter. JOHN P1.KTCIIKR. Halfback John Fletcher is one of the finds of the Southern football season of 1921. Fast as a streak, with a ram that taeklers cling to well on line plunges, hut which is well nigh impossible to grasp on an open field, he offers a problem to the opposition. In the Mercer game the Baptists sat all over his hack, rode his neck, and otherwise tried to halt the human ramrod, hut John was seldom stopped for less than seven yards. Walter Comp had his eye on him; he will do well to watch him for tin- three years. DICK HAKTI.KY. Halfback Dick came to ns as another one of those G. M. A. stars. For three years this man has la-ell the incarnated fear of every Southern opponent of tin- Red and Black. In 1920 In- broke a world's record in that he made two touchdowns in succession against South Carolina in less than three minutes. I-'ach time he ran a distance of more than ninety yards. He also holds another record which would In- coveted by any proponent of the game. He is the first Southern man fo cross the goal line of Harvard there ill the Stadium. For two years, by his ability to complete forward passes, he has defeated the mighty Auburn Tigers. Dick is a good man to have in a football camp. M F.RCF.R M fit RAY. Kh,I Mercer Murray comes from Fort Valley, in tin-land where peaches grow, and he lives ably up to the reputation of a peach of an end. He was the star athlete at G. M. A., scintillating in both basketball and football, just as he has done at Georgia. He has speed as well as a nose for the oval when it falls in a free-for-all melee. I le exhibited this tendency to get the sow skin when he dived under an Old Dominion hack and received a fumble for a touchdown behind the Virginia goal. The feat of Mercer's was one of the cleverest of the season. G. C. l’KARCK. Quarterback Pearce's work in tin Imcklield has drown favorable comment from the critics that know football from A to Z. lie has in his system many a {good run. Hint the next year should find him a steady and dAring quarter. Christopher was a star for two years of the Citadel eleven. "TKANY” UAXDAIJ,, Qiiartertmck I.ord Haudall. the brilliant, the omnipotent, the omnivcrotis, a good football man and a good musician. Randal) ended his first year as a Bulldog gridder when Georgia liowed to the Dartmouth (ireen in Atlnnta last Fall. It might lie well to state that "Team” amassed more points for the Itcd and Black last season than any other back. He scored the lone and winning touchdown against the Auburn Tigers in Columbus in October. JIM TOM ItKYNOI.DS, Halfback In 1911» Jim Tom Reynolds, of Donaldsonviile, made his debut on Sanford Field after starring the previous season at 0. M. C. Near the end of the season Jim had the misfortune of receiving a broken leg. Returning in 1919, after doing his hit in the struggle across the seas, he received injuries to h knee in the second game. This injury again laid him low for the rest of the season. This year the tlashy veteran was the first on the Bulldogs' score card, and contributed the most brilliant, and the longest run of the season for fifty yards. SAM RICHARDSON, Sub ICn.l Sam Richardson has just about as much spirit tucked away in that medium size frame of his as any player that has liven on Sanford Field this year. He goes after everything in sight, is a good tackier, and can dump an interference in such a way that it looks like a storm-torn house. With benefit of his experience this year Ik- should rank well with the ends of the .South next year.n OH A K LIB WILLIAMS, fexenr Tackle (Xot in iact lire) Charlie was in a few jinnies tliis year, and his showing in the Oglethorpe fracas was magnificent and pleasing to the eyes of supporters. His tackling is of that deadly nature the kind tliHt makes the teeth of the victim rattle audibly, so as to cause the women of the grandstand to scream. Though only a Freshman, the former Tech High star was good, and next year should find him a wizard in the grid line. JIMMY SPICER. Halfback Jimmy Spicer, long known as a back of great driving power, has acquitted himself manfully this year. With his weight, his toe. and his dash, he has caused the gladdening of the Red and Black sup-|H»rters hearts. His work next year should la- as good as the liest. “GOAT" TAXNF.lt, Halfback And there shall la- cyclones and rumors of cyclones, hut never shall it lie expected that n running ton of brick are to lie allowed to run wild on a gridiron. Yet that is just what Coach Stcgeman did last Fall. This Goat Tanner is the hardest hitting back you most ever saw, and when he gets tangled up in the opposition's interference he diseutegrates it. causing liorscs to neigh, women to faint, and strong men to tremble. "SMACK" THOMPSON. Halfback “Smack Thompson came to Georgia widely heralded as a back of experience and great possibilities. The way that la»v toppled the Auburn lads and gained off of Dartmouth in those hectic battles and his work in the Virginia game, has established for him a name Ids brother Charlie, famous Georgia athlete, may well In- proud of. NF.MO" VANOIVFlt, (luant “Nemo" Hails from Home, but not the one across the big pond. He is little in speech and in size, blit, I,nrd, what a giant wlien it comes to action. “Fatty" Warren of onr distinguished cunteni|Mirarics, the Auburn Tigers, will heartily vouch, while rubbing sundry bruises sustained in that momentous grid battle of 1920, for the accuracy of the latter assertion. c Harvard Has Close Southern Invaders Are Beaten 8ack. 10 to 7, In Hard-Fought Gridiron Battle. CRIMSON FIRST TO SCORE Blocked Punt Allows Fitts to Make Touch-down Which Saves Cambridge Eleven. PASS NETS VISITORS' TALLY Hartley Carries Ball Over to Complete Great Play in Final Period Pfafman Kicks Field Goal. (From The New York Timex.) (A.MBKIIX5E. Manx.. Oct. lV—The Harvard football eleven may well consider Itself fortunate tonight that It was not tied or even beaten by the hustling eleven from the I'nlverxlty of Georgia this afternoon In the Stadium. The Crimson defeated Its opponents from the South hut were fought hard from start to finish and after the first three minutes of play did not make anything like the showing the Crimson coaches were looking for. The score was JO to 7. Harvard making a touchdown, goal and field goal in the first half and the visitors scoring a touchdown and a goal In the final period of play. Harvard's touchdown was scored soon after the kick-off. Owen punted the ball to the Georgia -’.’•-yard line, where three plays were completely stopped. Kaudall. the Georgia kicker, then was slow in getting a punt away and Hradford. the Harvard centre. rushed through on his attempted kick, blocked the hall and sent It bouncing straight Into the arms of Koscoe Fitts, who today was playing his first game at end. Fitts had ?i clear field to the Georgian’s goal line and ran about seventeen yards. l.ator on in the same period Harvard made a very steady ruslung advance for a first down on the Southerners’ eight-yard line, but here Owen. Koulllnrd and .leukinx vainly drove Into the line and Georgia took the luill on downs. Later In the same period of play Holding set Harvard back after Jenkins had made a brilliant gain, which carried the ball to the visitors' 10-yard line. Pfaffman Kicks Field Goal. In the second quarter Harvard got the ball on Its opponents' 20-yard line when "Dick" Hartley fumbled a kick for Georgia, and Captain Kane fell on the ball for the Crimson. Here again the Southern team stopped the Gr'mson's rushing game, hut Pfaffman. who k I eked a field goal a week ago against Indiana, was called into the play and Isnited the ball over from the 25 - Call With Georgia yard line, his shot going over the middle of the cross bar. although he was standing only ten yards from the side I ne. The second half was discouraging for Harvard, which reached the visitors' ten-yard line, only to have Itouillard fumble and Key nobis recover the ball for Georgia. Again Harvard failed to make a go of forward passing from Its opponents' 30-yard line, and shortly afterward had u forward pass Intercepted by Collins, who ran to the Crimson's 45-yard line with the hall. Here came a first down advance, but finally a try for field goal was blocked. Hobson getting the hull for Harvard. The last period of play brought Joy to the hearts of Georgia travelers. They got a break early In the period, but turned It to the best advantage, and by following up their optNirtunltles scored a touchdown and put a Mot on the Crimson’s uncrossed goal line record. The visitors were forced to kick near the middle of the field. Captain Kane of Harvard partially blocked the punt, the hull hitting his hands but continuing to go on Its Journey down the field by ripples and bounds. There was a mad scramble for the hall and It was finally secured by Captain Keynobls of the Georgia team. Georgia, however, could gain only six yards oa three plays. Then came the touchdown. Collins went out on the left wing, came across fast to receive the ball, then quickly passed It to Jim Keynobls. The latter dropped further bark and let the ball go toward the right corner of the field. Churchill, the Harvard left defensive hack, had rushed In and Hartley, the Georgia right end. picked the hall out of the air and within a few feet of Quarterback Buell of Harvard. Buell made a leap for Hartley, hut could not reach him. and i lie little troop of Georgia rooters went wild with del'ght when Hartley crossed the Cambridge goal line. Teams Battle on Even Terms. The visitors met Harvard on even terms nfter that first hit of bad work on Kandnll's opening punt. Defensively the visitors were very rugged, particularly Day. former All-American guard, and Pew and Bennett, on ihe rush line. Harvard dropi c l the hall several times 1 localise of the fierceness with which Its hacks were tackled. Georgia made only one first down on Its sweeping plays with the linesmen running in Interference, hut had a scoring play when the time came. Harvard made some good offensive rallies, hut did not keep them going to the goal line. On defensive play the Cambridge team showed improvement, but the Inability of the outfit to show more cohesion in Its running game than It did a week ago was disappointing. Harvard expected to accomplish much with forward passes, but the overhead game was poorly executed, the visitors Intercepting three passes cleanly and blocking others. Chapin, when he got Into the game, made a 20-yard run after taking a pass from Owen, but this was the only successful overhead work accomplished l»y Harvard. At the very end of the game Chapin made a 31- ULL GWmmlM: 7 »- iikW -v y yard run and would have had a touchdown had It not been for a beautiful tackle by Few, who also secured the ball for Georgia when Owen fumbled the ball on the next rush. Tin- line-up: GBORG IA «(7) L.K........ Reynold I..T......I. Bennett 1 .0...... W belch el C.............. Ihiy R.G......... Anthony R.T............. Few MeCnmbor ........... ILK.......... Murray Ituell ............. Q.H......... Randall Jenkins ...........I,.H.B......... Hartley Rouillard ..........R.H.B......... Spicer Owen ............... F.B......... Fletcher HARVARD 10 Fitts ......... Kane.......... tSrew ......... Bradford ...... Brown ......... Tierney Score by iH-rlods: ■10 Hartley. Few. Goal Goals from Harvard ............... Georgia ................ Touchdown —Fitts. V. from touchdowns—Buell, Held— I “faffman. Substitutions Harvard. Johnson for Ituell. .1. Hartley for Fitts. Clark for Bradford. FfufTtnan for Jenkins. Crocker for Jenkins. Buell for Johnson. Ilobtfon for Tierney. Henry for Kane. Hubbard for Grew. Cluipln for Churchill: Georgia. J. Reynolds for Randall. | Bennett for C. Reynolds. Collins for Spicer. Vandercr for Whelchel. O. Reynolds for Murray. Referee -William G. Crowell. Swartlnnore. 1‘mplre W. R. Okeson. Lchight. Field Judge- II. N. Merritt of Yale. Linesman— G. Norman Bangarl, Dartmouth. Time of periods 1J minutes. MAGNIFICENT TRIBUTE PAID PLUCKY RED AND BLACK ELEVEN BY NOTED EXPERT Hdcncc. nor siwctacular enthusiasm. They were Mulct, pleasant young men who hoped they would extend Harvard but were not too certain about It. When they got Into action the thing about them that was most impressive- If only because It has not In the iwist been chlelly characteristic of southern nor western teams was their tugged, alert and discerning line defense. The Crimson had no weuimn that Georgia didn't know all alsiut and It was inspiring to see the Cambridge machine slopped short and thrown off the track so consistently. The tackle play, which must be of high order if a team such us Harvard Is to he stopped, was splendid, and this applies as much to the work of Joe Bennett, as to Artie Few, of whom good work Is always to l»e expected. Fletcher, a newcomer In the Red and Black backlield, showed himself to be a star and the work of Day at center was line. Perhaps later In the season the eleven will develop a sustained and comprehensive attack. Just now It is an Iniinitcly better tenm defensively than went on offence. • • • I’ntll the fourth quarter Georgia showed nothing that was really dangerous, and then Just as everybody—including Harvard thought she bad no offensive weapons at all. she slipped over a beautiful long forward pass for a touchdown. When punting. her defense formation for the kicker, three men abreast, looked —and actually proved—-to la dangerous. Her backs ran from diagonal formation with one hack loose and usually she paired her tackles and guards. The ends played well the smashing-in type of game. THE VIRGINIA GAME By Lawrence Perry. Harvard football coaches will begin Unlay the task of building upon the hints sup pl'.ed by the I'nlvcrslty of Georgia game at the stadium last Saturday. The Crimson was Imping for a good hard contest, one that would point out shortcomings and deficiencies a very valuable thing Just at tills season of the year. And she got what sin was bmklng for. That poised, hard tackling, defensively resourceful set of young men from tin land of tlu ruby cheeked peach and the pallid co'n llckalt. pointed morals for the lienetU of their Cantabrigian op)M ncnta ns clearly, as relentlessly as the searchlight rays pencils out objects on a night laden sea. For which Harvard Is undoubtedly grateful to the Georgians who In every way made the finest Impression on tills, their first visit to the home field of what Is perhaps the most exact anil scientific football machine In the country. • • • There was nothing of tin hoimh about this northern Invasion of the Bulldogs that marked the visit last year of Centre college: none of the overweening con- Vlrglnla won the toss and chose to defend the west goal. Day kicked off forty-five yards to Foster, who returned ten yards. Virginia's ball on their own thlrty-om-yard line. Rhlnehart failed at right tackle. Few made the tackle. Opplcman failed at right guard. Rhlnehart punted forty yards, ball falling dead. Georgia's ball on their own thlrty-one-yard line. Reynolds fumbled anil Stephenson recovered for Virgin's on Georgia's sixteen-yard line. Opplenuin made two yards through center. Opplcman lost two yards on an attempted end run. A forward pass, Foster to Stephenson, fell Incomplete. Clark drew hack for a drop kick, the pass wax high and Clark lost two yards. Rail went over on downs. Georgia's ball on thlry-five. yard line. Reynolds hit right tackle for eight yards. Hartley lost two yards on attempted left -end run. .1. Reynolds made six yeards ami first down through right tackle. Hartley fumbled and Hankins recovered for Virginia on Georgia's forty-five-yard line.Foster fulled around right end. Forward pus . Foster to Clark. gained four yards. Oppleman made one yard through center. Rhlnchurt punted forty-five yards to J. Reynold . who was downed in Ids tracks. Georgia's Iwill on their own five-yard line. Ceilings punted forty yards, the hall falling dead on Georgia’s forty-yard line. Time out. Virginia. Georgia penalized 11 yards for tackling man who had signalled for fair catch. Foster gained 3 yards through line. Opplenmn made 3 more through center. Oppleman again went over left guard for I yards and first down. Hall on Georgia’ 13-yard line. Harris made 3 yards through center. Foster falls at center. Harris made 3 yards over right guard. At this stage Virginia called time out for consultation. A line piny was smeared and the hall went over to Georgia on downs. Georgia's hall on own 5-.vard line. Codings punted 30 yards, the hall falling dead. Hall on Georgia's 30-yard line, oppleman failed at right guard. Forward pass, Foster to Stephen, grounded. Mathis went in for Harris at fullback for Virginia. Oppleman made three yards at left guard. A forward pass was Intercepted l»y O. Reynold . who returned the hall to Georgia's thirty-yard line. Foster threw the pass. Reynolds failed through the line. Codings punted thirty yards, the hall fading dead on Virginia's forly-dve-yard line. A forward pass. Foster to Rinehart, grounded. Second down. A forward ihiss thrown by Foster was caught by Whelchel. of Georgia, who ran thirty yard through a clear Held for a touchdown. Score: Georgia. 6: Virginia. 0. I'ew kicked goal. Store: Georgia. 7: Virginia. 0. Clark kicked off sixty yards over the goal line. Georgia's had on their own twenty-yard line. Hartley gained two yards through center. .1. Reynolds made six yard through left guard. Reynolds failed to gain at right tackle. Reynolds made two yard and first down through center. Reynolds made four yards over right tackle. Hartley lost three yard on a criss-cross around left end. Quarter ended here. Score: Georgia. 7: Virginia, u. Reynolds Jumped over center and made seven yards. Colling punted llfty-flve yards, the hall falling dead on Virginia's five-yard line. Foster punted thirty-six yards out of Istunds. Hall on Virginia's forty-one-ynrd line. Hartley made twelve yards around left end. Reynolds made six yards through right tackle. Tanner made first down on Virginia's eighteen-yard line. Hartley lost one yard on a criss-cross around left end. Time out for Georgia. Whelchel was hurt hut stayed In the game. A forward pass. Reynolds to Hartley, guiu-d sixteen yards. Georgia’s ball on Virginia's four-yard line. Hartley fulled at left end. Campbell goes In for l avls for Virginia. Hartley got one yard at left tackle. Reynolds made three yards over left tackle for a touchdown. Row kicked goal. Score: Georgia. 14; Virginia, n. Clark kicked oft fifty yards to J. Reynolds. who fumbled, hut Georgia recovered on their own twenty-eight-yard line. Georgia penalized fifteen yards for hurdling. Codings punted fifty yards to Foster, who returned the ball to Georgia's thirty-nine-ynrd line. Rhlneliart lost one yard around right end. Oppleman made three yards at left guard. Rhlneliart made two more over left tackle. A forward pass thrown by Foster was Intercepted by .T. Reynolds, who was downed on Georgia's iwciuy-iilne-yard line. .1. Reynolds failed to gain at right tackle. Hartley hit center for seven yards. Hartley added three yards and first down through left tackle. J. Reynolds lost one yard on a right tackle buck. A forward pass. Reynolds to Hartley, fell incomplete. Codings punted forty yards to Foster, who returned the halt to Virginia's twenty-six-yard line. Oppleman got eight yards through left tackle. Hays replaced Ward for Virginia. Time out for Georgia. Foster made three yards and first down over center. Opple-man lost one yard on attempted end run. hut then ran eleven yards through center for llrst down. Hall in midfield. Oppleman hit left guard for three yards. Time out for Virginia. Rinehart got one yard through center. Oppleman g"t six yards and first down over left guard Maplils fumbled and Whelchel recovered and carried I,all four yards to Georgia's forty-four-yard line. Tanner plunged over left guard for two yards then Hartley added two over left-tackle. Tanner plunged seven yard over left guard for first down. Hall oil Virginia's fort y-foui -yard line. Tanner hit oentcr for six yards. Tanner then got one yard over center. Caldwell goes in for Clark for Virginia. On a criss-cross. .1. Reynolds raced ten yards around right end for first flown. Hartley circled left end for two yards. Half ended here, with ball In possession of Rulhlogs. oil Old Dominion's twentv-elght-yard line. Score: Georgia. 14: Virginia, 0. Second Half. THIRD l’BRIOD—1 lull kicked t5 yards to J. Reynolds, who returned hall to Georgia's 34-yard line. J. Reynolds gained one yard through center, hut Georgia was penalized 5 yards ofT sides. .1. Reynolds again got 1 yard through line. Davis gives in for Campbell for Virginia. Colllugs punted 45 yards to Oppleman. who returned l»all to Virginia's 44-yard line. Foster failed at left end. Rlilnelmrt got six yards off right tackle. Maphls hit center for three yards. Foster made one yard and first down over center. Oppleman hit left tackle for five yards. UC341X lBn ST Ly'O- .ff:■ ■ 4m fca Hi IE fgB Am MJ Foster plunged over line for three yards. Khlnehart made '-' yards over center and itrst down. Virginia's hall on Georgia's yard line. Time out. Khlnehart plunged over center for two yards. Opplemnn struck a stone wall at center and failed, forward pass. Foster to Stephenson. Knitted thirty yards. Kail on Georgia's eight-yard line. It was n beautiful run. Vandiver replaces Anthony. Op-pieman got one yard at left guard and then Khinchart failed on line buck. Foster hit left guard for two yards. Opplemun failed on a line buck and It was Georgia's hall on their own three-yard line. Ceilings punted forty yards to Foster, who fumbled. Murray recovering on Georgia's forty-yard line. Hartley failed on a line buck, anil then gained two yards off left tackle. On a double shift Tanner was thrown for no gain. Colllngs punted 3.r. yards to Foster, who fumbled, but he recovered on Ills own 32-yard line. Khinchart hit left tackle for eight yards. Opplemnn lost two yards on attempted end run. Khinchart punted 10 yards out of bounds. Georgia's ball on Virginia's 3.I-yard line. Carrington replaces Foster, for Virginia. On a criss-cross. .). Keynolds lost two yards around right end. Tanner made ten yards through line. Tanner then hit center for one yard. Jim Keynolds hit right guard for three yards and llrst down. Georgia's ball on Virginia's 21-yard line. Hartley lost a yard around left end. Forward |mss. Codings to Hartley, gained twelve yards and puts ball on Virginia's II-yard line In Georgia's js)ssesslon. Hartley failed through line. Jim Keynolds got a yard around right end. Forward pass thrown by Keynolds was blocked by Hayes and grounded. Time out. Spicer replaced Hartley for Georgia. Third down, seven to go. Jim Keynolds circled right end for six yards. Quarter ended with luill In Georgia's possession on Virginia's four-yard line. Hlackford for Shackleford. Ward for Hayes. Foster for Carrington. Clark for aldwell. Kail went over on last play of third quarter. Khlnelmrt got four yards over center. Khlnehart fumbled back of Virginia's goal line anil Murray fell on the ball for a touchdown for Georgia. l ew kicked goal. Score: Georgia. 21; Virginia, 0. Day kicked oft forty-five yards to Foster, who ran out of bounds on his own forty-four-yard line. Time out. A forward pass, Foster to Stephenson, fell incomplete. A second forward jmss. Foster to Khlnelmrt. was Incomplete. A third pass. Foster to Stephenson. was blocked by Keynolds. Khlnehart punted forty-five yards to Spicer, who returned the ball to his own twenty-seven-yard line. Spicer hit center for two yards and then Hdib-d another yard over right guard. Kurge replaced Khlnehart, for Virginia. Spicer made two yards over left guard. Pearce replaced Collings. Spicer punted forty-five yards to Foster, who fumbled. but recovered on his own twenty-one-vard line. On an attempted right end run. Kurge lost five yards, but play was called hack and Georgia penalized five yards for off side. -t Kurge ran off tackle for one yard. Time out, substitutions. Hubbard for Opplemun. Witt for Foster, for Virginia. A forward pass. Witt to Hubbard, was grounded. Second pass. Witt to Davis, gained fifteen yards and put the ball on Georgia's forty-three-yard line. Third pass, from Witt was grounded. Substitutes. Parris replaces Mnphis. Parris hit right tackle for four yards. Dietrich goes in for Davis for Virginia. Clark punted sixty yards over goal line. Georgia's ball on their own twenty-yard line, on next play Jim Keynolds fumbled anil Kurge recovered on Georgia's twenty-six-yard line. Hubbard made three yards off left guard. Parris made two yards through center, but ball called back and Virginia penalized five yards for off side. Forward pass by Witt was intercepted by J. Keynolds. who returned the ball to his own eleven-yard line. Spicer punted forty yards to Witt, who returned one yard. Dnndel replaced Kurge. for Virginia, who was hurt, but not bad. Parris plunged through right tackle for four yards. A forward pass. Witt to Stephenson. was grounded. A second jutss. Witt to Stephenson. netted live yards. Fourth down, one yard to go. Kail on Georgia's twenty-eight-yard line. Hubbard plunged over center for three yards and first down. Kail on Georgia’s twenty-llve-yard line. A forward pass thrown by Witt was intercepted by J. Keynolds. who returned the ball to his own eighteen-yard line. .1. Keynolds plunged over right guard for two yards. Tanner added three more through center. Jim Keynolds bucked off right tackle for seven yards and first down. Spicer plunged through center for three yards. Spicer got two more through center. Time out for Georgia. Honey replaced Wlielchel for Georgia. On a criss-cross Jim Keynolds went two yards off right tackle. Spicer punted forty yards, the hall falling dead on Virginia's thirty-five-yard line. Parris hit center for five yards. A forward pass. Witt to Hubbard. fell incomplete. Dundel failed on a line buck. Clark punted forty yards to Spicer, who returned the hall to Ids own twenty-flve-yard line. Spicer shot center for two yards, and then added four through center. Spicer gained two more through line. Spicer punted forty yards to Witt, who returned to his forty-yard line. Game ended here. Kali In possession of Virginia on their forty-yard line. Final score: Georgia, 21: Virginia. ». VIRGINIA Davis .......... Shackleford .... Hall ........... Hankins ........ Ward ......... . Clark .......... Stephenson ..... Foster ......... Khinehart c ... Opplemnn ....... Harris ......... G BORGIA ..LK...O. Keynolds (c) .. L.T.. . .LG . .. C___ ..K.G.. .. K.T. -. .. K.K.. -Q.K... .. 1H.. 1C. II.. J. Kennett . W belch el .... Day .. Anthony ..... Few ... Murray Codings .. Hartley J. Keynolds . F.K........ Tanner Officials — .Magoffin. referee. Michigan, empire. Klcock. Dartmouth, lleadllncsman. llardage. Vanderbilt. Fifteen-minute quarters. h tac 'ff ii ■■ Tr r.TTiiff,i j - illjjj|||j|j 1 -U £ ;£ v ■ - - .CkcA) W. kr 1922 Football Squad Stkokmax DkIIakt Co XOVKM Owkn HkVXOIIM. ('aptaiu anti Km I Aniwrsox.....................11 ml A XTIIOX V BKXNKVr I . Bkxnot lloXKY . . Com.i nos.................Fullback Day........................('enter ................Quarterback Fi.ktoiikk I I AHTI.K V Mi-kkaV Mri.vi him (S mini Tnek . Kml (’ruler .... Full buck ...........Half buck .............. ml Turkic ...........Coach .Intie tan I ('ouch .1 r net ant Conrh I’kakck..............Quarterback |»r.w.....................Turkic Han .................Quarterback .1. Hkynoid ............Halfback K icn animon .............. ........................Fullback Tan ....................Fullback ........................Halfback Thomason ..................l‘“kU Vandivkh ............... !u,,r l ..........................Tackle ... ... . . (luurtl ................. . (Inara ...................... Statistics on Record of 1921 Georgia Bulldogs Scomi: 1st Downs Yahoac.k Punt. Av. CiAMU (i. . Or. ga. Or. (;. . Or. Ga. Or. 0 22 0 417 08 27 7 20 8 353 202 to 40 Harvard . . . • • . • • 7 10 4 7 90 182 35 13 Oglethorpe . . . . 14 0 18 i 3S3 to • • Auburn .... I) 7 5 177 148 18 12 Virginia . . . 21 0 9 (i 202 191 43 44 Vanderbilt . . 7 12 2 3- l 120 85 39 Alabama . . . 22 0 13 3 207 54 to 3.» CJvmsnii . . . 28 0 20 a 470 111 39 37 Dartmouth . . ... 0 I 7 7 129 215 31 38 Totals . . . 31 130 .-si 2830 1373 39 to IMiis Penalties............................................... 300 .11311 1922 Schedule Septcml er 23rd . . . . Georgia Vs. Newberry . . Athens Scpteml cr 301 li . . . October 7tli .... . Georgia vs. Chicago . . October 14th .... . Georgia V . Furman . . . Greenville Octolier 21st vs. Tennessee . . Athens Octolier 28tl» .... Vs. Ogk tlior|M' Noveinlier 4th . . . . Georgia VS. Auburn . . NovmiiIkt lltli ... vs. Virginia . . . .... Charlottesville November I8tb . . . . Georgia Vs. Vanderbilt November 26th . . . . Georgin VS. Alabama . . . CAPTAIN PA IGF. BKNNKTT. Center Paige. the lanky nlld rangy, has Iwld down renter «n the Ile l and Black for two years now. He lias never played a sorry pone of basketball since he joined the Bulldog ranks, and Is generally regarded as the most consistent scorer to come out of tile local kennel tills past season. As an end on the football varsity it is said of him in general characterization that when Paige hits a iiian that unfortunate individual is coining down like the temple on Hercules. OA FT AI N-KI.KCT F.DDIK HAWSON. Forward Young Kdwurd, aside from leading the 22 basketball aggregation in scoring, going like a house in Hume-all the season, and playing in every game of the fifteen scheduled, was absolutely of no use to Coach Stegeinan. in the basketball campaign of the Bed and Black. One hundred and fifty markers did this lad jniur into the netted basket. In recognition of his superb ability as a basketecr his team-mates gatiiered together at the close of the season and named the handsome hid captain for the coining session. Thereby did they show infallible judgment. .IOE BKNNKTT, (Imini Joe Bennett, who, along with his athletic ability, is possessor of the additional asset of hailing from Atlanta. Georgia, gets the celluloid insulator for consistent playing. They never call time on this lad unless his shoestrings give away. Virile, young, aggressive and spirited, Joe is hound for great things as a football and a basketball man. In the past basketball campaign the big fellow could Ik- seen in the thick of the fray, constantly following the ball and dealing out death and desolation, destruction and catastrophe wherever he roamed.— a _— ."rs Y • ij " " v- ■ o • v . K x „ X 5 a Iphir '"''!:M!lllTTTTfnI -w $ • ( VJ )- « E SAM BONEY, Forward The versatile Samuel was ill basketball, as he is in every other of the major sports, a eapahle performer. The saying is that when that boy Sam rakes that sonth-|»aw of liis toward the hoops that the old hall has gone for two points, lie was the Iwst shooter on the Bulldog squad this winter. Sain was a star in the Citadel five before he east his lot with the I'niversitas (leorgiae. Great is the pity that the angular lad did not eonte here sooner, for next year will Ik his second and last as a member of the Georgia " Great things are expected of him in the coming season. GKOHGK Cl .A UK, Cuanl At the conclusion of the Georgia-North Carolina game in the S. 1. A. A. tourney last March, David Yates, one of the foremost basketball referees in the nation, said of George: “This man has the Invst athletic temp- erament that has ever come under my observation. Athletic ability is also one of the young man’s attainments. He created a greater rumpus among the ranks of the opposing forwards in the past season than did the absence rules at Georgia. He covers the floor like a greyhound and follows the ball in an uncanny perfection. El) GIBB. Foneani This young man flits about a basketball like a nymph and shoots them like a crack marksman. Gurr was a dependable man in 1921, and though getting in very few games, delivered in grand style when called upon in the pinch, it was not until the memorable cage fracas with Mercer in Mmcou this February that our hero really came to his own. He started the rally that won the game, and as a consequence, Kd Gurr will always Ik a well liked young man in the Hed and Black territory. CIIABI.KY W 1 11 IBS, Uuard Opponents of the Bed and Black basketeers have often stop|M d to ask spectators what might be that apparition floating by in such destructive fashion. Every time they have to be told that “Greek” Weihrs is the party. Honest, this man is the swiftest piece of timber wc have seen on a local floor since the days of eight o'clock classes. He has the additional renown of being the first Southerner ever to play basketball while wearing a headgear. “Greek” will find a place with the regulars next vear.Ton How (left to right): Butler. J. Bennett. I . Bennet. Honey, and Clurr. Bottom How (left to right): Uiclmrdson. Chirk. Haw.son. Murray, and Wielirs. II. .1. St»: ;kman ('ouch I’aiok Bkxxktt I onii: IIawsox Sam Bosky . . ClKOKOK Cl.ARK . Jor Hkssktt . Cm............. WtKlIHS . . . . Bcti-er . . . . Riciiarimox . . . Captain nail Center ..........F near (I ...........Forteard ..............Cunrd .............(iuard Center and Fortcard .............tfuard .........Sutmtitute .........Sutmtitute cl !•- o'ite ■"'- i J G xSEE A Review of the Basketball Season it-1 By Coacii Stkokman jjJv I 922 basketball season, from tlic point of development. was a letter 0nc than the previous year. The opening of the year found but two men who had played regularly for the University back in harness. These were Paige Bennett and Eddie Itawson. Murray had substituted during the 1921 tournament, but was declared ineligible when the season was about half way over. This meant openings for three new regulars and three, or four substitutes. The number of men trying out for the team was not as large as the crowd that tried the year before. This lack of interest is hard to understand. 'I’he season was shorter than ever before, with only twelve scheduled games and three tournament games. The fact that most of the men trying out for the team eame from the football team necessitated a late start. The four games played on the two South Carolina trips helped greatly to get the team into good physical condition. After the first Mercer game at home the team improved with each game, and they finished the season in pretty good shape, the last half of the last game of the year lieing the highest point in the team s ability. Paige Bennett, at center, duplicated his 1921 game. He started off slowly, but gained speed and keenness with each game. During the tournament he played exeellentlv. Paige was rewarded for his hard work by being elected captain of the team. Itawson improved over his 1921 form, being much more consistent, being always in better physical condition, and working hard in all games. Itawson and Paige plaved through nearly all of the whole season, requiring substitutes very seldom, itawson will captain the 192.1 team. Bouev started slowly and did not even make the team on the first trip. But when he started to improve he started with a vengeance. Bouev was a bit erratic at times, but this was due to temperament more than to lack of consistent skill. He needs only a bit more athletic tempering to still further enhance his value as ail outstanding athlete. He should have a great year ahead of him. Clark and .1. Bennett were selected more for their size and previous athletic experience than for previous basketball experience, but their good work vindicated the choice. .1. Bennett had never played more than half a dozen games of basketball, but his indomitable will and wonderful athletic spirit made him a consistently good guard. His offensive work still showed inexperience, but he will be a strong all-around man next year. George Clark took to basketball easily, having had some reserve and prep experience. His defensive work was more skillful than that of many men with more experience. George has natural competitive instinct, and during the tournament received a fine compliment from the officials, who declared him to l»c the best type of college athlete among the many players. Charley Wiehrs and Ed Gurr got into most of the games as substitute guard and forward, and both did well. Wiehrs is a fast, aggressive player with a cool head and will do very good work in years to come. Gurr played a good game whenever called upon, and did excellent work in the second Mercer game, starting a rally that meant victory when things looked bad. Williams played in one game in the tournament, and is a fine prospect for next year. m : - m r - " I lit-. i IS - J • K ■to, ___.IXf. V. WB ■’ • - • - ■: ill In size :md weight the team was large and heavy. With three regular football players on the squad all opponents expressed surprise at the elean game they put up. 'l’he whole team averaged less than one personal foul each per game for the season. Only one man was removed for personal fouls during the fifteen games. This speaks well for the individual ability of the men playing. All of the men who played this year should return to college next year. 'I lie experience gained this year should mould them into a strong team for another campaign. The. reserve strength will also be stronger for the same reason, along with the fact that several men on the Freshman team showed fine promise. The men should return to retrieve the Mercer. Alabama, and North Carolina games. These games can he traced to definite causes this year. None of which should exist if all the men return next year. The first Mercer defeat cannot be traced to the fault of any of the players. In an effort to find a better working combination the men were shifted about so much during the game, and so many men used, that the team had little chance to do any effective work. The Alabama game was lost through poor foul shooting. In the last game of the year a lethargic start and inability of the team to adapt themselves to a new style of opposition led to an overwhelming score in the first half, which was very clearly overcome in the second period. The experience gained this year should he very valuable. For the Freshman team “Smack” Thompson. Carter. Mulvihill. Williams. Randall. Richardson. Butler. Greene. Perkins, and Fletcher, all did good work, and all showed good promise for future material. The Freshman team lost but one game during the season. Basketeers’ Record for the Season Georgia...........................21 Georgia...........................82 Georgia...........................84 Georgia...........................48 Georgia...........................18 Georgia...........................39 Georgia...........................80 Georgia...........................17 Georgia...........................81 Georgia...........................81 Georgia...........................29 Georgia...........................19 Georgia...........................48 Georgia...........................27 Georgia...........................2G Georgia..........................458 Georgia average per game .... 30.2 22 ... Clemson...........................1C Furman....................... South Carolina 2 Wofford...........................31 Mercer............................27 Auburn............................15 Atlanta A. C......................42 Alabama...........................20 Auburn............................17 Mcrccr............................21 Trinity...........................J9 Atlanta A. C......................30 Oglethorpe........................12 Vanderbilt........................2G North Carolina....................34 .•.■njesfr; i i , ilfSpfc - I I . 1 1 „ ' ■ ---- 'G “('HIKl'"' CODY, Ctt ilniii anil Firnt Hnurman A first baseman, to lay claim to immortality, must have a certain amount of rubber in bis makeup. Here you see the original elastic article. Wclborn is, jierhaps, the greatest fielding initial first sacker the Bulldogs have had since the days of the renowned “Ilank” Floyd. Many achievements have been this lad's on the diamond, but the greatest, in our estimation, was a little pinch bingle he unloosed in the Georgia-Vale game in April. lJVil. This single scoring, the winning run for Georgia in a game that like to broken the hearts of our New Haven friends. The New York Times said this in a head: “Cody's pinch single in ninth wins for Crackers." Del.ACY AI.I.F.N, Shorlsln t This man is completing his first year as a member of the royal Bulldog diomondeers. If there have ever been rookies to make good with a swifter rush Glide Albert himself cannot point him out. As the press Im»x way was once heard to remark, the old apple just seems to careen off of “D," and, remarkable to say. it invariably careens right into the first baseman's hands. His hitting has failed to break down many outfield fences, yet it has succeeded in bringing about run scoring, and that, after all. is the purpose of hitting. GKOItGK Cf.AK K. V« er » i cr “What's that noise, son. Has the Bonus Bill been passed?" “No. Dad, ‘Father' ('lark has just broken up another ball game.” Our subject has sent more Imrlers to tla mad-house than the Volstead Act. lie is, one might say, a slugger of unknown quality—that is, one never knows whether his hits are good for just an ordinary home-rim or whether he might not trot around the bases again after circling them the prescribed once. George is rounding out a triplet of years as an A-l horschider for the Bulldogs. He is probably the most picturesque character in the outfit, and, in accordance with the claims of the girls, certainly the cutest. Here's a cup of cheer to a top-notch baseball player. MITCH HI.I. DF.KI.K, Fihhrr There are the sport sages who tell us of two manners of pitchers the one throws ’em over with his arm, the other with bis head. Our lmy Mitchell throws them by the batter with head and arm. When “Der.le” takes the bill and lieckons for “Doc" Harper, that steady old receiver, and the coach of the opposition then signals his bat lmy to take the bats back to the club house, for sticks are unnecessary implements when this pair is working. “De .ie's" greatest coup is a small hit affair he chunked against tin- Alabama Crimson right in the Tide's own bailiwick. LUll.-H vL ■ ■ ' ■ TT"c v ? ■ ) ('lilt I STOP I IKK 1 1 BUCK. Hcsrrvc Thin! liareman This wcc hit of dynamite is one of the most versatile athletes you will see in many a dnv’s travel. He performs on the diamond. the gridiron and the basketball rourt with e |iial relnt, and Is a personal magnet IneauM- if those qualities of tenaeity and persistence that are Ills in the fullest measure. . is what von may cal! « “gccclic , and Ids railing of signals from the position of ipiarterhaek keeps the defense laughing so heartily that one might think a copy of the "Whir. Hang ' was lieing passed around. More pounds to you, (.. Cl.IFF PANTONK. 1‘ilcher There are four aees in tin- deck, friends, and this Ih»v is all of them. For two years he has turned bark the l est pitehing talent that leading institutions have offered, and his equal on the Georgia moiindsmnn's hill has not liren seen si nee the days of Iliteheoek. Ve gods, how he can throw a ball! Cliff can l»elt the apple. I!«• was entirely responsible for the Georgia win in the Clemson game of April 7, when he socked the first triple of the year way out in right field with a man on the path ahead of him. -PAT POWMltS, Snb titMlr Catcher Powers is a newcomer on Sanford Field. He has shown up well so far, and though he has the stiffest sort of eompetition lie has managed to get in some of the games. Doubtless Pat will Ik able to lit right in when the time comes that there is a vacancy in the catching department of Coach White's aggregation. KDDI K HAWSON. Catcher And it was decreed bv his ( oacliship s Highness that one man was to go out and stop the swiftly thing darts of the mighty Pantonc, the catapulting Frost, and the wiry Sale. It was further written that Mr. Kddie Itaw-son was to stand in the rampart Iwhlnd the sacred platter and exert the steadiest sort of influence on his own ritlc-man. Kddie has caught for the Crackers lo these three years and no one has ventured on tlie field with the wind pad and mask until this date to even give him a battle for his place. lie's the goods, is this brilliant, little, hard-hitting receiver. May the cause of the Red and Black have another one as good some day. IS  G 1131 c Fit HI) SALK, ntrhrr This Itcardlcss youth gives promise of developing into the best Inirler to present the lle l mid Black since the days of Hitchcock. He was known at various times during the season as “the Freshman ’ phenomenon, and his performance on the hill for the Bulldog diamondeers have fully justified the detonation. The liest lie could do in his first appearance against a collegiate foe was to let the Oglethorpe Petrels down with one miserable hit. Friends, watch Fred Link's smoke! .1. I . THOMASON, ll'ujhtpfhlfr Thomason, in the opinion of his fellow students at the University, is destined to Itecomc the greatest allround baseball performer to have east his lot with the Athenians since 1900. Kven now he is lending the regulars in hitting, run scoring, total bases and stolen bases. Big and powerful, intrepid and talented, we see a large niche in the Southern collegiate Hall of Fame yawning for bis bulky likeness. ‘JUDGK ’ THOMAS, Pitcher Judge is one of those determined sort of fellows who never admit that they are defeated. For three years he has faithfully performed the duties of a scrub on Sanford Field. This year “Judge" has had a chance to show his wares, and lie made a good display of them. He has the student Ixwlv behind him this year, for all Georgia men like to see a game lighter. JOSH WATSON, Srciml Iftmrmnii For two years jesting Josh has capably guarded the keystone sack on the Bulldog nine. The only complaint yet heard on his worth was from a "flapper", who was peeved because Josh wouldn't pull off his hat when she cheered one of his brilliant bits of fielding. When the pill is hit to Watson one languidly lolls back in one's seat and orders one another “dope" or another sack of gronndpeas, for the ball is certain to be steadily fielded. SAM BONY, First llnsmum (Not in picture) Sam is slow to get started at the la-ginning of a season, but after he gets going, lookout! With such opposition as “Chief" Codv he could not la exja-eted to make a regular liertb. However, when Watson was injured and Cody was shifted to second, Sam slipped into the first baseman's shoes and the team was not weakened in the least. Sam is strongest with the willow, although his fielding is of high class. We lielieve that Sam will, in a large way. make up for the loss of Cody next season. I -- J JS l i -f - • o ,a Baseball Team 1922 Front How (loft to right): Hawson. Fantone, Only. Watson, and Dcklc. Skcom) How (loft to right): Hutcheson, Clark, McWhorter, Frost, Harper, and Tliomason. Tnmo How (left to right): Spicer, Thomas, Allen, Kldridge. Sale. Meltae, and Coach White. W. I . W.mitk......................................................Coach Codv...............................................Captain amt h'ir t lia e Watson.........................................................Second Hose Ai.i.kx.............................................................Short ! op Hl’TCiiKNox...........................................................Third lta r Hawson..............................................................Catcher McWiiortkk.....................................................Oat fielder Ki.oriikik.......................................................Outfielder C i.ax ..........................................................Outfielder Tiiomason........................................................Outfielder Frost..............................................................Pitcher Sam:...............................................................I’itcher Faxtonk............................................................Pitcher Dkkm:..............................................................Pitcher Thomas.............................................................Pilcher Si'iCKH............................................................Pitcher Fkarck.............................................................Utility Fowkrs.............................................................t'lilHy IIarpkr............................................................Utility I loom s...........................................................I’I Hit if McRak.............................................................. tiHt! Boxk...............................................................(’Mil if • V'V  j 11H eliding of the 1922 baseball season marks one of the most sneeessfnl years a Bulldog nine has ever had. The record made this year will go down in our athletic history as one unparalleled by any of our former great teams. Working under the strain of a schedule of thirty-three games, this team has lost only six of these contests. 'I wo of those in the lost column were dropped to northern teams. Only four games were lost to southern teams. The team started off to a great beginning--winning the first nine games. Their finish was even stronger—Georgia taking fourteen out of the last sixteen struts. Much of the success of this year's nine can lie attributed to the careful tutelage of Conch White. He is ranked as one of the foremost baseball coaches in the south. His knowledge of the national game has never Ixrcn |uestioned. and by the brand of ball lie has instilled into our young athletes, he has shown himself to be a thoro teacher of the game. Coach White stands for clean sportsmanship, and the men under him have become imbued with his spirit. AH teams who have played against the Bulldog nine this season have been impressed bv the clean game they put up. Georgia boasts the hardest hitting team in her history. The three outfielders are hitting at an average of .350. while the infield is hitting at .273. This is a very high batting average for a college team and it would take some experienced pitcher to withstand the onslaughts of this team for nine innings. Our pitching staff is by far the strongest of any southern team and is the l cst ever boasted by the Red and Black. Frost has not lost a game this season, while Sale and Pantone have records nearly as good. All of these men are eligible to return next year, and if they do our rivals will have another tough season. Wc lay claim to no title, but are willing to let our record for the past season speak for itself. Regardless of what other critics may think of our team, the supporters of the Bulldogs are satisfied! The end of the 1922 season brings to a close the athletic careers of two of our greatest athletes. “Chief" Cody, premier first sackcr. and "Booze” McWhorter have tossed the pill their last time for old Georgia. Their shoes will Ur difficult to fill. As they leave us they carry with them the best wishes of the student U dy. If they fight the battles of life as cleanly and energetically as they have played the game for Georgia we have no doubt but that they will still further honor their Alma Mater. A 7 mi I y Jffilj W liftG 1922 Baseball Scores GEORGIA. GEORGIA. GEORGIA, GEORGIA, GEORGIA. GKO KOI A, GEORGIA. GEORGIA. GHOHGIA. GEORGIA. GEORGIA. GEORGIA. G BORGIA, GEORGI . GEORGIA. GEORGIA, GEORGIA. GEORGIA. GEORGIA. GEORGIA. GEORGIA. GEORGIA. GEORGIA. GEORGIA. GEORGIA, GEORGIA. GEORGIA. GEORGIA, GEORGIA, GEORGI . GEORGI . CAME HENNING, 4. Battery Rawson. Rowers; TIioiiihs, Raiitone. CAME HENNING, 1. Battery Rnwson; Sale, Spicer. OGLKTHOR EE, 1. Battery Rnwson, Rantone. OGLETHORPE, 0. Battery Kitwson, Sale. MERCER, 2. Battery—ltnwson, Ernst. MERCER, 5. Battery—Rawson, Eieree; Eantoue. CI.EMSON. I. Battery—Rnwson. Sale. CLKMSON. 1. Battery—Rawson, Eantoue. MICHIGAN. 2. Battery—Rnwson. Frost. MICHIGAN. 5. Battery Rawson. Eantoue. V. OF NORTH CAROI.INA, !». Battery Rawson. Sale. NORTH CAROI.INA STATE, 51. Batten Fierce. Dekle. MARYLAND, 2. Battery Rawson, Frost. MARYLAND. fi. Battery Rawson. Sale. YAI.E, 1. Battery -Rawson, Eantoue. ALABAMA, «. Battery Rnwson, Frost. ALABAMA, I. Battery—Rawson. Sale. CAME BENNING. 2. Battery Eieree. Thomas. CAME HENNING, S. Buttery—Rowers; Dekle. Raiitone. VANDERBILT. 2. Battery Rnwson. Frost. TENNESSEE, 1. Batten—Rowers. Sale. TENNESSEE, 1. Buttery -Rowers, Rantone. ACBCRN, 1. Battery Rowers, Frost. ALBURN, 2. Battery- Rowers, Eantoue. KENTUCKY, 0. Battery—Rowers, Sale. KENTUCKY. 7. Battery Rowers. Thomas. AUBURN, 2. Battery—Rowers. Raiitone. AUBURN, 1. Battery Rowers, Frost. MISSISSIPPI COLLEGE, 0. Battery Rowers. Sale. MERCER. 0. Battery—Powers, Frost. MERCER. N. Batterv Rowers. Runtime. Sale. —--X: '' 5 •• ■-ft 4 «0 Ti G 9 ft g q a iL V i V wlAd 1922 Track Team II. J. StkOK.MAN..................................................('otirh It. I.. Fitts.......................................................Captain ■I. |„ Davis........................................................Manager IIkoadxax................................................Shol pul; discus ( i.kcki.ky........................100-yard (lush; 220-vard lasli; xliol put K1.1.U......................................100-yard dash; 220-yar l dash Fitts . 140-yard dash; half mile Furri'iiM........................................44-O-vitrd dash; hurdles F«yk...........................................................High .jump (i«mx...............................................................Javelin Hri.i..................................................................Pole vault I Ion a x.........................................................11 unites Hoooes...........................................................Broad jump Howard...................................................Mile; two miles Joiixsox.........................................................Bole vault Kickijoiites......................................................High jump Mobley .............................................................Invcliu Mri.riiiiLi.........................................................Hurdles Mctiimx..................................................Mile; two miles Rbvxous....................................................100-yard dash Ric.ia.dsox..........................................................Discus Jor"...................................................................Half mile TAXX.........................................................Broad jump eiidixo....................................... 440-vnrd dash; half mile  • JlF University of Georgia Y. M. C. A. Organization I 111 i.i i It. Tkioii..................llenerat Secretary IIkxrv Dor max . ..................................I resident IIai.hh I.. Fms........................I'ire-1 rr fide at C. I). Stkwart.....................................Secretary •I. W. Hkxnktt. -In................................Treasurer COMMITTKK CIIAIKMKN .1. G. Wooiirooh..............................................Freshmen V. W. II ARUM AN..............................................Vespers II. M. Cook..........................................Cliurrh Relations S. I). Xickkrsos.......................................... tilde Stinly Kir: ah M. DrXSTAX.............................................Mission Study Frank Hritck.................................................Membership C. A. Mc.Mn.i AX............................................Deputation ( A. I,kwis.................................................Community Service N. ,1. HARMIN'...................................................Campus Sendee V. W. Dkakk.....................................................Social Frkii M. Gokiaix..............................................Meetings Khnkst A. 1 .owl;...........................................1‘utdicity .Ion x W. Snuri’AKu........................................Conferences .1. Fhaxk Kkiii................................................HuHdiny HO A III) OF 1)111 KCTOItS K. H. llotMftix, .Ir............................................ resident Aniikkw J. ................................................I'ice-I'residenl H. I’. ...........................................................Treasurer J a Mm I.. .......................................................Secretary D. C. Harrow John W. Morton John H. Fain H. K. I’ark W. T. Forio:s S. V. Saxkorii I.. 1.. 11i: dhi.n Anokkw M. Soi i.k FADIKS At’XII.IAHY Mrs. W. 11. Hocock............................... . FresidentOfficers of the Y. W. C. A Makcikhitk llr.Al.K.............. Wii.ma Mitch..................... XOKI.V N ...................... nxk Hcth M«nwk.................. Ui-KNA Wank Fkkkmax.............. ..........................Cresident .......................1 'Ice-Frtnidenl ..............................Secretory ............................'I’reasurer . . . I'nderyradnate Representative CHAllt.MKN OF COMMITTKKS (•MACK Al.I.KX . . . I .Cl,A Kimtamw . . . I.ircr Wihhi . . . Nki.i. I'miAw . . Item Kak . . . . Moii.h: Wiiitkiikaii X NIK WOOTKX . . Many Whitt . . . Hcth IIatw . . . Nkm. (Iiii.axo . . Wii.ma Mitciiki.i. (iKKTHrilK Stith . . ..................Derolinnal ...........World Felliixcships .................Itilile Study ..............Social Srrrire ......................Social ...................Publicity Conference anil Conventioui .....................Finance ....................Ubieties .......................M h sir ..................Membership ...........House ami RoomsThe Work of the University Y. M. C. A. 11E Y. M. C. A. has endeavored during tlu; year 1921 22 to give to the men of the University an opportunity to experience the need of a spiritual life of depth, of adventure, and of conquest. Its program has l»een varied and in conformity to the conditions and the thoughts of the students. It can he said that the Association has accomplished the things that were planned for it at the beginning of the year. It hopes to do. in a measure, for the men of Georgia what the Master did so well tor the Twelve: indicate the supreme value of unselfish service, one man for another. If the Y has accomplished this end in the life of one man. the year's work has been successful in a large degree. No one student can be praised justly for a large share of the work done. Every job has been performed in the spirit of team work, unselfishness. and sincere devotion to the man at the worker's elbow. The quietness and the uuussuinption of the Christian spirit lias been the ruling factor in every deed of service rendered. Recognition should be made of the vitalizing force and power with which Community Service Committee has made itself useful in the community: and of the matchless zeal that the Conference Committee has shown in urging men to attend the Conference at Blue Ridge. Twenty-three students from the University heard the notes of Christian service from the voices of the world thinkers at the Conference last June. Next year's program will aim for a delegation of fifty men. The splendid co-operation of the Ladies’ Auxiliary, composed of the wives of the iucihIhts of the faculty, and the generous assistance in entertainment by the young people’s organizations of the city have been potent factors in the life of the year’s work. Bible and Mission Study Classes, vespers, prayer groups, weekly entertainments, visitations, addresses by men of special qualifications, and deputations to near by towns have been included in the year’s activity. The quiet note of service rendered without favor and without thought of reward—this is the aim of the Y. M. C. A. in the University.I’axdoha—the gift of the gods, first blessed us with is presence under the guidance of the Class of I88 . It had the distinction of l»cing the first of its kind published in Georgia, and the second in the entire South. I rom its first humble beginning until the present dnv it has always recognized its dependence upon the student-body in general for its success or failure. In its initial dedication we read these lines duly expressing this thought: “To you. who have by your counsels, sought to make this thing succeed, aiding us by kind suggestions, and explaining every need, would we dedicate this medley of our college jokes all new. as a token and expression of our gratitude to you.” It is true that our first annual was crude and humble, hut yet it was a noble beginning, unpretentious though it was. 'Phe gods had something better in store. jpir I This year we have tried to give expression in our pages to every phase of student activity. We have tried to make it a symbol worthy to go out to the world as a true representative and outward sign of what Georgia is and what she does. Our Alma Mater lias turned out from her hallowed walls men fused with the divine light of inspiration to do great deeds. These men have stepped into the highest positions of trust within the gift of our State and country. They have all made good. Georgia is still capable of even greater attainments in the divine plan of our nnt'um. From your midst shall come the leaders. Embrace every opportunity. Have enthusiasm. We ask you not merely to Iniost this book, but try to keep it and all that bears the mark of obi Georgia above reproach, and if not the first, at least among the verv best in the land. Pandora Boards Since 1886 Voi.oik I. 1886- Editor-iii-Chicf, Ci. N. Wilson, K A. Business Manager, W. B. Cook. A T 0. Associate Editors. W. E. Wooten, £ A B; McDaniel, X «! ; C. F. Hire, X 4»; C. H. Wilson. K A; W. A. Speer, |. a O; F. F. Stone. !• A 0; It. I). Meador, . T ft; M. B. Bond, A T A: W. S. G pshaw, a T a; It. S. Move, -I T A: I I.. Wade, 1 T A; A. W. Wade, 2 X; W. 0. Brown, 2 X. n■ c 5T - -V.v Sbe -■:J Httyt y ilr m  - I. G ' o? : -e ' v, i '■•: S i ■ : 2 4li fjt f,'' Voi.cmk II, 1887.—Editor-In-Chief, G. F. bice, X •! . business Manager, J. W. Daniel, K . . Associate Editors, T. W. Heed, 4 A O; G. Waters 4 T A; W. .1. Shaw, 2 X; II. F. Milner. A T !); . . I.. Franklin. A T A- Volume Hi, 1888. Editor-in-Chief, Allicrt Howell, K A. business Manager. A. W. Griggs, a T A. Associate Editors, W. I.. Moore, x A 1C; T. H. Crawford, A T 12; F. W. Guile, X X; Eucicit L Knight, X 4»; W. M. Glass, A T A. Voi.r.MK IV, 1890. Editor-in-Chief, John I). I.ittle, X A K. business Manager. W. K. Wheat ford, X Associate Editors, F. K. Callaway, K a: S. J. Trihhle, «j. A (); J. C. Crawford, XX; W. W. Ellis, X«|»; W. E. Stalling' , A T A; W. N. Smith, X 4'; E. A. Cohen, X‘I1. Voi.fjn: V, 189 2. Editors-in-Chicf, J. F. I.ewis, X 4 ; I.. E. brown, A T 12. business Managers, W. E. Christie. X X; W. T. Kelly, a T A- Associate Editors. J. C. Kimball, X A K; bov Dallas. l a O; J. b. I.ane, y. A X; E. W. Frey, x 4 . Voi.cmk VI, 1898. Editor-in-Chief. Harry Hodgson. K A. business Manager, F. G. Barfield, X A K. Associate Editors, C. It. Nishet, x •!•; N. b. Stewart, AT 12; A. O. Halsey, XX; H. A. Alexander, E. G. Cabnniss, «| a O; F. G. Jolui'on, AT A; Eugene Dodd, X 4 . Voi.r.MK V||, 1891.— Editors-in-Chiof, C. It. Tidwell, A T A; Noel Moore, X A K. business Managers. Paul I,. Fleming, X 4 ; John I). Stilling. A T ‘.2. Associate Editors, I,. D. Frick. X X; W. I . Harbin, X 4 : H. brown, K A; George beckctt, «|. A O. Voi.r.MK VIII, 1893.—Editor-In-Chief, W. A. Harris, X 1 . business Manager, J. J. Gibson. A T A- Associate Editors, 11. H. Steiner, X A K; J. W. Morton, K A; W. W. ('handler, a T 12; V. E. Kemp, X X; J. T. Dunlap, «| A O; H. V. black, x 4 ; J. G. Smith, Non-Fraternity. Voi.r.MK IX, 189G.— Editor-in-Chief, Pliny Hall, K A. business Manager, J. G. Pitman, A O. Associate Editors, M. M. 1 Kkhart, X A K; J. b. Connelly, X 4»; Fred Morris, X X; C. H. Holden, A T A; 11. V. black, X 4 ; T. A. Neal; It. b. Nallv. Voi.cmk X. 1897.- Editor-in-Chief, II. G. Colvin, x A K. business Manager, It. K. brown, AT .2. Associate Editors, F. I.. Fleming, X l ; J. W. Spain, K A; Harry Dodd, X'P; P. S. Smith, «|» A (); A. E. Tidwell, A T A; H. Eovojoy, x X; W. b. Kent; J. W. Hendricks. Voi.cmk XI, 1898.—Editors-in-Chicf, Harry Dodd, X 4s Hugh White, X X. business Manager, J. C. McMiehael, K A. Associate Editors, C. H. black, X E. E. Pomeroy, X A K; C. West brook, A T A; J. T. Dorsey, l a 0; H. It. Perkins, a T 12. Voi.cmk XII, 1899.- Editors-in-Chicf, Gcrrnrd Glenn, X A K; A. P. Adams, X 4 . business Manager, I . E. Johnson, X 4'. Associate Editors, J. b. MeCurry, K A; W. S. blun, A T 12; F. E. Broadnax, A T 12; W. E. Watkins, v d. (}. Hcidt; J. W. Mason. Volume XIII, 1900.—Editors-in-Chicf, Archibald blackshear, K A; Fair Dodd, X 4 . business Manager, F. E. Broadnax, A T 12. Associate Editors, F. P. Calhoun, X 4»; E. P. Shannon, «!■ A O; F. G. Topper, X A K; J. P. Gardner, X X; William Davis; E. H. Hamby. Voi.cmk XIV, 190E- Editors-in-Chicf, E. P. Shannon, «| A O; J. I). McCartney, x A K. business Manager, Jack Banks, %i . Associate Editors, I’. A. Williams, x X; V. II. Bullard, AT 12; b. G. Stephens, KA; I. M. Putnam. K X; W. D. Hoyt, X'P; James E. Sibley. r- J  c) 1 m Voi.umk X ', 15KC2. Kditors-in-Chief, Frank II. Barrett, X A K; Sterling II. Blackshcar, X 1'. Business Manager ., .1. K. .Iordan. A TO; M. NV. Lewis, X'i'. Associate Editors, C. I). Russell, TAO; I. S. Peebles, X X: M. S. Johnson, K A; 11. M. Fletcher, K X; Dcwald Cohen. Voi.r.MK XVI. 1908. Kditors-in-Chief, G. Dexter Blount, KA; Framplon K. Kills, TAO. Businev Managers, ,1. Benton. High; Claude NV. Boyd, X . Associate Editors, Marion II. Smith, X A K; Hugh M. Scott, X T: Preston Brooks, , T ‘I; NV. G. Lngland, X T: Marvin M. Dickinson, K X; Sidney J. Nix, U I L. Voi.cmk XVII. 1901.- Kditors-in-Chief, L. I . Goodrich, XX; I. S. Hopkins, Jr., !• A O. Business Managers. II. M. Blnekshear, A Til; G. W. Nunnnlly, X'I ; J. B. Gamble. Associate Editors. J. I). Bower. KA; Roderick Hill, X A K; Wailcs I«cwis. XT: NV. B. Shaw, KX: W. O. Bolarts. f P I.; It. N. Burt. Voi.r.MK XV1IJ, 190JJ. Kditors-in-Chief, A. 1.. Hardy, K X; V. B. Moore, X'I . Business Managers. Itoderiek Hill, XAK; C. P. Pratt. A T11. Associate Editors, H. W. Telford, I’ P I.; T. C». Stokes; A. II. Carmichael, XT; W. 0. Marshhurn. TAO; J. C. Upshaw, XX: Art Editor. (). H. B. Bloodworth. Jr.. KA- Voi.r.MK XIX. IIXH . —Kditors-in-Chief, NV. (). Marshhurn, «l A0; Lansing B. la e, XAK. Managing Editor. H. L. Covington. KA. Assistant Managing Editor, J. II. Bradherry, I P L. Art Editor, J. G. Mays, XT. Associate Editors, It. S. Parker. XT; G. A. Green, A Til; NV. B. Hainhleton, XX; E. It. I,aml crt. K X; J. It. Turner. Voia’mk XX. 1907.— Kditors-in-Chief, Phil NV. Davis, Jr., TAO; J. K. MacDonald, X T- Business Manager, T. K. Scott. Art Editor, NV. A. Griflith, K A. Assistant Business Miinagcr, H. M. Wilson, XX. Associate Editors, NV. T. McCaffrey. KX: NV. G. Brantley, Jr.. XAK; J. II. Neisler, U P L; it. S. Parker. XT; T. S. Winn. A Til. Voi.ir.MK XXL 1908. Kditors-in-Chief, S. O. Smith, TAO: NV. C. Henson. Business Manager, It. P. King. XAK. Assistant Business Manager. I). L. Rogers. Art Editor, H. G. Cannon. AT!’. Associate Editors, J. B. Harris, XT; S. E. Morton, KX; C. C. Brooks, XX: Lanier Branson, XT; Roy Strickland, KA: G. NV. Glausicr, II K A. Voi.r.MK XXII. 1909. Kditors-in-Chief, NV. H. Johnson, KA; James Montgomery, XT. Business Manager, I). L. Rogers. Art Editor, J. B. NV'eir, Jr., KX: R. F. Revson. Associate Editors, J. M. Walker, XAK; K. M. Brown, XT; NV. It. Holmes, TAO; Frank Clark. Jr.. A TO: C. C. Brooks. XX: C. F. Pekor. U P L; O. P. Beall. Voi.vmk XXIII, 1910. Editors-in-Chief, H. Abit Nix; John Moore Walker, XAK. Business Manager. It. L. Campla-ll. Art Editor, Hugh King Allen, XX. Associate Editors, Eugene S. Taylor, KX; Hughes Spalding, XT; O. M. Gresham, A TO; Aubrey Matthews, XX: Robert Cuniining: Henry Newman, XT; Fred Allen, TAO: Itoliert P. White, KA; Corbin C. Small, n K a. Voi.it.mk XXIV, 1911.—Editors-in-Chief, Evans V. Heath. A TO; Arthur K. Maddox. N-sociate Editors, Geo. C. Blanton; Pope F. Brock; J. L. Deadwvler; J. H. Foster; Malvern Hill, XX; NV. S. Jones, XX: Henry Nawninn, XX; NV. J. Northern, Jr., TAO; H. B. Peacock. KA: II. 1). Russell; C. S. Small IIK A; 0. A. B. Sparks. X A K; Boykin C. NV right, X T. Business Manager, Howell Brooke. Assistant Business Manager, F,. V. Carter. T A 0. iiiiiiiiiimuniiiiuuiiiiuiiinniiuiiinnniuiiiiiniiiiH 7Hold Voi.rsiK XXXI. 1918. I litnr-in-Chief, Mark Matthews. Associate lidilnrs Alfred Blalock, 2 X; .T. It. Bow«lcn, 4 A 0. Business Managers, A. S. Bussey: I.. B. West, 1 A ft. Art 1 litor, Chester W. Slack.20r ££ First Term BDITOHIAI. STAFF Hknkv Dorman..................................................EdUor-in-Chief Farce K. Watson, .Ih............................Eire! .1 reociatc Editor Howard Mewhocrnk...............................Second .Aggociaie Editor Km nest K. IiOWK....................................................Athletic editor Terrel K. Pehkv......................................... ... Social Editor Jack Barnett................................................Exchange Editor BIS1NKSS STAFF Hrtm W. I lost'............................................Ifurinerg Manager W. D. Wisdom..............................l i lant Circulation Manager F. C. -McCi.i rk.....................................Circulation Manager Alton IIoscii...............................Ageigtant tiuxinegg Manager .1. W. Tanner..............................Aggietant Circulation Manager Second Term KD1TOK1AL STAFF Kari.k E. Watson, Jk. I ioWAKI) MbWKOI'H NK F.knest K. Iajwk . . Terrel H. Perry . . Jahe Barnktt . . . F. 0. -McClure . . . . Editor-in-Chief .A ggociate Editor Atsociate Editor . .Athletic Editor . . Social Editor Exchange Editor BUSINESS STAFF IltKIii W. Hoscii...........................................tin gin egg Manager W. D. Wisdom.....................................Aetigtant Hug in egg Manager Al.TON Hosch................................................Circulation Manager •I. W. Tanner................................Afeigtant Circulation Manager 1 .ee 1 . Uohinson...........................Aesigtant Circulation Manager Ai.heht Dir n Stan ..........................Aggie font Circulation Manager I.rocs Lamar..............................................Ae»ietanl Circulation Manager  Teorgia Faculty S isted In Who'? PH! BETA KAPPA MEN PREDOMINATE flchievments Range Fra thip To Industrial JNIVERSITY Kj SCHOLARS as vm s:j Georgia Cracker Staff Frank Daniki............................Editor-in-chief I I umorout X n in bert Oi.ivkr S. Morton.........................EdUor-in-Chief I At erarg .Xu nib era Jkromk Junks................................................l ociatr Editor Irwin I . Mvkh.hon..........................................Itnocinte Editor HaroiJ) C. SliKmcui...............................................Irt Editor J. K. Mooxky...........................................Itrittout Art Editor Caki. K. Nkijsox...........................................Hutinrtt Manager M. C. Hah.ky..................................Itrirtanl Hutinet Manager Ki»w. ri» .1. Haar............................Ittitlonl Hutinett Manager C. H. BkoCKIXOTON.......................................idrertiring Manager J. K. Dkn.mark..........................................Circulation Manager Dkssk Doxaijmox...............................Artirtant Circulation Manager C. K. McAktih'R...............................Attittant Circulation Manager I.. II. Nkijmin...............................Ittitlaul Circulation Manager iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinnimtmiimiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiP fap=OT v - Zt'   Our Commandant Colonel D. W. Ryther ZJOL. RYTHER was born in North Evans, N. Y. He attended High School in Buffalo. . Y.. before enter- ing the Army Military Academy at West Point. He had the good fortune while serving in the Spanish-American War, along with the late Col. Roosevelt, to take part in the capture of San Juan Hill. After leaving Cuba he spent seven years in the Philippines and took part in over twenty-five engagements while on the islands. During the World War he was in command, for a time, of the District of Hassons, near Bordeaux, where over forty thousand troops were in training. Ho. is a graduate of the school of the Line at Leavenworth, Kansas, and served for two years as Instructor in Law at the Post. Col. Ryther is a staunch supporter of athletics and every other phase of college activity. His kindly disposition, lofty ideals and broadmindedness has endeared him to every student at the Uni-versitv.  Regimental Adjutants N. I). Nickkksox................................Idjutonl 1. K. Dknmark............................ nlrlliyence Officer Miss Ciadvs Urxx.................................Syoimor Miss I.ki.ia Dait.iithy..........................Sponsor Regimental Adjutants • . First Battalion OfficersSecond Battalion Officers sET Motor Transport Battalion Headquarters Officers II. W. 111ho11..................................................Major I- .M. Harman......................First Lieutenant and Adjutant H. H. Dmkwrv............First Lieutenant and Intelligence Officer Miss Caroi.yn Nkwton..........................................Sponsor I TO.  Company “A” Privates A. (!. Bond (). I'.. Gay J. V. Calhoun It. K. Ghikukn W . V . Howards W . B. Him. c. l Gi.katon C. 11. Languokd c. s. 1 IoDC.KS M. Lund K. .f 1 N IKK .1. B. MADDON 1. 1 . Morris .1. V. McKi.vkkn .1. 11. Nkwton C. D. Mcl.KXDON F. J. Osttrman 1.. II. Nkijuin !.. 11. HuGIIBS J. 11. PlIINI .V A. It. Bknnktt 11. 1.. Itol'LK F. F. Calhoun K. 1. Sandkms F. I. C ha no: F. G. Sl.AUOIITKR Ai KX. Davis It. 11. Smai.i.ky C. S. Duncan Fr ank Smith K. I.. Dolvin N . L. Stokks F. T. Dowih.b K. Trkanon .1. 1.. Kidkk C. Turk J. M. Fletciikh . 11. Vbai.k W . L . Frioiiui I K. Wkatiikri.y I.. S. Garoinkr F. M. Young C. It. Youngbloodrv • Company “B” Privates W. (). How UK N It. S. C'aki'tiikns A. H. C x joins It. I.. Kills II. W 11 ARTI.KY H. W. Joki. (I. W. Johnson It. S. Kknt W. M. Mckhay J. W. Pkhkins .1. S. WlllTNKK A. N. Ai.kokii W. I.. Aixim-S. Hkkk It. (I. Ill'NSKY W. 1.. Ci.om A. K. Dknstan W. J. Baton J. I . Kvknkti- V. K. Kvitt .1. H. Kitts K. It. Foi'mciikk K. V. (Jam.am:n W. C. Crxmv J. N. Hawks J. A. II.NYKS I I. 11 KAO K. N'. Jki.ks 1.. H. Joki. J. It. Johnson C. V. I.OWK J. I . I.KOG li. I. Miiidi.khrooks C. K. McAktiu-k V. OWKNS It. NV. I’k.uock l„ H. ItoilKKTS H. H. ltoTiisciiii.il II. C. SlCKKITKI.il W. (I. Smaiia It. I.. Stankokii N. J. Tayi.ok 1.. NVkstmhcmiks S. J. Fkanki.in Company “C” Officers II. K. Ki.i riim;k . . I). McKaklanii T. M. Mkknktt . . . l . A. Nksmitii . . Miss 1,11.1.1 A.N SnriT ..........('11 plum . l.irulrunnt Srcoml Lit-ulenunl . . Fir ! ,sV ryeunt ..............S xmxor SKKCKANTS C. Hayks C”. (J. IIkxmv .1. ( . McDaxiki. (). M. (Tarns r()UI»()HAI..S M. I.ANIBR S. A. Idi.kmin .1. A. Wksois ■ ■ ————— 1 LLmiUJl rrfrjy' . y Vrn lull (’, T. WlllTCIIKAIl .1. Ia vvkrn Troop “A” Officers I). DoSAMMON...............................................Captain A. Hanoi.....................................................first Lieutenant S. (». Chasiii.kh...........................................Second Lieutenant 0. 0. Watson........................................first Senjeant Mow I ni!K iu.A Coi.i.ikk..................................Sponsor SKKGKAXTS J. G. Jarkkli. J. V. Davis F. I). Piknck V. Tatk .1. A. N'kwtox C. .1. Thornton V. 1). Wisikoi M. S. Yokmanh COItt’OK AI.S A. Hhhjht V. G. Tai.iovkrro W. L Hominson 11. I.. Dkaktii D. M. Dornhi.att .1. I.. Farkk.r c c A+ %%$$$ %  Troop “B” Officers C. T. 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Mounts |T was the night of the last mullet supper of the year in Candler Hall, and 1 had just retired to my room replete with mullet, which fact resulted in the final resolve never to indulge in another piscatory repast. hailing to fall immediately into the arms of Morpheus, due to unusual and raucous uproar near mv door, quite different from any concoction that ever originated in the head of a Freshman, I cautiously arose to determine the cause and origin of such anomolous disorder. Nervously I peered through a small opening made in the door and beheld a most despicable spectacle, caused by a seething and restless conglomeration of hybrid eats. Their eyes gleamed with the fire of avarice and their tails twitched with contempt at one who had devoured their favorite fruit. For a moment I was at a loss as to how the discourteous beasts might be disbanded. Then, lo! There came, wafted by a gentle nocturnal zephyr, low and melodious strains of music exuding from a Victrola in the apartment on the third floor, occupied bv Wilbur Murray and his cohorts. It was such music as hath power to soothe the savage beast. Suddenly there burst upon the still, midnight atmosphere that old familiar ditty. “Come Nestle in Your Daddy’s Arms.” Abruptly, the cantankerous felines relegated themselves to the soothing and lieckoning effects of the heretofore mentioned music-box and precipitately scurried away to where they had been summoned. Again I retired to my bunk as one who wraps the dra| ery of his couch about him and lies down to hideous dreams. Gladly submitting to the empyrean luxury, beloved from pole to pole, it was but a short while before there was a distinct reaction furnished by the lavish consumption of the once delectable mullet. I am now Lord Paramount of a flourishing spaghetti farm near Havana. Cuba. This plantation lwing handed down as an heirioom by a superannuated uncle who was decidedly loco. Unfortunately for such an opulent and ol esious husbandman of such an indispensable commodity as spaghetti. I had the insatiable craving of an inebriate. Whereupon, being of a peripatetic nature and of a gregarious temperament. I meandered down to the Cafe Guantanamo. Nonchalantly I sauntered to a nearby table and ordered a bottle of concentrated vitriol. After imbibing a few times of this mild beverage, there blustered in a man who looked as tho life had dealt him the joker. But there seemed to be something familiar about the physiognomy of this rolling stone, who had ostensibly gathered no moss. By the characteristic wave of the hair and his facetious countenance, he was at once recognized as my old friend Jones Haves of the Class of the Uni- versitas Gcorgiae. After a lengthy recapitulation of the vicissitudes of life the discourse reverted to those halcyon college days and to those chums whom wc once knew there. Hayes tells me that in his ranging ramblings he has seen and heard of a few members of the Commerce Department. He tells me: That Sam Honey is a Pullman porter on the Gainesville Midland Railroad. That Jack Frost runs a chain of pool rooms, known as the Frost Houses. That Hugh Gurley is a dispenser of Fizz Water. - •1 ■ 11 iignirnif fff u |n|‘ -A Top Mark Anthony on Broadway. ('kxtkr—1The Long and Short of It. Bottom Tlu Sons and Daughters c»f 1-Will-Arisr (Jive a Minstn That Dcssie Johnston has finally been permitted to visit Louise unmolested and has won her heart, Imt has incidentally lost his overcoat. That Robert Mcadden Powers is Sec. to Opt. Hillv of the Whiz-Bang. That Owen Reynolds has. for many years, been searching ardently for an outlet to the great Salt J.ake. That Willie L’pshaw is director of traffic in the hamlet of Watlcinsville. having as his private See. the only girl graduate of the Commerce Dept.. Anne Ruth Moore. While hunting boa-constrictors as a pastime in the jungles of Africa, he finds the entire Education Class, composed of Ilia Cooper. Kathleen Drake and Ida Pound, engaged in the work of uplifting and educating the pygmies of Timhuctoo. I passed around the bottle of concentrated vitriol and my friend Haves, after a couple of drinks, began to gesticulate wildly and became more loquacious. He tells me that of the three Civil P.ngincers that he has seen of the ’22 Class That Guy Cooper is shaving warts off of cucumbers in a pickle factory. That Hugh Hosch is the star cartoonist for the Wampus Cat. 'flint Jimmie Spicer is operating a hot dog stand with the motto. "In onions there is strength.” Of the one graduate of the Architectural Engineering Class. Haves has observed that Norman Dunning Nickerson is "what every woman ought to know.” Being not much of an artist, and being pretty well stewed by this time. Hayes tells me that he has seen hut few of the graduates of the Arts Department. But of the few that he has seen he informs me: That Oliver Morton is a pearl diver in the Dead Sea. That Ware Hutcheson is an instructor in Dog Latin at the canine exposition being held in Labrador. That Red Pittman is manufacturing check valves for hot-air artists. 'flint Karl Watson is a duck hunter out for a lark. That Mallon Sheffield is playing a banjo in a bevo emporium. That Marion Moore is an exponent of the “back-to-nature” movement. That A-}- Dixon is an athletic director at Yassar College. That Mary Dick Colvin is running a kindergarten at Leesburg. Ga. Seeing a sick horse hobbling bv. Haves tells me such a spectacle reminds him of the Vet. Dept., and that the two of them. H. G. Bailey and A. 15. Davis, were running a dog hospital on Sandy Hook. After meditating for a few minutes. Haves withdrew from his tattered paraphernalia a copy of an International Scientific Magazine. In this magazine he cited me to extensive research work conducted by Henry Pickett Dorman. The culmination of his arduous efforts was the production of a hybrid by crossing the hog with the chicken and thereby automatically producing that ever-enticing breakfast food, ham and eggs. In another section of the magazine we saw where Ralph Kitts, once known as “Battling” Fitts, after finishing at Harvard, has become a master in the science of picking Yale locks. Turning further into the pages we found among the illustrations the likeness of one Abner Tliaddetis Persons, operating a wireless station, through which medium the major portion of the Southwestern Co.’s reports were controlled. Said station being located just off the coast of Sandwich Island.On the editorial page there appeared a .statement of grave and momentous import to tile effect that dames Rav.sor Stokes had ultimately accepted the position tendered him some years ago by the government of Switzerland. 11 is lengthy procrastination was due largely to the technical analysis of this gigantic responsibility necessarily incident to the position, which consisted of counting holes in Swiss cheese. Near the back there was a picture bearing close resemblance to that renowned and perfunctory scientist. Count Isaac Archemcdc.s Galliseo. Beneath this portrait there appeared the enlightening inscription of ('has. Morse Slack, who. the article explained, had acquired such likeness through the endless endeavor to solve the perplexing problem of how in the name of the Immortal Gods did King Arthur ever get a square meal on his round table? For the first time my old friend broke loose with vociferous laughter. At last lie controlled himself sufficiently to gasp that it was not the scientist furnishing the amusement but the Home Economics Dept. Comfortably reposing into another posture after engulfing the 1.0th glass of this delicious fluid, he related his maneuvers in the various nooks of N. Y. His dessertation follows: One cold night in Dee., while wandering along the Bowery of X. Y.. I was attracted by a rather elegant looking Bldg, for that section. A tlioro investigation disclosed the fact that this was a combination Cafeteria and Cabaret, owned and operated by the Co-ed grads, of Home Economies, numbering eleven in all. The dancers of much repute were Misses Mary Elizabeth White. Anna Belle Drake, Buena Ware Freeman, and Lula Blanche Edwards. Music for the auspicious occasion was rendered by a one-piece jazzless jazz orchestra composed of the entire graduating class of Journalism. John Eldridge Drewry has now acquired great fame with his left-hand Piccolo. Speaking of the Law Class of 22, Red related that one member was engaged in the active practice of his profession, but was unable to reeall his name, he himself having deserted the ranks after three mortal days of a baneful existence as a lawyer. Julian Hartridgc. it seemed, was the standard licarcr of the Bolsheviki Brigades, stationed around Archangel, whither In- had been deported for having a conscientious objection to everything and cvcrylnxly. Sadly, and with a rising lump in his throat, he recounted the deplorable death of Reuben Alvin Braswell, who had some time since departed this life from starvation incurred by patiently waiting for the passage of the soldiers’ Bonus Bill. Incidentally lie mentioned that Harvey Kennedy is now serving a life term sentence in the Penitentiary because of failing to pay his income tax. It was with much pride that he enumerated the names of some members of his graduating class who have displayed rare judgment in selecting a vocation sufficiently remunerative to warrant them of sustenance three days ahead. Seth Dekle, B. B. Bowers. I.. G. Lanier. Jake Shclor, “Ted” Lcvic. "Block Head" McWhorter, Sam Few. “Stitt" Wilson. Allen Arnold and John Sheppard have organized a minstrel. With a shade of desperation creeping over his countenance. Hayes related an instance of one member of that august assembly who had forsaken the l cuch of justice and sauntered into the field of Kvangclistieal aspirations. Hesitatingly, he submitted the name of this erratic individual as that of “Honest Harvey" Tisinger. The seemingly immortal work of Noah Webster, having become more or less antiquated for usage in the present day. one illustrious member of this class. Herbert Gray bv name, having ever the interest of humanity at heart, some years ago sue-cccdcd in impioving on the original. Bv diligent application lie lias compiled in a single volume approximately four million words, the most abbreviated of which are the following: transmagnificnndniidubonciality and honorificabilitndcntitatibus. A complete mastery and frequent consultation with this volume is an invaluable aid in his chosen profession of grave digging. Anxiously I awaited the fate of the Agr. Dept. He not l eing directly familiar with this Dept., he could only account for a limited munlier. He snvs: That Hunt Harris is now the ehampion heavy-weight pugilist of the world. Nuxiated Iron was responsible. That Don Hastings is Mgr. of a Hockey Team at the L'niv. of Liberia. That Mack Brand has assumed the responsibility of restoring law and order in Oconee Co.. On. That Earnest Nix is endeavoring to make sand of a pile of rocks. He has been convicted of bigamy. That John Robert Slaughter has just recently paid $250,000 for a seat pn the X. V. Stock Exchange. That Skip Conyers is instructor in the art of riding buffaloes across the Sahara Desert. During vacation he is stable sgt. in the Swiss Navy. That Troy Edwards is a confirmed old bachelor. He is now a "barker” at a 49 show. That J. T. (’ox is a bar tender on the Island of Guam. That at the Hotel Picftdiliy. formally known as the Jewel Hotel of Athens, there is employed a man of much avoirdupois in the capacity of Bell Hop. 'flic efficiency with which Malcolm Angus Mcllainey handles his weight is marvelous. That Doe Faulkner is making a survey of tin- Arctic Region for the purpose of establishing graj»e vineyards and banana groves. Being touched bv the earnest pleadings of a waif, he finally permitted Frank Martin to accompany the squad, with the understanding that he Ik given all lie made selling Eskimo Pies to the natives. That "Bull Henry" Williams is Poet Laureate of the Island of Yap. Henry, don’t clean up the room till you help me get to the infirmary. I’m in a bad fix. ‘‘King Solomon and King David In youth led wayward lives. Each had n few affinities. Besides their numerous wives. But wlwn old age came rolling on. With all its acfies and qualms. King Solomon wrote the Proverbs, And David wrote the Psalms." • ■ That Louise was not popular with the Georgia hoys. That Pete Stevens was getting more popular with the student hodv. That A-plns Dixon quit studying after making Phi Beta Kappa. 'Flint there was at least one man in the Sigma Chi fraternity who was neither a would-be athlete nor a would-be manager. That the grafters of the student body didn’t have Pon .i beat when it comes to chasing nickels. That V. V. Drake made iH) under Botany Kendo. That all laws are enforced in Athens, the Prohibition Law included. That politics was a thing of the past at the l of Gn. That Tige Stone was the In-st in the South. That Karlc Watson was likely to pass French 2a. That Frank Fuller wasn’t a slinger of the taurus. 'Flint Professors Sanford and Ramirez never cut classes. 'Flint there was no politics in the faculty of the University. That Nick had quit crediting those who wouldn’t pay him. That Co-education was getting more popular every day. That we didn’t miss Shorty Andrews as a cheer leader. That a few alumni living in Athens didn’t run the University. That a member of the Chi Phi fraternity had a philosophy of life. That no member of the Okecfenokcc party needed a bootlick to pass up Botany 1. That Mister "Fobbes”. of tin Y. M. C. A., was dearly loved by the University “Boozcliounds”. That the University Library was very efficiently operated. That the Military Department wasn’t any letter than it was two years ago. That the theologians of the state told the truth about the University. That Dr. Svlvy failed to mark a chape) absence. That the Senior C lass would Ik excused from final exams next year. That Dean Dudley did not have any authority to handle the absences. That all this "bull" is straight goods.  UK name of Louise. to ordinary mortals, arouses no vivid impression nor raises in their minds nnv unusual scene or incident. Hut this name, Louise, to every man connected with the University of Georgia, carries with it a certain charm that neither time nor tide can erase from his memory. Hut, however, let that Ik . Around the word Louise hangs a tale, as the monkey once remarked. Having disposed of these preliminaries we will now get down to hare facts, and if you have tears prepare to shed them now. It happened last Kail. Quite soft were the skies. And also were the youths who were seduced to leave their beds of ease and seek pleasure far from the maddening crowd. Louise was a woman who. at some previous time, had acquired a husband, something that no self-respecting woman should he without. Her husband. howe cr. was a traveling man. And when we say he was a traveling man. we leave you to picture the rest. She was accompanied on her stay in the ('lassie City hv another female, who combined all the grace ot onus and all the beauty and charm of Cleopatra with the modesty and decorum of a chorus girl. mm Upon removing to tin city of Athens, said party of the first part sought a sequestered spot on the Mitchell s H ridge Hoad, having, no doubt, a desire to remove from the pitfalls and temptations which beset a girl in such a cosmopolitan city as that aforementioned. Here she lived and prospered. We must pause at this point to properly describe the place which the fair I.ouise made her habitat and most notorious place of abode. Situated about three miles from town, the place occupied a prominent position upon a little knoll removed about three hundred yards from the highway. The house itself was about fifteen feet from the ground and the steps thereto were exceedingly shaky. In front of the house Howcd a little creek which, in the course of its meander-ings. circled the entire house, and which was fordable only at one place, and that where a foot-bridge had been placed across it by some laboring hind from the surrounding fields. At no other place could it be crossed without wetting the various portions of the anatomy. Hut on with the story. The venue had l ccn laid with sufficient and wc must proceed to the action. On a certain evening in the Fall of the year, “when the melancholy days had come, the saddest of the year ’, the husband of Louise took up his bed (to employ a scriptural phrase), shook the dust from his sandals and departed a1- -ioj ['.'.'.kiL'.jAii ■jnjgpi  to parts unknown. At least, so was the impression given out to tin general public,, of which the students of the University of Georgia constituted the larger element. "In the Spring « voting man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love." As before noted, this was the Fall of the year, and hence so many fell, if you will pardon the pun. However, the thoughts of those amorously inclined turned toward the fair Louise and her equally fair visitor. Four of those so inclined thereupon sought a place where they might hire a Ford and ford out to the rendezvous. (Ain't we devilish, using these French phrases?) Take care. Snappy Stories. After obtaining the Ford, the four gentlemen turned their heads in the direction of the .Mitchell s Bridge Bond and its two fair strangers who dwelt thereon. They arrived at their destination in safety. After stopping the machine two alighted and the other two remained in the car. The two pedestrians then crossed the fence, waded the creek and drew nigh unto the house hallowed and sanctified by the bcautious Louise. They ascended the hill just beneath the porch and here they halted for a moment. They then climl cd the rickety steps and stood upon the porch. One knocked, softly.No reply. “Louise.” Still no reply. “Louise. It’s me. This time there was a reply. The door opened. But. alas, no Louise was revealed to the eves of the youths. In her stead stood a man who had his regular growth and, perhaps, enough for two. We need not linger on his description. Suffice to say that he appeared powerful, and that in his right hand he held that equaller of all men—a Smith and Wesson. “Louise $5 $ " -------- The above marks stand for very emphatic language. In fact, some have even ventured to suggest that it was profane language. Thereupon he fired his revolver. Whether he fired once or twice or thrice will never be known. Those running testify that they heard but one shot. Before the second had been fired they were beyond all distance of sound and sight, leaving the fait Louise to her fate. s Hi i  Never did they stop to look for the foot-log at the creek. Time was of the essence of this contract. The creek was many feet wide, but they crossed it with clean feet. Their feet were wet, but it was perspiration. The barbed wire fence presented no difficulty. They hurdled it as though they had been on a track team for many years. With these obstacles past them, in the language of the immortal Caesar, "they placed all safety in headlong flight.” Never did they stop for breath until they reached the highway. And then, what sounds greeted their ears? Surely it could not Ik laughter. And yet it couldn't be nothing else. They paused, perplexed. Again a peal of laughter rang out on the air. What could be the meaning of this? What had become of the irate husband? And what could be the meaning of so many figures cavorting around and holding their sides in laughter? Slowly the light burst. They had been hoaxed. They had been badly deceived. No person such ns I.ouisc had ever existed. IN J Vj A ||r g 1 Why the Dear Old Professors Go Coo-Coo Answers Received On An Exam In Chemistry 1. Give the preliminary test for Group III. Answer: A preliminary test for Group 3 is as per instructions, to-wit: Remove a small portion of the filtrate from Group 2. Break two testtubes and one beaker. Introduce 2.5 c c of nitric acid (cone) to the solution. Add ammonium hydroxide to alkaline reaction. No litmus paper will be available, so test with your fingers. Now pour in 10 c. c. of colorless ammoninum sulphide and spill 80 c. c. on the floor. Any precipitate shows that perhaps Group 3 is present, but if none is formed there has probably been a mistake made, so ask the instructor where it was and proceed with Group 3. Y'ery little chemistry is involved in the addition of nitric acid to the solution. But there is a suspicion that it is added to dissolve the precipitate. Since there is no precipitate formed then, however, it must be for some other purpose. This is one of the mysteries of science. 2. Give the flame tests for sodium and potassium. Answer: There comes before mv mind a brilliant yellow flame which lasts for several minutes; ah! Eureka! (I have found it!) It is the yellow flame of the metal sodium. The glorious platinum wire is dipped ostentatiously into the liquid supposed to contain the elusive object of our quest, Potassium. It is then unmercifully thrust in the hot flame of the diabolical Bunsen burner and if it gives off' the beautiful blue-violet flame then, at last, our noble perspiring hero (or shero) is convinced that he has found potassium and that potassium is present. Thank goodness!! for that little baby blue flame test for the potassium. 3. Give, in detail, the proper care of the platinum wire. Answer: The platinum wire should be bathed several times daily in cone IICl, and then warmed before a comfortable fire until that red glow of perfect health appears. It may be necessary to scrape it gently now and then to remove undesirable companions that attach themselves during an operation. 'Fins should be done with extreme solicitude as some of the platinum itself might be removed and it is worth a dollar a speck. Never grow careless of the platinum wire. There are always jealous eyes around that are waiting for an opportunity to lead it off to other places where good little platinum wires should not frequent. Be very careful with it! Some chemists simply place it in their drawers when not in use, but as the writer has lost several himself he finds it the tatter plan to remove it from the glass rod and deposit it in a vault at the Atlanta National Bank until further needed. . How do you test for magnesium? Answer : Take the solution in nuestion and add ammonia sulphate. 3 grams of potassium nitrate and one cake of Horseford’s baking powder. Boil until all the water is driven off —burn up—, and catch all the devilish little vapors who will try to escape. As punishment for their misbehavior dissolve them in apple vinegar and serve on Knoxes Gelatin for a pure, wholesome, delightful and attractive dessert, which will please the children. | v  HE management of the University Theatre has announced the indefinite engagement of the Faddy Dain-Stete Pevens Company. This act is a headliner among a variety of first-class numbers. Altho the other features for sometime in the future are of a very high grade and will be appreciated bv the University vaudeville devotees, they must needs take second place with this experienced outfit. Faddy Dain is a well-known song composer and singer. Among the popular songs now being sung by countless thousands throughout this land are many which arc the result of his musical nature. Equally well known is the other member of this notorious organization. Stetc Pevens is one of the most popular entertainers that the patrons of the University Theatre have had presented for their approval in some time. He is known from coast to coast as a sterling vaudevil lion. These gentlemen have about the same menu of fun and jokes as they have offered for the last twenty U mSam Events That Have Never Occurred 1. Professor puts test questions on the blackboard and is not asked “Most we write the questions?” 2. Fraternity man pays dues on tile date they arc due. 8. Man purchases straw hat which feels comfortable on his head from the first. 4. Student discovers snappy hosiery ad in a library magazine and does not tear it out. 5. Salesman goes to chapter house and fails to sell his wares. 6. Clothes brought in by a washwoman check exactly with list of those sent out. 7. Piece of apparatus in Physics Building found to be in working order. 8. The Cracker comes out on time. 9. Intoxicated student nearly as drunk as he pretends to be. 10. Athens belle fails to ride bv all fraternity houses in the course of an afternoon. 11. Freshman Club announces that it has sufficient funds to defray expenses of their dance. 12. Pandora goes to press on date intended. 18. Student docs not affirm that the girl he is inviting to the dances is the best looking girl in the world. 1 4. Athens enterprises discontinue the erection of filling stations and bill boards. 15. Student calls at library and gets latest best seller before Athens blue-stockings have read it. 16. Co-ed seen on campus not wearing a sweater. 17. "Big Man” in college fails to wear one of his score of club pins. 18. Member of the Military Department neglects to point out the advantages of drilling five hours a week for two years to secure three-hour credit. 19. A committee of thirty-six “prominent men” in college politics call on a prospective candidate and urge him to run because he is the man for the place. 20. The chapel is packed with out of town people who came to hear the Freshman debate. 21. The entire faculty enforce the absence rules as they are supposed to and discontinue interpreting them individually. 22. A Co-ed seen helping out on a Georgia Hah! —F. I).  ¥1 . loth: 16th: 17th: 18th: 19th: 20th: 21st: 22nd: 23rd: 26th: 27th Happenings of the Year 1921-22 SEPTEMBER Football men begin to show up. John Drcwry inflicts sonic of his preseason dope on the general public. "Mustachio” Gerald Koscoc Evans drags in and creates an unusually large wave on the social slop bucket. Nickerson visits the military department. 9:00 A. M. Nickerson visits the military department. 2:00 P. M. Nickerson visits the military department. Nickerson spends the day with the military department. Nickerson rushes madly into Col. Ryther’s office and asks if cadet officers will wear Sam Browns and Boots. Many students show up. Nick and Pop all smiles. Nickerson now confident that he has things sewed up. Politicians liegin to arrive. “Little Mac” McCrancy has something trembling on his upper lip besides the langue Anglaise. "Stitt” Wilson returns on this date. Politics getting right. Great hordes of Freshmen, including the gutless brigade from Sparta, comes in. Athens barbers rushed off their feet. Gutless brigade from Sparta are waited on by Vigilance Committee. Great times for gutless brigade, from Sparta. 9:00 A. M. Gutless brigade from Sparta prepares to return to “mommer.” 11:00. Old home guard get out their funeral apparel and give a dress parade. 2:2-4 P. M. Gutless brigade from Sparta leaves Athens for home. They were weaned too young, ta! ta ! Politics reach the boiling point on this date, at 2:30 P. M. Students in New College rejoice when “A-plus” Dixon and "Square Head” Cook are approvers. "Stitt” Wilson and Percy Upshaw ally with "Pistol” Jenkins as Beanery floor-walkers. Freshman night. "Hard Charlie" Seagravcs shows his caliber by firing into a crowd of Freshmen who were doing nothing. F.vidence shows that "Hard Charlie’s” windshield was broken by a brick which had bounced off’ his (Hard Charlie's) head. Four Horsemen of "The Poker Chips” in town. College night. Much spirit and many speeches. Coach Stegcman announces a prize of ten dollars for any one who can distinguish a literary number of the Go. Cracker from a humorous number of the same publication. Nickerson’s air-castles tumble when they put him on the "shelf” with the rank of captain. There are no square deals, he says. is—-28th: Dorman elected Editor-in-Chicf of the Red and Black. Clioo—Choo—toot— toot—Y. M. C. A. Rah! 29th: Oliver S. Morton, in a sport write-up, announces that Mercer is depending on the strength of Georgia’s line. Har! liar! 30th: Pandora election held. As usual, no politics. First mass meeting of year. Shorty Andrews announces that the team will show up well in “Barstnn”. OCTOBER 1st: Mercer taken into camp. Chief Buesse and the heroic Athens police star. Don’t shoot, please don’t shoot. 2nd: Col. J. Townsend Dudley gets a card from his old friend. Joe I.ongino. 3rd: “Kodaking” John Shepherd arrives. 4th: Due to rain, no bull session is held on either buttress at Candler Apartments on this date. 3th: Jarnagin gets his October Whizz Bang. ’Nuf sed. 6th: The Dean stops Ag. Club initiation, declaring that “this hazing has got to stop”. 7th. Ag. Club Reception. 8th: “Purple Hurricane” blows fine for first half but fails to maintain its pep. Eddie Rawson and Richard Hickey give evidence which tends to show that prohibition is a state of being much sought after but seldom, if ever, attained. Freshman Cox gets excited over referee “penelating” Georgia so much and raises serious objection. 9th: Freshman gets a notebook and starts out taking down “Bob” Parks’s original sayings. 10th: Walter Camp predicts that Georgia will only give Harvard a mere practice game. 11th: Million-Dollar Drive opens. Biggest and best parade ever pulled ofF in Athens. 12th: Noted Southern sport writers, viz: Morgan Blake. Oliver S. Morton, and John E. Drcwrv, decry Walter’s prediction. 18th: Earle Watson’s room is scene of much wrangling. Loud noises heard within, color of air in immediate vicinity is blue. Spark’s circus in town. “Big” Patterson is arrested bv "Hard Charlie” for annoying the balloon men. The Dean opens up his anti-hazing crusade; Allison and Baird severely wounded. 11th: “Stitt” Wilson, J. F. Brannen, Jr., and Carl K. Nelson affiliate themselves with Pandora Board. How quiet things are now. 15th: Georgia Gives Harvard Hell. As a football dopist Walter Camp would make a good admiral for the Swiss Navy. At any rate, he should be awarded the nice, first-class prickly pear sofa. Tech band plays “Glory to Old Georgia”. The niillcnium, gentlemen, is nearly here. 16th: Southern newspapers sing praises of the Bulldog. 17th: Report reaches Athens through the Atlanta Journal that “Mark Anthony asked the guide in New York if Joan of Arc was Noah's wife. "Big’’ Patterson invests heavily in balloon stock at request of the mayor. 18th: Football team gets great reception from students and citizens of Athens, who get up at five o'clock to meet the train. 19th: Great commotion on campus. The Ga. Co-op is fined by United States Com- missioner for failing to make out income tax report. John R. Fain and "Pete” Stevens have a severe attack of insomnia, har! har! Three (electric) cheers for the Co-op. 20th: "Red” Pittman is seen at the Q Room with a derby. Many Seniors cancel their orders immediately. 21st: “Mutt” Soule’s vacation ends. 22nd: Oglethorpe taken for a ride. "Bum" Day chastizes a member of the Lemon and Smut. 23rd: Freshman discontiues his collection of “Bob" Parks’s original sayings when he finds that they recur every week in due order. 24th: Three more casualties in the Dean’s crusade against hazing. Spann, Miles, and Lanier are honored. 26th: 27th: 25th: “Dean” Dudley posts an "honor” list without Woodall’s name on it. Even the "Dean" makes an error sometimes. John Robinson’s circus in town. "Big” Patterson confines himself to his room so as to escape further investment in balloon stock. Fee Kopper trounces Demosthenian in annual Freshman impromptu debate. Chapel is filled to overflowing. Thirteen present—ten Freshmen and three judges. Hoboes leave for Columbus. Great numbers of punch boards arc operated on campus. Chief operators arc "Peter” Tisinger, “Simp” Hurt. Victor King Mender, “Judge” Thomas and "Kit” Carson. Georgia defeats Auburn. Penn State slaughters Tech. Ain’t we got fun? Blake gets picked and sours on the Tornado that was so easily turned into a cool evening zephyr. "Cliff” Pantone buys seventy-five dollars’ worth of experience betting on Tech. 30th: O. B. Keeler gives Georgia his usual punk write-up. Everybody gets back from Columbus except Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. How dry I am! 31st: "Sylvv” Morris seen speaking to John Morris by one student. Not enough evidence to convict. 28th: 29th: NOVEMBER 1st: Y. M. C. A. Cabinet returns from Tuskcgec Institute. They spend five hours Monday night driving around Jefferson, Ga., looking over the country. Where did you get it, boys? 2nd: R. I.. Fitts inflicts his impressions of Tuskegee Institute upon his fellow Demosthenians. 3rd: Frank Martin stays awake thru the entire fifty-five minutes in Ag. Education 34. Wc marvel at such self-control.  3Wg 1th: 5th: Arom.i of beanery hash a la ‘‘Pistol’' Jenkins overcomes “Buck” Miles, first victim of the year. Virginia bows to Georgia in a great game. “Puss” Whelchel qualifies as a sprinter. Jim Tom Reynolds returns to his old time form. Another shirt-tail parade. 6th: John Sheppard and Henry Dorman caught rolling the galloping dominoes, John reported as actually popping his fingers and saying, “Come you lubly leben”. Tth: “Bob” Parks reported as giving Freshman disagreeable advice on this date. 8th: “Chancellor” Short and “Dean” Powell hold important faculty meeting. 9th: Frank Bruce asks only thirteen questions in one fifty-five-minute period on this date. 10th: Art editors for Pandora elected. 11th: Co-ed Newman asks Prof. Carter why mountain licker tastes so much like lye. Boy; the alcoholic blues! 12th: Vandy lucks a tie with Ga. The net yardage the ball was advanced by Vandv was—17. 13th: Last of the contract hunters appeared today. Allah be praised! 15th: The great Southwestern trio. Hendricks. Henderson, and Kemp, entertain the boys with wonderful tales of the book agent's golden trail. 16th: “Goat” Durden’s mustache reaches the astounding length of sixteen micro- milliinctcrs. 17th: Long letter from J. V. T. Longino published in the Bed and Black. Joe still has his strong line. Miskoph attends graveyard party. 18th: Frank Martin almost impeached in Ag. Club. Miskoph interviews the Dean at Baird’s urgent request. 19th: Georgia wallops Alabama, 22 0. Muddy field held down the score. Tech yells for Alabama. T. H. W. T. 20th: V. M. C. A. suddenly becomes very popular. 21st: Gridiron Club banquet, ’uuf sed. “Graveyard” Lewis honor guest of a graveyard party composed of underclassmen. Freshmen. Seniors and j ost-grads. 22nd: Baird. Hunt and Foster return to their ancestral domains. 23rd: “Monk” Garret. “Swiper” Dasher and Fit .patrick arrive in Classic City. 21th: Sam Boney gets hardboiled in Clcmson game, which goes on ice to the tune of 28-0. Chicken served at the beanery, causing several of the older men to faint. 25th: Frank Martin impeached in the Ag. Club and removed from the office of Sergcant-at-Arms. John Slaughter elected to fill out unexpired term. Politics, rah! 26th: Georgia bows to Dartmouth, 7-0. Tech yells for Dartmouth. We now know for what the Lemon and White stand. F.ditor-in-Chicf enjoys bonnti-ful supper at expense of one Thco. Smith.n. ) 1 3rd “Polly Mac" buys himself an automobile. “Polly’s'’ failing in his old age. Half term grades out. An undergraduate gets B-plus under “Botany" Reade and collapses. Frank Martin spends the night at the Delta Tau Delta chapter house. Yea, verily the wolf and the lamb shall lie down together. Hendricks caught politicking in Demosthenian hall by Nelson, who prefers charges against the said Hendricks. Hendricks demands trial by combat. DECEMBER First literary number of the Ga. Cracker appears. Morton, rah! Mexican half-dollar passed on Co-op. All student assistants narrowly escape being laved off because of this unheard of neglect of duty. Drs. McHatton and Jarnagin stage a bull-fight at Ag. Hall. The bout was stopped on account of a foul in the third round when Dr. Jarnagin quoted the Whiz . Bang. Ralph Fitts thirty-three seconds late at Sunday-school today. “Pete” Steven’s examination schedule heartily welcomed by the student body. Louise entertains quite a few of the students—male only. Frank Fuller, Fred Haar, John Slaughter, Dessie Johnson, “G-square" Finch and others cordially welcomed. Dick Hartley develops into a speed demon and Bill Mundv into a prayin’ fool. Apple, banana, and orange venders reported business on a boom. I,. II. Hill purchases a new suit of clothes for some unaccountable reason. Sam Siebert buys many unnecessary accessories. “Possum” Raines visits Louise and returns to town with an ugly scar on his check. Marshal Foch stops five minutes in the Classic City but does not make an arrest. (Nor a speech.) Report out on campus that lawyers get out for the holidays on the 20th. The academics wax turbulent and wrathful at Dr. “Sylvv’s” inconsistency. Everybody gets a few exams moved up. John R. Fain moves his exam up. The smelling salts, Maria! Louise has more callers. Reported that “Co-op” was one of the gang. Sun rises as usual but Old College knows nothing of its setting. Exams start and Old College chips and dice put away.. (For the time being.) The editor? all get shot on this date. They begin to realize that classes were actually carried on during the Fall term. Traveling man visits Louise, and from all accounts lie’s still traveling. Freshman turned up for cheating in the Physics Department; lie thoughtlessly turned in his “jack” with his exam paper. No brains! No brains! Louise signs movie contract and sells out for Los Angeles. Dr. Barker takes his Genetics section for an outing. 20th: A real good (ia. Cracker appears. For the first time, the student body gets its money’s worth. 21st: “Daddy” Fain and “Pete” Stevens celebrate the success of their konkockshun to keep everybody in Athens until Christmas, thereby taking the joy outer life. 22nd: Everybody and his brother takes Christinas. The Statesboro delegation leaves Athens soused. Water, water everywhere, but I don't drink a drop. JANUARY 1st: New Year’s resolutions again come up for consideration. 2nd: Military Staff begins to sober up for new year’s work. 3rd: The old grind resumed. Classes as usual. 4th: Co-ed hands bucket to J. II. Chaffin and says, “Thank you, Mr. Powell”. 5th: Five men announce for the presidency of the Ag. Club. 6th: Prof. Ramirez shoots A-plus Dixon aloose from his bearings. 7th: Mallon Sheffield cuts the members of the Glee Club. Very good! 8th: “Jim” Stokes and W. L. Lamb return to college. 9th: The Student Council entertains. 10th: Morgan Blake announces additional prizes in his world famous limerick contest. Ninth prize, a picture of Bill Mundy in the last stages of his crosscountry run at Athens. liar! liar! 11th: Ed. Danforth again gets hard with his Ga. correspondents. 12th: The Sophs suddenly realize their responsibilities. 13th: The Editor-in-Chief balled by the Horticultural Club. IIo. hum! 14th: John Sheppard fails to take any notes in class on this date. ’Smatter, “Jawn”? 15th: “Professorcss” Ruth Bates delivers the first of a series of lectures to the Pandora Board, entitled, “The Evils of Graft”. 16th: Members of the faculty announce that there will be no exams in March. 17th: Members of the faculty announce that there will be exams in March. 18th: 9:00 A. M. No exams in March 12:00 M. Exams in March. 3:00 P. M. No exams in March. 6:00 P. M. No holidays in April. What the? ? ? 19th. “Sid” James and “Milt” Day stage a cross-country run at the Normal. “Sid” won. Exams in March,—holidays in April,—holidays in March,— exams in April,—no exams,—holidays.—exams.—no holidays,—etc. 20th: Pandora Staff meets. No fights. Holidays, no exams.—exams.—no holi- days. 21st: Finally settled bv faculty that there will be exams in March and holidays in April. FEBRUARY 1st: Joe Longino arrives in town. 2nd: Sgt. Hoban takes up a collection for the widow of the “unknown soldier ". All members of the faculty contribute. Dean Dudley included. 3rd: Freshman asks for four yards of second-hand skirmish line at Co-op. He is told that the Co op quit handling that commodity because the profit was less than the usual 200%. 1th: “Mutt” Thomas lakes a bath. 5th: Colonel I)ekle (cadet-colonel) gets an absence in Military. 6th: Felder Frederick answers a question in History—his first this session. 7th: Dean Dudley’s obituary appers at several places on the. campus, that indi- vidual having died from the neck up. 8th: Big speaking in Chapel. Twenty-two white people and the Red and Black quartet attend. 12th: “Jessie” James is called home to court. ’Nuf scd. 13th: White and Dixon given one hundred shccklcs each by the Chancellor in Chapel. 15th: Dr. Svlvey Morris cuts a glass—the second in forty years. 21st: John Sheppard wins anniversarian contest from “Senator” McClure. Mc- Clure made a “noble efTort”, but was forced to yield. 22nd: Dawson Durden appoints a president of Demosthenian. Dean Dudley comes out from l chind the bush. Alas and alack, his beautiful mustache is no more. Freshmen get bolsheviki at chapel. Charlie Hodges pays his weekly visit to the Dean. “Senator” McClure introduces Governor Hardwick in chapel. Freshman addresses Brigham Young as Dr. Young. Don’t worry, freshman, you’re safe for the year. “Jessie” James sports a cane out to Normal School and is escorted to the graveyard that night. Better watch vour step, “Jessie”. Politics exceedingly warm. Denmark and Wilson accused of leathering by the Pandora Board. Saturday: Everybody takes a bath. Another bum Cracker out! (Literary.) Great commotion on campus. Prcmayya, the Hindu Christian, and a Greek-Jcw. gets into an awful row over religion. F.ditors go to church. No news. 22nd: 23rd: 24th: 25th: 26th: 27th: 28th: 29th: 30th: 31st:  What Is Jazz? Quite often one is asked or thinks the above question, and in answer the following answers have lnren copied from the opinions of different persons of all walks of life. JAZZ Battle of sticks on tin pans, Bruno carrying on his tail a load of cans, Frightened hound's mournful whine. Squeak of rosined twine. That’s Jazz. Salute of lonely cow, Gambling niggers in a row, Voice of blatent goat. Whistle of steamboat. That’s Jazz. Cats fighting on the back fence. Thunderstorm about to commence. Ford climbing a steep hill. Landlady paying a bill. That’s Jazz. Crying baby in the dark, Lovers on a bench in the park, Hammer on iron boiler, Grunts of rustic toiler. That’s Jazz. Trombone's sliding moan, Saxophone's .jazzy groan, Violin's rasping wheeze, Somebody trying to sneeze. That’s Jazz. Woodpecker on arid beam, hipping canvas seam. Pigs In-fore feeding time. Little boy with a dime. That's Jazz. Jaybirds come from below, Locomotive trying to go. Dinner horn at noon, Dog calling to moon. That’s Jazz. D. D. Scarborough, ’22,r“JLi :'; i »7TOrnfvrr ' .KV1' v' ZiifwW AyJNX . 'y ''TVS rHriK(ni 1' tfla -— M % HI 91 1 8 W vrjj'Sl [• -HH 1 f].. ] rfcj il 30 1 pHH vl k——■ m Hi Jay slip The Strange Case of Pudley and Darks Being a Story of the Raid on the Basement of the Old College T was one of those cool and invigorating nights which we more commonly expect during the month of July, but which come upon us during the month of March, according to the calendar, but not according to the thermometer. On this particular night the moon was shining. The moon was also full, but I cannot sav where he got it. Everything was still, not even an ox stirred. Now that this epistle has been started and the night during which the following events transpired and the following people perspired has been described we may proceed with the main plot. As has already been mentioned, the moon was full, and in accordance with natural law it was shining, as everything shines when full. The first action having any bearing on this plot happened in the wee small hours of the morning, when the bell of- a certain scribe softly and tenderly tingled on the outskirts of the Classiek City—I mean, that the bell which tingled tingled on the telephone and that the said telephone on which the bell tingled was on the wall of a certain man’s house, which house was on the outskirts of the city commonly known as the Classiek City. One o’clock, and all’s well. The above mentioned bell again tingled, since no one stirred when the tingling came to pass. Again the occupants of the house slept as a log (however that is). After several tingles the bell was rewarded for its faithful service by being soundly cussed for ringing out at this ungodly hour (one-ten). The former loglike sleeper awoke and answered the telephone. Into his startled cars came broken sentences telling him that things were not as they should be. Something was happening over on the Hat area, making up the campus of the ancient and venerable institution of the University of Georgia that should never be allowed on those sacred precincts. Over the wires came these words, “If you have a place in your heart for this institution it is your duty to put a stop to this disgraceful ’’, but our hero heard no more. When the word “duty” rang out in his oyster-like ears there could be no time for the bullying of words. Such a situation demanded actions, and being a man of action and not of words ( ?) our Vala hero immediately set the bail to rolling which would accomplish the cessation of this sinful practice. Who was this man. my gentle reader? I ask you that! You, of course, hove realized by this time that this man awakened at this hour of the night on account of this serious matter was none other than the senior member of the famous sleuthing outfit of Pudley and Darks, Gumshoe Detectives. The courageous Pudley dressed in silence and in his everyday clothes ns well. (It was not regarded as proper for a person to appear on the street clad only in silence.) He then bid his tearful family a fond farewell and took his departure and left. You will wonder what his departure contained, but that will be revealed later. He immediately sought out the residence of his fearless associate, Mr. Darks. Upon reaching this place of rest he aroused his fellow much like Paul Revere woke up Patrick Henry when the Yankees were about to attack Gettysburg. Mr. Darks immediately arose and divested himself of his slumbering apparel and took on his street attire. While P=?F 0 Si fill 18m EMlf IllIllilE divesting his clothes he was digesting the subject matter as put to him bv the great Pudley. After a time the slow Mr. Darks attained that state of being which the common herd know as dressed, and the two knights of the gumshoe put their heads together. It is to be realized, gentle reader, that two heads are better than one, even if both are goat heads. As a result of this conference the noble sleuths decided to take a nip from their hip. After having added this stock of Dutch courage to their enormous stock of ordinary courage they felt that they could lick a circle saw going something around .3600 per. Thus equipped for the dreaded night’s work they sally-ed forth. After having sallv-ed forth they found themselves in the street about one mile or thereabouts to the west of the actual scene of the terrible disorders. However, to cover this space was only a matter of about ten minutes and 1.3 seconds. At the end of a ten-minute period we find our hero and his resourceful comrade at the police station asking for help in this momentous undertaking which was to forever rid the fair city of Athens of the woeful blot hereunto mentioned. The chief of police calmly stroked his pet cut. Winking at the night sergeant the same brought out the contraband material and the chief served out a round of toddy, handing himself a double portion. “If you please, sir’’, said the sergeant, “our stock is getting low". “Well, well”, replied the chief, as he oiled his palate, “I will have Lootcnent Occangrave to make another raid tomorrow night"! After careful consideration of the request the chief decided to send a couple of men along with both our heroes. (By this time the toddy had made both of them feel equal to any emergency, and henceforth must be regarded as heroes.) lie ordered the night attendant to take the temperature of the feet of the reserve policemen. It was found that Cap’n Tare and Sergeant Spree had by far the lowest temperature; that of Cap’n Tare being 269 below zero C, while that of Sergeant Spree being nearly as low (258). In view that these two seemed to have the worst set of cold feet the chief assigned them to the job. Upon being assigned to this dangerous task (that of being seen on the U. of G. campus) the two policemen betook themselves aside to commune alone. The result of the communion has never been definitely decided, but it is an accepted fact that the mayor missed three pints tin-next day. With this force behind him the fearless Pudley immediately led the way to the entrance to the campus, facing College Avenue. When this historical landmark was reached the gallant little force, concentrated to righteousness, halted. Here one of our heroes began to falter, the toddv was gradually dying out. No one in the little group noticed his changed attitude. After many long years as a gumshoe detective and free advice giver at last the noble Darks was about to be phased. His teeth clattered with fear and his knee knocked sugar in the gourd. His eyes walled and his lips twitched. Ilis heart beat a tattoo on his erstwhile care-free breast. ( ou may still see the tattooing.) However, he choked down his real feeling and advanced unsteadily forward at the command of the headstrong Pudley. (Dan Boone had nothing on this noble character.) Forward moved the silent quartette until they reached the brow of the hill. However, the fears of Darks refuse to be choked any longer and began to creep down his long and tortuous legs. Darks smelt the WB HtEEEJ rv W. ill well-known mouse and besought himself to flight just before the battle, mother. Thus was the name of Darks stained with having deserted a comrade in dire need. Although the noble name of Darks was being stained with seeming dishonor because one of its bearers had thus deserted his lifelong eomrades under great duress, let’s follow the rapidly disappearing figure of the once fearless Darks. When the fears of Mr. Darks began to get the upper hand of him the gallant little troup, led by ex-Captain Pudlcy, had passed the cheek of the hill leading up the campus walk and was near its brow. It was here that the worm made its famous about-face, and soon the tall and lithe figure of Darks was speeding down the campus walk in the direction from whence they had just come. On sped the gumshoe Darks. The noise made by his hoofs as they struck the walk reminded one of a motorcycle making ninety per hour in a hippodrome. As Darks swept down the broad walk Cap I-cc Cox narrowly missed being run over. On went the fleeing Darks. His coat and shirt-tails fluttered in the swirling atmosphere as the green flags on the caboose of a through freight. Old Icabod with the headless horseman after him had nothing on the notorious Mr. Darks as he headed out College Avenue on this beautiful night in March. So much for the worthless Mr. Darks. Two o’clock and all’s hell. For the moment the three remaining members of the expeditionary force which was to do battle for the right did not miss their former brother-in-arms. The intrepid Pudlcy was rapidly going over the situation which confronted him. The objective was now in view. (The objective was Old College.) The straight sides of the venerable old edifice seemed to rear up against the overhanging sky. but this did not incite any fear in the steeled heart of Pudlcy, for his toddy was still with him. Having decided on a plan for attack he ordered a reconnoissance by Sergeant Spree. This noble sacrifice on the altar for humanity started unsteadily forward. At this time a stir was noticeable in the camp of the enemy. There was no time to lose. So the infundibuliforni Pudley called for a general advance. He shouted his commands with a frothing mouth. “Forward”! he spluttered. “Spree to the rear! Tare to the front! Don’t let any of them d—n— —escape”, yelled the excited Pudley. With this the entire garrison of tl»e old dilapidated fort awoke and rushed out to meet the attack. On rushed the two henchmen of Pudley. 'fare tore to the front entrance while Spree hied himself to the rear. With this wonderful maneuver it was evident to all observers that the unsurpassed strategy of Pudlcy had already won the victory. “Search the cellar”, ordered the grand commander. The entire building was then ruthlessly and feverishly searched, but to no avail. "What does all this mean”? asked one of the inmates, who was known among his fellows as Joe. To this innocent inquiry the fierce Pudley replied. “I am hunting those d—n n----r -----you boys had”. “But, argued the assaulted ones, “It is not so’ Do you hear any noise”? To this question Pudley made this historical statement, “Who ever heard any noise on such an occasion”? Laughter rained. (A very peculiar natural phenomena, but then it is true.) The bull was thrown to and fro for some minutes. Then Tare and Spree made their report. They acknowledged that their search had been in vain. But the noble Pudley was not so easily discouraged. Search again, he ordered, determined to take away what the boys had. Again a fruitless searchwas the result, and he had to admit failure, it seemed. But not so. for never would our hero admit that he had made an error. The reputation of the firm of Pudley and Darks was at stake. Therefore, he decided to stand by his air bedding. The vile-minded young man heretofore mentioned as Joe came near unto our hero and accosted him in a very slow and deliberate voice. "You certainly have our interests at heart, -Mr. Pudley”, deet-tcel. "Oh, yes”, replied the gentle Pudlev, “1 love this old institution and you boys". "We want to thank you, Mr. Pudley, for your kindness. I believe you wanted to do what’s right, and we appreciate it that | you brought plain clothes men along and not just ordinary policemen”. Laughter rained. Three o’clock and all’s smell. Prom this point on the heroic Pudley was beseiged with all manner of inquiries. But may it always be said to his everlasting credit that he did not falter in the path of duty, but that he threw the little calf’s popper as far as any of the inmates of that aged pile of brick and mortar. On went the session. I'he bullring was enlarged by recruits from Lcs Appartemcnts dc College Doinitoria Noveau and later on from the other result of legislative freeheartedness. Pudley never faltered. One by one he tired out his questioners until only a few remained. Gathering all his strength into one long line about, having it four times before knowing how to prevent it, lie succeeded in putting the entire crowd on their backs, • including the fellow called Joe. Seeing their defeat, the different inmates slunk away to slumber, leaving our hero alone with bis thoughts and his faithful policemen. He curtly dismissed his comrades and then sullenly sulked for a few minutes. Then, realizing the old adage that it is useless to erv over wasted manunery secretion, our hobo Pudley returned to the shadow of his roof. As he entered he realized that he had never opened up his departure which he had taken with him as he left, but decided that it was now too late, and he then turned over and was soon sound asleep. (Sound is right.) Four o’clock and all’s well. SfclQn « The Storming of Old College Old College there, so bright and fair, I I ax had its balmy days. Every inmate was honest and t[Hare, So the old timer sayer says. Jt seems that now (I don't know how), • It has lost it prestige rare. A detective great took a look around. A detective beyond compare. In the wee small hours of the early morn. The detective was roused from his sleep. In eager response to an idea born. To see if liis irord he’d keep. The telephone rang, and it rang and rang. To waken this seluth so rare. ‘‘Vice in Old College;" the receiver went bang: In five minutes the detective was there. I wasn't there, and I don’t know Hut I xcouldn’t deny its truth; A ml if you doubt, or don’t think so, You might ask this wonderful sleuth. For he’s among you day by day; He should be able to tell it right, And be pleased to tell you, dare say, Of the storming of Old College that night. -1). M. Alusox. ij ‘ ffJcT T, - Wfr essii The World’s Champion Bullfighters!!Cvt 0 . 0 x Qjfca, aii Senor Hack Matton lias had a short but strenuous career. In the last twelve years, since openly coining out for the championship, he has met and successfully downed eight hundred and ninety-nine opponents. By far the greater number of these unfortunates were disposed of in the first round. None lived past the third round. This lends weight to the argument advanced by the supporters of Senor Hack that his line is as quick as it is deadly. On the other hand. Senor Jull Barnngin is not without support in his claim. As a matter of fact it has been shown that he has had by far the tougher opposition and that his experience has covered a longer term of years. For the last fifteen years Senor Barnagin has claimed this title and has not sidestepped any opponent who offered combat. In all the battles in which he has been engaged in during this space of time only one opponent managed to pass the third round. This opponent offered feeble resistance thru the fifth round, but it was plainly evident that he was totally outclassed from the beginning of the encounter. There is no doubt but that the Senor Jull will be very, very difficult to defeat since bullfighting is second nature with him. The only unpleasant thing associated with the proposed bout is the fact that certain promoters have accused the Senor Jull Barnagin of receiving professional coaching. He stoutly denies the accusation. But the fact remains that he has probably received instruction from one certain fellow high in the professional bullfighting ranks by the name of Captain William Fawcett, commonly known as Captain Billy. We hope that he will be cleared of this charge, since it is obvious that Senor Hack cannot meet such opposition and live! Who’s Who at the Medical Department Most Popular Student...............................................Reese Bradford Ugliest Freshman...........................................Tobacco Queen Smith Biggest I.oafkm.................................................Poole Gay (Tic) Most Conceited....................................................“Koc»i“ Alden Biggest Liar ....................................................... Dan I amox Biggest Later.......................................Perry Wingfield (Unanimous) Handsomest ........................................................ Puny Brooks Most Desperate Lover....................................................Eberhardt Best Line of Bum...................................................“Rock’' Wiley Biggest Nuisance ............................................................Bert Brown Most Popular With the Ladies................................................Stacy Howell Proudest Would-be Doctor.................................Dan Lamon, BS, Pscd. Biggest Tea Hound.................................................Wallace Poole Worst Knocker...............................................Sledgehammer Jamison Loudest Man.....................................................“Rabbit’' Floyd Biggest Runt.............................................Swertboy McGlamery Biggest Fish........................................................“Mud” Brown Most Timid.......................................................Bashful Kenney Most Susceptible...........................................................Vkulin Bryant Prettiest................................................“Pkhunia” Wingfield Greenest ............................................................ Pat Smith Happiest.........................................................Julius Johnson Luckiest...........................................................Laurie Dozier Wittiest?................................................John Malcolm Gorman Hardest Boner............................................“Midnight Oil” Bostick iMEi  Halter Scamp Picks All-American NOTED SPORT WRITER NAMES CHOICE Courtesy Collies’ Weekly APOLIO, MASS. (Special to the Pandora). Halter Scamp this afternoon completed his famous All-American selections for the past season. “This season has produced some very great and noble players”, Mr. Scamp is reported as saying, “and it was only with the greatest difficulty that I have, after many laborious hours of thought, been able to teams. However, after such patriotic devotion to duty, I feel certain that my choice is correct, and any other selections which do not tally with these may be safely regarded as incorrect. AI.L-AMERICAN HARDBOILEI) ELEVEN Right End...............“Puny” Brooks.......................Georgia Right Tackle............“Frenchv” I.ustrnt..................France Right Guard...............“HawkbiH" Cantrell................Georgia Center.............“Gustavus Adolphus” Crnbb.............Ohio State Ix;ft Guard.............“Pistil” Jenkins................Vanderbilt f.eft Tackle.........“Gloomy Gus” Woof ter..................Georgia I .eft End..............“Botany” Reade......................Toronto Quarter Back............“Svlvy” Morris....................Georgia Right Half Back............“Daddy” Fain...................Tennessee Ix-ft Half Back.........“Pete” Stevens...................Georgia Full Back .............“Goo-Goo” Egerton....................Trinity Way Back...............“DcutchlnndH Morris..................Georgia Coach .............“Mental Training” F.dwards The above selection represents the best in the country, affirms Mr. Scamp. After a careful perusal of the list there will be few objections. Halter believes. His reasons for the different selections are given below: In the matter of selecting the men to fill the end positions on my mythical eleven there was no choice. Brooks, of Georgia, and Reade. of Toronto, stand head and shoulders above all competitors. Never has there been known anyone who could pass up either of these gentlemen, especially without severe mental depletion. There has never been a man in the entire time that they have been before the public that have hopped either of them for a crip. It is a peculiar thing that as good as these men arc in the prevention of a pass they are of very little value in starting the oval on its careening career. For this reason these men are given the end positions, since the end is not supposed to start passes. The selection of tackles was not so easy, for this season, above all others, has produced many stellar men for this difficult position. To fill a tackle’s place on our modern teams a man has to be energetic in detecting the faults of the opposition and applying his knowledge to prevent any end runs by honor men or any line- •iiiiinimniiiiiniinmiimmuiimuiiniuiiiiiiinuniiui Rfibucking by the other poor devils facing them. The up-to-date tackle must be on the guard always to prevent anything being pushed over him. After much careful deliberation 1 concluded that Lustrat, of France, and Woofter, of Georgia, were the best men for these places. However, I hated to turn down such stars as “Polly” McPherson, “Brigham” Young and “Scott” Holland. These men have had a great season but were not quite so good as in former years. The matter of guards for this year’s team presented a very dillicult enigma, and it was only after many hours of silent argument pro and con that I was able to make a decision. For a long time my brain was clouded by three men, all of whom were so good that none of them could legitimately be cut off. Jenkins, of Vanderbilt, Cantrell, of Georgia, and Ederton, of Trinity, represent three of the greatest guards ever seen in action on the gridiron. In my long service as a sport writer, I do not recall any former stars which scintillated like these. However, as the position under discussion requires a man of bone and muscles instead of brains the selection was more easily made. Jenkins represents much bone, while Cantrell represents more or less muscle. Consequently these men paired well together and they won the places. Fgerton was shifted from his usual position ns guard and put in as fullback. I care not what may be the opinion of others as to this swap. To the general rule of not placing a man on a team at a position where he doesn’t play I also care not a thrip. I will discuss Egcrton fully at his regular and proper place. At the position of center, which is becoming more and more important, I place Crabb. of Ohio State. Crabb is a real star. Although only a young man. comparatively speaking, he has already won his laurels as a lover of red tape. Crabb is not an extra good passer, some affirm, while others say that his passes are ns numerous as the average. There is much discussion over this point. However, from my viewpoint, his passes arc seldom enough to make him a good man for the place and choice of all scribes and pharisees. Crabb is a sticker for the rules, and in the position of center, as it is now being played, he can detect with his eagle eyes any infraction to prevent any penalty from this cause. Furthermore, his love for the red tape will always keep him to the front for this position. There was little to decide in the choice of a quarterback. S. Morris, of Georgia, is one of the finest field generals ever seen in action. He is very hardboiled and a terror to the opposition. He is a wonder at repartee and in this capacity will be of the greatest value to the team. Morris has had a long and varied career, and has for a long number of years been one of the main drawing cards wherever lie played. Although lie has never heretofore liecn chosen for the first All-American he lias been deserving for a number of years, but on account of his playing on such a small team the critics have not given him his just deserts. In spite of Morris great playing ability he has a few faults to correct before he will be able to find a place on the All-Time All-American. One of the chief of these is the matter of turning sick or becoming nauseated when anything distasteful comes up before him. I nless this failing is corrected Morris can never expect to rise to heights hitherto unknown in the field of sport, while in case he does succeed in ridding himself of this fault then the way lies open before him. When the matter of halves was taken up there was a multitude of material which deserved severe criticism. However. Fain, of Tennessee, and Stevens, of Georgia, 'l ------------ were selected for the places because if there is anything needed between the two halves it is co-operation. These men have long shown that they can co-operate. In fact their co-operative abilities are notorious. One of the fearful examples of the fifteenth century brigandage still remaining unhampered in this day of Bolshcviki and prohibition is the Co-Op which these gentlemen operate. When an innocent young fledgling enters this venerable institution the first thing taken from him after his hirsutish head-covering is removed is a fee of one “webster” for the Co-Op. Later, from time to time, the innocent young gelding adds to the store of filthy lucre possessed by these gentlemen, as he buys articles there at a lower price (?). Another atrocious example of their nasty co-operation is the Exam, schedule which they pan off on an unwilling faculty and a rebellious student body. Only the closest co-operation could be rewarded with such stupendous results. 1 think that there will be. no voice crying aloud in the wilderness of humanity with whom these gentlemen have come into contact in their defense. In placing these men on. other good men had to he turned down. “Hungry” Childs. “Bull” McHatton, of Macon, and “Teahound” Connoly, of Cornell, were very deserving but, unfortunately. were outclassed. Well! At last we reach the position of fullback which, in the modern game, is of greater importance than ever before. The material for the fullback’s place on my imaginary team was of first water. But, nevertheless, all of these noble and perspiring stars were ditched for the noblest Roman of them all. Tor the first time hi the long period over which I have panned off mv opinion as official on the dear public this is the first time that I have placed a man at a position where he does not normally play. However, “Goo-Goo” Eger ton, of Trinity, is so hardboiled that there was no wav of leaving him off. However, at first I was inclined to play this mental monstrosity at guard, hut decided to shift him and strengthen the already very strong back field of S. Morris, J. Fain, and P. Stevens. Add the great Egerton to this trio and you will have an All-Time selection for the back field. Egerton’s broad physique has been seen in practically every play pulled in his department and on the gridiron. Never has Moore College produced a more deceptive and comical player. Never has M. C. produced as lmrdhoiled an egg as this robust splinter of humanity. Jn the very hardest games his towering form could be seen ns clearly as Washington Monument from Clayton Street on a foggy day. He was in every play and his terrific lint-plunging saved his associates much flunking. Egerton is one of the seven modern wonders of the world in detecting any errors that the opposition make, and in his career, short but strenuous, no one can boast of having pulled the well known wool over his eyes. Luck to you, “Goo-Goo.” An auxiliary position was added to my team this year in order that the other Morris twin might he honored with a place. The chief reason for this is that S. Morris will play so much better if he knows that brother Johnny is on the sidelines waiting to supersede him at his favorite cavorting position of quarterback. Although only a few spectators ever see J. Morris in action they, with one voice and with one accord, acknowledge him to be the superior of any man in the game at any position. However, I am doubtful if such is the case, but the voice of those who have seen this star at play does have its weight and for this reason he is awarded the. position of wav back or general substitute for all the positions on the team except that of quarterback, for which he is the specific substitute. i ■ CL  For the head mentor there can he but one choice and that is “Mental Training Edwards. (He is also called "Psychology” Edwards.) Mr. Edwards has had a long career as the trainer of young minds and is therefore unsurpassed in being equipped for the position of coach to this team. I feel that with such a wonderful array of real stars and such a wonderful trainer and coach to keep them shining that they would be world beaters. However, in mv final word. 1 would advise Mr. Edwards to sec that his men keep training, and one of the essentials of good health and training is plenty of sleep. Everyone knows that many players arc of such a nervous nature that sleep fails them on the nights immediately previous to a contest. It is therefore of first and very great importance that these men lie kept clear of insomnia. The only sure cure for this ailment is to pop one of your famous psychology tests to the entire team in that sonorous voice which you alone possess. In this way the team will sleep as quietly as though they were babes. All right! When I say go, Go! Ready! Go—o-o-o! Another All-American selection by Mr. Scamp for the past season was his choice of the Crap Shooting Team, which is as follows: ALL-AMERICAN CRAP SHOOTING OUTFIT Right Forward....................................“Y. M. C. A.” Dorman Right Guard................................“Kodaking" John Sheppard Center................................................. “Red" Stewart I.eft Guard.........................................."Hash-hound Cox Ix;ft Forward...............................................“Rattling" Fitts Coach ..........................................................“Phil" Trigg Substitute ........................................“Graveyard" Lewis This selection needs no comment, and Mr. Scamp says that he believes that there will be little adverse criticism. ■ 395| j mil i iimin m uminininHUimimmiui minim mm i r Famous Remarks Caesar: Veni, vidi, vici. John R. Fain: Gentlemen, be above the average. General Persuing: La Fayette, we are here. M. P. Jarnagin: I believe in feeding the goose that laid the golden egg, conse- quently 1 patronize Piggly Wiggly and Sears-Rocbuck. Dr. Syi.vy: An Athens policeman will settle a question in a few seconds over which the United States Supreme Court would deliberate for months. Patrick Henry: Give me liberty or give me death. Tea-hound at Co-ed Barn: Give me liberty or give me death. M. P. Jarnagin: Young gentlemen, all I have to say on this exam is to let your conscience be your guide. I)r. Sanford: I have no statement to make. Bum Day: They will never get through this Lime Gregory. Mark Anthony: Boys, this is getting to be real humiliating. Dr. Syi.vy: Young man, you have every qualification for a negro bishop except intelligence. Commodore Perry: We have met the enemy and they are ours. The Physics Department: The Freshmen have registered and they are ours. Botany Readk: You students want to go after this course like you were fighting wild fire and keep it up the whole nine months. Bob Parks: Young gentlemen, this is of the utmost importance. Pf.te Stevens: Any kestions? Prof. Lustrat: It is so samp. Henry Clay: 1 had rather be right than be President. P. Reynolds: I had rather be right than be President. Dr. White: It is now, is it not, ves it is, isn’t it? Brigham Young: Now, gentlemen, if I can only make you understand this ioniza- tion I will have accomplished a great work. Gen. Joffre: They shall not pass. Gooooo Bgerton : They shall not pass. A-plus Dixon: Boys, I shore have got to work this term if 1 get by. Chikkie Cook: I do think “literachure” is the most delightful study. Prof. Payne: It’s just one of those things you can’t ever tell about. Benjamin Franklin: We must hang together or we’ll hang separately. G. O. P. Party: We must hang together or we’ll hang separately. Dean Dudley: Who doubts my authority? Dr. Syi.vy: Ah-h-h-h, Ycs-sssss! Judge Wilcox: Gentlemen of the Moot Court Bar. Nick: I swear to the god that 1 will not credit after May first. Jerry Jones (To dumb audience): Say! Can’t you hear me out there.’1 c''y T fymo uT Who’s Who at the Dear Old Universitas Georgiae Proudest Corporal Biggest Liar . . . Biggest Bootlicker P. K. Anderson, first; Bright, second. Nickerson ruled out because of bootlicking the Colonel. “Graveyard” Lewis, first; I). Edwards, second. Frank Fuller and Bleckley disqualified on professionalism. “A-plus” Dixon, first (by a large vote); “Chinkie” Cook second on account of his love for “literac-chure”. “Skinny” Rivers not considered. — Biggest Bootlickerkss Biggest Eater . . • Ugliest Freshman . . Most Conceited . . • Handsomest Man . . Biggest Sport Most Desperate I.ovkr Hardest Boner . . • Wittiest Man . . . Best Athlete . . . Strongest Man . . Biggest Bull Artist Sweetest Boy .... Loudest Man ... . Biggest Runt .... Biggest Fish . . . Proudest Shavetail Nellie Bowen, first; “L. D.” Davison, second. “Bill” Dean, first; “Jake” Shelor only two of “Pistil’s” “catheads” behind. Ossinskv and Carter tie for first place and Chancellor Short breaks it in favor of “Skinskv”, saying, “That guy’s map will sour milk”. P. K. Anderson, first; no competition. Ed Gurr defeats “Han'sum Harry” F.ldridge by the use of politics. McMillan wins out over Kelley on acount of his uniform and that beautiful curly hair which is divided in the middle. L. II. Hill, Rufus Johnson, Dessic .Johnson, G-square Finch, in the order named. (According to Louise’s statistics.) Charlie Hodges, first; A-plus Dixon, second. Jerome Jones, Jr. (of Atlanta), first; Hartridge, second, and Gray, third. “Honest Harvey” Tisinger, first; “Tliam” Boney, second. “Mark” Anthony leads the list, closely followed by Eberhardt. “Tolliver”, first; the other 1199 “Georgia” boys second. , Felder Frederick unanimously elected. .Eberhardt, first; Mooney, second; J. G. Wood-roof, third. .“Straw” Nall, first; “Honest Harvey” Tisinger. second. . “Willie” Upshaw leads the field. . “Napoleon Caesar Washington Alexander Thwcatt Smathers Tabscott Gork” Nickerson. imm.-i............KV....m.................................. ..y,..........i::; 4Best Cue Artist Biggest Loafer......... Biggest Countryman . . Best Musician............ Most Brilliant........... Most Popular Professor . Most Popular Coed . . . Biggest Grouch.......... Biggest Grouchess . . . Luckiest Man . . . Biggest Burden on the University .... Biggest Coed Hater . Biggest Coed Chaser Biggest Bolshevik . . Best Writer .... Best Orator............. Laziest Man............. Biggest Freshman .... Biggest Politician . . . Most Popular Occupation Most Popular Song . . . Biggest Grafter . . . . Biggest Nuisance . . . . Hardest Boy............ Walter Hugh (Mike) Donohue, first and last, the beginning and the end, alpha and omega, selali! John Sheppard, O. S. Morton, Earle Watson, Henry Dorman, in rapid succession. “Lonnie” Anderson and “Ncvy” Clark tie for first place. Frank Daniel wins second, while Chriss Conyers (otherwise as the “Skipper”) rattles oft’ with third. McGee’s Orchestra (Special Rates). On a strict faculty vote A-plus Dixon would have won out. but the student body elected “Cue-Ball” Dart and “Goat” Durden. Pete Stevens and Daddy Fain tie for first place on the strength of their ex-am-a-narsh- c- awn skid-dool. After “I.. D.” withdrew it was a tie race between “Roscs-in-May” Whittaker and Omah Babcock. “Judge” Wilcox. (Gentlemen— of the moot court bar- r-r-r-r-r-r-!) “Professoress” Ruth Bates. (She gives a special set of lectures on “The Evils of Graft and How We Can Overcome Them.) Mitchell Seth Dekle and J. D. Thomason. The New Examination Schedule. “Stitt” Wilson. Trov Edwards wins easily! Hartridge and Finch tie for first place. O. Sam Morton wins enough Freshman votes to lead the ticket. “Hart County” McMullan gets all the Senior votes. “Ted” Levie, first; “Senator" McClure, second. Faculty votes win for Whclchel and Collings. “Nut” Hollis, first; “Joawn” Fletcher, second. “Ain’t none”. (We have no such article at Geor-gia.) “Bellv-achin’”, first; Pool (i. e. French. English, and Banking), second; Tossing the little callufs popper, third. T. H. W. T. Co-op. first; Wilson, Brannen, Dasher, Reynolds, and others, cop second place. The Cracker doesn’t rank as an amateur any more. “Pete” Stevens’ and “Daddy” Fain’s Examination Schedule. “Jack” Frost, first; Thompson-Carter-Joselovc. Ltd., second. =31 rS'  “Puss” Whclchel, first; Roy Jones, second. The Board of Editors canot mix in any personalities, consequently the results on this count have been thrown out. (Note—These may be obtained privately.) G-square Finch: ’nuf sed! They all think that they are the best, but Levic, Slielor and Wilson, along with “Honest Harvey”, hang over the others like Pike’s Peak over Lucas Hill. Jule Hartridge, first; “Red” Pittman, second; G-square Finch, a GOOD third. “The Impersonal Politicians Two members of this faculty overshadowed all student opposition. How we wish we could reveal their identity! I.. A. Bailey, Athens. Georgia. Moore College and Knox Institute. The Georgia Student Body, Ltd. Whitehead, according to a certain small bunch of Sophomores who did track work, leaving Moore College during the open season on Freshmen. Again we must not announce the decision because of our personal feelings, but then U No! Most Bashful Biggest Sissy Biggest Fkeak Best Lawyer Woust Knocker Biggest Joke . . Biggest Tightwad Most Obscure Man Most Popular College Best Boxehead . . . Craziest Freshman Biggest Crook Deeply I drink the mellow wine With a toast to other times, And I casting lot then and there The enchantment of mv vestervear. And so, I live anew With the rose and jessamine And the flower of hope that grew. When you whispered you were mine. So I treat myself the reverie A dream of the might-havc-l een And live a moment of happiness With the old love, o’er again. And as I feel the magic charm Of that glad hour of mine Again I drink the deeper Of memories’ mellow wine. Gordon W. Cha.mhkk ‘M ‘v -V ilii'Viililti The Seniors Get Limericked Tlk-rc is a young fellow named Andrew, Whose proud npj»er lip I conunand you To admire with glee (Without a “Tee, bee”) And thank the young man for tin grand view. There is a self-hater named Howell, Who thus rivals Poole, Alden and Powell. He has hairs on his lip And he may take a dip. After which lie can dir with a towel. There is a young doctor named Smith. Who captivates ladies forthwith; He just has his way When he goes out to play And never needs ask for a kith. — Anon. Bases Did you e'er know a fellow called Barge, With a lieart so pleasingly large That he never laid blame On master or dame. Or made an unwarranted charge? A dignified senior named Bowen, If he went with a lady a-rowin’. Would ne'er rock the boat. For he might wet h's coat And start other ill winds a-hlowin'. There is a lean guv named Morales, Who used to hunt babies up alleys. Whose names were so rare The stork lieat him there And cut down h:s number of tallies. A coming young doctor named Bradford, Whose name could never be Radford, Now drives a nice six Which can do many tricks. Though he used to be tied to a sad-Ford. A sharp-faced fellow named Burpee, May never have used Ncwbro’s Herpi-Cide tonic for hair. But I'll tell you for fair If he had lie might look more chirpy. There is a young doe named DeLoach, Who never receives a reproach. He does his work well And says “Coter ’Kell.” If you hint ’at lie’s needin’ a coach. You all ought to know Henry Mealing, With his nntatorium appealing. His bathing l cach beauties Are certainly cutics; And the cool H;0 helps your feeling. A tall stately fellow is Nash, I'm not handin' yon any trash. With honors' lie’s full. And he didn't use pull; Somehow lie just makes a mash. A pretty voting doctor is Rogers, This Lochlnvnr beat all the lodgers To the heart of each maid Wherever he stayed. And made 'em all look like old codgers. A serious vonng man is Manson, Who rhymes with Bradford’s nice Hanson. But “Man" drives a Ford, And makes a light load. Now isn't this limerick grand, son? Recent Additions to the University Library SEVENTY-FIVE YEARS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA, or Kodaking Along the Oconee...........................John Walter Sheppard POKER ACCORDING TO IlOYLE, or Reminiscences of Old College Days, John William McCranev THE WORK OF THE Y. M. C. A.............H. P. Dorman and G. G. Finch PARTY POLITICS.......................................“Stitt” Wilson non TOOMBS AS I KNEW HIM.......................John Walter Sheppard SOME SELECT HOME BREW RECIPES.................“Bull Henry” Williams SPEED...................................................Don Owens SCIENTIFIC BELLY-ACHING..............................T. A. Whitener THE EVILS OF GRAFT, and How Shall We Free Ourselves from this Bondage? ltuth Bates THE ART AND SCIENCE OF EYE-BLACKING.................“Judge” Wilcox FRENCH. ENGLISH, AND BANKING, or the Philosophy of the “Q” Room '‘Mike” Donahue THE BULL-FIGHT.................................Jnrnngin and McHatton IIOW TO MAKE LOVE, or The Track Meet at Mitchell’s Bridge Road, Hill, Finch. Johnson, Fuller, Hartley, Siebert, Haar. and Slaughter (Co-Authors). Preface by “Possum” Raines. THE VALUE OF A DOLLAR.............“Polly” McPherson and “Pete” Stevens TIIE SCIENCE OF SLEUTHING.............'..............“Dean” Dudley TWO YEARS SERVICE WITH THE STUDENT COUNCIL. M. A. McRainey THE BOOK AGENT’S GOLDEN TRAIL, or Scouting the Blue Ridge Mountains with the Southwestern Company.....Hendricks, Henderson and Kemp SHORT CUTS TO THE SPHINX..................................Frank Daniel United Order of Bug Chasers and Frog Stickers Re-established 1922 Colors: Crimson and Scarlet. Motto: “Let the Carnage lleyin." Yell: Sarcodina, Jleliozoa Calcarea. Metazoa Crrnoidea Elasipoda, A rticulala Cestoda, Vertehrata lli-ol-o-yy “House-hide” Stokes...............................Keeper of the ltaven ms Amoeba “Ed" V right.........................................Shiper of the Siphonophora “Shorty' IV rioht..............................Pitiless Persecutor of the Protozoa “Hennery ’ Dorman.........................Earnest Emanulator of the Echinodermata E. Vogt........................................Artful Agitator of the Arthropoda Odell....................................Dauntless Destroyer of the Devilish Diptera  GUESS WHO? For the first 1.200 correct answers received by tile Pandora as to the identity of the above, this publication will award a nice basket of fruit, containing; the following kinds: half rotten crab-apples, moulded squash, seedless Japanese persimmons, and prickly pears. Only students of the University are eligible. Address all answers to The Pandora Editors, Milledgcville, this state, in care of the proper authority. We quote the following from a South Georgia newspaper: Want Ad. Wanted: A house, by newly married couple with no children, until December. AT THE BANQUET Junior: “I wonder where Bill is?' Senior: "F think he has gone to pet some thing on his hip.” Perry: “What is the matter with his hip?" WASN’T A PILL ROLLER An Irishman went into a drug store and asked for a quarter’s worth of little liver pills. “Shall I put them in a box?” asked the druggist. “Well, I guess yes,” responded Pat. “You don’t think Pin going to roll them home, do vou ?"Showing the Infallibility of the College Professor Scene—Faculty room. Time—Five-thirty P. M. (Curtain rises slowly, revealing n serious assemblage of college professors. Dr. Bocock is seen standing in the foreground. All is hushed for ten seconds or more in expectant silence.) I)r. Bocock: “Mr. Chancellor, I have in my hands a petition to the faculty which was presented by Mr. Ossinskv. asking that he be allowed to take his examinations early in order that he may go home and help his father in the store during the Christmas trade. 1 move you, sir. that we do not grant this petition.” The Chancellor: “Do I hear a second?” Another Professor: “I second the motion.” The Chancellor: “Do I hear any discussion of this motion?” Dr. S. Morris (Arising slowly): “Mr. Chancellor:” The Chancellor: "Dr. Morris.” Dr. S. Morris: "If 1 understand this petition the young man presenting it wants to have his exams moved up so that he may go home and help his father with the Christmas trade. Am I right? Yes-s-s-s! I thought so. I want to sav that I am opposed to this proposition. If you let down the gap once then they will all troop in and want to go home and sell goods or what not. Those that have no goods to sell will have crops to gather and other urgent business to attend to. A number will desire to get home so that a sister may marry or a grandmother may die, and so on. I have kept more students from their grandmothers' funerals than all the remainder of this faculty. Why, to grant this man’s petition would destroy all signs of discipline. lie knows full well that we cannot grant this request. It is simple to consider this thing. In fact, it makes me sick! I am very much against it.” The Chancellor: “Any other discussion? As many as favor Dr. Bocock’s motion will say avc.” All Members Present (except Drs. Morris and White, who are busily engaged talking): "Ave-e-c-e-e-e-e!” The Chancellor: “Those opposed will indicate their opposition by the usual sign.” Drs. Morris and White (Loudly): “Ave-c-c-c-e-e-e!" Much laughter greets this 'bout-face of Dr. Sylvy. After discovering his mistake Dr. Sylvy arose and had his vote changed. Moral: “Two-rail thought cannot run on a one-rail mind.”In Nick’s Emporium It Happens Every Day 1st Stude: “Well, Nick, how’s business? Nick: “Der businuss all shot to pieces— the}' no pay—no pay me. What shall I do. I hire lawyer; he no collcck. Studence commie ter inc an’ say. Mister Nick, lend me five dollars. I lend twenty-five, thirty-five, feefty, seventy-five dollah, two dollar, three dollar, four dollar, five dollar. They no pay me one month, two month, three month, six month. They do not pay me. (Frantically) What shall I do? The studence Councilium no hclpv me. They ouphter to helpy me. Studence commie to me say, Mr. Nick give me crack meek dope froot cigarettes and then no pay me.” 2nd Stude: “Well, I wouldn't let a little matter like that worry me if I were you, Ole Student's Friend!’’ Nick: “Shuttey up, fool. You pot no business sense. How Pin gonna run my business if dc studence no pay me? Say? (Frantically again) Dev come here wanner get smoke meek crack froot dope—everything I got—and den dey now won’t pay me." 1st Stude: “Well, that’s mighty bad. Thirty-three, Niek.” Nick: “Tirtv-tee? All right.” 2nd Stude: “Don’t look like a Turk like you would mind that.” Niek: “Shuttey up. fule. You crazy.” 2nd Stude: “Turk—ha ha ha! A regul’r ole Turk.” Niek: “Fool! Boll Weevil!” Newcomer: “Hey, Niek, run up my account ; I want to square up.” Nick (all smiles): “I am ver’ glet to see you. I-ess sec. Heckalun deekylun pecky-iun scckyliui. Pentvlun bcckylnn seckylun heckvlun. Neckylun jeckylun spcckylun. Um-hum. Right dollah and forty-eight cent.” Newcomer: “Kight-forty-cight. Gee us! You must have made a mistake.” Nick: No mecstake! Sec here! Hccky-lun deekylun peckylun seckylun. Eight— seer” Newcomer: “Yeah!” Nick: “Well! Pcntylun, bcckylun, seckylun, heckvlun. That’s fife! I am much obliclie, my frein.” Newcomer: “You needn’t go any further or it will lx ten dollars the next time you count it. You Greeks have a progressive system of addition. The more you count the same thing the more of the same thing you have.” Nick (making change): “Liar! Eight- fifty -e ight- twoos-secxty-seventy-eighty- ninc-ty-ninety-five-dollar and one’s ten.” Newcomer: “All okay, Nick. Key reek!” 3rd Stude: (reading the paper which cover’s ‘Dixie like the dew’): “Say, there. Old Niek will sure horse you if you don’t mind!” Nick: “Gttty outer here, crazy fool!” 3rd Stude: “Aw, don’t get rash, Turk! Hahaha, Turk.” At this point in this interesting dialogue a large night colored citizen enters. Nick jumps up and grabs him by the arm and pulls him in before 2nd and 3rd Studes. Niek: “Here, here. Meet vour brother fool, boll weevil crazy—your brother. Hahaha ha haha baba!” 2nd and 3rd Studes (simultaneously): “I.ook at the new Turk. Watch Nick welcome his countryman. A regul’r ole Turk. Ha ha ha ha ha ha!” Nick (still laffing). 2nd and 3rd Studes (still laffing). Nick (s. 1.). 2nd and 3rd Studes (s. 1.). Large Night Colored Citizen: “Gimme something, please, sir gemmen.” Nick pitches him an apple, while 2nd and 3rd Studes toss out a jitney a piece. L. N. C. C.: “Thankv, gemmen: thanky.” Nick: “Your brother—hahaha hahaha hahaha!” 2nd and 3rd Studes: “Another Turk. Ole Nick’s fellow countryman. Hahaha hahaha hahaha!” TTW The Sons of Vulcan Alpha Chapter Established in 1909 Re-organized and Strengthened in 1922 Motto: "Knock, ami it shall be opened unto you:’ Colors: Black and Blue. Sosa: Anvil Chorus from “11 Troratorc Trade Mark: Arm and Hammer. Pathox Saint: Jack Dempsey. Mascot: Andy (lump. Official Okoax: The Fun Section of the Pandora. FACULTY DIRECTORS Colonel Julius Townsend Dudley Doctok Sylvanus Morris • Esquire Goo-Goo Eoerton Tea-hound Coxnoly Botany Reade OFFICERS The Ant'd Chorus G-squirk Finch..........................................Director of the Anvil Chorus “Robe” Braswell T. A. Whitener II. W. Derdex B. I). Henderson G. I.. Hendricks C. C. Kemp (Saw, Cow) Cyrus W. Fields...................................Keeper of the Sacred Sledge Hammer “ Jtme’ Wilcox }...................................Guardians of the Eternal Grouch “Bumpy" Green.......................................................Outside Popper “Jack” Frost.........................................................Inside Papper I. P, Phreely.............................Wielder of the Beer-ready Ballpeen Hammer “Nut” Hollis.............................................................Understudy “Red” Pittman............................Most High Destroyer of Custom and Tradition Oliver S. Morton.............................................Belly-Achin' Leatherer MEMBERS . The Entire Georgia Student Body Taken Alphabetically. Student (to Professor who has just completed a lecture on Evolution): “Oh— er. Professor, is a monkey a degenerate man, or is man a civilized monkey?” Professor (Riled): “Young man. fools are always asking questions which wise men cannot answer!” Student: “Yes, sir; I suppose that explains why I flunked your last exami- nation.” Freshman: (after having been seated in the Ag. Cafeteria during off hours for some twenty minutes): “Gee-us, but this is rotten service.” 0  K We Favor (?) This— OME of the leading educational authorities of the country are advocating the substitution of a phsycological examination for the unit system now being used by standard colleges and universities. 1 he Pandora sympathizes with these fellow-sufferers in having to deal with individuals who have a minus brain capacity. Realizing that the proposal w. .—II J . rr'.b — ' ’y will tend to correct this very common evil (that of having dumbbells registered as students on the strength of the old man’s bank account or their long and varied pedigree), we, therefore, unhesitatingly and without fear, cast our lot with the pioneers in this movement. In fact, upon more deliberate consideration, we believe that this system may be used to determine whether a student deserves to rise from one class to another. This will also decrease the labors of the mossbacked professors and will greatly add to their already large amount of time exclusively devoted to loafing. Below we offer an examination which should be passed by freshmen who wish to register sophomore. The passing mark is 100. The time allowed for this test is thirteen seconds. 1. What is the Philo-Kosmean Society? 2. What brave man led an attack on Old College during the spring of 1921 ? What were the results? Why cannot the washwoman enter the venerable edifice mentioned in question two? What big loafer was elected Editor-in-Chief of the Red and Black during the winter term? (Hint: He is an A. T. O.) What world famous artists had designs turned down by the 1922 Pandora? (Hint: Patrick and Sheppard.) Why is the V. M. C. A.? (No hints available.) What dormitory is occupied bv the United and Amalgamated Order of the Flingers de la Bull? (Hint: It’s a name with two words in it, the first of which is Candler.) What Apollo-like professor bears the Knick-Knaine of Goo-Goo? What historic statement did Nick Deakides make containing the general idea of credit and involving the first day of May? By what high-sounding title is the “beanery” known to the Trustees of the University of Georgia? (Hint: It’s in the catalog.) Underscore the most appropriate term so as to complete the sense of the sentence: 1. The Senior Round Table is made of—pine, oak. mahogany, cedar, ivory. 2. The literary issues of the Georgia Cracker are—bum. rotten, bum. rotten, bum, rotten. 3. The crip building of the University is—Peabody Ilall. Pcabodv Hall. Peabody Hall, Peabody Hall. t. H—11 on earth is found in—Moore College, UcConte Hall. Terrell Hall, Moore College, LeConte Hall, Terrell Hall. 5. The finish of the Junior Cabinet is— shellac, oil of sandalwood, white lead, tar, Dressin’ up. 3. 5. G. 7. 8. 9. 10. A. « In the following sentences fill in the blanks with the proper word: 1. Blackstone, under................Morris is the d.. .1 to pass. 2. You should take chemistry under B..i..h..m Young. 3. The best physical acrobat in Moore College is Goo-Goo..................... 4. The biggest shark in history in the student body is Fred...........Felder. 5. The two most efficient tightwads on the faculty are “Pete”..............., and “Polly”................ In answering the questions given below allow your experiences and your imagination to be vour guide! 1. What is meant by “the unpadded pants and the oaken board?" 2. Name three efficient methods of disguising the voice so that your nocturnal duties as sophomores may l»e performed unhindered. 3. Plan a graveyard party, giving in detail the different objectives and the most approved methods of obtaining these. 4. Discuss the symbolism of the sacred turkey which all Zeta Chi initiates wear. Some Senior Statistics (These were (fathered by the editor in reading the senior writeups.) 1. The entire senior class (202) are perfect gentlemen (including co-eds). 2. 99% are hounds after “the fair sex." (Those not chasing the ladies are being chased by the ladies, according to their biographers.) 3. 98.67% “number their friends by their acquaintances.” “To know them is to love them.” Har-har-har! 4. All are brilliant except one, and his biographer starts off his “liner bull” by frankly admitting that his subject is not brilliant, but says that since he is honest this makes up for his lack in that respect. 5. All are slated for success in whatever walk of life they take up. 6. None drink; altho the Chief of Police says he is willing to swear that at least fifty have been arrested for being soused out of season. (Week-ends are considered as being “in season.”) 7. Immediately upon being introduced to 67.89% of the class you will be impressed by their worth of character. 8. 92.43% of the class came to Athens fresh and unsophistocated but the benign influence of the “classick” city and the University had finished the rough diamonds until they would sparkle in the Court of St. James. 9. 43.55% are the pride of their home towns, in spite of the fact that as a good many of us were seen leaving signs of relief by the Mayor. Council, and the Police Force were almost too noticeable. 10. “The world of hard knocks” is calling to a goodly number, and their biographers plead with them to be men and accept the challenge. 11. It is claimed bv some of the biographers that 10% of the class “talk little but say much.” They do not mention the other 90% in this respect, and for the Iwncfit of those who do not know the class of ’22. the F.ditor will vouch for the fact that 90% “talk much but say little.” 12. Most of the Ag. seniors will settle down on some little farm, live in a little house, bv a little brook, with a little wife. Jokes NOT S’AWFL'L WEAK AT THAT! “Your stomach is very weak, I sec,” said the good old lady to one of the seasick passengers on a trans-Atlantic liner. “What!” ejaculated the object of her pity, “ain't 1 throwing it as far as the rest?” The play was "Hamlet,” and the performance was for one night only. All the townspeople attended the show, and the "weakly" paper had been held open for the notice. The next day the criticism read thusly: “Hamlet” was played in our town hall last night by Mr. I______ and his company. It was a great social event. There has been a long and heated discussion as to whether Bacon or Shakesj carc wrote the plays commonly attributed to Shakespeare. It can he easily settled now. I.ct the graves of the two writers be opened. The one who turned over last night is the author.” Freshman (trying to get a bootlick with Dr. Sylvy): “Dr. Morris, I had a brother up here year before last and he took law under you.” Dr. Sylvy (grouchily): “What name?” Fresh: “Algernon Jones, sir.” I)r. Sylvy: “No! He did not take law.” Fresh (not wishing to differ with Dr. S.): “He told me that he did, sir.” Dr. Svlvy: “Well, I’ll admit that he attended my classes, but lie didn’t succeed in taking any law.” THIS HAPPENED IN THE CLASSIC CITY Butcher (very nice): “Well, what can I do for you?” (irouch: “I want some steak that T can eat.” Butcher: “Oh! So you want some steak that you can eat?” Grouch: “Yes, that's what I want. I am getting particular. My dog died last week.” Dr. Soule (seeing a freshman light a cigarette in the Ag Hall): "Say, little boy, can't you read? Come here, little man, I want to show you something you haven't seen before. See that large beautiful placard on the wall with those cute little black marks on it? Well, that is what we know as a sign, and this sign tells little boys that they must not smoke in the building. Do you understand? Now run along and play, but don't let me sec you smoke in this building any more, or I’ll have to send VOU to mamma.” Judge: “And now, liufus, tell the jury exactly what the Sheriff said to you when he raided your liouse and found the whiskey.” Kufe: “Well, Jedge, Mr. Tucker, he say, ‘Nigger, ain't yo got no better lickcr here dan dig?’” Hunt: “There's only one reason why I hate to be shipped.” His Friend: "What’s that?" Hunt: “Well, the old man sent me away to become a lawyer, and here I mn going back to him in two months' time a full-fledged barber.” Co-ed: “Ob, wbat is that loud laughing about?” Ed: “Dr. Jarnagin has just pulled one of his Whizz Bang jokes.” Sophomore (after Dr. Jarnigin had finished explaining the examination which be had put on the board): “Oh, Professor! Could you tell me anything more concerning tin- fifth question?” Dr. Jarnagin: “Well, all I have to say i to Met your conscience la your guide.’" Co-ed Newman: “Professor Carter, why does this mountain moon shine liquor taste so much like lye soap?” Finis If there’ a sinyle human soul, Who’s read this volume as a whole, Who’s waded all this hot air thru. And read the old as well as the ntac. Perused the lies, the tales and jokes(?). And marveled at our knocks and strokes. And who, like Twist, will want more yet. To him wed say with real re,yret: “This winds up the product of our pads. Who reads further must read our ads." —Revmox. 0604060602010810080910051008050403091110040605081010As is Usual take this occasion to express to the general public our regrets lmt this publication is off our hands! How we wish, gentle coder, that such situations did not arise, for we have thoroly njoyed working on this—the thirty-fifth volume of Pandora. Before making our final bow, however, we must express our appreciation to those members of the faculty and the student body whose aid has materially assisted the staff in the work of publishing this book. We wish to especially mention Dr. R. K. Park, Dr. Joseph Krafku, Prof. J. 13. Wade, H. J. Stcgeman, Dr. R. P. Brooks, Chief W. B. Cody, O. Reynolds. Oliver S. Morton, and Mr. J. K. D re wry for their valuable suggestions and aid in reading the proof material. To Dr. C. M. Strahan. Dr. John Morris, and Mr. T. W. Reed we express our thanks for literary contributions. To the members of the Senior Class who aided the staff in writing up the Seniors we are thankful. To Mr. F. J. Ball much appreciation is due for his ever ready advice and service, he and his wife making every sacrifice of their time and pleasure in order that the pictures in this book might measure up to the work done by his studio in former years. To Mr. Theo. S. Smith, of the Johnson-Dallis Company, much credit is due for anv success that this volume of Pandora may attain. His knack for getting good pictures in spite of the opposition of the elements is past a reasonable explanation. We wish to thank Chester W. Slack for the interest he has taken in this publication and for the great care he has taken to see that the minute details of the book were given proper consideration. To T. E. Merritt and Frank Daniel we are indebted for art contributions. The Editor-in-Chief wishes to thank the Art Editors of Pandora for their steady co-operation and ever willingness to devote their time and energy to improve this book. In conclusion we wish to state that it is our sincere hope that the thirty-fifth volume of Pandora meets the approval of the student body and faculty of the University. Eoitor-in-Ciiiek.SONGS AND AIRS That are Associated with the Life of The Student Body of UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA THE CHAPEL Compiled by C. T. CONYERS, ’22 Asst. Leader Georgia Glee Club 1922 Published under Auspices of GEORGIA GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUBS Athens, Ga.Copyi ig-ht, 1922, by C. T. Conyers. FOREWORD In the publication of the following- songs it has been the aim of the compiler to include all the old tunes that have made the University so dear to us. When we go out as alumni and reflect upon our former years, the song’s included in the following: pages will always touch the sweetest chord of our life — that of our colleg-e days. They will not only be a treasure for us for a few years but will be lifelong- remembrances. The work of compiling all the old melodies as well as the addition of some of the new ones has been quite a task and the compiler is indebted to the many friends and alumni of the University who have so cheerfully helped secure the music for this book. The Compiler2 Marcia (not too fast) « u „: 11 _ Hail to Georgia! (Hail to U-G-A!) (1916) Words ar.d Music by GAINES W. WALTER, 15, ’16 Uii 4 5 Hail! Hail! to our Georgia down in Var- si -ty of V m Dix ie! Geor - gia! JL A col-lege Thy sons will hon - .ord, e’er thy JJ'iTTWJ rAlr-i -ft 9 £ hi jig | X flap —r 4 : -pM =dt ==c sc i l rui =a J? L-::. " JT —aH •r ' r fair an glo - ry s a ? true; sinffJ ■ m - — - prrrTT—v _ The Red and Black is her _ To thee well ev-er be S £ £ h—r - - r—"L stand-ard, proudly it faith-ful, loy-al and ? f ; hCfcrW . —P -p- 3 KT —F _ ■ c 1 m p F— -:-ip f!W =H- -=i— —d p f- s—— “P—h—=—F r _- _P — r ] _zr -1 1 • t • 1 — rP-flr f JTP . £ - —A I ♦ t L r -£■ . ue g-_ .g . £— £ r4 £ ■ P g- »— O’M i i L - 4—V—4- 17 1— p “P r—H ■j — — «J waves, true, a Y Stream Ev - e » ing r to and L ■ - J - day and the ag aye will thy prais - £ es through; es ring Isgsfctsfr (TV -I, 4 P P m 1 T0—T 9 J 1 1 tzJ-: t 1 c: 1 _ P P P 1 _i i r i 1 i m 1 i - -U • LT _ m r £ C— J g 4 . v t f- f % [ -1 1 She’s Grand -1-i the fa old tin 1 _ ir-est in the les of ours at f £ South-land Well pledge ou I Geor - gia The hap-piest d fr £ . I | " 1 f "' r 1 ove to her for ays they’ll be al - f f n»l.rh P ' P I P P P P 1 1 t d a ■—| | ■ m I r —p , t i_p. r i i—c_ - i p p I ■ I — r 1— “ • fJ P t rffH • i aye; _ way;- P-it— - To that Al-ma R - :ol - lege ( lat - er ear well r “air be - j ing ond c l i om - i- cheer, pare, All Alh P— iail to ail to ■ t r- - m- P —P — » p— -P - P" » - L „l,. _ - • i L t 1 1 i tJ Ur feJ Lr JL |1 |-f: .. . 1 [y ——r— I dear old J uear old 1 4=4= 1 -P f - H 1 .Jd U - G . A! U - G rf pfr r 5h LLf A! F-vNl J b Used by permission I Want To Go Back To U-G-A $ Syncopated Jm. .u.-i Words and arrangement by C.T. CONYERS '22 £ r'-r. r w p I wantago back to U - G - A, Back to dear old Ath-ens town a E-a-Hf...f -J,1 j. f fri —p—p—p——■»— « ft —-— m 1—:= Back to Q room ar )4 : t,- ,| ...I . — Mi= id the -[T J pic-ture show, J_p .. .p p«T-—T- I P- -J Back where we used to spend our dough, t f _ —r 1 • •—P — ±i. r j- r- -i.. r r r j=j ■j.... r -t-f .4 ,£,1 f I wantago back to U - G - A; Back to dear old Ath-ens town. I u r jFu ffni-LLiu- - -= k P-4 f -"■■f — S — ifzEEftr rttr L M 1 1 J iP II l J r gotta go back. To U - G, 5 1 0- U - G, -P- p G -E-O-R-G - I -A. ? f j • ■p- 1 r—— ■p —r—r p 1 r—rr J 'P I P I 1 P T r i L L -,i it » ii J J—1 I mi ■ 1 1 m- 1 ■■ d 6 Oh! We’ll Whoop ’Em Up For U-G-A (For Male Voices) Alla Marcia ns Words by MORTON S. HODGSON 01 well woop ’em up for U- G - A, We’ll whoop ’em up a - gain! We’ll woop ’em up for ns m. sl •j 3 S' _J U - G-A, A jol -ly set of men! O! we’ll whoop ’em up for U - G-A-We’ll n P i r t ? 11 f11f Faster ( J = J-) ’Rah; 'rah, ’rah, ’rah! Siss boom bah! Were for Geor - gia Siss boom bah! N -li -I If 1 r If I1 r i1 I.) .1 j Alma Mater (Male Voices) 7 Words by J. B. WRIGHT, Jr. ’l4 Moderato Air in 2d Tenor f r 1 From the hills of Geor-gias north-land Beams thy no-ble brow, WHf - $ WM f i i i And the sons of Geor-gia ris - ing, Pledgedwith sa-cred vow. i f r i111 li'liU ■■ . r ■ 4 £ g;, -il t 1 r p i v 1 r ' 1 i Ev - er crowned with praise and glo - ry, Geor -gia hail t 1 As—j—- m m 0 —m . m £ o thee 2. ’Neath the pine trees’ stately shadow Spread thy riches rare, And thy sons, dear Alma Mater, Will thy treasures share. 3. Through the ages Alma Mater, Men will look to thee; Thou the fairest of the Southland Georgia's Varsity.8 Raise A Ru-kus To-nite 2nd Verse by C.T.CONYERS. 22 £ m My ole mis-tis Can’t you hear that promised me Georgia yell, m 3EEE3f r v ±. i i i-i t =f Gwine ter raise a Gwine ter raise a ru-kus to-nite, That ' ) ru-kus to-nite, Well n'P.ki. . 1— t— 7 k—i—h—1 h— — L. ... r . 1 —d r J a) .. IP 1 I 1 ■ I i ■r • i- 1 ' d Lr-J when she died she’d set me free Gwine ter raise a ru - kus to - nite. bust the line and ring the bell, Then we’ll raise a ru - kus to - nite. ■4V U'T 1 m g-rg—1 “—c • v 1 A— 1 •- ■ T-. fL h- QP f a' — n ■ E la 1C 1 ZL_ ■ — —f i -m t — h-4 —1 CHORUS [|'Al'l ? B ii i i iii 1 K 0 come 2—4 L_1 zJ L-4 a - long my child-ren come a - long, While 0 come a - long, old Geor-gia come a - long} While . | —a m-1 m _— H =i f—C f' == r' P:tr 'w • ■ - r ■=—h!— v r r l-P-J- i—=J the moon am shin - in the Bull dogs in the bright, Get on fight f We’ll get on the boat that ball and - - |Ejpy I t I I J I i we’ll and down the riv - er down the field dz float, rove, Gwine ter raise a Thenwell raise a ru-kus to - nite • ru - kus to . nite. — i A Going Back To Athens Town Words by MORTON S. HODGSON back_ 'Vri 1 YJ go -ing back j-l J r -vp- p I p V 1 1 1 r rr Go - ing go -ing back TT go -ing back Go-ing back to Ath-ens SB Mi Ml Go-ing back • + rf t 71"'1 r r W 7 ? 7 G » go- ing back___ Town,Athens town go ing back Mi go - ing back, To the rtir Pf 't'r'iuTlr t' l» Go- ing back,. go “ing go "ing back, best old place a - round, te' te'- - ♦ Mifa back go - ing back hear that grand old sound Of a m chap - el bell and a Geor-gia yell, Go-ing back to Ath-ens town. b- ..Hartley crossing the Crimson goal Georgia-Harvard Game, 1922. SOUTHERN DEPARTMENT A. I. BRANHAM, Manager J. E. McREE Traveling Representative for Georgia 2-4 North Forsyth Street ATLANTA, GEORGIA York Cincinnati Chicago --AND-- COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS iiiftftiitii £• i mm i ii mm 11 mm muinn 11 When the Zero Hour Comes You have, spent several years preparing for the Battle of Life. In the Battle of Commerce you will want your store, office or bank to compare favorably with others. Our expert designers arc at your service. Catalogues upon request, We build all kinds of store, bank or office furniture. NATIONAL SHOW CASE COMPANY COLUMBUS, GEORGIA THE SOUTH’S LARGEST FIXTURE MANUFACTURERS In quenching thirst it leaves nothing to be desired. Drink Delicious and Refreshing The Coca-Cola Co. Atlanta, Ca.Dave Paddock, Pres. Joe Fambre, Mt»r- PIGGLY-WIGGLY It will pay the fraternities and other Georgia organizations to trade with us. Six stores in town run by Paddock and Co., Inc. CANDIES SODA FOUNT FANCY FRUIT BOSTON Candy Kitchen Andrew Chcleves, Prop. CIGARS mM CIGARETTES 115 College Ave. PIGGLY-WIGGLY GIFTS THAT LAST an mimimLmji iiirf ramsiK COMPLIMENTS OF M. F. FICKETT JEWELRY COMPANY J e weler s—Optometrists lOE 268 Clayton Street ATHENS. GA. The Colonial Theatre S. M. FUNKENSTEIN Lessee and Manager GEORGIA BOYS WELCOME  !oV =u 111 COMPLIMENTS OF CANDLER, THOMSON HIRSCH ATLANTA, GEORGIA MONTAG BROTHERS, INC. Manufacturing Stationers MAKERS OF SCHOOL AND COLLEGE STATIONERY, TABLETS, NOTE BOOKS, SCHOOL SUPPLIES, ETC. B:  $ m IB OFFICERS T. E. Blanchard ......... President T. S. Fleming ...... Vice-President W. R. Luttrell ............ Cashier J. T. Anthony ......... Asst. Cashier H. G. Higgins ......... Asst. Cashier W. M. Howard .......... Asst. Cashier 4th National Bank OF COLUMBUS, GEORGIA 4% Interest on Savings STRENGTH—COURTESY SERVICE Springer Hotel Springer Theatre Springer Billiard Parlor COLUMBUS, GEORGIA 10th Street and 1st Avenue Hotel—THE WAVERLY Cafe “In the Heart of the Business District” THIRTEENTH STREET, NEAR BROAD Chas. E. Walton, Proprietor COLUMBUS, GEORGIA HOTEL TERMINAL m  The King-Hodgson Co. FANCY GROCERIES Everything for the Table Quality and Purity Our Motto Millege Ave. Store The Experienced Housewife Knows all the different cuts of meat and cannot be deceived. Our cuts are all choice, even though all cannot be “first” cuts. First class meat is often found in “second” and even “third” cuts. You will make no mistake ordering your meats from this shop. Prince Ave. Store PIEDMONT MARKET Down Town Store, 151 Clayton Street Hilley and Jones Company (Incorporated) BARBERS Southern Mutual Building ATHENS, GA. COLUMBUS, GA. ANDERSON, S. C. GREENVILLE, S. C. About Clothes for Boys Our clothes have placed the college fellow in a style class by himself. They are neither too youthful nor too mature, but impart the utmost of grace and style distinction to him who is just developing a keen appreciation of good grooming. H. J. REID CO. Clothiers—Hatters—Furnishers SL m The Atlanta National Bank Extends to the Students of the University of Georgia a cordial invitation to make use of its banking facilities. t 1 Oldest Bank in the Cotton States Capital, Surplus, and Profits—$3,000,000.00 In the heart of Atlanta The heart of the South THE LAWYER’S LIBRARY The foundation of every lawyer’s library should be the local books of the state in which he intends to practice. GEORGIA LAWYERS will find the following books of first importance: Georgia Supreme Court Reports, Georgia Appeals Reports, Van Epps-Akin-Stevens-Index Digest of the Georgia Reports and Georgia Appeals Reports, Park's Annotated Georgia Code, Local Text Books. WRITE FOR PRICES AND TERMS THE HARRISON COMPANY Law Book Publishers ATLANTA, GEORGIA 9 I ? E. H. DORSEY Commercial Bank Of Athens lap ipf Jtai VI lEStl FOR QUALITY 5 Gents’ Furnishings and Clothing 255 CLAYTON STREET Conveniently located on College Avenue, near Campus. This Bank is the depository of the Athletic Association. Cultivate the habit of paying your bills by check. We are handling a large number of students’ accounts and will handle yours to your satisfaction. W. E. CODY COMPANY, Inc. COLUMBUS, GEORGIA Automotive Equipment Jobbers and Distributors to dealers only. Members of the National Automotive Equipment Association, Southern Jobbers Automotive Equipment Association, and Georgia State Dealers’ Association.  111! 1 ilfljl i Util f 1J111 ■ijJ! ’; i LIKE' “THE UNIVERSITY” SERVES ALL GEORGIA 1859 1921 THE GEORGIA HOME INSURANCE COMPANY OF COLUMBUS, GEORGIA DIRECTORS Dana Blackmar—Vice President. I H. Chappel—Real Estate. Julius Friedlaender—President Julius Fried-laender Qk . R. E. Dismukes— President Home Building Savings Association. Rhodes Browne—President. H. H. Swift—Slade Swift. Attorneys. H. I-. Williams—President Swift Mfg. Co. The Central Bank and Trust Corporation OF ATLANTA Cash Capital ............ Assets .................. Net Surplus ............. Surplus to Policyholders $200,000.00 781,596.36 166.929.49 366.929.49 Rhodes Brown . Dana Blackinar A. P. liUKK ---- George Klump ........ President V. Pres, and Sec. ........ Treasurer ...... Asst. Sec. EUREKA FIRE HOSE DEPARTMENT NEW YORK, X. Y. LIBERTY There is no liberty without self EUREKA. PARAGON, RED CROSS reliance. Increase your resources. Lay up something you can fall back upon. P. O. Hebert. Southern Manager ATLANTA, GEORGIA Motor Apparatus For Fire Dept. Service STRENGTH. POWER, BALANCE Built by American-LaFrance Fire Engine Company, Inc. ELMIRA, NEW YORK P. O. IIebekt, Southern Manager ATLANTA, GEORGIA iiiniuiiiuiniiiiiiiuimmiiniimniHn u Start a Savings Account and be free from the fears and misgivings of the future. Capital and Surplus $425,000.00 Columbus Savings Bank Trust Company COLUMBUS. GEORGIA lm m  One of the best things a young business man can learn is the bank habit. Get acquainted with banks and banking laws. The success and permanence of your career will depend upon it. This bank welcomes the young business man. GEORGIA NATIONAL BANK Athens, Georgia ■ iV ■ uui’iJiixmnL icii'K:xtc f' t: a gj - v The PHOTOGRAPHS in This Annual Were made by FREDERICK J. BALL COLLEGE AVENUE ATHENS, GEORGIAJs. T) v n Telfair Stockton. Pres. Office: Robt. Gamble. Vlcc-Prcs. 219 Twelfth St. C. W. Dixon. Sec. Treas. Telephone 282. Columbus Brick and Tile Com pany Manufacturers and Distributors High Grade Clay Products Face Brick, Building Brick, Fire Proofing, Partition Tile Drain Tile Dennison Interlocking Tile STYLE and QUALITY The two foremost requisites of our Young Men’s Suits. Our Furnishings are in keeping with the suits—the very latest that Fashion decrees. Hofflin Greentree The Store That Service Built COLUMBUS, GEORGIA THE LEADING DRUG STORE IN COLUMBUS Wheat Drug Company 1116 BROAD ST. THE LEADING FLORISTS IN COLUMBUS WHEAT SHELNUTT, Inc. 1116 BROAD ST. The University Commencement means for many the severing of college ties preparatory to the forming of new ties in the world of business. A connection with a strong, progressive bank is of first importance in any well-formed plan of business success. Merchants Mechanics Bank COLUMBUS, GEORGIA Established 1871 "At Your Service” £EZ3 1 p cd Vx? W(3:W w y ■- ICE CREAM SODA CIGARETTES CIGARS COSTA’S THE FINEST SODA AND ICE CREAM FOUNT IN GEORGIA MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALERS OF COSTAS DELICIOUS ICE CREAM “JUST A LITTLE HIT BETTER” JOBBERS OF CONFECTIONERY AND FOUNTAIN SUPPLIES Cooper’s Cafe Davison - Nicholson Company tiimtimiiiHimimiiiinit iiimmuiiniiiiimu Ga. boys welcome at all times. The best place in town to eat. Sodas and Ice Cream wmimimuntmictiiMii Cigars and Cigarettes 134 Clayton Street Athens. Ga Ladies Suits, Coats, Capes, Dresses, Millinery, Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery, House Furnishings. inuimitmimimiimiim DAVISON-NICHOLSON CO. ATHENS, GA. iimmiiHH iimim imramn nmuiinmiiimiiin| Bfflfmjmlli Service, Equipment, Environ ment the Very Best Patrick’s Pharmacy Telephone 88 Eighteen Carom and Pocket Hilliard Tables Sodas and Smokes ■lsk Your Doctor—He Knoxes A meeting place for gentlemen Joy Flower Shop COLUMBUS, GEORGIA Your patronage appreciated Q Room College Avenue FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS Manhattan Cafe COMPLIMENTS OF JACOBS’ PHARMACY CO GEORGIA BOYS WELCOME AT ALL TIMES TEN STORES IX ATLANTA Enjoy Home Cooked Foods Deliciously Prepared at THE CLOVER LEAF TEA ROOM Georgia Boys 123 West Clayton Street ATHENS, GA. We Guarantee Satisfaction 1). T. BROWN, Proprietor College Avenue ATHENS, GEORGIA BARRETT COMPANY (Incorporated) Cotton Factors North Georgia Cotton a Specialty ATHENS, GA. B. A. CRANE B. F. HARDEMAN C. H. PHINIZY, Manager The Georgian Hotel Tenders its thanks to the Georgia boys for their patronage, : : : and announces the opening of The Georgian Hotel H. Ft. and C. It. CANNON. Proprietors The Georgian Palm Garden Under the same roof—the South’s finest ice cream parlor and terrace garden.  


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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

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