University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA)

 - Class of 1920

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 352 of the 1920 volume:

UPS riVi I -? 3.0 30 the sweetest flowers in Life’s beauteous garden, whose loveliness and fragrance never fade; q To the higher and best of God's creations, whose faith never falters and whose love never fails; J To the tenderest and noblest hearts in all the world, whose affections never lessen and whose devotion lasts unto the end; 1 To those who suffer without complaining, serve without selfishness and sacrifice without murmuring: To those who give without stint the full measure of the heart’8 affection and by their pure and gentle lives point the way to success and happiness and the eternal reward of duty well performed: qTO OUR MOTHERS this volume of Pandora is lovingly dedicated.  7 V JThe Mothers of Men B$ Joaquin Miller The bravest battle that ever was fought! Shall I tell you where and when? On the maps of the world you will find it not 'Tis fought by the mothers of men. Nay. not with cannon or battle shot. With sword or nobler pen! Nay. not with eloquent words of thought From mouths of wonderful men. But deep in the wallcd-up woman's heart— Of woman that would not yield. But bravely, silently, bore her part— Lo. there is that battle-field! No marshaling troop, no bivouac song. No banner to gleam and wave; But. Oh! their battles, they last, they last. From babyhood to the grave. Yet faithful still as a bridge of stars. She fights in her walled-up town— Fights on and on in endless wars. Then, silent, unseen, goes down. Oh. ye with banners and battle shot. And soldiers to shout and praise. I tell you the hingliest victories fought Were fought in those silent ways. Oh. spotless woman in a world of shame. With splendid and silent scorn Go bach to God as white as you came— This kingliest warrior born.EDITOR IN CHIEF suvnA QV aAA ftt 6aiiu4 ASSOCIATE EDITORS vJLajcovU r [ ), BUSINESS MGRS.JFttr uuJrft THE Editors of the 1920 Pandora lake this method of thanking each and every one who has by direct assistance made this Annual possible. The issuance of such a book, representing as it does the varying interests of college life, is no easy task. The Editors have often been discouraged and sometimes well nigh hopeless of bringing out the book. But the interest and unfailing loyalty of the students, from Freshmen to Seniors, has ever been present as a goad to our flagging energies. In spite of the multitudinous duties of editorship we finish our task with regret. We offer the book to the students, not with entire confidence, but nevertheless with the feeling that they will not regard our efforts as altogether unworthy of the great institution the Pandora represents. arpjs VILWS TRUSTED FACULTY tAIL. old buildings, that have, to the tread of thousands, echoed and re-echoed! Hail, masses of wood and stone, wrought by the hands of man. but personified by the spirit of Knowledge! Inanimate and yet alive! Dumb, and yet speaking with a thousand tongues of the splendor of yesterday, the wonders of today and the marvels of tomorrow. Kvery crevice holds its whispering relator of the past. Kvery initial carved in your sacred bodies speaks more plainly than human words of those who were. Like great Mothers you have nourished your sons. who. in endless procession, have spent their allotted moments under your protecting wings. To you have they come in their hours of strife, in their hours of joy. Patiently you have heard the low. drowsy singsong of study; delightedly you have heard their stormy debates; merrily you have heard their joyous laughter. In all you have-joined with the ardor of love. Years have come and gone, but still you stand in all your beauty of graceful old age. Some of you have seen more than a century go by. but still you arc as firm as in your youthful days. Your association with youth has found for you that spring of eternal youth. Some of you arc but buds, yet you have taken your places with dignity and have won the love of vour sons. Association has brought forth love and love shall make you whole. Your spirit will forever guide the destiny of your sons. As you stand, watchful and earnest, your cvcr-old. ever-new sons shall pass in ranks of glory and each shall pay tribute to you. Old Buildings, as like a Commander you stand at attention on Georgia's sacred soil. —Lamah J. Trotti, ’21.The Chapel HKRli is a majestic fronting to this Chapel. These great columns to every man must needs lie something more than columns- mere inflexible beauty or the strong moral pillars of the soul. So must the entire chapel itself which in memory still re-echoes to the youthful voices of Toombs, Stephens, Hill and Gordon, stand forever in men’s minds os one of the most potent factors in Georgia’s greatness. How many joys and sorrows, how many reunions and separations, old Chapel, have you witnessed in your more than a hundred years of life!University Library HIS building whs donated to the University through the generosity of one of Georgia's sons, George Foster Fcalaxly. Housing nI onty forty tlMMisnnd volumes, it assists mntcrinlly in fulfilling Carlyle's definition of a university: “A collection of Ixioks . Many liappv and profitable hours have l»cen ••pent in the pnst and will l c spent in tl»c future by the students of the University within this building. A fine collection of old and rare Inxiks, manuscripts, anil newspapers make this library a depository of Georgia history and a fertile field for research workers.Terrell Hall |HIS building stands on the site of a former science building, destroyed by fire in 1905. It is the home of the chemistry and pharmacy departments. Few institutions of learning have chemistry departments better equipped with scientific apparatus and class rooms. Joseph 1. Terrell, sonic years In-forc his death secured the appropriation that made this structure possible. In grateful appreciation of what he did the trustees gave the building his name. It is one of the most impressive as well as one of the most convenient of all the buildings of the University.Law Building IIIS is the only University building in Athens not lociited on the campus—this the new home of the hiw department. It whs erected for the Athenaeum Club, a social organization of Athens. When the Club went out of existence, their old place was purchased by the' Klks. Upon its being offered for sale last year, the generosity of a few friends of the University made it possible for the law department to become its latest purchaser. It has l ecn remodelled and made into ideal quarters for this branch of the University. 4 r Peabody Hall VI tin death of the great international Wanker, Francis I’ealxxly. a Georgia man, it was found that lie had left a large part of his estate to the cause of education. This money was administered for many years by a Board of Trustees, special piirjmso for which the money was left, was training of teachers. When the science of Pedagogy become sufficiently developed in a numlicr of colleges, money was «tp|x rtloncd among them, tlx- (.’Diversity The the had the of Georgia receiving at tlint time fifty tltousnnd dollars, of which benefaction this building is the result. It has already meant much to the State.Campus Walk HKN the campus is green in the spring, this old walk in front of these buildings is about ns delectable and fine n thing as men generally have opportunity to look at. At sun-down, many a time, you must have passed here, hearing the incoherent whistlings of the l ovs in the dormitories—conscious of the heavy fragrance of the magnolias, believing somehow from all this, and from the deep crimson of the sky beyond the drill field—Indieving somehow—and justly—that you were in a rarer and higher world than you could come at elsewhere.Moore College HIS building represents the generosity of the people of tlie city of Athens. An appropriation of twenty-five thousand dollars from the City Treasury was made in 1S74. Because of the active interest in securing this appropriation shown by Dr. K. I). .Moore the building was given his name. From the beginning it lias been the home of the Engineering and 1’hysics Departments. Much of the construction work in the State takes inception here. One of the best telescopes in the South is mounted on the roof of this building.New College |V the Iil crnlity of the legislature of 1821 this j edifice was erected. The corner-stone was laid : on June 25th, 1822 A. L. 5823 by the .Mount • Vernon Lodge at tlie request of the Trustees of the University of Georgia. So reads the inscription on the corner-stone. This building has known many different uses, first ns a dormitory, then ns an academic building, now ns dormitory and the home of the military department. Many a l»oy whose name has helped to make the State illustrious has been sheltered within its walls. 9Academic Building m Kit K, if anywhere, is tin- old mngit-inn. Here lie will make plain for you the course of liuiimn hope nml human despair, rising and falling across time like a plotted graph. I'pun these walls are legends of the vastness and the littleness of man, the hardy venerahleness of him and the still Idind vonthfuloess. Here, if anywhere, men may find the ohl sweet peril of being turned mad ami made dreamers of, battled by contradictions. Hut from this blissful bell, after headlong Indecision, checked by tested license, emerge what arc l»om»d to l e the sanest elements of an often vain and foolish-seeming world. LeConte Hall Ills building was named after tlte IxContc Brothers, men who were famous teachers and scholar and Imth of whom at one time occupied professional chairs in the University. This was the first building ever erected in the South devoted exclusively to the teaching of Biology. Some of the foremost scientists and physicians of the State caught vision of the |M ssihilitics of their great work while students here. Its designer and one of the University's greatest teachers was Dr. John Pendleton Campbell, wjiosc untimely death in the fall of 1918, deprived this institution of the services of one of its most capable workers.His Kxcki.i.kncy, Govkknok I Iron M. Doksky, Kx-()lRcio, Atlanta. Gkonc.k l’ Gomkk, Marietta, from the State at Urge. Hknny I). McDanikl, Monroe, from the State at l.argc. William I'). Simmons, I.awreneeville, from the State at I.nrge. Hamilton McWhontkn, At liens, from the State at l.nrge. Samiki. B. A hams, Savannah, 1st Congressional District. Byron B. Bowks, Bainhriiige, 2nd Congressional District. J. 1C. Hayks, Montezuma, 3rd Congressional District. Hknny H. Goktciiil , Columhus, 4th Congressional District. Clank Howkll, Atlanta, 5th Congressional District. I.oyi Ci.KVKi.ANn, Griflin, (ith Congressional District. .Ioskimi 1C. Biowx, Bnrnc.sville, 7th Congressional District. Andmkw J. Conn, Athens, 8th Congressional District. I low and Thompson, Ciaincsvillc, l»th Congressional District. Bowiwk 1’iiinixy, Augusta, 10th Congressional District. John W. Bknnktt. Waycross, 11th Congressional District. Drm.KY M. Ili'anni, Danville, 12th Congressional District. Hcgii J. Bowk, Athens, Resident Trustee. Hanky Hooosox, Athens, Resilient Trustee. Gr.oxe.K Fontkk Pk.anoov, New York, I.ifc Trustee, by Special Act of the General Assembly. Nat M. 1 Iannis, Atlanta, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the School of Technology, Kx-Oflicio. Tiikooonk K. Atkinson, Nrwnan. Chairman of the Bonn! of Directors of the Georgia Normal and Industrial College, Kx-Oflicio. Pktkk W. Mki.dmim, Savannah, President of the Board of Conimissioncrs of the Industrial College for Colored Youths, Kx-Oflicio. B. McCants, Winder, President of tlu Board of Trustees of the North Georgia Agricultural College, Kx-Oflicio. B. S. Mili-kk, Columbus, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the State Normal School, Kx-Oflicio. Jamks J. Connkk, Cnrtersville, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the College of Agriculture, Kx-Oflicio. Enoch H. Callaway, Augusta. President of the Board of Directors of the Medical College, Kx-Oflicio. William K. Thomas, Valdosta, President of the Board of Trustees of the South Georgia Normal College, F.x-Oflicio. Thomas W. Rekd.........................................................Secretary and Treasurer David Ch»:nsiiaw Barrow, I.L.D. Chancellor of the I 'nirertily iFACUEra David Chknsiiaw Bakhow, I.I..I). ChanceNor David Francis Barrow, IMi.D. .tutorial? Professor of Mat hematics iIoM :x Van Vai.kknkcmou Black, IMi.D. Associate Professor of ('hrmistry W'ii.i.is IIknhy Bocock, A.M., LL.D. Dean of the Graduate School ami MUledye Professor of Ancient Lanyuayes Wai.tkk Clinton Bi?rkiiaht. D.V..M. Junior Professor of Veterinary Medicine Duncan Bcknkt Librarian William Milks Bcrson, D.V.M. Professor of Veterinary Medicine •Ia.mks William Cantkkli., A.B. Adjunct Professor of Physics Axdkkw Jackson Cobh. A.B., B.L. Lecturer of Constitutional Lair and LeyaI Procedure William )i.in Collins, B.S.A. Instructor in Ayricultoral Chemistry Wai.tkk Gkovkk Cornktt. 1.1..B. Adjunct Professor of Laic Wyatt Ahnott Clkoo, B.S.A. Junior Professor of A yricult oral P.nyineeriuy Ki.i.is Mkmton Con.TKR, IMi.G. Associate Professor of History and Political ScienceMary E. Ckeswell Director of Home Economics Uriah Harroi.d Daves fort, B.S. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering Austin Soitiiwick Edwards, rh.D. Professor of Psychology Frank Xiciioi.au Kokrton, Jr., A.M. Professor of Agronomy John Hiciiaro Fain, B.S. Associate Professor of Physics Ernest Lee Gkioos (Graduate V. M. I.) Associate Professor of Ciril Engineering and Drawing Harlow Williamson Harvey, B.S.A. Junior Professor of Horticulture Cornelius Jacob Heatwole, A.M. Professor of Education Linvii.i.e Laurentine Hkniihkn, Pli.iX Professor of Physics and Astronomy Thomas Scott Holland, A.B. Instructor in Itumance Languages William Davis Hoover, A.M. Professor of Latin Georoe Alexander Hutchinson. Fli.I). Professor of Philosophy and School Administration Howei.i. Arthur Inoiiham, B.S.C. Adjunct Professor of Economics Milton Preston Jahnaoin. B.S.A. Professor of Animal Husbandry Joseph Kraeka, Jr.. Ph.I). Associate Professor of Zoology Joseph Lusthat, Bach, i s Lett. Professor of Romance Languages Mary Dorothy Lyndon, A.M. Dean of Women and Associate Professor of Education Thomas Hubbard McHatton, D.Sc. Professor of HorticultureJohn Hanson Thomas McPherson, PIi.D. Professor of History and Political Science Kohkrt I.igon McWhorter, A.M. Associate Professor of Latin and Greek Robert I). Mai.thy, H.S. Slate Supervisor of Vocational Agriculture Howard Hoy Cecil Mh.ks, B.S.K.E. Instructor in Mathematics John Morris, A.M. Professor of Germanic lAinguages Sylvan vs Morris, B.L., LL.D. Dean of the Laic Department and Professor of Law Howard Mcrkay Offley, Captain Cavalry, L'. S. A. Professor of Military Science and Tactics Kohert Emory Park. A.M., Litt.I). Professor of English William Oscar Payne, A.M. Associate Professor of History and Political Science Hoiikrt Spencer Pond, Ph.I). Associate Professor of Mathematics Ha nut. William Kamirex, A.M. Associate Professor of Romance Lanya yes John Moore Heade, PIi.I). Professor of Potany and Director of Dialogical Laboratories Thomas Walter Reeii, A.M. Registrar Steadman Vincent Sanford, A.B., l.itt.l). Professor of English Language and Journalism ,Ivi.ivs Hcoene Severin', D.V.M. Jnior Professor of Veterinary .Medicine Lafayette Miles Shaffer, B.S. Junior Professor of Agricultural Education Charles Mercer Snellino, A.M., Sc.I). President of Franklin College, Dean of the University and Professor of MathematicsAndrew McNaihs Socle, D.Sc., 1.I..I). President of the Colley? of A yricult ure mnl the Mechanic Art , and Dean of the Colley? of Ayrieultnre Herman James Stegeman, Ph.l). Instructor in Physical Education Rosweu. Powell Stephens. Ph.l). Professor of Mathematics John Spencer Stewart, Pcd.l). Professor of Secondary Education Ciiahi.es .Morton Sthaiian, C. and M.K., Sc.I). Professor of Civil Enyinreriny Ciiari.es Bert Gorton Swktland, Ph.G. I list radar in Chemistry Stephen Cummings I'pson, I.L.B. Adjunct Professor of Laic John Donai.d Waiie, A.M. Instructor in Enylish Roosevelt Phcyn Wai.ker, A.M. Associate Professor of Enylisli Paul NVkathkrwax, Ph.l). Associate Professor of Hot any Jonn Tayi.or Wheeler, B.S. Professor of Ayricult ural Education Henry Clay White. Ph.l)., Sc.l).. D.C.I.., I.I..I). Professor of Chemistry and Terrell Professor of A yricult oral Chemistry Cecil Norton Wiijikm, B.S.A. Instructor in A yricult ural Chemistry Roiiert Cum.mini; Wii.son, PIlG. Professor of Pharmacy James Herkeht Wood, B.S.A Adjunct Professor of Poultry Husbandry Thomas Jackson Wooetek, PIi.G. Dean of the School of Education and Professor of Philosophy and Education William Archer Worsham, Jr.. A.M. Professor of A yricult arid ChemistryEQKH 0=27 2=vS=!   Senior Class History HKKK are many things that might he said for the class of 1920, pro and con; hut wc cannot say all. (In fact, vc dare not say all. Students arc human, too, peruser of an idle hour.) The world does not wish to hear all. It knows that wc entered four years ago as Freshmen, and it realizes more truly than wc ourselves, as we stand now upon the brink of this Campus and look out upon the prospect of life, that wc are still Freshmen. It knows that wc were Sophomores once, and about as wise as Sophomores usually are—with the wisdom that only true fools can reallv possess. It knows that wc were once Juniors, and has known now for a year from our dignified airs that wc have reached the last act of the play of College-I.ife. The world knows it all, for the world knows its own. Yes. the world has seen one hundred and twenty classes like ours pass from these gates and mingle with the throng outside. It saw a handful, clothed in home-spun garb, emerge more than a century ago. It has watched others since, each with the characteristic manner of its time, and each a wee hit larger than those that had gone before. Now it comes our time to he the figures in the annual exodus. One hundred of us—and we are no more to the onlookers without the gates than the hundreds who have passed before. The world sees us as one hundred individuals, sees us. halts for a moment, then moves on to its business. Hut there is something that the casual world has never seen, something that it will not see as we go forth this year, for it is not capable of being seen. It is a thing that is only felt. It is the spirit that the University has infused into our verv bones, has moulded into our very souls. Our history can be written in black and white, and read to the world, which Incomes not much the wiser. The spirit that has come from the years of our history cannot lx- written, need not be written. It is a thing which can only be felt, and which will be felt as the members of this class move about among their fellows in the years to come. Georgia Spirit has moulded men for one hundred and twenty years, has manifested itself on the field of battle in matchless bravery, in the councils of state in true wisdom, in the ways of trade in simple greatness and consideration for others. We look back with heartfelt appreciation upon our four years—we feel within us the spirit of our Alma Mater. As wc go forth anew to other places and other deeds, let us lie strong in will To strive, to seek, to find, and not to vicld!” —Historian'.Senior Class Officers C. W. Slack.......................................................President K. L. Andkrson ..............................................Vice-President II. I). O’Cai.lac.iiax............................Secretary and Treasurer T. L. Stokks, Jr..................................................Historian V|II.IA 1 WaI.KKX AlCXANOTR, A.H. "Alec" Thomasvillc, Georgia. ItoHKKT IVKV Al.I.KN. B.S. “Hob-’ Atlanta, Georgia. Deniosthciiian. I’lii Ka] { a; Sigma Alpha Fpsilon. Sophomore Declnimer; .Junior Cabinet; Barrister; Buccaneer; Gridiron Club; .Jeffersonian. Little Alex—gentlemen—lie’s little but he’s loud. From the wilds of South Georgia lie stepped off the train as a meek little Freshman in short pants and shoes—probably his first pair (of shoes). But now wIk'H there appears a frown, a swaggering walk, a strong pipe, a dark sweater—that's Alex, the Imnl hoy. Perhaps, though, we’ve tweii a little too Imnl on him, for, in reality, he is one of the shining lights in the social life of the I'niversity. In four years Alex has learned not only how to jablier with Jokey. hut also to smoke, dance, and rend a few hands—not human ones, either, lie is frequently seen boarding a street car with a large “I ” on it, and we can say literally, as well as figuratively, that he is a prince of n fellow. A loyal supporter and true friend, Alex is right there. Spanish Club; Mathematics Club; Mandolin Club; Students Loan Fund Governing Board; V. M. C’. A. Cabinet; Secretary of Y. M. C. A. and Mathematics Club; Phi Beta Kappa. To those who know him nothing need he said, but those who have not hnu the pleasure of liecomim; intimately acquainted with “Boh" could learn much from observing tills determined and steady worker. A conscientious disciple of pedagogical forethought, “Bob” appeared in the Classic City four years ago with a violin, and a system of social uplift plans. We have seen that lie has used both successfully. It is rumored that “Boh” has fiddled his way Into many hearts of the fair sex, much to the unfathomable envy of his contcinjamiries. Allen Is not only addicted to music, lint to tlie utmost sincerity of purpose in his work ns well. No predictions could l c made of one of such enviable record than that whatever la- lays hold on in the future his enthusiastic nature will carry forward to untKMindcd success.Lkwis Atkinson, A.I . “Jim" I .nG range, Georgia. Dcuiosthcniaii; Chi Psi. ItoHKKT I.ANIHH ANDKKUON, ill., A.B. "Lonie" Macon, Georgia. 1 1.1 Kappa; IMii Delta Theta. Gridiron Club; Senior Hound Table; Senate; Barrister; Vice-President of Senior Class; Manager of Football Team ’It); Mandolin Club ’18, '19 and 20; Pan Hellenic Council. I.ii|tiid Veneer, lie’s got a long chin but his bead is no shorter. During bis four years at Georgia, Liquid has made many friends, but be seems strangelv attached to Brother Hugh (II.) so much so, in fact, that be very frequently spends the night out at bis home. Liquid has always Ik-cii a good student, but be bad a few shaky moments during the first weeks the sbhumic craw tiit him. He couldn't seem to shake it the same direction as others. He hails from Macon, but is strangely attached to Athens, often returning in summer to get a view of the old place. It has l»een whis| ered that Liquid has a faint love for graft. But all in all he is an excellent fellow, a true lover, a hard working student and an nliimiius the University will l e proud of. ’ Old man never had much to say, -‘Ccptiif to Jim, And Jim was the wildest l ov lie had. And the old man Jes wrapped lip in him r Mr. Atkinson, ladies and gei tlcnien, has tarried in our mid t for four years, and during that time he has acquired many friends. He is also a great lover of the dumb brutes and can frequently Ik seen walking across the campus in company with bis dog. He may possibly ride said dog at times, for tie lias tne dimensions of the lion that Daniel is reputed to have spent the night with. Jim is a very likable sort of fellow, the only tiling against him living that he once was a second lieutenant in the army , a disgrace that is hard to live down. Jim seems heartily sorry for his offense, however, and is willing to rhino for it in any manner jHissible. Here's to yon, Jim! May you have many friends and few occasions to use them.Kcoknk Attaway, H.S.A. “Mitt’ Wrlghtsville, Georgia. I)cmosthcnia:i. Miss Attaway, Co-eds look him over. He first made his appearance on the campus in the spring of 1919, after having spent his early school days at Emory. A great athletic reputation preceded Attaway to the ('Diversity, and we expected him to break all records here and win at least four letters and several Ik)xcs of medals through his physical prowess. We cannot understand why he never came forth into the limelight. How almut it “Gene? It is said that Attaway is much interested in “Rural Community Problems, ’ ami spends most of bis time searching the encyclopaedia for references along this line. “Miss" takes to the more difficult courses of the I'niversity like a duck takes to water, and has even gone so far this year as to register for Education 5. Such rashness is ns-tounding! Attaway is liked by all who know him, especially those of the opposite sex. He expects to teach school for a livelihood. May riches and happiness follow him idl of his days. Thomas Bkaiuoko Bac.i.ky, B.S. "Shy lor It” Columbus, Georgia. Demosthenian. Jeffersonian; Spanish Club; Senior Round Table; Senior Basket-ball Team. This is a notorious person for nicknames. They have l»een the bane of bis college existence. Shyloek, Cu-fu. Kooteli (the other we forlwar to mention, as it gets his goat), have all dogged his very footsteps. Bagiev also has the honor of being a charter member of the famous Columbus Home Guards. He lias made the precarious college course in three years, and during this time has withstood the acid test of advanced physics, and dared to cross Broad to SvIvy’s lair. The four hundred of scholarship counts Bag-ley among its own. We close this history with the most prominent promotion that ever came to Bagiev. This is his migration from Candler Hall to Old College. In the latter domicile he has endeavored to display his Senior dignity by training up n Freshman in the ways of the campus. Go back to Columbus and “Show-cm-up Shyloek; we’re for you.Am'okzo Tkkrki.l Hkxkohd Ucmosthcninn. Itowdon, Georgia. Economics Society; Carroll County Club. Everyone who has seen this long, lean, lanky “drink of water" strolling down the street, sporting a derby and a cane with a nnnehainuee that would turn Lord Chesterfield green with envy, will never forget "AT. 11 is poise is imported all the way from Heard County, and is even more impressive and dignified than that of his never-to-be-forgotten brother, Jesse .lames. Hen ford has I wen with us for four long years and has burned his name on the walls all the way from l.ueas Hill to Candler Hall, and we are wondering as we write whether in future years we shall find his imprint in the soil of mother earth, or on the hroad. flaring bill-lionrds of the l»usl-ness world. We cannot know wliat the coining years will yield, hut we Im»|h “bourn', as we follow your imprints in the sands of time, to some day find your name burned on the walls of the Hall of bame. Loan: Kknxktii IIktih’NK, 1I.S.C. "lied" I'a vo, Georgia. Demostheiiian. Economics Society; Manager Track-Team; President Economics Society; President Athletic Association; Second Lieut- U. S. Army; Senior Basket-ball Team; Gridiron Club. “Lieutenant Husty Bethunc of the {•'mirth Platoon" hails from the colony of Pavo (the new soft drink) in the unexplored jungles of Smith Georgia. Outwardly, the predominating feature alxmt Husty is tlx auburn mantle tlint adorns his sky-piece, but inwardly it is Ills sterling worth and honest frankness. To know him is to know one of the finest fellows that ever enrolled himself as a student at the (’Diversity of Georgia, and to claim him as a friend is to have an asset immeasurable in dollars and cents. The only fault we have been able to find about Husty. if, indeed, it is a fault, is Dial in tossing to the line for pennies, his adversary invariably looses. Our best wishes go with you. Husty, and alwnvs on life’s pathway we know that the shadow of the gix! of Chance will be lurking nigh. GENERAL library University of Georgia Athens. Ceok iaTkkxt Ci.akkk Bhaxcii, B.S.C. "Creek"’ Cedartown, Georgia. Dcmosthcnian. Kcoiiomics Society; .Junior Cabinet. We take great pleasure in introducing to you this lean, lank, long-legged exponent of Hawaiian music, a specimen of which Imrst forth in rapturous melody, accompanied hv the tune of a shingle on the white breeches of a neophyte of the Junior Cabinet. In addition to this musical talent, he has achieved quite a local reputation for his neatness of appearance. We can never recall the time when his face was not powdered and when he was not wearing a crushed hat (Iwar in mind that this hat was difficult to secure on account of the unparalleled magnitude of his "bean", the dimensions of which necessitated several trips to the "(into City" in ail effort to obtain a Senior derby). However, this massive dome has been quite an asset in his encounters with (he Commerce Department, for his is one of the most enviable records ever made in Ibis branch of the I'niversity. Hkvwahu Stiisos Bkaxnkn, B.S.C. "Hull l)oy" Stilson. Georgia. Demosthenian. Kcoiiomics Society: Spanish Club; Vice-President Athletic Association. Stop! kind render; gaze iijam this cx-|H ncnt of New York fails and fashions. Kvon in his utter insignificance ns a Sophomore he was able to attain a notoriety among tin- fair damsels of Athens as well as I'niversity students by parking his yellow JacK-itahhit in front of tIk- Candler Apartments. But it was only during the balmy days of his Senior year that he realized his dream of resembling the fashion plates displayed in the show-windows of the Columbia Tailoring Company. He spends a large part of his time prancing up and down Prince Avenue with his dog, derby, and cane. “Stilson" has a habit of attending to his own business and attending to it well, so we don’t see why lie shouldn't handle other people's all right, lie is a good student, also, and we predict for him money and friends when he returns to the regions of Southeast Georgia.PoHTKR CnOWI. BltOOK, B.S.A. “Sail i " Howdon, Georgia. Dcuiostliciiinn. Wn.i.lAM .Morris Brown . B.S.C. "Little Willie" Tampa, Florida. Dcmosthcnian. Member of Agricultural Clid ; .Mathematics Club; President Agricultural (Midi. We are at a loss as to what to say alamt this young man hut, anyway. Porter was captured in the wilds of Howdon, ('•a., and against his will transported to the civilized community of Athens. He is very fond of the language that lie ac-quired while in B-o-s-t-o-n, where he spent several months in the Navy Training Camp, lie also acquired in this salty school the habit of wanting to “shiinmie." Porter now cuts a prominent figure at all Ibe New Kra Club dances, especially at ♦lie farmer’s frolics, lie mingles with all politics, and since the Co-eds arc here has gained headway along this line. We trust that when Porter leaves us armed with his “Dip" he will not let his ambition run away with him. hut will settle down on a good Georgia farm where he can dig the gold from the soil. So long, "Sally"! We expect to hear great things from you soon. Charter .Member F.eonomics Society; Beta Gamma Sigma. Whenever anyone mentions Brown’s name our minds involuntarily flop over and la-gin thinking alxiut kodaks, picture albums, business, good marks, electrical engineering, church, safety razor blades. Imnrding houses, and income tax. “Little Willie" is an imported product,—lK»rn and snatched up in old Virginia, where lie spent bis undergraduate years in college l eforc coming to Georgia to barn something. That he has accomplished his purpose of learning something his grades will testify. Brown is a modest sort of young Apollo, and never talks aland his Successes in class any more than he does about his love affairs. If he is not successful in love, then we must say that some fair lady is overlooking a true blue op|M rtunity. Mr. Brown states that it is his intention to go into business ujion graduating, and we take thi occasion to warn the general public to hold to tlieir I wicket-hooks.I'owi.u. Daniki. Bi'kii, D.S.K. l P. Q. Hamesville, Georgia. Dcmosthcuinn. Fconomics Society; President Spanish Club. Hush has lived up to his nickname of I’. I . Q. by finishing tip accordingly. He i a “Speed King" in all his classes, graduating in two years without previous credit. Hush heard the call of the “open road" Inst Novcmlier. when Georgia played Auburn and, togchter with other noble-hearted hut empty-pocketed souls, he journeyed to Columbus in a freight car. While making the trip he was seized with a fit of ajMiplectic frenzy ami dashed off amid the curses and shrieks of his companions, “A rainy day", hut by this we do not mean to belittle his ability as a poet far from it. Although he has been with us hut two years, he has made an army of friends, and we all regret to lose him. Hush is one of the rare birds classified under the name of a natural shark and consequently we arc assured of his success in whatever undertaking lie enters. K.mmi.t Ovk.kton Cahaxiss, H.S.A. '‘Pop" Maxeys, Georgia. Agricultural Club. botanical Society; Freshman and Sophomore Scholarships; lpha ’ .eta; G. M. C. Club; Square and Compass Club; Stock Judging Team 20. From the wilds, the brush wood, and the sage, he came into our midst a veritable demon on Ag. lie’s a small-berg chap, but they siy he is a devil in his own lanne town. Never tending to any one rise’s affairs, hut always ’miking nfler his own in a manner licfitting a New Vork broker, Cnbuniss has a characteristic v.'hich is obliged to bring success to him when he gets out into the world of modern competition. Of course, now, v ; don’t mean to minimize his present success, for he is already compiling with the sun for brightness. ’ The fact is, lie must have once spilled something on his I lead that made his liair rust. However, in the years to come, ve are sure .nnxevs will have plenty of reason to point to hint with pride ami say, “We lining him up!"Ci.iwnim Kcokni: C'aoi.i:, A.H. nn 1 B.S.C. •'Kag” Bnrncsville, Georgia. Jay Wii.i.iam Camp, B-S.A. •“ZeeC Dougin svillc, Georgia. Demosthenian. Demosthenian. I’.conoinics Society; Jeffersonian 1 aw Society; Mathematics Club; Spanish Club; Winner Bert Miehael Prir.e; President Kconomics Society; Beta Gamma Sigma. I.et us digress for a moment and tell vou aliout tills other addition to our Senior menagerie. “Hag" has been here only three years, and in this short time has "copped two degrees, while it is a difficult matter for the majority of ns to acquire one in four years. He has a quiet, unassuming manner, and clings to his own opinions, no matter which way the wind blows. In spite of the handicaps of his environment Tisinger and the Honorable Victor King—he tins made his mark as one of the leading men of our class in all the courses leading to his two degrees. In addition to the A.B. and B.S.C. degrees, lie has completed a greater part of the work required for a diploma in Ijiw. “Kag" has a verv high ambition, and we propheey for him a most brilliant future. Agricultural Club; Captain Cadet Corps: Cotton School Debate; Square and Compass. If the Kaiser’s ambition bail not overleaped itself. “.lay" would have graduated long ago with the class of 1918. Although delayed two years by his tour of France and Germany, he returned and resumed his interrupted task with fervent 7.eal. It is rumored olmut the campus that “Jay’s” experiences in Spain were of wild and varied nature. I’or four years “Jay" has tried to get a berth on the baseball team, tint on account of the prejudicial character of the managers, according to “lay," he has not been able to enumerate this honor among his list of accomplishments. Camn is the first jmlitieinn ever to be accused of altruism. He has always manifested n great interest in the G. O. I’.’s. anil from the day he left the cows and chickens and entered tin University, has been a true and loyal supjmrtcr of his party ami friends, always working for the welfare of otlwrs and not himself.ClIANI.KS P.C.IO'.Hr CANNON, A.B.S.S. "Sixty” Conyers, Georgia. Phi Kappa; Alpha Tnu Omega. Senate; Pan Hellenic Council. ln eourtlv French .shall all his phrases lief’ Charley is really a past master in this modern language, thereby rellecting great credit on some beautiful Mademoiselle (or should we use the plural?). Prior to his going to Fra nee Charley gave the dances quite a rush, but this year spends more time studying to tin-bet terment of his scholastic standing. TIktc must he some very mysterious reason for this sudden change, although we ourselves confess ignorance as to its nature, ('barley hns always proved himself to la a very capable man in all he attempted, is a good student, and one of the most popular men at Georgia with Inith the faculty and the student Imdy. He leaves us with the best wishes of all for a long, happy, prosperous life. In a few short years lie will l e one of the foremost business men of the State. Good luck lo von. Charier, and lots of it. Mil. i. a Hi) Wish Ci.ahk, B.S.C.K. -Millard" Blythe. Georgia. Ijuudii Chi Alpha. Sine and Tangent; President Engineering Society; Captain Cadet Corps. Behold! Bow your bean and bend your back, for the lieing l cfore us is the beaming, unabashed Beau Brummcl of Blythe. Talk about aces of aces, hut whatever that is, he is it when it eomes to giving the geography of the country around where the girls all live. This fact gives fresh fuel to our IlieKerilig flume of laipe that he will ever amount to anything as an engineer. In other words, a map- maker or draftsman would Ik- right in his line. Since necessity is the mother of invention, it is alrcay lieing rumored that he is planning to build a bridge to Augusta. where his talents will find more room for expression. We cannot help hut predict, however, that a long life, many friends, and few cares will he the lot of any man with such an cver-rcady smile and amiable disposition.John I.aikkns Convkms, ILS.A. '‘Skip” (.‘artcrsville. (icorgiu. Dcmosthcnian; Kappa Sigma. Agricultural v htb; Glee Club ‘16, ‘17, 18, 19; Lender (lire Club ‘18; Major (’inlet Corps; Georgia Pour; Thallans; Pan Hellenic Council; Senate; l.ieut. I . S. Army. Tl»c gentleman from Ciirtcrsvillc, the only living survivor of Swamp Knot. The gentleman with a voice like a fog horn, and possessing tne intellectual asceticism of Hamlet. Like numerous other individuals, Mr. Conyers came Ik re for knowledge four years ago, and has managed to survive with those immortal few who were not born to die . Conyers lalxirs under the soubriquet of the “DATK-HOl'ND." lie has had more dates with more different girls than any other man ill school. He is a firm lieiiever In the saving that Variety Is the spice of Life. This does not mean that his dates have lieen spicev- far from it. Conyers, too, yearns for tiic simple life, and to follow the north end of a south Imuilid mule as a means of livelihood. We wish him all the success in the world, for he deserves it. .1 onN Ai.moxo (‘own, ILS.A. "Jack” l.oganvillc. Georgia. Demosthenian. Agricultural Club; Alpha ' .eta. ••Jack” is a very quiet and lazy-going hoy; hut he is, nevertheless, a typical “Georgia Man” and a good fellow, lie is one among many who are learning “Georgia” with the sole intention of promoting agriculture, and thereby making our Kin-pi re State “Safe for the Farmers.” His chief occupation seems to he writing letters and making “week-end trips" to Monroe. Why? You can easily imagine, as be has already adopted a slogan very suitable for Ag. Seniors: “A pretty little wife and a big plantation.” The Ag. Department may feel sure of Ills good work, for he is a progressive, hard-worker. Though you may not see him often, unless you “Call"; though he talks hut little, he greets everyone pleasantly, and is a friend to all who know him. We ••redict that, as he enters life’s work, he will climb t.ie ladder of leadership in such n manner as to tiring honor to his Alma Mater. Wc I tope that success will crown all of his undertakings.Gkohuk Cai.iiocn D.vniki. "('ururo'’ Daniels' ille, Georgia. Dcmosthcnian. Agricultural Club; President Freshman ('lass; Alpha ' .eta; Glee Club; Captain Cutlet Corps. George bails from the town which seems, judging from its name, to be all his own. Although at times it is a little difficult to get acquainted with him, when really known, a Iwtter fellow cannot be found. Iteinc eifted with a beautiful voice, his chief delight is to give utterance to the music within his heart. A rare conquiund of happiness, frolic, and fun; enjoys a good joke, and is courteous to every one. Having l een t(H) busy to engage in athletics. he has developed wonderful wrestling powers trying to make a pompadour that will not “pomp.” With the completion of trie agricultural course “George” will probably take up farming; but being still undecided as to what vocation he will follow, no may become a lawyer, or a great singer. Whatever he undertakes will l c well done, and our l est wishes go with him. I'nion Point, Georgia. Demosthenian; Agricultural Club. Here is a man who is known by all. Kv-cry laxly has seen “Dick" rushing aland over tin1 campus with the butt of a stogie invariably hung in his mouth. Hut it is with the fair sex that Dick is a killer. He knows ’em from Fast to West, and when he goes for his mail his ! ox is so full of various colored and violet scented letters that it resembles the hues in the rainliow. Dame Humor has it that, during his Freshman year at a dance in Gainesville, Dick tried to dance left handed with sonic sweet young thing. Ask him nliout it. Hut Dick, here's our Iwst wishes to you, and wc hope that your love for women never crosses your craving for the stogie. BiA if it docs, just remember what our friend Itudvard Kipling has said: “A woman is only a woman, hut a good cigar is a smoke.” Good luck, Dick. Fear not, for a gentleman and a friend is never at loss in this world.W11.i.iam Bass Disuko. Jm., A.B. •imr Atlanta, (u'orjtifl. I’hi Kappa; Kappa Sigma. Senior Hound Table; Lieut. Cadet Corps; V. M. C. A. Cabinet; Mandolin Club; Senate; (iridiron Club. Here be is, ladies, and you can't find a handsomer if you look through seven states. Lord Chesterfield was not more polished, nor Menu Brummel more gracious than our Hill. The ladies fall for him. If he weren’t tin sensible young fellow that lie is, we would predict that the next few years would see the movie heroines weeping at his feet. Hut Bill is not going into tin films. No. he tells us that lie is going to Ik a staid business man with bunlier as bis line. We know that Bill will never l e •'staid"—that is impossible -but we do know that he will succeed in selling lumber, carrying with him into the outside world the good nature and uncanny mathematical ability that be has displayed in college. A true friend and a sterling gentleman— that's Bill, and the ladies will add to this, we know. Wii.i.iam Alan rues Doimmin, Ja., A.H. -HfUtneimtj It ill” Americas, Georgia. I’hi Kappa; Sigma Alpha Kpsilon. Senate; Gridiron Club; Adjutant Second Hattalion ’IB. We can’t see bow be grew so tall, as the fair damsels refuse to let “Golden Glow" walk. There are, perhaps, two reasons for this Incredulous phenomena. One might la his impartiality, as be has roamed from the Normal School to Milledge Heights playing the Borneo to all the Athens Juliets, experienced and tin. The other reason, Without a doubt, is that they are unable to resist bis laugh. We’ve heard laughs that trickle and gurgle, but William’s is a perfect gtiyser. jle bails from the sage and brush around Americas, and neither the Gcals above nor the Devil !»c-neath could persuade him to percti a derby on top of bis dome. But beneath this gay vale of color and spirit is the real Bill, first at a meal, first at an argument, and first in the hearts of his friends. To you and yours. Hill, we wish th • l cst of luck. vliiciiamii Jacob I)ni:x»:i., B.S.A. ” rex‘ Tiftnn, (icorgin. I.aiii(ln Chi Alpha. Agricultural Cluh; Botanical Society; Kditor-in-Chief Agricultural Quarterly. "Out of tin hills of Habersham, down through the valleys of Hall”, I tinier said, a mighty river rushed. And our historian tells us, “I'l'i from the swamps of Tift across the Hell Old Hills of Georgia roslM-d the mighty Agricola l)rcx'.” After Ihc Sophomores '‘waited on" him. o|M n his arrival, he rushed to the "Beanery,” where he still ranks first. alMlominally speaking— to the sorrow of Freshmen and deep grief of the Dean. The hrav of a mule ami the gentle lowing of a cow beckoned him to pitch his tent on the “Air." hill, where he lias made splendid success. Tin “Grafter's Instinct” led him to line up with the Colonel in the “ChajH'l Trust,” to the woe of his non-friends of his class. His desire for a place in the “Social Sun" at “Geor-giu" tiiis year has united him with the "Country Cluh”. M)rex" leaves us admirably fitted to publish his county's farm pajwr and demonstrate “scientific” farming. John K»:i.i.kk Kiskman, B.S.C. ■J. AY' Atlanta. (Icorgin. I’hi Kappa; Phi Kpsilon Pi. Junior Cabinet; Keonomics Society; Beta Gama Sigma. t the l cginning of the nineteenth century the city of Atlanta was hallowed by la-coming the birthplace of the (listing-uisla-d gentleman upon whose physiognomy you now gaze. After exhausting all the knowledge of that fair city, he entered the I'diversity, and while here he has attracted attention by his extreme modesty and reserve. Johnny ranks with those other ‘Atlanta" sharks who have finished here in three years tnking away high honors in the meantime. His only unredeeming feature is that his name, unfortunately, rhymes with that of a certain individual formerly connected with the Gold and oilc, but this unfortunate calamity is far outweighed by his many good traits, which have put him so high in the eves of all who know him here. Johnny leaves us well versed in all the fundamentn's of business, and wc sec for him a very brilliant success in the financial world in the future.Jcucs Mitciiki.i. Ki.aon, U.S.A. "Jim’' Jefferson, Georgia. T. yi.«k I .am ak Kvkkktt, B.S.A. "Hit Hoy" Cochran, Georgia. Dcmosthcnian. bcmosthenian. Agricultural Club; Alpha ' .eta. Ho comes from the rod old hills of Georgia's northland. A long, loan, lanky lad— that’s Klrod, and if silence in golden, he ought to he a whole mint. A lot of us might he as popular as dim if we didn't talk so hiamed much. Klrod Is a hardworking, conscientious l »y, and can seldom he found among the gay fun-finders of the school. Tlie only time we can remember him getting the least hit rash was when he went to Costa’s and indulged in a strong chocolate milk at the expense of a successful candidate for I Ik presidency of the Ag. Club. Klrod is known among his classmates as “The Shark”, for he is taking two years of Ag. work in one. It is a little hard to know Jim, hut once you d«f you will find he possesses plenty of character and good, practical knowledge. Here’s to you, old man. Agricultural Club; Cotton School De-laite; Associate Kditor Agricultural Quarterly. Coming fresh from Cochran, where, as he says, the Goldenrods and the huxom girls hloom all the year round. “Big Boy” lind cpiitc a time getting accustomed to the strange surroundings of the I'niversitv. At least that’s the way the tale was told to us, for Kverett came to Georgia while the rest of this class were serving their High School sentence. After a somewhat extended visit with I’ncle Sam he is hack this year for his Dip. Kverett sticks so close to his work and is seen so seldom in the general sessions around the campus this year that wc must confess we have several "times tlmught he had left school. “Big Boy" has been a consistent and ever plodding student, and lwneath his smooth and easy-going surface you will find plenty of character and good, practical knowledge, which has won for him many friends who will ever hold him in their memory.ClXMKNT Mani.ky Kvi.uk, B.S.C. “Gabriel' Savannah, Georgia. lM.i Kappa; l.ainbdn C'lii Alpha. Sophomore Declamation; Junior Cabinet; Senior Hound Table; Glee Club 17, 18. 1!», 20; '('Italians; Kconomic.s Society; Spanish Club; Cotillion Club; Kan Hellenic Council; Beta Gamma Sigma; Gridiron Club; Manager Baseball Team 19; Major First Battalion C adet Corps. When he slings his wicket! line, they swear tis strange, tis passing strange; tis pitiful. tis wondrous pitiful. Mr. Kvler, the human mocking bird. When he ojkmis his mouth let no dog bark. In all seriousness, however, Clement has a fine tenor voice and his singing is always enjoyed. Kvler, like Ulysses, is a many-shied man. As an actor lie is a decided success, and if he chooses the stage as a means to keep the wolf from the door, he will always have him many miles away. Clement's only vice Is that lie insists in smoking cigarettes through a holder. Perhaps lie can overcome this habit in time, however. He is particularly taken with the fair sex. and is a golden opportunity for some fair damsel. Wai.tkb IlniMii Gainks, B.S.C. •Fori" Sandersville, Georgia. Khi Kappa; Sigma Nu. Kan Hellenic Council; Senate Club; Beta Gamma Sigma. We have here before us one of the few men that entered college in the fall of 1915. His graduating day should have lwcn a year ago. However, when war was declared, like most other members of his class, lie volunteered in the services of his country. “Fort has a notable career in the army, both in old U. S. A. ami nl road. In France he was a personal worker on N’o Man's Kami, and was on the front when the armistice was signed. After this, he remained in France in scltool for several months, staving with the army until the fall of 1919. On being released from service, he Immediately re-enlisted ns a student of the University as a memlier of the class of “'20." Gaines is said to lie a great Indies man, having developed under the tutelage of “Hap" Willis. He will make a model husband for some wiley girl, if she can just catch him.('an i. (Jorrrisr.KM, B.S.C. ••Car " Atlnntn. Georgia. Phi Kappa; Phi Epsilon Pi. Economics Society; Lieutenant Cadet Corps; Thaiiuns. “Carl" Iihs I teen with us only three short years, hut in tills length of time lias, as it were, become a fixture of tne I Diversity. We don’t know what lie intends to do in life hut with liis training as quartermaster sergeant under Siuatliers, lie has. no dnuht, a good ground work for success in the clothing business. Ask any mcmlicr of Company 11, S. A. T. ( . about it. In Carl Atlanta will gain a fine citizen, and if Ik can blow for Atlanta as well and as consistently as lie lias blown smoke from his old pipe, the Boosters Club over there can disband. Seriously, however, this Atlanta !»v has been an excellent student, a conscientious worker, and a good fellow and leaves many friends who wish him well, l.uck to you, Carl! May the fortunes of happiness Ik in proporion to those others we are expecting you to amass Fnaxk Wai.kkk Marioi.o, A.11. -I'rank’’ Americas, Georgia. Phi Kappa; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. KIkmIcs Scholar; Sphinx; Associate Editor Paxuoka; Anniversarian; Winner Junior Orators’ Medal and Sophomore Cup; SoplKiniorc Debate; Freshman Debate; Impromptu Debate; Debating Council; President Thaliaus; President Phi Kappa; Assistant Leader Glee Club; Gridiron Club; Senior Round Table; Junior Cabinet; Senate; Phi Beta Kappa. "What is your fortune. Sir?” she said. "My feet are my fortune. Ma’am," he said. Frank would Ik famous at Georgia for the performance of bis feet alone. With them lie can do anything from inventing n new “jar. . step to playing n tune. But Frank’s “understanding docs not end with his feet. Next to Frank’s feet the most notable parts of him are his voi e and his brain, laith of which be lias under perfect control. Frank has distinguished himself in ev rv form of student activity. When lie has secured England’s most treasured honors he will return to lieco .c j.c of Georgia’s foremost citizens and statesmen. Here’s to you, Frank! May v n. live long, love well and die happy.Uoukky |,kk Hay. H.S.C. "linl ' Dallas, Georgia. Demos! hen inn; Laminin Chi Alpha. Kcnnumics Society; First Unit. Com-puny F. mid Second I .lent. Company A Cadet Corps. It is said that Dallas prides itself in having sent this young man off to College so that the people will Ik aide to rest for a span of a few years. It is certainly peculiar how a city can change a lx»y in such a short time, hut gaze upon Mr. 1 . A. and von will see what scientists would have claimed in 1916 to have hcen impossible. Boh has a hard time ill arranging his schedule so that he can get over to Gainesville at least once every two weeks—no, you are wrong, he has no girl at Brcnau. But, after all, it is part of a man's life when he is blossoming out, and such is tile case with I . A. Many a person has guessed why they call him 1 . A. But there is no one win) has ever got a close score. So ask Boh; lie likes to tell you. Cii ahi.kx Simon I Iky ian, B.S.C. Charlr ' Atlanta, Georgia. Demosthcnian; Phi Kpsilon I’i. 'G" Club; Tennis Champion 1917-lh; Senior Basket-ball Team. Charles came to us from the "New York of the South", and with his brother’s career as an incentive to make good, has done well. He is a success in all he undertakes, and there is no limit to his jaissihilities. Charles is quite a “Shark" in his classes, as his record shows, and is sonic tennis player, too. He is quiet and non-assertive, doing much thinking and little talking. When lleymaii is not at classes or occupying a comfortable chair Ik fore a certain little green bungalow on Hill Street, he may Ik seen daily making his way in rapid haste to and from the gymnasium. The I’niversity will lose a good student but the State will gain a fine citizen upon the graduation of this commerc shark. "May fortune Itcain on you with her choicest smile. Charlie", is the wish of many friends. May health, wealth, and happiness attend yon ever.I’kjxo: Ai.i.kn IIummon, Il.S.A. •• ». A." Atlicns, Georgia. Dcmosthcnian. Agricultural Club; First Place Stock Judging Contest 1917-18. “Prince” is one of those local Im vs who came to Georgia to further his education. It might also la remarked here that he is one of the original 57. One of his cardinal virtues consists in the fact that he is a great lielicver in minding his own business, doing the best that he can an.l letting other men worry. “Prince” is a quiet sort of fellow, and hv his modest, non-assuming manlier, has made many friends who wish him every success in the world. “Prince" has distinguished himself as a military man of promise, and has made the I’nlversity a very capable officer. As n student he has delved into all the mysteries of l)r. Soule’s Store House of Agricultural thought. Sometime in the near future we prophecy that “Prince" will take unto himself a wife and a farm and “raise a lot of cows and pigs and chick "- and ‘Everything’.” r.uck to yon, “Prince", and may fortune smile on vou. (Ikokc.k Adams Howalu, B.S.A. “(leari e'’ Decatur, Georgia. Agricultural Club; Pi Kappa Phi. George is another one of those “Near-Atlanta" Ihivs'. He hails from the village of Decatur. George, during his sojourn of four years at Georgia, has conducted himself so ns to have earned the title of a “Mechanical Nut." lie is a “Shark" when it comes to making a Cadillac out of a Ford, and is enjoying tlie fruits of his work by rolling around in the aforesaid Cadillac. George is an expert in radio, and is not the least bit tmthcrcd when a quick message has to he sent. He has l ccn recognised by the government for his rndio ability. He is quite an unassuming chap, and has only one hail failing—he is always attracted by a representative of the fair sex. But; he has no immediate intention of joining that famous order (no use naming it)—he is far too fickle. Wc wish vou luck, George, in your life game, and in this age of scientific and mechanical advance we predict for you a brilliant future.Monro I-'ijjaii IIowkm., B.S.A. ■‘Eh hi," Canton, Georgia. Demnsthenian. Agricultural Club; Cotton School Debate. on, verily, Moses l-'Jijah stcj s forth for mir in ) ection. Since lie has been away two years he probably ought to Ik introduced to those wImi have joined our ranks during his leave. But, as the old slogan goes, “A Georgia man nyeds no introduction”, so it will be omitted here, lie is a ijiliet, unassuming, and a very likeable fellow, and is an expert in agricultural lines. Me is seldom seen participating in n “Bull Session”, and most likely this accounts for his marked success. Khhie Stopped into the limelight through his speaking nhility in the ‘. g" Club, and capped the climax bv proving in the late cotton school debate that the “Big Five” should 1m- allowed to continue their graft in the “Bull and Hog” packing industry. F.Mue has a heart as big ns a watermelon, and feet even bigger. We haven’t the slightest idea where he will co to set up his dairy farm, but you can bet vonr lands on Moses F.lijah. Jkmo.mk Jnxro, Jk., A.B. "Jrrry" Atlanta, Georgia. I’bi Kappa; Kappa Sigma. Senate; Gridiron Club; Glee Club; Georgian Board; Author .ferry’s Jokes; Creator of T. H. W. T. Club. Jest and jollity that’s “Jerry”, one of the best halves in a “Bull Session” you ever met, be it soiillK-rly serious or giddily gay. Jerry’s nature is on of those rare compounds of penetrating wisdom and contagious humor. His classroom s|»ecialties are Knglish and History, in Imth of which subjects he has proven an aide student. From these inclinations we predict for him a brilliant career in the I.aw, where, we understand, he is going to tackle tltc game of life. Outside of the seh«M»InM m In has exhibited the other side of his nature in his timelv jests; in his humorous articles for the Heel and Black ami The Georgian, and his ready wit as an after-dinner speaker. We predict that the years to come will never bring to him the- long, somln-r face worn by some of the legal profession. His optimism will save him. He says he is going to “batch” it for life.John Tiiounton Kostx. A.B. ‘’Jack" Atlanta, Georgia. lMli Kappa; Kappa Alpha. Mandolin Club 17. 18, ’1!» and ’2«; Leader Mandolin Club s20; Senate; Cl riel-iron ( lnl»; Secretary an l Treasurer of Pan Hellenic Council. I lore lie is, fellows -unapproachable, manicured, and immaculate the man with a mania for mastering music, lie plays everything from a Jew’s-harp to a bass fiddle, and lie does it all well. Jack is firm in bis Iwlief that music is tlit breath of life. Jack can’t Parley Vous quite ns well as he can Oo-la-ln, and Jakev lias been much disinclined to part company with him. Even at that, however. Jack’s books often show where he has spilt the midnight oil. Jack has been a prominent man and leader in all the biggest clubs in college, and as a friend to keep, a lawyer to be, and a good, steady fellow to remain, you have our l est wishes. Jack, old man. Go out and show the State that "Another Atlanta Bov” can succeed. “I p with Hcvo nnd cliewing-gum.” Gkokok Wiisos I.anikh, B.S.C.E. ••Hilt " Athens, Georgia. Phi Kappa; Kappa Sigma. Engineering Society; Sine and Tangent; President Mathematics Society; Meinlier Students’ Council. Mr. Ijtnirr is one of the old guard—he dies, but never surrenders. “Hilts” first entered school here in 1913, and since that time has liecome one of the foremost men in college affairs. His favorite pastime is mathematics. When not engaged in solving calculus and other mathematical problems he may la seen measuring distances across the campus in company with “Little Charlie”. Hilts intends to In an engineer after receiving his degree, and he will, assuredly, make a good one. Mr. Lanier’s college career was rather handicapped, due to the fact that he volunteered to aid Uncle Sam in the recent disturbance in Europe. He was away with the colors two years, and during that time captivated the hearts of many of the French Mademoiselles. Mav von have the best of luck. Hilts, and get idl that your talents deserve! Natiianiki. Guv Lonc., A.il. "Shorty" Pendergrass, Georgia. Demosthcniun. Sophomore Dcclaimcr; Sophomore Debater; .Junior Orator; Champion Debater; Impromptu Debater; Junior Cabinet; Senior Hound Table; Gridiron Club; Associ-ate Editor Georgian; Member of Debating Connell; President Dciuostbenian; IMii lift Kappa. He doesn’t say very uiiieh, but when he starts to speak, "You’d Ik- surprised’’. We admit that a side glance of Shorty would not Itonst bim of having any too many brains, but look again. His bead is just full of ’em—e. g., brains. And Shorty will sure fool you if you don’t wateb him. For two years be rode the Gainesville Midland every Sunday to go to see a girl. An aeid test of true love. But when the girl married and Shorty kept up Ids weekly rides we were forced to the conelusion that the Kiri who married was just a camouflage for bis real sweetie. Shorty is a polished speaker, an able writer, a brilliant student, ami a good man to have for a friend. May the sbeekles roll his wav. Clinton l.orr, H.S.A. “Snipy” Douglas, Georgia. Kappa Sigma. Pan Hellenic Council; .’ griculturul Club; Cotillion Club; Second Lieutenant Corps of Cadets. My name is Lott, a darn go nl name. As yet unknown in the halls of fame; But whatever I do, you can always say. He’s a loyal friend to the L Ga. Mr. Lott first saw the light of day in the town of Douglas, Ga. He came here to school four years ago, happy and ignorant. He’s still ignorant. Mr. Lott yearns for the simple things, the true things, down on his father’s farm, where lie can commune with nature and in the interim pay his tribute of love to the young ladies in the nrighlHirltood. While in college Lott proved himself to Ik a social vampire. lie is Wallace Reid’s only rival. We are expecting great things of Mr. l,ott sometime in the near future, and he will probably be a success in whatever he undertakes. He has our best wishes.Francis Sokmki. Mackai.i., A.B. if(Ie relief” Savannah, Georgia. Phi Kappa; Sigma Alpha Kpsilon. Gridiron C'lnlt; Senate. "The friends thou hast and their adoption tried, grapple them to thy soul with I mops of steel; hut do not dull thy palm with entertainment of each new hutched, unfledged comrade"! A true disciple of this doctrine; sincere, and conscientious we find him a Mend of a rare combination of true man with the eyes of youth. A real understanding of Gecchee entitles one to more than an acquaintance, ns within him is tile stuff from which true friendship is built. To show what he tlmught of our State, (leechee had seen no other town in Georgia except Savannah until he came off to Georgia, and he says that, without a doubt, his eyes were opened. We arc worried ulmut one thing only. He is expecting to Ik a lawyer, and he is too honest for his profession. However, any man as open-minded, fair, just, i.-d the very essence of truth ns is (leech, cannot help but succeed. Gkomck Travis Mans, B.S.C. "(•'int ur" Milner. Georgia. Deinosthcniitn. Kconomics Society; Spanish Club; Jeffersonian; Freshman Debater; Soplmmore Debater; .Junior Orator; Junior Cabinet; Senior Hound Table; Walter B. Hill Prir.e in F. tides; Debating Council; Hditor-in-Cliief Kcd and Black; Gridiron Club: Champion Debater; President Demosthc-nian. Behold his “Ginkship"! “Gink" is one of the smoothest article we have ever seen, lie tells no man of what he is ntmut to do. or of what he has done. He hauls his guano from Milner, Gn.. and only he know , where that is. ‘‘Gink’s" most important characteristic is his ready adaptability to civilisation, lie is the keenest observer in college, “(’link" is also one of the liest students in his class, has an almost unparalleled list of honors, and an uncanny ability for handling business matters such as Pressing Clubs, Church Movements, Bibles, and many other sources of graft. Wc expect a great deal of “Gink", for he who never tells his own business, and who never interferes with the other fellow’s, is bound to succeed. Ii 4 Tiiomas Dickkv Mathox, A.II. -Tom” Atlanta. Georgia. Phi Kappa; Alpha Tim Omega. Lieutenant Corps of Cutlets; Senate. Gaxing upon tin hIkivc portrayetl physiognomy we are struek at onee by the unusually blitliesoine anti cheerful background selected bv the plwlographcr f» r this portrait. It is a true index to our hero's disposition. Never grumbling, never complaining (in his sleep) Thomas Dickey-bird presents to the general public an unruffled conscience, pitying the world for the wrong start it got back in Adam's time. Hut this is simply a little hy-plny on Tom’s most outstanding characteristic, lie is. indeed, a warm friend, standing ready to help a pal in every possible way. The old duffer who said that consistency is a rare jewel didn’t know our friend Mat-son, for here we have one of’ the consistent, persevering type who can look hack upon his college career with the full knowledge that the goal is reached and the race is won. Good for you, Toni. •Iamks 1.kox Mkim.in, B.S.C. “Shorty” Jacksonville, Florida. Senate; Alpha Tan Omega. This short, dumpy specimen of humanity has attained prominence in the social world and elsewhere by virtue of three particular characteristics. First and foremost, he is the only member of the “I’ppcr set” who rates a silk beaver and it is to Shorty Medlin and his lieaver that the society crowd turns when tnc annual dances are at their width. The second quality for which he deserves glory is his transcendent supremacy in French 2A. The third characteristic of this truly remarkable mail is his conscientious objection to any form of drink stronger than Bcvo. Shorty has felt somewhat lonesome and out of place since Pud Allen left school, and Tom Matson seems to be the only one who can console h.m. It is said that he has such a firm grasp on the money situation that he makes the eagle “Caw" twfore he lets him go. He never meets anyone without greeting them with a pleasant word ami a smile. Quiet, vet good-hearted. Shorty’s prospects for success are bright. Edward IIknry MIKAOl.lA, •?«., A.B. "Eddie" Macon, Georgia. Demosthenian. I resilient Spanish Club. A call for F.ddic Miraglin—“Hi! Kddic", is sure to get you a pleasant response from Edward Henry Miraglia, .Fr. Kddic came to Georgia from Macon, which, he thinks, is “la plus lx-lie hille du mondc". Kddic went to Columbus with a select crowd last fall to see Auburn and Georgia play fixitbnll. Once, when it seemed ns if they might languish in some village jail, Kddic became tin apologist of the bunch by explaining satisfactorily that they were not "rcg'lur holms". Ilenrv VIII, of KngJnnd, spoke all the languages of Europe. Kddic is our nearest approach to him. He sj cnks French, Spanish, German, and Itnlinii. He is going to Columbia to study law next year. His delightful personality and his high ideals, hidden under a slight reticence, will lie cherished in the memories of many a Georgia student. Au revoir ct bon voyage, Kddic. William Ka.ndolimi Moork, A.B. “Handy” Mobile, Alabama. Phi Kappa; Alpha Tan Omega. Freshman Club; Vice-President Cotillion Club; Senate; Assistant Manager Baseball Team 19; Pan Hellenic Council; Manager Football Team 19; Gridiron Club. "If music Ik the food of love, play on". No one not personally acquainted with “Handy" will understand this little epitaph, but let it suflicc to say that the subject of our present discussion has often cast amorous eyes towards a certain celling and breathed soulful sighs, at the same time emitting said quotations while tuneful music has permeated the atmosphere. But to enlarge on this beautiful word picture might Ik telling secrets so getting down to business. Handy holds ample claims to |M»pularity . numlx'ring his friends by his acquaintances. Besides this, lie attained his seniority in three years, with plenty of clearance over the pnssing mark. So let us bid him good-bye with hoj es fo. a bright future, and remember him ever as an allround good fellow, and a representative Georgian.Simon Marks Morris, A.B. ‘'Simon" Athens, Georgia. Pill Kappn; Phi Kpsilon Pi. Sophomore Declamation; Thu I inns; Pan Hellenic Council. Although Morris was given the name of Simon when he renounced all works of darkness, lie is by no means related to the Simon of the tale who was reputed to l»c Simple. On the contrary, lie is wise l c-vond his years. Simon is one of the wits of the school, and his chaste countenance is always covered with the smile that won’t wear off. I-pun completion of his college course Simon intends to run for president of the Irish Itcpuhlic, and confidently l»c-lievcs that he will lie elected. He has many amiable qualities and numbers his friends by the hundreds. Among Simon’s many talents is his ability to talk with himself, and he can often be heard carrying on a very interesting conversation alone. He is very devilish, and yearns for twinkling toes and bright lights of Broadway. Our last toast to Simon is that he may have a long life and a happy one. Kkxnon Mott, .Ir., M..B.. A.B. ••AVnaoM ’ Atlanta, Georgia. Phi Kappn; Pi Kappa Phi. Jeffersonian; Gridiron Club; Senate; “G” Club; Counsellor; Impromptu Debater; Debating Council; Secretary and Treasurer Pan Hellenic Council; Glee Club ’lt and 'lft; Business Manager of Georgian: Captain and Adjutant Cadet Corps; Football Tram; Baseball Team; Basket-ball Team; Captain Basket-ball Team ’20. Kennon came to us from the Capital City, as one can ascertain bv his liearing, and lie has delved into college activities with varying success. Looking at his attainments in college life the world would call him an athlete, an orator, a lady-killer, a politician and a singer, but. judging him bv his own opinion of himself, he is a “master of all he surveys’ . He has l cen a stnr on the basket-ball team for three years, Iwine Captain of tIk? five this year. He has also made good in baseball and football. Mott is a good all-round man. and has made a success in college. His combination of self-confidence and willingness to work, we hope, will bring him soccers in life. .Ioski’ii Oi.ix .»lcG»:m:»:. B.S.C. “Jo" Greenville, Georgia. Dcmnsthcnian; ('lii I i. Kconomics Society; Buccaneer. "What’er In did, was done with so much case in him alone, twas natural to please". Here is another piH r, lovelorn lad. and while he lias reeeive l ail exeellent ednea-tion from the I’liiversity. it must he admitted that the finer points in his training were administered on Woodlnwn Avenue. Hot. anvway, lie seems to Ik- leading the field. Joe, however, does not confine himself to social stunts alone, lmt is a leader in whatever he undertakes, whether it lain society, polities, or classroom, and in addition to that lie has rare conversational abilities and can tell a joke with good grace; so all in all you would characterize him as being a mighty good man. Some day in the not far distant future J k will be celebrated for some grout stroke of stale, and then Georgia will he duly proud of him. I.tick to you, Joe! May the cup of plenty overflow for vonr benefit. l.nwiN Ahiki. McWiioiitkh. A.It. “Mar” Savannah, Georgia. Dfinosthcnian. Junior Cabinet; Senior Round Table; Champion Debate; Sophomore Declamation; Junior Oration. "They baik, and still their wonder grew, that one small la-ad could carry all lie knew". Mac is a fellow whom everyone naturally likes. Mis chief failing is an unearthly yowl, that is, a mixture of a Banshees’ death cry and a cat’s vcodlc. This gives him great delight, nod often the campus resounds with his unearthly yell in the wee hours of the night. This Is Mac's only form of dissipation. He tins lieen n good student, alive to the needs of his fellow men, and ever eager and willing to work for a just cause. Mae is going to lie a lawyer, though many say the ministry is his call. We are glad to have known you, Mac, and we join the many who wish you well. May you find favor hi yoi • true one's eyes, a sufficiency of wealth, and a life full of gotnl deeds.UoHKKT I.KK N’OWKI.I.. A.B. "Hob" .Monroe, Georgia. Phi Kappa; Sigma AIplm Fpsilon. Kconomics Society; Baseball Team 17 and 18; Senate; Gridiron Club. It was in the fall of 1910 that Bob, with all the liencfits that could Ik derived from a rural atmosphere, breezed in from Monroe. He entered the Freslunan class, and had not lieen in college long before lie made manifest his possession of a trait which is envied by every man-—the ability to keep out of other people’s business save when requested. During the past four years his generosity rind faithful performance of his duty have not only won the esteem and respect of all with whom lie came in contact, but made for him a host of warm friends. Other things have demonstrated Bob’s faithfulness. Any college man who can cleave to one maiden only, for four years, is certainly faithful—and this fellow did it. We do not know wliat your vocation is. Bob, 1 r whatever it la-, we wish you the best success. I tout: mt Dknxis O’Cai.i.auiias. A.i». "Hob” Athens, Georgia. Fhi Kappa; Kappa Sigma. Sphinx; Secretary Debating Council: Students’ Loan Fund Board; President Thalians; Associate Kditor Panooha; Georgian Board; President Phi Kappa; Sophomore Debater; Sophomore Declaim er; Junior Orator; Impromptu Debater; Champion Debater; Anniversarian; Major Cadet Corps; Pan Hellenic Council; Cotillion Club; Senate; Junior Cabinet; Senior Bound Table; Gridiron Club; Memlier Students’ Council; Phi Beta Kappa. An Irishman born, an Irishman bred, and when he dies there’ll Ik an Irishman dead. Good-natured and happy-go-lucky a I a ut everything but Ireland, laming for three years and blowing for one. Bob has come forth from Georgia with lamor colors, a Ihix of medals, a batch of pins, and a host of friends. We thought his affections were centered until Campbell’s 49 show arrived in Athens, and it seems that Boll then tried to break up the show by vamping all the girls. A hard, earnest worker, a strong benefactor of Georgia, and a good fellow. TImtc’s a place for Bob in the heart of everyone from I’nclc Albert to the Chancellor.Howard Jkxxixgx Ovkhstkkkt, B.S. “ Uherttrutte” Baxley, Georgia. Dcmosthenian; Pi Kappa Phi. Hr in it not her fellow who helped put Huxley on the map. To prove that he lui.s upheld her honor we have only to remind you Hint he has run the four years' eour.se in three. “Dump" has made many friends while in Athens, and we hale to see him go. When hr is around, you may feel assured that joy reigns supreme and that some very interesting question is in the process of a lively discussion. “Dump's" most strising characteristic, perhaps, is his laugh; by it he is easily distinguished in the dark. When among the fair sex he shows marked signs of I»nshfulness. This is n great handicap to him. and we hope that througu some mysterious way he will l c relieved of it lieforc many years. “Dump” is planning to go to Medical College next year, and we are sure he will get his “M.1V l»v a good count. We wish for him many patients and trust tnem to tell tnc talc. Stkpiikx Pori’KK, .1 ., A.U. •Strre" Macon, Georgia. Phi Kappa. Junior Oration; Senior Hound Table; Phi Beta Kappa. "The gentleman with the gentle touch" - that's Steve. When it comes to social affairs, no brighter light ever cast its rays on the gatherings of brave men and fair women than that of this Macon Senior. Although one of the spiliest dressers in college, Steve has absolutely refused to bow under the load of a derby, hut tliorongli and dependable, he knows not tnc field of failure. Nothing too good can l»c said it 1 h i11 this man, but we’d rather call on Shakespeare, as our own words would not lie appropriate for such noble sentiment: “You might face the world and say there stands a man’'! Kvcry inch sincere to his lieliefs, but not radical; one of Georgia's best students, but not a bookworm; always seeking a good time, blit has not pleasure for his entire aim. Macon should l e proud of such a son. and can well ! onst his name.Wii.i.iam Mos :s I’inrxKV, B.S.A. ‘thick’’ Home, Georgia. Agricultural Club. From out of tlu wild and craggy hills of North Georgia this strange biped comes to our threshold. Putney is one of those left-overs from the class of 1918. When the call for men to go to the army was made, I’utncy was one of the first to enlist. After serving Uncle Sam for two years, he comes hack to us with a grim determination to get his Ag. degree. Some say Putney has greatly profited hv his army service. He has discarded the old issue uniform that was so conspicuous around the campus for three years and now wears a brand new store-bought suit. They say he also uses the ivory a little more freely now. The only outstanding fault of Putney is his great attachment to society, especially the ladies. At any baseball game be may lie seen with bis fair damsel, viewing the game from the Ag. hill. If hard, steady work will gain one anything Putney will not be behind when tl»o successes of this world are counted. John Higdon, H.S.A. ‘‘ tiff John ' Tifton, Georgia. Demosthcnian. Agricultural Club; President Freshman ('lass; Football Team ’lli; Alternate Captain ’19; President Athletic Association; Track Team ’19 and 20; Campus Club; Member Students’ Council. This is “Big John". Though his face may not lictray him, know, gentle reader, that he is big in stature, big in football, big in track, and big in heart. John's chief fame is of the Gridiron nature. He leaves la-hind him the reputation of l cing one of tnc gamest fighters that ever defended the Red and Black. His big arm has won twice for Georgia the shot-put medal in track meets. But the most painful tasks of his college life has been his announcements at the Beanery. John is unusually quiet, and for him to s| cuk has caused each time an encore of applause. Some blame "Monk Garret" for all this, but Monk says it is the hard luck of a floor-walker. All in all, here’s to you, John. May you l c as big . success in life as in college.Otto: Bknjasiix KoBKi-n. B.S.A. " Limlrnanln Douglusvillc, Georgia. Deinosthcninn. Agricultural Club; Captain Cadet Corps; President Agricultural Club. This way, ladies and gentlemen, we desire to introduce to you no other than "Ottie ’ Roberts, the I my witlmut a doubt. He says little, hut that little he says with the conviction that comes only after careful consideration and thought. "Bobbie” hails from Douglasville, and nfter having made the Cniversity a go »d student, will return home to give Ocorgia the higher gift of high-minded citizenship. When not otherwise engaged Ottie may he seen almost every morning drilling his company, which reflects well its captain's merits. “Bobbie ' is a good-hearted boy. whom his friends hold in the highest esteem, lie goes out from Georgia shorn of that verdure, characteristic of all who enter here, lie will make Georgia proud of him in the days to come. Luck to you, Ottie. May you have the lx st of fortune in ail you undertake, and may success and your lady smile sweetly on you. Hknrv ) ik« Uomisox, B.S.C.K. ' Urn" Athens, Georgia. Phi Kappa; Pi Kappa Phi. We first rememlier Henry when, four long years ago, we were under his instruction in Freshman Drawing. Henry was a Junior then, and in the eyes of us newcomers. rated higher than Boh Park or the l can, and was only to he looked upon as a Iwing in a loftier sphere. But since that time he has, for two years, listened to the tooting of the bugle and the rattling of the mess tins and has finally returned to grace the chapel stage with the Freshmen he used to teach. 11 is hangout here Is Moore College, third floor, and excepting his visits to Pete’s Math, department, he never leaves this hangout. Henry is one of “I.ittle Charlie's" prize pupils. This statement needs no explanation -to engineers, at least. It is said that Henry is desperately In love, but he evades our questions and seems inclined to talk aland anything hut himself, so we really can’t vouch for this statement. Henry will make n success in something, we know. Here's '.oping it’s engineering.Wll.I.IAM IIAMT SlHI.KY, A.B. '•nur Cnion Point, Georgia. Phi Kappa; Chi Phi. Senate; .Junior Cabinet; Baseball Manager ’ 20; Gridiron Chib. And they say when he stepped from the I’nion Point express and set foot on Athens soil for the llrst time in his Freshman year he marveled that there could he a metropolis of such magnitude as the ('lassie City. But in the years he has spent at Georgia this barefoot l y with chceKS of tan has developed wonderfully. He no longer hails from the wilds of I nion Point, Init is now a eosinopolitc of the first water, with Atlanta engraved on his visiting card, t onseientious and energetic, he has won many lionors and made friends in abundance at the Cniversity. Bill's greatest worry seems to he that he cannot find enough to do for others, ever putting the welfare of his friends before his own. The originator of the tribute “All wool and a yard wide" certainly must have coined the phrase as n tilting bouquet for Bill. IDavis Sinoi.kto.v, B.S.C. “Lieutenant" Gainesville, Georgia. Demosthenian. Kconnmics Society; Lieutenant Cadet Corps Headquarters Staff. "Company Attention! — ltcst!" Behold in the foreground, gentlemen, Napoleon's only equal and Stonewall Jackson's only rival, no other personage than our friend and classmate, "Lieutenant Singleton. Singleton is one of those matter-of-fact, good-hearted boys that you can not nslp but like. The more you see of him tlie Iwtter he wears with you. This is true also of his inseparable companion, an cver-wear grin. Singleton has done well at college, and no doubt will do the same somewhere up around Gainesville, when lie starts out in the great battle of life. lie has performed his work faithfully and made a host of friends, who wish for him a fud measure of this world's good fortunes. The Crip building sends him fully "h -led" to meet the obstacles that not infreqi illy beset our path. Be no' wary, O, Doctors'. Your champion will never fail. Luck to you, "Lieutenant"!Jamks Baskin Stani.ky, A.B.S.S. “Solemn” Quitman, Georgia. Dcmostheniaii; Sigma Nil. They cal! him Solomon, not l ceause he lia-. wifish notions, lint In-cause it sounds so much like solemn. He is forever tending to his own business and never Imtlicr-ing nnylmdv elsc's, which is quite some attribute in itself. Solomon started off taking A.Ik, but became so fond of the crip building that be just couldn't help riding a social science Dip. It is said that lins are liable to sprout on him most any time, not liecaiisc he is a shark, but. instead. resembles a little, the pool room variety. While not going to too wide a sphere to select friends, those near him be has gripped with “lamps of steel", and good fortune is sure to come bis way. Altnough a cup demon. Co-eds are bis Jonah, and when becoming a teacher his one requirement of the school to widen lie goes will be, “Co-eds never again”! Stanley is a irood student, and in cvcrV way has proved himself to Ik- a nice fell ov. May success lie his. Thomas I.i-nskikd Stokks, Jk., A.B. “Tom” Atlanta, Georgia. I'bi Kappa; Alpha Tan Omega. Sophomore Debate; Sophomore Declamation; Senior ltouud Table; Gridiron Club; V. M. c. A. Cabinet 18, '!! . 20; lied and Black Staff l8- lf ; Kditor-in-Chicf of Georgian Senior Basket-ball Team; Phi Beta Kappa. I'rom the above list you can see that Tom has made a success in bis career at Georgia. He has many accomplishments- from getting the tip off over Billy Anderson in arguing to remctnl ering the dates when George Washington first winked at Martha and Napoleon crossed the Delaware. ‘•Sunshine” has had his irons in ninny tires, and whatever he has undertaken he has performed well, lie has done a great deni of newspaper writing and won many friends for the Cniverjitv through one of Atlanta's papers. Like all the other Atlanta tmys, Tom Is not the • -asl bit boastful. Modesty is one of bis chief characteristics and la-even carries it to great extremes. Luck to von. Tom; we are eountin; on you to bring renown to old 1‘. On.Komkkt Hknky Sti-cki:y, .Ih., B.S.C. “Stool:” Blakely, Georgia. Deiiiostheiiian; Kcnuumics Society. Stuckey is another one of our three-year men. However, he comes from another institution of learning. 11c is a nice fellow, being a shining example of wlmt Mercer University can lo for a man in just one year. He takes life easy, ami never troubles with anything unless Ih- is preparing for commercial law class under Syl-vanus. Due to tnc grading of test papers, Stuckey, in his Senior year, has la-en taxed with tin minute problems of economies live, having to rend in the wee hours of night, from the result of attending shows presented by the students. He contemplated entering politics, but considered the burdens that would Im- heaped upon him and withdrew. He is a very prominent figure in problems arising with a room-mate of his. If you don’t liclicve it. » k the latter. •'Stuckey” expects to enter the grocery business in the county of F.arly, in the city of Blakely. He carries with him the good wishes of everyone when be leaves in June. Ciiaki.m Wii.iiam Si mmkmock. B.S.A. ‘'Charlie” Duluth, Georgia. Demosthenian. Agricultural Club; Business Manager -Agricultural Quarterly; Treasurer of Agricultural Club; Alpha ' .eta; Vice-1‘resilient Athletic Association; President Georgia Naturalist Society. Better known as “I.ittle Charlie” this young fellow is as gentle as a cat and so reserved that only n close friend can break through and reach him—that’s his nature, Imvs, to a gnat’s toe-nail. But “I.ittle Charlie" is an industrious young fellow, having won quite a number of the honors in his department. Mis ideal in life is to become the most progressive farmer in the vicinity of Duluth, the metropolis from which he hails, and we see no reason why he should not realize tins ambition. In spite of his reserved nature, those who know him say he is some lady-killer, and that when he gets back home he shimmies as well as anyone. Whatever he does in life we liclicve he will make plenty of money and friends. Hanvky Hknky Tisixokr, B.S.C. “Ty" Carrollton, Georgia. Deinosthcninn. Keonomics Society; Spanish Club; So-pliomorc Declaimcr; (lice and Mandolin Club; Jeffersonian; President Keonomics Society; Secretary Athletic Association; Cheer leader; Secretary an l Treasurer Students’ Council; Beta Gamma Sigma. Carroll County claims the honor of l e-ing the birthplace of this distinguished gentleman. After learning everything to be learned there, like Alexander of old, he yearned for other fields to conquer, and so he came to Georgia. What Ty likes in size he makes up in brains and ability. As an actor, he stands par excellent, nnd as comedian on the Glee Club he Created more laughs than the combined efforts of the rest. lie is not only a good student, hut he is also a fine mixer. He knows more people and has more friends than probably any man in school. Mr. Tisinger intends to pursue the filthy sheckels when he graduates by engaging in the mercantile business. He will undoubtedly be a success, for money comes ns regularly into his hands as the chickens come home to roost. Francis Jkromi: Vacohax, B.S.A. ‘’Jenny’ Carter.svillc, Georgia. l hi Kappa; Kappa Sigma. Alpha ' .eta; Botanical Society; President V. M. C. A.; Agricultural Quarterly Staff; President Agricultural Club; Students’ Council. He scorns the light and foolish word, And holds aloof from the common herd. Mr. Vaughan, another representative from Cartersville. He is particularly anxious that von do not confuse this with Carter’s Pills. Since entering college, Vaughan has excelled at everything he undertook. He is one of the liest students in college, and has wielded a great influence for good since he has l»ecn here. Since the introduction of Co-cducntion, he has become a passionate admirer of the opposite sex. Daily he offers tributes of love on the altar of Venus to his heart’s idol, nnd nothing pleases him lictter than to revel in the sunshine of his sweetie’s smile. Our fondest wish is that he may never feel the pangs of disprized love. Vaughan, also, prefers agricultural pursuits, and after graduation be intends to raise hens and pigs nnd cows nnd other things.“Stormy" Glennvillc, Georgia. Demostheninn. First i.ieuteniint Cadet Corps; Freshman Debater; Sophomore Debater; Impromptu Debater; Junior Cabinet; Senior Round Table; Gridiron Club; President of Demostlienian; Phi Beta Kappa. Mr. Weathers, gentlemen, is one of tin men of dignity and supports a derby with graee second to none. There is no one else just like him. and we guess you may call this a compliment. We hope it will be taken as such. We cannot afford to give his “pet’ name, for our life is still sacred to u . You may rest assured that it is elm ruling. However, in all seriousness, Weathers is one of the liest men in the class, and has taken off so many honors that he has lost record of them. He has dabbled in polities to some extent, is a graceful basket-ball player and has a laugh of which anyone might well be proud. “Stormy” has a heart as big as a watermelon, and feet even bigger. May riches, health and happiness come his wa' Phi Kappa; l uinhda ('hi Alpha. Agricultural Club; Botanical Society; Glee Club ’! ». '17 and ’IS; Captain Cadet Corps; Alpha ’ .etn. Altout him, there is not much to say. Coming to Athens from the little country town of Thomnsville, it is hnrd for this hoy to get accustomed to the bright lights. Our first impression of him is on the train talking to a bunch of prospective Freshman and telling of his accomplishments back in South Georgia. He says that he found the first ladl-wccvil in Georgia, and that he is going to Columbia and specialize in entomology; but now, since the lad has seen a city he has, no doubt, changed his mind and will develop into man-alamt-town in several years. If such is the case the fnrming profession will certainly lose n good man. It is too bad that he could not have lived without seeing a city, for it has made him lose his former good habits. It was once this way- “Shucks ’; but now it is AW H—! Wai.i.ao: Daniki. Wkatiikms, A.B. Ai.va Ci’htis Wki.cii, B.S.A. Co-ed" Thomnsville, Georgia. J C II AH I.US IltNTINOTON W IIKATI.KV, B.S.C.L. ‘Charlie’ Americas, Georgia. Demostheniau; Chi Psi. Kngincering Society; Lieutenant Cadet Corps; Pan Hellenic Council. The classroom and the lecture palls, lie loves the click of billiard balls. When Wheatley entered college, he evidently made a vow to support Casper to the full extent of his ability. He has nobly executed this vow. He may be found at any hour at the Q Boom. When not engaged in the profession of Willie Hoppe, Charlie may be seen mingling with the common herd. He is an ardent worshipper of the weaker sex. and exerts himself to the utmost to please them on all occasions. This may account for the fact that he is often seen rilling in an automobile with some charming young Indy at the wheel. Charlie has many good qualities that have endeared him ‘o .s friends and we would not be surprised to hear some day that he has been elected to the Senate. He would make an admirable filibuster. You have our kindest regards. Charlie, whatever you may do. |.»:k Gi.anton Whitakkk, B.S.A. “JmUje” Harlem, Georgia. Demosthcnian. Agricultural Club; Stock Judging Team; Alpha eta; Meudier Students Council. "Whit”, as he is proverbially known on the campus, is from the country. Look at him and sec for yourself. But mind you, that is not saying that Whit is not a fine fellow, for undoubtedly he is. True to his nature, he took "Ag". The only fault ever rumored on Whit is that once during his Senior year he resorted to toe ltooi i and participated in a game of pool. Nevertheless. in spite of this fact, the future is bright for him. We predict that if h.- follows the same ouiet. unobstructive path to success in life as he has in college, that in the years to conic he will be one of the leaders in his home community. And further, if some one should in the near future descend upon his neighbor and ask his opinion of Whit, the answer would be that, "Whitaker is a farmer and a gentleman.lull X .Iri.lAN Wll.KISX, .III.. B.S.C. "Jack" Athens, Georgia. 1 1 1 Kappa; Chi Phi. Kconomies Society; Senate; American Legion. Jack is one of the town Imivs. After graduating at tin- local High School lie yearned for higher education, and consequently entered the University. He entered as an Inimhlr Freshman, and has mounted the ladder of fame until he now stands on the top round. Jack is a regular Roaming Romeo, a la-art-breaker with the ladies. I le is also one of the la st fellows in school, and is well liked by everyone. Jack is one of the few survivors of the glorious days of the S. A. T. C. and the reign of Thweutt the First. It Is hard to say what this gentleman's ambitions in life are. He may aspire to la a poet. or a school teacher, or an actor; or he may follow in the footsteps of others and become a banker and .subsequently a s-eond Alexander Hamilton, lint whatever lie tries for. he will surely succeed. for he has all the qualifications necessary for f access. Bainbridge, Georgia. IMil Kappa; Sigma Nil. He comes from Bainbridge, and is not known at the University as Willis or Mr. Willis, but hs just plain “Hap”. He acquired this title by reason of being always, eternally, and at all times, happy. Not even the terrors of Foabixly Hall in his Senior year, when lie was wrestling with Sociology, Kducatkin, and other kindred subjects, could take away from him his jollity. Our hero is especially noted for his admiration of women, and it is knowledge in Athens that he Is the really great ladies’ man of the entire student Ixxty. Another virtue of “IlnpV is that i.e csj ecinlly liked to drill in his first years in college, and so lunch did it suit him that at the very first intimation that there was going to be war in 1917, he ceased his labors and entered the army. “Hap”, you nr- . real Georgia man and an all-round fine scout whom we will always Ik- glad to call our friend. .Ia.m»:s Ki.uxc.tox Wilms, A.B.S.S.•Ia.mks IIkywakd Yorxo, B.S. Cartersville, Georgia. IMii Kappa; Kappa Alpha. Sophomore l)cl a to; Junior Cabinet; President of Phi i appn. “Brigham" is a man woo talks little and says much. For several years he gave promise of eclipsing even Brother .Morrison’s political career at Georgia. Then his mind turned to deeper things. “Brigham” has proven himself a good student and a competent leader. He lias made a host of friends who wish him well. Luck to you, “Brigham"! May Fortune shower her choicest blessings on you. Kvki.yn Howako Bcixaro, B.S.I1.K. All women are, in some degree, j»oets of imagination, angels in heart, and diplomats in mind. Truly, livelyn is all of these. Her record as a mcmlter of the first laxly of young women to graduate from the University of Georgia speaks for .'.self. Her craving for a higher education has but made her a real woman to Ik admired more among Imth men and women. Sh is pretty to walk with, And witty to talk with. And pleasant, too, to think on. Her face is like the milky-wav i’ the sky, A meeting of gentle lights without a name—Jkssik limroN, B.S.I1.K Cartersville, Georgia. Snu»: Manik Hi'mmin', H.S.H.K. Athens, Georgia. Women I in ve ninny faults, hut of the many this is tnc greatest-that they please themselves too milch, ami give little attention to pleasing the men. So quoted Planters, and history repeats itself in the character of Susie. Her record nt the l'niv rsity has l cen an enviable one, l cing third in excellency in the whole I'niversity, in her first year of attendance. This may be due to pleasing herself or to the fact of her holding steadfastly to her umhitious to render her service to her State ns a teacher. Gentlest and bravest in the battle brunt The C'liampion of the truth She Imre her banner to the very front. Of our immortal youth. Another pioneer npj enrcd on the horizon when the gates of the I’niversity were opened to women. And there could not be a more loyal pioneer than she. She too seized the opjmrtunity to make this life given her more useful to her fellowmnn and came for further understanding of life’s great problems. To her— l.ife is mostly toil and trouble, two things stand like stone. Kindness in another's trouble, courage In her own.V Pkaxckx Rita Coum-owh, V.S.H.K. IVnfit'Id, OiDrgin. No truer pioneer could ever have live l than tins ineiulier of the class of young women, first to graduate from the University of Georgia. She has already meant much to our State, and wherever she has lived her life has meant much service. If th - leaders for higher education of women could see no other fruits of their laliors —than the sending of this young woman out with her degree—their effirts would not have Inen in vain, and her life shows that the training which make; women happiest in themselves also makes them most serviceable to others. Kami Vai'OHN' (’kkswki.i., li.S.lI.K. Athens, Georgia. 1 dare aver, she is a brave discoverer Of climes her elders do not know. She has more learning than appears On the scroll of twice three thousand years. The more jiowcrful the obstacle, the more glory we have in overcoming it anti the difficulties with which we arc met arc the maidens which set off virtue . So it is with Kditli. We wish for her everything possible. Her toils have been faithful and her laliors hard, yet— A hulv with n lamp s’ all stand On the great history of the land— A noble type of good — Heroic womanhood.Sihvi. M. »: Hamiton, H.S.II.K. At lions, Georgia. Shut tin door of a woman’s wit ami it will out the easement, shut that and it will out the kcv-hole, stop that and it will fly with smoke up the chimney. Woman's wits are uneonipierahle, so are Sibyl’s. She literally Imhhlcs over with humor and fun. Her career has Iktii marked l»v determination, and by her determination she 1ms achieved success. Her air, her manners, all who saw admired; Courteous. tl o’ coy and gentle, tho’ retired, The joy of youth and health l»er eyes dis-played, nd ease of heart her every look convey’d M.vrm: I)ok.» Ha.mio.kv, K.S.Ii.K. Carnesville, Georgia. She smiled and the shadows departed, She shone and tlie snows were rain, And they who were froxeu-hearted Bloomed up in love again. Man pays deference to woman involuntarily, not lK-eause she is hcautif'il or truthful or wise or proj»er, hut because she is a woman and hr cannot help it. If she descends, he will lower to her level, if she arises, he will rise to her height. Man could truly Ik expected to soar no higher, than when influenced hv this noble character. A woman’s rank Lies in the fulness of her worn. ’'hood. Therein alone she is royal.Edith Romkhtson, B.S.H.K. Dalton, Georgia. We judge ourselves l»v what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us hv what we have already done. Whether we judge Kdith or not, the fact Is evident that she has done, is doing, and will do, great things. Her record as a student at the University of Georgia is one to he held as an example of concentration, diligence, and achievement. Her motto has been: “By labor and intense study, joined with strong propensity of nature, 1 might, perhaps, leave some record to after time, os tlicy should willingly not lot it die”. l’.rNici: Knms, A.B.S.S. Byron, Georgia. And—some say she’s been Itustin long enough—perhaps she, in time, may decide that what “some Say” Is true. However, she has dreamed a dream—of a career— with A.U.’s A.M.’s, and who knows, perhaps Ph.D.’s strung along side the Eunice Itustin? She is a gtxxl student, conscientious and laborious, spending “some” of her time on her work, taking high rank in all her studies, French Iwing especially delightful to her, her renderings of its romantic pages being always apt, original and interesting. It is reported that she has visions of learning to “paries vous” in France. Au Revoir, Eunice. Don't stay too long.History of the Senior Law Class IIK SENIOR I.AW CLASS is one of the smallest in the history of the Lumpkin Law School. On account of the peculiar situation brought about by National circumstances and changes in the curriculum of the Law School, the existence of a Senior Class looked doubtful, and for some time it was thought there would he no Senior Class this year. The class began its year of strenuous work with Mr. J. I . Atkinson, of the Junior Class of 1918. as President-elect; A. L. Lippitt, Junior Class of 1918; J. R. Slater. Junior Class of 1917; C. T. Burnett. Junior Class of 1917. and S. T. Swift, Junior Class of 1917. The Class, though small, has l ecn very active in college life, and is well represented among the Fraternities. Honorary Societies and Political Clubs. Its members have taken an unusual interest in their work, in the Henry W. Grady Public Speaking Club and the Moot Court work of the Jeffersonian Law Debating Society. Now that the year’s work is almost completed and we are soon to he leaving the University and start the practice of our chosen profession, let us hope the love for our Alma Mater will not die, hut increase, ns time moves on. And in taking our departure from the University of Georgia let us hope that we have learned and that wc do not soon foreet. that which is so dear to the hearts of all true Georgians—Justice. Wisdom and Moderation. —Historian.Law Class Officers H. Sl.ATKK . C. T. Ul’RXKTT .1. i Atkinson . ....................Pr trident .................Vice-Prttidenl . . Secretory and TreasurerC'iju'iiii: Thaiiki’h Bcknutt. M..H. South Carolina. Dcmosthcnian. Vice-President Senior I.aw ('hiss; Presi-dent Jeffersonian. Wlmt clanging of brazen bells! What “sounding brass", hut where are the “tinkling eynilmls"? What zeal! Hut Old Where is the knowledge? Gifted in combination of copper and mine witli eternal effervese-ense of sonorous expostulations. An cx| o-nent of one, theory, hut an argument for many. Such is our gentle introduction to this man lieyond description. Wc leave it to von, gentle rentier—ask the man who knows. Should he he able to describe this rare combination, he is more versed in met-alurgv than we. Hut we hand it to you, Claud, for you have l eon a revelation. You are a mystery of Science. You have exploded all theories of hot-air t. chincs, for the meehnnieal advantage it has given you enables us to congratulate you U| on the results of your energy. It is such men ns you that make the name of our State famous. I.uck to you. Claud. Joint Pkppkm A tk is sox, 1.1..11. Greenville, Georgia. Chi Psi. Chi Kappa; Jeffersonian; l’rcsldent-clect I.aw Class of ' 1!»; Secretary and Treasurer Class of 20; Pan Hellenic Council; Counsellors; Vice-President Jeffersonian; l.nw Debating Council; Vice-President Public S|K aking Club? Buccaneer; Gridiron Club. “Brevity is the soul of wit". If we were to preach a sermon on this text, we should have no better cx]M ncnt of our philosophy than he who is now under discussion. A true man of ability, practicing, not preaching. his convictions; sincere and successful in the attainment of his purposes; a blend of admirable characteristics is he. Known to his friends as John, the “Shark', with a smile, ami to his professors as an invulnerable target, he Could not be nubhed by a mere acquaintance as otherwise than a reserved gentleman. While he exj»cots every man to do his duty, yet lie never refuses a helping hand to anyone. True to his friends and just toward his adverraries, we foresee in him not a demagogue of parties, but a pilot of principles and an idol of elinets.■ Al.KOXHO l.INTO.V Liimmtt, LL.H. Albany. Georgia. Sigma Alpha Kpsilon. Phi Kappa; Jeffersonian. With his route laid out before him ami at each cross-road the sign with the famous arrow and this subscription. “Study haw, for your brother did but that”; and with a Imuquet of four-leaf clovers in a shower of horse-shoes, we find our youthful friend cheerfully loitering along the edge of this narrow path translating these signs into a “Never let your studies interfere with vonr education". I.nek to you, old scout! We envy you your horse-shoes ami your four-leaf clovers and we admire your good nature. If you are as luekv in winning cases ns you arc in reciting on the one paragraph you have read in the lesson, it will not be amiss for you some day to add on the title which we hope you will catch through your exposure to legal atmosphere. We are glad to have known you, ‘Ton”, and trust wc will hear lots from you later. John Uavmonii Si.atkk, LL.B., B.S. Valdosta, Georgia. Sigma Alpha Kpsilon. Phi Kappa; Counsellors; Gridiron Club; Senate; President Senior I.aw Class; President Jeffersonian; Pan Hellenic Council; President Students’ Council; Sphinx. “If conditions arc not right, make them so"- that is John’s slogan. Not being content with upsetting the old absence system and introducing one to meet the present requirements, he further put the Law Department on the map by instituting the Student Council movement. Not only in these two instances has John's influence been felt, but in many other matters of importance. His personality has been an asset to the University, and as a student he has Ix-cn an example. lie has not l ccn a social butterfly, hut few people have his ability as a mixer, and his “that reminds me" is always a welcomed sound, for it gives promise of an interesting story. John has made the University a good man, and in leaving takes with him the liest wishes of his many friends for a prosperous future.History of the Senior Pharmacy Class 1THSTAN 1)1 NG the terrors of Terrell Hall and being “shot” by an expert faculty for two years is enough to make history of any class, and when we look around us and see how deadly has been the aim we feel that be congratulated on being able to present a history during our collegiate life. Quite a few of us came with the intention of being “pill rollers.” but we arc now reduced to about half the first enrollment, and those of us who have not fallen by the way are l eginning to see that there are some points of Pharmacy not to be grasped in a moment. Most important, the class has a splendid record. It has. by its constant use. kept the Chemist busy manufacturing chemicals, and it points with pride to the fact that very few of its lost members left college bv the “flunkout” route. In other lines of college activity it has not fallen short. The struggle has been ceaseless and hard, but now all stand triumphant on the verge of the goal towards which wc have l»ccn toiling through a maze of chemistry, pills and powders. We arc now ready to take our places among the members of our profession, starting at the l ottom and never resting until the height of our ambition has been reached, and that is to number ourselves among the leaders. Farewell, dear old Alma Mater. Many fond memories and incidents can wc recall during our stay here. Although wc will not he here in person, and even though wc will miss the strains of “Glory.” yet that undcfinablc phrase, the “Georgia Spirit,” will be forever embodied in us, and whatever success we may attain in our career wc will attribute to the training received by your faculty. —Hugh. C. Walker, Historian. we shouldSenior Pharmacy Class Officers Chaki.ks I,. Pickkx ............................President Hkkrkrt ,1. IIarcock.......................Vice-President Miu» H. (iRiCR......................Secretary ond Treasurer I Ivon C. Wai.krm...............................HistorianHi'iikkt J. Babcock, Ph.G. Miami, Florida. Phi Kappa; Alpha Tan Omega. Babcock has been with us only two years, ami too much of that time lie has had to spend in I)r. Wilson’s Castor Oil and Fill Mixer’s factory, which we feel to be a distinct loss to ourselves. Hnbcock has proven himself to Ik: a quiet and ever gentlemanly sort of fellow. He is a man of the highest ideals and lives up to them always. As a student, we understand that he is one of the Doctor’s very best. lie leaves Georgia with only the best wishes from all wIh knew him. We send hack to Florida, an adopted son, whom she will, one day, be proud to claim. If she raises others as fine as the sample, we would be proud to know more of them. Babcock will be successful in anything he undertakes. If he invents a panacea we will all buy it, for we can be sure that it will do all that he claims for it. Good-bye and good luck, Babcock. Go back to Florida and “show ’em tip". Paiti. M. Gowdkk, Ph.G. I .ula, Georgia. Demosthenian. Lula, Georgia, is certainly some town. There is more time wasted there in one month by innocent travelers waiting for trains than is wasted in Fop’s "()" Boom iiikI the picture show combined in a whole year. But we didn’t start out to tell you ala»ut I .ula excepting that “Doc" Gowder hails from there and seems to be proud of it. Perhaps, some (lay, I.ula will In proud of Doc. As light of spirit as he is of mind, Gowder always has a smile for those whom lie may meet. He can generally be found hanging around Candler Hall or the Co-op. and is seldom seen near the Pharmacy Department. How he manages to pull the wool over F. Wilson’s eyes is more than we can see, but lie certainly docs it. If college records are any index to accomplishments in after-life. Doc’s pill-shop in I.ula. or wherever lie may decide to settle, will Ik a howling success, and he can own a whole flock of Packards, which is said to be his highest ambition. CiuHi-et L. Pickkx , Ph.G. Gainesville, Georgia. Dcmosthcninu; American Legion. “Pick" first won fume for himself lit the University wav Inick in RM , when he used to slioot “Proty" CmnplieH regularly three times a week. Those who knew l’roty will admit that this was no easy task. Sinec that time Pick has liecn to France for two years, and unless you have several liours with nothing to do, don't dare get him started talking almut it. In spite of the interruption of tlfe war into his college course, Pickens has accomplished much. He is president of Ids class and a mendier of tlie Students’ Council, liesides holding a class-room record to make anyone proud. Pick claims to he from Gainesville, and although he has liecn seen to arrive in Athens in the 0. M. (Great Mistake), the exact whereabouts of his domicile are unknown. It is rumored that he will Ik hack with us next year, assisting Hr. Wilson to train future castor oil dispensers. We surely hone so, for Pick can “hold ‘cm in the road” if niivone can. M11.0 IIchest Gnici:, IMi.G. Macon, Georgia. Demos t hen ia n. Grice has been with us only two years, and during this short time has confined himself so closely to the Pharmacy Department and the City V. M. C. A. that it is only on rare occasions we have been able to see him at all. On these rare occasions he was always swinging across the campus at a rapid rate with a heavy load of Ixioks under his arm. A side glance at Grice might convince you that he was from the coastwise city of Savannah; lie has the eye-marks of a true native. Really, Iwiwcver, he hails from Macon, and Macon should lie proud of it. He has done well in ail his studies, even licing able to shoot Dr. Black in Chemistry ‘2. Grice is quiet and reticent, attending strictly to his own affairs, hut underneath his calm and silent surface you will find plenty of character and good common sense. To know him is to like him. and it is certain that he will have untold success in his profession.T. Fohii Smith, PIi.G. Commerce, Georgia. Demnsthcniaii. Commerce, Georgia. The longest town in the world for its width. Three miles by two blocks, gentlemen, are its dimensions, and T. Ford Smith is from there. For over a year’s time he walked about the campus while every one thought he was living exposed to agriculture. IIis reason for taking Pharmacy is that farming is too hot for a man of his disposition, so he has chiefly occupied his time in trying to perfect a concoction to make his hair more glossy. But we arc afraid wc are writing this epic in too light a vein, for surely we should bring out a few of the many good jMiints almut .Mr. Smith. lie is one of Stitt Wilson’s best students, as well as Im -ilig quite a hand with the ladies. We have lots of confidence in T. Ford, and whether he decides to settle in the thriving village of Commerce or launch forth in the hie wide world we'll bet our last penny on bis success. Ilt-r.ii C. Wai.kkr, PIi.G. F.atonton, Georgia. Flu Kappa; Phi Delta Theta. Hugh (’. has been with ns only two years, but yet those who know him feel that they have always known him. lie is quiet and unassuming, lad always foremost to aid a friend in need. He can he seen daih, faithfully plodding the path to and from the ,l,ill-.Mixcr’s" rendezvous ill Terrell Hall. Hugh has studied well and has made good, lad yet he lias taken time to mix wito his fellow students as well as to mix bad-tasting potions. Wc are sorry not to have had him with us longer, and prophecy that he will some day lieeoine famous as the inventor of a panacea pill or a strong kick tonic that will bring to mind the joys of the days before the “Dry Age” set in. Some day, too, his winsome smile will win tin- heart of some fair damsel and he will settle down and live happy ever aflcr. Fuck to you, Hugh! May you live long, love well and die happy.  Junior Class History HROUGH tlio ages, Alum Mater, men will look to thee, tliou the fairest of tlie Southland—Georgia’s Varsity!" And now for the first time we are beginning to realize the meaning of these words, and to wonder if we are doing our part in upholding the traditions of our Alma Mater. For two years we indulged in "College Life" extensively and had our share in all under classman activities. As Freshmen we made our presence known and won the pushball game with case (?), this being our greatest achievement (hiring the year. As Sophomores we wielded the scissors with a skill unknown to most Sophomore classes, and the fame of our Vivilancc Committee was known far and wide, in Freshman circles especially. Many of those who stood so valiantly l»v us in our days of need as Freshmen, and made life miserable for the Class of ‘2 2, have forsaken us to pursue other callings; but those of us remaining are shouldering the responsibilities of an upper-classman with the firm purpose to make our class as successful in its last two years as it has been for the past two. In all college activities the Class of ’ 21 is well represented. When football came back to the University after an absence of two years on account of the war many of our members responded to the call to uphold the record of our Alma Mater on the gridiron, and wc were well represented on the team. In all literary and social activities we are taking our part. It must be admitted that there are few "l ook-worms" among us. and although the general average of the class is high, we have little hope of setting the record for the highest individual average in the history of the University. The C’lass of ’‘21 is fully imbued with the famous "Georgia Spirit.” and we have indorsed with all of our power every movement for the betterment of our Alma Mater. Wc arc now fast beginning to assume the responsibilities for the upholding of the famous traditions of "Georgia,” and wc intend to make our Alma Mater a little licttcr for our having been here. As wc start out upon the home stretch in our college career wc do so with this sole purpose in view. —HI st on I AN’.Junior Class Officers H. C. Wiiklciiki.........................................President II. G. Da iikk.....................................V'ice-President J. M. Wk t.................................Secretory and Treasurer R. W. Hioiismitii........................................HistorianJunior Class Roll Andkkso.v, Marik . . Aniikhson. Wii.i.iam Dickson Uarrktt, Di-Phi: . . . Bknkokd, Nora . . . Bknnktt, Pack Hanskn Hi.ai.ock. Kiioar . . . Houankn, C’uahi.ks Hay.mos Bradi.ky, Wai.do . . . Bkaxdon, Srsti: . . . Bhodnax ( iiahi.ks Kowakii Hl'Cll WAI.I). Bkx . . . Hcrson, Ykna.............. Cai.iiocn. John IIkiot . Carson. John Patk . . Carson, Wii.i.iam Joskihi Cllf.MHI.KY, Pl.I .ANKTH . Conn, Wii.i.iam Prkdkkick Cckii’Km, Ina............. Cohiiray, Wii.i.iam Khnkst Cox, Howki.i. Boatwright Crank. Wii.i.iam .Moohk , Dasiikh, Hamilton Gkorgk Davkni'ort, Iris............ Davis, Thomas John, Jk. Davis. Wii.i.iam John . Dknnard. Hoy Johnston Dkspohtks, Hiciiakd Smai.i.wooi Drakk, Jamks H. . . Kdwaiiiw, Krxkst Aaron Pk.no, Ciiac Chi'an . PlKI.DS. I.OCIK Gi.knn PlTZI’ATRICK. HkNRY YaIT.I POHKMAX. Cl. AII K HoWKI.I. Port, I.ctiikr Harvky . . Port. I.ynn ................ Gaisskrt. Iriiy Prkdkkick Goidsmitii. Wii.i.iam S. . Ghikkkth, Artiicr F.rnkst Hargis. Hiciiakd Kkchkn Harris. I.itcikn............ Hkatox. Wii.i.iam David . Hkiman, Isadork .... Hiohsmith, Kvkkktt Way HoWKI.I.. Co.MKR............ Johnson. Tiiomas Marion Kkknkr, Hcki'S I............ Home Economic ............................Brunswick Jr . .........................................Macon Eore try.....................................Athens Hume Economic ...............................Bowdon Agriculture ............................... Quitman Commerce .................................Jonesboro Agriculture ............................. I.ithonia Commerce...................................Savannah Home Economic ............................Dahloncga Agriculture..............................Carrollton Art ......................................... thcns Home Economic ...............................Bowdon Agriculture.................................Atlanta Art .........................................Tifton Commerce...................................Reynolds Social Science............................... thcns Ciril Engineering...........................Whigham Social Science............................... thcns Art Savannah Agriculture .................................Toccoa Artx.........................................Athens Agriculture..................................Marlow Home Economic ...........................Fitzgerald Agriculture................................Savannah Agriculture...................................Meigs Civil Engineering..........................Danville Commerce...................................Columbus Agriculture...................................Turin Agriculture................................. Oxford Agriculture...........................Ho Job, China Commerce...................................Ixivcjov Agriculture................................Cullodcn Artx....................................... Atlanta Commerce.....................................Morrow Science.....................................Atlanta Agriculture.................................Madison Art ....................................... Atlanta Science......................................Athens Commerce...........................Charlotte, X. C. Science.....................................Atlanta Art .....................................Tallapoosa Art ....................................... Atlanta Science......................................Haxlev Art ....................................... Atlanta Art ......................................Columbus Agriculture.............................Rabun Gap Kixxkhkkw, Xaxnh: . . Lewis. Samuki. Lee . . I .vox, Hkxry Corky Mai.i.ako, Wii.i.iam . , Makmki.stkix, Chari.es Augl Mass', Jok Wiikki.kk . . Maxey, Hkrhkmt Ai,u:x Miodi.kiirooks, Wii.uk Tom Mosxovm, Ahhaiiam Is a dork McDonai.o. Doxai.I) Bexxktt McGkhkk, Rosa.............. McFxtirk. Ossie............ McI.ki.i.an, .Ioiix McAkkk Xai.i., Chester Wortiiam Xki.ms, Wii.uam Frank . Nkvii.i.k, Lucy............ Xkwton, Catherine . . . Ol.IVKH, Ki.ihiha.......... O’Xkai., Benjamin I . . . Pai.kkky, Frank IT. ... PlNTCIU'CK, I.oris .... Prick, Rosai.ind........... Quartkiiman, Keith Axson Qitii.i.ian, Daxiki. David . Higdon, Hkxry.............. Rogers, Wii.i.iam Mitchki.i. Rose, Frank Darnki.i. . . Ross, .Ti'i.iax Fvkrf.tt . . Rwoi.pii. Mu,ton Oscar Huge, Adki.aidk............ Urn.a no, John T. . . . Sims. Jamks Harrison . . Sint.kh. I.kon............. Sori.K, Horkrt Mi-rray . Sparks, Stki.i.a........... Spicer, Jamks Payne . . So:PiiKN's, Wii.i.iam IIit.ii Thomson, Xina.............. Torrence, Cohii Cai.du-km. Tkoto, I.amah Jefferson Wai.kkr, Ai.ick............ Watkins, Joki. S........... Wkst, Joseph Henry . . WlIATI.KY, Cl.lFFOHD I’OKA HI W IIKI.CITKI., BLANCHE . . Whelchel, Hugh Calvin Wiisox, Maggie............. Wl.MKERI.EY, ErXKST Cl.lFFORD Woodard, Otis................ TUS Home Economics.....................Franklin, X. C. Arts......................................... tlnnta Agriculture...........................Clarkesvillc Arts........................................ Atlanta Civil Enyinccriny...........................Savannah Veterinary Medicine........................... Lyons Agriculture...................................Winder Agriculture..............................Starrsville Medicine.........................................Ft. Valley Agriculture..................................Quitman Home Economics.............................Knoxville Home Economics................................Athens Agriculture...................................Dalton ................................Lnthersvillc Arts..................................Commerce Social Science........................Ralmn (Jap Home Economics................................ thens Home Economics................................Bogart Arts...........................................Macon Agriculture.................................. Athens Commerce................................... iigtista Social Science................................Athens Arts..........................................Winder , Civil Engineering.......................... Athens , Commerce....................................Tifton , Science .............................. Barnesville , Commerce..................................Valdosta Arts ........................................ Winder . Science....................................Douglas , Social Science.......................... Dnhlonega , Veterinary Medicine.......................LaOrange . Agriculture................................Douglas . Science...................................Savannah . Agriculture................................ Athens . Home Economics..............................Athens . Civil Engineering.........................Savannah .Arts ..................................... Savannah . Social Science...............................Comer . Science....................................Atlanta . Journalism ............................... Atlanta . Education...................................Monroe . Civil Engineering..........................Tnckson .Arts.................................Union Point . Veterinary Medicine.......................Reynolds . Home Economics ....................... Gainesville . Agriculture .... Douglas . Social Science........................Watkinsville .Arts........................................ Lyons . Agriculture.................................DexterJunior Class Roll Andkrsox, Marik . . . Aniikrson, W’ii.i.iam Dickson Barrktt, J)rI’RK .... Bkxkokd, Noha .... Bknxktt, Pact. Haxskx Bi.ai.ock. Kdc.ah .... Boiiaxkx. ( iiaki.ks Ray.mon Braih.ky. Waumi............ BRANDON, Sl'SIK............ BkoDNAX C II ANI.KS Kl WAK» Bcchwai.ii, Bi:n .... Bmsox, Vkxa................ Cai.iiocx, John Hkiiit . . Cakson, John Patk . . . Carson, Wh.mam Joskph CII CMMI.KY, Kl.lZAHKTH . . Co HU, Wh.mam Fkkiikrick COOI'KH, Ina............... Cor dr ay, Wh.mam Krnkht Cox. Howki.i. Boatwright Crank, Wii.i.iam Muokk . Dasiikr, Hamitox Gkohc.i: D.wknpokt. Iris............ Davis, Thomas John, Jh. Davis. Wh.mam John . Dknnahii,' Hoy Johnston Dkspohtks. Hiciiakii Smai.i.winm Drakk. Jamks B. ... Howards. Kkxkst Aaron Fkno, Ciiait Ciicax . . Fiki.iis. I.ocik Cii.kxn Fitzpatrick, IIknry Vacoi Fokkman, Ci.ark Howki.i. Fort, I.ctiikh Harvky . . Fort. I.ynn ............... (iaisskkt, Irby Frkdkrick Goidsmitii. Wii.i.iam S. . (iRIPKKTII. AhTIICR F.KNKST Hahc.is, Hiciiakii Hkchkn Harris, I.ccikn............ Hkatox, Wii.i.iam David . Hkimax, Isadoki: .... Hiciis.mitii, Kvkrktt Way Howki.i.. Comkh............ Johnson. Thomas Marion Kkknkh, Hcrcs I............ Home Economics............................Brunswick Arhi.......................................Macon Forest rtf...................................Athens Home Economic ..............................Bowilon Agriculture ............................... Quitman Commerce ................................ Jonesboro Agriculture ............................. Litlionia Commerce...................................Savannah Home Economies............................Dahloncga Agriculture..............................Carrollton Arts....................................... t liens Home Economies..............................Bowilon Agriculture.................................Atlanta Art .......................................Tift on Commerce...................................Reynolds Social Science...............................Athens (’icil Engineering..........................Whigham Social Science............................... thens Arts ..................................... Savannah Agriculture .................................Toccoa Art ..............................................A thens Agriculture..................................Marlow Home Economics...........................Fitzgerald Agriculture................................Savannah Agriculture...................................Meigs Civil Engineering..........................Danville Commerce...................................Columbus Agriculture...................................Turin Agriculture..................................Oxford Agriculture..........................Ho Job, China . Commerce..................................Lovejoy Agriculture................................Cullodcn .Iris ..................................... Atlanta Commerce.....................................Morrow Science..................................... tlanta Agriculture.................................Madison Arts....................................... Atlanta Science......................................Athens , Ctnnmerce........................Charlotte, N. C. , Science...................................Atlanta Arts....................................TnllajHKisa , Art ..................................... Atlanta , Science....................................Baxley Art ....................................... Atlanta Art ......................................Columbus , Agriculture...........................Rabun GapKinxkbrew, Nannik......................Home Kconomic .......................Franklin, N. C. I-KWW, Samuel Lee......................Art ........................................ Atlanta Lyon, Hexry Cobby .....................Igricnltnre.............................Clnrkcsvillc Mallard, William ......................Irt ........................................ Atlanta M armei-stein, Chari.ks Augustus . . . Civil Engineering...........................Savannah Mann, .Iok Wheeler.....................Veterinary Medicine........................... Lyons Maxkv, Herbert Ai.ijcn.................Agriculture...................................Winder Midiilebrooks, Wii.uk Tom..............Agriculture..............................Starrsvillc Morkovitx, Abraham Isaihihk............Medicine.........................................Ft. Valley McDonald, Doxalii Bennett .... Agriculture..........................................Quitman McGkiiee, Rosa.........................Home Kconomic .............................Knoxville McKntirk, Ossie........................Home Kconomic ................................Athens McLki.lan, John McAm...................Agriculture...................................Dalton Nam., Chester Wortiiam.................Art ....................................Luthcrsvllle Nelms, W11.1.IAM Frank.................Art ........................................Commerce Nkvii.i.k, Lucy........................Social Science..........................Rahim (Jap Newton, Catiikrixk.....................Home Kconomic ................................ thens Oi.ivkr. Kijk)R. .....................Home Kconomic ................................Bogart O'Nkai., Benjamin I’...................Art ...........................................Macon Palfrey, Frank lT......................Agriculture.................................. Athens Pintciiuck, I n'is.....................Commerce..................................... ngusta Frick. Rosalind........................Social Science................................Athens Quartkrman. Kkitii Axson...............Art ..........................................Winder Qltlijan, Daniki. David................Civil Kngineering.............................Athens Rmuox, IIknry..........................Commerce......................................Tifton Rogers, Wii.i.iam Mitciiei.i...........Science ................................ Barnrsvillc Rose, Frank Darnki.i...................Commerce....................................Valdosta Rons, Julian Kvkrktt...................Art ........................................ Winder Rudolph, Mh.ton Oscar..................Science......................................Douglas RtrOE, Aiiki.aidk......................Social Science.............................Dahlonrga Hi'uanii, John T.......................Veterinary Medicine......................Ln(’ range Sims. James Harrison...................Agriculture..................................Douglas Singer, Leon...........................Science.....................................Savannah Soule, Robert Murray ..................tyricullure.................................. Athens Scarks, StkII-a........................Home Kconomic ................................Athens Scicer, James Payne....................Civil Kngineering...........................Savannah Stephens, Wii.i.iam Hroic..............Art ....................................... Savannah Thomson, Nina..........................Social Science.................................Comer Torrence, Coiih Caldwki.i..............Science......................................Atlanta Trotti. Lamar Jeffersox................Joumalitm................................... Atlanta Wai.ker, Aijce.........................Kducation.....................................Monroe Watkins. Joki. S.......................Civil Kngineering............................Jackson West, Joseph Henry......................Irt ....................................Union Point Wiiati.ey, Clifford Howard.............Veterinary Medicine.........................Reynolds Wiielchkl, Blanche.....................Home Kconomic .......................... Oainesville WiiEi.cnel, Hugh Calvin................Agriculture..................................Douglas WiiJOX, Maggie.........................Social Science..........................Watkinsville Wimberlky, Krnebt Clifford.............Art ......................................... Lyons WooiiARn. Otis.........................Agriculture...................................DexterJunior Law Class History ROM small beginnings come great things, and no beginnings of tilings, however small, should be neglected, because continuance makes them great. Beginnings arc never masterpieces, and this thought is the only thing that gave our class hope, because we •r greater difficulties. probably, than any other class at the University since the Civil War. We have now at least passed through two years of trials and tribulations. such as only a law student at the University of Georgia can understand. and after daily being reminded of our “Sins, negligences and ignorances.’' we have all come at last to unite in one grand prayer. “Oh. Lord, have mercy on the poor, defenseless public, who. unbcknowiugly. stand in imminent danger of having loosed upon them this wild and ravenous horde of ignorant lawyers.” Verily, they will be like the lamb in the clutches of the hungry lion! We are not only praying to avoid such a calamity, however. but are striving with all our might and main to make our future advent into the legal profession with as little disaster to the interests of the public as possible. It would be difficult to find a class containing more representatives in all the different college activities—literary, social, and athletic. And it is also a significant fact that the great majority of the class have been lately engaged in the service of Uncle Sam. We honestly believe that this class has done more work than any other class that has ever graduated in law. Our opportunities have, of course, been greater. V’c will be the first to reap the benefits of the three-year course, two years of which arc ascribed, principally, to theory, and the third to practice. The benefits of this year arc apparent at once and need no explanation. We are also the first to receive the benefits of the new building and of a faculty such as is rarely assembled, who understand our needs and who, at all times, stand ready to give us any aid and information desired. and these things, together with the old, never—sav-—die spirit of the class will enable us, wc hope, in spite of the pitiful prayer before expressed. to turn out a class of lawyers that will uphold and extend the splendid traditions and reputations that have been made by the graduates of the Law Department of the University of Georgia in the past. —Histohiax.Junior Law Class Officers K. W. Martin .......................................President J. K. Dasiikk..................................Vice-President W. B. Cony.............................Secretary and Treasurer E. M. McCaxlkss.....................................HistorianJunior Law Class Roll Aniikkws, Fhxkst Howard.........................Twcoa Bkk.max, .Toskimi Kmii.k Hkkkx, Fi.orknck Lic.htkoot Thomasville Hkowx, Kmjaii A Dasiikh, .Joskimi Krwix Dickkksox, Koiikrt (Ii.k.v.v Hoim-rvillr Foni , I’hkstox Hmooks . . Sylvester Fctrai., .Tkssk Ooi.ktnkk Ham., 11 riiKKT M Hav liol.MKS, 1’lKKCK FdwaHDS Jom.ks, Natiiax Washington I.AXIKR, WlI.IJAM I)KAX I.KSSKH, .ToSKI'II HKKMAX McFari.axd, Jamks A MK'axi.kss, Kdoar Maxwki.i . . . Canton Mahtix, Haymoxd Wii.i.iam Powki.i., (Jkaysox Chaxdi.kh Swninstioro Sl’KXCK, Homkkt Kdwahd I.kk Wkxghow, Isaac Max Vm:i.cm:i., Ovid Tiio.mpsox Junior Law Class Roll Axiwkws, Krnkst Howard Bkk.max, Joski'ii Kmii.k Camilla HlIKKX, Fi.OHBXCK I.IOHTFOOT .... Bhowx, Him ah A Dasiikh, .Ioskpii Krwix Dickkkson, Hoiikht Gi.kx.x FCTRAI., JKSSK Ooi.BTRKK Ham., Hi'ukrt M linl.MKS, 1’lKKCK KnWAKDS Joi.I.KS, S’ATI! AX I.AXIKR, Wjl.MAM 1)KAX l.KSSKR, JOSKI'II llKK.MAX Me Fa hi. a xi), .Iambs A McCaxi.kss. Kdgar Maxwki.i Mahtix, Haymoxd Wii.i.ia.m .... PoWKl.l., Ghaysox Cicaxdi.kk .... . . . . SwainslKjro Wkxgkow, Isaac Max......................................................Brunswick WicKi.cnki., Ovid Thomi’sox...........................................GainesvilleJunior Pharmacy Class Officers O. B. Land......................President Junior Pharmacy Class History X September fifteenth, nineteen hundred and nineteen, we were called from our pleasures to again take up the grind to further prepare ourselves for future life. Having de- cided upon Pharmacy as a life work we next decided to enter ourselves at the University of Georgia. I)r. Wilson enlisted us in Ins Pharmacy Class as "rookie” pill rollers, and now that we have gotten into the course O. K., we will try and live up to the “UP” of Pharmacy students and graduates who have preceded us. The students turned out by I)r. Wilson have always Wen successful at the State Board examinations and thereafter through life, all, mainly, due to the untiring efforts of DU. WILSON. It has been adopted bv us, the largest Pharmacy Class ever at the University of Georgia, to do our best in all the different studies, so that when we have graduated and gone Dr. Wilson can look back to the days when we were under him and say, “The Pharmacy Class of J 020-21 was the best I have ever turned out." —Historian .Junior Pharmacy Class Roll Ahkkcxommik, J. E........................................................Yatcsville A i.vkrsox, W. F..........................................................Lafayette Bki.i., S. C.................................................................Milieu Bki.i., W. E.............................................................Swainsboro Bind, J. II..................................................................Mettcr Butte, S. K.............................................................Blairsville Chavex, F. 11............................................................Tallapoosa Kowi.kk, A. 11 till.!., C. 1) Hodgson, R. 1) .1 Oil NSOX, A. S Land, (). B Mattox, H Palmer, V. D Patrick, A. R Rogers, E. B Richvllle Trapxki.i., L. R Waxsiev, V. R Wood, A. C You MANS, R. P Sophomore Class History K are the Class of ’22, and though in number vc do not compare with our Freshman Class of last year, for many have fallen by the wayside, we make tip in quality what we have lost in quantity. The new Freshman Class entering this year was the largest in the history of the University, and it was what you might call a herculean task to see that each and every one received his merited reception. Hut for the first month nothing was more common to the ear than the sweet music of the Sophomore’s shears as he deprived the “lowly” Freshman of his raven pompadour. And many a time at the lonely hour of midnight might be seen a group of grim and determined Sophs headed toward the renowned graveyard with one or more scared and shaking Freshmen in their midst. In every athletic activity of the University this year’s Sophomore Class stands well towards the top. In football the record of our class is to be envied by all others, while in baseball, basketball and track, we took our share or more of the first positions. Besides this representation in the athletic field wc have taken our place in the literary accomplishments as well. In fact, members of our class have won places in every phase of college activity for which they were eligible. As a class we stand in the midst of our college career. Behind ns arc the never-to-be-forgotten experiences and adventures of our Freshman year. Before us lies the long and rugged pathway of collegiate effort. It is with serious determination that wc will assume our duties as upper classmen of the oldest and grandest educational institution in tlu; South. Wc fully realize that the academic work of a Junior is the backbone of his collegiate education. With a grim and serious determination we lake up this work, bearing always in mind that we arc now in position to add our share to the already glorious spirit of this institution. Our studies will be hard—wc expect them to be. but to those of us who have struggled through the intricate problems of Physics. Math, and Chemistry, the more difficult but specialized work to which wc look forward will but serve as an opportunity for testing our greater abilities. Tims, with a feeling of pride we review our accomplishments toward the Freshman Class of this year, and with a feeling of determination assume the more serious duties of upper classmen resolved to carve for ourselves a nick of glory in the archives of the Institution. —Historian.Sophomore Class Officers F. G. Ferric.....................................President A. H. Powei.i.............................. Vice-President A. M. Day..........................Secretary and Treasurer C. M. Slack......................................Historian iSophomore Class Roll A max, 11. S .... Decatur A1..MONO, F. M. . . . . Social Circle Ax OK MON, B. 11. . . . . . . StntcslHiro Axokrsox, Grace . . . Summit Bailey, II. G Cobb Baskin, T. 1. .... Temple Bates, Item Jacksonville, Fla. Bird, F. M Bl.ACK.MON, .1. W. . . . . . . Columbus Bocock, Natalie . . . Bookiiakot, J. B. . . . Powder Springs Bowen, K. 1 Bovo. A. 1) Brand. M. F. Brannkn. ,L F . . . Statesboro Bkioiitwki.i., T. .1. . . Maxcvs Broach. B. J Bkoaihickst. G. M. . . Jesup Broadnax. M. J. . . . Brock. W. G Brooks, T. G. ... Brown, F. B. ... Bkoyi.es, X. A Bryant. C. 11 Maxcvs Biiysox, .1. K. . . . Cai.i.away. A. W. . . . Ihens ("ai.i.away, L. S. ... Ca.mchki.i., W. II. . . . .... Columbus Cannon. G. M. . . . Dalton Cakkkkkh. H. G. ... . . . . Commerce Carson, .1. B . . . . Commerce ClIII.DS. (' ( 01.1,1 NOS, I). A. ... tlanta Coi.viN. K. D . . Locust Grove Coi.vix, Mary .... Coxokr. (». I) Connei.i., H. K. . . . Sparks Con yeks. C. T . . . Cnrtersvl’le CoOl'KR, G. II Cox, J. T.............................Macon Cciijkrtson, A. B.................LSI hoti!h Ct’U'KfCKK, T. M.................Ft. Gaines Damki., W. P......................Thomaston d'Antiosac. G. M. K.................Griffin Darden, I!..........................Blakely Dart, F. C,.........................Douglas Davidson, W. H................Ft. Valley David, A. B..................Donaldsonvillc Davis, C. A......................... tlanta Davis, S. C..........................Mlanta Davis. T. .1.......................Tcnnillc Dav. A. M...........................Dougins Doxikk. L. I.................... 11illtitaii Dhkwky, .1. F,.....................(iriflin Drxi.Af, .1. C.......................Ulnntn Dckokx, C. It.....................Grayinont Dchden, D. B......................Grayinont Dckokx. It. V.....................Grayinont Dckokx, V. C.....................Grayinont Dckokx. V. i)....................Grayinont F.dwahiw, Troy.......................Monroe Kxr.usii, A. II................Bartlesville Fskew, W. U..........................Toccoa Kstek brook, V. H............Wexford. I a. Kvaxs, G. It.......................Savannah Fagan. .1.1)............................Ft. Valley Faix, F. II...............Daindridge, Tenn. Faci.kxkr, I). G.....................Monroe Fitts, H. I..........................Dalton Fi.akk. T. J.......................Lithonia Fi.axokms, G. F..................Swainslmro Fi.kmixo, K.........................Augusta Fi.k.mixg. V. C....................Augusta Fi.ovo, W. K.....................Statesboro Fkkkmax. I.. O.................College Park Gaixks. J. K.......................Klbcrton Gav. J. It............................Wrens Gkamkai.d. F. I......................Newnnn (ioKKAix. F. M.....................SavannnbG HI WIN, L. A. ... Gibson Mkrritt, J. L. . . Vim-ricus Groover, T. 1) .... Savannah Mktiivin, O. It. . Dexter Gcri.ky, Hroii . . . . Miii.kh, It. D. . . Mooney, J. It. . . tlicns Gainesville HaiI.EY, I. B Morton, (). S. . . Ham.. N. 1) Mrxx. K. K. . . . Hamm, W. G . . . . Gainesville Mt’RI’llEY, .1. C. . . 1 lep .ihah Hampton, Bei.i.e . . t liens McCranky, .1. W. Colninhus Hamhick, 1. C. ... McGaiirk, It. C. . Hearing Hand, I '. M McCikk, Faiti. . . Harman, I.. M. . . . McKinmcy, I.. C. . .... Milledgeville Harris. it. W. . . . Wrens McMci.ixn, '1'. L. Hartwell 11 ASTI NO . 1). M. . . . McMiirray, W. M. Henderson. .1. H. . . Oeilla McFiikrson, It. ('. . . . Chelsea, Mass. Hendrix, (I. I.. . . . Metter McHak, C. E. . . Mt. Vernon Hick , 0. L Meltainky, M. A. Khnodel Him, T. V I 101X1 0N, F. C. . . . McWiiortkr, T. thens Hodgson, 11. B. ... N’kinon, ('. K. . . Dublin IIoscu, H. W. . . . . . . . Gainesville Nickerson, N. D. . Athens Howard, K. Y. ... i 1 cxokrkord, Mary . . Stephens Randolph. Kan. Nix, F. M. ... 111'TC HINSON, W. . . Joneslwro Obkhiiomkkk, D. . . O’Hkar. F. G. . . Inman, It. .1 Isrem.. C. AV Dalton Osiiorxk, J. A. . . Fkiikick, F. G. . . Maysvilur Jordan, C. I) .... Colninhus INmm.k, W. L. . . Kei.i.ky, T. G Kkmp, C. C . Powder Springs PoWKM., A. II. . . Augusta Kknnky, C. B. ... Athens Brio. J. F. ... Kickmghtkr. H. G. . .... Glennville It KVIM.K, T. V. . . Kino. G. II Hew, I,. C Kiriiy, J. T ItKYN01.08, J. T. . . . . . Donaldsonville ItKYNOIJW, (). W. . . . . . Donaldsonville Lamb, W. I. . . . SwninslMiro It IDOKWAY, (5. II. ltoyston i.ANIER, I,. It ltlVRKS, W. K. . . Vahlosta I.ONOINO, J. W. . . . Atlanta ltoniNsox, II. A. Lvmpkin, B. C. . . Athens Hose. W. H. . . I’nadlflu Hock ke, J. W. . Savannah Maiionky, J. 11. . . Dublin ItoYXTON, C. A. . M AI.O.VK, G. K. . . . . . . Suinlersville SanKORii, C. H. . . Athens Manoiim. II. H. . . . .... Grovetown Sasser, T. J. ... Woodeliff Martin. A. C. . . . Sawtki.i., R. It. . Ciriflln Martin, E. E Sciii.ky, F. B. . . Martin, I.. V. . . . Adairsvillc SCIIWAHH. J. F. . . Savannah Manx. 1) SlIKKKIKIJ), M. J. . AtlantnSlIEI’I’AHU, C. A. . . Atlanta Veale, J. E . . Watkinsvillf SlMLKY, J . . . . Millcdgevitlc Marsliallville Si EBERT, L. It. . . . Wai.kkk, S. E West, W. S . . Valdosta Stack. C. M Westbrook, L Flowery 11 ranch SLAUGHTER, C. N. . . . Wavcrly Hall Smith, 11. II. ... Smith, C. 11. ... . . . . Sandcrsvlllc Wiiitnky, C. 1) Wicker, I). .... .... Augusta . . . Warrenton Smith. .1. J Sl'AHKS, G Macon Williams, 11. H. . . . Spicer , C. K Williams, G. J Steinhero. I). . . . . Augusta Wll.lJAMS, W. C. ... Griflin Stewart. C. I). . . Sltinglcr Wii.uk, U. K Swift. K. C Talma doe, J. J . . . ii.i.is, 0. s WiiaoK, W. P Meigs Tempi es, P. M. . . . Statesboro WlNGFIEI.D, P. 11. ... Athens Thaxtux, J. R. . . Woodall, F. M Tvsox, G. C Woodruff, H. E. ... 1 1 811 AW, P. C. . . . , . . . . I gnnvlllc Weight, G. W Sophomore Law Class Officers J. B. J. C. w. s. Hoy i Wimox.....................................................President Skkior.............................................. Vice-President Noktiicttt................................Secretary and Treasurer C. Mom....................................................HistorianSophomore Law Class Roll Aniikmsox, K. I.. Ahnoi.d, A. .1. . . . Macon Monroe BoWKKS, B. B. ... Boykin, S. .1. ... Bhaswki.i., H. A. . . Brown, .1. A. . . . Bkowx, .1. K. . . . Carrollton Danila Cl.AKDY. C. I.. • . • C'i.ak k . N. K. . . . Coov, W. B. ... CoN('i!H)X, W. I . . . . . . Talladega, Ala. Dkki.k, M. S. ... Donaiii’k, 11. . . Metier Savannah Kichoi.z. M. S. . . Kvkrktt, C. H. . . Atlanta Fr.w. S. W FoKK.ll AND. H. B. . Sylvester (JoilKKKY, .1.1). . . . (ioOI)WIN, K. .T. . . . (iNAvnti.i.. M GhkkX, F. M. ... Orikkin, II. 1). . . ....... Baxley Hancock. It. 11. . . Hahhoch, J. W. . . . Hahgkktt. V. T. . . II akthioc.i:. J. . . . Hayks. .1 llt'.KKY. V. 0. . . . 1 Iki.ms, F. B. ... . . . Piedmont, Ala. Savannah . . . Monroe, N'. C. Hickky, 11. 1 Hoi.co.min:. M. L Jakkki.i., A. K JoilNSTONK. A. C. . . . . . . l.aG range . . . Atlanta Kki.i.y, a. M Kknnkiiy, H. J . . Barnesvllle 1 .A N IKK. 1.. (I . . Statesboro Mom, B. C. Mci.iikim, 1 Mm, C. .1 McDowki.i., .1. P McCikk. T. .1 McNViiirtkr. .1. W .... Twcoa .... Griffin . . . Coluinhiis N'oktiicitt, W. S. . . . . College Park Pattbrson, It. A . . . Cuthliert Kkiiwink, .1. K KoTiicini.il, H. . . . . It VAN, A. .1 . . Gainesville . . . ColumlniN SlIKI.OK, J. C Shipp, W. W Sims. J. H Smith, Cl. C Smith, J. It . . . Moultrie . . Ileplir.ihuh . . . Atlanta Tayi.ok. 1) Thomas, V. (I ’I'koctman, ,T. F . . . Cuthliert . . Ft. Valley Wai.ton, M. C Wiijson, J. B freshman class history 1ST ns dawn was breaking upon the classic city of the Empire State of the South on a certain September morn, 1919. a solitary figure might have been seen leaving Candler Hall. Six feet two, and tipping the scales at 111 it was a striking, though not a handsome, figure. Hack home it had fancied itself both handsome and distinguished, but upon its arrival at the campus it had been quickly disallusioned bv a band of pestiHerons Sophs who had fallen upon it and heaped indignity upon its person and its long and flowing tresses upon the ground. That night had been long and dreary; and now. with the breaking of the day. it has slipped out of. bed and looked at itself in a mirror. Horrors unspeakable! How should it ever be able to face the world again.' 'Idle burden was too great, and without delay it left the Hall and started for the river. Near the Road I.ab. it walked straight into old Pete, the ancient and honorable mule that infests the campus grounds. Both man and mule were startled at the unexpected meeting; but the mule was the first to recover his cquinimity! “Hee-haw." laughed Pete, “I am truly glad to make your acquaintance. Sir; for I see you arc a bit disturbed—perhaps homesick or hurt in dignity and need a friend. Your bunch, too. is just about as those unendurable and uppish Sophs were a year ago; and they were like those who had gone before. For these twenty years I have watched the procession come and go. and have ceased to wonder. Some will drop out some will Hunkout and have to leave; many will remain—and here is the hope of the Institution, for the Freshman is the real grist that must be ground.” At this our hero grew a bit philosophical and made its way back to the Hall a wiser and even happier individual. Along with the other members of the class it adjusted itself to its surroundings, found the old world a much larger place than it had believed, and discovered that it was merely one unit in the student body of one University. Moreover, its association with the students began to wear away the rough corners from without while the prodding of the Professors worked wonders from within; and whispers on all sides declared that perhaps, after all. the University had unearthed a diamond in the rough. About this time there was another meeting of the man and mule—and right glad both seemed. Old Pete was quite proud of the part he had played as prophet, but no prouder than the man for looking back to that September morn, though only a few months in the past, he even then realized that there had been much room for improvements in his person and attainments, though he had not realized it then. Classmates, one and all, stand before the picture I have tried to draw and answer me in truth if I have not pictured YOU. -— rilSTOIlIAN .freshman class officers w. I. pattcrson........................................president mar ion usry......................................rice-president h. n. wilkinson..........................secretary and treasurer miss f. 1. chumblcy....................................historianfreshman class roll ahcrconihic, w. f. adair, j. t. adcrholdt. c. alexander, a. I. alexander, hi. b. alexander. t. w. alien, st, e. alien, w. I. aluion, w. It. undersoil, ) , k. untliony, I. 1. appleby, f. in. arms! rung. b. k. armstrong. j. r. bailey, c. b. baker, e. v. baker, e. v. burlier. w. b. barchan. joe barnett, j. w. barrett, p. t. bar roil, r. e. Itell, iii. r. bennett, 1. j . Iiennett, ,j. w. bentmi, n. a. berryinim. f. b. Itcxley, s. e. biggs, r. 1. black, e. h. black, e. h. bleekley, li. Itont wriglit, jus. bonnell, li. iii. boswiek, w. b. bowdcn. I. e. liowden, r. n. brlce. d. f. bridges, d. h. broekington, c. r. browdcr, w. e. brown, p. o. brown, g. iii. bunch, j. d. hurt, j. f. burton, r. g. bush, a. butt, w. e. bvroin, j. s. cain, r. e. eantrell, w. o. earlton, w. in. earson, b. eandlcr, o. chandler, s. g. chajunHii, h. 1. chapman, j. c. chastain, t. d. chevcs, j. p. childs, 1. a. ehnniblcy, frauds ehiirehwcll. a. f. dark, g. j. cohcn, e. li. childs, v. w. eolcinan, h. h. colcinan, iii. m. collier, 1. o. collier, p. a. collier, p. n. cook, h. in. cook, r. r. eordell, j. w. corley, v. w. coulter, i. p. cox. c. cox, f. crossley, j. I. crider. r. crossley. j. I. dahbs, c. m. danicl, e. g. dantos, j. g, dnvnnt, r. in. davis, c. k. da vis, .j. d. davis, j. 1. davis. j. w. davis, w. p. davison. b. dean, h. b. deninark, j. e. derden, h. w. dickerson, j. b. dixon, c. dorman, h. p. drew, e. w. drew, in. in. drewry, h. li. dunn, ted. diirhnm, c. j. eckford, e. eld ridge, h. e. ellis, e. enunitt, p. li. cnglaml. c. r. ewing, e. e. farrar, g. finch, b. d. fitts, c. foy. j. p. fredcriek, f. j. frost, f. li. fuller, f. h. fut rail, a. w. galius, g. gamble, t. 1. gannoii, a. f. gibbs, w. j. giltson. w. s. gillesjiie, j. w. ginn, s. a. goethc, w. goru»an, j. m. grant, j. w. gray, 1. d. groover, a. r. groves, w. h. gunby, p. c. gurr, e. m.bailey, j. 1. hnlpert. j. h. Itnnahan, in. I. hansford, l . n. !mrl in. n. j. harden, t. f. harden, w. n. harden, h. harper, j. k. harris. h. t. Iinrris, j. o. hnrrison, w. h. hart. g. s. hart. v. g. hartley, h. v. hasty, a. h. hatch, a. 1 . Imwkins. r. h. haves, z. c. henderson, l». 1. henry, s. j». herrington. a. j. hester. w. h. hill. I. h. hill. I. h.. jr. hodges, e. s. Iiodges, j. w. horgnn, e. e. holliday, e. holmes, e. d. honour, j. v. hood, j. g. home, otis howard, j. w. huhert. h. h. hunter, f. j. hurst, w. I. hurt. e. v. huteheson. 1. hyde, a. irons, w. h. jaekson. r. I. jar roll, jns. jcnnings. j. v. Johnson, a. w. johnson, e. a. johitson, {|. f. jones. r. h. jours, w. e. jones, w. h„ jr. kassawitz. h. kelley, e. a. kieklighter, w. e. king, h. a. king. h. e. lainnr. j. e.. jr. laimm. j. d. langley, 1. r. lanier, e. f. Jester, j. p. leverett, • j. g. levie, t. lewis, j. f. lineh. a. o. long, j. a. lovelaee. j. w. lowe. e. a. lufhurrow, s. h. Iuiiiiiius. g. I. lundv, w. a. maddox, h. h. niarshhurn. j. d. martin, f. n. martin, j. r. martin, r. f. mathews, e. mnthes, I. meadow, e. h. meador, v. k. meredith, w. h. miehall. e. I. miller, g. miller, j. miller, j. g. miller, r. b. milliean. c. e. milton, p. h. minis, w. f. mitehell. w. j. inohley. h. mobley. m. 1. monfort, e. e. imMiney, e. g., jr. mooney, j. e. mooney, j. k. moon, j. w. miKire, a. a. morris, h. m. morris, zepher morris, m. f. mullis. w. g. murj hy, j. p. murray, f. h. murray, g. mcalistrr, r. medonald, g. mefarland, d. w. megee, j. h. meghee, f. m. megoiildrieh, j. j. mckcnzie, f. o. mekenzie. w. 1. melaws, p. I. melindon, f. memillnn, e. a. mewhorter, l . e. nanee. j. f. nesmith, r. neville, r. j. newton, e. h. newton, j. a. newton, j. b. nix. r. m. niinn, j. •. numinlly, hi. t. oliver, I. g. overstreet, g. j. oxford, in. palmer, j. e. parhain. v. 1. paris, 1. li. patterson, w. 1. patterson, y. m. peaeoek, e. h. perry, t. r. persons, a. t. | hiIIip's, g. s. pittman, r. e. jMillrn'k, 1. m. pool, h. powers, r. h. pritehett. d. I. pritehett, t. j.pryor, f. d. peebles, e. radford, v. mines, w. h. ratehford, w. c. raw.son, c. e. reaves, r. j. rhodcs, r. t. ricliardson, g. w. rigdon, xv. i. rivers, t. h. roberts, j. h. roberts, j. p. robinson, j. jr. mdgors, li. w. ross, j. t. ruinpb, s. e. russeil. t. 1. snodors, j. sunders, m. d. scarliorougli, d. d. sealiorn, in. d. scllnrs, j. a. shell, s. p. silerton, w. j. short, o. s. short, f. j. sioonons, f. skoon, r. h. slappey, j. h. sioissoo. It. smith, o. o. smith, o. h. smith, o. n. smith, f. b. smith, f. a. smith, 1. m. smith, m. in. hallnniv, $. h. howden, roy broach, h. d. brown, d. f. smith, m. s. smith, r. h. smith, s. j. southwell, b. s. still, 1. o. stokes, j. r. stokes, q. u. story, k. h. strain, 1. c. striekland, w. p. Stubbs, e. r. summers, a. d. swift, a. k. tait. w. k. tanner, f. thorn as. h. j. t bourns, h. o. thoina.H, j. k. thoinas, w. w. thompson. c. a. thrasher, c. thurmond, d. f. tillmun, h. y. tolliert, I. e. turner, g. a. underwood, p. j. upshaw, b. k. usery, in. vandirver, j. h. vann, e. j. vinson. 1. . voght, w. s. e. walker, e. c. walker, j. h. walker, j. m. warren, c. wntson, e. a. 1 yr. a ;. havnie, s. s. miles, f. r. mecolum, h. a. mcneil. r. d. watson, j. d. watson, j. w. watson, e. e. watts, g. r. weeks, r. b. weleh, w. u. welllHirn, j. d. wells, f. w. wills, j. 1. wesley, j. w. weymiin, g. f. what ley, r. t. wheaton, r. in. wlielan. e. j. whitener, c. p. wiley, c. r. wilkinson, b. a. williams, a. h. williams, b. t. williams, c. j. williams, f. williams, I. c. williams, s. g. williamson, j. m. Williamson, r. d. willingham, r. s. wilaon, j. r. wingate, j. I. winn, 1. s. wisdom, w. d. wise, j. e. wise, r. i. wood, d. 1. wood, luey woodall, a. ni. woodruff, j. g. wright, c. s. young, r. b. youngblood, c. r. traurck, a. j watts, w. a. zcllner, c. t.1Pan-Hellenic Council SIGMA ALPHA KPSII.ON SIGMA NU .1. H. Sl.ATKR C. C. Tohkk.no; W. B. Gaixk F. M. Hand (III PHI DELTA TAP DELTA .1. H. Calhoun A. M. Kki.i.v W. I). IIkaton L. J. ThOTTI PHI DELTA THETA CHI PS1 l(. I.. Axiikhkox .1. K. Talmadok J. P. Atkixrox K. M. Souu KAPPA AI.PIIA KAPPA SIGMA .1. T. Kont7. M. B. Pouxo J. L. COXYKRS C. Lorr ALPHA TAP OMEGA PI KAPPA PHI H. K. L. SrK.xcr, Jr. C. K. Cannon K. Mott J. L. Mkrrktt SIGMA CHI LAMBDA CHI ALPHA J. B. SlIW.NUTT E. M. .Mi-Caxduow C. M. Kyij-.r R. V. Martin PI EPSILON PHI S. 1. Mourns •I. 10. Bur maxPan-Hellenic Council Representatives selected l y tlie respective Fraternities OPPIC'KKS W. 1). IIkato.v, a T A.............................................President .1. H. Smki.nitt. X...........................................Vice-President ,1. '1 . Kon't , K A...............................Secretary and Treasurer Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity Founded nt University f Alabama 1856 Iieta Chapter Established Colors: lloyttl Purple and Old (fold SEN I OHS W. W. Ai.kxaxukr F. V. Uahkoi.d V. A. Doiwox A. I . I.ippitt F. S. Mack am. H. L. Nowki.i. .1. R. Si.at»:r A. .1- Ak.voij) Lynx Fort, Jk. V. S. Goldsmith JUNIORS It. H. Hancock It. !.. IIkkky Wl 1.1.1 AM MaI.I.ARI) L. M. Smith C. C. Tohkano: W. M. Rogrrs F. I). Roue II. (i. CaKRKKKK It. I.. Dasiikr It. J. IX MAX SOPHOMORES T. (I. Kki.i.y C. F. Laxikh N. I . Nickkhsox M. (I. Sharks V. Siiipp W. S. Wkst .1. I). Wki.i.hokx Fit FSILM F.N L. Ai.i.kx A. F. Gaxxox c. II. Smith M. K. Hki.i. J. F. I.KWIS II. V. Tii.i.ma: J. E. Rrysox T. It. Pkkky .1. II. Wai.kkm N. K. Clark I). M. 1 Nil.LOCK M. N. I)h»: vChi Phi Fraternity Founded iit Princeton l'nivcr ity 18‘2l Eta Clinplcr Established 1867 Colors: Scurlrt and lilac SENIORS W. 11. Smi.KY J. J. Wilkins .Il'NIOHS E. A. Brown 11. C. IlOWKI.1. J. C. Calhoun S. L. Lewis C. 11. Foreman SOPHOMORES J. S. Owens T. .1. Brightwki.i. J. U AKTKIDGE .1. E. Brown A. M. Kelly N A. Broyi.es 11. J. Kennedy A. W . Cai.i.away T. W. M AH TIN I., s. Cai.i.away T. .McWhorter I). A. Coli.i xc.s C. S. SanK)Ri G. S. Hart J. White Fit ESI 1 MEN A. Is. Alexander L. H. Hill T. W . Alexander E. V. Hurt C. 11. Black C. Mathews J. s. Byrom It. 11. . Skeen A. F. Church well J. J. Tayi.oii J. W. Grant J. M. Walker C. F. WlflTXKK Phi Delta Theta Fraternity Founded itt Miami University ISIS Georgia Alpha Chapter lvstnblMied 1S71 Comics: Hint- nul White SKNIOUS It. I„. Andkmsox JUNIORS 11. C. Wai.kkh I.. Harris R. 1 . O’Nkal W. F. Nki.ms J. K. Tai.madgk H. C. I.t'MI’KIN SOPHOMOKI2S J. F. Thoitman F. li. H HOW N A. R. Groovkh F. I„ Gkakkki.d W. G. Hamm II. T. Harhis C. I). J OH DAN (i. (). I.I’M 1’KtX .1. I). Fagan .1. M. Wai.kkh J. I'l. Rkdwink, W. C. Wn.r.iAMs FKKSI1MKN .1. W. Rarxktt It. Davidson'. Jii. W. II. Hkstkk F. (). McKkxxik T. K. Stokks I . N. Coi.I.IKH F. M. Guru .1. I). M AHSIIIITHN .1. It. Stokks .1. C. PaimkrKappa Alpha Fraternity Founded jit Washington and I.cc 1865 (lamina Chapter Fstahlislied 1872 Coi.ohs: Criniunn ami (Sold SENIORS •I. T. Kontz M. B. Found Arthur 1V.w .1. II. Young JUNIORS F. II. Bkxnktt W. Bnadi.ky .1. F. Carson W. (I. Carson T. .1. Davis. Jk. It. S. I)is Fohtks W. II. Stkimikns A. !•'. Gkikfktii T. I). Gnoovkr W. G. Hakghktt T. M. Johnson I). B. McDonald J. F. Snout SOFIIOMORKS K. I . Bowkn J. II. Dkkwry W. II. Kstahrook II. W. I lose 11 F. K. Aniikhson B. Carson J. II. Sims FRKSIIMKN It. WlIKATON J. T. Kiriiy J. II. M A IIONKY F. I.. Mel. aw It. It. Sawtki.i II II. Dkan B. II. IIl‘IIKR-1Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity Fournlcri at Virginia Military Institute 18(»5 Alpha Beta Chapter Established 1S78 Colons: Sky Ifhie and Old Cold II. J. Bamcock C. E. Canno.v T. I). Matson SKNIOHS J. } . MKill IN. Jk. W. It. Mookk T. E. Stokks I. F. Gaiswkbt W. S. N’ohtiicitt .1I’NIOHS II. C. Wiiki.ciiki. SOI’I lOMOIt ES S. .T. Boy k i n -F. D. Bl’CII AN NAN 1). S. Ckandai.i. •I. I’. CrSIIMAN S. C. Davis II. II. Dkkwky E. N. Smith H. K. I.. Sfkkck. .Fi«. O. It. Evans A. W. Johnston W. I .on gi no .1. V. I.ovki.ack, Jn. J. I . McDowki.i. T. I.. McMi iikn J. J. Smith Fit ESI I MEN F. M. Am-i.KHY W. B. Bostwick J. I.. Davis E. E. Ewing W. M. Goktiik .1. K. IIahi-kh Z. C. Hayks C. S. Hodgks, .Fa. W. II. Jonks, Jr. W. II. Mkiikihtii It. B. Mu.i.kr C. K. Montkoht M. (J. Mckkay. Jr. A. B. SlIKlIKK .?. K. Thomas E. E. Watson ,F. W. Wksiky E. S. Wxioiit . Sigma Chi Fraternity Founded at Miami I'nivcr-ity 1855 Delta Chapter Established 1872 Colors: Jilur and (laid SENIORS .1. I). SlIKI.NITT ElKiAK Hl.AI.OCK W’. I . Coxonox .1 L’NIORS E. M. McC.txi.KK J. E. Itoss SOPHOMORES F. M. Bird .1. V. Bl.ACK.MOX .1. F. Braxxkx W. H. Camphki.i. B. Carson J. I . ClIKVKS T. J. Davis W. E. Floyd J. I . F«v D. M. IIastixcs WaHB IIlTCIIKSOX H. H. Maxoc.m L. C. McKixi.by E. M. Nix It. M. Nix K. K. PlHCKI.I. M. .1. SllKKMKI.il A. S. Smith B. It. Smith C. It. Yorxc.ni.uon Fit ESI I MEN J. V. Bkxxktt D. F. Bkxxktt .Iamks Boatwright B. .1. Broach (J. J. C’l.AHK Jamks Ckossi.ky .1. B. Dickkrsox F.hkom. Eckkorii F. II. Fci.i.kr Mai.coi.m Giiayiiiii. A. C. JoilXSTOXK J. C. I .AMAH E. A. l.OWK (J. M. Mil l KM I . n. Milton C. II. Mohiky Fhaxk SimmoxsSigma Nu Fraternity Founded at Virginia Military Institute lt 9 Mu Chapter Established 1SS1 C01.0KS: Hltu'k, White and Old (Sold FACt'l.TY M KM BEKS C. M. Snki.i.ino V. A. WollSHAM I). II. Dl'FRKK .1. I). Waiik .1. K. Y 11.1.1s C. I„. IllCKS I . It. Ford SENIORS W. It. Gainks JUNIORS I.. R. Tkauxki.l J. H. Stani.ky G. K. Mai.oni: V. I). Fai.mkii SOPHOMORES I . II. Kmmktt A. M. Woodai.i. F. M. Hand (). S. W11.ua I.. O. Fkkkmax, Jh. I . I.. WlCKKN. .Ik. M. M. Sims II. C. Kim; J. V. W.m.kkn It. A. I’attknso.v It. V. Stylus I.. K. Toi.iikht W. M. Carlton S. E. Wai.kkr FRESHMEN C . I . Me It Ac M. M. Smith F. J. Uxiikhwooo J. E. I.KSTKR F. .1. Fkkdkmck, Jm. T. .1. I’llITeilKTT W. F. Ml M M .1. (i. Mll.I.KK M. I.. Hanaiian .1. II. ItlNII C. G. Tiiomi'so.v It. K. I’PSHAW F. G. CoKKKKDelta Tau Delta Fraternity Founded at Bethany College b59 Beta Delta Chapter Fstahlished 18S- C. F. Bhoadnax .Il’NIOHS 1.. W. H. Davidson w, W. 1). 11 baton ;. I). 11. Bkiik-.ks K. A. Qiwhtkkmax SOIMIOMOUFS I). M. .1. Broadnax w, F. C. Dakt w C. It. Dmncx (). S. C. Bki.i FltF.SH.MFN 11. 11. 11. Col.KM A S' A. C. M. Domes (I. Gukku Fakkak I.. J. Tkotti M. Mc.Mikky I’OWKI.I. B. Dckdk.v 1). Dckiikx I). Di'Rukn S. Mohtox, .Ik. V. Hakiky It. Hatch I. O'KRSTUKKT v WinnChi Psi Fraternity Founded nt t’nion College 1841 Alpha Alpha Delta Chapter Established 1890 Coi.ohs: lloi nl Purple and Old Gold SENIORS J. I . Atkinson F. XV. Rond J. I,. Atkinson J. O. McGkiikk C. II. M’hkatlky juniors Roy Dknxard R. M. Souu: C. 11. WllITNKY SOPHOMORES A. II. English .1. F. Rkkvks F. 11. Sciii.ey .1. SlIII.KY II. S. Ai.iikn E. Fikmint. V. F. Daniki. FRESHMEN E. G. Daniki. .1. G. I.KVKRKTT F. M. McGkiikk Marvin Williamson Gkokgk Wine.in Ai.kkht .Iamhkii Rorkrt MartinKappa Sigma Fraternity Founded at tin- I’niversity of Virginia Beta Lambda Chapter J'Mablislied l!»(»l Coi.oks: Scarlet, Emerald and White .L L. Coxykhs SKXIOKS c. NV. Laxikk V. B. Disiiho h. 1). 0‘CaI.I.AOHAN .1. iIonks, .Ik. F. C. Pai.khky C. 1.. Lon F. .1. VAIT. IIAX NV. 1). Axiikhsox .11’NIOItS NV. .1. Davis NV. 1L Cody I). 1). Qi'ii.i.iax IL II. Axdknsox O. T. WlIKI.ClIKI. SOIMIOMOUKS I. B. 1 Iaii.ky I). »OYU NV. X. IIAMURX C. '1'. C’OXYKHS M. L. 1Ioi.co.mio: (I. M. Cannon .1. H. Mooxky F. Cox (i. W. McNV IIIKTKK C. II. F.vkkktt NV. H. ItosK .1. Barchan .1. B. NVkik Fit LSI IMF N .1. S. 1 Iaii.ky W. K. Bkowdkk '1 . F. Handkx .1. I). Brxoi .1. NV. Jkxxixos II. It. Dii.iox («. 1.. I .I’M MI'H L. 1). Cray K. V. Smith NV. II. IIahkisox K. Q. SmithPi Kappa Phi Fraternity Founded at College of Charleston 1901 Georgia Lainlxla Chapter Kstabli'hed 1!)I.’S C01.OHH: (io tl tnul While SKXIOKS G. A. Uowaij) Kkxxox Mott (). Vtxsox K. .1. OVKHSTHKKT II. (). ItoMISOX M. W. 11 Kl I ISM ITII A. I . Wiiiim'i.k. -In. .1. W Hornk, .Ik. K. MK'axkii.i. .1. .1. .McCioci.okick .1. K. W'isr. .1. (I. Moran C. I.. Parham V. W. Con. JINIOKS F. I.. Hrkkx .1. O. Fithai. SOI’MO.MOHKS 11. F. Braski.ton .1. 1.. Mkrritt .1. R. Tiiaxtox KKKSIIMKN A. O. Bkxtox C. K. Brock jxtox 1.. (). Vixsox I). F. Brown 1.. K. Wll.I.lAMILambda Chi Alpha Fraternity Founded at Boston I'niversity 19(H) Xu Chapter Established 1915 Coi.ohs: l urplr. Crent mid Cold AU'MNI I’kok. 1C. G. Wki.ch SENIORS M. W. Ci akk C. M. F.yi.kr A. C. Wki.ch .11'NIOKS .1. E. Vkai.k It. W. Martin 1’. B. WiNcma.n SOI'IIOMOKKS T. G. Brooks .1. F. Schwai.ii I . M. Ai.moni) 1C. 11. VolINC.KIN Fit ICSIIMEN M. C. W A I.TON II. C. Gray W. (). I Ikknv It. II. Wkkks (I. A. Kki.i.v 1C. I.. Ciiai.kkk, .Ik. 11. M. Evans J. I). I.AVMON It. I.. Hay It. J. Dhkxki. W. 1). I .AN IKK .1. M. MeCi.KH.AN 0. C. Tyson .1. It. Gay II. B. Fomkiiani) .1. I.OY Wki.IS W. II. Bakiikh. Jh. U. 1.. Chapman .1. I). Davis IC. J. Vann i). M. Bhown II. J. I I A Kill N C. 1C. Raw-sonPhi Epsilon Pi Fraternity FoiiikUmI ;i t City ('ollrgo of New York lJHRJ Mm Chapter Ivstnhli.slK-d HM5 Coi.oks: ‘iiriilr am! Old Cold SENIORS John K. Kiskman Cami. Gokttixokn CII AM IKS S. HKV.MAX Simon M. Mohkis Jl’NIOItS •Ioski'ii E. IIuoiax Samtki. (itthman A. .1. Moskowitx SOPHOMORES I)avii» Manx, .In. Doxoi.n Oio:him hk :ii Jac. H. Rotiisciiii.I) Fit ESIIMKN Joskimi II. Mai.I'kiit Hahoid Kasskwitz I.ksi.ik I,. Matiiks I.kHav H. IrakisTau Epsilon Phi Fraternity Founded at ('olumliia I'niversitv Mu C'liopter Kst«l)li lu l 1!) 1 ! Colons: Lni'fmlrr nml II'hilr J I’NIOKS J. H. I jKsskk h)l!B PlNTCIUTK I. M. Wknokoiv 1 SAIN IKK I I KIM A.N SOIMIOMOIU’S Davk Stki nhkkc. Fit KSIIM BN M. S. Ku’iioi.tx C. II. CoiosnZeta Chi Fraternity Founded ut I’nivcrsitv of (it'orgiti 1872 Counts: "lied, Yelloxc anti drrrn Motto: ''Tout tin, totideni nrhis.” OFFICKKS It choi.hu............................(Imini lliijh Moyul •Dick” Dickkhsox ............................... 1C rail til Secretary "C11 kt’ Si.ack........................luxrriher of Sacred Turkey K 1‘Sty ’ Bktiicxk................................Chief Custodian •Swii'kk” Dasiikh.................................. Holy Custodian •Siiohtv” Anunkw.s.................................Indirial relate ‘Kasv" Manx............................Coinjuiser of Sacred Chant “Bovii” Moss.....................................Holder of the llod NOBI.KS OF TIIF OARBAGK-CAX ‘Bio John" Rionox “Otis” Wooiiakii 1 (ton’' Tisixakn “Ai” Bkxkohii •Skiti'kn” Wiiati.ky “.Jay” Camp Bcm" Day “11 kinii:" Hiuikix “K i m kttk' ’ M Ahti x The History of Demosthenian Society class room “When the classic business of the day had ended.” For nearly twenty years the meetings were held in a class room; and in the year 1824 the present building was erected at a cost of four thousand dollars. There are no records to tell the exact date when the society was christened Demosthenian; but from later reports we find allusions to the “Opportunities” of tlie organization bv the pursuit of which the “Youthful speaker” might acquire the fundamental elements of oratory; and through continual practice and patient labor he might “Attain proficiency in extemporizing,” even rivaling the fame of the world-renowned Demosthenes "In honor of whom the ten charter members named their society.” Internal strife divided the society in 1820 into two irreconcilable factions, and. as a recent writer has expressed it. “First came the idea of a new society, the suggestion ripened into action, and the result was the founding of Phi Kappa. Intense rivalry at once arose, resulting often in clashes, open warfare, armistices and treaties, all of which gave rise to traditions rich in glory and illumined with the fame of many a hero. Let us now recall hut a few of the many brilliant men who have illumined the pages of Demosthenian's renowned history, and among them we find: W. S. Rutherford. Benjamin Hill, Robert Toombs, Pope Barrow. J. H. Alexander. Philip Cook. Joseph E. Pottle, and J. H. Dorsey; and among those on the faculty are: Chancellor Barrow. Dr. Svlvanus Morris. Prof. C. M. Strahan. and others. The society today welcomes back her many sons honored in battle and glorified in victory, and is aiding them in starting the pursuit of their life’s calling. HE HISTORY of Demosthenian Literary Society through the ages has linked the foundation of the Society with the year 1801. Let us quote a letter written by William S. Rutherford on February 5th of that year, a part of which runs as l follows: "The Junior Class began by a general consultation the establishment of a society for | the promotion of extemporizing or extemporary speaking.” Nine days later, so the record continues: "At the appointed time a constitution was framed for the good regulation of the late established society.” The first meeting was held in a  k rr t Demosthenian Officers IMt KS1DKNTS N. (i. I.ONG.................................Firel Term W. I). Wkathkhs.............................Second Term K. K. A xiiHKws..............................Third Term SKCltKTAltlKS W. 1). Dl'kiikn...............................Fimt Term («. I.. IIkxuhickx..........................Second Term It. C. McGaiikk..............................Third TermThe History of the Phi Kappa Society WING withstood tlic agencies of destruction and processes of decay for eighty-five years, the old Phi Kappa building stands forth today as one of the ancient landmarks of the campus. In style it is the court architecture of the early thirties. Its massive pillars of brick, covered with concrete, are almost of the Doric order. Rectangular in shape. Phi Kappa Hall majestically faces Dcmosthcnian on the opposite side of the campus at the end of an avenue of trees. From the early records we have: "On Saturday, February 12. 1820. the Philokosmean Society met for the first time, consisting of William R. Crabbe. Homer V. Howard. Stony Simmons. John G. Rutherford, the latter of whom was absent." For three years the society met in the old Chapel garret; and in the year 1828 moved into a wooden building, which was used for eleven years. In 1831 the present structure was erected at a cost of five thousand dollars, and the society finished paying for it in 1839. The founders contemplated a fraternal organization when they organized Phi Kappa, for they lalxircd with profound secrecy in all of their performances. 'Flic members addressed each other ns "Brother,” and in the annual reports of the early society is found the allusion. "This fraternal organization." I.et us now recall but a few names of the illustrious men whose voices have echoed and re-echoed throughout the grand old hall, and we find here the names of John G. Rutherford, J. P. Waddell. A. O. Bacon, Howell Cobh, T. R. R. Cobb, Alexander M. Stevens, and Henry W. Grady. Prominent today arc: V. A. Harris, Andrew .1. Cobb. Lucian L. Knight. T. R. Hardwick, and J. M. Slaton. On the faculty we find: Prof. John Morris. Prof. R. I.. McWhorter, Mr. T. W. Reed. Prof. W. I). Hooper, and Col. C. M. Snclling, are listed as honorary members. Today Phi Kappa is passing through a golden age of oratory: so many of their sons having returned in triumph from the late war, she welcomes them back and is assisting them in seeking life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. —John W. Shkfpahi), Historian.Phi Kappa Officers PRESIDENTS R. 1). O'Cai.i.aoiian-..........................................Firtt Term K. C. Wimhkki.v................................................Second Term Kkxn'ok Mott....................................................Third Term SECRETARIES C. II. Fokkmax.....................................First Term I. Wknokow........................................Second Term O. S. Moiitox......................................Third TermT, VI Agricultural Club PUKSIDKNTS I . I'. Bkook.............................h'ir t Term F. J. Vacoiian..........................Second Term 0. B. Hohknts..............................Third Term VICK-IMIKSIDKNTS J. T. It I'TI.anii..........................Pint Term J. W. Manx................................Second Term C. W. Dickinson............................Third Term SI’CItKTA It IKS “Doc” Falm.kxkr........................... Fir Term •I. H. Martin.............................Second Term II. Ci. Dasiikr........................... Third TermEconomics Society Officers PRESIDENTS H. II. Tisinokk.....................................First Term C. E. Cac.i.k......................................Second Term I. . K. Bktiu-nk....................................Third Term VICE-PRESIDENTS I.. K. Bktiiuxk......................................First Term L. G. Fiki.im......................................Second Term R. II. Stuckey.......................................Third Term SECRETARIES L. G. Fiki.im........................................First Term G. T. Manx.........................................Second Term P. C. Upshaw.........................................Third TermSpanish Club It. W. Ramirez . . Director i. M. Wkxohow President First Term J. W. McCraxky President Second Term P. I). Bush . . . . President Third Term Bi.ackmoxd. J. W. Sir.riiK.xs, W. H. Carson, J. B. Bush, A. Atkinson, .1. I.. Cox, C. K. Coopkh, Cl. H. Anderson, G. Davis, S. C. Cot.I.!NS, I). A. Brannkx, H. S. Eisf.m ax, J. K. Honour, J. F. Brown, W. M. Eyltr, C. M. Hurt. E. W. Coi.vin, M. It. McGee, Paui. Inman, It. J. Hampton, B. Wexgrow, Isaac Xanck, G. L. Michaki., B. I.. Mikaoi.ia, E. Vogt, J. E. Wai.krr, A. 1 ONOINO, J. W. Watson, K. E. Wkst, J. H. Marmki.stf.in, C. A. At.r.rx, It. I. WlIATI.KY, It. J. Reeves, Oioa Buciiwai.1), B. Cai.i.away, A. W. It 1 VERS, W. K. Martin, A. C. Cai.i.away, I,. S. Tiiaxton, J. It. Suck, C. M. Cai.houn, J. H. Jordan, C. I). Smith, W. P. Anderson, P. K. jDkuati no Cor nci i.Anniversarians . itiT II. Nix..............Master of Ceremonies I) K MOST 11RNIA N K. Way 1 Iiohsmitii....................................."The Xc,c America” J. E. Hass......................................................Introduction 1 111 K A 1 1 A ....................................“A merieanism H. I). O'Cai.i.aoiiax W. H. Stki'iikns . . . . Introduction Champion Debate Subject: Resolved, That the Leai ue of Satious should be ratified at onrr with no reservation other than the interpreted ones. AFFIRMATIVE G. T. Maxs.......................................Demnsthenian J. E. Itoss......................................Demnsthenian NEGATIVE E. C. WlMBEBLY.....................................Phi Kappa “Bill” Congdox.....................................Phi KappaIntercollegiate Debate Schjkct: ltegolred. That the United States should adopt gome system of compulsory military training for all males between the ayes of 18 and 21 for a period not exceeding 12 months. AFFIRMATIVE K. W. Hioiismitk Nathan Jou.es To debate Alabama in Alabama Georgia wonIntercollegiate Debate Si’hJkct: Rexoh’td, That the I 'nited Stole should adopt some system of compulsory military training for all males between the ayes of 18 am! 21 for a period not exceeding 12 months. AFPIIt MAT1VE It. E. L. Spence V. H. Stephens To debate Vanderbilt in Athens Georgia tcoiiSophomore Debate Schjkit: Resolved, That there should be a board of compulsory arbi-tratb n to settle all disputes betireen capital and labor. DE MOST 11K XIA N (Negative) C. K. Nki.hon G. I.. Kknuhicks W. I). Dcmdkn PHI KAPPA (Affirmative) K. C. Dart O. S. Morton C. S. Sankord Freshman Debate SnuKCT: llesatx'ed. That the t'nited States should assume a protectorate ox’er Mexico. DK.MOSTHKNI AN K. I). Dkxmakk.................................Negative U. C. Pittmax.........................................Negative W. C. Kicki.ic.iitkr..........................Negative PHI KAPPA T. F. Stokks...............................Affirmative R. II. Dixon................................Affirmative A. U Chapman......................................AffirmativeFreshman Impromptu Debate Sl'BJKCT: Unsolved, That i intniy ration lit this country should hr entirely prohibited for u period of three years. I) K.MOST11KSIA N PHI KAPPA .1. V. Bkn nktt O. C. JoilNSTONK L. C. Stii.i It. (’. Pittman .1. B. DlCKKHSOX )l. L. Chapman J. L. Wills IS. II. Dixon J. II. Kknnkdv W. L. IlfMST Demosthenlan won. Xeyativ .Cotton School Debate SrujKCT: “Itwaived. That (he Kenyon Hill (S2202), to control (he meat nicking iudustrg, should he passed immediately by Congress’’ AFFIRMATIVE I.. Westbrook .1. F. Draxxkx, Jr. NEGATIVE J. M. Elrod 1. E. Howell Negative WonCrfSiM . Tf. V ft ft r r Phi Beta Kappa 1)k. .1. II. T. McPherson...........................President Prop. W. O. Payne...................................Secretary I)k. H. P. Stephens................................ Treasurer CHARTER MEMBERS Dr. J. H. T. McPherson Dr. It. P. Stephens FOINDATION M KM UKHS D. C. Barrow J. Kcstrat W. II. Bocock C. M. Sneixino I,. I.. Hkniiren H. C. White W. I). I lool'KIt 'J‘. J. Wooetkr R. E. Park John Morris ACTIVE MEMBERS It. I. Aixkn S. Popper F. W. Harhoi.d C. W. Si.ack X. G. Long T. I., Stokes It. D. O’Cai.i.aoiian W. D. Weatherst f % Beta Gamma Sigma I)m. ,J. II. T. McPiikkso.v...................................I’res'ulent C. M. Kvi.kr....................................................Secretary 011 a n cki.i.ok Bar how Dm. J. II. T. Mc.Piiknson Prokkssor H. A. Ingram Dm. It. I Stki’Hknh W. M. Brown C. K. Cagi.k J. K. Krs.Man C. M. Kyi.kr W. B. Gainks II. H. TisingkrFACULTY MKMUKRS Ciiaxcci i.kh Barrow Dm. Wooktkr S. V. Saxkord C. M. Stkaiian U. K. Park W, D. 1IlMH'KH II. I). Ml I'M L. H. Tiri'Kn K. I). O'Cai.i.aoha.v ( . U. Sattxrhki.d F. W. I I AH KOI !) . . Ahtih’h Pkw . . . B. K. L. Sl'KNCK . C. NY. Si.ack . . . .1. B. Sl.ATKR . . . SphinxSenior Round Table (SIGMA UI’SI LON) MKMBKItS Prop. It. K. I ’.Ml K Honorary It. L. Axdkhsox T. B. Baoi.ky W. B. Dishko F. W. Hakkoi.d N. G. I.oxo K. A. McWhorter C. W. Sl.ACK T. L. Stokes G. T. Manx It. I). O’Cai.i.aoman S. Pol'PKH W. I). Weathers BOLL OF TI1K CIIAPTKHS OF SIGMA UPSILON Soi'iiknim, University of 1110 South Cai.cmkt, Vanderbilt University Osiris, itnndolph-Mucon College Skniom Itorxn Tahi.i:, University of Georgia Odd Ni'mhkk Ci.ru, University of North Carolina Boar's Head Cwh, Transylvania University Scribblers, l'niversitv of Mississippi Kit Kat, Milsnps College Scarabs, I’niversity of Texas Sckibbs, l'niversitv of Smith Carolina Coikkk IIorsK, F.mory I’niversity Fortxioiiti.v Ci.i'H, Trinity College Arne, l'niversitv of Alahama Grcb Street, University of Washington Gordon Hope, College of William and Mary Bi.i'k Pencil, Davidson College Sphinx, Hampton-Sidney College Vk Tabard Ixx, University of OregonUPS1LON Wto« v BACA'' •IAV1V Alpha Zeta FACULTY MEMBERS l)x. A NDMKW M. SoCl.K r. C. Wand I)k. T . 11. McILvrrox F. C. Ward Pkok. Gko. A. Ckabh W. 0. Com.ins e. a Wksthhook E. I). Ai.kxaxiikk P.wi. Takok A. M. Thornton X. 1). Pkacock C. K. Kkm.ogg L. V. Davis Gi Y R. JoXKS ACTIVE Ml- LMIIEKS I . H. Bkxxktt •I. M. Hi.xoi) K. O. Caban iss H. V. Fit .I ATXIC! J. A. Cowx C. V. Sr.M.MKXOlR O. C. I) a.vh:i. F. .1. VAir.nan W. J. Davis A. ( . Wki.cii L. G. Wiiitakkk ALPHA ' .ETA HOI.I. Townskxd........................................................Ohio College of Agriculture Mom him..............................................Crnnsylvunia College of Agriculture Moxxow......................................................Illinois College of Agriculture CoKXKl.l...............................................New York College of Agriculture Kkdxik......................................................Michigan College of Agriculture Ghaxjtk...........................................Xexc Hampshire College of Agriculture Xkmkaska...................................................Xehrasko College of Agriculiure Nohth Cahomna.....................................Xorth Carolina College of Agriculiure LaGkaxgk...................................................Minnesota College of Agriculture Cihkks MorxTAlN..............................................Vermont College of Agriculiure Wiisox.......................................................... mca College of Agriculture Babcock....................................................Wisconsin College of Agriculture Ckxtkxxiai..................................................Colorado College of .Agriculture Maink..........................................................Maine College of Agriculture MiitsorHi...................................................Missouri College of Agriculture KI.mutt...................................................Washington College of AgricuHure Caiikoknia................................................Coliforniu College of Agriculture Pnmi’K.......................................................Indiana College of Agriculture Kansas........................................................Kansas College of Agriculture Dakota............................................Xorth Dakota College of Agriculture Scoyki.i....................................................Kentucky College of Agriculture Morgan.....................................................Tennessee College of Agriculture Gkoxgia......................................................Georgia College of Agriculture Ax Kansas...................................................Arkansas College of Agriculture Omkco.v..................................................... Oregon College of Agriculturervry$T v ry UWUlkUlM f ! 'SO Gridiron Club Roll S. V. Saxiohd Hakkoiji Mkykii W. ). Payxk Jt’i.ics Tai.madc.k Coac i« Styok.m a x A hit 11. Nix Axukkws l.t'MVKIX A XDKHSOX Mackai.i. A l.KXAXDKR Mott Atkinson Manx liimiCNK McCaxi.kss I)isi no Nowki.i. Doiwon O'Cai.i.aohan Dickkxson Si.ac k Kyi.kr Sattkhkiki.d IIarxom) Sl’KNCK Jox»:s Si-atkr Koxtz Stokks I«oxc. SlBI.KY 1.0 WHY Wkatiikks J.Thalian Club F. W. Mankoi.d.....................................................President John '1 . Conykks............................................ Vice-President R. K. !,. Sr»:xcK, li ................................Hu.tine ex Manager J. B. Carson Ol.KMKNT M. EVI.KH Cari. Gokttixokr Akciiik Grikkitii Wii.uam Hamm Is II.MAX HaII.KY COMKR HoW KM. Thomas M. Johnson Jn.iAN E. Ross IIarkoi.i) Kasskwjt . E. M. McCannixsm F. (). McKknzik Wi i.mam Malt.and Simon M. Morris Roy Nix l . l . OCai.i.aoiian A RTiirn Pkw_____________________________tmum. • UdJD -X'3 U »r'TiHGlee and Mandolin Club Professor II. A. Ingram...............................Faculty Supervisor Frank I). Bosk................................................. Husiuess Manager •I. I . Spickk........................... iit I ant liushiess Manager T. M. Johnson.....................................Advertising Manager (ii.Kk ci.ru V. I). IIkaton J. B. SlIKI.NVTT II. A. Manky C. Iv. Wiiati.kv John Cai.iioi’n W. T. IIahorktt S. J. Boykin Fhv.ic Hakhis John Conykr: .1. Whitk, Jr. V.m. Mai.i.akii C. II. Kvkrktt J»:rhv Jonks Loris Smith II. 11. Tisjnckk J. I , ('arson K. ('. Pittman I '. W. IIakroiii MANDOLIN Cl.l'B .1. T. Koni7. |{. Iv. L. Spknck P. N. Coi.ijkr Mai.i.on Siikki'iki.o J. Iv. Bryson Frank Hand It. IL Skkkn B. Davidson It. I.. Andkrson W. II. Stkimikns C. I). Jordan V. B. Disiimo P. II. Bknnkt W. 11. I VST A HKOOK Lynn Fort T. I), (ikovkr D. B. MrDoN.vi.D OKCHF.STKA Fkss Dottkry Farrar Bond P. Iv. Hoi.mks Ai. Johnson It. J. Dknnard (’. M. Snki.i.ingsV U C - I? I GOO'4 iUOO" NUNC PRO TUNC 1 AN©«V S The Senate Colons: lied mid IIhick R. K. I.. Spence.................................................President Ciacoe Satterfield ........................................ Vice-President Thank I). Rose..................................Secretary and Treasurer Anderson. It. 1.. Gicikkktii, A. E. McWhorter, T. Hind. T. M. Uahokktt, W. T. Nelms, Frank Rroyi.es, N'. II EATON, W. D. Nowell, R. I.. Calhoun, J. Mickey, It. I.. O’Cai.laoiian, It. Cannon, Charlie I loWKl.I., II. C. Owen, John CllEEVKS, J. P. Hakkold, F. W. It El) WINE, J. E. Coi.linos, 1). VK Johnson, At. Reeves Conyers, John Jones. J. J. Soule, It. M. Dasher. Joe KoXTZ, J. T. Sibley, W. H. Dickerson, R. G. Kei.i.y, Morris Spicer, J. P. Disrro, W. M. Lewis, Sam Slater, J. R. Dodson, W. A. Medi.in, J. L. Shei.nutt, J. 1J. Durden, W. D. Matson, T. D. SHEFFIELD, M. J. Tm.mk.ttk, Petk Moore, V. R. Tai.madoe, J. E. Kstkrhhook. Rim. Mott, Ken non Torrance, C. C. FORT, I.YXX Mekmitt Trotti, L, J. Gaines, W. R. McDowei.i. Wellborn, John Goldsmith, W. S. McCaxdmm, K. M. Wilkins, J. J. Carroll County Club il. II. TmiSukii.....................................President •I. F. It mu................................... Vice-President W. L. Cai-sky........................................Secretary I.. M. Harmon .......................................Treasurer MKMBKItS Baskin , T. I. Bknkohd, A. T. Bknkoro, Nora Bird, K. M. Boykin-, S. J. Broadnax, M. J. Broadnax, C. K-Brooks, I . C. Cai-sky, I.. Harmon , I.. M. Morton, J. It. Morris, J. L. ItKAVF.S, R. J. Reid, J. F. Tisingkr, 11. H. Taijiot, Lewis Kino, H. G. Bt-RSON, VenaSquare and Compass Club Doc Hakpkh.......................................Chairman I . Smith...............................Vice-Chairman S. S. Havnik .................................. Treasurer B. A. Wilkinson.................................Secretary T. I. Baskin..............................Seryeant-at-Armt G. D. Concur M. T. Nf.VNAI.LY .1. W. Camp G. A. Ti'kxer F. B. Smith L. Westbrook W. Thomas W. R. Kskkw K. .J. Braswell J. W. Sheppard W. B. Almon M. K. Brand It. G. Dickerson It. W. Martin C. L. Parham E. K. AndrewsG. M. C. Club I«. I« Do .ikk I’aick Bknnktt 1 . T. Dknmakk I.kk McKini.ky C. L. Hicks Kr ASTI'S 1 OMR M. (). Hcimii.cii K. (). Caban iss Sam Hoy kin Hhioiitwki.i. G. 1.. H1. N PRICKS Bkn Hhoacii •I. K. Hahi-kr KimiK Kawson John Atkinson Hastings JoSIAII SlHI.KY J. W. Bkxnktt Gkorc.i: Da niki. Tai.mot Ni'nnam.y Hcck Chrkvks Frank Fci.i.kk Gko. Ci.ark Edgar Hi.ai.ock J. H. SiiAi.Nrrr II. Mohi-ky .Tok BrRNirn Hoy kin Smith K. M. McCaxi.kss Riverside Military Academy Club Uaiciu.v, Jok Bowers, B. B. Deax, II. H., Jr. Hatch, A. B. I .AM AR, J. C., Jr. Mooxf.y, J. E. O’Neal, B. P., Jr. Pryor, F. O. Ukdwixk, J. E., Jr. Slack, C. M. Slack, C. W. Waltox, MillerH. .1. Kennedy Gordon Club T. I.. Stokes . . . A. M. Day . . . . Appleby, T. C. Mii.ler, J. 0. Gray, I I). Hodges, C. S. Allen, S. E. Kki.i.y, A. M. Damt, V. C. Bush, I . I). Pound, M. Stokes, T. E. Rogers, V. M. Baker, C. V. Stokes, ,T. R. .1 ON'US, J, NVhati.by, R. J. Dickerson, .T. Kexnedy, II. G. Arrercromrir, J. E. Day, A. M. Brown, G. M. I .ESTER, J. Ql'ARTKRMAX, K. Mints, W. T. Frederick, F. J. Coi.i.ikr, r. x. Short, C. S. Tii.i.man, H. Y. Mahshhuhx, J. D. Palmer, J. C. Wai.kkr English, A. II. Johnson-, T. M. Godi-rby, J. D. Henderson, ,T. II. Hurst, W. L. O’Xeal, B. I Slappf.y, J. A xdersox, B, H. Whipple, P.Barristers I'noc. Stephen I won. In Facilitate Kki.ly, Morris I«owry, J. A. Uyan, J. IIedwink, J. E. ScitKKI-ER, 1. C. Shut, W. V. Troutman. F. Alexander, W. W. Anderson, It. I,. Aknoi.ii, A. .1. Ci.ark, N. K. Harokett, S. 11 aki hii c.e, J. Hickey. It. I..Freshman Club OVERSTREET. G. .1. FIRST TERM Mohi.ey. G. II. . . . Davis. .1. 1 Secretary ami Treasurer WlLl.IA.MS, A. II. . . I I CHERT, 11. II. ... SECOND TERM Frederick, T. J. . . Vice-President Walton, M. (’ . Secretary ami Treasurer Barker, W. If. Hill. .1. II. Short, C. S. Bennett, J. W. Hill. I.. II. Skein. R. II. Black, C. K. 1 Ioik.es, C. S. Smith, E. V. BhoCKINGTON, C. K. IIOI.I.IIIAY, C. . Smith, M. M. C HANDLER, (). !. 11CRT, K. W. Stokes, T. E. ClIAPMAN, J. K. 1 .A MON, J. I). Si’mmers, A. D. CoiIEN, C. II. I,(’MAS, A. Simmers, II. A. ("OI.EM AN, Jl. II. Miller, ,1. G. Taylor, J. J. C'oi.i.iek. B. .M. .Miller. J. M. Tillman, H. Y. CONIIKI.L, J. W. M OH I.EY, G. W. Walker, J. II. D. mis, C. M. Nance, J. F. Weeks, R. II. Dean, H. II. Paris, L. H. Wheaton, R. M. Dickson, E. Perry, T. R. Whitman, C. F. Drew, M. N. Phillips. G. S. Williams, A. D. Hai.pert, J. H. Siiei.vekton, W. S. Williamson. A. 11. Hayes, Z. C. V.'ii.i.iamson, E. S.American Legion II. Kknnkiiy M. T. 1.. Stokks NV. O. Ai.mon, NV. B. IloilGKS, .1. W. Ol.IVKM. S. G. Anthony. T. 1.. Hkxdknsox. J. 11. Oi.iniANT, J. B. A I.I.KN. It. 1. Hay. It. L. PoWKLL, G. C. Backkk. C. V. Hi nt, NV. S. PlNTCHCCK. I.. Britt, I). ;. 11KATOX , V. I). Pkiikick, F. I.. Bkkky.man, F. B. Hasty, A. 11. Pittman, It. C. Bhow.v, K. A. II AY NIK, S. S. PlCKKNS, C. L. Bmnv.u.i), B. IIkxky. S. P. Qcahtkiiman, K. A. Brown, 1). (). Hydk. a. It Kill. F. J. Bhaswkll, K. A. Hamiikn, N. (I. ItlVKHS, W. K. Bakrktt. I . T. Hkiman, 1. It AWSON, C. K. Bagi.ky, T. B. 11 ART. Ci. S. Iti: tm.k, T. P. Bi'riikx. K. (I. 1 lOl.MKS, P. K. licnoi.i’ii, M. 0. Cox. J. F. IsHKI.I., C. NV. SlNC.KR, I.. Col.I.IKH, 1 . A. Johnson, C. A. Smith, F. B. CoXGKR, (I. 1). Johnson, A. S. SlIKIL, S. P. Cannon. ('. K. Kkmi», C. C. Sol’TIl Wl’.l.l , It. T. Camaniss. K. O. Kino, H. (I. SoL’TIIWKI.L, B. S. Cl’I.HKRTSON, A. B. Sand. ). B. Sc.MMKHS, A. I). Carson, NV. .1. i.ANIKK, G. A. St’MMKKOI'H, C. NV. Caknki.i. i.ANIKIt, I,. It. Thomas, J. K. ('iiii.os, ’. C. I.OWRY, J. A. Thompson, 11. J. Dh'KKRsox, It. (I. Martin, A. C. Thomas, NV. NV. Dk.kik, M. S. Martin, J. It. Ti'knkii, C. A. Dchiikx, H. NV. Mann, J. NV. N'andivkk, J. 11. Day, A. M. Martin. F. A. NVkst, J. H. Dkakk, J. B. M AR.MKI.STKI X NVooiirckk, II. F.. Davis. K. K. M t’RPIfV, J. NVkstiirook Kdwahds. T. Mattox, NV. II. Wilkinson, B. A. Kskkw. w. n. Minin, J. NV. NViutk, J. Kvans. (J. It. Mott. Kk.nnon NVai.kkk. S. K. Ki.IIRIDGK, II. K. Mt’RPIIKY, J. P. NVhki.ciikl, H. C. Kvans, B. M. McFarland Wkatiikrs, NV. I). Kdwariih. H. I.. Mc.NIim.an, C. NVkloi, A. C. Fain, F. A. McGahkk, It. C. NVi.miikri.y, K. C. Fohii. P. B. XoKTIICrTT, S. Cavscy, V. K. (Iihms, NV. .1. O’Nkii., B. P. COCHOIT, C. S. Gibhs, M. NV. O’Ukar, A. M. Camp, J. NV. Gctiimax. S. O'CaI.I.AC.1! AN, It. I). Do .ikr, I,. I.. 11 h i.. S. H. Mill. C. J.American' I.eoioxPioneers Club Kctii 11kki .....................................................President Nina Thompson...............................................Vice-President Adelaide it i ok...................................Corresponding Secretary Kunick H cstix........................................Iteceizdny Secretary Ai.ick Wai.kkh...................................................Treasurer Pansy Aikix......................................................Historian Grack Anokhson R i'iiy Anokhson Pansy Aikin Hi-tii Bates Mary Colvin Ll’CV Neville Lucy Matiiks Rosalind Prick Hitii Reed Adelaide Hook Eunice Rustin Nina Thompson Ai.ice Wai.kkh Lucy WoodOXCKIVKI). created and formulated l»v the Student Body of the University for promoting a more brotherly feeling among the students and a greater love for the University, for the promotion of “Georgia Spirit” and for the settlement of all affairs which concern the best inter- ests of the Student Body. Student Government became effective on Wednesday, March third, of this year. The organization is known as the Student Body of the University of Georgia; that of the supreme ruling body. The Student twelve members elected from the various departments or groups of departments. The officers of the council are: President. Vice- President, and Secretary and Treasurer. Generally stated, the duties and powers of the Student Council are the formulation and execution of all rules and regulations governing the conduct of students, the Student Body having power bv a two thirds vote of a quorum to rescind any action of the Student Council or of its officers. While the prevailing sentiment for the election of that type of leaders whom offices seek, and with the painstaking provisions to insure such leadership, this government conceived in a desire for greater things for the University, is certain to accomplish those things for which it has been created. Council of the University of Georgia, which council consists ofTo the City of my Alma Mater By B. S. Ivey I cannot go so far away lint I must dream of you, O, Athens Town upon the hill, And Campus that I knew! Although my feet With hobnailed beat Have trod the streets of France. And though my eyes Have seen where lies Old England of Romance, I cannot go too far away For ever as I dream, I travel where your Campus is Al ove the amber stream. When clouds grow dense above the land Where Fate has driven me, By mv Dream-Window then I sit And through some magic see: Far a wav Across the day. Beyond the sunset, too, A sunny spot The world has not. That as a lad I knew, O, Athens Town upon the hill, Refuge in Life's rough sea, You arc an isle, your Campus is Earth’s greenest spot to me, Whose memories now bloom apart, Greenest, deepest in my heart. TODENT'3 crams -23- AT4LEITGS V-MC-A PIBLKM0N5 MILITARY DEMKTMOT m — —» FOOT BA 1.1. Amtiii'h 1 kw. Captain S. 1.. Austin Kknnon Mott II. ('. WlIKU’IIKI. Owkn Hkynoijw K. S. Kotiik P. I). Rimk K. K. Mrnx .1. V. Bi.ack.mon N. A. Bik yi.»:s .1. 11. Vandiver •I ok Bahcuax •loll N .1. I’. A. .1. I). T. I). w. K. •I. V. T. Kicdox I . Chkvks M. Day T. 1 kynoi.ds A. Coi.i.ixos McWhorter OllEHDOHIT.lt II. CAMI‘HKI.1. W. UlC.IISMlTII K. Hahpkh Tannkk I.. Anthony BASK KTBA1.1. Kknnon Mutt, Captain C. II. Sattkritki.d .1. I . ClIKVKS V. II. Camprki.i. M. B. Pound W. I). Axdkxson •I. S. Owens I'.dime Kawsox BASKBAU. C. II. Sattkhkiki.d, Captain T. B. Cody T. McWhorter H. I.. Nowki.l Kknnon Mott It. II. Hancock Manc.um VV. T. Hanorktt TRACK John Hioihin. Captain TP.XN1S W. II CvMI’HKIl C. S. IIkyman I.YNN FoHT Review of the Football Season of 1919 |HK football season of IS)If) at the University of Georgia will always he a banner year, not in games won nor points scored, but in the building of a championship contender in the short time intervening between the close of the World’s War and the opening of the season. After demonstrating one hundred per cent loyalty of service, when every man of the squad volunteered for some service against the foreign foe. the men reassembled tor the opening of the season with a determination of placing Georgia on the football map. It was to be expected that many of those who bad gone against the graver problems of life and responsibilities of war would not again don the moleskins, and then again the team of I?) 1(5 was composed of Seniors. Rube Tate. Tom Beasley and Braxton, three of the noblest of Georgia’s sons, bad made the supreme sacrifice. They had answered the referee’s whistle and gone over the top. not wearing the coveted “G,” but for better in those perilous times, wearing the olive drab of service. Owen and Jim Reynolds, from the Aviation; John Rigdon. from the Naval Service, and Captain Pew. from the Marines, were the old Regulars to return. I he new men, without exception, had either seen service or were in the R. O. I. C. From the calibre of the men who reported for the team it was quite evident that a representative team would l c developed. Under the skillful and inspiring lead-crsliip of Captain Pew there was developed an “esprit de corps” that has never been excelled. It was a fighting team that never knew when it was whipped, and though the offense was shattered early in the season through the loss of the entire hack field, the defensive qualities predominated to a marked degree and made the teams play uniformly successful. If I may break the custom of years in mentioning the individual merits of the players I would call attention to the play of three men who I consider played the highest calibre of football it has ever been my opportunity to witness. Owen Reynolds, the true type, hard smashing, driving end. Captain Pew, the steady, dependable, unstoppable tackle; and Captain-elect Day. calm, deliberate judgment of opponent’s play and faultless passing of the ball. I do not think the South has ever seen three players of such brilliancy of play as these three men noted. The deserved mention of these men does not detract from the hard-earned honors won by the others, for there were honors enough for all. The great number of accidents that have occurred during the last three years has convinced me that the men should be given the strictest training rules and follow a planned diet. Due to regular habits of eating and sleeping the doughboys in France would play football on the frozen ground and escape without a bruise. Though we carefully planned the training season and safeguarded the men with every protection, there was the fatal recurrence of injuries. Regardless of expense the men should be given a training table for next season. Injuries were fatal to last season’s success. During the Sewn nee game Reynolds was lost tor balance of season. Then followed Hartley, Neville, and Barchan. The entire back field was gone in midseason, and had it not been for the brilliancy of C heves open field-running, the team would have had no scoring strength. I his has happened at the same time for three successive years, and with every heartfelt hope for Georgia’s success I urge a training table for the boys. Broyles was a player of unusual possibilities, and while he played a consistently good game, it is to the future that I look for his greatest development. Munn is also a player with a great future, a hard-driving fullback who will be unstoppable another year. Neville came into his own Thanksgiving Day, and by desperate efforts bore more than half of Georgia’s offense. I sincerely hope that Barchan’s and Hartley’s unfortunate injuries will not cut off the predictions ofbrilliancy so noticeably impressed on one by their play. Buck C’hevcs was a star bis first season out. Without him Georgia would have been unable to gain ground against opjmnents. Dave Collins needs this year’s experience and physical development to make him one of Georgia’s greatest stars. One of the most certain punters I have ever had, who could place bis kicks with remarkable skill. Do you remember when Georgia held Alabama on the one foot line? Dave had been in bed for two weeks, but in splendid determination to give his all to the team had put on a uniform and was on the sideline. Just had to get that kickoff, and Dave was the one who placed the ball »9 yards down the field and off to the sideline. Mott, the fiery little general of the team, has received some mighty hard bumps in winning the high honors that he claims. His determination won over many difficulties. Vandiver is needed on end next fall, for, without doubt, he has no superior in catching passes and diagnosing opponents’ plays. Whelchcl played like a four-year veteran his first season of college ball. A player of splendid spirit and unexcelled possibilities, he has a future that should leave its imprint on Georgia’s athletic pages of glory. “Doc" Harper was one of the most conscientious players I ever had under me. His faithful attendance at practise, even though laboring under the handicaps of injuries, was most commendable. It was truly unfortunate that Jim Reynolds, last year, was handicapped by injuries of such severity that even his great heart could not overcome them. I only wish it had been possible to discover Austin’s speed earlier in the season, for in the closing games he showed splendidly as a back field man. Rigdon, McWhorter. Campbell, Obcrdorfcr, and Bowers did good work and deserve most favorable comment. Watch carefully andremember mv prediction that one Anthony will he an all-Southern tackle next year. Our scrubs were faithful and did yeoman service in shaping the Varsity. When the student body honors the football team line up those scrubs in the front rank and pay them the tribute of being true loyal Georgia boys who served without credit, yet faithful at all times. It is especially pleasing to note that Conch Stcgemnn will l»e the bead coach another year. A wise choice on the part of the Athletic Council, for no better nor capable instructor can be found. In closing this small contribution I draw down the curtain of mine happy years spent at the University of Georgia, a college whose greatest asset is that wonderful “esprit de corps,” better known as Georgia Spirit. In all that time I have found that every confidence could be placed in those men who represented Georgia on the athletic field. I do not remember a black mark against their record of clean sportsmanship. Poor in money, buildings and those things that make the universities of this country great, but rich in those traditions which make the University of Georgia loved by those who bad trod her paths. It does not take victories to make her teams great, for the greatest teams Georgia has bad were those who went down in defeat. With the splendid boys who labored so valientlv during the season of 11)19 under the skillful leadership of Coach Stcgenmn and guided by the masterful hand of my good friend and diplomat. Prof. S. V. Sanford. I can only see the greatest season of all for 11)20. —W. A. Cunningham.Athletic Association Officers FIRST TERM John Higdon...........................................President II. S. Bhannon...................................Vice-President II. II. TisiNjiKH......................Secretary and Treasurer SECOND TERM I.. K. Bktiii’Nk......................................President W. K. Rivkks.....................................Vice-President T. W. Him.............................Secretary and TreasurerFor many years wo lmve had with us u jewel in the |»erson of Coach Cunningham, lie eaine to iis from Gordon Institute at Barncsville, Gn. at which seh(H)l lie spent a successful term of coaching. He was merely a youngster when he eaine here, having just graduated from Vanderbilt University a short while lieforc. Now he has gone from our midst, entering a different field of endeavor in the business world. C’oacii Alec left tiehiiid him a record that any coach that any man—should In justly proud of. Not only a record of athletic successes, hut also a record of a man’s superb character as reflected in those successes. C'oadi Cunningham is a man of the highest character and of striking personality. lie is well known throughout the South and is liked by everyone who has the pleasure of his acquaintance. A man of his qualities full well deserves the admiration and respect of men. We are sure that, as his efforts in the athletic field were successful, so his efforts in any other field will he crowned with success. Our heartiest good wishes go out to him wherever he is—Alec Cunningham— Our Coach. “Coacher" hails from the middle west Michigan, lie is the type of man everyone admires. Although he came to us a stranger, he quickly endeared himself to us and we are proud to claim him for our own. “Coacher” brought with him a train load of "rep" and has certainly lived up to it. He is a four letter man from the University of Chicago, having won the coveted “C" in football, basketball, baseball and track. Conch Stagg refers to him as one of the greatest athletes ever turned out by Chicago. Above all “Coacher” i one of the finest gentlemen we know. He has had wonderful success since he has been here and we feel that under him we shall always turn out champion teams. “Coacher" is a treasure to la coveted and we earnestly hope that we can keep him for many years to come.ill 11111 111 U I 1919 I G FOOTBALL Amtiit,-it I'kw "RusT Day Captain, ’10 Captain Elect 20 I’rw is another of those Outstanding Atlanta Hoys. “Artie” preped at 1'encode in Atlanta anil remained there for four years. Coining to Georgia in 1915-lti he scrublicd on the football team and, also, the basketball team. The next fall he fought his way to a regular berth on tin football team, playing center and end. In this year he made his letter in basketball, the M|uad winning the Southern Championship. Due to the war football was done away with in 1917-18. Arthur played guard however on the again Southern Championship basketball team of 1918 and immediately thereafter heard the call of his country and enlisted in the Marine Corps. Receiving his discharge from the army, Arthur returned to Georgia in time enough to matriculate in the fall of 1919. 1'oothall was again organized and he was elected to lead the team in the fray and to captain it to the end. He has proved himself a true leader and one of whom every Georgia man sliould Ik proud. Arthur was picked unanimously as All-Southern tackle mid well deserved it. "Hum", as he is named by his many ardent sup|»orters, is a South Georgia product. He has fought under several banners, the first being that of the Douglas A. M. College where he played two years and was a star full-back. He then severed his actual relations with Douglas and tried Gordon Institute for two years, from which school he graduated. Again he starred on the football team and made an envious record. This, my friend, is where Ashel M. Day went wrong—he matriculated at Tech. “Ruin” showed Walter Camp how to play center and was honored by being placed on Camp’s All-American team. After football season, “Hum" saw his mistake and withdrew from Tech, registering at Dear Old Georgia. He upheld his reputation last fall on the Red nnd Hlaek eleven, being again mentioned as a candidate for an All-American berth. He was awarded for his unfailing courage and fighting heart by his team mates, being elected to captain them in the fall of 1920. Football Team Cunningham . . . .1. Kkynoius . . . . Hulk llark Stmikmax ClIKVKS .... . . . Half Hack Dav McWiiortkh . . . . Half Hack Higiismitii .... ItoTIIK .... . . . Half Back WlIKI.CIIKI Broyi.ks . . . . . . Half Hack Vanuivkm Guard Hack KlC.OOX Mrxx .... . . . Full Hack Honk Tannkr .... . . . Full Hack Ohkhoorkkh .... Barchan . . . Hack l»rw Mott Back I IaRI’KR Tackle ('AMI‘HKI.1. . . . . Quarter Back Anthony Tackle Blackmon . . Scrub Captain (). Kkynolds . . . Andhkws . . . .... Manager Col.LINGS Moork .... F.nd A NDKKSON . . . I1919 Football Score Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia Citadel . . . South Carolina Sewn nee . . . Florida . . . Auburn . . . Tulanc . . . Alabama . . CleniNon . . . October 2 Octolxrr ! OetolH-r 13 Oetolnr 23 October 30 November G Noveml er 13 November 20 November 25 . . . Athens . . Columbia Greenville . . Atlanta . . Columbus Charlottesville . . . Athens . . Atlanta . . . Athens 1920 Football Schedule Citadel . . . South Carolin: Furman . . Oglethorpe Auburn . . . Virginia . . Florida . . . Alabama . . Ciemson . . .Kkxno.v Mott Buck Ciieevks Captain ’20 Captain Elect 21 Ken non Mott had the distinction of lending Coach Stegeman’s “WiUI Cats" this past season. Kennon is another of those Marist hoys who have contributed much to Georgia’s athletic strength. Besides captaining this years basketball team, Kennon is a valuable incmlier of both the varsity football and baseball teams. He is skillful in all and is just bubbling over at nil times with the “pep to win." This is Keiuions fourth year as a stellar player on the university quintet, Last year he served in the position of coach, as well and made good in laith positions. Kennon is one of the Iwst and scrappiest guards ever seen in action. It was only bv a small margin that Georgia failed to Ik in the finals in the National Basketball Tournament this winter. Kennon has made good and Georgia is proud of laith him and Ids great team. “Buck” Cheeves. will captain next years quintet. With most of this years material returned and under “Buck’s" capable leadership, there is no doubt but that a winning team will be turned out. “Buck" is one of the swiftest and closest basketball guards in the country. He knows the game thoroughly and plays it well. “Buck” is also a great baseball and football player. With “Buck" as captain and the absence of any epidemic of sickness, such as we suffered from this past year. Georgia will put out a team to which we can point with pride; and our opponent , with awe and astonishment. We have implicit confidence in “Buck" and Coach to produce a winning combination. When the "Wild Cats’’ are loosed next season, we may cx|H ct great things of them, for thev will Ik out to win, and we feel that victory will la theirs. Basketball Team, 1920 Stkckmax............................................. Pound ............................................... Kawson............................................... NIIKRSON .......................................... ClIF.VKS............................................... Mott................................................. Sattkhkiki.o ........................................ OWKNS................................................ CaMI'HHI.I........................................... McCmaky.............................................. . Coach Fortcard Forward Center Guard Guard Utility Utility Utility Manayrriuimiiu U 1320 G BASEBALL lllllllllll W’iiitkv" Davis Captain ’19 Ci-AUtK Sattkkmki.ii Captain 20 "Whitey" Davis, one of tin greatest third basemen ever set'll in action in eiillrgr baseball, most capably ni] taincd last years varsity. After serving the team faithfully and most efficiently for three years, it was, indeed, a fitting tribute to his athletic career, to lie the leader of our last years nine. The work of Captain Davis augmented l»v the capable coaching of ‘‘Pop" Wingoe of the Cincinnati Reds, produced a winning combination of which (ieorgia will always he justly proud. "Whitey" was fast as lightning, and handled bis position with characteristic efficiency and ease. He was a veritable demon with the big stick. To be captain of a (Ieorgia team which took four straights from Tech, is, alone sufficient to mark a fitting close to any successful career. "Whitcy's" place will be hard to fill. Claude Satterfield, affectionately known to his numerous friends as "Sat", the king of college players is captain of our varsity baseball team this year. Under his leadership and efficient coaching of Coach Stcgcman, the chances for a victorious and successful season are assured. “Sat’’ hails from Adairsville, where he first learned (on the old town green) the essential principles and fundamentals of the great national game. Claude is a natural baseball player. He fields well and has never been known to lose a ball when once it sailed out into the left garden or anywhere close bv. His terrible peg from deep left to home is and has been the terror of opposing sluggers. With "Sat" at the but we feci certain of at least a two bagger and, if badly needed, a home run. Claude is a great athlete, a capable captain and iilaive all a fine, big-sou!cd fellow of whom Georgia is dcserwdlv proud.Stockman.......... Sattkkkiki.d, Captain JIutciiksox .... Wkwh.............. Hancock........... Coi y............. Rawson............ Slatpky .......... I.UMMTT........... Cl.AKKK........... Dkki.k............ Mott.............. Mancum ........... IIari’kk ......... McWhohtok . . . . . . Coach Left Field Third Date Short Stop Second Bate First Base . . Catcher . . Pitcher . . Pitcher . . Pitcher . . Pitcher Center Field Hip hi Field . . . Utility . . Utility Baseball Team, 1920-r 1920 Baseball Scores Georgia .............................. (i Georgia............................... i Georgia ............................... a Georgia ............................... a Georgia ...............................II Georgia ............................... t Georgia ................................— Georgia ............................... 1 Georgia ...............................10 Georgia ................................— Georgia ................................— Georgia ................................— Georgia ................................— Georgia ................................— Georgia ................................— Georgia ................................— Georgia ................................— Georgia .............................. — Georgia ................................— Georgia................................ — Georgia.................................— Georgia ................................— Georgia............................... — Georgia ................................— Georgia.................................— Oglethorpe.............................1 ('tenison............................. 2 Chanson............................... 0 Maryland State........................ 7 Maryland State........................ 1 Furman................................ 1 Virginia ..............................— Virginia.............................. 5 Washington and I are.................. 7 Michigan ..............................— Michigan ..............................— Chanson................................— Cleinson...............................— Pittsburgh.............................— Pittsburgh.............................— Mercer ................................— Mercer ................................— Auburn ................................— Auburn ................................— Vanderbilt.............................— Vanderbilt........................... — Mercer ................................— Mercer ................................— Auburn ................................— Auburn ................................— Young Men’s Christian Association Officers OFFICERS F. J. Vaughan...................................................President E. W. lliGiiSMiTH...........................................Vice-President Kohkrt I. A 1.1.KX...............................................Secretary W. M. Cmaxk, Jk..................................................Treasurer CABINET Mack Rogkrs.........................................................Vesper W. F. Smith................................................Mission Study K. A. McWhorter.........................................Industrial Service «f. II. Sims......................................Conference Delegations C it as. I). Stkwakt.........................................Bag's Work C. W. Summknock.................................................Membership J. B. Siiki.nutt......................................Church Relations W. B. Dishko, .Ik.................................Fraternity Bible Study T. Ij. Storks, .Ik..................................................Social E. E. Martin..........................................................Sick I’isitation A. C. Welch........................................................Musical G. T. Mann......................................................Publicity ADVISORY E. R. Hodgson, Chairman John Wiiitk Morton David C. Barrow U. 1 . Stevens W. M. Crane R. E. Park J. R. Fain F. J. Vaughan “Y” Notes HK LM lvKSl I . M. (. A. entered upon its past year career without the assistance of a General Secretary—all attempts for securing one having Ihcii fruitless. To "tide us through" the rush of meeting the trains and assisting the new men in registering and finding rooms incident to the opening days of college, the temporary services of .Mr. II. Tippitt. an old Georgia man. just hack from I ranee, were obtained. According to the usual annual custom. "CO 1.1. KG I IGHT." the first student get-together meeting of the new year, was held in the chapel on the first Monday evening after college opened, under the auspices of the Y. M. ('. A. Short, interesting speeches from Chancellor Harrow, various professors and students were made, giving the new students an insight into the different activities of the University. fter these talks, the "old Georgia Spirit was fully demonstrated in the playing „f the Hand and the college yells led by the cheer leaders, and. finally, in a delightful social hour. As to other definite work carried on during the year, in spite of the handicap resulting from our continued inability to secure a General Secretary, the daily Vespers Service deserves special mention. Under the efficient leadership of Messrs. Max Rogers and .1. II. Simms, together with the valuable assistance rendered by .Mr. W. I . Cobh, at the piano, the fifteen to thirty-minute religious services have been conducted each evening immediately after supper in the basement of the Library Huilding. Splendid and helpful short talks from speakers selected from the student body, faculty. Athens, and out-of-town pastors and laymen, together with lots of good singing, have constituted the programs of these Vespers services. Hible Study Classes have been organized in practically all the Athens churches, and these groups of students have met regularly at the Sunday-school hour of the respective churches. 1 he elected and sent Mr. It. I. Allen as one of the four dele- gates that represented the University at the Drs Moines Student Volunteer Conference. Settlement extension work among the people of the factory districts of Athens has been carried on by the Kxtcnsion Committer, of which Mr. K. A. McWhorter is Chairman. l'or die coming year it is earnestly hoped that the Association will not have to do without the services of a General Secretary. As the purpose of the V. M. C . A. is to foster such activities as will promote higher Christian living among the students of the University of Georgia, lx th students and parents are urgently requested to give their hearty support in making this purpose realized to a greater extent that ever l»eforc.Student Representatives to Des Moines Dks Moinks. Iowa Dwrinlwr 31, 1919 to .Innunry t. I9 2 ), inclusive .Miss Marik Axiikksox..........livpresrnlalh'e of ) IT. Uohkkt I. Ai.i.kx...............Representative of '. M. C. I . K, CJI'Mmv...............Representative of Freshman Class F. .1. Vacgiiax...........Representative of .1 i ricnllural CoUeyeA Message from the Y. W. C. A. COKING into the future of the women of the University of Georgia and realizing the need and value of high Christian life among the student ImhIv, those women attending the University during the year ] I!)18-19 in May, I!)I!), organized a student Y. Y. C. A. During the past year various activities have been undertaken. The spiritual life of the students has been enriched by Vesper services each evening and other meetings on Sunday, led by students and meml ers of the faculty. Two courses in Bible Study and one Mission Study class have been successfully conducted this year. Delegates were sent to Blue Ridge last summer and to the World Student Volunteer meeting at Des Moines. Iowa, in January. OFFICERS OF THE Y. W. C. A. Etta Coi.o.ornii.................................................President SesiK Britsox...............................................Pice-President Mattik Hami'LKV..................................................Secretary Editii RoiikiitxoX...............................................Treasurer CABINET Jkssik BriiTON...........................................Service Committee Sum. Hamilton.........................................Membership Committee Evki.yx Bri.i.Aun.......................................Athletic Committee I ms Davkxpokt............................................Social Committee Catiikmixr Nkwtox........................................Finance Committee Km.tii Ckk.ivku................ .......................Publicity CommHUe Marir Andkiison................I ADVISORY BOARD Miss I.almia Bi.acksiirar Miss Ej»sif. Camprkll Miss Erna ProctorAN DOH A—tilt gift of tlu gods, first Mossed us with its presence under tue guidiinee of the Class of 1SSH. It had the distinction of being the first of its kind published in Georgia, and the second in the entire South. From its first humble beginning until the present day it has always recognized its dependence upon tin stndent-bodv in general for its success or failure. In its initial dedication we read these lines duly expressing this thought: "To you, who have by vour counsels, sought to make this thing succeed, aiding us by kind suggestions, and explaining every need, would we dedicate this medley of our college jokes all new. as a token and expression of our gratitude to you." It is true that our first annual was crude and humble, but yet it was a noble beginning, unpretentious though it was. Flic gods had something better in store. This year we have tried to give expression in our pages to every phase of student activity. We have tried to make it a symbol worthy to go out to the world as a true representative and outward sign of what Georgia is and what she does. Our Alma Mater has turned out from her hallowed walls men fused with the divine light of inspiration to do great deeds. These men have stepped into the highest positions of trust within the gift of our State and country. They have all made good. Georgia is still capable of even greater attainments in the divine plan of our nation. From your midst shall come the leaders. Embrace every opportunity. Have enthusiasm. We ask you not merely to boost this book, but try to keep it and all that bears the mark of old Georgia above reproach, and ;f not the first, at least among the verv best in the land.Pandora Boards Since 1886 Vui.niK I. 18815. Kditor-in-Chief, CJ. N. Wilson, K A. Business Manager, V. B. Cook, A T 11. Associate Kditors, W. K. Wooten, X a K; McDaniel, X «| ; C. F. Hiee, X «| ; C. II. Wilson, K A; W. A. Speer, !• a O; F. F. Stone, «!• a 0; K. I). Meador, A T It; M. B. Bond, A T A; W. S. I pshaw, a T A; U. S. Move, i T A; I . L. Wade, 4» T A; A. W. Wade, 2 X; W. C. Brown. 2 X. Voi.Umk II. 1887. Kditor-in-Chicf, ( ». F. Bice, X 4 . Business Manager, J. W. Daniel, K a. Associate Kditors, T. W. Heed, •] a O; G. Waters 1 T A; W. J. Shaw, x X; II. F. Milner, A T 11; A. I.. Franklin. A T A. Voi.t MB III, 1888.—Kditor-in-Chief, Alliert Howell, K A. Business Manager, A. W. Griggs A T A. Associate Kditors, W. I.. Moore, 2 A K; T. H. Crawford, T 11; F. W. Coile, 1 X; I.uclen I.. Knight, X 4»; W. M. Glass A T A. VoM'sir IN', 181)0.—Kditor-in-Chief, John 1). Little, X A K. Business Manager, W. K. Wheat ford, X X Associate Kditors, F. K. Callaway, K a S. Trlhhle, a O; J- C. Crawford, XX; NV. W. Kills, X «1»; W. L. Stallings, a T A; W. N. Smith, X 4 ; K. A. Cohen, X 4 . N’oli'mk ". 181)2.— Kditors-in-Chief, J. F. I«rwis, X 1 ; L. L. Brown, A T 11. Business Managers. W. K. Christie, X X; NV. T. Kelly, A T A- Associate Kditors, J. C. Kimball, X A K; Hoy Dallas. 4» A O; J. It. Lane, |{ A X; K. NV. Frey, X 4'. N’oi.umk VI, 181)3. Bditor-ln-Chief, Harry Hodgson, K A. Business Manager, F. G. Barfield, X A K. Associate Kditors, C. It. Nisbet, X 4 ; N. B. Stewart, A Til; A. O. Halsey, XX; H. A. Alexander, R. G. Cabaniss, 4. a O; F. G. Johnson, AT A; Kugene Dodd, X+. Voi.vmr VII, 181)1 Kditor$ in-Chief, C. It. Tidwell, A T A; Noel Moore, X A K- Business Managers, Haul L. Fleming, X 4 ; John I). Stelling. A T 11. Associate Kditors, L. D. Frick, X X; NV. I . Harbin, X 4 ; H. Brown, K A; George Beckett, «h a 0. Voi.cmk VIII, 1895.— Kditor-in-Chief, NV. A. Harris, X 4’. Business Manager, J. J. Gibson, A T A. Associate Kditors, H. II. Steiner, X A K; J. NV. Morton, K A; NV. NV. Chandler. ATI); NV. L. Kemp, X X; J. T. Dunlap, 4 A 0; II. V. Black, X 4 ; J. G. Smith, Non-Fraternity. Voi.cmk IX, 1898. -Kditor-in-Chief. Pliny Hall, K A- Business Manager, J. G. Pitman, 4 A 0. Associate Kditors, M. .Nl. I ockhart, X A K; J. B. Connelly. X ‘1 ; Fred Morris, XX; C. II. Holden, A T A; II. V. Black, x ; T. A. Neal; It. B. Nally. Voi.cmk X, 1897.—Kditor-in-Chief, 11. G. Colvin, XA K. Business Manager, It. K. Brown, NTH. Associate Kditors, F. L. Fleming, X 4»; J. NV. Spain, KA; Harry Dodd, X'k; I . S. Smith, 4 A 0; A. L. Tidwell, A T A; H. Lovejoy, X X; W. B. Kent; J. NV. Hendricks. N'olcmk XI, 1898.—Kditors-in-Chief, Harry Dodd, X 'k; Hugh White, X X Business Manager, J. C. McMichael, K A. Associate Kditors, C. II. Black, x 4 ; K. K. Pomeroy, X A K; C. Westbrook, A T A; J. T. Dorsey, 4 A 0; H. It. Perkins, t fl.Voi.r.MK XII, 1899.- -Kditors-in-Chief, Gcrrard Glenn, x A K; A. I . A dm ns, x ‘I . Business Manager, I . K. Johnson, x 'k- Associate Kditors, .1. B. McCurry, K A; W. S. Ilhm, A T F. K- Broadnax, a T li; W. K. Watkins, x X; I). ( . ileidt; J. W. .Mason. Voicmk XIII, 1900. Kditors-in-Chief, Archibald Blaekshear, K A; Fair Dodd, X 'k. Business Manager, F. I'.. Broadnax, A T il. Associate Kditors, F. I . Calhoun, x '!•; K. I . Shannon. A O; F. G. Tupper, X A K: I . Gardner, X X; William Davis; K. H. Hamby. Voi.r.MK XIV, 1901. Kditors-io-Chief, K. P. Shannon. •!» a O: .1. 1). McCartney, x A K-Business Manager. .lack Banks, X 'k. Associate Kditors, p. . . Williams, X X: V. II. Bollard. V T ii: H. G. Stephens, KA: I. M. Putnam. KX; W. 1). Hoyt. XT; .James I,. Sibley. Viii.i mk XV, 1902. Fdilors-in-Chief. Frank II. Barrett, X A K; Sterling 11. Blaekshear. X‘I . Business Managers, ,1. K. .Iordan, A Til; M. W. Lewis. X S'. Associate Kditors. C. I). Bussell. •!• A O; 1. S. Peeldes, XX: M. S. Johnson. KA: H. M. Fletcher, KX; Dcwald Cohen. Voi.r.MK X 'l, 1903. Kditors-in-Chief, G. Dexter Blount. KA: Frampton K. KHis, |.AO. Business Managers, J. Benton. High; Claude W. Boyd, XX. Associate Kditors, Marion H. Smith. X A li: Hugh M. Scott, X «|»; Preston Brooks, A T 1 ; W. G. Kngland, X T; Marvin M. Dickinson. KX: Sidney J. Nix, C P I.. Voi.r.MK XVII. loot. Kditors-in-Chief, I.. P. Goodrich. XX; I. S. Hopkins. Jr., «| AO. Business Managers H. M. Blaekshear, , T1I; G. W. Ximnally, X‘I’; J. B. Gamble. Associate Kditors. J. I). Bower. KA; Roderick Hill. X A K; Wailes I.ewis, x T; W. B. Shaw, K X: W. O. Roberts, f P L; It. N. Burt. Voi.rMK XVIII, 1905.- Kditors-in-Chief, A. I.. Hardy, KX; V. B. Moore, XT. Business Managers. Roderick Hill. XAIi; C. P. Pratt, A T il. Associate Kditors, II. W. Telford. C P I.; T. G. Stokes; A, H. Carmichael, X 'I': W. (). Marshhurn. t AO: J. C. I’pshaw. XX; Art Kditor. (). H. B. Bloodworth. Jr., K A. Voiimk XIX, 1909. Kditors-in-('hief, W. (). Marslihurii. 1 AO; Lansing B. Lee, X A K. Managing Kditor, II. I.. Covington. K A. Assistant Managing Kditor, J. II. Brmlherry, I" P L. rt Kditor, J. G. Mays, XT- Vssoeinle Kditors, It. S. Parker, X l ; (». A. Green. A tu; W. B. Ilamhlcton, XX; K. It. l.aml crt. KX; J. It. Turner. Voi.r.MK XX, 15107.— Kditors-in-Chief, Phil W. Davis. Jr.. «l AO; J. K. MacDonald. X M'. Business Manager, T. K. Scott. Art Kditor. W. A. Griflith, K A. Assistant Business Manager. II. M. Wilson. XX. Associate Kditors. W. T. McCaffrey, KX; XV. G. Brantley. Jr., X A K: •!. II. N'eislcr. C P L; It. S. Parker, X 4 ; T. S. Winn, A Til. Voiimk XXI, 1908.- Kditors-in-Chief. S. (). Smith, |» AO; W. C. Henson. Business Manager. It. P. King, X A K. Assistant Business Manager, I). L. Rogers. Art Kditor, II. (1. Cannon, A Til. Associate Kditors, J. B. Harris, XT; S. K. Morton. KX; (-. C. Brooks, XX: I.anier Branson, X'k; Roy Strickland, KA; ( . W. Glausier, II K A- Voi.r.MK XXII, 1909. -Kditors-in-Chief, W. H. Johnson, KA; James Montgomery. X T-Business Manager, I). I.. Rogers. Art Kditor, J. B. Weir, Jr.. KX; R. F. Revson. Associate Kditors. J. M. Walker, x A K; K. M. Brown. XT; W. It. Holmes. 4 A0: Frank Clark. Jr.. A Til: ( C. Brooks. XX: C. F. Pckor. f P L: 0. P. Beall.Voi.cmk XXIII, 1910. Editors-in-Chicf, 11. Ablt Nix; John Moore Walker, 2 A K-Business Manager, II. I., Campbell. Art Editor, Hugh King Allen, 2X. Associate Editors. Eugene S. Taylor, K2); Hughes Spalding. X'h; (). M. Gresham. A TO; Auhrey Matthews. XX; KoIktI Cumining; Henry Newman, X ; Fred Allen, «|. AO; Robert I . White, K A; Corbin C. Small. II K A. Voi.eMi: XXIV. 1911. Editors-in-Chicf. Evans V. Heath, A Til; Arthur K. Maddox. ssociale Editors, Geo. C. Blanton; Poj»e F. Bmrk; .!. I.. Deadwyler; .1. H. Foster; Malvern Hill, XX: W. S. Jones, XX; Henry Nnwnian, XX: W. J. Northern. Jr.. 4 AO: II. U. Feacock, KA: H. I). Russell; C. S. Small ||K. : (). A. B. Sparks. X A K: Boykin ( . Wright, X 1 . Business Manager, Howell Brooke. Assistant Business Manager. E. . Carter. !• A 0. Voi.cmk XXV, 1912.- Kditor-in-Chicf. Marion B. Folsom, 2 . Associate Editors, J. M. I.yueh. A T li: Thomas N. Fowell, «| a O. Art Editor, James B. Wright. Business Manager H. I). Russell. Assistant Business Manager II. S. Langston. Vommk XXVI, 1918 Kditor-in-Chicf, Robert H. Freeman. | a 0. Associate Editors, R. It. Childs; S. Turner Brewlon. Business Manager, I). A. Russell. X X. Advertising Manager, II. II. West, A T A. Art Editor, Edgar L. Bennington. Voi.cmk XX NT I, 1911. Editor-in-chief, David Knox MeKumy. Associate Editors. John I). Wade. X X: Edgar It. Fund, a T A- Business Manager. II. I). Russell. Art Editor. Aaron B. Bernd, Voi.i'ju: XXVIII, I9IJJ.- Bditor-in-Chicf, Geo. S. Whitehead. AsMieiate Editors, Tlmiuas S. Candler; Louis Lester, .|. a O. Business Managers. Win. 11. Key; 1). K. MeKumy. Art Editor, Boss W. Coker, v . Voi.e a: XXIX, 191(1. Editor-in-Cluef, Roliert Callaway, A T II. Associate Editors, W. H. ( uarterman. Jr.. A T A: Benjamin II. Robinson. Business Managers Frank A. Holden. «| A O: Joel B. Mallet. A T ». Art Editor. W. A. Griffin. X X. Voi.cmk XXX, 1917. Editor-in-Cluef, J. liuland Cannieal. Assoeiate Editors W. O. While, x X; F. Otey MeCIrllan. X i . Business Managers. Neil L. Gillis, Jr.; J. William Fowell. 1 A O: Gilbert X. Cheves. Art Editor, Charles M. Tanner, Jr., A T A. Noi.I’mk XXXI. 191$.- Editor-in-Cluef, Mack Matthews. Associate Editors Alfred Blalock, X X: J. It. Bowden, «| a O. Business Managers, A. S. Bussey; L. B. West, •I AO. Nrt Editor. Chester W. Slack. Voi.i-.mh XX XI I, 1919. Editor-iu-Chief. Walter Jo Whitehead. A T 11; John Carlyle McDonald; John NN. Ahney, 1, X A. Business Managers, Roy V. Harris; It. Glenn Dickerson, Jr.; Fhilip Cohen. II K .|,. Art Editor, Chesler W. Slack. Voi.cmk XXXIII. ur (). Editor-in-Cliicf. Chester W. Slack. Associate Editors, Robert D. () Callaghan, K X; Frank N . Ilarmhl, X A K Business Managers. It. Glenn Pickcr-son. Jr.; Frank W. Rose. X A K.Business Department .........Business Manager At if Ian t Business Manager . . . Circulation Manager Kkxxox Mott Caul K. Nklsox 1 .KOX SlNC.KK OE.ORGI IN _______e= Editorial Staff Thomas I.. Stokks, .Ik.............................Editor-in-Chief K. A. McWiioktkr.................................Associate Editor N. ( • I.«»xr....................................Associate Editor Kohkkt I). O'Cai.i.aoiiax........................Associate Editor Ciiisttr W. Slack.......................................Art Editor Jkromk Joxbs, .Ik.................................Exchange Editor I .am ak J. Trutti..................................Junior Editor Oijvkr S. Mortox, Jk.................................Junior Editor Clank Fokkmax........................................Junior Editor J. I . Car sox..................................Junior Art Editor9 iflnrlBusiness Department .... 11 urines Manager Assistant li urine Manager Assistant liusinexs Manager . . . Circulation Manager KMMKTTK K. MANTIN' M. Mai.i.ahd . . Kiciiahd It. Hargis . K. K. Kwinc . . . I. 1’TIIKK H. Font Hamiton (I. Dasiikk J. 11. Wwrr J. Iv. Dhkwnv Assistant Circulation Manager Editorial Staff, First Term Cojikii I Iowki.i................................................Kditor-in-Chief (Iko. T. Manx..................................................Associate Editor I. am an J. Tnotti...............................................Athletic Editor J. I), ('arson....................................................Social Kditor ('iiahi.ks M. Si.ack............................................Exchange Editor Editorial Staff, Second Term (Iko. T. Mann..............................................Editor-in-Chief I.amah .1. Tnotti........................................Associate Editor .1. H. (’arson.............................................Athletic Editor Hovii C. Moss................................................Social Editor Kmnkst K. A xiirkws.......................................Exchange EditorEditorial Staff K. J. Drkxkl.................................................Editof-in-Chitf T. I.. F.vkhktt............................................den oriole Editor II. (I. I)a h»:k..........................................1t tv date Editor S. M. IIamptox.............................................A tractate Editor Business Department C. W. Summkrour........................Hu finest Manager F. J. V a roil ax.............Assistant Business Manager H. V. Fmi'ATUlCK..............Assistant Easiness Manager H. W. IIakmis........................Circulation Manager■'.£.vtfSL«ek. Ki waki Mi kray Okki.ky........................Commandant of Cadet Captain, Cavalry, I . S. A. Cliaki.ks Anokkw McCarhioi.k.......................t i tant Commandant Captain. Infantry, I . S. A. Ci(ANi.K5 Wblu JaCOBSo.v.........................................Adjutant Lieutenant, Cavalry, I'. S. A.Regimental Officers K. E. L. Si'knck, Jk..............................Colonel V. I). IIkatox........................Lieutenant-Colonel K. Mott..........................................Adjutant Miss Kkhkcca Jackson.............................Sjtoneorw “l»» First Battalion Officers C. M. Evusk.....................................Major H. A. Maxkv...................................Ijulanl Miss Mary H. Mooiuk.............................SponsorSecond Battalion Officers U. W. Mahtix.....................................Major C. E. Wiiati.ky............................. Adjutant Miss Mary Atkinson.............................SponsorThird Battalion Officers R. 1). O'Cai.i.aoiiax...................................................Major J. W. Manx...........................................................Adjutant Miss Iaicisk Moktox...................................................SponsorCompany “A” Officers F. C. Gahkktt . . . I). 1). Qcii.i.ian . . . M. 0. Hroou-ii . . Miss Naxxik Wicc.is K. C. WlMHKKt.Y . . Wkst, II. Bhyant, C. II. Stokks, J. K. ...........Captain Fir.fl Lieutenant Second Lieutenant ........... Sponsor . First Seri cant SKKOKANTS WlIKIA'IlKI., II. C. McCi.km.ax, .1. V. COUPON AI.S Stokks, T. B. Font. I.. II. I .AXIKK, C. F.1 111 VAT KS A in-.hson, B. II. Fncmmii, A. II. Far ham. C. Antiiosv, T. I,. L. A. Fkyom, A. 1). Aimm.khy, F. M. 11 AKIM N. T. F. Hawson, C. K. Banrktt, I . T. Hakti.ky, H. V. It ICIIAHDSON, Ci. NV. Bkaim.ky, W. IloiKIKS, C. S. Sasskn, T. .1. Cai.i.oway, A. W. Howki.i., C. II. SlKl.KY. .1. ClIKKVKM, J. I . IIknny. S. I . Smith, K. V. Cl ARK, (I. J. Hkmkixoton. II. 'I'. Sl.AI l KY, J. Chastain, F. I). 1 .KWH, S. 1.. SlTCK.K, .1. F. Carson, B. Martin, J. It. Tannkm. K. A. Conor ay, V. K. McPiiknson, It. K. Vanoivkn, J. II. Daniki., k. g. Mohi.ky, (I. II. W.AI.K, .1. K. Davis. K. K. Mii.i.kh. .1. Ci. Wll.I.IAMMON, .F. M. Dkan, II. II. Moskowitx, A. I. WlIKATON. It. M. 1 ) .! KK, L. L. Nkmmith, K. A. Wki.i.mokn, .1. I). Dickkxson, J. B. OUKRDOKYKN, 1). OVKRSTKKKT. C. II. Frost, F. II. OWKNS, .J. S. I’wiiaw. B. K.Company “B” Officers .1. V. Camp...............................................Captain K. V. IIkuismitii...........................................First Lieutenant W. M. i{(NiKit...................................Second Lieutenant Miss Ktiiki. Gkkcohy.......................................Sponsor C. II. I’kacock...................................First Sergeant SKKGKANTS Button, H. G. Cantrki.i, A. Brigiitwki.i, T. J. Nam, C. W. Shki.i, S. I . Tiiomi-so.v, C. A. Exoi.ani), E. A. Kvkrktt, II. W. COB BOR A I.S Fu.i.kk, F. II. Hamm, W. G. John sox, C. A.PRIVATES Bowiikn. R. A. IIahkison, W. II. Saniikhs. M. 1). Bhockington. C. E. .1 Oil NSTON K, A. C. Stii.i., 1 . C. Bvrt, .T. F. Kino, H. II. I’sry, M. Cicandi.kr, 0. W. I.KWlS, J. F. Watson, E. E. Chapman, .1. E. 1 .INCH, A. 0. Vogt, W. S. Coi.i.ins, 1). A. .Mow.r.v, M. 1). Wksijcy, J. W. Cook, II. M. McCai.i.cm, II. A. Whitnky, C. F. Ckavkn, F. II. McI.knihjn, F. Williams, C. J. Dixon, K. H. Nkwton, C. II. Wingatt, J. I.. Dixon, E. OxKORII, .1. M. Williamson, R. D. Ewing. ( E. Pattkrsox, Y. M. Wood, A. C. Fakkar. c;. Fowkhs. It. II. Wool), 1). I.. Gamhi.k, I,. Paris. I.. 11. Wki.ls, j. 1.. Hai.io:kt, .1. II. ltoHKHTS. .1. II. Watts. W. A. IIainskomo. B. A. ItoUKMH, E. B. Zkli.nkm, .. T. Him., L. 11. Simmons. F. TaVIjOR. J. .1.Company “C” Officers W. J. Carson............................................Captain J. P. Carson...................................Fir I Lieutenant H, G. Dashkk..................................Second Lieutenant Miss i( t’Tii Kvass.....................................Sponsor W. I,. Patterson................................First Senjeant SKKGKANTS Broach, B. .1. Kdwarm, B. I . Swi t, A. K. Bcciiwaij), B. Smith, B. It. Drf.xkl, It. J. CORPOItAI S Cosc.kr, (i. I . Smith, It. II. Moon, J. W. Nix, K. M. Wai.kkr, J. M.PRIVATES ABERCROMBIE, W. F. HoLLIDAY, C. Perry, T. R. A her hold, C. (). Hood, J. G. Pooi., H. Adair, J. T. Irons, II. W. Heaves, It. I,. Buck, C. A. Johnson, I). F. ItrssEi.i., F. L. Brand, M. I- K ASS A WIT , H. G. It 1 VERS, T. H. Brown, 1). F. Kickmciitkr, H. G. Seahorn, M. I). Cai.laway, L. S. K(CKi.ioirn:R. W. C. Smith, C. II. Coi.i.k, V. W. Lanolky, L It. Smith, M. M. Cook, It. It. Mathew’, C. Smith, M. S. Cordki.i., J. W. Maddox, H. II. Tait, W. L. Darks. C. M. Mii.i 1, J. M. Thomas, H. O. Davant, R. M. Mii.i.ican, K. F. Vann, E. J. Davis, J. D. Moody, C. G. Warren, I,. Ki.i.is, K. C. Mooney, J. It. Watson, J. W. Fitts, K. C. Monkort, C. K. Whitner, T. A. Gili.. C. I). Murray, M. G. Wll.KINSON, R. A. Grant, J. V. Mac onai.d. G. WII.LI A MS, A. Hailey, J. S. McGee, J. B. Wilson, J. D. Hart, W. J. McKenzie. W. D. Winn, L. S. Hayks, C. Z. McHka, C. E. Wrioht, E. S. Hoc.an, K. C. Newton, J. B. Patrick, A. It. YoU.NGBI.OOD, C. It.Company “D” Officers A. C. Wki.ch...............................................Captain T. M. Johnson...................................i'irtt Lieutt-nanl L. J. Troth......................................Second Lieutenant Miss Dorothy Dikiy........................................S toneur A. M. Day.........................................Firet Smjeant SKIKi KANTS Conooon, W. 1 . Ki.riihsk, M. F. Mattox, W. II. Howards, T. Kiki.os, L. (I. Kskkw, W. K. CORPORALS (’arson, H. J. Davis, J. ].. Dchukn, W. I). Davis, C. A. Dchiikn, W. C. Siack, C. M.IMUVATKS Anderson, I . K. Iaincino, W. T. Al-EXAXDER, T. W. l.lTWWRtfW, S. It. Haii.kv, M. ('. Martin , F. A. Byron , A. S. Martin . 1,. W. Hroyi.es, N. A. Mi nx, K. It. Barchan. Joe McGhee, It. C. Umax nan. .?. F. McI.aws. I I.. C am them.. W. 11. Meltaixky. 1. A. CoiJKMAX. 11. 11. Newton. .1. A. Darden. 11. Nance. J. F. Dasher. It. I.. NrxNAi.i.Y, M. T. Davis, S. C. Stirnhero, I). Fort. I». Summers, II. A. Green. F. M. Stewart, I). (iRflOVEK, A. It. West. W. S. Haii.ey, I. 1). Wl 1.1.1 A MS. It. II. Henderson, It. 1). Weight. G. W. Jordan . C. I). SciiWAMI, J. S. Kenxy. C. It. SlKHKMT. I,. It. 1 .AM H, W. I.. Siiki.vkrtox, W. .1. Row. J. T.Company “E” Officers O. B. Kohbrts . . W. M. Crank . . . J. 10. Boss .... Miss Cora Katci.ikk N. I). Nickerson . .........Co plain Pint Lieutenant Second Lieutenant ........Sponsor . Fire! Senjeant SKKGKANTS Brsii, I . I). Drake, J. It. Smith, C. B. Ciiiuxs, V. C. PlNTCItl'CK, L. Boyd, D. COKPOK AI.S Bexxkit, J. Coi.vix, K. N. Stkphkxr, V. Coxxki.i., H. K. Kirby, J. T. Kivers. W. K. Sims, J. H.PRIVATES Al.MOXI), P. M. IaiVKLACB, J. W. Mktiivix, O. R. Mh.i.kr, R. B. BcCHAXAX, J. I). Haii.ky, If. G. Howkx, K. P. Brock, W. G. Brown, F. B. Coopbr, C». H. Daxibl, W. F. Davis, II. B. Dchurn, D. B. Dcrdkn, II. V. Orbit, W. M. Gainr.s, G. E. Haxahax, M. I.. Harris, R. W. Hbimax, 1. Hodgks, J. W. Hodgson, R. D. Hutciibsox, W. Mc Viioht :r, T. PlTTMAX, R. C. Pritciiktt, I). I.. Maxoom, H. H. Ratciikord, W. C. Sl.Al’GHTKR, .1. R. St'MMRRS, A. D. Sparks, M. G. Watson, E. E. Wai.kbr, J. Wkir, J. B. Wki.ch, W. A. WILLIAMS, G. I.. WlIKI.AX, K. J. Williams, W. C. Hargis, R. R.Company “F” Officers I . A. 1 I OIX'.SO X . W. I). Wkatiikbs !. F. (lAISSKKT . . .Miss Annie lion: 11. Ri ;ikin' . . . Dikdkn, ('. H. Aniikkson. V. 1). Armstmono, .1. U. HNOOKS, I). ...................................Captain .........................First Lieutenant ........................Second Lieutenant ..................................Sponsor ..........................First Sergeant SERGEANTS Bl.AI.OCK, K. SlNOKR, Watkins, S. COUPON A US Cox. C. K. Swift, E. C. Kkvii.i.k, T. I . Wicker. I). L. • » $ ; 3 • 4 ® 0 0 - 'e, 8Vs k c %?+ ' k® A b ! • ® V 4 f% :' N w W v «v c " IMtIVATKS Blackmon, .1. V. Bbnton, A. O. Boatwright, .1. T. Butt, S. K. Carmaker. II. (I. Cocroe. C. S. Cori.TKR. I. I . Coi.ukr, 1 . A. Cox, Caki. Denmark. J. K. Davison. B. Dki. Homme. W. I ;. (•CRI.BY, II. It. Geakhai.d. H. II. Henderson, J. II. Howard. K. V. Hatch. A. II. Inmax. It. .1. Kbli.y, C. A. I.evie, A. 'I . I .ESTER, .1. I’. I .ANION, J. 1). Mii.i.ioan, J. I . Moran, .1. (I. Meredith, V. II. Morton, (). S. Marx, I). Milijsr. G. W. Mac Far i. and. I). W McHka. C. I . Nelson, C. K. Poi.I.OCK. I). M. ItllMK WAY, (I. II. Sawtem., It. It. Smith. .1. .1. Sanders, ,1. Tk.mim.es. I . M. Til ANTON, J. It. I’lWIIAW. I . ( Watts, (I. It. Oliver, I.. (». Ol.ll II ANT. II.Cavalry Officers M. E. Dkki.k............................................Captain C. E. Broadnax............................................Fir t Lieutenant J. White......................................Second Lieutenant Mias Sibyl Johnston.....................................Sponsor W. H. Davidson............................................First Sergeant SERGEANTS Whitney, C. R. Edwards, R. E. Westbrooks, E. Brown, G. M. Foreman, C. II. COR I’OIt A US Fitts, R. F. Gcrr, E. M. Hyde. A. Howard, J. Fkdxick, F. G. Chandler, S. G. Makmeintikn, C. A.«« K .. ‘IV |T 4Tr 1 1(1 VAT ICS Ai.drx, II. S. Brooks, T. (I. Uariikh, W. II. H 1 11, A. Chcrciiwri.l, A. F. Cain. I(. V. CltAl.KKR, 1C. I.. ClIUKR, K. Coi.MKR, 1.. (). Chi mis. 1.. A. Dux x, T. KVAX’S, G. I(. Floyii, W. K. Fi.kmixo, 1C. Fixcii, B. I). Gii.i.kspik. J. W. Hi’rknt, 11. H. Hoi.mks, 1C. 1). IIkstkk, II. W. Hakdkx, H. .1. Jahhki.i., .1. G. • lOXKS, W. II. Lrvrrktt, L. G. Ml’RPIIV, .1. I . Mradow, K. Miciiaki., 1C. L Mims, W. F. McKk.x7.ip., F. G. MoGrb, F. M. McDoxai.ii, I). B. Fkksoxs, A. T. I iiii.i.ips, G. S. Kkkvrs, ,1. S. Kocrrs. H. W. Straix, L C. Short, C. S. Tysox, G. C. Watsox, J. I). Wisdom, W. I). WlXOKIKIJ), I . 11.Motor Transport Corps Officers (I. ( Daniki......................................... Captain H. I„. Hav....................................First I As ate nan t II. V. FiTXfATHlCK..........................Secant! Lieutenant Miss Stki.i.a Davis...................................Sponsor V. T. Miihm.khkooks............................First Sen eant Dakt. F. C. SKKGKANTS Dorm ax, H. I’. Broadnax, M. .1. COlirOKALS A i.mon. W. B. Davis. T. J. Kvans. B. M. (Iannan. A. S. ( 1 Hits, V. J. IIrnokicks. G. I-I loseii, H. W. I .ANIKK. I.. H. Ia»wk. K. A. It KID. J. F. ItoCKHS. I). S. WlKIDKI II. I I HI VAT KS Bar x kit. .1. W. I .AM AN, .1. C. Baskin, F. .1. I.rxiiy, V. A. Bkrmymax, F. 1). Merritt, J. L. Book hard, .1. B. Mri.i.is, V. C. Broad iicrst, J. B. Mcrimiy, .1. C. Bkxxett, 1). I . Mr.ML'i.un, T. I.. Coiikx, C. H. .Mr.Mn.LAX. C. A. COLKMAX, M. 1. Nix, K. M. Cox, J. Nrxx, J. C. Davis. W. 1 . Boole, W. I„ Dkrdkx, H. W. Hew, !,. C. Drkwemy, il. II. H MODES, H. I). Fain, F. II. Hohixson, II. A. Fi.aki:, T. .1. Hoi kk. j. W. Frederick, F. .1. Hoystox, C. A. CJihsox, W. S. Saxeohd. C. S. ( iKooves, V. II. South well. B. I.. Hasty, A. 11. Smith. F. B. Hah.mo.v, 1.. M. Trawick. A. .1. Hamrick, I. C. Tili.max. H. V. Hoxoitk, J. W. Ti’rxer, (J. A. II CRT, 15. W. Wiley. C. H. Hodgson, F. C. .Wili.is, O. S. Kemi . C. C. Thomas, W. W. B,'V Supply Company Officers M. W. Ci.ark ......................................... Captain C. (ioKTTiNOKK...........................................First Lieutenant L. I). Si Not.ktox...........................Second Lieutenant Miss Miriam Weeks......................................Sponsor Kind reader, as you turn each page, View every line with care; And fume not, pray, with inward rage, Should your own name appear. Remember, pray, each word we say Is but a merry quip, And laugh with us dull care away In jolly fellowship. oa— oJ Mostly Nonsense By S. M. Mohhis A FOl’R WO 111) T HAG 1C “POME” ENTITLED, "JUST AS THE OLD MAN ENTERED” Miss. Kiss, Bliss, Fist There ni.iv he nothing to this Ouijn hoard business, hut you can’t make the Ouija lx ard manufacturers believe so. ON THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION Everybody’s going nutty, About who’s going. To live in the White Mouse, For the next four years. And one would think. It mattered. And as for me. As long as 1 have. Three square meals. Every day. And a nice soft spot. To lay mv head. When the shades of night. Gently falleth, 1 don’t care. Even if, Thev elect. William Jennings Bryan. The Grape Juice Fiend. Love is that state where two fools of opposite sex are concerned, each thinking the other one is just about 2% V above par excellence. Cuba The Land of the Thirsty and the Home of the Scotch. THE SWAN SONG OF LOVE 'File night was black. So was she. And by her side sat one of these “bright yellow niggers". Romance was surging to and fro. as ’twa, in his manly breast. At last lie piped: “Matilde, does ver luvs me?” "Does I luvs ver? Chile, ver is der one bright spot in mall dark life.”i«S??r; Freshen boobie mjooof was a QR.EEN COUNTRY COB, he suscribed to fake fo jds awo HE vJOIHEO THE FAKE CLUBS, the boys Hut. laughed a his Such, rounded dome, and Remarked to each other. THERES NOBODY HOME? FOUR YEARS HAVE PASSED BY — OUST COUNT BOOBIES SCORE, HE HRS HONORS AND MEDALS AND PRIZ.ES ‘'ALORE , WHILE SflPOUO FLUNKED,LET 03 TELL YOU THE NEWS:-HE IS NOW OERKING- SODA TO PAY FOR HlS BOO NOW SAPOLlO SHINE WAS A PROMISING LAO WHO WRS BACKED BY THE REP OF HlS WEALTHY OLD DAD; THE PROFFESORS All SAID THAT SRPOLIO SHINE, VYOULD LEAD THE WHOLE SCHOOL IN A MIGHTY SHORT TIME.BULSHLVIKI e) “BU le-shooter. TRIED TO TELL WE Tlmt That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That That all tlu: students loved Jacobsin. Col. Phil lost money at the Beanery, someone flunked education. Drexel failed to mark a Senior Chapel Absence. Sheppard shot a game of pool, a non-frat man made the Thalians. Duncan Burnett stayed in the library, they had fried chicken at the Beanery. Polly-Mac spent money recklessly, the library always opened on time, the Dean did not care to he Chancellor, this year’s Freshman class is a Hell raiser, there were no politics in the Faculty. Dr. Broadhurst was the most popular professor. Drake and Flake would not join a Fraternity if they could. Co-Kducation was a good thing. the V. M. C. A. had done great work this year. Boh Park’s popularity was decreasing. Nick couldn’t make money in his new store, the Georgia Spirit was going to the dogs, psychology was a crip, editing the Pa.vdoha was an easy job. Shorty Andrews and Miss Rosa Costa loved Tech. Chatty Martin isn’t l ow-leggcd. John Itigdon doesn’t want coeds on the football team. Easy Mann went to Costa's. the Co-op couldn’t do without Miss Wade. “Q” Room Pop cracked a smile. “Daddy” Fain cut a class. Dr. Black tried to teach too many classes, the boys are sorry Punnv Brooks left, the Buccaneers and Barristers were worth a Damn, von can fool Miss Susie. eta Chi Camp is an Athlete. the Columbus Guards didn’t think much of each other. Bob Park always kept his promise. Shvloek smiled when someone bleated. the 1020 Pandora was the best ever published.»£WHAT iappene SKPTEMBEK Kith: First Ik-aucry Bull-session. Freshman Millie in has honor of initial shave. 11th: Glass door broken at the hennery. Freshmen take up a liberal collection to have it fixed. 15th: School opens. 16th: Kangaroo Dallas blows through on his way to Columbia. 17th: Deniosthenian and Phi Kappa start extensive advertising campaigns. 18th: Freshmen organize. Hcrty field is scene of pitched battle, between the lower classes. Patterson visits the country. 10th: Co-eds hold a hull session on the campus. Bumpy Green taken in bv the Campus Club. 20th: Freshman night. No excitement excepting songs by Freshmen. 21st: Benevolence Club holds initial meeting of the year. 22nd: V. M. C. A. Night held in the Chapel by Vaughan and Tippitt. 23rd: Pandora election. Usual lot of sorry editors elected. 2tth: Dcmosthcnian initiates 108 new Freshmen. How about Phi Kappa? 25th: S. A. T. C. boys rejoice at having Smathers with them for the day. 26th: Freshmen adorn their ivories with red caps. 27th: Cinque Mann carries good looking girl to the Picture Show. 28th: Otis Woodard breaks a tooth at the Beanery. First victim of the season. 29th: Tisingcr starts graft on Senior canes worse than Cohen. Westbrook and Talley of the olden days. 30th: Zeta Chi Camp leaves his undesirable room-mates for Candler Hall. OCTOBER 1st: Freshman Lanier’s light hull) burns out and he reports to Bob Park for new wick and kerosene. 2nd: Tv and his Freshman try pooling clothes to Wat the wash-Iadv. 3rd: Beanery actually opens on time at breakfast this morning. 1th: Four Freshmen get dumped in the salt house. Number 5, Beans Dcvant. 5th: Tom Flake vamps a Lucy Cobb girl out of the third story window. 6th: Mr. Jenkins writes everyone a personal letter.7th: 8th: mil: 10th: 12th: 18th: 1 1th: 1.5th: 17th: 19th: 20th: 21st: 28 rd: 21th: 27 th: 28th: 80th: 1st: 2nd: .3rd: 4th: 5th: 7th: 8th: 9th 11th 12th 13th Number o’s trial is held, Framc-up, as usual. Judge Penny blows through. Freshman Mooncv blows the top off the lung tester while taking his physical examination. Gridiron Club banquet. Tom Stokes strikes a reminiscent vein and infliets it on the general public. Sophomore Cox gets sheared. Mann, Whatley and Rudolph take dancing lessons. Georgia Hand goes to Griffin to Shriners’ nTect. Ask I cwis Monroe Smith what kind of time they had. Rough-neck Hill knocks out nigger at the Hennery. Old K. P. system restored. Whatley. Dick and Sleepy go out into society. Johnnie Welborn and other Y. M. ('. A. Freshmen are visited by vigilance committee. Freshman Smith refuses to wear red cap and even scraps with Pcdrick. Freshman Smith entertained in Old College while his classmates besiege the building. Great times reported by Freshman Smith. John Sheppard shows up with his kodak strapped on his back. Pete Stephens and the Dean pass up psychological test at Chapel. Co-cds take up collection to send one band meml er to Columbus. All agree it must Ik Hill Goldsmith. Fifty per cent of the students leave for Columbus via the side-door Pullman route. NOVKMHKR Great Auburn game. Columbus said to be both wet and rainy. Georgia Student-lnxly heard from in Birmingham. Nashville, Augusta, etc. Girl asks Swiper Dasher if he isn’t a Clmofcr. Chancellor Short retires from his eminent position at the University. Brigham Young’s moustache reaches the astounding length of .37 centimeters. Washington and I.ee beats Tech. Circus day. Harry Garrison, Geo. Conger. Rmmctte Martin. Shorty Long, A1 Hen ford and Ginque Mann entertain the Co-eds from 10 A. M. to 2 P. M. waiting for the parade. Pete Stephens dismisses his class 10 minutes early in order to be sure and see said parade. Shorty T.ong tried to get this date but Hovd Moss beat him to it. Armistice Day Parade. Ofl’lcy leads off on the old gray mare. Everyone goes to see Prof. Sanford and Uncle All»ert at the Elite. Candler Hall gets in a piano and celebrates by a big Mullet Supper.Iltli: Grand Armistice Day Pageant. Kith: Carnival Hand retreats down Lumpkin Street to the tunc of anthracite coal. 18th: Georgia Hand and student-body visit 19 shows at the carnival. I )th: Mac Rogers bucks the Dean at the Beanery and asks for $1.00 reduction in the price of ! onrd. 20th: Some mysterious unknown (?) person turns up Hedrick’s dog. 21st: The Bumblel cc alights and applies it's first sting. 22nd: Georgia plays Alabama in Atlanta. Shorty Andrews and P. Reynolds crown tin day with success. 28rd: Sunday night supper done away with at the Hennery. Dean buys himself a now suit of clothes. 21-th: John Shep and Drexel go to the Gym for exercise and hath. 2.1th: Shriners come to town with a goodly supply of Camel’s milk and dismiss the school. 20th: Special order Number One appears. Vigilantes non subvenit vigilantes est. DECEMBER 1st: Queen Wade of Co-op abdicates. 2nd: Tech, having broken Athletic relations with Georgia, decides to put out a basket-ball team. 1th: Delicious mullet breakfast served at the Beanery. 3th: Old vigilance committee posts it’s warning to obstreperous Sophs. 9th: Freshman Co-ed goes to sleep in the library. 10th: Counterfeit nickel passed on the Co-op. Prof. Stephens passes sleepless night.13th: Rxams .start. 14th: Duncan Burnet camouflages ns Santa Claus in front of the Library Build- ing. J5th: World due to come to an end on this date. Lon Lippitt takes a girl to see Somebody’s Sweetheart. 19th: All off for the holidays. Mfcrrv Xmas. JANUARY 2nd: John Sheppard, with his kodak, welcomes the Chancellor back for the beginning of the mid term. 5th: One hundred and seven Freshmen decide they are needed on the farm and fail to show up. 6th: School opens. Seniors appear with derbys and canes, much to Tisinger’s relief. Brigham Young regrets his shave. 3th: Heyman gives uptown exhibition on the best way to carry a walking stick. 9th: Tisinger and Brannon's dog visit Costa’s. 11th: Nice, sleety day. Jacobson cracks sidewalk in front of Chapel, and some- thing else. too. 12th: Al Hen ford buys overcoat at a bargain. 13th: New Band instruments come in. Fess had two hundred and thirty-eight applicants for places. 1 Ith: Hob Lark and Puque Forman start movement for Honor System. 15th: John Slater debates faculty concerning new absence rules. 16th: Gridiron Banquet. 17th: Colonel Griggs raids dormitories for lights, etc., with very satisfactory results (to him). 18th: Puss Whelehcl takes out fire and theft insurance with the Dickv-Slceper- son Co. 19th: Ask Joe Lesser about the Murder in Old College on this date. 21st: South Georgia syrup and sausage devoured in I I Candler Hall. Big Dick entertains. 22nd: Lanier and Meador get visits. 23rd: Georgia beats Clemson basket-ball. Freshmen raise Hell, as usual. 21-th: Stuckey and Benford take a front seat at the F.litc. 25th: A. T. O.’s get a letter recommending a Freshman and take in the wrong man. 26th: Hob Park anprars in class-room, carrying an umbrella. 27th: Cavalry Freshmen report to train at six A. M. to get their horses. Houser Davidson leads the bunch. 28th: Considerable hasting in Military Department. Jacobson. Spicer and Comer Howell reduced.29th: 30th. 3rd: 4th: 5 th: 6th: 8th: 0th: lOtli: 11th: 12th: 13th: 15th: 18th: 20th: 29th: 30th: 2nd: 6th: 7th: 11th: 15th: 10th: 18th: 20th: 22nd: 26th: 31st: Bill Disbro pinched for speeding. l.nw Building caught fire. Plenty of dry material. FEBRUARY Griggs and Park make second dormitory raid. P. Reynold's dog stars at the Co-ed basket-ball game. Also Miss Chumblev. Vampire Flake appears with his hair parted in the middle. Dr. McPherson and Jerry Jones argue Capital and Labor. Stitt Wilson dines at the Ag. College. Benevolence Club holds meeting. Ag. Quarterly staff resigns. Athletic Association election held. Joe Barchan loses on account of his mouth. Cnclc Albert has his third birthday of the year and collects 13.00. Friday the 13th. Freshman Lanier visits Normal School on request. Pete Stephens buys an automobile. Ix rd, what extravagance is this world coming to? Frances Vaughan takes Nujol with disastrous results. Prof. McPherson said to have spent a quarter on this date. Joe Dasher fails to cut class. MARCH “Blonde” speaks to A1 Ben ford in the cafe. Tisinger procures automobile in a questionable manner. Police make settlement. Bush seen without Thaxton. Thaxton also reported roaming around without Bush. Chattic Martin and Alvin Welch propound their theories of Co-education through the columns of the Red and Black. Kx-Captain Jacobson indulges in an argument with a Candler Hall bull-session. Carnival band escorted down Lumpkin Street. Safety first. Dcmosthenian asks Jacobson to remove his cavalry unit from their building. Student finds desired l ook in the library. Great excitement around campus. Second Term exams start. Students leave for Spring holidays. Nick and Q Room Pop spent miserable week. Panuoka finally sent to press. Editors sweep out padded cell and take "Never again” oath. Allah be praised. The “He” Co-ed Chapter of the Tea-Hound Sororitv Founded at Tuskcegee ISM)I. Col.ons: Bralxic muI Ochre. I’khkcmk: Hoyt's Tm-Ccnt Special. Pkkamiii.k: We’re nothin' hut poor workiu’ girls, hut (iod knows we’re hon- est. t By Mamina Shipper.) Motto: As little ehildren. we love one another. Sorority HKXDKKVors: “Co-ed Cottage Rathskeller. M C. H. Qtwi.i fixations koh Mkmhkksiiip: Grace. Beauty. and Purity of Thought. Kmoiiulity Rkoiihkmkxts koh Votino: McuiImts must tat at the rate of seven and two tenths centimeters |x r second per second. Bvk Wori : Tn—ti»!! CosMKTies: Vaseline, rouge. Menncn’s Bahv Tale and Mum’s Oderovoudon't- sayso. PmeosK ok tiik Soiioiiitv: Purposeless on purpose. 0FFICIA1.S Mamma Poim'Kii...............................................................Matron Piiissv PrgrK I'oRKMAN.......................Star Athletic and Military Hr porter Saimk Co-opkkation Smith.............................................Flower Girl Wii.lik Bkm.k Disiiho................................................I’tilily Girl Francks Jkxnik Vaughan...............................................Chamber Maid Moi.i.ik -1. Siikkkiki.I)........................Idvocatrix of Squatter Sovereignty RonKKTA Imaiikllk Ai.i.kn............................Tom Boy. (Xauyhty-Xalujhty) Maxik Rowobiw........................................................Shimmie Kitten Gkokgia Tkciik Manx...........................................................Sales Lady I.OI.I.IK O. FmkkmaK......................................Camper of the Faculty Doi.i.ik B. (Whkkkkr.........................................................Member Hattik Bkm.k Cox.............................................................Member Rosaiiki.i.a Pri nki.i.a Wai.kkh................................Faculty AdrixorettetvCftyrMiNCc vi«cr «avc tm cwotK . tt l«K GtWTVf TICKtf, ki mvhhktt pcAet tolly st ©i« Ml MMHtMM'fJ' c rmim at i amo G t6 in TMC 0 0, Amo vvacx hi alarm cwick CllJt O' Ml MCAO- Mt aii to M«n«cvr HM»o w«t« CCATAlHWN 0 ntwl, CAM |Nt Or or r TAHC THAT C,t AM PROMPTLY AT tftlMt- AT W CVt 0.K,4»HnY 6M«ftC ■H i vh toc 4ahc tto cmprosio , Po tut AlAKMi CLOCK MAS TMIVCO To MMt AN mPMCSMon- VMLM J»MMV TlHOuy »ftl»t. t CMI.CI tc MCAMO To A 6wcc , AO K C PM© ms MCSPCCT6 to TMC ONTAITMPOLV. CWOCM— TM»S » TMC A At AMOCMCHT tMAT MOV! AC6TJ Y JlMWJ ICO, r IT CRC » A GRAYttARO |T M«OkO MAKC. OP TMC PtAO-Gee, Ain’t It Hell By ,1. P. Causon Did you ever work real hard for three days just before inspection and have your pun looking like a Tiffany diamond, and feel sure that you were going to pass up in good shape?—And then you go in the barracks on the morning of inspection and find only one gun present and it's caked with rust and dirt an inch thick, and alnnit that time the bugler blows "Pall in.” (ice, ain't it Hell! And then you study all night for an examination in history but the exam covers so much that you could not get over all the reading and you had to neglect twenty pages—And then you go to the exam and find that the four questions are on the twenty pages you failed to read—Well! Ain't it Hell! Do you remember the night of the script dance when you decided not to go because you had to stay in and work for three hours on a final report? And your roommate went to the dance and copied your work when he came in—And then when the Prof, returned the papers you had a 7; and your roommate had only 90— Gee. ain’t it Hell!Then you had played 1‘or three years on the Varsity and came back to make All-Southern. and in the practises you showed up like a million-doliar halfback, and then in the first panic you broke vour leg—and had to he put out for the rest of the season—Gee. ain't it Hell! And that time when the big dance of the year was to come off, and you had invited your best girl up a month ahead of time. After she had accepted the invitation you had arranged a swell card for her and had told all the fellows what a pippin she was—and then on the day of the dance you received a telegram stating that her mother was sick and hence she couldn’t come—-Ain't it Hell! And yon go down to the Q room to ease your mind with a nice game of billiards. You pick out a fellow that you know is a fish and start the game. You finally get to 19 and he has H and then you fail to make the necessary one point. And on tin-next shot your opponent breaks his record and for the first time makes a run of 9. which puts him out, and you have to plank down the four bits for the game—Gee, boys, ain't it Hell!Campus Characters La v-man Anibitionless. I. 1 lin«r listlessly in whatever posture his spineless corpus might happen to he reclining. Bookwohm Near sighted. Nervously cramming his bloodless hrain with every impractical theory that crosses his line of vision. Politician l at. Passionately pumping the paw of every possible voter at the polls. Booti.u kkk -Smirking. Knowingly nodding his knot in assent to every unsavory utterance that any pedantic professor propounds. Bci.i.-siiootkii— Blustering. Blatantly bellowing his meaningless phrases at every tin fortunate listener. Tiiiiit-wai)—Avaricious. Cautiously counting the. coveted kale and greedily grasping at every goodly gain. Tka-iiocxi —Scented. Shamelessly shaking ami shoving a shocking shimmie at every sorority soiree. (iamni.Kit—Shifty-eyed. Grumblinglv grouching and gripinglv complaining because he can’t rake in the coin. Tocoii Grv- Boiled. Thoughtlessly thumping the thinking piece ot every puny pedestrian that passes. Sissy—Powdered. Thwcetly litliping and thorrowfullv thighing hecauth hith troutherth were menth. Sono-hiho—Discordant. Shrilly screaming and brutally bruising tin- defenseless ear-drums of the long suffering listeners. Bkankuy-iioi-ni)—Gutty. Persistently prompt; Passionately packing and gouging his gigantic gut to prepondcrous pressure with the filthy food of I hil.To Nick Deakides, Our Friend ()l». Boon C ompanion of our hungry hours, A friend to all and enemy to none. The services you've rendered, tilings you’ve done To make our college life more fair, are ours To hold in grateful memory. May flowers F.ndow with joy vour path and mav the sun Of happiness make bright the days of one Whose modest all is offered us in showers. Kind Friend, upon this earth the fame of man Is often unproportioned to his deeds, flic gentle soul, who ministers the needs Of fellow men. who lends a helping hand Along life's path, has done a greater thing Than he who would he kaiser or a king. Itfluv. | G« 5 l'«t A .vT r« r«f A LlTTlC MAI M W. WmAT • V v » nil » «y i C«MC IN IH- »•« «NL • «•»«« AM liul OA«»lt- ■AVC A CA 91 At AA» Mt'U CMJ.T A MTTVA inihl bu (a »• mrAiWti ««jA4 k l r -that C4HH-Q W T Mtlk •« ».m w »»wr A kiiftt it • T MCA MiT»»l« "MICA MCO kmt Oomatc y T«C All ftHtt him IM, wt weep thc newer1 (t»iUKU»t Cm j»C ■ IMlAHT !• » 1 • rt r Tmu • » H«V -IH.T»»T WA« » c 4«nl w« T Ml p.e |»« lit r»cr » ' THAT AA» • « kjWho’s Who Phocdkst Coupon a i,—Ex-Captain Jacobson. Biookst Li a ii—John Talmadgc; A la Flake votes for liimselt. Biookst Boot-i.kkkh—Bob O'Callaghan, Puck Foreman, and the Pioneer s Club in rapid succession. Biookst Katrr—Stitt Wilson. John Sheppard and George Conger. Bagiev ruled out on tin cans. Ccimkst Fiikkiiman—Watson, Ted Dunn, Stuckey of the white sweater, with Bumpy Green bringing up the rear. Most Coxckitko—Frank Harrold and Brigham Young, neck an neck. Haxdso.mkst Man—Captain Monk Garret and Baseball Slnppey. naturally. Biookst Scout Big John Higdon. No opposition. Most Dkspkkatk I.ovkii— M. O. Rudolph first; Hap Willis gets the Sigma Nu vote and Skip Whatlev polls the Quacks. 1 Iakukst Boxkii Jack Slnppey gets first; Red Willie second. Dixon polls five Freshman votes. Wittikst Man—Easy Mann wins over Jerry Jones by a close margin. Bust Atiilktk C'laud Satterfield and Bum Day. Sthoxokst Man Anthony and Higdon each lift 213 votes. Biookst Bn.i. Autist—John ’anderbilt Slater. Bkst Whitkii—Tom Stokes. •Bust Orator— Highsmith. Shorty Long and Bill Mallard. Laxikst Man Goat Miller and Extra Duty Ridgwav, since Feekerwood Bond has left school. Biookst Fukshman—Count Yon Lawyer Burnett. Chancellor Broadhurst and Victor King Meador. Biookst Politician—Zeta Chi Camp. Dickerson and Boh Spence run poor seconds. Most Popclah Occcpation "Wc see you Jakie”. Bullsheviki. Most Popclah Soxo —Sacred Chant and How Dry 1 Am. Biookst Ghaktkh—A certain Faculty Member runs first, with Tisinger and his canes right behind. Biookst Ncisaxck Snipy Lott and Ex-Captain Jacobsin again. Hahdkst Bov—Little Alee and Straw Nall. P. C. Brook and his Baa—ston Brogue run a good race.Most Basiikul—Little Willie lJrown. Biookst Sissy—Puck Foreman and Roosevelt Walker. Biookst Fhkak—Charley Wheatley. No comment. Bust LawYKit—Kicholz first; John Slater second. Sherlock Holmes gets one vote. WoitST Knockkh 'Pom Matson. Little Alee. Boyd Moss, Joe Ixmgino, Dr. Black. Tom Stokes. Shorty Davis, and others. Biookst Jokk F.x-Captain Jacobsin again. Golden Tornado. Biookst Tightwad—See Lott of Douglas. Swkktkst Bov—Lee Wicker and Lollie Freeman. I.oi’dkst Man— Pedrick. Biookst Hi nt—Skinny Rivers and Mark Anthony. Biookst Fisii — Little River Dozier first and Bunk Bowers second. Proudest Siiavktaii.—Kx-Captain Jacohsin again. Lieut. Culherson and Pate Carson get a few scattered votes. Bkst Pool Shot Miss Frances Vaughan of the Pioneer Club, followed closely by Shorty Mcdlin. Biookst Loafkr—-Senior Class, since Pecker wood Bond has departed. Biookst Cor nth vm an Bum Day. Manguni. and Sam I.ewis. another Atlanta boy. Bkst Musician—McGee’s Orchestra. Harry Garrison votes for Shorty Long. Toddv Walker has lost out since he stopped appearing at Chapel. Most Brilliant— Highsmith and Pete Bennett. Most Popular Piiokkssor- Inghram and Sanford. Most Popular Co-kd-—Isn’t none. May l e here next year. Biookst Grouch—Tom’s syndicate— Stokes and Matson. Luckikst Man- -Rusty Bethunc of the fourth platoon. Biookst Burdkn on thk Univkrsity— Puck Foreman and his Honor System. Biookst Co-ki Hatkr—All masculine members of the student body. Biookst C’o-ki) Ciiaskr—Mac Rogers and Stormy Weathers. Biookst Boi.siikvik—Durden Brothers and cousins, followed by Red Anderson. Most Obscurk Man—.1. (’. Murphy, of Hcphzibah, Georgia. Most Popular Coi.lkok Knox Institute and the State Normal.IT KILLED N SIX PtOPUE WHEN THEY Y'KNOW,THEY GOT HONEST TO GOWD TRBFF1C i COPS! TR»ED mTO m M SHOOT Cvl IT I AN THE ONLY DOUBLE-BARR.LLLD i CANNON IN |E; THE WORLD ATHENS HRS « REAL SHO'-NUFF GHOST TOO AH ts L 'Epl THE VTy TTjJ ONLY TREE 114 --- THE WORLD THAT OWNS ITSELF THAT MUTUAL Q f rv 5 CORNER ON A ffiSB WINDY DRY------- ATHENS S ALSO ) NOTED FOR FERTILIZERS; 1 GARBAGE-CANS; GAS-V STATIONS; AND THE. JL J ' OULV FIRE DEPT. THAT EVER BURNED DOWN. _ --ai INCIDENTALLY—THE —-------— UNIVERSITY OF GA. IS SITUATED ATHENS, LITTLE AS SHE REALISEPooling Clothes to Beat the Washwoman Hy 1 K. BktiII'NK Scknk- Room on second floor «»f Old College. On the will! hung pictures of Scpteinlicr Morn, Boll I’ark, Woodrow Wilson, and Charlie Chaplin. In the center is u large desk-table covered with books, dirty collars and magazines—also n copy of the Georgian and other trash. In the small ante-room at the hack quietly rejwscs an economic expert, wImi is sometimes familiarly known ns Tv, and on special occasions as Mr. Tv. Timk Friday morning. Curtain rises, accompanied hy a gentle knocking sound. “Tap, tap, tap”. Ty (glancing at watch)—‘‘Freshman, wake up! What the I loll is that knocking on the door at this ungodly hour? Damn! The chick has not yet struck six". Freehnnin (waking suddenly from his deep sleep anil humping his head on the slats of Ty upper lierth) "Yes, sir, Mr. Tv: I’ll see what it is". Ty—“Well, don’t he so damn slow". Freehnnin (crawls out from his place of rest, finally reaches the door after stumping his too on a chair, gently turns the knob and cracks the door wide enough to sec out)—“Who is it that dares disturb the slunilicr of my room-mate at this unseemly lioiir"? Sweet mice from without “Wash I-ady’’. Freehnnin (half asleep, i. c., normal, and in a low tone so ns not to further disturb his room-mate’s rest) “Well, what do you want"? Wnehwoman (pushing a white hag through the crack in the door)—“Here's the clone 1 done wash fyou". Freehnnin (takes tlie lmg of clothes, shuts the (hair and goes hack into the ante-room. Wakes up Ty and explains that the washwoman has brought the clothes and is waiting outside for the money). Ty “What the hell are you coming to me for. It’s your time to pay for the wash. I paid thirty-five cents last week and, besides, you ain't nothing hut a damn Freshman. (Ty turns over and pretends he is sawing logs.) Freehnum (after searching in his pockets, flnnllv assembles two dimes, n nickel and a quarter. Ojietis the door ami offers this to the dark lady waiting witlmut)—“Here’s all I got. 1 was going to tip you this week, hut I found one sock missing". Wnehwonnw (hands on hips mid taking a long breath)—"Sow look a' lie re, white folks. In the fus place I ain’t lost no sock, ’cause they wnn’t hut three in the hag—two little ’nils and one big un. In the next place I done caught right square up with you and Mr. Ty. I ain't doin’ no wasliin’ for no two pusons, white nor colored, for fifty cents a week. I knows Mr. Tv’s close when I sees ’uni as good as Mr. Ty docs. Tell Mr. Ty he jus’ as well come across with tlrnt other fifty cents. You laith done the same thing last week hut I jus’ kept my mouth shut ami didn’t say nothin’. You can’t fool Miss Susie". Ty (overhears tin conversation, which was growing more heated on the part of tl»c washwoman every minute. Fearing his Freshman is incapable of coping with the situation he yells out)—“What the hell is all that going on out there? Come help me out of this hunk. Freshman". Freehmon (excited and confused by the washwoman on the one hand ami Ty oil the other, stands speechless and motionless.) Ty - (disgustedly, pulls a Douglas Fairbanks from the upper lierth via the extension light cord to the table and thence rushes angrily to the door.) llf(MAiront(iii—(repeats what she has just said to the Freshman, except in a more forceful nianiiucr.) Ty—(nervously readies for his trousers and hands over fifty cents to Miss Susie, softlv closes the door and faces the Freshman. They stand thus for thirty seconds.) Freeh man (hesitantly)—“I told you last Monday I didn’t think it would work again". Ty (turning away)—“Damn ! f’ (Curtain.) TLLM-HONKi L n) IbMid L—»« l WUvt Canbler Apartments J h, CUMO KAN UIxT AMO AMERICAN IT IKAViCf ALAN ■MlUcMIk B-.». £ • » DKUITM M» miM A Tw i • . •» « •• ( »' W 7 ■. » K».W. ii kw • i■Mil yvovt Mlfct llokl »'» »" K«4- |.k It , «Wr»i KM W A».nJ IU W alM i:m» wk«m r«un «•••• "llyti.t rwu a« n Ml N.».' r»i Th»i« K«0 aiu 4 Ibidil (ATI: IM»WII J— II||M WlAiR M.( (MAI || M.aa. IkW Ml »(•»• I Kaa N Jwll. W'la-laa WkllTT IllTk UHTfM , V- Mot»( W'tlUaa. -.(A. •Itailr Kiwi 1a4 ( Mob. JmIIKI KlIlH TalMT PmW». IwnrtAi A La rX»T Uti'A UawK lbtb MN, T. M..I VM T •» • • - « N- I twt( CmHI Hmt IImAto.tim. Al.ka Ota. a. Mi CM MinMn Okk kail »«■■»( iMMia Tkrw Urn r»r »M. • bn urkn'ii iLt.a I.. -• WMk tkr XI«M « Mrk. til ) • Will lt«l IMa la|a |). -A BIG SIGH? IH THE CANDLER APARTMENTS" TEE UNIVERSITY OK GEORGIA HAS BEEN FAMOUS KOR MANY YEARS FOR ITS CALENDER OF SOCIAL EVERTS, AND THE MOST FAMOUS, SELECT AMD EXCLUSIVE AFFAIR OF THE LIST IS THE ANNUAL RECEPTION AMD DIMMER GIVER BY THE OLD RESIDENTS OF CANDLER APARTMENTS TO THE NEW IBHABITAHT2. THIS EVENT TATES PLACE IN THE EARLIER PART OF THE SCHOLASTIC YEAR. DURING TEE LATE WAR THIS AFFAIR IAS POST-POMED FOR THE YEARS '16,'17 AMD 18. IN THE FALL OF ’19 IT IAS DECIDED AT A MEETING 0? THE OLD MEM OF THE APARTMENTS TO REESTABLISH THIS ANCIENT CUSTOM, AMD ARRANGEMENTS WERE MADE TO CELEBRATE ITS RETURN BY PULLI1G THE LARGEST AND BEST ENTERTAINMENT EVER PULLED II THE SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY. ENGRAVED INVITATIONS WERE SENT TO NEARLY ALL OF THE OLD MEN 03 TEE CAMPUS AND THEN FOLLCIED A SEEK OF CAREFUL PREPARATION FOR THE COMING FESTIVITIES. FOR THIS MOMENTOUS OCCASION THE LARGE DRAWING ROOM (MO) IAS VERY BEAUTIFULLY AND ARTISTICALLY DECORATED IITH CUT FLOVEP.S AND TERMS; CARRYING OUT A GENERAL COLOR SCHEME OF GREEN AND RED. BEING THE COLORS OF THE HALL. DURING TRK EVENING CANY OF THE OLD MEM MADE SPEECHES OF VELCOME TO THE NEW-COKERS. ALL OF THE SPEECHES SEOIEB A GREAT DEAL OF THOUGHT AND MUCH PREPARATION. AFTER A FEW SELECTIONS RENDERED BY WHATLEY, THE NOTED SB OR OF THE MKTP.OPOLITIAN GRAND OPERA COMPANY, THE ASSEMBLAGE IAS CONDUCTED UP TO THE READING ROOM BY 1AY OF THE EKW ELEVATOR. 1HERE A WONDERFUL AND SUMPTOUS REPAST HAD BEEN SPREAD. MUSIC WAS RENDERED AT INTERVALS THRU OUT THE EVENING BY THE SCRAP IRON BAND. THE PARTY IAS BROUGHT TO A CLOSE BY THE OLD CITY HALL CLOCK STRIKING THE HOUR OF THREE, AND AS THE VARIOUS MEMBERS OF THE COMPANY TURNED THEIR FOOTSTEPS TO THEIR RESPECTIVE ABODES THEY CAST MANY A IISTFUL GLANCE BACKWARD AT TEE PUCK OF THE LATE SCENE OP HAPPINESS AND JOY AID EACH ONE Z1EI THAT HE COULD NEVER FORGET "THE BIG MIGHT II THE CANDLER APARTMENTS." r • A 1 4 4 YThe I. W. W. Derby Club (I. V. V.— I won’t wear) Okai, Motto If'c do what others do not do, but we do not do what others do do.’ (Editor’s Note—“What makes you do like you do do, when nobody cares how vou do do or do not do?”) Piievailixo CiiAKAcTKitJSTics AM) QUALIFICATIONS yon Membehshif—Stubbornness, Tidwaddidittj, Stubbornness, Pedantic Peculiarities and Stubbornness. Reasons advanced bv various members for joining the club: "Willie” Bkowx—‘‘I’m afraid I won’t look good in one.” R. I. Allkx ”1 won’t get a derby because the Chancellor wears one and, Insides, I had rather spend all my money shooting pool." “Siivi.ock" Baoi.ey—“I only buy straw hats so 1 can eat ’em when they wear out.” Eddie Miuaoua “I won’t wear one because the Co-eds don t. W. P. Smith—“Now, you let me alone. I’ll simply do just as I please. 'M1 old naughty thing.” Mamma Popped—“I’m trying to camouflage.” “Bbi.i.owinc; Bill" Dodson—“I don’t like the way mv voice echoes from tin crown when I wear a derby.” “Monk" Gaiiktt—“None of ancestry were guilty. I can t afford to cstablis 1 a precedent.” FI BN ii v Robinson—“A mechanical brain ceases to function under such »n head-gear.” Tin following men refused to interview the Pandoiia reporter: Simon Mounts P. I). Q» Brsn Vkiinon Sammons T. L. Eveiiett Jack ('own Jkkky Jones J. B. Shei.nctt 0Holies of Co-ed —"So do we."51 Jo eJ-E C If here you find some ancient joke, a veteran in its line, Don't sneer and scoff, you thankless bloke, just smile and say, "That's fine." it it it l)r. Black (sarcastically) — " our explanation is as clear as mud." Student — “Well, that covers the ground, anvwav." Bed rick (to Freshman)—‘‘ ou want to keep vour eyes open around here today.” Freshman—“What for ?” Pedrick — “’Cause folks'll think you’re a damn fool if you go around with vour eves shut." ¥ ¥ Kxams is just a gamble, don't you know ? .Tust a little idle ramble, don’t you know ? The Prof lays down his hand, you scratch your head and lose your sand. Think awhile and then disband, don't vou know? First Student—"What are you doing taking history? I thought you took that last year.” Second Ditto—"Sure I did. But. vou know, history repeats itself.” $ Freshman—“Professor. I'm indebted to you for all I know alnuit mathematics.” Prof. Pond—"Don't mention it—a mere trifle." ¥ Freshman, Freshman, green as grass, always wondering, “Will I Pass ?” Of course you’ll pass and all vour class, if you’ll learn to use the gas. ¥ From Freshman physics, of course: “Steam is water cra .v with the heat." ¥ ¥ ¥ At the Beanery: Vou can get all the Bull part of the time or part of the Bull all the time: but don’t fool yourself into thinking you can get all the Bull all the time.HAVE YOU EVER NOTICED How the Co-eds greet the Instructors as they enter the classroom? That's “Courtesy How the above-mentioned always call a Professor “Doctor”, but never a Doctor “Professor”? That's "Getting a drag". How Sheffield . Mott. O’Callaghan and some others speak to all the Coeds? That’s “Unnecessary”. How the Student Body sticks together—roots like Hell and fights for the old school? That’s "Georgia Spirit”. M. B. Ai.kxaxiikh, '22. TIME, fOR THAT FlIiST CLASS OH A COLD MONDAY MORNING. OH BOY! How the Freshmen call Mr. Dudley ‘Dean"? That's "Policy". How a candidate for office says "Hi, there”! to all, and pays for the drinks? That’s “Politicking". How a man who’s broke looks for a fish to play pool with? That’s "System”. How the Freshman dodge the "Q Room”? That's “Compulsion”. How lavishly the officers of certain organizations spend money? That’s “Graft". How the candidates for the Glee and Mandolin Clubs see that Heaton and Kontr. don't spend money? That’s “ Bootlicking”. f f $ Prof. Inghram (in Accounting class) —“Now, Mr. I.ongino. if you wanted to l egin a good book-keeping system for your business what would be vour first step”? I.ongino—"I’d hire a good bookkeeper”. Student (leaving the Beanery) — “Dean, can I get my breakage fee back now”? Dean—"Well, did you break anything”? Student—"No, sir; but one morning I bent a piece of steak”. Georgian.THE GONG liy Edgar Awful Pooh Hear the cheerful clanking of the gong, chapel gong. What a world of lively hustling Its ringing brings along. See the inerrv students bustling Down the halls, a jolly throng. Doth the Prof his quiz. prolong? Are your answers mostly wrong? When vour heart is sinking, sinking. And your vainly thinking, thinking. For the answers to his questions, how you long For the cheerful silvery clinking Of the gong. Of the gong. gong. gong. gong. gong. gong, gong. For the tinkling and the klinkling of the gong. ¥ it SHOWING HOW EASILY ONE MAY HE MISJUDGED liy S. M. Morris I went to a movie. With a girl. And I liked her. A whole lot. And I didn’t sec the picture. Because I was too busy. Talking to her. And when I wasn’t talking, I was stealing. Sideward glances, in her direction. And we left. At the end. And we got. Something to drink. And I took her home. Via the boot route. Because she wanted to walk. And not because, I didn’t have twelve cents. For I had, A quarter stuck away. Somewhere in my jeans. And she asked me. Didn’t I think. The hero was cute. And whatever she meant. I didn’t know. But I said “ves”. And it pleased her. And that’s all. That mattered anyway. And she bagan asking. Other questions. And 1 gave. Foolish answers. For I didn't see. The pietnr . As I said before. And she saw. I was getting embarrassed.And red in the face, And she changed, The subject, Hut I know, She thought, I was dense. And I am. Hut not because, 1 couldn’t tell her. Al out a picture. 1 haven't seen. Hut sin thought. I couldn't understand it. And when I went home. 1 swore to myself. That in the future. When I take. This certain young lady. To a movie. I am going to make sure. That I see. The picture beforehand. Hecause I don't want her. To think. I’m a nut. When I might possibly. Not be quite. That bad oll ¥ ¥ ¥ W. S. West—“Say, Doctor, I don’t believe T deserved an absolute zero on this paper”. Prof. Inghram—“T know you don’t, but that’s the lowest grade we give”. Co-ed—“Horrors! What was that awful belching noise I just heard"? Student (nonchalantly like)—"Aw. that’s just Bill Dodson speaking to the Chancellor". Praver: Almighty dollar; thy shin- ing face bespeaks thv wondrous power Tn mv pocket find thy resting place; I need thee every hour. CUTS We cut his hair when he arrived, A blustrous. stormy night; He cut in haste for Candler Hall And beat it out of sight. His clothes were cut the latest style, He cut a wide, wide swath; His father put the bills on file, Then cut a long, tough lath. He cut the Chapel and the Gym, He cut the “lab” and “quiz”; “They couldn’t catch a bird like him; He knew his little biz”. The Profs cut down his final grades; He cut in haste for home. And now. outside its hallowed shades. He can no longer roam. HE. TO THE,THK RKM.KDY Jiif M. B. Ai.kxaxdkk, '20 Have you ever noticed A Freshman, nice and green, When first he comes to Georgia, A place lie’s never seen; How guiltily he looks about And never cracks a smile, Tho very soon "Hi, there”! he’ll shout, When he’s been here awhile?— At times there are exceptions; This year there are a few Who never speak, and when you speak Quite coldly look at you. Of course we have a remedy, The grave-vard trips and such For those who lack the spirit. If they lack it very much. But the best thing I can think of Next to hanging bv the neck. Is to force these so-called "Georgia Men" To register at Tech. NOOS OF OUR COLLETCH Jiff S. M. Moitms Mr. Jon K. Talmugc hasn’t a charge account at Nicks no more. Mr. Robe Bert O. Kallahand is always talking about the pretty birds and what a wonderful world we liv in and we thine lies in luv. Mr. O. B. Dorfer chanced his p. o. Box scein as how he never got any male in his olde box. Mr. Shortce Medlin will be much missed around these parts next year after spendin a considerable length with us—since tile memory of man ran to the opposite. In the recent toonainent the Ga. Basketballers covered themselves with much glory and perspiration. There was a false roomer that stamps has gone up. They still stick at the olde price of two c cents per one and fifty for one $ dollar. Mr. David Moxs girl had tonsolitis and same which made the aforementioned said Mr. Mox sick fer a week. Prohibishun is certainly a bad thing for brewers and colletch boys. But thets allright, theirs no kick as long as we have Bcvo. The Thalians. the acting club of our colletch, recently put on a show which same was pronounced very good by the whole cast. Mr. Chest Stir Slack, the well known cartoonist and Commander-in-chief of the Pandora, is thinkin bout goin to L’ropc this summer and lookin things over. Their is said ter lie quite a few things ter look over. A lot of other fellows from our colletch is all so goin ter I'rope and surroundin territorv this summer on hat tel boats. Dumb aniinulcs show has a tough time. Wc predict big things for Mr. Julian Boss. Like as not some day he’ll be cr Winder Alderman. If wc wo , childish enough at our age ter blow bubbles we wouldn’t go round like some folks do. singin lwmt it. V ,Co cds er like oughter-mobilcs— some is pretty and some aint. I.uv and hiccoughs is no respecter of persons. • Some men gits inspiration and others goes thirsty. Mr. A1 Fred Kallawav, another of the promisin (but that dont mean yer’ll git it) home boys, has lost his glasses agin. Finder please return same ter either his office, on College ave between Clayton st. and Broad, or home address and receive his internal gratitude. 'Flic end of the school ycrc is welcomed by all as well as by Mr. John Konyers. Girls is funny critters. But they is cute little devils after all. Water is so | oplnr since prohibi-sliun thet they done tuk ter puttin it in gasolene. •f- % THK CHARGE OF THE FRESHMAN BRIGADE It'ith apologies to ".Ilf” Half a page, half a page. And pages unnumbered, AH in Moore College. Wrote the six hundred. Forward the Freshman brigade. Oh. what a price they paid When in Moore College, Wrote the six hundred. Forward the Freshman Brigade, There was not man nor maid But who was sore afraid. And everyone blundered. Their’s not to reason why Their’s not to sit and sigh; Their’s but to bone and try. All in Moore College, Wrote the six hundred. Hcndrcn to the right of them, Cantrell to the left of them, Edgerton in front of them, Strutted and thundered. While they prayed for the bell Boldly they wrote and well. There in Moore College, There in the Freshmen's Hell. Wrote the six hundred. Scratched each his head so bare, Scratched and squirmed in his chair Studying the questions there. Cursing the Profs, while All the school wondered. Pluneed in Phvsics smoke Bravely they sit and choke. While facts and formulae Roll from each pencil stroke. Shattered and sundered. Then they came back—-but not. Not the six hundred. Hcndrcn to the right of them. Cantrell to the left of them. Edgerton in front of them. Threatened and thundered. Ah, noble talcs they tell How horse and rider fell. They who had writ so well Came from Moore College Back from the Freshmen’s Hell, All that was left of them. Left of six hundred. When can their glory fade? Oh, the hard try they made. All the school wondered. Honor the try they made. Honor the Freshman brigade. Noble six hundred.College Events of the Year Bv the Casual Spectator 1. Georgia Co-eds Swamp Christian College in Basket-ball Game:— In a hotly contested contest at the University Gym, the husky Georgia Co-eds snatched victory from defeat in the last few minutes of play. The game was featured by manv spectacular actions on the part of both teams and by the renowned Georgia "mascot. “Nip”, owned by P. Reynolds. In fact, the Co-eds owe their success to the prompt action of Nip, supplemented by the presence of mind and accurate shooting of “Hough-neck’’ Chumhlcy. II. Military Orders, Promotions. Demotions, and General Commotions:— Reductions—Sergeant Hargis to private in Freshman Company. Cause: Check roll call by Commandant. Captain Jacobson to first class shave-tail. Cause: General incompetence. Sgt. Major Comer Howell and I.t. Spicer to privates. Cause: Affection for the hay. Promotions—I.t. Jay Camp to Captain. Cause: Better man than cx-Captain "Jakic”. (Not saying much for Jay at that.) III. Historic “Victory Pageant" is Held. During the latter part of November, some several weeks after the Armistice day anniversary, a delightful pageant, arranged by the old women of Athens, was, for some reason, held in the open air in the middle of College avenue. After extensive preparations, covering over two months, during which time the columns of the state capital in Atlanta were moved to Athens to construct a scat for Columbia (some contend she was Miss Liberty), the students and the good people of Athens gathered together to he cheated out of hours of valuable time.The place where Columbia set was built over the public horse-watering trough, and was lighted on the night of the pageant bv six searchlights, three placed over the “Q” Room, and three over the Manhattan Cafe. The air was full of atmosphere, and each thermometer had crept down in its little bulb and gone to sleep. The stage was set. The audience waited—they waited—God knows they waited. Several hours later the actors took their places. Haughey's orchestra mounted the stand built for it in front of the Old-Ham Shoe Shop. The music was played with graceful motions, although no one could hear it. As the Star-Spangled Banner was played a troup of blase college maidens climbed half way up all the telephone posts on the street and stood on platforms. They were handsomely draped in white cheese-cloth, trimmed with icicles, which was wafted here and anon by the November bli . .ard. As 1 remarked before, the stage was set. It stayed set for three hours. In fact, it congealed. Some one on the platform arose and said something. The pageant was over, and the exploited audience homeward wound their wcarv way, wondering what it was all about. T or three months, no horse in Athens had drank water. Bii.ucr" Hoopm SPHINX HAS mu.ic INITIATION C. W. Suck, .1. II. Si.atkk Bottom 7 amsuf • ■ XMM )tfL I inJ BARE AKIN FlllUM COThe Lost Perspective We enter in tlic Freshman gate— How wise the Seniors’ looks! Can we attain that wondrous pose By study of mere books? Wc gaze, we yearn, we study hard. We seek elusive fame To prove to these wise judges We’re “Fresh” alone in name. Wc enter on our Sophomore year. Ah. Folly's call is loud. Wc lose our hooks, write home for “more”. And join the maddening crowd, Wc loaf, wc hum. wc go to shows. Wc look at midnight lights, Wc shift our brain to find excuse To stay out late o’ nights. Next year wc come as Juniors, Our heads are lifted high. Wc now arc upper classmen. Our hopes spring to the sky. Wc dream of fair young faces. We tread the mystic measure. With our hard work on themes and tomes Wc mix a lot of pleasure. Three years are gone; how can it he That time has flown so fast? We arc enrolled as Seniors now And stand on heights at last. Wc look, and hope to find the seal Writ on each high pale brow— For have wc not that long road climbed. Have wc not earned it now? Wc rtd) our eyes and look again; No mighty Seniors here! They arc the same good fellows, all. Nor changed since Freshman year. Robert C. r.r.. w. v.THE NEWS IN RHYME By S. M. Morris ]. Commencement time is here «t last, Same which I don't regret. Georgia turned out some football team, I'll say she did, by heck. Now when it came to basketball. The game of baseball, too. We'd only win Nine out of ten. Which sorter hard to do. 2. Friend Nick’s moved from his former place. He wouldn’t stand the raise. The Freshmen wore their hair real short. That was in Autumn days. The Lucies arc as pretty’s e’er. That’s not mere idle talk. The Georgia lad Is oftimes sad. They’re guarded like a hawk. 3. The Faculty became real good. Gave us a ten days’ rest. Seniors sjKtrted derbys and canes. When dressed in Sunday best. The Glee Club toured the state again. And put on a darn good show. Brcnau and Rome. And here at home. Were liberal with their dough. I. We now have Co-eds in our midst, Some like them, others not. Student Council, too. we’ve added. For good it does a lot. The Q Room prospers as of old. From morn ’til dark 'tis busy. To now get lit, Costs quite a bit. “Bill’’ Heaton has a “li . .ie ”! 5. The Georgian after one year’s lapse, Is back again once more. Polities no longer practiced. As ’twos in days of yore. Merit decides now everything. And black is white, forsooth. And green is red. And gold is lead. And Uncle Al’s a youth. ’$’ "iir lir PANDORA’S QUERY AND ANSWER COLUMN Personally Conducted by S. M. Morris (This column will endeavor to answer perplexing questions of readers of Pandora. Address all communications to “Pandora's Query and Answer Column”. P. O. Box 6% Remember to always enclose a £3.08% gold coin to cover cost of P. O. Box, chewing gum. shoe shines, and the like.) Dear Answer Man: 1 recently bought a very fine han-kerchicf for ten cents and cnlv had it six months when 1 spilt some ink on it. considerably disfiguring said hanker-chief. What must I do about it? Outterluck. Dear Outterluck: I would advise you to take the han-kcrchicf to the store where you purchased same, explain the incident to them, and 1 am sure they will do the right thing to you by giving you a new one for ten cents. Dear S. M. M.: I have a son whom I have not heard from now going on a day and a half.When last heard from he was in Home. If he is not still there 1 feel sure he is dead. Please advise the course I should pursue. Anxious. Dear Anxious: I am of the same opinion as yon— that you son is either dead or in Home. You can only hope for the best—that he is not in Home. Dear Answerer: 1 am sweet sixteen (1 cannot tell a lie and won’t add the rest, for my mother often kisses me). Goo Goo Kved, and quite attractive, if 1 do say so myself. I can feel myself falling in love. As this is my first experience, would like to prevent it. How can 1? Goo Goo Eyes. Dear Goo Goo Eyes: One way to prevent your falling in love is by drowning yourself. I wouldn’t advise tins method, though, dust fall, you won’t bo the first one. Dear Answer Man: Who will he elected President. Ha he Huth or Tv Cobh? Eycwannano. Dear Kyewannano: Your ignorance is positively refreshing. Neither Babe Huth nor Ty Cobb will be elected President. You ought to know it is practically conceded to Willie Hoppe. Dear S. M. M.: I am married, otherwise in good health. How can 1 relieve myself of mv Great Trouble? Never Again. Dear Never Again: Though never having gone through what you have I can, nevertheless, feel for you. I have experienced something of a similar nature, though, being in an awful train wreck once. Then. too. I have a very dear friend who, unfortunately, is married, and therefore all my fellow men in the same predicament have my deepest sympathy, and I feel it a privilege, yea, an honor, to help them in their troubles. You may try choking your other half some dark night when she isn't looking, or. perchance. if that seems too harsh, you can go to Hciio. Dear Answer Man: I write poetry and am pretty sure f am a genius. Where can 1 go to show my genius off to the best advantage ? Betterthansbakespeare. Dear Betterthansbakespeare: There is a very fine place in Mil-ledgeville that yon can go to. They are only too glad to get such geniuses as no doubt you are. They will gladly suport you, even giving you soda water and pool money. There will be a man going around with you that you can recite your innermost thoughts to. as they spontaneously rise t rom the depths of your soul. At night time they will put you in a nice room and have it well guarded so that nobody will disturb you while you are per-forininir the delicate act of thinking. Dear Toll Me Man: How can I obtain some whiskey for a sick friend? Worried. Dear Worried: Wc are all sick since July I. Try Cuba. Dear S. M. M.: i am a young woman fifty years old and have a hundred and fifty thousand dollars, with nobody to share it with. Advise me how 1 can get a man. Singlehutdont wannabe. Dear Singlehutdont wannabe: If that hundred and fifty thousand is real American money, and not Russian rubles or German X marks, I see no reason why you can’t get some sort of man. Try different methods than those you have pursued in the past. ¥ it ¥ Yes, they sent their son to College, (As fond parents often do) To absorb much useful knowledge And a spare degree or two. And they dojddcd his allowance In a thoughtful sort of way. So he wouldn’t have to worry On his graduation day. 1. And for four years there he studied With determination grim, I;or his proud and loving parents Sure expected much of him. And he wrote ambitious letters That made both their old eyes shine — Then became a ear-conductor On the local trolley line. 2. And for four years there he wasted In abandon every day; Chewed, drank, danced and gambled In a reckless sort of way. And he bowed his poor old parents Under loads of care and grief— Then he rose to sit in pow-wow With the Standard Oil Chief. Ode to the Library Come, let me tunc my lute to thee, () building, dark and grim, Where nightly goes the sweet co-ed To keep her date with him. They meet at the assignment board And slyly slip away. And thus evade the lawful rules Of dear old U. G. A. Sometimes she comes without a date Into the solemn room. And straightway fills the musty air With giggles and perfume; She looks around and finds a scat— Aha, on with the play! (Of course she didn't sec the hand— Some man across the way.) He sneaks a furtive look at her. And then another look. Hut, dash it all. her eyes are dropped Demurely on her hook. He quite forgets tomorrow’s quiz ., 11 is head is in a whirl. (It’s funny what a fish a man Can be about a girl.) Ah, how fortunate, I’m sure— She’s dropped her fountain pen! He scrambles quickly to the floor And picks it up again. And gurgles, “Please permit me"—and But shucks! what is the use Of going on—the ending You can easily deduce.In the Libc, in the Like, where Phi Betas all reside. Where they opened up a window Once and seven people died; If your mind is bent on learning, And for study you are burning, Don’t attempt to get it done within the Like. Like, I.ikc. In the musty, dusty, smelly, rusty I.ike. Oh the like, oh the Lihc— You arc safer far outside, Than within the scented dungeon Where the sirens all abide. Where the air is full of chatter. You’ll go mad as any hatter In the Djcr-Kiss laden precincts of the Like. Like. Like, Of the—I quite—'Phis stuff’s too damn hard to set up—Li notypist.Freshman Randolph Oliphant de Montfort Hall’s First Night at Georgia ACT I. Scknk—Itooni in Old College. Curtain rises, disclosing Freshman Hall seated at a table and wearing the blank expression characteristic ot’ the college initiate. His Senior roommate, Buuchcr Mudd. is busily engaged in arranging his personal cfleets, whistling, proteinpore. the chorus from Scaz .cr’s opera. “Yallcr al ! A kick on the door is heard. Mudd—Come in! (Kilter Kegg O’Nail and Excel 1 Greece.) O’Sail—Well, if it ain't old Muddy! When did you get in. Muddy? Mudd—Shake, boys, shake my paw. I’m dam glad to see you both. W hat s the news? Greece—Not so fast, not so fast. Who’s wall-eyed Freshman is this? Mudd—He’s mine. Found him here when I got in a little while ago. Mr. Randolph Oliphant de Montfort Hall, meet my respected class-mates, Mr. Kegg O'Nail and Mr. Kxcell Greece. (They shake hands.) Mudd—Have a seat, fellows. (They sit down.) O’Xail—What town are you from, Fresh? Mudd—He’s from Gopher Speedway; won two medals for debating, and a pair of blue suspenders for recitation. Greece—Have the Sophs been up here yet? I heard they killed two more Freshmen last night. O’Xnil—That so? How did it happen? Greece—Aw. the Freshmen tried to buck when the Sophs started to pull their toe nails out. O’Xnil—Great (runs, if they object to a little thing like that what will they do when the Sophs begin cutting their ears off. as they did last year? Mudd—By the way, has it Ih’cu decided yet where they will brand the little Freshmen lambs this year- -on the cheek or on the forehead? Greece Dunno, it's unimportant, anyway. Have you registered yet?Miidd—Nope, not vet. (To O’Nail) How much li l old T. W. hit von for this time? Voii see. I'm going to help lc Monty register tomorrow. O’Xail- Well, let’s see now; counting the maintenance fee for Shack number nine, which was one and one-half williams. I think it all amounted to about two hundred berries and four cents. Mmid— Being a Senior, you got out light. They always hit Freshmen heavier than that. (The conversation is interrupted by a loud crash from below, followed by six pistol shots in rapid succession, and a long drawn out wail, "Frcslnn-a-ann”!) Greece (nonchalantly like)—The Sophs seem to be getting after the Freshmen early. Guess I'll go out and see the fun. Mudtl (carelessly) Oh. don’t hurry. They’ll be here in a few minutes. You can join them then. O'Xaii Yep. let’s wait. I've got a new experiment I want tried. I want to see ’em pluck some Freshman bald, one hair at a time. (irrecr—That’s too slow. It’s better to soak their hair in oil and burn it off. Come on. let's go out and help start the ball rollin’. (They go out. slamming the door, and leaving Monty to | onder and dream. After a lapse the door bursts open and six enormous Sophs with blue faces and bloody eyes enter, each carrying a knife between his teeth. They amuse themselves for a while by pulling out DcMonty’s eve-lashes one at a time, and then turn to the more absorbing occupation of cracking and dropping red-hot soft-boiled eggs on his bare back. After beating him over the head for several minutes with a poker, they begin cutting off his fingers just above the nails, and then proceeded to cram quarts of red pepper down his throat with a broom handle. They then tied him in a sheet with a hole for his head and after pouring both his cars full of gasolene, which they set on fire, they took him to the window and shoved him out--------- Mr. Randolph DeMontfort Hall struck the floor with a whack and awoke with a start to find two strangers smiling down on him. First Stranf rr—Well, Frcshie. this is no time to be sleeping. Get up like a nice little boy and have your hair trimmed. It’ll cool vour head a bit. (Curtain.)Verily— There was once a youth and he yearned for wisdom. And lie spake unto his sire and said, ”1 prithee, send me away to school that my soul may profit and my pate gather knowledge”. And his sire made answer and said, “My son, heed unto my words. Thou art ignorant of the affairs of the world and knowest not the pitfalls in the path to knowledge". Hut the youth, in his simplicity, heeded not the words of wisdom that fell from his sire’s lips, hut was importunate and waxed impatient. So his sire relented and gave him sheckels of gold and bade him seek his education. And he again spake unto his son and said, “When thou hast squandered this, seek not more, but return home as the prodigal son, for. lo! the asses shall be lonely without thee". And it came to pass that in course of time the youth came to the Classic City. And behold! a mob was gathered together at the depot. And the members thereof waxed turbulent and wrathful, and howled and sang in glee. And the youth wondered much thereat. And as he alighted from the train, divers fellows fell upon him and beat him sorely. And the youth cried out a great deal and spake unto them, saying, “Now wherefore beatest thou me"? And they made answer and said, "In sooth, tlmn art a Freshman”. And again they fell upon him and smote him, hip and thigh. And a certain lewd fellow brought forth shears, and, like Samson of old. the youth was shorn of his locks. And he cried out the more a great deal, saying, “I prithee, desist, ere I summon a policeman". And the mob laughed thereat and were incontinently merry. And one of them spake and answered. "Thou poor Freshman, in sooth the grass of the field nor the leaves of the tree arc not as green as thou". And the youth was abashed thereat and spake him not a word, but hied him to find suitable lodging. And he journeyed on. and it came to pass that he arrived at a greensward. And he spake and asked a passcr-bv. “Can’st thou direct me to the office of his F.xccllencc, The Most High"? And he was directed accordingly and at length fame into The Most High’s sanctuary. And the Worshipful One spat full sorely and cast a baleful eye upon the stranger. “And. prithee, what dost thou want?” he spake. And the youth made answer and said. “I.o, I am a stranger within your gates, and am desirous of lodging and a place and table under which I may set my weary feet". And the Most High made answer and said. “Hast thou sheckels"? And the youth made answer and said. “Aye, and in abundance". And the Most High smiled thereat and directed him to suitable lodgings upon the payment of a fee.And the youth went forth, light in spirits. And lie sought his lodgings, seeking rest. And he entered and, behold! a goodly number of youths were seated upon the Hoor in various positions. And two certain white cubes bounded around upon the Hoor. And the youth, in his innocence, spake and asked, “I prithee, brothers, at what art thou engaged”? And the youths were amused thereat and laughed loudly. And one of them spake up and answered, "Lo, we are at play at craps ’. And the youth answered and said, “I prithee, show me the manner of playing, that 1 may partake of the mirth”. And they did as he desired and, lo, the sheckcls began to pass. And the youth cried and waxed profane and besought the cuIjcs to behave naturally, but his prayers were in no wise answered. And he arose from the game a sadder and a jniorer man. And a longing came over him to satisfy bis hunger. And he sought his boarding place and sat him down. Now certain other youths were present also, and they jeered at him and made all manner of ridicule. And they in no wise passed him food. And the youth cried out in desperation. “Give me food ere I famish”. And they took pity on him and passed him viands. And he was able in no manner to satisfy his hunger for lie could not partake of the food. For he bent his knife and lie Iwnt his fork and he was not able to carve the bovine. And he arose from the table with sadness in his heart and hunger in his stomach. And he journeyed to the metropolis. And he entered a certain low place of vice and iniquity. And he spake and asked, “What manner of place is this”: And the man made answer and said, “Thou fool, 'tis the Q Room”. And the youth again asked. “What manner of croquet is it that they play here”? And the stranger worked his hands similar to the motion of a fish swimming and made answer and said. “I.o, I will teach yon”. And lie taught the youth. But the price thereof was exceeding high and dear. And the youth departed from the Q Room. And the youth returned to his lodgings and lay him down to sleep, for his body was aweary of this world. And he fell asleep, and as he slept divers fellows entered his room. And they poured upon him water cold as crystal and doused his pate. And they pulled him from his bed. And one of the fellows drew a slat therefrom and applied it to the youth’s anatomy. And the youth was hurt sorely and bellowed a great deal. But the fellows desisted in no wise, but beat him until he was black and blue. And when the youth at length fell asleep, lo. the sun had arisen in the cast and the day was high. And a great longing came over the youth to see his ancestral fields and the vinyards of bis sire. And he arose and girded his loins and set forth toward bis sire’s domain. And he had no means to ride and the journey was long, and he arrived at the set of sun. And the youth spake him not a word, but ate to his heart’s content. And the sire smiled and said. “Lo. the asses were lonclv without thee”.Freshman Letter Atliins, Ga. Sept. 23, 1919. Dear Maw and Paw, 1 got me a room in Candler Apartments. I guess you all aint used to the turni apartments hut thats what they call the house where I'm liviu in now. Of course it aint huilt up just like a regular house is hut more like Mr. Joneses store is but with more rooms in it hut not made out of planks, hut out of cement. Mr. Heed knew my first two names when 1 got here and where I come from. He is the man that takes all your money when you first get up here and dont smile much. He give me a lot of tickets and cards hut lie was in a big hurry when he wrote them down and 1 cant read them. 'Phe Sophomores who are hoys that have been here one year all ready come around every night and treat the Freshmen (which stands for new comers) rough. One night they made me get up on a table and look like September Morn and when I got all ready they dumped a picture of cold water on me. I am catin down at Mr. Sncllings Denmark Heanerv Hall. He makes us pay him sixteen dollars a month but it aint hardly worth it I don’t think so. I went up to sec Professor Parks yesterday (every body does). He said V days ago he would get my trunk up for me but I guess he is mighty busy and besides he dont look very strong and 1 most forgot to tell you we have hot water to wash in every night only it rains down on you and they dont have have no tubs to stand up in. I joined the cooperation association and give them a dollar but I dont no what its for. Thats where I get mv mail and soap. The bar Ma put in my satchel is all used up now. I dont get much sleep every night rooming in Candler Apartments because the boys roll garbage cans (this is what they dump trash in) down the stairs (Candler Apts is 3 stories tall) and carries Freshmen to the grave yard and holler to hell with the New College which is another house where boys stay but it aint as good as Candler Apartments and Herty Field where we have to drill is between New College and Candler Apts where they make us run races after dark, naked. We dont have no recesses and you dont have to set in the room only when the teacher hears the class only he docs most of the talking. The hole school covers more land than Pas alfalfa patch and pasture put together but malic not the swamp. They made me take off the medals I won at the pig Club and Corn show. I joined the V. M. C. A. and they put me on a committee to do some kinds of resolutions and we had a hot dog sausage supper last night served in rolls.I went to the eilitc oust since I been here and I had to pay 20 cts hut it shore was worth it. The name of the picture was Smashin Herders. It was so long I cant tell you about it now. They dont show all of it at oust. Its what they call a serious hut I guess you dont know what that means. I wish you would send me some extry money so I can see it again next Friday. Captain Jacobson shore is Hard Boiled. He is the man the army sent down here to give us training. He is working for I'nele sain, so it will he unpatriotic, to say, what I think about him. I had a picture made in my new uniform. The feller in it with me was my room mate. He lives in Poduiik Holler and his paw runs the store there which is pretty big. You can keep it because I got two more. You can find it in the letter. Has my bull pup got well of the mange yet. and how is sister Sue and the baby getting along? I will have to close up now and quit hut I shore hope I can get home when l ar kills hogs. It looks like rain. Yourc lovin son, Theodore Brigham Simpkins. I s. You never put no kuccdlcs in my soing hag and one of them three bed sheets you put in my trunk which aint enough for two weeks had a hole in it but I dont care so good by agin. MABE YOU’VE NOTICED HOW Oui College.-Spirit- SINCE MWgTW And Now— It is with not so much a feeling of relief as of anticipation that the Kditor concludes this, the 1920 edition, of the Pandora. Its appearance from the press is looked forward to in the sincere hope that the entire volume will meet with the approval of all its readers. Herein has been attempted the portrayal of our University I.ifc at Georgia, in both its dignified and frivolous aspects. It is hoped that this portrayal is as accurate and as sufficient as our grand old Alma Mater deserves. Such being the ease, one might feel assured that the results of the efforts expended hereon will Ik- acceptable. The Editor takes this occasion to thank his associates for allowing him to publish the volume without any interference on their part. Their aid in having a part of the Seniors written up and in obtaining the roster of the military department. not to speak of some other contributions, has been invaluable. The greater part of the success that this book may attain is due to Mr. Tlico. S. Smith. Not only has he been most patient and accommodating in carrying out my suggestions, but many of the most pleasing arrangements and effects of the book are his ideas, and came as a pleasant surprise to me in reading the proof. Under the present conditions, without his personal interest and untiring efforts this volume would have been impossible. To Prof. II. A. Inghram. who has given untiring aid in literary contributions and advice on the general make-up of the book, much appreciation is due. Thanks is extended also to J. P. Carson for art contributions, and to Messrs. S. M. Morris, I.. K. Bethune, .1. Jones, O. T. Mann. I,. J. Trotti, M. B. Alexander, W. A. Cunningham and others for literary contributions. Prof. R. K. Park has been ever ready with kindly advice and has helped pull this edition over many rough spots. Mr. F. J. Ball should also be commended for the exceptionally good work he has done. Do not overlook the advertisers. They are worthy of your consideration, and have meant much materially to this edition. Thus endetli the thirtv-third volume of Pandora. Editor-In-Chief.-h r„r Avo«. LASTS rebo MONK. 6MRIT •ASUT-MU MASCOI 'fORSALC NJICK 5EXWLDS ■Ituc cn y Dltim rr t Rooolph mSURANCC |KORSt 0 0 HKV WANTCO |oo» IA C Ml I p« r- y r-x C J lSl)LT hoylf on new ABSENCE - R-ULES ft CNT Nor aw«-ov i 0 W.StflCK IFASHION PARK CLOTHES CUSTOM SERVICE WITHOUT THE ANNOYANCE OF A TRY-ON READY-TO-PUT-ON • TAILORED AT FASHION PARK CHARLES STERN COMPANY Established 1867 HIGH GRADE CLOTHING, HATS AND FURNISHING GOODS ATHENS, GEORGIATRIMBLE HATS FROM ANY VIEWPOINT ARE HATS OF STYLE, QUALITY AND PERSONALITY THE COLLEGE MAN’S HAT-SOLD BY THE COLLEGE MAN’S STORE CHARLES STERN COMPANY Established 18G7 HIGH GRADE CLOTHING, HATS AND FURNISHING GOODS ATHENS, GEORGIACHAS. MORRIS CO. "SMART CLOTHES” CLAYTON ST. ATHENS’ EXCLUSIVE REPRESENTATIVES — OF — ADLER ROCHESTER CLOTHES THE KING-HODGSON CO. Fancy Groceries Everything for the Table Quality and Purity our Motto MILLEDGE AVE. STORE PRINCE AVE. STORE DOWN TOWN STORE, 151 CLAYTON STREET E. H. DORSEY FOR QUALITY GENTS’ FURNISHING AND CLOTHING 255 CLAYTON STREET COMPLIMENTS OF HAUGHEY HAUGHEYTHK STATIC NORMAL SC HOOL. Atiikns, Gkuiuiia I?ortv-six officers and teaclier , ton buildings, seventeen «lo|» irtinonts of instruction. The home life courses arc among the strongest in the South. Domestic Arts and Sciences, Manual Arts. Agriculture and School Gardening, Instrumental and Vocal Music. Physical Culture. Kducation for cUieieney and happiness in the home. Write for catalog. JUKI . M. POI ND, PhksiiikxtI DELICIOUS and REFRESHING You smack your lips over it, because you like its taste, its quality, its genuine gratification. It satisfies thirst. Nobody has ever been able to successfully imitate it, because its quality is indelibly registered in the taste of the American public. Dctncnd the genuine by full name —nicLr.otnee encourage substitution. The Coca-Cola Co ATLANTA, GA. Georgian Hotel Finest Hotel in Georgia” Absolutely Fireproof M. P. O’Callaghan, Manager ATHENS, GEORGIA The McGregor Company STATIONERS PRINTERS BINDERS Office ana School Supplies 321 CLAYTON STREET ATHENS, GEORGIA Davison-Nicholson Company Ladies’ Suits, Coats, Capes Dresses, Millinery, Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery House Furnishings Davison-Nicholson Co. ATHENS, GEORGIA SMITH SHOE COMPANY FINE SHOES CLAYTON STREET ATHENS, GEORGIAHILLEY JONES CO. Barbers Neat, Clean, Up-to-date Service Q-R 0 0 M — BILLIARDS, CIGARS Four Shops: 288 Jackson Street COLD, DRINKS, Etc. Southern Mutual Bldg. Basement L. A. Shop, 185 College Avenue 101G Broad Street, Columbus, Georgia Your Patronage Appreciated “STYLE, SERVICE, SANITATION” BATHS. MANICURING ATHENS, GEORGIA THORNTON’S VICTROLAS AND RECORDS Mandolins, Violins, Cornets Ukuleles, Guitars, Banjos and Band Instruments LIGHT LUNCHES Latest Sheet Music SODAS and ICE CREAM Player Rolls In Fact CIGARS and CIGARETTES “EVERYTHING KNOWN IN MUSIC” — Write for Catalog Holman Building PHILLIPS CREW PIANO COMPANY ATHENS, GEORGIA 82 North Pryor Street ATLANTA, GEORGIATHE LAWYERS LIBRARY The foundation of every lawyer’s library should be the local books of the state in which he intends to practice. GEORGIA LAWYERS will find the following books of first importance: Georgia Supreme Court Reports, Georgia Appeals Reports, Van Epps-Akin-Stevens-Index Digest of the Georgia Reports and Georgia Appeals Reports, Park’s Annotated Georgia Code, 8 Volumes, Hopkins' The Georgia Law of Personal Injuries, Gober’s Georgia Form Book, Cozart’s Georgia Practice Rules, McElreath on the Georgia Constitution, Powell on Actions for Land, Powell’s Georgia Land Registration Act, Cann’s Instructions to Georgia Juries. WRITE US FOR PRICES AND TERMS THE HARRISON COMPANY LAW BOOK PUBLISHERS ATLANTA, GEORGIA. Your Store And Ours This store belongs to us, but it’s no good to us unless it’s your store, too. To be your store it must contain the clothes you want to wear; it must be arranged for your comfort, and do business in a way satisfactory to you, having and holding your confidence. Lots of men—more every year—find that our store is their store. If it isn’t already your store, come in and let us make it so. Winfield, Chamberlain Reed THE SHOP OF QUALITYICE CREAM CIGARETTES SODA CIGARS COSTA’S THE FINEST SODA AND ICE CREAM FOUNT IN GEORGIA MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALERS JOBBERS OF CONFECTIONERY OF ICE CREAM AND FOUNTAIN SUPPLIES A Good Bank in Atlanta AT PRYOR AND EDGEVVOOD THE LOWRY NATIONAL BANK Resources $24,000,000.00f Commercial Bank OF ATHENS Conveniently located on College Avenue near campus. This Bank is the depository of the Athletic Association. Cultivate the habit of paying your bills by check. We are handling a large number of students’ accounts and will handle yours to your satisfaction. The patronage of its customers is appreciated by this institution, where officers and employees endeavor to give personal attention to the business of the individual AMERICAN STATE BANK OFFICERS JNO. J. WILKINS, President W. C. GORDON, Vice-President HOWELL C. ERWIN, Vice-President R. W. SIZER, Cashier For a Good Meal gc to New York Cafe With Prompt and Courteous Ser vice and the Best Things to Eat GEORGIA BOYS WELCOME 175 CLAYTON STREET ATHENS. GEORGIA Manhattan Cafe Georgia Boys Welcome at all times We Guarantee Satisfaction D. J. BROWN, Proprietor College Avenue ATHENS, GEORGIA“GLORY TO OLD GEORGIA” The “Georgia Spirit” of today which dominates your very being and makes you cheer your fighting songs and rise in reverence to “Alma Mater” will, tomorrow, not be changed, but strengthened, by a broader tie which makes your heart pulsate with a new glory for State and Section. You, College Men, who will be the bulwark of strength in handling the affairs of State tomorrow, are invited to associate yourself with us and grow up under the influence of a progressive institution, recognized for character, strength and service. The Central Bank and Trust Corporation ATLANTA, GA. OFFICERS ASA G. CANDLER, President CARL H. LEWIS. Cashier JOHN S. OWENS, Vice-President A. J. STITT, Assistant Cashier A. P. COLES, Vice-President FONVILLE McWIIORTER, Asst. Cashier WALTER T. CANDLER, Vice-President THOMAS I. MILLER. Asst. Cashier HENRY C. HEINZ, Vice-President L. H. PARRIS. Auditor COMPLIMENTS OF W. T. Collins Ladies’ Ready-to-Wear Clayton Street ATHENS, GEORGIA Famous Lilley Uniforms MADE to tand the hard test of College wear. The recognized standard Uniform for colleges everywhere. Lilley College Uniform ■ re superior In point of •tyle because cut by military clothing cutters, and tailored by skilled workmen to your Individual measurements, insuring a perfect fitting uniform. Catalog on Request THE M. C. LILLEY CO. COLUMBUS. OHIOf DEPENDABILITY No better thing can be said of any Man or any Business Concern than that he or it is Dependable. Your Dependability rests largely upon your Financial Standing and Methods. Right there is where this Bank can help you. THE ATLANTA NATIONAL BANK ATLANTA, GEORGIA Askin Clothing Company Newest Style—Quality Best Prices, Satisfaction, in Young Men’s, Young Ladies’ FURNISHINGS and CLOTHING Selected by and for the most educated tastes CLAYTON STREET ATHENS Ford THE UNIVERSAL CAR Sold at C. A. TRUSSELL MOTOR CO. ATHENS, GEORGIANEW . FINAL! Quide to over a Million Dollars worth of Annotations for only six dollars— On the desks of thousands of good lawyers to-day, you will find a new and final volume (no other edition will be necessary) that places in their grasp the master guide to over a million dollars worth of legal annotations, published during a third of a century in one hundred forty-six volumes. These men — and you know who many of them are—are fortified to begin their search for the law in the place to get results in the shortest time. Their indexing facilities L.R.A. DESK BOOK for quick search can be made yours by the investment of a sum so small that no lawyer will let this opportunity go by. This book was published more especially for the L.R. A. subscriber to secure at the low price of six dollars. But your order will be welcomed. Use the coupon. Right Here—Now To the Lawyers Co-op. Publishing Co. Rochester, N. Y. Send me the L. R. A. Dc»k Rook which I understand to he the new and final INDEX TO ALL THE LAW IN L. R. A. NOTES -188$ to 1919—1400 pages, price delivered only $6.00 I ‘II watch the coming mail for it—and ute it in my search-in with pride and pleasure. Name _ AddressBack of Swift’s Red Steer Fertilizers--the Swift Reputation. For more than fifty years Swift Company has maintained the reputation of making each product the best of its kind This nation-known reputation is back of every bag- of Swift’s Fertilizers Only the highest grade and most productive plant food materials go into Swift’s Red Steer Fertilizers. Our great natural advantage (Swift Company are the largest producers in the world of Bone. Blood and Tankage) supplies the animal matter invaluable for fertilizers that carry the crop to complete maturity. Our chemical staff—by laboratory and field tests—knows what sources of plant food give the most profitable results on various crops. They see to it that Swift’s Red Steer Fertilizers are properly combined and processed to insure best crop results and good mechanical condition. They are free and easy drillers. Now is the time to place your order for Swift's Fertilizers. Don’t wait—play safe—order today. Swift Company (Fertilizer Works) Atlanta. Ga. SALKS OFFICES: Charlotte, N. C. New Orleans, La. Shreveport, I a. THE NATIONAL BANK OF ATHENS ATHENS, GEORGIA JOHN WHITE MORTON, President W. F. BRADSHAW, Vice-President C. H. PHINIZY, Vice-President A. S. PARKER, Cashier G. F. STEPHENS, Asst. Cashier DIRECTORS John White Morton H. W. White C. H. Phinizy M. R. Welch John W. Welch W. T. Bryant C. M. Snellinp R. E. Morton W. T. Bradshaw S. Michael COMPLIMENTS STRAND AND ELITE A K. HAWKES CO. Opticians EASTMAN KODAKS 14 WHITEHALL ST. ATLANTA, GEORGIA EUGENE V. HAYNES CO. DIAMONDS 73 Peachtree Street ATLANTA, GEORGIA DELMAR’S LUNCH QUICK SERVICE We serve the best the market affords at all times. Run by Americans. Our prices are reasonable. 14G CLAYTON ST. ATHENS, GEORGIA SYSTEM • The ideal of this Bank is System Plus Personal Efficiency. We depend upon system to do what individual initiative cannot do so well. We trust the individual officers of the Bank to do what System can not do. THE GEORGIA NATIONAL BANK ATHENS GEORGIAThe PHOTOGRAPHS in This Annual Were made by FREDERICK J. BALL COLLEGE AVENUE ATHENS, GEORGIAQUALITY PAYS IN THE LONG RUN YOU, undoubtedly, heard that axiom in your cradle, and each day you are forcibly reminded of it. Whether it is an automobile or a Suit of Clothes, quality does pay in the long run. Good things may mean a greater initial cost, but in the long run they are economical. Griffon Clothes are an example of true quality. You’ll say so after giving them a fair test. CHAS. STERN COMPANY Established 18G7 HIGH GRADE CLOTHING, HATS AND FURNISHING GOODS GEORGIA ATHENSI 


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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

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University of Georgia - Pandora Yearbook (Athens, GA) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

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