University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1921

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 368 of the 1921 volume:

r V PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BYYHE'SEN I OR: CLASS CFTHBUHI VERSriTCF GEORGIA. SX.RCY C- LX S' pi a 2. IIn grateful recognition of his splendid ability, his unswerving loyalty, his abiding friendship and his fidelity to duty this volume of PANDORA is dedicated to Dr. ‘Anfireu) Dlao airn Soule Whose genius in time of peace has given to the South its greatest agricultural college Whose unflagging patriotic zeal in time of war conserved in largest measure the food supplies of our great state Whose high character, lofty ideals and unbounded energy are among the most potent forces that are carrying Georgia forward to her high destinyEDITOR IN CHIEF (J ASSOCIATE EDITORS JlUjdU cAy ART EDITOR1 AIH3JFttttnunrft DUE to the recent growth of the University and the expansion of college activities and interests, the work of presenting this, the 1921 Pandora, has been very difficult. The staff has endeavored strenuously to place in the following pages a true account of those occurences which will some day be our fond memories as we, as alumni, reflect upon our college days. We have done our best to perform the responsible duty that has been assigned to us. If we have succeeded in this serious undertaking, our success may be best judged by the number of times our fellow students refer to these pages ten. twenty or thirty years from now.S' . sro JV£US VIEWS TRUSTEES FACUOYARE WELL old Buildings! To you you who have sheltered and fostered us for four long and happy years, we must bid adieu. We shall ever remember you and pleasant will be our recollections of you. To us you have been more than structures of wood and stone. Indeed, you have been temples of knowledge. The hours that we have spent within your walls have been hours that will in a large measure shape our destinies. You have been the potter and we have been the clay. For the success that may be ours in life, to you, our carnate Alma Mater, we shall give our praise and gratitude. For years, yea even a century, you have stood, and on the sands of time you have, in truth, left footprints. Through days that were dark, days when we were tempted to give up, you have been an undying inspiration. Like the great rock Gibraltar you stand, enduring the sands of time. In you there is strength, endurance, inspiration. Old Buildings, we love you! John E. Drewry, ’21.f The Chapel HERE is a majestic fronting to this Chapel. These great columns to every man must needs be something more than columns—mere inflexible beauty or the strong moral pillars of the soul. So must the entire chapel itself which in memory still re-echoes to the youthful voices of Toombs, Stephens. Hill and Gordon, stand forever in men’s minds as one of the most potent factors in Georgia’s greatness. How many joys and sorrows, how many reunions and separations, old Chapel, have you witnessed in your more than a hundred years of life! X S®8 University Library HIS building was donated to the University through the generosity of one of Georgia’s sons, George Foster Peabody. Housing about forty thousand volumes, it assists materially in fulfilling Carlyle’s definition of a university: “A collection of books.” Many happy and profitable hours have been spent in the past and will be spent in the future by the students of the University within this building. A fine collection of old and rare books, manuscripts and newspapers make this library a depository of Georgia history and a fertile field for research workers. jTerrell Hall TUUS building stands on the site of a former science building, destroyed by fire in 1905. It is the home of the chemistry and pharmacy departments. Few institu-tions of learning have chemistry departments better equipped with scientific apparatus and class rooms. Joseph M. Terrell, some years before his death, secured the appropriation that made this structure possible. In grateful appreciation of what he did the trustees gave the building his name. It is one of the most impressive as well as one of the most convenient of all the buildings of the University. J1 Law Building TiHIS is the only university building in Athens not located I on the campus—this the new home of the law department. It was erected for the Athenaeum Club, a social organization of Athens. When the Club went out of existence, their old place was purchased by the Elks. Upon its being offered for sale last year, the generosity of a few friends of the University made it possible for the law department to become its latest purchaser. It has been remodeled and made into ideal quarters for this branch of the University. •f t'I Peabody Hall A " IT the death of the great international banker, Frances Peabody, a Georgia man, it was found that he had left a large part of his estate to the cause of education. x|,js money was administered for many years by a Board of Trustees. The special purpose for which the money was left, was the training of teachers. When the science of pedagogy had become sufficiently developed in a number of colleges, the money was apportioned among them, the University of Georgia receiving at that time fifty thousand dollars, of which benefaction tins building is the result. It has already meant much to the state.Campus Walk HEN the campus is green in the spring, this old walk in front of these buildings is about as delectable and fine a thing as men generally have opportunity to look at. At sun-down, many a time, you must have passed here, hearing the incoherent whistlings of the boys in the dormitories -conscious of the heavy fragrance of the magnolias, believing somehow from all this, and from the deep crimson of the sky beyond the drill field—believing somehow—and justly—that you were in a rarer and higher world than you could come at elsewhere. w 38S L1 Moore College TiHIS building represents the generosity of the people of the city of Athens. An appropriation of twenty-five thousand dollars from the City Treasury was made in 1874. Because of the active interest in securing this appropriation shown by Dr. R. D. Moore the building was given bis name. From the beginning- it has been the home of the engineering and physics departments. Much of the construction work in the state takes its inception here. One of the best telescopes in the South is mounted on the roof of this building. •1 New College V the liberality of the legislature of 1821 this edifice was erected. The cornerstone was laid on June 24th, 1822, A. L. 5823, by the Mount Vernon Lodge at the ------ request of the Trustees of the University of Georgia.— So reads the inscription on the cornerstone. This building has known many different uses, first as a dormitory then as an academic building, now as dormitory and the home of the military department. Many a boy whose name has helped to make the state illustrious has been sheltered within its walls. [H »TV I Academic Building ERE. if anywhere, is the old magician. Here he will make plain for you the course of human hope and human I despair, rising and falling across time like a plotted graph. Upon these walls are legends of the vastness and the littleness of man, the hardy venerableness of him and the still blind youthfulness. Here, if anywhere, men may find the old sweet peril of being turned mad and made dreamers of, baffled by contradictions. But from this blissful hell, after headlong indecision, checked by tested license, emerge what are bound to be the sanest elements of an often vain and foolish-seeming world.1 Leconte Hall TiHIS building was named after the LeConte brothers, men I who were famous teachers and scholars and both of whom at one time occupied professional chairs in the University. This was the first building ever erected in the South devoted exclusively to the teaching of biology. Some of the foremost scientists and physicians of the state caught vision of the possibilities of their great work while students here. Its designer and one of the University’s greatest teachers was Dr. John Pendleton Campbell, whose untimely death in the fall of 1918, deprived this institution of the services of one of its most capable workers. 4The S3,500,000 Campaign IVING S40,000 as their share of the War Memorial Fund, the 140 members of the Class of 1921 head the million dollar alumni subscription list, the first step in the campaign for S3,500,000 which is to give the University of Georgia an adequate plant. In October the alumni are to call upon the friends of the University to get behind the S3,500,000 campaign and if the rest of the state does as well as the Senior Class, there can be no doubt as to the outcome. That the money is greatly needed is apparent to every man that has been on the campus recently. Already many students are being turned away because there is no room for them. If Chancellor Barrow’s estimate that 5,000 high school graduates will apply for admission to some university this fall is true, the University of Georgia will be totally unprepared to handle its share unless the $3,500,000 program is gotten under way immediately. The program of the alumni calls for one million dollars to be raised through private gifts. This sum will provide for six items covering the essential needs of the University as outlined by the committee of the alumni and faculty. The remainder of the building needs, requiring an expenditure of S2,500,000, must be met by the legislature. Every alumnus, every friend of the University, must do his part if the program .is to be carried out,—and unless it is carried out, Georgia will lose her high standing in education. The work at the University cannot be kept up to present standards without better financial support, even with the 1200 enrollment that the University now has. The sixty new high schools which have never before graduated a single student, will soon begin to pour out their boys and girls, many of whom will want to go on with their education. The University of Georgia must be ready to care for them. Furthermore, it must expand its work. New demands are constantly being made upon it, but these cannot be met as other stales are meeting them, without money. The standing of Georgia as a state depends upon her educational facilities. While other states arc spending millions on their universities, Georgia is allowing hers to struggle along with insufficient funds. The alumni of the University of Georgia have resolved to better the situation and are going to awaken the citizens of the state to the needs of higher education. Already the Georgia spirit has been fired to action. Before another issue of the PANDORA is off the press, the first million will have been raised, and the University of Georgia's S3,500,000 program will be well under way.Essential Needs of the University of Georgia 1. Endowment ......................................-.......S 500,000 Sum necessary lo complete the building begun in 1910. This structure has been designated by the Board of Trustees of the University as the memorial to the exstudents who were lost during the Great War. 2. Alumni Memorial Hall....................................... 150,000 One-half the cost of the building; the other half to be borne by the State. 3. Dormitory for Men.......................................... 150,000 One-half the cost of the building; the other half to be l orne by the State. 4. Physics Building and Equipment ............................ 125,000 Onc-half the sum necessary to complete the building begun in 1918; the other half to be borne by the State. 5. Animal Husbandry Building .................................. 50,000 6. Veterinary Building ........................................ 25,000 One-half the sum necessary to complete the building begun in 1914; the other half to be borne by the State. --------- SI,000,000 7. Physics Building ................................................... 125,000 The State's half of the cost of the building. 8. Animal Husbandry Building ........................................... 50,000 The State’s half of the cost of completing the building. 9. Veterinary Building ................................................. 25,000 The. State's half of the cost of completing the building. 10. Dormitories ........................................................ 550,000 Two for men, one for women. 11. Homes for Professors ............................................... 200,000 12. Chapel ............................................................. 300,000 13. Dining Hall ........................................................ 200,000 14. Academic and Administration Building ............................... 300,000 15. School of Commerce Building ................................. 200,000 16. Enlargement of Library ............................................. 100,000 17. Heating Plant ...................................................... 100,000 18. Additional Equipment for all Departments ........................... 150,000 19. Law Building ....................................................... 100,000 20. Improvement of Grounds, Viaduct and Roads ...................... 100,000 $3,500,000Board of Trustees His Excellency. Governor Hugh M. Dorsey, Atlanta, Ex-Officio. George F. Coder. Marietta, from the State at Large. Henry I). McDamei., Monroe, from the State at l.argc. William E. Simmons, Lawrenceville, from the State at Large. Hamilton McWhorter, Athens from the State at Large. Samuel B. Adams. Savannah, 1st Congressional District. Byron B. Bower, Bainhridge. 2nd Congressional District. J. E. Hays. Montezuma. 3rd Congressional District. Henry K. Goetchh s, Columbus. 4th Congressional District. Clark Howell. Atlanta, 5th Congressional District. Loyd Cleveland, Griffin, 6th Congressional District. Joseph M. Brown, Marietta, 7th Congressional District. Andrew J. Cobb, Athens, 8th Congressional District. Howard Thompson, Gainesville, 9th Congressional District. Bomdre Phinizy, ugusta, 10th Congressional District. John W. Bennett, Waycross. 11th Congressional District. Drnt.Et M. HrciiKs, Danville, 12th Congressional District. Ill'CH J. Rowe, Athens. Resident Trustee. Harry Hodgson, Athens, Resident Trustee. Cecrce Foster I’eahod . New York. Life Trustee, by Special Act of the General ssemblv. Nathaniki. E. Harris, Macon. Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the School of Technology. Ex-Officio. Richard B. Russell, Winder, President of the Board of Directors of the Georgia Normal and Industrial College, Ex-Officio. Peter W. Meldrim, Savannah. President of the Board of Commissioners of the Industrial College for Colored Youths, Ex-Officio. W. B. McCants. Winder, President of the Board of Trustees of the North Ceorgia Agricultural College, Ex-Officio. B. S. Miller, Columbus, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the State Normal School, Ex-Officio. James J. Conner. Cartersville. Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the College of Agriculture. Ex-Officio. Enoch H. Callaway, Augusta, President of the Board of Directors of the Medical College. Ex-Officio. William E. Thomas, Naldosta, President of the Board of Trustees of the South Georgia Normal College. Ex-Officio. Marion L. Brittain, Atlanta, State Superintendent of Schools, Ex-Officio. J. L. Lovvekn, President of the Board of Trustees of Bowdon College. Ex-Officio. Henry I). McDaniel, Chairman. Thomas W. Reed, Secretary and Treasurer.1 4David Crenshaw Barrow, LL.D. Chancellor of the University1 H • arvi tAC'd LTV t □EJm I. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS David Crenshaw Barrow. LLD............................................................Chancellor Charles Mercer Snellinc. A.M., Sc.D..........................President of Franklin College Andrew MacNairn Soule, B.S.A., LLD., F.R.S.A............................................ President of the College of Agriculture and the Mechanical Arts Thomas Walter Reed, A.M............................................Secretary and Treasurer 11. THE UNDERGRADUATE. GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS Charles Mercer Snellinc. A.M., Sc.D................................Dean of the University Andrew MacNairn Soile, B.S.A., F.R.S.A., LLI)..............Dean of the College of Agriculture Thomas Jackson Woofter. Ph.D.....................................Dean of the School of Education Robert Preston Brooks, Ph.D.......................................Dean of the School of Commerce Willis Henry Bocock, A.M., LL.D...............................Dean of the Graduate School Sylvanus Morris, B.L., LL.D...................................Dean of the Law Department Jame§ Philander Campbell, B.S.A..........................................Director of Extension Robert Cumminc Wilson, Ph.C................................Head of the School of Pharmacy Mary Dorothy Lyndon, A.M......................................................Dean of Women Mary Elizabeth Creswell, B.S.H.E...............................Director of Home Economics 111. THE AUXILIARY DIVISIONS Duncan Burnet.....................................................Librarian of the University Dwicht Warren Rytiier, Colonel, Infantry, U.S.A......................................... Commandant of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps Thomas Jackson Woofter, Ph.D..........................Superintendent of the Summer School Joseph Spenser Stewart. Ped.I)...................................Inspector of High Schools John Richard Fain, B.S., Sc.D...........................Supervisor of Rehabilitation. Division Daniel Huches DuPrke. B.S., M.l).................................Surgeon to the Udiversity Clarence G. Butler, M.D.....................................................Resident Physician Ethel Godfrey............................Superintendent of the Crawford W. Long Infirmary OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION David Crenshaw Barrow, LL.D...........................................................Chancellor Charles Mercer Snellinc. A.M.. Sc.D............................President of Franklin College Andrew MacNairn Soule, B.S.A., F.R.S.A.. LL.D........................................... President of the College of Agriculture and the Mechanical Arts Emory DeWitt Alexander. B.S.A............................Associate Professor of Agronomy Mrs. Emory DeWitt Alexander.............................Instructor in Rehabilitation Section Mrs. Edith May Andrews........................Associate Professor of Institutional EconomicsThomas Lynn Asbiry, B.S.A.....................................District Supervisor of County Agents David Francis Barrow, Ph.D...................................Associate Professor of Mathematics Homer Van Valkenburgii Black, Pii.D............................................Professor of Chemistry LaI'KA BLACKSHEAR............................................................................Illustrator Evelyn Bi llard. B.S.H.E.....................................Assistant Home Demonstration Work Willis Henry Bocock. A.M.. LL.D......................................Milledge Professor of Greek William Bradford. A.B., A.M............................Assistant Supervisor of Agricultural Clubs William Earlf. Broach. B.S.A.....................................Field Agent in Agricultural Engineering Walter Scott Brown, B.S.A...................................District Supervisor of County Agents BrI'CE Lamar Bt rch. Major. Cavalry, U.S.A..................................................... Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics Walter Clinton BtRKHART, DA .M.......................Associate Professor of Peterinary Medicine Thomas D. Bl'RI.F.ICH, B.S.F.. M.S.F...............................Associate Projessor of Forestry Duncan Burnet........................................................Librarian of the I'niversity Susie Ul'RSON. B.S.H.E...................................................Teacher in Practice School Thomas Nathan Bussey........................................Field Agent in Plant Disease Control Jessie Burton. B.S.H.E........................District Supervisor of Home Demonstration Work James Philander Campbell, B.S.A.........................................Director of Extension Work Epsie Campbell, B.S..................................Assistant Supervisor of Vocational Education Leonidas Myers Carter, B.S..............................................Professor of Soil Chemistry Ross Renfroe Childs, B.S.. .M.S............Professor of Agronomy, in Charge of Colton Industry Wyatt Arnton Clecc. B.S.A..........................Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering Andrew Jackson Cobb. A.B., B.L.............Lecturer on Constitutional Laic and Legal Procedure William Olin Collins. B.S.A..................................Associate Professor of Soil Chemistry Etta Colclouch, B.S.H.E......................Assistant Supervisor of Home Demonstration Work Paul T. Connolly. D.V.M..............................Associate Professor of Veterinary Medicine Walter Grover Cornet. LL.B............................................................Professor of Law James Horace Colliette. A.M., C.E................................................Instructor in Physics Ellis Merton Coulter, Ph.D...................Associate Professor of History and Political Science George Arthur Chabb. B.S.A...........................Professor of Agronomy, in Charge of Soils Mary Elizabeth Creswell, B.S.H.E........................................Director of Home Economics Gkokcia Crews.................................District Supervisor of Horne Demonstration Work George Vivian Cunningham. B.S.A.............................State Supervisor of Agricultural Clubs Uriah HaKROLD Davenport, B.S.......................Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering Leslie Vincent Davis, B.S.A.................................Supervisor of Fertilizer Investigations .Lois Pauline Dowdle, B.S.H.E.....................................Slate Supervisor of Girls' Clubs Austin Southwick Edwards. Ph.D.................................................Professor of Psychology Frank Nicholas Edckrton. Jr., A.M.......................................Associate Professor of Physics George Alexander Fain, B.C.E.................................Professor of Agricultural Engineering John Richard Fain, B.S., Sc.D..................................................Professor of Agronomy Gkokce Henry Firor. B.S.A.................................................Field Agent in Horticulture Frank W. Fitch...................................................Field Agent in Dairy Husbandry Charles Cordon Garner. B.S.A.....................................Field Agent in Marketing Livestock Milton Cleveland Gay, B.S.A............................................State Supervisor of Marketing William Edwin Garnett, M.S.........................Associate Professor of Agricultural Education John Kyrcess Giles, B.S.A..........................................Assistant Director of Extension Ernest Lee Griccs. Graduate of V.M.I.................Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing Harlow Williamson Harvey. B.S.A.............................Specialist ill Landscape Gardening Cornelius Jacob Heatwole, A.M..................................................Professor of Education Linvii.le Laurentinf. Hendren, Ph.D..........................Professor of Physics and Astronomy James Pittman Hill. A.B...............................................Instructor in Mathematics William Davis Hooper, A.M.........................................................Professor of Latin DeForhest HuncerfOKD. B.S., M.A........................Scientific Assistant in Farm Management Georce Alexander JIi tchinson. Ph.D. . . . Projessor of Philosophy and School Administration Howell Arthlh Ingraham, B.S.C..................................................Professor of Accounting Charles Wells Jacobson, Captain. Cavalry. U.S.A................................................ Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics Milton Preston JaknaCIN, B.S.A., Sc.D................................Professor of Animal Husbandry John Wilkinson Jenkins. A.M....................................................Professor of Economics James Aucustus Johnson, BS.A..................................District Supervisor of County AgentsHenry Norman Kaluaiil. B.S.............................Associate Professor oj Animal Husbandry Charles Coward Kkllocc. B.S., M.S.A........................................Reef Cattle Specialist Joseph Khafka. Jk., Ph.I)..................................................Professor of Zoology Julius Gordon Liddf.ll, B.S.A.....................................Field Agent in Swine Industry Marion Wayne Lowry, B.S.A., M.A..........................Associate Professor of Soil Chemistry Joseph Llsthat, Bach, es Lett..................................Professor of Romance Languages Mary Dorothy Lyndon, A.M.......................................Associate Professor of Education Leo Hartland Marlatt...........................................Field Agent in Cheese Production Susan Matthews, B.S...............................Special Agent in Home Demonstration Work Alfred H. Meyer. B.S.A.........................................Soil Expert on State Highway Julian Howell Miller. B.S.A..................................Associate Professor of Horticulture Mrs. Leila Ritchie Mize........................District Supervisor of Home Demonstration Work John Morris, A.M...............................................Professor of Germanic Languages Sylvaniis Morris, B.L., LL.D.....................................................Professor of Laiw Martha McAi.pine. A.B...................................Social and Physical Director of If'omen Samuel Edwin McClendon.........................................Specialist in Stored Grain Insects Charles Andrew McGarkicle. Captain, Quartermaster, U.S.A....................................... Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics Thomas Hubbard McHatton. B.S.. Sc.D....................................Professor of Horticulture Haden Mayo McKay, B.S.A...........................................Field Agent in Horticulture Pauline McKinley............................................Instructor in Rehabilitation Section JOHN Hanson Thomas McPherson. Ph.D.....................Professor of History and Political Science Kobert Licon McWhorter. A.M..............................Associate Professor of Latin and Greek John Walter Nicholson. Captain. Infantry. II.S.A............................................... Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics James Cranblry Oliver. B.S.A.................................Stale Supervisor of County Agents Robert Emory Park. A.M.. Litt.D...............................................Projessor of English William 0 car Payne, A.M......................................................Professor of History Neal Dow Peacock. B.S........................................Associate Professor of Horticulture Herman Victor Persells, D.V.M.............................................Hog Cholera Specialist James Vernon Phillips, B.S............................................Senior Drainage Engineer James Thomas Pittman....................................................Special Extension Agent Erna Elizabeth Proctor, B.S............................Associate Pro essor of Foods and Cookery Elmo Ragsdale, B.S.A.......................................Field Agent in Marketing Perishables Rafael William Ramirez, A.M........................................Associate Professor of Sfmnish Rosalie Virginia Rathhone, B.S...........................Associate Professor of Textile Clothing John Moore Reade, Pii.D.......................................................Professor of Rotany Thomas Walter Reed, A.M....................................................................Registrar Albert G. G. Richardson, D.V.M.................................Professor of Veterinary Medicine Wilbur Fowlf.k Rue, B.S......................................Field Agent in Poultry Husbandry Dwicht Warren Kyther, Colonel, Infantry, L S.A. . . Professor of Military Science and Tactics Steadman Vincent Sanford, A.B., Litt.D............Professor of English Language and Journalism Ceorce Paul Save, B.S.A................................Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry Julius Eocene Severin'. D.V.M..........................Associate Professor of Veterinary Medicine LaFayette Miles Shelter, B.S......................Associate Professor of Agricultural Education James I.oncstreet Sibley, B.S................................Extension Professor of Social Work Guy L. Smith. C.C.............................................................Drainage Engineer Mrs. Katie Lamar Smith.........................District Supervisor of Home Demonstration Work Charles Mercer Snellinc, A.M., Sc.D....................................Professor of Mathematics Herman James Stece.man, Pll.B.........................Instructor in Physical Education for Men Roswell Powell Stephens, Ph.D..........................................Professor of Mathematics Joseph Spencer Stewart, Ped.D..................................Professor of Secondary Education Charles Morton Straham, C. and M.K., Sc.D..........................Professor of Civil Engineering Elmer Rf.cde Straham, B.S.A...............................District Supervisor of County Agents Charles William Si m.merour. B.S.A.....................Assistant Editor. College of Agriculture Paul Tabor, B.S.A., M.S.A..................................................Field Crop Specialist Alfred Melba Thornton, B.S.A.........................................Editor, College of Agriculture Stephens Cummins Upson, LL.D..................................................Professor of Law Francis Vauchn. B.S.A. • ......................................Adjunct Professor of Farm Crops Curry LaFayette Veatch. B.S.A.....................................In Charge of Practice SchoolRoosevelt Pruyn Walker. A.M............. Frank Ward, B.S.A.......................... Pall Weatherwax, Pm.I).................. Robert Wricmt Wesley, A.B............... Edison Collins Westbrook. B.S.A......... John Taylor Wheeler, B.S................ Robert Fred Whf.i.chf.l. B.S.A.......... Robert Cum.minc Wilson, Ph.G............ Mrs. Bessie Stanley Wood. B.S........... Mrs. May Wood........................... James Herbert Wood. B.S.A............... Thomas Jackson Wooftkr, Ph.D............ William Archer Worsham, Jr., B.S., A.M. • . Lewis H. Wricht. D.V.M.................. James Heyward Yolnc. B.S................ .....................Associate Professor of English ..................................Cotton Specialist .....................Associate Professor of Botany ..............................Instructor in English ..............................Tobacco Specialist ..............Professor of Agricultural Education ...........District Supervisor of County Agents .........................Professor of Pharmacy • State Supervisor of Home Demonstration Work ............Instructor in Rehabilitation Section ................Professor of Poultry Husbandry .... Professor of Philosophy and Education ..............Professor of Agricultural Chemistry . . Associate Professor of Veterinary Medicine .........................Instructor in Chemistry Robert Ivey Ali.en, B.S...................................................Tutor in Physics Georce Marion Broadhurst...............................Tutor in Stenography and Typewriting James Bayard Carson.........................................................Tutor in French Edward Miraclia...........................................................Tutor in French Charles Lee Pickens, Ph.G.................................................Tutor in Pharmacy OTHER OFFICERS Saraii Cobb Baxter................................................. Secretary to the Chancellor Julius Townsend Dudley.........................Secretary to the President of Franklin College Ethei. Reese . . Secretary to the President of the College of Agriculture and the Mechanical Arts Duchess Williams................................................ • Secretary to the Treasurer Ethel May Reese.............................................Librarian, College of Agriculture Pharks ObadIAH Vanattek...................................Superintendent of Field Experiments Ambrose Penn Winston......................_............................Foreman of College Farm • Charles Bowden Sweet......................Superintendent of College Greenhouse and Grounds Annie Carlton . . . Hazel Piiilrrick . . Sarah Bailey Lamar William Crane . • . E. W. High smith . . Charles S. Sanford . Lamar Sledge . . . . LIBRARY STAFF . First Assistant .... Assistant .... Assistant Student Assistant Student Assistant Student Assistant Student Assistant STUDENT ASSISTANTS P. C. Upshaw..................................................................Commerce W. K. Rivers..................................................................Commerce L. PlNTCHUCK.................................................................Commerce E. W. Hiciismith...............................................................Physics E. A. McWhorter................................................................Physics Leon Sincek....................................................................Physics J. S. Watkins..................................................................Physics M. O. Rudolph..............................................................Chemistry C. A. Marmf.lstein.............................................................Drawing L. G. Field.................................................................PsychologyiBBBK-iEEl B9 the. j . 1 3 1 Z7 : J s.K =fia =n t " V 7Z7iC=3 fn Senior Class History HE Class of 1921 has had a hard road to travel, and we might truly he termed the ‘‘hard luck” class of the University. Our hard luck began in 1917 and continued throughout our Senior year. As Freshmen, we were made to go to “gym” twice every week, which became monotonous to the last degree. This was the last year that “gym” was required, so the classes following us should appreciate their lucky exemption. Then as we entered our Sophomore year. Uncle Sam's military establishment broke forth in all its glory and we were scattered to various army camps in different branches of the service. So we were, somewhat slow in gelling organized in order to properly introduce the Freshman Class of 1918 to Georgia customs. The pushball game, previous to 1918, had always been an annual affair between the two lower classes. This event had always been looked forward to because of the excitement and entertainment it created. As Freshmen we downed the Sophs, thus upholding the dignity, honor and reputation of our class. Our victory was the last, however, because this ancient custom has been abolished, and after becoming Juniors and Seniors, we have not had the pleasure of witnessing this battle royal. This turn of fortune would have downed almost any class, but the Freshman Class of 1917 was made of sterner stuff, for we had two more trying ordeals to undergo. At Georgia, it has always been a custom that Freshmen, Sophomores and Juniors had to drill. No matter how hard the wind blew or how cold it was, for three long and unforgotten years we had to attend drill at an early morning hour. On coming back this year, we were proud of the fact that there would be no more “squads right” for us. But were the Seniors to enjoy this privilege alone? Not by any means, because a new rule was enacted whereby the Juniors were also freed from this burden. Therefore it happens to be a fact that the Class of 1921 is the last class that had to drill during its Junior year. From time immemorial. Seniors have enjoyed certain privileges. Lo and behold, new absence rules have been adopted, thus excluding these prerogatives. And classes begin an hour earlier than in former limes. On our roster are found names of men who have represented their Alma Mater in every branch of college activities. Star athletes, debaters and scholars are among our number. In no respect, has our great record failed to reach the lofty heights of our predecessors. Earnestness and sincerity of purpose is indeed the striking characteristic of the Senior Class of 1921. As we go out from the doors of our beloved Alma Mater, may this characteristic lead each and every one of us to success, prosperity, and happiness in life’s trials and tribulations. Lynn Fort, Jr., Historian.Senior Class Officers M. O. Rudolph C. E. Whatley J. P. Spicer . -I,. Fort . . . . . President Vice-President .... Poet . . HistorianDuPre Barrett, B.S. Forestry "Dupe" Athens, Georgia William Dickson Anderson, Jr., A.B. "Elongation" Macon. Georgia Kappa Sigma; Phi Kappa "G" Club; Basketball ’19. '20. 21; Mandolin Club '19: Gridiron Club. “Elongation” is the famous basketball tosser from the hamlet of Macon. To look at this spectacled youth as he leisurely glides by the Q room, one would think that his boldness would only extend to partaking in a bridge game, or handling the chips. But really, he’s awfully rough and stands many hard knocks on the basketball court. "Billy” has thus far stayed shy of the fair sex. No one has ever seen him escorting a “feme” around, or going crazy over one. Probably “Elongation" has one already spotted or he may be taking his time in looking them over. “Billy" is quite a student, having successfully combatted such opponents as Greek and Dr. White. And even at this, he has enuf spare time to make a “Pop” call on the green where he is an expert. As you depart, Billy, you carry our best and may you ring many a basket in the game of life. Agricultural Club; President of Forestry Club. Four years ago “Dupe" rattled in from the suburbs in his copper-head lizzie of the vintage of ’78. For these many days, his sylphlike form has been familiar to us as he has labored through the vicissitudes of a forester’s life, under the tutelage of Prof. Berry, whose creed of “Me und Colt" has killed ambition in the heart of many an embryonic woodsman. Now that the new era has come, "Dupe” has prospered mightily and is the controlling factor in the politics of the Forestry Club. As for the future, “Dupe" intends to follow his chosen profession of lumberman, and his mill will in all probability be the dominating factor in the tooth-pick business shortly after he assumes active control. In the words of the immortal poet, “Sock it to ’em, ‘Dupe’."Paul Hansell Bennett, B.S.A. "Pete" ' Quitman, Ceorgia Kappa Alpha Agricultural Club; Band; Mandolin Club. ’18, ’19, 20; Buccaneers; Alpha Zeta; Senior Round Table; Student Council; Stock Judging T am ’20; 1st Prize Stock Judging Southeastern Fair '20; President Saddle and Sirloin Club; Gridiron Club. “Pete” has done well since he has been in our midst. He cleaned up in high school circles before lie came to the University, so it was quite natural for him to win distinction in college. Above all he is a well rounded student, having for his hobby playing bridge and volley ball. At present “Pete" confines his judging of stock to cows and hogs, but later on he may include in his field the New York Exchange. He has also acquired a certain keen ability in judging the fair sex. as he receives a perfumed missive quite frequently. “Pete,” you will no doubt have a successful career when you take up your life’s work, and your Alma Mater will be proud of you. Edcar Blai.ock. B.S.C "Ed" Jonesboro, Georgia Sigma Chi; Demosthenian Economics Society; Buccaneers; Junior Cabinet; Associate Editor of Pandora. The rarest of all gifts to a man is friendship. Guard it well. “Ed." the man of the curly locks, has been endowed with this gift, the gift of being a friend. We could proceed and say numbers of other good things about “Ed,” but words arc, somehow, superficial and that already said so well applies to “F.d," we will not add further adjectives. But one weakness “Ed” has. He loves the beautiful girls, the long ones, tall ones, fat and lean—show him a girl and it’s a glimpse of heaven he’s seen. Not so much poetry as truth. Once “Ed” had a Ford and ever and 3non he would ride by the S. N. S. until a pistol and a watchman changed his course to the more even lanes along Milledge. All of which leads us to conclude that “Ed" is one of the best fellows we ever knew. We're strong for you, “Ed.”Charles Raymond Bohanan, H.S.A. “Do” Lilhonia. Ccorgia Agricultural Club; Student Instructor in Agricultural Engineering. From I.ilbonia there came into our midst ibis gentleman, better known as "Engineering and Mechanical Arts." Bohanan, as be is sometimes known by the Freshmen, is one of our hardest workers and most deserving students. It was a sad day in his life when he had to leave old “Beck" and the plow back behind to pursue his studies at the University. “Bo” is so regular in his work, we sometimes wonder whether be is really mechanical. Due to his quiet reserved nature, you very seldom find him among the gay fun finders of the University. His hobby is to be loyal to all agricultural activities and to sec that the Freshics put nothing over in farm mechanics. Just the relation between tutor and student is not known, but from a source unseen, in his place of seclusion he seems to wield an influence worthy of the solicitude of any office seeker. “Bo" is a fine fellow and we wish him well. Enoch Piercel Bowen, B.S.C. “Pete” Tifton. Georgia Kappa Alpha; Economics Society “Fete" hails from the good town of Tifton. which has given the University quite a number of noted characters. Possessed of a reserved disposition and a studious nature. “Pete” has made a success of his sojourn with “Puny" Brooks and Dr. Jenkins. His success is to be indicated by the fact that he has obtained the "old dip" by only three years of application. In his leisure hours after he has made up his trial balance, lie may be seen in the Q room munching on a hot dog. or preparing to lake in Mr. Gidlcy’s “lab." Enoch enjoys a good joke, and enjoys hearing Joe Longino relate his latest gags. For the last few summers “Pete” has spent his vacation as a banker around the native hamlet of his. No doubt this section will some day look upon him as a great financial magnate. Luck to you, “Pete," and may your years be many. I 1 I ■Waldo Bradley. B.S.C. "Count" Savannah. Georgia Kappa Alpha Buccaneer. Ladies and gentlemen, allow us to introduce “Count" Bradley from the Kingdom of Chatham. He has made quite a coup d' etat during the time that he has spent in our midst. At first it seemed as if he would become a great military genius, but he changed his mind when he saluted a famous colonel in Gainesville some years ago. Since that time he has been studying how to make a million dollars in the next ten years. Circumstances would indicate that the "Count” will be able to do this, as he has done some keen figuring with the Dean and has solved some serious angular intricacies around the Q room. During the "Count’s” recreation hours he may be found driving a certain young damsel’s Cadillac around the village, or out horse back riding. Occasionally too. he journeys over to Atlanta to see another fair lady. When the "Count" finally settles up his love affairs, he intends to settle down and work hard. Here’s to you. "Count." Benjamin Buckwald, A.B. "Benjy" Athens. Georgia Phi Kappa Abou Ben Buehwald (may his tribe increase) is one of the best known characters who ever deigned to walk our campus sod. He is known by everybody and everyone agrees that he is one of the most frequent and untiring visitors in college. In fact Benjy spends most of his spare time visiting. Benjy has received more invitations than any other man in college- invitations to “get out.” He is a somewhat quiet and timid fellow who very seldom attends to anybody’s business— anybody that wants him to. Benjy is usually to be seen where he is least expected, and is a veritable genius at talking abolit anything, being an authority on everything from nothing to nothing. However, laying all jokes aside. Benjamin is a fine lad, and when he has finished college 3nd has learned Kcat's little verse, "Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard are sweeter,” he should make a great success in his chosen occupation.Jamks Bayard Carson, B.S.C. “Bayard” Commerce. Georgia Sigma Chi; Demoslhenian Freshman Club; Freshman Impromptu De- baler; Treasurer of Freshman Class; Economics .Society; Thalians; Buccaneers; Junior Cabinet; Red and Black Staff ‘18, ’19, ’20; Varsity Football Squad ’20; Student Instructor in French 21; Beta Gamma Sipma. Bayard came to Georgia from Commerce and managed to get his degree in three years, besides joining the royal order of French instructors. He has been a good scholar, especially in French. “Professor" delights in the courtesy shown him by the Freshmen who lip their hats to him, knowing no better. Bayard like the other two Carsons in our class stands at the very top. He is a consistent worker and a true gentleman. He does not intend to continue teaching, but rather to enter the commercial world. We know that he will make a great success. John Patk Carson, A.B. "Father" Tiflon, Ceorgia Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Freshman Impromptu Debater; Freshman Debater; Sophomore Declaimer; Junior Cabinet; Winner of Junior Orator’s Medal; Glee Club '20. ’21; Buccaneers; Cadet Captain; Scabbard and Blade; Debating Council; Student Council; Senior Round Table; President of Phi Kappa; Art Editor of Ceorgia Cracker; Editor-in-Chief of Pandora 21; Gridiron Club. Four years ago “Father" Carson left the wilds of South Georgia coming to the “classic city” for the finishing touches. We are told by those who were here on the day of his arrival that he made a yery pronounced impression. “Father’s" role in college activities has been a most important one. He has been a very prominent figure in both the political and social life of the University. The long list of honors after his name are an index to his very brilliant record. “Father" intends practicing law some day. His numbers of friends hope that he will have as much luck as he had around Pop’s emporium. We believe you will, too, "Father.” William Joseph Carson, B.S.C. “Bill" Reynolds, Georgia Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Charter Member Economics Club; Captain Co. “C” 20; Scabbard and Blade; Buccaneer; Major First Battalion 21; Beta Gamma Sigma. Bill started his collegiate days at the University of Virginia, but after hanging around there for a year, he forsook the rotunda and entered the fold of Colonel Phil. Although Bill hails from a rather small town, he is quite a "city slicker" now. as he has published a punching board once. In the near future he intends to publish a new military manual giving particular attention to the subject of “demonstration.” Bill has spent most of his afternoons on Sanford’s meadow booting the pigskin or holding the horse hide, while during the evenings he occasionally partakes in the pastime of ball room wrestling. In the first two sports he has always been a scrub, but in the last mentioned he has made the varsity. We arc for you. Bill, and we know that you will develop into one of Georgia’s leading business men. John Seaborn Clkcklkr, B.S.A. "Cltck" Fairburn. Georgia Agricultural Club; Stock Judging Team 17; Saddle and Sirloin Club. “S” in my name stands for "Seagoing" but does not mean that I am a sea wanderer. In fact I am a “land lubber" and deeply in love with the place I came from. Fairburn. the town William Green, Mrs. Catherine Brad-street, bank robberies and myself, made famous. While I did not help William ruin our bank. I do know Catherine, and I might add she is a good game sport. The height of my ambition is to go back home, erase this crime from the records of our town, marry and settle down, and start the production of young and beautiful growing things. My troubles shall be little ones. I am a good boy and know right from wrong and may be depended upon to do the right thing at all times. I leave you boys—and girls- and now I shall wend my solitary way back to Fairburn and settle down and become a worthy citizen. To know “Clcck" is to secure a true friend. Outward appearances are often deceiving. He has been true to his Alma Mater and we expect to hear from him later in life.William Frederick Cobb. B.S.C.E. "Fred" Whigliam, Georgia Kappa Alpha; Demosthenian Freshman Club; Engineering Society; Cadet Captain '21; Sine and Tangent. Here is a product of “Little Charlie’s" peripatetic school. Our first impression of Cobh was several years ago when he first went out to act as a chainman for “Little Charlie." “Fred’s” broad smile and cheerful disposition have won for him many a friend. His hobby is working over difficult technical problems and keeping up with the bovine wrestling around the Q room. "Fred” has the distinction of being a cudct captain one day and a member of the band the next. Cobb, you have made good in your chosen profession as a student and we are willing to venture that you will make good as an alumnus. The best of luck to you. Cyril Prentiss Conaway, A.ll. "Crip" Athens, Georgia American Legion; Reserve Officer li.S.A. He came, he saw, he conquered the co-eds. Just gaze upon that irresistible countenance. If lie doesn’t possess those unique and distinct traits that completely magnetize the females. we’ll give up the ship and declare white is black and that “Teehites" are fine fellows. Not only is “Crip" an A-l student in the game of love, but he has learned the art of unmercifully shooting to pieces “friend Hutcheson" and other sub-assistant members of the Peabody School. Though his onslaught is more to be leared than the deadly punches of “Mauling Monk” "Crip" is as good a fellow as hails from the classic city: Many obstacles have confronted him on his way to “dipland," but he has waged a good fight and has reached his goal. Luck to you. Conaway. _William Ernest Ccrdkay, A.B. "Cordray" Savannah, Georgia Phi Kap| a Cordray is a rather quiet and obscure student! bul since becoming a Senior and donning the derby he has almost eliminated the last adjective. Perhaps he has a reason for being a little ob cure as he has tackled such courses as Dr. White's, Prof. John Morris' and has even dared to put his foot in Dr. Sylvan us’ sacred sanctum. Wherever he goes he is generally in a big huriy, and he generally gets there. Cordray has made a good student during the three years that he has been in our midst. He has a hunch that lie will make a lawyer out of himself some day. If his success depends upon hard work and application we know that he will succeed. Howell Boatwriciit Cox, B.S.A. "Co-op" Toccoa. Georgia Demosthenian Vice-President Agricultural Club; Saddle and Sirloin Club; Cotton School Debate '18. Don t blame him. gentlemen, he did not name himself. This is the gentleman who has made a greater success selling pen points and rubbers at the co-op than he lias in the game of love. For four long years lie rushed a certain young lady here in Athens and right when he thought that he had everything fixed as he wanted it. he was forced to make a quit claim deed to his rival. During his Freshman year "Co-op” entered into a graft alliance with "Pete” Stephens and John K. Fain and since then has spent his time robbing the pocket books of unprotected and unsuspecting students. But “render unto Osar that which is Caesar’s" Cox has been a loyal Georgia man, an excellent student, and has made many friends. Hitch your cart to a star, Cox. but don't look at it too much, you'll get “moonstruck." William Mocre Crane. Jr., A.B. "Bar Athens. Georgia Phi Kappa Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Treasurer Y. M. C. A.; Junior Basketball Team; Bert Michael Prize: Major Cadet Corps; Scabbard and Blade; Pin Beta Kappa. Bill is a local product and can generally be found around the Y. M. C. A. where he keeps things going. Ever since Bill has been in college he has been a thorough student, but he is not a book-worm by any means. He steps around rather lively on the basketball court and has many a time commanded “Battalion, ten-shun" as numerous heels clicked together. To know Bill is to be acquainted with a good fellow and a genuine gentleman. He always has a smile when be greets his friends. Bill intends being a lawyer. Bill, if you handle the jury as you have “Jakie," then we are more than willing to crown you with success. HAMmroN Georcf. Dasher. B.S.A. "S wiper" Valdosta. Georgia Demostbenian Agricultural Club; Editor-in-Chief Georgia Agricultural Quarterly; Vice-President of Senior Class; Stock Judging Team ’19; Campus Club; Captain Cadet Corps; Saddle and Sirloin Club; Manager Track Team; Gridiron Club. He’s a merry gentleman, lads, and somehow one of those who can make more friends than a centipede grows legs and with apparently no effort. When asked to give a little humorous incident in his life, “Swipcr” replied that his stay on the S. A. T. C. house party had taken all the wit and humor out of his system. But we do not believe this, because he is one of the jolliest fellows we ever knew. In the capacity of editor of the Agricultural Quarterly, he has done a great deal for his Alma Mater. This is not. however, the only field in which he has been active. He is a great politician and if his influence is as great after he leaves college as it has been here, we feel that be can do great things. Here’s to you. “Swiper.” 1 I I 1 William Hoiskr Davidson. B.S.A. “Davie" Fort Valley. Georgia Delta Tau Delta. Phi Kappa Agricultural Club; Scabbard and Blade; Alpha Zcta; Cadet Major of Cavalry. “Khaki Clad Adorius." they call him across the branch where lie rales A-l in three phases of University life, viz., co-ed chasing, cavalry and studies (named in order of nrominenrei. Since co education, it is rumored that “K. C. A." went one night without a date, but minute investigation fails to disclose any verification of this assertion. In respect to No. 2, “K. C. A.” rates captain and he sits on his horse like a “sho-nuP officer. In his studies, too. he shines. He has made numbers of honors in his work as the above record shows. Friends, too, he has made. In fact, he numbers his friends by his acquaintances. Houser, we wish you well—we know that you will do your Alma Mater honor. Shelley Carter Davis, B.S. “Shelley" Atlanta. Georgia Alpha Tau Omega: Phi Kappa This young man entered our midst in the fall of 1918, hailing from the city of Atlanta. Quiet by nature, he has always been unsusceptible to Cupid's dart, but as the old saying goes. “They all fall sooner or later,” and so the Christmas holidays of 1920 brought about this fall with “Shelley.” The very mention of a certain female institution in the old dominion state never fails to bring forth. “Who do you know there?” “Shelley” is a conscientious, hard working boy as the very fact that he is securing the "old dip" in three years will show. Although small in size, “Shelley" has his share of the gray matter. He does that which he undertakes, and after all what better can be said of a man? As he leaves us, we feel sure that he will do himself, as well as his Alma Mater, honor in life.Thomas John Davis, 11, B.S.A. "Hook" Savannah. Georgia Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Freshman Agricultural Scholarship; Clee .Club T8; Red and Black Staff 17. T8. No. fellows, that's not a vendor of patent medicines trying to make a sale, that's “Hook" Davis leading a "hull session." He is such an adept in this art that he can vamp any girl who is not deaf. "Hook" has gone into the agricultural game rather thoroughly, hut he has specialized in chemistry. His discoveries in the chemical laboratories have been so extensive that it is rumored he has several recipes for good beverages, and one of them, it is believed, will put Bevo off the market in a few years. "Hook." being a great adventurer, took a trip down to Cuba la:t summer to investigate the conditions there from a chemical standpoint—as well as from a sociological standpoint. After his loquacious powers have won the girl whom he seeks, he intends to settle down as “major domo" on a vaM plantation along the Savannah River. Here's to you. "Hook." William John Davis, B.S.A. ‘"Shorty" Meigs, Georgia Kappa Sigma Sophomore Prize; Junior Prize; Alpha Zeta; President of Georgia jNaturali»ts; Student Council. This handjr-legged gentleman, a farmer by vocation and a lady's man by avocation, will probably some day startle the followers of Burbank by grafting a strawberry to a milkweed down in South Georgia, and produce therefrom strawberries and cream. "Shorty" is primarily a student of agriculture and has done well. He is a genial, well tempered man and will make some community a good citizen. We would support him for mayor, then he should go to the legislature, after which indiscretions he would make some loose-jointed plantation a mighty good owner. If there is any one thing about “Shorty' that we admire more than all else, it is his kindly smile and unchanging grace of manners. The luck o' the Irish lie yours.Ash all Monroe Day. B.S.A. “Bum" Douglas Ccorgia Associate Editor Pandora; Football Team T9, ’20; Captain Football Team ’20; Buccaneer; Gridiron Club; Sphinx; Vice-President Strident Council; Cadet Captain '20; Manager Baseball Team 21; Agricultural Club; President of Athletic Association. We present here for your consideration the one and only “Bum” Day of football fame. And when we say fame, we mean it. This veteran of the pigskin has won so many honors for himself and his Alma Mater that his name will live forever in Georgia's hall of fame as one of her most beloved sons. This All-American, All-Southern center is the kind of fellow who loves a fight, whether it be on the gridiron, at the polls, or in the game of love. But it is in the latter, perhaps, that "Bum" outclasses himself. It is rumored- -but that is a family secret and must not be revealed. Doubtless the best thing that can be said about “Bum” is that he is a man. He plays the game, whatever it be, fairly, squarely, and above board, but he plays it hard and with a determination to win. As you leave, "Bum,” you carry with you the very best wishes of thousands of friends and admirers. n,,«.TER Reed Eskew. p Richard Smallwood DesPcrtes, B.S.C. “Dick'' Columbus, Georgia Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Economics Society; Buccaneer; Student Council. After absorbing all the knowledge offered by the Columbus High School, Dick came over to the University in keeping with certain predecessors of that section. From the very first day Dick has enjoyed a successful career. Perhaps this has resulted from his wearing tortoise shell spectacles in.class, which gives him quite a distinguished and learned appearance. Dick is not only a good student, but is quite a ball room wrestler and is always on hand when the orchestra starts playing. It is rumored that our friend has been seriously in love for a long time. We admire your taste, Dick, as your selection is a good one. We trust that you will win the hand you seek, and may success smile upon you. John Li «. . "ft teriucif, Griffin, Ccorgia Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Red and Black Staff ’19, 20. 21; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Director of Universi.y Publicity Bureau. “Wicnberg" entered the University three years ago and through good fortune and other things that accompany a lucky man, he becomes a graduate at a very early age. He has been a constant admirer of Professor Sanford and has thus acquired many honors in the journalistic world. He is now connected with several news syndicates that will in a few years replace the Associated Press. These syndicates arc not only rapidly becoming famous, but they are also paying enormous salaries. so doubtless within a few years “Wien-berg” will be enrolled among the country’s millionaires. His college days will soon be spent, but no man other than he can boast of receiving six hours credit in the military department without ever adorning a uniform. Here’s to you, “Wienberg,” we know that you will make a great success in life. Ernest Aaron Edwards, B.S.A. "Aaron" Oxford, Georgia Agricultural Club: Band. Aaron hails from the Fifth District A. 3nd M. School of Monroe. It was while he was pursuing knowledge there that he decided that his calling was that of agriculture, so he came to the University to prepare for this great work. Seeing the opportuni'.y in the vocational agricultural held, he began fitting himself to be a teacher and he is one of the few who go out this year to spread the gospel of scientific agriculture. During the four years that Aaron has been with us he has made a good record. He has made many friends who expect to see him some day in the near future, a great exponent of his chosen work. They will not be disapj ointed because Aaron has that "stickability” that it takes to win success. You have our best wishes, Aaron. ■ •  Roy Lee Edwards. B.S.C. “Judge" Monlicello, Georgia Demosthcnian Economics Club; Square and Compass. "Judge,” the knight of the sample case, hails from the country somewhere near Monticello and came to the University unvamped and happy. He leaves happy. "JudgeV’ college career may be summed up as follows: "Just sign on the dotted line -thanks—well, congratulations old man. glad to have you with us, you'll never regret it. I’m urc." One of the "Judge’s" favorite pastimes was building rabbit pens for a certain chicken, but the bird has flown and now he vows that he will never build another rabbit pen if he wants to hold a chicken and has already made plans for a chicken house. He is a hard worker, a passionate lover, one of the best hand-shakers in college, and indirectly a great church worker. One of the greatest adventures of his life was a trip to Tallulah Falls where lie got the hardest fall of his life. That’s why he is making plans for the chicken house. Luck to you, “Judge.” Walter Keed Eskew, ILS.A. "Eskrxc” Toccoa. Ceorgia Agricultural Club; Square and Compass; Cotton School Debater. Probably the most outstanding fact connected with this bird is his saying: "Mr. Chairman, I move that the nominations be closed." Such a statement brings back happy memories of our arguments in the Agricultural Club. We admire a man who has sufficient abdominal equipment to speak up when things have gone far “enuf." And man, he loves the ladies, and—try this on your piano. “Girls Mean Everything in My Young Life, I Don't Think That I Will Ever Need a Wife, etc.” Look out Toccoa debutantes, when "Eskew" gets home he will shine. He is very prominent in college, at Nick's, the Q room, and certain places where the fairer sex stay. “Eskew,” we predict for you a wonderful future and hope that you will soon become an educational power in Ceorgia. Don’t graft, mess into politics, teach school. Good-bye, old boy, we shall miss you. aChao Chuan Fenc. B.S.A. Ho-joy Wcisch Kiangser. China Treasurer of Georgia Naturalist ; President of Cosmopolitan Club. Among the heterogeneous mas9 of Seniors is to l e found this visitor from far away China. The very fact that he is here should indicate that he has more than the ordinary amount of intelligence, but since he lias received a degree it is quite a distinction for our visitor. During the time that he has been with us he has worked hard. Not only has he confined his activities to text hooks, but he’s a great booster of the Cosmopolitan Club, or in other words ‘‘the League of Nations.” Feng is an energetic and jolly fellow. He has absorbed a great deal of knowledge while in our midst and when he returns to his native land lie should accomplish much for his native people in giving them the benefit of his acquisitions. O-huo Feng. Louie Glenn Fields, B.S.C. "Rosie" . 1-ovejoy, Georgia Dcmosthenian Spanish Club; President of Economics Club; Senior Football Team; Assistant in Psychology; Red and Black Staff. We present Dr. Fields of the Psychology Department. Like all psychological students, Glennie has a love for the "hay.” In his own mind. Fields holds the distinction of being a lady’s man, receiving several specials and telephone calls a day aside from his frequent visits to the co-ed barn, lie ha9 had some very thrilling experiences and it is his greatest delight to tell these to his friends. In this instance it might be said that "Rosie" is very fond of cheese sandwiches. Why? We wish we knew. Seriously speaking.' Fields is a good fellow, being one of the most reliable men in college. He has done well in his work, and is the kind of fellow everyone wants for a friend. Luck to you. Clenn. Henry Vaughn Fitzpatrick. B.S.A. "Fits” Culloden, Georgia Dcinoslhcnian President of Agricultural Club: Saddle and Sirloin Club; “G" Club; Manager Football Team ’20; Business Manager of Agricultural Quarterly; Alpha Zeia. This fierce man goes by several names, e. g.. “Fitz, Henrie, Long Boy, Slim, Drink o' Water," etc. However we all know "Fitz" and think he is one of the best servants of the cafeteria and Lord Chesterfield we have ever known. He "cusses" very little, smokes very much, works very little, talks very much, and goes to the S. N. S. every Sunday. "Fitz" is uite a politician, having run for enough of-ccs that by the process of elimination he should be sure to get something. He. like the rest of the bachelors, is peculiar. Past the culiar part, you have a true friend. We lieve that he is going to do well in his life work. We wish you the best of luck. Edwin Flemming, B.S.E.E. ''Hus" Augusta, Georgia Chi Psi; Phi Kappa Engineering Society; Math. Club; Buccaneers; Sine and Tangent. “Bus" is among the few to be graduated in three years and is among the very few to finish up his dealings with "Little Charlie" in such a short time. To be sure, he has had to work a little to attain such a record, but still he has "enuf" time left to journey over to Waynesboro occasionally for certain reasons. "Bus” is a rather quiet fellow and hasn’t told us yet. but we have our hunch. Being interested in electrical subjects, he has been trying to devise some appliance whereby the speed of Athens street cars may be increased. So far as we know, he hasn’t succeeded. However, from his experiences he has become accustomed to many shocks. "Bus” is a swell fellow with a genial nature, and we predict a great future for him as an electrical engineer.) Clark Howell Fcrkman, A.B. “Uiill" Atlanta, Georgia Chi Phi; Phi Kappa Sophomore Declamation; Member of Publicity Bureau; Phi Kappa Council; Chess Team; President Woodrow Wilson Club; •Champion Debater. “Bull" came to the University three years ago and made his debut to the public as soon as the first dance came off. All the fire and enthusiasm of youth l elong$ to him. He's an energetic kind of fellow and has done well in college. He was for a while one of the keenest politicians in school. He had a line that won for him many a vote, in fact, he is mainly responsible for the reduction of Dickerson's political influence. But alas, he has forsaken the life of the speaker and the politician to become a sport writer. Being of a very enthusiastic nature he is, of course, a thorough fan at any athletic contest and covers the sport happenings in great style. But think what a shame that such a politician should give up his natural calling for the newspaper game. “Bull” is young yet, however, and will no doubt some day become one of our leading journalists. We’re all pulling for you, “Bull." Lynn Fort. Jr., B. S. “Stud" Atlanta. Georgia Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Kappa Senate; “G" Club; Tennis Champion 19, ’21; Mandolin Club T9. '20; Senior Cla«s Historian. “Stud" Fort from Atlanta, is one of the most popular boys at the University. He is a good inixer, a fine fellow, and a true friend. However, procrastination is his principal fault. "Stud” can sit and bull for hours and his line is good, so a certain person in the southeastern part of the state says. He has made numerous visits to this town, the first one being way back in 1920 when the Glee Club went there. Since that time he has been overwhelmed with specials and telegrams. Luck to you. “Stud,” we're all pulling for you and anyway we know that it lakes a fast guy to gel ahead of you. “Stud" is going to follow the medical profession. We know that he will achieve honors in this field.Luther Harvey Fort. B.S.C. “Bud" Morrow, Georgia Dcmosthenian Spanish Club: President of Economics Club: Manager of Senior Football Team; Red and Black Staff. Just look at him- -that is all that we ask. He thinks that he is the handsomest man who ever entered the University. He prides himself on his two cute dimples, his sweet mouth, his winning eyes and his Apollo like brows. We say HE prides himself on these we don't. But with these attractions he has lead many a girl astray in the picture show. “Beautiful" vamps them all into playing “hands" with him. His favorite expression is “Look out. gentlemen, l m fixing to raise h—I around here in a few minutes." But we have to hand it to Harvey. He is one of the best fellows in college, and is well known. His college career has earned for him a number of friends who wish him godspeed. “Thy rod and thy staff, may they comfort thee.” Loomis Oscah Freeman, Jr., B.S.C.E. "Iso" . College Park, Georgia Sigma Nu; Dcmosthenian Band; Sine and Tangent; Engineering Society; G. M. A. Club; Pan-Hellenic Council. Coming to Georgia three years ago as first honor graduate from G. M. - ., Freeman had many ambitions. During the three years he has sojourned with us he has realized quite a few of these. Attached to his name are several of the highest honors that it is possible for an engineering student to make. But it might well be said that these honors were acquired before Freeman's Senior year. This year has caused a very noticeable change in our heretofore studious young engineer. Early in the season he began parting his hair in the middle. Next caine the derby, cane and fancy vest. Then, well it would be hard to tell all that did come. Sufficient is it to say that Lucy Cobh began to play an important role in Freeman's young life. But despite Freeman's love for the “Lucies” we believe that he will some day make a great engineer. He carries with him the best wishes of a large number of friends.'I Irby Frederick Gaissert. B.S.A. Madison. Georgia Alpha Tau Omega; Dcmoslhenian Freshman Club; Agricullural Club; Freshman Impromptu Debater; Rifle Team ‘19; Cadet Lieutenant ‘20; Cadet Captain ‘21; •American Legion; Buccaneers. Gaissert hails from Madison, the most important town on the Central between here and Macon. It is rumored that he had something to do with the construction and management of the road and so arranged it that he’d have plenty of time to converse with his friends on the train while plying between Athens and his native town. His friends say that he is very much in love and is always looking for the postman to bring the pink missive. Gaissert has been a strong supporter of Old College against all adversaries. When he’s not engaged in discussing the production of lima beans on “Ag” bill, he may be found at “Pop's" emporium shooting the bovine. He’s a jolly, easy going fellow. When he settles down in Madison as a citizen he should, some day. develop into a first-rate agriculturist. Luck to you. Gaissert. William Stokes Goldsmith. A.B.S.S. “Bur Atlanta, Georgia Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Kappa Senate Club: One Club; Freshman Club; Drum Major '19, '20. It is doubtful in the minds of most contemporaries just exactly when “Bill" began his career at the University. The most competent authorities, however, have agreed upon the assertion that lie made his appearance at the same time our friend “Slump" Talmadge did. “Bill" deserted us once during his sojourn and went over to F.inory, but the life around the small hamlet of Oxford was a little too tame for him. Therefore, "Bill” returned to us the next year. For years lie has distinguished himself as a French shark with "Jakie" and has even joined1 the "Alliance Francais.” In his leisure moments, "Bill" serves as toastmaster around "Pop’s." He’s a jolly good scout and has made a host of friends. If he ever gets mixed up in politics around Washington they will likely send him to France as ambassador. “Bon voyage, M'sieur.”Arthur Ernest Criffeth. Jr.. B.S. “Archie” Athens, Georgia Kappa Alpha Georce Linton Hendricks. A. 15. "CtAoneC' Metier, Ceorgia Demosthenian Senate; Thalians. “They go wild, simply wild" over him. He is one of those good looking lions who always find someone ready to fall for them. And best of all he is blissfully ignorant of his charms. All of which calls to our mind that “Archie” has a Hudson. Word to the contrary, “Archie" is not the original of the Cosmopolitan stories about a youth of said cognomen. On the other hand he is quite a sensible chap, than whom no Senior is more generally liked. He is a local boy but the four years of Georgia life erased even this stigma. “Archie" has made a good record here and we are devotees enough of Alexander to predict for him a fine future. If his afler life is modeled after his beginning, then he will be assured of a place among the elite. Freshman Debater; Sophomore Debater; Senior Round Table; Student Council. Look upon the beaming countenance in front of you and you will readily know why we say that he was captured in the wilds about Metier. Georgia. He is one of those men who think little and do a great amount of work. He has finished his college course in three years, during which time he has taken part in a number of college activities. His favorite expression is "1 hope to dal." During the time he has been in college he has made a numl er of friends who would do anything for him. Wc predict for him a bright and brilliant career as a politician. McDuffie, rah! ||! I Irby Fhkdkhick Gaissert. B.S.A. Madison. Georgia Alpha Tau Omega; Demosthenian Freshman Club; Agricultural Club; Freshman Impromptu Debater; Rifle Team '19: Cadet Lieutenant ’20: Cadet Captain 21; American Legion; Buccaneers. Caisscrt hails from Madison, the most important town on the Central between here and Macon. It is rumored that he had something to do with the construction and management of the road and so arranged it that he’d have plenty of time to converse with his friends on the train while plying between Athens and his native town. His friends say that he is very much in love and is always looking for the postman to bring the pink missive. Gaissert has l een a strong supporter of Old College against all adversaries. When he's not engaged in discussing the production of lima beans on “Ag” hill, he may be found at “Pop’s” emporium shooting the bovine. He’s a jolly, easy going fellow. When he settles down in Madison as a citizen he should, some day. develop into a first-rate agriculturist. Luck to you, Gaissert. Richard Reuben Hargis, B.S.C. "Dick" Charlotte. N. C-Demosthenian Economics Society; Spanish Club; Assistant Business Manager Red and Black ’20; Campus Club; Cheer Leader. Here he is, the brainless wonder, the only one in captivity. He’s hard, he’s arsenic. He walks barbed wire fences barefooted with a wild cat under each arm. spitting fire. Many a heart has “our Richard" broken with his caveman stuff. Only recently he was elected president of the Zodiac Club. Perhaps the foregoing attainments are due to his rooming in cw College, the unpardonable sin of college life. There is a reward of $100 in gold awaiting anyone who will produce a girl whom Dick can't vamp, but this should not offer encouragement to the females of the species because Dick is already in love. We congratulate the young lady, for we are sure that she could not find a finer fellow or a truer gentleman anywhere. His hosts of friends will always remember him with the kindest regards. Here’s to you. Dick, may Lord Chesterfield bless you. David Avers Coi.li.ncs, Jr., B.S. Cen. "Dave" Atlanta, Georgia Chi Phi; Phi Kappa Varsity Football '19, '20; Senate; “G" Club. After having been heralded far and wide as a football player in prep circles. “Dave” decided that he would resume his athletic career at Georgia. When the 1919 season opened up he was right there with the goods and kept up the good work through two seasons. “Dave" is a jolly good fellow and has made many friends during his short stay with us. We say his stay has been short because “Dave" has finished the prescribed course in two and a half years, which is going some for such a strenuous athlete. This only goes to show that he has the old punch in the class room as well as on the gridiron. Whatever you undertake in the future. “Dave." you may be assured that our best wishes arc with you. Ceorce Linton Hendricks. A.Ik "Colonel" Metier. Georgia Dcmosthcnian Freshman Debater; Sophomore Debater; Senior Round Table; Student Council. Look upon the beaming countenance in front of you 3nd you will readily know why we say that he was captured in the wilds about Metier. Georgia. He is one of those inen who think little and do a great amount of work. He has finished his college course in three years, during which time he has taken part in a number of college activities. His favorite expression is “1 hope to dat.” During the lime he has been in college he has made a number of friends who would do anything for him. We predict for him a bright and brilliant career as a politician. McDuffie, rah! Evekett Wav Hichsmith, B.S. "IT'ay" Baxley, Georgia Pi Kappa Phi; Demoslhenian Freshman Impromptu Debater; Winner Freshman Debate Medal; Sophomore Debate • Medal; Declamation Cup; junior Cabinet; Junior Oration; Anniversarian; Intercollegiate Debater; Football Team '19, '20; “G" Club; Senior Bound Tabic; Scabbard and Blade; Cadet Captain 21; Gridiron Club; President Y. M. C. A.; Sphinx; Champion Debate; Phi Beta Kappa. Page Mr. Highsmith who has ascended the throne of Denmark Hall, as the =ucccssor of Prince Dick. “Way” rules with an iron hand as shown some time ago when under very slight provocation he chased Hon. “Monk" Garrett from the hall. One would hardly think that he would be so hard-hearted being such a Y. M. C. A. worker. Like all great men “Way" has made several mistakes, the most noticeable being that he has joined the cohorts of the co-ed chasers, and that he is an assistant in the physics department. In spite of these shortcomings he is known 3nd liked by everyone, as a scholar, an orator, a soldier, an 3thlete, a true gentleman, E. Way Highsmith. Harold Bishop Hodcson. D.V.M. “nar Athens, Georgia Dcmosthenian Agricultural Club. “Hal" is a home-grown product. He first entered the University in 1914, but like many others of his class he had his college course disturbed by his country’s call. After doing his bit he returned to the University to round out the finer points in administering pills and relieving pains of equine, bovine, kanine and the like. ‘'Hal” has been - faithful to his duties about the veterinary hospital and has been equally scrupulous about picking up members of both sex, but Cupid finally entered in and now he seems to have adopted the motto. “Two is company, three is a crowd.” You arc very fortunate, “Hal," you have our best wishes and may success crown all your endeavors. Hueii Comkk Howell, A.B. •Wick" Atlanta. Georgia Chi Phi; Phi Kappa Thalians; Sophomore Declaiiner; Senate: Editor-in-Chief of Red and Black; Business Manager Pandcua 21. He entered like a lamb, but leaves us like a lion. The gentle and timid Comer who joined the University ranks in 1917, after four years of college life and a trip to Washington and l.ee. leave? us a dashing “wild ox." an 1 the “oily peril.” As a military man “Nick" has made a good impression with all the officials. Along with Sam L he has always been fond of drilling. But outside of several r uls by the military department he has done well. At one time he was editor of the R J a-iJ Black which position he filled in first-cla style. Those who know “Nick" like him, for he is a true friend. We predict a military career for this master of social sciences, and later the editorship of the Atlanta Constitution. the position that his father now so ab‘y fills. Thomas Marion Johnson, A.B. "Tommie" Orchard Hill, Georgia Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Freshman Club; Sophomore Debater; Sophomore Dcclaimer; Junior Cabinet; Thalians; Glee Club 19, '20, 21; Buccaneers; Scabbard and Blade: Regimental Adjutant '20: Senior Round Table; Impromptu Debater; Debating Council; Phi Kappa; Key; President of Phi Kappa. No men allowed! This tent has in it the blond hc-vamp who has made himself famous throughout the South. He spends his vacations paying visits from Virginia to Louisiana. No girl's education is complete without knowing “Tommie." He has vamped many a girl but it is rumored that he is now strong for someone around Marietta. But after all he is not so fickle minded as one might think. For years he has stood the onslaught of Dr. Bocock and only recently was it that he met slight defeat at the hands of Dr. White, assisted by the atomic group and the halogen family. “Tommie” is also quite an actor and will some day take Eugene O’Brien’s place in presenting again the “Perfect Lover." "Tommie” intends entering the banking business. We know that he will make a regular J. P. Morgan.Rufus La Fay ettk Keknfji. B.S.A. “Genera " Rabun Cap. Georgia Dcmosthenian Agricultural Club: Freshman Debater: Cotton School Debater. Why for, oh! worthy son of the great red old hills and member of the Club de Vingt weaves! thou that look? Where gettest thou that look? The trouble is that the “General” is deeply interested in trying to get the mystery of his “love affair” solved and he wants to know if “Shylock" will make a good house detective. “General" is a faithful and conscientious fellow and lias made good at school, lie gave his services to Uncle Sam for two years and served faithfully as a lieutenant in France. He is one of the few of the class of T9 left. Just as soon as he gets "hooked up.” he intends settling down to business. Look out, Rabun Gap. here comes a future mayor. Keener, old boy, we wish you great success and happiness. Joseph Wiikklkk Loncino. B.S.C. "Joe" Atlanta. Georgia Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Kappa Freshman Impromptu Debater; Economics Society; Spanish Club. J. W. T. laingino, alias “Talliafcrro." a man of checkered career and varying experiences. To rest his weary head he has made use of the haystacks in Delaware and the soft-colored green pool tables in Columbus. He once propelled a street railway car in Jacksonville. Willi not a care be sails along with true indifference, condemning all text books as nuisances and all college professors as non-essentials. His one ambition is to dwell peacefully on some south sea isle, his only protection against the elements the garb that nature gave him; for sustenance the bananas that grov% without cultivation, and a harp. Given these he will sing and play his way merrily through life. He has withstood the barrage of the professional artillery, shortening the usual four-year course to three. We predict for him a brilliant success as admiral of the Irish Navy or professor of business law in some famous institution of learning.  John Hichtowkh Maiioncy, A.B. "Psycho" Dublin, Georgia Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Memlwr of Publicity Bureau. Make way. hoys! This is the biggest speed demon in the University with the exception of Bill Rogers. In fact, to look upon his lithe figure, one would naturally say "built for speed.” His celerity is remarkable as demonstrated by the fact that lie can arise at 8:25 A.M., eat a scrumpluous meal, and by 8:30 be at his class waiting to greet the professor. And while speaking of greetings, "Psycho" always meets his friends with a smile from car to car. He is undoubtedly the greatest optimist in college and never lets anythin? worry his mind. During his sojourn in college be has become a sport scribe for one of the Atlanta papers, and expects some day to cover the sporting news for the "Police Gazette." Occasionally he may be seen lecturing to a few friends on the subject of psychology in which he has become so adept that his friends have awarded him the nom-dc-plume of “Psycho." Luck to you. "Psycho." you have run a good race. Joseph Wheelek Mann, D.V.M. "Izzy" Lyons. Georgia Demosthenian Track Team 19, 20; Captain Track Team 21; Cadet Lieutenant '20; Cadet .Captain '21; Scabbard and Blade; President of Agricultural Club: "G" Club; Gridiron Club. “Izzy" hails from the red mud and clay colored waters of the Altamaha swamp in the lower vicinity of Toombs County. When he left these secluded spots and entered the fair pastures of North Georgia he gazed in wonder at the red hills and fertile fields. But prior to "Izzy’s" departure from the swamps to civilization, he had developed into a great athlete. He had cha«ed so many rabbits over logs and ditches that as a collegian he has gained the distinction of being one of the best hurdlers and jumpers in Dixieland. It has been four years since our friend entered our portals, but this time has been sufficient to change "Izzy" from a rough country lad to a finished product. He now possesses the bearings of a real man, a host of friends, and a good knowledge of veterinary surgery. We can see nothing but a remarkable success for you. Wheeler. I Ch Aiti,K.s Auci sti s Marmelsteix, B.S.C.K. "Charlie” Savannah. Georgia Engineering Society; Sine and Tangent; Senior Round Table. “I am the captain of ir.y soul. I am the master of my fate" -that was Charlie’s motto until lie was vamped by a little “Miss Nor-malitc" and now “she" takes precedence over the “1.” Yes. we all believe that Charlie has fallen desperately. In all phases of college life Charlies has played his part well. In addition to completing a four-year course in three, he has been very active on the outside. By active we mean in such activities as pressing hi suits, attending ball games, etc. But in all seriousness it can be said that he is a good scholar, a true gentleman and a friend worth having. Luck to you. Charles. David Marx, Ji«., B.S.C. "Duve" Atlanta. Georgia Phi Epsilon Pi; Phi Kappa Economics Society; Sophomore Declaimer; Junior Cabinet. Gentlemen, we must present Mr. David Marx of Atlanta, a member of the tortoise rim spectacle association. “Dave" wears these during important class room occasions in order to make a good appearance before his prof. We must admit that lie does make a distinguished impression. He has only been with us three years and during that time he has made a good record. The two words “Marx” and “good marks” seem to he synonymous terms. Possessed of a bright mind, and being of an energetic nature there is no reason why “Dave” shouldn’t be a great success. He says that he hears the financial world calling him. In another year or so we will, no doubt, be saying “as rich as ‘Dave’ Marx.”Hr.KRKKT Allen Maxey, B.S.A. "Max” Winder, Georgia Dcmosthenian Agricultural Club; Glee Club 20. 21; Cadet Captain '21. Captain “Max." as he is known on the drill field, is a jolly good-natured fellow and has a smile for everybody. He numbers bis friends by his acquaintances, and to know him is to hear him laugh. “Max” is a hard worker and one of his greatest virtues is that he minds his own business. He is a strong believer in co-eds and sees to it that they arc well entertained at all times. May Cupid spare him is our wish. Being a great singer, his chief delight is in giving the inmates of Candler Hall the benefits of his talents. He is fitting himself for vocational work, although he has not decided what vocation it will be. W'e predict that whatever it is. however, he will make a success of it. Our ! est wishes go with you. Maxey. William Thomas Middlebrooks, B.S.A. “Little Willie' Starrsvillc. Georgia gricultural Club Major M. T. C.; Instructor Agricultural Engineering; Scabbard and Blade. “Little W illie" is a quiet, easy going fellow, nevertheless he is a typical Georgia Senior. and is often seen gliding down Gayton Street with bis derby and cane. It was when following the south end of a mule going north that he came to realize that there should l c a better method of tilling the soil. Consequently he left the farm behind and came to the University to learn the more scientific methods of agriculture. During the time that he has been with us he has made a good student, and also a good major in the Motor Transport Corps. We predict that when he takes up his life work he will do honor to his Alma Mater.Russell Dewey Miller, B.S.A. “Shylock" Athens, Georgia Here's another home product for your consideration. After talking with him once you will conclude immediately that he is a second Ponzi and a “devil in his home town.” He knows more girls, has more dates, and make-more money than any three men in college according to his book-keeping. “Shylock" can he «een almost as often as “Pete" Stephens riding his bicycle around, selling sandwiches and potato chips. He has almost succeeded in cornering the Clarke County market. If business continues to improve in the next few years as it has in the past few, “Shylock” should be able to follow in “Pete’s” steps and trade his bicycle for a sedan. Luck to you, “Shylock,” we like your mettle. Abram Isadore Moskovitz, B.S.C. ‘'Abe' Fort Valley. Georgia Phi Epsilon Pi; Phi Kappa Economics Society. After “Abe” had cleaned up in the high school circles around Fort Valley he journeyed up to the “classic city" to get the latest dope. During his sojourn here he has become a prominent figure around the city Y. M. C. .. indulging in various games. “Abe" is a rather cjuiet and reserved kind of a fellow, attending strictly to his own business, and he's very business like, too. “Abe” has finished up his fourth year with us and with the immense amount of knowledge he has accumulated from Professor Ingraham and Dr. Jenkins, he should return to his native city and develop rapidly into one of the greatest merchants in that section. “Abe" may have the peach market cornered within a few years. L.Donald Bennett McDonald, B.S.A. "Skete" Quitman. Georgia Kappa Alpha; Agricultural Club. Mandolin Club ’18. '19. '20; Stock Judging Team; Winner of Short Horn Medal, Southeastern Fair; Pan-Hellenic Council; Saddle and Sirloin Club. “Skete” and his friend “Pete" have put Suitman on the map during their ojourn at le University. D. B. went up to Camp Zachary Taylor during the war to train for a general. Since that time he has been pretty hard so far as his profs, are concerned. He doesn't allow them to put anything over on him as his record above well indicates. “Skete." however, is not so hard around the ladies because he receives a pink missive nearly every day from a certain institution up around Rome. Once in a while, he journeys over to Atlanta to meet his lady fair. When he feels in a reckless mood he organizes a bridge party, or something of a similar nature. With such winning ways 'tis no wonder that he takes so well with the ladies. “Skete." may you love well and live happy. Lee Carrington McKinley. B.S.C. "Major" Milledgeville, Georgia Sigma Chi; Dcmosthenian Buccaneers; Beta Gamma Sigma. After pursuing a course of study at G. M. C.. a military course in the army, and a course of mademoiselles in France, Lee dropped in on us to see if the University offered anything at all new. And alas, alas, he found her with something entirely new co-education. He escaped the French mademoiselles entirely unscathed (so he says), but who is proof against these sweet young things that roam our campus? Surely not Lee, and so when one of our fair co-eds left us at the end of the first term, we fear that she carried the “Major’s” heart with her. It as not only with the fairer sex that Lee is popular for the number of his friends is limited only by the number that know him. Lee has managed to finish a B.S.C. in two years and has done it in great style. We feel sure that a man who can do this will make his mark when he leaves the walls of his Alma Mater for the big adventure in life.Charles Wortham Nall, A.B. “Straw” Lulhersville, Georgia Demosthenian Spanish Club. • The only man in the University who can stand on the ground floor of the Academic Building and stop a leak on the roof by putting his Anger on the hole, would live to be a million years old should he follow the courses of some, and die by the inch. But every inch of "Straw" is a part of a good fellow. He has a splendid disposition and is very popular. He smiles all the time and not only does he smile, but he seems to spread the smile disease. Investigation disproves the theory that "Straw’s" head is not subject to the forces of gravity, being above the law. Scientists say his connection with shoes overcomes whatever tendency is displayed. May your life be as long as your body, “Straw." William Frank Nelms, A.B. “Skinny” Commerce, Georgia Phi Delta Theta; Phi Kappa Senate; Band. On account of the fact that “Skinny’s" home town is located only a short distance from the classic city, he was fairly well acquainted with the town when he came over his Freshman year. “Skinny” is one of those fellows who are very quiet except on certain occasions. It is said that he waxes very loquacious when around the ladies. His hobbies are playing his clarionet and driving his Cadillac. In both of these he is an adept. “Skinny" intends adding a little more to his education by going to Columbia next year. Whatever you decide to do in life we wish you the best of luck, "Skinny.”Cakl Kratiikr Nelson, A.B. “Car " Dublin, Ccorgia Demosthcnian Historian Freshman Class; Freshman Debater; Sophomore Debater; Sophomore Declamation; Junior Cabinet; Assistant Baseball Manager ’21; Business Manager Georgia Cracker; Cadet Lieutenant; Impromptu Debater; Champion Debater. Unlike Shylock of old be demands not his pound of flesh, but his peck of gold. Rumor hath it that he is growing wealthy through his efforts as business manager of the Georgia Cracker. Outside of his financial deals "Carl” is a good fellow and when he gets on bis derby he out-Beau-Brummels old Beau himself. In his day "Carl" had political dreams, but even as plans go astray so do dreams vanish, so Carl began to build up his money interests. He is a fine chap, however, and has a large number of friends who expect him to do great things in the financial world of tomorrow. William Stokely Northcltt. A.B. "Doc" College Park. Georgia Alpha Tau Omega: Phi Kappa Jeffersonian; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Counsellors. Our near Atlanta friend spent the first part of his college career at Oglethorpe, but seeing his mistake in time he came to the University. Stokely is a firm believer in co-education, or rather in co-eds, for on any Sunday afternoon you may find him parked at the co-ed barn. On the campus Stokely has made himself known through his connection with the University “Y” and its varied activities, such as weekly weiner roasts. "Doc" was evidently very fond of studying at Oglethorpe, for he entered that institution with the avowed purpose of becoming a professor of Creek, but he has so far changed his ambition that he is now studying law under the divine guidance of Dr. Sylvy. Stokely has made a fine record at the Georgia and we wish him success with his work in the law department. Some day, Stokely, you will be a great statesman, we are sure.Donald Obmidokfkk, B.S.C. “Oby" Atlanta. Georgia Phi Epsilon Pi; Phi Kappa Benjamin Paschal 0'Nf.al, .B. “Balmy Benny” Macon. Georgia Phi Delta Theta; Phi Kappa Economics Society; Sophomore Declaimer; Football Team T9; Captain Sophomore Basket-ball Team; Captain Cadet Corps; “G” Club; Pan-Hellenic Council. Hail to the everlasting grin! Have you ever seen him without it? “Oby's” genial spirit has won for him many friends during the three years he has been with us. He also has the profs, fooled into thinking that he is a class room shark. Donald came to us front the Marist College and has continued to make the same good record that he did there. His biggest worry is keeping up with his mail, but outside of this he is carefree. He calls St. Louis quite frequently. Of late he has taken great interest in football and is a dashing cadet officer. His favorite working building on the campus is the crip shed. But “Oby" has done well, making the course in three years. His friends predict a great future for him. Scabbard and Blade; Buccaneers; Tennis Team ’21. Ben comes to the University from the metropolis of Macon. Since being in our midst he has worked hard. He has always been on the job except certain periods when it is rumored that he would occasionally fall into the “arms of Morpheus’ while listening to the soothing discourse of Dr. White in regard to certain elements. It was during that hour that he acquired the nom-dc-plume of “Balmy Benny." On all other occasions, however. he has been much on the alert. He’s always strong for a house parly and during such a season can be seen entirely occupied with the fairer sex. Ben has made a good student and should develop into a successful business man as lie generally takes good care of the old shcckles. We wish you all the luck in the world. Ben. I  John Sheffield Owens "Red" Atlanta, Georgia Chi Phi; Phi Kappa Senate; “G" Club; Varsity Basketball; Varsity Football. "Ffed': came to the University four years ago from the Boys’ High of llanta. His pink hair has been exposed to the stormy weather as well a« to the sunshine, for “Red" does not know how it feels to wear a hat and to those who know him personally a very small number, in faett, he is easily recognized by that red dome of his. From the very first he has been imbued with the "old Georgia spirit" and has taken a great part in athletics. He is one of the best guards that has ever worn a Georgia uniform on the basketball court. “Red" was a substitute end on the football team of this year, which position be filled admirably. Aside from these athletic honors “Red" holds still another. He is one of the few men who have made their letter down at Nick’s place, a great distinction indeed. "Red' has a fine personality and is known and liked by all. He possesses the type of manhood that our Alma Mater is always proud to call her own. We wish vou the best of luck, "Red.” Frank Upson Palfrey "Frank" San Antonio. Texas Kappa Sigma Agricultural Club; Saddle and Sirloin; Naturalist's Club; Alpha Zeta. Originally of the class of '19. Frank decided to defer his education and enter the scrap with Germany, which he did. fter satisfactorily bringing to a close this little difficulty he returned to the University to complete his education. He brought with him this p3st fall a little red and black flivver in which he has so many times since ridden his many friends. We understand that he intends entering the field of animal production. May success be his. Every bit of a gentleman and a scholar, Frank will make the University an alumnus of whom she will always be proud. T Aktiuik Pew, Jk.. B.S.C.E. "Artie" A llama. Ceorgia Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Engineering Society; Varsity Football '16. '19. '20; Varsity Basketball '18; Captain of Football Team ’19; President of “G” Club; Gridiron Club; Sphinx; All-Southern Tackle. Composite Pick '20. “Artie” has had a long career with us. He started off in 1915 and got the old dip in 1918. Just after this the Kaiser started a little commotion in Europe and “Artie” went over to see if he couldn’t calm matters. The fact remains that the situation was adjusted soon after his arrival. “Artie” returned in such good physical condition that he decided he would play a little more football with his Alma Mater. When the referee’s whistle blew for the 1919 season “Artie" was on hand and has been hard at work ever since. This year his playing was so excellent that he rated All-Southern. Not only has “Artie" achieved greatness on the gridiron, but he is a fine student. For the past two years he has been studying engineering under “Little Charlie" and we all know, “Artie.” that you will make a success in your profession. “Give ’em h—1." Louis Pintchuck. B.S.C. "Pint" Atlanta, Georgia Tau Epsilon Phi; Phi Kappa Freshman Club; Economics Society; American Legion; Championship Featherweight Boxer ’19; Beta Gamma Sigm3. When gazing upon his girlish countenance little one would think that Louis was a boxer of no little merit. But it is in the commercial lines that he leans for honors. Quiet, unassuming. and a very likable fellow, he has mastered every branch of the commerce course, and is one of the leaders of his class. Although with a natural weakness for the ladies he eclipses this minor tendency with his higher ambitions for doing big things and we will not be surprised to soon hear of him promoting large enterprises. He has finished the course in three years and when he leaves Professor Ingraham loses a valuable assistant. Daniel David Quillian, B.S.C.E. "D. Dr Athens, Georgia Kappa Sigma Engineering Society; Sine and Tangent; Scrub Basketball 18, T9; Lieutenant Cadet Corps ‘20. This Athens hoy has the reputation of being the lady’s man of the Senior Civil Class, lie has been practicing since way back in the dark ages and has acquired a very clever line. But the real secret of “D. D.’s" success amongst the female of the species may be found in his ability to bring copious tears to his eyes at the psychological moment—quite an accomplishment, in fact. “D. D." can be found in the gym. most any afternoon and he is quite a wrestler. He is a peach of a fellow, the kind that everybody wants for a friend. He is a devout disciple of “Little Charlie’s” and mechanics seems to be his specialty. “D. D.,” here’s hoping that you will make a good engineer, civil or otherwise. Keith Axson Quarterman, B.S.C. "Keith" Winder, Ceorgia Delta Tau Delta; Phi Kappa Vice-President of Sophomore Class; Economics Club; Pan-Hellenic Council 21. Keith came lo Ceorgia four years ago from Winder, a very thriving metropolis some twenty miles over the western horizon. Since his first day he has been a well-known figure on the campus. He has one fault, he loves the ladies, and it is whispered that they are not averse to him. He h3s a specialty of receiving "specials,” but enough of this. A derby and a cigar become Keith and he is seldom seen without cither, all of which is good for one who has attained the dignity of a senior. We do not know but that Keith may eventually study law and take his place at the bar of Georgia, which he will adorn even as his dreams predict. If a course in business law is indicative of future life and success, then we are sure that Keith will be one of the greatest. We believe that you have the ability. Show it!Henry Ricdon, B.S.C. "Henry" Tiflon, Georgia Demosthenian Economics Club; President of Sophomore Class; President of Athletic Association; Track Team ’19, ‘20; Football Squad ‘19, ‘20; Campus Club. "Henry ' came to the University four years ago with his brother “Big John.” After John had showed him all over the place he introduced him to Mr. Ilced, who extracted the necessary articles to make “Henry" a full-fledged student. Henry started off with the idea of making an expert agriculturist out of himself, but coming in contact with a certain species known as grafters, he decided that he’d have to take commerce. He has made good with Dr. Ingraham and has caught onto the game so well that he has started a business of his own. a pressing club. Although “Henry’s" duties have been “pressing" be ha' managed to find time to boot the old pigskin around the pasture a little. At other times he may be seen chatting with his friends around "Casper’s Emporium" or delving in a little politics. "Henry" has made a large number of friends who wish him well as he leaves his Alma Mater'. Wayne Kikby Rivers. B.S.C. "tTyne” Valdosta, Georgia Demosthenian Hamilton McWhorter Prize; President of Economics Club; Senior Hound Table; Student Council; Vice-President of Athletic Association; Bela Gamma Sigma. We have before you. ladies and gentleman, for your perusal and inspection. "Handsome Wyne" Kirby Rivers, the most dignified "derby bearer" and "cane throttler" in college. Our friend has but one fault, he thinks everybody, especially the co-eds and normal-ites like red sweaters, particularly his, and he refuses them the benefit of a contrary doubt by adorning himself six days oyt of the week with the triple combination of red sweater, derby and walking cane. “Wyne" will no doubt some day amass the sheckles, because for three long years he has labored as a disciple of "Pete’s" in the Co-op. a thing which will give a man the necessary experience to become a millionaire. But leaving this bit of humor we can say that “Wyne” has all the attribute of a true gentleman, an excellent scholar and an admirable companion. The best of luck to you, “Wyne.”  William Mitchell Rocer , B.S. “Biir Barncsville, Georgia Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Kappa junior Cabinet; Scabbard and Blade; Cadet .Lieutenant ’20; Cadet Captain 21; Gordon Club; Math. Club. In “Bill" we have a combination that on? seldom finds. With one eye brown and the other one blue, “Bill" attracts attention wherever he goes. Perhaps it is not so much the color of his eyes that attracts the attention, as it is that way of his. Due to the fact that lie has never been known to be in a hurry he is commonly referred to as the "s|ieed king" of the University. “Bill" is a good student, however, as the fact that he is getting the dip in three years will show. "Bill is great on going out for Sunday night suppers. In fact, very few Sunday nights have passed since he has been with us that he has not managed to get a supper somewhere. One of his favorite places is located on Hill Street-"Bill" has a wonderful personality and there is not a man at Georgia who does not like him. "Bill" contemplates studying medicine at Johns Hopkins. Here's to you. “Bill," we know that you will make a success at anything you undertake. Julian Everett Ross, A.B., B. J. “Shorty” Winder, Georgia Sigma Chi; Demosthenian Freshman Debater; Freshman Club; Tiia-lians; Lieutenant Co. "E" '20; Sophomore Declaimer; Sophomore Debater; Junior Cabinet; Champion Debater; Junior Orator; Senior Round Table; Scabbard and Blade; Debating Council; President of Demosthenian; Impromptu Debater; Football Manager '20; Gridiron Club; Anniversarian. The lone fact that lie is a product of Winder is “enuf said," the town famous for the carnivals and "49" shows. Here "Shorty" learned the art of dancing and even now the show refuses to stop in the fair little metropolis unless he is at home for the week. "Shorty” is a great fellow socially. He has a different line for 'em all and on these moonlight nights may frequently be seen on the Ag hill, especially the woodpile on the north side of the dormitory. But “Shorty" has made a record to be proud of. He is getting two degrees and has made a number of honors. Good luck to you, “Shorty," and may you and the Winder Bugle have great success..Milton Oscar Rudolph. B.S. “Sleepy" Douglas, Georgia Demostlienian Math. Club; Football Manager; 'G" Club; Campus Club; Cadet Captain 21; President of Senior Class; Gridiron Club. After seeing so many athletes from Douglas we can’t see why '‘Sleepy hasn’t distinguished himself in this line. Perhaps it is due to his size we shall attribute it to this at any rate. But “Sleepy’’ has distinguished himself in other lines, notably “politics. " He is one of the best known men in college and has always been a campus leader. For four years his motto has been. “To h 1 with New College" and Candler Hall prides herself upon housing such a man. His most besetting sin is fatigue and Chesterfield. “Sleepy" is a fine fellow to know and we hope that he will soon settle bis love affairs and direct his attention in another way. He has made a good record in college as well as a numlier of friends. Good-bye. “Sleepy." may your success in life be great, and may your troubles be little ones. John Thomas Rutland. Jr., D.V.M. "Speck" LaCrange, Georgia Demostlienian; Agricultural Club Secretary and Treasurer Athletic Association 15, 19; Track Team 16; President Rehabilitation Club 19; Manager Track Team 20; “C" Club. Now just why “Speck" is attached we find it hard to say. It may be from the specks on his face or from the specks of pretty girls who hang on his wall or other specks and spots. Seriously “Speck" is one of the luckiest men in college -money just seems to come his way and stop. Poor eagles, when they get in his pocket, they may as well Ire in iron cages. They scream loudly, Irut to no avail. A lady killer and a heart smasher, a regular tea hound in fact. Originally of the class of 19, “Speck” left to serve his country. We admire his action both in going and returning to college to finish his education. He has done well here we know that he will later on in life.Charles Steadman Sanford. B.S.A. “Charlie" Alliens, Georgia Chi Phi; Phi Kappa Freshman Cluli; Agricultural Club; Freshman Impromplu Debater; Sophomore De-bat ; -Sophomore Declamation; Georgia Naturalists; Buccaneers; Junior Cabinet; Y. M. C. . Promotion Committee; Saddle and Sirloin Club; Phi Kappa Key; Alpha 7ela. "Charlie" is another "local talent" hoy. He entered the University three years ago with the intention of making a farmer out of himself. However, lie has not confined his efforts to this field alone. He has always been active around Phi Kappa where he has ac quired numl ers of speaking honors. In order to make his education complete lie journeyed to Chicago last fall along with "Mutt" Soule. “Pete" Bennett and others to take in the big live stock exhibition. It is rumored that "Charlie’s” specialties were the "calves." The old saying "like father, like son” applies very-well to "Charlie’s" rase, for he has a very-lengthy line of conversation always ready to be lianded out. "Charlie" is a good chap and we all trust that he will have great success in raising mushrooms. Leonard Robert Siehert, B.S.C. “Sam” Valdosta. Ceorgia Demosthcnian Economics Society. Here is another three-year man from the southern part of our state. No doubt lie will some day be a promoter of some South Ceorgia enterprise, probably "spirits of turpentine.” “Sam" has been quite an admirer of Professor Ingraham and Professor Ramirez he is proficient both in accounting and Spanish. Lately it has been noticed that he is indulging in the theories of law as advocated by Dr. Sylvy. It is hard for us just at this time to make a prediction as to his future except to say that we know that he will be a success. Luck to you!Leon Sincek. B.S. Boykin Rupert Smith, ELS. "Red'' l'B. R.” Savannali. Georgia Sandcrsville, Georgia Phi Kappa Sigma Chi: Demosthcnian The above fellow has a great distinction. By distinction we do not mean to indicate 'that he is president of the Singer Sewing Machine Co., but we do claim that he bears the distinction of being the only red-headed specimen of the species—in college. The only tiling that is irregular alnnit him is that he does not wear tortoise shell Savannah spectacles. He makes a very imposing spectacle, however, when he dikes up in his cane and derby. "Leon" is very strong with the ladies and inhabits the "New York" quite frequently with a certain one. Singer has taken a variety of courses, all the way from Physics 4 to Dr. Sylvy’s work. He is a very bright fellow and should offer very valuable assistance to the delicatessen business on his return to his native city. Freshman Club; Y. M. C. A. Promotion Committee: Lieutenant Cadet Corps; Georgia Naturalists. Three years ago Boykin entered the University. During his sojourn with us he had a very wide and varied career. Being scientifically minded, he has made a very brilliant record in chemistry, in fact, he has acquired so much knowledge under Doctors White and Black, he has about decided to lie a chemical expert for some big concern when he leaves Georgia. But chemistry is not the only thing in which he is good. If what we hear is true he has done some great work over about Augusta. Here’s to you. Boykin, we know that life holds a great treasure for you. V► Lewis Monroe Smith. B.S. "Lew” Atlanta. Georgia Sigma Alpha Kpsilon; Phi Kappa Robert Murray Soule, B.S. A. "Mult” Athens. Georgia Chi Psi Freshman Club; Band '18. ’19. '20, 21; President of Buccaneers: Glee Club ‘18, ‘19. "20. 21; Assistant Leader of Glee Club ‘21. Lewis Smith of baritone fame, a member of the band and the famous impersonator of the Glee Club. He has the form of a male Venus and the looks of a Paul Swann. He has always been a favorite with the girls and next to his inevitable pipe craves the other sex. While in Columbus with the band at the Aulturn game, he was not conspicuous by his absence. In fact, he was all there, lie is a jolly good lad and has a way of his own with the ladies, and the boys like him. too. We Kredict a great career for him in any line. ut would suggest that lie and Julian F.ltinge join forces and tour the country in a new play. Seriously, "L. M. is one of the best fellows in the world, and if we didn't like him we wouldn’t rag him here. "Lou." you have blown a big horn and we hope that you’ll toot a big one in the game of life. Senate; Pan-Hellenic Council. The "Cap-sule” as he is familiarly known on and off mostly off) the campus is another worthy son of Athens. It is said that at times he may be seen digging deep into the intricacies of Ag chemistry, but we have never actually caught him at it. By far his most arduous task of late seems to be the study of the fairer sex and reading the pasteboards. There is an old proverb that says to be lucky at either one of these pursuits, one must be unlucky at the other, but we shall not hazard a guess as to which holds success for the “Capsule.’’ It is whispered that his Cadillac automatically turns down Hearing Street as the result of deep-rooted habit. What the "Capsule” intends to do in the future is a mystery, but we think his ambition is. after he has learned all the new dance steps in existence, and has broken all the ladies’ hearts in sight, to settle down to the simple life in some sequestered "love nest" where two hearts beat as one. James Payne Spicek. B.S.C.E. "Jimmy" Savannah. Georgia Kappa Alpha; Engineering Society Freshman Club; Sine and Tangent; Glee Club '20. 21; Senate; Student Council; Vice President of Pan-Hellenic Council; Captain Scrub Football Team '20; Gridiron Club. Look out girls, here conies Jimmy Spicer! Jimmy is a very strong man on the gridiron where he has scrubbed for two years. He has dealt many a player a severe blow as he romped down the field with the old pigskin, but he deals out even stronger blows than that when he is with the ladies. If he had lived with the ancients hack in the "paragonic age” we might have had this gentleman as the subject of our statuary in the place of Apollo. In his serious moments Jimmy may be found figuring out difficult problems with “Little Charlie" or planning the Glee Club trip, for which organization he handles the sheckles. He is quite a poet, too. Seriously speaking, Jimmy is one of the most popular fellows at Georgia. He has not taken an active part in college politics, but if he ever enters state politics, his many friends intend to put him in as chairman of the state prison board. “Bon jour,” Jimmy. William Much Stephens. A.B. "Steve" Savannah, Georgia Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Freshman Club; Freshman Impromptu Debate; Freshman Debate; Junior Cabinet; Glee and Mandolin Club '20. 21; Anniversarian; Junior Orator; Senior Bound Table; Intercollegiate Debater; Gridiron Club; Thalians; Phi Kappa Key; Sphinx: Phi Bel3 Kappa. In consideration of the magnitude of the subject, we present herewith another product of Savannah. He has been with us for only three years but lie has made himself at home. Hugh is quite a ninirod, not only in the field among partridges and duck, hut is an excellent indoor trap-shooter, using the profs, as clay pigeons. Not satisfied with his many and varied activities, “Steve" took up the hobo game last fall in company with “ye editor” and developed into a regular No. 1. Hugh, although in his prime, has roamed the old Lnitcd States from one end to the other. He knows how many drops of water there arc in Niagara and how many rocks the Grand Canyon contains. Hugh intends making law his profession. It is needless to opine that he will outwit many a judge in the defense of numerous clients. Here's to you, "Steve.”John Erwin Tai.madck. Ill, A.B. "Stump" Athens, Georgia Phi Delta Theta Senate. The “E" in his name stands for playfulness, we iufard. Without a doubt, “Stump" stands at the head of the list when it comes to playfulness. In the pursuit of the elusive happiness he has chosen this medium, and has employed it with right good will. Part of it has been taken out on his Cousin "Tarzan,” the balance being distributed between Pop and other Athenians in the University. “Slump” has had a many colored career here. During the war he was a Plaltsburg lieutenant but he has outgrown this indiscretion and again stands in the good grace of his fellow students. He has had a few seasons of stupendous triumph under the tutelage of Dr. John Morris, and has at last mastered the German language, ’(less to you. John. James Ralph Thaxton, A.B. "A+ Thaxton” Griffin, Georgia Pi Kappa Phi; Phi Kappa Senior Round Table; Phi Beta Kappa. Ralph conceded himself the title of “A plus” and he is well deserving of it, though the faculty apparently are somewhat dubious. To the ladies Ralph needs no introduction. Just glance at his handsome, figure and you will think that you have known him all your life. Yes. Ralph is a typical All-American heart-breaker. Once he asked his ‘‘sweetie” to return “Scott's" diamond and she was so extremely disappointed that she married her present husband. Despite these misfortunes and several others of a similar nature Ralph has acquitted himself well during hi.$ stay in college. His hobby is Spanish and bis knowledge of that subject will rival the best. Ralph is, in fact, good in all his studies. He has many friends who wish for him the best in life.O bd Caldwell Tcrhence, B.S. "Shy" Atlanta, Georgia Sigma Alpha F.psilon; Phi Kappa Freshman Club; Secretary and Treasurer of Pan-Hellenic Council; President of Senate • Club; “One Club;” Baseball Manager ’21. That “toddlin’ fool" who numbers among his many honors that of being from Atlanta, is none other than Cobb C. Torrence. He is a dancer of rare grace and has lead most of the dancing contingent -a la Polly —a merry chase learning all the new steps. “Shy" has always been a very popular student with l oth sexes. He has achieved quite a coterie by giving dancing lessons to a numlier of fair co-eds. It is said that many forgot how to dance just to learn again under Cobb’s tutelage. Cobb has always been a great follower of athletics of every kind and at foreign points where Georgia has played, he has usually been the dynamic force in creating spirit. In many respects he represents the best in Georgia students and it has been a privilege to know him. Cobb intends to make an insurance dealer out of himself. If he handles it as well as he has his dancing business, he will make a great success. Lamar Jefferson Trotti, B.J. "Trot" Atlanta, Georgia Delta Tau Delta; Demosthcnian Freshman Club; Lieutenant Cadet Corps; Scabbard and Blade; Secretary of Senate; Editor-in-Chief of Red and Black; Associate Editor of Georgia Cracker; Chairman of Students Loan Fund Board; Publicity Bureau: Gridiron Club. "Trot" came to Ccorgia from the capital city of Atlanta four years ago. but for the past two years, although he has been in Athens, his heart has been in Atlanta. Early in life he fell for a certain member of the fairer sex and ever since has been flooded with telegrams and specials. "Trot" has edited the Red and Black, been on the Cracker Staff, written editorials for the Athens Herald, aside from doing his scholastic work. His journalistic work is of the highest character. Lamar is one of the best known boys in college and his friends are many. Although he has never been seen indulging in any of the piscal games, still he is a frequent visitor at Pop’s. He’s strong for the dances and generally has a big time on such occasions. We feel sure that in the journalistic world Lamar will soon be at the top.Jerome Masskk Walker. A.I). “Jay [Talker" Marshallvillc. Georgia Phi Delta Theta; Phi Kappa Freshman Club; Buccaneers. Three years ago "Jay Walker” departed from the peach trees of Marshallvilic and landed in the "classic city.” For a long lime he labored diligently and developed a coup d'etat with the faculty, but lie has lately undergone a change and has nearly forsaken the Academic Building for Peabody Hall, lie has a strong "buddy” in his pipe which generally accompanies him here and there. To know him is to be acquainted with a fine fellow. ‘J" has made many friends during his sojourn with us and we all expect to hear from him in the future as a great peach magnate. Our best wishes go with you. Jerome. Joel Smith Watkins, B.S.C.E. "Pete" Jackson. Georgia Dcmosthenian Engineering Society; Sine and Tangent; Vice-President Demosthenian. "Pete” entered the sacred precincts of Candler Hall four years ago with the determination and ambition of becoming a world famous engineer. Unfortunately one beautiful spring afternoon he strolled up Jackson Street, inadvertently turned his head and what did he see but a fair and beautiful maiden. Since this occurrence "Pete" has been a frequent visitor to Jackson Street and his visits haven’t been confined to the afternoons either. In fact. "Pete” has had a little difficulty in making his college course work in with his numerous other activities. We all confidently hope that when "Pete's” college days are over and all his aspirations and ambitions have been realized that "he and she” will settle themselves in a little home far in the west “and let the rest of the world go by."Joseph Henry West, A.B. "Judge" Atlanta, Georgia Demosthenian Jeffersonian; Agricultural Club; Sccrctary Junior Class; President of Spanish Club; . Cadet Captain; Red and Black Staff '20; American legion; President of Demosthenian. All hail to the fair product of Greensboro. "Judge” has acquitted himself well during his stay in college. Aside from winning several honors and completing the A.B. course, he has progressed far into his three-year law course. “Judge" is quiet and unassuming. He seldom speaks, but when he does hear the lions roar! He possesses the splendid hut rare trait of being able to transact his business well but leave that of others alone. We call him "Judge." We sincerely hope and confidently believe that in the near future it will not be uttered in sportive familiarity, but will be a real and permanent prefix Judge J. H. West. Co to it, "Judge,” we have faith in you! Lloyd Claybolrnf. Westbrook, B.S.A. "Wei ty" Gainesville, Georgia Demosthenian President of Agricultural Club; Cotton School Debater; Square and Compass Club; Saddle and Sirloin Club. Out of "the red old hills of Georgia” down to Athens town came a green, lanky lad who later became known as "Wcsty.” Early ambitions to get "high up” in the agricultural world ousted him from his native habitat. During his stay here he has been a consistent, hard worker. His chief interest in college activities has centered around the Ag Club for which he would hoard great treasures of wealth. His mind runneth ever to the contrary of his fellow members. Nevertheless he is persistent in his convictions. During his life he has pursued several vocations and avocations —one of which was selling Bibles. We wish you well. "Westy.” we know that you will do well in your chosen life’s work.Clifford Edward Whatley, D.V.M. "Skipp" Reynolds, Georgia Demostlienian Hucif Calvin Wiiki.chell. B.S.A. “Puss” Douglas, Georgia Alpha Tau Omega; Demostlienian Agricultural Club; Glee Club '18, '19. '20. '21; First Lieutenant '19. '20; Scabbard and Blade; Vice-President Senior Class; Campus Club. "Skipp" bails from Reynolds, and soon after arriving at the University selected as bis work, carving the “old gray mule." From this he hopes to derive the benefits and become one of Georgia's best known “quacks." “Skipp" has been very active in many college activities and especially so in the military department where during bis junior year he served as adjutant and was most noticeable during parades. Also "Skipp" distinguished himself on the Glee Club where he was known as the belter quarter of the Georgia four. As to where “Skipp" will locate and what he will do, we cannot say. but that matters not. We know that he will make good in his chosen line. "Skipp" has always been a faithful Georgia man and has made a host of friends who wish him well in bis life’s work. Agricultural Club; President Junior Class; Captain Cadet Corps; Varsity Football ’19. '20: Student Council; Saddle and Sirloin Club; “G” Club; Gridiron Club. “Puss" came to the classic city from the town of Douglas which was then producing first-class athletes and which now prides itself for producing tobacco. During his first two years the University had forsaken the pigskin game, but Hugh kept himself in training by those long hikes to the “Ag" hill. When, how-ever, festivities were renewed down on Sanford's pasture, “Puss" was right there with the goods. Many a time we have seen him dart through an opposing guard or nail the runner. In the Alabama game he rendered Yeoman service to his Alma Mater and our hearts leaped with joy as lie blocked a certain attempted field goal. Not only is “Puss" an athlete but he is a swell fellow and a good student. With the personality that he possesses he is bound to make good when he bucks up against it in the serious game of life.I White. A.B. “Jim" Athene. Ceorgia Chi Phi; Phi Kappa Freshman Club; Buccaneers; Scabbard and Blade; Glee Club '20; Lieutenant Cadet Corps '20; Lieutenant Colonel ‘21; Pan-Hellenic Council. This is not some famous movie star, it’s “Jim" While. “Jim" came to the University three years ago during the regime of the S. A. T. C. He had a rather unpropilious time to begin his college career, but “Jim" happened to possess the necessary ability to stand the gaff. It is not only in a military way that this da«hing young cavalryman has distinguished himself, for many years ago it was rumored that he was strong with the ladies both near and far. (Especially was this said to be true during a certain itinerary made by the Glee Club. In every town the applause that he won was very vociferous. e« pccially in a city south of here which has been contending for the state capitol. But a sudden change has occurred to “Jim.” He no longer sings solos and vamps the ladies, because he has now joined the ranks of the benedicts. You arc a fine fellow. “Jim." and we all wish you well. Charles Barry Whitney. B.S.C. “Charlie" Augusta, Georgia Chi Psi; Phi Kappa Buccaneer; Spanish Club: Math. Club; Military Cadet Medal T9. During "Charlie’s” three years sojourn at the University he has always conducted himself as a loyal son of Augusta should. He has always been a hard working student and has never allowed anything to interfere with his pursuits, especially that one which he has so faithfully conducted on Cobb Street. We believe that he is going to be successful in life, for "Charlie" usually gets what he goes after. No matter how busy this august Augus-tarian is, he always manages to find lime to join in any bull session that he gets wind of and at this he cannot be exhausted—probably like someone we read about, “though vanquished. could argue still." While "Charlie" is small of stature, his heart is big and everybody who knows him likes him. Our best wishes go with you. “Charlie."Eicnest Clifford Wimbkmley, A.B. “Cren” Lyons, Georgia Phi Kappa Freshman Impromptu Debater; Freshman Debater; Sophomore Declaimer; Junior Orator; Champion Debater; Red and Black Stall; President of Spanish Club; Chairman Debating Council; President of Phi Kappa; Senior Football and Basketball Teams; Impromptu Debater ’19. ’20; Gridiron Club. Here he is. boys, look him over. “Cren" hails from the classic city of Lyons. During his early abode there we would surmise that he imbued something of the ferocity of a Lvonite, which has well been impressed upon students of a certain neighboring institution. Go to it, “Cren," we are for you. “Cren” is a leader in college activities and always ready to support anything that will foster Georgia spirit. He is a co-worker with the Sophomores in installing Georgia spirit in the newcomers each year. He is a steady worker, but is often seen about the dance hall, in fact, the “Farmer’s Frolic” has played an important role in his college career. "Cren" is a valuable friend to have. Luck to you and may you continue to instill the Georgia spirit as you go through life. William Cardnkk Wincatk, B.S.A. "Iliir Arlington, Georgia Dcmoslheniau Agricultural Club. Now, ladies and gentlemen. I wish to have your individual attention for a few moments. This noble exponent of the W illies is a devil from his own home town. And still he adheres to his father's teaching that a man is worthless for two years in his life- the year before he marries and the year after. “Bill” is now on the worthy staff and is the proud father of another little Willie. “Bill” has not only made good in college, but also in keeping the stock of Bills from becoming extinct. And seriously, ladies and gentlemen, “Bill” docs not dabble in politics. He looks after the financial end of the game. He has the distinct honor of being on the graft staff of the University. “Bill” has been faithful in the little things of life and we predict for him bigger things in the future. “Bill” leaves behind many friends who wish him well. Good luck, old man, keep up the good work.! h Otis Woodard. B.S.A. “Kid Woody" Dexter. Georgia Demosthenian • Alpha Zeta; Student Council; President Agricultural; Vice-President Athletic Association; Associate Editor Agricultural Quarterly; President Berrien Club; Stock Judging Team 17; Captain Senior Football Team. “Woody" hails from the little village of Dexter down in South Georgia. Ambitious for scientific learning along agricultural lines, he came to us in 1915 and spent two years in diligent application to study. He then left college to join the ranks of those who were to thwart the Kaiser in his ambition to rule the world. After spending two years in France serving as a lieutenant, he returned to this country and resumed his work at the University. Since then he has shown by conscientious. faithful and untiring effort that his ambition runs high into the agricultural world. “Woody" is faithful to all college activities and to anything that tends to the betterment of Georgia. He is a fine fellow and numbers his friends by his acquaintances. Georgia is expecting great things of you, “Woody." Our best wishes go with you. James- Holt Park. A.B. "Jim" Athens, Georgia Chi Phi; Phi Kappa Freshman Club. “Jim” is another member of the home guards. But he has overcome this stigma on account of the fact that he went up to Harvard for his Junior Year. After studying in that famous old institution for a year, the old Georgia spirit began to call him back. So “Jim" returned and has finished the course with his fellow classmates. “Jim" has studied the art game for the last few- years, and has developed into an artist of merit. We do not know what he intends to adopt as his life’s work, but if the wolf should howl too near his door, “Jim's” pen and brush should drive the wolf away. “Jim” is a steady, energetic fellow and there is no reason why the greatest success should not smile upon him. Aufwie-dersehen. mein Herr! « ) | I !Marie Anderson, B.S.H.E. "Marie" Brunswick. Georgia President of Y. W. C. A.; Vice-President of House Council; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '19. ’20; Homccon; Omicron Nu; Girls’ Glee Club ’21; Student Representative to International Student Conference ’19. Ah! “Marie,” thou fairest of the weaker sex and humbler of great men who worship at thy shrine. ".Marie” entered the University amid the cries of “Give us back our University.” Your stickability is all right, little girl, but you bowed your neck to allow the yoke to be fitted by a professor named "Francis.” Seriously, "Marie" is one of the best known co-eds in college and represents our little sisters on momentous occasions when great men like Boyd Moss, "Jakie’’ Tysinger and "Skipp" Whatley speak at college night occasions. When she speaks, men sit up and take notice, because she always has something worth while to say. don’t you, "Marie?" Although we are not so fortunate, "Marie,” you carry the best wishes of every meml er of the class. We expect to hear great things of you soon. Louise Brand, A.B.S.S. “Froggie” Lawrencevillc, Georgia House Council; Diths; Homecon; Girls’ Glee Club; Basketball ’21. Brenau was the scene of the first happy-go-lucky years of "Froggies’’ college career. School opened on the 18th and on the 25th "Froggie’s" blond hair appeared crowned by the latest coiffure. Though still .retaining a regard for her first love, she has become a true Georgia co-ed. She is the embodiment of pep and puts life into everything she undertakes. Her popularity and attractiveness are not confined to the Woman’s Building.Vice-President of Homecon. What would we do without Elizabeth to filibuster for us? Inclined toward a happy-go-lucky existence, Elizabeth likes a good time, flic present being good enough, and the future can take care of itself. Good matured and jolly, with a rep of never getting mad. Through the adversity of hard toil, trying to understand all the knowledge thrust toward her, with a beaming countenance through it all. Elizabeth has shown herself a worthy member of the Home Economics Gass of young women. Y. W. C. . Cabinet; House Council; Zodiac; Homecon; Girls' Glee Club. If Vena's beauty were only skin-deep, we would even forgive. That is unnecessary, however. for she is one of those persons who seem to measure up to every standard of beauty as well as brains. Her popularity is not confined to Georgia for her box is always full of mail from home and—? As a friend she is faithful and full of good humor. Good nature is in every smile, which she is never without. No one could ever he ill at ease with her and it would be impossible not to love her. I , Elizabeth Ciiumbley, A.B.S.S. Toccoa, Georgia Thalians; Vice-President Girls’ Student Council; Pioneer. Everybody, especially desirous of making A or A + , or perhaps a mere pass, might well take lessons from Elizabeth on greeting the professor on entering the class room. This is not “boot licking," because girls do not (?» believe in that. It’s courtesy: it’s the same genuine smile with which she greets everyone. She possesses rare charm and attractiveness, and her accomplishments are many. She merits the highest esteem. Iris Davenport, B.S.H.E. Fitzgerald, Georgia President House Council: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Homccon; Omicron Mu; Girls’ Glee Club. Iris has the unique combination of being both skilled in home economics and being a physics “shark." She has won admiration from all who have known her and her career as a member of the second class of young women to be graduated by the University is an enviable one. She has always ranked among the first in the class, in the hearts of her classmates, and with all whom she comes in contact. Her poise and dignity give her a bearing of which few can boast. The Home Economics Department prides itself upon being able to graduate such a good all-round girl as Iris.Edith Elizabeth Hopkins, A.B. Decatur, Georgia Ossie McEntire, B.S.H.E. Athens, Georgia Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Zodiac; Girls Glee Club; Pioneer. Homecon; Girls’ Glee Club; Basketball '20. ’21. For the pas', year Edith has been at t' e University “reviewing” her Latin and Creek. ‘She i- earn- -t and studious, but by no mean a bookworm. Her spare moments are spent in having real fun. One remarkable thing about Edith is that she ha never been known to “bite” when someone is trying to "pull" something. Probably this clever insight was acquired through her intensive study of the ancient languages. She has a polite demeanor and upon first acquaintance a dainty reserve. She is deserving of the best. Although Ossie lays no claim to outstanding fame, she is one of those steady headed people who are always there with the goods. She is one of the few girls who say little, but think much. Her course through college has been of a quiet peaceful nature. She is a practical individual and is never willing to let anything go by that is worth knowing. She is always willine to work for her college and her friends, and has consequently won much love and admiration. Those who have heard her play the mandolin can testify to her extraordinary musical talent. Aufwiedersehen, Ossie.Rosa Blanche McGee. B.S.H.E. Knoxville. Tennessee Secretary Y. W. C. A.; Mouse Council; llomecon; Omicron Mu: Girls' Glee Club 21; President of Alpha Mu. Rosa came to Georgia with a purpose to make good and her three years here can be taken as an indication that she has and will continue to do so. Over and above her ability. she has a delicacy of personality that has served to endear her to all her acquaintances. If you want a clear-headed account of Y. W. C. A. affairs, go to Rosa. Interesting herself very little in the affairs of Athens, and bothering no one with her own. she quietly goes her way and accomplishes what she set out to accomplish. Lucy Mae Neville. B.S.H.E. “Ituck” Rabun Gap. Georgia Treasurer of Pioneer; Girls’ Glee Club; Girls' Basket hall Team. “Buck" is always ready to enter into any fun and is an all-round good sport. She has a steadiness of purpose and an untiring devotion to the la-k before her. These excellent qualities coupled with strong character and good nature will carry her toward success From her course in college, it can be easily predicted that she will some day be prominent in the educational world. With an irrepressible spirit and a depth of good fellowship. she is liked and admired by all. Adelaide Ruck, A.B.S.S. Pittsburg. Pennsylvania Treasurer Y. W. C. A.; Pioneer Club; Tha-liana. She is jolly but serious enough not to be frivolous. Her name is always mispronounced and usually mis-spelled r-o-u-g-e, which causes her no little embarrassment. Off the stage, however, she rarely indulges. “All the world's a stage, and all the men and women are merely players." At least this is the way it appears to Adelaide. So she plays her part, be it tragedy, comedy, melodrama or mere farce a well set stage is all that is needed for dramatic success. Those who know her art well assured that a real opportunity is all that is needed for life’s success. Katherine Newton. B.S.H.E. “Kat" Athens, Ccorgia President of Homecon; Omicron Nu; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Zodiac. . “Have you studied your lessons yet?" expresses Katherine’s chief source of delight. Conscientiously doing her lessons is “Kat.’' Although busy in studying most of the time, she has had time to delve into Homecon. She is a person who rarely fails to do what she knows she ought to do, at the time she ought to do it, whether she feels like it or not—except to cut a class. When it comes to boning, she is a professional. She expects to head the chemistry department in 1922.  Stella Sparks, B.S.H.E. “Sieir Athens, Ccorgia Associate Editor of the Agricultural Quarterly; Girls' Student Council; Basketball '20. 21; Hoinecon. As an athlete. “51011” is right there. As for basketball, the team could not exist were it not for her regularity in attending practices. Your first estimate of Stella is likely to be indifferent, but a better acquaintance proves her to be surprisingly companionable and sincere. She is one of those mortals who say what they think in plain language and with a touch of true wit. of which she has an abundance. Georgia has not as yet been allowed to produce any successful women politicians, but Stella bids fair to develop into such as ail the symptoms arc there. Bon voyage. Nina Thompson. A.B.S.S. Comer, Georgia President of Pioneer Club '20. '21; Tha-lians; Manager Basketball 19, '20; Sigma Kappa. Nina is a typical college girl. She never appears to have a care, at the same time is never behind in class ork. Calling on “Mus Necna" is one of Professor Lust rat's favorite pastimes. One of her own pastimes is regular attendance at Chattel. Her character is steady, well balanced and above all, womanly. With these traits are combined a happy disposition and winsome manner which have won her the friendship of all who know her. Toward what end does she aspire? No one can tell. Whatever it be. she will attain it. ) Auer. Walker, A.B.S.S. Monroe, Georgia President of Girls' Student Council; Vice-President Y. W. C. A.; Secretary Pioneer Club; Girls' Glee Club '21; Zodiac. It would be impossible to say all the good tilings about Alice in this space. She is quiet, unassuming, and a very likable girl. Alice i» president of the Clrls Student Council he just could not help it. Mie is to the under-clas-men an emhod.'men: of dignity, law and honor, to be admired and to be looked up to. To her closer friend- she is a girl with high ideals and strength of character to live up to them. Blanche Elizabeth Wiiklchel, BS.H.E. “Doc" Gainesville, Georgia Y. W. ('.. A. Cabinet; Homecon; House Council; Girls’ Glee Club '21. Blanche is one of the college celebrities who is introduced on all occasions as "Doc" Whel-chel. An ever present quantity on the front seat in the English room “up the stairs,” she usually by some means, as yet unknown, stunds in the good graces of the awe inspiring genius there. She is an indispensable factor in the Y. W. C. A. Blanche is one of those girls who works all the time. In her studies as well as in other activities, she has shown a steady tenacity that has brought her worthy mention. “Doc" says that she had rather give a dose of medicine than be president.Senior Law Class History HIS year’s graduating class is the first one to he graduated under the rule making law a three-year course. The equipment, therefore, of the class is much better than that of former classes, am! each member feels that he is much better prepared to face the hardships of the legal world. In the personnel of our class is to be found the names of many men who are prominert in college circles. Some of them are more or less of landmarks around the old institution, having studied in the academic department before taking up the law and some even have other degrees by their names. Our last year has been marked by a spirit of congeniality and a fellowship that will never be forgotten. These future lawyers have gathered around the long table by the cheerful fireside of the class room, and many jests have been passed. But underneath the surface there is a seriousness of purpose and a realization that soon these lawyers will go out over the state to practice their profession, uphold the law, and be factors in the future of Georgia. This class has worked hard, and there is no reason why its members should not be heard from in after years, in the court rooms of the country. Historian.Senior Law Class Officers J. A. McFarland P. B. Ford . . . E. M. McCanless . W. B. Cody . . . E. A. Brown . . ................President .... Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer .....................Poet ' ................HistorianWilliam Walker Alexander, A.B., LL.B. “Little Alec" Thomasville. Georgia Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Kappa Sophomore Dcclaimcr; Junior Cabinet; Buccaneers; Barristers; Gridiron Club. It is rumored that when “Little Alec" first came to the University he had on short trousers and was barefooted. Dame Humor also hath it that he was at one time a hard student, feeling very miserable if he ever made below A+ in a subject. He is still quite a student, however, as witnessed by the fact that he was graduated from the academic department last year and has already won his spurs from the law department. Then too. much of his time has been given over to the fair sex. with whom “Little Alec” is a regular Chesterfield. On account of his strong infatuation with the ladies he has become a master of the tcrpsichorean art. Love affairs have been worrying him quite a bit of late and when he disposes of them. “Little Alec" should develop into one of Georgia’s leading legal lights. Ernest Edward Andrews, LL.B. “Shorty’’ Toccoa. Georgia Demosthenian Jeffersonian: Red and Black Staff; Scrub Football T6. ’19; Cheer Leader T7. ’18. T9. '20, 21; Vice-President Junior Class; Campus Club; President Demosthenian T9; Football Manager T9; “G" Club; Square and Compass; Business Manager Pandora ’21; Gridiron Club. This gentleman appears very diminutive in stature, but he’s a wonder when it comes to action. For years he has been the very terror to a certain species of beings who are said to attend a nearby technical institution. “Shorty" has always been on the job for his Alma Mater, at any time and under any circumstances. It is also known that “Shorty'’ is rather strong with the weaker sex. He has been seen very frequently steering a red roadster accompanied by some fair damsel. In his spare moments he attends Dr. Sylvy’s classes where he has closely studied contracts. He has been with us for about six years. We’re strong for you, “Shorty,” but before you leave we’ll all join in that old ballad “We hate to lose you, we’re so used to you now.” Joseph Emile Berman, LL.B. "Jot" Camilla, Georgia Fhi Epsilon Pi; Phi Kappa Freshman Impromptu Debater; Henry Grady Society; Jeffersonian; President of Jeffersonian Vice-President of Junior Law Class; Counsellors; Pan-Hellenic Council; Intercollegiate Debater. The “indispensable party” to the suit. A new joke every morning. He knows all the late ones, and revives and retouches all the old ones, invents a few, and tells them when everybody is busy. When we are tired and grouchy, his jokes cheer us up; when the 2ero hour (11:15 A.M.) approaches, his good nature and the invariable, inevitable joke braces us for the shock. Honestly, Joe has been a necessity and the class will always remember the good cheer that he has given us. Joe mixed in politics some, too. and some day we expect to vote for him for some high office. Why the good people of Mitchell may even send him to the legislature. Nay. with the experience and service, added to his present attainments. even an alderman’s place may be his. Cood luck, Joe, you've been a ray of sunshine to us. Elijah Alexander Brown, A.B.. LL.B. “Governor" Atlanta. Georgia Chi Phi; Phi Kappa Champion Debater; Heady Writer’s Medal; Henry Grady Society; President of Jeffersonian. “Lige" entered the University the year the chapel was built. In his early years he was noted for his silence, his promptness, and his scorn for politics. Today he retains the first two virtues, but alas, it seems as if Goldberg had it right when he said “They all flop sooner or later,” for the “Governor" has now developed the trait of his ancestors and sits as the presiding officer when the Jeffersonian Society is in session. On one occasion when the “Gov-ernor" broke his watch, it is rumored that the next day he was seen carrying a “Big Ben" to classes to insure his promptness. “Lige" has made a close study of the law. He has an industrious nature which will, no doubt, some day place the ermine on his shoulders.Welborn Butt Cody. LL.B. "Chief" Atlanta. Georgia Kappa Sigma; Phi Kappa Joseph Edwin Damier. LL.B. "Joe" Valdosta. Georgia Demosihenian Pan-Hellenic Council; Baseball Team T9, '20, '21; Buccaneers; Jeffersonian; Henry .Grady Society: Gridiron Club. Introducing Georgia's star first baseman and a good lawyer. Quick witted and clean, lie plays his position whether it be in the court room or on the diamond. He is an excellent example of what Atlanta can produce and does at times. The members of his class will miss the familiar greeting, “Boys, I’ve got a good one on Welchcl this morning." His optimism meant much to us and his unfailing good nature helped us over many a hard place. With his alert mind and cheerful disposition, “Chief" will never lack clients and no jury-can resist him. W'c confidently expect him to rise high in his profession. Work hard, “Chief," and save your money, we'll let you cash all the checks when we reach the Gate City. Jeffersonian; Henry Grady Society; Senate; Counsellors. "Doctor, may 1 ask a question please?" If Joe didn't know it, you can depend upon him to find it out. He hadn't been in the class three days before discovering that it was much easier to ask questions than to answer them. It was a great system and it worked. Witness the LL.B. Though one of the youngest men in the class, Joe measures up with most of them in judgment and experience. He could dig more law out of the left lol c of his imagination than most fellows could abstract from the law library in a month. If he sells farm machinery and supplies as he rashly threatens, the bar of Georgia will lose a good man. Better stay in line, Joe, the profession needs you. (Joe also plays golf, provided he can reach the club by three P.M.)Robert Clew Dickerson, Jr.. L1..B. "Dick" Homervillc, Georgia Dcmosthcnian Jeffersonian; Henry Crady Society; Senate; Counsellors; Campus Club; Square and Compass; C- M- A. Club; President of Demos-thenian; Student Council '20; Business Manager Pandora ’19, ‘20; Debating Council; Impromptu Debater; Baseball Manager 21; Gridiron Club. This gentleman ha« been at the University almost as long as Dean Snelling. in fact, “Dick" is the Dean of Candler Hall. Many years ago he used to help Col. Phil run the Beanery, but he gave up this job the next year to run the Pandora. During this year “Dick” has been muchly interested in l.ucy Cobh and Wesleyan. He has been very active in many college activities and is a very polished politician. Glenn’s efforts are now confined to politics and love, but love must be the most absorbing for Alexander said so, “Dick.” We know that you will render a great service to your constituents when you return with the LLB. attached to your name. Preston Brooks Ford, LL.B. ‘7 B Sylvester, Georgia Sigma Nu; Dcmosihenian Jeffersonian; Counsellors; President of Henry Grady Society; Vice-President Senior Law Class; Y. M. C. A. Promotion Committee; Square and Compass; President of Student Council; Gridiron Club; Sphinx. This gentleman is the senior member of the firm of Ford McFarland. “P. B.” was delayed in getting at the law game on account of soldiering for Uncle Sam. but it didn't take him long to make up the lost time. As a matter of fact the target practice he received in the army tended to aid him in hitting the bull's eye when dealing with Dr. Sylvanus. He is a steady, industrious fellow who applies himself. His hard work has won for him a place in the hearts of every student. “P. B.” has made a good law student and there is no reason in the world why his table should be ever scantily arrayed at mealtime, when he begins his practice. Luck to you, "P. B."Jesse Ocletree Futhal. LL.B. Jessr" Griffin, Georgia Pi Kappa Phi; Deiuoslhenian Jeffersonian; Henry Grady Socicly: Counsellors. "Jesse" comes to us from Griffin and the atmosphere of that city must be charged with "pep" for lie is always busy. He is one of those hard working fellows who always get their work up and are on time. His punctuality will win him many clients and we predict a hard time for the lawyer on the other side. Despite the pressing demands of the many and varied duties that he has performed so faithfully, he likes a hit of diversion now and then. He has that far away look in his brown eyes, and something kept him in Athens last summer. We should not keep you longer in suspense, but that would he telling and perhaps he has a girl back home. So gentle reader, draw your own conclusions. We will boost your guessing chances by assuring you that he didn't go to summer school. The defense will let the case rest. Pierce Edward Holmes, LL.B. “Sherlock" Vidalia. Georgia Phi Kappa Jeffersonian; Counsellors; President Henry Grady Society; Glee Club 19. 20. 21; Alternate Champion Debater '20. “Sherlock” is nearly a land mark as he tried the academic department before taking up the law. He is known far and wide in detective circles and has served on some important cases, especially those in which a little “filthy lucre" occasionally disappears through the medium of African golf. In his spare moments. ‘‘Sherlock" gives vent to his musical feelings on the clarinet. It is said that music hath charms, so evidently our friend intends charming his clients. But speaking again of his detective capacity, it is rumored that his clarinet has been the only thing over which his detective abilities have failed to function. On the Glee Club trip he lost this valuable instrument several times. When his practice liegins. “Sherlock" should at least draw the business of musicians and all the clarinet players.Nathan Jolles, LLB. Washington. Georgia Phi Kappa Jeffersonian; Henry Grady Society; Champion Debater ’19; Intercollegiate Debater ‘20; Impromptu Debater 21; Alternate Anniver-sarian 2.1; Phi Kappa Key; Sphinx. Jolles, from the aristocratic city of Washington in Wilkes, is one of our best men, a splendid student, a formidable debater and a quiet unassuming gentleman. He has reduced the gentle art of “spotting" to one of the exact sciences, having scored seventeen 10’s by actual count on a favorite question of one of Georgia’s foremost legal authorities. He is one of the few lawyers we know who can “howl and l eat the table" creditably without neglecting the necessary preparation of the case. Cultivate the ability to tell a joke to the jury, Jolles, and you will be a well rounded lawyer, a success “per se." Favorite indoor sports brief making and eating cheese tidbits. William Dean Lanier. LL.B. Harlem, Ceorgia Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Kappa Jeffersonian; Henry Grady Society; Law School Debating Council; President of Jeffersonian; President of Phi Kappa. Folks, this is Mr-er-r-r-r Lanier, a very imposing senior and a prominent member of the law school. He distinguishes himself most when he is called upon to read a passage or two from the code and delivers his remarks with great force and a protrusion of his jaw. He must be a very shrewd student, for his classmates have agreed on the point. As a politician, he’s even l»etier than John R. Cooper and has used Phi Kappa as well as Jeffersonian as his victims. His political schemes and dreams are many. He is very strong on arguing the technicalities involved in any subject from nothing minus to nothing plus, so there is no reason why he shouldn’t start his career as a justice of the peace and eventually get elected President of the United States.Joe Herman Lesser. LL.B. Rome, Georgia Tau Epsilon Phi; Phi Kappa Jeffersonian; Henry Grady Society; Vice-President of Junior Law Class; Square and Compass; American Legion; Champion Middleweight Boxer ’19; Scrub Football '19; . Scrub Baseball '20; Assistant Track Manager '20. “Mr. Chairman, I move that we adjourn." Thus has Joe demonstrated his good sense and tact many times. When voices grew’ high, faces flushed, and oft fists were clenched. Joe's calmness and quick wit found expression in the above-quoted words and the meeting adjourned in order and without the loss of blood. In these days of endless (and often senseless) speaking, if we were called upon to bestow a medal for oratory at the University, it would go to Joe by unanimous acclaim, for these six words pronounced in his stentorian tones. Although he was admitted to the bar by-special examination last spring, and both by-license and ability he was fully qualified to enter the practice of his profession at that time, he was loyal to his class and returned to finish the course with his less fortunate classmates. Good luck to you, Joe. you are sure to be a success in your profession. F.dcar Maxwell McCani.rss. LL.B. "Max" Canton, Georgia Sigma Chi; Demosthcnian Thulians; President of Thalians '21; Senate; Historian of Junior Class; Secretary of Senior Class; Jeffersonian; President of Jeffersonian; Baseball Manager ‘20; Counsellors; Pan-Hellenic Council; Gridiron Club. “Max" came to the University four years ago with nothing in particular against himself except that he was red headed. Since arriving, however, he has developed one other failing and that’s a great proclivity for “puns.” In his senior year he has developed a general approval for co-education and is a source of much delight over at the "Ag" hill. Besides conquering the ladies, “Max" has also been successful along many other lines und has acquired a long list of honors, lie has made a good student and his friends may be said to be innumerable. Luck to you, “Max," and may you have as great success in your law-practice as you have in fooling Dr. Sylvy. James Archie McFarland, LL.B. “Mac" Dalton, Georgia Demos! hen ian Jeffersonian; President of Henry Grady Society;. American Legion; Student Council; Counsellors; President of Senior Law Class. During “Mac’s" sojourn at the University he has applied himself thoroughly to the study of the law. He takes great pride in his marks, which range around 99. It is rumored that he nearly got into a fight with Ford on one occasion when Ford made 99Vi and “Mac" only got 99. If you have ever been to an athletic game and had the fortune of sitting near “Mac,” you will remember what a rooter he is. Why he talks football or baseball to the player just like a Philadelphia lawyer speaks to the jury. He puts all he's got into pulling for the team. Probably this is the reason that “Mac" has made good under Dr. Sylvy. “Mac.” after a few seasons, we expect to find you on the bench, sitting pretty, and dealing out justice to your fellow countrymen. Raymond William Martin, LL.B. “Chatty" LaGrange, Georgia Lambda Chi Alpha Jeffersonian; Henry Gradv Society; President of Junior Law Class; Pan-Hellenic Council; Cadet Major '20; Cadet Colonel ’21; Scabbard and Blade; Square and Compass; Manager Track Team '19. “Turn out the guard.” Colonel Marlin approaches. One of the notables of the law-department. While the rest of us were kept busy with the “prescribed studies” and were getting demonstrations of “the human mind in agony," "Chatty” found time to climb to the top of the military department of the University. just as a diversion. However, we forgive all his fame and prestige, for he discards all his military dignity when within the sacred confines of the law building and is one of the boys—a prince of a fellow. Does he believe in co-education? You'll have to ask him. for we thought we had him located and didn’t. Once upon a time he saw red when a skirt casually flitted across the historic old campus, but now he wears a regular “Quaker Oats" smile. Never do you hear him find fault with Georgia as “she" is. “There’s a reason.”Robert Edward Lf.e Spence, A.B.. A.M.. LL.B. "Rob" Albany. Georgia Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Kappa . Freshman Debater; Sophomore Debater; Sophomore Declainier; President of Phi Kappa; Intercollegiate Debater; Phi Kappa Key; Colonel Cadet Corps; Business Manager of Thalians; President of Senate; President of Pan-Hellenic Council; Counsellor’s Club; Scabbard and Blade; Glee Club; Gridiron Club; Sphinx. "Bob" is more or less of a landmark around the University, this being his sixth year. He has made his appearance once before as a senior, but seeing a great future in the law, he enlisted among the cohorts of Dr. Sylvy. To be sure Bob has a good line not only with the profs., but with the ladies too. He is quite an actor, as his role in the “Flower Shop" along with "Jerry" Jones, well demonstrated last fall. “Bob" is a very busy man as his honors indicate. He has rendered a great deal of service to his Alma Mater and it is rumored that his efforts have not been for the honor alone. "Bob" is a man of ability and will render a great service to his state in his profession. Isaac Max Wkncrcw. LL.B. Brunswick, Georgia Tau Epsilon Phi; Phi Kappa Jeffersonian; Secretary and Treasurer of Junior Law Class; President of Spanish Club; Impromptu Debater ’20; Henry Grady Society. Wengrow is the junior partner of the famous law firm of “lesser Wengrow.” In addition to this distinction, he is the youngest member of the Senior law class. He is a very hard working student and through the efforts of Dr. Sylvy and “Joe” he has accumulated a very fluent command of the law in it? most comprehensive sensi. Wengrow has been practicing his preliminary courting up and down Hancock Avenue, but in the future he intends to handle the contract business in regard to shipping around his native town of Brunswick. Due to his energy and persistence he has made good in our midst. There is no reason to believe that Max won’t make a good “J. P." some day. He has a good town to start with and his success should be certain.Ovid David Wiielchel, LL.B. "Dutch” Gainesville. Georgia Kappa Sigma; Phi Kappa Jeffersonian; Henry Grady Society; American Legion. Always busy and nothing to do. always in a hurry and nowhere to go, always thinking and nothing on his mind. Everybody knows that Hall County is some spirit maker and it is not surprising that "Dutch" has the real old Georgia spirit. He is one of the best fellows in school and one of the most industrious, too. Not content with getting up all the work in his course he went outside for practical experience. If he maintains his present interest in law. we confidently expect great things from this gentleman of Hall. Keep it up. “Dutch," you have all our good wishes. L 4History of the Senior Pharmacy Class, 1921 N the fall of 1919 we were enrolled in the largest pharmacy class in the history of the University, and each of us began with the determination to make it the best. Though our class has shown great interest in the general . college activities, and done all in its power for the welfare of Georgia, still it has been necessary for us to spend much of our time in study. For our work has been ceaseless and our tasks have been hard and many a time has our future looked gloomy,—so gloomy as to require a bit of light from our midnight candles, and still our destiny at times was uncertain. Sad to say, but many of those who began with us are with us no more. However the number that survives is determined to uphold the record of those who have gone before, and to make a record for ourselves that shall not soon be surpassed. And many of those who have gone are working for other degrees, some were called away by some act of Providence, but SOME would not be HARD to find. When first we roamed the campus of dear old Georgia, possessed with that feeling that is always experienced by a Freshman, the first to speak a word of encouragement to us was Doctor Wilson, and all through the struggle he has been our constant friend, guide and companion. Whatever success may come to us in life,—much credit will be due to his ceaseless and unyielding efforts. Our stay at the University has been short, but when we are gone to gaze no more on the scenes of the dear old campus and are longing once more to have those sacred notes of “Alma Mater" and “Glory to Old Georgia” ringing in our ears, we will recall many a thrilling incident that has occurred during our stay among the hills of Athens, and many a.friendship that was formed here that will never be forgotten, and whatever the future may bring to us, we will ever have in our hearts that feeling that is only felt and is only known by a true Georgia man,—a feeling of u dying love and devotion to his Alma Mater. E. B. Rogkrs, Historian.Senior Pharmacy Class Officers R. P. You.mans A. S. Johnson R. D. Hcdcson . E. R. Rooers . ................President . ... . Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer ................HistorianWilliam Fkancis Alvkbson, Ph.G. “Fall ' Villanow, Georgia Demosthenian Since Alverson has left the little metropolis of the allied nations, its inhabitants have lost rthal we have gained. "Fatty” is a prince of a fellow. His thoughts are as deep as he is tall. He is known by most of the fellows as "Doctor" because he shoots all the profs, coming and going on all subjects. He took great delight in shooting Dr. Wilson on the difficult plots in the pharmaceutical field and also is one of the few to knock Dr. Black for a loop in chemistry. Alverson has made New College his domicile and occasionally has to administer to his unfortunate dormitory mates that now and then get in a tilt with Candler Hall. After spending two successful years with us he returns to his constituents to administer castor oil. We hate to see you depart, hut you hear the call of the tinkling coins. May you live long, love well, and die happy. Sylvan Edwin Butt, Ph.G. “Lieutenant" Blairsville. Georgia Demosthenian You'd be surprised after looking at this fellow that he hails from the "roughs" of North Georgia. Blairsville has the honor that very few cities have—that of putting out “a man who knows.” The very name of Butt brings to us memories of the S. A. T. C. Once during inspection when ordered to “port arms," he replied, “Sir. I’m paralyzed." The "lieutenant’s” stay in Athens cannot be classed as complete failure since he has accomplished the impossible, viz., a bootlick with Dr. Black and passed the course without cracking a book. Our greatest regret is that we must part with the "lieutenant” when he goes back to Blairsville to begin the "pill rolling" practice. W'e predict a great future for “Archie" and we hope that he will perfect his favorite drug. So long "Lieutenant."Andrew Herbert Fowler. I h.G. 44Bert” Woodstock, Georgia Demosthenian Fowler comes to us from Woodstock and though he has been with us only two years, his wit, jollity and pleasant smile have won him numbers of friends. Early in the mornings he can be found propped up on his elbows looking out of the window of Dr. Wilson’s class room. Some think he is making an early morning study of the co-eds, while others say he is only trying to get a view of his greatly admired chemistry professor as he comes to work. Though he is especially fond of the co-eds and much of his time is spent dreaming of the romance that awaits him in the other end of the castor oil dispensory, he has worked well and made good. Those who know him best like him best. Luck to you, old boy, may your life be a success. Clark David Gill, Pii.G. “Fish” Butler. Georgia Demosthenian Though Gill has been with us only two years he has made a wonderful rep. for himself. especially with the Freshman ('lass. Our first impression of him was that he was a sign painter, as evidenced by the fact that when he and other were painting up a building at the S. N. S. one night. "Fish" signed his name to the work as all sign painters do. But after returning to Candler Hall, meditation told him that when said name was discovered. the officials would probably desire his presence at an early date. So a postmidnight trip was made back to the above-mentioned institution and the entire side of the building was painted red in order to obliterate his name which he couldn’t find in the dark. Hobo! Only say the word and Clark is raring to hop a side door pullman which he did on two recent notable occasions. Clark, you’re a good scout and we hope you will live a thousand years and that prosperity will be your only stumbling block.Roy Dowmf. Hodgson, Pii.G. “Hod" Alliens, Georgia Demosthenian Class Treasurer. Roy hails from the “classic city" claiming •that his home is out on Boulevard, but from all evidence it is cither at the City Y. M. C. A. or Terrell Hall, as these arc the only places at which he can ever be seen. We understand that he spends most of his time in l)r. Wilson's class room, answering to his name when the roll is called. On one occasion when asked what a “sialogogue" was. he replied. “It is something that stimulates something somewhere.” A great athlete has been spoiled by his not getting the time to go out for practice for he admits himself that he is good. Methinks that he will go out next year for if co-education holds out he will never have the heart to leave his Alma Mater. But in spite of all this Hodgson is a fine classmate. always wearing a smile and welcoming everyone to smile with him. We wish the best of luck to you. old scout, wherever you set up your “pill” stand. Albkkt Sidnky Johnson. Ph.G. “Johnny” Crawfordville. Georgia Demosthenian Student Council: American Legion; Vice-President of Class. This look of Dr. Johnson's is not natural but has been acquired since the honor of being a meml er of the student council has been bestowed upon him. Dr. Johnson came to the University back in 1916. but in the spring of 1917 he contracted the patriotic fever and soon thereafter became an “old salt" and sailed the high seas on the good ship “Merci." On his last trip across the pond “Johnny" liecame very seasick and he then and there vowed that he would never cross again until he bad discovered and perfected a seasickness preventative. Influenced by this and the fact that certain promenades down on Jackson Street might be resumed he came to the University to get his Ph.G. We believe lhat lie is going to gel that seasickness remedy, at least if he is as consistent in his efforts along this line as he has been in others, he should. Luck to you. “Johnny.”Eowakd Benjamin Rogers. Ph.G. "Doc" Reidsvillc, Georgia Demosthenian William Thompson Morris, Pii.C. “nnr Rome. Georgia Phi Kappa "Bill's" chief ambition once was to make the world safe for democracy and he began this arduous task in 1918 when he came to the University for the S. A. T. C. house party. Coupled with this ambition was his desire to become a finished pill roller. Those closely associated with Bill are forced to note several peculiarities about him, viz.: his love for the campus, his undying devotion for the chemistry department and Dr. Black and his fondness for I)r. Edgerson in the physics department. Besides this “Bill” is an excellent fellow and we do not know where we could find anyone who could he classed as his enemy. He has a broad smile and a word of encouragement for everyone whom he meets. He is often found around Dr. Wilson's castor oil dispensary entertaining his classmates with humorous remarks. We predict a great future for Dr. Morris and we hope that some day he may compound a drug which will prove a panacea for all ills. Luck to you. "Bill.” Class Historian. There are very few men who come to the University to learn to roll pills who enjoy the popularity that Rogers does. He is a type of student who is very modest with his accomplishments. The practice of pharmacy will not be the only practice of "Doc's" when he launches forth in the world to fill prescriptions for the M.D’s. To prove this ask a certain young lady friend of Rogers. The coming of graduation means that Georgia will send out into the world a man who is one of the finest students who have ever developed the "old Ceorgia spirit.” We feel safe in predicting that "Doc” will be very successful in life, because he says little but keeps digging all the time for what he intends to accomplish. We hid you "au revoir." "Doc."Roger Preston Yolmans, Ph.G. "Pres” Swainsboro, Georgia Dcmosthenian President of Senior Pharmacy Class. Roger is one of those ambitious lads who is taking a four-year course in two. The fact that he is taking both the pharmacy and pre-mcd. in two years indicates that he has an extraordinary mind. “Pres" says that it is hard for him to decide whether to be an ordinary pill chaser or a real doctor. He has made many friends and to say that the ladies like him is putting it too mild. He is a “killer" with the weaker sex and likes to spend his leisure hours on windy days standing on the corners looking ’em over. He divides his time between the pill factory and the ladies, giving the ladies the benefit of the doubt. We must admit that “Pres" is a jolly good fellow and we predict great success for him whether it be as a M.D. or as a Ph.G. Give ’em hell, “Pres.”Junior Class History college life is like a great gridiron, and we are the actors sreon. The goal is now in sight, very, very much nearer an it once was. Seventy-five yards lie behind us, twenty-re rugged ones before us. Three years have slipped by like the flowers of spring; they have gone but their memory is with us, their fragrance is strong in our hearts. So it is always with the pleasant things of life. They haunt us with sweet memories like the odor of the rose clings to the vase that is shattered. Three years are with the centuries of the past—one is yet to be explored. Each one we thought the hardest, but as we make the final charge we feel the conviction that we might have done better, might have made more useful those jeweled days that flitted by on the wings of youth. We must have been a lucky class. Our path has been a bed of roses. The fates smiled upon us. First we missed the pushball fracas as Freshmen, and later we missed it as Sophomores. You who have gone before, are we not fortunate? Other than this and some minor things, we are the first Junior Class not to drill. But with all that we have done something. Those who number themselves amongst us have taken part in all the college activities—literary, athletic and all. And there is yet one more year. One more year in which to right our mistakes of the past, for we all could have done better. Surely, during these three years that now lie in the dark halls of time, we have made an honest effort. We have accomplished something. We hope that we have added a new lustre to the name of our Alma Mater. And we promise that the last lap shall be the best lap. That when we have passed out of these portals it can be said of us that we did our part to make true the statement that ' “Through the ages, Alma Mater Men will look to thee,— Thou the fairest of the Southland, Georgia’s Varsity.’” Historian.I Junior Class Officers W. H. Campbell L. M. Harmon . J. W. McCraney C. M. Slack . . H. H. Mancum . ...............President ...........Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer .....................Poet ................HistorianJunior Class Roll Bailkv, H. 11 Beale, Marcukrite . . Savannah Bird. F. M Blackmon, J. W. . . . Boney, S. M . . Columbia. S. C. Bookiiart, J. B Brand. M. E Brannen, J. F Brichtwell, T. J. • • . Broach. B. J Broadhurst. G. M. . • Broadnax, M. J. . . . Carrollton Brooks, D. W Callaway, A. W. • . . Campbell, W. H. ■ . . Cannon, G. M.. Ill . . Cantrell, T. L Carreker, H. G. • • • Carson, B Chandler. Alice . . . Childs, V. C Cohen, C. H Colvin, Mary Atlanta Cox, C. E Cox. J. T Culbertson, A. B. . . . • • Stone Mountain Daniel, W. F Dart, F. C Dasher, R. L Davis, A. B Dorsey, Elizabeth . . Drake, Anna Durden, 1). B Durden, R. V Durden, W. C Graymont Durden, W. D Edwards, Lula . . • . Oxford Edwards, Troy . . . . Estabrook, W. H. • . Evans, G. R Faulkner, D. G. Fitts, R. L Freeman, Buena . . . Frost, F. H Griffin, L. A Cunn, W. E Gurr, Edward .... Curb. Nancy Haddock, Nancy . . . Harmon, L. M Harris, R. V Hastincs, D. M. . . . Henderson, J. H. . . . Hosch, H. W Hurt, E. W Hutcheson, W Inman, R. J Kelley, T. G Komp, C. C Kinc. C. H Kinc, H. G Kirby. J. T., Jr. . . . Lamb. W. L ■ • • • • Swainsboro Lanier, L. R Summit Mancu.m, H. H • • . • Grovestown Martin, F. A Martin, Mary . . . Merrit, J. L Methvin, 0. K. . Moore, Annie . . . . Moore, Marion . . . Morris, H. M. . . . Morton, 0. S. • • . Murphy, J. C McCiianky, J. W. . . McFarland, I). W. . . McGee, Paul . . . . McKinley, L. C. . . . .... Millcdgevillc McMaster, J. H. . . . McMillan, T. L. . . . McRainey, M. A. . . . Elmodcl McWhorter, T. . • . Nickerson, N. D. - . Nix, E. M Pearce, C. C Pound, Ira Reid, J. F Reid, Sarah . . . . . Re v, L. C Reynolds. 0. G. . . ■ . . . Donaldsonville Ridcway, C. H Robinson. H. A Rodgers, D. S Royston, C. A Sawtell. R. R Sheffield, M. J. . . . Simpson, Frances . . . Smith, C. B Slack. C. M Smith, Maude Sparks, M. G Stewart. C. D Stokes, J. R Upshaw, P. C Veale, J. E Walker, J. M Watson, E. E White, Mary Cannon Wier, J. B Williams, B. H Wilson, Marcukret • • ■ Willis, 0. S Woodruff, H. E Wricht, G. W Younc, Elizabeth . . . History of the Junior Law Class reader behold with lenient eye; likewise calm thy surging ;r ere it arise: your Historian would tell the truth, even igh, in so doing, he describe the Junior Class in Law. Now comes to our recollection: “Law, in its most general and comprehensive sense, signifies a rule of action.” This was the first siege gun fired in the five months campaign around the Four Hills of Black-stone. We emerged from this fatal encounter, terribly crippled, and after reorganization and recuperation lasting through three months vacation, we assaulted Common Law Pleading, confirmed our Right of Petition according to the Code, and, as we go to print, we are engaged generally around the Mount called Equity, and the reports coming from the front arc rather “vague, shadowy and nebulous.” Though we might assume the extraordinary risk, yet we do most solemnly dedicate the short and brilliant past to our many accomplishments. Moreover to the dim and glorious future we demise: a new era in jurisprudence,—bdth equitable ,and legal,—many encumbrances, several presidents, one or two governors, a host of judges and a few lawyers; provided, nevertheless, mala impedimenta non oriuntur. We do hereby lay bona fide claim to the largest and best class in the history of the Law School, “whereof the memory of man runneth not to the contrary.” By and through virtue of all the pleas known, both at Law and Equity, we have succeeded in inducing five or six men to discard the stately scholarly profession and they are now imbibing the legal nectar at the fount of Jurisprudence, including among them, the tallest songbird in college and the “littlest” college man in the world, undiscovered regions included. The Senior Class is indebted to us for much of their extra pleasure; and the Sophomore Class is indebted to us for all of their privileges, by reason of our having discovered and perfected the now inalienable Right of Petition. Besides having the largest number of ex-service men, we have a large percentage wearing the Silver Victory Badge. By reason of the foregoing facts we declare our class the largest and best, ever in the history of Old Georgia. The Law Department concurs in this judgment, Dr. Morris and the Senior Class dissenting. Historian.Junior Law Class Officers H. J. Kennedy . R. E. McCaskell A. J. Ryan . . . J. W. Shephard . .............President .... Vice President Secretary and Treasurer ...............Historian ■Junior Law Class Roll Anderson, R. L. . . Arnold, A. J. . . Arnold, J. W. . . Bowers, B. B. . . . Braswell, R. A. . Brown, J. A.. . . Clark, N. H. . . . CoNCDON, W. P. . . Dkkle, M. S. • . . Donohue, W. H. . Fawcette, A. R. . Few, S. W......... Godfrey, J. D. . . Goodwin, J. E. • . Gray, H. C. . . . Harcrett, W. T. . Hartridce, Julian Hayes, Jones . . . Hkery. W. 0. . - . Hickey, K. L. . . Holcombe, L. L. . Johnstone, A. C. . Kennedy, H. J. . . Lanier, L. G. . . Levie, A. T. . ■ ■ Mann, C. T. . . . Moss. B. C. • • • Mull, C. J. • . . McCaskill, K. E. . McDowell, J. P. . McGee, T. J. . . McWhorter, E. A. Northcutt, W. S. . Ryan, A. J. . . • Shelok, J. C. . . Sheppard, J. W. . Thomas, W. G. • Tisincer, H. H. -Troutman, J. F. . Walton, M. C. • West, J. H. . . . Wilson, J. B. . . . . . Macon . . . Monroe . . . Alliens . . . . Canon . . . Ducula . . . Alliens . . Savannah . . . Augusta . . . Melter . . Savannah . . Savannah . . Apalache . . Davisboro . . Savannah . . - Augusta . . . Tifton . . Savannah . . Eastonellc . . Savannah . . . Atlanta . . ■ Atlanta . . ■ Atlanta . . Barncsvillc . . Statesboro . . Montezuma . . . . Milner . . . Toccoa .... Rome . . . Athens . . . . Griffin . . Columbus . . Savannah . College Park . . Savannah . . . Atlanta .... Daisy .... Jesup . . Carrollton . Fort Valley . . . Augusta . . Greensboro . . LogansvilleJunior Pharmacy Class Officers A. R. Patrick . . T. A. Mi'rphy . . T. V. Coleman . . Eunice Youmans K. E. Blanchard ...............President , . Vice-PresUlent Secretary and Treasurer ...............Historian ................ChaplainJunior Pharmacy Class History inflAVING heard the “call” not the “call” of the “wild” but (a bd the “call of ambition,” we answered it on a September morn I hi of nineteen hundred and twenty. Hailing from far-away M Russia, the tulip land of Holland and all parts of the Em- pire State, co-ed hater, co-ed chaser, of which there are plenty, and co-eds alike we arrived in old Athens town on the above mentioned date; handed Mr. Reed something like eighty bucks, and put our nom de plume in the column of Pharmaceutical Pursuers. .There was only one rejected applicant, that being one of our “Ag.” friends, who thought Pharmacy was the technical (high ferluting as he called it) name for a farming course. However he got in over on the hill and is now contented to roll the wheel-harrow while we roll the pills. Our arduous duties started in Terrell Hall which we soon learned to call Terror Hall, and believe me it is. It has as much admiration in the academic line as the beanery has in the show line. Nevertheless the majority of us are of the opinion that “Keeping everlastingly at it brings success,” and so we arc. Those who hopped into this course for a “Crip”, soon found out different and were forced to remark as REUBEN did, “There ain’t no such animul.” Then there are those who seem to be beguiled under the assumption that Ph. G. means Graduate of Poolology. They are making them- selves more proficient in rolling billiard balls than they are in rolling pills, and have decided to let Pop do the mixing of their drugs for them; we fear that having been given their chance, and not taking it, they will sail away from the U. of G. on the “Col. Phil. Ship Route” to the tune of “Home Sweet Home.” When we first entered we didn't know a mortar from a spatular or a pill-tile from a pestle. In fact we thought they were all a pestilence. Now however we have become acquainted with all those terms, and hope to pass on into the Senior Class from hence. In another year, we hope to venture out into the world of our profession, and make a great success, one that Dr. Wilson will be proud of for many years to come. We hope that every one of this class have that undefinable phrase, the “Georgia Spirit,” and that it will be forever embodied in us. Whatever success we may attain in our career we will attribute to the training we may receive by our expert faculty. Eunice YoumanS, Historian.Junior Pharmacy Class Roll Blanchard, K. E. . Brown, M. C. . . Boyette, A. S. • • Bloemink. A. • • Coleman. T. V. . Drewky, H. H. . Howell, W. R. . . Lee. J. H....... Lyndon, C. B. . • Moody, C. A. . . Mosely, T. L. . Murphy, T. A. . Mc.Michael, R. L. Parker, G. C. • • Patrick, A. R. . Rosomoff, M. . . Smith, L. O. . . Styles, L. . . . Sasser. T. J. . . Tool. T. E. . . . You.mans, Eunice Younc, T. C. . . ..............Leah, Ga. . . . . Gainesville, Ga. . . . Buena Vista. Ga. . . . Deventer, Holland .............Macon, Ga. ............Griffin, Ga. .............Summit, Ga. ............Oliver, Ga. . . . Washington, Ca. ..........Blakely, Ga. .... Harrison. Ga. ..........Coolidgc, Ga. . . . Buena Vista, Ga. . . . Buena Vista. Ca. ............Eldora, Ga. Radomysle KicfT, Russia ..........Valdosta, Ga. . . . . Tallapoosa. Ga. . . . . . Savannah, Ga. .... Arlington, Ga. . . . . Swainsboro, Ga. ...........Tennillc, Ca.Sophomore Class History E, the Class of ’23, having passed the never-to-be-forgotten days of the perennial greenness of Freshmen, were called upon September 15, 1920, to take up again the serious undertaking of preparing ourselves further for future life. As Sophomores we realized from the very beginning that there was a certain preliminary work that must be done. The incoming Freshman Class presented our first serious problem. The class was so large that there was much labor for the Sophs in seeing that their hair was properly trimmed in keeping with the time-honored custom of the Sophomore Class. Phis was indeed, however a labor of love and no Freshman can say that he was slighted. What we did and the countless ways in which we benefited suffering humanity in our Freshman year have been enumerated in a previous edition of the PANDORA. It is now the happy lot of the historian to recount some of the glowing deeds done in a year that advances us another quarter toward the goal to which each member looks with a hopeful eye. As an organization, our class has been a great success. We have never failed to stick together on any occasion that demanded unity of action. Many of our fellows have come forward in the critical moments of our second year in college and have shown their abilities as leaders—men who do things. Our class has “taken a lion’s share" in all phases of college activities. On the gridiron, diamond and track she has furnished her full quota of stars to help bring victory to the Red and Black. In basketball, as we all know, the Sophomores have taken a leading part. Several of her members wore the coveted “G” in our Freshman year and a still greater number have shown themselves worthy of it this year. In all literary and social activities we are taking our part. In the class-room and on the campus our members have shown a never-failing spirit. We can boast of a class full of enthusiasm, teeming with activity, men with bright minds and noble hearts, men who are willing to work in order to accomplish the honored seats in the hall of fame. The Class of ’23 is throughly imbued with the “ole Georgia spirit” and we have shown and will continue to show by our deeds that we intend making our Alma Mater a little better for our having been here. We confidently believe that when the last member of the Class of ’23 shall have answered the roll call of death, our record for things accomplished will not be excelled by any other class that has ever been graduated from this grand old institution. Historian.Sophomore Class Officers C. A. McMillan..........................................President H. V. Hartley......................................Pice-President C. S. HODCES...............................Secretary and Treasurer A. T. Persons...........................................HistorianSophomore Abercrombie, W. F....................Douglas Aderhold, 0. C.......................Atlanta Adair, J. T...........................Athens Alexander. T. W......................Augusta Almond, P. M...................Social Circle Anderson, P. K.......................Quitman Anthony, T. I...........................High Shoals Akmsthonc, J. R...................Moodv-ille Bailey, M. C............................Cobb Baker. C. W...........................Tifton Barber, W. H........................Moultrie Barnett, J. V........................Sharon Barron, Ruth.....................Clarksville Bell, M. R.....................Millcdgcville Bell, Ruby...........................Waleska Bennett, J. C..........................Stone Mountain Bennett, John W.....................Waycross Benton, A. 0......................Fitzgerald Bices. R. L...........................Athens Bcwdex, L. C..........................Athens Brokincton, C. E...................Brunswick Bhuce, D. F...........................Athens Buchanan, J. B.......................Jackson Burdashaw. W. J......................Augusta Burt, J. F.............................Point Peter Burton, R. G..........................Monroe Bush, Aaron...........................Athens Chandler, O. W........................Albany Chandler, S. G..........Springfield. W. a. Chapman, J. E.......................Columbus Chastain, F. D.........................Siger Chumrley, Frances.....................Toccoa Clark, G. J.........................Waycross Coleman, H. H....................Graymont Conyers, C. T.................Cartersville Cook, H. H............................Blythe Cook, R. R............................Madras Cooper. C. H........................Columbus Cordell, J. W.........................Bowman Coulter, I. P.......................Columbus Crider, R. J......................Carrollton Davant, R. M.......................Butler Davis, E. K......................Clarksville Davis, J. D...........................Athens Davis. J. L............................Macon Davison, Beaumont....................Atlanta Dean, H. H.......................Gainesville Denmark, J. E.....................Statesboro Derden, H. W..........................Elijah Dixon, E. H............................Wrens Dorman, H. P........................Americus Drake, W. W............................Turin Drew. E. W...........................Preston Dunn, Ted.........................Fitzgerald Eldridce, H. E......................Ringgold Erambert, G. F..........Fayetteville, N. C. Class Roll Facan, J. D Farrar, Greer . . . Flake, T. J Frederick, F. J. . . Fuller, F. H Gamble, T. L . . . Gannon, A. F. . . . Gibson, W. S Gillespie, J. W. . . Greer. F. M Gunby, P. E. . . . Lincolnton Gurley, H. B. . . . Loganville Hailey. J. S Halpert, J. 11. . . • Hampton, Belle . . Athens Hanahan, M. L. . . Dothan. Ala. Harbin, N. J Hardin, H. J Harkins, A. D. . . . Harper, J. K Harris, H. T Hart, G. S Hart, W. J Hartley, Etiiyleen . Hartley, H. V. . . . Hasty, A. H Funston Hayes. ' . C Henderson, B. D. . . Adairsville Hester. W. H. . . . Hill. L. 11 Hodces. C. S Hood, J. G Howard, E. Y. . . . Jarrell. Iris .... Jarrell. J. G Johnson, C. A. . . . Johnson, Dessie . . Higston Kicklichter. H. G. - Kinc, H. C Lane, R. L Blakely Lancley, I.. R. . . . Leverett. J. G. . . . Levie, Thurston . . Lewis. J. F Linch, A. 0 Lowe, E. A Lufbi RROW, S. B. . Llndy, W. A Maddox. H. H. . . . Meador. V. K. . . . Michael, E. L. . . . . West Carrolton, Ohio Miller, G. W. . . . Millican, J. P. . . . Mims, W. F Mitchell, W. J. . Mobley, M. D. . . Dallas Moon, J. W .... Bowman Mooney, J. K. . . . . Gainesville Morris, J. Z .... Ml. Zion Mollis, W. C Cochran Murphy. J. P Murk ah, E. P Murray, M. G Murray, W. T Albany McGee, .1. B McKenzie, F. 0 McKenzie, W. 1). . . McLendon, W. F McMillan, C. A Monroe McRae, C. E McRae, CP Newton, C. H Newton, J. A Padcett, C. L Baxley Paris, L. H Patterson, Y. M Perry, T. R Persons, A. T .... Taiesville Phillips, G. S Phinizy, T. B Pittman, R. C .... Villanow Pollock. 1). M Powers, R. 11 Rae. Ruth Rawson, C. E Reaves, Olca Athens Reaves, K. J Rhodes, R. B Richardson, G. W. . . . Rivers, T. H Roberts, J. S Russel, F. L Sasnett, Martha .... Atlanta Sasser, T. J Scarborough, D. D. . . SCHWALB. 1). I) Seaborn, M. 1) Shell. S. P Simmons, Frank .... Skeen, R. H Slack, Mildred Tifton Slaughter, J. R. • . . . . Columbus Smith, E. N . Greensboro Smith. F. B . . . Bowersvillc Smith. M. M McRae Smith. R. 11 Southwell, B. L. Still, L. C Stokes. T. E Summers, A. D Conyers Swift, A. K Tait, W. L. Tanner, F. A Thomas, H. 0 Homer Thomas, W. W. . . . Thurmond, D. F. . . . Usury, Marion . . . . Vandiver, J. H. . . . Vann, E. J Vocht, E Walker, H. C Walker, J. H Ware. Laura Mae . . . Athens Warren, Loy . . . . Swoinsboro Watson, J. W Weeks. R. B Harlem West, W. S Wheaton, Robin . . . . Griffin Whitehead, S. G. . . . Whiteker, T. A. . . . W'iiitner. C. F Wiley, C. R Williams, A. B Williams, C. J .... Greensboro Williams, G. J Tifton Williams, H Williamson, J. M. • ■ . Wilson, J. R WlNCATE, J. L Arlington Winn. L. S Wisdom, W. D Wood, Lucy Ann . . . W'oodruff. J. G Wkicht. E. S Younc, W. H Youncblood. C. R. . . . Sophomore Law Class History Jy} B, the members of the first year law class, assembled here, students of the great old University of Georgia. came from out of the “great everywhere.” Many souls were filled with the single thought of achieving those heights that the old college has made possible. We were conscious of other emotions besides our hopes and ambitions. We were keenly sensitive of many fears and timid misgivings. The standards set by those before us seemed so impossible. But now that the first act of our college drama is finished we proudly proclaim, “We came, we saw, we conquered." Now that our first year is over and but one short chapter finished with many more to he written, it is well that we look io the future. The next two years will pass all too quickly and the thought of our return to the “great everywhere” is tinged with a sadness known only to the love of a man for a man. Though we know that the comradeship our association has instilled will be a part of that never-die Georgia spirit, it will never console our loss. And to the poor defenseless public on whom we will be turned loose, we beg you to calm yourselves. W;e know that we came scantily clad, but we shall go forth clothed in the light of our faculty’s knowledge. We further pledge that this knowledge will always be used to insure justice, to protect our American institutions, to keep real the victories of Washington and the heritage of our Jefferson. HistorianSophomore Law Class Officers J. P. Chkkvks . . K. Y. Howard . H. Pool ........ C. W. Chambers ...............President .... Pice-President Secretary and Treasurer ................HistorianSophomore Law Class Roll Bivins, M. 1...........................................................Moultrie Boatwright. Jas., Jr....................................................Augusta Boykin, J. M............................................................Atlanta Chambers. G. W..........................................................Augusta Cheeves, J. P...........................................................Atlanta Cook, Howard.............................................................Madras Cook, L. D..............................................................Atlanta Cooley. T. H...........................................................Elberton Crawley. H. D............................................................Milner Daniel, Benjamin.......................................................Moultrie Durden, C. R...........................................................Graymont Fields, C. W...............................................................Rome Garland, R. A...........................................................Atlanta Coodrum, J. T............................................................Newnan Gordon, J. F............................................................Atlanta Grayson, S. M..........................................................Savannah Haar, E. J.............................................................Savannah Hall, J. S............................................................Talbotton Hogan, E. C...........................................................Stonewall Howard, E. Y...........................................................Stephens Jones, Jerome...........................................................Atlanta Jones, R. S.......................................................College Park Kassewitz, H.........................................................Fitzgerald Pool, Howard.............................................................Dacula Rains, W. H..............................................................Athens Richards, C. D..........................................................Atlanta Rosser, J. R..........................................................LaFayette Schaul. S. M...........................................................Savannah Sibley, M. E......................................................Milledgeville Sims, W. D.............................................................Valdosta Stancill, U. V.......................................................Eastonellc Tillman, H. Y..........................................................Valdosta Treadwell, G. H.........................................................Atlanta Tyson, G. C..............................................................Darien Venable, M. W...........................................................Atlanta Wilcox, J. E.............................................................Athens Wilkerson, E. H........................................................Cuthbertfreshman class history of the night can he heard the continuous K t TO the silence Vif J1 PT(v 'Pea s ° a hell. Why is it ringing? Is someone in distress? r' fA n£A No. It is sending out peals of unmistakable joy and as one listens he understands that the indomitable spirit of Georgia has again manifested itself and we “have played the gome and won." As the bell continues to ring, there can be seen a figure bending and straightening as the rope goes up and down, a figure on whose head is a red cap with a big black letter “F”. Deep within the heart of this figure there gradually arises an indescribable feeling such as he has never before felt and which seems to say “You are now a Georgia man and that means you are one who will stand for that which is honorable and right.” Thus setting the time back a little, we may see a multitude of men gathered together forming an incoherent mass, each one to the other a stranger, but as time elapses one, from external appearances, can easily distinguish his classman. As it has been said: “Our appearances have been somewhat altered by being deprived of our hair that we may better understand and learn the seriousness of our college life." We hope that our career at this institution will stand out in the pages of history as one of the greatest of any classes that have ever attended this old institution. Our first year has been a most eventful one. We hope that the remaining three will carry as much for us as this the first one. Historian. ifreshman class officers 1. m. allison............................................................president h. s. tyson.........................................................vice-president f. c. me clurc.............................................secretary and treasurer f. hargrett...............................................................historianfreshman class roll adams, c. a alexander, t. w. . . . allison. d. m anderson, c. r anderson, j. 1 anderson, o. b appleby, f. m. ■ • • bailey, c. b baird. a. c baker, h. c bargeron, marie • . . barnett, j. h beall, j. s belding, m. g. . . . bell. w. c bennett. d. p bennett. j. j betts, 1. n black, c. h., jr. . . . blanchard. h. h. . . . blankenship, v. k. • . bohren, k. w bolton, j. 1 bowden, w. o bremen, helcn .... bridges, waiter . . . . bright, a. j brooks, 1. b brooks, phillips . . . . brown, 1. w brown, m. h burner, r. butt, h. 1 byrley, j. h carter, s. 1 cart ledge, s. 1 chaffin, j. h chandler, w. s chang, t. c chappcl, j chick, h. n colley, j. w connally, w. e. . . . cook. r. e cooper, j. e. . . . . . cooper, j. w. . cooper, w. g. . costa, j. . . . cox. I. p. . . . cox. w. h. . . . crandall. d. s. . cummings. Ii. o. dabbs, c. m. . . daily, 1. p. • ■ daniel, e. g. • • danicl, sallie • dantas, j. g. • • d'antignac, a. . davis. n. v. . . day, t. r. . . . deadwvler, d. I. dean, a. f. . . . dean, r. y. . . . death, h. 1. . • dodd, f. p, . . donaldson, b. . donovan, marv dornblatt, b. . . drexcl. a. c. . . dunaway, j. 1. . edwards, w. v. . ells worth, o. m. . emerson. j. f. . everett, e. m. . exley. s. h. . . fant, h. b. . • • farrar, c. e. • ■ fernandes, j. m. fesperman, g. t. fickling, w. 1. . firor. kate . • . fitts, sheldon . . Handers, j. c. . fowler, j. h. . . frederick. s. a. . freeman, j. h. . foy. j, e. . . . fry, b. o. . • • fulcher, w. m. . goldenberg, c. . . . . armuchee ..........atlanta .......... athens .... Camilla .........griffin . . • fort valley .............lula - . tupelo, miss. ..........Iiorner ...........milieu - ■ ■ danielsvillc ..........brazil ..........griffin .......... ideal .... douglas ..........carlton . . . gainesville ...........martin . . . covington • ■ . . hoschton .... summit .... wad ley ...........athens ............t if ton ............rome ..........griffin carrollton. w. va. ............macon ..........atlanta ...........clvco .......... athens ...........da:son ...........brazil » . . . waycross ............rome .......... athens • hamburg, ala. . . . swainsboro .......... athens . . marshallvillc .... forsyth . . . . savannah . . . clarksville . . . wayncsboro ...........griffingriffin, m. h. . gurley, j. b. . hall, c. e. . . • hammock, t. e. hanahan, I. i . . harbin, r. ni. -hardeman, j. c. hardman, w. w, hardy, a. s. . . hargretl, f. . . harrcll, h. . . harrison, t. c. • henry, c. g. . herringlon, a. j. hinton, g. $. . . hodgson. hazel . holt, d. j. • . . hosch, a. . . . howell, j. r. - . hudson, j. a. . . huff, c. w. . . huff, j. b. . . . idlcson, s. a. . izlar, w. h. . . jackson, j. w. joel, f......... johnson. o. 1. . johYiston, j. b. . johnston, w. g. jones, h. a. . • jones, j. m. . . jones, w. t. . . kellar. c. a. . . kclley, w. h. . kling, j. w. . . lancastcr. h. h. . langston, s. p. lanier, b. . . . lanicr, j. r. . . lovern. j. . . . marshall, a. a. . martin, c. t. . martin, g. c. . . mavne, c. . . . merritt, t. e. • . miller, c. o. . . miller, j. z. . . mills, j. 1. . . . - . . douglas ■ • . loganvillc .... bowman .... conyers . ■ dolhan, ala. ............rome . . . . louisville . . . . crawford • . • gainesville ..........tifton Jacksonville, fla. ...........martin .... augusta . . . Statesboro ...........dacula .......... athens • . • sandersville • • • gainesville canton • • ■ miami, fla. . . . carrollton ■ . . columbus ...........doerun . . . . waycross .... augusta .... atlanta .... graham .......... canton . . • thomaston • • • . sale city ..........sardis . • . hogansville .... mitchcll . . . columbus • . . greenwich . • . gainesville .... monroe • . . . summit! metter • • ■ carrollton .... atlanta .... ashland • . andersonville .... athens ............macon ............macon . • ■ toombsboro .... atlanta miles, w. g. . . . minor, w. g. . . . mitchcll, 1. h. . . mitchcll, p. . . . mize. f. in.......... moblcy, j. w. . . . montag. 1. a. . . moody, g. c. • . . inorgan, j. a. . . . morris, i. p. . . . morris, w. s. . . . moss, clizabcth . molt, w. h. . . . murphey, g. w. . . murray, w. m. . -musgrove, I. b. . . myerson, i. p. . . me arthur, c. t. . me clure, f. c. . . me colum, w. w. . me commons, 1. c. me cord. w. f. . . me daniel, j. g. . . me donald, o. 1. . . me gchee, j. h. . . me nair, nannie . . me rainey. n. d. . -me williams, h. d. . nasworthy, j. h. . nevin, h. w. . . . orr, d. f............ owens, donovan . panlone. c. . . . palmer. {..... parker, j. 1. . . . patterson. h. t. . pearson, c. w. . . peterson, j. c. . . peterson. m. . . . pierce, f. d. . . . poe, h............... post, d. m........... powers, h. w. . . . power, pat . . . pritchett. r. 1. . . pund, ruth . . . . putman. I. w. . . radford, h. v. . . .... dalton stone mountain . . . columbus • . . acworth . . • commerce . millcdgeville ■ . . . atlanta . . . woodville . . . valdosta .... athens ... augusta • • . . alliens .... butler ... whatley . . fort valley . . homerville .... athens . . . . cordclc • • • lafayette .... nelson . • greensboro .... macon . . . east man • . . . decatur . . . talbotton . . . Colquitt ... el model .... griffin . . . . dawson • • • • atlanta .... athens . . . . atlanta . . ■ ■ atlanta ■ • . Cleveland . . . whigham . . . . athens . . . augusta ..........ailey .... tifton .... parrot .... vidalia ■ . . . newnan ...........rome . . . carrollton . . . calhoun ... augusta - . . ■ atlanta .... wrensreed, c. m............................lincolnton reeves, m. a.............................zebulon register, j. c............................metier richardson. s. I...........................rayle ricks, i. j.............................reynolds roberts. It. s..........................columbus rohinson, w. 1......................college park rockwell, w. ...........................savannah rogers, j. It............................griffin roes, j. t.................................macon royal, g. 1............................crossland ryther, f.................................athens sanders. j. p...........................hartwell seay. j. 1................................liclog sharp, j. h................................macon shaw, r. b.................................union point shirley. s. j.............................plains shreve, m. o...........................eric. pa. sibert. j. w.............................augnsta slaughter, j. 1.........................columbus smith, c. h........................madison, fta. smith, n. j............................kcysville Spain, c. m...............................dalton Stephenson, j. w.........................atlanta smith, gertrude..........................vidalia stovall, f. a...........................elherton jtruppa, r. w...........................columbus sullivan, It. p.......................wayncsboro taliafcrri, w. g........................savannah tanner, j. w..........................carrollton late, william...............................fair mount tavcrcs, h. a.............................brazil thomas, b. d.............................quitman tltomas, edtvin............................jesup thomas, e. h..............................martin thomas, 1. a...............................macon thornton, c. j...........................atlanta todd, b. w..............................lecsburg lownsend, g. a. tarpncll. peniel -trawick, a. j. . . turman, r. 1. . . turner, g. 3. . . turner, r. 1. . . . lyson, b. s. . . . van lioutcn. j. g. . van valkenburg, ni. varnadoe, s. I. . • vlcitas, r......... vianna, a.......... walton, g. b. . . wallon. r. j. . . . walton, t. b. . . . watson, h. I. . . watson, j. I. . . watson, o. o. . . watson. t. e. . • webb, f. a. - • . weeks, f. t. . . . wesley, j. w. . . west, j. It........ wbittakcr, c. d. . wbittaker, e. e. . wliitmire, d. w. . whitner, j. s. . . wiehrs, c. f. • - • wilcy, c. f. . . . williams, a. b. . williams, j. o. • ■ williams, 1. e. . -willis, e. j. . . . wilson, w. a. . . wise. r. q. - • • wright, r. a. . . wyche. b. w. . . ..........kite .... metier ..........linlon .... atlanta . - ball ground . . ball ground . . swainsboro • ■ bolingbrokc • ■ • • atlanta . . . . savannah ...........brazil ...........brazil • ■ • Hamilton .... harlem ■ ■ . Washington . - . columbus . . . Statesboro .... dublin .... litbonia ...........pavo ............wrens .... atlanta . . . greensboro .... harlem .... harlem ............lalmo .... atlanta ... savannah . . . eastonelle . • • • quitman . . . cedartown .... atlanta . . . bainbridge brocksdale, s. c. . . . savannah ............route . . madison. fla.Pan-Hellenic Council SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON N. K. Clark Cobb C. Torrence CHI PHI J. S. Owens James White KAPPA ALPHA W. H. Estabrook James P. Spicer PHI DELTA THETA R. L. Anderson J. F. Troutman ALPHA TAL OMEGA James P. McDowell R. E. L. Spence SIGMA CHI J. P. ClIEEVES E. M. McCanless SIGMA NU L. 0. Freeman, Jr. A. M. Woodall DELTA TAU DELTA K. A. Quarterman Lamar J. Trotti CHI PSI R. M. Soule G. W'. Wricht KAPPA SIGMA J. C. Bennett W. B. Cody PI KAPPA PHI J. L Mehrit R. E. McCaskell LAMBDA CHI ALPHA H. C. Cray J. F. SchaWB PHI EPSILON PI J. E. Berman D. Ob error ferPan-Hellenic Council Representatives selected by the respective fraternities OFFICERS R. E. L. Spence............Alpha Tau Omega.............President James P. Spicer............Kappa Alpha............Pier-President Cobb C. Torrence...........Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Secretary and TreasurerSigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity Founded ai the University of Alabama 1856 Beta Chapter Established 1866 Colors: Royal Purple and Old Cold SENIORS W. W. Alexander L. Fort W. S. Goldsmith W. M. Rockrs E. M. Smith C. C. Torrence JUNIORS A. J. Arnold S. M. Boney J. E. Bryson H. G. Carhekeh N. K. Clark R. L. Dasher W. S. R. L. Hickey R. J. Inman C. B. Lyndon D. Nickerson C. C. Pearce, Jr. V. W. Smpi West SOPHOMORES M. R. Bell A. F. Cannon G. F. Lewis R. L. McMichael T. R. Perry, Jr. J. I). Wellborn D. M. Pollock M. O. Shreve C. H. Smith H. Y. Tilman J. H. Walker FRESHMEN T. W. Alexander K. W. Bohren L. P. Cox B. Daniel W. M. Fulcher. Jr. C. G. Henry J. W'. Jackson M. I.IPPITT C. H. Phinizy L. L. Robinson. Jr. T. J. Simpson, Jr. A. M. Snellinc H. W. Todd L. Turner R. A. Wricht B. W. WycheChi Phi Fraternity Founded at Princeton University 1824 Fla Chapter Established 1867 Colors: Scarlet and HI tie SENIORS E. A. Brown C. H. Foreman H. C. Howf.i.l J. White J. S. Owens J. H. Park C. S. Sanford JUNIORS T. W. Alexander T. J. Briciitwell A. W. Callaway D. A. Collincs J. M. Walker G. S. Hart J. Harthidce E. W. Hurt H. J. Kennedy SOPHOMORES C. H. Black J. T. Goodrum C. F. Whitner L. H. Hill K. H. Skeen FRESHMEN M. H. Brown W. L. Ficklinc H. W. Nevin J. S. Whitner D. Owens S. L. Richardson S. L. VarnedoeKappa Alpha Fraternity Founded at Washington and Lee 1865 Gamma Chapter Established 1868 Colors: Crimson and Cold SENIORS P. H. Bennett E. P. Bowen W. Bradley J. P. Carson W. J. Carson T. J. Davis R. S. DesPortes J. E. Drkwry A. E. Griffith. Jr. T. I). Groovf.r T. M. Johnson J. H. Mahoney I). B. McDonald A. Pew. Jr. J. P. Spicer W. H. Stephens JUNIORS B. Carson W. II. Estaurook W. T. Hakckett, Jr. H. W. IIosch J. T. Kirby. Jr. R. R. Sawtell SOPHOMORES P. K. Anderson H. H. Dean, Jr. S. M. Grayson W. H. Younc W. D. Sims C. K. Spicer R. M. HEATON FRESHMEN H. C. Baker J. M. Blue E. M. Covincton A. F. Dean J. E. Foy, Jr. F. Harcrett A. Hosch J. B. Huff H. B.'Joiinson L. H. Mitchell E. Neal D. M. Post H. L. Watson A. MarshallPhi Delta Theta Fraternity Founded at Miami University 18-18 Ceorgia Alpha Chapter Established 1871 Colors: Blue and White SENIORS R. L. Anderson, Jr. W. C. Hamm W. F. Nelms 15. P. O'neal, Jr. J. T. Talmadce. Ill H. R. Cohen H. C. Walker J. M. Walker JUNIORS F. L. Gkarkai.d J. R. Stokes H. T. Harris J. F. Troutman SOPHOMORES J. Harnett P. N. Collier B. Davison J. 1). Facan E. M. Gi'Rk W. H. Hester F. O. McKenzie T, E. Stokes FRESHMEN C. R. Anderson Jobe Barnett C. Brown C. Farrar J. C. Hardeman . S. Hardy R. S. Jones W. T. Jones J. L. Mills J. Naswortiiy D. F. Orr F. D. Pierce J. W. SOLOMAN 11. I). Thomas M. W. VenableAlpha Tan Omega Fraternity Founded at irginia Military Institute 1865 Alpha Beta Chapter Established 1878 Colors: Sky lilue und Old Cold SENIORS S. C. Davis I. F. Gaissert J. Y. Lonci.no Y. S. Nohthcltt K K. L. Spence, Jr. H. C. Whelchfll D. S. Crandall H. H. Drkwery C. R. E a s J. P. McDowell Jl NIORS E. E. Watson J. 11. Mc.MASTER T. L. Mc.M u elan F. M. Perry K. N. Smith SOPHOMORES F. M. PP1.EBY J. M. Boykin J. D. Bl CHAN AN J. W. Colley J. L. Davis J. K. Harper E. S. Whiciit Z. C. Hayes C. S. Houcks M. G. Murray W. T. Mlrray R. A. Tift W. J. Wesley FRESHMEN I. Bkaditeld A. D. Br«vn R. Bi'hke H. M. Gaisslrt C. 0. Miller J. H. McCeiiee G. M. Perry M. A. Reeves J. L. Slauchtf.r T. B. WaltonSigma Chi Fraternity Founded at Miami University 1855 Delta Chapter Established 1872 Colors: Blue and Gold SENIORS Kulak Blalock J. B. Carson E. M. McCanless I. . C. McKinley J. E. Ross B. R. Smith JUNIORS F. M. Biro J. W. Blackmon J. F. Bkannkn. Jr. B. J. Broach . 11. Campbell. Jr. J. P. Chelves M. J. Sheffield W. P. Concdon D. M. Hastings Ware Hutcheson A. C. Johnstone H. H. Manccm E. M. Nin SOPHOMORES D. P. Bennett J. W. Bennett, Jr. James Boatwricht, Jr. C. J. Clark F. H. Fuller E. A. Lowe C. M. Miller Frank Simmons J. 0. Williams C. R. Youngblood FRESHMEN .1. E. Cooper G. T. Fesperman Sheldon Fitts Josh Watson J. W. Mobley, Jh. Clifford Pantone Leonard PutnamSigma Nu Fraternity Founded at Virginia Military Institute 1869 Mu Chapter Established 1881 Colors: Mack, White and Old Cold I 11. Foro SENIORS L. 0. Freeman. JUNIORS W. Graham W. E. Ginn J. L. C. Smith H. C. King J. W. Walker I). L. Wicker O. S. W illis SOPHOMORES F. J. Frederick M. L Hannahan C. P. McRae W. F. Mims T. J. Pritchett C. S. Short M. M. Smith C. J. WILLIAMS E. J. Willis A. M. Woodall 11. K. Upshaw M. S. Yeomans FRESHMEN L I). Cook J. Evans I). II. Frederick J. F. Cordon E. J. Haar J. M. Heath L. II. Hawaiian W. M. Izlar W. G. Johnson J. 11. Johnston 0. W. O’QUINN C. J. Thornton R. C. TlccleDelta Tau Delta Fraternity Founded at Bethany College 1859 Bela Della Chapter Established 1882 SENIORS W. H. Davidson K. A. Quartern an L. J. Thotti JUNIORS M. .1. Bhodnax F. C. Dart C. R. Dt KDF.N 0. S. Morton D. B. Durden W. C. Durden W. D. Durden H. H. Coleman C. M. Dabus SOPHOMORES L. S. Winn C. Farrar H. V. Hartley FRESHMEN H. 0. CUMMINCS W. R. Echols J). L. Deadwyler D. J. Holt W. M. Murray B. L Musckdve V. L. Robinson F. Rythkr J. W. Tanner W. Tate .Chi P»i Fraternity Founded at Union College 1811 Alpha Alpha Delta Chapter Established 1890 Colors: Royal Purple and Old Gold E. Fleminc SENIORS K. M. Souls C. B. Whitney W. F. Daniel JUNIORS G. W. Wriciit E. G. Daniel J. G. LEVERETT SOPHOMORES T. Phi.ni .y F. M. McGeiiee J. M. Williamson M. G. Belimnc K. A. Garland FRESHMEN W. S. Morris M. E. Sibley G. H. Treadwell■mKappa Sigma Fraternity Founded at the University of Virginia 1869 Beta Lambda Chapter Established 1901 Cot.OKS: Scarlet, Emerald and While SENIORS W. D. Anderson. Jh. W. J. Davis J. Jones, Jk. W. B. Cody K. I'. Palfrey D. D. Qullian 0. T. HEI.CII EL JUNIORS J. C. Bennett C. T. Conyers C. M. Cannon. II! J. W. McWhorter C. H. Everett M. L. Holcombe J. B. WlER SOPHOMORES J. S. Hailey • J. K. Mooney E. V. Smith FRESHMEN J. J. Bennett J. H. Rogers, Jh. R. W. Smith, Jr. M. Van Valkenbi rc J. H. Byrely. Jr. C. J. Bloodvvorth, Jr. J. G. Van Hoi tenPi Kappa Phi Fraternity Founded al the College of Charleston 1901 Georgia Lambda Chapter Established 1915 Colors: Gold and IT'hite SENIORS J. O. Futral E. W. Hichsmitk J. K. Thaxton JUNIORS A. S. Boyette R. E. McCaskkll J. L. M ERR IT L. 0. Smith SOPHOMORES A. 0. Benton 0. W. Chandler W. C. McMillan J. T. Ross L. E. Williams C. E. Brockincton G. G. Finch C. L. Richards D. F. Thurmond FRESHMEN E. Thomas A. M. Fisher J. S. Beall W. V. Edwards H. T. McWilliamsLambda Chi Fraternity Founded at Boston University 1909 Nu Chapter Established 1915 Colors: Purple, Green and Gold SENIORS J. E. Veale R. W. Martin W. D. Lanier P. M. Almand .M. C. Walton JUNIORS J. C. Murphy H. C. Cray W. O. Heery SOPHOMORES C. E. Rawson W. H. Barber, Jr. J. F. SCHWALB J. D. Davis K. L. Lamer E. J. Vann J. 1). Lamon, Jr. K. B. Weeks H. J. Hardin C. J. Padcett FRESHMEN W. II. Cox F. M. Mize C. WlKHRS H. Harrell R. L. Turman R. J. Walton A. J. Bright L. A. Thomas J. W. Sibert, Jr. W. C Tali a Kerri J. M. Jones C. . KellyPhi Epsilon Pi Fraternity Founded at City College of New York 1902 Mu Chapter Established 1915 Colors: Purple and Old Cold SENIORS J. E. Berman David Marx, Jk. A. I. Moskovitz Donald Obkrdorker SOPHOMORES J. H. Halpert Harold Kassiwitz L. H. Paris S. M. Scicaol FRESHMEN Edward Goldendurc S. A. Idelson B. F. Joel L. A. Montac 1. P. MorrisTau Epsilon Phi Fraternity Founded at Columbia University 1909 Mu Chapter Established 1919 Colors: Lavender and White HONORARY M. G. Michael SENIORS I. HELMAN L. PlNTCItl'CK J. H. Lesser I. M. Wencrow JUNIORS C. H. Cohen FRESHMEN 1J. M. Doknblatt I. I . Myerson I). Stei.nbercAlpha Kappa Kappa Fraternity Founded at Dartmouth College September 29, 1888 HANOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE Alpha Gamma Chapter Instituted January 25, 1904 Medical Department University of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia COLORS: Myrtle Green and V'hite Members: Loyd Kennedy Boccs Reese Watkins Bradford William Gibson Brock Jacob Pope Eberiiardt Elzie Nesbert Gleaton Stacy Claibourne Howell John Clark Hudgens Plumer Jacob Manson John Charles McCall Lawrence Howell McCalla Robert Carey McCahee Ira Oclethorpe McLemcre James Clayton Metts Marvin Pinkney Mocrf. Wallace Lamar Poole Albert Henry Powell Ferdinand Richards Frank McKennie Rogers Earnest W. Veale Eoward James WhelanPhi Mu Fraternity Founded at Wesleyan College 1852 Alpha Alpha Chapter Established 1921 Colors: Pink and White Flower: Enchantress Carnation Miss Mary Lyxoox, Faculty Member Adelaide Rice SENIORS Alice Walker Stella Sparks JUNIORS Mary Richards Colvin Ida Pound Anne Ruth Moore SOPHOMORES Lucile Chumbley Iris Jarrell Mildred Slack FRESHMEN Gertrude StitiiThe Girl I Never Have Met Here's to the girl 1 never have met! Here’s to my love I have never yet seen! Here's to the girl in whose heart there is a song. Contented and joyous all the day long; Ready with sympathy, comfort and aid Battling with vanities—never dismayed. Never a murmur, never a fret Here's to the girl 1 never have met! Here's to a soul all noble and sweet! Here's to sincerity scorning deceit! Here’s to the union of beauty and art! Here’s to a loving and generous heart Free from unselfishness, trustful and pure, A fountain of love which shall ever endure. Once could I see her, I’d never forget My dear little woman I never have met. Here's to my darling who loves me I know. The girl who will help me life's journey to go. The bright star to guide my poor ship of life home. Safe in the harbor—out of the foam. To comfort and help me and teach me the right. Showing the day when to me all is night. I’ve sought her in vain, I am seeking her yet— Here’s to my ideal I never have met! —L. C. Campus Verse.The History of Demosthenian Society HE history of the Demosthenian Literary Society through the ages has linked the foundation of the society with the year 1801. Let us quote a letter written by William S. Rutherford on February 5th of that year, a part of which runs as follows: “The Junior ( lass began by a general consultation the establishment of a society for the promotion of extemporizing or extemporary speaking.” Nine days later so the record continues: “At the appointed time a constitution was framed for the good regulation of the late established society.” The first meeting was held in a class room “when the classic business of the day had ended.” For nearly twenty years the meetings were held in a class room, and in the year 1824 the present building was erected at a cost of four thousand dollars. There are no records to tell the exact date when the society was christened Demosthenian, but from later reports we find allusions to the “opportunities” of the organization by the pursuit of which the “youthful speaker” might acquire the fundamental elements of oratory, and thru continual practice and patient labor he might “attain proficiency in extemporizing,” even rivaling the fame of the world-renowned Demosthenes, “in honor of whom the ten charter members named their society." Internal strife divided the society in 1820 into two irreconcilable factions, and, as a recent writer has expressed it: “First came the idea of a new society, the suggestion ripened into action, and the result was the founding of Phi Kappa.” Intense rivalry at once arose, resulting often in clashes, open warfare, armistices and treaties all of which gave rise to tradition rich in glory and illumined with the fame of many a hero. Let us now recall but a few of the many brilliant men-who have illumined the pages of Demosthenian’s renowned history. Among them we find W. S. Rutherford, Benjamin Hill, Robert Toombs, Pope Barrow, J. H. Alexander, Phillip Cook, Joseph F. Pottle and J. H. Dorsey, and among those on the faculty are Chancellor Barrow, Dr. Sylvanus Morris, Prof. C. M. Strahan and others. The society today welcomes back her many sons honored in battle and glorified in victory, and is aiding them in starting the pursuit of their life's calling.Demosthenian Presidents G. T. Mann J. E. Ross • J. H. West . First Term Second Term . Third TermThe History of the Phi Kappa Society A INC withstood the agencies of destruction and processes of decay for eighty-five years, the old Phi Kappa building stands forth today as one of the ancient land-maiks of the campus. In style it is the Court architecture of the early thiities. Its massive pillars of Lrick covered with concrete arc almost of the Doric order. Rectangular in shape Phi Kappa Hall majestically faces Demos-thenian on the opposite side of the campus at the end of an avenue of trees. From the early records we have: “On Saturday February 12, 1820, the Philokosmean Society met lor the first time, consisting of William R. Crabbc, homer V. Howard, Stony Simmons, John G. Rutherford, the latter of whom was absent.'' For three years the society met in the old Chapel garret; and in the year 1823 moved into a wooden building, which was used for eleven years. In 1834 the present structure was erected at a cost of five thousand dollars; and the society finished paying for it in 1839. The founders contemplated a fraternal organization when they organized Phi Kappa, for they labored with profound secrecy in all of their performances. The members addressed each other as “brother” and in the annual reports of the early society is found the allusion “this fraternal organization.” l.et us now recall but a few names of the illustrious men whose voices have echoed and reechoed throughout the grand old hall, and we find here the names of John G. Rutherford, J. P. Waddell, A. 0. Bacon, Howell Cobb, T. R. R. Cobb, Alexander H. Stevens and Henry W. Grady. Prominent today are W. A. Harris, Andrew J. Cobb, Lucian L. Knight, T. R. Hardwick and J. M. Slaton. On the faculty we find Prof. John Morris, Prof. R. L. McWhorter, Mr. T. W. Reed, Prof. W. D. Hooper and Col. C. M, Snelling are listed as honorary members. Today Phi Kappa is passing through a golden age of oratory: so many of her sons have returned in triumph from the late war, she welcomes welcomes them back and is assisting them in seeking life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. John W. Shkppard, Historian.Phi Kappa Presidents J. P. Carson.....................................First Term W. I). Lanier...................................Second Term T. M. Johnson....................................Third TermJeffersonian Presidents J. E. Berman..............................................First Term W. D. Lamer..........................................Second Term E. A. Brown...............................................Third Term E. M. McCanlESS..........................................Fourth TermAgricultural Club Presidents J. W. Mann......................................First Term O. Woodard.....................................Second Term L. Westbrook....................................Third TermEconomics Club Presidents 1.. G. Fields • W. K. Rivers H. Fort . . First Term Second Term ■ Third TermSpanish Club Presidents J. H. West.......................................First Term E. C. WiMBERLEY.................................Second Term F. M. McGehee....................................Third TermDebating Council E. C. WlMBERLEY....... B. C. Moss............. PHI KAPPA J. P. Carson T. M. Johnson E. C. WlMBERLEY .................Chairman ................Secretary DEMOSTHENIAN B. C. Moss J. E. Ross J. B. WilsonAnniversarians PHI KAPPA W. H. Stephens......................................“ WilT' Introduced by N. Joi.LES DEMOSTHENIAN J. E. Ross..........................“The True Worth of Honor" Introduced by B. C. MossIntercollegiate Debate • SUBJECT: Readied, That immigration into the United States should be suspended lor a period of five years. AFFIRMATIVE W. P. Co.ncdon Nathan Jolles To debate Virginia Intercollegiate Debate Subject: Resolved, That the United States should adopt some form of compulsory arbitration for all railroad labor disputes on all railways engaged in inter-state commerce, constitutionality conceded. NEGATIVE W. D. Durden J. E. Berman To debate VanderbiltChampion Debate Subject: Resolved. That the Federal Constitution should be amended so as to empower Congress to pass uniform marriage and divorce laws. AFFIRMATIVE C. H. Foreman....................................Phi Kappa I. M. WEXCROW....................................Phi Kapp i NEGATIVE E. W. Hichsmith.................... C. K. Nelson....................... Demosthenian Demosthenian Impromptu Debaters DEMOSTIIENIAN E. W. HtCHSMITI! A. T. Lkvie B. C. Moss C. K. Nelson J. E. Boss J. C. Shelcr PHI KAPPA J. P. Carson T. M. Johnson N. Jolles H. J. Kennedy E. C. Wimberley I. A!. WkncrowJunior Orators A. B. CULBERTSON 0. S. Morton W. D. Durden C. M. Slack Troy Edwards E. E. WatsonSophomore Debate Si bject : Resolved, That the Philippine Islands should be granted an autonomic system of government. DEMOST11ENI AN (Affirmative) J. E. Denmark R. C. Pittman L. C. Still PHI KAPPA (Negative) 0. W. Chandler F. O. McKenzie T. E. StokesSophomore J. M. Boykin E. H. Dixon G. G. Finch F. 0. McKenzif. R. L McMichael Declaiiners L. H. Paris A. T. Persons J. T. Perry T. J. Sasser T. E. Stokes ALTERNATES B. Davison R. H. SkeenFreshman Debate SUBJ ECT: Resolved, That the State of Georgia should adopt a state income tax. DEMOSTH EM AN PHI KAPPA L. W. Brown C. R. Anderson W. G. Cooper A. F. Dean F. C. McClure A. Hosch I t ' J Freshman Impromptu Debate Subject: Resolved, That all students making ninety or above should be exempted from final examinations, in the subjects in which they attain this average. PHI KAPPA (Negative) C. R. Anderson A. F. Dean B. DORNBLATT A. Hosch A. B. Williams Phi Kappa won DEMOSTHENIAN (Affirmative) T. E. Drake G. G. Finch F. C. McClure E. Thomas J. W. WellsPresidents of the Henry W. Grady Public Speaking Club P. D. Ford...................................First Term P. E. Holmes................................Second Term J. A. McFarland..............................Third Term _ t I t ?. « $ Beta Gamma Sigma . Dr. J. H. T. McPherson.........................................President Prof. H. A. Ikcraham........................................Secretary FACULTY MEMBERS Chancellor Barrow Dr. R. P. Stephens Dr. J. H. T. .McPherson Prof. J. W. Jenkins Dr. R. P. Brooks ACTIVE MEMBERS J. B. Carson W. J. Carson L. C. McKinley L. Pintchuck W. K. Rivers H. H. TisincerArthur Pew, Jk. . K. E. L. Spence . E. Way Hichsmitii A. M. Day . . . . H. H. Mancum . • W. II. Stephens • P. 13. Ford . . . . N. Joules.......... . P. P. . . Ph. d. s. a. . K. S. • • • FACULTY MEMBERS Chancellor Barrow S. V. Sanford W. D. Hooper C. M. StraiiAN- IL E. Park Dean C. M. Snf.llinc T. J. Woofter W. H. BocockGridiron Club Roll S. V. Sanford W. O. Paynf. Coach Stkceman Jimmie DeHart Andrews Anderson, R. L. Anderson, W. D. Alexander Bennett Carson Cheeves Dasher Day Dickerson Ford Hichsmitii Jones Harrold Meyer Julius Talmadce A. H. Nix Mann, G. T. Mann, J. W. Mancum McCanless Reynolds Ross Rudolph Spence Spicer Stephens Trotti WlMBERLEY WhelchellSenior Round Table Prof. R. (SIGMA UPS1 LON .MEM HERS E. Park ................. P. H. Bk.nnett J. P. Carson C. L. Hendricks E. V. Hichsmith T. M. Johnson E. C. Wimbb ...................Honorary C. A. Marvielstein W. K. Rivers J. E. Ross V. H. Stephens J. R. Thanton ROLL OF THE CHAPTERS OF SIGMA UPSILON Sopherim, University of the Smith Calumet, V anderbilt University Osiris, Randulph-Macon College Senior Roi no Table, University of Georgia Odd Number Club. University of North Carolina Boar's Head Club. Transylvania University Scribblers, University of Mississippi Kit Kat, Milsaps College Scarabs, University of Texas Scribbs. University of Souili Carolina Coffee House, Emory University Fortnichti.y Club, Trinity College Attic, University of Alabama Grub Street, University of Washington Gordon Hope, College of William and Mary Blue Pencil, Davidson College Sphinx, Hampton-Sidney College Ye Tabard Inn, University of OregonAlpha Zeta FACULTY MEMBERS Dr. Andrew M. Soule' I)r. T. II. McHatton E. C. Westbrook C. A. Crabr Paul Tabor N. D. Peacock L. V. Davis F. C. Ward W. 0. COLLI N E. D. Westbrook ■ . M. Thornton C. E. Kkllccc II. N. Kaldahl F. J. Vaughn C. W. Sl'MMF.ROlR F. V. Bennett ACTIVE P. H. Bennett V. C. Childs W. J. Davis W. H. Davidson D. M. Hastincs MEMBERS H. V. Fitzpatrick D. B. McDonald M. A. McRainey F. U. Palfrey Otis Woodard ALPHA ZETA ROLL Tovvnshend....................................................Ohio State University Morrill....................................................Pennsylvania State College Morrow.......................................................University of Illinois Cornell....................................................... • • Cornell University Kedsie................................................Michigan Agricultural College Ghanite.........................................New Hampshire Agricultural College Nebraska................................................... University of Nebraska North Carolina.....................................North Carolina A. M. College LaChancf...................................................University of Minnesota Green Mountain..............................................University of Vermont Wilson...........................................................Iona State College Babcock....................................................University of Wisconsin Centennial............................................Colorado Agricultural College Maine...........................................................University of Maine Missouri....................................................University of Missouri Elliott.....................................................Washington Slate College California.................................................University of California Purdue............................................................Purdue University Kansas............................................Kansas State Agricultural College Dacota!!..........................................North Dakota Agricultural College ScoVELL....................................................University of Kentucky MorCan.....................................................University of Tennessee Georcia.......................................................University of Georgia Louisiana..................................................University of Louisiana Oklahoma.................................................Oklahoma A. M. College Arkansas....................................................University of Arkansas Okecon..........................................................Oregon Agricultural College Maryland...................................................Maryland S'ate College Idaho...........................................................University of Idaho —T I I A I I A fc I P I M A I I A l l 'A I I 1 U_ I IM U L aThalian Dramatic Club Miss Mary Lyndon..............................................Director E. M. McCanless..............................................President T. M. Johnson...........................................Pice-President K. E. L. Spence................................................Manager W. D. Dukdeii Adelaide Ruck R. L. Fitts K. E. L. Spence Nannie McNair H. H. Kassewitz E. J. Haar Marcuerite Beale W. G. Hamm C. T. Conyers F. 0. McKenzie J. E. Ross T. E. Stokes T. M. Johnson J. D. Facan J. B. Carson M. M. McCanless D. S. Crandall Elizabeth Chumbley M. J. Sheffield Arthur Penv, Jk. Rltii Pi:nd Beaumont Davison Comer Howell Nina Thompson W. H. Stephens Archie Ghifketii. Jr. —r i Officers of the Club M. J. Sheffield...............................................President Jerry Jones..........................................Leader Glee Club W. H. Kstabhook..................................Leader Mandolin Club Professor Pond.................................. Director Orchestra R. L. Anderson.........................Assistant Leader Mandolin Club • L. M. Smith..................................Assistant Leader Glee Club J. P. Spicer........................................Business Manager T. M. Johnson..............................Assistant Business Manager R. L. Dasher.................................Assistant Business Manager Professor H. A. Ingraham.............................Faculty Supervisor Personnel GLEE CLUB ♦ J. M. Boykin H. T. Harris H. Rowlinson S. J. Boykin E. W. Hurt L. M. Smith J. P. Carson J. B. Johnstone -• R. E. L. Spence S. A. Cartlkdcf. Jerry Jones. Jr. M. C. Walton C. T. Conyers R. S. Jones C. E. Whatley W. H. Cox H. A. Maxky MANDOLIN CLUB C. R. Anderson B. Davison, Jr. M. 0. Siireve R. L. Anderson. Jr. W. H. Estabrook R. H. Skeen J. C. Bennett Lynn Fort, Jr. John Slaughter • J. W. Blackmon E. L. Michael W. H. Stephens J. A. Broivn Henry Nevin J. W. Tanner M. Sheffield ORCHESTRA Farrar Bond Harry Kanoel M. Segal R. Burke W. Davis IThe Senate Colors: Red and Mack C. C. Tcrrence..............................................President W. H. Estabkock........................................Pice-President L. J. Trotti..................................Secretary and Treasurer Anderson, P. K. Anderson, R. L. Bell. M. R. Bennett, J. W. Bennett, C. Benton, A. O. Bird, F. M. Black, G. Brockincton, C. L. Carson, B. Cheeves, J. P. Clark, G. W. Colley, J. Collier, P. Collincs, I). A. Crandall. D. A. Davis, F. Dasher, J. E. Dickerson, It. G. Dean, H. H. Dobbs, C. M. Durden, W. D. Estabhook. W. H. Facan, J. D. Fort, L. Frederick Goldsmith. W. S. Grayson, S. M. Griffeth, A. E., Jr. Gurr, E. M. Grant, J. Harcrett, W. T. Hartley, H. V. Hickey. R. L. Howell, H. C. Jones, J. Lewis Miller Merrit, J. L. McDowell, J. H. McCanless. E. M. McKenzie, F. O. McRae McWhorter. H. Nelms, W. F. Owens, J. S. Pollock. D. M. Soule, R. M. Sheffield, M. Smith, E. V. Smith, R. A. Spence, R. E. L. Spicer, J. P. Tillman, Y. J. Tcrrence, C. C. Trotti, L. J. Talmadce. J. E. Wellborn, J. H. Whitner, W. H. Williams, J. Wricht, G. W. Wheaton, R.Barristers • Prof. 5 . C. Upson, In Facilitate Anderson, R. L. Jones, J. Arnold, A. J. Jones, R. S. Alexander, W. W. Kennedy, H. J. Clark, N. K. McCaskill, R. E. Daniel, B. Owens, J. S. Grayson, S. M. Ryan, A. J. Harckett, W. T. Shelor, J. C. Hartridce, J. Treadwell, G. H. Hickey, R. L. Troutman, J. F. JBuccaneer Roll L. M. Smith............................................................President J. D. Buchanan....................................................Vice-President Frank Troutman..........................................Secretary and Treasurer Alexander, W. W. Appleby, F. M. Arnold, A. J. Barnett, J. H. Bennett, P. H. Blalock. Edcar Bradley. Waldo Brichtwell, T. J. Buchanan, J. I). Carson, J. B. Carson, J. P. Carson, W. J. Clark, N. K. Cody. W. B. Daniel, E. C. Dasher, K. L. Davison, Beaumont Day, A. M. Durden, W. C. DesPortes. K. L. Flemminc, E. Gannon, A. F. Gaissert. I. F. Hamm, W. G. Harris, H. T. Harper, J. K. Hart, G. C. Haktridck, J. Hayes, Z. C. Hastincs, D. M. Ii ester, W. Hurt, E. W. Hutcheson, Ware Inman, R. J. Johnson, T. M. Kirby, J. T„ Jr. Kelly, T. G. Leverett. J. G. Mancum, H. H. McCaskill, H. E. McKinley, L. C. O'Neal, B. P. Perky, T. R. Sanford, Charles S. StIREVE, M. 0. Skeen. R. H. Simmons, Frank Smith, E. N. Smith, L. M. Sparks, M. G. Troutman, Frank Watson, E. E. Whitney, C. B. Willis, E. J. Walker, J. M. Walker, J. Miller White, JamesrCounsellors Club SENIORS J. E. Berman P. E. Holmes J. E. Dasher E. M. McCanless R. G. Dickerson J. A. McFarland P. B. Ford J. 0. Fi'trai. JUNIORS R. E. L. Spence J. W. Arnold E. A. McWhorter W. P. Concdon C. T. Mann M. S. Dekle W. S. Northcutt H. C. Cray W. G. Thomas T. J. McGee SOPHOMORES J. B. Wilson M. L. Burns J. P. Cheeves James Boatwricht. Jr. E. Y. Howard J. M. Boykin T. H. Cooley M. K. SibleyI The Cosmopolitan Club Founded October 6. 1920 OFFICERS President Secretary Treasurer HONORARY MEMBERS D. C. Barrow, Chancellor Dr. A. M. Soule Mr. I B. Thicc Mr. C. W. Crook Mr. C. A. Rowland 1ST TERM C. C. Fenc J. G. Dantas J. T. Cox 2ND TERM C. C. Fenc J. T. Cox J. M. Fernandes 3RD TERM R. 1. Allen Y. T. Yeh E. M. Dunstan Allen, R. 1. (A) Bloe.mink, A. (lit Ciianc, T. C. (Ct Cox. J. T. (A) Dantas, J. G. (B) Dorman, H. P. (A) ROLL OF MEMBERS Dunstan, E. M. (Bl Fenc, C. C. (Ct Fernandes, J. M. (B) Gi’imaraes, L. i B) Rosomoff, M. (R) Tanc, C. Y. (Ct Tavares, 11. A. (B) VlKITAS, R. (B) VlANNA. A. (B) Yeh. Y. T. «C Chanc. T. W. (C) (A), (B), (C», (lit. (Rl. America, Brazil. China. Holland, Russia.American Legion J. H. Kennedy...............................................Commandant J. T. Reynolds.........................................Vice-Commandant T. L. Storks.................................................Historian W. 0. Cantrell.........................................Finance Officer Almond. W. 1}. Anthony, T. L. Allen. K. 1. Bruce, I). C. Brown. E. A. Buchwalo, B. Cox. J. F. CULBERTSCN, A. B. Carson, W. J. Childs, . C Dickerson, R. G. Dkkle. M. S. Durden, H. W. Day, A. M. Edwards, T. Eskew. W. R. Evans, C. R. Eldkidce, 11. E. Edwards. R. L. Ford. P. B. Houcks, J. Harden, N. G. Hart, G. S. Holmes, P. E. Johnson. C. A. Johnson, A. S. Lanier, G. A. Martin, A. C. Mann. J. W. Martin, F. A. Marmklstein, C. A. Murphev, J. P. McFarland. J. A. McMillan, C. McGahee. R. C. Ncrthcutt, S. O'nkal. B. P. Oliver, S. G. Pintchi ck, L. Pittman. R. C. Quahterman. K. A. Rivers. W. K. Rawson. C. E. Rudolph, M. 0. SlNCER. L. Shell, S. P. Thomas. J. K. Vandiver, J. H. West, J. H. Westbrook. L. White, J. Walker, S. E. Whklciiell, H. C. WlMBERLKY, E. C. Homecon Society Catherine Newton • Elizabeth Bruce • • Nancy Gurr • • • . . Ruth Barron . . . . Buena Ware Freeman ...............President ..........Vice-President Corresponding Secretary ■ ■ Recording Secretary .............. Treasurer MEMBERS Anderson, Marie Baroeron. Marik Barron, Ruth Berry, Julia Bremen. Helen Bruce. Elizabeth Burson, Vena Davenport, 1hi Dorsey. Elizabeth Drake, Anna Belle Edwards, Lula Freeman. Buena Ware Curr, Nancy Haddock, Nano Wood. Lucy Moore, Marion Mitchell, Wilma McEntihe, Ossie McGee, Rosa Newton. Catherine Pi no, Ruth Rak. Ruth Reid. Sarah Simpson. Frances Smith. Maud Sparks. Stella Ware. Laura May Whelchel, Blanche White. Mary FACULTY MEMBERS Mrs. Edith Andrews Miss Epsie Campbell Miss Mary E. Creswell Miss Martha Me Alpine Miss Er.na Proctor Miss Rosalie RathborneThe Square and Compass Club J. K. Harper.............................................Chairman E. E. Andrews.......................................Vice-Chairman N. J. Harbin..............................Secretary and Treasurer J. W. Sheppard............................Corresponding Secretary F. B. Smith 0. L. Johnson S. W. Few R. L. Edwards J. H. Wilson F. M. Mize R. W. Martin Albert S. Johnson W. W. Thomas W. L. Tate M. E. Brand E. H. Thomas H. E. Eldridce A. B. Davis C. A. Turner D. Donaldson L. C. Westbrook D. C. Faulkner Fred C. Garrett T. !.. Anthony R. C. Pittman F. C. McClure W. B. Almon W. R. Eskew J. H. Lesser A. B. Ford R. G. Burton J. D. Godfrey H. K. Kennedy H. H. Mancum bi G. B. SnyderFreshman Club W. S. Morris. Jk. G. G. Finch . • L. A. Montac • • John Stevens ins FIRST TERM OFFICERS ........................................ ’resident ....................................Vice-President ..........................Secretary and Treasurer ..................................Sergeant-at-Arms Jok J. Ren NETT W. H. Rolinson M. W. Venable . P. Mitchell . . SECOND TERM OFFICERS ...........................................President .....................................Vice-President ...........................Secretary and Treasurer ...................................Sergeant-at-Arms Amerscn, J. F. Anderson. C. P. R. Beam., J. S. Baker, H. C. Bkldinc. C. Bennett, J. J. Bricht. A. J. Brooks, P. Brown, M. Bohren, K. W. Byrley. J. H. Carswell. M. Chandler. W. C. Cook. L. I). Cooker. J. E. Costa. J. Covincton, E. M. Cl MMINCS. H. 0. d'Anticnac. A. Dean. A. F. Dcrnblatt. B. Drake, E. Edwards, W. C. Ellswcrth, 0. M. Evans, J. J. Feseerman, Gkcrge Ficklinc. W. L. Finch. G. G. Fischer, A. M. Fov. J. E. Frederick. I). B. Frederick. C. A. Fulcher, W. W. Garland, R. C. Goldenberc. E. Gordon, F. Haar. E. J. Hanahan, L. M. Hardy. A. S. Harbin. R. M. Henkky. C. C. Holt. D. J. Hosch. J. A. Huff, James Idelson. S. A. IZLAK. W. H. Jackson, J. W. Johnston. J. B. Johnston. W. J. Jones. A. Jonf.s. R. S. Jones, J. M. Joel. R. F. Lancston. S. P. Marshall. A. A. Merrit, T. E. Mills. J. L. Mitchell. L. Mitchell. P. Morris, P. P. Morris. W. S. Montac. L. A. Mobley, J. . Muse rove. L. B. Myf.rson, I. P. McDaniel, J. G. McGhee. J. H. McWilliams, H. T. Neal, E. G. Ncrvell. Z. S. Owens. D. Patterson. H. T. Perry. C. A. Peterson. J. C. Post, D. M. Phinizy. T. B. Putman, L. W. Quinn. 0. . Richardson. S. Robinson. I- L. Rockwell, W. S. Rocebs, J. H. Rowlknson. W. H. Sibley. M. C. Sibert. J. W. Seicnous, I. C. Sims. W. D. Slai ciiter. John Smith, L. O. Soloman. J. W. Stephenson. J. W. Stovall. F. A. Tate. W. Tanner. J. W. Thomas. L. A. Thornton. C. J. Todd. H. W. Tuccix, C. Turman. R. L. Turner, J. L. VanHoi ton. J. G. Van Yalkknbukc. M. Varnedoe, S. L. Venable, M. W. Watson, H. L. Walton. R. J. Walton, T. B. Whitner, J. S. WlEHRS, C. L. Williams. A. D. Wilson. R. C.V •« a Fresh man Cm iiRome Club Holly Vandiver . . :.........................................President Joe Lesser..............................................Pice-President Kcbert Powers.................................Secretary and Treasurer Eucene Hass Loyd Ficki.inc Cyrus Fields Robert Harbin William Morris Clarence Mull Henry Powers Robert Wricht Oliver Land I f V.PHA tyfjBreak! Break! Break! 0«!c to the Beanery) Break! Break! Break! This unspeakable biscuit crust. And I would that my teeth could crumble This bread into finest dust! Oh. well for the hungry man That his massive jaws arc strong! Oh, well for the feeble hoy That he brings his hammer along! And the tiresome meal goes on. And the starving ones get their fill? But. oh, for a taste of a nice hot roll. And a steak that is tender still! Break! Break! Break! With your jaws 3s best you may. For tender beef you have prayed for so, Will not come for many a day! Broke, Broke, Broke Broke, broke, broke. Are "every day" terms you see. But you’d better be glad that the pen won’t write The thoughts that arise in me. Oil. well, for the millionaire’s boy s he rides in his auto car. And feasts all day on the fat of the land ’Mid the smoke of a fat cigar. But the "poverty struck" go on To their haven under the hill. And sigh from morn ’til eventide For the sound of the "chink" that is still. W. E. McDot CALL. '0 .The Student Council ONCEIVED, created and formulated by the Student Body of the University for promoting a more brotherly feeling among the students and a greater love for the University, for the promotion of “Georgia Spirit” and for the settlement of all affairs which concern the best interests of the Student Body, Student Government became effective on Wednesday, March third, 1920. The organization is known as the Student Body of the University of Georgia; that of the supreme ruling body, the Student Council of the University of Georgia, which Council consists of twelve members elected from the various departments or groups of departments. The officers are: Presi- dent, Vice-President, and Secretary and Treasurer. Generally stated, the duties and powers of the Student Council are the formulation and execution of all rules and regulations governing the conduct of students. The Student Body has power by a two-thirds vote of a quorum to rescind any action of the Student Council or of its officers. While the prevailing sentiment for the election of that type of leaders whom offices seek, and with the painstaking provisions to insure such leadership, this government conceived in a desire for greater things for the University, is certain to accomplish those purposes for which it has been created. The Council has recently completed its first year of work, and its influence and achievements have been frequently evidenced.iStudent Government Association of Women Alice Walker . . • Elizabeth Chu.mblby Stella Sparks • • • OFFICERS ..................................President ............................Pice-President ..................Secretary and Treasurer MEMBERS Elizabeth Dorsey Mary Richards Colvin Ruth Fund Ruth RasStudent Government Association for WomenGirls' House CouncilBOOK Iff TODENT cutties ATiLETTGS VMOA PUMM0H5 MIUT TCY DEPARTMENT tufcun,IJ sCoach Steceman Coach DeHart The 1920 Football Season T is always embarassing for a coacli to write a “review of the season.” If the season has been successful from a viewpoint of games won and lost he must push the boquet button on the switchboard, and out flows a flowery flood of praise for the players, the scrubs, the managers and rubbers. If the gods of fortune or fumbled punts have decided against a lucky season he has to press the alibi button, and before lie has ruined one typewriter ribbon the season looks like the most marvellous or.e the University has ever had. But the editor was insistent! What measure of success the football team enjoyed during the season of 1920 was due mainly to the large number of men used in games during the season of 1919. Any team that has the same men for two consecutive seasons and plays practically the same opponents, should win the majority of its games. Pew, Day, Reynolds, Vandiver and Whelchel formed a nucleus for a good line and Codings. Tanner, Chcevcs and Hartley -were left from the 1919 backficld. The early games with Citadel and the University of South Carolina were won with ease. Furman University proved harder than was expected. in spite of daily warnings, and the game was won in the last quarter with the greatest difficulty. Furman did not threaten Georgia’s goal line seriously at any time, but their defense was very nearly perfect against Cheeves and Hartley. One mistake by a Furman back cost them the game, 7-0.The Oglethorpe game was won rather easily, the reserves playing a large portion of the time. Oglethorpe played a good game for the young team that they have, and they can be figured on to give strong competition inside of a very few years. The Auburn game was the high point of the season. The squad had been pointed toward Auburn since the opening day of the season, as it was the first of the big games of the year. The game was won early, and won in two places. The first was the scoring play, in the first quarter, and the second was the time in the second period when Auburn’s full back was stopped on the two-yard line. The defensive work of the entire team, especially the tackles, was good. After the first quarter Georgia did not threaten, but good punting by Collings brought the ball out of danger several times. The Virginia game at Charlottesville resulted in a tie for the second consecutive time. Virginia’s offense was not as strong as Auburn’s was the week before, but her defense was the best the Georgia team was to meet during the whole year. The Virginia ends ruined a perfect season for Georgia. They were the ones who kept Georgia from scoring in the last quarter after a blocked punt had given Georgia the ball on the 15-yard line. They were the best ends seen in action this year. Joe Bennett, Taylor, Echols, Murray, Frost, and Fitts were ineligible on account of the Freshman rule which operates in all Gcorgia-Virginia games. The Florida game was much easier than was anticipated. The ’Gators did not put up the stubborn defense that they showed at home a year ago, and their goal line was crossed eight times.The Alabama game on the following week was one that gave the students and alumni a topic for feverish conversation for months. The dope on the game pointed to an even struggle, but five minutes after the game had started it looked like a rout for Georgia. Two touchdowns were scored off Alabama’s plays, one on a fumble and the other on a blocked kick. The consequent let-down by Georgia proved fatal, for by the end of the third quarter the score was 14 to 14. No credit is taken away from .Alabama for their wonderful comeback, for they put up the gamest fight against apparent defeat that the writer has seen in years. They displayed the most brilliant and varied attack seen in Atlanta in years, and looked like the best drilled team in the South. However, with a few minutes left to go, a drop kick was blocked, scooped up by Cheeves and converted into the winning score after an 82-yard run. The game was the most spectacular that has been played on a gridiron in any part of the country, and as such, was given prominence in many large Northern and Eastern papers. It was the first defeat for the Thin Red Line of 1920. The final game on Thanksgiving Day was against Clcmson, and proved to be too much Hartley, Fitts, and Cheeves for the visitors. Hartley played a brilliant game, scoring four touchdowns from runs of over 40 yards each. Clcmson advanced the ball to the five-yard line at the opening of the game, but failed to score and from that point on were helpless. Captain Day, Ex-Captain Pew and Captain-Elect Reynolds were honored at the close of the season by being elected to the Composite All Southern team, and received gold medals emblematic of this honor. It is a peculiar coincidence that all three men are Red and Black captains, showing that this honor has been given to men worthy of it every time. The men who deserve mention besides the fifteen letter men are the following: Owens, Highsmith. Blackman, Oberdorfer, Anderson, Richard- son, Murray, Soule, Baker, Bohren, Estabrook, Garret, Shelor and Frost, all of whom got into at least one of the games. Owens, Murray and Bohren deserve special mention, having played in at least five games. The Freshman team played three games, winning from Tech High and the Auburn scrubs, and losing to the Clemson scrubs. They developed several good men, and these men may be seen on the varsity teams in years to come.A Tribute to Georgia’s 1920 Southern Champs By Powell D. Bush To the bravest, to the truest, to the gamest fighting crew That ever handled pigskin or donned a cleated shoe; To to the fiercest, most courageous and the cleanest playing, too; To our ever fighting champions, let us rend the honor due! On the team that conquered Auburn, turned the famous Crimson back; On the ever loyal wearers of the dear old Red and Black; On the team, that never quitting, had the will to do or die: On our true and valiant warriors, let us heap the praises high! For. 0, Champions of the Southland, you have made a record grand That forever, through the ages, in our memories will stand. You have played your best for Georgia, and your best so nobly done, Has no equal in the Southland, and the victory has been won. You have fought so brave a battle, that each single player’s name Shall, forever, stand emblazoned in our Ceorgia “Hall of Fame." And the record of your victories shall be looked back on with pride. From where’er a Georgia student drifts on life's uncertain tide. Let us. therefore, hail to Georgia, to the team that fought so hard That the best of her opponents never gained an unfought yard. To the Champions of the Southland, let our highest praises be. Let us, therefore, hail to Georgia, to the wearers of the “G!"“BUM" DAY. Captain Captain Day, center, played in every minute of the entire season. His experience was at all times a very-valuable asset to the defensive strength of the team. Day plays football instinctively, is an excellent man at both tackling and breaking up passes, passes accurately, and makes many tackles down the field under punts. Day’s play was consistent throughout the season. All-Southern. OWEN KEYNOLDS. Captain Elect Last year was Owen’s third year of college football. He played a skillful defensive game at his position of left end, outplaying any end that he faced during the year. Work is his middle name and he is always in tip top physical condition. His work against Auburn was truly remarkable. He will make a fine captain and if his men will follow him in purpose and determination the season will be over too soon. All-Southern. “BUCK” CHEEVES, Alternate Captain Playing under a handicap of several hard and long lasting bruises and weighing only 145 pounds, this head-gearless and unpadded fighter outfought every opponent met in nine games. Chceves plays football with utter and reckless abandon and can always be relied upon. He inspires his team mates by mere presence in the line-up and plays to win. His 82-yard run won the Alabama game. Buck is equally efficient on a basketball floor, being captain of the 1921 team.W=1 ARTHUR PEW. Ex-Captain Pew. right tackle, was the most feared man on the last two Georgia teams. An unusually hard player in close and open play, a quick diagnostician of opponents’ play and as consistent as the season is long, he is a hard man to gain over. He is the best student of football on the squad and practises with a determination to master every detail. All-Southern. PUSS WHELCHEL Guard Whclchel. at guard, played a consistent game throughout the entire season. An injury kept him out of the first two games hut he played the remainder of the season in first-class style. Whelchcl is heavy enough to he able to go through any college line at times and fast enough to lead the interference. His games against Auhurn and Alabama stamped him as the best guard seen this year. Against Alabama he blocked two kicks, both of which were run for touchdowns. VANDIVER The quiet man of the squad. Vandiver plays with an earnestness and determination that makes him one of the hardest workers on the squad. He has played his position at guard for two years and has always performed faithfully and well. He knows the ins and outs of line play well and is quick and intelligent. He can be depended upon to take care of more than his share of the defensive work of the line. “MARK"ANTHONY "Mark" played at guard in several important games of the year and showed great improvement over the previous season. Next year “Mark" should make any lineman on the squad hustle to hold his joh. Anthony tries harder than any other player and only inexperience keeps him from playing better than any other. The year’s experience should he of great value to “Mark.” PAIGE BENNETT Paige played the last six games at right end. He is a first-year man and should prove to be a valuable member of the next few squads. His defensive work was good throughout the season. His offensive work still requires some improvement. He has the knack of tackling hard and fearlessly and knows the game well enough to make but few mistakes. He is the natural end type, tall, fast and eager. His recovery of punts, fumbles and blocked kicks proved him to l e the best follower of the ball on the team. JOE BENNETT Freshman Joe is another hard worker. He played left tackle in every game except the Virginia game and did exceptionally well for a first-year man. The strain of the season 3nd a bad crop of boils put Bennett in bad shape for the last three games of tile year but his work against Auburn and Furman showed him to lie aggressive and eternally fighting. He is the type of athlete that will make an excellent record on the team in years to come. • DAVE" COLUNGS Collings was known as "Daredevil" at prep school. At the University lie is known as "Hospital Dave." “Dave" spends every Sunday in the hospital recovering from the games and has never missed a game in the last two years. He developed into the best line plunger of the year and did all the punting for the team. His kicking is above the college average and there is little danger of his punts being blocked. He places his punts well and has two drop kicks of better than forty yards each to his credit. "Dave" still has his best year before him. as he has improved in all around work in every game for two years. "DICK" HARTLEY Hartley was the most sensational performer of the year. He made eleven touchdowns in the year, eight of them being from runs of more than thirty-five yards. Two of these were runs of ninety-two and seventy-five yards on two plays in one minute. He is exceptionally fast and when once out in the open is hard to bring down. He showed fine judgment on receiving forward passes behind the goal line through skillful picking of open spots. One of these defeated Auburn. TANNER Tanner again won his letter at fullback. His best game was against Virginia, where he played the best defensive game a Georgia fullback has played in the last two years. He is a very hard hitter and enjoys working. He should be a mainstay next fall and it will take a mighty good fullback to keep him off the regulars.JIM TAYLOR Taylor is a Freshman and hails from Douglas, the home of Day, Whelchel, Coach While and others. He showed excellent line ability from the first day of practice and got his chance against Auburn after the game had gone about ten minutes. Taylor played the best game of the year that day, in fact the play of both tackles, Jim and Dennett, both Freshmen, against the heaviest line in the world, was one of the features of the game. Taylor was forced to leave college during February and his loss will be felt next year. ECHOLS Hoy Echols played the greatest part of the schedule at fullback. He came from Darlington Academy and had been a teammate of Vandiver while in the Navy. He was an excellent defensive player and was used mostly to lead the interference on offensive, which job he did well, though he performed excellently the few times he was called upon to carry the ball. Echols did not return to college after Christmas and, like Taylor, will be missed. FITTS Fitts alternated with Cheeves and Hartley at quarter and half. He is a heady quarterback and has all the life and drive that is necessary to run a team well. He bandies punts well and developed into the best broken field runner in camp this season. His' work against Florida was the best seen on Sanford Field in the last two years. He is a good, sure defensive man, his tackling saving the Auburn game in the closing moments of the day. 1920 Record Georgia...................................40 Georgia...................................37 Georgia....................................7 Georgia...................................27 Georgia....................................7 Georgia....................................0 Georgia...................................56 Georgia...................................21 Georgia...................................55 Total.............................250 Citadel ...................................0 S. Carolina..............................0 Furman.....................................0 Oglethorpe.................................3 Auburn.....................................0 Virginia...................................0 Florida....................................0 Alabama...................................14 Clemson....................................0 Total .............................17 October 1st . October 8th . October 15th . October 22d . October 29th . November 6th iNovember 13th November 20th November 25th November 27th 1921 Schedule Georgia vs. Mercer . . . Athens Georgia vs. Furman...............................Athens Georgia vs. Harvard . ........................Cambridge Georgia vs. Oglethorpe...........................Athens Georgia vs. Auburn.............................Columbus Georgia vs. Virginia.............................Athens Georgia vs. Vanderbilt........................Nashville Georgia vs. Alabama........................... Atlanta Georgia vs. Clemson..............................Athens Georgia vs. Dartmouth...........................Atlanta1920 Football Squad Steceman.............................................Couch DkHakt.....................................Assistant Coach Alexander GARRETT ANDERSON Hartley Anthony Hicksmith Baker Ml HR AY Bennett, J. Oberiiorfkr Bennett, P. Owens Blackmon Pew Bohren Reynolds Carson Richardson Ckeeves Shelor Coli.i ncs Soule Day. A. M. Taylor Day. K. Tanner Echols Vandiver Estabrook Whelchei. Fitts WillisCAPT. "BUCK" CHEEYES. Guard Capt. "Buck" Cheeves, the leader uf Georgia’s 1921 case crew, is one of the fastest and most formidable basketball players that has ever been produced at Georgia. He has been in every game of the season and has put out a brand of ball that has completely baflled all coiners. At the guard position "Buck" has proven himself a capable leader and an irreproachable player. He is a clean player and every inch an athlete. Last fall he showed his mettle at quarterback on Georgia’s wonderful football machine by his splendid generalship and his magnificent playing. “Buck” has put his very heart into the fight and there is not one who can say that lie has not done his best. EDDIE KAWSON. For,and He’s little but he's loud. This is the second year this Athens gentleman has played on the Bulldog Five. During both years he has been one of the most dependable forwards who has ever stepped on the floor and his sensational shots from the middle of the court have saved the Georgia quintet from defeat more than once. It will be remembered that it was during the Georgia underbill game that Eddie went wild. He shot twenty-five points of the total thirty-two that were scored. Rawson is also a baseball player of note and his catching behind the bat last year and his sure peg to second arc something sensational. BILLIE ANDERSON, Forward We present to you, gentlemen. Mr. Billie Anderson, an old Lanier High star and a disciple of the famous Alfred .Scott. Billie has played on the Georgia team for three years and has shown himself to be a regular Jim-dandy. He shoots them from all angles and all positions and it is due in a great measure to his accuracy and aim that the Bulldogs have made such a wonderful record. nderson has made the leading point scorer on the squad, having successfully negotiated 226 of the 610 points made during the season. Billie reached the zenith of his career in the S. I. A. A. tournament. The Kentuckians declare that he is the best forward they have ever come up against. "RED" OWEN’S. Guard One of the most dependable cogs in the red shirted brigade and a star in the far-famed five-man defense is that sorrel-topped gentleman from the Gate City named “Red" Owens. "Red” has made a wonderful running mate for Checvcs and together they were a combination that it was hard to break through. He knew the science of the game perfectly and was always willing to sacrifice self for the benefit of the whole. The many followers of the Red and Black teams will remember how "Red" worked for old Georgia last fall on the gridiron. On the court he always went at a fast clip and if any one is in the least in doubt as to his prowess all they need to do is to ask Auburn or Clcmson or Mercer or Kentucky or any of the other fives that he went up against this season.PAIGE BENNETT. Center Here's the first man who touches the hall when the Bulldogs meet their foe. Paige Bennett, at the center position, has been a scintillating star this season. His long, lean, lanky form can he seen rushing about over the court scattering desolation in his path. He has ripped up many of the opponents’ plays and turned the tide toward the Georgia goal. He has learned to follow the ball with the keenness of a bloodhound on the trail and many of the counters that have been rung up on the Red and Black side of the scoreboard have been due to his ability to find the goal at the right time. Bennett is a product of G. M. C. and was a star in football and the cage game while attending this institution. This is Bennett's first year on the Georgia team and he has won his spurs by his brilliant performing throughout the season. ‘ ARTIE" PEW, Sub Guard Arthur Pew. or ‘‘Artie." as he is familiarly called by his friends, was a member of that famous 1918 basketball championship aggregation along with Sir Alfred Scott. He came to Georgia from Peacock School of Atlanta and during his sojourn in the University he has become one of the most famous athletes in the South, in both football and basketball he has been a shining star. For the past two seasons lie has battled for Georgia on the gridiron and has been twice picked for All-Southern. JACK FROST, Sub-Center Jack Frost is another man who went out for the team and worked with great perseverance and consistency. Jack has been called the “West Virginia Wildcat" and after watching him perform the unanimous decision is that he deserves the title. Jack is "arsenic" and as his name indicates he bites ’em oil when they are young. It takes a fast and experienced man to stay with this clever player and should lie land a berth on next year’s five and the chances arc that he will, Georgia will have a most dependable man in him. J. W. McCRANEY, Manager “Mac” is the manager of this gallant gang of basket tossers. When it comes to enthusiasm and genuine backing of his Alma Mater, he’s right there with the goods. In other words, he’s a fan right from the heart and has made many friends around the University. “Mac" claims that he and “Red" and “Coacher" will cop the tournament next year and make up for the missing point of 1921 that occurred in the Kentucky game. Varsity Basketball Team Tor How: Coach Stegeman; Curr; Frost; Pew; McCraney, .Manager. Hottom Row: Anderson; Hawson; Clteeves; Owens; Bennett. SCORES OF GEORGIA GAMES OF THIS SEASON (Georgia . 69 Furman . 25 Georgia 31 Auburn . 22 Georgia '. 26 Mercer Ceorgia '. 45 Mercer . 16 Georgia 22 Macon Y. M. C. A. . . . . 35 Georgia •'.45 Clemson . 22 Georgia ‘''•31 Vanderbilt . 17 Georgia •‘'•29 Auburn • 23 Georgia '.20 Camp Henning • 17 Georgia 74 Augusta Y. M. C. A. • - . 25 Georgia 55 Savannah Y. M. C. A. . . . 19 Georgia 23 Atlanta Athletic Club. . . . 33 Georgia . 25 Atlanta Athletic Club. • . . 37 Georgia .47 Newberry Georgia r. 32 Auburn Ceorgia 26 Georgia Tech . 21 Ceorgia 19 Kentucky Freshman Basketball Team Tor How: Wiehrs; Cooper; Bohrcn: Coacli While. Bottom Row: Venable; Bennett; Honey: Murray. Scores of Freshman Team Georgia Freshmen...............29 Georgia Freshmen...............32 Georgia Freshmen...............56 Georgia Freshmen...............27 Georgia Freshmen...............42 Georgia Freshmen...............53 Georgia Freshmen...............22 Tech Hi...............................18 Riverside..............................8 Gainesville A. C......................20 C. M. A.............................18 Athens Hi.............................21 Griffin A. C..........................21 A go gas..............................34Review of Basketball Season In reviewing the past season, one of the outstanding features of the year was when the Bulldogs held the Mercer Baptists to one lone field goal on their own floor in Macon. The Auburn Tigers were forced to lower their colors on three different occasions to the wearers of the Red and Black. The Stegeman lads were victorious over Mike Donahue’s Plainsmen in the pair of regular schedule contests and made it unanimous by humbling the Tigers in the tournament. For the first time in many moons the Bulldogs visited Augusta and Savannah and gave the basketball fans of that section a chance to see them in action. In both places they emerged the victors in games with the Y. M. C. A. quintets. Vanderbilt fell before the Bulldogs battle-axe. The Commodores were the Southern champions last year and the boys revenged themselves by trouncing Vandy and getting even with them for the defeat handed the Stegeman charges last season. SOLDIERS ROUTED The strong Camp Benning quintet was numbered among the victims. The soldiers had one of the best aggregations in the state and put up a lively scrap before the boys were able to lake their measure. The Macon V. M. C. A. defeated the Red and Black in the one scheduled game with them. The “Blues” have a wonderful machine and the basketball fans over the South would like to see them in action against the Atlanta Athletic Club. A. A. C. WON A PAIR Joe Bean’s Atlanta basketeers took two games from the Red and jerseyed warriors. The Bean boys won both contests by over a 10-point margin. The A. A. C. five is a crack-a-jack machine and several old Georgia stars are performing on this club. COACH STEGEMAN A season’s review would not be complete without mentioning the great work accomplished by Coach Stegeman, Georgia’s nonpareil. He made Dixie stand up and take notice this season—and showed them a few things about the cage game. It is generally conceded that Stegeman is the best basketball coach in the entire South. The Red and Black mentor has done much for the game in the South. He is the man who originated the idea of the basketball tournament in Atlanta for the S. 1. A. A. teams. He has helped to make the game a cleaner and better one as far as Georgia is concerned. The local athletic authorities went to much expense to secure competent officials to take charge of all games where Georgia participated. Georgia will have another great team next year—even a stronger machine than carried the Red and Black standards on the floor this season and “Watch Georgia Win.”Coach W. P. Whitp. Captain 11. II. Mancum COACH W. P. WHITE Coach While, a new-comer ai Georgia, Ims charge of baseball. He is a native Georgian and a graduate of Mercer University. As a baseball mentor he won a reputation at Douglas A. M. School, his teams always taking the lead in prep school circles. Last year he produced one of the greatest prep school nines in the state, and came lo Georgia in January of tltis year. Though he has been at the University only a short lime, he has already won a place in the heart of the student body. “Coach Hill” is possessed of a most pleasing personality and is a marvel when it comes to itandling men. He always wears a sunny smile and is “one of the boys.” Georgia welcomes Coach White and every supporter of the Red and Black is wishing for him a most successful career. CAPTAIN “COUNTRY" MANCUM “Country” Mangum, captain of the 1921 team, hails from Grovetown. Ga. He played prep school baseball at the Academy of Richmond County, Augusta, Ga.. and was a team-mate there of “Whiley" Davis and “Tommy" Philpot, both All-Southern picks for several years. This is Man-gum’s third year on the Georgia team. He was catcher on the team of 1919 and played outfield in 1920. He led the Georgia team in batting last year and was on Coach Stcgeman’s All-Southern selection.Baseball Team, 1921 White . . . . Manci m. Captain Cody............ Watson .... Mize............ Hutcheson . . . Rawson . . . . Cl.AKK.......... Panto.ne . . . . Dekle........... Frost .......... McWhorter . . Fitts........... Hari ek .... llODCES .... . . . Coach Right Field ■ First Rase Second Rase . Shortstop . Third Ruse . . Catcher . . Pitcher . . Pitcher . . Pilcher . . Pitcher . . Leftfield • Ccnterficld . . Utility . . Utility1921 Baseball Scores Georgia.............................14 Georgia..............................5 Ceorgia..............................2 Georgia.............................10 Georgia..............................6 Georgia..............................3 Georgia..............................5 Georgia..............................5 Georgia..............................2 Georgia..............................8 Georgia..............................6 Georgia..............................2 Georgia..............................7 Georgia..............................5 Georgia..............................5 Georgia..............................2 Georgia..............................— Georgia............................. 7 Georgia..............................5 Ceorgia..............................3 Ceorgia Georgia Ceorgia Ceorgia Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia Ceorgia University of Cincinnati...........6 University of Cincinnati...........0 Clemson............................1 Clemson............................2 Yale...............................5 Oglethorpe.........................3 Camp Benning.......................2 Camp Benning.......................1 Yale...............................1 Furman.............................5 Furman.............................2 Mercer.............................0 Mercer.............................4 Alabama............................4 Alabama............................1 Michigan...........................1 Michigan...........................— Oglethorpe.........................7 Alabama............................5 Alabama............................1 Auburn............ Auburn............ Vanderbilt .... Vanderbilt .... Kentucky ......... Kentucky.......... Auburn............ Auburn............ Washington and Lee Washington and Lee Mercer............ Mercer............1921 Track Team Anthony Baker Fitts Hartley Hill Howard Kicklichti.r Mann Mobley Murray Pritchett Reynolds Ricdon • WincateTrack $TECEMAN........................................Captain J. W. Manx........................................Coach H. C. Dasher....................................Manager T. L. Anthony..........................................Javelin, shot put H. C. Baker..............................120 yard high hurdles, high jump R. L. Fitts.........................................440-yard dash, half mile H. V. Hartley....................................100-yard dash, broad jump 220-vard dash. 220-vard low hurdles L. H. Hill......................................................... Pole vault J. W. Howard..................................................Mile. 2 miles H. G. Kicklichter....................................................High jump J. W. Mann.............................................120-yard high hurdles 220-yard hurdles, broad jump J. V. Mcblkv.............................................................Javelin W. M. Murray.............................................................Discus R. Pritchett.........................................................Pole vault 0. Reynolds.....................................100-yard dash, 220-yard dash H. Ricdox...............................................................Javelin L. Wincate..........................................Shot put. discus, javelinUniversity of Georgia Y. M. C. A. Organization Phili.ii Tricc • • E. W. Hichsmith J. T. Cox .... H. P. Dorman . . E. A. McWhorter . General Secretary ...........President - . Pice-President Recording Secretary , ... . Treasurer 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. CABINET Bible Study Committee • . • Bu'k Riuce Committee • • • Cam its Service Committee . Church Relation Committee Deputation Committee . . . Employment Committee . • • Extension Committee .... Finance Committee......... Freshman Committee................ Meetincs Committee................ Membership Committee.............. Missions Committee............... Publicity Committee.............. Social and Entertainment Committee Vespers Committee................. .........Wm. Crane. Chairman . John W. Sheppard. Chairman . . . Chas. D. Stewart, Chairman - . . Earnest M. Nix, Chairman Norman D. Nickerson. Chairman . . . J. W. Gillespie, Chairman ... A. T. Persons. Chairman . . E. A. McWhorter. Chairman ..........R. L. Fitts, Chairman . . . A. R. Fawcett, Chairman .........J. T. Cox, Chairman . . . J. G. Woodruff, Chairman . . . . W. W. Drake, Chairman . ■ . W. S. Northcutt, Chairman . • . H. P. Dorman, Chairman“Y” Notes HE purpose of the Y. M. C. A. is to develop the spirit, mind and body. It has a place in the University unlike that of of any other organization and fills a need that no other organization can fill. The Y this year has done a great deal of work, and an organization has been completed which should put the association on the map at Georgia next year, as it never has been before. Plans have been started for the maintenance of a building equipped with games of all kinds, reading material and various other forms of recreation. This is the first step toward a real Y building, which is needed so much and which should be a reality in the next few years. For the past two years the University has not had a General Secretary. This year however we were fortunate in securing the services of Mr. P. B. Trigg who has been in the “Y” service for several years. Although having been here only one year he has made many friends among the student body and has conducted the work of the Association in an admirable manner. The most outstanding feature of the work this year has been the daily vesper services conducted under the direction of H. P. Dorman. Attractive services, consisting of music and short talks and prayers, have been held each night. Able assistance has been given by the co-eds and the girls of the State Normal School. The Promotion Committee, renowned of old, came into its own again this year and has been the nucleus of the work all the year. Combining the social feature with the other features of a Committee meeting, the meetings each Tuesday night in the city Y. M. C. A. building have been full of pep and enthusiasm. Several excellent bible classes have been conducted all the year under the direction of the Y. Many other things accomplished could be mentioned. An extensive campaign has been conducted this year to secure a large representation for Georgia at Blue Ridge. With a large delegation at this conference, returning with training and enthusiasm to get in the work next year the Y. M. C. A. should be a real force in the University next year.Message from the Y. W. C. A. HE first organization started for women upon their entrance into University life was the V. W. C. A., and no organization has served to enrich the lives of the young women students on the whole, as much as this organization. It is primarily a reorganization, but the fact has not been forgotten that development, mentally, physically, socially as well as spiritually should be thought of in this organization and any activity that will promote higher and better Christian living among the students has been fostered. Vesper services have been held in the Gymnasium each evening at sunset and here the students express themselves in praise and thankfulness to their Creator. The ultimate purpose of the association to develop Christian character with the special aim to unite the girls in love and loyalty to Jesus Christ, to lead them to become His followers, and to build them up in knowledge of His work, is ever kept in mind in the planning of the Association meetings and the offering of new opportunities for services in the Cabinet Departments. And in this work great interest has been manifested l)v the young women of the student body. A Bible Study Class has been instituted and weekly meetings held throughout the year under the leadership of our valuable friend Miss Mary Bacon. Social meetings have been planned for the bringing the Association members together for various forms of wholesome entertainment. And the Athletic Committee has been active in planning hikes, tennis tournaments, basketball games, swimming, etc., for the students. Since education does not come from books alone and does not consist of mere acquisition of facts, we hope our organization may do its part in preparing its members for life leadership.Officers of the Y. W. C. A Maiuc A.ndeksox Alice Walker . Rosa McGee • ■ Adelaide Rlce . . . President Vice-President . . Secretary . . Treasurer Vena Burson • • • • Iris Davenport . . . Blanche Whf.lcheli. . Edith Hopkins - . . Alice Walker . . . . Wilma Mitchell . . Frances Simpson • • Lula Edwards . • ■ • Lucy Woods........... Elizabeth Donovan . Many Richard Colvin Ruth Barron .... CABINET ......................Social Committee ......................IPortd Fellowship ................................ Finance ............................Bible Study ..............................Membership ..............................Devotional ...............................Athletics ..........................Sociul Service ....................................Room ......................Association News ..............Conference and Convention ...................................Music ADVISORY Laura Blacksiiear Erna Proctor Epsie Campbell Martha McAlpineDreams, Dreams Did you ever dream of sleeping When the world disturbed you not? Did you ever wake a-weeping Over sorrow long forgot? Did you ever dream of waking From a dream within a dream. When you found your heart a-hreaking Over things that seemed to seem? Did you ever dream of dreaming? In a dream from dreams awake. Just to find your happy seeming Seemed to seem for seeming's sake? Have you seen the stars in the daytime. Or the sun shine all night long? Have you seen it snow in May lime. Or a Christmas coming wrong? Have you thought all wisdom foolish. Things below seem to seem above? Or the Cherubim seem ghoulish? Then you've never been in love. Pandoka '01. Dan Hunnicutt ANDORA—the gift of the gods, first blessed us with its-presence under the guidance of the Class of 11186. It had the distinction of being the first of its kind published in Georgia, and the second in the entire South. From its first humble jinr.ing until the present day it has always recognized its dependence upon the student-body in general for its success or failure. In its initial dedication we read these lines duly expressing this thought. “To you, who have by your counsels, sought to make this thing succeed, aiding us by kind suggestions, and explaining every need, would we dedicate this medley of our college jokes all new, as a token and expression of our gratitude to you." It is true that our first annual was crude and humble, but yet it was a noble beginning, unpretentious though it was. The gods had something better in store. This year we have tried to give expression in our pages to every phase of student activity. We have tried to make it a symbol worthy to go out to the world as a true representative and outward sign of what Georgia is and what she does. Our Alma Mater has turned out from her hallowed walls, men fused with the divine light of inspiration to do great deeds. These men have stepped into the highest positions of trust within the gift of our state and country. They have all made good. Georgia is still capable of even greater attainments in the divine plan of our nation. F rom your midst shall come the leaders. Embrace every opportunity. Have enthusiasm. We ask you not merely to boost this book, but try to keep it and all that bears the mark of old Georgia above reproach and if not the first, at least among the very best in the land. Pandora Boards Since 1886 Volume I. 1886. Editor-In-Chief. G. N. Wilson, K A. Business Manager, W. B. Cook. A T Q. Associate Editors, W. E. Wooten. X A E; McDaniel, X V; C. F. Rice, X V; C. H. Wilson. K A; W. A. Speer. V A 0; F. K. Slone. V A 0: U. I). Meador. A T D: M. B. Bond. A T A; W. S. Upshaw. A T A; R. S. Move, T A; P. L Wade. V T A; A. W. Wade. £ N; W. C. Brown. 2 N. Volume 11, 1887 Editor-in-Chicf. G. K. Rice, X V. Business Manager. J. W. Daniel. K. A. Associate Editors. T. W. Reed «!» A 0; G. Waters. V T A; W. J. Shaw, X j ’; H. f. Milner. A T 0; A. L Franklin, A T A. Volume III, 1888. -Editor-in-Chief, Albert Howell, K A. Business Manager, A. W. Griggs. A T A. Associate Editors. W. L. Moore. — A E; T. R. Crawford. A T Q; F. W. Coile, X N; Lucien L Knight, X V; W. M. Glass. A T A. Volume 1 , 1890.—Editor-in-Chief, John D. Kittle, X A E. Business Manager, W. K. Wheatford, X N. Associate Editors, F. E. Callaway, K A; S. J. Tribble. V A 0: J. C. Crawford. X N; W. W. Ellis. XV; W. K. Stallings. A T A: W. N. Smith. XV; E. A. Cohen. X V. Volume . 1892.-Editors-in-Chief. J. F. Lewis. X V; L. L. Brown. A. T. Q. Business Managers. W. E. Christie, N; W. T. Kellv. A T A. Associate Editors, J. C. Kimball, X A E; Roy Dallas, V A 0; J. R. Lane, E A X; E. W. Frey. X V. Volume VI, 1893.—Editor-in-Chief. Harry Hodgson. K A. Business Manager, F. G. Barfield, X A E. Associate Editors. C. R. Ni l)et. X V; N. B. Stewart. A T Q; A. 0. Halsey. X N; H. . Alexander. E. G. Cabaniss. V A 0; F. G. Johnson. A T A; Eugene Dodd, X V. Volume VII, 1894. -Editors-in-Chief, C. R. Tidwell. A T A; Noel Moore. X A E. Business Managers, Paul L. Fleming. X V; John I). Stelling, A T Q. Associate Editors, L. D. Frick. X N; W. P. Harbin. X V; H. Brown. K A; George Beckett, V A 0. Volume VIII. 189.r .- -Editor-in-Chief. W. A. Harris. X 1 . Business Manager, I. J. Gibson. A T A. Associate Editors. H. H. Steiner. A E; J. W. Morton, K A; W. W. Chandler. A T £}; W. L. Kemp, £ N; J. T. Dunlap. I» A 0; H. V. Black, X V; J. G. Smith, Non-Fraternity. Volume IX, 1896.—Editor-in-Chicf. Pliny Hall. K A. Business Manager, J. G. Pitman, V A 0. Associate Editors, M. M. Lockhart. 2: A E; J. B. Connelly, X 1 ; Fred Morris, X N; C. H. Holden, A T A; H. V. Black. X V; T. A. Neal; R. B. Nally. VOLUME X, 1897. -Editor-in-Chief. H. G. Colvin, X A E. Business Manager, R. E. Brown, A T Q. Associate Editors, F. L. Fleming, X V; J. W. Spain. K A; Harry Dodd. XV; P. S. Smith. V A 0; A. L. Tidwell, A T A; H. Lovejoy, S N; W. B. Kent; J. W. Hendricks. Volume XI. 1898.- Editors-in-Chief, Harry Dodd. X V; Hugh White, X N. Business Manager. J. C. McMichncl, K A. Associate Editors. C. H. Bbck, XV; E. E. Pomeroy, 2! A E; C. Westbrook, A T A; J. T. Dorsey. V A 0; H. R. Perkins. A T Q. Volume XII. 1899.--Editor$-in-Chief, Garrard Glenn. 2) A E; A. P. Adams, X V. Business Manager, P. E. Johnson, X V. Associate Editors, J. B. McCurry. K A; W. S. Blun, A T Q; F. E. Broadnax. A T Q; W. E. Watkins, X N; I). G. Hcidt; J. W. Mason. Volume XIII, 1900.--Editors-in-Chief. Archibald Blackshear. K A; Fair Dodd, X V. Business Manager, F. E. Broadnax. A T Q. Associate Editors. F. P. Calhoun, XV; E. P. Shannon. V A 0; F. G. Tupper, 2 A E; J. P. Gardner. X N; William Davis; E. H. Hamby. Volume XIV, 1901.--Editors-in-Chief. E. P. Shannon. V A 0; J. D. McCartney, X A E. Business Manager, Jack Banks, X V. Associate Editors, P. A. Williams, X N; V. H. Bullard, A T Q; R. G. Stephens. K A; I. M. Putnam. K X; W. D. Hoyt. X V; James L. Sibley.You; mi: XV, 1902. Editors-in-Chief, Frank H. Barren. — A E; Sterling H. Black shear. X 4». Business .Managers. J. K. Jordan, A T ft; M. W. Lewis, X ML Associate Editors. C. 1). Russell. 4 A 0; 1. S. Peebles, — N; M. S. Johnson. K A; H. M. Fletcher, K X; Dew-aid Cohen. VOLUME XVI, 1903. Editors-in-Chief, C. Dexter Blount. K A; Frampton E. Ellis. 4 A 0. Business Managers, J. Benton. High; Claude W. Boyd. — N. Associate Editors. Marion H. Smith. A E; Hugh M. Scott. X 4 ; Preston Brooks, A T ft; W. G. England, X 4'; Marvin M. Dickinson. K X; Sidney J. Nix, L P L. Volume XVII, 1904. -Editors-in-Chief. L. P. Goodrich, 1 N; I. S. Hopkins, Jr.. 4 A 0. Business Managers, H. M. Blackshear. A T ft; G. V. Nunnally, X 4 ; J. B. Gamble. Associate Editors. J. D. Bower. K A; Roderick Hill. 2 A E; Wailes Lewis. X XP; W. B. Shaw. K X; W. O. Roberts, U P L; R. N. Burt. Volume X 111. 1905.—Editors-in-Chief, A. L. Hardy. K —; V. B. Moore. X 4 . Business Managers. Roderick Hill, X A E; C. P. Pratt. A T ft. Associate Editors. H. W. Telford. U P L; T. C. Stokes; A. H. Carmichael. X V; W. 0. Marshburn. 4 A 0; J. C. Upshaw, X N; Art Editor. 0. H. B. Blood worth, Jr., K A. Volume XIX, 1906.- Editors-in-Chief, W. 0. Marshburn, 4» A 0; Lansing B. Lee. X A E. Managing Editor. H. L. Covington, K A. Assistant Managing Editor, J. H. Bradberry, t P L. Art Editor. J. G. Slava. X V. ‘Associate Editors. R. S. Parker, X 4»; G. A. Green, A T ft; W. R. llambleton, X N; E. R. Lambert K 2; J. R. Turner. Volume XX, 1907. -Editors-in-Chief. Phil W. Davis. Jr.. 4 A 0: J. K. MacDonald, X ML Business Manager, T. E. Scott. Art Editor, W. A. Griffith. K A. Assistant Business Manager. H. M. Wilson. X N. Associate Editors, W. T. McCaffrey. K 2; W. G. Brantley, Jr.. X E: J. H. Neisler, U P L; R. S. Parker. X 4 ; T. S. Winn. A T ft. Volume XXI. 1908. Editors-in-Chief. S. 0. Smith. 4 A 0; W. C. Henson. Business Manager, R. P. King. X A E. Assistant Business Manager. D. L. Rogers. Art Editor. H. G. Cannon. A T ft. Associate Editors. J. B. Harris. X 4 : S. E. Morton, K X; C. C. Brooks, X N: Lanier Branson, X vl ; Roy Strickland, K A; G. W. Glausier, n K A. , Volume XXII, 1909. Editors-in-Chief, W. H. Johnson. K A: James Montgomery. X ML Business Manager, D. L. Rogers. Art Editor. J. B. Weir. Jr., K 2; R. F. Rcvson. Associate Editors, J. M. Walker, X A E; E. M. Brown. X 4 ; W. R. Holmes. 4 A 0; Frank Clark. Jr.. A T ft; C. C. Brooks, X N; C. F. Pekor. U P L; O. P. Beall. You me XXIU, 1910. -Editors-in-Chief, H. Abit Nix; John Moore Walker, X A E. Business Manager, R. L. Campbell. Art Editor. Hugh King Allen. X N. Associate Editors. Eugene S. Taylor, K X; Hughes Spalding; X 4 ; O. M. Gresham, A T ft; Aubrey Matthews. X X: Robert Cumining; Henry Newman. X 'F; Fred Allen. 4» A 0; Robert P. White. K A; Corbin C. Small, II K A. Volume XXIV, 1911. Editors-in-Chief. Evans Y. Heath. A. T. 0.; Arthur K. Maddox. Associate Editors, Geo. C. Blanton; Pope F. Brock; J. L. Deadwyler; J. H. Foster; Malvern Hill. Sigma Nu; WL S. Jones. Sigma Chi; Henry Newman, Sigma Chi: W. J. Northern Jr., Phi Della Theta; H. B. Peacock. K. A.; H. D. Russell: C. S. Small, Pi Kappa Alpha; O. A. B. Spark-. S. A. E.; Boykin C. Wright. Chi Phi. Business Manager, Howell Brooke. Assistant Business Manager. E. V. Carter, Phi Delta Theta. Volume XXV. 1912. Editor-in-Chief. Marion B. Folsom, Sigma Nu. Associate Editors. J. M. Lynch, A. T. O.; Thomas N. Powell. Phi Delta Theta. Art Editor, James B. Wright. Business Manager II.‘D. Russell. Assistant Business Manager, H. S. l-angston. Volume XXVI, 1913.- Editor-in-Chief. Robert H. Freeman. Phi Delta Theta. Associate Editors. R. R. Childs; S. Turner Brewlon. Business Manager D. A. Russell, Sigma Chi. Advertising Manager, 11. H. West, Delta Tan Delta. Art Editor, Edgar L Pennington.Volume XXVII, 1914. Editor-in-Chicf, David Knox McKamy. Associate Editors, John D. Wade, Sigma Nu: Edgar K. Fund, Delta Tan Delta. Business Manager, II. D. Russell. Art Editor, Aaron B. Bernd. Volume XXVIII. 1915. Editor-in-Chief, Ceo. S. Whitehead. Associate Editors. Thomas S. Candler; I.oui- Lester, Phi Delta Theta. Business Managers W'm. II. Key; D. K. McKamy. Art Editor, Ross W. Coker, Sigma Nu. Volume XXIX. 1916. Editor-in-Chief. Robert Callaway, A. T. 0. Associate Editors, V. 11. Quarterman, Jr., Delta Tan Della; Benjamin II. Robinson. Business Managers, Frank A. Holden. Phi Delta Theta; Joel B. Mallctt. A. T. 0. Art Editor, W. A. Griffin. Sigma Chi. VoLl’ME XXX, 1917. Editor-in-Chief. J. Huland Carmical. Associate Editors, W. 0. W'hite, Sigma Nu; F. Otcy McClellan, Chi Psi. Business Managers, Neil L. Cillis. Jr.; J. William Powell. Phi Della Theta; Gibert X. Cheves. Art Editor. Charles M. Tanner, Jr., Delta Tan Delta. Volume XXI, 1918. Editor-in-Chief, Mack Matthews. Associate Editors, Alfred Blalock. Sigma Chi; J. R. Bowden. Phi Delta Theta. Business Managers, A. S. Bussey; L. B. West. Phi Delta Theta. Art Editor, Chester W. Slack. Volume XXXII. 1919.—Editor-in-Chief. Walter J. Whitehead. A. T. 0. Associate Editors, John Carlyle McDonald; John W. Abney, 1-ambda Chi Alpha. Business Managers. Roy V. Harris, R. Glenn Dickerson, Jr.; Philip Cohen. Pi Epsilon Phi. Art Editor. Chester W. Slack. Volume XXXIII. 1920.— Editor-in-Chief. Chester W. Slack. Associate Editors. Robert 1). O'Callaghan. Kappa Sigma; Frank W. Harrold, S. A. E. Business Managers, R. Glenn Dickerson, Jr.; Frank W. Rose, S. A. E. Volume XXXIV. 1921.—Editor-in-Chief. John Pate Carson. K. A.; Associate Editors, Edgar Blalock, Sigma Chi; Ashell Monroe Day. Business Managers, E E. Andrews; Comer Howell, Chi Phi; Jerome Jones. Kappa Sigma. Art Editor, Hugh W. Hosch, K. A.the: ©EORSfA CRACKER nescHj Georgia Cracker Staff Jkromk Jonks. Jk L. J. Trotti . . O. S. Morton . Clack Foreman . J. F. Carson . . F. W. Daniki. . . C. K. Nelson . . R. K. McCaskill M. C. Bailf.y . . .................Edit nr-in-Chief ............Associate Editor ............Associate Editor ..........Associate Editor ..................Art Editor • . . Associate Art Editor .... Business Manager Assistant Business Manager ... Circulation Manager3 eb anb Marik msat-m Editorial Staff First Term Lamar J. Trotti.......................................Editor-in-Chitf Boyd C. Moss.........................................Associate Editor E. C. Wimberley.....................................Associate Editor 0. S. Morton..........................................Athletic Editor John E. Dkf.wky.......................................Society Editor L. C. Fields.........................................Exchange Editor Editorial Staff Second Term Boyd C. Moss.........................................Editor-in-Chief • E. C. Wimberley..........................................Associate Editor E. E. Watson...............................................Associate Editor Carey J. Williams....................................Athletic Editor E. A. Lowe...................................................Society Editor T. R. Perry..........................................Exchange Editor Business Department John B. Wilson.......................................................Business Manager Much W. IIoscii..................................Assistant Business Manager FIRST TF.RM John W. Bennett.........................................Circulation Manager T. E. Stokes.................................Assistant Circulation Manager M. G. Murray..................................Assistant Circulation Manager SECOND TERM T. E. Stokes............................................Circulation Manager Alton Hosch.............................................Assistant Circulation Manager F. C. McClure................................Assistant Circulation Manager "OJp) John E. Dhkm ky. Director Cl.AKK KoKKMAN J. K. Hari'Kk Jkhomk Jonks. Jr. John H. Mahon ky H. H. Manci m Olivkk S. Morton IIom C. Mos; J I LIAN K. R':» Lamar J. Trotti Carry J. Williams The University of Georgia Publicity Bureau was organized in January. 1921. as the result of llie efforts of John E. Drewry and l)r. S. V. Sanford of ihe School of Journalism. Prior i the organization of this bureau, there has never been any systematic gathering and dissemination of news items covering the activities of the University. Already the bureau has demonstrated il« inestimable value, not only in keeping the University before the people, but also in providing the students in the School of Journalism with practical training in newspaper work. It is expected that this bureau will in the future play an important part in the publicity of the University. Much credit is due both Doctor Sanford and Mr. Drewry for their work in the organization of the bureau.vicuctur l Agricultural Quarterly Staff H. G. Da$HEK....................................................Editor-in-ChieJ Otis Woodard..................................................Associate Editor Miss Stella Sparks............................................Associate Editor M. A. McUainey................................................Associate Editor J. F. Hhannen.....................................................Local Editor D. D. Scarborol'Cii............................................Exchange Editor H. V. Fitzpatrick......................................................Business Manager W. J. Davis........................................Assistant Business Manager R. W. Harris.......................................Assistant Business Manager I. P. CoULTER...............................................Circulation ManagerAgricultural Quarterly StaffOfficers of the Alumni Society C. Mi urn by Candler, 77...............................................President N. K. Haiihis. 70..........................................First Vice-President II. A. Nix, 70............................................Second Vice-President Augustine Sams. 75.........................................................Third Vice-President Sylvaniis Mokkis, 74...................................................Secretary Chas. M. StkaiiaN, ’83.................................................Treasurer W. O. Payne. "00.............................................Assistant Treasurer R. I . Bkooks. '01................Alumni Secretary and Editor of The Record War Memorial Fund Organization CKNKRAI. CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE Hakio Hodgson. ‘93. Chairman.........................................Alliens R. P. Stephens, 96. Vice-Chairman....................................Athens R. P. Bkooks, 04. Alumni Secretary................................... thcns If. A. Inch AH am. 77, Assistant Secretary............................ ihens V. 1). Andkkso.n. '91. . . . Macon 1. J. Hokmaier, '97 ... . Albany I). C. Harrow, 74 . . . . Athens Mrs. Wm. Lkakin. • • • Savannah Frank K. Boland. '97 . . Atlanta J. 1). McCartney, '02 . . . Rome Rufus H. Brown .... Augusta R. E. Park................................Athens Miss Isma Dooly...........Atlanta H. H. Swift. '03 . . . . Columbus C. I). Fi.anicen..........Athens Erwin Sibley. 70 . . Millcdgeville H. H. Gordon. Jk.. '04 . . Athens Mrs. Chas. M. Snki.li.ng • ■ Athens Mrs. Frank Hakkold . . Americus M. J. Witman. 71............Macon Harold Hirscii. '01 ... . Atlanta S. B. Vow. '94............Lavonia BOARD OF TRUST Andrew J. Cork. 76. Chairman W. M. Howard, 77 . . . Augusta Athens Mrs. S. M. Inman .... Atlanta R. P. Brooks. 04. Secretary- A. R. Lawton. 77 . . . Savannah Treasurer...................Athens E. W. MotSE, 71...........Atlanta Walter A. Harris. '95 . . . Macon E. P. Rose...............Valdosta Mrs. J. E. Hayes . . . Montezuma John E. Talmadce. Jr. . . AthensDl CATION is a business, it is big business. The Charter of the University speaking of “a free government,'’ says, “it can only be happy where the public principles and opinions are properly directed and their manners regulated. This is an influence beyond the stretch of laws and punishments, and can only be claimed by religion and education.' This, if true, and I am sure it is, gives education a place of prime importance in a free government, second only to religion. The public has been awakened to the value of education. Unfortunately the argument has tended too much toward the financial and other personal and individual benefits. As an essential to the happy continuance of free government, the cause of education has not been sufficiently considered, nor has it been fully presented. What we need is an understanding that the value of free government is dependent on its people. It is dependent on the fact of education and also on the nature of the education. The education must be sufficient in quantity and it must be patriotic in quality, a robust body and a righteous spirit. It is fully granted that the personal appeal in education, i. e., the advantage to the individual, is most potent as an inducement: but it is not admitted that the shaping of education to meet this personal appeal is better for the safety of the state. Education must of necessity furnish an advantage to the individual in obtaining a livelihood, or very many will not he attracted by it. We must take people as they are, recognize our premises, and work intelligently. The body of our education must give an advantage to the possessor; but there must be a spirit in it which looks to the welfare of the state. It is quite true that most of us who are directly engaged have been glad to get any kind of education. It has been with us a question of what we could get. We have been among those who proverbially must not be choosers. Education is a big business, indeed, it is a great big business. Upon it depend all other businesses, even free government. Sonorous phrases, such as “making the world safe for Democracy” are catch-penny talk u iless Democracy is enlightened and well disposed. Does the reader realize this? Does he apprehend the truth- it is a truth -that free government depends on education? No matter what his business may be, it depends on education—no matter how great his property -how so-called safe his investments—business and property depend on education. This is only the beginning of the benefits of education. It is the safeguard of his life, his liberty of conduct, his freedom of thought and express-ion. Education affects freedom of thought by widening its scope and enabling it to sec clearly. Many people think in a line, either straight or crooked, some think in a surface, a few think in three dimensions. 1 feel rather hopeful that those who think in three dimensions will agree that free government depends on education. I rather think that they will agree that business safety and personal freedom depend on education. An ignorant man who has accumulated property is just as dependent on education as the most highly taught for the safety of his life and property—the education of his community. Has the reader made an investment in education? Has he invested time and effort? Has he invested money? Has he even thought enough on the subject to be a well wisher? Does the reader intend to leave this matter of advancing education to someone else? Does he intend to lend a hand? I trust so. Chancellor Barrow.Military Staff Col. 1). W. Rytiikk.........Professor oj Military Science and Tactics Maj. II. 1.. Burch ... Assistant !,rofessor of Military Science and Tactics Capt. C. . McCarriui.k . Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics Capt. J. W. Nicholson . . Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics Capt. C. W. Jacobson . . Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tacticsf ¥ HfN Regimental Headquarters R. W. MaHTI.N...........................................Colonel F. C. Garrett................................Lieutenant-Colonel Promoted Colonel February 1, 1921 Miss Mar Atkinson......................................Sponsor J. H. Vandiver............................................Color Sergeant L. N'. Retts..............................................Color Sergeant L.First Battalion Officers (Infantry Battalion Headquarters) W. M. Crane........................................................Major M. S. Df.KLE...............................First Lieutenant and Adjutant Miss Alice Chandler..............................................Sponsor ISecond Battalion Officers • Cavalry Squadron Headquarters James White...........................................................Major P. K. Andkkson...............................First Lieutenant ami Adjutant E. L. Michael.......................................Squadron Sergeant-Major Mbs. James White....................................................Sponsor Third Battalion Officers (Motor Transport Battalion Headquarters) W. T. Middlkbrooks...................................................Major M. J. Brodnax................................First Lieutenant and Adjutant W. B. Almon.............................First Lieutenant and Supply Officer Miss Mary White....................................................SponsorAdjutants J. R. Stokes....................Captain and Regimental Adjutant H. A. Maxey.................Captain and Regimental Supply Officer D. Obkrdorfek..........Captain and Regimental Personnel AdjutantScabbard and Blade (Honorary .Military Fraternity) Founded at the University of Wisconsin 1901 Company I., 2nd Regiment, established at the University of Georgia 1920 IN FACULTATE Cot.. I). W. Rythek Cai t. C. A. McGakhiclk Maj. Bi rch Cai»t. J. V. Nicholson Cait. C. W. Jacobson Anderson, P. K. Broadnax, M. J. Carson, J. P. Carson, W. J. Cox. C. E. Crane. W. M. Davidson. W. H. Fitts, R. L. Garrett. F. C. IllCHSMITH, E. W. Hosch. H. W. Johnson, T. M. Mann, J. W. Martin, R. W. Midolkbrooks, W. T. Murphey, J. C. Nickerson, N. 1). Rawson. C. K. Rogers. W. M. Stokes, J. R. White, J.Company “A” Officers J. P. Carson .... N. D. Nickerson . . S. P. Shell........ J. F. Emerson . . . .Miss Ione McKenzie ...........Captain . First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant • . First Sergeant ...........Sponsor H. H. Dean................................................Additional Captain I. F. Caissert............................................Additional Captain J. H..West................................................Additional Captain SERGEANTS J. F. Hurt 7. C. Hayes T. E. Merritt M. G. Murray CORPORALS A. Bi sh J. D. Davis E. VoctCompany “A” Privates A. C. Baird B. Lanier V. K. Blankenship J. R. Lamer C. M. Britton J. G. McDaniel T. V. Coleman J. H. McGaiiee H. Cook F. C. McKenzie R. R. Cook C. T. Martin J. W. Cooper D. Owens J. W. Cordell R. B. Park W. H. Cox W. H. Paul E. C. Daniel J. S. Roberts S. H. Exley G. L. Royal M. H. Caissert R. VlEITAS A. S. Hardy T. B. Walton J. A. Hudson H. L. Watson J. B. Huff C. D. Whitaker H. A. Jones C. J. Williams H. M. Kandel F. P. Willis R. L. Lane J. C. Wilson J. L. WingateCompany “B” Officers F.. V. I Ik: ii smith . . . C. K. Kawson........ I). W. McFarland • • • J. R. Anderson .... Miss Winifred Gilmore ...........Captain . First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant ■ ■ First Sergeant ...........Sponsor 13. J. Broach...............................................Additional Captain W. F. Cobh..................................................Additional Captain H. G. Dasher................................................Additional Captain T. E. Stokes................................................Additional Captain C. A. Johnson.................................Additional Second Lieutenant J. W. Moon....................................Additional Second Lieutenant A. K. Swift...................................Additional Second Lieutenant SERGEANTS H. N. Chick H. H. Coleman CORPORALS H. 13. Gl KI.E F. H. Fi i.i.ek J. L. Mills H. V. Hartley K. S. Wright . B. WilliamsCompany “B” Privates T. L. Anthony W. H. Kelley J. H. Barnett H. G. Kicklickter F.. B. Bass F. C. McClure L. N. Betts M. McGahee C. H. Black J. B. McGee A. Bloemink W. 1). McKenzie H. L. Brim I. !’. Morris S. A. Cartledck W. M. Murray K. K. Cook D. F. Ork VV. G. COOI’KH H. T. Patterson J. D. Facan J. C. Peterson G. T. Fespekman I). M. Pollock J. E. Foy M. 0. Shreve E. Goldenherc N. J. Smith M. H. Griffin P. 1). Storey J. S. Hailey H. W. Tom B. 1). Henderson J. H. Vandiver F. Haro Rett J. M. Williamson J. R. Howeli. B. W. Wyche 0. L Johnson C. R. YorNC.Bi.oonCompany UC” Officers C. B. Smith........... 1!. K. Kldkidce .... C. E. Cox............ H. M. Wheaton • • . Miss Frances Fritzlen ..........Captain ■ First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . • First Sergeant ......... Sponsor E. A. Edwards..............................................Additional Captain 0. L. Hendricks............................................Additional Captain C. K. Nelson....................................Additional Second Lieutenant J. F. Schwa LB..................................Additional Second Lieutenant B. Davison SERGEANTS T. R. Perry A. 0. Linch W. T. Murray A. 0. Benton CORPORALS D. F. Johnson C. M. Dabbs J. H. UalpkktCompany “C” Privates K. W. Bohren J. Z. Miller W. 0. Bowden P. Mitchell L. B. Brooks F. M. Mize C. R. Brown J. K. Mooney A. d’Anticnac C. Pantone W. L. Fickunc M. Peterson T. L. Gamble P. Powers L. M. Manama:; R. J. Reave H. Harrell C. M. Reed W. H. Hester R. B. Rhodes S. A. Idelson W. S. Rockwell J. W. Klinc J. H. Rocers J. C. Leverett J. P. Sanders J. Lovvorn A. M. Snellinc L. C. McCommons F. Styles W. F. McCord B. D. Thomas W. F. McLendon S. S. Varnedoe H. T. McWilliams F. T. Weeks G. W. Miller J. S. WhitnerCompany “D” Officers J. W. Mann............................................................Captain W. L. Patterson E. N. Smith J. W. Bennett ' Miss Katharine Currie . . . • A. M. Da H. C. Whelchkli M. C. Hailey J. E. Denmark B. It. Smith ■idditional Captain . Additional Second Lieutenant ■ Additional Second Lieutenant ■ Additional Second Licntertant SERGEANTS J. E. Cooper M. L Hanaiian F. Ryther It. C. Pittman CORPORALS H. P. Dorman J. G. Hood L. S. Winn G. J. WilliamsCompany “D” Privates J. L. Anderson G. S. Hinton 0. B. Anderson C. S. Hodces F. M. Appleby W. H. IZLAH R. K. Blanchard J. B. Johnston J. L. Bolton T. L Lancfokd 0. W. Chandler S. P. Lancston 1. P. Coulter C. McArthur P. Dailey C. E. McRae T. R. Day W. C. Miles J. L. Dunaway C. 0. Miller E. M. Dunston W. A. Minor W. V. Edwards G. W. Murphey E. M. Everett J. H. Nasworthy C. E. Farrar H. W. Powers P. H. Field M. E. Reeves S. Fitts T. H. Rivers W. M. Goethe F. Simmons J. B. Gurley J. E. Toole R. M. Harbin J. L. Turner C. G. Henry T. B. Walton A. J. Herrincton F. A. Webb C. F. WhitnkrTroop “A” Officers W. H. Davidson.......................................................Captain R. L. Fitts............................................................First Lieutenant J. W. Howard..............................................Second Lieutenant W. H. Barber................................................First Sergeant Miss Marcaret Shepard................................................Sponsor T. W. Alexander................................Additional Second Lieutenant C. T. Conyers..................................Additional Second Lieutenant A. Hosch.......................................Additional Second Lieutenant C. A. Kelley...................................Additional Second Lieutenant C. A. Lewis....................................Additional Second Lieutenant C. P. McRae....................................Additional Second Lieutenant G. S. Phillips.................................Additional Second Lieutenant E. A. Thomas..................................Additional Second Lieutenant SERGEANTS S. G. Chandler L. H. Hill CORPORALS R. Crider J. D. LamonTroop “A” Privates 1). M. Allison L. A. Montac C. W. Baker J. A. Morgan J. S. Beall W. 0. McCollum II. H. Blanchard C. L. Padcett I. Bradkielo F. D. Pierce W. Bridges D. M. Post M. H. Brown T. J. Pritchett J. H. Brylev L. W. Putnam W. S. Chandler J. C. Recister J. E. Chapman I. J. Ricks J. Chappell H. S. Roberts H. 0. Cummincs R. B. Shaw J. W. Davis J. W. SlBERT A. F. Dean C. M. Spann B. Dornblatt W. L. Tait C. J. Durham W. C. Taliaferro J. C. Flanders E. H. Thomas J. H. Fowler J. C. Van Houten J). J. Holt C. F. WlEHRS W. T. Jones H. Williams D. Marx M. S. YeomanTroop “B” Officers Teo DlNN.............................................................Captain 1). F. Bruce...........................................................First Lieutenant D. Donaldson...............................................Second Lieutenant J. G. Cooper................................................First Sergeant Miss Mary Ellen Swords...............................................Sponsor H. C. Bailey...................................Additional Second Lieutenant H. J. Hardin...................................Additional Second Lieutenant W. L. Lamb.....................................Additional Second Lieutenant J. W. Mobley...................................Additional Second Lieutenant J. P. Mukphky..................................Additional Second Lieutenant M. E. Sibley.....................................Additional Second Lieutenant J. W. Gillespie SERGEANTS J. L. Watson J. W. Jackson A. T. Persons R. Y. Dean CORPORALS W. D. Wisdom G. Farrar 0. 0. WatsonTroop “B” Privates T. W. Alexander S. L. Richardson W. E. Bell W. L. Robinson M. G. Bkldixc F. L. Russell J. C. Bennett S. J. Shirley A. J. Bright C. H. Smith S. L. Carter M. M. Smith C. W. Collier J. W. Stephenson J. Costa L. C. Still W. L. Dkadwylek F. A. Stovall H. L. Death W. Tate A. E. Drexal C. J. Thornton S. A. Frederick R. L. Thurman J. H. Freeman H. S. Tyson B. F. Joel J. H. Walker V. K. Meador J. W. Watson L H. Mitchell E. E. Whitaker V. S. Morris C. M. Wiley L B. Mlscrove Ariel B. Williams J. A. Newton J. 0. Williams J. L. Parker E. J. Willis T. B. PlIIMZY J. R. Wilson E. Poe W. A. Wilson K. H. Powers R. A. Wricht K. M. Pritchett Motor Transport Company No. 1 Officers E. A. Lowe..............................................Captain H. W. Hoscii..............................................First Lieutenant H. A. ROBINSON...........................................Second Lieutenant J. W. Barnktt..................................Additional Captain 4Motor Transport Company No. 1 Privates W. B. Almon W. A. Lu.ndy J. R. Armstkonc C. A. McMillan J. W. Barnett J. F. Reid J. B. Bookhakdt L. C. Rbw C. H. Cohen 0. G. Reynolds. F. C. Dart H. A. Robinson H. H. Drewry C. A. Royston Troy Edwards F. B. Smith T. J. Flake B. L. Southwell F. J. Frederick A. D. Summers L. M. Harmon W. W. Thomas A. H. Hasty G. A. Turner C. C. Kemp C. R. Wiley S. B. Lufbirrow 0. S. Willis  -fir- k y Motor Transport Company No. 2 Officers L. R. Lamer.......... J. C. Murpiiey .... D. S. R cccrs........ E. H. Dixcn......... Miss Ollie Birkhaltlr ...........Captain . First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant ■ ■ First Sergeant .......... Sponsor F. C. Dart Additional Captain SERGEANTS W. F. Abercrombie W. W. Drake W. J. Hart CORPORALS C. 0. Aderholb F. 1). Chastain G. W. Richardson H. W. DerdenMotor Transport Company No. 2 Privates J. T. Adatr M. D. Mobley C. S. Bearden W. C. Mulus I). P. Bennett N. D. McKainey P. Brooks H. H. Maddox K. R. Bitn h V. M. Patterson H. H. Cook D. D. Scarborough R. M. DAVAST M. D. Seaborn E. K. Davis J. H. Shart E. L. Encland U. V. Stancill T. E. Hammock F. A. Tanner W. G. Johnson H. 0. Thomas W. T. Johnson L. Warren J. M. Jones T. H. Whitner L. R. Langley S. G. Whitehead T. Levie J. H. WilsonM. K. Bell Band Drum Major E. C. Bowden K. D. A. I). Brown J. 7. W. L. Bl RDASHAW C. H. B. R. Burt L L R. L. Dasher J. A. J. L. Davis R. H. 0. M. Ellsworth J. L H. B. Fant J. W. D. B. Frederick L. A. W. M. Fulcher R. J- J. C. Hardeman R. B. MlU.ER Morris Newton Robinson Seay Skeen Slaughter Tanner Thomas Walton Weeksr Kind reader, as you turn each page. View every line with care; And fume not. pray, with inward rage. Should your own name appear. Remember, pray, each word we say Is but a merry quip. And laugh, with us. dull care away. In jolly fellowship.THE OUIJA BOARD AT GEORGIA NOW (HCORP© Now OUIJA, TC.Lt. Mf rue AN6WCR TO TM C F IFTH Ciut TlON - R. SMI TMWH AT • £TMCi POP. AM. WLftAOITAMCNT? J vJMY U-8-R- Oottca, ?!• THAT TIRM ONt tVPRr 'SLS - - o nn □ Jk u U J4J i. Pod THC LXAM fc. Fort OAlt'f ROOTING NOW OUIJA V.IU I WIN IN T M AT POKt-R JRM' TOHIOUT fj i t }A— D ] H FOR. PIRiONtk awe TlONS OUIJA . VUILI. OR. 0OCOC.H MEET Hid U:»° CUftSi T H IS MORN |N o ? Bi °l FOR CONVE.NlE.NCE AY. OIO I PAS THAT OvSiNtSS V-AW UNDER OR. J CM KIN 0 t 5. To CAS C YOuR. MiNO l ._ ,t.TCHA HAMARD ) vCORtS HER TMRtC J r«u - TOWN (, OH O-COROlAlPopular Soncs Illustrated “Chilly Bean Now-a-Days You have heard of the man who loved his girl For her sweetness and fairness of face; You have heard of the bird who attributes his fall To her smiles and her marvelous grace; You have heard of the simp who worships blue eyes;-None other so fair do we see— But Alack! And Alas! I fell for my girl For the dimple she has in her knee! My friends, I know you all have heard Of a land of milk and honey. But I would take, if I have a choice, The land of silk and money. Happenings of the Year SEPTEMBER 15lh: Influx of Freshmen begins. 16th: Two new additions to the faculty announced, viz., Doctors Young and Jenkins. 17th: Big fire sale of units. Professor Hooper begins to get heavy correspondence. 18th: Solon McClure, the representative from Walker County, gets a free hair cut. 20th: All barber shops do a rushing business. 25th: Tysinger makes his appearance as floor-walker at the “Beanery.” 27th: Pandora election held. The usual good staff elected and no politics. OCTOBER 1st: “Shorty” Andrews and “Jerry" Jones make great personal sacrifices in order to serve their Alma Mater as business managers of the Pandora. 2nd: P. Reynolds holds lengthy discussion with Bob Park on “free love." 7th: Motor Transport Corps solves problem of next war by appointing ninety-five (95) officers. 10th: All military commissions announced and Field Marshall Ross makes his appearance. 12th: Thalians hold first try out for Co-eds. Absolutely no politics, but the best lookers were selected. 16th: The Georgia Cracker makes its initial appearance and the staff celebrates royally beginning at ten P. M. 27ih: University hoboes headed by Professor Wesley start out for Columbus. 28th: Capt. Whatley and “Shylock" Miller slate that they are betting on Auburn. 29th: Advance guards roll into Columbus. 80th: Georgia gets Auburn’s goat as well as Warren and Sizemore. NOVEMBER 1st: Capt. Whatley and “Shylock” Miller den charges of above mentioned bet. The hoboes who rode the side-door Pullmans going, come back in real Pullmans. 9th: Georgia Freshman football team defeats Tech Hi. One world's series frame-up goes wrong.10th: Professor Coullcr annouces his correspondence courses in history for after Christmas,—several new members added to the class. 11th: Professor I pson dismisses his law class when Flournoy’s barbecue hell rings. 12th: Large flock of chickens begin to arrive for week-end festivities. Stephens and Mangum dismiss classes for the day. “Foxy Grandpa” makes serious objections. 13th: Georgia heats Florida and Mark Anthony stars. 15th: Pop and Casper open up the second floor of the Q room. 16th: Senior canes arrive and “Sleepy” Rudolph buys a new pair of shoes. 17th: “Politician” Lanier seen around Phi Kappa with twenty-one l21 members of the “Country Club.” 18th: Chancellor Barrow predicts that Georgia will defeat Alabama and intro- duces a new term,—“Abdominal equipment.” 19th: Hoboes set out for Atlanta to take in the Alabama game. 20th: Georgia beats Alabama 21-14. Tech roots for Alabama. Tysinger in lobby of Piedmont after game and offers to scrap any Tech man his size. 22nd: Hugh Stephens gives fair Harvard accent to Boston in political science class. 24th: l)r. Heatwole cuts his sociology class. 25th: Scabbard and Blade holds first public initiation. Monk Garrett offi- ciates. 26th:. “Field Marshall” Ross seen without his boots and spurs. 27lh. Wes Hargrett seen strolling on the campus. 28th: Bill Goldsmith pays his weekly visit to the Dean. 29th: 'fhe Senior Derby Tornado lines up against the Freshmen Brigade. DECEMBER 1st: All frat. houses swarmed with punching boards operated by young Ponzis. 2nd: Athens police force make a number of arrests. Mr. Jonnv Walker arrested. 3rd: Lucy Cobb, Jerry Jones, Tom Johnson, and company put on play at the Colonial. Everybody enjoyed the show including the actors. Jones scores big hit. 4th: Co-eds entertain with a dance. 6th: “Field Marshall” Ross loses his boots and spurs and enters civilian life.9th: Advertisement appears in Athens Banner wanting a trainer for Tarzan of the Apes. 11th: Demosthenian wins a hard fought fight from Phi Kappa. 13th: Miss Bargeron asks l)r. White to explain the chemical process of hypothesis. 14th: Professor Upson keeps his law class the entire period. 15th: Term exams begin. A few cobwebs arc brushed off several books. 20th: Dr. Sylvy cuts a class. 22nd: Everybody clears out for the holidays. Pop and Casper seen weeping. Nick takes a vacation. JANUARY 3rd: School opens up again. I.ong line of students appear at Col. Reed's office at twelve midnight. 4th: A few students take in classes. 0th: “Pete” Watkins pays his mattress bill to “Shorty’ Andrews, which has been running for the last four years. 7th: Ford seen without McFarland. 8th: Infantry puts on first parade. All the officers star. 9th: Ben O’Neal seen up at 8:30 o'clock. 10th: “Booze" McWhorter nearly thows a lemon on top of Southern Mutual Building. The occasion nearly causes heart-failure on the part of his financial backers. 11th: “Pete" Stephens gets hair cut. Barbers were busy for a week.—hence no Math, classes for a week. 12th: Col. Ryther cuts drill. 13th: Someone secs Professor Edward's upper lip move in psychology class. 14th: Pof. Upson breaks in a few of his new lawyers by getting them to read a few code selections. 15th: “Monk" Garrett appears at basketball game with co-ed and gels big ovation from his fellow students. 16th: “Sylvy” Morris takes in O'Brien’s Ministrels. both matinee and night. 17th: Frank Martin and “Monk” Garrett fired from “Beanery”. 19th: Prof. John Morris calls at Law Building and asks to be directed to Dr. “SyIvy’s” office.20th: University artists meet with Lucy Cobb art class. Tom Johnson shows up as an artist. 21st: “Sleepy’ Rudolph, “Stilt Wilson and “Skipp" Whatley attend vespers. 22nd: One of Dr. Hutcheson’s students rings him up from the Georgian Hotel, stating that he is President of the University of Kentucky. I)r. Hutcheson dismisses class and goes down to see the gentleman from the “Blue Grass State."’ 2-Jth: Alexander conies to town and reveals Glenn Dickerson’s love affairs. Alex failed to predict the big fire that occurred on the same night. 25th: Dean Dudley fails to hold a bull session. 26th: First snow in four years appears. Costas has a rushing ice-cream trade. 28th: The “Moonriders” is concluded at the Strand amid great applause from the matinee fans. FEBRUARY 1st: “Shorty” Ross seen wearing only two pins on his vest. 3rd: Prof. Bob Park leaves for Cuba. He carries two suit cases. 4th: “Theo” Smith comes to town with his camera. Pandora staff gets free Portinas. 5th: “Monk” Garrett introduces Joe Longino at the co-ed basketball game as the famous left handed picolo player from Girard, Ala. 7th: Joe Longino issues his memorable reply to “Mauling Monk' and other contemporaries, entitled ‘Ten Slashing Rounds.” 9th: Dean Dudley gets a call inquiring if Mr. Freely is in school. lCtli: John Slaughter asks Foxy Hcatwolc to open a window as he’s hot. 11th: A certain young professor starts his open air classes out on Herty Field. 13th: Prof. Park returns from Cuba carrying the two suit cases still. 17th: “Country” Mangum and his gang of horse-hide tossers take their initial work-out. 18th: Fritz. Leiber’s Shakespearian troop hit town. The Colonial is flooded by the S. N. S. and “Solon” McClure nearly gets a good seat. 20th: “Rallies” club makes visit to all the Athens girls and annour.ee their coming dance. A golden bon-bon box is to be given to the most popular girl. 21st: Nick Deakides closes up early in order to get in a poker game. 22nd: Big snow fight occurs in front of the Q room.24th: Dr. White dismisses his geology class fifteen minutes early when he hears the hell of a nearby freight engine. 26th: Cobb Torrence appears before the Grand Jury. Tech and Georgia win in basketball tournament. 28th: Georgia and Tech line up together for first time in two years. Picture shows in Athens do bum business on this date. MARCH 1st: Pandora goes to press, while the editors quote the old saying of Poe’s Raven. “Yep,” said Gap Johnson, of Rumpus Ridge, Ark., “my idee of a real good political job is taking a census of the niggers at a lynching.” My girl has thrown me down. So I Blew all for just one quart. Of rye. I thought to forget it all in one, !VIad fling But the rye was tea—Oh Death where is, Thy Sting!Who’s Who Most Popular Student “Buck’' Cheeves Proudest Corporal—!Nickerson Biggest Liar—Longino Bicgest Bootlicker—A f Dickson Biggest Eater “Squeaky” Mitchell Ugliest Freshman -“Wes” Harriett Most Conceited- “Field Marshall'’ Ross Handsomest Man—“Monk” Garrett Biccest Sport “Doc” Mullis Most Desperate I.over Billy Anderson Bicgest Vamp—“Tarzan” Hardest Boner—“Woodall” Wittiest Man- John Sheppard Best Athlete—J. Jones Strongest Man—Mooney Biccest Hot Air Artist—Governor Brown Best Writer—“Old Timer” Best Orator- John Sheppard Laziest Man—Highsmith Biccest Freshman—“Mutt” Soule Biggest Politician—Cordrey Most Popular Occupation—Studying Most Popular Song—“Dan, Dan, — !!!!!! Biccest Grafter—Day Bicgest Nuisance—Pandora Managers Hardest Boy—Daniel Best Sincer—Jerome Jones Most Bashful—Glenn DickersonBiccest Sissy—“Shorty” Andrews Biccest Freak Fawcett Best Lawyer—Judge Raines Worst Knocker—P. B. Ford Most Solemn Man—Jerome Jones Biccest Joke—“Count” Callaway Prettiest Man—“Shylock” Mi I Ici- Best Poet—Jimmie Spicer Biccest Tite-Wad Shylock Miller Sweetest Boy Wimberley Loudest Man—“Pete” Bowen Biccest Runt—“Straw” Nall Most Practical Man—“Simp” Hurt Most Obscure Man Glenn Dickerson Biccest Fish—Doctor Young Best Pool Shot—Bill West Most Popular Collece—‘Tech Biccest Loafer—Bill Crane Best Bone Head— P. B. Ford Biccest Countryman -Cobb Torrence Best Musician—The I-eft Handed Picolo Play Most Brilliant Judge Wilcox Most Popular Professor—“Pistil” Jenkins Most Unpopular Professor -Sanford Most Popular Co-ed—Kate ' mswAMuitti itniuMf ' f? l H SHEFFIELD i 'ma a m IIkav Date k.Dr. Penkins and His Law Students A COMEDY IN ONE ACT 'DRAMATIC PEliSONNA Jistil Penkins..................................................................... professor Lob PoNCINO..................................................... •.............Brightest Pupil Youkc Flood.............;................................................Most Polite Student Back PKNNETT.....................................................I lost Accomplished Student ....................................................................................Ilis Pal Hbdmund Bi'RT.............................................................................Best Student Mayid Darx...........................................................................Shrewdest Student Ooze Telly............................................................. Most Popular Student Ensemble........................................................................Entire Class Scene In Business Law class room when cveiybody was loaded and ready lo sliooi to kill. Professor (swinging o|K n his door and entering with his hair handolined and cheeks rouged) "Good morning!" Ensemble "Good morning!" Professor (throwing out Romeo) "This is no place for dogs." Buge Pennett "Don’t kick my dog around like that.” Professor (gradually losing his audacity) "I don’t think that 1 hurt him er cr .Mr. Pennett.’’ B. Pennett “Be sure and don’t trouble him again unless he troubles you." Professor—“Mr. Pongino, have you read the first sixty-nine pages for today?" L. Pongino “No. sir. Dr. Penkins, I have read only sixty-eight and three-fourths pages.” Professor “You should have read it all." (He begins recording a 0.) L. Pongino “Doctor, do you give a man a zero when he lacks only a quarter of a page out of sixty-nine? Professor “Suppose you tell us the case on page er—cr fifty-eight. Mr. Pongino.” L. Pongino "Well. d«»clor, when you answer my question. I will answer yours." Professor (answering the question) "Well, when 1 give a zero, it i? nobody's business but mine and I try to be just and fair to all." L. Pongino i answering the case as recorded on page 58) "The guy was guilty and liable for $1.98." Professor—“Mr. Burt, what have we for today?" . Burl “Contracts, doctor." Professor “What is a contract?" Ensemble—“A contract is an agreement to do or not to do something, as the case may l»e." Professor “Mr. Burl, only, please. If I have er cr a patch of onions and you have er er a cow and Mr. Young Flood has er er a mandolin, and your cow eats my onions would it be a contract for Mr. Young Flood to agree to give me his mandolin in payment for my onions that your cow ate?" II. Burt "Yes. sir, doctor, because if er er you consider the mandolin a just payment in due consideration for onions, it is a contract pure ami simple.Frofessor “What would you do with the milk if it tasted like onions?” . Hurt—'I would er er sell it to Mr. Young Flood.” Professor “What would you do in that case, .Mr. Young Flood?" Y. Flood “I would sue Mr. Hurt for selling onion juice under the name of milk.” Frofessor “Correct, sit down. Mr. Young Flood, what was that remark?” Y. Flood -“Nothing, doctor.” Frofessor “Well, when you have anything to say er er say it to me. I thought that I explained the rules of etiquette at the beginning of the year for fear that some people didn’t have the sense er er enough to understand them.” (He l cgins to give Young Flood a zero.) Y. Flood--"I just remarked to Mr. Darx about the case, doctor.” Frofessor “You must make remarks to ine about cases.” Y. Flood "1 l cg your pardon, doctor.” Frofessor ”1 grant it.” Flood “Thank you. sir.” Frofessor (hesitatingly) “You arc welcome. We will take up the remainder of this period assigning counties to get up the mailing list for the alumni directory. Mr. Hargis, will you take Hutts County and get the boys from that end of the state. Mr. Telly, you will take Oconee County. You know the Oconee boys, don't you Mr. Telly?" Ensemble "No, doctor, but lie knows the Oconee girls.” (Much laughter.) Hell rings. Curtain.Advice By “Jerry” Jones i in trouble and distress, in sorrow and in anguish, when sickness, more or less, and on mv col I languish; my all gather 'round my bed to heed by lamentation, and ey pour into mv head advice and consolation. Says what you need to put new spirit in you, raise all the windows and, indeed, you'll strengthen bone and sinew.” Another says: “Take my advice; fresh air will cramp and fetter; close all your windows ill a trice, you’ll find yourself much better.'- Another says: “Take all the pills, the powders and prescription; in sooth they'll banish all your ills and better your condition.” And still some other lads speak out: “Pay no heed, we assure you, let all your medicine leak out; let Mother Nature cure you.” And so 'mid all my aches and pain I hear these words, and suffer, until 1 resolution gain to banish every duffer. “Get out!” I say in accents loud, “and leave me to my sorrow, no more around my bedstead crowd, or I’ll be dead tomorrow.” And other times when I’m pursued by worries without number, when life seems far from rosy-hued, when cares disturb my slumber, as I walk down the thorough-fare, my friends all warble gaily: “Why all this melancholy air that sits upon you daily? Take some advice from one who knows; improve your disposition; throw to the dogs your earthlywoes and smile a benediction. What though your creditors are keen and seek their long-owed money, still walk with countenance serene; with smile both bright and sunny. What though your girl has failed to write, let not such trifles fret you; sit down, to her a note indite, and say she’ll never get you.” Too long I listen to his words, then 1 cry in resentment: “Enough! How do you idle birds know how to find contentment? The trouble that I have is mine, what do you know about it? Advice to smile is very fine, but 1 can live without it.” 4r. AN 0 You M AO TAKtN MLR to AUL. TMC OANCLS too HCR f»Vfc POUND Boxes or CANDY ANO ONC O AY You DftoPPlD IH ALU OfA (UOOC.N ANO fOUNO NCR. WLARINO AUOTHLR fUtow'S rrtAT 9lN — Cto, OtDN T Yog rtcu cwt p • .fi------Professor Eve Stupson’s Class ONE ACT COMEDY Place Prof. Eve St upson’s class room. Dramatic Pehsonnae- Prof. Eve Stepson and his law class. (Enter students.) Students “Good morning. Judge.” Professor “Good morning, gentlemen. Attention to roll call." Judge Rains- “Did you mark me present, ’fessor?” Professor “No, but I will." Mr. Aar “Mr. Rake has left school. Judge." (Professor rubs out Rake’s name.) Judge Pool—"Rut Rake will he hack next week, Professor." (Professor puts Rake hack on the roll.) Professor -“Now. gentlemen, you have been having a pretty easy time of it so far. I have ! een starling with the A’s and coming down the alphabet. It has been very easy for you to tell when you would he called on. Rut loginning tomorrow I am going to fool you. 1 am going to start with the Z’s and come backward. Now has everybody read the lesson for today?" Judge Billcox -“No, sir. Judge, 1 didn’t get to read it all over as I was sick." Professor—“Very well then, I won’t call on you today, Mr. Rillcox.” Judge Rains “1 was sick had yesterday, too, ’fessor.” Professor -“I can't excuse you Mr. Rains, you've been offering that excuse too much here lately.” Judge Rains “Well, ’fessor, my eyes have been giving me trouble. (Great laughter.) Is that excuse good enough, ’fessor?” Professor “I’ll let you know later. Mr. Rains. Now, Mr. Reeves, are you prepared today?" Mr. .Chuck Reeves “No, sir. Professor, I hurt my hip yesterday." Professor "That’s right, Mr. Reeves, you’re a basketball player, aren’t you?" Mr. Beeves—“Yes, sir." Professor -“ ery well, 1 will excuse you for the rest of the season, but I’ll call on you after the season closes." (Reeves sits down amid applause.) Professor “Now, Mr. Karland. if a man was transporting some mules and horses in a freight car and happened to an accident, would he have a kick coming?" Mr. Farland "Not unless one of the mules kicked him." 1‘rojessor “Now, I notice a number of new faces in the class this morning and I'll call on them to read a little out of the code. Mr. Jones is an old man, so I’ll call on him to read first in order to show the new men how it is done. (Mr. Jones comes forward and reads about the innkeeper’s responsibilities for the personal foods of his guest.) Professor--"Mr, Joss, you will read next, and I'll ask Mr. Foodall for criticisms." (Flournoy’s barbecue bell rings.) All—“There's the l»ell. ’fessor." Professor “Class dismissed. Take the next twenty-five pages for tomorrow." (Curtain.) The Reason Jimmy Missed the QuestionConclusion In presenting this the 1921 volume of the PANDORA, the editors wish to express their appreciation to those who have in various ways assisted us and without whose aid the publication of this volume would have been almost impossible. Especially do we thank John E. Drewry who so kindly assisted us in the editing and preparation of the copy and whose valuable suggestions have been embodied in the make-up of this book. To Lamar Trotti, W. J. Carson, E. C. Wimbcrley, P. B. Ford, J. A. McFarland, A. S. Johnson, and Miss Iris Davenport, we extend our thanks for literary contributions. To J. H. Park, Frank Daniel, J. k. Mooney, and H. 0. Sheffield, we express our thanks for art contributions. To Messrs. F. J. Ball and Theo Smith who have managed the photographic end, we are very grateful. To the advertisers whose loyal support has made the publication of this volume possible, we express our appreciation. And now in conclusion, we hope that before you pass judgment on this volume,. you will consider the enormous field that we have attempted to cover. We have tried to present those activities which have stood out during the year and in which we believe you will be interested. The success with which we have met can best be determined by the number of times you refer to this volume in years to come. Board of Editors.ADVERTISE ttWHOSG it z 0$ F G u A J“ 3% « § OOp kifThe Atlanta National Bank Extends to the Students of the University of Georgia a cordial invitation to make use of its banking facilities. Oldest National Bank in the Cotton States In the Heart of Atlanta, The Heart of the South." BANK LOOSE LEAF EQUIPMENT DEVICES 'Cfje THE McGREGOR HOTEL CAFE COMPANY European Office Furniture and Systems Chas. E. Walton. Prop. printing LITHOGRAPHING ENGRAVING • ColumbusG $torgia ATHENS, GA. TAILORED AT EASHIOM PARK K A Y - B A C HE WEARS A KAY-PAC SUIT—THE LATEST FASHION PARK STYLE DEVELOPMENT CUSTOM 3KKVJCI WITHOUT THK NNNOYNNCK Of N TRY-ON RKNOY-TO-PUT-ON CHAS. STERN COMPANY THE HOME OF GOOD CLOTHES ATHENS, GEORGIAICE CREAM SODA CIGARETTES CIGARS Costal The Finest Soda and Ice Cream Fount in Georgia MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALERS OF ICE CREAM JOBBERS OF CONFECTIONERY AND FOUNTAIN SUPPLIES Georgian Baggage Transfer Co. Service with Courtesy Special Attention Given to Students’ Baggage HAULING MOVING TAXI SERVICE Phone 783 Georgian Baggage Transfer Co. Compliments • . of The Colonial Theatre Fukenstein Williams Georgia Roys WelcomeHats! Hats! Hats! R1MBLE hats are always the latest showing of styles and the very best of quality. Young men’s hats by Trimble are featured by us. "Satisfaction with Every ’ CHAS. STERN CO. The Home of Good Clothes ATHENSCompliments of Like “The University” Spalding, MacDougald Sibley Jack J. Spalding Hughes Spalding -The-Central Bank Trust Corporation Daniel MacDougald John A. Sibley OF ATLANTA ATLANTA, GA. Serves All Georgia Compliments of • Little, Powell, Smith Compliments o( Goldstein Attorneys at Law Jno. D. Little Arthur G. Powell Marion Smith M. F. Goldstein Candler, Thomson Hirsch ATLANTA, GA. ATLANTA, GA. KIRSCHBAUM CLOTHES OUR MONEY-BACK Does the suit look right— and keep on looking right? Does it wear as a good suit should ? Does it give you a fair money’s worth ? Judge a Kirschbaum suit by those standards. With just reasonable care it will fulfill them. Eitherthat,oryour money back—cheerfully! Spring prices on Kirschbaum Clothes are $25 to $45. CHAS. STERN CO. High Grade Clothing, Hats and Furnishing Goods ATHENS . SPRING 1921 PLEDGEAmerican Book Company (Incorporated in New York) PUBLISHERS OF SCHOOL --AND-- COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS SOUTHERN DEPARTMENT A. I. BRANHAM, Manager J. E. McREE Traveling Representative for Georgia 2-4 North Forsyth Street ATLANTA, GA. New York Cincinnati Chicago Boston%IGHT and WRONG 'iimirai i| ,r T HERE’S a right way and a wrong way of being well dressed. The right way is to buy a well-appearing suit of good material and careful tailoring in the first way—and you won’t be buying new clothes all the time. That’s the right way, because such a suit will stay well appearing much longer than any other. There’s real wear in Griffon Clothes and lots of style. We take pleasure in inviting you to see the new Spring styles. mmmmm umam' Chas. Stem Co. Athens, Ga.THE LAWYER’S LIBRARY The foundation of every lawyer’s library should be the local books of the state in which he intends to practice. GEORGIA LAWYERS will find the following books of first importance: Georgia Supreme Court Reports, Georgia Appeals Reports, Van Epps-Akin-Stevens-Index Digest of the Georgia Reports and Georgia Appeals Reports, Park’s Annotated Georgia Code, Local Text Books. Write for Prices and Terms THE HARRISON COMPANY Law Book Publishers ATLANTA, GA.If Interested in T eaching,— Write us. We operate an absolute FREE Teachers’ Registration Bureau SOUTHERN SCHOOL BOOK DEPOSITORY, Inc. ATLANTA, GA. Distributors of School and College Text Hooks THE GEORGIA 'NATIONAL BANK ATHENS, - GEORGIA This Bank advertises the following qualities of service, which it strives to maintain: Completeness of equipment. Absolute protection of funds in its custody. Efficiency and courtesy on the part of officers and employees. Capital and Surplus $900,000.00 RIVERSIDE A military academy of the highest grade. Junior Unit R. O. T. C. Located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mts. Golf, all athletics, aquatics. Thorough preparation for universities, technical schools. Government Academies or business. National patronage. more than 200 cadets from 28 states last session. Expenses Moderate. Write for Catalog. RIVERSIDE GAINESVILLE. GEORGIA Q—ROOM BILLIARDS, CIGARS COLD DRINKS, Etc. Your Patronage Appreciated ATHENS, - GEORGIATHE PHOTOGRAPHS IN THIS ANNUAL WERE MADE BY Frederick J. Ball COLLEGE AVENUE ATHENS, GEORGIABARRETT COMPANY INCORPORATED COTTON FACTORS NORTH GEORGIA COTTON A SPECIALTY ATHENS, GEORGIA Davison-Nicholson Company COMPLIMENTS OF The Palace Theatre “Dixie’s Playhouse Deluxe” STRAND THEATRE-ELITE THEATRE WHERE BETTER PICTURES ARE SHOWN Ladies’ Suita, Coats, Capes, Dresses, Millinery, Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery, House Furnishings Davison-Nicholson Co. ATHENS, GA. Chas. Morris Co. “SMART CLOTHES" CLAYTON STREET ATHENS. GA. ATHENS. GA.


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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

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